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Full text of "Students' hand book of the University of Maryland"

LIBRARY-COLLEGE PARK 




IDENTIFICATION 



Name 



Home Address- 



School Address. 



P. O. Box No Phone- 



Fraternity 



In case of serious accident notify. 



STUDENTS- 
HANDBOOK 



THE UNIVERSITY OF 
MARYLAND 



Presented by 

THE 

COLLEGIATE ORGANIZATIONS 

1928-1929 



STAFF 

John E. Schueler, '29 

Lucy R. Voris, '20 

Henry Whiteford, '29 — 

Melvin Beachy, '31 

William L. Lucas, '30 



Editor-in-Chief 

-Women's Editor 
.Associate Editor 

Business Mgr. 

..Asst. Bus. Mgr. 



upue 



ity Calendar (.... 



University Calendar L. :. _... 6 

Foreword — 8 

President's Greeting 9 

University Departments 10 

Student Pastors 12 

Regulations of Student Activities - 13 

Freshman Procedure 1 5 

Tips to Freshmen 16 

University Regulations - 18 

Traditions 23 

Infirmary Rules 25 

Greetings from the Dean of Women 26 

Coed Activities — 27 

Student Publications 36 

Who's 'S^ho 37 

Athletics 4 1 

Songs and Yells 45 

Fraternities — 5 1 

Greek Alphabet _ 59 

Mail Service 59 

Organization Members 60 

Transportation Facilities 75 



HISTORICAL SKETCH 

The history of the present University of Mary- 
land practically combines that of two institutions. 
It begins with the chartering of the College of 
Medicine of Maryland in Baltimore in 1807, 
which graduated its first class in 1810. In 1812 
the institution was empowered to annex other 
departments, and by the same act was constituted 
a University by name and became the University 
of Maryland. 

For more than a century the University of 
Maryland stood almost as organized in 1812, 
until an act of the Legislature in 1920 merged 
it with the Maryland State College and changed 
the name of the Maryland State College to the 
University of Maryland. 

The Maryland State College first was char- 
tered in 1856 under the name of the Maryland 
Agricultural College, the second agricultural 
school in the Western Hemisphere. In 1862 
Congress passed the Land Grant Act and the 
Maryland Agricultural College was named the 
beneficiary of the grant in Maryland. Thus, the 
college became, at least in part, a State institu- 
tion. In the Fall of 1914 its control was taken 
over entirely by the State. In 1916 the Legis- 
lature granted a new charter to the College, and 
made at the Maryland State College. 

192971 



UNIVERSITY CALENDAR— 1928-1929 

First Semester 

1928 

Sept. 24-25 — Monday-Tuesday, Registration for 
Freshmen. 

Sept. 26 — Wednesday, Registration for Upper 
Classmen. 

Sept. 27 — Thursday, Instruction for first sem- 
ester begins. 

Oct. 3 — Wednesday, Last day to change registra- 
tion or to file schedule card without 
fine. 

Nov. 12 — Monday, 11 A. M., Observance of Ar- 
mistice Day. 

Xov. 28-Dec. 3— Wednesday, 4.20 P. M. to 
Monday, 8.20 A. M., Thanksgiving 
Recess. 

Dec. 20— Thursday, 12.10 P. M., Christmas 
Recess begins. 

1929 

Jan. 2— Wednesday, 8.20 A. M., Christmas Re- 
cess ends. 

Jan. 28-Feb. 2 — Monday-Saturday, First sem- 
ester examinations. 



Second Semester, 

Jan. 23-26 — Wednesday-Saturday. Registration 
for second semester. 

Feb. 4 — Monday, Last day to register for second 
semester without payment of late 
registration fee. 

Feb. 5 — Tuesday, 8.20 A. M., Instruction for 
second semester begins. 

Feb. 11 — Monday, Last day to change registra- 
tion or to file schedule card without 
fine. 

Feb. 22 — Friday, Washington's Birthday. Holi- 
day. 

Mar. 26 — Tuesday, Observance of Maryland 
Day. 

Mar. 28.Apr. 3— Thursday, 12.10 P. M.-Wed- 
nesday, 8.20 A. M., Easter Recess. 

May 8-9 — Wednesday-Thursday, Festival of 
Music. 

May 22-25 — Wednesday-Saturday, Registration 
for first semester, 1929-30. 

May 2 9- June 5 — Wednesday- Wednesday, Second 
semester examinations for Seniors. 

May 30 — Thursday, Memorial Day. Holiday. 

June 3-8 — Monday-Saturday, Second semester 
examinations. 

June 9 — Sunday, 11 A. M., Baccalaureate Ser- 
mon. 

June 10 — Monday, Class Day. 

Tune 11 — Tuesday, 11 A. M., Commencement. 



FOREWORD 

In presenting this, the first All-College Park 
Student Handbook, we feel that we are helping 
to reflect the ever growing opinion, that this 
branch of the University is taking its place 
among similar institutional units. It is farthest 
from our wishes that we should draw away from 
our Baltimore colleagues; our chief aim is to 
provide suitable means for both branches to 
express individuality. 

As the undergraduate division, it is only 
natural that our activities — social, athletic, and 
scholastic — should trend themselves along some- 
what different — although not radically different — 
lines from our professional fellow-students. The 
Handbook, as a condensed mirror of local stu- 
dent life, is the logical medium for brief expla- 
nations of campus tradition and affairs. 

Each scholastic unit encounters needs and 
problems of its own; hence the reason for indi- 
vidual treatment. We trust that the increased 
local color will prove commensurate with the 
cosmopolitan aspect of preceding Maryland 
Handbooks. 

It is our sincere hope that this little volume 
will provide a foundation for later books in- 
corporating numerous other features that are 
made prohibitive here because of limited space. 



GREETINGS FROM THE PRESIDENT 

To THE Students of the 

University of Maryland. 

There is always a cordial welcorne for new 
students entering our university. We are glad 
to have you with us and we want to help you 
in every way we can to accomplish the high pur- 
poses that bring you here. 

We always have in our student body represen- 
tatives of all the important activities of- the 
state. They come from the best homes, from 
the poorest homes, and most of them come from 
average homes. 

On this campus any young man or woman is 
judged by what he or she is rather than by the 
place from which they come. Those who make a 
real effort to get ahead in their studies and who 
prove themselves to be good friends and com- 
panions are the ones who in the end will derive 
the greatest benefit from the university life. It 
is a privilege to be admitted to a university, and 
a very high privilege to make a valuable contri- 
bution to the university life. 

Some new students need to be warned of the 
importance of keeping their work up to date. The 
most common cause of failure in college is let- 
ting the work get behind and thinking that it 
can be made up later. The later days always 
bring tasks enough without giving time to what 
should have been done before. 

I am speaking for all of the members of our 
staff and for most of the older students when I 
say that we truly want to help the new students 
in every way we can. And this offer of as- 
sistance is extended also in behalf of the pas- 
tors of the local churches and officers of the 
several religious associations. 

Sincerely yours, 

R. A. Pearson, 

President. 



University Departments 



YOUNG MEN'S CHRISTIAN 
ASSOCIATION 

The Young Men's Christian Association at the 
University of Maryland operates independently 
of the other organizations. It is formed to aid 
persons in leading a Christian life and its pur- 
pose is as follows: 

1. To lead students to faith in God through 

Jesus Christ. 

2. To lead students into membership and ser- 

vice in the Christian Church. 

3. To promote their growth in Christian faith 

and character, especially through the 
study of the Bible. 

4. To challenge students to devote themselves 

in united effort with all Christians to 
making the Will of God effective in 
human society and to extending the King- 
dom of God throughout the world. 

In the past, the "Y" has had its support from 
the Board of Managers of the Y. M. C. A., but 
now the Board is discontinued and in its place 
is substituted the Supervisory Committee on Stu- 
dent Religious Activities. The Committee does 
not function solely with the "Y" as the Board 
formerly did, but instead, it extends a helping 
hand to campus religious organizations that 
desire its need. Through this committee, the 
"Y" will look for its aid indirectly. 

The officers of this Committee are as follows; 

Dr. W. B. Kemp, Chairman. 

Dr. A. E. Zucker. 

Dr. H. J. Patterson. 

Dean A. Stamp. 

M. W. Grafflin. 

10 



Student Officers 

President — William L. Lamar. 
Vice-President — W. Gelston McNeil. 
Secretary — Thomas Hughes. 
Treasurer — Melvin Beachey. 

The Young Men's Christian Association was 
reorganized in the Spring of 1924 to meet the 
demand felt by many students for a men's or- 
ganization which would be able to assume the 
leadership for the religious life of all students. 
Programs are being planned and carried in re- 
sponse to whatever needs arise. 

The Discussion Group this past year reached 
several hundred students, and the Freshman Con- 
ference at Camp Conoy was an effectual intro- 
duction into college life of those who attended. 
This forthcoming year the "Y" will present 
prominent speakers on its program as it has 
done in the past. The social side is to be stressed 
more than previously. Likewise we plan to 
work with and to co-operate with the "Y.W." 

President Lamar has chosen his cabinet as 
follows: 

Robert Simmons Thomas Hughes 

John Schueler Melvin Beachey 

Henry Whiteford Lawrence Downey 

William Lucas Lloyd Groshon 

Gelston McNeil Duncan Clark 
Arthur Aholt 

Of special interest is the Sunday Evening 
Discussion Group, held under the direction of 
the Y.M. and Y.W., each week. Everyone is 
invited. 

Various conferences are held during the year, 
including those at Western Maryland, Blue 
Ridge, Camp Conoy, and Eagles Mere. 



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12 



REGULATION OF STUDENT ACTIVITIES 

Association of students in organized bodies, 
for the purpose of carrying on voluntary student 
activities in orderly and productive ways, is 
recognized and encouraged. All organized stu- 
dent activities, except those which are controlled 
by a special board or faculty committee, are 
under the supervision of the Committee on Stu- 
dent Affairs, subject to the approval of the Presi- 
dent. Such groups are formed only with the 
consent of the Committee on Student Affairs and 
the approval of the President. Without such 
consent and approval no student organization 
which in any way represents the University 
before the public, or which purports to be a 
University organization or organization of Uni- 
versity students, may use the name of the 
University in connection with its own name, or 
in connection with its members as students. 

Eligibility to Represent the University 

Only students in good standing are eligible to 
represent the University in extra-curricular con- 
tests. No student while on probation may repre- 
sent the University in such events as athletic 
contests, glee club concerts, dramatic per- 
formances and debates. 

Discipline 

In the government of the University, the 
President and faculty rely chiefly upon the sense 
of responsibility of the students. The student 
who pursues his studies diligently, attends classes 
regularly, lives honorably and maintains good be- 
havior meets this responsibility. In the inter- 
est of the general welfare of the University, 
those who fail to maintain these standards are 
eliminated. Students are under the direct super- 
vision of the University only when on the 
campus, but they are responsible to the Uni- 
versity for their conduct wherever they may be. 



Student Government 

The General Students' Assembly is composed 
of all the students and is the instrument for stu- 
dent government. It operates under a constitu- 
tion. Its officers are a President, Vice-Presi- 
dent, Secretary, Treasurer, and an Executive 
Council representative of the various college 
classes. 

This Assembly meets every second Wednesday 
at 11.20 o'clock in the Auditorium for the trans- 
action of business which concerns the whole stu- 
dent body. On alternate Wednesdays a program 
is arranged by the officers with the aid of the 
Department of Public Speaking. The Students' 
Executive Council, with the aid of the Com- 
mittee on Student Affairs, acting as an advisory 
board to the Council, performs the executive du- 
ties incident to managing student affairs. 

