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Full text of "Student perspectives of the Junior College of Broward County (J.C.B.C.), Broward Junior College (B.J.C.), and Broward Community College (B.C.C.) between 1960-1998 by Dr. Thomas J. Ryan"

, 




Digitized by the Internet Archive 

in 2011 with funding from 

LYRASIS Members and Sloan Foundation 



http://www.archive.org/details/studentperspecti02brow 



The Student Perspectives 



Broward Community College (B.C.C.) 

Between 
1960-1998 














Student perspectives of the Junior 

College of Broward County 
(J.C.B.C), Broward Junior College 
(B.J.C.), and Broward Community 
College (B.C.C.) between 1960-1998 

Dr. Thomas J. Ryan 



Volume 2 



Broward Community College 
Fort Lauderdale, Fla., 2000 



Copyright © Broward College. All rights reserved. 

Content is the property of Broward College and is protected by United 
States copyright and trademark laws. The content and text may not be 
copied, translated or distributed in any manner (electronic, web or printed) 
without the prior written consent of Broward College with the exception of 
properly-attributed quotations and other "fair use" exemptions provided 
for under copyright law. All scanned page images (of books, journals, 
newspapers, magazines and pamphlets) produced by Broward College, or 
its predecessors (Junior College of Broward County, Broward Junior College, 
Broward Community College) are subject to Copyright Law, and may be not 
used without restriction for any purpose whatsoever. 

Special Collections LD6501.B7 R78 2000 



Copyright © Broward College. All rights reserved. 



Disclaimer 
Comments, observations, opinions, and views compiled in this volume were 
originally published between 1960 and 1998 in various student newspapers 
including: The Venetian Crier, Phoenix, New Horizons, Polaris, and Observer. The 
text is directly transcribed from these sources and reflects the language of its day. 

Content of this volume may reflect the opinions, personal reflections and 
remembrances of the author(s) and editor(s) and may not reflect the past or current 
institutional views held by Broward College, or its predecessors (Junior College of 
Broward County, Broward Junior College, and Broward Community College). 

Broward College, or its predecessors (Junior College of Broward County, Broward 
Junior College, and Broward Community College) is not responsible for any 
comments, observations, opinions, views, personal reflections and remembrances 
found in this volume. 

This unpublished volume has not been edited or proof read. It is presented as a 
compilation of data from student newspapers and personal recollection, not as an 
official institutional document. 



Table of Contents 
Volume 2 



1. Introduction 



2. Acknowledgments 

3. Newspapers (Pulse of the College) 



4. Student Services 



5. Newspaper 

6. Student opinions 

7. Student comments on policies 



8. National items 



9. JCBC clubs 



Introduction 



INTRODUCTION 

The history of the students of the Junior College of Broward County to 1968, Broward Junior 
College to 1975, and Broward Community College to 1998 provides a diversified kaleidoscope of 
ideas, thoughts and views of the students and how they interacted with concerned faculty, 
support staff and administrators who provided direction and leadership. The perspectives and 
interpretations of how the students dealt with their campus life, student organizations and 
personnel needs. There was never a moment when the students failed to comprehend, analyze 
and express themselves. 

The life of the students as it changed from the 1960's to 1998 reflects everything from national 
issues to local advertising. Each decade had its own high and low points, but in each case the 
students tried various opinions on the public and their peers. The alternatives were fascinating as 
the institution provided a laboratory experiment to allow the students to try different methods. 
Their approaches are worth studying as the students changed the life of the students to meet 
daily needs and societal factors. 

The critical thinking that the students exhibited proved they were in partnership with the college to 
accomplish more than academics, athletics, cultural diversity and social development. Their 
changing perspectives ranged from "sharing and caring" to asking "what is in it for me?" Their 
social and community welfare efforts highlighted each decade, the difference was the delivery 
systems. 

The Junior College of Broward College was linked with the Broward County School Board. 
Broward Junior College created a variety of sources for college parallel, professional or technical 
development. Then Broward Community College showed everything from life rings of retention to 
the flexibility necessary for future burdens or opportunities. The institution has provided a true 



traffic control center for Broward County to suit needs from Camp BCC pre teens to the Speakers 
Bureau seminars in retirement condominiums. 

The leadership demonstrated by the various administrations established directions in each 
decade. The conceptualization of everything from new programs to remedial assistance served 
the community with a wide range of options. All of these different approaches were vital to meet 
a very different environment as Broward County moved demographically and required economic 
concerns as change occurred. 



The multi campus institution provided a quasi home for many underprepared traditional high 
school students to returning traumatized adult learners seeking both training and employment. 
The advisement and counseling aspects could be found from Students Affairs to minority 
mentoring. The warmth experienced by those students gave them a comfort zone, a campus 
home despite the commuter image. It was the administrator, faculty or staff as individuals who 
made retention far more personable. 

The international flavor where travel abroad or influx of students from over 150 nations made 
Broward Community College, the place to be. Never were so many countries attracted to a 2 
year institution. There was also ethnicity constructed in the fiber of our college that allowed 
"cultural diversity" to infiltrate every aspect and level. The best part of this collection is the 
students, faculty, staff and administration. Their ideas, plans and work are highlighted in 16 
topics in a chronological manner. By no means is this a total or complete collection. The interest 
was to enlighten the points that made the institution change while affording all participants past, 
present, and in the future to add additional components. This is a living narrative of where we 
were why we needed to change, and how we managed to take advantage of so many 
opportunities. 



There are almost 83 volumes of student newspapers, yearbooks and scrapbooks that provided 
this manuscript with the detailed highlights. These will be stored in the Broward Community 
College Central Campus Library as the basis for archival history. It will never end as the story 
lives with the arrival of every new student, the activity of every campus event, and the 
achievements of each organizations or college program. J 

This is a chronological index to campus life, student organizations and the results. Whether 
positive or negative the results have caused change. In the decades that have passed the 
foundation of our institution has always been the people involved. Now records of their 
challenges to accomplishments will allow those who follow to build on what we did. 



Acknowledgements 



ACKNOWLEGEMENTS 

It required almost 19 months to acquire the various materials donated to Broward Community 
College. From newspapers to individual organization scrapbooks, the various offices and 
individuals who assisted in this project were tremendous in their efforts to contribute to our 
history. 

All three campuses newspaper offices were the starting point during the summer of 1996. Jerry 
Elam was the key figure for the overall consolidated newspaper collection. His student editors 
continue in his very large footsteps. Ann Chishom his administrative assistant provided so much 
detail from Polaris files on North Campus. Pat Ellingham assisted with the efforts to revive New 
Horizons from South Campus. Max Hall's foresight in the late 1970's provided me with Venetian 
Crier to Phoenix materials of the 1960's and 1970's. So, the fourth estate provided over 26 
volumes of extremely valuable student perspectives in the writing of the decades. 

Next came the three campus Student Activities Offices. Here was everything from Orientation 
flyers to F-Troop scrapbooks. The most valuable collection were the 21 display books located in 
a sealed room in Central Campus, Building 11 that contained the only copies of 1960's and 
1970's copies of Intramural Handbooks, Student Survival Guides, Movie Brochures, Orientation 
detailed maps and systems of campus programs, and those materials that were presented to 
students for 19 years of Student Life programming. Former F-Troop Captain and current 
Hollywood elementary school teacher Mary Waters had to refurbish several due to climate 
damage. Student Life Administrative Assistant Eleanor Myers was especially helpful in the 
identification of many archival works. 

Former Broward Junior College graduate Penny Mclsaacs who served Student Activities for 12 
years on all 3 campus location as well as program director of Camp BCC had been a very active 
member of BJC Greek system and Intramurals donated many books, banners and memorabilia. 



Currently, Penny Mclsaacs serves BCC as the Director of Collegewide Student Program and 
Services. She will be in charge of the materials and how they can be utilized to show the current 
college family what occurred so the future will be better for all who come to Broward Community 
College. 

As to the manuscript the typing, revisions and development would not have been possible without 
the assistance of Leith Mazzochi who serves as the secretary for Central Campus Social 
Sciences. The work of the organization was on going for 18 months and Leith donated hundreds 
of hours to this cause. 

It was the students in the quest to acquire an education that really provided the thoughts, words 
and decades that inspired this collection. Without their constant presence, efforts to be all they 
culd be, and the challenges that they provided to the faculty, staff or administration there would 
be no History of the Perspectives of Students at the Junior College of Broward Contv or Broward 
Community College, 1960 to 1998 . 

This book is dedicated to all those faculty members, support staff and college administrators who 
donated the countless hours of volunteer time and personal resources to give our students every 
chance. 



Newspapers 
pulse of the 
college 



NEWSPAPERS (Pulse of the College) 

Jerry Elam (1986-1996), Advisor to the Polaris and then the Observer remarked on the events of what occurred 
when newspapers consolidated at Broward Community College 

The competition was between the North Campus (N/C) Polaris and the South Campus (S/C) New Horizons while 
the Phoenix on Central Campus (C/C) was in different. This promoted an intercampus jealousy in form of 
unhealthy competition. All papers were a part of Broward Community College (BCC) and not part of each campus. 
Positive things needed to be combined to publish a better college-wide paper. 

The advertisement took away from N/C and was not fair with Central having students who had the option of selling 
a good experience. The technology made everything easier which kept Central in the control position. Max Hall, 
Dean of Newspapers Advisors commanded respect for his longevity. 

Broward Community College (BCC) in August of 1980 saw Jerry Elam who came from Central Florida Community 
College in Ocala intimidated by a multi-campus as well as metropolitan setting. The Polaris needed direction and 
leadership. The Student Activities Board (SAB) helped advisors control their own budget and destiny. The Student 
Activities Board is a positive group that doesn't rely on Student Government Administration or Student Life. Jerry 
Elam retired as of July of 1996 as Observer advisor, and is going to be Communication Department Chair N/C who 
will volunteer for the Endowed Teaching Chair Committee that will take up his time. 

Some individuals caused conflicts, but papers experimented and went their own direction. This certainly hurt 
consolidation or efforts to promote that concept. S/C did not get compatible equipment so S/C didn't want 
assistance with their equipment and publication. 

Jerry Elam felt that his major accomplishments were: 

1) The National Pace Maker Award, November 1993 in Dallas, the only one ever won by a BCC newspaper. 
It was the culmination of years of training and hard work. Bob Adams of Western Kentucky University was 
Jerry's former college advisor who was present and cried that Jerry was his only student to ever win this 
award. 



2) The first edition of the Observer was trying to bring students of three campuses to agree on something. 

The bridging of the emotions and animosity was a major accomplishment. 

3) The Editor-in-Chiefs (as were the Observer Magazine Editors): were very close including Bill, Matt, Melissa, 

Heather, and Eileen who all set their own challenges, number of issues, and specific heights. 

The reason for so much doubt in publications was the huge outlay of the printing costs. It was the time when the 
papers left type setting to printer. In long run, we would save the cost of having printer do the type setting. 

From important to funny, the position on one newspaper advisor because of lack of qualification became one issue. 
The first year of the Observer required a huge amount of travel that caused neglect of the students on N/C. So, 
one of his North Campus visits came about midnight catching the students missing for they were at a drinking party. 
It was the first issue of Term II, January, 1987 to appease the other campus for each campus got to do 2 
productions. The night before the printing slowdown the whole staff took off to eat and drink. They never came 
back so Jerry Elam finished the whole edition and took it to the printer. He put signs up that if it ever happened 
again, he would fire everyone on the editorial staff. After a very tiring day, a poster board that had each student's 
name stated the message that they would never do it again! That made it a positive experience. 

There were very humorous times developed including the following: 

1) Jerry Elam married one of the editors from the South Campus rival paper after working with her as co- 

editor the S/C student Jodi Rubin who hated Jerry. They got together at FAU and married in 1990. So, 
they now look upon their daughter with more love than the hatred they shared during the newspapers' 
competition. 

2) Jerry also reminisced about the conventions in late 1980's when students had Toga parties with towels and 

sheets from the hotels. 



3) Then, there was Dave Laval of the Polaris who had not won anything in four years. He altered the fire 

extinguisher and other hotel equipment. Winning or not fostered camaraderie and friendship as a result of 
their work. 

4) A disappointment was Glen Friedman; an Editor-in-Chief who was fired due to lack of dedication. It 

occurred when the other student threatened mutiny if he was not replaced for leaving and going home 
when a deadline was due. 

'The Observer became the " Pulse of Campus ". The function of the paper was a recorder or chronicle of what had 
gone on. This paper, a living record influenced the college employees, students and others to have community 
coverage and build a community spirit!" 

The Time Capsule 1966-76-86-96, approach of the college Newspapers included articles on: SGA, Students' 

Faculty, Newspaper, Sports, School Spirit, Organizations, Entertainment, Student Fees, Ethnicity/Cultural 

Diversity, and Student Activities. The Venetian Crier School Spirit Exhibit included articles of the 1960's about the 

Freshmen Beenie, Pep Rallies, the Alma Mater, the Bon Fire, Student Attendance, Theme Dances, Camaraderie, 

and Illegal Societies. In the 1970's the Phoenix, Guardian, BJC News, Polaris and New Horizons presented articles 

about Fraternities & Sororities, Icebreaker Dances, Greek Olympics, Jersey Days, Greek Letters & Tables & 

Message Boards, the Thanksgiving Food Drive, SGA vs. Greek Council, SGA vs. Newspaper, SGA vs. SGA, and 

the Fat Cats (Faculty). The Observer in the 1980'sfurther developed articles about Clubs, Off Campus Activities, 

Campus Individuals, as well as Older and Cultural Diverse Students. The Newspaper Transition Concept put all of 

the Newspapers: Venetian Crier, Guardian, BJC SGA News, Phoenix, Polaris, New Horizon, and Observer. 

* 
The papers in the 1960's emphasized items that were Campus Orientated, Editorial Emphasis of JCBC, Few 

Advertisements, Events After and Before, along with a Traditional College Focus. Then in the 1970's the paper 

was filled with SGA Headlines, Intramurals vs. Intercollegiate Athletics, Faculty Coverage, Conflicts Disclosed, and 

Investigations Reporting. The papers in the 1980's brought change because of Competition Based on Multi 

Campuses, Technology Needs, Emphasis on off Campus Events, Entertainment News, Sports Intercollegiate then 

Professional not BCC, Selling Advertisement to survive, and Consolidation Conflicts. Now in the 1990's the 

Observer is the Pulse of College, Chronicle of what has gone on, and Analytical Rather than a Bulletin Board. 



Student 



services 



STUDENT SERVICES 

\ 

On August 30, 1960 almost 700 students attended classes at the Naval Air Barracks. By 1962 three years at Naval 

Air Barracks was completed while the new campus had begun construction on Buildings 1 and 2, the Library, and 
the Student Center. 



The year 1962 saw a memorial to George Francis Fairwatter, the first student killed while at JCBC. The Venetian 
Crier ads included Sears, Coke, Imperial Brick, Shoe String Bookshop, and Saks. The Annual yearbook showed 
two campuses with a look toward new facilities. The College activities, organizations and Student services had 
begun to develop. 

Student Sharon Roesch had developed a "Learning and reaching goal" for the Freshman who showed enthusiasm, 
desire and anticipation. A totally new atmosphere with adult and progressive students who were a little afraid of 
failure. Hope and desire continued to build to overcome feelings of frustration and a lack of self confidence. The 
campus scheduling differed for students from different age groups who were bound together by the quest for 
knowledge. New formal independence proved difficulty with little difficulty that the priorities of: Learning freedom 
and then comes from responsibility . The student must become well informed, studies were more difficult that they 
had a desire to be recognized with new procedures from buying books to registration, that all means Freshmen 
need to find themselves. 



Student Thomas Robinson assisted Why the Choice of BCC with the results: First, Academics caused 62% of high 
school students to choose BCC, their grades not good enough for a university; Second, 26% saw the social reason 
for their high friends were attending; and Third, 12% desired living at home. 

In 1963, the new campus had 152 acres with buildings 1, 2, 11, 17, 14, and Bookstore (Student Center) 



i 



In 1964 The Silver Sands highlighted students Robert Moreland, George Piatt, Leon Hankerson who became Dean 
of MacArthur High School, and Carlton Moore who started Fort Lauderdale Civilian Conservation Corps as well as 
county commission. JCBC students had a campus of sand to begin college parallel programs. They became 
integrated and believing of their future. The cafeteria, current bookstore had vending machines, tables and student 
center. The library was center of campus while Building 1 was multi purpose. 

1965 student founder and Chairman Rick Barnard organized for recruitment the JC Student Speakers Bureau with 
Student Activities Board support. Barnard met with Activities Director Neil Crispo to finalize the proposed Speaker's 
Bureau proposed at November, 1964 SAB meeting. The purpose of the bureau was to tell people of Broward 
County about their junior college which some felt was nothing more than grades 13 and 14. The bureau visited 
every county high school in 1964. Elaine Ashecraft, Sharon Roesch, Craig Barrer and Rick Barnard were looking 
for 12 to 15 new members with 2.5 GPA, speaking ability, poise and excellent appearance. 

Speed reading club was formed with projector, stop matches, and goal to increase individual accelerators in 
reading laboratory (Room A-13). 

Student ID Cards were needed because theatre managers refused to accept student receipt cards. They were 
similar to Faculty cards without expensive photos, but cosigned by student and college official. "They give the 
student dignity, and proved to be helpful in getting student rates for theatres and special programs as Peter Nero" 
according to Dean of Students Dr. Jack Taylor. 

October 15, 1965 

Mid-term "Disaster Sheets" (mid term grade sheets for every student) were available on October 27th 
encouraged students to meet with advisor or counselors to discuss academic problems. Counseling provided 
to JCBC students free Scholastic Ability Test (SAT) for all entering junior college graduates and transfers for 
many colleges and universities. Navy Aviation Procurement Team and Marine Corps Officer Section team 
visited student center. The Language Department created language clubs and a laboratory to enhance 
students understanding of modem foreign languages. 



October 29, 1965 

Since 1961 JCBC had provided for students with well over 200 scholarships available through financial aid. 
The qualifications of 2.5 GPA during high school, a personal letter why student wanted the scholarship, a 
certain amount of maturity in attitude, a completed application form, and being a full-time student. The new 
Cafeteria was to open in 1967 inside the Campus Hospitality Center which would be staffed by students 
studying Hotel-Motel Administration. The snack-bar, a dining room seating 350, faculty dining room, a large 
kitchen and conference room would have planned hours from 7:00 a.m. to 9:00 p.m. The Silver Sands was 
distributed in the administration office with no charge to full-time students while part-time students must pay 
one dollar and free protective covers were available. The four issues cost $25.00 for non-students with faculty 
featured in first and student organizations in second. 

December 3, 1965 

The Vietnam Forum conducted by 4 JCBC students who were Vietnam Veterans, was held in the student 
center and sponsored by the Crier and SGA. 

1966 

BJC had 3,000 students taught by 130 teachers. Construction of Buildings 5, 6, 3, 10 and Planetarium 
enlarged the campus. 

January 28, 1966 

The Library added 300 volumes monthly, Micro Film magazines, and student reading room. 

February 4, 1966 

Announcements of clubs and department activities were taped and played alternating with music. All 
announcements had to be presented each week and were forwarded for Campus Calendar publication. The 
National Teacher's Examination was offered at JCBC on March 19, 1966 with registration closing on February 
18th with $3.00 late fee until March 4th. 



I 



February 11, 1966 

FBI Jobs were open for students with degree requirements: male U.S. citizen 23 to 41 years of age, good 
physical condition with 20/20 vision; and able to travel in US and its territorial possessions with starting salary 
$9,000.00 a year. The "Sing Out '66" troupe was interviewed on campus. Career Center with Occupational 
files was added in counseling for students and adults of the college community. The Tecih Program was now 
separated in an administration shake-up with acting president Dr. Jack Taylor who explained the removal from 
Dr. Lauderdale to Dean Edward Rotchi that was based on 1963 Southern Association of Colleges and Schools 
Accreditation process. A Travel Center on campus offered group rates in airfare and guarantees for travel on 
the European continent. 

February 18, 1966 

Acting President Dr. Jack Taylor brought forth the recommendation of not increasing JCBC Matriculation Fees 
despite state legislative permission. Dr. Taylor said at present the college did not need the money, and that no 
change in the fees was forecasted. He did, state he's in favor of a raise in teachers salaries, but did not think 
that the students should be required to make up the difference. 

February 25, 1966 

University of Florida Representatives led by Dr. E. Ruffin Jones Assistant Dean of the College of Arts and 
Sciences at University of Florida spoke to transfer students on Wednesday. 

Accident Hazard Route, State Road 84 will be expanded to four lanes from State Road 7 west to Davie Road, 
which was averaging 3 accidents per month according to FH Patrol Corporal C.R. Marvis and MA Lewis. 
Senior District Designer for Road Department, was conducting a survey supported by the Governor Haydon 
Burns program. 

Jim Smith, music instructor said Pep Band was too late in season to be a full time band. The Opportunity to 
build school spirit and service was blueprint for future. 



I 



March 4, 1966 

The Mid-semester grade reports were distributed to students on Monday, March 14, 1966 from 8:00 a.m. to 
4:00 p.m. in Student Personnel Services Lobby of Administration Building. Students were encouraged to 
make appointments to discuss any problems related to progress in their programs with Counselor. Vietnam 
Gl's were to get books via Operation Booklift with 3,500 JCBC books sent to Vietnam. John Homan, a 
freshman, had supported of Fort Lauderdales Public Library, Phi Beta Lambda and Air Force for 
transportation. 

March 11, 1966 

Early registration was by appointment time cards only with the order determined by the number of hours 
completed. Students wishing to change their faculty advisors needed to come to counseling. The "1967 
Orientation was to give the students the opportunity to visit the campus, learn policies and procedures, and 
meet members of the administrative staff' according to Dr. Frank Scalice, head of the counseling staff. 
Approximately 900 students attended and were guided by 3 different color pamphlets. The tour of campus 
was by John Homan's slide show in the Lecture Theatre that portrayed campus highlights which people felt 
was more effective than an actual walking tour. Student leader Nancy Davis felt that campus organizations 
got a head start with perspective freshman candidates. Lunch of hoagies and cokes, entertainment, that 
included a RAT Wedding preformed on two Freshman boys. George McCall of Administration said "It is 
recommended that all new students have a RAT cap (JCBC Beanie) or suffer the consequences! 

September 2, 1966 

Students have to give the Admissions and Records Office their selective service numbers as information was 
automatically forwarded to their local draft boards. The "Drop and Add" procedure in Lecture Theatre was after 
classes begin with the most pressing need to fill schedules so classes at the end of selection not always 
desirable or needed but fitting into schedule most important. 



September 2, 1 966 

New electronic machine (Perceptoscope) was to help student with faster reading rate and comprehension 
according to Mrs. Margaret Porter, campus reading teacher. "Speed Reading" teaches students to read 4 or 5 
words at a time rather than only one, so this was open to all students with the machines in the Reading Lab. 

September 10, 1966 

University of Miami football tickets ($4 or $5 a ticket) arranged by Mr. Neil Crispo were sold on campus for $2 
each. 500 tickets sold to JCBC students with a 2 ticket limit and student ID. 



