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Full text of "Students' hand book of the University of Maryland"

1925 



CALENDAR 



1926 



July 



S M T W T F S 

12 3 4 

5 6 7 8 9 10 11 
12 13 14 15 16 17 18 
19 20 21 22 23 24 25 

26 27 28 29 30 31 . . 



August 




1 


2 3 4 5 6 7 

9 10 11 12 13 14 

16 17 18 19 20 21 

23 24 25 26 27 28 

30 31 


8 
15 
22 
29 




September 



.... 1 2 3 4 5 

6 7 8 9 10 11 12 

13 14 15 16 17 18 19 

20 21 22 23 24 25 26 

27 28 29 30 

October 

'. '. i 2 3~ 

4 5 ■6789 10 
11 12 13 14 15 16 17 
18 19 20 21 22 23 24 
25 26 27 28 29 30 31 

November 

12 3 4 5 6 7 

8 9 10 11 12 13 14 

15 16 17 18 19 20 21 

22 23 24 25 26 27 28 

29 30 

December 

~~7. 12 3 4 5 

6 7 8 9 10 11 12 

13 14 15 16 17 18 19 

20 21 22 23 24 25 26 

27 28 29 30 31 , . 



January 



s 


M 


T W T 


F 


S 








1 
8 


7, 


3 


4 


5 6 7 


9 


10 


11 


12 13 14 


15 


16 


17 


18 


19 20 21 


22 


23 


24 


25 


26 27 28 


29 


30 


31 











February 



.. 12 3 4 5 6 

7 8 9 10 11 12 13 

14 15 16 17 18 19 20 

21 22 23 24 25 26 27 

28 



March 



12 3 4 5 6 

7 8 9 10 11 12 13 

14 15 16 17 18 19 20 

21 22 23 24 25 26 27 

28 29 30 31 



April 



12 3 

4 5 6 7 8 9 10 
11 12 13 14 15 16 17 

18 19 20 21 22 23 24 
25 26 27 28 29 30 . . 



May 




1 

8 

15 

22 

29 


2 3 4 5 6 7 
9 10 11 12 13 14 

16 17 18 19 20 21 
23 24 25 26 27 28 
30 31 




June 



.. .. 12 3 4 5 

6 7 8 9 10 11 12 

13 14 15 16 17 18 19 

20 21 22 23 24 25 26 

27 28 29 30 



^U ,M. 



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STUDENTS' / 

1 HAN D BOOK 

OF THE 

University of 
Maryland 

PRESENTED BY 

THE 
CHRISTIAN ASSOCIATIONS 

1925- 1926 

STAFF 

Editor (College Park) — Betty I. Amos 

Associate Editor(Bci\umoTe) — W. M. Newell 

Business Manager (College Park) 
Clark Seibert 

Assistant Manager (Baltimore) 
Hugh Ward 

Assistant — Ruth Williams 



\<- 



r 



CONTENTS 

page 

Calendar Front cover 

Editor's Welcome 3 

President's Greeting 5 

University Calendar 6-9 

Alma Mater 10 

University Notes 11 

Greeting from Dr. Lee 13 

Y.M.C.A Committee of Management 13 

Baltimore Departments 15-27 

University Hymn 28 

College Park Departments 30-33 

Who's Who 34-37 

Academic Regulations 38-42 

Freshmen Rules 43 

General Students' Assembly Rules 44-51 

Greeting from Dean of Women 53 

Womens' Student Government Rules 5i-62 

Point System for Women 62-63 

Inter-fraternity Council Rulings 64-67 

Student Publications 68 

Musical Organizations 69 

Wearers of the "M" 70 

Football Schedule 72 

Songs and Yells 73—75 

College Park Ads 76-83 

Daily Schedules 83-84 

Baltimore Ads (Churches) 85-94 

Baltimore Ads (Business houses) 106-141 

Memoranda and Addresses 155 



WELCOME 

The Christian Associations extend to the new 
students a hearty welcome to the University of 
Maryland. We present to you, as well as the upper 
classmen, this Handbook, trusting you will find it 
of practical value. 

"Entrance to college is always a searching test 
of character. It is a time of readjustment to new 
environment. You will find here new methods of 
instruction, new Iriendships, new phases of life. 
You will find here traditions to be respected, cus- 
toms to be observed, and a personal freedom of 
thought and action which will make or mar your 
future. You will find true and noble friends, if 
you want them,. among both faculty and students. 
The process of adjustment, of learning wise use of 
freedom, is sometimes bewildering, but always 
educative. 

"He who keeps a candid mind, and an honest 
purpose to do his best shall find the four years of 
his college career among the richest and happiest 
that life can bring." 

— The Editors. 




DR. ALBERT F. WOODS, 
President of the University of Maryland. 



PRESIDENT'S GREETING 

"I am glad, on behalf of the Regents, Officers, 
and Faculty of the University of Maryland, to 
extend to the students a hearty welcome. 

"To the new students, I wish especially to com- 
mend the various student organizations and ac- 
tivities. Find those in which you are interested 
and take an active part. These organizations mean 
much for the promotion of the highest type of 
student life and activity. The inspiration and 
training that you will get through them will be of 
value to you through life. By virtue of your ad - 
mission to the University, you are a member of 
the Student Self-Government Association. You 
must do your -part to make this a success. 

"The Young Men's and Young Women's Christ- 
ian Associations are general activities in which all 
should take part. The Glee Club and other clubs, 
the Chorus, Orchestras, Band, the Literary Soc- 
ieties, and the various teams — athletic, debating 
judging, etc., offer opportunities for the develop- 
ment of special talents. You can take a reasonable 
part in sev'eral of these activities without in any 
way interfering with your regular work. 

The Faculty and Officers are here to help and 
advise you. We are always glad to have you call 
on us." 

Sincerely yours, 

A. F. WOODS, 

President . 



University Calendar 1925-26 

COLLEGE PARK BRANCH 

FIRST SEMESTER 
1925 

Sept. 21-22, Monday-Tuesday — Registration for all 
students. 

Sept. 23, Wednesday — Instruction for first semes- 
ter begins. 

Sept. 28, Monday — Last day to register without 
payment of additional fee. 

Sept. 30, Wednesday — Last day to change regis- 
tration or to file schedule card in 
Registrar's Office without payment of 
fine. 

Nov. 11, Wednesday — Observance of Armistice 
Day. 

Nov. 25-30, Wednesday, 4.20 P.M. to Monday, 
8.20 A.M. — Thanksgiving Recess. 

Dec. 19, Saturday, 12 M. — Christmas Recess be- 
gins. 

1926 

Jan. 4, Monday, 8.20 A.M. — Christmas Recess ends 
Jan. 20-23, Wednesday-Saturday — Registration for 
second semester. 

Jan. 25-30, Monday-Saturday — First semester ex- 
aminations. 

Feb. 1, Monday — Last day to register without pay- 
ment of additional fee. 



SECOND SEMESTER 

Feb. 2, Tuesday, 8.20 A.M. — Instruction for second 
semester begins. 

Feb. 9, Tuesday — Last day to change registration 
or to file schedule card in Registrar's 
Office without payment of fine. 

Feb. 22, Monday — Washington's Birthday, Holi- 
day. 

March 25, Thursday, 11.20 — Observance of Mary- 
land Day. 

April 1-7, Thursday, 12 M. to Wednesday, 8.20 
A.M. — Easter Recess. 

May 12, Wednesday — Festival of Music 

May 13, Thursday — Festival of Music 

May 26-June 2, Wednesday- Wednesday, — Second 
semester examinations for seniors. 

May 29-June 5, Saturday-Saturday — Second sem- 
ester examinations. 

May 31, Monday — Memorial Day, holiday. 

COMMENCEMENT WEEK 

June 6, Sunday, 11.00 A. M. — Baccalaureate Ser- 
mon. 

June 7, Monday — Class Day. 

June 8, Tuesday, 11.00 A.M. — Commencement 
Day. 

SUMMER TERM 
June 14-19, Monday-Saturday — Rural Women's 

Short Course. 
June 23, Wednesday — Summer School begins. 
Au^r. 3, Tuesday — Summer School ends. 
Aug. 5-10, Thursday-Tuesday — Boys' and Girls' 

Club Week. 



UNIVERSITY CALENDAR 

Baltimore Branch 

FIRST SEMESTER 
1925 

Sept. 14, Monday — Instruction begins for first 

semester — School of Law. 

Sept 28, Monday — Last day to register — School 
of Law. 

Instruction begins for first semester: 
School of Medicine, 
School of Dentistry, 
School of Pharmacy, 
School of Business Administration. 

Oct 5, Monday — Last day to register: 
School of Medicine, 
School of Dentistry, 
School of Pharmacy, 
School of Business Administration. 

Nov. 11, Wednesday — Armistice Day. Holiday, 
(All Schools). 

Nov. 26, Thursday — Thanksgiving Day. Holiday, 
(All Schools). 

Dec. 19, Saturday — Christmas Holiday begins 
after last class period, (All Schools) 

1926 

Jan. 4, Monday — Christmas Holiday ends. In- 
struction begins with first class period , 
(All Schools) 

Jan. 18, Monday — Registration begins for second 
semester, (All Schools). 

8 



SECOND SEMESTER 

Jan 25, Monday — Instruction begins for second 
semester, School of Law. 

Feb. 1, Monday — Instruction begins for second 
semester: 

School of Medicine, 

School of Dentistry, 

School of Business Administration. 

Last day to register, 

School of Law. 

Feb. 6, Saturday — Last day to register: 
School of Medicine, 
School of Dentistry, 
School of Pharmacy, 
School of Business Administration. 

Feb. 8, Monday — Instruction begins for second 
semester — School of Pharmacy 

Feb 22, Monday — Washington's Birthday 
Holiday. 

Apr. 1, Thursday — Easter Holiday begins after 
last period, (All Schools). 

Apr. 6, Tuesday — Easter Holiday ends. Instruc- 
tion begins with first class period, (All 
Schools). 

June 5, Saturday — Commencement Day, (AH 
Schools). 



9 



ALMA MATER 

{Marylandl My Maryland)\ 

Thy sons and daughters throng thy door, 

Maryland! My Maryland! 
They come from mountain, farm and shore, 

Maryland! oh Maryland! 
Their hearts and hopes they bring to thee. 
And place them in thy custody, 
Proud hearts that pledge their love for thee: 

Maryland University! 

Go forth, brave youth, throughout the State: 

Maryland! My Maryland! 
And by your actions, show her great: 

Maryland Our Maryland! 
Thy Alma Mater's name and fame, 
Oh keep alive her holy flame. 
Until all hearts as one exclaim, 

Maryland! My Maryland! 

Cheer, three times cheer, and one cheer more 

For Maryland! Dear Maryland! 
Send forth that cry from hill to shore: — 

Maryland University! 
Fair Mother of our brightest dreams. 
Blest giver of life's precious things, 
To thee each heart its service brings: — 

Maryland! My Maryland! 



10 



UNIVERSITY NOTES 

HISTORICAL SKETCH 

The history of the present University of Mary- 
land practically combines the history of two in- 
stitutions. It begins with the chartering of the 
College of Medicine of Maryland in Baltimore in 
1807, which graduated its first class in 1810. In 
1812 the institution was empowered to annex 
other departments and was by the same act "con- 
stituted an University by the name and under the 
title of the University of Maryland." 

For more than a century the University of Mary- 
land stood almost as organized in 1812, until an 
act of the Legislature in 1920 merged it with the 
Maryland State College and changed the name of 
the Maryland State College to the University of 
Maryland. 

The Maryland State College first was chartered 
in 1856 under the name of the Maryland Agricul- 
tural College, the second agricultural college in the 
Western Hemisphere. In 1862 Congress passed 
the Land Grant Act and the Maryland State 
College was named as the beneficiary of the grant 
in Maryland. Thus the College became, at least 
in part, a State institution. In the fall of 1914 its 
control was taken over entirely by the State. In 
1916 the General Assembly granted a new charter 
to the College and made it the Maryland State 
College. 



11 




DR. FREDERICK E. LEE 
Chairman, Committee of Management 



WELCOME! 

As Chairman of the Committee of Management 
of the Y. M. C. A. and former leader of the Bible 
Study Group for the two Christian Associations, 
I take this opportunity of extending to every new 
student a very hearty welcome to the Schools and 
Colleges of the University. In cooperation with 
the older students may you help make this year 
the best year for the Associations and the Univer- 

FREDERICK E. LEE, 
Executive Dean of the University . 



THE YOUNG MEN'S CHRISTIAN 
ASSOCIATION 

The Y. M. C. A. at the University of Maryland 
operates under the direction of a Committee of 
Management of the Baltimore Young Men's 
Christian Association which is composed of Stud- 
ents, Faculty, Alumni and friends of the Univer- 
sity. The personel of this committee for the 
coming year is as follows: 

Dr. Frederick E. Lee, Chairman 

W. M. Hiliegeist, Vice-Chairman 

Dr. John C. Krantz, Jr., Treasurer 

Dr. McCarty, Secretary 

Dr. H. J. Patterson 

Dr. P. W. Zimmerman 

Dr. .\. E. Zucker 

Dr. W. B. Kemp 

J. J. Ekin 

Dr. A. F. Woods, Ex-officio 

W. M. Newell 

J. C. Seibert 
This Committee of Management is responsible 
for the general oversight of the work of the Y. M. 
C. A. at the University. It exists as an advisory 
body upon which the Student Cabinets of the 
Association may depend for advice and help on any 
problems which may arise. The details of the 
program both in Baltimore and College Park are 
in the hands of the Student Cabinets. 

13 



BALTIMORE DEPARTMENTS 

THE YOUNG MEN'S CHRISTIAN 
ASSOCIATION 

Officers 

President W. M. Newell, Dental 

Vice-President Frank Lusby, Medical 

Vice-President Paul Miller, Pharmical 

Secretary-Treasurer Hugh Ward, Medical 

Executive Secretary Harry E. Foulkrod 

Rooming and Boarding House Directory 

In order to assist out-of-city students in securing 
suitable rooms and boarding places, the Associa- 
tion prepares each fall a list of available places 
and helps direct students to the type of place they 
desire. 

