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Full text of "Sub turri = Under the tower : the yearbook of Boston College"

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ARCHIVES 




According to the grace of God, that is given to me, as a wise 
architect, I have laid the foundation: and another buildeth there- 
upon. But let every man take heed how he buildeth thereupon. 

For no one can lay another fotmdation, but that which is laid: 
which is Christ Jesus. 

Now if any man build upon this foundation, gold, silver, 
precioics stones, tuood, hay, stubble: every man's work shall be 
made manifest: for the day of the Lord shall declare it, because 
it shall be revealed by fire: and the fire shall try every man's work, 
of what sort it is. 

If any man's work abide, which he hath built thereupon, he 
shall receive a reu/ard. 

If any man's work burn, he shall suffer loss: but he himself 
shall be saved, yet so as by fire 



Know you not you are the temple of God, and the Spirit of 
God dwelleth in you? 

But if any m-an violate the temple of God: him shall God 
destroy. For the temple of God is holy, which you are. 

Let no man deceive himself: if any man among yo7i seem to 
be wise in this tvorld, let him become a fool, that he may be ivise. 

For the wisdom of this world is foolishness with God. For it 
is written I will catch the wise in their otun craftiness. 

And again: the Lord knoweth the thoughts of the ii'ise, that 
they are vain. 

Let no man, therefore, glory in men. 

For all things are yours, whether it be Paul, or Apollo, or 
Cephas, or the world, or life, or death, or things present, or things 
to come: for all are yours, and you are Christ's, and Christ is 
God's. 

St. Paul to the Corinthians; 1:3, 10-23 





THE SENIORS' BOOK 
BOSTON COLLEGE 
CHESTNUT HILL, MASS. 




REVEREND JAMES J. KELLEY, S.J. 




M. 



OST of Hs met Father Kelley for the first time at our 
Freshman banquet. We ivere impressed by his striking bearing, his calm 
confidence — we kueiv that ive were meeting a man of action and deter- 
mination, yet we could detect a warm and human side. His own students 
knew him already as an excellent teacher, a capable administrator and 
as a true friend and counsellor. And in the years that have followed tve, 
too, have seen unquestionable evidence of Father Kelley' s ability and of 
his great efforts on behalf of his students. His office has been ever open 
to the student in difficulty, and his u'ise ivords of advice have eased the 
paths of many. 

As the first class of our College of Business Administration, Father 
Kelley's greatest tribute, goes forth, lue, the Forty-Two's, wish to add to 
the honors of this humble priest our ivords of dedication. 





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'LD timers fell 21s that declining years are 
pleasant if lue can relive happy memories. Today, we are 
not looking back on our four years at Boston College — 
there is no time for that. Instead, we look to the future 
boldly, confident in our ability to meet tomorrovj. But, 
soon, we'll be no longer able to follow an active life — then 
ive'll ti.se otir memories — of dances and banquets, of foot- 
ball games and rallies, of the fellow who sat beside us, of 
all our classmates and professors, of those little incidents 
that always live in memories. If this Sub Turri can help 
you, in its oivn small ivay, then our efforts are repaid. 

M\RTIN J. HaNSBERRY, 

Editor-in-Chief 







* ADMINISTRATION 

* SExNIORS 

* COLLEGE OF 
BUSINESS 
ADMINISTRATION 

* UNDERCLASSMEN 

* ACTIVITIES 

* ATHLETICS 

* FEATURES 





MpjtU* 




VERY REVEREND WILLIAM J. MURPHY, S.J. 



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REV. JOHN J. LONG, S.J. 
Dean, College of Arts and Sciences 



REV. JOHN P. FOLEY, S.J. 
Dean of Freshmen 

REV. WILLIAM E. SHANAHAN, S.J. 

Dean of Men 



REV. JAMES J. KELLEY, S.J. 

Dean, College of Business 
Administration 

REV. JAMES L. McGOVERN, S.J. 
Strident Counsellor 




Rev. James L. Burke, S.J., Ph.D. 

Chairman of Dcparfmciif of History 
ami Govcrmuent 



Rev. Evan C. Dubois, S.J., Ph.D. 

Assistant Professor of Biology 




Rev. Francis J. Dore, S.J., Ph.D., 
M.D. 

Chairman of Department of Biolosy 




Rev. George A. Morgan, S.J., A.M., 
S.T.L. 

Assistant Professor of Religion 



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John J. Drummey, M.B.A. 

Professor of Accounting 




George F. Fitzgibbon, Ph.D. 

Professor of Sociology 




Rev. John Louis Bonn, S.J., A.M., 
S.T.L. 

Assistant Professor of English 



Rev. Francis J. MacDonald, S.J., 
A.M. 

Professor of Education 



Frank M. Gager, E.E. 

Associate Professor of Physics 



F.ev. Edward T. Douglas, S.J., A.M. 

Chairman of the Department of 
Religion 



Rev. Frederick W. Boehm, S.J., Ph.D. 

Professor of Philosophy 



Rev. Richard G. Shea, S.J., A.M., 
S.T.L. 

Assistant Professor of Latin 




Rev. W. Edmund Fitzgerald, S.J., 
A.M. 

Chairman of the Department of 

Classics 



Eduardo Azuola, Ph.D. 

Professor of Spanish 



Rev. John A. Tobin, S.J., Ph.D. 

Chairman of the Department of Physics 



Paul Arthur Boulanger, Ph.D. 

Professor of German 



Rev. Carl H. Morgan, S.J., S.T.L. 

Assistant Professor of Mathematics 



John J. Convery, M.Ed. 

Assistant Professor in EJnc:Ji'"i 



George P. Donaldson, M.B.A. 

Director of Gnnhucc 



Rev. Albert F. McGuinn, S.J., Ph.D. 

Chairman of the Department of 
Chemistry 




Rev. John A. O'Callaghan, S.J., A.M. 

Chairman of the Department of 
English 



Rene J. Marcou, B.S. 

Assistant Professor of Mathematics 



Rev. John A. O'Brien, S.J., Ph.D. 

Chairman of the Department of 
Philosophy 



Rev. Alexander G. Duncan, S.J., 
A.M., S.T.L. 

Professor of Psychology 



Thomas H. Mahoney, A.M. 

Assistant Professor of History 



Hans H. Reinheimmer, Ph.D. 

Assistant Professor of Physics 



Rev. John E. Murphy, S.J., Ph.D. 

Professor of Gael it- 



David C. O'Donnell, Ph.D. 

Professor of Chemistry 




Joseph P. Maguire, Ph.D. 

Assistant Professor of Greek am! Latii 



John Pick, Ph.D. 

A^ustant Professor of English 



Rev. William J. Leonard, S.J., A.M., 
S.T.L. 

Assistant Professor of English 



Frederick T. Bryan, M.B.A. 

.\\ustant Professor of Economics 



Francis J. Campbell, A.M. 

Regi,t,.n 



Harold A. Zager, M.S. 

Associate Professor of Mathematics 



Harry M. Doyle, Ph.D. 

Professor of Government 



Rev. George A. O'Donnell, S.J., 
Ph.D. 

Vean of the Graduate School 
Professor of Mathematics 




Rev. Francis J. Cotter, S.J., Ph.D. 

Professor of Philosophy 



Gino de Solenni, Ph.D. 

Chairmau of the Department of 
Romance L'iguages 



Andre G. de Beauvivier, A.B. 

Assistant Professor of Trench 



Rev. Stephen A. Koen, S.J., A.M. 

Professor of Philosophy and Education 



Frederick E. White, Ph.D. 

Assistant Professor of Physics 



Rev. John A. McCarthy, S.J., A.M., 
S.T.L. 

Assistant Professor of Philosophy 



Theodore N. Marier, A.M. 

Lecturer on Music 



Erich N. Labouvie, Ph.D. 

Professor of German 




Rev. J. F. X. Murphy, S.J., A.M. 

I'rofessor of History 



Robert F. Buck, M.F.S. 

Instructor in Economics and 



Rev. John J. Murphy, S.J., Ph.D. 

Professor of Ethics 



Rev. Stephen A. Mulcahy, S.J., A.M. 

I'rofessor of Classics 



Rev. Oswald A. Reinhalter, S.J., 
A.M. 

Professor of Classics 



Rev. Michael J. Harding, S.J., Ph.D. 

Professor of Philosoph , 



Rev. Lemuel P. Vaughan, S.J., A.M. 

Assistant Professor of Religion 



John F. Norton, A.M. 

Professor of Latin and English 




Rev. David R. Dunigan, S.J., A.M. 

Instructor of Education 



Frederick J. Guerin, Ph.D. 

Assistant Professor of Chemistry 



Rev. Stephen A. Shea, S.J., A.M., 
S.T.L. 

Professor of Philosophy 



Rev. John F. Doherty, S.J., Ph.D. 

Professor of Education 



Henry Lee Bowen, Ph.D., Professor of History 

Francis M. Buckley, Jr., A.B., Fellow in English 

Timothy J. Burke, A.M., Instructor in Romance Lan- 
guages 

Matthew P. Butler, A.M., Instructor in Education 



Rev. Thomas P. Butler, S.J., Ph.D., Assistant Professor 
of Chemistry 



Rev. John D. Donoghue, S.J., A.M., Assistant in 
Philosophy 



Arthur H. Doyle, A.B., C.P.A., Instructor in Account- 
ing 



Rev. George T. Eberle, S.J., Ph.D., Professor of English 



Harold H. Fagan, M.S., Assistant Professor of Chemistry 



Eugene J. Feeley, Ph.L., Professor of Greek and Latin 



Robert J. Cahill, A.B., Fellow in German 



Walter R. Carmody, Ph.D., Associate Professor of 
Chemistry 



Rev. Thomas B. Feeney, S.J., A.M., Assistant Professor 
of English 



Rev. Leo E. Fitzgerald, S.J., A.M., Professor of French 



A. Kenneth Carey, LL.B., Instructor in Law 

Daniel J. Carmichael, M.B.A., Professor of Marketing 

Nazzareno P. Cedrone, M.S., Instructor in Mathematics 



Rev. Patrick H. CoUins, S.J., A.M., Assistant Professor 
of English 



William J. Collins, M.B.A., Instructor in Accounting 
and Finance 



Thomas P. Condron, A.B., Assistant in Physics 



Rev. Terence L. Connolly, S.J., Ph.D., Special Lecturer 
in English 



Joseph J. Coughlan, A.B., Fellow in Chemistry 



Rev. Francis J. Coyne, S.J., Ph.D., Professor of Philos- 
ophy 



Rev. Francis Flaherty, S.J., Ph.D., Assistant Professor 
of Philosophy 



Rev. Ernest B. Foley, S.J., A.M., Chairman of the De- 
partment of Economics 



Rev. Walter F. Friary, S.J., Ph.D., Professor of Philos- 
ophy 



Walter J. Gavin, A.M., Professor of English 



Rev. James E. Geary, S.J., S.T.L., Assistant Professor 
of History 



Joseph F. Gould, B.Ed., Lecturer in Education 
Wilfred A. Grapes, B.S., Fellow in Chemistry 
Edward Greeley, B.S., Assisting Fellow in Chemistry 
George Gage-Grob, A.M., Assistant Professor of English 



James W. Culliton, D.C.S., Professor of Management 



D. Leo Daly, A.M., Lecturer in Education 



Rev. Francis J. Donoghue, S.J., A.M., Instructor in 
History 



Rev. Martin P. Harney, S.J., A.M., Assistant Professor 
of History 



John J. Hayes, A.M., Instructor in French 
William Hayward, LL.B., Director of Publicity 



Lawrence Howe, B.S., Fellow in Physics 



William P. Husband, Jr., B.B.A., C.P.A., Instructor in 
Accounting and Finance 



William F. Irwin, A.B., Fellow in Sociology 



Rev. Walter C. Jaskievicz, S.J., A.M., Assistant in 
Philosophy 



Rev. John S. Keating, S.J., A.M., Librarian 

Augustine L. Keefe, A.M., Professor of Classics 

James Kiely, A.B., Assistant in Philosophy 

Rev. Richard Lawlor, S.J., A.M., Instructor in English 

Joseph A. Leary, M.Ed., Lecturer in Education 

Rev. James M. Leavey, S.J., A.M., Professor of French 

Robert F. Long, B.S., Fellow in Physics 

Rev. Francis E. Low, S.J., Ph.D., Professor of Philosophy 

Joseph F. McCarthy, A.M., Lecturer in Education 

Louis McCoy, A.M., Lecturer in Education 

Rev. Peter J. McKone, S.J., M.S., Instructor in Physics 

John F. McLaughlin, B.S., Fellow in Physics 

Henry J. McMahon, A.B., Fellow in History 

Robert B. Masterson, M.Ed., Lecturer in Education 

Francis L. Maynard, A.M., Instructor in Biology 

Vincent G. Millbury, A.B., Fellow in Italian 

Rev. Robert D. O'Brien, S.J., Ph.L., Professor of English 



Rev. Vincent de Paul O'Brien, S.J., A.M., Dean of 
Intown School 



Rev. John C. O'Connell, S.J., Ph.D., Chairman of 
Department of Sociology 



John T. O'Connell, Ph.D., Lecturer in Education 

John M. O'Loughlin, A.B., Librarian 

John W. Pillion, B.S., Fellow in Chemistry 

Rev. Leo F. Quinlan, S.J., A.M., Instructor in Lati: 



Rev. Thomas J. Quinn, S.J., A.M., Professor of Greek 
and Latin 



John .J. Rohan, B.S., Fellow in Chemistry 

Rev. Gregory Roy, S.J., A.M., Assistant in Biology 

James J. Ryan, B.S., Fellow in Chemistry 

Thomas I. Ryan, M.S., Instructor in Biology 

Rev. Stephen A. Shea, S.J., A.M., S.T.L., Professor of 
Philosophy and Religion 

John Shork, M.S., Assistant Professor of Physics 

Ernest A. Siciliano, A.M., Instructor in Romance Lan- 
guages 



Rev. George F. Smith, S.J., A.M., Assistant Professor of 
History 



Rev. Sidney J. Smith, S.J., A.M., Professor of English 
and Latin 



Rev. Patrick Sullivan, S.J., A.M., Instructor in Classics 
Henry C. Titus, A.M., Instructor in History 



James V. Toner, B.B.A., A.M., C.P.A., Professor of 
Mathematics of Finance and Special Lecturer in 
Accounting 



Rev. Edmond Walsh, S.J., A.M., Instructor in History 



Louis R. Welch, M.S., M.Ed., Instructor in Education 



William A. Welch, A.M., Lecturer in Education 



SERVING GOD AND COUNTRY 




REV. DANIEL J. LYNCH, S.J. 

Lieutenant Colonel, U.S.A. 





Jesuits are noted for their flexibility, individually 
and collectively. Saint Francis Xavier abandoned meta- 
physics for the missions, and Jesuits ever since have been 
traveling to and fro into every field and to every place 
on the globe where souls are to be saved. This war 
saw no break in the tradition of the Jesuits, and in the 
Summer of forty-one. Reverend Anthony J. Carroll, 
S.J., went from test tubes to troops, from Chemist to 
Captain. First stationed at Camp Edwards, he was later 
transferred to the West Coast and duty in the Pacific. 

Memories of Father Carroll are many, — a genial priest 
who knew hundreds of people by their first names, who 
gave brilliant lectures in S-4, who came down and 
smoked cigarettes with the Heights staff on Wednesday 
nights, who supplied the enthusiasm for the formation 
of the Crystal, who had a thirst for knowledge and a 
tremendous capacity for work. 

Father Daniel J. Lynch, S.J., also answered the call 
and went frora ledger-keeping to Lieutenant Colonel, 
from serving Boston College to serving the Nation. He 
left his position as Moderator of the Philomatheia Club 
to return to the post at which he had so nobly proved 
himself in World War L 

This tall, dignified, grey-haired Lieutenant Colonel 
went to Camp Edwards. In the depth of Winter he 
returned to Boston College to recover from a short 
illness. After recovery, he was assigned, according to 
reports, to the West Coast. Lieutenant Colonel Lynch 
has been a Chaplain for over twenty-five years and is 
the senior ranking officer in the Chaplain Division of 
the First Corps Area of the United States Army. 

Father Carroll and Father Lynch are the only recent 
members of the Boston College Faculty who have been 
called to the colors. But many other Jesuits, former 
teachers at Boston College, are now in the service; among 
these are. Father Lawrence M. Brock, S.J., First Lieu- 
tenant, and the most popular man at Edwards; Father 
John F. Clancey, S.J., First Lieutenant; Father James 
J. Dolan, S.J., First Lieutenant; Father John J. Dugan, 
S.J., First Lieutenant, with Mac Arthur and his troops; 
Father George M. Murphy, S.J., First Lieutenant; all of 
these priests are serving in the Army. Father Joseph T. 
O'Callahan, S.J., is now a Lieutenant Senior Grade in 
the United States Navy. 

In addition to these, there are many other men who, 
after graduating from Boston College, entered the priest- 
hood and are now serving both God and Country as 
chaplains in our armed services. 



REV. ANTHONY G. CARROLL, S.J. 
Captain, U.S.A. 



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On the twenty-fourth day of September, 1941, the Reverend ^S^i^ianl J. McGarry, S.J., nineteenth president of 
Boston College, departed this life as simply as he had lived it. No man ever saw life more steadily or fully than he 
who could look well beyond the narrow present to the broader expanses of the future. He was, as we all learned, a 
man of vision, keen penetrating perception, a man with a rich appreciation of values. Perhaps this accounted for the 
simplicity which was his in no small measure. Of him it can be said in all truth, he had the simplicity of greatness 
and the greatness of simplicity. 

As president of Boston College Father McGarry impressed all who met him with his deep love of scholarship and 
study. He was an intellectual in the finest sense of that word, but his heart was in his study as it was in his hand, 
giving a human warmth to his work and his life. No mere theorist, he was successfully practical where the seemingly 
more practical met with failure. Nor was his life spent merely in the perusal of learned tomes. On the contrary, he 
was devoted to youth and to their adjustment in a world thrown sadly out of joint, and this devotion made many an 
inroad into his very busy life. No group of young people was ever too unimportant or too insignificant for Father 
McGarry's talents. He had a message for youth, and in his zeal to lend encouragement and direction to their efforts 
no call that came from them to him failed to find a generous response. 

The work of Father McGarry at Boston College is well known to all. Those of us who had the good fortune to 
serve in the interests of Catholic education under his aegis may well wonder at his inexhaustible energy, his untiring 
devotion, his genuine inspiration, his winning sincerity. Though he spent but two short years as our Rector his name 
and his deeds will not be forgotten when the chronicle of the college which he loved is written. The sublime dignity 
of his priesthood sat well upon him; the tremendous responsibilities of his calling were ever uppermost in his mind. To 
these he was ever faithful; in their pursuit he laid down his hfe. He was our father, our leader, our guide, our friend. 
May his noble soul rest in peace. 

Joseph R. N. Maxwell, S.J. 

President, Holy Cross College 




ioBS 




SENIOR OFFICERS 

James L. Malone, Paul J. Maguire, James F. Stanton, Thomas R. Hinchey, 

Richard H. Callahan 



LIKE IT WAS YESTERDAY 



There is very little rain on the streets, so 
that they shine under the neon signs and the 
dim window lights, softly and even beautifully 
in a part of the city that is not supposed to be 
very beautiful. You are with your girl and 
you are walking up Canal Street on a Sunday 
night in December. You have your arm 
around her and you are laughing, talking 
about June and what you hope will happen 
after June. You go under the tunnel at Hay- 
market Square and come up on Washington 
Street when suddenly a little Italian kid in a 
dirty face dashes out in front of you and holds 
up a newspaper. You read some very large 
words about a place called Pearl Harbor and 
you say to your girl that this is it, this is it 
all right. And then you are in front of the 
Boston Post where there are a lot of men with 
gray faces looking up where another man is 
drawing history with a piece of chalk on a 
blackboard. You look down at your girl and 
you see that she is not smiling. 

"Don't worry, baby," you say, "everything 
is going to be all right. I am going to get along 
fine." 

"I'm not thinking just of you," she says. "It 



is for all the others, too — " So then you think 
of all the others. The class of Forty-two, the 
fellows that you have been going to school 
with for the past four years .... Ahern, Al- 
man, Andrews .... 

It is four years ago and you are coming up 
that long hill, walking very slow because the 
heat of the summer is still spread out all over 
the place, and it is a hard walk anyway, and 
you are looking up where those Towers are 
laced out in the sunlight very grayish-blue and 
strong-looking. You wonder if you will ever 
see anything so beautiful again in your life. 
You wonder how it will be, for four years of 
living where these towers are and the trees and 
the great sweep of the valley where the reser- 
voirs lie. Today you do not stop to drink it 
in. Today the beauty must stay itself, for the 
future is being born today and waits for you at 
the very end of this long flat winding hedge . . . 
Sudetan is the word you have Just heard some- 
one whispering in the street car, Sudetan and 
what will the British do? ... . Alexander's 
Ragtime Band and Alice Faye, and it is Sep- 
tember, 1938 and the first day at Boston Col- 
lege for four-hundred freshmen. 

Buy your books, "Wooley and Scott," 



Cicero, "Snyder and Martin." . . . . 10:10, 
Everybody to the Auditorium, because you 
have to find out what it is all about. What 
are we doing here? What does it mean? An 
education at Boston College, and they tell you. 
They tell you about ideals and working hard 
and the method. Then you go outside and 
open up a package of cigarettes and stand 
around in knots. And my name is so and so, 
what's yours? That is how it begins. The 
place looks very big to you and the first day 
you do a lot of walking around. And there 
are classes to go to and things to learn. It is 
new and exciting these first weeks, because you 
are joining every academy, every club on the 
campus. You are rushing over to the Heights 
office or trying out for dramatics or down in 
the gridiron doing Calisthenics for a man 
named Galligan. 

This is the way things go and the time is 
short. Pretty soon there are names that every- 
body knows, like Vito Ananis and Dobie and 
Father Fitzgerald and Maggie Maguire, and 
pretty soon you are standing out on the lawn 
with a thousand others while Father McGarry, 
who is the president of the College, says a 
Mass. The Mass of the Holy Ghost, they call 
it, because it is for grace in studies. The sun 
is warm on your shoulders and the altar is very 
white. You say to yourself like you've said 
already a thousand times before that this is 
something I will not forget. You feel big and 
important and heavy with responsibility. 



One after the other the days pass like this, 
with you very busy taking notes about poetry 
or syntax or algebraic terms. You read the 
weather report for September 21, and it says 
that it will be slightly colder the next day. 
The next day comes and you have just gotten 
home from classes when billboards and trees 
start falling down all around you and dams 
are breaking and business is at a standstill. So 
now you know what it is to live in Florida. 

Then it is October. A man by the name of 
Eduard Benes resigns as premier of Czechoslo- 
vakia .... Father Peter Dolan and the Fresh- 
men of forty-two confer for three days on 
spiritual matters. At the end of the three days 
a holiday is given, and the Yankees win the 
World Series. October is pretty good. There 
is the football team. There are names like 
Butch Kissel, and Morro and Levanitis and a 
powerhouse unit that is doing to other fresh- 
man teams what the hurricane did to the Cape. 
There is the Library and piles of green Boston 
bags lining the walls. There is a growing fa- 
miliarity with blue books and fellows dashing 
into class at nine-fourteen feverishly whisper- 
ing, "What's hot?" and there are the confident 
guys. Stiles and Hawco and Nicholson and 
Hansberry. There are the professors .... 
Father Bonn with blue hair and a volume of 
Shakespeare, Gus Keefe, Mr. King, Mr. Ball, 
Mr. Lyons, Henry Titus behind the Guggen- 
berger .... A sonnet is a poem with fourteen 
lines. Si quid est in me etiim .... The Sin A 
equals the Cos B . . . . Happy day. 




PROOF: THIS HISTORY IS BASED ON FACT 



Munich is the word you should be remem- 
bering in November, but you remember Fresh- 
man Day. You remember Frank Maznicki 
going around ends with his arm full of disaster 
for Boston University .... 53 to ... . Man 
alive! After the game you are hungry be- 
cause you have been screaming your head off. 
But you go over to the Library theatre to 
watch the One-Act Playshop play at being 
professional. Somehow or other it is hard to 
get into the spirit of tragedy. Joe Dever 
enters in a red wig. You say "Woo, Woo" 
and what was very sad becomes very funny to 

everyone but Joe Dever Then the lights 

go on and you charge across the lawn to where 
they have set up tables in T 100 and spread 
them with olives and celery and cigarettes. 
You eat the inevitable chicken and banana 
fritters. John Curley talks about a great team; 
he reveals secrets and makes promises so that 
you feel that the A.A. is being run for your 
personal benefit. The officers that you have 
voted for are introduced .... Paul Maguire, 
president, Jim O'Neill, Tom Flanagan, Joe 
Hegarty, Joe Kelley. Wonderful fellows, you 
think to yourself, we're all wonderful fellows. 
Then we wait for Father Fitzgerald while he 
beats with ponderous whimsicality around a 
bush that we all know is traditional; the an- 
nouncement that there will be no classes to- 
morrow. So we stand up and sing the Hail 
Alma Mater and there is that banner hanging 
up on the wall, Forty-Two, and in spite of 
yourself you feel pretty big. 

This is the month that the Ambassador to 
Germany was recalled, remember, and Henry 
Ford offered to bet that there would never be 
another war. You were skipping class to see 
Ronald Colman in If I Were King, and The 
Citadel. You know how it went on from there. 
There was Second Spring with Connie Pappas 
and Dick Keating .... there are mid-years with 
"What's hot?" again. There is Under-the- 
Towers and you with the most beautiful girl 
you know, to show off. There is April and 
the whole college is sitting on the hill looking 
down on the reservoir road where Donald 
Mulcahy is swallowing twenty-nine goldfish 
and three quarts of milk for a new record. 
Pretty soon it is time for the Prom, the great 
night when you pick up a corsage and then 
pin it on white satin with your own hands and 
take over the Somerset .... smooth in a white 
tie. There is M3' Reverie and romance and 
Stardust is no longer the name of a song but 
the way you feel. And the day you bring 
your mother out to the Heights and show her 
the place, and Father McGovern makes the 
speech about mothers and it is certainly a nice 



day. As a matter of fact you feel that it has 
been a nice year. Of course there have been 
some bad days like when Father Fitz came 
around from class to class and said, Mr. X, 
your marks are South of the Border. But you 
finished the year filling out blue-books and 
they looked pretty good to you when you 
handed them in and you went out to lie in the 
sun for a while. You were pretty satisfied with 
things, and what is happening in Europe, as 
you start down the hill to Lake Street on the 
last day, does not bother you at all. 

So there is two months while you swim or 
play golf or carry dishes from one table to 
another in a Maine Hotel, and then you are 
coming up that hill again. This time, the 
world is on the loose once more. Henry Ford 
has lost his bet, and England and France and 
Germany have agreed to disagree, although 
England and France are a little slow to catch 
on. It is a little serious but you still have time 
to think about the new dean, who meets you 
at the top of the hill. Maybe you like him and 
maybe you don't. This year you are older 
and you feel that you have a right to worry 
about appointments. You wonder how the 
new coach will make out, because after all no- 
body knows much about him and he may be a 
mistake. But he is okay. He looks good up 
there on the platform and he looks good when 
you watch him on the field. You like the new 
president, too. He is quiet and reassuring so 
you like him. But you are not too sure about 
the dean. You can see at once that this is 
going to be a heavy year. There is that red 
rhetoric book which looks pretty ominous and 
all the professors are making assignments the 
first day of class. But you are not going to let 
that bother you. You can still go down to the 
lunchroom and talk to all your friends and 
take some time out to listen to the juke box 
pound away at the Beer Barrel Polka and won- 
der about a boat called the Athenia. There 
are the new class officers to think about .... 
Jack Heffernan, Jim O'Neill, Red Flanagan, 
Joe Hegarty and Maggie Maguire, A.A. pres- 
ident this time. Pretty much the same, you 

think, pretty much the same The Yanks 

win another series Fr. Fay warns you 

about cuts The team loses to Florida .... 

It is like another song you are singing. Day In 
Day Out. But there are a few differences. 
The Sophomore Marquettians are debating like 
fury: Joe Nolan, Bob Muse, and all the others 
— and this is the year Marquette beats Fulton 
for the first time in History. The subject they 
argue is The Third Term Issue, and you are 
also talking about it in the lunchroom, not 
very ferociously now, but you will later. 



There is a lot you will have to say, because you 
are beginning to like and dislike things very 
violently and are no longer willing to accept 
everything that you are told. Maybe that is 
why there is a little trouble about football 
tickets and you remember back to a surrepti- 
tious little mimeographed newspaper called 
the Eagle's Talon. 

Around the activities fields things are really 
humming. Fr. Bonn's reputation for startling 
dramatics is getting to be more solid than a 
Louis Armstrong recording. There is the 
Taming of the Shreiv to remember, jammed 
full of your promising classmates, Leo Mur- 
phy, Connie Pappas, Del Duquette. It is a 
swell show. You brought your girl backstage. 
There is the Stylus and Joe Dever. And what 
about your Halloween Dance. The band was 
pretty bad but the lights were low and there 
was always Stardust. And what is it you are 
talking about in the lunchroom now? The 
Graf Spec and Oh! those Eagles. Detroit, and 
a victory. You contributed to send the 
wounded heroes along. You helped to rip 
down the goal posts while Holy Cross moaned 
in the lockers. And you went down to the 
station when the boys left for Texas and the 
Cotton Bowl and Leahy was now a success. 
And Finland shared the front page. So we 
lost, okay we lost, but we knew it was only the 
beginning and when the warriors pulled in at 
the South Station you were there to cheer. 
That was at the end of a vacation and you 
had to give up your job on the mail and pick 
up the text books where you left off. Exams 
are coming up with the feverish cry again 
"What's Hot" and bluebooks two for a nickel, 
please. You stop to remember the guys that 
are missing, but not for long. There is too 
much of a rush, too much Greek, or Chemis- 
try, too much history being made. 

One day you go to the movies and there is a 
shot of the pope .... Pope Pius the Twelfth, 
and you remember that it is a year since the 
last pope died. That had been a personal blow 
in a changing world. He had been there as 
long as you could remember, smiling out of 
flickering newsreels, blessing you. Then he 
was dead and a year has passed. And it seemed 
like yesterday. 

The world changes. There is no more 
Poland but you stand in line outside of Loew's 
Orpheum for tickets to Gone With the Wind 
and maybe while you watch the story of an- 
other great age passing, maybe you think 
about your own. Anyway, you are back at 
class the next day and a few nights later you go 
to the Sophomore banquet, which turns out 



to be a pretty boisterous time There 

is Brother Orchid and we scoop Hollywood, 
there is a might fine hockey team and after 
that it is a matter of sliding into the finals. 
This has been another good year on the 
whole. You have done a lot of loud talking 
and a lot of laughing and you figure you will 
remember this year what with Fathers Pop 
Quinn, Sid Smith, Dick Shea, Steve Shea, and 
other characters to think about. Yes, you will 
remember it all right, but not because of itself, 
but because of the new years coming. That 
is the usual way. What is happening to you 
in the present always makes the past seem very 
sweet. But that is not what is in your head 
when you leave this year. Instead you are try- 
ing to recall the words of the song you were 
singing at your Prom, the one when Johnny 

Long did not show up What was the 

name of that song Something about over 

sleepy garden walls And Dunkirk is com- 
ing and there is a new and unpleasant flag fly- 
ing on the Eiffel Tower You remember 

the song at last. It is Deep Purple and you go 
down the hill without looking back. 

You come back again, though. You come 
back and there is philosophy to face .... minor 
logic in the classroom and bitter debating 
everywhere else .... on the stairs .... in the 
lunchroom, everywhere .... Isolation .... 
Intervention .... Willkie .... Third Term 
.... as if the fate of the world depended on 
what you personally had to say. But don't 

let anyone fool you. This is the big year 

This is the year that you inherit the college 

.... the Junior Pic .... Junior Week 

This is the year of the greatest football team 
that Boston ever saw. You can't make up 
your mind whether or not to be a playboy or 
a scholar. After all there are the electives to 

consider You are pre-med or Chemistry 

or Business for this is the year that the Business 
School came up on the hill. They used to be 
down town, plugging away at economics and 
Fr. Doyle's Defense book. They have also had 
a couple of good years and they feel pretty 
much the way you do. So it is nice to see 
them. And they stand beside you in the sun, 
out on the lawn, and listen to the Bishop and 
his talk, "Fated Not to Die." That is the day 
of the Holy Ghost Mass and the words of the 
Bishop are not about you. But they are good, 
fine words and you read them again in the 
first issue of the Stylus. 

So we all get together and make plans for 
Junior Week. There is Bob Muse to listen to 
and he is a fast man with a plan. And there 



is Father Finnegan who is soUd, and you take 
the whole thing very seriously. If you are cut- 
ting classes at all it is to see such things as Knute 
Kockne — All American. And all the time 
there is that lunchroom hysteria that is be- 
coming national about a certain right arm that 
belongs to a not very hefty young man named 
O'Rourke and the speed and power of a set of 
Junior backs, Maznicki and Kissel. There is 
Under-the-Towers again and the most beauti- 
ful girls are not there now, but the ones you 
really think are something are there, being 
introduced to the guy that sits beside you in 
minor logic. You whistle the Ferry Boat Sere- 
nade down the back of her up-do and go out 
into the rotunda for punch. 

It is hard for you to remember this year as it 
really was because things are really moving 
fast. There seems to be so much happening. 
First there is the draft. Maybe you are old 
enough for this one and if you are not then 
your time is coming. It gives a funny feeling 
to things because you know that speeches end- 
ing with "Again and Again and Again" do not 
always work out and there is no more Norway 
or Denmark and a good many people on a cer- 
tain island are singing a song called There'll 
Alivays Be An England partly because there 
is that aching feeling that maybe there won't 
always be one. But even the draft doesn't 
bother you too much because you probably 
have a year to go and the years are long. So 
you keep on plowing ahead with Epistemology 
and Chem Lab or Biology and in the spare time 
flirt with the juke box. You do a lot more run- 
ning around in an intellectual way this year. 
There are men around the campus with new 
and startling things to say .... men like Doc 
Bowen and Doc Pick and you listen to them 
with your mouth open. There are little 
groups of juniors standing at the foot of the 
stairs in the Science Building and someone is 
saying "But how do I really know this wall 
exists?" It has been going on like this for 
years. You know that, but it is still wonder- 
ful. 

The dramatists come through again with 
Richard the Second and the Heights is coming 
out every week per usual. The Greeks are 
chasing the Italians back to Albania. Charlie 
Chaplin talks about oppression, Burma is the 
name of a road as well as a shaving cream and 
there is something different about the Stylus 
this year. There is Joe Dever and impudence 
and before you know it there are mid-years 
again. But not before the triumph, not before 
the torchlight parade and the speeches for the 
heroes. Put them up on fire wagons, declare a 



holiday because the Eagles have brought home 
the sugar and national prominence. They 
came out from behind when it counted. There 
is the chamber of commerce to toast them, and 
plaques and speeches and all in all it is a pretty 
handsome affair. You, yourself listened to the 
game at home and laughed at the announcer 
because he sounded as if he had his shirt bet on 
Tennessee. But those mid-years are still com- 
ing on and perhaps it is you who comes rush- 
ing into class at the last minute asking "What's 
hot. What's important?" There is no time to 
worry though, no time at all for right on top 
of exams comes the second Under the Tower 
dance. Isolation and Charles Lindbergh and 
Wheeler and Knox and Pepper are making the 
American scene a bitter, unfriendly landscape, 
the English are dodging bombs and sending 
their most convincing personalities to talk to 
Americans; while you are Under-the-Towers 
having a peculiar time. It must have been 
peculiar because the next week there was a lot 
of stir and the traditional Junior Week was 
relegated to the position of a might-have-been 
and certain people were saying not very nice 
things about other people. You worried about 
that. You held a few tempestuous meetings — 
but that particular excitement was bombed 
into obscurity by a very super and unexpected 
development. Leahy resigned. Your Leahy 
up and left you. He was going back to 
greener fields and at first you were very mad. 
You said some terrible things about Frank and 
then you just felt bad because after all he had 
a right to go and then you said to heck with it, 
we'll be great without him. 

Tom Mix is dead. Things are tightening up 
"Over there" and you have Ontology on your 
mind. We take over Greenland and you take 
over the Statler again. Junior Week has been 
on the side .... a party here, a dance there, not 
official but very sweet and it ends up at the 

Statler. Red Nichols and La Conga Meet 

me at the bar Satin and lace .... "you 

used to call funnyface" You ride around 

a little while and it is daylight and the orchid 
that would positively not wilt looks as if it did 
not share the confidence of the florist. And 
you are tired, so you stop at a diner for coffee 
and a truckdriver looks at you as if you were a 
trifle screwy and maybe you are. When you 
take out your wallet to pay the man you make 
sure that your draft card is in place. Let the 
third year go, then. Let it slip into the sum- 
mer. Do not try to remember all the loud 
singing and the noisiness of it, try to think 
back to the principles. That is the best way. 
Remember the logic and the thesis and the 
nervous feeling that you had before you went 



into that little room for your oral exam. Re- 
member what you said to the fellows that you 

stopped to talk to on the last day I'll see 

you in he fall and you added "maybe" with a 
little laugh, and before you reached the end of 
the hill, this June, you stopped and you did 
look back. The Towers were more beautiful 
than ever. 

The last September is on the surface of your 
memory. It is only yesterday but really, and 
there you are talking in the lunchroom again. 
You notice with a bit of shock that the fellow 
you are talking with has a streak of gray in his 
hair and you think of the longer forehead you 
are developing yourself. Isolation is a very 
bitter word now, and Lend-Lease is a seven 
billion dollar fact and there have been inci- 
dents every now and then that make you 
worry. Nevertheless you are confident that 
you will be safe. God is in His Heaven, Den- 
nie Myers is on the field with the boys and Billy 
Frazier is in his office and this promises to be 
the greatest year of all. The Mass of the Holy 
Ghost is a reminiscent and tender recapturing 
of the peaceful before, and the sun on your 
tweedy shoulders this year is warmer than it 
has been during the past three. Father Terry 
and the same old words. It is because they do 
not belong to this time alone but stretch back 
into the middle ages of nineteen-ten that they 
are so wonderful today. The Neutrahty Act 
is gone but there is psych and ethics to take its 
place. You find yourself paying more atten- 
tion to those professors who have something to 
say about social reform. There is a lot of that 
kind of discussion in the lunchroom. The 
juke box blares out with the Strawberry Blonde 
and you chew on a plate of spaghetti and argue 
about Eric Gill and Fustianism .... you argue 
about a lot of things because it is a good thing 
to argue and it relieves your mind to find out 
that nobody else knows very much more about 
anything than you do. And all the time 
the unnoticeable routine, the usual sights and 
sounds go on .... a visit to the reference libra- 
ry ... . buy a package of cigarettes .... 
what's your draft number .... a quiz class, 
you wait in line at the telephone so that you 
can make a date .... and there is Charlie 
O'Rourke back for a visit and you say "Hello 
Charlie" and he says "Hi," and the line you are 
calling is busy so you go in town to a show. 
Then there is the Stylus out with a fancy new 
cover and some fancy new writing. For the 
first time in four years you find yourself read- 
ing it all the way through. There is the new 
Liggett estate to play with. First they tuck 
the Business School up there where they can be 
alone with their ledgers and then the A. A. fol- 



lows and the Dramatic Society is rehearsing 
King Lear in a made over swimming pool. You 
wish they hadn't built it so very far from the 
Tower though, because it is a nice place to 
lounge around in if it wasn't such a walk. 

You are going to football games again. The 
team loses a couple of tough ones but you feel 
that you can't have everything and besides it 
is the Holy Cross game that matters. Just 
give us that one and we will be satisfied. There 
is a retreat coming up and if you have the lei- 
sure and means you go to Andover and if you 
haven't you show up at the Tower Building at 
nine-thirty for three mornings in a row. You 
recall all the Jesuit retreats that you have at- 
tended in your life and you think that they are 
important too, or maybe it should be that 
everything else is unimportant alongside of the 
retreats. 

Anyway you have plenty to think about 
during the retreat what with shore incidents 
and acts of hostility happening all over the 
place. Thank God you say for Bing Crosby 
and people who sing. Thanks for people like 
J.F.X. and Father Leonard around the campus. 
Thanks for those Towers and the sun on the 
reservoir. You keep after the philosophy, 
ducking around quiz classes, wondering 
whether you should take a crack at one of 
those prize essays, reading the bulletin every 
morning and in general trying to get back 
your tuition in trade. You decide on a class 
ring and someone is talking about the Sub 
TuRRi and the war certainly looks bad for the 
English, though, of course, the Russians are be- 
ginning to drive back the Germans and maybe 
everything will be all right if only we can 
manage to stay out of it. That is about the 
size of things up until the Cross game .... 
but meanwhile you get together to say good- 
bye to a drafted hero, Justin McGowan, and 
when he says what he has to say about leaving 
B.C. the inside of your throat is decidedly un- 
comfortable, and you want to get outside the 
auditorium and laugh about something. 

This is pretty much the shape of things up 

to that day of the Cross game It is a good 

football day and you have pretty fair seats. 
Your girl has a cane with a flag on it. You sit 
there and get lower and lower because if ever 
things looked black they look black now. Here 
you have a big celebration planned for the 
night and the score leans the wrong way .... 
the game looks a little sluggish .... you do not 
say very much to your girl. Then, suddenly 
.... bang, smash, wham and those boys of 
yours are doing things. That team is moving 



faster than the Pony Express. Your boys .... 
Levanitis and Zabilski and WilUams and Leo 
Strumski and oh! that Maznicki, and look at 
them go. This is last minute stuff and you 
can't hear a thing because there is noise evei-y- 

where So you can just kiss your girl and 

scream your head off. That makes the evening 
a fine and howling success. Everybody is slap- 
ping everybody else on the back We win 

and do not think about the Reuben James. 
Maybe for a minute you think that all the 
merriness, all the high, boisterous laughing ex- 
citement is a little strained, that there is some- 
thing else underneath it, but you forget that 
idea very soon, and you dance and you may 
even do a little polite drinking and you are 
very happy because you are with people you 
have known and liked for a long time and the 
taste of triumph is on your lips. 

Now you remember that day as probably 
the last time you saw all your friends together 
in that particular way. Things just went on 
in the same old manner for a while after that 
and pretty soon there you are on Washington 
Street, looking up at that blackboard history 
.... Pearl Harbor and the gallant dead .... 
and your girl is not smiling. 

You can change the tense from now on. 
Because from now on things are different. 
You show up for class the next day and there 
is no heart in the lectures. The professors are 
asking themselves what they are going to tell 
these kids now, what do we tell them? They 
are remembering their classmates .... the ones 
who didn't come home and even wor^e, the 
ones who only partly came home and they 
wonder if they have been wrong about educa- 
tion. Many of the professors are able to tell 
us of their experiences during the first World 
War .... of their service in the armed forces, 
of disrupted life at Boston College .... bar- 
racks .... the S.A.T.C the boys who 

went across .... and B. C. did its part. So the 
college is changed again. The word classics is 
to be forgotten as quickly as possible like the 
word isolation is to be temporarily forgotten 
and chemistry and math and navigation are the 



new words. There are uniforms on the campus 
and slogans and like every other college in 
America we settle down to making officers. 
Sure, we do a lot of the same things. We do 
them because we know in our hearts that war 
is no interruption to life, only to habit, and the 
thing to do is to keep on. So when the exams 
come and someone rushes in one morning 
feverishly demanding "What's hot, what's im- 
portant " even though you feel like saying 
"You tell me what's important," you don't. 
Instead you say the eighth thesis is important 
.... the eighth thesis is hot. The Quiz classes 
are discontinued so that you can study math 
and the final thesis is abandoned but the Dra- 
matic Society produces Uncle Tom's Cabin 
and in the lobby you are saying wonderful 
things about a man named MacArthur. Kose 
O'Dea .... and every week someone leaves for 
the marines or the navy. In spite of every- 
thing, however, the next two months seem a 
little superfluous .... the accent is shifting to 
the future and you strain towards tomorrow. 
Now it is lA in the army, now it is get that de- 
gree because it is no longer just a degree but a 
commission. So set aside Bishop Berkeley and 
English Lit, burn the books of the critics. We 
know how trite it is to talk about a job to be 
done, but that's what it is no matter how we 
call it. So we are not thinking about the fel- 
lowships we wanted or the homes in the coun- 
try we were looking at. We are not worrying 
about Eric Gill. We haven't time for anything 
but tomorrow. It is a very famous story that is 
happening to us — the story is the same old 
story — you have to forget the old to make 
room for the new. But it is not easy. 

We can't help remembering a lot of things 
.... remembering them and feeling good 
about them .... The Masses .... the Banquets 
.... the teachers that live in our minds as char- 
acters .... the football .... the feeling of 
books in our hands .... the dreams we held 
for four years 

We remember them all right .... like it was 
yesterday. 

L. J. M. 





JOHN J. HICKEY 



JOHN H. SHATTUCK 



Jn iUpmnrtmn 



The hand of death reaches out and claims its 
victims without warning, without respect for 
age, without regard for civil or social position. 
Through the wisdom of Divine planning, we 
are constantly reminded of the inevitable hour 
of death. Man, in every phase of life, knows 
not the hour or the day when the Hand of the 
Almighty shall fall silently upon him and take 
him to the judgment seat of God. 

The Class of 1942, entering Boston College, 
knew that the day must come when one and 
all would answer to God for those deeds per- 
formed while on this mortal soil. But who 
was to know, that during the Christmastide of 
freshman year, we were to lose our first class- 
mate, John J. Hickey, one of the most promis- 
ing students in the newly-founded Business 
School. His genial personality and refreshing 



sense of humor were merits that none can for- 
get. Though his stay with us was brief, the 
impress of his character is stamped on our 
hearts forever. 

We escaped the sorrow of loss again until 
our Senior year when John Shattuck was un- 
timely snatched from our midst. In classes or 
on the campus, he was always the gentleman, 
quiet and unassuming, a sincere student, and a 
true friend. 

As there is no power on earth which can 
restrain human love to the earthly limits of the 
tomb, the memory of these men shall always 
be a strong link in the chain which binds us 
to home and to God. Though they have gone, 
they shall always be remembered by their 
Class, the Class of 1942 of Boston College. 




CHARLES J. AHERN A.B. 

72 Amsden St., Arlington, Mass. 

ARLINGTON HIGH 

MAJOR: PRE-BUSINESS 

Cross and Crown; Sodality 1, 2, 3; Economics Academy 
3, 4; Ricci Math. Academy 2; Football Numerals. 



RALPH W. ALMAN 



B.S. 



1680 Commonwealth Ave., Brighton, Mass. 

BOSTON PUBLIC LATIN SCHOOL 

MAJOR: BIOLOGY 

Dramatics 1, 2, 3, 4, Costume Manager 3, Company Man- 
ager 4; German Academy 1, 2; Pre-Medical Seminar 4; 
Fencing Letter 3, 4, Captain 4. 



J. FRED ANDREWS A.B. (Honors) 

156 Lawton Ave., Lynn, Mass. 

ST. Mary's high, lynn 

MAJOR: SOCIOLOGY 

Sodality 1, 2, 3, 4; Heights 1; French Academy 2, 3. 



ROBERT W. ATTRIDGE A.B. 

15 Cross St., Salem, Mass. 

ST. Mary's high, lynn 

MAJOR: ECONOMICS 

Sodality 1, 2, 3; French Academy 1; Law and Gov't 
Academy 3; Ring Committee. 



JOHN J. BALLANTINE B.S. 

1 5 Edgemont St., Roslindale, Mass. 

BOSTON ENGLISH HIGH 

MAJOR: EDUCATION 

Law and Gov't Academy 4; Sodality 1, 2; Track Letter 
2, 3, 4, Captain 4. 



JAMES J. BARNICLE B.S.B.A. 

36 Atherton Road, Brookline, Mass. 

ST. AIDAN's HIGH, BROOKLINE 

MAJOR: MARKETING 
Marquette 1, 2; Sodality 1, 2, 3; Ring Committee. 





DANIEL J. BARRETT A.B. 

187 High St., Reading, Mass. 



READING HIGH 



MAJOR: HISTORY 



Glee Club 1, 2, 3, 4; Orchestra 1, 2, 3; Cross and Crown; 
Band 1, 2, 3, 4; Sodality 1, 2, 3, 4; President Musical 
Clubs 4. 



RICHARD J. BARTHOLOMEW A.B. 

51 Newport St., Arlington, Mass. 

ARLINGTON HIGH 

MAJOR: ECONOMICS 

German Academy 1; Sodality 1, 2, 3, 4; Economics Acad- 
emy 3, 4. 



FRANCIS \V. BEKSHA A.B. 

3 Prospect St., Medway, Mass. 

MEDWAY HIGH 

MAJOR: ECONOMICS 

Law and Gov't Academy 4; Economics Academy 3, 4; 
Sodality 1, 2, 3, 4. 



LEO P. BENECCHI A.B. 

262 Prospect Ave., Revere, Mass. 



REVERE HIGH 



MAJOR: PRE-MEDICAL 



German Academy 1, 2; Italian Academy 3, 4; Pre -Medi- 
cal Seminar 4; Sodality 1, 2, 3; Chemists' Club 2, 3; 
Marquette 1, 2; Ricci Math. Academy 1, 2. 



GEORGE F. BENT A.B. (Honors) 

7 Florence St. East, Roslindale, Mass. 

BOSTON COLLEGE HIGH 

MAJOR: PRE-BUSINESS 

Alpha Sigma Nu; Heights, Special Editor 3; Cross and 
Crown; Sodality 1, 2; Baseball Letter 3; Sub Turri Staff. 



DAVID P. BIRTWELL 



B.S. 



59 Lakewood Road, Newton Highlands, Mass. 

NEWTON HIGH 

MAJOR: PRE-BUSINESS 

Dramatics Society 1, 2, 3, 4; Spanish Academy 1,2, Vice- 
President 2; Sodality 1, 2, 3, 4; Ricci Math. Academy 1, 2; 
Law and Gov't Academy 4; Tennis Letter 3. 





ARTHUR A. BLAISDELL 



A.B. 



1 1 Calvin Road, Jamaica Plain, Mass. 

CATHEDRAL HIGH 

MAJOR: PRE-BUSINESS 

Ricci Math. Academy 1, 2; Physics Seminar 4; Sodality 
1, 2, 3. 



GEORGE C. A. BOEHRER A.B. 

32 Crescent St., Hewlett, L. I., New York 

BROOKLYN PREP 

MAJOR: HISTORY 

Philosophy Academy 4; Spanish Academy 2, 3, 4, Secre- 
tary 4; Sodality 2, 3, 4; Sub Turri, Associate Editor. 



JOSEPH E. BOOTHROYD A.B. 

166 Great Road, Maynard, Mass. 

MAYNARD HIGH 

MAJOR: HISTORY 

Cross and Crown; Ricci Math. Academy 1, 2, President 
1; Von Pastor History Academy 1, 2; Marquette 2; 
Heights 2, 3, 4; Philosophy Academy 4; SodaHty 1, 2, 3, 4. 



MORRIS J. BORDENCA A.B. 

20 Lexington St., Waltham, Mass. 

WALTHAM HIGH 

MAJOR: PRE-MEDICAL 

Classical Academy 1; Sodality 1, 2, 3, 4; Italian Academy 
1, 2; Pre-Medical Seminar 4. 



JAMES F. BOUDREAU B.S. 

5 5 Stearns St., Cambridge, Mass. 

BRIDGTON ACADEMY 

MAJOR: EDUCATION 

Spanish Academy 1,2; Law and Gov't Academy 4; Hockey 
Letter 1, 2. 



JOHN J. BRENNAN, JR. B.S.B.A. 

43 Francis Ave., Cambridge, Mass. 

CAMBRIDGE LATIN 

MAJOR: ACCOUNTING 

Cross and Crown; French Academy 1; Business Club 1, 2; 
Sodality 4; Business Debating 1, 2; Hockey Numerals; 
Tennis Letter 3. 





LAWRENCE E. BRENNAN A.B. 

164 Blue Hill Ave., Milton, Mass. 

BOSTON PUBLIC LATIN SCHOOL 

MAJOR: MATHEMATICS 

Glee Club 1; German Academy 2; Sodality 2; Von Pastor 
History Academy 4. 



HARRY W. BROWN A.B. 

44 Hooker St., Allston, Mass. 

BOSTON PUBLIC LATIN SCHOOL 

MAJOR: ENGLISH 

Cross and Crown; Heights 3; Sodality 2; Assistant Director 
of Publicity; Sub Turri Staff; Track Manager 4. 



EDWARD M. BROWNE B.S.B.A. 

143 Sanderson Ave., Dedham, Mass. 

BOSTON COLLEGE HIGH 

MAJOR: MARKETING 

Economics Academy 4; Sodality 1, 2, 3, 4; French Acad- 
emy 1, 2; Business Club 1; Business Debating 1, 2. 



RICHARD L. BUCKLEY A.B. (Honors) 

7 Jewett Road, Beverly, Mass. 

BEVERLY HIGH 

MAJOR: GOVERNMENT 

Cross and Crown; Marquette 2; Fulton 3; Sodality 1, 2, 
3, 4; Classical Academy 2; Law and Gov't Academy 3; 
Heights 3, 4, Feature Editor 4; Track Numerals. 



WILLIAM F. BUGDEN A.B. 

45 M St., South Boston, Mass. 

GATE OF HEAVEN HIGH 

MAJOR: ECONOMICS 

Ricci Math. Academy 1, 2, Secretary 2; Law and Gov't 
Academy 4; Sodality 1, 2, 3, 4; Heights 2, 3, 4, Busi- 
ness Manager 4. 



JOHN B. BULMAN B.S. 

25 8 Arborway, Jamaica Plain, Mass. 

BOSTON PUBLIC LATIN SCHOOL 

MAJOR: PHYSICS 

German Academy 1, 2; Radio Club 1, 2, 3, 4; Sodality 
1; Physics Seminar 3, 4. 





JOHN J. BURKE B.S. 

3 5 Tenth Ave., Haverhill, Mass. 

ST. JAMES HIGH, HAVERHILL 

MAJOR: PHYSICS 

Cross and Crown; German Academy 1, 2; Sodality 1, 2, 3; 
Chemists' Club 1, 2; Physics Seminar 3, 4. 



JOHN T. BUTLER B.S.B.A. 

133 West St., Maiden, Mass. 

MALDEN CATHOLIC HIGH 

MAJOR: MARKETING 

Business Debating 1, 2; Fulton 3; Spanish Academy 2; 
Sodality 1, 2, 3, 4; Sub Turri, Associate Editor. 



WILLIAM J. CADIGAN A.B. (Honors) 

32 Saint Margaret St., Dorchester, Mass. 

BOSTON PUBLIC LATIN SCHOOL 

MAJOR: ENGLISH 

Alpha Sigma Nu; Cross and Crown; Dramatics Society 1; 
Marquette 1, 2; Fulton 3, 4, Vice-President 4; Sodality 
1, 2, 3, 4; Stylus 4; Heights 2, 3, 4, Managing Editor 4; 
Sub Turri, Special Editor; Track 1, 2. 



JAMES B. CAHALANE A.B. 

90 Glencoe St., Brighton, Mass. 

ST. COLUMBKILLE's high, BRIGHTON 

MAJOR: GOVERNMENT 

Marquette 1, 2; Fulton 3; Law and Gov't Academy 3, 4; 
Sodality 1, 2, 3, 4; Cheer Leader 3, 4; Co-Chairman, Junior 
Prom; Ass't Track Manager 2, 3. 



RICHARD A. CALLAHAN A.B. 

3 A Lake View, Arlington, Mass. 

ARLINGTON HIGH 

MAJOR: ACCOUNTING 

Marquette 1; Sodality 1, 2, 3, 4; Baseball Manager 4; Vice- 
President, Senior Class. 



TIMOTHY J. CALLAHAN A.B. 

93 Lowell St., Reading, Mass. 

BOSTON COLLEGE HIGH 

MAJOR: PHYSICS 

German Academy 1, 2; Flying Club 3, 4; Physics Sem- 
inar 4. 





CHARLES W. CAPRARO A.B. 

426 Hanover St., Boston, Mass. 

BOSTON COLLEGE HIGH 

MAJOR: PRE-MEDICAL 

German Academy 1, 2; Sodality 1, 2; Italian Academy 3, 4; 
Heights 1 ; Pre-Medical Seminar 4. 



RICHARD J. CAREY B.S. 

1520 Dorchester Ave., Dorchester, Mass. 

DORCHESTER HIGH 

MAJOR: CHEMISTRY 

Crystal 3, 4, Associate Editor 3, Editor 4; Cross and Crown; 
Chemists' Club 2, 3, 4; Sodality 1, 2, 3, 4; Sub Turri 
Staff. 




PAUL J. CARLIN A.B. 

80 Warren Ave., Milton, Mass. 

BOSTON COLLEGE HIGH 

MAJOR: ENGLISH 

Ricci Math. Academy 1,2; German Academy 1,2; Fresh- 
man Hockey; Sub Turri Staff. 



DAVID J. CAVAN A.B. 

1 1 Colby St., Haverhill, Mass. 

ST. JAMES HIGH, HAVERHILL 

MAJOR: PRE-MEDICAL 

Marquette 1; Ricci Math. Academy 1, 2; Sodality 1, 2, 3, 4; 
Chemists' Club 3, 4; Pre-Medical Seminar 4. 



RAYMOND C. CHAISSON B.S. 

390 Rindge Ave., Cambridge, Mass. 

HEBRON ACADEMY 

MAJOR: GOVERNMENT 

French Academy 1, 2, 3; Law and Gov't Academy 4; 
Hockey Letter 1, 2, 3; Tennis. 



THOMAS J. CLARK B.S.B.A. 

765 Washington St., Dorchester, Mass. 

BOSTON COLLEGE HIGH 

MAJOR: MARKETING 

Sodality 2; Business Club 1, 2; Treasurer, Junior Class, 
Business. 





AMBROSE J. CLAUS B.S.B.A. 

46 Metropolitan Ave., Roslindale, Mass. 

BOSTON ENGLISH HIGH 

MAJOR: ACCOUNTING 

Business Club 1, 2; Spanish Academy 1, 2; Sodality 1, 2; 
Economics Academy 4; Law and Gov't Academy 3. 



PAUL S. COLEMAN 



B.S. 



42 Peter Parley Road, Jamaica Plain, Mass. 

BOSTON ENGLISH HIGH 

MAJOR: EDUCATION 

Philosophy Academy 4; Dramatics Society 1; Sodality 
1, 2, 3, 4; Heights 4; Sub Turri Staff. 




JAMES P. COLLINS, JR. A.B. 

8 8 Bartlett St., Charlestown, Mass. 

BOSTON COLLEGE HIGH 

MAJOR: ECONOMICS 

Glee Club 1, 2, 3, 4; SodaUty 1, 2, 3, 4; Economics Acad- 
emy 3, 4; German Academy 1, 2; Cheer Leader 4; Co- 
Chairman Junior Prom; Track 4; Law and Gov't Acad- 
emy 4; Class Representative 1. 



FRANCIS L. COLPOYS A.B. (Honors) 

26 Nottinghill Road, Brighton, Mass. 

BOSTON PUBLIC LATIN SCHOOL 

MAJOR: PRE-MEDICAL 

Cross and Crown; Orchestra 1, 2, 3; Band 1, 2, 3, 4; 
Sodality 1, 2, 3, 4; Crystal, Associate Editor 4; Chemists' 
Club 3; Pre-Medical Seminar 4; Sub Turri, Activities 
Editor. 



JOHN J. CONNERY B.S.B.A. 

90 Louder's Lane, Jamaica Plain, Mass. 

BOSTON ENGLISH HIGH 

MAJOR: ACCOUNTING 

Business Debating 1, 2; Business Club 1, 2; Sodality 1, 2, 
3, 4; Economics Academy 3; Law and Gov't Academy 4. 



EDMUND R. CORBETT B.S. 

34 Dracut St., Dorchester, Mass. 

CATHEDRAL HIGH 

MAJOR: ECONOMICS 

Sodality 1, 2, 4; German Academy 1, 2; Economics Acad- 
emy 2, 3; Law and Gov't Academy 3. 






RONALD P. CORBETT A.B. (Honors) 

75 Warren St., Revere, Mass. 

IMMACULATE CONCEPTION HIGH, REVERE 

MAJOR: GOVERNMENT 

Cross and Crown; Classical Academy 2; Sodality 1, 2, 3, 4; 
Football Letter 1, 2; Baseball Letter 3; Class Representa- 
tive 4. 



FRANCIS D. CRONIN B.S. 

132 Pauline St., Winthrop, Mass. 

WINTHROP HIGH 

MAJOR: CHEMISTRY 

Chemists' Club 1, 2, 3, 4, Treasurer 4; Sodality 1, 2, 3, 4; 
German Academy 1, 2; Crystal, News Editor 4. 



FRANCIS X. CRONIN 



B.S. 



204 Washington Ave., Winthrop, Mass. 

WINTHROP HIGH 

MAJOR: HISTORY 

Cross and Crown; Sodality 1, 2, 3; French Academy 1; 
Von Pastor History Academy 2, 3, 4, President 4; Winner, 
TuUy Essay Award 3. 



JAMES D. CRONIN B.S.B.A. 

24 Linnaean St., Cambridge, Mass. 

ST. John's high, no. Cambridge 

MAJOR: ACCOUNTING 

Economics Academy 3, 4; Business Club 1, 2; Sodality 
1, 2, 3; Ledger 1, 2. 




GEORGE W. CROWLEY B.S. 

4 Pearl St., Salem, Mass. 

SALEM HIGH 

MAJOR: PHYSICS 

German Academy 1, 2; Radio Club, Treasurer 4; Chem- 
ists' Club 1, 2; Physics Seminar 3, 4; Sodality 1. 



JOHN CUONO A.B. 

218 Chelsea St., East Boston, Mass. 

BOSTON ENGLISH HIGH 

MAJOR: ITALIAN 

Ricci Math. Academy 1, 2; Italian Academy 1, 2, 3, 4; 
Radio Club 1, 2. 





ARTHUR L. CURRY, JR. B.S.B.A. 

266 Arborway, Jamaica Plain, Mass. 

BOSTON ENGLISH HIGH 

MAJOR: ACCOUNTING 

Business Club 1, 2; Economics Academy 2, 3; Law and 
Gov't Academy 3, 4. 



WILLIAM M. DALY A.B. (Honors) 

Lenox Road, West Stockbridge, Mass. 

BOSTON COLLEGE HIGH 

MAJOR: ENGLISH 

Classical Academy, President 2; Sodality 1, 2, 3, 4; French 
Academy 1, 3; Sub Turri Staff. 



FRANCIS A. D'AMBROSIO A.B. 

69 No. Margin St., Boston, Mass. 

BOSTON ENGLISH HIGH 

MAJOR: PRE-MEDICAL 
Sodality 1, 4; Italian Academy 2, 3; Pre-Medical Seminar 4. 



THOMAS J. DAWSON A.B. 

989 Winthrop Ave., Revere, Mass. 



REVERE HIGH 



MAJOR: HISTORY 



Classical Academy 2; Sodality 1, 2, 3, 4; Von Pastor 
History Academy 3; Baseball Letter 2, 3. 



VINCENT J. DeBENEDICTIS A.B. 

157 Washington St., Dedham, Mass. 

DEDHAM HIGH 

MAJOR: FRENCH 

French Academy 1, 2, 3, 4; Italian Academy 3, 4; Foot- 
ball 2. 



JOHN F. De COSTA, JR. A.B. 

17 Farquhar St., Roslindale, Mass. 

BOSTON COLLEGE HIGH 

MAJOR: SOCIOLOGY 

Philosophy Academy 4; Sodality 1, 2, 3, 4; Heights 1, 3; 
Sodalist, Editor 2; Von Pastor History Academy, Pub- 
licity Director 1; Tutor, Russian 3, 4. 






MICHAEL J. DEE, JR. A.B. 

222 Elm St., Concord, Mass. 

CONCORD HIGH 

MAJOR: ECONOMICS 

Sodality 1, 2, 3; Economics Academy 2; French Academy 
1, 2; Law and Gov't Academy 3; Von Pastor History 
Academy 3. 



