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Full text of "Students' hand book of the University of Maryland"

1926 CALENDAR 1927 


September 


March 


S M T W T F S 


S M T W T F S 


12 3 4 

5 6 7 8 9 10 11 
12 13 14 15 16 17 18 
19 20 21 22 23 24 25 
26 27 28 29 30 


12 3 4 5 

6 7 8 9 10 11 12 
13 14 15 16 17 18 19 
20 21 22 23 24 25 26 
27 28 29 30 31 


October 


April 


1 

] i 

I LIBRARY— COLLEGE PARK ► 


r 
t 

\ 1 


12 3 4 5 

6 7 8 9 10 11 12 
13 14 15 16 17 18 19 
20 21 22 23 24 25 26 
27 28 


.... 12 3 4 5 6 
7 8 9 10 11 12 13 
14 15 16 17 18 19 20 
21 22 23 24 25 26 27 
28 29 30 M J. .... 



STUDENTS' 

HANDBOOK 

OF 

THE UNIVERSITY OF 
MARYLAND 



Presented by the 

CHRISTIAN ASSOCIATIONS 

1926 - 1927 



STAFF 

Editor (Baltimore)-^Donalcl P. Roman 

Editor (Coll.ige Park)— Ralph Nestler 

Girls' Editor (College Park) 

Ruth Williams 

Business Manager (College Park) 

Paul L. Fisher 

Business Manager (Baltimore) 

Hugh Ward 






CONTENTS 



University Calendar 4 

Retiring President's Greeting 9 

Greeting from Dr. Lee 11 

Y. M. C. A. Committee of ]VIanagement_.. 11 

Baltimore Departments 12 

College Park Departments 27 

Student Pastors at the U. of M 33 

Academic Regulations 34 

Greetings from Dean of Women 43 

Women Students' Government Ass'n 47 

Point System for Women 55 

Student Publications 57 

Musical Organizations 58 

Wearers of the *'M"- „ 62 

Football Schedule 83 

Track and Field Records 67 

Songs and Yells 68 

Fraternities ~ 73 

Constitution of Interfrateraity CouncU- 74 

College Park Ads 80 

Daily Schedule „..„ _ 86 

Baltimore Ads (Churches) 88 

Baltimore Ads (Business) 104 

Memoranda and Addresses 150 



IIISTOKIC AI. SKETCH 

The history of the present University of 
Maryland practicnlly couihiiies the history 
of two institutions. It bejrins with the 
rhart.M-iii;,' of the CoUfKo of Mctlioine of 
Marvlaiul in r.alliniorc in 1S(»7. which jirad- 
natfd its tirst class in ISIO. In 1S12 the 
institution was empowered to annex other 
departments and was by the same act 
"constituted an I'niversity by the name and 
nndor the title of the University of Mary- 
land." 

For more than a centnry the University 
of Maryland stood almost as or^'anized in 
]sr_>. until an act of tlie Legislature in 
r.fJM n»(>r^ed it with the .Maryland State 
Coilejjfe and changed the name of the Mary- 
land State College to the University of 
Maryland. 

The Maryland State Collejre lirst was 
chartered in isnti under the name of the 
Maryland Agricultural ColleKe. the second 
agricultural college in the Western Hemi- 
sphere. In lS<i2 Congress passed the Land 
(Jrant Act and the Maryland State College 
was named as the beneficiary of the grant 
in Maryland. Thus the College became, at 
least in part, a State institution. In the 
fall of 1014 its control was taken over en- 
tirely by the State. In 191(5 the General 
Assembly granted a new charter to the 
College and made it the Maryland State 
College. 



91918 



University Calendar 

1926-1927 



BALTIMORE 

FIRST SEMESTER 
1926 

Sept. 7, Tuesday— Registration for first 
term in Law begins. 

Sept. 13, Monday — First term classes begin 
in Evening Law. 

Sept. 20, Monday — First term classes begin 
in Day Law. 

Sept. 27, Monday — Instruction begins wuth 
first scheduled period in Medi- 
cine, Pharmacy, Dentistrj-. Last 
day of registration for Law 
Schools. 

Oct. 4. Mondaj' — Last day for registration 
in Medicine, Pharmacy, Dentis- 
try. 

Nov. 11, Thursday — Holiday (Armistice 
Day). 

Nov. 24, Wednesday — Thanksgiving Recess 
begins after the last schedule 
period. 

Nov. 29, Monday — Instruction resumed with 
first schedule class period. 

Dec. 23, Thursday — Christmas Recess be- 
gins after last schedule period. 
1927 

Jan. 3, Monday — Instruction resumed with 
first schedule period. 

Jan. 17, Monday — itegistration begins for 
second semester. 

Jan. 29, Saturday— First term ends in Day 
Law and Third Year Evening 
Law. 



SECOND SEMRSTEU 

Jan. ?>l. Monday — Instrnction hoffins in 
Medicine, rharmaoy, Dentistry. 
Day Law. ."{rd Evening- Law. 

PVb. 5, Satnrday — Last day for registra- 
tion. First term ends in 1st 
and 'Jnd Evening: Law. 

Fet). 7, Monday— Second term begins in 1st 
and 2nd Evening Law. 

Feb. 14, Monday — Last day lor registration 
in Day and Evening Law. Last 
day for registration in 1st and 
2nd Evening Law. 

Feb. 22, Tnesday-Holiday (Washington's 
Birthday). 

April 14, Thursday — Easter Recess begins 
after last schedule period. 

April 19, Tuesday — Instruction resumed 
with first schedule period. 

May 28, Saturday — Second term ends in 
Day and .'ird year Evening Law. 

June 4, .Saturday — Commencement. 

June 25, Saturday — Second term ends, 1st 
and 2nd Evening Law. 



COI.I.EGE PARK 

FIRST SEMESTER 
1926 

Sept. 17, Friday — Registration for Fresh- 
men. 

Sept. 20-21. Monday-Tuesday— Registration 
for all other students. 

Sept. 22, Wednesday — Instruction for first 
semester begins. 

Sept. 27, Monday — Last day to register. 

Sept. 29, Wednesday — Last day to change 
registration or to file schedule 
cards without fine. 

Nov. 11, Thursda.y — Observance of Armistice 
Day. 

Nov. 2-4-29. Wednesday. 4:20 P.M.. to Mon- 
day, 8:20 A. M. — Thanksgiving 
Recess. 

Dec. 18. Saturday, 12 M. — Christmas Recess 
begins. 
1927 

Jan. 3, Monday, 8:20 A.M.— Christmas Re- 
cess ends. 

.Tan. 19-22, Wednesday-Saturday — Registra- 
tion for second semester. 

Jan. 24-29, Monday-Saturday — First semes- 
ter examinations. 

Jan. 31, Monday — Last day to register for 
second semester without pay- 
ment of late registration fee. 



SECOND SEMESTER 

Feb. 1, Tueaday, S:l»0 A.M.— Instruf tion for 
second seniHstiT begins. 

Feb. 8, Tuesday Last day to chanj^e reg- 
istration or to file sehedulecard 
withont tine. 

Feb. 22, Tuesday WasliinKton's Birthday. 

Mar. 25. Friday. 11 :-'0 A.M. -Observance of 
Maryland Day. 

Apr. 14-20. Thursday, 12 M. to Wednesday, 
8:20 A.M.— Easter Recess. 

May 11-12, Wednesday and Thursdaj' — Fes- 
tival of Musi<'. 

May 25-June 1, Wednesday-Wednesday — 
Second semester examinations 
for seniors. 

May 2y-June 4, Saturday-Saturday — Second 
semester examinations. 

May 30. Monday — Memorial I>ay. 

June 5. Sunday. 11 A.M. — Baccalaureate 
Sermon. 

June 6, Monday— I'lass Day. 

June 7, Tuesday, 11 A.M. — Commencement. 

SUMMER SCHOOL 

June 13-18, Mondaj'-Saturday — Rural 
Women's Short Course. 

June 22. Wednesday— ^Summer School 
begins. 

Aug. 2. Tuesday -Summer School ends. 

Aug. 4-9. Thursday-Tuesday — Boys' and 
Girls' Club Week. 




Dr. Raymond Pearson, 

resident of the University of Maryland. 



KETIKIN<; l'KKSII>i:\T*S <;kkktin(i 

June 7, 1U2(5. 

To the Stud. Mils c.f the University of Mnry- 
land : 

In this tiiuil Kivetin^ to the students of 
the University, I wish to coniniend to you 
uiy suceessor, Dr. Pearson, who is my dear 
I'iend and co-hilxner and who will l)e your 
friend and helner. I know you will work 
with hiin as you have worked with me for 
the welfare of the student body and of 
•lie iK'o'.de of o\ir State and nation. 

■'T^et us be faithful in well doiuK. for in 
due season we shall reap if we faint not." 

(Character, as exemplified in the life and 
t-'irhinjfs of Jesus is the foundation on 
which we must build. The spirit of unsel- 
fish service and sacrifice must be built iuU) 
the whole structure of our lives. If it is. 
our lives cannot helj) but be successful and 
our University will stand out as one of the 
^'reatest influences for good. 

With best wishes, I am 

Sincerely yours, 

A. F. WOODS. 
Retiring President. 




Dr. Frederic E. Lee, 

Chairman, Board of Managers. 



WKLCOME 

As Chairman of the Board of Mana^trs 
of the Y. M. C. A., I take thin op|)orl unity 
of extending: to every new student a very 
Inarty welcome to the schools and ((dlej^'es 
ot tlie Tniversity. In co-operation with 
the older students, may you help mak«' this 
vi'iir tli<> hfst year lor the Associations and 
tiie I'niversity. 

fki:i)i:ri(' e. lee. 

Executive Di-an of the liiiversity. 
TIIK YOUNCi Mi:\S ( IIKIISTIAN 
ASSOCIATION 

The Y. M. C. A. at the University of 
Maryland operates under the direction of 
a lioard of Managrers of the Baltimore 
Younj; Men's Christian Association, which 
is composed of Students. Faculty, Alumni 
and friends of the University. The person- 
nel of this Board for the cominfr year is as 
follows : 

IM-. l<'rederie E. Lee. Chairman 

W. M. IlilleKt'ist, Vice-Chairman 

Dr. John C. Krantz, .Ir., Treasurer 

Dr. H. B. McCarthy. Secretary 

Dr. II. J. Patterson 

Dr. I*. W. Zimmerman 

Dr. A. E. Zucker 

Dr. W. B. Kemp 

John J. Ekin 

Dr. A. F. Woods 

Dr. EdKar Miller 

J. Franklin Witter 

Donald I'. Komaii 
This Board of Managers is responsil)le 
for the j^'eneral oversight of the work of the 
Y. M. C. A. at the University. It exists as 
an advisory l»ody upon which the Student 
Cabinets of the Association ma.v depend for 
advice and help on any i»roldem which 
may arise. The details (»f the program 
both in Baltimore and College Park are in 
t!ie hands of the Student Cabinets. 
11 



Baltimore Departments 



THE YOUNG MEN'S CHRISTIAN 
ASSOCIATION 

Officers and Cabinet 

President Donald P. Roman, Law 

Vice-President Arthur Pagenhardt. Phar. 

Vice-President Avery Fitch. Dental 

Secty-Treas Charles Taylor, Medical 

Exec. Secty Harry E. Foulkrod 

Socials Chad wick Aiau 

Athletics F. C. Kohler 

wStudent Volunteers George Gulck 

FelloAvship Dinners Charles Taylor 

Foreign Students Hugh Ward 

Conferences Donald P. Roman 

Freshmen Arthur Pagenhardt 

Rooming: and Boarding: House Directory 

In order to assist out-of-ciity students in 
securing suitable rooms and boarding 
places, the Association prepares each fall a 
list of available places and helps direct stu- 
dents to the type of place they desire. All 
students who do not have rooms should 
report to the "Y" Office as soon as they 
register. 

The Handbook 

Th^ Handbook is published and distrib- 
uted without cost to each student. Its 
purpose is to make a ready reference book 
for all students, but especially to aid the 
new stndent in adjusting himself to uni- 
versity life. 

Church Co-operation 

The Association accepts its position as a 
representative of the Churches among the 
students. It does not concern itself with 

12 



the student's choice of a Church, but it is 
concerned to help him maiiitaiis iiitirnatp 
contacts with the Church he chttoscs. 

Fellowsliip Dinners 

In order to cultivate Christian Fellow- 
ship and co-opcralioii anions the students 
of the University, the Y. M. (\ A. will hold 
a series of six fellowship dinners, during,' 
the year, to which all students will l)e wel- 
comed. They will he held at stated inter- 
vals at the i'. W. C. A. Notable speakers 
an<l good music will be used in making 
these affairs well worth while. 

Conferences and Conventions 

Every year numerous conferences and 
conventions are held by the Council of 
Christian Associations ot .Maryland. Dela- 
ware, and the District of Columbia. Three 
major conferences for this year have al- 
ready been !)lanned. In October, a confer- 
ence on Christian F'nndamentals will be 
held at Sherw(»od Forest led by Dr. Tweedy 
of Yale. The Februarv Conference will l)e 
held at Hood College, Frederick. .Md. The 
S])ring Training Conference will be held at 
Sherwood Forest, during the latter part of 
April. The Association aims to have the 
University well represented at all of these 
gatherings. 

Cosntopolitan Club 

Last year 125 students from 34 different 
nations studied in Baltimore. The Associa- 
tion tries in man^' ways to help these stu- 
dents to get the best out of. their life here, 
l)ut its major work is through the Students 
Cosmopolitan Club of Baltiniote. which, 
although an independent student organi- 
zation, is fostered by the Y. M. C. A. It 
meets bi-monthly and all foreign students 
are especially invited to attend. 
13 



Beadlngr Room 

The Y. M. C. A. reading room, in the 
Meflifal building, is at the disposal of all 
the students. Among the current period- 
icals are: Harpers, Atlantic Monthly, Sat- 
urday Evening Post, Life, Judge, National 
Geographic, Review of Reviews, World To- 
morrow, etc. 

Student Volunteers 

The Association has a major interest in 
the world-wide work of the Church. It is, 
therefore, interested in and fosters the 
work of the students in the University Avho 
are preparing for foreign service. During 
the past year, there were live student vol- 
i.iiitit'rs studying for the Medical Mission- 
ary Field. 

Athletics 

During the past year the "Y," at the re- 
quest of the members of the student body, 
sponsored a series of basketball games 
which aroused a feeling of school spirit 
that is much needed in the professional de- 
partment of the University. This year a 
full schedule' of basketball games will be 
maintained between the various schools. 
All interested students should report to 
the "Y" Oliice. 

Central Y. M. C. A. ^lemberships 

The Central Branch of the Y. M. C. A. 
with its tine equipment, including Gymna- 
sium, Swimming Pool, Reading Rooms, etc., 
offers its privileges to University students 
at a special rate for the school year. 



14 



I'KOfFDrRK FOR REGISTRATION 

A new ri'fristration is coiKliiotod onoh 
year. 

All stiideivls ill iiKMliciiic, doiilist ry, i>h:ir- 
iiiacy. must ro^^islcr in Ihc (itlicc df the 
n^Mstrar (law scliocil Ituildiiip:) during the 
pt'iiod Iroiu Mcindav, Soplcnilier 27. to Mon- 
thly. October 4. 