The Handbook 

The Handbook is published and distributed 
without cost to each student. Its purpose is to 
make a ready reference book for all students, but 
especially to aid the new student in adjusting him- 
self to university life. 

Church Cooperation 

The Association accepts its position as a repre- 
sentative of the Churches among the students. 
It does not concern itself with the student's choice 
of a Church, but it is concerned to help him main- 
tain intimate contacts with the Church he chooses. 

14 



Fellowship Dinners 

In order to cultivate Christian fellowship among 
students of the University, the Y. M. C. A. will 
hold, at intervals, during the year Fellowship 
Dinners to which all students will be welcomed. 

Speakers 

Whenever possible the "Y" makes available 
nationally known speakers both at the University 
and in the city. Each winter the Central Branch 
holds a series of Sunday afternoon Theatre Meet- 
ings at which some of the best speakers in the 
United States may be heard. Students are always 
welcome at all of these meetings. 

Conferences and Conventions 

Every year numerous conferences and conven- 
tions are held by the Y. M. C. A., Y. W. C. A., 
Student Volunteer Movement, and Churches. The 
Association aims to hava the University well re- 
presented at many of these gatherings. 

Cosmopolitan Club 

Last year 125 students from 34 different nations 
studied in Baltimore. The Association tries in 
many ways to help these students to get the best 
out of their life here, but its major work is through 
the Students Cosmopolitan Club of Baltimore , 
which, although an independent Student organiz- 
ation, is fostered by the Y. M. C. A. It meets bi- 
monthly and all foreign students are especially 
invited to attend 

15 



Reading Room 

The Y. M. C. A. supplies the University Library 
with current periodicals each year. 

Student Volunteers 

The Association has a major interest in the 
world-wide work of the Church. It is, therefore, 
interested in and fosters the work of the students 
in the University who are preparing for foreign 
service. 

Central Y. M. C. A. Memberships 

The Central Branch of the Y. M. C. A. with 
its fine equipment, including Gymnasium, Swim- 
mimg Pool, Reading Rooms, etc., offers its priv- 
ileges to University students at a special rate for 
the school year. 



IG 



PROCEDURE FOR REGISTRATION 

A new registration is conducted each year. 

All students in medicine, dentistry, pharmacy, 
and business administration, must register in the 
office of the registrar (law school building) during 
the period from Monday, September 28th, to 
Monday, October 5th. 

The period of registration for the students in 
law begins Monday, September 14th, and concludes 
Monday, September 28th. 

There is a late registration fee of $5.00 which all 
students are subjected to who do not register in 
the time set aside for that purpose. 

Each new student will present at the office of 
the registrar the matriculation receipt which has 
been issued by the dean of the school in which he 
will register. After the registration card has been 
filled out completely, the card is presented at the 
office of the registrar for approval. When the 
registration card has been vised, the student will 
take the card to the office of the comptroller and 
pay the required fees. The office of the comptroller 
adjoins the office of the registrar. 

W. M. HILLEGEIST, 

Registrar. 



17 



THE SCHOOL OF MEDICINE 

J. M. H. Rowland, Dean 

Medical Council 

Arthur M. Shipley, M.D., Sc.D. 

Gordon Wilson, M.D. 

Harry Friedenwald, A.B., M.D. 

William S. Gardner, M.D. 

Standish McCleary, M.D. 

Julius Friedenwald, A.M., M.D. 

J. M. H. Rowland, M.D. 

Alexius McGlannan, A.M., M.D. 

A. H. Ryan, M.D. 

Hugh R. Spencer, M.D. 

H. Boyd Wylie, M.D. 

Carl L. Davis, M.D. 

William H. Schultz, Ph.B., Ph.D. 

Maurice C. Pincoffs, S.B., M.D. 

The School of Medicine of the University of 
Maryland is one of the oldest foundations for 
medical education in America, ranking fifth in 
point of age among the medical colleges of U. S. 
In the school building at Lombard and Greene 
streets in Baltimore was founded one of the first 
medical libraries and the first medical college 
library in America. 

Here for the first time in America, dissecting was 
made a compulsory part of the curriculum; here 
instruction in Dentistry was first given (1837), 
and here was first installed independent chairs 
for the teaching of diseases of women and children 
(1867), and of eye and ear diseases (1873). 

This School of Medicine was one of the first to 
provide for adequate clinical instruction by the 
erection in 1823 of its own hospital, and in this 
hospital intra-mural residency for senior students 
was first established. 

18 



SCHOOL OF DENTISTRY 

J. Ben Robinson, D.D.S., F.A.C.D., Dean 

The first lectures delivered on Dentistry in 
America were given by Horace H. Hayden, M.D., 
at the University of Maryland in the year 1837. 
A charter was applied for and granted in 1839 es- 
tablishing the Baltimore College of Dental Surgery , 
the first dental school in the world. Lectures were 
begun in 1839 and the first class graduated in 
1841. in 1873 the Maryland Dental College, an 
offspring of the Baltimore College of Dental Sur- 
gery, was organized and continued instruction in 
dental subjects until 1879 when it was consolidated 
with the Baltimore College of Dental Surgery. 

A department of dentistry was organized at the 
University of Maryland in the year 1882, grad- 
uating its first class in 1883 and each subsequent 
year to the present. The Dental Department of 
the Baltimore Medical College was established in 
1895, continuing until 1913, when it was merged 
with the Dental Department of the University of 
Maryland. 

The final combining of the dental educational 
interests of Baltimore was eff^ected June 15, 1923 
by the amalgamation of the University of Maryland 
School of Dentistry and the Baltimore College of 
Dental Surgery, under State supervision and 
control, becoming a department of the State 
University of Maryland. 



19 



THE SCHOOL OF LAW 

The Faculty Council 

Hon. Henry D. Harlan, A.M., LL.B., LL.D., Dean 

Hon. Alfred S. Niles, A.M., LL.B. 

Hon. John C. Rose, LL.B., LL D 

Randf Iph Barton, Jr ,Esq , A.M., LL.B., Secretary 

Hon. James P. Gorter, A.M., LL.D. 

Charles McHenry Howard, Esq, A B., LL.B. 

Hon. Morris A Soper, A B , LL.B. 

Robert Hill Freeman, M.A., LL.B., 

Assistant to the Dean. 

While the fiist faculty of law of the University 
of Maryland was chosen in 1813, and published in 
1817 "A Course of Legal Study Addressed to 
Students and the Profession Generally" which the 
North American Review pronounced to be "by 
far the most perfect system oi study ot law which 
has ever been offered the public," and which recom- 
mended a course of study sc comprehensive as to 
require for its completion six or seven years, no 
regular school of instruction in law was opened 
until 1823. This was suspended in 1836 for lack 
of proper pecuniary support. In 1869 the Law 
School was organized, and in 1870 regular instruc- 
tion therein was again begun. From time to time 
the course has been made more comprehensive and 
the staff of instructors increased in number Its 
graduates now number more than two thousand, 
and included among them ?re a large proportion 
of the leaders of the Bench and the Bar oi the State 
and many who have attained prominence in the 
profession elsewhere 

20 



THE SCHOOL OF PHARMACY 

E. F. Kelly, Dean of the Faculty. 

B. Olive Cole, Secretary of the Faculty. 

J. Carlton Wolf, Professor of Dispensing 

Chas. C. Plitt, Professor of Botany and Materia 

Me die a. 

H. E. Wich, Associate Professor of Chemistry. 

John C. Krantz, Jr., Associate Professor of 

Pharmacy. 

The School of Pharmacy was organized in 1841, 
largely at the instance of members of the Faculty 
of Medicine, and for a time the lectures were de- 
livered at the Medical School. Later it became 
separated and continued an independent organi- 
zation as the Maryland College of Pharmacy, 
until it finally became a part cf the University in 
1904 With but one short intermission previous 
to 1865 it has continuously exercised its functions 
as a teaching school of pharmacy. 

This school' holds membership in the American 
Conference of Pharmaceutical Faculties. The 
object of the Conference is to promote the interests 
of pharmaceutical education and all institutions 
holding membership must maintain certain min- 
imum requirements for entrance and graduation. 

This schocl is registered in the New York De- 
partment of Education and by the Boards of 
Pharmacy of Ohio and other states that maintain 
a registration bureau. 

Upon completion of the first three years of the 
course the diploma of Graduate in Pharmacy 
(Ph.G.) is awarded which admits the holder to 
the board e.xaminations in the various states for 
registration as a pharmacist. 

The degree of Bachelor of Science in Pharmacy 
(B.S. in Pharmacy) will be given upon completion 
of the work prescribed for the entire course of four 
years 

Its diploma is recognized in all states. 

21- 



SCHOOL OF BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION 

Herbert M. Daimond, Ph.D., Dear. 

In response to repeated requests from men and 
women in Baltimore, the University of Maryland 
opened in that city in the fall of 1921 Extension 
Courses in Commerce to provide systematic in- 
struction in those subjects which would be of ben- 
efit to those who were engaged in or expected to 
engage in business. The demand for such courses 
proved to be so great — over six hundred students 
having been enrolled during the academic year 
1924-1925 — it was decided in the Spring of 1925 
to create on the foundation of these Extension 
Courses, a School of Business Administration w^hich 
would be closely articulated with the College of 
Arts and Science of the University. All matters 
pertaining to standards, faculty, courses of study, 
degrees, etc., are handled by the dean. The 

School offers courses in General Business Account- 
ing, Advertising and Marketing, and Banking, 
Investments and Real Estate. 



22 



SCHOOL OF NURSING 
Faculty and Instructors 

Superintendent of Nurses and Director of School 
of Nursing 

Annie Creighton, R.N. 

Assistant Superintendent of Nurses 

Stella U. Ricketts, R.N. 

Instructor in Nursing 

Mildred Everett, R.N. 

Instructor in Nursing and Supervisor of Wards 

Louise Savage, R.N. 

Assistant Instructor in Nursing and Supervisor of 

Wards 

Grace L. Elgin, R.N. 

Instructor in Surgical Technique for Nurses and 
Supervisor of Operating Pavilion 

Elizabeth Aitkenhead, R.N. 

Instructor in Dietetics 
Miriam Connelly 

Instructor in Massage 
Edith Walton 

Instructor in Social Service 
Grace Pearson, R.N. 

The University of Maryland School for Nurses 
was established in the year 1889. Since that time 
it has been an integral part of the University of 
Maryland Hospital. 

The School is non-sectarian, the only religious 
services being morning prayers. 

The University of Maryland Hospital is a 
general hospital containing about 285 beds. It is 
equipped to give young women a thorough course 
of instruction and practice in all phases of nursing 
including experience in the operating room, 

23 



FIVE-YEAR PROGRAM 

In addition to the regular three-year course of 
training the University offers a combined Academic 
and Nursing program leading to the degree of 
Bachelor of Science and a Diploma in Nursing. 

The first two years of the course (or pre-hospital 
period),'" consisting of 70 semester hours, are spent 
in the College of Arts and Sciences of the Univer- 
sity, during which period the student has an in- 
troduction to the general cultural subjects which 
are considered fundamental in any college training. 
At least the latter of these two years must be spent 
in residence at College Park in order that the stud- 
ent may have her share in the social and cultural 
activities of college life. The last three years are 
spent in the School of Nursing in Baltimore. In 
the fifth year of the combined program certain 
elective courses such as Public Health Nursing, 
Nursing Education, Practical Sociology, and Ed- 
ucational Psychology are arranged. 



24 



THE ATHLETIC ASSOCIATION 

In November, 1924, the entire student body of 
the Dental Department of the University of Mary- 
land met in the 4th Regiment Armory and organ- 
ized an Athletic Association. This Association was 
made possible after much hard work by Dr. 
Zelwis, assisted by Drs. May and McCarthy, and 
the co-operation of our Dean, Dr. Robinson . 

This is the first organization of its kind ever ac- 
complished in the Dental Department. It has for 
its object the creation of good fellowship among 
the student body, as well as providing a means 
whereby the students can participate in those 
branches of athletics in which they are best suited. 

Dr. Zelwis was chosen President of the Athletic 
Association; Dr. May, Vice-President and Sec- 
retary and Dr. McCarthy, Treasurer. Coaches: 
Drs. Zelwis and May. Graduate manager. Dr. 
McCarthy. 

The Basket-ball team played six different col- 
leges the last season, the Track team held a big 
meet at the Stadium, and the Baseball and Tennis 
teams also did well. 

Old students and new-comers pick out your team 
and let's go and make it a big year. 



THE MUSICAL CLUB 

The Musical Club, which includes the Glee Club' 
Orchestra and Mandolin-Banjo Club, was organi- 
zed at the beginning of the 1923-24 session by its 
present director, Roy P. May, D.D.S. (class '16). 

The last session was very successful giving its 
Annual Spring Concert at Lehman Hall. The 
club has been given widespread attention by its 
work over the Radio. Its members have a splendid 
time not only by entertaining, but also by being 
entertained. New men who play an instrument , 
or sing, are invited to join. 

25 



COUNCIL OF CLASS PRESIDENTS 

This student organization is composed of the 
Presidents of each of the regular classes in the 
six schools located in Baltimore. It is the one 
group that represents the entire student body. 

The council is organized each fall after the 
classes have elected their officers. Meetings are 
held regularly. All matters of interest and concern 
to the student body are considered by the Council. 

The importance and value of the organization 
has been recognized by the committee of Deans, 
and in accordance with a recommendation of the 
Deans, the Council supervises the puolication of 
the Terra Mariae. The Council has played a lead- 
ing part in fostering dances, athletic mass meetings, 
and engendering a virile university spirit. 



CASHING CHECKS 

Checks may be cashed at Cashier's office, in 
the Medical Building. Hours: 9 A. M. to 1 P. M; 
3 P. M. to 5 P. M. 