WALTER L. DEVENEY 



B.S.B.A. 



45 Speedwell St., Dorchester, Mass. 

BOSTON COLLEGE HIGH 

MAJOR: ACCOUNTING 

Sodahty 4; Sub Turri Staff; Economics Academy 2; Span- 
ish Academy 1 ; Law and Gov't Academy 1 ; Business 
Club 1, 2; Ledger 1, 2; Business Debating 1, 2, Presi- 
dent 2. 



FRANCIS J. DEVER B.S.B.A. 

9 Spaulding Square, Dorchester, Mass. 

ST. Philip's prep. 

MAJOR: ACCOUNTING 

Freshman Baseball; Business Sodahty 1, 2, 3, 4, Vice- 
Prefect 1, Prefect 3; Business Debating 1, 2, Secretary 2. 



JOSEPH G. DEVER B.S. 

3 1 Bolton St., Somerville, Mass. 

SOMERVILLE HIGH 

MAJOR: HISTORY 

Sodality 1, 2; Dramatics Society 1, 2, 3, 4; Stylus 2, 3, 4, 
Editor-in-Chief 4; Heights 1; Sub Turri, Feature Editor. 



JOHN J. DEWIRE A.B. 

48 Central St., Somerville, Mass. 

ST. CLEMENT HIGH 

MAJOR: GOVERNMENT 
Glee Club 1,2; Law and Gov't Academy 3, 4. 



JAMES F. DOHERTY B.S. 

23 2 Chapel St., Newton, Mass. 

HIGH SCHOOL OF OUR LADY 

MAJOR: SOCIOLOGY 
Baseball Letter 1, 2, 3; Sodality 3; Italian Academy 3. 





HENRY A. DOLAN 



A.B. 



5 5 Hawthorne St., Belmont, Mass. 

BOSTON COLLEGE HIGH 

MAJOR: ECONOMICS 

Sodality 1, 2; German Academy 1; Ricci Math. Acad- 
emy 1, 2. 



CHARLES A. DONOVAN A.B. (Honors) 

560 Veterans of Foreign Wars Pkwy., 
West Roxbury, Mass. 

BOSTON PUBLIC LATIN SCHOOL 

MAJOR: PRE-BUSINESS 

Cross and Crown; Sodality 1, 2, 3, 4; Dramatics Society 1; 
Glee Club 1, 2, 3, 4; Band 1, 2, 3, 4, Drum Major 2, 3, 4; 
Heights 2, 3. 



JOHN E. DONOVAN A.B. 

5 Matchett St., Brighton, Mass. 

BRIGHTON HIGH 

MAJOR: SOCIOLOGY 

Sodality 1, 3, 4; Glee Club 4; Classical Academy 1. 



WILLIAM P. DOONAN B.S.B.A. 

45 Blakeley St., Lynn, Mass. 

ST. Mary's high, lynn 

MAJOR: ACCOUNTING 

Sodality 4; Dramatics Society 2, Business Manager; Econom- 
ics Academy 3, 4; Law and Gov't 4; Business Club 1, 2; 
Secretary, Junior Class, Business. 



JOHN R. DOYLE, JR. B.S. 

144 State St., Newburyport, Mass. 

NEWBURYPORT HIGH 

MAJOR: ECONOMICS 

Sodality 4; Ricci Math. Academy 1, 2; Economics Acad- 
emy 2, 3, 4. 



ROBERT F. DRINAN A.B. (Honors) 

7 Fairview Ave., Hyde Park, Mass. 

HYDE PARK HIGH 

MAJOR: ENGLISH 

Cross and Crown; Sodality 1, 2, 3, 4; Band 1, 2, 3; Mar- 
quette 1, 2, Secretary 2; Fulton 4; Heights 1, 2, 3; 
Humanities 2, 3, 4; Sub Turri, Managing Editor; Philoso- 
phy Academy 3. 





I '/W 




ARTHUR S. DRINKWATER A.B. 

221 Broadway, Revere, Mass. 

IMMACULATE CONCEPTION HIGH, REVERE 

MAJOR: mSTORY 

Ricci Math. Academy 1, 2; Sodality 2; Von Pastor History 
Academy 2, 3. 



FRANK L. DRISCOLL, JR. B.S. 

116 Billings Road, North Quincy, Mass. 



THAYER ACADEMY 



MAJOR: HISTORY 



Cross and Crown; Sodality 1, 2, 3, 4; Spanish Academy 
1, 2; Von Pastor History Academy 1, 2; Freshman Foot- 
ball. 



JOHN P. DRISCOLL A.B. 

101 Lincoln St., Cambridge, Mass. 

ST. John's high 

MAJOR: FRENCH 

Ricci Math. Academy 1, 2, Treasurer 1, 2; French Acad- 
emy 2, 3, 4; Sodality 1, 2, 3, 4; Freshman Football. 



THOMAS F. DUFFY, JR. A.B. 

70 Maple St., Waltham, Mass. 

ST. CHARLES HIGH, WALTHAM 

MAJOR: ECONOMICS 

Von Pastor History Academy 1; Ricci Math. Academy 2; 
Fulton 3; Heights 2, 3; Track 2; Sub Turri Staff. 



WILLIAM P. DUGGAN A.B. 

120 Fuller St., Dorchester, Mass. 

BOSTON ENGLISH HIGH 

MAJOR: FRENCH 

Marquette 2; Ricci Math. Academy 1, 2; Sodality 1, 2, 
3, 4; French Academy, Secretary 3, President 4. 



ELPHEGE O. DUMOND B.S. 

6 Rice St., Cambridge, Mass. 

RINDGE TECHNICAL SCHOOL 

MAJOR: ECONOMICS 

French Academy 1, 2, 3; Economics Academy 3, 4; Law 
and Gov't Academy 4; Hockey Letter 1, 2, 3; Tennis 
Letter 2, 3. 






ROBERT L. DUNN B.S.B.A. 

16 Trull St., Dorchester, Mass. 

BOSTON COLLEGE HIGH 

MAJOR: MARKETING 

Business Debating 1, 2; Ledger 1, 2; Economics Academy 
3,4; Spanish Academy 1, 2; Sodality 1, 2, 3, 4; Heights 1; 
Sub Turri Staff. 



WILLIAM J. DYNAN B.S.B.A. 

121 Inman St., Cambridge, Mass. 

CAMBRIDGE HIGH AND LATIN 

MAJOR: MARKETING 

Business Sodality 1, 2, Prefect 1; Spanish Academy 1, 2, 3; 
Business Club 1, 2; Economics Academy 2, 3, 4. 



JOSEPH J. ELLIOTT A.B. (Honors) 

101 Congress Ave., Chelsea, Mass. 

BOSTON COLLEGE HIGH 

MAJOR: ENGLISH 

Cross and Crown; Sodality 3, 4, Prefect 4; German Acad- 
emy 1, 2; Glee Club 2, 3; Dramatics Society 1; Heights 
3, 4; Stylus 4. 



BERNARD P. FARRAGHER A.B. (Honors) 

17 Emerson St., Newton, Mass. 

HIGH SCHOOL OF OUR LADY 

MAJOR: ENGLISH 

Cross and Crown; Marquette 1,2; Classical Academy 1,2; 
Sodality 1, 2, 3, 4; Sub Turri Staff. 



ALBERT T. FERGUSON B.S.B.A. 

16 Ord St., Salem, Mass. 

ST. John's prep. 

MAJOR: ACCOUNTING 

Sodality 1, 2, 3, 4; Business Debating 1, 2; Economics 
Academy 1, 2; Spanish Academy 1, 2. 



RICHARD J. FERRITER A.B. 

3 Mansfield St., Allston, Mass. 

BOSTON PUBLIC LATIN SCHOOL 

MAJOR: PRE-BUSINESS 

Cross and Crown; Ricci Math. Academy 1, 2; Economics 
Academy 3, 4; Baseball Letter 1, 2, 3. 






JOHN C. FITZGERALD A.B. 

46 Rosemont St., Hyde Park, Mass. 

BOSTON PUBLIC LATIN SCHOOL 

MAJOR: PHYSICS 

Sodality 1, 2, 3, 4; Radio Club 2, 3, 4; Ricci Math. Acad- 
emy 1, 2. 



JOHN E. FITZGERALD A.B. 

247 Lakeview Ave., Cambridge, Mass. 

CAMBRIDGE HIGH AND LATIN 

MAJOR: ECONOMICS 

Glee Club 2, 3; Sodality 1, 2; Radio Club 2; Law and 
Gov't Academy 4. 



JOHN H. FITZGERALD A.B. 

715 Broadway, Chelsea, Mass. 

CHELSEA HIGH 

MAJOR: EDUCATION 

Sodality 1, 2, 3, 4; Law and Gov't Academy 3, 4; Foot- 
ball Numerals. 



WALTER T. FITZGERALD B.S.B.A. 

48 Brighton Ave., Allston, Mass. 

BOSTON COLLEGE HIGH 

MAJOR: MARKETING 

Sodality 1, 2, 3; Spanish Academy 1, 2; Economics Acad- 
emy 3, 4; Business Club 1, 2. 



EDWARD J. FITZPATRICK A.B. 

5 50 East Eighth St., South Boston, Mass. 

GATE OF HEAVEN HIGH 

MAJOR: FRENCH 

Cross and Crown; French Academy 1, 2, 3; Sodality 1, 
2, 4; Heights 3, 4, Circulation Manager 4. 



JOSEPH J. FITZPATRICK B.S. 

86 Fletcher St., Roslindale, Mass. 

ROSLINDALE HIGH 

MAJOR: ENGLISH 

Marquette 2; Fulton 3; Ricci Math. Academy 1; German 
Academy 2; Sodality 3; Von Pastor History Academy 2; 
Tennis 3. 







THOMAS J. FLANAGAN A.B. 

99 Belmont St., Somerville, Mass. 

BOSTON COLLEGE HIGH 

MAJOR: PHYSICS 

Glee Club 1, 2, 3; Band 1, 2, 3; Orchestra 1, 2, 3; Sodality 
2, 3; Physics Seminar 4; Secretary, Freshman Class; 
Treasurer, Sophomore Class; Flying Club 1, 2, 3, 4, Presi- 
dent 4. 



JOHN F. FOX B.S.B.A. 

1 Thane St., Dorchester, Mass. 

BOSTON COLLEGE HIGH 

MAJOR: ACCOUNTING 

Business Debating 1,2; Spanish Academy 2; Sodality 1, 2, 
3, 4; Dramatics Society 1; Law and Gov't Academy 1. 



WILLIAM J. FRENI A.B. (Honors) 

60 Beryl St., Roslindale, Mass. 

BOSTON PUBLIC LATIN SCHOOL 

MAJOR: SOCIOLOGY 

Cross and Crown; Heights 1, 2, 3; French Academy 1, 2; 
Classical Academy 2; Sodality 1,2, 3,4. 



ARTHUR R. FRITHSEN B.S. 

10 Hooper Court, Rockport, Mass. 

ROCKPORT HIGH 

MAJOR: CHEMISTRY 

Chemists' Club 2, 3, 4; Crystal 3, 4, Managing Editor 
4; Sodality 1. 



WILLIAM N. GAINE B.S. 

28 Lowell St., Somerville, Mass. 

SOMERVILLE HIGH 

MAJOR: HISTORY 

German Academy 1, 2, Treasurer 2; Von Pastor History 
Academy 1, 2, President 2; Law and Gov't Academy 
3, 4; Tennis Letter 3; Sodality 1, 2. 



ROBERT E. GALLAGHER A.B. 

92 Prospect Ave., Revere, Mass. 

IMMACULATE CONCEPTION HIGH, REVERE 

MAJOR: ECONOMICS 

Sodality 1, 2, 3, 4; Ricci Math. Academy 1, 2; German 
Academy 1,2; Economics Academy 3, 4. 





FRANCIS X. GANNON 



B.S. 




27 Bourneside St., Dorchester, Mass. 

BOSTON COLLEGE HIGH 

MAJOR: HISTORY 

Spanish Academy 1, 2; Sodahty 1, 2, 3; Ricci Math. Acad- 
emy 1, 2; Von Pastor History Academy 2. 



TERRENCE J. GEOGHEGAN B.S. 

216 Wood Ave., Hyde Park, Mass. 

HYDE PARK HIGH 

MAJOR: PHYSICS 

Radio Club 2, 3, 4; German Academy 2, 3; Sodality 
1, 2, 3; Physics Seminar 3, 4; Football Letter 1, 2, 3, 4. 



JOHN J. GIBBONS B.S.B.A. 

4379 Washington St., Roslindale, Mass. 

ROSLINDALE HIGH 

MAJOR: ACCOUNTING 

Cross and Crown; Sodality 1, 2, 3, 4; Business Debating 
1, 2; Fulton 3, 4, Sergeant-at-arms 4; Radio Club 3; Eco- 
nomics Academy 3 ; Sub Turri Staff. 



PHILIP J. GILL B.S. 

20 Oakland St., Lexington, Mass. 

BOSTON COLLEGE HIGH 

MAJOR: PHYSICS 

Dramatics Society 3, 4; German Academy 1, 2; Physics 
Seminar 3, 4; Radio Club 4. 



JOHN J. GLENNON, JR. B.S.B.A. 

79 Reservation Road, Milton, Mass. 

BOSTON COLLEGE HIGH 

MAJOR: ACCOUNTING 

Ledger, Editor 1, 2; Business Club 1, 2, 3; Sodality 1, 2, 
3, 4; Business Debating 1; Economics Academy 1, 2; 
Sub Turri Staff. 



GEORGE GOMES A.B. 

234 South Walker St., Taunton, Mass. 

TAUNTON HIGH 

MAJOR: HISTORY 

Spanish Academy 1, 2, 3, 4; Von Pastor History Academy 
1, 2; Sodality 1, 2. 





MARCEL J. GOULD A.B. (Honors) 

116 Thornton St., Revere, Mass. 

REVERE HIGH 

MAJOR: PRE-MEDICAL 

Crystal 3; German Academy 1, 2; Classical Academy 2; 
Chemists' Club 3; Pre-Medical Seminar 4. 




THOMAS H. GRADY B.S.B.A. 

Id Walnut St., Clinton, Mass. 

CLINTON HIGH 

MAJOR: MARKETING 

Sodality 1, 2, 3; Economics Academy 3, 4; Spanish Acad- 
emy 1, 2; Law and Gov't Academy 3, 4. 



ANTHONY J. GRAFFEO A.B. 

2 5 College Ave., Medford, Mass. 



MEDFORD HIGH 



MAJOR: PRE-MEDICAL 



Marquette 1, 2; Sodality 1; Italian Academy 1, 2, 3, 4; 
Chemists' Club 3; Pre-Medical Seminar 4; Ricci Math. 
Academy 1. 



RICHARD E. GRAINGER B.S.B.A. 

480 Hyde Park Ave., Roslindale, Mass. 

BOSTON PUBLIC LATIN SCHOOL 

MAJOR: ACCOUNTING 

Cross and Crown; Ledger 1, 2; Business Club 4; Business 
Debating 1, 2, 3, Vice-President 3; Sodality 1, 2, 3, 4; 
Economics Academy 2, 3; Heights 2, 3; Sub Turri Staff. 



FREDERICK J. GRIFFIN A.B. 

93 Belmont St., Cambridge, Mass. 

ST. Mary's high, waltham 

MAJOR: ENGLISH 

French Academy 2; Writers' Club 3; Stylus Staff 2, 3, 4; 
Class Representative 3. 



JOHN V. GUINEE A.B. 

10 Arlington St., Somerville, Mass. 

SOMERVILLE HIGH 

MAJOR: HISTORY 

Von Pastor History Academy 1, 2; Sodality 1; Law and 
Gov't Academy 3, 4. 






FRANCIS J. HAGGERTY A.B. 

127 Fort Hill Ave., Lowell, Mass. 

LOWELL HIGH 

MAJOR: SOCIOLOGY 

Sodality 1, 2, 3, 4; Law and Gov't Academy 4; Radio 
Club 4. 



ERNEST J. HANDY B.S. 

12 James St., Boston, Mass. 

CATHEDRAL HIGH 

MAJOR: SOCIOLOGY 

Ricci Math. Academy 1, 2, Ass't Editor Math. Journal 2; 
Sodality 1, 2, 3; German Academy 1, 2. 




MARTIN J. HANSBERRY A.B. (Honors) 

24 Hardy St., Waltham, Mass. 

ST. Mary's high, waltham 

MAJOR: HISTORY 

Alpha Sigma Nu; Cross and Crown, Ass't Knight Com- 
mander; Marquette 1, 2, Vice-President 2; Fulton 3, 4, 
Student Manager 3, Treasurer 4; Philosophy Academy 3; 
Sodality 1, 2, 3, 4; Classical Academy 1, 2; Von Pastor 
History Academy 1, 2; German Academy 1; Sub Turri, 
Editor-in-Chief. 



HUGH L. HARKINS, JR. A.B. 

12 Exeter St., Arlington, Mass. 

KEITH ACADEMY 

MAJOR: ECONOMICS 

Glee Club 1, 2, 3, 4; Heights 1, 2; Sodality 1, 2, 3, 4; 
Economics Academy 3,4; Ricci Math. Academy 1, 2. 



PAUL V. HARRINGTON A.B. (Honors) 

5 Shepton St., Dorchester, Mass. 

BOSTON PUBLIC LATIN SCHOOL 

MAJOR: ECONOMICS 

Cross and Crown; Marquette 1, 2; Sodality 1, 2, 3, 4; 
Law and Gov't Academy 3, 4. 



ROBERT A. HARRIS B.S. 

117 Common St., Watertown, Mass. 

ST. Mary's high, waltham 

MAJOR: SOCIOLOGY 

French Academy 1,2; Sodality 1, 2, 3, 4; Baseball Letter 
2, 3; Heights 2. 





JOHN J. HART B.S. 

22 Goddard Road, Framingham, Mass. 

FRAMINGHAM HIGH 

MAJOR: SOCIOLOGY 

Glee Club 1, 2, 3, 4; Sodality 1, 2, 3, 4; Ricci Math. Acad- 
emy 1; Spanish Academy 1; Economics Academy 2. 



CLEMENT J. HASENFUS A.B. 

970 Dedham St., Newton Centre, Mass. 

SACRED HEART HIGH 

MAJOR: HISTORY 

Marquette 1 ; Band 1 ; Von Pastor History Academy 1 ; 
French Academy 2; Sodality 4. 



JAMES E. HAWCO A.B. (Honors) 

63 Holmes St., Quincy, Mass. 

NORTH QUINCY HIGH 

MAJOR: ENGLISH 

Alpha Sigma Nu; Cross and Crown, Knight Commander; 
Marquette 1, 2; Fulton 4; Sodality 1, 2, 3, 4; Humanities, 
Editor 2, 3, 4; Classical Academy 2, 3, 4; Sub Turri, 
Associate Editor. 



FRANK A. HAYDEN B.S. 

3 Kress St., Lawrence, Mass. 

LAWRENCE HIGH 

MAJOR: BIOLOGY 

Ricci Math. Academy 1; Germsn Academy, 1, 2, Presi- 
dent 2; Glee Club 1; Sodality 1,2; Chemist's Club 1, 2, 3; 
Pre-Medical Seminar 4. 



LAWRENCE P. HEALEY 



B.S. 



561 Massachusetts Ave., Lexington, Mass. 

LAWRENCE ACADEMY 

MAJOR: HISTORY 

Spanish Academy 1, 2; Von Pastor History Academy 3,4; 
Football Numerals. 



LESLIE J. HEATH, JR. B.S. 

83 Boston St., Somerville, Mass. 

SOMERVILLE HIGH 

MAJOR: PHYSICS 

Chemists' Club 2, 3; Radio Club 3, 4; Physics Seminar 
3, 4; Track 1, 2. 





JOHN R. HEFFERNAN A.B. 

36 Cerdan Ave., West Roxbury, Mass. 

BOSTON PUBLIC LATIN SCHOOL 

MAJOR: GOVERNMENT 

German Academy 3; Sophomore Class, President; Law and 
Gov't Academy 3, 4; Sodality 2, 3; Co-Chairman, Fresh- 
man Prom. 



PAUL T. HEFFRON A.B. 

10 cherry Place, West Newton, Mass. 

NEWTON HIGH 

MAJOR: HISTORY 

Marquette 1, 2; Law and Gov't Academy 3, 4; SodaUty 
1, 2, 3, 4. 



THOMAS E. HENRY A.B. (Honors) 

111 Mt. Ida Road, Dorchester, Mass. 

BOSTON PUBLIC LATIN SCHOOL 

MAJOR: ECONOMICS 

Cross and Crown; Dramatics Society 1; Sodality 1, 2, 3, 4; 
Economics Academy 3, 4; Radio Club 3; Sub Turri Staff. 



THOMAS R. HINCHEY A.B. 

17 Pine St., Waltham, Mass. 

BOSTON COLLEGE HIGH 

MAJOR: PRE -MED 

Sodality 1, 2, 3, 4; German Academy 1, 2; Chemists' 
Club 2, 3, 4; Fulton 4; Pre-Medical Seminar, Secretary 4; 
Senior Class, Treasurer. 



LEO J. HOCHMAN B.S. 

286 Chestnut St., Chelsea, Mass. 



CHELSEA HIGH 



MAJOR: BIOLOGY 



Crystal 3,4; German Academy 1,2; Chemists' Club 3, 4; 
Radio Club 3; Pre-Medical Seminar 4. 



LAURENT B. HOULE B.S. 

90 Jackson St., Cambridge, Mass. 

RINDGE TECHNICAL 

MAJOR: BIOLOGY 

German Academy 2, 3; Pre-Medical Seminar 4; Hockey 
Letter 1, 2, 3; Chemists' Club 3, 4. 




-"«rrX' 




ROBERT JAURON B.S. 

9 Thayer Court, Nashua, N. H. 

NASHUA HIGH 

MAJOR: EDUCATION 

Law and Gov't Academy 3, 4; Baseball Letter 2, 3; Foot- 
ball Letter 2, 3, 4. 



HARRISON W. JORDAN A.B. 

1093 Washington St., So. Braintree, Mass. 

BOSTON COLLEGE HIGH 

MAJOR: HISTORY 

Ricci Math. Academy 1, 2; Von Pastor History Academy 
3; Sodality 1, 2, 3, 4. 



GERARD J. JOYCE A.B. 

5 Sherman St., Roxbur)^ Mass. 

BOSTON ENGLISH HIGH 

MAJOR: ECONOMICS 

Sodality 1, 2, 3, 4; French Academy 1; Economics Acad- 
emy 2, 3; Track 1, 2; Flying Club 3, 4. 



WILLIAM J. KANE B.S. 

715 Cummins Highway, Mattapan, Mass. 

BOSTON COLLEGE HIGH 

MAJOR: EDUCATION 

Marquette 1,2; French Academy 1,2; Ricci Math. Acad- 
emy 1; Sodahty 1, 2, 3. 



LEON KATZ B.S. 

156 CooHdge St., BrookHne, Mass. 

BOSTON PUBLIC LATIN SCHOOL 

MAJOR: CHEMISTRY 

German Academy 2; Crystal 2; Chemists' Club 3,4; Radii 
Club 3, 4. 



JOHN P. KEANE B.S.B.A. 

16 Graves Ave., Lynn, Mass. 

LYNN ENGLISH 

MAJOR: ACCOUNTING 
Business Club 1, 2; Sodality 1,2; Economics Academy 3, 4. 





RICHARD A. KEATING A.B. 

21 Walter St., Newton Centre, Mass. 

NEWTON HIGH 

MAJOR: PHYSICS 

Dramatics Society 1, 2, 3, Secretary 4; Band 1, 2, 3; Ger- 
man Academy 1, 2; Heights 1, 2, 3, Society Editor 4; 
Hockey Manager 3,4; Tennis Manager 4; Sub Turri Staff. 



JOHN F. KEEFE, JR. B.S.B.A. 

12 Alicia Road, Dorchester, Mass. 

BOSTON COLLEGE HIGH 

MAJOR: ACCOUNTING 

Business Debating 1, 2; Economics Academy 2; Sodality 
1, 2, 3; Secretary, Freshman and Sophomore Business; Vice- 
President, Junior Business. 



JOHN J. KEEFFE B.S.B.A. 

9 Temple St., Arlington, Mass. 

ARLINGTON HIGH 

MAJOR: MARKETING 

Sodality 1, 2, 3; Economics Academy 3; Spanish Acad- 
emy 2. 



HUBERT G. KELLEY 



B.S. 



1 1 Addison Ave., Saugus, Mass. 

SAUGUS HIGH 

MAJOR: CHEMISTRY 

Glee Club 2, 3, 4; German Academy 1, 2; Ricci Math. 
Academy 1, 2; Chemists' Club 1, 2, Vice-President 3, 
President 4. 



JOHN E. KELLEY B.S.B.A. 

4 Smith St., Marblehead, Mass. 

ST. John's prep 

MAJOR: ACCOUNTING 

Business Club 1,2; Business Debating 1, 2; Spanish Acad- 
emy 1, 2; Economics Academy 3, 4; Sodality 1, 2, 3. 



JOHN J. KELLEY A.B. 

1 1 Stevens St., Maiden, Mass. 

MALDEN CATHOLIC HIGH 

MAJOR: LATIN 

Sodality 1, 2, 3, 4; French Club 1, 2; Classical Academy 
1, 2. 





JOSEPH E. KELLY A.B. 

740 Saratoga St., East Boston, Mass. 

BOSTON COLLEGE HIGH 

MAJOR: PHYSICS 

Sodality 1, 2, 3, 4; Glee Club 1, 3; French Academy 2; 
Physics Seminar 4; Radio Club 4; Freshman A. A. Repre- 
sentative; Chairman, Philomatheia Ball. 



ROBERT M. KENNEY B.S.B.A. 

23 Sparhawk St., Brighton, Mass. 

ST. columbkelle's high 

MAJOR: ACCOUNTING 

Alpha Sigma Nu; Cross and Crown; Business Club 1, 2, 
3, 4; Ledger 2, 3; Sodality 1, 2, 3, 4, Prefect Business 2; 
Class Representative 4; Economics Academy 2; Sub Turri, 
Business Manager. 



EDWIN J. KEYES B.S. 

57 North Crescent Circle, Brighton, Mass. 

BRIGHTON HIGH 

MAJOR: EDUCATION 

Fulton 3, 4; Sodality 1, 2, 3; Economics Academy 2, 3; 
Radio Club 3. 



ADOLPH J. KISSELL B.S. 

36 School St., Nashua, N. H. 



NASHUA HIGH 



MAJOR: ECONOMICS 

Ricci Math. Academy 1; Economics Academy 2, 3, 4; 
German Academy 1, 2; Football Letter 2, 3, 4; Track 
Letter 2, 3, 4. 



ROBERT E. KOPP A.B. (Honors) 

14 Ronan St., Dorchester, Mass. 

BOSTON COLLEGE HIGH 

MAJOR: GOVERNMENT 

Cross and Crown; Marquette 1, 2; Fulton 3, 4, Secretary 
3, President 4; Sodality 1, 2, 3, 4; Secretary, Junior Class; 
Winner, Gargan Debating Medal; German Academy 1, 2; 
Sub Turri Staff. 



LOUIS J. KUC A.B. 

3 3 Whitney St., Roxbury, Mass. 

MISSION HIGH 

MAJOR: PRE-MEDICAL 

Sodality 1, 2, 3, 4; German Academy 1; Ricci Math. 
Academy 1, 2; Pre-Medical Seminar 4. 





ARTHUR W. LaCOUTURE B.S. 

1 1 Winnemay St., Natick, Mass. 

BOSTON COLLEGE HIGH 

MAJOR: CHEMISTRY 

Chemists' Club 1, 2, 3, 4; German Academy 1, 2; Golf 
Letter 2, 3, Captain 4. 



ROBERT F. LALLY A.B. (Honors) 

3 Davis Ave., Brookline, Mass. 

BROOKLINE HIGH 

MAJOR: PRE-BUSINESS 

Law and Gov't Academy 4; Classical Academy 2; Eco- 
nomics Academy 2, 3, 4; Sodality 1, 2. 



ROBERT N. LaMARCHE A.B. (Honors) 

241 Norwcll St., Dorchester, Mass. 

BOSTON PUBLIC LATIN SCHOOL 

MAJOR: PRE-MEDICAL 

Cross and Crown; Classical Academy 1, 2, Secretary 2; 
German Academy 1, 2; Sodality 1, 2, 3, 4; Pre-Medical 
Seminar 4; Chemists' Club 2. 



THOMAS J. LAMOND B.S. 

507 Andover St., Lawrence, Mass. 

LAWRENCE HIGH 

MAJOR: CHEMISTRY 

Chemists' Club 1, 2, 3, 4; German Academy 1, 2; Crys- 
tal 2. 



JOHN F. LANE A.B. 

185 Huron Ave., Cambridge, Mass. 

ST. John's high 

MAJOR: ECONOMICS 

Glee Club 1, 2, 3; Economics Academy 3, 4; Radio Club 3; 
Track 2. 



THOMAS J. LANE A.B. 

7 Semont Rd., Dorchester, Mass. 

BOSTON COLLEGE HIGH 

MAJOR: ENGLISH 

Heights 1, 2, 3, 4; Sodality 1, 2, 3, 4; Dramatics Society 
1; German Academy 1, 2; Law and Gov't Academy 3, 4; 
Sub Turri Staff. 





ROBERT J. LARKIN A.B. 

3 5 Brunswick St., Brockton, Mass. 

BROCKTON HIGH 

MAJOR: SOCIOLOGY 

Von Pastor History Academy 1, 2; French Academy 1,2; 
Sodality 2, 3. 



JOSEPH A. LAVOIE, JR. A.B. 

9 Parkdale St., Somerville, Mass. 

MALDEN CATHOLIC HIGH 

MAJOR: ENGLISH 
Glee Club 1; German Academy 2; Sodality 4, Treasurer 4. 



STEVEN J. LEVANITIS B.S. 

260 Columbia St., Cambridge, Mass. 

RINDGE TECHNICAL 

MAJOR: EDUCATION 

Italian Academy 1, 2, 3, 4; Class Representative 4; Track 
2, 3; Football Letter 1, 2, 3, 4. 



PAUL J. LIVINGSTON A.B. 

9 Pickering St., Woburn, Mass. 

BOSTON COLLEGE HIGH 

MAJOR: ECONOMICS 

Glee Club 2, 3, 4; Band 1, 2, 3, 4, Manager 4; Sodality 
1, 2, 3, 4, Vice-Prefect 2; German Academy 1, 2; Eco- 
nomics Academy 3, 4; Class Representative 1. 



SAMUEL J. LOMBARD, JR. 

62 East St., Ipswich, Mass. 



A.B. 



IPSWICH HIGH 



MAJOR: ENGLISH 



Sodality 1, 2, 3, 4; Glee Club 1, 2, 3, 4, Secretarj' 4; 
Spanish Academy 2; Stylus Staff 2, 3, 4; Sub Turri Staff. 



FRANCIS X. MACK A.B. (Honors) 

50 Brush Hill Road, Milton, Mass. 

BOSTON COLLEGE HIGH 

MAJOR: PRE -MEDICAL 

Marquette 2; Sodality 4; German Academy 1; Chemists' 
Club 4; Pre-Medical Seminar 4. 





PAUL J. MAGUIRE A.B. 

20 Silloway St., Dorchester, Mass. 

BOSTON PUBLIC LATIN SCHOOL 

MAJOR: ECONOMICS 

Sodality 1, 2; Law and Gov't Academy 3, 4, President 4; 
Sub Turri Dance, Chairman; Freshman Class, President; 
Sophomore Class, A. A. Representative; Junior Class, A. A. 
Representative; Senior Class, A. A. President; Sub Turri 
Staff. 



WILLIAM H. MAGUIRE B.S. 

3 3 Woodland St., Newburyport, Mass. 

WALPOLE HIGH 

MAJOR: CHEMISTRY 
Chemists' Club 1, 2, 3, 4; Sodality 1, 2; Radio Club 2, 3. 



ROBERT C. MAHER B.S.B.A. 

8 Hadwen Lane, Worcester, Mass. 

CLASSICAL HIGH 

MAJOR: MARKETING 

Sodality 1, 2, 3; Spanish Academy 1, 2, 3; Ledger 1, 2, 
Co-Editor 2; Class Representative, Business 4. 




FRANCIS X. MAHONEY B.S. 

86 Clark Ave., Chelsea, Mass. 

ST. Philip's prep. 

MAJOR: EDUCATION 

Spanish Academy 1, 2; Sodality 1, 2; Law and Gov't 
Academy 3, 4. 



JAMES J. MAHONEY A.B. 

8 3 Green St., Charlestown, Mass. 

BOSTON PUBLIC LATIN SCHOOL 

MAJOR: PRE-BUSINESS 

Classical Academy 1, 2; Ricci Math. Academy 1, 2; So- 
dality 1, 2, 3, 4. 



JOHN V. MAHONEY A.B. 

70 Hudson St., Somerville, Mass. 

ST. Clement's high 

MAJOR: ACCOUNTING 

Glee Club 1, 2; Band 1, 2; Sodality 1, 2, 3, 4; Economics 
Academy 3, 4; Spanish Academy 1, 2, 3; Ricci Math. 
Academy 1; Sub Turri Staff. 





JOSEPH F. MARCANTONIO A.B. 

91 Cornell St., Roslindale, Mass. 

ROSLINDALE HIGH 

MAJOR: PHYSICS 

Ricci Math. Academy 1, 2; Italian Academy 1, 2, 3, 4, 
Secretary 3, President 4; Physics Seminar 4; Marquette 2. 



JAMES P. MARINI A.B. 

3 Dudley St., Cambridge, Mass. 

CAMBRIDGE HIGH AND LATIN 

MAJOR: ITALIAN 

Italian Academy 1, 2, 3, 4; Sodality 1, 2; Ricci Math. 
Academy 1 ; Freshman Hockey. 



FREDIANO D. MATTIOLI A.B. 

17 Thetford Ave., Dorchester, Mass. 

DORCHESTER HIGH 

MAJOR: MATHEMATICS 

Cross and Crown; Sodality 2, 3, 4; French Academy 2, 3, 
4; Ricci Math. Academy 1, 2, Vice-President 2. 



JAMES H. MAXFIELD B.S. 

223 Woodford St., Portland, Maine 

DEERING HIGH 

MAJOR: ECONOMICS 

Von Pastor History Academy 2, 3, 4, Secretary 3; Sodality 
1, 2, 3, 4; Economics Academy 2, 3, 4; French Academy 
1, 2; Law and Gov't Academy 4; Track 2. 



FRANCIS S. MAZNICKI B.S. 

120 Pulaski St., West Warwick, R. I. 

WEST WARWICK HIGH 

MAJOR: EDUCATION 

Sodality 1, 2, 3, 4; Football Letter 1, 2, 3, 4; Baseball 
Letter 2, 3; Law and Gov't Academy 3, 4. 



JAMES H. McAVOY A.B. 

91 St. Rose St., Jamaica Plain, Mass. 

BOSTON PUBLIC LATIN SCHOOL 

MAJOR: PRE-BUSINESS 

French Academy 1, 2; Sodality 1, 2, 3, 4; Economics 
Academy 3, 4. 






WILLIAM J. McCANN A.B. (Honors) 

3 3 Child St., Jamaica Plain, Mass. 

BOSTON PUBLIC LATIN SCHOOL 

MAJOR: ECONOMICS 

Sodality 1, 2, 3, 4; Radio Club 3; Law and Gov't Academy 
3; Economics Academy 4. 



ED^5C^ARD R. McCARTHY B.S. 

70 Fulton St., Medford, Mass. 

MEDFORD HIGH 

MAJOR: EDUCATION 

Sodality 1, 2, 3, 4; German Academy 1, 2; Heights 3, 4; 
Track Letter 1, 2, 3, 4. 



HENRY B. McCONVILLE B.S.B.A. 

15 Walnut St., Wakefield, Mass. 

WAKEFIELD HIGH 

MAJOR: MARKETING 

Sodality 1; Economics Academy 2; Spanish Academy 2, 
3, 4. 



EDWARD L. McCORMACK B.S.B.A. 

45 Olney St., Dorchester, Mass. 

BOSTON COLLEGE HIGH 

MAJOR: ACCOUNTING 

Ledger 1, 2; Business Debating 1, 2; Sodality 1, 2, 3, 4; 
Economics Academy 2, 3; Sophomore Business, Treasurer; 
Business Club 1, 2; Sub Turri Staff. 



FRANCIS J. McCUE, JR. A.B. 

100 Highland Ave., Arlington, Mass. 

SOMERVILLE HIGH 

MAJOR: ECONOMICS 

Sodality 1, 2, 3, 4; Economics Academy 3, 4; Ricci Math. 
Academy 1, 2; Heights 2. 



EDWARD s. McDonald b.s. 

1 1 Champney St., Brighton, Mass. 

BRIGHTON HIGH 

MAJOR: ECONOMICS 

Spanish Academy 1, 2; Economics Academy 3; Law and 
Gov't Academy 4; Sodality 1, 2, 3, 4; Baseball Letter 2, 3. 





JOHN w. McDonald b.s. 

29 Laurel St., Roxbury, Mass. 

ROXBURY MEMORIAL HIGH 

MAJOR: SOCIOLOGY 

Flying Club 3, 4; French Academy 1, 2; Sodality 1, 2, 3, 4; 
Law and Gov't Academy 3. 



THOMAS F. McDonald b.s.b.a. 

65 Sawyer Ave., Dorchester, Mass. 

BOSTON COLLEGE HIGH 

MAJOR: ACCOUNTING 

Business Club 1, 2; Business Debating 1, 2, Treasurer 1, 2; 
Sodality 1, 2, 3; Economics Academy 1, 3; French Acad- 
emy 1, 2. 



MARTIN J. Mcdonough b.s.b.a. 

326 Dorchester St., South Boston, Mass. 

BOSTON PUBLIC LATIN SCHOOL 

MAJOR: ACCOUNTING 

Business Club 1, 2; Economics 3, 4; Sodality 3, 4; Business 
Debating 1, 2. 



EUGENE G. McGILLICUDDY B.S. 

3 1 Paris St., Medford, Mass. 

ST. Philip's prep 

MAJOR: EDUCATION 

Heights 2; French Academy 1,2; Law and Gov't Academy 
2, 3, 4. 



JOHN J. McGILLICUDDY A.B. 

23 Tower St., Forest Fiills, Mass. 

BOSTON PUBLIC LATI>f SCHOOL 

MAJOR: SOCIOLOGY 

Glee Club 1; Marquette 1; German Academy 1, 2; Ricci 
Math. Academy 1, 2; Crystal 1; Sodality 1, 2, 3, 4. 



JOHN A. McGOWAN A.B. 

44 Washington St., Medford, Mass. 

MEDFORD HIGH 

MAJOR: PRE-MEDICAL 

Cross and Crown; Sodality 3, 4; Marquette 1; Chemists' 
Club 2; Pre-Medical Seminar, President 4. 





EDWARD G. McGRATH B.S.B.A. 

1490 Centre St., Roslindale, Mass. 

ROSLINDALE HIGH 

MAJOR: MARKETING 

Sodality 1, 2, 3, 4, Secretary 3, Vice-Prefect 4; Economics 
Academy 1,2; Spanish Academy 1,2; Business Club 1, 2; 
Track 1, 2, 3. 



MAURICE A. McLaughlin, jr. b.s. 

2 5 Newton St., Lawrence, Mass. 

LAWRENCE HIGH 

MAJOR: CHEMISTRY 

Crystal 3, 4, Business Manager 4; German Academy 1,2; 
Ricci Math. Academy 1, 2; Chemists' Club 3, 4. 



ROBERT P. McLaughlin a.b. 

184 North St., Bennington, Vermont 

EDWARD LITTLE HIGH 

MAJOR: ENGLISH 
French Academy 1, 2. 



WILLIAM P. McLaughlin, jr. b.s. 

167 Central St., Somerville, Mass. 

SOMERVILLE HIGH 

MAJOR: PHYSICS 

Glee Club 1, 2; German Academy 1, 2; Radio Club 4; 
Physics Seminar 3, 4. 



JOHN A. McMAHON A.B. 

2 8 Worthington St., Roxbury, Mass. 

BOSTON PUBLIC LATIN SCHOOL 

MAJOR: PRE-BUSINESS 

Economics Academy 2, 3, 4; Heights 1, 2, 3; Law and 
Gov't Academy 3, 4. 



JOHN C. McMAHON B.S.B.A. 

8 Prospect Hill Ave., Somerville, Mass. 

• SOMERVILLE HIGH 

MAJOR: ACCOUNTING 

Sodality 1, 2, 3, 4; Business Debating 1,2; Stylus StafF 4; 
Economics Academy 2. 





THOMAS M. McMAHON 



B.S.B.A. 



370 Washington St., Brookline, Mass. 

ST. Mary's high, brookline 

MAJOR: MARKETING 

Business Club 1, 2; Sodality 1, 2, 3, 4; Economics Acad- 
emy 3, 4. 



ROBERT C. McMANAMY B.S. 

269 Highland St., Roxbury, Mass. 

BOSTON PUBLIC LATIN SCHOOL 

MAJOR: HISTORY 

Cross and Crown; SodaHty 1, 2, 3, 4; French Academy 
1, 2; Ricci Math. Academy 1, 2, Journal Editor 2; Von 
Pastor History Academy 3, 4, Vice-President 3. 



GERALD J. McMORROW A.B. 

127 Spencer St., Dorchester, Mass. 

BOSTON PUBLIC LATIN SCHOOL 

MAJOR: ECONOMICS 

Sodality 1, 2, 3, 4; Economics Academy 3,4; Flying Club 
1, 2, 3; Radio Club 3, 4; Law and Gov't Academy 3, 4. 



JOSEPH T. McNALLY A.B. (Honors) 

196 Lawrence St., Lawrence, Mass. 

LAWRENCE HIGH 

MAJOR: PRE-MEDICAL 

Cross and Crown; Marquette 1, 2; Sodality 1, 2, 3, 4; 
Crystal, Associate Editor 3, 4; German Academy 1, 2; 
Classical Academy 2; Chemists' Club 3, 4; Pre-Medical 
Seminar 4, Vice-President 4. 



AUSTIN T. McNAMARA B.S. 

did Pine St., Manchester, N. H. 

ST. Joseph's high 

MAJOR: SOCIOLOGY 

Dramatics 1; Sodality 1, 2, 3; Economics Academy 2; 
Spanish Academy 1, 2; Ski Club 2, 3. 



JAMES P. McNULTY A.B. 

266 Crescent Ave., Beachmont, Mass. 

REVERE high 

MAJOR: PHYSICS 

Sodality 1, 2, 4; French Academy 1; Ricci Math. Academy 
1,2; Law and Gov't Academy 3. 





ROBERT J. McQUEENEY A.B. 

34 Cameron St., Dorchester, Mass. 

MISSION HIGH 

MAJOR: PRE-MEDICAL 

Sodality 3; German Academy 2; Chemists' Club 3; Pre- 
Medical Seminar 4. 




ROBERT J. MEE B.S. 

165 Oakland Ave., Arlington, Mass. 

HEBRON ACADEMY 

MAJOR: EDUCATION 

Economics Academy 3; Hockey Letter 1, 2, 3; Freshman 
Hockey Coach 4. 



CHARLES R. MEEHAN 



B.S. 



44 Parklawn Road, West Roxbury, Mass. 

ROXBURY MEMORIAL HIGH 

MAJOR: ECONOMICS 
Sodality 3; Economics Academy 2; French Academy 1, 2. 



JOSEPH F. MILLER B.S. 

82 Cutter Hill Road, Arlington, Mass. 

BERKELEY PREP 

MAJOR: GOVERNMENT 

Sodality 1, 2, 3, 4; French Academy 1, 2; Ricci Math. 
Academy 1; Law and Gov't Academy 3, 4; Von Pastor 
History Academy 2. 



JOHN F. MITCHELL B.S.B.A. 

69 River Ridge Drive, Wellesley Hills, Mass. 

WELLESLEY HIGH 

MAJOR: MARKETING 

French Academy 1, 2; Economics Academy 2, 3; Law and 
Gov't Academy 2, 3; Sodality 1, 2, 3, 4. 



A. ROBERT MOLLOY A.B. 

94 Chestnut St., Nashua, N. H. 

NASHUA HIGH 

MAJOR: ACCOUNTING 

French Academy 1; Ricci Math. Academy 2; Sodality 1,2; 
Ski Club 3 ; Sub Turri, Assistant Business Manager. 





JOHN H. MOLONEY, JR. B.S. 

3 8 George St., Norwood, Mass. 

NORWOOD HIGH 

MAJOR: HISTORY 

Law and Gov't Academy 4; Von Pastor History Acad- 
emy 4. 



WILLIAM P. MONAHAN B.S. 

98 Stoneleigh Road, Watertown, Mass. 

WATERTOWN HIGH 

MAJOR: EDUCATION 

Economics Academy 2, 3; Law and Gov't Academy 3, 4; 
Ricci Math. Academy 1, 2. 



ALFRED L. MORIN A.B. 

92 Glencoe St., Brighton, Mass. 

ST. columbkille's high 

MAJOR: ECONOMICS 

Band 2; Fulton 3; Heights 3; Law and Gov't Academy 4. 



ALFRED V. MORRO B.S. 

17 Sycamore St., Providence, R. I. 

PROVIDENCE CENTRAL HIGH 

MAJOR: EDUCATION 

Spanish Academy 3, 4, Treasurer 4; Football Letter 1, 2, 
3, 4, Captain 4; Track Letter 1, 2, 3, 4. 



THOMAS J. MULDOON B.S. 

45 Union St., Watertown, Mass. 

ST. Philip's academy 

MAJOR: SOCIOLOGY 

French Academy 1; Von Pastor History Academy 2, 3; 
Sodahty 2. 



EDMUND W. MULVEHILL A.B. 

2 3 Cottage St., Norwood, Mass. 

NORWOOD HIGH 

MAJOR: SOCIOLOGY 

German Academy 1, 2; Cheer Leader 3, 4; Law and Gov't 
Academy 4; Prom Committee 2, 3. 





FREDERICK C. MURPHY B.S.B.A. 

14 Benedict St., Somerville, Mass. 

BOSTON COLLEGE HIGH 

MAJOR: ACCOUNTING 

Sodality 1, 2, 3, 4; Economics Academy 2, 3, 4; French 
Academy 2; Law and Gov't Academy 2, 3. 



FRANCIS X. MURPHY B.S.B.A. 

15 Cawiield St., Dorchester, Mass. 

BOSTON PUBLIC LATIN SCHOOL 

MAJOR: MARKETING 

Business Debating 1, 2, Vice-President 1, 2; Sodality 1, 2, 
3,4; Spanish Academy 1,2; Economics Academy 2; Junior 
Class Business, President; Prom Committee 1, 2, 3. 



LEO J. MURPHY A.B. 

2 Francis St., Boston, Mass. 

MISSION HIGH 

MAJOR: ENGLISH 

Dramatics Society 1, 2, 3, 4, Vice-President 4; Stylus 1, 2, 
3, 4, Feature Editor 4; Sodality 1, 2; Sub Turri History 
Editor; Rev. T. F. O'Leary Award for Prose Biography, 
1940. 



HOWARD W. MURRAY, JR. B.S.B.A. 

1 1 Glenwood Circle, Lynn, Mass. 

LYNN ENGLISH HIGH 

MAJOR: MARKETING 

Sodality 1, 2, 3, 4; Economics Academy 2; Spanish Acad- 
emy 1, 2. 



ROBERT F. MUSE 



A.B. 



14 Byron St., Wakefield, Mass. 

MALDEN CATHOLIC HIGH 

MAJOR: HISTORY 

Marquette 1, 2, President 2; Fulton 3, 4; Von Pastor His- 
tory Academy 3, 4; Junior Class, President; Chairman, 
Sodality Lecture Teams; Freshman Hockey. 



HAROLD E. NASH, JR. A.B. 

36 Goodnough Road, Brooklinc, Mass. 

BOSTON COLLEGE HIGH 

MAJOR: PRE-MEDICAL 

Sodality 1, 2, 3, 4; German Academy 1, 2; Chemists' Club 
1, 2, 3, 4; Pre-Medical Seminar 4; Yacht Club 1, 2, 3, 4, 
Officer 3, 4. 





FRANCIS J. NICHOLSON A.B. (Honors) 

234 Central Ave., Medford, Mass. 

MALDEN CATHOLIC HIGH 

MAJOR: HISTORY 

Cross and Crown, Assistant Knight Commander; Philoso- 
phy Academy 3, 4; Classical Academy 1, 2; Sodality 1, 2, 
3, 4; Sub Turri Staff. 



JOSEPH T. NOLAN A.B. (Honors) 

15 Moore St., Winthrop, Mass. 

WINTHROP HIGH 

MAJOR: HISTORY 

Cress and Crown; Sodality 1, 2, 3, 4; Fulton 3, 4, Presi- 
dent 4, Secretary 4; Marquette 1, 2, Secretary 2; Stylus 
2, 3, 4, Managing Editor 4; Humanities 3, 4, Ass't Editor 
4; French Academy 1; Von Pastor History Academy 2; 
Sub Turri Staff. 



ROBERT J. NOONAN B.S. 

146 Brighton Ave., Portland, Maine 

ST. John's prep 

MAJOR: SOCIOLOGY 

Ricci Math. Academy 1; Law and Gov't Academy 2; 
French Academy 2; Glee Club 2, 3; Sodality 2, 3, 4. 



JAMES J. O'BRIEN A.B. 

67 Russell St., Maiden, Mass. 

MALDEN CATHOLIC HIGH 

MAJOR: PRE-MEDICAL 

Cross and Crown; German Academy 2; Ricci Math. Acad- 
emy 1, 2; Sodality 1, 2, 3; Pre-Medical Seminar 4. 



JAMES M. O'CONNOR B.S.B.A. 

40 Adrian St., Somerville, Mass. 

MALDEN CATHOLIC HIGH 

MAJOR: ACCOUNTING 

Ledger 1, 2; Vice-President Freshman Business; Sodality 
3, 4; Freshman Baseball; Law and Gov't Academy 4. 




JOHN L. O'CONNOR B.S.B.A. 

2 52 Geneva Ave., Dorchester, Mass. 

BOSTON PUBLIC LATIN SCHOOL 

MAJOR: ACCOUNTING 

Business Club 1, 2; Ledger 1, 2; Sodahty 1, 2, 3, 4; Eco- 
nomics Academy 3; Law and Gov't Academy 2. 





JOHN E. O'DONNELL A.B. (Honors) 

6 Kingsdale St., Dorchester, Mass. 

BOSTON PUBLIC LATIN SCHOOL 

MAJOR: GERMAN 

Cross and Crown; German Academy 1, 2; Classical Acad- 
emy 1, 2, Vice-President 1; Sodality 1, 3, 4; Sub Turri 
Staff. 



RICHARD F. O'HALLORAN 

394 Centre St., Jamaica Plain, Mass. 

BOSTON ENGLISH HIGH 

MAJOR: HISTORY 
Sodality 2; Fulton 3; Italian Academy 3, 4. 



A.B. 



PAUL G. O'HARA B.S. 

133 Calumet St., Roxbury, Mass. 



ST. PHILIP S PREP 



MAJOR: SOCIOLOGY 



Glee Club 1; Ricci Math. Academy 1; Von Pastor History 
Academy 2; French Academy 2; Sodality 4; Law and Gov't 
Academy 3. 



DAVID A. O'KEEFFE A.B. 

12 Rowell St., Dorchester, Mass. 

BOSTON COLLEGE HIGH 

MAJOR: ECONOMICS 

Sodality 1, 2, 3, 4; Law and Gov't Academy 3, 4; Eco- 
nomics Academy 2, 3, 4. 



THOMAS G. O'LEARY B.S. 

5 8 Francis St., Roxbury, Mass. 

MISSION HIGH 

MAJOR: CHEMISTRY 

Glee Club 1, 2, 3; German Academy 1, 2; Class Repre- 
sentative Freshman, Sophomore; Chemists' Club 2, 3, 4. 



JAMES P. O'NEILL, JR. A.B. 

5 Stearns Road, Watertown, Mass. 

SOMERVILLE HIGH 

MAJOR: PRE-BUSINESS 

Cross and Crown; Sodality 1, 2, 3, 4, Vice-Prefect 1; 
Vice-President, Freshman, Cophomore Class. 





VITO A. ORLANDELLA B.S. 

3 Thatcher St., Boston, Mass. 

BOSTON ENGLISH HIGH 

MAJOR: BIOLOGY 

Sodahty 1, 2; Crystal 2; German Academy 1, 2, Secretary- 
Treasurer 2; Chemists' Club 1, 2, 3, 4; Pre-Medical Sem- 
inar 4; Italian Academy 3. 



CONSTANTINE G. PAPPAS -JAMESON 
A.B. (Honors) 

74 Field St., Boston, Mass. 

BOSTON PUBLIC LATIN SCHOOL 

MAJOR: SOCIOLOGY 

Alpha Sigma Nu; Dramatics Society 1, 2, 3, 4, President 4; 
Humanities 2, 3, 4, Associate Editor 4; Baseball 2, 3. 



ALBERT F. PASHBY A.B. 

24 Banks Road, Swampscott, Mass. 

ST. MARy's high, LYNN 

MAJOR: SOCIOLOGY 

Heights 3, 4, Advertising Manager 4; Radio Club 2; Sodal- 
ity 1, 2, 3, 4; Sub Turri Staff. 



JOSEPH J. PAZNIOKAS B.S. 

58 Heaton Ave., Norwood, Mass. 

NORWOOD HIGH 

MAJOR: PHYSICS 

Dramatics Society 1, 2; Physics Seminar 3, 4; Stylus 2, 3, 
4, Associate Editor 4. 



JOHN J. PHELAN A.B. 

9 57 South St., Roslindale, Mass. 

ROXBURY MEMORIAL HIGH 

MAJOR: ECONOMICS 

Marquette 1, 2, Vice-President 1, President 2; SodaHty 1, 
2, 3, 4; Fulton 3; Economics Academy 3, 4; Ricci Math. 
Academy 1; Law and Gov't Academy 3, 4. 



JOHN A. PIERONI, JR. B.S. 

3 Nashua St., Somerville, Mass. 

SOMERVILLE HIGH 

MAJOR: HISTORY 

Spanish Academy 1, 2, 3, 4; Von Pastor History Academy 
2, 3; Varsity Football Manager 4. 





RALPH C. POWERS 



B.S. 



32 Park St., Cambridge, Mass. 

RINDGE TECHNICAL SCHOOL 

MAJOR: EDUCATION 

Spanish Academy 1, 2, 3; Baseball 2; Hockey Letter 1, 2, 
3, 4, Captain 4. 




WILLIAM J. POWERS B.S. 

9 Winford Way, Medford, Mass. 



COMMERCE HIGH 



MAJOR: GOVERNMENT 



German Academy 1, 2; Ricci Math. Academy 1, 2; Law 
and Gov't Academy 2, 3, 4; Sodality 1, 2; Chemists' 
Club 2. 



CHARLES E. PRICE 



B.S. 



14 Copeland St., Roxbury, Mass. 

LAWRENCE ACADEMY 

MAJOR: GOVERNMENT 

Heights 1, 2, 3; Sodality 2, 3, 4; French Academy 1, 2; 
Law and Gov't Academy 1, 2, 3, 4; Class Representative, 
Freshman, Sophomore; Chairman, Sophomore Promenade; 
Tr.-ck 1, 2; Baseball 3. 



WILLIAM P. QUINN A.B. 

153 Middlesex Ave., Medford, Mass. 

BOSTON COLLEGE HIGH 

MAJOR: ECONOMICS 

Marquette 1, 2; Sodality 1, 2, 3, 4; Economics Academy 
3, 4; Von Pastor History Academy 1; Law and Gov't 
Academy 3, 4. 



FRANCIS P. READY A.B. 

109 Reed St., Cambridge, Mass. 

ST. John's high 

MAJOR: HISTORY 

Sodality 1, 2, 3; Von Pastor History Academy 1, 2; Law 
and Gov't Academy 3, 4. 



JAMES P. REILLY B.S.B.A. 

21 Child St., Jamaica Plain, Mass. 

ST. Philip's prep 

MAJOR: ACCOUNTING 

Business Club 2; Ledger 1, 2; Sodality 1, 2, 3, 4; Ricci 
Math. Academy 1, 2; Law and Gov't Academy 2, 3, 4. 








EAMON G. RENAGHAN B.S. 

2 Evelyn Ave., Maiden, Mass. 

MALDEN CATHOLIC HIGH 

MAJOR: BIOLOGY 

German Academy 1,2; Chemists' Club 1, 2, 3; Pre-Medicai 
Seminar 4. 



MURRAY A. RICE A.B. 

21 Mechanic St., Fitchburg, Mass. 

FITCHBURG HIGH 

MAJOR: FRENCH 

Cross and Crown; Band 4; French Academy 1, 2, 3; Italian 
Academy 2, 3, 4; Vice-President 4. 



WILLIAM E. RILEY A.B. 

15 Hopkins Road, Jamaica Plain, Mass. 

BOSTON PUBLIC LATIN SCHOOL 

MAJOR: ENGLISH 

Cross and Crown; SodaHty 1, 2, 3, 4; Heights 1, 2, 3, 4, 
Sports Editor 4; Track Letter 1, 2, 3, 4; Sub Turri, Sports 
Editor. 



EDWARD RITTER B.S. 

East Main St., Georgetown, Mass. 

GEORGETOWN HIGH 

MAJOR: BIOLOGY 

German Academy 1, 2; Chemists' Club 2, 3; Pre-Medical 
Seminar 4. 



CHARLES I. ROBICHAUD A.B. 

369 Webster St., Rockland, Mass. 

ROCKLAND HIGH 

MAJOR: CRIMINOLOGY 

Sodality 1, 2, 3; Law and Gov't Academy 3, 4; Tennis 
Letter 2, 3, Captain 4. 



RICHARD J. ROCHE B.S. 

Harvard, Mass. 

BROMFIELD HIGH 

MAJOR: BIOLOGY 

Sodality 2; German Academy 1,2; Chemists' Club 3; Pre- 
Medical Seminar 4. 






FRANCIS J. ROGAN A.B. 

116 Murdock St., Brighton, Mass. 

BOSTON PUBLIC LATIN SCHOOL 

MAJOR: PRE-MEDICAL 

Ricci Math. Academy 1; Sodality 1, 2; Chemists' Club 3; 
Pre-Medical Seminar 4. 



JOHN G. ROSS A.B. 

576 Randolph Ave., Milton, Mass. 

BOSTON COLLEGE HIGH 

MAJOR: ENGLISH 

Dramatics Society 1, 3, 4; Marquette 1, 2; Sodality 1, 2, 3; 
German Academy 1, 2; Stylus 2, 4, Associate Editor 4; 
Flying Club 1, 2, 3; Boxing Letter 1; Fencing 2; Secretary, 
Sophomore Class; Sub Turri Staff. 



JOHN W. RUSSELL A.B. (Honors) 

205 Wachusett St., Jamaica Plain, Mass. 

JAMAICA PLAIN HIGH 

MAJOR: ENGLISH 

Philosophy Academy 3,4; Sodality 1, 2, 3, 4, Secretary 4; 
Humanities 3, 4; Classical Academy 2, 3, 4; Sanctuary 
Society 4; Sub Turri, Special Editor; Chairman, Senior 
Banquet. 



THOMAS P. RUSSELL 



A.B. 



324 Washington St., Somerville, Mass. 

MISSION HIGH 

MAJOR: PHYSICS 

Marquette 1, 2; Fulton 3, 4, Vice-President 4; Sodality 1, 2, 
3, 4; Physics Seminar 4; Ricci Math. Academy 1, 2, Journal 
Editor 2; Economics Academy 3. 




JOHN T. RYAN, JR. B.S. 

127 Manomet St., Brockton, Mass. 

BROCKTON HIGH 

MAJOR: EDUCATION 

Spanish Academy 1, 2, 3; Heights 1,2; Von Pastor History 
Academy 3; Radio Club 4. 



PAUL F. SALIPANTE B.S.B.A. 

20 Chestnut St., Wakefield, Mass. 

WAKEFIELD HIGH 

MAJOR: ACCOUNTING 

Cross and Crown, Assistant Knight Commander; Business 
Club 1, 2; Ledger 1; Sodality 1, 2, 3, 4; Economics 
Academy 3. 





ANTHONY A. SANNICANDRO B.S. 

92 Waushakum St., Framingham, Mass. 

FRAMINGHAM ACADEMY 

MAJOR: EDUCATION 

Glee Club 1, 2, 3, 4; Sodality 1, 2, 3, 4; Italian Academy 
1, 2, 3, 4; Law and Gov't Academy 4. 



ROBERT F. SAUNDERS B.S. 

17 Gates St., South Boston, Mass. 

BOSTON COLLEGE HIGH 

MAJOR: SOCIOLOGY 

Spanish Academy 1,2; Law and Gov't Academy 3,4; Von 
Pastor History Academy 2, 3. 



CHARLES H. SAVAGE, JR. B.S.B.A. 

45 Hastings St., West Roxbury, Mass. 

BOSTON PUBLIC LATIN SCHOOL 

MAJOR: ACCOUNTING 

Heights 1, 2, 3; Glee Club 3; Fulton 3; Economics Acad- 
emy 2; Sodality 1, 2, 3, 4; Vice-President, Business, 2. 



JOSEPH M. SCANNELL B.S.B.A. 

921 Metropolitan Ave., Hyde Park, Mass. 

HYDE PARK HIGH 

MAJOR: ACCOUNTING 

Sodality 1, 2, 3, 4; French Academy 1, 2; Ski Club 3; 
Business Club 1; Law and Cov't Academy 3; Economics 
Academy 1, 2. 



FREDERICK J. SEELEY B.S. 

145 Blue Hill Ave., Mattapan, Mass. 

HYDE PARK HIGH 

MAJOR: GOVERNMENT 

Flying Club 1, 2, 3, 4; Track 1, 2, 3, 4, Letter 1, 2, 3; 
Law and Gov't Academy 2, 3. 



HUGH E. SHARKEY A.B. 

8 5 Lewis Road, Belmont, M:ss. 

BELMONT HIGH 

MAJOR: HISTORY 

Glee Club 1; Von Pastor History Academy 3, 4; Hockey 
Letter 1, 2, 3. 





.^ ^^ 




JOSEPH M. SHAW B.S.B.A. 

99 Dartmouth St., Everett, Mass. 

BOSTON COLLEGE HIGH 

MAJOR: MARKETING 

French Academy 1, 2; Sodality 1, 2, 3, 4; Economics 
Academy 3, 4. 



JOSEPH A. SHEA B.S. 

1 1 Orchard St., Cambridge, Mass. 

ST. John's high 

MAJOR: EDUCATION 

Sodahty 1, 2, 3, 4; Marquette 1, 2; Ricci Math. Academy 
1, 2; French Academy 1, 2, 3, 4; Law and Gov't Academy 
3, 4. 



JOHN M. SHEA B.S.B.A. 

63 Bellevue Hill Road, West Roxbury, Mass. 

boston college high 

MAJOR: MARKETING 

Sodality 1, 2, 3, 4; Economics Academy 3, 4; French 
Academy 1, 2. 



PAUL E. SHEEHAN 



B.S. 



39 Thurston St., Somerville, Mass. 

SOMERVILLE HIGH 

MAJOR: SOCIOLOGY 

Cross and Crown; Sodality 1, 2, 3, 4; French Academy 1; 
Itahan Academy 1, 2, 3; Law and Gov't Academy 2. 



JOSEPH A. SHERRY B.S. 

8 Burroughs St., Danvers, Mass. 

ST. John's prep 

MAJOR: HISTORY 

French Academy 1, 2; Von Pastor History Academy 2, 3, 
Secretary 3; Sodahty 1, 2, 3, 4; Glee Club 3, 4; Ring Com- 
mittee 4. 



FREDERICK M. SLINEY 



B.S.B.A. 




