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Full text of "Studio light ... a magazine of information for the profession"

Aristo Motto 



'"1 ^ TE believe permanency is the 
» » Keystone of Photographic 
Success, and all brands of paper 
bearing our Trade-mark are manu- 
factured on this principle. We hold 
our consumer's reputation and suc- 
cess identical with our own. We 
surround both with every safe- 
guard known to chemical science 
and oiu: own experience." 




PRESIDENT WILLIAM H. TAFT 

Copyright IMS, by Pack Bros. 



ana the :?^R.lKS"rO ^^p^GY^B^ 



A JMagazinc of Information for the Profession 



NEW SERIES 

Vol. 1 Xo. 1 



M A Tt r H 1909 



OLD SERI ES 

N <i . it s 



s 



ALUTATORY 



With this issue the Eagle 
spreads its wings to cover the 
whole professional nest. 

Devoted bird that it is, it still 
looks Avith greatest fondness at 
the largest, roundest and whitest 
egg — Aristo. But it is a big 
enough, strong enough and broad 
enough Eagle to foster the other 
eggs as well. It will do its duty 
by them. 

When the Aristo School, Avhich 
was originally inaugurated to 
help the jjrofession in the use of 
Aristo and the Aristo Lamj), came 
to its full groAvth, it became ap- 
parent that there Avere so many 
things of interest to the profession 
that — for the benefit of every- 
body concerned — its scope should 
be broadened. And so it became 
the Eastman School of Profession- 
al Photography, but Aristo still 
held and continues to hold the 
center of the stage — Avith the cal- 
cium light turned on to the full. 

LikeAvise there is every reason 
why the Eagle should be also 
broadened in its scope. There 
are a thousand and one side lights 
that are of value to all of us. 



Avhich can be throAvn on studio 
Avork. We Avant to be helpful to 
j'ou in your everyday Avork and 
to tell j'ou monthly about the new 
goods and the new methods that 
are interesting from your stand- 
point and our own. Whenever 
Ave can ])ick up a good idea, an 
idea that Avill be helpful to you 
in broadening your business, we 
Avant to be alile to give it to you. 
There's a mutuality in your liusi- 
ness and ours. Whatever tends 
to the Avelfare of the one, tends 
also to the Avelfare of the other. 
And so we propose to broaden 
the scope of the Eagle until it 
covers the AA'hole field of profes- 
sional photography. 

This liy no means implies that 
there Avill be less attention jiaid 
to Aristo — it means simplj' that 
there Avill be more said about 
other matters that are of vital in- 
terest to you and to us. 

And so, to be consistent, there 
is Avith this number a new title 
— a broader title that Avill, we 
hope, prove typical of the Avork 
that this journal is to accomplish : 

STUDIO LIGHT and 

the ARISTO EAGLE. 



STUDIO LIGHT and 



T ET HER RUN IT 

■* — * Leave the studio in charge 
of the receptionist for a week? 
Certainly — if she is as sharp and 
business-Uke as the average, she 
is certainly competent to run your 
studio for a Aveek in midsummer. 
No one to make sittings? No 
matter, just let her tell the pro- 
spective customers that you have 
gone to attend the National Pho- 
tographers Convention, and will 
have all sorts of new ideas when 
j^ou return, and the3''ll wait for 
you all right and be more than 
willing to. 

"Haven't got time to attend 
conventions" — that doesn't de- 
serve a repl}'. "Can't afford it" 
— yes, but j'ou can; whatever 
you spend in attending the Nat- 
ional this year will be returned 
to you many fold, in the shape of 
valuable ideas, rest, recreation, 
good fellowship and change of 
scene. 

"Conventions don't do any 
good." Of course they don't, if 
j^ou stay at home, or attend 
because you feel that you have to. 
Conventions dodo good, and lots 
of it, to the man who attends 
determined to learn something, 
and to have a good time. 

" You can ' t teach anybody any- 
thing." Yes you can, evenif j'ou 
have just graduated from your 
apprenticeship, jou can march up 
to the biggest professional in the 
hall, give him a man's grij) and a 
man's look straight in the face. 



and teach him a lesson of good 
fellowship that will quicken the 
pulse of anj^ man a hundred dol- 
lars worth. 

And the Nineteen-nine Con- 
vention is going to be a gi-eat 
one — this is not a prophecy, but 
a statement fully warranted, bj^ 
plans already outlined, and being 
carried to fulfilhnent by men who 
know how. 

The officers of the Association 
are men of many years experi- 
ence in convention affairs, and 
are going to give you a conven- 
tion that will be a record breaker. 

Then sto]) a moment, and con- 
sider in what city the convention 
is to be held — in Rochester, the 
photographic center of the world. 

Supposing the photograj^hic 
manufacturers didn't intend to do 
anything special for you, and that 
would be a pretty bad guess, 
wouldn't it be worth any man's 
while just to visit the factories, 
and to leam how, and under 
what conditions the products so 
closely identified with yoiu' suc- 
cess are made? 

Every moment of the conven- 
tion is going to be of surpassing 
interest, fi-om both the technical, 
business and social standpoint. 
You are going to see more of the 
profession than was ever before 
gathered together at one time, 
and you will be offered instruc- 
tion and i)leasure worth many 
times the money and time you 
expend in attending. 



the ARTS TO EAGLE 



A PORTFOLIO OF THE 
KODAK ADVERTIS- 
ING COMPETITlOxN 

The general average of the 
pictures made by professional 
photographers for our I9O8 Kodak 
advertising contest was much bet- 
ter than the average in the con- 
test for the previous jear. This 
■was not only gratifying to us, but 
was a good thing for a number of 
the contestants, because it gave' 
us an opportunity to liuy a larger 
number of pictures that did not 
land m the prize list. 

To help make the average still 
better in the present ( 1909) com- 
petition, we have i)ublished a 
portfolio of the I9O8 competition, 
reproducing a numljer of the pict- 
ures that we consider best from 
an advertising standjioint. These 
portfoUos have already been sent 
to the entire list of I9O8 con- 
testants, and we have a limited 
quantity left, which we would be 
glad to send, while they last, to 
such photographers as are suffici- 
ently interested to send us a pos- 
tal, asking for one. A copy will 
prove highly valualile to anyone 
intending to enter the contest, for 
it will show precisely the class of 
work which the judges (adver- 
tising men and photogi-aphers) 
consider with the most favor, and 
Avill show in addition the class of 
work which we ourselves pick out 
for purchase fi-om among the non- 
winning prints. In our 1909 
competition we oifer $2000 in 



prizes, of which $1400 goes to 
l^rofessionals and $600 to ama- 
teurs. The contest closes October 
1st., and is worth while fi'om two 
standpoints: In the first place, 
there is the prize money and the 
further possibility of the sale of 
l)ictures to us. In the next place, 
there are great possibilities for 
advertising Avork in photography 
for every photographer avIio a\ ill 
combine advertising ideas Avith 
good clean photography. At any 
rate, send for a copy of the Port- 
folio, and see Avhat is doing. 



T 



HE ILLUSTRATIONS 



Our principal illustrations 
in this issue are reproductions 
from Collodio-Carl^on prints by 
Kandeler Bros., of St. Louis, 
Mo. 

The Kandeler Studio enjoys a 
A ery high-class patronage and is 
recognized as one of the leading 
studios of the country. The qual- 
ity of the Avork speaks for 
itself. 

We are indebted to Messrs. 
Bauer and Coffee, Kansas City, 
Mo., for the chaniiing subject 
upon our fi'ont co\er, and to 
Pach Bros,, of NeAv York City, 
for the splendid portrait of Presi- 
dent William H. Taft, Avhich Ave 
use as a frontispiece. 

We trust in later issues to shoAv 
further examples from these 
studios. 



STUDIO LIGHT and 



A 



BOUQUET AND A 
GROWL 

Dear Eagle : So you are going 
to have a new name and a new 
cover and are going to spread 
yourself. Good for you. 

You have done a lot toward 
helping the fi'atemity to make 
good. You have stood for quality, 
quality, quality. And that has 
helped all of us. Most of us have 
adopted also as our motto, "We 
believe permanency is the Key- 
stone of Photograj^hic Success." 
You have helped us in upholding 
the courage of our convictions 
when tempted to price cutting; 
you have helped us to improved 
quality and therefore to better 
prices ; you have helped us, espe- 
cially in the early days Avhen we 
were not on so familiar a footing 
with good old Aristo, by your 
timely suggestions from the tech- 
nical side. When we have fallen 
doATO j'ou have helped us to our 
feet. 

Latterly, I am glad to note 
that you have been widening the 
field — have been telling us about 
plates and bromide pajjers and 
hoAV to Avork them, and about 
plate development and the new 
tank methods. You have been 
getting too bi'oad gauge for j'our 
old title, and I'm glad of it. We 
don't need the technical helps 
about Aristo so much now, and 
you might better take up the 
space by talking aliout other mat- 
ters which, though not the back- 



bone of our business, we are more 
in need of because not so familiar 
with. I shall miss the old green 
and gold cover, l)ut I am sure 
that I shall soon learn to welcome 
the new one whatever it maj" be. 
But, Mr. Editor. I'm sore. I 
think you are suffering from a 
chronic attack of blue-i)encil-itis. 
The nice things I have said about 
3'ou above you Mill publish of 
course. But I don't like the way 
you impale me on that infernal 
blue pencil every time I dip mj' 
pen in red ink and try to say 
things. You're too calm. Why 
don't you flare up at the inces- 
sant stream of nast}' nothings that 
are thrown at you l\v "inspired" 
jealous journalists who fire at you 
at so much per "inspire"? I got 
a copy of the January Eagle the 
other day, and sticking right out 
in ]ilain sight in that preferred 
position, first right hand page fol- 
lowing and facing pure reading 
matter, was the Conmiercial Ar- 
isto Platino price list. Every pho- 
tographer in the land could see 
it. The same mail brought me a 
copy of the Itinerant-Anti-Organ, 
containing an attack on your com- 
pany regarding Commercial Aristo 
Platino at-Sl.()0 per gross which 
Avound up Avith this statement : 
"The letter in question, Avhile 
sent out pretty broadly, appears 
to have have been sent only to 
those studios Avhich are knoAvn to 
have acquired the developing 
paper habit." 



the ARISTO EAGLE 



Same old trick — same old mis- 
representation — same old hiding 
behind "appeai-s to be" and "it 
is alleged." 

Here's some more from the 
same paper, same article, same 
page : 'As everybody knows, the 
standard price of cabinets, for 
some years past, has been ^2.00 
per gross, less a small cash dis- 
count. The price was originally 
lower, but was boosted when the 
company thought it had control 
of the paper situation and when 
raw stock went up in value." 

THE FACT IS THAT THE 
PRICE OF ARISTO PLATINO 
CABINETS HAS NEVER 
BEEN LESS THAN $2.00 PER 
GROSS.* Somebody has, — well, 
I suppose if I said what, I think 
you Avould use jour old blue pen- 
cil, so here goes for a milder 
statement — Somebody has, 
either through dense and inexcus- 
able ignoi'ance or else wilfully, 
that is to say, intentionallj- and 
with malice aforethought, so far 
deviated from the truth as to 
have uttered a falsehood. 

And say, pencil this or not, as 
you please, did you ever notice 
how the d. o. p. shouters, when 
they want to tell how nice a thing 
is, have to comi)are, even in print, 
with your products? Going into 
editorial ecstacy over prints on 
somebody's D. O. paper, the Itin- 
erant-Anti-Organ man says that 
some of them have 'the delicate 
olive tone of the collodion print" 

* In tlie United States. — Editor. 



and others "have all the richness 
of color of that "Will-'o-the- 
Wisp. Angelo. " The printer' s boy 
says that they call Angelo a " Will- 
'o-the-Wisp" because they "can't 
touch it." 

Hoping that you have left your 
blue pencil in your other vest, I 
am, Yours truly. 

Stereoscope. 



A 



POST GRADUATE 
COURSE 

It is the ambition of every 
physician or surgeon, after he 
has once established a paying 
practice, to take a post graduate 
course and perfect himself in the 
finer and higher practices of his 
profession. 

A post graduate course is, for 
him, an expensive proposition, 
arid he must leave his practice 
and spend at least a year in 
time, and a good deal of money, 
in taking this course. Yet he 
knows it will pay big returns on 
his investment, and he will 
make many sacrifices to do it. 

The expert, the man with a 
full Avorking knowledge of all 
the latest improvements, all the 
new methods, certainly stands a 
much greater chance of success 
than the man depending solely 
upon the school of his own ex- 
perience for his knowledge and 
ideas. 

The man without the post 
graduate course has only himself 



STUDIO LIGHT and 



for a teacher. The post gradu- 
ate man has not only the benefit 
of his own experience, but the 
benefit of the experience of all 
the brightest minds in his pro- 
fession as Avell. 

If the ambitious physician can 
afford to sacrifice a year or more 
of his tmie, and the entailed 
financial cost, surely you of the 
photographic profession can -well 
afford the shoi't time necessary 
to take a post gi-aduate course 
in jour profession. 

The Eastman School of Pro- 
fessional Fhotographj' is the col- 
lege of expert post graduate 
information for the professional. 
Every moment of each day in 
the three-daj* course is devoted 
to sound, practical demonstra- 
tions of the most advanced ideas, 
and of all that is newest and 
best in the practice of profes- 
sional photography. 

The Eastman School is not a 
school for the novice. Its corps 
of instructors fully realize that 
each student has more than 
mastered the rudiments of the 
the profession, and that to make 
the school worth Avhile, each 
moment must be devoted to in- 
struction along the most ad- 
vanced lines and must afford 
ideas that the ah'eady successful 
professional can turn into good, 
profitable dollars upon his return 
to his own studio. Let us con- 
sider for a moment the school 
program, as outlined for I909: 



FIRST DAY 

10-12 A. M. — Lighting and Posing 
with Aristo Lamp. 

1-2 p. M.— Tank Development. 

2-3 p. M.— Nepera Demonstration. 

3-4 p. M. — Carbon Sepia Demonstra- 
tion. 

4--5 p. M. — Ozobrome Demonstra- 
tion. 

SECOND DAY 

10-11 A. M. — Tank Development 
Explained. 

11-12 A. M. — Demonstration Poly- 
chrome Plates. 

1-2 p. M. — Tank and Tray Develop- 
ment. 

2-3 p. M. — Aristo Demonstration. 
All Collodion Papers. 

3-4 p. M. — Angelo Platinum Demon- 
stration. 

4-5 p. M. — Nepera Demonstration. 

8 V. M. — Nepera and Bromide En- 
larging Demonstration. 

THIRD DAY 

10-10::]0 A. M.— Aristo Printing Cab- 
inet and proofing negatives made 
at the school. 

10:30-11:30 A. M.— Talk on Retouch- 
ing. 

11:30-12 M. — Nepera Demonstra- 
tions with school negatives. 

1-2 p. M. — Sepia tones on Nepera 
by Re-development. 

2-3 p. 31. — Ozobrome Demonstra- 
tion. 

3-4 p. M. — Printing Room Dodges. 
Devices and Ideas. Illustrated 
talks. 

The first two hours of the 
opening session are devoted to 
Lighting and Posing with the 
Aristo Lamp. There are several 
thousand Aristo Lamps in use — 
you maj^ be using one success- 
fully, and feel that you need no 
instruction on this subject. Again, 
you maj' not be using one, and 



the ARISTO EAGLE 



feel quite certain that you never 
"vvill. In either event j'ou have 
here the opportunity to learn all 
about it, from men Avho have not 
only successfully used the lamp 
according to their own ideas, but 
in addition have had the advan- 
tage of seeing hoAV other profes- 
sionals all over the country have 
used it. In other words you have 
the combined experience of 
every professional using the 
lamp, at your service. Out of the 
three-day session, three and one- 
half hours are devoted to the var- 
ious uses of the lamp, including 
lighting and posing, with test sit- 
tings, and the making of prints. 

Then there is Tank Develop- 
ment, a topic of absorbing inter- 
est to every one of you. True 
enough, the tank is simpli«-it\' 
itself, but do you wish to know 
just how to produce a certain 
quality of negati\ e — just how to 
acquire less density, greater den- 
sitj^, more or less contrast — just 
how to do the many little things 
that only experience can teach.'' 
All this is at your service, and 
told in such a way you just have 
to remember it. 

The Nepera Demonstrations 
alone will be worth e\ery effort 
you have made to attend the 
school. Can I successfully use a 
developing out paper for portrait- 
ure ? is an absorbing question 
with the profession. At the East- 
man School you will find this 
question most fully and satisfac- 
torily answered — not alone by 



lectures but by practical demon- 
stration as well. 

The quality of negatives best 
suited for Nepera, and how to 
produce them, all the finer stunts 
m ])rinting and mounting, the 
production of rich sepias by rede- 
velopment, evexy possible ques- 
tion answered by demonstration. 

Then there are demonstrations 
on Aristo Carbon Sepia, Ozo- 
brome, Angelo Flatiiuun, and a 
special demonstration on the new 
Standard Polychrome plate — a 
plate of marvelous possibilities 
under the light. 

Demonstrations of enlarging 
with both Bromide and Nepera 
papers, the proper apparatus to 
use, and all about producing or- 
dinary and extraordinary results. 
A talk on Retouching, one on 
Printing Room Dodges and De- 
vices and Ideas. 

The Eastman School of Pro- 
fessional Photography affords the 
ideal post graduate course for the 
professional eager to be classed 
among the leaders. 

Long experience in the school 
Avork has enabled the instruc- 
tors to make every minute count, 
so that in three one-day sessions 
the course is complete. 

You cannot afford to miss the 
Eastman School. It takes but 
three days of your time, and will 
be Avorth a hundred fold the time 
and money you have expended 
to attend. Look over the school 
datings on page 24, and plan 
now to attend. 



10 



STUDIO LIGHT and 




FROM A COLLODIO-CARBON PRINT 
By Kandeler Bros. St. Louis, Mo. 



the ARISTO EAGLE 



11 




FROM A COLLODIO-CARBON PRINT 
By Kandeler Bros. St. Louis, Mo. 



12 



STUDIO LIGHT and 



SINCE THE BOSS CAME 
BACK 

BY THE OFFICE BOY 

I don' know -wht-thi-r I am 
going to get a raise of pay or get 
fired. Ever since the Boss got 
back from that Eastman School 
iy^V, gone a week) he's been 
flyin' around the place from 
mornin' till night stirrm' up 
things. Mos'ly when he gets 
hack from a trip he sits around 
for a day or so talkin' with the 
head prmter about the shows 
he's seen .and how he aint so 
young as he onct was. Nix on 
the sit down this time though. 
First thing when he gets back 
he grabs me and says, "jimmie, 
clean out that store room" — 
then he has a man in to put up a 
couple of new shelves, an' then 
the stuff begins to come in 
from the the stock house. My 
back Avas mos' broke from usin' 
the nail puller.— Two new five 
seven plate tanks and one ole 
socker, a eight by ten. Three 
cases of Pollychrome plates. I 
ast the Boss Avas they somethin' 
for the parrot that hangs in the 
reception room to eat oif (that's 
when I thought I Avas goin' to 
get fired). I Avent an' had an- 
other look at the cases and saAv 
it wa3 "Poly" stead of "Polly," 
and they AAas only dry plates 
after all. 

The Boss Avas aAvful interested 
in them plates, though. You 
knoAV that Avhen folks used to 



come in to see about having some 
pictures took, he used to tell 'em 
Avhat to Avear, an' Avhat colors 
Avouldn't shoAv up — an' he used 
to groan every time he seen a red 
headed Avoman come in. Secon' 
day he Avas home he has his old- 
est girl, Sadie (she's a peach, 
too) and one of her chums come 
doAvn, Avith a Avhole suit case full 
of clothes — all sorts of colors, 
an' he spends most all day niak- 
in' negatives on them new Poly- 
chromes. Gee ! he couldn't hard- 
ly Avait to get 'em out of the 
tank — an' maybe you think they 
wasent beauts. The Boss says 
the color values Avas immense, I 
don' knoAv Avhat he means, but 
one of Sadie's dresses Avas red 
and black, and there Avas a heap 
of difference betA\ een the reds 
and the blacks in the "Poly nega- 
ti\es. Avhen there Avouldn't have 
been hardly any Avith the regular 
kind. 

The retoucher said hcAvas fraid 
of losing his job if the Boss kept on 
makin' negatives like that. The 
Boss keeps on pullin' out books 
full of notes he made at the 
school, and keei)s changin' things 
around; the printer an' the finish- 
in' room men didn't like it at 
first, but noAv they keep goin' to 
the Boss for more neAv stunts. — 
Wait till you see some of the ncAv 
double printed Aristos Jimmie is 
makin'. 

The Boss says he never had 
such a good time lookin' and 



the ARISTO EAGLE 



13 









4 m 


^^^^^^v '.^^^HL. ^ 


7^ ^^^^^^^^^^^^^1 






^^^^^^^^^n^^^^ggHBHH|^^H|^| 


tfril 



FROM A COLLODIO-CARBON PRINT 
By Kandeler Bros. St. Louis, Mo. 



14 



STUDIO LIGHT and 



listenin' before in his life, and 
that he never knew before how 
much he dident know — an he 
says nex' year he's goin' to take 
all ns fellers. 

\^'hen I get through with that 
an' the convention I'll be wise 
all right. 



AW A Y T O MAKE 
SOME MONEY AT 
NO INCREASE OF COST 

The better grades of 4x6 paper 
are not costing jou any m(jre to- 
day than the regular cal^inet. Of 
course, if you use regular cabinet 
pictures, you can trim your 4x6 
paper, but you know a 4x6 print 
looks mighty nice — looks much 
larger than a cabinet, and larger 
than it really is. 

Taprell, Loomis & Company 
have placed a new line of mounts 
on the market specially for 4x6 
and fractions of 4x6 prints. You 
would be surprised how large 
they look compared with a cabi- 
net, and yet they cost you no 
more than your regular cabinet 
print. It Aviil give a wonderful 
opportunitj' to the photograj)her 
to get a better price all along 
the line. They are made in white 
on a good grade of stock, 
matched edges and with a beau- 
tiful engraved shaded design 
under the name of Fontenoy, and 
in bro\ATi with red-brown border 
under the name of Esmont. 



Don't forget that this is one of 
the schemes you can work, and 
even if you sell it at the saine 
price as you are asking to-day for 
your cabinets, you will be pleasing 
your customers more for the sim- 
ple reason that you are giving 
them a larger picture for the 
same monej' ; and as a matter of 
fact, you can easily put it in a 
grade by itself, and it is a safe 
bet to say that one-third of the 
people would gladly pay an in- 
crease of price when they see 
the picture. 

Don't fail to insist on the rep- 
resentati\'e showing you samples 
of the Esmont and Fontenoy in 
in both colors and sizes. 



D 



ISAPPOINTED 



The Eastman salesmen 
and demonstrators have all sorts 
of experiences in demonstrating 
and selling ncAv products. 

Sometimes they find the custo- 
mer full}' informed and eager to 
place an order, and again find 
him highly sceptical and hard to 
convince. 

We api^end herewith a letter 
from a highly disappointed plate 
tank purchaser: 

Ada, Okla., Dec. 8, 1908. 
EIastmax Kodak Co., 
Dear Sirs: 

Some time ago one of your tank 
demonstrators called upon me and 
showed me how to use the Plate 
Tank, and its advantages in saving 
time, etc. Well, I thought I was 



the ARISTO EAGLE 



15 




FROM A COLLODIO-CARBON PRINT 

By Kandeler Bros. St. Louis, Mo. 



16 



STUDIO LIGHT a7id 



getting about as good results as I 
cared for, but he informed me that 
all first-class photographers were us- 
ing the tanks, so then I decided if I 
wanted to be first class I must get 
one of the tanks. But I just thought 
to myself, I won't use the darn thing, 
so I ordered one, and had to re-order 
twice before my order was filled ( so 
I knewso/He one was wanting tanks). 

At last the thing came. I looked 
it over and wondered if it was worth 
the money. 

Then I decided to use it, and as I 
am no person to experiment with 
little things, I just chucked it full 
of plates. 

But instead of sitting down and 
reading the morning paper while the 
tank did the work, like the tank 
man told me, 1 was walking the 
floor counting up how many S S 
1 was losing with that blamed tank. 

I finally figured out that I had 
seventy-two dollars worth of work 
in the tank. 

Well, it just seemed like that thirty 
minutes would never end ; really it 
was worse than waiting for a late 
train to send your mother-in-law off 
on, but finally the time came for me 
to see what this wonderful machine 
had done. 

I went in the dark room and tum- 
bled the lid off, as I thought to my- 
self, " I expect I had better have 
thrown this thing out in the alley 
before I used it, as I will have to do 
it anyway." 

I slipped one of the plates out and 
held it up to the light, and to my 
overwhelming delight; a good nega- 
tive, so I just slipped the dozen into 
the fixing bath, and went back in 
fifteen minutes, and what do you 
think I saw ? Oh, Pshaw ! You 
know; twelve ideal negatives, yes, 
sir, as good as I ever saw, and of all 
the good things you have ever put 
out, not one excels the plate tank. 

I shall never be without one in my 
studio. N. B. Stall. 



QTUDIO ADVERTISING 

*^-^ "Advertising ^^iX[ make any- 
thing good a success," states the 
editor of Geyer's Stationer. 
"Year after year lines of goods 
which it was fomierly beheved 
could not be sold through adver- 
tising have found their way into 
advertising columns, and have 
staid there, because it has paid 
to advertise them." 

"To-day it is not too much to 
say that advertising, properlj" ad- 
ministered, is by far the greatest 
single factor in the promotion of 
man}' of our greatest enterprises. 
The principle of advertising has 
been tried, and it is true beyond 
all shadow of doubt. It pays." 

If advertising pays the manu- 
facturer of pianos, clothing or 
food products, it will pay the 
manufacturer of photographic 
portraits. But to successfully ad- 
vertise any product you must 
keep everlastingly at it. 

Studio advertising pays. Let 
us cite an instance that came 
under our personal observation 
some years ago : 

In a certain city, then of about 
one hundred thousand inhabi- 
tants, one photograi)her had had 
for a number of years the repu- 
tation of "the leading photog- 
rapher," and everj'body who 
wanted pictures that were "the 
thing" went to him. He had pros- 
pered accordingly and moved into 
a fine new studio, with everything 
new, elevator opening right into 



Ike ARISTO EAGLE 



17 




FROM A COLLODIO-CARBON PRINT 
By Kandeler Bros. St. Louis, Mo. 



18 



STUDIO LIGHT and 



the reception room, and all that. 
On another street, a block away, 
there Avas another studio, which 
had been just barely running 
along, doing "dollar a dozen" 
work, and never for a moment 
considered as a dangerous com- 
petitor by anj' studio in the city. 
This studio quietly changed 
hands, no one knew or cared any- 
thing about it, except perhaps 
the stock house men. The new^ 
proprietor quickl}^ proceeded to 
to refurnish it, in keeping with 
his ideas. Next a big sign ap- 
peared, " ,the Photographer. " 

and a show case filled with pic- 
tures that were corkers. All the 
Sunday papers contained a doulile 
column ad of the new studio — 

" , the Photographer," being 

prominentlj" displayed. 

Now this man did not make 
one splurge in the Sunday papers 
and then quit. Day in and day 
out, every paper m toAvn carried 
his copy . and his show case backed 
up his news})aper copj*. 

"Doing things well, but doing 
them differently fi-om the other 
fellow, " appeared to be his motto, 
and it Avas not long before he was 
the leading "photographer" even 
if the people had to climb up the 
stairs to his studio, when they 
could ride up to the studio of the 
man he had deposed. 

He made first-class work, and 
let the people know about it^ 
he kept himself in their minds all 
the time — and he got more 



money per dozen than the other 
fellow ever dreamed of. 

]Making it pay is a simple 
proposition. 

Make good ivork — charge good 
prices, and keep your Avork and 
yourself constantly before the 
public. 



QCIENTIFIC PLUGGING 

^^^ The only sure Avay to deter- 
mine the ripeness of a melon is 
to plug it. Of course, if the 
melon is not ripe plugging doesn't 
improve its chances of arriving 
at a luscious maturity, but it does 
save disappointment for the 
guests at the feast. 

The surest Avay to determine 
the purity of the chemicals you 
are using is to try them : if they 
afford perfectly satisfactory re- 
sults your plugging hasn't 
hai-med anything, but if, on the 
other hand, your practical test 
demonstrates their unAvorthiness, 
j'our plugging has been a some- 
Avhat expensive operation. 

If you are an expert chemist 
you may plug your chemical 
melon without doing any damage, 
but this entails a knowledge and 
apparatus usually beyond the av- 
erage professional. Lp against it 
then? Not a bit of it. You may 
have j'our chemicals "plugged" 
for you in the most scientific 
manner and at a trifling cost. 
Even if you possessed the re- 
quisite technical knoAvledge and 



the ARISTO EAGLE 



19 




FROM A COLLODIO-CARBON PRINT 
By Kandeler Bros. ^t. Louis, Mo. 



20 



STUDIO LIGHT and 



all the apparatus necessary, test- 
ing your chemicals scientifically 
would prove a very expensive 
proposition owing to the compar- 
atively small quantity you, indi- 
vidually, use. Some philanthropic 
scheme? No sir, just plain 
business. 

Supposing you were a lamp 
manufacturer, and made corking 
good lamps, and the oil to be 
used in them wouldn't burn, j'ou 
would get very busy trjing to 
improve the grade of oil or else 
go out of the lamp business. 
That's the answer: The manu- 
facturer of the sensitized pro- 
ducts with which the chemicals 
are to be used must for his own 
salvation test your chemicals for 
you and see that you are provided 
with only those of tested and 
known purity and strength. 



This device on 
the package is 
your guarantee. 



FROM A BUSINESS 
STANDPOINT 

When Mr. Aristo Demonstra- 
tor comes into your studio, he 
comes on business, and in every 
instance you can well afford to 
spend a little time with him ; he 
won't waste your time — hasn't 
got any of his own to waste, and 




in many instances is in a position 
to do you a real service. 

You already use Aristo, are 
perfectly satisfied with it, and are 
busy and don't want to see him? 
Now let's think a moment — you 
would welcome a customer that 
would bring money into your 
studio; sure you would. Well, 
there are other Avays of making 
money besides earning it, waj's to 
save money count just as well. 
Now, while Mr. Demonstrator 
won't order a dozen cabinets, he 
may have some suggestions to 
offer that will save you the price 
of several dozen. Hadn't thought 
of it that way before? Well, 
that's just it, a busj^ man hasn't 
always time to stoj) and consider 
all sides of a question, hence this 
httle suggestion. 

Mr. Demonstrator is constantly 
on the move fi'om one end of his 
territoiy to the other; he sees 
new faces, receives new ideas, 
new problems confront him. Per- 
haps in just the last town he vis- 
ited, he learned a new stunt that 
you could use to excellent advan- 
tage; one customer was having 
difficulty in producing good neg- 
atives, that he, from his experi- 
ence, Avas able to remove. Will 
he tell you of these things, and 
do all he can to solve your prob- 
lems for you? Just meet him half 
Avay and see if he don't. If you 
are not using Aristo, will he try 
and induce you to? Certainly, 
that's what keeps him on the 



the ARISTO EAGLE 



21 




FROM A COLLODIO-CARBON PRINT 

By Kandeler Bros. St. Louis, Mo. 



22 



STUDIO LIGHT and 



pay roll, you know, and he'll offer 
some convincing reasons, too. No, 
he wont go away mad if you turn 
him dowm, but he'll be back to 
see you every time he comes to 
town, and sooner or later he will 
land you, for he has good old 
Aristo to back him. 



I 



T IS 



I wonder that it didn't come 
long ago. And yet, I think there 
may be good and valid reasons 
for the dela}-. 

For a long time there have been 
signs that Sepia was the coming 
tone. To-day Sepia is neither a 
"will be," nor a "has been." It's 
an "izzer." And its strength 
began at the right place — at the 
top. For the past three or four 
years, nearly every one of the 
great convention successes have 
been Sepia prints. A fad with 
the judges? Not a bit of it. The 
true reason for the Sepia succes- 
ses at the conventions lies deeper. 
Sepias have led, because the men 
who had the art to make the liest 
negatives also had the art to 
select for their prints a tone that 
would give the most pleasing 
rendition of the values in those 
negatives. 

The Sepia has come into its 
own. It has passed the conven- 
tion stage. It is in the show 
cases. It isbeingdehvered. Pho- 
tographers all over the country 
are taking it up and are making 



with it marked success. Mind 
you, I am talking about Sepias, 
not near Sepias — not the lemons — 
that is to say. not the lemon 
colored prints that are being 
handed out in some quarters. The 
demand for Sepias is here. Wit- 
ness not only the show cases and 
the work that is being delivered, 
but the attemi)ts t)f those who 
started along other lines to now 
make their pa])ers till the Sepia 
bill by providing new Sei)ia ton- 
ing methods "while you wait." 

I believe in the real thing. 
When I want a warm black, just 
a tinge of olive in it, I want 
Aristo paper to make it on. I 
don't like these jn-esto change 
papers: "You see me now? Most 
as good as Aristo, am I not? 
Plunge — here I go into one bath, 
now I dip into another. I just 
hop into another tray, and out 
I come ; I am washed, dried, then 
bleached and bathed again. 
Don't j'ou think I look like Car- 
bon Sepia? Most as good, anj'- 
way? And so easy." 

No ; you don ' t appeal to me — 
no, not even with the "last for- 
mula " You are most as good as 
everything, which means — well, 
to be polite about it, it means 
that I can't use you. I don't 
want any near everything paper. 
1 want the paper that's IT. 

I've seen, I think, everything 
neAv and old in developing papers 
up to date, and here's one truth 
I have set down : Every develop- 



the ARISTO EAGLE 



23 



ing paper that givex the olive bhick 
(near AristoJ is a Jidt failure as a 
Sepia. It' s one thino- or tht- other, 
and j'ou can't get away from it. 
Take Velvet Nepera — it comes 
closer than the other d. o. p.'s to 
Aristo, but at least the makers 
don't try to hokey pokey it into 
being "near Angelo." 

But there are three other Nep- 
eras that do give Sejjia tones that 
are right — Rough. Matte and 
Royal — and they gi\e them by 
straight re-development. Some 
of the work I've seen latelj' on 
Royal Nepera will make the best 
of them look to their laurels. 
Near Platinum? No, sir! It's 
Royal Nepera: it's its own self. 
It doesn't have to be like any 
other paper, and pretty soon 
you'll hear some demonstrator 
telling you that he has a new 
paper that's "as good as Royal 
Nepera." 

Roj'al Nepera is at its liest 
when printed from fairly snajjjiy 
negatives having dark back- 
grounds. 'Twill look so well un- 
toned, that you will he temi)ted 
to leave it so : but go ahead and 
re-develop, and you will have — 
well, a ROYAL Nepera. No, the 
stock isn't yellow; it's mellow, 
giving a soft India-tint in the 
high lights, that hannonizes ab- 
solutely with the rich Sepias of 
the shadows. 

And Royal Nepera is a comfort 
to handle ; lies flat, dries between 
blotters, is practically a double 



weight pa])er (fine for folders), 
though at a single weight price; 
doesn't l)lister. and responds 
beautifully in lustre, to an appli- 
cation of Nejiera Waxing Solu- 
tion. But there's one mistake I 
must warn you against making 
with Royal Nepera. It costs so 
little, weight considered; works 
so easily; behaves so well, that 
you may be tempted to sell too 
cheap. Don't do it. The Sepia is 
here. It is fashionable. For the 
sake of yoin* bank account, make 
tile most of it. 

(rRAOUATE. 



Rochester 

July 19-24 

19 9 



YOU 

and the 

CONVENTION 



24 STUDIO LIGHT a nrf 



B 



U L L E T I N : THE EASTMAN SCHOOL OF 
PROFESSIONAL PHOTOGRAPHY FOR 1909 



Auspices Milwaukee Photo Materials Co., Milwaukee, Wis., March 
2, 3, 4. 

Auspices Zimmerman Bros., Sioux Citj-, la., March 9? 10, 11. 

Auspices H. Lieber Co., Indianapolis, Ind., March l6, 17, 18. 

Ohio-Michigan Convention, Toledo, O., March 23, 24, 25. 

Auspices F. Hendricks Co., Syracuse, N. Y., March 30, 31, 
April 1. 

Auspices M. L.Jones, Ft. Wayne, Ind., April 6, 7, 8. 

Auspices Walter K. Schmidt Co., Grand Rapids, Mich., April 

14, 15, l6. 

Auspices O. H. Peck Co., Minneapolis, Minn., April 20, 21, 22, 

Auspices Illinois College of Photography, Effingham, 111., April 
27, 28, 29. 

Illinois Convention, Springfield, 111., May 4, 5, 6, 7. 

Auspices of W. F. Uhlman, St. Joseph, Mo., May 11, 12, 13. 

Auspices Charles Lawrence, Wichita, Kansas, May 18, 19, 20. 

Auspices C. Weichsel Co., Dallas, Texas, May 25, 26, 27. 

Auspices F. J. Feldman, El Paso, Texas, June 1, 2, 3. 

Auspices Howland & Dewey, Los Angeles, Cal., June 8, 9? 10. 

Auspices Hirsch & Kaiser, San Francisco, Cal., June 15, l6, 17. 



the A R I S T O E A G I. E 



25 



Commer- 
cial 

Aristo 
Platino 



ROLLS 

10 ft. Roll 241 _, 
ins. wide. .-Si. 95 

5 yd. Roll 241 2 
ins. wide. .-^2.80 

10 yd. Roll 241, 
ins. wide. ..$5.15 

(Furnished only 
in 241, inch 
widths.) 



Canadian 
Kodak 

Co., Limited 
Toronto, Can. 



Per Per 


Per 


Per 


Size ?2 Doz. Doz. 


^2 Gross 


Gross 


2i4x2i:i 


$ .15 


$ .60 


$1.05 


21 , X 21 , 


.15 


.60 


1.05 


2I4X3I4 


.15 


.60 


1.05 


2I4X3I7 


.15 


.60 


1.05 


214x334 


.15 


.60 


1.05 


2i,x4i4 


.15 


.60 


1.10 


3 x4 


.15 


.60 


1.05 


31, X 31 7 


.15 


.70 


1.80 


3i4x4M 


.15 


.70 


1.30 


31 9 X 4 


.15 


.70 


1.30 


21;; X 7 


.18 


.75 




4 x4 


.18 


.75 


1.45 


4I4X414 


.18 


.75 


1.45 


3I4X6 


.18 


.75 


1.45 


3I4X514 


.18 


.75 


1.45 


4 x5 


.18 


.75 


1.45 


3'«x5i', 


.25 


.95 


1.75 


37s X 573 


.30 


1.10 


1.95 


414X51/2 


.30 


1.10 


1.95 


4 x6 


.25 


.95 


1.75 


4I4X6I', 


.30 


1.30 


2.25 


4^4 X 61 , 


.30 


1.50 


2.60 


4 x9 ' 


.35 


1.75 


2.85 


5 x7 


.35 


1.70 


2.75 


5 X 71/2 


.35 


1.80 


3.00 


5 x8 


.35 


1.80 


3.15 


51 , X 734 


.40 


1.95 


3.45 


31 , X 12 


.35 


1.90 




6 "x8 


.45 


2.30 


4.10 


6i,x8i^ 


.50 


2.50 


4.40 


7 x9 


.55 


2.85 


5.15 


7i,x9i, 


.60 


3.20 


6.00 


8 ' x 10' 


.65 


3.60 


6.70 


9 xll 






8.70 


10 xl2 


'. .95 


5.40 


10.30 


11 xl4 S 


65 1.25 


7.20 


13.45 


12 xl5 


80 1.40 


8.50 


16.00 


14 xl7 1 


00 1.90 


10.80 


20.65 


16 x20 1 


::!0 2.50 


14.80 


27.90 


17 x20 1 


40 2.75 


15.45 


29.95 


18 x22 1 


65 3.15 


18.00 


35.15 


20 x24 1 


95 3.(;o 


12.15 


41.30 



26 



STUDIO LIGHT and 



The best of everything 
for use in the Studio 



A complete line of 

Canadian Kodak Co. 's 
Plates, Papers and 
Tested Chemicals. 

Canadian Card Co.'s 
Mounts 

Century Studio Ap- 
paratus. 



The D. H. Hogg Company 

MONTREAL, CANADA 



</«<- ARISTO EAGLE 27 



A New Booklet for 
the Professional 



Tells how to construct your own 
apparatus; how to enlarge by day- 
light ; how to enlarge wdth artificial 
light without condensers; correct 
grades of paper to use, and how to 
use them; all the new ideas — right 
up to the minute. 

A copy is yours for the asking, 
at your dealers or by mail 



Eastman Kodak Company 

Rochester, N. Y. 



28 



STUDIO LIGHT and 



Spending" is Saving, 
when you spend 
money for chemicals 
of known quality 
and strength. 

To be sure look for 
this label: 




the ARISTO EAGLE 29 



The only developing out paper for 
the professional that affords uniform 
sepia tones by re-developnient is 

NEPERA 



In 

Rough, 
Matte, 

(Did 

Royal 

Grades. 



Velvet Nepera not suitalile for Sepias. 

CANADIAN KODAK CO., 

Limited 

Toronto, Can. 

ALL DEALERS 





30 STUDIO LIGHT «ntf 

Canadian Made for the 
Canadian Professional 



Seed, Royal and Stanley 
Plates 

Canadian Card Co.'s 
Mounts 

Canadian Kodak Co.'s 
Tested Chemicals 

Canadian Made Papers 



J. G. Ramsey & Co., limited 

Toronto, Canada 



the ARISTO EAGLE 



31 



^■1 hb 


DARK Roo 






^^^K. e^-.'^^''C| 


^^^^^k-« _ ^^^i^^^B^^^^^I^^^^^^H 




mi^HHw" ' I 


m 



Let the 
Tank 
lielj) to 
slturter 
hours. 



Where the tank enters, the dark room worries end. Not merely 
less trouble but better negatives for those who use the 

EASTMAN 

PLATE TANK 



Eastman Plate Tank, 5x7. 
Eastman Plate Tank, 8 x 10, 



I 4.50 
10.00 



CANADIAN KODAK CO., Limited, 

.4// Di-alers. TORONTO, CAN. 



32 



the ARISTO EAGLE 



A CHOICE STYLE 



For Backed Arixto Platino and 
Nepera Prints. Made in two 
colors. Grey and Brown. 




THE PRINCETON STi^LE -THICKNESS. 



For Unmounted Batked Aristo Platino and Nejiera prints tlie Princeton, 
while a flt\il)le folder, will "stand up." It fills the demand for a folio that, while 
flexible, has hody enouL,ii to hold its shape after it leaves your studio. It is made 
in a beautiful sliade of (Irey Silk finish and in a dark, rich Brown in the same 
pattern. The Tissue is first qualitj-, finely etched in White scroll, which drives it 
an entirely new look. While made priniaril\ fur unmounted prints, some very 
beautiful styles can be made up with the I'rinceton if you have our Kembranta, 
VanDyke, Assembly or Medalia styles. Y<m mount your print first, then place 
or paste it in the folder— you have a new effect and a very charming; one, made 
in two colors. Brown and Grey. Be sure to state color when ordering. 

Size Size for Insert Size Outside Per Box of lOO 

FM 6x9 6K X 9I4 $3.00 

HM 7x10 714x10'^ 3..50 

XM 7x11 7'4Xll'4 ;'-"5 

JM 8x11 8U x llH 4.00 
Be sure to see samples of this size. 

DESIGNED AND MANLKACTCRED BY 

CANADIAN CARD CO., Toronto, Can. 



Aristo Motto 



'''WJ^ believe permanency is the 
' ' Keystone of Photographic 
Success, and all brands of paper 
bearing our Trade-mark are manu- 
factured on this principle. We hold 
our consumer's reputation and suc- 
cess identical with our own. We 
surround both with every safe- 
guard known to chemical science 
and our own experience." 




< 



o 
p— I 

s> < 

:z ^ o 

>i O 
'' : en 

on 

^= X 

~" <: 
o 

H 

; j Oh 

~ : w 
-i X 

~ i H 

in 
O 



o 



'ff 




an 



a the :?^R.I^"rO :^7^GL^ 



A Magazine of Information for the Profession. 



NEW SERIES 

Vol. 1 No. 2 



APRIL 1909 



OLD SERl ES 
No. 99 



rpHEY DO 

■^ No business man ever made 
a bigger mistake than he Avho 
attempts to sell an inferior arti- 
cle for a first-class price and im- 
agines that "his customers don't 
know the difference." Now just 
size U]) this question from outside 
your own business : You can pur- 
chase a Avatch that "looks" gold 
for five dollars; you can obtain a 
derby hat for a dollar or a " Knox" 
for five dollars, or the clothing 
man Avill sell you a suit of clothes 
for anyAvhere from ten to seventy- 
five dollars. WTien they are neAv 
and in the dealer's hands, they 
all look pretty good, and pretty 
much alike — j'et the cheaper 
ones don't fool you for a minute. 
The maker of the cheap ])roduct, 
from the \'ery fact that it is 
cheap, has not the same resi)ect 
for his Avares as the maker of the 
first grade ones, and either con- 
sciouslj' or imconsciously shghts 
them somewhere in their make- 
up, and it doesn't take jou very 
long to discoAcr it either. If you 
go to the dealer and tell him 
that you Avant an inexpensive 
suit of clothes, jou Avill accept 



its deficiencies, provided it is 
good value for the monej', but if 
he tries to sell you a ten-dollar 
suit for tAventy, you forever after 
regard him AAith suspicion — and 
if he does succeed once in "doing" 
you, it AAon't be veiy long till 
jou find it out, and thenceforth 
you derive good satisfaction in 
turning all the trade aAvay from 
him that j^ou can. The maker of 
the spurious, may, first off, en- 
deavor to finish his product so 
Avell that he can for a time give 
it a quality a])])earance, but 
sooner or later his knoAvledge of 
its uuAA'orthiness Avill lead him to 
slight it someAvhere, and he fools 
neither his customers nor himself, 
and his business reputation passes 
into the discard. 

With a true "quality" product 
to Avork Avith, the manufacturer 
instinctivelj' puts forth his best 
efforts, he cannot preserve his 
self respect and slight good ma- 
terial, and his finished Avares con- 
tinue to shoAV greater and greater 
improAcment and Aalue, and if 
he persevere, the products AAith 
his imprint or trade mark are 
recognized as "best," to his ever- 
lasting satisfaction. 



(ly 



STUDIO LIGHT and 



It is just this foundation of 
quaUhi that has kept Aristo in 
the lead for twenty years. Per- 
haps not ten per cent, of your 
customers have known anything 
about Aristo or Aristo quality, 
but you have known it, and your 
very respect for its sterling qu;d- 
ities has compelled you to i)ut 
forth your best efforts in every 
stage of picture making to make 
your finished product Avorth 
while. 

If j"ou do not have faith and 
confidence in everything that 
enters into the making of what 
you have to sell, sooner or later 
your standard of value is lowered 
and your business is not progress- 
ing, not standing still — but going 
backward. 

Aristo is for the man who uill 
succeed. 



THE JUDGES WERE 
RIGHT 

After the 1907 Kodak Adver- 
tising Competition was over and 
the judges had decided on where 
the money had to go, mc had a 
still hunt. We had another one 
after the 1908 competition. 
These Avere still hunts among the 
rejected prints for other pictures 
that Ave could use for ad\'ertising, 
pictures that the judges had 
tinned doAvn as prize possibilities. 
We found them. Some of them 
Ave have used and shall use very 
extensively, perhaps in some 



cases more than we shall use prize 
Avinners. Yet the judges Avere 
right. They Avere looking ^br the 
best pictures as submitted. We 
Avere looking for the possibilities 
that might lurk in a negative. 
One of the best, if not the very 
best picture that we selected, Avas 
given but slight consideration by 
the judges. The prnit Avas bad — 
flat to muddiness. They had no 
alternative but to reject it. Later 
on Ave purchased the negative, 
coddled and jolhed the printing 
along until W'e got a beautifid 
result. In another case there Avas 
no trimming where there should 
have been a lot. The judges Avere 
right in turning the Avork doAvn. 
If the man Avho made the nega- 
tive had used as much skill in 
printing and trimming as he did 
in making the negative, if he had 
Avorked as hard in trying to get 
something out of that negative 
as Ave did, he Avould probably 
have gotten several times as 
much money for it — Avould have 
landed a prize. 

The successful competitors are 
the ones Avho combine ideas 
— advertising ideas — Avith good 
teclniical Avork. It must be Avork 
that Avill reproduce Avell, Avork 
that is snappy, vigorous. We may 
personally admire and delight in 
a soft loAV toned print. But those 
Avho have had experience knoAv 
that to decently reproduce such 
a print on super-calendered paper 
from electrotj'pes that were made 
from a half-tone cut that Avas in 



V 



the ARISTO EAGLE 



turn made from that print, on 
presses that are running over 
2000 impressions to the hour, is 
an impossibihty. 

Remember that the judges 
have this in mind Avhen at their 
work, and that they will judge 
your negative bj' your print. Re- 
member, too, that there are five 
prizes in the professional class: 
$500, $400, $250, $150 and 
$100. 

If your haven't had a circular 
giving the terms we will mail one 
on request — or hkely your dealer 
can supply you. 



s 



OFT PAPER OR SOFT 
NEGATIVES .? 

In taking up the use of devel- 
oping papers for portraiture the 
professional has been seemingly 
somewhat perplexed as to just 
the quality of negative to use for 
best results. This state of mind 
has been largely brought aliout 
by some manufacturers of devel- 
oping-out papers whose products 
possessed but slight range in gra- 
dation, necessitating a soft and 
comparatively flat negative to pro- 
duce anything like passable re- 
sults. Make soft negatives — 
make thin negatives — make flat 
negatives — make this and make 
that — anything to dodge the real 
issue — that their product could 
not satisfactorily fill the bill. 

What the busy professional 
wants and must have is a paper 



that will print all the values of 
the average negative of good, 
full strength and density — ^and, 
without having to experiment 
with a dozen or more grades of 
paper before he is sure he has 
the one that will afford him the 
desired result. What he wants 
is a paper that -will yield a first- 
class print from a negative that 
will yield a good print on Aristo. 

Nepera is pitched to duplicate 
Aristo in gradation — therein lies 
one of the secrets of its imme- 
diate and great success. No ex- 
perimenting under the light, no 
experimenting in the dark-room — 
no juggling to produce a guess- 
work negative. 

Make good, snappy, brilliant 
negatives, Nepera has the soft- 
ness, gradation and latitude to 
receive and retain every value. 

The paper should be too soft 
rather than too hard — a paper 
too hard is hopeless; with the 
softer paper both color and con- 
trast are easy to control. For in- 
stance: Velvet Nepera devel- 
oped in nonnal developer will 
give warm tones, but a decided 
ohve can be obtained by adding 
common salt and bromide of po- 
tassium in equal quantities to the 
normal developer. The addition 
of bromide of potassium to the 
developer for Nepera not only 
contrcjls the color of the print, 
but also 7-educes contrast, quite 
contrary to its action with other 
developing papers, but the con- 
trast can be preseiied or increased 



6 



STUDIO LIGHT and 



as necessary by the addition of 
salt. Make your negatives as 
you would for Aristo, the lati- 
tude and gradation of Nepera 
will give j'ou all there is in the 
negative. 



TUST ABOUT NINETY 

*^ You have just about ninety 
days before the National Con- 
vention — and you really haven't 
got that many in which to make 
up your mind to attend and 
plan things for smooth running 
while you are aAvay. 

Plan now to attend, it's going 
to be worth w^hile, it isn't every 
j-ear that can give you a vacation, 
pleasure, profit and instruction 
all in one. There never was a 
National Convention but Avhat 
was worth every man's while to 
attend, and the Convention at 
Rochester is going to surpass 
them all in interest and pleasure. 

You must Avant to see the fac- 
tories that produce the goods you 
use every day, to learn how they 
are made, packed and shii)ped, 
and to acquire that personal 
knowledge that will be sure to 
make your handling of them more 
pleasurable and successful. Every 
facilitj' for visiting and inspecting 
these factories will be afforded 
you during the convention, and 
everything will be done to make 
this part of your visit both pleas- 
ant and protitalik". 

The citizens of Rochester are 



interested in you, and in j'our 
coming, more than in any other 
class of her many other visitors, 
because you are so closelj" allied 
Avith her greatest industry — and 
they'll let you knoAv you are 
AA'elcome. The convention officials 
are busy — too busy to talk much 
just noAv, but they'll have things 
doing in the convention. 

Rochester, July 19, 20, 21, 
22, 23, 24.. 

COMPOSITION IN POR- 
TRAITURE 

Sidnej' Allan (Sadakichi Hart- 
mann) has Avritten a good book on 
Composition in Portraiture. Sid- 
ney Allan Avrites entertainingly 
and to the point, and, not in com- 
mon Avith most Avriters on this 
subject, has soAvorded his descrip- 
tions, and so full}' illustrated them 
Avith pictures and diagrams, that 
his meaning is made absolutely 
clear. 

There are chapters on The 
Placing of the Head, The Man- 
agement of Hands, Standing 
Positions, Sitting Positions, 
Backgi'ounds, The Arrangement 
of Groups, Fomis and Values and 
Light Eff"ects. 

The book is Avritten Avith 
special reference to the needs of 
the photographer and should 
prove a great aid in the produc- 
tion of artistic portraiture . 

The book is published by Ed- 
Avard L. Wilson, NeAvYork, and 
the price is three dollars. 



^; 



the ARISTO EAGLE 



G 



ENUINE OIL 



I was -walking down Sixth 
avenue a few months ago, and in 
a window that was much in need 
of soap and hot water, I saw this 
sign, "Genuine Oil Paintings, 
$1.98." Curiosity led me Avithin, 
and (excuse the paraphrase), my 
exclamation was, "Oh, Art, how 
many crimes have been com- 
mitted in thy name ! ! " 

Purple cows (or perhaps they 
were sheep) feeding on genuine 
blue grass, pink streams of Avater 
and figure studies that looked 
like they had been copied from a 
khidergarten slate — but all genu- 
ine oils at -^l-PS. 

Straightway I thought I would 
go and write to the Eagle, you 
were the Eagle then, and lecture 
the boys about its being their 
work and not their material that 
counts. These pictures were pro- 
bably as advertised, "genuine oil. " 
So is the paint on your house. 
But it isn't the paint, it's the 
man who spreads it that counts. 
It isn't the brush, it's the man 
Avho swings it. To get down to 
photograph}' — no, up to photog- 
raphy — it isn't a question of 
platinum or silver, it's a question 
of the man who Avorks them. 

Well, I Avas going to Avrite you 
a nice long letter Avith the above 
as an introduction, and Avas going 
to tell you to l)e honest (because 
it pays) and to be honest liecause 
of the satisfaction to yourself. I 
Avas going to tell you not to try 



to fool people — not to advertise 
silver prints as platinum prints, 
because when you use the right 
silver paper and work it right, no 
fancy names are necessary. You 
don't Avant the people in your 
tOAvn to talk aljout silver prmts or 
platinum prints. If your name 
happens to be Smith, you Avant 
them to talk about "Smith's" 
prints. Well, to tell you the 
truth, I either Avas too busy or 
too lazy, I just don't remember 
Avhich, so I didn't Avrite my dis- 
sertation on honesty, and noAv I 
have decided not to Avrite it at all. 
This is Avhy. A manufacturer 
has gone it stronger than any 
})hotographer ever did. Listen 
to this advertisement — it's in 
most of the March photographic 
magazines. "Real Sepia Plati- 
num Prints are made only on Sil- 
ver Paper." (For the Avord silver 
substitute the name of a silver 
developing out paper.) Noav 
Avhat do you think of that.^ 
Next Ave Avill see: Genuine dia- 
monds are noAV made only of 
glass : real sealskin coats are not 
sealskin unless made of cotton 
plush. Here's a suggestion for a 
heading for an advertisement : 

BEWARE OF THE GENUINE 



ALL of Our Goods Are Guaranteed 
to he I MIT A TIONS 



IF SOMEBODY ELSE MAKES 
IT WE WILL TRY TO. 



STUDIO LIGHT and 



No. I'm discouraged. I can't 
A\Tite that letter to the fraternity 
about calhng things by their right 
names, yet I do notice this. The 
men in photography who have 
made the big and lasting suc- 
cesses are the ones who do call 
things by their right names — and, 
so also, with men in other lines of 
business. 

Genuine oil paintings have sold 
for $1.98. Charcoal sketches, 
lead pencil drawings, pen and ink 
drawings have sold for thousands 
of dollars. It's neither the oil, 
nor the lead, nor the silver, nor 
the platinum, it's the MAN. Let 
the man do good work, and then 
let it be known as his work. 
There's where the honor and the 
profit he. 

Stereoscope. 



r^ ONTRADICTORY 

^"^ This magazine reserves 
the right and privilege of contra- 
dictmg itself. The stuft", good or 
bad, is not all written by the 
same man. The company that 
publishes this little book has in 
its employ a lot of expei'ienced 
men, who don't always agree. 
One, for instance, swears by D. 
O. P., and another at it. If we 
tried to smooth out every little 
inconsistency that appears in the 
manuscript submitted. Studio 
Light would, indeed, prove dull 
reading. Every contributor with 
every pen dip would be thinking, 



"Will this get by the blue pen- 
cil?" instead of thinking, "Am I 
making my point clear?" 

In the interests of hot-stuff, 
Ave propose to let the Aristo man, 
the D. O. P. man and the Plati- 
num man each crow his loudest. 
We shall not force any one of 
them to crow at a certain pitch, in 
order to make a crescendo in 
favor of any particular product. 
As to the respective merits of 
different kinds of products, we 
are often out of key. As to the 
quality of Eastman products, 
however, Ave are in harmony. On 
this point we can crow m key 
and at concert pitch. 

Editor. 



o 



UR ILLUSTRATIONS 



The splendid group of the 
officials of the P. A. of A. which 
Ave use as a fi-ontispiece is from 
the studio of J. E. Mock of 
Rochester, N. Y. 

The remainder of the illustra- 
tions are from Aristo Platino 
prints made by Bauer & Coffey 
of Kansas City, Mo. The illus- 
tration on our coA'er for March 
Avas from the same studio and 
elicited much favorable comment, 
and Ave are pleased to afford our 
readers further examples of their 
most artistic Avork. 

The Bauer & Coffey Studio 
have made a specialty of Platino, 
as they find it splendidly adapted 
to their high-class custom. 



1) 



the ARISTO EAGLE 




FROM AN ARISTO TLATINO PRINT 
By Bauer cf- Coffey Kansas City, Mo. 



(W 



10 



STUDIO LIGHT a ?i d 



SOME THOUGHTS ON 
SPRING 

BY THE OFFICE BOY 

Ma says it's time for me to 
take a sirring tonic. I ast the 
Boss Avot was a spring tonic for, 
an' he says "a spring tonic is a 
dope for a lazy man so he can 
have an excuse for bein' lazy a 
little while longer." He said if 
I took mor'n one dose he'd fire 
me sm-e. 

The Boss saj's, "give your l)usi- 
ness a spring tonic, but pass it 
up yourself." He says the man 
that owns a business is the heart, 
hver and lungs of that busi- 
ness, an' he's got to be mighty 
careful how he monkeys with 
himself or he'll land the business 
in the hospittle. 

The Boss says "keep the vital 
part of your business in good 
shape by workin' hard six days iii 
the week and sleepin' hard seven 
nights, — shut off steam one day 
in the week an' give your in- 
wards a chance to cool off and 
rest up. He says "hard Avork 
never killed anybody" (he looked 
hard at me when he said that) 
— but that Avorryin' killed a lot of 
people (he didn't look hard at me 
Avhen he said that) . The Boss 
says Avorryin' is a good bit 
like a httle bit of sand gittin' 
into the cylinder of an engine — 
don't amount to much in itself, 
but it keeps grindin ' along inside 
an' pretty soon the Avhole engine 
is to the bad. The Boss says. 