Tlu> poriod of rpfristrntion for the stu- 
dents ill law i)e{,'i"s Tuosil;iy. September 7, 
and rondudes Monday. September 27. 

There is a late rejjristration fee of $5.00 
which all students .-n-e sultjected to who 
do not rejrister in the time set aside for 
that purpose. 

Each new student will i)resent at the 
office of the KcKistrar the matriculation 
receipt which has i)een issued i>y the Dean 
of the School in which he will retrister. 
After the rejristratioii card has been tilled 
out complete, the card is jtresenteil at the 
office of tlu> Ifejristrar for approval. When 
the reg:istr.ition card has been vised, the 
student Mill take the card to the ollice of 
the Comptroller and i»ay the retiuired fees. 
The office of the Comi»troller adjoins the 
office of the Registrar. 

W. M. IIILLE(JEIST. 

liegistrar. 



15 



THE SCHOOL OF MEDICINE 

J. M. H. Rowland, Dean 

Medical Council 

Arthur M. Shipley, M.D., Sc.D. 
(lordon Wilson, M.D. 
Harry Friedenwakl. A.B.. M.D. • 
William S. Gardner, M.D. 
Standish MeCleary, M.D. 
Julius Friedenwakl, A.M., M.D. 
J. M. n. Rowland, M.D. 
Alexius McGlaiinan, A.M., M.D., LL.D. 
Hugh R. Spencer, M.D. 
H. Bovd Wylie, M.D. 
Carl L. Davis, M.D. 
William II. Schultz, Ph.B., Ph.D. 
Maurice ('. Pincotts, S.B., M.D. 
Frank W. Hachtel, M.D. 
A. H. Ryan, M.D. 
The School of Medicine of the University 
of Maryland is one of the oldest founda- 
tions for medical education in America, 
ranking fifth in point of age among the 
medical colleges of U. S. In ithe school 
building at Lombard and Greene streets in 
Baltimore was founded one of the first 
medical libraries and the first medical col- 
lege library in America. 

Here for the first time in America, dis- 
secting was made a compulsory part of the 
curriculum; here instruction in Dentistry 
Avas first given (1837), and here was first 
installed independent chairs for the teach- 
ing of diseases of women and children 
(1867), and of eye and ear diseases (1873). 
This School of Medicine was one of the 
first to provide for adequate clinical in- 
struction by the erection in 1823 of its own 
hospital, and in this hospital intra-mural 
residency for senior students was first es- 
tablished. 

16 



THE SCHOOL OF PHARMACY 

Andrew G. DuMez, Dean of the Faculty 

B. Olive Cole, Seoretarj' of the Faculty 

John C Krantz, Jr., Professor of Pharmacy 

J. Carlton Wolf, Professor of Dispensing 

Chus. C. Plitt, Professor of Botany and 

Materia Medica 

II. E. Wich, Associate Professor of 

Chemistry 

The School of Pharmacy was organized 
in 1841, largely at the instance of members 
of the Faculty of Medicine, and for a time 
tliH lectures were delivered at the Medical 
School. Later it became separated and 
continued an independent organization as 
the Maryland College of Pharmacy, until 
tinally it became a part of the University 
in l!)b4. \yith but one short intermission 
previous to 1865 it has continuously exer- 
cised its functions as a teaching school of 
pharmacy. 

This school holds membership in the 
American Association of Colleges of Phar- 
macy The object of the Association is to 
promote the interests of pharmaceutical 
education and all institutions holding 
membership must maintain certain mini- 
mum requirements for entrance and grad- 
uation. 

Upon completion of the first three years 
of the course the diploma of Graduate 
(Ph. G.I is awarded which admits the holder 
to the board examinations in the various 
states for registration as a phai-macist. 

The degree of Bachelor of Science in 
[*harmacy (B.S. in Pharmacy) will be given 
wpon the completion of the work prescribed 
for the entire course of four years. 

Its diploma is recognized in all states. 

17 



BALTIMORE COLLEGE OF DENTAL 
SUKGEKi: 

J. Ben Robinson. F.A.C.D., Dean 

The Baltimore College of Dental Surgery 
was chartered by the Maryland Legislature 
February 1, 1840. It was the first institu- 
tion ever organized to offer instruction in 
the art and science of dentistry. It has 
roucinned with an unbroken record and 
reniains the oldest dental school in the 
world. 

The first lectures offered on the special 
subject of dentistry in a medical school 
in America were delivered by Horace H- 
Hayden. M.L)., at the University of Mary- 
land in the year 1837. It Avas Dr. Hay- 
<len's idea that dentistrj' merited greater 
attention than had been given it by med- 
ical instruction, and undertook to develop 
this specialty as a branch of medicine. 
With this thought in mind, he, with the 
support of Dr. Chapin A. Harris, appealed 
to the Faculty of Physic of the University 
of Maryland for the creation of a depart- 
ment of dentistry as a part of the medical 
curriculum. The request having been re- 
fused, an independent college was decided 
upon. A charter was applied for and 
granted by the Maryland Legislature. Feb- 
ruary 1, 1S40. The first Faculty meeting 
was held February 3. 1.S40, at which time 
Dr. H. H. Hayden was elected president 
and Dr. C. A. Harris dean. The introduc- 
tory lecture was delivered by Dr. Harris 
on November 3, 1S40, to the five students 
matriculated in the first class. Thus was 
the Baltimore College of Dental Surgery, 
the first and oldest dental school in the 
world, created as the foundation of the 
present dental profession. 

18 



In lS7a the Maryland Dental CoIlcKt'. :in 
(. Its prill J? of the HaltinK.re ( '(•II.'kc of Den- 
tal Snrticry, was nr^'ani'/i'd an<l conlinuod 
instruction in denial sul)j«'cts until 1S79, 
wIk'JI it was <'(Hisolidated witli the Balti- 
more Colletre of Dental Suryery. A de- 
partment of denllslry was organized at the 
University of Maryland in the year 1SS2. 
graduating: its lirst class in 1SS3 and each 
suhsequeiit year to l'.)li.'?. This school was 
chartered as a corporation and continued 
as a privately owned and directed institu- 
tion until T.CJO, when it became a State 
institution. The Dental Department of the 
Baltimore Medical College was established 
in IS'J."), continuing until 191;', when it 
inerged with the Dental Department of the 
Cniversity of Maryland. 

The final coniljiinng of the dental edu- 
cational interests of P.altimore was effected 
June 1"). 1!H'."I, by the amalgamation of the 
stndt-nt bodies of the Baltimore College of 
Dental Surgery and the University of 
Maryland School of Dentistry, the Balti- 
more (,'ollege of Dental Surgery becoming 
a distinct departnient of the State Uni- 
versity under Sta'te supervision and con- 
trol. Thus we lind in the Baltimore Col- 
lege of Dental Surgerj', Denial School, 
University of Maryland, a merging of the 
various efforts at dental education in Mary- 
land. From these component elements 
have radiated developments of :the art and 
science of dentistry vsntil the potential 
strength of its Aluinni is second to nont; 
either in numbers or. degree of service to 
the orofession. 



19 



SCHOOL OF LAW 

Tlie Faculty Counoil 

Hon. Hpnry I». Harlan, A.M.. LL.B., LL.D., 

Dean 

Kobf-rt Hill Freeman, M.A., LL.B., 

Assistant to the Dean 

While the first faculty of law of the Uni- 
versity of Maryland was chosen in 1813, no 
regular school of instruction was opened 
until IS23. This was suspended in ISS'l, 
and in 1S70 rej;ular instruction was again 
begun. In I'JIS the Baltimore Law School, 
which had previously absorbed the Balti- 
more University School of Law, was merged 
into the Law School of the University of 
Maryland. The graduates of the Law School 
now number more than two thousand, and 
included among them are a large propor- 
tion of the leaders of the Bench and Bar 
of thp State and many who have attained 
prominence in the profession elsewhere. 

The course of instruction in the Law 
School is designed to thoroughly equip the 
student for the practice of his profession 
when he attains the Bar. The course of 
study embraces both the theory and prac- 
tice of law. and aims to give the student a 
broad view of the origin, development and 
function of law, together with a thorough 
practical Knowledge of its principles and 
their application. Analytical study is made 
of the principles of substantive and pro- 
cedural law, and a carefully directed prac- 
tice court enables the student to get an 
intimate working knowledge of procedure. 

The Law School is divided into two divi- 
sions : The Day School course, covering a 
period of three years, and the Evening 
School course a period of four years. The 
dec^ree of Bnchelor of I.,aws is conferred 
upon graduates of each school. 
20 



SCHOOL Ol NIKSING 

Frtoulty iind Instructors 

Supcriiiteiuleiit of Xiirst's and Dirootor of 

School of Niivsiiiji-, 

Aiuiie ('rei{4hton, U.N. 

Assistiint SiiiicriiitciHleiit of Nurses, 

Man-is M. Hranlpy, U.N. 

Instructor in NursinjJ!: 
Isobel Ziuiuicrman, U.N. 
Instructor in Nursing and Supervisor of 
Wards, 
I.,ouise Savage. U.N. 
Assistant Instructctr in Nursiny and Super- 
visor of Wards, 



Instructor in Surgical Techni(iue for 
Nurses and Supervisor of 

Operating Pavilion, 

Elizal)eth Aitkenhead, U.N. 

Instructor in Dietetics, 

Miriam Connellj' 

Instructor in Massage, 

Edith Walton 

Instructor in Social Service, 

Grace Pearson, U.N. 

The T'niversity of Maryland School for 

Nurses was established in the year 1889. 

Since that time it has been an integral i)art 

of the University of Maryland Hospital. 

The School is non-sectarian, the only re- 
ligious services being morning prayers. 

The University of Maryland Hospital is 
a general hospital containing about 285 
beds. It is equipped to give young women 
a thorough course of instruction and prac- 
tice in all phases of nursing, including ex- 
perience in the operating room. 



21 



FIVE-YEAR PROGRAM 

Tn addition to the regular three-year 
course of training the University offers a 
coniliint'd Acadeniio and Nursing program 
leading to the degree of Bachelor of Sci- 
ence and a Diploma in Niirsing. 

The first two years of the course (or 
pre-hf)Spital period), consisting of 70 se- 
mester hours, are spent in the College of 
Arts and Sciences of the Tniversity, dur- 
ing which period the student has an intro- 
duction to the general cultural sul)jects 
which are considered fundamental in anj' 
college training. At least the latter of 
these two years must be spent in residence 
at College Park in order that the student 
may have her share in the social and cult- 
ural activities of college life. The last 
three years are spent in the School of Nurs- 
ing in Baltimore. In the fifth year of the 
combined program certain elective courses 
such as Public Health Nursing, Nursing 
Edijcation, Practical Sociologs', and Edu- 
cation Psychology are arranged. 



22 



THE ATHLKTIC ASSOCIATION 

(Dental School) 

III XovtMulxT, 1924, the entire student 
body of the D.'iital Department of the Uni- 
versity of Maryland nn't in the 4th Reffi- 
nuMit Armory and orj,'anized an Athletic 
Association. Tliis Association was made 
possible after much hard work by Dr. 
Zelwis, assisted by Drs. May and McCar- 
thy, and the co-operation of our Dean, Dr. 
Robinson. 

This is the first organization of its kind 
yver accomplished in the Dental Depart- 
ment. It has for its object the creation of 
good fellowship among the student body, 
as well as providing a means whereby the 
students can participate in those branches 
of athletics in which they are best suited. 

Dr. Zelwis was chosen President of the 
Athletic Association and continues as such. 
Dr. May is Vice-President, Dr. McCarthy, 
Treasurer; Dr. Browning, Graduate Man- 
ager: Coach. W. P. Dailey. 

A schedule of twelve games was played 
during the winter. Among the colleges to 
be played ne.xt season are Seton Hall, 
Villa Nova, Western Maryland, St. John's, 
and Blue Ridge. 

Like last year, a big track and field 
meet, intercollegiate and interscholastic, 
will be held at the Stadium. Washington 
College won the meet this year. 



CASHING CHECKS 

Checks may be cashed at Cashier's Of- 
tice. in the Medical Building. Hours : S( 
A.M. to 1 P.M., 3 P.M. to 5 P.M. 

23 



COUNCIL OF CLASS PRESIDENTS 

This student organization is composed of 
the Presidents of each of the regular 
classes in the six schools located in Balti- 
more. It is the one group that represents 
the entire student body. 

The council is organized each fall after 
the classes have elected their officers. Meet- 
ings are held regularly. All matters of 
interest and concern to the student body 
are considered by the council. 

The importance and value of the organi- 
zation has been recognized by the commit- 
tee of I>eans, and in accordance with a 
recommendation of the Deans the council 
supervises the publication of the "Terra 
Mariae." The council has played a leading 
part in fostering dances, athlettic mass- 
n»eftings. and engendering a virile univer- 
sity spirit. 



THE MUSICAL, CLUB 

Director — Dr. Roy P. May 
The Musical Club, which includes the 
Glee Club. Orchestra, and Mandolin Club, 
was organized three years ago by its pres- 
ent director, Dr. Koy P. May. and is now 
well esatblished as a regular organization. 
Last year, the club gave ten concerts and 
presented many enjoyable programs over 
the radio. 

The club, meeting once a week for re- 
hearsals, gives an excellent opportunity for 
students to get together for two or three 
hours in something outside of the school 
routine, to form closer friendships and to 
learn music. The organization is open to 
all students who play instruments, sing, or 
who are willing to learn to sing. 

The club has had a pleasant and success- 
ful existence in the past, and is looking 
forward to greater success this year. 
24 



FRATERNITIES 

General 

Gamma Alpha Pi Phi Alpha 

Iota Lambda Phi Tau Kpsilon Phi 

I*hi Kappa Delta 

Law 

Alpha Kappa Sigma Alpha Theta Phi 
Alpha Zeta Gamma Alpha Eta Gamma 
Phi Kappa Sigma 

Dental 
Alpha Omega Xi Psi Phi 

Theta Nii Epsiloii Psi Omega 

Medical 

Thl Zeta Chi Phi Chi 

Lambda Phi Mu Phi Delta Epsilon 

Nu Sigma Nu Phi Lambda Kappa 

Phi Beta Pi Theta Kappa Psi 

Pharniaey 

Alpha Zeta Omega Kappa Psi 
Phi Delta Chi 



CLUBS 



Gorgas Odontological Society 

Medical Students' Council 

Pharmacy Students' Council 

Randolph Winslow Surgical Society 

Italian Club 

Alpha Debating Club 

The Musical Club 

1'prra Mariae." published annually by the 
Senior Class of the Baltimore Schools. 



25 




Harry E. Foulkrod, 

Executive Secretary University of Maryland 
Young Men's Christian Association 



College Park Departments 

Kff^iilatiuii of Stiideiit Activities 

The :iss()ci:ili(»ii of snidt'iils in orKaiiized 
lutdit's, iov the imrimsc uT cariyinj,' i»ii vol- 
iiiitaiy stu(l«'iit aclivitifs in orderly and 
productive ways, is rfcot;ni/fd ami encour- 
aged. All orj,'aiii/.ed student activities, ex- 
cept those which are controlled l)y a special 
board or t'ai-ulty t-oinmittee, are under the 
si'pervisiou of the Coniniittee on Student 
Affairs, subject to tiie api»roval of the 
I'resident. Such organizations are formed 
only with the consent of the <V»nunittee on 
Student Affairs and the api»roval of the 
I'resident. Without such consent and ap- 
proval no student organization which in 
any way rejiresents the Tniversity before 
the public, or which purports to be a Uni- 
versity orj,Minization or orfjanizatioii of 
Cniversity students, nia.v use the name of 
the University in connection with its own 
name, or in connection with its members as 
students. 