September 23, 1966 

Counselor Leon Watts gave tests for vocational counseling using choices of Kuder, Strong Vocational, Oliver, 
MM Personality, Edward's or Webster. 

October 14, 1966 

Planetarium went public with shows during October for 5th graders to JCBC students. 

Woolworth's recruitment were front page announcement desperately seeking business students for manager's 
positions. Two year degree will enable students to make $475.00 a month. 

Hotel and Motel Administration participated in the 21st Annual Pan American, Hotel and Restaurant exposition 
with a JCBC booth using slides as well as a static display. 

Jaycee Club was laminating Draft Cards. 

The Alumni Drive for membership with the first meeting in Gym on October 1 , 1966 had the alumni speaker Dr. 
Jack Taylor who lectured on academic standards of JCBC. The Association was to be: 

1 . Instrument of Communication 

2. Provide community with JCBC information 

3. Aid campus projects 



4. Provide community needs that JCBC can meet. 

5. Placement of JCBC graduates 

6. Assist members in professional and business growth. 

7. Encourage continuous education and cultural activities. 

November 4, 1966 

Advisement changed to hourly schedule by major areas of study. 

Job opportunities opened to students in an extensive range of career opportunities according to George F. 
McCall who placed 434 students in September with 110 new positions posted that attracted 549 students. 
There were 3,166 referrals in 1965. 

Lions Clubs essay contest "Peace is Attainable" must be submitted by December 10, 1966 for $25.00 prize. 

Marymont College of Boca Raton hosted folk festival inviting JCBC students to participate. 

Modern Language Division provided foreign film presentations in various languages to help students with their 
comprehension. 

Flag raising ceremony was in little theatre with Veteran Club members putting on event. 

April graduates asked to apply for financial aid to Florida universities by George McCall as scholarships were 

■ 

limited. 



January 20, 1967 

Placement service offered full or numerous part-time jobs by Coordinator of Financial Aid and Placement 
George McCall who created introduction card to get recruits and employees together. 









', 






January 27, 1967 

Fourteen students were honored on President's List with unheard of 4.0 GPA. 

Instructional TV station set for Mid-April was financed by county school board that George Voegel, audio- 
visual director, got a government grant to tie JCBC into the station. 

FAU and American U representatives were on campus along with Navy recruiters to offer students 
opportunities. 



February 4, 1967 

New Student Center to replace "Pit" with construction to begin in JCBC third phase according to Dr. Myron 
Blee. The Central Service Building (number 19 now) was designed as student lounge, recreation area, 
cafeteria, snack bar area for food service training courses and general student activities. 

Graduating Sophomores qualified for Civil Service jobs. 



February 10, 1967 

Mark R. Douglas, Dale Carnegie Leadership and Sales Course gave Sales Course, on "How to Make A Habit 
of Succeeding". 

Pirate World set auditions for fourth theme entertainment center in US with over 100 acres. 

Planetarium introduced 'Unknown Realm of Gods" at 7:30 Tuesdays and 3:00 p.m. on Sundays using 
$30,000.00 equipment. 



March 3, 1967 

Registration schedules got instructors back by putting their names on future schedules according to Donald 
LaRowe, acting college president. 

8 



) March 3, 1967 

All male students who were dependent on 2-S draft classifications had to complete 32 hours during academic 

year. 

Operation Teenage "Alert" was program designed to inform students and parents aboufproblems presented 
by sex, drugs and alcohol. 



March 17, 1967 

JCBC Business Administration Division hosted secretarial contest for all local high schools with scholarship 
and typewriters awards for winners. 

Outstanding Students Awards announced Sunday after Prom that were nominated by each club or 
organization to SAB along with Deans of Students Affairs and Academics. 

Robin Moore, author of book "Green Beret" came on campus to speak about service with Special Forces in 
Vietnam. 



March 23, 1967 

Silver Sands was picked up in the Student Center with current Student ID. 

March 31, 1967 

Art Exhibit featured best students' work in Fine Arts building on April 3 rd . 

April 14, 1967 

Dean of Instruction Walter Jarecki set up April 21 st meeting for all candidates of Graduation. 



. I 



, 






November, 1967 

) 

Dr. Frank Scalise, head of Counseling, said the reason for Orientation "was to give the students the 
opportunity to visit the campus, learn policies and procedures, and meet members of the administrative staff. 
Approximately 900 students saw campus slides, visited student groups, enjoyed dance and "Rat Wedding" 
with hoagies and cokes paid by Student Personnel Services. A 

The 4, 548 members of the student body according to Assistant Registrar Ray Hoover completed a long 
sometimes tedious registration process that involved meeting each instructor for a class card proved to be a 
frustrating and confusing time for both student and instructor. 



April, 1968 

FAU offered program leading to Bachelor of Arts and Science had 4,144 junior and senior students this 
academic year. 

September 15, 1970 

College trustees changed name from Broward Junior College to Broward Community College to convey 
comprehensive nature of the College's mission and programs. New concepts include special short courses, 
seminars, and in-service courses expansion to 3 campuses, "face lifting" for Central Campus, outreach center, 
and BCC mobile unit for student services. 

December, 1970 

North Campus had begun in several churches and a temple with completion construction date in 1971 for 
permanent facilities located at Hammonville Road and the Florida Turnpike for 114 acre campus. There was 
predicted 1,500 students at North Campus for 1972-1973. 

December, 1970 

BCC's Fire Science taught by Mr. Redman had 80 students in class per week. 

Social Science Seminar sought answers through efforts of Dr. Paul Cauffield and Frank Branca for the 

purpose of intellectual enrichment. 

10 



I May 5, 1972 

Students according to Byron Jackson, BJC Music Instructor, were eligible for 6 hours credit, 6 weeks in 
Europe at a cost of $1 ,070.00 through College Abroad program in Phoenix. 

Credit offered to superior high school students at 4 different high school locations. J 

Students needing help found several kinds in Financial Aid. Students besides those whose families make less 
than $6,000.00 per year qualified on a need basis. 

Pan Ku copies were picked up free in the Hospitality Centers. 

Radio did BCC 73 the campus radio show aired on both WSHE and WSRF and was looking for more 
collegiate broadcasters. 



September 22, 1972 

Top level administrative group were ready to move to the First National Bank in Fort Lauderdale. September 22, 1 972 

Voter registration was coming to try to improve on last year's 769 new voters. 

Language lab got new location and system for the new cassette system that was more flexible for students' 
meets according to Bud Call, Director of Learning Resources. 



September 22, 1972 

Counselors aided decision making adviser Leon Watts, Director of Student Services on North Campus. 

Co-op got money from a $20,000.00 grant from Health, Education and Welfare. 



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November 3, 1972 

Tutoring Services were available as members of Phi Theta Kappa were offering their services according to 
Chet Hadleman, Advisor to Phi Theta Kappa. 

November 17, 1972 

Legal Aid Service debated by Student Board at North Campus. 

A new North Campus publication magazine was called Poseidon. 

First time, Filmmaking Course was already popular with students was again offered to students on Central 
Campus Term II. 



December 1, 1972 

Fl V was a personalized admission system that would eliminate many steps that community college students 
had to do to register. 

Annual Ninnet scholarship instituted by Trustees was permanent for policeman graduates who was killed 
during a robbery. 

Travel cheap and comfortable with Youth Hostels with the Head of Modem foreign Languages Will Kempton 
who was an owner of one hostel in Alton, New Hampshire. 



December 8, 1972 

Downtown Center was to open for Term II was leased on a 5 year basis at a cost of $5.00 for 21 ,800 square 
feet plus $125.00 for each of 75 parking spaces for annual amount of $100,000.00. 



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December 8, 1972 

Women's seminar hosted Feminists and Scholars who focused on goals of Female Liberation featuring 
Virginia Allan and Dr. Virginia Pendergrass. 

"Outreach Program" produced 7.9 growth rate at BCC as opposed to the nation-wide average of 10 per cent, 
according to Mr. Glen Rose, Assistant Registrar in program designed to find out what the public expect from 
the college. 



December 8, 1972 

BCC hosted College Night for students, 63 colleges, and parents. 

January 26, 1973 

Jim Ackerson former department head of Business Administration was first chairman of Division of Public 
Services. 

FIU representative Dick Marly was available for a week of counseling in Hospitality Center for students 
interested in FIU. 

Permission was granted to the National Guard to use BCC Central as an assembly point in case of atomic 
bomb attack. 

Inter-Communications Club presented students with a five minute television program, "Free Style". 

South Campus appraised this week according to Claude Pridgin, Assistant to the President as a preliminary 
for purchase. 

January 26, 1973 

Movie Star Frances Langford presented BCC with a complete collection of "The Wette Legacy of Piano 
Treasures." 

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February 2, 1973 

Out of state students had to pay more tuition because of a category set up by the State Board of Education. 

Davie invited BCC to join 1973 Orange Festival Parade sponsored by the Police Benevolent Association. 
"Plant a Tree Day at BCC" with Smokey, Dr. Hugh Adams, and Dr. Clinton Hamilton who participated in event. 
BCC revamped its telephone system. 

Circle K volunteered to build park on land received from Kiwanis member J. Walker Field. 
Multi-purpose calendars provided by Circle K. 



Hollywood Forum discussed religion and ideals. 



February 9, 1973 

Women's seminar scheduled for continuing education of mature women. 

New courses for next year passed the Academic Affairs committee included Theatre Appreciation, Western 
Civilization, Magazine Production, Current Business Practices Seminar, Fashion Design, Infant Development 
and Behavior, and Tourism if budgeting was possible. 

"Poseidon" adventure launched as North publication. 



February 16 1973 

New program designed for returning veterans according to Powell D. Waite, Director of Financial Aid. 

SPANS (Student Program to Achieve New Sphere) had goal that stressed Individual Instruction has been led 
by Dr. Ted Taylor for 3 years. 

Employment available at Placement Office conducted by Mrs. Pat Novak. 

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February 23, 1973 

Freestyle, a 5 minute information style program over BCC's ITV gave students news before each hour on all 
channels. 

March 2, 1973 

Special Medical Clinic Issue described free clinic to produce full health care. The new clinic provided free X- 
rays for all students. 

Speakers' Bureau established on crime prevention. 

Criminal Justice aided area police with new programs in Institute headed by James McGown, Director. 

Education and food rising costs addressed by BCC's Board of Trustees with special funds for courses in 
Radiological procedures and ARA Food Services raising prices for 13 vending and cafeteria items including 10 
cent candy bars to 15 cents, coffee up 5 cents per cup, along with 60 cents per semester hour for student 
related construction. 

March 16, 1973 

Audio-Tutorial help featured in new Science Department Lab revealed by Holt Harner. 

Free hearing test was required for teachers certificates. 



March 30, 1973 

Bill Porterfield, HPR instructor and self defense coach showed proper techniques of unarmed defense. 



April 6, 1973 

Mini-mester concept made scheduling easier for students. 



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April 6, 1973 

"BCC-Many Things to Many People", film made available for community showings. 

Billiards and Soviet Union highlighted course changes for next year. 

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Observatory dome was to house 12 inch telescope built on Central Campus. 

Mysteries of Photography came to light with College Photographer Murray Spitzer who believed "visual images 
were important because they can say far more than words". 



April 13, 1973 

Trustees appointed consultant Mrs. Sara Nicholas to update development. 

European credits were available for trip with David Shaw. 



April 23, 1973 

Graduation conducted at War Memorial Auditorium featured State Attorney Robert Shevin. 

May 18, 1973 

Campus parking tickets were appealed to SGA Supreme Court Judges who handled investigation with campus 
security who were more concerned with $1 1 ,894.00 in books, equipment, and money that was stolen from the 
parking lots. 

June 1, 1973 

Business administration had new mini business class offered in lll-B that gave student experience in the field. 

Music Scholarships were available for six music students. 



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June 8, 1973 

Nurse and First Aid were available in Health Center in Student Services Building with Mrs. Mary L. Heffermen, 
the college's registered nurse. 

September 23, 1973 

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1974 graduates had to be advised before registering for their final term. 

Learning Resources supported BCC student projects. 

September 28, 1973 

Community Services offered volunteer programs emphasized headstart. 

October 5, 1973 

Building Construction Program awarded Scholarship Fund of $10,000.00. 

FAU offered program to students unsure of major. 

Co-op education allowed student jobs had grown from 19 to 200 employers. 

October 19, 1973 

New courses were offered in vocational exploration with Ms. Doris Sams. 

Bill Walker and Frank Branca sought funds for a Biofeedback Machine. 

Photography let students capture personal view with class for Term II. 

November 16, 1973 

Employment available at any Broward County school for all BCC full time students for 15 hours at $1.80 per 
hour. 

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December 7, 1973 

New courses aimed at Self-Direction as counseling began teaching. 

New leadership program offered needed guidance at Ramoda Ranch for SGA membership. 

December, 1973 

Communication Mall held at Blanche Ely High School was run by Rosalyn Blake's Social Science class to 

assist in use of English. 

January 18, 1974 

Day Care Center was low on priority list that Dr. George Young stated was without federal funding. 

February 9, 1974 

Student group rather than regular committee had to decide on New Dean of Student Development. 

February 21, 1974 

New Student Services Office in Student Activities to help foreign BCC students adjust as Mrs. Katherine 
Tymeson replaced Mrs. Phyllis Rhodes who was on leave. 

March 1, 1974 

University research team selected BCC as one of 20 sites to study Co-op education designed at BCC for 
students who desired to work part or full time in their career field while at BCC. 

Financial aid funds were available to students. 

March 15, 1974 

Rape Defense Program conducted in Central Lecture Theatre led by House Representative Elaine Gordon of 
Dade County. 

Seniors in the nursing programs raised $700.00 for their pinning ceremony. 

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April, 1974 

Financial aid included loans with Florida Student, Nursery, Federally Insured, Florida Insured, and Short Term 
loans while other aid Basic Opportunity, Educational Opportunity, Nursing, Law Enforcement grants and 
Tuition Waivers. 

May 24, 1974 

Child Care Center Facilities outlined by Judy Yates, special assistant for women's affairs. 

Florida students offered foreign study through the State University system. 

Library offered students information aid. 

A BCC drug survey showed that 57.1% Of students had tried "grass". 

June 7, 1974 

Registration began for cruise classes on SS Universe Campus as joint venture between BCC and Chapman 
College. 

June 7, 1974 

Personnel offered salary info from Director of Personnel Tom Brown that BCC ranked 25 out of 28 community 
colleges. 

September 13, 1974 

Speech and hearing defects tested by Central Campus Clinic. 

Crisis Intervention Center needed volunteers and funds. 

October 3, 1974 

SGA President Glen Lewis emphasized that Student Services was real priority of SGA along with a Hospitality 
Renovation plan. 

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) October 15, 1974 

Black History Living was presented with Afro-American culture featuring members of the community. 

November 7, 1974 

BCCN students visited FAU during Community College Day for rock band concerts and tons of free ice cream. 

November 15, 1974 

ID cards to replace registration slips that cost between 10 to 20 cents according to SGA Senator Cathy 

Colvert. 

November 31, 1974 

Super Brains inducted into Phi Theatre Kappa that now totaled 80 students according to advisor Ralph Clark. 

December 2, 1974 

Cafeteria food price increase was in effect. 



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December 12, 1974 

Career Center housed 5 student job services. 

January 23, 1975 

Poseidon new North Campus Yearbook was taking pictures of students, faculty or staff in Building 10, Room 
105. 

February 1, 1975 

Alumni group sought 8,000 members. 

February 20, 1975 

Food services opened at North Campus for food between classes. 

Plantation Junior Women's Club offered $750.00 scholarship to any BCC student. 



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March 7, 1975 

Second Annual European summer Study Tours offered 6 hours of HIS 290 according to tour conductor Central 

Campus History instructor Tom Ryan. 

March 12, 1975 

BCC went European for summer session 1 975 with 3 weeks in Europe. * 

September 4, 1975 

Orientation 1975 worked with Circle K, Publications Booth, huge turnout, faculty help, Homegrown 
Coffeehouse and ROTC. 

November, 1975 

Rising unemployment had its effects on BCC North. Co-op program placed 150 students according to Sharon 

Hill Co-op advisor. 

Registration neared December deadline according to Bob Meinhold, North Campus Registrar. 



November 14, 1975 

New Financial Aid Director John Wynn was to revitalize Career Services. Wynn who held Master in History 
and Theology was program developer at Federal City College in Washington, special counselor for University 
of North Florida, and then came to BCC. 

December 6, 1975 

Eastman Kodak donated $500.00 Educational Grant. 

February 2, 1976 

Earn credits through travel featured Bicentennial sights with North Campus Gloria Johnson and Central 
Campus John Hays during lll-B. 



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February 9, 1976 

Leadership training by Speech 112 Group Discussions was unique speech course offered by Dean of 
Students Dr. David Cox and Kathy Spanton, speech instructor. 

February 17, 1976 

European Tour featured Cairo. * 

March 29, 1976 

Anthropology Field School led by Professors Richard Furlow and Barbara Gortych went to Chihuahua, Mexico. 

"Assertiveness Training for Everyone" was included in Women Interested in Today's Happenings (WITH). 



April 5, 1976 

English 1 05 Reading Course with 3 credits increased and offered to matriculating students. 



Basic Educational Opportunity Grant freeze was removed after Congress voted to continue program. 



Business students visited the Federal Reserve Bank. 



April 12, 1976 

Latin American Study Tour offered for 6 hours of HIS 290 credit to five different Southern American Capitals 
with Central History Instructor Tom Ryan who also was the Director of Student Activities. 

October 25, 1976 

Career Day was set for Central Hospitality Center with 50 representatives from Broward County businesses. 

Women's Center offered assertiveness training with Susie Smith and Trish Smith. 

November 1, 1976 

Listening skills seminar conducted by Susie Smith and Pricilla Lassard consisted of What Listening is Not, 
Characteristics of Effective Feedback and Non-verbal Communication. 

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I November 22, 1976 

Women's Center on North Campus expanded according to newsletter Editor Val Santiago. 

Tour Leader Tom Ryan planned second Annual trip for students to tour Latin America including special side 
trip to Macchu Ricchu. * 

December 8, 1976 

Women's Center on North Campus scheduled Reverend Arlene Patcock of the Science of the Mind Center. 

January 24, 1977 

Career Planning Center offered vocational help coordinated by Don Cleveland in North Campus Building 8. 

January 31, 1977 

Ms. Karen Roberts of BCC North Art Department planned European Travel Study program to Moscow and 
Leningrad. 

Day Care Center with child care proposed in Building 3 with SGA support on North Campus. 



February 7, 1977 

BCCN Women's Center hosted woman lawyer Susan Lebow Weinberg who spoke on "Women aid in the 
Legal System". 

March 7, 1977 

Jerry Gillies "Friends" workshop packed the Women's Center. 

March 28, 1977 

BCC summer study tour went south of the Border with Student Activities Director Tom Ryan. 

April 18, 1977 

300 lucky heads received free hair styling at BCCN after Hospitality Center interviews. 



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September 28, 1977 

Roy Eugene Davis, a direct disciple of Paramahanse Yogananda cited unawareness as a fatal flaw. 

Octobers, 1977 

Career help was on its way in BCC Career and Placement Centers. * 

November 2, 1977 

High School pilot orientation program was designed to bring BCC closer to the high school student success. 

November 16, 1977 

Bobby White, author of TV's "The Legend of Lizzie Borden" spoke to future writers at BCCN English classes. 

December 8, 1977 

Jay Sacks Syndrome, Huntington's Chorea and Sickle Cell Anemia were part of new "sex" course in Genetics. 

February 1, 1978 

Foreign study tours were offered to all students for additional credits with fine Arts European, 5 th Annual 
European, 3 rd Annual Latin American Study, West African Study and the Anthropology Mexican Field School 
Tours. 

March 18, 1978 

Programs in Israel available to students that included 9 different curriculum areas. 

September 26, 1978 

The BCC handicapped program was new to BCC. Educational Specialist Sam Adekunle served as liaison 
between BCC's 23 handicapped students and the rest of the college. 

October 10, 1978 

BCCN eyed addition of Pub. 

115 students enrolled in Co-op worked in their fields study can earn 2 or 3 hours. 



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November 7, 1978 

BCCN Women's Center denied funds because of "Administrative Decision" when Dean Leonard Bryant 

suggested to Vice President Dr. George Young to spend the money on retention of students rather clerical 

staff for the Women's Center. 

December 5, 1978 , 

Departments planned expansion. 

December 12, 1978 

Career Center guided students with the annual Career Advancement Grant by Pompano Beach Business and 

Professional Women's Club. 

December 12, 1978 

Nursing offered on job training. 

January 30, 1979 

Travelers received college credits for travel study programs that included 6 th Annual European, Jamaican 
Sociology Field School, and World Explorer Cruises or tours. 

George Laschinski sponsored student politics at BCCN. 

February 6, 1979 

Handicapped Department increased aids between disabled students and anyone that may have to interact. 

Pat Novak, a board member of the critically acclaimed Rhode Island Feminist Theater (RIF) put on plays on 
the most important women's issues. 

February 13, 1979 

BCC students' insurance plan was up in the air as SGB could not make decision. 

February 27, 1979 

Day Care Center was born, approved by Women's Center Coordinator Linda Lieberman and Judy VanAlstyne 
special assistant for Women's Affair to be called Childhood Learning Lab that Dr. George Young felt depended 
on adequate funding. 



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March 27, 1979 

MD Dance-A-Thon raised nearly $5,000.00. 

April 3, 1979 

Campus nurse Helen Rominger aided students personal problems. * 

November 6, 1979 

BCC East Campus located in Seville, Spain was also known as the BCC Semester in Spain program was BCC 
first semester long study program abroad. 

BCCN proposal to bridge North Campus canal to cost $300,000.00, but would relieve traffic problem. 

November 10, 1979 

Free Money created long lines at registration for students at the Financial Aids Office with special attention to 
Basic Educational Opportunities Grants where tuition was deducted from checks and balance sent to your 
home. 

November 16, 1979 

Office career students awarded top honors by BCC Academic Dean Dyer along with scholarships. 

Peer counseling course presented by Dr. Richard Washell for Creative Lifelong Interaction. 

BCC offered beginning and intermediate sailing at Tigertail Lake scheduled in its Physical Education and 
Community Services program. 



December 18, 1979 

A season for giving prompted the United Way Campaign on all BCC campuses to reach $7,300.00 for 1979 
goal. 



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January 18, 1980 

Central Campus Provost Dr. Willis Holcombe explained Central's new phone system as "dimensional" with 50 

new telephone numbers. 

WPLG/TV "Official Health Watch Reporter" Art Carlson joined fight for rights and needs of handicapped. 

March 7, 1980 

Learning Resource Center got bigger and better nearly tripling its size. 

September 26, 1980 

College got $25,000.00 grant from the Florida Equality of Access and Opportunity Higher Education Grant 
Committee for BCC minorities. 

November 21, 1980 

Semester-ln-Spain Program was a valuable experience for students of all ages to study in foreign countries. 

Hypnosis was a safe way to tap hidden resources according to Dr. Frank Branca. 

Contest for Best Limerick was part of Pan Ku's Turkey Contest with $10.00 prize according to Dr. Michael 
Cleary. 