178 Waverley St., Belmont, Mass. 

BELMONT high 

MAJOR: ACCOUNTING 

Sodality 1, 2, 3; Business Club 2, 3; French Academy 1, 2; 
Economics Academy 3, 4. 





ROBERT P. SNEDDON 



B.S. 



116 Brush Hill Road, Milton, Mass. 

MILTON HIGH 

MAJOR: EDUCATION 

Sodality 1, 2, 3; Marquette 1, 2; Spanish Academy 1, 2; 
Ricci Math. Academy 1. 



ROCCO R. STAFFIER A.B. 

189 Gladstone St., East Boston, Mass. 



ENGLISH HIGH 



MAJOR: PRE-MEDICAL 



Sodality 1, 2, 3, 4; German Academy 1, 2, 3, 4; Italian 
Academy 2, 3, 4; Pre-Medical Seminar 3, 4. 



JAMES F. STANTON A.B. 

114 Shornecliff Road, Newton, Msss. 

BOSTON COLLEGE HIGH 

MAJOR: ECONOMICS 

Sodality 1, 2, 3, 4; Economics Academy 4; Von Pastor 
History Academy 2; Treasurer, Junior Class; President, 
Senior Class. 



JOSEPH R. STANTON A.B. 

114 Shornecliff Road, Newton, Mass. 

BOSTON COLLEGE HIGH 

MAJOR: PRE-MEDICAL 

Alpha Sigma Nu; Cross and Crown; Sodality 1, 2, 3, 4, 
Vice-Prefect 4; Dramatics Society 1; Heights 4; Pre- 
Medical Seminar 3, 4; Harrigan Award 3. 



RICHARD E. STILES A.B. 

125 Tyndale St., Roslindale, Mass. 

BOSTON PUBLIC LATIN SCHOOL 

MAJOR: PRE-MEDICAL 

Cross and Crown; Sodality 1, 2, 3, 4; Marquette 1, 2; 
German Academy 1,2; Pre-Medical Seminar 3, 4. 



LEO W. STRUMSKI B.S. 

12 Crane St., Canton, Mass. 

CANTON HIGH 

MAJOR: EDUCATION 

Sodality 1, 2, 3; Spanish Academy 1, 2, 3; Class Represen- 
tative 4; Football Letter 1, 2, 3, 4. 





ARTHUR F. SULLIVAN B.S. 

51 Reservoir St., Cambridge, Mass. 

NEW PREP., CONN. 

MAJOR: EDUCATION 

Sodality 1, 2, 3; Law and Gov't Academy 3, 4; Hockey 
Numerals. 



BRIAN B. SULLIVAN A.B. 

25 Wm. Jackson Ave., Brighton, Mass. 

BOSTON COLLEGE HIGH 

MAJOR: ACCOUNTING 

Sodality 1, 2, 3, 4; Glee Club 1, 2, 3, 4, Vice-President 4; 
Economics Academy 3, 4. 



CHARLES I. SULLIVAN B.S. 

12 Mystic Ave., Melrose, Mass. 

MALDEN CATHOLIC HIGH 

MAJOR: SOCIOLOGY 

Sodality 1, 2; German Academy 1, 2; Law and Gov't 
Academy 4; Hockey Letter 1, 2, 3, 4; Tennis 3. 



JAMES F. SULLIVAN B.S.B.A. 

342 South Union St., Lawrence, Mass. 

ST. JAMES HIGH 

MAJOR: ACCOUNTING 

Sodality 1, 2, 3; Business Debating 1, 2; Fulton 3; Business 
Club 1; Spanish Academy 1, 2; Economics Academy 3; 
Law and Gov't Academy 3, 4. 



JOHN L. SULLIVAN B.S.B.A. 

17 Royal Ave., Cambridge, Mass. 

ST. John's high 

MAJOR: ACCOUNTING 

Sodality 1, 2, 3, 4; Economics Academy 3; Business Club 
1, 2. 



JOSEPH F. SULLIVAN A.B. 

39 Arbor View Road, Jamaica Plain, Mass. 

BOSTON PUBLIC LATIN SCHOOL 

MAJOR: ECONOMICS 

Cross and Crown; Sodality 1, 2, 3, 4, Prefect 1; Marquette 
1, 2; Classical Academy 1; Law and Gov't Academy 3, 4. 





TIMOTHY F. SULLIVAN B.S.B.A. 

39 Shirley St., Roxbury, Mass. 

BOSTON PUBLIC LATIN SCHOOL 

MAJOR: ACCOUNTING 

Sodality 1, 2, 3, Secretary Business Sodality 2; Business 
Debating 1, 2, Secretary 1; Economics Academy 3; Law 
and Gov't Academy 4. 



EDWARD J. THOMAS A.B. 

22 Upton St., Boston, Mass. 

BOSTON PUBLIC LATIN SCHOOL 

MAJOR: MATHEMATICS 

Sodality 1, 2; German Academy 1; Ricci Math. Academy 
1, 2; Economics Academy 3, 4. 



EDMUND T. TIERNEY B.S. 

37 Pleasant St., Clinton, Mass. 

CLINTON HIGH 

MAJOR: HISTORY 

Sodahty 1, 2, 3; Spanish Academy 1, 2; Law and Gov't 
Academy 2, 3; Von Pastor History Academy 2, 3, 4. 



JOHN V. TONER B.S.B.A. 

300 Church St., Clinton, Mass. 

CLINTON HIGH 

MAJOR: MARKETING 

Sodality 1, 2, 3; Economics Academy 2; Spanish Academy 
2, 3, 4. 



BERNARD M. TOOMEY B.S.B.A. 

5 Ord St., Salem, Mass. 

SALEM HIGH 

MAJOR: MARKETING 

Sodality 1,2, 3; Glee Club 3, 4; Treasurer, Freshman Busi- 
ness Class; President, Sophomore Business Class. 



JAMES P. TRAVERS B.S.B.A. 

66 Mt. Vernon St., West Roxbury, Mass. 

BOSTON COLLEGE HIGH 

MAJOR: MARKETING 

Sodality 2, 3, 4; Economics Academy 2, 3; Spanish Acad- 
emy 2. 





PAUL J. TRIFIRO B.S. 

30 Lothrop Ave., Milton, Mass. 

MILTON HIGH 

MAJOR: EDUCATION 

Marquette 1, 2; Stylus 1; Sodality 1, 2, 3; Ricci Math. 
Academy 1; Italian Academy 1, 2. 



ROBERT F. TROY A.B. 

5 63 Liberty St., Rockland, Mass. 

ROCKLAND HIGH 

MAJOR: SOCIOLOGY 

Sodality 2, 3, 4; Classical Academy 2; Ricci Math. Acad- 
emy 2. 




JOSEPH P. VENETO A.B. 

179 Blue Hill Ave., Roxbury, Mass. 

ROXBURY MEMORIAL HIGH 

MAJOR: SOCIOLOGY 

Law and Gov't Academy 3, 4; Economics Academy 3; 
Sodality 1, 2, 3, 4. 



MODESTINO J. VITALE A.B. (Honors) 

156 Everett St., East Boston, Mass. 

BOSTON PUBLIC LATIN SCHOOL 

MAJOR: ENGLISH 

Cross and Crown; Sodality 1, 2, 3, 4; Marquette 1, 2; Ful- 
ton 3, 4; Class Representative 1, 2; Dramatics Society 1; 
Sub Turri Staff. 



WILLIAM J. WALLACE B.S. 

16 Waverly Ave., Everett, Mass. 

EVERETT HIGH 

MAJOR: ECONOMICS 

Cross and Crown; Sodality 2, 3, 4; Economics Academy 
1, 2, 3, 4; Spanish Academy 1, 2; Law and Gov't Academy 
3, 4. 



DAVID I. WALSH A.B. 

72 Schiller Road, Dedham, Mass. 

DEDHAM HIGH 

MAJOR: ECONOMICS 

Sodality 1, 2, 3; Economics Academy 3, 4; Law and Gov't 
Academy 3, 4. 







#S*k 



LEO J. WALSH A.B. 

167 Middlesex Ave., Medford, Mass. 

BOSTON COLLEGE HIGH 

MAJOR: PRE-MEDICAL 

Dramatics Society 1; Sodality 1, 2, 3, 4; German Academy 
1, 2; Chemists' Club 2; Pre-Medical Seminar 4. 



EDMUND A. WEISS A.B. 

109 Bellevue St., West Roxbury, Mass. 

MISSION HIGH 

MAJOR: GERMAN 

Cross and Crown; Sodality 1, 2, 3, 4; Fulton 4; Heights 1, 
2, 3, 4, News Editor 3, Editor-in-chief 4; German Acad- 
emy 1, 2, 3, 4; Radio Club 3, 4, Vice-President 4; Chem- 
ists' Club 2; Sub Turri, Associate Editor. 




THEODORE P. WILLIAMS B.S. 

331/4 Friend St., Gloucester, Mass. 

GLOUCESTER HIGH 

MAJOR: HISTORY 

Sodality 4; Spanish Academy 2, 3; Law and Gov't Acad- 
emy 3; Von Pastor History Academy 4; Football Letter 
2, 3, 4. 



HENRY B. WORONICZ B.S. 

9 Perkins St., Bridgewater, Mass. 

BROCKTON HIGH 

MAJOR: EDUCATION 

Sodality 1, 2, 3, 4; Law and Gov't Academy 3, 4; Football 
Letter 1, 2, 3, 4. 



EDWARD J. ZABILSKI B.S. 

86 Julian St., Providence, R. L 

CENTRAL HIGH, PROVIDENCE 

MAJOR: EDUCATION 

Spanish Academy 1, 2, 3, 4; Sodality 1, 2, 3, 4; Football 
Letter 1, 2, 3, 4; Sub Turri Staff. 



SAUL ZUSMAN A.B. (Honors) 

419 Seaver St., Dorchester, Mass. 

BOSTON PUBLIC LATIN SCHOOL 

MAJOR: ECONOMICS 

Heights 1; Economics Academy 3; French Academy 1, 3; 
Classical Academy 2; Law and Gov't Academy 3, 4; Class 
Representative 2. 




FORMER FORTY-TWO'S 



Paul F. Alphen 
James F. Bacigalupo 
Vincent P. Bane 
Salvatore J. Bellissimo 
Robert L. Bianchi 
Donald E. Bonnette 
John Bryson 
Warren A. Bradley 
James A. Burke 
Edgar G. Carney 
Alphonse W. Carpenito 
Maurice E. Carroll 
Edward F. Casey 
John W. Casey 
Peter A. Caulfield 
John J. Charves 
Louis R. Chauvenet 
Antonio A. Cintolo 
John P. Clark 
Thomas F. Coen 
Francis H. Cogger 
Daniel P. Collins 
Frederick R. Condon 



James I. Connors 
Joseph F. Connolly 
Thomas S. Conroy 
James F. Considine 
William J. Cooney, Jr. 
Joseph F. Costello 
Richard D. Costello 
Frederick T. Crowley 
Charles A. CuUen 
Austin E. DeGuglielmo 
William C. DeKonimy 
Francis X. DeMartino 
John F. Dempsey 
Edward G. Dillon 
Joseph V. Doherty 
George L. Donaher 
Arthur W. Dowd 
William H. Dowd 
Joseph J. Downey 
Edward V. Drinan 
Leo B. Driscoll 
James T. Duane 
Daniel W. Dunn 



Delphis O. Duquette 
William J. Dynan 
Francis X. Fallon 
Gerald J. Farmer 
Alfred V. Fidrocki 
Rocco Fini 
Edward L. Finnegan 
William F. Fitzgerald 
William A. Fitzhenry 
William C. Flynn 
Joseph T. Foley 
Harold R. Fugere 
Enrico L. Gangi 
Andrew Garrity, Jr. 
Bernard R. Garrity 
Paul A. Good 
William Goulding 
Robert E. Graves 
Thomas W. Gray 
Leonard R. Gricci 
Ambrose J. Griffiths 
John E. Hartigan 
Henry L. Hastry 
Thomas J. Heath 
John V. Mahoney, Jr. 



William F. Higgins 
Richard P. Hines 
Bernard C. Hogan 
John R. Horan 
William J. Home 
Thomas C. Hudgins 
Robert V. Hughes 
Joseph C. Hurley 
John Joyce 
John R. Keefe 
James A. Keeley 
James P. Kelleher 
James F. Kelley 
John P. Kelly 

John T. Kelly 

Thomas R. Kennedy 

John F. Kirby 

Raymond A. Laramee 

Nicholas A. Lauretano 

John F. Lawlor 

Edward G. Lee 

George J. Look 

John K. Madden 

James F. Mahoney 

David W. Manning 



Francis G. Marotta 
Henry J. Mazur 
Gerald F. McAvoy 
Charles D. McCarthy 
James F. McCarthy 
John J. McCarthy 
Charles D. McDonough 
John J. McGloin 
Richard J. McNeil 
Joseph J. McNulty 
Thomas M. Meehan 
Robert H. Moore 
Neil F. Moynihan 
Leo E. Mullin, Jr. 
Kenneth B. Murphy 
William J. Murphy, Jr. 
John R. Murray 
Philip E. Murray 
Paul V. Navien 
Joseph H. Nestor 
James R. Nickerson 
James P. Noonan 



John D. Noonan 
Gordon J. O'Brien 
Edward J. O'Connor 
Gerard E. O'Leary 
Charles C. O'Neill 
Lawrence J. O'Neill 
George R. O'Sullivan 
John F. Pettie, Jr. 
Thomas T. Quinlan 
Richard R. Ramsey 
John C. Reardon 
Henry J. Riendeau 
Frank T. Riley, Jr. 
Vincent J. Robinson 
John J. Roman 
Marcello R. Sanesi 
Hector J. Scicchitano 
John R. Shaughnessy 
Francis L Sullivan 
Frederick M. Vallett 
Daniel C. Yuill 



FORTY-TWO'S SERVING COUNTRY 



Confusion ramps supreme Freshmen 

gleefully studying math Seniors rushing 

to change courses Faculty rushing to 

calm students Junior philosophy tele- 
scoped to three times a week Navigation, 

a major subject Commanders lecturing. 

.... Quiz Masters teaching math Fresh- 
men finishing in three years .... no mid-years 
.... no Senior theses 

This is Boston College, the Boston College 
of early December. The treasured and proven 
"Ratio Studiorum" was upset by the unex- 
pected eruption of war, the swift transition 
from calmness to confused uncertainty. The 
immediate tools of the system, the Classics, 
were brushed aside by the materialistic giant, 
the Sciences. The student mind, developed 
and trained according to the principles of 
Aquinas, was not able to cope with the mate- 
rialistic demands of an industrialized nation at 
war. Unpreparedness in the sciences caused 
confusion and uncertainty for those students 
of military age. 

However, the matured minds of our educa- 
tors, developed for clear and logical thought at 
all times, were quick to react to the critical 
situation that was upon them. Readjustment 
of Curriculum was demanded by the sudden 
turn of events and within a very short time a 
new Curriculum was incorporated with the 
old. Confusion disappeared with new studies 
and uncertainty was solved by the new schools 



of Officer Training. The large number of stu- 
dents entering Officers Training, either Naval, 
Air Corps or Army, necessitated a great 
many scientific courses of which Navigation 
and Nautical Astronomy, Radio Communi- 
cations, Morse Code, Civilian Aeronautics, 
Naval Indoctrination and Spherical Trigo- 
nometry were the most prominent offered. 

Under the tutoring and teaching of Father 
O'Donnell, S.J., Dean of the Graduate School, 
a large number of students were guided over 
the obstacles of Navigation and Nautical As- 
tronomy. They were soon to discover that 
Navigation was a little more than conducting 
a ship from port to port; that a rumb line is 
not a liquor line; a knot means speed per hour; 
the front of the ship is called the bow and the 
back, the stern; that left and right are port and 
starboard; latitude and longitude mean a posi- 
tion of a body on the earth's surface; they were 
confused by three North Poles, True, Mag- 
netic Bearing and Standard Compass Bearing. 
The stars and the moon were aids to navigation 
and not to love, they soon discovered. 

In order that the students might gain a 
practical knowledge of real navy life, naval 
officers from the First Naval District lectured 
to them each week. "Ship's Organization and 
Naval Organization" was the first lecture 
given. Commander Jordan, U.S.N.R., proved 
to them that a ship is only as good as its per- 
sonnel. Absolute coordination and efficiency 



is the essential factor in the correct operating 
of a Man-of-War. "Fire Drill, Collision Drill, 
Abandon Ship Drill are the three funda- 
mental calls that every man on shipboard must 
recognize instantly", so said Lieutenant Com- 
mander Fuller, U.S.N., during his lecture. 
"Navy Regulations", "Naval Courts and 
Boards", "Naval Traditions and Customs", 
were other lectures given. 

Another phase of the new curriculum was 
the Civilian Aeronautics Authority established 
by Rev. John A. Tobin, S.J. in 1939 and fur- 
ther developed and expanded by the urgent 
call for aviators. This was the most practical 
course given due mainly to the actual flying 
involved. A brief study of the system of Me- 



teorology and the mechanics of aviation com- 
pleted the course of instructions. 

Although much that is happening is delight- 
fully novel, nevertheless, the present concern 
of the war and the uncertainty which the 
future holds for all of us are matters of no lit- 
tle importance. It is, therefore, our wish to 
thank the entire Faculty of Boston College for 
their untiring efforts and most generous assist- 
ance in aiding us in these troubled times. And 
so, as we leave you, we follow in the footsteps 
of our fellow classmen who have already an- 
swered their country's call, with the same 
resignation of will, never to falter from the 
ideals which we cherish so dearly. 




FROM THE HALLS OF MONTEZUMA 

Dear Gerry: Do you remember .... the tall tales of Quan- 
tico .... how positive you were that you'd stay till graduation 
.... conferences with the Dean in the middle of Junior .... the 
feeling of being a boarder after two years of commuting .... 
Doc Pick's when you drank Cider .... the corridor where you 
held forth daily .... Mr. Murray's History of Lit. Class .... 
your shadow, Dave Cavan .... telling McMorrow why the 
marines were better .... three days notice .... of being the 
first of the marines to go ... . the jiu-jitsu you practiced on us 
in the caf .... the sharpie coats .... (where are they now .... 
in moth balls in Haverhill or under three balls in Philly) .... 
campaigning for Joe Kelly???? Do you remember, Gerry? 
We do. 

Dear Charlie: Do you remember .... when you wondered 
why you weren't called with Gerry .... then the sudden notice 
.... defending Honors .... Bob Kopp .... the races with Bill 
Cadigan around the track .... and Jack Ryder ( .... he was 
asking for you today . . . .) .... and the Ken at the end of the 
Junior year .... the Bowl trip to New Orleans .... the Dean's 
List .... the Cross and Crown .... and Eleanor .... and Father 
Mac and Father Dick Shea .... (and Father Bonn wants to 
know if you have taken off any of that protective layer of soft 
muscle) .... Do you remember, Charlie? We do. 

Dear Red: Do you remember the Totem Pole .... and the 
girls you brought .... and Chez Vous .... and a roller skating 
party held there .... the burdensome duties of being Secretary 
.... Frank McCue and Dick Bartholomew .... the telegram 
that you and Charlie sent to Washington before your orders 
came .... the second table from the clock in the caf .... Doc 
Bowen's class and the debates afterward and the reports. Red, 
the reports .... and the clock in the Library that was always 
missing one hand .... Do you remember, Red? We do. 




2ND LIEUT. 
122 Lakeview 



GERARD T. 
Avenue, Havi 



ARMITAGE 
rhill, Mass. 





2ND LIEUT. CHARLES P. MACKIN 
23 Bentham Road, Dorchester, Mass. 




2ND LIEUT. JAMES L. 
26 Lakewood Street, Ar 




STAFF SGT. BERNARD E. O'DONNELL 
998 Beacon Street, Newtmi, Mass. 




ENSIGN WILLIAM J. CONNELLY 
39 Codman Street, Dorchester, Mass. 




To Edward A. McDonald 

Dear Ed: Do you remember Bee Cee's best waterboy .... 
Father Vaughn's rehgion class .... the sensation of being the 
only Irishman in religion class .... the sidelines at Fenway .... 
the never-ending jokes .... Steve and Al??? Do you remem- 
ber, Ed? We do. 

Dear Barnie: Do you remember Ted Marier .... and the 
Band (you should see it now) .... when you were the biggest 
and toughest man in class .... the Newton Socialites .... and 
Fred Condon, the Martins, and Paul Foley .... the feeling 
that we got when you blew that horn at us? Do you remember, 
Barnie? We do. 



ANCHORS AWEIGH 

We remember September and October of Forty .... stories 
of a month's cruise .... talking gaily of commissions .... jokes 
.... laughter .... navigation courses and then the summer 
months of Forty-One. 

Reports drifting north-east from Philly, the Prairie State and 
Newport .... quick week-end trips .... visiting the boys in 

New York from 3:45 to 5:00 P.M saluted by the officers 

. . . aye, aye, sir! ... . the George Washington bridge in the 
background .... cool nights along the river .... jaunts to 
Jersey and the beaches .... 

We remember one day in August when a bulletin arrived 
from CINCUS informing the boys that their services were 
needed .... a bit of a sudden blow .... senior year gone .... 
and school out .... and then the boys were buying uniforms 
.... out of pay that was yet to come. . . . 

Dick McMorrow skipping gaily from booth to booth. . . . 
"All I want is a sword and some epaulettes". . . . "Not a sword, 
Dick". . . . "Sure, what do you think I joined the Navy for?" 



ENSIGN JOHN F. KELLEY 
19 Leedsville Street, Dorchester, Mass. 



.... and Ned Martin looked dubiously at Navy jackets .... 
they wouldn't be as loose fitting as those old familiar ones at 
the Heights .... Bill Connelly and John Kelley looking blue, 
thinking of Doc Guerin, of a position on the Heights, of 
the Crystal, of the Chem Society, of the smelly Chem labs, and 
especially of the Alpha Sigma Nu .... and somewhere Tom 
Kelty wondering just how that uniform would look. 

Back to school in September .... absent faces .... the Clique 
went into mourning .... Dick and his questions were missed 
in Philosophy class .... Ted Mulvehill thought of a late- 3 2 
Chewy and a trick knee, both the proud possessions of one 
Ned Martin .... oh yes. Doc Boulanger lost his hair when 
he thought of the German Academy .... bad enough to lose 
Tracey and Buckley after Sophomore but now it looked as if 
the government was deliberately sabotaging the club. . . . Bob 
Molloy missed Jack Keefe when he wanted to verify his reports 
on a certain Bowl trip. 

The boys were in the Navy now .... most of them on 
destroyer detail .... six forty-two's .... McMorrow .... 
Kelty .... Martin .... and then we felt sorry for the Navy. 
.... They came back once in a while .... football games in 
snazzy uniforms .... dean's office without appointments .... 
pictures in the papers .... hm, they had something there 
.... we saw them or heard from them .... Tom Kelty flew 
up from New Orleans for most of the games .... just what 
is an ensign's pay, anyway? .... and Jack Keefe became quite 
well known in the officers' clubs of Gotham and Frisco. 

Then we remembei-ed Jack larrabino .... speeding through 
Newton .... paying his fines in pennies .... and large fines 
too — nothing small about Jack .... around the course in par 
.... and now Naval Wings .... no cops up there. Jack! ! ! 

Naval Wings! Four forty-two's .... Jack, Fred Tracey, 
Walter Colbert, and Roland Buckley .... Colbert .... the 
boys from Newbury Street and now of Liggetts miss him .... 
Colbert of Manomet .... week-ends that are still the topic 
of conversation .... and the awesome trilogy of Buck, Car- 
michael and Drummey thought back to sophomore and junior 
.... problem child .... papers .... oh yes .... Colbert. 




ENSIGN THOMAS W. KELTY 
54 Arborway, Jamaica Plain, Mass. 




ENSIGN EDWARD T. MARTIN 
17 Dale Street, NewtonviUe, Mass- 




ENSIGN RICHARD 
3 6 Rosecliff St. 



McMORROW 
ndale, Mass. 




WALTER F. COLBERT NAVAL AIR 

CADET 

86 Ossipee Road, Somerville, Mass. 




ENSIGN JOHN F. lARRABINO 
148 Suffolk Road, Chestnut Hill, Mas 




Roland Buckley .... Dick Keating wandered about like a 
lost soul .... and the pre-meds missed the small talk about 
someone who had lived in Salem .... presidential candidate 
.... Sophomore Banquet Committee. . . . 

Fred Tracey .... first of the forty-two's to help out Col. 
Knox .... do you remember a hot and then sometimes sweet 
clarinet .... do you remember a band that was popular in 
some quarters? .... you know somewhere around the Fenway 
.... two years at Quantico with Armitage and Mackin and 
"the shores of Tripoli" .... gang went in for dramatics, too, 
now that we think of it ... . the first of those boys to get his 
wings. . . . 

Ed Sheehan .... in the navy now .... the thin man .... 
one of the Newton Socialite crowd .... the boys with the crew 

cuts et al the two Martins, Barney O'Donnell, Paul Foley, 

Fred Condon, and Ed Sheehan .... the services cut a pretty 
wide swath into that group .... Ed Sheehan .... ex-Hoya 
.... and now ex-Eagle. 

The Business School again .... talking of their men .... 
John McCarthy .... tall and taciturn .... possessor of the 
rhythmic "sacroiliac of the back" .... Ned Browne breathed 
with relief when he left .... now Ned had undisputed pos- 
session of the driest wit in the class .... Ferguson and Keefe 
still remain uncompleted substances and the Ledger lost a good 
man. . . . 

Say, whoever said it was the U. S. Navy? 

IT'S THE B. C. NAVY! ! ! ! ! ! 



EDWARD B. SHEEHAN, JR. 
12 Locksley Road, Newton Centre, Mass. 



OVER THERE 

Summer of '40 .... good year for the Air Corps .... a bad 

year for B. C The first to make a break .... Larry 

Keohane and Pat Rafferty .... Larry was a "ham" . . . . Fr. 
Tobin's pride and joy .... one of the first to join the C.A.A. 
and first of the Flying Club to get Uncle Samee's wings .... 
Boston .... Shreveport .... next stop Tokyo .... the South- 
erners took to the B. C. boys .... Pat got his wings and bars 
at Maxwell Field 

Junior year .... Der fliegende hollander .... Bill Duf ault 
never liked Wagner .... so he made it the "Flying Frenchman" 
.... do you remember Bill? .... piano at the Sophomore ban- 
quet .... and when Fr. Burke was out .... Sophomore banquet 
.... hm .... was it the food or was it Bill? .... "Deep in the 
Fieart of Texas" last year .... this year it's high in the hills of 

New Hampshire WINGS WINGS wings 

flying over camps and DRAFTEES 

We remember stories of Quantico .... the biggest, toughest, 
and best marksman in the "Leathernecks" .... Neil Cohan 
.... happenings in Buffalo .... nites in Philly .... Jerry, 
Charlie, and Red went off to be "Shavetails" and Neil went off 
to be a "buck" .... a sarge in three weeks .... now it looks 
like Officers' Training School 



Joe McCarron .... Peggy and Matrimony .... Regis and 
rats .... trappings and temperament .... (Peggy's of course) 
.... Ford in ruts .... ordinance .... a card from Joe .... 
now in Alaska .... with Maher, Dunn, and Butler consoling 
Peggy in Newton .... but it's still Joe 



Football .... Javeline .... Track .... a record holder no '^^- 
less .... first to go ... . bang-up farewell .... with Father 
Terry and Al and Denny and the entire student body .... do 
you remember the lumps in your throat .... McGowan, Justin 
McGowan, the first to go 




2ND LIEUT. LAWRENCE T. KEOHANE 
226 Boston Street, Dorchester, Mass. 




2ND LIEUT. PATRICK H. RAFFERTY 
5> Upland Road, Brookline, Mass. 




SGT. CORNELIUS D. COHAN 
74 Grampian Way, Dorchester, Mai 




ROBERT A. HARRIS 
117 Common Street, Watertowr 




JOSEPH C. McCARRON 
19 Pearl Street, Newton, Mas 




Then there were Lieutenants Johnny Ballantine and Brian 

B. SuUivan .... C.M.T.C in class one day and out the 

next .... snappy uniforms on the campus .... K. of C. Track 
Meet .... Glee Club .... and then the South 

Vinny Smyth .... and definitely not Smith .... ask Joe 
Stanton 



Tex Charlton .... another of the Clique .... what hap- 
pened .... remember the Sophomore banquet with Mr. Murray 
.... and Friday History of Literature classes 



There was a man .... tall .... smooth .... personality 
.... football .... Vice President of the Junior Class .... 
definitely solid .... Paul Regan of course 



Ever hear of Border Patrol? . 
.... not the Sox but the Army 
in Border Patrol? ??.... OH 
ball too 



not Rio .... but Maine 

poor Fran Doherty .... 

. Frank Davis .... base- 



Davis to Harris .... Bucky's in General Hershey's army 
. . you know, not the candy man .... campus to Pine Camp 
. . . 3 5 th Armored Division 



Davis to Harris to Hegarty .... around the diamond .... 

Joe .... Secretary of the Sophomore Class .... C.A.A 

another one of Fr. Tobin's birds .... pilot? ??.... NO 
.... NO .... instructor .... but definitely .... Hegarty 's 
at LaGuardia Field .... Seeley is at East Boston .... Mutt 
with Jeff ... . "HELLO HYMAN" .... remember Charlie 
Price and "Snowshoes" .... 



Wilfred Henry Smith .... not Smyth .... four hours of 
homework per .... bashful? .... well .... maybe .... from 
Newbury Street to Fort Hulen via the Heights .... another 
Refugee from Newbury Street 

The Business School .... and Maher .... and Thaddeus J. 
Lyons .... what a combination .... top-kick .... "somewhere 
on the globe" .... 



ILVilX I. 
79 Fair Street, Lac( 



A)\\AN 
New Hampshii 



"Chuck" Holder .... bottom man on the TOTEM POLE 
.... man of many women .... but variety is the spice of hfe, 
so I've heard it said .... an alumnus of the "Supreme" .... 
"a brilliant student" .... ask Dr. Boulanger .... P.S. Chuck, 
they've reduced it to three years now 

Football .... Spanish Academy .... clever wit .... well, 
at least he had a million jokes .... some were good .... and 
some were just — .... who was he? ? ? . . . why, Adolph A. 
Pasiuk, of course 

Edward L. Madden .... an orator of great ability and 
promise .... a winner of a national oratorical contest .... 
remember, Ed? "Drink to me only with thine eyes". . . . 

Gerard Donovan and Carmen G. Muto .... they were once 
students here but the Draft Boards called and away they went 
.... get your guns, boys 

M.I.T Meteorology .... Physics .... Mathematics 

.... Thermo-dynamics .... Hubert Kelley .... Fred Mattioli 
.... Art Frithsen . . . the only ones fortunate enough to be 
appointed .... $127.50 per .... and then a commission in 
the Air Corps. . . . 



Charlie Sullivan .... Hockey .... fighting Irish .... more 
penalties than anyone else .... now fighting for Uncle Sam 
.... anything goes against the Japs .... also ace tennis player 
.... and budding sociologist .... but no slums in the Philip- 
pines like those in New Orleans. . . . 




JOHN PAUL RKGAX 

24 Woodbury Street, Portsmouth, Ne 

Hampshire 




J. VINCENT SMYTH 
i 1 Summit Avenue, WolUston, Mass. 



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t.llAIiLI^ iL'LLIX'AN 
12 Myrtle Avenue, Melrose, Ma 





LIEUTENANT JOHN BALLANTINE 



PRIVATE VINCENT SMYTH 



A GROUPING OF THE FORTY-TWO'S 

IN THEIR RESPECTIVE BRANCHES 

OF THE SERVICE: 

MARINES: Edward A. McDonald, Staff 
Sergeant Bernard E. O'Donnell, Lieutenant 
Gerard T. Armitage, Lieutenant James L. 
Malone, Lieutenant Charles P. Mackin. 

ARMY AIR CORPS: Lieutenant William 
F. Dufault, Lieutenant Lawrence T. Keohane, 
Lieutenant Patrick H. Rafferty, Joseph R. 
Hegarty. 

ARMY: Lieutenant John Ballantine, Ser- 
geant Cornelius D. Cohan, WiUiam L. Charl- 
ton, Gerard Donovan, Robert A. Harris, Wal- 
ter Holder, Edward Kenney, Sergeant Thad- 
deus J. Lyons, Jr., Edward L. Madden, Joseph 
C. McCarron, Justin A. McGowan, Carmen 



G. Muto, Adolph Pasiuk, John P. Regan, Wil- 
fred H. Smith, J. Vincent Smyth, Lieutenant 
Brian B. Sullivan, Charles I. Sullivan. 

BORDER PATROL: Frank C. Davis. 

METEOROLOGY: Arthur R. Frithsen, 
Hubert G. Kelley, Frediano Mattioli. 

NAVAL AIR CORPS: Roland M. Buckley, 
Walter C. Colbert, Ensign John F. larrabino, 
Ensign Frederick W. Tracey. 

NAVY: Ensign William J. Connelly, En- 
sign John E. Keefe, Ensign John F. Kelley, 
Ensign Thomas W. Kelty, Ensign Edward T. 
Martin, John F. W. McCarthy, Ensign Rich- 
ard H. McMorrow, Edward Sheehan. 



SERVICE LIST 



The following are the men of forty-two 
who have passed examinations for the various 
services. They have been sworn into office and 
will assume their duties by the end of June : 

Naval Air Corps (V-5): Charles Robi- 
chaud, Ambrose J. Claus, John J. Connery, 
John Mahoney, Joseph F. Sullivan, William 
Gaine, Joseph G. Dever, Edmund W. Mulve- 
hill, Francis Maznicki, William Freni, Thomas 
J. Dawson, Walter T. Fitzgerald, Robert Mc- 
Laughlin, Robert Muse, Howard Murray. 

Naval Reserve (V-7) : James J. Barnicle, 
Paul J. Carlin, Philip J. Gill, John J. Hart, 
Arthur W. LaCouture, Joseph Pazniokas, 
Charles E. Price, Henry B. Woronicz, Richard 
O'Halloran, Lawrence Brennan, Robert Mee, 
Edward Zabilski, Anthony Sannicandro, Rich- 



ard Keating, William P. Doonan, Martin 
Hansberry, Thomas Duffy, James O'Neill, 
Francis McCue, James E. Hawco. 

Artny Air Corps: James Boudreau, Ralph 
Powers, John A. McMahon. 

Army: Francis X. Murphy, Charles F. Sul- 
livan, Paul G. O'Hara, Francis X. Gannon. 

Marine Reserve: Robert W. Attridge, Fran- 
cis Ready, Edwin J. Keyes, Edward S. Mc- 
Donald, Robert Troy, Robert Noonan, Ste- 
phen Levanitis, Edward R. McCarthy, Ed- 
mund R. Corbett, Leo J. Walsh, Michael J. 
Dee, Joseph A. Sherry, Francis Driscoll, John 
W. Russell. 

Civilian Flight Instructor: Thomas J. Flan- 
agan. 




FORTY-TWO'S SERVING GOD 



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SEMINARIANS AT ST. JOHN'S: 
Seated: Joseph C. Hurley, John F. Pettie, Thomas C. Hudgins, Joseph J. Downey, 

Antonio A. Cintolo, John F. Lawler. 
Standing: Richard J. McNeil, John P. Kelly, Frederick R. Condon, William C. Flynn, 

James F. Mahoney, Delphis O. Duquette. 



To every man is apportioned a share of 
human talents to be used for the betterment 
of himself, society, and God. Carpenter and 
lawyer, doctor and farmer, all dedicate their 
lives to the institution of a Christian temporal 
order. 

"Thy kingdom come, thy will be done on 
earth as it is in heaven." 

From this heavenly precept, directly spoken 
by the Son of God, flows the moral union and 
spiritual integration that is the core of Chris- 
tiandom, and to the establishment of this social 
order each Catholic man is bent in proportion 
to his inclinations and ability. All men must 
work out concretion of their destiny in this 
life by their own efforts, but for the continu- 



ance of His Church, God has granted special 
divine vocations to priests and teachers, lead- 
ers and missionaries. 

So with respect and gratitude to this heav- 
enly ordination we mention our former class- 
mates who are serving us in the priesthood. 
Tall, handsome, beaming, Dick McNeil cheer- 
fully weathered two years of Rhetoric and 
ptomaine, and then took his Irish ingrained 
personality to St. John's Seminary. Quiet, 
reverential, devoted John Lawlor steeped him- 
self in Latin and Greek for two years, captured 
the position of Prefect of Sodality, and joined 
his best friend Dick. Tony Cintolo, quiet, 
talented Glee Clubber, entered as a chanter par 
excellence. Patient, hard-working Jim Maho- 



ney liked Latin Composition in Freshman, 
enjoyed liturgical studies in Sophomore, and 
stepped enthusiastically into the Seminary. 
Fred Condon was our personal donation; his 
charm and grace as well as his astuteness are 
voices that shout success in his service of God. 
Jack Pettie, sturdy, solid, was a granitic factor 
in the Sodality during Freshman and Sopho- 
more, and then transferred his apostolic zeal 
to the professional priesthood. Newburyporter 
Joe Downey, as deep as a mine shaft, packed 
his devotion, and entered the Seminary with a 
surety of his faith. Backgrounded with gen- 
erations of Irish Boston, Joe Hurley did not 
idle away Dorchester's tradition as the incu- 
bator of Catholic priests to the world; his 
energetic years here were only a prelude to his 
intense career as priest and man. From Canton 
our pastoral Bill Flynn proved that contem- 
plation is only a prerequisite to activity, for 
his vitality now at the Seminary can be meas- 
ured in proportion to the thoughts stimulated 
by two years at Boston College. 

But St. John's Seminary was destined not 
to have a monopoly on all the vocations of 
our classmates. Jim McCarthy, a quizzical, 
homespun Gaelic, did not return to Junior, 
but commenced his studies at St. Mary's Sem- 
inary, Baltimore, Maryland. Dick Costello, 
suave, and gentlemanly, grew up soon and 
joined the Jesuit Order at Shadowbrook; even 
during Sophomore he was already prominent 
in public speaking and apostolic work. To the 
Oblates went Jim Nickerson, outstanding in 
Cambridge and Glee Club circles, ever inter- 
esting, ever exciting, ever Catholic. And with 
the Maryknoll Fathers in their worldwide mis- 
sionary endeavor traveled lively, Chelsean 
Bernie Garrity, the last to withdraw in this 
welcome spiritual destination of the Class of 
Forty-two. 

This was the surprise when we returned to 



school in the September of Junior, and our 
regrets at their absence were equalled ordy by 
our awe and admiration at these manifestations 
of the strange workings of God amongst men. 
But with the close of Junior more prominent 
men of Forty-two found a call to their voca- 
tion irresistible and impelling. Calm, benevo- 
lent Ken Murphy entered St. John's Seminary 
to begin his studies. With him went his coun- 
terpoint, Jim Considine, tall, aquiline, olive 
complexion, versatile. At the same time Tom 
Hudgins followed suit, adding the strength of 
his Medford Irish vigor. And then our own 
Del Duquette, — talented blond artist and 
actor, honorary President of the Dramatic 
Society, and especially famed for his portrayal 
of the title rcle in Richard II. 

This is our roll call to God — philosophers, 
sodalists, socialites, students, dramatists, sing- 
ers, men. This is Forty-two thanking Him for 
finding His sons worthy — and thanking our 
former classmates for making themselves 
Christlike. 




J. RUSSELL NICKERSON 



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To give to you an account of the Business 
School — an account that is honest, correct and 
complete — I must take you back a little way. 
Back, not to the Spring of nineteen hundred 
and thirty-eight, but to the Spring of sixteen 
hundred and twenty. Back, not to the begin- 
ning of a College of Business Administration, 
but to the beginning of it all. . . . 

As the germ of civilization, once released, 
spread out over the length and breadth of this 
continent; as man moved inland from the 
Atlantic seaboard; as territories were con- 
quered and colonized and hardships overcome; 
as wildernesses were beaten back; as resources 
were exploited and power harnessed; as Amer- 
ica grew: something grew with it. It was a 
thing, inexplicable at first, and then accepted 
— accepted for no reason other than its exist- 
ence. It was a necessary condition, consequent 
upon the rapid, breath-taking, phenomenal 
rise of a nation. And the emergence of that 
nation, a short century after its conception, 
as one of the great powers of the earth. It was 
the thing we call "big business." To explain 



this phenomenon or to attempt a definition 
of it is, for me, an impossibility. Suffice it to 
say, that it was the result of a frenzied, fever- 
ish quest on the part of man to amass to him- 
self a great share of the world's wealth. It was 
man's human nature allowed to run rampant 
in a field which had no precedent in all history. 
Never before had a playground so rich, so fer- 
tile, so full of unrealized potentialities been 
given over to man. Its presence invited devel- 
opment. And develop it, man did. As evi- 
dence of that development we have our tall 
buildings, our paved streets, our railways, and 
highways, and airways, our immense factories, 
our modern improvements. And this develop- 
ment had for its substantial form, big business 
— big business, the guiding principle, the driv- 
ing force behind it all. 

But as big business surged onward and up- 
ward and higher on its wings of gold, a carrion 
rode with it. A carrion that was the personi- 
fication of waste, demoralization, destruction 
and despair — the ills and evils of a system. 

It was to combat the materialistic and un- 



christian trends of big business, to slay the 
carrion which was its accompaniment, that 
Pope Pius XI was prompted in his encychcal 
Oiiadragesimo Anno to urge the institution of 
schools of business wherein Catholic youth 
would be trained not only in the rudiments of 
economics but also in the essentials of ethics 
and morality. Acting upon this mandate of 
the Supreme Pontiff the late Rev. William J. 
McGarry, S.J., former Rector of Boston Col- 
lege, in the Spring of 1938, announced the 
establishment of a College of Business Admin- 
istration to open in the Fall. 

Thus in September of 1938 in an unpreten- 
tious office building in downtown Boston the 
Business School formally began. The first class 
numbered seventy- three; the faculty, five; the 
classrooms, two; and these it shared with the 
Boston College Extension School. It was in- 
deed an humble beginning. 

Today on a hill overlooking the campus of 
Boston College, a stately, luxurious Tudor 
mansion stands. Its broad lawns, its pictur- 
esque shrubs, its towering trees cover ten acres 



of ground. A sign in the upper north-west 
corner identifies it as "The College of Business 
Administration of Boston College." It is a gift 
of Boston College's most eminent alumnus. His 
Eminence, William Cardinal O'Connell, Arch- 
bishop of Boston and dean of the American 
Catholic hierarchy. 

Beside it the two rooms on the sixth floor of 
126 Newbury Street look rather small and a 
bit shabby. But to those who started there, 
they still hold a quiet charm and a simple fas- 
cination. In the four years that have inter- 
vened since the Fall of 1938 much has hap- 
pened. 

When on the thirteenth of May the present 
Senior Class of the College of Business Admin- 
istration is graduated, an epoch in the life of 
Boston College will have been completed; the 
dream of a man, now gone, will have been 
realized; the efforts of another crowned with 
success. The students in the class will have 
not only the distinction of being the first re- 
cipients of a Bachelor of Science in Business 
Administration degree ever granted by Boston 




College but, more than this, theirs will have 
been the honor and the privilege of establish- 
ing the precedents, of breaking the way and of 
writing the history of a School that will in 
time take its place among the finest of its kind. 
These past four years have been years marked 
by activity, interest, progress and achieve- 
ment. During these years much has been ac- 
complished. In the years that lie ahead much 
remains to be accomplished. But the ground- 
work has been built; the foundation laid; the 
diflScult work completed. To the men of the 
future must be given the task of building upon 
this foundation a structure that is firm, a 
structure that is secure, a structure that will 
endure. It is a project that will require per- 
severance, patience and wisdom. That the men 
who are called to this high office will be in 
possession of that wisdom, that patience, that 
perseverance is the hope and the prayer of all 
who are taking their leave. 

The formation of a Business School seemed 
to some, in those early months, a radical de- 
parture from all that the established "Ratio 



Studiorum" of the Society of Jesus holds high. 
It appeared that the code of laws laid down 
some four hundred years before for the guid- 
ance of Jesuit college officials had been aban- 
doned, or at least temporarily overlooked. 
Such was not the case. In her College of Busi- 
ness Administration, Boston College has pre- 
served all that is essential to the Jesuit Plan of 
Studies. She has formulated a program which 
rests firmly upon the traditional Jesuit system 
of education. The curriculum has been devised 
with a view toward developing the whole 
man; toward supplying him not only with the 
highly specialized technical training so essen- 
tial to leaders in modern industry, but also 
giving him a background of culture and a true 
sense of moral values. The courses have been 
so arranged that they will send out into the 
world men who understand fully the "Why", 
the "What" and the "Wherefore" of their 
existence; men who will know their ultimate 
destination and will so order their lives that 
they will eventually arrive at that destination; 
men whose view will extend beyond their 
desks, beyond their balance sheets, beyond 





their typewriters; men who will reflect credit 
upon their parents, their society, and their 
school; men who will "render to Caesar the 
things that are Caesar's and to God the things 
that are God's." 

Modern industry, "big business," roughly is 
divided into three parts: production, distribu- 
tion and management. Under these three 
headings fall all the activities found in the 
modern business world. With this in mind the 
College of Business Administration oflFers to 
the student the opportunity of choosing the 
particular phase of business which best suits 
his talents. The three "majors," Accounting, 
Marketing and Industrial Management, ade- 
quately and completely cover these three fun- 
damental divisions. The faculty of the Busi- 
ness School is ideally trained and expertly 
equipped for the task of presenting to the 
student both the essentials and the accidentals 
of the courses contained in the curriculum. 
The Philosophical, Religious and Cultural 
studies are taught by members of the Society 
of Jesus and the faculty of the College of Lib- 



eral Arts. In this regard the Business School is 
indeed fortunate in that it may draw freely 
upon the rich deposit of professors in its par- 
ent institution. These are men who are admir- 
ably versed in all that constitutes that invalu- 
able thing that we know as Western Culture. 
For its more technical subjects, its faculty is 
peculiarly its own. To head its Accounting 
Department the Business School called upon 
John Drummey, a graduate of Holy Cross 
College who is both a lawyer and a certified 
public accountant. Its professor of Industrial 
Management is Dr. Culliton, a Ph.D. in Com- 
mercial Science from the Graduate School of 
Business Administration at Harvard Univer- 
sity. To fill the position of Chairman of the 
Marketing Department, Boston College jour- 
neyed half way across the country to Drake 
University in Des Moines to find Daniel J. 
Carmichael, who fulfilled all that they re- 
quired in this regard. The president of the 
Edison Electric lUurainating Company at one 
time taught the Juniors majoring in Account- 
ing. To the Rev. Stephen Shea, S.J., was 
assigned the task of instilling in the students 




a knowledge, appreciation and love of Philos- 
ophy. It was a difficult task to be sure, but one 
that he accepted willingly and completed suc- 
cessfully. Fr. Lemuel Vaughan, S.J., fashioned 
the groundwork in English and Religion which 
other Fathers were later to build upon. And 
so on down the roster. Each a well-trained 
and a well-balanced instructor. 

Throughout its formative years the College 
of Business Administration has leaned heavily 
upon a group of Catholic business men who 
have been at once unfailing in their encour- 
agement, unceasing in their support and un- 
abating in their zealous promotion of the Busi- 
ness School. To them the School, the Faculty 
and the Student-body owe a debt that will not 
easily be discharged. They are: 

Henry F. Barry, Manager, Business OflSce, New York 
Telephone Company 

Bartholomew A. Brickley, Lawyer, Brickley, Sears and 
Cole 

James J. Byrnes, President of the New England Division, 
The Great Atlantic and Pacific Tea Company 

James H. Carney, Kaler, Carney, Liffler and Com- 
pany, Insurance 



William B. Carolan, President, Union Savings Bank of 
Boston 

Frederick A. Carroll, Vice-President and Attorney, Na- 
tional Shawmut Bank of Boston 

Michael H. Corcoran, Corcoran, Soule and Company 

Charles M. Corey, Manager, Agency Department, John 
Hancock Life Insurance Company. 

John W. Cronin, Vice-President and General Counsel, 
Liberty Mutual Insurance Company 

John Donnelly, Vice-President, John Donnelly and Sons, 
Outdoor Advertising 

Donald Falvey, Treasurer and Secretary, Massachusetts 
Bonding and Insurance Company 

John J. Hagerty, New England Manager, Reconstruc- 
tion Finance Corporation. 

John W. Kapples, Treasurer, Lincoln Stores, Inc. 

Arthur J. Kelley, Treasurer, R. H. White Company 

John C. Kiley, Real Estate Broker, Director, Norfolk 
County Trust Company 

Half dan Lee, President, Eastern Gas and Fuel Association 

A. Emmet Logue, President and Treasurer, Charles 
Logue Bldg. Company 

Patrick F. McDonald, President, P. F. McDonald and 
Company 



Patrick A. O'Connell, President, E. T. Slattery Company 

Arthur O'Keeffe, President, First National Stores, Inc. 

Charles J. O'Malley, Treasurer, O'Malley Associates, 
President, O'Malley Advertising and Selling Com- 
pany 

William J. O'Sullivan, Treasurer, United Corporation of 
Massachusetts 

J. J. Prindiville, President, LaPoint Machine Tool Com- 
pany, and President, International Engineering 
Company 

Vincent P. Roberts, Member of Firm, V. P. Roberts and 
Company, Wool Dealers 

Thomas F. Scanlan, Member of Firm, V. P. Roberts and 
Company, Wool Dealers 

Joseph H. Sheehan, Examiner, Reconstruction Finance 
Corporation 

George C. Sheilds, President and Treasurer of Sheilds 
Foundry Company 

Edward Watson Supple, Cashier, The Merchants Na- 
tional Bank of Boston 

John Francis Tinsley, Presiden and General Manager, 
Crompton and Knowles Loom Works, President, 
Associated Industries of Massachusetts 



James V. Toner, President, Boston Edison Company 

James A. Walsh, Treasurer, Universal Textile Corpora- 
tion 

Edward F. Williams, Resident Manager, American 
Woolen Company, Inc. 

Charles N. Winship, Treasurer, Winship-Boit Company 

The struggle has indeed been hard, the 
temptation great to convert this history of the 
Business School into a personal tribute to one 
man — for in a sense he is the Business School. 
To borrow the words of a famed poet, he has 
been to the students of his school a "Father, 
Brother, Friend." This struggle has been won, 
this temptation resisted, primarily and princi- 
pally because the author did not feel himself 
qualified to pay adequate tribute to him. In- 
stead he can but refer you to his deeds and to 
his school. And this is praise beyond the power 
of words. Whatever we, his students, are and 
whatever success we may later enjoy will be 
due in great measure to the first dean of the 
College of Business Administration, our dean, 
the Reverend James J. Kelley, S.J. 

J. T. B. 





JUNIOR OFFICERS 

Seated: Francis J. Conroy. 
Standing: James A. O'Donahoe 
Joseph J. Murphy. 





SOPHOMORE OFFICERS 

Seated: John J. Murphy. 
Standing: Paul D. Murphy, James 

A. Kelleher, Harry A. Mc- 

Grath. 



FRESHMAN OFFICERS 

Seated: Edward L. McMahon. 

Standing: Francis J. Duggan, Ar- 
thur M. Quilty, William F. 
Gartland. 




JUNIOR CLASS 



Three, the mystics tell us, is the key to life. 
Sophomores know that from Father Vaughan's 
course on the Trinity. Juniors know it too, 
for as they climb the hill for the third 
year, they are greeted at the top by those awe- 
some trios of philosophers, Fathers Coyne, 
Harding, and Flaherty; Low, Friary, and Shea. 
For three months this year these philosopher- 
kings reigned supreme, teaching unwilling 
subjects the art of living in the right philos- 
ophy. But like all present day dynasties they 
fell before the blitzkrieg of history's most 
hated triumvirate. 

President Ed Walsh led the ever-increasing 
column of Juniors marching to answer their 
country's call to arms. A true Eagle, he flies 
high in the service of the Army Air Corps. 
Beneath him he can see spread the panorama 
of the Junior Class. On the field at Fenway 
Park the men of '43 hold firm the Myers line, 
captained by the junior three of football, Fred 
Naumetz, Mike Holovak, and Don Currivan. 
Only three times did they bow in defeat! Not 



far away in the Arena the flashing skates of 
Nick Flynn and Wally Boudreau carry the 
hockey team to its third consecutive Intercol- 
legiate championship, continuing a series of 
victories begun three years ago. Clearly writ- 
ten on the sands of time are the words of 
Stylus Tom Heath; and on the waters, the 
news flashes of Ernie Santosuosso. The gentle 
south wind wafts the melodious voice of Uncle 
Tom Myers high in the heavens. In the far 
North under the Towers the peace of three 
months is being smashed by a complete reor- 
ganization of courses. 

From the chaos arise a new three, Religion, 
Mathematics and Draft, to rule the life of 
every Junior. But through the darkness of 
disappointment gleams the vision of the Jun- 
ior Prom bringing joy to the hearts of those 
who contemplate it while a forgotten hand 
scribbles half-heard words into a notebook. 
Highlight of all three years, it has an added 
glow for those for whom it is now just a mem- 
ory as they take their place in Boston's fight- 
ing tradition which has endured since 1863. 



JUNIOR DIRECTORY 



JOHN C. ACTON 

19 Mansfield St., Framingham, Mass. 

TAYLOR AHEARN 

460 Gallivan Blvd., Dorchester, Mass. 

HECTOR J. ALEXANDER 

11 Allen St., Boston, Mass. 

LOUIS F. ALFANO 

43 54 Washington St., Roslindale, Mass. 

PAUL F. ALPHEN 

6 Halifax St., Jamaica Plain, Mass. 

WILLIAM J. AMSLEY 

2 8 Harkainway Rd., North Andover, Mass. 

THOMAS G. ANTICO 

146 Sylvan St., Maiden, Mass. 

JOSEPH F. ARONE 

110 Templeton Parkway, Watertown, Mass. 

DAVID C. BAATZ 

109 Saint Rose St., Jamaica Plain, Mass, 

WALTER J. BARONOUSKI 

53 Silver St., South Boston, Mass. 

JOHN L. BATTLES 

27 Warner St., Somerville, Mass. 



THOMAS P. BEATY 

2 Webb Park, South Boston, Mass. 
EDMUND J. BEGLEY 

209 Kittredge St., Roslindale, Mass. 

SALVATORE J. BELLISSIMO 

41 Slade St., Belmont, Mass. 

ANGELO M. BERGAMASCO 

82 Lcyden St., East Boston, Mass. 

GEORGE W. BLAND, JR. 

Blatseslee St., Cambridge, Mass. 

ROBERT D. BLUTE 

830 South St., Roslindale, Mass. 

DONALD E. BONNETTE 

7 Conisto Rd., Roslmdale, Mass. 

WARREN A. BRADLEY 

40 Washington St., Peabody, Mass. 

FRANCIS J. BRADY 

33^ Adrian St., Somerville, Mas 

GEORGE BRAY 

49 Brook St., Qulncy, Mass. 

JOHN J. BREEN 

12 5 Surry St., Medford, Mass. 



ELMO J. BREGOLI 

32 Fountain St., South Bralntree, Mass. 

EDWARD J. BROOKS 

198 8 Commonwealth Ave., Brighton, Mass. 

PAUL F. BROSNAN 

1 Butler St., Dorchester, Mass. 

RICHARD D. BUCK 

73 Worcester St., Boston, Mass. 

FREDERICK T. BURKE 

3 3 Washington St., Peabody, Mass. 

ROBERT H. BUTLER 

3 6 Fitchburg St., Watertown, Mass. 

JOHN C. CALDWELL 

22 Irving St., Readvillc, Mass. 

EDWARD D. CALLAHAN 

3 09 Summit St., Brighton, Mass. 

WILLIAM G. CAMPBELL 

143 Marcella St., Roxbury, Mass. 

ROCCO P. CANALE 

15 3 Breen Ave., Watertown, New York 

ROBERT A. CANNON 

171 Wachusett Ave., Arlington, Mass. 



JAMES M. CANTY 

48 Pearl St., Somerville, Mass. 

PATRICK J. CAPRIO 

3 6 Northampton St., Boston, Mass. 
RICHARD J. CAREY 

16 Lincoln St., Natick, Mass. 
ROBERT F. CARR 

18 West-wood Road, Some-viUe, Mass. 

JOHN J. CARUSONE 

36 Ridgewood St., Dorchester, Mass. 

ROBERT M. CASEY 

74 Virginia Road, Waltham, Mass. 

WALTER F. CASSELL 

71 Whitten St., Dorchester, Mass. 

PETER A. CAULFIELD 

1 Richmond Park, Woburn, Mass. 

LAWRENCE C. CETRONE 

15 Shepard St., Brighton, Mass. 

GEORGE D. CHAGARULY 

9 Burltse St., Lowell, Mass. 

WILLIAM L. CHARLTON 

340 Park St., Dorchester, Mass. 
SAMUEL T. CHIUCHIOLO 

7 North Margin St., Boston, Mass. 
JOSEPH F. CLAYTON 

209 Beech St., Roslindale, Mass. 
FRANK L. CLINTON 

43 Withington St., Dorchester, Mass. 
FRANCIS R. COEN 

9 Elm St., Waltham, Mass. 
WILLIAM J. COMMANE 

70 Auckland St., Dorchester. Mass. 
JOHN F. CONDON 

89 Burkeside Ave., Brockton, Mass. 
THOMAS J. CONLON 

441 Old Colony Ave., South Boston, Mass. 
HARRY W. CONNOLLY 

144 Flax Hill Road, South Norwalk, Conn. 
JAMES P. CONNOLLY 

270 School St., Waltham, Mass. 

JAMES J. CONNOLLY 

21 Bogandale Road, West Roxbury, Mass, 
JOHN J. CONNOLLY 

14 Beaver St., Salem, Mass. 
JOHN W. CONNOLLY 

474 Massachusetts Ave., Boston, Mass. 
EDMUND G. CONNOR 

19 Atherton St., Roxbury, Mass. 

THOMAS P. CONNOR 

ISS Hale St., Beverly, Mass. 

PAUL V. CONNORS 

5 8 Addison St., Chelsea, Mass. 

FRANCIS J. CONROY 

104 Perkins St., Jamaica Plain, Mass. 

THOMAS S. CONROY 

280 Railroad Ave., Norwood, Mass. 
ALFRED J. CONTTRADA 

3 Thacher Court, Boston, Mass. 
JOHN F. CORBETT 

61 Highland Ave., Watertown, Mass. 



GEORGE M. CRISS 

43 Mount Fort St., Boston, Mass. 

EDWARD V. CRONIN 

11 James St., Boston, Mass. 
ROBERT T. CROWLEY 

5 5 Garfield St., Cambridge, Mass. 
GEORGE F. CURREN 

67 Albion St., Somerville, Mass. 
DONALD F. CURRIVAN 

26 Shawmut Ave., Mansfield, Mass. 

STEPHEN J. D'ARCY, JR. 

3 1 Monadnock St., Dorchester, Mass. 

EDWARD V. DAILEY 

10 Atherstone St., Dorchester, Mass. 
MARTIN W. DALY 

12 Chestnut St., Andover, Mass. 

STANLEY H. DAVIS 

14 North Munroe Ter., Dorchester, Mass. 
WILLIAM L. DAVIS 

9 Forest Avenue, Natick, Mass. 
JOHN T. DAY 

1780 Columbus Rd., South Boston, Mass. 
ROBERT J. DeGIACAMO 

23 Perthshire Rd., Boston, Mass. 
JOHN F. DEMPSEY 

48 Burt St., Dorchester, Mass. 
LOUIS W. DIEGALI 

8 Walter Terrace, Somerville, Mass. 
GEORGE M. DIMOND, JR. 

8 Fletcher Road, Bedford, Mass. 
JOSEPH F. DINNEEN 

716 Webster St., Needham, Mass. 

EDWARD L. DIVVER, JR. 

6 Sunnymeade Tr., Brighton, Mass. 

WILLIAM R. DONAHUE 

781 Southern Artery, Quincy, Mass. 

ROBERT J. DONLAN 

703 Hyde Park Ave., Roslindale, Mass. 

ALFRED M. DONOVAN 

202 Market St., Brighton, Mass. 
FRANCIS A. DOUGLAS 

43 Dartmouth St., Somerville, Mass. 
BERNARD F. DOWNEY 

224 Summer St., Somerville, Mass. 
JAMES J. DOYLE 

190 Hamilton Ave., Lynn, Mass. 

CHARLES F. DRUMMY 

41 Nichols Street, Norwood, Mass. 
JAMES T. DUANE 

56 Hilton St., Arlington, Mass. 
ELI H. DUBINSKY 

5 Fayston Rd., Roxbury, Mass. 
HENRY J. DUCEY 

140 Wilmington Ave., Dorchester, Mass. 
JAMES O. DUNN 

157 Newbury Ave., Quincy, Mass. 
ROBERT E. DURANT 

564 Nuion St., New Bedford, Mass. 
ROBERT E. FALLON 

201 Federal Ave., Quincy, Mass. 



FRANCIS J. FARRY 

3 00 Hyde Park Ave., Jamaica Plain, Ma; 

HAROLD J. FERLAND 

567 Lincoln Ave., Saugus, Mass. 
LAURENCE J. FERRITER 

26 Mansfield St., AUston, Mass. 
JOHN R. FERRY 

205 Weld St., Roslindale, Mass. 

JOSEPH P. FINNEGAN 

639 Chestnut Hill Ave., Brookline, Mass. 
ALBERT M. FIORENTINO 

3 09 Hawk St., Watertown, New York 

THOMAS V. FITZGERALD 

752 East 5th St., South Boston, Mass. 
WILLIAM F. FITZGERALD 

59 Grove Place, Winchester, Mass. 

FRANCIS E. FLAHERTY 

20 Auburn St., Charlestown, Mass. 

JOHN H. FLYNN 

42 Addington Rd., West Roxbury, Mass. 

NICHOLAS P. FLYNN 

91 Cleveland St., Melrose, Mass. 

DAVID W. FOLAN 

27 Plypton St., Woburn, Mass. 

ANGELO FONIRI 

65 5 Manlot Rd., North Scituate, Mass. 
EDWARD G. FORRISTALL 

13 5 Albion St., Somerville, Mass. 
VINCENT S. FOATE 

3 3 Shannon St., Brighton, Mass. 
JOHN T. FOYNES 

31 Brooksdale Rd., Brighton, Mass. 
WILLIAM J. GALLAGHER 

157 Mount Vernon St., Lowell, Mass. 
ROBERT W. GALLIGAN 

12 Palmer St., Watertown, Mass. 

JOHN J. GARTLAND 

81 Belmont St., Somerville, Mass. 

CHARLES J. GARVEY 

18 Pleasant St., Dorchester, Mass. 
JOSEPH J. GENTILE 

26 Thornton St., Newton, Mass. 
PAUL A. GOOD 

48 Standish St., Cambridge, Mass. 
JOSEPH A. GRADY 

215 Albion St., Wakefield, Mass. 

JOHN F. GRADY 

22 Terrace St., Roxbury, Mass. 
JAMES F. GRAHAM 

48 Manet Road, Chestnut Hill, Mass. 

WALTER T. GREANEY 

31 Levant St., Dorchester, Mass. 

JAMES R. GREENE 

90 T Street, South Boston, Mass. 

EDWARD W. GREENLAW 

4 Tower Road, Reading, Mass. 

JAMES F. GRIMES 

€€ Orchard St., Jamaica Plain, Mass. 
WALTER J. GRONDALSKI 

8 Blinkhorn Ave., Lowell, Mass. 



HALEM G. HABIB 

129 ^"arren Ave., Boston, Mass. 

HALLEM N. HADDAD 

1503 ■Washington St., Boston, Mass. 

JAMES H. HAGAN 

40 'Srildwood Rd., Arlington, Mass. 

JOSEPH W. HANIEY 

3 3 Highland St., Lynn, Mass. 

JOHN F. X. HARNEY 

74 Perkins St., Jamaica Plain, Mass. 

JOHN E. HARTIGAN 

26 Adams St., Charlestown, Mass. 

FRANCIS M. HARVEY 

190 Pauline St., Winthrop, Mass. 

JAMES E. HARVEY 

378 Park Ave., Arlington, Mass. 

PAUL I. HASTINGS 

109 North Main St., Xatick, Mass. 

JOHN S. HAYES 

3 5 Sydney St., Somerville, Mass. 

