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Full text of "Sub turri = Under the tower : the yearbook of Boston College"



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Ineffable Creator, Who, out of the treasure of Thy 
wisdom, has ordained three hierarchies of angels, and 
placed them in wonderful order above the heavens, and 
has most wisely distributed the parts of the world; Thou, 
Who are called the true fountain of light and wisdom, and 
the highest beginning, vouchsafe to pour upon the darkness 
of our understanding, in which we were born, the double 
beam of Thy brightness, removing from us all darkness of 
sin and ignorance. Thou, Who makest eloquent the tongue 
of the dumb, instruct our tongues and pour into our lips 
the grace of Thy blessing. Give us quickness of understanding, 
capacity of retaining, subtility of interpreting, facility in 
learning, and copious grace of speaking. Guide our going 
in, direct our going forward, accomplish our going forth; 
through Christ our Lord. Amen 

St. Thomas Aquinas 



FOREWORD 



And it came to pass, that in those days 
of tribulation, there went out a decree 
from the ruler, that all men should be 
enrolled. And all went to be enrolled, 
everyone into his own city. There was 
war. After that there was peace. Be it 
known therefore, that this is a record 
of the fidelity, endeavors and accom- 
plishments of those who having once 
fought, now study that all may have a 
richer, fuller, and more abundant life. 




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Very Rev. William L. Keleher, S.J., President 

To our President, to a priest of God, to the Rev. William L. 
Keleher, S. J., we respectfully dedicate this SUB TURRl 



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IN MEMORIAM 




The late Rev. Michael J. Harding, S.J. 

Father Harding was an active man. Not in the sense that 
he did more and more things but in the sense that he loved 
more and more. He loved philosophy deeply and intensely. 
Father Sullivan said, "He loved to search for the truth, the 
truth." This was the specific characteristic of his life, and 
this we know was the reason why he was born, why he came 
into the world, and why he studied and taught. It was to bear 
witness of The Truth. 




fflCULTY 






Rev. Stephen A. Mulcahy, S.J. 
Dean of Boston College 

With your graduating class, Boston College takes on 
again at least the appearance of normality. Last year, hardly 
twenty-five students received degrees from Alma Mater. Such 
has been the story for the past few years. This year, close 
to two hundred of you, fortified with the solid principles 
of your faith and philosophy, will go forth in a compact 
body to help heal the body politic, which is still suffering 
severely from the wounds of war. The world so badly needs 
straight thinking and straight acting to set it aright. As you 
gave your best to the winning of the war, now you must give 
your very best to the restoration and perpetuation of all for 
which you stand. Noblesse oblige! 

Stephen A. Mulcahy, S.J. 




Rev. James J. Kellev, S.J. 
Dean of The College of Business Administration 

Gentlemen of the Class of 1947: 

Perhaps your reflections are varied as you finish your 
student days at Boston College. For you it has not been an 
uninterrupted course of study in cloistral solitude, for the 
world in which you live was torn asunder by hate and ambi- 
tion and lust for power. You were worthy sons of Alma 
Mater in the triumph of arms and you returned from that 
triumph to hear again her final words of maternal guidance. 
With the promise of unceasing vigilance over you, she again 
sends you forth, confident that because you are stronger now 
in knowledge and wisdom and justice and charity, you will 
win a greater victory than the triumph of arms, the victory 
over self. May God grant you the exalted vision, the high 
resolve and persevering fortitude you will need in the action. 
Rev. James J. Kelley, S.J. 
Dean 







Rev. John A. O'Brien, S.J., Ph.D. 
Chairman, Department of Philosophy 



Rev. Terence L. Connolly, S.J.. Ph.D. 
Librarian 



Rev. Martin P. Harney, S.J., M.A. 

Professor of History 






Rev. John A. McCarthy, S.J., S.T.L. 
Assistant Professor of Philosophy 



Rev. David R. Dunican, S.J., Ph.D. 
Assistant Professor of Education 



Rev. John A. O'Callachan, S.J., Ph.D. 
Professor of English 




Rev. Richard G. Shea, S.J., A.M. 
Assistant Professor of Latin 




Rev. George A. O'Donnell, S.J., Ph.D. 

Dean, Graduate School of 

Arts and Sciences 




Rev. Albert F. McGuinn, S.J., Ph.D. 
Professor of Chemistry 




Faculty — College of Liberal Arts and Sciences 



Eduardo Azuola, Ph.D. 
Professor of Spanish 

Rev. Joseph L. Barrett, SJ. 
Instructor in Chemistry 

Andre G. deBeauvivier, A.B., A.M. 
Asst. Professor of French 

Rev. John Louis Bonn, S.J., S.T.L. 
Asst. Professor of English 

Paul A. Boulanger, Ph.D. 
Professor of German 

Rev. Wilfred T. Bouvier, S.J. 
Instructor in French 

Rev. Eugene C. Brisette, S.J. 
Instructor in Chemistry 

Robert F. Buck, M.F.S. 

Asst. Professor of Economics 

Richard L. Buckley, A.B. 
Instructor in History 

Rev. James L. Burke, S.J., Ph.D. 
Professor of History and Gov't 

Rev. Thomas P. Butler. S.J., Ph.D. 
Asst. Professor of Chemistry 

Vincent M. Burns, A.B. 
Instructor in English 

Robert J. Cahill, A.B. 
Instructor in German 

Rev. Henry A. Callahan, S.J. 
Instructor in History 

Francis J. Campbell, A.M. 
Registrar 

Rev. Anthony G. Caroll, S.J. 
Asst. Professor of Chemistry 



Rev. William J. Casey, S.T.L. 
Instructor in Religion 

Rev. Terence L. Connolly, S.J.. Ph.D. 
Librarian 

Rev. Charles G. Crowley, S.J., A.M. 
Instructor in Physics 

Rev. James J. Devlin, S.J., M.S. 
Associate Professor of Physics 

Silvio DiPietro, Ed.M. 
Instructor in Biology 

James J. Doherty, A.B. 

Instructor in Government 

Rev. John F. Doherty, S.J., Ph.D. 
Professor of Education 

Rev. Joseph G. Doherty, S.J., A.M. 
Asst. Professor of Religion 

George P. Donaldson, M.B.A. 
Director of Guidance 

Rev. Edward T. Douglas, S.J., A.M. 
Professor of Religion 

Thomas B. Dowd, A.B. 
Instructor in Physics 

Harry M. Doyle, Ph.D. 

Professor of Government 

Rev. Alexander G. Duncan, S.J. 
Professor of Psychology 

Rev. David R. Dunigan, S.J., Ph.D. 
Asst. Professor of Education 

Rev. Anthony J. Eiardi, S.J., A.M. 
Instructor in Mathematics 

Harold H. Fagan, M.S. 

Asst. Professor of Chemistry 



Bernard P. Farragher, A.B. 
Instructor in English 



Faculty — College of Liberal Arts and Sciences 



Eugene J. Feeley, Ph.L. 

Professor of Greek and Latin 

Rev. Edward H. Finnegan, S.J. 
Associate Professor of History 

Rev. Francis Flaherty, S.J., Ph.D. 
Associate Professor of Philosophy 

Rev. Ernest B. Foley, S.J., A.M. 
Professor of Economics 

Rev. John P. Foley, S.J., A.M. 

Dean of Freshman and Sophomores 

Albert M. Folkard, A.M. 
Instructor in English 

Rev. James F. Geary. S.J., S.T.L. 
Assistant Professor of History 

George F. G. Grob, A.M. 

Assistant Professor of English 

William G. Hayward, LL.B 
Director of Publicity 

William F. Irwin, A.M. 
Instructor in Sociology 

Augustine L. Keefe, A.M. 
Professor of Classics 

James J. Kiely, A.B. 

Instructor in English 

Rev. Harold C. Kirley, S.J. 
Instructor in History 

Joseph F. Krebs, A.B. 

Instructor in Mathematics 

Archie J. Laferriere, A.B. 
Instructor in Mathematics 

Rev. Richard V. Lawlor. S.J. 
Instructor in Religion 



Rev. James F, 
Professor 



Rev. James M. Leavey. S.J., A.M. 
Professor of French 

Robert J. LeBlanc, A.B. 

Instructor in Mathematics 

Rev. Francis E. Low. S.J.. Ph.D. 
Professor of Philosophy 

Rev. John A. McCarthy, S.J.. S.T.L. 
Assistant Professor of Philosophy 

Rev. Leo P. McCauley. S.J., Ph.D. 
Professor of Classics 

Rev. Albert F. McGuinn, S.J.. Ph.D. 
Professor of Chemistry 

Rev. Joseph E. McInnis, S.J. 
Instructor in English 

Henry J. McMahon, A.M. 
Instructor in History 

Bev. Paul J. McManus, S.J. 
Intsructor in German 

Rev. Paul S. McNulty. S.J. 

Instructor in Latin and English 

Rev. Francis J. MacDonald, S.J. 
Professor of Classics 

Paul M. Maginnity, Ph.D. 

Assistant Professor of Chemistry 7 

Joseph P. Maguire, Ph.D. 

Assistant Professor of Greek and Lati 

Fakhri B. Maluf, Ph.D. 

Assistant Professor of Philosophy 

Rene J. Marcou, Ph.D. 

Assistant Professor of Mathematics 

Francis L. Maynard, A.M. 
Instructor in Biology 

Moynihan, S.J. Ph.D. 
of Education 




Faculty — College of Liberal Arts and Sciences 



Rev. John E. Murphy. S.J.. Ph.D. 
Professor of Gaelic 

John F. Norton, A.M. 

Professor of Latin and English 

Rev. John A. O'Brien. S.J., Ph.D. 
Professor of Ethics 

Rev. Vincent deP. O'Brien, S.J., A.M. 
Professor of Classics 

Rev. John A. O'Callaghan, S.J., A.M. 
Professor of English 

Rev. John C. O'Connel. S.J., Ph.D. 
Professor of Sociology 

David C. O'Donnell, Ph.D. 

Professor of Chemistry 

John M. O'Loughlin, A.B. 
Assistant Librarian 

Rev. Leo F. Quinlan. S.J.. A.M. 
Instructor in Classics 

Rev. Oswald A. Reinhalter, S.J., A.M 
Professor of Classics 

Rev. James W. Ring, S.J. 
Instructor in Physics 

John K. Rouleau, Ph.D. 
Professor of Chemistry 

James F. Rowean, B.S. 

Instructor in Mathematics 



Rev. Richard G. Shea, S.J., A.M. 
Assistant Professor of Latin 

John W. L. Shork, M.S. 

Assistant Professor of Physics 

Ernest A. Siciliano, Ph.D. 

Instructor in Romance Languages 

Rev. George F. Smith. S.J. 

Asst. Professor of Romance Languages 

Rev. Sidney J. Smith, S.J., A.M. 
Professor of English and Latin 

Rev. Edward J. Sullivan, S.J. 
Dean of Men 

Rev. James D. Sullivan, S.J. 

Assistant Professor of Ethics 

Rev. Joseph J. Sullivan, S.J.. Ph.D. 
Professor of Chemistry 

Abdelnour S. Thomas, Ed.M. 
Instructor in Mathematics 

Rev. John A. Tobin. S.J. 
Professor of Physics 

Leon M. Vincent, M.S. 

Assistant Professor of Biology 

James R. Walsh, A.B. 

Instructor in Mathematics 

Rev. Maurice A. Whelton, S.J., S.T.L. 
Professor of Religion 



Rev. John W. Ryan, S.J. 

Assistant Professor in English 

Thomas I. Ryan, M.S. 

Instructor in Biology 

Jacob A. Santamaria, A.B. 
Instructor in French 



Frederick E. White, Ph.D. 
Professor of Physics 

Donald J. White, B.S. 

Instructor in Economics 

Rev. Francis X. Wilkie, S.J., M.S. 
Professor of Biology 



Harold A. Zager, M.S. 

Associate Professor of Mathematics 




s t n 1 R s 




SENIOR CLASS OFFICERS 




Joseph Stokes. J<vt> Kilet. Fraxk Flevitsc. Fj»nr>T> Flaherty. Thomas Moras 





ANTHONY A. ABRUZZESE B.5. 

45 Minot St.. Dorchester. Mass. 

DORCHESTER HIGH FOR BOYS 

Major: Math 

Heights 1: Sodality 3. 4: Manager of Band and 
Orchestra 3 : Dance Committee 4 : Prom Committee 
4: Cap and Gown Committee 4. 




FREDERICK GOOD AHERN A.B. 
N Arcadia St_ Dorchester. Mass. 

DORCHESTER HIGH FOR BOTS 

Major: Pre- 

Football 1 : Sodality 1 : Chairman of Freshman 
Prom: Pre-Medical Semi] ai 1 *. - ".-.airman 

of Junior and Senior Proms- Glee Club 4. 






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WILLIAM J. AKERMAN, JR. B.S. 

22 Surrey St., Brighton, Mass. 

BOSTON ENGLISH HIGH SCHOOL 

Major: English 

Glee Club 1. 2. 3; Sodality 4; Sub Turri 4; Phi- 
losophy Academy 4. 




JOSEPH T. ALVES A.B. 

35 Rockingham Rd., Mattapan, Mass. 

BOSTON PUBLIC LATIN SCHOOL 

Major: Sociology . 

Sodality 1, 2, 3, 4; French Academy 3, 4; Phi- 
losophy Academy 4, 




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CHARLES DAVID AZNAVOORIAN, JR. B.S. 

33 Yale St., Medford. Mass. 

MEDFORD HIGH AND HUNTINGTON PREP 

Major: History and Government 

Sodality 1. 2: Dramatic Society 4; Glee Club 1, 2; 
Heights 1, 2; Bowling Club 3; French Academy 
1, 2. 



CHARLES J. ALEXANDER B.S. 

318 Waverly St., Framingham. Mass. 
FRAMINGHAM HIGH SCHOOL 

Major: Economics 
Sodality 1, 2, 3, 4; Marquette 2. 





JOSEPH EDWARD BELLISSIMO B.S. 

41 Slade St., Belmont, Mass. 
st. mary's high school 
Major: Biology 
Glee Club 4: Pre-Medical Seminar 4. 





CARMINE J. BELMONTE B.S.B.A. 

296 Revere St.. Revere. Mass. 

REVERE HIGH SCHOOL 

Major: Marketing 

Sodality 2, 3; Track 1; Football 1; Golf 1. 2: 
Spanish Academy 1. 2. 




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JOHN T. BERRY A.B. 

47 H St., South Boston, Mass. 

GATE OF HEAVEN HIGH SCHOOL 

Major: P re-Medical 

Sodality 1, 2, 4; Dean's List 1, 2; Pre-Medical 
Seminar 4. 



47 



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THOMAS F. ROLAND A.R. 

900 Washington St., Dorchester, Mass. 
DORCHESTER HIGH SCHOOL 

Major: History and Government 

Class Representative 1: Sodality 1, 2; Heights 1: 
Freshman and Sophomore Dance Committees. 






WILLIAM C. BONNER B.S.B.A. 

284 Bellevue St., West Roxbury, Mass. 

ROSLINDALE HIGH SCHOOL 

Major: Accounting 
Management Club 3, 4; Sodality 1, 2, 3. 




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JEFFREY J. BOWE A.B. 

31 Champney St.. Brighton, Mass. 

BOSTON PUBLIC LATIN SCHOOL 
Major: Math 
Sociality 1; Humanities 3. 



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KEVIN JOSEPH BOWERS A.B. 

53 Sorrento St., Allston, Mass. 

BOSTON PUBLIC LATIN SCHOOL 
Major: English 
Stylus 1, 2, 3; Humanities 3. 



HENRY J. BRASH B.S.B.A. 

131 Ashmont St., Dorchester, Mass. 

JAMAICA PLAIN HIGH SCHOOL 

Major: Accounting 

Sodality 1. 2. 3_: French Academy 2, 3; Manage- 
ment Club 2, 3; Business Club 1, 2. 





PHILIP D. BROOKS B.S.B.A. 

16 White Oak RcL West Roxbury. Mass 
ROSLINDALE HIGH SCHOOL 

Major: Accounting 
Golf Team 1; Rand 1; Sodality 1, 2, 3, 4. 





MORRIS BRESLOUF B.S. 

49 Revere St.. Boston, Mass. 

ENGLISH HIGH SCHOOL 

Major: Pre- Medical 
French Academy 1. 2: Pre-Medical Seminar 3, 4. 




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JOHN F. BUCKLEY, JR. B.S. 

505 Pleasant St.. Maiden, Mass. 

STONEHAM HIGH SCHOOL AND LAWRENCE ACADEMY 

Major: History 
Baseball 1, 2, 3, 4 (Captain 4) : Hockey 1, 2, 3, 4. 



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JOHN JOSEPH BUCKLEY A.B. 

21 Mansur St.. Jamaica Plain, Mass. 

BOSTON PUBLIC LATIN SCHOOL 
Major: Economics 
French Academy 1, 2; Classical Academy 2, 3. 






19 



EDWARD A. BURBANK, JR. B.S.B.A. 

106 Knell St.. Roslindale, Mass. 
ROSLINDALE HIGH SCHOOL 

Major: Marketing 
Sodality 1, 2, 3; Management 3. 4. 





GEORGE A. BURKE A.B. 

107 Waban Hill Rd., Chestnut Hill, Mass. 

BOSTON COLLEGE HIGH SCHOOL 

Major: English 

Football 1; Sodality 1, 2, 3, 4; German Academy 
1, 2; Marquette 3; Dramatic Society 4; Fulton 3, 
4; Heights 4; Stylus, Editor-in-Chief 4; Bowling 
Club 2, 4; Humanities 4. 



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EUGENE E. BURLINGAME B.S.B.A. 

24 Pleasant Ave., Somerville, Mass. 

SOMERVILLE HIGH SCHOOL 

Major: Advertising 

Sodality 1, 2, 3; Glee Club 2; Spanish Academy 
1, 2; Marketing Club 2; Management Club 2, 3, 4. 



CHARLES FRANCIS BURNS B.S. 

85 Arlington St., Lawrence, Mass. 

CENTRAL CATHOLIC HIGH SCHOOL 

Major: History and Government 

Sodality 1, 2, 3, 4; Pre-Medical Seminar 1, 2; 
French Academy 3; Bowling Club 3, 4; Philos- 
ophy Academy 4. 





LAWRENCE RUSSELL BYRON, JR. B.S. 

23 Dale St., Woburn, Mass. 

st. John's preparatory school 

Major: History and Government 

Sodality 1, 2, 3, 4; Class Secretary 3; Heights 2; 
Sub Turri 4. 





EDWARD C. BYRNE, JR., B.S. 

1025 Front St., South Weymouth, Mass. 

WEYMOUTH HIGH SCHOOL 
Major: English 
Sodality 1, 2. 3, 4: Dramatic Society 3, 4. 




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JOHN JOSEPH CALLAHAN A.B. 

110 Bay View Ave., Lynn, Mass. 
st. mary's boys' high school 
Major: Sociology 
Sodality 1, 2, 3, 4; Philosophy Academy 4. 



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JOHN J. CAMPBELL A.B. 

11 Felton St., Cambridge, Mass. 

CAMBRIDGE HIGH SCHOOL 

Major: I 're-Medical 
Sodality 1, 2, 3, 4; Heights 1. 2; Marquette 1, 2; 
Physics Seminar 3. 






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MICHAEL JOHN CAPRIO U.S. 
36 Northhampton St., Roxbury, Mass. 

BOSTON ENGLISH HIGH SCHOOL 

Major: Economics 
Sodality 4; Glee Club 1. 




DAVID M. CAREY B.S.B.A. 

22 Belknap St., Concord, Mass. 

CONCORD HIGH SCHOOL 

Major: Accounting 
Sodality 1, 2. 3; Management Club 3. 4. 







MARK V. CARR A.B. (Honors) 

3940 Washington St.. Roslindale, Mass. 

BOSTON PUBLIC LATIN SCHOOL 

Major: English 

Sodality. Secretary 1, 2, 3, 4; Heights 2. 3, 4; 
French Academy 2; Humanities 2; Stylus 3: Bowl- 
ing Club 2, 3; Glee Club 4; Sub Turri 4; Who's 
Who in American Colleges and Universities. 



JOSEPH V. COMERFORD, JR. A.B. 

58 Greaton Road, West Roxbury, Mass. 

BOSTON COLLEGE HIGH SCHOOL 

Major: Economics 
Activities: Sodality 1, 2, 3. 4; Band 1, 2. 




CHARLES WILLIAM CONNOLLY B.S. 

71 Laurel St., West Lynn, Mass. 
st. mary's high school 
Major: Pre-Medical 
Sodality 1, 2, 4; Pre-Medical Seminar 1, 2, 3. 





DENNIS M. CONDON B.S. 

59 Baldwin St., Dorchester, Mass. 

DORCHESTER HIGH SCHOOL 
Major: Education 
Activities: French Academy 1. 




19 




JOHN JOSEPH CONNOLLY, JR. B.S. 

34 Speedwell St., Dorchester, Mass. 

BOSTON PUBLIC LATIN SCHOOL 

Major: Accounting 

Dramatic Society 1. 2, 3, Exec. Secretary 3; Heights 
1, 2, News Editor 3; Management Club 3; Sodality 
3, 4; Junior Prom Committee; Sub Turri 4; 
"Who's Who Among Students in American Col- 
leges and Universities" 1947. 





JAMES O. CONWAY B.S. 

60 Lathrop St., Newtonville, Mass. 
our lady's help of christians 
Major: Economics 
Fulton 4; Sodality 1, 2, 3. 





VINCENT T. COX B.S. 

102 Salem Si.. Lawrence, Mass. 

CENTRAL CATHOLIC HIGH SCHOOL 

Major: Chemistry 

Fencing Team 1; German Academy 1. 2: Chemists 
Club 2. 