26 



FRATERNITIES 

Phi Sigma Kappa Theta Kappa Psi 

Psi Omega Alpha Pi 

Xi Psi Phi Delta Sigma Pi 

Alpha Omega Alpha Kappa Sigma 

Phi Beta Pi Gatnma Eta Gamma 

Nu Sigma Nu Delta Theta Pi 

Theta Nu Epsilon Phi Alpha 

Phi Chi ^ Sigma Theta Pi 

Phi Delta Epsilon Sigma Mu Delta 

Chi Zeta Chi Alpha Zeta Gamma 

Phi Lambda Kappa Alpha Zeta Omega 

Kappa Psi Phi Delta Chi 
Iota Lambda Phi 

CLUBS 

Gorgas Odontological Society- 
Medical Students Council 

Randolph Winslow Surgical Society 
Italian Club 

Alpha Debating Club 

The Musical Club 

"Teira Mariae," published annually by the Senior 
Class of the Baltimore Schools. 



27 



UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND HYMN 

Tune: "Flow Gently, Sweet Afton" 



On the hills of fair Maryland thou dost proudly 

stand, 
The lamp of true wisdom alight in thy hand. 
With calm brooding mother eyes tender and clear. 
Thou gazest upon us, thy children, so dear. 
Thy sweet rolling hills in tenderest green, 
Thy white lofty pillars, the tall trees between. 
Serene over all, the blue heavens smile there 
On Maryland, our mother, our mother, so dear. 

II 

Thy sons thou hast given, how nobly they stand, 
Their voice and their deeds loud resound thru the 

land. 
Thy walls have re-echoed to valiant tones, 
And honor and beauty were laid with thy stones. 
Our loved Alma Mater, our own mother dear. 
When foes shall assail thee, thou never shalt fear. 
Thy sons shall defend thee and cause thee to stand, 
O bow not thy proud head, O fair Maryland! 

Anne Stone Stewart. 



28 




HARRY E. FOULKROD 

Executive Secretary University of Maryland 

Young Mens' Christian Association 



COLLEGE PARK DEPARTMENTS 

Regulation of Student Activities 

The association of stuQents in organized bodies, 
for the purpose of carrying on voluntary student 
activities in orderly and productive ways, is re- 
cognized and encouraged. All organized student 
activities, except those which are controlled by a 
special board or faculty committee, are under the 
supervision of the Committee on Student Affairs, 
subject to the approval of the President. Such 
organizations are formed only with the consent of 
the Committee on Student Affairs and the approval 
of the President. Without such consent and ap- 
proval no student organization which in any way 
represents the University before the public, or 
which purports to be a University organization 
or organization of University students, may use 
the name of the University in connection with its 
own name, or in connection with its members as 
students. 

Eligibility to Represent the University 

Only students in good standing are eligible to 
represent the University in extra-curricular con- 
tests. No student while on probation may re- 
present the University in such events as athletic 
contests, glee club concerts, dramatic performances 
and debates. 

Discipline 

In the government of the University, the Presi- 
dent and faculty rely chiefly upon the sense of 
responsibility of the students. The student who 
pursues his studies diligently, attends classes 
regularly, lives honorably and maintains good be- 
havior meets this responsibility. In the interest 
of the general welfare of the University, those who 
fail to maintain these standards are eliminated. 
Students are under the direct supervision of the 
University only when on the campus, but they are 
responsible to the University for their conduct 
wherever they may be. 

30 



Student Government 

The General Students' Assembly consists of all 
the students and is the instrument for student 
government. It operates under a constitution. 
Its officers are a President, Vice-President and 
Secretary and an Executive Council representa- 
tive of the several college classes. 

The Students' Assembly meets every second 
Wednesday at 11.20 o'clock in the Auditorium for 
the transaction of business which concerns the 
whole student body. On alternate Wednesdays a 
program is arranged by the officers with the aid of 
the Department of Public Speaking. The Students' 
Executive Council, with the aid of the Committee 
on Student Affairs, which acts as an advisory 
board to the Council, performs the executive 
duties incident to managing student affairs. 

The Honor System 

The honor system is an integral part of the sys- 
tem of Student Government. It presupposes that 
the student will apply the honor principle in all his 
dealings — with fellow students, the faculty and the 
University. The honor system, in its narrower 
sense as applying to honor in examinations and 
quizzes, is administered by the Honor Court, con- 
sisting of two representatives from each of the five 
colleges. 

Women Students' Government Association 

Women Students' Government Association is an 
organization comprising all the women students, 
for the management of all affairs concerning the 
women students exclusively. It operates under a 
constitution. Its officers are the same as those of 
the General Students' Assembly. Its Executive 
Council has the advisory co-operation of the Dean 
of Women. 



31 



THE YOUNG MEN'S CHRISTIAN 
ASSOCIATION 

Officers 

Presiden t J. Clark Seibert 

Vice-President William H. Evans 

Secretary N. C. Thornton 

Treasurer J. Franklin Witter 

Executive Secretary Harry E. Foulkrod 

The Young Men's Christian Association was 
reorganized in the Spring of 1924 to. meet the de- 
mand felt by many students for a men's organiza- 
tion on the campus which would be able to assume 
leadership for the religious life of all the students. 
Programs are being planned and carried out in 
response to whatever needs arise. The Y. M. C. A. 
at Maryland is a new organization as far as the 
present student body is concerned and it invites 
the cooperation of every student. 

The work this year will be under the direction 
of the following committees: 

Religious Education — L. E. Newcomer 
Deputations — C. H. Remsberg 
New Students — M. S. Whaley 
Social — W. H. Evans 
Finance — J. F. Witter 



32 



THE YOUNG WOMEN'S CHRISTIAN 
ASSOCIATION 

Officers 

President Katherine Baker 

f^ice- President Elise Dorsey 

Secretary Mary Jane McCurdy 

Treasurer Olive Wallace 

Undergraduate Rep Mary Stuart York. 

Committee Chairmen 

Publicity Julia Louise Behring 

Program Dorothy O. Young 

Socials Priscilla Panecoast 

finance , Ellen Jane Kciser 

Religious Program Betty Amos 

The Y. W. C. A. was organized in 1924 (during the 
last year) for the purpose of meeting the need for an 
all-campus religious organization among the women 
students which would correlate and coordinate all 
the religious activities for the women of the Uni- 
versity. In cooperation with the Y. M. C. A, the 
Y. W. C. A. assumes a major responsibility for 
the religious activities of the campus. This is a 
difficult task, but one that is so worthwhile that 
the Y. W. C. A. calls upon every girl upon the 
campus who wishes to help others build high 
Christian character, to join with them in carrying 
out their program. 

The religious proj^ram for this year will center 
in the Sunday Evening Vesper Service undei the 
joint auspices of the Y. M. C. A. and Y. W. C. A. 
The Discussions are held at 6.30 P. M. every Sun- 
day in the University auditorium. Mrs. H. J. 
Patterson will also conduct a Biole Study group 
every Sunday at 10.00 A. M. in the College Park 
Church, which all students are invitea to attend. 



33 



WHO'S WHO, 1924-1925 

Football 

Captain John Hough 

Manager John Ennis 

Baseball 

Captain Walter Troxell 

Manager Edward Christmas 

Basket-ball 

Captain William Supplee 

Manager Mason Hopwood 

Lacrosse 

Captain Jack Faber 

Manager Edward Allen 

Track 

Captain Joseph Endslow 

Manager Fred Herzog 

Tennis 

Captain William Weber 

Manager Howard Burns 

Cross-Country 

Captain Albert Petruska 

Manager Fred Herzog 

Student Assembly 

President J. L. McGlone 

Secretary Katherine Baker 

Y. M. C. A. 

President J. C. Seibert 

Secretary 

Y. W. C. A. 

President Katherine Baker 

Secretary Mary Jane McCurdy 

Bible Class and Discussion Group 

President Betty Amos 

Secretary-Treasurer Franklin Witter 

34 



Episcopal Club 

President Thomas Brown 

Secretary-Treasurer Naomi Ryon 

Student Executive Council 

President Stewart W'haley 

Secretary Joseph McGlone 

Senior Rrpresentative Hamilton Whiteford 

Junior Representative Kenneth Spence 

Junior Representative Charles Futterer 

Sophomore Representativr Donald Adams 

Sophomore Representative Walter Chapman 

Men's Rifle Club 

Captain E. DeAtley 

Manager G. Ninas 

Engineering Society 

President Charles McFadden 

Secretary-Treasurer W. H. White 

Home Economics Club 

President Alberta Orton 

Secretary-Treasurer Ruth Williams 

Masque and Bauble Club 

President George Schmidt 

Secretary Betty Amos. 

Live Stock Club 

President 

Secretary-Treasurer 

New Mercer Literary Society 

President Parks Shipley 

Secretary Aileene Gleeson 

Poe Literary Society 

President 

Secretary 

Public Speaking Club 

President W. H. Whiteford 

Secretary 

35 



Rossbourg Club 

President Stewart Whaley 

Secretary-Treasurer Albert Ady 

Student Grange 

Master Charles Remsberg 

Secretary K. Stevenson 

Diamondback j 

Editor-in-Chief Kenneth Stoner 

Business Manager Charles Futterer 

Reveille I 

Editor-in-Chief Parks Shiple}- 

Business Manager Morrison 

Girls' Rifle Team 

Captain J. L. Behring 

Manager Dorothy Murray 

Inter-fraternity Council 

President Fred Herzog 

Secretary-Treasurer K. Stevensoi 

Women's Student Government Associadon 

President Thelma Taylo; 

Secretary Eleanor Sea 

Womens' Athletic Association 

President Patricia Wol 

Secretary Margaret Wol 

Opera Club 

President Stanleigh Jenkii 

Secretary J. L. Behrin 

Cheer Leaders 



36 



FRATERNITIES AND SORORITIES 

National Fraternities 

Kappa Alpha 
Delta Sigma Phi 
Sigma Phi Sigma 
Sigma Nu 
Phi Sigma Kappa 
Phi Alpha 

Local Chapters 

Delta Psi Omega 
Nu Sigma Omicron 
Sigma Tau Omega 
Delta Mu 

Sororities 

National: 

Alpha Omicron Pi 

Local: 

Sigma Delta 
Kappa XI 

Honorary Fraternities 

Alpha Zeta — National Honorary Agricultural 
Fraternity 

Phi Kappa Phi — National Honorary Association 
open to honor students in all branches of learning. 

Phi Mu — Honorary Engineering Fraternity. 

Sigma Delta Pi — -Honorary Spanish Fraternity. 

Senior Honor Society — Honorary Society forWomen 
Students 

Phi Chi Alpha — Honorary Chemical Fraternity. 



37 



ACADEMIC REGULATIONS 



General Procedure for Registration 

1. Students should report to the Office of the 
Registrar for admission and direction. 

2. After the Registrar has verified the student's 
credits, the student will be sent to the proper 
Dean with a matriculation card. 

3. The student will receive a course card in the 
Dean's office. 

4. After the course card is properly made out 
it must be signed by the Dean. 

5. Course cards should then be taken to the 
Sectioning Committee, Room T-211, Agricultural 
Building, for section assignment. 

6. The course card will then be taken to the 
Registrar's office where a charge slip will be issued. 

7. The charge slip and the course card will be 
taken to the office of the Financial Secretary where 
fees must be paid. 

8. The Financial Secretary upon the adjustment 
and payment of fees certifies upon the course card 
that satisfactory arrangements have been made 
and sends the student to the office of the Registrar 
for final registration and issuance of class cards. 
Class cards are not issued until the course card is 
certified by the Financial Secretary. 

9. Each student must file in the office of the 
Registrar within seven days after the semester 
opens a schedule of his classes. A fee of one dollar 
is imposed for failure to do this. 

10. The student places his name, his college, 
and the date on the class cards and presents at the 
first meeting of a class the appropriate cara to the 
instructor for enrollment in the class. Students are 
not admitted to classes without class cards. In- 
structors will see that this rule is enforced. 

38 



11. Students who, for adequate reasons, are 
more than ten days late in registering must secure 
permission for entrance into courses from the 
instructors in charge of the courses. Such per- 
mission, if given, must be indicated on the course 
card. A fee of $2.00 is imposed for late registration . 

12. Any change of course is made only on writ- 
ten permission fron the Dean involved and is 
subject to a fee of one dollar after the first week ot 
the semester. After securing such permission from 
the Dean, the student must present the same to the 
Registrar at once, who, in turn issues the student 
a class card for the course he is entering and a 
withdrawal card is sent to the instructor in charge 
of the course from which the student is withdraw- 
ing. Unless this is done no credit will be given 
for the new course, and a failure will be recorded 
for the course dropped. In general, withdrawals 
from courses other than elective, will not be granted 
after the first six weeks of the course. 

13. A student who desires to transfer from one 
college to another must petition the Dean of the 
college from which he wishes to withdraw on the 
regular form obtained from the Registrar. 

14. No student shall carry more or less than 
the prescribed number of hours without permission 
from his Dean. 

Examinations and Marks 

15. Examinations are given at the end of each 
semester. 

16. The following grading system is In operation: 

A, B, C, and D — Passing. 

E — Condition. 

f — Failure. 

/ — Incomplete. 

16. Grade A denotes superior scholarship; 
grade B, good scholarship; grade C, fair scholarship; 
and grade D, poor but passing scholarship. 

17. A student who receives the grade of D in 
more than one-fourth of the credits required for 

39 



graduation must take additional courses or repeat 
courses until he has the required number of credits 
for a degree, three-fourths of which carry a grade 
above D. 

18. A student with a mark of E is conditioned. 
The grade E indicates that while a student has not 
failed in a course, he has not presentea sufficient 
evidence to pass; however, in the opinion of the 
instructor his record in the course has been suffi- 
ciently good to justify the presumption that he 
knows enough about the course to secure a passing 
grade by re-examination or by additional work 
without repeating the course. The grade E cannot 
be raised to a higher grade than D. 

19. A student must arrange with his instructors 
at the beginning of a semester for the removal of 
conditions received in the previous semester. A 
fee of $1.00 will be charged for each regular con- 
dition examination. No instructor will give a con- 
dition examination until a student presents a 
receipt showing the fee has been paid. Following 
each condition examination the instructor will re- 
port the results to the Registrar. 