December 3, 1980 

BCC North daytime phone registration utilized for 2,310 part-time night students. 

March 6, 1981 

Literary minds appeared in BCC's Pan Ku. 

Students learned leadership through weekend seminar at Elliot Key. 

April 1, 1981 

Women's Center featured workshop week. 



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April 22, 1981 

BCC summer camp conducted on Central's 152 acre campus designed to teach youngsters basic 
fundamentals in their chosen sports or activities under direction of Tom Ryan, collegewide Director of Student 
Activities. 

Omni hosted BCC's graduation exercises. 

SOS meant Survival of Students in BCCN summer class by student development specialist Sandy Rhodes. 

October 7, 1981 

BCC welcomed high school seniors along with FAU President Dr. Glenwood Creech. 

Legislative grant to ease traffic and parking woes partially remedied situations. 

Building numbers were changed to improve college efficiency. 

October 23, 1981 

President Reagan's recent budget overhaul did not lend loans that were still available. 

January 22, 1982 

"Sophomore Test Day" was proposed by CLASP. 

February 5, 1982 

BCC made steady progress in the Higher Education Management Institute (HEMI) and Self Study as the first 
institution to integrate HEMI into the self-study to facilitate re-accreditation with the Southern Association of 
Colleges and Schools (SACS). 

April 23, 1982 

Graduation night for the students, faculty and guests in Omni lasted from 8:00 to past 10:30 p.m. with over 500 
graduates. 

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November 8, 1982 

825 students took the CLAST exam that lasted an extra hour and fifteen minutes. 

April 4, 1983 

The Day Care Center repeated failures that plagued previous efforts to establish a facility that lacked $1 13,000 

to start project. 

November 15, 1983 

The New work programs became centralized as the new Florida College Career Work Experience Program 
(CCW) was designed to assist students by finding jobs and reimbursing their employers for 50 percent of 
students' salaries. 

November 8, 1984 

A cash incentive was offered to marketing students at 16 th annual Philip Morris Marketing-Communications 

Competition. 

February 28, 1985 

The "Teacher of the Year" to be selected from each campus was to recognize teaching excellence for one 
teacher committed to maximizing student learning. 

Career information was made available for interested students on Career Information Day with over 50 
employers. 

March 15, 1985 

Valuable suggestions were worth money for BCC employees to win $2,000 if they that saved college time, 
energy and money. 

March 18, 1985 

Graduates prepared for a fond farewell at the 25 th Anniversary Graduation ceremonies highlighted by Dr. Joe 
Rushing, BCC's First President as keynote speaker. 



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March 18, 1985 

Physical Education was a required must for all new students when BCC's Academic Affairs committee passed 
on that curriculum change. 

March 28, 1985 

The career doors opened for graduates. 

September 27, 1985 

Test scores rose on CLAST. 

February 14, 1986 

The Office of Minority Program Development sponsored a series of survival skills workshops that included test 
taking, note taking, study skills, math anxiety, research paper writing, time management and career planning. 

February 28, 1986 

There were 600 immigrants who took oath of citizenship conducted by Honorable Norman C. Roettger, Jr. who 
held court proceedings in BCC OMNI because of terrific "back-log" of applicants with Congressmen E. Clay 
Shaw and Larry Smith were on hand to congratulate. 

March 27, 1986 

Cambridge University's study program was offered through BCC's English Department. 

April 18, 1986 

Graduation with pomp and circumstance at BCC commencement and featured retiring President A. Hugh 
Adams. 

October 3, 1986 

Bloodmobile brought a chance to save lives with no risk from AIDS when you gave a pint. 

AIDS Education was the best defense against this deadly virus. 



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October 3, 1986 

Continuing Education met community needs. 



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CLAST scores were better, but still too low as BCC was ranked 27 of the 37 Florida State Institutions. 

Students received "Justice" at Learning Resources Center where Terry Justice catered to all students. 

October 31, 1986 

The food drive began the "Christmas Charities" program directed by F-Troop better known as student activities 

according to Tom Ryan, Director of Student Activities that provided for 3,200 children from 194 families. 

November 23, 1986 

TV Broadcasting system was proposed so BCC would stand at the forefront of broadcast education in the 
county and, possibly the region according to Dr. Irmgard Bocchino. 

December 1, 1986 

The focus on Allied Health programs for Initial Professional Preparation and Programs for Post-Professional 
Development that taught what is needed to meet state and national licensing or certification according to 
Wanda Thomas, Provost of Allied Health. 

December 12, 1986 

Blacks were provided role models through the mentoring program. 

Continuing Education's unique courses livened things up from Gaelic music to underwater photography. 

December 12, 1986 

The study in Spain had BCC cooperation with the University of Seville that enabled BCC students to study in 
Spain. 

BCC moved into a new era of slowly expanding enrollment. 
The reading lab aided student literacy. 
Computers eased registration blues. 



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January 30, 1987 

New CLAST results caused BCC to jump in state rankings from 29 th to 19 th . 



Honors credit opened doors for BCC students. 



Literature courses at South fired up students. 



Steve Elliot's art appreciation class was unconventional. 



March 27, 1987 

Myths about AIDS were dispelled by Pat Callahan, representative of the Broward County Health Unit. 

Classes spanned the entire week with development of the weekend college concept under Dr. Neil Crispo, the 
Director of the Weekend College. 

April 10, 1987 

Cops were trained at BCC's Criminal Justice Institute. 

South's math tutor trio added up to tutorial help for students coming to the Math Lab. 

October 12, 1987 

BCC was given grant approval for an International Coordinator to assist 2,200 international BCC students. 

October 26, 1987 

AIDS education program was initiated by BCC and FAU with "An Epidemic of Fear: AIDS in the Workplace". 

December 14, 1987 

The Electronic Information System (EIS) was taking over thanks to the efforts of Downtown Center's Ken 
Custer and South's Robert Buford. 



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February 22, 1988 

Weekend College offered a chance to get an Associate's degree quickly. 

The study abroad program earned credits as well as a broad, cultural education. 

March 14, 1988 

The telephone eased registration blues with over 7,000 utilizing the process. 

High school students can enter BCC earlier. 



November 7, 1988 

New experience programs developed BCC's Cooperative Education (Co-op). 

Robotic class offered at Central. 

November 7, 1988 

Leadership retreat was a valuable experience on Elliot Key conducted by Rick Miller, a former student 
activities director and Dr. Tom Ryan, Director of Student Life to bring back to each student's organization or 
club those qualities needed for development. 

December 12, 1988 

Israel was a bus ride away with Florida-Israel Institute located at FAU's, University Tower in Downtown Fort 
Lauderdale. 

Co-op offered to BCC students combined on-campus study with related work experience. 

January 30, 1989 

Selection process began for college's "Professors of the Year" recognition of excellence process. 

The Tri-Rail System was the new way to commute in South Florida. 



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February 13, 1989 

HPRD sponsored AIDS awareness week at college. 

The recently formed Florida Atlantic University Dance Team "Motion" opened its roster to any interested and 
qualified BCC students. 

•4 

February 27, 1989 

Tuition support was available for single mothers in "Project You". 

March 13, 1989 

Electronic mail offered students several services including computer help program, phone messages, mail and 
special help to handicapped students. 

Work program helped students in job field. 

April 17, 1989 

High School students made the grade at BCC when they enrolled in the Early Admissions Program that was 
good for those individuals who were highly motivated. 

October 10, 1989 

The BCC Foundation established faculty grants for endowed teaching chairs with $50,000.00 of private 
monies that would provide $7,500.00 extra a year to outstanding teachers. 

The hurricane emergency plan was ready for action according to Thomas E. Brown, Dean of Business Affairs 
at Central. 

September 21 , 1 992 

Hurricane Andrew Disaster Relief occurred every week beginning September 12 th to 29 th with students, faculty 
and staff members in Florida City who made specific assignments including: needs assessments, debris 
removal, counseling, child care, completing relief forms, and generally helping residents with anything they 
can. 

North Campus fall orientation's program proved successful to Dr. Carol Findley, North Campus Orientation 
Coordinator who felt the mandatory Orientation provided new students with what to expect in college. 

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September 21 , 1992 

Central security improved with addition of new lighting, but the crime rate on campus was reported low; except 
for the occasional domestic problems and reports of stolen book bags according to Carol Lewandowski, 
Coordinator of Facilities, Central Campus. 

September 21, 1992 

AIDS Outlook by Kent Peterson, Assistant Coordinator HIV/AIDS Prevention Education Program, who did 
weekly newspaper column Sensitivity 101: a prerequisite for those who were unaffected. 

October 5, 1992 

The North Campus testing center made retaking sections of CLAST easier with Dotlyn Lower, testing 
Coordinator of the automated option ,The Computer Adaptive Test (CAT). 

August 23, 1993 

The Criminal Justice Institute served as a principal training center that prepared students body and mind for 

law enforcement careers. 

New Day Care center gave student parents time to study and develop other options. 

The Honors Institute maintained an academic based community that was caring, interdependent and scholarly 
according to Dr. Mary Jo Henderson, Honors Institute Director. 

March 7, 1994 

The Alumni Association bonded the college community. 

North Campus celebrated safer sex with a Condom Carnival coordinated by Dr. Janet Parke. 

Student health insurance offered inexpensive rates and comprehensive care for six days a week of medical 
service according to Dr. George Young, Vice President of Student Affairs. 

Mentor/mentee retreat honored outstanding student achievement. 



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March 21, 1994 
| Former Air Force pilot Otis Stigler helped veterans find employment and funds for college. 

The AIDS outlook with Emily Cole, Peer Educator/Counselor, emphasized contracting HIV should not be our 
only concern as students should be aware of other sexually transmitted diseases. 

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April 25, 1994 

Grant award aided Hispanic students by the establishment of higher level courses in Spanish that aided the 

students. 

The road to success started with the mentor program which for 8 years had accommodated 400 students and 
275 mentors according to Donald Cleveland, Director of Academic Intervention. 

September 12, 1994 

The inaugural school reunion spanned 34 years. 

The Administrative hierarchy restructured as Academic Affairs developed 3 assistants to Vice President of 
Academic Affairs Dr. Jean Hunter to assist in joint-use library projects, loss of key professional positions, and 
redistribution of functional responsibilities. 

Nurse Joyce Groch was a welcome addition to South Campus as well as a first step to wellness center. 

September 26, 1994 

Student Life presented Domestic Violence Seminars to promote autonomy and sensitize students to the 
pervasiveness of domestic violence and the impact that it has on relationships, while developing the necessary 
skills for dealing with such behavior on all campus locations. 

September 26, 1994 

Absorb at your own pace was the alternative program as a concept of Open College that eased class loads for 
BCC students. 



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September 26, 1994 

The Competitive Edge Presidential Leaders program created by Dr. Willis Holcombe, President of BCC and 
Dr. George Young, Vice President of Student Affairs, was a year long internship focused on learning and 
developing different leadership styles. 

September 26, 1994 

Jobs waited in campus Career Centers where job listings, brochures, videos and career search programs, 
along with many workshops and seminars were available to aid student development. 

October 17, 1994 

Holocaust survivors spoke at Central Campus Student Awareness Day with concern over parallels of today 
and yesterday. 

The AIDS outlook included possible change in FDA approval time for new HIV/AIDS drugs along with huge 
amounts of money and suffering through major toxicity's along with the drug company's word that drugs will 
work. 

Central Campus professor Nelson Akinrinade brought his students to "The Pit Stop" for television show at BCC 
studios. 

October 31, 1994 

AIDS awareness educated students collegewide. 

Students aided NASA. 

Grant bridged education gap as BCC received its fourth FIPSE Grant. 

October 31, 1994 

BCC sponsored retreat transcending race and culture for 35 students with several presentations and lectures 
by BCC instructors Drs Reginald Browne and Denise Munoz. 

Holocaust survivors spoke at Central. 

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\ November 14, 1994 

Substance abuse awareness was spread by Student Life through activities, advertisements and education. 

November 28, 1994 

BCC expanded recycling program. ■< 

There was life after BCC as the 2 + 2 system was recruiting BCC students for upper division studies. 

December 12, 1994 

Resource Center provided free tutoring. 

Court reporters who were former BCC students formed organization called "Real Time" assisted elementary 
school students with disabilities in hearing. 

The study abroad program provided students with cultural experiences. 

March 13, 1995 

BCC accessed Internet with 51 lines available through Seflin's Free Net. 

"Project You" aided single parent families with 172 people enrolled last year in the program where 62 received 
financial aid for child care. 

April 24, 1995 

Camp BCC provided fun and funds for the college with revenue for college refurbishing. 

Career Center offered help on each campus to graduates or BCC students needing summer jobs with career 
testing to identify career choice. 

Tigertail Lake offered credits in the summer with recreation classes featuring Keys and canoe trips. 



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August 23, 1995 

Millions earmarked for "C" students as the late Edward Seese, a Fort Lauderdale millionaire, left $4.5 million 

for "C" average students. 

August 23, 1995 

Teachers may "bank" on summer freedom by teaching an overload class each semester with no changes 
affecting summer offerings. 

Students utilized vacation wisely by taking summer classes with interesting teachers and a different 
atmosphere that distinguished BCC from other colleges. 

Camp BCC provided "hot fun in the summertime" and paid for many improvements to the college like two 
computerized math classrooms and a second sound system in the Lecture Theatre. 

September 11, 1995 

There were 1 ,655 students who earned credits at home during the 1994-95 school year out of a total semester 
population of 26,500. 

The travel abroad program enabled students to earn college credit under direction of Dr. William Greene. 

October 9, 1995 

The mentor program offered help towards student success. 

October 23, 1995 

NASA was to launch BCC astronomy students' payload according to Rolando Brandy, Astronomy Central and 
advisor to the project. 

National Collegiate Alcohol Awareness Week was celebrated collegewide about dangers of alcohol and 
substance abuse. 



39 



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November 6, 1995 

BCC operated long-distance classes in physical therapy classes in a concept created by Dr. Wanda Thomas, 
Executive Director for Health Sciences. 

A weekend retreat proved successful for club leaders at Sea Base in Florida Keys. 

* 

January 22, 1996 

Literary magazine Pan Ku released. 

College officials rescued technical vocational students by having Dr. George Young, Vice President of Student 
Affairs take emergency actions to meet government shutdown. 

February 19, 1996 

James Bond theme was a big hit for the 10 th Annual Colleague Recognition Day. 

Prep course completion improved chances of college success. 

March 25, 1996 

The annual Health Fair sponsored by BCC and South Regional Library spread health awareness. 

April 8, 1996 

The Seahawks After School Program started with young children age 6 through 12 on Central Campus as a 
charity program providing Davie's underpriviliged children with adult influence of BCC students while helping 

■ 

them develop friendships with their peers. 

August 26, 1996 

Child Care program available to students at Central Campus with 100 openings available for night care was 
staffed by 2 teachers and 1 BCC students. 



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August 26, 1996 

A Summer program aided students with low grades with tutoring of the students in North Campus writing lab 
under direction of Darlene Nolan, BCC North Campus Learning Center Director. 

September 16, 1996 A 

Co-Curricular transcript program to begin in January to include extracurricular activities on college transcripts 
to assist students seeking admission to upper division university and those searching for a job. 

Common sense about college money as total of 70 percent of parents surveyed say they save half or less of 
anticipated tuition and fees. 

September 29, 1997 

Remedial Mathematics program used to teach students at North. 



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♦ 



I 



Newspaper 



NEWSPAPER 

The 1965 Venetian Crier Editor-in-Chief Matthew J. Faison, endorsed the current Dean of Instruction, Dr. E.P. 
Lauderdale for President. The editor claimed his skills as an administrator of a fine teaching staff and the smooth 
efficiency of the JCBC operation. Matthew J. Faison, Editor in Chief, reconfirmed to all student organizations, 
faculty and department heads that Dr. Lauderdale should be the next occupant of the big office at "Olympia-on-the- 
Green" (President's Office in Administration Building #1) over Dr. Myron Ashmore who had been reported by the 
Miami Herald to be the next President. 

December 3, 1965 

Venetian Crier editorial support of SGA candidates raised the issue of elections and candidates who were 
selected and who were not. 

February 18, 1966 

Venetian Crier earned seven top awards at Florida Junior College Press Association Conference collecting 
more than any other of Florida's 28 colleges. The Gainesville meeting saw the Venetian Crier get 7 firsts, 3 
seconds, and 4 thirds. Matthew Faison Editor, won first place for his columns and one for school service 
concerning his editorials on fraternities. The paper also received first for sports, feature photos, news photos 
and sport photos. In the yearbook competition, the Silver Sands won first place for photography, cover and 
best sports photo. 

March 4, 1966 

Avoiding the political overtures of local talent, the JCBC Presidential nomination of Dr. Roy Jervis did not 
succeed according to Crier Editor Matthew Faison for Jervis lacked Junior College experience. Matthew 
Faison publicly refuted a Letter to the Editor and disclosed that the student in question had been suspended 
from JCBC during the previous term so he wasnt a student to be covered by JCBC news article. He also 
corrected a misquote that indicated the Crier budget was $6,000.00 not $12,000.00. 



September 2, 1966 

The announcement of a 10% commission on all ads sold for the Venetian Crier developed sales corps. 

September 16, 1966 

The Venetian Crier, the student newspaper tries its best to inform the students at the junior college and the staff 

just what's going to happen, when it's going to happen and where it's going to happen. The Crier's office was in 

the Student Center ("the Pit") for students who wished to join the staff. 

September 23, 1966 

Criticism by John Lotz, Chairman Division of Business Administration that the Crier quoted incorrect figures 
and percentages for his Division. 

Editor Julie Poole sees our campus as the "growing up ground" for junior college students was not aware of 
their relationships with and their responsibilities to their associates. JCBC was a waiting room for another time 
and place. 

October 7, 1966 

Editor David Fitzgerald's criticism of the sex education and passing of letters being conducted in Student 
Center "Pit". 

October 14, 1966 

Editor David Fitzgerald was thrown in the campus lake for last week's on-site editorials not articles. 

School pride was created by a special atmosphere with social the events that sometimes omitted scholastic 
work. 

January 20, 1967 

Crier inquirer found answers to anyone's question as a student service. 

Editor Julie Poole suggested bringing back bundling, reviving a warm custom of friendship. 



January 27, 1967 

Circle K knocked SGA in Crier for being the "paragon of apathy" while the Crier criticized the dance after 

basketball game for having only 6 people. 

February 4, 1967 

"Why can't students approve activities?" Walter Turner, Sophomore, advocated student voting on all activities. 
Also 4,465 students with on 1,800 parking spaces caused a concern. 

March 23, 1967 

Editorial comment that JCBC's Ken Perkins, leader of the Advocates, bore a resemblance to Tammy Hall's 
Boss Tweed for his concept of a commission to replace current SGA. 

Community College Mentor Dr. James L. Wattenburger admonished the Venetian Crier for referring to the 
students that the Board of Regents regulated the Florida community colleges. 

March 31, 1967 

Criticism of "Better SGA Presidential Election Campaign" was all but completed. 

Senator Gary D. LeAndre considered Crier "Yellow Journalism" because of recent unwarranted SGA criticism 
for Ron Fraser editorial policy with personal war against SGA. 

March 31, 1967 

Christian candidates, communists, and cannibals were growing SGA melee according to Butch Clifford. 

April 1, 1967 

Crier Liar satire issue with highlights GAS approved loveseats for "PiT", KKK moved to WINO, LaGong brought 
suit against Square K, "Plain Cute" nude shot raised campus fervor, Win your fortune by trying "Pit" Slot 
machines, Sub Races saw action", Intramural Mermaid Hunt Set, and Underwater Polo added to PHR 
Aquatics. 



April 14, 1967 

R.A. Fraser editorial about tension between JCBC Administration and Faculty over classroom work load that 

the instructors were definitely against caused students' concern over accreditation. 



April 21, 1967 

Rally not chaotic as Fraser editorial called for wait and see by School Board. "Cease censorship" said Dr. 
Harold Hayes, sponsor of publications because of previous week's editorial being too inflammatory and 
censored, so paper's advisor who preached "freedom of press" in Building C to censor editorial not only 
incongruous, but also hypocrisy. 

Gerry McNamus's letter on blood purge that had to stop because it sent fears and innuendos with finals only 
one week away. 

Richard Silvano's letter said now we were untied so what is next? Because of lack the of communication 
between administration and faculty called for united student support of SGA. 

April, 1968 

The Guardian had offered an interesting paradox with conservative layout while the liberal editorials in the 
Paladin developed a semi sensational papers that replaced the Venetian Crier. 

May 8, 1970 

Ex-editor David Fitzgerald was now in Walter Reed Hospital for battle wounds as a Green Beret in Vietnam. 

September 22, 1972 

Criticism that Administration move may injure student rapport seemed as a possible "worry tower" that will not 
continue relationship of responsibility and concern, but instead of indifference and detachment. 






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February 16, 1973 

Editor Frank Rinella hoped new SGA VP Bill Medlin can turn SGA into a bunch of nice guys instead of a bunch 

of arrogant snobs. 

March 2, 1973 

Editor Frank Rinella presented funding flaws that discredited the new SGA funded (from entertainment funds") 

Health Clinic. Editorial called for return to entertainment and clear analysis of Health Clinic funding. 



March 30, 1973 

Editorial urged students to cut back on ice in cokes and carry own trays to improve tray conveyor quality and 
reduce cost. 

April 23, 1973 

Phoenix took first place in Columbia Competition. 

I October 19, 1973 

A new registration was best for all concerned according to Phoenix Editor Mark Sherman. 

November, 1973 

North Campus had voice with first copy of the North Campus newspaper Polaris to inform and create interest in 
campus activities as well as training ground for North Campus journalism. 

November 16, 1973 

"Polaris" became North Campus Paper. 

November 26, 1973 

Student Publications acquired new building. 

November 30, 1973 
| "Poseidon" magazine, North Campus publication, was meant for students expression. 



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February 9, 1974 

News Editor Sal Recchi described Papanek's "Design for Real World" as stimulate for creativity and useful 
ideas. He posed question that the total revenues of General Motors, Standard Oil of New Jersey and Ford 
Motor Company exceeded that of all the American States. 

March 15, 1974 

Front page photo and article on Streakers hit home with double exposure about a morning streak by two 
streakers who got Phoenix coverage. They stated this was to promote morale and show people that someone 
had pride in BCC. 

November, 1974 

Campus publications won state awards with Phoenix getting 7 awards. 

February 4, 1975 

Polaris offered a 35% commission on front page for anybody interested in selling ads. 

September 12, 1975 

Florida's universities and community colleges faced possible cuts in federal funds if attempts aren't made 
quickly to correct any noncompliance's within Florida's desegregation plan. BCC was represented by Assistant 
to the President Dr. Willis Holcombe who stated that all 27 would be affected adversely if only a few colleges 
did not try to comply with the Office of Civil Rights (OCR). 

October 1, 1975 

Newspaper asked what kind of life did you lead with Janice Williams advocating God's work. 

October 30, 1975 

Journalism students covered convention in Miami. 

November 5, 1975 

The Polaris continued its religious series as well as poetry's such as Sue's Views. 