Women Students' Government Association 

Women Students' Government Association is 
an organization composed of all the women stu- 
dents, for the management of affairs concerning 
the coeds. It operates under a constitution. Its 
officers are a President, Vice-President, Secre- 
tary and an Executive Council. This Council 
has the advisory co-operation of the Dean of 
Women. 



14 



FRESHMAN PROCEDURE 

Freshman registration will take place Monday, 
September 19, beginning at 9 A. M. All 
freshmen are expected to register on this day. 
Wednesday, September 21, is reserved for regis- 
;ering the students of the three upper classes, and 
freshmen will not be registered on this day. 

Dormitories will be ready for occupancy by 
freshmen Sunday, September 23, and the dining 
hall will be ready to serve dinner to freshmen 
Sunday evening at 5.30. 

A special program is planned covering the 
time between registration day, September 24, 
and the beginning of the instruction period, 
Thursday, September 27, the object of which is 
to complete the organization of freshmen so that 
they may begin their regular work promptly and 
effectively on September 27. This program in- 
cludes classification of all freshmen students, 
medical examinations, psychological examina- 
tions, instruction in regard to the departmental 
and campus facilities and advisory conferences, 
conducted by the faculties of the several col- 
leges for the students registered in those depart- 
ments. 



15 



TIPS TO FRESHMEN 

First of all, remember that you are a fresh- 
man. It is apparent at all times, and when you 
attempt to' hide it the result is as prominent as a 
sore thumb. 

Do not imagine that you are lowering your- 
self by observing the Freshman Regulations. 
They are to impress upon you the idea that you 
are no longer a high school senior. You are 
beginning again, and as such, you must start 
"on the ground floor." By disregarding the 
rules, you are not being unique, or admired for 
your spirit of independence. You are merely 
laying the foundation for trouble with the sopho- 
mores. It is considered a mark of good class 
spirit, not servility, to act in accordance with 
freshman tradition. 

Get the speaking habit. A habitual cheery 
greeting to everyone on the campus will do more 
toward establishing your popularity than any 
other single act on your part. 

If you were a leader in high school, don't 
advertise it here. In all probability it is known 
already. Conversely, if you took little part in 
student affairs in your prep school don't be dis- 
couraged. Everyone is given plenty of oppor- 
tunity at Maryland. There is at least one activ- 
ity here that is suited to your tastes and ability; 
find it and stick to it. Also, remember that 
everyone cannot be a star athlete. Do not skip 
around from one activity to another needlessly, 
but on the other hand, do not waste time on one 
for which you find yourself unqualified. 

If you are living away from home don't for- 
get that the folks like to receive a letter, now 
and then. Establish a certain day for doing 
this, and then let nothing interfere. 

Remember that you are your own master now. 
You have reached the age when you can dif- 
ferentiate between right and wrong. Your con- 
duct on and away from the campus reflects upon 

16 



the institution. In a large measure you have 
the good reputation of the University of Mary- 
land in your hands. It remains for you to prove 
that this trust is not misplaced. 

"By your works you shall be known." No- 
where is this more true than on the university 
campus. Here at Maryland you cannot bask in 
the reflected glory of a prorninent brother, father 
or other relative. Opportunities are yours; make 
the most of them. 

Finally, be warned against trying to revolu- 
tionize the school in your first year. If you do 
not approve of the regulations the trouble is in 
your own disposition. They have not proved 
injurious to hundred of students who have pre- 
ceded you. It is your traditional duty to obey 
the rules during your freshman period, before 
you are in a position to recommend changes. 



17 



UNIVERSITY REGULATIONS 

Registration 

1. Students should report to the Dean of the 
College in which they are registered, where they 
will receive a course card. New students must 
present a matriculation card. If this card has 
not been received by mail, arrangements for its 
issuance must be made in the Office of the 
Registrar, prior to reporting to the Dean. 

2. The course card, properly made out and 
approved by the Dean, and a registration card 
obtained in the Office of the Registrar, will be 
presented at Window One in the Office of the 
Registrar and a bill for the semester's expenses 
will be issued. 

3. This bill, together with the course card, 
will be taken to the Cashier's Office, where fees 
are paid and where the Cashier certifies upon the 
course card that payment has been made. 

4. The course card is then taken to the Sec- 
tioning Committee, Room T-21 1, Administration 
Building, where section assignments are made. 

5. About three hours later the student may 
obtain class cards in the Office of the Registrar, 
Window Two. 

6. The student places his name, his college, 
and the date on the class cards and presents at 
the first meeting of each class the appropriate 
class card. Students are not admitted to classes 
without class cards. Instructors will see that 
this rule is enforced. 

7. Within seven days after the opening of 
the semester, each student must file in the Office 
of the Registrar, a schedule of his classes. A fee 
of one dollar is imposed for failure to do this. 

8. Students, who for adequate reasons, are 
more than ten days late in registering must se- 
cure permission for entrance into courses from 
the instructors in charge of the course. Such 
permission if given must be indicated on the 
course card. A fee of from $3.00 to $9.00 is 
imposed for late registration. 

18 



9. Any change of course is made only on 
written permission from the Dean involved and 
is subject to a fee of one dollar after the first 
week of the semester. After securing such per- 
mission from the Dean, the student must present 
the same to the Registrar at once, who, in turn, 
issues the student a class card for the course he 
is entering and withdrawal card is sent to the 
instructor in charge of the course from which 
the student is withdrawing. Unless this is done, 
no credit will be given for the new course, and 
a failure will be recorded for the course drop- 
ped. In general, withdrawal from courses other 
than elective, will not be granted after the first 
six weeks of the course. 

10. A student who desires to transfer from 
one college to another must petition the Dean of 
the college from which he wishes to withdraw on 
the regular form obtained from the Registrar. 
The transfer is effected when the blank properly 
approved is filed in the Office of the Registrar. 

Examinations and Marks 

11. Examinations at the end of each semester 
complete the studies pursued to that point. 

12. The following grade symbols are used: 
A, B, C, and D — Passing. 

E — Condition. 
F— Failure. 
I — Incomplete. 

13. Grade A denotes superior scholarship; 
grade B, good scholarship; grade C fair scholar- 
ship; and grade D, poor but passing scholarship. 

14. A student who receives the grade of D in 
more than one-fourth of the credits required for 
graduation must take additional courses or re- 
peat courses until he has the required number 
of credits for a degree, three-fourths of which 
carry a grade above D. 

15. A student with a mark of E is con- 
ditioned. The grade E indicates that though a 
student has not failed in a course, he has not 

19 



presented sufficient evidence to pass; in the opin- 
ion of the instructor his record in the course 
has been sufficiently good to justify the pre- 
sumption that he may secure a passing grade by 
re-examination or by additional work without re- 
peating the course. The grade E cannot be 
raised to a higher grade than D. 

16. A student with a mark of F has failed 
in the course. In case of failure in a required 
course a student must repeat the course. He is 
required to enroll in that subject again the first 
time it is offered, if possible. 

17. In case a condition or failure is incur- 
red in an elective subject the student may be 
permitted to substitute only upon recommenda- 
tion of the head of the Department in which the 
student is majoring and approval of the stu- 
dent's Dean. 

18. The mark of I (incomplete) is given only 
to those students who have a proper excuse for 
not completing all the requirements of a course. 
The mark of / is not used to signify work of in- 
ferior quality. In cases where this grade is 
given, the students must complete the work as- 
signed by the instructor by the end of the first 
semester in which that subject is again offered, 
or the mark becomes F. 

19. Work of grade "D", or of any passing 
grade, cannot be raised to a higher grade except 
by repeating the course. A student who repeats 
a course for which he has received credit for 
work done at the University or elsewhere, must 
meet all the requirements of the course, includ- 
ing regular attendance, laboratory work and ex- 
aminations. His final grade will be substituted 
for the grade already recorded, but he will not 
receive any additional credit for the course. 

20. A student must arrange with his instruc- 
tors at the beginning of a semester for the re- 
moval of conditions received in the previous 
semester. A fee of $1.00 will be charged for 
each regular condition examination. No instruc- 
tor will give a condition examination until a 

20 



student presents a receipt showing the fee has 
been paid. Following each condition examination 
the instructor will report the results to the 
Registrar. 

21. A condition not removed within the 
succeeding semester becomes a failure. 

22. A student transferring to another college 
will consult with his new Dean regarding the 
adjustment of his record. A record of this ad- 
justment must be filed in the Registrar's Office. 

Absences 

23. A student is expected to attend punc- 
tually each class and laboratory exercise in each 
course. 

24. In case of extended illness which pre- 
vents the attendance of a student at his classes 
he should promptly notify his Dean. 

25. In case of absence 24 hours . before or 
after a holiday, a student will be penalized by 
the payment of a special fee of three dollars for 
each course cut. Instructors will report such 
absences immediately to the office of the Reg- 
istrar. 

Probations and Delinquencies 

26. If a student receives a mark of failure 
(F) in fifty per cent or more of the semester 
hours for which he is registered he is auto- 
matically dropped from the rolls of the Uni- 
versity. 

27. A student who does not make a passing 
mark in at least eight hours of work in which he 
is enrolled for a given semester, may not con- 
tinue for the next semester without the permis- 
sion of his Dean. Where such permission is 
given the student is on probation, and remains 
on probation until his deficiencies are removed. 
A notice of his probationary status will be 
mailed to the student's parent or guardian. 

28. A student while on probation shall not 
represent the University in any extra-curricular 
activity such as: participation in athletic con- 

21 



tests, the Glee Club, dramatics, debating teams, 
etc. 

29. While on probation a student is required 
to report weekly to his Dean or faculty advisor 
with regard to his probationary status. 

30. The Dean shall recommend to the Presi- 
dent, the withdrawal of any student who, in the 
opinion of his college faculty, is deemed unde- 
sirable, or who continues to do unsatisfactory 
work. 

31. Any student who has been dropped from 
the University or has withdrawn in order to 
avoid being dropped, and who is subequently re- 
admitted, is not eligible to represent the Uni- 
versity on any team, club, or association, until 
he has been in the University for a period of 
one semester from the date of his return and 
has satisfied the regular conditions of eligibility. 

Withdrawal from the University 

32. A student who desires to withdraw from 
the University must obtain the permission of his 
Dean on the regular form obtained from the 
Registrar and must have filled out a clearance 
slip. After these forms have been filled out 
they must be filed in the Office of the Registrar. 
A student who withdraws without following this 
procedure forfeits all claims for reimbursements, 
and is not entitled to a statement of honorable 
dismissal. 



22 



TRADITIONS 

In the realization that the incoming freshmen 
do not understand the traditions established by 
previous classes, it is the purpose of these rules 
to assist the freshman in finding his place among 
the students, to instruct him in the spirit of the 
student body, "and to teach him a fundamental 
lesson — discipline. 

Freshmen are required to abide strictly by the 
following rules, which will be enforced by the 
student body through the Sophomore vigilance 
committee. 



Freshman Regulations 

The following is taken from the Constitution 
of the Student Assembly: 

"Article V, Freshman Regulations. Section II. 
These Regulations shall be enforced by the en- 
tire Student Body through the Sophomore Com- 
mittee on Freshman Regulations, i. e., penalties 
imposed by the Committee upon the complaint 
by an upper classman of an infraction of the 
Freshman Regulations." Any Freshman who 
feels that he has been imposed upon by upper 
classmen shall have the opportunity to appeal 
to the Sophomore Committee on Freshman 
Regulations.- 

1. Freshmen must wear rat caps at all times 
when on campus. 

2. Freshmen must not smoke on the campus. 

3. Freshmen must keep hands out of their 
pockets. 

4. Freshmen must not cut across campus and 
must use only cinder and cement paths. 

5. Freshmen must refrain from wearing 
school insignia of atvy kind unless earned at this 
school, 

23 



6. Freshmen must enter and leave Adminis- 
tration Building by basement doors and must 
not loiter around front of the buildings. 