20. A condition not removed within the suc- 
ceeding semester becomes a failure. 

21. A student with a mark of F has failed in 
the course. In case of failure in a required 
course a student must repeat the course. He is re- 
quired to enroll in that subject again the first time 
it is offered, if possible. 

22. In case a condition or failure is incurred in 
an elective subject the student may be permitted 
to substitute only upon recommendation of the 
head of the Department in which the student is 
majoring and approval of the student's Dean. 

23. A student transferring to a college will con- 
sult his new Dean regarding the adjustment of his 
record. A record of this adjustment must be filed 
in the Registrar's Office. 

24. The mark of / (incomplete) should be given 
only to those students who have a proper excuse 

40 



for not completing all the requirements or work ot 
the course. The mark of / should not be used to 
signify work of inferior quality. In cases where 
this grade is given, the students must complete 
the work assigned by the instructor by the end of 
the first semester in which that subject is again 
offered, or the mark becomes F. 

24a. Work of grade D, or of any passing grade, 
cannot be raised to a higher grade except by re- 
peating the course. 

24i. A student who repeats a course for which 
he has received credit for work done at this Uni- 
versity, or elsewhere, must meet all the require- 
ments of the course, including regular attendance, 
laboratory work, and examinations. His final grade 
will be substituted for the grade already recorded, 
but he will not receive any additional credit for 
the course. 

Absences 

25. A student is expected to attend punctually 
each class and laboratory excrcis ; in each course. 

26. In case of extended illness which prevents 
the attendance of a student at his classes he should 
promptly notify his Dean. 

27. In case of absence immediately before or 
after a vacation a student will be penalized by the 
payment of a special fee of three dollars for each 
course cut. Instructors will report such absences 
immediately to the office of the Registrar. 

Probations and Delinquencies 

28. If a student receives a mark of failure (/") 
in fifty per cent or more of the semester hours for 
which he is registered he is automatically dropped 
from the rolls of the University. 

29. _ A student who does not make a passing 
mark in at least eight hours of work in which he is 
enrolled for a given semester, nay not continue 
for the next semester without the permission of his 
Dean. Where such permission is given the student 

41 



is on probation, and remains on probation until his 
deficiencies are removed. A notice of his probation- 
ary status will be mailed to the student's parent 
or guardian. 

30. A student while on probation shall not re- 
present the University in any extra-curricular 
activity such as: participation in athletic contests, 
the Glee Club, dramatics, debating teams, etc. 

31. While on probation a student is required to 
report weekly to his Dean or faculty advisor with 
regard to his probationary status. 

32. The Dean shall recommend to the President, 
the withdrawal of any student who. in the opinion 
of his college faculty, is deemed undesirable, or who 
continues to do unsatisfactory work. 

33. Any student who has been dropped from the 
University or has withdrawn in order to av^oid 
being dropped, and who is subsequently re-admit- 
ted, is not eligible to represent the University on 
any team, club, or association, until he has been 
in the University for a period of one semester from 
the date of his return and has satisfied the regular 
conditions of eligibility. 

Withdrawal from the University 

34. A student who desires to withdraw from the 
University must obtain the permission of his Dean 
on the regular form obtained from the Registrar 
ana must have filled out a clearance slip. A student 
who withdraws without following this proceaure 
forfeits all claims for reimbursements. 



42 



FRESHMAN RULES 

1. Freshmen must pjrform promptly and cheer- 
fully all tasks assigned them. 

2. Freshmen must refrain from wearing all 
insignia of any kind, unless earned at this school. 

3. Freshmen must attend all meetings of the 
Assembly (occupying front rows) and all cheer 
practices. 

•1. Freshmen must attend all games in a com- 
pact cheering section (no dates with girls at games). 

5. Freshmen must tip their caps and speak to 
all upper classmen, addressing them with "sir" and 
"pardon". 

6. Freshmen must wear rat caps and name tags 
at all times while on the campus. 

7. Freshmen must not cut across the campus 
and must use only cinder and cement paths. 

8. Freshmen must not loiter around front of 
buildings, nor sit on stone wall along Washington- 
Baltimore Boulevard. 

9. Freshmen must wear "four-in-hand" ties of 
the Sophomore class colors only; cannot wear 
knickers, smoke on the campus, or keep hands in 
pockets. 

10. Freshmen must work on the athletic field 
when requested, and must learn all college yells 
and songs. 

11. Freshmen must conduct themselves in 
gentleman like manner at all times in and around 
the dormitories. 

Dining Hall Regulations 

1. Freshmen must line up in twos in rear of 
dining hall. 

2. Freshmen must not sit at the heads of tables 
unless authorized to do so by an upper classman. 

3. Freshmen must fold their arms during an- 
nouncements. 

4. Freshmen must eat with the best of manners 
and ask for and pass things cheerfully. 

43 



THE GENERAL STUDENT'S ASSEMBLY 
PREAMBLE 

We. the students oi the University of Maryland, 
in order to secure an effective student self-govern- 
nient,an elevated community life and to advancethe 
University as a whole, do hereby establish this 
Constitution as a basis for the Honor System 
under which the student body hereafter is to be 
governed. 

Article I — Name 

The name of this organization shall be The 
General Students' Assembly of the University of 
Maryland. 

Article II— Object 

The object of this organization shall be to main- 
tain a student self-government, to promote general 
student activities, to advance the interests of the 
University as a whole, and to build up a general 
community life in accordance with the dictates 
of the Honor System, hereinafter described. 

Article III — Membership 

All undergraduate students enrolled in the Uni- 
versity are eligible for membership. 

Article IV — Officers 

The officers of this organization shall be a 
Presiaent, Vice-President, and Secretary, who shall 
be Seniors, and who shall serve until their succes- 
sors ara elected and qualified. The President of 
the Senior Class shall not hold any of these offices. 

Article V — ^Executive Committee 

The Executive Committee shall consist of ten 
members; the President and one elected member 
from each of the respective classes, and two elected 
representatives from the non-collegiate group. 
The President of the Students' Assembly shall act 
as its secretary, but shall not be a member thereoi. 

44 



Article VI — Advisory Board 

The Students Affairs Committee, consisting of 
five members of the faculty, shall constitute the 
Advisory Board. 

Article VII — Annual Meetings 

The last meeting in April shall be for the election 
of officers. The first meeting in May shall be for 
the installation of officers and the reading of an- 
nual reports. 

Article VIII — Amendment 



BY-LAWS 

Article I — Duties of Officers 

Sfctionl. The President shall preside at all 
meetings of the Assembly, and shall act as the 
secretary of the Executive Committee, but shall 
not be a member of the Executive Committee nor 
have a vote therein. He shall present at the An- 
nual Meeting a report of the work of the Assembly 
during the preceding year. He shall appoint all 
special committees and fill all vacancies in standing 
committees not otherwise provided for in the By- 
Laws. 

Sfction2. In the absence of the President, the 
Vice-President shall perform the duties of that office 

Sections. The Secretary shall keep the minutes 
of the Assembly, conduct its correspondence, keep 
a complete list of members according to classes, 
and perform such other duties as the organization 
may direct. 

Section 4:. The Executive Committee shall 
function as the body to carry out the rules and 
regulations as prescribed by the General Students' 

45 



Assembly, and shall function as the body for final 
discussion and action on all questions and com- 
plaints that come from sub-committees and in- 
dividuals. From this Committee, and this Commit- 
tee alone, shall evolve all recommendations that 
shall be submitted to the President of the Uni- 
versity for his approval. This Committee shall 
likewise propose and present to the General 
Students' Assembly any questions that may need 
the attention and endorsement of the whole stud- 
ent body. The President of the Senior Glass shall 
be chairman of the Executive Committee, which 
committee shall determine its procedure of business. 

Section 5. The Advisory Board, representing the 
faculty of the University in its joint meeting 
with the Executive Committee, shall advise and 
aid in all matters of student welfare and general 
University activities. 

Article II — Meetings 

Section 1. The regular meetings of the organiza- 
tion shall be held at 11.25 A. M. on Wednesday of 
each week during the collegiate year, except dur- 
ing holiday or recess periods. 

Section 2. Special meetings of the Assembly 
shall be called by the President in the event im- 
portant business demands immediate disposal. 

Sections. The Executive Committee shall meet 
Thursday of each week at an hour determined by 
its members. It shall hold special meetings at the 
call of its chairman, or upon the request of six of 
its members. 

Section A. A joint meeting of the Advisory 
Board and the Executive Committee, shall be 
held the first and third Mondays of each month at 
4.15 P. M. 

Article III — Election 

Section 1 . The nomination of officers shall be 
made at the regular meeting previous to the An- 
nual Meeting, and shall be made from the floor. 

46 



Section 2. The election of officers shall be by 
ballot; a majority of the votes cast by those present, 
which must constitute a quorum, shall be neces- 
sary to elect. In the event no candidate receives a 
majority vote upon first ballot there shall be a 
second casting of votes, and all except the two 
highest shall be eliminated before voting a second 
time. 

Sections. No person shall be eligible to the 
offices of President, Vice-President, or Secretary 
who is not a qualified member of the Senior Class. 

Section 4. A Sophomore Committee for the en- 
suing year shall be elected by the Freshman class 
at its last meeting in the month of May. 

Sections. There shall be a Managing Editor of 
the Diamondback. He shall be appointed by the 
faculty committee in charge oi student publica- 
tions. The Editor and Business Manager for the 
current year shall be eligible for the office. The 
appointment shall be made one week before the 
first regular meeting in May. The Managing 
Editor shall supervise the financial and editorial 
work on the Diamondback. 

The Editor and Business Manager of the Dia- 
mondback for the ensuing year shall be elected by 
the Assembly at the first regular meeting in May. 
These offices must be filled from the Junior Class. 
Candidates for these offices shall be proposed by 
the Executive Committee. 

The newly chosen officers of the Diamondback 
shall assume their duties one week after the date 
of their election. 

The staffs are to be appointed by the three 
officers from the student body at large. 

Section^. There shall be a student manager 
and a student assistant manager for each branch 
of sport in which the University is represented in 
intercollegiate competition who shall be elected 
by the Assembly at the second regular meeting 
after the last game played in each respective 
sport with the exception of baseball, which shall 
be elected at the last regular meeting in May. 

47 



The Assistant Manager must be a member of the 
Junior Class, but must be elected from those 
Juniors who have been designated by a joint 
meeting of the Athletic Board of the Athletic 
Association and the Executive Committee as hav- 
ing assisted In the respective sports during the year 
and, consequently, are eligible for election. This 
Assistant Manager shall automatically become 
Manager in his Senior Year, provided he has served 
his office faithfully and satisfactorily. The Manager 
shall be responsible to the Director of Athletics 
and the Assistant Manager to the Manager. The 
Manager shall perform all duties assigned to him 
by the Director of Athletics and the Assistant 
Manager the duties assigned him by the Manager. 
Either of them may be removed from his position 
by a complaint in writing of the team represented 
upon a seven-ninths vote of the Athletic Board. 

Section 7 . There shall be a head cheer leader 
and two assistant cheer leaders. One assistant 
cheer leader must be a member cf the Sophomore 
Class, and one a member of the Junior class. 
The Sophomore assistant cheer leader shall be 
elected at the second meeting of the Assembly in 
each collegiate year. This Sophomore shall auto- 
matically become Junior assistant cheer leader. 

Section 8. There shall be a Managing Editor 
of the University Annual. He shall be appointed 
by the faculty committee in charge of student 
publications; the editor ana the business manager 
for the current year being eligiole for the office. 
The appointment shall be made one week before 
the last regular meeting of the Assembly in April. 
The Managing Editor shaU supervise the financial 
and editorial work orr the Ye.ir Book. 

The Editor and Business Manager of the Uni- 
versity Annual for the ensuing year shall be elected 
by the Assembly at the last regular meeting In 
April. These offices must be filled from the Junior 
Class. Candidates for these offices shall be pro- 
posed by the executive committee. 

The staffs are to be appointed by the three 
officers from the student body at large. 

48 



Article IV — Committees 

Section 1 . There shall be a Sophomore Commit- 
tee, consisting of one appointed Senior member 
from the Executive Committee, and five elected 
members from the Sophomore Class, which shall 
issue Freshman Caps and present the Freshman 
code on the first Monday of the collegiate year to 
the new men, and which shall supervise the appli- 
cation of the above-mentioned code. The action 
of this Committee shall be subject to the sanction 
of the Executive Committee. 

Section 2. The four collegiate classes and the 
non-collegiate group shall be a committee of the 
whole which shall handle the affiairs of the res- 
pective classes, and which shall instruct their 
respective representatives on the Executive Com- 
mittee. Any matter which cannot be satisfactorily 
settled within the class may be referred to the 
Executive Committee. 

Article V — Quorum 

Section 1. One-third of the members of the 
Assembly shall constitute a quorum. 

Article VI — Impeachment 

Section I. Any officer of the Assembly who is 
negligent and dilatory in his duties may be im- 
peached upon the two-thirds vote of those present. 
The Executive Committee shall try all cases of 
impeachment. Conviction will cause removal 
from office. 

Article VII — Amendments 

Section I. These By-Laws may be amended at 
any meeting, if notice has been given in writing 
at the previous regular meeting, and appended to 
the call for the meeting. A two-thirds vote of 
those present shall be necessary for adoption. 

It is herewith understood that the Honor System 
as mentioned in the Constitution and By-Laws of 

49 



the Students' Assembly of the University of Mary- 
land shall be: 

1. That each student shall so conduct himself 
that he will not at any time infringe on the personal 
property rights of others. 

2. That each student shall act and deal fairly 
in all things, with all other students and with the 
University, and with the members of the Faculty. 

3. That each student shall consider the prin- 
ciple involved in Paragraph 2 as applying to the 
students and faculties of other institutions with 
which he may come in competition in athletics 
or in other fields of endeavor. 