THOMAS J. HEATH 

83 Boston St., Someri-ille, Mass. 

DANIEL A. HEALY 

90 Morton St., Waltham, Mass. 

PAUL E. HEALY 

41 Vassal Lane, Cambridge, Mass. 

JOHN H. HEGARTY 

398 Centre St., Jamaica Plain, Mass. 

PATRICK J. HERLIHY 

63 Minot St., Neponsett, Mass. 

JOHN B. HIGGENS 

5 Gertrude Ave., Sharon, Mass. 

FRANCIS E. HILL, JR. 

217 Railroad Ave., Lawrence, Mass. 

WILLIAM R. HILL 

65 Center St., East ^Teymouth, Mass. 

PAUL J. HOAR 

43 Burtt St., Lowell, Mass. 

WILLIAM M. HOAR 

4 Naples Road, Salem, Mass. 

BERNARD C. HOGAN 

111 High St., Everett, Mass. 

HAROLD F. HOGAN 

79 Cedar St., '^'akefield, Mass. 

MICHAEL J. HOLOVAK 

312 East Betsch St., Lansford, Pa. 

CHARLES C. HOUGHTON, JR. 

222 West Main St., Avon, Mass. 

JOSEPH J. HURLEY 

5 36 Vermont St., "West Roxbury, Mas 

ALFONSE W. JANAVICH 

5 3 Cedar St., Norwood, Mass. 

ARTHUR C. JORDAN 

3 Warren Ave., Milton, Mass. 

ROBERT E. JORDAN 

224 Ferry St., Everett, Mass. 

JOHN F. JOYCE 

40 Buttonwood St., Dorchester, Mass. 

WILLIAM M. JOYCE 

22 Webber Ave., Beverly, Mass. 



JOHN E. KANE 

46 Everett St., Lawrence, Mass. 

NORMAN E. KANE 

45 Celdah Ave., West Roxbury, Mass. 

LOUIS KASSLER 

82 Ballou Ave., Dorchester, Mass. 

JOHN F. KEANE, JR. 

194 Commonwealth Ave., Newton, Mass. 

JOHN B. KELLEY 

43 Emerson Road, Milton, Mass. 

JAMES J. KELLY 

5 5 Cedar St., Wakefield, Mass. 

JOHN F. KELLY 

395 Holton Rd., Norwood, Mass. 

ARTHUR L. KENNEDY 

44 Stetson St., Bridgewater, Mass. 

THOMAS R. KENNEDY 

9 Smith Ave., Somerville, Mass. 

EDWARD F. KENNEY 

21 Faneuil St., Brighton, Mass. 
THOMAS J. KERRISSEY 

118 Kittredge St., Roslindale, Mass. 

JOSEPH W. KHOURY 

24 Elliott St., Brockton, Mass. 

LAURENCE E. KIELY 

31 Rangeley Rd., Arlington, Mass. 

THOMAS W. KILLION 

60 Washington Manor, West Haven, Ct. 

ROBERT W. KILLORAN 

14 Malcolm Rd., Jamaica Plain, Mass. 

FRANCIS A. KIMMEL 

12 Fulda Street, Roxbury, Mass. 

PAUL J. KING 

48 Parkton Rd., Jamaica Plain, Mass. 

ROBERT F. LACY 

32 Charlotte St., Newton Centre, Mass. 

EDWARD C. LAMBERT 

1307 Commonwealth Ave., Allston, Mass. 

JAMES T. LANE 

67 Townsend St., Roxbury, Mass. 

EDWARD L. LANIGAN 

160 Carleton St., Lawrence, Mass. 

JOHN J. EARNER 

3 Arbroth St., Dorchester, Mass. 

WILLIAM D. LAUBNER 

93 Collins St., Lynn, Mass. 

PAUL J. LEARY 

37 Emerson Rd., Winthrop, Mass. 



EDWARD G. LEE 

9 Sherman St., Natick, Mass. 



FRANCIS A. LIND 

90 Waban St., Newton, Mass. 

EDWARD E. LINEHAN 

IS High St., Cambridge, Mass. 

JOHN I. LOGUE 

9 Garden St., West Roxbury, Mass. 

SAVINO J. LOSCOCCO 

5 Port Norfolk St., Boston, Mass. 

CARL L. LUCAS 

104 Convell St., Somerville, Mass. 



HARRY LUKACHIK, JR. 

282 Bunnell St, Bridgeport, Ct. 

GREGORY C. LUKE 

76 5 American Legion Pky., Roslindale, Mass. 

JOSEPH F. LYONS 

61 Cliilmont St., Roslindale, Mass. 

EDMUND D. LYONS 

4 Shatter St., Dorchester, Mass. 

THOMAS J. LYONS 

12 Springfield St., Belmont, Mass. 

MAURICE A. LYONS, JR. 

3 90 Lebanon St., Melrose, Mass. 

EDWARD L. MADDEN, JR. 

9 Aspinwall Ave., Weymouth, Mass. 

JOSEPH J. MAHONEY 

27 \l"ildwood Ave., Newton, Mass. 

JOHN C. MARTIN 

23 Salem Street, Lawrence, Mass. 

THOMAS D. MANNING 

44 Monadnock St., Dorchester, Mass. 

FRANCIS P. McCANN 

89 Boxford St., Lawrence, Mass. 

DANIEL F. McCarthy 

2 5 Murray Ave., East Milton, Mass. 

FRANCIS D. McCarthy 

6 5 Park Ave., South Weymouth, Mass. 

FRANCIS J. McCarthy 

15 Bellvista Rd., Brighton, Mass. 

JOHN F. McCarthy 

3 6 Brookdale St., Roslindale, Mass. 

WILLIAM J. McDEVITT 

59 Vine St, Lexington, Mass. 

WALLACE R. McDONALD 

74 Richardson Rd., Lynn, Mass. 

JOHN G. McELWEE 

57 Dwight St., Brookline, Mass. 

EDWARD J. McEAROE 

1 1 Swan Street, Everett, Mass. 

JOHN J. McGARR, 

14 Kernwood Ave., Beverly, Mass. 

EDWARD F. McGILVERY 

5 Narragansett St., Dorchester, Mass. 

PHILIP G. McGINTY 

15 Hopedale St., Allston, Mass. 

WILLIAM P. McHALE 

166 Main St., Medford, Mass. 

WILLIAM P. McGRATH 

73 Clinton St., Brockton, Mass. 

WILLIAM M. McGRATH 

22 Columbia St., Brookline, Mass. 

GEORGE E. McKINNON 

44 Boutwell St., Dorchester, Mass. 

JOHN J. McNAUGHT 

66 Adams St., Maiden, Mass. 

ARTHUR J. McQUADE 

52 Highland St., Lowell, Mass. 

WILLIAM F. MacDONALD 

6 Gay Head St., Jamaica Plain, Mass. 

JOSEPH F. McSWEENEY 

74 Prichard Ave., Somerville, Mass. 



FRANCIS X. MAHONEY 

8 Ray Street, Peabody, Mass. 

JOHN C. MAHONEY 

3 3 Buchanan Rd., Roslindale, Ma 

GEORGE T. MALONE 

11 Wendell St., Cambridge, Masss. 

JOHN E. MANNING 

68 Oak Street, Taunton, Mass. 

CHARLES P. MASTERSON 

12 Chester St., Taunton, Mass. 



THOMAS F. MEAGHER, JR. 

125 Prospect St., West Newton, Mass. 

FRANCIS X. MEEHAN 

11 Sonrel St., Woburn, Mass. 

HAROLD P. MOLLAHAN 

97 Elm St., Somerville, Mass. 

THOMAS F. MEEHAN 

176 Farnham St., Lawrence, Mass. 

EDWARD J. MOLONEY 

SO Highland St., Lowell, Masss. 
ROBERT H. MOORE 

7S9 North Montello St., Brockton, Mas; 

DANIEL F. MORAN 

19 St. William St., Dorchester, Mass. 

FRANCIS X. MORAN 

40 Glide St., Dorchester, Mass. 

THOMAS A. MORAN 

40 Glide St., Dorchester, Mass. 

EDWARD J. MURPHY 

244 Walden St., Cambridge, Mass. 

JOHN M. MURPHY 

8 5 Market Rd., Newton, Mass. 
THOMAS H. MURPHY 

123 Charles St., Boston, Mass. 

JOSEPH L. MURPHY 

86 Greenlawn Ave., Newton, Mass. 

PHILIP D. MURPHY 

3 36 Cabot St.. Beverly, Mass. 
JOSEPH J. MURPHY 

37 Lewis St., Somerville, Mass. 

WILLIAM F. MURPHY 

3 5 Vassal Lane, Cambridge, Mass. 
ROBERT J. MURPHY 

44 Weld Hill St., Forest Hills, Mass. 

THOMAS O. MURRAY 

8 Danville St., West Roxbury, Mass. 

HENRY S. MULLEN, JR. 

SO Western Ave., Saugus, Mass. 

ROBERT J. MUSE 

14 Melville Ave., NewtonvUle, Mass. 

EDWARD F. MYERS 

520 LaGrange St., West Roxbury, Ma 

ROBERT B. NANGLE 

Central Street, Topsfieid, Mass. 

RALPH K. NASH 

83 Curtis Street, Somerville, Mass. 
FREDERICK J. NAUMETZ 

71 Prospect St., Newburyport, Mass. 

TIMOTHY J. NEVINS 

62 Patten St., Jamaica Plain, Mass. 



JOSEPH D. NEYLON 

103 Marion St. Somerville, Mass. 

JAMES P. NOONAN 

37 Dana Street, Cambridge, Mass. 

WILLIAM F. NOONAN 

44 Franklin St., Peabody, Mass. 

HOBERT W. O'BRIEN 

102 Wheatland Ave., Dorchester, Mass. 

RICHARD F. O'BRION 

S6 Meredith Circle, MUton, Mass. 

HENRY F. CFCONNELL, JR. 

20 Belcher St., Winthrop, Mass. 

EDWARD J. O'CONNOR 

17 Sutton St., Peabody, Masss. 

JOHN J. O'CONNOR 

66 5 East 6th St., South Boston, Mass. 

THOMAS B. O'CONNOR 

19 Eatley St., Maiden, Mass. 

THOMAS F. O'CONNOR 

52 Slade Street, Belmont, Mass. 

JOHN A. O'DONNELL 

28 George St., Attleboro, Mass. 

JAMES A. O'DONOHUE 

96 Brown St., Brookline, Mass. 

JOHN W. O'DONOGHUE 

3 3 Robins Road, Arlington, Mass. 
GEORGE L. O'HARA, JR. 

13 S High Sq., Medford, Mass. 
JOHN J. O'HARA 

27 Ardale St., Roslindale, Mass. 
WILLIAM F. OLIVO 

175 School St., Waltham, Mass. 

FRANCIS E. O'MALLEY 

199 Warren Rd., Framingham, Mass. 

ROBERT B. O'MEARA 

3 6 Maxwell St., Dorchester, Mass. 

BERNARD J. O'NEIL, JR. 

110 Knoll St., Roslindale, Mass. 

JOHN J. O'SHEA 

44 Loring St., Hyde Park, Mass. 

DANIEL M. O'SULLIVAN 

118 Hamilton St., Dorchester, Mass. 

EDWARD P. O'SULLIVAN 

24 Druid St., Dorchester, Mass. 

THOMAS J. OWENS 

9 Woodbine St., Roxbury, Mass. 

ARTHUR F. PARNELL 

9 Alfred Rd., Arlington, Mass. 
PAUL D. PASQUINE 

47 Orchardfield St., Dorchester, Mass. 

WILLIAM G. POTTER 

2 Lincoln St., Salem, Mass. 

FRANCIS G. POWER 

8 Sunset St., Roxbury, Mass. 

WILLIAM J. POWER 

12 Eldora St., Roxbury, Mass. 
ROBERT A. RADLEY 

52 Wren St., West Roxbury, Mass. 

JOHN F. RAFFERTY 

66S Washington St., Brighton, Mass. 



THOMAS J. RAFFOL 

33 Union Park, Boston, Mass. 

FRANCIS L. READE, JR. 

96 Lexington St., Waltham, Mass. 

JOHN F. READON 

83 Trowbridge St., Cambridge, Mass. 

JOSEPH P. READON 

18 Ayer St., Peabody, Mass. 
JOSEPH M. REGAN 

23 Harris Ave., Lowell, Mass. 

ROBERT F. REHLING 

993 South St., Roslindale, Mass. 

NORMAN W. REINHALTER 

1 1 Hardwick St., Brighton, Mass. 
JOSEPH S. REPKO 

3 56 West Abbott St., Lansford, Pa. 

JOHN A. REPPUCCI 

23 Rand St., Revere, Mass. 

FRANCIS J. RICHARDS 

IS Hamilton St., Quincy, Mass. 
YALE W. RICHMOND 

1 1 Courtland St., Mattapan, Mass. 

JOHN J. RING 

29 Highland St., Framingham, Mass. 
SABINO J. RIZZO 

13 Washington St., Revere, Mass. 
VINCENT J. ROBINSON 

15 Newbury St., Somerville, Mass. 

CARLO J. RUOCCO 

84 Salem St., Boston, Mass. 
IRVING J. RUSSELL 

4 Gardner Place, West Roxbury, Mass. 

ERNEST E. SANTASUOSSO 

7 Mill St., Dorchester, Mass. 

JOHN A. SARJEANT 

86 Standard St., Mattapan, Mass. 

WILLIAM C. SAWYER 

2 Winthrop Place, Taunton, Mass. 

LEOPOLD L. SCHWARTZ 

516 Blue Hill Ave.. Roxbury, Mass. 

RICHARD J. SCHOENFIELD 

17 VC'ellougliby St., Brighton, Mass. 

SOLDMAN S. SCHWARTZ 

3 8 Wales St., Dorchester, Mass. 

PAUL H. SHANNON 

4 Bradford Ave., Medford, Mass. 

JAMES F. SHAW 

2 Central St., Mansfield, Mass. 

WILLIAM G. SHEA 

31 Oak View Terr., Jamaica Plain, Mass. 

ROBERT L. SHERRY 

3 Park St., Peabody, Mass. 

RAYMOND W. SISK 

2 5 Jackson St., Medford, Mass. 
ALEXANDER J. SKENE 

63 Withington St., NewtonviUe, Mass. 

JAMES F. SOMERS 

54 Auburn St., Haverhill, Mass. 

EDWARD M. SMITH 

North Munroe Terrace, Dorchester, Mass. 



VINCENT J. STAKUTIS 

6 84 East 6:h St., South Boston, Mass. 

JOHN M. STEWART 

230 Liberty St., Randolph, Mass. 

DAVID J. SULLIVAN 

69 Lowell St., Watertown, Mass. 

EDWARD D. SULLIVAN 

9S Andrews St., Lowell, Mass. 

LEO T. SULLIVAN 

141 Bucknam St., Everett, Mass. 

JOSEPH E. SULLIVAN, JR. 

144 Wesmith St., Lowell, Mass. 

ALBERT I. SUTKUS 

3 Adrian St., Somerville, Mass. 

JAMES F. SWEENEY, JR. 

72 Allen St., Arlington, Mass. 

TANOUS J. THOMAS 

3S Murray Hill Rd., Roslindale, Mass. 

JOSEPH A. TIMPANY 

12 Leyden St., Medford, Mass. 



CHARLES E. TOOLE 

27 Westglow St., Dorchester, Mass. 

HENRY F. TRAINOR 

10 Columbus Ave., Salem, Mass. 

THOMAS E. TULLIE 

2 8 Winsond St., Brockton, Mass. 

JOSEPH G. TURKE 

26 Creighton St., Boston, Mass. 

JOSEPH M. TYNDALL 

269 Lowell St., Peabody, Mass. 

MARTIN B. UNDERWOOD 

34 Oxford St., Winchester, Mass. 

GUIDE C. VALLARIO 

24 Hall St., Lawrence, Mass. 

FREDERICK M. VALLETI 

27 Eddy St., Mansfield, Mass. 

ANTHONY M. VEGELANTE 

135 Bradstreet Ave., Revere, Mass, 

ANTHONY P. VETTRAINO 

5 Snow Hill St., Boston, Mass. 



HERMAN F. VOHEL 

90 Central St., Peabody, Mass. 

GILBERT L. WALKER, JR. 

60 Ashton St., Everett, Mass. 

EDWARD B. WALSH 

116 Milton Ave., Dorchester, Mass. 

CHARLES A. WATSON 

3 Granite St., Cambridge, Mass. 

FRANCIS C. WEIR 

3 18 Main St., South Amboy, New Jersey 

EDWARD K. WELCH 

20 Rosemont St., Hyde Park, Mass. 

FRANCIS A. WELCH 

82 Harvard St., Newtonville, Mass. 



JOHN J. WHELAN 

34 Windom St., Allston, Mass. 

ROBERT L. WINKLER 

8 Parker St., Exeter, New Hampshii 

JOHN E. WILLIAMS 

164 Forest Ave., Brockton, Mass. 




SOPHOMORE CLASS 



It is Sunday night, and 400 heads are bent 
over as many Snyder and Martins, when sud- 
denly the radios downstairs abruptly cut their 
programs to scream hysterically: "Hawaii 
bombed . . . war about to be declared;" 400 
pairs of feet rush to the radios. 400 startled 
brains forget Snyder and Martin, Chetwood, 
the theory of marketing and the law of Pascal; 
400 Sophomores are lifted bodily from the 
narrow seclusion of their studies and hurled 
suddenly onto a world-wide stage full of ac- 
tion and confusion. In the flash of a bomb 
400 lives seemed blasted from their moorings. 
Forgotten are the things of home and college; 
the girls waiting for a date in half an hour; 
the lessons waiting to be done. 

Not so long ago football monopolized con- 
versation; the slashing attack of Gil Bouley; 
the stolid defense of Darone and Furbush, the 
whipping arm and fleet feet of Ed Doherty. 



In a short time President Johnny Murphy, Jim 
Edgeworth, goalie Phil Carey and Harry Cro- 
vo will skate the Kellymen to another cham- 
pionship. Tom Von will be sketching and poet- 
izing. Ed Thomas will be bringing Fran 
Burke for dancing and John Eastman will fol- 
low with the big Soph prom. Frank Sidlau- 
skaus and Joe O'Donnell will be lending Father 

Bonn their genius to use on the stage But 

who can think of these in such an hour? .... 
John Burke will be leaving and with him 
countless others, all remembering Pearl Har- 
bor. Who cannot think of these things? .... 

After Munich and Dunkirk and Crete it 
was easy to fall back to routine again but now 
even the sacred temples of classic culture are 
rocked to their foundations; the veil is rent 
asunder as unholy war and profaning neces- 
sity rush in, to sit upon the altars of learning, 
masters of our destiny. 



SOPHOMORE DIRECTORY 



WILLIAM J. ACKERMAN 

22 Surrey Street, Brighton 

EDWARD J. ACTON, JR. 

104 Walnut Street, Framingliam 

FRANK W. AKSTIN 

11 Burton Street, Brockton 

JOSEPH T. ALVES 

17 Regis Road, Mattapan 

FRED C. ANDERSON 

39 Temple St., Arlington 

GEORGE T. APPS 

51 Dunham St., Attleboro 

ANTONIO G. ARMATA 

80 Summer St., Natick 

JOSEPH P. BANE 

5 3 Hilary St., Cambridge 

GEORGE F. BARRY 

66 Manners Ave., Brockton 

JAMES H. BENEDETTO 

40 Buena Vista St., Swampscott 

ROBERT J. BERNARD 

52 Carroll St., Chelsea 

THEOPHILE J. BERNHARDT, JR. 

89 Prospect St., West Newton 
EUGENE E. BERTOLLI 

5 8 Carver St., Boston 



RAY H. BONGIORNO 

272 Newhall St., Lynn 

WILLIAM H. BOODRO 

1581 Centre Street, Roslindale 

VINCENT P. BORIS 

42 Boynton St., Jamaica Plain 
JAMES A. BOUDREAU 

9 Faulkner Street, Maiden 

GILBERT J. BOULEY 

16 North Main St., Jewett City, Co 

WILLIAM B. BOUNDY 

476 School St., Belmont 

ROBERT F. BOUSQUET 

46 Washington Road, Marlboro 

OLIVER H. BOWMAN, JR. 

Main Street, Barnstable 

EDWARD G. BOYLE, JR. 

11 Valley Road, Woburn 

CHRISTOPHER P. BRADY 

64 DriscoU Street, Peabody 

WALTER M. BRADY 

3 Winnifred Road, Brockton 

HENRY J. BRASH 

131 Ashmont St., Dorchester 

ARTHUR A. BRENNAN 

8 3 Centre St., Dorchester 



JOHN J. BRIEN 

5 6 Prince Street, Jamaica Plain 

PHILIP D. BROOKS 

36 Wren St., West Roxbury 

CLARENCE W. BUCKLEY 

I46a Summer St., Somerville 
JOHN F. BURKE 

20 Gorham Street, Waltham 

PAUL J. BURNS 

11 Lenoxdale Ave., Dorchester 

ROBERT D. BURNS 

3 9 Stone St., Saugus 

FREDERICK H. BUSBY 

144 Bellevue Road, Watertown 

AUGUSTINE J. CAFFREY, JR. 

5 5 Reservoir St., Lawrence 

GERALD A. CALAHAN 

18 King St., Belmont 

CHARLES A. CALCAGNI 

1 Humbert St., Barre, Vermont 

FRANCIS J. CALLAHAN 

2 5 Schorncliffe Rd., Newton 

ROBERT E. CAMPBELL 

28 Burgoyne St., Dorchester 

EMIL J. CANNING 

3 6 Fulton St., Dedham 



DAVID E. CANNON 

531 East Fifth St., South Boston 

PHILIP E. CAREY 

14 Newell St., Cambridge 

GERARD C. CARROLL 

3 5 Bullard St., Dorchester 

HENRY J. CARROLL 

6 Utica Street, Woburn 

THOMAS S. CASEY 

62 Landseer Street, Arlington 
CHARLES R. CAVANAGH, JR. 

158 Park Ave., South "Weymouth 
WALTER P. CAVANAUGH 

36 Marilyn Road, Milton 
JOHN M. CAXALDO 

8 Minot Street, Boston 
WILLIAM E. CHRISTIE, JR. 

113 Myrtle Street, Rockland 
FREDERICK G. CLANCY 

77 Tremont St., Cambridge 

JOHN F. CLANCY 

100 Washington St., Weymouth 

CORNELIUS J. CLEARY 

12 West St., Norwood 

ROBERT A. COLBERT 

86 Ossipee Road, W. Somerville 

MARTIN J. COLEMAN, JR. 

15 Bacon St., Waltham 
RICHARD L. COLLETTE 

27 Highland St., Marlboro 

LEONARD C. COLLINS 

59 Warren St., Arlington 

WALTER V. COLLINS 

29 5 Dudley Street, Roxbury 

THOMAS P. COMER 

79 Barry Street 
FRANCIS M. CONDON 

31 Central Square, Brockton 
JAMES C. CONLEY 

17 Kidder Ave., West Somerville 

JOHN J. CONNELLY 

42 Greenbrier St., Dorchester 

JOHN H. CONNERY 

78 Paine Ave., Pride's Crossing 

WILLIAM CONNERY 

191 Lake Street, Brighton 

CHARLES W. CONNOLLY 

71 Laurel St., Lynn 
COLIN H. CONNOR 

128 River Road, Winthrop, Mass 

JOHN J. CONNOR 

155 Hale Street, Beverly 

TIMOTHY J. CONNORS 

124 Crescent Ave., Revere 

CYRIL J. CONROY 

1 5 Webb St., -Weymouth 

EDWARD R. CONROY 

104 Perkins St., Jamaica Plain 
PAUL T. CONWAY 

2 5 Mapleton Street, Brighton 



GEORGE J. COOLEY 

93 Sawyer Ave., Dorchester 

WILLIAM J. CORKERY 

3 2 Blakeslec St., Cambridge 

KEVIN E. COSTELLO 

124 Westchester Road, Jamaica Plain 

WILLIAM J. COSTELLO 

47 Princeton St., Somerville 

JAMES T. COTTER 

136 Vernal St., E. Everett 

LEO P. COTTER 

200 Mt. Vernon St., West Roxbury 

VINCENT T. COX 

102 Salem St., Lawrence 

WARREN COX 

111 Woerd Ave., Waltham 

JOHN F. CREHAN 

3 Percival St., Dorchester 

HARRY A. CROVO 

70 Arlington Rd., Woburn 

WILLIAM E. CROWLEY 

242 South St., West Bridgewater 

PAUL M. CUENIN 

129 Lynn St., Peabody 
ROBERT E. CUNNIFF, JR. 

402 Weston Road, Wellesley 
JOSEPH F. CUNNINGHAM 

68 Van Winkle St., Dorchester 

ROBERT H. DALEY 

42 Flynt St., North Quincy 

HUGH F. DALY, JR. 

22 Bradfield Ave., Roslmdale 

RICHARD H. DALY 

59 Playstead Road, Newton 

WILLIAM J. DALY 

59 Playstead Road, Newton 

PASQUALE F. DARONE 

16 Springdale Street, Maiden 

RICHARD M. DART 

17 Fernald Terrace, Dorchester 

JEROME J. DAUNT 

23 Railroad Ave., Norwood 

FRANCIS H. DAWSON 

5 5 Monroe St., Belmont 

JOSEPH K. DEE 

3 3 Channing Road, Watertown 

WILLIAM F. DEGAN 

190 L St., So. Boston 

WALTER C. DeGUGLIEMO 

79 5 Cambridge Street, Cambridge 

JOHN A. DELANEY 

97 Stearns Ave., Lawrence 

JOSEPH L. DELANEY 

5 Summer Street, Waterbury, Conned 

JOHN J. DELLEA, JR. 

41 Minnesota Ave., Somerville 

EDWARD C. DESMOND 

11 Eaton Street, Revere 

ROBERT L. DEVANEY 

18 Larchwood Road, Methuen 



JOHN J. DEVLIN 

7 54 Centre Street, Jamaica Plain 

THOMAS H. DEVLIN 

5 3 Berbard St., Dorchester 

ALBERT P. DICKENSHEID, JR. 

74 Howitt Road, West Roxbury 

STANLEY J. DMOHOWSKI 

11 Pierce Street, Hyde Park 

EDWARD A. DOHERTY 

12 5 No. Main Street, Andover 

FRANCIS W. DOHERTY 

3 06 Bellevue St., West Roxbury 

THOMAS J. DOLAN 

61 Stearns Ave., Lawrence 

DENNIS F. DONAHUE 

40 Ash Avenue, Somerville 

THOMAS F. DONELAN 

75 Rosseter Street, Dorchester 

FRANCIS A. DONOVAN 

28 Tip Top St., Brighton 

JOHN J. DONOVAN 

64 Vermont St., West Roxbury 

THOMAS J. DONOVAN 

880 Lincoln St., Bradford 

JAMES E. DOWD 

31 Upland Road, W. Somerville 

ARTHUR J. F. DOYLE 

3 6 Crosby Rd., Chestnut Hill 
JOHN DUBZINSKI 

158 Lovewell St., Gardner 

EDWARD J. DUFFEY 

9 LarkhiU Road, West Roxbury 

JOSEPH A. DUFFY 

70 Maple Street, Waltham 

MAURICE J. DUFFY 

69 Montgomery Street, Boston 

WILLIAM W. DUFFY 

80 Greenough St., Brookline 

JOHN A. DUGGAN 

49 Linden Park, Rockland 

PAUL R. DUNN 

4 57 Highland Ave., Maiden 

WILLIAM E. DUNN 

109 Landon St., Newton 

JAMES H. DUNPHY 

19 South Main Street, Randolph 

DANIEL J. DURANT 

154 West Street, West Roxbury 

STEPHEN J. D'URSO 

87 Summer St., Lawrence 

FRANCIS K. DWYER 

5 Winthrop Place, Taunton 

JOHN E. EASTMAN 

icut 2 80 Nantasket Ave., Nantasket 

JAMES N. EDGEWORTH 

25 1 Weston Road, Wellesley 

JOSEPH W. EGAN 

31 Sanborn Ave., West Roxbury 

JOHN V. EICHORN 

22 Shepherd Rd., West Medford 



JOHN F. ELLIOTT 

341 Avrel Road, Milton 

SIMON P. FAHERTY 

83 Glencoe Place, Quincy 
JOHN A. FAHEY 

44 Eldridge Road, Forest Hills 

ROBERT F. FAIX 

11 Freeman St., Auburndale 

LAWRENCE F. FALLON 

2 5 Welles Ave., Dorchester 

JOHN J. FARRELL, JR. 

8 Field Road, Dorchester 

ROBERT E. FARRELL 

59 Amesbury St., Quincy 

FRANCIS X. FAY 

1 Sheldon St., Roslindale 

HENRY E. FIDROCKI 

617 Massachusetts Ave., Boston 

ANTHONY F. FINELLI 

3 S Melbourne Ave., Newton 

JOHN B. FINIGAN 

Concord Street, Concord, Mass. 

GERARD W. FINNERTY 

640 Newton Street, Brookline 

THOMAS J. FITZGERALD 

63 Semont Rd. 



WALTER D. FITZGERALD 

6 Howe Street, Dorchester 

FRANCIS H. FLAHERTY 

26 Pearl St., Attleboro 
JOHN S. FLANAGAN, JR. 

3S Melbourne Ave., Newton 

PAUL V. FLEMING 

11 Potosi Street, Dorchester 

CHRISTOPHER J. FLYNN 

18 Whitten St., Dorchester 

JAMES E. FLYNN 
3 3 Pratt St., AUston 

NEWALL N. FLYNN 
3 Wadsworth St., Danvers 

PAUL D. FLYNN 

48 Bacon St., Walthsm 

ROBERT E. FOLEY 

2 Wilbur St., Dorchester 

MICHAEL M. FORTUNATO 

98 Bucknam St., Everett 

JOHN M. FREEMAN 

108 Washington St., Peabody 

CARMEN A. FUCILLO 

3 83 Lovell Street, East Boston 

CHARLES I. FURBUSH 

50 Waverly Oaks Rd., Waltham 

FRANCIS L. GALLAGHER 

9 Druid Street, Dorchester 

HENRY J. GALLAGHER, JR. 

2 5 Windsor Road, Milton 

JOHN A. GALLAGHER 

16 Hawthorne Street, Watertowr 

JOHN J. GALLAGHER 

251 Boston St., Dorchester 



LAWRENCE F. GALLAGHER 

14 Haverford St., Jamaica Plain 

CHARLES J. GALLIGAN 

1049 Washington St., Canton 

JOSEPH G. GALWAY 

70 Becket Road, Belmont 

JOHN A. GANNON 

1 5 Braston Ave., Somerville 

JOSEPH F. GANNON 
184 Broadway, Lynn 

MICHAEL J. GARGAN 

12 Marchett St., Brighton 
PAUL F. GARRITY 

3 5 Belton Street, Dorchester 

ALFRED J. GAUDET 

5 Tremont Ave., Amesbury 

JOSEPH M. GAUDREAU 

182 Atlantic Ave., North Quincy 
EDWARD T. GEARY 

17 Bradford Road, Watertown 

JOSEPH J. GEORGE 

70 Oak Street, Boston 

EDWARD M. GILMORE 

101 Vernon St., Lowell 

WILLIAM F. GLYNN 

101 Richmond Street, Dorchester 
WILLIAM GOON 

8 Washington St., Plainville 

VINCENT J. GOULDING 

103 8 Eastern Parkway, Brooklyn, Ne 

LAURENCE F. GREENE 

7 Adams Terrace, Dorchester 

SUMNER M. GREENFIELD 

13 14 Blue Hill Ave., Mattapan 

JAMES F. GRIFFIN 

5 5 Harbor View, Dorchester 
JOSEPH J. GUNN 

54 Union Street, South Weymouth 
MORRIS L. GUSS 

151 H St., Boston 

THOMAS J. HALLETT 

74 Carleton Road, Belmont 

WILLIAM F. HALY 

141 Robbins Road, Watertown 
THEODORE J. HAMMILL 

69 Charlemont St., Dorchester 

FRANK H. HARRIS 

520 Pleasant St., Maiden 

JAMES H. HATHAWAY 

789 Parker Street, Roxbury 

JOHN M. HEHER 

6 North Pleasant Street, Taunton 

EDWARD F. HENNESSY 

23 Frawley St., Roxbury 

JOHN F. HERLIHY 

5 West Place, Cambridge 

RALPH A. HILTON 

24 Neponset Ave., Roslindale 

LEO J. HINCHEY 

17 Mayall Road, Waltham 



FRANCIS R. HINES 

S3 Ellison Park, Waltham 

DANIEL S. HOAR 

4 Naples Road, Salem 

JOSEPH F. HODAPP 

127 Howard Ave., Dorchester 
RAYMOND D. HOLLAND 

1763 Commonwealth Ave., Brighton 
CHARLES J. JACOBS 

5 1 Clarkson St., Dorchester 
GEORGE A. JOSEPH, JR. 

Marmion Way, Rockport 

THOMAS A. JOYCE 

3 63 Crofts St., Newtonville 

JOHN P. KAVANAGH 

120 Brooks St., Brighton 

PHILIP C. KEANEY 

Boston Road, Billerica 
BERNARD J. KEENAN 

34 Patten Street, Watertown 

JAMES A. KELLEHER 

88 Ames Street, Lawrence 

WILLIAM KELLEY 

229 Lakeview Ave., Cambridge 
JOSEPH C. KELLY 

154 School St., Jamaica Plain 
JOSEPH F. KENDALL 

199 Lewis Road, Belmont 
DONALD P. KENEFICK 

76 Hyde Park Ave., Jamaica Plain 
THOMAS F. KENNEDY 

5 8 Dustin St., Brighton 
JAMES E. KENNEY 

23 Dartmouth St., Woburn 
JAMES F. KIELY 

44 Lombard Ave., Amesbury 
JAMES F. KILEY, JR. 

71 Stanton Ave., Dorchester 
GEORGE P. KING 

38 Lewis St., Newton 

PATRICK J. KING 

213 W. 9th St., So. Boston 
THOMAS F. KINSELLA 

3 5 Callender St., Dorchester 
CHARLES F. KIRBY 

48 Merrill Road, Watertown 
GERARD L. KIRBY 

109 Bright Road, Belmont 
JOSEPH F. KREBS 

12 Gladstone St., E. Boston 
LOUIS G. KREINSEN 

77 Nonantum St., Brighton 

EUGENE G. LAFORET 

52 Watts St., Chelsea 

VINCENT E. LALLY 

3 8 Davis Avenue, Brookline 
PAUL K. LAMBERT 

77 Bowdoin Ave., Dorchester 
JOHN C. LANG 

123 South 5th St., West Missoula, Montan 



JAMES J. LANNON 

H Carmel St., Roxbury 
ROBERT S. LARKIN 

132 Boston St., Salem 
THOMAS J. LARDNER 

133 Margin St., Lawrence 
WILLIAM A. LAUGHLIN 

134 Broadway, Taunton 

JOHN T. LAWLOR 

70 Waban Hill Road, Chestnut Hill 

WILLIAM J. LAWLOR 

9 Adams Terrace, Cambridge 

EDWARD J. LEARY 

521 Washington St., Norwood 

ROBERT R. LeBLANC 

1! Liberty St., Waltham 

ROBERT J. LEE 

120 Willis Avenue, Medford 

MELVIN E. LEVISON 

47 Shepard St., Lynn 
STEPHEN D. LOPEZ 

41 Bradford Road, Watertown 
GEORGE M. LOVELESS 

92 Cleveland St., Melrose 
CORNELIUS T. LYNCH 

40 Ames Street, Dedham 

JOHN S. LYNES 

28 Atkins Ave., Lynn 
ROBERT E. MAGUIRE 

113 Montvale Ave., Woburn 
EDWARD J. MAHONEY 

63 Coolidge Ave., Weymouth 

THOMAS J. MALONEY 

44 Speedwell St., Dorchester 

WALTER H. MALONEY 

37 Frederick St., Newtonville 

CHARLES F. MANNING 
185 Hammond St., Waltham 

STEPHEN A. MANNING 

169 East Main Street, Marlboro 

VICTOR MATTHEWS 

260 Avenue I, Brooklyn, New York 

FRANCIS J. MAY 

27 Neponset Ave., Hyde Park 

CHARLES F. B. McALEER 

91 West Street, Maiden 

DONALD R. McARDLE 

79 Oakland St., Brighton 

EDWARD H. McCALL 

10 Auburn St., Woburn 

PAUL C. McCANN 
110 D St., So. Boston 

JOHN F. McCarthy 

3 8 Woodrow Ave., Medford 

JOHN T. McCarthy 

19 Marlboro St., Chelsea 

WILLIAM J. McCarthy 

153 8 Tremont St., Roxbury 

WILLIAM T. McCarthy 

5 3 No. Pleasant St., Taunton 



ARTHUR J. McCOLGAN 

22 Kenneson Road, Somerville 

ALBERT L. McDERMOTT 

1027 Middlesex St., Lowell 
GEORGE P. McDONOUGH 

14 Clarkson St., Dorchester 

THEODORE F. McELROY 

106 South Main St., Randolph 

JOHN J. McGONAGLE 

8 5a Boston Ave., Somerville 

JAMES F. McGORLEY, JR. 

96 Trowbridge St., Cambridge 
HARRY A. McGRATH, JR. 

16 Rangeley Ridge, Winchester 
MATTHEW L. McGRATH 

43 Richwood St., West Roxbury 

WILLIAM C. McINNES 
29 Connell St., Quincy 

DONALD F. McINTIRE 

78 Antwerp St., Milton 

GEORGE L. Mclaughlin 

221 Pond Street, Jamaica Plain 

WALTER J. McLaughlin 

5 5 Newton St., Lawrence 

WALTER N. McLaughlin 

37 Old Middlesex Road, Belmont 

FRANK McMANUS 

24 Hale Street, Beverly 

THOMAS G. McNABB 

162 Huntington Ave., Boston 

JOHN' P. McNAMARA 

106 West Foster St., Melrose 

WILLIAM J. McNULTY 

3 85 8 Washington St., Roslindale 

ROBERT V. MIETHEI 

36 Elder St., Dorchester 

JOSEPH A. MINAHAN 

193 Wolcott Road, Chestnut Hill 

PAUL J. MICALI 

2 5 Fulton St., Lawrence 

EDWARD A. MOAN 

9 Parmenter Terrace, W. Newton 



ANTHONY J. MOGAN 

311 Nahatan St., Norwood 

LEO E. MONKS 

123 Woodcliff Road, Newton Hills 

THOMAS J. MOONEY 

197 Parsons St., Brighton 

ROBERT J. MOORE 

17 Alban St., Dorchester 

EDWARD J. MORGAN 

172 Harvard St., Cambridge 

PAUL J. MORIARTY 

39 Wyatt St., Somerville 

PAUL S. MORIN 

9 Strathmore Road, Brookline 

JOHN F. MORRISON, JR. 

11 Niles Street, Brighton 

JOSEPH W. MOULTON 

14 Orchard St., Jamaica Plain 



JOHN E. MULLIGAN 

150 Lake St., East Weymouth 

GERARD B. MULLIN 

51 Beechwood St., Quincy 

ERNEST C. MULVEY 
Purington Ave., Natick 

CORNELIUS F. MURPHY 

8 5 Hall St., Lowell 

JOHN F. MURPHY 

3 Thayer St., Framingham 

JOHN H. MURPHY 

251 Waverly St., Belmont 

JOHN J. MURPHY 

5 5 Dartmouth St., Belmont 

PAUL D. MURPHY 

2 3 Oliver Road, Belmont 

ROBERT J. MURPHY 

17 Archdale Rd., Roslindale 

ALFRED N. NADAFF 

31 Upton Street, Boston 
JOHN A. NASH, JR. 

22 South St., Wrentham 

JOSEPH F. NATES 

1666 Washington St., Boston 

ROBERT D. NAVIEN 

215 AUston St., Cambridge 

EDWARD G. NAYMIE 

548 Massachusetts Ave., Boston 

FREDERICK W. NEDVINS 

76 5 Washington St., Dorchester 
RAYMOND L. NEE 

16 Darlington St., Dorchester 

ANGELO NICKETAKIS 

56 5 Essex St., Lynn 

PAUL J. NILES 

83 Willow Ave., Somerville 

JAMES J. NOLAN 

42 Semont Road, Dorchester 

JOSEPH M. NOONAN 

14 Franklin St., Peabody 

JAMES M. OATES 

14 5 Russell Ave., Watertown 

EDWARD R. O'BRIEN 

227 No. Beacon St., Watertown 

JOHN J. O'BRIEN 

344 Mystic St., Arlington 

THOMAS E. O'BRIEN 

24 Sharon St., Boston 
EDMUND J. O'CONNELL 

71 Green St., Wa 



JOHN P. O'CONNELL 

278 HoUis St., Framingham 

ARTHUR J. O'CONNOR 

3 3 Brookdale St., Roslindale 

JOHN E. O'CONNOR 

45 Kenneth St., West Roxbury 

WILLIAM L. O'CONNOR 

16 Thetford Ave., Dorchester 

JAMES F. O'DONNELL 

108 Chestnut St.. Everett 



JOSEPH P. O'DONNELL 

3 8 Raymond St., Medford 
WILLIAM F. O'DONNELL 

97 HiUman St., New Bedford 
JOHN E. OGLE 

SO Wesson Ave., Qulncy 
JOSEPH B. O'GORMAN 

10 Castleton St., Jamaica Plain 
JOHN W. O'GRADY 

185 Bellevue Road, Watertown 
ALFRED J. O'HARE 

S3 Flint St., Somerville 
JAMES I. O'HEARN 

S8 No. Bay Field Rd., No. Quincy 
JOHN E. O'KANE 

S60 Heath St., Chestnut Hill 
EDWARD J. O'KEEFE 

30 Royal St., Allston 
JOHN E. O'KEEFE 

2 8 Harvard St„ Chelsea 
KEVIN P. O'LEARY 

IS. Fernald Terrace, Dorchester 
ROBERT D. O'LEARY 

21 Franklin St, East Milton 
JOHN J. O'SULLIVAN 

Bedford Road, Lincoln 
THOMAS J. OWENS 

15 Holyoke Road, Lynn 
FRANK E. PANARO 

4 Myrtle Place, Dorchester 
JOSEPH M. PANETTA 

24 Potosi St., Dorchester 
WILLIAM M. PASHBY 

8 Henry Ave., Lynn 
GEORGE A. PASQUALUCCI 

42 EUerton Road, Quincy 
THOMAS E. PATTEN, JR. 

2 3 Wellesley Pk., Dorchester 
ARNOLD R. PERLMAN 

9 5 Shalton St., Dorchester 
ROBERT J. PETTIE 

93 Ch-ipel St., Lowell 
THOMAS J. PHAIR 

6S Pleasant St., Revere 
NORMAN F. PHEENEY 

20 Lombard St., Newton 
WILLIAM A. PHILBRICK 

12 Ridlon Road, Mattapan 
WILLIAM R. PHILIPS 

37 Circuit Rd., Dedham 
EDWARD J. PLUNKETT 

62 Aldrich St., Roslindale 
CHARLES C. POLCARI 

9 Fleet St., Boston 
RICHARD E. POTOCKI 

46 Alteresko Ave., Dorchester 
C. RICHARD POWERS 

181 Common St., Belmont 

JOSEPH E. PRENDERGAST 

42 Oak St., Cohasset 
PETER R. PRZEKOP 

141 Golden St., Norwich, Connecticut 
WILLIAM A. QUINN 

3 3 Slocum Ave., Englewood, New Jersey 



PAUL W. RATHBONE 

39 Hubbell Park, Rochester, New York 
PAUL R. RAYNOSKA 

3 2 Arlington St., Methuen 
JAMES J. REDDING 

19 Clementine Park, Dorchester 

ROBERT P. REYNOLDS 

106 Hewlett St., Roslindale 

FRANK E. RILEY, JR. 

93 Court Road Winthrop 

JAMES A. RILEY 

270 Parker Hill, Roxbury 

V. ROBERT RIORDAN 

2 8 Ashcroft St., Jamaica Plain 

THOMAS E. ROCHE 

54 Union St., Watertown 

WILLIAM H. ROCHE 

5 Edgehill Rd., Woburn 

JAMES A. ROONEY 

43 Moultrie St., Dorchester 

ROBERT M. ROSS 

3 15 Winchester St., Newton Hills 

WILLIAM J. ROTONDI 

144 Blue Hill Ave., Roxbury 

HAROLD J. RUBIN 

4 Leicester Street, Brighton 

JAMES F. RUSSELL, JR. 

48 Gay Street, Newtonville 

ALBERT SANTOSKY 

22 Newbury St., Boston 

PETER W. SARNIE 

12 Summit St., Roslindale 

RAY V. SCHENA 

15 Bonner Ave., Medford 

ROBERT J. SCOTT 

84 Colting St., Medford 

TIMOTHY H. SCULLY 

3 Granville Road, Cambridge 

KENNETH W. SEARS 

Hillcrost Road, Pride's Crossing 

ALFRED G. SEGADELLI 

3 9 Ashland St., Arlington 

THOMAS H. SENNOT 

22 Hayes St., Arlington 

DANIEL F. SHEA 

17 Frederick St., Belmont 

EDWARD J. SHEEHAN 

8 8 Westminster St., Hyde Park 

JOHN F. SHEEHAN 

37 School St., Somerville 

JOHN P. SHEEHAN 

6 Bradford Ave., Medford 

FRANCIS W. SIDLAUSKAS 

918 E. Broadway, So. Boston 

WILLIAM J. SIPSEY 

161 Jackson St., Lawrence 

ANGELO SISTI 

71 Lowell Ave., Providence, Rhode Isla 

THOMAS J. SOLES 

3 8 Warren Ave., Woburn 
TINO A. SPATOLA 

125 Fuller St., Dorchester 

FRANK P. SPOSATO 

8 Pond St., Westerly, Rhode Island 
JOSEPH C. STOKES 

83 Grozier Road, Cambridge 

HENRY V. STROUT 

10 Mystic Street, Charlestown 
STEPHEN H. STRAVO 

2S Zamora St., Jamaica Plain 



THOMAS G. STUART 

3937 Washington St., Roslindale 

GEORGE C. SULLIVAN 

3 Shepard St., Brighton 

JAMES F. SULLIVAN 

44 Union St., Brighton 

JOSEPH A. SULLIVAN 

57 Harbor View, Dorchester 

JOSEPH J. SULLIVAN 

813 Heath St., Brookline 

ROBERT D. SULLIVAN 

22 Pleasant St., Mansfield 

ROBERT F. SULLIVAN 

136 Leonard St., Waltham 

FELIX A. SWEENEY 

2 3 St. James St., Lowell 

FRANCIS J. SWEENEY 

2173 Dorchester Ave., Dorchester 

JAMES C. SWEENEY 

43 1 E. 7th St., So. Boston 

ALBERT J. THIBAULT 

2 8 Walden St., Cambridge 

EDWIN M. THOMAS 

179 Weld St., Roslindale 

ROBERT J. THOMAS 

108 Broadway, Lowell 

ARTHUR TISDALE 

124 Berkshire St. 

ALBERT J. TOOMEY 

120 Wyman Street, Stoughton 
JOHN A. TOOMEY 

27 Mt. Vernon St., Charlestown 
JOSEPH T. TRACEY 

375 Baker St., West Roxbury 

JAMES F. TRAVERS 

101 Sycamore St., Roslindale 
PAUL H. VAN WART 

2 39 Central Ave., Boston 

PAUL Z. VARTIGAN 

186 Willow Ave., W. Somerville 
PHILIP C. VINCELLO 

266 Crescent St., Waltham 

THOMAS VON HOLZHAUSEN 

4 5 Witherbee Ave., Revere 

EDWARD J. WALLACE 

80 Rust St., South Hamilton 
GERARD WALLACE 

28 Magdala St., Ashmont 
JOHN F. A. WALSH 

20 Granite St., Peabody 

JAMES F. WALSH 

206 Rindge Ave., Cambridge 

JOHN F. WARK 

69 Pleasant Hill, Dorchester 

HYMAN M. WEINER 

6 Howland St., Roxbury 

PAUL H. WEISS 

109 Bellevue St., West Roxbury 
WALTER J. WELCH 

2 3 Farragut Ave., Somerville 
PHILIP I. WESSLING 

303 Bellevue St., West Roxbury 
DONALD J. WHITE 

83 Upland Road, Quincy 

PAUL WHITE 

15 Bonner Ave., Medford 

LEO F. WILSON 

34 Silk St., Arlington 

GERALD P. ZIEGENGEIST 

56 Alden St., Plymouth 
ROSARIO S. ZISA 

7 Jackson Court, Lawrence 



FRESHMAN CLASS 



The first "Here-as-long-as-the-draf t-board- 
lets-us-stay" class came to Boston College as 
the Class of '45 and will leave, mysteriously 
enough, as the Class of '44. Five hundred of 
them enrolled in September 1941, the largest 
class, numerically, to enter the Heights, and it 
probably will leave the smallest. 

They have had as dean the capable and pop- 
ular Father John Foley. Early in the year they 
elected Edward McMahon, President; Francis 
Duggan, Vice-President; Arthur Quilty, 
Treasurer; and William Gartland, Secretary. 
These men showed ability in planning a suc- 
cessful year with Under-the-Towers dances, 
freshman day, mother's day and the freshman 
prom. 

This Freshmen Class considered many things 
important, including the Dean's list, and on it 
they managed to place about thirty of their 



members, led by the 94.4 average of R. L. Kel- 
leher. We have more names for you to watch 
in the coming years. Men that have already 
shown ability. Boys who have played football 
beautifully and fast. Bob Mangene, Bill De- 
Rosa, Ed Fiorentino, Leo Landry .... and fast 
on the track .... Tom Greehan, Ed Delaney 
.... Jim Ronayne, Bob Mason, Ed Burns, Jack 
Cunniff were the men that chased the puck for 
the Maroon and Gold. Dramatics displayed 
Charlie Rogers, Dick Ward, Ed Jennings .... 
StyltLS men, Sandy Jenks, Bill Miller. . . . These 
are but part of the roster. Watch them go, 
they show promise. 

Though only freshmen, they have men in 
the service already such as Bill Miller, flying 
high, he of Catholic Literature and art. So he 
and others fight for country and the Class of 
'45 continues to become the Class of '44. 




FRESHMAN DIRECTORY 



MITCHELL J. ABDONORE 

5 88 Tremont St., Boston, Mass. 



JOHN J. BENT 

7 Florence St. East, Roslindale, Ma«. 



FRANCIS J. BRENNAN 

8 3 Hamilton St., Wollaston, Mass. 



ROBERT H. ACHIN 

9 Plymouth St., Lowell, Mass. 



ANGELOS S. AFENTAKIS 

18 Pine St., Boston, Mass. 



FRED G. AHERN 

460 Gallivan Blvd., Dorchester, Ma 



JOHN T. BERRY 

47 A St., South Boston, Ma 



JOHN J. BERNBE 

700 Metropolitan Ave., Hyde Park, Ma 



EDWARD W. BEUCLER 

9 Columbia St., Cambridee, Mass. 



THOMAS F. BRENNAN 

82 Henley St., Charlestown, Mass. 



RICHARD J. BROGGI 

8/2 Bodwell St., Sanford, Maine 



THOMAS J. BROWN 

92 Chandler Road, Medford, Mass. 



CHARLES J. ALEXANDER 

318 Waverly St., Framingham, Ma 



JOHN P. ALLEGRA 

156 Fort Hill St., Hingham, Ma 



LOUIS A. AMOROSO 

31 Wedgewood St., Everett, Ma 



ALFRED F. ARCIERI 

3 64 K St., South Boston, Mass. 



LOUIS F. ARONE 

110 Templeton Pky., Watertown, Mass. 



ARTHUR J. ASHOOK 

106 East Brookiine St., Boston, Mass. 



DONALD W. AUBREY 

5 5 River Ave., Norwich, Conn. 



PHILIP J. AULSON 

413 Lafayette St., Salem, Mass. 



WALTER A. AVERY 

3 3 Upland Road, Quincy, Ma 



HARRY R. BARKER, JR. 

26 Garrison Road, Wellesley, Ma 



ROBERT R. BEAUCHEMIN 

3003 Connor St., Port Huron, Mich. 



JOSEPH E. BELLISSIMO 

41 Slade St., Belmont, Mass. 



FRANCIS X. BELOTTI 

460 Ashmont St., Dorchester, Mass. 



JOHN P. BIRTWELL 

5 9 Lakewood Road, Newton Highlands 
Mass. 
EUGENE L. BLACKWELL 

16 Amherst St., Roslindale, Mass. 

ROBERT W. BLACKENEY 

447 Brookiine St., Newton Centre, Mass. 

WILLIAM A. BOGEN 

66 Lawton St., Brookiine, Mass. 

THOMAS F. BOLAND 

900 Washington St., Dorchester, Mass. 

JOSEPH A. BONACCORSI 

44 Jaques St., Somerville, Mass. 

GEORGE S. BOOTHBY 

99 Bedford St., Abington, M.iss. 

ANTONIO E. BOSCHETTI 

138 White St., Belmont, Mass. 

JEFFREY J. BOWE 

3 1 Champney St., Brighton, Mass. 

KEVIN J. BOWERS 

5 3 Sorrento St., Allston, Mass. 

BERNARD F. BRADY 

186 Arborway, Boston, Mass. 

JOHN P. BRADY 

1 5 Edison Green, Dorchester, Mass 

JOHN J. BRADLEY 

63 Whitten St., Dorchester, Mass. 



JOHN J. BUCKLEY 

21 Mansur St., Jamaica Plain, Ma 



WALTER J. BUCKLEY 

12 Prospect St., Charlestown, Mass. 



EDWARD A. BURBANK 

106 Knoll St., Roslindale, Mass. 



EUGENE E. BURLINGAME 

24 Pleasant Ave., Somerville, Ma 



HENRY T. BURKE, JR. 

210 Middle St., Weymouth, Mass. 



WILLIAM J. BURKE 

117 Florence St., Brockton, Mass. 



EDWARD P. BURNS 

269 Lowell St., Arlington, Ma 



VINCENT M. BURNS 

5 Lawndale Terrace, Jamaica Plain, Ma 



WILLIAM H. BUTLER 

3 6 Fitchburg St., Watertown, Mass. 



EDWARD C. BYRNE 

102 5 Front St., So. Weymouth, Ma 



JAMES I. CALABRESE 

3 8 Julian St., Dorchester, Ma 



JOHN J. CAMPBELL 

11 Felton St., Cambridge, Ma 



JOSEPH A. CANCELLIERE 

3 3 Glenwood Road, Somerville, Ma 



CARMINE J. BELMONTE 

296 Revere St., Revere, Mass. 



JOHN T. BRENNAN 

113 Cedar St., Framingham, Mass. 



MICHAEL J. CAPRIO 

3 6 Northampton St., Boston, Mass. 



DAVID M. CAREY 

22 Belknap St., Concord, Mass. 

JAMES M. CARNEY 

4 Playstead Road, Dorchester, Mass. 

MATTHEW F. CARROLL 

19 Linwood Road, Lynn, Mass. 

THOMAS F. CARROLL 

29 Devens St., West Quincy, Mass. 

JOSEPH A. CASANOVA 

76 Dayton St., West Quincy, Mass. 

THOMAS J. CASEY 

2 8 Hale St., Beverly, Mass. 

WALTER E. CASEY 

60 Clinton St., Everett, Mass. 

EDWARD F. CASHMAN 

175 Tracy Ave., Lynn, Mass. 

FRANCIS J. CASSANI 

70 Fremont Ave., Chelsea, Mass. 

VINCENT A. CATALOONA 

3 6 Beach Road, Revere, Mass. 



JOSEPH V. COMERFORD 

5 8 Great Road, West Roxbury, Ma 



DENNIS M. CONDON 

249 Bunker Hill St., Charlestown, Ma 



PAUL B. CONDON 

48 Highland St., Sharon, Ma 



WILLIAM R. CONDON 

3 6 Mason St., Salem, Mass. 



JOHN P. CONEYS 

86 Webb St., Weymouth, Mass. 



JOHN E. CONNELLY 

21 Gerald Road, Brighton, Ma 



JOHN J. CONNOLLY 

34 Speedwell St., Dorchester, Ma 



WILLIAM E. CONNOLLY 

185 Hammond St., Newton, Mass. 



JAMES O. CONWAY 

60 Lothrop St., Newton, Ma 



WILLIAM H. COOPER II 

2 1 Prospect Park, Ncwtonville, Ma 



JOSEPH M. CRONIN 

83 Washington Ave., Waltham, Mass. 



PAUL X. CRONIN 

8 3 Washington Ave., Waltham, Mass. 



ROBERT L. CRONIN 

3 Lake Shore Drive, Wcstwood, Ma 



TIMOTHY X. CRONIN 

106 Arlington St., Brighton, Ma 



JOHN R. CRAIG 

73 Warren St., Waltham, Ma 



FRANCIS G. CROSBY 

47 Vine St., Roxbury, Mass. 



FRANK A. CROSBY 

252 Grant St., Framingham, Mass. 



JOSEPH J. CROWLEY 

94 Warren Ave., Milton, Ma 



WILLIAM L. CULLEN 

60 Pitcher Ave., Medford, Mass. 



CARROLL J. CUMMINGS 

Topsfield Road, Ipswich, Ma 



JOSEPH D. CAVAN 

1 1 Colby St., Haverhill, Mass. 



WILLIAM D. CORBETT 

61 Highland Ave., Watertown, Ma 



PAUL D. CUMMINGS 

47 Waldcck St., Dorchester, Mass. 



PASQUALE J. CEGLIO 

72 Westminster Ave., Watertown, Mass. 



JOHN E. CORCORAN 

3 Moulton St., Newton Lower Fa 



JOHN A. CUNNIFF 

Mass. 412 Weston Road, Wellesley, Ma 



JOHN R. CLANCEY 

90 Thetford Ave., Dorchester, Mass. 



WILLIAM P. CORNYN 

43 Rockdale St., Mattapan, Ma 



THOMAS F. CUNNIFF 

37 Dunster Road, Jamaica Plain, Mass. 



JAMES J. CODY 

797 Columbia Road, Dorchester, Mass. 

EDWARD A. COEN 

9 Elm St., Waltham, Mass. 

JOHN J. COFFEY 

208 Granite Ave., Milton, Mass. 

THOMAS J. COLBERT 

16 Edgccliffe Road, Watertown, Mass. 

ROGER C. COLLETTE 

27 Highland St., Marlboro, Mass. 



RICHARD J. COSTELLO 

200 Parker Hill Ave., Roxbury, Ma 



WILLIAM J. COSTELO 

72 Linden St., Brooklme, Ma 



WALTER C. COTTER 

200 Mt. Vernon St., West Roxbury, 



EDMOND J. COUGHLIN 

66 Cross St., Norwood, Ma 



JAMES J. COUGHLIN 

21 Sycamore St., Norwood, Ma 



EDWARD F. CUNNIGHAM 

182 Magazine St., Cambridge, Ma 



WILLIAM H. CURLEY 

28 Boundary Road, Maiden, Ma; 



JOSEPH P. CURRY 

Mass. 34 Davis Ave., Brookline, Ma 



JOHN V. CURRY 

34 Davis Av*., Brookline, Ma 



JOHN M. GUSHING 

373 E St., South Boston, Ma 



JAMES M. COLLINS 

1 Focke Place, South Boston, Mass. 



GEORGE C. CRONIN, JR. 

14 Summer St., Saugus, Ma 



PAUL H. DALLAS 

5 5 Brown Ave., Boston, Mass. 



ROBERT A. DALLAS 

S5 Brown Ave., Boston, Ma 



CHARLES W. DARCY 

32 Bardwell St., Jamaica Plain, Ma 



PAUL F. DAWSON 

93 Rindge Ave., North Cambr 



THOMAS E. DEE 

122 Dorchester St., Lawrence, Ma 



JOHN E. DELANEY 

141 Newton St., Lawrence, Ma, 



WILLIAM J. DELANEY 

2 51 Weston Road, Wellesley, Ma 



JOHN A. DELEO 

7 Fenelon St., Dorchester, Mass. 



JOHN S. DENNEHY 

106 Algonquin Road, Newton, Ma 



WILFRED DE ROSA 

232 Vine St., Everett, Ma 



GEORGE E. DESAULNIERS 

46 Romscy St., Dorchester, Mass. 



JAMES H. DEVINS 

62 Egmont St., B:ookline, M::ss. 



ROBERT J. DEVITT 

12/2 Clifton Ave., Salem, Ma 



JOSEPH T. DEVLIN 

14 CrandJl St., Roslindalc, Mass. 



GENNARO L. DI PRIZIO 

170 Endicott St., Boston, Ma 



ROCCO J. DI SABATO 

5 8 Franconia St., Dorchester, Mas: 



JAMES M. DODERO 

203 Elliot St., Brockton, Ma 



EDWARD L. DONAHUE 

2 Douglas Ave., Maynard, MiSs. 



JOSEPH F. DONAHUE 

4! Sheridan St., Jamaica Plain, Ma 



JOSEPH P. DONAHUE 

Mass. 1602 Dorchester Ave., Dorchester, Mass. 



JAMES A. DONNELLY 

83 Webster St., Arlington, Ma 



JOSEPH S. DONNELLY 

57 Metropolitan Ave., Roslindale, Ma 



WILLIAM P. DONNELLY 

3 Bartlett Road, Randolph, Ma 



FRANCIS J. DONOVAN 

118 Arlington St., Brighton, Mass. 



LEO W. DONOVAN 

96 Wheatland Ave., Dorchester, Mass. 



THOMAS T. DONOVAN 

128 West Brookline St., Eo-.ton, Ma 



FREDERIC W. DOYLE 

179 Beacon Hill Ave., Lynn, Mc 



JOHN C. DRISCOLL 

27 Artwell St., Milton, Ma 



PAUL A. DUARTE 

606 Centre St., Brockton, Mas; 



JAMES D. DUFFEY 

9 LarkhiU Road, West Roxbury, Ma 



FRANCIS J. DUGGAN 

27 Revere St., Everett, Ma 



FRANCIS J. DUNNE 

2 3 Jersey St., Dedham, Ma 



FRANK M. DWYER 

1 Oak Ave., Belmont, Ma 



JOHN J. EGAN 

6!1 Chestnut Hill Ave., Brookline, Mas; 

ELI EHRLICH 

1509 North Shore Road, Revere, Mass. 

HERBERT ELLIS, JR. 

108 Westbourne Terrace, Brookline, Ma; 

DANIEL F. ENEGUESS, JR. 

1090 Massachusets Ave., Arlington, Ma; 

ALBERT C. ENGLISH 

127 Waverly Ave., Watertown, Mass. 

ARTHUR M. FAGAN 

49 Langley Road, Newton Centre, Ma; 

HAROLD F. FAGAN 

63 B St., Lowell, Mass. 

JOHN J. FAHERTY 

48 Avalon Road, West Roxbury, Mass. 

JOHN R. FAHEY 

16 Pine St., West Newton, Mass. 

JOHN T. FARRELL 

272 Weld St., West Roxbury, Mass. 

MICHAEL F. FARINA 

17 Murphy Court, Newton, Mass. 

ALFRED F. FERULLO 

249 Chambers St., Boston, Mass. 

JOSEPH FIGURITO 

34 Horace St., Somerville, Mass. 

JAMES E. FINIGAN 

46 Lexington Road, Concord, Mass. 

THOMAS F. FINIGAN 

67 Scott Road, Belmont, Mass. 

CHARLES W. FINNERTY, JR. 

5 Pearson Road, West Somerville, Ma; 



EDWARD M. DOHERTY 

39 Washington St., Charlestown, Ma 



CHARLES H. EARLY 

43 Spring Park Ave., Ja 



lica Plain, Mass. 