19 




JOSEPH F. CREEDON A.B. 

1 Moville St.. West Roxbury, Mass. 

BOSTON PUBLIC LATIN SCHOOL 

Major: English 
Sodality 1, 2, 3, 4; Prom Committee 4. 




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EDWARD JOSEPH CRONIN A.B. 

23 Parsons St.. Brighton, Mass. 

BOSTON COLLEGE HIGH SCHOOL 

Major: History and Government 

Football 1, 2, 3: Heights 2; Rowling Club 2. 3, 4; 
Pre-Medical Seminar 4. 



ROBERT L. CRONIN A.B. (Honors) 

30 Lake Shore Drive, Westwood, Mass. 

BOSTON COLLEGE HIGH SCHOOL 

Major: Economics 

Sodality 1. 2; Dramatic Society 2: Ring Committee 
3. 





THOMAS F. CUNNIFF B.S.B.A. 
37 Dunster Rd.. Jamaica Plain, Mass. 

HIGH SCHOOL OF COMMERCE 

Major: Accounting 
Sodality 1, 2; Management Club 3, 4. 





PAUL DAVID CUMMLNGS B.S. 

47 Waldeck St., Dorchester, Mass. 

LAWRENCE ACADEMY 

Major: Education 
Football 1, 2; Track 2, 3; Sub Turri 4. 




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FRANCIS ANDREW CURRAN A.R. 

49 Rockland St., Roxbury, Mass. 

ST. FRANCIS XAVIER 

Major: Sociology 
Sodality 3, 4. 



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PASQUALE F. DARONE B.S. 

11 Sprindare St., Maiden, Mass. 

MALDEN HIGH SCHOOL 

Major: Education 
Activities: Track 1, 2, 3; Football 1, 2, 3, 4. 





19 



THOMAS E. DEE A.B. 

122 Dorchester St., Lawrence, Mass. 

CENTRAL CATHOLIC HIGH SCHOOL 

Major: Physics 

Sodality 1, 2, 3; French Academy 1, 2; Marquette 
1, 2; Physics Seminar 3, 4. 




JOHN A. DELEO A.B. 

7 Fenelon St., Dorchester, Mass. 

BOSTON ENGLISH HIGH SCHOOL 

Major: Pre-Medical 

Sodality 2; Glee Club 1, 2. 3; Pre-Medical Sem- 
inar 4. 




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FERDINAND PAUL D'ERRICO B.S.B.A. 

31 Ruggles St., Franklin, Mass. 

FRANKLIN HIGH SCHOOL 

Major: Accounting 
Sodality 2, 3, 4; Glee Club 4. 




JOHN S. DENNEHY B.S. 

106 Algonquin Rd., Chestnut Hill, Mass. 

NEWTON HIGH SCHOOL 

Major: Economics 

Sodality 1, 2. 3; Heights 3, 4; Stylus 4; German 
Academy 1, 2; Philosophy Academy 4. 






DONALD RICHARD DESMOND B.S. 

34 Mayall Rd., Waltham, Mass. 

st. mary's high school 

Major: History and Government 

Sodality 1, 2, 3, 4; Heights 3; Dean's List 2. 3; 
Philosophy Academy 4. 



JOSEPH T. DEVLIN A.B. 

315 Park St.. West Roxbury, Mass. 

ROSLINDALE HIGH SCHOOL 

Major: Sociology 

Sodality 1. 2, 3: Spanish Academy 1, 2; Junior 
Prom Committee 3. 




19 





FRANCIS WINN DOHERTY A.B. 

306 Bellevue St., West Roxbury, Mass. 

BOSTON COLLEGE HIGH SCHOOL 

Major: Economics 
Class Treasurer 1; Sodality 1, 2. 3, 4. 



47 



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JOHN JOSEPH DOHERTY A.B. 

11 Rutland St., Watertown, Mass. 

BOSTON COLLEGE HIGH SCHOOL 

Major: History and Government 

Sodality 1, 2, 3, 4; Stylus 3; Philosophy Academy 
4; Harrington Oratorical Contest 3. 






JOSEPH S. DONNELLY B.S. 

57 Metropolitan Ave.. Roslindale, Mass. 

BOSTON COLLEGE HIGH SCHOOL 

Major: Economics 
Sodality 1, 2; Radio Club 3, 4. 



19 




JAMES EDWARD DOWD A.B. 

31 Upland Road, West Somerville, Mass. 



ST. JOHN S 



Sodality 1, 2, 3; Fulton 3; Law and Gov't 4; 
Marquette 1, 2. 




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JAMES O. DUNN B.S.B.A. 

25 Summer St., Quincy, Mass. 

NORTH QUINCY HIGH SCHOOL 

Major: Accounting 
Sodality 1, 2. 3; Spanish Academy 1, 2; 



FRANCIS K. DWYER 

5 Winthrop Place, Taunton, Mass. 

MONSIGNOR COYLE HIGH SCHOOL 

Major: History 
Sodality 1, 2, 3; French Academy 1, 2. 




ELI EHRLICH B.A. 

1509 North Shore Road, Revere, Mass. 

REVERE HIGH SCHOOL 
Major: Social Science 
Marquette 1, 2; Sub Turri 4. 





WILLIAM BERNARD EARLEY, JR. B.S. 

16 Westville St.. Dorchester 24, Mass. 

DORCHESTER HIGH SCHOOL 

Major: Physics 
Sodality 1, 2; Physics Seminar 3. 4; Radio Club 4. 




f9 




JOHN FRANCIS ELW YN A.B. GREEK 

22 Harrington St., Newtonville. Mass. 

NEWTON HIGH SCHOOL 

Major: History and Government 
Sodality 1. 2; Heights 2, 4; Bowling 2, French 
Academy 2. 



Galle. 

47 



ae 




DANIEL FRANCIS ENEGUESS, JR. A.B. 

1090 Massachusetts Ave., Arlington, Mass. 

BOSTON COLLEGE HIGH SCHOOL 

Major: Economics 
Sodality 1. 2; Adv. Mgr. Dramatic Society 3. 4. 





ARTHUR M. FAGAN, JR. B.S. 

62 Hartford St., Newton Highlands, Mass. 

NEWTON HIGH SCHOOL 

Major: Marketing 

Activities: Track 1, 2, 3; Football 3; Heights 1, 
2, 3, 4, Editor-in-Chief 4; Stylus 3; Sodality 1, 2, 
3; Glee Club 1, 2; Dramatic Society 1, 2; Man- 
agement Club 3; Dance Committee 1, 2; Junior 
Prom Committee 3; Spanish Academy 1, 2. 



f9 




FREDERICK A. FARREY, JR. B.S. 

9 Newbury St., Woburn, Mass. 

WOBURN HIGH SCHOOL 

Major: Education 
Sodality 1, 2, 3 ; German Academy 3. 






JOSEPH FIGURITO A.B. 

34 Horace St.. Somerville, Mass. 

SOMERVILLE HIGH SCHOOL 

Major: Romance Languages 

Sociality 3; Dramatics 3, 4; Glee Club 3, 4; Stylus 
1; French Academy 1. 




RALPH F. FELECIANO B.S. 

53 Murray Hill Rd.. No. Cambridge, Mass. 

PERKINS INSTITUTION 
Major: Social Science 
Sodality 1, 2, 3, 4. 




ROBERT P. FITZGERALD A.B. 

106 Lincoln Rd., Medford, Mass. 

MEDFORD HIGH SCHOOL 

Major: F 're-Medical 

Sodality 1. 2. 4; German Academy 4: Ski Club 3; 
Track 1, 2. 





RICHARD J. FITZGERALD B.S. 

54 Hampstead Rd.. Jamaica Plain 30, Mass. 

HIGH SCHOOL OF COMMERCE 

Major: Education 

Sodality 4; Heights 1, 2, 3. 4; Sub Turri 4; 
Bowling Club 2. 




19 




EDMUND L. FLAHERTY A.B. 

132 Arlington St.. Brighton. Mass. 

BOSTON COLLEGE HIGH SCHOOL 

Major: Pre-Medical 

Sodality 1, 2, 3, 4; Fulton 3; Sub Turri Staff; 
Marquette 1, 2 (Pres.) ; Pre-Medical Seminar 3. 
4; Senior A. A. Representative; Delegate to Catho- 
lic Confraternity of Christian Doctrine; "Who's 
Who Among Students in American Colleges and 
Universities" — 1947. 





FRANK J. FLEMING B.S. 

3 Massassoit Court. Waltham. Mass. 

st. mary's high school 

Major: Accounting 

Sodality 2. 3. 4; Dramatics (Pub. Mgr.) : Heights 
2, 3 (News Editor); 4 (Editor-in-Chief): Stylus 
4 (Consulting Editor) : Sub Turri; French Acad- 
emy 2; Management Club 2: Dance Committee 3; 
Delegate to Catholic Confraternity of Christian 
Doctrine. 





t9 



JOHN JOSEPH FLEMING A.B. 

1364 Gotham St., Lowell. Mass. 

KEITH ACADEMY 

Major: Sociology 

Sodality 1, 2, 3, 4; Heights 3. 4 (News Editor) ; 
Stylus 2, 3, 4 (Circ. Mgr.) ; French Academy 1, 
2, 3; Pres. Lowell B.C. Undergraduate Club. 




WILLIAM A. FLEMING A.B. 

53 Fairbanks St., Brighton, Mass. 

BOSTON COLLEGE HIGH SCHOOL 

Major: Economics 
Glee Club 4; Sub Turri. 




GolU 

47 



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HENRY G. FRANCIS B.S. 

21 Albion St.. Maiden, Mass. 
MALDEN HIGH SCHOOL 

Major: Mathematics 

Sodality 2. 3; Fulton 3. Heights 1 (Managing Ed. I 
2. 3 (Editor in Ch.) Bowling Club 2; German 
Academy 2; "Who's Who Among Students in 
American Colleges and Universities" — 1947. 



R. POWER FRASER, JR. B.S. 

9 Brook St., Manchester, Mass. 

STORY HIGH SCHOOL 

Major: Economics 

Sodality 1, 2; Sub Turri; Bowling Club 3, 4; 
A. A. Dance Committee 4; Basketball 3. 






STEPHEN MAURICE FRAWLEY A.B. 

378 Ames St., Lawrence, Mass. 

CENTRAL CATHOLIC HIGH SCHOOL 

Major: P re-Medical 

Sodality 1. 2, 3; French Academy 1, 2; Marquette 
1, 2; Pre-Medical Seminar 4; Spanish Academy 1. 



BERNARD J. FRIM A.B. 

69 Wayland St., Dorchester, Mass. 

BOSTON PUBLIC LATIN SCHOOL 

Major: Pre-Medical 

Dramatics 4; German Academy 1: Pre-Medical 
Seminar 4. 




19 





HENRY P. GAITA B.S. 

43 Oakland Ave., Brookline, Mass. 

BROOKLTNE HIGH SCHOOL 

Major: History and Government 

Sodality 1, 2, 3, 4; Heights 1, 2; Aquinas Circle 
4. 



GotU 

47 



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JOSEPH G. GALWAY A.B. 

70 Becket St. 

BOSTON COLLEGE HIGH SCHOOL 
Major: Economics 
Sodality 1, 2. 





THOMAS R. GIBBONS B.S. 

32 Mapleton St., Brighton, Mass. 

ST. columbkille's high school 

Major: Chemistry 

wlins; Club 2: German 



Sodality 1, 2, 3 
Academy 2. 




/9 




ERNEST JOSEPH GRAUSTEIN A.B. 

1657 Cambridge St., Cambridge, Mass. 

BOSTON COLLEGE HIGH SCHOOL 

Major: Education 
Sodality 1, 2, 3. 




GolU 

47 



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JAMES F. GRIFFIN A.B. 

21 Second St.. Framingham, Mass. 
BOSTON COLLEGE HIGH SCHOOL 

Major: Economics 
Management Club 2. 3; French Academy 1, 2. 



EDWARD PAUL GRIGALUS A.B. 

16 Thomas Park, South Boston, Mass. 

SOUTH BOSTON HIGH SCHOOL 

Major: History and Government 
Dramatics 4; Heights 2. 




JAMES J. HARRINGTON B.S.B.A. 

153 Strathmore Rd.. Brighton, Mass. 

BOSTON LATIN SCHOOL 

Major: Accounting 
Sodality 1, 2; Management Club 3, 4; Sub Turri 4. 





WALTER J. GRONDALSKI B.S. 

S Blinkhorn Ave., Lowell, Mass. 

LOWELL HIGH SCHOOL 

Major: Biology 

German Academy 1; Chemists Club 1; Radio 
Club 1. 




19 




PAUL F. HARRIS A.B. 

117 Common St., Watertown, Mass. 
st. Patrick's high school 
Major: Sociology 
Sodality 1, 2, 3; French Academy 1. 2. 



GolU 

47 



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JOHN V. HARVEY A.B. 

378 Park Ave.. Arlington, Mass. 

ARLINGTON HIGH SCHOOL 

Major: History and Government 

Golf 2. 3. 4; Hockey 1, 2. 4; French Academy 
Law and Government (Runner-up N.E. I.G.C.) 





RICHARD JOSEPH HASSEY B.S.B.A. 

8 Holly Ave., Cambridge, Mass. 

st. John's high school 

Major: Accounting 

Sodality 1, 2, 3; Management Club 2; Spanish 
Academy 1, 2; Marketing Club 2. 




19 




JOHN MICHAEL HEHER A.B. GREEK 

6 N. Pleasant St., Taunton, Mass. 

MSGR. JAS. COYLE HIGH SCHOOL 

Major: English 
Sub Turri; French Academy 1, 2. 




GoUe 
47 



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EDWARD J. HICKEY B.S.B.A. 

37 Newburg St., Roslindale, Mass. 

ROSLINDALE HIGH SCHOOL 

Major: Accounting 
Sodality 2: Management Club 2. 



RALPH A. HILTON B.S.B.A. 

24 Neponset Ave., Roslindale, Mass. 

BOSTON COLLEGE HIGH SCHOOL 
Major: Marketing 
Sodality 1, 2; Management Club 2, 3. 





BERNARD C. HOGAN B.S. 

33 Highland Ave.. Everett, Mass. 
st. John's preparatory school 
Major: Education 
Spanish Academy 1, 2. 





LEO J. HINCHEY B.S. 

17 Mayall Rd., Waltham, Mass. 

st. mary's high school 

Major: Biology 

Activities: French Academy 1. 2: Pre-Medical 
Academy 2, 3, 4; Sodality 1, 2, 3, 4. 




/9 




JAMES D. HOGAN B.S.B.A. 

37 Meade St.. Lowell, Mass. 

LOWELL HIGH SCHOOL 

Major: Accounting 

Sodality 1, 2, 3, 4; Law and Government 1, 2; 
Marquette 1, 2; Management Club 2; Fulton 3; 
Heights 3; Stylus, Business Manager 3; Spanish 
Club 1, 2; World Relations League 2, 3, (Secre- 
tary 4). 



GolU 

47 



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JOHN P. HOGAN, JR. A.B. 

37 Meade St.. Lowell, Mass 

KEITH ACADEMY 

Major: Pre-Medical 

Sodality 1, 2, 3; Glee Club 1, 2; French Academy 
1, 2; Pre-Medical Seminar. 






19 



WALTER L. HOLDEN B.S. 

2 Humboldt Avenue, Roxbury, Massachusetts 

BOSTON COLLEGE HIGH SCHOOL 

Major: History and Government 

Activities: Law and Government 3, 4; German 
Academy 1, 2; History Academy 4; Sodality 1, 
2, 3, 4; Heights 1. 




RAYMOND D. HOLLAND, JR. B.S.B.A. 

1763 Commonwealth Ave., Brighton, Mass. 
st. John's preparatory school 
Major: Industrial Management 
Sodality; Glee Club; Management Club. 







RICHARDSON WARD HOWE B.S. 

107 Prospect St.. Reading, Mass. 

SACRED HEART HIGH SCHOOL, NEWTON 

Major: Chemistry 
Fencing 1 ; Chemists Club 3, 4. 



HENRY PAUL JANCSY A.B. 

3 Elwood St., Everett, Mass. 

EVERETT HIGH SCHOOL 

Major: P re-Medical 

Sodality 1. 2, 3: Glee Club 1, 2. 3; Band 1, 2. 
French Academy 1, 2; Pre-Medical Seminar 4. 






EDWARD J. JENNINGS, JR. A.B. 

12 Kennick St., Brighton. Mass. 

BOSTON COLLEGE HIGH SCHOOL 

Major: Economics 

Sodality 1, 2, 3, 4; Dramatics 1, 2. 3 Vice-Pres. 4: 
Boston College Theater; Who's Who in American 
Colleges and Universities. 



THOMAS V. KEATING, JR. A.B. 

53 Upland Rd.. Quincy. Mass. 

QUINCY HIGH SCHOOL 

Major: Economics 
Sodality 1, 2, 3; Spanish Academy 1. 2. 




19 





FRANCIS MICHAEL KEELEY A.B. 

77 Moseley St.. Dorchester, Mass. 

BOSTON PUBLIC LATIN SCHOOL 

Major: Math 

Sodality 1, 2. 3; Fulton 4; Heights 2. 3; French 
Academy 2; Bowling Club 3, 4; Football 2. 





JOHN M. KEELEY A.B. 

20 Bradstreet Ave. 

REVERE HIGH SCHOOL 

Major: History and Government 
Sodality 3, 4. 





JAMES P. KEENAN A.B. 

36 Walnut St.. Milton, Mass. 

THAYER ACADEMY 

Major: Physics 

Band 1, 2; Yacht Club 1, 2. Commodore 4; Co- 
Chairman, Junior Prom. 




f9 




EDWARD J. KELLEHER A.B. 

57 Simpson Ave., Somerville. Mass. 

ST. CLEMENT HIGH SCHOOL 

Major: Physics 

Sodality 1. 2; Fulton 1, 2; Track: Treasurer of 
Junior Class. 



Golle 

47 



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JOHN PATRICK KELLEHER A.B. 

103 Quincy St., Roxbury, Mass. 

BOSTON PUBLIC LATIN SCHOOL 

Major: Social Science 
Sodality 1, 2, 4; Sub Turri 4. 



JOHN H. KELLEY, JR. B.S. 

19 Surrey St., Brighton, Mass. 

BRIGHTON HIGH SCHOOL 

Major: History and Government 

Sodality; Sub Turri 4; Law and Government; 
Marquette; Class Representative. 





RICHARD M. KELLEY A.B. 

757 Boylston St.. Chestnut Hill, Mass. 

MISSION HIGH SCHOOL 

Major: Sociology 

Sodality 3, 4; Aquinas Circle 3; Sub Turri Man- 
aging Editor; Senior Prom Committee; Delegate 
to Confraternity of Christian Doctrine 4, 



DONALD P. KENEFICK A.B. 

336 Hyde Park Ave., Boston. Mass. 

ENGLISH HIGH SCHOOL 
Major: Pre-Medical 
Dramatics 1, 2, 4; Pre-Medical Seminar 3, 4. 




/9 





JOHN EDWARD KENNEDY, JR. A.B. 

9 Nelson Heights 

st. mary's high, milford 

Major: Physics 

Sociality 1; Glee Club 1; Physics Seminar 2; 
Pre-Medical Seminar 4. 



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47 



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THOMAS FRANCIS KENNEDY A.B. 

58 Dustin St.. Brighton, Mass. 

ST. COLOMBKILLE HIGH SCHOOL 

Major: History 






19 



JAMES EDWARD KENNEY B.S. 

25 Dartmouth St., Woburn, Mass. 

WOBURN HIGH SCHOOL 

Major: Economics 
Sodality 1; German Academy 2; Chemists Club 2. 




JAMES FRANCIS KILEY A.B. 

71 Stanton St.. Dorchester. Mass. 

DORCHESTER HIGH SCHOOL 

Major: Sociology 

Sodality 1; Sub Turri; Chairman Cap and Gown 
Committee 4; Senior Prom Committee; Senior 
Class Secretary. 






JOHN FRANCIS KINEAVY A.B. 

40 Easton St.. Allston. Mass. 

BOSTON PUBLIC LATIN SCHOOL 
Major: History and Government 
Baseball 




JOHN F. KILLORY, JR. B.S. 

219 Forest Ave. 

BROCKTON HIGH SCHOOL 

Major: Economics 
Sodality; Baseball. 






PATRICK J. KING B.S. 

213 Ninth St., South Boston, Mass. 

BOSTON ENGLISH HIGH SCHOOL 

Major: History and Government 
Football; Sodality. 



FRANCIS T. KINSELLA A.B. 

35 Cal lender St., Dorchester, Mass. 

BOSTON PUBLIC LATIN SCHOOL 

Major: Sociology 

Sodality 1, 2; Sub Turri; Humanities; Cap and 
Gown Committee 4; Senior Prom Committee. 




t9 





HI 

mil 

% 

RICHARD M. KIRBY A.B. 

103 New Park St., Lynn, Mass. 
st. mary's boys' high school, lynn 
Major: Economics 
Sodality 1, 2, 3, 4; Track 1, 2, 3. 



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47 



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JAMES E. KNOX A.B. 

Star Route. Guilford. Maine 

Major: English 

Sodality 1. 2, 3; Heights 1, 2 Business Manager 3; 
Bowling League 2; Fulton-Marquette 1; French 
Academy 2. 






19 



LOUIS G. KREINSEN A.B. 

77 Nonantum St., Brighton. Mass. 
BOSTON COLLEGE HIGH SCHOOL 
Major: English 
Sodality 1 ; Stylus 1 ; Sub Turri. 




JOSEPH F. LAMBE, JR. A.B. 

