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Full text of "Students' hand book of the University of Maryland"

LIBRARY-COLLEGE PARK 




English Clothes Tailored in America 



LIKE 
QUALITIES 
ATTRACT 



COLLEGE MEN like 
Van Co. Clothes 
because Van Co. 
Clothes are college 
men's clothes. They 
exact no premium for 
their finer quality and 
greater distinction. 




STUDENTS' 

HANDBOOK 

OF 

The University of 
Maryland 

PRESENTED BY 

THE 

CHRISTIAN ASSOCIATIONS 

1 927 - 1928 

STAFF 
Editor (Baltimore)— Donald P. Roman 
Editor (College Park)— Henry Whiteford 
Girls' Editor (College Park)— Ruth Williams 
Business Manager (College Park)— William 

La Mar 
Business Manager (Baltimore) — Hugh Ward 



UPUB ^^^ . 

^JC I r- CONTENTS 

iQ:)7/^r — 

University Calendar 4 

President's Greeting 9 

Baltimore Departments 11 

College Park Departments 24 

Student Pastors at the U. of M 27 

Academic Regulations "28 

Greetings from Dean of Woiften- 40 

Women Studenis' Government Association .... 44 

Point System for Women r)2 

Student Publications ")4 

Musical Organizations o5 

Wearers of the "M" 60 

f"ootball Schedule 61 

Track and Field Records 62 

Songs and Veils 63 

Fraternities 6V) 

Constitution of Inter-Fratcrnity Council 70 

College Park Ads '. . . . 76 

Daily Schedule 84 

Baltimore Ads (Churches) 86 

Baltimore Ads (Business) 102 

Memoranda and Addresses 150 



HISTORICAL SKETCH 

The history of the present University of Mary- 
land practically combines the history of two insti- 
tutions. It begins with the chartering of the College 
of Medicine of Maryland in Baltimore in 1807. 
which graduated its first class in 1810. In 1812 the 
institution was empowered to annex other depart- 
m ents and was by the same act constituted a 
University by name and under the title of the 
University of Maryland. 

For more than a century the Universitj- of Mary- 
land stood almost as organized in 1812, until an 
a ct of the Legislature in 1920 merged it with the 
Maryland State College and changed the name of 
the Maryland State College to the University of 
Maryland. 

The Maryland State College first was chartered 
in 1856 under the name of the Maryland Agri- 
cultural College, the second agricultural college in 
the Western Hemisphere. In 1862 Congress passed 
the Land Grant Act and the then Maryland Agri- 
cultural College was named the beneficiary of the 
grant in Maryland. Thus, the college became, at 
least in part, a State institution. In the fall of 
1914 its control was taken over entirely by the 
State. In 1916 the Legislature granted a new 
charter to the College and made it the Maryland 
State College. 



f 9 29^0 



BALTIMORE SCHOOLS 

FIRST SEMESTER 
1927 

Aug. 29, Mon. — Last day for filing applications 
for deficiency examinations. 

Sept. 6, Tue. — Deficiency examinations begin. 

Sept. 6, Tue. — Registration for first term begins, 
all schools. 

Sept. 12, Mon. — First term classes begin in Even- 
ing School. 

Sept. 19, Mon. — First term classes begin in Day 
School. 

Sept. 19, Mon. — Registration begins. 

Sept. 26, Mon. — Instruction begins with the first 
scheduled period. 

Sept. 26, Mon. — Last day of registration for first 
term, all schools. 

Oct. 3, Mon. — Last day to register, without pay- 
ing fine of $5.00. 

Nov. 11, Fri. — Holiday (Armistice Day.) 

Nov. 23, Wed. — Thanksgiving recess begins after 
the last scheduled period. 

Nov. 28, Mon. — Instruction resumed with the 
first scheduled period. 

Dec. 21, Wed. — Christmas recess begins after the 
last scheduled period. 

1928 

Jan. 3, Tue. — Instruction resumed with the first 
scheduled period. 

Jan. 16, Mon. — Registration begins for second 
semester. 

SECOND SEMESTER 
Jan. 28, Sat. — First term ends in Day School. 
Jan. 30, Mon. — Second term begins in Day School. 
Jan. 30, Mon. — Instruction begins with the first 
scheduled period. 



Feb. 4, Sat. — First term ends in Evening School. 

Feb. 4, Sat. — Last day to register without paying 
fine of $5.00. 

Feb. 6, Mon. — Second term begins, Evening School. 

Feb. 6, Mon. — Last day for registration Day School. 

Feb. 13, Mon. — Last day for registration, Even- 
ing School. 

Feb. 22, Wed.— Holiday (Washington's Birthday) 

April 5, Tues. — Easter recess begins after the last 
scheduled period. 

April 10, Tue. — Instruction resumed with the first 
scheduled period. 

May 6, Sat. — Second term ends in Day School. 

June 2, Thur. — Commencement Day. 

Tune 23, Sat. — Second term ends, Evening School. 



University Calendar 1927-28 

COLLEGE PARK 

FIRST SEMESTER 
1927— 

Sept. 19-20, Mon.-Tues. — Re ns*rarion for Fresh- 
men. 

Sept. 21, Wed. — Registration for all other students. 

Sept. 22, Thur. — Instruction for first semester be- 
gins. 

Sept. 28, Wed. — Last day to change registration 
or to file schedule card without fine. 

Nov. 11, Fri. — Observance of Armistice Day. 

Nov. 23-28, Wed., 4.20 to Mon. 8.20 A.M.— 
Thanksgiving Recess. 

Dec. 21, Wed., 12.10— Christma s Recess begins. 
1928 

Jan. 2, Mon. 8.20 A.M. — Christmas Recess ends. 

Jan. 18-21, Wed.-Sat. — Registration for second 
semester. 

Jan. 23-28, Mon.-Sat. — First Semester examinations. 

Jan. 30, Mon. — Last day to register for second 
semester without payment_^of late 
registration fee. 

SECOND SEMESTER 
Jan. 31, Tues., 8.20 A.M.— Instruction for second 

semester begins. 
Feb. 6, Mon. — Last day to change registration or 

to file schedule card without fine. 
Feb. 22, Wed. — Washington's Birthday. Holiday. 
March 25, Sun. — Observance of Maryland Day. 
Apr. 5-11, Thur, 12.10— 

Wed. 8.20 A.M.— Easter Recess. 
May 10-11, Wed.-Thur. afternoons — Festival of 

Music. 



Mav 16-19, Wed.-Sat. — Registration for first sem- 
ester, 1928-1929. 

Maj- 23-29, Wed.-Tues. — Second Semester ex- 
aminations for seniors. 

May 26-June 2, Sat.-Sat. — Second Semester ex- 
aminations. 

May 30, Wed. — Memorial Day. Holiday. 

June 3, Sun. 11 A.M. — Baccalaureate Sermon. 

June 4, Mon. — Class Day. 

June 5, Tues. 11 A.M. — Commencement. 
SUMMER TERM 

June 11-16, Mon.-Sat. — Rural Women's Short 
Course. 

June 20, Wed. — Summer School begins. 

July 31, Tues. — Summer School ends. 

Aug. 2-7, Thur.-Tues, — Boys' and Girls' Club 
Week 




Dr. Raymond Pearson 

President of the University of Maryland 



DR. RAYMOND PEARSON'S GREETINGS 

To THE Students 

OF THE University of Maryland: 

I came here a year ago to take up work which had 
been well done by my good friend Dr. Albert F. 
Woods. It has been my purpose to uphold the 
standards which he raised to a high level. I am 
very grateful for the support, advice and encourage- 
ment that has been given to me by students and 
faculty members. It is a great task to keep a uni- 
versity going, and this needs the cooperative effort 
of many persons. The task is a joyful one when we 
remember what the service of the University means 
to the State of Maryland through material benefits 
and, let us hope, measurable spiritual benefits. 

The new year opens with great promise. Through 
the kindness of the Governor and the Legislature 
some important improvements are to be made. 
Let us continue to show by our honest work, our 
loyalty and our interest in the whole University 
plant, including buildings and equipment as well 
as the personnel that we appreciate the oppor- 
tunities that lie ahead of us and will make the most 

of them. 

Truly yours, 

R. A. PEARSON, President. 




Harry E. Foulkrod 

Executive Secretary University of Maryland 
Young Men's Christian Association 



BALTIMORE DEPARTMENTS 

THE YOUNG MEN'S CHRISTIAN 
ASSOCIATION 

The Young Men's Christian Association at the 
University of Maryland operates under the direc- 
tion of a Board of Mana^ers^ of the Baltimore 
Y. M. C. A. This Board is composed of Students, 
Faculty, Alumni and friends of the University. 
The personnel of the Boaid for the coming year, 
is as follows: 

Board of Managers 

Dr. Carl Davis, Chairman. 

Prof. O. G. Harne, Treasurer. 

Dr. H. B. McCarthy, Secretary. 

Dr. John C. Krantz. 

Donald P. Roman. 

Hugh Ward. 

Arthur Pagenhardt. 

F. C. Kohler. 

This Board of Managers is responsible for the 
general oversight of the work of the Y. M. C. A. 
at the University. It exists as an advisory body 
upon which the Student Cabinet of the Associa- 
tion may depend for advice and help on any prob- 
lem which may arise. The details of the program 
are in the hands of the Student Cabinet. 

Officers 

Donald P. Roman (Law) President 

Wilbur Gum (Pharmacy) Vice President 

Edwin C. Barnes (Dental) .... Secretary 

Ralph Young (Medical) Treasurer 

Harry E. Foulkrod Executive Secretary 

Rooming and Boarding House Directory 

It is the job of the Y. M. C. A. to assist you i n 
finding a room. During late summer we prepare a 
list of inspected rooms and we want everybody to 
make use of this list by reporting to the "Y" office 
in the Medical Building, as soon as they arrive in 
the city. 

11 



The Handbook 

The Handbook is published and distributed to 
each student without cost. It is a ready reference 
book for all students, but it is particularly helpful 
in aiding the new student to adjust himself to uni- 
versity life. 

Church Cooperation 

The Association accepts its position as a repre- 
sentative of the churches. It is not concerned with 
a student's choice of a church, but it is concerned 
in helping him make contacts that it will ba a 
pleasure to maintain in the church of his choice. 

Fellowship Dinners 

In order to create Christian Fellowship and to 
operate among the students of the University, 
the Y. M. C. A. will hold a series of six Fellowship 
Dinners during the year, to which all students 
will be welcomed. They will be held at stated 
intervals and notable speakers and good music 
will be used in making these affairs worth while. 

Conferences and Conventions 

Every year numerous conferences are held in 
Maryland, Delaware and the District of Columbia 
by the Council of Christian Associations. The 
students of our Professional schools cannot onb^ 
make a contribution at these gatherings but can 
also learn much which they otherwise could not get. 

The conferences already planned for the next 
year are: the Fall Conference at Delaware; the 
Mid-winter Conference: The Detroit Convention; 
and the Spring Training Gathering. 

Cosmopolitan Club 

Last year 125 students from 34 different nations 
studied In Baltimore. The Association assists these 
students in many ways, but its major work is 
through the Student Cosmopolitan Club of Balti- 
more, which, although an independent student 
organization, is fostered by the Y. M. C. A. It 
meets bi-monthly and all foreign students are es- 
pecially invited to attend. 

12 



Student Volunteers 

The Association has a world-wide interest in 
the activities of the Church. It is interested in 
and fosters the work of students in the University 
who are preparing for foreign service. During the 
past year there were seven Student Volunteers 
studying for the Medical Missionary Field. 

Central Y. M. C. A. Memberships 

The Central Branch of the Y. M. C. A. with its 
fine equipment, including Gymnasium, Swimming 
Pool, Reading Rooms, etc., offers its privileges to 
University students at a special rate for the school 
year. 

Cabinet Dinners 

The Association Cabinet meets for dinner once 
a week. All students are welcome to these gather- 
ings. Due notice of them will be posted regularly. 

News Sheet 

During the year, the "Y" will publish four editions 
of a News Sheet. This will carry "Y" news, as 
well as news items relative to other activities in 
the University. 



13 



PROCEDURE FOR REGISTRATION 

A new registration is conducted each year. 

All students in medicine, dentistry, pharmacy, 
must register in the office of the registrar (law 
school building) during the period from Monday, 
September 19, to Monday, October 8. 

The period of registration for the students in 
law begins September 6. 

There is a late registration fee of $5.00 which all 
students are subjected to who do not register in 
the time set aside for that purpose. If any fees 
whatsoever remain unpaid twenty (20) days from 
the beginning of said semester, the student's 
name shall be stricken from the rolls. 

Each new student must present at theoffice of the 
Registrar the matriculation receipt which has been 
issued by the Dean of the School in' which he has 
registered. After the registration card has been filled 
out complete, the card is presented at the office 
of the Registrar for approval. When the registra- 
tion card has been vised, the student will take the 
card to the office of the Comptroller and pay the 
required fees. The office of the Comptroller ad- 
joins the office of the Registrar. 

W. M. HILLEGEIST, 

Registrar. 
Definition of Student Residence and Non- 
Residence 

Students who are minors are considered to be 
resident students, if at the time of their registra- 
tion, their parents or guardians have been residents 
of this state for at least one year. 

Adult students are considered to be resident 
students, if at the time of their registration they 
have been residents of this state for at least one 
year. 

The status of the residence of a student is deter- 
mined at the time of his first registration in the 
University and may not thereafter be changed by 
■ him unless, in the case of a minor, his parents or 
guardians move to and become legal residents of 
this State. 

14 



THE SCHOOL OF MEDICINE 

J. M. H. Rowland. Dean 

Medical Council 

Arthur M. Shipley, M.D., Sc.D. 

Gordon Wilson, M.D. 

Harry Friedenwald, A.B., M.D. 

William S. Gardner, M.D. 

Standish McCleary, M.D. 

JuHus Friedenwald, A.M., M.D. 

J. M. H. Rowland, M.D. 

Alexius McGlannan, A.M., M.D. 

Hugh R. Spencer, M.D. 

H. Boyd Wylie, M.D. 

Carl L. Davis, M.D. 

William H. Schultz, Ph.B., Ph.D. 

Maurice C. Pincoffs, S.B., M.D. 

