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Full text of "Sub turri = Under the tower : the yearbook of Boston College"

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Digitized by the Internet Archive 

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Boston Library Consortium IVIember Libraries 



http://www.archive.org/details/subturriundertow1959bost 



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For four years we have been a part of Boston College. And 
now, we realize, Boston College is just as truly a part of 
us. And so we begin to question. What is this place to 
which we have given these four years? And, more impor- 
tant, what have we become by doing so? 






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1959 



BOSTON 



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SUB TURRI 




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Dedication 



It is customary for one volume of the Sub Turri to be 
dedicated to the President of the University during his 
tenure of office. However, Father Walsh's presidency is 
but the occasion of this dedication, not the reason. 

For it is not to the office or title of President that we 
wish to pay this small tribute, but to the man himself. 
We wish to acknowledge our debt of gratitude to him for 
the sincere interest and genuine understanding which has 
marked all his dealings with us during these four years. 
And we wish especially to express our respect and ad- 
miration for a man who in his every action has shown 
himself to be truly humble in greatness and truly great 
in humility. 

Thus we dedicate the 1959 Sub Turri to the Very Rev- 
erend Michael P. Walsh, S.J., President of Boston College. 




Boston College is a complex of good and bad features. 
During these past four years we have sometimes 
ignored the former in the name of honesty and some- 
times we have glossed over the latter in the name of 
tradition. But both are a part of the University and both 
have been a part of our education. We must neglect 
neither, for it is only by understanding the good and 
the bad that we are able to see beyond the petty criti- 
cism and unreal traditions to discover what is of endur- 
ing value in the education which we have received. 







4- 

4 








St. Mary's Hall 



Dormitories 





Ford Tower 



Boston College is a place of tradition 



It is a university old beyond its ninety-six 
years, as old as the oldest of the traditions in 
which it is rooted. As old as the Jesuit order, 
as old as the Church, as old as the history of 
thought itself. 



Campion Hall 



Newer than its more recent building, newer yet than the latest book in 
its library, it is as new as the still wet ink on a research paper or a yet 
unasked question in the mind of a student. 

. . . and a place of progress. 




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It is a place of complexity 




As varied as the architecture and purposes 
of its score of buildings, as complex as the 
body of thought of all its faculty and students. 



Devlin Hall 
East Entrance 




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and a place of simplicity. 





The Gold Eagle 



As simple as its motto, "Excel always," as 
simple as its purpose. Catholic education, as 
simple as its most valued possession. Truth. 



To each of us it is many things 

A place of study 




and prayer 



Third Floor Alcove 
Gasson Hall 




of recreation 



Alumni Stadium 



St. Mary's Chapel 





and concentration 



of friendship 



Gasson Rotunda 




. and guidance 



Physics Laboratory 





Linden Lane 



It is what we have made it 



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A Heritage 



Boston College is today the sum total of all that it has 
been in the past. It is what we have made it and what all 
who have preceded us have made it. For in passing 
through the gates and halls of this university we have not 
only drawn upon the traditions of its past but we have 
communicated these traditions to the future. And in doing 
so we have left behind something of ourselves. This is the 
great exchange known as education. 

But the participation of all in this exchange is not equal. 
There are some who, not content merely to inherit and 
continue the tradition, strive to put their own mark firmly 
upon it. In our own context there have been men whose 
influence is unmistakable, men who inherited the Western 
tradition, the Christian tradition, and the Jesuit tradition, 
and made of them something more than they were. 

These were the men who, through the force and energy 
of their own characters and intellects, shaped their tradi- 
tion into something other than it was, added to it, and 
gave it an effectiveness, a poignancy, and an actuality that 
it did not previously possess. They grasped the tradition 
which they inherited and of it they created Boston College. 

The accomplishments of these men will not be soon 
forgotten. For, in giving generously of themselves to the 
heritage which they passed on, they left on this university 
and on us, its students, a mark that will long remain — a 
mark that is as firm and as enduring as the very stones of 
the buildings which symbolize their achievements. 




REV. JOHN BAPST, S.J. 
First President 




and a Challenge 




Gasson, Bapst, Fulton, Devlin, Lyons. These are the 
men who fashioned Boston College, who put the imprint 
of their own character upon the institution and upon us. 
They are the men whose ideas and convictions form a 
large part of our heritage, and whose courage, determina- 
tion, and dedication are to us a challenge. 

For just as they shaped and molded and gave form and 
meaning to the tradition which was theirs, so too must 
we make of the tradition which they have passed on to 
us a living thing, a body of ideas and ideals which is 
different and better for having been communicated by us. 
We must, following their example, firmly stamp the tradi- 
tion of today with the enduring mark of our own char- 
acter. 

This is a process that encompasses a man's whole life 
and work, and the extent to which he succeeds is a true 
and accurate yardstick of his greatness. Gasson, Bapst, 
Fulton, Devlin, and Lyons gave themselves wholly to 
this task, and their success and greatness is fittingly cele- 
brated in the monuments which constitute the university 
they fashioned. 

Our own molding of the traditions passed on by these 
men began the day we entered Boston College, and it will 
continue through the rest of our lives. The success with 
which we have begun this task can be measured by our 
accomplishments as we know them and as they are set 
forth in this book. We have established no monuments. 
The challenge of our heritage still awaits us. 



REV. CHARLES W. LYONS, S.J. 
Fourteenth President 




REV. WILLIAM DEVLIN, S.J. 
Fifteenth President 




REV. THOMAS I. GASSON, S.J. 
Thirteenth President 



REV. ROBERT FULTON, S.J 
Third President 




CONTENTS 


1 








FACULTY ^^^^^^K 
page nineteen I^^^^V 

SENIORS 

page forty-five 

ACTIVITIES 

page two hundred three 

SPORTS 

page two hundred eighty-one 

FEATURES 

page three hundred twenty-seven 




FACULTY 




REV. THOMAS I. GASSON, S.J. 
Thirteenth President of Boston College 



Determination, steadfastness, and the courage of his intellectual convic- 
tions were the distinguishing characteristics of the Rev. Thomas I. Gasson, 
S.J. An immigrant to America and a convert to Catholicism while still in 
his teens, Father Gasson maintained a spirit of independent inquiry and 
action through all his life. These qualities, together with his broad learning 
and vigorous personality, enabled him not only to establish Boston College 
on its present site but also to establish in the secular conmiunity respect 
and admiration for the University and for the Church which fostered it. 

The ideals of Father Gasson are today reflected in the faculty of the Uni- 
versity, both Jesuit and lay. For it is they to whom has devolved the task 
of building intellectually where he built physically and of strengthening and 
confirming the position which he won. No less determined, no less stead- 
fast, no less intellectually courageous must we also be, for it is to us that 
the faculty has passed on this task and this challenge. 



UNIVERSITY 




REV. WILLIAM V. E. CASEY, S.J. 

Academic Vice-President 

Dean of the College of Arts and Sciences 



REV. THOMAS F. FLEMING, S.J. 
Assistant to the President 




22 




REV. FRANCIS B. McMANUS, S.J. 
Secretary of the University 
Dean of Men in the College of 
Business Administration 



ADMINISTRATION 



REV. TERENCE L. CONNOLLY, S.J. 


Director of Libraries 




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REV. JOHN E. MURPHY, S.J. 

Business Manager 





REV. EDMOND D. WALSH, S.J. 
Director of Admissions 



REV. EDWARD J. WHALEN, S.J. 
Treasurer 




23 



ARTS AND SCIENCES 




HENRY J. McMAHON, A.M. 
Assistant Dean 



REV. JOSEPH L. SHEA, S.J. 
Dean of Men 





24 



EILEEN M. TOSNEY, A.M. 
Registrar 



REV. HENRY A. CALLAHAN, S.J. 
Student Counsellor 




BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION 




REV. W. SEAVEY JOYCE, S.J. 
Dean 





DONALD J. WHITE, Ph.D. 
Associate Dean 




JOHN C. CONWAY, A.M. 
Registrar 



REV. CHARLES J. REARDON, S.J. 
Student Counsellor 




SCHOOL OF EDUCATION 




REV. CHARLES F. DONOVAN, S.J. 
Dean 



REV. ROBERT F. HOEY, S.J. 
Assistant Dean 





REV. HENRY P. WENNERBERG, S.J. 

Student Counsellor 



26 





MARY T. KINNANE, A.M. 
Dean of Women 



ELIZABETH A. STRAIN, M.Ed. 

Registrar 




SCHOOL OF NURSING 



MARY L. PEKARSKI, B.S.L.S. 

Librarian 



KATHARINE M. HASTINGS, A.M. 
Registrar 



RITA P. KELLEHER, M.Ed. 
Dean 






CATHERINE M. CROSBY, A.B. 

Registrar 



REV. CHARLES B. TOOMEY, S.J. 
Dean 




INTOWN COLLEGE 




ROBERT F. O'MALLEY, M.S. 
Chemistry Department 



JAMES E. SHAW, M.B.A. 
Business Law Department 





REV. JOHN J. L. COLLINS, S.J. 
Finance Department 



REV. LEO P. McCAULEY, S.J. 
Classics Department 




REV. ROBERT J. McEWEN, S.J. 
Economics Department 



29 



FERDINAND L. ROUSSEVE, Ph.D. 
Fine Arts Department 



PAUL T. HEFFRON, Ph.D. 

History and Government Department 





JUSTIN C. CRONIN, M.B.A. 
Industrial Management Department 



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REV. JAMES W. SKEHAN, S.J. 
Geology Department 



30 




Mathematics 
Marketing 
Military Science 





LT. COL. PHILIP R. CIBOTTI, JR., U.S.A. 
Military Science Department 



GERALD F. PRICE, Ph.D. 

Marketing Department 



REV. STANLEY E. BEZUSZKA, S.J. 
Mathematics Department 




31 




Psychology 
Sociology 
Special Programs 
Theology 



p. ALBERT DUHAMEL, Ph.D. 

Special Programs 



REV. RICHARD W. ROUSSEAU, S.J. 
Theology Department 



JOHN D. DONOVAN, Ph.D. 
Sociology Department 





REV. JAMES F. MOYNIHAN, S.J. 
Psychology Department 



33 




Raymond J. Aheme, Ph.D. 
Economics 



Michael Albery, Ph.D. 
Economics and Finance 



Redmond Allman, Ph.D. 
History 




John R. Betts, Ph.D. 
History 



Joseph Bomstein, Ph.D. 



Chemistry 



Paul Boulanger, Ph.D. 
Modern Languages 



Edward Bradford, Capt. U.S.A. 
Military Science 

Phyllis Bromwell, M.Ed. 
Nursing 

Frederick T. Bryan, M.B.A. 
Marketing 



Francis M. Buckley, D.Ed. 
Education 



Rev. Richard P. Burke, S.J. 
Social Work 



Rev. Thomas P. Butler, S.J. 
Chemistry 



William J. Carey, M.B.A. 
Business Education 



William A. Carito, A.M. 
Mathematics 



Ralph K. Carleton, Ph.D. 
Chemistry 



THE 

FACULTY 

OF 

BOSTON 

COLLEGE 




Rev. David F. Carroll, S.J. 
Theology 




Rev. James J. Casey, S.J. 
Theology 





Joseph R. Cautela, Ph.D. 
Modern Psychology 

Joseph H. Chen, Ph.D. 
Physics 

Rev. Richard J. Coakley, S.J. 
Theology 



Rev. Jeremiah F. Coleman, S.J. 
Ethics 



Catherine Conners, M.Ed. 
Nursing 

Rev. Joseph J. Connor, S.J. 
Theology 



Katherine C. Cotter, Ph.D. 
Education 



John R. Cox, Ph.D. 
History 



Rev. James T. Creamer, S.J. 
Economics 









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Jacqueline L. Criscenti, Ph.D. 
Mathematics 



Joseph T. Criscenti, Ph.D. 
History 



Rev. Charles M. Crowley, S.J. 
Physics 



Rev. Paul A. Curtin, S.J. 
Theology 



Andre G. DeBeauvivier, A.M. 
Modern Languages 



Andre J. DeBehtune, Ph.D. 
Chemistry 



Raymond DeRoover, Ph.D. 
Economics 



Rev. J. Frank Devine, S.J. 
Theology 




36 



Rev. James J. Devlin, S.J. 
Physics 

Paul A. Devlin, M.B.A. 
Accounting 

Antonette E. DiLoreto, D.Ed. 
Business Education 



Stanley J. Dmohowski, B.S.B.A. 
Economics 

Rev. Joseph F. Donahue, S.J. 
Theology 

George P. Donaldson, M.B.A. 
Director of Vocational Guidance 
and Placement. 





A 



THE 

FACULTY 

OF 

BOSTON 

COLLEGE 



Catherine M. Downey, B.S. 
Education 



Richard E. Downing, M.S. 
Physics 



Joseph L. Driscoll, Ph.D. 
Education 



Rev. John V. Driscoll, S.J. 
Dean, School of Social Work 



Rev. George L. Drury, S.J. 
Biology 



Rev. James L. Duffy, S.J. 
Economics 



Rev. Maurice V. DuUea, S.J. 
Theology 



Rev. Alexander G. Duncan, S.J. 
Philosophy 






Rev. Daniel N. Dwyer, S.J. 
English 

Benedetto Fabrizi, D.M.I. 
Modern Languages 

Harold H. Fagan, M.S. 
Chemistry 



Mr. Leo J. Fahey, S.J. 
Philosophy 

Bernard P. Farragher, Ph.D. 
English 

Joseph Figurito, D.M.L. 
Modern Languages 



37 




John J. Fitzgerald, Ph.D. 
English 



Rev. William E. Fitzgerald, S.J. 
Philosophy 



Rev. Francis Flaherty, S.J. 
Psychology 




Albert M. Folkard. A.M. 
English 



Rev. George R. Fuir, S.J. 
Director of Housing 



Philip F. Garity, LL.B. 
Economics 



Robert M. Gibson, Major, U.S.A. 
Military Science 

Rev. Edward J. Gorman, S.J. 
Philosophy 

George F. G. Grob, A.M. 
English 



Hans G. Haefili, Ph.D. 
Mathematics 



Owen A. Hanley, A.M. 
Modern Languages 



Rev. Martin P. Harney, S.J. 
History 



Vincent A. Harrington 
Finance 



Carlton J. H. Hayes, Ph.D. 
History 

Rev. R. E. Healey, S.J. 
Theology 



THE 

FACULTY 

OF 

BOSTON 

COLLEGE 



Richard E. Hughes, Ph.D. 
English 

Weston M. Jenks, Jr., A.M. 
Director of Guidance 



Sister M. Josephina, C.S.J., D.Ed. 
Education 



Mary W. Kennedy, B.S. 
Nursing 

Rev. Harold C. Kirley, S.J. 
History 

Pierre D. Lambert, Ph.D. 
Education 



Rev. Gerard M. Landrey, S.J. 
Chemistry 

Walter G. Langlois, Ph.D. 
Modern Languages 

Rev. George F. Lawlor, S.J. 
Biology 





John P. Leahy, Lt. Col., U.S.A. 
Military Science 



Rev. Daniel Lenihan, S.J. 
Seismology 



Rev. William J. Leonard, S.J. 
Theology 



Howard T. Lewis, Ph.D. 
Business Administration 



Truman S. Licht, M.S. 
Chemistry 



Rev. Francis A. Liuima, S.J. 
Physics 



Rev. Francis E. Low, S.J. 
Ethics 



Rev. Francis C. Mackin, S.J. 
Asst. Director of Admissions 




40 



Rev. Arthur A. MacGillivray, S.J. 
English 

Rev. John R. McCall 
Psychology 

John L. Mahoney, Ph.D. 
English 



Rev. Leonard P. Mahoney, S.J. 
History 

Rene J. Marcou, Ph.D. 
Mathematics 

Walter L. Mayo, Capt., U.S.A. 
Military Science 





John J. McAleer, Ph.D. 
English 



Joseph M. McCafferty, A.M. 
English 



Francis McCaffrey, Ph.D. 
Physics 



Rev. John A. McCarthy, S.J. 
Philosophy 



Rev. John J. McCarthy, S.J. 
Physics 



Timothy E. McCarthy, Ph.D. 
Chemistry 



Vincent A. McCrossen, Ph.D. 
Modern Languages 



Daniel L. McCue, Jr., A.M. 
English 




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Francis J. McDermott, A.M. 
English 



Henry P. McDonald, A.M. 
Marketing 



Rev. Albert F. McGuinn, S.J. 
Chemistry 



George L. McKim, M.Ed. 
Education 

Rev. Paul J. McManus, S.J. 
Modern Languages 

Rev. Walter J. Meagher, S.J. 
Theology 



41 






Rev. Anthony B. Meslis, S.J 
Theology 



Louise S. Moore, M.Litt. 



History 



John J. Mulligan, Ph.D. 
Modern Languages 





Rev. Edward H. Nowlan, S.J. 
Modern Psychology 




John F. Norton, A.M. 
English 





Joseph D. O'Brien, Ph.D. 

Marketing 

Thomas H. O'Connor, Ph.D. 
History 

David C. O'Donnell, Ph.D. 
Chemistry 



Marguerite M. O'Malley, M.Ed. 
Nursing 



Mary C. O'Toole, A.M. 
Business Education 



C. Alexander Peloquin 
Music 



John J. Power, M.S. 
Physics 



Francis P. Powers, M.Ed. 
Education 



Rev. Joseph F. Quane, S.J. 
Philosophy 



Maurice J. Quinlan, Ph.D. 
English 



Antoinette T. Ragucci, M.S. 
Nursing 



Rev. Leo A. Reilly, S.J. 
Ethics 




THE 

FACULTY 

OF 

BOSTON 

COLLEGE 



Rev. John P. Rock, S.J. 
Philosophy 

Rev. Charles M. Roddy, S.J. 
Theology 

Rev. Daniel Saunders, S.J. 
Theology 



Janet Scully, A.B. 

Asst. Registrar, Intown College 

Pauline R. Sampson, M.Ed. 
Nursing 

Mary E. Shaughnessy, M.S. 
Nursing 



Rev. Leo A. Shea, S.J. 
neology 



Joseph E. Sheerin, Ph.D. 
Classics 



Rev. Thomas C. Shortell, S.J. 
Philosophy 





Ernest A. Siciliano, Ph.D. 
Modern Languages 



Clara M. Siggins, Ph.D. 
English 



Rev. George F. Smith, S.J. 
Modern Language 



Olga Stone, Mus.M. 
Education 



Rev. Francis W. Sweeney, S.J. 
English 



Rev. Francis J. Toolin, S.J. 
Philosophy 



Leon M. Vincent, M.B.S. 
Biology 



George Vogel, D.Sc. 
Chemistry 




44 



Maurice K. Walsh, M.Ed. 
Mathematics 



John J. Walsh, Ph.D. 
Education 



Norman J. Wells, Ph.D. 
Philosophy 



Frederick E. White, Ph.D. 
Physics 

Harold A. Zager, M.S. 
Mathematics 

Frederick J. Zappala, M.B.A. 
Accounting 






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SENIORS 



45 




REV. JOHN BAPST, S.J. 
First President of Boston College 



Father Johfi Bapst, S.J. lived a life of suffering. The pains of loneliness, 
frustration, persecution, and physical torture were ever present to him, 
and through all his duties — as educator, missionary, preacher, and admin- 
istrator—he faced obstacles that would have defeated or at least discour- 
aged most rrien. But he accepted and discharged with calm resignation the 
role that had been thrust upon him, meeting all opposition, bigotry, and 
suffering with a quiet force and courageous idealism that eventually won 
victory for hitnself, supporters for his cause, and converts for his Church. 

Such selfless dedication to an ideal has become one of the hallmarks of 
the tradition qf his university. For the philosophy and theology which we 
have chosen to adopt imposes upon us certain principles which of them- 
selves demand not only understanding and belief but total surrender and 
support. Thus, in a world of uneasy peace and shadowy threats, where 
these same principles are sorely in need of defenders, we find ourselves in 
much the same situation as was Father Bapst a century ago. And to him 
we can look to discover that quiet force and gentle courage that is our 
heritage. 






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1955-1959: A CLASS RECORD 



Those first days were days of hurried confusion, of 
adjustment and orientation — a blur of lines and registra- 
tion forms and yellow slips and classification notices and 
lectures. We were Freshmen then, and this place to which 
we had come for our education was strange and baffling, 
a place of activity and calm, of freedom and restriction, 
of warmth and coldness, of laughter and seriousness. 

We were told that we were the Class of 1959 of Boston 
College, but we knew that this was not true. Not yet. We 
were just individuals who happened to be in the same 
place at the same time, and we were not a part of anything. 
But we knew too, or at least we hoped, that the experi- 
ences that we would share during the next four years 
would bind us with close ties to each other and to the 
university. What we needed was time. 

We needed time to discover ourselves and our place in 
this new world. Time to investigate the questions and 
problems that arose in the classrooms and lecture halls — 
questions which had no answers and problems which had 
no solutions, and which were made all the more fascinat- 
ing and important by this fact. Time to engage in the 
activities and join the organizations that beckoned us on 
all sides. Time to develop new friendships and re-estab- 
lish old ones. Time to explore the stacks of books that 
waited in the library. Time to kneel and pray in St. 
Mary's chapel. Time to sit in the caf or the snack bar and 
talk about everything and about nothing. Time to lie on 
the grass in the quad and think or wonder or just day- 
dream. But there was never enough time and the year 
raced on ahead of us. 

We were in the middle of our first football season and 
already talking about a bowl bid, and then an insigni- 
ficant team named Xavier came from nowhere and 



blasted our hopes. But we remained in the stands and 
continued to cheer and sing "For Boston" as only Fresh- 
men can, and we saw the team go on to easy wins over 
B.U. and Holy Cross and come within seven points of 
carrying off the upset of the year against a much touted 
Miami squad. And we rioted for two hours after the 
Cross game, defying the University to show we were 
proud of it. 

And while the season was still in full swing, our atten- 
tion was diverted by another type of activity. We were 
taking our first major step toward becoming a class with 
the election of officers. Hesitantly at first, then with grow- 
ing enthusiasm, our class politicians blanketed the campus 
with posters and cards, wrote slogans on the blackboards, 
and shook every hand in sight. When the ballots were 
counted, the returns showed that our class had added a 
new element to the school. For the first time in years the 
"B.C. High Party" did not control the Freshman elec- 
tions; for there was a new group to be reckoned with — 
the dorms. In September we had witnessed the dedication 
of the new dormitories, Claver, Loyola, and Xavier 
Halls, but now, with a dorm student as president of the 
class and another as vice-president, we realized that 
Boston College was no longer a local school. The officers 
for Freshman year were Charlie McCullagh, John Sul- 
livan, Roberta Lukis, and Bill Daley. The nursing stu- 
dents held their own elections and chose Mary Powell, 
Mary Jane Gibbons, Nancy Pacious and Lorraine Bon- 
vouloir. 

Freshman year was a time for experimenting, for learn- 
ing about the university and the class to which we were 
supposed to belong. We looked around, discovered the 
opportunities that were open to us, and began to par- 



48 



ticipate in the campus life. We wrote news stories for The 
Heights, or submitted manuscripts to the Stylus, or we 
got a bit part in the Dramatic Society's "Detective Story" 
or "Holiday," or we joined the debating society or the 
Gold Key, or tried out for the band or glee club. In small 
ways we began to learn what Boston College was and we 
began to be a part of it. 

We had no spring elections that year because of the 
reorganization that the Student Government was under- 
going, but the fall of our Sophomore year saw the poli- 
ticians out in greater numbers than ever. There was no 
longer a single Student Council for the whole university, 
but this was replaced by a senate in each of the campus 
schools — another indication of the growth of the univer- 
sity. In Arts and Sciences we elected Bob Keating, John 
O'Connor, Jack Madden, and Bob McHugh; in the Busi- 
ness School it was Tom Murray, Charlie Battaglia, Jim 
Mulrennan, and Bill Appleyard; in the School of Educa- 
tion, Jack Tobin, Angelo Taranto, Alice Kaiko, and Jim 
Delaney; and in the School of Nursing, Mary Jane Gib- 
bons, Beth Grady, Jane Kelly and Betty Ann Devisevich. 

The football team spent its first four weeks on the road 
that year, and returned with an unimpressive 2 and 2 
record. Back at Fenway Park we cheered them as enthu- 
siastically as ever and watched them redeem themselves 
with wins over Villanova, Brandeis, and B. U. It was, 
however, an unimpressive season until the Holy Cross 
game. Until the last forty seconds of the Holy Cross 
game. Then it became a disastrous season, with Bill 
Smithers and Paul Toland collaborating on an "impos- 
sible" pass that turned mild disappointment into aston- 
ished defeat. All this, and they painted our new gold 
eagle purple too. 

That was the year that we almost gave up football, but 
instead began a full scale rebuilding of the sport, begin- 
ning with the construction of our own stadium. And it 
was the year that the parking lot was built, and a few 
months later torn up to make room for the stadium. The 
Dramatic Society presented "The Crucible" and "Char- 
lie's Aunt," and Robert Frost visited the campus. The 
tuition was raised $100 for the second time in two years 
and the Archbishop broke ground for a new gymnasium. 
A Cadet Murbles wreaked havoc with the ROTC, and 
the basketball and hockey teams began to show real 
promise for the future. 

It was a busy year and a varied one, a year in which we 
began to become a part of the events and activities to 
which we had been just spectators the previous year, a 
year which saw us choosing our field of concentration 
and making at least general plans for a career, and a year 
which, for the nursing students was marked by the begin- 
ning of clinical experience at Boston City Hospital and 
the long-awaited capping. We ended it with one of the 
most intense campaigns for class ofiice that the University 
had seen in years. A record turnout of voters elected Jim 
Marrinan, John O'Connor, Jack Wiseman, and Jack 



Baer in A&S, Jim McCormack, Tom Murray, Bill 
Fawcett, and Bob Latkany in CBA, Jack Tobin, Gene 
Prior, Mary Watts, and Madeline Collins in the School 
of Ed., and Beth Grady, Mary Cashin, Dorothy Fenelon, 
and Nancy Dolan in the Nursing School. 

We returned for Junior Year in the fall of 1957 and 
watched the finishing touches being put on the new 
stadium to get it ready for the dedication game with 
Navy, and we saw the construction get underway for the 
new gym. At the annual Mass of the Holy Ghost the 
Archbishop dedicated Kostka and Gonzaga Halls and 
the boarders were now a substantial part of the student 
body. There were other changes too which aifected us 
even more directly. First class was at 9 instead of 9:20, 
and suddenly we knew which were the toughest twenty 
minutes of the whole day. Number grades were replaced 
by letter grades, and the requirements for honors degrees 
were modified. The ordeal of the seventy-five minute 
class was introduced. And everywhere we noticed a 
tightening of academic regulations, a determined effort to 
develop a university second to none. It was a good feeling. 

Oldham and Forrestal led the Middies to a 46-6 rout 
over an out-classed B.C. eleven, but we packed the 
stadium that day and knew that, despite the score, we 
had a good team. So we returned for the next game and 
watched the team defeat Florida State and then roll on 
to one win after another — over Quantico, and Villanova, 
and Dayton, and Detroit, and B.U., and Marquette. 
And by the middle of November we knew we had a bowl 
bid and began to make plans to head south. But the 
farthest we got was Worcester. It poured that day; it 
rained so hard we couldn't see the length of the field. But 
we bucked the traffic jams on Route 9 and the Mass. Pike 
and we sat through the coldest, wettest game of the 
century to watch Tommy Greene and Co. roll up two 
touchdowns and add the gloom of defeat to the misery 
of the weather. 

In February we saw Father Walsh raised from the 
chairmanship of the Biology department to succeed 
Father Maxwell as President of the University. In his 
first press conference Father Walsh promised a concen- 
tration on the academic and intellectual aspects of the 
school, and we waited to see what direction this would 
take. Soon we heard of the inception of the Humanities 
Lecture Series and the Coe Lecture Series, and of the 
inauguration of recruitment policies to better both the 
student body and the faculty; we saw the reactivation of 
the undergraduate journal of scholarship, the Humanities, 
and the establishment of the Cosmos, its scientific counter- 
part, both projects entrusted to members of the class of 
'59; and we applauded the selection of two of our class- 
mates, Carney Gavin and Dan Geagan, as the first recip- 
ients of the title, "Scholars of the College." 

Then it was election time again, and the politicians, 
both old pros and newcomers, once again tacked up their 
posters and handed out their cards. This was the big 



49 



election and we looked the candidates over more closely 
than ever. As a result the results were closer than ever, 
with most of the contests still undecided in the late hours 
of the day. But after recounts and runoff elections we had 
chosen John O'Connor, Maurice Lapierre, Frank Martin, 
and Pete McLaughlin in A&S, Tom Murray, Pete Derba, 
Al Wisialko, and Joe Lucas in CBA, Paul Harrington, 
Brenda Jackson, Claire O'Toole, and John Paris in the 
School of Ed., and Beth Grady, Nancy Dolan, Eleanor 
Sullivan and Mary Powell in the School of Nursing. 

As spring drew closer the pace of the activity grew more 
hectic. We were all busy, but we all took time out for 
Junior Week. It was then that we knew that we were no 
longer just a group of individuals, but among us there 
had developed through the previous three years bonds of 
close friendship and a unity rooted in pride and love of 
class and school. 

We began Junior Week with Mass and received Com- 
munion in a body together with our parents. The Jazz 
concert was a success from the first trumpet note — even 
though we did all have to report en masse to the Dean's 
office the next day. We headed for Saxonville on Tuesday 
night, so many of us that we broke all fire and safety laws 
and left ourselves no room to dance; but the Barn Dance 
brought no complaints — from the students. The Junior 
Show was a triumph of songs, dances, skits, and in- 
sanity, with everybody playing it for laughs and the cast 
enjoying it as much as the audience. On Friday we took 
over the New Ocean House and Lester Lanin played to 
a capacity crowd at the Prom. Then, after two hours 
sleep, it was off to Ipswich for a class outing that had to 
be seen to be believed. We finished Junior Week on 
Tuesday of the following week on a somewhat more 
sedate note with a night at the Pops. 

Then it was back to the books in an effort to pull our- 
selves into shape for the finals. T.S. Ehot visited the 
campus to read and comment on his poems, and the en- 
thusiastic reception that he received gave evidence that, 
behind all the activity and glitter, we still remembered the 
main purpose of the University. The year closed with the 
usual notice that tuition would be increased $100 for the 
next year. And so we were Seniors. 

Senior year was different from the other three. We 
found that we had more freedom than before and at the 
same time more responsibilities. We looked forward im- 
patiently to graduation, and yet we felt a sense of loss as 



the year slipped by so quickly. We became even more 
actively a part of the life of the university, but already we 
were looking beyond the campus and beginning to sepa- 
rate ourselves from it. 

The story of senior year is contained in the rest of this 
book. But it is a story that makes no pretense at being 
complete, for we all know that for each of us there were 
many things which, though perhaps unimpressive to an 
outsider, will nonetheless be remembered long after the 
results of elections and the scores of games are forgotten. 

There were those spring vacations in Florida, where 
the warm sun of the South and the hospitality of the Elbo 
Room provided a respite from the work of second semes- 
ter. There were the rallies and B.C. parties during the 
football season, and there were the long, rambling, often 
incoherent conversations at the Tam or the Tap. There 
were all night bull sessions and all night term papers, 
ROTC camp and summer school, St. Patrick's Day in 
New York and the week-end in Syracuse. There were the 
jokes in class and the more elaborate stunts in the dorms, 
and there was the always confused feeling of accomplish- 
ment and frustration that is essential to education. There 
were the 9 o'clock dashes up the stairs from the parking 
lot, the NA slips in the library, the coffee in the caf, the 
classes both good and bad, the long hours of studying 
and cramming, and some of the best friends we will 
ever have. 

We will meet again, we will have our reunions, and we 
will engage in all the sentimental and not a little foolish 
practices of old grads. We will reminisce about these past 
four years, and time will give them a glamour that they 
did not possess. We will recall what happened during 
these years and we will make up many things that did not 
happen. Some of us will become cynical about what we 
gained from the time we spent at Boston College, blaming 
the University for our own failures. 

But before time and future events color our memory of 
the years 1955 to 1959, we look now at the experience 
through which we have just past and must say in honesty 
that with all their difficulties these have been good years 
and with all their shortcomings they have been profitable 
years. And we look at the University from which we have 
just graduated and, whatever our feelings, we must agree 
to a man that, with all its imperfections, Boston College 
has given us more than we have given it. It has been just, 
and often a little more. And we are in its debt. 



50 



College of Arts and Sciences 



JOHN O'CONNOR 
President 



MAURICE LAPIERRE 
Vice-President 







PETER Mclaughlin 

Treasurer 



FRANCIS MARTIN 
Secretary 



51 




PAUL J. ANDREWS 

Woburn, Mass. A.B. Pre-Medical 

Mendel Club 4-3-2-1. 



RONALD V. ARCIERI 

Cochituate, Mass. B.S. Biology 

Mendel Club 4-3. 



RAYMOND B. ASSELIN 

Chicopee, Mass. B.S. Sociology 

Gold Key Society 4-3 (Keyholder 4); 
Junior Week Chairman; Dormitory 
Council 4; French Academy 4-3-2; 
Western Massachusetts Club 4-3-2 
(President 3, Vice-President 2); Intra- 
murals 4-3-2-1; Commencement Ball 
Chairman. 




JOHN F. BAER, JR. 

Boxford, Mass. A.B. English 

Junior Class Treasurer; Treasurer of 
Class Council 3; Marquette Debating 
Society 2-1; Sodality 3-2-1; The Heights 
2-1; French Academy 1. 




DAVID P. BAILEY 

Weymouth, Mass. 

A.B. Modern Languages 
Humanities 4-3; French Academy 4-3 
(Vice-President 4); Spanish Academy 4; 
Dean's List. 



DAVID P. BATTLES 

Barrington, R. I. B.S. English 

Track 1. 



DAVID P. BELLIVEAU 

Watertown, Mass. B.S. Chemistry 1 

Chemical Society 4-3. 




52 




RALPH K. BENWARE 

Medford, Mass. A.B. Economics 

Delta Sigma Pi (Junior Vice-President 
4); Gold Key Society 4-3-2 (Secretary 4, 
Keyholder 4-3); Sub Turri (Head Col- 
lector A&S) 4; Junior Week Chairman. 



HERBERT M. BLACKWELL, JR. 

Beverly, Mass. B.S. English 

Historical Society 4-3. 



SAMUEL R. BLABR 

Waltham, Mass. B.S. English 

Cross and Crown; Stylus 4-3-2-1 (Editor 
4); Humanities 4-3 (Assistant Editor 4, 
Art Editor 3); Sub Turri (Art Editor) 4; 
English Academy 4; Dramatic Society 
4-3-2-1. 



SCIENCES 



JOHN G. BLAKE 

Revere, Mass. B. S. History & Govt. 
Historical Society 4; Foreign Relations 
League 4; The Heights 4; Sub Turri 4; 
Intramurals 4-3-2-1. 




PAUL A. BONGIORNO 

Wayland, Mass. B.S. Economics 

Foreign Trade Club 3-2; Economics 
Academy 4-3-2; Aquinas Circle 4; Intra- 
murals 4-3-2-1. 



JOHN A. BOUSSY 

Norwell, Mass. A.B. Economics 

Alpha Kappa Psi (Secretary 4); Eco- 
nomics Academy 4; Aquinas Circle 4; 
Intramurals 4. 



MICHAEL J. BOYLE 

Jamaica Plain, Mass. B.S. Chemistry 
Chemical Society 4-3-2-1 ; Drill Team 4; 
Track 2. 




53 



ARTS and SCIENCES 





JAMES E. BRADY, JR. 

Arlington. Mass. B.S. Economics 



DAVID BREEN 

Roslindale, Mass. A.B. Economics 

Economics Academy 4; Tlie Heights 
4-3; Sodality 1; Intramurals 4-3-1. 



AUGUSTINE W. BREWIN, JR. 

Nahant, Mass. B.S. Biology 

The Heights 4; The Scope 4; Rod and 
Gun Club 4; Camera Club 4; Mendel 
Club 4-3-2-1; Intramurals 4-3-2-1. 



CHARLES E. BRUSARD 

Cambridge, Mass. A.B. Mathematics 
Ricci Mathematics Academy 4-3 (Secre- 
tary 4); Ricci Mathematics Journal 
(Senior Editor 4, Junior Editor 3). 



54 



GEORGE R. BULGER 

Roxbury, Mass. B.S. Sociology 

Cadet Officers' Club. 



JOHN F. BURKE 

Woburn, Mass. A.B. History & Govt. 
Young Democrats Club 3-2; Blessed 
Oliver Plunkett Society 2; Historical So- 
ciety 4-3; Foreign Relations League 4; 
Intramurals 2. 






WILLIAM J. BURKE, JR. 

Mattapan, Mass. B.S. Physics 

Sigma Pi Sigma (Secretary 4); American 
Institute of Physics 3-2-1; Intramurals 
4-3-2-1. 



JOHN C. BURNHAM 

Ayer, Mass. B.S. Government 

Historical Society 4; Cadet Officers' 
Club 4. 



PAUL J. BURNS 

Dorchester, Mass. B.S. History 

Foreign Relations League 4; Historical 
Society 4; Intramurals 4-3-2-1. 



FREDERICK A. BUSCONI 

Watertown, Mass. B.S. Biology 

Mendel Club 4-3-2-1; Historical So- 
ciety 4; Intramurals 4-3-2-1. 



ARTHUR H. BUSH 

Allston, Mass. B.S. Sociology 

Sodality 2; Intramurals 2. 



JAMES C. CABRAL 

Middleton, Mass. B.S. Biology 

Mendel Club 4-3-2-1; Intramurals 4-3- 
2-1. 




"^^ 




ARTHUR J. CAHILL 

Quincy, Mass. B.S. History & Govt. 
Mendel Club 2-1; Foreign Relations 
League 3; Intramurals 4-3-2-1. 



DANIEL M. CALLAHAN 

Lynn, Mass. B.S. Psychology 

Psychology Club 4-3-2 (Vice-President 
4); NFCCS 4; Intramurals 2-1. 



55 




EDWARD W. CALLAHAN, JR. 

North Miami, Fla. B.S. Biology 

Cross and Crown (Marshal); The Scope 
4-3-2-1 (Co-Editor 4); Section Repre- 
sentative 1; Mendel Club 4-3-2-1; Aqui- 
nas Circle 4; Freshman Orientation 4; 
Dean's List. 