October 25, 1976 

Publications won nine awards between North Campus Polaris and Poseidon. 

October 25, 1978 

BCC North Publications snared nine awards. 

December 5, 1978 

Poseidon and Strobe merged to form Post Script (PS). 

March 14, 1980 

First Amendment protected press with exceptions. 

October 10, 1980 

Paper's future was still in doubt; new bids key to next issue according to Max Hall, head of Central's Journalism 
Department. 

October 18, 1982 
\ Polaris excelled in press awards in photography, typography and layout. 

November 8, 1984 

Paper prevailed due to perseverance after eleven years of publishing due to first advisor Robert Meeker and 
current advisor Jerry Elam. 

March 27, 1986 

Consolidation of newspapers was recommended by Jerry Elam, Polaris advisor, to Dr. George Young, Vice 
President for Student Development because of "insufficient funding" and consolidating paper would increase 
revenue and reduce Journalism enrollment on all campuses. 

October 3, 1986 

Collegewide paper dubbed "Observer" was more professional looking with a more professional hands on 
experience for the participating students. 






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October 17, 1986 

BCC papers, magazines earned state awards receiving eleven citations at the state conference while BCC 

Literary Magazine won four awards. 

March 27, 1987 

The Observer was awarded its first All American rating. A 

April 10, 1987 

Broward Community College's The Observer recognized their Movie and Television favorites led by Bill Cosby 

and Bruce Willis. 

September 28, 1987 

"Observer" was again named All American for second year. 

October 26, 1987 

Tampa State Convention netted the Observer 12 trophies. 

January 20, 1988 

Consolidation was finally complete. 

April 20, 1988 

The Observer survey showed students wanted music and fewer "personalities". 

October 24, 1988 

State Convention reaped 19 awards from students on BCC publications. 

November 7, 1988 

"Observer" awarded Pacemaker for excellence in newspaper journalism. 

January 30, 1989 

Club News page allowed student organizations on all campuses to report on their activities along with Student 
Life Calendar, Display Ads on Party Weekend that featured two collegewide dance parties and a photo of SGA 
| Central cookout. 



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April 3, 1989 

Dr. Gary Ray of North's Reading Department saw Observer article short on facts and logic concerning BCC's 

support or lack of it for Athletics. 

October 10, 1989 

BCC hosted journalism convention with the 30 th annual Florida Community College j Press Association 
Convention for first time at BCC. 



March 7, 1994 

100 th anniversary Special celebrated 8 years of hard work with talents and creativity to produce award-winning 
issues. 



March 7, 1994 

Jerry Elam, the Observer Advisor, related the History of the Observer that had rested on students participation 
where there was more students on the staff in 1986 than all 3 campuses combined now. 

October 17, 1994 

Publications went to state 35 th annual Florida Community College Press Association Convention that served an 
instrumental part in producing successful and responsible journalism. 

April 24, 1995 

Recent columns in the Observer presented points of view not usually found in conventional newspapers, 
because knowledge was essential to life itself. 

The Observer Timothy Shirley's comments concerning "White History Month" caused numerous letters 
challenging his thought and comments. 

September 11, 1995 

The Observer began a column that developed into environmental issues that started with the Sea Shepherd 
Conservation Society devoted to the protection of endangered marine wildlife which faced bankruptcy. 



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October 23, 1995 

Million Black Man March redefined Pan African American male image planned on Capital Hill. 

Financial aid cuts and tuition increase proposed by Congress. 

April 8, 1996 

Observer editorial supported Drug testing good for BCC athletic teams. Observer questioned benefits of 
downsizing Music Department with consolidation between compromises. 

April 22, 1996 

The Observer celebrated its 10 th anniversary after 10 th years of publication including All American honors, 
National Pacemaker awards, and solid reputation. 



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Student 



opinions 



STUDENT OPINIONS 

Student comments about concerns, issues, policies and procedures. 

The Junior College of Broward County in 1960 at the Naval Air Barracks in the area adjacent to 
the Ft. Lauderdale International Airport was the scene of a most harmonious group of 732 
students. Not from the same background, same high school, or with the same futures, but the 
student were a most unusual group when it came to their issues and concerns. They knew not 
what college was about or suppose to be and they intended to find out some of what their older 
brothers and sisters told them about Gainesville or Coral Gables. Some could only think about 
their high school days as traditional students they thought that college should be just like high 
school. Some were returning Veterans from World War II and saw only careers with the 
opportunities to develop a profession at a university as their mark in life. The first two years the 
Student Body had some disgruntle students in some of the clubs, but the majority ruled and for 
most part all of the clubs and organizations functioned with a normal approach to the concerns 
and issues, and to the policies and procedures. They let the administration or the faculty take 
care of the situations, except for the Venetian Crier. From the onset, the Venetian Crier's 
editorials led the students charge as to what were the issues and concerns, policies and 
procedures the students should have some opinions about. The initial editorials dealt with, no air 
condition, that the actual buildings, the lack of parking spaces, and the need for changes. It was 
natural, the Navy Air barracks were constructed of wood frame buildings that lacked a lot of the 
amenities. They did not provide the students with all the creature comforts that the 1960's were 
bringing the world from air conditioning, to enough parking spaces, for not enough places to sit 
and talk to friends, to the playing surface of the Intramural field that was really not fields, just 
someplace where they could have their flag football or volleyball or Softball. 

1963 saw the Student Government Association start debating some of these issues. SGA had 
standing committees that dealt with issues such as where the prom would be, what would be the 
size and shape of the freshman senate, and should it be the same as the sophomore senate. The 
overall opinion of the SGA showed maturity, faculty guidance, and showed itself as a laboratory 

1 



experiment of political science looking at how the state and national government was run and 
trying to duplicate what they achieved. 

The honeymoon was over, as the Student Government began the first complaints against the 
administration over different policies that dealt with everything from the way students would have 
to register for classes with these computerized program cards to how and where functions would 
be held and the number of chaperones required for off campus student activities events. Student 
Government felt that in 1963, when we were moving to a new campus so a new philosophy 
should be adopted. A collegiate image as everybody was in a college parallel program and 
nobody was going to stay behind in Broward County because they were all going to go to Coral 
Gables or Gainesville. The students in the freshman senate and the sophomore senate made up 
one body and issues with concerns that started to develop that were much smaller in nature, but 
didn't deal with policies or procedures. In fact SGA dealt with things like vending machines for 
food, prices, "you mean we have to buy our textbooks now", "the potholes when they are filled 
with water they destroy the front end of my car", or "why are the ducks all over the place"? "Why 
can't we have a student center where we have enough room to have a band or a concert", "why 
do we have to be stuck with Mr. Crispo's ideas, or why can't we develop some of our own"? 

In 1963-1965 border lines were drawn over concerns, administration policies dropped ideas into 
the student government, the Venetian Crier and several of the more active service organizations 
on campus as well a few of the faculty were stirring up their quasi academic clubs to make issues 
about the money and how it was being spent. That was one and a half percent of the general 
operating budget that was suppose to be allocated for extracurricular events, where was it going? 
Why was there just the Lyceum program? Why wasn't there a cultural affairs program? Why 
wasn't their an art Lyceum? Why wasn't there money for clubs and organizations to have 
individual budgets so they could have functioning accounts for their advisors to dictate and carry 
some of the clubs operations? The faculty found themselves in a very precarious situation from 
1963-1965, every time they challenged one of the student issues they found themselves being 
lambasted for getting into something that was not a student concern, but was a faculty concern 
and thereby take it somewhere else. 



The hottest issues came up in 1964-65, the first big one had to do with social societies. The 
college already had a group of illegal fraternities and sororities that were more or less modeled 
after those that their big brothers and big sisters attended in Coral Gables or in Gainesville. Now 
the situation became more critical, the administration decided to announce that there was a 
Florida law that prohibited secret social societies from operating on the campus of, any public 
school, and as the Junior College of Broward County was part of the public system of Broward 
County. This issue meant no fraternities or sororities, no organization that did not submit their 
membership roles for verification of membership as a student and the checking of the GPA, 
minimum of 2.0 to belong to any student organization or to participate in any extracurricular 
activities. 

The procedures of the student's concerns found many discussions on the floor of both the 
freshman and sophomore senate about, "why do we have to have a GPA of 2.0 the first 
semester, aren't we in transition from high school, shouldn't we be given the benefit of the 
doubt"? The Freshman Senate Chair Larry Ellis raised this issue to bring back the fact that a lot of 
freshmen entering JCBC did so because their grades were not sufficient to enter the University of 
Florida or the University of Miami. Therefore they were at JCBC for the first two years to pick up 
their GPA so why should they be penalized the first semester. Student Government President Bill 
Greene found himself in a very unenviable position, secretly he had been president of Sigma Tau 
Sigma, the largest at that time of the social societies where all the students having come from 
one high school. They were without a doubt unified enough to form a Greek ticket and actually 
get Bill Greene and a slate of Greeks selected to office and put into the Student Government 
Executive branch. This caused a whole wave of dissention across the campus, Dr. Jack Taylor 
had publicly on the front page of the Venetian Crier stated there would be no fraternities and 
sororities on campus, no jersey days, no social societies will have any type of parties on or off 
campus. There will be no funding of any of their activities, be they rush functions or founders 
dances. So if they were to participate and if they were caught they would be suspended from the 
college. This very harsh statement on the front page of the Venetian Crier led a lot of the students 
who were non-Greeks to leave their service clubs, their quasi academic clubs and either start a 



new fraternity or sorority or join one of the existing ones. All of a sudden instead of five 
fraternities and sororities there were nine with a number that would continue to expand until 1973 
when there would be nineteen different Greek social society organizations. The debate over the 
legality went on, so Dr. Taylor consulted the School Board the School Board that rendered a 
decision of no secret societies. Dr. Taylor consulted the Commissioner of Education whose letter 
that was returned said no social society, well it was a hot issue. ,, 

Amazingly enough, the editor of the Venetian Crier and the President of the Student Government 
shared their own cottage and lived together. The issue was constantly debated between the two. 
It would jump from the agenda of the student government meetings to the editorial page of the 
Venetian Crier. Students started to debate it in the Student Center, or in various clubs and 
organizations asking the faculty "what's bad about this?" What's wrong with us having a social 
life? Why do we have to do everything that's service?" The faculty trying to maintain a very 
straight hard line said "It's really just fun and games and you're here to learn and get an 
education and service is the best way to learn about helping others and therefore help your 
education". Students weren't buying it, the debate didn't go away. 

In 1966, the social societies were given legal status. Mr. Crispo and Dr. Taylor surrendered their 
policy on social societies as long as 1) the social society turned over their membership roles so 
Mr. Crispo could ascertain they were students and check their GPA that turned out to be a 
controversial issue, and 2) that they all have BCC faculty or staff at their on and off campus 
parties to watch exactly what they do. That was refused, about the privacy and in "loco parentis" 
being dead and what are you talking about we're adults now, aren't you going to treat us like 
adults? 

The debate raged and then died out and something new was needed. In 1966 the next big issue 
came, the cost of textbooks. The concern of course was from the students, they were on college 
tracks so they knew they had to have the textbooks, but they found out from Dr. Schindeler and 
Dr. Ryan. The textbooks were being way overcharged as auxiliary service had to compensate for 
both the storage space, the actual shelf space, the sales personnel, the accounting and all of the 

4 



items on sale, from the supplies to souvenirs and T-shirts. That didn't sell for all that cost had to 
be covered by the textbooks. Front page of the Venetian Crier debated that these professors 
were leading a student demonstration which was not true, they simply discussed the matters in 
their classrooms. Unfortunately, the administration thought they were attempting to lead a strike, 
a student boycott, or even a picket of the auxiliary services about the purchasing of new 
textbooks. There was two basic problems: 1) faculty chose to change textbooks, on a very 
irregular basis and the companies would not buy back textbooks that were unsold so the 
bookstore went into a high profit margin to cover those textbooks that were leftover and 2) most 
discouraging to the students with no other sources of for the textbooks and especially the 
buyback policy of the used textbooks. The College bookstore or the auxiliary services as it was 
called developed a buy back policy that irritated the students, less than 40% was paid for 
textbooks that were returned after one semester's use. Some students barely opened the 
textbook and found that they had lost almost 50% where someone had highlighted or really used 
the textbook that student would only get 20% of what they paid. Students were irate over the buy 
back policy so they took the matter to the Student Government. This was the first of five different 
times that the Student Government would spearhead a program to establish a book exchange, 
contact the publishers to see about the buy back policy or discuss with the professors, asking if 
they couldn't keep the textbooks for two or three years so the students would have a chance to 
get a fair price for them. 

The physical layout of the campus was spread out. There were four functioning buildings, and the 
gym on the way. The students had to walk quite while between the student center, the library, the 
classroom building and the administrative building. Those four buildings had no landscaping 
between them and worst then that, they had two giant sand pits, when the wind blew, the 
students had a most difficult time. If you did not have glasses over your eyes the sand really 
made tears, especially if you had contact lens. The sand had another bad stigma to it, it was 
covering the tar mack of some World War II runways, so when it rained, even though it was sand, 
there was no drainage. Puddles, deep puddles, knee deep puddles, extremely deep puddles, 
would last for up to three days at a time. Making the campus look like it had two or three giant 
lakes. One in the middle of the campus, one on the west side parking lot, and one on the east 



side parking lot. People trying to get to and from their cars found themselves in difficulty. The pot 
holes filled with water presented a real driving hazard. The students complained, the 
Administration said that they had no funds to landscape. Different fund raising efforts were 
undertaken by the students to raise money for grass or for bushes. Finally, the Administration 
landscaped one side of building one, the Administrative building, put up a flag pole and the 
campus beautification was started. It would take years, the students would constantly /emark and 
make it one of their big concerns. 

Registration never had so many that stood so long, for so little. Once the new gym was born, it 
was selected as the site. Even though it didn't have air-conditioning, it was listed as the site 
where students would line up for an eight to sixteen hour marathon of searching out the 
professors they needed to get a class card from. These were IBM computer cards. Once you 
obtain the four or five, you ran as fast as you could to the registration computers in building one 
on the opposite side of the campus. If you were lucky, not all of those classes were already full, 
but nine times out often your four or five cards were not always accepted. If they were rejected, 
you would have to take the card back to the gym and try to find a professor, for a section open 
that you could get into. People didn't really think about the time schedule. So some of the classes 
had a two or three hours gap between them. Students would learn that trick very quickly, and try 
to make convent schedules, either three days of the week, two days of the week, or just in the 
morning. The problem was, that when they said registration was closed, it closed. You'll have to 
come back the second day and stand in the same lines again so tempers really flared. 

Registration had a drop and add period that followed registration. This allowed students who 
didn't like the class, didn't like the professor, didn't like that part of the curriculum to change to 
another area. The Administration would change that policy in the next decade so that drop and 
add would be done before registration started. That made very little sense to students. In fact, 
the policy of drop and add ceased to exist. 

With registration, came the word orientation. It was mandatory that every student attend the 
orientation. Five different colored cards were given out, so students would go to five different 



locations where their orientation was held. If there major was in a certain area they were inside 
the Lecture Theatre of Building 6. If they were in a small area they were inside the large 
classrooms upstairs and downstairs in Building 5. If they were in specialized areas they were put 
into the smaller classrooms inside Building 5. If they were in a general or liberal arts type area, 
they were put into the largest room inside the Library. And if they were undecided, they were put 
in the gym and told to think about their future. Counselors and Advisors did not take part in most 
of the planning. The Administrators set this up to move the most people through the most areas. 
They covered subjects like you have to have a parking decal, a student id, yes, pay your fees, or 
your test scores from high school count. At this time, BCC would see the need to establish a 
policy to set up their own placement test. Well, actually the SAT and ACT scores were very good 
of the JCBC students. It would be the next group when the college switched to be JC and the 
students were taking vocational ed, started to enter the curriculum, that we will see a major need 
for our own placement test, because quite frankly the scores of the students dropped drastically. 
As they realized that were not in a college parallel environment . They went after whatever they 
needed for an AS degree or even less than that with an eight month certificate program, or less 
than that, a three month training program that would help them in a certain technical or vocational 
area. 

The orientation did involve a few students as the cheerleaders always showed up. Student 
Government always brought some type of entertainer, whether it was a person who did magic 
tricks, a guitar player, or even maybe a trio that did imitations of the Kingston trio. The students 
hated one part of this orientation. It was called RAT week. The introduction to all incoming 
freshman's that they were considered rats, and they would have to wear beanies or red caps. 
There would be a special element being tested for the first couple of weeks, until a rat court could 
be held with the rat prom, crowning the king of rat week or the queen of rat week, but all the 
freshman thought this is hazing. This is how college is everyone seems to have the same idea 
about rat week it was a good form of orientation, and it indoctrinate every freshman whether they 
liked it or not they learn the words to the alma mater. Whether they liked it or not they had to 
recite different poems given to them. Whether they liked it or not they were embarrassed in the 
student union standing on tables and told to recite the different types of food in a certain vendor 



machine, or why JCBC had no other buildings. Some of the issues and concerns came out during 
this rat week. It became an issue itself, was it hazing? Well, it would be eliminated after another 
year. For the students felt it was embarrassing. 

1967-68 saw the students bring up concerns about, the quality of their education. They looked at 
the Administrations changing of Presidents with Three Presidents in two years. Is trjis going to 
affect our accreditation, are we going to be accepted into the University of Florida, or the 
University of Miami? Are we going to have the same quality of education, as we have had before? 
There was no plain answers. As the college was in a period of transition. The college was taking 
in different students, with technical/vocational backgrounds who would not be going on to college 
parallel work. They would in fact to forester the terminal type of degrees where they would be 
going into a certain vocation or technical area. They would be remaining in the Broward County 
area. The college changed its mission statement, the students questioned that. Well for the 
students staying, this was perfect. It was better then the high schools or vocational/tech schools. 
It was a notch ahead of some of the training programs set up by the various businesses. BJC was 
received, and did produced jobs. 

With only two counselors, and no academic advisors, the Student Affairs Department was not 
exactly a large area. Dr. Jack Taylor, Dean of Students, formerly Dean of Men had taken over 
both capacities now that the Woman's Dean Nan Hutchinson had left so Dr. Taylor who was now 
also the interim president. It wore on Dr. Taylor saw a need to expand Student Affairs with two 
more counseling staff. The new counseling staff did not do academic advisement, the faculty was 
doing that in the sixties. The new counseling staff was supposed to take care of helping the 
students articulate into another institution for professions or help them into different careers, but 
we didn't have a career center. The counselors had to take care of personal issues, there weren't 
that many then in the sixties. They taught things from hygiene to budget management. The 
counselors even taught some classes on student success. The counselor had a different role in 
the sixties, they chaperone a lot of the dances, judged some of the contests, and were the friends 
of the students. Students liked that, that procedure to them was highly recognizable. It would be 



8 



neat to be able to talk to a counselor sitting inside the student union, no matter how crowded it 
was. It gave them the opportunity to see faculty and counselors in a different light. 

In 1968, BJC added two new buildings and the construction made the campus change. Student 
Services Building 7 and the Fine Arts Building 6 were added along with a Computer Building 2. 
The college was growing, they had too. Now, they were split between college parallel and 
technical/vocational. The difference now was the student body was growing with the 3400 
students that started in 1963 was almost 10,000 students in 1968. Night classes had taken on a 
new image. The college had to establish a policy for a Dean of the Night School to develop a 
different curriculum. The efforts were acceptable, but not outstanding. Up until this time, the 
students dropped in dropped out. They took one class for gratification or one class for self 
improvement and went on their way to see what they can do. Now, students want to take classes 
at night time. The enrollment of the night classes jumped up by more than 50%. It was not the 
overwhelming 53% of the total population in the 80's and 90's. It was a significant increase, a 
most significant. New teachers had to be found. Only they were not going to full-time. The policy 
of the college in the late 1960's was to go for the part-time adjunct. What a beautiful idea, we can 
pay them less, there is no benefits and all we have to do is go pick up a high school teacher. 
Some of the students liked that because they had known the teachers in high school. Some of the 
students said, "What are we getting, a high school teacher that cannot teach in high school 
anymore?". Is this going to effect our education? That policy was also challenged. From the 
Venetian Crier to the student government, students started to voice concerns about who was 
going to be their teacher. 

Dr. Hugh Adams' arrival with Dr. Clinton Hamilton changed the college policies with a thorough 
search that was made through all the policy manuals, the procedure manuals and guidelines 
manuals. For the first time it was done to meet the Southern Association's Accreditation Plan 
especially section 7 dealing with Student Affairs. All of the policies, procedures and guidelines 
were revamped. This caused the departures of several key personnel from Dr. Kidd of Dean of 
the Night School to Mr. Crispo as Director of Student Activities. The departure of Dr. Jack Taylor 
as Dean of Students with several key department chairmen from communications to Social 



Sciences changed the face of the college drastically changed fori 969. The biggest change was 
Dr. George Young taking over Student Affairs with an entire new operation installed. With Mr. Bill 
Vaught from University of Miami taking over Student Activities, and "local parentis" dend we no 
longer assumed any control over the students off the campus. The fact that they lived at home 
didn't stop JCBC now Broward Junior College from always looking after its students. 

A 

Faculty members found themselves very confused about their roles as advisors. There had been 
34 key Faculty advisors, more than half would resign during that change over. As they saw less 
guarantees of protection for these new policies and procedures angered the students. They found 
themselves without advisors and they were told well we are still going to recognize student 
organizations, but the key is that they must have six students and you the students must get a 
faculty or staff person to be your advisor, write an constitution , register with the Student Activities 
Office, be recognized through student government and the vice president which was actually the 
Dean of Student's Office. Bureaucracy comes to BJC with the Florida laws passed by the state 
legislature that really changed for BJC in 1969. 

BJC became disassociated with the school board that raised all kind of concerns from who will 
handle the plumbing, to where are we going to get the textbooks to fill the library. A new source of 
funding, the State of Florida, would at first provide 70% of the funding, the rest would come from 
local sources or the federal government or the students' pockets. It looked neat at first, but this 
policy change did result in a great deal of student anguish. As there will be a continuous raise in 
student fees for though the student activities fees as all the extra curricular activities were 
considered part of the operational budget of the college. It took no students money, but it brought 
for the first time state auditors in to look at every aspect of state funding, four times a year. This 
accountability created a lot of anxious people for the 1970's. 

A lot of veterans were coming back from Vietnam their training were guaranteed and funded by 
the U.S. Government. The formed their own organization on campus. They got their own 
advisors, set up their own curriculums, and looked for exceptions. They made a lot of interesting 
contributions with a new sense of maturity. This group of the student body required new policies 

10 



and procedures as well as raised several issues for they demanded their rights. They wanted to 
see where the money was, What activities were geared toward them as they would not want to be 
like the high school kids. 

