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Full text of "The students' handbook"

.D\ / 

31 }( 
1^16/17 



::'-vM, ■:'■■■''■■■ 






3| Maryland State College of Agriculture, 
ft College Park, Maryland. 



/ 



LIBRARY-COLLEGE PARK ' 




Trade at 



E. F. Droop & Sons Co. 

1 3th & G STS., N. W. 
Washington, D. C. 
An M. S. C. Booster 



"IT PAYS TO USE THEM" 

SWIFT'S 
RED STEER 
FERTILIZERS 

Swift customers say that they 
get 2/5 bushels more wheat and 
corn per acre from Swift's Fertili- 
zers than from the "next best." 

This equals $10.00 per ton 
profit, even with only 1 bushel of 
wheat more, figuring wheat at 
$1.00 per bushel and using 200 
pounds fertilizer per acre. 

ORDER SWIFT'S 
AND PROVE THIS PROFIT 

WRITE 

Swift & Company, Inc. 

STOCK EXCHANGE BLDG., BALTIMORE. 



Contents 

Page 

Agricultural Club 18 

Baseball, 1916 Record 26 

Baseball Score Sheet, 1917 34 

Buildings 9 

Calendar, 1916-1917 6 

Calendar, School Year 7 

Calvert Hall 8 

Cash Account 40-48 

Chess Club 18 

Church Directory 11 

College Spirit 21 

One Way to Spend Sunday 22 

Engineering Society 18 

Faculty Committees 10 

Football Records, 1915 80 

Football Score Sheet, 1916 32 

Fraternities 18 

Greeting to New Students 4 

Handbook 17 

Interclass Contests 24 

Intercollegiate Records 31 

Lacrosse Record. 1916 26 

Lacrosse Score Sheet 32 

Liebig Chemical Society 18 

Managers Athletic Team, etc 18 

Miscellaneous Organizations 18 

Morrill Literary Society 18 

M. S. C. Song 19 

M. S. C. Weekly 17 

New Mercer Literary Society 18 

The Gateway r» 

Places Worth Seeing 20 

Publications 17 

Reveille 17 

Rossbourg 18 

Study Schedule 36, 38, 40 

Student Rules 4 

Track Records of M. S. C 30 

Track Meet, 1916 Scores 30 

Y. M. C. A 12-16 

USE GAMES— DO NOT ABUSE THEM. 



~y\arKxP~<i'vA . t^ v-a) "e>v ^-tX<. , 

The 
Students' 
Handbook 

1916-1917 






PUBLISHED ANNUALLY 
BY 

The Young Men's Christian Association 

OF 

Maryland State College 



UPUB 



(^m\m to Hfto Stndfnts 



CtlCfD 



To each new student the Y. M. C. A. ex- 
tends a cordial welcome. It wishes to make 
everyone feel at home — to look forward to a 
year of well spent effort among a group of 
men whose friendship and fellowship, it trusts, 
will make college life more pleasant and more 
profitable. 



(titi 



The Association recognizes no denomina- 
tional differences and works for everyone, re- 
gardless of whether or not he is a member. 
On the other hand, the Y. M. C. A. earnestly 
invites you to give it your support. It needs 
you — you need it. With your help it can in- 
crease its sphere of usefulness. 

STUDENT RULES 

Every student at the College must live the 
life of a man and a gentleman. 




192827 






CALENDAR 


1916-1917 


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B- 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 
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> _5: 6^JL 8 9 10 11 
9 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 
•2 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 
26 27 28 29 30 


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2 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 

Q 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 

24 25 26 27 28 29 30 

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CALENDAR 



FIRST TERM 

TUESDAY, St'ptpmbor 12th, and Wednesday, 
September 18th. — p]ntrance Examinations. 

THURSDAY, September 14th, 1 P. M.— Col- 
lege Work Begins. 

THURSDAY, November .30th. — Thanksgiving 
Recess. 

FRIDAY, December 22nd, 12 M. — First Term 
Knds. 

FRIDAY, December 22nd, 12 M., to Wednes- 
day, January 3rd, 8 A. M. — ^Christmas Recess. 



SECOND TERM 

WEDNESDAY', January 3rd, 8 A. M.— Second 
Term Begins. 

WEDNESDAY, January 3rd. — Special Winter 
Courses Begin. 

THURSDAY, February 1st. — Filing Subjects 
of Theses. 

SATURDAY, March 17th.— Second Term and 
Special Winter Courses End. 



THIRD TERM 

MONDAY, March 19th.— Third Term Begins. 

WEDNESDAY, April 4th. Noon, to Wednes- 
day, April 11th, 8 A. M. — Easter Recess. 

TUESDAY, May 15th.— Submitting of Theses. 