Elifirihilit.v to Repreftent the University 

Only students in prood standing are eli- 
gible to represent the University in extra- 
curricular contests. No student while on 
probation may represent the University in 
such events as athletic contests, glee club 
concerts, dramatic performances and de- 
bates. 

Disoipline 

In the government of the University, the 
President and facultA- rely chietly upon the 
sense of resi)onsil)ility of the students. The 
student who pursues his studies diligently, 
attends classes regularly, lives honorably, 
and maintains good behavior meets this re- 

27 



sponsibility. In the interest of the general 
welfare of the University, those who fail 
to maintain these standards are eliminated. 
Students are under the direct supervision 
of the University only when on the cam- 
pus, buit they are responsible to the Uni- 
versity for their conduct wherever they 
may be. 

Student Government 

The General Students' Assembly consists 
of all the students and is the instrument 
for student governmenit. It operates un- 
der a constitution. Its ofBcers are a Pres- 
ident, Vice-President and Secretary and 
an Execuitve Coviucil representative of the 
«pveral college classes. 

The Students' Assembly meets every sec- 
ond Wednesday at 11:20 o'clock in the Au- 
ditorium for the transaction of business 
which concerns the whole student body. 
On alternate Wednesdaj's a program is ar- 
ranged bj' the officers with the aid of the 
Department of Public Speaking. The Stu- 
dents' Executive Council, with the aid of 
the Committee on Student Affairs, which 
acts as an advisory board to the Council, 
performs the executive duties incident to 
managing student affairs. 

'The constitution is undergoing revision 
and is not available for publication in this 
handbook.) 

Wonien Students' Government Association 

\A^.omen Students' Government Associa- 
tion is an organization comprising all the 
women students, for the management of 
all affairs concerning the women students 
exclusively. It operates under a constitu- 
tion. Its officers are the same as those of 
the General Students' Assembly. Its Ex- 
ecutive Council has the advisory co-opera- 
tion of the Dean of Women. 
28 



FRESHMAN I'KOCKDr KK 

The r.'uistnitioii of fn'slnncii will take 
nl.ifc Fri(l:iy. Scptt'inlx'r 17, he^MiiiiinK at 
'.) A.M. All rrcshmt'ii arc t-xpcfti'd to rej?- 
ist«M- «tn this date. .Monday, Seiiteniber 20, 
and Tuesday, Seiiteiiiher L'l. are reserved 
for registeriiif? students of the three u[)i)er 
classes, and freshmen will in.t lie registered 
on those days. 

Donnitories will l>e ready tor oeeui)ancy 
Jty freshmen Thursday, September Ifi, and 
the tlining- hall will l)e ready to serve sup- 
per to freshmen Thursday eveninj?. 

A si)ecial freshman itrogram is planned 
eoverinu the time between registration day 
(September 17 1 and the beginning of the 
insitriiction schedule (Wednesday, Seittem- 
ber 22l, the' object of which Is to comi)lete 
organization of freshmen so that they may 
begin the regular work i>romptly and ef- 
fectively on \\'ednesday, the 22nd. and to 
familiarize them with their new surround- 
ijigs. This program includes classifica- 
tion of all freshman students, medical ex- 
aminations beginning on Friday, Septem- 
ber 17: psychological examinations, Mon- 
day A.M., September 20th; instruction in 
regard to the departmental and campus 
facilities and advisory conferences con- 
ducted by the faculties of the several col- 
lr<>os for the students registered in those 
colleges. On Friday evening the President 
and faculties will receive the students in 
the Gymnasium; on Saturday evening an 
entertainment will be provided in the As- 
sembly Hall; on Sunday there will be one 
religious service. 

On or about September 1, the Registrar 
will send to all prospective freshmen a de- 
tailed statement of this program. 

29 



THE. YOING MENS CHRISTIAX 
ASSOCIATION 

Officers 

I'resident J. Franklin Witter 

Vice-President Kaymoud Carringtou 

Secretary Emerson Bishoff 

Treasurer Myron Shear 

Executive Secretary Harry E. Foulkrod 

The Young Men's Christian Association 
Nvas reorganized in the spring of 1924 to 
meet the demand felt b3' many students 
for a men's organization which would be 
able to assume the leadership for the reli- 
gious life of all the students. Programs 
are being planned and carried out in re- 
sponse to whatever needs arise. 

The Discussion Groups this year reached 
about three hundred students, and the 
Freshmen Conference at Camp Conoy was 
a most effectual introduction into college 
life for foity-tive new men. This year the 
'"Y" will bring more speakers of the cali- 
ber of J. Stitt Wilson, who was here dur- 
ing the past winter. Deputations into 
some of the smaller Maryland communi- 
ties are also being planned. All students 
are welcome to take part in any phase of 
the work. The cabinet in charge of the 
work for this year is as follows: 

New Student Frank Terhune 

I>eputations Stanlej' Jenkins 

Keligious Education, Norwood Thornton 

Social William Lamar 

Finance Myron Shear 

Conferences Duncan Clark 

Publicity Raymond Carrington 

Church Relations Emerson Bishoff 

Y. W. Co-operation Ross Smith 

Editor Handbook Ralph Nestler 

Inner Circle Gelston McNeil 

iO 



The Y M f"- A. began its activities for 
the year of 192o-2«i with the Freshman 
Conference at Camp Conoy. This confer- 
ence was sponsored by the old cabinet 
members with the purpose of intro.lucin? 
into college life those new s:tudenrs who 
had evidenced some interest in religions 
work. The success of the experiment is 
largely measured by the testimonials of 
the forty-five Freshnien. who sacrificed their 
last week-end at honu- t<> attend the camp. 
That it was a great help in helping them 
to readjust themselves properly to the new 
life into which they were entering is an 
undeniable fact. This trip will not be pos- 
sible this year, but the members of the 
Y. M. C. A. will be ready to aid the ne^v 
students in every way possible if the latter 
will only ask them. 

Each year the Y'. M. (\ A. holds a recep- 
tion for the Freshman class. Every Fresh- 
man is invited to attend, and it is impor- 
tant that he be there, for he will meet and 
become acquainted with the students and 
faculty of the institution. 

Sunday evenings there are discussion 
groups for the purpose of discussing our 
way of living here at the University and 
if possible to better it. The best Christian 
interpretations are sought. All are invited 
to attend and give his or her opinion upon 
the subjects arising there. 

During the past year we have had four 
or five good speakers with us. one of whom 
was the Hon. J. Stitt Wilson. The Y. M. 
C. A. in the future will have some of the 
finest speakers here, and your attendance 
is greatly desired. 



31 



Our "Y" participated in five conferences 
last year. The first was in Baltimore, at 
which the subject was Bruce Curry's Bible 
Class. The next was held at Western 
Maryland College, where a week-end was 
spent upon a question of most vital im- 
portance to us all. The Relationship Be- 
tween Men and Women. The third con- 
ference took place at Camp Conoy. known 
also as the Cabinet Retreat, at which plans 
were made for the coming year. The 
Sherwood Forest Conference was held for 
the purpose of training officers and cabi- 
net members for their work. At the last 
conference, in Baltimore, the questions dis- 
cussed were Compulsory Military Train- 
ing and the World Court. 

"he Y.M.C.A. holds a very good Christ- 
mas Party and Entertainment each year. 
Likewise, the members of both the Y. M. 
C .A. and the Y. W, C. A. give a pretty and 
apiiropriate pageant each spring. 

In conclusion, the "Y" extends its greet- 
ii'gs of good fellowship to the students of 
this institution, and invite you to join 
t ■.vn\ in helping one another to lead a bet- 
ter Christian life. 



32 





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33 



ACADEMIC REGULATIOXS 



Registration 

1. Students should roport to the Dean 
of the College in which they are registered, 
where they will receive a course card. Ncav 
students must present a matriculation card. 
If this card has not been received by mail, 
arrangements for its issuance must be 
made in the Office of the Registrar, prior 
to reporting to the Dean. 

2. The course card, properly made out 
and approved by the Dean, and a registra- 
tion card obtained in the Office of the Reg- 
istrar, will l)e presented at Window One 
in the Office of the Registrar and a bill for 
the semester's expenses will be issued. 

3. This bill, together with the course 
card, will be taken to the Cashier's Office, 
where fees are paid and where the Cashier 
certifies upon the course card that pay- 
ment has been made. 

4. The course card is then taken to the 
Sectioning Committee, Room T-211. Agri- 
cultural Building, where section assign- 
ments are made. 

5. About three hours later the student 
may obtain class cards in the Office of the 
Registrar, Window Two. 

(i. The student places his name, his col- 
lege, and the date on the class cards and 
presents at the first meeting of each class 
the appropriate class card. Students are 
not admitted to classes without class 
cards. Instructors will see that this rule is 
enforced. 



34 



7. Within seven days after the opening 
of the Semester each student must file in 
the Ottice of the lle^'istrar a schedule of 
his classes. A fee of one dollar is imposed 
for the failure to do this. 

S. Students who for adequate reasons 
are more than ten days late in registering^ 
must secure permission for entrance into 
courses from the instructors in charge of 
of the courses. Such permission, if given, 
must be indicated on (he course card. A 
fee of ."F2.00 is imposed for late registra- 
tion. 

9. Any change of course is made only 
on written [)ermission from the Dean in- 
volved and is subject to a fee of one dol- 
lar after the first week of the semester. 
After securing such permission from the 
Dean, the student must present the same 
to the Registrar at once. who. in turn, is- 
sues the student a class card for the 
course he is entering and withdrawal card 
Is sent to the instruclor in charge of the 
course from which the student is with- 
drawing. Tailless this is done, no credit 
\vill be given for the new course, and a 
failure will be recorded for the course 
dropped. In general, withdrawals from 
courses other than elective, will not be 
granted after the first six weeks of the 
course. 

10. A student who desires to transfer 
from one colleg<> to ;inother must petition 
the Dean of the ccdlege from which he 
wishes to withdraw on the regular form 
obtained from the Itegislrar. The trans- 
fer is effected when the blank i)roperly ap- 
proved is filed in the Otfice of the Regis- 
trar. 



35 



^Examinations and Marks 

11. Examinations at the end of each 
semester complete the studies pursued to 
that point. 

12. The following grade symbols are 
used : 

A. B, C, and D— Passing. 
E — Condition. 
F — Failure. 
I — Incomplete. 

13. Grade "A" denotes superior schol- 
arship; grade "B" good scholarship; grade 
"C" fair scholarship; and grade "D" poor, 
but passing scholarship. 

14. A student who receives the grades 
of 'D" in more than one-fourth of the 
credits required for graduation must take 
additional courses or repeat courses until 
he has the reriuired number of credits for 
a degree, three-fourths of which carry a 
grade above "D". 

15. A student with a mark of "E" is 
conditioned. The grade "E" indicates that 
though the student has not failed in a 
course, he has not presented sufficient evi- 
dence to pass; in the opinion of the in- 
structor his record in the course has been 
sufficiently good to justify the presump- 
tion that he may secure a passing grade 
by a re-examination or by additional work 
without repeating the course. The grade 
"E" cannot be raised to a higher grade 
than "D". 

16. A student with the mark of "F" has 
failed in the course. In case of failure in 
a reriuired course a student must repeat 
the course. He is reqviired to enroll in that 
subject again the first time it is offered, if 
possible. 

36 



17. In rasf a fondition of failure is in- 
runcd in an elective sultject the student 
may be permitted to substitute only upon 
recommendation of the head of tiie depart- 
ment in which the student is majoring and 
approval of the student's Dean. 

18. The mark of "I'' (Incomplete) is 
jjiven only to those students who have a 
proper excuse for not completing all the 
refiuirenients of a course. 'IMie mark of 
"1" is not used to signify work of inferior 
quality. In cases where this grade is given 
the student must complete the work as- 
signed l»y the instructor by the end of thf 
first semester in which that subject is 
again offered, or the mark becomes "F". 

19. Work of grade "D", or of any pass- 
ing grade, cannot be raised to a higher 
gr;ide except by repeating the course. A 
student who repeats a course for which he 
has received credit for work done at the 
University or elsewhere, must meet all the 
retjuirements of the course, including reg- 
ular attendaiu-e, laboratory work and ex- 
aminations. His final grade will be suli- 
stituted for the grade already recorded, 
but he will not receive any additional 
credit for the course. 

120. A student must arrange with his in- 
structors at the beginning of a semester 
for the removal of conditions received in 
the previous semester. A fee of $1.00 will 
be charged for each regular condition ex- 
amination. No instructor will give a con- 
dition examination until a student presents 
a receipt showing the fee has been paid. 
Following each condition examination the 
instructor will report the results to the 
Registrar. 

37 



21. A condition not removed within the 
succeeding semester becomes a failure. 

22. A student transferring to another 
college "nill consult with his new Dean re- 
garding the adjustment of his record. A 
record of this adjustment must be filed 
in the Registrar's Office. 

Absences 

2.3. A student is expected to attend 
punctually each class and laboratory ex- 
ercise in each course. 

24. In case of extended illness which 
prevents the attendance of a student at 
his classes he should promptly notify his 
Dean. 

25. In case of absence immediately be- 
fore or after a vacation a student will be 
penalized by the payment of a special fee 
of three dollars for each course cut. In- 
structors will report such absences imme- 
diately to the oflSce of the Registrar. 

Probations anid Delinquencies 

26. If a student receives a mark of fail- 
ure (F) in fifty per cent, or more of the 
semester hours for which he is registered 
he is automatically dropped from the rolls 
of the UniX-ersity. 

27. A student who does not make a 
passing mark in at least eight hours of 
Avork in which he is enrolled for a given 
semester, may not continue for the next 
semester without the permission of his 
Dean. Where such permission is given 
the student is on probation, and remains 
on probation until his deficiencies are re- 
moved. A notice of his probationary status 
Avill be mailed to the student's parent or 
guardian. 

38 



28. A student wliile on [irohiition shal 
not represent the T^nivt'rsity in any extra 
ci'iTieuIar activity such as: i>arf icipntioi 
in athletic contests, the (Jlec Clnl), dra 
matlcs, debating teams, etc. 

29. While on probation a student is re 
<iuired to rniMirL weekly to liis Dean oi 
faculty advis(»r with regard to his proba 
titiuary status. 

30. The Dean shall reconmiend to th( 
President the Avithdrawal of any studnii 
who, in the opinion of liis college faculty 
is deemed undesiraltlc, or who continues t( 
do unsatisfactory work. 

31. Any student who has been droppec 
from the TJniversitj' or has wihdrawn ii 
order to avoid being dropped, and who i: 
subsequently readmitted, is not eligibb 
to represent the I'liiversity on any team 
club, or association, until he has been ii 
the University for a period of one semes 
ter from the date of his return and ha 
satistied the regular conditions of eligi 
bility. 