JAMES J. CAMPBELL 

Marlboro, Mass. B.S. Mathematics 

Ricci Mathematics Journal (Business 
Manager) 4; Ricci Mathematics Acad- 
emy 4-3-2-1; Gold Key Society 2-1; 
Psychology Club 4; Intramurals 4-3-2-1. 



JAMES A. CAPPELLETTI 

Wallingford, Conn. B.S. Economics 

Freshman Orientation 4-3; Economics 
Academy 4-3-2; Sub Turri 4; Connecti- 
cut Club 4-3-2-1; Cadet Officers' Club 
4-3; Junior Show; Junior Week Com- 
mittee; Accounting Academy 4; Track 
2; Intramurals 4-3-2-1. 




CHARLES F. CARROLL 

W. Somerville, Mass. A.B. History 

The Heights 3-2; Economics Academy 
4-3; Bellarmine Law and Government 
Academy 4-3; Blessed Oliver Plunkett 
Society 4-3; Intramurals 4-3-2-1; Dean's 
List. 



I 



ARTS an 




JAMES M. CARROLL 

Waban, Mass. B.S. English 



MARCEL C. CARTIER 

Willimansett, Mass. B.S. Biology 

Mendel Club 4-3-2; Sodality 2-1; Span- 
ish Club 3-2; Psychology Club 4-3; 
Western Massachusetts Club 4-3-2-1 
(President 4, Vice-President 3); Intra- 
murals 4-3-2-1. 



GEORGE E. CASAVANT 

Manchester, N. H. B.S. Chemistry 

Marquette Debating Society 1 ; Chemical 
Society 4-3-2; Cadet Officers' Club; 
Spanish Academy 3; Intramurals 1; 
Dean's List. 




56 





*--^ 



WILLIAM L. CASEY, JR. 

Portland, Me. A.B. Economics 

Marquette Debating Society 2-1; Eco- 
nomics Academy 4-3; Spanish Academy 
3-2; Cadet Officers' Club; Maine Club 
4-3-2-1 (President 4); Intramurals 4-3-2; 
Dean's List. 



DONALD J. CECE 

Cos Cob, Conn. B.S. Sociology 

The Heights 3-2; Economics Academy 
2-1; Connecticut Club 4-3-2-1; Intra- 
murals 3-2-1. 



GEORGE P. CERNADA 

Somerville, Mass. B.S. English 

English Academy 4; Intramurals 3-2-1. 



SCIENCES 



RAYMOND R. CHASE 

Nantasket, Mass. B.S. Economics 

Intramurals 4-3-2-1. 





FRANCIS E. CHISHOLM 

Everett, Mass. B.S. English 

Writers Workshop 3; Dramatic Society 
4; Blessed Oliver Plunkett Society 4. 



ROBERT W. CHURCHVILLE 

Newton Centre, Mass. 

B.S. Natural Science 
Glee Club 4-3-2-1 (Vice-President 4); 
Mendel Club 2-1; Junior Show; Intra- 
murals 4-3-2-1; Senior Dinner Dance 
Committee. 



THOMAS M. CBBOTTI 

Hyde Park, Mass. A.B. French 

French Academy 4-3; Italian Academy 
4-3 (Treasurer 4); Intramurals 4-3-2-1. 




57 



ARTS and SCIENCES 





EDWARD F. CLARK 

Somerville, Mass. B.S. Sociology 

Gold Key Society 4; Psychology Club 
4-3; Blessed Oliver Plunkett Society 4; 
Intramurals 4-3-2-1. 



WILLIAM J. CLIFFORD 

Roxbury, Mass. A.B. English 

Writer's Workshop 3. 



GEORGE W. COFFEY 

Newtown, Pa. B.S. Economics 

Bellarmine Law and Government Acad- 
emy 4; Junior Week Committee; Eco- 
nomics Academy 4-3-2; NFCCS 4; In- 
tramurals 3-2-1. 



EDWARD W. COLBERT, JR. 

West Roxbury, Mass. B.S. Economics 
Alpha Kappa Psi; Section Representa- 
tive 2; Sodality 4-3-2 (Council 4-3); Sub 
Turri 4; Economics Academy 4-3-2 
(Treasurer 4); Freshman Orientation 4; 
Intramurals 4-3-2-1. 



58 



ROBERT J. COLLINI 

Watertown, Mass. B.S. Economics 

Delta Sigma Pi; Economics Academy 4- 
3-2 (Vice-President 4); Gold Key So- 
ciety 4-3 (Keyholder 4); Cadet Officers' 
Club; Sub Turri 4; NFCCS 4-3. 

FRANCIS E. COLLINS, JR. 

Roxbury, Mass. A.B. Economics 

Alpha Kappa Psi (Parliamentarian 4); 
Cross and Crown; Boston College De- 
bating Society (President) 4; Fulton De- 
bating Society 3; Marquette Debating 
Society 2-1 (Treasurer 2); Glee Club 4- 
3-2-1; Economics Academy 4-3; Public 
Speaking Club 4-3; Section Representa- 
tive 1; Junior Show; Distinguished Mili- 
tary Student; Intramurals 4-3-2- 1 ; Dean's 
List. 




'M4 1 M 




LAWRENCE J. COLLINS 

Dorchester, Mass. B.S. Sociology 

Intramurals 4-3-2-1. 



JOHN F. CONCANNON 

South Portland, Me. B.S. Economics 
Sodality 4-3. 



JOHN J. CONNOLLY 

Hull, Mass. B.S. History 

Historical Society 4; Foreign Relations 
League 4-3; Intramurals 2-1. 



JOSEPH E. CONNOLLY 

Somerville, Mass. B.S. Sociology 

Sub Turri 4; Gold Key Society 3; Intra- 
murals 4-3-2-1; Senior Dinner Dance 
Chairman. 



CHARLES F. CONNORS 

Dorchester, Mass. B.S. Economics 

Economics Academy 4; Aquinas Circle 
4; Junior Week Committee; Intramurals 
4-3-2-1; Senior Ball Committee. 



DAVID P. CONROY 

Charlestown, Mass. B.S. Sociology 

Mendel Club 1; Psychology Club 2; 
Blessed Oliver Plunkett Society 4. 




a»v. 





h^M 





DAVID W. COJNSIDINE 

Waltham, Mass. A.B. Economics 

Public Speaking Club 4-3; Economics 
Academy 4-3-2; Sodality 4-3-2-1; Cadet 
Officers' Club; Junior Week Committee; 
Intramurals 4-3-2-1. 



JOHN M. COPPOLA 



Revere, Mass. 



B.S. Biology 



Mendel Club 4-3-2-1; Intramurals 4-3- 
2-1. 



59 




JOSEPH E. CORCORAN 

Dorchester, Mass. B.S. History 

The Heights 4; Foreign Relations League 
4-3 (President 4-3); Historical Society 4; 
Public Speaking Club 3; Bellarmine Law 
and Government Academy 4; Varsity 
Baseball 3. 



EUGENE M. COSTELLO 

Wobum, Mass. B.S. Economics 

Economics Academy 4. 



JAMES F. COSTELLO 

Dorchester, Mass. B.S. History & Govt. 
Historical Society 4. 




JAMES M. COSTELLO 

Jamaica Plain, Mass. B.S. Sociology 
Psychology Club 4-3-2. 



tfffe 




ARTS and 



^ 



JOHN E. COX ROBERT E. COYNE 

Wakefield, Mass. B.S. Physics South Boston, Mass. A.B. Economics 

Band 1; Physics Club 4-3-2-1; Public Economics Academy 4. 
Speaking Club 4. 



MARK F. CREHAN, JR. 

Roxbury, Mass. B.S. History & Govt. 
Psychology Club 4; Bellarmine Law and 
Government Academy 4; Foreign Rela- 
tions League 4-3; Historical Society 4; 
Blessed Oliver Plunkett Society 4; Intra- 
murals 3-2-L 




^Lt^M 




60 




JOHN D. CREMIN 

Brighton, Mass. B.S. Physics 

Alpha Sigma Nu; Sigma Pi Sigma (Pres- 
ident 4); Public Speaking Club 4-3 (Pres- 
ident 4); American Institute of Physics 
4; Ricci Mathematics Academy 2-1; 
Marquette Debating Society 2; Intra- 
murals 4-3-2-1; Sailing Club 3-2-1; 
Dean's List. 



ARTHUR A. CRONIN, JR. 

Hingham, Mass. B.S. Economics 

Intramurals 4-3-2-1 . 



RICHARD F. CRONIN 

Brighton, Mass. B.S. Economics 

WBCR (Co-Founder and Chief En- 
gineer); Mendel Club 1; Economics 
Academy 4-3-2; Radio Club 4-3-1 (Pres- 
ident 4); Junior Show; Camera Club 4; 
Intramurals 4-3-2-1. 



SCIENCES 



STEPHEN G. CRONIN 

Somerville, Mass. B.S. Biology 

Mendel Club 4-3-2-1; Intramurals 4-3-2; 
Dean's List. 




TIMOTHY M. CRONIN 

Revere, Mass. B.S. History & Govt. 
Blessed Oliver Plunkett Society 2; For- 
eign Relations League 4; Varsity Foot- 
ball 4-3-2-1; Intramurals 4-3-2-1; Dean's 
List; Class Night Committee. 



DAVID F. CROWLEY 

Binghamton, N. Y. B.S. Economics 

New York Club 4-3; Economics Acad- 
emy 4-3. 



RICHARD P. CROWLEY 

Milton, Mass. A.B. Modern Languages 
Sodality 4-3-2-1 (First Assistant Prefect 
4); Band 4-3-2-1 (Vice-President 4); 
French Academy 4-3. 




61 



u X 





WILLIAM M. DALEY 

Chelsea, Mass. A.B. Pre-Medical 

Freshman Class Treasurer; Mendel Club 
4-3-2-1; Intramurals 4-3-2-1. 



t / 




ROBERT A. D'ANDREA 

South Boston, Mass. B.S. Economics 
Economics Academy 3-2; Intramurals 
4-3. 



LEWIS F. DAY, JR. 

Manchester, Mass. B.S. Government 
Mendel Club 2-1; Historical Society 4; 
Intramurals 2-1. 




EDWARD J. DeGRAW 

Peabody, Mass. 5.5". Chemistry 

Varsity Football 4-3-2-1; Chemical So- 
ciety 4. 



62 



GERALD T. DELANEY 

Newton, Mass. B.S. Economics 

Glee Club 4-3-2-1 (Treasurer 4); Eco- 
nomics Academy 4; Intramurals 4-3-2-1. 



PETER A. DELMONICO, JR. 

Belmont, Mass. B.S. Natural Science 
Sub Turri 4; Student Council 1; Mendel 
Club 4-3-2-1; Junior Week Committee; 
Psychology Club 4; Class Night Chair- 
man; WBCR (Music Director) 4; Intra- 
murals 4-3-2-1. 






ALBERT J. DeLUCA 

Stoughton, Mass. A.B. Mathematics 
Ricci Mathematics Academy 4-3; Sail- 
ing Club 4; Varsity Baseball 4-3; Var- 
sity Football 3-2; Intramurals 2. 



JOHN F. DEMPSEY 

Waterbury, Conn. B.S. Physics 

Glee Club 4-3-2; Connecticut Club 4-3- 
2-1; Marquette Debating Society 2; So- 
dality 4-3; American Institute of Physics 
4-3-2; Track Team 2-1; Intramurals 2-1. 



JOHN H. DEMPSEY 

Maiden, Mass. B.S. Chemistry 

Cross and Crown; Chemical Society 4- 
3-2-1; Blessed Oliver Plunkett Society 
4-3-2; Distinguished Military Student; 
Track 4-3-2 (Captain 4); Intramurals 
4-3-2-1. 



JOHN L. DENNEHY 

Brighton, Mass. B.S. Economics 

Economics Academy 3-2; Public Speak- 
ing Club 4; Sailing Club 2-1; Football 
2-1; Intramurals 3-2-1. 



ROBERT F. DENNEHY 

Jamaica Plain, Mass. A.B. Psychology 
Cross and Crown (Marshal); Sodality 
4-3-2-1 (Prefect 4, Consultor 3); Psy- 
chology Club 4-3 (President 4); Public 
Speaking Club 4-3; Freshman Orienta- 
tion Committee 4; Sub Turri 4; Intra- 
murals 4-3-2-1; Dean's List. 



ANTHONY R. DeSALVO 

Lowell, Mass. B.S. History & Govt. 

Intramurals 4-3-2-1. 






ROBERT J. DESAUTELS 

Turner Falls, Mass. B.S. Sociology 

Western Massachusetts Club 4-3. 



BERNARD F. DeSAVAGE 

Walpole, Mass. B.S. Physics 

American Institute of Physics; Sigma Pi 
Sigma (Vice-President). 



63 





RALPH R. DeSIMONE 

West Roxbury, Mass. B.S. Economics 



ROBERT J. DESMOND 

Lowell, Mass. B.S. History & Govt. 

Blessed Oliver Plunkett Society 2-1; 
Camera Club 4-3; Foreign Relations 
League 4-3; Intramurals 4-3-2-1. 



JAMES E. DEVLIN 

Brighton, Mass. B.S. English 

Mendel Club 1; German Academy 4-3. 




KEVIN J. DIGGINS 

Jamaica Plain, Mass. B.S. Physics 

Sigma Pi Sigma; American Institute of 
Physics 3-2-1; Drill Team 4-3-2-1; Cadet 
Officers' Club; Track Team 2; Intra- 
murals 4-3-2-1. 



ARTS and 



3 



FREDERICK A. DUORIO 

Belmont, Mass. B.S. History 

Historical Society 4; Psychology Club 4; 
Foreign Relations League 4-3; Intra- 
murals 4-3-2-1. 



DAVID W. DiNARDI 

Hyde Park, Mass. A.B. History & Govt. 
Bellarmine Law and Government Acad- 
emy 4-3; Historical Society 4-3; Foreign 
Relations League 4-3; Intramurals 4-3- 
2-1. 



PHILIP J. DOHERTY 

Dorchester, Mass. A.B. Pre-Medical 
Mendel Club 4-3-2-1; Intramurals 4-3- 
2-1. 




64 




JA]\IES M. DONAHUE 

Cambridge, Mass. B.S. Government 

Marquette Debating Society 2; Bellar- 
mine Law and Government Academy 3. 




PAUL J. DOOLEY 

Dorchester, Mass. A.B. English 



CALVIN J. DORSEY 

Maiden, Mass. B.S. Biology 

Mendel Club 4-3-2; The Scope (Asso- 
ciate Editor) 4; Intramurals 4-3-2-1. 




JAMES F. DOWD 

Dorchester, Mass. A.B. Economics 

Mendel Club 2-1; Economics Academy 
4; Aquinas Circle 4; Foreign Trade Club 
4-3 ; Intramurals 4-3-2-1 . 




JOHN P. DOWLING 

Kings Park, L. L, N. Y. 

A.B. Mathematics 
Ricci Mathematics Club 4-3; New York 
Club 4-2-1; Intramurals 3-2-1. 



CHARLES J. DOWNEY, JR. ROBERT J. DUGAN 

Milton, Mass. A.B. Economics Dorchester, Mass. B.S. English 

Economics Academy 4-3; Foreign Trade English Academy 4. 

Club 4-3; Aquinas Circle 4; Intramurals 
4-3-2-1. 




65 



ARTS and SCIENCES 





WILLIAM J. DUNN 

Kings Park, L. I., N. Y. 

A.B. Economics 
Accounting Academy 4; New York 
Club 4-3-2-1; Aquinas Circle 4; Intra- 
murals 4-3-2-1. 



GEORGE A. ELLIOTT 

Portland, Me. B.S. English 

Maine Club 4-3-2-1; Spanish Academy 
3-2-1 (Secretary 3-2); Psychology Club 
4; Intramurals 4-3-2-1. 



GEORGE E. ESPINDLE 

Lynn, Mass. B.S. Economics 

Economics Academy 4; Intramurals 4- 
3-2-1. 



JOSEPH J. FALLO 

Waltham, Mass. B.S. Natural Science 
Mendel Club 4-3-2-1; Intramurals 4-3- 
2-1. 



66 



DANIEL J. FEENEY, JR. 

Wollaston, Mass. A.B. Sociology 

Mendel Club 1; Junior Week Commit- 
tee; Glee Club 4; Intramurals 4-3-2-1; 
Dean's List. 

ERNEST W. FERNEAU, JR. 

Aubumdale, Mass. B.S. Psychology 

Cross and Crown; Sub Turri (Activities 
Editor) 4; The Heights 4-2-1 (News Edi- 
tor 2-1, Associate Editor 4); Intramurals 
2-1; Section Representative 3-2; Psy- 
chology Club 4-3; NFCCS 4-3-2 (Junior 
Delegate 4); Freshman Orientation 4-3; 
Junior Week Committee; Cosmos 4; So- 
dality 4-3-2-1 (Assistant Prefect 4-3); 
Dean's List. 




I 





JOHN W. FITZGERALD 

Dorchester, Mass. B.S. Physics 

Sigma Pi Sigma; American Institute of 
Physics; Intramurals 4-3-2-1. 



EDWARD J. FITZGIBBON 

BrookUne, Mass. B.S. Economics 

Economics Academy 4-3-2; Band 1 ; In- 
tramurals 3-2-1 ; Dean's List. 



JOHN G. FITZGIBBON 

Hartford, Conn. B.S. English 

Cross and Crown; The Heights 4-2 
(Sports Editor 4); Marquette Debating 
Society 2; Connecticut Club; Writers 
Workshop 4-2; Intramurals 4-2-1. 



GEORGE M. FITZPATRICK 

Marlboro, Mass. B.S. Economics 

Economics Academy 4-3; Intramurals 1. 



JOHN J. FLANAGAN 
Hanover, Mass. B.S. Economics 

Varsity Football 4-3-2-1; Intramurals 4- 
3-2-1; Junior Show. 



RICHARD L. FLANIGAN 

Newton, Mass. B.S. History & Govt. 
Historical Society 4; Foreign Relations 
League 4; Bellarmine Law and Govern- 
ment Academy 4; Intramurals 4-2-1. 




tL\i-I^^, 




THOMAS A. FLATLEY 

Brighton, Mass. B.S. Economics 

Section Representative 3; Intramurals 
3-2-1. 



DONALD J. FLEMING 

Somerville, Mass. B.S. Economics 

Economics Academy 4-2; NFCCS 4-3-2; 
Intramurals 3-2-1. 



67 




JOHN F. FLYNN, JR. 

Kings Park, L. I., N. Y. A.B. History 
Cross and Crown; Dormitory Council 
(Secretary) 2; New York Club 4-2-1; 
Dramatic Society 1; Intramurals 4-2-1. 



ROBERT F. FLYNN 

East Walpole, Mass. 

A.B. History & Govt. 
Section Representative 2; Historical So- 
ciety 4-3; Bellarmine Law and Govern- 
ment Academy 4-3. 



JAMES E. FOLEY 

Woburn, Mass. B.S. Biology 

Mendel Club 4-3-2-1; Intramurals 4-3- 
2-1. 




RAYMOND W. FONTAINE, JR. 

Needham, Mass. B.S. Economics 

Historical Society 4; Intramurals 2-1. 



I 



ARTS and 



JOSEPH F. FURCINITTI 

Milford, Mass. B.S. Biology 

Cross and Crown; The Scope (Circula- 
tion Manager) 4; Dormitory Sodality 
4-3; Mendel Club 4-3; Sailing Club 2. 



EDWARD G. FURLONG 

Brockton, Mass. B.S. Economics 

Radio Club (Activities Manager) 4; In- 
tramurals 2-1. 



LAWRENCE F. GAMBINO 

East Boston, Mass. B.S. History 

Historical Society 4-3; Humanities 4; 
Section Representative 2. 




68 




PAUL G. GARRITY 

Jamaica Plain, Mass. B.S. History 

Drill Team 4-3-2-1; Historical Society 2; 
Cadet Officers' Club; Intramurals 1 ; 
Dean's List. 



CARNEY E. GAVIN 

Jamaica Plain, Mass. A.B. Classics 

Scholar of the College; Alpha Sigma Nu 
(President 4); Cross and Crown (Knight 
Commander); Stylus 4-3-2 (Associate 
Editor 4); The Heights 4-3; Humanities 
(Editor) 4-3; Marquette Debating So- 
ciety 2; Fulton Debating Society 3 (Vice 
President 3); B. C. Debating Society 4; 
Sodality 4-3-2. 



DANIEL J. GEAGAN 

Watertown, Mass. A.B. Classics 

Scholar of the College; Sodality (Pre- 
fect); Cross and Crown (Marshal); Hu- 
manities (Secretary 4); Alpha Sigma Nu; 
Debating 2; French Academy 1. 



SCIENCES 



GEORGE J. GIERSCH 

Bronx, N. Y. B.S. Chemistry 

Varsity Basketball 4-3-2-1 (Captain 4); 
Varsity Baseball 4-3-2; A. A. Represen- 
tative 4; New York Club 4-3-2-1. 




EDWARD A. GILL 

Jamaica Plain, Mass. 

B.S. Modern Languages 
French Academy 4-3-2; Spanish Acad- 
emy 3-2. 



JOSEPH E. GILLIGAN 

Newton, Mass. B.S. History 

Delta Sigma Pi; Gold Key Society 4-3 
(Keyholder 4); Bellarmine Law and 
Government Academy 4-3; Historical 
Society (Treasurer) 4; NFCCS 4; For- 
eign Relations League 4; Cadet Officers' 
Club; SubTurri4. 



RONALD A. GILLIS 

Holyoke, Mass. B.S. Economics 

Dormitory Council 2; Mendel Club 3- 
2-1; Western Massachusetts Club 4-2; 
Intramurals 3-2. 




69 




ARTS and SCIENCES 



^ 




ROBERT J. GOULET 

Boston, Mass. B.S. Physics 

Intramurals 3-2-1. 



DAVID W. GOVONI 

Wareham, Mass. B.S. Economics 



JAN R. GRAY 

Little Falls, N. Y. B.S. Natural Science 
Mendel Club 4-3-2-1. 



RICHARD J. GREENE 

Winthrop, Mass. B.S. Sociology 

Sodality 2-1; NFCCS 2-1; Rod and Gun 
Club 2-1; Psychology Club 4; Aquinas 
Circle 4; Intramurals 2-1; Ski Club 4-3. 



EDWARD S. GRENNAN, JR. 

West Concord, Mass. A.B. Economics 
Economics Academy 4-3; Ski Club 4; 
Intramurals 4-2-1 ; Senior Dinner Dance 
Committee. 



CHARLES W. GRINNELL 

Dorchester, Mass. A.B. German 

German Academy 4-3 (President 4); 
English Academy 4; Radio Club 4; 
Stylus 4-3; Intramurals 4-3-1. 





70 








JOSEPH E. HAGAN 

Dorchester, Mass. A.B. English 

Foreign Relations League 4-3; Debating 
Society 4-3; Glee Club 4-3-2-1; His- 
torical Society 4-3; Section Representa- 
tive 3-2; Sub Turri 4; Intramurals 4-3-2- 
1 ; Senior Ball Committee. 



PAUL P. HAGERTY 

Wollaston, Mass. A.B. Economics 

Economics Academy 4-3-2; Accounting 
Academy 2; Intramurals 4-3-2-1. 



JAMES B. HALLIGAN 

Sharon, Mass. B.S. Biology 



THOMAS F. HALPIN 

Reading, Mass. B.S. Biology 

Cross and Crown; The Scope 3; Mendel 
Club 4-3-2-1; Junior Week Committee; 
Ski Club 4-3-2. 



GEORGE L. HARKINS 

Newton Centre, Mass. A.B.Pre-Medical 
Mendel Club 4-3-2-1; Intramurals 4-3- 
2-1. 



JOSEPH M. HART 

Charlestown, Mass. 

B.S. History & Govt. 
Bellarmine Law and Government Acad- 
emy 4-3; Historical Society 4; Foreign 
Relations League 4; Intramurals 4-3-2-1. 






WILLIAM L. HARTNETT 

Jamaica Plain. Mass. B.S. Economics 
Economics Academy 4-3-2; Junior 
Week Committee; Intramurals 4-3-2-1; 
Ski Club 4-3; Dean's List. 



JEROME J. HAVDRA 



Milford, Conn. 



B.S. Chemistry 



^i^KM 



Chemical Society 4-3-2-1; Varsity Foot- 
ball 4-3-2-1 ; Junior Show. 



71 




EDWARD J. HAYES 

Lawrence, Mass. B.S. History & Govt. 
Historical Society 4-3; Bellarmine Law 
and Government Academy 4. 



JOSEPH B. HAYWARD 

South Boston, Mass. A.B. English 

Radio Club 4; English Academy 4; 
Rifle Team 1; Junior Prom Committee; 
Section Representative 2-1; Intramurals 
4-3-2-1. 



RICHARD A. HEALEY 

Lynn, Mass. A.B. Sociology 

Glee Club 4. 




JAMES F. HEALY 

West Roxbury, Mass. B.S. Economics 
Economics Academy 3-2; Glee Club 4- 
3-2; Junior Week Committee; Sopho- 
more Prom Committee; Intramurals 4- 
3-2-1; Ski Team 4-3. 




ARTS and 



RICHARD J. HINCHEY 

Salem, Mass. B.S. Chemistry 

Chemical Society 4-3-2-1 (Representa- 
tive 3); Cosmos 4; Intramurals 2-1; 
Cross Country Track 3. 



HARRISON E. HOBBS 

Bath, Me. B.S. History 

Chess Club 4-3-2-1 (Secretary 3); Maine 
Club 4-3-2-1 (Vice President 4); Fresh- 
men Orientation 4; Intramurals 4-3-2-1; 
Pops Concert Committee. 



GEORGE E. HOLLAND 

Maiden, Mass. B.S. Physics 

Sigma Pi Sigma; Dramatic Society 4-3-2 
(President 4). 




72 




PAUL F. HUGHES 

Newton Center, Mass. A.B. Government 
Intramurals 4-3. 



THOMAS A. HUGHES 

Belmont, Mass. B.S. History & Govt. 
Heights 4-3 (Sports Editor 4); Sub Turri 
4; Historical Society 4-3; Foreign Rela- 
tions League (Secretary) 4; Senior 
Week Program. 



ROBERT E. HUNTER 

Dorchester, Mass. B.S. Biology 

Scope 4-3-2-1; Mendel Club 4-3-2-1; 
Blessed Oliver Plunkett Society 3; Intra- 
murals 4-3-2-1. 



SCIENCES 



HAROLD G. JACKSON 

Belmont, Mass. B.S. History & Govt. 
Bellarmine Law and Government Acad- 
emy 4; Foreign Relations League 4; In- 
tramurals 4-3-2-1. 




RICHARD J. JODOIN 

Marblehead, Mass. B.S. History & Govt. 
B.C. Debating Society 4; Historical So- 
ciety 4; Dramatic Society 1 ; Intramurals 
3-2. 



JAMES G. JOHNSTON 

Belmont, Mass. B.S. Economics 

Economics Academy 4-3; Sub Turri 4; 
Section Representative 1; Dorm Coun- 
cil 4-3-2-1; Junior Week Committee; 
Intramurals 4-3-2-1. 



MICHAEL F. JORDAN 

Hartford, Conn. B.S. Economics 

Economics Academy 4; Mendel Club 
2-1; Accounting Academy 4; Connecti- 
cut Club 4-3-2-1. 




73 



ARTS and SCIENCES 



^^ 




JOHN E. JOYCE 

Jamaica Plain, Mass. B.S. Philosophy 
Aquinas Circle 4; Track 4-3-2-1 (Cap- 
tain 3); Cross Country 4-3-2-1 (Captain 
4-3). 



JOHN J. JOYCE 

Dorchester, Mass. B.S. History & Govt. 
Bellarmine Law and Government Acad- 
emy 4. 



WILLIAM D. JOYCE 

Dorchester, Mass. B.S. English 

Aquinas Circle 4; Foreign Relations 
League 4-3; Dramatic Society 2; Intra- 
murals 4-3-2-1; Senior Dinner Dance 
Committee. 



ROBERT A. KATZ 

Revere, Mass. B.S. Biology 

Mendel Club 4-3-2-1; Intramurals 4-3- 
2-1. 



ROBERT E. KEANE 

Brighton, Mass. B.S. Economics 

Bellarmine Law and Government Acad- 
emy 3; Economics Academy 4; Section 
Representative 1; Psychology Club 4; 
Intramurals 4-3-2-1. 

WILLIAM J. KEARNEY 

Maiden, Mass. A.B. History 

Bellarmine Law and Government Acad- 
emy 3; Foreign Relations League 3-2; 
Historical Society 4. 



74 








JOHN W. KEEGAN 

Dorchester, Mass. A.B. Pre-Medical 
Mendel Club 4-3-2-1. 



ROBERT E. KELLAN 

North Andover, Mass. B.S. Biology 
Mendel Club 4-3-2-1; The Scope 3; In- 
tramurals 4-3-2-1. 



JOHN J. KELLEHER 

Brockton, Mass. B.S. History & Govt. 
Bellarmine Law and Government Acad- 
emy 4; Historical Society 4; Foreign Re- 
lations League 4-3; Aquinas Circle 4; 
Section Representative 2; Intramurals 
4-3-2- L 



GEORGE T. KELLEY 

Lynn, Mass. B.S. Economics 

Economics Academy 4; Spanish Acad- 
emy 2-1; Foreign Trade Club 4; His- 
torical Society 4; Section Representa- 
tive 3. 



PAUL F. KELLY 

Brighton, Mass. A.B. Pre-Medical 

Cross and Crown; Alpha Sigma Nu 
(Secretary 4); Sodality 4-3-2-1 (Secre- 
tary 4); Mendel Club 4-3-2-1; Public 
Speaking Club 4-3; Sub Turri 4; Senior 
Ball Committee. 



FRANKLIN T. KENNEDY 

Springfield, Mass. B.S. Economics 

Public Speaking Club 4; Economics 
Academy 2; Delta Sigma Pi; Western 
Massachusetts Club 4-3-2-1; Junior 
Week Committee; Intramurals 2-1. 





JOHN F. KENNEDY 

South Boston, Mass. B.S. English 

French Academy 1; Blessed Oliver 
Plunkett Society 4-2-1 ; Mendel Club 2-1 . 



ROBERT L. KENNEY 

Rockland, Mass. B.S. Mathematics 

Ricci Mathematics Academy 4-3-2. 



75 




THOMAS J. KENNEY 

Mattapan, Mass. A.B. Pre-Medical 

Mendel Club 4-3-2-1; Intramurals 4-3- 
2-1. 



EDWARD L. KEOUGH 

Waltham, Mass. B.S. Mathematics 

Ricci Mathematics Academy 4-3-2-1 
(President 4); Psychology Club 4; Junior 
Week Committee; Intramurals 4-3-2-1. 



KENDALL F. KIELY 

Quincy, Mass. A.B. Economics 

Economics Academy 4-3; Cadet Officers' 
Club; Intramurals 4-3-2-1. 




BERNARD F. KING 

Beverly, Mass. B.S. History 

Humanities 4; Intramurals 4-3-2-1. 



ARTS and 



: 



'^s^ 

Y 
'& 



PAUL R. KING EUGENE P. KOURY PAUL C. LAINCZ 

Brighton, Mass. A.B. Mathematics Medford, Mass. B.S. English Natick, Mass. B.S. Economics 
Ricci Mathematics Academy 4-3; So- Band 2-1. Alpha Kappa Psi; The Heights 4-3; So- 
dality 4-3-2-1; Camera Club 4-3; Chess ciety for the Advancement of Manage- 
Club 4-3; Sub Turri 4. nient 4-3; Sub Turri 4. 




76 




DAVID J. LAND 

Boston, Mass. A.B. Physics 

Sigma Pi Sigma; Ricci Mathematics 
Academy 4-3; Cosmos (Associate Edi- 
tor) 4. 



FRANK M. LANE 

Newton Highlands, Mass. B.S. History 
Public Speaking Club 2; Economics 
Academy 2; Historical Society 4-3; Band 
4-3-2-1; Glee Club 4-3-2-1; The Heights 
4-3; Junior Week Committee; Junior 
Show; WBCR 4. 



JOHN J. LANE, JR. 

Quincy, Mass. B.S. History & Govt. 
Sodality 4-3-2; Historical Society 4-3; 
Bellarmine Law and Government Acad- 
emy 4-3; Dean's List. 



SCIENCES 




MAURICE E. LAPIERRE 

Los Angeles, Calif. 

A.B. Modern Languages 
Senior Class Vice-President; Glee Club 
4-3-2-1 (Accompanist, Treasurer 3); 
Margolds 4-3; French Academy 4-1; 
Campus Council Representative 4; Cross 
and Crown. 




GEORGE F. LAWLOR ROBERT F. LEONARD THOMAS M. LESTER 

Arlington, Mass. B.S. Biology Somerville, Mass. B.S. Economics Jamaica Plain, Mass. B.S. Economics 

Mendel Club 4-3-2-1. Intramurals 4-3-2-1; Dean's List. Economics Academy 4-3; Public Speak- 

ing Club 4-3; Sailing Club 4; Ski Club 4. 





77 



ARTS and SCIENCES 



1 




ROBERT F. LEVANGIE 

E. Weymouth, Mass. B.S. Chemistry 
Intramurals 4-3-2-1. 



DANA R. LEVINE 

Cambridge, Mass. B.S. History 

Camera Club 4-3; Rifle Team 4-3-2-1; 
Journal of Business 4. 



CHARLES L. LINDSEY 

Franklin, Mass. A.B. English 

Historical Society 4-3. 



JOSEPH F. LIVINGSTON 

Roslindale, Mass. B.S. Economics 

Economics Academy 4; Band 4-3-2-1 
(Advisory Board 4-3); Ski Club 4; Intra- 
murals 4-3-2-1. 



78 



PAUL A. LoCONTE 

Hyde Park, Mass. B.S. Natural Science 
Mendel Club 4-3-2-1; Cadet Officers' 
Club; Intramurals 4-3-2-1. 

TERENCE P. LOGAN 

Milton, Mass. A.B. English 

The Heights 4-3-2-1 (Asst. Editor 2, 
Features Editor 3, Editor-in-Chief 4); 
Stylus 1 ; Junior Week Committee; Dra- 
matic Society 3; Marquette Debating 
Society 2-1 (Parliamentarian 2); B.C. 
Debating Society 4; English Academy 4; 
Public Affairs Forum 4; Writers Work- 
shop 3-2-1 (Guildsman 2, Craftsman 3); 
Dean's List; Senior Week Program. 




vh 




JOHN W. LOTUS 

Roxbury, Mass. B.S. Physics 



ROBERT R. LUNDY 

W. Roxbury, Mass. B.S. Economics 

Economics Academy 4. 



DAVID M. LYNCH 

West Springfield, Mass. B.S. Economics 
Delta Sigma Pi; Junior Week Chairman; 
Journal of Business 4-3; Western Massa- 
chusetts Club 4-3-2; Gold Key Society 
2; Economics Academy 2; Section Rep- 
resentative 3; Intramurals 3-2. 



ROBERT J. LYNCH 

Hyde Park, Mass. B.S. Economics 

Bellarmine Law and Government Acad- 
emy 1; Economics Academy 4-3; Aqui- 
nas Circle 4; Intramurals 4-3-2-1; 
Dean's List. 



JAMES E. LYONS 

Montpelier, Vt. B.S. Chemistry 

Chemical Society 4-3-2-1; Cosmos 4; 
Intramurals 2-1; Dean's List. 



WILLIAM J. LYONS 

Roxbury, Mass. B.S. Economics 

Foreign Trade Club 4; Economics Acad- 
emy 4; Spanish Academy 2. 













DOMENIC P. MACAIONE 

Franklin, Mass. B.S. Chemistry 

Chemical Society 4-1; Radio Club 2-1. 



TERRENCE M. MacDONALD 

Aubumdale, Mass. B.S. Economics 

Economics Academy 4-3; Junior Week 
Committee; Band 4-3-2; WBCR 4. 



79 




MCHARD E. MacDOUGALL 

Dorchester, Mass. A.B. Psychology 

Psychology Club 4-3; Mendel Club 2-1; 
Intramurals 4-3-2-1. 



FRANCIS P. MacMILLAN JAMES J. MADDEN 

Everett, Mass. B.S. Biology Somerville, Mass. A.B. French 

Scope 3; Mendel Club 4-3-2-1; Intra- French Club 4-3-2-1; Blessed Oliver 



Plunkett Society 4-3-2-1 (President 4); 
Dean's List. 




JOHN A. MADDEN 

Dorchester, Mass. A.B. English 

Alpha Sigma Nu; Cross and Crown; 
Sub Turri 4-3 (Editor-in-Chief 4); Stylus 
4-3-2 (Associate Editor 4-3); Humanities 
(Assistant Editor) 3; The Heights 3-2 
(Managing Editor 3); English Academy 
4; Section Representative 1; Dramatic 
Society 2-1; Marquette Debating So- 
ciety 2-1; Commencement Week Com- 
mittee 3; Junior Show; Young Demo- 
crats Club 3-2 (Secretary 3, Founder 2); 
Prom Chairman 1; Intramurals 2-1. 




ARTS and 



1 



RICHARD F. MADDEN 

Somerville, Mass. B.S. Sociology 

Psychology Club 4-3; Intramurals 3-2-1; 
Dean's List. 



JAY J. MAHONEY 

Cambridge, Mass. B.S. English 

The Heights 3-2; Hockey Manager 4-3- 
2-1 ; Senior Dinner Dance Committee. 



THOMAS R. MAHONEY 

Peabody, Mass. A.B. Pre-Medical 

Mendel Club 4-3-2-1; Scope 4-3-2; In- 
tramurals 4-3-2-1. 




80 




PAUL A. MAHONY 

Edina, Minn. A.B. Economics 

Economics Academy 4; Dormitory 
Council 4-3; Fresliman Orientation 4; 
Junior Week Committee; Track 4-3-2-1; 
Sailing Club 4; Intramurals 3-2-1. 



ANDREW F. MAJEWSKI 

Chelsea, Mass. A.B. Modern Language 
Intramurals 4-3-2-1. 



GEORGE F. MALLOY 

Newton, Mass. B.S. Biology 

Mendel Club 4-3-2-1; Commencement 
Week Committee 3; Communion Break- 
fast Committee. 



n 



CIENCES 




FRANCIS J. MALONE 

Melrose, Mass. B.S. History & Govt. 
Historical Society 4; Foreign Relations 
League 4-3; Intramurals 4-2-1. 