EDWARD A. FIORENTINO 

10 Andrew St., Everett, Mass. 



JOSEPH H. DOHERTY 

7 Corwin St., Dorchester, Ma, 



CHARLES V. FARLEY 

115 Aspen Ave., Auburndalc, Ma 



BERNARD L. FITZ-GERALD 

144 Hillside St., Roxbury, Mas 



DONALD V. DOLAN 

4 Hollywood Road, Winchester, Ma 



WILLIAM B. EARLEY, JR. 

16 Westville St., Dorchester, Mass. 



ROBERT D. FITZGERALD 

117 Chestnut St., Haverhill, Ma 



THOMAS W. DOLAN 

2 5 Eton St., Springfield, Ma 



HARRY L. ECHTELER 

1 1 Joyce Kilmer Road, West Roxbury, Mass. 



ROBERT L. FITZGERALD 

106 Lincoln Road, Medford, Ma 



WILLIAM T. FITZGERALD 

3 5 Beacon St., Somerville, Mass. 



MARIO M. GIANNELLI 

29 Lynde St., Everett, Mass. 



FRANCIS J. HARDIMAN 

310 Centre St., Jamaica Plain, Mass. 



EDMUND L. FLAHERTY 

3 Granite St., Norwood, Mass. 



WILLIAM A. FLEMING 

S3 Fairbanks St., Brighton, Mass. 



JOHN J. FLYNN 

1140 Massachusetts Ave., Arlington, Mass. 



PAUL F. FLYNN 

83 Saxton St., Dorchester, Mass. 



FRANCIS G. FOLEY 

S Cutler Ave., Cambridge, Mass. 



FRANK D. FOLEY 

61 Tenner St., Lawrence, Mass. 



JOHN J. FOLEY 

261A Broadway, Somerville, Mass. 



GREGORY V. FORTUNE 

46 Lincoln St., Waltham, Ma 



REDMOND P. FRASER, JR. 

9 Brook St., Manchester, N. H. 



STEPHEN M. FRAWLEY 

378 Ames St., Lawrence, Mass. 



BERNARD J. FRIM 

69 Wayland St., Roxbury, Ma 



WILLIAM I. FUREZ 

16 Vassar St., Dorchester, Mass. 



JAMES N. GABRIEL 

1686 Massachusetts Ave., Cambridge, Ma 



VINCENT H. GANNON 
117 Plain St., Millis, Mass 



CHARLES E. GARDNER 

2 57 West Main St., Littleton, N. H. 



JOHN A. GIANOULIS 

28 Highland Ave., Salem, Ma 



JAMES M. GIBBONS 

4379 Washington St., Roslindale, Ma 



MARTIN J. GIBBONS 

607 Heath St., Brookline, Ma 



PATRICK J. GILMORE 

22 Harrison St., Quincy, Mass. 



STANLEY A. GOODE 

69 Myrtle Ave., Fitchburg, Ma 



JOHN J. GORHAM 

22 Gloria Road, West Roxbury, Ma 



BYRON P. GRAFF 

83 Claymoss Road, Brighton, Mass. 



ANGELO C. GRANDE 

48 Short St., Lawrence, Mass. 



LOUIS J. GRANDISON 

61 Dartmouth St., Somerville, Ma 



ERNEST J. GRANSTEIN 

1657 Cambridge St., Cambridge, Ma 



THOMAS J. GREEHAN 

29 Stearns Road, Belmont, Ma 



JOHN J. GREENLER 

R. F. D. 4, Georgetown, Ma 



FREDERICK R. GRIFFIN 

106 Glenwood Road, Somerville, Ma 



JOSEPH W. GRIFFIN 

93 Belmont St., Cambridge, Ma 



LAWRENCE J. GRIFFIN 

164 Allandale St., Jamaica Plain, Ma 



FRANCIS E. HARRINGTON 

17 Andrews St., Everett, Mass 



JAMES F. HARRINGTON 

2 8 St. Rose St., Jamaica Plain, Mass. 



JAMES J. HARRINGTON 

153 Strathmore Road, Brighton, Ma 



JOHN F. HARRINGTON 

88 South Street, Lynn, Mass. 



WILLIAM J. HARRINGTON 

70 Monroe St., Norwood, Mass. 



PAUL F. HARRIS 

117 Common St., Watertown, Ma 



JOHN J. HART 

105 E.xeter St., Lawrence, Mass. 



JOHN V. HARVEY 

378 Park Ave., Arlington, Mass. 



JOHN A. HASENFUS 

970 Dedham St., Newton Centre, Mass. 



RICHARD J. HASSEY 

8 Holly Ave., Cambridge, Mass. 



JOHN J. HAVLIN 

3 3 Nottingham Rd., Brighton, Ma 



DANIEL M. HEALY 

SO Pontiac St., Roxbury, Mass. 



ROBERT E. HEALY 

90 Morton St., Waltham, Ma 



THOMAS J. HEALY 

91 Russell St., Maiden, Ma 



JOSEPH G. HERBERT 

97 Franklin St., Framingham, Mass. 



WILLIAM F. GARTLAND 

3 8 Pleasant Hill Ave., Dorchester, Ma 



EDWARD P. GRIGALUS 

16 Thomas Park, South Boston, Ma, 



ROBERT E. HERLIHY 

109 Medford St., Arlington, Ma 



LAWRENCE D. GAUGHAN 

201 Chestnut Ave., Jamaica Plain, Mass. 



JOSEPH F. GEARY 

43 2 East Fifth St., South Boston, Mass. 



JOHN F. GERAN 

117 Garland Road, Newton Centre, Ma 



WILLIAM P. GRIMES 

66 Orchard St., Jamaica Plain, Ma 



WILLIAM F. HAMROCK 

16 Potosi St., Dorchester, Ma 



RICHARD C. HANSEN 

73 Horace St., East Boston, Mass. 



DAVID A. HERN 

34 Adams St., Dorchester, Ma 



THOMAS V. HEVER 

4 Sunset Rd., Salem, Mass. 



PAUL H. HINES 

7 Bellaire Rd., West Roxbury, Mass. 



MICHAEL A. HIRREL 

19 Golden Ave., Medford, Ma 



JAMES J. KELLEY 

1545 Cranston St., Cranston, R. I. 



RICHARD F. KNIGHT 

19 Kingsbury St., Framingliam, Ma 



DANIEL J. HOBART 

21 Madison St., West Medford, Ma 



JOHN W. KELLEY 

60 Harrison St., Brookline, Mass. 



ROBERT J. KOSLOWSKY 

8 Park Ave., SomerviUe, Mass. 



JOHN P. HOGAN 

37 Meade St., Lowell, Mass. 



THOMAS A. KELLEY 

66 Westville St., Dorchester, Ma 



JOSEPH S. KULIS 

49 Andover St., Lowell, Ma 



JOHN J. HOLLAND 

9 Hinckley St., Dorchester, Mass. 



JOHN H. KELLY, JR. 

19 Surrey St., Brighton, Mass. 



JOSEPH T. LAFFEY 

70 Kingstown Road, Peacedale, R. L 



JAMES P. HOULIHAN 

94 Arlington St., Brighton, Mass. 



PATRICK J. KELLY 

3 3 Stearns Road, Brookline, Ma 



JOSEPH F. LAMBE 

132 Middle St., East Weymouth, Mass. 



RICHARDSON W. HOWE 

2 Ripley Terrace, Newton, Ma 



JOHN E. KENNEDY 

9 Nelson Heights, Milford, Mass. 



FRANK E. LANDRY 

84 Park St., Gardner, Mass. 



JOHN D. HULHES 

46A Elm St., Worcester, Ma 



MICHAEL J. KENNEY 

79 Walworth St., Ro.xbury, Mass. 



JOSEPH A. LANTEIGNE 

SO B St., Lowell, Mass. 



HENRY P. JANESY 

3 Elwood St., Everett, Mass. 



EDWARD S. JAY 

66 Craigrie St., SomerviUe, Mass. 



PAUL F. KENNY 

2 J Dartmouth St., Woburn, Mass. 



THOMAS B. KENNY 

3 Revere St., Jamaica Plain, Ma 



JOHN J. LARIVEE 

27 Green St., Beverly, Mass. 



PAUL A. LARIVEE 

2 Harris St.. Salem, Mass. 



WESTON M. JENKS 

8S9 Watertown Ave., Waterbury, Conn. 



WILLIAM C. KERIVAN 

24 Woodman St., Lynn, Mass. 



JOSEPH A. LaROSSA 

43 Pierce Ave,, Everett, Mass. 



EDWARD J. JENNINGS 
80 Kenrick St., Brighton, Ma 



LOUIS J. KERRIGAN 

3! Prescott St., East Boston, Ma 



KARL L. LAUBER 

93 Collins St., Lynn, Ma 



JOSEPH L. JOHNSON, JR. 

19 Harvard Ave., Brookline, Ma 



PAUL C. KEYES 

2 8 No. Crescent Circle, Brighton, Mass. 



HENRY J. LAWLOR 

70 Waban Hill Road, Waban, Mass. 



LEO J. JOY 

3 6 Lowden Ave., SomerviUe, Mass. 



WILLIAM J. KICKHAM 

6 57 Chestnut Hill Ave., Brookline, Ma 



JOHN F. LEARY 

220 Central Ave., Medford, Mass. 



THOMAS V. KEATING 

5 3 Upland Road, Quincy, Mass. 



EDWARD J. KILEY, JR. 

2 8 Corinthian Road, West SomerviUe, Ma 



FRANCIS G. LEE 

74 High St., Charlestown, Mass. 



JOHN M. KEELEY 

20 Bradstreet Ave., Revere, Ma 



JOHN J. KILLELEA 

52 WUliams Ave., Hyde Park, Ma 



EDWARD R. LEMBO 

IS Sanger St., Framingham, Mass. 



JAMES P. KEENAN 

3 6 Walnut St., Milton, Ma 



JOHN F. KILLORY 

223 Forest Ave., Brockton, Mass. 



ROBERT F. LEMON 

9 Medway St., Quincy, Mass. 



JOHN P. KEILTY 

4 Hudson St., Lynn, Ma 



JOHN F. KINEAVY 

40 Easton St., Aliston, Ma 



FRED C. LEONARD 

67 Fairmont St., Belmont, Mass. 



EDWARD J. KELLEHER 

57 Simpson Ave., SomerviUe, Ma 



RICHARD T. KING 

S3 No. Putnam St., Danvers, Mass. 



LOUIS A. LEONE 

3 60 Longwood Ave., Boston, Mass. 



ROBERT L. KELLEHER 

IS Palmyra St., Winthrop, Ma 



RICHARD M. KIRBY 

103 New Park St., Lynn, Ma 



JOHN M. LETVINCHUK 

10 Giffords Court, Salem, Ma 



DAVID J. KELLEY 

95 Highland Ave., SomerviUe, Mass. 



GEORGE E. KIRVAN 

10 Bangor Road, West Roxbury, Ma 



JAMES F. LILLIS 

23 Seagrave Road, No. Cambridge, Ma 



JOHN J. LINEHAN 

75 Foster St., Brighton, Ma 



NORMAN P. MARTIN 

16 Bulfinch St., Lynn, Ma 



GERARD J. McGANN 

13 5 Corey St., West Roxbury, Ma 



PETER A. LOCONTO 

96 Thorndike St., Cambridge, Ma 



JOSEPH MARTINS 

62 Shawmut Ave., Boston, Mass. 



WALTER J. McGLYNN 

8 8 McKay St., Beverly, Mass. 



THOMAS J. LOFTUS 

48 Fuller St., Dorchester, Mass. 



ROBERT T. MASON 

5 West Elm Ave., WoUaston, Ma 



JAMES M. McGOWAN 

2911 — 29th St., San Diego, California 



CHARLES D. LOGUE 

82 Walnut Ave., Norwood, Mass. 



JAMES A. MATTHEWS 

2602 Ave I, Brooklyn, N. Y. 



JOHN B. McGOWAN 

66 Bedford Road, Woburn, Ma 



SANTO J. LOSCOCCO 

5 Port Norfolk St., Neponsei, Ma 



JOHN P. MAHONEY 

726 Winthrop St., Brockton, Mass. 



JOSEPH D. MAHONEY 

16 Fleming St., Lowell, Mass. 



JOSEPH M. MAHONEY 

82 Julian St., Dorchester, Ma 



ARTHUR R. MAIER 

1063 Dorchester Ave., Dorchester, Ma 



FRANCIS X. MALLAHAN 

3 3 Blakeslee St., Cambridge, Ma 



ROBERT J. MALLON 

1 Chester Court, Maiden, Ma 



DANIEL F. MALONEY 

138 Marston St., Lawrence, Ma 



THOMAS M. MALONEY 

40 President's Lane, Quincy, Mass. 



ROBERT W. MANGENE 

5 8 Beach St., Maiden, Mas: 



WILLIAM J. MANNIX 

28 Randolph St., Belmont, Ma 



ANTHONY E. MANOK 

17 Fairmont St., Arlington, Mass. 



PAUL S. MARBLE 

26 5 Stevens Ave., Portland, Ma 



JAMES P. MARKHAM 

15 Emerson St., Belmont, Ma 



GERARD T. MARTIN 

19 Massachusetts Ave., Natick, Ma 



GEORGE E. MacDONALD 

3 Benton Road, Medford, Ma 



ALEXANDER H. MacLEAN 

73 Pine St., Belmont, Mass. 



DANIEL P. MacLEAN 

11 Rose Garden Circle, Brighton, Mass. 



JOHN J. McALEER 

24 Fairfield St., North Cambridge, Mass. 



JOHN K. McANDREWS 

81 B St., Lowell, Mass. 



JOHN J. McBRIDE 

3 8 Chauncy St., Watertown, Ma 



BERNARD J. McCARTHY 

5 68 Andover St., Lawrence, Ma 



CHARLES H. McCARTHY 

927 East Fourth St., South Boston, Ma 



JOHN J. McCarthy 

2 Ossipee Road, Somerville, Ma 



JAMES F. McCOURT 

660 Huntington Ave., Boston, Ma 



CHARLES R. McCREADY 

139 East Cottage St., Dorchester, Ma 



ROBERT J. McDonald 

1093 Saratoga St., East Boston, Mass. 



EDWARD J. McDonald 

71 Auckland St.. Dorchester, Mass. 



ROBERT B. McDOUGALL 

16 Revere St., Jamaica Plain, Ma 



CLIFFORD F. McELROY 

3 Magnus Ave., Somerville, Mass. 



BERNARD K. McGRATH 

43 3 Quincy Shore Drive, North Quincy, 
Mass. 



HERMAN G. McGRATH 

77 Billings St., Sharon, Mass. 



LEO E. McGRATH 

66 Wren St., West Roxbury, Ma 



JAMES J. McGUINN 

5 Washington St., Newton, Mass. 



JOHN F. McGUIRE 

29 Dyer St., Framin, 



ROBERT W. McKEARNEY 

12 5 Viola St., Lowell, Mass. 



JAMES W. McKENNA 
8 5 Jackson St., Lynn, Ma 



CHARLES P. McKENZIE 

27 Alden St., Waltham, Ma 



ANDREW J. McLaughlin 

63 Vine St., Reading, Mass. 



EDWARD P. McLaughlin 

62 Tuttle St., Dorchester, Ma 



EDWARD L. McMAHON 

5 B St., Lowell, Mass. 



THOMAS K. McMANUS 

23 3 Poplar St., Roslindale, Mass. 



EDWARD J. McMORROW 

2 5 Athelwold St., Dorchester, Ma 



PAUL F. McNAMARA 

5 3 Dartmouth St., Somerville, Ma 



LEO M. MARTIN 

8 3 Eleanor St., Chelsea, Mass. 



THOMAS J. McENTEE 

82 Highland Road, Brookline, Mass. 



EDWARD P. McNULTY 

3858 Washington St., Roslindale, Mass. 



ALBERT L. McPHEE 

16 Linden St., South Boston, Mass. 



WALTER F. NORRIS 

16 Fiske Road, Wellesley Hills, Ma 



JOHN J. NIHAN 

3 34 Centre St., Dorchester, Ma 



EDWARD W. McQUARRIE 

2 5 Clarendon Ave., Lynn, Ma 



PAUL V. MOYNIHAN 

1 J Victoria St., Dorchester, Mass. 



EDWARD M. NIXON, JR. 

87 Walnut St., Brookline, Mass. 



EUGENE S. McSWEENEY 

863 Metropolitan Ave., Hyde Park, Ma 



JOHN P. McSWEENEY 

5 Manor St., Dorchester, Ma 



WILLIAM J. MEAD 

97 Draper St., Dorchester, Ma 



WILLIAM A. MEADE 

20 East Milton Road, Brookline, Ma 



STEPHEN W. MEAGHER 

125 Prospect St., West Newton, Mass. 



WILLIAM F. MEARD 

15 Webster St., South Weymouth, Ma 



RICHARD D. MEDLEY 

15 Churchill Ave., Arlington, Mass. 



HENRY J. MEGLEY 

37 Norfolk Road, Holbrook, Mass. 



AUGUSTINE A. MERCURIO 

1 Alexander Ave., Medford, Ma 



RICHARD D. MESSINA 

256 Leyden St., East Boston, Ma 



CHARLES A. METCALF 

24 Furness St., Revere, Mass. 



ROY S. MILBURY 

246 Wolcott Road, Brookline, Mass. 



RICHARD R. MINICHIELLO 

52 West Cedar St., Boston, Ma 



HENRY E. MONTANA 

9 Bracket! St., Brighton, Ma 



THOMAS M. MORAN 

57 Ackers Ave., Brookline, Ma 



LEO J. MORGAN 

2 Packard Ave., Dorchester, Ma 



DAVID M. MORIARTY 

29 Grove St., Milford, Ma 



JOHN P. MULLEN 

8 Wolcott Park, Medford, Ma 



ROBERT W. MULLOY 

2 3 Partridge Terrace, Everett, Ma 



JOHN E. MULVANEY 

43 Ashcroft Road, Medford, Mass. 



JOHN P. MULVIHILL 

49 Priscilla Road, Newton, Ma 



FRANCIS L. MURPHY 

313 K St., South Boston, Ma 



JOHN J. MURPHY 

3 Ascot St., Brighton, Ma 



JOSEPH C. MURPHY 

43 Stonehurst St., Dorchester, Ma, 



JOSEPH P. MURPHY 

14 Shattuck St. Natick, Ma 



PAUL G. MURPHY 

92 Sivan St., Everett, Ma 



ROBERT P. MURPHY 

26 Bradfield Ave., Roslindale, Mass. 



WILLIAM J. MURPHY 

73 Pearl St., Lawrence, Ma 



GEORGE F. MURRAY 

19 Wynian St., Woburn, Ma 



ROBERT J. MURRAY 

3 5 Paris St., Medford, Ma 



SYLVESTER F. MURRAY 

2 3 Hemenway St., Boston, Ma 



JOHN F. MYATT 

1 1 Walnut Terrace, Quincy, Ma 



ERLE S. MYERS 

10 Buftum St., Salem, Mass. 



JOHN J. NEE 

42 Sumner St., East Boston, Ma 



KENNETH B. OATES 

5 5 Union St., Watertown, Mass. 



DONALD F. O'BRIEN 

66 Whittemore Ave., North Cambrid 



FRANCIS J. O'BRIEN 

8 5 Wicklow Ave., Medford, Ma 



JOHN F. O'CONNELL 

14 Euclid St., Dorchester, Mass. 



JOHN P. O'CONNELL 

229 Centre St., Dorchester, Mass. 



JOSEPH J. O'CONNOR 

172 Church St., West Roxbury, Mass. 



JOSEPH R. O'CONNOR 

301 Beech St., Roslindale, Mass. 



THOMAS F. O'CONNOR 

16 George St., North Cambridge, Mass. 



THOMAS P. O'CONNOR 

215 N St., South Boston, Ma 



CHARLES F. O'DONNELL 

24 Hudson St., Woburn, Ma 



JOHN P. O'DONNELL 

59 Huron Ave., Cambridge, Mass. 



ROBERT R. O'KEEFE 

24 Harrington Ave., Revere, Mass. 



WILLIAM A. OLIVER 

51 Dalton Road, Belmont, Ma 



JOHN B. O'NEIL 

659 Bedford St., Whitman, Ma 



PAUL J. O'NEIL 

1 Lexington Square, East Boston, Ma 



GERARD A. O'NEIL 

3 6 Mouiton St., Lynn, Ma 



JOHN M. MORIARTY 

15 Hutchinson St., Cambridge, Ma 



JOHN A. NEEDHAM 

5 6 Orchard Field St., Dorchester, Ma 



JOSEPH P. O'NEILL 

873 East Second St., South Boston, Mass. 



WELDON H. OSBORNE 

60 Orchard St., Salem, Mass. 

PAUL J. O'SULLIVAN 

24 Druid St., Dorchester, Mass 

WILLIAM J. O'SULLIVAN, JR. 

Bedford Road, Lincoln, Mass 

AUSTIN F. O'TOOLE 

18 Church St., Dorchester, Mass. 

JOHN L. OWEN 

5 Congreve St., Roslindale, Mass. 

EDWARD J. OWENS 

12 Amos Ave., Lowell, Mass. 

ROBERT J. OWENS 

197 Grove St., Auburndale, Mass. 

PAUL G. PAGET 

16 Mapleton St., Brighton, Mass. 

VICTOR J. PALLADINO, JR. 

123 Pleasant St., Watertown, Mass. 

WILLIAM V. PALLADINO 

24 Ridgewood St., Dorchester, Mass, 



LEONARD L. PASCIOCCO 

446 Quincy St., Dorchester, Mass. 

VINCENT PATTARINA 

241 Washington St., Quincy, Mass. 

JOSEPH F. PAULSON 

64/2 Whitney St., Roxbury, Mass. 

DAVID F. PAYTON 

2 8 Pay ton Court, Brockton, Mass. 

NORMAN E. PERRA 

24 lUh Ave., Haverhill, Mass. 

FRANCIS J. PERRY 

168 Newbury St., Roslindale, Mass. 

ALPHONSE J. PETKAUSKAS 

402 East Fifth St., South Boston, Ma 

FREDERICK J. PHIARD 

16 Morton Ave., Saugus, Mass. 

KENNETH H. POLLARD 

13 Oakland Ave., Methuen, Mass. 

JOHN J. POWELL 

46 Myrtle St., Maiden, Mass. 



EDMOND J. POWER 

19 Birch St., Everett, Ma 



RICHARD A. PUNZO 

132 Vernon St., Waltham, Ma 



ARTHUR M. QUILTY 

62 Dunster Road, Jamaica Plain, Ma 



THOMAS F. QUINN 

17 Wakullah St., Roxbury, Mass, 



WILLIAM J. RAE 

370 Main St., Milford, Mass. 



JAMES J. REGAN 

48 Farragut Ave., SomerviUe, Ma 



WILLIAM H. REID 

145 Overlook Ave., Great Neck, N. Y. 



JOSEPH A. RESCA 

109 Cottage St., Chelsea, Ma 



NERIO RESTANI 

24 Miller St., SomerviUe, Mass. 



PAUL J. REYNOLDS 

9 5 Lowell St., SomerviUe, Ma 



FRANCIS X. RILEY 

11 Cheever St., Chelsea, Ma 



ROY A. ROBICHAUD 

3 69 Webster St., Rockland, Mass. 



THOMAS J. ROBINSON 

78 Willow St., Everett, Ma 



THOMAS J. ROCHE 

11 Orvis Road, Arlington, Mass. 



CHARLES M. ROGERS 

2 3 Norfolk Road, Holbrook, Ma 



DONALD J. ROMEO 

123 3 Main St., Brockway, Pennsylva 



JAMES A. RONAYNE 

27 Belvoir Road, Milton, Mass. 



ROBERT V. ROONEY 

37A Amaranth Ave., Medford, Mass. 



WILLIAM T. RORKE 

62 Greaton Road, West Roxbury, Mass. 



ALBERT J. RUBACK 

322 West Ridge St., Lansford, Pcnnsylv 



PAUL J. RYAN 

63 Ellison Park, Waltham, Ma 



WILLIAM W. RYAN 

11 Westchester St., Lowell, Ma 



CHARLES T. RYDER 

20 Appleton Place, Arlington, Ma 



PAUL J. RYDER 

3 Alteresco Ave., Dorchester, Ma 



JACOB A. SANTAMARIA 

248 Roslindale Ave., Roslindale, Ma 



JAMES J. SCALE Y, JR. 

14 Paradise Road, Swampscott, Mass. 



ROBERT A. SCOTT 

131 Rossett Road, West Roxbury, Ma: 



THOMAS H. SEAVER 

2 Nelson Heights, Milford, Ma 



JOHN R. SERAFINI 

17 Phelps St., Salem, Mass. 



EDWARD F. SHEA 

10 Nevada St., Dorchester, Ma 



JAMES J. SHEEHAN 

109 Parsons St., Brighton, Mass. 



PAUL E. SHEEHAN 

37 Henry Ave., Lowell, Mass. 



ROBERT L. SHEEHAN 

133 Tonawanda St., Dorchester, Ma 



JOHN W. SHIERANT 

36 Edith Ave., Everett, Ma 



WILLIAM J. SHINNEY 

31 Monument Square, Charlestown, Ma 



FRANCIS T. SIRAGUSA 

102 Lake St., Brighton, Ma 



CHARLES H. SMITH 

84 Whittier Road, Medford, Mass. 



JOSEPH W. SMITH 

42 Revere St., Everett, Mass. 



PAUL E. SMITH 

2 8 Stonehurst St., Dorchester, Ma 



LOUIS V. SORGI 

-lia 2 58 Blue Hills Parkway, East Milton, Mass. 



RICHARD L. SPELLMAN 

3 9 Eliot Road, Arlington, Mas 



PHILIP H. SPILLANE 

49 Milwood St., Dorchester, Ma 



JAMES A. SPROUL 

378 Main St., Medfield, Ma 



STANLEY J. SREDA 

474 Shawmut Ave., Boston, Ma 



LOUIS P. STEELE 

105 Bryant Ave., East Milton, Ma 



JOHN T. SUDBAY 

24 Raymond Ave., Beverly, Ma 



CORNELIUS J. SULLIVAN 

18 Iroquois St., Roxbury, Ma 



DANIEL H. SULLIVAN 

89 Waltham St., West Newton, Ma 



FRANK J. TOLAND 

84 Codman Hill Ave., Dorchester, Mass. 

JOHN J. TOOHEY 

40 Shcppard Ave., East Braintree, Mass. 

JOHN J. TOOMEY 

SS 0.ik Ave., Belmont, Mass. 

FRANCIS X. TRACY 

49 Athcrton St., Jamaica Plain, Mass. 

EDWARD F. TREPANIER 

23 Gurney St., Cambridge, Mass. 

PHILIP T. TROY 

47 School St., Melrose, Mass. 

JOHN J. TULLY, JR. 

3 14 Pine St., Lowell, Mass. 

AUGUSTINE P. TURNBULL 

3 56 Scaver St., Dorchester, Mass. 



GEORGE F. WATERS 

1093 Walnut St., Newton Hills, Mass. 



FRANCIS P. WEBB 

3 Austin St., Back Bay, Boston, Ma 



ALFRED N. WEBER 

13 1 Myrtle St., Lynn, Ma 



FRANCIS J. WELCH 

Fort McKinley, Maine 



JOSEPH W. WESOLANS 

262 Parkway, Chelsea, Mas: 



EDWARD M. WHELAN 

64 Fletcher St., Roslindale, Mass. 



PAUL J. WHELAN 

7 Orient Ave., East Boston, Ma 



FREDERICK W. WHITTAKER, JR. 

8 Sheffield Road, Roslindale, Mass. 



JAMES H. SULLIVAN 

144 Ncsmith St., Lowell, Ma 



HENRY TYSZKOWSKI 

391 Pine St., Providence, R. I. 



GEORGE A. WHITE 

6 Maple Ave., Cambridge, Ma 



JOHN L. SULLIVAN 

410 Washington St., Wcllesley, Mas 



MARTIN B. VARTAN 

5 9 Jackson St., Lawrence, Ma 



ROBERT H. WHITE 

16 Ashton Ave., Newton Centre, Ma 



RAYMOND H. SULLIVAN 

114 Shcpard St., Lynn, Mass 



ANTHONY E. VITALE 

2 57 Greene St., New Haven, Conn. 



JOSEPH L. WILKINSON 

13 Lowe St., Peabody, Ma 



PAUL F. SWEENEY 

8 HunncwcU Ave., Brighton, Ma 



JOSEPH V. WAITKUNAS 

46 Thomas Park, South Boston, Mass. 



BERNARD L. WILLETT 

194 Lewis St., Lynn, Mass. 



PAUL J. SWEENEY 

Fitchville, Conn. 



JAMES F. WALL 

244 Montgomery Ave., Cranston, R. I. 



PHILIP E. WILLETT 

5 Holly St., Lawrence, Mass. 



FRANK R. TANGHERLINI 

6 Tremont St., Charlestown. Ma 



WILLIAM R. WALL 

3 5 West Ashland St., Brockton, Ma 



CHARLES A. WILLIAMS 

176 Falcon St., East Boston, M: 



ARTHUR P. TIBBETTS 

68 Olney St., Dorchester, Mass. 



EDWARD V. WALSH 

5 57 East Fourth St., South Boston, Ma 



CIRO R. YANNACO 

1 1 Woodville St., Everett, Ma 



ALBERT G. TIERNEY 

56 Green St., Watertown, Ma 



JOHN D. WALSH 

41 Greaton Road, West Roxbury, Mass. 



WILLIAM J. YOUNG 

94 Standard St., Mattapan, Mass., 



STEPHEN L. TINGLEY 

17 Potter St., East Providence, R. I. 



JAMES P. WARD 

187 Beaver St., Waltham, Mass. 



EMMANUEL L. ZISSIS 

52 Melendy Ave., Watertown, Ma 



SODALITY 



In the ideal order the Sodahty would be the 
center of the campus universe and the focal 
core from which all collegiate activities would 
emanate. For four years we have watched the 
Sodality gradually, slowly at times, approach 
its goal. In particular, senior has been the big 
year for the major of all activities. 

Teeming with the new ideas of Prefect Joe 
Elliott and the direction of Fr. Francis Coyne, 
the Sodality mapped out a fine plan for the 
workings of the group. With efficiency the 
members organized into smaller groups that 
activities might be well handled. With De- 
cember and the subsequent change in all activ- 
ities, the Sodality became the leader in the 
extra-curricular events at the College. Adapt- 
ing its organization to the times, they knifed 
at the root of America's war bewilderment 
with a series of timely lectures. These discus- 
sions on such topics as "The Christian Basis of 
Patriotism", "The Bill of Rights in Wartime", 
"Morality Is Morale", "Nietzsche and Nazism" 
and "Peace Plan of the Popes", were delivered 
by outstanding members of the faculty. In 



co-operation with these professors the Sodality 
Lecture Team under the leadership of Bob 
Muse spoke upon these subjects at various halls 
and forums in and around Boston. 

Added to this vital program of the Civilian 
Morale Group of the Sodality were other in- 
terests of the members. There were the spirit- 
ual exercises, prayers for peace, daily rosary, 
communion of reparation, and the traditional 
work among the negroes at the Blessed 
Sacrament Mission, as well as extensive work 
and reading for the blind, particularly at Per- 
kins Institute, under the direction of Sec- 
retary John Russell. 

A new feature was introduced to the mem- 
bers of the Sodality this year. It was the com- 
mittee on Functionalism under the supervision 
of Dr. H. Lee Bowen. This group was very 
active and put in much time on a study of the 
theory and tenets of Catholic Functionalism. 

Thus the Sodality permeated the other ac- 
tivities and unified them into a solid bloc of 
Catholic Action. 




Sc.ucd: Joseph J. Elliott, Edwiird S. McGrath. 

Standing: Joseph A. Lavoie, Joseph R. Stanton, John W. Russell. 



FULTON DEBATING SOCIETY 



If the Sodality is the core of the campus 
universe, then the Fulton is the wielding force 
of the students. Look at the leaders in the class 
and in the extra-curricular activities and you 
will find that they have been members of the 
debating societies for one to four years. In the 
Marquette and more particularly in the Fulton 
these men have been taught how to express 
themselves forcefully and cogently. They 
have learned the art of speaking. 

This year, as in other years, the Fulton led 
the way. With bustling Fr. Richard Shea as 
the motivating force the debaters engaged in a 
series of inter-collegiate debates with the out- 
standing colleges of the East. Thus far in 
decision debates the Fulton has been edged 
four times and has won three verdicts. They 
have met Holy Cross, Harvard, St. Joseph's, 
Sienna, M.I.T. and St. Michael's. 

The seniors are especially indebted to the 
compelling Father Shea for they have been 
under his guidance for three years. In his first 



term with the Marquette he coached the team 
into an undefeated season in fifteen inter-col- 
legiate debates. "We moved up to the Fulton 
and Fr. Shea was made moderator of the same. 

During the two years that we have been in 
the Fulton we have been pushed and taught, 
forced and parried into learning all the intrica- 
cies of debating technique. When the mem- 
bers began to develop in ability, they were 
drawn into other spheres because the college 
recognized their talent. 

Despite the war and the changed courses, 
the Fulton fulfilled all its speaking engage- 
ments. For the first half of the year, Joe Nolan 
was President, Tom Russell, Vice-President, 
Bob Kopp, Secretary, and Martie Hansberry 
Treasurer. At the mid-year elections Bob 
Kopp became President, Bill Cadigan, Vice- 
President, Joe Nolan, Secretary, and John 
Gibbons, Treasurer. During the season Mr. 
John D. Donoghue, S.J., was assistant modera- 
tor and Jack McElwee, debate manager. 




' ^^ /.'■J/ ^^!^ h'-il 'A'' / // '/ i'' ' 



Seated: Robert F. Muse, Martin J. Hansberry, Joseph T. Nolan, Robert E. Kopp, Thomas 

P. Russell. 
Standing: Modestino J. Vitale, James E. Hawco, John J. Gibbons, Thomas R. Hinchey, 

Robert F. Drinan, William J. Cadigan, Joseph A. Timpany, John L. Battles, John 

McSweeney. 



ALPHA SIGMA NU 



Linking together the twenty-two Jesuit 
Colleges in America is the only fraternity ex- 
isting in or between any of them, the Alpha 
Sigma Nu. Organized in 1939, the society 
has been mainly honorary. Its members have 
been limited to a few juniors selected each 
spring by the senior group which is retiring. 
The qualifications for members are capability, 
dependability, and leadership. 

The juniors who are elected to the frater- 
nity are immediately made marshals at the 
Commencement Exercises of the senior class, 
and are shown certain privileges at the various 
functions during the school year. The society 
hopes some day to be a unifying influence for 



thought and plans among all the Jesuit Col- 
leges. 

The eight men of the forty-two's selected by 
the '41 members for the National Jesuit 
Honor Society are: George Brent, outstanding 
baseball player; William Connolly, active in 
scientific fields and at present an Ensign in the 
United States Navy; William Cadigan, able 
journalist and debater; Martin Hansberry, 
Editor of the Sub Turri and mainstay of the 
debaters; James Hawco, vigorous editor of the 
Humanities; Robert Kenney, competent Busi- 
ness Manager of the Sub Turri; Constantine 
Pappas- Jameson, ingenious actor; and Joseph 
Stanton, all-around pre-medico. 




Seated: James E. Hawco, Joseph R. Stanton 

Standing: Constantine G. Pappas-Jameson, Martin J. Hansberry, William J. Cadigan, 
Robert M. Kenney. 



CROSS AND CROWN 



At the college official recognition is granted 
to those members of the senior class who have 
displayed talent and activity in their four 
years of undergraduate life on the campus by 
appointment to the Order of the Cross and 
Crown. In general, the basis for selection has 
been excellence in curricular and prominence 
in extra-curricular activities combined with 
reliability and integrity of character. 

Yet in all frankness, the authorities of the 
college met with unusual difficulty this year in 
the selection of members from the forty-two's 
because, according to the best authorities, '42 
has produced the most versatile array of talent 
since '34. 



Though primarily an honor organization, 
the Cross and Crown has continued the estab- 
lished policy of conducting and suggesting 
programs beneficial and pleasant to the under- 
graduate body. Foremost among these was a 
tea sponsored by the Cross and Crown for 
Father Martin D'Arcy, S.J., noted English 
author, educator, and lecturer. 

Under Knight Commander James E. Haw- 
co, the Order took an active part in all the 
functions of the college. Their permanent 
banner for the year has been Catholic College 
Action, and in the last analysis, this has been 
their most valuable contribution to the 
College. 




Seated: Martin J. Hansberry, James E. Hawco. 

Standing: Paul F. Salipante, Francis L. Colpoys, Francis J. Nicholson. 




ROBERT M. KENNEY 



MARTIN J. HANSBERRY 



ROBERT F. DRINAN 



SUB TURRI STAFF 

MARTIN J. HANSBERRY, Editor-in-Chief 

ROBERT F. DRINAN, Managing Editor 

SPECIAL EDITORS 

John W. Russell William J. Cadigan 

ASSOCIATE EDITORS 
George C. A. Boehrer James E. Hawco 

John T. Butler Edmund A. Weiss 

FEATURES 
Joseph G. Dever, Editor 
Joseph T. Nolan Modestino J. Vitale 

Frederick J. Griffin William M. Daly 

Thomas J. Lane John G. Ross 

ACTIVITIES 
Francis L. Colpoys, Editor 
Richard J. Carey Richard A. Keating 

Paul S. Coleman Samuel J. Lombard 

Robert L. Dunn Walter L. Deveney 

HISTORY 
Leo J. Murphy, Editor 
Francis J. Nicholson Edward L. McCormack 

Albert F. Pashby Bernard P. Farragher 

SPORTS 
Wilham E. Riley, Editor 
Harry W. Brown Thomas F. Duffy 

Robert L. Dunn George E. Bent 

BUSINESS 
ROBERT M. KENNEY, Business Manager 
A. ROBERT MOLLOY, Assistant Manager 
Richard E. Grainger Paul J. Maguire 

John J. Gibbons John J. Glennon 

PHOTOGRAPHY 
Paul J. Carlin, Editor 
John E. O'Donnell John V. Mahoney 

CIRCULATION 
Robert E. Kopp Edward J. Zabilski 



SUB TURRI 



The catalogue says the Sub Turri is the 
annual publication of the seniors of the Col- 
lege of Arts and Sciences, and is a pictorial 
chronicle of the activities of the class during 
the four years of its undergraduate life. We 
prefer to think of it as one desk, five chairs, 
one broken filing case, eight willing workers, 
and ten unwilling hunkies — the efficient causes 
of this Sub Turri. A wartime budget of a 
little more than half the ordinary year is the 
formal cause. 132,000 pages of paper, 106,- 
002 words, and 404 pictures constitute the 
material cause, and the final cause or the finis 
operis is the greater glory of the forty-two's. 
And thus the four causes are carried out and 
the 1942 Sub Turri is a true act of creation 
in accordance with the principles of St. 
Thomas, Eric Gill, Billy Frazier, and Cyril 
G. K. Marshbank III. 

First among the willing workers was Marty 
Hansberry, who threatened and thundered all 
into doing some work, but found that most of 
the work boomer anged back into his own lap. 



Scouring the town for ads and keeping our 
accounts of hundreds of dollars all in the 
proper columns was Bob Kenney; Bob Drinan 
managed the patron list; John Russell took up 
habitation in the closet in Cardinal O'Connell 
Hall, which we called the office, and became 
special editor. Bill Cadigan is the flare behind 
the senior section and was the happiest man on 
the campus when finances made biographies 
impossible. 

George Boehrer moved in on us and was 
welcomed and promptly overworked. John 
Butler was our ambassador to the strange parts 
of the business school. Paul Carlin wrote, 
planned, and typed and did not hide his 
talents. 

To the gentlemen named on the opposite 
page, most of whom we began to know, but 
some of whom we have never seen, we extend 
an invitation to come up to our closet some 
time. We want to lock you up for the dura- 
tion. 




First row: William J. Cadigan, Robert M. Kenney, Martin J. Hansberry, Robert F. 

Drinan, John W. Russell. 
Second row: John J. Glennon, John E. O'Donnell, Edward L. McCormack, Paul J. 

Maguire, Paul S. Coleman, James E. Hawco, Robert E. Kopp, Thomas J. Lane, 

Modestino J. Vitale, Joseph T. Nolan, Samuel J. Lombard. 
Third row: Edmund A. Weiss, John V. Mahoney, Francis L. Colpoys, A. Robert Molloy, 

Bernard P. Farragher, George C. Boehrer, Francis J. Nicholson, John J. Gibbons. 



STYLUS 



when there is something to be said, and 
said dynamically, colorfully, and smooth, The 
Stylus is where you will find it already said and 
usually under the name of one of the bright 
young faces that shine out of this page at you. 
When these fellows, Joe Dever, Leo Murphy, 
Joe Nolan, Tom Heath, and Jack Ross, came 
to Boston College, the Stylus was a pretty typi- 
cal college literary magazine. It had its quota- 
number of essays, polite poetry, and the usual 
handicap of trying to be too different from 
any other Stylus of the past sixty years. 

During the four years since these seniors 
individually and nervously stumbled into the 
Styhis office with a sheaf of one poem, things 
were changing and changing fast. One by 
one the formalistic shackles of tradition were 
broken up and changed into type, and a new 
magazine with an old name swept like a sand 
storm over the frightened heads of the pre- 
war generation. A lot of it started with a 
young man who did not live to be an editor, 



Wendel Turley. But Wendel had a dream 
and it was to come true. 

Maybe you remember the first fine poems of 
Joe Dever that startled the College with their 
fervor and nostalgic realism. Maybe you re- 
member the first hard-hitting open letters of 
Joe Nolan, the classic sculpturing that was 
Jack Ross' poetry. And how about "Less 
Probable Opinion", our teacup heresy of the 
Junior year, and Leo Murphy's "In A Strange 
House"? How about Sammy Shafter, and the 
Poetry Number? And the Stylus Book Fair. 
This was two years of fighting against opposi- 
tion from conservative quarters; this was two 
years of sitting up late, of revolution, with the 
last year the best. 

Look for the Stylus today and you will find 
it reprinted in almost every leading Catholic 
magazine: Joe Dever in America, Nolan in 
The Catholic Digest, Murphy in The Rock. 
Look for the hand, the flame, and the Stylus, 
and you will find the best Stylus in fifty-nine 
years. 




Seated: Joseph T. Nolan, Joseph G. Dever, Leo J. Murphy. 

Standing: Samuel J. Lombard, John G. Ross, Thomas J. Heath, James F. Sweeney, 
George E. McKinnon. 



HEIGHTS 



The 1942 edition of the Heights, so-called 
student newspaper, began its days as the or- 
phan of the storm. The Heights' office was in 
the depths of the Tower building. The odds 
were great; the office, big; the issue, as usual. 
After three weeks of cellar-dwelling, the 
student news organ was promoted to new 
quarters in O'Connell Hall. We use the word 
quarters advisedly. 

In the new office Editor Ed Weiss and com- 
pany published the bulletin with many inno- 
vations, including critics, literary and drama- 
tic, cuts of the various columnists, and news, 
now and then. By far, the finest work of the 
year appeared in the fourteen page B.C.-H.C. 
issue. There was such a demand for this copy 
that the faculty willingly donated their bundle 
of 150 papers to the student body. This, the 
best Cross issue in the last ten years, contained 
a novel front page with cuts of both teams 
and circle inserts of the coaches surrounding a 
clever drawing of the traditional Eagle swoop- 
ing down on a mounted Crusader. The inner 



pages had pictures of all the senior players and 
several feature articles. 

With the new year came many worries. The 
Heights was rationed to four pages and the 
students were rationed as to the number of 
copies because of the poor circulation of the 
paper from the remote confines in the new 
headquarters. By Saint Swithin's day things 
were back to normal and the Heights appeared 
on time, one half hour late. 

In the course of the year the staff was de- 
pleted by the loss of Bill Connolly, Managing 
Editor, and Gerry Armitage, staff reporter. 
Bill became an Ensign in the Navy, and Gerry 
a Lieutenant in the Marines. 

On press night the office was cluttered with 
the likes of Ed Weiss, Sports Editor Bill Riley, 
Managing Editor Bill Cadigan, Feature Editor 
Dick Buckley, Society Editor Dick Keating, 
and News Editor Ernie Santosuosso. There 
were several other creatures about the premises 
who were called Fran Reade, Tom Meagher, 
Frank Farry, Bob Galligan, Jack McElwee, Al 
Pashby, and John Earner. 




Seated: William J. Cadigan, William E. Riley, Edmund A. Weiss, Richard L. Buckley, 
Richard A. Keating. 

Standing: Francis L. Reade, Paul S. Coleman, Ernest E. Santasuosso, Edward R. Mc- 
Carthy, Thomas F. Meagher, Edward R. O'Brien, Henry F. Trainor, Robert M. 
Casey, John J. Campbell, Joseph J. Elliott, Joseph R. Stanton, John J. Earner, 
Francis J. Farry, Thomas O. Murray, William F. Bugden. 



RADIO 
CLUB 



The really solid senders of the College arc 
grouped into a club of tinkerers and tappers. 
From their shack in the back of the Science 
Building they operated station W-lPR on the 
amateur transmission bands with a one hun- 
dred watt continuous wave transmitter. The 
original equipment was a gift of Cardinal 
O'Connell in 1919. At present the main re- 
ceiving equipment is of the most modern short- 
wave superheterodyne type that responds to 
all amateur and important commercial fre- 
quency bands. 

Composed of a cross-section of the students 
— chemists, physicists, biologists, and Arts men 
— this club offers its members an opportunity 
to take informal courses in Morse Code and 
elementary radio theory. The fundamental 
aim of the Radio Club is to enable a member 
to pass the examination for an Amateur Radio 
Operator's license. This requires a knowledge 
of the elementary radio theory and the ability 
to send and receive thirteen words a minute. 

From September to December such tinker- 
ers as Ed Weiss, Jim Sullivan, and Tom Fitz- 
gerald toyed with radio parts and constructed 
small sets. Such activity in the past has re- 
sulted in much of the equipment in the radio 
shack which the members have constructed 
themselves. 

At the regular Tuesday meetings the pro- 
fessors of the physics department directed the 
work and discussion with Fr. John Tobin as 
the moderator. With plans well under way 
for an extensive broadcasting year, the war Seated: James F. Sullivan, 
cut activities short during the latter half of Standing: George W. Crowley, Edmund A. Weiss, Thomas J. Fkzgerald. 

the year. 

In compliance with Government orders re- 
stricting amateur broadcasting, the Radio 
room was locked, barred and bolted. How- 
ever, the members shifted their activity to 
allied fields and began courses in advanced 
Morse code and Radio theory. 




With the trend toward science and modern 
languages becoming more marked daily, it 
cannot be said that Boston College has not 
adapted its activities to the times. Mastery 
of a language is not acquired overnight, it is a 
slow process, a combination of intensive study 
and relaxation in the literature of the language. 
This program has been proved beneficial, and 
is recommended by all language teachers. 



GERMAN 
ACADEMY 




Seated: Joseph M. Gaudreau. 

Standing: H. Meyer Weiner, John J. DevHn, Edward M. Gilmorc. 



The German Academy has brought this 
idea to its fullest realization. Its traditional 
program has attracted a large percentage of 
the students studying German, who are anx- 
ious to supplement their class work with 
carefully-selected readings from the brilliant 
pens of Goethe and Schiller, or from some of 
the lesser known authors of the eighteenth 
century, the greatest age in German Litera- 
ture. At the bi-monthly meetings the stu- 
dents were called upon to read reports on 
their literary research, and these discussion- 
meetings were usually conducted in German 
by Dr. Paul A. Boulanger and Dr. Erich La- 
bouvie. 

The activities of the German Academy were 
by no means restricted to the cultural side. 
The annual banquet is always the highlight 
of the school year for the members. This 
affair is held in the traditionally Bavarian 
fashion with guest speakers and the singing 
of folk songs. The academy also has a dance in 
the spring, the focal point in the social ac- 
tivities. 

Prominent as members of the German 
Academy were seniors Frank Hayden, Vito 
Orlandella, Robert Kopp, Louis Kuc, John 
Burke, Paul Carlin, Joseph McNally, John 
O'Donnell, Harry Doyle, and Peter Hickey, 
as well as underclassmen Joseph Gaudreati, 
John Devlin, Myer Weiner, and Patrick Gil- 
more. All agree that the German Academy 
has given them a greater appreciation of Ger- 
man Literature, and a greater facility in Ger- 
man conversation. 



(Translated from the original German by 
Herr Weiss.) 



SANCTUARY SOCIETY 



The organized spiritual 'exercises of '42 
started with the first Friday of October, 1938, 
when Father Richard Rooney introduced the 
monthly program which was to be a stable 
spiritual commodity for four years. Shortly 
after this, the freshman retreat, conducted by 
Fr. Dolan, S.J., initiated '42 into the other tra- 
ditional custom and we found them both valu- 
able and inspiring. The sophomore First Fri- 
day exercises were conducted by Father Lem- 
uel Vaughan who talked on the revelations 
of St. Margaret Mary and the devotion ren- 
dered the Sacred Heart. Father James Mc- 
Govern, S.J., gave the retreat in sophomore, 
stressing the theme, "Sanctity is a dreadfully 
personal thing." 

In junior. Father McGovern took over first 
Friday devotions and Father Terrence Con- 
nolly conducted the retreat. In Senior, a Dia- 
logue Mass with a sermon and benediction of 
the Most Blessed Sacrament became the first 
Friday devotions, with Father McGovern as 
the celebrant and the collective reading led by 



Joe Stanton and Joe Nolan. The senior re- 
treat was presided over by Father Thomas 
Herlihy, S.J. 

Before this year the student assistants at 
these spiritual exercises for the class were a 
sporadic crew which sometimes you saw and 
sometimes you didn't. To remedy this situation 
Rev. Walter C. Jascievicz, S.J., formed the 
Sanctuary Society last fall with the aim of 
providing competent servers at any time. The 
society did not elect officers since these were 
not needed to organize or allot the work. The 
enlisted men were volunteers with the qualifi- 
cation that they had previous serving expe- 
rience. The society provided assistants for the 
first Friday devotions, retreats, and the daily 
eight-thirty Mass. 

Among the men of '42 who served are 
Adolph Kissell, John Russell, Joseph Nolan, 
and Bernard Farragher. The group were con- 
scious of their responsibility and the dignity of 
their function and served faithfully and con- 
scientiously. 




Seated: Samuel J. Lombard, John W. Russell. 

Standing: John A. Gunn, James A. O'Donahue, Bernard P. Farragher, Joseph T. Nolan. 



CLASSICAL ACADEMY 



Motivated by more than academic zeal, and 
stimulated by the Jesuit insistence upon the 
classics as the fundaments of liberal education, 
the Classical Club has been initiated and main- 
tained by earnest, enthusiastic students of the 
Greek and Roman Classics under the capable 
moderation of Father O. A. Reinhalter. The 
club has directed most of its energies toward 
the institution and publication of a quarterly 
journal, the Humanities. 

In the course of three years the magazine has 
bounded from a small undergraduate hobby to 
a national position in circulation and interest. 
With a constant emphasis on sincere opinions 
from the students, spontaneity, and zest in all 
the articles, the magazine has modernized, 
vitalized, and re-interpreted the perennial ap- 
peal of classical works. The consummation of 
this purpose has shone forth from every page. 

In particular, the Humanities has conduct- 
ed an editorial campaign in the interests of 
Christian Humanism, an idea that these two 
notes are not incompatible but supplementary 



and almost identified. In the furtherance of 
its campaign, the magazine has criticized the 
abolition of the classics in the modern emanci- 
pation. They have demanded through its 
columns that American education should re- 
turn to the substantial unity of classical 
education. 

With national developments such as they 
are, the Club, ever ready and eager to apply 
its theoretical maxims, has confined itself to 
pertinent essays on intellectual lethargy and 
the irresponsible educational unpreparedness in 
America. Our psychological unfitness for war 
has been traced to the chaotic complexity of 
American Education. The remedial plans for 
the future are grounded on a return to the 
thoroughness and unity of Christian Human- 
ism. 

Special acknowledgment has been received 
by the staff and Editor James E. Hawco from 
many colleges throughout the country. The 
intense enthusiasm of the students has been an 
inspiration to all concerned in the endeavor. 




Seated: Joseph T. Nolan, James E. Hawco. 

Standing: Constantine G. Pappas-Jameson, Robert F. Diinan, John J. McNaught, John 
W. Russell. 



Since many of the new members of the 
Marquette are inexperienced speakers the 
Society adopted a deUberate poUcy of house 
debates for the first semester. These weekly 
debates were spirited and covered a wide range 
of subjects from the beginning of the year: 
On Neutrahty, Union with the Democracies, 
Bases in Eire, Regulation of Labor Unions and 
the Western Hemisphere Union. 

On December 4, the Marquette scheduled 
a house debate for December 11 on the sub- 
ject: Resolved, that the United States should 
retain its territorial and commercial interests 
in the Far East. Pearl Harbor answered the 
question and cancelled the debate. 

Limited by its policy and the debate re- 
trenchment after the declaration of war, the 
Marquette inter-collegiate schedule was small. 
The Freshman-Sophomore Society won a de- 
cision over M.LT. and had a no-decision meet- 
ing with Tufts. The focal point of the year 
was the Marquette Prize debate on March 29 
of this year. On the question of a permanent 
government policy of compulsory one year 
military training, James O'Donnell, John 
Moriarty, and Donald White upheld the 
affirmative against the attacks of Paul Mori- 
arty, James Hathaway, and George McDonald. 

Following the rules of the Fulton, the Mar- 
quette has elections twice a year. For the first 
semester Robert Lee served as President, Don- 
ald White as Vice-President, John Kavanagh 
as Secretary, and Daniel Durant as Sergeant- 
at-arms. At the change of officers at mid- 
year James O'Donnell became President, James 
Cotter, Vice-President; Daniel Durant, Sec- 
retary; and Arthur Doyle, Sergeant-at-arms. 

For the whole year the necessity of purity 
in diction and precision of logic in forensic 
eloquence was emphasized by the Moderators, 
Father James F. Geary and Mr. Edmond D. 
Walsh, S.J. 



MARQUETTE 

DEBATING 

SOCIETY 




Seated: James F. O'Donnell. 

Standing: James H. Hathaway, Michael J. Gargan. 



THE 

RICCI 

MATH 

ACADEMY 




Seated: Frank R. Tangherlini. 

Standing: G. Edward De Saulniers, Joseph J. Martins, Joseph A. Resca. 



The Ricci is one of the few societies that 
can legitimately claim increased interest be- 
cause of the Defense Program and the War. 
With governmental emphasis on mathematics 
and correlated courses, the Society developed 
into one of the leading undergraduate activi- 
ties. Hill and Linker became the Book-of- 
the-Term and long queues of prospective ap- 
phcants waited outside the registrar's office. 

Unperturbed by this academic revolution, 
the Academy geared itself, as the authorities 
had already done, to the production of capable 
mathematicians and future officers. However 
the organization did not forget or abandon the 
initial purpose of their foundation — an appre- 
ciation of the service rendered to modern life 
by mathematics and the imparting of a cul- 
tural foundation and background, so ably ex- 
emplified by the life of the Rev. Matteo Ricci, 
S.J., one of the ablest mathematicians of the 
Society and of his age. 

The regular bi-monthly meetings were de- 
voted to the presentation of intricate problems 
by the student members, and were opened to 
both sophomores and freshmen. Guest speak- 
ers from the faculty addressed the body on 
different phases of the science. Aiming at 
integration at every meeting, at least one re- 
port was read on the lives of one of the great 
mathematicians, emphasizing their cultural 
and scientific influence on the modern era. 

The society is also the pioneer among the 
other Academies because it edits its own 
Journal, one of the first of such magazines 
of the College. The Journal, pubHshed bi- 
monthly, contains the minutes of the meetings 
and articles written by the student members. 
The Ricci is also a member of the New Eng- 
land Conference of Associated Math Clubs. 

Among the class of 1942 who served in the 
society are Joseph Boothroyd, Frediano Mat- 
teoli and John Driscoll all former officers, and 
Thomas Russell, former editor of the Journal. 
The new moderator, the Rev. Carl Morgan, 
S.J., has contributed greatly to the increased 
success of the society. 



CRYSTAL 



If you have seen the Crystal, you know 
why its distinctive cover is found on exhibi- 
tion in many large industrial laboratories in 
the East, and many leading colleges and uni- 
versities throughout the country. It is attrac- 
tive. It is novel. 

The magazine, supplement to the Chemists' 
Club, was crystalized in the fertile mind of 
Father Anthony Carroll who is now serving as 
a chaplain in the United States Army. During 
the short space of its four years' existence the 
Crystal has received a commendation by the 
official bulletin of the American Chemical 
Society, which is an honor that few college 
publications have attained. 

The Crystal offers a ready source of infor- 
mation to all interested in the field of Chem- 
istry. It acts as a complement to the work 
done in the lecture halls and the laboratories; 
it acquaints the students with interesting 
phases of chemistry. These facts would other- 
wise be hidden because of the great amount of 
research and study needed for a thorough 
treatment of the subject. 



The greatest benefit in such a publication 
lies in its universal appeal, for it is read by 
chemists and arts men alike. The articles 
presented are written with an emphasis on 
style and individuality. Manuscripts are care- 
fully checked for accuracy and clarity, the 
stress being placed on up-to-date material. 
Bibliographies are given with every article for 
reference. 

Among the articles by members of the 
Forty-two's this year are: "Fermentation In- 
dustries" by Arthur Frithsen, "Vinegar" by 
Francis Colpoys, "Aluminum Compounds in 
Food" by Paul Carlin, and "The Use of Bro- 
mides in Medicine" by Marcel Gould. Modern 
warfare and the part chemistry will play in it 
was treated in "Plastics in the Construction of 
Modern Aircraft" by Lieut. Gerard T. Armi- 
tage. United States Marines. 

The staff included: Editor, Richard J. 
Carey; Managing Editor, Arthur R. Frithsen; 
Business Manager, Maurice P. McLaughlin; 
News Editor, Francis P. Cronin; Associate 
Editors, Francis L. Colpoys and Joseph T. Mc- 
Nally. 




Seated: Richard J. Carey, Arthur R. Frithsen. 

Standing: Maurice A. Lynch, Maurice A. McLaughhn, Francis L. Colpoys, Joseph T. 
McNally, Francis D. Cronin. 



FLYING CLUB 



In 1939, Boston College, under the direc- 
tion of Rev. John Tobin, S.J., adopted the 
youngest of the means of transportation. 
During the same year the Civilian Pilot Train- 
ing Program was opened to students at the 
College and the Flying Club was organized to 
correlate this program with extra-curricular 
life. The club has been opened to all students 
of the College who are either participating in 
the Civilian Pilot Training Program or already 
possess a private pilot's license. This year 
the club also admitted any alumnus who pos- 
sessed the proper qualifications. 

The club has, since its organization, en- 
deavored to promote a spirit of friendship 
and fellowship among those who have a com- 
mon interest in flying and to act as a society to 
popularize flying in the college. Their other 
frank and unavowed desire has been to raise 
sufficient money to purchase an airplane for 
the use of the members. Increased interest in 
the activity has been apparent since the war 
and because of the need for pilots in the armed 
forces. 

By the close of this year, the group has to 



its credit sixty active members, ten of whom 
are in the primary training, two of whom have 
received commercial licenses with instructor's 
ratings and the remainder of whom are in the 
secondary training division. Of the entire 
sixty members, twelve have already enlisted 
in the Naval Air Corps and three joined the 
ranks of the Army Air Corps. Two other 
members are employed as instructors of avia- 
tion; Joseph Hegarty is stationed at LaGuar- 
dia Field in New York City and Frederick 
Seeley is at the East Boston airport. Both the 
above mentioned are of the Forty-two's and 
their fellow senior members expect to join 
them soon or enter the other flying combat 
branches. The Civilian Pilot Training has 
received applications from the students almost 
trebling the applications of the past two years, 
and the Flying Club, although losing a good 
number of its members with graduation, can 
look forward to an even more successful year. 
The officers of the club this year were: 
Thomas Flanagan, President; Robert Nagle, 
Vice-President; Frederick Seeley, Secretary; 
and Joseph Hegarty, Treasurer. 




Seated: Thomas J. Flanagan, Timothy J. Callahan. 

Standing: Gerald J. McMorrow, Gerard J. Joyce, John B. Higgins, John J. O'Connor, 
John W. McDonald. 



Medicine, today, has reached a strictly 
scientific zenith, so much so, that the proper, 
ethical and moral conduct of the science has 
been practically abandoned. Since Birth 
Control addicts. Abortionists, and Illegitimate 
Practitioners are rampant in the world, it is 
only proper that such faults should be reme- 
died. One of the best solutions to the growing 
problem is the Pre-Medical Seminar of every 
Catholic College. The correct ethical back- 
ground of a practicing physician is the most 
important part of his career. Therefore, it is 
the purpose of the Seminar to present an op- 
portunity to the potential medical student 
to become acquainted with medical problems 
involving ethical and moral principles and to 
determine the proper treatment of such sub- 
jects. 

The Pre-Medical Seminar of Boston Col- 
lege is most fortunate in having as their 
moderator not only a priest of God but a 
highly capable doctor. Rev. Francis J. Dore, 
S.J., M.D., is the guiding mind behind the 
weekly meetings of the Pre-Medical students. 
These meetings are conducted by the students 
themselves, having one member as lecturer and 
the remaining members as prepared objectors. 
This past year subjects have included Steriliza- 
tion, Contraception, Impotency, Sterility, 
Diabetes and Cancer. These subjects are the 
most important problems of the medical world 
today and their correct ethical treatment must 
be known. 

Another feature of the Seminar is the show- 
ing of medical movies. Two successful opera- 
tions, A Cataract Removal and a Strabismus 
Correction, performed by Dr. Beetham of the 
Massachusetts Eye and Ear Infirmary, were 
the films shown this year. The officers of the 
Seminar: John McGowan, President; Joseph 
McNally, Vice-President; Thomas Hinchey, 
Secretary; Larry Houle, Treasurer; succeeded 
in promoting an interest in medical problems 
and a deeper spirit of friendship among the 
members. The medicos of the Seminar pass- 
ing to the future have been accepted by such 
Medical Schools as Tufts, Georgetown, Yale 
and McGill. 



PRE- 
MEDICAL 
SEMINAR 




Seated: John A. McGowan, Thomas R. Hinchey. 

Standing: Joseph T. McNally. 



FRENCH 
CLUB 




Seated: William P. Duggan. 

Standing: Thomas H. Murphy, William A. Philbrick. 



Despite the chaotic conditions in present- 
day France, the struggle between Vichy and 
De Gaulle's France Libre, and the resultant 
divergence of views, the French Academy pre- 
sented a united front against the repeated on- 
slaughts of the Spanish and German languages. 
No longer did it function solely as a mere 
supplemental extra-curricular activity, but 
has merged into the leadership of the language 
groups. From informal discussions and quiz 
programs, it gradually expanded the range of 
its interest to the performance of one-act 
plays and famous scenes from the larger plays 
and to participation in debates and oratorical 
contests. The Academy has also sponsored a 
series of lectures by members of the faculty 
and prominent authorities on the customs, 
culture and literature of France. During 
Lent, the usual activity was replaced by dis- 
cussions on the position of the Catholic Church 
in France, the history of the traditional reli- 
gion from the Dark Ages to the Church in 
current literature and politics, and the present 
and future cultural and social protest against 
tyrannous totalitarianism. 

Under the leadership of William Duggan, 
President; Thomas Murphy, Secretary; and 
William McDonald, Treasurer, the Academy 
took a leading and active part at the meetings 
of the Collegiate French Clubs of Greater 
Boston which was instituted last year with our 
Academy as a leading organizer. 

Unofficially, the French Club of Emmanuel 
College was augmented this year by members 
of our Academy for their production of 
"L'Annonce Fait a Marie" of Paul Claudel. 
Among those who volunteered their aid were 
Edmund Weiss, Charles Toole, Ernest Santo- 
suosso and Joseph Tyndall. 

With the new program, the increased inter- 
est in the modern French Catholic novelists 
and the play, the society successfully reorgan- 
ized itself into the most versatile of the organ- 
izations of the college. As a chief agent of 
success, youthful, efficient Mr. Timothy Burke 
was not only a moderator but also an instigator 
and collaborator in every effort. 