Withdrawal from the Uniiversity 

32. A student who desires to withdrav 
from the University m\ist ol)ain the per 
mission of his Dean on the regular forn 
obtained from the Registrar and must havi 
filled out a clearance slip. After thes 
forms have been tilled out they must b 
filed in he Office of the Registrar. A stu 
dent who withdraws without followinj 
Uiis procedure forfeits all claims for reim 
bursements and is not entitled to a sate 
ment of honorable dismissal. 



39 



TRADITIONS 

In the realization that the incoming fresh- 
men do not niulerstand the traditions es- 
tablished by previons classes, it is the pur- 
pose of these rules to assist the freshmen 
in finding his place among the students, to 
instruct him in the spirit of the student 
liody, and to teach hiui a fundamental les- 
son — discipline. 

Freshmen ire requirf^d to strictly abide 
by the following rules, which will be en- 
ffjrced by the student body through the 
sophomore class: 

Rules 

1. Freshmen must wear rat caps and 
name tags at all times while on tlie cam- 
pus. 

2. Freshmen must wear black "fore-in- 
hand" ties, cannot wear knickers, smoke on 
the canipiis. or keep hands in pockets. 

3. Freshmen must refrain from wearing 
all Insignia of any kind unless earned at 
this school. 

4. Freshmen must not cut across the 
campus, and must use only cinder and ce- 
ment paths. 

5. Freshmen must enter and leave the 
Agricultural Building by basement doors, 
must not loiter around the front of build- 
ings, nor sit on stone wall along the 
Washington-Baltimore Boulevard. 

6. Freshmen must speak cheerfully to all 
upper-classmen, and run all errands as- 
signed them. 

7. Freshmen must work on the athletic 
field when requ^'Sted. 

8. Freshmen must attend all meetings of 
the Assembly (occupying front rows) and 
all cheer-practices, and must learn all col- 
lege yells and songs. 

40 



9. Freshinoii must attend all ^'aincs in a 
compact cheering section (no dates with 
girls at games). 

30. FreslmnMi must work in the "I)ia 
iiiondhack" Otiice wlicn nMincsted. 

11. Freshmen mnsi at all limes carry an 
ample supply of matches and toothpicks. 

12. I'^reshnieii must conduct Ihemscdves in 
a gem IcMianlike manner at all limes on and 
around I lie campus. 

Dining Ilall rourtvsies 

1. I'reshmen must line up in twos in rear 
of dining hall. 

2. Freshmen must not sit at the heads of 
the tai>h's unless authorized to do so by 
an vipper-cdassman. 

y. Freslnnen must fold their arms dur 
ing announcements. 




Adele H. Stamp, 

Dean of Women. 




A^ 



jjyVh^ 



V^^/lx^ 



r 



here for the fii'St 
hcaiMy ami cordial 
s.\ iiipiit liy and uu- 



GREKTINGS FROM DKAN OF WOMEN 

To thoso of you who havi- n'rurned to 
carry <m work already hoKHU and to thoso 
now stiidonts. coiiiinj,' 
tinio. ^M-fotiuKH iuul a 
wcloonio. 'Friondshii*, s; 

dcrstandiuK await yon licrc and tho ovor- 
present, ever-in(anj:il»lo Maryland spirit is 
waiting to roooive you and waitiny^ in turn 
for you to make it your own. 'I'liis spirit 
instructs you to do soniolhiuK worth while 
during your collofrc career, in i-olle^^e life 
as well as aeadeniically. For, tho one who 
lives most fully during her four years in 
college takes part in tlie various aclivitios 
on the campus. However, you must have 
a sense of values and chouse wisely from 
the groat numher of organizations. Do not 
rush headlong into too many. Do a few 
things well rather than many in a hap- 
hazard fashion. We offer to you our ideals 
of Maryland, our I radii ions and customs, 
and ask you to help us to perpetuate them. 

Sincerely yours, 

ADELE H. STAMP, 

Dean of Women. 



43 



THE YOUNG WOIVIEN'S CHRISTIAN 
ASSOCIATION 

Officers 

President. Mary Stewart York 

Vice-President Geneva Reich 

Secretary , Gertrude Ryon 

Treasurer Frances Freeny 

rnder^raduate Rep Hazel Watson 

Coinniittee Chairmen 

Jane Kirli Mary Jane McC'urdy 

Charlotte Collins Grace Warner 

Rebecca Woodward Roselle Bishoff 

Ruth Williams Eleanor Freeny 

Anne Hoffman Emilj' Herzog 

The Y. W. C. A. was organized in 1924 
for the purpose of meeting the need for 
an all-camv>us religious organization among 
the women students which would correlate 
and co-ordinate all the religious activities 
for the women of the University. In co- 
operation with the Y. M. C. A., the Y. W. 
C. A. assumes a major responsibility for 
the religious activities of the campus. This 
is a difficult task, but one that is so worth- 
while that the Y. W. C. A. calls upon every 
girl upon the campus who Avishes to help 
others build high Christian character to 
join with them in carrying out their pro- 
gram. 

The religious program for this year will 
center in the Sunday Evening Vesper Serv- 
ice under the joint auspices of the Y. M. 
C. A. and Y. W. C. A. The discussions are 
held at 6:30 P.M. every Sunday in the Uni- 
versity Auditorium. Mrs. H. J. Patterson 
will also conduct a Bible Study Group 
every Sunday at 10:00 A.M. in the College 
Park Church, which all students are in- 
vited to attend. 

44 



THK WOMKNS ATHI.KTIC ASSOCIA- 
TION 

OttittrH 

Tresident Klizahoth Taylor 

N'ict'- 1* resident Mary Stuart York 

Secretary Eliza lt*'th Corkins 

Treasurer Helen Heyerle 

The \V. A. A., since its <»rj,'aiiization in 
the fall of l!»li4, has satislied a lonjtr-felt 
need for an orj^aiiizaf ion f(ir tlu' i)ronioti(»n 
of organized athletics anion^ the women 
students. 

The Association has been very successful 
during its two years on the campus and 
has a very hrijrht future (»utlook. During 
the past year it put across successfully 
lioih lall and spring tennis tournaments 
and an inter-class l)asketl)all series, and 
established interest in track jiractice. The 
year was cl(»seil with the second annual 
baiKiuet of the Association, which was ar- 
ranged for by a special committee and 
had a large attendance. At this banquet 
suitable awards were formally presented 
by the President of the Tniversity to the 
girls and teams who had won them during 
the year. 

No girl may play on a team or take 
other active part in any sport without 
first joining the W. A. A. This rule is for 
the piiri>ose of keeping up interest in the 
organization and for assuring it of having 
sufficient funds to properly carry on its 
work. 



45 



GIKLS' WHO'S WHO, 1925-1926 

Y. W. C. A.— 

President— Mary Stewart York 
Secretary — Gertrude Ryon 

Home Ecnomics Club- 
President — Frances Giinby 
Secretary -Treasurer — Roselle Bishoff 

Girls' Kifle Team- 
Captain — Helen Beyerle 
Manager — Mary Jane McCurdy 

Women's Student Government — 
President — Eleanor Seal 
Secretarj'— Frances Gruver 

Women's Athletic Association — 
I'resiflcnt — Elizabeth Taylor 
Secretary — Elizabeth Corkins 



SORORITIES 

National — 

Alpha Omicron Pi— Established in 1924 
Local — 
Sigma Delta— Established in 1920 
Kappa XI— Established in 1924 



B. Amos 
J. L. Behring 
H. Beyerle 
A. Dorsey 

M. Heiss 
E. Taylor 
A. De Ran 



GIRLS WHO WON "M'8' 
Girls' Rifle 

A. Essex 
D. Murray 
T. Winkjer 



Girls' Basketball 

L. Harbaugh 
G. Ripple 
M. Wolfe 



CONSTITUTION AND BY-I.AWS 

of the 

WOxMKN STIJDKNTS' (JOVKRNMENT 

ASSO( lATION 

OF THE IJNIVKRSITV OF MARYLAND 

CONSTITUTION 

AKTIOr.K I~NAME 
The naiup of this orj^aiiization shall be 
file women Students' iiovei-nnient Associa- 
tion of Hie University of Maryiaiul. 
ARTICLE 11 OIIJIOCT 
The luupi.scs of this nssociat ictn sliall 
i.e:^ 

1. To maintain an .■ff.'ctive student self- 
{,'overnment. 

2. To increase in tlie student iiody a 
sense of responsibility. 

3. To promote co-operation between the 
students and tlie President and Faculty of 
the Tiiiversity. 

4. To attain a high standard of scholar- 
sliip and living. 

AKTH'LE III— MEMBERSHIP 
Section 1. All women retfistered as stu- 
dents in the I'niversity shall be uiembers 
of this Ass(»ciation, but only those resid- 
ing in the dormitories, or in ho\ises under 
the su|»ervisi(»n of the University, shall 
have a vote on matters pertaining to dor- 
mitory life. 

Sec. 2. A quorum shall consist of a ma- 
jority of the mem!)ers of the Association 
living on the caiupus. 

AUTICLE IV— OFFICERS 
Section 1. The otficers of this Associa- 
tion shall be a President and Vice-Presi- 
dent elected from the incoming Senior 
Class, and a Secretary, elected from the 
incoming Junior Class. 



(a) The President must have served on 
the Student Council one year. 

(b) All officers of the Association shall 
be without conditions or failures in class 
work at time of election. 

(c) No girl shall hold office in the Asso- 
ciation who has not been a student in the 
University at least two years previous to 
her election. 

(Note — As the election of officers is held 
in the spring, this rule may be interpreted 
to mean any girl who is about to complete, 
or has completed, two j'ears of college 
work in this University.) 

Sec. 3. Duties of officers: 

(a) The President of the Association 
shall call and preside over all meetings of 
the Association and perform the general 
duties of an executive. She shall also act 
as President of the Student Council. 

(b) The Vice-President of the Associa- 
tion shall assume the duties of the Presi- 
dent in her absence. 

(c) The Secretary shall post notices of 
meetings, keep a record of the minutes of 
all meetings, and conduct the correspond- 
ence of the Association. She shall also 
keep an up-to-date record of the points 
credited to each girl in the Association. 

ARTICLE V— EXECX'TIVE COUNCIL 

Section 1. Members : 

The Executive Council shall consist of: 

The President of the Association. 

The House President of each of the dor- 
mitories and of each of the houses under 
the supervision of the Univprsity. 

A Representative from each of the Sen- 
ior, Junior, Sophomore, and Freshman 
classes. 

One Day Student, who shall have no 
vote except on matters concerning day stu- 
dents. 

48 



Sec. 2. Qualifications and collegiate 
standing (»f uicniltcrs: 

(a I 'rii«> House President must l)e a .Jun- 
ior or Senior. 

(I)) Tiie Cla.ss Representative niusf re- 
side in one of the dormitories or in a 
house tinder the supervision of the Uni- 
versity. 

(c) The Day Student shall he a Junior 
or Senior. 

(dl All members of the Council shall be 
without conditions or failures at time of 
election. 

Sec. ;?. OfTicers: 

Tlie l'resid(Mit of the Association shall 
act as Tresident of tlie Council. I)ut shall 
liave no vote e.vcept in case of a tie. 

A Secretary, who sliall ktM-p a record of 
tlie minutes of all meetinjrs of the Council, 
shall he elected from its upper classmen 
members. 

Sec. 4. l»uties of the Council: 

(a) To act as an Advisory Board to the 
President of the Association. 

(b) To enforce all rules of the Associa- 
tion. 

(c) To fix and enforce penalties for vio- 
lations of rules of the Association. All 
major penalties must be approved by the 
l>ean of Women. 

Id) To remove from office at any time 
House Presidents who are inefficient in the 
performance of their duties. 

(e) To make decision and act in all mat- 
ters not provided for in this constitution. 

ARTICLE VI— ELECTIONS 
Section 1. Officers of the Association: 
Nominations for the officers of this Asso- 
ciation shall be made from the tloor in the 
meeting previous to the Spring Meeting. 
With the notice for the Spring Meeting 

49 



shall be posted the names of these candi- 
dates. This list of candidates must be 
approved 1)3' the Dean of Women and the 
President of the TTniversity. 

The eleetion of officers shall bo by secret 
ballot; a majority of votes cast by those 
present; who must constitute a quorum, 
shall l»e necessary to elect. In the event 
no candidate receives a majority upon 
first ballot, there shall be a second casting 
of votes, and all except the two highest 
shall lie eliminated before voting a second 
time . 

Sec. 2. Class Representatives: 

PL'ich of the Senior, Junior and Sopho- 
more classes shall elect its representative 
to the ExecMitive Count-il by secret ballot 
during the last weeli in MaV- This meet- 
ing f(tr election sliall l)e called by the act- 
ing n'i»resentative of eacli class. 

The Freshman representative shall be 
elected at the beginning of the fall term. 

Se<'. o. House Presidents: 

The House Presidents shall be elected at 
the close of the Fall Meeting of the Asso- 
ciation at the beginning of the school year. 

Sec-. 4. Day Student Kepresentative to 
Council : 

The Day Student Representative shall be 
elected at the beginning of the fall term. 

ARTICLE VII— MEETINGS 

Section 1. Women Students' Government 
Association. 

There shall be at least P> meetings a year 
of the Women Students' Government Asso- 
ciation, the meetings to l)e held as follows: 

(a) A Fall Meeting to be held during 
the first month of school, at which time 
the President of the Association will ex- 
plain to the new women students the ideals 
and functions of the Women Students' 

50 



Governmpnt, incliulinp: the Honor System. 

(1») A 111001111}? to 1)0 hold !it loast oiio 
wook in adv.'inoo of tho Spriiip: ^^ootiny: for 
tho i)Ui'i»oso of iiiakiii^- nominations. 

((•) A Spriii]? Mooting for aimnal oh'otion 
of otficors of tho Association to bo hold tho 
third Monday in May. 

A Spooial MootinjJT of tho Asaooiation 
may l»o callod at any time by tho I'resi- 
tloiit or at tho writlon roqiiost of twonty- 
livo nioinbors of tho Association. 

Soc. L'. FiXocntivo Coniicil: 

'i'ho Council shall moot rojrularly on tho 
tirst Monday of ovory month. Additional 
mootings may bo callod at any timo l>y the 
I'rosident. 

AKTirLE VITT— HONOR SYSTEM 
Tho AVomon Studonts' (Jovernmont Asso- 
ciation upholds tho Honor System. Any 
infringoniont of tho Honor System bj' a 
moml)or of the Association is pnni.shable 
by the Executive Council. 

ARTICLE IX— AMENDMENTS 
This constitution may be amended by a 
two-thirds vote of the Council and a rati- 
fication by a two-thirds vote at a general 
meeting of the Association. 



BY-I.AWS 
SOCIAL. REGULATIONS 

I. LATE LEAVES 

The attendance at any function which 
does not permit a girl to return to her 
dormitory by 7:30 P.M., before April in, 
and by 8:00 P.M., after April 15, with the 
exceptions noted below, shall be considered 
a late leave. After a late leave a girl 
must return by 12:45 A.M. to her dormi- 
tory. 