The 1970's, the administration considered building a second campus. It was proposed at first for 
the Pompano Beach area off Atlantic Blvd and 95 on Hammondville Road. A larger site was 
needed so they looked west of the turnpike and found a location that was idea. The first building 
was certainly a work of art even though it had no functional use toward the students as there was 
no privacy inside the building for the use of part time partitions up to 6 feet. Students trying to 
confer with Faculty members were disturbed by classes in session on the other side of that 
building. The pool table that someone brought from the other campus and put next to the 
doorway where the students gathered. The birth of North campus made the administration 
develop another policy. Was it right to have the administration located on one campus and 
governing another campus? Or should the administration be located at a central location? The 
centralization of Broward Junior College utilized a bank building built in 1952. A six story building 
on East Las Olas Blvd. At first rented, but later the Building would be purchased to become the 
Executive Offices and Supplementary Support Services of Broward Junior College. The fury of 
some of the faculty was unbelievable, where did they get this money, why shouldn't we have this 
in our paychecks, what do they think they are doing, setting up their own Camelot? 

The college grew in the early 70's. The North campus and the downtown center started to 
become a reality with state funding for buildings. The state had established a policy where they 
had one fund for buildings, one fund for programs, and one fund for personnel. They all couldn't 
be used for the same thing. This confused the Faculty and the American Association of the 
Universities Professors that had been the only collective body of faculty on the campus started to 
raise issues about are they doing things correct? 

The student President picked up on it and now we had a new newspaper and a new advisor. Dr 
Harris had left, Maxwell had come and the Phoenix was bom. The Phoenix was very liberal in its 
views and soon a second newspaper the Guardian was put out on campus. The two newspaper 

11 



would alternate, one was liberal, one was conservative . Talk about raising some issues and 
concerns. The student government meanwhile went completely bonkers, it now had gone to a 
large representative body. It had 23 people on the Executive Board of the one campus student 
government and a 120 Senators and Representative elected at large from the student body. It 
had a three man supreme court that handled everything from parking tickets to believe it or not 
cheating and plagiarism reports turned in by the faculty. SGA had a Director of Internal Affairs to 
investigate things done on and off campus. From the gas masks purchased and put inside the 
physical plant building to what was going on with trigonometry, how come they are only going to 
have one session next year? Some of the limitations of the student government violated the 
academic freedom of the faculty as well as they went a little far with the administration, but the 
students made comments about the issues and concerns. The students raised doubts about multi 
campus policies. They certainly challenged the procedures of each campus as the growth of the 
college shot upwards in the early 1970's. 

The Student Affairs developed a far more comprehensive program that involved everything from 
placement to actual academic advisement but not by the faculty. The faculty of the 70's was hired 
as an academic advisor and part time employee of Student Affairs this Professor advised two or 
three days a week for students which classes they should take, which curriculum they should be 
planning, the colleges they should think about transferring to, but it was obvious that the faculty 
was being phased out of Student Affairs. Money, of course, would be one of the major issues 
hiring students to be clerical help and hiring faculty to be paraprofessional academic advisors. 

Student Affairs took on an entirely new aspect of student services. Counseling was still held, and 
for the first time people talked about student activities and why it wasn't more educational, why 
didn't it have a lecture series, or why didn't it have laboratory programs to go with the different 
academic areas? There was a large battle, but Student Affairs and Student Activities survived. 
The Faculty left disgruntled at about what happen to the Art Lyceum, where is the cultural affairs, 
what happen to the money that we were supposed to get for our student parties, or why we could 
have people in our classes do this or that. The issues and comments of the students were very 
quick, the response was, well it is our programs, isn't it our money, we pay tuition now, why can't 

12 



we decide? The students thought they knew what is best for them, they are adults. The traditional 
high school students were not being treated as adults. By 1973, the high school was sending the 
bulk of the students to BJC. Night classes were still very large and the enrollment was increasing 
for the adult learners, who were coming back to get a college degree. 

Student affairs took care of this, there was a lot of complaints though, how come thejibrary isn't 
open every night of the week? Why isn't there a counselor on duty at night time to talk to us, like 
in the daytime? You know the bookstore is only open the first week of classes, how can we buy 
supplies, or where are we suppose to eat on campus, the new cafeteria is closed and locked up 
at night time? The students' issues and comments ranged from everything about God this place 
is just tinker toy tech or it is the thirteenth year of high school. It's not really a college. 

The fact that this Professor really liked was the size of the classes. The faculty really took an 
interest in us. Look at the ratio and the recommendations by the faculty members, of course, the 
faculty was relieved of some of their extra duties. They no longer had to take part in registration, 
they no longer had to take part in academic advisement, they no longer took part in orientation. 
One of the big students gripes was are we here for the faculty or is the faculty here for us? There 
was a major issue brought up and the students said, the only reason there is a college here is 
because we are here! It became one of those issues that would continue throughout the 80's and 
the 90's. Often the faculty, later the faculty union would be challenged, did they understand that? 

The administration and the SGA luncheons would provide in the 80's and 90's would always have 
things directed at the Administration. Isn't this supposed to be for us? Well, that was the new 
issues and concerns that attacked policies and procedures. In the mid 70's, the development of 
the second campus and the establishment of the Fort Lauderdale center brought a lot of 
interesting policy changes. 

We were now a multi campus operation. As a multi campus operation, the students challenged 
where the money was going. Now, there was two newspapers, The Phoenix on Central campus 
that survived the battle with the Guardian that disappeared along with the student government 

13 



own paper which was their idea of a newspaper. On North campus, the Polaris had arisen and 
offered competition in the news media productions. The editorial sheets reflected almost the 
same questions, price of textbooks, the number of sections offered for a course, a shortage of 
parking places, how come we don't get the Jewish holidays off, or what's the matter with these 
people why aren't they sensitive? These people at the counters at registration and bursar treat us 
like we're just numbers. These issues and concerns was starting to create the need, for a new 
area of the college, a new training area. Human resources management would take over 
personnel and they would divide into several areas from staff and program development to 
sensitivity training. They started to look upon the support staff from the secretaries to the 
registration clerks as the people who would first meet the students. No more was the Faculty be 
able to have a certain attitude and nature it was the mid 70's and BJC was getting ready to 
change again. 

For BJC needed in the 1970's was two campuses with two separate sets of sports teams, two 
completely different newspapers, several student organizations that would vie for competitive 
trophies in intramural, two student governments, two different levels of development and two sets 
of faculty. Faculty that had left Central campus to go to North campus had all kinds of opposing 
views of what the policies and procedures had been. The students grew up on these two sets of 
ideologies. 

Athletic competition was neat. The Trotters of North campus Vs The Seahorses of Central 
campus. You would think the student body would have come out to watch them, but they didn't. 
The competition whether it was women's tennis or men's basketball drew very little support. That 
was a problem created by the multi campus concept. The spirit and pride that had been with the 
programs on one campus was divided and conquered. 

Opposing views though were not. The newspapers and student governments started a bitter 
rivalry, then the athletics. They argue over key policies of the Fort Lauderdale center and what 
the President and Vice President were trying to do. From a new Student Affairs initiative to 
development of retention rings, life rings using different student organizations. Through the idea 

14 



of the student governing board to bring the two campuses together with a common goal of 
throwing a giant art festival. The diversity of the issues are amazing, some of the pettiness of the 
arguments were even more amazing. 

The mid 1970's and the late 1970's saw the student organizations intensify a rivalry that was the 
best. F-Troop a group from Central campus took on the Syndicate, a group from Noflh campus. 
F-Troop had always been kind of just following the Greeks and competing with them on Central, 
but now a organization in the late 70's and early 80's was directed directly at F-Troop so both 
sides went and got ringers. The competition was even better than collegiate athletics in some 
events. It sparked issues of about how a town meeting should be run, what a gripe session was 
about, and for the first time students brought up issues that would go to the administration on 
both the campus and collegiate level. 

There were no student luncheons yet, but they went to meet the administrators in their offices 
they took it to them. The policy about the bookstore, back to the bookstore again, it never 
changed. We objected to the fact that teachers are selling their desk copies and getting paid for it 
and then selling them back to the students. We objected to the buy back policy. We objected to 
the speed bumps on the different campuses, whose idea was that? You should see all the 
damages to the mufflers and tailpipes, we objected to the food, the quality of aria is pathetic! We 
objected to the number of higher math class being offered to the entire policy of college to go to 
technical vocational. That was always an issue in the end of the 70's that BCC was developing 
too many partnership with local businesses, firms, industries, well, we were! The corporate world 
had come to BCC and we had developed twelve partnerships, but that got students jobs and that 
made things right for some. The late 1970's saw the beginning of several student organizations 
that developed related directly to academic areas. Leading the way was Phi Theta Kappa now 
emerging as the largest organization on North campus and soon the largest on Central campus. 
This honorary group even though they were of the same name formed two opposing sets of views 
about what their purposes are for. If you go back and look at their advisors and faculty member 
that guided them. You can see where the views came from them. 



15 



Other academic organizations sprang up with a resurgence in the Distributive Educational Clubs 
of America that would become fantastic. There would be two campuses and the two groups were 
not the same. Also, Religious organizations led the way, but other religious organizations from the 
Newman Club to Campus Ministries became interesting. All cult like organizations they banded 
very close together, they wouldn't come out for any of the common things They objected to some 
of the student activities and would not attend. They instead asked for money to attend their own 
conferences and develop their own thing. The policy and procedures evolved around student 
travel which truly changed in the end of the 70's. Everyone, every level from administrative to 
students felt the interaction between BCC students and students from other community colleges 
and universities would bring new ideas and better growth for the campuses. Student Activities 
bought and encouraged it and increased the amount of money in the travel budgets and the 
amount of trips a group could take in one year. Its amazing how independent students didn't 
question the fact that these students were using up a big portion of the budget. For the Lyceum 
was gone, there were no more two or three big concerts a year instead there was a smorgasbord 
of Student Activities. From the teasers at noon 

Student concerns of the 1980's ranged from meism to a complete understanding of cultural 
diversity with sympathy for people who came from other places. The diversity of the Student 
Activities, the change in the actual minority status, the reflection of a new type of Student Affairs 
staff geared toward the International students from counseling to academic advisement with an 
actual international placement test to even the student success classes so that we were getting 
ready for a real change. The college also took on a new aspect of adult learners, as a lot of 
South Florida businesses started to experience some mild recession so people started coming 
back to BCC to develop a community connection. It was only appropriate that the name of the 
institution be changed again to Broward Commuter College, well not quite, it was Broward 
Community College, but it was a commuter based. 

The early 1980's the concept of a third campus to the South was deliberated and a large legal 
battle began with issue taken on with everyone from the FAA to the City of Pembroke Pines. 
Another campus was coming and with it a whole new set of issues would there be another 

16 



Student Government, would there be another different newspaper, would there be more athletic 
teams, where is the money coming from? The budget didn't increase, in fact the big thing about 
the college in the early eighties was a decline in enrollment that would actually lead to some 
financial exigency of letting thirteen full time people go by the mid 1980's. This decline would 
mean that the operating budget of the college was decreasing even though the number of 
organizations, the number of funded sources and now another new campus would haye to come 
out of the same exact amount. The part of getting funds so that policy of being and receiving 
everything from the general operation fund caused a major problem in policy. BCC had to slice 
the financial pie so thin that the students started to write letters, the editorial staffs of the papers 
bombarded the administration, the coaches saw it first, athletics would be the first area asked to 
consolidate. 

A policy of consolidation, why do we need a sport on each campus? A team on each campus for 
every sport now that we have a third campus coming we just can't afford so $18,000.00 would be 
saved with the consolidation, instead of having two teams in one sport the college would have 
one team in each sport. Which campus got them became a real power struggle and created some 
more division between the campus administrations as they tried to show that they were golf 
orientated or basketball orientated. The Provost on each campus started to take a leadership 
role in the mid eighties up to this time they followed the Vice Presidents leads and the Executive 
Vice Presidents' really ran the show because the President was usually in Tallahassee. The 
institution had developed a chain of commands and everybody seemed to report to Dr. Clinton 
Hamilton, he helped make decisions in everything from Student Activities Entertainment contracts 
to what types of curriculum would be added in what areas. 

The 1980's saw the emergence of a faculty union. The faculty had enough with the policies of the 
Ft. Lauderdale Center and the administration. They challenged everything from the amount of pay 
to the actual tenure process, they questioned things like "where is the sabbatical money coming 
from"?, "where is the supplementary money coming from"?, "what are you going to do continually 
hire adjuncts"?, or "why don't we start advertising for more full time faculty so we have better 
quality folks adding to the committee rather than detracting from it"? 

17 



The students read between the lines. They wrote letters of protest for there was no real student 
governments in effect in the early 1980's. There was a two year moratorium on them because of 
social misconduct and mismanagement of their fund so new student leaders came from the 
intellectual side, the Phi Theta Kappa students raised the questions first. The F-Troopers 
continued the fight over a certain key issues from "what's a CLAST test and why do we need it"? 
to "why can't we keep developing Intramurals"?, we have more people in Intramurals than they 
every thought of having at any intercollegiate athletic event. Everyone had their own pet project 
and that's when the conflict of interest started. The policy had always been to set up standing 
committees and these committees were supposed to be free of controversy. They were never 
free of controversy, but they were so supposed to be free of conflicts of interest. The people who 
were appointed now to the Student Activities Board, for example, were the advisors of the various 
cost centers, they were people who worked very hard to keep their area in tact so they lobbied on 
the board. They argued at the budget deliberations, and even went over peoples' heads and took 
matters directly to the President like Mildred Mulligan in drama wasn't satisfied so she took her 
claims right to the President that the SA view is not treating her fair. Well if one could do it they all 
could do it, so one by one different groups that are going to Dr. Young, the Vice President of 
Student Affairs, then called Student Development, became the "sugar daddy", "oh yea, we'll find 
the money somewhere" "take it out of this budget or that budget" he would tell the Director of 
Student Activities Dr. Tom Ryan". 

A change in administration in 1986 brought a change in a lot of the policies, the big thing was 
decentralization, putting campus based management ahead of centralized control. The provost, 
are the front line people so let them deal with the procedural problems, let the vice presidents just 
take care of policies, for the first time a division, clearly defined, marked the difference between 
the campus based and college based administrators. The issues and concerns continued to be 
some of the old ones, in the mid 1980's the bookstore campaign went on and on and on. So 
students in the revised three student governments actually took the matter to Tallahassee 
demanding something be done about the textbook policies, the buy back policies, the desk copy 
policies they even went further than Tallahassee and took it to a publishing convention in Texas, 
trying to do something to stabilize the changing of textbooks and the prices. Students saw the 

18 



prices of textbooks double in cost in the 1980's so at one point the price of a textbook easily 
surpassed the price of a credit hour, sometimes the book would cost the price of the entire 
course, it became a major issue in the late 1980's. Childcare came up again as there were more 
adult learners and returning students coming, not just for nighttime they would bring their kids to 
classes in the daytime, children in the classes were disruptive, students in classes with children 
were chaotic. The late 1980's saw policies change to try to revamp the concept of chjldcare, that 
was the fourth attempt. 

A big policy changed in the establishment of student activities fees. The legislature allowed the 
college administration to charge each student fifty cents a credit hour for a student activities fee 
and also a dollar a credit hour for student scholarship fees. All the students were being charged 
for activities they didn't attend and for scholarships that they did not enjoy, but as Federal and 
State withdrew more and more support to the institution so it was obvious who was going to pay, 
the students. 

Credibility, signs would be put up saying "This cookout is sponsored by your Student Activities 
Fees" the athletes would walk around with signs around their neck saying "my scholarship was 
paid for by your student scholarship fund". The 1980's, the late eighties saw students starting to 
challenge teachers in the classroom for the first time. The professorial type level didn't know 
everything, didn't present it right, didn't use the right book, or didn't evaluate tests properly. 

They didn't just challenge what you knew, they challenged how you carried it out and even your 
judgment. The PAL syndrome, kids were taught by their parents to challenge and the PAL in the 
eighties on how umpires called their Softball game. In the mid 1980's, they challenged their 
teachers in middle schools about what was being taught and at what level. By the late 1980's, it 
was obvious the college was being challenged by what the faculty was presenting, it wasn't a 
contract, it wasn't a guarantee, but each student felt he was entitled to get the best education so 
he would have the best chance at a job or a career. It was almost as if they wanted it in writing, 
you're next, what are you going to get from me, or why am I going to have this. The whole thing 



19 



started to evolve and suddenly in the late 1980's no area of the college went without student 
challenges. 

The 1990's saw a lot of administrative changes, a lot of new deans, the decade of the nineties 
was supposed to be the decade of challenges. It had already started in the classrooms, and now 
they started to challenge on the athletic fields, challenging coaches, or putting forth ^ultimatums 
about how they wanted things done. The cultural diversity brought in people who didn't quite 
understand because of language differences or cultural differences, what was expected of them. 
Orientation did not fulfill their needs, registration let people register that couldn't even speak 
English, and the ESL program by 1991 doubled and by 1992 doubled again. Students were under 
prepared and totally not ready for a college experience. The college preparatory class had been 
offered since the eighties, but in the nineties it became a point of reality for students were not 
ready for college. They couldn't read for comprehension, accomplish critical thinking, come up 
with an analysis of a situation, and lacked the power of expression. 

The college policies came from a statewide movement on Student Affairs trying to gear them for 
success. If anything the early 1990's pushed the students to be successful whether they liked it 
or not. It was not like the social progression of the public schools for it was a movement to make 
the students get basic education. They needed middle school math, give it to them, at the college 
level! They needed high school English at the college level! they couldn't read and pass the basic 
placement test. So BCC used a laboratory to give them the opportunity to learn and develop. The 
situation got quite out of hand by 1993-1994 students under the Title Three Initiative compelled to 
take student success courses. Courses that would tell them what college was all about, "wait a 
minute, didn't they tell them that in high school, didn't they care enough, where have their parents 
been, or, they didn't come from this country". By 1994, the college had a mission to make these 
students part of the mainstream, little did they know, soon they would be the majority. Warnings 
were given about increasing different types of reading classes to help them and of course ESL 
doubled again for the third time, so now, its own department connected to reading with its own 
direction that should have been that way in 1992, but the college policy was slow in reacting to 
what the high schools warned us about. Students started to complain about the people they were 

20 



sitting next to, a different type of discrimination not on ethnicity or race, but "this person was 
wearing funny kind of clothing, and they smelled, they were carrying a toothbrush and why do I 
have to be with them"? Now here's where college policy is really needed to sensitize this multi 
cultural student body to a multi cultural society, with multi cultural businesses, it's going to be a 
way of life this country has always had one based on immigration throughout every decade of 
every century. A 

In The 1990's students are starling to use the Student Government Luncheons as the main way 
to go after the college administrators for policy and the campus administrators for procedures. 
The only problem is budgets are so tight on the campuses that the campus based administrators 
don't have the leeway unless they get collegewide support and this is going to take meeting after 
meeting with negotiations so that everyone gets on the same page, but in 1990's if they are going 
to succeed they are going to have to settle a lot of students issues and concerns. They are going 
to have to find a common denominator, a pathway, a weaving through the cultural diversity, 
through the different campuses and through the community connection. They are more students 
now, that are taking less classes, the day of the 12 credit student is almost gone, the average 
student takes about 6 credit hours, this is going to create another new need to change policy and 
procedure to take care of the part-timer, the adult learner, the student who doesn't understand the 
language we're speaking. 

We are going to have to change the faculty that's not going to be well received and develop 
people who can deal on the registration lines with these different people. We need to develop 
more high tech to respond to this change. BCC is going to have to have high tech that builds and 
creates a quicker way to cut through each dimension so that the different parts of the student 
body are served. 

Should the students have a representative on the Community College Board for the State? 
Should the students have a voting representative on the District Board of Trustees of the 
individual colleges? Do the students have that kind of right to get up and have representation at 
that level? If you ask the students they will say "yes, we do, we are now paying far more than the 

21 



< 



students did in the sixties, we're paying a lot more than the student did in the eighties, our fees 
have increased every year and the future looks like they will continue to increase every year. 

BCC students need to have a right to help in establishing the policy that runs the state system 
and the individual college. We need to help set the amount of the money that's being taken in 
and therefore we should also have the rights to decide how it is spent". What came first, the 
student or the faculty member, the faculty unions now are saying the same thing, what is needed 
more, new facilities, new programs, better labs, assistance in textbooks, more scholarships and 
extracurricular activities. Let's face the issue in concern of the late 1990's, they are not going to 
be able to afford all of those different aspects. Some hard choices are going to be made for either 
they continue to raise the fees that the students have to pay so the students will have to bear the 
bunt as both the Federal and State government deems it a local issue. The students issues are, 
"why can't we rate the faculty?, why can't we weed out the bad ones?, what do you mean they 
have tenure?, we should have the best bang for the buck, we need to have some control and say 
over their evaluation. 

How far can the students go? Remember the autonomy of colleges in the beginning was to let 
the students and faculty run it totally, well we evolved to something new, we have state 
mandates, the Gordon Rule, the CLAST Test, over hundred blocks on prerequisites, the recent 
change in the amount of hours offered by community colleges, and the newest change in the 
basic curriculum, cutting down to 36 hours those required courses, making different curriculums 
actually fight over who should be teaching what in what area. That's going to become one of the 
hardest issues in the late 1990's. Should the community colleges teach it or should it be taught at 
the universities. The legislature thinks, of course, the universities because we will make more 
money, universities because we have more money invested in dorms and other support staff, the 
universities are starting to think about changing the articulation agreement that has been in effect 
for the last eighteen years, requiring more of the students. 

Will this close the open door? Will this indeed affect the students transfer and choice to get an 
education. The community college's future is one that is not so bright, we'll have some 

22 



opportunities, but the challenges of the nineties are going to create so many problems that we will 
become not as diverse, not with an open door, but with an attitude to check the credibility and 
accountability and productivity of each teacher to see if we get their monies worth out of them, or 
will they help to make the students succeed. The students are starting to feel and the attrition rate 
shows in certain parts in the curriculum a sharp decrease in what was some of the strongest 
curriculums. Now is the time to be proactive and set up some new policies,, some new 
procedures, but if we are getting them from other areas such as the State of Florida. We all have 
to stay on the same page, won't we all have to have the same programs, don't we have to meet 
the needs that the universities are going to require. If the college parallel track is followed, BCC is 
going to have to be dictated to by what the legislature expects us to produce for the university's 
acceptance. Students say so the issues and concerns are no longer petty, they now look at the 
major issues, Student Support Services rather than Student Activities. Laboratories and study 
halls rather than faculty hours that are optional for student visitations, a new type of testing, a 
variety for different level to meet the needs of a diversified student body. The issues, the 
concerns, the policies, the procedures they have all been changed, no one force can control any 
of them, there is going to be a lot of negotiations and a lot of changes. 



23 



< 



Student 



comments 
on policies 



STUDENT COMMENTS ON POLICIES 

In 1965 student complaints caused Business Dean Dr. Harvey Oates to try to ease a serious food problem with 
food service on ground floor of building 10, that prepared stews, soups, and sandwiches. 

Student Bob Ferrigano figured the general atmosphere at JCBC was one of mediocre idiocy.. He stated that the 
SGA and the Administration joined forces to produce what he described as "Asininity in Excelsis". He 
complained about "Hazing" of freshmen by the social outcasts, pseudo - "cool guys" and other human flotsan to 
try to intimidate the freshmen. The "Dress Code" including long hair, no socks, etc., distracted from class work. 
What about short skirts? On September 24, 1965 he compared JCBC to following the Great American 
Nightmare of creating a nation of stereotyped slugs, mindless hordes who blindly follow the dictates of authority. 