132 Middle St., East Weymouth, Mass. 

WEYMOUTH HIGH SCHOOL 

Major: History and Government 
Sodality; Basketball; Golf. 






JOHN L. LARIVEE A.B. 

27 Green St.. Beverly, Mass. 
st. John's preparatory school 
Major: Economics 
Sodality 1, 2; Management Club 3, 4. 




FRANK E. LANDRY, JR. B.S. 

84 Park St., Gardiner, Mass. 

GARDINER HIGH SCHOOL 

Major: Economics 
Sodality 2; Football 3; Track 1, 2, 3, 4. 






WILLIAM H. FINNEGAN A.B. 

114 Linden St.. Everett, Mass. 

BOSTON COLLEGE HIGH SCHOOL 

Major: Pre-Medical 

Sodality 1, 2, 3, 4; Bowling Club 2; German 
Academy 1. President 2; Pre-Medical Seminar 4. 




FREDERICK CHARLES LEONARD, JR. 
B.S.B.A. 

67 Fairmont St., Belmont, Mass. 

BELMONT HIGH SCHOOL 

Major: Accounting 

Sodality 1, 2, 3, 4; Dramatics — Box Office Man- 
ager 2. 3; Heights 1, 2, Society Editor 3; Junior 
rom Committee; Cross and Crown 4; Who's Who 
American Colleges and Universities. 




19 




LEO MICHAEL LINEHAN A.B. (Honors) 

17 Bay St., Watertown, Mass. 

WATERTOWN HIGH SCHOOL 

Major: Classics 

Sodality 1, 2, 3, Prefect 4; Fulton 3; Heights 2, 
Feature Editor 3; Stylus 2. Managing Editor 3; 
Marquette. Secretary 2; Pre-Medical Seminar 4; 
Cheer Leader 3; World Relations League 3, 4; 
Football 2; Cross and Crown 4; W.C.T.U. 



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47 



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THOMAS J. LOFTUS A.B. 

48 Fuller St., Dorchester, Mass. 

BOSTON COLLEGE HIGH SCHOOL 

Major: Pre-Medical 

Sodality 1, 2. 3. 4: Fulton 3; Marquette 1, 2: 
Pre-Medical Seminar 4. 






19 



S. JOHN LOSCOCCO B.S.B.A. 

3 Alpha Rd., Dorchester, Mass. 

BOSTON HIGH SCHOOL OF COMMERCE 

Major: Accounting 

Cross and Crown; Sodality 2; Dramatics Adver- 
tising Manager 2, Executive Secretary 4; Heights 
2, Business Manager 3 ; Junior Prom Committee : 
Rosary Bead Dance Committee 3 ; Ligget Estate 
Dance Committee 2: Who's Who in American Col- 
leges and Universities. 




ARTHUR A. LUCIANO B.S.B.A. 

240 Lindsey St., Fall River, Mass. 

MSGR. COYLE HIGH SCHOOL, TAUNTON 

Major: Accounting 
Sodality 1, 2, 3, 4. 






PAUL L. MALLOY B.S. 

21 Taft St.. Dorchester, Mass. 

BOSTON COLLEGE HIGH SCHOOL 

Major: Chemistry 
Sodality 1, 2. 3, 4; Bowling Club 2. 




THADDEUS FRANCIS MALISZEWSKI B.S. 

275 High St.. Lowell. Mass. 

LOWELL HIGH SCHOOL 

Major: Biology 
German Academy. 






THOMAS L. MALONEY B.S. 

44 Speedwell St.. Dorchester. Mass. 

LAWRENCE ACADEMY 

Major: Education 

Sodality 1. 2. 3. 4; Baseball 1, 2. 3. 4; President 
of Freshman Class; Vice^resident of Junior Class. 



THOMAS M. MALONEY A.B. 

40 Presidents Lane. Quincy. Mass. 

QUINCY HIGH SCHOOL 

Major: History and Government 

Sodality 1. 2. 4; German Academy 1. 2; Mar- 
quette 1. 2; Law and Government 4. 




19 





ROBERT W. MANGENE B.S. 
2] 5 Tremont St.. Maiden, Mass. 

MARIANAPOLIS PREP 
Major: History and Government 
Football 1, 2. 3, 4. 





THOMAS E. MANNING A.B. 

537 East Sixth St.. South Boston. Mass. 

GATE OF HEAVEN HIGH SCHOOL 

Major: Sociology 

Activities: Baseball 1; Heights 1; Sodality 1, 2, 

3, 4. 






f9 



ALBERT JOHN MARCIELLO B.S. 

] 7 Madison Ave., Everett, Mass. 

EVERETT HIGH SCHOOL 
Major: Sociology 
Sodality 1, 2, 3, 4; German Academy 1, 2. 




HENRY ANTHONY MARIANI A.B. 

23 Sixth St., Medford, Mass. 

MEDFORD HIGH SCHOOL 

Major: Pre-Medical. 

Heights 3; French Academy 4; Pre-Medical Sem- 
inar 2, 3, 4; Radio Club 4. 




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JOHN J. McAULIFFE, JR. A.B. 

1 1 Joseph St., Dorchester, Mass. 

BOSTON COLLEGE HIGH SCHOOL 

Major: Social Sciences 

Sodality 3, 4; Aquinas Circle 4; Sub Turri Editor 
in Chief 4; "Who's Who Among Students in 
American Colleges and Universities"; Delegate to 
Confraternity of Christian Doctrine; Senior Prom 
Committee. 



JOHN J. McALEER A.B. 

24 Fairfield St., North Cambridge, Mass. 

st. John's high school 

Major: English 

Activities: Sodality 1, 2, 3, 4; Heights 1, 2, 3; 
Stylus 1, 2, 3, 4; Humanities 1, 2, 3, 4; French 
Academy 1, 2; Classical Academy 1, 2, 3, 4. 





john j. McCarthy b.s. 

2 Ossipee Rd., Somerville, Mass. 

SOMERVILLE HIGH SCHOOL 

Major: Economics 

Track 1, 2; Treasurer of Junior Class; Marquette 
1, 2. 





JOHN GEORGE McCARTHY A.B. 

8 Cliffside Terrace, Maiden, Mass. 

ST. JAMES, HAVERHILL 

Major: History and Government 
Sodality 2; Band 2. 




19 




WILLIAM JOSEPH McCARTHY A.B. 

133 Condor St., East Boston, Mass. 

BOSTON PUBLIC LATIN SCHOOL 
Major: English 
Sodality 1, 2, 3, 4; Sub Turri 4. 



G&IU 

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JOSEPH FRANCIS CYRIL McDAVITT 
B.S.B.A. 

30 Lee St.. Cambridge, Mass. 

CAMBRIDGE HIGH AND LATIN 

Major: Marketing 

Sodality 1, 2, 3, 4: Bowling Club 2, 3. 4; Man- 
agement Club 3, 4; Track 1, 2, 3. 





mm \ f 

EDWARD AUSTIN McDONALD B.S. 

1093 Saratoga St., East Boston, Mass. 

BOSTON COLLEGE HIGH SCHOOL 
Major: Education 
Sodality 1, 2, 3, 4. 





f9 




robert j. Mcdonald a.b. 

1093 Saratoga St., East Boston, Mass. 

BOSTON COLLEGE HIGH SCHOOL 

Major: English 

Sodality 1, 2, 3, 4; Bowling Club 1; Spanish 
Academy 1, 2. 






JOHN J. McGONAGLE A.B. 

85A Boston Ave., Somerville. Mass. 
st. Clement's high school 
Major: Economics 
Sodality 1, 2, 3, 4. 



DOUGALD C. McGILLIVARY A.B. 

33 Halison St.. Brighton, Mass. 

BOSTON COLLEGE HIGH SCHOOL 

Major: Pre-Medical 

Pre-Medical Seminar 4; Bowling Club 4; Junior 
Prom Committee; Sodality 1, 2, 3, 4; Classical 
Academy 1. 






JOHN BRESLIN McGOWAN A.B. 

66 Bedford St.. Woburn. Mass. 

WOBURN HIGH SCHOOL 
Major: P re-Medical 
Sodality: Pre-Medical Seminar; Radio Club. 



ROBERT EMMET McINTYRE B.S.B.A. 

59 Tower St., Forest Hills, Mass. 

BOSTON HIGH SCHOOL OF COMMERCE 

Major: Accounting 
Sodality 1, 2, 3, 4. 




19 





CHARLES P. McKENZIE A.B. 

27 Alder St.. Waltham, Mass. 

ST. CHARLES HIGH SCHOOL, WATERTOWN 

Major: Economics 
Sodality 2: Glee Club 1. 



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THOMAS K. McMANUS 

233 Poplar St.. Roslindale, Mass. 

BOSTON COLLEGE HIGH SCHOOL 

Major: History and Government 
Activities: Sodality 1. 2, 3, 4; Baseball 3. 4. 






19 



RICHARD H. McNEALY B.S. 

19 Eddie St., Quincy, Mass. 

BOSTON COLLEGE HIGH SCHOOL 

Major: Economics 

Sodality I, 2, 3, 4; Heights 3, 4; Stylus 4; Sub 
Turri ; German Academy, Vice-President 2 ; Junior 
Prom Chairman : Senior Ring Committee. 




EDWARD P. McNULTY A.B. 

3858 Washington St., Roslindale, Mass. 

ROSLINDALE HIGH SCHOOL 

Major: P re-Medical 
Pre-Medical Seminar 4. 






JAMES J. McSHARRY B.S. 

319 Reedsdale Rd., Milton, Mass. 

BOSTON COLLEGE HIGH SCHOOL 

Major: Chemistry 

Hockey 1; Heights 3, 4; German Academy 2; 
Pre-Medical Seminar 2; Aquinas Circle 4. 



JAMES J. McTAGGART A.B. 

53 Churchill St.. Milton. Mass. 

MILTON HIGH SCHOOL 

Major: History and Government 

Sodality 2; Glee Club 1; Heights 1; Stylus 1: 
Bowling Club 2: Treasurer of Junior Class. 





WILLIAM FRANCIS MEARA, JR. A.B. 

15 Webster St., South Weymouth, Mass. 

WEYMOUTH HIGH SCHOOL 

Major: History and Government 
Sodality 1, 2, 3, 4; Marquette 1. 





WILLIAM J. MEAD A.B. 

97 Draper St., Dorchester. Mass. 

BOSTON COLLEGE HIGH SCHOOL 

Major: Economics 
Sodality 1. 2, 3. 4; Fulton 3, 4. 




/9 



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RICHARD D. MEDLEY, JR. B.S.B.A. 

15 Churchill Ave.. Arlington. Mass. 

ARLINGTON HIGH SCHOOL 

Major: Economics 
Sodality 1, 2, 3, 4; Fulton 3, 4. 



Qoile. 
47 



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HENRY JOSEPH MEGLEY B.S. 

37 Norfolk Rd., Holbrook. Mass. 

SUMMER HIGH SCHOOL 

Major: Economics 
Sodality 1, 2, 3, 4. 





CHARLES A. METCALF B.S. 

24 Furrior St., Revere, Mass. 

REVERE HIGH SCHOOL 

Major: Sociology 
Activities: French Academy 1. 2. 




19 




ROBERT JAMES MOORE, JR. B.S.B.A. 

23 Radford Lane, Dorchester, Mass. 

DORCHESTER HIGH SCHOOL 
Major: Marketing . 
Management 3, 4. 







THOMAS E. MORAN B.S. 

40 Glide St., Dorchester, Mass. 

BOSTON CATHEDRAL HIGH SCHOOL 

Major: Economics 

Sodality 1, 2, 3, 4; Aquinas Circle 4; Football 1, 
2, 3; Law and Government 1, 2; Spanish Club 1, 
2; Vice-President of the Senior Class; Who's Who 
in American Colleges and Universities. 



THOMAS MAURICE MORAN B.S. 

57 Ackers Ave., Brookline, Mass. 

BROOKLINE HIGH SCHOOL 

Major: Chemistry 
Glee Club: Band; Chemists Club. 





THOMAS WILLIAM MORAN B.S. 

5 Noyes Terrace, Lynn, Mass. 

LYNN ENGLISH HIGH SCHOOL 

Major: History and Government 
Sodality 1, 2, 3, 4; Aquinas Circle 4. 



PAUL VINCENT MOYNIHAN A.B. 

15 Victoria St., Dorchester, Mass. 
st. Joseph's preparatory seminary, new jersey 

Sodality 2, 3, 4; Marquette 1; Heights 3, 4; Fulton 
4; French Academy 3; World Relations League 
3, 4. 




19 





JOHN E. MULLIGAN B.S. 

150 Lake St.. Weymouth. Mass. 

WEYMOUTH HIGH SCHOOL 
Major: History and Government 
Sodality 1, 2, 3, 4. 



G&lle 
47 



ae 




JOHN P. MULVIHILL A.B. 

49 Priscilla Rd., Chestnut Hill. Mass. 

BROOKLINE HIGH SCHOOL 

Major: History and Government 

Sodality 3; Fulton 2; Marquette 1; Chairman, 
Sophomore Prom; Baseball; Hockey. 





f9 



JOHN J. MURPHY B.S. 

55 Litchfield St., Brighton, Mass. 

BRIGHTON HIGH SCHOOL 

Major: Biology 

Sodality 1, 2, 3, 4; German Academy 1, 2; Pre- 
Medical Seminar 4. 




ROBERT J. MURPHY B.S.B.A. 

17 Archdale Rd., Roslindale, Mass. 

BOSTON ENGLISH HIGH SCHOOL 
Major: Accounting . 
Sodality 1, 2, 3, 4. 




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THOMAS J. MURPHY, JR. 

85 Manet Rcl, Chestnut Hill, Mass. 

SACRED HEART HIGH SCHOOL, NEWTON 

Major: Economics 

Activities: Sociality 1: Heights 1; French Acad- 
emy 1. 



HVSVaBBH 

JOHN J. MURPHY B.S. 

55 Dartmouth St., Belmont, Mass. 

BELMONT HIGH SCHOOL 

Major: History 

Hockey 1, 2, 3, 4, Captain 4; Baseball 1, 2, 3, 4; 
President of Sophomore Class; Junior A.A. Rep- 
resentative. 





EDMUND J. NAUGHTON A.B. 

324 Burns St.. Forest Hills. New York 

CRAXWELL PREP 

Major: English 

Sodality 2. 3. 4: Fulton 3: Heights 2. 3. 4: Stylus 
2. 3. Editor 4: Sub Turri 4: Marquette 2: Human- 
ities Editor 2. 3; International Relations Club 2. 3. 



RAYMOND LAURENCE NEE A.B. 

21 Hutchinson St.. Dorchester, Mass. 

ROXBURY MEMORIAL HIGH SCHOOL 

Major: Pre-Medical 

Sodalitv 1. 2. 4: Sub Turri; Pre-Medical Seminar 
4 : Chairman Senior Prom : Chairman Sub Turri 
Dances. 




19 





PETER OBERTO 

111 Pennsylvania Ave.. Somerville. Mass 

SOMERVILLE HIGH SCHOOL 
Major: Math 
Band 1. 



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DAVID JAMES O'CONNOR, JR. B.S.B.A. 

24 Rose St.. Somerville. Mass. 

st. John's high school 

Major: Accounting 

Sodality 1. 2. 3. 4: Bowling Club 1. 2. 3. 4: Man- 
agement Club 3. 4. 






JOHN E. O'CONNOR B.S. 
45 Kenneth St., West Roxbury, Mass. 

BOSTON ENGLISH HIGH SCHOOL 

Major: Accounting 
Activities: French Academy 1, 2; Sodality 1, 2, 3, 4. 




19 




JOHN J. O'CONNOR B.S. 

291 Emerson St., South Boston, Mass. 

GATE OF HEAVEN HIGH SCHOOL 

Major: Physics ■ 

Sodality 2, 3, 4; Bowling Club 3; German Acad- 
emy 3; Physics Seminar 4. 



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JOHN E. OGLE B.S.B.A. 

50 Wesson Ave., Quincy, Mass. 

BOSTON COLLEGE HIGH SCHOOL 

Major: Accounting 

Sodality 1, 2, 3. 4; French Academy 1, 2; Mar- 
quette 1. 



WILLIAM EDWARD O'HALLORAN A.B. 

377 Walnut St., Newtonville. Mass. 

NEWTON HIGH SCHOOL 

Major: English 

Sodality 4: Dramatics 4, Secretary-Treasurer 4; 
Fulton 1; Bowling Club 2; Radio Club 1; Co- 
Chairman of Junior Prom ; Assistant to A.A. Rep- 
resentative 4. 





WILLIAM J. O'SULLIVAN A.B. 

Bedford Rd.. Lincoln, Mass. 

PORTSMOUTH PRIORY, PORTSMOUTH, R.I. 

Major: Physics 
Sodality 1, 2; Physics Seminar 2. 





PAUL J. O'SULLIVAN A.B. 

24 Dryid St.. Dorchester, Mass. 

BOSTON COLLEGE HIGH SCHOOL 

Major: Physics 
Sodality 1, 2, 3, 4. 




19 




EDWARD JOSEPH OWENS A.B. 

12 Ames Ave., Lowell, Mass. 

KEITH ACADEMY 

Major: History and Government 
Sodality 3, 4; French Academy; Humanities. 



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PAUL GERARD PAGET A.B. 

16 Mapleton St., Brighton, Mass. 

BOSTON PUBLIC LATIN SCHOOL 

Major: Sociology 

Dramatics 1, 2, 3, 4, Chairman of House Com- 
mittee 4. 





JOHN E. PENDERGAST A.B. 

216 Rutherford Ave., Charlestown, Mass. 

st. philip's prep 

Major: English 

Sodality 1, 2, 3, 4; Heights 1, 2, 3; Aquinas 
Circle 4. 




19 




ALPHONSE J. PETKAUSKAS A.B. 

402 East 5th St., South Boston, Mass. 

BOSTON PUBLIC LATIN SCHOOL 

Major: History and Government 
Sodality 3, 4; French Academy 4. 




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Cf& 




CHARLES PUOPOLO B.S. 

870 Broadway, Everett, Mass. 

EVERETT HIGH SCHOOL 

Major: Sociology 
Pre-Medical Seminar 1. 2; Sodality 1, 2, 3, 4. 




EDMOND J. POWER B.S. 

13 Birch St., Everett, Mass. 

EVERETT HIGH SCHOOL 

Major: History and Government 
Sodality 3; Marquette 1. 





JOSEPH JAMES REDDING B.S. 

19 Clementine Pk. 

BOSTON ENGLISH HIGH SCHOOL 

Major: Education 
Sodality 1, 2, 3, 4; Radio 3. 





WILLIAM QUINN B.S. 

32 Brown St., Waltham, Mass. 

HORACE MANN SCHOOL, NEW YORK CITY 

Major: History 
Football 1, 2, 3, 4; Basketball. 




19 




JOHN PAUL REGAN B.S. 

87 Brooks St., Brighton, Mass. 

AUSTIN-COTE ACADEMY, NEW HAMPSHIRE 

Major: History 

Football 1. 2; Vice-President of Junior Class; 
Fulton 4. 



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47 



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PAUL JOSEPH REYNOLDS B.S. 

28 Paulina St.. Somerville, Mass. 
st. john's high school 
Major: Physics 
Sodality 1, 2, 3, 4; Physics Seminar 4. 






19 



HAROLD JOHN ROBERTS A.B. 

129 Cornell St.. Roslindale, Mass. 

BRIGHTON HIGH SCHOOL 

Major: Sociology 

Sodality 1, 2. 3. 4: Aquinas Circle 4: Sub Turri. 
Business Manager 4; Who's Who in American Col- 
leges and Universities. 





RALPH D. ROBERTSON B.S. 

184 Spring St.. West Roxbury, Mass. 

ROXBURY MEMORIAL HIGH SCHOOL 

Major: Math 

Sodality 3 r 4; Heights 1; Bowling Club 3. 4; 
Cross and Crown 4; Delegate to Confraternity of 
Christian Doctrine 4: Who's Who in American 
Colleges and Universities. 






THOMAS J. ROBINSON A.B. 

78 Wilbur St.. Everett. Mass. 

EVERETT HIGH SCHOOL 
Major: Economics 
Sodalitv 1- 2. 3. 4: French Academv 1, 2. 



CHARLES M. ROGERS A.B. 

23 Norfolk Rd.. Holbrook. Mass. 

BOSTON COLLEGE HIGH SCHOOL 

Major: English 

Sophomore Class President: Chairman of Fresh- 
man Prom : Stylus 1 ; Dramatic Society. President 4. 





JAMES A. RYAN B.S. 

319 Cherry St., West Newton, Mass. 

NEWTON HIGH SCHOOL 

Major: History and Government 

Sodality 1, 2, 3, 4; Aquinas Circle 3; Bowling 
Club 3, 4. 





HENRY JOHN RUSH B.S.B.A. 

428 Hyde Park Ave., Roslindale, Mass. 

SOUTH BOSTON HIGH SCHOOL 

Major: Accounting 
Sodality 1, 2, 3, 4; Management Club 3, 4. 




f9 




PAUL JOSEPH RYDER A.B. (Honors) 

35 Oakridge St.. Dorchester, Mass. 

BOSTON PUBLIC LATIN SCHOOL 

Major: Economics 

Sodality 1, 4; Glee Club 1. 2. 4; Band 1, 2; Chair- 
man of Junior Prom; World Relations League 4; 
Cross and Crown 4; Who's Who in American 
Colleges and Universities. 





LOUIS P. SAMMARTINO B.S.B.A. 

473 Academy Ave., Providence, R.I. 

MOUNT PLEASANT HICH SCHOOL 

Major: Business Management 
Football 2. 3; Sodality 1. 2. 3. 4: Glee Club 4. 






DONALD HENRY ST. JOHN B.S.B.A. 