Late leaves per year shall be : Freshmen, 
1 per month ; Sophomores, 2 per month ; 
Juniors, 3 per month ; Seniors, 4 per month. 
Seniors Avithout conditions or failure may 
take late leaves at their discretion after 
April 1, provided they sign up as usual. 
Seniors graduating in February and hav- 
ing no conditions or failure may take late 
leaves at their discretion after January 14, 
provided they sign up as usual. Fresh- 
men and Sophomores may borrow and 
carry over their late leaves' provided they 
do not exceed 2 a month for Freshmen 
and 3 a month for Sophomores. 

All University functions may be attended 
without late leaves. This includes frater- 
nity dances held in the Park during the 
week-ends and school dances held off the 
campus; it does not include fraternity 
dances held during the week. 

No week-ends spent away from the cam- 
luis shall count as late leaves. 

II. DANCES 

It is understood that girls will return to 
their dormitories immediately after the 
close of all dances. 

The chaperons for University dances, 
fraternity dances, and sorority dances must 
be approved by the Dean of Women. No 

52 



stiulf'iit in the dormitories may attend a 
n()ii-foll«'f,'-e (lance unless the chaperons 
have heeii approved hy the Dean of Women. 

III. FllATEHMTY HOUSES 

(J iris may not ^o unchaperoned to fra- 
ternity houses. 

HOUSE KECiULATIONS 

1. IIOrSE PRESIDENT 

The duties of the House I'resident shall 
he: 

(A) To call and preside over bouse meet- 
ings. These shall be called by her own 
discretion or at the written request of any 
live residents of her house. 

(B) Tt) be responsible for the general 
conduct and welfare of her house in co- 
operation with the faculty member resid- 
ing in h.er house. 

iC) To act as hostess of her house. 

(D> To check up all girls at I0:;i0 and 
see that lights are out. 

(El '!"(» see that quiet is preserved dur- 
ing study hours. 

(F) To grant light cuts and to keep a 
record of those taken by each girl. 

(U) To keep a record of the late leaves 
taken by each girl as shown by the late 
leave slips turned over each week to the 
House President by the matron or chap- 
eron. 

(H) To grant special minor permissions 
after study hours begin. 

(1) To appoint a girl to act in her place 
when she is absent. 

(.1) To authorize the payment of bills 
to house residents, such as going to Bill's 

II. 
Girls shall be in their respective houses 
at 7:30 P.M. until April 15, at which time 

53 



they shall be in their houses by 8:00 P.M., 
except on Friday, Saturday, and Sunday 
nights, and evenings before and of holi- 
days, when they shall be in by 10:30 P.M. 

III. QUIET HOURS 

Quiet hours shall be observed : 
Until 12:00 noon and from 1:00 to 4:30 
daily except Saturday and Sunday. 

At night from 7:30 P.M. on, with inter- 
mission from 10:00 to 10.30, except on Fri- 
day, Saturday, and Sunday nights, when 
houses must be quiet after 11 :00 P.M. 

There shall be no bathing after 10:30 
P.M. 

IV. MUSICAL INSTRUMENTS AND 
TYPEWRITERS 

Musical instruments maj' not be played 
during quiet hours. 

Typewriters shall come under the same 
ruling as musical instruments, as regards 
their operation, unless they are kept in a 
room provided for them, in which room 
they shall be so far removed that they 
disturb no one. 

V. LIGHTS 

Lights must be out by 10:30 P.M. except 
on Friday, Saturday and Sunday nights, 
and nights belore and after holidays, when 
they must be out by 11:00 P.M. 

Light cuts shall be allowed as follows: 
Freshmen 3, Sophomores 3. Juniors 4, Sen- 
iors 5 per month. These light cuts must 
be taken in the living room or in some 
room other than a sleeping room, unless 
both roommates are taking a light cut, in 
which case each girl shall be credited with 
a cut and the girls may remain in their 
room. 

Extra light cuts will be given for exami- 
nations as follows: 2 extra for Freshmen 
and 1 extra for Sophomores. 

54 



VI. ROOMS 
All rooms must be orderly by 8:00 A.M. 

VII. REGISTKATION 
Any ^'irl leaving College Park at any 
time Bhall register her destination at her 
dormltojy. 

Girls leaving their dormitory for meet- 
ings, library, social functions, etc.. shall 
register destination at their respective dor- 
mitories. 

VII. GUESTS 
Permission must be secured from the 
owner of the room for its use and from the 
house chaperons. 

IX. CALLERS 
Girls may have men caHcrs at the dormi- 
tories after dinner until 7 :.''>0 on Monday, 
Tuesday, Wednesday, and Thursday nights 
on Saturday and S\inday afternoons and on 
P^idav. Saturday and Sunday evenings un- 
til 10:30 P.M. 

Point System 

The purpose of the Point System is to 

prevent a few girls from Itcing overworked 

and to encourage and make it possible for 

more girls to share in campus activities. 

(Maximum: 2."» points per vear) 

MAJOR 

1. President Student (iovt. Assn 18 

2. President Y. W. C. A 18 

3. House President 15 

4. Secretary of (irange 15 

5. President of W. A. A 15 

6. Manager Rifle Team 15 

7. Manager Basketball 12 

8. Secretary Y. W. C. A 10 

9. Treasurer of (J range 10 

10. Intercollegiate l>ei»ater 10 

11. President of Opera Club 10 

12. Captain Rifle Team 10 

13. Treasurer Y. W. C. A 10 

14. President Home Economics Club ...10 

55 



MINOR 

1. Class Rep. to Student Council 8 

2. Day Student Representative 8 

3. Manager of Track 8 

4. Manager of Tennis 8 

5. Secretary-Treasurer of Opera Club... 8 

6. President Latin-American Club 8 

7. President French Club 8 

8. Secretary Student Assembly 8 

9. Secretary W. A. A 8 

10. Treasurer W. A. A 8 

11. Captain Basketball 6 

12. Secretary of Literary Society 5 

13. Secretary Dramatic Club 5 

14. Treasurer Dramatic Club 5 

15. Secretary-Treas. Home Eco. Club 5 

16. Treasurer Literary Society 5 

17. Secretary Student Govt. Assn 5 

18. A'ice-President Y. W. C. A 5 

19. Cabinet Member Y. W. C. A 5 

20. Program Comm. Literary Society 5 

21. Fresiiman Reporter "Diamondback".. 5 

22. Sophomore Reporter "Diamondback" 5 

23. Staff of 'T>iamondback" 5 

24. Organization Reporter 5 

25. Secretary of Class 5 

2fi. Asst. Sect.-Treas. of Opera Club 5 

27. Secretary Latin-American Club 5 

28. Treasurer Latin-American Club 5 

29. Secretary French Club 5 

30. Treasurer French Club 5 

31. Vice-Pres. Student Govt. Assn 3 

32. President of Bible Class 3 

33. Ladv Asst. Lecturer of Grange 3 

34. Recording Secty of Episcopal Club... 3 

35. Cor. Secty. of Episcopal Club 3 

36. Vice-President of Opera Club 3 

37. Secretary-Treasurer Bible Class 2 

38. President Young People's Union 2 

39. Secty-Treas. Young People's Union.... 2 

40. Vice-President Literary Society 2 

41. Vice-President Home Economics Club 2 

42. Vice-President Bible Class 2 

56 



4;i. Vice rresident Youii;.; reuple's I'niou.. 2 

44. Vico-I'vesideiit of Class 2 

4~^. Mcmhor of Ex. Coinin. on Bible Class 2 

4«J. Vice-I'residPiit of W. A. A 2 

47. Vice rresidciit of Kpiscoi.al Club 2 

-IS. Vice-Presi<leiit L:it in American Club.. 2 

4t>. Vice-President French Club 2 

STl DKNT rritl.H ATIONS 

Kach underKraduate student of the Uni- 
versity of .Miiryland is e-xpected to pay 
seven dollars (iST.OO) for his student publi- 
cations. Two dollars of this amount is 
for a subscription to the Dianiondback, 
published weekly, (on Tuesday). The re- 
niMiniriK Hve dollars ('.';"). 00) is for The 
Keveille, the year book for Collejie Park 
Students, issued about June 1st. The en- 
tire seven dollars is due on the day of 
rej^istration and should be paid to the 
Business Manajrer of the Keveille. 

The major otlieers of the two publica- 
tions are as follows: 

Keveille 

Kditc.r-in-Chief D. C. Fahev. Jr. 

(Jirls' F]ditor Ruth Williams 

Business- Manager Heese L. Sewell 

Diamandbaek 

Editor-in-Chief Milford Sprecher 

Editor Raymond Carrington 

Business Manager Franklin M. Haller 

Faculty Advisor for both Publications, 

Win. H. Hottel 

Tliose who are interested in publications 
should get in touch with one of the mem- 
bers of the staff on which he would like 
to work. Freshmen and Sophomores are 
especially urged to become affiliated with 
one of the publications. A new ruling re- 
quires that only students who have had 
at least one year's experience on a publi- 
cation are eligible for nomination to a 
major office on either publication. 
57 



MUSICAL. ORGANIZATIONS 

Four musical organizations are main- 
tained in connection with the Department 
of Music. 

ChoriiK. Membership in the Chorus is 
open to all students, and to persons resid- 
ing in the community. Oratorios and 
standard part-songs are studied. Rehear- 
sals are held weekly. The Chorus presents 
an annual festival of music in May. 

Glee Ciub. A Glee Club, of limited 
membership, is recruited from the best 
vocal talent among the men of the Uni- 
versity. Admission is gained through tests 
or "tryouts," conducted at the beginning 
of the school year. The club holds two 
rehearsals a week. Public concerts are 
given. 

Opera Club. The "Maryland Opera Club" 
was established in 192.3 and gave its first 
performance in the spring of 1924. Its 
object is to foster and promote music in 
connection with dramatic art. and to de- 
velop and direct musical talent of students 
in the TTniversity. One or more public 
performances will be given each year. 

Military Band. This organization, of lim- 
ited membership, is a part of the military 
organization of the University, and is sub- 
ject to the restrictions and discipline of 
the I)ei>artmenl of Military Science and 
Tactics, but the direction of its work is 
under the Deitartment of Music. 



58 



WHO'S WHO lirlH-l9H 

ATiiM-rrics 
i oodiiiii 

C.iI'lMiii M.vniii n. iMilu'l SI.'v.mis 
MaiKij^tT Kciiiifl li Siii'iicf 
Assl. Myr. WiilliT ('i.;i|.iu:iii 

Itiisehall 

• 'aptMiii— Ht'i-li, Mil ray 
Maiiaucr — Mylo l>u\viioy 
Asst. Mgr. i.awiviict- l'.(»llllM•^K^'l■ 

|{,iMketl)ulI 

( aptaiii— l.rlainl ('ar.lw.-ll 
MaiwiKHi- IhMiry Vosr 
Asst. Mtrr.— Tf'd Oldo 

I.ju*rosse 

Captain -Paul TripU-tt 
MaiiaK<^r— Oscar B. ('..I. lent:-. 
Asst. Mur. llniact> Ilaiuptnii 

Tru<k 

( aplain— l.'oLrcr Wliitcford 
MaiKiKpr — (icorj^p Morrison 
Asst. Mgr.-Brhrc lOmcrsoii 

Tennis 

('ai.taiu— Ejrhprt F. Tingrley 

Mana^'nr — \\'illiani Ivor IT 

Asst. Mgr. — I'^JIwood It. Nicliolas 

Kxrontive C'nnnoil 

(Miairnian — Kciinetii Spence 
Secretary- E. Melchor 
Tnnior President — J. Adams 
'<oi)honiorp IMvsidPiit — G. Kessler 
•Fnnior Itrprespntat ivp — Unvace Hann»ton 
^<ophoinort' llcprcsfntativp — Duncan Tlark 

Cheer Traders 

Senior I cadcr — Horace Hauiplon 
Junior Leadei" — Fred Linton 

59 



V. M. C. A. 

President — J. Franklin Witter 
Vice-President — Raymond Carrington 
Seoretary — Emerson Bishoff 
Treasurer — Myron Shear 

Episcopal Club 

President — Philip Trnesdell 
Vice-I'resident — Mary Stuart York 

LITERARY AND DEBATING 
SOCIETIES 
Poe Literary Society 

President — Cecil Propst 
Vice-President — Kenneth Petrie 
Secretary — Frances Freeney 

New Mercer 

President — Eld wood Nicholas 
Vice-President — Joan McGreevy 
Secretary — Geneva Reich 

Calvert Forum 

T'resident — Clark Beech 
Vice-President — Frank Witter 
Secretary — ^Cecil Propst 

AGRICULTURAL SOCIETIES 

Grange 

Master— Norwood Thornton 
Overseer — A. E. Nock 
Stewart — M. S. Downey 
Secretarj' — Katherine Stephens 

Horticulture Club 

President — J. Harrison 
Vice-President — Paul Gunby 

Livestock Club 

President — Harry Cottman 
Vice-President — E. H. Schmidt 
Secretary— G. E'. Bishoff 
Treasurer — H. I'ost 

60 



CAMPUS OIUJANIZATIONS 
Kifle Club 

Captain— M. Wooster 
Managpr — U. Simmons 
I'n^sidcnt — (}. Ninas 
Vice-lM('si(lent--R. Troth 
IMihlirity M^r.— E. Sfclirist 

Kussburt; Club 

rrt'sidcnt — A. Mii/z/ey 

Nice President — J. Harrison 

V.lee Club 

Prcsideii't — Harry Kelohner 
Vice-President Robert Wilson 
MniiMKer (Veil Probst 
'l'ie;isnrer — ^P.nice (ieddes 
IMivctor -l>r. Homer ('. House 

Interf rater iiity Council 

President — Edward Tenney 
Vice-President — Leland Card well 
Secretary — Milford Sprecher 



61 



WEARERS OF THE "M' 





Football 


Bpatty 


Lanigan 


Sniiplee 


Stevens 


Wolchel 


Tenney 


Herzog 


Bromley 


Thomas 


Waters 


Boiiiiett 


Parker 


Beasley 


Rothgeb 




Track 


Whiteford, H 


Whiteford, R 


End slow 


Supplee 


ShPi-ift- 


Ditman 


Deibert 
Kay 


Hill 


Baseball 


Stevens 


Troxell 


Besley 


Kemsburg 


Murray 


Spinney 


Soh rider 


Nihiser 


Brayton 


Snyder 


Burgee 






Basketball 


Stevens 


Card well 


Troxell 


Adams 


P^'aber 


Linkous 


Ensor 


Boyd 


Beatty 


Supplee 




liaerosse 


Allen 


Faber 


Beatty 


Reading 


Ensor 


McDonald 




Tennis 


Weber 


Kimbrough 


Burns 


Tan 


Greene 


Tingley 



62 



FOOTBALL SCHEDl I.E 

Sept. 25— Washington Collof:.^ at College 

Park. 
Oct. 2 — South Carolina T'niveisity at 

Cohinibia. 
Oct. 9 — University of Chirago at Chicago. 
Oct. 16 — Virginia Polytechnic at Norfolk. 
Oct. 23- North Carolina Fniversity at 

College Park. 
Oct. 30— Callaudet College at College Park. 
Nov. 6 — Yale at New Haven. 
Nov. 13 — University of Virginia at College 

Park. 
Nov. 20— "Washington and Lee at Lexington. 
Nov. 25 — Johns Hopkins at Baltimore. 