The Freshman "Rat" not wanted, had to hide on campus and was told to leave the Library for the Student 
Center. The Planetarium named 'Tomb of the Unknown Rodent". Words of "Roving" must be carried on by 
Venetian Crier. The rebuttal to "Asininity to Excelsis" that complaints about activities that are planned rather 
than participation was really the sign of immaturity according to student Tony Long. Student Rick Barnard on 
October 29, 1965 criticized the JCBC food as bad food with frozen sandwiches or curdled hot dogs in the 
Student Center. 



On October 15, 1965, student Thomas Shuttleworth's poem, "Sing a Song of Protest" (the leaderless campus) 
cited problems that need no disscussion as: freshmen orientation, theatre ticket reduction, fraternal brotherhood, 
lack of SGA candidates, elections on whims, less than 10% of voters, dress code, and false editors. 
Sophomore Lee Ann Elch preferred junior college so she doesn't have to be distracted by friends being around 
because she doesn't have to live on campus. Pat Hart, student, saw that the lack of college policy on cheating 
led to a misunderstanding, but the instructor was still in control of his class. 

Student Perceptions in 1965 were centered on the Planetarium as a Tomb of Lost Civilization, the Campus 
Official Tree was only a tree, the Conformity of everyone dressing the same, and the Bomb Squad Demise in 
not finding any devise. April Robinson critized lack of interest in any student cultural creativity. Jack Cresse felt 



that year round intramural activities fostered spirit of competition with recognition trophies. Mildred Edwards felt 
that the second Director of Student Activities, Neil Crispo provided activities that correlated with academics. 
Pam Edwards inventoried that in 1965 the Library with 20,100 books, 224 seats, open 62 hours a week, and 6 
classrooms had been converted into large study area along with reserve books with periodicals. John 
Leatherwood took part in the second annual Freshman Retreat that was 2 days with 150 students at the Fort 
Lauderdale Beach Club Hotel with 8 workshops featuring Dr Melveme Hardee who delivered the closing speech 
and included social activities. Mike Katz stated "I was skeptical about Broward Junior College, but now I've 
made a complete change in opinions". Margie Kitzmiller I was afraid that JCBC would be filled with clique 
groups, but was happy to find that a clique atmosphere appeared absent in college. Dave Brown was surprised 
at the smoothness of the Freshmen Retreat, the well planned organization, and the good food served to us for 
he expected less. Bill Mandeville liked the array of teachers and the great amount of intelligence displayed. 
Nancy Davis critiqued the Orientation for 900, campus tour by slides and music, categories designed with 
different color brochures for different curriculums, and Rat caps for $1 .00 each for each freshman student to 
wear or suffer the consequences. Sue Fee questioned registration 3,151 full-time and 1,397 part-time students 
in the gymnasium with computer cards used for 3 days before classes with professors doing registration. Elaine 
Frat had no thought of the extracurricular activities, but now desired a club membership. Greg Fitzpatrick had 
gained a better understanding of college and knew what to expect after Orientation. 

On October 15, 1965, Freshman Steve Weichelt said the junior college did not have a college atmosphere. 
Sophomore Sylvia Lopez appreciated JCBC because you maintained some social contacts, but you also had 
your responsibilities of home life and family problems. She stated, "On a large university campus, you may wish 
to participate in a larger circle of social, cultural, physical and spiritual events for the very purpose of burdening 
your education". Sophomore Chuck Drago said, "Many students who attend a junior college were still subject to 
parental pressures to make good grades, whereas students at a university did not have people constantly 
pushing them". Freshman Frank Hutchison stated, "Without more on campus activities, there won't be any 
college atmosphere or spirit". 



On February 4, 1966, how something as vital as the appointment of a college president can be kept in limbo for 
so long was a source of constant amazement. Editor-in-Chief Matthew J. Faison raised continued support for 
Dr. E. P. Lauderdale, Dean of Instruction, but WHY was the discussion taking so long and when will a decision 
be made? Matthew Faison also raised the need for students' self expression on Student Government conflicts, 
SAB funding, the fraternity issue, and, especially, the food in the student center. He accented the Venetian 
Crier Newspaper as student run for student purposes so he urged letters to the editor on these controversial 
subjects. Pidgeon Darbo stated that illegal gaffing was prevalent with false ID cards. JCBC students felt they 
were not breaking the law and were only sorry for getting caught. All students but one admitted they didn't drink 
on campus. 

In 1968 Pan Ku, Volume IV in March, G.D. Eisman wrote "Yield Free Image of Creativity". Pan Ku's issue 
reflected on sentiment of the late turbulent 1960's. Some of the most outrageous student commentaries that 
included: Jana Magruder - Belief in God , Zita McAfee - Fear of Next Atomic War, Maryann Douglas - Children 
on Perilous Islands of Amiability, Anna Marie Mills - Despair Caused Drugs, G.D. Eisman - The Wounded 
Vietnam, Draft, Sleep, Bob Vandenberg - Death of a Bull and Person, Sheila Holmes - Death in Southeast Asia, 
and G.D. Eisman - Domestic Violence Ignored 

Now, Broward Junior College had a 1969 Pan Ku, No. 2, Volume V in March that used several guardian 
columnist to be very vocal in their articles that included: Rick de Revere - The House Holds Memories, Steve 
Jacobs - Distrust and Wonderment SGA Senator?, Michael Rech - Living and Learning Racism, Emancipate all 
Mankind, Michael Rech - Vietnam, Frank Doulze - Vietnam, Draft, Death, Bill Goetz - Drugs and Courts, by 
Peace Corps FAU English Major, and Stanley McDonald - Soldiers Killings and Death. 



September 2, 1966 

The hurry up and wait situation created by only 50 chairs and tables offered a removal from Student Center 
that meant eating standing up according to Alan Kent's letter. 



September 2, 1966 

Dave Fritzgerald, Editor to the Venetian Crier complained that only 1% of 4,500 students in 1965-1966 took 
part in school activities so they lacked school spirit. 

The student commentary on excessive walking for the drop and add process of registration and then the 
"snake pit" of a student center were the main campus complaints. 

Ellen Loughlin, Freshman (Rat) expressed confusion over the beginning of the semester for lack of direction 
or understanding of college procedures, but most objectable part being called a rat which was an indication 
of freshman status. 

September 16, 1966 

Obeying the Dress Code would provide for college and career success so don't dress for the beach, go to 
class looking like the student. Richard F. Polangin feels he should be free to wear whatever he wishes 
except for health reasons such as the need for shoes. 

September 23, 1966 

A protest by students after one with a beard was suspended. 

January 27, 1967 

Diane Morrow, freshman, said she always smiled and said hello to young men. 

Nerva Coffin said she just hadn't enough time to attend student activities. 

Sharon Zak said why should I waste time on a basketball game. 

Timothy Smith stated that students have other extra curricular activities to do. 

Marel Coyle attended half of the student activities because JCBC was like high school. 



January 27, 1967 

Ed Stone agreed that the same high school cliques were at JCBC so the activities were not interesting. 

Harry Austin who commuted from Pompano Beach time was a real factor in attending student activities. 

Andre Dawson there was not enough student participation in advertising to stimulate student attendance. 

Ellen Loughlin did attend most of Lyceum and said that most students did not know what was going on. 

February 4, 1967 

SGA President Terry LaBelle ordered Sergeant-at-Arms Bb Van Denberg to evict a complaining Jim 
Higgins, former SGA Secretary of Internal Affairs, but he resisted and ripped faucet off table so all were 
drenched. 

February 10, 1967 

Alan Kent congratulated Dr. Blee to the School Board for the extinction of the "Pit". 

Ken Perkins, member of Advocates asked why SGA President Terry LaBelle appointed 10 almost one third 
of the Senate. SGA Constitution said the President can only recommend, the Senate must pass with two 
third vote. 

March 3, 1967 

The WP-WF system was used to give students a chance to get out of classes. WP meant hours were not 
used in computing your GPA. 

April 14, 1967 

The Leader of Advocates, Senator Ken Perkins raised issue of students being run off by a dispute started 
with the Administration's tightening the belt that ran off faculty for being incompetent that students held in 
high esteem. 

Students questioned of Crier for not taking a stand and endorsing any SGA Presidential candidates. 



April 14, 1967 

Page Lord, Crier Managing Editor responded, that SGA held up photo I.D. cards to try to find way to avoid 

extra cost to students. 

April 21, 1967 

Mary Zain, sophomore education major expressed terrible treatment of faculty who need more freedom of 

speech and thought. 

Gary LaAndre, SGA sophomore senator, felt situation was mild unrest and students should carry out 
normal activities. 

April 21, 1967 

Robert Miller, sophomore liberal arts major, felt quality of education at JCBC was in peril and crisis must be 

resolved. 

Linda Callahan, sophomore in math, said situation was worsen by rumors, but lack of communication 
between administration and faculty genuine concern. 

Valerie Herbst, freshman in English, "saw Miami Dade as getting influx from BJC of concerned students. 

April 21, 1967 

Walter Turne, sophomore in Business Administration, saw lack of belief in faculty as quality problem as 

other instructors prepared to leave. 

Merritt Rathge, freshman in Education, supported the teachers for if they had to lower their standards it 
would affect JCBC accreditation. 

Ellie Kurplewski, sophomore in Public Relations, saw situation as end to JCBC student apathy, but saw 
need for faculty and students to know answers. 

Bob Brewer, sophomore in Law, said administration was specializing in 180 degree answers, especially 
when students met with School Board. 



April 21, 1967 

John McCullough, freshman in Pre-Med thought students should stay out of situation for they will only 

complicate problems. 

May 8, 1970 

Student Activity fee was combined into $13.00 tuition raise that brought storm of protest from various groups 
who felt action was uncalled for and would lead to the deterioration of the student activity program. Activity 
program was educational so the hope that the program would not be entirely rock groups. 

The condemning of Nixon's policy was wrong without facts so all needed to know what was made common 
knowledge before a decision could be made. 

September 15, 1972 

Students stated views on 1972 Election, defending Nixon except for Kevin Ordinay who led "Students for 
McGovem" but Nixon was reelected. 

September 22, 1972 

Carol A. Ives praised computerized registration for each individual student adding that it would be efficient to 
include pre registration procedures. 

November 17, 1972 

Leiliani Fountain, Chairman of the Freshman Senate stated that Bob Kecskesmety's editorial comments 
about the K-ettes children's" trip to Disney World were false and misleading. 

December 1, 1972 

Apathy in SGA reigned supreme after invalid Senate election and Vice President who wasn't happy about 
inheriting her office when Vivian Hunter had not fulfilled chairmen's appointment. 

December 8, 1972 

The outdated Library hindered students with only 56,000 books and a with yearly addition of 5,000 to 
service 8,000 students. 



February 2, 1973 

SGA launched Comedy Hour in their investigation of SGA President Vivian Hunter according to Frank 

Rinella comments. 

October 5, 1973 

SGA Entertainment Plan rested on shaky ground with only 3 acts as criticized by Phoenix Editor Mark 
Sherman. 

August 28, 1975 

It can't get any worse as parking conditions, restroom placement, locations of water fountains and color 

coding of doors. 

April 18, 1977 

Students petitioned with 74 signatures for art instructor Kyra Hess after she was terminated, "Keep Kyra" 
posters and the Miami Herald were the next possible appeal. 

Secret society of intellectual rowdies named "The Harlequins" had taken upon themselves to put written 
messages inside of balloons in the quiet lounge. 

October 17, 1980 

Apathy reigned at BCC! was anybody out there? Asked Bill Duke who felt BCC lacked sense of community. 

October 31, 1980 

Campus survey revealed Jimmy Carter as slight favorite for the Presidental Election. 

October 3, 1986 

New possibilities, not controversy provided new opportunities according to student Bill Duke about the new 
consolidated newspapers. 

October 31, 1986 

David Summit, Central Campus student, made a plan for editorial moderation. 

8 



October 31, 1986 

Jackie Ulrich, sophomore Elementary Education major, felt the Observer was pretty good meat, informative 
about the other campuses and keeps college as one unit. 

Joanne Acosta felt students anxious about math have math anxiety. 

November 12, 1986 

A freshman student living with HIV, the virus that causes AIDS, promoted awareness at seminars sponsored 
by BCC. 

December 12, 1986 

Barbara Schaffer corrected Director of Student Financial Services Judith Berson over her letter concerning 
Observer cartoonist Kennedy Reid Egbert cartoon about the slowness of BCC's registration process. 

January 30, 1987 

Barbara Schaffer, student South Co-Editor felt "Observer" linked BCC campuses. 

October 26, 1987 

Patrick Hacksaw, North Campus student editor, was concerned that the Administration cannot censor the 
student paper so Dr. George Young, Vice President for Student Development, retorted that all students had 
the right to use the paper as an avenue of expression. 

February 8, 1988 

David Summit urged that BCC's Security had opened the records and let the Observer see the students 
files. 

February 22, 1988 

This Spring Break was first to be a week long, so BCC students could join collegians at the Beach. 

December 12, 1988 

BCC's Students' Environmental Action League greeted visitors at Galleria Mall to protest living conditions. 



December 12, 1988 

HPRD policy absurd and wasteful with only possible reason for this policy was that it was a guaranteed 
source of revenue for the college according to Ruth Kostuch. 

Possibility of abortion law repeal gained the support which pleased student Lisa M. Brown while Ellen B. 
Curran differed because pro-life stereotype unfair. A 

January 30, 1989 

Students Seth Pollino and Carol Ann Palucci were unhappy about parking lot construction forcing students 
to have to walk over 250 yards to get to their cars. 

February 13, 1989 

Seahawk Talk where Observer Sports Editor Lucio Guerrero complained about $51 ,489.00 for all Sports 
budget. 

March 13, 1989 

The Observer failed to focus on BCC as Jacques Bikoundou of Central International Club pointed at lack of 
any coverage for their week long festival. 

October 10, 1989 

Heather Lyn Gupton Editor of Its Magazine and South Campus student supported burning of the US Flag. 

Bob Homme, Vietnam Veteran, expected to be buried under a US Flag which he sees as a symbol that 
should not observe the principals for which that symbol stands. 

September 21, 1992 

Other options available to aid hurricane cleanup after Andrew proved that the time honored methods of 
boarding up, coupled with code, construction, were insufficient is high magnitude winds. 



10 



October 5, 1992 

Aaron Glassman of Central Campus believed that the privilege to drive should not be abused with the first 
offense of Driving Under the Influence up to 9 months in jail, $250.00 - $1,000.00, and 6 months suspended 
license. 

North Campus student Thomas R. Williams felt Homeless did not deserve criticism that they abused grants 
and disrupted classes. 

Maryann McCarthy, the Observer's Managing Editor felt Algebra did not compute for math classes, 
frustrate and were not necessary to a productive life. 

March 7, 1994 

Students felt casino gambling should be made legal in Florida. 

Lori Dayton, Observer Columnist wrote about some teachers that stand out and make a lasting impression 
and difference. 

March 21, 1994 

The collegewide Student Government Association felt spirit of volunteerism should not be required of 
students to serve the community. 

North Campus students Armando Pesaturo and Heather Hunter felt that the "heartwrenching" stories of two 
AIDS speakers informed, touched and helped students understand. 

September 26, 1994 

Student editorial staff of Observer tried to revisit the impasse between faculty and administration and found 
the importance of faculty principles and never stop asking questions, for eventually, the truth will present 
itself. 



11 



< 



September 26, 1994 

South Campus students got the message: Cheaters never win as many students responded to North 
Campus cheating scandal where one student took an English class for another so he could maintain an "A" 
and then gain membership in Phi Theta Kappa, BCC's Honor Society. 

October 31, 1994 

People endured pain for self expression as tattoos started to make statements. 

Tracy Ann Scott, President of TAWIC, said by getting involved with the Community Connections, student 
clubs have an opportunity to strengthen community and college relations while making valuable contacts. 

There should not be board legislation without student government representation. 

November 28, 1994 

College should come up with short-term solution to eliminate flooding on Central. 

The Observer staff commented on faculty no confidence vote of Dr. Holcombe. 

February 6, 1995 

Students should not be denied access to facilities as Central Campus closed Building 19 including Student 
Life offices. 

March 13, 1995 

Student Life events poorly scheduled according to Features Editor Timothy Shirley who advocated that 
entertainment occur at 12:30 p.m. when classes are over. 

Paul L. Hodges, and Observer Columnist, felt Algebra was still not his friend and cited the Gordon Rule as 
factor of fear for community college students. 

September 11, 1995 

BCC's Board of Trustees began a campaign to seek "alternate funding" which is a nasty word, "taxes" as 
63.6 percent of costs funded by the state while students contributed 32.9 percent. 

12 



October 23, 1995 

Observer's editorial staff criticized the decision to remove Physical Education classes and activities from the 

BCC curriculum. 

February 19, 1996 

Students needed t o get involved in today's issues after only 7 students showed for lecture by Congressman 

Hastings. 

October 28, 1996 

Central Campus Provost Dr. Glen Rose was named the local winner of the Distinguished Service Award by 
Phi Theta Kappa's Mu Mu chapter's student's. 

November 20, 1996 

College president always on the job in search for money saving ideas. Priority for Holcombe and other 
college administrators including proposed tax cut, BCC/FAU Library, 2+2 program, BCC Foundation, 
BCC/FAU Studies partnership, property tax referendum, ad curriculum articulation. 

Observer columnist Tracy Fritz emphasized that the homeless need a helping hand not a cold shoulder for 
human beings who have nowhere to go and no one to turn to. 



13 



National 



items 






NATIONAL ITEMS 
In October 1965, Silver Sands became a Quarterly magazine. 

Barbara Glowaski wrote the truth about the New Left for college students stated concern about the present not 
the future. Students were sophisticated, yet self-conscious, with little faith in two political parties, but were 
leaning toward the liberal wing of the Democratic party. New Left emphasized a trip to Cuba; picketing 
churches, businesses, public and private projects; demonstrations against segregation and for other popular 
causes and becoming politically aware. Students impressed with Caryl Chessman's execution, Castro, civil 
rights sit-ins, student peace movement, rules regulating sex, rental rates in Harlem were against Barry 
Goldwater, The House Un-American Activities Committee, nuclear testing and limitations on the right of free 
speech. 

Students' subconscious goal of self-expression and opposition to the "Establishment" included: following John 
F. Kennedy's "New Frontier" to move again that life was worth living; college professors impact to lean left; 
intellectual appeal of liberalism; and rebellion against conservative parents and other directed persons in urban 
centers. So peer pressure and anxiety was made of insuring obedience. 

Notre Dame was to win final game of season for they played the University of Miami. Cassius Clay promised to 
teach Floyd Patterson the way of Mohammed after their November 22, 1 965 fight. 

Hurricane Betsy changed most of State Road 7's Neon signs creating new version of English language. 

George Meany, President of AFL-CIO promised all out fight if Senate and LBJ repealed Taft Hartley Bill. 
The 1966 Silver Sands in May highlighted Vietnam Service and anti Vietnam Berkley Riots. 

September 23, 1966 

Folk and Rock music was debated to which was more popular with folk for listening while rock was for 
dancing, but carried its own message 

Football Quarterbacks held the glamorous job that excited the imagination of the public. 



November 4, 1966 

J. Herbert Burke, Republican nominee for the new 10 th District Congress emphasized the students ability to 
leam the truth of topics from Vietnam, National Debt, United Nations to Poverty Program. 

Baby boomers bom at end of World War II had a concern that they would not have the opportunity to go 
into combat. The students were concerned that they would not be able to finish their studies to learn how 
to end the curse of war forever. 



November 11,1 966 

Veterans remembrance was very faded as only the Veterans Club on campus honored them. 

George Wallace stated that the majority of Americans felt as I did that caused campus criticism by Jim 
Crowley, News Editor. 

November 18, 1966 

Claude Kirk's sweeping victory in Florida was indication of need for change, but concern over tax freeze 
and how it would effect school system and education. 

January 20, 1967 

Vista Volunteers recruited for anti-poverty program in JCBC Student Center. 

March 17, 1967 

Nelson Boswell, Introduction to Business instructor, had received the 1966 Radio Program Award in form of 
the George Washington Honor Medal. "An outstanding accomplishment in helping to 

March 17, 1967 

Top cars and drivers highlighted Sebring 1967 written for Crier special. 

March 23, 1967 

Easter Vacation added bikinis, beer, bodies and mix well. 



April 14, 1967 

Folkienism swept colleges about existence of Mid-earth culture created by English author J.R. Tolkien 
started 1 ,00 page trilogy "Lord of the Rings" which centered on the Hobbits. This has led to campus 
establishment of "Friends of the Elves" as club. 

The US Auto Club Champion, Mario Andretti with Bruce McLaren was in a newly modified Mark IV Ford U J" 
Car thatwon the 1967 twelve hours of Sebring. 

April 21, 1967 

Florida Conference of the AAUP President John M. DeGrove issued statement about JCBC's deplorable 
faculty morale, breakdown of meaningful communication, administrative arbitrary actions, violation of 
faculty rights, and James L. Wattenburger pre-judgment of situation. 

November, 1967 

Nova University was conceived for the advanced, the gifted and the creative student that was founded with 
two objectives of high quality center of learning and private institution dedicated to the advancement of 
science. First President Warren Winstead called Nova the "MIT" of the South. 

The average American had been described as one who drove a mortgaged car down a bond-financed 
highway, used a credit card. He lived in a mortgaged home with furniture, appliances and household items 
paid for on the installment plan. It was estimated that one tenth of the 60 million Americans families had at 
least 40% of their yearly income allocated to debt payments so young people knew what they wanted and 
where their credit facilities were effective. 

Wallops Island in Space was on a shoestring budget as a smaller launching site on this Virginia island 
started in 1945 by National Advisory Committee on Aeronautics for supersonic speed testing had now had 
more than 6,000 vehicles launched. 

Russia's Higher Education had no tuition for its students with 23 hours of classes per week with a 
requirement to work for State for several years in any position that the State had chosen. 



April, 1968 

The annual blue and Silver Poll conducted by the Silver Sands listed the following: Past Motion Picture - 

Gone with The Wind; Recent Motion Picture - The Graduate; Male Vocalist - Dean Martin; Female Vocalist 

- Dianne Warwick; Favorite Song (Mood) - Love is Blue; Instrumental Group - Herb Alpert and the Tijuana 

Brass; Vocal Group - Beatles; Musical Style - Popular; Instrumentalist - Al Hirt; Favorite Song (Popular) - 

Love is Blue; Vocal - Instrumental Group - Beatles; Preferred Leisure - Sleeping; Poet - Robert Frost; 

National Newspaper - New York Times; News Broadcast - Huntley Brinkley; Outstanding National Figure - 

Everett Dunksen; Automobile - Corvette; Comedian - Bill Cosby; TV Show Smothers Brothers; Motion 

Picture Actress - Elizabeth Taylor; Sports Figure - Johnny Anitas; Motion Picture Actor - Paul Newman; 

spectator Sport - Football; Most Dramatic Blunder - Pueblo Incident; Outstanding World Figure - LBJ; Most 

Outstanding Personality of 20 th Century - John F. Kennedy; Most Influential Historical Figure - Christ; 

Outstanding Indecision Maker - President Johnson; Novel Fiction - Valley of the Dolls; Playwright - 

Tennessee Williams; Novelist - Ernest Hemingway; Artist - Pablo Picasso; National Magazine - Playboy. 