"Don't Avorry, if there's any 
Avorryin' to be done let the other 
felloAV do it. If you oAve the 
grocer or stock dealer a little bit 
— don't waste time worvyin about 
it, but use that time hustlin' for 
business to get the money to pay 
'em AA'ith." 

The Boss says "Hustle — that 
Avhile Avorrying is like the sand 
inside the cylinder, hustlin' is 
like good slick grease to lubricate 
things Avith — and if you put in all 
your time hustlin' — Avhy, you 
amt got no time left to Avorry. 
You can afford to trust a hustler 
for a month longer, but you can't 
afford to trust a Avorrier for a 
minute." 

Gee ! aint card mounts heavy 
— the Boss got in a lot of stuff 
fi-om Taprell's the other day — 
gettin' ready for the convention 
— sure he's goin' to have an ex- 
hibit — saj'S he's going to have 
tAvo of 'em — one for the conven- 
tion an' one for the shoAV case 
here Avhile he's gone, so the 
recejition room girl Avill have 
somethin' to do. Says he's a 
notion to put a card in his shoAv 
case readin', "These are pretty 
good, but Avait for the ncAV 
ideas I am goin' to firing home 
from the Photograijhers Conven- 
tion." 

The Boss says the printer won't 
be the only busy one when he gets 
back, an' j'ou can bet he's right 
for our reception room girl is a 
hustler. She'll Avork that shoAV 
case idea to a finish. 



JJ 



the ARISTO EAGLE 



11 




FROM AN ARISTO PLATING PRINT 

' Bauer & Coffey Kansas City, Mo. 



<^ 



12 



STUDIO LIGHT and 



A STARTER 

"*■ ■*■ Yes, I know there is 
money in making enlargements, 
and I have been going to take it 
up, but somehow haven't got 
around to it. 

But supposing the other fellow 
down the street thinks just as 5'ou 
do and starts in making them, 
isn't he not only going to scoop 
in some nice easy money, but 
also take a bit of the wind out 
of your sails ? 

We have published a booklet 
on Enlarging, forty-eight pages 
of suggestions, working plans 
and formukt, just to help you 
get started. This is not an ama- 
teur booklet, but one written 
from your view point, and up to 
your knowledge of things pho- 
tographic. The booklet takes up 
and exi)lains the making of en- 
largements by both daylight and 
artificial light; Avith specially 
constructed, readj^-to-use appa- 
ratus, and bj" adapting some cam- 
era you alread}^ possess to this 
purpose. It affords full instruc- 
tion for constructing apparatus 
for daylight use, for use by arti- 
ficial light with and without cox- 
DExsERs. It tells you the most 
suitable forms of artificial light 
and how to employ them to the 
best advantage. It explains 
about condensers, the correct size 
to use, how to mount them, and 
just where to place them. How 
large a room Avill you require ? 
Consult pages seventeen and 



eighteen, there you will find 
tables affording the exact distance 
for enlargements from one to 
twenty times, with any lens from 
five to twentj'-five-inch focus. 
The booklet tells you the best 
sort of lens to use and why ; the 
proper qualities in the negative 
for best results; test exposures; 
development, with fonnukc ; how 
to produce good prints and what 
to avoid; how to produce soft 
effects; vignetting, printing in 
clouds ; how to mount on cards, 
on cloth and on stretchers; how 
to produce sepia tones; how to 
produce olive tones ; what grade 
or brand of paper to use, and 
why ; and many other invaluable 
suggestions. 

The booklet is yours for the 
asking from jour stock dealer or 
fi'om us by mail. 

Ask for a copy to-day and get 
started. 



M 



ONEY IN LEATHER 
NOVELTIES 

Taprell, Loomis & Company 
have lately placed on the mar- 
ket a line of Leather Novelties, 
which offer a Avonderful oppor- 
tunity to photographers to make 
extra money and to swing a 
cheap grade of pictures into a 
good grade. 

First of all, they have a line 
of Black Seal Grain Leather 
Gentility Card Cases and Bill 
Books, with openings for a 2 x 3 



39 



the ARISTO EAGLE 



13 




FROM AN ARISTO PLATING PRINT 
By Bauer rf- Coffey Kansas City, Mo. 



14 



STUDIO LIGHT and 



picture. If you are making a 
specialty of baby pictures, you 
can offer a special grade on a dif- 
ferent mount and one of these 
Bill Book Novelties, making the 
increased cost of your stjle pay 
for the Bill Book mounts, besides 
netting you a handsome profit. 

They are also showing some- 
thing very unique in Leather 
Novelties for a penny picture 
photo. There is the Midget 
Pocket Book to hold a Print 
f X l|^, the Souvenir Match Safe 
and Watch Fob. They have 
been put at remarkably low 
prices, and no photographer 
should fail to insist on seeing 
them when the traveling sales- 
man calls. 



w 



HY GIVE IT TO 
TOMPKINS.? 

It's the man Avho can do un- 
usual things just Avhen thej' are 
needed that gets the big monej*. 
The only man at hand who can 
deliver what some one else wants, 
and wants badly, can come pretty 
near obtaining his o\n\ price for it. 

Any commercial photographer 
can go out and make an outside 
jol), but just for this reason his 
profit on the job is often small, 
because the man across the street 
or in the next block can do it just 
as well as he can. 

There are lots of jobs the man 
with the ordinaiy equipment can 
not do, just aching to be done, and 



lots of prospective business to be 
worked up from the work already 
in sight. Let us take for instance 
a real estate dealer Avho has a 
beautiful country home or estate 
placed in his hands for sale. 
Now there is a good fat commis- 
sion for him if he effects the sale, 
and he wants that commission 
badly, and is worried every 
moment for fear the owner will 
place it in some other agent's 
hands, and that the other agent 
Avill find a purchaser first. He 
will rush eveiy probable custo- 
mer he can get hold of out to see 
it, but supposing he leanis of 
some customer at a distance, or 
one closer at hand, that for some 
reason cannot come and \iew the 
propertj , Mouldn't he be wilhng 
to i)ay a big price for a picture 
that would clearly and adequately 
show the estate and its surround- 
ings? Fifty, a hundred or even 
three hundred dollars wouldn't 
make much of a hole m his com- 
mission on a big sale hke that, 
and he Avould be a poor business 
man indeed who wouldn't risk 
a little to gain so much. 

But where could he get a 
picture or pictures hke that 
made? You couldn't make 'em 
right A\ith your view box, or 
Smith or Jones ^\\t\v their regu- 
lar outfits couldn't either, and 
so Mr. Real Estate Dealer just 
goes begging some one to make 
this nice big bunch of easymoney. 

Pretty soon he learns of a man 
in a near-by city that can make 



the ARISTO EAGLE 



15 



just -what he wants, out he goes. 
"Tompkins, can you make me 
some views of an estate that will 
show just how it looks, some- 
thing that will take in a lot, and 
show not onlj' just how the coun- 
try home looks, but just how it 
appears when you are approach- 
ing it, and the splendid pano- 
ramic views from the library or 
fi-ont portico?" Tompkins says, 
"Surely, I can," shows him some 
samples of work, ar.d names a 
good fat price. "Hang the 
price," says Mr. Real Estate 
Dealer, "how soon can you make 
'em?" and pretty soon in Avalks 
Mr. Tompkins into your town 
Avith his Cirkut Camera, and car- 
ries off a lot of dollars that might 
have gone to you. 

But I can't afford to keep a 
special outfit on hand just for a 
job like that — of course you can't, 
and neither can Tompkins, but 
between ourselves, the first job 
or so Tompkins made with his 
Cirkut paid for his outfit, and 
now all he makes with it is 
largely velvet, and his Cirkut is 
kept pretty busy. 

When Tompkins bought his 
Cirkut he didn't hide it away in 
a closet and say nothing ; no, sir, 
he went out and made some sam- 
ples — good ones, framed them 
up and placed them where people 
could see them and know that 
Tompkins made them. Then the 
first job came along, Tompkins 
named a good price — but no one 
else at hand could do the job. 



There are a multitude of op- 
portunities to make pictures that 
only the Cirkut can make, right 
at hand. Real estate men, own- 
ers of country estates, factory 
corporations, railroads, highway 
commissions, contractors, pro- 
moters of athletic events, all are 
not only possible but very prob- 
able customers. 

Don't let Tompkins come into 
your territory again, but land 
this extra profit for yourself. 

A postal card to the Century 
Camera Division at Rochester 
will bring you a most interesting 
booklet telling you all about the 
Cirkut — there is a mail train 
going that way to-night. 



A 



FAIR CHANCE 



The busy season is nearly 
at hand, and we expect our plate 
tanks to save us a Avhole lot of 
time and hard work, but we must 
give the tanks a fair chance and 
not expect them to make up for 
our oAAii carelessness and inaccu- 
racj". 

When we are given a time or 
labor saving device we are apt, 
after we have become accustom- 
ed to its usefulness, to become 
a bit careless, and then if it fails 
to perform its functions perfectly, 
to declare it "no good, " when the 
fault lies entirely with ourselves. 

We have had the theory of 
"time and temperature" develop- 
ment — the foundation of the tank 



16 



STUDIO LIGHT and 




FROM AN ARISTO PLATING PRINT 
Batter rf- Coffey Kansas Ciiy, Mo. 



7/ 



the ARISTO EAGLE 



17 




FROM AX ARISTO PLATINO PRINT 
By Bauer <£• Coffey Kansas City, Mo. 



li 



STUDIO LIGHT aiid 



system pounded into us until we 
know it by heart, yet some of us 
have been known to guess at the 
temperature bj' the insertion of a 
more or less calloused forefinger, 
and to guess at the time by esti- 
mating how long we had been 
out of the dark room. 

Again, some of us, thank for- 
tune, not many, have been known 
to make up our developer by 
guess — a pinch of this, a handful 
of that — the way mother makes a 
cake — and then cuss the tank 
because results were not perfect. 

Yes, you can fix the plates in 
the tank, but what's the use, 
nine hundred and ninety-nine out 
of every thousand of us have a 
good fixing box already installed 
in our dark room, with a good 
fixing bath in it, and it is only a 
few moments Avork to ti'ansfer the 
plates from the tank to the fixing 
box. Before we had the the tank, 
we would have jumped on any 
one good and hard who put hypo 
in our pet developing trays. 

Of course it is a simple matter 
to cleanse the tank or tray fi'om 
the hypo, but suppose some time 
you are in a big hurry and forget 
it — the hypo wont ruin your neg- 
atives, it's true, but it will make 
some difference, and it's just as 
easj^ to have them exactly right 
as a little off. 

There isn ' t a supei-fluous word 
or bit of instruction in the tank 
manual — we not only wanted but 
had to simplify it in every way 
possible and the instructions are 



few and simple, j-et what there 
m-e must be followed to make the 
tank the real helper and time 
saver it is meant to be — and is. 
Folloiv the few simple instruc- 
tions and the tank will do the 
rest. 



rpHE SIGNAL 

'*- We have had a lot to say 
about tested chemicals — pure 
chemicals — in these columns and 
in our advertising pages. The 
subject is an imjjortant one and 
demands earnest consideration bj' 
you and by us. Our efforts to 
produce and market a line of 
tested chemicals, absolutely right 
for photographic use, arose not 
so much from oyxr desire to in- 
crease our business in chemicals 
and chemical preparations, as to 
further increase the surety that 
our manufactured products with 
which these chemicals were to be 
used, would have the best possi- 
ble treatment, in order to yield 
the best possible results. We 
could afford to spend a lot of 
money in investigation and tests 
— more than any manufacturer of 
chemicals or chemical prepara- 
tions, for our interest, unlike his, 
does not cease with the sale of 
the chemicals — we must see not 
only that our chemicals are right, 
but that they are exactly suited 
to our other products. We do 
want to increase the sale of our 
tested chemicals — and it is obvi- 



y/ 



the ARISTO EAGLE 



19 




FROM AN ARISTO PLATING PRINT 



By Bauer <& Coffey 



Kansas City, Mo. 



20 



STUDIO LIGHT and 



ous that our interest is much 
greater than the securing of the 
profits arising from their sale 
alone. 

The only way we can hold your 
friendship and patronage is by af- 
fording you the means for produc- 
ing uniformly good results the 
easiest and simplest way. We 
dare not leave any loo])hole for 
failure. We must make every 
product just the best Ave know 
how and we must go further and 
take more pains than anyone else 
in giving you the right chemicals 
to work our products Avith. You 
in your turn are just as anxious 
to secure good results as we are 
to have you. 

We have adopt- 
ed this trade mark 
and have afforded 
it a prominent 
place on the pack- 
ages of our prep- 
arations as a signal - 
and safe to follow — a signal for 
our mutual benefit. 



A 



HELP AT COST 




CONVENTION 



THE T I ^I E 

July 19-24 



THE PLACE 
Rochester, New York 



We want to make Studio 
Light an all around helper for the 
profession. There has been a lot 
of Avork, and some of it good 
Avork, done for the photogra- 
phers by the photographic maga- 
zines in the Avay of giving sound 
advice on advertising subjects. 
But the photograi)her has been 
handica))i)ed in the obtaining of 
good illustrations for use in his 
neAvspaper advertising. Line cuts 
are the only kind that Avill Avork 
Avith advantage, and to have 
drawings made and then have 
zinc etchings made from the 
draAvings is obviously too expen- 
si\e for the aA^erage photogra- 
pher. 

Our plan is to furnish cuts at 
a price you can afford to pay. We 
expect to lose something on the 
scheme, but if Ave can help 5"ou 
increase your business Ave shall 
hope to do enough more business 
Avith you to come out all right in 
the long run. 

We can buy electrotypes 
cheaply, and shall sell them at a 
very slight advance, to partly 
pay us for the cost of draAvings 
and etchings. An aA'erage draAV- 
ing for this purpose Avill cost us, 
say, 815.00, and the zinc etch- 
ing a dollar or so more If Ave 
charge you five cents each OA'er 
the actual cost of electrotypes 
and postage, aac Avould have to 
sell OA'er three hundred from each 
draAA'ing to break CA^en — to say 



the ARISTO EAGLE 



21 



KuA 




Photographs of the chil- 
dren—pictures for their 
friends, — pictures for your 
family and your wife's — 
pictures for you and the 
children both to look on in 
future years and brin.o- back 
the childhood days again. 

We take them, and take them so 
well that they catch a U the charms 
and preserve them for you. 

Telephone for an Appointment. 

The Pyro Studio 



No. 130 



22 



STUDIO LIGHT and 



nothing of our packing and cleri- 
cal work. Just Avhat we shall 
charge will depend somewhat on 
how nianj^ we find you ordering 
per month. At any rate, the 
charge to j'ou will be merely 
nominal, but will \nvy somewhat 
fi'om time to time with the 
size of the electros and the 
cost of the drawings. This 
month's electro as shown on 
page 21, will be furnished for 50 
cents, postpaid. Please order by 
number and remit in stamps. 

The text matter, as shown in 
our sample advertisement, is 
a suggestion — the electros do not 
contain any printed matter, but 
are properly mortised to receive 
same, 

ONE CONDITION 

It is obvious that two i:)hotog- 
raphers in the same town would 
not care to use the same cut, and 
we are therefore obliged to limit 
this offer to one photographer in 
a town. It will be a case of first 
come first served. The first order 
fi-om a city Avill be promi)tly 
filled. Succeeding orders (if any) 
will necessarily" be turned down 
and the remittance, of course, 
will be returned. 

We shall vary the style and 
size fi'om month to month, shall 
have good drawings and good 
cuts, and shall endeavor to make 
this service highly valuable to 
the profession. We shall not make 
a dollar of direct profit on it. 
We hope that it will prove profit- 



able to you — but you must not 
expect too much in immediate 
results. The advertising road is 
a long one to travel on, and the 
fare is high — but if it is steadily 
followed and is backed up by 
good goods and good service, the 
Advertiser is sure to arrive on 
schedule time at the teraiinal 
station — Successtown, 



A BAD DREAM 
Br-r-r-r-r— "Hello! Is 
this you, Mr. Thompson? This 
is Mrs. Brown of St. Paul's 
Chin-ch. We sold all those large 
pictures of the church at the 
Church Fair last night, and we 
can sell fifty more to-night if we 
can get them." 

"I'm tremendously sorry, Mrs. 
Brown, but I haven't any more 
eight by ten paper; you see, I 
buy all my paper direct from the 
factory, and it will take at least 
three days to get here." 

"Oh Dear ! " — Gloom ! 

Smash! Well of all the care- 
less — there goes my big toning 
tray and it will take a week to 
get one from the factory — more 
gloom . 

Why, what's the use of wor- 
rymg, you can send over to the 
stock house and get your eight- 
ten paper and a new tray, and 
have 'em here in thirty minutes. 

Yes, I know I could in the 
good old days, but there are no 
stock houses now; you see, we 



7/ 



the ARISTO EAGLE 



23 



figured out that we could save 
the retailers' profit by buj'ing di- 
rect fi-om the factory, and also 
always have fresh goods to use — 
direct from the factory — so the 
stock houses Avent out of busi- 
ness. 

— Please, Mr. Thompson, 
we're all out of Pyro — Jimmie 
forgot to order any — and the 
printer saj's that five-seven pa- 
per is so old he can't use it. — 

Well, you ought to have made 
a good bit extra by saving the 
dealers' profit. 

Saved! Extra profit! — Say, 
you come here, young man, and 
have a look — see that store 
room — there is more extra profit 
tied up in there than I can get 
out in twentj* years, and no mat- 
ter how carefully I plan mj' buy- 
ing — we are ahvays out of Avhat 
we want in a hurry, and in spite 
of everything, stock will get old 
on my hands. 

Well, can't you exchange with 
the other photographers? Wish 
I could, but they are all in the 
same bad boat that I am — we 
ahvays seem to be out of every- 
thing that's needed. 

Oh ! Wow ! My, but that was 
an awful dream. Mighty glad 
we didn't all take up with that 
"from factory to user," extra 
profit scheme — guess the stock 
inan earns his profit all right. 

"Jimmie, rim over to Smith's 
and get three gross Aristo cabs., 
two dozen fourteen-seventeen 
Royal Bromide, and a half dozen 



Six-H Retouching pencils — and, 
wait a minute, give him this 
check for last month's account." 



V^ 



T USTRE 

■^^^ A slight lustre to the sur- 
face of a sepia print imparts a 
depth and delicacj' to the shad- 
ows that adds greatly to its at- 
tractiveness. Many photogra- 
phers are producing this efiect by 
applying wax to the surface of 
the print and many more or less 
satisfaetorj" formulas for this pur- 
pose have been pulilished. Un- 
fortunately the photographer is 
not always able to secure just the 
proper ingredients, and if the 
effect is not all it should be he 
gives up the idea as impractical. 

Nepera Waxing Solution is 
made especiallj' for the purpose 
and Avill afford good results every 
time. It is especially effective 
on sepia toned Royal Nepera 
])rints. Apply evenly Avith cotton 
fiannel and rub into the surface. 

The price is twenty cents per 
bottle, at all dealers'. 



KEEP YOUR EYE ON 

THE EASTMAN 
SCHOOL BULLETIN 

NEW DATINGS EACH 
ISSUE 



24 STUDIO LIGHT «»f/ 



B 



U L L E T I X ; THE EASTMAN SCHOOL OF 
PROFESSIONAL PHOTOGRAPHY FOR 1909 



Auspices M. L.Jones, Ft.Wajne, Ind., April 6, 1, 8. 

Auspices Walter K. Schmidt Co., Grand Rapids, Mich., April 
14, 15, 16. 

Auspices O. H. Peck Co., Minneapohs, Minn., April 20, 21, 22. 

Auspices Illinois College of Photography, Effingham, 111., April 

27, 28, 29. 

Illinois Convention, Springfield, 111., May 4, 5, 6, 7. 
Auspices W. F. Uhlman, St. Joseph, Mo., May 11, 12, 13. 
Auspices Charles Lawrence, Wichita, Kansas, May 18, 19, 20. 
Auspices C. Weichsel Co., Dallas, Texas, May 25, 26, 27. 
Auspices F. J. Feldman, El Paso, Texas, June 1, 2, 3. 
Auspices Howland& Dewey Co., Los Angeles, Cal., June 8, 9, 10. 
Auspices Hirsch & Kaiser, San Francisco, Cal., June 15, l6, 17. 

Auspices Portland Photo Supply Co., Portland, Oregon, June 

22, 23, 24. 

Auspices Tacoma Dental & Photo Supply Co., Tacoma, Wash., 
June 29, 30, July 1. 

Auspices Robt. Dempster Co., Omaha, Neb., July 14, 15, l6. 

Auspices Memphis Photo Supply Co., Memphis, Tenn., July 
20, 21, 22. 



J) 



the ARISTO EAGLE 



25 



Commer- 










— 


p« 


T Per 


Per 


Per 




cial 


Size ? j Doz. Doz. 


li Gross 


Gross 




214 X 214 


S .15 


$ .60 


$1.05 




Aristo 


21, X 21 7 
2I4X31I 
2I4X31', 


.15 
.15 
.15 


.60 
.60 
.60 


1.05 
1.05 
1.05 




PI a tin o 


214x334 
21 , X 414 


.15 
.15 


.(>0 
.(iO 


1.05 
1.10 






3 x4 


.15 


.(;o 


1.05 






31 , X 314 


.15 


.70 


1.30 






314x414 


.15 


.70 


1.30 






31, X 4 


.15 


.70 


1.30 






21.4x7 


.18 


.75 








4 x4 


.18 


.75 


1.45 






414x414 


.18 


.75 


1.45 






3I4X6 


.18 


.75 


1.45 






3'4x5y2 
4 x5 


.18 
.18 


.75 
.75 


1.45 
1.45 






ROLLS 


37 8 X 51/2 


.25 


.95 


1.75 




10 ft. Roll 241 3 


S'sxSTg 


.30 


1.10 


1.95 




ins. wide. .SI. 95 


4' 4x51/^ 


.30 


1.10 


1.95 




5 yd. Roll 241, 


4 x6 


.25 


.95 


1.75 




ins. wide. ..$2.80 


414x61^7 


.30 


1.30 


2.25 




10 yd. Roll 241 , 
ins. wide. ..$5.15 


43,4 X 6I/2 
4 x9 


.30 
.35 


1.50 

1.75 


2.60 

2.85 






5x7 


.35 


1.70 


2.75 




(Furnished only 


5 X 7I2 


.35 


1.80 


3.00 




in 241, inch 


5 x8 


.35 


1.80 


3.15 




wndths.)' 


51 , X 734 


.40 


1.95 


3.45 






3i;xl2 


.35 


1.90 










6 "x8 


.45 


2.30 


4'. 10 






61 , X 8I/2 


.50 


2.50 


4.40 






7 x9 


.55 


2.85 


5.15 






71, X 91^2 


.60 


3.20 


6.00 






8 " X 10 


.65 


3.60 


6.70 






9 xll 






8.70 






10 xl2 


'. .95 


s.'io 


10.30 






11 xl4 $ 


65 1.25 


7.20 


13.45 




Canadian 


12 xl5 

14 xl7 1 


80 1.40 
00 1.90 


8.50 
10.80 


16.00 
20.(;5 




Kodak 


16 x20 1 


30 2.50 


14.80 


27.90 






17 x20 1 


40 2.75 


15.45 


29.95 




Co., Limited 


18 x22 1 


65 3.15 


18.00 


35.15 




20 x24 1 


95 3.60 


21.15 


41.30 




Toronto, Can. 




















_J 



26 



STUDIO LIGHT and 



The best of everything 
for use in the Studio 



A complete line of 

Canadian Kodak Co. 's 
Plates, Papers and 
Tested Chemicals. 

Canadian Card Co.'s 
Mounts 

Century Studio Ap- 
paratus. 



The D. H. Hogg Company 

MONTREAL, CANADA 



1) 



the ARISTO EAGLE 



27 



Spending is Saving, 
when yoa spend 
money for chemicals 
of known quality 
and strength. 

To be sure look for 
this label: 




28 STUDIO LIGHT «72rf 

Just Use Average Negatives 

VELVET 
NEPERA 



Is Pitched 

to 
Duplicate 

Aristo 

in 
Gradation 



CANADIAN KODAK CO. 

Limited 

Toronto, Can. 





the ARISTO EAGLE 29 

Canadian Made for the 
Canadian Professional 



Seed, Royal and Stanley 
Plates 

Canadian Card Co.'s 
Mounts 

Canadian Kodak Co.'s 
Tested Chemicals 

Canadian Made Papers 



J. G. Ramsey k Co., limited 

Toronto, Canada 



30 



STUDIO LIGHT and 




You can spend 
more of your 
time outside this 
door when you 
use the 



EASTMAN 

PLATE 
TANK 



Less Trouble, 
iNIore Comfort, 
Better llesults. 



KASTMAN PLATE TAXKS. 



5x7 

S X 10 



§ 4.50 
10.00 



EASTMAN KODAK CO. 

ROCHESTER, N.Y. 

All Dealers. 



the ARISTO EAGLE 



31 




THE Cirkut Camera opens up 
an entirely new and profitable 
field of photographic work. 

The user of a Cirkut is not restricted to plates of 
conventional sizes; he may include in the nega- 
tive as much of the view as the subject may re- 
quire. With the No. 16 Cirkut, negatives of any 
length up to eighteen feet may be made. 

Cirkut Catalog free on request. 

Century Camera Division 

Eastmaji Kodak Co. Rochester, N.Y. 



32 



STUDIO LIGHT aiid 



A POINTER 

Be sure and see samples of these styles 
They are the best value ever oifered 



The Enqyrcss, Jf^elleslei/ and ^....^^^ Diqjoiit Styles 



fiT" 







"VA'^E can conscientiously say that these stjles are the best vahie ever offered. 
^ ' They are made of medium heavyweiirht stock, matched cdjies, witli a 
neat corded silk finish. Embellished with beautiful two lined design with orna- 
mental corners, brought up in rich shades to match the border. They are very 
attractive in appearance and will prove popular sellers. 

Sample of one size free. 

They are made in three colors, named as follows: The Empress, tnaAe in 
Artist's Brown; the Dupont, in Ash Grey; and the IVelleslei/, in Cream White. 



Size 
CX 
FX 



For Photo 

Cabinet Oval 

Cabinet Square 



Size Outside 
6x9 
6X9 



Price per 100 
$ 2.50 
2.50 



DESIGNED AND MANUFACTURED BV 



The Canadian Card Co. 



TORONTO 
CANADA 



Aristo Motto 

"T ^ 7E believe permanency is the 
» » Keystone of Photographic 
Success, and all brands of paper 
bearing our Trade-mark are manu- 
factured on this principle. We hold 
our consumer's reputation and suc- 
cess identical with our own. We 
surround both with every safe- 
guard known to chemical science 
and our own experience." 




FROM AN ARISTO PLATINO PRINT 
By 11. E. Gray Houston, Texas 




T? "T? 



L^l 




ana the ^<^R.IkS^O :^9^guS^ 



A Magazine of I n f o r m a t i o ti for the Profession 



NEW SERIFS 

Vol. 1 No. 3 



MAY 1 9 9 



OLD SERIES 
No. 100 



THE PHOTOGRAPH- 
ERS ASSOCIATION 
OF AMERICA 

COXVENTIOX OF 1909 

It is with a sense of optimism 
for the future of the P. A. of A. 
that plans are contemiilated for 
the Rochester convention which 
are intricate, arduous and vitally 
essential to the future welfare of 
]>hotographers. I would shrink 
before the task undertaken were 
it not for the hearty support and 
approval of the rank and file of 
our cratt. Their loyal supjiort of 
my chief aim and desire, that of 
amalgamating the interests of the 
state associations, has led me to 
believe the tiine has come to 
place this matter before our mem- 
bers for discussion. 

We have year after year spent 
our time and money congregat- 
ing together, and that we have 
been benefitted, instructed and 
socially entertained each year is 
best proven by the continuous 
interest and attendance. 

This year we desire you shall 
have all the good that has ma- 
tured out of the past, but let us 
seriously and unselfishly bend our 



energies toward i)erfecting a uni- 
versal brotherhood A\hich shall 
in time include the majority of 
the professional jjhotograjjhers of 
the United States and Canada, 

This is a big undertaking, but 
not impossible nor improbable. 
All that is needed is the earnest 
and selfwilled intent of the best 
minds of our profession. Canvass- 
ing among our meml^ers for their 
opinions has demonstrated that 
action is Ijoth wise and expedient. 
It has therefore been decided to 
start the movement which I hope 
Avill culminate in a perfect work- 
ing congress of photography. 

This plan will in no wise in- 
terfere with the state societies, 
but to the contrary it will tend 
to strengthen and increase them, 
as in my opinion M'ith such an 
organization no one could become 
an active member of the P. A. 
of A. unless he hold credentials 
from his state society. All others 
would be associate members and 
would be deprived of none of 
the privileges except votmg. 

The legislative work could 
then be conducted by delegates 
from the state associations elect- 
ed or appointed by their respect- 



STUDIO LIGHT and 



ive societies. In order that this 
plan may have a practical test I 
am placing this matter before 
each state society, asking for 
delegates who will assemble at 
Rochester for the purpose of 
perfecting a future plan of ac- 
tion. Their report will then be 
])laced before om- members for 
consideration. 

The Ohio-Michigan, the first 
convention of the year, has 
taken favorable action and the 
following delegates have been 
appointed : 

For Ohio — C. L. Lewis, To- 
ledo; \V. L. Smith, St. Mary's; 
J. A. Walker, Bowling Green. 

For Michigan — E. E. Dotj", 
Belding; J. E. Rentchler, Ann 
Ai-bor; E. J. Traj", Jackson. 

The Canadian Association have 
abandoned their convention for 
1909; and are to attend the 
Rochester convention in body, 
and Avill appoint delegates. 
They are ready to support this 
undertaking, which makes this 
year one of opi)ortunity for in- 
ternational results. 

This invitation is now before 
the New York and Pennsylva- 
nia state associations for ap- 
proval, and Avill be advanced to 
all other organized bodies of 
professional photographers be- 
fore the meeting of our conven- 
tion in Jul}'. 

Arrangements have been per- 
fected whereby the delegates 
will meet in the Chamber of 
Commerce Hall, aj^art from the 



convention; this procedure vnH 
demonstrate the wisdom of a 
delegated body for legislative 
action in the interest of pho- 
tographers generally. 

As soon as notification of the 
election of a delegate is re- 
ceived, appropriate credentials 
will be assigned him, and no 
person will be recognized or ad- 
mitted to this congress without 
them. The congress Avill act 
independently of convention and 
repoi-t its deliberations to the 
P. A. of A. for amendments, or 
adoption. 

There are to be other matters 
pertaining to the week's accom- 
plishments, other than law and 
organization, which Avill make 
for the Rochester convention 
the heaviest week's woi'k in the 
history of its twenty-nine years' 
service to photogi-aphers. 

The School of Photography 
will be represented by the fore- 
most men of our profession, and 
conducted in Convention Hall 
under the leadership of Ryland 
W. Phillips, of Philadelphia. 
For persistence and untiring en- 
ergy, this man Phillips has no 
superior, and when he conducts 
this school we are assured of its 
success. Back of him stands 
every member of our association, 
ready and willing to lend assist- 
ance. Details of the school will 
be given out later. 

The picture exhibit this year 
is to be complimentary. This 
one feature of convention week 



the ARISTO EAGLE 



is to prove the contending ojjin- 
ion of prizes. I have now filed 
away treasured letters of en- 
dorsement for the board's atti- 
tude on this question fi-om many 
leading photographers, all prom- 
ising their best efforts and an 
exhibit for the Rochester con- 
vention. Think of it, seventy 
of our leading men promising 
from four to six i:)ictures, and at 
this early date. I pro])hesy for 
the Rochester exhibition one of 
the best and most attractive col- 
lections m recent years. Many 
others will be appealed to to 
sustain the prestige of Ameri- 
can professional photography. 
As the pictures are to be cata- 
logued this year, Ave must know 
early of your intentions of be- 
coming one of the exhibitors. 
Therefore be loyal to your asso- 
ciation and friends and write 
Mr. A. T. Proctor, Huntington, 
W. Va., of your intention to 
send from four to six of your 
best pictures, neatly framed, 
that, when our i:)ictures are 
hung, Ave may all point Avith 
pride to our Art Gallery of I909. 
Remember that all pictures are 
to be hung by states, so let us 
prove Avhat state organization 
can do in promoting state pride 
— get busy. 

The women of America are to 
be given a distinction this year 
by exhibiting collectively. 
Enough signatures have been 
received to waiTant the success 
of this innovation, but the avo- 



men must become interested to 
make the best possible shoAving, 
and Avith their assured co-opera- 
tion success is certain. 

There is so much Avork to be 
accomplished in this, our first 
six-day convention, that we are 
having difficulty in finding time 
to Avork out the Aveek's program. 
One day of the week is given 
over to Rochester's manufactur- 
ing interests, Avhich are many and 
varied. You can choose for your- 
self Avhere you can most profit- 
ably spend the day. The East- 
man Kodak Comi)any have asked 
for one night to entertain our 
members, and this has been 
granted them, and they extend 
the invitation to every one, man 
or Avoman, photographer or 
dealer, Avearing a button, to be 
present. You will miss a good 
tmie if you stay aAvay. 

Redviced railroad rates by 
the Trunk Line Association, Ncav 
England Passenger Association 
and the Eastern Canadian Asso- 
ciation, on the certificate plan, to 
one fare going, and three-fifths 
fare returning, is the first reduced 
rate Ave have enjoyed in three 
years. I am sure Ave shall be 
greatly benefitted by this conces- 
sion. Added information along 
this line Avill be given out as fast 
as received, Avith full instructions 
as to the purchasing of reduced 
rate tickets. 

HoAV about your dues of 
$2.00? Have you paid them for 
1909? If not, send to L. A. 



6 



STUDIO LIGHT and 



Dozei', Bucyrus, Ohio, and if you 
are in arrears he Avill tell you how 
you stand. If you are not already 
a member and desire to become 
one, send $3.00 for niembershi}> 
and $2.00 for annual dues, and 
upon receipt of $5.00 Mr. Dozer 
will order your name on our list 
and send you receipt. 

Remember the $100 cash 
prize which will be awarded 
during convention week for 
the best invention or process. 
Any exhibitor competing must 
have article or device on exhibi- 
tion throughout convention and 
make public demonstration be- 
fore convention members at a 
time which will be announced 
through i^rogram. There should 
be general interest in this invi- 
tation, and it sometimes happens 
that the one who least expects 
the awai-d is successful iii taking 
home the monej'. 

The headquarters for the con- 
vention have been located at the 
Seneca, a new and modern hotel, 
first-class in its appointments and 
near to Convention Hall. Write 
in advance and secure accommo- 
tions. There are other first-class 
hotels which offer special rates, 
including the Powers, Rochester, 
Whitcomb and O shorn. 

It is time to begin your prep- 
arations for the convention. Get 
your exhibit ready now. Take a 
week's vacation in July and 
attend the big convention in 
Rochester. Yours truly, 

F. R. Barrows. 



A 



CHANGE OF BASE 

Dcm- j\Ir. Editor : 

He rose to the hook, didn't 
he? 

The editor of the Anti-Organ 
has tried to fog the question. 
Unfortunately for him, however, 
he lost his temper, and is now 
Avandering m the fog of his own 
creation. 

In the article which I quoted 
in my letter, published in your 
March issue, he said : "The stand- 
DARD price of cabinets for some 
years past has been $2.00 per 
gi'oss less a small cash discomit. 
The price was originally lower, 
but was iaoosted when the com- 
pany thought it had control of 
the paper situation." 

In my letter I said: "The 
price of Aristo Platino caliinets 
has never been less than $2.00 
per gross." 

He 710W says, "I said nothing 
about the Hst price." 

Pray tell me, if the list price 
isn't the standard price, what 
is? Next he tries to create an 
impression that in the old days 
the photographers, mind you, he 
says "all professional photogra- 
phers," had discounts on Aristo, 
and dares me to deny it. Most 
emphatically I do. 

The facts are that the Aristo 
Company received exactly the 
same price for Aristo Platino 
then that its successor the East- 
man Kodak Comi:)any receives 
for it now. The list price was the 



the ARISTO EAGLE 



same, and the discount to the 
dealer was the same. It is by no 
means true that "all j)rofL-ssional 
photographers, " nor for that mat- 
ter any considei'able percentage 
of them received discounts. It 
was the policy of the Aristo 
Company to discourage price cut- 
ting between dealers, but it is 
admitted that that same policy 
has been more successfully car- 
ried out by the Eastman Kodak 
Company than by its predeces- 
sors. It costs the dealer on the 
average about twenty per cent, 
to do business. Surely he is then 
entitled to the twenty- five per 
cent, discount which he receives, 
leaving him five per cent. net. 

The square issue was and is: 
The Anti-Organ stated that your 
publishers had " b o o s t e d " 
prices, and inferred that it was 
for the sake of fattening the 
dividends. The facts are that 
you did nothing of the kind, and 
that you do not receive one iota 
more for the product than did 
your predecessors. 

I suggest that before making 
so many easily controvertil)le 
statements that the editor of the 
Anti-Organ study up the history 
of the photographic business in 
this, the land of his adoption. 
Yours truly, 

Stereoscope. 



P. S.— Please, Mr. Editor, do 
you know of any manufacturer 
that has, within the last decade, 
recommended a hot hypo alum 
bath for sepia toning? My guess 
is, that hot hypo went out about 
ten years ago, being succeeded 
by the better actor, cold alum, 
which was in turn succeeded 
several years ago by your re-de- 
velopment process. I am 
prompted to these remarks and 
questions by an advertisement I 
saw the other day, which had a 
paragraph in it that read like 
this: "No uncertain, tedious, 
slow and unsafe hot hypo alum 
bath need be considered." 

If you can find out Avho wrote 
that ad you had better invite 
him to come up to Rochester 
and see what's really domg in 
the photographic Avorld. Only 
be sure to let him know there's 
a railroad — he may not have 
heard of it yet, and it would be 
too bad to have him waste his 
valuable time coming up by 
canal. 

Who Avas it that said, "Every 
whale has its barnacles, every 
success its imitators"? Whoever 
it was, I'll bet my studio against 
a pound of hypo that he didn't 
travel by canal ten years after 
the railroad opened. 

s. 



National Convention — Rochester 

July 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24 



STUDIO LIGHT and 



R 



OYAL NEPERA 
PURE WHITE 



If Graduate, the man Avho 
took up nearly two pages of 
March Studio Light telUng about 
how good Rojal Nepera (India- 
tint) is, had only seen the new 
Royal Nepera Pure White before 
he wrote his article, he would 
have filled the whole book if Ave 
had let him. 

Every good thing that he said 
about Royal Nepera — the India- 
tint kind — applies to the new 
Royal Nepera Pure White. And 
as an additional advantage the 
new paper, as the name indi- 
cates, is on a white, perfectly 
white, stock. 

It's a paper for either black 
and white or sepias, and it 
doesn't need comparing with any 
other paper. You can follow the 
straight formula for black and 
white and the results are brilliant 
l)ut full of gradation. You can 
juggle it a bit if you wish, for 
one man Avill like a warm black 
and another a cold black. One 
man will like a print a little 
softer and another a little harder. 
Royal Nepera Pure White is the 
most tractable paper you ever 
saw. It seems to want to be ac- 
commodating, and Avhile sure to 
come along alright by strict ad- 
herence to the regular formula 
will do most anything with a lit- 
tle coaxing — and with the same 
kind of treatment will do pre- 
cisely the same thing the next 



time. Perhaps the best descrip- 
tion of a black and white Royal 
Nejiera Pure White print that 
we can give is to say that we 
have seen some rarely fine plati- 
nums that were most as good. 

And sepia toned by re-devel- 
opment it has a delicacy that you 
simply don't get on other papers. 
Not a whit of the original grada- 
tion is lost. You simplj' change 
the color. (Here's a case where 
color should be spelled c-o-1- 
o-u-r, just as it is in the old art 
books.) There's no question 
about the sepias having found 
favor. They are the growing 
vogue, and here's a paper that 
you can furnish them on easily, 
satisfactorily, profitably. Gradu- 
ate's plea that the India-tint 
stock harmonizes with the sejiia 
tone is well founded, but the 
average customer will prefer the 
pure white stock because of the 
added sparkle that it gives to 
the high-lights. Take a very 
contrasty negative, with sketchy 
backgrounds and broad, deep 
shadows, and it will produce a 
more artistic sejjia print on the In- 
dia-tint Royal than on any other 
paper, but for the average nega- 
tive and the average customer 
the Pure White has just the 
snappy touch that will please. 

Royal Nepera Pure White is 
an all around i)aper that enables 
j'ou to furnish two very different 
styles of prints (black and white 
or sepia) fi'om out of the same 
box. Like the other Royals it is 



the ARISTO EAGLE 




FROM AN ARISTO PLATING PRINT 
By U. E. Gray Houston, Texas 



10 



STUDIO LIGHT and 



really a double weight paper, 
though sold at the single Aveight 
price, and as it lies flat — not 
stiff like a piece of roofing tin, 
but flexibly flat — it is just right 
for delivering in folders. Though 
a new i)roduct it is by no means 
an experiment, for chemically it 
is simply the coating of our well 
tried and thoroughly relialile 
Royal Nepera emulsion on a pure 
white stock which is similar in 
all, save color, to the India-tint 
Royal stock. 

Rojal Nepera Pure White 
may now be had of photograi)hic 
stock dealers everywhere. In 
ordering be sure, however, to 
specify "Pure White," otherwise 
there is a likelihood that you will 
be fiu-nished the India-tint. Pro- 
fessional sizes onlj', and at the 
same price as Nepera single 
weight papers. 

Royal Nepera Pure White 
marks the greatest advance that 
has been made in developing 
papers in a decade. It combines 
in a degree not found in any 
other paper the physical qualities 
that make it a pleasure to handle 
and the chemical qualities that 
make it — for both the photogra- 
phers and the customer — a pleas- 
ui-e to deliver. 



$1400 in cash prizes for the 
professional in the 1909 Kodak 
Advertising Contest. 



r^OIl CONVENIENCE 

Did you ever hurry into 
your dark-room, or some other 
l)ortion of your studio, and — 
crash down goes a rack full of 
negatives? Mighty cai-eless to 
leave 'em there, but it is such 
a hard thing to find a good place 
to dry negatives. Usually the 
best place to dry them is just 
the place some one will run 
against or fall over them. In 
our own model studio we feel 
that this is one of the problems 
we have satisfactorily solved. 
As shown in the accompanying 
diagram the negative dryer is a 
part of the loading bench, the 
negatives being racked on a slat- 
ted shelf underneath the bench, 
and i^rotected bj" a slatted door, 
entirely out of the way of any 
one working within the room. 
The hinged door inay be let 
down and supported by a stop, 
as shown in the drawing, foi-m- 
ing a shelf when placing the 
negatives in the dryer or with- 
drawing them for examination. 
At one end of the shelf is placed 
an electric fan for creating a 
current of air. The fan is wired 
in connection with an incandes- 
cent bulb, which may be turned 
on whenever necessary to reduce 
the speed of the fan. Fastened 
to the wall over the loading 
bench is a convenient cupboard 
for the storage of plates or extra 
holders . The ruby light for use in 
loading plates is shielded by an 



the ARISTO EAGLE 



11 



opaque revolving reflector, which 
may be turned so as to allow the 
light to shine in anj' direction. 



where you want it and acting as 
an insurance against the "just 
borrowing it for a minute" habit. 



S^e.^-, 






ffuB Y L/CmT - 



^SBf\S^ PIPE COUNT£.R '^E h 

'-'Brush for P'lj^tcs 



R£c>uc£ sp£ £ o or r^f^ — 




Another simple and conven- This changing table and neg- 
ient feature is the cord and ative dryer can be easily con- 
brass pipe counter-weighty for structed by any carpenter with 
suspending the dust bi'ush just the diagram to aid him. 



12 



STUDIO LIGHT and 



A 



N ANNOYANCE 
A V O I D E R 



Practically every photographer 
finds more or less use for a view 
camera. For the commercial and 
view man this type of instrmnent 
is indispensalile and the regular 
studio man frequently finds use 
for it. There are view cameras 
and view cameras, many of them 
have shortcomings that evidence 
themselves just when you least 
expect them or when they are 
most distressingly annoying. 

Working in a hurry, we all 
know how cantankerous that long 
threaded screw that locks the 
extension lied to the camera body 
can be, and how wobbly some of 
the view boxes are, especially 
when we are using extremely 
short focus lenses. Most of us 
have experienced the delightful 
sensation incident upon discover- 
ing that part of our negative has 
been cut oif because Ave forgot to 
loop up the bellows. Then again, 
through some misfortune Ave hap- 
pened to insert our plate holder 
slide corner wise, making room 
for a ray of light that squirts fog 
clear across the plate. 

All of us have been hoping for 
a \ieAv box that Avouid avoid all 
these distressing httle annoj'an- 
ces, that Avould in addition be 
light, strong, compact and hand- 
some in appearance — and at last 
we have it, a good deal nearer 
the ideal view camera than we 
ever expected to find. 



It's called the Empire State 
No. 2, has double SAA'ing, rising 
and falling front actuated by rack 
and ])inion, front and back focus, 
reversible back, strap handle and 
comes AA'ith case and plate holder. 

Yes, youA'e seen cameras be- 
fore Avith these features, but note 
these important advantages. 

Sliding tripod block — This is a 
heavy block Avhich clamps rigidly 
at any point of the front exten- 
sion so that the box may be sup- 
ported directly above the tripod 
Avhen short focus lenses are used. 

Automatic bellows support — You 
can't forget to hook up the bel- 
loAvs, for this simple device auto- 
matically keeps the bellows up in 
place at all times. Requires no 
attention. Folds automatically 
Avhen camera is closed. 

Neiu light protector — This is a 
supplementary hght trap made 
into the camera back, so that 
leakage is impossible e\' en if the 
plate holder trap were defective. 
No need to throAV the cloth over 
the camera back Avhen Avithdraw- 
ing the slide. 

New extension clamp — The old 
fashioned long threaded screw 
has been replaced in this model 
by a special clamp Avhich is 
merely pushed in and given a 
quarter turn to hold each exten- 
sion absolutely rigid. 

Ease of operation — All operat- 
ing nuts are located on the right 
hand side. Clamping nuts on the 
left. No confusion in operating 
and clamping. No chance of 



the ARISTO EAGLE 



13 




FROM AN ARISTO PLATINO PRINT 

By n. E. Gray Houston, Texas 



14 



STUDIO LIGHT a>id 



tightening an adjustment while 
trj'ing to manipulate it. 

Complete descrii)tion of this 
camera can be had from the 
Rochester Optical Division. 
These are the prices : 
5 X 7, 833.00 Draw 22 inches 
617X81 2, 25.00 " 2T " 

8 " X 10, 28.00 " 30 " 



npHE SHOW CASE 

■*• The introductory chapter 
in "The Art of Decorating" has 
this to say: 

"The show window displaj- is 
an acknowledged attribute of 
trade winning. It is the mer- 
chant's closest connecting link 
with the public. Many a retail 
business stands or falls accord- 
ingly as the show window at- 
tracts or repels customers; for, 
by the show uindotcs the public 
will judge the store. The su- 
preme test of merit in a show 
window is that it will advertise 
and sell goods. The general 
public is composed entirely of 
possible customers, but only the 
pleased element thereof may be 
considered as probable cus- 
tomers." 

If the public conceives a fa- 
voral^le impression of youi- stu- 
dio by a passing glance at your 
shoAv case thej' Ijecome probable 
customers because they have 
been brought to a condition of 
mind which must always precede 
a purchase. 



Granted then, that the show 
case is a most important factor 
in the securing of business, do 
we make the most of it.'' Why, 
of course, our show case is al- 
ways filled ■vWth pictures from 
our best negatives — but, wait a 
minute, how long have those 
same pictures been in that case? 

Things that present the same 
front to us every day soon lose 
their identity and we pass them 
by with no more attention than 
we pay to the flagstones in the 
pavement. The old town pump 
might stand on the corner in its 
dingy grayness for months and 
you would never notice it, but 
some night let some one pahit it 
red, and the next morning you 
and every one else would notice 
it, and then if next week it 
should he painted green, and a 
few nights later decorated with 
stripes, you would look for that 
pump every time you went by, 
to see what had been done to it. 

This comparison with your 
show case may be a bit over- 
draAvn, but it apjilies neverthe- 
less, because if you do not edu- 
cate your public to look for new 
and interesting things in your 
show case, they soon pass it by 
A\ithout even a glance, and it 
becomes a positive detriment to 
your business. 

Now let us go about on the 
other tack for a moment. You 
are a live wire and change your 
show case frequently — and so 
does your competitor, so in or- 



the ARISTO EAGLE 



15 



der to attract the attention that 
will pull in the dollars we must 
do a few extra stunts. Suppose 
we try a few special displays. 
One for instance, of the seven 
ages of man, using the picture 
of a baby in his nurse's arms, 
then one of a child of three, 
then of a school boy, another of 
a young man of about twenty- 
one, then one of a man about 
thirty-five, and complete the 
series with the portrait of some 
fine looking old i)atriarch with 
snowy hair and beard. A neat 
httle card with an appropriate 
quotation will strengthen this 
display. Next week let us try 
a show case full of young girls, 
all as attractive as possible, with 
a little card "Sweet Sixteen." 
Another week, give the young 
men a chance, fill your case with 
the chaps just turning twenty- 
one with a little card "First 
Voters" or something similar. 
For a June or October display, 
a collection of brides. Devote a 
week to prominent citizens, an- 
other week to society ladies, a 
week to the grandmothers, and 
with each display make use of the 
little card calling attention to the 
particular dis])lay. All this means 
work and thought, but if persist- 
ently carried out each week you 
will have your public looking for 
and at your show case every time 
they pass, and when they want 
pictures, they will come to you 
involuntarily. Make your show 
case pay dividends. 



o 



UR ILLUSTRATIOxNS 



We are pleased to afford 
in this issue some examples of 
the excellent work from the stu- 
dio of Mr. H. E. Gray, of Hous- 
ton, Texas. 

Mr. Gray is one of the lead- 
ing j)hot()graphers of the south- 
west, and presides over a hand- 
some and well appointed studio. 

Mr. Gray attributes much of 
his success to the continued use 
of good old Aristo. 



s 



IMPLE AND CON- 
VINCING 

"Whj-, they are the simplest 
sort of {pictures— the kind that 
one could find most any place." 

Such has been the thought of 
every one who has examined the 
pages of the Portfolio of the 
I9O8 Kodak Advertising Compe- 
tition and studied the prize win- 
ning jiictures. 

Why, there is Katherine Jones 
or Marj' Kidder everj' bit as at- 
tractive as the prize winner girls, 
and why didn't I think of old 
Doctor Thompson and his two 
grand-children, and there's 
Charlie Smart's wife M'ith her 
pretty little three-year-old, — I 
could have made a picture like 
that one of Mrs. Pearce's just as 
easy. And there's that little place 
down by the brook — just around 
the bend from the swimming 
hole — about the prettiest little 



16 



STUDIO LIGHT and 



place you ever saw ; why, I could 
have taken my youngsters down 
there and made something great. 
There's those two girls develop- 
ing film in the kitchen, and the 
two standing by the dark room 
door, Jennie and Ethel could 
have posed fine for that. And I 
wouldn't have had to do any 
special fixing up either — just the 
simple, natural suiToundings. 

That is the whole story, just 
simple, natural human beings, in 
natural and logical sourround- 
ings — if the}' possess more than 
the average of good looks, so 
much the better, but not abso- 
lutely necessarj". 

All you have to do to stand a 
good chance of being listed Avith 
the winners in the 1909 Kodak 
Advertising contest is to take 
your simple, natural humans, in 
simple natural sourroundings, and 
make your jjicture tell some sim- 
ple story that will create a desire 
for a Kodak or an interest in the 
Kodak way of picture makmg. 

As a help, study the pictures 
used for advertising in the gen- 
eral magazines and note how 
simj^ly they tell their story. 

You still have plenty of time, 
but not any too much, so begin 
planning and making your prize 
Avinning prints now. If you 
haven't seen one, a postal card 
addressed to our advertising de- 
partment will bring you a copy of 
the portfolio of successful pictures 
in our 19O8 Kodak Advertising 
Contest. 



rpHERMIC 

-*- Most of us are not greatly 
troubled by climatic conditions 
during the heated tenn, and can, 
without much difficult}^, dispose 
of such hot weather troubles as 
arise. 

In some localities, however, 
the heated tenn brings photo- 
graphic troubles galore, particu- 
larl}^ in the development part of 
the work. 

Trj- as Ave will, it is almost 
impossible to maintain the nor- 
mal degree of temperature dur- 
ing development, and frilling 
and similar trouV)les make life a 
burden. 

The neAv Standard Thermic 
Plate meets perfectly any reason- 
able demand of the photographer 
laboring under the disadvantages 
of humidity and high tempera- 
ture. The Standard Thermic is 
physically and chemically harder 
than the other brands of Stand- 
ard plates. The emulsion is 
harder, perhaps tougher is a bet- 
ter Avord, and Avill stand a higher 
temperature without frilling. 
Standard Thermic has also the 
speed and latitude and, another 
strong point, requires no special 
manii)ulation or modification of 
developer. 

Standard Thermic is a good 
plate anyAvhere, but its qualities 
Avill be most highly appreciated 
in latitudes AA-here a tough emul- 
sion is required to Avithstand high 
temperature. 



the ARISTO EAGLE 



17 




FROM AN ARISTO PLATIXO PRINT 
By H. E. Gray Houston, Texas 



18 



STUDIO LIGHT and 



WITHOUT COST 
About this time of the 
year we commence to read arti- 
cles on Development troubles' ' 
and Dark room difficulties," 
and are told how to maintain an 
even temperature, how to avoid 
frilling and fog in half a hundred 
different ways; how to test our 
own dark room lamps, how to 
remain happy though suffocated, 
and how to more or less satis- 
factorily dodge the troubles and 
inconveniences incident to pro- 
longed incarceration in the dark 
room. 

It is to laugh. 

The sovereign remedy is so 
simple — Tank Development. 

A year or so ago some ques- 
tion might have been raised as 
to the quality of negative pro- 
duced by this method, but to- 
day the thousands of tanks in 
constant and successful use in 
studios the world over have 
demonstrated the superiority of 
this method over the tentative 
dark room way. 

Comfort, convenience and re- 
sults. These three points score 
in favor of the tank. The re- 
maining point is that of econ- 
omj"; we have the dark room 
with its necessary equipment of 
trays, lamps, etc., so why should 
we spend money for the tank 
when w e can produce good 
enough results without it? 

An eight by ten Eastman 
Plate Tank costs ten dollars. 



Now how long have we got to 
use it to get our money back, 
and enjoy its admitted good 
features without cost to us? We 
can, if we are expert, and will- 
ing to take some chances, de- 
velop eight five by sevens at one 
time, while the tank Mill accom- 
modate twenty-four. The tank 
will develop the twenty-four 
plates perfectly in thirty min- 
utes, and will demand our per- 
sonal attention, not to exceed 
ten minutes, leaving twenty min- 
utes to devote to other things 
outside of the dark room. To de- 
velop twenty-four five by seven 
plates by the regulation dark 
room method will require about 
four times ten minutes and de- 
mand personal attention every 
one of those minutes. Any way 
we estimate it, the tank will save 
one-half or more of the time 
spent for development and at 
that rate it will not require many 
weeks use of the tank to pay for 
it, after which all the economy, 
comfort and convenience of the 
tank are ours tvithout cost. 

There is no argument against 
the tank. 



Have you the Canadian Card 
Co.'s 1909 catalogue? If not, 
write for it to-day, it's full of 
live suggestions for making 
money . 



the ARISTO EAGLE 



19 




FROM AN ARISTO PLATING PRINT 
By H. E. Gray Houston, Texas 



20 



STUDIO LIGHT aiid 



I 



NSURANCE 



"It isn't what you spend, 
but what you get for what you 
spend." — Yes, this is another 
"tested chemical" stoiy — and if 
you are not interested in busi- 
ness insurance skip and turn 
over. We have spent thousands 
of dollars in the procuring of 
chemicals and in the compound- 
ing of chemical preparations 
that we know are right. 

We ought to? — granted — 
and more, we had to. 

It is of the utmost importance 
to us that our sensitive products 
receive the best possible treat- 
ment, so that they may, in your 
hands, yield the best possible 
results. The highest grade 
cheinicals cost us more money 
than the ordinary grocery store 
variety and they are worth it to 
us and to you. It is worth the 
extra cost to us to know that we 
are putting into your hands the 
best possible chemicals Mith 
Avhich to work our products and 
it is worth the small increase in 
price to you, many times over, 
to know that you are backing up 
the brains and skill of your- 
self and your workmen with 
the best the market affords, and 
that when you have produced 
an unusually beautiful effect in 
lighting and posing, that you are 
not handicapping the final result 
by the use of indifferent ma- 
terials anywhere in its produc- 
tion. 



The best is always worth its 
cost. 




On the package is your insur- 
ance policy at a low premium 
rate. 



r^IXING UP 

"*■ There is a certain big 
railroad system that has been 
made the butt of a good many 
jokes. One of the stories they 
tell is this: A local accommo- 
dation slowed down, jerked 
along a Httle ways and came to 
a dead stop. The fireman 
crawled over the tender, walked 
through the luggage compart- 
ment of the combination car into 
the smoker and inquired, "Any 
you fellers got a piece of string 
— the engineer Avants to fix the 
engine?" 

We all like to hang on to the 
things that have sei'ved us well, 
even when they are past practi- 
cal usefulness and require bol- 
stering up with a piece of string 
or other make-shift repair, to 
l)erform their functions. In get- 
ting ready for the spring busy 
time we usually find something 
out of kilter, and, if we are 
wise, forestall any break-downs 
when delays cost money. 



the ARISTO EAGLE 



21 




FROM AN ARISTO PLATINO PRINT 
By H. E. Gray Houston, Texas 



22 



STUDIO LIGHT a7id 



That studio stand has been 
acting a bit ci'anky and wobbly 
of late. Supposing it should 
stick just when we were posing 
Mrs. Bank President or that 
large group. 

That neAV Semi-Centennial 
Stand of the Century Division 
conies as near being complete as 
anj'thing we know of, and they 
have a number of other styles, 
some at a very low figure, and 
all Century quality. 

A ncAV shutter may be need- 
ed. The Auto Studio Shutter 
has a lot of good points to rec- 
ommend it. You can use it with a 
number of different lenses, and it 
is really, truly, a noiseless shutter. 

That old goods box, with the 
bottom set in on a slant has just 
about seen its best days as a re- 
touching stand. The New Cen- 
tury Retouching Stand is not 
onlj^ mighty convenient, but 
looks well and don't cost much. 

And the printer says the print- 
ing frames are some of ' era pret- 
ty badly warped; and — well, 
say, why don't you write and 
ask the Century Division for a 
copy of their catalogue? That 
will show you just what you do 
need, and your dealer can have 
it for you in a jiffy. 



A 



H I T 



In our April issue ap- 
peared the first of the drawings 
we have had prepared to assist 
the professional in advertising 
his work in an attractive and up- 
to-date manner. AVe assumed the 
profession would gladh" embrace 
the opportunity, and thej' have. 
The orders for electros are com- 
ing in steadily, and we know if 
they are judicioush" used that 
they will bring results. 

On page 23 Avill be found the 
drawing and sample advertise- 
ment for this month. 