FRIDAY, June 1st.— Final Meeting of Trus- 
tees. 

SUNDAY', June 3rd. — -Baccalaureate Sermon. 

MONDAY, June 4th.— Class Day. 

TUESDAY, June 5th.— Alumni Day. 

WEDNESDAY, June 6th, 11 A. M. — Gradua- 
tion Day Exercises. 

FRIDAY, June 8th. — Examinations for Pro- 
motion Begin. 

FRIDAY', June 15th. — Examinations for Pro- 
motion End. 

7 



BUILDINGS 

We hope the new Agricultural Building will 
be under way by tbe first of November. The 
money for this building was appropriated by 
the last Legislature. When completed it will 
be one of the best buildings of its kind in the 
United States. 

"Calvert Hall," the new dormitory in which 
120 students live, contains also the Y. M. C. A. 
rooms in section A and a classroom in Sec- 
tion E. 

"The President's Residence"' is now the 
rooming place of about 20 boys. It is com- 
monly called "Cab's House"' and sits in a beau- 
tiful grove near the other college buildings. 

The Farm House, near Cab"s House, fur- 
nishes quarters for fifteen students. 

The departments of Civil, Electrical and 
Mechanical Engineering are located in a two- 
storj"^ brick building and annex, an addition 
four stories in height. The building is com- 
modious and well equipped. 

The Chemical Building is just above and 
west of the P^ngineering Buildings. 

Morrill Hall, commonly known as Science 
Kail, is a large Iniilding between the library 
and the Mess Hall and accommodates the de- 
partments of Agriculture, Horticulture, Ento- 
mology, Vegetable Pathology and Veterinarj- 
Science. 

The Library is located in the two-story brick 
building near Science Hall and the Auditorium. 

The Auditorium is a frame building con- 
structed for temporary use after the fire. It 
serves its purpose admirably. Chapel exercises 
are held in it daily. 

The Mess Hall is a frame building in the 
rear of the old dormitory site and is the scene 
of active work three times a day. 

The new greenhouses contain also class- 
rooms for Pomology, Vegetable Culture and 
Landscape Gardening. 

The buildings at the Experiment Station 
contain many collections of interest to the 
student and he should familiarize himself with 
them as soon as possible. 



Take good care of your soul's dwelling place. 
9 



FACULTY COMMITTEES 

(The President is an ex-officio member of all 
committees.) 

Alumni : Messrs. Buckle.y. Cory, Byrd, War- 
then, Jarrell, Dennis, and Ruffner. 

Amusements, Dances, P^ntertainments, Lec- 
tures, Student Socials: Messrs. 4i(i«B«B, T. H. 
Taliaferro, Crisp, Broughton, 4iMBMK\% Bom- 
berger, Cory, and Anspon. , 

Catalogue : Messrs. T. H. Taliaferro, Spence, 
Metzger, Broughton, and Cory. 

Courses of Study : Messrs. McDonnell, 
Spence, ^y. T. L. Taliaferro, Bomberger, i^ 
mone, T. H. Taliaferro, and Metzger. 

Discipline : Messrs. Spence, McDonnell, T. 
H. Taliaferro, Harrison, and Broughton. 

Library : Messrs. Bomberger, W. T. L. Talia- 
ferro, Gwinner, B*>«e, and Broughton. 

Physical Culture and Athletics : Messrs. 
Byrd, Richardson, Everett, Griffith, Bomberger, 
Broughton, and Cory. 

Public Functions : Messrs. Harrison, W. T. 
L. Taliaferro, Gwinner, Everett, Anspon, Bom- 
berger, and Richardson. 

Publicity : Messrs. BirighiiJDi, Richardson, 
Sjtfiaotrs, and Metzger. 

Sanitation : Messrs. Griffith, McDonnell, W. 
T. L. Taliaferro, BH«lrteA-, and T. H. Taliaferro. 

Schedule : Messrs. Creese, McDonnell, Har- 
rison, Cory, and Gwinner. 

Student Enrollment, Records, Class and 
Quarter Assignments : Messrs. Spence, Harri- 
son, Richardson, Metzger, and T. H. Taliaferro. 

Student Enrollment, Records, Class fti*e» 
Quarter Assignments, Glee Club, Dramatic As- 
sociation : Messrs. Richardson, Creese, Dar- 
row, Bi-uce, and W. T. L. Taliaferro. 

Student Publications : Messrs. Richardson, 
Metzger, Bomberger, and Cory. 

Student Relations : Messrs. Bomberger, Omm- 
v^¥F, Richardson, SyjDttOjrs, and Ruffner. 

Summer School : Messrs. Metzger, Bom- 
berger, Crisp, Beckenstrater, aii<l 



College is merely an opportunity to increase 
your ability to serve humanity. 