MUSIC CLUB 



Here we have something that the students 
can well be proud of having as a Boston Col- 
lege organization. The club is composed of 
the Glee Club and the Band. We will treat 
each of these in turn. 

Augmented by new members and arrayed 
in snappy new maroon and gold uniforms, the 
band provided appropriate entertainment at 
all football games, rallies, and torchlight 
parades. Popular arrangements of operatic 
and symphonic works were the basis for their 
repertoire. These included the Triumphal 
March from Aida, the First Concerto in B 
Flat Minor of Tschaikowsky, and numerous 
others. The organization also featured varia- 
tions of familiar tunes, intricate formations of 
pin-wheels, reverse and trick steps. As the 
season progressed the band became especially 
proficient in letter formations and spelling 
out the names and slogans of the rival teams. 

The Glee Club is made up of two groups, 
the club proper and a double octet. This 
smaller group supplements the work of the 
main club, especially in ecclesiastical selec- 



tions. One of their specialties is a Coronation 
Hymn done in Gregorian Chant whose Latin 
text goes back to the people's chorus of the 
seventh and eighth centuries. The double 
octet also fills many engagements that come up 
in all parts of Boston. Solo work plays a part 
in all concerts of the club and often includes 
rollicking numbers from Gilbert and Sullivan. 
The club is aided in many of its concerts by a 
group of singers from the Emmanuel College 
Choral Society. Folk tunes of Europe are in- 
cluded in the program of the club along with 
popular and classical numbers. 

Various annual concerts constitute the pro- 
gram of the year; the Christmas concert; the 
joint concert given by the Emmanuel College; 
the Regis and Weston College Concerts, the 
latter being given on Lactate Sunday. Parish 
concerts were climaxed by an affair held at 
St. Joseph's College in West Hartford, Conn. 
The year closed when the annual Music Club 
dance was staged at the Philomatheia Chalet. 

The club was directed by Mr. Theodore 
Marier '34 and supervised by Father Francis 
Flaherty. 




Seated: Daniel J. Barrett, Brian B. Sullivan. 

Standing: Edward H. Mulrey, Paul J. Livingston, Samuel J. Lombard. 



CHEMISTS' CLUB 



As a concession to those students who have 
httle time for other extra-curricular activities 
because of their late laboratory periods in 
physics, chemistry, and biology, the Chemists' 
Club was founded by Father Anthony Carroll 
a few years ago. The Club promoted a closer 
union between the students in the allied 
scientific courses, by the introduction of the 
members to varied fields in which chemistry 
plays a decisive role. The members strove for 
a more complete understanding of the prac- 
tical applications of the fundamental princi- 
ples in these fields. With this end in view 
lectures were given every other week by rep- 
resentatives of chemical industries as were 
many motion pictures of "Chemistry at 
Work". Theses on popular topics were read 
by the students. Organized field trips to 
nearby chemical plants were part of the activ- 
ities of the club. 

With Father Carroll on active Army duty, 
the direction of the club was in the hands of 
Father Thomas Butler. He organized the mem- 
bers into three specialized sections: demon- 
stration, glass-working, and photography, 
which were under the general supervision of 



President Hubert G. Kelley, Vice-President 
Maurice Lynch, and Secretary Joseph Gaud- 
reau. 

The task of devising experiments illustrat- 
ing some chemical principle fell to the lot of 
Arthur Frithsen, now taking the Meteorolog- 
ical Course at the Massachusetts Institute of 
Technology, Maurice McLaughlin, and Thom- 
as Lamond. With special equipment supplied 
by the moderator these men performed many 
spectacular demonstrations for the benefit of 
the students — and for their amusement when 
the tests failed to work. 

For the instruction of the members in the 
properties of glass and the acquisition of skill 
in the construction of apparatus, Richard 
Carey, Francis D. Cronin, and William 
Maguire represented the Glass- working section 
of the Club. Father Albert McGuinn, head of 
the chemistry department, directed this sec- 
tion and installed a laboratory-workshop. 

The third section experimented in the use 
and effects of chemicals in the developing and 
printing of pictures. Thus they furnished the 
students with a thorough knowledge of the 
chemical processes of photography. 




Seated: Hubert G. Rally, Maurice A. Lynch. 

Standing: Francis D. Cronin, Richard J. Carey, Thomas Ci. O'Leary, Arthur R. Frithsen. 



To provide interested students with an ex- 
cellent opportunity for advanced study in the 
current work of Law and Government, this 
Academy was founded. A further purpose 
was to develop in the members the ability to 
discuss these vital topics among themselves and 
before a public audience. For proof that these 
objectives were attained this year we point to 
the membership of every student in these and 
allied fields. As an aid to the members in 
forming accurate and intelligent views on cur- 
rent affairs, both problems and cases, such 
prominent lecturers as Father J. F. X. Murphy, 
Father James Burke, and the moderator, Dr. 
Harry Doyle, addressed the academy. 

As the year progressed it became apparent 
that many subjects of outstanding interest and 
importance would arise, subjects which would 
be excellent material for the weekly debates 
and discussions of the members. Lively, and 
heated sessions were waged over the Selective 
Service, the Constitution, contemporary court 
decisions, and many aspects of the labor ques- 
tion. 

We have it on excellent authority that Paul 
Maguire was duly elected President, Walter 
Cassell, Vice-President, and Tom Lane, Sec- 
retary Ti-easurer. After the elections came 
the war. With the war came many problems 
verging on Law and Government fields. With 
the war came the edict temporarily restraining 
extra-curricular activities. 

After the period of re-adjustment, the 
Academy again resumed its functions as a 
vital activity. Dr. Doyle began a series of 
discussions on the legal aspects of the Com- 
munistic and Fascistic States. At all of these 
lectures the members turned up en masse. At 
the time we go to press the members are en- 
gaged in a debate on the points which the good 
Doctor developed in his talks during the recent 
months. 



LAW AND 

GOVERNMENT 

ACADEMY 




Seated: Paul J. Maguire. 

Standing: Walter F. Cassell, Thomas J. Lane. 



VON PASTOR 

HISTORY 

ACADEMY 




Seated: Francis X. Cronin. 

Standing: Robert C. McManamy, James H. Maxfield. 



Convinced that history in the making was 
more vital than that of the past, the members 
of the Von Pastor Academy decided to make 
reports on books and documents that per- 
tained at least indirectly to the present con- 
flict. This was the policy determined by 
President Francis X. Cronin, Vice-President 
Robert C. McManamy, and Secretary James 
Maxfield. The Academy is named after Dr. 
Ludwig von Pastor, prominent promoter of 
historical science in the realm of church 
history. As the world was shaken by numer- 
ous epoch-shaping events the Von Pastor 
determined to continue its work of generating 
interest in current history. 

In line with this policy the members began 
to correlate contemporaneous events. The 
information secured was then judged in the 
light of recent conditions. Some authors 
proved to be excellent prophets while others 
were made to look rather ridiculous. Some of 
the books reported upon were Wolfe's "The 
Imperial Soviet", Valtin's "Out of the Night", 
and Demaree Bess' article "The Axis is a 
Myth", and others. 

Naturally these discussions led to subjects 
that were of vital interest to the members; as, 
whether or not United States should enter the 
war, or, is Russia aiding Great Britain to per- 
petuate democracy or to satisfy her own im- 
perialistic ambitions? These topics were en- 
livened by the adherence of supporters to both 
sides of the question. Unfortunately some of 
the activity had to cease with the entrance of 
America into the conflict, for one of the 
questions had been decided not on its merits 
but by the action of a belligerent. Through- 
out most of the discussions the seniors, Robert 
McManamy, Frank DriscoU and F. X. Cronin, 
usually maintained a solid bloc against the 
varied onslaughts of Robert Halligan, Thomas 
Murphy and Frank Mahoney. 

In the second semester the interests of the 
Academy swung from European difficulties 
to those of Asia, especially to the problems 
of Japan and China and the general ground- 
work of the present war. 



SPANISH ACADEMY 



This year the effect of the Good Neighbor 
Pohcies and the war has struck home and 
Spanish has become the language of Boston 
CoUege. The resuk in both courses and the 
Academy has been a definite shift of emphasis 
from Spain to Spanish-America. The Acad- 
emy itself has established direct contact with 
Latin America through the medium of short 
wave radio. During the winter months the 
members broadcast "Rossima Es Fragil" by 
Martinez Sierra, with Sumner Greenfield, 
Samuel Loscocco, Samuel Chiuchiolo, and 
James Dunn of the Heights. The feminine 
roles were taken by coeds at the Intown School. 
At the present time "Encanto de Una Hora" 
by the same playwright is in production, and 
will be presented over Station WRUL during 
the latter part of the college year. 

Radio was again the medium when the 
Academy's moderator. Dr. Eduardo Azuola, 
spoke over a nationwide hookup on South 
America's position in the defense of the Hem- 
isphere. Continuing to stress Hispano-America, 



the Academy was addressed by several 
eminent South Americans in the latter part of 
the year. Among them were Lie. Fernando 
Fournier of the Costa Rican legation, Senor 
Gomez Duran, Consul from Colombia, and 
Dr. Gustavo de Aragon of the University of 
Havana. Spain was not entirely forgotten 
and at one of the important meetings of the 
year, Dr. Azuola gave a slide-lecture on the 
Spanish Province of Granada, the home of the 
Moors for many generations. 

In a break with former tradition, the officers 
were changed twice this year with Sumner 
Greenfield retaining the presidency through- 
out the year. The officers for the second sem- 
ester were James Doyle, Vice-President, 
George C. A. Boehrer, Secretary, and Alfred 
Morro, Treasurer. 

The last official function of the Academy, 
the annual Spanish Banquet, in charge of 
Gerard Finnerty, will be held in April imme- 
diately before the close of college. Hasta la 
vista, caballeros! 




Seated: Surner M. Greenfield, Thomas P. Comer. 



STUDENT ATHLETIC ASSOCIATION 



There is a Student Athletic Association at 
the College. There must be, it says so in the 
catalogue; but the handbook also says there 
are no radicals at Boston College. Be that as it 
may, we go on to the Association as such. 

During the football season these boys really 
do some work. With Paul Maguire as the 
senior President of this clubby little group, 
junior Tom Kennedy, and sophomore Harry 
McGrath promote the before-the-game rallies 
and the Victory Dances. Credit goes also for 
the torchlight parades during the pigskin 
period. Of course, if you have tried to get a 
job ushering at Fenway of a Saturday, you 
know that the man to see was the same Paul 
Maguire. It is the function of these boys to 
act as go-between in dealings of the students 
with the Athletic Association, and to organize 
the students for the various athletic meets and 
games. In this they have acted capably and 
efficiently. 

However, after the football comes the 
hockey season. This is the rub. For the past 



three years Boston College has had the finest 
ice six in New England, and this year the club 
was crowned as the National A.A.U. Cham- 
pionship team as well. For the number of 
students that were on hand for the games 
they might just as well be playing in Vladivos- 
tok. The reason? Student lethargy. Poor 
direction. Little publicity. Here's a shovel, 
take your pick. We feel that basically the 
fault is a lack of co-operation between the 
powers-that-be and the students. We grant 
that football is the only paying sport, but we 
deny that such conditions must exist. It is not 
that football has been overplayed but that 
hockey has been underplayed. Paul Maguire 
and Tom Meagher tried to stir up the collec- 
tive interest of the students with but little 
success. 

For the years to come we feel that the future 
A.A.'s should fight as has the present for sup- 
port for the hockey, baseball, tennis, and 
fencing teams. Then for sure, happy days 
will be here again for the students. 




Seated: Paul J. Maguire, Harry A. McGrath. 



"Dolce far niente," the most beautiful 
language in the world — pictured above, you 
have its most ardent exponents, the gentle- 
men of the Italian Academy. Since the day 
that Julius Caesar crossed the Rubicon and 
began his conquest of Italy, the Culture that 
was Rome's became the Culture of the world. 
With this background of Culture as its ideal, 
the Italian Academy was founded with the 
purpose of fostering fluency in speaking the 
Italian tongue and of studying Italian culture. 
The Club carried out these objectives with 
regular weekly meetings at which lectures on 
Italian art and literature were given, after 
which the members took part in discussions 
of the subject matter of the lecture. 

In order to follow the general customs of 
the Italian people and to show the gaiety and 
simplicity that was theirs, the Club held their 
annual Festa and play and terminated a very 
successful year with their characteristic Ital- 
ian Banquet. The delicacies a la Italienna were 
prepared by the members themselves and were 
served to such distinguished guests as Father 
McGovern, Father DeMangaleere, Father 
Shanahan and Dr. H. Lee Bowen. Dr. Bowen, 
Professor of History at Boston College, was 
the guest speaker of the evening and delivered 
an excellent illustrated lecture on "Italian Art 
and Architecture". Following Doctor Bowen's 
lecture, the evening was concluded with a 
discussion of present day affairs in Italy and 
some of the features in the Italian State were 
deplored. 



ITALIAN 
ACADEMY 




Seated: Joseph F. Marcantonio. 

Standing: Anthony G. Armata, Murray A. Rice. 



The Club owes its continued success to the 
untiring efforts of its moderator, Dr. Gino de 
Solenni, chairman of the Romance Language 
Department, and the officers for the current 
year, Joseph Marcantonio, President, Murray 
Rice, Vice-President, Peter Sarni, Secretary, 
and Antonio Armata, Treasurer. 



PHILOSOPHY 
ACADEMY 




Seated: John W. Russell. 

Standing: Paul S. Coleman, Francis J. Nicholson, George C. A. Boehrer. 



The philosopher-king, Plato said, was the 
best type of ruler, for in him would be com- 
bined the wisdom of the ages and the ability 
for true-thinking leadership. Several hundred 
years later the Scholastic Jesuit Order founded 
its first school to train men in wise leadership. 
For five hundred years the tradition of philo- 
sophical studies has endured till we find it to- 
day, placed in a position of note, heightened 
by present conditions. In keeping with this 
tradition the Philosophy Academy was found- 
ed. Its founding came as a solution to the 
greatest difficulty of philosophy, the problem 
of integrating the various branches and apply- 
ing their metaphysical ideas to ordinary phys- 
ical living. The solution to such a problem 
is best found in open discussion in which all 
difficulties can be clarified. Under the guid- 
ance of Father John McCarthy, S.J., the mem- 
bers of the Philosophy Academy have been 
working towards this solution in their own 
activities. In Junior the discussion centered 
about Saint Thomas' Summa Contra Gentiles, 
and philosophers Hansberry, Drinan, Nichol- 
son, Malone and Russell carried the task of 
analyzing the work, selecting its highlights 
for topics of discussion and application to the 
studies of Junior Philosophy. This year a new 
set of members. Seniors Boehrer, Boothroyd, 
Coleman, DeCosta and one member from last 
year, Russell, began the study of early and 
modern philosophies as they are seen in the 
Platonic Dialogues. Discussion was confined 
to the Republic which is in many ways the 
Summa of Plato's philosophy. In it are con- 
tained some of the ideas which have been 
taken by such modern philosophers as Kant, 
William James, Berkeley, Bertrand Russell and 
John Dewey. Here, too, are found the seeds 
of restricted oligarchic states, of progressive 
education and communism. Such a variety of 
philosophers and creeds indicates the impor- 
tance of Plato's influence. 



THE DRAMATIC SOCIETY 



This year, the Dramatic Society, under the 
direction of Father Bonn, and Eliot Duvey, 
celebrated its seventy-fifth anniversary with 
a hilarious production of "Uncle Tom's 
Cabin." 

Freshman: "Second Spring" and "Ion" fea- 
tured the unexploited talent of Delphis Du- 
quette, Constantine Pappas- Jameson and 
Richard Keating. 

Sophomore: Leo Murphy appeared as the 
Shrew and was supported by Joe Dever, Con- 
nie, Del and Dick in "The Taming of the 
Shrew". The Society scooped the movies with 
its production of "Brother Orchid", starring 
Connie Pappas who out-Robinsoned E. G. 
After this, the players moved into the ultra- 
modern field with "The Dreamers", produced 
in the Wellesian manner. 

Junior: Del Duquette emerged in the lead- 
ing role of "Richard 11" with Joe Dever as 
Egton; the versatile Pappas as John of Gaunt 
and the entire production under Frank Sid- 
lauskas. For the modern play, "Father Mal- 
achy's Miracle" with Leo, Dick, Connie and 
Joe Dever. The forty-two's came out again in 
"Hippolytus", the closing vehicle of the year. 

Senior: The year of amazing achievements! 



Paul Good was cast in the title role of "King 
Lear", and was supported by Leo Murphy's 
Edmund, a masterpiece of craft and guile, 
while Connie as Oswald added to his laurels 
as a scene-stealer. In their last college play, 
the seniors abandoned themselves to a hilarious 
burlesque of a darky's emancipation, "Uncle 
Tom's Cabin". Dick Keating emerged from 
retirement for the role of Little Eva. Paul 
Good appeared as Aunt Ophelia, Leo Murphy 
as Gumption Cute, Connie Pappas as Marx, 
Bill Philbrick as St. Claire, and Moe Myers in 
the lead. Uncle Tom. 

Aside from dramatics, the society moved its 
quarters to their new Bohemian and fustian 
den and workshop in the quadrangle at Car- 
dinal O'Connell Hall. The erstwhile actors 
rolled up their collective sleeves and went to 
work with paint brushes, hammers and other 
unfustian articles. By the end of the year they 
boasted the best offices and quarters of any of 
the under-grad societies and undoubtedly the 
most bizarre, featuring black corridors, a sham 
Elizabethan office, and a workshop in Chinese 
red and Russian blue, lined with Viking shields. 
The new quarters evoked spontaneous dismay 
rnd yet fustian approbation. 




Joseph G. Dever, Constantine G. Pappas-Jameson, William P. Doonan. 



THE PHYSICS SEMINAR 



Since its tentative beginning in the early part 
of 1933, the Physics Seminar owes its exist- 
ence and continued growth to the persistent 
and constant efforts of Rev. John A. Tobin, 
S.J., who has perfected the program to assure 
all members the greatest possible theoretical 
instruction and empirical contact. The then- 
prevailing interest in the proceedings of mod- 
ern physics necessitated the inclusion of cur- 
rent topics treated in the scientific world, and 
the discussion of these subjects in keeping with 
its two established principles: Explanation and 
Application. During this first decade of the 
Seminar, a transition was steadfastly taking 
place. It was a transition in the sense of an 
extended program of activity designed espe- 
cially for Seniors engaged in experimental the- 
sis work. Each thesis problem included a dis- 
cussion of the points to be studied, the pro- 
cedure, the probable results and the possible 
explanations. At the close of each Scholastic 
year, theory was checked with experiment, 
and a brief resume presented to the group. 



The Seminar gatherings were never mere 
passive lectures insofar as the undergraduates 
were concerned. As Juniors, they were awed 
and somewhat reticent regarding their abihties 
to propose logical objections. However, as the 
junior year progressed, fortified by accumu- 
lated knowledge and interests, they relin- 
quished their former cloak of restraint and 
took an active part in discussions on the same 
footing as the graduate students or even the 
professors. That year, peregrinations in the 
Physical Sciences brought them into such 
fields as Ballistics, Planetary Motion, Commu- 
nication Cables, Vacuum Tubes, Photo-Elas- 
ticity, and X-Rays. 

Fully confident of their abilities to express 
themselves and to develop the various fields 
of concentration and interest, the weekly 
seminars of the Senior year were started with 
great promise. However, due to the National 
emergency, meetings were temporarily discon- 
tinued and energies were directed into more 
timely, if not more essential channels. 




Seated: William P. McLaughlin, Philip J. Gill, George W. Crowley, John J. Burke. 
Standing: Joseph J. Pazniokas, Leslie J. Heath, Terience J. Geoghegan, John J. Bulman. 



SKI CLUB 



If one can imagine an infant on skis, a 
sloping New England hill for a play-yard and 
a group of conscientious, ambitious snowmen, 
then one has a rather confused idea of the 
baby of all college activities. Conceived in 
the minds of three members of the class of '41, 
and with the backing and vocal support of 
Father Anthony G. Carroll, late of the faculty 
and now a charter member of the United 
States Army Chaplain Corps, the club inaug- 
urated its season with intra-mural endeavors. 
Foremost among the members of this budding 
club were the Messrs. Dole, Houlihan, Post, 
and Corbett who waged bitter battles on the 
slopes of New Hampshire for the title of 
"champ". 

Skiing is not the easiest of sports to under- 
take. It takes a warm-blooded, healthy indi- 
vidual with a keen sense of balance and a fear- 
less heart to master the technique of navigat- 
ing those barrel staves down hill. The club is 
open to any student who so desires to become 
a future ski-trooper in the service of Uncle 
Sam. 



The tropical weather that surrounded the 
slopes of northern New England delayed the 
opening of the '42 season to late December 
and the war curtailed and limited the contests 
to merely intra-mural activities. The schedule 
was arranged by the new moderator of the 
club. Father Stephen A. Mulcahy, but had to 
be cancelled because of the speed-up in studies 
and the curtailment of extra-curricular activ- 
ities. Despite these unforeseen setbacks the 
club enjoyed many afternoons prepping for 
the next season to come. 

Bob Molloy, Lieut. Brian Sullivan of the 
Coast Artillery, and John Mahoney were the 
officers of this year's club and the senior mem- 
bers both in service and ability. The members 
of the Club are not professionals in any sense 
of the word but that does not stop them from 
dragging themselves out of snowpiles and 
starting all over again. The spirit is willing 
and the flesh is strong and so in the new seasons 
to come, watch out for the Baby. He's grow- 
ing fast. 




A. Robert Molloy, John V. Mahoney. 



THE YACHT CLUB 



One of the youngest of Boston College's 
organizations, the Yacht Club, has been mak- 
ing great progress over almost insurmountable 
difficulties. In spite of the fact that they are 
without facilities of any kind, that their head- 
quarters are far from any suitable body of 
water, and there are no boats, not to mention 
a boathouse, the club has to its credit a record 
of achievement. 

The club's membership is drawn from stu- 
dents who are members of the Massachusetts 
Bay Yacht Clubs, who summer in such places 
as Winthrop and Hull. All summer the mem- 
bers sail their own boats, of various types — 
Snipes, Hustlers, Seabirds, Stars, Adams Inter- 
clubs and larger sloops. However, when they 
represent the College in the fall and spring, 
they sail in dinghies on landlocked rivers. 

During its infancy, the crews representing 
the club did all their racing on the Charles 
River, off the M.I.T. sailing pavilion. In the 
last few years, however, they have participated 
in regattas held at the United States Coast 
Guard Academy on the Thames River at New 
London, Connecticut, and at Brown Univer- 



sity on the Seekonk River in Providence, with 
varying success. Yet, the best showings of the 
club have taken place on the Charles River. 

Last year a boathouse was opened on the 
Boston Bank of the Charles by the Community 
Boat Club. This organization is supported by 
the Metropolitan District Commission, which 
was responsible for the construction of the 
boathouse. John P. Curley, Graduate Manager 
of Athletics at Boston College, is one of the 
directors of the Commission. This club has 
been responsible for the birth of a series of 
races among colleges of Greater Boston in 
which Boston College has played a leading role. 
Colleges outside of the Greater Boston com- 
munity have been invited to attend and our 
brother college. Holy Cross, has been among 
the guests. 

The most successful crews have been Nash 
and McGorley and the second crew of Noonan 
and Crehan. The officers for the past season 
were James Noonan, Commodore; Harold 
Nash, Vice-Commodore; James McGorley, 
Secretary; and James Keenan, Freshman Fleet 
Captain. 




Jiimcs F. McGorley, Harold H. Nash, John 1-. Crehan. 



- |^\v> ' 






VARSITY 




DENNIS E. MEYERS Head Coach 



A new regime came to the Heights for the 
1941 football season when affable Denny 
Myers brought the "T" formation to Boston 
College. With a record of seven victories and 
three losses, the year was credited a success. 
True, the Eagles did not soar to fame on the 
wings of thrilling Cotton and Sugar Bowl 
games as in the previous two seasons, but Cap- 
tain Al Morro and his mates gave Boston Col- 
lege a fighting and, at times, a spectacular 
eleven. 

In the past years the Eagles had won their 
place in the national spotlight by their victo- 
ries over the prides of the South. In this 1941 
campaign the devils from Dixie proved to be 
the major stumbling blocks. The Maroon 
bowed before the might of Tulane, Clemson 
and Tennessee, but with their thrilling triumph 
over Holy Cross all was forgiven and for- 
gotten. 

Al Morro and his senior mates closed out 
spectacular careers in this finale with the 
Purple. In their four years on University 
Heights, the men of '42 did not once taste of 




FOOTBALL SQUAD 
Bottom Row: Henry Woronicz, Robert Jauron, Edward Zabilski, Leo Strumski, Adolph Kissel, Stephen Levanitis, Capt. Alfred Morro, Francis 

Maznicki, Theodore Williams, Justin McGowan, Terrance Geogeghan, Michael Holovak, Harry Connolly. 
Second Row: Edward Lambert, Carl Lucas, Rocco Canale, William Power, Fred Naumetz, Joseph Repko, Donald Currivan, Thomas Moran, Albert I 

Fiorentino, Walter Boudreau. 
Third Row: Robert Burns, Peter Prezkop, Victor Matthews, Angelo Nicketakis, Charles Furbush, Gilbert Bouley, Angelo Sisti, John O'Sullivan, 

Pasquale Darone, Linden Blanchard. 
Fourth Row: William Connery, Edward Mahoney, Joseph King, Christopher Brady, Edward Doherty, Albert Toomey, William Quinn, John Dub- 

zinski, James Benedetto. 



FOOTBALL 



defeat from their ancient rivals from Holy 
Cross. Al Morro was truly a great and inspir- 
ing leader. Frank Maznicki rose to the pin- 
nacle in this, his final year, and was among the 
nation's outstanding backs. Adolph Kissell 
blossomed as a great fullback in his junior year 
and paced the Eagles in their epic win over 
Tulane that fall. Ted Williams won everlast- 
ing glory for himself and Alma Mater in his 
only Holy Cross game as he scored the winning 
points on the now-famed open reverse. Steve 
Levanitis, Leo Strumski and Henry Woronicz 
all did their part despite serious injuries. The 
unsung hero of the class of '42 was the silent 
Ed Zabilski, one of the really great ends of 
Eagle football history. Also unnoticed, but 
nevertheless vital factors in this first Myers- 
coached eleven were Terry Geoghegan, the 
scholar-athlete, Justin McGowan, the first 
soldier-athlete of the class, Bob Jauron, and 
John Pieroni, the most popular of all Eagle 
managers. 

The class of '42 may look back with pride 
upon these men who carried their school to the 
top in the football world. Playing beside them 
were names which shall be the heroes of the 
years to come. Naumetz, Holovak, Currivan, 
Doherty, Bouley and Furbush all helped in 




REV. MAURICE V. DULLEA, S.J. 

Faculty Director 

large measure to make this a successful season. 
The class of '42 wishes Coach Myers the best 
for the future. 




COACHING STAFF 

Head Coach Meyers; Backfield, Carl Brumbaugh; Line, Emerino Sarno; End, Harry Marr; 

Freshman, Tom Powers. 




JOHN P. CURLEY 
Graduate Manager 

Back in 1926 Boston College walloped St. 
Louis by 66 points. The Eagles, operating 
from the famed "T" formation, bettered that 
total in their 1941 opener with St. Anselm's 



at Alumni Field as they trampled the Hawks, 
78-0. 

Boston College led at the half, thanks to the 
plunging of Mike Holovak and the brilliant 
passing of Connolly and newcomer Ed 
Doherty who worked under the center in the 
new formation. Up until half time the Hawks 
offered reasonable resistance, but shortly after 
the start of the third quarter Ted Williams 
broke the visitors' hearts on a dive tackle play. 
Ted broke clear at midfield and went over 
standing up. That was all there was to it. 

From there in, Boston College scored almost 
at will, Henry Woronicz, Butch Kissell, Bull 
Dempsey, and Billy Connery all sharing in the 
glory. Kissell, with 22 points from three 
touchdowns, a field goal and conversion, led 
the way. 

Vengeful Tulane, mindful of its '41 whip- 
ping, evened matters by overpowering the 
Eagles 21-7 before 46,000 in the Sugar Bowl 
Stadium. It was B. C.'s first setback since the 
Cotton Bowl. 

All three Tulane scores came in the first half 
as the result of loose ball handling on the part 
of the Maroon. 

In the third quarter the Eagles went to 
Tulane's three before Jim Ely intercepted an 




BOB JATJRON OUTFLYING THE HAWKS 



end-zone pass. Gil Bouley then blocked a punt 
and Ed Zabilski recovered for the score. 
Maznicki converted. 

Maznicki played a magnificent game as did 
Capt. Morro who played his heart out for the 
losing cause. 

The colorful cadets from Carolina stretched 
their win streak over the Eagles to two straight 
as they took advantage of loose play on the 
part of the home eleven to carry off the 
honors, 26-13. 

After being stalled on the goal line on a 
Holovak miscue, the Eagles rolled eighty yards 
to open the scoring. 

In the second canto Clemson went out in 
front as Timmons bucked over. The cadets 
tallied again in the third quarter as they swept 
fifty-four yards on two Payne-to-Blalock 
aerials. 

In the final period the Eagles after a third 
Tiger score took the kickoff and marched 
sixty-three yards for a touchdown 

The Carolina eleven registered again in the 
closing minutes when Harry Franklin hood- 
winked the Eagle defenders on a wide reverse 
and went over standing up. 

The Myersmen outplayed the Southerners 
throughout the game but they were the vic- 




CAPTAIN AL MORRO 

tims of their own failure to hold the ball and 
cash in on the breaks. Mickey Connolly's 
passing and the fine all-round play of Frank 
Maznicki were the bright spots in the Maroon 
setback. 




BUTCH KISSELL GOING DEEP IN THE TIGER'S LAIR 




NAUMETZ BLOTS OUT THE OWLS WHILE TEDDY GOES THE OTHER WAY 



Following the Clemson disaster, the Maroon 
and Gold eleven took a new lease on life and 
turned back the invading Jaspers from Man- 
hattan in a free-scoring game, twenty-six to 
thirteen. The Eagle backs enjoyed a field day 
as they ripped the out-manned Manhattan line 
to shreds. 

The Myersmen moved out in front early in 
the opening quarter as Williams, the flying 
fisherman, snared a misguided Jasper aerial and 
romped thirty-five yards through the startled 
New York eleven to score. A few moments 
before the close of the period, Williams again 
brought the crowd to its collective feet as he 
intercepted another Manhattan forward deep 
in his own territory and scampered down the 
sidelines untouched for eighty-five yards and 
the second Boston College score. 

The Eagles' third touchdown opened the 
third quarter as Gil Bouley crashed through 
to block a Jasper punt which the alert Eddie 
Zabilski fell upon in the end zone. Midway 
along in the final period the flying Williams 
again broke through the bewildered Jaspers 
and romped sixty yards for a final tally. 

As the shadows fell over Fenway late in the 
fourth quarter, Coach Herb Kopf sent in his 
reserves and the young Jaspers twice drove 
through the Eagles' defence for scores. 



In a repetition of their 1940 thriller, the 
Golden Eagles again downed the Georgetown 
Hoyas by a 14-6 score. Georgetown hopped 
away to an early lead as B. C. fumbled on their 
13 shortly after the initial kickoff. Four plays 
later G. U. counted on a 14 yard aerial. The 
Maroon then started from their own twenty 
and tramped eighty yards to even the count. 
An arching pass, Doherty-to-Zabilski, carried 
the Eagles over from the twenty-eight. 

In the final quarter Bee Cee increased their 
slender margin as they swept the length of the 
field for the score. On this march a perfectly 
executed pass from Ed Doherty to Don Cur- 
rivan ate up fifty-two yards and put the Eagle 
eleven on the Hoya twenty. Maznicki ripped 
over tackle for fifteen more and then cracked 
through his own right guard for five and a 
touchdown after bowling over Dornfeld on 
the one yard line. As usual Frank bisected the 
uprights with the additional marker. 

The standout lineman of the day was Boston 
College's great sophomore tackle, Gil Bouley. 
The Connecticut bombshell completely over- 
shadowed Georgetown's candidate for All- 
America honors, Al Blozis. Naumetz played 
the entire game with a broken thumb, smashed 
on the opening kickoff. 



In their annual clash with the Cherry and 
White of Temple University, the Golden 
Eagles reached the season's offensive heights. 
The Owls came to the Hub with five consecu- 
tive wins safely tucked beneath their wings 
and envisioning an undefeated season. 

A steady rain and sea of mud greeted the 
squads at Fenway and a dull game seemed in 
the offing but almost from the opening whistle 
the Maroon eleven swam to a lop-sided win. 
Before the game was five minutes old the 
Golden Avalanche was well on its way to sink- 
ing the Owls under a 31-0 shelling. 

With but three minutes to go before the 
close of the first half, Frank Maznicki stepped 
back and swung his automatic toe through the 
Fenway mud to put the Maroon out in front 
by three points. Shortly after the second half 
got under way the same Maznicki dog-paddled 
thirty yards off tackle for the first touchdown. 
"Mighty Mike" Holovak twice bulled his way 
through the weary Temple line for scores. Jim 
Bennedetto also chipped in with a touchdown 
dash. 

Captain Al Morro, Ed Zabilski, Bouley and 
Darone played brilliantly as they stopped the 
vaunted Temple attack cold. Maznicki en- 
joyed a field day as he romped through the 
Owl team at will, rolling up ninety-five yards. 



November 8 opened a new chapter in B. C. 
football relations as the Deacons of Wake For- 
est trudged into Boston to tangle with the local 
heroes. The southern brigade was as tough and 
capable a crew as ever marred the infield at 
Fenway. 

The game see-sawed until the closing mo- 
ments of the first half when Ed Doherty 
moved back and whipped a strike to Charlie 
Furbush for first blood. The second half 
opened in great fashion from the B. C. view- 
point, Maznicki taking the kickoff back 2 5 
yards. On the first play from scrimmage, 
with the line opening up a highway, the 
"Monk" tip-toed fifty-two yards down field. 
Holovak added three before Williams snared 
Doherty's lateral and swept the end for 
twenty yards and the second Eagle score. 

The Heightsmen weren't through yet and 
shortly thereafter an alert Eagle pounced on 
an enemy miscue. Doherty pitched three 
strikes in a row to place the ball on the eight 
yard line. From here Kissell deposited the pig- 
skin over the double stripe in one thrust. 

Petie Horchak deservedly tallied for the 
Southerners, but the point after went awry. 
Holovak's fine plunging brought the Eagles 
their final six points and the 26-6 verdict. 




TEDDY WILLIAMS "FIRST DOWNS" THE DEACONS 




B. U. SEES A SHADOW— THAT'S ALL 

The Tennessee Volunteers brought along 
some fine southern weather as they came to the 
Hub to renew the famous Sugar Bowl rivalry 
with the Myersmen on the second Saturday of 
November. Over thirty-five thousand en- 



thusiastic football fans crowded their way into 
Fenway Park to watch the vaunted Vols and 
the Eagles do battle. 

The Eagles drew first blood in the second 
period. Maznicki personally conducted the 
Myersmen fifty-five yards in three plays and 
chalked up the tally. In the second half the 
Vols roared back with a vengeance and drove 
to the three where Cifers fumbled as Maznicki 
hit him. The loose ball rolled into the end 
zone where MoUoy claimed it for Tennessee. 

In the final minutes, Boudreau gambled on 
a win but his pass to Woronicz boomeranged 
as Gold intercepted and carried to the one yard 
line. In three plays Cifers blasted out the win- 
ning touchdown. 

A 95 yard runback by Dolph Kissell on the 
opening kickoff featured the annual B. U. 
game as the Eagles scored all their 19 points 
within the first seven minutes against the Ter- 
riers before 17,000 rooters at Fenway Park. 

Not until the second half did B. U. register. 
Walt Williams did the scoring on a 14 yard 
sprint. Walt kicked the point to bring the 
count to 19 and 7. Outstanding for the 
Maroon were Terry Geoghegan, senior end, 
and sophomore Angie Sisti who replaced Al 
Morro at tackle. 




THE MONK CONGAS FOR THE VOLS 



The twenty-ninth of November was a great 
day for Coach Denn}' Myers and his Eagles as 
they rose up from the Fenwa}'' sod to topple 
the Holy Cross Crusaders in the closing min- 
utes of the game. 

Holy Cross took the opening kickoff from 
the toe of "Rock" Canale, and inaugurated a 
sustained drive which was climaxed at the five 
minute mark with a score. 

TraUtng 7-0, the Eagles' initial scoring 
efFort was sparked by the indomitable "Monk" 
Maznicki, our All-American backfield star, 
whose broken-field running moved the Maroon 
down to the Ho^'a 25 yard stripe. At this 
juncture, Maznicki amazed the capacity 
throng of forty thousand by hurling a per- 
fect strike to Ed Zabilski, senior wing, who 
snared the toss five yards short of the Purple 
goal. In one blast through right guard, 
"Monk" rocketed into the end zone for the 
Bee Cee score. He then proceeded to split the 
uprights with the equalizing digit. 

Early in the final quarter, Grigas again 
bowled his wa)' over the double stripe. Maz- 
nicki rocketed out of nowhere to smother 
Roberts' attempted conversion. 

The clock showed three minutes to go as 
Doherty lugged a Purple punt to midfield. 
Maznicki again passed for twent}' yards. 




\L\Z COMES THROUGH AGAIN 

On the next play Ted Williams raced to vic- 
tory on the now-famed "Naked Reverse." As 
the clock ticked away the precious seconds, 
Frank Maznicki calmly converted the winning 
point as the assembled throng collapsed. 




SURPRISE OF THE YEAR— MAZNICKI TO ZABILSKI 




ED^X^ARD ZABILSKI THOMAS MORAN 

TERRENCE GEOGHEGAN 
THEODORE WILLIAMS ADOLPH KISSELL 




STEPHEN LEVANITIS 
FRANCIS MAZNICKI 



LEO STRUMSKI 



HENRY WORONICZ 
ROBERT JAURON 



BOWLING 



"Bowling", as defined by Webster, did not 
meet with the approval of our football team 
during our Sophomore and Junior years. They 
preferred to prove to the lexicographers that 
"bowling" meant victory and travel. In their 
attempts to substantiate their statements they 
travelled "deep into the heart of Texas" and 
there displayed the football prowess which 
gave to Boston College the honor of having 
one of the greatest teams in the nation. 

A royal welcome was tendered our men in 
the Lone Star State and they fully realized 
that the "eyes of Texas were upon them". 
They arrived in Dallas, the city of dashing 
adventure, of Dallas debs, the home of the 
Cotton Bowl. Here they received the keys to 
the city and even managed to secure the keys 
to the county jail. Before they left they had 
operated police cars, abetted the law in numer- 



ous raids, and dined with the Texan and his 
wide-brimmed hat. The Texans were delight- 
ed with the Bawston accent and the northern- 
ers were equally amazed at the Texas drawl. 
Every Texan girl was impressed by tales of 
the reservoir, of Jake Wirth's, and of the Park 
Street Subway. They, in turn, mystified the 
quiet lads from Boston with stories of riding 
the range, of boots and saddles, and of the old 
corral. 

The color and splendor of the Cotton Bowl 
activities of 1940 have passed on but they have 
been reported in Boston as one of the "seven 
wonders of the world". For those who cotton- 
bowled it "Southern hospitality" is more than 
a mere phrase — it means charm and generosity, 
friendliness and geniality. . . . We won't forget 
these things. 





^%J% >«' 3/i^ 





BOWLING 



"New Orleans or Bust" was the slogan of 
the student body after the 1940-41 football 
team accepted the invitation to play in the 
Sugar Bowl. Upon receiving their pay checks 
from the federal government, for supposed 
work in the mail department, some five hun- 
dred sons of alma mater headed for the "Sunny 
South". 

In everything from a '28 Buick to a '41 
Packard the rabid rooters upped and left home 
and began their long motor-cade to the city of 
bathing beauties and the French Quarter. The 
great American highways swayed to the tunes 
"For Boston" and "Hail Maroon and Gold". 
From the mountains of Virginia to the plains 
of the Carolinas, Boston College men im- 
pressed the native with the greatness of Boston 
College and her team. 

After whizzing through cotton fields, past 
the negro with his donkey, and the timid south- 
ern belle with her southern drawl, the Mr. 
B. C. was driving up Canal Street. From the 
top floor of the Roosevelt to the cellar of the 
county tap the familiar twang of Boston slang 
echoed throughout the city. 

Every hour the South received another vis- 



itor who was to make the Civil War seem like 
a fairy tale. The hospitality of the Town of 
The Mardi Gras made them all but forget the 
clash of the greats on New Year's Day. That 
battle has been fought, and all know the glory 
attained by the National Champions of 1941, 
but only a privileged few know of the excite- 
ment after the game. 

Canal Street became the Boston College 
Campus; every hotel, her dorms; and every 
nite-spot, her meeting place. Dancing debs 
showed Boston's best the Orleans Shuffle in the 
most expensive dance halls. Yankee boys 
taught rebels' daughters the "Hail Alma 
Mater". Rebels' daughters taught the Yankee 
boys the story of Robert E. Lee. 

But as suddenly as it all began, it was all 
over. Again the student yearned for Boston 
and beans, and quietly the motor-cade 
chugged out of the city of Antoine's, of color, 
and of victory. He plotted his course through 
the land of the defeated "Vols", through the 
hills of Dogpatch and after one last look for 
Daisy Mae before the dream was over, the spell 
broke and the Towers of Boston College hove 
in sight. 




^^ 



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/ 






r 



'mm i 



Charlie really fills those shoes. . . . Here we come . . . ready or not. . . . The 
thundering herd — Toole leading. . . . Just Patsy Darone. . . . Durable Fred Naumetz. 
. . . Isn't this a good picture? . . . The goal line express. . . . They shall not pass. 







'sJs>' 



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This, gentlemen, is a football. . . . V . . . — for Victories. . . . Here's how the T 
should work. . . . Always time for a picture. . . . Quarterback Ed Doherty. . . . Mud, 
Mire and Maznicki. . . . The starting lineup. . . . Where we were crowned. 



VARSITY 




JOHN A. KELLY 

Coach 



New England Intercollegiate Champions 
for three straight years and National Amateur 
titlists for the 1942 season — that was the rec- 
ord established by Coach John A. Kelley's 
varsity hockey sextet. Four seasons ago, the 
greatest array of hockey players entered Bos- 
ton College. Ray Chaisson, Al "Fishy" Du- 
mond, Bob Mee, Ralph Powers, Larry Houle, 
Hugh Sharkey and Charlie Sullivan skated to 
hockey fame as freshmen when they combined 
to ice the most formidable collegiate hockey 
team in the country. 

In their first year of varsity competition, 
the men of the class of "Forty-two" joined 
Joe Maguire, Johnny Pryor, Wally Cuenin and 
Captain Bill Flynn to lift the Eagle ice team to 
the top of the New England Intercollegiate 
league after several years' lapse in Maroon 
hockey supremacy. That winter the Kelley- 
men journeyed to Rye, New York, to win the 
annual winter carnival round-robin series. 
The following winter the Chaisson-Dumond- 
Pryor line became the greatest front wave to 
operate outside of the professional ranks. For 
the second straight year the Maroon and Gold 




Kneeling: Walter Fitzgerald, Lindy Blanchard, Harry Crovo, Capt. Ralph Powers, Jim Edgeworth, Hugh Sharkey, Phil Carey. 
Standing: Dick Keating, Mgr., Wally Boudreau, "Putto" Murphy, Nick Flynn, George Malone, Walter Brady, Charley Sullivan, 
Roy Schenya, Alex Skene, John A. Kelly, Coach. 



HOCKEY 



sextet topped the local intercollegiate confer- 
ence and the professional teams began to cast 
covetous glances in the direction of the Eagles' 
super-stars. During that eventful season, Les 
Eagles dropped but one game; that the sea- 
son's opener with the Yale Bulldogs at New 
Haven. 

Coming into senior year Larry Houle was 
forced to give up the ice game because of an 
injury suffered the previous season. Bob Mee, 
whose play had won for him the title of the 
"outstanding defenseman in intercollegiate 
hockey," retired from varsity service to assume 
the freshman coaching duties at the Heights. 
Ray Chaisson and diminutive "Fishy" Du- 
mond turned their hockey skill to the profes- 
sional game as they joined the Boston Olym- 
pics. Confronted by such staggering losses, 
the Maroon and Gold hockey outlook for the 
1942 season was, to say the least, very bleak. 

However, the exploits of the past campaign 
are history now. We all know how Coach 
"Snooks" Kelley performed the seemingly im- 
possible and turned out another championship 
sextet. Under the inspired leadership of Cap- 




CAPTAIN RALPH POWERS 




BOUDREAU— BAD NEWS FOR B. U. 




CHARLES SULLIVAN 

tain Ralph Powers, the Eagles opened their 
historic season in New Haven by avenging 
their honor at the expense of the bewildered 
Bulldogs of Eli Yale. It was in this game that 
the Eagle rooters discovered that the next 
heroes in the Boston College hockey world 
were to be the previously unsung members 
of the sophomore class. After their thrilling 
4-3 verdict over the Ivy Leaguers, the Eagle 
team returned to the local arena to start their 
sterling defense of their League championship. 
The supposedly potent Huskies of Northeast- 
ern fell before the rising Eagles as Goaler Phil 
Carey and wings Jim Edgeworth and Putto 
Murphy turned in spectacular performances. 

Early in January the Maroon and Gold 
waded through the helpless and hapless Engi- 
neers of Technology as they rang up six mark- 
ers while Phil Carey bowed but twice. Two 
days later they journeyed to the wilds of New 
Hampshire to meet the Wildcats beneath the 
arclights in sub-zero weather. The Kelleymen 
were rolling along in high gear at this point 
and neither the New Hampshire sextet nor the 
freezing temperature was up to the task of 
cooling them off. The Powers-paced Eagle 
team rang the bell on seven occasions that 
night to top the Wildcats by two goals. 

Returning home once more, the conquering 
Eagles staged another successful defense of 



HUGH SHARKEY 

their city championship as they humbled the 
Boston University Terriers beneath an eight 
goal barrage. The overpowered Intowners 
could pierce the staunch Maroon defenses on 
only two occasions. The Boston University 
clash marked the final appearance of Linden 
Blanchard, stellar Maroon defenseman and 
football star. 

Four days later Coach Kelley led his charges 
to Waterville, Maine, to meet the challenging 
Colby Mules. The Maroon six was equal to the 
task of halting the march of the Maine boys 
as sophomore Putto Murphy, second line cen- 
ter, sank the winning marker in the first over- 
time period to give the Eagles a hard-earned 
5-4 victory. After the mid-season layoff, the 
Kelley brigade girded itself to halt the ram- 
paging Dartmouth Indians. The largest crowd 
of the season turned out to see the Indians and 
Eagles battle on the ice of the Boston Garden. 
The icemen from the Hanover hills brought a 
great sophomore line to the Hub for this clash 
and the young Indians packed too much skill 
and hockey finesse for the overpowered Eagles 
and the Maroon sextet met its first defeat of 
the season by a 7-2 score. The famed Hanover 
line of Rondeau, Riley and Harrison showed 
the Boston hockey fans the most spectacular 
play they had been privileged to watch since 
the Chaisson, Dumond and Pryor era. 



The following night, after suffering their 
first setback in nineteen games, the weary 
Maroon and Gold skaters suddenly came to 
life as they wreaked havoc on the Northeastern 
Huskies in a successful attempt to regain their 
lost glory. After their convincing 9-5 tri- 
umph over the Huskies, Charlie Sullivan, the 
captain of the Eagles' second line, departed to 
answer the call to the colors. For the second 
time since the opening of the season. Coach 
Kelley had to shuffle his lineup. This time 
George Malone was brought up from the third 
line to replace the drafted Charlie. A week 
later the Maroon and Gold, now definitely 
leading the league, polished off the Terriers in 
a fast 5-2 battle that put them one more game 
nearer to another title. The Fates had decreed, 
however, that the Eagles should experience one 
more downfall. The Chestnut Hillers invaded 
the lair of the Princeton Tiger at Nassau but 
Captain Al Stuckey turned in a brilliant per- 
formance to lead the Orange six to a 5-2 win 
over our boys. 

A week later the rejuvenated icemen met 
Colby in the final game of the season. Coach 
Kelley's charges trailed 3-2 at the end of two 
periods but the great Boston College spirit was 
not to be denied and paced by center Wally 
Boudreau who collected four goals, the Eagle 



six roared home with a 7-5 victory, another 
league title — their third in as many years — and 
the Donald Sands Memorial Trophy. By vir- 
tue of their thrilling win over the potent 
Mules, the Eagles were invited to compete in 
the National Amateur Championships at the 
Arena. 

For the gruelling N.A.A.U. tournament 
Coach "Snooks" Kelley called upon three 
members of Bob Mee's crack freshman sextet 
to lend the varsity skaters a helping hand. Ed 
Burns, Jim Cunniff and Tom Dolan answered 
the coach's call for aid and teamed with the 
veteran Eagle skaters to boost the Maroon and 
Gold to the National championship. In the 
opening round Les Eagles faced the flashy 
Hi-Standard sextet of Connecticut but the 
sophomore combination of Edgeworth and 
Murphy clicked in the closing moments to 
give the Eagles a 3-2 triumph. 

In the semi-final round Les Eagles faced the 
powerful Messina Hockey Club of New York 
and once more the Kelley stalwarts were equal 
to the task as they battled the New Yorkers 
to a standstill and eked out a hard-fought 9-8 
victory. The following afternoon a packed 
house turned out to watch the title clash be- 
tween the Eagles and St. Nick's. And the 
Eagles brought home another trophy. 




FACE OFF— B. U. GAME 



VARSITY 




FREDDIE MAGUIRE 
Coach 

When this issue of the Sub Turri went to 
press, Freddy Maguire had not called out the 
candidates for the varsity nine, but he was 
frank to admit that he expects his best season 



since assuming the coaching berth four sea- 
sons ago. 

Coach Maguire expects high-grade pitching 
from George Bent, last year's surprise winner, 
and Dick Ferriter, the leading hurler for the 
past two seasons. Maguire is also counting 
heavily on sophomores Ed Leary and Tom 
Hazlett, the stylish left-hander. 

Behind the plate, Larry Ferriter will hold 
forth. Last spring Larry progressed a long way 
as the second string receiver. He is a depend- 
able target behind the plate and a timely hitter. 

At present the infield is uncertain, but Vic 
Matthews will probably guard first base if 
Uncle Sam does not claim him in the interim. 
If Vic is unavailable, either Wally Cassell or 
freshman Tommy Brennan will take over the 
berth. 

Mickey Connolly, Ed Kenney and Putto 
Murphy, the hockeyist, have the inside track 
on the remaining infield positions. All three 
are capable fielders and sharp, though not 
robust hitters. In the outfield the loss of Cap- 
tain-elect Frankie Davis will be felt. The lead- 
ing candidates at the moment appear to be 
Bob Jauron and Bill Commane, veteran hold- 
overs, with Al Sutkis, Walt Cassell and Connie 
Pappas providing the opposition. With this 
material the Eagles will have a well balanced 
and aggressive team. 




RICHakD Callahan, EDWARD McDONALD, ROBERT CORBETT. GEORGE bent, FRANCIS DOHERTY 



BASE BALL 



Looking over the seniors on the team we find 
Dick Ferriter heading the hst. Dick came to 
the varsity with Httle or no experience and 
made good as a sophomore. He has been the 
mound mainstay ever since that time. Fran 
Doherty, another right-hander, hurled his best 
ball as a freshman. During that campaign he 
hurled a one-hitter against the Dartmouth 
frosh. Last spring Fran was hampered by 
wildness and was used mostly in relief roles. 

George Bent came into his own in junior 
when he licked a strong Fordham club 6-3 in 
his varsity debut. George added to his laurels 
with a 5-3 win over St. John's, the Metropoli- 
tan champs. "Bentie" held the Seton Hall 
nine, winners of 1 5 straight games, to two hits, 
only to lose 2-1 in eleven innings. 

Ronnie Corbett, another member of the 
pitching corps, stood out because of his fine 
control. His best effort was a 9-1 victory over 
Northeastern in his junior year. Ed McDonald 
was a standout receiver on the frosh nine but 
due to weak hitting the mechanical man never 
received a chance to shine. 

Bob Jauron, among the outfielders, was a 
top-notch fly-chaser and a better than average 
hitter. Bob Harris, better known as "Bucky", 
was due to hold down third base until Uncle 
Sam claimed him on waivers. The season is 




RICHARD J. FERRITER 

opening with the annual Fordham clash on 
April nineteenth and winding up with the 
traditional Holy Cross series beginning on 
Memorial Day. 




FOR BOSTON — BENT PITCHING 



VARSITY 




JACK RYDER 

Coach 



Close to fifty candidates answered Coach 
Jack Ryder's call for track aspirants as the 
silver-haired Eagle mentor inaugurated his 
twenty-third season atop University Heights. 
The veteran head of the spiked-shoe sport 
looked forward to another highly successful 
campaign. Captain Johnny Ballantine of Ros- 
lindale led ten varsity lettermen into the sea- 
son's opening engagement with Tufts in the 
annual informal meet. Harry Brown of 
Brighton succeeded John Mulroy as the varsity 
manager. 

Having lost but one man, Captain Bill 
Dowd, from the mile foursome which set the 
all-time Boston College record of 3:21.8 in 
New York the previous winter, Coach Ryder 
and his charges envisioned another banner 
campaign. The Eagles had Capt. John Ballan- 
tine, Bill Riley and Ed McCarthy back for 
another year. John O'Connor bested Frank 
Harris, Jim Kelleher, Fred Seeley and Bob Ross 
for the remaining berth. The only other var- 
sity competitor during the indoor season was 
Angie Sisti, sophomore shot-putter, who an- 
nexed both the New England amateur and 




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Kiucliii^: I iMiik Spdsato, Jim Kelleher, Dick Buckley, Capt. John Ballantine, Bill Riley, Tom Greehan. 

Standing: Coach Jack Ryder, Ernie Santasuosso, Asst. Mgr., Ray Sullivan, Joe Kulis, Phil Willette, Angie Sisti, Ed 



. ..J,. J --^ , , --0 ' / - 

McCarthy, Bob Ross, Tom Joyce, Frank Harris, Mgr. Harry Brown. 



TRACK 



intercollegiate titles and held the runner-up 
spots behind Al Blozis in the IC4-A and New 
York K. of C. games. 

The Maroon and Gold legmen suffered sev- 
eral early season setbacks when Justin Mc- 
Gowan was called to the colors, Gil Walker 
left school along with Fred Seeley and John 
Ballantine was absent studying for his com- 
mission in the army. Sophomore Jim Kelleher 
came along fast to fill the vacant position as 
the mile quartet opened the year with a vic- 
tory over Holy Cross and Manhattan in the 
Millrose Games. The following week at the 
B.A.A. meet the Eagle flyers again bested the 
Crusader foursome as McCarthy and Riley 
provided the edge with excellent perform- 
ances. This marked the first Boston win over 
the Crusaders in over five seasons. 

Rhode Island State fell victim to a superior 
club in the New York A. C. meet as Johnny 
Ballantine returned to action and showed that 
he had lost none of his speed or competitive 
skill. Pitted against the crack Colgate team, 
Syracuse, New York University and Rhode 
Island State in their trial heat in the IC4-A 
Championships, the Maroon four reached the 




CAPTAIN JOHN BALLANTINE 




ED McCarthy and bill riley 



TRACK TRIUMVIRATE 
John Ballantine, Jack Ryder, Harry Brown 



finals through the inspired legs of Ballantine 
and Riley. The Eagle anchor-man was clocked 
in 5 seconds flat as he overhauled the Syracuse 
entry on the stretch. The Maroon and Gold 
flyers had to be content with sixth honors in 
the finals as Colgate, Georgetown, Villanova 
and Co. proved too fast. 

In the final meet of the indoor season, the 
Casey Games in New York, the Boston College 
quartet went after its third straight relay win 
over Holy Cross, New York U. and Manhat- 
tan. A mix-up in the baton-passing cost the 
Eagle four an easy win. Although they did 
not equal the record showing of last winter's 
team, the Maroon runners ranked sixth in the 
East. With O'Connor, Kelleher and Harris to 
provide the nucleus. Coach Ryder hopes to 
turn out another crack foursome next season. 

The veteran Eagle coach has a well-balanced 
squad despite the loss of such vital men as 
Ballantine, Gilbert Walker and Justin Mc- 
Gowan. Big Mac was slated to climax his 



brilliant four-year career this spring by lead- 
ing the eastern collegians in the javelin event. 
The sprint division was weakened consider- 
ably by the withdrawal of diminutive Gil 
Walker, the New England dash titleholder. 
However, under the new ruling, freshman 
Tommy Greehan, Ryder's latest sprint discov- 
ery, will garner the Maroon points in this 
event. In the other running events Ryder will 
call upon McCarthy, Riley, Buckley, Ross, 
Harris and Joyce to uphold the Eagles' record. 
The Maroon and Gold will find their chief 
strength in the field events with Al Morro, 
the New England discus champion, ready for 
another record-breaking season. Big Al will 
also compete in the hammer and the shotput 
along with Dolph Kissell who is scheduled to 
take over the iron-man role vacated last June 
by the incomparable Joe Zabilski. The Maroon 
team will be well-fortified in the hurdle events 
with sophomores Jim Kelleher and Bob Ross 
and first-year man Paul Sweeney ready to 
carry on. 




Dick Kirby, Jim Kelliher, Bill Riley, Ed McCarthy 



i:i) IKI.l.S IT R) CRADS 
Bill Ohrenberger, Joe McKenney, Charley Fitzgerald 



FENCING 



Although Mr. John Roth was unable to 
assist the fencing team this season in his usual 
coaching capacity, the Maroon and Gold 
fencers drew up a difficult and ambitious 
schedule and with a limited player personnel 
prepared to show their fine competitive spirit. 

Graduation had ended the collegiate careers 
of such capable foilsmen as Captain Baker, 
Keily, Struzziero, MacNeil and Eblan, but the 
squad determined to carry on. Heading the 
"Forty-two" fencers was the industrious and 
capable Capt. Ralph Alman, the lone veteran 
and letterman. During the past season Ralph 
developed into the team's only three-event 
swordsman and was the leading scorer for the 
Eagle squad. 

In the supporting cast such weapon-wielders 
as Yale Richmond, John O'Brien, Bill Gaine, 
Bob Ross, John Delaney and Bill Duff ey gave 
their all for the Heightsmen. Junior Yale 
Richmond, the efficient player-manager, ar- 
ranged a fine schedule which saw the Eagles 



tangle with such teams as Wesleyan, Boston 
U., Middlebury and Norwich. In addition to 
his managerial chores, "Harvard" also did his 
bit for the Maroon in the foils and sabre com- 
petition. 

Bob Ross, a mid-season addition from the 
track squad, gave promise of developing into 
a valuable asset before he was sidelined with 
an ankle injury. The fencers opened their 
campaign at Wesleyan as they dropped a close 
13-9 match. Upon their return home the Bee 
Gee's met Norwich and bowed to the cadets' 
superior skill, 17-10. 

Next came the annual tussle with the Boston 
University fencers and the Terriers prevailed, 
16-11. In the return match the Maroon 
pierced the Terriers' armor, 15-12. 

The Eagles journeyed to Vermont to meet 
Middlebury but the at-home team eked out a 
slim, 14-13 win. In the season's finale the 
Maroon downed Brown in the best match of 
the year. 




YALE RICHMOND, ROBERT ROSS, CAPT. RALPH ALMAN, JOHN DELANEY 



TENNIS 



The Boston College tennis team looked for- 
ward to this season with high hopes for a ban- 
ner campaign. Despite the loss of Capt. Gene 
Sullivan and player-manager Al Arsenault 
from last spring's net squad, the 1942 team 
was potentially the most powerful array of 
racqueteers to represent the Maroon and Gold 
in recent years. 

The Eagle net squad was forced to concen- 
trate on their at-home schedule and Manager 
Dick Keating, although disappointed to find 
his impressive Dixie tour cancelled, set his 
managerial brains to work and lined up an 
imposing list of matches among the local col- 
leges. 

Heading the 1942 Maroon tennis team was 
Capt. Charlie Robichaud of Rockland. The 
amiable Charlie flashed his way into the tennis 
spotlight in freshman when he was the top 
first-year volleyman. Robichaud easily made 
good on the varsity squad and was a letterman 
in sophomore and again in junior. 

Junior Bill Davis of Natick won the all- 
important number one post this spring with 



his experienced and steady play. Last season, 
as the only sophomore on the squad. Bill 
amazed all with his spectacular play on the 
southern invasion. 

Dave Birtwell was another capable racquet- 
eer in the Eagle camp. Four years ago Dave 
played on the Eaglet team but remained idle 
as a sophomore. Returning to action last 
spring, Dave won his varsity letter. Larry 
Brennan has enjoyed a spasmodic career. He 
competed as a freshman but remained on the 
sidelines during the following two seasons. 
This spring, however, the lanky senior re- 
turned to the game, a vastly improved netman. 

John Daly was the only sophomore to win 
a berth on the current Eagle team. 

Dick Keating, dapper man about town and 
manager deluxe, also took a racquet in hand 
but the Newton socialite was much more 
adept in the managerial department. Although 
they did not play varsity tennis this year, Al 
Dumond and Ray Chaisson of hockey fame 
were vital cogs in the Maroon net machine 
during the past three seasons. 




WILLIAM DAVIS, DAVID BIRTWELL, CAPT. CHARLES ROBICHAUD, 
RICHARD KEATING, RICHARD DALY 



GOLF 



Under their Captain, John Raflferty, the Bee 
Cee golfers are looking forward to their most 
successful season in recent years. Due to the 
shortening of the academic schedule, the an- 
nual southern tour will extend only as far 
south as Virginia. The Eagle swingers have 
high hopes of avenging last year's setbacks at 
the hands of the capable southern gentlemen. 
The Maroon invasion of the Confederate terri- 
tory will come during the Easter holidays. On 
the tour Les Eagles will meet Randolph- 
Macon, George Washington, Georgetown and 
Newport News. 

Captain Jack Sheehy was the only gradu- 
tion loss but John Rafferty promises to fill the 
vacancy left by the Belmont golfer. Aiding 
Rafferty in the task of upholding the Eagle 
colors will be Jim Harvey, Harry McGrath, 
Phil Brooks and Jack Harvey. The Harvey 
brothers of Arlington boast an impressive links 
record and are rated high in the C.Y.O. golf- 
ing circles. Jim carded the low score in last 



fall's qualifying matches at Winchester C. C. 

Sophomore Phil Brooks of West Roxbury is 
another newcomer to the Maroon team. How- 
ever, Phil is not a novice at the links game and 
his fine qualifying round seems to indicate that 
he will collect his share of points for the Eagle 
foursome. 

Harry McGrath of Winchester completes 
the playing list on the current team. Like 
Brooks, Harry is a sophomore and a well- 
known junior golfer. For the past few seasons 
he has been listed among the top contenders 
for the state title matches. 

The managerial end of the golf team has 
been entrusted to senior Art Lacouture of 
Natick. Last spring Art saw service as an 
active player but he has retired from the links 
this year to attend to the schedule-making 
duties. Art has billed home matches for the 
Maroon foursome with Harvard, Boston Uni- 
versity, Rhode Island and Holy Cross in addi- 
tion to the Dixie engagements. 




BOB REHLING 



ARTHUR LACOUTURE 



JIM HARVEY 



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Touche. . . . Dr. Bones tries a thigh. . . . Asking for splinters — Riley and Seeley. 
. . . Dick Gill sits this one out. . . . The Jeer Boys, Morin, Mulvehill, and Cahalane. . . . 
The "Snooker" and his "boys". . . . "O captain, my captain." 









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Angi Sisti . . . New England Champ. . . . Pour it on, you pucksters. . . . Friends 
again. . . . The Breakfast of Champions. . . . Who'll you have in the third? ... En 
Garde. . . . Take it all off! . . . Play this number. 