You will agree with us, we 
feel sure, that the drawing and 
copy are timely and attractive, 
and we hope you will follow up 
your first efforts with this copy 
and reap a goodly harvest in the 
month of brides. The electro 
Avill be furnished for fifty cents 
postpaid. Please order by num- 
ber and remit in stam]is. Do not 
overlook the fact that we cannot 
furnish this electro to more than 
one photograi)her in the same 
town, and that it will be first 
come, first served. 

Good advertising of good 
goods, and good service must 
bring success. 



TT'EEr POSTED on the Eastnmn School 
-^^^^ of Professional Photography dates 
Bulletin on page 24. 



see 



the ARISTO EAGLE 



23 



THE ONLY CON- 
DITION 

We make but one condi- 
tion in our offer of cuts for 
the use of photographers. 

It is obvious that two 
photographers in the same 
town would not care to use 
the same cut, and we are 
therefore obliged to limit 
this offer to one photogra- 
pher in a town. It Avill be 
a case of first come first 
served. The first order 
from a city will be promptly 
filled. Succeeding orders (if 
any) will necessarily be 
turned down and the re- 
mittance, of course, will be 
returned. It is also obvious 
that we cannot, on account 
of the cost of the drawings, 
furnish any large variety of 
cuts at the nominal prices 
quoted, and therefore can 
offer no substitute cut. The 
thing to do is to get your 
order in first, as it would not 
be fair to give the man Avho 
happens to get in his order 
early one month, a pennanent 
advantage ; Ave shall book no 
orders in advance. They 
must always specify the num- 
ber of cut desired. If later 
on it develops that there is 
a great enough demand for 
these advertising cuts to war- 
rant our furnishing a larger 
variety, we shall be glad to 

do so. „ - 

L. K. Co., Ltd. 




Don't forget to be 
photographed imme- 
diately after this in- 
teresting occasion. 

And don't forget to 
have the photographs 
taken by 

The 

Pyro 

Studio 



No. ijl 



24 STUDIO LIGHT r/wf/ 



B 



U L L E T I N : THE EASTMAN SCHOOL OF 
PROFESSIONAL PHOTOGRAPHY FOR 1909 



Illinois Convention, Springfield, 111., May 4, 5, 6, 7. 

Auspices W. F. Uhlman, St. Joseph, Mo., May 11, 12, 13. 

Auspices Charles Lawrence, Wichita, Kansas, May 18, 19, 20. 

Auspices C. Weichsel Co., Dallas, Texas, Maj' 25, 26, 27. 

Auspices F. J. Feldman, El Paso, Texas, June 1, 2, 3. 

Auspices Rowland & Dewey Co., Los Angeles, Cal.. June 8, 9, 10. 

Auspices Hirsch & Kaiser, San Francisco, Cal., June 15, l6, 17. 

Auspices Portland Photo Supply Co., Portland, Oregon, June 
22, 23, 24. 

Auspices Tacoma Dental & Photo Supplj' Co., Tacoma, Wash., 
June 29, 30, July 1. 

Auspices John W. Graham & Co., Spokane, Wash., July 7, 8, 9- 

Auspices Robt. Dempster Co., Omaha, Neb., July 15, l6, 17- 

Auspices Memphis Photo Supply Co., Memphis, Tenn., July 
20, 21, 22. 

Auspices Des Moines Photo Materials Co., Des Moines, Iowa, 
July 27, 28, 29. 



the ARISTO EAGLE 



25 



Commer- 
cial 

Aristo 
Platino 



ROLLS 

10 ft. Roll 241 2 
ins. wide. .§1,95 

5 yd. Roll 241 2 
ins. wide. ..§2.80 

10 yd. Roll 24^2 
ins. wide. .-So. 15 

(Furnished only 
in 24^2 inch 
widths.) 



Canadian 
Kodak 

Co., Limited 
Toronto, Can. 



Per Per 


Per 


Per 


Size !jDoz. Doz. 


3 2 Gross 


Gross 


2I4X2I4 


$ .15 


$ .60 


$1.05 


2i,x2i, 


.15 


.60 


1.05 


2I4X3I4 


.15 


.60 


1.05 


214x31, 


.15 


.60 


1.05 


2I4X334 


.15 


.()0 


1.05 


2i,x4i4 


.15 


.60 


1.10 


3 "x4 


.15 


.60 


1.05 


31 , X 31 ', 


.15 


.70 


1.30 


3I4X4I4 


.15 


.70 


1.30 


31, X 4 


.15 


.70 


1.30 


2I4X7 


.18 


.75 




4 x4 


.18 


.75 


1.45 


414x414 


.18 


.75 


1.45 


3I4X6 


.18 


.75 


1.45 


3' 4x5}', 


.18 


.75 


1.45 


4x5" 


.18 


.75 


1.45 


3''s X dV-? 


.25 


.95 


1.75 


8'sx57i 


.30 


1.10 


1.95 


414X51/2 


.30 


1.10 


1.95 


4 x6 


.25 


.95 


1.75 


4I4X6I', 


.30 


1.30 


2.25 


434x61 2 


.30 


1.50 


2.60 


4x9 


.35 


1.75 


2.85 


5 x7 


.35 


1.70 


2.75 


5 x 71 ', 


.35 


1.80 


3.00 


5x8 


.35 


1.80 


3.15 


51^x734 


.40 


1.95 


3.45 


3i,xl2 


.35 


1.90 




6 x8 


.45 


2.30 


4.10 


6i,x8i2 


.50 


2.50 


4.40 


7 'x9 


.55 


2.85 


5.15 


71 2x91-2 


.60 


3.20 


6.00 


8 xlO 


.65 


3.60 


6.70 


9 xll 






8.70 


10 xl2 


'. .95 


5.40 


10.30 


11 xl4 $ 


65 1.25 


7.20 


13.45 


12 xl5 


80 1.40 


8.50 


16.00 


14 xl7 1 


00 1.90 


10.80 


20.65 


16 x20 1 


30 2.50 


14.80 


27.90 


17 x20 1 


.40 2.75 


15.45 


29.95 


18 x22 1 


65 3.15 


18.00 


35.15 


20 x24 1 


.95 3.60 


21.15 


41.30 



26 STUDIO LIGHT «Hrf 

The best of everything 
for use in the Studio 



A complete line of 

Canadian Kodak Co. 's 
Plates, Papers and 
Tested Chemicals. 

Canadian Card Co.'s 
Mounts 

Century Studio Ap- 
paratus. 



The D. H. Hogg Company 

MONTREAL, CANADA 



the ARISTO EAGLE 



27 



Demand a certifi- 
cate of character 
from your chemical 
assistants : 




28 



STUDIO LIGHT and 



A NEW NEPERA— 

Royal 
Pure White 



All the breadth and softness of India-tint Royal 
Nepera with the added sparkle that the pure white 
stock gives to the high lights. 

When sepia toned by re-development it possesses 
a richness of color not to be found in an}' other de- 
veloping paper — and the prints lie flat. 




CANADIAN KODAK CO. 

Limited 

Toronto, Can, 



the ARISTO EAGLE 29 

Nepera 

Waxing Solution 

Helps detail and adds lustre 
to Sepia prints 



Especially effective on Sepia 
toned lloyal Nepera and Royal 
Velox prints. 

Apply evenly with Canton 
Flannel, and rub into the 
surface. 



Price, per bottle, Tiventy Cents 
All Dealers 



Canadian Kodak Co,, Lttd, 

Toronto, C(i)in(l(i 



30 



STUDIO LIGHT and 




You can spend 
more of your 
time outside tliis 
door when you 
use the 



EASTMAN 

PLATE 
TANK 



Less Trouble, 
]More Comfort, 
Better Results. 



EASTMAN PLATE TANKS. 

5x7 . . . . % l.SO 



Canadian Kodak Co., 

Ltd. 
Toronto, Canada 

All Dealers. 



ihe ARISTO EAGLE 81 

Canadian Made for the 
Canadian Professional 



Seed, Royal and Stanley 
Plates 

Canadian Card Co.'s 
Mounts 

Canadian Kodak Co.'s 
Tested Chemicals 

Canadian Made Papers 



J. G. Ramsey ^ Co., limited 

Toronto, Canada 



32 



STUDIO LIGHT and 



A POINTER 

Be sure and see samples of these styles 
They are the best value ever offered 



The Empress, Jf'^eUcslcy and ,„.,^^ Dupont Styles 




W 



'E can conscientiously say that these stjles are the best value ever offered. 
They are made of medium heavyweitrlit stock, matched edircs, witli a 
neat corded silk finish. EmljellislH-d with l)eautiful two lined design with orna- 
mental corners, brought up in rich shades to matcli the border. They are very 
attractive in appearance and will prove popular sellers. 

Sample of one size free. 

Tliey are made in three colors, named as follows: Tlie Empress, made in 
Artists Brown; the Dupont, in Ash Grey; and the Wellesley, in Cream White. 



Size 
CX 
FX 



For Photo 

Cabinet Oval 

Cabinet Square 



Size Outside 
6x9 
6x9 



Price per 100 
$ 2.50 
2.50 



DESIGSED AND MANUFACTURED BY 



The Canadian Card Co. 



TORONTO 
CANADA 



Aristo Motto 



'T ^ fE believe permanency is the 
' • Keiistone of Photographir: 
Success, and all brands of paper 
bearing our Trade-mark are manu- 
factured on this principle. We hold 
our consumer's reputation and suc- 
cess identical with our own. We 
surrovmd both with every safe- 
guard known to chemical science 
and our own experience." 




FROM AN ARISTO PLATINO PRINT 
By Filson d' l^on Sleitbenville, Ohio 




T7 T7 



L^l 




ana Me ^^R^IkS^O [^^T^GI^B^ 



A Magazine of Information for the Profession 



NEW SERIES 
Vol . 1 Nl). t 



J I' N E 1909 



OLD S E R I ES 

No. 101 



REDUCED RAILROAD 
RATES TO ROCH- 
ESTER CONVENTION 

ROCHESTER, N. Y. 
JULY 19 TO .'4, 1909 

Do not fail to as It- fur certificate 
when purchasijig ticket to lioch- 
ester which entitles you to three- 
Jiftlis fare returning. 

Cei'tificates are issued at the 
time the going ticket is pur- 
chased and may be secured from 
Julyl5th.to21st. inclusive. Make 
inquiry of your local ticket agent 
to ascertain if he is supplied with 
certificates, if he is not, he will 
advise you of the nearest point 
where they can be secured. 

Present yourself at the ticket 
office at least one-half hour early 
that you may not be detained 
from procuring your certificate 
before the departure of the train. 

IMMEDIATELY upon your 
arrival at the convention hall de- 
posit your certificate with L. A. 
Dozer, Treas., at the box office. 
The special agent of the railroad 
associations will be at the con- 
vention hall to validate certifi- 
cates from 9 A. M. to 6 p. M. of 
July 22d., 23d. and 24th. A 



charge of twenty-five cents will 
be made for validating each 
certificate. If you arrive at the 
convention later than July 24th. 
the validating agent will have left 
and you will therefore be unable 
to get the benefit of the reduced 
fare home. 

To secure your return passage 
home, present your validated 
certificate at the railroad office 
and the agent will supply you 
Avith j'our return trip ticket upon 
payment of three-fiths of the 
amount of the fare paid for going 
ticket. 

Return trip tickets may be 
purchased with certificates at re- 
duced rates from July 22nd. to 
midnight of July 28th. 

The following railroad associa- 
tions have allowed the reduced 
railroad rates : 

The Trunk Line Association 
comprises the following states, 
New York, Pennsylvania, West 
^'irginia, New Jersey and Dela- 
ware, with the following rail- 
roads offering reduced fares : 

Baltimore & Ohio, Buffalo & 
Susquehanna, Buffalo, Rochester & 
Pittsburgh, Central of New Jersey, 
Chesapeake & Ohio, Chesapeake S. 
S. Co., Cumberland Valley, Delaware 



STUDIO LIGHT and 



& Hudson, Erie, Delaware, Lacka- 
wanna & Western, Fonda, Johns- 
town & Gloversville, Jamestown, 
Chautauqua & Lake Erie, Lehigh 
Valley, New York Central & Hud- 
son River, New York, Phila. & 
Norfolk, Norfolk & Washington S. 
S. Co., Pennsylvania, Northern Cen- 
tral, Philadelphia & Erie, Philadel- 
phia, Baltimore & Washington, West 
Jersey & Sea Shore, Pittsburg, 
Shawmut & Northern, Western 
Maryland, West Shore. 

The New England Passenger 
Association, comi)rising the states 
of Maine, New Hampshire, \ev- 
mont, Massachusetts, Connecti- 
cut, and Rhode Island, with the 
following railroads oifering re- 
duced fares: 

Boston & Albany, Boston & 
Maine, Canadian Pacific ( eastern 
lines). Central Vermont, Grand 
Trunk, Maine Central, N. Y., N. H. 
& Hartford ( including sound lines 
N. E. Nav. Co.). 

Eastern Canadian Passenger 
Association, comprising the prov- 
inces of eastern C'anada.with the 
following railroads offering re- 
duced fares: 

Algoma Central & Hudson Bay, 
Bay of Quinte, Boston & Maine, 
Brockville, Westport & Northwest- 
ern, Canadian Northern Ontario, 
Canadian Northern Quebec, Cana- 
dian Pacific (eastern lines). Central 
Ontario, Central Vermont, Domin- 
ion Atlantic, Grand Trunk, Inter- 
colonial R. R., Irondale, Bancroft 
& Ottawa, Kingston & Pembroke, 
Michigan Central, N. Y. Central & 
Hudson R. R., Orford Mountain, 
Ottawa & N. Y., Pere Marquette, 
Quebec Central, Quebec, Montreal 
& Southern, Rutland R. R., Temis- 
couata R. R., Temiskaming & 
Northern Ontario, Toronto, Hamil- 
ton, & Buffalo, Wabash R. R. 



The following Navigation 
Companies make special rates 
which may be had upon applica- 
tion : 

Huntsville, Lake of Bays & Lake 
Simcoe Nav. Co., Muskoka Nav. 
Co., Niagara Nav. Co., Northern 
Nav. Co., Ottawa River Nav. Co., 
Pembroke Nav. Co., Richelieu & 
Ontario Nav. Co., Rideau Lakes 
Nav. Co., Trent Valley Nav. Co. 

Central Passenger Association, 
com]n-ising the following states, 
Ohio, Indiana, Lower Michigan, 
and that part of Illinois south of 
a line drawn fi-om Chicago to 
Keokuk, with the following rail- 
roads offering reduced fares : 

Ann Arbor R. R., B. & O. South- 
western R. R., B. & L. E. R. R., 
Big Four Route, B. R. & P. Ry., 
Chicago & Alton R. R., C. & E." I. 
R. R., C. & E. & Erie R. R., C. I. 
& L. Ry., C. L & S. Ry., C. R. & 
M. Line, C. R. I. & P. Rv., C. & M. 
V. R. R., C. H. & D. Ry., C. & B. 
Transit Co., Cleveland & Toledo 
Line, D. & B. S. Co., D. & C. N. 
Co., D. & M. Rv., C. & O. Ry., D. 
T. & I. Ry., D. A. V. & P. Ry., 
E. & L R. R., E. & T. H. R. R., 
Ft. W. C. & L. R. R., G. R. & I. 
Ry., G. T. Rv- Svstem, Hocking 
V'alley Ry., L. E. & W. R. R., L. 
S. & M. S. Rv., L. & N. R. R., L. 
H. & St. L. Ry., M. C. & C. R. R., 
Mich. Central R. R., Mobile & O. 
R. R., N. Y. C. & St. L. R. R., 
Northern O. R. R., O. Central 
Lines, Penna. Lines, Pere Marquette 
Ry., P. & L. E. R. R., P. L. & W. 
R. R., Southern Ry. (St. Louis 
Div.), T. St. L. & W. R. R., Van- 
dalia Rv., Wabash R. R., Wab. 
Pitts. Ter. Ry., W. & L. E. R. R., 
Z. & W. Ry. 

The JVestern Passenger Asso- 
ciation, comprising the following 
states, Minnesota, Wisconsin, 



the ARISTO EAGLE 



So. Dakota, Iowa, Nebraska, 
Kansas and Missouri north from a 
line drawn from St. Louis to Kan- 
sas City, and No. Dakota east of 
Bismarck. From a number of 
points in these states tourist rates 
may be secured to Chicago from 
St. Louis, and Chicago certificates 
may be secured for the SJ5 re- 
turn trip fare. Photographers in 
these states desirous of attending 
the Convention shoukl make in- 
quiry regarding these i-ates in 
advance. Local ticket agents 
will supply the information. 

Southwestern Passengei- Asso- 
ciation, comi)rising the states of 
Texas, Arkansas, Oklahoma, and 
Missouri south of a line drawn 
from Kansas City to St. Louis. 
This association instructs to ad- 
vise photographers that a low 
summer tourist rate will be in 
effect to Rochester at the time 
of our convention. An earlj- in- 
quiry of your local ticket agent 
will give you definite infomiation. 

Certificates may be procured 
from Cairo, Ilhnois, and St. Louis 
to Rochester on the basis of one 
fare going and SJb fare re- 
turning. 

Southeastern Passenger Asso- 
ciation, comjjrising the states of 
Kentucky, Mrginia. Tennessee, 
North Carolina, South Carolina, 
Mississippi, Alabama, Georgia, 
Florida. Photographers in this 
territory are promised no specific 
reduced rate by this association, 
but are requested to inquire as to 
such tourist rates as may be in 



efiect to Rochester at this time. 
Parties living in this territory 
may secure certificates at the re- 
duced rates from border line cities 
of Indiana, Illinois and Ohio, also 
from Huntington, Charlottes- 
ville, and Charleston, W. Va., 
and Washington, D. C. 

For the information of those 
living in states not mentioned in 
this list would advise that no 
reduced rate concessions have 
been secured. 

Fraternally yours, 
F. R. Barrows, 

Pres. P. A. of A. 



NOT TO BE READ BY 
PHOTOGRAPHERS' 
WIVES 

That the Eastman Plate Tank 
is a time saver when used in the 
ordinary manner has been many 
times demonstrated, but it has 
remained for a professional in 
Texas to go a step farther. At 
night, just before closing the 
studio, he starts the plates de- 
veloping and carries the tank 
home Mith him, reaching there a 
short time before the plates are 
due to come out of the devel- 
oper. These are fixed and washed 
at home, and in the morning 
carried back to the studio, all 
ready for proofing. 

This ought to be a fine scheme 
for the wives of those who find 
it difficult to be home in time 
for supper. 



STUDIO LIGHT and 



THE CENTURY AUTO- 
MATIC PRINTING 
MACHINE 

The Century Automatic Print- 
ing Machine is not the first de- 
vice offered to the i)rofession for 
the printing of developing-out 



fk 




the foot levi'r. release and re- 
move exposed sheet. With nega- 
tives of average densitj^ it is 
easilj' possible to make twenty ex- 
posures per minute, as l)oth hands 
are free to handle the pajjcr. 
The l>ox is lined with sheet steel. 




MAKING THE EXPOSURE 

papers, but it is easily first in sim- 
plicity of operation, quality of 
work and econoni}'. 

As shown in the accompanying 
illustrations, the machine consists 
of an electric light box sup{)orted 
on a stand, with a simple and 
positive device for bringing the 
negative and paper into perfect 
contact during the exposure. The 
operation is very simple — place 
the paper on the negative, press 



RELEASING PRESSURE TO REMOVE 
EXPOSED SHEET 

white enameled, and provided 
with sockets for six incandescent 
electric lamj>s, one for a ruby 
lamp Avhen adjusting the paper, 
and the others to provide the 
exposing light. The machine is 
specially economical of current, 
as all lights, except the ruby, 
are automatically extinguished 
at the completion of each ex- 
posure, and automatically re- 
lighted at the instant the paper 



the ARISTO EAGLE 




THE CENTLHV ALTUMATIC TKINTING MACHINE 



STUDIO LIGHT and 



comes ill contact with the nega- 
tive. Any one of the five lights 
may be turned off at will, when 
exposing negatives of uneven 
density. An extra switch is pro- 
vided for controlling the four 
corner lights for border printing. 
Two grooves underneath the 




REAR VIEW, SHOWIXO LIGHT I'.OX 

negative supjiorting glass are pro- 
vided for inserting sheets of 
ground glass, or vignettes, when 
printing from imperfect negatives 
or in making vignetted prints. 
A sliding ])anel in the fi'ont of 
the machine renders the grooves 
easy of access and the necessary 
changes of diffusing or vignetting 
screens can be made instantly. 
The contact pad is fitted M'ith 
felt, and the contact roller auto- 
matically adjusts the pad to any 
thickness of negative or paper. 
Direct or alternating current of 
110 or 220 volts maybe used. 



but in ordering it will be neces- 
ary to state voltage desired. If 
you are not sure, ask your local 
electrician as to voltage in use in 
your building. The machine as 
furnished is equipjied with two 
side tables, aff"ording a top sur- 
face of 1-t X ;^S inches; the red 
electric bulb and 8-foot connect- 
ing cable. 

The Century Automatic Print- 
ing Machine, in the eight by ten 
size, will accommodate negatives 
8x10 and under, and requires 
a floor space of but fourteen 
inches square. The machine is 
finished in black mission style, 
and is a decidedly handsome 
equipment. The price is twenty- 
five dollars. 

The Century Automatic Print- 
ing Machine is the most satisfac- 
tory and economical device on 
the market for the raj^id pro- 
duction of first-class developing- 
out i)ai)er prints, and will save 
many times its cost. 



The Eastman Thermometer 
is designed especially for use in 
Tank development. The degree 
marks are easily read, and the 
back is curved to fit a corner of 
the tank, and has a handy little 
hook to suspend it by. 

Price, 50 cents, all dealers. 



C 



OXVENTION 

July 19-24 



the ARISTO EAGLE 




FROM AN ARISTO PLATINO PRINT 

By Filson <$: Son Steubenvillc, Ohio 



10 



STUDIO LIGHT aiid 



I 



IMPORTANT CONVEN- 
TION BULLETIN 

Everything ])oints to a record 
breaking attendance at the Na- 
tional Convention. While Roch- 
ester has more than the usual 
number of good hotels, their 
capacity is apt to be pretty se- 
verelj' taxed Convention week, 
and we advise all those planning 
to attend to w^rite and secure ac- 
commodations nouK 

We jirint herewith the list of 
Rochester hotels and their official 
rates for the National Convention, 
July 19 to 24. 

Hotel Sknfxa, European Plan. 

Official Headquarters. 
Per day — Room with running water, 

1 person, $1.50. 

2 persons, $"2.50. 

Per day — Room with shower and 
toilet, 

1 person, .$2.00. 

2 persons, $3.00. 

Per day — Room with tub bath and 
toilet, 

1 person, $9.50 to .$3.50. 

2 persons, $3.50 to $5.00. 

Per day — Room with shower bath 
and toilet, 2 beds, .$3.50 and$4.,J0. 

Per day — Room with tub bath and 
toilet, 2 beds, $5.00 and $6.00. 

Powers Hotel, European Plan : 

Nearly all rooms are equipped with 
hot and cold rimning water, shower 
and tub baths. Rooms, $1.50 per 
day and upwards. For each addi- 
tional person, $1.00 per day extra. 

Hotel Rochester, European 

Plan : 
Per day — 1 person, room with show- 
er bath, $1.50 and up. 



Per day — Front rooms with private 
bath, $2.00 per day and up. 

Per day — Suite of rooms, $5.00 per 
day and up. 

Three hundred rooms. Every room 
has private bath and telephone. 

Whitcomb House, European 
Plan: 

Per day— 1 person, $1.00, $1.50 and 

$2.00. 
Per day — 1 person, room with bath, 

$1.50, $2.00 and $2.50. 
Per day — 2 persons, $2.00, $2.50 

and $3.00. 
Per day — 2 persons, with bath, $3.00 

and $4.00. 
Total, 170 rooms ; 60 rooms at $1.00. 

All rooms have running hot and 

cold water. 

Eggle-ston Hotel, Stag, Euro- 
pean Plan: 

Per day — 1 person, $1.00, $1.25, 

$1.50, $2.00. 
Per day — 2 persons, $2.00, .$2.25, 

$2.50, $3.00. 
All $1.50 and $2.00 rooms have bath 

and toilet. Total, 80 rooms. 

OsBURX House, American Plan: 

Per day — $2.50 to .$3.50. 100 rooms 
with running water; 50 rooms with 
bath. Bell phone in every room. 

Jackson Temperance Hotel, 

Evn-opean Plan : 
Per day— 1 person, 50c., 75c., $1.00. 
Per day — 2 persons, $1.00, $1.25, 

$1.50'. 
Total, 65 rooms. 

All of the foregoing hotels are 
in the heart of the business sec- 
tion and within a few minutes 
Avalk of the Convention Hall. 
In addition there are a large 
number of rooming and boarding 



the ARISTO EAGLE 



11 




FROM AN ARISTO PLATINO PRINT 
By Filson dt Soyi Steubenville, Ohio 



12 



STUDIO LIGHT and 



houses where excellent accom- 
modations may be secured. The 
important thing is is to trriie di- 
rect to the hotel you wish and se- 
cure your accommodations- NOIV. 

The Seneca, Powers, Roches- 
ter, Whitcomb and Osburn hotels 
have busses that meet every train. 

If you have secured accommo- 
dations elsewhere, or desire ac- 
commodations and are not famil- 
iar with the city, when you arrive 
take the car marked Conven- 
tion Hall," and go directly to 
the Bureau of Information, which 
is in charge of the Rochester Sec- 
tion, where you Avill be promptly 
taken care of. Everything pos- 
sible is going to be done for your 
comfort and convenience — but to 
make doubly sure, write and 
secure your accommodations now. 



c 



OMMODIOUS AND 
CONVENIENT 

In the May issue we described 
the Changing Table and Negative 
Drj'er, in use in our model studio. 
This article elicited much favor- 
alile comment and a demand for 
further information along the 
same lines. 

On the opposite \)nge we illus- 
trate the Developing Sink that 
two years constant use has 
demonstrated to be most prac- 
tical and convenient. It will be 
noticed that every bit of space 
has been utilized to good advan- 
tage, and that its proportions can 



readily be modified to fit any 
room. The hypo bin and chem- 
ical cupboard do not extend to 
the floor, thus protecting the con- 
tents from dam))ness. The h\po 
bin swings outward and down 
from the top, so that its contents 
may be easily transferred without 
spilling and is a vast improvement 
over the dangerous open keg or 
barrel. The chemical cujjboard 
is fitted Avith sliding doors, in- 
suring against barked shins, 
should a door inadvertently be 
left open. The disappearing 
shelves for mixing chemicals are 
always ready for use when needed, 
and out of the way when not in 
use. Underneath the tray rack 
is a removable trough for col- 
lecting any drip, this not only 
helps to keep the dark room floor 
dry, but protects the plates from 
any chemical dust arising from 
solutions drying on the floor. 
The Avhite incandescent lamps for 
illuminating the dark room, and 
the lamps in the developing lights 
are connected Avith a " two Avay " 
SAvitch, so that throwing the 
handle over extinguishes one and 
lights the other. The white 
lights are placed directly over 
the Avashing boxes so that the 
plates ma3' be readily seen and 
scratches and finger marks 
avoided. These lights are also 
placed sufficiently high to illumi- 
nate the fixing boxes as well. 
The developing lights are fitted 
Avith three movable sashes, one 
fitted Avith ground glass, one Avith 



the ARISTO EAGLE 



13 




^b 



14 



STUDIO LIGHT and 



ruby, and the outer frame Avith 
orange glass. The outer frame 
also carries a sheet metal hood 
for throwing the light doAvn upon 
the developing traj', and making 
it easy to move the tray out of 
the range of light. The sliding 
sashes carrying the orange and 
ruby glasses are raised and 
lowered by means of cords 
passing over small j)ulleys at the 
top, and the ruby glass sash is 
pro\ided with a lock, to prevent 
its being accidentally raised when 
exi)Osed plates are in range of 
the light. The ground glass sash 
may be raised by hand when 
necessaiy. The shelf between 
the developing lamps is the only 
shelf in the room, and provides 
a i)lace for bottles of stock devel- 
oper solutions. Underneath the 
shelf is a rack for graduates, the 
rack holds the graduates firmly 
and affords perfect drainage, and 
is much better than the long 
pegs sometimes used to slip the 
graduate over, as nothing comes 
in contact with the inside of the 
graduate. The two end ta])S 
l)rovide cold water, and the cen- 
ter one hot water, and are placed 
at a sufficient distance apart to 
avoid accidents. The brackets 
supporting the white incandes- 
cent lamps could be made with 
tops sufficiently large to support 
electric fans for cooling and ven- 
tilating in hot weather. 

The diagram is largely self 
explanatory, and we trust this 
brief description will be of ser- 



vice to anj' of the fraternity 
desiring to remodel or build a 
dark room. 



i^~\UIl ILLUSTRATIONS 

^-^ Filson & Son of Steu- 
benville, Ohio, have kindly sup- 
l)hed the illustrations for this 
issue. 

The Filson Studio is finely ap- 
pointed and enjoys a steadily 
increasing patronage. 

Quality first, last and all the 
time has made the Filson repu- 
tation, and the fact that Aristo 
is used almost exclusively demon- 
strates that with them quality 
means quality. 



A 



DOUBLE HEADER 



Nepera Waxing Solution, 
as a medium for adding lustre 
and helping out detail on sepia 
prints, has made a hit, and in 
addition we have received several 
letters from the profession rec- 
ommending it as a negative var- 
nish and as a retouching medium. 
Our experiments demonstrate its 
adaptability for these purposes 
and we are very glad to ]iass the 
information alono-. 



Rochester 

July 19-24 



the ARISTO EAGLE 



15 



THE NEW RECEP- 
TIONIST 

BY THE OFFICE BOY 

We got a new recejjtion room 
girl. Miss Higgiiis she got mar- 
ried to a man las' month an' the 
Boss had to get a new one. 

Nope, she aint so much on 
looks, but she just sorta fits into 
things — nope, she don't wear no 
l)onipadour an' she dresses quiet 
like, an' her clothes don't scraj) 
with any of the ladies' clothes 
wot comes in. 

She sure knows her business 
though — if anybody comes in 
that looks like ready money they 
don't get otF with any four dol- 
lars for a dozen cabs, either. She 
Avorks a little game somethin' 
like this — she never lets anyone 
stand up and paw over a lot of 
samples, she gets 'em off in a cor- 
ner in a nice comfortable chair, 
an' then comes back with four 
or five prints, some of the bosses 
real classy stuif, about twenty- 
five per, an' she says, "here' s some 
nice things the Boss (only she 
don't c;dl him that) made las' 
week of Missus Perkins — yes, 
the wife of Mr. Perkins the Pres- 
ident of the Bank — yes, she's 
very particular you know — has 
lots of pictures made here — yes 
— that's the very latest style the 
Boss jus' got fi-om New York. 

Um — I wish you Avould have 
a sitting made full length, you 
are so well proportioned — and 
do have a profile made — it isn't 



often we get a face like yours — 
so well suited. 

An' she don't handle any two 
of 'em alike — sizes 'em up first, 
j,ome of 'em she lets do all the 
talking, an' others she jus' car- 
ries along — sort of draws 'em out 
till she gets a good fat order 
booked. 

If she finds out she's been 
showing 'em something too high 
priced— she don't say anythin' 
aliout anythin' cheaper — nix — she 
goes at it like this. 

"Oh, yes, I mos' forgot to 
show you this style, catchy, isn't 
it — yes, the pictures are smaller, 
but the effect is really the same, 
an' this folder gives it such an 
artistic finish — an' you are sav- 
ing quite a bit — yes — ten dollars 
a dozen. Will to-morrow at ten- 
thirty suit you? Good morning." 

Secon' day she was here she 
sorts all the sample prints — and 
then gets out Taprell's catalogue 
— then she asks the finishing 
room man to come in a minute — 
an' asks him has he any more 
mounts like those — he says 
" Nope" — and then she says, " I see 
Taprell don' make these any 
more, and if Ave aint got any 
more of 'em, our samples ought 
to be mounted on mounts we can 
supply." "Sure," he says, and he 
says to me that noon, "she's an 
up-to-dater, aint she?" 

She sure takes an interest in 
the business — she wont let me 
come around 'less my shoes are 
shined an' my face clean — Gee, 



16 



STUDIO LIGHT and 




ALL ABOARD F 



Write the organizer in your territory 



the ARISTO EAGLE 17 

Special parties to attend the 

National Convention 
July 19th to 24th, 1909 

are being organized by the following : 



Robey-French Co., Boston, Mass. 

C. F. Becker, 235, West 23rd St., 

New York City 

John Haworth Company, Philadelphia, Pa. 

Sweet, Wallach & Co., Chicago, 111. 

W. Schiller & Co., St. Louis, Mo. 

St. Louis-Hyatt Photo Supply Co., 

St. Louis, Mo. 

Zimmerman Bros., St. Paul, Minn. 

O. H. Peck Company, Minneapolis, Minn. 



)R ROCHESTER 



or full information and reservations 



STUDIO LIGHT arid 



it's wonderful wot a influence a 
woman can have m ith us men. 



QCHOOL DAYS 

^^ There have been a good 
many sessions of the Eastman 
School of Professional Photog- 
raphy, and we have yet to hear 
from the j^hotographer who did 
not feel that his time was well 
spent in attending— and we have 
had a good many of the top 
notchers. 

No two people think exactly 
alike, or do things in exactly the 
same waj", and no matter how 
adept we may be in one or all 
branches of the profession, there 
is always some one who has 
worked out a short cut or dis- 
covered a method of doing things 
that are an improvement over 
our methods. 

The lessons and teachings of 
the Eastman School are not the 
same year in and year out. The 
lecturers and demonstrators are 
just as eager to learn as to teach, 
and when some one shows or sug- 
gests a new stunt, method or 
device that looks good, it is, if 
it stands a practical test, incor- 
porated in the lessons and passed 
along. 

Our salesmen and demonstra- 
tors cover the countiy thoroughly, 
and they go about Avith eyes and 
ears open, as for their own good 
they must keep up to date ; they 
hear and learn many things, and 



the good ideas thej' pick up are 
sent in to headquarters so that 
all may benefit bj^ them. 

Be thorough and keep a little 
ahead of date, is the slogan of 
the school. And so it will pay 
you to attend every time it is 
held in your territory. Keep 
yourself posted up to date by 
reading the School Bulletin pub- 
lished in each issue of Studio 
Light. 



u 



P TO US 



If we want to keep on 
selling you plates and papers, it 
is up to us to see that you obtain 
the best possible results Avith 
these products. But if we pro- 
vide you Avith plates and ])apers 
that are perfect, and then fail to 
provide jou with the correct for- 
mulas, for working these plates 
and paj^ers, and Avith first-class 
chemicals Avith Avhich to com- 
pound these formulas, who 
loses? That is the reason for 
our saying so much about tested 
chemicals. By sight, taste or 
smell you cannot tell pure chemi- 
cals from the impm-e. Neither 
can Ave, and neither can our ex- 
pert chemists determine the qual- 
ity by any of the means afforded 
the average man. To determine 
chemical quality and purity, 
special means must be provided, 
and at a cost only in reach of 
those Avho deal in large quanti- 
ties. We have expert chemists, 



the ARISTO EAGLE 



19 




FROM AN ARISTO PLATINO PRINT 

By Filson c& Son Steubenville, Ohio 



20 



STUDIO LIGHT and 



and the most modern and up to 
the minute laboratorj^ equip- 
ment. Every chemical we use or 
sell must pass the severest tests 
for purity and quality, and this 
trade mark on the 
label is your and 
our mutual insur- 
ance. Best results 
are imperative for 
us and for you. 
We take no chances, neither 
should you. 




B 



Y SIMPLE MEANS 



We all of us hesitate a 
a little bit when it comes to in- 
tensifying a particularly choice 
negative by means of the ordi- 
nary bi-chloride of mercury pro- 
cess. There is always that chance 
of iridescent stains — the kind 
that "wont come off" — and like- 
Avise the chance of the nega- 
tive going bad at no far distant 
day. There is little to be said in 
favor of the bi-chloride of mer- 
cury process, and the profession 
are according a warm welcome 
to the simjjle and sui-e process 
of re-development. 

This method is onlj' com])ar- 
atively new, but the now com- 
mon use of Royal Re-developer 
for sepia tones on Nepera and 
Bromide prints has made the 
process well known and has 
placed the necessarj^ materials in 
the hands of every photog- 
rapher. 




SHOWING KFFF.CT OF RE-DEVELOPMENT 

Royal Re-developer may be 
used for the intensification of 
negatives in exactly the same 
manner as for producing sepia 
tones on developing paper. 

Negatives intensified by means 
of Royal Re-developer lose ab- 
solutely nothing in the way of 
permanence, run no risks from 
stains or granular markings, and 
build up evenlj" and without un- 
due contrast. 

The advantage of being able to 
use the chemicals for two different 
purposes is oljvious, and the re- 
sults in either case are all that 
could be desired. 



Keep a copj' of Canadian Card 
Co.'s catalogue handj' — there is 
a ])rofit suggestion in every 
page. 



the ARISTO EAGLE 



21 




FROM AN ARISTO PLATINO PRINT 
By Filson cfc Son SteubenviUe, Ohio 



22 



STUDIO LIGHT and 



R 



EADY FOR 
THING 



ANY- 



In comes Mrs. Jones, one of 
your best and wealthiest custom- 
ers. "Oh, Mr. Smith! I am go- 
ing to give a garden party for my 
httle daughter next week, can't 
you come out or send some one 
to make some pictures.^" 

You smihngly give assent, and 
when the day of the party arrives 
you send Tom, your assistant, or 
go yourself to make the pictures. 
Now Mrs. Jones became your 
permanent customer because you 
gave her some pictures out of the 
ordinary. In this mstance you 
can make a number of groups 
and single figure exposures, and 
let it go at that — but — if you 
could only show her some pict- 
ures of the children dancing the 
maypole dance or actively en- 
gaged in some of the games de- 
vised for their entertainment 
instead of the usual stereotyped 
pictures, your reputation for orig- 
inahty wouldn't suffer any.— And 
the amount of your bill might be 
quite a few dollars more. 

You are pretty well acquainted 
with the High School and Col- 
lege boys, and one day young 
Thomi>son of the Track Commit- 
tee calls you up: "Saj", Mr. 
Smith, we're going to have some 
track events next Saturday and 
we want you to come out and 
make some pictures — all the fel- 
lows know you and don't feel so 



fussed up when you make the 
pictures." 

Perhaps next daj' Brown over at 
the First National drops in — "Say, 
Smith, I've got the dandiest lit- 
tle three-year-old — good for two- 
ten any day, come on out to the 
park with me and make me a 
picture or so of her in action." 

Your business is taking pict- 
ures in the studio? To be sure, 
yet 5'ou really don't want any of' 
these good customers of jours to 
feel that you cannot or do not 
want to make these other pict- 
ures for them, as there is always 
a chance of their keeping on go- 
ing to the other fellow if j ou let 
them get away from you even 
once. 

The solution is a focal plane 
shutter. 

But a Graflex camera costs a 
lot of nionej". Well now, who 
said anything about a Graflex 
camera? — that will come in time 
— but until j'ou have enough of 
this unusual sort of work in sight 
to warrant it, take the next best 
thing. 

Have a Graflex Focal Plane 
Shutter fitted to j^our vicAV cam- 
era, and you are ready for any- 
thing that comes along. Not so 
handy or convenient as the Gra- 
flex camera, but it will do the 
work, and give you the reputa- 
tion for being ready for anything 
that comes along. 

The Graflex Focal Plane Shut- 
ter lists as follows : 5 x 7, .^24.00 ; 
6^x8i, $27.00; 8 x 10, $31.00. 



the ARISTO EAGLE 



23 



THE ONLY CON- 
DITION 

We make but one condi- 
tion in our ofFt-r of cuts for 
the use of photographers. 

It is obvious that two 
photographers in the same 
town would not care to use 
the same cut, and we are 
therefore obHged to limit 
this offer to one photogra- 
pher in a town. It Avill be 
a case of first come first 
served. The first order 
froin a city Avill be promptly 
fUled. Succeeding orders (if 
any) will necessarily be 
turned down and the re- 
mittance, of course, will be 
returned. It is also obvious 
that Ave cannot, on account 
of the cost of the drawings, 
furnish any large variet}' of 
cuts at the nominal prices 
quoted, and therefore can 
offer no substitute ciit. The 
thing to do is to get your 
order in Jirst, as it would not 
be fair to give the man who 
happens to get in his order 
earlj' one month, a permanent 
ad\'antage ; we shall book no 
orders in advance. They 
mustalwaj's specify the num- 
ber of cut desired. If later 
on it develops that there is 
a gi-eat enough demand for 
these advertising cuts to Avar- 
rant our furnishing a larger 
variety, Ave shall be glad to 
do so. c. K. Co.. Ltd. 




You are proud of your 
wife and cliildren. 
Why don't you bring 
them to us to be plio- 
tographed? We will 
give you a picture that 
will make you prouder 
still. 

Telephone to-day 
for an Appointment. 

The Pyro Studio 



24 



STUDIO LIGHT a 7t d 



G 



R O W I N G 



The demand for our elec- 
tros for use in studio advertising 
is steadily increasing. Practically 
every photographer Avho ordered 
the first cut has ordered the 
second one. and our list shows a 
most encouraging number of new 
names for the second electro. 

Join the army of the pro- 
gressive, let your public know 
you are in business, back up 
your newspaper copy with good 
show case display — keep at it and 
you are bound to win. 



It is our intention to provide a 
new cut for each issue of Studio 
Light, and we shall endeavor to 
make the cut and copy as season- 
able as possible. On page 23 we 
illustrate the cut for this month, 
the number is 142 and the price 
is 50 cents. 

Please order by number and 
remit in stamps, and do not over- 
look the fact that but one pho- 
tographer in a town can be sup- 
plied, and that it is first come, 
first served. 

You will find pen, ink and 
paper in your desk. 



B 



r L L E T I N : THE EASTMAN SCHOOL OF 

Professional PHOTOGRAPHY for looo 



Auspices F. J. Feldman, El Paso, Texas, June 1, 2, 3. 

Auspices Howland& Dewey Co., Los Angeles, Cal., June 8, 9, 10- 

Auspices Hirsch & Kaiser, San Francisco, Cal., June 15, l6, 17. 

Auspices Portland Photo Supply Co., Portland, Oregon, June 
22, 23, 24. 

Auspices Tacoma Dental & Photo Supply Co., Tacoma, Wash., 
June 29, 30, July 1. 

Auspices John W. Graham & Co., Spokane, Wash., July 7, 8, 9* 

Auspices Robt. Dempster Co., Omaha, Neb., July 15, l6, 17. 

Auspices Memphis Photo Supply Co., Memphis, Tenn., July 
20, 21, 22. 

Auspices Des Moines Photo Materials Co., Des Moines, Iowa, 
July 27, 28, 29. 



the A RISTO EAGLE 



25 



Commer- 










— 1 


Per Per 


Per 


Per 




cial 


Size Vi Doz. Doz. 


3.4 Gross 


Gross 




2I4X2I4 


§ .15 


§ .60 


81.05 




Aristo 


2i,x2i, 
2I4X3I4 
21 4 X 31s 


.15 
.15 
.15 


.60 
.60 
.60 


1.05 
1.05 
1.05 




Platino 


214x33^ 
2i,x4i4 


.15 
.15 


.(;o 

.60 


1.05 
1.10 






3 x4 


.15 


.60 


1.05 






3i,x3i^ 


.15 


.70 


1.30 






314x414 


.15 


.70 


1.30 






31, X 4 


.15 


.70 


1.30 






2I4X7 


.18 


.75 








4 x4 


.18 


.75 


1.45 






414x414 


.18 


.75 


1.45 






3I4X6 


.18 


.75 


1.45 






3I4X51/2 
4 x5 


.18 
.18 


.75 
.75 


1.45 
1.45 






ROLLS 


3^8 X 514 


.25 


.95 


1.75 




10 ft. Roll 241, 


3"sx5"8 


.30 


1.10 


1.95 




ins. wide. ..ii;1.95 


414x51/2 


.80 


1.10 


1.95 




5 yd. Roll 241 2 


4 x6 


.25 


.95 


1.75 




ins. wide. ..S2.80 


414x6!.^ 


.30 


1.30 


2.25 




10 yd. Roll 241 2 
ins. wide. .§5.15 


434x61, 
4x9 


.30 
.35 


1.50 
1.75 


2.60 
2.85 






5x7 


.35 


1.70 


2.75 




(Furnished only 


5 x7i, 


.35 


1.80 


3.00 




in 24I2 inch 


5x8" 


.35 


1.80 


3.15 




widths.)' 


51 , X 734 


.40 


1.95 


3.45 






31 , X 12 

6 'xS 


.35 
.45 


1.90 
2.30 








4.10 






61 > x 81 , 


.50 


2.50 


4.40 






7x9" 


.55 


2.85 


5.15 






71 , X 91 , 


.60 


3.20 


6.00 






8 xlO 


.65 


3.60 


6.70 






9 xll 






8.70 






10 xl2 


; .95 


5.40 


10.30 






11 X 14 $ 


65 1.25 


7.20 


13.45 




Canadian 


12 X 15 

14 xl7 1 


80 1.40 
00 1.90 


8.50 
10.80 


16.00 
20.65 




Kodak 


16 x20 1 


30 2.50 


14.80 


27.90 




M. ^L. V^ X^S- %^.A.^ 


17 x20 1 


40 2.75 


15.45 


29.95 




Co., Limited 


18 x22 1 


65 3.15 


18.00 


35.15 




20 x24 1 


95 3.(;o 


21.15 


41.30 




Toronto, Can. 




















1 



26 



STUDIO LIGHT and 



Nepera 

Waxing Solution 

Helps detail and adds lustre 
to Sepia prints 



Especially effective on Sepia 
toned Hoyal Nci)era and lioyal 
A^elox prints, 

A])pl3^ evenly with Canton 
Flannel, and rub into the 
surface. 

Price, 2^cr bottle, Txventy Cents 
All Dealers 



Canadian Kodak Co., Ltd. 



Toronto. Ca/iada 



the ARISTO EAGLE 



If you don't use the 
Kodak tested chemi- 
cals for your work we 
shall both lose money 
— but you'll lose the 
most. 




28 



STUDIO LIGHT and 




THE EASTMAN 

PLATE TANK 

Is Constructed Right. 



The simple loading device permits the loading of 
the plates into the rack in a few seconds, without 
scratching or marring. 

The a'n-tig'hf, locking cover allows the whole tank 
to be reversed — no fishings the plate raek out of the 
.solution dur'ntg- development — and the hand on the 
dial tells you when development will be completed. 

Eastman Plate Tank, 5xT, - S 4.50 

Eastman Plate Tank, 8x10, - 10.00 

Canadian Kodak Co., Ltd. 

Toronio. Cdiuula 



//«(^ ARISTO EAGLE 29 

The best of everything 
for use in the Studio 



A complete line of 

Canadian Kodak Co. 's 
Plates, Papers and 
Tested Chemicals. 

Canadian Card Co.'s 
Mounts 

Century Studio Ap- 
paratus. 



The D. H. Hogg Company 

MONTREAL, CANADA 



30 STUDIO LIGHT r/»f/ 



ROYAL 
NEPERA 

Pure White 



The developing paper 
that forgets to curl. 




Canadian 

Kodak 

Co. 

Lid. 

Toronto, 
Canada 




the ARISTO EAGLE 31 

Canadian Made for the 
Canadian Professional 



Seed, Royal and Stanley 
Plates 

Canadian Card Co.'s 
Mounts 

Canadian Kodak Co/s 
Tested Chemicals 

Canadian Made Papers 



J. G. Ramsey cV Co., limited 

Toronto, Canada 



32 



STUDIO LIGHT and 



You Can't Afford 

To overlook the Kenshigton Style when placing your 
order for a neat classy card for your best grade of work 





The Kensington Style "i,'«t,;"a J ct'a'S wSe! 



rich Water-Silk finish; matched edges, with tinted line to harmon- 
ize with color of card 1 4 -inch from border all round. Embossed with 
a very neat design set up from the bottom; just what you are want- 
ing in a 7 X 11 mount. 

Samples mailed on receipt of three two-cent stamps. 

DESIGNED AND MASIFACTURF.D BY 

The Canadian Card Co. 

TORONTO, CANADA 



Aristo Motto 



'T ^ fE believe permanency is the 
» ' Keystone of Photographic 
Success, and all brands of paper 
bearing our Trade-mark are manu- 
factured on tliis principle. We hold 
our consumer's reputation and suc- 
cess identical with our own. We 
surround both with every safe- 
guard known to chemical science 
and our own experience." 




FROM AN ANGELO SEPIA PLATINUM PRINT 
By Frank E. Dean Grand Junction, Colo. 



%I 




T7 T? 



[=^l 




ar,a the :?^R.I^"rO ]^:?^GL^]^ 



A M a gaziti c of I u f o r m a t i o n for the Profession 



NKW SERIES 

Vol. 1 No. .5 



JULY 1909 



OLD SERIES 
No. 10^ 



BIGGER, BUSIER AND 
BETTER: THE ROCH- 
ESTER CONVENTION 

July 19-24, 1909 

Every jihotographer who jour- 
neys to the Rochester convention 
this year will return to his home 
the week following, assured of 
the fact, that to keep pace with 
the times, one must meet his 
fellow workman in time and place 
where the knowledge of years 
is dispensed freely and without 
Oust. This is what is proposed at 
the Rochester convention. The 
Association takes pleasiu-e in an- 
nouncing the names of the fijllow- 
ing photographers Avho will take 
charge of the classes of instruction 
in the schools of photography ar- 
ranged by the Association : 
Monday, 9 a. m. — A. F. Bradley, 

New York. 
Tuesday, 10:30 a. m. — F. H. So.ai- 

MERs, Cincinnati. 
Wednesday, 8 p. m. — Lantern exiii- 

bition : Ryland W. Phillips, 

Philadelphia; Gertrude Kase- 

BiER, New York. 
Thursday, 10:30 a. m.— E. B. Core, 

New York; Frank Scott Clark, 

Detroit. 
Friday, 11 a. m.— W. H. Towles, 

Washington. 



Saturday, 11 a. bi. — Showing com- 
plete results of demonstrator's 
work, by lantern projection. 

The school program for the 
week will be under the leader- 
ship of Ryland W. Philhps, of 
Philadelphia, Avho does things 
well. He will be ably assisted 
by Vice-president J. H. C. Evan- 
oif in carrying out his plans, all 
of which speaks for the success 
of the school. 

When it is possible for an 
Association to assemble talent of 
this calibre for mutual improve- 
ment, its members should appre- 
ciate the fact that they are not 
secured by pecuniary consider- 
ations. They give freely of their 
knowledge and valuable time to 
uplift and advance the move- 
ment of associated interests in 
photograjjhy, purely from a fra- 
ternal standpoint. 

An entirely new and novel 
feature in convention class work 
will be shown for the first time 
at this convention. Through the 
courtesy of the Bausch & Lomb 
Optical Co. they have constructed 
for our use, a new projecting 
lantern which will alhnv our mem- 
bers to see negatives intensified 



STUDIO LIGHT and 



or reduced upon the screen, and 
also show the results of the vari- 
ous class leaders. 

As fast as the negatives are 
made under the light they will 
be develoj)ed and lanteni slides 
made fi-oni them. The time oc- 
cupied for the comj)letion of these 
slides ready to show upon the 
screen will be less than one-half 
hour. By the time the last neg- 
atives are made in the class dem- 
onsti*ations the final results will 
be read}' to shoAV ujion the screen. 

Saturday morning the devices 
or inventions Mill be shoAvn and 
demonstrated for the following 
prizes : 

First prize, ^100 cash. 

Second prize, handsome hand- 
liound set of the Library of Prac- 
tical Photography, valued at 875, 
the courtesj' of J. B. Schriever. 

These awards to be given by 
po])ular vote of the convention. 

After this business the closing 
feature of the week will be the 
showing of the complete results 
and finished pictures of the vari- 
ous demonstrators which in the 
final results Avill embodj' their 
individual ideas. A slide of the 
crude negative Avill first be shown, 
then followed by a slide made 
from a picture ready to deliver 
to a patron. Don't fail to get 
this instruction. 

The business sessions will 
occur on the mornings of Tues- 
day, Thursda}', Friday and 
Saturday, at 9 a- m. sharp, in 
the Assembly Hall of the Seneca 



Hotel, the headquarters of the 
Association. These sessions will 
be called promptlj' on time. 
They are to be short snappy 
sessions in order to clear the way 
for the school classes on the same 
mornings. 

Monday afternoon at 2 o'clock 
the various state representatives 
will assemble at the Chamber of 
Commerce Hall for organization 
of the first congress of photog- 
raphy, its object being to dis- 
cuss, and if practical, to devise 
a plan of co-ojjeration of the State 
and National Ar.sociations. Let 
no delegate who has thus been 
honored by his state be absent, 
your ol^ligation is j'our duty. Let 
nothing hinder your presence, as 
a full representation is desired. 
All dulj" accredited delegates Avill 
receive their credentials at the 
box office in Cf)nvention Hall. 

Monday night will be a recep- 
tion of members at the Seneca 
Hotel. 

Tuesday afternoon the Cham- 
ber of Commerce Hall is reserved 
for the continuance of the con- 
gress of photography. Bj' so 
doing it is hoped to have a report 
ready preparatorj" to the dis- 
cussion of the Constitution and 
By-laws of the P. A. of A. on 
Tuesday night. 

Tuesday afternoon is Ladies 
afternoon. They are to be enter- 
tained by the Rochester Section 
of the New York State Society. 

Wednesday is given over en- 
tirely to the photographic in- 



%J 



the ARISTO EAGLE 



dustries of Rochester and manj^ 
of them are iirei)arin<jj to make 
you welcome and entertain you. 

Wednesday, 8 P. m. sharp, 
presents the most instructive 
night of the convention uiider the 
leadership of Ryland VV. Phillips, 
assisted by Mrs. Gertrude Kase- 
bier. Mr. Phillips in his own 
practical waj' will give illus- 
trations of the work of leading 
studios, showing how many of 
the best photographers w'ork 
their skylights in producing the 
beautiful Avork so familiar to all 
of us. GET THIS INFOR- 
MATION. 

Mrs. Kasebier will give an art 
criticism of her own work and 
her talk is sure to be of great 
value to her fortunate hearers. 
Mrs. Kasebier is one of the fore- 
most women photographers, and 
our Association is most fortunate 
in securing her services. She 
will have something to say. 

Thursday and Friday after- 
noons the Canadian photogra- 
phers will meet in the Chamber of 
Commerce Hall for the transac- 
tion of business of the Photog- 
raphers Association of Canada. 

Thursda}', from 5 p. m. till 
midnight, everybody will be en- 
tertained by the Eastman Kodak 
Co. atOntai'io Beach. Tickets will 
be supplied for this entertain- 
ment to include transportation 
to and fi-om the Beach, admission 
to the park and a seat at the 
banquet table. In short, an old 
fashioned picnic where happiness 



is to reign supreme for photog- 
raphers, dealers and the ladies. 

Friday night is reserved as 
manufacturers and dealers night 
and a good night of enjoyment 
is assured. Details will be an- 
nounced later. 

In arranging the Aveek's pro- 
gram every afternoon has been 
given over to the manufacturers 
and dealers; there being no 
business sessions or school classes 
during the afternoons. 

Remember that every hour of 
the time during the week has 
been provided for. Therefore 
follow the printed program which 
will be circulated at Convention 
Hall. 

O/" all things be on time and 
there Avill be no regrets after- 
wards. Everybody must keep 
moving as the program will be 
followed on schedule time. 

There Avill be the largest at- 
tendance of photographers in 
Rochester ever before assembled 
and for this reason you should 
secure your hotel accommoda- 
tions early. 

In purchasing your ticket Avhen 
leaving for Rochester don't fail to 
ask for certificate Avhich entitles 
you to the reduced railroad fare 
returning. 

Saturday night Ave break camp 
and leave for our homes with new 
inspirations, ncAV friends and new 
ideas, resolute and determined 
to make the 19 10 convention 
eclipse that of 1909. 

F. R. Barrows. 



V- 



6 



STUDIO LIGHT and 



AC H A N G E OF AIR 
Dear Mr. Editor: 

What is it that -will go up a 
chimney down or down a chim- 
ney down, but AvoTi't go up a 
chimnej' up or down a chinmey 
up? 

Confushig — but there's an an- 
swer — an umbrella. Likewise the 
Itinerant Anti-Organ, it has just 
moved again by the way, tries 
to confuse, befog and befuddle 
its readers — but there's an an- 
SAver — it lost the Eastman 
advertising. The itinerant editor 
asks me (in his June 5th. issue) 
if I read the little note in last 
week's paper. Yes, I did. His 
"little note" was a scurrilous and 
unwarranted attack in the form of 
an open letter to Mr. Conradi. of 
Bethlehem, a dealer in Eastman 
goods, who believes in the East- 
man Avay of doing business and 
has said so in print. May 29th, 
fi-om the coal regions, the Anti- 
Organ said : "It needed no state- 
ment fi-om you (Mr. Conradi) 
that you were not influenced l)y 
the so-called trust to write that 
letter. It is only too plain that 
they did not know that you were 
writing it. They are good bluff- 
ers up in Rochester, but thei/ do 
not usually care to go into print 
unth such silly statements as you 
have made in your letter." 

The very next week, Jmie 5th. 
having a new publication point, 
a change of air and ideas, the 
Itinerant Anti-Organ says that 



Stereoscope (that's me) is much 
the same kind of man as Con- 
radi, is paid by the E. K. Co. 
and that he goes into print with 
"statements he cannot prove." 

In short — May 29th. (influence 
of Scranton air) he says: E. K. 
Co. does not make silly state- 
ments. June 5th. (under influ- 
ence of Lake Erie breezes) he 
says: E. K. Co. does make silly 
statements. And there j'ou are. 
Mostly he has worried because, 
as he claims, you have raised 
prices. Now he worries because, 
as he claims, you have lowered 
prices. He appoints himself as 
attorney for the opjwsition, and, 
putting me on an imaginaiy wit- 
ness stand, wants to know 
Avhether Commercial Aristo and 
Aristo Platino are not the same 
except in name. 

Not being so close to the seat 
of infomiation as he thinks I am, 
I can truthfullj" answer, "I don't 
know." But this I do know. In 
manufacturing photographic pa- 
pers, the minutest difference in 
Aveight or surface in different rolls 
of raw stock makes a noticeable 
though slight difference in the 
coated product. I do know that 
where there are two grades of a 
photographic product «//«oi/ alike 
that it helps for the quality of 
the highest grade, highest priced 
product because it gives an oj)- 
])ortunitj^ for selection, and I do 
know that reliable as Aristo 
Platino has always been that it 
has been even more miiformly 



%J 



I he ARISTO EAGLE 




FROM AX ANGELO SEPIA PLATINUM PRINT 

By Frank K. Umu Grand Jniiction. Colo. 



8 



STUDIO LIGHT and 



perfect since the advent of Com- 
mercial Aristo. If the editor of 
the Itinerant Anti-Organ had 
ever been a professional photog- 
rapher, he could see for himself 
■whether or not there is a differ- 
ence — he would not be obliged 
to ask me. 

Two years ago, in an argu- 
ment with this same editor, I 
quoted a vigorous Anti-Truster 
who stated in print that the only 
thing necessary to break up the 
trust is to manufacture "even a 
better grade of material than now 
furnished." My comment was: 

"That's the most sensible 
thing that has been said on the 
trust question in a long time. 
There isn't anything else of im- 
portance. It's the goods that 
count. Patents are of no great 
avail, trade restrictions count for 
less. It'saquestionof the goods. 