10 



CHURCH DIRECTORY 



COLLEGE PARK. 

Episcopal. — Every Sunday at 7.30 P. M. 
Second Sunday in month at 11 A. M. Sunday- 
school, 10.00 A. M. 

BERWYN. 

Presbyterian. — Services, 7.45 P. M. Senior 
Christian Endeavor, 6.45 P. M, Sunday-school, 
10.30 A. M. 

Roman Catholic. — 9.00 A. M. on first, third 
and fifth Sundays. 

RIVERDALE. 

PresTiyterian. — Services, 11.00 A. M. Sun- 
day-school, 9.30 A. M. 

The Baraca Bible Class of Riverdale invites 
the presence of any and all M. S. C. students 
at its meetings held every Sunday morning. 

HYATTSVILLB. 

Presbyterian.— 11.00 ■ A. M. and 7.30 P. M. 
Sunday-school, 9.45 A. M'. 

Roman Catholic. — .St. Jerome's, 7.30 A. M. 
and 10.45 A, M. Sunday. 

Methodist Episcopal, South. — 11.00 A. M., 
7 30 P. M. Sunday. Sunday-school, 9.45 A. M. 

Johnson Avenue Memorial, M. E. — 11.00 A. 
M. and 7.30 P. M. Sunday. Sunday-school, 
9.45 A. M. 

Episcopal. — Sunday-school, 9.30 A. M. Ser- 
vice, 11.00 A. M. every Sunday. Holy Com- 
munion, first Sunday, 11.00 A. M. 

Baptist. — 11.00 A. M. and 7.30 A. M. Sun- 
day. Sunday-school, 9.30 A. M. 



Help the Church to become more divinely 
human. 

11 




12 



tJoung IQrn's (ittristian ^ssoriation 



^ 



CABINET 

PKIOSIDENT a. M. MERRILL 

VICE-PRESIDENT H. R. SHOEMAKER 

RECORDER J. E. REMSBURG 

TREASURER R. S. DEARSTYNE 

BIBLE STUDY— 

S. W. RUFF, T. V. DO^VNI^^ Assistant 

MEMBERSHIP M. A. PYLE 

SOCIAL W. D. GRAY 

MUSIC K. W. BABCOCK 

ATHLETICS H. SMITH 

PUBLICATIONS— 

J. P. JONES, R. T. KNODE, Assistant 

EMPLOYMENT D. J. HOWARD 

COUNTY CLUBS F. D. DAY 



The Y'oung Men's Christian Association is 
a body of students and faculty members un- 
selfishly interested in all that makes for better 
living. It is closely related to the Interna- 
tional Committee of the Y. M. C. A. of America, 
with headquarters in New Y'ork City. 

Membership in the local branch entitles the 
holder to all the general privileges of every 
Y'. M. C. A. in America. The Baltimore City 
Association gives to M. S. C. boys full rights 
of the Building, but most city Y'. M. C. A.'s do 
not give swimming pool rights. In Washing- 
ton the R. R. Y. M. C. A., 4th floor of the 
Union Station, and the Central Y. M. C. A., 
17.'!2 G St., N. W., extend to our members 
billiard table and bowling alley rights on the 
same basis as their own members. 

13 



OUR QUARTERS. 

With possession of six rooms in Calvert Hall 
the Y. M. C. A. assumes a new position in the 
social and recreational life of the College. In 
Section A is its large reception and reading 
room furnished with easy chairs, book case, 
library tables, piano and Victrola. Here also 
is placed the telephone booth. This room is 
a headquarters where '"good fellows get to- 
gether." 

Opening oflP the reception room are the pri- 
vate office of the General Secretary and a 
living room. Chess, checkers, carrom, flinch, 
baseball and numerous other games are pro- 
vided for these rooms. 

Adjoining the rooms above mentioned is the 
post-office with lock boxes, stamp counter, etc. 
A student will be in charge at certain hours 
of the day. 

In the basement under Section C is a newly- 
equipped billiard room. A boy will be in 
charge during periods when the room is open 
to see that it is run as it should be. No charge 
will be made to members of the Y. M. C. A. 
A plan has been worked out whereby individ- 
uals will be kept from monopolizing the use 
of the tables and from playing at all if their 
class work is unsatisfactory. 



USE GAMES— DO NOT ABUSE THEM. 



THE PURUOSE. 



The purpose of the Association is to help a 
"boy to be a boy"' without being a bad one. 
It fosters all those games which mean for 
clean enjoyment. It endeavors to make the 
boy more thoughtful of the great problems of 
life — of his obligations to himself and to 
humanity. It tries to smother the worst and 
at the same time bring out the best there is 
in him. 