7. Freshmen must not sit on stone wall 
along Washington-Baltimore Boulevard. 

8. Freshmen must speak cheerfully to all 
members of the faculty, upper classmen, and 
members of their own class. The form of ad- 
dress shall be: for one person, "Sir"; for a 
number, "Gentlemen." 

9. Freshmen must run all errands assigned 
to them by upper classmen and do all work 
assigned to them by Sophomore Committee on 
Freshmen Regulations. 

10. Freshmen must work on athletic field 
when requested. 

11. Freshmen must attend all meetings of 
the assembly (occupying front rows) and all 
cheer practices, and must learn all college yells 
and songs. 

12. Freshmen must attend all games in a 
compact cheering section (no dates with girls at 
games). 

13. Freshmen must work in Diamondback 
office each Tuesday throughout the year. 

14. Freshmen must at all times carrj- an 
ample supply of matches. 

15. Freshmen must conduct thernselves in a 
gentleman-like manner at all times o« and 
around the campus. 



Dining Hall Courtesies 

1. Freshmen must line up in twos on lower 
steps of dining hall. 

2. Freshmen must fold their arms during 
announcements. 



24 



INFIRMARY RULES 

1. All students paying the fixed University 
charges, who report at the Infirmary will be 
given medical attention, infirmary services and 
medicine, except for special conditions, such as 
major operations, eye, ear, nose work, etc. 

2. Students residing on tfie campus, when too 
ill to report at the Infirmary in person, will be 
given treatment in their rooms, by the University 
Physician. Except in emergencies, such cases of 
illness should be reported during the usual hours 
at the Infirmary. 

3. Students residing in fraternity, sorority, 
or boarding houses, adjacent to and approved by 
the University, will be treated by the University 
Physician the same as students living on the 
campus. 

When practicable, sickness should be reported 
before 9 A. M., to the University Physician 
(Phone Berwyn 68), or the Infirmary (Berwyn 
85M). 

4. Students living at home, with relatives or 
guardians shall not be entitled to medical atten- 
tion in their homes unless injured in some form 
Df University activity. 

5. Students residing in fraternity, sorority or 
boarding houses may, upon order of the Univer- 
sity Physician, be cared for in the Infirmary. 
Such students shall pay the University an extra 
charge of $1.00 per day to cover cost of food and 
service from the Dining Hall. 

6. The University Physician will give med- 
ical supervision and treatment to employees (but 
not their families) of the University who work 
in the kitchen, dining hall, dormitories and 
dairy. 

7. Members of the faculty, clerical force, 
and students not paying fixed charges shall not 
be entitled to free treatment or medical atten- 
tion by the University Physician or nurse, or to 
have the use of the Infirmary. 

25 



GREETINGS FROM DEAN OF WOMEN 

To those of you who have returned to carry on 
work already begun and to those new students, 
coming here for the first time, greetings and a 
hearty and cordial welcome. Friendship, sym- 
pathy and understanding await you here. An 
opportunity awaits you to serve your college com- 
munity. For, the one who lives most fully 
during his four years in college takes part in 
the various activities on the campus. However, 
you must have a sense of values and choose 
wisely from the great number of organizations. 
Do not rush headlong into too many. Do a few 
things well, rather than many in a haphazard 
fashion. We offer to you our ideals of Mary- 
land, our traditions and customs, and ask you 
to help us to perpetuate them. 

Sincerely yours, 

Adele H. Stamp, 
Dean of Women. 



26 



THE WOMEN'S ATHLETIC ASSOCIATION 

President Anne Matthews 

Vice-President Catherine Barnsiey 

Secretary Elanor Baumel 

Treasu rer M aro are T M c M i n i m Y 

The W. A. A. since its organization in the 
fall of 1924, has satisfied a long-felt need of an 
organization for the promotion of organized ath- 
letics among the women students. 

The Association has been very successful dur- 
ing its four years on the campus and has a 
very bright outlook. During the past year it put 
across successfully a Spring tennis tournament 
and an inter-class basketball series, and estab- 
lished interest in track practice. Because of cold 
weather the Fall tennis tournament was not 
completed. Swimming and bowling also were 
sponsored. The year closed with the second 
annual banquet of the Association, which was 
arranged by a special committee and had a large 
attendance. At this banquet suitable awards 
were formally presented by the Dean of Women 
to the girls and teams who had won them during 
the year. 

No girl may play on a team or take other 
active part in any sport without first joining the 
W. A. A. This rule is for the purpose of keep- 
ing up interest in the organization and for assur- 
ing it of having sufficient funds to carry on its 
work properly. 



27 



THE YOUNG WOMEN'S CHRISTIAN 
ASSOCIATION 

President Margaret Karr 

Vice-President Margaret McMinimy 

Secretary :._ Grace Maxwell 

Treasurer —Roberta Willard 

Conference Representative Gladys Bull 

The Y. W. C. A. was organized in 1924 for 
the purpose of meeting the need for an all- 
campus religious organization among the women 
students which would correlate and co-ordinate 
all the religious activities for the women of the 
Univrsity. In co-operation with the Y. M. 
C. A., the Y. W. C. A. assumes a major re- 
sponsibility for the religious activities of the 
campus. This is a difficult task, but one that is 
so worthwhile that the Y. W. C. A. calls upon 
every girl upon the campus who wishes to help 
others build high Christian character, to join 
with them in carrying out their program. 

Religious programs for this year will center 
in the Sunday Evening Vesper Service under 
the joint auspices of the Y. M. C. A. and 
Y. W. C. A. The discussions are held at 6.30 
P. M. every Sunday in the University audi- 
torium. Mrs. C. P. Close will also conduct a 
Bible Study group every Sunday at 9.45 A. M. 
in the College Park Church, which all women 
students are invited to attend. 



28 



CO-ED WHO'S WHO — 1928-1929 

Y. W. C. A. 

President — Margaret Karr 
Secretary — Grace Maxwell 

Theu Gamma 

President — Catherine Appleman 
Secretary — Frances Norton 

Rifle Team 

Captain — Hazel Kreider 
Manager — Elizabeth Garber 

Women's Student Government 

President — Emily Herzog 
Secretaray — Catherine Barnsley 
Recorder of Points — Clemencia Cause 



"M" WINNERS 

H. Kreider C. Barnsley 

A. Orton M. Claflin 

M. Hislop E. Hoffa 

M. Mitchell E. Jones 

E. Garber I. Bewick 



SORORITIES 
National 

Alpha Omicron Pi. Established in 1924. 
Local 

Sigma Delta. Established in 1920. 

Kappa Xi. Established in 1924. 

Alpha Upsilon Chi. Established in 1926. 

29 



BY-LAWS THE WOMEN'S STUDENT 
GOVERNMENT ASSOCIATION 

I. Late Leaves 

The attendance at any function which does not 
permit a girl to return to her dormitory by 7.30 
P. M. before April 15, or by 8.00. P. M. after 
April 15, with the exceptions noted below, shall 
be considered a late leave. After a late leave a 
girl must return by 12.45 A. M. to her dormi- 
tory. 

Late leaves per year shall be: Freshmen, 1 per 
month; Sophomores, 2 per month; Juniors, 3 per 
month; Seniors, 4 per month. Seniors without 
conditions or failures may take leaves at their 
discretion after April 1, provided they sign as 
usual. Seniors graduating in February and hav- 
ing no conditions or failures may take late leaves 
at their discretion after January 14, provided 
they sign up as usual. Freshmen and Sopho- 
mores may borrow and carry over their late 
leaves provided they do not exceed 2 a month 
for Freshmen and 3 a month for Sophomores. 

All University functions may be attended 
without late leaves. This includes fraternity 
dances held in the Park during the week-ends 
and school dances held off the campus; it does 
not include fraternity dances held during the 
week. 

School or fraternity dances held on nights be- 
fore or on holidays do hot require late leaves. 

Girls returning from late leaves must go to 
their dormitories immediately. 

No week-ends spent away from the campus 
shall count as late leaves. 

Attendance to educational plays, etc., in town 
shall not be courited as a late leave. 

Girls working after seven-thiry under Student 
Employment may stay out without taking a late 
leave. Example — taking care of the children 
of University people who live in the Park. 

During examination week, girls may go home 

30 



if they have no examinations the following day 
and that will not count as a late leave. During 
final examination week in June, girls not hav- 
ing examinations following day may have 10.30 
leaves. 

Late leaves may be substituted for light-cuts, 
and if a girl returns early from a late leave she 
may use her light for the same purpose as a 
light-cut until 12.45 when her late leave is over. 

Definite information must be put on slips when 
late leaves involves staying away all night. Girls 
are to sign their own late leave slips and give 
address of destination whenever possible. 

Girls going home to vote must return to their 
dormitories by 10.30 Tuesday night or be penal- 
ized a late leave. 

II. Dances 

It is understood that girls will return to their 
dormitories immediately after the close of alll 
dances. No school dances count as late leaves 
so girls should return immediately after such 
dances. 

Dancing on Sunday is forbidden by unwritten 
law. 

Girls "must return to dormitories by 12.45 
after fraternity dances. 

The chaperons for University dances, frater- 
nity dances and sorority dances must be ap- 
proved by the Dean of Women. No student in 
the dormitories may attend a non-college dance 
unless the chaperons have been approved by the 
Dean of Women. 

III. Fraternity Houses 
Girls may not go unchaperoned to fraternity 
houses. 

House Regulations 

I. House President 
The duties of the House President shaU be: 
(a) To call and preside over house meetings. 
These shall be called at her own discretion or at 

31 



the written request of any five residents of her 
house. 

ib) To be responsible for the general con- 
duct and welfare of her house in co-operation 
with the faculty member residing in her house. 

(c) To act as hostess of her house. 

(d) To check up all girls at 10.30 and see that 
lights are out. 

(e) To see that quiet is preserved during 
study hours. 

(/) To grant light cuts and to keep record of 
those taken by each girl. 

(g) To keep a record of the late leaves taken 
by each girl as shown by the late leave slips 
turned over each week to the House President by 
the matron or chaperon. 

(/;) To grant special minor permission to 
house residents, such as going to Joe's after 
study hours begin. 

(/) To appoint a girl to act in her place when 
she is absent. 

(;■) To authorize the payment of bills con- 
tracted by her house. 

(k) To give, permission to go to Bill's after 
7.30. This should only be granted when three 
or more girls are going together. Permission 
may be granted for girls to go to Bill's with 
dates only after basket-ball games or movies. 
This permission may be given only when girls 
can return to their dormitories in time to be in 
bed by 10.30. 

Girls shall be in their respective houses at 
7.30 P. M. until April 15, at which time they 
shall be in their houses by 8.00 P. M., except 
on Friday, Saturday, and Sunday nights, and 
evenings before and of holidays, when they 
shall be in by 10.30 P. M. 

III. Quiet Hours 
Quiet hours shall be observed: 
Until 12.00 noon and from 1.00 to 4.30 daily 
except Saturday and Sunday. 

At night from 7.30 P. M. on, with intermis- 

32 



siou from 10.00 to 10.30, except on Friday, Sat- 
urday, and Sunday nights, when houses must be 
luiet after 11.00 P. M. 
There shall be no bathing after 10.30 P. M. 