"When some other concern 
makes better goods than does 
the present so-called trust', 
conditions will change, but there 
will still be a trust. Onlj' the 
other concern will be the "trust. " 

"After all, there are just two 
things that matter to you and to 
me — Qualitj' and Price. The rest 
is — talk." Stereoscope. 

P. S. I recommend still an- 
other change of air. S. 



Be sure and have a copy of Cana- 
dian Card Co.'s catalogue handy — 
it will help in working out some of 
your new convention ideas. 



THE WORK OF FRANK 
E. DEAN 

At the 1909 Convention of the 
Inter-Mountain Photographers' 
Association, held in Salt Lake 
City, L'tah, April 5 to 8, work of 
an unusually high order was ex- 
hibited. 

The competitive exhibit was 
divided into two classes — Class 
I, open to all members of the 
Association. The award in this 
class being a handsome silver 
trophy for the best collection of 
photograi)hic portraits. Class II, 
being open to all members from 
towns of ten thousand population 
or less. The ti'ophy in Class I 
was awarded to Frank E. Dean 
of Grand Junction, Colorado, for 
his magnificent disjilay on Angelo 
Sepia Platinum. Mr. Dean has 
kindly furnished us with a dupli- 
cate set of prints for reproduction 
and we take pleasure in publish- 
ing them in this issue. In send- 
ing the prints Mr. Dean says, " I 
could write on any subject prob- 
ably better than myself or my own 
work. I never made anj' progress 
until I got rid of the idea that I 
knew anything, and since then 
I have become convinced of the 
superior knowledge and ability 
of so many of the craft that I 
feel like making a break for the 
tall timber when the subject ot 
self is introduced." 

Mr. Dean went to Colorado in 
18S'2, when Colorado seemed 
much further from the center of 



\} 



the ARISTO EAGLE 




FROM A VELVET NEPERA PRINT 
Firnik E. Dean Onind Junclion, Colo. 



v:' 



10 



STUDIO LIGHT and 



things than now, but kept right 
on coming East to attend con- 
ventions, even w^hen he had to 
borrow the money for the triji. 
He located in Grand Junction in 
1900 and built a small studio, 
went East to a convention, came 
back and rebuilt it. Since then 
he has once more remodeled it, 
and now has plans for a still 
better one. Mr. Dean says, " I 
think it good business to keep a 
little ahead of the town, even if 
it takes the last dollar and then 
some." 

" I believe in taking care of all 
classes of trade, and so make 
work from three dollars a dozen 
to eighteen dollars a dozen and 
find the demand for the better 
stuff grows. 

" I think we all can take a les- 
son from Studio Light. You 
could print as much in a common 
one, but it would not touch the 
spot. Its neatness suggests sys- 
tem, a thing we photographers 
are short on — it makes no excuses 
(don't have to), another place 
where we are lame, and taken 
all in all there is enough in the 
get-up of Studio Light to set 
any photographer thinking." 



There is comfort as 
well as convenience 
and oood results in 
the use of the 

Eastman Plate Tank 



A COMPREHENSIVE 
ART EXHIBITION, 
REPRESENTING AMER- 
ICAN PROFESSIONAL 
PHOTOGRAPHERS 

p. A. of A. CONVENTION, ROCHESTER, 
N. Y., JULY 19, 20, 21, 22, 23. 24, 1909 

It is in appreciation of the pho- 
togra{)hers of America, both men 
and women, that I have prepared 
for publication the following list 
of names, representing those who 
have given me their written prom- 
ises to send of their work to the 
Rochester convention. Not one 
of these will disappoint our asso- 
ciation by failing to fulfil their 
pledge. This being true, can we 
measure the influence and char- 
acter of this exhiliition? 

It is understood that the appeal 
this 3'ear is for individuality. Pic- 
tures that please the sense of the 
makers and represent their own 
characteristics and individuality. 
The aim of this undertaking is 
to get our memliers in line of 
thinking more seriously of per- 
sonal effort, and by so doing to 
break away from the habit of the 
copyist, which too often causes 
the productions of different pho- 
tographers to look alike ; in short, 
let us prove our capabilities. 

If added to this list I were to 
subjoin the names of all those 
who have given their verbal 
promise, this list would be largely 
increased. Either Mr. Proctor or 
myself Avill be pleased to receive 
a card from anj' person Avho 



%J 



the ARISTO EAGLE 



11 



desires to participate in this exhi- 
bition. It is important that Avord 
shall be received at an early date, 
that the name of the exhil)itor 
may appear in the cabilogue of 
the exhibition, which is to l>e 
pu])lished for the benefit of all 
those attending the convention. 

LIST OF EXHIRITORS. 

Will Armstrong-, Boston, Mass. 
H. A. Baird, Pittsburg, Pa. 
Bakur Art Gallery, Columbus, O. 
F. R. Barrows, Boston, Mass. 
Howard D. Beach, Buffalo, N. Y. 
Benjamin Studio, Cincinnati, O. 
A. F. Bradlev, New York, N. Y. 
W. (). Breck^n, Pittsburg, Pa. 
N. Brock & Co., Asheville, N. C. 

E. W. Brown, Beaver, Pa. 

A. M. Camp, Jamestown, N. Y. 

F. S. Clark, Detroit, Mich. 
Cole-Miller Studio, Danville, Pa. 
E. B. Core, New York, N. Y. 
Isaak DeVos, Chicago, 111. 

E. E. Doty, Belding, Mich. 

J. H. C. Evanoff, Salem, Mass. 

B. J. Falk, New York, N. Y. 

F. J. Feldman, El Paso, Texas. 
J. M. Field, Berlin, V.'is. 

J. H. Garo, Boston, 3Iass. 
J. E. Giffen, Wheeling, W. Va. 
Elias Goldensky, Philadelphia, Pa. 
Harris & Ewing, Washington, D. C. 
J. W. Hawes, Flushing, L. I. 

C. Pierre Havens, Jacksonville, Fla. 
C. M. Hayes, Detroit, Mich. 
Charles W. Hearn, lioston, Mass. 
O. C. Henrv, Pittsburg, Pa. 

H. Hoffman, Philadeli)hia, Pa. 
Alfred Holden, Philadelphia, Pa. 
Walter Holiday, Durham, N. C. 
Geo. G. Holloway, 

Terre Haute, Ind. 
Homier & Clark, Richmond, Va. 
Dudley Hoyt, New York, N. Y. 
IMeridith Janvier, Baltimore, Md. 
R. W. Johnson, Pittsburg, Pa. 
T. Kajiwara, St. Louis, Mo. 
J. WiU Kellmer, Hazelton, Pa. 



J. H. Kemp, Scranton, Pa. 
Joe Knaffl, Knoxville, Tenn. 
W. L. Koehne, Chicago, 111. 
C. E. Kough, Greensburg, Pa. 
Ben. Larrimer, Marion, Ind. 
S. H. Lifshev, Brooklvn, N. Y. 
W. S. Lively, McMinnville, Tenn. 
Milton Lorvea, Spokane, Wash. 
Pirie MacIJonald, New York, N. Y. 
F. W. Medlar, Sj)encer, Iowa. 
J. E. Mock, Rochester, N. Y. 
Carl jNIoon, Grand Canon, Mo. 
John Nicholson, Indianapolis, Ind. 
J. Geo. Nussbaiuner, Buffalo, N. Y. 
Oscar Pach, New York, N. Y. 

C. J. Parrot, Fort Wayne, Ind. 
W. H. Partridge, Boston, Mass. 
W. E. Perrv, Allegheny, Pa. 
RylandW. "Phillips, 

Philadelphia, Pa. 
A. T. Proctor, Huntington, W. Va. 
William H. Rau, Philadelphia, Pa. 
J. F. Rentschler, Ann Arbor, Mich. 
J. Ed. Roscii, St. Louis, Mo. 
Charles L. Rosevear, Toronto, Can. 

D. Rosser, Pittsburg, Pa. 
John Sabine, Providence, R. I. 
J. B. Schriever, Scranton, Pa. 
William Shewell Ellis, 

Philadelphia, Pa. 
Smith-Curry Studio, 

Rochester, N. Y. 
D. D. Spellman, Detroit, Mich. 
Geo. Steckel, Los Angeles, Cal. 
S. L. Stien, ]\Iilwaukee, Wis. 
Ben. Strauss, Kansas City, Mo. 
J. C. Strauss, St. Louis, Mo. 
Thuss Bros., Nashville, Tenn. 
Joe Thibault, Fall River, Mass. 
D. P. Thompson, Kansas City, Mo. 
Geo. E. Tinglev, INIvstic, Conn. 
Will H. Towles, Washington, D. C. 
A. C. Townsend, Lincoln, Neb. 
C. J. VanDeventer, Decatur, 111. 
Geo. Van Norman, 

Springfield, Mass. 
W. Neal Waldon, Evansville, Ind. 
Wharton & Tyree, Raleigh, N. C. 
Yoimg & Carl, Cincinnati, Ohio. 

WOMEN EXHIBITORS. 

Ella G. Ball, Lancaster, Pa. 



V? 



12 



STUDIO LIGHT and 



Mrs. Jessie Tarbox Beals, 

New York. 
Jeanne Bertrand, Boston, ]\Iass. 
Mary Carnell, Philadelphia, Pa. 
Helen W. Clogston, ^Marietta, Ohio. 
Mrs. C. A. Donaldson, 

Wahpeton, N. Y. 
Julia H. Elton, Pitman, N. J. 
Mrs. Emma Estelle Francis, 

Germantown, Philadelphia, Pa, 
Mrs. Walter Griffin New York. 
N. J. Hall, Brookline, Mass. 
Elizabeth Holden, Philadelphia, Pa. 
Katharine Jamison, Pittsburg, Pa. 
IM. Estelle Jenkins, Chicago, 111. 
Belle Johnson, ]\lonroe City, Mo. 
Frances B. Johnston, 

Washington, D. C. 
Mrs. Gertrude Kasebier, New York. 
Mary E. McGarvey, Bellefonte, Pa. 
Bessie Meiser, Richmond. Ind. 
Mrs. M. M. Morton, Lindsay, Ont. 
Rita B. Morris, Jackson, Mich. 
Blanche E. Reineke, 

Kansas City, Mo. 
Edith A. Ritenour, Uniontown, Pa. 
Mrs. Ella Saunders, Cleveland, O. 
Miss Small, Boston, Mass. 
Mrs. E. C. Standiford, 

Louisville, Ky. 
Mrs. Margaret Van Fleet, 

Detroit, Mich. 

The following list of names 
represent the Professional Photog- 
raphers' Society of Ohio. This 
society will exhil)it collectively, 
they having agreed that each 
member shall send a given num- 
ber of pictures. 

C. S. Bateham, Norwalk. 

R. B. Bellsmith, Cincinnati. 

L W. Bicken, Fostoria. 

F. R. Bill, Cleveland. 

W. A. Bishop, Sandusky. 

A. L. Bowersox, Cleveland. 

W. N. Brenner, Cincinnati. 

L. A. Dozer, Bucyrus. 

Geo. M. Edmondson, Cleveland. 

K, G. Goddard, Lorain. 



C. L. Lewis, Toledo. 
G. Barr Marsh, Galica. 

B. Frank Moore, Cleveland. 
J. W. Porter, Youngstown. 

C. W. Scheide, Elyria. 

J. S. Schneider, Columbus. 
F. I\I. Somers, Cincinnati. 
Geo. B. Sperry, Toledo. 
Fred J. Trost, Toledo. 
W. K. VanDeGrift, Piqua. 
W. E. VanLoo, Toledo. 
J. Zweifel, Dayton. 

The above movement of this 
society is very gi-atifjing just at 
this time, as it is in line with 
neAV departures to be discussed 
at Rochester. This idea demon- 
strates the value of sectional 
organization in assisting and pro- 
moting the interests of the 
national association. If in each 
State we had the organized sup- 
port of a like society, much of 
the anxiety of the executive 
boards would be eliminated, and 
the results are incalculable that 
would accrue to the National as 
regards exhibits, attendance, and 
moral support. 

The Canadian Photographers' 
Association is assembling a col- 
lection of photographs to rep- 
resent Canada. Its members have 
established a new departure in 
convention work which is com- 
mendable, and offers an oliject- 
lesson well worth considering bj^ 
other societies making collective 
exhibits. All pictures are to be 
sent to Toronto, and are there to 
be passed upon ])y a competent 
jury, and onlj" such pictures as 
are up to a certain standard will 
be forwarded to Rochester. 



%J 



the ARISTO EAGLE 



13 




FROM AN ANGELO SEPIA PLATINUM PRINT 

By Frank E. Dean Grand Junction, Colo. 



VT 



14 



STUDIO LIGHT and 



If each State in the Union 
were making the same effort as 
cm' Cana(han friends the magni- 
tude of the exhibition would lie 
greater and the quality better 
than can now l)e imagined by 
the best of us. 

THIS MKA.XS YOU. 

How many photographers are 
there who are willing to aid in 
making this years exhibition a 
representative one from the 
standpoint of professional 
photography? 

All we ask is that you send 
from four to six pictures, such as 
l)lease you and please the people 
you work for. While we request 
that pictures be put in passe- 
jiartout or frames, j^et it is not 
obligatory, and this question is 
left to the discretion of the 
exhibitor. 

If you wish to add to the pres- 
tige of the Photographers' Asso- 
ciation of America, and also 
sustain the efforts of its officers 
in gathering a fine collection of 
pictui'es for the education of its 
members, then send yom* appli- 
cation at once to Mr. A. T. 
Proctor, Huntington, W. ^"a., 
who will reser\e space for jou 
and enter j'our name in the cata- 
logue list. 

You need the convention; we 
need you. Let us all pull 
together for the Rochester 
convention. Fraternallj' yours, 
Fraxk E. Barrows, 

President P. A. of A. 



A SIMPLE AND PRAC- 
TICAL ENLARGING 
APPARATUS 

The professional is appi'eciat- 
ing more and more the financial 
benefits to be derived from well 
made enlagements, and with the 
wide range in effects afforded by 
the Eastman Bromide and devel- 
oping out papers he is able to 
duplicate, and in many instances 
improve upon, the (juality of con- 
tact prints, and at a low cost. 

The making of an enlargement 
is a simple matter, as an impro- 
vised apparatus is easily con- 
structed with an ordinary view 
camera, but when anj" quantity 
of work has to be turned out. a 
permanent and well constructed 
apparatus is advisable. 

We illustrate herewith one of 
the enlarging outfits in use in our 
studio, Avhich is simple in con- 
struction, and may be used with 
either dajdight or artificial illum- 
ination. 

The room in which this ap- 
paratus is installed measures 
aliout twelve by twenty feet, and 
is used exclusiveh' for enlarging 
purposes, and contains in addi- 
tion, developing sink, paper stor- 
age cabinet and work table. The 
same apparatus can be operated 
in a much smaller space, utilizing 
the dark room sink for de\'elop- 
ing and fixing. 

Figure 1 shows the side ele- 
vation of the complete apparatus, 
including the suspended paper 



%J 



the ARISTO EAGLE 



15 




Fis. 1. 



3 IDE- ErL&VATION OI=- 

Enlarging apparatus 



v 



16 



STUDIO LIGHT and 



easel. As sh()^vIl in the illustra- 
tion, the camera and artificial 
light box are installed against a 
window opening to the north, the 
artificial light box as arranged 
can be easily swung to one side 
when daylight is employed. The 
camera and light box used is 
substantially the same as supplied 
with the Folmer & Schwing 
Printing and Enlarging Cabinet, 
though an ordinary view camera, 
with reversible liack, could be 
sul^stituted. The light box con- 
tains a single tube Cooper-Hewitt 
lamp, and is so hinged as to 
swing to one side out of the way 
when daylight is used. See Fig- 
ure 2. 




r ] 

Fijr. ^ E-ND Ble-vation of 
Camera and .Standard for ^ame: 

Immediately in li-ont of the 
SAvinging light box is a square 
cone to which the camera proper 
is attached — this cone contains 
three ground glass diffusing 
screens in frames, any one of 
which may be removed when 



necessary. The camera and light 
box are supported on a table 
bi'acket, as shown in Figure 1 . 

( . 1 



-^ 



T\..,..^ 



unr 



Etnd Etlevation of- 

ErNLARClHG APPARATUS 



The paper easel is suspended 
from a track attached to string- 
ers fastened to the ceiling. The 
truck or carriage carrying the 
paper easel runs on roller bear- 
ings, as shown in Figure 3. The 
carriage locks on the track, by 
means of a simple spring, at any 
point when stopped, and is re- 
leased by a slight dowiiAvard 
pull on a lever just back of the 



\J 



(he ARISTO EAGLE 



17 




FROM AN ANGELO SEPIA PLATINIM PRINT 
By Frank E. Ihcni Gninil Ji(ucli(in, Colo. 



V 



1! 



STUDIO LIGHT and 



papt-r board, wht-n necessary to 
move for focusing. 

When a camera Avithout shift- 
ing and tilting movements is used 
it is a simple matter to adjust the 
copy board for both vertical and 
side adjustments as well as for- 
ward and back swing. 

The above apparatus has af- 
forded perfect satisfaction, as it 
is not liable to get out of order, 
takes up but little floor si:)ace, and 
is simple to construct and econ- 
omical in operation. 



A 



RE YOU A GOOD 
G U E S S E R .? 



The Photographers Associa- 
tion of America, in order to still 
further stimulate the interest in 
the coming National Convention 
at Rochester, offers an award of 
twenty-five dollars to the mem- 
ber of the Association making the 
nearest guess to the paid mem- 
bership at Rochester during the 
convention. All estimates to be 
sent to G. W. Harris, Secy., 
1311 F Street N. W., Washing- 
ton, D. C, and the contest posi- 
tively closes July seventeenth. 
Guesses arriving after that date 
will not be considered. There 
are about 1 5 ,000 professional pho- 
tographers in the United States 
and all indications point to a 
record breaking attendance at 
Rochester. 

Here's luck. 



THE 29TH ANNUAL 
CONVENTION 
P. A. OF A. 

The place: Rochester, N. Y., 
the photographic manufacturing 
center. The date: Jul}' 1 9th. to 
S^th. inclusive, an ideal time to 
leave j^our business for a few days. 
Come prepared to stay all week. 
Something doing every moment. 

Do you know that this prom- 
ises to be the most successful 
convention in the history of the 
P. A. of A.? Why? We meet 
this year in the most interesting 
city for photographers in the 
world. We will have the choicest 
collection of pictures, the most 
artistically arranged display, the 
most instructive school, the most 
interesting program with more 
new features added, and the best 
time the photographers have 
ever had the opportunity of en- 
joying at a convention. 

The photographic interests of 
Rochester extend to you a hearty 
Avelcome and promise a week of 
entertainment and instructive 
sight seeing that will be a revel- 
ation to many. Do not miss it. 
The Rochester section of the P. 
P. S. of New York will conduct 
a Bureau of Information in con- 
vention hall, with messenger ser- 
vice to look after the wants of 
those attending. 

Your officers would advise mak- 
ing hotel reservation early, and 
if any desire rooms other than 
those listed in circulars sent out 



\J 



the ARISTO EAGLE 



19 



recently, a request, stating what 
price room you wish, to Mr. J. 
E. Mock, Rochester, N.Y.,will 
secure for you just what is 
wanted. 

It is important dues be paid 
and ncAV memi:)ersliii)s be issued 
early. Attend to it NOW, TO- 
DAY. Your treasurer and his as- 
sistants vill be busy at the con- 
vention and if you wait until you 
reach the box office you may have 
to stand in line sometime before 
you can secure a button and your 
receipt. 

This delay can be avoided and 
you can materially assist the 
treasm'er by making remittance 
now. Official receipt and mem- 
bership button will be sent to 
you by return mail. 

If already a member with dues 
paid for 1908, send 82.00 to 
Treasurer L. A. Dozer, Bucyrus, 
Ohio. If you have no member- 
ship in the Association, send 
$5.00, 83.00 membership fee and 
$2 . 00 dues for 1 909 . Employees 
and dealers or their representa- 
tives hold associate membership. 
82.00 per annum, no membership 
fee. In making remittance by 
check, add ten cents for collec- 
tion. 

Anj' other information concern- 
ing the Photographers Associa- 
tion of America or the coming 
Rochester Convention will be 
gladly furnished upon request. 
L. A. Dozer, 

Treasurer P. A. of A. 



H 



OW TO BE IN THE 
MONEY 



We are going to spend two 
thousand dollars for phot(jgraphs 
this fall, and we hope to be able to 
spend quite a few dollars more 
for the same purpose. The two 
thousand dollars prize money for 
our 1909 Kodak Advertising Con- 
test will be charged against ex- 
pense, and we naturally want to 
oljtain the most we can for our 
money. In our previous contests 
we have found a number of pic- 
tures outside the prize winners 
that we were willing to pay a 
good sum for, and we are hoping 
that the I909 Contest will dis- 
close double the quantity the 
previous contests made a\ ailable. 
Nothing Avould please us better 
than to ha\ e e\ery entrj" so good 
as to stand a chance as a prize 
winner. In the two preceding 
contests quite a number of tech- 
nically excellent photographs 
were received that stood no pos- 
sible chance of being considered, 
some because they did not come 
within the limits of the competi- 
tion, and others because they 
lacked the power to convince or 
attract. 

In order to get on the right 
track, and have our entries stand 
at least a fair chance, let us take 
up a subject and see how we 
would work it out. Suppose, for 
instance, we wanted to produce a 
picture that would help sell 
Kodak Film Tanks. First, we 



V? 



20 



STUDIO LIGHT and 



would considfr the strung selling 
points of the Tank — the entire 
operation in full daylight, anj" 
time, any place — simplicity, no 
previous experience in develop- 
ment necessary to secure good 
results — portability, so small and 
compact as to be readily trans- 
ported anywhere. Having con- 
sidered these points let us attempt 
a picture showing the tank in use. 
In selecting the subject to operate 
the tank Ave^have the choice of 
men, women, young or old. and 
children. The time worn phrase, 
"so simple a child can use it," 
will perhaps flash into your mind. 

While it is true that a child 
of seven or eight could be taught 
to use the tank successfully, 
the percentage of children of 
that age interested in photog- 
raphy is very small, so a picture 
with a child of that age using 
the tank would lack conviction. 
A boy or girl of from twelve to 
fourteen would be better, but as 
most of these youngsters 
are using Brownie Cameras it 
would be better to use them in 
making a picture showing the 
use of the Brownie Developing 
Box. 

Next in selection we have 
young men and women. In turn- 
ing over the advertising pages in a 
magazine, a good many of us will 
stop to look at a picture of a 
manl}^ young man, but every one 
of us will pause to insjject the 
picture of a comely young woman . 
It thus appearing that the comely 



young Avoman would be the 
strongest factor in first arresting 
the eye, let us use her. 

Fortunately, attractive girls 
are to be found anywhere, so we 
wont have much trouble there. 
Now if she is a girl with sufficient 
intelligence to enjoy picture mak- 
ing, there are a few things she 
would not do: 

When she was preparing to de- 
velop her film in the tank, she 
Mould not don an evening gown, 
with low neck and short sleeves, 
but she Avould wear some of her 
common every daj' clothes, and 
being careful, would don a good 
long apron of gingham or some 
other fabric known best to 
womankind, — and further, hav- 
ing due respect for the household 
gods, she would not select the 
shining mahogany table in the 
jjarlor to develoj) on — quite true, 
she could develop on the mahog- 
any table and not get a spot on 
it — but she wouldn't use it just 
the same, and if you saw an ad- 
vertisement with her all "fussed 
up" in an evening gown, and us- 
ing the mahogany table, you 
Avould mentally exclaim "fake" — 
"just posing." and no matter how 
strong the argument in type ac- 
companying the picture, you 
would not be convinced. 

This one illustration will serve 
as well as a dozen in demonstrat- 
ing the points necessary in pic- 
ture making to be used for ad- 
vertising purposes. 

First, the picture must possess 



%J 



the ARISTO EAGLE 



21 




FROM AN ANGELO SEPIA PLATINUM PRINT 
By Frank E. Dean Gnind J\inrtion, Cnlo. 



STUDIO LIGHT and 



the power in lieautj' or strength 
to arrest attention. 

Second, it must create an in- 
terest in or desire for the goods 
advertised. 

Third, it must be simple and 
natural , — simple because its story 
must be told at the first glance, 
and natural in order to convince. 

Just good landscapes or good 
portraits are not suitable for use 
in our advertising. The pictures 
must tell a story and tell it sim- 
ply, quickly and convincingly. 
Beautj' is not absolutely essential, 
but wholesome attractiveness is 
— and above all naturalness. 

When you are planning your 
pictures, stop and consider would 
this picture attract or convince 
me — would it help to sell me the 
goods, then l^oil it down to the 
last degree of simplicity, and you 
stand a good chance of being "in 
the monev." 



B 



E COMFORTABLE 



TF you have 
not engaged 
accommodations 
for Convention 
Week 



Do It No 



w 



Phew, it's hot — thank 
goodness my work imder the light 
is done for this day, and if it 
wasn't for all those plates to de- 
velop I could take Mary and the 
kiddies and get out into the 
country for a breath of air. Hang 
this dark room work, anyhow — 
yet it's got to be done or no 
plates to proof in the morning. 

How many times have just 
such thoughts pop])ed into your 
head during the stifling midsum- 
mer days? Some of you still ha^•e 
to think and suffer that way — 
but what is the use, when the 
remedy is so easy.'' Here is how 
our fi-iend Mr. L. E. Webb, of 
Morgantown, N. C, works it: 

" Recently I photograjjhed a 
large graduating class individ- 
ually, and by tanking each dozen 
l)lates as exposed, when I had 
completed exposing, all my plates 
were developed and fixed, ex- 
cept the last dozen. The convcn- 
i''?ice of tlie tank in one large 
bunch of work will more than pay 
fur it/ 

Let the tank do the drudgery 
— it will not only protect you 
from dark room discomforts, but 
dark room accidents as well, and 
l^roduce uniform negatives of any 
printing qualitj' you desire. 

Let the tank do the work. 



Keep posted on the Eastman 
School of Professional Photography 
— read the bulletin on page 24. 



\J 



the ARISTO EAGLE 



23 



THE ONLY CON- 
DI T I O xN 

We make but one condi- 
tion in our offer of cuts for 
the use of photographers. 

It is obvious that two 
photographers in the same 
toAVTi would not care to use 
the same cut, and we are 
therefore obHged to limit 
this offer to one photogra- 
pher in a town. It will be 
a case of first come first 
served. The first order 
from a city Avill be promptly 
filled. Succeeding orders (if 
any) will necessarily be 
turned doAvn and the re- 
mittance, of course, will be 
returned. It is also obvious 
that we cannot, on account 
of the cost of the drawings, 
furnish any large variety of 
cuts at the nominal prices 
quoted, and therefore can 
offer no substitute cut. The 
thing to do is to get your 
order injirst, as it would not 
be fair to give the man who 
happens to get in his order 
earl}' one month, a permanent 
advantage; Ave shall book no 
orders in advance. The}' 
must always specify the num- 
ber of cut desired. If later 
on it develops that there is 
a great enough demand for 
these advertising cuts to war- 
rant our furnishing a larger 
variety, we shall be glad to 
do so. c\ K. Co.. Ltd. 




Children at the "awk- 
ward age?" Still we 
can make pretty good 
photographs of them, 
and you know you'd 
like to have the pic- 
tures to send away 
and some to keep for 
yourself too. 

Bring t/ie eliildren In <iiul let 
ns s/ion- i/oii n'hat ire ran do. 

The Pyho Stljdio 



No. \\i 



24 



STUDIO LIGHT and 



rpo GET MORE 

-*- Some man who knew what 
he was talking about said: 
"When business is good, adver- 
tise some to get more; when 
business is bad, advertise more 
to get some." 

That is really the secret of 
successful advertising — keep at 
it. A good show case display 
helps a lot, but every one in your 
town does not pass it, but prac- 
tically every one who has money 
to spend reads the local news- 
papers. Even an extra good ad- 
vertisement displayed but once 
prodvices but a slight impression, 
but repeated again and again it 
begins to get a grip on its readers 
and soon people are beginning to 
wonder what sort of pictures you 
do make, and go a little out of 



their Avay to see what your show 
case contains. Then j'ou com- 
mence to get results — and " when 
business is good, advertise some 
to get more. " Keep everlastingly 
at it — tell your public in the 
newspapers that they want — 
need — good pictures, and that 
your studio is the place to olitain 
them. You have a chance with 
every member of the femily from 
grandpa down to the baby. 

Our series of cuts for studio 
advertising have made a hit. 
Practically every photographer 
Avho ordered the first one has 
ordered the later ones, and the 
list grows longer each month. 
Get in step with the progressive 
and "get more.'' 

The cut on page 23 will be sent 
you on recei])t of thirty cents 
— and it's first come, first served. 



B 



U L L E T I X : THE EASTMAN SCHOOL OF 
PROFESSIONAL PHOTOGRAPHY FOR 1909 



Auspices John W. Graham & Co., Spokane, Wash., July 7, 8, 9- 
Auspices Robt. Dempster Co., Omaha, Neb., July 15, l6, 17. 

Auspices Memphis Photo Supply Co., Memphis, Tenn.. July 
20, 21, 22. 

Auspices Des Moines Photo Materials Co., Des Moines, Iowa, 
July 27, 28, 29. 

Auspices Mullett Bros. Photo Supply Co., Kansas City, Mo., 
August 3, 4, 5. 

Northwestern Photog. Convention, St. Paul, Minn., September 
2, 3, 4. 

Auspices Durtin cS: Co., Winnipeg, Man., September 8, 9, 10. 



\J 



the ARISTO EAGLE 25 

LAST CALL 

FOR ROCHESTER 

If you want to accompany one 
of the special parties to the Na- 
tional Convention at Rochester, 
July 19 to 24, write the org-an- 
izer in your territory to-day for 
information and reservations. 

Boston, Mass. 

ROBEY-FRENCH CO. 

New York C'itj' 

C. F. BECKER, 2:55 W. 23d St. 

Philadelphia, Pa. 

JOHN HAWORTH COMPANY 

Columbus. O. 

EMPIRE PHOTO SUPPLY CO. 

Chicago 111. 

SWEET, WALLACH & CO. 

St. Louis, Mo. 

W. SCHH.LER & CO. 

ST. LOUIS-HYATT PHOTO SUPPLY CO. 

Kansas Citj', Mo. 

Z. T. BRIGGS PHOTO SUPPLY CO. 
KANSAS CITY PHOTO SUPPLY CO. 

Omaha, Neh. 

THE ROBERT DEMPSTER CO. 

St. Paul, Minn. 

ZIMMERMAN BROS. 

Minneapolis, Minn. 

O. H. PECK COMPANY 



26 S T L D I O L I G H T rt « f/ 

The best of everything 
for use in the Studio 



A complete line of 

Canadian Kodak Co. 's 
Plates, Papers and 
Tested Chemicals. 

Canadian Card Co.'s 
Mounts 

Century Studio Ap- 
paratus. 



The D. H. Hogg Company 

MONTREAL, CANADA 



\J 



the ARISTO EAGLE 



27 



Commer- 
cial 

Arts to 
Platino 



ROLLS 

10 ft. Roll 241, 
ins. wide. .§1.95 

5 yd. Roll 241 7 
ins. wide.. 82.80 

10 yd. Roll 241^2 
ins. wide. .85.15 

( Furnished only 
in 241, inch 
widths.) 



Canadian 
Kodak 

Co., Limited 
Toronto, Can. 



Per Per 


Per 


Per 


Size ? J Doz. Doz. 


K Gross 


Gross 


2I4X2I4 


$ .15 


$ .60 


$1.05 


2i,x2i, 


.15 


.60 


1.05 


2I4X3I4 


.15 


.60 


1.05 


214x31, 


.15 


.60 


1.05 


2I4X334 


.15 


.(;o 


1.05 


2i,x4i4 


.15 


.60 


1.10 


3 x4 


.15 


.60 


1.05 


31 , x 31/, 


.15 


.70 


i.;jo 


314 X 414 


.15 


.70 


1.30 


31 , X 4 


.15 


.70 


1.30 


24x7 


.18 


.75 




4 x4 


.18 


.75 


1.45 


414 X 414 


.18 


.75 


1.45 


3I4X6 


.18 


.75 


1.45 


34x51/2 


.18 


.75 


1.45 


4 x5 


.18 


.75 


1.45 


37-8 X 51/ 


.25 


.95 


1.75 


3'sx5?8 


.30 


1.10 


1.95 


44x51/2 


.30 


1.10 


1.95 


4 x6 


.25 


.95 


1.75 


4I4 X 6I4 


.30 


1.30 


2.25 


434 X 61/2 


.30 


1.50 


2.60 


4 x9 


.35 


1.75 


2.85 


5x7 


.35 


1.70 


2.75 


5 X 71^, 


.35 


1.80 


3.00 


5x8" 


.35 


1.80 


3.15 


51, X 734 


.40 


1.95 


3.45 


3I2 X 12 


.35 


1.90 




6 x8 


.45 


2.30 


4". 10 


61 ', X 8I/2 


.50 


2.50 


4.40 


7 x9 


.55 


2.85 


5.15 


71/2 X 91/2 


.60 


3.20 


6.00 


8 xlO 


.65 


3.60 


6.70 


9 xll 






8.70 


10 xl2 


'. .95 


5.40 


10.30 


11 xl4 $ 


65 1.25 


7.20 


13.45 


12 xl5 


80 1.40 


8.50 


16.00 


14 xl7 1 


00 1.90 


10.80 


20.65 


16 x20 1 


30 2.50 


14.80 


27.90 


17 x20 1 


40 2.75 


15.45 


29.95 


18 x22 1 


65 3.15 


18.00 


35.15 


20 x24 1 


95 3.60 


21.15 


41.30 



28 



STUDIO LIGHT and 



If you don't use the 
Kodak tested chemicals 
for your work we shall 
both lose money — but 
you'll lose the most. 




the ARISTO EAGLE 29 



ROYAL 
NEPERA 

Pure White 



The developing paper 
that forgets to curl. 




Canadian 

Kodak 

Co. 

Lid. 

Toronto, 
Canada 




30 



STUDIO LIGHT a7,d 




THE EASTMAN 

PLATE TANK 

Is Constructed Right. 

The simple loading device permits the loading of 
the plates into the rack in a few seconds, without 
scratching or marring. 

The air-tig-Jit. locking cover allows the whole tank 
to be reversed — no Ji.shing the plate raeli out of the 
solut'toyi during- development — and the hand on the 
dial tells you when development will be completed. 

Eastman Plate Tank, 5x7, - $ 4.50 

Eastman Plate Tank, 8x 10, - 10.00 

Canadian Kodak Co., Ltd. 

Toronto, Canada 



the ARISTO EAGLE 31 

Canadian Made for the 
Canadian Professional 



Seed, Royal and Stanley 
Plates 

Canadian Card Co.'s 
Mounts 

Canadian Kodak Co.'s 
Tested Chemicals 

Canadian Made Papers 



J. G. Ramsey & Co., limited 

Toronto, Canada 



32 



STUDIO LKi HT and 



It is Sure to Make a Hit 

With Your Half-Cabinet Work 





fl& 




The Colhijkite Sti/h 



You have no idea how nifty a print looks when mounted on the 
Collegiate Style. It is made of medium weight stock, linen finish 
with bevelled edges. The Design and Crest are brought up in colors 
to harmonize with the stock, and it is bound to be a jiopular seller 
among the college trade. It is a good style to work during the quiet 
months and you should not fail to see samples. jNIade in two colors, 
Cream White and Artist's Brown. 

Sample mailed on receipt of one 2-cent stamp 
Price List Size for Photos Size Outside Price per 100 

H. 1^4 X :?' > Oval 3' i x 8> i Sl.^5 

B. ': Cabinet Oval 3"s x 8^4 1-Sn 

t;. '_> Cabinet Square 5 x QM 1.75 

THE CANADIAN CARD CO. 

T C) I! O X T O, C A N A DA 



Aristo Motto 



'"1 ^ fE believe permanency is the 
^ ' Keijstone of Photographic, 
Sttccess, and all brands of paper 
bearing ovir Trade-mark are manu- 
factured on this principle. We hold 
our consumer's reputation and suc- 
cess identical with our own. We 
surround both with every safe- 
guard known to chemical science 
and our own experience." 




FROM A FIRST PRIZE PRINT ON COLLODIO-CARBON 
By C. L. Venard Lincoln, Ills. 




V7 



L^ll 




an 



a the ^^RIkS^O ]^:?^GI^]^ 



A Magazine of Information for the Profession 



N EW SERIES 

Vol. 1 No. fi 



AUGUST 1909 



OLD SERIES 

No. 103 



THE BUSINESS OF 
THE CONVENTION 

The business meetings of the 
twenty-ninth annual Convention 
of the P. A. of A., were car- 
ried out strictly according to pro- 
gram and with a large and highly 
intei-ested attendance at every 
session. 

The first official meeting on 
the program was the assembling 
of the State Representatives for 
the First Congress of Photog- 
raphy, and as the sessions of 
this bod}' were distinct from the 
regular meetings of the P. A. 
of A., they will be dealt with 
separately in this report. 

The first regvilar session of the 
P. A. of A., was called to order 
promptly at 9 A- m. Tuesday 
morning, July 20th, in the As- 
sembly Hall of the Seneca Ho- 
tel, President Frank R. Bar- 
rows presiding, the order of 
business being as follows : 

Address of Welcome, Mayor Hiram 

H. Edgerton, Rochester, N. Y. 

Greeting, Edward G. Miner, Pres. 

Rochester Chamber of Commerce 

Response, . . Charles L. Lewis, 

Toledo, Ohio 



Reading of Communications, 

Geo. W. Harris, Sec'y, 
Washington, D. C. 
President's Report, Frank R. Bar- 
rows, Boston, Mass. 
Appointment of Committees 
Announcements 

Mayor Edgerton in his most 
happy manner cordially wel- 
comed the members, and in 
closing said, ' In behalf of all 
our citizens I extend to you a 
most cordial and hearty welcome, 
and the freedom of our city. Go 
wheie you will, I am sure you 
will be welcome." 

Mayor Edgerton was followed 
by Mr. Edward G. Miner, the 
President of the Rochester 
Chamber of Commerce, who 
spoke of the immense photo- 
grajjhic interests of the citj', 
and their close connection with 
and importance to the visiting 
members, and closed by \\ishing 
the members the best of good 
times and inviting them to come 
again. 

In response to the greetings 
Charles L. Lewis, of Toledo, 
Ohio, made a brief address in 
which he said he was sorrj- for 
any photographer who could not 
be present at this convention . and 



STUDIO LIGHT and 



expressed the hope that more 
members for the national body 
might result from this conven- 
tion. 

Letters were read bj' Secre- 
tary George W. Harris, from 
Past Presidents George M. Ed- 
mondson, Cleveland, Ohio, and 
W. H. Potter of Indianapolis, 
Ind. 

President Frank R. Barrows, 
then delivered his annual ad- 
dress, saying in part: 

"For so many years have you hon- 
ored me with a seat on your execu- 
tive bt)ard and for so many years 
have I had the pleasure of greeting 
you at our conventions, that I feel 
as if we were now one large family. 
And in truth, we are in many ways 
like one large family. Growing up 
year by year, we, the children often 
drift apart in our ideas and beliefs, 
but whatever our aim, we all still 
hold to our parent, the grand old 
P. A. of A. 

"Like a family, as we, the chil- 
dren, grow older, we think we are 
even wiser than our parent, and 
sometimes are apt to class her as 
old-fashioned and not vip-to-date, 
and we seek means whereby to 
change her attitude so that we, poor 
foolish children, need not feel that 
shame that we falsely assume when 
we parade under her wing. 

"Yes, we are indeed, but brothers 
and sisters after all. 

"Associations, such as this, which 
usually find outward expression in 
annual conventions, are of two kinds 
or rather are formed to serve one or 
two purposes, protective and educa- 
tive. 

"The old N. P. A., the predeces- 
sor of this association was originally 
protective, formed by photogra- 
phers to fight obnoxious patent laws 



and rights. The P. A. of A., was 
formed, after the lapse of the old 
society, to carry on the work of ed- 
ucation, combined with the spirit of 
brotherhood. That the P. A. of A., 
has been led right, or, at least, has 
not been led wrong, is shown by the 
steady onward progress as recorded 
by the history of the society. Twen- 
ty years back the P. A. of A., was 
stronger than when first started. 
Ten years ago it was again stronger 
in membership and financial resource 
than it was in the previous decade, 
and to-day, nearly thirty years after 
its foundation, theP. A.of A., shows 
us the largest gathering of photog- 
raphers and manufacturers that has 
ever assembled since the day Da- 
guerre first iodized a silver plate and 
made the first permanent photo- 
graph. 

"As old-fashioned as some of we 
children imagine the P. A. of A., to 
be, it still has the vitality that bids 
fair to outlive us and our works as 
it has already outlived many an- 
other good photographer. 

"But let me return to the family 
simile and carrj- it a little further. 
In its younger days the P. A. of A., 
stood alone. As its children grew 
older and wandered afield they too 
reared families of their own. Some 
prospered, for they were founded on 
good fellov>-ship and mutual helpful- 
ness. Some were unfortunate and 
while yet alive, led but a dragging 
existence. The younger children, 
profiting by the mistakes and fail- 
ures of their elders, founded fami- 
lies on new lines and their more 
youthful energy and more modern 
viewpoint has led them to success 
where some of the older families 
have reaped disappointment. 

"But while there has been friend- 
ship, there has been no union of 
these various family groups. Each 
individual family has gone its own 
way. M'hat the one has found good 
has been condemned by another. 



the ARISTO EAGLE 



There has been an interchange of 
ideas and courtesy, but the mutual 
helpfulness, the spirit of 'one for 
all and all for one' has been lack- 
ing. While each family was work- 
ing for its own good, the progress 
of the whole united family has Deen 
unheeded. Yet, in each family there 
have been members that have 
thought and reasoned seriously. 
They believed sincerely in their own 
families but they believed too, that 
the times demanded a real family re- 
union, making for a stronger family, 
one that would have such influence 
and power that the progress and wel- 
fare of each individual family mem- 
ber would be enhanced to a degree 
not attainable with the limited 
power of the smaller isolated fam- 
ily. Louder and louder became 
such expressions of belief that a re- 
union of the whole family seems ex- 
pedient. And who has greater right 
to bring about such a reunion, than 
the parent of them all, the P. A. 
of A." 

Mr. Barrows also spoke regard- 
ing the plans and aims of the 
Congress of Photography, and 
the advantages of forming a fed- 
eration of local photographers 
societies; he also stated the 
necessity for a revision of the 
constitution of the P. A. of A. 

The report was ordered spread 
on the minutes, and a vote of 
thanks was tendered him as 
President. 

The appointment of commit- 
tees followed. President Barrows 
named these committees: 

Improvements— W. H. Rau, 
Philadelphia; W. H. Koehne, 
Chicago; George J. Parrott, 
Fort Wayne, Ind. ; W. F. Oliver, 
Baldwinsville, Mass. 



Resolutions — C. W. Hearn, 
Boston; H. B. Medlar, Wood- 
stock, 111. ; E. E. Seavey, New- 
castle, Pa. 

Academy — C. W. Hearn, Bos- 
ton; Cr. W. Harris, Washington, 
D. C. ; J. W. Appleton, Day- 
ton, O. 

After the adjournment of the 
morning session the members pro- 
ceeded to Convention Hall to 
attend a demonstration at the 
School of Photography by F. 
Milton Somers of Cincinnati, 
Ohio. The room set aside for the 
school Mas crowded to the doors, 
many of the photograi)hers stand- 
ing through the entire session, 
as the demonstration was of ab- 
sorbing interest. 

In the afternoon the visiting 
ladies were tendered an outing 
on Jrondequoit Bay by the Roch- 
ester Section of the N. Y. State 
Association. A most enjoyable 
time was had, all returning in 
ample time for the evening ses- 
sion. 

At 3 p. M. the second session 
of the Congress of Photography 
was held, the plans and action to 
be reported to the P. A. of A., 
at the evening session. 

At 8 p. M. the second session 
of the Convention was held at 
Assembly Hall, President Bar- 
rows presiding. This session was 
devoted to the report of the Con- 
gress of Photography, which will 
be taken up later in this article, 
and to a discussion of the Con- 
stitution and Bv-Laws of Associa- 



I 



6 



STUDIO LIGHT and 



tion ; the Constitution, as amend- 
ed, will be found in fiill in the 
report of Fridaj^'s session. 

Wednesday was set apart as 
"Manufacturers and Dealer's 
Day, " no regular sessions of the 
Convention being held. This daj^ 
was devoted to visiting the vari- 
ous photographic factories, in- 
cluding Kodak Park, as detailed 
in the reprint from the Rochester 
Herald in other columns. 

In the evening the photog- 
ra})hers were entertained bj" illus- 
trated lectures by Ryland W. 
Phillips of Pittsburg and Ger- 
trude Kasebier of New York. 

The next regular session of 
the Convention was called to 
order a little after 9 a. m. Thurs- 
day, July 22, in Assembly Hall, 
President Barrows presiding. 
The order of business was as fol- 
lows : 

Secretary's Report. 

Treasurer's Report. 

Report of Committees. 

Appointment of Committee on 
Location. 

Appointment of Committee on 
Election. 

Annoimcements. 

The report of the Secretary, 
George W. Harris, showed all affairs 
in his department to be in a highly 
satisfactory condition. 

Treasurer Dozer was applauded 
when he took the platform to give 
his report. He complimented the 
association and Mr. Barrows on the 
neatness of the books and the busi- 
ness like manner in which the office 
had been conducted. i\Ir. Barrows 
was formerly treasurer of the organi- 
zation. 

Mr. Dozer said that the funds are 



now divided in two banks to prevent 
severe loss in case of a bank failure. 

The treasurer's report was as fol- 
lows: 
Cash on hand Jan. 1, 

1908 . . . $4,838.19 

Received from Secretary 3,647.00 
Membership and dues . 2,047.00 
Ladies' pins . . 31.50 

Total . . . $10,610.59 

Disbursements . . 5,911.95 
Cash on hand . . $4,698.64 

The following committee on 
location for the next convention 
was appointed as follows : George 
B. Sperrj", Toledo; Charles 
Townsend, Des Moines, Iowa; 
J. H. C. Evanhoff, Boston; F. 
S. Noble, Rochester; Schuyler 
Colfax, Columbus. 

The committee on elections 
was named as follows : Ryland 
W. Phillips, Philadelphia ; George 
M. Edmondson, Cleveland, O. ; 
Charles W. Hearn, Boston, 
Mass. ; C. J. Vanderventer, Indi- 
anapolis, Ind. ; Charles Smith, 
Evanston, 111. 

After the appointment of these 
committees and the reading of 
routine communications, the 
meeting was adjourned until 2 p. 
M . , at which time a special meet- 
ing was called to further consider 
the revision of the Constitution 
and By-Laws. 

The Friday morning session 
was called to order at 9 a. m. in 
Assembly Hall, President Bar- 
rows presiding. This was an im- 
portant session as it included the 
election of officers, selection of 
the next place of meeting, the 



the ARISTO EAGLE 



appointment of committees, and 
the presentation of a Life Mem- 
bership Certificate to Past Presi- 
dent Frank W. Medlar. At the 
opening of the session Secretary 
Harris read a letter from Elias 
Goldensky regretting his inability 
to attend on account of a death 
in his family. On a motion a let- 
ter expressing the sjinpathy of 
the association was ordered sent 
him 

William H. Rau of Philadel- 
phia followed with a most inter- 
esting paper on "The Progress of 
Photography," which we very 
much regret being unable to re- 
print, owing to lack of space. 
Beautifully engraved certificates 
of appreciation for work done in 
the instruction classes at last 
year's convention were presented 
to Elias Goldensky and Rjland 
Phillips of Philadelphia; John 
H. Garo, Boston; Dudley Hoyt, 
New York; W. S. Lively, Mc- 
Minnville, Tenn., and M. B. 
Parkinson, of Boston. 

Charles Wesley Hearn reported 
for the committee on the Acad- 
emy. He stated that the plans 
for the development of the Acad- 
emy were bemg held in abejance, 
pending the outcome of the fed- 
eration between the National 
and State bodies. 

The presentation of the Life 
Membership Certificate to Frank 
W. Medlar of Spencer, Iowa, was 
made by Charles W. Hearn of 
Boston. Mr. Medlar's appear- 
ance on the platform was the 



signal for enthusiastic applause. 
Mr. Hearn spoke of the loyal 
service given to the association 
by Mr. Medlar as president in 
1907 and as secretary in 1905. 
Mr. Hearn said that Mr. Medlar 
had never hesitated in sacrificing 
personal interests for the good 
of the association. 

Mr. Medlar accepted the honor 
in a few well chosen Avords of 
appreciation. 

The report of the committee 
on constitution and bj-laws was 
called for, but was put over until 
the special meeting. The x-eport 
of the committee on resolutions 
was put over until the final ses- 
sion . 

The report of the committee 
on location for the next conven- 
tion was the signal for general 
discussion. The report Avas read 
byC. F. Townsend of DesMoines, 
la., in the absence of Chairman 
George Sperry of the committee. 
The report recommended unani- 
mously Milwaukee, Wis., for the 
next gathering. This city was 
recommended in competition 
with Niagara Falls, Atlantic City, 
N. J., and Richmond, Va. 

Secretary Harris read commu- 
nications fi'om other cities, ask- 
ing for the convention. They 
were from Mobile, Ala. , Saratoga 
Springs, Cedar Point, Ohio, New 
Orleans, La., Atlantic Citj-, N. 
J., Milwaukee, Wis. 

Mr. Parkinson of Boston advo- 
cated Milwaukee. The swish of 
fashionable skirts and the swash 



STUDIO LIGHT and 



I 



of the waves at Atlantic City, 
he held, would not be conducive 
to close stud}' of photograph}- . 

It was moved that a single 
ballot be cast for Milwaukee. 
This was carried without a dis- 
senting vote. Cheers greeted the 
selection. 

The report of the committee 
on nominations, of which Mr. 
Phillips was chairman, was pre- 
sented. It recommended the 
following men for office: Presi- 
dent, A. T. Proctor, Hunting- 
ton, W. Va. ; first vice presi- 
dent, George W. Harris, 
Washington, D. C. ; second vice 
president, Benj. Larrimer, Mar- 
ion, Ind. ; secretary, J. H. C. 
Evanoff, Salem, Mass. 

This ticket met with hearty 
favor, the men named being 
elected by a single ballot in each 
instance. 

With a few changes of minor 
importance the new constitution 
and In-laws of the Photographers 
Association of America were 
adopted at the special meeting 
in the afternoon at the Seneca, 
at which President Barrows i)re- 
sided. The new constitution is 
expected to bring every state 
organization into the national 
body organized as the American 
Congress of Photography. The 
congress is really a body within 
a body. It will do the work and 
the P. A. of A. , will give its stamp 
to what the congress does, there- 
by exerting a strong influence for 
the passage of laws at Washing- 



ton a!id in the state legislatures, 
and obtaining conditions that will 
make for the betterment of the 
profession. 

B. Frank Puffer of New York 
spoke in support of the constitu- 
tion. Mr. Puffer said : 

" Tfiis constitution and by-laws as 
submitted in no way prevents the 
P. A. of A., from having a duplicate 
of this convention next year, and as 
this is the greatest convention in the 
history of the P. A. of A., what 
more can be said? The old consti- 
tution has been outgrown. It is 
faulty in its construction and im- 
possible to be lived up to. The one 
great step in advance to be gained 
under the new constitution is tliat it 
authorizes the P. A. of A., to call 
together the American Congress of 
Photography next year as a consti- 
tutional ac-t, whereas this year it 
was called together with the consent 
of the executive board of the P. 
A. of A. 

" The first step in the amalgama- 
tion of the P. A. of A., and the vari- 
ous state societies can now be con- 
sistently made and there is no 
dictation from the P. A. of A., to the 
state societies in any waj-. Next 
year the state societies will be in- 
vited to send delegates and affiliate 
with the P. A. of A., and through 
the American Congress of Photog- 
ra])hy, and this invitation can be de- 
clined or accepted, at the discretion 
of each individual state society, 
which will be determined by a ma- 
jority vote at their next annual 
meeting." 

" This association will do every- 
thing for the states," said I\Ir. Ham- 
mer, following Mr. Puffer. " The 
states may bring subjects before the 
executive board of the P. A. of A., 
for approval. New policies, ques- 
tions of copyright, a new standard 
of weights and measures, anything 
of good, of material interest, wiii Joe 



the ARISTO EAGLE 



9 



considered. We can make some- 
thing practical out of our conven- 
tions instead of using them for the 
entertainment of delegates." 

A motion involviiicr the disso- 
lution of the couiniittee on con- 
stitution and by-laws and carry- 
ing a vote of thanks to the com- 
mittee for its work and to Presi- 
dent Barrows for the idea of a 
congress was carried with loud 
applause. Adjournment was 
taken to allow delegates an op- 
portunity to attend the roastfest 
at Moerlbach Park, given by the 
Defender Photo Supjily and Sen- 
eca Camera Companies. 

The constitution and by-laws 
as amended and adopted are 
given herewith in full : 

ARTICLE I 

The official title of this associa- 
tion is : The Photographers' Associa- 
tion of America, and jurisdiction 
thereunto belonging. 

PREAMBLE 

The objects and purposes of the 
Society shall be the betterment of 
the profession, the creating, foster- 
ing and maintaining of cordial rela- 
tions between the members of the 
State organizations and the Photog- 
raphers Association of America, and 
to oppose any injustice or infringe- 
ment of the rights of photographers. 

ARTICLE II 

Titles of Officers 

Sec. 1. The officers, the official 
titles : 

President. 

First Vice President. 

Second Vice President. 

Treasurer. 

Secretary. 



And these shall constitute the Ex- 
ecutive Board, who shall hold office 
for one year from tlie first day of 
January, or until their successors 
be elected. The Treasurer shall be 
elected to serve for three years. 

ARTICLE III 

CoNSTITl'ENTS OF THE ASSOCIATION 

The membership of the Associa- 
tion shall (1) active, (-2) associate, 
(S) honorary, (4) life, and (5) a Con- 
gress of Photography. 

Active Members 
Sec. 1. Every active member of 
this association shall be either an 
active member of a regular organ- 
ized State Association in good stand- 
ing, owner or manager of a studio, 
or such photographers, owners or 
part owners as may pay the initia- 
tion fee and annual dues called for 
under Article IV, Sec. 1. 

Associate Members 

Sec. 2. Associate members shall 
include employees, manufacturers, 
dealers and their representatives, 
and shall enjoy all the privileges of 
the Association, e\cepting that of 
voting and speaking on the floor of 
the convention during executive ses- 
sions. 

Honorary Members 

Sec. 3. Eminent photographers 
of other countries, inventors and 
other scientific men, who may be 
thought worthy of the distinction, 
may be elected honorary members. 
They shall not, however, be required 
to contribute to the funds, nor shall 
they be eligible to hold office or to 
vote. 

Life Members 

Sec. 4. AH past i)residents shall 
be life members and shall enjoy all 
privileges of active members. 

American Congress of 
Photography 
Sec. 5. Each State Association 



10 



STUDIO LIGHT atid 



within the boundaries of America 
shall at the time at which its officers 
are chosen select one representative 
for each 50 or less of its members, 
who shall serve until the dissolution 
of each particular Congress, and one 
alternate, who shall serve in the ab- 
sence of the regular delegate. The 
President of the P. A. of A., shall 
upon notification of the selection of 
the delegates and alternates by the 
President of the State Association, 
forward the necessary credentials at 
least six days prior to the annual 
meeting. 

ARTICLE IV 
Dies 

Sec. 1. Active members — Initia- 
tion fee, 83.00; dues, 82. 00. 

Sec. 2. Associate members — No 
initiation fee; dues S'2.00. 

Sec. 3. Honorary members — No 
initiation fee ; no dues. 

Sec. 4. Life members — No initia- 
tion fee; no dues. 

Sec. 5. A yearly per capita tax 
of '25 cents from State members 
shall be paid into the National 
Treasury in lieu of initiation fee. 

Sec. 6. The annual dues shall be 
paid on January 1st of each year. 
A member being in arrears for two 
years' dues shall be notified by the 
Treasurer and on failure to pay 
such indebtedness before the next 
annual meeting his name shall be 
dropped. 

Sec. 7. The 25 cents per capita 
tax of State Associations shall be 
paid into the Treasury of the Na- 
tional on or before the first day of 
the annual Executive Board meeting. 

Sec. 8. Members of the Congress 
shall pay to the Treasurer their an- 
nual dues of 82.00, as an individual 
member of the P. A. of A. 

ARTICLE V 
The American' Congress of 
Photography 
Sec. 1 The American Congress of 



Photography shall constitute a de- 
liberative body to discuss all mat- 
ters suggested by the President of 
the P. A. of A., and other matters 
for the good of the profession. 

Sec. 2. All matters passed upon 
by the American Congress of Pho- 
tography shall be submitted to the 
Executive Board for final approval. 
Such matters as are rejected by the 
Executive Board may be submitted 
to an open meeting of the Conven- 
tion. 

ARTICLE VI 
Standing Committees 

Sec. 1. Auditing Committee 
which shall consist of members of 
the Executive Board. 

Nominating Committee, ap- 
pointed by the President. 

Committee on Resolutions, ap- 
pointed by the President. 

Committee f)n Progress of Photog- 
raphy, appointed by the President. 

ARTICLE VII 
DiTiES OF Officers 

Sec. 1. The President shall pre- 
side at all meetings of the Executive 
Board and the annual meeting of 
the Association. 

Sec. 2. In the absence or inability 
of the President to preside the 1st 
Vice President shall assum.e the 
duties of the office. 

Sec. 3. The 1st Vice President 
shall have charge of the exhibit of 
photographs at the annual conven- 
tion, and such other duties as may 
be required of him by the Executive 
Board. 

Sec. 4. The duties of the 2nd 
Vice President shall be determined 
by the Board. 

Sec. 5. The duties of the Secre- 
tary shall be to keep a fair and 
correct minutes of the proceedings 
of the meetings and carefully pre- 
serve on file for five years essays 
and pajiers received by the Associa- 
tion, and he shall receive 5 per cent, 
of the gross receipts during his terra 



^ 



the ARISTO EAGLE 



11 



of office as full compensation for his 
services. Any moneys collected by 
the Secretary shall be immediately 
turned over to the Treasurer, taking 
his receipt for the same. He shall 
make an accurate detailed re])ort of 
the business of his office in time to 
be audited at the regular meeting of 
the Executive Committee. 

Sec. 6. The Treasurer shall pay 
no moneys unless by order of the 
President and the Secretary. He 
shall present a statement of his ac- 
counts at each regular meeting of 
the Executive Committee. He shall 
receive 5 per cent, of the gross re- 
ceipts during his term of office as 
full compensation for his services. 
In the absence of the Treasurer, he 
shall appoint a deputy, with power 
of attorney, to fulfill his duties. The 
Treasurer shall be required to give 
an indemnity bond, equal to the 
amount of cash on hand on the 1st 
day of January of each year; said 
bond to be purchased by the Associa- 
tion. 

Sec. 7. The meetings of the Con- 
gress shall be called to order by the 
President of the P. A. of A., who 
shall act as temporary Chairman, 
until such time as this body shall 
elect its own officers, which shall 
constitute the first c>rder of business. 
These officers shall be a Chairman, 
a Vice Chairman and a Secretary. 

DUTIES OF OFFICERS 

American Conokkss of 
Photoguaphy 

Sec. 8. The Chairman of the 
American Congress of Photography 
shall preside at all sessions of the 
Congress. 

The duties of the Vice Chairman 
shall be to preside in the absence of 
the Chairman. 