168A Brookline. Cambridge, Mass. 

CAMBRIDGE LATIN SCHOOL 
Major: Marketing 
Track. 



19 




ROY V. SCHENA B.S. 

431 Broadway, Somerville. Mass. 

MEDFORD HIGH SCHOOL 
Major: History 
baseball; Hockey. 




G&IU 

47 



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JOHN R. SERAFINI B.S. 

17 Phelps St.. Salem. Mass. 

SALEM HIGH SCHOOL 

Major: History and Government 
Activities: World Relations League 3, 4. 



WILLIAM SHAFFERMAN B.S.B.A. 

37 Holbom St.. Roxbury, Mass. 

SOMERVILLE HIGH SCHOOL 
Major: Marketing 
Dramatics 3; Bowling Club 3. 






JOHN A. SHEEHAN B.S. 

141 Aldrich St., Roslindale, Mass. 

BOSTON PUBLIC LATIN SCHOOL 

Major: Physics 
Activities: Physics Seminar 3, 4. 



JOHN M. SHEEHAN A.B. 

6 Peter Parley Road, Jamaica Plain, Mass. 

BOSTON COLLEGE HIGH SCHOOL 

Major: English 

Activities: Fulton 1, 2; Heights 2, 3; German 
Academy 1, 2; Humanities 2; Class Representa- 
tive 1. 




19 





FRANCIS W. SIDLAUSKAS A.B. 

918 East Broadway, South Boston, Mass. 

BOSTON PUBLIC LATIN SCHOOL 

Major: English 

Sodality 1, 2, 3; Dramatics 1, 2, 4 President 3; 
Stylus 2 ; Co-Chairman Stylus Book Fair 2 ; One- 
Act Playshop 1, 2; Dramatic Society Production 
Manager 1, 2. 3, 4. 



GalU 



47 



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CHARLES H. SMITH B.S. 

103 Lincoln Rd., Medford. Mass. 

MEDFORD HIGH SCHOOL 

Major: Accounting 
Activities: Sodality 1, 2; Management Club 2. 






19 



THOMAS J. SOLES A.B. 
38 Warren Ave., Woburn, Mass. 

BOSTON COLLEGE HIGH SCHOOL 

Major: Sociology 
Sodality 1, 2. 3, 4. 




LOUIS VINCENT SORGI A.B. 

258 Bluehills Pkwy., Milton. Mass. 

MILTON CENTRAL HIGH SCHOOL 

Sodality 1, 2, 3, 4; Glee Club 1, .2, 3, 4; Pre- 
Medical Seminar 3; Baseball. 






DANIEL H. SULLIVAN B.S. 

89 Waltham St., Newton, Mass. 

NEWTON HIGH SCHOOL 

Major: Education 
Activities: Marquette 1, 2. 



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TINO A. SPATOLA B.S.B.A. 

125 Fuller St., Dorchester, Mass. 

HYDE PARK HIGH SCHOOL 

Major: Marketing 

Sodality 1, 2: Band 1, 2; Management Club 1, 2; 
Sub Turri. 






JAMES F. SULLIVAN B.S. 

44 Union St.. Brighton, Mass. 

ST. COLUMBKILLE 

Major: Accounting 
Marquette 1, 2; Radio Club 1, 2, 3. 



PAUL LEO SULLIVAN B.S. 

114 Dedham St., Newton, Mass. 

NEWTON HIGH SCHOOL 

Major: Sociology 

Sodality 1, 2, 3, 4; Heights 1; Bowling Club 1; 
Cheer Leader 3; Vice-President of Junior Class. 




19 






/ 1 



RAYMOND JOSEPH SULLIVAN B.S.B.A. 

53 Cottage St.. Framingham. Mass. 
FRAMINGHAM HIGH SCHOOL 

Major: Marketing 

Sodality 1. 2; Glee Club 1, 2; Band 1; Spanish 
Academy 1, 2; Management Club 2; Marketing 
Club 2, 3. 



GolU 

47 



ae 




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ROBERT DANIEL SULLIVAN B.S. 

22 Pleasant St.. Mansfield. Mass. 

MSGR. COYLE HIGH SCHOOL 

Major: History 
Baseball 1, 2, 3; Fulton 3: Pre-Medical Seminar. 






WALTER J. SULLIVAN, JR. B.S. 

15 Annapolis Rd., Milton, Mass. 

MILTON HIGH SCHOOL 
Major: Economics 
Sodality 1, 2,. 3; Track 1, 2. 



19 




DANIEL M. SURRETTE B.S.B.A. 

10 High St.. Beverly Farms. Mass. 

BEVERLY HIGH SCHOOL 

Major: Accounting ' 
Activities: Management Club 3, 4. 




Goile- 



47 



ae 





PAUL R. SUTLIFF B.S.B.A. 

25 Helena Rd., Dorchester, Mass. 

BOSTON ENGLISH HIGH SCHOOL 

Ma[or: Marketing 

Sodality 1, 2, 3; Bowling Club 3; French Acad- 
emy 3. 



ALBERT J. TWOMEY B.S. 

32 Joses Court. Stoughton. Mass. 

SETON HALL 

Major: Economics 

Football 1, 2, 3, 4; Baseball 1, 2, 3, 4; Basket- 
ball 1, 2, 3. 






CHARLES E. THOMAS B.S. 

22 Marcella St., Roxbury, Mass. 

ROXBURY MEMORIAL HIGH SCHOOL 

Major: Mathematics 

Sodality 1, 2, 3, 4; Marquette 1, 2; Football 
Varsity Manager 1, 2, 3; Bowling Club 2, 3; 
Fulton 3, 4; Sub Turri Circulation Manager: 
Dean's List 3, 4; Delegate to the Confraternity of 
Christian Doctrine 4; "Who's Who Among Stu- 
dents in American Colleges and Universities" — 
1947. 




MARTIN B. UNDERWOOD B.S. 

34 Oxford St., Winchester, Mass. 

WINCHESTER HIGH SCHOOL 

Major: Marketing 

Sodality 1, 2; Management Club 1, 2; Cardinal 
Newman Literary Club 1. 



f9 





JOHN A. VITALE, JR. B.S. 

122 Plain St.. Rockland. Mass. 

ROCKLAND HIGH SCHOOL 

Major: Economics 

Sodality 1, 2. 3, 4; Band 1; Heights 1; Aquinas 
Circle 4. 



G&IU 



47 



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WILLIAM R. WALL B.S. 

35 West Ashland St., Brockton. Mass. 

BROCKTON HIGH SCHOOL 
Major: Economics 






19 



JOHN D. WALSH A.B. 

41 Greaton Rd., West Roxbury, Mass. 

BOSTON ENGLISH HIGH SCHOOL 

Major: History and Government 

Sodality 3; Law and Government; Marquette 1 
Sub Turri. 




GEORGE V. WATTENDORF B.S. 

720 Columbia Rd.. Dorchester, Mass. 

BOSTON COLLEGE HIGH SCHOOL 
Major: Social Science 
Football 1. 2. 







HENRY WILLIAM WELCH, JR. B.S. 

36 Oliver St., Framingham, Mass. 

FRAMINGHAM HIGH SCHOOL 

Major: Sociology 

Sodality 1, 2, 3, 4; Band 1. 2; French Academy 1; 
Pre-Medical Seminar 1, 2; Heights 2, Society 
Editor 3. Managing Editor 4; Co-Chairman of 
Junior Prom ; Cheer Leader 3 ; Delegate to Con- 
fraternity of Christian Doctrine 4; Sub Turri Co- 
Editor 4; Stylus 4. 



JOSEPH L. WILKINSON A.B. 

13 Lowe St., Peabody, Mass. 

PEABODY HIGH SCHOOL 
Major: Economics 
Fulton 3, 4; Marquette 1, 2. 





CHARLES ARTHUR WILLIAMS A.B. 

119 Clinton St., Brockton, Mass. 

BOSTON PUBLIC LATIN SCHOOL 

Major: History 
Sodality 1, 2, 3; French Academy 1, 2. 





PHILIP E. WILLET B.S. 

21 Rice St., Newton Center, Mass. 

LAWRENCE HIGH SCHOOL 

Major: Economics 

Marquette 1. 2: President 1; Track 1. 2: Yacht 
Club 3, 4. 




19 




CLIFFORD JOSEPH XIARHOS B.S. 

319 Allston St., Brighton. Mass. 

BOSTON PUBLIC LATIN SCHOOL 

Major: Math 

Sodality 1, 2. 3, 4; Heights 3; German Academy. 
Secretary 3. 





CIRO R. YANNACO B.S. 

38 Stuart St.. Everett, Mass. 

EVERETT HIGH SCHOOL 

Major: History 














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SODALITY 



In the year 1584 there came into being, 
at the approval of the Holy Father, the religi- 
ous company known as the Soladity of the 
Immaculate Conception. This society in honor 
of our Blessed Mother has become the leading 
spiritual organization in every Jesuit College. 
So also have we, the students of Boston 
College, implored of Dear Mary that She 
might take us unto Herself and guide us in 
our every good undertaking and comfort us 
in our seeming failures. 

With the rules of ardent devotion, rever- 



ence, and filial love towards the Blessed Virgin 
Mary we have prayed, often perhaps poorly; 
but then even the poor shall see God, that we 
as Catholic men might gain that degree of 
personal sanctification which in turn can but 
lead to the fields of real Catholic Action. 
Under the most especial patronage of the 
Mother of God each sodalist, whether he be 
of Boston College or elsewhere, can not but 
reflect the love which his Mother has for him. 
One need only ask of Mary to assist. 




AQUINAS CIRCLE 



The main function of the Philosophy 
Academy, an organization conducted for 
Juniors and Seniors, is to afford its members 
opportunity to study and discuss general 
philosophical principles and apply these prin- 
ciples to social and political questions of the 
day. 

The philosopher-king, Plato said, was 
the best type of ruler, for in him would be 
combined the wisdom of the ages and the 
ability for true-thinking leadership. Several 
hundred years later the Scholastic Jesuit 
Order founded its first school to train men 
in wise leadership. For five hundred years 
the tradition of philosophical studies has 
endured till we find it today, placed in a 



position of note, heightened by present con- 
ditions. In keeping with this tradition the 
Philosophy Academy was founded. Its found- 
ing came as a solution to the greatest difficulty 
of philosophy, the problem of intergrating 
the various branches and applying their meta- 
physical ideas to ordinary physical living. 
The solution to such a problem is best found 
in open discussion in which all difficulties can 
be clarified. 

The Philosophy Academy owes its con- 
tinued success to the untiring efforts of its 
Moderator, Rev. John A. O'Brien, S.J., Jack 
McAuliffe, President, and Dick Kelley, Secre- 
tary. 




STUDENT ATHLETIC ASSOCIATION 



During the football season the Student 
Athletic Association was well occupied with 
work. Ed Flaherty as Senior A. A. Rep., ably 
assisted by Power Frazer and Bill O'Halloran, 
promoted victory dances following each foot- 
ball game. The various dances were held 
"Under the Tower", at the Copley Plaza, the 
Hotel Kenmore, and the Hotel Continental. 
On the eve of the Holy Cross game a monster 
rally and smoker was held at the Boston City 
Club with Ed Flaherty introducing the squad 
members and various celebrities from the 
sporting world. It was the function of these 
fellows, Flaherty, O'Halloran, and Frazer to 
act as go-betweens in dealings of the students 
with the Athletic Association and to organize 
the students for the various athletic meets 



and games. In these capacities they acted 
capably and efficiently. 

In the years to come we feel that the 
future A.A.'s should fight, as has the present 
organization, for the support of every sport 
or activity that takes place at Boston College, 
whether that sport be football, hockey, basket- 
ball, baseball, tennis, or the fencing team. 
Then, and only then, can the students be 
amply represented in all such functions; then, 
and only then, will there be complete co-opera- 
tion between the students, the members of 
the various teams, and the controlling mem- 
bers of the faculty; then, and only then, will 
happy days return, happy days for all and 
prosperous days for all. 




DRAMATIC SOCIETY 



So far this year, the Dramatic Society 
under the direction of Father Bonn, produced 
two plays — "Othello" and "The Works". They 
were both sterling performances and thor- 
oughly enjoyed by every one present. Charlie 
Rogers and Ed Jennings were the stars of 
"Othello", while John Stokes had the lead 
in the play "The Works". Bill O'Halloran 
also did a very capable job in both produc- 
tions. The plays were produced by Frank 
Sidlauskas. Paul Paget also deserves a great 
deal of praise for his work on the Produc- 
tion Staff. 

Aside from dramatics, the society re- 



cently moved its quarters to their new Bohe- 
mian and fustian den and workshop in the 
quadrangle at Cardinal O'Connell Hall. The 
erstwhile actors rolled up their collective 
sleeves and went to work with paint brushes, 
hammers and other unfustian articles. By the 
end of the year they boasted the best offices 
and quarters of any of the under-grad soci- 
eties and undoubtedly the most bizarre, fea- 
turing black corridors, a sham Elizabethan 
office, and a workshop in Chinese red and 
Russian blue, lined with Viking shields. The 
new quarters evoked spontaneous dismay and 
yet fustian approbation. 




THE HEIGHTS 



The Heights went to the top during the 
past year. Previously, it had been just a 
mediocre bi-weekly. Definitely, something had 
to be done to bring it up and beyond its 
pre-war level. 

Its Editor-in-Chief Arthur Fagan, Jr., 
and Frank Fleming, of the College of Busi- 
ness Administration realized the plight of 
their "brain child". First they planned for 
a weekly publication. Next was make-up. 
Managing Editor Hank Welch chose Bob 
Sherer, a junior, to assist him in revamping 
the format. Hank dressed up the paper and 
constantly called for more news. This was 
where Dan Sullivan of Newton came in. 

Dan was named News Editor and it was 
his task to keep the reporters going. His motto 
was: "If you can't find news, get it — even 
if you have to make it." 

The Editors sent out a call for more re- 
porters, more photographers, more cartoon- 
ists, re-write men. A number of men reported, 



mostly freshmen and sophomores, but they 
reported. Fr. Joseph Mclnnis, S.J. Moderator, 
took these aspirants under his wing and 
groomed them for their esteemed positions 
as members of the Fourth Estate. 

In January, Frank Fleming graduated. Dan 
Sullivan became Editor-in-Chief, Art Fagan 
was given the job of snapping the whip as 
News Editor. Hank Welch also graduated and 
was succeeded by Bob Sherer as Managing 
Editor. 

The ground work had been laid. Now it 
was necessary to keep the ball rolling. W. G. 
Hayward, B.C. Director of Publicity, was 
appointed Moderator. The seeds planted by 
Fr. Mclnnis had grown into a strong tree and 
the fruits of his efforts blossomed. 

Reviewing the past year, the Editors and 
their moderators could gaze upon one of the 
best success stories of any extra-curricular 
activity. The Heights was once again a first 
class college paper. 




STYLUS 



The Stylus started this year with a new 
staff and new ideas. The Stylus was another 
war casualty and the new staff had to create 
a new Stylus. 

The job was hard because all the old timers 
in the student body and the faculty remem- 
bered the peak Stylus editions that came out 
just before the war and the men on the staff 
knew they were being compared to it. 

For the first half of the year under Editor 
Ed Naughton, the tercentenary issue comme- 
morating the Jesuit Martyrs was made up. 
There was a new Stylus cover with this issue, 
photographs on the inside cover and through 
the magazine. Typographically it was the best 
Stylus since '42 and the staff was encouraged 
by a good start. 

After the Christmas vacation George Burke 



took over as editor bringing out a February 
issue with a photograph on the new cover, 
a feature of war poems, and prize short 
stories and essays from the December con- 
test run by the Stylus. Now photographs have 
taken an important part in the new Stylus and 
the college magazine was keeping pace with 
the newest trends on the newsstands. 

Through the year the idea of making quality 
interesting was in every line and photograph 
of the Stylus. As the magazine picked up 
momentum more articles were submitted and 
the editors worried less about making dead- 
lines and more about making up the next 
edition and maybe the one after that. The 
letters and congratulations the Stylus had be- 
fore the war were coming in again and Busi- 
ness Manager Dan Ahern found it was a little 
easier getting ads. 







JOHN J. McAULIFFE 
Editor-in-Chief 



RICHARD M. KELLEY 

Managing Editor 



HAROLD J. ROBERTS 

Business Manager 



ACTIVITIES 
Frank J. Fleming Paul V. Moynihan 

Mark V. Carr William J. Akerman. Jr. 



FEATURES PUBLICITY 

William J. McCarthy Thomas O'Connor 

Lawrence R. Byron Raymond L. Nee 

James O'Brien James F. Kiley 

SPORTS 
Richard J. Fitzgerald Paul D. Cummings 




HENRY W. WELCH. JR. 

Co-Editor 




CHARLES E. THOMAS 
Associate Editor 




EDMUND L. FLAHERTY 

Assistant Business Manager 



SUB TURRI 



Labor and Management, we are told, play 
an important part in production. In the pro- 
duction of the SUB TURRI this was especially 
true. Here is the list of men who produced it. 

John McAuliffe, the Editor-in-chief, plan- 
ned the book and arranged for the engraving, 
printing and photography. Henry W. Welch, 
Jr., the Co-Editor, was instrumental in arrang- 
ing the activities and organizations and fea- 
ture sections of the book. Harold J. Roberts, 
The Business Manager, was the salesman of 
advertising space and kept liabilities in proper 
balance. Edmund L. Flaherty took over the 
business of the SUB TURRI in January and 
by his work the final cost of the book was 
reduced as much as possible. 



Richard M. Kelley, the Managing Editor 
was the fellow who had all the worry and 
responsibility of directing and publishing of 
the SUB TURRI when the two Editors and 
Business Manager graduated in January. 
Charles E. Thomas was the circulation Man- 
ager and acted in an advisory capacity on 
editorial and make-up policies. 

Truly these men have lived up to all expec- 
tations and have revealed themselves more 
than equal to the assignment. 

Down through the ages this book will al- 
ways be a source of pleasant memories to 
us all. 




CLASSICAL ACADEMY 



Under the able and tested tutelage of its 
Moderator and the participation of its many 
active and energetic members, this Academy, 
the font of knowledge and culture, and this 
in the classical humanism of ancient Greece 
and Rome. 

The chief aims of the Classical Academy 
are twofold. Firstly, to arouse in the students, 
through its quarterly bulletin, "The Human- 
ities", a keener interest in the Classical Hu- 
manism of Greece and Rome as a basis of 
Christian Humanism. Secondly, to supplement 
the Latin and Greek courses by inspirational 
lectures, discussions and readings in the 
literature and art of Greece and Rome. Em- 
phasis is especially placed on the relation 
of the ancient classics to modern civilization. 



At the present time, the program for this 
"revivalist movement" includes a systematic 
study of Latin and Greek hymns and inspi- 
rational lectures and readings. The first lec- 
ture given this year was delivered by Rev. 
Leo McCauley, S.J., who spoke on the Greek 
Alphabet. 

The name of its publication was changed 
to that of the present day renowned and 
admired in academic circles as "The Human- 
ities". For many years now, this learned 
society has been under the direction of Rev. 
Oswald A. Reinhalter, S.J., who has worked 
ardently and diligently in the interest of this 
circle to assure it the important place it de- 
serves in academic life at Boston College. 




GERMAN ACADEMY 



The German Academy is an organization 
devoted exclusively to the interests of students 
of that language and its history dates from 
the earliest days of the College. The number 
of German students in the Freshman and 
Sophomore classes has been exceptionally high 
in the recent year, and since the majority be- 
long to the German Academy, it is one of the 



largest undergraduates organizations at Bos- 
ton College. 

The Moderator of the German Academy is 
Dr. Boulanger, whose kind counsel and assist- 
ance made the various activities possible. To 
the officers of the club, much credit is due for 
arranging another pleasant year for the mem- 
bers of the Academy and their friends. 




MARQUETTE DEBATING SOCIETY 



The Marquette Debating Society is surely 
the most important of the lower class activ- 
ities. On the battle-scarred floors of the Mar- 
quette room every Monday afternoon you can 
hear youthful orators thundering to heaven 
pro and con on any subject. If you have the 
unhappy fortune to be a believer in the quaint 
notion that Freshmen and Sophomores cannot 
stand on their feet and talk, then the most 
overpowering and all-sufficient argument that 
could set your misguided thoughts aright 
would be a five minute observation of the 
typical Marquette open forum when the young 



Ciceros and Websters jump into speech. It 
is rumored that some of the more noted 
talkers of the Class of '47, whose present 
eloquent flow is of such a nature as to suggest 
a gift of nature, are really not the natural 
elocutionists they seem to be, but owe much 
to the training they received in the Marquette. 
Since the end of the war, intercollegiate 
debating has not reached the wide scope it 
enjoyed prior to it. Another year should see 
the Marquette of old, represented by new 
faces. This year's society had as its successful 
President, John Nicholson, The Moderator was 
Fr. Gerry, S.J. 




FULTON DEBATING SOCIETY 



The Fulton Debating Society, oldest and 
most widely known extracurricular activity 
at Boston College, this year continued the 
unbroken string of forensic successes which 
were inaugurated seventy-nine years ago in 
1868 by Father Robert Fulton, S.J. The 
Society, originally known as the "Senior 
Debating Society", took the name of its 
founder in 1890. Today the Fulton, with its 
yearly schedule of intercollegiate debates and 



weekly debates within the society, develops 
the capacity of thinking clearly and quickly 
in the stress and strain of hostile contention 
and it offers to Juniors and Seniors a splendid 
opportunity to prepare themselves for an 
active part in public life. 

The Society had a very successful year 
with Rev. Richard G. Shea, S.J., as Moderator 
ably assisted by the officers, Messrs. Saunders, 
Mulvehill and Moynihan. 