Frank W. Hachtel, M. D. 

A. H. Ryan, M.D. 

The School of Medicine of the University of 
Maryland is one of the oldest foundations for 
medical education In America, ranking fifth in 
point of age among the medical colleges of the 
United States. In the school building at Lombard 
and Greene streets in Baltimore was founded one 
of the first medical libraries and the first medical 
college library in America. 

Here for the first time in America, dissecting was 
made a compulsory part of the curriculum; here 
instruction In Dentistry was first given (1837), 
and here was first Installed Independent chairs 
for the teaching of diseases of women and children 
(1867). and of eye and ear diseases (1873). 

This School of Medicine was one of the first to 
provide for adequate clinical instruction by the 
erection In 1823 of Its own hospital, and in this 
hospital Intra-mural residency for senior students 
was first established. 

15 



SCHOOL OF NURSING 
Faculty and Instructors 

Superintendent of Nurses and Director of School 

of Nursing 

Annie Crighton, R.N. 

Assistant Superintendent of Nurses 

Marcis M. Branley, R. N. 

Instructor in Nursing 

Isobel Zimmerman, R. N. 

Instructor in Nursing and Supervisor of Wards 

Helen F. Wright R.N. 
Assistant Instructor in Nursing and Supervisor of 
Wards 



Instructor in Surgical Technique for Nurses and 
Supervisor of Operating Pavilion 
Elizabeth Altkenhead, R.N. 
Instructor In Dietetics 

Miriam Connelly 

Instructor in Massage 

Edith Walton 

Instructor in Social Service 

Grace Pearson, R.N. 

The University of Maryland School for Nurses 
was established In the year 1889. Since that time 
it has been an Integral part of the University of 
Maryland Hospital. 

The School is non-sectarian, the only religious 
services being morning prayers. 

The University of Maryland Hospital is a 
general hospital containing about 285 beds. It is 
equipped to give young women a thorough course 
of instruction and practice in all phases of nursing 
including experience in the operating room. 

16 



SCHOOL OF LAW 
The Faculty Council 

Hon. Henry D. Harlan, A.M., LL.B., LL.D., Dean 

Robert Hill Freeman, M.A., LL.B., 
Assistant to the Dean 

While the first faculty of law of the University 
of Maryland was chosen in 1813, no regular school 
of instruction was opened until 1823. This was 
suspended in 1836, and in 1870 regular instruction 
was again begun. In 1913 the Baltimore Law 
School, which had previously absorbed the Balti- 
more tfniversity School of Law, was merged into 
the Law School of the University of Maryland. 
The graduates of the Law School now number 
more than two thousand, and included among them 
are a large proportion of the leaders of the Bench 
and Bar of the State and many who have attained 
prominence in the profession elsewhere. 

The course of instruction in the Law School is 
designed to thoroughly equip the student for the 
practice of his profession when he attains the Bar. 
The course of study embraces both the theory and 
practice of law, and aims to give the student a 
broad view of the origin, development and function 
oflaw, together with a thorough practical knowl- 
edge of its principles and their application. Analyt- 
ical study is made of the principles of substantive 
and procedural law, and a carefully directed prac- 
tice court enables the student to get an intimate 
working knowledge of procedure. 

The Law School is divided into two divisions: 
The Day School course, covering a period of three 
years, and the Evening School course, a period of 
four years. The degree of Bachelor of Laws is con- 
ferred upon graduates of each school. 



17 



BALTIMORE COLLEGE OF DENTAL 
SURGERY 

J. Ben Robinson, F.A.C.D., Dean 

The Baltimore College of Dental Surgery was 
chartered by the Maryland Legislature February 
1, 1840. It was the first institution ever organized 
to offer instruction in the art and science of den- 
tistry. It has continued with an unbroken record 
and remains the oldest dental school in the world. 

The first lectures offered on the special subject 
of dentistry in a medical school in America were 
delivered by Horace H. Hayden, M.D., at the 
University of Maryland in the year 1837. It was 
Dr. Hayden's idea that dentistry merited greater 
attention than had been given it by medical in- 
structions, and undertook to develop this specialty 
as a branch of medicine. With this thought in mind, 
he, with the support of Dr. Chapin A. Harris, ap- 
pealed to the Faculty of Physic of the University 
of Maryland for the creation of a Department of 
Dentistry as a part of the medical curriculum. The 
request having been refused, an independent col- 
lege was decided upon. A charter was applied for 
and granted by the Maryland Legislature, Febru- 
ary 1, 1840. The first Faculty meeting was held 
February 3, 1840, at which time Dr. H. H. Hayden 
was elected president and Dr. C. A. Harris dean. 
The introductory lecture was delivered by Dr. Har- 
ris on November 3, 1840, to the five students ma- 
triculated in the first class. Thus was the Balti- 
more College of Dental Surgery, the first and 
oldest dental school in the world, created as the 
foundation of the present dental profession. 

In 1873 the Maryland Dental College, an off- 
spring of the Baltimore College of Dental Surgery, 
was organized and continued instruction in dental 
subjects until 1879, when it was consolidated with 
the Baltimore College of Dental Surgery. A_ de- 
partment of dentistry was organized at the Univer- 
sity of Maryland in the year 1882. graduating 
its first class in 1883 and each subsequent year 
to 1023. This school was chartered as a corpo- 

18 



ration and continued as a privately owned and 
directed institution until 1920, when it became a 
State institution. The Dental Department of the 
Baltimore Medical College was established in 1895, 
continuing until 1913, when it merged with the 
Dental Department of the University of Maryland. 
The final combining of the dental educational 
interests of Baltimore was effected June 15, 1923, 
by the amalgamation of the student bodies of the 
Baltimore College of Dental Surgery and the 
University of Maryland School of Dentistry, the 
Baltimore College of Dental Surgery becoming a 
distinct department of the State University under 
State supervision and control. Thus we find in the 
Baltimore College of Dental Surgery, Dental 
School, University of Maryland, a merging of the 
various efforts at dental education in Maryland. 
From these component elements have radiated de- 
velopments of the art and science of dentistry until 
the potential strength of its Alumni is second to 
none either in numbers or degree of service to the 
profession. 



19 



THE SCHOOL OF PHARMACY 

Andrew G. DuMez, Dean 
Faculty Council 

Andrew G. DuMez, Ph.G., M.S., Phd. 

E. F. Kelly, Phar. D. 

B. Olive Cole, Phar. D., L.L.B. 

Chas. C. Plitt, Ph.G., ScD. 

G. L. Jenkins, Ph.G., B.S., Ph.D. 

J. Carlton Wolf, B.Sc, Phar. D. 

H. E. Wich, Phar. D. 

The School of Pharmacy was organized in 1841, 
and continued an independent organization as 
the Maryland College of Pharmacy, until it be- 
came a part of the University in 1904. With but 
one short intermission previous to 1865 it has con- 
tinuously exercised its functions as a teaching 
school of Pharmacy. 

This school holds membership in the .American 
Association of Colleges of Pharmacy. The object 
of the Association is to promote the interests of 
pharmaceutical education and all institutions 
holding membership must maintain certain mini- 
mum requirements for entrance and graduation. 

Upon completion of the first three years of the 
course the diploma of Graduate in Pharmacy 
(Ph.G.) is awarded which admits the holder to the 
board of examinations in the various states for 
registration as a pharmacist. 

The degree of Bachelor of Science in Pharmacy 
(B.S. in Pharmacy) will be given upon the com- 
pletion of the worK prescribed for the entire course 
of four years. 

Its diploma is recognized in all states. 



20 



COUNCIL OF CLASS PRESIDENTS 

This student organization is composed of the 
Presidents of each of the regular classes in the six 
schools located in Baltimore. With the exception 
of the Y. M. C. A. it is the one group that repre- 
sents the entire student body. 

The council is organized each fall after the 
classes have elected their officers. Meetings are 
held regularly. All matters of interest and concern 
to the student body are considered by the council. 

The importance and value of the organization 
has been recognized by the committee of Deans, 
and in accordance with a recommendation of the 
Deans the council supervises the publication of 
"Terra Mariae." The council has played a leading 
part in fostering dances, athletic mass-meetings, 
and engendering a virile university spirit. 



TH E MUSICAL CLUB 

Director — Dr. Roy P. May 

The Musical Club, which includes the Glee Club, 
Orchestra, and Mandolin Club, was organized 
three years ago by its present director, Dr. Roy P. 
May, and is now well established as a regular or- 
ganization. Last year, the club gave ten concerts 
and presented many enjoyable programs over the 
radio. 

The club, meeting once a week for rehearsals, 
gives an excellent opportunity for students to get 
together for two or three hours in something out- 
side of the school routine, to form closer friendships 
and to learn music. The organization is open to all 
students who play instruments, sing, or who are 
willing to learn to sing. 

The club has had a pleasant and successful 
existence in the past, and is looking forward to 
greater success this year. 



21 



MEDICAL ALUMNI ASSOCIATION 

The graduates of the Medical School number 
six thousand, and the Medical Alumni Association 
is making great strides in bringing and keeping 
them in touch with their Alma Mater. 

At present the membership is 1681, a gain over 
the previous year of 283 new members. 

The activities are varied, including Student Aid, 
Central Office, Representatives in every state, and 
Headquarters at various conventions. 

The officers desire every student, especially in 
the Medical School, to avail themselves of the 
facilities of the organization whenever they so 
desire. 

Annual dues are $3.00 and all graduates of the 
Medical School are invited to join. 

Officers 

Frank Keating, M.D., President. 

Vice Presidents: Joseph W. Holland, M.D., 
David E. Hoag, M.D., Henry Kolb, M.D., How- 
ard M. Bubert, M.D. Secretary; Nathan Winslow, 
M.D., Assistant Secretary; M. Leroy Lumpkin, 
Treasurer; Charles W. Maxon, M.D., Chairman 
Executive Committee. 

CASHING CHECKS 

Checks may be cashed at Cashier's office, in 
the Medical Building. Hours: 9 A.M. to 1 P.M.; 
3 P.M. to 5 P.M. 



22 



FRAT ERNITIES 

All fraternities and student organizations must, 
on or before November 1, in each year, register 
with the Registrar, Secretary of the Committee 
on Student Affairs, giving th^ name of the organ- 
ization, the school or schools from which its mem- 
bership is drawn, the date of organization, whether 
local in character or a chapter of a national body, 
the names of its local officers, a roster of its mem- 
bership, and the location cf its house or place of 
meeting. 

Law 

Delta Tneta Phi Gamma Eta Gamma 

Alpha Kappa Sigma 

Dental 

Alpha Omega, 1320 St. Paul street. 
Alpha Zeta Gamma, 1716 Eutaw Place. 
Psi Omega, 1111 St. Paul street. 
*Xi Psi Phi 

Medical 

Chi Xeta Chi Lambda Phi Mu 

Nu Sigma Nu. 116 E. Preston street. 

Phi Beta Pi, 817 St. Paul street. 

Phi Delta Epsilon, 1503 Eutaw Place. 

Phi Chi Phi Lambda Kappa 

General 

Iota Lambda Phi Alpha, 2225 Eutaw Place 

Tau Epsilon Phi Theta Nu Epsilon 

Pharmacy 

Kappa Psi Phi Delta Chi 

Alpha Zeta Omega 



23 



COLLEGE PARK 
DEPARTMENTS 

YOUNG MEN'S CHRISTIAN 
ASSOCIATION 



The Young Men's Christian Association at the 
University of Maryland operates independently of 
the other organizations. It is formed to aid per- 
sons in leading a Christian life and its purpose is 
as follows: 

1. To lead students to faith in God through 

Jesus Christ. 

2. To lead students into membership and ser- 

vice in the Christian Church. 

3. To promote their growth in Christian faith 

and character, especially through the study 
of the Bible. 

4. To challenge students to devote themselves 

in united effort with all Christians to 
making the Will of God effective in human 
society and to extending the Kingdom of 
God throughout the world. 

In the past, the "Y" has had its support from the 
Board of Managers of the Y. M. C. A., but now 
the Board is discontinued and in its place is sub- 
stituted the Supervisory Committee on Student 
Religious Activities. The Committee does not 
function solely with the "Y" as the Board formerly 
did, but instead,Jt extends a helping hand to campus 
religious organizations that desire its need. Through 
this committee, the "Y" shall look for its aid 
indirectly. 

The officers of this Committee are as follows: 

Dr. W. B. Kemp, Chairman. 

Dr. A. E. Zucker. 

Dr. H. J. Patterson. 

Dean A. Stamp. 

M. W. Grafflin. 

24 



Student Officers 

President Robert Simmons. . . . 

Vice-president W. G. McNeil 

Secretary Henry S. Whiteford. 

Treasurer Wm. Lamar . 



The Young Men's Christian Association was re- 
organized in the spring of 1924 to meet the demand 
felt by many students for a men's organization 
which would be able to assume the leadership for 
the religious life of all students. Programs are be- 
ing planned and carried in response to what ever 
needs arise. 

The Discussion Group this past year reached 
several hundred students, and the Freshman Con- 
ference at Camp Conoy was a effectual introduc- 
tion into college life of those who attended. This 
forth coming year the "Y" will present prominent 
speakers on its program as it has done in the past. 
The social side is to be stressed more than pre- 
viously. Likewise we plan to work with and to 
cooperate with the "Y.W." 

President Simmons has choosen his cabinet as 
follows: 

Finance T. A. Hughes 

Y. M. Cooperation Wm. Lucas 

Conferences F. Witter 

Socials A. Hamilton 

Librarian H. Hoops 

Business Manager Hand Book. ...... Wm. Lamar 

Editor Hand Book Henry S. Whiteford 

On Sunday evening the Y. M. and the Y. W. 
jointly as a unit, form a group known as the Dis- 
cussion Group. It was formed for the purpose of 
discussing the way of living here at the University, 
and if possible, how to better it. The best Christian 
interpretations are sought. All are invited to attend 
and to give his opinion upon the questions at issue. 

25 



The "Y" during the past year lias attended 
various conferences but theoutstanding and most 
prominent ones were held at Western Maryland, 
Hood, and Camp Conoy. It is at these conferences 
that the important and current issues are discussed. 