The duties of the Secretary shall 
be to keep a correct record of the 
meetings and report all matters to 
the Executive Board of the P. A. of 
A., as directed by the Congress. 



BY-LAWS 



ARTICLE I 

Mkktixos 

Sec. 1. The annual meetings shall 
be held at suc-h })lac'e as may be de- 
termined ujion by the Association. 

Sec. 2. Special meetings of the 
Association may be called by the 
President with the advice and con- 
sent of the Executive Committee, 
whenever deemed expedient. 

ARTICLE II 

QlOlllIM 

Twenty-five members shall consti- 
tute a quorimi for the transaction of 
business of the Association. 

ARTICLE III 
Ordeii oi' BrsiNEss 

Sec. 1. Calling of the meeting to 
order. 

Sec. 2. Calling the roll of mem- 
bers. 

Sec. 3. Reading the minutes of 
last meeting. 

Sec. 4. Reports of Special and 
Standing Committees, which shall 
be read by their titles in full. 

Sec. 5. Selection of location for 
next Convention shall be determined 
by ballot. The city or town receiv- 
ing the highest mnuber of votes 
shall be declared to be the choice of 
the Convention. 

Sec. 6. A Committee to nominate 
officers for the ensuing year shall be 
appc^inted to report at the next ses- 
sion. 

Sec. 7. The election of officers 
shall be held at the morning session 
on the day preceding the last day 
of the regular convention. 

Sec. 8. The first session shall 
close with the reading of the Presi- 
dent's report and referring to appro- 
priate committees any portion 
requiring the action of such com- 
mittees. 



12 



STUDIO LIGHT and 



Sec. 9. After the first session, the 
order of business shall be determined 
by the nature of the subject pre- 
sented and by the will of the major- 
ity. 

Sec. 10. All questions, except the 
election or expulsion of members, 
and the election of officers, may be 
determined by yeas and nays or by 
a division if necessary. 

Sec. 11. Any motion duly made 
and seconded shall be proposed by 
the President and shall then only be 
debatable. 

Sec. l-^. A motion made and sec- 
onded shall be open to discussion 
and while it is before the associa- 
tion, no motion shall be received 
unless to amend, divide, commit, to 
lay on the table, postpone or 
adjourn, and a motit^n to adjourn 
shall be decided without debate. 

Sec. 13. Any member who may 
desire to speak, on any motion or 
resolution shall, standing, address 
the President, and shall confine his 
remarks to the question at issue, 
avoid any offensive or personal re- 
marks and shall not speak more 
than once and then not more than 
five minutes upon the same subject, 
unless by permission of the Presi- 
dent. 

Sec. 14. No member shall be in- 
terru])ted while speaking imless by 
a person rising to a point of order 
decided by the President. 

ARTICLE IV 

Election' of Oificers 

Sec. 1. The election of officers 
shall be conducted by an officially 
prepared ballot. 

Sec. 2. All persons elected officers 
shall signify their acceptance or re- 
jection before adjournment. 

Sec. 3. The members of the Ex- 
ecutive Board shall be entitled to 
their expenses for attending all an- 
nual meetings of the Association 
and such other meetings as may be 
deemed necessary by the President. 



ARTICLE V 

Change of Constitition 
Sec. 1. The Constitution may be 
altered or amended by a three- 
fourths vote of all members present 
at any regular meeting, and notice 
to alter or amend same shall be 
given at least one session before 
action thereon can be taken. In 
questions as to parliamentary usages, 
Cushing's Manual shall prevail. 
(Signed) C. L. Lewis, 

Chairman, 
L. F. Haji.^ikr, Jr., 
B. Frank Piffer, 
. C. M. Hayes, 
J. Frank Johnson. 

The Avomen of the National 
Association met Friday morning 
and sections formed. The officers 
elected were : 

Mary Carnell, Philadelphia, pres- 
ident ; M. Estelle Jenkins, Chicago, 
secretary. 

Mrs. Gertrude Kasebier, New 
York, was apj)ointed chairman of 
the eastern territory; Miss Kather- 
ine Jamieson, Pittsburg, of the 
Middle West, and Miss Eola White, 
of all territory west of the Missis- 
sippi. They were empowered to 
select their own committees. 

The final business session of 
the convention was held in the 
school room at Convention Hall, 
Saturday, 10 a. m. 

The Committee on Resolutions 
reported, and the report was 
made the medium of conveying 
the thanks of the association to 
the citizens of Rochester, the 
Hotel Seneca management, the 
Chamber of Commerce, the mer- 
chants of the city, the Bausch & 
Lomb Optical Com pa 113', the 
Eastman Kodak Comi)any, the 
instructors in the school of pho- 



the ARISTO EAGLE 



13 



tography, the pi-ess of Rochester, 

the retiring president and the 
board of otHcers. The report was 
presented by Charles W. Hearn, 
of Boston. 

A special resolution thanked 
President Barrows for his capa- 
ble and efficient administration 
and the Rochester photographers 
who arranged for the conven- 
tion. In moving the adoption 
of the resolutions, Morris Burke 
Parkinson, of Boston, paid a 
tril)ute to George Eastman and 
spoke especially of the cordiality 
and hospitality which he had 
shown to the association. 

At the conclusion of the busi- 
ness session the prizes for the 
most practical device in photo- 
graphic accessories brought out 
within the last year Avere awarded. 
The decision was made by popu- 
lar vote, each delegate being al- 
lowed to cast a ballot. PrcA ious 
to the taking of the vote the con- 
testants, of whom there were 
twenty-seven, were given three 
minutes each in which to explain 
their inventions. 

The first prize was $100 in 
cash and was won by J. A. Meis- 
ser, of Eureka, C'al., on a mirror 
device which enaliles the oper- 
ating jihotographer to focus the 
camera, with the plate in position, 
thus allowing the operator to see 
the subject up to the moment 
the exposure is made. 

The second prize, a photo- 
graphic library valued at $75, 
was won by O. C. Courtright, 



of Fort Madison, La. The in- 
vention is a device for facilitating 
printing from negatives and can 
be used with ecpial facilitj^ in 
artificial light and daylight. 



THE FIRST CONGRESS 
OF PHOTOGRAPHY 

The idea of organizing a Con- 
gress of Photograi)hy originated 
with Frank R. Barrows, presi- 
dent of the P. A. of A., its ob- 
ject being to foster the organi- 
zation of state and local associa- 
tions of the profession, and to 
have such societies affiliate with 
the national association. With 
such affiliation Mr. Barrows and 
his supporters are confident that 
the Congress will be of lasting 
benefit to the profession. 

We understand that the Con- 
gress is to meet and consider all 
problems concerning the welfare 
of the profession, and to submit 
the result of their deliberations 
to the National organization in 
convention assembled for adop- 
tion or rejection. 

The delegates to this first 
Congress were summoned on the 
personal invitation of President 
Barrows, as the Congress at such 
time was not actually in exist- 
ence. 

The names of the delegates 
are as follows : 

Pennsylvania— Ryland W. Phil- 
lips, Philadelphia; Prank Horn- 
baker, Scranton; E. E. Seavy, New 
Castle. 



14 



STUDIO LIGHT and 



Ohio— C. L. Lewis, Toledo; W. 
L. Smith, St. Mary's; J. L. Walker, 
Bowling Green. 

New York — B. Frank Puffer, 
New York; B. Boyce, Trov; Harry 

A. Bliss, Buffalo. 

Illinois - E. C. Pratt, Aurora; H. 

B. Medlar, Woodstock; Victor 
Georg, Springfield. 

Michigan — E. E. Doty, Belding; 
E. S. Tray, Jackson; J. F. Rent- 
schler, Ann Arbor. 

Iowa — H. E. Voiland, Sioux City; 
H. O. Baldwin, Fort Dodge; Chas. 
Townsend, Des Moines; F. A. Tree, 
Davenport. 

Canada — Frank Jackson, Barrie, 
Ont. ; Fred L. Roy, Peterboro, 
Ont. ; Charles L. Rosev^ear, Toronto, 
Ont. 

Nebraska — J. Leschinsky, Grand 
Island; A. C. Townsend, Lincoln; 
R. C. Nelson, Hastings. 

Missouri — Fred Hammer, St. 
Louis; L. J. Studebaker, Kansas 
City; F. W. Crow, Marysville; Miss 
Belle Johnson, Monroe City; Alfred 
Larsen, Mexico. 

New England — A. W. Webster, 
Boston, Mass.; W. F. Oliver, Bald- 
winsville, Mass. ; W. H. Partridge, 
Boston, Mass.; J. H. Garo, Boston, 
Mass. 

Indiana — George J. Parrot, Fort 
Wayne; Benjamin Larrimer, Clar- 
ion ; Felix Schanz, Fort Wayne. 

Wisconsin — Ebenezer H. Har- 
wood, Appleton; W. A. Ross, J. M. 
Bandtel, Milwaid^ee; W. A. Pryor, 
La Crosse. 

Virginia and the Carolinas — 
Manly W. Tyree, Raleigh, N. C, 
and associates. 

Kansas — Max Wolf, ^Manhattan; 
H. W. Rudolph, J. J. Peunell. 

Northwestern Association — Louis 
Dworshak, Duluth, Minn., and as- 
sociates. 

The past presidents of the Pho- 
graphers' Association of America. 

President Barrows as Tempo- 



vary ChaiiTnan called the meet- 
ing to order in Chamber of Com- 
merce Hall at 3 p. M., July 19, 
1909, and on motion he was 
made Permanent Chainnan, and 
(ieorge W. Harris Secretarj' of 
the Congress. On opening the 
session Mr. Barrows addressed 
the delegates as follows: 

In calling this meeting to order I 
feel that it is one of the most impor- 
tant moves in photography that has 
been proposed for some years. We 
are here for the purpose of seeing 
if it is not possible to formulate a 
plan of action wherebj' the Ameri- 
can photographers can assemble and 
transact business, which shall cover 
the United States, and work out an 
united plan that will eventually 
prove of great vahie to us as mem- 
bers- This plan has received con- 
siderable consideration from my 
hands. I have corresponded at 
length with various members of the 
association in all parts of the coun- 
try, and to all the men, without ex- 
ception, the plan seems to meet with 
favor. It is understood, when we 
come together to discuss ideas, you 
all have ideas of your own, and pos- 
sibly some hobbies to ride. It would 
be my wish, as you deliberate on 
the matters that may come before 
you, that if possible you eliminate 
all red tape, in order that we may 
get accurately and positively to the 
gist of the matter and formulate a 
plan that shall be devoid of all tech- 
nicalities. What I wish to do at this 
meeting is merely to perfect an or- 
ganization, and pass it up to our 
parent body to see if it is accept- 
able to them. I wish you to under- 
stand that I have called you to- 
gether for this meeting, not as one 
with authority; you are invited 
guests of mine, the same as though 
I were inviting you into my own 
home. We are here to discuss a 



^ 



the ARISTO EAGLE 



15 



plan and to take action. If this 
meeting had been called of the au- 
thority or were considered in the 
light of legislative power, it would 
fall at once, but we have avoidetl all 
that in calling you together in this 
social manner, that whatever ac-tion 
we shall take will be binding on no 
one; we will just express our ideas 
and carry them up to the National 
Association, that our association 
then as a body may act with author- 
ity. It is not understood in calling 
you together that we are to mar or 
disturb the present relation that 
now exists in any of the state socie- 
ties. It is a known fact that our 
national government controls our 
states; all states have their own 
laws but they are governed above 
by the National. The states have 
to respect supreme court laws. So 
it is with this organization. If we 
shall formulate any plans, the plan 
shall be subject to the National 
body, and in nowise conflict with 
that of present state organizations. 
If then the state organizations de- 
sire to join us in the movement, then 
it is for them, as a delegate body, 
through the National to officially 
make the laws and plans that shall 
govern the association. It is with 
pleasure that I note the number of 
you who are already here this after- 
noon out of the number that have 
been called together. It is known 
that two delegations are on their 
way here in addition to the number 
of delegates that are here now as 
representatives to this body, and so 
in our preliminary action to-day I 
feel that we can go no further than 
to simply call our meeting together, 
elect a permanent chairman, call 
our roll, and get our members solid- 
ified; appoint a committee on con- 
stitution and by-laws and report to- 
morrow, and that is about as far as 
we can go to-day. Then to-morrow 
we shall have material to work 
upon, when we shall discuss this 



matter and bring it before the P. A. 
of A. If any of you have remarks 
to make on this subject, we will be 
very glad to listen to you, then we 
will immediately proceed to elec- 
tion of a permanent chairman of 
this organization. 

I am sure that the results of this 
are going to be forwarded until we 
shall number three-fourths of the 
photographers of the United States 
under one head. It is unfortunate 
that with a national body we are 
obliged to go to some manufacturer 
or dealer to secure a list of names 
whereby we may reach the photog- 
raphers of the United States. If we 
have a body of this kind where the 
secretaries of state associations and 
secretary of the National Associa- 
tion co-operate, we will in our own 
manner and way be able to reach 
every photograj)her in the United 
States and have a perfect list. We 
can ask the states to do their part in 
carrying on the work that now de- 
volves upon five men. If each state 
would do its part, it would ease our 
work in the National Association 
and we can increase our member- 
ship, finance and brotherhood and 
the good of the cause. I do not be- 
lieve there is a man here but who 
realizes what may be accomplished 
if we will become a united body of 
photographers throughout the 
United States. I do not think that 
prejudice or the opinion of one set 
of men, or one man should rule. I 
believe we should come together 
and avoid these little peculiar 
notions that we may have of our 
own, and come to some plan of 
action, and keep it just as simple as 
we possibly can until we get organ- 
ized. If then we have failures, 
they can be adjusted after once we 
are under a working body. 

With these suggestions I believe I 
have made it fairly clear to you what 
may be accomplished, and shall be 
glad to receive now the names of 



16 



STUDIO LIGHT and 



one whom you would like to have as 
your permanent chairman. 

The first business of the Con- 
gress was to consider a revision 
of the constitution and by-laws 
of the P. A. of A. 

The chair named the follow- 
ing committee to act and rejjort 
to the Congress and to the 
National Association : 

C. L. Lewis, Clarence M. 
Hayes, H. A. Bliss, L. F. Ham- 
mer, J. F. Jackson. 

The action and proceedings of 
this committee is given above in 
the account of the regular meet- 
ings of the association. 

It is exi)ected that among the 
first questions that will be taken 
up by the congress at its deliber- 
ations in Milwaukee, a year 
hence, will be the establishment 
of a uniform scale of weights and 
measures as applied to photog- 
raphers' chemical supjilies and 
the matter of copyright and at- 
tempt to limit the present prac- 
tically unrestricted use of photo- 
grajihic pictures by the press. 

From brief speeches by seve- 
ral of the officials, it was im- 
pressed on the delegates, that 
in view of the new federation it 
was extremely desirable to 
undertake the formation of asso- 
ciations in all states which are as 
yet unorganized. 



EASTMAN SCHOOL of 
Professional Photography, 
Winnipeg, INIan., Sept. 8, 9, 10. 
Allspices Duffin & Co. 



THE PHOTOGRAPH- 
ERS' ASSOCIATION 
OF CANADA 

The Photograjjhic Association 
of Canada, at its meeting at the 
Chamber of Commerce, got 
through much business. The 
L nion Jack and the Stars and 
Strijies hung side by side over 
the platform. 

President J. Frank Jackson of 
Barrie was in the chair. There 
was an illustrated address on 
"The Importance of the Back- 
ground in Portrait Photography" 
by G. Hanmer Croughton of this 
city. 

The feature of the business 
session Avas the re-election of the 
officers who have served for the 
year past, as follows : 

President, J. Frank Jackson, Bar- 
rie; first vice-president, T. J. 
Leatherdale, Toronto; second vice- 
president, Walter Dickson, Toronto; 
third vice-president, C. A. Lee, 
Listowel; treasurer, A. A. Gray, 
Toronto ; secretary, Fred L. Roy, 
Peterborough. 

A resolution thanking all who 
have helped to make the Roch- 
ester meeting a success was 
adopted. It was mo\ ed that the 
next convention lie held in Mon- 
treal, which indicated a joining 
of forces by the photographers 
of Canada. The matter of the 
time and place, hrnvever, was left 
in the hands of the pi-esident. 



«9 



the ARISTO EAGLE 



17 



K 



ODAK PARK INSPEC- 
TION REVELATION 
TO VISITORS. 

SAW WONDERS OF PHOTOG- 
RAPHIC MANUFACTURE ON A 
SCALE THAT WAS BEYOND 
PRIOR CONCEPTION 

Every man — every woman — who 
ever took a picture, whether a pro- 
fessional or an amateur, had heard 
of Kodak Park. Only a few of the 
several thousand photographers who 
visited the park yesterday after- 
noon had any real appreciation of 
the magnitude of the great industrial 
enterprise that has made Rochester 
famous on five continents and in all 
the isles of the sea. Figures and 
statistics some of them had seen, but 
the actual sight of the park itself, 
the personal inspection of the miles 
of buildings, the gigantic scale on 
which the plant is operated, were as 
much a revelation to the visitors as 
if they had never heard the name of 
the place. 

Fifty chartered cars ran at noon 
from the Bausch & Lomb factory in 
St. Paul Street to Kodak Park, on 
the Boulevard, and before 1 o'clock 
most of the photographers, their 
wives and friends were on the spa- 
cious grovmds of the Eastman Com- 
pany. Huge tents had been pitched 
on the lawn in front of the main 
entrance, and these served as dining 
rooms for the crowd. Another big 
tent in the rear was for cooking and 
serving. In another extemporized 
pavilion a band of forty pieces dis- 
coursed music for several hours. A 
canvas wall higher than a man's 
head screened the entire front of the 
plant for several hundred feet, and 
a single entrance into the roadway, 
leading to the building, was through 
a canvas tunnel, similar to that 
erected in front of residences at a 
wedding or other social function. 

JIR. EASTMAN RECEIVED 

George Eastman, president of the 



company, mingled with his guests in 
a most democratic fashion. There 
was no semblance of a formal recep- 
tion, but everbody wanted to shake 
hands with Mr. Eastman, and he 
was the center of animated groups 
during the afternoon. Henry A. 
Strong, Albert O. Fenn, Alexander 
]\I. Lindsay, and other prominent 
directors of the Eastman Company 
were on the grounds, as were a score 
of the managers of departments and 
chiefs of bureaus of the Eastman 
staff. Dozens of prominent business 
men, more or less closely affiliated 
with the Eastman enterprises, were 
guests of the company, as well as 
about 2()()() photographers, their 
wives and families. 

A WALK OF OVER TWO MILES 

An elaborate luncheon was served 
for an hour, until the midtitude had 
been fed. The long procession then 
started, marching in couples, and 
the inspection of the great plant 
began. Every detail had been ar- 
ranged. The path led from one 
buiiding to the other, upstairs and 
do\\ nstairs, even through semi-dark- 
ened rooms — the line of march was 
said to have been two and a quarter 
miles long — and thirty of the forty- 
six buildings at the park were vis- 
ited. At each turn, arrows pointed 
the way, and at least a hundred em- 
ployes of the factory stood along 
the lines at intervals of a few feet to 
keep watch of the crowds and see 
that everything ran smoothly and to 
explain tlie points of interest to each 
group as it wound slowly in and out 
of the buildings. It was almost like 
a labyrinth ; after the journey was 
started, there seemed no way to 
turn back. The lines wound in and 
out of the buildings, everyone eager 
to see things, and soon the astonish- 
ment at the magnitude of the plant 
was echoed on all sides. After 
walking for an hour — it seemed a 
day — one enthusiastic photographer 
from Iowa was heard to remark to 



STUDIO LIGHT and 




FROM NEGATIVE MADE AT CONVENTION SCHOOL 
By F. M. Soiners 



m^ 



the ARISTO EAGLE 



19 




FROM NKGATIVE MAUK AT CONVENTION SCHOOL 
By A. F. Bradley 



20 



STUDIO LIGHT and 



his wife : "Are we still in New York 
State?" 

A I.IliEHAL EDICATION 

The inspection plans were sn care- 
fully arranged that any intelligent 
man — and most of them were pho- 
tographers deeply interested in pho- 
tographic matters — could not fail to 
gain more of an idea of the process 
of making photographic paper, 
moving picture films and the 
dozens of other products manufac- 
tured at the plant than he ever be- 
fore had in all his life. It was a 
liberal education for the photog- 
raphic fraternity. ISIany of them 
said the visit to the Eastman fac- 
tory was well worth c-oming to Koch- 
ester to see, even if there had been 
no convention here. 

This extract from the souvenir 
book which was distributed to all 
the visitors conveys some idea of the 
impression that was gained by the 
visitors : 

THINKING IN BIG FIGIRES 

"We are accustomed in this coun- 
try to stupendous figures, and when 
they are applied to the output of 
a steel mill or the tonnage of a rail- 
road, we think not so much of it, 
because the products themselves are 
large. But a moving picture nega- 
tive is such a tiny thing, a post card 
is so small, an b x 10 plate is so in- 
significant as compared with a steel 
rail, and a camera is so unpreten- 
tious alongside of a locomotive or an 
automobile, that we do not look 
for mechanically big things in a 
photographic factory. In photog- 
raphy we think in grains and oimces 
and square inches — yet so great is 
the consumption of the various pro- 
ducts that to complete the Eastman 
works we must think in acres and 
tons. In Kodak I'ark, 23 acres 
of floor space is given up to the 
manufacture of sensitized photog- 
raphic goods; the new plate building 
now under construction will bring 



the total up to more than 28 acres, 
while our other Rochester factories 
with combined floor space devoted 
exclusively to the photographic busi- 
ness, brings the total up to 37 acres 
in Rochester alone— and there is 
still more under construction. 

SOME EASTMAN STATISTICS 

"There are nearly 4, 000 Rochester 
employes, and the capacity of our 
boilers is 6,700 horse power. The 
refrigerating machines at Kodak 
Park have a cooling power ecjual to 
the melting of 1,9-20 tons of ice daily. 
The works there are operated by 743 
motors, varying in power from y^ 
to 75 horse power, and these, with 
7000 incandescent lights, are fur- 
nished current by five engine-driven 
electric generators, with a capacity 
1,S()0 kilowatts or 3,000 horse 
power. In the Kodak Park grounds, 
consisting of 43 acres, are two and a 
third miles of water mains, one and 
a third miles of brick pavement and 
three-quarters of a mile of railroad 
trackage." 

THE BIG BOILER ROOM 

As the visitors walked along and 
saw the marvels of mechanical gen- 
ius, the magnitude of the enterjirise 
appeared almost to daze them. First 
was the boiler room, the seat of 
energy of the Eastman plant. Here 
were 16 huge boilers, with a capa- 
city of 6000 horse power. Above the 
boilers were the coal bunkers, hav- 
ing a capacity of 3,200 tons, from 
which the coal drops through chutes 
to mechanical stokers. Eighty tons 
of coal is burned daily, the waste 
gases passing off through fuel econo- 
mizers. There is no smoke nuisance 
at Kodak Park ; smoke means waste, 
and economy of product is too 
closely watched to permit waste on 
such a scale as would follow imper- 
fect coal combustion. 

Next came the refrigerating room, 
with its ten big machines, control- 
ling the temperature of every build- 



mjf' 



the ARISTO EAGLE 



21 



ing at the park, providing as stated, 
the equivalent of 1,9-iO tons of 
melted ice daily. 

A COMPAIIISOX ly EXr.rVES 

The dynamo room, which came 
next, looked like the biggest ma- 
chine shop any of them had ever 
seen. There is practically no shaft- 
ing at Kodak Park. The machinery 
is driven by 743 motors, and the 
power is generated by five of the 
largest engine-driven dynamos that 
were ever made, lighting the entire 
plant and furnishing power to thou- 
sands of machines. By the side of 
the steam-driven electric giants 
which furnish light and power at the 
park, there was seen, as an inter- 
esting exhibit, the little 3,5-horse 
power Buckeye engine which twen- 
ty years ago furnished all the power 
needed for the entire Eastman plant 
of that day. It is enjoying a well 
earned rest after its years of service, 
and is kept in the model engine 
room as one of the exhibits, show- 
ing the increase of the plant in the 
past two decades. 

BIG AXD LITTLE "doPe" BARRELS 

The "dope" building was the cen- 
ter of interest to the expert photog- 
raphers. Beneath the floor were 
the great barrels, holding 200,000 
pounds of the syrup-like mixture 
from which the film base is made. 
Technically this is known as cellu- 
lose nitrate for the ordinary film, 
and cellulose acetate for the new 
non-inflammable film now used for 
moving pictures. In the Eastman 
vernacular, the film base in this semi- 
liquid state is called "dope." 

There is another interesting ex- 
hibit in this do])e cellar. It is a 
small barrel which tells the story of 
the volume of the film business in 
18 9 1; it has a capacity of 500 
pounds. The present barrels hold 
4,000 pounds each and fifty of them 
are filled and refilled night and day. 
The managers seem quite proud of 



these old-time exhibits, as they show 
more conclusively than any figures 
that could be given, the rapidgrowth 
of the volume of business of the 
plant. 

A 20-TOX LIFTING CRAXE 

One of the most impressive sights 
at the park is the operation of the 
overhead traveling cranes. In the 
roll-coating building is one of these 
cranes with a 4,5-foot span and a ca- 
pacity of 20 tons, three electric mo- 
tors, all under the control of one 
operator, giving the different mo- 
tions. In addition are two smaller 
cranes, each of five tons capacity. 
The cranes are used in moving the 
tanks of "dope" to and from the 
mixers. 

The acid plant can hardly be called 
one of the show places at the park, 
but in its bearing on the quality of 
the products, it is immensely im- 
portant, and the visitors who were 
professional scanned the sections of 
the acid rooms with special interest. 
The sulphur burning furnaces mark 
the first step in the manufacture of 
sensitized silver products — the mak- 
ing of sulphuric acid, which in com- 
bination with nitre, makes the nitric 
ac-id with which the silver bullion is 
nitrated for photographic purposes. 

SILVER BiLLIOX IX' PILES 

A couple of stalwart employes 
stood guard over the piles of silver 
bricks. The Eastman company is 
the largest consumer of silver bul- 
lion in the world, outside the United 
States mint, the consumption of 
pure bullion amounting to about a 
ton a week. The visitors looked at 
the stack of silver bricks and some 
of them touched the piles as they 
walked by. Each brick is worth 
approximately S2o0. 

As a sample of the thoroughness 
of the equipment and the care that 
is taken in manufacturing the film, 
the company, in order to obtain per- 
fect salts and perfect chemicals. 



22 



STUDIO LIGHT a7id 





"1 


m 

T 


t 

9 




f 



Showing the arrangement of C. L. Venards First Prize Winning Exhibit on Collodio-Carbon 
at the 1909 lUinois State Convention. 



the ARISTO EAGLE 



23 




Sliowing the arrangement of another of C. L. Venard's First Prize Winning 
Exhibits on Cullodio-Carbon at the 1909 Ilhnois State Convention. 



24 



STUDIO LIGHT and 



makes them. Nitric acid is used in 
connection with silver bullion to 
make silver nitrate. The company 
makes its own nitric acid. It 
makes its own sulphuric acid, from 
which, in combination with nitre, 
the nitric acid is made. This acid 
plant made necessary the enormous 
stack, 3ti() feet in height, the high- 
est in America, in order to carry off 
the deadly poisonous gasses. Ni- 
tric acid is not only used in nitrat- 
ing the silver, but it is consumed in 
enormous quantities for cutting the 
raw cotton, which forms the base of 
transparent films. 

PAPKR ROLLS ACROSS CONTINENT 

Paper storage is another impor- 
tant item in the business. In the 
immense storage room was stacked 
up 11,800 huge rolls of paper — pa- 
per enough, 41 inches wide, to reach 
from New York to San Francisco. 

In line with the manufacture of 
incidental produc-ts for use in the fac- 
tory is the big department for the 
making of paper boxes. The box 
factory has a capacity of 25,000 pa- 
per boxes a day. In addition, there 
are made millions of envelopes for 
papers and millions of cartons for 
films. The box making, which is 
done mainly by girls, was one of 
the most interesting features of the 
inspection. 

At one end of the park is a rail- 
road warehouse on a spur of the 
New York Central that is large 
enough for a town of several thou- 
sand inhabitants. This is used 
mostly for incoming freight, the out- 
going product being shipped from 
the State street building, with the 
exception of the glass plates in car- 
load lots. 

THE CONSTRTCTION DEPARTJIENT 

There is a special construction de- 
partment, with a large and fully 
equipped drafting room, where 
plans for special buildings and ma- 
chinery are made by experts who 



know the peculiar requirements of 
the business. Much of the manu- 
facturing is done in dark rooms, 
where ventilation becomes a mat- 
ter of prime importance. In the 
roll-coating building, for instance, 
are two ventilating fans, each 160 
inches in diameter, giving a com- 
plete change of air every seven min- 
utes. Heating, cooling and ventila- 
tion in a plant of this size and with 
such special requirements become so 
important a factor that the construc- 
tion department experts spend much 
of the time in solving the various 
problems of this nature that are pre- 
sented and designing the special 
equi]>ment required. 

Another building that attracted 
general interest contained the lunch 
and rest rooms for the employes. 
There are two large dining rooms, 
one for the men and one for the wo- 
men, where meals are served at cost 
and where nourishing food can be 
obtained without the loss of time 
that would be required to go out- 
side for the noon lunch. 

2,000 PAID OFF IN TEN MINUTES 

The last building visited was the 
department where apjilications for 
work are received, where the time 
clocks are located, showing the ex- 
act minute when each of the 2,000 
park employes comes to work and 
leaves for the night. Here is the 
cashier's desk where 2,000 emploj-es 
are paid off in ten minutes time 
each week. 

At the northern end of the park 
the new plate building which is in 
proc-ess of construction was viewed 
with much interest. This building 
will be, when completed, the largest 
single building in the world devoted 
to the manufacture of photographic 
products. It is 357 by 8IW feet and 
will add 229,000 square feet or five 
and a quarter acres to the present 
floor space at the park. It will have 
a coating capacity of nearly an acre 
and a quarter of glass per day. It 



the ARISTO EAGLE 



25 



is of reinforced concrete faced with 
brick and in size so far surjiasses any 
of the other park buiklings as to 
make them seem small in compari- 
son. 

A FULL DAY OF INSTRUCTION 

The inspection continued for two 
or three hours and the chartered cars 
began to bring the visitors back to 
the city at 4 o'clock. For an hour 
the cars ran on short schedule until 
all had been brought back to the 
center of the city. Most of the del- 
egates had started out at 9 o'clock 
to the Bausch & Lomb factory, 
transferring to the Kodak plant at 
noon by chartered cars without in- 
termission and had continued at the 
park all the afternoon. It is safe to 
say that between the hours of 9 
o'clock in the morning and 5 o'cloc-k 
in the afternoon, they learned more 
about the magnitude of the photo- 
graphic industry of Rochester than 
they had conceived could possibly 
have existed in a single city in the 
world. They were all willing to ad- 
mit Rochester's claim to the title 
of the photographic center of the 
universe when they got through 
with the dual inspection yesterday. 
— Rochester Herald, July 2-J , 1909. 



A 



RESUME 



S-U-C-C-E-S-S, best tells 
the story of the Rochester Con- 
vention. In point of members, 
of practical good accom])lished, 
instruction, entertainment, and 
alwve all, in the spirit of har- 
mony and good fellowship the 
twenty-ninth annual convention 
will go down to history as the 
most successful convention of 
them all. 



From the week's program 
outlined, there was every reason 
to look for an unusual conven- 
tion ; from the fact that the 
convention was to be held in the 
l)hotographic center of the world, 
a large attendance was assured, 
and due to the fact that every 
part of the program was carried 
out with enthusiasin and to the 
minute, the Rochester convien- 
tion will live long in the mem- 
ory of those in attendance. 

Thirteen hundred and sixty- 
five men registered, and more 
than four hundred ladies, which 
made it by far the largest num- 
ber ever in attendance at a P. A. 
of A. convention. In Detroit 
last year seven hundred and 
seventj-five were in attendance, 
so undoubtedly this convention 
has touched high water mark for 
some tiiue to come. 

The School idea so success- 
fully introduced at the Detroit 
Convention, was splendidly car- 
ried out under the able leader- 
ship of Ryland W. Phillips of 
Philadelphia, with the co-ojiera- 
tion of such past masters as A. F. 
Bradley, F. Milton Somers, Cier- 
trude Kasebier, E. B. Core, 
Frank Scott Clark and W. H. 
Towles. 

A splendid operating light 
was constructed in the school 
room at Convention Hall and 
every session crowded the capac- 
ity of the large room, in fact, at 
some sessions many men were 
unable to secure seats and re- 



26 



STUDIO LIGHT and 



mained standing throughout the 
demonstration, so eager av ere 
the}' not to miss any part of the 
instruction . 



the splendidly arranged and 
lighted galleries were crowded 
almost every moment Conven- 
tion Hall was open : 




Father Rocliestcr slicked up for the occasion - From Rochester Herald 



And the comjilimentary pic- 
ture display — just glance over 
the following list of exhibitors 
and it will be easy to see why 



LIST OF EXHIBITORS 

1 O. C. Courtrlght. Ft. Mad., la., 4. 

2 F. W. Tvler. New York, N. Y., 3. 

3 Alice Boughton, New York, 4. 

4 C. R. Reeves, Anderson, Ind. 



mji^ 



the ARISTO EAGLE 




28 



STUDIO LIGHT and 



5 G. E. Tingley, Mystic, Conn., 4. 

6 H. O. Baird, Pittsburg-, Pa., 12. 
6a Miss E. K. Francis, Phil., Pa., 5. 

7 A. Newman. Trinidad, Col., 2. 

8 Carl Frey, U.ica, N. Y., 3. 

9 Park Bros., Oneida, N. Y., 6. 
10 W. F. Vanloo, Toledo, O. 
IIW. H. Rau, Phil., Pa., 6. 

12 Miss E. S. Bourke, Chicago, 4. 
1-3 Miss B. Johnson, 

Monroe City, Mo., 6. 

14 Izaak DeVos, Chicago, 111., 6. 

15 Mrs. W. Pearse, 

Waukegan, 111., 4. 
16E. W.Brown, Beaver, Pa.. 6. 
17 1. Biixbaum, New York. N.Y.. 5. 
IS A. Li. Bowersox, Cleveland. O.. 4. 

19 W. O. Breckon. AUeg., Pa., 6. 

20 Baker Art Gallery, Columbus, O. 

21 Baker Art Gallery, Col., O., 4. 

22 Ella G. Ball, Lancaster, Pa. 

23 W. Burnell, Sil. Springs, N. Y.. 4. 

24 W. N. Bullington, 

Greenville, Ala.. 4. 

25 A. M.Camp, .lamestown, N. Y.. 6. 

26 W. E. Burnell, Sil. Spgs., N. Y., 4. 

27 Cole & Miller, Dansville. Va., 6. 

28 F. S. Clark, Detroit. Mich., 6. 

29 H. M. Clogston. Marietta. O.. 5. 

30 A. W. Cooke, Auburn, N. Y.. 6. 

31 B. S. Covell. Birming'm. Ala.. 6. 

32 C. Lyons, Charleston, W. Va., 6. 

33 E. B. Core. New York. 6. 

34 P. Conklin, Troy, N. Y., 3. 

35 L. A. Dozer, Bucyrus. O., 5. 

36 E. E. Doty, Belding, Mich.. 5. 

37 I.Donaldson, Wahpeton, N. D.. 6. 

38 .1. H. C. Evanoff, Salem. Mass., 6. 

39 G. Edmondson. Cleveland, O., 6. 

40 ^V. Shewell Ellis, Phila., Pa.. 4. 

41 F. .1. Feldman. El Paso, Tex.. 4. 

42 M. VanFleet. Detroit, Mich., 4. 

43 E. Goldensky, Phila.. Pa.. 6. 

44 Homeier & Clark. Pach.. Va.. 4. 

45 C. M. Haves & Co.. Detroit. Mich. 

46 Harris &E wing, "W^ash., D.C.. 10. 

47 Miss E. Holden, Phila., Pa., 6. 

48 E. H. Hvatt, Cortland. N. Y., 4. 

49 .1. E. Hamsley, Danville, 111., 6. 

50 KnafflBros.. Knoxville. Tenn., 6. 

51 W. Koehne, Chicago, 111.. 6. 

52 L. Kellogg. Denver, Col.. 6. 

53 .1. H. Kirk. Wheeling. W. Va.. 6. 

54 M. Lorvea. Spokane, Wash.. 6. 

55 S. H. Lifshev. Brooklyn. N. Y., 6. 
56C. L.Lewis. Toledo. O.. 2. 

57 K. Moon. Grand Cany'n. Ariz.. 6. 

58 W.S. M'Caa, S. Bethleh'm. Pa.. 5. 

59 W. H. Partridge. Boston. 6. 

60 Rvland Phillips. Phila.. Pa., 6. 

61 W. E. Perrv. Allegheny. Pa. 

62 L. D. Phillips. Cincinnati. O.. 6. 

63 S. Price, Mt. Airy. Phila.. Pa.. 2. 

64 E. E. Seavy, New Castle. Pa., 4. 

65 D. D. Spellman, Detroit. Mich.. 4. 

66 .1. C. Strauss, St. Louis, Mo.. 4. 

67 F. M. Somers. Cincinnati, O.. 4. 

68 C. W. Schneide. Elyria. O. 

69 E. B. Reineke, Kansas City, 6. 



70 J.M. Reidsema, 

Kalamazoo, Mich.. 6. 

71 J. Thibault. Fall River, Mass.. 6. 

72 Towles Studio, Wash.. D. C. 6. 

73 Schedin Studio, Leadv'le. Col., 6. 

74 F. H. Shopp, Wash., N. .1., 6. 

75 E. M. Standif ord, Louis'le, Ky., 6. 

76 E. M. Stone, Hamilton, N. J. 

77 C. S. Vernard, Lincoln, Neb., 3. 

78 N. Walden, Evansville, Ind., 5. 

79 Wharton & Tvree, Raleigh, N. C. 

80 C. W. Weber, Erie, Pa., 6. 

81 J. F. Storck, Cleveland, O., 6. 

82 M. Wilson & Kellv, 

Palo Alto, Cal., 6. 

83 J. A. Dumas, Montreal, Canada. 

84 J. A. Meiser. Eureka. Cal., 5. 

85 Carl Ruegge, Milwaukee. Wis. 

86 Whitman Stu'o, Maiden. Mass.. 4. 

87 Young: & Carl, Cincinnati, O., 5. 

88 I. Benjamin, Cincinnati. O., 6. 

89 .1. E. Mock. Rochester. N. Y.. 5. 

90 Elwin R. Sanborn, New York. 

91 Mrs. A. R.^Finzel, Flint, Mich., 6. 
9la Hastings Stu'o. Hav'l, Mass., 6. 

92 3. S. Fent, Albion. N. Y., 6. 

93 .1. R. Mordvn, Franklin, Pa., 6. 

94 B. Hopkins. Denver. Col., 6. 

95 E. A. Ritenour, Uniont'n. Pa.. 6. 

96 R. M. Tebbs. Brooklvn, N. Y., 2. 

97 \V. M.Stevenson. Atlanta. Ga., 6. 

98 B. L. Meiser, Richmond, Ind., 4. 

99 C. H. Brown, Pittsburg. Pa., 2. 

100 Evan D. Evans. Erie, Pa., 5. 

101 Jane Reece, Dayton, O., 5. 

102 A. T. Proctor, Hunt'n. T^^ Va., 3. 

103 F. Johnston. Wash. D. C. 6. 

104 Mrs. Hewitt. Wash.. D. C. 2. 

105 A. W. Rice. Berkelev. Cal.. 6. 

106 M. Jeffers. Sacketts Harbor. 4. 

107 A. C. Townsend. Lincoln. Neb. 

109 M. Sunderlin. Flem'ton, N. J., 6. 

110 M. M'Garvey, Bellefonte, Pa.. 4. 

111 L. E. Allen. Rochester, N. Y., 1. 

112 G. Fisher. N. Y. C. 5. 

113 J. Brubaker. Grand Rapids., 3. 

114 Nat. Stu'io. Pawtucket. R. I., 6. 

115 C. A. Blodgett. Hicksv'le, O.. 4. 

116 S. L. Stein, Milwaukee. Wis.. 6. 

117 A. M. Thompson. Jack.. Fla., 6. 

118 J. M. Elliott. Germant'n. Pa.. 6. 

119 C. I. Schlitzer. Roches.. N. Y.. 6. 

120 W. H. Langdon. Fulton. N. Y., 6 

121 M. K. Eliason. Mitchell. S. D.. 6. 

122 E. Calhoun. Rochester. N. Y.. 5. 

123 E. Rose, Binghamton. N. Y.. 

124 L. S. White, New York. N. Y.. 6. 

125 S. Steinburg. S. Bethlehem. Pa. 

126 F. Steadman. Sea Breeze. Fla.. 6. 

127 C. W. Hearn, Boston. Mass., 4. 

128 I. E. Hori. New York. N. Y.. 6. 

129 M. Stewart. Canandai.. N. Y.. 6. 

130 F. F. Leet, Randolph. N. Y.. 6. 

131 Miss M.Morton. Linds'v, Can., 4. 

132 J. N. Lapres. Montreal, Can., 6. 

133 J. Smith. New York. N. Y.. 6. 

134 Nicholson Bros.. Indian.. Ind.. 4. 

135 W. E. Lennv. Atlanta. Ga.. 8. 

136 E. H. W. McKee. Pitts.. Pa.. 4. 

137 Y. J. Gold, Stella, Mo., 6. 



WJ' 



the ARTS TO EAGLE 



29 



138 C. A. Jarrett, Olean, N. Y., 4. 

139 C. W. Schneide, Elyria, O., 7. 

140 G. HoUoway, TerreH'te, Incl., 6. 

141 Miss J. H.Elton, Pitm'n, N. Y., 2. 

142 Hose. Biiig-hamton, N. Y., 6. 

143 Kemp's Stu'o. Scranton, Pa., 1. 

144 .1. E. Wamslev, Danv'le, Cal., 5. 

145 C. Pach, Lakewood. N. J.. 6. 

146 Perry Stu'io, AUeg-heny, Pa., 6. 

147 L. Dworshak, Duluth, Minn. 

149 Van Loo, Toledo, O., 4. 

150 Zweifel, Dayton, O., 3. 

151 E. H. Stone. Hamilton, N. Y., 5. 

152 Taylor & Carpenter. 

Ithaca, N. Y., 2. 

153 J. F. Cady, Boonville, Ind., 3. 

154 C. W. Gerald, Roches., N. Y., 6. 

155 I. W. Dickson, Ont. 

156 Bvrd Stu'o. Cambr'ge, Mass.. 5. 

157 C. A. Smith. Rochester, N. Y., 3. 

158 Giffln, Wheeling, W. Va. 

159 D. Rosser, Pittsburg, Pa., 3. 

160 J. E. liosch, St. Louis, Mo., 5. 

161 .J.Brigham, Battle C'k, Mich., 2. 

162 Falls, New York, N. Y., 3. 

163 Jamison Stu'o, Pitts., Pa.. 6. 

164 J. \V. Kellmer. Hazlet'n. Pa., 4. 

165 Van Fleet. Detroit. Mich.. 4. 

166 Van Deventer, Decatur, 111., 4. 

167 Dudley Hovt. New York, 5. 
167a Pirie M'Donald, New York. 6. 

169 Wilson & Kelly, Palo Alto, Cal. 

170 Aune, Portland, Oregon. 

171 Miss E. Jenkins, Chicago, 6. 

172 Frank Moore. Cleveland, O.. 4. 

173 Kajiwara, St. Louis, 3. 

174 Mrs. E. Satinders, Cleveland. 5. 

175 Baker Art Gal., Colum., O., 2. 

176 Chas. Lewis. Toledo, O., 2. 

177 W. S. Goddard, Lorain, O.. 2. 

178 C. B. March, Gallion, O., 2. 

179 Bowersox, Cleveland, O., 2. 

180 Van De Grift, Piqua, O., 2. 

181 Edmonson, Cleveland, O., 2. 

182 F. R. Bill, Cleveland, O., 2. 

183 Somers, Cincinnati, O., 2. 

184 Bateham. Norwalk, O., 2. 

185 Schneide, Elyria, O., 2. 

186 Porter, Youngstown, O., 2. 

187 Brenner, Cincinnati, O., 2. 
lS7a Edmonson. Cleveland. Ohio. 

188 Miller Studio, Minea., Minn., 3. 
1S9J. H.Kent. Rochester, N. Y., 3. 

190 H. Beach, Buffalo, N. Y., 6. 

191 Al. Holden. Phila., Pa.. 6. 

192 R. P. Bellsmith, Cincin., O., 3. 

193 M. B. Parkinson. Boston. 4. 

194 H. G. Andrews, Roch., Minn.. 6. 

195 Geo. Sperry, Toledo, O., 6. 

196 A. J. Borst, New^ York, 4. 

197 J. H. Garo, Boston Mass. 

198 R. W. Johnston, Pittsburg. 4. 

199 Miss Mary Carnell, Phil., I'a., G. 

200 J. Rentschler, 

Ann Arbor, Mich.. 6. 

201 G. Kasebler, New York, 6. 

202 C. C. Keough. Greensburg, Pa. 

203 Bradley's Studio, New York, 6. 

204 MissN. J. Hall, 

Brookline Mass., 6. 



205 Boyce, Washington, D. C. 

206 J. R. Bishop, Wash., D. C, 3. 

207 Henderson, Wash., D. C. 6. 
20S l-;ilni(inston. Wash., D. C, 6. 

209 Harris, Wash.. D. C, 6. 

210 J. 1'. Haley, B'dgep'rl, Conn., 1. 

211 F. R. Brothers, Olean, N. Y., 

212 W. A. Furlong, Roch., N. Y., 4. 

213 F. Barrows, Boston, Mass., 5. 

214 G. Nussbaumer, Buffalo. N. Y. 

215 G. F. Crawford, Hamilton, Ont. 

216 A. M. Cunningham. Ham., Ont. 

217 Frank Jackson. Barrie, Ont. 

218 F. L. Flov, Petertaoro, Ont. 

220 J. M. Bandtel. Milwaukee. Wis. 

221 .1. H. Brubaker, Grand Fiapids. 

222 Thuss Bros., Nashville, Tenn. 

223 Hostetler's Stu'o. Davenp't. la. 

224 O. P. Havens, Jacksonv'le. Fla. 
224a Charles Lewis, Bad Axe, Mich. 

225 C. Rosevear, Toronto, Ont. 

226 Miss J. Fleming, Joplin, Mo. 
226a F. T. Leatherdale. Toronto. 

227 C. Aylett, Toronto, Ont. 

227a H. H. Topping, Battle Creek. 

228 George Freeland, Toronto. 

229 John Kennedy, Toronto, Ont. 

230 Walter Dickson, Toronto. 

231 T. Mendall. Peterboro, Ont. 

232 W. G. Rounds. Woodst'ck, Ont. 

233 F. W. Webster, Des Moines, la. 

234 C. F. Townsend, Des Moines, la. 

235 H. M. Anschutz, Keokuk, la. 

The pictures were a feast not 
only for the novice attending his 
first convention, but for the hard- 
ened old convention goer of 
many years standing. 

The various manufacturers of 
photographic ])ai)ers had likewise 
remarkably attractive displaj's, 
the collection of exquisite prints 
on Aristo, Collodio Carbon, An- 
gelo, Nepera and the new Etch- 
ing Black Platinum papers of the 
Eastman Kodak Com])any, oc- 
cupying the entire south gallery, 
and extending fully half way 
along the east gallery, were at 
all times the center of an inter- 
ested and pleased throng. 

Every inch of s|)ace on the 
main floor of the spacious hall 



30 



STUDIO LIGHT and 



was taken up by the handsomely 
decorated booths devoted to the 
various trade exhibits. 

When the announcement was 
make at Detroit last j'ear of the 
selection of Rochester for the 
next convention, the Eastman 
Kodak Company stated that they 
would step back and make no 




The motlel shared the honors with tlie 
demonstrator— Rochester Herald 

selection of space for exhibiting 
at the Rochester convention until 
every other intending exhibitor 
had made selection and reserva- 
tion. 

\Mien all reservations had been 
made, it was seen that the entire 
space of the main floor had been 
taken, making it imi)ossible for 
the company to make a full dis- 
play, and therefore nothing but 
pictures were showai and those in 
the gallery. 

The various factories devoted 
to the manvifacture of photo- 
graphic goods, were naturally of 
great mterest to the visitors, and 



by means of a carefully prepared 
schedule, Avhlch did not in any 
way conflict with the convention 
program, the Company was en- 
abled to invite the visitors to in- 
siK'ct them. It is needless to 
state that practically every pho- 
tographer in attendance took ad- 
vantage of the invitation and 
highly interested parties thronged 
all the factories during visitors 
hours. 

Kodak Park, the immense 
plant devoted to the manufacttn-e 
of sensitized products was, of 
course, the center of attraction, 
and on Wednesday the jihotog- 
grai)hers visited the park in a 
body, on special invitation of the 
Company ; details of the visit are 
afforded in the reprint from the 
Rochester Herald published else- 
where in this issue. 

On Wednesday, Manufactm-ers 
Day, before visiting Kodak Park, 
the visitors were given a thorough 
exi)osition of high-grade lens 
making bj' the Bausch & Lomb 
Optical Companj% a complete 
plant showing all the pi'ocesses, 
being sjiecially erected in their 
new building. Light refresh- 
ments were served and the visit- 
ors had a highly enjoyable time. 

Rochester as a city was par- 
ticularly cognizant of the visit of 
the photograi)hers, as the pho- 
tographic industry is so closely 
allied with its welfare ; many of 
the buildings, and all of the pho- 
tographic factories being hand- 
somely decorated. 



WJ 



the ARISTO EAGLE 



31 



The comfort and entertain- 
ment of the visiting ladies Avere 
amply provided for. On Monday 
evening an informal reception 
was held in Assembly Hall in 
the Hotel Seneca, and on Tues- 
daj' afternoon they were tendered 
a special outing, a boat ride on 
Irondequoit Bay, and picnic by 
the Rochester Section of the P. 
S. S. of N. Y. The ladies were, 
of course, much in evidence at 
the regular sessions of the con- 
vention and at all the other en- 
tertainments provided for the 
members. 

On Thursday evening the 
members and their wives and 
friends were the guests of the 
Eastman Kodak Company at a 
picnic dinner and entertainment 
at Ontario Beach Park, Roch- 
ester's favorite resort. 

Through some slij) on the ]iart 
of the weather man, just before 
time for the visitors to start for 
the lake — down came the rain, 
the gf)od old fashioned kind, that 
indicated a determination to keej) 
it up all night, even if it took all 
the water in the lake to do it. 
But for once the Aveather man 
was doomed to disappointment, 
the more it rained the better the 
photographers seemed to like it, 
as with jokes, smiles and um- 
brellas they dashed wildly for the 
special cars that were to carry 
them to the lake. 

The Eastman Company had 
announced the entertainment as 
an informal one, and their guests 



took them at their word, and 
proceeded to enjoj' themselves 
to the limit. 

Fully two thousand members 
and their friends passed through 
the gates and were seated at the 
tabk-s on the immense camas- 
covered platform for the picnic 







It (/((/ rain a little— Kuchustcr llcrald 

dinner. Fortunately the rain 
aliated somewhat during the 
dinner hour, allowing the guests 
to dine in comfort. 

A happy incident of the din- 
ner was a surprise on the pojiu- 
lar President Frank R. Barrows. 

The members of the Photog- 
raphers' Association of America 
presented to him as president a 
beautiful gold watch and chain 
and some incidentals which the 
good humor of his friends sug- 
gested. The value of the watch 
is ^oOO. The inscription on the 
inside cover of the watch is: 



32 



STUDIO LIGHT and 



"Presented to F. R. Barrows 
by the boys of the P. A. of A., 
'09." Mr. Barrows' monogram 
is engraved on the back of the 
tmiepiece. 

The presentation of the time- 
piece came near the close of the 
dinner, and the donors Avere rep- 
resented by H. A. Colhngs. of 
the Eastman Kodak Comjiany. 
Mr. Barrows and Mr. Colhngs 
have been intimate friends for 
many years, and the latter was 
torn by conflicting emotions as 
he gave his little talk, his jovial 
nature struggling hard to over- 
come the jiressure of sentimen- 
tal considerations. President 
Barrows gave eveiy evidence of 
being deeply touched by the 
thoughtfulness of his friends and 
associates, who had taken occa- 
sion to mark the completion by 
their president of a decade of 
faithful service. 

During a lull in the music, Mr. 
Collings climbed upon a talile 
and after recovering his poise 
was seen struggling to haul 
someone up to his perch. He 
soon had President Barrows be- 
side him and endeavored to still 
the enthusiasm Avhich the ap- 
pearance of Mr. Barrows kindled 
in the guests. 

"Frankie," said Mr. Collings, 
addressing Mr. Barrows when 
there was something like silence, 
" I want to remind you that this 
is the tenth anniversary of your 
election. If I were to recall all 
the things that have hajjpened 



during that time you would bawl, 
I would bawl and I wouldn't be 
able to perfonn the duty which 
has been entrusted to me. 

" I am going to take your coat 
off. I see your vest is soiled. 
Well, the boys have bought you 
a nice new one. Here, put this 
on (forcing Mr. Barrows' arms 
through the armholes in the gar- 
ment.) I think you will like it 
better, and there is a watch in 
one of the pockets that you may 
find convenient at times, Frankie. 

" After we got the vest we had 
a little money left and we got the 
Avatch. Then Ave found a little 
more money left and Ave got a 
chain. There Avas still some more 
left over, and Ave decided to have 
a drink. When Ave ordered the 
drink we found that none of us 
drank anything stronger than 
liuttermilk, and there Avas three 
cents left after each of the five 
had his milk, so I Avill put the 
three cents in this A'est pocket. 
Again, Ave thought you might be 
embarrassed after you Avere given 
this little present and we bought 
a box of cigars so that if you 
lacked words to express your- 
self you could distribute the 
smokes. Noav that is all, 
Frankie . " 

" I Avant to assure you, ladies 
and gentlemen, that I Aalue this 
token very highly." said Mr. 
BarroAvs when he had recovered 
sufficiently fi-om the sui'prise. 
" I shall take this token back 
home. If you feel toAvard me 



f/ 



the ARISTO EAGLE 



S^ 



as I feel toward you we shall 
live together in eternity." 

There was a demonstration by 
the guests, who drowned the 
music with their cheers and 
handclapping. The dark clouds, 
the rain trickling through sag- 
ging spots in the canvas and the 
equally disagreeable weather 
were forgotten. 

When the dinner ended there 
Avere cheers for Mr. Eastman and 
those active in the arrangements 
for the entertainment. The 
cheers were followed by calls for 
a speech from Mr. Eastman, and 
the calls became so insistent that 
he was helped upon the table, 
where he spoke with charac- 
teristic brevity. 

" In behalf of my fellow di- 
rectors and myself," said Mr. 
Eastman, " I wish to thank you 
for yom- greeting and for your 
presence here. We think it is a 
great compliment that so many 
of you have come here for the 
convention. I thank you again." 

At the conclusion of the din- 



ner the visitors devoted the re- 
mainder of the evening to visiting 
the various concessions and danc- 
ing, tickets to all of Avhich had 
been supplied l)y their host, the 
Eastman Kodak Companj'. 

On Friday afternoon the De- 
fender Photo Supply Co., and 
the Seneca Camera Co., joined 
forces in entertaining the visitors 
with a Roastfest at Moerlbach 
Park where the visitors were 
royally entertained. 

Friday evening provided an- 
other very pleasant entertainment 
at Assembly Hall, the members 
enjoying themselves heartih' with 
dancing and renewing old friend- 
ships and cementing new ones. 

Saturday morning witnessed 
the last regular session of the 
convention, with a i-emarkably 
large attendance for the last day. 

The close of the Con\ention 
and its long round of duties and 
pleasures found the members still 
interested and enthusiastic over 
the most successful convention in 
the historj' of the P. A. of A. 




19 1 o ^^ ^--LSsQ^ 

How could Atlantic City win ?— Rochester Herald. 



Page 42 Will Interest You 



34 



STUDIO LIGHT and 



HARMONY 
Dear Mr. Editor : 

I never saw such har- 
mony. Even the lobster at your 
picnic dinner agreed with me. 

I'm glad that I rubbed the 
dust off my old traveling bag and 
came to your town. The only 
sore spot in me is the one I got 
in the back of my neck from 
standing at the foot of your 366- 
foot smoke stack and looking up 
at the top of it. Everyl)ody 
seemed to want everybody else 
to have a good time. Even the 
man behind the wire wicket in 
the hotel cashed my check with- 
out a murmur. 

The dove of peace sure hung 
over Rochester and any sport- 
loving indi\'idual who came to 
the city photographic thinking 
he was going to have the fun of 
watching a scraji, must have felt 
like he had stumbled in on a 
peace tribunal at the Hague. 
True, I caught competing man- 
ufacturers showing their teeth at 
each other, but in everj^ case the 
teeth w^ere back of a genuine 
smile and accompanied by a 
hearty hand shake that spoke 
for a removal of all bitterness 
from future competition. You 
and the other Rochester manu- 
facturers made good on your 
promise (made at Detroit a year 
ago) to let the out-of-town peo- 
ple have their pick of S])ace in 
Convention Hall and then take 
what was left. And what is 



eciually to the point, the visiting 
manufacturers made good by 
showing their appreciation of the 
action of the Rochester people. 
It was Harmony in capital let- 
ters and a harmony so much ap- 
j^reciated that I hope its effect 
Avill Ite lasting. Let's have more 
of it all along the line. Take a 
look through jour mental stereo- 
scoj)e, boys, and get things in 
their pro])er relation to each 
other. When your competitor 
(l)hotographer, dealer or manu- 
facturer) seems to be unfair, just 
try to take a look fi-om his point 
of view. Perhaps his is better 
than yours. This question of 
view-point has always been a 
hobliy of mine and touches so 
closely on my subject, " har- 
mony." that I want to ask you 
to i)ulilish these verses by Will 
Cundill. You see he can do 
something beside making good 
photographs : 

DIFFERENT POINT OF VIEW 

Will Cundill, Maquoketa, Iowa 

This world is what you see of it, as life you 

journey through. 
And nothing in it happens, that looks the 

same to two. 
The very self-same feature, in the verj' 

self-same game. 
To the hest of friends and neighbors, will 

never look the same. 

A friendship may be broken, and lost be- 
yond recall. 

In a foolish controversy, about a game of 
ball. 

When two good-natured people, both up- 
right, square and true. 

Just iiappen to be looking, from a differ- 
ent point of view. 

Don't call your friend a " knocker," if 

with him you don't agree, 
His judgment is as dear to him, as ours to 

you and me. 



WJ 



ihe ARISTO EAGLE 



35 



He's a risht to his opinions, .iiul to ex- 
press them, too. 

For it may he he was lookinjr, from a het- 
ter point of view. 

And if you meet some others, who think 
tlic same as he. 

Don't intimate they're aged, and say tliey 
cannot see. 

Their vision and their judgment, may seem 
at fault to you. 

When perliaps they all were looking from 
a better point of view. 

And when luck seems against you, don't 
let your feet get cold. 

Or be a howling quitter, and claim tlie 
game was sold. 

Don't call the umpire rotten, and make 
the air look blue. 

It may be he was looking, from a better 
point of view. 

And if you back your judgment with 
money on the game. 

Don't squeal if you're a loser, keep smil- 
ing just the same. 

The man who wins your money was no 
more sure than you. 

But lie happened to be looking, from a 
better point of view. 

In the long run. Truth is mighty, and tlie 
right will always w'in. 

So be honest and above-board, in every 
deal you're in. 