JOSEPH F. MANFREDA 

Wallingford, Conn. B.S. Physics 

Sigma Pi Sigma; The Heights 4-3 (Asso- 
ciate Editor 4); American Institute of 
Physics 4-3; Ricci Mathematics Acad- 
emy 4-3; Junior Week Chairman; Con- 
necticut Club 4-3-2; Senior Ball Com- 
mittee. 



DAVID L. MANNING 

Manchester, N. H. B.S. Government 
Foreign Relations League 4-3; Spanish 
Academy 4-3-2-1; Camera Club 3; Foot- 
ball 2-1; Intramurals 4-3-2-1. 



JOSEPH A. MANNING 
Portland, Me. B.S. Economics 

Economics Academy 4-3-2; Varsity 
Basketball 4-3-2-1. 




81 



ARTS and SCIENCES 




ii^tf 



JOSEPH A. MAZRIMAS 

Chelsea, Mass. B.S. Biology 

Rod and Gun Club 4. 



CLAUDE J. MAZZOLA 

Brighton, Mass. B.S. Physics 

American Institute of Physics 4-3. 



PAUL N. MANOS 

Manchester, Mass. B.S. Economics 

Economics Academy 4; Intramurals 4- 
3-2-1. 



JAMES T. MARRINAN 

Bronx, N. Y. B.S. Natural Sciences 

Junior Class President; Section Repre- 
sentative 2-1; Mendel Club 4-3-2-1; 
Glee Club 4-3-2; New York Club 4-3-2- 
1 (President 4); Freshman Orientation 
4-3; Sophomore Prom Committee; 
Freshman Prom Committee; Intramur- 
als 4-3-2-1; Senior Ball Chairman. 



FRANCIS J. MARTIN 

W. Somerville, Mass. A.B. Sociology 
Senior Class Secretary; Secretary of 
Student Senate 4; Campus Coimcil Rep- 
resentative 4; Sub Turri 4-3 (Assistant 
Editor 4); Gold Key Society 4-3-2 (Vice- 
President 4, Keyholder 4, 3); Bellarmtne 
Law and Government Academy 4-3; 
Young Democrats Club 3-2; Freshman 
Orientation 4-3; Intramurals 2-1. 



JAMES R. MASSON 

Hingham, Mass. B.S. Economics 

Intramurals 4-3-2-1. 



82 





JEROME F. McCarthy 

Somerville, Mass. B.S. Economics 

Economics Academy 4-3-2; Junior 
Week Committee 3. 



LEONARD M. MCCARTHY 

Cambridge, Mass. B.S. History 

Spanish Club 1; Historical Society 4; 
Intramurals 1. 



CHARLES J. Mccarty, ni 

Jamaica Plain, Mass. B.S. Philosophy 
Freshman Orientation 4; Bellarmine 
Law and Government Academy 3; Psy- 
chology Club 4; Aquinas Circle 4; In- 
tramurals 4-3. 



RUSSELL C. McCONNELL 

Roslindale, Mass. B.S. Psychology 

Psychology Club 4-3; Intramurals 4-3. 



JOHN J. McCORMACK 

Brookline, Mass. B.S. Chemistry 

Cross and Crown (Marshal); Cosmos 
(Editor) 4; Gold Key Society 3-2; Sec- 
tion Representative 2; Varsity Track 4- 
3-2; Varsity Cross Country 4-3-2; Intra- 
murals 4-3-2-1; Dean's List; Senior Ball 
Committee. 

CHARLES B. McCULLAGH 

Brighton, Mass. B.S. History 

Cross and Crown; Sub Turri (Sports 
Editor) 4; Freshman Class President; 
Section Representative 4-3; Varsity 
Basketball 2-1; Glee Club 4-3-2; His- 
torical Society 3; Junior Show; Junior 
Week Committee; Intramurals 4-3-2-1; 
Dean's List. 





HENRY P. McDonald 

Rockland, Mass. B.S. English 



DANIEL F. McGRATH 

Lynn, Mass. B.S. History & Govt. 

Bellarmine Law and Government Acad- 
emy 4; Sodality 4. 



83 




JOSEPH C. McGUILL, JR. 

Fall River, Mass. B.S. Natural Science 
Dormitory Council 4; Mendel Club 4-3; 
American Chemical Society 2-1; Sailing 
Club 4; Intramurals 4-3-2-1. 




d'Ml^ 




ROBERT J. McHUGH 

Winchester, Mass. B.S. Economics 

Sophomore Class Treasurer; Section 
Representative 4-3; Co-Chairman of 
Sophomore Prom. 



RONALD A. McINTYRE 

Boston, Mass. A.B. English 

Marquette Debating Society 2-1 (Par- 
liamentarian 2); Bellarmine Law and 
Government Academy 2-1; Humanities 
3; Track 3; NFCCS 1; Junior Week 
Committee; Intramurals 4-3-2-1. 




DONALD B. McKEON 

AUston, Mass. B.S. Modern Language 
Fulton Debating Society (Secretary) 3; 
Chess Club (Secretary) 4; German Acad- 
emy 4-3; Ricci Mathematics Academy 4; 
Marquette Debating Society 2. 



[ 



ARTS an 



1 



PETER J. Mclaughlin 

Cambridge, Mass. A.B. Economics 

Senior Class Treasurer; Treasurer of 
Senior Class Council; Economics Acad- 
emy 4; Varsity Baseball 4-3-2; Freshman 
Hockey; Freshman Football; Intramu- 
rals 4-3-2-1. 



FRANCIS R. McLELLAN 

Medford, Mass. B.S. English 

The Heights 4-3 (News Editor 4, Assist- 
ant Editor 3); Chess Club 4-3-2 (Vice- 
President 4); Dramatic Society 4-3-2; 
Writers Workshop 4-3-2; Humanities 4; 
Intramurals 2-1. 



JOHN A. McMURRER 

Arlington, Mass. B.S. Economics 

Intramurals 4-3-2-1; Dean's List. 




84 




OWEN J. McNAMARA 

Boston, Mass. B.S. English 

The Heights 2-1 (Assistant News Editor 
2); Stylus 2. 



JOSEPH F. McNEEL 

West Roxbury, Mass. B.S. Psychology 
Psychology Club 4-3 (Treasurer 4); In- 
tramurals 4-3-2-1; Commencement Ball 
Committee. 



BRIAN S. McNIFF 

Chestnut Hill, Mass. A.B. English 

The Heights 4-3 (Features Editor 4); 
Dramatic Society 4-3-2-1 (Recording 
Secretary 4); Public Speaking Club 1. 



SCIENCES 



DONALD P. McRAE 

Somerville, Mass. B.S. Sociology 

Intramurals 4-3-2-1. 




EDWARD D. MEAGHER 

Lowell, Mass. A.B. Economics 

Economics Academy 4-3; Aquinas Cir- 
cle 4; Intramurals 4-2-1. 



K. DAVID MILBURY 

Medford, Mass. A.B. Economics 

Sub Turri 4; Economics Academy 4-3; 
Mendel Club 2-1; Aquinas Circle 4; In- 
tramurals 4-3-2-1; Class Night Com- 
mittee. 



JOHN L. MONAHAN 

Newton Center, Mass. 

B.S. History & Govt. 
Foreign Relations League 4; Blessed 
Oliver Plunkett Society 4-3; Intramu- 
rals 2-1. 




85 



ARTS and SCIENCES 



3 






RALPH R. MOORE 

Lawrence. Mass. B.S. History & Govt. 
Cross and Crown; Humanities (Editorial 
Board); Foreign Relations League 4-3 
(President 4); Historical Society 4; B.C. 
Debating Society (Secretary) 4; Fulton 
Debating Society 3; Marquette Debat- 
ing Society 2; Writers Workshop 1. 



ANTHONY J. MOROSE 

Danvers, Mass. A.B. English 

Historical Society 4; Bellarmine Law and 
Government Academy 3. 



RODNEY J. MORRISON 

Wakefield, Mass. B.S. Economics 

Economics Academy 4-3-2; Junior 
Week Committee; Dean's List. 




BRIAN T. MORRISSEY 

Peabody, Mass. B.S. History & Govt. 
Historical Society 4-3. 



ROBERT S. MORTON 

Dorchester, Mass. A.B. Economics 

Sub Turri 4 (Features Editor 4); 
Cosmos 4; Economics Academy 4-3; 
Aquinas Circle 4; Blessed Oliver Plun- 
kett Society 4; Cadet Officers Club; 
Freshman Orientation 4; Commence- 
ment Week Committee 3; Junior Show; 
Intramurals 3-1; Dean's List. 

PETER F. MUELLER 

Reading, Mass. B.S. Physics 

American Institute of Physics 4-3-2; 
Glee Club 2. 





^ 




EDWARD T. MULKERN 

Dorchester, Mass. A.B. Economics 

Economics Academy 4-3; Bellarmine 
Law and Government Academy 4; For- 
eign Relations League 4; Intramurals 4- 
3-2-1; Commencement Ball Committee. 



EDWARD C. MULLIGAN 

Revere, Mass. B.S. Biology 

Scope 4; Mendel Club 4-3-2-1 (President 
4); intramurals 4-3-2-1; Dean's List. 



THOMAS H. MULLOWNEY, JR. 

Brookline, Mass. B.S. Economics 

Economics Academy 4-3; Intramurals 4- 
3-2-1. 



ANTHONY D. MURPHY 

Lynn, Mass. A.B. Economics 

Psychology Club 4. 



PAUL H. MURPHY 

Arlington, Mass. B.S. English 

Stylus 4-3; Marquette Debating Society 1. 



PETER K. MURPHY 

Winchester, Mass. A.B. English 

Historical Society 4; Bellarmine Law 
and Government Academy 4; French 
Academy 2-1; Intramurals 3-2-1. 






ROBERT W. MURPHY 

Roslindale, Mass. B.S. Sociology 

Junior Week Chairman; Young Demo- 
crats Club 4-3. 



WELLL^M M. MURPHY 

Waban, Mass. A.B. Philosophy 

Section Representative 4-2; Aquinas Cir- 
cle 4; Intramurals 2-1. 



87 




RICHARD D. MURRAY 

West Roxbury, Mass. B.S. Chemistry 
Chemical Society 4-3-2; Cosmos 4; 
Cadet Officers' Club; Freshman Orien- 
tation 4; Junior Weetc Committee; Men- 
del Club 1; Intramurals 4-3-2-1; Dean's 
List; Pops Concert Committee. 



WILLIAM E. MURRAY 

Dorchester, Mass. A.B. Economics 

Economics Academy 4-3; Aquinas Cir- 
cle 4; Mendel Club 2-1 ; Intramurals 4-3- 
2-1; Dean's List. 



FRANCIS J. MUSMANNO 

Holbrook, Mass. B.S. Economics 

Drill Team 4-3-2-1 (Finance Officer 4); 
Intramurals 3. 




^k 



JAMES M. NEE 

Roslindale, Mass. B.S. English 

Sub Turri (Theme Editor) 4; Heights 4- 
3-2 (News Editor 4); English Academy 
4; Dramatic Society 3; Junior Show; 
CBA Debating Society 2-1; Marquette 
Debating Society 2; Blessed Oliver 
Plunkett Society 1; Sailing Club 2-1; Ski 
Club 2-1; Intramurals 2-1; Dean's List. 




ARTS and 






JOHN H. NOLAN, JR. 

Marion, Mass. B.S. Natural Science 

The Heights 4; Mendel Club 4-3; Glee 
Club 4-3-2-1; Junior Show; Intramurals 
4-3-2-1. 



THOMAS J. NORTON 

North Randolph, Mass. B.S. Economics 
Delta Sigma Pi; Gold Key Society 4-3-2 
(Keyholder 4); Junior Week Committee; 
Foreign Trade Club 3; Economics Acad- 
emy 3; Marquette Debating Society 2; 
Intramurals 4-3-2. 



JOHN O'CONNOR 

Jamaica Plain, Mass. A.B. Pre-Medical 
Cross and Crown; Senior Class Presi- 
dent; Junior Class Vice-President; Soph- 
omore Class Vice-President; Campus 
Council Representative 3; Student Coun- 
cil 1; Gold Key Society 4-3-2-1 (Key- 
holder 4); Mendel Club 4-3-2-1; Sub 
Turri 2; Freshman Orientation 4-3; In- 
tramurals 4-3-2-1. 










JOHN F. O'LEARY 

Somerville, Mass. B.S. Physics 

The Heights 4-3-2 (Business Manager 
4); Journal of Physics (Editor) 3; Sec- 
tion- Representative 3; American Insti- 
tute of Physics 3-2-1; Glee Club 4-3-2-1; 
Dramatic Society 3; Band 3-2-1; Pops 
Concert Chairman. 



JOHN C. O'MALLEY 

Norwood, Mass. B.S. History & Govt. 
Foreign Relations League 4; Blessed 
Oliver Plunkett Society 4; Intramurals 
4-3-2-1. 



OWEN L. O'MALLEY 

West Newton, Mass. A.B. Classics 

French Club 3; Sodality 4-3-2-1; Band 
1 ; Freshman Football. 



SCIENCES 



DONALD J. O'NEILL 

Milton, Mass. A.B. Economics 

Economics Academy 4; Blessed Oliver 
Plunkett Society 4; Varsity Hockey 4-3; 
Intramurals 4-3-2-1. 




JAMES D. O'NEILL 

West Medford, Mass. B.S. Economics 
Ski Club 4-3-2-1. 



RICHARD A. ORLANDO 

Walpole, Mass. A.B. History & Govt. 
Historical Society 4-3-2 (Vice-President 
4). 



RICHARD J. O'SHAUGHNESSY 

Somerville, Mass. A.B. Economics 

Journal of Business 4; Economics Acad- 
emy 4-3; Aquinas Circle 4; Blessed 
Oliver Plunkett Society 4-1; Sodality 4- 
3-2; Track 4-3-2-1; Intramurals 2-1. 




89 



^ 



ARTS and SCIENCES 




MARTIN P. O'SULLIVAN 

Oyster Bay, L. I., N. Y. 

A.B. Mathematics 
Ricci Mathematics Academy 4-3; New 
York Club 4; Connecticut Club 3; Sail- 
ing Club 4; Intramurals 4-3-2-1; Dean's 
List; Senior Ball Committee. 



DERMOTT P. O'TOOLE 

Dorchester, Mass. A.B. Economics 

Sub Turri (Art Editor) 4; The Heights 4; 
Economics Academy 4-3; Public Speak- 
ing Club 4-3. 



ROBERT G. PAQUETTE 

Roxbury, Mass. A.B. Pre-Medical 

Mendel Club 4-3; Drill Team 4-3-2-1. 



WILLIAM J. PARKS 

West Roxbury, Mass. A.B. Pre-Medical 
Cross and Crown; Gold Key Society 4- 
3-2 (Keyholder 4-3); Mendel Club 4-3- 
2-1; Junior Week Chairman; Sopho- 
more Prom Committee; Sub Turri 4; 
Intramurals 4-3-2-1; Senior Ball Com- 
mittee. 



ROBERT A. 

East Boston, Mass. 
Mendel Club 4-3. 



PELOSI 

B.S. Biology 



ALBERT J. PEPIN, JR. 

Beverly, Mass. B.S. Economics 

Economics Academy 4-3; Varsity Foot- 
ball 4-3-2-1; Intramurals 4-3-2-1. 



90 






FELIX A. PERRIELLO 

Medford, Mass. B.S. Biology 

Mendel Club 4-3-2-1; Intramurals 4-3- 
2-1; Dean's List. 



JOHN F. PETERSON 

Framingham, Mass. A.B. English 

English Academy 4. 



STANLEY J. PIASECZYNSKI 

Medford, Mass. B.S. Chemistry 

Chemical Society 4-3-2-1; Section Rep- 
resentative 4. 



ROBERT E. PIERONI 

Dorchester, Mass. B.S. Biology 

The Scope 4-3; Cosmos (Assistant Edi- 
tor) 4; Mendel Club 4-3-2-1; Psychology 
Club 4-3. 



JOHN M. PIZZOLANTE 

Arlington, Mass. B.S. Biology 

Intramurals 3-2-1. 



JAMES E. PLOUFFE 

Natick, Mass. B.S. Physics 

Sigma Pi Sigma; American Institute of 
Physics 3-1; Track 1; Intramurals 2-1. 





LOUIS L. POCZATEK 

New Bedford, Mass. A.B. Pre-Medical 
Mendel Club 4-3-2-1; Psychology Club 
4; Camera Club 2-1; Rod and Gun 
Club 2. 



EDWARD A. PORTER 

Weymouth, Mass. B.S. English 

English Academy 4; Writers Workshop 
2; Intramurals 4-3-2-1. 



91 




WILLIAM L. POWERS 

Hyde Park, Mass. B.S. History 

Cross and Crown; Humanities (Editorial 
Board) 3; Historical Society 4; Bellar- 
mine Law and Government Academy 4; 
Economics Academy 4-3; Marquette 
Debating Society 2. 



ANDRIS PRIEDE 

Jamaica Plain, Mass. B.S. Chemistry 
Chemical Society 4-3; German Academy 

4-3. 



JOSEPH T. PROCITO, JR. 

Cambridge, Mass. B.S. Mathematics 
Chemical Society 1; Intramurals 4-3-2-1. 




PHILIP A. PUCCIA 

Boston, Mass. B.S. Social Science 

Economics Academy 4-3-2; Italian Acad- 
emy 4-3-2-1; Chess Club 3; Intramurals 
4-3-2-1. 




ARTS and 



] 



PAUL E. RADTKE 

Silver Lake, Minn. B.S. Mathematics 
Ricci Mathematics Academy 4-3, 



WILLIAM J. REAGAN, JR. 

Medford, Mass. B.S. Economics 

Economics Academy 4-3; Historical So- 
ciety 4; Marquette Debating Society 2; 
Track 4-3-2-1; Cross Country 4. 



RICHARD F. REGAN 

Dorchester, Mass. B.S. History & Govt. 
Historical Society 4; Bellarmine Law 
and Government Academy 4; Foreign 
Relations League 4-3 (Treasurer 3); In- 
tramurals 4-3. 




92 




WILLIAM S. REGAN 

West Roxbury, Mass. 

B.S. History & Govt. 
Historical Society 4-3; Bellarmine Law 
and Government Academy 4-3; Foreign 
Relations League 4-3. 



ROBERT E. RICHARDS 

Cambridge, Mass. B.S. Biology 

Mendel Club 4-3-2-1; Intramurals 4-3- 
2-1. 



ROBERT J. RILEY 

Milton, Mass. A.B. Pre-Medical 

Mendel Club 4-3-2-1 ; Junior Week Com- 
mittee; Freshman Orientation 4; Intra- 
murals 4-3-2-1; Pops Concert Commit- 
tee. 



SCIENCES 



RICHARD B. ROCHE 

Brighton, Mass. A.B. Economics 

Economics Academy 4-3; Bellarmine 
Law and Government Academy 4-3; 
Aquinas Circle 4; Sub Turri 4-3 (Social 
Chairman 4); Public Speaking Club 4-3; 
Junior Show 3; Intramurals 4-3-2-1. 




MARTIN B. RODDY DANIEL E. ROSEN JOSEPH L. ROSENTHAL 

Fitchburg, Mass. B.S. Economics Dorchester, Mass. B.S. Psychology Roslindale, Mass. A.B. History 

Economics Academy 4; Chess Club 4-3. Sub Turri 4; Psychology Club 4-3 (Sec- Intramurals 4-3-2-1. 

retary 4). 




93 



ARTS and SCIENCES 



^ 




LOUIS J. ROY 

Brunswick, Me. B.S. History & Govt. 
Psychology Club 2. 



F. KENNETH SAMU 

Bridgeport, Conn. A.B. English 

The Heights 4; Glee Club 4-3-2-1; Mar- 
golds 4; Junior Week Committee; 
Junior Show; Connecticut Club; Intra- 
murals 4-3-2-1. 



EUGENE W. SARGENT 

Needham Heights, Mass. 

A.B. Psychology 
Psychology Club 4-3-2; Intramurals 4-3- 
2-1. 



JOSEPH A. SARNO 

Boston, Mass. A.B. Economics 

Italian Academy 4-3; Intramurals 4-3- 
2-1. 



JOSEPH G. SAYERS 

Arlington, Mass. B.S. Economics 

Gold Key 4-3-2 (Keyholder 4); Sub 
Turri 4; Aquinas Circle 4; Junior Week 
Committee; Intramurals 2-1; Dean's 
List. 



ANTHONY P. SCAPICCHIO 

Revere, Mass. B.S. Biology 

Mendel Club 4-3-2-1; Intramurals 4-3- 
2-1 ; Dean's List. 



94 





ROBERT E. SCIGLIANO 

Revere, Mass. B.S. Psychology 

Psychology Club 4-3; German Club 1; 
Intramurals 4-3-2-]. 



FRANCIS S. SCIMONE 

Belmont, Mass. B.S. Biology 

Mendel Club 4-3-2-1; Intramurals 4-3- 
2-1. 



SAMUEL F. SCOTT 

Weymouth, Mass. A.B. History 

Cross and Crown; Humanities 4-3; Sub 
Turri 4; Historical Society 4-3 (President 
4); Foreign Relations League 4-3 (Vice- 
Ptesident4); Cadet Officers' Club; Junior 
Week Chairman; Intramurals 4-3-2-1; 
Communion Breakfast Chairman. 



ROLAND N. SEGUIN 

New Bedford, Mass. B.S. Economics 
Economics Academy 4; Mendel Club 2- 
1; Glee Club 4; Sailing Club 4; Varsity 
Baseball 2; Intramurals 4-3-2-1. 



JOSEPH A. SELVITELLA 

East Boston, Mass. B.S. Physics 

American Institute of Physics 4. 



JOSEPH K. SERGI 

Brockton, Mass. B.S. Economics 

Economics Academy 4-3; Foreign Rela- 
tions League 4-3; Intramurals 3-2-1. 





HAROLD P. SEXTON 

Watertown, Mass. B.S. History & Govt. 
Bellarmine Law and Government Acad- 
emy 3; Mendel Club 2-1; WBCR 4; In- 
tramurals 4-3-2-1. 

EDWARD J. SHAUGHNESSY 

Medford, Mass. B.S. History & Govt. 
Sub Turri 4; Historical Society 4-3; Sec- 
tion Representative 3; Bellarmine Law 
and Government Academy 4-3-2-1 
(President 4); Junior Show (Director); 
WBCR (Founder, Program Director) 4; 
Glee Club 4-3-2-1 (President 4); Senior 
Week Program. 



95 




GEORGE A. SHEDIACK CHARLES J. SMITH EARLE L. SMITH, JR. 

Fall River. Mass. B.S. History & Govt. Lynn, Mass. B.S. Mathematics Woburn, Mass. A.B. Economics 

Foreign Relations League 4-3; Historical Section Representative 2; Ricci Mathe- Economics Academy 4-3; Mendel Club 

Society 4; Bellarmine Law and Govern- matics Academy 4-3; Intramurals 4-3- 2-1; Intramurals 4-3-2-1. 

ment Academy 4. 2-1. 






FRANCIS J. SMITH, JR. 

Newton, Mass. A.B. History & Govt. 
Foreign Relations League 4; Historical 
Society 4; Dramatic Society 4-3; Glee 
Club 4; Junior Show; Intramurals 4-3. 



ARTS a 




nj 



JOHN H. SMITH 

West Roxbury, Mass. B.S. English 



CHARLES F. SPANBAUER 

Brighton, Mass. B.S. Economics 

Economics Academy 4-3; Bellarmine 
Law and Government Academy 4; 
Aquinas Circle 4; American Institute of 
Physics 2-1; Commencement Week 
Committee 3; Intramurals 4-3-2-1; 
Dean's List; Commencement Ball Com- 
mittee. 



ROBERT O. SPENCE 

Hyde Park, Mass. B.S. History & Govt. 
Bellarmine Law and Government Acad- 
emy 4-3; Historical Society 4-3; Foreign 
Relations League 4-3; Aquinas Circle 4; 
Psychology Club 4; Blessed Oliver 
Plunkett Society 4. 




96 




RAYMOND U. STEBBINS 

Tilton, N. H. B.S. Mathematics 

Ricci Mathematics Academy 4-3; Var- 
sity Baseball 4-3-2. 



ADRIAN J. SULLIVAN ARTHUR F. SULLIVAN 

Milton, Mass. A.B. English Winchester, Mass. B.S. Biology 

Mendel Club 4-3-2-1; Intramurals 4-3- 
2-1. 






SCIENCES 



DAVID A. SULLIVAN 

Roslindale, Mass. A.B. Pre-Medical 

The Scope 1; Mendel Club 4-3-2-1 
(Executive Council 4, Vice-President 3); 
Psychology Club 4-2; Foreign Relations 
League 3-2; Intramurals 2-1. 





JAMES M. SULLIVAN 

Jamaica Plain, Mass. B.S. Economics 
Gold Key Society 3-2; Economics Acad- 
emy 4-3; Aquinas Circle 4; Ricci Mathe- 
matics Academy 2-1; Junior Show; Var- 
sity Baseball Manager 4-3-2; Intra- 
murals 4-3-2-1; Commencement Ball 
Committee. 



JOHN F. SULLIVAN 

Mattapan, Mass. B.S. Economics 

Aquinas Circle 4; Psychology Club 4; 
Glee Club 4-3-2; Junior Show; Track 
2-1 ; Intramurals 4-3-2-1. 



LEO R. SULLIVAN 

Brighton, Mass. B.S. Biology 

Mendel Club 4-3-2-1; Intramurals 4-3- 
2-1. 




97 




ARTS and SCIENCES 




PAUL T. SULLIVAN 

Dorchester, Mass. B.S. Chemistry 

Chemical Society 4-3; Intramurals 4-3- 

2-1. 



PETER M. SULLIVAN 

Dorchester, Mass. A.B. Economics 

Economics Academy 4-3; Foreign Re- 
lations League 4-3; Intramurals 4-3-2-1. 



ROBERT R. SULLIVAN 

Chicopee Falls, Mass. B.S. History 

Historical Society 4-3-2; Bellarmine Law 
and Government Academy 2; Western 
Massachusetts Club 4-3-2-1; Intramu- 
rals 1. 



ROGER J. SULLIVAN 

North Quincy, Mass. B.S. Biology 

Mendel Club 4-3-2-1; Sodality 4-3-2; 
Intramurals 4-3-2-1; Senior Dinner 
Dance. 



THOMAS F. SULLIVAN 

Arlington, Mass. A.B. Economics 

Economics Academy 4; Aquinas Circle 
4; Ricci Mathematics Academy 3; In- 
tramurals 4-3-2. 



WILLL\M D. SULLIVAN 

Cambridge, Mass. A.B. English 

Section Representative 2; English Acad- 
emy 4; Humanities 3; Classics Academy 
2-1; Intramurals 4-3-2-1. 





NORMAN T. SWAIN 

South Boston, Mass. B.S. Mathematics 
Ricci Mathematics Academy 4-3. 



HAROLD A. SWANSON 

Quincy, Mass. B.S. English 

French Academy 4-3; Intramurals 2-1; 
English Academy 4. 



ALEXANDER S. TANOUS 

Van Buren, Me. A.B. History & Govt. 
The Heights 3. 



PHILIP W. THIBEDEAU 

South Hamilton, Mass. B.S. History 
Bellarmine Law and Government Acad- 
emy 2-1; Foreign Relations League 2-1; 
Intramurals 2-1. 



RICHARD N. TIERNEY 

Jamaica Plain, Mass. B.S. Biology 

Mendel Club 4-3-2-1; Varsity Baseball 
4-3-2; Intramurals 4-3-2-1. 



TIMOTHY F. TOBIN 

Roxbury, Mass. B.S. History & Govt. 
Bellarmine Law and Government Acad- 
emy 4-3; Historical Society 4-3; Foreign 
Relations League 4-3; Intramurals 4-3- 
2-1. 





ROBERT M. TRAHE 

Stewart Manor, N. Y. B.S. Chemistry 
Cross and Crown; Chemical Society 4- 
3-2-1 (President 4); Psychology Club 4- 
3; New York Club 4-3-2-1; Camera 
Club 4-3-2-1 (Treasurer 4, Secretary 2); 
Dormitory Council 3-2; Intramurals 1. 

THOMAS G. TUOHEY 

West Newton, Mass. A.B. Pre-Medical 
Mendel Club 4-3-2-1 (Executive Com- 
mittee 4-3-2); Intramurals 4-3-2-1. 



99 




ROGER J. TWYMAN 

Bridgeport, Conn. B.S. Economics 

Economics Academy 3; Junior Week 
Committee; Aquinas Circle 4; Bellar- 
mine Law and Government Academy 1 ; 
Intramurals 2-1. 



JULIUS J. UNDERWOOD 

White Plains, N. Y. B.S. Sociology 

Section Representative 2-1; Freshman 
Prom Committee. 



LEO G. VAN BEAVER 

North Attleboro, Mass. B.S. Chemistry 
Chemical Society 4-3. 




ROBERT S. VERMETTE 

Caribou, Me. A.B. Economics 

Economics Academy 4-3; Foreign Rela- 
tions League 4-3; Public Speaking Club 
4-3; Marquette Debating Society 2; 
Cadet Officers' Club; Dormitory Coun- 
cil 4; Maine Club 4-3-1; Intramurals 4- 
3-2; Dean's List. 




ARTS a 



n? 



JAMES D. VILLIOTTE 

Revere, Mass. B.S. Biology 

Mendel Club 4-3-2-1; Commencement 
Week Committee 3; Intramurals 2-1; 
Dean's List. 



FRANCIS J. VISALLI 

Belmont, Mass. B.S. Biology 

Mendel Club 4-3-2-1; Intramurals 4-3- 
2-1. 



VICTOR R. WADE 

Brookline, Mass. A.B. History & Govt. 
Gold Key 3-2; Sodality 4; Foreign Re- 
lations League 4-3; History Academy 
4-3; Blessed Oliver Plunkett Society 4; 
Track 4-3-2-1; Intramurals 4-3-2-1. 




100 




JOHN E. WALKER 

Wrentham, Mass. B.S. Chemistry 

Chemical Society 4-3. 



JOHN T. WALL 

Lynn, Mass. B.S. Economics 

Bellarmine Law and Government Acad- 
emy 4-3 (Vice-President 4); Economics 
Academy 4-3; Aquinas Circle 4; Intra- 
murals 4-3-2-1. 



DANIEL P. WALSH 

West Roxbury, Mass. A.B. Economics 
Band 4-3-2-1; Drill Team 4-3-2-1; Men- 
del Club 2-1; Blessed Oliver Plunkett 
Society 4-3; Intramurals 4-3-2-1. 




lENCES 



PETER J. WALSH 

Wakefield, Mass. B.S. Pre-Medical 

Writers Workshop 1; Mendel Club 4-3- 
2-1 (Secretary 3); Intramurals 4-3-2-1. 




FRANCIS E. WANAT 

Meriden, Conn. B.S. Biology 

Cross and Crown; Mendel Club 4-2-1; 
Connecticut Club 4-2-1 ; Marquette De- 
bating Society 2; Intramurals 2-1. 



BRENDAN J. WELCH WILLIAM L. WELCH 

Springfield, Mass. A.B. Sociology Newtonville, Mass. A.B. History & Govt. 

Radio Club 4-3. 




101 




THOMAS H. WHALEN 

Aubumdale, Mass. B.S. Economics 

Glee Club 4-3-2; Cadet Officers' Club; 
Economics Academy 4-3-2; Sub Turri 4; 
Sophomore Prom Committee; Junior 
Show; Intramurals 2-1. 



RICHARD T. WHELAN 

Newton, Mass. B.S. Economics 

Economics Academy 4-2; Bellarmine 
Law and Government Academy 2; 
Aquinas Circle 4; Intramurals 4-3. 



HENRY H. WIEMAN 

Dorchester, Mass. B.S. Biology 

Mendel Club 4-3-2; Intramurals 3-2-]. 




JOHN R. WISEMAN 

W. Somerville, Mass. B.S. Economics 
Delta Sigma Pi (Delegate 4); Junior 
Class Secretary; Gold Key Society 4-3- 
2 (President 4, Keyholder 4-3); Com- 
mencement Week Committee (Co-Chair- 
man) 3; Freshman Orientation 4-3; In- 
tramurals 2-1. 




PAUL F. WOELFEL 

South Boston, Mass. B.S. Economics 
Bellarmine Law and Government Acad- 
emy 4-3 (Treasurer 4); Psychology Club 
4; Economics Academy 4-3; Intramu- 
rals 4-3-2. 



WILLIAM R. YORK 

Maiden, Mass. B.S. Economics 

Glee Club 4-3-2-1; Economics Academy 
4-3-2; Foreign Trade Club 4-3; Sodality 
4-3; Sub Turri 4; Sophomore Prom 
Committee; Junior Week Committee; 
Junior Show; Intramurals 4-3-2-1. 



JAMES H. YOUNG 

Wobum, Mass. B.S. Mathematics 

Mendel Club 1; Ricci Mathematics 
Academy 4-3. 




102 



= College of Business Administration 



THOMAS MURRAY 
President 



PETER DERBA 

Vice-President 





ALBERT WISIALKO 
Treasurer 





JOSEPH LUCAS 
Secretary 



103 



BUSINESS ADMINISTRATIO 



^ 




ARTHUR T. ABELE, JR. 

Brookline, Mass. B.S.B.A. Accounting 



RICHARD K. ACCHIONE 

Newton, Mass. B.S.B.A. Finance 

Finance Club 4; Foreign Trade Club 4; 
Intramurals 2-1; Chess Club 4. 



DONALD G. ACKROYD 

Millis, Mass. B.S.B.A. Finance 

Gold Key Society I; Finance Club 4-3; 
Intramurals 4-3-2-1. 



JOHN R. AKIN, m 

Wakefield, Mass. B.S.B.A. Finance 

Finance Club 4-3; Cadet Officers' Club; 
Foreign Trade Club 4; Senior Dinner 
Dance Committee. 



104 



DONALD J. ALLARD 

Somerville, Mass. B.S.B.A. Marketing 
Varsity Football 4-3-2-1; Varsity Basket- 
ball 3-2-1. 



NICHOLAS E. ALTOBELLI 

Framingham, Mass. B.S.B.A. Marketing 
Marketing Club 4-3. 






WILLIAM T. APPLEYARD 

Maiden, Mass. B.S.B.A. Accounting 
Sophomore Class Treasurer; Account- 
ing Academy 4-3; Varsity Baseball Man- 
ager 3-2-1; Intramurals 3-2-1. 



CHARLES R. ARONIS 

Chelsea, Mass. B.S.B.A. Accounting 
Delta Sigma Pi; Glee Club 4-3-2-1; Ac- 
counting Academy 4-3; Intramurals 4- 

3-2. 



GERALD P. BALL 

Hyde Park, Mass. B.S.B.A. Marketing 
Marketing Club 4; Blessed Oliver 
Plunkett Society 4; Intramurals 4. 



ROBERT E. BARRETT 

Avon, Conn. B.S.B.A. Accounting 



ROBERT F. BARRY 

West Roxbury, Mass. 

B.S.B.A. Marketing 
Marketing Club 4-3. 



GERALD B. BARTUSH 

Birmingham, Mich. B.S.B.A. Accounting 
Delta Sigma Pi; Junior Week Chairman; 
Varsity Football Manager 4-3-2; Fresh- 
man Hockey; Accounting Academy 4-3; 
Young Democrats Club 2. 





CHARLES C. BATTAGLIA 

East Boston, Mass. B.S.B.A. Management 
Sophomore Class Vice-President; Sub 
Turri (Advertising Manager); Sopho- 
more Prom Chairman; Junior Week 
Chairman; Society for the Advancement 
of Management 4-3-2; Alpha Kappa 
Psi; Freshman Orientation Committee 
4; Intramurals 2-1. 

THOMAS M. BEATTY 

Cambridge, Mass. B.S.B.A. Marketing 
Gold Key Society 4-3-2 (Keyholder 4); 
Commencement Week Committee 3; 
Marketing Club 4; Toastmasters Circle 
4-3; Journal of Business 4; Golf Team 
4-3; Senior Ball Committee. 



105 





EDWARD H. BELANGER 

Dedham, Mass. B.S.B.A. Finance 

Journal of Business (Business Manager) 
4; Finance Club 4-3; Economics Acad- 
emy 4. 



WILLIAM F. BENCH 

Arlington, Mass. B.S.B.A. Finance 

Sub Turri 4; Finance Club 4-3; The 
Heights 4; Commencement Week Com- 
mittee 3; Cadet Officers' Club; Intra- 
murals 4-3-2-1; Class Night Committee. 



LEON H. BENNETT, JR. 

Auburn, Mass. B.S.B.A. Economics 

Varsity Football 4-3-2-1; Foreign Trade 
Club 4. 




STEPHEN F. BENNETT 

Auburn, Mass. B.S.B.A. Accounting 

Varsity Football 4-3-2-1; Accounting 
Academy 4; Intramurals 4-3-2-1. 




^ 

BUSINESS AD 



ROBERT A. BERRA 

Somerville, Mass. B.S.B.A. Accounting 
Delta Sigma Pi; Accounting Academy 
4; Intramurals 4-3-2. 



WILLIAM E. BERRIGAN 

Jamaica Plain, Mass. B.S.B.A. Finance 
Finance Club 4-3; Foreign Trade Club 
4-3; Intramurals 4-3-2-1. 



CHESTER W. BIELAWSKI 

Medford, Mass. B.S.B.A. Marketing 
Marketing Club 4-3; Gold Key Society 
3-2; Intramurals 2-1. 



106 





CHESTER FRANK BLAKE 

Brighton, Mass. B.S.B.A. Marketing 
Sub Turri (Business Manager) 4; Alpha 
Kappa Psi (Master of Rituals 4, Secre- 
tary 3); Marketing Club (Publicity 
Chairman) 4. 



RALPH J. BLOOM 

Ware, Mass. B.S.B.A. Marketing 

Accounting Academy 4; Marketing 
Club 4-3; Western Massachusetts Club 
4-3. 



LAURENT L. BOISVERT 

Lawrence, Mass. B.S.B.A. Accounting 
Accounting Academy 4-3-2, 



MINISTRATION 



JOSEPH A. BONDI 

Boston, Mass. B.S.B.A. Accounting 

Alpha Kappa Psi (Parliamentarian 3); 
Dramatic Society 4-3-2-1 (Vice-Presi- 
dent 3); Gold Key Society 2; Toast- 
masters Circle 3-2; Italian Academy 3- 
2-]; Chess Club 4-3. 