14 



MEMBERSHIP. 

Students of any faith are invited to member- 
ship. Last year the local Association had on 
its rolls the fifth largest percentage of the 
student body recorded in any college of our 
size in the country. 

The Y. M. C. A. dues will be for the coming 
year $2, which gives the members free use of 
all the equipment which the Association pos- 
sesses. The membership fees pay less than half 
the expenses and interested friends pay the 
rest. 

BIBLE STUDY. 

Most college boys do not know what they 
really think on religious matters and most of 
them are quite willing to know more. 

Our aim is to interest every student in the 
College and with one less we will not be satis- 
fied. There are a number of books from which 
choice may be made by the leaders and their 
groups. Among them are : 

1. "Great Events in the Life of Christ." 
McConaughy. 

2. "The Will of God in a Man's Life Work." 
Wright. 

3. "Life and Works of Jesus." Murray. 

4. "Studies in the Life of St. Paul." Leacock. 

5. "Student Standards of Action." Elliot. 

MISSION STUDY. 

Every one should know something of the 
missions. They have been forerunners of 
civilization in every continent ,on the globe. 

The last term of the year will be given over 
entirely to Mission Study. Both Foreign and 
Home Missions will be considered. 

15 



IlELIGIOUS MEETINGS. 

Every Sunday afternoon services of a non- 
sectarian nature are held. Speakers of note 
are easy to obtain, due to the proximity to 
Washington. Musical programs and sacred 
concerts will alternate with the speaking pro- 
grams. 



SOCIAL. 

Early in each year the Association gives its 
reception to new students. This chance to get 
acquainted, to have a good time, and to learn 
something about the College is one the new 
student cannot afford to turn down. 



EMPLOYMENT. 

The employment Inireau endeavors to find 
suitable work for all who desire it. Although 
many students find employment around the 
College and in the vicinity each year, there 
are usually some who want work, but fail to 
get it. With the help of every boy the Y. M. 
C. A. hopes to change this for the better. 

The Y. M. C. A. last year was especially 
active in securing summer work for those boys 
who desired it. Through the efforts of the 
employment bureau a large numlter of Iioys 
were placed in a position last summer to earn 
money to help out the expense of their Col- 
lego training, and at the same time secure 
valuable experience. Many boys have found 
the assistance of the Y. M. C. A. of great 
value in working their way through College. 

IG 



PUBLICATIONS 



The M, S. C. Weekly — the official college 
newspaper — ^is published by the student body. 
The Seniors edit it and the Juniors take care 
of the business end of the publication. Every 
student owes it to himself and his college to 
subscribe for it, write up articles for it and 
to patronize its advertisers who make possible 
itf! publication. 

Editor. H. R. Shoemaker ; Business Manager, 
G. P. Eppley. 

The Reveille is the annual of M. S. C, and 
in past years has ranked very high among 
such publications. It is published by the 
Senior Class. Representing as it does the 
literature and art of the College in its stories, 
jokes and take-offs, and being at the same 
time a camera record of all college activities, 
every student should reserve $2 to pay for a 
copy when it appears in May. 

Editor, L. M. Haslup ; Business Manager, 
W. M. Kishpaugh. 

Y. M. C. A. HANDBOOK. 

The Handbook makes its bow to M. S. 
Caesars for the third time this year. It is 
the expectation of the Y, M. C. A. to publish it 
each year and furnish it free to all students 
and prospective students. Remember the ad- 
vertiser — patronize him — he made this book 
possible. 



College is merely an opportunity to increase 
your abilitv to serve humanity. 



MISCELLANEOUS ORGANIZATIONS 

Besides the many miscellaneous affairs, tlie 
following associations conduct regular student 
activities : The old Rossbourg Club, founded 
in 1891, is dear to every M. S. Caesar. This 
club conducts the cotillions, and to the man 
who wishes to dance, and to be introduced into 
the social side of our College, our advice is 
"Join the Rossbourg." 

The Literary Societies are Morrill and New 
Mercer ; representatives from these engage 
annually in a debate on Tuesday of Commence- 
ment Week. The man in this contest who 
proves to be the best "live wire"' receives a 
very handsome gold medal offered by the 
Alumni Association. Under the auspices of 
these societies is also held an Oratorical Con- 
test for the Wm. Pinkney Whyte Medal, offered 
annually by the Hon. Isaac Lobe Straus. A 
m.ember of one of the societies is also chosen 
to represent M. S, C. in the annual Maryland 
Intercollegiate debate. 

Last year saw the organization of a College 
Chess Club, which affords many a pleasant 
hour for lovers of this science. 