4. In case of an infringement of the Honor 
Code in matters of examinations and quizzes the 
matter shall be referred to the president oi the 
Honor Court, which shall settle the matter ac- 
cording to their own discretion. The opinion of 
the court shall be final except in the case where a 
student is recommended for dismissal from the 
University, in which case the decision of the court 
shall be sent to the Presiaent of the University 
for his approval. This course shall be established 
by the election of two representatives from each 
undergraduate college by the college itself, one of 
whom shall be a member of the Senior Class and one 
a member of the Junior Class. The Senior member 
shall serve for one year and the Junior member 
for two years for the first year of the Honor Court. 
Beginning with the second year the Junior member 
automatically becomes the Senior member of the 
court. These elections will take place at the be- 
ginning of each academic year. 

Infringements of the Honor Code, other than 
exams and quizzes or violation of the law of the 
General Students' Assembly shall be handled by 
the Students* Executive Committee. 

Request to the President 

The withdrawal of a student under these cir- 
cumstances shall be accompanied by a letter setting 
forth the facts in the case and advising the Presi- 

50 



dent that the student is not considered a desirable 
resident in the institution. A copy of such a letter 
to the President shall be sent to the student's 
parents. 

Other Regulations 

1. Class cards are not O. K'd until each student 
has paid his class dues for the previous year. 

(a) Dues: Freshman, $2.50; Sophomore, $5.00; 
Junior, $20.00; Senior, $10.00., 

(b) The treasurers of the respective classes shall 
keep accurate roils of their classes, these rolls be- 
ing taken from and checked with those of the 
University Registrar. This treasurer shall collect 
all dues and pay all bills. Written reports must be 
made by the treasurers to the Registrar each 
month, showing the present list of members and 
the financial statement. 

(c) Extra assessment by a class on its members 
will not be accountable in this resolution. 

(d) In the case of special students, these will 
pay dues in accordance with the number of years 
spent at this institution. Examples: (1) A man has 
been a special student here for two years and en- 
ters the Senior Class. He will have to pay Sopho- 
more, Junior, and Senior dues. (2) A student 
from University of Pennsylvania enters the Junior 
Class. His dues will start in that year as a Junior. 
(3) A student remains in one class two or more 
years. He will pay the dues of that particular 
class for as many years as he is a member. 

The Executive Committee will pass on all cases 
of special students. The classes will abide, without 
question, by the decisions of the Executive Com- 
mittee. 

This resolution will go into effect April 1, 1921, 
and continue thereafter. 



51 




ADELE H. STAMP 



GREETINGS FROM DEAN OF WOMEN 

"To those of you who have returned to carry on 
work already begun and to those new students, 
coming here for the first time, greetings and a hearty 
and cordial welcome. Friendship, sympathy and 
understanding await you here and the ever-present 
ever-intangible Maryland spirit is waiting to re- 
ceive you and waiting in turn for you to make it 
your own. This spirit instructs you to do something 
worth while during your college career, in college 
life as well as academically. For, the one who lives 
most fully during her four years in college takes 
part in the various activities on the campus. 
However, you must have a sense of values and 
choose wisely from the great number of organiza- 
tions. Do not rush headlong into too many. Do 
a few things well rather than many in a hap- 
hazard fashion. We offer to you our ideals of 
Maryland, our traditions and customs and ask 
you to help us to perpetuate them. 

Sincerely yours, 

ADELE H. STAMP, 
Dean of Women. 



53 



Women Students' Government 
Association 



CONSTITUTION 

Article I — Name 

The name of this organization shall be the 
Women Students' Government Association of the 
University of Maryland. 

Article II — Object 

The purposes of this association shall be: 

1. To maintain an effective self-government. 

2. To increase in the student body a sense of 
responsibility. 

3. To promote cooperation between the students 
and the President and Faculty of the University. 

4. To attain a high standard of scholarship and 
living. 

Article III — Membership 

Section 1. All women registered as students in 
the University shall be members of this Associa- 
tion; but only those residing in the dormitories, 
or in houses under the supervision of the Uni- 
versity, shall have a vote on matters pertaining to 
dormitory life. 

Section 2. A quorum shall consist of a majority 
of the members of the Association living on the 
campus. 

Article IV — Officers 

Section 1. The officers of this Association shall 
be a President and Vice-President, elected from 
the incoming Senior Class, and a Secretary, elected 
from the incoming Junior Class. 

54 



Section 2. Qualifications. 

(a) The President must have served on the 
Student Council one year. 

(b) All officers of the Association shall be with- 
out conditions or failures in class work at time of 
election. 

(c) No girl shall hold office in the Association 
who has not been a student in the University at 
least two years previous to her election. 

Notf — As the election of officers is held in the spring 
this rule may be interpreted to mean any girl 
who is about to complete, or has completed, 
two years of college work in this University?. 

Section 3. Duties of officers. 

(a) The President of the Association shall call 
and preside over all meetings of the Association 
and perform the general duties of an executive. 
She shall also-act as President of the Student Coun- 
cil. 

(b) The Vice-President of the Association shall 
assume the duties of the President in her absence. 

(c) The Secretary shall post notices of meetings, 
keep a record of the minutes of all meetings, and 
conduct the correspondence of the Association. 
She shall also keep an up-to-date record of the 
points credited to each girl in the Association. 

. Article V — Executive Council 

Section 1. Members. 

The Executive Council shall consist of: 

The President of the Association. 

The House President of each of the dormitories 
and of each ol the Houses under the supervision 
of the University. 

A Representative from each of the Senior, Junior, 
Sophomore, and Freshman classes. 

One Day Student who shall have no vote ex- 
cept on matters concerning day students* 

55 



Section 2. Qualifications and Collegiate Stand- 
ing of Members: 

(a) The House President must be a Junior or 
Senior. 

(b) The Class Representative must reside in one 
of the dormitories or in a house under the super- 
vision of the University. 

(c) The Day Student shall be a Junior or Senior. 

(d) All members of the Council shall be without 
conditions or failures at time of election. 

Section 3. Officers: 

The President of the Association shall act as 
President of the Council, but shall have no vote 
except in case of a tie. 

A Secretary who shall keep a record of the min" 
utes of all meetings of the Council, shall be elected 
from its upper classmen members. 

Section 4. Duties of the Council: 

(a) To act as an Advisory Board to the Presi- 
dent of the Association. 

(b) To enforce all rules of the Association. 

(c) To fix and enforce penalties for violations of 
rules of the Association. All major penalties must 
be approved by the Dean of Women. 

(d) To remove from office at any time House 
Presidents who are inefficient in the performance 
of their duties. 

(e) To make decision and act in all matters not 
provided for in this constitution. 

Article VI — Election 

Section 1 . Officers of the Association. 

Nominations for the officers of this Association 
shall be made from the floor in the meeting pre- 
vious to the Spring Meeting. With the notice for 
the Spring Meeting shall be posted the names of 
these candidates. This list ot candidates must be 

56 



approved by the Dean of Women and the Presi- 
dent of the University. 

The election of officers shall be by secret ballot; 
a majority of votes cast by those present, who must 
constitute a quorum, shall be necessary to elect. 
In the event no candidate receives a majority upon 
first ballot, there shall be a second casting of votes, 
and all except the two highest shall be eliminated 
before voting a second time. 

Section 2. Class Representatives: 

Each of the Senior, Junior and Sophomore classes 
shall elect its representative to the Executive 
Council by secret ballot during the last week in 
May. This meeting for election shall be called by 
the acting representative of each class. 

The Freshman representative shall be elected at 
the beginning .of the fall term. 

Sfction 3. House Presidents: 

The House Presidents shall be elected at the 
close of the fall meeting of the Association at the 
beginning of the school year. 

Section 4. Day Student Representative to 
Council: 

The Day Student representative shall be elected 
at the beginning of the fall term. 



Article VIII— Meetings 

Section 1. Women Students' Government As- 
sociation: 

There shall be at least three meetings a year of 
the Women Students' Government Association, 
the meetings to be held as follows: — 

(a) A fall meeting to be held during the first 
month of school at which time the president of the 
.Association will explain to the new women students 
the ideals and functions of the Women Students 
Government, including the Honor System. 

57 



(b) A meeting to be held at least one week in 
advance of the Spring Meeting for the purpose of 
making nominations. 

(c) A Spring Meeting for annual election of 
officers of the Association to be held the thifd 
Monday in May. 

A special meeting of the Association may be 
called at any time by the President at the written 
request of twenty-five members of the Association. 

Section 2. Executive Council: 

The Council shall meet regularly on the first 
Monday of every month. Additional meetings may 
be called at any time by the president. 

Article VIII — Honor System 

The Women Students' Government Association 
upholds the Honor System. Any infringement of 
the Honor System by a member of the Association 
Is punishable by the Executive Council. 

Article IX — Amendments 

This Constitution may be amended by a two- 
thirds vote of the Council and a ratification by a 
two-thirds vote at a general meeting of the As- 
sociation. 



BY-LAWS 

Social Regulations 

I. LATE LEAVES 



The' attendance at any function which does not 
permit a girl to return to her dormitory by 7.30 
P. M. before April 15, and by 8.00 P. M. after 
April 15, with the exceptions noted below, shall be 
considered a late leave. After a late leave a girl 
must return by 12.45 A. M. to her dormitory. 



58 



Late leaves per year shall be: Freshmen, 1 per 
month; Sophomores, 2 per month; Juniors, 3 per 
month; Seniors, 4 per month. Seniors without 
conditions or failures may take late leaves at their 
discretion after April 1, provided they sign up as 
usual. 

All University functions may be attended with- 
out late leaves. This includes Iraternity dances 
held in the Park during the week-ends and school 
dances held off the campus; it does not include fra- 
ternity dances held during the week. 

No week-ends spent away from the campus shall 
count as late leaves. 

II. DANCES 

It is understood that girls will return to their 
dormitories immediately after the close of all 
dances. 

The chaperons for University dances, fraternity 
dances, and sorority dances must be approved by 
the Dean of Women. No student in the dormitories 
may attend a non-college dance unless the chaper- 
ons have been approved by the Dean of Women. 

III. FRATERNITY HOUSES 

Girls may not go unchaperoned to fraternity 
houses. 

House Regulations 

I. HOUSE PRESIDENT 

The duties of the House President shall be: 

(a) To call and preside over house meetings. 
These shall be called at her own discretion or at 
the written request of any five residents of her 
house. 

(b) To be responsible for the general conduct 
and welfare of her house in cooperation with the 
faculty member residing in her house. 

(c) To act as hostess of her house. 

59 



{d) To check up all girls at 10.30 and see that 
lights are out. 

{e) To see that quiet is preserved during study 
hours. 

(/) To grant light cuts and to keep record of 
those taken by each girl. 

(g) To keep a record of the late leaves taken by 
each girl as shown by the late leave slips turned 
over each week to the House President by the 
matron or chaperon. 

(A) To grant special minor permissions to house 
residents, such as going to Joe's after study hours 
begin. 

(t) To appoint a girl to act in her place when she 

is absent. 

0) To authorite the payment of bills contracted 
by her house. 

{,k) To present to the Executive Council any 
changes in House Rules desired by her house. 



II 

Girls shall be in their respective houses at 7.30 
P. M. until April 15, at which time they shall be 
in their houses by 8.00 P. M., except on Friday, 
Saturday, and Sunday nights, and evenings before 
and of holidays, when they shall be in by 10.30 
P. M. 

III. QUIET HOURS 

Quiet hours shall be observed: 

Until 12.00 noon and from 1.00 to 4.30 daily ex- 
cept Saturday and Sunday. 

At night from 7.30 P. M. on, with intermission 
from 10.00 to 10.30, except on Friday, Saturday, 
and Sunday nights, when houses must be quiet 
after 11.00 P. M. 

There shall be no bathing after 10.30 P. M. 
60 



IV. MUSICAL INSTRUMENTS AND TYPE- 
WRITERS 

Musical instruments may not be played during 
quiet hours. 

Typewriters shall come under the same ruling 
as musical instruments, as regards their operation, 
unless they are kept in a room provided lor them 
in which room they shall be so far removed that 
they disturb no one. 

V. LIGHTS 

Lights must be out by 10.30 P. M., except on 
Friday, Saturday, and Sunday nights, and nights 
before and of holidays, when they must be out by 
11.00 P. M. 

Light cuts shall be allowed as follows: Freshmen 
3; Sophomores 3; Juniors 4; Seniors 5, per month. 
These light cuts must be taken in the living room 
or in some other room other than a sleeping room,, 
unless both roommates are taking a light cut, in 
which case each girl shall be credited with a cut 
and the girls may remain in their room, 

VI. ROOMS 

All rooms must be orderly by 8.00 A. M. 

VII. REGISTRATION 

Any girl leaving College Park at any time shall 
register her destination at her dormitory. 

Girls leaving their dormitory for meetings, 
library, social functions, etc., shall register des- 
tination at their respective dormitories. 

VIII. GUESTS 

Girls must secure permission for all house guests 
from the Dean of Women. All guests must be re- 
gistered with the chaperon of the House at least 
one week in advance. Permission must be secured 
from the owner of the room for its use. 

61 



IX. CALLERS 

Girls may have men callers at the dormitories 
after dinner until 7.30 on Monday, Tuesday, 
Wednesday and Thursday nights; on Saturday 
and Sunday afternoons, and on Friday, Saturday 
and Sunday evenings until 10.30 P. M. 



Point System 

The purpose of the Point System is to prevent a 
few girls from being overworked and to encourage 
and make it possible for more girls to share in 
campus activities. 

Maximum: 25 points per year. 