JOHN E. BONNER 

Braintree, Mass. B.S.B.A. Accounting 
Accounting Academy 4-3; Intramurals 
4-3-2-1. 



HENRY W. BOTTE, JR. 

Melrose. Mass. B.S.B.A. Finance 

Finance Club 4-3; Economics Academy 
2; Intramurals 4-3-2-1. 



RICHARD J. BOUDREAU 

Sanford, Me. B.S.B.A. Management 

Sub Turri 4; Junior Week Committee 3; 
Accounting Academy 4; Society for the 
Advancement of Management 4-3 
(Treasurer 4); Economics Academy 4. 







107 



BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION 




FRANCIS G. BOWDEN 

Quincy, Mass. B.S.B.A. General Business 
Accounting Academy 4-3; Finance Club 
4-3; Section Representative 4; Intra- 
murals 4-3-2-1. 



HENRY G. BOWEN, JR. 

Manchester, N. H. B.S.B.A. Finance 
Finance Club 4-3-2; Distinguished Mili- 
tary Student; Varsity Basketball Man- 
ager 4-3-2; Junior Show; Intramurals 4- 
3-2-1; Dean's List. 



ROBERT F. BOYLE 

Milton, Mass. B.S.B.A. Marketing 

Varsity Hockey 4-3-2-1; Marketing 
Club 4-3; Cadet Officers' Club 4-3. 



CORNELIUS W. BRADY 

Boston, Mass. B.S.B.A. Finance 

Finance Club 4-3; Rod and Gun Club 4; 
Intramurals 4-3-2-1. 



108 



THOMAS BRADY, m 

Newton Center, Mass. 

B.S.B.A. Management 
Society for the Advancement of Man- 
agement 4-3; Intramurals 3-2. 

DAVID P. BRAUER 

West Roxbury, Mass. B.S.B.A. Finance 
Alpha Kappa Psi; Section Representa- 
tive 3; C.B.A. Debating Society 2-1 
(President 2); Drill Team 4; Accounting 
Academy 2; Finance Club 4-3; Glee 
Club 4; Junior Week Committee; B.C. 
Debating Society 4; Varsity Baseball 2; 
Band (Drum Major 3-2-1). 





PAUL L. BROUGHTON 

Arlington, Mass. B.S.B.A. Accounting 
Delta Sigma Pi (Treasurer); Alpha Sig- 
ma Nu (Sergeant at Arms); Gold Key 
4-3-2 (Keyholder 4-3); Commencement 
Week Committee 3; Junior Week Chair- 
man; Section Representative 4-3-2-1 
Accounting Academy 4-3; C.B.A. De- 
bating Society 2-1 (Vice-President 2) 
Intramurals 4-3-2-1; Senior Dinner 
Dance Chairman. 



WILLIAM W. BROWN 

Maiden, Mass. B.S.B.A. Marketing 

Varsity Football 4-3-2-1; Intramurals 
4-3-2-1. 



KARL J. BURGESS 

New Bedford, Mass. B.S.B.A. Marketing 
Delta Sigma Pi; Varsity Baseball 4-3-2; 
Accounting Academy 4; Dormitory 
Council 2; Marketing Club 4; Intramu- 
rals 4-3-2-1. 



JAMES J. BURKE 

Chestnut Hill, Mass. 

B.S.B.A. Marketing 
Delta Sigma Pi; Marketing Club 4-3; 
Intramurals 4-3-2-1; Dean's List. 



RICHARD M. BURNS 

Somerville, Mass. B.S.B.A. Accounting 
Beta Gamma Sigma; Accounting Acad- 
emy 4-3; Toastmasters Circle 4-3. 



ANTHONY C. BUSA 

Lexington, Mass. 

B.S.B.A. General Business 
Delta Sigma Pi; Gold Key Society 4-3-2; 
Junior Week Committee; Italian Acad- 
emy 4. 





iR^Tii 









\ 




JAMES E. BUTLER, JR. 

New Bedford, Mass. B.S.B.A. Finance 
Delta Sigma Pi; Journal of Business 4; 
Finance Club 4-3; Toastmasters Circle 
3; Glee Club 4-3-2; Spanish Academy 
4-3; Intramurals 2. 



JOSEPH F. CALLAHAN 

Brighton, Mass. B.S.B.A. Finance 

Sub Turri 4; Finance Club 4-3; Ac- 
counting Academy 4; Cadet Officers' 
Club; Intramurals I. 



109 




JOSEPH P. CALLAHAN 

Milton, Mass. B.S.B.A. Accounting 

Glee Club 4-3-2-1; Accounting Academy 
4-3-2. 



JOHN W. CANAVAN 

West Somerville, Mass. B.S.B.A. Finance 
Gold Key Society 4-3-2 (Keyholder 4- 
3); Sub Turri (Head Collector of C.B.A.) 
4; Finance Club 4-3 (Secretary 3); Sec- 
tion Representative 4-3; Commence- 
ment Week Committee 3; Intramurals 
4-3-2-1; Dean's List. 



WILLIAM J. CANNIFF 

Quincy, Mass. B.S.B.A. Management 
Society for the Advancement of Man- 
agement 4-3; Intramurals 4-3-2. 



s 




\ 


1 


-< 




, 




1 _ _, 



THOMAS M. CAREY 

Natick, Mass. B.S.B.A. Management 
Drill Team 4-3; Color Guard (Com- 
mander) 4. 




WILLIAM M. CARNES 

Charlestown, Mass. B.S.B.A. Accounting 
Accounting Academy 4-3; Cadet Offi- 
cers' Club; Blessed Oliver Plunkett So- 
ciety 4-2-1; Intramurals 4-3-2-1. 



EDWARD J. CARROLL 

Dedham, Mass. B.S.B.A. Finance 

Gold Key Society 3; Finance Club 4-3; 
Intramurals 4-3-2-1. 



JOHN B. CHRISTIAN© 

Elizabeth, N. J. B.S.B.A. Accounting 
Alpha Kappa Psi; Junior Show (Busi- 
ness Manager); Gold Key Society 3-2-1; 
Accounting Academy 4-3-2 (Treasurer 
4); N.F.C.C.S. 4-3-2; Economics Acad- 
emy 2; Intramurals 4-3-2-1; Senior Ball 
Chairman. 




110 





CORVIN R. CIANCI 

Boston, Mass. B.S.B.A. Marketing 

Marketing Club 4; Italian Academy 4-3; 
Dramatic Society 1; Intramurals 2-1. 



ANDREW CIARLETTA, JR. 

Lynn, Mass. B.S.B.A. Economics 

Accounting Academy 4; Economics 
Academy 4; Foreign Trade Club 4; In- 
tramurals 2-1. 



WILLIAM F. CLARKE 

West Roxbury, Mass. 

B.S.B.A. Marketing 
Varsity Baseball 4-3; Marketing Club 
4-3; Sodality 1. 



MINISTRATION 



PAUL M. CLOONAN 

Watertown, Mass. B.S.B.A. Accounting 
Accounting Academy 4-3; Freshman 
Orientation 4; Intramurals 4-3-2-1. 




ALAN J. CLOUTIER 

Somerville, Mass. B.S.B.A. Accounting 
Accounting Academy 4; Intramurals 2-1. 



ALFRED A. COCCA 

East Boston, Mass. B.S.B.A. Accounting 
Section Representative 1; Accounting 
Academy 4-3-2; C.B.A. Debating Society 
2; Toastmasters Circle 4; Italian Acad- 
emy 3. 



FRANK A. COLLEY 

Woburn, Mass. B.S.B.A. Finance 

Finance Club 4-3. 




BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION 




MANUEL E. CONCEISON 

Woburn, Mass. B.S.B.A. Economics 

Economics Academy 4-3; Foreign Trade 
Club 4; Intramurals 4-3-2-1. 



JOHN E. CONEY, JR. 

Bangor, Me. B.S.B.A. Marketing 

Marketing Club 4-3; Blessed Oliver 
Plunkett Society 4-3-2-1; Maine Club 4- 
3-2-1; Intramurals 4-3-2-1. 



WILLIAM F. CONNELL 

Lynn, Mass. B.S.B.A. Accounting 

Alpha Kappa Psi (President 4, Vice- 
President 3); Beta Gamma Sigma (Pres- 
ident 4-3); Alpha Sigma Nu; Account- 
ing Academy 4-3-2 (President 4, Secre- 
tary 3); Toastmasters Circle 2; Blessed 
Oliver Plunkett Society 4-2-1; Intramu- 
rals 2-1. 



ROBERT W. CONNELLY 

Amesbury, Mass. 

B.S.B.A. General Business 
Delta Sigma Pi; Journal of Business 4- 
3-2-1 ; The Heights 2; Accounting Acad- 
emy 2; Junior Week Committee. 



112 



JUSTIN J. CONNOR 

Chestnut Hill, Mass. B.S.B.A. Finance 
Finance Club 4; Basketball 1 ; Intramu- 
rals 4-3-2-1. 



FRANaS X. CONNORS 

West Concord, Mass. 

B.S.B.A. Marketing 
Drill Team 4-3-2-1 ; Cadet Officers' Club; 
Dean's List. 




mi^dm 




JAMES E. COTTER 

Dorchester, Mass. B.S.B.A. Marketing 
Sub Turri 4; Varsity Football 4-3-2-1; 
Varsity Baseball 4-3-2; Athletic Associa- 
tion Representative 4; Marketing Club 
4-3; Junior Show; Commencement Week 
Committee 3. 



RICHARD M. COTTER 

Wellesley, Mass. B.S.B.A. Accounting 
Accounting Academy 4; Intramurals 4- 
3-2-1; Communion Breakfast Commit- 
tee. 



FRANCIS J. COSTELLO 

College Point, N.Y. B.S.B.A. Marketing 
Marketing Club 4; Intramurals 4-3-2-1. 





^tS«? 



WILLIAM E. CRATTY 

Marlboro, Mass. B.S.B.A. Finance 

Journal of Business 4-3-2 (Co-Editor-in- 
Chief 4); Sub Turri (Faculty Editor); The 
Executive (Associate Editor) 4; Account- 
ing Academy 2; Finance Club 4-3; 
Blessed Oliver Plunkett Society 3; Toast- 
masters Circle 4-3; Intramurals 2-1. 



JOHN F. CRIMMINGS 

Belmont, Mass. B.S.B.A. Finance 

Delta Sigma Pi; Gold Key Society 4-3-2 
(Keyholder 4-3); The Heights 2; Cadet 
Officers' Club (Vice President 4); Fresh- 
man Orientation 4-3; Finance Club 4-3; 
Accounting Academy 2; Junior Week 
Committee; Junior Show. 

JAMES J. CROAK 

Brighton, Mass. B.S.B.A. Finance 

Delta Sigma Pi; Bellarmine Law and 
Government Academy 2; Foreign Rela- 
tions League (Treasurer) 2; Finance Club 
4-3; Foreign Trade Club 4; Journal of 
Business 3-2 (Editorial Board 3); Sub 
Turri 4. 







CHARLES L. CRONIN 

Arlington, Mass. B.S.B.A. Accounting 
Accounting Academy 4-3. 



JOHN J. CRONIN 

Medford, Mass. B.S.B.A. Finance 

Finance Club 4-3; Toastmasters Circle 4- 
3; Foreign Trade Club 2-1 ; Section Rep- 
resentative 4; Freshman Basketball; 
Blessed Oliver Plunkett Society ]; Intra- 
murals 4-3-2-1. 



113 




JOSEPH V. CRONIN, JR. 

Revere, Mass. B.S.B.A. Finance 

Marquette Debating Society 1; Fulton 
Debating Society 3; Finance Club 4; 
Cadet Officers' Club; Senior Dinner 
Dance Committee. 



PAUL E. CROWLEY 

South Boston, Mass. B.S.B.A. Finance 
Finance Club 4-3; Intramurals 2. 



ROBERT V. CROWLEY 

Jamaica Plain, Mass. 

B.S.B.A. Management 
Society for the Advancement of Manage- 
ment 4-3; Intramurals 4-3-2-1. 




DAVID W. CURLEE 

Hartford, Conn. B.S.B.A. Accounting 







BUSINESS A 



I 



MARTIN J. DANAHY, JR. 

Newton Highlands, Mass. 

B.S.B.A. Marketing 
Marketing Club 4; Freshman Orienta- 
tion 4; Intramurals 3-2-1. 



PARKER A. DAVIS 

Salem, Mass. B.S.B.A. Finance 

Finance Club 4-3; Foreign Trade Club 
4-3; Accounting Academy 2; Cadet 
Officers' Club; Freshman Orientation 4; 
Dean's List. 



LAWRENCE R. DEANGELIS 

Watertown, Mass. B.S.B.A. Marketing 
Varsity Football 3-2-1; Marketing Club 
4; Gold Key Society 2; Section Repre- 
sentative 1; Intramurals 4-3-2-1. 





^Mkd 




114 




ANGELO A. DelPRIORE 

Boston, Mass. B.S.B.A. Accounting 

Beta Gamma Sigma; Accounting Acad- 
emy 4-3-2; Junior Week Committee; 
Italian Academy 4-3; Fresliman Orien- 
tation 4; Dean's List. 



FRANCIS DEMEO 

Waltham, Mass. B.S.B.A. Accounting 
Accounting Academy 4-3-2; Italian 
Academy 3; Intramurals 2-1. 



JOHN J. DENEEN, JR. 

Milton, Mass. B.S.B.A. Accounting 

Sub Turri 4; Section Representative 4; 
Accounting Academy 4-3; Junior Show; 
Cadet Officers' Club; Intramurals 4-3- 
2-1. 



\AINISTRATION 



PETER J. DERBA 

Medford, Mass. B.S.B.A. Marketing 
Senior Class Vice President; Vice Presi- 
dent of Senior Class Council; Campus 
Council Representative 4; Junior Show 
(Director); Alpha Kappa Psi; Band 4-3- 
2-1 (President 4); Glee Club 4-3-2-1 (Sec- 
retary 3); Cadet Officers' Club; Intra- 
murals 3-1. 




ANTHONY J. DiMATTEO 

Brighton, Mass. B.S.B.A. Economics 
Freshman Hockey; Economics Academy 
4-3; Foreign Trade Club 4; Toastmasters 
Circle 4-3; Intramurals 2-1; Dean's List. 



JOHN DIPERNA 

Somerville, Mass. B.S.B.A. Accounting 
Accounting Academy 4-3; Intramurals 
4-3-2. 



ANTHONY J. DERE 

Watertown, Mass. B.S.B.A. Accounting 
Accounting Academy 4-3; Intramurals 
4-3-2-1. 




115 



BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION 



1 




THOMAS J. DOERR 

Somerville, Mass. B.S.B.A. Marketing 
Marketing Club 4-3; Intramurals 3-2. 



EDWARD A. DOHERTY 

Brighton, Mass. 

B.S.B.A. General Business 
Sailing Club 4-3-2-1; Rifle Team 1; 
Toastmasters Circle 4-3-2-1; Intramurals 
4-3-2-1. 



KEVIN L. DOLAN 

Framingham, Mass. B.S.B.A. Finance 
Finance Club 4-3 (Vice President 4); 
Cadet Officers' Club; Freshman Orien- 
tation 4; Intramurals 3-2-1; Senior Ball 
Committee. 




THOMAS E. DOLAN 

Wellesley, Mass. B.S.B.A. Finance 

Ski Club 2; Finance Club 4-3; Foreign 
Trade Club 4. 



116 



JOHN P. DONAHOE 

Randolph, Mass. B.S.B.A. Finance 

Gold Key Society 4-3-2 (Keyholder 4-3); 
Finance Club 4-3; Junior Week Chair- 
man; Intramurals 3-2-1; Commencement 
BaU Committee. 

RICHARD B. DONAHUE 

Roslindale, Mass. B.S.B.A. Accounting 
Accounting Academy 4-3; Sailing Club 
4; Commencement Week Committee 3; 
Intramurals 4-3-2-1. 







JOSEPH J. DONOVAN 

Somerville, Mass. B.S.B.A. Accounting 
Delta Sigma Pi; Accounting Academy 
4-3; Toastmasters Circle 4; Freshman 
Orientation 4; Chess Club 4; Intramurals 
4-3-2-1. 



HAROLD W. DOWNING 

Roslindale, Mass. B.S.B.A. Marketing 
Marketing Club 4. 



WILLIAM J. DRISCOLL 

Maiden, Mass. B.S.B.A. Finance 

Gold Key Society 4-3-2; Cadet Officers' 
Club; Finance Club 4-3. 



JOHN F. DRUMMEY, JR. 

Norwood, Mass. B.S.B.A. Management 
Glee Club 4-3-2-1; Foreign Trade Club 
4; Freshman Orientation 4. 



HUGH G. DUFFY 

Dorchester, Mass. B.S.B.A. Accounting 
Beta Gamma Sigma; Journal of Business 
4-3; Track 1; C.B.A. Debating Society 2; 
Young Democrats Club 3-2; Accounting 
Academy 4-3-2; Toastmasters Circle 4-3; 
Freshman Orientation 4; Chess Club 4; 
Intramurals 4-2-1; Dean's List. 




FRANCTS X. DUNNE 

Dorchester, Mass. B.S.B.A. Accounting 
Toastmasters Circle; Accounting Acad- 
emy 4; Blessed Oliver Plunkett Society 
4; Band 4-3. 






1^0!^^ 



^"i^ 





GERALD E. EISENHAUR, JR. 

Somerville, Mass. B.S.B.A. Management 
Society for the Advancement of Manage- 
ment 4-3. 



THOMAS A. ENGLISH 

Milton, Mass. B.S.B.A. Finance 

Finance Club 4-3; Accounting Academy 
4; Junior Show; Intramurals 4-3-2-1. 



117 




THOMAS J. FAHERTY 

Dorchester, Mass. 

B.S.B.A. General Business 
Foreign Trade Club 4. 



WILLIAM A. FALLON 

Port Chester, N. Y. 

B.S.B.A. Management 
Student Council 1 ; Cadet Officers' Club 
4-3; New York Club 4-3-2-1 ; Intramurals 
3-2-1; Commencement Week Commit- 
tee 3; Commencement Ball Committee. 



JOHN C. FARLEY 

Winthrop, Mass. B.S.B.A. Marketing 
Marketing Club 4; Blessed Oliver 
Plunkett Society 4; Intramurals 4-3-2-1. 




RAYMOND A. FARMER 

Lynn, Mass. B.S.B.A. Marketing 

Cadet Officers' Club 4; Marketing Club 
4-3; Intramurals 3-1. 




BUSINESS Ad 



i 



WILLIAM F. FAWCETT 

Marblehead, Mass. B.S.B.A. Economics 
Alpha Kappa Psi (Delegate 4); Junior 
Class Secretary; Dormitory Council 4-3 
(President 4); Fulton Debating Society 
4-3 (President 4); Chairman of Fresh- 
man Orientation 4; Toastmasters Circle 
4-3-2 (Treasurer 4); Junior Week Chair- 
man; Commencement Ball Chairman; 
Economics Academy; Journal of Busi- 
ness 4. 



JOSEPH H. FELTZ 

Medford, Mass. B.S.B.A. Accounting 
Beta Gamma Sigma; Accounting Acad- 
emy 4. 



WILLIAM A. FERIOLI 

Medford, Mass. B.S.B.A. Management 
Society for the Advancement of Man- 
agement 4-3; Toastmasters Circle 4; In- 
tramurals 4-3-2-1. 





118 




JOHN F. FITZGERALD 

Dorchester, Mass. B.S.B.A. Accounting 
Alpha Kappa Psi; Accounting Academy 
4-3-2; Toastmasters Circle 3-2; Intra- 
murals 4-3-2-1. 



WILLIAM E. FITZGERALD 

Milford, Mass. B.S.B.A. Management 
Cadet Officers' Club; Society for the 
Advancement of Management 4-3; 
Junior Week Committee; Intramurals 
2-1. 



JOSEPH E. FLAHERTY 

East Braintree, Mass. B.S.B.A. Finance 
Finance Club 4-3; Varsity Basketball 2- 
1; Intramurals 4-3-2-1. 



MINISTRATION 



RAMON A. FLOREZ 

Vedado, Habaua B.S.B.A. Economics 
Economics Academy 4-3; Foreign Trade 
Club 4; Toastmasters Circle 4-3. 




DENNIS J. FOLAN 

Norwood, Mass. B.S.B.A. Marketing 
Marketing Club 4-3; Blessed Oliver 
Plunkett Society 4; Intramurals 3-2-1; 
Dean's List. 



GERALD S. FOLEY, JR. 

Hyde Park, Mass. B.S.B.A. Accounting 
Accounting Academy 4-3; Cadet Of- 
ficers' Qub 4; Intramurals 4-3-2-1. 



ROCCO L. FONTI 

Everett, Mass. B.S.B.A. Marketing 

The Executive 4; Society for the Ad- 
vancement of Management 4-3; Market- 
ing Club 4-3; Chess Club 4-3; Toast- 
masters Circle 4. 




119 



BUSINESS ADMINIST 





H. FREDERICK FORRESTER 

Boston, Mass. B.S.B.A. Management 
Section Representative 1; Dormitory 
Council 3; Freshman Basketball Man- 
ager; The Executive 4; Society for the 
Advancement of Management 4-3-2; 
Chess Club 4-3; Blessed Oliver Plunkett 
Society 4-3; Junior Show; Intramurals 
4-3-2-1, 



WILLIAM J. FOTHERGILL 

Chelsea, Mass. 

B.S.B.A. General Business 
Accounting Academy 3; Foreign Trade 
Club 4-3; Finance Club 4-3. 



RICHARD J. GANONG 

Newton, Mass. B.S.B.A. Finance 

Cadet Officers' Club; Finance Club 4-3; 
Blessed Oliver Plunkett Society 4; Golf 
Team 4-3; Intramurals 4-3-2-1. 



MURRAY L. GARDLER 

Newton, Mass. B.S.B.A. Management 
Intramurals 2-1. 



JOHN GARVEY 

Dorchester, Mass. B.S.B.A. Economics 
Toastmasters Circle 4-3; Economics 
Academy 4-3; Foreign Trade Club 4; 
Intramurals 4-3-2-1. 



STEPHEN J. GARVEY 

Dorchester, Mass. B.S.B.A. Accounting 
Accounting Academy 4-3; Blessed Oliver 
Plunkett Society 4; Intramurals 4-3-1; 
Dean's List. 



120 





GEORGE G. GATELY 

Boston, Mass. B.S.B.A. Finance 

Finance Club 4; Foreign Trade Club 4; 
Toastmasters Circle 4. 



JOSEPH F. GATELY 

Mattapan, Mass. B.S.B.A. Finance 

Student Council 1; Finance Club 4-3 
(Treasurer 3). 



EDWARD P. GEARY 

Allston, Mass. B.S.B.A. Accounting 

Accounting Academy 4; Toastmasters 
Circle 4; Blessed Oliver Plunkett Society 
4; Intramurals 3. 



JOHN M. GERACI 

Newton Center, Mass. 

B.S.B.A. Marketing 
Section Representative 1; Italian Acad- 
emy 4-3; Foreign Trade Club 4; Prom 
Committee I; Intramurals 4-3-2-1. 



ROBERT F. GIBSON 

Reading, Mass. B.S.B.A. Accounting 
Accounting Academy 4-3. 



JOHN J. GILFOYLE 

Winthrop, Mass. B.S.B.A. Marketing 
Beta Gamma Sigma; Marketing Club 4; 
Blessed Oliver Plunkett Society 4; Intra- 
murals 4-3-2-1. 






^mtf 




ANTHONY M. GIORDANO 

Roslindale, Mass. B.S.B.A. Accounting 
Beta Gamma Sigma; Accounting Acad- 
emy 4-3-2; Ski Club 4-3-2; Pops Concert 
Committee. 



ROBERT R. GIORDANO 

Framingham, Mass. 

B.S.B.A. Accounting 
Cadet Officers' Club; Accounting Acad- 
emy 4; Italian Academy 4. 



121 






^h^ikdiM 



ANDREW J. GOREY, JR. 

Quincy, Mass. B.S.B.A. Marketing 

Alpha Kappa Psi (Chairman of Profes- 
sional Committee 4-3); Marketing Club 
4-3 (President 4); Toastmasters Circle 4-3 
(Vice President 4); Freshman Hockey; 
Economics Academy 1 . 



ROBERT D. GORI JAMES F. GOSSELIN 

Milton, Mass. B.S.B.A. Accounting Lebanon, N. H. 

Accounting Academy 4-3-2; Young B.S.B.A. General Business 

Democrats Club 4-2; Blessed Oliver Accounting Academy 3-2; Finance Club 

Plunkett Society 2. 4; Maine Club 3. 




JOSEPH P. GREELISH, JR. 

Belmont, Mass. B.S.B.A. Management 
Blessed Oliver Plunkett Society 1; So- 
ciety for the Advancement of Manage- 
ment 3; Rod and Gun Club 2; Intra- 
murals 4-3-2-1. 




ALAN T. GREENBERG 

Revere, Mass. B.S.B.A. Finance 

Finance Club 4-3; Accounting Academy 
4; Sub Turri 4; Junior Week Committee; 
Intramurals 4-3-2-1. 



STEPHEN V. GUARRERA 

Waterbury, Conn. B.S.B.A. Finance 
Finance Club 4-3; Intramurals 4-3-2-1. 



THOMAS W. GUILDERSON 

Arlington, Mass. B.S.B.A. Management 
Society for the Advancement of Manage- 
ment 4-3; Accounting Academy 2; 
Blessed Oliver Plunkett Society 4; Intra- 
murals 2-1. 




122 





JAMES W. HAGAN 

Gardner, Mass. B.S.B.A. Accounting 
Delta Sigma Pi; Freshman Football 
Manager; Journal of Business 1; Blessed 
Oliver Plunkett Society 1; Accounting 
Academy 4-3; Western Massachusetts 
Club 2-1; Junior Week Committee; 
Dean's List. 



THOMAS J. HAGERTY 

Somerville, Mass. B.S.B.A. Accounting 
C.B.A. Debating Society 4-3; Account- 
ing Academy 4-3; Toastmasters Circle 4. 



DANIEL S. HANLEY 

Westford, Mass. B.S.B.A. Marketing 
Marketing Club 4-3; Commencement 
Committee 3. 



MINISTRATION 



LAWRENCE F. HARDING 

West Roxbury, Mass. B.S.B.A. Finance 
Varsity Baseball 3-2; Finance Club 4-3; 
Drill Team 4-3-2; Society for the Ad- 
vancement of Management 4; Cadet 
Officers' Club; Intramurals 3-2-1; Senior 
Ball Committee. 




JOHN M. HARKINS 

Katonah, N. Y. B.S.B.A. Management 
Dormitory Council 3; New York Club 
4-3-2-1; Society for the Advancement of 
Management 3-2; Freshman Orientation 
3; Intramurals 4-3-2-1. 



DAVID J. HARRIGAN 

Dorchester, Mass. B.S.B.A. Finance 
Finance Club 4-3; Foreign Relations 
League 4; Intramurals 2-1. 



CHARLES F. HARRINGTON 

Waltham, Mass. B.S.B.A. Marketing 
Commencement Week Chairman 3; 
Marketing Club 4-3; Junior Week Com- 
mittee; Intramurals 4-3-2-1. 




123 



BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION 




LAURENCE P. HARRINGTON 

Waltham, Mass. B.S.B.A. Marketing 
Ricci Mathematics Journal 4; Marketing 
Club 4-3; Blessed Oliver Plunkett Society 
4; Commencement Week Committee 3; 
Junior Week Committee; Intramurals 4- 
3-2-1. 



WILLIAM J. HARRIS 

Brighton, Mass. B.S.B.A. Management 
Society for the Advancement of Manage- 
ment 4; Intramurals 2-1. 



JOSEPH M. HART 

Medford, Mass. B.S.B.A. Management 
Society for the Advancement of Manage- 
ment 4-3; Toastmasters Circle 4; Foreign 
Trade Club 4; Blessed Oliver Plunkett 
Society 4; Varsity Basketball 2-1; Var- 
sity Football 2-1 ; Commencement Week 
Committee 3. 



KEVIN W. HAYES 

Somerville, Mass. B.S.B.A. Accounting 
Glee Club 4-3-2 (Manager 4); Band 4-3-2 
(Manager 4); Accounting Academy 4-3; 
Junior Week Committee; Intramurals 
3-2-1. 



PAUL F. HAYES 

North Quincy, Mass. B.S.B.A. Finance 
Sailing Club 4-3. 



DAVID A. HEALEY 

Milton, Mass. B.S.B.A. Accounting 

Accounting Academy 4-3; Blessed Oliver 
Plunkett Society 4-3; Intramurals 4-3. 



124 





KENNETH P. HEALY 

Arlington, Mass. B.S.B.A. Finance 

Finance Club 4-3; Blessed Oliver 
Plunkett Society 3; Intramurals 4-3-2-1. 



GERALD R. HEGARTY 

Portland, Me. B.S.B.A. Management 
Blessed Oliver Plunkett Society 4; Toast- 
masters Circle 4; Intramurals 2-1. 



EDWARD F. HENNEBERRY 

Brighton, Mass. B.S.B.A. Management 
Society for the Advancement of Man- 
agement 4; German Academy 2; Intra- 
murals 4-3-2-1. 



PIERRE E. HENRY 

Brookline, Mass. B.S.B.A. Accounting 
Accounting Academy 4-3; Cadet Of- 
ficers' Club 4; Intramurals 3-2-1. 



PETER C. HERNON 

Somerville, Mass. B.S.B.A. Accounting 
Accounting Academy 4-3-2; Blessed 
Oliver Plunkett Society 2; Chess Club 
3-2; Intramurals 4-3-2-1. 



JOHN M. HIGGINS 

Peabody, Mass. B.S.B.A. Marketing 
Junior Week Chairman; Marketing Club 
4-3; Cadet Officers' Club 4; Intramurals 
4-3-2-1; Dean's List; Senior Dinner 
Dance Committee. 




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^ 



tfti 



2 





ALAN R. HILSINGER 

Arlington, Mass. B.S.B.A. Finance 

Finance Club 4-3; Toastmasters Circle 4; 
Intramurals 4-3-2-1. 



RICHARD K. HOPKINS 

Newton, Mass. B.S.B.A. Finance 

Finance Club 4-3; Marketing Club 2-1; 
Commencement Week Committee 3; 
Toastmasters Circle 1 ; Intramurals 2. 



125 




FRANCIS I. HORGAN 

South Boston, Mass. 

B.S.B.A. Management 
Beta Gamma Sigma; Alpha Kappa Psi; 
Section Representative 4; Society for the 
Advancement of Management 4-3. 



JOHN P. HUEGEL 

Brookline, Mass. B.S.B.A. Marketing 
Marketing Club 4; Intramurals 4-3-2-1. 



JOSEPH P. HURLEY 

Milton, Mass. B.S.B.A. Accounting 

Beta Gamma Sigma; Accounting Acad- 
emy 4-3-2; Chess Club 4-3. 




ANTHONY D. lANNUCCILLO 

Lawrence, Mass. B.S.B.A. Finance 

Finance Club 4-3; Cadet Officers' Club 
4; Intramurals 2-1. 



BUSINESS Ad 



JOSEPH P. JANGRO 

Melrose, Mass. B.S.B.A. Marketing 

Varsity Hockey 4-3-2-1 (Captain 4); 
Marketing Club 4-3; Blessed Oliver 
Plunkett Society 4; Intramurals 4-3-2-1. 



THOMAS E. JOHNSON, JR. 

Lewiston, Me. B.S.B.A. Finance 

Finance Club 4-3; Accounting Academy 
2; Spanish Academy 3; Maine Club 4- 
3-2-1. 



DANIEL L. JOYCE, JR. 

Wobum, Mass. B.S.B.A. Finance 

Alpha Kappa Psi 4-3; Finance Club 4-3 
(President 4); C.B.A. Debating Society 2- 
1; Toastmasters Circle 4; Intramurals 1. 




126 




WILLIAM J. JOYCE 

Dorchester, Mass. B.S.B.A. Management 
The Executive 4; Society for the Ad- 
vancement of Management 4-3; Intra- 
murals 3-2-1. 



MATTHEW F. JUDGE 

Peabody, Mass. 

B.S.B.A. General Business 
Delta Sigma Pi; Accounting Academy 4; 
Spanish Academy 4; Section Representa- 
tive 1; Intramurals 4-3-2-1. 



ARTHUR F. KAPLAN 

Dorchester, Mass. B.S.B.A. Economics 
Economics Academy 4; Spanish Acad- 
emy 4; Blessed Oliver Plunkett Society 4; 
Commencement Week Committee 3; 
Intramurals 4-3-2-1. 



^AINISTRATION 



n 



ALAN D. KAUFMAN 

Brookline, Mass. 

B.S.B.A. General Business 
Glee Club 4-3. 




JOHN W. KEANE 

Roslindale, Mass. B.S.B.A. Management 
Society for the Advancement of Manage- 
ment 4-3; The Executive 4; Intramurals 
4-3-2-1. 



WILLIAM G. KEANE 

Weymouth, Mass. B.S.B.A. Marketing 
Marketing Club 4; Blessed Oliver 
Plunkett Society 4-3; Intramurals 4-3- 
2-1. 



GEOFFREY J. KEATING 

Brighton, Mass. B.S.B.A. Marketing 
Marketing Club 4-3; Cadet Officers' 
Club (Corresponding Secretary 4); In- 
tramurals 4-3-2-1; Senior Ball Commit- 
tee. 




127 



BUSINESS ADMINISTRATI 



ON ^ 





JOHN F. KEAVENEY 

Dorchester, Mass. B.S.B.A. Finance 
Finance Club 4-3; Blessed Oliver Plunk- 
ett Society 4; Intramurals 4-3-2-1. 



tf^i^'B 








JOSEPH F. KELLIHER 

Norwood, Mass. B.S.B.A. Accounting 
Accounting Academy 4-3; Blessed Oliver 
Plunkett Society 4; Intramurals 4-3. 



DONALD F. KELLY 

New Rochelle, N. Y. 

B.S.B.A. Marketing 
Delta Sigma Pi (Vice President 4); Mar- 
keting Club 4-3 (Treasurer 4); Bellar- 
mine Law and Government Academy 4; 
Section Representative 1; New York 
Club 4-3-2-1; Freshman Prom Com- 
mittee; Junior Show; Sailing Club 4. 



FREDERICK L. KENNEDY 

Lynn, Mass. B.S.B.A. Accounting 

Alpha Kappa Psi; Accounting Academy 
4-3; Gold Key 2-1; Blessed Oliver 
Plunkett Society 4-2-1; Toastmasters 
Circle 2-1; Intramurals 4-3-2-1. 



DONALD R. KENNEY 

Needham, Mass. B.S.B.A. Finance 

Finance Club 4; Cadet Officers' Club; 
Gold Key Society 3-2-1; Intramurals 4- 
3-2-1. 

WILLLVM H. KEOUGH 

Millis, Mass. B.S.B.A. Finance 

Delta Sigma Pi; Beta Gamma Sigma; 
Gold Key Society 4-3 (Keyholder 4-3); 
Cadet Officers' Club; Finance Club 4-3; 
Junior Week Committee; Intr""iurals 
3-2-1. 



128 




^I'h 




KEVIN J. KILEY 

Melrose, Mass. B.S.B.A. Management 
Gold Key Society 2; Intramurals 3-2-1; 
Senior Ball Committee. 



JOHN J. KING 

Lynn, Mass. B.S.B.A. Finance 

Finance Club 4-3; Sodality 1; Cadet 
Officers' Club; Foreign Trade Club 4-3 
(Vice President 4); Blessed Oliver Plunk- 
ett Society 4-3-2; Toastmasters Circle 
3-2; Intramurals 3-2-1. 



MARTIN J. KING, JR. 

Lynn, Mass. B.S.B.A. Finance 

Beta Gamma Sigma; Finance Club 4-3; 
Intramurals 1; Dean's List. 



RICHARD L. KINGSTON 

Brighton, Mass. B.S.B.A. Economics 
Economics Academy 4-3 ; Foreign Trade 
Club 4. 



WILLIAM D. KRYZOVIC 

Everett, Mass. B.S.B.A. Management 
French Club 1 ; Society for the Advance- 
ment of Management 4-3; Intramurals 
2-1. 



JOHN F. KULIESH 

Haverhill, Mass. B.S.B.A. Management 
The Executive 4; Gold Key Society 3; 
Society for the Advancement of Manage- 
ment 4; Toastmasters Circle 4; Intra- 
murals 2. 





ROBERT J. LADD 

Hyde Park, Mass. B.S.B.A. Marketing 
Marketing Club 4; Freshman Orienta- 
tion 4; Intramurals 2-1. 



CONSTANTINE C. LAGANAS 

Lowell, Mass. B.S.B.A. Finance 

Finance Club 4-3; Foreign Trade Club 
4-3. 



129 




JOSEPH R. LaMONICA 

Boston, Mass. B.S.B.A. Accounting 

Sub Turri 4; Accounting Academy 2; 
Drill Team 3-2-1. 



MICHAEL R. LANDOLFl 

Dorchester, Mass. 

B.S.B.A. Management 
Society for the Advancement of Man- 
agement 4; Intramurals 4-3-2. 



THOMAS G. LARKIN 

Brighton, Mass. B.S.B.A. Marketing 
Marketing Club 4; Track 3-2-1; Intra- 
murals 4-3-2-1. 




ROBERT P. LATKANY 

Brooklyn, N. Y. B.S.B.A. Accounting 
Accounting Academy 4-3; Junior Class 
Treasurer; Junior Week Chairman; Jun- 
ior Show; New York Club 4-3-2-1; In- 
tramurals 4-3-2-1; Varsity Basketball 
4-3-2-1. 




BUSINESS 



OT 



JOSEPH F. LEARY, JR. 

Milton, Mass. B.S.B.A. Accounting 

Accounting Academy 4-3-2; Sub Turri 
4-3; Alpha Kappa Psi (Treasurer 4); 
Toastmasters Circle 4-3-2 (Secretary 4). 



HAROLD E. LeBONTE 

Newton Highlands, Mass. 

B.S.B.A. Accounting 
Accounting Academy 4-3-2; Intramurals 
4-3-2-1. 



THOMAS J. LEGERE 

Arlington, Mass. B.S.B.A. Marketing 
Section Representative 4; Gold Key So- 
ciety 3; Sub Turri 4; Heights 3; Market- 
ing Club 4-3; Cadet Officers' Club; Sail- 
ing Club 3-2-1; Freshman Orientation 3; 
Intramurals 4-3-2-1. 