IV. Musical Instruments 
Musical instruments may not be played dur- 
ing quiet hours. 

Typewriters shall come under the sarne ruling 
as musical instrumetns, as regards their opera- 
tion, unless they are kept in a room provided for 
them in which room they shall be so far removed 
that they disturb no one. 

V. Lights 

Lights must be out by 10.30 P. M., except on 
Friday, Saturday and Sunday nights, and nights 
before and of holidays, when they must be out 
by 11.00 P. M. 

Light cuts shall be allowed as follows: Fresh- 
men 3; Sophomores 3; Juniors 4; Seniors 5, 
per month. These light cuts must be taken in the 
living room or in some other room other than a 
sleeping room, unless both roommates are taking 
a light cut, in which case each girl shall be 
credited with a cut and the girls may remain in 
their rooms. 

VI. Rooms 

All rooms must be orderly by 8.00 A. M. 

VII. Registration 

Any girl leaving College Park at any time 
shall register her destination at her dormitory. 

Girls leaving their dormitory for meetings, 
library, social functions, etc., shall register des- 
tination at their respective dormitories. 

VIII. Guests 
Permission must be secured from the owner of 
the room for its use and from the house chaperon 
one week in advance. There shall be a charge 
of one dollar a person a ngiht. 

33 



IX. Callers 

Girls may have men callers at the dormitories 
after dinner until 7.30 on Monday, Tuesday, 
Wednesday and Thursday nights; on Saturday 
and Sunday afternoons, and .on Friday, Saturday 
and Sunday evenings until 10.30 P. M . 



Point System 

The purpose of the Point System is to prevent 
a few girls from being overworked and to en- 
courage and make it possible for more girls to 
share in campus activities. 

Maximum: 25 points per year. 

Major 

1. President Student Government Ass'n 18 

2. President Y. W. C. A 18 

3. House President 15 

4. Secretary of Grange — 15 

5. President of W. A. A 15 

6. Manager Rifle Team 15 

7. Manager Basketball 12 

8. Secretary Y. W. C .A 10 

9. Treasurer of Grange 10 

10. Intercollegiate Debater 10 

11. President of Opera Club 10 

12. Captain Rifle Team 10 

13. Treasurer Y. W. C. A 10 

14. President Theta Gamma 10 

Minor 

1. Class Representative to Student Council 8 

2. Day Student Representative 8 

3. Manager of Track 8 

4. Manager of Tennis 8 

5. Secretary-Treasurer of Opera Club 8 

6. President French Club — 8 

7. Secretary Student Assembly 8 

34 



8. Secretary W. A. A 8 

9. Treasurer W. A. A 8 

10. Captain Basketball .. 6 

11. Secretary of Literary Society 5 

12. Secretary Dramatic Club 5 

13. Treasurer Dramatic Club 5 

14. Secretary-Treasurer Theta Gamma 5 

15. Treasurer Literary Society 5 

16. Secretary Student Gov't Ass'n — . 5 

17. Vice-President Y. W. C. A 5 

18. Cabinet Member Y. W. C. A .. 5 

19. Program Com. Literary Society 5 

20. Freshmen Reporter "Diamondback" 5 

21. Sophomore Reporter "Diamondback" 5 

22. Stafif of "Diamondback" 5 

23. Organization Reporter 5 

24. Secretary of Class 5 

25. Ass't Sec.-Treas. of Opera Club 5 

26. Secretary French Club 5 

27. Treasurer French Club 5 

28. Vice-Pres. Student Gov't Ass'n 3 

29. Lady Ass't Lecturer of Grange 3 

30. Recording Sec'y Episcopal Club 3 

3 1 . Cor. Sec'y Episcopal Club 3 

32. Vice-President of Opera Club 3 

33. President Young People's L^niori 2 

34. Sec.-Treas. Young People's Union 2 

35. Vice-President Literary Society 2 

36. Vice-President Theta Gamma 2 

37. Vice-Pres. Young People's Union 2 

38. Vice-President of Class ... 2 

39. Vice-President of W. A. A 2 

40. Vice-President of Episcopal Club 2 

41. Vice-President French Club 2 



35 



STUDENT PUBLICATIONS 

Each undergraduate at Maryland is required 
to pay the Publications' Fee of eight dollars. 
Two dollars and a half of this provides a year's 
subscription to the ■"Diamondback." the weekly, 
published every Tuesday during the school year. 
The remainder is for the "Reveille," the annual, 
which is issued about June 1. The entire 
amount is payable on the day of registration to 
the Business Manager of either publication, or 
to their accredited representatives. 

Major officers of the publications for the term 
1928-1929 are: 

The Diamondback 

Editor-in-Chief John E. Schueler 

Xews Editor J. Vernon Powers 

Asst. Xcu's Editor William T. Rosenbaum 

Busiiicss Manager J. Donald Kieffer 

Coed Editor Louise Townsend 

Supervising Editor William H. Hottel 

The Reveille 

Editor-in-Chiefs William J. Kinnamon 

Coed Editor Genevie\-e G. Wright 

Business Manager Madison E. Lloyd 

Supervising Editor William H. Hottel 

Both publications welcome tryouts for their 
respective staffs. Any student wishing to affi- 
liate with either should consult some member of 
the staff which he or she wishes to join. 



36 



WHO'S WHO 

Football 
Manager — A. Guertler 
Assistant Manager — H. Jarvis 

Baseball 
Manager — W. Hopkins • 
Assistant Manager — W. Chaffinch 

Track 

Manager — F. Haller 
Assistant Manager — A. Dean 

Lacrosse 

Attack Captain — W. Holloway 
Defense Captain — E. Loane 
Manager — R. Blakeslee 
Assistant Manager — C. Dean 

Basketball 

Captain — T. Dean 
Manager — A. Winnemore 
Assistant Manager — L. Smallwood 

Tennis 

Captain — B. Dyer 

Manager — J. Norton 

Assistant Manager — E. Valiant 

Senior Class 

President — G. Kessler 
Vice-President — W. Holloway 
Secretary — R. A. Laughlin 
Treasurer — E. T. Loane 
Sergeant-at-Arms — W. Elliott 
Executive Council — R. Smith 

Junior Class 
President- — A. Heagy 
Vice-President — C. Mace 
Secretary — *M. Wisner 
Treasurer — R. Tansil 
Sergeant-at-Arms — J. McDonald 

37 



Executive Council 

D. Freseman 
R. Healy 

Sophomore Class 

President — J. LeRoy 
Vice-President — H. Hess 
Secretaary — M. Temple 
Treasurer — R. Parks 
Sergeant-at-Arms — J. Logan 

Executive Council 

J. Hammack 
J. Pitzer 

Student Assembly 

President — F. Linton 
Vice-President — A. Guertler 
Secretary — R. Laughlin 
Treasurer — P. Insley 
Sergeant-at-Arms — J. Keenan 

Interfraternity Council 

President — P. Wertheimer 
Vice-President— J. O'Neill 
Secretary-Treasurer — B. Dyer 

The Reveille 

Editor-in-Chief — W. Kinnamon 
Coed Editor— G. Wright 
Business Manager — M. Lloyd 

The Diamondback 

Editor-in-Chief — J. Schueler 
News Editor — V. Powers 
Coed Editor — L. Townsend 
Business Manager — D. Kieffer 

Y. M. C. A. 

President — W. Lamar 
Vice-President — G. McNeil • 

Secretary — T. Hughes 
Treasurer — M. Beachey 



38 



Episcopal Club 

President — W. Plumley 
Vice-President— F. Wallett 
Secretary — A. Ryon 
Treasurer — E. Jones 

New Mercer Literary Society 

President — N. Janetzke 
Vice-President — Edith Burnside 
Secretary — Edna Burnside 
Treasurer — H. Gilchrist 

Poe Literary Society 

President— D. Clark 
Vice-President — C. Everstein 
Secretary — G. Maxwell 
Treasurer — C. Hughes 

Grange 

Master^ — ^S. Stabler 
Secretary — A. Price 
Treasurer — C. Grey 

Livestock Club 

President — J. Long 
Vice-President — S. Stabler 
Secretary — A. Schreiber 

Horticulture Club 

President — R. Romary 
Vice-President — J. Long 
Secretary-Treasurer — S. Hemming 

Rifle Club 

Captain — N. Spicknall 

Manager — H. Sehorn 

Assistant Manager — F. Marshall 

Rossbourg Club 

President — J. McMahon 
Vice-President — J. Umbarger 
Treasurer — O. Crothers 

39 



Glee Club 

President — E. Stimpson 
Vice-President — A. Cook 
Treasurer — J. Caldara 
Manager — B. McPhatter 

Engineering Society 

President— W. Elliot 
Vice-President — E. Wheeler 
Secretary-Treasurer — R. Welsh 
Sergeant-at-Arms — R. Hitch 

Footlight Club 

President — F. Linton 
Vice-President — H. Watson 
Secretary — I. Bewick 
Treasurer — W. Lamar 



40 



WEARERS OF THE "M' 





Football 


Dodson 

Crothers 

Wondrack 

Snyder 

Roberts 


Young 

Keenan 

Kessler 

McDonald 

Heagy 




Baseball 


Mace 

DeMarco 

Hoffman 

Radice 

Leschinsky 


Bromley 
Hale 
Kessler 
Wilson 




Lacrosse 


Dodson 

Heagy 

Loane 

Holloway 

Smink 


Crothers 
Wilson 
Evans 
Snyder 




Track 


McDonald 

Quinn 

Myers 

Remsburg 

Aman 


Elliot 
Plumley 
Kinnamon 
Lindzey 




Basketball 


Heagy 
Radice 
Madigan 


Dean 
Hetzel 

Evans 




Tennis 


Gable 


Rosenbaum 




Rifle 


Spicknall 
Dale 


Sehorn 



41 



FOOTBALL SCHEDULE 

Sept. 29 — Washington College, at College Park. 

Oct. 6 — North Carolina, at College Park. 

Oct. 13 — South Carolina, at Columbia. 

Oct. 20— Western Maryland, at College Park. 

Oct. n—\. M. I., at Richmond. 

Nov. 3— V. P. I., at College Park. 

Nov. 10 — Yale, at New Haven. 

Nov. 17 — Virginia, at College Park. 

Nov. 24 — Washington and Lee, at Washington. 

No. 29 — Johns Hopkins, at Baltimore. 



BASKETBALL RECORD, 1927-1928 

Maryland Opponents 



Washington and Lee 


38 


24 


V. P. L 


-- 29 


20 


Washington and Lee 


31 


28 


V. iL I 


2i 


9 


Gallaudet _ .. .. 


45 


20 


Kentucky 


Z7 


7 


Johns Hopkins 


20 


22 


St. John's - - 


25 


22 


Virginia 


26 


20 


Stevens . . 


31 


24 




26 . 


35 


Pennsylvania 


26 


30 


North Carolina State_ 


36 


24 


Virginia 


12 


34 


Washington College 


22 


20 


Johns Hopkins — 


„^ 23 


19 


\'. P. I 


30 


10 


Western Maryland 


30 


29 



42 



FOOTBALL RECORD, 1927-1928 

Maryland Opponents 

Washington College 80 

South Carolina . . 26 

North Carolina 6 7 

V^ P. I 13 7 

V^ M. I 10 6 

Washington and Lee 6 13 

Yale .. 6 30 

Virginia 21 

\^anderbilt 20 39 

Johns Hopkins . . 13 14 

Florida 6 7 



LACROSSE RECORD, 1927-1928 

Maryland Opponents 



L'Hirondelle 

Randolph-Macon 

Harvard 

Georgia Tech 

X'irffinia 


. 4 
. 10 
. 12 

- 16 

- 17 
. 7 

- 7 

- 3 
. 8 

- 15 
. 1 

- 7 
. 6 

- 3 




1 
2 
2 
1 


Colgate 

St. John's of Annapolis 

Xavy ... 