The Y. M. C. A. holds a delightful Christmas 
Party and Entertainment each year. Likewise, 
the members of both the Y. M. and the Y, W. 
jointly give a pretty and appropriate as well as an 
instructive pageant each spring. 

In conclusion, the "Y" extends its greetings of 
good fellowship to the students of this institu- 
tion and invites you to join them in helping one 
another to lead a better Christian life. 



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27 



REGULATION OF STUDENT ACTIVITIES 

The association of stuaents in organized bodies, 
for the purpose of carrying on voluntary student 
activities in orderly and productive ways, is re- 
cognized and encouraged. All organized student 
activities, except those which are controlled by a 
special board or faculty committee, are under the 
supervision of the Committee on Student Affairs, 
subject to the approval of the President. Such 
organizations are formed only with the consent of 
the Committee on Student Affairs and the approval 
of the President. Without such consent and ap- 
proval no student organization which in any way 
represents the University before the public, or 
which purports to be a University organization 
or organization of University students, may use 
the name of the University in connection with its 
own name, or in connection with its members as 
students. 



Eligibility to Represent the University 

Only students in good standing are eligible to 
represent the University in extra-curricular con- 
tests. No student while on probation may re- 
present the University in such events as athletic 
contests, glee club concerts, dramatic performances 
and debates. 

Discipline 

In the government of the University, the Presi- 
dent and faculty rely chiefly upon the sense of 
responsibility of the students. The student who 
pursues his studies diligently, attends classes 
regularly, lives honorably and maintains good be- 
havior meets this responsibility. In the interest 
of the general welfare of the University, those who 
fail to maintain these standards are eliminated. 
Students are under the direct supervision of the 
University only when on the campus, but they are 
responsible to the University for their conduct 
wherever they may be. 

28 



Student Government 

The General Students' Assembly is composed of 
all the students and is the instrument for student 
government. It operates under a constitution. 
Its officers are a President, Vice-President, Sec- 
retary, Treasurer and an Executive Council rep- 
resentative of the various college classes. 

The Students' Assembly meets every second 
Wednesday at 11.20 o'clock in the Auditorium for 
the transaction of business which concerns the 
whole student body. On alternate Wednesdays a 
program is arranged by the officers with the aid of 
the Department of Public Speaking. The Students' 
Executive Council, with the aid of the Committee 
on Student Affairs, acting as an advisory board to 
the Council, performs the executive duties incident 
to managing student affairs. 

Women Students' Government Association 

Women Students' Government Association is an 
organization composed of all the women students, 
for the management of all affairs concerning the 
women students. It operates under a constitution. 
Its officers are a President, Vice-President, Secretary 
and an Executive Council. Its Executive Council 
has the advisory co-operation of the Dean of 
Women. 



29 



FRESHMAN PROCEDURE 

The registration of freshmen will take place 
Monday, September 19, beginning at 9 A.M. All 
freshmen are expected to register on this day. 
Wednesday, September 21, is reserved for register- 
ing the students of the three upper classes, and 
freshmen will not be registered on this day. 

Dormitories will be ready for occupancy by 
reshmen Sunday, September 18, and the dining 
hall will be ready to serve dinner to freshmen 
Sunday evening at 5:30. 

A special program is planned covering the time 
between registration day, September 19, and the 
beginning of the instruction period Thursday, 
September 22, the object of which is to complete 
the organization of Freshmen so that they may be- 
gin their regular work promptly and eflFectivcly on 
Thursday,, September 22. This program includes 
classification of all freshmen students. Medical 
examination begins on Friday, 16; psychological 
examinations, Wednesday, 21, also, Instruction in 
regard to the departmental and campus facilities and 
advisory conferences is conducted by the faculties of 
the several colleges for the students registered in 
those colleges. 



30 



ACADEMIC REGULATIONS 
Registration 

1. Students should report to the Dean of the 
College, in which they aie registered, where they 
will receive a course card. New students must 
present a matriculation card. If this card has not 
been received by mail, arrangements for its is- 
suance must be made in the Office of the Regis- 
trar, prior to reporting to the Dean. 

2. The course card, properly made out and 
approved by the Dean, and a registration card ob- 
tained in the Office of the Registrar, will be pre- 
sented at Window One in the Office of the Regis- 
trar and a bill for the semester's expenses will be 
issued. 

3. This bill, together with the course card, will 
be taken to the Cashier's Office, where fees are 
paid and where the Cashier certifies upon the course 
card that payment has been made. 

4. The course card is then taken to the Sec- 
tioning Committee, Room T-211, Agricultural 
Building, where section assignments are made. 

5. About three hours later the student may 
obtain class cards in the Office of the Registrar, 
Window Two. 

6. The student places his name, his college, 
and the date on the class cards and presents at 
the first meeting of each class the appropriate 
class card. Students are not admitted to classes 
without class cards. Instructors wilUsee that this 
rule is enforced. 

7. Within seven days after the opening of the 
semester, each student must file in the Office of 
the Registrar, a schedule of his classes. A fee of 
one dollar is imposed for failure to do this. 

8. Students, who for adequate reasons, are 
more than ten days late in registering must secure 
permission for entrance into courses from the in- 
structors in charge of the courses. Such permission 
if given, must be indicated on the course card. A 

31 



fee of from $3.00 to $9.00 is imposed for late 
registration. 

9. Any change of course is made only on writ- 
ten permission from the Dean involved and is 
subject to a fee of one dollar after the first week of 
the semester. After securing such permission from 
the Dean, the student must present the same to 
the Registrar at once, who, in turn, issues the stud- 
ent a class card for the course he is entering and 
withdrawal card is sent to the instructor in charge 
of the course from" which the student is with- 
drawing. Unless this is done, no credit will be 

given for the new course, and a failure will be re- 
corded for the course dropped. In general, with- 
drawals from courses other than elective, will not 
be granted after the first six weeks of the course. 

10. A student who desires to transfer from one 
college to another must petition the Dean of the 
college from which he wishes to withdraw on the 
regular form obtained from the Registrar. The 
transfer is effected when the blank properly ap- 
proved is filed in the Office of the Registrar. 

Examinations and Marks 

11. Examinations at the end of each semester 
complete the studies pursued to that point. 

12. The following grade symbols are used: 
A, B, C, and £>— Passing. 

E — Con(3ition. 

F — Failure. 

/ — Incomplete. 

13. Grade A denotes superior scholarship; 
grade B, good scholarship; grade C, fair scholarship; 
and grade D, poor but passing scholarship. 

14. A student who receives the grade of D in 
more than one-fourth of the credits required for 

32 



graduation must take additional courses or repeat 
courses until he has the required number of credits 
for a degree, three-fourths of which carry a grade 
above D. 

15. A student with a mark of E is conditioned. 
The grade Vindicates that though a student hasnot 
failed in a course, he has not presentea sufficient 
evidence to pass; in the opinion of the instructor 
his record in the course has been sufficiently good 
to justify the presumption that he may secure a 
passing grade by re-examination or by additional 
work without repeating the course. The grade E 
cannot be raised to a higher grade than D. 

16. A student with a mark of F has failed in 
the course. In case of failure in a required 
course a student must repeat the course. He is re- 
quired to enroll in that subject again the first time 
it is offered, if possible. 

17. In case a condition or failure is incurred in 
an elective subject the student may be permitted 
to substitute only upon recommendation of the 
head of the Department in which the student is 
majoring and approval of the student's Dean. 

18. The mark of / (incomplete) is given only to 
those students who have a proper excuse for not 
completing all the requirements of a course. The 
mark of I is not used to signify work of inferior 
quality. In cases where this grade is given, the 
students must complete the work assigned by the 
instructor by the end of the first semester in which 
that subject is again offered, or the mark be- 
comes F. 

19. Work of grade "D", or of any passing 
grade, cannot be raised to a higher grade except 
by repeating the course. A student who repeats 
a course for which he has received credit for work 
done at the University or elsewhere, must meet 
all the requirements of the course, including 
regular attendance, laboratory work and exam- 
inations. His final grade will be substituted for 
the grade already recorded, but he will not re- 
ceive any additional credit for the course. 

33 



20. A student must arrange with his instructors 
at tRe beginning of a semester for the removal of 
conditions received in the previous semester. A 
fee of $1.00 will be charged for each regular con- 
dition examination. No instructor will give a con- 
dition examination until a student presents a 
receipt showing the fee has been paid. Following 
each condition examination the instructor will re- 
port the results to the Registrar. 

21. A condition not removed within the suc- 
ceeding semester becomes a failure. 

22. A student transferring to another college 
will consult with his new Dean regarding the ad- 
justment of his record. A record of this adjust- 
ment must be filed in the Registrar's Office. 

Absences 

23. A student is expected to attend punctually 
each class and laboratory exercise in each course. 

24. In case of extended illness which prevents 
the attendance of a student at his classes he should 
promptly notify his Dean. 

25. In case of absence 24 hours before or after 
a holiday, a student will be penalized by the pay- 
ment of a specia4 fee of three dollars for each 
course cut. Instructors will report such absences 
immediately to the office of the Registrar. 

Probations and Delinquencies 

2G. If a student receives a mark of failure (F) 
in fifty per cent or more of the semester hours for 
which he is registered he is automatically dropped 
from the rolls of the University. 

27. A student who does not make a passing 
mark in at least eight hours of work in which he is 
enrolled for a given semester, nay not continue 
for the next semester without the permission of his 
Dean. Where such permission is given the student 
is on probation, and remains on probation until his 
deficiencies are removed. A notice of his probation- 
ary status will be mailed to the student's parent 
or guardian. 

34 



28. A student while on probation shall not re- 
present the University in any extra-curricular 
activity such as: participation in athletic contests, 
the Glee Club, dramatics, debating teams, etc. 

29. While on probation a student is required to 
report weekly to his Dean or faculty advisor with 
regard to his probationary status. 

30. The Dean shall recommend to the President, 
the withdrawal of any student who, in the opinion 
of his college faculty, is deemed undesirable, or who 
continues to do unsatisfactory work. 

31. Any student who has been dropped from the 
University or has withdrawn in order to avoid 
being dropped, and who is subsequently re-admit- 
ted, is not eligible to represent the University on 
any team, club, or association, until he has been 
in the University for a period of one semester from 
the date of his return and has satisfied the regular 
conditions of eligibility. 

Withdrawal from the University 

32. A student who desires to withdraw from the 
University must obtain the permission of his Dean 
on the regular form obtained from the Registrar 
ana must have filled out a clearance slip. After these 
forms have been filledout they must be filed in the 
Office of the Registrar. A student who withdraws 
without following this procedure forfeits all claims 
for reimbursements, and is not entitled to a state- 
ment of honorable dissmissal. 



35 



TRADITIONS 

In the realization that the incoming freshmen 
do not understand the traditions established by 
previous classes, it is the purpose of these rules to 
assist the freshmen in finding his place among the 
students, to instruct him in the spirit of the student 
body, and to teach him a fundamental lesson — 
discipline. 

Freshmen are required to strictly abide by the 
following rules, which will be enforced by the 
student Isody through the Sophomore class: 
Freshman Regulations 

The following is taken from the Constitution of 
the Student Assembly: 

"Article V, Freshman Regulations. Section II. 
These Regulations shall be enforced by the entire 
Student Body through the Sophomore Committee 
on Freshmen Regulations, i. e., penalties imposed 
by the Committee upon the complaint by an upper 
classman of an infraction of the Freshman Regu- 
lations." Any Freshman who feels that he has 
been imposed upon by upper classmen shall 
have the opportunity to appeal to the Sophomore 
Committee on Freshman Regulations. 

1. Freshmen must wear rat caps and name 
tags at all times when on campus. Name tags are 
to be worn up to the Thanksgiving holidays. 

2. Freshmen must not smoke on the campus. 

3. Freshmen must keep- hands out of their 
pockets. 

4. Freshmen must not cut across campus and 
must use only cinder and cement paths. 

5. Freshmen must refrain from wearing school 
insignia of any kind unless earned at this school. 

6. Freshmen must enter and leave Agricul- 
tural Building by basement doors and must not 
loiter around front of the buildir^s. 

7. Freshmen must not sit on stone wall along 
Washington-Baltimore Boulevard. 

8. Freshmen must speak cheerfully to all 

36 



members of the faculty, upper classmen, and mem- 
bers of their own class. The form of address shall 
be: for one person, "Sir"; for a number, "Gentle- 
men." 

9. Freshmen must run all errands assigned to 
them by upper classmen and do all work assigned 
to them by Sophomore Committee on Freshmen 
Regulations. 

10. Freshmen must work on athletic fields 
when requested. 

11. Freshmen must attend all meetings, of 
the assembly (occupying front rows) and all 
cheer practices, and must learn all college yells 
and songs. 

12. Freshmen must attend all games in a com- 
p act cheering section (no dates with girls at games). 

13. Freshmen must work in Diamondback 
office each Tuesday throughout the year. 

14. Freshmen must at all times carry an ample 
supply of matches. 

15. Freshmen must conduct themselves in a 
gentleman-like manner at all times on and around 
the campus. 

Dining Hall Courtesies 

1. Freshmen must line up in twos on lower 
steps of dining hall. 

2. Freshmen must not sit at the heads of the 
tables unless authorized to do so by an upper 
classman. 

3. Freshmen must fold their arms during an- 
nouncements. 



37 



INFIRMARY RULES 

1. All students paying the fixed University 
charges, who report at the Infirmary shall be 
given medical attention, infirmary services and 
medicine, except for special conditions, such as 
major operations, eye, ear, nose work, etc. 

2. Students residing on the campus, when too 
sick to report at the Infirmary in person, will be 
given treatment in their rooms, by the University 
Physician. Except in emergencies, such cases of 
illness should be reported at the usual hours at 
the Infirmary. 

3. Students residing in fraternity, sorority, or 
boarding houses, adjacent to and approved by the 
University, will be treated by the University Phy- 
sician the same as students living on the campus. 

When practicable, sickness should be reported 
before 9 A. M., to the University Physician (Phone 
Berwyn 68), or the Infirmary (Berwyn 85M). 

4. Students living at home, with relatives or 
guardians shall not be entitled to medical attention 
in their homes unless injured in some form of 
University activity. 