130 









THOMAS P. LENEHAN 

Dorchester, Mass. B.S.B.A. Finance 
Finance Club 4-3; Blessed Oliver Plunk- 
ett Society; Intramurals 4-3-2-1. 



BERNARD B. LEONARD 

South Boston, Mass. 

B.S.B.A. Accounting 
Accounting Academy 4-3; Blessed Oliver 
Plunkett Society 4-3; Intramurals 4-3- 
2-1. 



JOSEPH W. LUCAS 

Brighton, Mass. B.S.B.A. Accounting 
Secretary of Senior Class; Secretary of 
Student Senate 4; Secretary of Senior 
Class Council; Accounting Academy 4- 
3-2; Cadet Officers' Club 4-3 (Secre- 
tary 4); Blessed Oliver Plunkett Society 
4-3-2-1; Freshman Orientation 4; Com- 
mencement Week Committee 3; Intra- 
murals 4-3-2-1. 



^AINISTRATION 



PAUL J. LUCEY 

Maiden, Mass. B.S.B.A. Accounting 

Accounting Academy 4-3; Cadet Of- 
ficers' Club; Blessed Oliver Plunkett So- 
ciety 2-1; Intramurals 4-3-2-1. 





CHARLES O. LYNCH, JR. 

Dorchester, Mass. B.S.B.A. Management 
Delta Sigma Pi; The Executive 4; Sec- 
tion Representative 1; Society for Ad- 
vancement of Management 4-3; Blessed 
Oliver Plunkett Society 4; Rifle Team 1 ; 
Intramurals 4-1; Pops Concert Com- 
mittee. 



DAVID J. LYONS FRANCIS X. MacDONALD 

Milton, Mass. B.S.B.A. Accounting Dorchester, Mass. B.S.B.A. Economics 

Accounting Academy 4; Blessed Oliver Economics Academy 4-3-2; Foreign 

Plunkett Society 2-1; Commencement Trade Club 4; Sailing Club 4; Intra- 

Week Committee 3. murals 4-3-2-1. 




131 



BUSINESS ADMINISTRATI 



^^ 




WILLIAM F. MACK 

Milton, Mass. B.S.B.A. Marketing 

Section Representative 2; Marketing 
Club 4; Accounting Academy 2; Intra- 
murals 2-1; Dean's List. 



FRANK L. MACOLINI 

Belmont, Mass. B.S.B.A. Accounting 
Accounting Academy 4-3-2; Intramurals 
4-3-2. 



ARTHUR M. MADDEN 

Rochelle Park, N. J. 

B.S.B.A. Marketing 
Section Representative 1; Marketing 
Club 3-2; Camera Club 3-2-1; New York 
Club 2-1; Intramurals 2-1. 



JOHN J. MADDEN 

Brighton, Mass. B.S.B.A. Economics 
Section Representative 4-3-1; Alpha 
Kappa Psi; Alpha Sigma Nu (Vice- 
President); Beta Gamma Sigma; Eco- 
nomics Academy 4-3-2-1 (President 4); 
Foreign Trade Club 4-3; Toastmasters 
Circle 4-3; Golf 2; Intramurals 2-1. 



132 



JOHN S. MADDEN 

Framingham, Mass. B.S.B.A. Finance 
Finance Club 4-3; Economics Academy 
2-1; Varsity Hockey 4-3-2-1; Dean's List. 



JAMES P. MAGENNIS 

Roslindale, Mass. 

B.S.B.A. General Business 
Finance Club 4-3; Marketing Club 4-3; 
Sailing Club 2; Intramurals 4-3-2-1. 





fe^'A 




JOHN D. MAHONEY 

Westwood, Mass. B.S.B.A. Finance 

Alpha Kappa Psi; Sub Turri (Assistant 
Business Manager 4); Journal of Busi- 
ness 4-3 (Editorial Board 4); Finance 
Club 4-3; Junior Week Committee; In- 
tramurals 1. 



JAMES J. MAHONEY 

Brighton, Mass. B.S.B.A. Marketing 
Marketing Club 4-3; Delta Sigma Pi; 
Golf 4-3 (Captain 4); Hockey 1. 



EDWARD J. MALONE 

Jamaica Plain, Mass. 

B.S.B.A. Accounting 
Accounting Academy 4-3-2; Blessed 
Oliver Plunkett Society 4-3-2; Freshman 
Orientation 4; Intramurals 4-3-2-1. 



PAUL F. MANNING 
Boston, Mass. B.S.B.A. Finance 

Finance Club 4-3; Foreign Trade Club 
4-3; Gold Key Society 3; Intramurals 
4-3-2-1. 



RICHARD J. MANNING 

North Quincy, Mass. 

B.S.B.A. Marketing 
Marketing Club 4-3; Blessed Oliver 
Plunkett Society 4; Golf 4-3-2. 



PAUL H. MANTOS 

West Roxbury, Mass. B.S.B.A. Finance 
Finance Club 4-3; Intramurals 4-3-2-1. 





ROBERT A. MANZELLI 

Watertown, Mass. B.S.B.A. Marketing 
Delta Sigma Pi; Sub Turri 4; Heights 3; 
Marketing Club 4; Cadet Officers' Club 
4-3; Gold Key Society 3; Commence- 
■ ment Week Committee 3; Intramurals 
4-3-2-1. 

LAWRENCE R. MARTIN, JR. 

Lowell, Mass. B.S.B.A. Marketing 

Marketing Club 4-3; Commencement 
Week Committee 3; Golf Team 4-3-2; 
Intramurals 4-3-2-1. 



133 





ARMAND G. MARTINEAU 

Boston, Mass. B.S.B.A. Accounting 

Accounting Academy 4-3. 



PAUL J. McBRIEN 

West Roxbury, Mass. 

B.S.B.A. Management 
Society for Advancement of Manage- 
ment 4-3 (President 4); Tfie Executive 4; 
Toastmasters Circle 4-3; Fresliman Ori- 
entation 4; Intramurals 4-3-2. 



JAMES J. McCABE 

Somerville, Mass. B.S.B.A. Finance 

Finance Club 4-3; Toastrnasters Circle 3; 
Commencement Week Committee 3; 
Intramurals 2. 




BRIAN M. McCarthy 

Hyde Park, Mass. B.S.B.A. Marketing 
Marketing Club 4-3; Accounting Acad- 
emy 4. 




BUSINESS AD 



THOMAS J. McCarthy 

Brighton, Mass. B.S.B.A. Finance 

Finance Club 4-3; Intramurals 1. 



WILLIAM A. McCarthy 

Cambridge, Mass. B.S.B.A. Economics 
Economics Academy 4; Foreign Trade 
Club 4; Gold Key Society 3; Freshman 
Orientation 4; Intramurals 4-3-2-1. 



WILLLyVI H. McCLENNAN, JR. 

Dorchester, Mass. B.S.B.A. Accounting 
Alpha Kappa Psi; Journal of Business 
4-3; Accounting Academy 4-3-2; Toast- 
masters Circle 2; Young Democrats Club 
(Vice President 3); Intramurals 4-3; 
Communion Breakfast Chairman. 




134 




JAMES M. McCORMACK 

Wallingford, Conn. B.S.B.A. Accounting 
Junior Class President; Junior Class 
Council (Chairman); Accounting Acad- 
emy 4-3-2; Toastmasters Circle 4; Delta 
Sigma Pi (President 4, Treasurer 3); 
Journal of Business 3-2 (Circulation 
Manager 3); Junior Week Chairman; 
Connecticut Club 4-3-2-1. 



LEO J. McCORMACK 

Arlington. Mass. B.S.B.A. Marketing 
Marketing Club 4-3. 



HARRY A. McCORMICK 

Milton, Mass. B.S.B.A. Management 
Society for Advancement of Manage- 
ment 4-3; Intramurals 4-3-2-1. 



^AINISTRATION 



JAMES J. McCORMICK, JR. 

Jamaica Plain, Mass. 

B.S.B.A. Accounting 
Accounting Academy 4-3-2; Blessed 
Oliver Plunkett Society 4; Freshman Ori- 
entation 4; Intramurals 4-3-2. 




ARTHUR J. McDonald 

Bebnont, Mass. B.S.B.A. Marketing 
Marketing Club 4-3; Blessed Oliver 
Plunkett Society 4; Intramurals 4-3-2-1. 



JOHN E. McDonald 

Medford, Mass. B.S.B.A. Accounting 
Accounting Academy 4-3; Intramurals 
4-3-2. 



JOHN J. Mcdonough 

Lynn, Mass. B.S.B.A. Accounting 

Society for the Advancement of Man- 
agement 4-3; Accounting Academy 4-3- 
2; Blessed Oliver Plunkett Society 3-2; 
Intramurals 4-2-1. 




135 




KimMM^k 



BUSINESS ADMINISTRATIO 



F 




GERARD J. McELANEY 

Milton, Mass. B.S.B.A. Economics 

Delta Sigma Pi; Gold Key Society 4-3-2 
(Treasurer 4, Keyliolder 4-3); Foreign 
Trade Club 4; Freshman Orientation 4; 
Commencement Weelc Committee 3; 
Intramurals 4-3-2-1. 



JOHN J. McELENEY 

West Roxbury, Mass. B.S.B.A. Finance 
Society for Advancement of Manage- 
ment 4; Finance Club 4-3; Intramurals 

4-3-2-1. 



JAMES J. McELHINNEY 

Beverly Farms, Mass. 

B.S.B.A. Accounting 
Accounting Academy 4-3; Intramurals 
2-1. 



WILLIAM F. McGONAGLE 

Hyde Park, Mass. B.S.B.A. Economics 
Foreign Trade Club 4; Economics Acad- 
emy 4; Toastmasters Circle 4-3; Intra- 
murals 4-3-2-1. 



ROBERT E. McGURK 

Newton Center, Mass. 

B.S.B.A. Marketing 
Junior Show. 



JOHN A. McHATTON, JR. 

Chelsea, Mass. B.S.B.A. Marketing 

Drill Team 4-3-2-1. 



136 





i 




JAMES V. McHUGH, JR. 

Leominster, Mass. B.S.B.A. Finance 
Finance Club 4-3; International Trade 
Club 4; Dormitory Council 4; Western 
Massachusetts Club; Ski Club 4-3; In- 
tramurals 4-3-2-1. 



FRANCIS J. McKEEVER, JR. 

Boston, Mass. B.S.B.A. Marketing 

Marketing Club 4-3. 



EDWARD F. McKENNA 
Revere, Mass. B.S.B.A. Finance 

Finance Club 4-3; Cadet Officers' Club; 
Intramurals 4-3-2-1. 



CHESTER G. McLAUGHLIN 

Wilmington, Mass. B.S.B.A. Accounting 
Accounting Academy 4-3. 



PAUL F. Mclaughlin 

Jamaica Plain, Mass. 

B.S.B.A. Accounting 
Accounting Academy 4-3; Drill Team 
4-3; Intramurals 4-3-2-1. 



JOSEPH P. McMAHON 

South Boston, Mass. 

B.S.B.A. Accounting 
Society for Advancement of Manage- 
ment 4; Accounting Academy 4-3; 
Toastmasters Circle 4; Intramurals 4-3- 
2-1. 





THOMAS P. McNAMARA 

Somerville, Mass. B.S.B.A. Finance 

Finance Club 4-3; Freshman Orienta- 
tion 4; Intramurals 2-1. 



EDWIN A. MERCER, JR. 

Lexington, Mass. B.S.B.A. Marketing 
Marketing Club 4-3; Intramurals 4-3-2-1 . 



137 




ALAN R. MILLER 

Devon, Conn. B.S.B.A. Finance 

Finance Club; Varsity Football 4-3-2-1; 
Intramurals 4-3-2-1. 



ROBERT S. MILLER 

Newark, N. J. B.S.B.A. General Business 
Accounting Academy 3; Glee Club 2-1; 
New York Club 3-2-1; Intramurals 4- 
3-2-1. 



DENIS V. MINIHANE 

Brighton, Mass. B.S.B.A. Management 
The Executive 4; Society for Advance- 
ment of Management 4-3; Toastmasters 
Circle 4-3; Junior Show 3; Intramurals 
4-3-2-1. 




PASQUALE P. MOBILIA 

Waltham, Mass. B.S.B.A. Marketing 
Marketing Club 4; Italian Academy 4-3- 
2; Blessed Oliver Plunkett Society 4. 



■ 



1 

BUSINESS AC 

m 



FRANCIS L. MORAN 

Mattapan, Mass. B.S.B.A. Management 
Society for Advancement of Manage- 
ment 4-3; Section Representative 1; Rod 
and Gun Club 4-3; Intramurals 4-2-1. 



JOHN B. MORAN 

Maiden, Mass. B.S.B.A. Management 
Society for Advancement of Manage- 
ment; Toastmasters Circle 4-3; The 
Executive 4-3. 



GEORGE A. MORRIS 

Belmont, Mass. .B.S.B.A. Management 
Society for Advancement of Manage- 
ment 4-3; Intramurals 4-3-2-1. 




138 




JAMES J. MULRENNAN 

Cambridge, Mass. B.S.B.A. Accounting 
Sophomore Class Secretary; Section 
Representative 1; Accounting Academy 
4-3-2; Toastmasters Circle 2; Intra- 
murals 1. 



JOHN J. MURPHY 

Belmont, Mass. B.S.B.A. Marketing 
Section Representative 2; Marketing 
Club 4-3; Intramurals 4-3-2-1. 



KEVIN M. MURPHY 

Cambridge, Mass. B.S.B.A. Management 
Society for the Advancement of Manage- 
ment 4-3; Gold Key Society 4-3; The 
Executive 4; Intramurals 4-3-2-1. 



MINISTRATION 



MATTHEW G. MURPHY 

Medford, Mass. B.S.B.A. Marketing 
Marketing Club 4-3. 





THOMAS O. MURPHY 

Belmont, Mass. B.S.B.A. Marketing 
Marketing Club 4-3; Blessed Oliver 
Plunkett Society; Junior Show; Intra- 
murals 4-3-2-1. 



ANDREW E. MURRAY 

Brighton, Mass. B.S.B.A. Economics 
Foreign Trade Club 4; Economics Acad- 
emy 4-3; Section Representative 1; In- 
tramurals 4-3-2-1. 



JOHN E. MURRAY 

Wollaston, Mass. B.S.B.A. Management 
Alpha Sigma Nu; Beta Gamma Sigma 
(Vice President); The Executive (Co- 
Editor); Section Representative 3; So- 
ciety for the Advancement of Manage- 
ment 4-3; Sailing Club 2-1. 




139 



BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION 




THOMAS J. MURRAY, JR. 

Sandusky, Ohio B.S.B.A. Economics 
Alpha Kappa Psi; Alpha Sigma Nu; 
Beta Gamma Sigma; Sophomore Class 
President; Junior Class Vice President; 
Senior Class President; Campus Council 
3; Student Council 1; Secretary of Stu- 
dent Senate 3; President of Senior Class 
Council; Toastmasters Circle 4-3-2 
(President 4); Economics Academy 4; 
Foreign Trade Club 4; C.B.A. Debating 
Society 2; Intramurals 1; Dean's List. 

JOHN D. MUSSELLS 

Wakefield, Mass. B.S.B.A. Marketing 
Journal of Business 4-3 (Co-editor 4); 
Stylus 4-3 (Associate Editor 4); Hu- 
manities 4; Dramatic Society 3-2; 
Writers' Workshop 4-1; Blessed Oliver 
Plunkett Society 2-1; Intramurals 4-3-2. 



JAMES H. MYERS 

Charlotte, N. C. B.S.B.A. Finance 

Section Representative 2; Accounting 
Academy 4-3; Finance Club 4-3; Junior 
Week Committee; Alpha Kappa Psi. 



ANGELO A. NAPOLITANO 

Everett, Mass. B.S.B.A. Marketing 

Marketing Academy 4-3; Accounting 
Academy 3-2; Intramurals 2-1. 



140 



PAUL H. NATALE 

Cambridge, Mass. B.S.B.A. Management 
The Executive 4; Society for the Ad- 
vancement of Management 4-3; Track 
1; Intramurals 1. 

GEORGE D. O'BRIEN 

Cambridge, Mass. B.S.B.A. Finance 
Sub Turri 4; Gold Key Society 4-3 (Key- 
holder 4); Finance Club 4-3; Toast- 
masters Circle 4; Freshman Orientation 
4; Intramurals 4-3-2-1; Senior Dinner 
Dance Committee. 




%«% SStsX 



1 




ROBERT F. O'BRIEN 

Somerville, Mass. B.S.B.A. Marketing 
Marketing Club 4-3 ; Intramurals 4-3-2- 1 . 



DANIEL F. OCONNELL 

Milton, Mass. B.S.B.A. Finance 

Finance Club 4-3; Foreign Trade Club 
4-3; Intramurals 4-3-2-1. 



EDWARD J. OCONNELL, lU 

Roslindale, Mass. B.S.B.A. Finance 

Journal of Business 4; Finance Club 4-3; 
Accounting Club 2; Intramurals 2. 



KEVIN M. O'DONOGHUE 

Watertown, Mass. B.S.B.A. Finance 
Finance Club 4-3; Intramurals 4-3-2-1. 



EDMUND W. O'LEARY 

Dorchester, Mass. B.S.B.A. Accounting 
Accounting Academy 4-3; Section Rep- 
resentative 3; Blessed Oliver Plunkett 
Society 4; Intramurals 4-3-2-1. 



FRANCIS G. O'LOUGHLIN 

Watertown, Mass. B.S.B.A. Finance 
Finance Club 4-3; Intramurals 2-1. 




^^^Sm '^^tS^ ' 




THOMAS J. O'MALLEY 

Jamaica Plain, Mass. 

B.S.B.A. Marketing 
Marketing Club 4-3; Intramurals 4-3-2. 



FRANCIS J. O'REILLY 

Newtonville, Mass. B.S.B.A. Marketing 
Delta Sigma Pi; Marketing Club 4; Gold 
Key Society 2. 



141 




VINCENT M. O'REILLY 

Dorchester, Mass. B.S.B.A. Economics 
Alpha Kappa Psi; Beta Gamma Sigma 
(Secretary-Treasurer 4); Foreign Trade 
Club 4; Freshman Orientation 4; Toast- 
masters Circle 4-3; Intramurals 4-3-2-1; 
Dean's List. 



JOHN E. O'ROURKE, JR. 

Holyoke, Mass. B.S.B.A. Management 
Society for the Advancement of Manage- 
ment 4; Western Massachusetts Club 4- 
3-1; Intramurals 4-3-1; Pops Concert 
Committee. 



JOHN M. OVERTON 

Stoughton, Mass. B.S.B.A. Accounting 
Accounting Academy 4-3; Intramurals 
4-3-2-1. 




VICTOR J. PALMUCa 

Concord, Mass. B.S.B.A. Marketing 
Marketing Club 4; Intramurals 4-3-2-1. 




BUSINESS A 



^ 



DAVID F. PARENT 

Lowell, Mass. B.S.B.A. Accounting 

Accounting Academy 4-3; Cadet Of- 
ficers' Club; Intramurals 4-3-2-1; Com- 
mencement Ball Committee. 



ALESSIO J. PEONA 

Somerville, Mass. B.S.B.A. Finance 

Italian Academy (President 4); Finance 
Academy 4-3; Foreign Trade Club 4; In- 
tramurals 4-3. 



HERBERT A. PETERSON 

South Boston, Mass. 

B.S.B.A. Management 
The Executive; Society for the Advance- 
ment of Management 4-3; Historical So- 
ciety 4; Intramurals 4-2-1. 




142 





THOMAS A. PHELAN, JR. 

West Roxbury, Mass. 

B.S.B.A. Accounting 
Accounting Academy 4-3; Blessed Oliver 
Plunkett Society 4; Intramurals 1. 



JOHN D. PISACRETA JOSEPH R. PLATI 

Everett, Mass. B.S.B.A. Accounting Everett, Mass. B.S.B.A. Marketing 

Accounting Academy 4-3; Italian Acad- Marketing Club 4-3; Section Representa- 

emy 4; Intramurals 4-3-2-1. tive 4. 



\AINISTRATION 



JAMES M. P0WT;R 

Roxbury, Mass. B.S.B.A. Marketing 
Marketing Club 4; Section Representa- 
tive 4; Junior Show; Intramurals 4-3-2-1 . 



FREDERICK J. PRATSON 

Hartford, Conn. B.S.B.A. Management 
Dean's List; Class Night Committee; 
Sub Turri 4. 



OWEN R. QUINN 

Newton Upper Falls, Mass. 

B.S.B.A. Finance 
Cadet Officers' Club (President 4); Dis- 
tinguished Military Student; Marketing 
Club 2; Finance Club 4-3; Accounting 
Academy 2; Gold Key Society 4-3-2 
(Keyholder 4-3); Young Democrats Club 
2; Junior Week Committee; Freshman 
Orientation; Intramurals 4-2-1; Class 
Night Chairman. 




PETER B. QUINN 

Newton Center, Mass. B.S.B.A. Finance 
Gold Key Society 4-3-2 (Keyholder 4-3); 
Finance Academy 4-3; Accounting 
Academy 2. 




143 



BUSINESS ADMINISTRATIO 



^P 




JOHN J. REARDEN 

Longmeadow, Mass. 

B.S.B.A. Management 
The Executive 4; Society for the Ad- 
vancement of Management 4-3; Blessed 
Ohver Plunkett Society 4; Western Mass- 
achusetts Club (Secretary 4); Camera 
Club 4; Intramurals 4-3-2-1. 



MARTIN T. REDBNGTON 

Chelsea, Mass. B.S.B.A. Accounting 
Beta Gamma Sigma; Accounting Acad- 
emy 4-3; Freshman Orientation 4. 



PHILIP J. REGAN 

Swampscott, Mass. B.S.B.A. Finance 
Finance Club 4-3. 



RICHARD P. REGAN 

Belmont, Mass. B.S.B.A. Finance 

German Academy 4-3; Finance Acad- 
emy 4-3; Foreign Trade Club 4-3; Radio 
Club 4-3; Intramurals 4-3. 



144 



JOHN S. REINO 

Allston, Mass. B.S.B.A. Marketing 

Marketing Club 4; Rod and Gun Club 
4-3-2; Intramurals 4-3-2-1. 

EDWARD P. REYNOLDS 

Leominster, Mass. 

B.S.B.A. Management 
The Heights 4; Marketing Club 4-3; So- 
ciety for the Advancement of Manage- 
ment 4; Western Massachusetts Club 
4-3; Intramurals 4-3-2-1. 





HENRY A. RIOUX 

East Milton, Mass. B.S.B.A. Marketing 
Journal of Business 4-3 (Business Man- 
ager 4); Marketing Club 4-3. 



MARTIN F. ROACH 

Arlington, Mass. B.S.B.A. Management 
Society for the Advancement of Manage- 
ment 4-3; Rifle Club 4; Intramurals 4-3. 



EDWARD J. ROGERS 

Winchester, Mass. 

B.S.B.A. General Business 
Journal of Business 2-1; Accounting 
Academy 3; Blessed Oliver Plunkett So- 
ciety 3. 



JAMES F. ROGERS 

Cambridge, Mass. B.S.B.A. Marketing 
Accounting Academy 2; Marketing 
Club 4; Sub Turri, 4. 



RALPH L. ROGERS 

Beverly, Mass. B.S.B.A. Finance 

Finance Club 4-3; Chess Club 4-3-2-1; 
Intramurals 4-3-2-1 . 



CHARLES J. ROMANSKI 

Manhasset, N. Y. B.S.B.A. Accounting 
New York Club 4-3-2-1 (Treasurer 4); 
Accounting Academy 4-3; Dormitory 
Council 2; Delta Sigma Pi. 




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WILLIAM R. ROMERO 

North Attleboro, Mass. 

B.S.B.A. Marketing 
Marketing Club 4-3; Foreign Trade Club 
4; Dormitory Council 4; Junior Week 
Committee; Toastmasters Circle 4; In- 
tramurals 4-3-2-1. 

CHARLES R. RYAN 

Norwood, Mass. B.S.B.A. Finance 

Finance Club 4-3; Foreign Trade Club 4; 
Intramurals 4-2-1. 



145 




FRANCIS C. RYAN 

Somerville, Mass. B.S.B.A. Accounting 
Accounting Academy 4-3; Glee Club 4- 
3; Blessed Oliver Plunkett Society 4; 
Chess Club 4. 



JOSEPH F. RYAN 

Somerville, Mass. B.S.B.A. Accounting 
Delta Sigma Pi; Accounting Academy 
4-3; The Heights 2; Foreign Trade Club 
4; Intramurals 4-3-2-1. 



ROBERT E. RYAN 

Avon, Mass. B.S.B.A. Accounting 

Accounting Academy 4-3; Blessed Oliver 
Plunkett Society 4; Intramurals 4-3. 




LOUIS SABADINI 

North Quincy, Mass. 

B.S.B.A. Management 
The Executive (Co-Editor 4); Society for 
the Advancement of Management 4; 
Camera Club 4; Intramurals 2-1 . 



E 



BUSINESS A 



1 



GEORGE A. SABATINI 

West Roxbury, Mass. B.S.B.A. Finance 
Finance Club 4-3; Gold Key Society 3; 
Intramurals 4-3-2-1. 



JAMES D. SALVO 

Fall River, Mass. B.S.B.A. Accounting 
Delta Sigma Pi (Historian 4); Account- 
ing Academy 4-3. 



ROBERT M. SCANLAN 

Dorchester, Mass. B.S.B.A. Economics 
Beta Gamma Sigma; The Executive 4-3; 
Economics Academy 4-3; Foreign Trade 
Club 4; Society for the Advancement of 
Management 4; Junior Week Chairman; 
Freshman Orientation 4; Dean's List; 
Intramurals 2-1; Pops Concert Chair- 
man. 




146 





LEO A. SCHOFIELD 

Somerville, Mass. B.S.B.A. Finance 

The Heights 3-2; Gold Key Society 4-3-2 
(Keyholder 4-3); Finance Club 4-3; Jun- 
ior Show Committee; Cadet Officers' 
Club; Commencement Week Committee 
3; Freshman Orientation 4; Intramurals 
4-3-2-1. 



K 



JAMES T. SELUTA 

Boston, Mass. B.S.B.A. Finance 

Finance Club 4-3-2; Accounting Acad- 
emy 2; Intramurals 3-2-1. 




JOHN W. SHANAHAN 

Turners Falls, Mass. B.S.B.A. Marketing 
Student Council 1 ; DormitoryCouncil4-3 
(Vice President 4); Marketing Club 4-3 
(Vice President 4); Freshman Orienta- 
tion 4; Blessed Oliver Plunkett Society 
4-3. 



lAINISTRATION 



EDWARD J. SHEA 

North Cambridge, Mass. 

B.S.B.A. Accounting 
Delta Sigma Pi; Accounting Academy 4- 
3-2 (Vice President 4). 




PAUL M. SHEA 

Holliston, Mass. B.S.B.A. Finance 

Journal of Business 1 ; Finance Club 4-3; 
Blessed Oliver Plunkett Society 2-1; So- 
dahty 2; Junior Week Committee; Fresh- 
man Orientation 4; Dean's List. 



WILLL^M M. SHEA 

Concord, Mass. B.S.B.A. Marketing 
Marketing Club 4-3 (Secretary 4); 
Blessed Ohver Plunkett Society 4; Ski 
Club 4-3; Rod and Gun Club 4; Com- 
mencement Week Committee 3; Intra- 
murals 4-3-2-1. 



LOUIS W. SHEEDY 

Dorchester, Mass. B.S.B.A. Finance 
Finance Club 4-3; Cadet Officers' Club; 
Drill Team 4-3-2; Intramurals 2-1. 








147 



BUSINESS ADMINISTRATI 



^N 




THOMAS A. SHEEHAN, JR. 

West Roxbury, Mass. 

B.S.B.A. Marketing 
Marketing Club 4-3; Intramurals 3-2-1. 



WILLIAM A. SHERMAN 

W. Somerville, Mass. 

B.S.B.A. Economics 
Gold Key Society 4-3 (Keyholder 4); 
Economics Academy 4-3-2; Foreign 
Trade Club 4-3; Sub Turri 4; Freshman 
Orientation 4; Intramurals 4-3-2-1; 
Dean's List. 



ROBERT J. SIEVENS 

Everett, Mass. B.S.B.A. Finance 

Finance Club 4-3; Intramurals 4-3-2-1. 



FREDERICK J. SMITH 

Brighton, Mass. B.S.B.A. Finance 

Blessed Oliver Plunkett Society 4-3-2-1; 
Finance Club 4-3; Junior Week Chair- 
man; Intramurals 4-3-2-1; Commence- 
ment Ball Committee. 



EUGENE P. SMOLENSKY 

Roxbury, Mass. 

B.S.B.A. General Business 
Society for the Advancement of Manage- 
ment 4; Intramurals 3. 



EDWARD F. SNOW 

Jamaica Plain, Mass. 

B.S.B.A. Management 
Intramurals 4-3-2-1. 



148 




€S3^^ 




FRANCIS A. SPERA 

Arlington, Mass. B.S.B.A. Finance 

Gold Key Society 2-1 ; Finance Club 4-3. 



LAWRENCE M. STANFORD 

North Cambridge, Mass. 

B.S.B.A. Management 
C.B.A. Debating Society 1; Society for 
the Advancement of Management 4-3; 
Toastmasters Circle 4; Cadet Officers' 
Club; Intramurals 4-3-2-1; Class Night 
Committee. 



JOSEPH J. STEFANOWICZ 

Holyoke, Mass. B.S.B.A. Marketing 
Marketing Club 4-3; Intramurals 2-1. 



ANTHONY C. STEIN 

Great Neck, L. I., N. Y. 

B.S.B.A. Finance 



ROBERT B. STEWART 

North Scituate, Mass. 

B.S.B.A. Marketing 
Marketing Club 4; Freshman Orienta- 
tion 4; Intramurals 4-3-2-1; Dean's List. 



JAMES J. SUGHRUE 

Wobum, Mass. B.S.B.A. Accounting 
Accounting Academy 4-3. 





FRANCIS X. SULLIVAN 

Medford, Mass. B.S.B.A. Economics 
Foreign Trade Club 4; Economics Acad- 
emy 4-3; Intramurals 3-2-1. 

JAMES W. SULLIVAN 

New Bedford, Mass. 

B.S.B.A . General Business 
The Heights 4; Marketing Club 4-3; 
Blessed Oliver Plunkett Society 1; So- 
ciety for the Advancement of Manage- 
ment 4; Intramurals 4-3-2-1. 



149 




^Mi 




JOHN F. SULLIVAN 

Green Harbor, Mass. 

B.S.B.A. Economics 
Foreign Trade Club 4; Economics Acad- 
emy 4; Varsity Football 4-3-2-1; Intra- 
murals 2-1. 



ROBERT W. SULLTVAN 

Watertown, Mass. B.S.B.A. Marketing 
Marketing Club 4-3; Blessed Oliver 
Plunkett Society 4; Intramurals 4-3-2-1. 



ROGER F. SULLIVAN 

Weston Newton, Mass. 

B.S.B.A. Marketing 
Ricci Mathematics Journal (Assistant 
Editor 1); Marketing Club 4; Com- 
mencement Week Committee 3; Intra- 
murals 4-3-2-1. 




ROGER J. SULLIVAN 

North Reading, Mass. 

B.S.B.A. Marketing 
Marketing Club 4-3; Cadet Officers' 
Club; Intramurals 4-3-2-1; Class Night 
Committee. 




BUSINESS 



lESslH 



THOMAS M. SULLIVAN 

West Roxbury, Mass. 

B.S.B.A. Accounting 
Gold Key Society 4-3; Accounting Acad- 
emy 4-3; Cadet Officers' Club (Treas- 
urer); Drill Team; Junior Week Com- 
mittee; Junior Show; Intramurals 4-3- 
2-1; Commencement Ball Committee. 



RICHARD F. SYLVESTRE 

Woonsocket, R. I. B.S.B.A. Economics 
Economics Academy 4; Foreign Trade 
Club 4; Sailing Club 4; Freshman Ori- 
entation 4; Intramurals 3-2-1. 



VINCENT P. SYLVIA 

New Bedford, Mass. B.S.B.A. Finance 
Delta Sigma Pi (Secretary 4); Dormitory 
Council 4-3; Cadet Officers' Club; Fi- 
nance Club 4; Freshman Orientation 4-3; 
Commencement Week Chairman; Jun- 
ior Show; Intramurals 4-3-2-1. 



*^ "^^ 






150 




FREDERIC B. TAINTOR 

Boston, Mass. B.S.B.A. Finance 

Finance Club 4; Dramatic Society 1; 
Chess Club 2-1; Intramurals 2. 



JOHN N. TAMMARO WILLIAM S. TAUPIER 

Everett, Mass. B.S.B.A. Accounting Holyoke, Mass. B.S.B.A. Accounting 

Accounting Academy 4; Freshman Ori- Accounting Academy 4-3; Western 

entation 4; Senior Dinner Dance Com- Massachusetts Club 4-3. 
mittee. 



(\AINISTRATION 



^ 



JOSEPH S. TEBEAU 

Waltham, Mass. B.S.B.A. Management 
Society for the Advancement of Manage- 
ment 4-3; Intramurals 4-3-2-1; Dean's 
List. 




X. 



! 



THOMAS E. TIERNEY 

Arlington, Mass. B.S.B.A. Accounting 
Accounting Academy 4-3; Intramurals 
3-2-1. 



JAMES S. TOBIN 

Jamaica Plain, Mass. B.S.B.A. Finance 
Gold Key Society 4-3; Finance Club 4-3; 
Junior Week Committee; Intramurals 1; 
Commencement Ball Committee. 



FREDERICK P. TOLLAND 

Hyde Park, Mass. B.S.B.A. Marketing 
Marketing Club 4-3; Intramurals 3-2-1. 




151 



BUSINESS ADMINISTR 






PAUL G. TOUHEY 

Milford, Mass. B.S.B.A. Marketing 

Marketing Club 4-3; Foreign Trade Club 
2; Blessed Oliver Plunkett Society 4-3. 



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JAMES M. TULLY 

Waltham, Mass. B.S.B.A. Economics 
Economics Academy 4; Foreign Trade 
Club 4-3; Young Democrats Club 3; 
Commencement Week Committee 3; In- 
tramurals 2-1. 



JOSEPH A. VENUTI 

Belmont, Mass. B.S.B.A. Marketing 
Marketing Club 4; Ricci Math Journal 
1; Commencement Week Committee 3; 
Intramurals 4-3-2-1. 




JOSEPH J. VITALE 

East Boston, Mass. B.S.B.A. Economics 
Economics Academy 4; Foreign Trade 
Club 4; Toastmasters Circle 4; Intra- 
murals 4-3-2. 



CHARLES J. VOLPONE 

Newburyport, Mass. 

B.S.B.A. General Business 
Accounting Academy 2; Intramurals 4- 
3-2; Golf Team 3-2. 



ARTHUR J. WHALEN 

Maiden, Mass. B.S.B.A. Marketing 

Gold Key Society 3; Marketing Club 4-3; 
Commencement Week Committee 3; In- 
tramurals 4-3-2-1. 



152 





DAVID J. WHELTON, JR. 

Reading, Mass. B.S.B.A, Accounting 
Accounting Academy 4-3; Young Dem- 
ocrats Club 3. 



CHARLES W. WHITE, JR. 

Dorcliester, Mass. B.S.B.A. Marketing 
Delta Sigma Pi; Intramurals 3-2-] . 



JOHN W. WHITE 

Cambridge, Mass. B.S.B.A. Economics 
C.B.A. Debating Society 2-1 (Secre- 
tary 2); Toastmasters Circle 4-3; Blessed 
Oliver Plunkett Society 3-2; Economics 
Academy 4-3; Intramurals 4-3-2-1. 



PAUL F. WHITE 

Somerville, Mass. B.S.B.A. Finance 

Finance Club 4-3; Rod and Gun Club 
4-3-2-1; Sailing Club 4-3; Intramurals 
3-2. 



ALBERT J. WISIALKO 

Chelsea, Mass. B.S.B.A. Accounting 

Senior Class Treasurer; Treasurer of Stu- 
dent Senate 4; Accounting Academy 4-3; 
Section Representative 3; Cadet Officers' 
Club; Spanish Club 3-2-1; Commence- 
ment Week Committee 3; Freshman Ori- 
entation 4; Intramurals 4-3-2-1. 



DONALD J. WOOD 

Brookline, Mass. B.S.B.A. Accounting 
Delta Sigma Pi; Gold Key Society 3; 
Accounting Academy 3-2; Toastmasters 
Circle 4; Junior Week Committee; In- 
tramurals 4-3-2-1. 







VINCENT P. ZABBO 

Lowell, Mass. B.S.B.A. Accounting 

Accounting Academy 4. 



WALTER P. ZANOR 

Maiden, Mass. B.S.B.A. Marketing 

Marketing Club 4-3. 



153 



School of Education 




PAUL HARRINGTON 

President 




BRENDA JACKSON 
Vice-President 




CLAIRE O'TOOLE 

Secretary 



154 



JOHN PARIS 

Treasurer 





BURTON A. ABEL 

Westwood, Mass. B.S. Education 

Freshman Orientation 3; Intramurals 4- 
3-2-1. 



ROGETTE C. ABIZAID 

Roslindale, Mass. B.S. Education 

Honors Seminar in Education 2; Educa- 
tional Review 4-3; WRA 2; French Club 
4-3-2-1; Writers' Club 3-2; Junior Week 
Committee; Junior Show; Interclass 
Skits 3; Freshman Orientation 3; Dean's 
List; Senior Dinner Dance Committee. 



NANCY J. ATKINSON 

Winthrop, Mass. B.S. Education 

WRA 4-3-2-1; Commencement Week 
Committee 3; Freshman Orientation 3; 
Sodality 1; Junior Week Committee; 
Commencement Ball Committee. 




EILEEN R. ATWATER 

Belmont, Mass. B.S. Education 

Intramurals 4-2-1; WRA 4; Sodality 4; 
Psychology Club 4. 




CAROLE A. BATES 

Everett, Mass. B.S. Education 

WRA 2; Sodality 4-3-2-1; Dramatic So- 
ciety 2; Junior Week Committee; Ricci 
Mathematics Club 4-3-2-1; Interclass 
.Skits 3; Junior Show. 