MAJOR 

1. President Student Government Association 20 

2. President Y. W. C. A 20 

3. House President 18 

4. Secretary of Grange. .\ 18 

5. Secretary Y. W. C. A 16 

6. Treasurer of Grange 15 

7. Manager Rifle Team 15 

8. Intercollegiate Debater 15 



MINOR 

1. Class Rep. to Student Council 12 

2. Day Student 12 

3. Secretary of Literary Society 12 

4. Captain Basketball ' 12 

5. Captain Rifle Team 12 

6. Treasurer Y. W. C. A 10 

7. President Home Economics Club 10 

8. Secretary Dramatic Club 10 

9. Treasurer Dramatic Club 10 

10. Secretary Student Assembly 8 

11. Secretary-Treas. Home Economics Club... 8 

1.2. Treasurer Literary Society 8 

13. Secretary Student Gov't Association 8 

62 



14 . Vice-President Y. W. C. A . 5 

15. Cabinet Member Y. W. C. A. . 5 

16. Vice-Pres. Student Gov't Association.... 5 

17. Member of Standing Committee 5 

18. Honor Court 8 

19. President Athletic Association 

20. Vice-Pres. Athletic Association 

21 . Secretary Athletic Association 

22. Manager of Sport 

23. Vice-President Literary Society 5 

24. Program Committee Literary Society 5 

25. Lady Assistant Lecturer of Grange 5 

26. Freshman Reporter Diamondback 5 

27. Sophomore Reporter Diamondback 5 

28. Staff of Diamondback 5 

29. Organization Reporter 3 

30. Secretary of Class 3 

31. Vice-Pres. Home Economics Club 3 

32. Vice-President Bible Class 3 

33. Vice-President of Class 2 



63 



CONSTITUTION AND BY-LAWS OF THE 
INTER-FRATERNITY COUNCIL 

The name of this organization shall be the 
Inter-fraternity Council of the University of Mary- 
land. 

The membership of this organization shall con- 
sist of two representatives of each of the recognized 
competitive fraternities of the University of Mary- 
land; and the purpose shall be to maintain a har- 
monious relationship between the said Univesrity 
in the management of the affairs that pertain to 
fraternities; and to accomplish this purpose the 
following rules adopted by the President and 
Deans of the University are herewith incorporated 
as the Constitution of this organization: 



Each Iraternity and sorority shall keep on file 
in the Registrar's office a complete list, corrected 
to date, of all active pledged members, including 
officers. 

II 

Each fraternity and sorority shall keep on file 
in the Registrar's office a complete up-to-date 
list of all members living in the chapter house. 

Ill 

No fraternity or sorority shall pledge any stud- 
ent until 8 o'clock in the morning of pledge day. 
Pledge day shall begin the morning of Tuesday 
of the week previous to the Christmas holidays. 

The meaning of the word "Pledge": 

No fraternity or sorority shall either directly or 
indirectly cause any student to commit himself or 
herself in favor of or against any fraternity or 
sorority prior to pledge day. 

64 



IV 

No student may be pledged to any fraternity or 
sorority unless he or she has at least fifteen (15) 
units in high school subjects. 



No fraternity nor sorority may initiate any 
student until he or she shall have passed twelve 
(12) credit hours. 

VI 

Any student or group of students desiring to 
form a local fraternity or sorority must first sub- 
mit to the Inter-fraternity Council and University 
Senate duplicate statements of the object and 
ideals involved, with a list of the proposed charter 
members. The Inter-fraternity council, within 
one month, shall forward its recommendations 
relative to the application to the University Senate, 
where the final decision will be made and the 
students informed of the action. 



VII 

A group of students in order to become eligible 
to representation on the Inter-fraternity Council 
shall be required. 

a. To possess Ideals and Purpose of Organization 
such as will not be detrimental to the general 
welfare of the University or to the Fraternities 
or Sororities represented on the Council. 

b. To have been functioning actively as an organiz- 
ation at the College Park Branch of the In- 
stitution at least two years after having ob- 
tained permission from the Administrative 
Officials to function as an organization. Such 
organization shall abide by the Inter- fraternity 
Council rulings for two years immediately pre- 
ceding their application for representation. 

c. To have at least twelve active members. 

65 



d. To have at least a grade of "C as a general 
scholastic average for the year immediately 
succeeding the time of its application for re- 
presentation. 

f. To have at least 90 per cent ot its members 
actively angaged in recognized University 
activities — this includes athletics. 

g. To show sufficient evidence of good financial 
standing as an organization. 

VIII 

No student nor group of students shall petition 
for a charter in any national fraternity until after 
the group desiring nationalization has obtained 
recognition as a member of the Inter-fraternity 
Council; and no such petition shall be made with- 
out the permission of the University Senate. 

IX 

It is herewith understood that all matters having 
relationship to the organization of fraternities and 
sororities and general fraternity and sorority affairs 
shall be presented to the Inter-fraternity Council, 
composed of two representatives from each ol the 
competitive fraternities that have met all the 
requirements for recognition by the Inter-fraternity 
Council for recommendation to the University 
Senate. Final approval or disapproval of such 
matters rest with the President of the University. 



BY-LAWS 



It is herewith understood by the members of 
the Inter-fraternity Council that any fraternity 
violating any part of the Constitution of this 
organization shall be subject to a fine of one hundred 
dollars ($100), which shall be used to help defray 
the expenses of the annual Inter-fraternity Dance, 

66 



and suspension from representation on this Coun- 
cil for a period of one year. 

It is further understood that any fraternity or 
sorority suspended is by no means relieved from 
the obligation of observing the Constitution and 
By-Laws and the term "suspension" implies only 
punishment or the withdrawal of the privilege to 
send representatives to this body. 

II 

Men not pledged to a fraternity shall not become 
residents in any fraternity house, except as ap- 
proved by the Inter-fraternity Council. 

Ill 

No fraternity or sorority may withdraw from 
this Council without having first obtained the 
approval of the Inter-fraternity Council, and also 
the University Senate. 

IV 

The first meeting of each year to be held for the 
election of officers and that the chairman of the 
Committee on Student Affairs shall call the meeting. 



67 



STUDENT PUBLICATIONS 

The Diamondback 

Official organ of College Park students, published 
weekly, on Tuesday. 

Editor-in-Chief Kenneth Stoner 

News Editor Milford Sprecher 

Girls' Editor Betty Amos 

Business Manager Charles Futterer 

Circulation Manager Emerson Bishoff 

Those interested in writing are invited to con- 
sult the editor in regard to becoming members of 
the staff. Contributions of news, editorials, hum- 
orous items, poems and any matter that it is be- 
lieved would brighten up the pages, is also solicited. 
There is one fast rule, and that is, contributors 
must sign name to articles, but, of course, not for 
publication. 

The Reveille 

Year book for College Park students, issued about 
June 1st. 

Editor-in-Chief Parke Shipley 

Business Manager George Morrison 

Girls' Editor Helen Beyerle 

Cameramen and artists are always in demand 
for the year book and those in charge stand ready 
to sign up any who have the talent along these 
lines as well as those who can wield a fluent pen. 
Work on The Reveille is an all-year job. It begins 
with the opening of school and continues until the 
last proof is read just before going to press. 



68 



MUSICAL ORGANIZATIONS 

Four musical organizations are maintained in 
connection with the Department of Music. 

Chorus. Membership in the Chorus is open to 
all students, and to persons residing in the com- 
munity. Oratories and standard part-songs are 
studied. Rehearsals are held weekly. The Chorus 
presents an annual festival of music in May. 

Glee Club. A Glee Club, of limited member- 
ship, is recruited from the best vocal talent among 
the men of the University. Admission is gained 
through tests, or "try-outs," conducted at the be- 
ginning of the School year. The club holds two 
rehearsals a week. Public concerts are given. 

Opera Club. The "Maryland Opera Club" was 
established in 1923 and gave its first performance 
in the spring of 1924. Its object is to foster and 
promote music in connection with dramatic art, and 
to develop and direct musical talent of students in 
the University. One or more public performances 
will be given each year. 

Military Band. This organization, of limited 
menbership, is a part of the military organization 
of the University, and is subject to the restrictions 
and discipline of the Department of Military 
Science and Tactics, but the direction of its work 
is under the Department of Music. 



69 



WEARERS OF THE "M' 



Football 



E. Pugh 
W. Beany 
J. Burger 
J. Hough 
G. Lewis 
A. Bonnet 
W. Bromley 
W. Supplce 
G. Luckey 



R. Besley 
I. Hall 
G. Heine 
D. Osborn 
P. Lanigan 
J. Waters 
A. Parker 
F. Herzog 
W. Bartlett 



E. Zalesak 



Lacrosse 



J. Burger 

D. Osborn 
J. Hough 

E. Allen 

K. McDonald 
E. Smith 
H. Reading 
L. Ensor 



I. Peebles 
J. Faber 
T. Marden 
W. Beatty 
A. Sleasman 
G. Lewis 
E. Zalesak 
O. Greager 



Baseball 



P. Schnider 
W. Troxell 
J. Morgan 
K. Besley 
H. Murray 
A. Spinney 



J. Faber 
L. Ensor 
W. Supplee 
W. Troxell 
L. Cardwel! 



E. Juska 
Basketball 



K. Coghill 
M. Stevens 
H. Remsberg 
M. Burgee 
G. Brayton 
J. Burroughs 



J. Burger 
A. Boyd 
M. Stevens 
W. Beatty 
H. Baker 



70 



Track 

E. Pugh L. Ditman 

J. Endslow H. Buckman 

R. Whiteford H. Whiteford 

L. Sheriff R. Diebert 

\V. Supplee R. Hill 

J. Ray 

Cross-Country 

H. Buckman A. Petruska 

C. Bowman R. Hill 

C. Comphes I. Staley 

Tennis 

W . Weber ' H. Burns 

W. Kimbrough W. Greene 

J. Tau E. Lingley 
D. Walker 



Girls' Rifle 

B. Amos M. Harbaugh 

A. Dorsev T. Winkier 

H. Beyerle R. Willis 

Girls' Basketball 

M. Hill M. Harbaugh 

E. Duvall N. Buckey 

M. Heiss E. Taylor 



71 



FOOTBALL SCHEDULE 

Sept. 26 — Washington College at College Park 

Oct. 3 — Western Maryland at Baltimore 

Oct. 10 — Rutgers at Philadelphia 

Oct. 17 — Virginia Polytechnic at College Park 

Oct. 24 — University of Va. at Charlottesville 

Oct. 31 — North Carolina University at Baltimore 

Nov. 7 — Yale at New Haven 

Nov. 14 — Washington and Lee at College Park 

Nov. 26 — Johns Hopkins at Baltimore 



72 



SONGS AND YELLS 
Matyland 

In the very heart of Maryland, 

In the heart of every Maryland man, 

There's a spirit so endearing 

It will win your heart and hand. 

For she doth hold the sway. 

She will win the day, 

And her glorious men will ever win the fray. 

Chorus: 

Then it's Hurrah! Hurrah! for Maryland. 

Then it's Hurrah! Hurrah! for U. of M. 

With her banners ever streaming high. 

She will always win or die, 

Then we'll gather 'round Alumni, 

And "Fight" will be our one reply, 

For we love, we love Old Maryland, 
Hurrah! Hurrah! Hurrah! 

Who Owns This Team? 

Oh, who owns this team? 

Oh, who owns this team? 

Oh, who owns this team? the people say. 

Why, we own this team. 

Sure, we own this team. 

Sure, we own this team. 

M-A-R-Y— L-A-x\-D HURRAH! 

Oh, who'll win this game? 

Oh, who'll win this game? 

Oh, who'll win this game? the people say. 

Why, we'll win this game, 

Sure, we'll win this game, 

M-A-R-Y— L-A-N-D HURRAH! 

Oh, who owns this town? 

Oh, who owns this town? 

Oh, who owns this town? the people say. 

Why, we own this town. 

Sure, we own this town, 

M-A-R-Y— L-A-N-D HURRAH! 

73 



From Our Home Town 

We've brought along a football team, 

From our home town. 
It works better than the best machine. 

From our home town. 
We've got a line that never backs, 
It can push any engine off her tracks. 
And all the backfield players 
Have the speed of our fast Mailers. 

We'vj got a team that can't be beat. 

From our home town, 
Every man's a doggone Sheik, 

From our home town. 
We've got a battling "Light Brigade". 
They'll turn this game to a track parade, 
They're all Curly's own hand-made, 

From our home town. 



Victory Song 

(Tune — Toreador Chorus) 

Into the game with might and main, 

Maryland! Marylandl 
Fight! Every minute, fight against the foe! 
Drive straight down to the goal 
And we will win the game 

For Maryland. 
Sure, victory is won. 
Yes, Maryland will victor be — 

Our Maryland! 

Keep up the fight, we're rooting for you, 

Maryland! Maryland! 
Charge! Hit the line and circle round the ends, 

Drive back to their goal; 

And victory is won, for Maryland. 

Sure victory is won. 

Yes, Maryland will victor be — 

Our Maryland! 

74 



Defiance 

He— Haw— Ho— Go— Mar— y— land!— 
He — Haw — Ho — Go — Mar — y — land! — 
(Continuous) 

Whistle Boom!! Rah! 

U-M Rah Rah!— U-M Rah Rah!! 
Team! Team!! Team!!! 

Maryland U 

Mary land U. 

Mary land U. 

Maryland Rah Rah, 

Maryland Rah Rah, 
Hoo-Rah! Hoo-Rah! 

Maryland Rah! 
Rah! Rah! Rah! Rah! 
Mary — land! 

Hoo-Ray 
Hooooo Ray! Hooooo Ray! Hurrah! Team! 

Locomotive 

M-M-M-M A- A- A- A R-R-R-R Y-Y-Y Y 
L-L-L-L A-A-A-A N-N-N-N D-D-D-D 

Maryland, 
Team Team Team 

U. M. RAH) 

U. M. Rah! Rah! 
U. M. Rah! Rah! 
U— Rah! M— Rah! 
U.— M.— Rah! Rah! 

Hip Hip 

Hip! Hip! 
Hike! Hike! 
Fight, Team, Fight! 

Short Ray 

Ray! (Player) (Team) (Maryland) 
Ray! Ray! Team! Team! Team! 

Ge-He 

Ge-he! Ge-he! Ge-ha! ha! ha! 
Boom a racka! Boom a racka! 
Sis-Boom-Ba! 
Maryland! 

75 



ST. ANDREW'S EPISCOPAL 
CHURCH 

COLLEGE PARK, MD. 
Rev. Ronalds Taylor, S.T. D. Rector 

Services: 

9:45 A. M. Sunday School 

11:00 A. M. Morning Prayer 
and Sermon. 

Communion Service First 
Sunday of Each Month 

Make St. Andrew's your church 
home while in College Park. 
You will find a cordial welcome 
at all the services. The Rector 
will welcome an opportunity to 
meet and know you. 