5. Students residing in fraternity, sorority or 
boarding houses may, upon order of the Univer- 
sity Physician, be cared for in the Infirmary. Such 
students shall pay the University an extra charge 
of $1.00 per day to cover cost of food and service 
from the Dining Hall. 

6. The University Physician will give medical 
supervision and treatment to employees (but not 
their families) of the University who work in the 
kitchen, dining hall, dormotories and dairy. 

7. Members of the faculty, clerical force, and 
students not paying fixed charges shall not be entitled 
to free treatment or medical attention by the 
University Physician or nurse, or to have the use 
the Infirmary. 




ADELA H. STAMP 
Dean of Women 



GREETINGS FROM DEAN OF WOMEN 

To those of you who have returned to carry on 
work already begun and to those new students, 
coming here for the first time, greetings and a 
hearty and cordial welcome. Friendship, sym- 
pathy and understanding await you here. An 
opportunity awaits you to serve your college com- 
munity. For, the one who lives most fully during 
her f»ur years in college takes part in the various 
activities on the campus. However, you must 
have a sense of values and choose wisely from the 
great number of organizations. Do not rush head- 
long into too many. Do a few things well, rather 
than many in a haphazard fashion. We offer to 
you our ideals of Maryland, our traditions and 
customs, and ask you to help us to perpetuate 

them. 

Sincerely yours, 

ADELE H. STAMP, 

Dean of Women. 



40 



THE YOUNG WOMEN'S CHRISTIAN 
ASSOCIATION 

Oflficers 

President, Geneva Reich 
Secretary, Nona Miliner 

The Y. W. C. A. was organized in 1924 for 
the purpose of meeting the need for an all- 
campus religious organization among the women 
students which would correlate and coordinate all 
the religious activities for the women of the Uni- 
versity. In cooperation with the Y. M. C. A, the 
y. W. C. A. assumes a major responsibility for 
the religious activities of the campus. This is a 
difficult task, but one that is so worthwhile that 
the Y. W. C. A. calls upon every girl upon the 
campus who wishes to help others build high 
Christian character, to join with them in carrying 
out their program. 

The religious program for this year will center 
in the Sunday Evening Vesper Service undei the 
joint auspices of the Y. M. C. A. and Y. W. C. A. 
The discussions are held at 6.30 P. M. every Sun- 
day in the University auditorium. Mrs. H. J. 
Patterson will also conduct a Bible Study group 
every Sunday at 10.00 A. M. in the College Park 
Cnurch, which all students are invited to attend. 



41 



THE WOMEN'S ATHLETIC ASSOCIATION 
Officers 

President, Constance Church 
Secretary, Catherine Barnsley 

The W. A. A. since its organization in the fall 
of 1924, has satisfied a long-felt need for an organ- 
ization for the promotion of organized athletics 
among the women students. 

The Association has been very successful during 
its three years on the campus and has a very bright 
future outlook. During the past year it put iacross 
successfully both fall and spring tennis tourna- 
ments and an inter-class basketball series, and 
established interest in track practice. The year 
was closed with the second annual banquet of the 
Association, which was arranged for by a special 
committee and had a large attendance. At this 
banquet suitable awards were formally presented 
by the President of the University to the girls and 
teams who had won them during the year. 

No girl may play on a team or take other active 
part in any sport without first joining the W. A. A. 
This rule is for the purpose of keeping up interest 
in the organization and for assuring it of having 
sufficient funds to properly carry on its work. - 



42 



GIRLS' WHO'S WHO— 1927-1928 

Y. W. C. A. 

President — Geneva Reich 

Secretary — Nona Miiiner 
Home Economics Club 

President — Margaret McMinimy 

Secretarj- — Anne Mathews 
Girl's Rifle Team 

Captain — Mary Jane McCurdy 

Manager — Frances Gruver 
Women's Student Government 

President — Frances Freeny 

Secretary — Anna Price 
Women's Athletic Association 

President — Constance Church 

Secretary — Catherine Barnsley 

SORORITIES 
National 

Alpha Omricon Pi — Established in 1924 
Local 

Sigma Delta — Est ablished in 1920 

Kappa Xi — Establish ed in 1924 

Alpha Upsilon Chi — Established in 1926 

GIRL'S WHO WON "M's" 

A. Essex M. Heiss 

A. Krider M. J. McCurdy 

As Peters M. S. York 



43 



Constitution and By-Laws 

OF THE 

WOMEN STUDENTS' GOVERNMENT 

ASSOCIATION 

of The University of Maryland 



CONSTITUTION 
Article I — Name 

The name of this organization shall be the 
Women Students' Government Association of the 
University of Maryland. 

Article II— Object 

The purposes of this association shall be: 

1. To maintain an effective student self- 
government. 

2. To increase in the student body a sense of 
responsibility. 

3. To promote cooperation between the students, 
the President and Faculty of the University. 

4. To attain a high standard of scholarship and 
living. 

Article III — Membership 
Section 1. All women registered as students in 
the University shall be members of this Associa- 
tion; but only those residing in the dormitories, 
or in houses under the supervision of the Uni- 
versity, shall have a vote on matters pertaining to 
dormitory life. 

Section 2. A quorum shall consist of a majority 
of the members of the Association living on the 
campus. 

Article IV— Officers 
Section 1. The officers of this Association shall 
be a President and Vice-President, elected from 
the incoming Senior Class, and a Secretary, elected 
from the incoming Junior Class. 

44 



Section 2. Qualifications, 

(a) The President must have served on, the 
Student Council one year. 

(b) All officers of the Association shall be with- 
out conditions or failures at time of election. 

(c) No girl shall hold office in the Association 
who has not been a student in the University at 
least two years previous to her election. 

Note — As the election of officers is held in the spring 
this rule may be interpreted to mean any girl 
who is about to complete, or has completed, 
two years of college work in this University. 

Section 3. Duties of officers. 

(a) The President of the Association shall call 
and preside over all meetings of the Association 
and perform the general duties of an executive. 
She shall also act as President of the Student Coun- 
cil. 

(b) The Vice-President of the Association shall 
assume the duties of the President in her absence. 

(c) The Secretary shall post notices of meetings, 
keep a record of the minutes of all meetings, and 
conduct the correspondence of the Association. 
She shall also keep an up-to-date record of the 
points credited to each girl in the Association. 

Article V — Executive Council 

Section 1. Members. 

The Executive Council shall consist of: 

The President of the Association. 

The House President. of each of the dormitories 
and of each ol the Houses under the supervision 
of the University. 

A Representative from each of the Senior, Junior. 
Sophomore, and Freshman classes. 

One Day Student who shall have no vote ex- 
cept on matters concerning day students. 



45 



Section 2. Qualifications and Collegiate Stand- 
ing of Members: 

(a? The House President must be a Junior or 
Senior. 

(b) The Class Representative must reside in one 
of the dormitories or in a house under the super- 
vision of the University. 

(c) The Day Student shall be a Junior or Senior. 
{d) All members of the Council shall be without 

conditions or failures at time of election. 

Section 3. Officers: 

The President of the Association shall act as 
President of the Council, but shall have no vote 
except in case of a tie. 

A Secretary who shall keep a record of the min- 
utes of all meetings of the Council, shall be elected 
from its upper classmen members. 

Section 4. Duties of the Council: 

(a) To act as an Advisory Board to the Presi- 
dent of the Association. 

(b) To enforce all rules of the Association. 

(c) To fix and enforce penalties for violations of 
rules of the Association. All major penalties must 
be approved by the Dean of Women. 

(d) To remove from office at any time House 
Presidents who are inefficient in the performance 
of their duties. 

(e) To make decision and act in all matters not 
provided for in this constitution. 

Article VI— Election 

Section 1. Officers of the Association. 

Nominations for the officers of this Association 
shall be made from the floor in the meeting pre- 
vious to the Spring Meeting. With the notice for 
the Spring Meeting shall be posted the names of 
these candidates. This list oi candidates must be 

46 



approved by the Dean of Women and the Presi- 
dent of the University. 

The election of officers shall be by secret b&llot; 
a majority of votes cast by those present, who must 
constitute a quorum, shall be necessary to elect. 
In the event no candidate receives a majority on 
first ballot, there shall be a second casting of votes, 
and all except the two highest shall be eliminated 
before voting a second time. 

Section 2. Class Representatives: 

Each of the Senior, Junior and Sophomore classes 
shall elect its representative to the Executive 
Council by secret ballot during the last week in 
May. This meeting for election shall be called by 
the acting representative of each class. 

The Freshman representative shall be elected at 
the beginning of the fall term. 

Section 3. House Presidents: 

The House Presidents shall be elected at the 
close of the fall meeting of the Association at the 
beginning of the school year. 

Section 4, Day Student Representative to 
Council: 

The Day Student representative shall be elected 
at the beginning of the fall term. 



Article VII — Meetings 

Section 1. Women Students' Government As- 
sociation: 

There shall be at least three meetings a year of 
the Women Students' Government Association, 
the meetings to be held as follows: — 

(a) A fall meeting to be held during the first 
month of school at which time the president of the 
Association will explain to the new women students 
the ideals and functions of the Women Students 
Government, including the Honor System. 

47 



(b) A meeting to be held at least one week in 
advance of the Spring Meeting for the purpose of 
making nominations. 

(c) A Spring Meeting for annual election of 
officers of the Association to be held the third 
Monday in May. 

A special meeting of the Association may be 
called at any time bythe Presidentor at the written 
request of twenty-five members of the Association. 

Section 2. Executive Council: 

The Council shall meet regularly on the first 
Monday of every month. Additional meetings may 
be called at any time by the president. 

Article VIII— Honor System 

The Women Students' Government Association 
upholds the Honor System. Any infringement of 
the Honor System by a member of the Association 
is punishable by the Executive Council. 

Article IX — Amendments 

This Constitution may be amended by a two- 
thirds vote of the Council and a ratification by a 
two-thirds vote at a general meeting of the As- 
sociation. 



BY-LAWS 
Social Regulations 

I. LATE LEAVES 

The attendance at any function which does not 
permit a girl to return to her dormitory by 7.30 
P. M. before April 15, or by 8.00 P. M. after 
April 15, with the exceptions noted below, shall be 
considered a late leave. After a late leave a girl 
must return by 12.45 A. M. to her dormitory. 

48 



Late leaves per year shall be: Freshmen 1 per 
month; Sophomores 2 per month; Juniors 3 per 
month; Seniors 4 per month. Seniors without con- 
ditions or failures may take late leaves at their 
discretion after April 1, provided they sign as 
usual. Seniors graduating in February and having 
no conditions or failures may take late leaves at 
their discretion after January 14, provided they 
sign up as usual. Freshmen and Sophomores may 
borrow and carry over their lale leaves provided 
they do not exceed 2 a month for Freshmen and 
3 a month for Sophomores. 

All University functions may be attended with- 
out late leaves. This includes traternity dances 
held in the Park during the week-ends and school 
dances held off the campus; it does not include fra- 
ternity dances held during the week. 

No week-ends spent away from the campus shall 
count as late leaves. 

11. DANCES 

Girls must return to their dormitories immed- 
iately after the close of all dances in the gym- 
nasium: and at 12.45 from dances held in fraternity 
houses and elsewhere. 

The chaperons for University dances, fraternity 
dances, and sorority dances must be approved by 
the Dean of Women. No student in the dormitories 
may attend a non-college dance unless the chaper- 
ons have been approved by the Dean of Women. 

III. FRATERNITY HOUSES 
Girls may not go unchaperoned to fraternity 
houses. 

House Regulations 

I. HOUSE PRESIDENT 
The duties of the House President shall be: 
(a) To call and preside over house meetings. 
These shall be called at her own discretion or at 
the written request of any five residents of her 
house. 

49 



(b) To be responsible for the general conduct 
and welfare of her house in cooperation with the 
faculty member residing in her house. 

(c) To act as hostess of her house 

(d) To check up all girls at 10.30 and see that 
lights are out. 

{e) To see that quiet is preserved during study 
hours. 

(/) To grant light cuts and to keep record of 
those taken by each girl. 

is) To keep a record of the late leaves taken by 
each girl as shown by the late leave slips turned 
over each week to the House President by the 
matron or chaperon. 

(A) To grant special minor permissions to house 
residents, such as going to Joe's after study hours 
begin. 

(j) To appoint a girl to act in her place when she 
is absent. 

0") To authorize the payment of bills contracted 
by her house. 

(k) To present to the Executive Council any 
changes in House Rules desired by her house. 

II 

Girls shall be in their respective houses at 7.30 
P. M. until April 15, at which time they shall be 
in their houses by 8.00 P. M., except on Friday 
Saturday, and Sunday nights, and evenings before 
and of holidavs, when they shall be in by 10.30 
P. M. 

III. QUIET HOURS 

Quiet hours shall be observed: 

Until 12.00 noon and from 1.00 to 4.30 daily ex- 
cept Saturday and Sunday. 

At night from 7.30 P. M. on, with intermission 
from 10.00 to 10.30, except on Friday, Saturday, 
and Sunday nights, when houses must be quiet 
after 11.00 P. M. 

There shall be no bathing after 10.30 P. M. 

50 



IV. MUSICAL INSTRUMENTS AND TYPE- 
WRITERS 

Musical instruments may not be played during 
quiet hours. 

Typewriters shall come under the same ruling 
as musical instruments, as regards their operation, 
unless they are kept in a room provided for them 
in which room they shall be so far removed that 
they disturb no one. 

V. LIGHTS 

Lights must be out by 10.30 P. M., except on 
Friday, Saturday, and Sunday nights, and nights 
before and of holidays, when they must be out by 
ILOO P. M. 

Light cuts shall be allowed as follows: Freshmen 
3; Sophomores 3; Juniors 4; Seniors 5, per month. 
These light cuts must be taken in the living room 
or in some other room other than a sleeping room, 
unless both roommates are taking- a light cut, in 
which case each girl shall be credited with a cut 
and the girls may remain in their room. 

VI. ROOMS 

All rooms must be orderly by 8.00 A. M. 
VII. REGISTRATION 

Any girl leaving College Park at any time shall 
register her destination at her dormitory. 

Girls leaving their dormitory for meetings, 
library, social functions, etc., shall register des- 
tination at their respective dormitories. 

VIII. GUESTS 

Permission must be secured from the owner of 
the room for its use and from the house chaperon 
one week in advance. There shall be a charge of 
one dollar a person a night. 