4 
2 
2 


Princeton 

Lehigh ._„.... 


3 
2 
6 


Rutgers .. 

Navy 


2 

2 


Johns Hopkins 


6 



43 



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44 



SONGS AND YELLS 

ALMA MATER 

(Maryland! My Maryland!) 

Thy sons and daughters throng thy door, 

Maryland! My Maryland! 
They come from mountain, farm and shore, 

Maryland! oh Maryland! 
Their hearts and hopes they bring to thee, 
And place them in thy custody, 
Proud hearts that pledge their love for thee: — 

Maryland University! 

Go forth, brave youth, throughout the state: 

Maryland! My Maryland! 
And by your actions, show her great: 

Maryland! Our Maryland! 
Thy Alma Mater's name and fame. 
Oh keep alive her holy flame. 
Until all hearts as one exclaim, 

Maryland! My Maryland! 

-Cheer, three times cheer, and one cheer more 

For Maryland! Dear Maryland! 
Send forth that cry from hill to shore: — 

Maryland University! 
Fair Mother of our brightest dreams, 
Blest giver of life's precious things. 
To thee each heart its service brings: — 

Maryland! My Maryland! 



45 



MY MARYLAND 

The despot's heel is on thy shore, 
Maryland! My Maryland I 

His torch is at thy temple door, 
Maryland! My Maryland! 

Avenge the patriotic gore, 

That flecked the streets of Baltimore, 

And be the battle queen of yore, 
Maryland! My Maryland! 

Thou wilt not cower in the dust, 

Maryland! My Maryland! 
Thy gleaming sword shall never rust, 

Maryland! My Maryland! 
Remember Carroll's sacred trust. 
Remember Howard's war-like thrust, 
And all the slumb'rers with the just, 
Maryland! My Maryland! 



Madelon 



In the very heart of Maryland, 

In the heart of every Maryland man, 

There's a spirit so endearing 

It will win your heart and hand. 

For she doth hold sway. 

She will win the day, 

And her glorious men will ever win the fray. 
Chorus 

Then it's Hurrah! Hurrah! for Maryland. 

Then it's Hurrah! Hurrah for U. of M. 

With her banners ever streaming high. 

She will always win or die. 

Then we'll gather 'round Alumni, 

And "Fight" will be our one reply. 

For we love, we love Old Maryland, 
Hurrah! Hurrah! Hurrah! 



46 



Who Owns This Team? 

Who owns this team? 

Who owns this team? 

Who owns this team? the people say. 

Why, we own this team. 

Sure, we own this team. 

Sure, we own this team. 

M-A-R-Y—L-A-X-D— HURRAH ! 

Who'll win this game? 

Who'll win this game? 

Who'll win this game? the people say. 

Why, we'll win this game, 

Sure, we'll win this game, 

M-A-R-Y—L-A-N-D— HURRAH ! 

Who owns this town? 

Who owns this town? 

Who owns this town? the people say. 

Why, we own this town, 

Sure, we own this town, 

M-A-R-Y—L-A-X-D— HURRAH ! 



U. of M. 

(Tune, Caisson Song) 

U. of M., U. of M., 
Keep the ball away from them. 
Keep that pigskin a-rolling along! 
Up the field, down the field, 
Xot an inch of ground we'll yield. 
Keep that pigskin a-rolling along! 
Then it's Whiff! Wham! Whack! 
Hear that Maryland quarterback 
Shout out his signals loud and strong! 
Where'er you go, you will always know 
That the pigskin is rolling along, 

(Shouted) Maryland! Maryland! 
Keep that pigskin a-rolling along. 

47 



Sons of Maryland 

(Tune, Sons of America) 

Sons of the Gold, 

Sons of the Black, 

Fight! No spirit lack. 

Your Alma Mater 

Needs you today 

To help her win the fray. 

Shoulder to shoulder. 

Back to back. 

We'll fight together 

For the Gold and Black. 

Fair Sons and Daughters 

Of Maryland, 

Upon you all vict'ries stand. 

Chorus 

Sons of Maryland, 

Old Maryland needs you! 

Stand by your colors, boys. 

And to them e'er be true! 

Fight for old ^Maryland, 

Old Liners! Stand, 

Defenders of the Black and Gold 

Throughout this land. 

Team ! Team ! Team ! 



Here's to Old U. of M. 

Here's to old U. of M., 
We're out to win again, 
Come, give a rousing cheer. 
And press on to Victory, 
For we're out to win this fray. 

We'll show how to play, 

For our boys will fight to the end 
For U. of M. 

48 



Bingo 

Bingo, oh, Bingo, 
Bingo, Bingo, Bingo. 
That's the lingo, 
U. of M. 
Is out to win again 

•And chance is very, very slim, 

Bingo, oh. Bingo, 

Bingo, Bingo, Bingo, 

That's the cry. 

Fight, Fight! 

Fight with all your might 

For Bingo, U. of M. 



YELLS 

Yea, Maryland 

Yea, Maryland! Yea, Team! 
Fight 'em! Fight 'em Fight 'em! 

Maryland U ! 

Mary land U ! 

Mary land U ! 

Maryland! Rah! Rah! 
Maryland! Rah! Rah! 
Hoo-Rah! Hoo-Rah! 
Maryland! Rah! 
Maryland ! Rah ! 
Rah! Rah! Rah! Rah! 

Mary land. 

Team ! Team ! ! Team ! ! I 

49 



Hoo-Ray! 

Hoooo Ray! 

Hoooo — — Ray ! 

Hurrah: (Team) (Player) (Maryland) 



Locomotive 

.M-M-M A-A-A R-R-R Y-Y-Y- 

L-L-L A-A-A X-N-N D-D-D ! ! 

Maryland ! ! 
Team! Team!! Team!!! 



Defiance 



He — Haw— Ho— Go— Mar— y— land ! 
He — Haw — Ho — Go — Mar — y — land ! 

(Continuous) 
He — Haw — Ho — Go — Mar — y — land ! 
He — ^Haw — Ho — Go — Mar — y — land ! 

(Snappy) 
Team! Team!! Team!!! 



Siren 



Whistle ! Boom ! Rah ! 

Team ! Team ! ! Team ! ! ! 

50 



FRATERNITIES 

Honorary 

Omicron Delta Kappa — National Honorary 
Leadership Fraternity, chartered at U. of 
M., 1927. 

Alpha Zeta — National Honorary Agricultural 
Fraternity, chartered U. of M., 1920. 

Alpha Chi Sigma National Professional Chem- 
ical Fraternity. 

Phi Kappa Phi — National Honorary Fraternity 
open to honor students in all branches of 
learning. 

Phi Mu — Honorary Engineering Fraternity, 
chartered 1923. 

Sigma Delta Pi — Honorary Spanish Fraternity, 
chartered 1920. 

Le Cercle Francais — Honorary French Society. 

Scabbard and Blade — National Honorary Mili- 
tary Fraternity. 

Senior Honor Society — Honor Society for 
Women Students. 

National 

Kappa Alpha — Chartered 1914, founded Wash- 
ington and Lee, 1865. 

Sigma Nu— Chartered 1917, founded V. M. I., 
1869. 

Phi Sigma Kappa — Founded Mass. Agricultural 
College, 1893. 

Delta Sigma Phi— Chartered 1924, founded Col- 
lege of N. Y. C, 1899. 

Sigma Phi Sigma — Chartered 1916, founded U. 
of Penn., 1908. 

51 



Phi Alpha— Chartered 1915, founded Geo. Wash- 
ington U., 1914. 
Alpha Gammma Rho — Chartered 1927. 
Tau Epsilon Phi — Founded at Columbia, 1910. 
Phi Kappa Delta— Chartered 1927. 

Local 

Nu Sigma Omicron — Chartered 1914. 
Delta Mu — Chartered 1920. 
Delta Psi Omega — Chartered 1920. 
Sigma Tau Omega— Chartered 1921. 
Alpha Phi Sigma— Chartered 1927. 



52 



THE INTERFRATERNITY COUNCIL 
CONSTITUTION AND AMENDMENTS 

PREAMBLE 
(Adopted May 20, 1926.) 

The name of this organization shall be The 
Interfraternity CounciIv of the Univer- 
sity OF Maryland. 

Membership in this organization shall consist 
of two representatives of each of the recognized 
competitive social fraternities of the University 
of Maryland; and the purpose shall be to main- 
tain a harmonious relationship between the said 
University and the fraternities in the manage- 
ment of the affairs that pertain to fraternities; 
and to accomplish this purpose, the following 
rules adopted by the Interfraternity Council are 
herewith incorporated as the Constitution of this 
organization. 

It is further agreed that the following fra- 
ternities shall be charter members of the Council: 

Delta Sigma Phi Sigma Phi Sigma 

Sigma Nu Delta Mu 

Phi Sigma Kappa Nu Sigma Omicron 

Kappa Alpha Delta Psi Omega 
Sigma Tau Omega. 

ARTICLE I. 

The officers of thi sorganization shall be, 
President, Vice-President, and Secretary-Treas- 
urer. 

These officers shall be nominated at the last 
meeting in May of each year. 

There shall be a majority vote required for 
the election of any officer. 

ARTICLE II. 

The duties of the officers of this organization 
shall be as follows: 



S3 



Section 1. The President shall preside over 
all meetings; see that order is maintained, and 
cast the deciding vote in case of a deadlock. 

Sec. 2. The Vice-President shall assume the 
duties of the President in the absence or inability 
of the President. The Vice-President shall also 
act as Chairman of all social functions. 

Sec. 3. The Secretary-Treasurer of this Or- 
ganization shall keep a true record of all pro- 
ceedings of the council and shall also have 
charge of all monies belonging to the above 
Organization. 

ARTICLE III. 

The meetings of this Organization shall he 
held on the first and third Thursdays of each 
month, at 7.00 o'clock P. M. 

ARTICLE IV. 

This Constitution may only be amended by 
a three-fourths vote of all the represented frater- 
nities in the Council. 

ARTICLE V. 

Section I. No fraternity shall offer a bid to 
any student who is in his first year at this in- 
stitution until 8.00 o'clock on the morning of 
pledge day. Pledge day shall be the first Tues- 
day in December. 

(a) A student entering this institution after 
pledge day may not be pledged until the second 
Tuesday in May. 

Sec. 2. The meaning of the word "Pledge": 
No fraternity shall either directly or indirectly 
cause any student to commit himself in favor of 
or against any fraternity prior to pledge day of 
his first year at this Institution. 

Sec. 3. Be it further understood by the 
members of this Organization that those frater- 

54 



nities desiring to offer persons bids to join their 
respective fraternities shall, on the day preceding 
pledge day, hand in to a designated impartial 
person, bids to those men whom they wish to 
offer the chance of joining their fraternity. These 
bids will in turn, at 8.00 A. M. pledge day, be 
handed to the person to whom they are ad- 
dressed, and when he has marked them accepted, 
rejected or undecided, as he may choose, he 
shall return them to the aforementioned impartial 
person by noon of pledge day, who will in turn 
notify the several fraternities of the outcome of 
their bids. 

ARTICLE IV. 

No student may be pledged to any fraternity 
unless he has at least fifteen (15) units in high 
school subjects. 