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SENIOR 




WHAT'S YOURS 



BEST PROFESSOR ^ Dr. Geo. F. Fitzgibbon, Dr. David C. O'Donnell 

BEST STUDENT Martin Hansberry, James Hawco 

BEST DANCER Edmund MulvehiU, Modestino Vitale 

BEST CONVERSATIONALIST James O'Neill, Joseph Nolan 

BEST LOOKING Robert Mee, Robert Lally 

BEST JOURNALIST William Cadigan) ^ . t u t^ 

•^ J Ex Aequo, Joseph Uever 

Edmund Weiss ] 

MOST PESSIMISTIC Francis D'Ambrosio, Francis Gannon 

MOST OPTIMISTIC James O'Neil, Joseph Elliott 

MOST AMIABLE Leo Strumski, Edmund MulvehiU 

MOST FUNCTIONAL George Boehrer, Robert Drinan 

MOST TALENTED Connie Pappas, Barrett Murphy 

MOST SPIRITED Paul Maguire, Ted MulvehiU 

MOST LOQUACIOUS John DeCosta, James O'Neil 

MOST PRACTICAL Richard Callahan, James Stanton 

MOST GENTLEMANLY James Hawco, Joseph Stanton 

MOST VERSATILE Richard Keating, William Cadigan 

MOST PERSONALITY Edmund MulvehiU, James Stanton 

MOST BASHFUL Louis Kuc, Francis Nicholson 

MOST DIGNIFIED Thomas Hinchey, George Boehrer 

MOST INTERESTING COURSE Ethics, Religion 

MOST VALUABLE COURSE Ethics, Mathematics 

MOST CONSERVATIVE Richard Buckley, Joseph Boothroyd 

MOST RADICAL Joseph Dever, Leo Murphy 

MOST SOCIABLE Richard Keating, Edmund MulvehiU 



SUPERLATIVES 



MOST SUAVE Austin McNamara, Robert Lally 

MOST POPULAR PROFESSOR ._ j Doctor Harry Doyle, 

Father McCarthy, S.J. 

MOST POPULAR SUBJECT Ethics, Religion 

MOST POPULAR STUDENT Paul Maguire, Jim Stanton 

MOST LIKELY TO SUCCEED ...___ Martin Hansberry, James Hawco 

FAVORITE COMIC STRIP Lil Abner, Blondie 

FAVORITE MAGAZINE Newsweek, Time 

FAVORITE GIRL'S COLLEGE Regis, Emmanuel 

FAVORITE EXTRA-CURRICULAR ACTIVITY jFootball, 

) Sodality 

FAVORITE SONG j ,, "^^"^' ''' ^^^ Night", 

I "Deep in the Heart of Texas" 

FAVORITE SCHOLASTIC .... Mr. Donoghue, S.J., Mr. Jaskievicz, S.J. 

FAVORITE RADIO COMMENTATOR (Lowell Thomas, 

I Boake Carfer 

FAVORITE PASTIME Fox Hunting, Dancing 

FAVORITE UNDER-GRAD PUBLICATION Stylus, Heights 

FAVORITE THEATRE Metropolitan, R.K.O., Keith's 

FAVORITE COLUMNIST Boake Carter, Westbrook Pegler 

FAVORITE SINGER Bing Crosby, Helen O'Connell 

FAVORITE BAND Glenn Miller, Tommy Dorsey 

FAVORITE NEWSPAPER Boston Globe, Boston Post 

FAVORITE RENDEZVOUS Totem Pole, Lunchroom 

FAVORITE CIGARETTE Chesterfield, Camels 

FAVORITE RADIO PROGRAM Bob Hope, Fred Allen 

FAVORITE MOVING PICTURE "How Green Was My Valley", 

"They Died With Their Boots On" 

FAVORITE PLAY "Uncle Tom's Cabin", "My Sister Eileen" 

CLASS COMEDIAN Leo Murphy, Bob Jauron 

CLASS ACTOR Connie Pappas, Eichard Keating 

CLASS POET Joseph Dever, John Ross 

CLASS SCIENTIST Arthur Frithsen, Laurent Houle 

CLASS WIT Connie Pappas, Francis Gannon 

CLASS ATHLETE "Monk" Maznicki, Al Morro 

CLASS DEBATER Robert Kopp, Robert Muse 

MISSED EX-STUDENT Charles Mackin, Thomas Kelty 

BOOK OF THE YEAR . i "^'^! °^ '^! ^^°!^?''; 

I Out of the Night 

MAN OF THE YEAR General MacArthur 

WOMAN OF THE YEAR Madame Chiang Kai Shek 



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Down and Out. . . . They never smiled again. . . . Java Jive at 9:15. . . . 12 miles 
an hour . . . huh. . . . From here it's only an alpine climb. . . . Agammemnon playing 
left field. . . . Peeking into the mysteries. 



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The costumes were beautiful. . . . Each man with a Valentine. . . . Why all the 
boys went to New Orleans. . . . The tires look good. . . . Hochman, not interested. . . . 
Remember the lineups after Pearl Harbor? . . . The cuts haven't been tabulated since 
March 1st. . . . Behind the bars. . . . The hand that shook the hand of the President. 



SENIOR 




GIVING IT ALL AWAY 



The Class of Nineteen Hundred Forty Two, 

We, the body corporate. 

Commending here to memory and to potence 

What yet remains of our estate — 

Being some odd three hundred men and true, 

Sound of mind. 

Of hmb and wind. 

Credit to our more genial patron saints 

(To whom is owed more charity than due) — 

Make this our final will and testament: 
To Boston men who follow and shall come 
Somehow to home 

In this our haven, short years, mad years spent. 
The tasseled Senior from the Freshman cox- 
comb 
With this intent 

We do bequeath and evermore bequest 
Successive weeks of energy and rest. 
Sophomore theses and the Junior Prom, 
The lunchroom ministrations of the Dom, 
The weeks before the Mid-years left to cram, 
The Army's thorough physical exam, 



Freshman dabblings in the Hippocrene, 
The carpet in the Office of the Dean, 
And common things anent. 

Let our Patron Saint attend. 

Spare our Rector's craft. 

Let his vigils aid commend 

On questionnaires and all attendant 

Dangers of the Draft. 

Enrollment and conditions in the fall. 
Numerals, Forty-two, upon the wall 
The banner of our class thereon remain 
Against the cold and chillings of the rain. 

All remainder of our chattels. 
Trophies of our blue-book battles, 
Splinters from the goal-post fights, 
Yellowed issues of the Heights, 
Eagle rescued from the Pups, 
And assorted Victory Cups — 
Of these that may survive the war 
Juniors be executor. 



DISPOSITIONS 



To Dean of Men, of all our legatees, 
Perpetual interest on our breakage fees, 
For cuts a bottle of mercurochrome 
(Excuse for us who oversleep at home). 

Sophomores, the worldly-wise. 
We leave to Logic, and devise 
Theirs shall be the special crime 
To murder it in half the time. 
Theirs the most technical of courses 
Conant or Defense endorses; 
Fuzzy old logicians' dank wit, 
Dyspeptic memories of the banquet. 
Oral theses and Styhts exhibits 
And Physics experiments to kibitz. 

The Freshman Class be heir 

And any later successors, 

To the NYA and summer employment 

And scholars' singular treasures, 

The worse for war and tear: 

Guide and guard them from the storm, 

Keep their little tootsies warm, 

OfiFer them clean enjoyment 

And save for a peaceful year. 

Powers that be behind demerits 

Leave several cases of addled spirits; 

Goods of Houle and Paul Maguire 

We leave to set the world on fire; 

One used political machine 

Fit to render Suffolk clean. 

Relinquished to the public weal 

By 'Heflf', and 'Maxie', and Jim O'Neill. 

Give leave to History 

To dot and carry one. 

And pend conclusions of Seminars 

About the Rising Sun, 



How little and yellow it be; 
Then pause and heed one JFX 
On Far-Pacific politics 
When Roosevelt lets down the bars 
Of scholars' liberty. 

We leave the Fulton Forum well behind 

To wage debate of academic kind 

On careful questions previously rehearsed; 

And object-lesson in 'America First'. 

The Heights we leave to champion high 

criteria 
And kindle bonfires in the cafeteria; 
We leave Deans' Bulletins, the right to preach. 
And tender cares of Archibald MacLeish. 

Weiss leaves decrying civic blindness 
And rattles the pails of human-kindness, 
Cadigan leaves the bomb-proof shelter 
And submarine-races along the Delta, 
And Wednesday deadlines to sweat about 
Over Pastromis and Pickwick Stout. 

Physics we leave to the men in the cassocks, 
Whose lives shall become too bound up with 

the Classics, 
And to the Business Faculty 
Our unpaid quarters and Library Fee. 
The future Zabilskis and Morros (if any) 
To John P. Curley and Larry Kenney. 

Credit for lounges, things extra-curricular. 
To pick, were hard for one man in particular. 
Quarrels about what functional art meant 
To embattled dons of the English Department, 
To be their glory when once the bone 
Of contention successfully be shown. 



Leave the proselytisers, 

Gillian and Bowenesque, 

To cast out pseudo-Gothic styles 

For Neo-Romanesque; 

To be anathematisers 

Of times without compunction, al- 

Truistic and unfunctional; 

To march away in ordered files 

With functional khaki visors. 

Leave Farragher to chafe in clothes 

While clad, benighted races glose 

Deceits that naked means unpeeled. 

Unlike the lilies of the field. 

The Chief finds women are still a riddle; 

A thousand miles from the Cat and Fiddle 

Muse plans cottages for Mary, 

War and the Air Corps to the contrary. 



Levanitis leaves Georgetown keening, 
Ryan a novel with social meaning. 
Nash leaves behind midsummer races. 
The hockey team keeps going places 
Minus Chaisson, Mee and Dumond — 
(Ray may become a successful binger 
But he'll never have the same old ginger) 
Jim leaves the ASN unsummoned. 

Leave the bonny Dramatic 

With Lacey and Good, to boot 

In football games on the terrace. 

Let the great, grey Father recruit 

For players more erratic. 

Leave Sid and Steve at six and sevens 

To bring the guard-house down at Devens: 

Let the soldiers applaud Festeris, 

Who rarely go for the Attic. 



Pre-meds leave their unwashed coats, 
De Costa leaves liturgic notes 
To the Congregation of Propaganda; 
Drinan's reverence for Ananda. 
Buckley relieves a term made shorter 
With jottings of a raving reporter; 
Price and Collins' sport selections 
To Esquire's current College Sections. 

Leave the steady athletes 

To bask in the Cardinal's Quad 

Forgetful of August practise 

And zealous trainers' prod. 

To dream of the autumn's feats; 

The Monk and Jauron will wake with a chill 

Thinking of Frank and Gloomy Gil. 

Morro will write up Denny's tactics 

For Sunday Sporting Sheets. 



Keating leaves an old blue jean. 

And Pappas-Jameson's stolen scene. 

Lavoie leaves others to be subtler 

And the little, black book of Johnny Butler. 

Brown leaves dreams of New Orleans, 

Coastguard Murphy takes to beans. 

Connelly left us at the dock, 

Boehrer yearns along Pope's Walk 

For Student Centres and dorms to be, 

Rising in functionality. 

Leave the Stylus be. 

To Dever bananas leave 

And hopes that he make the Air Corps, 

A time to think and breathe 

And write for the Mercury. 

Let Murphy grind out corkers 

For subsequent New Yorkers 



while Ross writes postcards from Dakar 
From depths of the Naval Reserve. 

Dever leaves social predilections 
And "Sammy Shafter" to "New Directions". 
Nolan leaves the Stylus littler, 
And Hansberry leaves his whip to Hitler. 
Muse leaves political palavers 
To Honest Paul, and Kopp, and Travers. 
Carroll leaves singlehood for Margie, 
And the whole class leaves in a state of 
lethargy. 



This Will and Testament 

With sweat and blood be sealed, 

So foot the plot of Scholastic grounds 

And syllogisms wield — 

A way of life cement. 

Leave the dreamer to blow on his brew 

Sublimating the struggle through — 

Come the worst and the wounds, 

The Labors of fulfillment 

When somehow we muddle through. 



J. G. R. 




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$220 ... Ha ... Ha ... Ha .. . Now we know where those jokes come from. . . . 
B.C. Air Raid Wardens. . . . Look at that tie! . . . Students of the Byzantine Rite. 













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Getting up to his Psych. . . . Barrett Carradine Murphy. . . . Take a letter, Miss 
Mullen: "My Dear Horatio ..."... We have met the enemy and they are ours. . . . 
He has the Pope to back him up. . . . F.B.I. . . . Tire Shortage? . . . Gas Shortage? 
. . . Where? . . . Four of the Boys. . . . Why the Heights comes out or Why the Heights 
. . . Posin'. 



INTELLECTUALLY 




TELLING THE WORLD 



The scene Is a Charles Street staircase. On 
a gloomy Friday evening. Nine stealthy char- 
acters are floating spectrally up the worn 
wooden flights. There are cracks in the door- 
ways, and furtive watchers mark their pace, 
thinking deep black thoughts all the way. 
Fascisti? .... Fifth Column? Espionage? .... 
The dark parade goes on, past the doorway- 
watchers, past a woman singing arias .... they 
reach the skylight-region and are welcomed by 
a strange short man .... 

It is really nothing more vicious and upset- 
ting than Doctor Bowen's Functional follow- 
ers, on their way to a Friday meeting. And to- 
night they intend to upset a lot more things 
than a beer glass. At least they plan to finish 
off Industrial Capitalism once and for all. 

Of all the crops of thought that have dis- 
turbed the peaceful security of the philosophy 
department, Functionalism is beyond all hesi- 
tation the supreme cream. Their great objec- 
tive has been that mistreated thing of Social 
Justice; their hammer and sickle, what the 
philosophers gingerly call Ascetic Theology. 
They want to swarm all over the structure of 
society, to replace girder with girder, and bolt 
with bolt, economically and otherwise until 
the structure is once again their idea of a 
Christian one. Revolution is the word but in 
the happy sense of Chesterton, a "turning 



back" . . . this time about seven hundred years. 
After all, what is seven hundred years. 

Mostly you think of a functionalist as 
ploughing a field with one hand, smashing 
machines with the other, reading the biogra- 
phy of St. Eric during his lunch hour and 
hanging occasional capitalists in the snarls of 
their own ticker tape. But this is not so of 
these perfectly delightful young men. They 
are visionaries and everybody knows that a 
visionary should not be made to act. 

They open their beer bottles with their own 
hands for they believe that the evils of an 
Industrial Capitalistic Society can only be 
cured by individual handiwork, taking inspira- 
tion from within the individual, and in close 
harmony with the four planes of meaning that 
dominate the world. 

But it is sincerely not funny. They do oflfer 
a cure for the industrial evils that no one 
denies; and their cure is away and apart from 
the factories and largely in the riches of the 
land. Industrialism, to take one part of the 
problem, cannot change its assembly lines, and 
they believe that no man can be an artist fast- 
ening on moving frames, and every function- 
alist feels that an artist is a thinking animal, 
happy in a kind of labor that expresses his 
nature as such. Nor can Capitalism allow the 
control of lucrative property to pass to the 



SPEAKING 



individual where universal thinking .... which 
means great thinking .... maintains it should 
belong. This is the challenge of Functionalism 
and it is a good one. It has set a good many 
walls on fire at Boston College. 

Such a challenge, however, was not able to 
limp its way alone. All over the hotbed that 
we call Alma Mater, sects and cults and 
societies of varying respectability reared their 
controversial heads. Surreptitious attacks ap- 
peared in our leading periodicals such as the 
one line poem, "Eric Gill .... Still?" or the 
ballad in the S^j/^w demanding the world "to 
be Gillian or be damned" and nasty stories were 
circulated about the campus concerning a cer- 
tain eminent functionalist lurking around in 
the dark, and sprinkling holy water on ma- 
chines. And finally the Fustian school ap- 
peared, in tribute to Michael Finn, "a noble 
man .... born of South Boston peasant stock, 
for the express purpose of revelling in the 
rococo". There was a very fine battle between 
the two, but in the last hour they both capitu- 
lated to a strange new theory proposed by an 
obscure editor of an obscure newspaper and an 
obscure Irishman from the Honor list. The 
doctrine of Stuffology he called his theory and 
reconciled everything with Stuff. It was in- 
deed amazing what this man Cadigan could do 
with Stuff .... for it was Cadigan who was 
the obscure editor. Thesis for thesis they met 
the doctrine of the Jesuit Fathers, Fustians, 
Gillians, Functionalists and reconciled them. 
They later became known as the Stuff School, 
and a symbolic representation of Stuff was 
erected on the campus. 

Of course the harebell school is of no little 
moment; let us quote from their book: "How 
can any man who pretends to a potential em- 
brace of the beautiful ignore the compelling 
influence of the harebell here at Boston Col- 



lege! Close the book an instant and, here, you 
put these galoshes on, they will keep the pollen 
from your shoes. Ah, here is a good-sized one! 
Allez-oop! Up, up, into the harebell. Ob- 
serve the strength and grace which one may 
inscape here. Who is that little man? He is 
little; he is small; and nobody cares for him at 
all. See here, you stop squeezing the juice out 
of those harebell petals. What? It's good for 
Manicheans? How do you mean? 

Of Manicheans and the earth again, O 
Boston College, land of the ostrich, come out, 
come out, and see what is beyond the sand. 

"I want you harebell academicians to do 
little things, let the big people do the big 
things, we'll do the little, the small, let's give 
our days and nights to minutiae. Compose a 
little song, tilt your head to the sky like a little 
bird and sing it for your friends. Avoid escape 
like the plague, do little things for your own." 

Don't write articles, articles are silly! 
Write a book, gee, there are so many things 
to write about. Write a little play. Get a 
keyring and take it up to some swanky house 
on Commonwealth Ave., ask if it belongs 
there. Why, you'll probably be asked into tea, 
look at the furniture, observe, pass on, go into 
the next house. Write a series of essays which 
you can publish in book form, all about these 
barnstormings. Stay away from magazine 
articles, write a book." 

Gee, there goes the bell! Hey, help me down 
off this milk bottle and I'll hop into your vest 
pocket, I've harebells to investigate. 

Harebell in the summer when the nights 
are long, harebell oh, the shortest day. Shelter 
me from all the pincers of rude reality, let me 
hide in you, harebell, long in the summer, long 
in the summer night. 

And who will say that this one is a harebell 
man, and that one is not?" 

J. T. N. 




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Is the current on? . . . Father Bonn with a chip on his shoulder. . . . Senior A 
Hi, Bud. . . . Reverie in a breviary. . . . Dig Deep, Ted. ... In the name of the Law. 



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Getting at the soul of our publications. . . . From a functional point of view. . . . 
The beckoning hand. . . . Only thirty minutes to go, fellows. . . . The future business 
tycoons. . . . Unhand me, wench. . . . He is wondering who left those legs there. . . . 
On the straight and narrow path. . . . Pappas speaking. 



SOCIALLY 




SEEN HERE, SEEN THERE 



Socially speaking, Freshman year was dead. 
We had a dance at Christmas and a banquet 
and a Freshman Day. But all in all it was 
dead. Nobody knew who was who and it 
wasn't 'til late that Spring that we started 
calling by name, all the boys worth calling by 
name. We remember that Christmas Dance. 
Roland Buckley came in with a Salem girl, and 
Carroll O'Neil was there and Paul Maguire, 
the new President. Al Morro, Monk Maz- 
nicki, Butch Kissel and all the rest of the beef 
trust were around and Dan Dunn with the 
pride of Dorchester. And we remember the 
banquet, Fred Seeley and Jce Hegarty, Dave 
Birtwell and Jim Maxfield and all the others. 
We saw the poor boys at Steve Levanitis' table 
nearly starve because Steve was at the end near 
the food. We heard Bill SuUivan, Fr. Fitz- 
gerald and a few others and we went home. 
At the prom that year we heard Jimmy Walsh 
and we danced around nodding to Chuck 
Holder, Clem Hasenfus, Fred Tracy, Del Du- 
quette and Ernie Handy. Then on Mother's 
Day we saw Jack McMahon and Jim O'Neill 
all dressed up in tux and shoes leading good 
ladies around. And we remember Dave Walsh 
and Tony Sannicandro running here and there 
as if they knew what they were doing. 

A lot of funny things happened that year. 
Tom Flanagan used to publish his Daily Bugle 
in history class. Bill Charlton used to rush 
down to the Fenway in his off time, and every 



once in a while some one would sit in the "hot 
seat" in the A.A. office. And then we were 
sophomores. 

Jack Heffernan was top man that year and 
Jim O'Neill, Tom Flanagan, and Paul Maguire 
took over other offices. The "Monk" and Al 
Morro and Hank Woronicz, Frank Davis and 
"Butch" made history on the ball field. We 
began to notice Jim Cahalane and Al Morin 
stepping out nights. Paul "Tiger" Carlin 
joined the ranks that year and Dick McMor- 
row was making speeches in every class he 
attended. We had a sophomore hop with 
cider and do-nuts. Dave Birtwell appeared 
with his latest. Ned Martin dragged Ted 
Mulvehill out of the depth of Norwood and 
introduced him to the ci^owd. Later on Car- 
roll O'Neil and Mr. Martin ran some record 
hops out in Newton Highlands and nearly 
broke even. You began to see and hear names 
that you would remember later. Bill Cadigan, 
George Boehrer, Chas. Price, Joe Dever, Ed 
Weiss, Vin Robinson, Ray Chaisson and some 
more too. That was the year of cliques. There 
was a Dorchester clique, an anti-Dorchester 
clique and an anti-clique clique. And some 
laughed at the statement in the hand book. 
. . . Then came the Soph Prom and with 
it came Fran Burke with Alyce. Joe Kelly 
was there. Musty Vitale, Bill Riley, John De- 
Costa, Bob Kopp, Bob Lally and just about 



SPEAKING 



everyone came and danced. Jim Duane and 
Dick Callahan were there too. 

That was the year that we began to notice 
Jim Considine, Joe Lavoie and Dick Bartholo- 
mew, and Joe Stanton began to shine while 
Jim Hawcc, Dick Stiles, Frank D'Ambrosio 
and some of the others appeared way up on 
the Dean's List. Gerry Armitage and Dave 
Cavan were carrying on for dear ol' Haverhill 
with the help of Joe Burke. Every one was 
happy and we all took cuts. Then came 
Junior. 

That was the year that was supposed to be 
the social highlight of the college career. Bob 
Muse took the helm and proved to be the man 
for the job. The Business School came up to 
join the home forces. Soon we were hearing 
names like Bob Kenney, Bob Dunn, Ned 
Brown, Bob Maher, Frank Murphy, Berney 
Toomey and Jim Travers. Soon the lunch- 
room looked like Chinatown during a tong 
war. The A. A. ran a few dances and Bob 
Drinan, Bill Gaine, Fred Andrews, Des Cronin, 
Bernie Farragher and maybe a few others 
whirled around to Bert Edwards and his piano. 

We had an under-the-towers dance and 
.... Junior Week was called off. We tried 
to carry on with a few informals and Red 
Malone's skating party. We remember Vin 
Robinson, Tom Flanagan, Austin McNamara, 
and all the social lions trying their luck on the 
rollers. Later that week we dressed up and 
came to eat steak and hear Red Nichols blow 
his head off. It was a great dance. That was the 
night that Ted Mulvehill tried to act natural 
under the watchful eye of a rival suitor. That 
was the night that Ned Martin chose to remain 
silent and spoil the conversation for table 
twenty-two. Paul Carlin was there, and Ed 
McCarthy and Carroll O'Neil was chairman 
along with Johnny Clark. Phil Gill, Paul 
Coleman and Joe Fitzpatrick danced. But the 
orals killed all that and we took the long jump 
into Senior. 

Socially Speaking, Senior couldn't be beaten. 
We had a so-so football season but a super- 
special record of A. A. Dances and rallies. 
Remember the Clemson Rally when we sere- 
naded the boys outside the Kenmore, and then 



drove them out to the Heights. They said 
they'd never seen such hospitality. They came 
back the next night after taking us in the 
afternoon and we showed them the best iioii- 
victory dance they had seen. Paul Maguirc 
was worried because he didn't figure that we 
had spirit. That was the night that we stood 
around singing songs in the lobby 'til the wee 
hours, and Bob Molloy and Jim Hawco danced 
minuets and sat in statues. Then we danced 
again two weeks later at the Kenmore and 
there was an overflowing crowd. Dick Calla- 
han, Joe Stanton and Charley Robichaud and 
maybe Bernie Farragher and Bob Muse and 
John Ballantine. Then came the week — at 
Campion Hall and when they weren't praying 
you could find Bill Freni and Jim Cahalane, 
Gerry McMorrow and Jim Stanton foohng 
around with the pool table, or Buck Harris, 
Fran Doherty, Bob McLaughlin, Tom Lane 
pulling buttons off shirts, or Berney Toomey 
singing "Steve O'Donnell's Wake", or Dave 
Birtwell and Austin McNamara arguing all 
night. We'll never forget Fr. Frank Sullivan 
for his understanding, nor Dick Callahan for 
his appetite, nor Sykes Ryan for his off tackle 
plays. Then after a while came the Cross 
Dance with Jim Stanton appointing Paul 
Maguire to take over. And Al Morro received 
the trophy and Ted Mulvehill led the cheers. 
And then we had a great Sub Turri Dance. 
And later the Cross and Crowners tried to 
duplicate. Ed Weiss wondered if everybody 
enjoyed the music and he had good reason to 
wonder. Martin Hansberry, John Russell, 
Jim Hawco, Joe Lavoie and Dick Buckley 
hopped to and fro with due frustration. And 
we began to miss fellows. Fellows like Carroll 
O'Neil, Ned Martin, Charlie Sullivan, Gerry 
Armitage, Charlie Mackin, Ed McDonald and 
Bill Charlton. But anyway we struggled 
through to the Senior Ball and clapped Joe 
Kelly on the back for a swell dance. And we 
saw Hugh Sharkey and Bob Maher, Bill Doo- 
nan, Jim Boudreau, Bob Mee, and Ripper 
Collins and they all said they had a good time, 
and we guess they did. Socially speaking we 
all had a good time these last four years — 
Socially speaking .... of course. . . R. A. K. 



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Their Faces Might Frighten Even More. . . . And the Band Played On (N.B. Mary 
Beatty, Charhe Donovan, Joe Lavoie). . . . Unsung heroes of Dramatics— Pro- 
duction Crew. . . . When two Indians get together. . . . How does this wall get into 
my mind? ... In Fenway or Alaska? ... We don't get it. 




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Four men in a frame. ... A draft board that isn't out to get you. . . . For men 
only. . . . Fond memories of Andover. . . . The man behind the Library. . . . One, two, 
three, four . . . hep. . . . Connie steahng scenes as Oswald. 



The study of philosophy at Boston College 
has ever been of prime importance in the stu- 
dent curriculum. With this purpose in mind, 
on the fourteenth of October in the year 1932, 
Johnson Paterson O'Tangerini, 3rd., founded 
a society to afford to the interested student an 
opportunity for a more complete and full 
study of this most paramount doctrine. 

When the ceaseless and untiring efforts of 
Johnson Paterson O'Tangerini, 3rd., proved 
too great a toll upon his meagre strength he 
was transferred to Pomfret as Master of Ter- 
tians: there to spend his last days amid peace 
and plenty. 

With the passing of our dearly beloved 
O'Tang, Wilmington Washington Wishnioski, 
4th, was called to the high office then vacant. 
An eager sea of well over fifty smiling faces 
greeted the new moderator that year. This 
was to be the nucleus of a society that was 
destined in three short years to take its place 
with other bodies of like nature to be found 
on the Heights. 

Their collective efforts gave birth to a bril- 
liant quarterly journal featuring "High Tones 
in Hylomorphism." The editor-in-chief was 
Stephen Levanitis, author of most of the 
articles to be found therein. His chief contri- 
bution was "Hylomorphism as Applied to 
Hieroglyphics, Sanskrit and the Rosetta 
Stone." The article won acclaim wherever it 
was reproduced. And the places were many. 
He was ably assisted by such capable intellec- 
tuals as F. Chauncy Jones, Dr. W. Fauntleroy 
Frasier, and John Vladimir DeCosta, who 
authored that memorable opus "Hylomor- 
phism and its effects upon the Byzantine and 
Russian Rites." 

Due to the current trend towards militarism 
and things materialistic the Journal has adopt- 
ed a policy of running articles discussing such 
things as "Hylomorphism and what it will do 
to Hirohito, Hitler and Hansberry." 

The Senior Class extends its best wishes for 
the continued success of the Hylomorphites in 
general and to Hawco and Hansberry in par- 
ticular and hope that one day they may branch 
off into those kindred fields of Atomism and 
Dynamism. 

N.B. The Hylomorphic Academy is the 
only Academy to advertise in the Sub Turri. 



ACADEMY OF 
HYLOMORPHISTS 




TOM GEORGIE, BUNS DOTUS, PAL MIERI 



PICKWICK CLUB 



These boys are known as the Pickwickians, 
which is a distorted version of Bowenism. 
Bowen is a functionaHst without an overcoat. 
Pick is an Oxford don with an overcoat. 

The function of the club is to gather in Dr. 
Pick's apartment and drink Canadian Ginger 
Ale, munch on cheese that comes from Wis- 
consin, and eat Pumpernickel. The formal 
purpose of the club has been to discuss 
"What's Wrong With Boston College Any- 
way?" There were nine members in the Club, 
all culture vultures, who never held regular 
meetings, never even thought of publishing a 
journal. But they had files and files of plans 
and plans from AA to EE, for this and that 
and the other thing, too. 

Once upon a time the good Doctor, instead 
of talking about Aldous Huxley, Integration, 
or the Mulberry Bush, started to discuss, with 
an unbounded enthusiasm, the prints and prose 
of Eric Gill. Everyone became thoroughly 
Gilled. And thus the rage for Blessed Eric 



spread about the campus. Copies of both ver- 
sions of Gill's autobiography sprang up all over 
the College. And talk on Catholicism and the 
factory system flared over the Towers. 

Out of the night spread upon industrialism 
by Gill's theories came a reaction. The chief 
adversary to Gillianism was one Michael Finn 
of South Boston who founded the School for 
Fustians. Finnianism or Fustianism has for its 
main tenets a blaze of color and a splash of 
paint. The Gillians withdrew to the cozy fire- 
placeness of Garden Street, there to reaffirm 
their dogmas amidst stuff and things. 

This is the first year of the Pickwickians as 
a formal organization. Whether they will 
carry through their platform and formulate 
a back-to-the-land movement, or reverse the 
process and end up in stodgy conservatism or 
bizarre Fustianism, is a question which time, 
and time alone, will decide; which ends this 
thing not with a bang but a whimper. 




BUD WISER, TOM COLLINS, MICHAEL FINN 






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Not run for profit. . . . The President speaks to the Business School. . . . And 
Down Went the Devil! ... The Mighty Mite. . . . Frat House in New Orleans. . . . 
As we Pickwickians say. . . . Bishop Gushing . . . Mass of the Holy Ghost. 



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The New Mess Goes to Press. . . . Harmony backstage — but not onstage. . . . 
Jim and Jack and Carroll, too. ... It must be a picture he can't read. . . . Don't jump, 
Bernie. . . . The Klan rides again. . . . Lunch Room at Noon ... or any other time. 



IMPRESSIONS FROM 




THE FEENEY ACADEMY 



Prelude to Boston 

The first time I saw Boston, 

A snarl was in the wind, 

And my brother bought me coffee 

With a nickel that had come 

With a lot of other hard-wrung things 

That jingle and crisp-crackle 

When you urge them to a movement. 

With a nickel that had come 

From the same sweat-fountain bed 

As the nickels of the servants 

Of the doorbell 

The servants of the doorbell 

With their nickels and crisp-cracklings 

Who have reared up things like Boston; 

Granite articulations hurled to anchorage. 

Hard-fastened to a hill 

By the weightings of what used to be 

In red china tea pots, beneath lace doilies, 

Under a mantel piece clock; 

What used to be inertia 

In cold steel vaults. 

Counted by an automat 

Who never would have known 



If coin and paper money 

Were stored in vaults forever, 

Or sent to hold a soughing buoy 

At tether in a harbor. 

But it didn't stay in vaults 

And it didn't stay in tea pots 

And it didn't stay with those who rang the 

bells. 
What a wondrous alchemy. 
To make granite out of coin, 
To make all of Gothic Boston 
Out of sweat. 

For between the vault and tea pot. 
There was sweat. 

There were urgings that were endless 
In a ditch and at a bench. 
And at stools astronomical. 
There were green visors. 
And slow unwieldy tomes 
That did not give, but took. 
That other tomes might give. 
Might give from a rock-height 
As the infinite hours 
Were slow-translated into years. 
And my brother with a nickel, 



SOME OF THESE BELLS 



And me with a warmth-cup 
Come to look at Boston, 
Birth-look at Boston 
In November, 

As the Purple horde descended 
On the wintry field. 
"You will someday go to Boston," 
Said my brother 
As I made my first ascending, 
Oh the firstling hill walk ever. 
In all breathing, 
In all ever earth 
To Boston Hill! 
The Bells 

Twelve ! 

For His Hon-or, 
For His Glo-ry, 
Great-er Hon-or, 
Great-er Glo-ry! 

Per 
Haps 

E 

Ter 

Ni 

Ty 

Be 

Gins 

With 

Thir 

Teen 

Bells! 

The midnights we have known 

Since our pause at Gothic 

Are full of chimera. 

Tatterdemalion, 

Pomp and splendor, 

Red eyes, mazdas 

And leering text books, 

Snatched kisses 

At Friday night doorways. 

Last call in Jakies, 



And sleepings 

In white beds 

With warm moonlight 

Competing with their whiteness, 

With white snow 

As a top blanket 

From where somebody 

Left a window open. 

The midnights we have known 

Are spirit things. 

We have seen Gothic 

Like a great hand of night 

Dividing all the firmament 

Into two parts. 

Then we have heard Gothic speak 

About midnight. 

And about how it is 

Midnight in all of Boston, 

And about how all the Ignatians 

Better get to bed, 

Because five-fifteen in the morning, 

Is not only for birds to sing. 

But for Ignatians 

To rise and sing 

In their grey cliff 

Near Gothic. 

One! 

For His Hon-or, 
For His Glo-ry, 
Great-er Hon-or, 
Great-er Glo-ry. 

God! 

It is not wild 

To say that we 

A pile of autumn leaves 

Must be. 

When comes the wind 

Scatter Bostons, 

Scatter wide, 

The world will be 



A countryside 

To Bostons. 

But though the sheddings 

Wander far 

The tree remembers 

That you are 

A Boston man. 

Bell of One, 

Swell beyond 

The waters, 

Humps of earth; 

If your fond 

Sound 

May gather us 

To Boston 

If the ground ' 

Gather us 

Oh Boston, 

One we'll be 

In you. 

One of night. 

Reservoir 

Catch the Gothic, 

Moon-mirror- water 

Catches Gothic soul. 

We will hear it 

In the warm lands 

Where sand towers are. 

We will hear it 

In cold lands of night 

Where sun is but a star. 

One, 

Dark-rock-one, 

Granite mother. 

Swell your note 

High and warm. 

Shelter all the Bostons 

In a one-ness. 

Two! 

For His Hon-or, 
For His Glo-ry, 
Great-er Hon-or, 
Great-er Glo-ry! 



God 
Is! 

Go down the hill from Gothic 
And feel the pulsing earth 
Seething with delirious 
Ecstasy of birth. 
June is blowing kisses 
From the lilac riots 
And robins are mad-plumping 
On beatific diets. 
The reservoir resplendent 
In sapphire, blue and green, 
Is serving up the city air 
(once fetid) tart and clean. 
The cloud-blotched sky-scan 
Unmasks a daylight moon. 
And all of Gothic glory's in 
The two-bell afternoon. 

But 

"God 

Is!" 

When the daylight moon 

Sneers at night-time sun. 

The two-hour bell in darkness 

Has made no beauty run. 

For lovely is the morning 

Just before the morn. 

Toll two-bell lovely 

Night and day 

Though we be Boston-gone. 

Three! 

For His Hon-or, 
For His Glo-ry, 
Great-er Hon-or, 
Great-er Glory! 

God 
Son 
Ghost! 



a.m. 

The wonder hour 

When proms go scat 

And every flower 

Is a sorry signpost that 

Tells of the lacquered vanity 

That proms have been 

For us and we; 

As flowers go-wither 

After three 

And only the constant flower 

Of she 

Whoever she is, 

Whatever she be 

Is purest flower 

For us and we 

Of Boston. 

I dreamed of tingle 

During three-boom song, 

I bathed in gusto 

A gosh-day-long, 

For I yearned 

For the three-boom 

When I would be 

Atop the sand-mound 

Throwing free 

And easy floaters up 

To a giant with a leather cup, 

And I'd hear a bat-fan. 

Feel it whiff. 

Junk all of my scraggly 

Verses if 

You'd let me throw 'em 

Stark and straight 

Scything them down 

For the other eight; 

Eight of Boston 

But the Boom goes Three, 

And the ninth that's scything 

Isn't me! 
Four 

For His Hon-or, 
For His Glo-ry, 



Great-er Hon-or, 
Great-er Glory. 

I 

Love 

All 

Men! 

The shadow of the tower 

Sprawls in its sleep 

On Chestnut Hill. 

The environs of the city 

South Boston, West Roxbury, Cambridge 

Snort once or twice in their slumber 

And are still 

Dark, still. 



Five! 




For His 


Hon-or, 


For His 


Glo-ry, 


Great-er 


Hon-or, 


Great-er 


Glory! 


Bless- 


_ 


Ed 




Are 




The 




Meek! 





Inherit the land 

You Boston men, 

The earth is for 

The tilling. 

Its life is pregnant 

With your own. 

Its riches ever filling 

Bins and barns 

And cups of love 

That now are city-spendinj 

Acquire a wench. 

Give fists a clench, 

And stop this elbow 

Bending. 



Epilogue 

There are those of us 

Who will be the first 

Ever to come from a college 

The first since Cromwell 

Hung our fathers from steeples, 

The first since 

Infinite battles of the Boyne, 

So Boston is our ever-mother, 

Being mother to first-sons 

Like some of us. 

There may be other 

Hangings from steeples, 

And other Boynes 

Sooner than we know; 

But it will be Boston; 

Boston ever and always 

For us all. 

Boston in the autumn 

When the bells are crisp. 

When the leather-booms 

Are rhythmic on Alumni, 

When there are droves of beach wagons 

With bevied lovelinesses, 

When trees are an insanity 

Of red and yellow. 

When mornings are whip-cracks. 

When noons are retroactive Augusts, 

When nights are fluted coolings, 

Boston in the autumn. 

Boston in the winter. 

When a Jesuit is a contrast 

Moving across a whiteness, 

When ennui is the campus, 

Dull ennui and ever-cold 

On the campus. 

When the morning is a martyrdom 

Of shiver and sotto voiced 

Un-niceties; 

When the noon is a happiness 

Of steaming, flat coffee, 

And stinging bologna sandwiches; 



When the night is a sterility 

Of elusive text books. 

Keep-awake pills. 

And salvation comes awhiling 

In a telephone call 

From someone who is a promise 

Of warmer and more golden things. 

Someone who makes a winter 

Livable till spring. 

Boston in the spring 

When the hillside mud 

Is whipped and rich and alive, 

When tulip shoots are wary in the circle, 

When Jesuits look out sun-stormed windows 

And think of myriad nostalgias, 

"Like the time 

We had the candidates for crew 

Report to the reservoir. 

And Father Rector 

Bright and singing: 

"Deep In The Heart Of Texas'." 

Boston in the spring. 

When the mornings are trembling poems 

That fizz and bobble. 

And show images like: 

Typists in a street car. 

Like bud's on the Bishop's trees. 

Like a pregnancy of almost-loveliness 

Everywhere. 

When the afternoon 

Is 

Looking at the Tower 

As it gnaws away at finity, 

As it moves us little steps 

Toward the end. 

All the while 

Marking time 

With its bells. 

When the night is an almostness. 

Of bumming a ride at the corner 

And looking at the sky 

Which is a roister of double lights, 

A melange of day and night. 



Boston in the spring. 

Gothic ever-always 

And men in black soutanes 

Reading holy books 

And always there, 

Like the Tower and the bells, 

And the students . . . 

Black soutanes 

And a Tower 



Ever in our hearts, 
Ever-always! 

For His Hon-or, 
For His Glo-ry, 
Great-er Hon-or, 
Great-er Glory! 



J. D. 





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Some Jesuits come down under. . . . Joyce and Price and Seeley too. . . . Lift her up 
tenderly— Handle with care. . . . Workshop Quartet painting ^fustian colors. 
A Navy man ashore. . . . Ask the Stantons about this one. 
Baw . . . ston Coll . . . ege. 



. . CoUectivist Culture. . 




i«* ••*'«!«• 










Two Ballantines, Coming up. . . . To sleep perchance to dream. . . . Christ keeps 
His beauty everywhere. . . . This is where your bucks go. . . . Still life in the Chem 
lab. . . . The reading of the papal bull. . . . Let go of him, He's all blood. . . . 
What strange place is this. . . . 



NOTES FROM A THUMBNAIL 



Early in the year of our Lord 1942, schism 
smashed the ranks of Pope Martin's happy 
little flock. Stormy center of the controversy 
was the disputed doctrine, On Biographies. 
With full faith the Papal Bull thundered 
forth: anathema sint; they are not to be, and 
the Council of Drinan wrathfully withdrew 
to Stylus in the duchy of Dever. On this point 
of vantage they gathered forces for attack. 
To their aid rushed the whirling Deverishes of 
Stylus, the Lone Grainger and the wild pen- 
men of the Earls of Murphy and Hawco, and 
an ultimatum was sent, with the threat of 
War. With unbated breath the whole country 
of Beecee awaited the word of excommunica- 
tion. But then, with characteristic wisdom the 
Pope summoned the famous council of Sub 
Fury, and guided by the sage advice of cham- 
berlains, Cadigan and Russell, he called for a 
compromise, sound solution to all sticklers. 



And that, my dear readers (if you've read 
this far) , is the explanation of the following 
pages. Most biographies are vapid and trite, 
to say the least, but some people like them, so 
here is our compromise. We went to your 
friends and said, "What will you remember 
about little Horace, ten years from now?" and 
they told us, and we wrote this section. It is 
not meant for you, nor your family, nor your 
grand aunt Hepzibah. It's for your friends 
who will read it in their foxholes on Bataan 
and say, "Ah, that's the essence of Horace; I 
can remember him like it was yesterday." 
Then, as an added attraction, the ever-ready- 
to please Sub Turri offers to those who like 
biographies the following Form from which 
all biographies are written. Take it; insert 
your squib; and there you are, all nicely 
recorded for posterity. 



INSERT PICTURE 
HERE 



HORACE Q. WIGGLEBOTTOM 

1 Reservoir Rd. (summer residence) 

NEWTOWNE, MASS. 
BOSTON PUBLIC ENGLISH 

MAJOR: BULL SESSIONS 

Sodality 1, 2, 3, 4; Law and Gov't. 3, 4; French Academy 
1, 2; Spanish, German, Greek, Chinese and Russian 1, 2, 
3, 4, 5; The Ledger 4; Fulton 1, 2; Ricci Math 3, 4; Pre- 
Med and Biology Clubs 1, 4; Sociology 3; Letter in Juke 
Boxing 4. 



Horace comes to us from East Overshoe by 
way of the Boston El. Horace is the strong, 
silent man of the class. Horace is also a radical, 
but there are no radicals at Boston College; 
that is why Boston College is mentally asleep; 
we need more Horaces. Horace is a lion in 
social circles, there is a more modern word but 
decency forbids. Horace also does not partici- 
pate in many sports, being the only "student" 
at Boston College, but he is seen at all the 
games and is an ardent rooter, often going so 



far as to cheer. Horace has always been active 
in extra-curricular activities and will go far 
on his ability to attend three at the same time 
while studying in the library and working in 
the Supreme Market. Horace will be remem- 
bered forever by his friends, because (here 
insert your squib). Horace will be a success; 
we know he will, because he has those inde- 
finable qualities which make a successful man. 
Good luck, Horace! 



CHARLES J. AHERN — First on the list, alpha- 
betically and otherwise — and we do mean scholas- 
tically. . . . RALPH W. ALMAN — The coat with the 
built-in-shoulders, or, science everywhere, even in 
philosophy. ... J. FRED ANDREWS— Terpsichorean 
means dancing that is smooth, and also Fred Andrews, 
the aged youngster. . . . GERARD T. ARMITAGE— 
Lt. Gerry will definitely tell it to the Marines. . . . 
ROBERT W. ATTRIDGE — A rakish rascal, as mis- 
chievous as Donald Duck's nephews, and as sober as 
Donald Duck. 



JOHN J. BALLANTINE— From baton to Bataan; 
surety, body and savoir faire. . . . JAMES J. BARNICLE 
— Probably the largest of his kind attached to the 
U. S. Navy. . . . DANIEL J. BARRETT— Baritone 
Barrett from Regis to the sea. . . . RICHARD J. 
BARTHOLOMEW— What's cooking here? Long, lean, 
hthesome master of the culinary art ... . FRANCIS 
W. BEKSHA — Prospects look good for the Medway 
Councilor and Ambassador of Economics. . . . LEO 
P. BENECCHI — Dark, curly haired Latin, harmonica 
player, chauffeur of the Fascist Club. . . . GEORGE F. 
BENT — Rube Walberg, Abe Lincoln with a three 
strike curve. . . . DAVID P. BIRTWELL— He wore 
a different girl to every dance. Dear Dave, vary 
everything except your loves. . . . ARTHUR A. 
BLAISDELL — Has a dell in Jamaica where he studies 
like blazes. . . . GEORGE C. A. BOEHRER— The 
late George Apley in a Bond Street Suit and Spengler 
under his arm. . . . JOSEPH E. BOOTHROYD— 
Frere Feeley's philosophical caustic majoring in Bowen 
and Mahoney. . . . MORRIS J. BORDENCA— The 
barber of Seville. Never takes it on the chin — takes it 
off. Keep 'em smiling. . . . JAMES F. BOUDREAU— 
The answer to Strumski's prayers and questions. . . . 
JOHN J. BRENNAN, JR.— Good at hockey, marks 
and looks, but, John, where did you get those jokes? 
.... LAWRENCE E. BRENNAN— He saw it 
coming and majored in Math. . . . HARRY W. 
BROWN — Undergrad drum thumper for the AP, 
Herald-Traveler, and the AA. . . . EDWARD M. 
BROWNE — These little things remind me of you — a 
corny pipe, a corny joke and a corner in West Roxbury. 
. . . RICHARD L. BUCKLEY— The Beverly bullet; 
the next to the last Puritan. WILLIAM F. BUGDEN 
— Well-dressed Yehudi who tinkles when he talks. . . . 
JOHN B. BULMAN— "Don't you see, Prof. Einstein, 
your reasoning here is all wrong?" . . . JOHN J. 
BURKE — God bless the Hibernians and John. . . . 
JOHN T. BUTLER— Oil on troubled Jesuits, the Mey- 
nell to Connolly's Thompson. 

WILLIAM J. CADIGAN— Meet Cyril G. K. Marsh- 
bank, III. The man with the bunch of STUFF, he 



stays nights at the Heights and sends the mess to press. 
. . . JAMES B. CAHALANE— With Morin to Taunton; 
with Thornton's in Brighton. . . . RICHARD A. 
CALLAHAN — He's A.A. to Shannon and hey, hey to 
Regis. . . . TIMOTHY J. CALLAHAN— The bane 
of Fr. Boehm's existence. A Holy Cross man who got 
wise. . . . CHARLES W. CAPRARO— The Latin 
from Connemara Hill with the cowboy hats. . . . 
RICHARD J. CAREY — "Science is true judgment in 
conjunction with reason." Plato. . . . PAUL J. CAR- 
LIN — Buxom critic of Oscar Wilde. Porky without 
Bess. . . . DAVID J. CA VAN— Loudest laugh in the 
rotunda; minor in marital relations. . . . RAYMOND 
C. CHAISSON— Picks up the pucks for the "Pics." 
A Puck on and off skates. . . . THOMAS J. CLARK— 
Tom, Tom, the piper's son. His draft board called, And 
away he run! discovered in the Lost and Found Dept., 
Greensboro, N. C. . . . AMBROSE J. GLAUS- He'll 
give a good "accounting" of himself in the an". . . . 
CORNELIUS D. COHAN— The weight that makes 
authority. Careful, private, he knows all the tricks 
from experience. WALTER F. COLBERT— Claudette 
is also very beautiful. Colbert's for clear heads in the 
clouds. . . . PAUL S. COLEMAN— The B. C. George 
Holland, who spends his days and nights in a Second 
Balcony. . . . JAMES P. COLLINS— Chubby Pied Piper 
of the gridiron. Goes in for sophisticated jitterbugging. 
FRANCIS L. COLPOYS — A moss man in summer and 
a Ross man in winter. . . . JOHN J. CONNERY— 
Ready to amble into the air with "Ambie." . . . WIL- 
LIAM J. CONNELLY— Chemist corralled into career 
with the Navy and climbing fast. Full speed aport, 
chief engineer. . . . EDMUND R. CORBETT— 
"Breezing" from Cathedral to the Marines in four years. 
. . . RONALD P. CORBETT— Made in the image and 
likeness of Revere Beach Boulevard. . . . FRANCIS D. 
CRONIN — "Dez," Winthrop's wittiest, waggiest and 
whackiest. FRANCIS X. CRONIN — The one and only 
student (the original one who still studies in B. S. 
History). . . . JAMES D. CRONIN— Author, "What 
Three Years at Regis Can Do To a Man." . . . GEORGE 
W. CROWLEY — "Fellow physicists, unite, we must 
revise the laws of nature." . . . JOHN CUONO — The 
little hitchhiker going to join Father Coughlin, nov 
schmoz ka pop. . . . ARTHUR L. CURRY, JR.— "He 
seldom errs who thinks the worst he can of woman- 
kind." J. Hume. 

WILLIAM M. DALY— Sturdy and taciturn as the 
Berkshire Hills, unperturbable, indisturbable. . . . 
FRANCIS A. D'AMBROSIO— He trains the quiz kids 
with questions and he won't take yes for an answer. . . . 
THOMAS J. DAWSON— Revere bookmaker, poHti- 
cian, and sportsman; connoisseur of dogs, Red Sox and 
Hialeah— on the side from G. E. . . . VINCENT J. 
DeBENEDICTIS— Knightly courtier of the Romance 



Languages JOHN F. DeCOSTA, JR.— Effervescent 

as a bromo, the quantity of conversation is unrestrained. 
. . . MICHAEL J. DEE— Chief advocate of Bittle. 
Forward, but the Marines like them aggressive. . . . 
WALTER L. DEVENEY— "Sail on, sail on, oh ship 
of stout." "I'll clean every mackerel out of Boston 
harbor, if I'm elected." . . . FRANCIS J. DEVER— 
"My name is Dever, what's yours?" . . . JOSEPH G. 
DEVER — "There are no radicals at Boston College: 
but I've never read the handbook." . . . JOHN J. 
DEWIRE — The monsignors have a new problem child. 
. . . JAMES F. DOHERTY— Another member of the 
beef trust; if baseball couldn't take it off, the army 
will. . . . HENRY A. DOLAN— There have been men, 
and there will be men; but there will always be one 
Henry Dolan. . . . CHARLES A. DONOVAN— Solid 
sender musically and philosophically. . . . JOHN E. 
DONOVAN — Brilliant, black-haired, Brighton boy 
just out of a band-box. . . . WILLIAM P. DOONAN— 
Billy owns the car that you helped to push. . . . JOHN 
R. DOYLE, JR. — Bossy's in jail but John is still with 
us. . . . ROBERT F. DRINAN— Senior salesman for 
functionalism and Pickwickian papers. . . . ARTHUR 
S. DRINKWATER— The highHght on the Broadway 
of Revere. Silently, smilingly querulous. . . . FRANK 
L. DRISCOLL — Roly-poly, conscientious addict to 
railroads. . . . JOHN P. DRISCOLL— Silent as a clam 
in mother's chowder. . . . THOMAS F. DUFFY, JR.— 
He of the large philosophy mark for the third quarter. 
Proprietor, Duffy's Tavern. . . . WILLIAM P. DUG- 
GAN — Reasonably close facsimile of Andre Beauvivier, 
the seat of supra immanent action for bashful smiling. 
. . . ELPHEGE O. DUMOND— Wings on steel, a giant 
of a little man. Has rhythm in or outside of class. . . . 
ROBERT L. DUNN— Dorchester's gift to Emmanuel, 
i.e., he owns a beach wagon. . . . WILLIAM J. DYNAN 
— Best of luck to a fine fellow. 

JOSEPH J. ELLIOTT— Corregidor personified, the 
last Irishman in Chelsea. Senior worries are many, and 
Joe is the Bromo for them all. 

BERNARD P. FARRAGHER— The Louis Brems 
of B. C. Admirable Farragher. Clubby as a rumble 
seat. . . . ALBERT T. FERGUSON— If you need a 
cynical saboteur, here is a good natured substitute. 
Combat is every other word to a Marine. . . . RICHARD 
J. FERRITER — Half of the Ferriter and Ferriter com- 
bination. Unassumingly quiet. . . . JOHN C. FITZ- 
GEBJVLD — No. 1 on the John Fitzgerald parade. 
Mattioli has gone into meteorology — what will Fitz 
do now. . . . JOHN E. FITZGERALD— No. 2 on the 
hit parade. Cambridge thrush of sorts. And then 
there was one. . . . JOHN H. FITZGERALD, JR.— 
No. 3 on the St. Patrick's parade. Educationally minded. 
And then there was none. . . . WALTER T. FITZ- 
GERALD — Usually serene, sometimes explosive sin- 



cerity. Volcanic quietness. . . . EDWARD J. FITZ- 
PATRICK— F. D. R., Walter Lippman, and Dottie 
Thompson were with you, Ed. . . . JOSEPH J. 
FITZPATRICK — The Shadow plagiarized his laugh. 
Corny, but capable. . . . THOMAS J. FLANAGAN— 
Here's that man again. Flanagan, the Cafe Cicero. . . . 
JOHN F. FOX. — Another pessimistic Republican! . . . 
WILLIAM J. FRENI — Finds his soul efficient principle 
in Nancy. Thirty seconds after you get off the ground. 
. . . ARTHUR R. FRITHSEN— Splendidly scientific, 
specifically, terrifically, prolific. 



WILLIAM N. GAINE— "Our loss is your . . . ." 
Knows what it is to live in a broken down mansion. 
. . . ROBERT E. GALLAGHER— Like Jimmy, He's 

still hanging on FRANCIS X. GANNON— "Josh," 

a card shark, bowler, conversationalist, an expert on 
the evolution of Sammy Shafter. . . . TERRENCE J. 
GEOGHEGAN — Unsung hero of brain and brawn. 
'42's George Kerr. . . . JOHN J. GIBBONS— Good 
natured, in potency to perfection in laughter. . . . 
PHILIP J. GILL — Untrusting, because he's a scientist. 
. . . JOHN J. GLENNON— It took him two years to 
get out of an elevator. . . . GEORGE GOMES — 
"Laugh while you can. Everything has its time." 
Voltaire preaches. Gomes practices. . . . MARCEL J. 
GOULD — Well, just smile it off and never commit 
yourself: but I am definitely interested in those 
"martial" reladons. . . . THOMAS H. GRADY— A 
veritable statistical handbook on sloops and schooners 
and things of unimportance. . . . ANTHONY J. 
GRAFFEO — Black suited fisher boy, mad chemist with 
the eagle eye and the strong arm. . . . RICHARD E. 
GRAINGER — The Lone Grainger means Danger: Live 
wire — scholastically and socially. . . . FREDERICK J. 
GRIFFIN — Ad for Prince Albert, model boy, non- 
chalant, mellow and ripening as a writer. . . . JOHN V. 
GUINEE — A quiet little cherub with a Christian Front. 



FRANCIS J. HAGGERTY— From Lowell to Boston 
in three easy lessons. He reads the Summa on the smooth 
saihng and finds it rough going. . . . ERNEST FLA.NDY 
— A born student who never developed his birthright. 
The Fix-You-Up-WIth-A-Date Club 1, 2, 3, 4. . . . 
MARTIN J. HANSBERRY— Censor Librorum of the 

Sub Tauw Diocese HUGH HARKINS— Hugh says 

he needs new tires. We say he needs a car. . . . PAUL 
V. HARRINGTON— Black-haired boy with the 
bouncing bombers. . . . ROBERT A. HARRIS— 
Couldn't Buck the draft so he'll "Harrass" and 
embarass the Japs. . . . JOHN J. HART— The Hart 
that once through Tara's Halls sang deep in the Hart 
of Texas. . . . CLEMENT J. HASENFUS— Friendly, 

baby-faced. Majored in Regis JAMES E. HAWCO 

— Christian humanist and unaffectedly sensual cosmo- 



politan of Marblehead and Worcester. . . . FRANK A. 
HAYDEN — ^Fondest expression — "Oh, for the week- 
end," and he went for them strong. . . . LAWRENCE P. 
HEALEY — Man of many and varied motored contrap- 
tions who has done admirably in making Lexington 
forget the Minute Men. . . . LESLIE J. HEATH— 
Immortalized in Macbeth and the Physics Lab. . . . 
JOHN R. HEFFERNAN— Lunchroom lounger. A 
politician with a party but no support. The Clique 
1, 2 (pres.) 3, 4. . . . PAUL T. HEFFRON— Quizzical 
Paul looks at you, laughs. A ready wit, but never an 
answer. . . . JOSEPH R. HEGARTY— The type that 
"College Humor" calls Joe College. . . . THOMAS J. 
HENRY — Gentlemanly bouncing along with Bowen, 
cooperatives, symphonies and the Army Air Corps. . . . 
THOMAS R. HINCHEY— Portly on the gold chain 
type. "Definitely milder." . . . LEO J. HOCHMAN— 
Editor of "How to Get Most of Your Lab Fee Back," 
to pay for tickets for cutting out of line in Charlestown 
traffic. . . . LAURENT B. HOULE— Houle, Houle, 
the gang's all here, time to play more hockey. 

ROBERT JAURON — Pure Potency determined to 
act by the imposition of Leahy's form. . . . HARRISON 
W. JORDAN — Caspar has a counterpart, bvit Harry's 
definitely smarter. . . . GERARD J. JOYCE— Barrel- 
chested, air-minded, cinder-pounding Gerry. 

WILLIAM J. KANE— Little WiUie with the loud 
whisf>er. Doodler-de-luxe. Professor heckler. . . . 
LEON KATZ — ^Master gate crasher with the chemical 
approach. . . . JOHN P. KEANE— "I like work. It 
fascinates me. I can sit and look at it for hours." . . . 
RICHARD A. KEATING— Emmanuel 1, 2, 3, 4, 
prefect of discipline 4. Regis 3, 4. Euphemistically 
known as "Little Eva," from Tower to Town. . . . 
JOHN F. KEEFE, JR.— No beef from Keefe. The 
Naval Air Corps has priorities. . . . JOHN J. KEEFFE 
Mental magnet who magnifies management. . . . 
HUBERT G. KELLEY— The man who made Doc 
Guerin laugh; chromic acid pants conscious. . . . JOHN 
J. KELLEY — Maiden, Irishness and Latin culture; a 
repugnant concept? . . . JOHN F. KELLY — The 
last thing we heard he was a censor in the 
Navy. It's good he did not work on this "Sub." 
. . . JOSEPH E. KELLY— A politician who 
didn't need a party for support. A gentleman under all 
perspectives. . . . THOMAS KELTY — And now we 
take you on the sea with grade ABC man. . . . 
ROBERT M. KENNEY— Champion sculler between 
the mainland and Nantucket. The man with the Sub 
Tanro dough. . . . EDWIN J. KEYES— Morning coffee 
addict who knows where the Math library is. . . . 
ADOLPH J. KISSELL— Little Butch, the fightingest 
man on the team. . . . ROBERT E. KOPP— Gesticulat- 
ing Democrat, vacillating between St. Thomas, 
Ward Eight, and Nantasket Beanos. . . . LOUIS J. KUC 
— The only man in '42 without a cut in four years. 



ARTHUR LACOUTURE— Doc Guerin's pal. 
Socialite and golfer with all the clothes to go with it. 
. . . ROBERT F. LALLY — The poise that refreshes. 
"How Bland is Our Lally." . . . ROBERT N. LA 
MARCHE — Shaggy as a Shetland but sharp as a coed's 
fingernail in a chem quiz. . . . THOMAS J. LAMOND 
— Every true chemist studies crystals; Tom studies the 
Crystal Ballroom. . . . JOHN F. LANE— The one 
Lane that had no turning. . . . THOMAS J. LANE — 
President of the Friday-Night-We'U-All-Go-Out- 
Together-Club. . . . ROBERT J. LARKIN— Harken! 
Watch Larkin. He's on the ball. . . . JOSEPH A. 
LAVOIE, JR.— Color blind but colorful Lucius Beebe; 
instigator of "old boy" and "furioso." . . . STEVEN J. 
LEVANITIS— Press agent of the Wayne Morris Club. 
President of the Hylomorphists' Academy. . . . PAUL 
J. LIVINGSTON— Doctor Stanley, I Presume. Husky 
Paul, Ford and all. . . . SAMUEL J. LOMBARD— 
Diminutive mystic. A poet of the little things, of 
symphonies, cabbages and kings. 



FRANCIS X. MACK— Life without labor. Ready 
to smile. Slow and sure. . . . CHARLES P. MACKIN 
— Dear Charlie, Coach Ryder misses you, Fr. Dick Shea 
misses you, Eleanor misses you and John DiNapoli is 
suing you. . . . PAUL J. MAGUIRE — Supreme Market 
1, 2, 3, 4 (Announcer, 4). A politician who is a 
statesman. WILLIAM H. MAGUIRE — Squire Maguire 
sets bunsens on fire. . . . ROBERT C. MAHER— 
Remember — 6 cokes per day, 100 in the orals. Lord 
Chesterfield. . . . FRANCIS X. MAHONEY— B. C.'s 
missionary to Chelsea. Oh, that Buick. . . . JAMES J. 
MAHONEY — Even the sophomore banquet couldn't 
keep Jim down. . . . JOHN V. MAHONEY— "Marie, 
the dawn is breaking." . . . JAMES L. MALONE— 
Now it can be told — Class thanks, Jim, for the skating 
party in the sub rosa Junior Week. . . . JOSEPH F. 
MARCANTONIO — Small and rotund, sunny disposi- 

tioned, model for Euinirc JAMES P. MARINI— Did 

well on ice in frosh and remember "Lacondiera." . . . 