ROBERTA M. BERRANE 

Jamaica Plain, Mass. B.S. Education 
Blessed Oliver Plunkett Society 1 ; Dra- 
matic Society 2; Psychology Club 4-3; 
Interclass Skits 3; Junior Show; WRA 
4-3; Sub Turri 4. 



FRANCES A. BESSOM 

Newton Center, Mass. B.S. Education 
Journal of Business 3; WRA 4-3-2-1; 
Dramatic Society 4-2; Interclass Skits 
4-3; Junior Week Committee; Junior 
Show. 




155 



SCHOOL of EDUCATION 





PAULINE BONGETTE 

Peabody, Mass. B.S. Education 

Section Representative 1; Junior Show 
Commencement Week Committee 3 
Women's Glee Club 1; WRA 4-3-2-1 
Dean's List; Commencement Ball Com 
mittee. 



JOAN E. BOURGEOIS 

Waltham, Mass. B.S. Education 

Sodality 3 (Treasurer 3); French Acad- 
emy 4; Psychology Club 4; English 
Academy 4; WRA 4-3-2-1; Communion 
Breakfast Chairman. 





FAITH M. BUCKLEY 

West Roxbury, Mass. B.S. Education 
Sodality 4-3-2; Junior Show; Blessed 
Oliver Plunkett Society 4; Women's 
Glee Club 3-2-1; WRA 4-3-2-1; Com- 
munion Breakfast Committee. 



HERBERT W. BUSCH, JR. 

Billerica, Mass. B.S. Education 

Interclass Skits 2; Freshman Football. 



156 



JAMES J. CANNON, JR. 

Waltham, Mass. B.S. Education 

Section Representative 2-1; Campion 
Choral Speakers 2; Freshman Orienta- 
tion 2; Interclass Skits 3-2; Junior Show 
(Co-Chairman); Dean's List; Senior Ball 
Committee. 

MARION CAREY 

West Quincy, Mass. B.S. Education 

Sodality 4-3; Commencement Week 
Committee 3; Interclass Skits 4-3; WRA 
4-3-2-1; Dean's List; Intramurals 2-1. 




f7^W»^^ fwv 





DIANE H. CARNEY 

Dorchester, Mass. B.S. Education 

The Heights 3; French Academy 1; 
Young Democrats Club 3; Interclass 
Skits 3; Dramatic Society 3; Junior 
Week Committee; WRA 4-3-2-1; Com- 
mencement Ball Committee. 



PAUL F. CARROLL 

Somerville, Mass. B.S. Education 

Intramurals 4-3-2-1. 



LORRAINE M. CASSIDY 

Brighton, Mass. B.S. Education 

Dramatic Society 4-3-2; Mendel Club 
2-1; Women's Glee Club 2; The Heights 
1; Interclass Skits 3; Commencement 
Week Committee 3; WRA 4-3-2-1; 
Dean's List. 



JAMES M. COLCLOUGH 

Quincy, Mass. B.S. Education 

Varsity Football 4-3-2-1; Interclass Skits 
3; Intramurals 4-3-2-1. 



MADELINE C. COLLINS 

Arlington, Mass. B.S. Education 

Alpha and Omega (President); Junior 
Class Treasurer; Sophomore Class 
Treasurer; Treasurer of Student Senate 
3; French Club 1; Sodality 2-1; Fresh- 
man Orientation 3; Commencement 
Week Committee 3; WRA 4-3-2-1; 
Dean's List; Class Night Chairman. 

MARY E. COLLINS 

Somerville, Mass. B.S. Education 

The Heights 4; Interclass Skits 3; Blessed 
Oliver Plunkett Society 4-3-2; Blessed 
Richard Gwyn Society 4; Junior Week 
Committee; WRA 4-3-2-1; Senior Ball 
Committee. 






JOHN T. CONRAD, JR. 

North Chelmsford, Mass. 

B.S. Education 



ELLEN M. COSTA 

Brighton, Mass. B.S. Education 

Women's Glee Club 4-3-2-1; Sodality 4- 
3-2-1; Interclass Skits 3-2; Junior Week 
Committee; WRA 4-3-2-1; Pops Con- 
cert Committee. 



157 






LEO P. COSTELLO 

Milton, Mass. B.S. Education 

Blessed Oliver Plunkett Society 4; 
Campion Choral Speakers 4. 



ANNE C. CULLINAN 

Cambridge, Mass. B.S. Education 

The Heights (Assistant Editor 3); Sub 
Turri 4; Junior Show; Junior Week Com- 
mittee; Interclass Skits 3-2; WRA 4-3- 
2-1. 



JAMES P. CURTIN 

Somerville, Mass. B.S. Education 

Varsity Baseball 4-3-2; Intramurals 4-3- 
2-1. 




KATHERINE DEINLEIN 

Hatfield, Mass. B.S. Education 

Junior Week Committee; Sodality 1; 
Women's Glee Club 4-3-2-1; Freshman 
Orientation 3; Interclass Skits 2; Junior 
Show; Dean's List. 



SCHOOL of 



1 



JAMES J. DELANEY, n 

Boston, Mass. B.S. Education 

Sophomore Class Treasurer; Treasurer 
of Student Senate 2; Marquette Debat- 
ing Society 2-1 (President 2; Cheer- 
leader 3-2-1 (Captain 3); Toastmasters 
Circle 2-1 (Treasurer 1); Young Demo- 
crats Club 2; Sodality 2-1; Junior Week 
Chairman; Intramurals 4-3-2-1; Senior 
Week Program. 



DONALD L. DELISLE 

Dracut, Mass. B.S. Education 

Educational Review 3-2 (Managing Edi- 
tor 4, Assistant Managing Editor 3); 
Section Representative 2-1; Junior Class 
Vice-President; French Academy 4-3-1 
(President 4, Vice-President 3); Inter- 
class Skits 3-2; Freshman Orientation 3; 
Sub Turri 4 (Head Collector, School of 
Education); Dean's List. 



MARY L. DEMEO 

West Newton, Mass. B.S. Education 
Italian Academy 4-3; WRA 4-3-2-1; 
Dean's List; Intramurals 2. 





15« 






KATHLEEN E. DESMOND 

Norwich, Conn. B.S. Education 

Women's Glee Club 4-3-2-1 (President 3, 
Treasurer 2); Blessed Oliver Plunkett So- 
ciety 2-1; Interclass Skits 4-3-2; Con- 
necticut Club 3-2-1; WRA 4-3-2-1. 



ANN E. DEWIRE 

Somerville, Mass. B.S. Education 

The Heights 3; Young Democrats Club 
3; WRA 4-3-2-1; Junior Show; Junior 
Week Committee; Interclass Skits 3; 
Dramatic Society 3-2; Sodality 4-3-2-1; 
Intramurals 2-1; Blessed Oliver Plunkett 
Society 4-3-2-1. 



FRANCIS A. DONNELLY 

No. Weymouth, Mass. B.S. Education 
Interclass Skits 3; Intramurals 4-3-2. 



EDUCATION 



LEONA M. DONOVAN 

Quincy, Mass. B.S. Education 

Sodality 4-3-2-1; Psychology Club 4-3; 
Junior Week Committee; Marquette De- 
bating Society 2; Interclass Skits 4-3-2; 
Commencement Week Committee 3; 
WRA 4-3-2-1. 




I 



CATHERINE M. DOOLEY 

Dorchester, Mass. B.S. Education 

Women's Council 2-1 (Treasurer 2); Jun- 
ior Week Chairman; WRA 4-3-2-1 
(Board 3-2); Blessed Oliver Plunkett So- 
ciety 4-3-2; Prom Committee 3-2-1; 
Commencement Ball Committee. 



RICHARD A. DOWD 

Springfield, Mass. B.S. Education 

Sub Turri 4 (Managing Editor 4); 
Campion Choral Speakers 4-3-1; Writ- 
ers' Workshop 3; Freshman Orientation 
2; Junior Week Committee; Interclass 
Skits 4-3; Blessed Oliver Plunkett So- 
ciety 1. 



BEVERLY M. DRISCOLL 

Medford, Mass. B.S. Education 

Marquette Debating Society 2-1 (Sec- 
retary 2); Junior Week Committee. 




^ 





159 



SCHOOL of EDUCATION 






ALICE M. DUFFY 

Hyde Park, Mass. B.S. Education 

Freshman Prom Committee; Junior 
Week Committee; Psychology Club 3; 
Commencement Week Committee 3; 
WRA 4-3-2-1; Pops Concert Committee. 



CECILE M. DUGGAN 

Scituate, Mass. B.S. Education 

Junior Week Committee. 





JAMES J. DUGGAN 

Maynard, Mass. B.S. Education 

Interclass Skits 3; Varsity Football 4-3- 
2-1; Intramurals 4-3-2-1. 



ANN B. FAGEN 
Pascoag, R. I. B.S. Education 

Mendel Club 4-3-2-1; Women's Glee 
Club 4-3-2-1 (Librarian 2, Advisor 4, 
Treasurer 3); Blessed Ohver Plunkett So- 
ciety 2-1; Interclass Skits 4-3-2 (co-di- 
rector 3); WRA 4-3-2-1; Junior Show; 
Senior Dinner Dance Committee. 



160 



ANNE M. FARIA 

Fall River, Mass. B.S. Education 

The Heights 3; Journal of Business 3; 
Women's Glee Club 4-3-2-1; Young 
Democrats Club (Administrative Secre- 
tary 4-3); Junior Show; Interclass Skits 
3-2; Commencement Week Committee 
3; Dramatic Society 3; WRA 2-1; Pops 
Concert Chairman. 

MARY E. FARREY 

Newton, Mass. B.S. Education 

Ricci Mathematics Academy 4-3-2-1; 
Dramatic Society 4-3-2; Sodality 4-3-2-1 
(Prefect 3). 







JOHN J. FINN 

Jamaica Plain, Mass. B.S. Education 
Campion Choral Speakers 4; French 
Academy 4-3; Dean's List. 



HELEN G. FOLEY 

Dorchester, Mass. B.S. Education 

Blessed Oliver Plunkett Society 3-2-1; 
Dramatic Society 2; Junior Show; Junior 
Week Committee; Freshman Orienta- 
tion 3; Interclass Skits 4-3; WRA 4-3-2- 
1 ; Intramurals 4-3-2-1 ; Senior Ball Com- 
mittee. 



CAROL L. GARIBALDI 

West Roxbury, Mass. B.S. Education 
Italian Academy 4-3-2-1 (President 3); 
Blessed Oliver Plunkett Society 1 ; WRA 
2-1 ; Commencement Week Committee 3. 



WINIFRED R. GIBBONS 

Dorchester, Mass. B.S. Education 

Blessed Oliver Plunkett Society 2; Junior 
Week Committee; Interclass Skits 3; 
Commencement Week Committee 3; 
WRA 4-3-2-1; Pops Concert Committee. 





CAROL A. GIBLIN 

Belmont, Mass. B.S. Education 

The Heights 3; Women's Glee Club 4-3- 
2-1; Dramatic Society 4-3-2-1; Writers' 
Club 3; Blessed Oliver Plunkett Society 
4-3-2-1; Junior Week Committee 3. 



MARIANNE G. HAGERTY 

Rosllndale, Mass. B.S. Education 

Sophomore Prom Committee; Junior 
Week Committee; Interclass Skit 3. 






PAUL A. HARRINGTON 

Allston, Mass. B.S. Education 

Senior Class President; Interclass Skits 
4-3-2; Freshman Orientation 4-3; Intra- 
murals 4-3-2; Dean's List. 



CARL A. HENDRICKSON 

Belmont, Mass. B.S. Education 

Blessed Richard Gwyn Society 1 ; Inter- 
class Skits 3; Dean's List. 



161 





ROBERTA HIGBEE 

Cambridge, Mass. B.S. Education 

Ricci Mathematics Academy 1; Psy- 
chology Club 4-3; Sodality 1; Junior 
Week Committee. 



BEVERLY F. HUBERT 

Arlington, Mass. B.S. Education 



LUCILLE R. lOVINO 

Melrose, Mass. B.S. Education 

Marquette Debating Society 2; French 
Academy 2-1; Italian Academy 4-2; 
WRA 4-3-2-1; Sodality 4-3-2-1 (Secre- 
tary 4); Junior Week Committee. 




BRENDA J. JACKSON 

Wollaston, Mass. B.S. Education 

Alpha and Omega; Senior Class Vice 
President; Campus Council Representa- 
tive 4; Sodality 4-3-2-1; Interclass Skits 
4-3; Junior Week Committee; Freshman 
Orientation 4-3; Commencement Week 
Committee 3; WRA 4-3-2-1; Dean's 
List. 




SCHOOL o 




MAUREEN A. JACKSON 

Needham, Mass. B.S. Education 

Women's Council (Treasurer 3); Com- 
mencement Week Committee 3; Junior 
Week Committee; Freshman Orientation 
3; Dramatic Society 3; English Academy 
4; Interclass Skits 3; Intramurals 2-1; 
WRA 4-3-2- L 



ALICE KAKO 

Jewett City, Conn. B.S. Education 

Sophomore Class Secretary; Women's 
Council 2-1; Freshman Prom Commit- 
tee; French Club 4-3-2-1 (Secretary 3, 
Treasurer 4); Connecticut Club 2-1; Sub 
Turri 4; Senior Dinner Dance Com- 
mittee. 



JOSEPH M. KELLY 

North Weymouth, Mass. B.S. Education 
Varsity Football 2-1; Varsity Baseball 4- 
3; Intramurals 4-3-2-1. 




iiiii..^; 



162 






MARGARET A. LALLY 

Somerville, Mass. B.S. Education 

The Heights (Assistant Editor 3): Sub 
Turri 4; Blessed Oliver Plunkett Society 
4-3-2 (Vice President 4); Interclass Skits 
4-3-2; Junior Show; Dramatic Society 
4-3; WRA 4-3-2-1; Senior Ball Chair- 
man. 



NANCY A. LANGTON 

Braintree, Mass. S.S. Education 

Sub Turri 4; Women's Glee Club 3-2-1; 
Junior Week Committee; Commence- 
ment Week Committee 3; Interclass 
Skits 3-2; WRA 4-3; Commencement 
Ball Committee. 



JOAN O. LARKIN 

Natick, Mass. B.S. Education 

Women's Glee Club 2-1; Sodality 4-3. 



ir 



DUCATION 



CAROL M. LOOME 

Dorchester, Mass. B.S. Education 

Educational Review 3-2 (Co-Editor 3); 
Women's Council 2; Women's Glee Club 
4-3-2-1; Blessed Oliver Plunkett Society 
2; Junior Week Committee; Interclass 
Skits 3-2; WRA 4-3-2-1; Commence- 
ment Ball Committee. 




MARY ELLEN LYNCH MARGUERITE A. MacDONALD PETER J. 

Peabody, Mass. B.S. Education Lexington, Mass. B.S. Education Burlington, Mass. 

French Academy 1; Blessed Oliver French Academy 2-1; Business Club 4; Intramurals 4-3-2-1. 

Plunkett Society 4-3-2; Junior Week Freshman Orientation 3; Commence- 

Committee; WRA 4-3-2-1; Dean's List. ment Week Committee 3; WRA 4. 



MACIONE 

B.S. Education 






163 



SCHOOL of EDUCATION 






SHEILA A. MAHONEY 

Belmont, Mass. B.S. Education 

Writers' Club 3; Blessed Oliver Plunkett 
Society 4-3-2-1 (Plunketteer 3). 



PATRICIA R. MANNING 

Maynard, Mass. B.S. Education 

Women's Glee Club 2-1; Sodality 2-1. 





BRIAN K. MARRON 

Boston, Mass. B.S. Education 

Campion Choral Speakers 2-1; Fresh- 
man Orientation 2. 



PATRICIA A. MARTIN 

Natick, Mass. B.S. Education 

Dramatic Society 2-1; Sodality 1; Dean's 
List. 



PAULINE MATHIEU 

Norwich, Conn. B.S. Education 

Dramatic Society 4; Women's Glee Club 
4-3; Connecticut Club 4-3; Educational 
Review 3-2; Mendel Club 4-3-2-]; Jun- 
ior Show; Prom Committee 3-2-1 ; Fresh- 
man Orientation 3; Interclass Skits 4-3- 
2; Section Representative 1; WRA 2-1; 
Senior Diimer Dance Chairman. 

WILLIAM A. McCARRON 

Everett, Mass. B.S. Education 

Blessed Oliver Plunkett Society 4-3-2-1; 
Freshman Orientation 4-3. 



164 




#-«^ 
V^ 



j<*«^ 






MARY E. McCROHAN 

Newport, R. I. B.S. Education 

Women's Council 4; Marquette Debat- 
ing Society 2; Blessed Oliver Plunkett So- 
ciety I; Interclass Skits 3; Junior Week 
Committee. 



SISTER 
MARY RUTH McGOLDRICK, S.P. 

Holyoke, Mass. B.S. Education 



JOHN B. McGRATH 

Worcester, Mass. B.S. Education 

Varsity Basketball 4-3-2-1. 



JEANNE M. McGUIGGIN 

Roxbury, Mass. B.S. Education 

Women's Council 3 (President 4); Alpha 
and Omega; Honor Seminar in Educa- 
tion 4-3-2; Dean's List; French Academy 
2-1; Freshman Orientation 4-3; Inter- 
class Skits 3; Junior Week Committee 3; 
WRA 4-3-2-1. 



JOHN P. McGUIRE 

South Boston, Mass. B.S. Education 
Varsity Track 4-3-2-1. 



FRANCIS W. McGURL 

Arlington, Mass. B.S. Education 








MARY C. McHALE 

Melrose, Mass. B.S. Education 

The Scope 4-3-2 (Co-Editor in Chief 4); 
Kircher Science Club 4-3-2-1 (President 
4); Sodality 4-3-2-1; Writers Club 3-2; 
Junior Week Chairman; NFCCS 2-1; 
Mendel Club 3-2-1; Interclass Skits 4-3; 
WRA 2; Communion Breakfast Com- 
mittee. 

JOHN N. MEADE 

Brookline, Mass. B.S. Education 

Education Review 3-2; Mendel Club 4-3. 



165 




MARY C. MILLER 

Roslindale, Mass. B.S. Education 

Alpha and Omega (Secretary, Treasurer 
4); Honors Seminar in Education 2; So- 
dality 4-3-2-1 (Vice-Prefect); Women's 
Glee Club 3-2-1 ; Blessed Oliver Plunkett 
Society 4; Commencement Week Com- 
mittee 3; WRA 2-1; Dean's List; Com- 
munion Breakfast Committee. 



NEIL A. MORAN 

Amesbury, Mass. B.S. Education 

Assistant Freshman Football Coach 4-3- 
2; Freshman Football; Student Council 
1; Freshman Orientation 3. 



SHEILA D. MULLEN 

Chestnut Hill, Mass. B.S. Education 
The Heights 3-2-1 ; The Scope 2; Journal 
of Business 4-3-2; Writers Club 2; Sub 
Turri 4; Junior Week Committee; Dra- 
matic Society 4-3-2-1; Women's Glee 
Club 4-3-2-1; Sailing Club 3; Interclass 
Skits 4-3-2. 




JOSEPH A. MURPHY 

Dorchester, Mass. B.S. Education 

Sub Turri 4; Junior Week Committee; 
Blessed Oliver Plunkett Society 4; Young 
Democrats Club 4-3; Intramurals 4-3- 
2-1. 




SCHOOL of 






DONALD J. NELSON 

Randolph, Mass. B.S. Education 

Glee Club 4-3-2-1; Band 1; Campion 
Choral Speakers 2-1; Blessed Richard 
Gwyn Society 1; Interclass Skits 3-2. 



NANCY M. NEVILLE 

Cambridge, Mass. B.S. Education 

Ricci Mathematics Academy 4-3-2-1; 
Section Representative 2; Sodality 1; 
WRA 2-1. 



PAUL J. GATES 

Somerville, Mass. B.S. Education 

Blessed Oliver Plunkett Society 4-3; 
Blessed Richard Gwyn Society 4-3-1; 
Interclass Skits 4-3; Junior Week Com- 
mittee; Senior Ball Committee; Dean's 
List. 




166 




CONSTANCE S. O'BRIEN 

Brighton, Mass. B.S. Education 

Psychology Club 4; Sub Turri 3; So- 
dality 4; WR A 4-3-2-1. 



PAUL A. O'BRIEN 

Dorchester, Mass. B.S. Education 

Campion Choral Speakers 4-3-2 (Presi- 
dent 4-3); Blessed Richard Gwyn So- 
ciety 3-2; Freshman Orientation 3; Inter- 
class Skits 4-3-2; Intramurals 3-1. 



JOHN M. O'DONNELL 

Jamaica Plain, Mass. B.S. Education 
Sodality 4-3-2-1; Blessed Oliver Plunkett 
Society 4-3-2-1; Campion Choral Speak- 
ers 4-3-2-1 ; Sub Turri 4; Blessed Richard 
Gwyn Society 4-3-2; Interclass Skits 4- 
3-2; Intramurals 4-3-2-1; Junior Week 
Committee. 



w 



DUCATION 



AGNES M. O'LEARY 

Boston, Mass. B.S. Education 

Foreign Relations League (Secretary 
3-2); Blessed Richard Gwyn Society 3; 
Blessed Oliver Plunkett Society 2; Inter- 
class Skits 3; Sophomore Prom Com- 
mittee; Junior Show. 




SHEILA A. O'LEARY 

West Roxbury, Mass. B.S. Education 
Sodality 4-3-1; Dean's List; Blessed 
Oliver Plunkett Society 4-3-1 ; WRA 4-3- 
2-1; Communion Breakfast Committee. 



ANN R. O'MEARA 

Milton, Mass. B.S. Education 

Blessed Oliver Plunkett Society 3-2; 
Blessed Richard Gwyn Society 3 ; Dean's 
List; Interclass Skits 3; Sodality 4; WRA 
3; Junior Week Committee 3; Com- 
mencement Week Committee 3; Com- 
mencement Ball Conunittee. 



CHARLES T. O'SHEA 

Peabody, Mass. B.S. Education 

Blessed Oliver Plunkett Society 4-3; In- 
tramurals 4-3-2-1. 






167 




SCHOOL of EDUCATION 






CLAIRE T. O'TOOLE 

Dorchester, Mass. B.S. Education 

Senior Class Secretary; English Academy 
4; Dean's List; Blessed Oliver Plunkett 
Society 4-3-2; Dramatic Society 4-3-2; 
Sodality 4-3-2; Freshman Orientation 
4-3; Interclass Skits 4-3; Junior Week 
Committee; Commencement Week Com- 
mittee 3; WRA 2. 

JOHN J. PARIS 

Boston, Mass. B.S. Education 

Senior Class Treasurer; Treasurer of Stu- 
dent Senate 4; Alpha and Omega; Dean's 
List; B.C. Debating Society (Vice-Presi- 
dent 4); Fulton Debating Society (Treas- 
urer 3); Educational Review 2; Fresh- 
man Orientation 4-3; Interclass Skits 4- 
3-2; Intramurals 4-3-2. 



ROSEMARIE J. PASHBY 

Lynn, Mass. B.S. Education 

Alpha and Omega; Honors Seminar in 
Education 3-2; N.E.T.P.A. (Delegate); 
Educational Review 3; French Academy 
3-1; Toastmasters Club 1. 



STEPHEN A. PATERNA 

Boston, Mass. B.S. Education 

Campion Choral Speakers 3-2; Fresh- 
man Orientation 3-2. 



ROBERT M. POLLOCK 

Weston, Mass. B.S. Education 

EUGENE I. PRIOR 

Somerville, Mass. B.S. Education 

Junior Class President; Alpha Sigma Nu 
(Treasurer); Alpha and Omega; Campus 
Council 3; Blessed Richard Gwyn So- 
ciety 1; Blessed Oliver Plunkett Society 
1; French Academy 1; Section Repre- 
sentative 2. 



168 








MARGARET M. QUINN 

East Boston, Mass. B.S. Education 

Writers' Club 3; Dean's List; Class Night 
Committee. 



ELEANOR J. RADZWILL 

East Walpole, Mass. B.S. Education 
Dramatic Society 4-3-2-1 (Secretary 4); 
Ricci Mathematics Academy 4-3-2-1; 
Sodality 4-3-2-1; WRA 4; Junior Week 
Committee; Dean's List. 



GERALD S. REILLY 

Dorchester, Mass. B.S. Education 

Campion Choral Speakers 3-2; Intra- 
murals 4-3-2-1. 



PAULINE B. ROONEY 

Roslindale, Mass. B.S. Education 

Educational Review 4-3-2; Sodality 4-3- 
2-1; Blessed Oliver Plunkett Society 4-3- 
2-1; Psychology Club 3-2; WRA 2-1; 
Dean's List. 



CAROLYN M. SHEA 

SomerviUe, Mass. B.S. Education 

Women's Glee Club 3-2-1; Ricci Mathe- 
matics Academy 2-1 ; WRA 3-2 (Board). 



CHARLES W. SILVA 

Quincy, Mass. B.S. Education 

Campion Choral Speakers 4-3-2-1 ; Inter- 
class Skits 3; Intramurals 3-1. 





".^P^f^ 






GERALDINE A. STEELE 

Washington, D. C. B.S. Education 

Section Representative 1; Sodality 4-3- 
2-1; Psychology Club 2-1; Junior Show; 
Interclass Skits 4-3-2; WRA 4-3-2-1 
(Vice-President 3); Class Night Com- 
mittee. 

RICHARD J. SULLIVAN 

Roslindale, Mass. B.S. Education 

Intramurals 4-3-2. 



169 




THOMAS TANOUS 

Van Buren, Me. B.S. Education 

The Heights 4-3-2-1 (Editor-in-Chief 4, 
News Editor 3-2); NFCCS 4-3 (Senior 
Delegate 3); Marquette Debating So- 
ciety 2-1 (President 2); B.C. Debating 
Society 4; Interclass Skits 4-3. 



ANGELO J. TARANTO 

Waltham, Mass. B.S. Education 

Sophomore Class Vice-President; Blessed 
Richard Gwyn Society 3-2-1; Class 
Night Committee. 



DAVID P. TENNEY 
Dorchester, Mass. B.S. Education 

Blessed Oliver Plunkett Society 3-2; In- 
tramurals 3-2. 




JOHN J. TOBIN 

Mattapan, Mass. B.S. Education 

Sophomore Class President; Section 
Representative 1; Honors Seminar in 
Education 2; English Academy 4; Fresh- 
man Orientation 3; Interclass Skits 2 
(Director 2); Chess Club 3; Blessed 
Richard Gwyn Society 3-1 ; Intramurals. 




HOOL of 






BARBARA A. VAZZA 

East Boston, Mass. B.S. Education 

Italian Academy 4-3-2-1 (Vice-President 
3); Interclass Skits 3-2; Junior Show; 
Junior Week Committee; Dean's List. 



JOAN P. WALL 

Medford, Mass. B.S. Education 

The Heights 4-3; WRA 4-3-2-1 (Board 
3); Blessed Oliver Plunkett Society 4-3-2; 
Dramatic Club 3; Junior Week Com- 
mittee; Commencement Week Com- 
mittee 3; Interclass Skits 3-2; Senior Ball 
Committee. 



MARY E. WATTS 

Melrose, Mass. B.S. Education 

Sub Turri 4; Educational Review 2; 
Junior Class Secretary; Class Council 
(Secretary 3); WRA 4-3-2-1 (Board 2); 
Junior Week Chairman; Sodality 4-3-2- 
1 ; French Academy 1 ; English Academy 
4; Interclass Skits 3; Honors Seminar in 
Education 2; Dean's List; Class Night 
Committee. 






170 




MARGARET A. WEAFER 

Winchester, Mass. B.S. Education 

Women's Glee Club 4-3-2-1; Junior 
Show; Junior Week Chairman; Sub 
Turn 4; Interclass Skits 4-3. 



CAROLYN E. WHITTAKER 

Natick, Mass. B.S. Education 

Dramatic Society 4-3-2-1; Sodality 4-3- 
2-1 ; Junior Week Committee; WRA 4-3- 
2-1 ; Dean's List. 



MARTHA J. ZIMMERMAN 

Keene, N. H. B.S. Education 

Sub Turri (Patron Manager 4); WRA 4- 
3-2-1 (President 4); Sailing Club 4-3; 
Rifle Team 4; Marquette Debating So- 
ciety 2; Junior Show 3; Interclass Skits 
3; Dean's List; Senior Dinner Dance 
Committee. 



F 



DUCAT! ON 



1 



171 



School of Nursing 




ELIZABETH GRADY 

President 



MARY POWELL 

Treasurer 





ELEANOR SULLIVAN 

Secretary 



NANCY DOLAN 
Vice-President 



172 






\ 



PRISCILLA C. ALMEIDA 

Hanover Center, Mass. B.S. Nursing 
Sodality 4-3-2-1; Glee Club 2-1; Com- 
mencement Week Committee 3. 



ARLENE E. BARBEAU 

Lynn, Mass. B.S. Nursing 

Sodality 4-3-2-1; Glee Club 2-1; Com- 
mencement Week Committee 3; Capping 
Committee 1; Dean's List. 



LORRAINE C. BONVOULOIR 

Central Falls, R. I. B.S. Nursing 

Freshman Class Treasurer; Sodality 4- 
3-2-1; Glee Club 2-1; Basketball 2-1; 
Commencement Week Committee 3; 
Capping Committee 1 ; Dean's List. 





ELIZABETH A. BOURRE 

Woonsocket, R. I. B.S. Nursing 

Sodality 4-3-2-1; Glee Club 2-1; Com- 
mencement Week Committee 3; Cap- 
ping Committee 1 ; Dean's List. 



FRANCES S. BRUYA 

Waltham, Mass. B.S. Nursing 



BARBARA A. CARTNICK 

Wood-Ridge, N. J. B.S. Nursing 

Commencement Week Committee 
(Chairman 3); Honor Board 1; Sodality 
4-3-2-1; Glee Club 2-1; Capping Com- 
mittee 1 ; Dean's List. 






MARY V. CASKDM 

Danvers, Mass. B.S. Nursing 

Junior Class Vice-President; Student 
Government 4; Sodality 4-3-2-1; Basket- 
ball 3-2-1; Glee Club 2-1; Commence- 
ment Week Committee 3. 



MARION DEVINE CONNERY 

Worcester, Mass. B.S. Nursing 

Sodality 4-3-2-1; Glee Club 2-1; Com- 
mencement Week Committee 3. 



173 




NANCY A. CUNNING 
Needham, Mass. B.S. Nursing 

Sodality 4-3-2-1 (Secretary 2, Treasurer 
1); Honor Society 2; Commencement 
Week Committee 3; Capping Commit- 
tee 1; Glee Club 2-1; Dean's List. 



BETTY ANN DENISEVICH 

Graniteville, Mass. B.S. Nursing 

Sophomore Class Treasurer; Sodality 4- 
3-2-1; Glee Club 1; Capping Commit- 
tee 1. 



NANCY V. DOLAN 

Peabody, Mass. B.S. Nursing 

Senior Class Vice-President; Junior Class 
Treasurer; Honor Board 2; Sodality 4- 
3-2-1; Glee Club 2-1; Commencement 
Week Committee 3. 




ELLEN M. DURKIN 

Salem, Mass. B.S. Nursing 

Honor Board 4; Sodality 4-3-2-1; Glee 
Club 2-1; Commencement Week Com- 
mittee 3. 



SCHOOL of 



1 



\ 



WILMA T. FALLON DOROTHY E. FENELON MARY A. FENNELL 

Belmont, Mass. B.S. Nursing New York, N. Y. B.S. Nursing Salem, Mass. B.S. Nursing 

Sodality 4-3-2-1; Glee Club 2-1; Sub Junior Class Secretary; Sodality 4-3-2; News from 126 2; Sodality 4-3-2-1 ;_Glee 

Turri 4; Commencement Week Com- Glee Club 2. 
mittee 3; Capping Committee 1. 



Club 2-1; Basketball 1; Capping Com- 
mittee 1. 





174 




BARBARA A. FRATES 

Norwood, Mass. B.S. Nursing 

Sodality 4-3-2; Glee Club 2; Commence- 
ment Week Committee 3; Capping Com- 
mittee 1 ; Dean's List. 



VIRGINIA M. FREDIANI 

Squantum, Mass. B.S. Nursing 

Sodality 4-3-2-1; Glee Club 2-1; Cap- 
ping Committee 1. 



ELAINE M. GEISSLER 

Holyoke, Mass. B.S. Nursing 

Sodality 4-3-2-1; Glee Club 2-1. 




URSING 



ELIZABETH A. GRADY 

Dorchester, Mass. B.S. Nursing 

Senior Class President; Junior Class 
President; Sophomore Class Vice-Presi- 
dent; M.S.C.S.N. (President 4); News 
From 126 (Co-Chairman 2-1); District 
Five Executive Board 3; Student Coun- 
cil 4-3; Delegate to National Student 
Nurses' Convention 4-3; Sodality 4-3-2- 
1 ; Basketball 4-2-1 ; Glee Club 2-1 ; Com- 
mencement Week Committee 3; Cap- 
ping Committee 1. 



MARY JANE GIBBONS 

Roslindale, Mass. B.S. Nursing 

Sophomore Class President; Freshman 
Class Vice-President; Student Faculty 
Organization 4-3-2-1 (President 4, Vice- 
President 3); District Five, M.S.C.S.N. 
(President 3); Sodality 4-3-2-1; Glee 
Club 2-1; Capping Committee 1; Dean's 
List. 




CLAIRE L. HAYNES 

Danvers, Mass. B.S. Nursing 

Sodality 4-3-2-1; Glee Club 2-1. 



NANCY E. HOLMES 
Brighton, Mass. B.S. Nursing 

Sodality 4-3-2-1; Glee Club 2-1; Blessed 
Oliver Plunkett Society 1; Basketball 4; 
Capping Committee 1 . 






175 




WM 



SCHOOL of NURSING 









NANCY J. HUNT 

Maiden, Mass. B.S. Nursing 

Basketball 2-1 (Manager 2, Assistant 
Manager 1); Sodality 4-3-2-1; Glee Club 
2-1; Honor Board 3; Dean's List. 



VTOA V. JASKIEVICZ 

Dorchester, Mass. B.S. Nursing 

Stylus 3; News From 126 1; Sodality 4- 
3-2-1; Glee Club 2-1; Capping Com- 
mittee 1. 



JUNE A. KELLY 

Arlington, Mass. B.S. Nursing 

Sophomore Class Secretary; Sodality 2- 
1; Basketball 2-1; Glee Club 2-1; Com- 
mencement Week Committee 3. 



JANET A. KNIGHT 

Brockton, Mass. B.S. Nursing 

Sodality 4-3-2-1; Glee Club 2-1 ; Basket- 
ball 4; Blessed Oliver Plunkett Society 1; 
Capping Committee 1; Commencement 
Week Committee 3. 



MARY GRACE KNOWLES 

Melrose, Mass. B.S. Nursing 

News From 126 1; Sodality 4-3-2-1; Glee 
Club 2-1; Capping Committee 1. 



SISTER MARIE 
CLAIRE ANGELA LEMIRE, SSA 

Marlboro, Mass. B.S. Nursing 




176 





C. MARIE LUNIVEY 

Chelsea, Mass. B.S. Nursing 

Sub Turri (Associate Editor 4); Sodality 
4-3-2-1; Glee Club 2-1; Capping Com- 
mittee 1; Commencement Week Com- 
mittee 3. 



MARY ANN LYND 

New York, N. Y. B.S. Nursing 

Sodality 3-2-1; Glee Club 2-1; Com- 
mencement Week Committee 3. 



CLAIRE A. MALIS 

Dorchester, Mass. B.S. Nursing 

Sub Turri 4; Sodality 4-3-2-1 ; Glee Club 
2-1; Capping Committee 1. 



CATHERINE A. McGUINNESS 

Hyde Park, Mass. B.S. Nursing 

Sodality 2-1; Glee Club 2-1; Commence- 
ment Week Committee 3. 




\ 



«> 



CAROL A. McHUGH 

Newton, Mass. B.S. Nursing 

Student Government 2; Sodality 4-3-2-1 ; 
Glee Club 4-3-2-1; Blessed Oliver 
Plunkett Society 2-1; Basketball 1; Com- 
mencement Week Committee 3; Capping 
Committee 1. 



MARY A. MULLINS 

Brockton, Mass. B.S. Nursing 

Sodality 2-1; (Prefect 2, Vice-Prefect 1); 
Glee Club 2-1; Commencement Week 
Committee 3. 






PATRICIA M. O'NEIL 

Franklin, Mass. B.S. Nursing 

Sodality 2-1; Glee Club 4-3-2-1; Com- 
mencement Week Committee 3; Dean's 
List. 



PATRICIA L. O'NEILL 

Lynn, Mass. B.S. Nursing 

Sodality 4-3-2-1 ; Glee Club 2-1 ; Capping 



Committee 1. 



177 






HELEN A. O'REGAN 

Weymouth, Mass. B.S. Nursing 

Sodality 2-1; Glee Club 2-1 ; Commence- 
ment Week Committee 3. 



NANCY H. PACIOUS 

Medford, Mass. B.S. Nursing 

Freshman Class Secretary; Sub Turri 
(Associate Editor) 4; News From 126 
2-); Sodality 4-3-2-1; Glee Club 2-1; 
Capping Committee 1; Dean's List. 



SANDRA J. POBUDA 

Worcester, Mass. B.S. Nursing 

Sodality 4-3-2-1 ; Glee Club 2-1. 




SISTER MARIE 
ANNE ELISE PONTBRIAND, SSA 
Marlboro, Mass. B.S. Nursing 



k^^_ i 



SCHOOL of 



1 



MARY E. POWELL 

Cambridge, Mass. B.S. Nursing 

Senior Class Secretary; Freshman Class 
President; Sodality 4-3-2-1; Basketball 
4-2-1; Glee Club 2-1; Blessed Oliver 
Plunkett Society 1; Commencement 
Week Committee 3. 



ELIZABETH W. POWER 

Brookline, Mass. B.S. Nursing 

Sodality 4-3-2-1; Glee Club 1. 



BEATRICE C. RAE 

Natick, Mass. B.S. Nursing 

Sodality 2-1; Glee Club 2-1. 




178 




PATRICIA A. RAE 

Natick, Mass. B.S. Nursing 

Sodality 2-1; Glee Club 2-1. 