Filth for profit was shown in the big business of pornography. 

Dr. Martin Luther King 1929-1968 was immortalized in "We Shall Overcome". 

July, 1968 

War was not healthy for children and other living things that became beginning of poster art. 

Letters from Vietnam came from the former JCBC and Associate Editor of Venetian Crier who was as well 
the first JCBC male cheerleader David J. Fitzgerald who asked students not to protest. 

Non-violent protesting . . . was there such a thing? The very cornerstones of shift from protest to resistance 
influenced by writings of Regie Debray and Ernesto "Che" Guevera. 

Senator Robert F. Kennedy, Presidential hopeful, was shot last night after concluding a speech. 



July, 1968 

Those who waited, watched and made up the 1,393 male draft age students at BJC had created a lot of 
dissension at the Davie Campus for their was no uniform feeling. 

There were two sides to War. 

Governor Claude Kirk's Conference on Youth allowed student leaders of the State of Florida to air their 
views was not a success. 

May 8, 1970 

Community College was the best education bet for blacks in a Ford Foundation Study of more than 31 ,000 
students. 

December, 1970 

Floyd Christian spoke out in favor of the 18 year old vote for "if we can ask them to fight we can ask them 
to vote. Maturity certainly deserved considerations". The SGA and AAUP initiated BCC's first meet the 
candidates forum on October 9, 1970. 

September 15, 1972 

America needs a new system of checks to prevent involvement's such as South East Asia. 

Terrorism leading World down pathway to disaster such as marring of 20 th Olympic games with a senseless 
slaughter. 

Board of Regents overturned University of Florida President Steven O'Connell placing student newspaper, 
the Alligator. 

Bahamas' Independence a hot issue until general election decide future. 

November 17, 1972 

Nixon landslide and split ballot surpassed many. 



January 26, 1973 

Nixon's inauguration: peaceful amid protest in crowds numbering 100,000 against the war during the 

President's second inauguration. 

February 23, 1973 

Increase in school crime warranted action in Senate according to Florida Senator Edward Gurney. 

March 16, 1973 

Big time pushers compound drug problem as Broward County Narcotics Division confiscated nearly 2 
million pounds in 1971. 

April 13, 1973 

Retail meat prices skyrocket to nearly 5 percent jump, largest ever reported. 

April, 1974 

No Gas, fuel problem hit everyone in January and there was no relief in sight for the lines of motorists that 
had to wait up to 2 hours for as little of $3.00 worth of 55 cent-a-gallon regular. A system volunteer 
rationing was instituted in Broward County in February. Limits were lifted in March with the only problem 
the price which was increasing. 

April 19, 1974 

Florida's turn to ratify ERA came before legislature for second time. 

January 23, 1975 

For the first time since January 27, 1973 when the Vietnam War treaty was signed a large communist 
offensive was launched against South-Vietnam prompting a US Navy fleet led by USS Enterprise to the 
Indian Ocean. 

February 12, 1975 

The National Woman's Organization held its Broward County meeting at the PM Building on Davie 
Boulevard to discuss the ERA program. 



October 17, 1975 

JFK Findings discredited Warren Report with showing of the Zapruder film and presentation by Harvey 
Yagijcan, a member of the Assassination Information Bureau packed, standing room only in Central 
Campus Hospitality Center Student Activity. 

February 9, 1976 

Two Hundred Years Birthday was highlighted as "Land of the Free, of Life, Liberty and Pursuit of 
Happiness". 

March 8, 1976 

Broward County School Board changed zones despite parents' protest. 

October 1, 1976 

The National Organization for Women and the Florida Federation of Women held formal debate in Central 
Hospitality Center sponsored by SGA was very important as 4 more states were necessary for ratification. 

California debated Quality over Quantity as University of California tried to get away from enrollment driven 
operating budget. 

October 11, 1976 

Swine Flu was serious health threat that created the National Influenza Immunization Program of 1976. 

April 11, 1977 

Collegers invaded Fort Lauderdale Beach from colleges all around the nation for sun, relaxation, drinking 
and partying all day. 

October 12, 1977 

"Idiot Box" celebrated its fiftieth birthday by mesmerizing US public as no other single invention had ever 
affected the live of the American people. 



October 4, 1 979 

Nuclear Energy was bombarded by South Florida's anti-nuclear organization that protested nuclear power 
plant operations. 

October 11, 1979 

President Carter had denied that Soviet Troops were no threat in Cuba to United States security, but 
continued to urge signing Salt II Treaty. 

Atomic Energy Commission (AEC) developed in 1946 to develop humanitarian, peaceful uses of the atom, 
as well as to continue weapons research. 

October 22, 1979 

Gordon-Barron Bill proposed to legalize marijuana in Florida. 

Salt II Treaty followed President Jimmy Carter breaking relations with Taiwan, giving away the Panama 
Canal, and withdrawing troops from Korea, but will it bring peace? 

Pope's visit to Ireland self-limiting for Catholics belief in their religion. 

November 16, 1979 

The impressive sight of Goodyear airships traces back to man's earliest form of powered flight back to 
1852 when Frenchman Henri Giffard flew 145 foot airship powered by 3 hp. steam engine. 

January 18, 1980 

Senator Lawton Chiles "walk across Florida" stopped in Central Campus Lecture Theater after he walked 
around BCC on foot. 

January 21, 1980 

Adult education or lifelong learning" was causing many people to return to Academia for everything from 
retraining to self gratification. 



8 



October 30, 1980 

Cuban crisis regarding Russian troops in Cuba and President Carter's handling. 

The Woodstock Nation, a festival of peace and music attracted 50,000. 

December 16, 1980 

John Lennon was a poet in his own right with his music, philosophy and love. 

November 3, 1981 

Projects urged concern for missing children mounting throughout country for some 2 million children that 
ran away, or were murdered, abducted and those that simply disappeared (50,000 each year). Mrs. Reve 
Walsh, mother of Adam, was attending BCC as an Interior Design student prior to her son's abduction. 

March 19, 1982 

Spring breakers here to stay and play as Fort Lauderdale's beaches attracted an estimated 200,000 
students. 

April 2, 1982 

Columbia succeeded in landing White Sands Missile Range. 

Governor Bob Graham brought news of educational plans for an FAU downtown campus. 

April 23, 1982 

Governor Bob Graham talk explained "tax against crime'' at 6 th annual Condo and Home Owners 
Association at OMNI at BCC North. 

February 22, 1983 

Action taken against student loan defaulters including 46,860 Federal Government employees while 
government owed $1.7 billion. 

Herpes made mate-choosing a selective game as the casual sex of the 1960's and 1970's has 20 million 
Americans afflicted with genital herpes. 



March 21, 1983 

South Florida economy set to soar from Spring Break included sun worshiping and girl watching on Fort 

Lauderdale Beach. 

December 1, 1986 

Charges followed Iran deal regarding legality of broken arms embargo with profit on sate of US arms to Iran 
from Israel was redirected to Nicaraguan Contra Rebels. 

Vietnam Veterans Memorial, a tribute to the fallen in Washington DC while Arlington remained the resting 
place of the free and brave. 

December 12, 1986 

Should English be our official national language? was question of importance. 

June 1, 1987 

Salute to the 1960's contained 1967 continued, the Beatles an Essay, Black in the 1960's, Sergeant 
Pepper Review, Legacy of Vietnam, Contrary 1960's items, Best of Psychedelic and Artists and Musicians 
Against Drug Abuse. 

October 26, 1987 

CLAST standards increased which could cause a decrease in black and Hispanic student. 

January 25, 1988 

Lottery opened with $13.5 million sold first day. 

February 8, 1988 

Soaring college costs altered many families' college plans after college costs rose 35% during the early 
1980's. 

February 22, 1988 

AIDS cases to triple warned the Center for Disease Control with 44,395 cases diagnosed in the US. 



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March 14, 1988 

Alluring ads for students are cautioned to beware of swindling marketing techniques. 

April 11, 1988 

Spring Break 1988 found Fort Lauderdale no longer where the "Breakers" were. 

November 7, 1988 

Fewer freshmen were taking "prep" classes. 

September 21, 1992 

With the wake of Hurricane Andrew came an increase in the mosquito population of South Florida. In the 

Ravine and Cutlerridge areas, horror-filled stories about living through Andrew with its savage onslaught of 

destruction. 

October 5, 1992 

Hurricane Andrew: Destruction, recovery and community rebuilt after $20 billion in property damage and 
$7.3 billion in industry losses that left 86,000 jobless as 82,000 businesses suffered from some type of 
destruction that caused 52 deaths and left 160,000 homeless. Hurricane relief inspired community with 
benefit concert generated 2 million dollars. 

March 25, 1994 

America should seek alternatives to current immigration policy of 700,000 immigrants annually plus 
500,000 illegal immigrants. 

September 26, 1994 

Clinton launched Ameri Corps, service program to enlist college students to help others. 

October 31, 1994 

The Governor's race between Jeb Bush and Lawton Chiles started to revolve around the gambling and 
casino issue. 



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November 14, 1994 

National Domestic Violence Month hit home as South Campus students experienced relationships that 

marked abuse levels. 



December 12, 1994 

A 

World AIDS Day elicited emotional response was led by one of Broward County's foremost prevention 
education leaders, Dr. Janet Parke, BCC's Director of HIV/AIDS education honored the memory of more 
than 3 million people worldwide who have bravely with, but died of advanced HIV disease AIDS. 

March 13, 1995 

Balanced budget would save future generations. 

August 23, 1995 

Crime and punishment or lack of justice system lacked elements of deterrence. 

October 9, 1995 

The O.J. Simpson trial and not guilty verdict was end of circus trial that BCC students felt was way 
overdrawn and overplayed. 

April 8, 1996 

The Kitchens Opinion Poll centered in Orlando find that Florida's community colleges are perceived as 
positive role models for today's students. 



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JCBC 



clubs 



JCBC CLUBS 

There was a rich tradition of academic, service and religious interest clubs at JCBC and BJC from 1962 to the 
present. The 1970's after the conclusion of the Vietnam Warsaw a large decline in the organizations. At first the 
Social Societies, F-Troop (service Honorary) and SGA competed for the students who wished to be involved. This 
continued until the mid 1990's when concern and issues again entered into clubs. 

Organizations in 1962 emphasized service and variety of Quasi purposes. The publications of Silver Sands and 
Venetian Crier which in February, 1962 had Advisor, Miss Hedrum, and Editor, Rick Burkhardt. The largest 
organizations were German Club (22), Les Miserables (16), and SNEA (21). The diversified styles of the Chemical 
Society, Psychology Club, Venetian Players, Newman Club, and Baptist Student Union were present for students if 
they desired participation. The service clubs included Circlettes, Civinettes (24), Circle K (hosted the Student- 
Faculty Reception, November Beach party, Used Book Sale, and the Starlite Serenade Dance), Jaybees (had 
JCBC Shirts, Christmas Dance, Easter Seals, Christmas Toy Drive, party crippled children, refurbishing 
playground, Lyceum productions, "social" functions, and Sweetheart selection). 

In 1963, the organizations that were the most prominent were College Singers, Vox Musica, Venetian Players, 
Silver Sands, and Venetian Crier which was published by Ft. Lauderdale News, formed noteworthy campus 
personality for the 1st year. Also in 1963 a Religious influence permeated JCBC with the Inter Varsity Christian 
Fellowship featured Stimulating Films, Speakers and Forums, Monday Morning Meditations, Bible Study Groups, 
Intercollegiate Conferences, Summer Camp, Bull Sessions, Easter Vacation Activities, Religious Emphasis Week, 
Library Donation of IVCF Publications, and The Question of Choice? to which Christ's response was that, "I am the 
Way, the Truth and the Life". The Baptist Student Union interacted at State Convention, Retreat, Social events, 
Religious Emphasis Week, Christian Witness to Campus, and had Rex Brumley as advisor. There was also the 
Episcopal Youth Fellowship and Newman Club. 

In 1963 Service Club Alliance was formed to establish the best way for ideal services under Nan Hutchison, who 
was the 1st Director Student Activities. The alliance included the Civinettes, Circlettes (had Fashion Show, 
Thanksgiving Basket, Christian Party for Exceptional School and needed Families Gifts), Circle K, Jaybees, and 
Collegiate Civitans ( advised by Joe Patton, present coach at Hillsborough Community College). 

1 



The interest organizations were led by the Student National Education Association (that created School Stationary, 
Education Week Emphasis, and Reception during school),Young Republicans, French Club, Die Wandrer, Center 
of Hispanic Studies with the language laboratory, Phi Sci Society that was voted on by the Junior College Chemical 
Society and used Laboratory Facilities on 1st and 3rd Friday morning of every month. 

The organizations in 1964 saw the Honor Society become the leading organization having grown in 1963 (12), and 
in 1964 (19) now known as Phi Theta Kappa. The Inter-Organizational Council included All Campus Club 
Presidents, United Way Fund Telethon, and a united voice. 

The service organizations were very active in 1964. Circle K proved to be a creative service organization with a 
T.B. X-Ray Unit on campus, plus the spirit Pep Rally and Bonfire. The Civinettes also assisted the campus with 
Thanksgiving Basket Drive, Fashion Show, Student Center's Christmas Decoration, Easter Lilies for Easter Seal 
Clinic, and Working Easter Seal Clinic on Lily Day. 

The Student National Education Association and the Circlettes (1963 Service Club of Year) joined in Selling Book 
Covers, a Fashion Show for Scholarship Fund, Holiday Baskets for the Needy, and the selling of Cokes at 
Basketball Games. The Jaybees supported by the Junior Chamber of Commerce promoted the School Board 
Issue and hosted the Christmas Sweetheart Dance. 

The Academics of JCBC clubs were exemplified by Newman Club for Catholic Service, Delta Psi Omega for 
National College Dramatics, Venetian Players, Drama Club, and Student Nurses. There were 29 Clubs, 
Organizations and Teams in 1964 with new organizations including Les Miserables, Physical Science Club, "Los 
Picaros" (Spanish), and Die Wanderer (German). 

The Inter-Variety Christian Fellowship advised by Ron Haire established the club's direction with, 'The primary 
purpose of this organization was the investigation of the claims of Jesus Christ and the consideration of His 
challenge to today's college student". The other interest clubs that were active included, Young Democrats, 



Wesleyan Fellowship (Methodists), Civitans, with many community service projects, Psychology Club, Young 
| Americans for Freedom Republican, Baptist Student Union advised by Dr. Bill Porterfield, Visipecta Club (Visual 
Arts), Judo club, College Singers, Venetian Crier, and Silver Sands. 

Organizations in 1965 experienced the First Freshman Retreat with Dr. Ken Lund. The Lyceum series was 

A 

composed of Serendipity Singers, Paul Winter, Carl Sandburg, Ruth Mitchell (Dancers), and Pearl Buck. 

The growth of the sizes of the student organizations was significant in 1965 led by the Student Nurses Association 
(36), Circle K Club (46) led by Joe Morici, Jaybees (23) led by Donald Lusk, Phi Beta Lambda (31) that was Coed 
but only males were pictured, Circlettes (40), Civinettes (34) led by Judy Cahill, College Singers (39), and Phi Theta 
Kappa (27) led by John Bund. The active student organizations in 1965 were Young Democrats, Young 
Republicans that changed name and greatly increased in size, Phi Sci, Silver Sands, Venetian Crier, Pan Ku (new 
Literary magazine), Inter-Varsity Christian Fellowship, Newman Club, Spanish Club that had name change, Les 
Miserables, German Club that had name change, and Judo Club that included instructors Dave Pactor and Harold 
Theriault. 



In 1965, the organizations began to act more independently. The Circlettes hosted a picnic at Birch State Park as 
well as the meeting in the Library on the 2nd and 4th Thursdays. Phi Theta Kappa was one of the campus leaders 
and largest organizations, meeting on the 1st and 3rd Thursdays. The SGA sponsorings of the SGA workshop on 
elections and publications was beneficial to all campus organizations. The Student National Education Association 
met on the 1st and 3rd Thursdays in C-207. The Newman Club met on the 2nd and 4th Sundays off campus at the 
Queen of Martyrs Church with mass, dinner, lecture or panel discussion on topics pertinent to BJC students 
followed by a social hour with live band and movie from 6:00-9:30 p.m. for .50 cents. 

October 15, 1965 

Phi Beta Lambda held an on campus car wash behind the student center. 

The SNEA teacher symposium with Dr. Homer Ledbetter featured a "Teaching as a Career" with panel 

discussion. 



December 3, 1965 

Circle K put the torch to the 'Best Blaze Yet', the annual bonfire, sparked this year's basketball season to a 
November 24, 1965 victory over Florida Keys College. Scott Anderson sang "Talkin Candy Bar Blues" as a 
plug for the Circle K candy sale after which Coach Morris introduced the basketball team. The lighting of the 25 
foot bonfire preceded the SGA-Circle K sponsored dance which was followed by a fireworks display. 

A 

The Sales and Marketing Club, 1964's interest club of the year, had its club members selling advertising for the 
Venetian Crier. 

December 4, 1965 

The French Club meeting on Thursdays had films and food and anyone interested may come. 

Phi Beta Lambda painted a home for the mentally ill as a campus service project. 

February 25, 1966 

Marketing Club planned a state meeting in Clearwater on March 11 th and 12 th that was part of a national plan 
to arouse interest in college students to consider the growing opportunities in sales and marketing for students 
who had college training in this field. 

March 4, 1966 

Delta Psi Omega initiated new members and elected officers with an oral presentation prepared by the 
pledges. Miss Mildred Muliikin and George Cavanagh were Faculty Directors while Matt Faison was elected 
Student Director. 

"Les Miserables' bake sale was held in front of the student center. 

The Student National Education Association rummage sale financed delegates to their state convention. 
September 2, 1966 

Gamma Sigma Sigma, national service sorority, started by Barbara Glowski and Clarkia Dennis, two 1965 
JCBC graduates, held September 22 and 27 rush parties with pledging starting October 2. Their Service 
Projects included Marines' Toys For Tots, adoption of second grade class, and a National Convention in 
Tallahassee. 






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September 2, 1 966 

Venetian Crier stated students can only belong to one organization. 

Circle K received honorable mention at the Texas Convention after being first in nation in 1965. Projects 
included United Fund Drive, Vietnam Blood Drive, "Operation Kid" with underprivileged children, charity house 
show, and the country's largest college organization in world. 

The Vets Club provided service to the school and veterans. Mike Mallardi started the organization that hosted 
forums on Vietnam, the draft, as well as other major events. 

September 16, 1966 

Pan Ku Club for the literary magazine met every Thursday, 3:30 PM, and needed all interested students. 

The Forensics Club started its 2nd year with Mrs. Majorie Esco supervising in the fields of speech and debate 
with the Readers Theatre directed by Mr. Don Nichlos. 

September 23, 1966 

Medical Assistance Club started by Glenda Mellen was renamed Florida Medical Assistants Club by Glabiola 
G. King, head of Medical Assistance Department and sponsored by Broward County Association of Medical 
Assistants. 

Les Miserables, the French Club, was active in sparking interest in the language and culture of France. 

The HPR Club on campus for Physical Education majors was a co-ed club that adopted the name PEM 
(Physical Education Majors) with Tom Burke and Judy Blucker as advisors. 

October 10, 1966 

Phi Theta Kappa alleviated the tutoring situation with one on one assistance. 






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October 10, 1966 

The Broward Junior Forensics Club hosted the national champion Miami Dade Debate Team. 

The Veterans Club advised by former Navy Commander Harold T. Theriault. 

Contact Lense Fan Club was open to students now on campus. 

October 14, 1966 

Psi Delta XI, Public Relations Club. 

October 14, 1966 

The Advocates was a new anti apathy political party with Dress Code petition. 

October 21, 1966 

Circlettes changed their name to Vestas after Rome's Vestal Virgins, keepers of the sacred flame. 

Alpha Phi Zeta men's social organization elected Rick Dahl as President. 

The Newman Club had to cancel their beach party because of Hurricane Inez 

Phi Delta Chi in cooperation with college photography John Homan sold all Student Activities pictures at 
Student Center. 

October 28, 1966 

Circle K had official proclamation by Mayor-Commissioner Berry to bring candy to JCBC on November 1 . 
BCC International club participated and celebrated cultural awareness of National Hispanic Awareness month. 

November 4, 1966 

The party politics Advocates club formed with George Laschinski, political science teacher, encouraged party 
politics that aided campus activities and elections. 

Literary Club held reading workshop to allow Pan Ku members to analyze their works in informal meeting at 
Higgins Resort. 



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November 4, 1 966 

The Silver Sands editor Pam Edwards felt the magazine was more liberalized and writings were more cynical of 

freshman class, SGA, LSD and the faculty that focused on students' opinions. 

The Cheerieading Club was led by Captains Irene Meyeingh, Darlene Neely and sponsor Mrs. Nancy 

MacNamara. 

* 

November 11, 1966 

Circle K gathered over 2,000 pounds of candy from school children in their Share-the-Treats program that was 
distributed at the Sun Dial School, Variety Children's Hospital, Holy Cross Hospital, the Migrant Workers Camp, 
and the South Florida Mental Hospital. 

The Third Journalism Seminar held on November 19, 1966 was sponsored by Broward County Chapter of 
Theta Sigma Thi and Florida East Coast Chapter of Sigma Delta Chi, which were both professional fraternities 
for men and women in communications, that featured Bill Boggs, Editor of Miami News that was open to all 
Broward high schools in the campus' Little Theater (Building 6). Dr. Harold B. Hayes, Student Publication 
Director was in charge of arrangements along with JCBC members of Sigma Theta Chi and Psi Delta Chi. 

February 10, 1967 

Pan Ku hosted trips to Europe for 22 days covering 5 countries. 

Phi Theta Kappa mailed invitations to all students with 3.0 GPA and 14 credit hours with all questions to John 
Bunch in Social Sciences. 

Physical Education Majors Club sponsored the Activities Night on Monday, February 14 th for basketball, 
volleyball, ping pong, and badminton that was open to all perspective members and ended with a club 
meeting. 

March 23, 1967 

Circle K won the state "Outstanding Club" placing in six award divisions. 






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March 23, 1967 

Circle K apologized to the SGA after a letter of abomination along with a letter of censure for failure to turn in 

Christmas Formal receipts and report. 
Clubs began nominations for Miss JCBC Contest. 

* 
This year's Prom was at the Seville Hotel in Miami Beach with the theme "La Paloma". 

March 31, 1967 

Devotions were held each morning at Davie Methodist Church by the Newman Club, Baptist Student Union and 
the Christian Science College Organizations. 

Jack Pawlowski joined Betty Owen as co-advisor to the Pan Ku. 

April 14, 1967 

Marketing and Sales Club took five top awards in state competition. 

Phi Theta Kappa, National Honor Society announced initiation of new students with JCBC President Dr. Blee's 
address on the three requirements of scholarship, which were individualism, fellowship, and variety of 
intelligence. 