51 



IX. CALLERS 

Girls may have men callers at the dormitories 
after dinner until 7.30 on Monday, Tuesday, 
Wednesday and Thursday nights; on Saturday 
and Sunday afternoons, and on Friday, Saturday 
and Sunday evenings until 10.30 P. M. 



Point System 

The purpose of the Point System is to prevent a 
few girls from being overworked and to encourage 

and make it possible for more girls to share in 
campus activities. 

Maximum: 25 points per year. 

Major 

1. President Student Government Ass'n . . 18 

2. President Y. W. C. A -. 18 

3. House President 15 

4. Secretary of Grange 15 

5. President of W. A. A 15 

6. Manager Rifle Team 15 

7. Manager Basketball. .. 12 

8. Secretary Y. W. C. A 10 

9 . Treasurer of Grange 10 

10. Inter-collegiate Debater 10 

11. President of Opera Club 10 

12. Captain Rifle Team 10 

13. Treasurer Y. W. C. A 10 

14. President Home Economics Club 10 

Minor 

1. Class Representative to Student Council 8 

2. Day Student Representative 8 

3. Manager of Track 8 

4. Manager of Tennis 8 

5. Secretary-Treasurer of Opera Club . . ... 8 

6. President Latin-America Club 8 

7. President French Club 8 

8. Secretary Student Assembly. . 8 

9. Secretary W. A. A 8 

52 



10. Treasurer W. A. A 8 

H . Captain Basketball 6 

12. Secretary of Literary Society 5 

13. Secretary Dramatic Club 5 

14. Treasurer Dramatic Club 5 

15. Secretary-Treas. Home Economics Club. 5 

16. Treasurer Literary Society 5 

17. Secretary Student Gov't Ass'n 5 

18. Vice President Y. W. C. A 5 

19. Cabinet Member Y. W. C. A 5 

20. Program Com. Literary Society 5 

21. Freshmen Reporter "Diamondback". .. . 5 

22. Sophomore Reporter "Diamondback". . . 5 

23. Staff of Diamondback" 5 

24. Organization Reporter 5 

25. Secretary of Class 5 

26. Ass't Sec-Treas. of Opera Club 5 

27. Secretary Latin-American Club 5 

28. Treasurer Latin-American Club 5 

29. Secretary French Club 5 

30. Treasurer French Club 5 

31 . Vice Pres. Student Gov't Ass'n 3 

32. President of Bible Class 3 

33. Lady Ass't Lecturer of Grange 3 

34. Recording Sec'y of Episcopal Club 3 

35. Cor. Sec'y Episcopal Club 3 

36. Vice President of Opera Club 3 

37 . Secretary-Treasurer of Bible Class 2 

38. President Young People's Union 2 

39. Sec-Treas. Young People's Union 2 

40. Vice President Literary Society 2 

41. Vice President Home Economics Club. . 2 

42. Vice President Bible Class 2 

43. Vice Pres. Young People's Union 2 

44. Vice President of Class 2 

45. Member Ex. Com. on Bible Class 2 

46. Vice President of W. A. A 2 

47. Vice President of Episcopal Club 2 

48. Vice Pres. Latin American Club 2 

49. Vice President French Club 2 



53 



STUDENT PUBLICATIONS 

Each undergraduate student of the University 
of Maryland is required to pay seven ($7.00) for 
the student publications. Two dollars of this 
amount is for a subscription to the Diamondback, 
published weekly (on Tuesday). The remaining 
five dollars is for The Reveille, the year book for 
College Park Students, issued about June 1. The 
entire seven dollars is due on the day of registra- 
tion and should be paid to the Business Manager 
of The Reveille, or his representative. 

The major officers of the two publications, are 
as follows: 

The Reveille 

Editor-in-Chief Herbert Budlong 

Girls' Editor Edith Burnside 

Business Manager Philip Insley 

Faculty Advisor Wm. H. Hottel 

The Diamondback 

Editor-in-Chief Raymond Carrington 

News Editor John E. Schueler 

Girls' Editor Mary Jane McCurdy 

Business Manager Ross Black 

Faculty Advisor .' . Wm. H. Hottel 

Those who are interested in publications should 
get in touch with one of the members of the staff 
on which he would like to work. Freshmen and 
Sophomores are especrally urged to become affil- 
iated with one of the publications. Only students 
having one year's experience on a publication are 
eligible for nomination to a major office on either 
publication. 

54 



MUSICAL ORGANIZATIONS 

Four musical organizations are maintained in 
connection with the Department of Music. 

Chorus. Membership in the Chorus is open to 
all students, and to persons residing in the com- 
munity. Oratories and standard part-songs are 
studied. Rehearsals are held weekly. The Chorus 
presents an annual festival of music in May. 

Glee Club. A Glee Club, of limited member- 
ship, is recruited from the best vocal talent among 
the men of the University. Admission is gained 
through tests, or "try-outs," conducted at the be- 
ginning of the school year. The club holds three 
rehearsals a week. Public concerts are given. 

Opera Club. The "Maryland Opera Club" was 
established in 1923 and gave its first performance 
in the spring of 1924. Its object is to foster and 
promote music in connection with dramatic art, and 
to develop and direct musical talent of students in 
the University. One or more public performances 
will be given each year. 

Military Band. This organization, of limited 
membership, is a part of the military organization 
of the University, and is subject to the restrictions 
and discipline of the Department of Military 
Science and Tactics, but the direction of its work 
is under the Department of Music. 



55 



WHO'S WHO 

ATHLETICS 
Football 

Captain— Joe H. (Biff) Bafford 

Manager — Walter Chapman 

Assistant Manager — A. Guertler 
Baseball 

Captain — (Keefe) England 

Manager — Lawrence Bomberger 

Assistant Manager — Wm. Hopkins 
Track 

Captain — Henry (Andy) Matthews 

Manager — Bruce Emerson 

Assistant Manager — Heller 
Lacrosse 

Captain — Wilbur Streett 

Manager — Horace Hampton 

Assistant Manager — (Pee Wee) Blaskiee 
Basketball 

Captain — Fred. (Tiger) Linkous 

Manager — Ted Olds 

Assistant — Whittemore 
Tennis 

Captain — She ton 

Manager — Ellwood R. Nicholas 

Assistant Manager — Norton 
Cheer Leaders 

Senior Leader — Horace Hampton 

Junior Leader — Fred. Linton 

Sophomore Leader — Lawrence Smalhvood 

SENIOR CLASS 

President — Paul Doerr 
\'ice President — Dan. Fahey 
Treasurer — Wm. Press 
Secretary — Francis Freeny 
Histoiian — Ruth Williams. 
Sergeant-at-Arms — Ted Olds 

56 



Executive Council 

Roger Snouffer 
Francis Morris 

Junior Class 
President — Gordon Kessler 
Vice President — Weller Holloway 
Secretary — Rebecca Woodward 
Treasurer — (Empty) Loane 
Historian — Emily Herzog 
Sergeant-at-Arms — Jack Keenan 
Executive Council 

"Gus" (Omar) Crothers 
Olyure Hammack 

SOPHOMORE CLASS 

President — Wm. Chaffinch 
Vice President — Robert Healy 
Secretary — Margaret Wismer 
Treasurer — Harry Jarvis 
Sergeant-at-Arms — F. Ribnitzkl 
Executive Council 
Lawrence Smallwood 
Catherine Dawson 

STUDENT ASSEMBLY 
President — John Savage 
Vice President — Horace Hampton 
Secretary — Grace Laleger 
. Treasurer— Ted. Olds 
Sergeant-at-Arms — F. Linkous 

INTER -FRATERNITY COUNCIL 

President — J. Franklin Witter 
Vice President — Louis Cairico 
Secretary-Treasurer — J. Allen Matthews 

ORGANIZATIONS 
Y. M. C. A. 

President — Robert Simmons 
Vice President — W. G. McNeil 
Secretary — Henry S. Whiteford 
Treasurer — Wm. Lamar 

57 



£piscopal Club 

President — Fred. Wallet 
Vice President — Harry Cashell 
Secretary — Evelyn Eckert 
Treasurer — Edward Troth 

LITERARY AND DEBATING SOCIETIES 
Poe Literary Society 

President — Reese Sewell 

Vice President — Duncan Clark 

Secretary — Hazel Watson 

New Mercer 

President — Ellwood R. Nicholas 
Vice President— Milly Woolman 
Secretary — Edith Barnside 

Calvert Forum 

President — W. Wylie 
Vice President — C. Hearn 
Secretary-Treasurer-.— D. Clark 

AGRICULTURAL SOCIETIES 
Grange 

Master — Frank Witter 
Overseer — Walttr Chapman 
Stewart — Reese Sewell 
Secretary — Grace Lighter 

Horticulture Club 

President — D. Bonnet 
V'ice President — F. Dodge 
Treasurer — J. Long 

Livestock Club 

President — F. Witter 

Vice President — J. Long 

Secretary — R. Nessler 

Treasurer — M. Ross 

Sophomore Representative — H. Hoops 

58 



CAMPUS ORGANIZATIONS 
Rifle Club 

Captain — Harry Wells 

Manager — J. P. Dale 

Assistant Manager — R. Van Allen 

Rossburg Club 

President — R. Powers 
Vice President— N. Spottswood 
Secretary — J. McMahon 
Treasurer — R. Snouffer 

Glee Club 

President— S. Pollock 
Vice President— B. Stiffler 
Secretary-Treasurer — A. Cook 

Le Cercle Francais 

President — Olyure Hammack 
Vice President — Ed ythe Eckenrode 
Secretary — Barbara Schilling 
Treasurer — Isabel Dynes 

Engineering Society 

President — Edwin Page 
Vice President — Wm. Dynes 
Secretary-Treasurer — Allan Methews 
Sergeant-at-Arms — Mallory Wooster 

Footlight Club 

President — Wm. Lamar 

Vice President — Hazel Watson 

Secretary-Treasurer — Ira Romberger 



WEARERS OF THE "M" 





Football 


Bafford 

Parsons 

Thomas 

♦Crouthers 

Adams 

♦Stevens 

Snyder 


Leatherman 

♦Zulick . 

Wondrack 

Tenney 

Linkous 

Kessler 

Keenan 




Baseball 


England 
Kessler 


Campbell 

Mills 




Track 


Matthews 
Pugh 
Thomas 
Neuman 


Blanz 
ZuHck 
Fahey 
Whiteford, R. S. 




Lacrosse 


Streett 
Boyer 
Cleveland 
De Ran 


Loane 
Davidson 
Linkous 
Holloway 


Harrison 


Basketball 


Linkous 
Stevens 
Faber 


Dean 

Adams 
Boyd 




Cross Country 


Neuman 

Gadd 

Myers 


Whiteford, R. S. 
Hill 

Tennis 


Tingley 
Dyer 
Schofield 
Troth 


McEntee 

Sheton 

Spottswood 



*Made "All Maryland" 



60 



FOOTBALL SCHEDULE 

Sept. 24 — Washington College at College Park. 
Oct. 1 — South Carolina at College Park. 
Oct. 8— North Carolina at Chapel Hill. 
Oct. 15 — Virginia Poly at Norfolk. 
Oct. 22— V. M. I. at Richmond. 
Oct. 29 — Washington and Lee at College Park. 
Nov. 5 — Ya le at New Haven. 
Nov. 12 — Virginia at Charlottesville. 
Nov. 19 — Vanderbilt at Nashville. 
Nov. 24 — Johns Hopkins at Baltimore. 



FOOTBALL RECORD 1926-1927 

■ U of M Oppon. 

Washington College 63 

South Carolina 12 

Chicago 21 

V. P. 1 8 24 

North Carolina 14 6 

Gallaudet 38 7 

Yale 15 

Virginia 6 6 

Washington and Lee 3 

Johns Hopkins 17 14 

Totals 161 93 



61 






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t^ t^ t^ X 00 lO o IC iC IC O O •-0 :0 O lO 



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re nS n! rt.l:^^ q ~ ^ gQ i-»- ^^ 



6 6oo6 oSS 3.£f-^ > 2-- 



62 



SONGS AND YELLS 

ALMA MATER 

(Marylandl My Maryland)] 

Thy sons and daughters throng thy door, 

Maryland! My Maryland! 
They come from mountain, farm and shore, 

Maryland! oh Maryland! 
Their hearts and hopes they bring to thee, 
And place them in thy custody. 
Proud hearts that pledge their love for thee: 

Maryland University! 

Go forth, brave youth, throughout the State: 

Maryland! My Maryland! 
And by your actions, show her great: 

Maryland Our Maryland! 
Thy Alma Mater's name and fame. 
Oh keep alive her holy flame. 
Until all hearts as one exclaim, 

Maryland! My Maryland! 

Cheer, three times cheer, and one cheer more 

For Maryland! Dear Maryland! 
Send forth that cry from hill to shore: — 

Maryland University! 
Fair Mother of our brightest dreams, 
Blest giver of life's precious things, 
To thee each heart its service brings: — 

Maryland! My Maryland! 



63 



MY MARYLAND 

The despot's heel is on thy shore, 
Maryland, My Maryland! 

His torch is at thy temple door, 
Maryland, My Maryland! 

Avenge the patriotic gore. 

That flecked the streets of Baltimore, 

And be the battle queen of yore, 
Maryland, My Maryland! 

Thou wilt not cower in the dust, 

Maryland, My Maryland! 
Thy gleaming sword shall never rust, 

Maryland, My Maryland! 

Remember Carroll's sacred trust, 

Remember Howard's war-like thrust, 

And all the slumb'rers with the just, 

Maryland, My Maryland! 



Maryland 

In the very heart of Maryland, 

In the heart of every Maryland man. 

There's a spirit so endearing 

It will win your heart and hand. 

For she doth hold the sway. 

She will win the day, 

And her glorious men will ever win the fray. 

Chorus: 
Then it's Hurrah! Hurrah! for Maryland. 
Then it's Hurrah! Hurrah! for U. of M. 
With her banners ever streaming high. 
She will always win or die. 
Then we'll gather 'round Alumni, 
And "Fight" will be our one reply, 
For we love, we love Old Maryland, 
Hurrah! Hurrah! Hurrah! 