And when you meet a neighbor who don't 
agree with you. 

Just remember he is looking, from a dif- 
ferent point of view. 

It means a lot for future con- 
ventions and for futin-e good of 
the btisiness if the spirit of Har- 
mony dispensed by Past Presi- 
dent BarroAvs and the Rochester 
bunch can be kept in circidation. 
Now for Milwaukee ! Hurrah for 
Harmony ! Stereoscope. 



npOO BUSY 

-*- Deare Edditor: I prom- 
ised yoti a story about the Con- 
vention but the boss has kep me 
so darn liusy since we got back 
that I aint had no time to write 
it yet. Will wait till he goes fish- 
in' nex' time. Yours respekfully. 
The Office Boy. 



ONE-FIFTY 
PER CABINET GROSS 

N E P E R A 

On and after August 15th the 
price of Nepera j^aper will be 
one dollar and a half per gross, 
cabinet size, Avith other sizes in 
proportion. 

The Nepera business has 
grown steadilj' for two years. 
Every month shows an increased 
number of Nejiera c(*nsumers and 
an increased constnnption of Ne- 
pera paper. With the growing 
volume of the business and with 
our new developing-out paper 
btiilding, having a coating capac- 
ity of a million square feet of 
paper per day, we can afford to 
make this reduction. Nepera 
sales have been increasing rapidly 
at the two dollar price against 
other papers at a similar list. At 
the new price it is going to move 
even more rapidly. 

Remember too, that the Royal 
Nepera in either pure white or 
India tint is practically a double 
weight paper, at the single 
weight price. There has never 
before been so much value offered 
in a sensitized photogi'aphic i)ro- 
duct. 

Nepera paper is ftmiished in 
professional sizes only, in matte, 
velvet and rough in lioth single 
and double weight. The Royal 
Nepera is furnished in one weight 
only, and at the single weight 



36 



STUDIO LIGHT and 



list but is very nearly the full 
doul>le Avcioht thickness and is 
known as, " the paper that for- 
gets to curl. ' ' The Royal is how- 
ever, furnished in two colors, 

India tint ' ' and pure Avhite, 
and has made close friends of 
many photogra])hers who are 
making a specialty of sepia prints. 
Redevelojied prints on Royal 
Nepera delivered in folders bring 
the extra })rices. 

There is a surface for your 
every want and you can't buy a 
better development paper at any 
price. The full list is published 
in the advertising section. 



/^UR ILLUSTRATIONS 

^-^ We have an unusual va- 
riety in our illustrations in this 
issue. 

The cover page illustration 
and a numl>er of the others are 
from the prize winning exhibits 
on Collodio-Carbon of Mr. C. L. 
Venard of Lincoln, Illinois, who 
was awarded the first prize in 
Classes A and B at the I909 Illi- 
nois State Convention. 

We also reproduce two of the 
pictures made at the Convention 
vSchool, one by Mr. A. F. Brad- 
ley and one by F. Milton Somers. 

The cartoons are reproduced 
from issues of the Rochester 
Herald published durmg the 
Convention. 



OODAS IN 25-LB. CANS 

*^~^ We have always been par- 
ticularly careful about the purity 
of the chemicals put up by us 
for photographic use. Our busi- 
ness in such chemicals grew 
steadily for many years not be- 
cause we pushed it with any vig- 
or but simply because the qual- 
ity of the goods we put out 
brought repeat orders. A full 
realization of what we could do 
directly for all users of sensitized 
photographic goods, and indi- 
rectly for our sale of such goods 
by putting out and pushing a 
a full line of tested chemicals, 
induced us a few years ago to 
equip a special department and 
cover the entire line with pure 
chemicals. The growth of this 
department has been inarvelous- 
ly rapid, and many large con- 
sumers are finding it worth while 
to specify Kodak Tested Chemi- 
cals when they order. 



Every package 
bears this trade 
mark : 



Our latest additions to the line 
are Carbonate of Soda and Sul- 
phite of Soda in 25-lb. cans. 

The Price 
Kodak Carbonate of Soda per 

25-lb. can $3.50 

Kodak Sulphite of Soda, per 

25-lb. can 5.50 

Order from vour dealer. 




F/ 



the ARISTO EAGLE 



37 



EASTMAN'S ETCHING 
BLACK PLATLNUM 

Distinctive. 

Distinctive — that's the word 
that best describes the new 
l)latininn paper, Eastman's Etch- 
ino- Black. No, it's not in imita- 
tion of any other paper, it is de- 
cidedly away from the ordiiKuy 
cold blue-black platinum that 
you are acquainted with. The 
l)latinum gradation is there, the 
richness of platinum blacks is 
there, but there's a pleasing 
warmth that you do not find in 
other black and white jjlatinums. 
It's a paper that the best i)hotog- 
rapher in y<nir town is going to 
adopt — and after him, others. 

The manipulation of the East- 
man E. B. Platinum is a per- 
fectly simple cold development 
process and it will not, therefore, 
be in any way handicapped liy 
complications. There are two 



surfaces — "smooth and rough" — 
and the weight of the paper is 
practically the same as that of 
Angelo Sepia Platinum. 

Eastman's Etching Black was 
the new good thing at the con- 
vention in the paper line, and 
the large display on it was given 
carefid attention by the people 
who were here for business and 
wanted to investigate up-to-date 
goods. It has the quality that 
will ajipeal to the most exclusive 
patronage of the best studio in 
town. It's away from the com- 
mon-))lace, yet leaves nothing to 
ask for in photographic (juality or 
simplicity of manipulation. 

The price is the same as 
Angelo Sepia. 
Developer for Eastman's E. B. 
Platinum Paper 
Eastman's E. B. Developer, 

per 1-lb. pkg. . . $ .60 

Do., per 1 2-lb. pkg. . . .35 
Do., per 14-lb. pkg. . . .20 

At all stock dealers of course. 



B 



U L L E T I N : THE EASTMAN SCHOOL OF 
PROFESSIONAL PHOTOGRAPHY FOR 11)09 



Auspices Mullett Bros. Photo Supply Co., Kansas City, Mo., 
August 3, 4, 5. 

Northwestern Photog. Convention, St. Paul, Minn., September 
2, 3, 4. 

Auspices Duffin & Co., Winnipeg, Man., September 8, 9, 10. 



38 



STUDIO LIGHT and 



THE EASTMAN GRAV- 
ITY PRINTER 

There has been an insistent 
demand for a simple, inexpensive 
and rapid printer for developing 
out papers that could be cpiickly 
installed and used with any light. 

The Eastman Gravity Printer 
meets this demand in a most 




Fig. 1 

satisfactory manner, as it is ex- 
ceedingly simple in construction 
and operation, and can be used 
with daylight or any form of 
artificial illumination. Uni- 
formity of exposure is one of the 
strongest points, as the duration 
of exposure is so regulated as to 
make variation in a given speed 
practically impossible. 

As shown in illustrations 1 and 
2, the Eastman Gravitj^ Printer 



consists of a cabinet, in one side 
of which is an adjustable opening 
for regulating the exposure, and 
a simple clock-work mechanism 
for lowering and raising a carrier 
containing an ordinary five by 
seven printing frame past the 
opening. 




Fig. 2 

The exposure opening is fitted 
with an adjustable metal slide 
with graduated stops, affording 
exposure apertures fi-om 7 inches 
to ^4 of an inch, and, with a 
printing frame and negative of 
average weight, will aiford an 
approximate exposure of one 
second per inch of opening. For 
instance, if the aperture is 7 



w 



the ARISTO EAGLE 



39 



inches, the exposure will be 
approximately 7 seconds. See 
illustrations 3 and 4. Illustration 
4 shows niethf)d of adjusting 
exposure aperture. 




FiK. 3 

When the weight actuating 
the clock-work mechanism swings 
fi-ee, it will descend and thus 
raise the printing fi-anie carrier 
just past the exposure aperture. 
The printer is installed with the 
exposure apei'ture scjuarely facing 
the exposing light, and with the 
light so adjusted as to come about 
the center of the aperture when 
fully open, and at a distance of 
about 7 inches from the opening, 



to afford even illumination. Illus- 
tration 5 shows the printer in use 
with two incandescent gas lamps. 




Fig. 4 

When desired, the exposing 
light may be boxed in by means 
of strijis of asliestos or metal in- 
serted in the grooves in the outer 
casing, on each side of the ex- 
posure aperture. 

When ready to print, the 
loaded printing frame is inserted 
in the carrier, as shown in illus- 
tration 2, with the negative facing 
the exposure aperture : when re- 
leased its own weight will carry 
it down past the exposing light, 
as shown in illustration No. 4, 
the exposure continuing until the 
carrier has reached the bottom of 
the shaft. 



40 



STUDIO LIGHT and 




Fig. 5 

The carrier returns instantly 
when the exposed fi-ame is re- 
moved, and while one exposure 
is being made, another printing 
frame may be loaded ready for 
insertion in the carrier. 

The many advantages of the 
Eastman Gravity Printer are 
apparent at a glance, and its ease 
of installation, and low price, 
ten dollars, will particularly 
commend it to the professional 
using developing papers. 

Order through your dealer. 



Studio 

Advertising' 

Pays 



Take advantage 
of our advertising 
cut service. 

The cut for the 
month is shown on 
page 44. 

The price is 50 
cents. 

Order hy number. 



'W 



the ARISTO EAGLE 



41 



New NEPERA List 

N'KPERA is not furnislied in dozens in sizes smaller than 5 x 7, or in rolls 
shorter than ten yards, unless as listed below. 



SINGLE WEIGHT. 




DOUBLE WEIGHT 










CABINET ^ 








Dozen 


V2 Gross 


Gross 


3's X5I2 


Dozen 


1 2 Gross 


Gross 




$.85 


$1.50 


J 4X5 V 
^ 4I4 X 51 2 ( 

I 3">8X578 
' 4X6 / 




$1.00 


Si .90 




1.15 


1.95 


4I4 X6l'2 




1.45 


2.45 




1.30 


2.20 


4^4 X 6I2 




1.60 


2.75 


.25 


1.45 


2.40 


5X7 


.30 


1.85 


3.00 


.:W 


1.60 


2.65 


5 X 7H 


.35 


2.00 


3.30 


.30 


1.60 


2.70 


5X8 


.35 


2.00 


3.40 


.35 


1.75 


S.OO 


512x734 


.40 


2.20 


3.75 


.10 


2.05 


3.60 


6X8 


.45 


2.55 


4.50 


.40 


2.20 


3.85 


6l 2 X 8li 


.50 


2.75 


4 80 


.45 


2.50 


4.50 


7X9 


.55 


3.10 


5.65 


.50 


2.80 


5.25 


712x91-2 


.70 


3.55 


6.55 


.55 


3.15 


5.85 


8 X 10 


.75 


3.95 


7.30 


.70 


3.80 


7 20 


9X11 


.90 


4.75 


9.00 


.85 


4.75 


9.00 


10 X 12 


1.15 


5.95 


11.25 


1.10 


6.30 


11.70 


11 X 14 


1.45 


7.90 


14.65 


1.25 


7.45 


13.95 


12 X 15 


1.75 


9.30 


17.45 


1.65 


9.45 


18.00 


14 X 17 


2.25 


11.80 


22.50 


i.iO 


12.00 


24..30 


16 X20 


3.05 


15.75 


30.40 


2.40 


13.50 


28.10 


17 X20 


3.25 


16.90 


32.65 


2.70 


15.75 


30.60 


18 X 22 


3.85 


19.70 


38.25 


3.15 


18.45 36.00 


20 X 24 


4.50 


23.05 


45.00 



Gross and half-frross paekaires of cut sheets of paper of sizes not listed vill 
w ill be supplied providing; the order amounts to Si. 00 list or more, and list of 
s.inie will be practicalh proportionate to that of listed sizes. 

NEPERA SECONDS furnished in limited quantities in all surfaces in 3",s x 
5' ; (Cabinet i and 4X6 only. 
Sinirle Weight, . $1.00 per srross | Double Weight, . $1.25 per gross 

ROLLS 





SINGLE WEIGHT. 






double weight. 




10 ft. Roll, 20 inches wide. 


$1.50 


10 ft. Roll, 20 inches wid 


e. 


$1.90 


10 ft. 


■■ 40 " 


3.00 


10 ft. ' 


40 




3.75 


10 vd. 


" 20 '■ 


4.50 


10 yd. ' 


20 " 




5.65 


10 yd. 


" 40 ■' 


9.00 


10 yd. • 


40 '■ 




11.25 




Rolls 10 yards or longer 


ire supp 


ied in an> 


• width up to 40 


inches. 






For Pr 


IXTS FRO 


I CiRKUT 


Negatives 








SINGLE WEIGHT. 






DOUBLE weight. 






e'l in. 8 in. 10 in. 


16 in. 




6' 7 in. 8 in. 


10 in. 


16 in. 


25 ft. 


Si. 25 $1.50 $1.90 


$3.00 


25 ft. 


$1.60 $1.90 


$2.i?5 


$3.75 


50 ft. 


2.50 3.00 3.75 


6.00 


50 ft. 


3.15 3.75 


4.75 


7.50 


loo ft. 


4.95 6.00 7.50 


12.00 


100 ft. 


6.30 7.50 


9.45 


15.00 



CANADIAN KODAK CO., Ltd., Toronto, Can. 



42 STUDIO LIGHT r/«r/ 



$50000 

FOR ONE SIMPLE PICTURE 



Total Prizes 

$2000'^ 



IN THE 



Kodak 

Advertising Contest 

CONTEST CLOSES OCTOBER FIRST 
FULL PARTICULARS ON REQUEST 



Eastman Kodak Co, 

Rochester, Neic York 



f/ 



the ARISTO EAGLE 



43 



Commer- 










— 1 


Per Per 


Per 


Per 




cial 


Size I2D0Z. Doz. 


} 2 Gross 


Gross 




2I4X2I4 


§ .15 


8 .60 


81.05 






2i,x2i, 


.15 


.60 


1.05 




Arts to 


2I4X3I4 
214x31, 


.15 
.15 


.60 
.60 


1.05 
1.05 




Platino 


214x33] 
21 , X 4I4 


.15 

.15 


.60 
.60 


1.05 
1.10 






3 'x4 


.15 


.60 


1.05 






31 , X 31/, 


.15 


.70 


1.30 






3I4X414 


.15 


.70 


1.30 






31, X 4 


.15 


.70 


1.30 






2i;x7 


.18 


.75 








4 x4 


.18 


.75 


1.45 






41^x414 


.18 


.75 


1.45 






3I4X6 


.18 


.75 


1.45 






3I4X5I7 
4x5" 


.18 
.18 


.75 

.75 


1.45 
1.45 






ROLLS 


3^8x51/2 


.25 


.95 


1.75 




10 ft. Roll 241 _, 


' g X 5 ; 3 


.80 


1.10 


1.95 




ins. wide. .81.95 


4I4X5I/2 


.30 


1.10 


1.95 




5 yd. Roll 241:, 


4 x6 


.25 


.95 


1.75 




ins. wide. .82.80 


4I4X6I3 


.30 


1.30 


2.25 




10 yd. Roll 241 , 
ins. wide. .85.15 


44x61, 
4 x9 


.30 
.35 


1.50 
1.75 


2.60 
2.85 






5x7 


.35 


1.70 


2.75 




(Furnished only 


5 X 71 , 


.35 


1.80 


3.00 




in 241, inch 


5 x8 


.35 


1.80 


3.15 




widths.) 


51 , X 73^ 


.40 


1.95 


3.45 






31 ; X 12 

6 'x8 


.35 
.45 


1.90 
2.30 








4.10 






61, X 81 7 


.50 


2.50 


4.40 






7x9 


.55 


2.85 


5.15 






7i,x9i^ 


.60 


3.20 


6.00 






8 ' X 10 


.65 


3.60 


6.70 






9 xll 






8.70 






10 X 12 


'. .95 


5.40 


10.30 






11 X 14 S 


65 1.25 


7.20 


13.45 




Canadian 


12 X 15 

14 X 17 1 


80 1.40 
00 1.90 


8.50 
10.80 


16.00 
20.65 




Kodak 


16 x20 1 


30 2.50 


14.80 


27.90 






17 x20 1 


40 2.75 


15.45 


29.95 




Co., Limited 


18 x22 1 


65 3.15 


18.00 


35.15 






20 x24 1 


95 3.(;o 


21.15 


41. SO 




Toronto, Can. 




















1 



44- 



STUDIO LIGHT and 



t 



THE ONLY CON- 
DITION 

We make but one condi- 
tion in our offer of cuts for 
the use of photographers. 

It is obvious that two 
photographers in the same 
town would not care to use 
the same cut, and we are 
therefore obHged to limit 
this offer to one photogra- 
pher in a town. It will be 
a case of first come first 
served. The first order 
fi-om a city will be promptly 
filled. Succeeding orders (if 
any) will necessarily be 
turned doA\'n and the re- 
mittance, of course, will be 
returned. It is also obvious 
that Ave cannot, on account 
of the cost of the drawings, 
furnish any large variety of 
cuts at the nominal prices 
quoted, and therefore can 
offer no substitute cut. The 
thing to do is to get your 
order in^rst, as it Avould not 
be fair to give the man Avho 
happens to get in his order 
early one month, a permaiient 
advantage ; we shall book no 
orders in advance. They 
must always specify the num- 
ber of cut desired. If later 
on it develops that there is 
a great enough demand fur 
these advertising cuts to war- 
rant our fumisliing a larger 
variety, we shall be glad to 
do so. c. K. Co.. Ltd. 




/^UR pictures of men 
^-^ /ooA- like men. They 
show the force, energy, 
character of the sitter. 
Tliey are portraits that 
really tell something of 
the men portrayed. 



Telephone to-day for 
an appointment. 



The Pyro Studio 



No. 144 



//ze AR 1ST O EAGLE 45 



For the best Studio in town— 



EASl^MAN 




PLATINUM 

A distinctive paper — all the richness 
of Platinum blacks, with a delicate 
pleasing warmth found in no other 
black and white Platinum. 

Two Grades : Smooth and Rough. 



Eastman Kodak Company 

ROCHESTER, N. Y. 



46 



STUDIO LIGHT and 




the ARISTO EAGLE 




THERE IS COMFORT 

as well as CONVENIENXE and RESULTS in the 

EASTMAN PLATE TANK 

The simple loading device permits the loading of 
the plates into the rack in a few seconds, with- 
out scratching or marring. 

The air-tight, locking co\er allows the whole tank 
to be reversed — 710 Jishing the plate rack out of 
the solution during developme7it — and the hand on 
the dial tells you when development will be 
completed. 

Eastman Plate Tank, 5x7, - S 4.50 

Eastman Plate Tank, 8x 10, - 10.00 

CANADIAN KODAK CO., Limited 

TORONTO, CAN. 



48 



STUDIO LIGHT and 



WE HAVE IT 



Just what you 
The Newcastle 
unmounted 
m i n i a t u r e 
prints. 



arelookinu^for. 
style for 




Colors: Broirn for Sepias and Grey for Black and White tones. 
The Newcastle is made double thickness, water silk finish, 
colored deckle all around, etched tissue ; neat crest in upper left 
hand corner. You just tip the edges of the print with paste and 
place it in folder. They are for any style of print in backed 
Aristo, Nepera or Platinum papers. A Sample Free. 

PRICE LIST 

Size Closed 

4 x 5 '4 



Size 

E 
AA 



For Print 

' J Cabinet Square 

Cabinet Square 



Price Per 100 

Sl.50 

1.80 



Designed and Manufactured by 



THE CANADIAN CARD CO 



TORONTO, CANADA 



Aristo Motto 



''WJ^ believe permanency is the 
' ' Keystone of Photographic 
Success, and all brands of paper 
bearing our Trade-mark are manu- 
factured on this principle. We hold 
our consumer's reputation and suc- 
cess identical with our own. We 
surround both with every safe- 
guard known to chemical science 
and our own experience." 




FROM AN ARISTO TLATIXO PRINT 
By C. F. Bretzmnn Indianapolis, Ind. 




V7 T? 



LV]. 




a/7^ Me :?^R.IkS^O :^2^GU^ 



A Magazine of I u f o r in a t i o n for the Profession, 



S ¥.\V SKRIKS 

Vol. 1 No. 7 



S E P T E M B E R 1 9 9 



O I n S K R 1 F.S 

No. 10 + 



w 



HY IT PAYS 



It pays to buy the ^ood.s 
that are consistently and ])ersist- 
ently advertised. There is no 
greater fallacy than that contain- 
ed in the statement that non-ad- 
vertised goods can be sold cheaper 
because the expense of adver- 
tising is not added to their cost. 

The sole reason for advertising 
is to create a market and an ever 
growing demand for the product 
or products advertised. 

It requires no lengthy expla- 
nation to demonstrate that anj' 
product produced in large quanti- 
ties can be manufactured and 
sold cheaper than those made in 
small lots. The manufacturer in 
large quantities can not only de- 
crease the cost, but at the same 
time can improve ihc quality. The 
purchase of raw materials in quan- 
tities can command the market ; 
those that have these materials 
to sell are anxious for his trade 
— they quote him the lowest fig- 
ures — they supi)ly him with the 
choicest grades — and further, 
when a shortage in supply occurs, 
the large purchaser will be the 
one favored invariably. 



The manufacturer in small 
quantities must put up with in- 
ferior facilities for manufacture 
— he must, in view of his small 
outjiut, perform many of the oj)- 
erations of manufacture by hand, 
while the large producer can 
stand the expense of the con- 
struction of special machinery 
that will perform these same op- 
erations a hundred fold cheaper 
and better. 

The small manufacturer in 
many instances is at the mercy 
of the seller of raw materials as 
to quality — the large producer 
can and does have in his service, 
experts to make accurate sci- 
entific tests for quality, and by 
so doing can establish a standard 
of quality impossible for the 
smaller concern. 

The non-advertiser or semi- 
occasional advertiser has a smaller 
field for his wares and can, and 
in fact has to take some chances 
as to quality. The heavj' adver- 
tiser, with his l)ig output and 
growing field, docs not dare to 
take any chances as to quality. 
He must make his products live 
up to their advertised quality — 
in fact, if he is wise he will, and 



STUDIO LIGHT and 



usually does, make them even 
better than advertised m order 
to please the ultra fastidious. 

It paj's to buy the well adver- 
tised products because the qual- 
ity has to be there, or else the ad- 
vertising outlay -would become an 
expense instead of an investment. 

In some instances the price of 
the advertised goods niaj" be 
higher than that of the other 
kind — but the quality is also 
higher and that's what counts. 



ANGELO SEPIA FROM 
TORONTO 

Increased sales and growing 
popularity with the best photog- 
raphers have brought about a 
change in the Angelo Sepia busi- 
ness, which will be of ben- 
efit to the profession in 
Canada. From September 
1st this paper has been 
supplied from Toronto according 
to the list given on page 29, but 
only in the sizes shown, the de- 
mand for other sizes not being 
large enough to warrant packing 
them . 



A SIMPLE PRINT DRY- 
ING MACHINE 

Practically every photographer 
has some pet method for concave 
print drying, but the machine 
constructed by Mr. L. Frank 
Griffith, of Salt Lake City, works 
so well and is so easy to con- 
struct that Ave afford a description 
of it for the benefit of the pro- 
fession in general. 

As shown in the illustration 
the machine consists of two slat- 



THERE IS GOOD 
^lOy^YX In Good 
EXLARGMENTS. 

READ CAREFULLY 
THE ARTICLE on PAGE 
TWENTY. 




ted, wooden ended cylinders or 
rolls, fixed in a swinging frame, 
supported by uprights; the up- 
rights being braced, top and bot- 
tom, by cross pieces. From one 
cylinder is attached the end of a 



I he ARISTO EAGLE 




FROM AN ARISTO PLATINO PRINT 
By C. F. Bretzmaii Indianapolis, Ind. 



6 



STUDIO LIGHT and 



roll of cheese cloth, and of blot- 
ting paper, the loose ends of the 
cheese cloth and blotting paper 
are then brought over the axis 
rod supporting the SAvinging 
frame, to give a slight tension, 
and then rolled upon the other 
cylinder for a few tin-ns. 

To use, the prints are first sur- 
face dried by pressing lightly be- 
tween dry blotters, then removed 
and placed between the blotting 
paper and the cheese cloth with 
the face of the i)rint against the 
cheese cloth. The cylinder is 
then revolved by means of the 
handle shown in the cut, until 
all the prints to be dried have 
been rolled in. 

Under average conditions, 
where a current of air can strike 
the machine, the prints should 
dry perfectly over night. 



R 



EADY WHEN THE 
BELL RINGS 

"Hello! is this 249 Main — 
Brown's Studio? How do jou 
do, Mr. Brown. This is Mrs. Got 
Cash. The children's grandpa is 
here for a short visit and I'd like 
verj" much to ha\e you come out 
to the house and make some 
pictin-es of him and the children 
in our living room. No, the room 
is rather dark in furnishings, but 
the windows are good size. To- 
moiTow afternoon at 2 : 30 will 
suit me very nicely. Good-bye." 

Well let's see — that means a 



pretty good order, and though 
we don't do much in the home 
portraiture line, we'll have to 
tackle this job and deliver the 
goods. 

" Old gentleman — he'll stand 
for a time exposure all right, but 
the children, even in light 
dresses means a mighty short ex- 
posure as they simplj' can't keep 
still. 

Frank, bring out that eight 
by ten view box, and uncouple 
that portrait lens from the studio 
camera. No, the lens board is 
not half big enough, and if it 
Avere the front was never made 
to support so much weight. I'd 
like mighty well to take advan- 
tage of the speed of that portrait 
lens, but I'll have to use the 
smaller and slower lens and take 
chances on the children mo\ ing. " 

Just such proi)ositions as this 
confront us every once in a while, 
and if they find us unprepared 
— well, we just have to take 
chances, and at the first opportu- 
nity guard against similar hap- 
penings in the future. 

There is a camera ideal for 
just such ])urposes, though it 
was designed for other work — 
the Improved Sky wScraper Cam- 
era manufactured by the Folmer 
& Schwing Division of the East- 
man Kodak Company. 

The Sky Scraper Camera was 
designed for use in photograph- 
ing tall buildings, and other 
subjects where gi-eat rise of front 
and excessive swing back are 



the ARISTO EAGLE 




FROM AN ARISTO PLATING PRINT 

Btj C. F. Bretzman Indianapolin, Ind. 



STUDIO LIGHT and 



\ \ 



necessary. Just right for such 
purposes, the Sky Scraper also is 
just right for home portraiture 
work, with large lenses. In ad- 
dition to the rising front, both 
vertical and horizontal swings 
are jjrovided, t)perating by wonn 
screws. Focusing is done by 
means of finely adjusted rack 
and pinion and the back is re- 
versilile, thus providing all the 
convenient adjustments of the 
up-to-date studio camera. 

Its great features for home 
portraiture work, are its strong 
and extremely rigid fi-ont and 
extra large lens board, the one 
for the 8x10 size measuring 7 x 
7 inches, the 1 1 x 1 ^j S x 8 inches, 
ample in every way to accommo- 
date the large, extreme speed 
portrait lenses. The Sky Scraper 
is exceedingly compact, as the 8 
X 10 measures 16^x13x7/^ 
inches and weighs but 1 1 pounds. 
The large fi-ont permits the fit- 
ting of the noiseless Auto Studio 
Shutter, so that the equii)ment 
provides every studio camera con- 
venience together with ordinary 
view camera portability. 

We know of no better invest- 
ment than one of these instru- 
ments, as they are fully capable 
of taking care of most of the out 
of the studio requirements. 

The Folmer & Schwing Divis- 
ion makes them and your dealer 
will be verj' pleased to afford full 
particulars on request, so you can 
be prepared when next the bell 
rings. 



THREE HANDY 
TABLES 

In arranging and equipping 
our model studio we endeavored 
to install only such fixtures as 
Avould prove thoroughly practical 
and convenient and a help in the 
economy of both time and labor. 

The three tables, or work 
benches, described in this article 
have thoroughly demonstrated 
their pi-actical efficiency in three 
years' constant use, and we have 
found no necessity for any modi- 
fications fi-om the original plans. 

It will be noticed that none of 
the shelving or cupboarding ex- 
tends entirely to the fioor — the 
free space allowing the floor un- 
derneath the benches to be easily 
swept, and also acts as a i)rotec- 
tion to the contents of the 
benches from dampness. 

The table in the printing room 
— see illustration No. 1 — is placed 
against the side wall of the room, 
just out of range from the light 
from the printing window. The 
top is pi'ovided with liack and 
end pieces about twelve inches 
high, the back forms a handy 
support for the negatives when 
sorting for printing, and also pre- 
vents any of the negatives from 
sli])ping down behind the table 
and becoming lost or damaged. 

We call your attention to the 
fact that all printing frames are 
stored in the lower part of the 
bench, either in the open shelves 
at each end or in the enclosed 



the ARISTO EAGLE 



L 



-^ y^L ic/f^tf oooy=fs 



Fig. 1. Printing Room Table 



^^->-" 



Fig. 2. Mounting Room Table 



iF^r 



Fig. 3. Enlarging Room Table 



\l 



10 



STUDIO LIGHT and 



cujilioards — this method is far 
better than sorting the frames on 
shelves above the table, as when 
stacked above the table, they 
sometimes come tumbling down 
with disastrous results to im- 
portant negatives. The table is 
provided with three snugly fit- 
ting drawers, equipjied with pull 
handles, for the storage of sensi- 
tive paper. In the cupboards be- 
neath ample space is provided 
for the storage of vignettes, tis- 
sues and other printing necessi- 
ties. 

The table in the mounting 
room is of solid construction and 
is provided Avith a broad, per- 
fectly smooth top. which may be 
covered with white rubber or oil- 
cloth to insure its surface being 
always clean, and mounts and 
prints fi'om damage by soiling. 

The long shelves for the stor- 
age of thin mountboard will be 
found a great convenience, as 
the thin stock will remain in 
perfect condition, and no time 
need be lost sorting the sheets 
to locate different colors or 
weights. The other open shelves 
may be used for storing dry 
mounting tissue or paste, and 
other incidentials for mounting, 
while the shelving protected by 
the sliding doors forms an ideal 
storage i)lace for stock mounts. 

The table in the enlarging 
room presents some unusual fea- 
tures, which, though simple, 
greatly facilitate the work when 
enlarging in large sizes. 



By referring to illustration No. 
3 it will be noticed that the top 
of this table is constructed in the 
same manner as the table in the 
printing room, and for the same 
reasons. This table is fitted 
with six drawers for the storage 
of paper and other incidentals, 
four of the drawers are of the 
ordinary type, but the two ui)per 
right hand ones are designed for 
the storage of bromide paper in 
large sizes, and are of special 
construction. 

Illustration No. 4 affords a 
profile view of one of these 
drawers when ])ulled out. It will 
be seen that the drawer is jiro- 
vided Avith a heavv l^oard cover, 
which slides up and down on 
wooden puis, and serves as a 
weight to keep the paper flat 
during storage. This cover is 
provided Avith a brass flush ring, 
so that it may be easily lifted up 
to a vertical position when it is 
necessary to remove paper for 
use. 

The fi-ont of the drawer pulls 
down, and is supported by a brass 
desk slide, making the large sizes 
of paper stored on the bottom of 
the drawer, easy of access, and 
permitting the removal of any 
size sheet without disturbing 
the remainder. The paj^er may 
be stored in this manner in its 
original enclosures, the size, sur- 
face and grade may be written in 
the edge extending, thus making 
it easy to locate and remove any 
size or grade instantly. 



the ARISTO EAGLE 



11 



The plans reproduced here- 
with are reduced from the origi- 
nal scale of three inches to the 
foot, but they of course can be 
constructed in dimensions to ac- 
commodate any space. 



We will be very pleased to re- 
ceive description of anj^ labor 
saving devices you have discov- 
ered and to rej)roduce them when 
possible, for the benefit of the 
profession. 




Fig. i. Profile of Paper Storage Drawer 



The 1909 Kodak 
Advertising Contest 
Closes October first 



VI 



12 



STUDIO LIGHT cuid 



c 



ONVENTION RECOL- 
LECTIONS 

B Y T H E O F F I C E BOY 



Say, that nt-w suit of clothes 
I got to wt-ar to the Convention 
ain't no good no more. I et so 
mutch that the i)ants is too small 
round an' too short up and down 
— they wasn't any vest with the 
suit so I ain't out so mutch as I 
might be. 

Me an' the Boss, an' Jimmie 
the printer — an' the bosses wife, 
we all gets to Rochester early 
Monday moniing. Soon's we 
get off the train a man with a 
big button sayin' on it " Ask me 
I live here" steps up an' says, 
"Where do you want to go?" 
"Senecky Hotel" says the Boss — 
"Right this way" says the man, 
an' in a few minutes we was 
there . 

Says, that's some hotel; the 
Boss got me an' Jimmie a room 
together — an' Jimmie puts up 
a job on ine with that shower 
bath thing. He says you want to 
get all slicked up before you go 
to the Convention Hall, so you 
jus' step in there an' take a 
shower bath — that was a new 
one on me, an' I says where, 
an' he shows me a funny lookin' 
thing with a rubber curtain to 
draw around jou, he shows me 
two little wheels to turn the wa- 
ter on and off, so I gets in, an' 
pulls the curtain aroun' me, an' 
turns one of them little wheels — 
Oh! Wow! 'bout a million gal- 



lons of ice water comes down on 
me, so I grabs quick an' turns 
the little wheel the other way, 
an' then turns the other wheel 
an' mos' got scalded to death — ■ 
nix for mine, I took the rest of 
my bath in the stand up wash 
stand, as I know 'bout them. 

Soon as we got some break- 
fast we starts for Convention 
Hall, jus' a couple of blocks 
away — thought we'd never get 
there at that, as the Boss kep' 
ineetin' fellows, an' shakin' 
hands an' sayin' "Hello old 
man" an' introducin' his wife, 
an' bein' introduced to other fel- 
lows wives, an' askin' is Tom or 
Dick here — guess all of em wuz 
here as he seemed to know every- 
body. 

An' when we gets in Conven- 
tion Hall ! Oh ! Ge ! most wish 
I hadn't promised to tell you 
about it. 

All the first floor, an' the 
building is a whopper, wuz 
filled with slick little booths, 
with all sorts of photographic 
things in 'em. They wuz a lot 
of pictures downstairs, but Hul- 
ly Gee, you ot to see the pic- 
tures lip stairs, miles and miles 
of 'em, the Boss had some up 
stairs — good ones too — one 
whole end an' way long one 
side wuz filled with pictures on 
Aristo (the Boss says that's the 
stuff), an' on Angelo, an' Nepe- 
ra, an' on a new one called Etch- 
ing Black — they wuz alwaj^s a 
crowd aroun' the pictures on 



the ARISTO EAGLE 



13 




FROM AN ARISTO PLATING PRINT 
By C. F. Bretzman Indianapolis, Ind. 



VI 



14 



STUDIO LIGHT and 



this etching lilack, say its great, 
soon's "we got home the Boss 
ordered two big rolls an' Jimmie 
sajs it's a cinch to work it. 

They had a lot of things doin' 
everj" night, an' Thursday night 

— but wait till I get to that. 
On Wednesday, I think it wuz, 

we all went to see 'em make 
lenses at Bausch & Lomb's — I 
tried to make a lens since we 
got home out of a couple of bot- 
tles — mos' cut my fingers off — 
'taint so easj- as it looks. Then 
we goes down to Kodak Park — 
hones' to goodness, betcha we 
walked a hundred miles down 
there — in l)uildin's an' out of 
'em, up stairs and down stairs — 
an' the ehimley for the smoke 
to go up — betcha it's higher 
than the meetin' house steeple 

— a man saj's it wuz three hun- 
dred and sixty-six feet high, a 
foot for each day in the year an^ 
a extra foot for a leap year. 
They showed you how they made 
plates an' paper, an' the paper 
boxes to put 'em in, an' they 
got a ole socker of a engine 
room, makes our town 'lectric 
light plant look like a watch 
charm. 

They had a band ])layin' out 
on the laAvn, an' things to eat, 
yep, chicken salad an' ice cream 
and cigars — dasent smoke tho', 
'cause the Boss might ketch me 
— he ketched me onct up in the 
printin' room an' he tole ma and 
ma tole pa — an' — you know. 

An' Thursday night — that's 



the night / got in good — the 
Eastman Company invites us all 
to go down to a place called On- 
tario Beach Park — jes' like 
Coney Island, only the water is 
fresh, an' the waiters ain't. 
They give us all a book with 
street car tickets in it — (sure, 
both waj's), and a ticket for din- 
ner an' tickets for all the doin's 
in the Park — eatin' that picnic 
dimier is what spoiled me for 
that new suit I tole j"Ou about. 
It rained good and plenty but 
that didn't make no difference to 
nobody, everybody avuz havin' 
too much fun to notice it — the 
boys give Frank Ban-ows — he's 
it in the association, a new vest, 
'cause he wore his ole one out 
revisin' the constitution, so a 
man tole me, an' they put a new 
gold watch and chain in it so he 
could tell when his tank-devel- 
oped negatives wuz done, an' 
Joxie Collings made a speech, 
an' Mr. Barrows he made one, 
an' Mr. Eastman he made one, 
only he didn't talk half long 
enough. 

The Boss won a cane tossin' 
rings an' give it to me only I got 
so sleepy comin' home in the car 
that I lost it — the cane I mean. 

Nex' afternoon Sandy Wilmot 
and Tot Townsend, they run the 
Defender and Seneca factories, 
invites us to another feed — it's 
a good thing I am young and 
helthy, after all them picnics 
and things. 

Every minute the whole week 



the ARISTO EAGLE 



15 



they wuz somethin' doin' an' 
everybody avuz sayin' they wuz 
havm' the time of their lives, 
an' how glad they wuz to be 
alive. I guess I could write a 
whole lot more, only mj' head is 
kinda confused like ytt with see- 
in' an' doin' so mutch. 

P. S. — The Boss has gone 
fishin' — to re-cooperate I think 
he sed. 



o 



PPORTUNITIES 



I am a lot more than half 
tempted to open up a studio 
again, remarked an old timer. 
Now-a-days there are so many 
more ways of attracting trade 
to your studio, and annexing 
extra dollars when your compet- 
itor happens to be a dead one. 
In my tune, all we could do in 
the way of advertising was to 
fill our show case full of carte- 
de-visites, and perhaps run a 
"card" in the weekly paper, 
reading "John Smith, Photog- 
rapher, Main Street." We all 
used about the same thing in 
mounts and sizes and all turned 
out about the same style of work, 
so there was mighty little chance 
to display any originality or of- 
fer anything in the way of nov- 
elties to attract people to our 
studio, outside of the stated in- 
tervals and occasions that war- 
rant^ d their having their i)ictures 
taken. 

To-day the photographer has 



unlimited variety in color, style 
and finish, and aside from his 
regular line of work can put out 
many things in the way of nov- 
elties to induce people to spend 
their money for pictures, that 
the regular run of work would 
not atti'act. 

Just glance at Taprell, Loomis 
& Company's new catalogue and 
see the multitude of dollar pul- 
lers. Take for instance those 
souvenir watch fobs, made of 
leather with strap and buckle, 
with an opening for a small pic- 
ture, they only cost twelve cents 
apiece; maybe you think I 
wouldn't fill my show case with 
those ; a few given away to the 
right young people with their 
pictures in 'em would make 
every school boy and girl in town 
feel that they just had to have 
one and my cashier would be 
pretty busy handing 'em out for 
about thirty-five cents each. 
Right on the same page are some 
midget pocket books and sou- 
venir match safes that could be 
sold in the same way. I tell 
you the man that can get a fad 
started among the young folks 
in his town is in for a quick and 
satisfactory harvest. Customers 
at thirty-five cents each may 
sound pretty small, but it not 
only paj's a profit but it is good 
advertising, it gets the young 
people acquainted with you and 
your studio. Treat the young- 
sters well and they wont forget 
you Avhen they become grown- 



16 



STUDIO LIGHT and 



" I 




FROM AN ARISTO PLATINO PRINT 
By C. F. Bretzman Indianapolis, Ind. 



the ARISTO EAGLE 



17 




FROM AN ARISTO PLATINO PRINT 

By C. F. Bretzman Indianapolis, Ind. 



VI 



li 



STUDIO LIGHT and 



ups. No, of course. I wouldn't 
start anj'thing of this sort dur- 
ing my Christmas rush or any 
other extra busy season — but 
for an off season I'd try it sure. 

The T. & L. people have a 
lot of other novelties for the 
grown-ups that can be made to 
work in M'ith your regular orders 
in great shape. When mamma 
comes in to have the kiddies' 
pictures taken, show her one of 
the De Luxe Photo Holders and 
Bill Books, with openings for 
three pictures and suggest that 
pajm would be mighty pleased to 
have one with the kiddies' pic- 
tures in — I know I would. 

All through the catalogue are 
extra dollar suggestions, and 
their line of folders and styles of 
mounts make me just itch to fix 
up my show case and give my 
competitor a jolt. 

If a man will make good clear 
work I don't see how he can help 
succeeding with all these good 
things to help him out. 



D 



UST 



We are in receipt of a 
communication from one of our 
readers requesting that we deal 
with the problem of dust elimin- 
ation in the photographic work 
room. 

We know of no absolute pre- 
ventive, but in our own work 
rooms we experience no difficulty 
in keeping it within bounds. 



Window screens and the like 
are of comparatively httle use as 
the particles of dust are so ex- 
ceedingly fine as to readily come 
through the finest screen mesh. 

The only practical solution is 
to take precaution against its 
accumulation and to remove all 
that has settled at least once a 
day or oftener. The scientifically 
constructed air filters and vacuum 
cleaners are out of the question 
for the average studio. 

The next best thing then is to 
so construct the work rooms that 
the dust can not find too many 
hiding jjlaces in which to accu- 
mulate and later spread its mil- 
lions of i)articles in the various 
unwelcome places. Hard wood, 
closely matched flooring, with 
rounded corners instead of sharp 
angles, to the rooms will assist 
greatly in the removal of the 
dust that has settled on the 
floors. Open shelves or heavy 
curtains or draperies are great 
dust catchers and should be done 
away with in all cases, except 
when al^solutely necessary. 

There is also a right and a 
wrong way for the removal of 
dust. The common variety of 
feather duster and com broom 
are simply diixt disturbers, not 
removers. The feather duster 
stirs up the dust, without remov- 
ing one particle, the com broom 
allows the heavier particles only 
to be collected, while the finer 
ones, the real trouble makers, 
are sent merrily dancing through 



the ARISTO EAGLE 



19 



the air to pop down just where 
you do not want them. 

The only way to remove dust 
from side walls and shelves is to 
wipe it up with a slightly damp- 
ened cloth. In sweejjiiig our 
rioors we employ a long handled 
brush broom, with long and 
rather fine bristles. The top of 
this broom contains a reservoir 
filled with common kerosene oil, 
which filters through in very 
small quantities, yet ample to 
prevent the dust from arising 
and escaping collection. These 
brushes are manufactured by the 
Milwaukee Dustless Brush Co., 
and are made in various sizes 
from Si inches up to 86 inches. 
The 24-inch brush lists at $5.50, 
and will last a long time if well 
treated. 



rpHE PUBLIC KNOWS 

^ The photographer who 
beheves that his patrons do not 
know or are not interested in the 
quality of paper he uses will find 
food for thought in the following 
extract from a letter recently 
received by Sweet, Wallach & 
Company, Chicago: 

You will be interested to 
know that we have gone back to 
Aristo Platino, and we find it less 
work, and can get out our work 
just as fast on Platino as we 
could on developing paper and 
the general public know that 
Aristo is better. All one needs 



to do is to hunt up some old Pla- 
tino prints and compare them 
with developed prints, and that 
will show you which is the best. " 

Yours very truly, 
(.Signed) C. W. Ahganbright, 
What Cheer, la. 

There can be no question but 
what the public is familiar with 
Aristo quality and tone. They 
may not know the name Aristo, 
but they do know the appear- 
ance of an Aristo print and that 
the prints look just as well after 
ten years as they do the day 
they are delivered. 

The best paper to use is the 
paper that will produce all the 
quality in your negative — that 
will give your customers the 
quality and tone most pleasing — 
that you yourself know is abso- 
lutely permanent, and that the 
prints will stay sold. 

That paper is the paper with 
a twenty years' reputation — 
ARISTO. 



The Fall rush will soon 
begin — Let the 

Eastman 
Plate Tank 

Save Your Time 



VI 



20 



STUDIO LIGHT and 



O 



UR ILLUSTRATIONS 



The illustrations in this 
issue are from the studio of Mr. 
C. F. Bretznian, of Indianapolis, 
Indiana. 

Mr. Bretzman believes in bread 
and butter pictures, and those he 
so kindly sent us for reproduc- 
tion are from his regular run of 
work and printed on Aristo Pla- 
tino. The Bretzman studio is 
splendidly appointed and up-to- 
date in every jjarticular, and this, 
coupled with the extensive use 
of Aristo, has been the means of 
building up a steady and profit- 
able patronage. 



I 



NCREASING ORDERS 



We plan to have every cus- 
tomer that enters our studio leave 
as man}' dollars as possible with 
us, aTid to that end we employ 
pleasant and tactful receptionists 
and do everything else possible 
to create a favorable impression 
and a desire for our work. 

There are a number of ways of 
legitimately increasing the orders 
even after the work of the wiz- 
ard (or wizardess) in the recep- 
tion room is finished. A num- 
ber of successful photographers 
make a j^ractice of making one or 
more large negatives after the 
posing for the regular order has 
been completed. In some in- 
stances, however, the cost of the 
large plates for a purely specula- 
ti\ e purpose is too great, and a 



less expensive means must be 
provided to promote the sale of 
the speculative order. A prop- 
erly made enlargement from the 
best negative of the regular sit- 
ting Mill, in the majority of cases, 
find a ready sale with the regu- 
lar order, but to sell, it must in 
every instance at least equal in 
quality the small pictures. 

While Bromide paper will 
faithfullj^ reproduce many of the 
quahties of the original negative, 
it will not in all instances prove 
suitaljle until more or less air- 
brush or hand crayon work has 
been ajiplied. But there is a pa- 
per splendidly adapted to the 
purpose, and that Avill look and 
really possess quality all through. 

Royal Nepera, either India 
Tint or pure white, will produce 
enlargements up to even sixteen 
by twenty, fiilly equalling and in 
many instances surpassing con- 
tact prints. Rojal Nepera is as 
easy to work as the ordinary bro- 
mide paper, except that it re- 
quires a longer exposure, and this 
added length of exj^osure is an 
advantage, as it affords sufficient 
time to harmonize any inequali- 
ties in the negative, strengthen- 
ing shadows, bringing out detail 
and other things dear to the heart 
of the expert printer. 

When re-developed and treat- 
ed with Nepera Waxing Solu- 
tion, enlargements on Royal 
Nepera possess a qualitj' and rich- 
ness that make them more than 
easy sellers. If you have never 



the ARISTO EAGLE 



21 



taken up or considered enlarging^ 
as a means of easily increasing 
your profits, let us send you a 
copy of "Enlarging, a Booklet of 
Suggestion for the Professional." 
This booklet is written purely 
from the j)rofessional standpoint 
and takes \\y> and describes in de- 
tail every jiart of the work, cov- 
ering enlarging by both artificial 
and daylight, and by means of 
simple home-constructed appa- 
ratus as well as by the more elab- 
orate and specially made instru- 
ments. The booklet also con- 
biins a number of invaluable 
suggestions for special effects in 
after treatment, and, of course, 
includes up-to-date formula? for 
every chemical process in enlarg- 
ing. If you hav&not already se- 
cured a copy of the booklet, wiite 
for it to-day, and, between us, 
plan to make those extra dollars. 



A 



N OPPORTUNITY 



Eastman's Etching Black 
Platinum was one of the big hits 
at the Convention. As one vis- 
itor expressed it, "It has just 
that difference as is between a 
marble Inist and the real human. " 
Etching Black has just sufficient 
warmth of tone to produce flesh 
values that stand out, and all the 
full, delicate gradation that is a 
joy to the operator and printer 
who delights in the correct ren- 
dering of the texture values of 
draperies. 



And Etching Black Platinum 
is so simple to handle. To secure 
perfect results, print in the reg- 
ular way and develop in a cold 
bath — quick, easy and certain. 

Etching Black is for the stu- 
dio that leads,— that has and 
holds a reputation for quality 
work. 

Leading studios all over the 
country are enthusiastically re- 
ordering Etching Black, and 
show case disj)lays are appearing. 
How about your show case? You 
will never have a better ojipor- 
tunitj^ to bid for and secure the 
high class trade of your territory 
than is afforded by an opportune 
display on Etching Black. 

Two grades, smooth and rough 
— your dealer will be glad to sup- 
ply you. Price same as Angelo. 



A 



LAST REMINDER 

The 1909 Kodak Adver- 
tising Contest closes October first. 
Two thousand dollars in prize 
money will be distributed amcjng 
the winners in this contest. Sim- 
ple and easily made pictures are 
going to win this money, and 
even at this late date you stand 
an equal chance of participating 
in the awards — but you must 
"get busy" at once. 

if you have entries for this con- 
test under way, complete them 
and forward to us as soon as pos- 
sible — we will promptly acknowl- 
edge their receipt upon arrival. 



>* 



22 



STUDIO LIGHT «»rf 



All entries should be ad- 
dressed to 

Eastman Kodak Co., 

Rochester, N. Y. 
Advertising Department. 

In sending j^ictures mark the 
package plainly, "Kodak Ad- 
vertising Contest," and in the 
lower left-hand comer write your 
own name and address. Then 
write us a letter as follows : 

I am sending you to-day by 
Express , .J 
Mail ^"harges prepaid 

prints. Please enter in your Kodak 

Advertising Competition, Class 

Yours truly. 

Name, 

Address, 

The name and address of the 
sender must be legibly written 
on a paper and enclosed in a 
sealed envelope in the same pack- 
age in which the prints are for- 
warded. There is to be no writ- 
ing on prints or mounts. 



A 



DVERTISE 



Our i)lan for providing up- 
to-date cuts for studio advertis- 
ing at cost, has been a big suc- 
cess from the start. In almost 
every instance, those who pur- 
chased the first cut issued have 
ordered each succeeding one, and 
we have received many letters 
commending the plan. 

Fall business is just commenc- 
ing and a judicious use of news- 
paper space cannot help but bring 
you good returns. 



Slick up the studio, re-dress 
the show case, do the best work 
you possibly can — and advertise 
— there is the combination for 
business bringing that must suc- 
ceed. To make a studio suc- 
ceed you have to do more than 
play a waiting game. True 
enough, a certain percentage of 
patrons will convince themselves 
that they need photographs, but 
peoi)le in this frame of mind are 
just as apt to stop at the studio 
down the street as they are to 
come to yours. 

On the other hand, if the 
people are convinced by your 
advertising that they need 
pictures, your studio is upper- 
most in their mind when the 
time comes, and they will pass 
the displays of j^our competitors 
without a thought, except per- 
haps to make sure that they are 
headed right to reach you. 

Our series of cuts have been 
planned to help you bring your 
business guns to bear on every 
member of the family from baby 
to grandpa. We will try our 
best to provide cuts particularly 
pertinent to each season. 

Also remember that if you have 
not purchased any of the cuts, 
you may obtain the full series 
that has been issued, provided, 
of course, that no other photog- 
rapher in your citj" has already 
ordered them. 

Send in jour order to-day and 
plan to develop your fall and 
holiday business. 



the ARISTO EAGLE 



23 



THE ONLY CON- 
DITION 

We make but one condi- 
tion in our offer of cuts for 
the use of photographers. 

It is obvious that two 
photogi'aphers in the same 
town would not care to use 
the same cut, and we are 
therefore obliged to limit 
this offer to one photogra- 
pher in a town. It will be 
a case of first come first 
served. The first order 
from a city will be promptly 
filled. Succeeding orders (if 
any) will necessarily be 
turned down and the re- 
mittance, of course, will be 
returned. It is also obvious 
that we cannot, on account 
of the cost of the drawings, 
furnish any large variety of 
cuts at the nominal prices 
quoted, and therefore can 
offer no substitute cut. The 
thing to do is to get your 
order in^/irst, as it would not 
be fair to give the man Avho 
happens to get in his order 
early one month, a permanent 
advantage ; we shall book no 
orders in advance. They 
must always specify the num- 
ber of cut desired. If later 
on it develops that there is 
a great enough demand for 
these advertising cuts to war- 
rant our fiimishing a larger 
variety, we shall be glad to 
do so. c. K. Co., Ltd. 




To You Who Are 
Engaged 

You want her pic- 
ture to keep always 
and you want to give 
her yours too. 

Telephone to-day for an 
appointment. 

The Pyro Studio 



Cut No. 145. i^nce 5u cents 



24 



STUDIO LIGHT and 



THE NEW ENGLAND 
CONVENTION 

Though the Convention of the 
Photographers Association of 
New England, held in Boston, 
August 3, 4 and 5, was not a 
success from point of numbers 
in attendance, it was successful 
in the carrying out of a highly 
instructive and entertaining pro- 
gram. 

The following officers were 
elected unanimously : 

President, W. F. Oliver, Bald- 
winsville, Mass.; first vice-presi- 
dent, Fred E. Frizzell, Dorches- 
ter, Mass. ; second vice-president, 
E. L. Byrd, Cambridge, Mass.; 
secretary, George H. Hastings, 
Haverhill, Mass. ; treasurer, Samuel 
M. Holman, Attleboro, Mass. State 
vice-presidents: Maine, L.C.Gerry, 
Sanford; New Hampshire, C. L. 
Powers, Claremont; Vermont, A. 
A. Bishop, Newport; Rhode Island, 
W. B. Davidson, Narragansett Pier; 
Connecticut, J. P. Haley, Bridge- 
port; Maritime Provinces, J. Y. 
Mersereau, Chatham, N. B. 



AWARDS 

GRAND PORTRAIT CLASS. 

A. A. Bishop, Newport, Vt. 

PORTRAIT CLASS. 

1. A. A. Bishop, Newport, Vt. 

9. Byrd Studios, Cambridge, 
Mass. 

3. Frank R. Barrows, Dorchester, 
Mass. 

GENRE CLASS. 

1. Thibault Studio, Fall River, 
Mass. 

2. A. A. Bishop, Newport, Vt. 

'i. Katherine B. Stanley, Spring- 
field, Mass. 

GROIP CLASS. 

1. Frank R. Barrows, Dorchester, 
Mass. 

9. W. B. Davidson, Narragansett 
Pier, R. I. 

I^NDSCAPE CLASS. 

1. George E. Tingley, Mystic, 
Conn. 

2. W. H. Manahan, Jr. 

ANGEI.O PRIZE. 

W. B. Davidson, Narragansett 
Pier, R. L 

ARISTO PRIZE. 

Divided between J. H. C. Evan- 
off, Salem, Mass., and Thibault 
Studio, Fall River, Mass. 



B 



ulletin: the eastman school of 
Professional photography for 1909 



Northwestern Photog. Conv., St. Paul, Minn., Sept. 2, 3, 4. 
Auspices Duffin & Co., Winnipeg, Man., September 8, 9, 10. 



A number of further datings for the fall term of the school are 
practically arranged, and will be announced in our October issue. 



f 



the ARISTO EAGLE 



25 



New NEPERA List 

NEPERA is not furnished in dozens in sizes smaller than 5 x 7, or in rolls 
shorter than ten yarils, unless as listed below. 



SINGLE WEIGHT. 



DOUBLE WEIGHT. 









/ CABIN FJT 








Dozen 


Vi Gross 


Gross 


1 3'sX5l2 


Dozen 


■ 2 Gross 


Gross 




$.85 


$1.50 


J 4X5 V 

4I4 X 54 

3^8 X 5^8 
4X6 / 




$1.00 


$1.90 




1.15 


1.95 


4'i X 6'/2 




1.45 


2.45 




1.30 


2.20 


4-^4 X 6'-2 




1.60 


2.75 


.25 


1.45 


2.40 


5X7 


.30 


1.85 


3.00 


.30 


1.60 


2.65 


5 X 7H 


.35 


2.00 


3.30 


.30 


1.60 


2.70 


5X8 


.35 


2.00 


3.40 


.35 


1.75 


3.00 


5' 2 X 7^4 


.40 


2.20 


3.75 


.40 


2.05 


3.60 


6X8 


.45 


2.55 


4.50 


.40 


2.20 


3.85 


6' 7 X 8I2 


.50 


2.75 


4 80 


.45 


2.50 


4.50 


7X9 


.55 


3.10 


5.65 


.50 


2.80 


5.25 


7' ' X 9I2 


.70 


3.55 


6. .55 


.55 


3.15 


5.85 


8X 10 


.75 


3.95 


7.30 


.70 


3.80 ' 


7.20 


9X 11 


.90 


4.75 


9.00 


.85 


4.75 


9.00 


10 X 12 


1.15 


5.95 


11.25 


1.10 


6.30 


11.70 


11 X 14 


1.45 


7.90 


14.65 


1.25 


7.45 


13.95 


12 X 15 


1.75 


9.30 


17.45 


1.65 


9.45 


18.00 


14 X 17 


2.25 


11.80 


22.50 


2.20 


12.60 


24.30 


16 X20 


3.05 


15.75 


30.40 


2.40 


13.50 


26.10 


17X20 


3.25 


16.90 


32.65 


2.70 


15.75 


30.60 


18 X 22 


3.85 


19.70 


38.25 


3.15 


18.45 


36.00 


20 X 24 


4.50 


23.05 


4.-5.00 



Gross and half-gross packages of cut sheets of paper of sizes not listed will 
will be supplied providing the order amounts to $1.00 list or more, and list of 
same will be practically proportionate to that of listed sizes. 

NEPERA SECONDS furnished in limited quantities in all surfaces in 3^s x 
5' 2 (Cabinet) and 4x6 only. 
Single Weight, . $1.00 per gross | Double Weight, . $1.25 per gross 

ROLLS 





SINGLE WEIGHT. 






DOUBLE WEIGHT. 




10 ft. 


Roll, 20 inches wide. 


$1.50 


10 ft. Roll, 20 inches wide. 


$1.90 


10 ft. 


■' 40 " 


3.00 


10 ft. • 


40 


3.75 


10 yd. 


" 20 " 


4.50 


10 yd. ' 


20 " 


5.65 


10 yd. 


" 40 " 


9.00 


10 yd. ' 


40 " 


11.25 




Rolls 10 yards or longer are supplied in any width up to 40 inches. 






For Pri 


NTS FROM CiRKUT 


Negatives 






SINGLE WEIGHT. 




DOUBLE WEIGHT. 






6I2 in. 8 in. 10 in. 


16 in. 




6' 2 in. 8 in. 10 in. 


16 in. 


25 ft. 


$1.25 $1.50 $1.90 


$3.00 


25 ft. 


$1.60 $1.90 $2.35 


$3.75 


50 ft 


2.50 3.00 3.75 


6.00 


50 ft. 


3.15 3.75 4.75 


7.50 


100 ft. 


4.95 6.00 7.50 


12.00 


100 ft. 


6.30 7.50 9.45 


15.00 



CANADIAN KODAK CO., Ltd. , Toronto, Can. 



26 STUDIO LIGHT flnrf 



For the best Studio in town— 



EASTMAN 




PLATINUM 

A distinctive paper— all the richness 
of Platinum blacks, with a delicate 
pleasing warmth found in no other 
black and white Platinum. 

Two Grades : Smooth and Rough. 



Eastman Kodak Company 

ROCHESTER, N. Y. 



f 



the ARISTO EAGLE 



27 




THERE IS COMFORT 

as well as CONVENIENXE and RESULTS in the 

EASTMAN PLATE TANK 

The simple loading device permits the loading of 
the plates into the rack in a few seconds, with- 
out scratching or marring. 