76 



The First Presbyterian Cliurcli 

Hyattsville, Md. 

And its Minister 
Joseph M. Anderson, D.D. 

Extend a cordial invitation to Uni- 
versity students to attend all ser- 
vices as follows: 

Bible School— 9:45 A. M. 

Preaching— 11 A. M. and 8 P. M. 

Young People 7 P. M. 

Prayer — Wednesday, 8 P. M. 

Historical 

This Church celebrated its 220th 
Anniversary December 20, 1924. 

Its official records come down un- 
broken from the year 1704 — a long 
period of service. The churche's 
most precious relic is a silver com- 
munion service, donated by Queen 
Ann in 1707. 

"Remove not the ancient land- 
marks which thy fathers have set" 

— Prov. 22:28 



77 



Berwyn Presbyterian Church 

B. A. MATZEN, Pastor 

Services, Sunday, 11 a. m. 
Sunday School, 9:45 a. m. 
Student's Bible Class, 9:45 a. m. 
Christian Endeavor Meeting, Sunday 7 p.m. 
Prayer and Bible Study, Wednesday 8 p.m. 

You are Most Cordially Welcome 

First Baptist Church 

HYATTSVILLE, MD. 
Rev. B. P. Robertson, D.D., Pastor 

Invites you to all of its services 

Bible School— 9:30 A. M. 

Preaching— 11 A. M. and 8 P. M. 

B. Y. P. U.— 7 P. M. 

Mid-week Service — Wednesday 8 P. M. 

Why not make this home-like church 
your church home. 

78 



To the students of the University 
of Maryland 

The First National 
Bank 

OF HYATTSVILLE 

Extends to you greetings and a 
welcome and invites you to make 
this bank your depository while at 
the University. 

Do not keep money in your room — 
pay your bills by check. 

This prevents loss, robbery, extrava- 
gance and disputes. 

The facilities of this bank are at 
your command. 

BANKING HOURS 

Mondays and Government Pay 
Days, 9 to 5:30 P. M. 

Saturdays, 9 A. M. to 12 M and 
4 to 8 P. M. 

Other days, 9 A. M. to 3 P. M. 

H. J. PATTERSON C. B. GASCH 

President Cashier 



79 



We solicit your Account 

Prince Georges 
Bank 

Resources over 
$1,500,000 

BANKING HOURS 

8;30 A. M. to 3:00 P. M. 

Saturdays 

8:30 A. M. to 12:00 
4:00 P. M. to 8:00 P. M. 



T. M. JONES J. ENOS RAY 

Cashier President 



80 



KUSHNER'S 

VARIETY STORE 

BERWYN 91 

COLLEGE PARK, MD. 

Visit our Lunch Room. 

Reasonable prices. 

Fresh Fruits, Delicatessens, 
Candy, Ice Cream, Sodas, 
Cigars and Cigarettes, Mag- 
azines, Drug Supplies. 

Shoes for all College Uses. 

Radio is always tuned in for 
your convenience. 

What you don't see ask for. 

Give us a trial 



81 



E. T. HARRISON 

DEALERS IN 

General Merchandise 

COLLEGE PARK, MD. 

MOSE LEVIN 

Cleaning, Pressing and 
Repairing 

HYATTSVILLE, MD. 

WORK CALLED FOR & DELIVERED 

Phone Hyattsville 144-J 
Experience Teaches Wisdom 

BENJAMIN F. CHINN & SONS 

(Established 1893) 
Have served you faithfully for over 30 years 

Shaving and Hairdressing Parlor 

Ladies' And Children's Work A Specialty 

Up-to-Date Massage and Shampooing 

Razors Honed, Set and Concaved 

At the car stop HYATTSVILLE, MD. 

82 



4J 

OS 




















£ 




















• 

2 

3 




















• 




















S 

3 




















e 

o 




















£ 

3 


S 





















83 



• 




















• 


, 


















« 

u 
3 
X 
H 








































• 

99 

3 




















c 

o 




















09 

3 
O 

X 





















84 



NOTE 

We wish to call attention to 
these churches, whose ads fol- 
low. All University students 
will be welcomed at their ser- 
vices. The College Park 
churches will be found on 
pages 76, 77 and 78. — Editors. 

EMMANUEL CHURCH 

Cathedral and Read Sts. 

Rev. Hugh Birckhead, D. D., Rector 

This Church holds out a cordial welcome to all of 
the students of the Maryland University 

SUNDAY SERVICES 

8.00 A. M. — Holy Communion. 

9.45 A. M. — Church School. 

11.00 A. M. — Morning Prayer and Ser- 
mon. (Holy Communion and Ser- 
mon first Sunday in the month). 

8.00 P. M. — Choral Evensong and Address 

The Rector will be glad to meet you at the 
close of any of these services. 
Every Fully Developed Man is Religious 

85 



Franklin Street 

Presbyterian 

Church 

Franklin and Cathedral Sts. 



Rev. Harris £. Kirk, D.D., Pastor 



Service at 11 A. M. and 8 P. M. 

Sunday School at 9.45 A. M. 

Young People's Society at 
6.45 P. M. 



Students are Cordially Invited to All 
Services:;-,:;,^ y^'^:;y, 



86 



ST. MARK'S 

LUTHERAN 

CHURCH 

St. Paul and 20th Sts. 
Robert D. Clare, D.D., Pastor 



Sunday Services: 
P:30 A. M.— Sunday School. 

10:00 A. M.— Brotherhood Bible 
Class. 

11:00 A. M. and 8:00 P. M. Congre- 
gational Services. 

7:00 P. M. — Luther League. 

Mid-Week Services: 
8:00 P. M. Wednesday. 

This Church provides a religious 
atmosphere and fellowship especially 
congenial to University and College 
students. 

A Cordial Invitation is Extended to 
All of the University of Mary- 
land Students 



&7 



Mt. Vernon Place 
Methodist Episcopal Church 

at the Washington Monument 
Rev. Oscar Thomas Olson, D.D. Minister 



At the heart of the city to serve your 
needs and desires. 

The services on Sundays at eleven and 
eight have fine musical setting, a vigor- 
ous putting of religion for today and a 
real welcome to you. 

The Blue and Gray Room, the Assembly 
Hall and the Bowling Alley serve as a 
student rallying center. 

Sunday afternoon from 5 to 7 the social 
"At Home" brings together U. of M., 
Hopkins, Goucher, Peabody and city 
young people. 

The big Bible Class Sunday morning at 10 
in the Assembly Hall is worth your while. 

88 



The Brown Memorial 
Presbyterian Church 

Park and Lafayette Avenues 

Rev. G. A. HULBERT, D.D., Pastor 
1316 Park Ave. 

Rev. JOHN C FINNEY, 

Director Christian Education 
The Cecil Apartments 

Services at 11 A. M. and 
8 P. M. 

Christian Endeavor Meeting 
at 7 P. M. 

Social Hour for Young People 
of the Church, students and 
their friends at six o'clock. 

Brown Memorial Church ex- 
tends a most friendly welcome 
to all students. 



89 



The Brantly Baptist Church 

Edmonson Ave. and Schroeder Street 
Rev. Henry M. Wharton, D.D., Pastor 

Services Every Sunday 11:00 A, M. and 

8:00 P. M. Conducted by the Pastor 

Young People's Meeting Every Sunday at 

7:00 P. M. With Social Tea. 

You will be welcome at this Church 
and if you come once you will come 
again. 

MADISON AVENUE 
Methodist Episcopal Church 

Madison and Lafayette Aves., Balto.,Md. 
Edward L. Watson, Minister 

Sunday Services: 

9:30 A. M. Sunday School. 
11:00 A. M., 8:00 P. M. Divine Worship 
7:00 P. M. Epworth League. 

A Church in a student neighborhood which 

aims to be a neighborhood church. 

We bid you a cordial welcomer-"^— 

90 



FIRST CHURCH 

ST. PAUL and 22nd STS. 
Rev. JO. W. G. FAST, D D., Minister 

Services at 11 A. M. and 8 P. M. 
Epworth League at 7 P. M. 

Students are cordially invited to attend 
all services. 

Seventh Baptist Church 

North Ave. and St. Paul St. 

Offers a most Congenial 

Church Home 

To Young College Men 

Join our^Student Alembership and one of 
our Men's Classes meeting every Sunday 
morning at 9.30 : : 

CHURCH SERVICES 

Sunday— 11 A. M. and 8 P. M. 

B. Y. P. U— Sunday, 7 P. M. 

Prayer Service — -Wednesday, 8 P. M. 

91 



University Baptist 
Cburcb 

N. E. Corner of Charles and Green way 



SUNDAYS 
9:30 A. M. Sunday Bible School 
9:45 A. M. Men's Bible Class 

Joshua Levering, Teacher 

11:00 A. M. Morning Service 

6:30 P. M. Young People's 
Meeting. 

8:00 P. M. Evening Service 

FRIDAY 
8:00 P. M. Weekly Prayer Service 

A cordial welcome awaits the students. 
We are eager to know you. When you 
reach the city drop a postal card to 
the church that we may get in touch 
with you. 



92 



Church of the Ascension 

(Episcopal) 

LAFAYETTE SQUARE 

Robert Evans Browning, Rector 

Services: 7:30 A.M. 

9:30 A.M. 

11:00 A. M. 

S:00 P. M. 

Men's Bible Class, Wednesday 8 P. M. 

Parish Hall All Seats free 

CATHEDRAL OF THE INCARNATION 

University Parkway and St. Paul St. 

Rev. Harold N. Arrowsmith 
Canon in Charge 

8 A. M. — Holy Communion. 

11.00 A. M — Morning Prayer and Ser- 
mon (Holy Communion on first Sun- 
day in the month). 

4,30 P. M. — Choral Evensong and Address 

Eutaw Place Baptist Church 

Rev. O. C. S. Wallace, D.D., Minister 

SERVICES 

Sunday School 9:30 A. M. 

11 A. M. and 8 P. M. 

Y. P. S. 7 P. M. 

Students are Cordially invited to all 
these services. 

93 



Grace Methodist 
Episcopal Church 

CARROLLTON AVE. at 
LANVALE ST. 

Cordially invites all students in 

Baltimore to share in its services 

and fellow^ship. We want 

to know you and 

serve you. 

SUNDAY SCHEDULE 
Church School at 9:40 A. M. 
Morning Worship at 11 A. M. 
Young People's Service at 7 :00 P.M. 
Evening Worship at 8:00 P. M. 

The Minister, Dr.Victor G. Mills, 

will be glad to be of personal 

service to student friends 

at any time. 



94 



SEPTEMBER 



Sunday Sept. 13 



Monday Sept. 14 



Tuesday Sept. 15 



Wednesday Sept. Ifr 



Thursday Sept. 17 



Friday Sept. 18 



Saturday Sept. 19 



95 



• 



SEPTEMBER 



Sund^ Sept. 20 



Sept. 21 





Sept. 22 



-c^^-3r 




Friday' H Sept. 25 



C t '-^ ' . '^'KZ&X^.'^ 



Saturday iSept. 26 



SBPTEMBER 






Monday ^^^ W,, } t<jC^T^i^ 
Tuesoay ' Sept. 29 

^4 0^ ^^' ^^ ^.'/^/y. 






We4nesday Sept. 30 




- 0//.44.\AJ lUCLtjL^ A^. 



AJ lUCLijL^^ 



OCTOBER 
Thursday Oct. 1 




x4i& :L.. jt.rp./>j. 



Friday -^ y- ^ Oct. 2 

Saturday Oct. 3 



OCTOBER 



Sunday Oct. 4 

Monday U Oct. 5 



Tuesday Oct. 6 

Thursday ' Oct. 8 " 



Saturday // — ^ . Oct. 10 j 




OCTOBER 






^<i^«2-e O- 



Monday^ ^^^ 




Imsday 





Thursday ' . Oct. 15 

/" / / 

Friday Oct. 16 



Saturday Oct, 17 



99 



OCTOBER 



Sunday Oct. 1 8 



Monday Oct. 19 



Tuesday Oct. 20 



Wednesday Oct. 21 



Thursday Oct. 22 



Friday Oct. 23 



Saturday Oct. 24 



100 



OCTOBER 



Sunday Oct. 25 



Monday Oct. 26 



Tuesday Oct. 27 



Wednesday Oct. 28 



Thursday Oct. 29 



Friday Oct. 30 



Saturday Oct. 31 



101 



NOVEMBER 



Sunday Nov. 1 



Monday Nov. 2 



Tuesday Nov. 3 



Wednesday Nov. 4 



Thursday Nov. 5 



Friday Nov. 6 



Saturday Nov. 7 



102 



NOVEMBER 



Sunday Nov. 8 



Monday Nov. 9 



Tuesday Nov. 10 



Wednesday Nov. 11 



Thursday Nov. 12 



Friday Nov. 13 



Saturday Nov. 14 



103 



Chartered 1864 

Safe Deposit & 
Trust Company 

OF BALTIMORE 

Fireproof buildings, with 
latest and best equipment 
for safety of contents. Safes 
for rent in its large fire and 
burglar -proof vaults, with 
spacious and well-lighted 
coupon rooms for use of 
patrons. Securities held on 
deposit for out of town cor- 
porations and persons. 

13 SOUTH STREET 

104 



NOVEMBER 



Sunday Nov. 15 



Monday Nov. 16 



Tuesday Nov. 17 



Wednesday Nov. 18 



Thursday Nov. 19 



Friday Nov. 20 



Saturday Nov. 21 



105 



Baltimore's Best Clult 




CENTRAL YOUNG MEN'S G 



FRANKLIN AND 1 



for University Men 




Student 
Rates 

Full 

Privileges to 

June ISth. 

SI 0-00 

Student 
Gym Class 

Tues.,Thurs. 
5:10 P. M. 



IRISTIAN ASSOCIATION 

FHEDRAL STS. 



ELLERBROCK 

Student Photographer 

112 N. Howard St., Baltimore, Md. 

CHARLES R.DiSTEFANO 

Light Lunch and 
Confectioneries 

Opposite Mercy Hospital 

Call at VELZIS' 

for all kinds of Photographic work 
and Enlargements. 