In the spring of 1913 the first fraternity was 
organized here, and at the present time Gamma 
Pi, Sigma Phi Sigma, Kappa Alpha, Nu Sig- 
ma Omricon are fully organized and represent 
the highest type of the fraternal idea. Mem- 
bership is, of course, by invitation from the 
individual fraternity. 

The Agricultural Club, organized in the 
spring of 1014, and the Student (irange hope 
to aid in the training of leaders of country 
life. Subjects dealing principally with the 
farm will be discussed at regular meetings by 
men of note and every member will as often as 
possible be placed on the program. 

The above applies also to the Liebig Chem- 
ical Society and the Engineering Society, ex- 
cept that their main interest is not agricul- 
ture but chemistry and engineering. 

Several County Clubs have been organized 
and are doing good work in bringing the Col- 
lege and the counties into closer touch with 
each other. 



18 



'THE SCHOOL IN THE HEART 
OF MARYLAND" 



^ 



To the tune of "There's a Girl in the Heart 
of Maryland." 

In the finest Aj?gie College 
In the dearest Aggie town, 

Midst oak trees tall and comrades dear, 

There plays a team I mean to cheer. 
Hear our happy voices calling ! 

We will ever stand by thee. 
So thy glory ne'er '11 be falling. 

We adore our M. S. C. 

CHORUS. 

There's a school in the heart of Maryland 

With a team that looks good to me. 
So we'll shove them through the line, 
Wo'll do it every time ; 

Fighting, we always shall be, 
For Maryland, our Fairyland, 

WIe love thee, oh, M. S. C. 
There's a school in the heart of Maryland 

With a team that looks good to me. 

Come on ! Let's be up and doing ; 

Let us sing a happy song. 

We'll fill our line as it grows thin. 
For St. John's know they can not win. 

Just you watch our linesmen smashing. 

And I'll bet a brand new coat. 

With our backs forever clashing. 
Soon we'll get old St. John's goat. 

CHORUS. 

The rooters with real College spirit cheer 
hardest and most cheerfully when their team 
is losing — that's when it is most needed. 

You don't deserve the honey if you 'all'us 
shun the stings — your team can't always win, 
but you can always cheer them when they lose. 

19 



PLACES WORTH SEEING 

GOA'EKNMEXT EXPERIMENT FARM— Belts- 
ville, M(l. 

AGRICULTURAL DEPT.— Mall. 12th and 14th 
Sts. S. W. 

ARLINGTON GEMETERY. Arlinfrton. Va. 

ARMY MEDICAL MUSEUM— Tth and P. Sts. 
S. W. 

POT,ANICAL GARDEN— Pennsylvania Ave. 
and 1st St. 

BT'REAU OF ENGRAYING AND PRINTING— 
14th and B Sts. S. AY. 

CAI'ITOI> — Capitol Hill. 

CORPOUAN ART OALLERY— New York Ave. 
and 17th St. N. W. 

DEAD LETTER MUSEUM— In National 
Museum. 

GOYERNMENT PRINTING OFFICE— N. Capi- 
tol and H Sts. 

LIBRARY OF CONGRESS— Capitol Hill. 

LINCOLN MUSEUM (25 cts. Admission »— .",10 
Ktth St. N. ^Y. 

MARINE BARRACKS— Sth and G Sts. S. E. 

MT. YERNON. YA. — Wharves Tth and M Sts. 

NATIONAL MUSEUM— Smithsonian Grounds. 

NAYY YARD— Foot of 8th St. S. E. 

I'OTOMAC (4REAT FALLS— Washington and 
Old Dominion Ry. 

S>"THSONIAN INSTITUTION- Smithsonian 
(irounds. Mall.' 

SOLDIERS' HOME — ^Near Seventh St. ex- 
tended. 

STATE. WAR AND NAYY DEPTS.— Pennsyl- 
vania Ave. and 17th St. 

TREASURY— Pennsylvania Ave. and l.'.th St. 

WASHINGTON M O N U M E N T — Washingtim 
I'ark, near 14th St. 

WHITE HOUSE, EAST ROOM— Pennsylvania 
Ave. and 10th St. 

ZOOLOGICAL PARK— Rock Creek. Open San- 
days. 



COLLEGE SPIRIT! WHAT IS IT? 

1. Is it rooting uproariously for a winning 
team 'i 

2. Is it liotly defending your Alma Mater's 
name under all circumstances? 

3. Is it indulgence in horse-play, practical 
jokes and mischief generally? 

4. Is it an intense spirit of rivalry with 
other colleges? 

YES! YES! YES! 
IT IS ALL THAT AND MORE. 

1. It is rooting cheerfully and encouragingly 
for the losing team that gives the best it has 
to a clean fight. The rooters section that sits 
glum while the team is slipping, has no right 
to exult or feel proud when victory hovers 
near. 