PRE-MED SEMINAR 



Boston College is proud of the splendid 
preparation secured by its Pre-Med students. 
However to obtain the same, a rather heavy 
class schedule has been required, thus making 
it difficult for these future M.D.'s to engage 
in extracurricular activities. Thirteen years 
ago they decided to have an activity of their 
own. This is one of the most select groups of 
men in the college. 

This Seminar has been a very practical 
forerunner of Medical school. Throughout its 



meetings the theory of Catholic Ethics and 
morality in medical practice has predomi- 
nated, thus equipping our aspiring medicos 
with apt, scientific, ethical solutions to prob- 
lems they are bound to meet. 

In the Seminar, the students find means of 
greater cooperation with their professors and 
a more intelligent appreciation of their spe- 
cial advantages, as well as the development 
of deeper friendships among themselves. 




PHYSICS SEMINAR 



Since its tentative beginning in the early 
part of 1933, the Physics Seminar owes its 
existence and growth to the persistent and 
constant efforts of Rev. John A. Tobin, S.J., 
who has perfected the program to assure all 
members the greatest possible theoretical in- 
struction and empirical contact. 



Its work is to supplement the regular curri- 
culum of the B.S. in Physics course. This is 
accomplished by a weekly series of lectures 
given by graduates and undergraduates stu- 
dents majoring in Physics. Each lecturer does 
some research on his own time and initiative 
and then gives a lecture followed by a question 
and answer period. 




RADIO CLUB 



The Radio Club was organized in 1919. 
Its purpose is to inculcate and develop in 
the students an intimate knowledge of the 
modern application of radio telegraphy and 
telephony. The original equipment was a gift 
of His Eminence, the late William Cardinal 
O'Connell, D.D., Archbishop of Boston. With 
the march of progress in the science of radio 
many radical changes in the equipment have 
taken place. At the present time the station, 
operating under the official call letters W-IPR, 
is equipped with a one-hundred watt conti- 
nuous wave transmitter, operating on the 
amateur harmonically related transmission 
bands. In addition an experimental 56 to 60 



megacycle transmitter and receiver forms an 
auxiliary unit for telephonic and telegraphic 
operation in the quasi-optical portion of the 
spectrum. The main receiving equipment is 
of the most modern short-wave superhetero- 
dyne that responds to all amateur and im- 
portant commercial frequency bands. The 
signals from W-IPR have have been heard 
the world over, and the receiving equipment 
is equally effective. The station is located in 
the Department of Physics. The elevation of 
the second floor of the Science Building, where 
the transmitter is situated is 220.7 feet above 
mean sea level, and its latitude is 42°20'8.6", 
and its longitude is 71°10'5.6". The Moderator 
is Rev. Charles G. Crowley, S.J. 



.0 *■?"• 




THE YACHT CLUB 



One of the youngest of Boston College's 
organizations, the Yacht Club, has been mak- 
ing great progress over almost insurmountable 
difficulties. In spite of the fact that they are 
without facilities of any kind, that their head- 
quarters are far from any suitable body of 
water, and there are no boats, not to mention 
a boathouse, the club has to its credit a record 
of achievement. 

During its infancy, the crews representing 
the club did all their racing on the Charles 
River, off the M.I.T. sailing pavilion. In the 
last few years, however, they have partici- 
pated in regattas held at the United States 
Coast Cuard Academy on the Thames River 
at New London, Connecticut, and at Brown 



University on the Seekonk River in Provi- 
dence, with varying success. Yet, the best 
showings of the club have taken place on the 
Charles River. 

In 1941 a boathouse was opened on the 
Boston Bank of the Charles by the Community 
Boat Club. This organization is supported by 
the Metropolitan District Commission, which 
was responsible for the construction of the 
boathouse. This club has been responsible for 
the birth of a series of races among colleges 
of Greater Boston in which Boston College 
has played a leading role. Colleges outside 
of the Greater Boston Community have been 
invited to attend and our brother college, 
Holy Cross, has been among the guests. 




WORLD RELATIONS LEAGUE 



The World Relations League of Boston 
College, familiarly known as the WRL, was 
founded to study and discuss international 
issues. The League is open to all students 
and meets bi-weekly during the school year. 

At each meeting a member presents a talk 
on some subject of international import. After 
the talk a question period is held. 

These talks have two advantages, they pro- 
vide an introduction to a knowledge of world 
affairs and an opportunity to practice public 
speaking. 

The League participates in many activities 
of nation-wide Student Group organizations. 
During this past year its members have been 
especially active at Conferences of associa- 
tions whose activities are aimed at world 
peace. 



At Chicago, members Flynn and Scanlon 
were delegates from the College to the N S 
conference. On their return they gave a first- 
hand report to the WRL. 

At this year's New England meeting at 
Regis College of the National Federation of 
Catholic Colleges Students, two WRL members 
participated. Mr. Paradis was chairman of 
one discussion and Mr. Fitzpatrick gave a 
talk on United States Trusteeship. 

OFFICERS OF THE 
WORLD RELATIONS LEAGUE 

President — John Fitzpatrick 
Vice-President — Maurice L. Paradis 
Secretary — James Hogan 
Treasurer — John Flynn, Jr. 

Faculty Moderator — Rev. James L. Burke, S.J. 




BAND 



Allied with our great Football Team of 
1946 in supporting its every fuction with its 
highest talents was the Boston College Band. 
It displayed skilled qualities as a unit at each 
and every football game and smoker during 
the season. Its intricate drills and formations, 
emphasized by its rich uniforms of maroon 
and gold added the needed shade of pageantry 
and zest when things weren't going just right 
down there on the gridiron. 

Through this function, it has won acclaim 
from all over the eastern States. The excel- 
lent performance and exemplary conduct of 
its members at the N. Y. U.-B. C. game is a 



norm to be esteemed and imitated for each 
student when on an Alma Mater mission. 

Under the wise and deeply interested 
leadership of its moderator, the Rev. Henry 
A. Callahan, S.J. this great unit of musical 
talent has enjoyed a most successful and 
creditable season. Likewise, less praise cannot 
be relegated to its immediate and inspiring 
director, Mr. James J. Kiely, '41, through 
whose untiring persistence Boston College 
once again has a Band of which it can be 
truly proud to boast of, the like of which has 
not been evident at the Heights since those 
great games of pre- War days. 




THE 1947 SUB TURRI SENIOR POLL 




Most Catholic 
Mark V. Carr 




Most Scholastic 
Paul J. Molloy 




Most Likely to Succeed 
Harold J. Roberts 



BEST PROFESSOR-JESUIT Fr. McCarthy 

BEST PROFESSOR-LAY Mr. Drummey 

MOST POPULAR PROF.-JESUIT Fr. O'Brien 

MOST POPULAR PROF.-LAY. Mr. Buck 

MOST POPULAR SUBJECT Ethics 

HARDEST COURSE Psychology 

EASIEST COURSE Religion 

MOST POPULAR STUDENT George Donelan 

BEST STUDENT Paul Malloy 

MOST LIKELY TO SUCCEED Harry Roberts 

MOST PESSIMISTIC Fred Ahern 

MOST OPTIMISTIC Bill O'Halloran 

BEST CONVERSATIONALIST Hank Welch 

MOST LOQUACIOUS William Shafferman 

BEST LOOKING George Donelan 

BEST DRESSED ... Jim Harrington 

BEST PERSONALITY Tom Soles 

MOST RELIABLE William McCarthy 

NOISIEST STUDENT . William Shafferman 

BEST ATHLETE "Tuck" Twomey 

MOST TALENTED Ralph Feliciano 

MOST SPIRITED Paul Sullivan 

MOST VERSATILE Power Frazer 

MOST DIGNIFIED Jack Brennan 

MOST CONSERVATIVE James Kenney 




Social Lion 
John P. Regan 





Most Energetic 
Ray Nee 



Most Witty 
John J. O'Connor 



MOST RADICAL Ed Naughton 

MOST SOCIABLE Frank Fleming 

MOST ENERGETIC Ray Nee 

MOST ORIGINAL George Burke 

LEAST APPRECIATED Al Marciello 

SOCIAL LION John Regan 

CLASS SCIENTIST Paul Malloy 

CLASS PHILOSOPHER John McAuliffe 

CLASS WIT John O'Connor 
STUDENT WITH BEST LINE Duke Dailey 



CLASS FAVORITES 



GIRL'S COLLEGE Regis 

MOVIE It's a Wonderful Life 

COMEDIAN Fred Allen 

SINGER Bing Crosby 

SONG They didn't believe me 

ORCHESTRA Vaughn Monroe 

RADIO PROGRAM Family Hour 

MAGAZINE Time 



NEWSPAPER Boston Globe 

COMIC SECTION Lil' Abner 

ACTRESS (SCREEN) Ingrid Bergman 
ACTOR (SCREEN) Frederick March 
TYPE OF GIRL Simple— not Complicated 
MAN OF THE YEAR Pope Pius XII 
WOMAN OF THE YEAR Clare Booth Luce 
EX-STUDENT James Knox 




ATHLETICS 




COACH DENNY MYERS 

For two glorious years, from 1940 to 1942, 
athletics at Boston College assumed as lofty 
a pinnacle as it ever had achieved previously 
and there was no reason to see why this 
success on the gridiron, track, diamond and 
ice shouldn't continue. And it would have 



continued if a little thing like war hadn't 
reared its ugly head in the American scene. 

The war drained the colleges of its male 
students and athletics suffered as a result. 
Some institutions were fortunate enough to 
have Naval trainees stationed on their cam- 
puses. These men were allowed to participate 
in sports. There was no such group stationed 
at Boston College and, although football, 
hockey and track were carried on as activities 
at the Heights, they were played in a very 
informal manner. 

While the teams enjoyed considerable suc- 
cess at times, it was a far cry from the days 
when the Eagles athletic teams were some of 
the most feared groups in the nation. Base- 
ball had been dropped altogether and hockey 
was played under the guidance of a student, 
John Buckley. 

With the end of the war, the end of the 
famine of sports in the nation's colleges came 
also and few colleges appreciated the end 
of the conflict from an athletic point of view 
more than Boston College. 

The influx of veterans to the college and 
the assured presence of the students who 
would ordinarily be draft material provided 
enough material for Coach Fred Maguire to 
mould a New England Championship team 
from the medium-sized number of candidates 
who reported to him. This team won 17 out 
of 19 games for the best baseball record at 
Boston College and seemed to augur well for 
the fortunes of the other teams. 

Denny Myers, returning from the service 
himself, came up with a fine team that 




THE BOSTON COLLEGE FOOTBALL SQUAD OF 1946 



dropped its opening game to Wake Forest 
due to the inexperience of the players. The 
team showed well for the remainder of the 
season, dropping a game to Tennessee after 
the Boston College eleven had forged ahead 
to a quick thirteen point lead, but overcon- 
fidence did the rest as the Volunteers sub- 
merged the Eagles in the last half. The loss 
to Holy Cross was a hard one to take but it 
brought down the curtain on a season that 
promised well for the following season and 
the team had made a fine showing consider- 
ing the fact that the men had been away 
from the game for some time. The team was 
good enough to be rated tops in New England 
and third in the East behind West Point and 
Pennsylvania. 

Coach John Kelly duplicated the feat 
turned in by Maguire and brought a power- 
ful Boston College sextet onto the ice for 
the winter season with the team dropping 
decisions only to Dartmouth and Boston 
University although the Eagles later tied the 
Terriers in the best collegiate hockey game 
played in Boston in many years. 

The basketball team was still in the grow- 
ing process, having been revived after a 
layoff of more than twenty years and this 
particular sport has had to come a long way 
in the little time it has been reborn, but the 
team has met the top teams of the nation and 
fared well against all of them. The hoopsters 
improved on their first year record and wound 
up the 1946-47 season with a creditable .500 
average. 

If these fine showings, after years away 




FATHER DULLEA, S.J. 
Director of Athletics 

from the games, can even be duplicated, let 
alone bettered, in the future, then it can be 
truthfully said that athletics at Boston Col- 
lege have enjoyed a successful renaissance 
after the dark war years. 







&»****?*" \ 







COACHES — ED DOHERTY, HARRY MARR, HEAD COACH DENNY MYERS, MOODY SARNO 




CAPTAIN BOB MANGENE 

Coach Denny Myers ushered his first B.C. 
football team in three years onto the turf of 
the Eagles' new home, Braves Field, to meet 
the highly regarded Deacons of Wake Forest. 



WAKE FOREST 



A crowd of 38,500 attended the opener. From 
the moment the opening whistle was sounded 
the Eagles were in trouble when Ed Clasby, 
starting quarterback, fumbled the kickoff 
with the visitors recovering. This seemed to 
shake the poise of the Maroon and Gold 
eleven but' they managed to hold off the 
Deacons' attack on this occasion. Later in the 
same period, with Red Cochran running wild, 
Wake Forest managed to push across the first 
tally of the night. The Eagles almost tied the 
ball game in the same stanza when Panciera 
engineered a drive to the Southerners door 
but an interception halted the attack. 

Penalties proved to be as costly in the last 
half as they did in the first thirty minutes, 
although the Eagles piled up plenty of offen- 
sive yardage as well. Red Cochran then added 
insult to injury when, after just missing 
going all the way on a punt return, he pro- 
ceeded to lug the pigskin across the goal 
line on the very next play. With time running 
out, B.C., in the guiding hands of Panciera, 
moved relentlessly down field and the climax 
came in the closing minutes when Ceasario, a 
substitute end, snatched a pass in the end zone. 

Inexperience played a big part in the 
Eagles' 12 to 6 setback, but the fine signal- 
calling of Panciera heralded better days 
ahead. 




THE JESUITS SHOWED THE DEACONS 



MICHIGAN STATE 



With Don Panciera holding down the start- 
ing quarterback role, Boston College stunned 
a favored Michigan State by parading to a 
touchdown only four plays after the visitors 
got their hands on the ball. DeRosa, Mangene 
and Lanoue carried the ball to the Spartan 
36 and then Panciera lofted a pass to Lanoue 
at the twelve from where he scooted over. 
In short order the Eagles carried the ball 
back down to the three from where Mangene 
plunged over. 

The Spartans finally got rolling in the 
second quarter when Russ Reader jaunted 36 
yards for a Michigan tally. Immediately 
after this effort he lugged the oval back to 
the B.C. three from where Smith went over 
in one smash at the line. 

A few minutes after the second half opened 
Panciera and Killelea connected on a long 
56 yeard pass that gave the Eagles a little 
breathing space. Spiegel attempted to put the 
Spartans back in the game when he rambled 
60 yards for a score. The Eagles offset this 
TD when Cannava scooped in a 17 yard pass 
by Panciera to give B.C. its last score. Can- 
nava also contributed a 40 yard run in this 
quarter and helped set up B.C. on the Spartan 
one yard line when time ran out. Panciera 
completed seven out of eight passes in this 




CAPTAIN TUCK TWOMEY 

game while Clasby connected with four out 
of five. Penalties again hindered the Eagles, 
but a powerful offensive saved the day. 













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MASTER MAGICIAN — WHO"S GOT THE BALL 




CAPTAIN ANGI SISTI 

Picking up where he had left off the week 
before, John Killelea gathered Kings Point's 
opening kickoff on his own eight yard line, 
started down the middle, cut to his right 
skirting the entire team of Mariners and 
raced the remaining distance for the first six 



KINGS POINT 



points of the evening. Panciera added the 
extra point, his first of seven straight con- 
versions that night. After being temporarily 
stalled, Bob Palladino broke the ice when he 
climaxed a 45 yard drive by a 10 yard scor- 
ing effort. The score was run up to 20 to 
by halftime when Albie Gould hauled in a 
Clasby pass shortly before intermission. 

Two plays after John Killelea opened the 
second half by intercepting a Mariner pass, 
the Eagles scored again with Killelea once 
again the gent to enter the end zone. B.C. was 
penalized 15 yards on the attempted conver- 
sion but Panciera still managed to pump the 
pigskin between the uprights. 

Dom Papaleo picked up a loose ball after 
Vic Palladino had blocked a kick for the 
Eagles' fifth T.D. Patsy Darone, playing a 
terrific game, intercepted a pass and was 
nailed from behind at the three. Brennan 
lugged the ball across the line to turn the 
game into a complete rout. Before the third 
period ended Ed Burns added another six 
points by scoring from the 4. The last B.C. 
score came in the final period when Morro 
carried to the 1 from where Aznavoorian hit 
paydirt. 

Only after a flood of substitutes had been 
sent into the game were the Mariners able 
to push across their lone marker and avert 
a shutout. 



':. ■ 



AROUND THE END IN THE DARK 



VILLANOVA 



With the line and Ed Clasby holding, Don 
Panciera put the ball through the uprights 
for two first period extra points that proved 
to be the margin of victory for the Eagles 
over Villanova. 

John Furey fell on a blocked kick on the 
Wildcats 37 to start the Eagles on their way. 
A run by Benedetto, and two passes to Nick- 
etakis finally put the Eagles across into the 
end zone. After getting their hands on the 
ball again Killelea carried from midfield to 
the 36, from the 36 to the 17, from the 17 
to the 2 and from the 2 to paydirt for B.C.'s 
second and decisive tally. Another touchdown 
by Cannava was called back and before the 
Eagles could push the pigskin into scoring 
territory again they had lost the ball on a 
fumble. This missed opportunity was high- 
lighted by a 63 yard run on an interception 
by Cannava. 

The Wildcats came back with less than 
two minutes remaining in the half and the 
Mainliners threw a scare into the B.C. rooters 
when a pass from Gordon to Polidor was 
good for a score. This was the last scoring 
gesture made by either team until the last 
period when Boston fans were on the edge 
of their seats after Zehier slipped around 
the B.C. end, cut back into the center, eluded 
three tacklers and put the Mainliners within 
2 points of a tie game. 




CAPTAIN MARIO GIANELLI 



After a lightning-fast start it looked like 
it might turn into a rout, but the B.C. punch 
faded and they were forced to fight down to 
the last whistle. 




PALLADINO CLAWED 




Son 



CAPTAIN ED BURNS 



NEW YORK UNIVERSITY 



The Eagles went on a touchdown marathon 
at the expense of the N.Y.U. Violets and, 
though the officials did their best to stop them, 
by the time the game ended the Maroon and 
Gold had amassed 72 points with nine differ- 
ent men taking part in the scoring. 

Don Panciera, Ed Clasby and Steve Stuka 
completed 24 out of 34 passes with three of 
Stuka's being good for touchdowns. Bill 
Mono started the parade by bucking across 
the goal line from the 2. In rapid succession, 
Panciera, Diminick, Benedetto, Gould, Man- 
gene, Vic Palladino, Songin, Morro and 
Poissant added tallies for the Eagles with the 
last two men scoring twice. Panciera kicked 
four extra points while Songin and Morro 
converted once each. 

The weak Violet team was helpless in front 
of the Eagles and it was only after the offi- 
cials paced off most of the distance to the 
goal line that the New Yorkers were able 
to cross the B.C. goal. 

It was interesting to see two games being 
played on the field at the same time. Boston 
College showed New York the T formation 
while the officials played a new game called 
'Drop the handkerchief. 




THE EAGLES PLUCK THE VIOLETS IN THE RAIN 



GEORGETOWN 



Boston College almost lost this one through 
overconfidence. Regarding the Georgetown 
game as a tuneup for the Tennessee game the 
next week, the Eagles almost fell victim to 
a small but fast Hoya eleven with only a last 
period scoring surge saving B.C. from defeat, 
finally winning, 20 to 13. 

To the surprise of all at the game, George- 
town soon left the Eagles behind in the scoring 
column when Jack Haggerty's spread forma- 
tion wrought havoc with the B.C. defense. 
With the Hoyas in possession at the B.C. 48, 
an unheralded Hilltopper, Tom Graham, 
swivel-hipped his way through the B.C. de- 
fense for a touchdown. Mr. Graham was heard 
from again when, a few plays later he un- 
corked a pass to George Benigni who couldn't 
believe he had caught the ball but managed 
to stagger his way into the end zone to leave 
the Eagles six points behind. 

A terrific recovery in the last period 
snatched victory out of defeat for the Eagles. 
Back on their own 2, B.C. gave the ball to 
Cannava who turned in a sensational perfor- 
mance by eluding practically the entire 
Georgetown team in his own end zone and he 
squirmed out to his own 20. From here Pan- 
ciera passed to Spinney who made a miracu- 
lous catch and then to Cannava to produce 
the tying points. With only a minute remain- 




CAPTAIN JOHN KILLELEA 

ing, Cannava gathered in another Panciera 
pass and pulled the game out of the hole and 
saved the Eagles from what would have been 
a big upset. 





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CAPTAIN VIC PALLADINO 

"They looked like the best ball team I ever 
saw during the first period, but we finally 
wore them down and our score came from 
their mistakes." This was the statement made 



TENNESSEE 



by the Tennessee Coach Bob Neyland after 
his Vols came from 13 points behind to ad- 
minister a 33 to 13 beating to the Eagles. 

The B.C. line wrought havoc with the 
Tennessee forward wall and in the first period 
the Eagles made the Vols look like a bunch 
of amateurs with the visitors Dick Huffman, 
All-America tackle, included. A long pass, 
Panciera to Killelea accounted for the first 
B.C. score minutes after the game got under- 
way. Before the ten minute mark was reached 
the Eagles scored again when Panciera, with 
Huffman draped all over him, managed to 
drop a pass into the arms of Ed Burns who 
hit paydirt with a host of interferers paving 
his way from the 10. 