749 W. BALTIMORE ST. 

Tel. Calvert 3348 



Patronize Our Advertisers 



108 



NOVEMBER 



Sunday Nov. 22 



Monday Nov. 23 



Tuesday Nov. 24 



Wednesday Nov. 25 



Thursday Nov. 26 



Friday Nov. 2'/ 



Saturday Nov. 28 



109 



Your Drug Store Needs 

Will be supplied 
by 

HYNSON, 

WESTCOTT & 

DUNNING 

Two Locations 

CHARLES AND CHASE STS. 
Vernon 0890 

EUTAW PLACE AND 
NORTH AVE. 

Madison 0405 
BALTIMORE 

110 



NOVEMBER-DECEMBER 



Sunday Nov. 29 



Monday Nov. 30 



Tuesday Dec. 1 



Wednesday Dec. 2 



Thursday Dec. i 



Friday Dec. 4 



Saturday Dec. 5 



111 



When you Spend a dollar, that's 
the End of it. 

When you Save a dollar, that's 
the Beginning of it. 

Union Trust Company 

OF MARYLAND 

Charles and Fayette Streets 
Baltimore 

FIRE AND BURGLAR PROOF 

THE COMMONWEALTH 
BANK 

HOWARD AND MADISON STREETS 

State and City Depositary 



SAVINGS DEPARTMENT 

INTEREST 4 PER CENT 

Safe Deposit Boxes 

112 



DECEMBER 



Sunday Dec. 6 



Monday Dec. 7 



Tuesday Dec. 8 



Wednesday Dec. 9 



Thursday Dec. 10 



Friday Dec. 11 



Saturday Dec. 12 



113 



MARYLAND 

GLASS 
CORPORATION 



BOTTLE MANUFACTURERS 

BLUE and GREEN 
TINT BOTTLES 



Mt. Winans 
BALTIMORE, MD. 



114 



DECEMBER 






Sunday 


Dec. 


13 


Monday ^ /-^ " > 


Dec. 


14 


Tuesday // 


Dec. 


15 


Wednesday / 


Dec. 


16 


Thursday 


Dec. 


17 


Friday 


Dec. 


18 



Saturday Dec. 19 



115 



MORRIS RESTAURANT 

517 N. HOWARD ST. 

Table Board by the week 
3 Meals a Day $4.50 

Try our Regular Dinnei 

Club Breakfast 35c 50c 



For Good Food and Service come to 

IMPERAL LUNCH 

One visit only will convince you 
Few steps from U. of M. 

Near Baltimore and Greene Streets 



Calvert 1441 

Eugene Shipley 

Our Lunch 

513 W. Baltimore St., Baltimore, M 

116 



M 



DECEMBER 



Sunday Dec. 20 



Monday Dec. 21 



Tuesday Dec. 22 



Wednesday Dec. 23 



Thursday Dec. 24 



Friday Dec. 25 



Saturday Dec. 26 



117 



College Jewelry and Novelties 

All the new makes of Fountain pens 
and Pencils in gold and silver, small 
sterling silver Footballs, Basket 
Balls, Base Balls, Bats, etc.$l. 00 each 
Also Glass Pins and Emblems 

\A/M. J. MILLER 

The Popular Priced Jeweler 
28 EAST BALTIMORE STREET 



Established 1873 

A. H. PETTING 
MANUFACTURING JEWELRY CO. 

MANUFACTURERS 

Greek Letter Fraternity Jewelry 

213 N. Liberty .Street 
BALTIMORE, MARYLAND 

118 



DECEMBER-JANUARY 



Sunday Dec. 27 



Monday Dec. 28 

Tuesday Dec. 29 



Wednesday . Dec. 30 



Thursday Dec. 31 



Friday Jan. 1 



Saturday Jan. 2 



119 




CLOTHES 



211-213 E. Baltimore St. 

GOOD 

CLOTHES 

NOTHING 

ELSE 

Only four words, but 
they tell our whole 

story 

120 



JANUARY 



Sunday Jan. 3 



Monday Jan. 4 



Tuesday Jan. 5 



Wednesday Jan. 6 



Thursday Jan. 7 



Friday Jan. 8 



Saturday Jan. 9 



121 



J. TROCKENBROT & CO. 

Manufacturers of 

Class Pins, Emblems, Buttons, Col- 
lege Seals, Greek Letter Fraternity 
Pins and Rings 

Original and Special Designs to order 

324 W. Saratoga Street 
310 N. Paca Street 

We can duplicate any pin, ring or emblem 



RADIO 
CENTER 



329-331 W. BALTIMORE ST. 
offers particularly to 

U. of M. MEN 

The best values obtainable from the 

largest stock of sets, parts and 

accessories 

Graduate Electrical and Radio Engineers in 

Charge. Advice Cheerfully given without any 

obligation to buy. 

122 



JANUARY 



Sunday Jan. 10 



Monday Jan. 11 



Tuesday Jan. 12 



Wednesday Jan. 13 



Thursday Jan. 14 



I 



Friday Jan. 15 



Saturday Jan. 16 



123 



GOLD! 

—Get it by Systematic Saving 
Start a Savings Account today 

PARK BANK 

Lexington Street at Liberty 

Baltimore, Maryland 

Furniture oj Quality 

and individuality is offered here at prices 
that are not and cannot be underquoted 
by any house at any time. 

Besides the reputation of an old est- 
ablished firm is back of each sale with a 
guarantee. 

JOHN C. KNIPP & SONS 

Furniture - Decorations 
Draperies 

343 N. CHARLES STREET 

124 



JANUARY 



Sunday Jan. 17 



Monday Jan. 18 



Tuesday Jan. 19 



Wednesday Jan. 20 



Thursday Jan. 21 



Friday Jan. 22 



Saturday Jan. 23- 



125 



Gray Line Motor Tours 

DEPENDABLE 
RESPONSIBLE 
COMFORTABLE 
ECONOMICAL 

Sightseeing Trips 
Tours to Distant Points 
De Luxe Coaches and 
Buses for all Occasions 

Let us help you plan your 
party — Write, Phone or Call 



BUSES 





2 ST. PAUL ST. Phone, Plaza 5000 



^1 

,126 





JANUARY 




Sunday 




Jan. 24 


Monday 




Jan. 25 


Tuesday 

r 




Jan. 26 


Wednesday 




Jan. 27 


Thursday 




Jan. 28 


Friday 




Jan. 29 



Saturday Jan. 30 



127 



BURNS 

Medical Standard Book Company 

301 N. CHARLES ST. 

Cor. Saratoga 

Headquarters for Medical Books, 

Fiction, Fountain Pens and 

Students' Supplies of 

all kinds 

SURGICAL INSTRUMENTS 



Telephone Vernon 6128 

Hepbron & Haydon 

Law Booksellers and Publishers 

14 W. FRANKLIN ST. 

We supply all text -books and syllabi 
of lectures used in the Law Depart- 
ment of the University of Maryland. 

Books Bought, Sold and 
Exchanged 

128 



JANUARY-FEBRUARY 



Sunday Jan. 31 



Monday Feb. 1 



Tuesday Feb. 2 



Wednesday Feb. 3 



Thursday Feb. 4 



Friday Feb. 5 



Saturday Feb. 6 



129 



THE WALKER -GORDON 
LABORATORY 

Certified Milk and Cream 
from Burnside Farm 

IN THE GREEN SPRING VALLEY 



Charles R. Deeley 

Dealer in all kinds of 

DENTAL 
SUPPLIES 

108 W. MULBERRY STREET 
BALTIMORE, MD. 

130 



FEBRUARY 



Sunday Feb. 7 



Monday Feb. 8 



Tuesday Feb. 9 



Wednesday Feb. 10 



Thursday Feb. 11 



Friday Feb. 12 



Saturday Feb. 13 



131 



Co-operative Dental 
Laboratory 

"YOUR FUTURE ASSISTANTS" 

Eutaw and Franklin Sts. 
Baltimore, Md. 



Smith's Dental Laboratory 

W. T. SMITH 

S. W. Cor. Franklin St. and 

Park Avenue 

Baltimore, Md. 

Personal supervision of 
all work 

Phone, Vernon 7575-7576— P. O. Box E-2 

132 



FEBRUARY 



Sunday Feb. 14 



Monday Feb. 15 



Tuesday Feb. 16 



Wednesday Feb. 17 



Thursday Feb. 18 



Friday Feb. 19 



Saturday Feb. 20 



133 



Carefully Selected ^^ 
orrectly Prepared M /^ ^ ^ 

ourteously Served X V U vl 

FOR 

BREAKFAST - LUNCH - DINNER 



We Welcome You to Our New Dining Room • 

YTlJr /^ A Franklin St. 
♦ lYl* V-«* /\* At Cathedral 

Ladies Patronage Invited 
Group Luncheons ana Dinners a Specialty. 

The Murray Baumgartner 
Surgical Instrument Company 

216 W. Franklin St. 

STUDENTS AND PHYSICANS 
SUPPLIES 

Dissecting Cases and Microscopes 
Laboratory Supplies 

134 



FEBRUARY 



Sunday Feb. 21 



Monday Feb. 22 



Tuesday Feb. 23 

Wednesday Feb. 24 

Thursday Feb. 25 

Friday Feb. 26 

Saturday Feb. 27 

135 



MEDICAL BOOKS AND 

SCHOOL BOOKS 
SECOND HAND AND NEW 

SMITH'S BOOK STORE 

805 N. HOWARD STREET 

(3 doors above Madison St.) 

BOOKS BOUGHT & EXCHANGED 

G. Kenneth Greer, Phone, 

Prop. Hamilton 0612-W 

THE COMMUNITY PRESS 

Commercial and Social Printing 

3 Grindon Ave. 
Prices That Please Lauraville 

Drink 

Western Mainland Daiiy 

Milk 

136 



FEBRUARY-MARCH 



Sunday 



Feb. 28 



Monday 



March 1 



Tuesday 



March 2 



Wednesday 



March 3 



Thursday 



March 4 



►^ 



Friday 



March 5 



Saturday 



I 



March 6 



137 



Weinbautn Bros. 

Dental Supplies and 
Dental Equipment 

PARK BANK BUILDING 

Lexington and Liberty Streets 

BALTIMORE 

Branches; New York, Philadelphia 



Luther B. Benton Co. 

DENTAL SUPPLIES 

305 N. Howard St. 

Baltimore, Md. 

Phone, Vernon 1370 

138 



MARCH 



Sunday 



March 7 



Monday 



March 8 



Tuesday 



March 9 



Wednesday 



March 10 



Thursday 



March 11 



Friday 



March 12 



Saturday 



March 13 



139 



MARCH 



Sunday 



March 14 



Monday 



March 15 



Tuesday 



March 16 



Wednesday 



March 17 



Thursday 



March 18 



Friday 



March 19 



Saturday 



March 20 



140 



99 



"D. S. 

(DOCTORS OF STYLE) 

Isaac Hamburger 
& Sons 

Men's and Boys' Outfitters 
Baltimore and Hanover Sts. 



Why Pay More 

We have the very Suit 

$\5 Cheaper 
Because we make them 

M. SOLOMON & SONS 

603 W. BALTIMORE ST. (nr. Greene) 

141 



MARCH 



Sunday 



March 21 



Monday 



March 22 



Tuesday 



March 23 



Wednesday 



March 24 



Thursday 



March 25 



Friday 



March 26 



Saturday 



March 27 



142 



MARCH-APRIL 



Sunday 



March 28 



Monday 



March 29 



Tuesday 



March 30 



Wednesday 



March 31 



Thursday 



April 1 



Friday 



April 2 



Saturday 



April 3 



143 



APRIL 



Sunday April 4 



Monday April 5 



Tuesday April 6 



Wednesday April 7 



Thursday April 8 



Friday April 9 



Saturday April 10 



144 



APRIL 



Sunday 



April 11 



Monday 



April 12 



Tuesday 



April 13 



Wednesday 



April 14 



Thursday 



April 15 



Friday 



April 16 



Saturday 



April 17 



U5 



APRIL 



Sunday April 18 



Monday April 19 



Tuesday April 20 



Wednesday April 21 



Thursday April 22 



Priday April 23 



Saturday April 24 



146 



APRIL-MAY 



Sunday April 25 



Monday April 26 



Tuesday April 27 



Wednesday April 28 



Thursday April 29 



Friday April 30 



Saturday May 1 



147 



MAY 



Sunday May 2 



Monday May 3 



Tuesday May 4 



Wednesday May 5 



Thursday May 6 



Friday May 7 



Saturday May 8 



148 



MAY 



Sunday May 9 



Monday May 10 



Tuesday May 11 



Wednesday May 12 



Thursday May 1^ 



Friday May 14 



Saturday May 15 



U9 



MAY 



Sunday May 16 



Monday May 17 



Tuesday May 18 



Wednesday May 19 



Thursday May 20 



Friday May 21 



Saturday May 22 



150 



MAY 



Sunday May 23 



Monday May 24 



Tuesday May 25 



Wednesday May 26 



Thursday May 27 



Friday May 28 



Saturday May 29 



151 



MAY-JUNE 



Sunday 



May 30 



Monday 



May 31 



Tuesday 



June 1 



Wednesday 



June 2 



Thursday 



June 3 



Friday 



June 4 



Saturday 



June 5 



152 



JUNE 



Sunday 



June 6 



Monday 



June 7 



Tuesday 



June 8 



Wednesday 



June 9 



Thursday 



June 10 



Friday 



June 11 



Saturday 



June 12 



153 





JUNE 






SUNDAY 




June 1 




MONDAY 




June 1 




TUESDAY 




June 1 




WEDNESDAY 




June ] 




THUSTDAY 




June ] 




FRIDAY 




June : 




SATURDAY 


154 


June 


1 



1 Name. . 
Address. 

Phone . . 



2 Name. . 
.\ddre8s. 
Phone. . 



.'^ .Name. . 
Address. 
Phone. . 



i Name. . 
Address. 
Phone. . 



5 Name. . 
Address. 
Phone . . 



6 Name. . 
Address. 
Phone. . 



155 



□ E 



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English Clothes Tailored in America 

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