2. It is defending her name from foes — but 
it stands against all those things in student 
life which merit shame. 

3. It is for rollicking times — ^but it is not 
for anarchy ; it requires the breaking of none 
oi; the laws of common sense or of justice. 

4. It is for the spirit of intense rivalry — 
Init it never forgets good sportsmanship to- 
ward the teams and students of other colleges. 

* 21 



INTERCLASS CONTEST WINNERS, 
1915-1916 

Cane Rush — Freshman, 
Cross Country Run — J^reshman. 
Billiard Tournament — Freshman. 
Tug of War — Sophomore.* 



ONE WAY TO SPEND SUNDAY 

8.00 A. M. — Snoring. 

9.00 A. M. — Still at it. Had expected to go 
Sunday School. 

10.00 A. M, — Cussing out unwelcome visitors. 

11.00 A. M. — Going to study. 

12.00 — Still going but not gone. 

1.00 P. M.— Still going to study — can't take 
a walk — f/ot to study as soon 
as the fellows clear out. 
3.00 P. M. — Fellows still hangin' roun'. 
5.00-8.00 P. M., etc. — ^Much the same only 
more so. Had expected to go to 
church, but must give it up — 
huh — huh — got to study. 

laghts out — In rotten humor ; no studying 
done ; devilishly dissatisfied 
with self ; not rested. 

Through the night — Dreams of zips bearing 
down upon him in battalion 
formation ; zips give way to 
threatening wall-eyed preacher 
who missed him during the 
day, etc., etc. 

Monday morning — Humor rottener than ever. 
Dreams come zipping true. No, 
never again. — \Phil Osopher. 



He loveth his College best, who 
liveth for her the fullest, noblest life 
of service. 




H. C. ("Curly") BYRD, 

A Good Athlete, a Good Coach and a Good 
Fellow. 



INTERCLASS CONTESTS 



HARRY SMITH AND STUDENT CONFER- 
ENCE COMMITTEE IN CHARGE. 

Lots 'o pep ! Something doing all the time. 
A real red blooded, manly rivalry and a jolly 
good time is' the reason for interclass contests. 

September. — 'Freshman-Sophomore cane rush. 

October. — Interclass track and field meet 
managed by Coach Byrd and the Y. M. C. A. 
The class totalling the most points will be 
awarded a trophy. Another trophy will be 
given the Freshman or the Sophomore class as 
a part of the Freshman-Sophomore series. 

December. — A billiard tournament between 
the Freshman and Sophomore classes will l)e 
held. The other classes may also participate. 

January.- — If finances permit the buying of 
a wrestling mat, it is planned to conduct an 
interclass wrestling match. 

During the spring months contests will be 
staged in baseball and tennis, and a grand 
tug-o-war across Paint Branch will be pulled. 

Since each of the two classes contesting will 
always bicker for rules favoring itself at the 
expense of its rival, the rules will be drawn 
up and put in writing by the Athletics Chair- 
man, Coach Byrd. and the .lunior and Senior 
members of the Student Conference Committee. 



Don't be a quitter — but l)etter be a quitter 
than use unfair means. 



Phone: Berwyn Exchange 



E.T. HARRISON & GO. 



DEALERS IN 



General Merchandise 

COLLEGE PARK, MD. 



AGENTS 



W. L DOUGLAS 



$3 




5 




AND f 
UP # 



W. L. Douglas. 



MEMORANDUM 



CLASS PRESIDENTS 

Senior — H. B. Derrick. 

Junior — P. E. Clark. 

Sophomore — L. L. Siegert. 

Freshman — L. M. Goodwin. 

Second Year Agricultural — H. F. Bible. 



1916-1917 ATHLETICS 

Football — R. S. Dearstyne, Manager ; Lyman 
Oberlin, Captain. 

Baseball — W. M. Kishpaugh, Manager. 
Track — Irving Coggins, Manager. 
Tennis — C. Fuchs, Manager. 
Lacrosse— A. V. Williams, Manager. 



FOOTBALL SCHEDULE, 1916 . 

September 2-3 — 'Baltimore Folytechnic Insti- 
tute, at College Park. 

September 30 — Pennsylvania Military Col- 
lege, at Chester, Pa. 

October 7 — Dickinson, at College Park, Md. 

October 11 — -Navy, at Annapolis. 

October 21 — Virginia Military Institute, at 
College Park. 

October 28 — Haverford. at College Park. 

November 4 — St. .lohns, at Annapolis. 

November 11 — Catholic I'niversity. at Wash- 
ington. 

November IS — New York University, at New 
York. 

November .30 — (Thanksgiving) Johns Hop- 
kins, at Baltimore. 