The Vols got their first break when they 
recovered a B.C. fumble on the Eagles' 17. 
They converted this into a score but the Eagles 
still led. After a B.C. pass was intercepted 
in the second half, running plays carried to 
the 8 from where Lund tied it up. The Vols 
only sustained march netted them their win- 
ning tally with Proctor polishing it off with 
a spurt into the end zone from the 4. The 
final two T.D.s were gifts, with the Eagles 
heaving desperation passes in an attempt to 
score. 

Wait 'til next year!!! 




40,000 HEARTS WERE SAD 



ALABAMA 

Four periods of perfect football by B.C. 
sent the Alabama Rose Bowl victors back to 
Alabama with nothing but bruises for their 
long hike to the city of the baked bean. 

The opening period saw each team carry 
the ball the length of the gridiron only to 
have their scoring bids stifled, with the Crim- 
son Tide running the ball through the B.C. 
defense that was set for a passing attack. 
Gilmer sparked the 'Bama drive that carried 
from its own 17 to the B.C. 19. 

Spinney made a sensational catch of a 
Panciera pass on the Tide's 2. Benedetto then 
put the first six points of the afternoon into 
the B.C. side of the ledger. Before the first 
half had drawn to a close, the Crimson Tide 
got back into the ball game when Harry 
Gilmer once again paced the Southerners on 
a march. This effort bore fruit, though, as 
Gilmer lofted a pass to towering Ted Cook 
over Benedetto's head to put the Tide back 
in the game. Gilmer added the point to tie 
the game. 

Ed Clasby's beautiful kick to the 'Bama 
2 kept the visitors bottled up in their own 
territory. Then in the fourth quarter, with 
Songin and Cannava sharing duties, the ball 
was moved to the 'Bama 39. In a deceptive 
play that even the spectators couldn't see 
from the roof, Poisant broke right through 
the center of the line and scooted to the goal 
line where he leaped into the end zone with 
a defender grabbing at his ankle. It was the 




CAPTAIN PATSY DARONE 

most exciting play of an exciting afternoon 
and served to bring the margin of victory to 
the Eagles. Songin took personal charge to 
see that Mr. Gilmer got nowhere on his next 
few tries at a score and played a terrific 
game in doing so. 




40,000 HEARTS WERE GLAD 




^mM0tik> 



JOE KING 

Once again the old Holy Cross jinx asserted 
itself and the Crusaders sprung an upset win 
over Boston College, 13 to 6. The B.C. ground 
and air attack was stifled by a fast and hard 
charging Purple forward wall that wrecked 



HOLY CROSS 

havoc with the Eagles' heretofore potent 
passing attack. 

The Eagles went out to a short-lived lead 
in the second period due to the fleet-legged 
Al Cannava. It was nothing more than an 
ordinary punt that carried to about the B.C. 
20. Despite the play's indifferent beginning, 
it turned out to be the most outstanding offen- 
sive gesture to take place all afternoon. 

Although most fans thought this would be 
the turning point, the Crusaders were un- 
shaken. They took the kickoff and didn't 
relinquish possession of the oval until they 
had racked up six points. Sheridan carried 
to the 37, Kissell added twenty more on two 
tries, and then Sheridan passed to Kelleher 
on the B.C. 25. Sheridan looked for receivers 
on the next play but finding none open, he 
rambled down the sidelines to the Eagle four. 
The pay-off came on a pass from Sheridan to 
Costello for the tying points. 

The camel's back was broken in the third 
quarter when Sheridan lofted another pass, 
this time to Troy who outjumped an Eagle 
defender for the winning score. 

The two previous games, Alabama and 
Tennessee, seemed to take the spark out of 
the team and as a result, they suffered a let- 
down. Better days are ahead, though as the 
freshmen of the squad have shown enough 
promise to pick up where the departing 
seniors have left off. 




OH, WELL 




VARSITY 



COACH FRED MAGUIRE 

The call that Coach Freddie Maguire issued 
early in April of the 1946 baseball season 
was answered by approximately sixty-five 
diamond hopefuls, an encouraging number 
with which to work after a layoff of several 



years. Poor weather cut into the already 
scarce time and it looked as though Maguire 
would be hard pressed to field a representa- 
tive club for the opener with Northeastern 
on April 20. The weatherman seemed in a 
spiteful mood as snow covered the ground 
for a while to further hamper progress. 

Thus it was with some surprise that the 
newspapers carried accounts of B.C.'s defeat 
at the hands of the Huskies in the 10th inn- 
ing. The Northeastern nine was regarded as 
one of the Lop teams in the area. The Eagles 
actually had the game won in their half of 
the tenth, but Maguire moved Gerry Leven- 
son, a pitcher, to the outfield after he had 
gone to bat as a pinch-hitter in the same 
inning. This proved to be a fatal move. A 
lofty fly made its way out to Levenson and 
the sun plus his own inexperience at the 
position caused him to lose the ball in the sun 
and two of the Huskies scampered across 
home plate with the tying and winning runs. 

Despite this discouraging loss, the Eagles 
came back in their next outing. They jour- 
neyed to Amherst where they tangled with 
the Lord Jeffs. For a time it appeared as 
though the Eagles would be charged with 
their second defeat of the young season. After 
the B.C. representatives edged their way to a 
one run lead in the first half of the sixth, 
the hosts countered with three quick tallies 
that erased the lead of the Eagles. But in the 




NEW ENGLAND INTERCOLLEGIATE CHAMPS OF 1946 



BASEBALL 



next inning the Eagles more than made up 
for the Amherst splurge and racked up a 
seventh inning total of five runs, enough to 
turn the tide for B.C. and give them their 
first win, and also start them off on their 
winning streak which set a record for a Boston 
College baseball team. 

The butterfingers of a Harvard team paved 
the way to their own downfall with the bats 
of the Boston College outfit providing the 
extra measure of pressure that saw the Eagles 
take a 5 to 1 verdict from the Crimson team 
in the first formal athletic contest between 
the two neighboring institutions in twenty- 
five years. This game was followed up by 
a 3 to triumph over the Providence Friars. 

The Eagles kept in the running for the 
mythical Greater Boston Championship when 
they trounced Tufts in the Jumboes own back 
yard, 9 to 4. This enabled B.C. to keep within 
distance of Northeastern, the club that had 
beaten them earlier. 

B.C. then stretched its winning streak to 
five straight when the Maguiremen dropped 
Colby 10 to while Tom McManus was hold- 
ing the Mules to a total of three hits. Tom 
Mulhern, the starting hurler for Colby, had 
pitched 18 consecutive hitless innings up to 
the time he toed the rubber against B.C. His 
charm was gone though, and B.C. peppered 
him for nine safeties. Two days later B.C. 
racked up its high-scoring mark of the season 




JOHNNY BUCKLEY 

when it ran roughshod over the Brown Bruins 
at Alumni Field, 15 to 1. 

The return game with Northeastern turned 
out to be as exciting and as close a game as 
the first encounter between the two clubs. 




GUARDIAN OF THE INITIAL SACK 



VARSITY 




JERRY DUANT 

After they had manufactured a lead over the 
Huskies, Bob Quirk lost his effectiveness in 
the light drizzle that had threatened to post- 
pone the game, and he was lifted for Leven- 
son after the visitors had erased the B.C. 



margin and gone ahead. Although the out- 
come was ominous for the Eagles — both the 
rain and Northeastern were getting stronger 
as the game went on — they managed to pull 
the game out of the fire at the last minute 
with the result that the Eagles won the Greater 
Boston crown and also protected their win 
streak at eight contests, having defeated 
Quonset Naval two days earlier. 

The B.C. pitching staff grew stronger as 
the season progressed with the result that by 
the time the season was drawing to a close, 
the Eagles had just about the strongest col- 
legiate mound corps in New England. This 
strong pitching plus the powerful batting of 
such men as Daunt, Buckley, Lynch, Maloney 
and Spinner as well as others kept the team 
going at a hot clip. The Eagles powerhoused 
their way to wins over Providence (4-1), and 
Boston University (9-1), before they met their 
Waterloo at the hands of the University of 
New Hampshire. The final outcome showed 
the Eagles on the tail-end of a 4 to 2 count 
although Levenson had allowed but four hits. 
The only trouble was that the Wildcats' 
hurler stifled the Eagles with two bingles, 
one made by Spinner and the other by Lynch. 

While the Eagles managed to travel the 
remainder of the schedule without blemishing 
their record by defeating Tufts, Villanova, 
B.U., Rutgers and Dartmouth, the best part 
of the season was the twin victories over the 



I 



milium 







BEARING DOWN 



BASEBALL 



usually prevailing baseball team of Holy 
Cross. The first win came on Memorial Day 
at Worcester when the Eagles solved Harper 
Gerry, previously undefeated in four years 
of collegiate competition, getting twelve hits 
and six runs while the Crusaders could gather 
only one run for their cause while 5400 fans 
sat in on the proceedings. 

The second tilt between the two teams saw 
a much closer battle take place with the Eagles 
playing host to an Alumni Day throng of 
6500. The lead had see-sawed back and forth 
between the two teams and going into the 
ninth the Crusaders led 6 to 4. A rally was 
sensed by the spectators when Bob Fitzgerald 
walked and was moved to second when Johnny 
Buckley strolled as well. Tom Maloney, a 
dependable player all year, then stepped to 
bat and drilled a single for the Eagles' third 
hit of the day and which produced the fifth 
run. With the fans pleading for the winning 
runs, two attempted bunts became easy pop- 
ups and the hopes for a win seemed dimmer. 
But Jerry Daunt, who had been named as 
second baseman for the Eastern Collegiate 
All-Stars, lined a single that sent Buckley 
across with the tying run. Maloney then 
caused the spectators some anxious moments 
as he broke for the plate. He just barely 
beat the throw to the plate and the Eagles 
managed to eke out their second win of the 




TOM MALONEY 

season over the Worcesterites and also bring 
down the curtain on the most successful base- 
ball season under Maguire and the best in 
the history of the sport at the College. 







HARVARD WENT DOWN 5-1 




WINGMAN ED BURNS 

Coach John "Snooks" Kelly put Boston 
College Hockey back on the high peak it 
occupied before he entered the Navy several 
years ago. 

When the season opened there was little 



VARSITY 



known as to the possibility of the Eagles 
being represented by another topflight sextet 
such as has characterized the Maroon and 
Gold teams in the past. 

The only returnee with whom Kelly could 
say he had a speaking acquaintance was John 
"Putto" Murphy who had played as a start- 
ing winner of the great pre-war B.C. teams. 
His experience and the fact that he was the 
only such returnee won for him the election 
to the captaincy, something he showed he 
more than deserved as the season moved along. 

The season opened on a discouraging note 
with the Eagles dropping a hard one to Boston 
University, the Eagles' perennial rival for 
the New England Intercollegiate crown. This 
game dropped to the Terriers, 9 to 5, was 
the only game the Eagles dropped in the 
entire schedule of League competition. Two 
other games were lost in the course of the 
season, one being to Dartmouth on poor ice 
at Hanover by a count of 4 to and the other 
a loss to the powerful Yale sextet while the 
Eagles were playing with only two lines avail- 
able at New Haven. 

With the exception of these two games, 
the Eagles moved through the season without 
blemishes on their record. In the second game 
of the year the Eagles met the Holy Cross 
Crusaders in a game that figured to be a 
soft touch for the Kellymen. The Crusaders 
were at another disadvantage having lost 




HOCKEY SQUAD — WON 14, LOST 2, TIED 1. 



HOCKEY 



their coach just prior to their opener. All 
this seemed to add up to a bad night for the 
Purple but the visitors surprised everyone 
and showed plenty of skill as well as fight, 
although the Eagles had little trouble in down- 
ing them, 8 to 4. This showing by the Cru- 
saders gave warning to future opponents that 
they would be a team to fear in a short space 
of time. 

After B.C. dropped its game to Dartmouth 
it returned to the confines of the Arena ice 
where the Eagles got back into competition 
for the New England crown. The first team on 
the list was the Northeastern club that had 
done a good job on Tufts the previous week. 
Because of this showing by the Huskies, they 
looked as though they would prove to be tough 
medicine for the Eagles. All such fears were 
dispelled shortly after the first period opened 
when the B.C. team moved into a commanding 
lead which kept mounting as the game con 
tinued. By the time the final bell had rung 
the Eagles had won going away by a count 
of 10 to 1. 

This victory set the pace for the remaining 
games on the B.C. schedule. B.C. was expected 
to have a bit more trouble at the hands of 
Harvard but the fear was unfounded since 
the Maroon and Gold team set the Crimson 
back on its haunches to the tune of 6 to 3. 

Once B.C. got by Devens which was accom- 
plished by a 4 to 1 score in a game played 



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CAPTAIN PUTTO MURPHY 

in sub-freezing temperatures on an outdoor 
rink, the Eagles met little stiff opposition 
until they met Yale at New Haven. Before 
tangling with the Bulldog the Eagles steam- 
rollered their way to lopsided wins over M.I.T. 




SET UP AGAINST M.I.T. 




VARSITY 



WINGMAN JACK HARVEY 



and Tufts, defeating the latter team twice. 
B.C. scored 35 goals to the oppositions' 7. 

The Yale game found the Elis pressing an 
advantage of an extra line while the Eagles 
were without the services of a third set of 



forwards. The remaining two B.C. lines found 
the pace too stiff and they wilted before the 
rushes of the Elis so that they could put up 
only slight resistance, finally dropping the 
tilt, 9 to 2. 

The game with B.U. had received advance 
notices as being the best game to be played 
in Boston that year and by the time the fans 
wended their way to the exits there was not 
one voice that could say that the prediction 
had been unjustified. At the time the outcome 
of the New England League depended on the 
result of this game. A win by the Eagles 
would have put them in a tie for the top rung 
and a playoff would have been necessary. 

For a while it looked as though that would 
be the case when Ed Songin opened the scor- 
ing for the night on a powerful drive that 
sailed by Ike Bevins and gave the Eagles a 
one goal advantage. Ten minutes later, though, 
B.U. tied it up and that was the way the score 
stood at the end of the first period. By the 
time the end of the second period rolled 
around the score was still deadlocked but 
this time the score was 2 to 2. Jack Harvey 
tied the score after the Terriers had gone 
ahead earlier in the period. 

The play in the third period was terrific. 
Only a minute has passed when B.U. went 
out ahead. Pressure mounted as Fitzgerald 
pushed a shot by Bevins to knot the count 
again. The play was even throughout the first 




X 



& mm 





HARVEY DRIVES ONE AT THE NET 



HOCKEY 



stages of the period, but toward the end the 
Eagles started to press more and more, but 
B.U. had a goalie that was a goalie and the 
count was still knotted. Only two minutes 
remained in the game and it looked as though 
the scoring would stop here. But B.U. didn't 
think. With only a minute and a half left the 
Terriers beat Burke and it looked like cur- 
tains for the Eagles but not one fan left the 
Arena. And well they didn't for with only 
seconds remaining Fitzgerald turned the trick 
again and scored. 

The overtime period was anything but a 
letdown. In the ten minute period the pace 
was furious with the Terriers scoring first at 
the 7:53 mark. Although such a feat would 
have been looked on as impossible, Murphy 
broke away from the B.C. end of the rink, 
soloed the length of the ice, faked Bevins 
out of position and scored. Time ran out 
seconds later and it was a good thing for the 
spectators that it did as the human heart can 
stand only so much. 

The game certainly lived up to its advance 
billing and there are those who'll maintain 
that no better hockey game was played in 
Boston, Bruins included. B.U.'s goaltender, 
Ike Bevins, made numerous saves that would 
ordinarily have been sure scores. It was this 
fellow who kept the teams on a par with each 
other. 

To go into detail over the remaining games 




DEFENSEMAN BUTCH SONGIN 

would only be a letdown, but the Eagles 
closed out the season with wins over Harvard, 
Holy Cross, St. Nicholas Hockey Club and 
M.I.T., experiencing no trouble from any of 
the latter. 




MURPHY WAITS FOR PASSOUT FROM GALLAGHER 




VARSITY 



COACH AL McCLELLAN 



Once again basketball returns to the Heights 
as a major sport on the athletic program of 
Boston College. After a layoff of about twenty 
years Maroon and Gold uniforms jogged, 
pivoted and shot on the court representing 
Les Eagles from Chestnut Hill. 

The initial start after the long absence was 
the 1945-46 season which wasn't too impres- 
sive in the record books, but after such a 
long period of sleep, the sport wasn't ex- 
pected to pick up overnight and Coach 
McClellan had set the groundwork for the 
future. 

Last year may have been a different story, 
but this season found the many top-flight col- 
lege quintets listed on the B.C. program a bit 
more worried. The local experts considered 
the Eagles a threat whenever they played and 
no longer were the Eagles regarded as the 
doormat of the New England region. 

This rise in prominence was due to the 
enrolling of new players who figured to give 
B.C. the shot in the arm that was so badly 
needed. This year year's team was a much 
taller outfit as well as a much smoother 
operating team. One main reason the Eagles 
enjoyed so much of the spotlight was because 
of the presence of Elmore Morgenthaler, 
seven-foot-one inch giant from Texas who 
sparked the Eagles in the earlier part of the 
season before he left college. John Letvinchuk 
is another man who headed the Eagle club, 




BASKETBALL SQUAD — BOASTED .500 AVERAGE 



BASKETBALL 

with his fierce tactics drawing applause from 
the fans every time he was in the game. 

In the few games he played for B.C. Mor- 
genthaler piled up a big point total after a 
slow start so that by the time he played Ford- 
ham he managed to set a Garden scoring 
record of 37 points. This was the high water 
mark of his scoring parade but on several 
other occasions he approached it and managed 
to gain an average of 20 points per game by 
the time he stopped playing. 

Perhaps the one outstanding player on the 
roster was John Letvinchuk who was the lead- 
ing playmaker for the Eagles and was out- 
standing on defense. This likable six foot 
four inch student from Salem moved into the 
pivot post later in the season and here he 
managed to gather enough points to give him 
the title of leading scorer after he had bad 
a slow start. 

Jim Sharry, Ray Carr and Phil Kenny- 
rounded out the starting five, with all these 
three veterans of one year at B.C. The latter 
was the forward while Sharry and Carr, 
though short in stature, were immense in the 
quality of their play and were two of the 
outstanding guards in the local field. Sharry 
in addition to his fine defensive play, was 
an outstanding set-shot artist who pulled the 
Eagles out of many close calls during the 
season with his dead-eye. He is a senior and 
has played his last game for B.C. His position 




SET SHOT ARTIST — JIM SHARRY 




THE GENERAL HOLDS A BLACKBOARD DRILL 




VARSITY 



ELMORE MORGENTHALER 



will be a tough one to fill. He was an out- 
standing basketballer in high school, starring 
for Somerville. 

Carr and Kenny, both starters, come from 
Rhode Island and they each have two years 
of eligibility left so that there presence for 
the next few years will make things a bit 
easier for McClellan. Kenny is a steady op- 
erator who was high scorer on the '45-'46 
team and his accuracy under the hoop will 
help B.C.'s hoopsters become a team to be 
reckoned with in the future. 

Franny Higgins and Tom O'Brien are a 
couple of fellows who started to show their 
best form toward the close of the season. 
Both Higgins and O'Brien come from New 
York as do Mort Stagoff and Dan Bricker. 

Higgins showed nice form all season while 
O'Brien made quite a debut for himself near 
the close of the schedule. His scoring antics 
brought him a healthy total of points con- 
sidering the fact that he was around for so 
few of the contests. Off their performances 
of the past year it seems fairly certain that 
these four players will have a lot to say in 
local hoop circles since they are all fresh- 
men with three years to go. 

McClellan hopes to improve on this season's 
average of .500 in the win-loss column. 
Several of the games the Eagles dropped were 
heartbreaks, especially in the case where they 
played the power-houses of the mid-west, 




ACTION AT THE GARDEN 



BASKETBALL 

Bradley and Bowling Green, only to lose each 
one in the closing minutes. The Bowling Green 
game was lost in the last few seconds of the 
game after the Eagles had assumed what ap- 
peared to be a comfortable lead earlier in 
the game. A similar situation prevailed in 
the Bradley game where the Eagles were way 
out front only to have the visitors come from 
behind in the closing minutes to wrest victory 
from the hands of the Bee Cee'ers. Had the 
Eagles been able to win these two games it 
might have boosted their morale to the point 
where they would be unbeatable but such was 
not the case. Games with Boston University, 
Georgetown and Colby were lost in the fading 
minutes of their respective tills. 

Apparently McClellan will have to concen- 
trate on some way in which to stop these last 
minute thrusts which have caused so many 
heart-breaking defeats. Maybe he will petition 
to have the length of the game shortened. 
Whatever it takes, it will have to be good, 
but there seems little doubt that basketball 
is at Boston College to stay and as the years 
go on will the standing of the hoop team's 
ranking in the nations collegiate roster. 

The team has shown it can play a terrific 
brand of ball. They have set several records 
this past season, both inter-collegiate and 
Boston College marks that will take a lot of 
playing to equalize. 




JOHNNY LETVINCHUK 




ELMORE PLUNKS IN ANOTHER 



VARSITY 




COACH JACK RYDER 

Probably the one sport to suffer most at 
Boston College due to the war was the track 
team. All during the bad months of the war 
years Coach Jack Ryder made his way up to 
University Heights to greet whatever few can- 



didates might make their way to the cinder 
and wooden oval. On most of these occasions 
he was the sole person to be present on the 
scene. 

Again, when the other men flocked back 
to the college the coaches of the other sports 
were overburdened, but even then Ryder was 
hard pressed to get together a suitable group 
of men to represent Boston College at the 
many indoor meets for the Winter season. 

Luckily, among those men who did report 
to Ryder were some of the athletes who had 
run for him in earlier years, both before the 
war and during it. Among the former were 
fellows like Tom Greehan and Angie Sisti. 
Sisti had made quite a name for himself 
while taking part in the shotput event of the 
National collegiate championship. A bad arm 
he picked up in football kept his effectiveness 
down to a minimum, but he still managed to 
garner quite a few points as did Bill Morro 
in the same event. 