63 



FOOTBALI. 

September 2f>— Maryland, 13: Washington 

College. 0. 
October 10— Maryland. 16; Rutgers. 0. (At 

Philadelphia.) 
October 17 — Maryland, 0; Virginia Poly. 3. 

(At Washington.) 
October 24 — Maryland, 0; Virginia (?. (At 

Charlottesville.) 
October 31 — Maryland, 0; North Carolina, 

l(i. (At Baltimore Stadium.) 
November 7 — Maryland, 14; Yale, 43. (At 

New Haven.) 
November 14 — Maryland, 3; Washington 

and Lee, 7. 
November 2(5 — Maryland, 7; Johns Hopkins, 

7. (At Baltimore Stadium.) 

TENNIS 

April 10 — Maryland, 8; Western Mary- 
land, 1. 

April 17 — Maryland, 6; Washington Col- 
lege, 0. 

April 24— Varsity, 9; Frosh, 0. 

April 27 — Maryland, 5; Virginia. 3. 

May 1 — Maryland, 5; Johns Hopkins. 4. 

May 8— Maryland, 6: C. U., 1. 

May 11 — Maryland, 6; Virginia Poly. 3. 

May 14 — Maryland 4; Pennsylvania, 5. (At 
Philadelphia.) 

May 15 — Maryland, 6; Delaware. 0. (At 
Newark. ) 

May 20— Maryland. 0: Navy, 9. (At An- 
napolis.) 

BASKETBALL 

December 18 — Maryland. 40; AVashington 

and Lee, 27. 
December 19— Maryland, 21; Navy, 12. (At 

Annapolis.) 
January 12 — Maryland, 30; Ptichmond U., 

14. 

64 



I a II nary l.V Maryland, :U) ; V. M. I., 21. 

(At LcxiiiKfoii. » 
.laimarv 14 - Marvlaiul. .'W ; Washington and 

L.'e, '•_•(). (At LoxinKton.) 
lannary HI- -Ma lyland. lit: Virginia Poly. 

17. (At Blackshur^M 
January 20 Maryland. 40; Gallaudet, 13. 
Ian -ary 22 — Maryland, .'JO; Washington 

College, 26. 
February 2 — Maryland. 24; Stevens, 27. 
I'\'bn:arv 4 — Maryland, 30; Virginia Poly, 

14. 
February (i — Maryland, 28; Virginia, 34. 

(At C'harlottcsvi'lle.) 
Fel>ruary i) — Maryland, 23; Nortli Carolina, 

22. 
I'ebruary 12— Maryland, 25: West Virginia. 

15. 
F.-l.ruary l.*5^MaryIand, 41; Duke, 20. 
February l(i — Maryland, 30; Virginia, 21. 
Fel)iuarv IS-^Maryland. 32; Princeton. 26. 

LACROSSE 
April 3 -Maryland. 11; Oxford-Cambridge, 

1. (At .Washington.) 
April 10— Maryland. 4; Swarthmore. 2. 
A [Mi! 1!>— Maryland. S; Lafayette, 0. 
April 24 — Maryland, 10; Virginia, 1. (At 

Cliarlottesyilie.) 
May 1— Maryland. 9; Pennsylvania, 1. 
May .S— Maryland, (5; Stevens, 2. 
May 15— Maryland, 7; Lehigh, 3. (At Beth- 
lehem.) 
May 22— Maryland. 3; Hopkins, 10. (At 

Baltimore.) 

BASEBALL, 
March 25 — Maryland, 11; Richmond U., 7. 
April 2— Maryland, 4; Yale. 16. 
April — Lehigh (rain). 
April 7— Maryland. 3; Penn, 6. 
April S — North Carolina (wet grounds). 
April U — Maryland. 6; North Carolina, 1. 
April 21— Maryland, 12; Gallaudet, 6. 

65 



April 22-~Marylan(l. 14; Washington Col- 
lege, 4. 

April 24— Maryland 2; Navy, 10. (At An- 
napolis.) 

April 27— Maryland. 8: Mt. St. Mary's, 4. 

Mav <) — Maryland. 3; Virginia, 6. 

May 7— Maryland, 6; V. M. I., 2. 

May 10 — Maryland. 8; Washington and 
Lee, 5. 

May 11 — Maryland. 8; Washington and 
Lee, 9. 

May lo -Maryland, 1); Washington College, 
1. (At Chcstertown.) 



66 



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67 



SONGS AND YEL,I.S 



ALMA MATER 

(Maryland, My Maryland) 
Thy sons and daughters throng thy door, 

Maryland ! My Maryland ! 
They come from mountain, farm and shore, 

Maryland, oh, Maryland! 
Their hearts and hopes they bring to thee. 
And place them in thy custody, 
Proud hearts that pledge their love for 
thee: — 

Maryland University ! 

Go forth, brave youth, throughout the 
State, 

Maryland ! My Maryland ! 
And by your actions, show her great, 

Maryland, our Maryland ! 
Thy Alma Mater's name and fame, 
Oh, keep alive her holy flame, 
Until all hearts as one exclaim : 

Maryland ! My Maryland ! 

Cheer, hree times cheer, and one cheer 
more 

For Maryland, Dear Maryland! 
Send forth that cry from hill to shore — 

Maryland University ! 
Fair Mother of our brightest dreams, 
Blest giver of life's precious things, 
To thee each heart its service brings: — 

Maryland ! My Maryland ! 



68 



UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND HYMN 

(Tune: Flow Gently, Sweet Afton) 

I 
On the hills of fair Maryland thou dost 

proudly stand, 
The lamp of true wisdom alight in thy 

hand 
With calm, brooding mother-eyes tender 

and clear. 
Thou gazest upon us, thy children, so dear. 
Thy sweet rolling hills in tenderest green, 
Thy white lofty pillars, the tall trees be- 
tween. 
Serene over all, the blue heavens smile 

there 
On Maryland, our mother, our mother, so 

dear. 

II 
Thy sons thou hast given, how nobly they 

stand ! 
Their voice and their deeds loud resound 

thru the land. 
Thy walls have re-echoed to valiant tones, 
And honor and beauty were laid with thy 

stones. 
Our loved Alma Mater, our own mother 

dear. 
When foes shall assail thee, thou never 

Shalt fear, 
Thy sons shall defend thee and cause thee 

to stand, 
O bow not thy proud head, O fair Mary- 
land! 

— Anne Stone Stewart. 



Maryland 

(Tune: Madelon) 
In the very heart of Maryland, 
In the heart of every Maryland man, 
There's a spirit so endearing 
It will win your heart and hand. 
For she doth hold the sway, 
She will Avin the day. 
And her glorious men will ever win the 
fray. 

Then it's Hurrah! Hurrah! for Mary- 
land, 

Then its' Hurrah! Hurrah for U. of M. 

With her banners ever streaming high, 

She will always win or die. 

Then we'll gather 'round Alumni, 

And "Fight" will l)e our (tne reply. 

For we love, we love old Maryland, 
Hurrah! Hurrah! Hurrah! 

Who Owns This Team 

Who owns this team? 

Who owns this team? 

Who owns this team? the people say. 

Why, we own this team, 

Sure, we own this team. 

M-A-K-Y-L-A-N-D— Hurrah \ 

Who'll win this game? 

Who'll win this game? 

Who'll win this game? the people say. 

Why, we'll win this game. 

Sure, we'll win this game. 

M-A-K-Y-L-A-N-D— Hurrah ! 

Who owns this town? 

Who owns this town? 

Who owns this town? the people say. 

AVhy, we own this town, 

Sure, we own this town. 

M-A-R-Y-L-A-N-D— Hurrah! 



I . of M. 

(Tune: Caisson Song) 
U. of M., IT. of M., 
Koop the l»all away from them, 
Keep that piK><l<in a-rolliiiK along! 
T'p the held, down tlie field. 
Not an inch of gidiind we'll jMeld, 
Kee|> that pigskin a-rolling along I 
Then ifs Whiff! Wham! Whack! 
Hear that Mar'land quarterbaek 
Shout out his signals loud and strong! 
Where'er you go, you will always know 
That tliat pigskin is rcdiiiig along. 

(Shouted) Maryland: Maryland! 
Keep that pigskin a-rolllng along! 

Sons of Maryland 

(Tune : Sous of Ameriea) 
Sons of the (iold. 
Sons of the Black, 
Fight! No spirit lack. 
Your Alma Mater 
Needs you today 
To help her win the fray. 
Shoulder to shoulder, 
I'.ack to hack. 
Well fight together 
F(»r the (iold and Black. 
Fair Sons and Daughters 
Of Maryland, 
I'pon you all vict'ries stand. 

Chorus 
Sons of Old Maryland, 
Old Maryland needs you! 
Stand by your colors, boys. 
And to them e'er be true! 
Fight for old Maryland, 
Old Liners! Stand, 
Defenders of the Bla(;k and Gold 
Thorughout this land. 
Team ! Team ! Team ! 
71 



Tea, Maryland 

Yea, Maryland ! Yea, Team ! 

Fight 'em! Fight 'em! Fight 'em! 

Hip! Hip! 

Hip! Hip! 
Hike! Hike! 
Fight, Team! Fight! 

Defiance 

He — Haw — Ho — Go — Mar — y— land ! 

He — Haw — Ho — Go — Mar — y — land ! 

(Continuous) 

Whistle Boom ! Rah ! 

U-M-Rah-Rah! U-M-Rah-Rah! 
Team! Team!! Team!!! 

Maryland U 

Mary land U ! 

Mary land U ! 

Maryland! Rah! Rah! 
Maryland! Rah! Rah! 
Hoo-Rah! Hoo-Rah! 

Maryland ! Rah ! 
Rah! Rah! Rah! Rah! 

Mary land ! 

Ho o- Ray 

Hooooo — Ray! 
Hooooo — Ray! 
Hurrah! (Team) (Player) (Maryland) 

LK>comotlTe 
M-M-M— AAA— R-R-R— Y-Y-Y— 
L-L-L— AAA— N-N-N— D-D-D ! 
MARYLAND ! ! 
Team! Team!! Team!!! 

U. M. Rah! 

U. M. Rah! Rah! 
U. M. Rah! Rah! 
U— Rah! M— Rah! 
U— M— Rah! Rah! 

72 



FKATEKNITIES— LOCAL, 

1. Delta I'si OmeKa, chartfrod 15)20. 

2. Nil Sigma Oinicron, chartennl 1914. 

3. Sigma Tau Omega, charteretl 1021. 

4. Delta Mil, chartered November, 1920. 



FRATERNITIKS^— HONORARY 

Alpha Zeta— National Honorary Agricul- 
tural Fraternity, chartered U. ofM. 1020. 

rill Kappa Phi— National Honorary As- 
sociation oi»en to honor students in all 
branches of learning. 

Phi Mu — Honorary Engineering Frater- 
nity, chartered 1923. 

Sjgnii Delta Pi — Honorarj' Spanish Fra- 
ternity, chartered 1920. 

Senior Honor Society— Honorary Society 
for Women Students. 

Phi Chi Alpha — Honorary Chemical Fra- 
ternity. 

l-eab?)ard and Blade, chartered 1922. 



FRATERNITIES— NATIONAL 

1. Kappa Alpha, chartered 1914, founded 
\\'ashington and Lee 1865. 

2. Delta Sigma Phi, chartered 1924, found- 
ed College of N. Y. C. 1899. 

3. Sigma Phi Sigma, chartered 1916, 
founded U. of Penn. 1908. 

4. Sigma Nu, chartei'ed 1917, founded V. 
M. I. 1869. 

5. Phi Sigma Kappa, founded Mass. Agri. 
College 1893. 

6. Phi Alpha, chartered 1915. founded 
Geo. Washington U. 1914. 

73 



CONSTITUTION OF INTEKFKATEK- 
MTY COUNCIL 



PREAMBLE 

Adoptpd Maj' 20, 1020 
Thf naino of this Orgranization shall be 
THE IXTEUFIIATERMTY COrXdE OF 
IHE UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND. 

The uifmbership of this Organization 
shall roDsist of two representatives of each 
of the rocogiiized competitive national so- 
cial men's fraternities of the I'niversitj' of 
Maryland ; and the rtnrpose shall be to 
maintain a harmonious relationship be- 
tween the saifl Universitj' and the frater- 
nities in the management of the aaairs 
that pertain to fraternities: and to accom- 
plish this purpose, tiie following rules 
adopted by the Inter-Fraternity Council 
are herewith incorporated as the Constitu- 
tion of this Organization. 

It is further agreed that the following 
fraternities shall be charter mcml)er of 
the Council: 

Delta Sigma Phi Delta Mu 

Sigma Nu Nu Sigma Omicron 

Phi Sigma Kappa Delta Psi Omega 

Kappa Alpha Sigma Tau Ouiega 

Sigma Phi Sigma 

ARTICLE I 

The officers of this Organization shall i)e 
President. Vice-I'resident. and Secretaiy- 
Treasurer. 

These officers shall be nominated at the 
last meeting in April and elected at th;* 
first meeting in May of each year. 

There shall be a majority vote required 
for the election of any officer. 

74 



ART [CLE II 

The duties of the omrcrs of this orprani- 
zafioii sliall \h' :is follows: 

Section 1. The President shall preside 
over ;iil iiieteinjjs, see that order is niain- 
f.-iiried. ;iiid cast the docidiiiff-vote in rase of 
;i deadlock. 

Sec. L'. The Vici'- President shall assume 
the (rutios of the President in the absence 
or inal)ility of the President. The Vice- 
President shall also act as Chairman of 
all social functions. 

Sec. .'i. The Secretary-Treasurer of this 
Orjra nidation shall keep a true record of 
all pro<-eedinKs of the council and shall 
also have charge of all monies belonging 
to the above Organization. 

ARTICLE III 
The meetings of this Organization shall 
be held on the first and third Thursdays 
of each- month at 7:00 o'clock P.M. 

ARTICLE IV 

This Constitution may only be amended 
by a three-fourths vote of all the repre- 
sented fraternities in the Council. 

ARTICLE V 

Section 1. No fraternity shall offer a bid 
to any student who is in his first year at 
this i"nstitution until S:00 o'clock on the 
morning of i»ledge day. Pledge day shall 
Ite the first Tuesday in December. 

(a) A student entering this institution 
after pledge day may not be pledged until 
the second Tuesday in May. 

Sec. 2. The meaning of the word 
■Pledge": No fraternity shall either di- 
rectly or indirectly cause any student to 
commit himself in favor of or against any 
fraternity prior to pledge day of his first 
.year at tliis institution. 

75 



Sec. 3. Be it further understood by the 
members of this Organization that those 
fraternities desiring to offer persons bids 
to join their respective fraternities shall, 
or the day preceeding pledgi day, tand in 
to a designated impartial person, bids to 
those men whom they wish to offer the 
chance of joining their fraternity. These 
bids will in turn at 8:00 A.M. pledge day, 
"be handed to the person to whom they are 
addressed, and when he has marked them 
accepted, rejected or undecided, as he may 
choose, he shall return them to the afore- 
mentioned impartial person by noon of 
pledge day. who Avill in turn notify the 
several fraternities of the outcome of their 
bids. 