The air-tight, locking cover allows the whole tank 
to be reversed — no Ji.shing the plate rack out of 
the solution during development — and the hand on 
the dial tells you when development will be 
completed. 

Eastman Plate Tank, 5x7, - $4.50 

Eastman Plate Tank, 8x 10, - 10.00 

CANADIAN KODAK CO., Limited 

TORONTO, CAN. 



28 STUDIO LIGHT flHf/ f 



$50000 

FOR ONE SIMPLE PICTURE 



Total Prizes 

$2000'^ 



IN THE 



Kodak 

Advertising Contest 

CONTEST CLOSES OCTOBER FIRST 
FULL PARTICULARS ON REQUEST 



Eastman Kodak Co. 

Rochester, \cic York 



the ARISTO EAGLE 



29 



Angelo Sepia Platinum 
Papers 

GRADES SMOOTH AND ROUGH 



Cabinet 




6>2 


X 


8 


8 


X 


10 


20 


X 


26 


20 


X 


26 


20 


X 


26 



Per Dozen 


1 


.55 


a a 




1.25 


a i I 




1.85 


Per % Dozen 




2.6o 


" yz " 




5.00 


Per Dozen 




10.00 



Roll, 20 inches wide by 26 feet long, 

equal to one dozen 20 x 26 sheets 
Roll, 20 inches wide by 13 feet long, 

equal to six 20 x 26 sheets 
Angelo Sepia Sol ution ( ]/?. gal . bottle) 
Angelo Sepia Solution (6 oz. bottle) 
Angelo Sepia Solution (s oz. bottle) 
Angelo Sepia Solution (2 oz. amateur 

size) ..... 

Angelo Sepia Solution ( 1 pint bottle) 
Angelo Sepia Salts (}^ lb.) 
Angelo Sepia Salts {}{. lb.) 
Angelo Sepia Salts (Amateur size) 

Sepia Solution is paci^ed in cases containing 8 ■/2-gal. ; 36 pint 
()-oz. ; S>ti 3-()z. or 96 of tlie amateur size bottles. 

Sepia Salts are packed in cases containing 7-2 >2-lb. ; 144 % 
or \\\^ amateur size packages. 



10.00 



,00 
.00 
,00 
,50 



,.3 

.50 
.30 
15 
,10 

; -IH 

-lb. 



CANADIAN KODAK CO., Limited 



TORONTO, CANADA 



30 STUDIO LIGHT «Mrf 



ROYAL 
NEPERA 

Pure White 



The developing paper 
that forgets to curl. 




Canadian 

Kodak 

Co. 

Lid. 

Toronto, 
Canada 




the ARISTO EAGLE 



31 




32 



STUDIO LIGHT a7td 



WE HAVE IT 



Just what you 
The Newcastle 
unmounted 
miniature 
])rints. 



arelookini^for. 
style for 








"•' -^ 


















' \ i ' 




1 


< 




i 


- ,. .A 



Colors: Broicnfoi- Sepias find Grey for Black and White tones. 

The Newcastle is made double thickness, water silk finish, 
colored deckle all around, etched tissue; neat crest in upper left 
hand corner. You just tip the edges of the print with paste and 
place it in folder. They are for any style of print in backed 
Aristo, Nepera or Platinum papers. A Sample Free. 

PRICE LIST 



Size 


For Print 


Size Closed 


Price Per 100 


E 


1 > Cabinet Square 


3x4 


$1.50 


AA 


Cabinet Square 


4x5^4 


1.80 



Designed and Manufactured by 



THE CANADIAN CARD CO 

TORONTO, CANADA 



Aristo Motto 



^Wf^ believe permanency is the 
' ' Keystone of Photographic 
Success, and all brands of paper 
bearing our Trade-mark are manu- 
factured on this principle. We hold 
our consumer's reputation and suc- 
cess identical with our own. We 
surround both with every safe- 
guard known to chemical science 
and cur own experience." 




By The Rose Studio 



FROM A COLLODIO-CARBON PRINT 



Providence, R. I. 




L^l 




and the :?^R.IkS^O :^7^GIJ^ 



A Magazine of Information for the Profession 



S KW SK RIHS 
Vol . 1 No. s 



OCTOBER 1909 



01 n S> RIES 

No. 105 



NEGATIVE QUALITY 
AND RESULTS 

In making arfjuments for the 
jn-oduct which they sell, repre- 
sentatives of certain ])hot()<jrai)hic 
paper concerns fretjuently state 
that results on their jiaper de- 
pend ui)on a si)ecial character of 
negative used to print from. 
They give as their opinion that 
the qualitj' of negatives should 
always be varied to meet the 
l)articular paper used. Followed 
to its logical conclusion this 
means no standard in negative 
making and that negatives are to 
be considered good or bad mere- 
ly in their relation to this or that 
l)rinting paper. A good nega- 
tive for one paper must be con- 
demned and discarded when 
prints are wanted on some other 
paper. 

In landscape work this varia- 
tion in printing quality of nega- 
tive is difficult to avoid, as no 
one paper emulsion can have the 
latitude to produce best possible 
results from negatives of widely 
varying density and quality such 
as are frequently made. But this 
complication and uncertainty are 



undesirable and unnecessary for 
the portrait photographer. 

To support their argument 
these representatives mention 
the Albumen paper which, when 
in vogue, they state required a 
negative of a particular quality, 
which quality became obsolete 
Avhen other papers were adojited, 
and thej^ argue that the quality 
of negatives would always vary 
from time to time as photogra- 
phers shift fi-om one paper to 
another. Historically this state- 
ment is incorrect. In the Albu- 
men daj's there was a certain 
negative quality which was ac- 
cejjted as perfect and by the ma- 
jority of experienced and skilled 
photographers at the present day 
the writer lielieves that the chem- 
ical quality of negatives of the 
Albumen days should still be 
considered as ideal. 

When prepared papers were 
first introduced the emulsions 
were of a quality especially 
adapted to producing the best 
results on negatives which were 
then generally made. The first 
prepared papers that came out 
were for the most part coated 
with gelatine emulsions. After 



STUDIO LIGHT and 



these came the American Aristo 
Bhie Label, which was a pure 
Collodion paper of such brilliant 
printing quality that a particu- 
larly soft negative was required. 
It was at this time that a special 
negative to suit the jjaper was 
first advocated by the manufac- 
turers. The manufacturers of this 
paper were, however, quick to 
perceive the disadvantages of 
recommending a new sort of neg- 
ative. It was largely because the 
Aristo Blue Label was not adapt- 
ed to the negatives generally 
made that it did not take the 
pkice which, on account of its 
permanency and capacitj' for 
beautiful tones, was expected for 
it. To-day it is not known. 

Following this in logical order 
came the Aristo Jr. and the 
Aristo Platino. These papers 
proved popular because they 
suited the Albumen" nega- 
tives, and where you find a i)ho- 
tographer who is using Aristo 
Platino to-day and getting the 
best results, you will also find he 
is making negatives which will 
produce excellent results on the 
old Albumen paper. This proves 
that from the inception of nega- 
tive making the recognized and 
accepted characteristics of a per- 
fect negative have not materially 
changed. Styles may change, but 
real worth is the same in all 
ages. Character in jiictures is 
much like human character. The 
gentleman of fifty years ago 
would still qualify as the gentle- 



man of to-day. Basic principles 
cannot be changed to meet mo- 
mentary conditions. 

Let us go back to first princi- 
ples. The writer contends that 
photographic printing pajjcr 
should be made for the negative 
rather than the negative made 
for the paper. Some manufac- 
turers in the Collodion P. O. P., 
as well as in the gelatine 1). O. 
P., field recognize this and 
work for it, others do not. Let 
any of us who have not already 
done so, start in anew and build 
on the foundation of technical 
excellence in negative making. 
Let us have that roundness, bril- 
liancy and gradation in negatives 
which will yield prints pleasing 
to the eye and which our best 
friend, the public, most admires. 
Whatever supei-structure of art 
and style, of ideality, romance 
and poetry which we may wea\e 
into and about our pictures, let 
us not forget that we must lead 
and educate our customers and 
we must always make some con- 
cession to their understanding of 
"things as they are," as well as 
of our conception of "things as 
they ought to be." To harmon- 
ize these elements is the higher 
art and it is also the "bread and 
butter" end of the business which 
we should not forget. 



Oi/r Advertising Cuts 

help to more and better bus- 
iness. See page '2\. 



the ARISTO EAGLE 




FROM A COLLODIO-CARBON PRINT 
By TJie Rose Studio Providence, R. I. 



STUDIO LIGHT and 



Tj^IRST CLASS 

■^ Wanted — a first class recep- 
tionist. 

Quite often we see an adver- 
tisement of this nature in the 
advertising sections of the pho- 
tographic journals. An attractive 
young lady to wait on customers 
in the recejjtion room is easy 
enough to find, but to secure the 
services of a first class receptionist 
is quite another matter. True, 
the first class receptionist must 
lie attractive and neat, but in 
addition she must possess quali- 
fications above the average. It 
is imjjerative if she is to be of 
full value to the studio employ- 
ing her that she possess great 
tact and true selling ability. 
There is more than one studio 
that holds many of its ])atrons 
year after year almost solely on 
account of the personality of the 
lady in the reception room and 
her ability to make and retain 
friends. It is easy enough to sell 
what a customer Avants, a lot of 
samj)le prints with the prices on 
could in most cases do that, but 
it requires alnlity and dijjlomacy 
of a high order to sell a customer 
what he or she ought to have. A 
first class receptionist must pos- 
sess the ability to " size up " her 
customers, and to know intui- 
tively just what class or price of 
work to present and just when 
to force the sale of higher jiriced 
pictures or recede gracefully to 
something less expensive. 



One thing sometimes over- 
looked even by otherwise clever 
receptionists is simplicity of 
attire; gowns too fussy or too 
elaborate create a feeling of dis- 
comfort with patrons of small 
means, and those with a plethora 
of this world's goods likewise re- 
sent it. The clever receptionist 
knows and remembers names and 
faces — addressing a person by 
name often helps a lot in estab- 
lishing pleasant relations and she 
likewise knows just M'hen and 
when not to make suggestions re- 
garding costume, coiffure or jjose. 

One of the most valuable qual- 
ities of the first class recej)tionist 
is loyaltj^ to the studio that em- 
jiloys her: she must not only feel 
that her studio turns out the best 
work but she must impart this 
feeling to not only her customers 
but to her employer and business 
associates as well. 



o 



UR ILLUSTRATIONS 



The portrait illustrations 
in this issue are from the well 
known studio of Ph. Rose, Provi- 
dence, Rhode Island. Mr. Rose 
has been in his present location 
many years and is happy in one 
of the most jjerfectly appointed 
studios in the country. The Rose 
Studio enjoys a high class patron- 
age—the kind that is quick to 
appreciate the sterling quality of 
Aristo the stand-by of the Rose 
establishment. 



the ARISTO EAGLE 



N 



EGATIVE AND POSI- 
TIVE 

Men in business achertise what 
they have to sell in either a neg- 
ative or positive manner. Nega- 
tive advertising does not necessa- 
rily mean publicity that will give 
the business a bad name, but an 
attempt at publicity that fails be- 
cause it neither attracts nor con- 
vinces. The majority of i)rofes- 
sional j^hotographers have show 
cases filled with examples of 
their work, and the purj^ose of 
these show cases is to sufficiently 
attract the passers-by so they 
will come in and spend money 
for photographs. The average 
person does not purchase photo- 
graphs every day or e\ery month , 
and unless some special occasion 
demands it, having his picture 
taken does not enter his mind. 
If your show case is like too 
many of the show cases he passes 
it bj^ without even a thought, or 
if having a moment or so to idle, 
he casually inspects it and passes 
on, your name and your work 
having made absolutely no im- 
pression on his mind — and should 
occasion arise for having his pic- 
ture taken, he asks his wife or 
some friend whom to patronize, 
and you take the chance with 
all your competitors of being the 
lucky one that gets his money. 
"Yes, I believe there is a pho- 
tographer in this block — seems 
to me I've seen his show case 
somewhere along hei'e — I couldn't 



say whether he does good work 
or not." That is what we mean 
by negative advertising. If your 
efforts at publicity do not differ 
from those of your competitors 
you are benefiting them equally 
well. Your show case can be 
made to do positive advertising, 
the kind that will bring people 
inside your studio. 

You every day pass a dead wall 
with a sign on it — that sign has 
been painted there a year or 
more, you have seen it, read it, 
know it is there, yet if anyone 
should ask you off-hand whose 
sign it was or just what it said, 
ten to one you couldn't tell him. 
Yet let someone over night re- 
place that sign with a new one, 
you would notice it the first thing 
and if they kept changing it every 
little while you would look to 
see what it said every time you 
passed. Your show case can do 
equally well for you. Make it at- 
tract, not only by the good work it 
contains, but by it or its contents 
being different from those of 
your comi)etitors, and keep the 
interest up, by giving the ])assing 
jjublic something new every lit- 
tle while — once a week at least 
— every day if i)Ossible. Of course 
this means extra work and extra 
cost, but if it brings in more dol- 
lars — and it surely will — it is 
worth more than the labor and 
money it costs. 

Positive advertising is the kind 
that helps i/oii, that brings the 
public to your studio, instead of 



STUDIO LIGHT and 



letting them wander hap-hazard 
into the first studio they come 
to. When they do stop to ex- 
amine your show case, give them 
aside from your good work some 
httle argument to convince them 
that you are "it" in the picture 
making business, and Avhenever 
possible convince them of their 
need for photographs made by 
you. 

The Canadian Card Comjjany 
have i)re))ared a set of twelve at- 
tractive and convincing show case 
cards that will help out wonder- 
fullj" in a positive advertising 
camjiaign. These cards are four 
by six inches in size and printed 
on good heavy stock in two col- 
ors. Included in the set is also 
a large card eight and one-half 
by fourteen inches with a most 
convincing argument for you and 
your products. The price of the 
comjilete set is only 25 cents. 
In connection with the set the 
C. C. Co. have to say: 

"These show cards should In- 
changed at least twice or three 
times a week, so as to keep the 
interest of the public on phoio- 
araphs; in fact, we believe it 
would be policy to change your 
pictures, in other words, to make 
up enough sample prints to 
change your show case three 
times; that will enable you to 
keep changing the styles around : 
in other words, Avith enough sam- 
ple prints to change your win- 
dows comjilete three times, will 
enable you to make 20 or 25 



effective dressings bj' changing 
the styles around, and with the 
aid of these show cards, the at- 



HE Kiddies 

rt^ are my specialty 
This is their studio 




T 



OUR SPECIALTIES 



Correct Posing 
Popular Tones 
Scientific Lighting 
The Latest Styles 



Two of the Show Case Cards 

tention of the public can be riv- 
eted effectively on your photographs 
in their different styles and 
finishes. The large card should 
be tacked up at intervals in your 
show window or show case so 
that the public may read it as 
they pass by. You will notice 
that it draws particular attention 
to the desirability of photographs 
as gifts, which will insure a large 
jiortion of the buying public leav- 
ing their money with yon instead 
of with stores engaged in other 
lines of business." 



the ARISTO EAGLE 




FROM A COLLODIO-CARBON PRINT 
By The Rose Studio Providence, R. I. 



10 



STUDIO LIGHT and 



THE WOMEN'S SEC- 
TION P. A. of A. 

To the li'ometi of the profession : 

The movement towards uniting 
the women photographers of the 
eountry, whieh liegan in a modest 
way at the Detroit Convention 
in 190s, has resulted this year, 
at the National Assemblj^ at 
Rochester, in the formation of a 
Section for the purpose of ad- 
vancing their art. " In union 
there is strength," and a good 
fellowship among co-workers is 
sure to prove of benefit to all. 

The following officers were 
elected : 

President, Mary Camell, 1.314. 
Chestnut St., Philadelphia; Vice- 
President, Belle Johnson, Mon- 
roe City, Mo. ; Secy and Treas., 
M. Estelle Jenkins, Chicago; 
Chairman Eastern Section, Ger- 
trude Kasebier, 315 5th Ave., 
New York; Chairman Middle 
Section, Katherine Jamison, 
Centre and Highland Ave., Wal- 
lace Blk., Pittsburg, Pa.; Chair- 
man Western Section, lola White, 
Kansas City, Mo. 

Those who did not participate 
in the j)roceedings at the National 
Convention are herewith heartily 
invited to join the federation, 
which has already representatives 
in nearly every state in the union. 
It is hoped that each woman 
photograi)her in America will 
promptly conununicate with the 
chairman of her Section or with 
the Secretary, M. Estelle Jen- 



kins, 115 N. Park Ave., Austin 
Station, Chicago, 111., that she 
may be informed of the full pur- 
pose and plans of the Association. 
Cordially yours, 
Mary Carnell, President. 



o 



NLY NINE 



We once saw a well drilled 
witness called in court. It was a 
criminal case of some importance 
and after the attorney for the 
prosecution had finished with the 
witness, he was, as usual, turned 
over to the ojiposing attorney for 
cross-examination. 

After the usual questions as to 
name, age, occupation, and the 
like, the attorney for the defense 
asked, in sarcastic tones, "Isn't 
it true that you have been con- 
victed ten times ? " 

"No, sir," replied the witness 
in a voice that fairly trembled 
with indignation, "only nine 
times." 

The application of which story 
is that somebody slipped a cog. 
Pictures on our papers didn't take 
quite as many prizes at the Mis- 
souri Convention as were re])ort- 
ed to and then advertised by us. 
But the results were not so far 
different from our claims as to 
justify any indignant protest. 
Even after making the claimed 
allowance, the results were over- 
whelmingly Eastman. 

Once again Missouri was 
shown. 



the ARISTO EAGLE 



11 




FROM A COLLODIO-CARBON PRINT 
By The Rose Studio Providence, R. I. 



12 



STUDIO LIGHT and 



T 



AKE TIME TO SAVE 
TIME 

Every once in a while you come 
across a ])hotographer v.ho com- 
plains of unsatisfactory results 
with develojiing out papers, and 
just so often you find that it is 
the photographer and not the 
paper that is at fault. 

Most of the trouble arises from 
the fact that as developing out 
papers are so much quicker than 
printing out paj)ers, the user 
seems to feel that he must hurry, 
keeping pace with the short du- 
ration of exposure, and go slaj) 
dash, any old way or else his 
print will get away fi-om him. In 
fact too much stress has been laid 
upon the time saving qualities of 
develo])ing out papers, and the 
new manipulator seems to be- 
grudge every moment that he 
should and must devote to the 
proper ]ire])aration of his devel- 
oper and fixing bath. 

With Nepera the producing of 
first class prints is a simple matter, 
only in saving time you must not 
waste it. For instance; your de- 
veloper must be properly ])re- 
pared, from the best and purest 
chemicals you can purchase, and 
carefully weighed and measured 
in accordance with the official 
formula. True enough, most any 
developer will produce some sort 
of an image when applied to a 
sheet of the paper exposed under 
a negative, but if the developer 
has been carelessly prepared, or 



not in accordance with the right 
formula, you cannot expect the 
l)est results and have been wasting 
some of the time you expected 
the paper to save. 

Proper temperature of the 
developing solution plays an im- 
portant part in the color and gra- 
dation of the print, and if you 
"just guess at" the temperature 
instead of using the thermometer 
and the very few moments of 
time necessary to obtain the 
jiroper degree, you are wasting 
still more of the time that should 
be saved. 

To projierly handle developing 
liaper, follow the printed in- 
structions exactly and thoroughly . 
Take time and pains to see that 
everything is just right — the time 
thus spent is not wasted, and this 
is the only way you can make 
develoj)ing out paper save you 
the amount of time it should 
save over any of the printing 
out processes. 



PIE AND CAKE 
Dear Mr. Editor: 

On behalf of the frater- 
nity I want to say that we can 
see through a wire fence. 

We can see the point to your 
"bread and butter" phrase used 
in the Aristo advertising and the 
attempts made to create preju- 
dice against you on account of it 
dont go. Of course, we also 
like and deserve lobster Newburg 



the ARISTO EAGLE 



13 



and ice cream and cake, and lots 
of us are getting these minor 
frills, to say nothing of automo- 
biles. The man who implies, by 
giving it an unfair twist, that we 
can't see through a figure of 
speech, insults our intelligence. 
We require no diagram or kinder- 
garten instruction to see that 
"bread and butter" work means 
business work, — work that sells, 
— work that assures an income. 

Personally, I don't believe 
that the real people mean to put 
out such puerile attempts at pre- 
judice creating as have been made 
in their name, but they have 
some second lieutenants and cor- 
porals who need discii)lining. No 
early aid to the addled is neces- 
sary in the case of the profes- 
sional photographers. They, for- 
tunately, have the mental capac- 
itj' to understand an ordinary 
figure of speech and are also keen 
enough to see why the attempts 
at perverting the same are made. 

That's all. 

Yours truly, 

Stereoscope. 



o 



N GETTING WISE 



The time to order 
that Eastman Plate 
Tank is 

Now 



BY THE OFFICE B O Y 

I'm goiii' to the E. K. School 
again this year— me. an' the Boss, 
and Jimmie the printer. 

Las' year was the first time I 
t-ver slep in a sleepin' car, an' in 
the mornin' when I woke up I 
forgot where I was an' jumped up 
an' whacked my dome so hard I 
mos' broke my main spring. 

The Boss is goin' to have a lot 
of things done while we're away. 
Studio all repainted and i)apered, 
new curtains in the opera tin' room 
— says he wont have no time to 
do it when he gets back. 

He was out in the operatin' 
room the other daj' showin' the 
paint man what he wanted done 
when a chap comes in an' asts 
him does he want to buy any 
chemicals. Maybe, says the 
Boss, an' the man says the pho- 
tographers is all payin' too much 
for their chemicals, an' he can 
sell 'em to 'em for about half 
what what they are payin' the 
stock house man. 

Are your chemicals strictly 
high-grade? asts the Boss. Well 
now, says the man, chemicals is 
jus' chemicals, and all this talk 
about high-grade and low grade 
chemicals is mos'ly in your 
eye. 

Is that so? says the Boss, may- 
1)e you think us photographers 
aint gettin' waked up on this 
chemical question, an' maylje we 
aint some posted as whether the 



14 



STUDIO LIGHT and 



low priced chemicals is the cheap- 
est or not. 

Sposin' I spend half a day out 
here under the lio;ht niakin' some 
corkin' negatives, an' vhen I am 
ready to put 'em in the tank to 
develop I don't know the strength 
of my developer, I'm up against 
it good an' hard, aint I, an' 
sposin' I save half a cent or even 
five cents an ounce on my sodas, 
an' don't get the best results on 
the four or five dollars worth of 
plates, to say nothin' of my time, 
I'm ahead, 7wt. 

No, sir, we've been gettin' 
posted, an' we know that the 
common garden variety of car- 
bonate mos' usuallj' has a lot of 
things in it besides carlionate, 
such as silicic acid, sulphiu'ic acid, 
arsenic, lime, phosphoric acid, 
hypo, bi-carbonate, and some 
everj' day dirt thrown in for good 
measure. Sulphite aint so liad, 
the impurity is mos'ly sulphate, 
don' do any harm, but you can't 
tell how much is sulphate an' 
how much is sulphite, an' when 
you go to weigh out your stuff 
accordin' to fornuila, you're only 
guessin', says the Boss, I pay 
good money for my chemicals 
when they have that little C. K. 
C. Tested Chemical label on 'em 
— then I know where I'm at. 

The Boss aint no tight wad an' 
he was born near Joplin. 



I 



NCREASING THE 
BUSINESS PROFIT 



The man Avho conducts a 
photographic studio and the man 
engaged in running a drj' goods 
store are in business for the 
same reason — to make money. It 
is true that the dry goods man 
handles mostly what we term 
necessities," that the people in 
his town must purchase, while 
the jihotographer deals m what 
may be called luxuries. In or- 
dinary good times both the nec- 
essities and the luxuries find a 
market with all classes of people, 
and when the profit is small, 
owing to the low price or grade 
of the goods sold, it then be- 
comes necessary, in order to in- 
crease profits, to educate your 
trade into a desire for something 
better — that sells for a higher 
price and pays a correspondingly 
greater profit. When once this 
desire is created the higher 
priced goods are sold as easily or 
easier than the cheaper ones. 
The Quoin Club Key tells how 
a dry goods store solved this 
pro])lem for one of its depart- 
ments : 

There was a dry goods store 
in a small Michigan town. Its 
corset department did a large 
business in fifty-cent goods. A 
dollar and a half was the utmost 
limit. When a woman in that 
little town paid one-fifty for a 
pair of corsets she thought she 
had a costly luxury. But one 



the ARISTO EAGLE 



15 



day a traveling salesman came 
along, as the story is told, and 
said there was no reason in the 
world why this department 
should not be systematically 
brought up the line in quality 
and price and annual turnover. 
He began by giving a properly- 
fitted two-dollar and a half cor- 
set to the woman clerk at the 
corset counter. She was a 
stoutish woman. Her figure im- 
proved greatly. Her enthusiasm 
lead her to speak of that two- 
fifty garaient to f-ustomers of the 
better class. Even a town that 
size has its social leaders. Soon 
the "smart set" was wearing 
two-fifty corsets. In a few 
months the demand for one-fifty 
and two dollar goods was so 
steady that the old fifty-cent 
grade was thrown out of the 
store altogether. Then three- 
fifty corsets were put in. In a 
year, out went the dollar line. 
To-day that store has a good 
trade in five-dollar corsets, and is 
working toward custom-made 
goods and a corset expert." 

The illustration may be a 
homely one, but it's full of 
meaning. You can educate your 
trade, can 'bring your customer 
up to the line," if you drill your 
employees to an aj^preciation of 
what it means in added profits. 
Now it may seem a far cry frcjm 
corsets to portraits, but the un- 
derlying business principle ap- 
|)lies equally well in both cases. 

With a good clever reception- 



ist such as most of us are fort- 
unate enough to possess, and 
some good hard thinking in de- 
vising a style or two that are a 
bit different, and backing up the 
new styles with the best pos- 
sible work we can turn out, we 
have more than a fighting chance 
in educating our trade to the 
better goods and higher prices. 



THE EASTMAN 
STUDIO 

We have had the pleasure in 
previous issues of describing sev- 
eral of the time and labor sav- 
ing conveniences in use in our 
model studio. In response to a 
number of requests we publish 
in this numl)er the floor i)lan of 
the studio showing its general 
arrangement and where the de- 
vices described in our previous 
issues are installed. The plan 
shown on pages l6 and 17 is large- 
ly self explanatory, and only in 
a few histances will it be necess- 
ary to ask attention to special 
features. 

It will be noticed that there 
is a clear passageway leading 
from the reception room and 
office to any of the work rooms, 
except to the dark room in the 
rear of the operating room, and 
the dark room may be reached 
without disturbing the operater 
or sitter by means of a door 
opening behind the backgrounds. 



16 



STUDIO LIGHT ajid 




FLOOR PLAN OF THE 



the ARISTO EAGLE 



17 



roi/CM/M> •^INDO^ 




EASTMAN STUDIO 



1! 



STUDIO LIGHT aiid 



It will be noticed that all doors 
opening off the passageway be- 
tween the operating and printing 
rooms are sliding, instead of 
opening in the usual manner, 
this not only saves space, but 
likewise prevents accidents in 
case of the door suddenly open- 
ing against an employee carry- 
ing a rack of negatives. 

The skylight is of the single 
slant style and faces the north. 
From the opposite wall is sus- 
pended an Aristo Lamp for use on 
all occasions when daylight is not 
available. The printing room is 
divided into two parts, one for 
daylight printing, and one for 
artificial light, either when us- 
ing the Aristo Printing Cabinet 
or when printing develojnng out 
papers. The dividing wall be- 
tween the printing and toning 
rooms contains a cupl)oard with 
doors opening into both rooms ; 
this cupl)oard saves many a step 
as the exposed sheets are placed 
in this cupboard by the printers 
and removed by the workmen in 
the other room for toning. The 
enlarging room has its own sink 
for the handling of enlargements, 
so that class of work may l^e kept 
entirelj^ separate from the ordin- 
ary printing. 

In every respect this arrange- 
ment of studio and work rooms 
has worked perfectly in three 
years of constant use and we 
have not found it necessarj' to 
make ajiy but the most minor al- 
terations in that time. 



Any futher information re- 
garding this studio or its ap- 
pointments will be gladly fur- 
nished to the profession upon 
request. 



A 



LITTLE BIG 
FEATURE 

One extremely bad feature of 
the ordinary double plate holder 
is the inability of the light trap 
in the slide openings to prevent 
the entrance of light when the 
slide is inserted corner wise, and 
in many instances the trap fails 
to work at all, allowing a stream 
of fogging white light to strike 
across the plate during an ex- 
posure. 

The Sterling, Graphic, Gra- 
flex, Century \'iew and Univer- 
sal plate holders all overcome 
this annoying imperfection per- 
fectly by means of a spring fin- 
ger cut-off. This cut-off ab- 
solutely prevents the entrance of 
light and the slide may be 
inserted corner wise, and the 
holder left unjirotected even dur- 
ing a jjrolonged outdoor expos- 
ure without danger. 

The Sterling, Ciraphic, and 
Graflex jilate holders are manu- 
factured by the Folmer & 
Schwing Division, the Century 
by the Century Camera Division, 
and the Universal by the Roch- 
ester Optical Division, and may 
be had from your stock-house. 



the ARISTO EAGLE 



19 




FROM A COLLODIO-CARBON TRINT 
By The Rose Studio Providence, R. I 



20 



STUDIO LIGHT and 



^11 7HEN YOU NEED IT 

* * It is human nature that 
the most of us do not appreciate 
the vahie of a life preserver till 
we come slap bang up against the 
emergency that makes us wish 
we had one — then we can clear- 
ly see all its advantages, and 
would be willing to put up with 
even an indifferent one. 

It is a good deal the same way 
in our every day studio work. In 
slack seasons we put up with a 
good many inconveniences and 
make-shift devices, because we 
have plenty of time anjhow, but 
when rush time comes, then, oh! 
how frantically we wish we had 
that life preserver. With only a 
sitting or two a day, the time 
spent in the dark room develop- 
ing doesn't really amount to 
much, but when everybody 
wants a sitting at once, and you 
are making exposures up to the 
last minute, and mother is going 
to have fried chicken and hot 
biscuits for supper and wants j^ou 
home on time, theii the develop- 
ment of all those plates means a 
lot. Got to be done, too, before 
you leave, or the jiroof printer 
will be in trouble in the morning. 

With the Eastman Plate Tank 
at hand, development doesn't 
worry you a bit, twenty-four cali- 
inets at a time, and developed 
to perfection without bother, or 
damage from accident, and with- 
out any loss of time to you. 
One week's use in any rush sea- 



son will more than pay for the 
Tank — then you have all its 
splendid advantages free. 

Eastman Plate Tanks are in 
most of the studios doing good 
work to-day — if one or more is 
not working in your studio have 
your dealer send one up first de- 
livery. You'll never be sorry. 



M 



ORE PROFIT 



Raise the quality of jour 
work and you can increase its 
price. Increasing the quality 
often adds but little in the cost 
to you but adds a lot in profit. 
Of all the printing mediums at 
the command of the modern pro- 
fessional, Augelo platinum leads 
in the ability to show quality to 
even the most superficial ob- 
server. Make two prints from 
the same negative, one on carbon 
and the other on Angelo Sepia, 
and show them to any person 
without knowledge of photo- 
graphic processes, and in prac- 
tically every case the soft velvety 
quality of the Angelo print will 
M'in. Sejiia tones are the vogue 
and no ])aper outside of Angelo 
Se])ia can so successfully rejiro- 
duce every delicate gradation of 
the negative in true sepia tones. 
In Angelo Sepia you have the 
ideal medium for increasing both 
quality and price. No profes- 
sional pai)er is so easy to manip- 
ulate as Angelo, quick to print, 
simple in after treatment, pro- 



the ARISTO EAGLE 



21 




FROM A COLLODIO-CARBON PRINT 

By The Rose Sliirtio Providevrr, ff. I. 



22 



STUDIO LIGHT and 



ducing jirint after print, uniform 
in qualit}' and tone. 

The holiday season is ap- 
proaching — the harvest time. 
Now is your time to commence 
the education of your patrons in 
the higher quahty, higher priced 
work. Spend a Kttte thought in 
devising some up to the minute 
styles, make a show case and re- 
ception room display on Angelo — 
do it now before the man down 
the street comes out with his — 
and you will be a long way on 
the road to increased profits. 



rpOO GOOD TO MISS 

The scope of the Eastman 
School of Professional Photog- 
raphy is much greater than the 
photographer who has never at- 
tended its sessions can imagine. 

Every man on the school staff 
is a picked man , chosen not alone 
for his knowledge of things pho- 
tographic, but for his abilitj' to 
intelligently and successfully im- 
part his knowledge to others. 
And back of his ability as a pho- 
tographer and instructor he must 
have that something, magnetism, 
if j'ou will, that will enable him 
to make friends and to impress 
everyone attending the school 
that he is working for his especial 
benefit. 

And back of each instructor's 
skill a7id ability is the combined 
brain and nerve force of the en- 
tire Eastman organization, and 



the combined brain and nerve 
force of every photographer in 
America. By this we mean that 
the school corps is not dependent 
upon its collective skill alone, but 
is ke])t constantly in touch with 
the Eastman organization, and its 
highlj^ skilled staff of chemists 
and inventors, and in touch with 
every professional in America 
through the medium of the trav- 
eling demonstrators and salesmen. 

New and imj)roved methods 
for producing better or newer re- 
sults, or shorter cuts to the old 
ones . are constantly 1 )eing brought 
to light from these varied sources, 
and everything of value to the 
school instructors is taught them 
thoroughly and at once. 

Every minute of the three 
days session of the Eastman 
School is needed to cover the wide 
course of iustruction, and every 
minute must be and is utilized to 
the best advantage. 

No matter how many sessions 
of the Eastman School you have 
attended, it will more than re- 
pay you to attend each time it is 
in your territory, as the school is 
up to the minute and each ses- 
sion ])rovides a multitude of new 
things, the knowledge of which 
is indispensal)le to the man in the 
business to succeed. 



the ARISTO EAGLE 



23 



R 



EAD IT 



The manufacturer of sen- 
sitized i)roducts must keep up to 
date. No matter how excellent 
his product may be he must con- 
tinually strive to make it still 
better or devise formulas or 
methods for working that will 
produce even finer results. You 
who use these products are like- 
wise striving to produce the best 
possible results and the only way 
you can keep in touch with the 
improvements of the manufact- 
urer is to read the printed 
matter sent with the goods. 
Every now and then the manu- 
facturer discovers some method 
for improving his product, such 
improvement necessitating a 
change in formula or in manipu- 
lation; he changes his direction 
sheets in accordance, but camiot 
otherwise notify each individual 
consumer, so if you want always 
to secure the best results, do 
not throw away the direction 
sheet without comparing it with 
the one you have on file. 



A HANDY DARK ROOM 
LAMP 

We illustrate herewith an ex- 
ceedingly simple and practical 
dark room lamp to be used where 
electric current is available. 

Procure an ordinary two quart 
glass fruit jar, break out the por- 
celain lining in the cover and cut 



a hole through the co\er just 
large enough to fit over the 
socket of an incandescent electric 
lamp, then solder cover and sock- 




et together. Line the inside of 
the jar with two thicknesses of 
good orange post office paper. 
The best lamp for the purpose is 
an eight candle power show case 
lamp, the same as shown in the 
illustration. Screw the lamp 
into the socket and screw cover 
onto jar, and you have a safe 
light of excellent illuminating 
power. 

\Mien you desire to work by 
white light, two turns will re- 
move the jar. If developing 
papers are being worked, obtain 
a second jar and line with light 
orange paper, screw into cover 
fastened to lamp and you have a 
safe and pleasant light for load- 
ing and development. By at- 
taching sufficient cord to the 
lamp it can be moved to any part 
of the dark room necessary and 
you have three lamps at a trifling 
cost. 



24 



STUDIO LIGHT and 



TH E ONLY CON- 
DITION 

We make but one condi- 
tion in our offer of cuts for 
the use of photographers. 

It is obvious that two 
photographers in the same 
town would not care to use 
the same cut, and we are 
therefore obliged to limit 
this offer to one photogra- 
pher in a town. It will In- 
a case of first come first 
served. The first order 
from a city will l)eprom])tly 
filled. Succeeding orders (if 
any) will necessarily be 
turned down and the re- 
mittance, of course, will be 
returned. It is also obvious 
that we cannot, on account 
of the cost of the drawings, 
furnish any large variety of 
cuts at the nominal prices 
quoted, and therefore can 
offer no substitute cut. The 
thing to do is to get your 
order in first, as it would not 
be fair to give the man who 
happens to get in his order 
early one month, a permanent 
advantage ; we shall book no 
orders in advance. They 
must always specify the num- 
ber of cut desired. If later 
on it develo]is that there is 
a great enough demand for 
these advertising cuts to war- 
rant our furnishing a larger 
variety, we shall be glad to 




"A picture of father 
and mother. "* — 

How it would delight your 
children, how it Mould 
please your friends. 



The Pyro Studio 



do so. 



C. K. Co., Ltd. 



No. 146. Price, 50 cents. 



the ARISTO EAGLE 



25 



ADVERTISE 

"*■ ■*■ Now is the time to get 
into the newsjjapers — don't let 
a week pass without your adver- 
tisement suggesting photographs 
as the most suitable remem- 
brances and also influencing the 
l)ul>lic to think that your studio 
is the best place to have them 
made . 

If you have not been making 
use of our advertising cut service, 
the whole series pulilished is at 
your disposal (provided, of 
course, that they have not been 
previously used in your town) 



and we will issue a new one each 
month to help you. 

Take an evening or two and 
devise plans for attracting jjcople 
to your studio and for getting 
orders when you have them in 
to see you. Keep your show 
case busy working for you every 
minute. Make the i)eople think 
of you and photograi)hs everj" 
time they glance over the news- 
paper and every time they pass 
your studio. 

An advertisement just once in 
a while Avill do some good ; ad- 
vertising all the time will do a 
lot of good, so keep everlast- 
inglv at it. 



SMOOTH ONLY 

/N f/ic Scptonhcr number the ptrjfe.mon 
teas advised that AngeJo Sepia, in certain 

sizes, zcas siepi^Ued from Toronto, and on 
piige 20 of the same issue a priee list teas 
sh(ncn. This list reads "Grades Smooth and 
llougli,'' hut the limited demand for the Rough 
does not rear rant packing it in Canada; and 
onJif the Smooth uvV/ he sup>pUed at prices re- 
ferred to above. 

See page 31 of this issue. 



26 



STUDIO LIGHT and 



New NEPERA List 



NKPERA is not furnished in dozens in sizes smaller than 5 x 
)rter tlian ten yards, unless as listed below. 



SINGLE WEIGHT. 



DOUBLE WEIGHT. 



Dozen 


Vi Gross 


Gross 


/^ CABINET \ 

V& X5I2 


Dozen 


H Gross 


Gross 




$.85 


$1.50 


J 4X5 V 
\ 414x54 { 
\ 3'8X5'8 
' 4x6 / 




$1.00 


$1.90 




1.15 


1.95 


4I4 X 61^2 




1.45 


2.45 




1.30 


2.20 


4-'4 X 6! 2 




1.60 


2.75 


.25 


1.45 


2.40 


5X7 


.30 


1.85 


3.00 


.30 


1.60 


2.65 


5 X 7I/2 


.35 


2.00 


3.30 


.30 


1.60 


2.70 


5X8 


.35 


2.00 


3.40 


.35 


1.75 


3.00 


512x734 


.40 


2.20 


3.75 


.40 


2.05 


3.60 


6X8 


.45 


2.55 


4.50 


.40 


2.20 


3.85 


6I/2 X 8!^ 


.50 


2.75 


4 80 


.45 


2.50 


4.50 


7x9 


.55 


3.10 


5.65 


.50 


2.80 


5.25 


71 2 X9!2 


.70 


3.55 


6.55 


.55 


3.15 


5.85 


8 X 10 


.75 


3.95 


7.30 


.70 


3.80 


7.20 


9 X 11 


.90 


4.75 


9.00 


.K5 


4.75 


9.00 


10 X 12 


1.15 


5.95 


11.25 


1.10 


6.30 


11.70 


11 X 14 


1.45 


7.90 


14.65 


1.25 


7.45 


13.95 


12 X 15 


1.75 


9.30 


17.45 


1.65 


9.45 


18.00 


14 X 17 


2.25 


11.80 


22.50 


2.20 


12.60 


24.30 


16 X20 


3.05 


15.75 


30.40 


2.40 


13.50 


26.10 


17X20 


3.25 


16.90 


32.65 


2.70 


15.75 


30.60 


18 X 22 


3.85 


19.70 


38.25 


3.15 


18.45 


36.00 


20X24 


4.50 


23.05 


45.00 



Gross and half-jrross packages of cut sheets of paper of sizes not listed will 
will be supplied providing: the order amounts to $1.00 list or more, and list of 
same will be practically proportionate to that of listed sizes. 

NEPERA SECONDS furnished in limited quantities in all surfaces in 3''8 x 
5' : (Cabinet^ and 4x6 only. 
Single Weight, . $1 .00 per gross | Double Weight, . $1.25 per gross 



ROLLS 



SINGLE WEIGHT. 

10 ft. Roll, 20 inches wide, . $1.50 

10 ft. ■' 40 " " . 3.00 

10 yd. " 20 " " . 4.50 

10 yd. " 40 ■' " . 9.00 



DOUBLE WEIGHT. 

10 ft. Roll, 20 inches wide, 
10 ft. " 40 " 
10 yd. " 20 " 
10 yd. " 40 



Rolls 10 yards or longer are supplied in any width up to 40 inches. 
For Prints from Cirkut Negatives 





SINGLE weight. 






DOl 




6i' in. 8 in. 


10 in. 


16 in. 




6i 2 in 


25 ft. 


$1.25 $1.50 


$1.90 


$3.00 


25 ft. 


$1.60 


50 ft. 


2.50 3.00 


3.75 


6.00 


50 ft. 


3.15 


100 ft. 


4.95 6.00 


7.50 


12.00 


100 ft. 


6.30 



DOUBLE WEIGHT. 

8 in. 10 in 
$1.90 
3.75 
7.50 



$2.35 
4.75 
9.45 



$1.90 
3.75 
5.65 

1 1 .25 



16 in. 

$3. 75 
7.50 
15.00 



CAXADIAX KODAK CO., Ltd., Toronto, Can. 



//if ARISTO EAGLE 27 



For the best Studio in town— 



EASTMAN 




PLATINUM 

A distinctive paper— all the richness 
of Platinum blacks, with a delicate 
pleasing warmth found in no other 
black and white Platinum. 

Two Grades : Sjiiooth and Roug-h. 



Eastman Kodak Company 

ROCHESTER, N. Y. 



28 



STUDIO LIGHT and 



\ 




THERE IS COMFORT 

as well as CONVENIENCE and RESULTS in the 

EASTMAN PLATE TANK 

The simiile loading device permits the loading of 
the plates into the rack in a few seconds, with- 
out scratching or marring. 

The air-tight, locking cover allows the whole tank 
to he reversed — no ^fisliing the plate rack out of 
the solution during development — and the hand on 
the dial tells you when development will be 
completed. 

Eastman Plate Tank, 5x7, - $4.50 

Eastman Plate Tank, 8x10, - 10.00 

CANADIAN KODAK CO., Limited 

TORONTO, CAN. 



the ARISTO EAGLE 



29 




30 STUDIO LIGHT on </ 



ROYAL 
NEPERA 

Pure White 



The developing paper 
that forgets to curl. 




Canadian 

Kodak 

Co. 

Ltd. 

Toronto, 
Canada 




1 



the ARISTO EAGLE 



ANGELO 

Sepia Platinum Paper 



SMOOTH SURFACE 



Cabinet 


Per Dozen 


% 


.55 


65^ X 8>^ 


i i It 




1.25 


8 X 10 . 


a a 




1.85 


20 X 26 . 


Per % Dozen 




2.60 


20 X 26 . 


. . - % " 




5.00 


20 X 26 . 


Per Dozen 




10.00 



Roll, 20 inches wide by 26 feet long, 

equal to one dozen 20 x 26 sheets 10.00 

Roll, 20 inches wide by 13 feet long, 

equal to six 20 x 26 sheets 
Angelo Sepia Solution (/^ gal. bottle) 
Angelo Sepia Solution ( 1 pint bottle) 
Angelo Sepia Solution (6 oz. bottle) 
Angelo Sepia Solution (.'5 oz. bottle) 
Angelo Sepia Solution (2 oz. amateur 

size) ..... 

Angelo Sepia Salts (/2 lb.) . 
Angelo Sepia Salts {}i \h.) . 
Angelo Sepia Salts (Amateur size) 

Sepia Solution is packed in cases contain! 
6-oz. ; 96 3-oz. or 96 of the amateur size bottles 

Sepia Salts are packed in cases containing 79 ^2"lh. ; 144 14-lb. 
or 144 amateur size packages. 

CANADIAN KODAK CO., Limited 

TORONTO, CANADA 



(( C( 




5.00 


i< ei 




8.00 


a a 




2.50 


a (I 




1.00 


ii (( 




.50 
.35 


a ii 




.SO 


(t a 




.15 


ii ii 




.10 


ng 8 1 2-gal. 


,36 


pint; 48 



32 



STUDIO LIGHT and 



DON T FORGET 

That the DRUMMOND style is one of the best on the market. You 
are sure to make a hit with your customers if you use this style. 




^hp r^yn nunmi rl ^^ ^ very beautiful card, made of 
M lit J^r UllimUliU, heavy stock, matched edges, square 
corners, with the centre of the card and border in its natural color 
and the surface of the card brought up in a beautiful shade to match 
the regular stock. It has a beautiful water silk finish, with a very 
neat design embossed above the centre. Remember it is made in 
two colors. Grey and Brown. 

Sample mailed on receipt of one ^-cent stamp. 



Size 
CX 
FX 



Price List 

For Photos Size Outside 

Cabinet Oval 6x9 

Cabinet Square 6x9 

DESIGNED AND MANUFACTURED BY 



The Canadian Card Co., 



Price per 100 

$2.85 
2.85 

Toronto, 
Canada 



Aristo Motto 



'"1 1[ 7E believe permanency is the 
* ' Keystone of Photoiiraphic 
Success, and all brands of paper 
bearing our Trcuh-mark are manu- 
factured on this principle. We hold 
our consumer's reputation and suc- 
cess identical with our own. We 
surround both with every safe- 
guard known to chemical science 
and our own experience." 




Copyrighted 1909 by the Lumiere Studio 

FROM AN ARISTO PLATING PRINT 



By Hvrman Heyn 



Omaha, Neb. 




NEW SERIES 
Vol. 1 No. 9 



NOVEMBr.R 1909 



OLD SERIES 

No. 106 



A 



RTURA AN EAST- 
MAN PRODUCT 

The best in evei-y branch of 
photograi)hy for every one of our 
customers — that's the kejnote 
of our business. Originate im- 
provements, spare no expense in 
making better goods, but when 
somebody else has made a marked 
advance in the production of a 
certain class of goods, be big 
enough and broad-gauge enough 
to recognize the facts and acquire 
the benefits for our customers — 
that is our pohcy. 

Having become convinced that 
Artura is the product that best 
meets the requii'ements of the 
professional photographer in a de- 
\ eloi)ment paper, we have pur- 
chased the business of the Artu- 
ra Photo Paper Co. This pur- 
chase means Artura quality plus. 
Under the same superintendence 
in manufacture, that of Mr. M. 
A. Yauck, Artura will have the 
added advantage, as soon as the 
necessary details can be worked 
out, of our Kodak Park facilities, 
and when its manufacture begins 
there, the still fin-ther advantage 
of distribution through the East- 



man dealers everywhere, a dis- 
tinct convenience to all Artura 
consumers. 

We have purcha.sed the Artura 
Photo Paper Co., but we recog- 
nize the fact that a i)hotographic 
manufacturing business is some- 
thing more than a few formulae 
and certain buildings and ma- 
chinery. The personnel of a 
going concern is by no means its 
least important part. We are 
pleased to announce that in taking 
over the Artura Company we 
have not only secured the ser- 
vices of Mr. Yauck, but also of 
Mr. Schuyler Colfax, and, with 
the exception of Dr. Early, who 
retires from the photographic 
business, all of the important 
members of the Artura staff. 

Good business for ourselves, 
we believe, consists in furnishing 
to the photographers the best 
goods in every department. Ar- 
tura rounds out our line abso- 
lutely and with our facilities for 
manufacturing and marketing, we 
expect to make Artura more val- 
uable to ourselves by making it 
invaluable to the photographer. 



STUDIO LIGHT and 



A 



BOUT NEWSPAPER 
ADVERTISING 

The editor has consented to let 
me talk to you about advertismg. 
You know an advertising man' s 
job and an editor's task are a 
good deal alike in one way— every 
outsider thinks he could do the 
job better. Writing stuff is such 
easy Avork any way, that most 
people take particular delight in 
criticising their morning paper — 
and the advertisements therein. 
Between you and me I think I 
could get out a better photo- 
graphic magazine than — but per- 
haps I'd better not touch on that 
tojjic here. 

In the minds of many people 
there's a misconception of what 
advertising really is — they look 
upon it as a rather hit or miss 
game and think that all public- 
ity, no matter how achieved, is 
good. Some even go so far as 
to mistake notoriety for fame and 
forget that the ultimate end of 
business advertising is to sell 
goods. 

I take it that I can pass over 
that first and last part of an ad- 
vertising man's proposition — that 
to advertise profitably the first 
requisite is good goods. I know 
that all of you must be making 
and delivering good goods and 
that you exi)ect to make them 
still better in future. Now, what 
do you want to accomplish by 
your advertising ? Sell pictures. 
Right. As I look at it, there 



are two things that your adver- 
tising must do. First, it must 
make people want pictures, and, 
next, the desire for pictures hav- 
ing been created, it must con- 
vince them that the place to go 
for the lectures is your studio. 

Whj^ not keep them reminded 
that baby is growing up and that 
mother is growing old, that Susie 
will never graduate but once, and 
that John and Mary hope never 
to be married but once, and that 
there are many ages of man and 
Avoman and that in e\ ery one of 
them their friends and relatives 
are interested. And then tell 
them that you know how to make 
them feel at home, and tell them 
how you have all the new, good 
things in the way of up-to-date- 
ness in your studio, whereby you 
can furnish pictures that their 
friends will really cherish. 

But you've got to keep a-ding- 
ing and a-dinging and a-dinging, 
and, what's moi-e, you are not 
going to be able to see what we 
advertising men call " visible re- 
turns." Aliout a year ago a cer- 
tain small merchant asked me to 
advise him about his local adver- 
tising. I said, " By all means use 
the newspapers and keep at it." 
He did, and I want to say for 
him that he published some verj' 
clever advertisements. A few 
weeks ago he complained to me 
that he could see no results. I 
said: "My dear fellow, do you 
expect people are going to fonn 
m line and come to your store 



the ARISTO EAGLE 




FROM AN ARISTO PLATINO PRINT 
By Herman Heijn Omaha, Neb. 



STUDIO LIGHT and 



and hand you $20 . 00 bills , 
with the remark, I saw your ad 
in the Herald ' ? " But let' s have 
a look. His business in the goods 
advertised had doubled in the 
first six months of 1909? as com- 
pared with the corresponding 
period in 1908, though he had 
had live competition all the time. 
His advertising had paid him, 
and paid him well — but he did 
not know it. The truth is that 
people, nine times out of ten, 
don't know when they are re- 
sponding to advertising. This is 
fortunate, for some of 'ein are 
just contrary enough so that they 
wouldn't respond if they knew 
that they were acting on some- 
body's else suggestion. Create a 
demand for pictures and then 
persuade people that you are the 
man to make 'em. It's in let- 
ting the second condition over- 
shadow the first that most of us 
are prone to be weak. Who is 
your competitor.'' The Smith 
Studio dowTi the street? No. 
Your competitor is the jeweler, 
the bookseller, the music dealer, 
the confectioner, the theater, 
even the milliner. Your compet- 
itor is anybody who sells luxuries 
to the same people to whom you 
sell, or would like to sell photo- 
graphs. The Roliinson familj' has 
a suri)lus of $3.5.00 that's going 
to disappear into the channels of 
trade aljout Christmas time. If 
you want to get part of that 
$35.00 you must convince the 
Robinsons that it's a shame they 



haven't any pictures to send 
home to mother for Christmas; 
she would appreciate them so 
much more than she would a tidy 
for the parlor lamp. Getting peo- 
ple to wanting more pictures is 
far easier and far better for you 
than trjing to drag business away 
fi-om the Smith Studio. 

And advertise the popular 
thing. I have intimate knowl- 
edge of a maiuifacturing business 
that, for several years, had been 
running behind to the tune of 
$100,000 a year. It spent a lot 
of money in advertising and spent 
it mostly trying to move off un- 
popular stuff. There came a 
change of management. The 
junk went under the boilers, the 
catchy, live stuff was advertised, 
and the new management showed 
a small profit the first six months, 
and inside of two years the profits 
were ruiuiing a hundred thous- 
and dollars per j^ear. 

But there's a heap of graft 
hidden behind the name of ad- 
vertising. When you buy Hypo 
you expect to get l6 ounces to 
the pound. When you buy ad- 
vertising, you ought to know 
what you are getting and Avhat 
the market price is. I can give 
to j'Ou an illustration of how it 
goes in my line and point a finger 
of warning at the fake schemes, 
— though I'm going to admit 
right now that the advertising 
fakir often doesn't know he's a 
fakir. He's absolutely ignoi-ant 
of the business. 



the ARISTO EAGLE 




FROM AN ARISTO I'LATINO PRINT 



By Herman Heyn 



Omaha, Keb, 



STUDIO LIGHT and 



The average price paid bj- a 
general advertiser for space in the 
standard magazines is a little 
more than one dollar per page 
(5/^x8 tyi)e) per thousand cir- 
culation. The very high-class 
magazines like Harper ' s and Cen- 
turj' get rather more than this, 
but such pul)hcations as Argosy, 
All-Story, etc., where the rate 
is only 60e to 80c per page per 
thousand, bring the avei-age down 
so that we are not far wrong in 
saying a dollar per page per 
thousand. 

Now, the Knights of Pythias 
are about to hold a picnic and 
they sell the advertising privi- 
lege in the program to some good 
fellov/ out of a job. He pays 
150.00 or $100.00, or perhaps 
$200.00, and starts out with a 
dummy under his arm. He hits 
up the banks and the local mer- 
chants and perhaps the photog- 
raphers, and bye and bye goes 
up against a national advertiser. 

The advertising manager 
doesn't believe the medium is 
any good anyway, because an ad 
to be influential should have a 
responsible publication behind it, 
but he puts the question : 

"What's the price?" 

"120.00." 

"Too much." 

"Whj', you pay 8500.00 for a 
page in Everjbody's Magazine." 

"Will you accept an order at 
the same rater " 

"Why, what do you mean? 
Yes." 



"Verj'well. How many copies 
are you gouig to print?" 

"800." 

"I'll take a page at the Everj'- 
body's rate — that would be 80 
cents." 

"But it costs me more than 
that to print it." replies the so- 
licitor, beginning to back water. 

"Certainly it does, but 80c is 
what it costs me for a page in 
800 copies of Everybody's Mag- 
azine. You said your rates were 
low. As a matter of fact, they 
are 25 times as high as the rates 
in the average magazine, and in 
my opinion the advertising is far 
less valual)le per copy." 

"Ciood-day." 

"Good-day." 

Likewise you should make 
comparisons with your newspaper 
rate when the program solicitor 
attacks — not a comparison of page 
for page, because your newsj^aper 
page is large and his page is 
small, but a comparison of space 
for space. It is evident that the 
rates are higher in proportion to 
circulation in the country news- 
paper than in the big city daily 
because newspaper making is sim- 
ply a manufacturing projiosition 
after all, and the newspaper pub- 
lisher with a hundred thousand 
circulation can therefore easily 
undersell the one with only a 
thousand, but it's the paper with 
the thousand that interests i/oii 
if it goes to a thousand people in 
your neighborhood who might be 
induced to come to i/our studio. 



the ARISTO EAGLE 



On the average you can buy space, 
if you contract for a reasonably 
large amount at one time, for 
about seven cents per column 
inch per insertion for each thous- 
and of circulation in small papers 
— much less in large ones. At 
that rate a double column adver- 
tisement, eight inches deep (to- 
tal 16 inches), would cost you 
one dollar and twelve cents for a 
thousand circulation. This space 
is about equal in size to that of- 
fered you as " a page in the pro- 
gram of the Amalgamated Avi- 
ators picnic of which one thous- 
and are to be printed (and 6OO 
thrown away) at the very low 
price often dollars." 

"But sometimes," you say, "I 
simply have to go into the pro- 
gram of the church entertain- 
ment, the firemen's convention, 
etc." True. But don't charge 
that up to advertising; charge it 
to "good-will" account. But in- 
vestigate the matter before you 
go into such things and find out 
whether you are really paying 
your money to the church or other 
commendable charitj', or whether 
you are pajing it to the solicitor 
who has taken over the adver- 
tising as a private speculation. 
On one point you may be sure — 
he won't volunteer the infomia- 
tion. 

In my opinion the newspaper 
should form the backbone of the 
advertising for every photogra- 
pher in cities of 25,000 or less, 
and of the centrallj" located pho- 



tographers in cities up to a hund- 
red thousand. In the big cities 
this doesn't apply. For instance, 
the photogi-apher on 125th street 
in New York could not afford to 
advertise in the metropolitan 
dailies because probalily not more 
than 3 per cent, of the total cir- 
culation would be in his imme- 
diate neighborhood. He would 
have to pay, therefore, for 97 
per cent, waste circulation, waste, 
that is, so far as he is concerned. 
Above all, newspaper adver- 
tising should not be spasmodic. 
Small space every week in the 
year in small towns where there 
are no dailies, and say two to 
three times a week where there 
are dailies, is much more ef- 
fective than a big splurge three 
or four times a year; but best of 
all, if your bank account will 
stand, is the constant small ad 
and the occasional big one. And 
change your copy, change your 
copy, change your copy. Give 
'em new stuff every time if you 
have to sit up nights to do it. 
The best way is to write up a 
lot of advertisements when you 
have the time, so that you won't 
have to tell the publisher to "run 
the old ad" when he phones you 
about it at the last minute. Make 
the ads short, simple, and as con- 
versational in style as you can. 
When you get something new 
tell folks about it in just a plain 
homely way. Just talk common 
sense in your ads, and use the 
same sense in buying space in the 



10 



STUDIO LIGHT and 



pai)ers. Compare rates and cir- 
culation, and in comparing circu- 
lation make the comparison both 
as to quahty and quantity. Use 
the same care in preparing your 
advertisements that you do in 
making your pictures, use the 
same care in buying space that 
j'ou do in buj'ing materials — and 
keep at it. 

There are other methods of 
advertising that are of unques- 
tionable value to every studio — 
but in my opinion the newspaper 
should be the backbone of all 
local publicity work. Just good, 
dignfied, common-sense talks 
aliout pictures in general and 
your pictures in particular, with- 
out the expectation of inniiediate 
and overwhelming results must 
help in the building up of the 
business of the studio, provided, 
of course, that the newspaper 
advertising is backed up by an 
attractive show case, an inviting 
studio, courteous treatment of 
customers, and above all — good 
goods. 

The Ad Max. 