64 



Who Owns This Team? 

Who owns this team? 

Who owns this team? 

Who owns this team? the people say. 

Why, we own this team. 

Sure, we own this team. 

Sure, we own this team. 

M-A-R-Y— L-A-N-D HURRAH! 

Who'll win this game? 

Who'll win this game? 

Who'll win this game? the people say. 

Why, we'll win this game. 

Sure, we'll win this game, 

M-A-R-Y— L-A-N-D HURRAH! 

Who owns this town? 

Who owns this town? 

Who owns this town? the people say. 

Why, we own this town, 

Sure, we own this town, 

M-A-R-Y— L-A-N-D HURRAH! 



U. of M. 

(Tune: Caisson Song) 

U. of M., U. of M., 
Keep the ball away from them, ■ 
Keep that pigskin a-rolling along+^*^,^v , ,,. 
Up the field, down the field, •♦~' 

Not an inch of ground w'e'fl yield, > . 

Keep that pigskin a-rolHng along! ' 

Then it's Whiff! Wham! Whack! 
Hear that Maryland quarterback 
Shout out his signals loud and strong! 
Where'er you go, you will always know 
That that pigskin is rolling along, 

(Shouted) Maryland! Maryland! 
Keep that pigskin a-rolling along. 

65 



r 



Sons of Maryland 

(Tune: Sons of America) 

Sons of the Gold, 
Sons of the Black, 
Fight! No spirit lack. 
Your Alma Mater 
Needs you today 
To help her win the fray. 
Shoulder to shoulder. 
Back to back, 
We'll fight together 
For the Gold and Black. 
Fair Sons and Daughters 
Of Maryland, 

Upon you all vict'ries stand. 
Chorus 
Sons of Maryland, 
Old Maryland needs you! 
Stand by your colors, boys, 
And to them e'er be true! 
Fight for old Maryland, 
Old Liners! Stand, 
Defenders of the Black and Gold 
Throughout this land. 
Team! Team! Team! 



YELLS 
Here's to Old U. of M. 

Here's to old U. of M. 
We're out to win again. 
Come, give a rousing cheer, 
And press on to Victory, 
For we're out to win this fray, 

We'll show how to play, 

For our boys will fight to the end 
For U. of M. 

66 



Bingo 

Bingo, oh. Bingo, 
Bingo. Bingo, Bingo. 
That's the lingo, 
U. of M. 
Is out to win again 

And • chance is very, very sli 

Bingo, oh. Bingo, 

Bingo, Bingo, Bingo, 

That's the cry. 

Fight, Fight! 

Fight with all your might 

For Bingo, U. of M. 



Yea, Maryland! 

Yea, Maryland! Yea, Team! 
Fight em'! Fight 'em! Fight 'em! 

Maryland U! 

Mary land U! 

Mary land U! 

Maryland! Rah! Rah! 
Maryland! Rah! Rah! 
Hoo-Rah! Hoo-Rah! 
Maryland! Rah! 
Rah! Rah! Rah! Rah! 

Mary land 

Team! Team!! Team!!! 



67 



Hoo-Ray! 

Hoooo Ray ! 

Hoooo Ray! 

Hurrah! (Team) (Player) (Maryland) 



Locomotive 

M-M-M A-A-A R-R-R Y-Y-Y- 

L-L-L A-A-A N-X-X D-D-D!! 

Maryland!! 
Team! Team!! Team!!! 



Defiance 

He — Haw — Ho — Go — Mar — y — land! 
He — Haw — Ho — Go — Mar — y — land! 

(Continuous) 
He— Haw— Ho— Go— Mar— y— land ! 
He — Haw — Ho — Go — Mar — y — land! 

(Snappy) 
Team! Team!! Team!!! 



Siren 

Whistle! Boom! Rah! 

Team! Team!! Team!!! 

68 



FRATERNITIES 

Honorary 

Alpha Zeta — National Honorary Agricultural Fra- 
ternity, chartered U. of M. 1920. 

Alpha Chi Sigma — National Honorary Chemical 
Fraternity. 

Phi Kappa Phi — National Honorary Fraternity 
open to honor students in all branches of learning. 

Phi Mu — Honorary Engineering Fraternity, char- 
tered 1923. 

Sigma Delta Pi — Honorary Spanish Fraternity, 
chartered 1920. 

Le Cercle Francais — Honorary French Society. 

Scabbard and Blade — National Honorary Military 
Fraternity. 

Senior Honor Society — Honor Society for Women 
Students. 

National 

Kappa Alpha — Chartered 1914, founded Washing- 
ton and Lee 1865. 

Sigma Nu— Chartered 1917, founded V.M.I. 1869. 

Phi Sigma Kappa — Founded Mass. Agricultural 
College 1893. 

Delta Sigma Phi— Chartered 1924, founded College 
of N. Y. C. 1899. 

Sigma Phi Sigma — Chartered 1916, founded U. of 
Penn. 1908. 

Phi Alpha— Chartered 1915, founded Geo. Wash- 
ington U. 1914. 

Local 

Nu Sgma Omicon — Chartered 1914. 
Delta Mu— Chartered 1920. 
Delta Psi Omega— Chartered 1920. 
Sigma Tau Omega — Chartered 1921. 
Alpha Gamma— Chartered 1926. 

69 



CONSTITUTION OF INTER -FRATERNITY 
COUNCIL 



PREAMBLE 

Adopted May 20, 1926 

The name of this Organization shall be THE 
INTER-FRATERNITY COUNCIL OF THE 
UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND. 

The membership of this Organization shall con- 
sist of two representatives of each of the recog- 
nized competitive national social men's fraternities 
of the University of Maryland; and the purpose 
shall be to maintain a harmonious relationship be- 
tween the said University and the fraternities in 
the management of the aflFairs that pertain to 
fraternities; and to accomplish this purpose, the 
following rules adopted by the Inter-Fraternity 
Council are herewith incorporated as the Consti- 
tution of this Organization. 

It is further agreed that the following frater- 
nities shall be charter members of the Council: 

Delta Sigma Phi Delta Mu 

Sigma Nu Nu Sigma Omricon 

Phi Sigma Kappa Delta Psi Omega 

Kappa Alpha Sigma Tau Omega 
Sigma Phi Sigma 

ARTICLE I 

The officers of this Organization shall be Pres- 
ident, Vice President, and Secretary-Treasurer. 

These officers shall be nominated at the last meet- 
ing in April and elected at the first meeting in May 
of each year. 

There shall be a majority vote required for the 
election of any officer. 

70 



ARTICLE 11 

The duties of the officers of this organization 
shall be as follows: 

Section 1. The President shall preside over all 
meetings; see that order is maintaincdi and cast 
the deciding vote in case of a deadlock. • 

Section 2. The Vice President shalT assume the 
duties of the President in the absence or inability 
of the President. The Vice President shall also act 
as Chairman of all social functions. 

Section 3. The Secretary-Treasurer of this 
Organization shall keep a true record of all pro- 
ceedings of the council and shall also have charge 
of all monies belonging to the above Organization. 

ARTICLE III 

The meetings of this Organization shall be held 
on the first and third Thursdays of each month, at 
7.00 o'clock P. M. 

ARTICLE IV 

This Constitution may only be amended by a 
three-fourths vote of all the represented fraternities 

in the Council. 

ARTICLE V 

Section 1. No fraternity shall ftftcr a bid to any 
student who is in his first year at this institution 
until 8.00 o'clock on the morning of pledge day. 
Pledge day shall be the first Tuesday in December. 

(a) A student entering this institution after 
pledge day may not be pledged until the second 
Tuesday in May. 

Section 2. The meaning of the word "Pledge": 
No fraternity shall either directly or indirectly 
cause any student to commit himself in favor of or 
against any fraternity prior to pledge day of his 
first year at this Institution. 

71 



Section 3. Be it further understood by the 
members of this Organization that those fraternities 
desiring to offer persons bids to join their respective 
fraternities shall, on the day preceeding pledge day, 
hand in to a designated impartial person, bids to 
those men whom thej'^ wish to offer the chance of 
joining their fraternity. These bids will in turn, 
at 8.00 A. M. pledge day, be handed to the person 
to whom they are addressed, and when he has 
marked them accepted, rejected or undecided, as 
he may choose, he shall return them to the afore- 
mentioned impartial person by noon of pledge 
day, who will in turn notify the several fraternities 
of the outcome of their bids. 

ARTICLE VI 

No student may be pledged to any fraternity 
unless he has at least fifteen (15) units in high 
school subjects. 

ARTICLE VII 

No fraternity may initiate any student until he 
shaU have passed twelve (12) credit hours at this 
institution. 

ARTICLE VIII 

Any student or group of students desiring to 
form a local fraternity must first submit to the 
Inter-Fraternity Council a statement of the object 
and ideals inv^olved, with a list of the proposed 
charter members. The Inter-Fraternity Council 
within one month shall act upon the application 
and inform the petitioning group of its action. 

ARTICLE IX 

A group of students, in order to become eligible 
to representation on the Inter- Fraternity Council, 
shall be required: 

(a) To have functioned at this Institution for 
at least one year as a club. 

72 



(b) To have functioned at this Institution for 
at least two years as a local fraternity, during 
which time it shall have abided by the Inter-Frat- 
ernity Council rulings. 

(c) To be a chapter in good standing of a com- 
petitive national, social, men's fraternity. 



ARTICLE X 

No local fraternity shall petition for a charter 
in any national fraternity until after the group de- 
siring nationalization has obtained the sanction of 
the Inter-Fraternity Council. 



ARTICLE XI 

It is herewith understood that all matters having 
relationship to the organization of fraternities and 
general fraternity affairs shall be presented to the 
Inter-Fraternity Council. 

BY-LAWS 

1^ All business of this organization unless 
otherwise provided for, shall be carried out in ac- 
cordance with "Robert's Rules of Order." 

2. A representation of three-fourths of the 
total members of the Council shall constitute a 
quorum. 

3. Each fraternity represented at a quorum 
shall be allowed two votes. 

4. It is herewith understood by the members 
of the Inter-Fraternity Council that any fraternity 
violating any part of the Constitution of this Or- 
ganization shall be subjected to a fine of twenty- 
five (S25.00), which shall be used to help defray 
the expenses of the Annual Inter- Fraternity Ball. 
This sum is to be posted by each fraternity on or 
before the date of the first meeting of the Inter- 
Fraternity Council at the beginning of each year. 

73 



It is further understood that the violating frat- 
ernity shall be suspended from the Inter-Fraternity 
Council for one year, during which time the said 
fraternity shall abide by the laws of the Inter- 
Fraternity Council. 

All violations of rules shall be fixed by a board 
of five (5) men representing five (5) different 
fraternities exclusive of the violating group. These 
men shall be elected by and from the Council. 

5. Men not pledged to or belonging to any 
fraternity at the University of Maryland shall not 
become residents in any fraternity house except as 
approved by the Inter-Fraternity Council. 

6. Each fraternity shall keep on file in the 
Registrar's Office a complete list, corrected to date, 
of all active and pledged members, includingofficers. 

7. Each fraternity shall keep on file in the 
Registrar's Office a complete up-to-date list of all 
men living in the chapter house. 

8. Rushing Rules. 

A. No fraternity shall hold an organized 
rush function until October 15. (Any function 
at which there are more than six (6) freshmen 
present, constitutes an organized rush function.) 

B. The time between the 15th of October and 
the beginning of the silence period shall be con- 
sidered as the season for organized functions. 
This time shall be divided into two equal parts 
during each one of which each fraternity shall hold 
not more than one organized rush function. 
(Silence Period shall be from 8.00 A. M. of the 
day preceding pledge day until 12.00 Noon of 
pledge day. During this time no upperclassmen 
may communicate directly or indirectly with any 
man who has attended this institution less than 
one semester.) 

C. During the time stipulated for organized 
rushing, no fraternity shall hold more than two 
organized rush functions. The dates for these 
functions shall be drawn by lots at some time pre- 
vious to October 1st. 

74 



D. Between October 15 and the silence period 
no fraternity shall entertain any first-year man 
after 7.00 P.M.. except that fraternity which has 
drawn that particular date. 

9. All Inter-Fraternity Sports shall be governed 
by the following rules: 

A. Only bona fide, active, undergraduate mem- 
bers of the fraternity chapters of the University of 
Maryland may be eligible to take part in Inter- 
Fraternity sports. 

B. No fraternity man may participate in any 
Inter-Fraternity sport in which he has previously 
made an official Maryland letter. 

C. Xo man who has been a candidate of any 
freshman or varsity sport or who has taken part 
in a regular school game conflicting in season with 
any Inter-Fraternity sport may participate in the 
Inter-Fraternity sport. 

D. Any such additional questions or disputes 
as may arise in Inter-Fraternity sports shall be 
governed by the rules of the Southern Conference. 



75 



ST. ANDREW'S EPISCOPAL 
CHURCH 

COLLEGE PARK, MD. 
Rev. Ronalds Taylor, S.T.D. Rector 

Services: 
9:45 A. M. Sunday School 
11:00 A. M. Morning Prayer 
and Sermon. 

Communion Service First 
Sunday of Each Month 

Make St. Andrew's your church 
home while in College Park. 
You will find a cordial welcome 
at all the services. The Rector 
will welcome an opportunity to 
meet and know you. 



76 



Berwyn Presbyterian Church 

B. A. MATZEN, Pastor 

Services, Sunday, 11 a. m. 
Sunday. School, 9:45 a, m. 
Student's Bible Class, 9:45 a. m. 
Christian Endeavor Meeting,Sunday 7 p.m. 
Prayer and Bible Study, Wednesday 8 p.m. 

You are Most Cordially Welcome 

First Baptist Church 

HYATTSVILLE, MD. 
Rev. B. P. Robertson, D.D., Pastor 

Invites you to all of its services 

Bible School— 9:30 A. M. 

Preaching— 11 A. M. and 8 P. M. 

B. Y. P. U.— 7 P. M. 

Mid-week Service — Wednesday 8 P. M 

Why not make this home-like church 
your church home. 

77 



SERVICE SATISFACTION 

We solicit your account 

Prince Georges 
Bank 

Honor Roll Bank 

BANKING HOURS 

8:30 A. M. to 3:00 P. M. 