ARTICLE VI 

No student may be pledged to any fra- 
ternity unless he has at least fifteen (15) 
units in high school subjects. 

ARTICLE \U 
No fraternity may initiate any student 
until he shall have passed tAvelve (12) 
credit hours at this institution. 

ARTICLE VIII 

Any student or group of students desir- 
ing to form a local fraternity must first 
submit to the Inter-Fraternity Council a 
statement of the object and ideals involved, 
with a list of the proposed charter mem- 
bers. The Inter-Fraternity Council within 
one month shall act upon the application 
and inform the petitioning group of its ac- 
tion. 

ARTICLE IX 

A group of students, in order to become 
eligible to representation on the Inter-Fra- 
ternitv Council, shall be required : 

(A) 'To have functioned at this institu- 
tion for at least one year as a club. 
76 



(B) To have functioned at this institu- 
tion for at least two years as a local fra- 
ternity, during which time it shall have 
abided by the Inter-Fraternity Council rul- 
injETS. 

(C) To be a chapter in good standing of 
a competitive national, social, men's fra- 
ternity. 

ARTICLE X 

No local fraternity shall petition for a 
charter in any national fraternity until 
after the group desiring nationalization has 
obtained the sanction of the Inter-Frater- 
nltyCouncll. 

ARTICLE XI 

It is herewith understood that all mat- 
ters having relationship to the organiza- 
tion of fraternities and general fraternity 
affairs shall be presented to the Inter- 
Fraternity Council. 

BY-LAWS 

1. All business of this organization un- 
less otherwise provided for, shall be car- 
ried out in accordance with "Robert's 
Rules of Order." 

2. A representation of three-fourths of 
the total members of the Council shall con- 
stitute a quorum. 

3. Each fraternity represented at a quo- 
rum shall be allowed two votes. 

4. It is herewith understood by the 
members of the Inter-Fraternity Council 
that any fraternity violating any part of 
the Constitution of this Organization shall 
be subjected to a fine of twenty-five dollars 
(.T25.00). which shall be used to help de- 
fray the expenses of the Annual Inter-Fra- 
ternity Ball. This sum is to be posted by 
each fraternity on or before the date of 
the first meetins: of the Inter-Fraternity 
Council at the beginning of each year. 

n 



It is further understood that the violat- 
iri<r fraternity shall be suspended from the 
Iiiter-P'raternity Council for one vear, dur- 
ing.- whifh time the said fraternity shall 
al»ide by the laws of the Inter-Fraternity 
('oiincil. 

All violations of rules shall be fixed by 
a Jtoard of five (5) rnen representing five 
(5) different fraternities exclusive of the 
virdatinj; prroup. These men shall be elected 
by and from the Council. 

'). Men not pledged to or belonging to 
any fraternity at the University of Mary- 
land shall not becr»me residents in any fra- 
(ernity house except as approved by the 
Inter-Fraternity Council. 

6. Each fraternity shall keep on file in 
the Registrar's Office a complete list, cor- 
rected to date, of all active and pledged 
members, including officers. 

7. I']ach fraternity shall keep on file in 
the Kegistrar's Office a complete up-to-date 
list of all men living in the chapter house. 

H. KuHliingr Rules: 

A. Xo fraternity shall hold an organ- 
ir.etl ruHh function until October 15. (Any 
function at which there are more than six 
iCt) freshmen present, constitutes an orgran- 
iy.ed rush function.) 

P.. The time between the 15th of Octo- 
ber and the beginning of the silence period 
shall be considered as the season for or- 
ganized functions. This time shall be di- 
vided into two e(iual parts during each one 
of which each fraternitj' shall hold not 
more than one organized rush function.. 
(Silence Period shall be from 8:00 A.M. of 
the day preceding pledge day until 12:00 
noon of pledge day. During this time no 
iitiperdassman may communicate directly 
or indirectly with any man who has at- 
tfnded this institution less than one se- 
mester.) 



(\ Dnriiifr th«' tiin(> st ipulMffd for (irjiran- 
i'/»Ml rushing', no f r.itcniit y sli.ill liold iii<»r.' 
th.iii two oiK:niiz('(l rush riiiicl ions. Tlic 
dates for thoso functions sJiall i»o drawn 
hy lots at some time previous to October 
1st. 

I>. n-tw.'cn October 1.". :ind tlie silence 
period no rr.iternily sliiill cnfertiiin any 
lirst-y-ur ninn after 7 :(M) l'..M. i-.xccpt that 
fnitcrnii V wliich has drawn that |>articul;ir 
date. 

i». All inter-fraternitj' sports shall he 
jrovcMMM'd ity the following; rules: 

A. Only liona tide, active, underj^radii- 
ate members of the fraternity chaiiters of 
tie University of Maryland may l>e eligible 
to take part in inter-fraternity sports. 

15. \o fraternity man may participate in 
any inter-fraternity sport in wliich he has 
previously made an ollicial Maryland letter. 

('. Xo man who has been a candidate of 
any frcsliman or varsitj' sport or who has 
taken part in a rejjular school jr:"iie con- 
"ictinj; in- season with any inter-fraternity 
sport may participate in the inter-frater- 
nity s{»ort. 

1>. Any such additional qiiestions or 
disputes as may arise in inter-fraternity 
sports shall be {governed by the rules of 
t!:e Southern Conference. 



79 



ST. ANDREW'S EPISCOPAL 
CHURCH 

COIvLEGE PARK, MD. 
Rev. Ronalds Taylor, S. T. D. Rector 



Services: 

9.45 A. M. Sunday School 

11.00 A. M. Morning- Prayer 
and Sermon. 

Communion Service First 
Sunday of Each Month 



Make St. Andrew's your church 
home while in College Park. 

You will find a cordial welcome 
at all the services. The Rector 
will welcome an opportunity to 
meet and know you. 



80 



BERWYN PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH 

B. A. MAIZEN, Pastor 

Services, Sunday, 11 a. m. 
Sunday School, 9.45 a. m. 
Student's Bible Class, 9.45 a. m. 
Christian Endeavor Meeting, Sunday, 

7 p. m. 

Prayer and Bible^Study, Wednesday, 

8 p. m. 

You are Most Cordially Welcome 

First Baptist Church 

HYATTSVILLE, MD. 

Rev. B. P. Robertson, D. D., Pastor 

Invites you to all of its services. 

Bible School— 9.30 A. M. 
Preaching— 11 A. M. and 8 P. M. 

B. Y. P. U. —7 P.M. 

Alid-Week Service -Wednesday, 

8 P. M. 

Why"not make^this home-like 
church your church home. 



81 



To the students of the University 
of Maryland 

The First National 
Bank 

OF HYATTSVILLE 

Extends to you greetings and a 
welcome and invites you to make 
this bank your depository wh le at 
the University. 

Do not keep money in your room — 
pay your bills by check. 
This prevents loss, robbery, extrava- 
gance and disputes. 
The fac lities of this bank are at 
your command. 

BANKING HOURS 

Mondays and Government Pay 

Days, 9 to 5.30 P. M. 
Saturdays, 9 A. M. to 12 M and 

4 to 8 P. M. 
Other days, 9 A. Al. to 3 P. M. 

H. J. PATTERSON C. B. GASCH 

President Cashier 



82 



SERVICE SATISFACTION 

M^e solicit your account 

PRINCE GEORGES 
BANK 

Rt'soimes over 
$1,600,000 

BANKING HOURS 
8.30 A. M. to 3 P. M. 

Satupdays 

8.30 A. M. to 12 Noon 

4 P. M. to 8 P. M. 



T. M. JONES |J. ENOS RAY 

Cashier President 



SECURITY STRENGTH 



83 



KUSHNER'S 

VARIETY STORE 

BERWYN 91 
COLLEGE PARK, MD. 

Visit our Lunch Room. 

Reasonable prices. 

Fresh Fruits, Delicatessens, 
Candy, Ice Cream, Sodas, 
Cigars and Cigarettes, Mag- 
azines, Drug Supplies. 

Shoes for all College Uses. 

Radio is always tuned in for 
your convenience. 

What you dor/t see ask for. 

Try our New Soda Fountain. 

Give us a trial. 

84 



I^yXperietice Teaclu'S Wisdom 

BENJAMIN F.(rilNN& SONS 

ihstahlishcJ 1893/ 

Have served you faithfully for over 30 years 
Shaving and Hairdressing Parlor 

Ladies' and Children's Work a Specialty 
Up-to-Date Massage and Shampooing 

Razors Honed, Set and Concaved 
At the Car Stop HYATTSVILLE. MD. 



COLLEGE PARK BOWLING ALLEYS 

8 New Alleys 

Cigars Cigarettes 

Refreshments 

Healthy Recreation 

Y. M. C. A. Y. W. C. A. 

Discussion Group 
Every Sunday 

Rest Room - 6.30 P. M. 



85 















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87 



THE EUTAW PLACE BAPTIST CHURCH 

Eutaw Place at Dolphin 

Reached directly by cars 3, 9, 16, 31 and 32 

0. C. S. Wallace, D. D., Lilt. D., Pastor 

11 a.m. and 8 p. in. Sunday Worship 
with sermon and Music. 
9.50 a.m. Bible School and organ- 
ized classes; Men's Bible Class, 
Eugene L/evering, Teacher; Junior 
Men's Class. Horace E. Flack, Ph.D., 
Teacher. 

Young People's Union 
5.30 p.m. Sunday, informal recep- 
tion, room 2 and corridors of 
Church House; 6 p.m., vSupper, 
room 3; 6.45 p.m., Prayer Circles, 
rooms 1 and 2; 7 p.m., Devotional 
meeting, Lecture Hall. 
7.40 p.m., Organ Recital, Audience 
Room. 

8 p.m., Wednesday, Prayer Meet- 
ing, Lecture Hall. 

The tall spire and beautiful architecture 
of this church invite to worship. The 
building was desigrned by Thomas O. 
Walter, architect of the dome of the Cap- 
itol. Washington. 

The spacious and finely equipped 
Church House and the large Lecture Hall 
are used by the young people for their re- 
ligious, musical and social gatherings. 
.Students of the U. of M. are specially 
invited. 



Franklin street 

Presbyterian 

Church 

Franklin and Catliedral Sts. 
Rev. Harris E. Kirk, D.D., Minister 



Service at 11 A. I\I. and 8 P. M 

vSunday School at 9.45 A. M. 

Young People's Society at 
6.45 P. M. 



Students are Cordially Invited to 
All Services 



89 



University Baptist Church 

N.E. Corner of Charles & Greenwav 



Russell Bradley Jones, Pastor 



SUNDAYS 

9.30 A.M.— Sunday Bible School 
U A.M.— Morning Worship 
6.30 P.M.— Young People's Meeting 
8 P.M.— Evening Worship 

WEDNESDAY 
8 P.M. — Weekly Prayer Service 



A cordial welcome awaits the 
students 

We are eager to know and to serve 
you 



90 



Mount Vernon Place 
Methodist Episcopal Ghurcli 

at the Washington Monument 

Rev. Oscar Thomas Olson, D. \). 

Rev. Robert Lee Wright 

Ministers 



At the heart of the city to serve your needs 

and desires. 
The Services on Sunday at eleven and eight 

have fine musical setting, a vigorous 

putting of religion for today and a real 

welcome to you. 
The Blue and Gray Room, the Assembly 

Hall and the Bowling Alley serve as a 

student rallying center. 
Sunday afternoon from 5 to 7 the social 

"At Home" brings together U. of M., 

Hopkins, Goucher, Peabody and city 

young people. 
The big Bible Class Sunday morning at 10 

in the Assembly Hall is worth your while. 

91 



ST. MARK S 

LUTHERAN 

CHURCH 

St. Paul and 20th Sts. 
Robert D. Clare, D.D., Pastor 



Sunday Services: 
9.30 A. M.— Sunday School. 
10.00 A.M.— Brotherhood Bible Class. 
11.00 A. M. and 8.00 P. M. Congre- 
gational Services. 
7.00 P. M.— Luther League. 

Mid-Week Services: 
'8.00 P. M. Wednesday. 

This Church provides a religious 
atnnosphere and fellowship especially 
congenial to University and College 
students. 

A Cordial Invitation is Extended 
to All of the Univetsity oj Mary- 
land Students 



92 



The Brantly Baptist Church 

Edmonson Ave. & ScliroedtT St. 
Rev. Henry M. Wharton, D.D., Pastor 



Services Ever\- Sunrlay 11 a.m. and 
8 p.m. Conducted by the Pastor 

Young People's Meeting: Every 
Sunday at 7 p.m. With vSocial Tea. 

You will be welcome at this Church 
and if you come once you will 
come again. 



EMMANUEL CHURCH 

Cathedral and Read Sts. 

Rev. Hugh Birckhead. D.D., Rector 

This Church holds out a cordial welcome 
to all of the students of the University of 
Maryland 
SUNDAY SERVICES 
8.00 A. M. — Holy Communion. 
9.45 A. M.— Church School. 
11.00 A.M. — Morning Prayer and Sermon 
(Holy Communion and Sermon first 
Sunday in the month). 
8 00 P.M.— Choral Evensongrand Address. 
The Rfclor-cvill be s:lad to »ieel you at the 

close of any of tliesf' seti^ices. 
Every Fully Developed Man is Religious 



93 



Wilson Memorial M. E. Church, South 

University Parkway and Charles St. 
CARLTON D. HARRIS. D. D. 

A students' church that caters to 
students. University class for men 
and Goucher class for women. 
Sunday School— 9.30 A.M. 
Hpworth League— 7.15 P M. 
Preaching— 11 A.M. and 8 P.M 



University Men and Women will find a congenial 

CHURCH HOME 

at 

Seventh Baptist Church 

North Ave. and St. Paul 
John Henry Day, D. D., Minister 

Sunday Worship Sanday School 9.30 a.m. 

1 1 a. m. and 8 p. in. Young Peoples Meeting 7 p.m. 

Student Membership 



94 



SKPTKxMBli^K 



Sunday Sept. 12 



Monday 


Sept. 13 


TueHday 


Sept. 14 


Wednesday 


Sept. 15 


Thursday 


Sept. 16 


Friday 


Sept. 17 



Saturday Sept. 18 



95 



Church of the Ascension 

(Episcopal) 

LAFAYETTE SQUARE 

Robert Evan* Browning, Rector 

Services: 7.30 A.M. 

9.30 A.M. 

11.00 A.M. 

8.00 P.M. 

Men .<; Bible Cla-^s. Wednesday 8 P.M. 