EDWARD MARTIN— Martin, Barton and Fish are 
serving and now a bigger and better Martin has left to 

serve FREDIANO D. MATTIOLI— Math madman 

in M. I. T. Meteorology JAMES H. MAXFIELD— 

If Jack Benny can have one, so can we, . . . well, some- 
thing like it. . . . FRANK S. MAZNICKI— An obvious 
contradiction, ... in class, retiringly Frank, on the 
field. Marauding Monk. . . . JAMES H. McAVOY— 
Jim can balance the figures in accounting but couldn't 
make up the shortage for the Navy. WILLIAM J. 
McCANN — The "jeep" who scribbles NA's on the 
Library slips. . . . JOSEPH C. McCARRON— Joe has 
roamed from home to Nome and left Peggy at home. . . . 
EDWARD R. McCarthy— Two-toned Trackman; 



prime exponent of Fr. O'Callaghanism. . . . HENRY B. 
McCONVILLE — Plank, uphold the nation, put your 
strategy into operation. . . . EDWARD L. Mc- 
CORMACK — "I see no objection to stoutness in 
moderation." . . . FRANCIS J. McCUE— Advocatus 
diaboli to Abbe Douglas. One-man cap and gown 
committee. . . . EDWARD S. McDONALD— Punch 
and politesse, a hypostatic union that spells dynamite. 
. . . JOHN W. McDonald— Sociology takes to the 
air. . . . THOMAS F. McDONALD— We didn't know 
they had farms in Southie. But that's where old Mc- 
Donald has a farm MARTIN J. McDONOUGH— 

The man who cuts better than a Gillette. . . . EUGENE 
G. McGILLICUDDY — Junior journalist and voice of 
the "Globe." . . . JOHN J. McGILLICUDDY— There 
is something Irish about this fellow. It's what's in a 
name. . . . JOHN A. McGOWAN— The sum of earthly 
bliss, no sense of getting riled, never betrayed by words. 
. . . EDWARD G. McGRATH— If it's anything social, 
he's got it. . . . MAURICE A. McLAUGHLIN— One 
of the makers of better things for better living, through 
Chemistry. . . . ROBERT P. McLAUGHLIN, JR.— 
Griffin and McLavighlin, insularable on land, in the air, 
on the sea. . . . WILLIAM P. McLAUGHLIN, JR.— 
The Marconi of Boston College. . . . JOHN A. Mc- 
MAHON — Has been accounting for some little old lady 
passing by. . . . JOHN C. McMAHON— "Why not let 
brother Henry teach me?" . . . THOMAS M. Mc- 
MAHON — Remember the night Dan reached for the 
check. . . . ROBERT C. McMANAMY— The ideal 
beadle — from the professor's point of view. . . . 
GERALD J. McMORROW— Dear Gerry, we miss your 
sometime tired, tired bomber. Remember Jake Wirth's, 
remember "Sorry", Remember Pearl Harbor. . . . 
RICHARD M. McMORROW— A tall, long drink 
who'll never get dunked in the brine. . . . JOSEPH T. 
McNALLY — "Father, what if a Protestant friend said?" 
Germanly scientific in life and love. . . . AUSTIN T. 
McNAMARA — The suave esquire of '42. New Hamp- 
shire hot shot. I-Had-An-Excellent-Time Club 2, 3,4. 
. . . JAMES P. McNULTY — Always made a quick get- 
a-way to the Gateway. . . . ROBERT J. McQUEENEY 
—Played Laurel to Cohan's Hardy. . . . ROBERT J. 
MEE — First undergrad to coach the undergrads. Cf. 
Frosh Hockey writeup. . . . CHARLES R. MEEHAN— 
Why take life seriously? You'll never get out of it 
alive. . . . JOSEPH F. MILLER— An illuminator of 
Barney Gavinisms, and a worthy yeoman of the Saturday 
steak counter. . . . JOHN F. MITCHELL — The essence 
of sincerity and simplicity. Prototype of angels with 
clean faces. ... A. ROBERT MOLLOY — Nashua sends 
her pride and joy, to be 4A's most bashful boy. Whee! 
. . . JOHN H. MOLONEY— From Fenwick to the 
Heights. Brother, you saw the light. . . . WILLIAM 
P. MONAHAN — High priest of the silence chamber. 
Sports page addict. . . . ALFRED J. MORIN— With 



Cahalane to Taunton; with Thornton's in Brighton. . . . 
ALFRED V. MORRO — The trinity in a maiden's heart, 
tall, tan, terrific. . . . THOMAS J. MULDOON— 
Sociological henchman for the Clique. . . . EDMUND 
W. MULVEHILL— Genial, jovial, m.c. of the Aca- 
demicians of the Lunchroom. . . . FREDERICK C. 
MURPHY — Cf. page 3 1 5 of the advertising section of 
Sub Turri. . . . FRANCIS X. MURPHY— The man 
about to change his uniform. . . . LEO J. MURPHY — 
The aesthete with the Broadway tan. . . . HOWARD W. 
MURRAY — Hurry, Hurry. Murray's on the way up 
with the naval air corps. . . . ROBERT F. MUSE — A 
dollar, gentlemen, for naming something he cannot do. 

HAROLD E. NASH, JR.— A professed bashful 
bachelor, slumberously calm yachtsman. . . . FRANCIS 
J. NICHOLSON — The Library's 17th column. Living 
notebook of every text and lecture at B. C. . . . JOSEPH 
T. NOLAN — Busy, blistering, belligerent, bumptious, 
Burkeian, Bellocian. . . . ROBERT J. NOONAN— 
Never too busy to say hello — or never too busy. 

JAMES J. O'BRIEN— Affable southern drawler. 
Optimist O'Brien is going Hawaiian. . . . JAMES M. 
O'CONNOR — He threw what went "In One Ear" 
"Out the Other." "God, but women are funny." . . . 
JOHN L. O'CONNOR — Supreme in his silence, and 
serene in any theatre during class time. . . . JOHN E. 
O'DONNELL — Gruff, gutturally German, but what a 
change of tune at the drop of a handkerchief. . . . 
RICHARD F. O'HALLORAN— For the smile of 
beauty see Dick's harmonious enamels. . . . PAUL G. 
O'HARA — Of whom it can be truly said, O'Hara is 
out for Victory. . . . DAVID A. O'KEEFFE— The 
keeper of the golden silence. THOMAS G. O'LEARY 
— Tom, we just can't be objective — or objectionable. 
. . . JOHN E. O'MALLEY — Conscientious, firm up- 
holder of individual rights with a flare for whistling. 
. . . JAMES P. O'NEILL — ^Smihng, smooth, sophis- 
ticated, sociable, synchronized, and, my, single. . . . 
VITO A. ORLANDELLA — As mellifluous as his 
monicker, and just as voluble. 

CONSTANTINE G. PAPPAS— Neo-Platonist with 
an innate flare for the incongruous. . . . ALBERT F. 
PASHBY — Educated journalist who doesn't advertise 
his two beautiful sisters we'd like to meet. . . . JOSEPH 
J. PAZNIOKAS — The most somber faced creature 
we've ever seen — but, wow, amateur crystographer, 
master mechanic and poetic playwright. . . . JOHN J. 
PHELAN — Our nominee for '42's most affable gentle- 
man. . . . JOHN A. PIERONI — Some say smooth, some 
say suave — but anybody that pacifies the foot-bawlers 
deserves a double-decker. . . . RALPH C. POWERS— 
Taciturn, but, with a hockey stick in his hands, you'd 
be surprised. . . . WILLIAM J. POWERS— Of all the 



powers that be we'll take Bill. . . . CHARLES E. 
PRICE — Our contribution for the masculine editor of 
Mademoiselle. 

WILLIAM P. QUINN— Like Gothic, solid and 
spiraling upwards. 

FRANCIS P. READY— "I heard my draft board 
calling," Frannie, get your gun. . . . JAMES P. REILLY 
— He's already in the Heights — really O'Reilly. . . . 
EAMON G. RENEGHAN— Hail, hail! a Gael. They're 
the spine of all nations. . . . MURRAY A. RICE— 
That's no reverie, that's thought in the groove. . . . 
WILLIAM E. RILEY— Fleet of foot, keen of mind, 
One of Coach Ryder's finds. . . . EDWARD RITTER— 
The Georgetown giant, heavily brief-cased purveyor of 
corny jokes. . . . CHARLES I. ROBICHAUD— Those 
shoulders and that smile, what a recipe for romance. . . . 
RICHARD J. ROCHE— Affable, unexcitable, mild, 
prompt, practical logician and biologist. . . . FRANCIS 
J. ROGAN — Rogan's Slogan — There's nothing like a 
doctor. . . . JOHN G. ROSS — Forgetful, aesthetic, 
poetic; smiling is of his essence, the "dark golden boy." 
. . . JOHN W. RUSSELL— Belligerent Papal chamber- 
lain; Pope Martin controls the Sub Turri and he con- 
trols the Pope, but subtly. . . . THOMAS P. RUSSELL 
— Machinist with a bent to statistics and debating. 
. . . JOHN T. RYAN — The Brockton artist who looks 
like a boxer, an author without pretence. 



pound than the TVA. . . . JAMES F. STANTON— "Oh 
if I could only be like him!" . . . JOSEPH R. STAN- 
TON — ^At last a pre-med with a refreshing naivete. 
Defensor fidei. . . . RICHARD E. STILES— Stack stu- 
dent steps to streptococcus sterilization. . . . LEO W. 
STRUMSKI — Amiable intellectual adversary of all 
Jesuits. . . . ARTHUR F. SULLIVAN— He's quiet, 
even Dr. Pick can't stir him. . . . BRIAN B. SULLIVAN 
— Most poise-onous. He did not hide his talent under a 
bushel. . . . CHARLES I. SULLIVAN— "Why take 
life seriously? None of us will be able to get out of it 
alive." .... JOSEPH F. SULLIVAN— Quiet Joe, all 
prefects are! . . . JAMES F. SULLIVAN— The most 
Sulhvan. 'Nuft' said JOHN L. SULLIVAN— Con- 
fidante of Curran and Coughlin. A dyed in the wool 
Anglophobe. . . . TIMOTHY F. X. SULLIVAN— 
Thomas Wolfe's Eddie Murphy incarnate. 



EDWARD J. THOMAS— All he needs is a finishing 
course in Joe Miller (not B. C.) . . . . EDMUND T. 
TIERNEY — Roly-poly and charged with infinite kilo- 
watts of laughter. . . . JOHN V. TONER— When the 
carpet baggers went south he came east. . . . BERNARD 
M. TOOMEY — Cf. D'Ambrosio and he also sings. . . . 
JAMES P. TRAVERS— A city politician with a bar- 
tender's finesse. . . . PAUL J. TRIFIRO— Tall, dark, 
gruff patriarch of the Oriental. . . . ROBERT F. TROY 
— Tony is the new Helen of Troy. 



PAUL F. SALIPANTE— The boy who didn't study 
because he didn't need to. A fine thing to teach fresh- 
men. . . . ANTHONY A. SANNICANDRO— Witty, 
waggy, one-man chamber of commerce for Framing- 
ham. . . . ROBERT F. SAUNDERS— And the Heavens 
were rent asunder. . . . How much did you say this book 
cost? . . . CHARLES H. SAVAGE, JR.— A new Dan 
Beard with answers to all knotty problems. . . . JOSEPH 
M. SCANNELL— F. D. R. has his Hyde Park and so 
has Joe. . . . FREDERICK J. SEELEY— Flying hench- 
man for the Clique. Charter member of the Lunch- 
room Club 1, 2, 3, 4. . . . HUGH E. SHARKEY— 
Diminutive and dapper. Well dressed, well fed, well, 
well! . . . JOSEPH M. SHAW— When you want the 
sweetest, page Shaw. . . . JOSEPH A. SHEA — Central 
Square Lothario. Excitable conversationalist and mad 
driver. . . . JOHN M. SHEA— B. C. is a half an hour 
from the theatre section. . . . PAUL E. SHEEHAN — 
The melodious resultant of Boston's Irish Tradition. . . . 
JOSEPH A. SHERRY— A Danvers commuter who has 
strong opinions on freedom of conversation during lec- 
tures and train rides. . . . FREDERICK M. SLINEY— 
Unique — he chases the devil and usually cheats hiin. . . . 
ROBERT P. SNEDDON— He's custom built, but 
makes the modern difference. . . . ROCCO R. 
STAFFIER — Like Atlas, Rocco has more power per 



JOSEPH P. VENETO— Dark, dapper "Benito", 
bashes bambinos in Boston's boys' town. . . . MODES- 
TINO J. VITALE — "Vittles," a voice in vital appro- 
bation for Italian culture. Latin to the core. 



WILLIAM J. WALLACE— The mail must go 
through and Wee Willie is the man who's been doing 
it. . . . DAVID I. WALSH— Well, we hope that our 
senior senator sees this plug. . . . LEO J. WALSH — The 
personality you'd like to have. When you think of 
refreshment think of Leo. . . . EDMUND A. WEISS— 
The Imprimatur of the "Heights"; does everything from 
Morse code to working in Brigham's. . . . THEODORE 
P. WILLIAMS — Guards Gloucester lives, smiles, says 
little and roars over for last minute touchdowns. . . . 
HENRY B. WORONICZ— Brockton's blond bomber 
brought Boston bouquets. 



EDWARD J. ZABILSKI— Ed has left his V8 for the 
V7. Where's Bob Maher? 



SAUL ZUSMAN — Vibratingly humorous. He who 
comes and laughs last, but, oh, how he laughs! 








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mmmm-' 



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Functionalists' Hell. . . . Not the lights we heard about. . . . Chapel at North 
Andover. . . . Taking it all in. . . . Well, it's a nice car anyhow. ... St. Robert of 
Wakefield. . . . After the fire . . . before the insurance. . . . Precision. . . . The Germans 
outnumber the Irish at last. . . . Our first sailor boy ... Ed Sheehan. . . . This night 
life is killing me. 



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Joe Stanton with the head, Jim Malone with the horse. ... As I see it. ... I was 
blurry that night too. . . . Our Rube Goldbergs in operation. . . . Straighten up, Cadigan. 
. . . Lear was Good. . . . Joe Hegarty way down yonder. . . . Boston should be on top. 



REPRINTS 



Somebody has said that everything at Boston College 
is printable, but the Class of Forty-two has done much 
that is reprintable. From the Heights and Styhis, the 
Crystal and the Humanities we present these specimens 
of undergraduate writing. They have said it before, — 
may they say it again, again. 

From the Humanities: 

OUR PLEA 

We plea for a more vigorous cultivation of the 
Classical Attitude at Boston College. By a more vigor- 
ous cultivation we mean a more enthusiastic, a more 
eager penetration of the human soul as found in the 
writings of Greece and Rome: a more vivid realization 
of the human life therein contained. We plead for an 
academic atmosphere that will be classical. This means 
we plea for an atmosphere that will be permeated with 
a zest for the warmth of life. But a Christian Human- 
ism demands not only a zest for full living but also 
for right living. Hence we plead for a greater enthu- 
siasm for the fullness of living; a greater love for the 
more elevating, the more beautiful, the more righteous 
things in life. Such an Academic atmosphere charged 
with a Classical Attitude, and guided by Christian 
principles is something personal. It is acquired by 
individual effort. But it can spread by the infection of 
enthusiasm. 

It has been said: "Boston is not a place, it is a way 
of thinking." In like manner Boston College is not a 
College on the Heights. It is a way of thinking. But 
more than that, it is a way of living. It is a way of 
Christian thinking, of Christian living. May the vitality 
of the Classics more deeply pervade that way of think- 
ing, that way of living! In other words may it be shot 
through and through with a Christian Humanism. 

THE BIG BUSINESS OF LITERATURE 

Today, in American civilization, there is a complexity 
of society that threatens to engulf the individual and 
leave him the mere protoplasmic molecule in time that 
cynics would have him be. In business, complexity is 
emphasized in large-scale production, in the march of 
machines, in specialization, in efficiency experts, in the 
factory system of bureaucracy to handle the unwieldy 
intricacies of society, though such remedial centraliza- 
tion has been censured bitterly as mere expediency. In 
medicine a recent effort has been made to abolish pre- 
medical courses that would aim at educational integra- 
tion, precisely because the demand of the specialist in 
medicine now requires long years of concentrated prep- 
aration. In education fields have specialized so narrowly, 
that there is danger of the total loss of liberal maturity 
in favor of educational cubby-holes, with all their 
narrowness and sterility. 

And just as the business of government and education 



has become complex in America, so likewise the business 
of Literature. The student of the ancient Greek and 
Roman classics is amazed at the complexity of the 
modern literary output, is bewildered at our long chain 
of meaningless ramifications without a central literary 
system. We have witnessed the birth of many new 
artistic forms such as free verse and polyphonic prose, 
atonality and surrealism. We have the modern short 
story that is a hybrid formed by the synthetic combina- 
tion of the plot of a novel and the character portrayal 
of the dramatic monologue. We have a new rhythmical 
composition in poetry that fuses the lyric vigor of poem 
and the fluidity of good prose. Today in the drama we 
have a democracy of subjects without the set characters 
and aristocratic legends of Greek Tragedy. America 
has spat the bit of restraint from her mouth and begat 
a literary complexity, not only in form but also in 
productivity. 

Perhaps the most conspicuously American literature 
is the novel and the magazine. Both are alike in their 
complexity and over-production. The magazine offers 
a multitude of subjects in colorful style, but only too 
often manifests superficiality of treatment and privation 
of careful workmanship. The novel has been betrayed 
in many cases by the influx of historical influences; 
often it displays an esoteric nature, and more often 
still sacrifices purity of form. In both, prolific produc- 
tivity of standardized brands is evident — much in the 
style of large scale production; and in fact, have we 
not a salesmanship apparatus similar to the advertising 
personnel of Big Business? 

We cannot refrain from the remark that the adoption 
of industrial methods in literature has effected a medi- 
ocrity in product and a degeneration of craftsmen into 
machinists. Perhaps classical simplicity is not a virtue 
to be confined to nations in a primitive and archaic 
state of development; and concentration is not a pecu- 
liarity regional to the Mediterranean, but a fundamental 
and essential element of all good literature. 

J. E. H., '42 

From the Crystal: 

PLASTICS IN THE CONSTRUCTION OF MODERN 
AIRCRAFT 

In an age when swift, mass production enables manu- 
facturing plants to turn out completed articles in an 
ever-increasing volume, the flying machine is still hand- 
made. Hundreds of workman-hours are required to 
rivet a metal plane's surface. 

The aviation experts have prayed long and fervently 
for some method of mass production. Their entreaties 
seem about to be answered through the medium of a 
comparatively new industrial advancement — plastics. 

Plastics and aviation have undergone their major 
developments in the past two decades. Both are indus- 
tries in which the innumerable optimistic predictions of 
the last generation have become realities in recent years. 



Most of the research in plastics adaptable to such 
production has been with the phenol-formaldehyde type 
of plastic known in America by such trade names as 
"Bakelite" and "Durex." This material is the least 
expensive of the synthetic resins and in molding, it 
cures into an infusible, insoluble mass. 

Selection of a re-inforcing material and its incorpora- 
tion into the composition in a manner which utilizes its 
abilities to a maximum, is a problem long-studied by 
experts in this particular field of research. Usually the 
resinous materials are mixed with shredded or ground 
"fillers" such as woodflour or cotton flock. These 
fibrous materials not only reduce the expense of a plastic 
but also increase its mechanical efficiency as regards 
impact and tensile strength. Cord and long fiber re- 
inforcing agents reveal great tensile strength. 

While accessory factories both here and in Europe 
have been manufacturing propellers, instrument panels 
and airplane interior embellishments for some time, the 
process of manufacturing cheap, sturdy planes from 
synthetic plastics was developed by Col. V. E. Clark, 
veteran designer and chief engineer in the U. S. Army 
in the Great War, and by Dr. Leo Hendrik Baekeland, 
father of modern plastics, with the co-operation of the 
Haskelite Corporation of Grand Rapids, Mich. 

This revelation in January, 1939, was no startling 
news to insiders who knew that Clark was struggling 
with the mass production problem and these little 
doubted his success. 

The new material, called "Duramold," manufactured 
by secret processing, does not chip, corrode; resists water, 
oil and acids and is stronger than metal. Says Col. Clark, 
"In the form of a simple thin-walled cylinder of given 
weight, under compression, Duramold is, roughly, 10.4 
times as strong as stainless steel. Basically it contains 
cheap and very common elements." 

It will keep any given shape and unlike metal planes 
will not dent or flaw. This is all important since similar 
imperfections interfere with the flight of a plane. 

Just the fuselage of the original Clark plane was of 
plastic construction; there is information in circulation, 
however, that a new plane entirely plastic is at present 
under test. 

Until today, American production, unhindered in 
turning out thousands of motors, instruments and fit- 
tings, bogged down in the production of wings and 
fuselages. This is not the case now! According to the 
figures presented by Forest Davis, with the new process, 
4,000 workmen, only semi-skilled but equipped with 
200 dies, could in one year mould and assemble 72,000 
Duramold planes. Their plane is nor only more quickly 
produced but it is far superior to its all-metal sister. 
It is stronger, lighter, cheaper and having less frictional 
drag is seven per cent faster. The lethal weapons of 
today quickly riddle the maze of spar and ribwork 
bracing on an all-metal plane. The same devastating 
weapons leave but a neat hole in a Duramold plane since 
its shell-like construction eliminates the necessity of such 
bracing. 

This transformation from a dream to a reality is due 



to the zealous research of unsuppressible chemists who, 
not resting with the establishment of one industry, are 
striving to link it with others for the benefit of man. 

G. T. A., '42 

From the Heights: 

WAR AND IMMORALITY 

There are many obstacles to be overcome before this 
war is ended. There are many dangers to be encountered. 
The greatest of these is immorality. Greatest because, 
like a weed with its roots already sunk, it is now spread- 
ing. The facts are such that they cannot be overlooked 
or denied. It has ever been that war and immorality 
are no strangers. England aflSrms this even in this crisis, 
history confirms. Why? 

There is no intrinsic connection between war and 
immorality. Rather we would expect that war would 
bring better morals, for with life more uncertain, we 
should logically take more precautions to safeguard our 
eternal salvation. Such is not the case. War is here; 
immorality is here. Neither has come too unexpectedly. 

Immorality has been coyly pacing up and down in 
the wings and now brazenly dances forth into the middle 
of the stage. We saw it coming when a morally indolent 
America turned to bawdy plays and shows, and come- 
dians with double-entendre. Utilitarian businessmen 
catered to the public and flooded the country with 
lightly-veiled obscenity in magazines and amusements. 
Now, with the war as a feigned excuse, immorality is 
flourishing. England has gone through the same stages. 
The evil is here. The remedy must be applied. 

Other nations currently engaged in a highly-publi- 
cized attempt at democracy, have made religion a com- 
pulsory course in all the schools. This was their method 
of curbing rampant immorality. We advocate a similar 
cure, prayer. However, because of the simplicity of the 
remedy, the so-called civilized, educated Americans dis- 
miss the cure. It remains for us Catholics, and those 
other Christians who still believe in a God who created 
man, to apply the remedy. Prayer is simplicity itself. 
This is the remedy. Prayer. 

Amid the chaos and in the crisis we must find time 
to pray. A mass, a visit, a rosary, the morning offering, 
an aspiration on the way to school. We urge the stu- 
dents to do some little thing, for we are the little men. 
Be humble and prayerful. Prayer and immorality are 
strangers. 

We quote the oft-used but well-adapted line of Ten- 
nyson: "More things are wrought by prayer than this 
world dreams of." 

W. J. C, '42 

From the Stylus: 

THUNDER OF THE FAITH 

1890: a young artillery soldier slogging through the 
mud of Toule. . . . 1907: a Member of Parliament, 
arising to insist that party finances be made public. . . . 
1920: a prominent author, finishing a manuscript called 



Europe and the Faith. . . . The soldier, statesman, writer 
and man of many trades is Joseph Hilaire Pierre Belloc. 
By 1942 he is better known as "the Grand Old Man of 
Catholic letters". 

It should not be difficult to write of Belloc, except 
for the necessity of choosing wisely and stopping even- 
tually in his self-made library. He is known in every 
field, since his knowledge touches them all. Take up 
histories — French, English, European; biographies, too 
many to mention here; military studies, polemics, eco- 
nomics, politics, and defense of things Catholic — the 
strong syllables of his name have been a by-line to them 
all. Invoke the lighter Muses; seek out poetry, verses, 
sonnets, essays, travel, fiction, satire, humor — yes, and 
even Nonsense Rhymes! — Belloc is bountiful still. 

The first event of his life occurred in St. Cloud, 
France, in 1870. A year later the country of his birth 
was overrun by Bismarck's brand of Prussian mihtarism; 
although I can find no reference to it, one wonders if his 
later enmity for the German philosophy of force, a bias 
which he badly explains, was aided by the sharp impress 
of childhood. His father a French barrister, his mother 
a leader of the English suffragette movement, it would 
appear that Belloc came naturally by his healthy sense 
of controversy. I have called him part Irish in deference 
to a well-spoken tradition, one which springs from his 
intense Cathohcity. He entered Balhol College, Oxford, 
in 1893, and became a naturalized English citizen in 
1902. No explanation is available as to why he adopted 
a country whose politics he discarded, whose religion he 
proved spurious, and of whose economics he forecast a 
ruinous ending. Be that as it may, he became so much 
of an Englishman that he won a seat in Parliament for 
four years of his choosing. Electing Hilaire Belloc was 
like opening the back door to a hurricane; the House 
was badly shaken by the disclosures he made in company 
with Cecil and Gilbert Chesterton. America widely 
knew him in the years of the first World War, when his 
critical surveys, as expert as a field general's and fully 
as authoritative, established him as the best strategist 
among the war commentators. He was well prepared 
for a war; in peacetime he fought his own battles with 
the enemies of the Church. 

The dust of combat is still settling and we are begin- 
ning only now to taste the grimy fruits of Catholic vic- 
tory. It is as if Hilaire Belloc had stood on some high 
vantage point of scholarship, surveyed all the histories 
of the past four centuries, and found them wanting. 
Their deficiency was of the moral order: they failed in 
truth. An infamous thing called the Protestant tradition, 
nurtured in error and grown strong in hatred, had 
choked the stream of European history, had falsified the 
heritage of the Catholic continent. It began quite in- 
evitably. The leaders of the Protestant Revolution, after 
the first century of the surge of heresy, were forced to 
record their beginnings. The enormity of their action 
in destroying the unity of faith that was Europe could 
become acceptable only in preference to a greater evil 
— to their minds, the Catholic Church. And so they 
began, as intellectual prostitutes, their sale of historical 



truth. An expatriate is the harshest critic of his former 
home. By Newman's time the non-Catholic tradition 
of history had woven a tight web of prejudice through 
which the indoctrinated masses could never see reality. 
By Belloc's era the great Catholic inheritance had been 
forgotten or warped along lines of ugly falsehood. 

Belloc was no crusader armed with pen and spirit. 
He began as a poet, published French history, continued 
as an economist, and in 1920 wrote Europe and the 
Faith, the first of his defenses. His writings were Cath- 
olic and hence truthful, and as they grew in volume 
their author grew also into a formidable adversary. He 
appreciated the importance of the Church as only a 
medievalist could, and as very few men today have 
done; he realized that its doctrines were intended to 
affect the whole structure of living even as air is 
breathed and vivifies man. In Europe and the Faith he 
traces the Catholic history of Europe in a bold sweep 
through the Christian era. The new religion is adopted 
by the Roman Empire, it continues its realm as a spir- 
itual force, and perpetuates Graeco-Roman civilization 
for the world. It passes through the age of combat and 
emerges to a shining peace. The thirteenth century saw 
its magnificence, the fourteenth its decline, and the 
fifteenth the destruction of its unity and universal moral 
force. Since then Europe has been divested of its most 
splendid garment and today cowers in a chaos of its 
own materialist philosophy. Unless she returns to that 
union, to the Faith with which Belloc claims she is 
identified, then, as in the separation of body and soul, 
Europe inanimate shall perish. 

The book proved to be a prospectus. The development 
of its theses and the biographies of its motivating char- 
acters kept Belloc writing vigorously for the next dozen 
years. His identification of European civilization with 
the Church and the Grseco-Roman Empire brought 
scholarly protests about the Nordic influence, barbarian 
customs, and Mohammedan culture. But the thesis 
stands, supported by our speech, our laws, our govern- 
ments, and our habits of life. His chapters on the Ref- 
ormation, which he calls the most staggering event of 
history since the foundation of the Church itself, ex- 
pose with cruel clarity the iniquity of its origins. It 
is a sordid record of abuses and decay, of autocratic 
kings seeking new power and the loot of plundered 
monasteries. Characters of the Keformation, a most 
readable Belloc book, is a vivid summary of the actors 
in Christendom's slow dismemberment. 

What are the well-springs of this great learning? 
Oxford, to begin with, was the place of his formal 
education. And the young Frenchman drew deeply 
from this hoary storehouse of seven centuries' knowl- 
edge. One gains the impression, though little is written 
in proof, that the forceful, Gallic Hilaire was a boister- 
ous innovation for Balliol. He did not proceed in his 
training beyond that college, for the University refused 
him a fellowship to All Souls — a cause for Oxonian 
chagrin. No greater misjudgment was made until 
Churchill was flunked out of Sandhurst. Belloc's dis- 
missal by the dignified dons was perhaps occasioned by 



the title of his thesis, which is supposed to have been 
"The Amount of Beer Consumed in the Cotswold in a 
Year." It must have brought a guileless smile of triumph 
for the author to return some twenty years later and 
give a fascinating lecture on Rabelais to the largest 
available audience in the largest hall of his self-reproving 
Alma Mater. 

His further education was acquired in the process of 
writing his books. Much of his fund of knowledge came 
from travel, which he called "the food for the mind of 
writers and thinkers." He traveled the waterways and 
footpaths of England, Europe, and America, by sailboat 
and by foot. The Cruise of the Nona reflects his sailing 
philosophies; The Path to Rome is a winsomely beautiful 
travel story of the journey, on foot, from Tours in 
southern France to Rome. A walk for Mr. Belloc con- 
notes a tour, undertaken with thick boots and no socks 
for a distance of at least 200 miles. Any speedier or 
shorter locomotion would have had the undesirable effect 
of halving his production of books. 

Since he never includes a bibliography with his works 
we do not know what writings have contributed to the 
giant's share of knowledge. It is safe to say that prac- 
tically everything pertinent which is not too bulky has 
been drained into the reservoir, for he reads even more 
rapidly than he writes, and discards the chaff like a 
threshing machine. 

The intimate friendship of Hilaire Belloc and G. K. 
Chesterton, a Damon and Pythias in their intellectual 
partnership, was a happy union of the two greatest liv- 
ing Catholic laymen. Their recognition as such was 
given in 193 5, shortly before Chesterton's death, when 
Pius XI conferred on them both the Order of St. Greg- 
ory. It was a gratifying tribute to the defensorcs fidci. 
Together they countered the supercilious wits of their 
day. One such, the playwright and partisan, G. B. Shaw, 
called the two of them taken together "a new kind of 
animal," loud and aggressive of voice, which he named 
"the Chesterbelloc." But for Chesterton's Orthodoxy, 
the sheerest example of logic in prose, he covild find no 
airy caption. Chesterton was the more scholarly and 
profound, Belloc the better stylist and popularist. To- 
gether they ventured on to the thin ground of exposing 
political corruption by means of a journal called The 
Nctc Statesman. The final outcome of such activity was 
to send Cecil Chesterton unjustly to prison for libel, 
leave G. K. magnificently unperturbed, and occasion two 
of Belloc's greatest works. The Servile State and The 
Distribution of Property. The pedant may decry his 
eminence as a historian; the reviewer may await time's 
telling of his poetry; but the economist cannot deny 
him a peerage for these profound theses on the evils of 
state capitalism. 

He is likeable, this Catholic encyclopedist. In appear- 
ance he is a frowning, shaggy mountain of a man with 
Johnsonian carelessness in his personal attire. Like Ches- 
terton, he measures up physically to his intellectual 
proportions. The name fits the man: it might have been 
chosen by Addison or Steele, with its hint of bellicosus: 



warlike. His face is remarkably strong, his chin and 
brow veritable outcroppings of aggression. More typical 
of his humor than his humility (and both qualities are 
richly his own) is the refrain from an old ballad that 
Belloc loves to shout at the jovial sessions of his friends: 

And the gates of Heaven are opening wide 
To let poor Hilary in! 

Another bit of evidence on the complex matter of 
pronouncing his name! 

The summary of Belloc's Catholic message may be 
found in his most vital volume. The Crisis of Civiliza- 
tion. Here again he traces the Catholic continuity of 
history with a style that rises to song. His theses on 
history, economics, the Church, and the Reformation 
are all written into one flowing, forceful Summa. He 
draws up the issue today: it is a choice between state 
ownership and state worship, which is slavery, or a re- 
generation of the forces of life they knew five hundred 
years ago. All progress is not paced by time. The elec- 
tion is ours, he writes, for this is the wreck of our 
world, "in which we have the misfortune or combative 
glory to live." It is his most significant phrase about 
our time. 

The cynics will smile at such praise for this stout 
apologist, just as Belloc himself would avoid it. But 
there are still more generous estimates by better students 
of the man. Some in England hold that his courage in 
attacking the political setup and his clarity in condemn- 
ing capitalism have started a wide counter-movement 
to a system of things that cannot endure. Some claim 
that he has headed another reaction, this time the intel- 
lectual reverse of the Reformation, writing his way to- 
ward the ultimate triumph of the Church that is always 
secure in the span of centuries from the rebellion of 
short-lived men. Some call him "the greatest master of 
English prose and poetry in our time." One thing is 
sure: he has sent the message of our Faith thundering 
across this part of life, and who shall say what men may 
hear and heed its echoes? 

All such disputants of Belloc's greatness would smile 
at the story of G. K. Chesterton, who was booming his 
way across the Sussex countryside where Belloc has his 
home. Spying a native son at work in his fields he bore 
down upon him and opened conversation: 

Hilaire Belloc was the name, lived in this neighbor- 
hood; surely he had heard of the gentleman? 
Hm-m-m. Couldn't say. Seems familiar. 
Had he read any of his books, by chance? 
Na, he hadn't. 

Had he heard him speak, attended a lecture? 
Na, he hadn't. 
And then: 

"Hilary Belloc, ye say! Farms a bit, doesn't he?" 
Sic transit gloria mundi. 

J. T. N., '42 



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And now for the Physics of St. Thomas. . . . College Cheesecake. . . . Kye Kyser 
visits B. C. . . . Oh, how those nights tell. ... Six hats and no miss. . . . Father Lem 
Vaughan. . . . Livingston's gang. . . . John McNaught as Albany (not N. Y.). . . . 
Front line at the Old Homestead or Ned Browne dressed for the Philomatheia. . . . 
One of those "intricate formations" cf. activities section. 



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It was a great fight, ma. ... St. Mary's Chapel. . . . Keep 'em flying. . . . Lake- 
view from Campion Hall. . . . After the Ball was over. . . . The Captain tells the time. 
. . . Jim McCarthy . . . Baltimore Sem. . . . Waiting for Father Keating. . . . Murray's 
. . . the Lake Street Frat. . . . They are at a premium now. . . . Dramatists unmasked. 



SONGS OF 



ONWARD B. C! 

All hail, Maroon and Gold, 

Our banners unfold. 

We loyal sons are with you today. 

Young grads and old. 

So march along, B. C. 

'Tis your victory, 

Fight! Fight! the Eagle will scream tonight. 

Onward, B. C. 



FOR BOSTON 

1 
For Boston, for Boston, 
We sing our proud refrain! 
For Boston, for Boston, 
'Tis wisdom's earthly fane 
For here men are men 
And their hearts are true. 
And the towers on the Heights 
Reach to heaven's own blue. 
For Boston, for Boston, 
Till the echoes ring again! 

2 
For Boston, for Boston, 
Thy glory is our own! 
For Boston, for Boston, 
'Tis here that truth is known; 
And ever with the Right 
Shall thy sons be found. 
Till time shall be no more 
And thy work is crowned. 
For Boston, for Boston, 
For Thee and Thine alone! 



TO THE COLORS 

Maroon is for the sunrise as it leaps across the 

sky, 
And gold is for the glory of the noon; 
And in the flush of nightfall, when our towers 

fade on high, 
The clouds are flaming golden and maroon. 
Rise up again, ye B. C. men, cheer louder than 

the rest! 
When the sunrise meets the noontide, see your 

glory and renown, 
For our banners mix at twilight as it sinks into 

the west. 
And the heavens shout — for Boston! 
When the sun is going down. 



BOSTON COLLEGE 



SWEEP DOWN THE FIELD 

Sweep down the field for Boston, 

Marching on to glory. 

Forward fighting Eagles, 

Carry home the spoils of victory. 

Oh! We'll crush the foe before us 

As the Boston men of old; 

So, Fight! Fight! Fight! Fight! Fight! Fight! 

Fight! 
For the old Maroon and Gold. 

Cheered to victory our team sweeps on, 

The foe is vanquished and their spirit gone. 

B-O-S-T-O-N 

Boston! Boston! Boston! 



B. C. VICTORY MARCH 

For Boston men are always true 

Faithful to the golden hue 

B-O-S-T-O-N 

Boston men will march again 

Then all together in our hearts we'll sing 

For the mighty eagle's taken to the wing 

Tower bells in triumph ring 

For Boston we'll win today. 



HAIL! ALMA MATER! 

Hail! Alma Mater! Thy praise we sing. 
Fondly thy mem'ries round our heart still 

cling. 
Guide of our youth, thro' thee we shall prevail! 
Hail! Alma Mater! Hail! All Hail! 



Hail! Alma Mater! Lo! on the height. 
Proudly thy tow'rs are raised for the Right. 
God is thy Master, His Law thy sole avail! 
Hail! Alma Mater! Hail! All Hail! 



STUFF 



By Cyril G. K. Marshbank III 



Because of the inroads made on senior 
philosophy by the Stuff School, we have de- 
cided to print the whole explanation by its 
originator. (Ed. Note) 

The most important thing in College is Stuff 
because it is solid. Stuff is also that which 
everything is, as is proven by the fact of Stuff 
and things. Since things are things and Stuff is 
everything, then Stuff is the most important 
thing in life. It is substance and accidents, and 
being and essence, and Stuff and things, and 
what have you. It is also the Stuff that little 
boys are made of. For this reason you can 
easily see why there is a movement afoot to 
substitute Stuff for the tenth thesis in Ad- 
vanced Psychology. 

While the tenth in Advanced Psych, proves 
that the intellect is an immaterial faculty that 
can know material and immaterial objects in 
an immaterial way, the thesis on Stuff proves 
that everything is Stuff, and that which is not 
Stuff, just is not. If you remember the defi- 
nition which the author so well expressed in 
an issue of the Heights, you recall that Stuff 
is "id quod per se stat". And brother that 
covers a whale of a lot of things and accidents 
and StufF and things, and being and essence, 
and what little boys are made of. 

Of course, the strong point in Stuffology 
is the thesis on Bunches of Stuff. This fine 
thesis is based on immaterial objects, imma- 
terial materials, immaterial things, and imma- 
terial Stuff. And imagine all that in bunches. 
Since this thesis is much more difficult than 
the plain thesis on plain, ordinary Stuff, it is 
reserved for the last place in the book on Stuff- 
ology. 

The Stuff above will serve as the pre-notes 
on the thesis. The statement of the Stuff is 
"Stuff is based on immaterial objects, imma- 
terial materials, immaterial things, and imma- 
terial Stuff, and what little boys are made of, 
and all who maintain otherwise are adversaries 
and they are wrong and therefore anathema 
sit." Since every Stuffologist and Hylomor- 
phist knows what the terms mean, I will pass 
over a definition of them for they are clear 
to all. For proof, since everything is Stuff, 
then things both material and immaterial are 
Stuff. @ Things, material and immaterial and 
immaterial and material are everything. There- 
fore, Stuff is Stuff and I am fine and how are 
you. 



All the brethren will see that really no proof 
is needed because the premises and conclusion 
and all the other Stuff is immediately evident 
and practically absurd. So climb aboard and 
we will pass on to the Scholion which is a nice 
word and comes from the Sanscrit of the same 
name. Yet any resemblance to real Stuff or 
unreal Stuff or Stuff in general or Stuff in 
particular or just Stuff, is intentional and a 
reasonably close facsimile. The first Scholion 
reads: Stuff is Solid and so are the overalls in 
Mrs. Murphy's chowder. The big point in this 
is that solidity is an accident and as was stated 
previously, accidents are Stuff and therefore 
the point is that Stuff is Stuff and you were 
tricked into reading this Stuff. There are a 
bunch of other Scholions but they are minor 
heresies and they will be dismissed summarily 
by saying that since Scholion are things, then 
they are Stuff and the Scholions are fine. 

The chief adversary to the thesis are the 
Jazzbowists who hold that all the world is a 
stage and all the people should wear jazzbows. 
This is directly the opposite of the stand of the 
Stuffologists. The last time the feud arose four 
Jazzbowists were converted to the tenets of 
Stuffology by the mere statement that Jazz- 
bows are things and things are Stuff and they 
were on my side anyway and besides I was 
buying the beer at the time. 

The main point which all Stuffologists de- 
fend with their life is the fact that if you 
admit anything, or say or do or think or feel 
or see or anything of anything then you are 
admittedly a Stuffologist. These converts are 
generally called the Neo-Stuffologists or the 
Stuff and Nonsense School of the third water. 

There are some who feel that the Stuff 
School or theory of Stuff is something new and 
not well established. The immortal bard once 
said: "This is solid Stuff," and that was back 
around ought eight. If you are a classicist you 
remember the proof that Socrates gave, which 
trotted into pigeon English is "Stuff is the 
immaterial material that little boys are made 
of." So you see that Stuff is nothing new; it 
has been going on for years but under another 
title before Marshbank integrated the whole 
thing and called it Stuff. In the old School it 
was named and proved to be corn or bunk or 
Stuff. 



POETRY OF THE FORTY-TWO'S 



WEDNESDAY, DEC. 25 

There was a chill upon the earth, 
A chill to set arms swinging 
And feet stamping, 
But no foot stamped 
No arm swung. 

A still beautiful delicate silence, 

For not one cloud was moving, 

Not one cloud slipping 

Past the sharp corners 

Of the winter's moon. 

Only serenity and peacefulness, 

And silvery Noeltide. 

Then there was a screaming, suddenly, 

As of a wounded cat, 

A flash of weird blue light. 

Like the burning of damp souls. 

And a body of a man hurtling 

A man's body hurtling. 

In two red pieces 

Towards a wire fence. 

For one brief moment, 
The Magi lost sight of their star. 
And a distant manger trembled. 

L. J. M. 



MONOPOLY 

The world is God's, the seas, the skies, 
The valleys, plains, and mountains. 
And even my own little boy 
Who can't reach drinking fountains. 

S. J. L. 



CHILD'S NIGHT PRAYER TO MARY 

Oh my mother in the sky. 
Here upon my bed I lie. 
Sun has covered all its light, 
I am covered all with night. 
Part a cloud and look at me. 
Then will all the night time be: 
Mother lighting up a child, 
Virgin mother meek and mild. 

J.D. 



SONNET 

When some long-thirsted evening with you 
Has slipped away like grains of arid sand. 
Because of something I had left unplanned 
That sets a noiseless gulf between us two; 
I feel as though foregoing flesh and wine, 
A pilgrim to far holy places bound, 
The parched plains crossed, breasted the swirl- 
ing sound. 
At Mecca I had slumbered in the shrine. 
Yet, when I leave, and am alone, I keep 
In contemplation of your phantasy: 
Then as dew melts with sunrise, I forget. 
Within a vision, all the night's ennui 
And hear the holy men from the minaret: 
Awake and praise God! Better prayer than 
sleep ! 

J.R. 



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In the Newbury Street lounge. . . . Bulman deep in research. . . . O'Donnell et al. 
. . . Profile study. . . . Please remove your hat. . . . Frank Bowden at the keys. . . . 
Canal Street car-tracks. . . . Father Harding addresses the Business School Sodality. 



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"Gentlemen, they'll fall where they will." . . . McCarthy and Deveney — deeply 
interested. . . . There is work behind all plays. . . . Joe, outside the realm of poetry. 
... It can't be that funny, Connie. ... Is that the Chattanooga Choo-Choo? . . . 
Also waiting for Father Keating. . . . DeCosta's Byzantine Seminar. ... On the road 
to the Sugar Bowl. . . . Library of Business School (Newbury St.). 



LET'S REMEMBER, 



Let yourself go! And so we gave free rein to our 
stream of consciousness and these are our snapshots of 
those who have impressed us during the past four years. 
We are the star-gazers at Boston College, and here is 
our gratitude to the more scintillating planets in our 
undergraduate firmament, though we may have seen 
only one hemisphere of our favorites. 

So thanks for the memories. . . . 

To Malachy McGrath for his miracles in parking and 
his nabbing of Statler crashers. . . . To Fr. O'Donnell, 
the V7 tutoring master. . . . To Bob Jordan for being 
the middle man on all our late themes. ... To Gene 
Donaldson, gaunt detective Hawkshaw, who knows 
where all the books from Homer to Hemingway have 
wandered. . . . To Sully and Mike for spaghetti, coffee 
and confusion. . . . To Larry Kenney, the boy who 
makes change for the card games. . . . To Fr. Finnegan 
for his work as our moderator in Junior. . . . To Fr. 
McCarthy for being an earnest advocate of integration. 
. . . To Guggenberger for retiring after freshman. . . . 
To Mr. Feeley, the Mr. Chips of B. C. . . . To Eddie 
the Mick, the most missed ex-janitor. . . . To the boiler 
man, Shorty, for percolating percussion in the pipes 
giving us silence from the profs. . . . To Colonel John 
DiNapoli for warning us from uncatholic books. . . . 
To Miss Crotty, Mr. O'Laughlin's secretary, for . . . 
well . . . inspiration. . . . To John Sullivan for being a 
pleasant buffer state between us and the dean. . . . To 
Fr. Bonn for all plays seen and usually enjoyed. . . . 
To Mr. John Norton for being fatherly in frosh. . . . 
To Mary Lind for just being Merry. ... To Frank 
Bowden for pleasantly accepting student stubs for your 
brother "who works in Fore River." . . . To Fr. Rein- 
halter for the inspiration and continued guidance of 
the Humanities. ... To Fr. Vincent O'Brien for engi- 
neering 3 5 boors through sophomore. ... To Fr. Finan 
for his snappy repetitions, his universal 8 5's and his 
references to Benziger. ... To Mr. Lyons, S.J., for a 
good set of notes. ... To George Donaldson for find- 
ing us an uncle who wants 300 young men. . . . To 
Dottie Mullen for getting the NYA checks out in time 



to pay library fines. . . . To Fr. Fitzgerald for his in- 
valuable quote, "the pace is going to accelerate." . . . 
To Fr. Dick Shea for his victory campaign in the Mar- 
quette in sophomore and in the Fulton in junior and 
senior. . . . To Connell for a definition of poetry that 
no one agrees with. . . . To Frank Dooley for sacrificing 
an army career to keep tabs on the dogfish and foetal 
pigs . . . for Fr. Dore. . . . To John Shork for never 
crossing his wires. . . . To Doc Fitzgibbon for being 
worthily popular. . . . To Jake Wirth's for the B. C. 
Intown School. . . . To Fr. Burke for the inspiration 
of the "Burkeian Sound Pragmatists" Club. . . . To Edna 
Krohn for just being Edna. . . . To Fr. Kelley for giv- 
ing us a beginning. . . . To Father William Murphy for 
settling us down after Pearl Harbor. . . . To the Boston 
Fire Department for their band. . . . To Fr. Lemuel 
Vaughan for happy Soph sessions. . . . To Snyder x 
Martin for rounded shoulders. . . . To Mr. Drummey 
for balancing the budgets all around the campus. . . . 
To Fr. D'Arcy for tea for sixty. ... To Fr. Foley for 
being a gentleman. . . . To the organ grinder of New- 
bury St. for rhythm. . . . To Doc Doyle for running 
Harry's Hilarity Hall. . . . To Fr. Leonard for being 
father of the "New Stylus." . . . To Fr. Dullea for 
getting Denny Myers. ... To Fr. CoUins for the Cotton 
Bowl. ... To Fr. McGovern for eloquence and inspira- 
tion. ... To Brother Peter at Bay St. Louis for southern 
hospitality. ... To Fr. Maxwell for dignity and a lec- 
ture on Chaucer. . . . To Red Nichols for "Goodnight, 
Sweetheart." ... To Fr. Frank Sullivan and Fr. Lyons 
for a Campion Hall Retreat and to Fr. Sullivan for our 
Day of Recollection. ... To Charley O'Rourke for 
Simco Shoes. . . . To Loyola University in New Orleans 
for beds. ... To Fr. Malachy for miracles. . . . To the 
two Mr. Donaghues, smiling and scrappy. ... To Dallas 
for the Debs. ... To Cheese McCreehan just for going; 
to Fred Maguire just for coming. . . . To Eric Gill for 
being the most misunderstood man of '42. . . . To the 
Philomatheia for being understanding. ... To the 
Newton Police for not doing their duty. . . . To Doc 
Bowen for "Form Follows Function." ... To Fr. John 



FORTY-TWO'S 



O'Brien for being solid. ... To Fr. Douglas for setting 
us straight. ... To Jack Ryder for being traditionally 
good. ... To all the family automobiles for allowing 
us to get to New Orleans. ... To Frank Jones for 
kneading knotted muscles. ... To Dr. Beauvivier for 
just being himself. ... To Mr. Ready, S.J., and Mr. 
Walsh, S.J., for "Boak, Hyma and Slosson." ... To Fr. 
Fay for favors received. ... To Dr. Pick for the Pick- 
wicks. . . . To "Snooks" Kelley for his pet power plays 
which brought three years of championships. . . . To 
gentlemen named Dobie and Leahy who passed through. 
. . . To Doc Azuola for his banquets and his dog. . . . To 
Eddie O'Connor for vigorously fleecing us on bluebooks. 
. . . To Dan Gould — -"something new has been added." 
. . . To Ted Galligan, John Janusus, Tom Powers for 
services rendered. . . . To New Orleans for the French 
Quarter. . . . To Ed of the lunchroom for two beers — 
root and birch. . . . To Brother Feeley for being a B. C. 
Morgenthau. ... To Fred Robertie, a bustling bundle 
of energy. ... To Mr. Pinisi, S.J., or the invisible man 
who used to race us to get the attendance slips from 
inside the doors. . . . To Wendell Turley for blazing 
the trail for the "New Stylus." ... To Mr. McMullin, 
S.J., for passing us all when we shouldn't have passed. 
. . . To the elevator man who was always there to give 
the boys a lift up down on Newbury St. . . . To Bill 
Connolly of the Liggett Maintenance Department. . . . 
To the Trustees of the Business School for being Cath- 
olic gentlemen with a kind heart and a generous hand. 
. . . To Professor Carmichael for his dictum, "It pays 
to advertise." . . . To Fr. J. F. X. for his debate with 
Professor Cross. . . . To Fr. Terrence Connolly for an 
inspiring Junior Retreat. . . . To Bill Cunningham for 
jumping on our bandwagon. . . . To Zallen's for the 
pause that refreshes. . . . To Fr. William Fitzgerald for 
his lecture on Christian Humanism. . . . To the men 
in charge of the Catholic Culture Lecture Series in 
Junior. . . . To Ananda Coomaraswamy for his brilliant 
lecture in freshman, "Christian, Oriental or the True 
Philosophy of Art." . . . To Ade Bethune for her stim- 
ulating appearance and talk in Junior. . . . To Fr. Rooney 



for cheery hellos to bewildered freshmen. . . To the apple 
machine for three apples. ... To Madame Van Fiueck 
for her insight into the racial problem. . . . To Fr. Dan 
Lord for his piano, prayers, and peace efforts in Soph- 
omore. . . . To the Newman Clubs for many a good 
Friday night. ... To the W.P.A. Orchestra for their 
production of "Rigoletto." ... To the Hotel Lincoln- 
shire for their Lounge. ... To the Stylus Poetry Number 
for the best issue ever of the Stylus. . . . To Fr. Tom 
Feeney for his hare bells and the best English Elective. 
. . . To "Barney" Gavin for his wonderful apples. . . . 
To those Jesuits who dropped in at the Sub Turri of- 
fice and encouraged us to go on. . . . To our Missions 
for their worthy work. ... To the Class Representa- 
tives for their unappreciated devotion to duty. ... To 
Mr. Jaskievicz, S.J., for his founding of the Sanctuary 
Society. . . . To Fr. John E. Murphy for keeping alive 
the Gaelic traditions. . . . To Fr. Coyne for stimulus to 
Catholic Action. . . . To Ted Marier for introducing 
swing to football games. . . . To the A. A. for loosening 
up and buying new uniforms for the band. . . . To 
Billy Frazier for just being Billy Frazier. ... To the men 
who aided in our having the Dialogue Mass every First 
Friday. ... To all the people who pick us up when we 
hitch-hike. ... To Joe Dineen of the Globe for his 
publicity for B. C. . . . To Doc Maguire for putting the 
cap on the Classical Education of many of us. . . . To 
Mr. Bob O'Brien for understanding and poetry. ... To 
Mr. Buck for a groundling in Christian Economic 
Principles. . . . To Fr. Dore for making twenty doctors 
in forty-two. . . . To the Emmanuel Choral Society for 
entertaining concerts. ... To Lt. Hornblower for grab- 
bing the most fit at Boston's Catholic University. . . . 
To Mr. Liggett for moving out. . . . To the Reference 
Library for a place to do accounting. . . . To the Cliques 
for having abdicated. . . . 

And thanks to all of those who have educated us, 
inspired us, amused us, entertained us, amazed us, prayed 
for us, worked for us, and last of all supported us. 

And thanks be to God — that we are still thankful. 



ACKNOWLEDGMENTS 

We here gratefully acknowledge and sincerely thank all who contrib- 
uted to the completion of this work. 

Particularly we wish to thank: 

The President and Dean of Boston College for their interest and co- 
operation, especially for their permission to continue the publishing of 
the Sub Turri in spite of war conditions. 

The members of the Staff who were not engaged in writing; 

The entire senior class for financial and moral encouragement; 

The Faculty and general student body for interest and suggestions; 

Rev. Daniel O'Connor, S.J., for his assistance; 

Our Patrons; 

The benefactors of the College and the Philomatheia Club especially; 

Our Advertisers; 

Purdy's Studio: George Corrigan and Jim Bleiler for direction, 
Norman Benrimo for pictures, Miss Marjorie Deegan for check- 
lists; 

Mr. Clayton Whitney, Mr. Paul Blanchard, Mr. Maurice Wiley of 
the Lawton- Wiley Engraving Co.; 

Mr. William J. Heffernan of the Heff ernan Press for supervision in 
printing and make-up; 

Fred Robertie of the Registrar's Office for numerous services; 

John Sullivan of the Dean's Office for kind attention; 

The Boston Post for the picture of John Ballantine in service men's 
section; 

Southeast Air Corps Training Center for picture of Lawrence T. 
Keohane in service men's section; 

Hampered as we were by limited space we are indeed grateful to 
the Heights, Stylus, Dramatic Society and Sodality for the use of 
their offices and typewriters. 



PATRONS 



His Eminence, William Cardinal O'Connell 

His Excellency, Richard J. Gushing 

Rt. Rev. Robert P. Barry 

Rt. Rev. Charles A. Finn 

Rt. Rev. Thomas J. MacCormack 

Rt. Rev. Joseph V. McGlinchey 

Rt. Rev. Jeremiah F. Minihan 

Rt. Rev. Edward G. Murray 

Rt. Rev. Francis L. Phelan 

Rt. Rev. Richard J. Quinlan 

Very Rev. William J. Murphy, S.J. 

Rev. John J. Long, S.J. 

Rt. Rev. Joseph V. Tracy 

Rev. Charles N. Cunningham 

Rev. Daniel Donovan 

Rev. Remi B. Schuver 

Hon. Patrick J. Duane 

Hon. James A. Farley 

Hon. Henry Cabot Lodge, Jr. 



Hon. John E. Swift 

Hon. Maurice J. Tobin 

Hon. Sinclair Weeks 

Walter Brown 

James Carney 

Bing Crosby 

Carl P. Dennett 

Mrs. Edward C. Donnelly 

James A. Dorsey 

Walter Downey 

Mabel Farnum 

Bartholomew F. Griffin 

Half dan Lee 

Charles D. Maginnis 

Jeremiah W. Mahoney 

Dr. Humphrey L. McCarthy 

Mr. and Mrs. Vincent P. Roberts 

Daniel Sargent 

Dr. and Mrs. Joseph S. Stanton 



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Boston College 

Chestnut Hill Massachusetts 



Arts and Sciences 



Four Year Courses 

leading to degrees: 

Bachelor of Arts with Honors 
Bachelor of Arts 
Bachelor of Science 

Biology 

Chemistry 

Physics 



Bachelor of Science 



Education 
History 
Social Sciences 

Pre-Medical Courses: 

Selected courses in preparation for graduate study in Medicine 
are offered. These courses meet the requirements of the American 
Medical Association. 

College Library: 

The College Library contains about 163,000 volumes. There are 
excellent facilities for consultation, private study, reference and 
research work. 

Activities : 

Debating, Dramatics, Orchestra and Glee Clubs, Science Clubs, 
College Paper, Language Clubs, Cross and Crown Senior Honor 
Society, etc. 

Fellowships: 

Each year fellowships are offered for advanced study and 
research work in pursuit of courses leading to the degrees of M.A. 
and M.S. Awards are based on evidence of scholarly attainment 
and ability for specialized training in the Arts and Sciences. 

Rev. William J. Murphy, S.J., President 

Rev, John J. Long, S.J., Dean 

Rev. John P. Foley, S.J., Dean of Freshmen 



COLLEGE OF BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION 

Four Year Course Leading to a Degree of 

BACHELOR OF SCIENCE 

IN 

BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION 



TECHNICAL 

ACCOUNTING INDUSTRIAL MANAGEMENT 

BANKING MARKETING 

BUSINESS ORGANIZATION CORPORATION FINANCE 

AUDITING TAXES 

CULTURAL 
LITERATURE ECONOMICS 

MODERN LANGUAGE SOCIOLOGY 

HISTORY LOGIC 

GOVERNMENT PHILOSOPHY 

MORAL 
MORAL PHILOSOPHY RELIGION 



UNIVERSITY HEIGHTS, CHESTNUT HILL, MASS. 



THE 

BOSTON COLLEGE 

ATHLETIC ASSOCIATION 

EXTENDS 
ITS BEST WISHES 

TO 

ALL THE MEMBERS OF THE 

CLASS OF 1942 



We Hope That You Have Learned 


to Read Catholic Books 


We Hope That You Will Keep in Touch 


With Things 


Catholic 


WE RECOMMEND THAT YOU REMEMBER: 


THE JESUITS IN HISTORY 


CHAFF AND WHEAT 


FRANCIS THOMPSON'S WORKS 


FISH ON FRIDAY 


GERARD MANLY HOPKINS 


AND DOWN THE DAYS 


SO FALLS THE ELM TREE 


ON THE LOVE OF GOD 


FATHER LORD'S PAMPHLETS 


UNTO THE END 


SURVIVAL 'TIL SEVENTEEN 


COVENTRY PATMORE 


AND 




THE CATHOLIC DIGEST 


THOUGHT 


THE JESUIT MISSIONS 


THE SIGN 


MARYKNOLL MISSIONS 


THE LAMP 


THE SACRED HEART MESSENGER AMERICA 


BE CATHOLIC! 


THINK CATHOLIC! 


READ CATHOLIC! 



PURD Y 



BOSTON 




Official Photographer 

for the 

1942 Suh Turri 



Compliments of 


BURNS INC. 


100 Summer St., Boston 


Quality 


Formal Clothes for Rental 


■'^^iiSgi^^^- 


Special Discount to Wedding Groups 


Compliments of 


Compliments of 


The 


J. FRANK FACEY AND SON 


Boston College Club 


Printers 


of 


36 Prospect Street 


Somerville 


CAMBRIDGE, MASS. 
Telephones: TRObridge 5520-21 


Complim.ents of 


Brighton Laundry 


Matthew F. Sheehan Co. 

Neiv EnglantVs Leading 


55 Union Street 
BRIGHTON, MASS. 


Church Goods House 


The Largest Laundry in the World 


22 Chauncy St. 


owned and operated by Women 


Boston, Mass. 


Telephone: STAdium 5520-1-2 





State Street 
Federal Street 


^^fe 


Copley Square 
Massachusetts Avenue 


^^^Ll S H Fo75j-<^^^>^^^^B£^^&k 


STATE STREET TRUST COMPANY 


FAMOUS FOR 


BOSTON 


GOOD FOODS 
FINE WINES 
CAKES AND ROLLS 


affords the depositors the advantages of 

four offices in excellent locations, 

prepared to meet every 

banking need 


CANDIES 
GI* 1 BOXES 
TOILETRIES 
CIGARS 


Main Office: Corner State and Congress Streets 

Union Trust Office: 24 Federal Street 

Copley Square Office: 581 Boylston Street 

Massachusetts Avenue Office: 

Corner of Massachusetts Avenue and Boylston Street 




Safe Deposit Vaults at All Offices 


S. S. PIERCE CO. 


Member Federal Reserve System 


Established 1831 BOSTON 


Member Federal Deposit Insurance 
Corporation 


PATRICK J. GILL 




Gold and Silversmith 


Compliments of 


With the Approbation of 

His Eminence, Cardinal O'Connell 


Circle Lounge and Grill 


387 Washington St. 


I960 Beacon St. 


BOSTON, MASSACHUSETTS 


Cleveland Circle 


Rooms 709-10 




Telephone LIBerty 8025 




At the 


Complim,ents of 


CoUege Book Store 


J. E. DOWLING 


Texts, Stationery 


TRUCKMAN 


and 
Religious Articles 


543 Atlantic Avenue 
BOSTON 



FREDERICK C. MURPHY, '42 

14 Benedict St. 
SOMERVILLE, MASS. 

Accounting and Tax Work 
Compliments of 

P. A. O'CONNELL 



Compliments of 

CHESTNUT HILL 
GARAGE, INC. 

(Opposite the College) 
Bieelow 5414 - 5415 



Tel. PARkway 4300 



Official Jewelers 

to the 

Class of '42 



Scholastic Jewelers, Inc. 

Boston's Largest Manufacturing 
Jewelers 

JOHN F. LYNCH 5174-78 Washington St. 

Sales Manager BOSTON, MASS. 



Boston College Alumni Association 

Chestnut Hill, Massachusetts 
TEL. BIG. 3356 - 1480 



Executive Committee 

President 

JEREMIAH W. MAHONEY, '21 

First Vice-President 

JOHN A. CANAVAN, '18 

Second Vice-President 

R. GAYNOR WELLINGS, '23 

Treasurer 

WILLIAM M. CASHIN, '18 

Secretary 
JOHN C. HOLBROW, '24 



Board of Directors 

FRANCIS R. MULLIN, '00 

RT. REV. CHARLES A. FINN, S.T.D., '99 

JOSEPH P. McHUGH, '12 

THOMAS C. HERLIHY, '26 

DANIEL L. KELLEHER, '23 

ALEXANDER L. LASHWAY, '23 

Executive Secretary 
JOHN C. GILL, '31 

Faculty Adviser 

REV. FRANCIS E. LOW, S.J., '11 



Avoid Headaches 



by contracting for your College Annuals and School 
Magazines with a firm that has been handling this class 

of printing these many years a firm that knows 

the short cuts to expedite the work that knows 

how to get the maximum of results in quality and ef- 
ficiency with the minimum amount of trouble for 

the Stafif. 



THE HEFFERNAN PRESS 

150 FREMONT STREET 
WORCESTER, MASSACHUSETTS 



Printers to the 

1941 AND 1942 Sub Turris 

and other good publications. 



Photo Engravings of the 

1942 SUB TURRI 

were produced by 

LAWTONWILEYCo. 



otcr C/^ 




25 Foster Street 

Worcester, Mass. 



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Leadership Springs from Achievement 



A Lasting Gift 



MINIATURE 
BOSTON COLLEGE 
CLASS RINGS 



Mother 



FOR 

Sister 



Sweetheart 



Loren Murchison and Company 

828 Park Sq. Bldg., Boston 



Compliments of 

The 

Hilomorphic 

Academy 

We Can Give You the Uplift That 
Never Lets You Down 



Com.pliments of 

BILLY FRASER 



Compliments of 

MALACHY McGRATH 



FCB^ICTORY 
BUY 

UNITED 
STATES 
DEFENSE 

BONDS 
STAMPS 




Lawrence Kenney 

Clothier to 

Boston College 

SUITS FOR ALL 

OCCASIONS 

BOSTON — NEW YORK — NATICK 



Best Wishes 

TO 

The Sub Turri 

FROM 

SUB FURY 
SUB TAURO 
SUB ROSA 
SUB NORMAL 



TOTEM POLE 



TAKES JUSTIFIABLE PRIDE 
IN PRESENTING 



DICK JURGENS 

IN HIS FIRST NEW ENGLAND APPEARANCE 

Opening the Summer Season For An Unlimited Engagement 

P.S. Dick Jurgens is one of the highest-priced orchestras ever to 
appear at Totem Pole 



DANCING FEET COST MONEY 



In 1941 



Totem Pole spent $100,000 for the nation's 
leading dance bands 



In 1942— 



An even greater array of musical talent — 
greatest ever to appear in New England 



Compliments 

of 

The Junior Class 



Compliments 

of 



The Sophomore Class 



Compliments 

of 

The Freshman Class