ARTICLE VII. 

No fraternity may initiate any student until he 
shall have passed twelve (12) credit hours at the 
institution. 

ARTICLE VIII. 

Any student or group of students desiring to 
form a local fraternity must fire submit to the 
Interfraternity Council a statement of the 
object and ideals involved, with a list of the 
proposed charter members. The Interfraternity 
Council within one month shall act upon the 
application and inform the petitioning group of 
its action. 

ARTICLE IX. 

A group of students, in order to become 
eligible to representation on the Interfraternity 
Council, shall be required: 

(a) To have functioned at this Institution 
for at least one year as a club. 

55 



(b) To have functioned at this Institution 
for at least two years as a local fraternity, dur- 
ing which time it shall have abided by the Inter- 
fraternity Council rulings. 

(c) To be a chapter in good standing of a 
competitive national, social, men's fraternity. 

ARTICLE X. 

Xo local fraternity shall petition for a charter 
in any national fraternity until after the group 
desiring nationalization has obtained the sanc- 
tion of the Interfraternity Council. 

ARTICLE XL 

It is herewith understood that all matters hay- 
ing relationship to the organization of fraterni- 
ties and general fraternity affairs shall be pre- 
sented to the Interfraternity Council. 

BY-LAWS 

1. All business of this organization unless 
otherwise provided for, shall be carried out in 
accordance with "Robert's Rules of Order." 

2. A representation of three-fourths of the 
total members of the Council shall constitute a 
quorum. 

3. Each fraternity represented at a quorum 
shall be allowed two votes. 

4. It is herewith understood by the members 
of the Interfraternity Council that any frater- 
nity violating any part of the Constitution of 
this Organization shall be subjected to a fine of 
twenty-five ($25.00), which shall be used to help 
defray the expenses of the Annual Interfra- 
ternity Ball. This smn is to be posted by each 
fraternity on or before the date of the first 
meeting of the Interfraternity Council at the be- 
ginning of each year. 

56 



It is further understood that the violating fra- 
ternity shall be suspended from the Interfrater- 
nity Council for one year, during which time 
the said fraternity shall abide by the laws of 
the Interfraternity Council. 

All violations of rules shall be fixed by a board 
of five (5) men representing five (5) different 
fraternities exclusive of the violating group. 
These men shall be elected by and from the 
Council. 

5. Men not pledged to or belonging to any 
fraternity at the University of Maryland shall 
not become residents in any fraternity house 
except as approved by the Interfraternity Coun- 
cil. 

6. Each fraternity shall keep on file in the 
Register's Office a complete list, corrected to 
date, of all active and pledged members, includ- 
ing officers. 

7. Each fraternity shall keep on file in the 
Registrar's Office a complete up-to-date list of all 
men living in the chapter house. 

8. Rushing Rules. A. No fraternity shall 
hold an organized rush function until October 15. 
Any fraternity function at which there are more 
than six first-year men present, and any func- 
tion sponsored by one or more members of any 
fraternity in private homes, hotels, or similar 
places, at which there are more than six first- 
year men present, and at which there are no 
members of any other fraternity represented on 
the Council shall constitute an organized rush 
function. 

B. The time between the 15th of October and 
the beginning of the silence period shall be con- 
sidered as the season for organized functions. 
This time shall be divided into two equal parts 
during each one of which each fraternity shall 
hold not more than one organized function. 
(Silence Period shall be from 8.00 A. M. of the 

57 



day preceding pledge day until 12.00 Noon of 
pledge day. During this time no upperclassmen 
may communicate directly or indirectly with any 
man who has attended this Institution less than 
one semester.) 

C. During the time stipulated for organized 
rushing, no fraternity shall hold more than two 
organized rush functions. The dates for these 
functions shall be drawn by lots at some time 
previous to October 1st. 

D. Between October 15 and the Silence 
Period no fraternity shall entertain any first-year 
men after 7.00 P. M. on the nights of authorized 
functions. 

9. All Interfraternity Sports shall be gov- 
erned by the following rules: 

A. Only bona fide, active, undergraduate 
members of the fraternity chapters of the Uni- 
versity of Maryland and may be eligible to take 
part in Interfraternity sports. 

B. No fraternity man may participate in any 
Interfraternity sport in which he has previously 
made an official Maryland letter. 

C. No man who has been a candidate of any 
freshman or varsity sport or who has taken part 
in a regular school game conflicting in season 
with any Interfraternity sport may participate 
in the Interfraternity sport. 

D. Any such additional questions or disputes 
as may arise in Interfraternity sports shall be 
governed by the rules of the Southern Con- 
ference. 

10. A standing committee of three men shall 
be appointed by the President to attend meetings 
of the Home and School Association of College 
Park and to report to the Council all matters 
discussed at said meetings. 

11. Any man breaking his pledge to a fra- 
ternity cannot be pledged by another fraternity 
until one full year has elapsed. 

58 



alpha A 
beta B 
g^amma r 
delta A 
epsilon E 
zeta Z 
eta H 
theta 
iota I 
kappa K 
lambda A 
mu M 



GREEK ALPHABET 

nu N 
xi H 
omicron O 

pi n 

rho P 
sigma 2 
tau T 
upsilon Y 
phi $ 
chi X 
psi ^ 
omega Q 



MAIL SERVICE 



Outgoing Mail 



Collected on 

Campus 
7.15 A. M. 
9.30 A. M. 
2.30 P. M. 
4.45 P. M. 



Leaves Campus 

Post Office 
7.30 A. M. 
10.00 A. M. 
2.45 P. M. 
5.00 P. M. 



Incoming Mail 



3.35 P. M 
11.00 A. M 
8.40 A. M 
Post Office 
At Campus 



59 



OMICRON DELTA KAPPA 



President 

Vice-President 

Secretary 

Treasurer.. 

F. B. Linton 
P. A. Insley 
T. X. Dean 

Capt. W. P. Scobev 
Dr. G. F. Cadisch 
C. S. Richardson 

G. Eppley 



O. D. Crothers 

G. A. Kessler 

A. L. Guertler 

H. N. Budlong 

Dr. E. N. Cory 

H. C. Byrd 

Dr. R. A. Pearson 

R. V. Truitt 

W. B. Kemp 

R. W. Carpenter 

Dr. W. S. Small 



ALPHA CHI SIGMA 



President 

Vice-President 

Secretary 

Treasurer 

B. R. Billmeyer 
G. A. Kessler 
E. G. Stimpson 
E. V. Haines 



G. F. Weiland 

W. L. Lamar 

J. R. Schultz 

J. E. McDonald 

W. W. Heintz 
A. T. Myers 
H. E. Ort 



ALPHA ZETA 



W. C. Cooper 
J. C. Long 
R. Romary 
C. M. Wilson 



C. G. Grey 
R. V. Smith 
S. P. Stabler 



SCABBARD AND BLADE 

Captain _-.. B. Dyer 

First Lieutenant W. Plumley 

Second Lieutenant E. Shepherd 

First Sergeant — _____W. Hopkins 

F. B. Linton R. C. Van Allen 

A. F. Weirich R. J. Epple 

H. E. Wheeler 



60 



WOMEN'S SENIOR HONOR SOCIETY 

For recognition of outstanding coeds. 
Emily Herzog Rose Alice Laughlin 

Elanor Freeny 

THETA GAMMA 

• 

President Katherine Appleman 

Vice-President Naomi Morris 

Secretary-Treasurer Frances Norton 

Anne Matthews Margaret McMinimy 

Marion Lane Lillian Lunenburg 

Margaret Karr Isabel Dynes 

Alverta Miller Grace Maxwell 

NEW MERCER LITERARY SOCIETY 

President Nicholas Janetzke 

Vice-President Edith Burnside 

Recording Secretary Edna Burnside 

Corresponding Secretary Jane Hammack 

Critic - James Benner 

Reporter. ...Audrey Ryon 

POE LITERARY SOCIETY 

President Duncan Clark 

Vice-President Carl Everstine 

Secretary Grace Maxwell 

Assistant Secretary Evelyn Ridout 

Treasurer Chalmers Hughes 

Critic .....Barbara Schilling 

Sergeant-at-Arms Edward Hudson 



61 



FOOTLIGHT CLUB 

President F. B. Linton 

Vice-President R. Simmons 

Secretary _I. Bewick 

Treasurer W. Lamar 

R. Laughlin S. Simmons 

H. Watson W. Gifford . 

B. Billmeyer H. Mead 

L. Townsend K. Appleman 

E. Mims C. Lung 

F. McLeod E. Garber 
R. Nathanson 

GLEE CLUB 

President E. G. Stimpson 

Vice-President A. B. Cook 

Manager D. B. McPhatter 

Treasurer — - J. Caldara 

A. S. Pollock R. W. Lockridge 
P. A. Insley W. G. Bradley 

D. L. Fisher E. J. Howell 
S. A. Caldwell F. R. Lininger 
D .S. Parris V. Adams 

B. S. Simmons M. Glynn 

C. A. Willmuth B. M. House 

E. Barron G. H. Brouillet 

C. W. Frame J. D. Caldara 
VV. R. Gifford R. H. Allen 

W. J. Kinnamon H. B. McDonald 

D. C. Blenard J. E. McDonald 

EPISCOPAL CLUB 

President- W. Plumley 

Vice-President— F. D. Wallett 

Secretary. E. Ryon 

Treasurer E. Jones 

I. Langeluttig R. lager 

M. Palmer R. McCandlish 

F. Simmons J. Henry 



62 



H. Meade 

M. Meigs 

T. Graham 

E. Hudson 

R. Conk 

R. Dallas 

A. Price 

W. Hammersley 

A. Gallup 

E. Ridout 

J. Meyers 

G. Oland 

\'. Fooks 

M. Wisner 

E. Harrison 

I. Mead 

G. Lee 

C. Chessei 



N. Morris 
H. Jarvis 
A. Grey 
I. Symons 
R. Lininger 

E. Roberts 

F. Carpenter 
E. Jones 

S. Hemming 
R. Garreth 
S. Tull 
C. Parks 
M. Lewis 
E. Stimpson 
T. Loy 
M. Claflin 
M. Karr 
A. Matthews 



ENGINEERING SOCIETY 

President W. H, Elliot 

Vice-President- H. E. Wheeler 

Secretary-Treasurer.-. R. R. Welsh 

R. Hitch R. Speer 

F. Holloway J. Barto 
R. Allen W. Bryan 
E. Ewald A. Dodd 
W. Willse J. Hall 

C. James W. Putnam 
J. Slack W. Iglehart 
H. Jarvis F. Walters 
R. Home I. Wales 

G. Hoffman P. Dabson 
R. Orwig A. Crothers 
L. Winnemore F. Stevens 

G. Cokes L. Bomberger 

T. Graham J. Gordon 

M. Falkenstein G. Taylor 

W. Doran J. Deckman 

D. Waesche P. Hartge 
G. Coe M. Lloyd 



63 



V. Koons 
T. Leach 
"D. Bock 
J. Perham 



J. Bowman 

R. Jones 

J. Stevenson 



GRANGE 



Master 

Secretary 

Treasurer 

H. Whiteford 
C. Chesser 

A. Matthews 
E. Garber 

C. Xourse 
E. Ridout 
H. Watson 
R. Ensor 
M. Hermann 
E. Xickell 
I. Svraons 
R. Miles 
E. Ballou 
H. Xeeley 
H. Anderson 
P. Corkran 
L. Groshon 
H. Hoopes 
T. Long 
J. McWilliams 
E. Moser 
R. Smith 
M. Wallace 

B. Powell 
L Gilbert 
L. Downey 
K. Baker 
A. Bickle 
A. Miller 

E. M. Burnside 
M. Edmonds 
G. Maxwell 



S. P. Stabler 

_. A. Price 

C. Grey 

G. Wright 

H. Beggs 

W. Cooper 

G. Hughes 

M. Hershberger 

L. Langeluttig 

W. Meyers 

A. Schreiber 

M. Wilson 

V. Pennington 

V. Holter 

R. Ward 

R. Johnson 

A. Martin 

A. Ahalt 

E. F. Burnside 

V. Fooks 

A. Miller 

G. Lighter 

A. Philips 

L. Sellman 

E. Jones 

M. McGarvey 

L. Gall 

A. Eliason 

E. Baumel 

X. Price 

M. Bullard 

E. Jones 

J. Bewley 

W. Cockerill 

S. Hemming 



64 



G. Lee 

F. Price 

B. Schilling 
X. Morris 

G. Bull 
E. Gruver 
R. Howard 

C. Barnsley 
G. Perry... 
W. Gahan 
S. Royer 



H. Holter 

B. Miller 
P. Marth 

V. Van Williams 
H. Whiteford 
A. Hamilton 
E. Gilbert 
M. Woods 
R. Romary 

C. McFadden 



KAPPA ALPHA 



President 

Vice-President 

Secretary 

Treasurer 

E. T. Loane 
G. Aman 

R. Blakeslee 
W. Cockerille 
W. Hale 
J. Keenan 
S. Simmons 
G. Snyder 

F. Stephens 
J. Batson 

J. Benner 
C. Bishop 
H. Bowman 
W. Chaffinch 
H. Milburn 
E. Maloney 

G. Tobias 



W. 