Saturdays 

8:30 A. M. to 12:00 

4:00 P. M. to 8:00 P. M. 



T. M. JONES J. ENOS RAY 

Cashier President 

SECURITY STRENGTH 



78 



To the students of the University 
of Maryland 

The First National 
Bank 

OF HYATTSVILLE 

Extends to you greetings and a 
welcome and invites you to make 
this bank your depository while at 
the University, 

Do not keep money in your room — 
pay your bills by check. 

This prevents loss, robbery, extrava- 
gance and disputes. 

The facilities of this bank are at 
vour command. 



BANKING HOURS 
Mondays and Government Pay 

Days, 9 to 5:30 P. M. 
Saturdays, 9 A. M. to 12 M and 

4 to 8 P.M. 
Other days, 9 A. M. to 3 P. M. 



79 



KUSHNER'S 

VARIETY STORE 

BERWYN 91 
COLLEGE PARK, MD. 

Visit our Lunch Room. 

Reasonable prices. 

Fresh Fruits, Delicatessens, 
Candy, Ice Cream, Sodas, 
Cigars and Cigarettes, Mag- 
azines, Drug Supplies. 

A Complete Line of Fresh and 
Smoked Meats. 

What you don't see ask for. 

Give us a trial 



80 



G. C. MATTHAI 

ALL INSURANCE 
SERVICE 

COLLEGE PARK, MARYLAND 

Phone Connections. 



B A R - B - 

Sandwich Shop 

COLLEGE PARK, MARYLAND 

Light Lunch Cigars Cigarettes 
Pop Ice Cream 

Open All Night 

81 



Have Your Dry Cleaning Done 

— AT THE — 

Clothes Hospital 

On the Boulevard near College Ave. 

OUR WORKMANSHIP FAULTLESS 

Men's Suits Dry Cleaned and Pressed 
$1.25. Suits Pressed, S.35 

Work called for and delivered 



College Park 
Bowling Alleys 

8 New Alleys 

BOWLING BILLIARDS 

REFRESHMENTS 

HEALTHY RECREATION 



82 



THE COLLEGE INN 

Delicious Foods and 
Pastries 

Clean - Attractive - Convenient 

COLLEGE PARK on the 
BOULEVARD 



Y.M.C.A. Y.W.G.A. 

DISCUSSION GROUP 
EVERY SUNDAY 

— IN — 

Rest Room - 6 :30 P. M 



83 

























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85 



The Eutaw Place Baptist Church 

Eutaw Place at Dolphin 

Reached directly by Cars 3, 16, 21, 31 ^ 32 

0. C. S. Wallace, D.D., Litt. D., Pastor 

11 a. m. and 8 p. m. Sunday Wor- 
ship with Sermon and Music. 
9.30 a. m. Bible School and organ- 
ized classes; Men's Bible Class, 
Eugene Levering, Teacher; Junior 
Men's Class, Horace E. Flack, Ph.D. 
Teacher. 

Young People's Union 

5.30 p. m. Sunday, informal recep- 
tion, Room 2 and Corridors of 
Church House; 6 p. m., Supper, 
room 3; 6.45 p. m.. Prayer Circles, 
rooms 1 and 2; 7 p.m.. Devotional 
meeting, Lecture Hall. 
7.40 p. m.. Organ Recital, Audience 
Room. 

8 p. m., Wednesday, Prayer Meet- 
ing, Lecture Hall. 

The tall spire and beautiful architecture 
of this church invite to worship. The 
building was designed by Thomas O. 
Walter, architect of the dome of the Capi- 
tol, Washington. 

The spacious and finely equipped Church 
House and the large Lecture Hall are used 
by the young people for their religious, 
musical, and social gatherings. Students of 
the U. of M. are specially invited. 



SEPTEMBER 



Sunday Sept. 11 



Monday Sept. 12 



Tuesday Sept. 13 



Wednesday Sept. 14 



Thursday Sept. 15 



Friday Sept. 16 



Saturday Sept. 17 



87 



THIRD REFORMED CHURCH 

N. E. Cor. Paca and Saratoga Sts. 
REV. JAMES RILEY BERGEY, Min. 

SUNDAYS 
9.30 — Sunday School 
10.00 — Bible Class, C. C. Copenhaver, 

President 
11 . 00 — Morning Worship 
8 . 00 — Evening Worship 

MONDAYS 
8 . 00— Bowling, King Pin Alleys, O. G. 
Harne, President 

WEDNESDAYS 

8 . 00 — Prayer Meeting 

SPECIAL FEATURES 
Scientific and General Lectures (aus- 
pices Men's Bible Class). 
Social Evenings — Plays — Dinners 
University of Maryland students are 
cordially invited to all services and ac- 
tivities of this church. 
"Come, and you will come again." 

• 88 



SEPTEMBER 



Sunday Sept. 18 



Monday Sept. 19 



Tuesday Sept. 20 



Wednesday Sept. 21 



Thursday Sept. 22 



Friday Sept. 23 



Saturday Sept. 24 



Franklin Street 

Presbyterian 

CliurcJi 

Franklin and Cathedral Sts. 
Rev. Harris E. Kirk,D.D., Minister 



Service at 11 A. M. and 8 P. M. 

Sunday School at 9.45 A. M. 

Young People's Society at 
6.45 P. M. 



Students are Cordially Invited to All 
Services 



90 



SEPTEMBER-OCTOBER 



Sept. 25 



Sept. 26 



Sept. 27 



Sept. 28 



Sept. 29 



Sept. 30 



Oct. 1 



91 



The Brantly Baptist Church 

Edmonson Ave. and Schroeder Street 

Rev. Henry M. Wharton, D.D., Pastor 

►!< 

Services Every Sunday 11:00 A. M. and 

8:00 P. M. Conducted by the Pastor 

Young People's Meeting Every Sunday at 

7:00 P. M. With Social Tea. 

You will be welcome at this Church 

and if you come once you will come 

again. 

Emmanuel Church 

Cathedral and Read Sts. 
Rev. Hugh Birckhead, D. D., 

Rector 

This Church holds out a cordial welcome to all of 
the students of the University of Maryland. 

SUNDAY SERVICES 

8.00 A. M. — Holy Communion. 

9.45 A. M.— Church School. 

11.00 A. M. — Morning Prayer and Sermon (Holy 

Communion and Sermon first Sunday in the 

month). 
8.00 P. M. — Choral Evensong and Address. 

The Rector will be glad to meet you at the close of 
any of these Services. 

92 





OCTOBER 




Sunday 




Oct. 2 


Monday 




Oct. 3 


Tuesday 




Oct. 4 


Wednesday 




Oct. 5 


Thursday 




Oct. 6 


Friday 




Oct. 7 



Oct. 8 



93 



Church of the Ascension 

(Episcopal) 

LAFAYETTE SQUARE 

Robert Evans Browning, Rector 

Services: 7:30 A. M. 

9:30 A.M. 

11:00 A. M. 

8:00 P. M. 

Men's Bible Class, Wednesday 8 P. M. 
Parish Hall All Seats free 



Wilson Memorial M. E. Church, South 

University Parkway and Charles St. 
CARLTON D. HARRIS, D. D. 

A students' church that caters to students 

University class for men and Goucher 
class for women 

Sunday School— 9.30 A.M. 
Epworth League — 7.15 P.M. 
Preaching— 11 A.M. and 8 P.M. 
94 



OCTOBER 



Sunday 


Oct. 9 


Monday 


Oct. 10 


Tuesday 


Oct. 11 



Wednesday Oct. 12 



Thursday Oct. 13 



Friday Oct. 14 



Saturday Oct. 15 



CHRISTIAN SCIENCE 

Branch Churches of the Mother Church, 

The First Church of Christ, Scientist, 

in Boston, Mass. 

FIRST CHURCH 

OF CHRIST, SCIENTIST 
University Parkwav, West of Canterbury 

Road 
SECOND CHURCH 

OF CHRIST, SCIENTIST 
Mt. Royal Ave. and St. Paul St. 
THIRD CHURCH 

OF CHRIST, SCIENTIST 
702 Cathedral St., opp. Mt. Vernon Place 
SUNDAY SERVICES 
11 A. M. and 8 P. M. 
Wednesday evening meetings at 8 P.M. 
include testimonials of Christian Science 
healing. 

SUNDAY SCHOOLS: 11 A. M. 
READING ROOMS: 
FIRST CHURCH: 1311 Fidelity Build- 
ing, Charles and Lexington Sts. Hours, 
9 A. M. to 9.30 P. M. (except Sunday and 
Wednesday). Wednesday, 9 A. M. to 
7 P. M. 

SECOND CHURCH: 6 E. Preston St. 
Hours, 9.30 A. M. to 5.30 P. M. (except 
Sunday). 

THIRD CHURCH: 702 Cathedral St. 
Hours, 9 A. M. to 5 P. M. (except Sunday) 
Wednesday, 9 A. M. to 7.45 P. M. 

The public is cordially invited to attend 
these services and to visit the Reading 
Rooms. 



96 



OCTOBER 



Sunday Oct. 16 



Monday Oct. 17 



Tuesday 


Oct. 18 


Wednesday 


Oct. 19 


Thursday 


Oct. 20 


Friday 


Oct. 21 



Saturday Oct. 22 



97 



ST. MARK'S 

LUTHERAN 

CHURCH 

St. Paul and 20th Sts. 
Robert D. Clare, D.D., Pastor 



A Church with a Vision and a Pro- 
gram. 

Sunday Congregational Services at 
n A. M. and 8 P.M. 

Sunday School at 9.30 A. M. 

Luther League at 7 P. M. 

Mid-week Congregational Service, 
Wednesday at 8 P. M. 



A Cordial Invitation is Extended to 
All University of Maryland Students 



98 





OCTOBER 




Sunday 




Oct. 23 


Monday 




Oct. 24 


Tuesday 




Oct. 25 


Wednesday 




Oct. 26 


Thursday 




Oct. 27 


Friday Oct. 28 



Saturday Oct. 29 

192970 



99 



UNIVERSITY 
BAPTIST CHURCH 

N. E. Cor. CHARLES AND 
GREENWAY 

Russell Bradley Jones, Pastor 

Hopkins Apartments 



SUNDAYS 
9.30 A. M.— Sunday Bible School. 
11 A. M. — Morning Worship. 
6.30 P. M.— Young People's Meet- 
ing. 
8 P. M. — Evening Worship. 

WEDNESDAY 

8 P. M. — Prayer Meeting. 



A cordial welcome awaits the 

students 

We are eager to know and to serve you 

100 



OCTOBER-NOVEMBER 



Sunday Oct. 30 



Monday Oct. 31 



Tuesday Nov. 1 



Wednesday Nov. 2 



Thursday Nov. 3 



Friday Nov. 4 



Saturday Nov. 5 



101 



University Men and Women will find 
a congenial 

CHURCH HOME at 

Seventh Baptist Church 

North Avenue and Saint Paul Street 

JOHN HENRY DAY, D.D., Minister 

SUNDAY SCHEDULE 
Worship:— 11 A. M. and 8 P. M. 
Social Hour:— 6 P. M. 
Young People's Meeting: — 7 P. M. 
Church School:— 9.30 A. M. 



G. Kenneth Greer, Phone, 

Prop. Hamilton 3500 



THE COMMUNITY PRESS 
PRINTING 

3 Grindon Ave. 
Prices That Please Lauraville 

102 



NOVEMBER 



Sunday Nov. 6 



Monday Nov. 7 



Tuesday Nov. 8 



Wednesday Nov. 9 



Thursday Nov. 10 



Friday Nov. 11 



Saturday Nov. 12 



103 



Ride The Cars 



The most Convenient, Com- 
fortable, Economical, Re- 
liable means of going from 
where you are to where you 
want to go. 

A 24-hour service, 365 days of 
the year. 

FREE TRANSFERS 

United Railways & Electric Co. 
of Baltimore 

Ride The Cars 

104 



NOVEMBER 



Sunday Nov. 13 



Monday Nov. 14 



Tuesday Nov. 15 



Wednesday Nov. 16 



Thursday Nov. 17 



Friday Nov. 18 



Saturday Nov. 19 



105 



Of course— 

U. of M. Men Use 



BETHOLINF 

^^ ''THE WONDER MOTOR FUEL" ^ ^ 



SHERWOOD BROS., Inc. 

Decorations Interior Wood Work 

JOHN C. KNIPP & SONS 
Furniture 

Show Rooms: 
343 N. Charles Street 
Factory: 
600 S. Pulaski Street 



106 



NOVEMBER 



Sunday Nov. 20 



Monday Nov. 21 



Tuesday Nov. 22 



Wednesday Nov. 23 



Thursday Nov. 24 



Friday Nov. 25 



Saturday Nov. 26 



107 



BURNS 



MEDICAL STANDARD 
BOOK COMPANY 



301 N. CHARLES ST. Cor. Saratoga St. 

Headquarters for Medical Books, Fic- 
tion, Fountain Pens and Students* 
Supplies of all kinds 

SURGICAL INSTRUMENTS 

Rent a Car Drive it Yourself 

The Auto Rental Co. 

E. H. WEEDON, Jr., President 

Charles & 20th Sts. 2125 Harford Ave. 

Phone Wolfe 1413 

Our Customers Are Fully Insured 

The Flag, Banner and Pennant Shop 

R. H. TAYLOR 
Successor to Sisco Brothers 

Flags, Banners, Pennants, Emblems 

Silk Banners for Schools, Societies 
and Fraternities 

302 Park Ave. Vernon 2355 

108 



NOVEMBER-DECEMBER 

Nov. 27 



Nov. 28 



Nov. 29 



Nov. 30 



Dec. 1 



Dec. 2 



Dec. 3 



109 



Charles R. Deeley 

Dealer in all kinds of 

DENTAL 
SUPPLIES 

108 W. MULBERRY STREET 
BALTIMORE, MD. 

We're gentlemen of recognized 

scholarship on the subject 

of ''College Style'' 

Isaac Hamburger 
& Sons 

BALTIMORE & HANOVER STREETS 

110 



DECEMBER 



Sunday Dec. 4 



Monday Dec. 5 



Tuesday Dec. 6 



Wednesday Dec. 7 



Thursday Dec. 8 



Friday Dec. 9 



Saturday Dec. 10 



111 



MORRIS RESTAURANT 

207 W. FRANKLIN ST. 

Table Board by the week 

3 Meals a Day $4.50 

Try our Regular Dinner 

Club Breakfast 35c 50c 

JOHN H. SAUMENIG & CO. 