Parish Hall All Seats Free 



at i^t 
^tviiictB of ihtst CI|urches 



96 



SEPTEMBER 

Sanday^ S«pt. 19 

Monday Sept. 20 

Tuesday Sept. 21 

Wednesday Sept. 22 

Thursday Sept. 23 

Friday Sept. 24 

Saturday Sept. 25 



97 



SEPTEMBER-OCTOBER 



Sunday Sept. 26 



Monday Sept. 27 



Tuesday Sept. 28 



Wednesday Sept. 29 



Thursday Sept. 30 



Friday 



Saturday Get. 2 



\ 98 





OCTOBER 




Sunday 




Oct. 3 


M(»nday 




Oct. 4 


Tuesday 




Oct. 5 


Wednesday 




Oct. 6 


Tliur8«lay 




Oct. 7 


Friday 




Oct. 8 



Saturday Oct. 9 



ai9i8 



OCTOBER 



Sunday Oct. 10 



Monday Oct. 11 



Tuesday Oct. 12 



Wednesday Oct. 13 



Thursday Oct. 14 



Friday Oct. 15 



Saturday Oct. 1« 



100 



OCTOBER 



Sunday Oct. 17 



Monday Oct. 18 



Tuesday Oct. 19 



Wednesday Oct. 20 



Thursday Oct. 21 



Friday Oct. 82 



Saturday Oct. XS 



101 



OCTOBER 



Sunday Oct. 24 



Monday Oct. 25 



Tuesday Oct. 26 



Wednesday Oct. 27 



Thursday Oct. 28 



Friday Oct. 29 



Saturday Oct. 30 



102 



OCTOBKK-NOVKMUKK 

Suiuluy 



Munday Nov. 1 



Tuesday Nov. 2 



Wednesday Nov. 3' 



Thursday' Nov. 4 



Friday 



Saturday Nov. 6 



103 



Chartered 1864 

Safe Deposit & 
Trust Company 

OF BALTIMORE 



Fireproof building:s, with 
latest and best equipment 
for safety of contents. Safes 
for rent in its large fire= and 
burgIar=proof vaults, with 
spacious and well = lighted 
coupon rooms for use of 
patrons. Securities held on 
deposit for out of tow n cor= 
porations and persons. 

13 SOUTH STREET 



104 



NOVEMBER 

Sanday Nov. 7 

Monday Nov. 8 

Tuesday Nov. 9 

Wednesday Nov. 10 

Thursday Nov. 11 

Friday Nov. 12 

Saturday Nov. 13 



105 



Your Drug Store Needs 

Will be suppliea 
by 

HYNSON, 

WESTCOTT & 

DUNNING 



Two Locations 

CHARLES AND CMASH STS. 

Vernon 0890 

EUTAW PLACE AND 
NOR IN AVE. 

Madison 0405 

BALTIMORE, MD. 

106 



NOVEMBER 

Sunday 



Tuesday 



\\><lne8*lay 



Thursday 



Friday 



Saturday 



107 



Gray Line Motor Tours 

DEPENDABLE 
RESPONSIBLE 
COMFORTABLE 
ECONOMICAL 

Sightseeing Trips 
Tours to Distant Points 
De Luxe Coaches and 
Buses for all Occasions 

Let us help you plan your 
party — Write, Plione or Call 

2 St. Paul ^^IJU^b^^ Phone 
Street ^^^^jg^f^ Plaza 5000 

United Railways & Electric Co. 
of Baltimore 

108 



NOVE»IBER 



Sunday Nov. 21 



Monday Not. 22 



Tuesday Not. 23 



Wednesday 



Thursday 



Friday 



{Saturday 



109 



MARYLAND 

GLASS 
CORPORATION 

Bottle Manufacturers 



BLUE 

GREEN TINT and 

FLINT 

MT. WINANS 



BALTIMORE, MD 



no 



NOVEMBEK-DKCEMBUK > 

Sunday Nov. 28 

Monday Nov. 29 

i 

Tresday Nov. SO ^ 

J 

I 

Wednesday Dec. Ij 



Thursday 



Friday Deo. 3 



Saturday 



111 



CITY SAVINGS BANK 

GAY & HIGH STREETS 
BALTIMORE, MD, 

■ IT 1 - • ■ ~- 

. WELCOMES STUDENTS' 

CHECKING A CCO UNTS 

— ' - - 

Call Mr. Taylor Plaza 2747 

Phone Plaza 2276 ■• 

Q] dtt Studio 

II Porlraiis of 
WPersonalily 

331 north Charles Street 
Baltimore, Md. 

112 



DKOEAEBER 



Sunday Dec. 6 



Monday Dec. 6 



Tuesday Dec. 7 



Wednesday Dec. 8 



Thursday Dec. 9 



Friday Dec. 10 



Saturday Dec. 11 



113 



Baltimore's Best Cli 



Gymnasium 

Nalatorium 
Lockers 
Showers 
Masseur 

Restaurant 
Reading 
Room 
Bowling 

Bootblack 
Barber 




CENTRAL YOUNG MEN' 

FRANKLIN ANI 



For further informatk 

114 



for University Men 




Student 
Rates 

Full 
Privileges 
to June Isl 

Student 

Gym Class 

Tues., Tliurs. 
5.10 P. M. 



HRISTIAN ASSOCIATION 



iTHEDRAL STS. 

nquire at the "K" Office 

115 



We're gentlemen of 

recognized scholarship 

on the subject of 

"College Style" 

Isaac Hambur£(er 
and Sons 

Baltimore and iTanover Sts. 



G. Kenneth Greer Phone 

Prop. Hamilton 061 2- W 



Ihc Commuaity Press 

Commercial and Social Printing 



3 GrindoB Ave. 
Prices That Please Lanraville 



116 



DECEMBER 



Sunday Dec. 12 



Monday Dec. 13 



Tuesday Deo. 14 



Wednesday Dec. 15 



Thursday Dec. 16 



Friday Dec. 17 



Saturday Dec. 18 



117 



Financial Independlnce 
AT 65 -HOW? 

by 
Systematic Savings 

Every Student Should Start Now 

PARK BANK 

Lexington Street at Liberty 

Baltimore, Maryland 

ELLERBROCK 



Student Photographer 



12 N. Howard Stl Baltimore, Md. 



CHARLES R. DiSTEFANO 

Light Lunch and 
Confectioneries 

Opposite Mercy Hospital 



118 



, DECEMBEK 

I _ 

Biinday '' ' Deo. 19 

i 

] I 

— - — H ' 

Monday Dec. 20 

\ 

■ — ^^-i — .■ > . ■ — -r: — : — '— 

f nesday Dec. 21 



Wednesday Dec. 22 



Thursday Dec, 2.3 



Friday Dec. 24 



Saturday Dec. 2.= 



119 



FIRE AND BURGLAR PROOF 

The Commonwealtn 
Bank 

HOWARD AND MADISON STREETS 
State and City Depositary 

SAVINGS DEPARTMENT 

INTEREST 4 PER CENT 

Safe Deposit Boxes 

Established 1873 

k. H. FETTING 
M^UFACTURING JEWELRY CO. 

MANUFACTURERS 

GREEK LETTER FRATERNIH JEWELRY 

213 N. LIBERTY STREET 
BALTIMORE 

120 



DEC EMBE R- J A N U A R Y 
Sunday D««. 2« 



Monday D««. 27 



Tnesday D««. M 



Wednesday Dee. 2* 



Thursday Dec. M 



Friday Dec. SI 



Saturday Jan. 1 



121 



Furniture of Quality 

and individuality is offered here 
at prices that are not and cannot 
be underquoted by any house at 
at any time. 

Besides the reputation of an old 
established firm is back of each 
sale -with a guarantee. 

JOHN C. KNIPP <& SONS 

Furniture - Decora.tions 
Draperies 

343 N. CHARLES STREET 
Telephone Vernon 6128 

iTepDron Ksf Hayaon 

LalP0 Booksellers a.nd Publishers 
14 W. FRANKLIN ST. 

We supply all text books and syllabi 
of lectures used in the Law Depart- 
ment of the University of Maryland. 

Books Bought, Sold and 
Exchanged 



122 



JANUARY 



Sunday Jan. 2 



Monday Jan. 3 



'tit'sday Jan. 4 



U ednesday Jan. 5 



Thursday Jan. & 



Friday 



Saturday Jan. 8 



123 



JANUARY 



Sunday Jan. 9 



Monday Jan. 10 



Tuesday Jan. 11 



Wednesday Jan. 12 



Thursday Jan. 13 



Friday Jan. 14 



Saturday Jani. 15 



124 



JANUARY 

Sunday Jan. 16 

Monday Jan. 17 

Tuesday Jan. 18 

Wednesday Jan. 19 

Thursday Jan. 24 

Friday Jan. 21 

Saturday Jan. 22 



12S 



Phone Madison 5760-5761 

Co-operative Dental 
Laboratory 

'-YOUR FUTURE ASSISTANTS'' 

Euta^v and Franklin Sts. 
Baltimore, Md. 

Luther B.Benton Co. 

Dental Supplies 

305 N. Howard St 
Baltimore, Md. 

Phone, Vernon 1370 
126 





JANUARY 




Sunday 




Jan. 23 


Monday 




Jan. 24 


Tuesday 




Jan. 25 


Wednesday 




Jan. 26 


Thursday 




Jan. 27 


Friday 




Jan. 28 



Saturday Jan. 29 



L 



127 



JANUARY-FEBRUARY 



STLnday 



Monday 



Tuesday 



Wednesday 



Thursday 



Friday 



Saturday 



128 



FEBRUARY 



Sunday Feb. 6 



Monday Feb. 7 



Tuesday Feb. 8 



Wednesday Feb. • 



Thursday Feb. 10 



Friday Feb. 11 



Saturday Feb. 12 



129 



College Jewelry and Novelties 

All the new makes of Fountain Pens 
and Pencils in gold and silver, small 
sterling silver Footballs, Basket 
Balls, Base Balls, Bats, etc., ^1 each. 

Also Class Pins and Emblems 

WM. J. MILLER 

The Popular Priced Je<weler 
28 EAST BALTIMORE STREET 



Charles R. Deeley 

T>ealer in all kinds of 

DENTAL 
SUPPLIES 

108 W. Mulberry Street 
Baltimore, Md. 

130 



FEBRUARY 



Sunday Feb. 13 



Monday Feb. 14 



Tuesday Feb. 15 



Wednesday Feb. 16 



Thursday Feb. 17 



Friday Feb. 18 



Saturday Feb. 19 



131 



FEBRUARY 



Sunday 



Monday 



Tuesday 



Wednesday Feb. 23 



Thursday Feb. 24 



Friday Feb. 25 



Saturday Feb. 26 



132 



FEBRUARY-MARCH 



Sunday 



Feb. 27 



Monday 



Feb. 28 



TueHday 



March 1 



Wednesday 



March 2 



Thursday 



March 3 



Friday 



March 4 



Saturday 



March 5 



133 



BURNS 

Medical Standard Book Company 
301 N. Charles St., corner Saratoga 

Headquarters for Medical Booka, 

Fiction, Fountain Pens and 

Students' Supplies of 

all kinds 

SURGICAL INSTRUMENTS 

MORRIS RESTAURANT 

207 W. FRANKLIN STREET 

Table Board by the week 
3 Meals a Day, $4.50 

Trylour Regular Dinne"" 

Club Breakfast. 35c 50c 



LEON LEVI 

CASH JEWELER 

307-309 W. Lexington Street 

''Maryland'^ Men Always 
Welcomed 

134 



MARCH 



Sunday 



March 6 



Monday 



March 7 



Tuesday 



March 8 



Wednesday 



March 9 



T4iursday 



Friday 



March 11 



Saturday 



March 12 



135 



MARCH 



Sunday 



March 13 



Monday 



March 14 



Tuesday 



March 15 



Wednesday 



March 16 



Thursday 



March 17 



Friday 



March 18 



Saturday 



March 19 



136 



MARCH 



Sanday 



March 20 



Monday 



March 21 



Tuesday 



March 22 



Wednesday 



March 23 



Thursday 



March 24 



Friday 



March 25 



Saturday 



March 26 



137 



MARCH-APRIL 



Sunday 



March 27 



Monday 



March 28 



Tuesday 



March 29 



Wednesday 



Thursday 



Friday 



April 1 



Saturday 



April 2 



138 



Al'KIl, 



Sunday Aprils 



Monday April 4 



Tuesday April 5 



Wednesday April 6 



Thursday April 7 



Friday April 8 



Saturday April 9 



139 



APRIL 



Sunday April 10 



Monday April ll 



Tuesday April 13 



U e<lne8daj^ April IS 



Tliut^diiy April 14 



Friday April 15 



Bfttufday April 10 



140 



APRIL 



Sunday 



April 11 



Monday 



April 18 



Tuestlay 



April 19 



Wednesday 



April 20 



Tluirsday 



April 21 



Friday 



April 22 



Saturday 



April 23 



141 



APRIL. 



Sunday April 24 



Monday April 25 



Tuesday April 26 



Wednesday April 27 



Thursday April 28 



Friday April 29 



Saturday April 30 



142 





MAY 




Sunday 




Mayl 


Monday 




May 2 


Tuesday 




Mays 


Wednesday 




May 4 



Thursday May 5 



Friday May 6 



Saturday May 7 



143 



MAY 

Sunday May 8 

Monday May 9 

Tuesday May 10 

Wednesday May 11 

Thursday May 12 

Friday May 13 

Saturday May 14 



144 





HA¥ 




Sunday 




May 15 


Monday 




May 10 


tueadair 




May 17 


\\' t'duesilniir 




May Id 


Thursdajr 




MaylSJ 



I'ridajr May 2d 



Kuturday May 2l 



145 





MAY 




Sunday 




May 22 


Monday 




May 23 


Tuesday 




May 24 


Wednesday 




May 25 



Thursday May 



Friday May 27 



Saturday May 28 



146 



MAY -JUNE 



Sunday May 29 



Monday May 30 



Tuesday May 31 



Wednesday Jane 1 



Thursday June 2 



Friday June 3 



Saturday June 4 



147 



JUNE 



Sunday- 



Jane 6 



Monday 



June 6 



Tuesday 



June 7 



Wednesday 



June 8 



Thursday 



June 9 



Friday 



June 10 



Saturday 



June 11 



148 



% 9R< e a. 

Laietcaia and. ^Juiina rJvQQm6 

Not only a^iothcr, but a better 
place to eat 

Good food — reasonable prices 
Open 7 A. M. to 9 P. M. 

t/tanfclin and Catncdtai Q)is. 



PATROHIZE 
OUR 
ADVERTISERS 



149 



1 Name . - 
Address. 
Phone .... 



2 Name 

Address. 
Phone — . 



3 Name 

Address. 
Phone ... 



4 Name 

Address. 
Phone ... 



5 Name 

Address. 
Phone ... 



6 Name „ 

Address _.. 

Phone 

ISO 



7 Name 

Address. 
Phone ... 



8 Name 

Address- 
Phone ... 

9 Name 

Address. 
Phone ... 

10 Name ... 
Address. 
Phone .. 

11 Name ... 
Address. 
I'hone .... 

12 Name .. 
Address. 
Phone ... 



151 



152 



MEMORANDA 



153 



MEMORANDA 



154 



H.G. ROEBUCK & SON 

PRINTERS 

of this and other 
HAHDBOOKS 



ColUge and School 

PUBUCA TIONS 

Dance Programs 

and Slalionery 



119 West Multerry Street 
BALTIMORE - MARYLAND 



Hamilton 0951-0962 , 

F. T. GATCH MOTOR CO. 

Belair Road & Park Avenue 



AUTHORIZED 

SALES ^^ SERVICE 

CARS TRUCKS TRACTORS 

Genuine Parts 



Competent Mechanics 
Real Service 

Financing Easily Arranged 
Lowest Terms 




m\Q 



CLOTHES 



Smart enough 

to go to 

College 

Suits and Topcoats 
$30 up 



211-213 E. Bait 



imore 



St.