JOSEPHINE A. RYAN 

Springfield, Mass. B.S. Nursing 



ELEANOR F. SULLIVAN 

West Roxbury, Mass. B.S. Nursing 

Senior Class Treasurer; Student Faculty 
Organization 3-2 (Treasurer 3, Corre- 
sponding Secretary 2); Sodality 4-3-2-1; 
Glee Club 2-1; Commencement Week 
Committee 3. 



NURSING 



^ 



ANNA K. SUPPLE 

Winchester, Mass. B.S. Nursing 

Sodality 4-3-2-1; Glee Club 2-1. 




KATHERINE M. VIERRA EMELENE F. WELCH PATRICL^ A. ZIELINSKI 

Boston, Mass. B.S. Nursing Brockton, Mass. B.S. Nursing Chelsea, Mass. B.S. Nursing 

Sodality 2-1; Glee Club 2-1; Dean's List. Sodality 4-3-2-1 ; Glee Club 2-1. Sodality 4-3-2-1; GleeClub2-l. 




179 



Intown College 




JOHN DONOGHUE 

President 




JOHN RUCK 
Treasurer 



ALICE NEARY 
Secretary 






180 




HAROLD DONNELLY 

Vice-President 





JAMES B. BARRON 

Quincy, Mass. B.S.B.A. General Business 
Sodality 5; Dean's List. 



BEVERLY M. BLAKE 

West Roxbury, Mass. B.S. Social Science 
Class Secretary 5-3; Student Council 
Secretary 5-3; Sodality 4-3. 



SARA P. BURGESS 

Boston, Mass. B.S. Social Science 

Sodality 4. 



CHARLES H. BURNES, JR. 

Mattapan, Mass. 



B.S.B.A. General Business 



Dean's List. 



DAVID W. CALLAGY 

Flushing, N. Y. A.B. Sociology 

New York Club 3-2-1 (Treasurer 3); 
Dramatic Society 3; Drill Team 2; Junior 
Show; Intramurals 2-1. 



WILLL^M H. CLEAVES 

Milton, Mass. B.S.B.A. General Business 





CATHERINE L. CODY 

^'^" Dorchester, Mass. B.S. Social Science 



RICHARD B. COLEMAN 

Boston, Mass. A.B. Education 



181 




DELLA T. CONCANNON 

Boston, Mass. B.S. Social Science 

Sodality 4; Speakers' Club 4. 



GEORGE P. CRONIN 

Lynn, Mass. B.S.B.A. General Business 



LIONEL G. DION 

Salem, Mass. B.S. Economics 

Dean's List. 



I 




HAROLD H. DONNELLY, JR. 

Jamaica Plain, Mass. 

B.S.B.A. General Business 
Class Vice-President 6-5; Student Coun- 
cil 6-5. 




INTOWN 






JOHN J. DONOGHUE 



MAURICE F. DONOVAN 



GERARD N. DUFFY 



Hyde Park Mass. B.S. Social Sciences Roslindale, Mass. A.B.English Somerville, Mass. 

Class President 6-5-4; Student Council ^■^•^•^- General Business 

6-5-4 (President 6, Vice-President 5). 




182 




ROBERT A. DUMAS LAWRENCE F. EDDY MAEVE O. FINLEY 

Dorchester, Mass. B.S.B. A. Accounting Winchester, Mass. B.S. Social Science Chestnut Hill, Mass. B.S. Education 

B.C. Eye 6; Sodality Prefect 6. 



^^ 



LLEGE 




ROBERT B. FLANAGAN 

Dorchester, Mass. B.S.B. A. Accounting 




LAWRENCE H. FOLEY 

Brookline, Mass. B.S. History & Govt. 
Speakers' Club 4; Bellarmine Law and 
Government Academy 3-2; Ricci Math 
Society 1; Intramurals 3-2-1. 



ROBERT A. FOOTE 

Beverly, Mass. B.S. English 

Glee Club 4-3; Dramatic Society 3; 
Italian Academy 4. 



SANTO J. FORTE 

Boston, Mass. B.S.B. A. General Business 




183 




INTOWN COLLEGE 





JOHN J. GILLIS 

Rockland, Mass. 

B.S.B.A. General Business 



CLAIRE J. GLYNN 

Jamaica Plain, Mass. B.S. Social Science 
Sodality 6. 



WILLIAM N. GOUDEY, JR. 

Everett, Mass. B.S. History 



JOSEPH A. GUINTA 

Mattapan, Mass. 

B.S.B.A. General Business 



184 



ROBERT F. HART 

Hyde Park, Mass. B.S.B.A. Accounting 



MARGARET A. HAYES 

Brighton, Mass. B.S. Social Science 




iff '"'•'V 



:^ 




MARIE E. fflGGINS 

South Boston, Mass. A.B. Education 



MARY EVANS HOOPER 

Beverly, Mass. B.S.B.A. General Business 
Sodality 6; Public Speaking Club 6-5; 
Dean's List. 



JOHN D. INGALLS 

Arlington, Mass. B.S. English 

Class President 3; Class Vice-President 
2; Dean's List. 



JOHN F. JORDAN 

Dorchester, Mass. 

B.S.B.A. General Business 
Dean's List. 



ROSALIE E. KANE 

Boston, Mass. B.S. English 

Sodality 6. 



HAROLD L. KARLE 

Dorchester, Mass. 

B.S.B.A. General Business 
Class Vice-President 4; Student Council 
4; Dean's List. 





MARGARET A. KEELEY 

Dorchester, Mass. B.S. English 



ROBERT R. KOCH 

Needham, Mass. B.S.B.A. Accounting 



185 




ROMEO J. F. LABBE 

Lewiston, Me. B.S.B.A. Finance 

Finance Club 4-3. 



RUDOLPH P. LEBEL 

Danvers, Mass. 

B.S.B.A. General Business 



RALPH L. LESPASIO 

Revere, Mass. B.S. Sociology 

Speakers' Club (President 4). 



FRANCIS J. LUNDY 

WoUaston, Mass. B.S. Social Science 



^V^ 





INTOWN 






JOHN R. MacDONALD 

Winthrop, Mass. 

B.S.B.A. General Business 
German Academy 2-1. 



NORMA F. MacDONALD 

Dorchester, Mass. B.S. Social Science 



JOHN P. MacMUNN 
West Newton, Mass. 

B.S.B.A. General Business 
Dean's List. 




186 




ROLAND D. MAHONEY 

North Falmouth, Mass. 

B.S. History & Govt. 
The Heights 3-2-1; Hockey 2; Intra- 
murals 2-1. 



BARBARA C. McCANN 

Medford, Mass. B.S. Biology 

Sodahty 3-2-1; Rifle Club 4. 



MAURICE F. McCORMACK 

Somerville, Mass. 

B.S.B.A. General Business 



COLLEGE 



JAMES J. McCURDY 

Boston, Mass. B.S. Social Sciences 




PATRICIA A. McGUIRK 

Cambridge, Mass. B.S. English 

Sub Turri 4. 



CATHERINE M. McHUGH 

Worcester, Mass. B.S. Social Science 



JAMES A. MORRISSEY 

Braintree, Mass. 

B.S.B.A. Business Administration 
Speakers' Club 6-5. 




187 



INTOWN COLLEGE 



] 




PATRICIA A. NALLY 

Milton, Mass. A.B. English 

Sodality 4; Dean's List; Sub Turri 4. 



ALICE A. NEARY 

Roslindale, Mass. B.S. English 

Class Vice-President 4; Class Secretary 
6-2; Student Council (Secretary 4-2); 
Sodality 6-5-4-3-2 (Treasurer 6); B.C. 
Eye 5; Dean's List. 



MARY F. O'BRIEN 

Somerville, Mass. B.S. Social Science 



MARIE CAMPBELL O'NEIL 

Salem, Mass. B.S.B.A. General Business 
Dean's List. 



188 



LOUIS L. PETERS 

Brockton, Mass. B.S. Social Science 



JAMES L. RICE 

Boston, Mass. B.S. History & Govt. 





LEONARD J. RUSSELL 

Cambridge, Mass. B.S. Economics 

Sodality 4. 



ALBERT J. ST. HILAIRE 

Maiden, Mass. B.S. Social Science 



EDWARD J. SAVILL 

Arlington, Mass. 

B.S.B.A . General Business 



LAWRENCE J. SINDONI 

Dorchester, Mass. 

B.S.B.A. General Business 
Class Treasurer 4; Speakers' Club 4. 



JACQUELINE M. STARR 

Providence, R. L A.B. English 

Sub Turri (Associate Editor 6); Dean's 
List. 



JOHN E. SULLIVAN 

Lexington, Mass. 

B.S.B.A. General Business 





EDWARD G. TOBES 

Allston, Mass. B.S.B.A. General Business 



RUTH M. TRAINOR 

Maiden, Mass. B.S. Social Science 

Sub Turn 4. 



189 




MICHAEL F. TRODDEN JOHN A. WALSH 

Maiden, Mass. B.S. Education Roslindale, Mass. B.S. Sociology 

Sodality; Intramurals 2-1. Sodality 4; Intramurals 3-2-1; Glee Club 

3-2-1. 



INTOWN COLLEGE 



1 



190 



Graduate Nursing 




MARY MALONEY 

President 



ALICE MORRISON 

Vice-President 





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KATHERINE KIRKPATRICK 
Treasurer 




191 



GRADUATE NURSING 






ELAINE M. BAIRD, R.N. 

Albany, N. Y. B.S. Nursing 

Sodality 4-3; English Academy 4-3; Stu- 
dent-Faculty Organization 4-3. 



NANCY M. BEGLEY, R.N. 

Derby, Conn. B.S. Nursing 

Sodality 4-3; English Academy 3. 





CAROLE C. BEMIS, R.N. 

Melrose, Mass. B.S. Nursing 

Social Committee 4-3. 



KATHLEEN M. BENEDICT, R.N. 

Lynn, Mass. B.S. Nursing 



JOSEPHINE M. BENSON, R.N. 

Leominster, Mass. B.S. Nursing 

Sodality 4; Social Committee 4-3. 



MARY F. BROGAN, R.N. 

Buffalo, N. Y. B.S. Nursing 



192 







MILTON C. BROWN, R.N. 

Haydenville, Mass. B.S. Nursing 



BARBARA M. CAHILL, R.N. 

Athens, Pa. B.S. Nursing 

Social Committee (Chairman 4-3); Stu- 
dent-Faculty Organization 4. 



DOROTHY CANTALL, R.N. 

Ft. Lauderdale, Fla. B.S. Nursing 

Senior Nominating Committee (Chair- 
man); Sodality 4-3; Student-Faculty 
Organization 4-3 (Legislative Board 3); 
Social Committee 4-3. 



JEANNE A. CARDON, R.N. 

Woonsocket, R. I. B.S. Nursing 

Student-Faculty Organization 4. 



KATHLEEN J. CHABOT, R.N. 

Lowell, Mass. B.S. Nursing 



MARILYN A. CHAUINARD, R.N. 

Wickford, R. I. B.S. Nursing 








f 



ELIZABETH M. CORCORAN, R.N. 

Medford, Mass. B.S. Nursing 

Social Committee 4. 



CHARLENE L. CROSBY, R.N. 

Waterville, Me. B.S. Nursing 

Student Council 4-3; Sodality 4-3. 



193 






ELAINE FALLS, R.N. 

Westwood, Mass. B.S. Nursing 

Student-Faculty Social Committee 4-3 
(Chairman 4); Sodality 4; English 
Academy 4-3. 



LEONA F. FIDRYCH, R.N. 

Providence, R. L B.S. Nursing 

Sodality 4; Student-Faculty Organiza- 
tion 4. 



MARGUERITE FOSMIRE, R.N. 

Greenfield, Mass. B.S. Nursing 




MARY- JANE K. GEARY, R.N. 

Providence, R. L B.S. Nursing 

Sodality 4-3; Student-Faculty Organiza- 
tion 4-3; Philosophy Club 3; English 
Academy 4-3. 



GRADUATE 



ELIZABETH A. GLYNN, R.N. JOAN GRINDLEY, R.N. JOAN T. HARTNETT, R.N. 

Westfield, Mass. B.S. Nursing Dorchester, Mass. B.S. Nursing Revere, Mass. B.S. Nursing 

Sub Turri (Associate Editor 4); Sodality 
3; Student-Faculty Organization 4-3. 





194 






SARA A. HEALEY, R.N. 

Dorchester, Mass. B.S. Nursing 



CATHERINE HOUTON, R.N. MARIE R. lANNACONE, R.N. 

Dorchester, Mass. B.S. Nursing Fitchburg, Mass. B.S. Nursing 

Sodality 4. Sodality 4; Student-Faculty Organiza- 

tion 4; Social Committee 4-3. 



NURSING 



U 



KATHLEEN R. JACEY, R.N. 

Waterford, Conn. B.S. Nursing 

Sodality 4-3; Philosophy Club 3; English 
Academy 4-3; Social Committee 4-3. 




I 



MARIE H. KEAVENEY, R.N. 

Waltham, Mass. B.S. Nursing 

Student-Faculty Organization (President 
4); Sodality 4-3; English Academy 4-3. 



MARY E. KEEFE, R.N. MARY J. KILBRIDE, R.N. 

Waterbury, Vt. B.S. Nursing New Haven, Conn. B.S. Nursing 

Student-Faculty Organization 4. Sodality 4-3; Student-Faculty Organiza- 

tion 3; English Academy 3; Social Com- 
mittee 4. 





195 



GRADUATE NURSING 






JEAN A. KINNARE, R.N. 

Guilford, Conn. B.S. Nursing 

Sodality 4-3. 



MARION KIRLEY, R.N. 

Winthrop, Mass. B.S. Nursing 



MILDRED E. LEBER, R.N. 

Cambridge, Mass. B.S. Nursing 

Class Representative 4; English Acad- 
emy 4-3 (Chairman 4). 



EILEEN M. LEEBURN, R.N. 

Boston, Mass. B.S. Nursing 

Social Committee 4-3 (Co-chairman 4); 
Sodality 4-3. 



MARY J. LENIHAN, R.N. 

New Haven, Conn. B.S. Nursing 

Student-Faculty Organization 4; So- 
dality 4-3. 



MARY LUDDY, R.N. 

East Bridgewater, Mass. B.S. Nursing 




196 






DOROTHY M. MAHONEY, R.N. 

Allston, Mass. B.S. Nursing 



CAROL MALO, R.N. 

So. Bellingham, Mass. B.S. Nursing 
Student Council 3; Sodality 4-3. 



MARY D. MALONEY, R.N. 

Boston, Mass. B.S. Nursing 

Senior Class President; Student-Faculty 
Organization 4; Sodality 4. 





BARBARA C. McCORMICK, R.N. 

Longmeadow, Mass. B.S. Nursing 

Honor Board 3; Student Council 3; Stu- 
dent-Faculty Organization 4-3; English 
Academy 3. 



CATHERINE A. McDONOUGH, R.N. 

Dorchester, Mass. B.S. Nursing 

Junior Class Vice-President; English 
Academy 4-3; Sodality (Prefect 4). 



LORRAINE McDOUGALL, R.N. 

Stoneham, Mass. B.S. Nursing 

Student Council (Treasurer 3); Social 
Committee (Chairman 3); English Acad- 
emy 4. 





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JANE McKEO, R.N. 

JANE McKEO, R.N. 

Boston, Mass. B.S. Nursing 

Student Council 3. 



NOREEN T. MEENHART, R.N. 

Maiden, Mass. B.S. Nursing 

Student-Faculty Organization 4-3. 



197 




ELAINE A. MELLO, R.N. 

New Bedford, Mass. B.S. Nursing 




FRANCES B. MICHALOWSKI, R.N. 

New Britain, Conn. B.S. Nursing 

Student-Faculty Organization 4; English 
Academy 4. 



DIANA L. MISENTI, R.N. 

Barstow, N. H. B.S. Nursing 




HELEN A. MORAN, R.N. 

Salem, Mass. B.S. Nursing 



RADUATE1 



ALICE T. MORRISON, R.N. VIRGINIA M. MOSTYN, R.N. CATHERINE T. O'BRIEN, R.N. 

Peabody, Mass. B.S. Nursing WoUaston, Mass. B.S. Nursing Marlboro, Mass. B.S. Nursing 

Senior Class Vice-President. Student-Faculty Organization 4; English 

Academy 4. 




198 




JOSEPHEVE OCALLAHAN, R.N. 

Somerville, Mass. B.S. Nursing 

Student-Faculty Organization 4-3; So- 
dality 4-3. 



ANN M. O'DEA, R.N. CATHERINE T. O'DONNELL, R.N. 

Waterbury, Conn. B.S. Nursing Boston, Mass. B.S. Nursing 

English Academy 4. Sodality 4; Student-Faculty Organiza- 

tion 4. 



^ 



URSING 



RUTH A. O'TOOLE, R.N. 

Dorchester, Mass. B.S. Nursing 

Honor Board 4 (Chairman); Student- 
Faculty Organization 4; Sodality 4. 




ANN OWENS, R.N. MARCIA A. PARISIEN, R.N. EFFIE M. PERAKIS, R.N. 

East Syracuse, N. Y. B.S. Nursing North Adams, Mass. B.S. Nursing Lynn, Mass. B.S. Nursing 

Student-Faculty Organization 4-3; So- Student-Faculty Organization 4. 
dality 3. 





199 



GRADUATE NURSING 



'I 




CATHERINE REILLY, R.N. 

Hyde Park, Mass. B.S. Nursing 

Student-Faculty Organization 4; So- 
dality 4. 



i 



ANN M. ROMANO, R.N. 

Brooklyn, N. Y. B.S. Nursing 



CLAIRE E. ROY, R.N. 

North Adams, Mass. 5.5*. Nursing 

Student-Faculty Organization 4; So- 
dality 4. 



MARY RUSSO, R.N. 

Waltham, Mass. B.S. Nursing 

Student-Faculty Organization 4; So- 
dality 4. 



JOAN M. RUTLEDGE, R.N. 

Hamden, Conn. B.S. Nursing 

Student-Faculty Organization 4-3. 



MARIE T. RYAN, R.N. 

Worcester, Mass. B.S. Nursing 

Student-Faculty Organization (Secre- 
tary 4); Student Council 3; Sodality 4-3; 
Social Committee 3. 



200 





PATRICIA A. SCHOENECK, R.N. 

Verona, N. Y. b.S. Nursing 



ALICE SIMARD, R.N. 

Salem, Mass. B.S. Nursing 

Sodality 4-3 (Treasurer 4); Student- 
Faculty Organization 4-3. 



FRANCES JEANNE SLAGLE, R.N. 

Cambridge, Mass. B.S. Nursing 

Sodality 3; English Academy 3; Phi- 
losophy Club 3. 



ROSE M. SPARICO, R.N. 

Hamden, Conn. B.S. Nursing 

Sodality 4-3; Social Committee 4. 




MARIE T. SPRING, R.N. 

New Britain, Conn. B.S. Nursing 

Sodality 4. 



SALLY R. STEVENS, R.N. 

Milton Mills, N. H. B.S. Nursing 







JEANNE D. SWEENEY, R.N. 

DeSoto, Mo. • B.S. Nursing 

Student-Faculty Organization 4; So- 
dality 3. 



JEAN M. WALSH, R.N. 

Baldwin, N. Y. B.S. Nursing 

Student Council 3; English Academy 4-3. 



201 




\ 




ANNE P. WItffiLAN, R.N. JOYCE C. WIREBACK, R.N. 

Morristown, N. J. B.S. Nursing Lancaster, Pa. B.S. Nursing 

Sodality 4-3; English Academy 3. Student-Faculty Organization 4; English 

Academy 4. 



KATHRYN C. YAGER 

Watertown, N. Y. B.S. Nursing 

Student Council 3; Student-Faculty Or- 
ganization 4; Sodality 3. 




GRADUATE NURSING 




202 




ACTIVITIES 



203 




REV. ROBERT FULTON, S.J. 
Third President of Boston College 



Father Robert Fulton, S.J. was a man of thought and action. Neither 
idle speculator nor impetuous pragmatist, he combined academic training 
with a dynamic personaHty, and as the University's first Dean of Studies 
and twice President he brought to bear upon the fledgling institution great 
powers of intellect and practical application. These dual qualities made Fr. 
Fulton not only a competent Dean and President but one of the Society's 
most able administrators, and he served also as President of Georgetown 
University and Provincial of Maryland. 

These characteristics of Fr. Gasson have not been lost to the University 
to which he contributed so much. The primary function of the University 
is to develop intellectual disciplines, but the practical aspects of life are not 
neglected. The extracurricular activities of the campus are the blending of 
thought and action, the practical application of the principles and theories 
of the curriculum. Yet these are only artificial, sheltered exercises in this 
application; they are but the shadow of the accomplishments of such men 
as Fr. Gasson. Whether we have succeeded or failed in these endeavors is 
now of little consequence. For the real test is just begun. 






Ill 



SMI 



Sub Turri Salutes 



As a university is a place dedicated to 
the attaining of excellence, it is to be ex- 
pected that those who succeed in this 
will be separated from their fellows. This 
is the purpose of the many offices and 
positions of honor which serve as goals 
in every phase of student life. But there 
are some who more than merit the 
honors which have been awarded them. 
These are the men who have seen in 
every honor a responsibility, and who 
have looked on every office as an op- 
portunity to contribute their talents to 
their class and school. They have given 
generously of their time and energies, 
and above all others in this class have 
contributed something of value to Bos- 
ton College and to us. 





Carney Gavin 



BiU ConneU 



206 




Frank Martin 




Tom Murray 





Jack Wiseman 



Sam Blair 



207 



A Time of Transition 



A university is a place of study. All else must be sub- 
ordinated to this, for the chief purpose of a university is 
the development of the intellect. But this is not its only 
purpose. It must develop not only the intellect but every 
quality of man which will enable him to use his intellect 
to its fullest extent. Such is the function of the extracur- 
ricular elements of the university. Just as the course work 
trains the student in the intellectual disciplines, so the 
academies, societies, clubs, publications, and teams help 
to train him in maturity, independence, responsibility, 
and whatever other qualities contribute toward making 
him a whole man. 

The fact that extracurricular organizations exist pri- 
marily for the individual makes evaluation difficult, for 
even the smallest and most inactive club may be the one 
that most benefits a particular student, and it is for him 
of greater value than the largest and most impressive so- 
ciety. However, by comparing similar organizations and 
by setting the performance of each against its aims, it is 
possible to arrive at an appraisal having more than a little 
objectivity and validity. In this way we have attempted in 
the following pages to comment on the extracurricular 
life of Boston College during the year 1958-1959. 

The easiest way to characterize any given period of time 
is to say that it was a period of transition. For, as there is 
nothing that cannot be said to be constantly changing, 
transition is necessarily a word as accurate as it is mean- 
ingless. Yet our discussion can begin with no other word, 
for change was the dominant characteristic of this year. 

Perhaps the most important changes were the innova- 
tions which 1958-1959 brought. The inauguration of the 
Humanities Lecture Series, the Public Affairs Forum, and 



the annual Maurice J. Tobin Memorial Lecture made 
possible appearances by such distinguished figures as 
Clement Attlee, Harry S. Truman, Carl Sandburg, Samuel 
Eliot Morison, Allen Tate, Bruce Catton, Robert Frost, 
and W.H. Auden. The approval by the Student Govern- 
ment of a University-wide Campus Council created at 
least a potential for order and co-ordination among the 
seventy-odd organizations now, in existence. And the 
establishment of the Film Society and the expansion of the 
Stylus Art Exhibit into an annual series of three or four 
shows helped to add new depth to the recreational and 
cultural activities available to the undergraduate. 

Not all the changes, however, were as positive as these; 
more than a few organizations faltered or deteriorated to 
only nominal existence during this year. For in most cases 
the transitions experienced by the different groups were 
those forced on them as parts of a larger and rapidly ex- 
panding institution. The accelerated growth of Boston 
College in recent years has created stresses in every phase 
of activity, academic and athletic as well as cultural and 
recreational; each element is beginning to realize itself in 
its new relationships and to adjust to the other elements 
and to the whole. As is often the case, these adjustments 
have been marked by as much regression as progress. 

The confusion on the extracurricular scene testifies to 
the need for a reappraisal and reorganization of this phase 
of undergraduate life. But at the same time, the recent 
successful attempts of such groups as the Student Govern- 
ment and some of the publications to adapt to the require- 
ments of the large University which B.C. has become, in- 
dicate that this need is being recognized and met on the 
student level. 



208 




Honor Societies 




Alpha Sigma Nu members coming from a meeting in St. Mary's 
Hall are Dan Geagan, Tom Murray, Paul Kelley, Secretary; 
Carney Gavin, President; Fr. McGillivray, S.J., Moderator; 



Paul Broughton, Sergeant-at-Arms; John J. Madden, Vice-Pres- 
ident; Gene Prior, Treasurer; John A. Madden, and John Cremin. 



Segregation, especially in its connection with education, 
was very much a part of the news this year. Front page 
headlines throughout the world testified to the bitterness 
and intensity of the conflict over segregation in our 
schools and colleges. Debated in every forum from the 
barbershop to the senate was the equal right of all to an 
education. Most of this discussion centered on segrega- 
tion according to race, and one historic decision after 
another declared that distinctions cannot be made in the 
schools on this basis. 



Scholars of the College, Dan Geagan and Carney Gavin, peruse a 
few Latin texts in the Humanities office. 



.iXUJ' 




However, segregation according to race was not the 
only aspect of this problem which received attention. Less 
publicised but often just as intense, and perhaps in the 
long run more important, was the debate on segregation 
according to ability. It became increasingly apparent in 
the harsh light of a national emergency that the equal 
rights of all do not include the right to higher education. 
There must be discrimination between the superior and 
the inferior. Within the university distinctions must be 
maintained among those of varying abilities. A university 
must be a truly aristocratic institution, and the aristocracy 
must be one of intelligence. 

These are old truths, as old as education itself, but they 
had become obscured and were only half realized and 
they needed to be relearned by many people. In the Jesuit 
tradition segregation according to ability has always been 
a basic principle. The motto of Boston College, "Excel 
always," reflects this abhorrence of mediocrity, and the 
Ratio Studiorum urges both the separation of the more 
from the less intelligent and the public recognition of 
those who achieve superiority. These recommendations 
receive more than historical attention in Jesuit universi- 
ties, and here to an even greater degree than in most. The 
newly instituted honors and advanced standing programs 
have increased the opportunities of the superior students, 
permitting them to obtain an education befitting their 
abilities. Even better observed is the recommendation to 
give special recognition to those who have attained ex- 
cellence. Such recognition is granted in various ways, 



210 



chiefly by scholarships, prizes, and awards; but the most 
highly regarded and eagerly sought distinction is member- 
ship in one of the University's honor societies. 

As the intellectual activities of a university are varied, 
each school or college having different goals, there are 
consequently many honor societies, the Order of the Cross 
and Crown in the College of Arts and Sciences, Beta 
Gamma Sigma in the College of Business Administration, 
Alpha and Omega in the School of Education, and the 
Basic Nurses' Honor Society in the Nursing School. Yet 
there is a fundamental unity to Jesuit education, whatever 
form it takes, and thus there exists for all the men of the 
university, whether in A&S, CBA, or the School of Ed, a 
chapter of Alpha Sigma Nu, the national Jesuit honor 
fraternity. 

This last mentioned society is unquestionably the most 
exclusive and most respected of all the university's honor 
societies. Each year approximately one per cent of the 
graduating class is elected to membership in Alpha Sigma 
Nu, the number being usually between seven and twelve. 
The criteria of selection are three: scholarship, loyalty, 
and service. Great importance is given to these last two 
qualities and, accordingly, Alpha Sigma Nu invariably 
numbers among its members the students who, in addi- 
tion to their high scholastic standing, are most active in 
the direction of the university's clubs and publications. 




Pausing beneath the Ford Tower to discuss anangements 
for the Cross and Crown Cotillion are Knight Commander 
Carney Gavin and Marshalls Dan Geagan, Ed Callahan, 
John McCormack, and Bob Dennehy. 



Shown on the steps of Bapst Library are the members of the Order 
of the Cross and Crown, (front row) Ed Callahan, Jr., Dan 
Geagan, Carney Gavin, Fr. Duncan, S.J., Moderator, John Mc- 
Cormack, Bob Dennehy, (second row) Jerry Fitzgibbon, Bill 
Parks, Bob Trahe, John Dempsey, Paul Kelly, (third row) Joe 



Furcinetti, Tom Halpin, Jack Madden, Frank Collins, Sam Scott, 
Ralph Moore, (fourth row) John O'Connor, Francis Wanat, John 
Flynn, Charlie McCullagh, Ernie Ferneau, Bill Powers, Maurice 
Lapierre, and Sam Blair. 




211 




Membership in Beta Gamma Sigma was extended to (standing) Joe Feltz, 
Bill Keough, Dick Burns, Martin King, Angelo Delpriore, Anthony 
Giordano, John Madden, Bob Scanlon, Joe Hurley, Frank Horgan, 



Martin Redington, and (seated) Bill Connell, John Murray, Fr. McEwen, 
S.J., Dean White, Registrar Conway, and Vin O'Reilly. 



The honor societies within the individual colleges place 
more emphasis on academic excellence than on general 
abilities or qualities of leadership. The degree of emphasis 
varies from the subordination of extracurriculars to the 
exclusion of any consideration except scholastic standing. 

The oldest of the honor societies at Boston College, the 
Order of the Cross and Crown, last year modified its 
method of selection. Its former method, a process where- 
by points were awarded for scholastic achievement and 
for participation in extracurricular activities was changed 
to a less rigid process which allows an evaluation of can- 
didates by the members and by the administration. In 
both selection methods academic excellence was the pri- 
mary consideration, participation in college and univer- 
sity activities being secondary. Of the three hundred sixty 
students in the College of Arts and Sciences, twenty-five 
were elected to the Cross and Crown. 

Beta Gamma Sigma, a national fraternity for collegiate 
business schools, now in its third year at B.C., bases its 
choice of members solely on academic performance. At 
the end of Junior year the top four per cent of the class are 
initiated into the society; after the first semester of Senior 
year an additional six per cent are chosen. Thus the 
thirty-five highest ranking seniors in the College of Busi- 
ness Administration graduate as members of its honor 
society. 

Alpha and Omega is the smallest of all the university's 
honor societies, this year consisting of seven members. 
Chosen at the end of their Junior year, they are the stu- 
dents who, in the opinion of the faculty of the School of 
Education and the senior members of the society, are most 



outstanding, first on the basis of academic excellence, 
secondly on extracurricular performance. 

The Basic Nurses' Honor Society bases its selection of 
candidates on a point system. Candidates must have at 
least an 84.9 average and must have accrued a total of 
twenty-five points for extracurricular activities. During 
the past year nine seniors qualified for membership. 

The origin of honor societies in a Jesuit university 
seems to be twofold, arising first from the academies. 



Registrar Conway and Dean White pose with Bill Connell, President 
of Beta Gamma Sigma, and Vin O'Reilly and John Murray, Secre- 
tary and Vice-President respectively. 



212 




antecedents of the present day societies and clubs, and 
secondly from the Sodality which was generally restricted 
to superior students. In recent years, while the academies, 
societies, and clubs have become an ever increasing 
part of campus life, and while the Sodality has concen- 
trated on the spiritual development of the students, the 
honor societies have found their sphere of activity sharply 
limited. Lacking any specific function, they have had to 
choose between becoming merely honorary distinctions 
and discovering new areas of activity to which they might 
bring their talents. 

This was a problem much discussed during this year. 
Some argued that the members of the honor societies had 
too many prior responsibilities to allow them to devote 
much time to additional projects. Others thought that the 
potential which the honor societies possessed for giving 
constructive criticism, recommendations, and other types 
of assistance to the university was too great to be neg- 
lected. 

Alpha Sigma Nu, being composed of the most active 
students, had the most to offer in this regard, but by the 
same token, had the least opportunity for undertaking 
any extensive projects. In April, however, the chapter cele- 
brated its twentieth anniversary with a banquet which 
saw the inception of the Boston College Alpha Sigma Nu 
Alumni Chapter. The members hoped that through the 



alumni they could bring some continuity to the organiza- 
tion, and thus more effectively pursue the role of an ad- 
visory council on academic and extracurricular affairs. 

The Order of the Cross and Crown made no attempt to 
broaden the scope of its activities. It remained largely 
honorary, its contributions consisting of the sponsoring 
of the spring concert by Jesu Maria Sanroma and the 
supplying of ushers for the Humanities Series lectures. 
The members of the order continued their traditional 
function of serving as marshals at the commencement 
exercises. 

Beta Gamma Sigma, young enough to be still searching 
for its proper role, began this year to extend itself in a 
number of different directions. To assist with the orienta- 
tion of freshmen, the members began a summary of all 
the majors offered in the CBA, explaining the purpose 
and content of each. Although the number of Beta gradu- 
ates is necessarily small, the chapter conducted an alumni 
day both to benefit the present members and to begin 
work toward the establishment of a scholarship fund. At 
the same time it established a file on the Beta alumni to 
help prepare statistics on their success in their various 
careers. In preparation for future years a poll was con- 
ducted among all the chapters throughout the country 
inquiring about the scope and nature of their activities. 

The Alpha and Omega Honor Society, continuing the 



Members of the Alpha and Omega Honor Society are (seated) Brenda Jackson, (standing) John Paris, Rosemarie Pashby, 

Mary Miller, Secretary-Treasurer; Madeline Collins, President; Jeanne McGuiggin, and Gene Prior. 




213 




The School of Nursing extended membership in its 
honor society to: (seated) Nancy Hunt, Mary Jane 
Gibbons, Patricia O'NeU, Marie Lunney, (standing) 
Eleanor Sullivan, Nancy Cunning, Lorraine Bon- 
vouloir, Mary Caskin and Nancy Pacious. 



practices of their predecessors, sponsored an academic 
contest and an educational symposium. The contest was 
designed for the underclassmen in the School of Educa- 
tion with the intention of inciting originality and cre- 
ativity in the fields of the short story, the essay, poetry, 
and oratory. Its symposium featured authorities in edu- 
cation who discussed topics of current significance and as 
usual it attracted educators from many surrounding com- 
munities. 

As the members of the Basic Nurses' Honor Society 
are not selected until the second semester of their senior 
year, when they have returned from hospital affiliation, 



there is little opportunity for them to undertake any 
projects. Thus this society is entirely honorary and makes 
no attempt at organized activity. 

That the honor societies possess a great potential for 
serving the University is undeniable, and that the more 
active societies have made distinct contributions is an 
established fact. But in one sense whether or not they 
realize their potential and contribute actively to the wel- 
fare of the University is of only secondary importance. 
For their primary function and greatest service is simply 
to serve as reminders and symbols of that ideal of the 
educational aristocracy, the need to "excel always." 



214 




Sodalities 




Fr. Devine, S.J. moderator of the Men's Sodality stops outside Fulton Hall with members, Bob Dennehy , 
Dick Crowley, Ernie Ferneau, Paul Kelly, Owen O'Malley, Ed Colbert, and Bill Healey. 



John Lane solicits contributions for the Sodality 
Christmas drive from Ginny O'NeU, Mary Holmes, 
and Steve Jones. 




216 



In theory the Sodality is the basis of all extracurricular 
life on a Jesuit campus, for according to the Ratio Stu- 
diorum no student may be admitted to any other organiza- 
tion until he has first been received as a Sodalist. In prac- 
tice this injunction is of only historical interest, but this 
does not mean that at Boston College the Sodality is no 
longer a force in the student community. 

Its influence, however, has been somewhat modified. 
For although it is no longer a prerequisite for an active 
student life, it remains what its director calls a "spiritual 
honors seminar." This means simply that the Sodality 
has no direct interest in acquiring a monopoly on campus 
leaders, but rather attempts to develop its own spiritual 
aristocracy. 

That this aim has been achieved many times since the 
founding of the first Sodality four centuries ago at Parma 
by Blessed Peter Faber is evidenced by the fact that 
former members of this organization include thirty-seven 
founders of religious orders or congregations, eighteen 
popes, and such saints as Francis de Sales, Peter Claver, 
Vincent de Paul, Alphonsus Ligouri, and Bernadette 
Soubirous. Not a few monarchs, and famed scholars, 
philosophers, and artists have also been numbered in the 
ranks of the Sodality. 

As this list indicates, Sodalists come from many classes 
of society and many stations of life. The overall organiza- 
tion is subdivided so that each Sodality exists for a specific 
class or state in life. Thus there are Sodalities for factory 
workers, princes, noblemen, lawyers, convicts, skilled 
craftsmen, fishermen, monks, secular priests, professional 
men, slaves, lepers, beggars, merchants, and butchers to 
name a few. 







i 



Sodality members often assisted at tlie many Masses said 
daUy on tlie campus. 



The senior members of the Women's Sodality of the School of 
Education, meeting in the Women's Lounge, are (front row) Paula 
Fitzgerald, Secretary; Carol Greene, Prefect; Veronica McLeod, 
Treasurer, (second row) Mary Miller, Marion Carey, Ellen Mary 



Costa, Lucille lovino, Pauline Rooney, Faith Buckley, Mary 
Farrey, (third row) Claire O'Toole, Joan Bourgeois, Mary Mc- 
Hale, Mary Watts, and SheUa O'Leary. 




217 




Fr. Gorman, S.J., moderator of the Basic Nurses' Sodality, lectures 
to Sodalists, (front row) Barbara Frates, Claire Haines, Catherine 
McGuinness, Patricia Zielinski, Carol McHugh, (second row) Pat- 



ricia O'Neil, Marie Lunney, Nancy Pacious, Helen O'Regan, and 
Anna Supple. 



The Sodality at Boston College is, of course, a student 
organization, and its activities are adapted to the needs 
and the limitations of its members. Members meet once 
a week, the usual format being an informal talk or general 
discussion. In addition the Sodalists are individually ex- 
pected to perform each day certain duties, which include 
Mass and Communion, the recitation of the rosary, and 
the practice of mental prayer. Before a student is received 
into the Sodality, at which time he promises to fulfill these 
obligations, he must undergo a probationary period of 
six months, during which he attends meetings, takes in- 
structions, and begins to follow the "sodality way of life." 

The chief benefit of the Sodality is for the individual, 
but in keeping with the spirit and dictates of the Church, 
it works also to benefit the community in which it exists. 
One of its most active programs is the providing of Chris- 
tian Doctrine instruction for Catholic pupils who attend 
public schools. Now in its fourth year, this phase of the 
Sodality's activities attracts over one hundred students, 
both sodalists and non-sodalists, each of whom donates 
at least two hours a week to the project. In conjunction 
with this program, the Sodality has been co-operating 
with the Archdiocesan Office of Education to test and 
evaluate textbooks and teaching methods. 