Tom Greehan was a consistent point-getter 
in the hurdles and the dashes. He managed 
to gather a few firsts during the season. An- 
other runner who vied with Greehan for top 
honors in the point department was Carl Par- 
sons. Parsons has a lot of natural ability on 
the track and Ryder feels that if the fleet- 
footed scholar would train diligently he could 
develop into one of the outstanding collegiate 
runners. In spite of his lack of practice, 




WAITING FOR THE GUN 



TRACK 

Parsons still managed to do more than his 
share towards putting the Eagles back on the 
track's winning trail. 

Ralph King and Gil Walker were steady 
performers all season although King had some 
trouble getting into shape and losing the 
weight that he had put on while in service. 

Several newcomers made their way into 
the local spotlight with Matt Malloy, a prom- 
ising miler, showing well. Malloy took part 
in the IC4A games at New York but lost 
count of his position, so crowded was the 
event. Despite these handicaps he picked up 
his pace and made his way to finish well. 
In the same meet both Walker and Parsons 
just missed qualifying for the finals. 

The outstanding event for the team was the 
win by the mile relay team at the B.A.A. 
meet at the Boston Garden. The Eagles' win- 
ning time, while good enough as it stood, 
would have been much better if Carl Parsons 
hadn't taken a spill. Spence and Harrington 
saved the day with their strong efforts. 

The two mile relay team showed well too 
with three of the four men on it members of 
the freshman class. 

The indoor season prepared the team for 
the outdoor season which saw the Eagles do 
much better. The runners who had had trouble 
getting into shape for the indoor meets were 
now ready for steady service and their con- 
dition paid off. 




ACTION AT THE GARDEN 

The team has a number of High School 
State Champions on it and it seems as though 
the lowly position occupied by Boston College 
track has been left in the background for 
good. 




THE MILE RELAY 








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FEATURE SECTION 




ALMA MATER 

Hail Alma Mater 

Thy praise we sing 

Fondly thy memory 

'Round our hearts still clings. 

Guide of our youth, 

Through thee we shall prevail. 

Hail! Alma Mater, 

Hail! all Hail! 



TWENTY CENTS 




6.50 AYEAR 



(ma. us. wi.ofp.) VOL. XL 



By Special Permission of Time, Copyright Time Inc., 1946 



Vol. XL No. 17 



TIME 

THE "WEEKLY NEWSMAGAZINE 



June 15,1947 



NATIONAL AFFAIRS 



Grant, Oil, Picket-breaking 

For fourteen years this country has 
carried a burden of war and depression. 
In all of these years it has also carried 
the burden of the Democratic party. Then 
last November the nation spoke. It 
would now bear the burden of the G. 0. P. 

Sometime during these years, perhaps 
it was during the past year, the country 
changed. The scope of the change was 
hard to measure. Most historians believed 
that it was a natural variation which had 
to occur in a world-minded nation. Was 
this the reason? Others would not say 
that it was. They believed that the accent 
should be put on the failure of the Gov- 
ernment to give people what they wanted- 
People were fed up. They had "Had 
Enough!" This, more than any other 
reason, they believed accounted for the 
change in leadership and planning. 

What was the history of Republican 
leadership? 

People who had hoped for a return of 
the "we know where we're going" sys- 
tem had only to turn back the pages of 
history to study the plan of Republicanism. 
It was a history book which the G. O. P. 
was not proud of, in this year of change. 
It told of the pressure on Andrew Johnson, 
the first Supreme Court packing, the long 
years of Grantism, and a nation controlled 
from the East. Was this what the people 
wanted? 

Boston College's history professor didn't 
think so. Father Finnegan has often, 
with a sly and twitching smile, said that 
people too soon forget the eras of Grant 
and picket-breaking. 

Whether the people would be sorry 
they had changed would depend on the 
strategy of the new leaders. The public's 
attitude was unmistakeable now. It had 
had enough of carelessness and undecided- 
ness, and enough of shortages and strikes. 
It had in effect "voted out a pro-people 
government and voted in one which it 
hoped would give to every man his just 
due." 

The new few years would be years of 
watchful waiting, the party going slow 
lest it offend those who had voted for 
them, the people anxious lest the big 
stick should strike too soon. 

The Veteran and the Mule 

That the presence of 17,000,000 veter- 
ans would create many domestic problems 
the U. S. already knew. Just how great 
some of the problems were the U. S. 
saw more clearly last fall when hundreds 
of Boston College student-veterans failed 
to receive their subsistance checks. 



Boston College is one of the U. S.'s 
most scholastic of schools.* At present 
its faculty and time is devoted to the edu- 
cation of thousands of veterans, part of 
the many who flocked last year to the 
nation's campuses. Working in con- 
junction with the college is the Veteran's 
Administration (single veterans receive 
$65 per month, married veterans $90) 
who. until the fall semester started had 
worked effectively and efficiently. Now 
that there was a delay in payments, the 
V.A. had its problems too. 




Student Veteran 
"/ Can't Wait" 

Student-veterans, unpaid since June 
of '46, were impatient. Now that the 
green had gone they looked to a grey 
and gray winter. They had had a happy 
summer but now that winter was ap- 
proaching the problems came too. In 
nearby Newton , four veterans' families 
had grocery bills as high as a P-80 can 
fly; veterans' wives stood three deep in 
the bargain basements. In Boston and its 
suburbs banks had record withdrawals. 
Telephones were disconnected. Com- 
munications were cut off. Home Loan men 
were doing a record business. From all 
the students came the same reports. 

Burdened under so many complaints 
the V.A. was placed in the limelight. 
Puzzled and bewildered the represen- 
tatives could only tell the students — "The 
Veterans must wait." 

* Scholastic Philosoohy is a must major. 



Then, during November, the puzzle 
broke. The V.A. had to act. They recog- 
nized their cue. Veteran opinion had 
increased. The wives of veterans were 
tired of "breast of frankfurter" and they 
intended to let the V.A. know it. The 
V.A. did not want that. 

Then the message came. The Veterans 
would be paid before Christmas. It was 
not a moment too soon. The move 
curtailed veteran sentiment then, but next 
year the same couldn't happen. Another 
wait would be too much for the veteran. 
The V.A. would have to act again. 

Fancy Finance 

Last fall the College book store took 
a deep, deep breath and looked pleasingly 
at the first big batch of first quarter 
earnings. Then it truly could relax. 
Despite the strikes, rising costs, ceilings 
and delayed checks, it had managed to 
earn a heart-warming amount of folding 
money. One big reason was that thousands 
of the once far-flung boys had returned 
to the campus, and any return to the 
campus meant a financial turn for the 
better for the book-store. 

Here was one corporation for whom 
strikes turned red into black. Books went 
literally ceiling high and prices went 
figuratively higher. Fundamental Psych, 
long a favorite at $1.50, jumped the tracks 
to $3.00 while the popular Herzog set 
kept the same face for a different price. 

Bright-faced, greying Eddie O'Connor 
posed for the Heights photographers in 
his cash-panelled Chestnut Hill office, 
while outside the lines went around and 
around and at times grew so long that it 
was hard to tell whether the student went 
to Boston College or to Boston University. 



Hope For the World 

It had been like a marathon. There 
had been an enthusiastic crowd of starters, 
but the going had been hard and tough, 
and the contestants were scattered along the 
whole route, like handbills at election 
time. Some were crossing the finish line, 
liking the cheers, glad it was over, but 
none to sure of what would happen next : 
these men would henceforth be known as 
the class of 1947. 

No one worried too much about the 
rest of the starters who, like the presi- 
dent's popularity, were still on the way 
up. Most of them, in the long run, would 
finish, one way or another, some running, 
some staggering, some finishing strong. 
It would all be in the marathon tradition. 




Boston College Seniors 
"// / Am To Be I Must Assume Responsibility" 



The real plaudits were being saved for 
the lucky ones, the first big batch of post 
war graduates. They were all in the 
spotlight as they received the symbol of 
their victory, their diploma. It had been 
a well earned victory; won by large 
quantities of pluck and luck, but 'most of 
them realized that this race had only 
been a trial heat for another and bigger 
race, the real race: The World. 

They all knew that the world they 
were entering would be totally different 
from the one they had known. It would 
be a tired, tried and shaken world, split 
by theories and practices, inhabited by 
many forces which ran counter clock- 
wise to them and all that they repre- 
sented. Many men had warned them of 
these forces, but no one had been too 
sure of what to call them. 

Bishop Henry Knox Sherrill, Presiding 
Bishop of the Episcopal Church in the 
United States had sounded a vague note 
of warning in January of 1947. Said 
Clericommentator Bishop Sherrill: "No 
true Christian can be complacent today 
about the state of the world, the church 
or himself — We are, in essence, waging 
a desperate spiritual war in a most critic- 
al period of history." 

Bishop Sherrill was none to sure of 
the enemy in this war but he was sure that 
there was a war going on, that there was 
an enemy to be fought. 

Monsignor Fulton J. Sheen, professor 
of Philosophy at the Catholic University 
of America was more explicit when he 
called the forces of evil the Anti-Christ. 
The vigorous protests that answered 
Monsignor Sheen from all sides, both 
right and left, left no doubt as to the 
existence of such an evil. 

The Boston College graduate had his 
own name for these forces: materialism. 
It was an all embracing word and it 
covered a wide variety of evil. It applied 
singularly and collectively to the multi- 
tude of forces, small and large, that are 
working with ant-like persistence and 
wasp-like fervor to overthrow Christianity. 



They knew it at Boston College, knew it. 
recognized it and knew how to fight it. 

Materialism was nothing new in the 
world; it only appeared new. It had 
changed clothing and appeared in many 
lands but it was still the same diabolical 
philosophy of Communism in general and 
Russian Communism in particular. 

What was this materialism? Material- 
ism is that philosophy (oddly enough it 
begins in the mind) which proclaims that 
the only thing in existence is matter and 
therefore that there is no spirit. There is 
only one reality, they say, and that is 
matter, the blind forces of which evolve into 
plant, animal and men. Even human 
society is nothing but a phenomenon and 
a form of matter, evolving in the same 
way. In such a doctrine there is no room 
for God, or even an idea of Him; there 
is no difference between matter and 
spirit, between soul and body; there is 
neither survival of the soul after death 
nor any hope in a future life. Pope Pius XI 
called materialism anti-religious for it 
considered religion as "the opiate of the 
people" because the principle of religion 
which speaks of the life beyond the grave 
took the proletarait from the dream 
of paradise which is of this world. 

That is materialism of its very nature. 
Its new clothing is nothing but Com- 
munism which today in the political 
order is taking away the liberty of a 
person because it has made the collectivity 
an absolute from which all liberty and 
authority comes, the same Communism 
which today in the economic order is 
stripping the individual person from his 
property and his right to property and 
from that person the ability to work for 
himself. 

It is this form of materialism which 
the graduates of Boston College know 
and recognize for what it is even in the 
fanciful trimmings of a classless society. 
Once this was known they would have to 
fight. They were well trained for the 
job. 

Many educators thought this class was 
the best educated in the history of the 



college. Certainly, theirs had been a well 
rounded education. It had not been the 
education-in-a-vacuum of many pre-war 
American colleges in which the students 
peered uncertainly at the world from 
behind Gothic arches for four years, then 
stepped out to face it armed wth little 
more than poise and a new wrist-watch. 
The men of the class of 1947 had very 
literally learned the hard way. They had 
in their curriculum the most expressive 
and the most informative subject of all: 
war. 

War is the hardest course of all, with 
the grimest penalty for failure. These 
men had gone from textbooks to training 
fields, from sports to slaughter. War had 
struck with lightning and in a flash they 
were transformed from students to 
soldiers, from youths learning for peace 
to men training for war. War had truly 
struck with lightning and the bolt had 
reeled them from their homes, from their 
country and tossed them into every con- 
ceivable nook in the world. Now that the 
war was over they knew beyond statistics, 
in the hard facts of death and twisted 
bodies, how much we had paid to win the 
war, what should be done with our victory. 

Returning from the war it was in the 
classroom that they learned to apply 
what they had seen and heard in the 
classroom of war and how to beat the 
swords of war into the weapons of peace 
for the war against materialism. In this 
war no steel was used, as yet; this war 
was being waged in the minds of men. 
And there was a good chance that the 
scholastic mind would' win. 

It was the able, capable and logical 
Jesuits who taught these men the way 
and molded their weaopns. First things 
were taught first for it is the first princi- 
ples, which, though they are the last 
things applied, have to be the first things 
known. It was in the Gothic-styled 
college that the finest were schooled in 
the classics, in the sciences and above all 
in scholastic philosophy. 

It was scholastic philosophy which was 
the proper answer to massed materialism 



NATIONAL AFFAIRS 




Boston College Entrance 
'Thru These Doors The Finest" 



for scholastic philosophy taught first that 
there is a God, that man was created by 
God, and that man was more than a 
mass of matter mixed in the turmoil of 
materialism. In truth, that there was a 
plan in the world, for man came from 
someplace, had a mission to perform on 
earth and was destined for some place 
hereafter. 

Man, therefore, is the central figure 
in the war on materialism for a man 
created it and man would have to destroy 
it. It would take the complete man, the 
scholastic man to do this. It would take, 
in truth, the intelligent man, composed of 
body and soul, intellect and will, the 
complete man who has a definite relation 
to God, to himself and to other men. a 
man essentially superior to matter and 
the forces of matter. 

These things learned, the students could 
now clash with the evil forces for besides 
the basic truths of philosophy they had 
also, through practice, sharpened their 
minds with logical precision and sharp 
distinctions. Thus broken down material- 
ism was nothing to be feared, for it 
refuted itself. It was, in fact, contrary to 
itself, for materialism was an idea which 
influenced history and politics, not simply 
a case of matter influencing the world. 
It was clear now that Communism was 
essentially a philosophic system of 
thought and that it had, to be an effective 
defeat, to meet its defeat in the realm 
of philosophy. Many systems have tried 
in vain and failed but scholasticism was 
still holding her own. 

The world, in this era of conflict and 
confusion needed such a system of 
thought. The world also needed such a 
man, a man who through his study and 
life, through his thinking and heart 
could bring hope into all the unfulfilled 
hopes of a world of people. This man 
had learned that Being was the most 



important thing in the world. And if he 
was to be, he knew he must assume 
responsibility. The task is great. The 
world is watching him. God is watching 
him too. 

Formula for Peace 

It was morning and a light March 
wind tossed a lighter mist against the 
classroom windows. Inside the students 
listened intently to the Rev. John O'Brien, 
S.J., Chairman of the Department of 
Philosophy. It was 10:30 A.M. 

Fifteen minutes later the class entered 
into a discussion concerning a modern 
philosophical problem. Did the men who 
fought the war win only a negative 
peace? It was as tantalizing a problem as 
the one: Did they fight in vain? Judgments 
formed according to the common consent 
of man and the clear dictates of conscience 
would lead you to believe that they had. 
Scholarly Fr. O'Brien didn't think so. 

"The men," he said, "fought to bring 
about a more lawful and intelligent world. 
While peace is not everywhere immedi- 
ately existent ... it is valid to conclude 
. . . that the progress made during and 
after the war is sufficient to terminate 
... in social peace. But . . . the task is 
not finished. Finally ... to achieve 
social peace it is necessary that the 
students of the world face the ever- 
present problems . . . with scholarly 
insight and serious study. Peace time 
battles are all fought ... in the realm of 
the mind." 

What was this social peace and what 
were its implications. To evaluate it 
properly it is necessary to turn to Thomas 
of Aquin, the Angelic Doctor of Scholastic 
Philosophy. For him "Social peace . . . 
was social progress." This was so be- 
cause the time concept of progress pro- 
vides for man's natural and supernatural 



ends by its concern for the practice of 
virtue and the sufficiency of material 
goods. In order, therefore, It hat all 
people may live well the concept of 
social peace implies the ever-presence of 
Justice and Charity. It implies the 
practise of them as well. 

Justice is most important for the 
maintenance of society and the promotion 
of social progress for it insures that each 
man receive his due. Charity, on the other 
hand, insures that each will obtain peace. 
"The practice of these two virtues," 
continued Fr. O'Brien, "remains . . . 
in the hearts of men." 

Knowledge can promote charity and 
charity justice. The responsibility of 
those who won this war "ends not with 
the feeding of famished peoples." but 
with the exchange of thoughts that pro- 
mote peace and bring about a progressive 
social peace. 




Marine Vet Manning 
Justice + Charity = Peace 

A Drop in the Cosmic Bucket 

William Shafferman had a tedious 
journey. Weather held up his plane at 
Cuba and again further along the line. 
Finally the man arrived at his destination, 
French Guiana. For those whose lives 
touched his it was not a minute to soon. 

For plump, balding, question-marked 
Mr. Shafferman, French Guiana was an 
end to months of anxious waiting, a ful- 
fillment of great hopes, a beginning of 
his post warfare. It was also the begin- 
ning of a sad awakening for on his 
arrival there was no flutter of flags, no 
spread of red carpets, no guard of honor. 

Days darkened into nights and nights 
dawned into days. Finally the Inquisition 
stood outside the governmental depart- 



NATIONAL AFFAIRS 




During the past year in Boston there 
were 7920 marriages which, translated 
into a demand for living accommodations, 
means that there have been 7920 new 
housing shortages. Multiply this by the 
number of contemplating companions 
and you have a fair estimate of future 
housing worries. One Boston wit re- 
marked: "It's easier to get better-halves 
than good quarters nowadays." 

"Where are they going to build homes?" 
seems to be the question of the day. 
The word used is homes and not projects, 
and so we see that people would like 
Housing Administrators (who to this 
day have only replaced slums with de- 
vices which are always excellently heated, 
shut out more light and as an added 
feature give more people less air) to 
think in terms of home ownership. For 
a home has the adequate accommodations, 
together with the facilities for privacy 
and comfort which no project has ever 
accomplished. 



The Inquisitor 
Journey Into Nowhere 

ment building and demanded the answer. 
Why was he sent here, and who sanctions 
this? An immediate reply was not given 
but it was generally known that the 
intent was to keep Mr. Shafferman in more 
distant and far-flung fields. 

Publications of the details were not 
known until last month. But the basic 
purpose of his mission was already known. 
It embodied a common policy formul- 
ated previously between department and 
college authorities, of keeping Mr. 
Shafferman busy so as not to hinder 
progressive education. 

When first the facts were known Mr. 
Shafferman was unhappy. He made no 
statement. Reporters who knew the way- 
farer's hostility to such a policy roared 
with laughter when a spokesman intoned: 

"You would think that there were no 
further questions. But from Mr. Shaffer- 
man came— 'Who sanctions this?' " 

Four Walls & a Roof Above . . 

Housing is a very personal matter. 
Every man would like to live in his 
special kind of house. Usually it is the 
type advertised in Ladies' and Gentlemen's 
Magazine. Very often it goes no further 
that the desire of the apartment seeker 
who said: "Any place to live— just as 
long as it is close to the local liquor mart." 
Housing is that personal. 

Since man has always wanted a par- 
ticular place to hang his hat we have 
always had a housing problem. Only 
recently, since Mr. Citizen discovered 
that he needs such a place, have we had 
a housing shortage. For the present man 
has had to disregard the cozy pictorial 
cottage as the ideal living place, for he 
knows that building it is an idle dream. 




from excavators to electricians. Col- 
lectively they are proud of the boast, ". . . 
Ours is a strong union!" Selectively their 
prices are enough to make any man forego 
his Saturday-night poker. But it will take 
that, and more, not the cramped quarters 
of little Miss Muffet, to get Jack to 
build a new house. 

A Stimulating Shakesperian 

While Bostonian theatregoers took 
what laughs they could from "Call Me 
Mister", they also took a few thoughts 
from Fr. Bonn's majestic production of 
Othello. 

Boston had anxiously awaited the re- 
turn of dramatist Fr. Bonn. Last De- 
cember they got him. 

The play was given its U. S. premier 
in Boston's famed Pilate's Daughter Hall. 
When it was staged there there was 
brought to the stage the deep purple and 
the tragedy of the greatest dramatic poet 
who ever lived. It was unmistakable. Fr. 
Bonn was of the Spirit of Shakespeare. 

The production consumed two hours 
and twenty minutes. Seldom during 
that time did it fall short, or even deviate 
from the best that its author gave it. 
Almost continually the BC players 
enhanced Shakespeare and the art of 
stage-production by giving both a new 
character, a new glory. Sometimes it 
even surpassed the original. Loud applause 
therefore goes to Fr. Bonn. 

Spry, but black at the temples, Fr. 
Bonn is also a noted author (So Falls 
the Elm) and an eminent Professor of 
English Literature. When the war came 
Fr. Bonn went too. Serving with the 
far-flung U. S. Navy in the far reaches 
of the Pacific he distinguished himself 
well and would have continued had he 
not been wounded by the engagement of 
Truk. Undaunted he returned to Boston 
College where, though he retains the 



Painter Linehan 
"/ Paint Too" 

One of the country's leading pro- 
ponents for home ownership is Prof. Irwin 
of Boston College. Prof. Irwin, an eminent 
sociologist in his own right, at a recent 
housing convention said, "Eighty-five per- 
cent of the people prefer home ownership." 
Home ownership is desired by all. It is 
true, however, he added, that this does 
not always work out, "for some people 
paint their houses and others do not. But 
on the whole most are painted." 

Building homes, however, is not as 
simple as it was a century ago when 
sturdy yeoman gathered from miles around 
to raise a roof (and also a little cain) 
for a neighbor. To-day it demands the 
skill of some twenty specialized trades, 




Boston College's Fr. Bonn 
"Amid the Elms, Thought" 



NATIONAL AFFAIRS 



scars of battle, he now freshens the mind. 
Since his return he has earned a solid 
reputation as a great Shakesperian. 