H. 

W. Cobey 
W. Evans 
U. Linzey 
C. Ross 
J. L'^mbarger 
R. White 
S. Blakistone 
W. Bonnet 
W. Cogswell 
J. Deckman 
P. Fellows 
R. Gaylor 
E. Harlan 
L. Harris 
H. Jones 
R. Roberts 



— -G. A. Kessler 

M. M. Price 

I. Russell 
D. Gorgas 



65 



SIGMA NU 



President 

V ice- President 

Secretary 

Treasurer 

I. D. Smink 

F. B. Linton 

H. S. Whiteford 

G. T. Burroughs 
D. Zahn 

W. T. Page 
L. Bomberger 
J. P. Kelley 

B. F. Cox 
A. B. Heagy 

C. R. Dodson 
L. Samllwood 
G. Madigon 
J. Radice 

M. G. Falkenstein 
A. L. Crothers 



_....C. V. Koons 
-O. D. Crothers 
-J. B. Parsons 
M. E. Koons 



X. A. Janetzke 
R. T. Settle 
G. H. Roberts 

B. L. Hanback 
R. F, Quinn 
E. C. Stevens 
J. A. Kay 

C. T. Crothers 
W. C. Mitchell 
W. T. Frazier 
J. P. LeRoy 
M. Brashears 
A. A. Owens 
M. E. Dix 

W. E. Rabbitt 



DELTA SIGMA PHI 



President 

Vice-President. 

Secretary 

Treasurer . 

\V. Atkinson 

T. Dean 

W. Fletcher 

F. Haller 

P. Wertheimer 

A. Wondrack 

O. Connaughton 

W. Covington 

A. Dean 

C. Dean 

J. Dent 

J. Hamilton 

T. Ensor 



.P. Wertheimer 
.J. MacDonald 

M. Young 

G. Lee 



T. Henry 

F. Hetzel 
T. Howard 

G. Lee 

J. McDonald 
F. Ribnitzki 
H. Smith 
N. Warcholy 
M. \''oung 
P. Butz 
R. Carico 
W. Dent 
A. Healy 



66 



J. Hill 
A. Koldeway 
J. Pitzer 
C. Zacharie 
G. Viewig 



O. Kafer 

H. McDonald 

R. Snyder 

G. Hendrickson 



PHI SIGMA KAPPA 

President F. Bradstreet 

Vice-President R. Tansil 

Secretary H. Gilchrest 

Treasurer H. Fox 

E. Cramer W. Behyraer 

H. Fox R. Dallas 

A. Guertler W. Fleishmann 

R. Hoar H. Gilchrest 

T. Weiss r. Ladson 

J. O'Neill J. Powers 

J. Robertson D. Talbot 

R. Tansil I. Chaney 

J. Clary D. Dixon 

O. Eadie E. Eierman 

W. Fisher W. Leyking 

T. Parran J. Peyton 

A. Unger 

SIGMA PHI SIGMA 



President 

Vice-President 

Secretary 

Treasurer 

H. Kreider 
P. Insley 
F. Porter 
W. Schofield 
E. Shepherd 
J. Slack 
A. Weirich 
C. Wilson 
O. Everhart 
W. Frame 



. B. Dyer 

F. S immons 

W. L. Shank 

W. Kinnamon 

G. Phipps 

H. Schramm 

W. Shank 

R. Spence 

E. Valliant 

H. Wilson 

H. Jarvis 

H. Cannon 

W. Chew 

L. Chiswell . 



67 



W. Higgins 
C. Mclntire 
A. Myers 
J. Morris 
J. Patchett 
G. Rude 
R. Safford 



M. Glynn 
H. Kinnamon 
R. Garreth 
J. Lee 
L. Shank 
M. Shank 



ALPHA GAMMA RHO 

President J. Long 

Vice-President R. Romary 

Secretary W. Cooper 

Treasurer ..S. Hemming 

H. Farley H. Hoopes 

E. Schmidt I. Langeluttig 

R. Johnson N. Pennington 

A. Hamilton L. Saunders 

R. Teeter A. Schreiber 

E. McFadden A. Ahalt 

J. Parks K. Baker 

R. Pryor A. Bikle 

J. Savage J. Coddington 

L. Groshon D. Henry 

M. Wallace V. Holter 

R. Cannaday H. Long 

C. Gray A. Martin 



SIGMA DELTA 



President — Elanor Freeny 

Vice-President _ Katherine Appleman 

Secretary Audrey Ryon 

Treasurer - — Emily Herzog 

Katherine Appleman Margaret Karr 
Anne Matthews Grace Lee 

Mena Edmonds Florence McLeod 

Emily Herzog Margaret Meigs 

Catherine Barnsley Curry Nourse 

Virginia Fooks Alice Orton 

Doi'othea Freseman Audrey Ryon 

68 



Adelaide Gallup 
Margaret Hermann 
Roberta Howard 
Elanor Baumel 
Anne Eliason 
Reba Ensor 



Elsie Ryon 
Louise Towrisend 
Margaret Wisner 
Geraldine Parry 
Isabel Symons 



ALPHA OMICRON PI 

President Ruth Barnard 

Vice-President __- Edna Burnside 

.Secretary Olyure Hammack 

Treasurer Adele Seihler 

Ruth Barnard Margaret Crunkleton 

Edith Burnside Grace Maxwell 

Edna Burnside Margaret Leighton 

Olyure Hammack Evelyn Ridout 

Phyllis Harbaugh Barbara Schilling 

Aline Herzog Genevieve Wright 

Phyllis Kress Julia Arnold 

Mildred Hislop Madeline Bernard 

Margaret Temple Lenore Blount 

Hazel Tenney Virginia Blount 

Adele Siehler Jane Hammack 

Mildred Kettler Ruth Miles 

Joy Linton Gwendolyn Sargeant 

Margaret McGarvey Virginia Smith 

Elizabeth Walton Martha Temple 



KAPPA XI 

President .__Rose Alice Laughlin 

Vice-President Isabel Bewick 

Secretary Margaret McMinimy 

Treasurer — Frances Norton 

Maude Lewis Marion Lane 

Evelyn More Harriet Bishop 

Bernice Balch Marjorie Cullen 

Betty Carmichael Emily Fuller 

Regis Dunnigan Adelaide Grey 

Fames Harrison Inez Hoffa 



69 



Estelle Hoffa 
Helen Mead 
Mary Graybill 
Dorothy White 
Anne Wolf 



Elizabeth Kirkwood 
Elizabeth Mims 
Margaret Wade 
E:iizabeth Wittig 
Norma Kahney 



ALPHA. UPSILON CHI 

President ._ Isabel Dynes 

Vice-President Alverta Miller 

Secretary Marion BuUard 

Treasurer __ Ruth Lawless 



Mary Murray 
Marye Boyd 
Maryvee Glass 
Felisa Jenkins 
Mary Koons 



Evangeline Gruver 
Alice Phillips 
Louise Sellman 
Xorma Rowe 
Winifred Gahan 



NU SIGMA OMICRON 

President - H. H. Anderson 

Vice-President J. E. Holland 

Secretary-. L. M. Harper 

Treasu rer M. E. Lloyd 

E. Beauchamp R. Rasch 

P. Corkran F. Walters 

H. Grey H. Street 

J. Schueler E. Haines 

S. Pollack R. McCandlish 

A. Barnes H. Robinson 

D. Caples V. Sullivan 
A. Ewald A. Klein 
R. Healy L Wales 

E. Hudson H. Hess 
D. Kieffer D. Parks 
G. Matheke W. Doran 
G. Munson W. Jones 
D. Miller 



70 



DELTA MU 


President 


B. Stifler 


Vice-President 


H. Ort 


Secretary 


W. Myers 


Treasurer... 


W. Insley 


H. Cashell 


C. Van Allen 


J. Dale 


F. Bromley 


C. Denton 


E. Howell 


R. Epple 


J. Keister 


W. Hopkins 


L. Vogel 


R. Insley 


J. Wilson 


W. Insley 


L. Williams 


VV. Meyers 


E. Stimpson 


B. Munroe 


A. Bowers 


H. Ort 


W. Burhans 


W. Plumley 


G. Coe 


E. Sangston 


K. Kesecker 


B. Stiffler 


S. Royer 


G. Taylor 


R. War f el 


J. Wallace 




SIGMA 


TAU OMEGA 


President 


T. H. Graham 


Vice-President 


R. D. Clark 


Secretary 


W. R. Gifford 


Treasurer 


W. L. Lucas 


B. R. Billmeyer 


R. E. Gable 


J. V. Bowman 


W .L. Hammersley 


W. H. Elliott 


E. J. Roberts 


R. L. Evans 


M. E. Beachy 


R. K. Gessford 


G. N. Copes 


M. F. Hershberger 


C. L. Gross 


R. A. Hitch 


J. A. Hunt 


R. F. lager 


C. W. Lung 


W. L. Lamar 


T. A. Nelson 


J. D. Nevius 


V. E. Spitznagle 


L. P. Winnemore 


J. M. Wilhelm 


A. P. Dunnigan 


R. E. Wilhelm 


H. T. Fetty 





71 



DELTA PSI OMEGA 



President 

Vice-President 

Secretary 

Treasurer 

S. Jenkins 
R. S. Molesworth 
E. H. Rehberger 
W. W. Hollaway 
H. Holzapfel 
W. M. Holzapfel 
J. H. Norton 
R. W. Ramsey 
E. K. Ramsburg 
R. V. Smith 
H. E. Wheeler 
\V. G. Wilson 
D. C. Blennard 
C .X. Everstine 
S. E. Hamer 
C. H. Hughes 
H. P. Jarvis 
C. B. Mace 



T. T. Taylor 

A. C. Cook 

--. G. W. Algire 

J. B. Hudson 

D. B. McPhatter 
R. K. Remsberg 
W. H. Scott 

R. Spear 

R. Allen 

J. E. Andrews 

G. Brouillet 

J. O. Caldara 

M. Derr 

L. Downey 

E. Ewald 
C. Hamel 
G. Hargis 

M. W. Woods 

F. R. Lininger , 
A. A. Holter 

M. M. Ramsburg 
X. E. Cameron 



TAU EPSILON PHI 

President H. A. Teitelbaum 

\'ice-President J. V^enezky 

Secretary S. S. Duckman 

Treasurer I. H. Rosenbaum 

B. A. Korostoff D. R. Robinson 

S. Spector B. Becker 

M. Cohen L. J. Markowitz 

J. Eisenstark O. Frankel 

S. Silverman 



72 



PHI ALPHA 

President J. L. Medwedeff 

Vice-President H. R. Pear 

Secretary H. M. Herstein 

Treasurer.... H. P. Friedman 

H. Needle W. T. Rosenbaum 

B. Rosen J. Shapiro 

R. Rosenfeld S. T. Lemer 

W. Raffel 

ALPHA PHI SIGMA 

President F. A. Franklin 



Vice-President _. 