2G 



PHOTOGRAPHERS OF MEN WHO ^ 

MAKE HISTORY Jt 



PHOTOGRAPHERS 

1311 F STREET N. W. 

WASHINGTON. D. C. 



PHONE. MAIN 4703 



27 




"OBEY" OBERLIN, 
Captain, IJtlO Football Team. 



Square, clean athletics will put anv college 
tc the front. 



Walk- Over Shoes 

LEAD THE WORLD 

For Men and Women in 

all the Latest Styles. 

Let. your next pair 

be Walk -Overs 

$3.50 and up 



WOLF'S 
WALK-OVER SHOE SHOP 

929 F Street N. W., 
WASHINGTON, D. C. 



^^^^^^^«-Jl«"^«.o^^^.^^«.0'^o 



31 



FOOTBALL, 1916 





1 Score 


Score 


M. S. C. 








M. S. C. 






M. S. C. 




1 


M. S. C. 








M. S. c' 






M. s. c. : 






M. S. C. j 






M. S. C. 


1 


M. S. C. ' 






M. S. C. 








M. S. C. 








M. S. C. 








LACROSSE, 1917 


M. S. C. 








M. S. C. 








M. S. C. 








M. S. C. 1 






M. S. C. 








M. S. C. 











If you dif. (lie kickin' 



Charlottesville Woolen 
^^ Mills ^= 

Charlottesville, Virginia 



Manufacturers of 



High-Grade Uniform Cloths in 
Sky and Dark Blue Shades 



For Army, Navy and other Uniform 
Purposes and the largest as- 
sortment and best 
quality 

CADET GRAYS 



Including those used at the U. S. Mill- 'SZ 

tary Academy at West Point, M. S. C. 2Z 

and other leading Military Schools of oC 

the country. 3£ 



33 







BASEBALL, 1917 






Score 




Score 


M. S. C. 






M. S. C. 






M. S. C. 








M. S. C. 








M. S. C. 








M. S. C. 








M. S. C. 








M. S. C. 








M. S. C. 








M. S. C. 








M. S. C. 








M. S. C. 






M.S. C.| 

1 






M. S. C.' 







Don't walk around to save funeral expenses. If 
you art- a dead one, admit it. 



34 



HOTEL 
RENNERT 

Rich cuisine 
Easily reached 
Near business section 
Nice, comfortable rooms 
Entirely fireproof 
Reasonable rates 
Travelers' headquarters 

Saratoga at ^^ Baltimore, 
Liberty Street d Maryland 



35 



STUDY SCHEDULE— FIRST TERM 


Mon. 


Tues. 


Wed. 


Thurs. 


Frl. 


8:15 












9:00 












9:45 










10:30 






/ 




* 


11 ::i5 
to 


Drill 


Drill 


* 


Drill 


12 :25 


CHAPEL 


1:00 


DINNER 


1 :30 












2:15 












3:00 












3 :45 


■ . ■ '! 








*Mil 

Evei 

Jift^; lu 


itary inst 
y effort 
j ahovo o 


ruction < 
we make 
irselves. 


11 one of 
for tlir 

3G , 


two days i 
happiness 


ndicatcd. 
jf others 



Meet Me at— 



JOES 



SODA 
ICE-CREAM 
CANDY, Etc. 

Hot Lunch served at all hours. 

Room or board by day, week or 
month. 



STUDY SCHEDULE— SECOND TERM 




Mon. 


Tues. 


Wed. 


Thurs. 


Fri. 


8:15 












9:00 












9:45 












10:30 












11 :25 
to 

12 :25 


Drill 


Drill 


1= 


Drill 


* 


12 :25 


CHAPICL 


1 :00 


DINNER 


1:30 












2:15 












3:00 












3:45 












*Mil 

AdV€ 

polishe 


itary inst 
rsity is 
s its jeM 


ruction o 
the dia 

^els. 


n one of 
mond w 

38 


two days i 
ith which 


ndicated. 
Heaven 



YOU OWE IT 

To Maryland to interest every boy in 
preparing for a well- 
lived life 

YOU CAN PAY IT 



To Maryland by showing every boy that ^ 

the Maryland State College |< 

of Agriculture can |< 

fit him to M 

EARN MORE I 

BE MORE I 

ENJOY MORE I 

Catalog and full information upon request -X- 

THE MARYLAND STATE 

COLLEGE OF AGRICULTURE | 

College Park, Maryland % 



30 



STUDY SCHEDULE— THIRD TERM 





Mod. 


Tues. 


Wod. 


Thurs. 


Fri. 


8:15 












9:00 












9:45 












10 :30 












11 :25 
to 

12 :25 


Drill 


Drill 


¥ 


Drill 


* 


12 :25 


CHArEIi 


1 :00 


DINNER 


1 :;jo 












1 
2 :15 1 

1 










1 
8 :00 










:^■AT> 


! 