April 21, 1967 

Sales Marketing Club's 5 students left for convention and competition in Chicago sponsored by local 
businesses. 

April, 1968 

Pan Ku permitted expression in the areas of language arts that featured freewheeling staff sponsored by Mrs. 
Betty Owen. 

Many accomplishments for Forensic Team during its second year at JCBC led by Coach don Nichols, Irmgard 
Bocchino, Ben Clark, and Marty Gass had high hopes for state and national competition. 

Community College Calling was a weekly radio program produced by Jeff Borden. 

8 



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April, 1968 

The ISSC included Alpha Delta, Dido, Delta Chi Epsilon, Delta Gamma Phi, Delta Psi Omega, Theta Kappa 
Gamma, Lambda Epsilon Pi, Sigma Tau Sigma, Alpha Theta Chi and Phi Delta Sigma sponsored Greek Week 
including events tug of wars, pyramid building contests, relay races, costume events. 

A 

Vista started at JCBC in 1960 as a service for betterment of college and community with goals; scholarship, 
leadership and friendship. 

Spanish club, Newman club, Circle K, Sales and Marketing, Student Nursing, Aviation Society, Sigma Theta 
Chi Journalism, French Club, PE Majors and Hatikvah were active on campus. 

May 8, 1970 

Florida Press Convention was attended by Phoenix Editor Joe Registrato and staff photographer John Moale at 
Gait Ocean Mile Hotel. 

Kathy Gibson represented BJC Pan Ku that was awarded the Superior Post Award. 

September 15, 1972 

Rotary was sponsoring Rotaract Club to carry out campus and community service projects. 

December 8, 1972 

Sky Diving Club formed by Guy Doiley was a required 6 hour course. 

February 16, 1973 

Eight Awards were taken by BCC Debaters. 

March 9, 1973 

Sigma Mu Gamma gained advertising experience as the advertising staff of the Phoenix. 

March 16, 1973 

Circle K Rally fought MS. 

Members inducted in Phi Theta Kappa ceremonies. 

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March 30, 1973 

International Foreign Language Organization presented songs and dances during their awards banquet in the 
Hospitality Center. 

April 6, 1973 

Debate team captured honors at State competition. 

April 13, 1973 

DECA earned 2 first places at the state competition. 

Circle K won first place in Florida and was voted outstanding for "Parks for Kids", newsletter "Bull Street", 
member quota and MS Award for $3,800.00 in fundraising. 

May 18, 1973 

Debaters lost in Finals to Hutchinson Community College from Kansas. 

Circle K planned projects including Parks for Kids, YMCA work, and banquet. 

September 21, 1973 

"Challenge to Action" was theme of Circle K with emphasis on environmental, student, health and institutional 
concerns. 

BCC's Flight Team had high ambition after last year's win at national competition. 

Chess Club meeting and tournament was scheduled. 

September 28, 1973 

BCC led the nation in Forensics directed by coaches Don Nicholas and Jim Wilson. 

North Campus Circle K planned service projects that included tutoring underprivileged children, Friend in 
Detention, Cerebral Palsy, and Wednesday office visits with donuts. 

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September 28, 1973 

Black Awareness Club organized by Randolph Brown felt there was little focus on the black student by both 
faculty and administration. 



Bahai offered peace to students as well as universal brotherhood. A 

October 5, 1973 

The Honor Society held its annual induction. 

October 19, 1973 

SMG (Sigma Mu Gamma) aided Business Students and became associated with DECA. 

Mixed Choir planned tour of Florida under direction of T.J. Cole. 

October 26, 1973 

Debate team pulled 25 wins at State Tournament at Stetson followed by trips to Kentucky and Georgia. 

November 9, 1973 

Bahai elected national delegates according to Mary Wallace, BCC Art Instructor and was set for "Faith-Crisis" 
talk. 

November 10, 1973 

The BCC Flight Team represented BCC at the National Intercollegiate Flying Association at St. Cloud, 
Minnesota. 

November 26, 1973 

Circle K members gave "The Cradle", a welfare nursery a hand. 

December, 1973 

Phi Theta Kappa was bom on the North Campus with organizational meeting for students with 3.3 GPAs or 
better. 



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February, 1974 

Phi Theta Kappa Omega Phi Chapter who inducted 52 new members at the First Baptist Church in Pompano 
was greeted by sponsor Ralph Clark with an orientation by Central Campus Phi Theta Kappa advisor Chester 
Handleman. 

February 1, 1974 , 

Phi Theta Kappa prepared for new scholars and offered active tutoring service to students who needed 
assistance in any area of study. 

February 21, 1974 

Phi Theta Kappa inducted 116 new members with Dr. Hugh Adams and Clinton Hamilton speaking for BCC 
along with Carl W. Knox, FAU Student Affairs Vice President. 

March 1, 1974 

Phi Theta Kappa's final test was to apply knowledge in our mechanized society. 

Lack of student interest dwindled with the Human Awareness Group's encounters according to Dr. David Cox, 
Director of Counseling. 

March 15, 1974 

Debaters advanced to State Finals with Bill Newman and Steve Salinger who defeated the Universities of 
Florida and South Florida. 

April, 1974 

BCC Flight Team won the prestigious Learning Trophy that any student could use by seeing either Russ 
Sheldon, their advisor or Chris McQuigg, President of the flight team. 

September 18, 1974 

Dr. David Cox, Acting Dean of Students, announced Student Activities were beginning in Term II to allow clubs 
and organizations to meet at a time to talk to their instructors. 



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September 27, 1974 

Circle K serviced the community as BCC North was the only service club assisting with Cerebral Palsy 
Walkathon, Christmas caroling nursing homes, bell ringing for Salvation Army, Multiple Sclerosis, Markam 
Elementary School, Juvenile Delinquents, Migrant Workers Children's School in Collier County and recycling 
with on campus paper bin. 

A 

October 4, 1974 

North Campus Booster Club presented an opportunity to cheer and present school spirit. 

November 1, 1974 

Black Awareness Club sponsored coffeehouse. 

November 8, 1974 

Members of Bahai Faith Club held seminar to celebrate the birthday of the faith's prophet according to sponsor 
Mary Wallace. 

December 12, 1974 

Phi Theta Kappa sought toy donation to brighten holiday and helping Girl Scout Troop in fundraising. 

February 20, 1975 

Circle K sponsored by the Kiwanis had a campus membership drive, and were located at United Cerebral 
Palsy Division of Ft. Lauderdale in Pompano Board of Directors for Neglected Children to show their service 
connections. 

New restaurant sponsored soul food dinners for Students for Black Awareness for Black Culture Week. 

March 19, 1975 

Black Awareness information involved the Black American Experience that was a part of the total American 
culture led by Larcelous Edwards. 

September 4, 1975 

New Political Clubs were the Young Republicans and the Young Democrats organized by George Lsaschinski, 
instructor of History and Political Science who advised both clubs. 

13 



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October 24, 1975 

Debaters defeated 20 universities in Stetson Tournament according to Debate Coach Irmgard Bocchino. 

November, 1975 

Cultural Horizons was designed for students taking foreign languages and their culture. 

Political clubs planned second courthouse trip. a 

December 6, 1975 

Phi Beta Lambda hosted conference for 60 members from colleges and universities in South Florida. 

March 1, 1976 

Phi Beta Lambda members attended the State Convention. 

March 29, 1976 

Phi theta Kappa inducted 55 new students in BCC North Omega Phi Chapter who all had a 3.5 GPA. 



> 



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April 5, 1976 

DECA student represented BCC at Orlando convention in preparation for the National DECA led by students 
Beverly Rennard and Lilly Kelly. 

October 1, 1976 

DECA presented Fashion Show in Central Hospitality Center entitled "Dynamic, Exciting, Creations for 
autumn". 

October 4, 1976 

The Syndicate, a new BCC North Club, infiltrated BCC Student Activities and planned to use illegal tactics to 
win the intramural President's Cup. 

December 6, 1976 

The Young Democrats and Republicans on North Campus were active in getting potential voters. 

Students for Black Awareness raised money with Wednesday night bake sales, weekend car washes, and 
weekend disco dances on campus. 



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January 23, 1977 

The Omega Phi chapter of Phi Theta Kappa, the national junior college honor society inducted new members 

with GPA of 3.5 or better. 

January 31, 1977 

Phi Beta Lambda of BCC North was invited to compete at Miami Dade South including events Business 

A 

Administration, Economics, Accounting, Data Processing, Business Law, Parliamentary Procedure and 
Business Communications. 

February 14, 1977 

The Young Democrats of BCC North attended state convention led by Ron Voegel, Heather Lajewski and 
Gina Thomas. 

April 11, 1977 

The college's student activity organization, known as F-Troop acted as BCC host for the busy and active 
National Association of Student Personnel Administrators Conference in Atlanta. 

October 26, 1977 

Gamma Alpha Beta, the BCC North Chapter of Phi Beta Lambda elected officers. 

October 26, 1977 

Wayne Dictor, one of BCC North students on BCC Debate team went to school on debate scholarship was 
ranked 1 st in nation last year led by Coach Robert Pendragas of Central Campus. 

February 19, 1980 

Business and DECA went hand in hand in aiding college students with BCC courses in Marketing and 
Merchandising. 

November 21, 1980 

F-Troop received Ryan's Folly, a 15 1 / 2 foot boat, motor and trailer, at the meeting of the college Board of 
Trustees for the groups' good work as a service group including helping the Florida Elks Harry Anna Crippled 
Hospital to get to Disney World and running Tigertail Lake with Director of Students Activities Tom Ryan. 



15 



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November 20, 1981 

"Brain bowl" to challenge intellects prepared for the first such competition at BCC. 

F-Troop with active student activities as a goal had a wide range of entertainment and leisure programs led by 
Tom Ryan, Director of Student Activities who traveled to all three campuses overseeing all activities. 

October 3, 1986 , 

DECA began its annual membership drive while counting achievements and electing new officers. 

October 31, 1986 

Phi Beta Lambda meant business was reinstated as a chapter on Central Campus sponsored by John Standi. 

Circle K excelled in providing services to get students involved to do something besides just attending classes. 

Steve Davis, South Chemistry instructor started Registered Student Voters for Political Process (RSVP2) 
promoted political awareness. 

October 31, 1986 

Student Entertainment Committee (SEC) visited different clubs to recruit entertainment ideas and along with 
Director of Student Activities Tom Ryan attended National Association for Campus Activities (NACA) to book 
entertainment. 

October 17, 1986 

Trivia paid off in big way for BCC Brain Bowl Team that won state championship with each student getting 
$1 ,750.00 in cash as well as a full two-year scholarship according to coaches Dr. Irmgard Bocchino and Mr. 
Gabe Milanese. 

December 1, 1986 

Student Ambassadors represented college with over fifty students according to John Brays faculty sponsor 
was to utilize student talent to publicize the many BCC Central programs. 

Jewish Club, Hillel, met on all 3 campuses. 
BCC's first Ford autotechs celebrated graduation. 



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December 12, 1986 

DECA did marketing survey for Taco Viva to raise funds for national convention. 

F-Troop got "A" for commitment and community spirit after Tom Ryan took over as advisor. 

January 22, 1987 

BCC's F-Troopers were legends for antics, service and scholarship who did not perform in an orthodox 
fashion, but bet get the job done led by Kathy Konnick, who at 19 was the captain of F-Troop, a second year 
political science student with perfect 4.0 grade average and President of the student council. 

January 30, 1987 

North Campus granted new Jaycees Club charter to help people who could not help themselves. 

South Campus Substance Abuse Committee formed with nine students who went into high schools for 
substance abuse education. 

March 27, 1987 

DECA took State with 42 awards. 

The case of the missing pool table was blamed on F-Troop who were under orders from Tom Ryan. 

April 10, 1987 

The International Club met the NATO fleet's ship HMS Tromp. 

September 28, 1987 

The Society of Brotherhood Elite fought apathy as a "disease" with student involvement. 

Phi Theta Kappa, the National Scholastic Honor Society, conducted tutoring services and Davie Park 
dedication. 

October 12, 1987 

Honors Institute enriched student's lives that participated according to Dr. Mary Jo Carl, "A student's 
involvement was life long. You never got away from us". 



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October 12, 1987 

The Broward Game Players Club offered an innovative form of entertainment for those who were tired of the 

same old scene. 

November 9, 1987 

Backstreet, a South Florida entertainment complex advertised to BCC student organizations for their 

fundraisers. 

December 14, 1987 

BCC clubs Phi Beta Lambda and Distribution Education Clubs of America offered aid in better business 
management. 

Direct TV Club needed production staff. 

DECA planned holiday food drive. 

February 8, 1988 

Direct TV was ready to Air things that included: art, culture and introduction, news and sports, "man on the 
street", talk of the town", comedy and the open forum. 

Brain Bowl was a success as the student team demolished the faculty team of Dr. Kenneth Ross, Dr. William 
Senior, Thomas Green and Deborah Nycz as the students won the tiebreaker 100-15. 

Student Ambassadors gave support to future students by visiting local high schools with coordinator Diana 
Martin, program coordinator. 

DECA Club got down to real business in South Florida marketing and business fields beyond the classroom 
with presentations to Taco Viva, Pembroke Pines General Hospital, and Kreepy Krauly USA which was a pool 
cleaner manufacturer. 

Speakeasy had talent only needed time and space for the Speechcraft Workshop. 



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February 22, 1988 

Hillel was a student organization that had fun and worked to alleviate concern of Jewish students. 

March 14, 1988 

DECA dominated on state level at Jacksonville. 

Phi Beta Lambda was affiliated with major businesses such as Florida Power and Light, IBM, American 
Express and Barnett Bank. 

April 11, 1988 

College students elected into office at 13 th annual Florida Black Student Association meeting included 45 
members of BCC's Society of Brotherhood Elite (SBE). 

October 3, 1988 

Student political party leaders Erik Milman of the Young Democrats and John Tikanich discussed their party's 
respective presidential candidates. 

College took the lead with BCC AIDS Awareness program headed by Vice President of Student Affairs, Dr. 
George Young that had produced a movie, "AIDS on Campus". 

November 7, 1988 

African American Student Union attended Gainesville conference and created lasting bonds with fellow student 
members. 

November 21, 1988 

Phi Theta Kappa's Mu Mu was forging a new style of leadership. 

December 12, 1988 

DECA gave all to less fortunate with development of the tact necessary for interaction with others on a personal 
and professional sponsored a balloon release called "Up, Up and Away with Arthritis" at the Broward County 
Fair and distributed 500 pounds of food to 10 needy families. 



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December 12, 1988 

Dr. Tom Ryan, Director of Student Life, requested nominations for Competition Edge Presidential Leaders after 
last year's 73 collegewide nominations for this year's 19 selections. 

January 30, 1989 

BCC's student Brian Bowl team with good in depth and individual strengths defeated the faculty 470 to 105. 

February 13, 1989 

The American West Indies Club (TAWIC) celebrated its second anniversary that featured everything from 
academic assistance to beach parties. 

Human Awareness, a club for students that felt there were more important things above and beyond car 
payments and GPA's. 

March 13, 1989 

Fencing program proposed on South Campus with funding request proposed by Athletic Director Rex Brumley 
to the Student Activities Board. 

Central hosted State Brian Bowl competition after winning 5 out of 7 of the last regional competitions. 

New drum and bugle group Florida Wave brought recognition to BCC and became part of North's music 
program. 



Mu Mu Chapter of Phi Theta Kappa celebrated their 25 th Anniversary at a formal induction at Rolling Hills 
Country Club. 

F-Troopers helped eight severely handicapped children in Orlando theme park Boardwalk and Baseball that 
provided free admission while the BCC students raised the rest of the costs. 

April 3, 1989 

BCC won State Brain Bowl as first ever host team to win. 

College Republicans hosted State Conference on Central Campus. 

North Campus Phi Beta Lambda brought home six state awards. 

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April 17, 1989 

International Club helped build cultural bridges as an ideal way to meet new people. 

Phi Theta Kappa with Omega Phi from North Mu Mu from Central and Alpha Delta Rho from South attended 
the National Convention in Atlanta where Central Campus Mu Mu Chapter received an Award of Excellence. 

BCC College Republicans hosted the Florida Federation of College Republicans Annual Convention at the 
Fort Lauderdale Beach Holiday Inn. 

October 10, 1989 

North Campus club scene thrived this fall with several extremely active and productive organizations. 

Science stressed by TS2 at their semester tea attended by 50 students and 1 5 faculty members with lecture 
on AIDS. 

October 5, 1992 

Phi Theta Kappa members honed their skills at this year's Florida Leadership conference was hosted by the 
Alumni Chapter, Pi of Florida together with Nova University and the Liberal Arts College of Florida Atlantic 
University coordinated by Dr. Mary Jo Henderson. 

BCC student members of Save What's Left were part of 2,000 Broward residents in the 1992 International 
Coastal Cleanup promoted by Elisa Chame, a biology professor and founder of BCC Save What's Left tried to 
motivate more BCC students in the volunteer effort. 

College Democrats were ready for upcoming elections by being focused on issues regarding the elections. 

Seahawk cheerleaders tried out new members. 

Writers Club sided with community by reading every weekend to children at Tent City for Hurricane Andrew 
victims. 

March 7, 1994 

Brain Bowl sought sixth state title. 

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March 7, 1994 

Festivity of flavors as AASU celebrated Caribbean and African tastes. 

Community Connection helped people get their pride and identity back was coordinated by Elisa Applebaum. 

Religious Newman Club taught Catholicism and welcomed all to attend with participation that was coordinated 
by advisor George Spahn. 

Science for Kids project targeted future doctors with positive proof that early intervention programs did work as 
directed by South Campus Dr. Daryl Miller, Coordinator. 

March 21, 1994 

DECA chapters at BCC succeeded at state competition. 

Students Against a Fouled Environment guarded the environment by organizing students to participate in local 
projects and inform students about issues. 

Math team aimed at gold at the University Central Florida competition. 

April 25, 1994 

Stiff competition as BCC's Brain Bowl team placed second to Valencia Community College. 

Global Unity club on South Campus celebrated similarities and appreciated differences that came about 
because of Student Awareness Day, Cultural Diversity Month and the annual Peace Walk. Director of Student 
Life Penny Mclsaac compared this to a movement that would be dynamic and affect change on campus. 

International Club prompted fellowship and community service. 

The Community connection and BCC students joined 1,300 people in 5 th annual MS Walk raised $600.00 



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September 12, 1994 

Architectural Club had plans for students and members. 

Students had access to top criminal justice fraternity Lambda Alpha Epsilon. 

The Runners Club welcomed new members under supervision of advisor Eileen Eliot. 

September 26, 1994 

The Foreign Language Club under guidance of John Pawlowski and Dora Romero was developing officers and 
membership through activities and upcoming celebrations. 

The Horticulture Club, Better Understanding in the Study of Horticulture (BUSH) was sponsored by Central 
Campus David McLean and met at the Broward County Cooperative Extension Office. 

Phi Beta Lambda supported all business interests including Business, Accounting, Marketing and Computer 
Majors. 

October 17, 1994 

Volunteer Fair brought huge crowds and success at Central. 

DECA entered New River raft race for charity. 

October 3 1,1994 

The Marital Arts Club's kick off on Central was supervised by Central Math instructor Vince Grasso. 

November 14, 1994 

Phi Theta Kappa brought home regional honors after various individual competitions. 

The Student Ambassadors gave out $25.00 gift certificates to needy families for Thanksgiving. 

Phi Beta Lambda sponsored a new tax assistance program. 

November 28, 1994 

BCC's Beta Chi Chapter brought home titles and honors at Regional American Criminal Justice Association 

Hollywood meeting. 

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December 12, 1994 

African American Student Union went to the Florida African American Student Association. 

Circle K provided services to the community and not only at the holidays. 

January 23, 1995 

Parade that commemorated Martin Luther King, Jr. with the BCC Chapter of the African American Student 
Union proudly marched in Fort Lauderdale. 

February 6, 1995 

The Haitian extravaganza in honor of Black History Month was to promote Caribbean culture and unity featured 
Professor Jean Claude Exulien "Haiti and the United States; Anthropologist Claude Charles" Voodoo Myth 
Religion"; and Dr. Roger Biamby Caribbean Unity was planned by the Roots Club. 

Phi Theta Kappa Chapter at Central hosted the Valentine's Dance in the cafeteria. 

March 13, 1995 

The African American Student Union and the American West Indian Club co-sponsored "The Roots of Addis 
Abada". 

Club Olympic games was set for success with softball tournament, sporting competitions in the Gym, club 
fundraisers, wacky games and relays. 

April 24, 1995 

President Willis Holcombe joined Phi Theta Kappa at the International Convention in Chicago as 34 BCC 
students won honors with Central's Mu Mu Chapter recognized for outstanding achievement and received a 
Continued Excellence Award that ranked 26 chapters among the 1 ,200 chapters with chapter alumni Elizabeth 
Priore received recognition for her service as PTK International President. Drs. Holcombe, Henderson and 
Nightingale were honored for dedicated service and received the Continued Excellence Award for advisors 
while Dr. Holcombe received an award of distinction. 



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April 24, 1995 

BCC International student speakers founded Central Campus Students' Horizons as a volunteer program 
designed to help Broward County schools by enhancing multicultural education. 

South Drama Club made a name with two award winning productions, "Snow white and Friends" then "Going 
Toward the Light" (AIDS play). 

BCC Sailing Club sailed into the Keys sunset with Tigertail Director Bill Metcalf. 

September 11, 1995 

BCC-Habitat through BCC's Community Connection built homes for Davie residents. 

October 23, 1995 

Educators promoted World AIDS Day with collegewide events that provided valuable information. 

Computer Club introduced the Internet to its BCC members. 

January 22, 1996 

Members of BCC's African American Student Union honored slain civil rights leader Dr. Martin Luther King in 
conjunction of a town of Davie program in FAU's Davie Campus auditorium. 

February 19, 1996 

BCC teams swept regional Brain Bowl tournament. 

Circle K Club sponsored horses for handicapped children. 

Hillel went to Israel from all three BCC campuses for the United Jewish Appeal Student Winter Mission. 

Roots, the Haitian American Organization celebrated Black History Month and 10 years of freedom from the 
Duvalier Dictatorship. 

March 25, 1996 

DECA beat out the state competition with over 40 students while North DECA Advisor Paul Ricker was elected 

to the State Board of Directors and selected as Advisor of the Year. 

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March 25, 1996 

BCC AIDS educators won big at the University of Central Florida. 

South Campus Club leaders carried out a Peace Walk in response to a group of Ku Klux Klan members who 
passed out neo-Nazi literature on campus. 

April 8, 1996 

College AIDS Awareness and Prevention Program won top honors at the Health Education Consortium hosted 
by the University of Central Florida. 

Members of BCC's African American Student Union attended annual convention in Gainesville with the theme, 
Promises to Keep; Many miles to go before we can sleep. 

April 22, 1996 

Positive effort brought campus and community together for the Celebration of the Future to benefit a BCC 
student Nary Baran who needed a kidney transplant. 

November 20, 1996 

Phi Theta Kappa hosted a convention at the Fort Lauderdale Hilton with BCC's South Campus Alpha Delta 
Rho chapter. 



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