B 



OTH WAYS NOW 



You Need That 
Eastman Plate 
Tank 

JVow 



In most instances the peo- 
ple who spend money for the 
higher classes of portrait work 
have their picture taken fre- 
quently and naturally become 
more or less familiar with styles 
and photogi-aphie possibihties. 
They may not, probably do not, 
know the various papers by name, 
but they do have a preference 
for this, that or the other photo- 
grajihic effect. They come to you 
primarily because they recognize 
your ability as an artist — j'our 
ability to produce portraits above 
the average — but from the fact 
that they have their portraits 
taken frequently wish something 
different, both in stjle and finish, 
and w'hen you show them some- 
thing new and when that some- 
thing new shows qualitj^ all the 
way through, a most satisfactory 
order is sure to be booked. 

A goodly number of this higher 
class of patrons have always had 
a leaning towards platinum — its 
soft, velvety effects and delicate 
gradations ajipealing to their 
sense of the artistic. 

You have been able -with An- 
gelo to show them sepias that 
were everything that could be 
desired, but have been some- 
what handica])i)ed when it came 
to delicate black and white effects 
in platinum because the ordinary 
black and white platinum is too 
cold in tone to be pleasing. Tex- 
ture and gradation were there, 



the ARISTO EAGLE 



11 



but that subtle suggestion of 
warmth, the flesh value tone if 
you Avill, was lacking. 

Now you can show them black 
and white platinums that will in- 
stantly appeal, as the new East- 
man Etching Black Platinum has 
that slight warmth of tone. And 
the new Etching Black is so flex- 
ible, for dark backgrounds, for 
vignettes or line effects — to all it 
lends itself perfectly to your ar- 
tistic inclination, and as it is sup- 
plied in both smooth and rough 
you can run the Avhf)le gamut of 
artistic interpretation with the 
assurance that Etching Black will 
afford just the right effect. 

Etching Black is exceedingly 
simple to manijiulate, Avith great 
latitude in both printing and de- 
velopment, and is cold developed. 
The annual harvest time is at 
hand, show the extra price pat- 
rons some of your best Avork on 
Etching Black, and an extra crop 
is j'ours. 



PHOTOGRAPHERS AS- 
SOCIATION OF WEST- 
ERN CANADA 

The Eastman School of Pro- 
fessional Photography, recently 
held under the auspices of Duffin 
& Co., Ltd., Winnipeg, attracted 
a large number of i)hotographers 
from that section of the country, 
and during the week of the 
school a meeting of the visiting 
photographers was held to form 



the Photographers Association of 
Western Canada. 

There were present at the meet- 
ing' Paul Denison, Indian Head; 
Frank Gowen and S. Davidson, 
Brandon; G. B. Warbiirton, Wilkie, 
Sask. ; Douglas H. Gibson, Bran- 
don; G. H. Llewellyn, R. F. A. 
McFadden, A. A. Gentzel, W. W. 
Robson, A. L. Lee, of Winnipeg; 
Harold H. Tilley, Minnedosa; A. 
Silver, Dryden ; Albert Smith, Shoal 
Lake; N. J. Osborne, Boissevain; 
J. L. Edlunds, Claresholm; C. M. 
Burk, Edmonton ; P. W. Rowe, 
Yorkton ; G. W. Sparling, Portage 
la Prairie; James Paynter, Car- 
berry; E. Smith, Glenboro; W. K. 
Ranton, Treherne; C. Jessup, Glad- 
stone; F. Steele, Winnipeg; Wm. 
Minns, Gladstone; A. J. Lawrence, 
Birtle; A. Schmidt, Winnipeg; Fred 
Ransdale, Moosomin ; G. S. Jenkins, 
Deloraine; H. L. Jones, Elbow; J. 
W.Gibson, Winnipeg; A. J. Rawson, 
Dauphin ; G. E. Durrant, Hartney ; 
W. Jackson, W^innipeg; S. E. Prest; 
Morden; Frank W. Weekes; Vir- 
den ; H. J. Strong, Winnipeg ; J. G. 
Banks, Kenora; J. L. Hamilton, 
Weyburn. 

The following officers were 
elected: President, W. W. Robson, 
Winnipeg; vice presidents, J. G. 
Banks, Kenora; C. M. Burk, Ed- 
monton; S. E. Prest, Morden; Fred 
Ransdale, Moosomin; secretary- 
treasurer, A. L. Lee, Winnipeg; 
executive, A. E. Gentzel, Winni- 
peg; G. W. Sparling, Portage la 
Prairie; P. M. Rowe, Saskatoon; 
Frank Gowen, Brandon, and R. T. 
McFadden, Winnipeg; auditors, W. 
K. Ranton, Treherne, and G. S. 
Jenkins, Deloraine. 



Advertise- 



Every mer- 
cha n t in 

town is your competitor in the 

Holiday Season. 



12 



STUDIO LIGHT and 



TT^OR a novelty to bring the extra 
^ Christmas dollars in, see page 
32 — the Prince of Wales calendar 
will do it. 



A 



NEW POST 
CAMERA 



CARD 



In the advertisings section we 
illustrate the new R. O. C. Post 
Card Camera. 

Aside from quality and price 
there is not a great deal that can 
be said about an instrument of 
this tyjie as it has no comi)licated 
adjustments or unusual features. 
But — the appearance of the cam- 
era used for post card work has 
a good deal to do with the price 
you can demand for your work. 
There is a good profit in good 
post cards, and jour patrons will 
without doubt be influenced re- 
garding the (]uality of your work 
by the appearance of the instru- 
ment you use. 

The new R. O. C. Post Card 
Camera sells for only twelve dol- 
lars, yet it is of most substan- 
tial construction and well fin- 
ished, having the appearance of 
an instrument selling for a good 
deal more money. 



rpWO TIME SAVERS 

-^ We illustrate herewith two 
new studio conveniences — neces- 
sities is the better word, as both 
articles are important enough in 
the saving of time to come under 
that heading. 




Four-in-One Grouper, Nested 



the ARISTO EAGLE 



13 




Four-in-One Groupers, Ready for Use 



We all have experienced the 
difficulties in photographing 
groups, even small ones, and to 
arrange them properly and ef- 
fectively has been no small task. 
There are a number of different 
sets of grouping seats or stool 



The new pjastman "Four in 
One" Groupers are not only per- 
fect as groupers, but when not 




Eastman Trimming: Board 



the market, most of them pretty 
good for the purpose, but serious- 
ly in the way when not in use, and 
when wanted one or more is pret- 
ty apt to have been misplaced. 



in use nest together as shown in 
the illustration, thus taking up 
the minimum amount of space 
and likewise insuring the com- 
plete set being on hand when 



14 



STUDIO LIGHT and 



wanted. Each one of the set is 
of good sohd oak, splendidly fin- 
ished in mission style. The price 
of the complete set is only ten 
dolbirs. 

With the new Eastman Trim- 
ming Board all you have to do is 
to place the print in position and 
l)ress down with the same hand 
that holds the print— no lost time 
or motion, no reachino; up and 
back for the trimming blade 
handle, and no danger of cut 
fingers from the trimming blade 
falling down through accident. 

The board is provided with an 
accurate rule, and is also divided 
into squares and equipj)ed with a 
transparent trimming gauge, so 
that to trim a jn'int "oif square" 
is a difficult matter. The blade 
is 12^^ inches long, so the trim- 
mer is ample in size for all ordi- 
nary studio requirements. 

The price of the Eastman 
Trimming Board is four dollars. 
Your dealer has both the grouj)- 
ers and trimming boards in stock . 

Send them up to-day } C'ei-- 
tainly. 



M 



AKE THEM 
WORK 



BOTH 



We can have no better evi- 
dence of the determination of the 
profession to make everything 
count between now and Christ- 
mas, than the big jump in orders 
for our advertising cuts. A good 
many of you have ordered and 



made use of every cut we have 
issued — that it has paid you is 
evidenced by the steady re-or- 
ders. Whether you have or have 
not been using these cuts, noiv is 
the time to get into the news- 
papers good and strong. During 
the holiday season every mer- 
chant in town is your competitor. 
You won't have to look very hard 
to see that they are letting the 
public know Avhat they ha\e to 
sell and that they are putting 
forth every effort to attract the 
people with money to spend. 

Your show case is a splendid 
selling asset, so are the mer- 
chants' show windows, and if the 
merchant cannot depend upon 
his show windows alone, neither 
can j'ou. 

Make both your show case and 
the newspapers work good and 
hard for you from now till up to 
Christmas. 



o 



UR ILLUSTRATIONS 



Herman Heyn of Omaha, 
Nebraska, is a maker of pictures 
that sell and stay sold. Mr. 
Heyn is a firm believer in quality 
all the way through — he puts the 
best that's in him into every 
negative he makes and prints 
them upon Aristo because he 
knows Aristo will permanently 
record all the good work he has 
put in the negative. A study of 
the reproductions from Mr. 
Heyn's prints in this issue will 
fully demonstrate this. 



the ARISTO EAGLE 



15 



D 



OUBLE DUTY 



With every sitting j'ou 
have got to make one or more 
negatives, and after a dozen or 
perhaps two dozen prints have 
l>een made those negatives re- 
tire to the Avaiting hst perhaps 
never to be called into use again. 
To find something to offset the 
cost of the extra sitting nega- 
tives, and to help pay the cost of 
those stored a^vay is the aim of 
all of us. A plan that works 
well in the majority of cases 
is to make a first-class enlarge- 
ment from the negative that 
has pleased your patron particu- 
larly well, and show it at the 
time you deliver the small prints 
or at a later date, as circum- 
stances seem to best warrant. 
An eleven by fourteen enlarge- 
ment can be sold anjwhere from 
two to five dollars, according to 
the price you are charging for 
your regular prints, and at either 
price Avill show a good ])r()fit. 
When the enlargement fails to 
sell, as sometimes happens, you 
can request the privilege of hang- 
ing it in your studio as a sample 
—a little tact in making the re- 
quest will most always secure the 
l)ermission and sometimes effect 
a sale. 

The profession is rapidly learn- 
ing that it is a simple matter to 
make good enlargements, and 
that the cost of installing the 
necessary apparatus is very small 
— in fact most all of you already 



have practically all that is nec- 
essary. 

We have in jiress a new edi- 
tion of our booklet, "Enlarging, 
a booklet of suggestion for the 
professional," and will be very 
glad to send you a copy ujion 
request and to supply any further 
information that may be desired. 

Put in an enlarging i)lant and 
make your negatives do the 
double duty that helps to double 
profit. 

^1 

THE AIM OF THE WO- 
MEN'S SECTION, P. 
A. OF A. 

The W. S. of the P. A. of A. 
is destined, we hope, to greatly 
further the interest and aims of 
the A\ omen in our profession. The 
benefit derived from the ex- 
change of prints last year war- 
rants the continuance of the 
arrangement as an important part 
of the season's progress — the 
members pledging themselves to 
send on to the next member, 
after a stated interval, the print 
they have themselves in turn re- 
ceived. Co-operation in this "Cir- 
cle" is optional, but the inter- , 
change of ideas and technic is 
valuable. Our gift of observa- 
tion can be cultivated, our am- 
bition stimulated by being famil- 
iar with the art and originality 
in what is being done by our fel- 
low-workers. \\'e must assist 
individually to draw our federa- 



16 



STUDIO LIGHT and 



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i^^^^^^^j^^lga^^^^^B 


^^^H 



FROM AN ARISTO PLATING PRINT 

By Herman Heyn Omaha, Neb. 



♦) 



the ARISTO EAGLE 



17 




FROM AN AIIISTO PLATINO PRINT 
By Herman Heyn Omahn, Neb. 



II 



STUDIO LIGHT and 



tioii into an organic whole, alive 
and vital in every part. 

Mary Carxell, 
Pres. Women's Section, P. A. of A. 



The purpose of our organiza- 
tion is: Bj' co-operation to 
strengthen and develop the ar- 
tistic, ethical and business side 
of our work — to practically dem- 
onstrate the value of exhibitions 
thoughtfully' conducted, as a 
stimulus to study and effort — 
to create opportunities for mu- 
tual criticisms and exchange of 
thought along these lines — to 
encourage the other women of 
our profession. 

Ctertrude Kasebier, 
Chairman of Eastern Section. 
315 5th Ave., New York. 



While woman's place in our 
profession is so thoroughlj^ estab- 
lished and so universally accepted 
as an accomplished fact that it 
needs no separate section of the 
P. A. of A. to gain recognition, 
it is certain that great good can 
come from this movement. 

Those of us who have ex- 
hil)ited prints in the past have 
asked no favors because we were 
women, nor hesitated to exhibit 
because our work was made a 
part of the general display. 
There is no doubt, however, that 
if at the next convention the 
Woman's Section makes a sepa- 
rate disjilay. it will attract much 
greater attention because it is 



separate, thus calling specific at- 
tention to the fact that it is the 
work of woman, and so offering 
a comparison. 

In entering into such a move- 
ment it is desirable that our ex- 
hibiti(jn be as complete and rep- 
resentative as possible. Therefore 
we are asking you to begin now 
to lay aside negatives which you 
consider worthy and that you 
continue to do this until next 
Maj^ Then comjjare and cull 
these negatives till you are sure 
you have selected the best of 
them, and send three prints suit- 
alily framed for display. 

We ask you to do this for the 
honor of the Women Photog- 
raphers of America. 

Belle Johnson, 

Vice President. 
INIonroe City, Mo. 



To create a congenial feeling 
among the Avomen of our great 
organization, and to give each an 
oj)portunity to advance. It will 
also give us prestige among our 
fellow-workmen as well as with 
our customers. An incentive to 
be the best. 

Eola W. White. 
Chairman, Western Section. 



As members of the P. A. of 
A. we feel an individual respon- 
sibility in being co-workers and 
contributors. 

We do not consent to enjoy 
its privileges nor accept recogni- 



the ARISTO EAGLE 



19 




FROM AN ARISTO PLATINO PRINT 
By Herman Heyn Omaha, Xeb. 



20 



STUDIO LIGHT and 



tion as a mere courtesy. Our aim 
is to be fit and capable, and we 
stand on our own merits. 

This should be an incentive to 
every woman photographer to 
keep pace with the progress of 
our profession, hence we ask the 
co-operation of all earnest women 
workers. There is an abundance 
of good material to be enlisted. 
Katherixe Jamieson, 
Chairman, Middle Section. 



The benefit each one of us 
may expect to derive in co-op- 
erating with other women of our 
profession is obvious, as we can 
make more progress by inter- 
change of work and thought. 

We have made the meml)er- 
shij> fee fifty cents for the year, 
to cover postage, stationery, 
j)rinting, or incidental expenses. 
This amount can be sent to me 
with your name and address. 
Also kindly state whether you 
wish to join the circle or simply 
become a member. Shall be 
most glad to gi\ e any further in- 
formation. M.EsTELLE Jenkins, 
Sec. and Treas. Women's Federa- 
tion P. A. of A., 43-2 N. Park Ave., 
Austin Sta., Chicago, 111. 



Yl^EDO 

^ ' A man remarked to one 
of our representatives, "Your 
Company is talking a whole lot 
about tested chemicals; do you 
really test them or is that just a 
talking point f " 



This remark demonstrated that 
we had at least set the man to 
thinking, even if not very deeply. 

We admit in all frankness that 
we make every effort to produce 
or procure the very best chemi- 
cals to be had, primarily for our 
own interests. 

We do test in the most mod- 
ern and scientific manner every 
chemical that we use or sell — 
tre have to. We test and re-test, 
not simply because Ave can ob- 
tain a few cents more per ounce 
or per pound, but because abso- 
lute purity and uniformity of the 
chemicals we use are necessary if 
we wish to keep you as customers. 

We supply you with the best 
there is in plates and papers — 
how long would their quality 
stand against comi)etition if we 
did not provide you with the best 
possible chemicals with which to 
bring out results? 

We not only have to test and 
re-test to provide you with "right" 
chemicals, but we have to make 
sure that you rightly see the ne- 
cessity for using them. That is 
why we so often call your atten- 
tion to this trade 
mark and why we 
display it promi- 
nently on every 
package of our 
chemical prepar- 
ations. C. K. Tested Chemicals 
are for our mutual protection. 




the ARISTO EAGLE 



21 



L 



OOK OUT FOR HIM 



In purchasing goods or 
making any business arrange- 
ments we cannot be too cautious 
in assuring ourselves that the man 
with whom we are deahng is "on 
the square" or representing a 
reliable house, and most emphat- 
ically so, in cases ,where any ad- 
vance payment is demanded. 

We print herewith a letter from 
three of the profession in New 
England calling attention to the 
alleged shortcomings of a man 
giving the name of J. D. Watson. 

October 1:2, 1909. 
Editor Studio Light, 
Rochester, N. Y. 
Dear Sir: 

We are taking the liberty to ask 
you to notify the photographers 
through your valuable magazine 
"Studio Light," to look out for a man 
giving the name of J. D. Watson. 

He has been working the Folio 
game on the photographers in New 
Hampshire with pretty good success. 
He has failed in every instance to 
supply the folios as agreed, thus mak- 
ing it pretty expensive. 

This fellow is light complexion, 
about five feet ten inches tall and 
weighs about 165 pounds, and has 
sandy mustache cut short. 

He is a smooth talking chap — 
look out for him. 

We who have had the experience. 
J. M. Stevexs, Rochester, N. H. 
W. H. Jkxks, St. Johnsbury, Vt. 
Edwa. a. Walcott, Barton, Vt. 



SEND for a copy of our 
booklet " Enlarging," 
a booklet of suggestion for 
the professional. 



73 EAD the ar- 

-*- ^ tide on page 
four over again, 
and then take ad- 
\'antafire of our 



Advertising' 
Cut Service 



The cut for this 
month is show^n on 
the following page 



STUDIO LIGHT and 



THE ONLY CON- 
DI T I O x\ 

We make but one condi- 
tion in our offer of cuts for 
the use of photographers. 

It is obvious that tAvo 
photofjraphers in the same 
town would not care to use 
the same cut, and we are 
therefore obliged to limit 
this offer to one photogra- 
pher in a town. It will be 
a case of first come first 
served. The first order 
from a city will be promptly 
filled. Succeeding orders (if 
any) will necessarily be 
turned down and the re- 
mittance, of course, Mill be 
returned. It is also obvious 
that we cannot, on account 
of the cost of the drawings, 
furnish any large variety of 
cuts at the nominal prices 
quoted, and therefore can 
offer no substitute cut. The 
thing to do is to get your 
order in Jirxt, as it would not 
be fair to give the man who 
happens to get in his order 
early one month, a permanetit 
advantage ; we shall book no 
orders in advance. They 
must alwa3'S sjiecify the num- 
ber of cut desired. If later 
on it develops that there is 
a great enough demand for 
these advertising cuts to war- 
rant our furnishing a larger 
variety, we shall be glad to 

^««^- C. K. Co., Ltd. 




Our photographs are 
more than good photo- 
graphs—they are true 
portraits, bringing out 
all that's best in charac- 
ter and individuality. 



^lake your appoint- 
ments now and avoid 
the holidav rush. 



The Pyro Studio 



No. U7. Price, 50 cents. 



the ARISTO EAGLE 



23 




Everything to suit you with the 

EASTMAN 
PLATE TANK 

No prolonged stay in a cold or damp dark 
room : No fogged or scratched ])lates : No fishing 
tlie plates out of the tank during develoiMiient — 
the entire tank reverses: No guess Mork — no 
bother — no discomfort — perfect results. 



Eastman Plate Tank. 5 x 7 
Eastman Plate Tank, 8 x 10 



\ 4.50 
10.00 



CANADIAN KODAK CO., Limited, 

All Dealers. TORONTO, CAN. 



24. 



STUDIO LIGHT and 




$12.00 



THE NEW R. O. C. 

Post Card Camera 

J5EST FOR THE rURPOSE 
BEST FOR THE PRICE 



The R. O. C. is supplied with Reversible Back either S^ 4 

X 4I/4, 31 4 X 5 1 2' 4 X 5, or 5 X T (size optional) 

and Double Plate Holder. 



Extra Reversible Backs, 3I4 x 4I4, SijxSl,, or 4x5, $2.50 
Extra Reversible Back, 5x7,- - - - - 3.00 

Extra Double Plate Holders, 3I4 x4-i4, 3I4 x 5i_., or 

4 X 5, - - - - - - - - - .50 

Extra Double Plate Holders, 5x7,- - - - .70 



EASTMAX KODAK CO. 



All J>ealers 



ROCHKSTKR, N. Y. 



^/jd' ARISTO EAGLE 25 



The slight tinge of warmth in 



EASTMAN 




PLATINUM 

adds a life and charm to j^ortraits 
iitterl}'^ impossible with the cold 
steely blacks of the ordinary black 
and white platinum. 

Two Grades: Smooth and Rough 



Eastman Kodak Company 

Rochester, N. Y. 



26 



STUDIO LIGHT and 




THE SWIVEL 
PRINTING FRAME 

for the Rapid Printing- of 
Developing- Out Papers 

In use, it is fastened directly in front of the printing 
light and the frame may be swung up out of the light 
for loading, and tilted at any angle when printing from 
negatives of unequal density. Made in three sizes, 8x8, 
10 X 10 and 11 x 14. 

The Price 



Swivel Printing Frame, 8x8 
Swivel Printing Frame, 10 x 10 - 
Swivel Printing Frame, 11 x 14 



$3.50 

4.00 
6.00 



CANADIAN KODAK CO., Limited 



All I>ealers 



TORONTO, CAN. 



//if- ARISTO EAGLE 27 

You can only be sure of 
the strength and purity of 
your chemicals when they 
are tested by those whose 
interest continues beyond 
the sale of the chemicals 
themselves. 

The sign of continued 
interest : 




28 STUDIO LIGHT fln^f 

To get the long 
price, use 

ANGELO 

The sepia platinum that 

wins wherever 

shown 



CANADIAN KODAK CO. 

Limited 

Toronto, Canada 



<A<'ARISTO EAGLE 29 



ROYAL 

NEPERA 



The paper that forgets to curl 



EITHER India Tint or Pure 
AMiite is the developin<jf paper 
for the professional. It affords 
a double weight ])aper at the single 
weight price, yields excjuisite sepias 
when redeveloped — and the prints 
lie flat. 



Canadian 

Kodak Co. 

Limited 

Toronto, Canada 





30 



STUDIO LIGHT and 




There is profit for you 
in enlargements on 
Eastman Bromide 
Paper 



"ENLARGING, A BOOKLET OF SUGGESTION 

FOR THE PROFESSIONAL," 
sent gratis to professional photographers upon request 



CANADIAN KODAK CO., Limited 
TORONTO, CANADA 



the ARISTO EAGLE 



31 



The 

Sky Scraper Camera 




For Home Portraits 

The front is of sufficient size to accommodate large Portrait 
Lenses and studio shutters, and is extremclij rigid. 
The Bellows has ample capacity. 
The Camera can be compactly closed and is easily portable. 

For Views 

Extreme rising and falling front, moving independently 
of bellows. 

Greatest range of movement to swing back and side swing. 

s X 10 11 X U 

20 inches -25 incfies 

7x7 inches 8x8 inciics 



Bellows Capacity 
Size of Lens Board 



PRICE 
Including carrying case and one double plate holder. 



8 X 10 



$4.5.00 



11x11. 



$60.00 



FOLMER & SCHWING DIVISION 



EASTMAN KODAK CO. 

ROCHESTER, N. Y. 



32 



STUDIO LIGHT and 



A Sure Hit for Xmas Trade 

THERE is money in novelties and we show you a halftone re- 
production of one of our best. And at that the illustration 
does not do justice to describe the real beauty of our Prince 
of Wales Calendar. It is made in two colors, Graj' and Brown, for 
Cabinet Square Prints only. 




We have not the space to describe the Prince of Wales Calendar 
thoroughly, so will ask you to be sure and have your travelling 
salesman show you samples of both colors. You cannot make a mis- 
take in stocking this style as it will make a sure winner with the 
jmblic. Show these in your window and get some of the Xmas trade 
that would go elsewhere and to other lines. 

Sample of one color mailed on receipt of six 3-cent stamps. 

DESIGNED AND MANCfACTlRED BY 



CANADIAN CARD CO. 



Toronto, Canada 



Aristo Motto 



'WJ^ believe permanency is the 
* * Keystone of Photographic 
Success, and all brands of paper 
bearing our Trade-mark are manu- 
factured on this principle. We hold 
our consumer's reputation and suc- 
cess identical with our own. We 
surround both with every safe- 
guard known to chemical science 
and our own experience." 



■llilllii 




J. E. Ralston 



Seattle, Wash. 




T? 




ana the ^^RI^STO :^7^Gi^:^ 



A Magazine of Information for the Profession 



new serifs 
Vol.1 No. 10 



DECEMBER 1909 



OLD SERIES 

No. 107 



THE AWARDS, PRO- 
FESSIONAL CLASS, 
1909 KODAK ADVER- 
TISING CONTEST 

Our contention that better pic- 
tures for advertising purposes 
could be prodiutd by means of 
photography than by any other 
artistic method has been still fur- 
ther justified by the result of the 
1909 Kodak Advertising Contest. 

It is gratifying to note the con- 
tinued interest of competitors in 
former contests, and also the 
highly artistic work submitted bj" 
new-comers in the field. 

We extend our thanks to the 
profession for the keen interest 
exhibited and for the highly suc- 
cessful results achieved. 

The jury which passed on the 
work was highly competent, con- 
sisting of Mr. Rudolf Eicke- 
meyer, of Davis & Eickemeyer; 
Mr. A. F. Bradley, ex-president 
of P. A. A., of New York; Mr. 
Henry D. Wilson, Advertising 
Manager of "Cosmopolitan"; 
Mr. C. C. Vemam, General Man- 
ager of the Smith & Street Pub- 
lications, and Mr. Walter R . Hine, 
vice-president and general man- 



ager of Frank Seaman Incorpo- 
rated, one of the largest, if not 
the largest advertising agency in 
the United Slates. Mr. Frank 
R. Barrows, ex-president of the 
P. A. of A., M'as announced as 
one of the judges, but was una- 
voidablj^ detained, Mr. Bradley 
acting in his place. 

Pictures which were not award- 
ed prizes are to be returned to 
their owners, but in this there 
will he a slight delay as we wish 
to go carefully through them for 
the further selection of pictures 
for i^urchase. During the winter 
we shall publish in booklet form 
a number of prints from among 
the prize winners, sending a copy 
to each contestant, and at that 
time will announce the terms of 
our 1910 competition. 

The prize winners — Profes- 
sional Class: 

First prize, $500.00, "William She- 
well Ellis, Philadelphia. 

Second prize, $4-00. 00, Percy De 
Gaston, Lincoln, Neb. 

Third prize, $230.00, Mrs. Ger- 
trude Kasebier, New York City. 

Fourth prize, $150.00, Bruguiere 
& Eisen, San Francisco, Cal. 

Fifth prize, $100.00, S. H. Lif- 
shey, Brooklyn, N. Y. 



STUDIO LIGHT and 



TANK POINTERS 
BYOXE OKTHESTAFKOKTHE 
EASTMAN SCHOOL OF PRO- 
FESSIONAL PHOTOGRAPHY 

Before taking u\) my a\ ork with 
the Eastman School I had to 
th( )roughlj' famiharize myself with 
both the theory and practice of 
tank dcvelojHnentand the further 
I pursued my investigations the 
more fully I became convinced of 
the pi-acticabihty of the Eastman 
Plate Tank, not only as a pro- 
ducer of first class results but 
from the standpoint of economy 
as well — to say nothing of its con- 
venience and comfort. 

Not long ago I had a gentleman 
tell me that he had purchased a 
tank l)ut had not used it, as he 
was afraid to — that he did not 
have sufficient confidence in it to 
entrust his regular run of work 
to it. This reminds me a good 
deal of the time when drj' plates 
were first introduced, and how 
slow the photographers were to 
make use of their many advan- 
tages — you don't find many of 
the profession using the old wet 
plate to-day — and soon tray de- 
velopment, exce])t for the extra 
large plates, will be equally 
obsolete. 

Now let us make a few prac- 
tical comi)arisons between tank 
and tray development. 

You go into your dark room 
with a dozen or so of plates to 
develop. You mix up your de- 
veloper and place, say a dozen 
plates in a big tray and pour the 
developer over them. In j-our 



big shallow tray a good proportion 
of your developer is exposed to 
the action of the air, and in a 
short time it decomposes and 
oxidizes — and if during develop- 
ment you remove a plate for ex- 
amination, it will acquire density 
in the high lights even more rap- 
idly than if left in the traj', owing 
to the increased action of the oxy- 
gen in the air. In cases where 
the negative under examination 
hap]iens to be a trifle under-ex- 
posed, say a girl in a white dress, 
what do you do the moment that 
Avhite dress begins to get strong 
— j'ou say, " I dare not let that 
go any further, because if I do 
there Avill be no detail in the high 
lights," so in it goes into the 
fixing bath and when you remove 
it you find you are without detail 
in the shadows. 

That demonstrates one great 
advantage of the tank ; but a very 
small portion of the developer is 
exposed to the action of the air, 
it has but little chance to oxidize, 
and at the end of the half hour's 
development the solution will be 
almost as colorless as when first 
made up, and further, your solu- 
tion being more dilute than that 
for tray development, allows the 
reducing action to proceed slowly 
and equally, building up the de- 
tail in the shadows ecpially with 
the development of the stronger 
portions of your negatives. 

Now here is another little point 
I Avant to impress upon some of 
the skeptical. You say, I live in 






the ARISTO EAGLE 




iliiiiiiilifilfilfS^^^ 



f'"ii'r''ii!"'ir'jr'iA"iir it iK"'h * l" iir '„ (. h 



'iy,[,i<ir'</nri/;. 



FROM A NEPERA PRINT 



By J. E. Ralston 



Senttle, Wash. 



6 



STUDIO LIGHT and 



a very hot or very cold climate, 
and while the people in the more 
temperate parts of the country 
will have no difficulty in main- 
taining the proper temperature 
of the developer, how can I do 
it without going to more trouble 
than it is worth? 

We had a session of the School 
in El Paso, Texas, ajid the ther- 
mometer registered 110 degrees. 
I made up the develojier and 
placed it in the tank with the 
correct temperature of ^5 de- 
grees ; at the end of the half hour 
the temperature had increased 
hut three degrees, and this increase 
had been so gradual as to produce 
no noticeable difference in the den- 
sitj^ of the i)lates. In a very cold 
climate, it is still easier, you can 
easily bring your developer uji to 
the correct degree by adding 
warm water, and as soon as your 
plates are in the tank, you can 
remove the whole business to a 
room that is heated to a normal 
temperature. 

The best way I can explain 
why the temperature of the solu- 
tion varies so slightly when sealed 
up in the tank during develop- 
ment is this: my mother, and I 
guess most everybody else's 
mother, has put up fruit and pre- 
serves, cooked them boilmg hot 
and then placed them in Mason 
fruit jars and sealed them up 
tight — and I have more than once 
waited all day and half the night 
for them to cool off enough for 
me to get a taste. 



Now a word as to the economy 
of tank development. I have fre- 
quently been asked "how much 
more develoi)er do you use? " You 
do not use any more developer to 
develop a dozen plates in the tank 
than you do when using a tray. 
You would not think of going 
into jour dark room to develop 
two or three plates, as you fre- 
quentlj' do, Avithout using at least 
one ounce of your sulphite solu- 
ti<jn, one ounce of your carl)onate 
solution, and one ounce of your 
pyro solution, together with eight 
or ten ounces of water. Now 
with the tank we use exactly the 
same quantity of chemicals, but 
instead of using eight or ten 
ounces of water we use sixtj'-four, 
and we can develop twelve plates 
just as well and a whole lot easier 
than you can develop the two or 
tln-ee. 

With the tank you can develop 
sixteen dozen 5x7 plates with 
one ounce of pyro. That sounds 
like a large statement but here 
is the arithmetic: according to 
the formula used with the tank, 
your pyro solution is made one 
to sixteen, and you use just one 
ounce of this stock solution for 
each dozen plates. Looking over 
my note book I find this question 
has been asked a good many 
times : " Can the developer be 
used over again for a second lot 
of plates?" I will state that it 
can, but in such cases you must 
be sure your plates are all fully 
timed for this reason : during the 



-) 



the ARISTO EAGLE 



first development the developer 
has taken up sufficient liromide 
of silver from the first lot devel- 
oped, to act as a restrainer, just 
the same as if you had added 
bromide to your develo{)er. De- 
veloper is cheap enough, how- 
ever, to throw it away after each 
batch of plates has been 
developed. 

In another issue, if the Editor 
permits, I Avill avail myself of the 
l)rivilege and take up some other 
features that have done so much 
to jjopularize the Eastman Plate 
Tank. 



G 



ETTING AT THE MEN 



The majority of the fair 
sex feel perfectly at home in a 
studio and thoroughly enj oy hav- 
ing their pictures taken, but with 
the average man it is quite a dif- 
ferent proposition. He views a 
visit to the photographer as a 
cross between a visit to the dent- 
ist's and the lawyer's as a de- 
fendant in a damage suit. Not 
that he has no vanity in his make- 
up, for he has his full share, but 
because he in most cases feels 
that the photograi)her will think 
his having his picture tfiken is 
due to vanity, and is disinclined 
to reveal his supposed weakness 
to a comparative stranger. 

Or again, wifie has insisted on 
his portrait being made and wants 
to have him specially " slicked 
up, " and dressed in the garments 
he has reserved for state occa- 



sions. Most men feel mighty 
bored and uncomfortable in gar- 
ments they do not feel at home 
in and will put off donning them 
whenever possil)le. If he is com- 
pelled to have his picture taken 
under these conditions, he is 
rarely satisfied with himself or 
the efforts of the photograjjher 
and leaves the studio with that 
"never again" feeling. 

We used to know a photogra- 
pher who thoroughly understood 
this side of the average man, 
yet he probably photographed 
more men than any of his com- 
petitors. He had good ground 
to commence with, as his ac- 
quaintance with the men in his 
city was large. He believed that 
if he could get the men into his 
studio and show them how easy 
it was to have their picture taken 
he would sooner or later have 
them for customers. Meeting an 
acciuaintance on the street he 
would casually invite him to drop 
into the studio with him a min- 
ute to inspect or discuss some- 
thing he knew the man was inter- 
estedin; having finished he 
would innocently suggest a tour 
of the studio and work rooms 
just to see how the "wheels went 
around." When under the light 
he would explain how the new 
fast plates and high grade lenses 
had greatly reduced the time of 
exposure, how he used no head 
rests, and how much more natu- 
ral the pictures were when his 
subject just dropped in in his 



STUDIO LIGHT and 



ordinarj' clothes, oftentimes ac- 
companying his remarks by a 
practical demonstration. Cietting 
back to his office or reception 
room he would say to his recep- 
tionist, "Miss B , please let 

me have one or two of those pic- 
tures of Mr. C," taking care to 
select some one the man was ac- 
quainted with. At this stage of 
the game his visitor Avas inter- 
ested, felt quite at home and on 
the "inside" of picture taking. 
Many an order was booked right 
then and there, or else at home 
that evening he would mention 
his little visit to the studio and 
his wife would comi)lete the sug- 
gestion so cleverly introduced by 
the man who knew his men. 



THE EASTMAN 
SCHOOL OF PRO- 
FESSIONAL PHOTOG- 
RAPHY FOR 1910 

We have yet to hear an ex- 
pression of dissatisfaction from 
any one of the thousands of the 
j)rofession who have attended any 
of the sessions of the Eastman 
School of Professional Photog- 
raphy. 

In fact so unstinted has been 
the praise of the school and its 
methods that Ave might rest con- 
tent with the plans of the school 
as heretofore carried out and be 
assured of a big attendance at 
every session in 1910- 



But there is no standing still 
with us — the good enough of yes- 
terday goes into the discard of 
to-day — the Eastman School of 
Professional Photography was es- 
tablished with definite aims and 
purposes, and to live up to its 
fundamental principles must pro- 
gress. 

That the school has been pro- 
ductive of good is evident to you 
and to us — but no matter how 
good the school has been it must 
be still better — must present the 
latest and best in processes and 
all that goes to make up success- 
ful photography in order to insure 
your attendance when the school 
is again in session in your terri- 
tory. 

The 1910 School will be con- 
ducted along Unes that will in- 
sure the greatest possible interest 
and enthusiasm; not only in in- 
struction in new and better 
methods, but in simple and more 
effective methods of instruction 
in the features retained from last 
year s school. 

The full sc()i)e and ])rogram of 
the school A\ill be announced in 
an early issue. 



^) 



PURITY 

STRENGTH 

U X I F O R INI I T Y 



Kodak Tested Chemicals 



the ARISTO EAGLE 




FROM A NEPERA PRINT 



By J. E. Ralston 



Seattle, Wash. 



10 



STUDIO LIGHT and 



A 



N OPPORTUNITY 



" Pretty snappy morning 
for October, Mr. Johnson — we 
got pretty well chilled driving 
over, but I just had to have my 
picture taken as I couldn't very 
well leave again between now and 
Christmas. Mrs. Thompson and 
Mrs. Jackson Avere saying to me 
yesterday that they ought to have 
some pictures taken too, only it 
was so far to come ; Avish you had 
a branch studio over in our little 
town, there is a lot of business 
to be picked up and the rent 
wouldn't amount to hardly any- 
thing." 

In a good many parts of this 
great big country there are small 
towns that would Avell support a 
branch studio. A good many 
studio proprietors have been 
quick to see this branch studio 
proposition and their one or more 
branches are coining good money. 
One or perhaps two days a week, 
exposures only made at the branch 
and work delivered on the next 
trij)— just an assistant to do the 
operating— mighty little expense 
for a good deal of profit. 

Of course it would be unhandy 
for the assistant to lug a portrait 
outfit back and forth with him 
every time and the Centvn-y Cam- 
era Di\ision has an outfit that 
seems just made for the purpose— 
the Century Studio Outfit No. 4. 
The camera supplied with this 
outfit is most compact in con- 
struction, made of mahogany and 




4 



CENTURY STUDIO OUTFIT NO. 4 

cherry, and assembled in the best 
possible manner. Both wood and 
metal work si)lendidly finished. 
Vertical and horizontal swings are 
provided, also the exclusive Cen- 
tury micrometer focusing device. 
The caliinet attachment is not 
automatic, but is constructed to 
take the regular 5x7 Century 
Curtain Slide Holder, such as sup- 
phed with the automatic attach- 
ment. The attachment is fitted 
with a ground glass screen at one 
end, which, after focusing, may 
be moved and the holder placed 
in position for the exposure. The 
plate may be placed in the holder 
either vertically or horizontally, 
and also peniiits of making two 
exposures on a 5 x 7 plate. The 
attachment is made of mahogany, 
highly pohshed, and fitted with 



the ARISTO EAGLE 



11 



the regular Century Cur- 
tain Holder in ebonized 
finish. The plate holder 
supplied is the regular 8 
X 10 Century Curtain 
Holder, ebonized and fin- 
ished to harmonize with 
balance of outfit. This 
holder is fitted for either 
8x10 or 5x7 plates. The 
No. 4 Century Stand forms 
part of the outfit. This stand is a 
most substantial piece of ajii^ara- 
tus. It is raised and lowered by 
means of a device entirelj^ new in 
studio apparatus and lodes auto- 
matically at any desired elevation. 
The stand rests upon three rul)ber 
tired casters, and equii)i)ed with 
the Century Camera Jack, which, 
by a movement of the foot, ren- 
ders it impossible to move the out- 
fit when the exposure is about to be 
made. The topiscovered with felt, 
and fitted with the Century Auto- 
matic Tilting device. The stand 
is made of hard wood, mahogany 
stained , all metal parts enameled . 
A plate holder rack is attached 
to the stand in a convenient posi- 
tion and does much to facilitate 
quickness and ease in operating. 
The camera has a focal capacity 
of 22 inches and the lens board 
measures 9x9 inches. The price 
of the outfit complete is only forty- 
five dollars. Your dealer will be 
glad to show you the outfit. 




A 



GOOD HEAVY ONE 



When it comes to mount- 
ing prints in a hurry a good heavy 
roller is a necessity as it saves 
both time and strength — the 
extra weight of the roller forcing 
the print into contact with the 
mount when the mountant is at 
just the right consistency to ad- 
here good and fast. A glance at 
the illustration will show the sub- 
stantial construction of the East- 
man Double Print Roller. 

Both of the eight inch rolls 
covered with first quality heavy 
white rubber and hung true so 
both rollers are at all times in 
perfect contact with the print, 
A solid metal handle, heavily 
nickeled, affords a strong firm 
grip — and the weight, a full five 
pounds, provides for perfect con- 
tact with the smallest effort. 

The price of the No. 1 East- 
man Double Print Roller is three 
dollars. 



TAKE ADVANTAGE OF OCR ADVERTISING CUT 
SERVICE— SEE PAGE 22 



STUDIO LIGHT and 




4 



A SIMPLE NEGATIVE 
DRYER 

A correspondent of the British 
Journal of Photography suggests 
the follo-sraig method for drying 
negatives over night in damp 
weather : 

"At this damp season a good 
way to ensure your negatives be- 
ing dry and ready by the first 
thing in the mornmg following 
development, is to hang on wall 
a wire negative rack to hold 24 
negatives about a foot above a 
gas bracket, and between the 
two suspend from the rack hori- 



zontally an empty platinum can 
with cover on and a hole about 
the size of a penny, cut in the 
middle of the under side just 
over the burner. By leaving a 
very small jet of gas burning all 
night under the hole, it forms a 
hot-air chamber, and distributes 
heat equally the length of the 
rack. Of course, negatives must 
be wiped surface-dry with a 
chamois leather, as any spots of 
water left on would show. 

"If center of can above the 
hole heats quicker than the ends, 
a small flat piece of tin slipped 
in over the hole compensates and 



the ARISTO EAGLE 



13 



im!llil!!lll!l!(I!!Ii!i|i!i!iil|||||!||| 







'""liiliiliiiiiS 



FROM A NEPERA PRINT 



By J. E. Ralsioii 



Seattle, Wash. 



14 



STUDIO LIGHT and 



distributes it better; one can 
soon regulate height of the 
flame to the greatest heat 
that can be safely used, and also 
the time wanted to dry." 



B 



EING THE LEADER 



BY THE OFFICE BOY 

The Boss says if you don't 
start j'ou don't get nowhere — an' 
that gettin' away first gives you 
a big chance of breakin' the tape 
first if your wind holds out. Guess 
he must have been thinkin' of 
foot racin'. I ust to run foot 
races when I was a kid. (I aint 
a kid no more, commenct shavin. 
las' week — wisht I'd used a safe- 
ty.) The Boss says some one 
has to run the leadin' studio in 
his town an' that it might jus' as 
well be him. He sure has got 
the people comin', an' it looks 
as though he was doin' it easy, 
but he aint. 

The Boss says you got to give 
the people a dollar's worth for 
their dollar, an' make 'em think 
they are gettin' a dollar and a 
half s worth. Every minute he's 
busy — an' he covers every inch 
of the place every day seein' that 
things is going right. He won't 
stand for me slightin' any cor- 
ners when I sweep out, an' he 
Avon't stand for sloppy mountin' 
or uneven prints — an' every 
mornin' he's shined and slicked 
up an' all the rest of us got to 
be too, whether we're where his 



customers can see us or not. The 
Boss saj-s if he keeps us slicked 
up we got to keep the whole 
place slicked up so we won't get 
mussed by bumpin' into some 
unslicked up place. 

Every time any of the factory 
folks says they've got somethin' 
new the Boss he tries it — gee 
but the demonstrators have it 
soft with him — an' if he likes 
the new stuff he don't saj', 
"(niess I'll try that out nex' 
season" — Nix, he tries it out 
right away an' before any of the 
rest of the bunch in the t(nvn 
wakes up he has a new show 
case display an' mos' always a 
ad in the newspapers — aint much 
dull season with us. 

The Boss says bein' a leader 
aint no snap, but it's more profit- 
able. 



L 



ENS BUGS 



A certain dealer in pho- 
tographic materials has quite a 
trade in anastigmat lenses, and 
is frequently the recipient of 
complaints regarding the small 
air bubbles sometimes found in 
such lenses. Most of us, of 
course, are fully aware that these 
small bubbles in no way detract 
from the value or cjuality of a 
lens, and are a guarantee in a 
way of genuine Jena glass being 
used. 

The other day Mr. Dealer had 
received several letters regarding 



the ARISTO EAGLE 



15 



air bubbles and had dictated a 
like niunl)er of letters explaiiiinj; 
the matter. His good wife is 
quite an amateur gardener and 
when he arrived home he foinid 
her struggling with the problem 
of how to annihilate the insect 
life that was attacking her rose 
bushes. The t;wo problems 
seemed to remain uppermost in 
his mind, as after he had fallen 
asleep he experienced most re- 
markable dreams, and eventually 
found himself awake again just 
as he was exjjlaining to his wife 
that the troul)le with her rose 
bushes was due to lens bugs. 

In order that the professional 
may be fiilly informed regard- 
ing these small air bubbles, we 
reprint herewith a statement 
from the Bausch & Lonib Opti- 
cal Co. in regard to the matter, 
together with some most excel- 
lent advice from the same source 
regarding the care of lenses : 

"With all the skill and care 
required in producing clear and 
homogeneous optical glass it is 
found impossible to avoid some 
small air bubbles. 

"All such glass as could in any 
way prove detrimental for opti- 
cal purjioses is rigidly excluded 
from use, first by the maker and 
likewise after careful tests by us, 
and in any case where bubbles 
may be found in the lenses, 
either single or grouped, they 
are of such a nature that the 
actual loss of light is inappreciable, 
and so far as the optical quality 



of the image formed by the lens 
is concerned, the presence of 
these small bubbles has no in- 
Jluence whatsoever. 

"A lens should remain for an 
indefinite time in as good a con- 
dition as wlien it leaves the man- 
ufacturer's hands, provided a few 
simple rules are observed, to 
which we draw attention: 

"Protect the lens as much as 
possible from dust and finger 
marks. 

"Do not subject it to sudden 
and extreme temperature. 

"Do not expose to the heat of 
the sun or steam coils. 

"Avoid damp places. 

"Never use any polishing ma- 
terial, alcohol, or other solvent 
on the lens. 

"Do not allow it to fall or get 
a sudden jar, 

"Occasional cleaning is not 
only advisable, but also very 
necessary when the lenses show 
dust, finger marks or moisture 
on the surfiices. 

"To clean use a well washed 
linen handkerchief only. 

"If dusty, blow off the dust 
first, then wijie. 

"To remove finger marks or 
moisture, breathe upon the sur- 
face, and wipe; always wipe 
lightly, and with a circular move- 
ment; a camel's hair brush is 
convenient to remove dust before 
cleaning, and afterward, remove 
lint. 

"If the inner surfaces require 
cleaning, the utmost care should 



16 



STUDIO LIGHT and 



illlliiilli! 






IHl' 
I III 




FROM A NEPERA PRINT 



By J. E. Ralston 



Seattle, Wash. 



the ARISTO EAGLE 




''illiijiiliilllll!!!!!''''''''''''*' 
i£i:i:f,'; 



Bv J. E. Ralston 



Seattle, Wash. 



II 



STUDIO LIGHT and 



be observed to remove the lenses 
one by one, clean, and replace 
before others are taken out. 

"Should the lenses or mount- 
ing require more attention than 
the above, do not entrust the 
same to any but the maker." 



H 



OT SHOT 



O 



UR ILLUSTRATIONS 



Through the courtesy of 
J. E. Ralston, of Seattle, Wash- 
ington, we are enabled to repro- 
duce some of the latest examples 
of his work on Nepera. 

Aecompanj'ing the prints was 
the following expression : 

"If giving permission to 
Studio Light to publish some 
of my prints will answer as a cer- 
tificate of character to my good 
fi-iend, Nepera, I certainly will 
grant it. 

"The old world is good to us 
now and Mrs. Ralston attributes 
it to — as she calls it — The Happy 
Trio, viz., Ralston for the oper- 
ating room, Seed and the little 
Tank for the dark-room, while 
Nepera has full charge of the 
printing department. 

" In recommending Seed ' and 
Nepera' I'm recognizing, I 
think, two potent factors that 
have contriliuted so much toward 
our higher prices. One must hit 
an ingrate that can only see him- 
self in his photograi)hic success. 
Cordially yours, 

J. E. R ALSTON." 



To any one accustomed 
to throwing hot shot into the 
comj)etitor's camj), Tai)rell, 
Loomis & Co.'s new fall supple- 
ment is a delight. Not only does 
the catalogue clearly illustrate 
and fully describe new and ahead 
of the minute stuff, but, way 
ahead of the stereotyped idea of 
a catalogue, this one affords sell- 
ing plans that are bound to suc- 
ceed if thoughtfully and fully 
carried out. Some of the plans 
demand the outlay of quite a 
little cash, others not as much 
as j"ou would spend in ordinarj' 
publicity, but everyone of them 
a winner. 

In a recent issue we described 
their new show card plan, it is 
new, timely and good — hundreds 
of the profession have taken ad- 
vantage of it — have you? 

Just to demonstrate the value 
of this new catalogue to you we 
reprint here two of its pages, 
sho^\dng two splendid ideas for 
more and better business. 

Sfnrlio Adverilshifi Albums oflFer 
the live photographer an opportun- 
ity of bringing his photographs to 
the rJirecf attention of the best of 
the pit-tiire-loving and picture-buy- 
ing public with the almost certain 
increase of business, prices and rep- 
utation as a first-class maker of por- 
traits. It does not make any dif- 
ference how large or small a city 
you are in, Studio Adverlmug Al- 
bums will be your best advance 
agent, your special solicitor, your 
silent but tireless employe. Studio 
Advertising Albums are made with 



the ARISTO EAGLE 



19 



ten leaves 11x16 inches, cloth cov- 
ered covers with tissue separators 
between the leaves. You will notice 
they are made with ^rey covers and 
grey leaves for black and white 
prints in No. 1, and brown covers 
and brown leaves lor sepia prints in 



reach, stating you will call for it in 
a day or two. Do yoit. see the point '■ 
Do you see what a boom the con- 
stant use of a dozen or two of these 
albiiins will give your business? By 
watc-hing the marriage, birth and 
society notices in the local columns 




STUDIO ADVERTISING ALBUM 



No. 2, and black covers and grey 
and brown leaves in No. 3. This 
lust album for miscellaneous styles, 
including heart/ or solid mounted 
prints in different sizes, and prints 
unmounted and on flexible cards. 

THE SCHEME 

You must have at least a half 
dozen to a dozen of these albinns in 
your studio, filled in part or entirely 
with specimen prints of your skill. 
In your spare moments you write a 
neat business letter to prominent 
people in your city, to strangers 
visiting your city, and request a sit- 
ting, and with it send one of these 
albums by special messenger to the 
lady or gentleman you want to 



of your papers you can keep before 
your public the fart of phofoyraphs 
belter than you can, by any other 
method. We just give you the out- 
line, only it can be handled in a 
hundred and one different ways and 
don't forget it can be worked with 
as proportionate telling effect in the 
small town as the large city, by the 
man who makes solid mounted styles 
in black and white tones as by the 
man who makes pictures on flexible 
cards only in sepia and black and 
white. Write us about them and ask 
the dealer. 

Remember you can loasfe ten times 
the price of a dozen of these albums 
in newspaper advertising and 
printer's ink without one-eighth of 
the good results. WHY? Because 



20 



STUDIO LIGHT and 



they shmn what y OH. hai'e for sale &nd some leather finished portfolio that 
the others do not. is in a class by itself. Each portfolio 




THE STEFFENS PORTFOLIO 



Sa.mpi.k Specimen Letter to Send 
WITH Album 

Dear Sir: 

I take pleasure in sending: you here- 
with, by special messenger, an album con- 
taining a few specimens of my work, 
which I trust will interest you as a lover of 
pictures. I shall be glad of an opportun- 
ity to have you sit for a portrait at my 
studio, and feel positive that you will be 
pleased with my etforts. 

My messenger will call for the album in 
a day or two, and thanking you in advance 
for the care given it, I am. 

Respectfully yours. 

Name. 

The Sleffens Portfolio can hardly 
be described on paper and with 
mere words — it is different, original 

— a new idea; it gives yon a style 

— in a dozen lot — put up in a hand- 



is a flexible brown or grey leather 
finish portfolio, containing one dozen 
flexible deckled mounts with no im- 
print or plate mark except a fine 
line round the edge which is deckled 
all round. A piece of fine silk tissue 
is attached neatly to each card as a 
protector to the print, and the whole 
dozen cards are enclosed in the 
leather finished cover which is a 
portfolio and cover combined. You 
can use the cards as they are for 
regular or odd sized prints or use in- 
serts to suit your taste. 

Sample only on receipt of list price. 
Prices include one dozen inserts in each 
folio. ■ 

Take the most expensive grade 
you're making to-day, subtract the 



the ARISTO EAGLE 



21 



price of the dozen cards or folders 
you're using from the pric-e of the 
Stejf'ens Porl folio , and it costs you 
no more and will bring you more 



money. You can show your patrons 
that ('•///( the photo they keep they have 
(he best possible kind of flexible album 
to keep it in. Insist on seeing this. 



STUDIO ADVERTISING ALBUMS 



No. 


LEAVES 


1 


11x16 


2 


11x16 


3 


11x16 



DESCRIPTION 



Grey covers and leaves for sheet pictures, in black and 
white or on flexible cards 

Brown leaves, brown covers for sheet pictures in sepia 
or on flexible cards 

Black covers, grey and brown leaves, for miscellaneous 
styles on heavy cards, folders and flexible styles 



PRICE 
EACH 



$1.25 
1.25 
1.25 



STEFFENS PORTFOLIOS 



No. 


COLOR 


FOR PHOTOS 


SIZE OUTSIDE 


EACH 


1-G 


Grey 


Cabt. and under 


6x9 


$ .90 


1-B 


Brown 


Cabt. and under 


6x9 


.90 


2-G 


Grey 


4x6 and under 


7 X 10 


1.10 


2-B 


Brown 


4x6 and under 


7 X 10 


1.10 


3-G 


Grev 


4x6 and over 


8 X 1-2 


1.25 


3-B 


Brown 


4x6 and over 


8x 12 


1.25 


4-G 


Grey 


5 X 7 to 8 X 10 


11 x 14 


1.70 


4-B 


Brown 


5 x 7 to 8 X 10 


11 x 14 


1.70 



Prices include the dozen cards in each folio. 



rpHE EASTMAN Plate 
^ Tank will Save Its Cost 
twice over during the holi- 
day rush :: :: :: :: 



22 



STUDIO LIGHT n7id 



THE ONLY CON- 
DITION 

We make but one condi- 
tion in our offer of cuts for 
the use of photographers. 

It is obvious that two 
photograpliers in tlie same 
town would not care to use 
the same cut, and we are 
therefore obliged to limit 
this offer to one photogra- 
pher in a town. It will be 
a case of first come first 
served. The first order 
from a city will be promptly 
filled. Succeeding orders (if 
any) will necessarily be 
turned down and the re- 
mittance, of course, will be 
returned. It is also obvious 
that we cannot, on account 
of the cost of the drawings, 
funiish any large variety of 
cuts at the nominal prices 
quoted, and therefore can 
offer no substitute cut. The 
thing to do is to get your 
order injirst, as it would not 
be fair to give the man who 
happens to get in his order 
early one month, a penmnieitt 
advantage; we shall book no 
orders in advance. They 
must always specify the num- 
ber of cut desired. If later 
on it develops that there is 
a great enough demand for 
these advertising cuts to war- 
rant our furnishing a larger 
variety, Ave shall be glad to 

do so. r, T- ^, X , 
C. k. Co., Ltd. 




PHOTOGRAPHY is an art, 
— or not, according to the 
aliility of the photographer. 

An artist can make a beauti- 
ful woman more beautiful, can 
add to the portrait, lines of 
graceful composition, charita- 
bly concealing or prettilj- em- 
phasizing lights and shadows. 
Above all, he strives to show 
those lines of character which 
often transform the plainest 
faces. 

We pride ourselves 
that ve are artists. 
May we prove it in 
our work for you? 



Delivery of Christmas 
Orders (xuaranteed 



The Pyro Studio 



No. 148. Price, 50 cents. 



the ARISTO RAGLE 



23 




Everything to suit you with the 

EASTMAN 
PLATE TANK 

No prolonged stay in a cold or damp dark 
room : No fogged or scratched plates : No fishing 
the plates out of the tank during development 
the entire tank reverses: No guess work— no 
bother — no discomfort — perfect results. 



Eastman Plate Tank, 5 x 7 
Eastman Plate Tank, 8 x 10 



$ 4.50 
10.00 



CANADIAN KODAK CO., Limited, 

All Dealers. TORONTO, CAN. 



24 STUDIO LIGHT ««f/ 



The best of everything 
for use in the Studio 



A complete line of 

Canadian Kodak Co. 's 
Plates, Papers and 
Tested Chemicals. 

Canadian Card Co.'s 
Mounts 

Century Studio Ap- 
paratus. 



The D. H. Hogg Company 

MONTREAL, CANADA 



the ARISTO EAGLE 25 

The slight tinge of warmth in 

EASTMAN 




PLATINUM 

adds a life and charm to portraits 
utterly impossible with the cold 
steely blacks of the ordinary black 
and white platinum. 

Two Grades: Smooth and Rough 



Eastman Kodak Company 

Rochester, N. Y. 



26 STUDIO LIGHT «nJ 



Canadian Made for the 
Canadian Professional 



Seed, Royal and Stanley 
Plates 

Canadian Card Co.'s 
Mounts 

Canadian Kodak Co.'s 
Tested Chemicals 

Canadian Made Papers 



J. G. Ramsey k Co., limited 

Toronto, Canada 



the ARISTO EAGLE 



27 



You can only be sure of 
the strength and purity of 
your chemicals when they 
are tested by those whose 
interest continues beyond 
the sale of the chemicals 
themselves. 

The sig-n of continued 
interest : 




28 STUDIO LIGHT and 

To get the long 
price, use 

ANGELO 

The sepia platinum that 

wins wherever 

shown 



CANADIAN KODAK CO. 

Limited 
Toronto, Canada 



/A^-ARISTO EAGLE 29 



ROYAL 

NEPERA 



EITHER India Tint or Pure 
\Miite is ///(' developing paper 
for the professional. It affords 
a double weight paper at the single 
weight ])rice, yields exquisite sepias 
when redeveloped — and the prints 
lie fiat. 



Canadian 
Kodak Co. 

Limited 




Toronto, Canada 




30 



STUDIO LIGHT and 




There is profit for you 
in enlargements on 
Eastman Bromide 
Paper 



"ENLARGING, A BOOKLET OF SUGGESTION 

FOR THE PROFESSIONAL," 
sent gratis to professional photographers upon request 



CANADIAN KODAK CO., Limited 
TORONTO, CANADA 



the ARISTO EAGLE 



31 



A/rOST of the trouble you have been 
having in securing good negatives 
of babies can be avoided by using the 
Century Baby Holder. 




It is quickly jind easily adjustable, has no 
frail parts to get out of order, and is the safest 
and most effective baby holder on the market. 
Price - - - - $5.00 



Century Camera Division 

East 111 an Kodak Company 

Rochester, N. Y. 



32 



STUDIO LIGHT and 



A Sure Hit for Xmas Trade 

THERE is money in novelties and we show you a halftone re- 
production of one of our best. And at that the illustration 
does not do justice to describe the real beauty of our Prince 
of Wales Calendar. It is made in two colors. Gray and Brown, for 
Cabinet Square Prints only. 




We have not the space to describe the Prince of Wales Calendar 
thoroughly, so will ask you to be sure and have your travelling 
salesman show you samples of both colors. You cannot make a mis- 
take in stocking this style as it will make a sure winner with the 
public. Show these in your window and get some of the Xmas trade 
that would go elsewhere and to other lines. 

Sample of one color mailed on receipt of six 2-cent stamps. 

DESIGNED AND MANIFACTIRED BY 



CANADIAN CARD CO. 



Toronto. Canada