*Mil 
10 vol 

lifts u 


itary inst 
y effort 
; aliovo o 


ruction o 
ft^e niako 
irselves. 


n one of 
for the 

40 


two days i 
happiness 


ndicatod. 
of others 



Parker Bridget 

Company 

Quality Outfitters 

TO 

COLLEGE MEN 

THE AVENUE AT NINTH 
WASHINGTON 



THE HANDY SHOP 
FOR STUDENTS 

m Mm mi mmm 

COMPANY 

G STREET, Near 7th 

Work Done While You Wait 

642 G STREET N. W. 
WASHINGTON 



41 



CASH ACCOUNT 



Keep your account straight witb God. 
42 



ELEVENTH STREET 

Opposite Post Ollice Dept. — 



Raleigh Haberdasher 

Hart, Schaffner & Marx Clothes 

1109-11 PENNSYLVANIA c>lVE. 
Between 11th and 12th Streets 



-Next to Raleigh Hotel 



TWELFTH STREET 



43 



^^ 



'it 



CASH ACCOUNT 



r>on't make Sunday a day of loaflng- 
inspiratioh and uplift. 



44 



-make it a day 



START— WRITE 

Keep on writing without 
a balk or a hitch. Carry 
it anywhere — right side 
up or vice versa — can't 
leak. 

Ask your dealer to dem- 
onstrate. MOORE'S 
won't leak. Moore's 
writes without coax- 
ing. Different from 
the ordinary pen. 

Sold by college book- 
stores, druggists, jewel- 
ers and stationers. 

AMERICAN FOUN. 

TAIN PEN CO. 
Adams, Cushing & 

Foster, Inc. 
168 Devonshire St. 
Boston 



45 



CASH ACCOUNT 



If a book is worth borrowing it is worth returning. 
4G 



MANICURING 



:«: 



MILLER'S BARBER 
SHOPS 

"STRICTLY FIRST-CLASS" 

The M. S. C. Boys Favorite 

717 14th STREET 
Phone, Main 4138 



3£ 



1208 G STREET i 
Phone, Main 6891 J 



47 



CASH ACCOUNT 



RemcmlKn- tho advertiser, to keep him contented. 

48 




COOPER & FINN 

JEWELERS and OPTICIANS 
910 G Street N. W. 



49 



MEMORANDUM 



50 



MEMORANDUM 



51 



MEMORANDUM 



52 



For Prompt Service, 

Sanitary Methods of Cleaning and 

Pressing, Call 

THE 

Washington Tailoring 
and Pressing Company 

710 9th STREET N. W. 

'T/je M. 5. C. A. Boys' Favorite 
Corner.'' 

Garments Remodeled. 

Satisfaction Guaranteed. 

Prices Moderate. 

Special Rates for Students. 

Phone, Main 1187 



5? 



MEMORANDUM 



54 



RAH! RAH! RAH! 

PRESSLER BROS. 

THE COLLEGE 

HABERDASHERS 
M. S. C.'s Favorite 

IN THE 

NIFTY NOBBY 

HABERDASHERY 



MENTION THIS AD AND GET 
10% DISCOUNT. 



TWO STORES 

612 9th St., N. W. 

AND 

1419 Pa. Ave., N. W. 
Washington, - D. C. 



55 



MEMORANDUM 



Thomas & Evans 
Printing Co. 

BOOKS, CATALOGUES, 

NEWSPAPERS, 

DAILY, WEEKLY, MONTHLY 




LETTERHEADS, BILLHEADS, 

STATEMENTS, CARDS 

and 

COMMERCIAL PRINTING 

GENERALLY 



217-219 GUILFORD AVE. 

(at the hub of the city) 

BALTIMORE, MD. 



ADDRESSES 



58 



IZ 



Armour Fertilizer | 
Works, Inc. 

BALTIMORE. MD. I 

MANUFACTURERS AND IMPORTERS OF | 

High-Grade Fertilizers | 

Acid Phosphate f 

Nitrate of Soda t 

Sulphate of Ammonia i 

Dried Blood § 

Animal Tankage t 

Bone Meal 1 

Raw Bone Meal f 

Poultry Foods t 

192827 

59 



ADDRESSES 



60 



The Brunswick- 

Balke-Collender 

Company 

712 THIRTEENTH STREET 

NORTHWEST 

Washington, D. C. 



Leading Manufacturers 
of 

Billiard and Combination 

Tables, Refrigerators, 

Bowling Alleys 



We Manufacture the Celebrated 
"BalHmore Duck Pin" 

Large Supply of Bowling Incidentals 
Always in Stock