Secretary 

Treasurer 

C. C. Pagana 
F. Di Stasio 
A .R. Mazzolini 



J. M. Cosimano 

E. A. Pisapia 

J. V. Jerardi 

P. S. Scoles 

J. D. Davalos 

P. J. Filippo 



PHI KAPPA DELTA 



President 

Vice-President- 
Secretary 

Treasurer 

M. Albert 
S. D. Beitler 
I. J. Gleiman 
A. Goldstein 
A. Silverman 
D. Schwartz 
Gr Singer 
H. Norman 
J. Snyder 
F. Weisman 



R. H. Israelson 

H. Schwartz 

B. Cooper 

E. Fell 

B. Misler 

H. Pariser 

S. Rosenblatt 

A. Shapiro 
L. B. Slusky 
M. Weiner 

B. Seigel 
J. Kaiser 

J. Waghelstein 



11 



LIVESTOCK CLUB 

President . J. Long 

Vice-President S. Stabler 

Secretary A. Schreiber 

Treasurer R. Teeter 

J. Henry R. Romary 

A. Bickle L. Groshon 

R. Ward H. Hoopes 

E. Gilbert R. Nestler 

H. Long W. Naill 

J. Parker X. Pennington 

V. Holter K. Baker 

A. Aholt F. Cockerille 

C. Grey J. Coddington 

I. Langeluttig E. McFadden 

P. Martin L Gilbert 



74 



BRANCHVILLE-TREASURY TROLLEYS 

Cars leave Treasury Building, 15th and G 
Streets, N. W., for College Park at frequent 
intervals from 6.45 A. M. to 11.35 P. M. 

Cars leave Branchville for 15th and G Streets, 
N. VV., from 5.35 A. M. to 10.33 P. M., leaving 
College Park about three minutes later. 

BALTIMORE AND OHIO RAILROAD 

Baltimore and Ohio local trains leave Union 
Station for College between 7.40 A. M. and 
11.30 P. M. Local trains leave Camden Station, 
Baltimore, for College Park between 5.45 A. M. 
and 11.35 P. M. Trains leave College Park for 
Washington between 6.57 A. M. and 12.44 
A. M.; for Baltimore, between 7.53 A. M. 
and 11.46 P. M. 

LAUREL-WASHINGTON BUS 

City and Suburban Railway Company. 
15th and H Streets N. E. to Laurel 

Busses leave 15th and H Streets, N. E., 
Washington, every hour on the half hour from 
5.30 A. M. until 10.30 P. M., arriving at Col- 
lege Park about ten minutes before the hour. 
Laurel to 15th and H Streets N. E. 

Busses leave Laurel every hour on the half 
hour from 6.30 A. M. until 11.30 P. M., arriving 
at College Park about ten minutes after the 
hour. 

BALTIMORE-WASHINGTON BUS 

Red Star Line. 

Willard Hotel, Washington to Southern Hotel, 

Baltimore 

Busses leave the Willard Hotel for Baltimore 
every hour on the hour from 8.00 A. M. until 
10.00 P. -M., with the exception of 9.00 P. M. 
On Saturdays and Sundays there is an additional 

75 



bus at 12.00 midnight. These buses arrive at 
College Park 35 minutes after the hour. 

COLLEGE BUS SERVICE 

The College Bus leaves the Administration 
Building for College Park as follows: 

To Baltimore and To Post Office 

Ohio Station goo A. M. 

7.30 A. M. 10.00 A. M. 

5.00 P. M. 2.45 P. M. 

The bus returns to the Administration Building 

immediately. 



76 



MEMORANDA 



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1 1 

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192971 



MEMORANDA 



80 



Service Satisfaction 

JVc solicit your account 

Prince Georges 
Bank 

Honor Roll Bank 

Banking Hours 

8.30 A. M. to 3.00 P. M. 

Saturdays 

8.30 A. M. to 12.00 
4.00 P. M. to 8.00 P. M. 



T. M. JONES J. ENOS RAY 

Cashier President 

Security Strength 



81 



MEMORANDA 



Ifiret Baptist Cburcb 

HYATTSVILLE, MD. 

REV. B. P. ROBERTSON, D.D. 

Pastor 

Invites 3^ou to all of its services. 

Why not make this hoine-Ukc church 

your Church Home? 

University Bowling 
Alleys 

BOWLING 

BILLIARDS 

COLLEGE PARK, MD. 

S. STATELAJiD 

EXPERT DRY CLEANING 

and 
REPAIRING 

Phone Berwyn 242 

KUSHNER^S 

VARIETY STORE 

Berwyn 91 

Visit Our Lunch Room 



83 



MEMORANDA 



84 



To the students of the University 
of Maryland 



"^k 



First National 
Bank 

OF HYATTSVILLE 

Extends to you greetings and a wel- 
come and invites you to make this bank 
your depository while at the Univer- 
sity. 

Do not keep money in your room — 
pay your bills by check. 
This prevents loss, robbery, extrava- 
gance and disputes. 

The facilities of this bank are at your 
command. 

Banking Hours 

Mondays and Government Pay Days 

8.30 to 5.30 P. M. 

Saturdays, 8.30 A. M. to 12 M. and 

4 to 8 P. M. 

Other days, 9 A. M. to 3 P. M. 



85 



1 Name..-. 
Address 
Phone .-_. 



2 Xame.-... 
Address 
Phone ... 



3 Name..... 
Address 
Phone ..,. 



4 Name 

Address 
Phone .... 



5 Name. — 
Address 
Phone -. 



6 Name..— 
Address 
Phone -. 



86 



St. Hn&rewV6 lEpiecopal 
Cburcb 

COLLEGE PARK, MD. 

REV. RONALDS TAYLOR, S.T.D. 

Rector 

Services : 
9.45 A. M.— Sunday School 
ILOO A. M. — Morning Prayer and 
Sermon. 
Communion Service First 
Sunday of Each Month 
Make St. Andrew's your church home 
while in College Park. 
You will find a cordial welcome at all 
the services. The Rector will welcome 
an opportunity to meet and know you. 



87 



7 Name— . 
Address 
City .-.. 



8 Name — 
Address 
City — _ 



9 Name — 
Address 

City ...:. 



10 Name — 
Address 
City — 



11 Name — 
Address 
City — . 



12 Name— . 
Address 
City — . 



Ifiret fiDetboMet 
Epiecopal Cburcb Soutb 

Maryland Ave. and Marion St. 

HYATTSVILLE, MD. 
REV. E. A. LAMBERT, Pastor 

Services : 

Sunday School 9.30 A. M. 

Worship and Sermon .-ll.OO A. M. 

Ep worth League 7.15 P. M. 

Worship and Sermon 8.00 P. M. 

A Church Home for Methodist 

Students 

Y. M. C. A. Y. W. C. A. 

E)i6CU06ion iSroup 

EVERY SUNDAY 

— in — 

REST ROOM— 6.30 P. M. 

?9 



13 Name 

Address 
Phone.... 



14 Name.-.- 
Address 
Phone .... 



15 Name..... 
Address 
Phone .... 



16 Name-.. 
Address 
Phone.... 



17 Name.... 
Address 
Phone ..- 



18 Name...- 
Address 
Phone .- 



90 



BAR.B.Q 

Sandwich Shop 

COLLEGE PARK, MARYLAND 

Light Lunch Cigars Cigarettes 

Pop Ice Cream 



Don't neglect your 

Personal Appearance 

U of M 
Barber Shop 

Three Barbers 
AT COLLEGE ENTRANCE 

CHARLES OLIVET 



91 



1928 CALENDAR 


1929 


SEPTEMBER 


MARCH 1 


S M T W T F S 


S M 


T W T 


F S 


1 






1 2 


2 3 4 5 6 7 8 


3 4 


5 6 7 


8 9 


9 10 11 12 13 14 15 


10 11 


12 13 14 


15 16 


16 17 18 19 20 21 22 


17 18 


19 20 21 


22 23 


23 24 25 26 27 28 29 


24 25 


26 "27 28 29 30 | 


30 


31 






OCTOBER 




APRIL 




12 3 4 5 6 


1 


2 3 4 


5 6 


7 8 9 10 11 12 13 


7 8 


9 10 11 


12 13 


14 15 16 17 18 19 20 


14 15 


16 17 18 


19 20 


21 22 23 24 25 26 27 


21 22 


23 24 25 


26 27 


28 29 30 31 


28_29^ 


30 
MAY 




NOVEMBER 


1 2 3 




1 2 


3 4 


4 5 6 7 8 9 10 


5 6 


7 8 9 


10 11 


11 12 13 14 15 16 17 


12 13 


14 15 16 


17 18 


18 19 20 21 22 23 24 


19 20 


21 22 23 


24 25 


25 26 27 28 29 30 


26 27 


28 29 30 


31 


DECEMBER 




JUNE 




1 
2 3 4 5 6 7 8 


2 3 


4 5 6 


1 
7 8 


9 10 11 12 13 14 15 


9 10 


11 12 13 


14 15 


16 17 18 19 20 21 22 


16 17 


18 19 20 


21 22 


23 24 25 26 27 28 29 


23 24 25 26 27 28 29 | 


30 31 

JANUARY 


30 






JULY 1 


12 3 4 5 


1 


2 3 4 


5 6 


6 7 8 9 10 11 12 


7 8 


9 10 11 


12 13 


13 14 15 16 17 18 19 


14 15 


16 17 18 


19 20 


20 21 22 23 24 25 26 


21 22 


23 24 25 


26 27 


27 28 29 30 31 


28 29 


30 31 




FEBRUARY 




AUGUST 




1 2 




1 


2 3 


3 4 5 6 7 8 9 


4 5 


6 7 8 


9 10 


10 11 12 13 14 15 16 


11 12 


13 14 15 


16 17 


17 18 19 20 21 22 23 


18 19 


20 21 22 


23 24 


24 25 26 27 28 


25 26 


27 28 29 


30 31 



"FRESHER BY A DAY" 

HARVEY'S MILK 

A Product of Southern Maryland 

Pasteurized Milk and Cream 

Cottage Cheese 

Buttermilk Butter and Eggs 

ICE CREAM 

Plant and Office: 

HYATTSVILLE, MD. 

Telephone Hyattsville 1345 

Special Rates to Fraternities 



THE UHIVERSITT 
DRY CLEAJilHG CO. 

(Next to Bowling Alleys) 

COLLEGE PARK, MD. 

Call Ber. 170 

T/ie ColIes:e Cleaner 



93 



PRI NTED BY 
ROEBUCK a SON 
BAl-TlMORE