Seldom in a day had the Boston papers 
spoken as they did. "Magnificent, awe- 
inspiring. One immediately perceived it 
as a notable advance in the progress of 
promoting Shakespeare." and again, "Fr. 
Bonn has left the earth." 

Still black at the temples Fr. Bonn had 
little to say despite the avalanche of 
acclaim. To him Shakespeare and the 
great conflict were both "stimulating, 
stimulating, just stimulating." 

Val and Paul 

There was war and all the grownups 
were gone, flung far across the seas. Then 
there was the surrender, the surprise one 
and the real one. After that there was 
the trip home, readjustment and the teen 
age problem. 

The teen age was one of the things the 
country created while the veterans were 
away. And homebound men didn't like 
it. 

The veteran was home now and his 
many months in many lands had 
changed him. Some men, men who had 
had less hazardous jobs and who spent 
less time doing them, talked with question- 
able familiarity about the places they had 
seen; others, those who had fought the 
war, said little. They said little now. 
But there was a time when they had tried 
to describe a nation, a world of people 
on a V mail. They wrote from London, 
from Belfast, and then as the armies 
moved across the continent, from Paris, 
Luxembourg; and in the Pacific from 
Manila, Sydney, Guam. Now that they 
were home they had grown wiser. 

The world had not changed much to 
them. To them the world was just as 
big as it was in geography class, the 
oceans just as large, the countries just 
as vast and the people just as complex 
as they always had been and would be. 
To them riots in Trieste were the results 
of cultural and religious clashes as well 
as political, and the breakouts in the 
Slavic countries were but one sign of the 
philosophical invasion of Russian material- 
ism which was now threatening the world. 
Then came Val and Paul. 

Val and Paul (H. Leonard Valway, 
Richard Paul Wilkas) are two intellectual 
teen agers. judging from the manner they 
pen their names. They are also ad- 
venturous teen agers, for when the war 
had ended they with youthful enthusiasm, 
embarked for parts west and south. Their 
mission? To bring to focus the many 
points, political and otherwise, which 
had managed to escape scholarly corre- 
spondents and wayfarying warriors. To 
them the world was shrinking and so they 
wanted to take off before there was 
nothing to see. They would go to the 
continent. Now that was a nice word, the 
continent. They would go there and re- 




Fellow Traveler Wilkas 
A New Puff of Wind 

turn and write and write and write. This 
is like what they wrote. 

"Val looked at me. I looked at Val. 
It was great to be on the continent. I 
looked at my passport. Val looked at 
me. I looked at Val. The trip over was 
fine. We landed in Cherbourg and then 
crossed the border. On the coast you 
could see boats worming their way across 
the Atlantic. Franco? Well, he was like 
a pilot who could land on one of 3 
fields. He would land on the field named 
Monarchy." 

This manner and method of reporting 
is nothing new. At best it was nice for 
the folks to keep in touch with them, 
at worse it disturbed proper perspection. 
Most of the reports carried descriptions 
of buildings and the sea or how it felt at 
a Spanish bull fight. It did little to present 
a scholarly and intelligent picture of Spain 
and her people. Such reporting was 
not unusual in this artificial age. It 
added to the list of these articles and 
books which stress the incidentals while 
forsaking the essentials. This was the 
wind of the age, to catch people, their 
thoughts, their feelings in a wisp of 
mind. But it takes more than that. All 
of which proved conclusively to many 
a tried and sometimes tired veteran that 
which other "3 weeks in a place and 
then write a book authors" had taught 
them previously. Val and Paul were 
young, it is true, but until they had 
several "Hershey bars", or their equivalent, 
their puff of wind would only fade away. 

Notification that the breeze had lowered 
its velocity was in evidence last month 
when the Heights, official news organ of 
the college, discontinued the talk of the 
trip just as it was nearing the States. 



MILESTONES 



Born. To Harold J. Roberts 25, U. S. 
Rubberman and 1947 Collegiate Who's 
Who, formerly with the 79th; and Helen 
Roberts, his first love: their first child; 
in Boston. Name, Linda. Weight: 8 lbs. 
3 oz. 



Born. To John Buckley, famed big 
stick with the 1946 Boston College nine, 
once bemedaled army veteran; and Claire 
Buckley, socially prominent Medfordite; 
their first child, daughter; In Medford, 
Mass. Name: Susan. Weight: 7 lbs. 8 oz. 



Born. To Edward Jennings 25. noted 
college actor (Othello, The Works), now 
turned orator (Hearst's selection) and 
Who's Who coljlege selection of 1947, 
and Phylis Jennings: their first child; In 
Boston. 



Engaged. Richard M. Kelley, Managing 
Editor of the new-faced, new-viewed Sub 
Turri, one time army veteran; and 
Patricia McCormack, noted socialite: He 
for the first time, she for the first time; 
in Boston. 



Born. To James J. Rodenbusch, 26, 
collegiate Beau Brummel, and now a suc- 
cessful enterpreneur; and his wife Mary: 
their first child; in Boston. 



Engaged. James Kenney 23, noted 
Boston College economist and famed 
Marine air ace and Kay Barry, very 
sociable and very prominent New Vorker; 
both for the first time; In Woburn, Mass. 



Died. Father Michael J. Harding, S.J., 
48, Professor of Scholastic Philosophy at 
Boston College, one time Dean of the 
Intown College, author of such works as 
The Science of Metaphysics, Problems 
of Epistemology. Father Harding some- 
times mixed poetry with his philosophy 
to soften hard facts. Long a campus 
favorite, his passing touched all when he 
died of a cerebral hemorrhage in Boston. 



Died. Father Stephen Koen, S.J., long 
time Professor of Education and Edu- 
cational Psychology at Holy Cross and 
Boston College, famed lecturer and noted 
authority on modern educational problems 
and methods. Father Koen was called 
the friend of the average student. His 
death forced his retirement from the 
teaching profession. 




^ ^ n ^ r^ 






£\ 




The Fathers 

of the 
Senior Class 

Present the Class Baby 
of 1947 




Master Billy Quinn 



Alabama Victory 

Dance at the 
Hotel Continental 





Soft Lights and Music 

at the 

Hotel Keiimore 



Power Frazer 

Collects at the 

Copley Plaza 




ONWARD B. C! 



SONGS OF 



All hail, Maroon and Gold, 

Our banners unfold. 

We loyal sons are with you today, 

Young grads and old. 

So march along, B. C. 

Tis your victory, 

Fight! Fight! the Eagle will scream tonight, 

Onward, B. C. 



TO THE COLORS 



FOR BOSTON 

1 
For Boston, for Boston, 
We sing our proud refrain! 
For Boston, for Boston, 
'Tis wisdom's earthly fane 
For here men are men 
And their hearts are true, 
And the towers on the Heights 
Reach to heaven's own blue. 
For Boston, for Boston, 
Till the echoes ring again! 



Maroon is for the sunrise as it leaps across 

the sky, 
And gold is for the glory of the noon; 
And in the flush of nightfall, when our towers 

fade on high, 
The clouds are flaming golden and maroon. 
Rise up again, ye B. C. men, cheer louder 

than the rest! 
When the sunrise meets the noontide, see 

your glory and renown, 
For our banners mix at twilight as it sinks 

into the west, 
And the heavens shout — for Boston! 
When the sun is going down. 



For Boston, for Boston, 
Thy glory is our own! 
For Boston, for Boston, 
'Tis here that truth is known; 
And ever with the Right 
Shall thy sons be found, 
Till time shall be no more 
And thy work is crowned. 
For Boston, for Boston, 
For Thee and Thine alone! 



BOSTON COLLEGE 



B. C. VICTORY MARCH 



SWEEP DOWN THE FIELD 

Sweep down the field for Boston, 

Marching on to glory. 

Forward fighting Eagles, 

Carry home the spoils of victory. 

Oh! We'll crush the foe before us 

As the Boston men of old; 

So, Fight! Fight! Fight! Fight! Fight! Fight! 

Fight! 
For the old Maroon and Gold. 

Cheered to victory our team sweeps on, 

The foe is vanquished and their spirit gone. 

B-O-S-T-O-N 

Boston! Boston! Boston! 



For Boston men are always true 

Faithful to the golden hue 

B-O-S-T-O-N 

Boston men will march again 

Then all together in our hearts we'll sing 

For the mighty eagle's taken to the wing 

Tower bells in triumph ring 

For Boston we'll win today. 



HAIL! ALMA MATER 

Hail! Alma Mater! Thy praise we sing. 
Fondly thy mem'ries round our heart still 

cling. 
Guide of our youth, thro' thee we shall 

prevail! 
Hail! Alma Mater! Hail! All Hail! 



Hail! Alma Mater! Lo! on the height, 
Proudly thy tow'rs are raised for the Right. 
God is they Master, His Law thy sole avail! 
Hail! Alma Mater! Hail! All Hail! 



ACKNOWLEDGMENTS 



We are glad of this opportunity to make 
public acknowledgment of all who have 
helped the SUB TURRI come to life despite 
this year of strikes, labor shortages, and 
fluctuating schedules. In particular we are 
grateful to — 

The President and the Deans of Boston 
College, for their willingness to help the SUB 
TURRI achieve its thirty-fourth birthday, and 
for their interest in our work which was a 
source of encouragement and inspiration to 
us. 

The Faculty and student body of the College 
for the aid, spirit of cooperation and financial 
assistance at SUB TURRI dances throughout 
the year. 

The members of the staff who were faithful 
to the task which they pledged themselves to 
accomplish — Dick Kelley, Charlie Thomas, 
Hank Welch, Jack McAuliffe, Harry Roberts, 
and Ray Nee. 

Tom O'Connor for his clever drawings and 
in particular for his TIME cover scheme. 

The senior class for their characteristic 
cooperative spirit. 



Our Patrons, especially the Philomatheia 
Club the benefactors of the college. 

Our Advertisers, without whose financial 
assistance this book would not have been 
possible. 

Mr. John Butler, for service beyond the 
line of duty to the book, for helpful sugges- 
tions on make-up, art design and for con- 
tributing in a great measure to whatever 
excellence this book may possess, to the em- 
ployees of Advertisers Engraving Co. who 
were always ready to help and assist us. 

Purdy's Studio: Mr. James Bleiler and 
Mr. George Corrigan for direction, sugges- 
tions and cooperation. 

Mr. William J. Heffernan of Heffernan 
Press for supervision in printing and make- 
up. 

To Misses Mary Lee, Helen McCarthy, 
Eleanor Hegarty, and Mary McDonough of 
the Registrar's Office, for class lists, collect- 
ing SUB TURRI mail and giving valuable 
assistance. 




'/?" 



>»%» , ^ 



■ M*Wv. ,!._-. 



HUM 







PATRONS LIST 

Most Reverend Richard J. Cushing. D.D. 

Rt. Rev. Jeremiah F. Minahan 

Rt. Rev. Richard J. Quinlan 

Rt. Rev. Robert P. Barry 

Rt. Rev. Joseph S. McGlinchey 

Rt. Rev. Charles A. Finn 

Rev. Daniel J. Donovan 

^ ery Rev. T^ illiam L. Keleher. S.J. 

Rev. Stephen A. Mulcahy. S.J. 

Rev. James J. Kelley. S.J. 

Rev. Harry M. OConnor 

Hon. James M. Curley 

Mr. and Mrs. A rncent P. Roberts 

Mr. P. A. CTCoiinell 

The Junior Philomatheia Club 

Thomas F. Scanlan 

Dr. John F. Bradley 

Rep. Charles J. Artesani 

Richard N. Summers 



Boston College 

Chestnut Hill Massachusetts 



Arts and Sciences 

Four Academic lear Courses 

leading to degrees: 

Bachelor of Arts with Honors 
Bachelor of Arts 
Bachelor of Science 

Biology 

Chemistry 

Physics 

Bachelor of Science 

Education 

History 

Social Sciences 

Pre-Medical Courses: 

Selected courses in preparation for graduate study in Medicine 
are offered. These courses meet the requirements of the American 
Medical Association. 

College Library: 

The College Lihrary contains ahout 163.000 volumes. There are 
excellent facilities for consultation, private study, reference and 
research work. 

Activities : 

Debating. Dramatics. Orchestra and Glee Clubs. Science Clubs. 
College Paper. Language Clubs. Cross and Crown Senior Honor 
Society, etc. 

Fellowships : 

Each vear fellowships are offered for advanced study and re- 
search work in the pursuit of courses leading to the degrees of 
M.A. and M.S. Awards are based on evidence of scholarly attain- 
ment and ability for specialized training in the Arts and Sciences. 

Very Rev. William L. Keleher. S.J.. President 

Rev. Stephen A. Mulcahy. S.J.. Dean 

Rev. John P. Folev. S.J.. Dean of Freshmen 



COLLEGE OF BUSINESS 
ADMINISTRATION 

Four Academic Year Course Leading to the Degree of 

BACHELOR OF SCIENCE 

IN 

BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION 





TECHNICAL 


ACCOUNTING 


INDUSTRIAL MANAGEMENT 


BANKING 


MARKETING 


BUSINESS ORGANIZATION 


CORPORATION FINANCE 


AUDITING 


TAXES 




CULTURAL 


LITERATURE 


ECONOMICS 


MODERN LANGUAGE 


SOCIOLOGY 


HISTORY 


LOGIC 


GOVERNMENT 


PHILOSOPHY 




MORAL 


MORAL PHILOSOPHY 


RELIGION 



UNIVERSITY HEIGHTS, CHESTNUT HILL, MASS. 



BOSTON COLLEGE 

CHESTNUT HILL 67, MASSACHUSETTS 

The Graduate School of Arts and Sciences 
and Education 



Courses leading to the degrees of: 
MASTER OF ARTS 
MASTER OF SCIENCE 
MASTER OF EDUCATION 

For information, apply to: 

THE REGISTRAR 

Boston College Graduate School 
Chestnut Hill 67, Massachusetts 



Compliments of the 

BOSTON COLLEGE 
LAW SCHOOL 

Day and Evening Courses Leading to 
Degree of Bachelor of Laws 

18 TREMONT STREET, BOSTON, MASSACHUSETTS 

REV. WILLIAM J. RENEALY, S.J., Dean 



BOSTON COLLEGE SCHOOL OF SOCIAL WORK 



A Graduate Professional School offering a unique 

preparation for the many new careers in the 

Social Services. 



Address: THE DEAN 

BOSTON COLLEGE SCHOOL OF SOCIAL WORK 

126 Newbury Street Boston, Massachusetts 

Catalogue Sent on Request 




IN THE LAND OF GOOD EATING 








Among New Eng'and's priceless heritages are its 
educational institutions,— to say nothing of its fine 
foods. We, at First National Stores, are proud of 
the fact that an overwhelming majority of New 
Englanders depend on us for all of their food require- 
ments. First National Stores, too, is a New England 
institution, — steeped in New England tradition and 
constantly devoted to the task of maintaining its repu- 
tation asNewEngland'sLargestRetailer of FineFoods 



NEW ENGLAND'S Largest Retailer of FINE FOODS 



Best Wishes to the Class of '47 

from 

SULLIVAN BROS., 
Printers 

New England's Fastest Groiving Printing Establishment 



MAIN OFFICE AND PLANT AT LOWELL 




Auxiliary Plants: 




BOSTON - CHICAGO ■ 


OCEANPORT, N. J. - 


PAWTUCKET, R. I. 


The continued patronage 


of the Scholarly Jesuit 


Fathers has materially 


aided our progress. 


Naturally we are genuinely appreciative. 



A PROMINENT SPOT ON 
MAIN STREET 

▲ 

V V ITHIN the past year A & P has been mentioned as part 
of the story or dialogue in at least 47 popular books of fact 
and fiction. 

Well, that's perfectly natural, because we provide 6,000,000 
American families with good food at low cost. 

Wherever plain people live, the A & P is an important part 
of their daily lives. Years ago it was the familiar red-fronted 
grocery store. Today the super market, carrying over two 
thousand different items, is as much a part of the American 
scene as the town hall or Main Street or the village green. 

No wonder so many chroniclers of American life put the 
A & P into their narratives! 

We're flattered to turn up in 47 books. But we know — and 
we think you know, too — that institutions like the A & P are built 
on generations of hard work and public service. 

If we're a fixture in American life, it's because the men and 
women of A & P have worked constantly for over 86 years to 
do the nation's most efficient job of food distribution. 

A & P FOOD STORES 



Compliments of 

SHERATON HOTELS 



in Boston 



THE COPLEY PLAZA 

Maurice T. Lawler, Gen. Mgr. 



THE BEACONSFIELD 

(Brookline) 
Douglass M. Boone, Gen. Mgr. 



THE SHERATON 

Howard R. Wiley, Gen. Mgr. 



THE MYLES STANDISH 

Douglass M. Boone, Gen. Mgr. 



Boston's Distinctive Store 

Famous 
Throughout the Nation for 
Good Foods and Delicacies 

S. S. PIERCE CO. 

Boston 

Stores in Boston, Belmont, Brookline 
and Newton. 

MAIL AND TELEPHONE ORDERS 


COMPLIMENTS 
OF 

THE JUNIOR CLASS 


Scholastic Jewelers, 
Inc. 

Boston's Largest Manufacturing 

JEWELERS 

Official Jewelers 

to the 

Class of 1947 

JOHN F. LYNCH, Sales Manager 

5174 Washington Street 
DEDHAM, MASSACHUSETTS 


COMPLIMENTS OF 

Matthew F. Sheehan 
Co. 

New England' s Leading 
Church Goods House 

22 Chauncy Street 
BOSTON, MASSACHUSETTS 



Edward Everett Federal 

Savings and Loan Association 

620 Columbia Road 
DORCHESTER, MASSACHUSETTS 

Savings and Investment Shares 
32 Years a Thrift Institution 


Compliments of 

DORCHESTER FRIENDS 


Compliments of 

HIND'S LAUNDRY 

K. S. Milllmry. "29 
V. G. Millbury, '41 
R. S. Millbury, '47 


"Loyal to the Ethics of Pharmacy" 

Kelly's Prescription 
Drug Store 

C. P. KELLY, Reg. Ph., B. C, 28 

389 Washington Street 
BRIGHTON 35, MASSACHUSETTS 


Compliments of 

The Junior Philomatheia 
Club 


BOSTON COLLEGE 

College of Arts and Sciences Intown 

Evening Degree Coarses in 
ARTS 

SOCIAL SCIENCES 
BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION 


TWO LOCATIONS 

APPLIANCE & RADIO DIVISION OFFICE 
362 Washington Street 

SUPPLIES - FIXTURES SERVICE DIVISION 

433 Market Street 

J. F. Conaty Electric Co. 

Brighton Centre, Massachusetts 
John F. Conaty Telephone STA. 3,300 


BRIGHTON LAUNDRY 

55 Union Street 
BRIGHTON, MASSACHUSETTS 

THE LARGEST LAUNDRY IN THE WORLD 
OWNED AND OPERATED BY WOMEN 

Telephones: STAdium 5520-1-2 



Compliments of 



e. f p BURNS 



INC. 



100 SUMMER STREET, BOSTON 

Fine Formal and Academic Clothes for Rental 
For Men and Women 

B.C. Representative, PAUL E. P. BURNS, B.C., '49 
LIBerty 3572 





PATRICK J. GILL 


AT THE 


Gold and Silversmith 


COLLEGE BOOK 


387 Washington Street 


STORE 


BOSTON, MASSACHUSETTS 




Rooms 709 - 10 Telephone LIBerty 8025 




"America's Finest" 




CLASS RINGS 


Texts, Stationery and 


MEDALS and TROPHIES 


Religious Articles 


Loren Murehison & Co., Inc. 

School and College Jewelers 




828 Park Square Building 




BOSTON 16, MASSACHUSETTS 




Ralph W. Coates, Dist. Mgr. 



PURDY 



BOSTON 



OFFICIAL PHOTOGRAPHER 

for the 
1947 Sub Turri 




126 DORR ANCE ST., PROVIDENCE, RHODE ISLAND 



BOSTON COLLEGE ALUMNI ASSOCIATION 

CHESTNUT HILL 67, MASSACHUSETTS 

Tel. BIG. 3356 - 1480 



R. GAYNOR WELLINGS, '23 

Executive Committee President 

J. LESTER HOURIGAN, 24 
First Vice-President 

WILLIAM J. FITZSIMONS, '35 

Second Vice-President 

WILLIAM M. CASHIN, '18 

Treasurer 

JOHN C. HOLBROW, '24 

Secretory 



JOHN B. ATKINSON, '16 
ROBERT E. CURRAN, '35 
LEO C. DONAHUE, '29 
JOHN W. KAPPLES, '14 
DANIEL A. LYNCH, '25 
JAMES H. RILEY, '19 
Board of Directors 

JOHN J. HAYES, '30 

Executive Secretary 

REV. FRANCIS V. SULLIVAN, S.J., '21 
Faculty Advisor 



Compliments of 



Tom and John Pappas 



THE 

BOSTON COLLEGE 

ATHLETIC ASSOCIATION 

EXTENDS 

ITS BEST WISHES 

TO 

ALL THE MEMBERS OF THE 

CLASS OF 1947 



For a Long Period of Years 



we have been serving Schools and Colleges of 
New England and New York in their require- 
ments for Catalogs, Literary Magazines, Year- 
books, Prospectuses, etc., and as a result have 
acquired a technique and experience which guar- 
antees our customers a first rate product at moder- 
ate cost, and with a minimum amount of trouble 
from detail. Ask any of those publications which 
bear our imprint. 



THE HEFFERNAN PRESS 

150 Fremont Street, Worcester, Massachusetts