College ^tationerp 

NOTE BOOKS - FOUNTAIN PENS 
129 Park Avenue 



The Norman-Remington Co. 

CHARLES ST. AT MULBERR Y, BALTIMORE 

BOOKS ^ ENGRAVING 
STATIONERY "^ PRINTING 



112 



DECEMBER 



Sunday Dec. 



Monday Dec. 12 



Tuesday Dec. 13 



Wednesday Dec. 14 



Thursday Dec. 15 



Friday Dec. 16 



Saturday Dec. 17 



113 



Chartered 1864 

Safe Deposit & 
Trust Company 

OF BALTIMORE 

Fireproof buildings, with 
latest and best equipment 
for safety of contents. Safes 
for rent in its large fire and 
burglar -proof vaults, with 
spacious and well-lighted 
coupon rooms for use of 
patrons. Securities held on 
deposit for out of town cor- 
porations and persons. 

13 SOUTH STREET 

L. L. NELLIGAN, President 



DECEMBER 



Sunday Dec. 18 



Monday Dec. 19 



Tuesday Dec. 29 



Wednesday Dec. 21 



Thursday Dec. 22 



Friday Dec. 23 



Saturday Dec. 24 



115 



The Pharmacists who meet the 
demands of modern medicine 
and supply the special needs of 
nurse and patient. 

HYNSON, 

WESTCOTT & 

DUNNING 

Pharmaceutical 
Chemists 

CHARLES AND CHASE STS. 

EUTAW PLACE AND 

NORTH AVE. 

BALTIMORE 



IK 



DECEMBER 



Sunday Dec. 25 



Monday Dec. 2 6 



Tuesday Dec. 27 



Wednesday Dec. 28 



Thursday Dec. 29 



Friday Dec. 30 



Saturday Dec. 31 



117 



MARYLAND 

GLASS 
CORPORATION 



BLUE 

GREEN TINT 
and FLINT 
BOTTLES 



BALTIMORE, MD. 



118 



JANUARY 



Sunday Jan. 



Monday Jan. 2 



Tuesday Jan. 3 



Wednesday Jan. 4 



Thursday Jan. 5 



Friday Jan. 6 



Saturday Jan. 7 



119 



Y. M. C. A. 

Cafeteria and Dining Rooms 

Not only another, but a 
better place to eat 

Good Food Reasonable Prices 

Open 7 A. M. to 9 P. M. 

FRANKLIN AND CATHEDRAL STS, 

J. TROCKENBROT & CO. 

Manufacturers of 

Medals, Emblems, Buttons, College 
and Fraternity Pins and College Seals 

310 NORTH PACA STREET 

Manufacturers of U. of M. Seals 
All Goods Manufactured on the premises 
We can duplicate any pin, ring or emblem 

120 



JANUARY 



Sunday Jan. 8 



Monday Jan. 9 



Tuesday Jan. 10 



Wednesday Jan. 



Thursday Jan. 12 



Friday Jan. 13 



Saturday Jan. 14 



121 



CHARLES R.DiSTEFANO 

Light Lunch and 
Confectioneries 

Opposite Mercy Hospital 

ELLERBROCK 

Student Photographer 

112 N. Howard St., Baltimore, Md. 
The 

Merchants'Restaurant 

Stevens Bros.— Proprietors 

19 N. Eutaw St. 
Opposite Hippodrome Theatre 

Near Fayette St. 
122 



JANUARY 

Sunday Jan. 15 

Monday Jan. 16 

Tuesday Jan. 17 

Wednesday Jan. 18 

Thursday Jan. 19 

Friday Jan. 20 

Saturday Jan. 21 

123 



Open 7.30 A. M. until 7.00 P. M. 

SUCCESS 

depends largely upon 

APPEARANCE 
Look Your Best 

A. DALFONZO 

Barber Service 

Specializing in Ladies' and Childrens* 
Hair Cutting, Bobbing, Shingling, Mas- 
saging 
660 Baltimore Street Baltimore, Md. 

Phone Madison 5760-5761 

Co-operative Dental 
Laboratory 

*'YOUR FUTURE ASSISTANTS" 

Eutaw and Franklin Sts. 
Baltimore, Md. 



124 



JANUARY 



Sunday Jan. 22 



Monday Jan. 23 



Tuesday Jan. 24 



Wednesday Jan. 25 



Thursday Jan. 26 



Friday Jan. 27 



Saturday Jan. 28 



125 



Established 1873 

A. H. PETTING 
MANUFACTURING JEWELRY CO. 

MANUFACTURERS 

Greek Letter Fraternity Jewelry 

213 N. Liberty Street 
BALTIMORE, MARYLAND 



Luther B. Benton Co. 

DENTAL SUPPLIES 

305 N. Howard St. 

Baltimore, Md. 

Phone, Vernon 1370 



126 



JANUARY-FEBRUARY 



Sunday 


Jan. 29 


Monday 


Jan. 30 


Tuesday 


Jan. 31 



Wednesday Feb. 1 



Thursday Feb. 2 



Friday Feb. 3 



Saturday Feb. 4 



127 



He Searched the World 
for Treasure 

— and found it at his own doorstep 

By determining to save systematically 
you will find future happiness at your door. 

PARK BANK 

Lexington Street at Liberty 

Baltimore : : : Maryland 

College Jewelry & Novelties 

All the new makes of Fountain Pens and 
Pencils, in Gold and Silver; small Sterling 
Silver Footballs, Basketballs, Baseballs, 
Bats, etc., $1.00 each. 

Also Class Pins and Emblems 

WM. J. MILLER 

The Popular Priced Jeweler 

28 EAST BALTIMORE STREET 

128 



FEBRUARY 



Sunday Feb. 5 



Monday Feb. 6 



Tuesday Feb. 7 



Wednesday Feb. 8 



Thursday Feb. 9 



Friday Feb. 10 



Saturday Feb. 11 



Meet men from 

OTHER SCHOOLS at 
rfieY.M.C.A. FELLOW' 
SHIP DINNERS 



Telephone Vernon 6128 

Hepbron & Haydon 

Law Booksellers and Publishers 
14 W. FRANKLIN ST. 

We supply all text books and syllabi 
of lectures used in the Law Depart- 
ment of the University of Maryland. 

Books Bought, Sold and 
Exchanged 

130 



FEBRUARY 



Sunday Feb. 12 



Monday Feb. 13 



Tuesday Feb. 14 



Wednesday Feb. 15 



Thursday Feb. 16 



Friday Feb. i: 



Saturday Feb. 18 



131 



FEBRUARY 



Sunday 



Monday 



Tuesday 



Wednesday 



Thursday 



Friday 



Saturday 



132 



FEBRUARY-MARCH 



Feb. 26 



Feb. 27 



Feb. 28 



Feb. 29 



March 1 



March 2 



March 3 



133 



MARCH 



Sunday 



Monday 



Tuesday 



Wednesday 



Thursday 



Friday 



Saturday 



134 



MARCH 



Sunday 



March 11 



Monday 



March 12 



Tuesday 



March 13 



Wednesday 



March 14 



Thursday 



March 15 



Friday 



March 16 



Saturday 



March 17 



135 



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Modi 

The Ri 

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SOLD EX'i 

M. SOLOW 

603 W. B.^ 

Just around the \ 
YOUR ACCC 



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136 



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MORE ST. 

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T SOLICITED 




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137 



MARCH 



Sunday 



March 18 



Monday 



March 19 



Tuesday 



March 20 



Wednesday 



March 21 



Thursday 



March 22 



Friday 



March 23 



Saturday 



March 24 



138 



MARCH 



Sunday 



March 25 



Monday 



March 26 



Tuesday 



March 27 



Wednesday 



March 28 



Thursday 



March 29 



Friday 



March 30 



Saturday 



March 31 



139 



APRIL 

Sunday April 1 

Monday April 2 

Tuesday April 3 

Wednesday April 4 

Thursday April 5 

Friday April 6 

Saturday April 7 
140 



APRIL 



Sunday April 8 



Monday April 9 



Tuesday April 10 



Wednesday April 11 



Thursday April 12 



Friday April 13 



Saturday April 14 



141 



APRIL 



Sunday April 15 



Monday April 16 



Tuesday April 17 



Wednesday April 18 



Thursday April 19 



Friday April 20 



Saturday April 21 



142 



APRIL 



Sunday April 22 



Monday April 23 



Tuesday April 24 



Wednesday April 25 



Thursday April 26 



Friday April 27 



Saturday April 28 



143 



APRIL-MAY 

Sunday April 29 

Monday April 30 

Tuesday May 1 

Wednesday May 2 

Thursday May 3 

Friday May 4 

Saturday May 5 

144 «. 



MAY 



Sunday May 6 



Manday May 7 



Tuesday May 8 



Wednesday May 9 



Thursday May 10 



Friday Map 11 



Saturday May 12 



145 



MAY 



Sunday May 13 



Monday May 14 



Tuesday May 15 



Wednesday May 16 



Thursday May 17 



Friday May 18 



Saturday May 19 



146 



MAY 



Sunday May 20 



Monday May 21 



Tuesday May 22 



Wednesday May 23 



Thursday May 24 



Friday May 25 



Saturday May 26 



147 



MAY-JUNE 



Sunday May 27 



Monday May 28 



Tuesday May 2'> 



Wednesday May 30 



Thursday May 31 



Friday June 1 



Saturday June 2 



148 



JUNE 



Sunday 



June 3 



Monday 



June 4 



Tuesday 



June 5 



Wednesday 



June 6- 



Thursday 



June 7 



Friday 



June 8 



Saturday 



June 9 



149 



JUNE 



Sunday 



June 10 



Monday 



June 11 



Tuesday 



June 12 



Wednesday 



June 13 



Thursday 



June 14 



Friday 



June 15 



Saturday 



June 16 



150 



MEMORANDA 



lol 



Take A Work-Out An 




Gymnasium 

Showers 

Pool 

Bowling 

Basketball 

Barber 

Tailor 

Restaurant 

Reading 
Room 



CENTRAL^^YOUNG MEN'S 

FRANKLIN ANE 
THE STUDENTS' DOW]\ 

152 



A Swim Every Week 




Student 
Member- 
ship Fee 

$10-00 

Full 

Privileges 

Sept. to June 



HRISTIAN ASSOCIATION 

kTHEDRAL STS. 

'OWN HEADQUARTERS 

B 153 



□ E 



3D 



nn 



]nnnnn[ 



HEHOUCK&CO 



PRINTING 

Done QuichJyA 
\andtoyourA 



JUTAWfr , 

MONUMCNTsi 



College Annuals 
School Publications 
Edition Printing 
Programs - Menus 
Commercial Printing 

Printers of this Book 



154 



■IB 



1 Name. . 
Address. 
Phone. . 



2 Name. . 
Address. 
Phone. . 



3 Name. . 
Address. 
Phone. . 



4 Name. . 
Address. 
Phone. . 



5 Name. . 
Address. 
Phone . . 



6 Name. . 
Address. 
Phone . . 



155 



7 Name. . 
Address. 
Phone. . 

8 Name. . 
Address. 
Phone. . 



9 Name. . 
Address. 
Phone. . 



10 Name. . 
Address. 
Phone. . 

11 Name. . 
Address. 
Phone. . 



12 Name. . 
Address. 
Phone. . 



156 



13 Name. . 
Address. 
Phone. . 



14 Name. . 
Address. 
Phone . . 

15 Name. . 
Address. 
Phone. . 



16 Name. . 
Address. 
Phone. . 



17 Name. . 
Address. 
Phone. . 



18 Name. . 
Address. 
Phone. . 



157 



MEMORANDA 



158 



1927 CALENDAR 1928 | 


September 


March 


S M T WT F S 

1 2 3 

4 5 6 7 8 9 10 
11 12 13 14 15 16 17 
18 19 20 21 22 23 24 
25 26 27 28 29 30 . . 


S M T W T F S 

12 3 

4 5 6 7 8 9 10 
11 12 13 14 15 16 17 
18 19 20 21 22 23 24 
25 26 27 28 29 30 31 


October 


April 


1 


12 3 4 5 6 7 

8 9 10 11 12 13 14 

15 16 17 18 19 20 21 

22 23 24 25 26 27 28 

29 30 


2 3 4 5 6 7 8 

9 10 11 12 13 14 15 

16 17 18 19 20 21 22 

23 24 25 26 27 28 29 
30 31 


November 


May 


.... 12 3 4 5 

6 7 8 9 10 11 12 

13 14 15 16 17 18 19 

20 21 22 23 24 25 26 

27 28 29 30 


.... 1 2 3 4 5 

6 7 8 9 10 11 12 

13 14 15 16 17 18 19 

20 21 22 23 24 25 26 

27 28 29 30 31 . . . . 


December 


June 


1 2 


12 3 

4 5 6 7 8 9 10 
11 12 13 14 15 16 17 
18 19 20 21 22 23 24 
25 26 27 28 29 30 31 


3 4 5 6 7 8 9 
10 11 12 13 14 15 16 
17 18 19 20 21 22 23 
24 25 26 27 28 29 30 


January 


July 


12 3 4 5 6 7 

8 9 10 11 12 13 14 

15 16 17 18 19 20 21 

22 23 24 25 26 27 28 
29 30 31 


12 3 4 5 6 7 

8 9 10 11 12 13 14 

15 16 17 18 19 20 21 

22 23 24 25 26 27 28 

29 30 31 


February 


August 

1 2 3 4 

5 6 7 8 9 10 11 
12 13 14 15 16 17 18 
19 20 21 22 23 24 25 
26 27 28 29 30 31 . . 


12 3 4 

5 6 7 8 9 10 11 
12 13 14 15 16 17 18 
19 20 21 22 23 24 25 

26 27 28 29 



The 1 


Anderson Motor li 


Company 




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Baltimore 


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Baltimore, Md 


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The right place to get a good 


used car 



106 




Smart enough 
to go to 
College 

Suits and Topcoats 
$30 up 

211-213 E. Baltimore St.