Many sodalists taught Christian Doctrine to public school pupils. 




218 




The officers and moderator of the Intown Sodality are (seated) Mar- 
jorie Casey, Vice-Prefect; Fr. Commiskey, S.J., Mary Faith Baker, 
Secretary, (standing) Lawrence Eddy, Prefect, and Alice Neary, 
Treasurer. 



The Sodality's inaugurating of a dialogue Mass each 
morning has helped to spread among the student body an 
understanding of and a participation in the liturgy. Among 
its charitable ventures have been a Christmas collection 
for needy families, weekly collections in support of the 
Jesuit missions, the distribution of used clothing to the 
poor, and volunteer work at the Kennedy Memorial Hos- 
pital. The contributions of the Sodality to the University 
consist of such work as the promoting of the Apostleship 
of Prayer, the supplying of reporters for the Faculty 
Newsletter, and the sponsoring of a talk by Dorothy Day, 
editor of the Catholic Worker and leading spokesman for 
the Catholic Worker movement in this country. 

This year the efficiency of the organization was in- 
creased by the consolidation of the sodalities of the A&S 
and CBA day-students into one group under the direction 
of Fr. J. Frank Devine, S.J. On the main campus this 
central organization was supplemented by affiliated so- 
dalities for the resident students and for the women stu- 
dents, and in the Newbury Street center by sodalities for 
the basic nursing students, the graduate nurses, and the 
students of the Intown College. 



Taldng time out for a picture during a meeting of the Resident Stu- 
dents' Sodality are (seated) Dan Geagan, Prefect; Fr. Saunders, S.J., 
Moderator; Bob Hart, Vice-Prefect, (standing) Joe Furcinetti, Tom 



McMahon, Dave Plaute, Dick Wallace, Charlie Glasshauser, An- 
thony Chen, and Diego Cisneros. 






'^-^Sl 






Officers of the Graduate Nurses' Sodality, meeting with members in the 
Intown Center, are Prefect Catherine McDonough (first row, fourth from 



right) and Treasurer Alice Simond (first row, third from right). 





Fr. Devine, S.J. emphasizes a point to the Sodality Council. 



The Blessed Mother is the patroness 
of the sodalities. 




Governments 




Shown at one of their weekly meetings with their moderator Mr. Weston 
Jenks, the members of the Student Senate of the College of Arts and 
Science are (seated) John O'Connor, Cole Flaherty, Frank Martin, Bill 



Friary (standing) Jerry Dalton, Kevin Byrne, Mike Morelli, Pete Mc- 
Laughlin, and Maurice Lapierre. 



The A&S Student Senate sponsored the first U.S. speaking 
engagement of the former prime minister of Great Britain, 
Clement Attlee. 




Three distinct types of individuals are attracted to the 
Student Government. The first are those who run for 
office to improve their college records, to make more 
friends, to gain experience in dealing with people, or to 
gain some other such advantage. Their motives differ, 
their only common quality being that not one of them has 
any intention of actually governing the class. They are 
popular, well-liked people, and good representatives of 
the student body. This type constitutes the majority of 
the government. 

The second type of officer is the deliberate and deter- 
mined leader, the future politician or senior executive. 
These students are officers simply because it is natural to 
them to want to govern, to attend to the endless details 
of office, and to make their lives a series of meetings and 
conferences. These are not so numerous as the first type, 
but their presence is felt much more strongly. 

Thirdly, there are those who, whatever their other 
motives, are officers primarily because they want to have 
a better class and a better university, and they think that 
they can best contribute to this through the government. 



They are the ideahsts and, as in any phase of Hfe, they 
constitute the smallest group — and the most dangerous. 

Each of these types influences the government in a dif- 
ferent direction and acts as a check on the others, giving 
to the system a certain stability. Sometimes, however, an 
imbalance makes the check a checkmate, and the govern- 
ment becomes not stable but stagnant. The reorganization 
of the Student Government on the main campus three 
years ago made its structure so complex that for a time 
such imbalances were hard to avoid, and for two years the 
government was so stable that it was difficult to detect 
any signs of life. 

The reorganization changed the government from a 
single twenty-four man council to a system which pro- 
vided for a Student Senate in each of the colleges and a 
University Council elected from these senates. Much of 
the difficulty in effecting this transition was centered 
around the relative powers of the senates and the Uni- 
versity Council, some claiming that the council should be 
the chief ruling body, others arguing that it should be only 
a co-ordinating or unifying body. 

This year saw the final approval of the constitutions 
of the senates and of the council on terms which were a 
compromise between the two extreme positions. How- 
ever, in the great discussion concerning the distribution 
of power, the fact was overlooked that there was, for all 
practical purposes, no power to distribute. The constitu- 
tions of both the old government and the new were so 




Secretary of Labor James Mitchell visited the Uni- 
versity under the auspices of the CBA Student 
Senate. 



Fr. Joyce, S.J. and Dean White meet with the members of the Student 
Senate of the College of Business Administration, Al Wisialko, Jim 
Cotter, Joe Lucas, Pete Derba, (standing) Bob Derba, Bill Connell, 



Walter O'Leary, Tom Murray, Mario DeBelardino, Frank Kelley, 
Robert Whitten, James Tonra, Matt Connelly, Bob Kelly, and 
Richard Harrington. 







Members of the Student Senate of the School of Education are (seated) 
Jim Russell, John Paris, Qaire O'Toole, Paul Harrington, Brenda Jack- 
son, Paul MacArthur, (standing) Edmund Madden, Pat Kenney, Judy 



Scalzi, Ann Kicin, Margaret Doyle, Donna Lee Mason, Fr. Donovan, 
S.J., moderator, Janet Davis, Mary Busalacchi, Gerry Dyer, and John 
Barclay. 



Senior co-eds form front line in the skit, "Ah 
So!", during the School of Ed's Inter-Class 
Skit Competition, sponsored by the Student 
Senate. 




224 



worded that their proper spheres of activity were only out- 
lined in principle. Thus, the government would in practice 
have only as much power as its members had the initiative 
to secure from the University administration or from the 
other student groups. 

Attempts were made this year by some of the idealists 
to bring the government into a real governing role. In the 
Student Senates and in the Campus Council these at- 
tempts met with opposition on the part of the more prac- 
tical minded and with indifference from the less enthusi- 
astic. It seemed to be the consensus of opinion among 
both the students and the administration that until the 
government passes the experimental or transitional stage 
and becomes established on a firmer foundation it should 
restrict its areas of activity. 

Thus the government was not really a government but 
operated almost exclusively as a spokesman for the stu- 
dent body, as a liaison between students and administra- 
tion, and as a quasi-service organization. It had little to 
do with the organization or direction of extracurricular 



activities and nothing at all to do with disciphnary prob- 
lems. But the politicians and the pragmatists, once they 
had a framework within which to work, began to make 
real progress in those areas which they considered their 
province. 

The Campus Council initiated a nine point program to 
benefit the University academically, socially, and cultur- 
ally. Among its plans were the establishment of a com- 
mittee to bring more foreign students to campus, the 
granting of assistance to the Admissions office in the pro- 
curing of superior students, the founding of annual awards 
for the most outstanding member of the faculty and the 
most deserving alumnus, the encouraging of academic 
awards for underclassmen, and the organizing of mixer 
dances with neighboring colleges. 

The senates of the three colleges spent much time dis- 
cussing the various problems peculiar to them and they 
continued such programs as freshman orientation and 
student awards. Each of the senates spent the greater part 
of its productive energy on the sponsoring of a single 




The Graduate Nurses' Student Faculty Organization checks the weekly report. At the head of the table 
the officers presiding are Helen Curtin, Vice President; Marie Keaveney, President; Mrs. Marie An- 
drews, Faculty Advisor, and Kathleen Kirkpatrick, Treasurer. 



225 




project. In the College of Arts and Sciences this was a 
lecture by former Prime Minister, Earl Attlee; in the Col- 
lege of Business Administration, The Sullivan Award 
Banquet; and in the School of Education, the inter-class 
skit competition. 

These events and the way in which they were organized 
reflect to some extent the prevailing attitudes of the three 
colleges toward their role in the governmental structure. 
The Attlee lecture was little distinguishable from a Uni- 
versity event, being concerned with a topic of general 
interest and intended to attract students from all the col- 
leges as well as many people from outside the University. 
The Sullivan Award was more specifically a CBA func- 
tion, and the School of Ed skits were also of rather limited 
interest. The reason for this difference is that the A&S 
officers more often looked at the role of government from 
the university viewpoint, and it was there that the idealists 
and visionaries predominated, those who tried to develop 
the government into a strong, active, and powerful force 
taking in the whole University, while those from CBA and 
the School of Ed were more concerned with the accom- 
plishments that they could effect on the college level. 

The most active and best organized branch of the 
government, and the only one which in fact really is a 
government is the Basic Nurses' Council. The small size 
of the Nursing School allows close contact among the 
students and between the students and the faculty, so that 
it avoided many of the problems faced by the larger col- 



The officers of the Senior Class of the Intown Col- 
lege are (seated) John Donoghue, President; Dolores 
Eraser, Secretary, (standing) Robert Burne, Vice 
President, and John Ruck, Treasurer. 



The profs meet their new students during orientation night, sponsored by 
the Intown Student Council. 



leges. Thus its student council is able to control extra- 
curricular activities, regulate student funds, and through 
the Honor Board enact disciplinary measures. In addi- 
tion to this, the council performs such other functions as 
running social events and promoting better relationships 
between students and administration. 

The governments of the Graduate Nursing School and 
the Intown College are similar in form to that of the 
Basic Nursing School, but in scope of activity they are 
not so exceptional. Like the governments on campus, their 
chief function is the bettering of the social and cultural 
life of the students and the promoting of understanding 
between the school and the students. 



226 



f4 






Fr. Gorman, S.J. meets with the officers of the Basic Nurses' Student 
Council, (seated) Doris Hand, Vice-President; Mary Jane Gibbons, 
President; Martha Cadigan, Treasurer, (standing) Marcia Fenlon, Cor- 

Much of the activity of the government takes place on 
the class level rather than within any one college. The 
chief function of the class councils is the planning of the 
social life of the campus. This involves the running of 
dances, proms, and such special events as Junior and 
Senior Week. The most outstanding accomplishment in 
this area was the establishment by the senior class of an 
interview system for selecting the chairmen and com- 
mittees of the various social events. This eliminated purely 
political appointments and increased the likelihood that 
the most qualified men would be chosen. 



responding Secretary; Marie Mooney, Corresponding Secretary, and 
Louise Comeau, Recording Secretary. 



The proper role and specific functions of each depart- 
ment of the Student Government will not be settled for 
many years, for the continued change and development 
of the University will permit no facile solution. The in- 
crease in the number of resident students, the presence of 
the Nursing School on the main campus, and the growing 
need for co-ordination and order on the extracurricular 
scene are all factors which will have an effect on the 
government. The nature of this effect will depend largely 
on the groundwork laid by those who were officers this 
year. 




The Father-Daughter Tea, sponsored by the Student Council, gave the 
nurses' fathers a chance to meet one another and become acquainted with 
the school. 



227 




Explaining to Fr. Donovan, S.J. the revisions in their constitution, the members of the Campus Council 
are Brenda Jackson, Maurice Lapierre, Peter Derba, Frank Martin, and Paul MacArthur. 



Officers of the Senior Class are, (seated) Joe Lucas, Pete Derba, Tom Murray, Pete McLaughlin, 
(standing) Maurice Lapierre, Frank Martin, Claire O'Toole, Brenda Jackson, Paul Harrington, 
and John Paris. 




228 




Organizations 




C. Alexander Peloquin directs a rehearsal of the senior members of 
the Men's Glee Club, (front row) John Nolan, Ken Samu, Joe Calla- 
han, Frank Collins, Dan Feeney, Joe Hagan, Bob Churchville, Vice- 
President; Jerry Delaney, Treasurer; Ed Shaughnessy, President, 
(middle row) Jim Chambliss, Dave Brauer, Jim Butler, Jack Drum- 



mey. Bill York, Frank Smith, Charlie McCullagh, (back row) Dick 
Murphy, Kevin Hayes, Senior Manager; Jim Marriman, Tom 
Whalen, Jay Sullivan, Jack O'Leary, Jim Healy, Frank Lane, Jack 
Dempsey, and Maurice Lapierre. 



Musical 



The Glee Club was featured at the premiere of Jean Langlais 
in Symphony Hall. 



Music has been part of education for thousands of 
years. Whether as a cultural influence or mathematical 
training, it has been, since the establishment of the 
trivium and quadrivium, closely associated with the uni- 
versity. The modern college and university have continued 
the tradition of their predecessors, but with a somewhat 
different emphasis, including in their curriculum such di- 
verse forms of music as Gregorian chant and jazz and 
giving rise to every type of musical group from string 
quartet to barbershop quartet. 

Music was one of the first courses offered by the fledg- 
ling Boston College ninety-six years ago, but it is found 
in the University today primarily outside the curriculum 
in the form of musical clubs, the three glee clubs and the 
band. 

The Boston College Glee Club is recognized as one of 
the twenty best such organizations in the country. It dif- 
fers from most college glee clubs not only in proficiency 
but also in the nature and scope of its repertoire. Its 
selections consist principally in modern Church music 
and in a revival of the best in traditional Church music. 
They include also a number of operatic choruses, songs 
from Broadway productions, folk music, both American 
and European, and the works of contemporary American 
composers such as Marshall Thompson and Paul Creston. 
Among the Church music included in its repertoire is the 
Mass in C Minor, an original work by Mr. Peloquin. 



230 





Elaine Guissler leads a rehearsal of the Basic Nurses' Glee Club. Around the piano are Lorraine Bon- 
vouloir, Barbara Cartnik, Mary Mullins, Elizabeth Powers, Beatrice Rae, Patricia Rae, Nancy Holmes, 
Mary Ann Lynd, Mary Caskin, Arlene Babeau, Helen O'Regan, Katherine Vierra, and Josephine Ryan. 



Clubs 




The public concerts by the glee club were this year 
more numerous and more widespread geographically 
than they have been in the past, giving evidence not only 
of the growing reputation of the group but also of the 
increased enthusiasm of its members. In addition to two 
concerts at Symphony Hall, a joint concert at Jordan Hall 
with Emmanuel College and Newton College of the 
Sacred Heart, and the annual Home Concert, the Glee 
Club for the first time conducted two concert tours out- 
side the state, giving performances in the New York, 
Washington, and Philadelphia areas. 

Providing an opportunity for the co-ed songsters, the 
Women's Glee Club and the Basic Nurses' Glee Club 
make no pretense at rivaling their male counterpart. Both 
clubs exist chiefly to benefit their own members and to 
provide entertainment for some of the social events of the 
School of Education or the School of Nursing. That there 
is no lack of talent in these groups was proved by the 
fact that they won both first and second prizes at the first 
annual Christmas Sing Contest. 

To the student body the most famihar of the musical 
clubs is the band. Throughout the football season the 
sixty-five man band performed at every game and rally, 
and during the winter it continued to provide music for 
both basketball and hockey games. Combined with the 
ROTC last year, the band often appeared in military dress 
as the B.C. Marching Band, and was featured at the 



231 



l-'^SV, 




Members of the Women's Glee Club of the School of Education 
pose with their moderator, Miss Olga Stone. Around the piano 



are Gerry Steele, Miss Stone, Fran Bessom, Ann Fagan, Elaine 
Estherhill, Anne Faria, Diane Carney, and Martha Zimmerman. 



The Glee Club received the commendation of Cardinals Cushing 
and Spellman at the academic convocation. 



232 




spring and fall reviews. Although some of its demonstra- 
tions were colorless, on occasion the band could demon- 
strate almost professional polish. Its highlights were the 
jazz show during the B.U. game, which won raves from 
the opposition newspaper, and the halftime demonstra- 
tion during the nationally televised Holy Cross game, 
which combined the hit songs from Broadway shows with 
appropriate formations. 

Public acclaim and recognition of the band's ability 
came in the form of invitations to march in parades in 
several of the surrounding communities. The band ac- 
cepted whenever possible and made appearances in Walt- 
ham and Quincy. The climax of the year was its partici- 
pation in the annual St. Patrick's Day parade in New 
York City, the second consecutive year that the band 
received this honor. 

One of the more unexpected and best received contri- 
butions of the band to the student body was the sponsor- 
ing of a jazz concert, featuring Herb Pomeroy and Fr. 
Norman O'Connor. Combining selections by the band 
with comments by "the jazz priest," the concert was 
culturally and socially one of the high points of the year 
and a happy omen of better things to come. 




The band provides entertainment between the periods at the Beanpot Tournament in Boston Garden. 



The B.C. Marching Band performs at Alumni Stadium. 




J" y y / •.-'>' 






^ 






Dramatic Society 



The DS rehearses for the One-Act Play Festival. 



Brian McNifT and George Holland seem to enjoy EUie Radzwill's 
disapproval of the scripts for the One-Act Play Festival. 




The Dramatic Society, together with the Stylus and 
one or two other organizations, serves as a gathering place 
for the campus beatniks, bohemians, and extroverts. 
These people give the DS a color and spirit that dis- 
tinguishes it from most other campus organizations. 
While much of this spirit is rebellion and escapism, a great 
deal more is true creativity. The Dramatic Society both 
naturally and deliberately seeks to develop a creative 
atmosphere, and this is undoubtedly its most valuable 
quality. For among those who are drawn to it are some 
truly talented students, and these find there the encour- 
agement, the opportunity, and above all the freedom to 
experiment with and increase their talents, whether they 
be in acting, directing, production, costuming or writing. 

Although its spirit was no less than in the past, the DS 
began this year at a disadvantage, having to contend with 
a number of limitations, not the least of which was the 
lack of proper facihties, including a real stage, and the 
loss through graduation of some of its more capable 
performers. For their first production, the thespians pre- 
sented Ondine, a play which made demands both technical 



and artistic that could not be met. That Ondine was, in 
the face of this, a qualified success is a tribute to the pains- 
taking efforts on the part of the cast and to the technical 
artistry of the brothers Hermans. 

The high point of the year for the Dramatic Society was 
the annual One-Act Play Festival. An increasingly ambi- 
tious and successful part of the society's regular program 
for the past few years, the festival presents plays that are 
entirely original — written, directed, produced, and acted 
by students. Such an endeavor allows for an almost un- 
limited amount of creative work on the part of the mem- 
bers, and thus draws on that resource they most abun- 
dantly possess. 

There were in each of these plays a number of tech- 
nical flaws, but more than compensating for this was the 
freshness of approach in the entire production and the 
spirit of independence of everyone connected with it. The 
contribution which it made to the University far exceeded 
those of other organizations which produced more pro- 
fessional but less challenging pieces of work. 



Gene Mulchahy cross-examines Fran Bessom 
in scene from Ondine. 




The Cast of Ondine included (first row) Leo Kearney, Carolyn 
Whitaker, Carol Giblin, Jack Czismar, Mary Farrey, George Hol- 
land, President; Larry Gleason, Eleanor Radzwill, Brian McNiflf, 



(second row) Lorraine Cassidy, Gene Mulchahy, Fran Bessom, 
Pauline Mathieu, (third row) Jim O'Heam, Jim Toomey, Carolyn 
Duffy, (fourth row) Kevin Byrne, and Maureen O'Brien. 




235 



Gold Key 





Shown on the steps of Lyons Hall with their moderator, Fr. McCarthy, S.J. are keyholders Jack Wise- 
man, President; Frank Martin, Vice-President; Ralph Benware, Secretary; Jack Crimmings, Jack 
Canavan, (second row) Jerry McElaney, Treasurer; Jack Donahue, Paul Broughton, Peter Quinn, Bill 
Keough, (third row) Leo Schofield, and Bob Quinn. 

The seniors who received gold keys at the annual cotillion were Joe Gilligan, Joe Sayers, Bill Sherman, 
George O'Brien, John O'Connor, Ray Asselin, Tom Beatty, and Bob Collini. 



236 





Fifty members and their dates attended the Gold Key Cotillion 
in Alumni Hall. 




The Gold Key Society is probably the best known and 
the most misunderstood of all the major student organi- 
zations. There are few who have not formed some opinion 
on it, but fewer still who have any accurate idea of what 
it is really like. It is variously thought of as being an honor 
society, a political bloc, a social fraternity, or a group of 
idealistic public servants. Much of this confusion is due 
to the fact that each year the nature of the society depends 
to a great degree on the interests and desires of those who 
control it. Thus the extent to which it honors its motto, 
"Service and Sacrifice," can vary greatly from one year 
to the next. 

Officially it exists to assist the University in the manage- 
ment of non-academic functions for which University 
faculties are not sufficient. In practice this amounts to 
two chief functions, the granting of money to organiza- 
tions and projects which need it and can obtain it from 
no other source, and the contributing of organizational 
ability and other services to any University sponsored 
function which requires them. 

During this year the Key played an important part in 
the freshman orientation programs, supplied ushers for 
football games and other University events, such as the 
convocation for Cardinal Spellman and the Citizen 
Seminars, organized rallies and dances, and served as 
hosts to rival football teams and visitors to conventions. 
With the money which the society raised by means of its 
dances and other activities it sponsored the annual tea for 
the President of the University and all organization presi- 
dents, contributed jackets to the football team, and sup- 
ported partially or fully the special projects of a number 
of insolvent clubs. 

In an organization of this type a closeness almost neces- 
sarily develops among the members, for this is a by-prod- 
uct of continued and extensive co-operation on a variety 
of projects. Also the fact that many of its services require 
the granting of certain privileges serves to band the group 
together in the same manner as a fraternity. For this the 
Key is criticized by some who feel it has become a sort of 
favored clique; yet it is actually one of the most demo- 
cratic of all the campus organizations. Membership is 
open to anyone wishing to join (except co-eds), and active 
members have seldom failed to be chosen as keyholders. 



Jack Wiseman presents the first annual Gold Key award to 
Ray Asselin. 




The Key sponsored the Holy Cross rally and float parade. 




Enjoying conversation at the Tarn are Gold Key officers Jerry 
McElaney, Jack Wiseman, Frank Martin, and Ralph Benware. 



237 



An additional criticism of the Gold Key in the past has 
been that it seemed to be serving its own ends rather than 
accepting its responsibilities as a service organization. 
This year the almost total absence of this type of criticism 
testifies to the conscientious observance of the society's 
motto on the part of President Jack Wiseman and the 
other officers and keyholders. The line between perform- 
ing service and usurping powers is a thin one, but the Key 
walked it well. 

Fn addition to the Gold Key, there are other, smaller 
service organizations with more limited functions. The 
Women's Council, which serves as an advisory board for 
the Dean of Women of the School of Education, is com- 
posed of two members elected from each class. It meets 
monthly to discuss problems, suggestions, and policies 
pertinent to the school's women students. The Council 
sponsors the Junior-Freshman Sister Program, as an ex- 
tension of the orientation program. Council members 
also serve as the official hostesses for all of the school's 
receptions and conferences, and for many other univer- 
sity events. Annually, its main social activity is the Winter 
Barn Dance. 

The Dormitory Council serves as the spokesman and 
co-ordinator of the growing campus population. It rep- 



resents the resident students before the administration, 
organizes such events as rallies, dances, and banquets, 
and assists in the orientation of the Freshman. One of its 
more ambitious projects of the past year; and one of the 
most worthwhile innovations in many years, was the pub- 
lication of The Eagle's Handbook, a forty page booklet 
describing the University, explaining its history, and giv- 
ing a resume of extracurricular and social opportunities 
both on campus and in Boston. 

A different type of service organization is the campus 
NFCCS unit. While each student is considered a member 
of the National Federation of Catholic College Students, 
active membership in the committee has been minimal in 
recent years. As the purpose of the group is to implement 
national and regional programs of the Federation on 
campus, to co-ordinate the activity of the student body 
with that of the National Federation, and to plan and 
direct such activity, its potential influence in student cir- 
cles is great, but it has yet to be realized. 

Twice during the year the unit sponsored seminars for 
the presidents of all the extracurricular organizations on 
campus. The purpose of these was to provide a forum at 
which the presidents could discuss and try to find solu- 
tions to the problems which affected their clubs indi- 



Women's Council 




The members of the Women's CouncU of 
the School of Education, shown with their 
moderator, Miss Mary Kinnane, Dean of 
Women (seated center), are (seated) 
Sheila Nugent, Secretary; Karen Moni- 
han, Vice-President; Jeanne McGuiggin, 
President; Carol Green, Treasurer, 
(standing) Nancy Bonnazolli, Alice Mc- 
Donough, Anne Madigan, and Mary Mc- 
Crohan. 



238 




vidually and jointly. The project was hampered initially 
by a half-hearted response on the part of the presidents, 
and both meetings dissolved into criticism without con- 
structive suggestions. The unit also conducted publicity 
campaigns in connection with National CYO Week and 
the NFCCS Travel Bureau. 

The service organizations are unique among student 
groups in that they offer little or no benefit to the indi- 
vidual member in the same way that the publications or 
academic clubs can offer a practical training or an in- 
crease in knowledge. They offer only a chance to work for 
the rest of the student body or for the University. The 
existence of four such organizations on the campus indi- 
cates that there are some students who feel that this is an 
activity that is not without a benefit of its own. 



Tom Tanous, Ernie Ferneau (seated), John Donovan, Brenda 
Crowley, Brian Moran, Mary Hines, Joe Wallcer, and Bob 
Cellini, delegates to the N.F.C.C.S., pose during a discussion of 
plans for their regional meeting. 



N.F.C.C.S. 



Dormitory Council 



The Dormitory Council members, shown in O'Connell Hall, are 
(seated) Jim Johnston, Bob Hart, Treasurer; Bill Fawcett, Presi- 
dent; Bill Shanahan, Vice-President; John Irwin, Secretary; Joe 



McGuill, (standing) Paul Mahoney, Bob Vermette, Ray Asselin, 
Vin Sylvia, Joe Wall, and Jim McHugh. 




239 




English Academy 



Considering topics for their next meeting are the officers of the 
English Academy, Brian McNiff, President; Mary Watts, Secretary- 
Treasurer, and Bill Sullivan, Vice-President. 



Historical Society 



Learning is essentially a very lonely activity. By far the 
largest part of the learning process occurs away from the 
classroom, the lecture hall, and the discussion group, and 
involves a man alone with himself, thinking, reading and 
reflecting. But as man is a social being and the college 
student the most social of all men, this particular aspect 
of learning is foreign to him, and he feels a need to temper 
it, to make the process more palatable to himself. This he 
accomphshes by means of the academic clubs. 

These organizations provide an opportunity for fuller 
or freer discussion of topics covered by the curriculum 
and for investigation of topics outside the scope of the 
course matter. They permit a deeper and a wider under- 
standing in a particular field, and complement, modify or 
contradict what is learned in classes and lectures. If cor- 
rectly organized and directed, academic clubs achieve 
more completely than any other element of the university 
that ideal of education, the free interchange of ideas. 

With the exception of some of the newer departments, 
such as Geology and Fine Arts, some of the smaller ones, 
such as Sociology, and, inexplicably, the Department of 
Theology, each field of study in the curriculum is repre- 
sented by some sort of academy, society or club. A 
realistic appraisal shows these organizations to vary 
widely in both purpose and format, some being almost 
exclusively social while others offer truly challenging and 
ambitious programs designed only for students capable 
of high caliber independent work. 



The Officers of the Historical Society, Sam Scott, President; John 
Lane, Secretary, and Joseph Gilligan, Treasurer, are shown with 
their moderator, Dr. Thomas O'Connor. 



The distinction between academies, societies, and clubs 
or circles is no longer preserved, and the titles are used 
indiscriminately. Traditionally an academy is composed 
of superior students who are seeking to achieve a degree 
of excellence greater than that sought by the university 
as a whole; societies and clubs hold title to no such lofty 



240 



aims. In practice there are societies, clubs, and other 
similar groups which in academic standards and intel- 
lectual stimulus far outrank some of the academies. 

Most of the academic organizations contribute little 
to the University at large but rather concentrate on their 
own members. This is to some extent necessary because 
of the specialized interests of each group, but the few 
exceptions — such as public academic specimens or foreign 
language plays have shown that such attempts are neither 
impossible nor without merit. The chief value to the Uni- 
versity community of these groups is that they provide a 
continual flow of speakers on a wide variety of topics. 
Unfortunately, the rather small size of most of the clubs 
limits the number of speakers, especially outstanding 
speakers, so that some of the talks turn out to be dull, 
trivial, or repetitious of one another. In spite of their 
shortcomings, these organizations provide a service in- 
valuable to an institution dedicated to the dissemination 
and cultivation of thought. 

The newest and in many ways the most ambitious of 
the academic groups is the English Academy. Established 
early this year, it is an academy in the traditional sense, 
being limited to a maximum of thirty of the leading 
Enghsh majors from both senior and juniors year. Its pro- 
grams have consisted of lectures or seminars by faculty 
members, original papers by students, and talks by in- 
vited guests; they have covered a wide range of topics 



Carleton Hayes receives honorory membership in tlie Historical So- 
ciety from President Sam Scott as Professor O'Connor looks on. 





The members of the Aquinas Circle await the arrival of their guest 
speaker, Fr. Currier-Aphonso, S.J. 



Aquinas Circle 



from "The New Critics" to "Existentialism" and from 
"Poetic Enthusiasm in Plato" to "Architecture in Mil- 
ton." Student participation was stressed in every type of 
program and each meeting concluded with an informal 
discussion period in which both students and faculty 
members freely and often heatedly exchanged opinions. 
This bringing together of students and professors on an 
equal basis in an atmosphere conducive to informal dis- 
cussion has been one of the most significant accomplish- 
ments of the English Academy. 

The chief practical distinction between the English 
Academy and other academic clubs was the demands 
which it made upon its members. For each meeting, re- 
gardless of topic or format, every member was expected 
to be adequately prepared and able to engage in a general 
discussion. By contrast, the majority of the clubs required 
only passive participation such as attendance at meetings 
and lectures and payment of dues. 

Combining both these types of organizations was the 
Historical Society. Open to all interested in the problems 
of historical research, this society boasted a membership 
of over seventy, and some of its meetings drew an audi- 
ence of two hundred. These, however, were predominantly 
members who attended meetings only to hear such talks 
as that by Prof. Carleton Hayes on "The Making of an 
Historian." To separate the real core of the membership 



241 



from the rest of the club the society inaugurated a policy 
of awarding pins to those who participated most actively 
in its programs. 

The programs which called for student participation 
were seminars, panel discussions, and the reading of stu- 
dent research papers. Independent work was required for 
all meetings of this type, and the quality of the perform- 
ances compared favorably with those of similar organi- 
zations. 

The Aquinas Circle, although allowing less active par- 
ticipation than many of the other academic clubs, gives 
the interested student an opportunity to pursue the study 
of philosophy in a broader manner than is possible within 
the confines of the curriculum. The circle remained a 
rather loosely organized group, and in place of regular 
meetings substituted a series of ten open lectures, entitled 
"An Introduction to Indian Philosophy" by Fr. John 
Curreia-Afonso, S.J. of Bombay. 

The presentation of so extensive a series of lectures was 
a departure from the usual thirty to fifty minute single 
appearance of most speakers. Fr. Curreia-Afonso was 
able to examine not just one facet of Indian philosophy 
or give the barest outline of what is the longest con- 
tinuous development of speculation in the world, but he 
discussed in detail such considerations as the lack of ap- 
preciation of Indian culture in the United States, the his- 
torical importance of Indian thought, the function of 
philosophical understanding as a basis for political unity. 



World Relations League 




Posing with their moderator, Dr. Allman, are the officers of the World Rela- 
tions League, Joe Corcoran, President; Sam Scott, Vice-President; Tom 
Hughes, Secretary, and Dick Regan, Treasurer. 



Bellarmine Law and 
Government Academy 

Doing research for the next meeting of the Bellarmine Law and Government 
Academy are Ed Shaughnessy, President; Paul Woelfel, Treasurer, and 
John Wall, Vice-President. 



242 




the nature of Indian democracy and neutralism, and the 
role of the spiritual values and non-violence of Indian 
philosophy in the international relations of that country. 
That the lectures did not draw larger crowds was due more 
to schedule conflicts than to a lack of interest. 

Concentrating exclusively on current problems and 
more familiar areas of study are the Bellarmine Law and 
Government Academy and the World Relations League. 
Although the spheres of concentration of each are dif- 
ferent, they are alike in that both seek to bring to the 
campus the thoughts and views of contemporary authori- 
ties in government and allied areas. Recognizing the 
dangers of a passive attitude toward present world affairs, 
both organizations have as goals the creation of an 
awareness on the part of the student body of either na- 
tional or international problems and the encouragement 
of careers in fields related to them. 

The scope of the Bellarmine Academy's interests was 
usually restricted to the national or even the local scene. 
Its meetings this year consisted almost entirely of informal 
talks by representatives of public administration, jour- 
nalism, pressure groups, politics, law, town government, 
law enforcement, and civil service. Drawing primarily on 
Boston and surrounding communities for speakers, the 
academy did not neglect the talent available on our own 
campus; one of its best attended meetings featured Fr. 
Robert Drinan, S.J., Dean of the Boston College Law 
School, who discussed the latest developments in the civil 



rights dispute from the standpoint of legal jurisprudence. 
Most of the speakers concentrated less on specific prob- 
lems than on the opportunities and positions available to 
college graduates, answering any questions in this regard 
which members posed. 

Spanning a wider area of investigation, the World Re- 
lations League had less opportunity than its sister organi- 
zation to hear from qualified experts. However, it capi- 
talized on this limitation by adopting the panel discussion 
as its usual format. Thus, by doing research themselves 
and acquiring knowledge through their own eff"orts rather 
than through lectures, the members developed a more 
active interest in world affairs and a more thorough under- 
standing of them. Taking its topics from the front pages 
and editorial columns of the daily newspapers, the league 
presented discussions of such problems as the defense of 
the offshore islands of Matsu and Quemoy and the ad- 
mission of Red China to the U.N. To provide a change 
of pace from these programs it occasionally sponsored 
lectures by authorities in international affairs, such as the 
German consul, Dr. Paul Lange, who discussed the 
post-war progress and future economic plans of his 
country. 



Representing no department and strictly speaking not 
an academic club, the Writers' Workshop in aims, format, 
and achievement far exceeds some of the academies. Re- 
organized and revitalized this year under the direction 
of Dr. Leonard Casper, a young prize-winning short story 
writer and member of the English faculty, the workshop 
demands constant active participation on the part of all 
members, both in the writing of original stories and plays 
and in the criticising of those written by others. It is 
unique among student clubs in that it has no officers, no 
formal rules, and no social events. Its sole purpose is to 
produce writers. This is does by the simple techniques of 
bringing together those students who evidence an in- 
terest and talent in writing, in order that they might 
mutually criticise and evaluate their efforts under profes- 
sional guidance. 

The number of students in the workshop is small and 
will probably remain so. For Professor Casper hmits the 
group to students who on the basis of past efforts seem 
most able to engage in independent and serious work. 
Thus he is able to examine the manuscripts of each mem- 
ber thoroughly, giving personal advice and direction in 
this essentially unteachable art. 



Writers' Workshop 



Professor Casper introduces a new play to the members of the Writers' Workshop, Ron Mclntyre, Bob 
Duggan, Hal Swanson, Ann Hilferty, George Cernada, Pat Thompson, and Ed Gallagher. 




243 




French 
Academy 




President Don Delisle discusses tlie text of a 
French play with Treasurer Alice Kaiko, Vice- 
President Dave Bailey, and Secretary Mary 
Hines. 



German Academy 




The officers of the German Academy Charles Grinnell, 
President; Mike Carney, Vice-President; John Beni- 
detto. Secretary; Bill Armstrong, Treasurer, meet with 
their moderator, Mr. Cahill, to plan agenda for the year. 




Placing less emphasis on scholarship than many of the 
other academic clubs, perhaps because of their greater 
potential for exploiting the social and cultural aspects of 
their subjects, the language academies presented a variety 
of interesting although unchallenging programs designed 
to supplement the foreign language curriculum. The pur- 
pose of these groups was to foster in the language student 
a broader understanding of the nation whose tongue he 
was studying and to increase his perspective of the his- 
torical and semantic development of the language itself. 

In practice the format of the clubs was less imposing 
than this statement of purpose suggests, and many of 



their activities were as much social as educational. The 
Italian Academy combined pizza parties with its films 
and lectures, while the Cercle Francais ended its year with 
a banquet at a local French restaurant, and the German 
Academy featured at its annual Christmas party the 
holiday customs of Austria. 

The regular meetings of the clubs covered a wide range 
of topics and included many different formats: animated 
readings of Moliere, slide lectures on the Italian country- 
side, talks on German economics, French government, 
and Italian politics, recordings of the works of Puccini, 
and discussions of various aspects of Spanish life in the 



244 



language of that country. Travelogues and feature films 
were presented by all the clubs. 

One of the more ambitious endeavors of the language 
academies was presentation by the Cercle Francais of two 
modern French comedies, La Paiz chez soi and La Poudre 
aux yeux. Directed by the club's moderator, Dr. Bene- 
detto Fabrizi, the plays were produced and acted by stu- 
dents. Although the unfamiliarity of the group with stage 
techniques detracted somewhat from the production, the 
novelty of the idea, the humor of the plays themselves 
and the enthusiasm of the group was sufficient to carry 
the night. 

On the fringe of the academic clubs, affiliated with no 
course in the curriculum but functioning along the same 
lines as those that are, the Blessed Oliver Plunkett Gaelic 
Culture Society and the Young Democrats Club are not, 
as has been suggested, synonymous. 

Whatever conclusions may be drawn from the fact. 
Blessed Oliver Plunkett is the largest of all student organi- 
zations. Boasting over three hundred members, BOP, 
with no scholarly pretensions, has as its purpose the 
popularization and enjoyment of the best in Irish cus- 
toms, songs, and dances. Throughout the year the club 
presents guest speakers, who discuss various phases of 
Irish life and history. The moderator. Father Martin 
Harney, S.J., often presents slide lectures on his favorite 
subject, Ireland. 




The officers of the Italian Academy, Tom Cibotti, Treasurer; 
Dolores Franchiossi, Secretary; Al Fiona, President, and Phil 
Puccia, Vice-President, malce preparations for their next meeting. 

Italian Academy 



Spanish Academy 





The officers of the Spanish Academy are Martha 
Zimmerman, Recording Secretary; Pete Delmonico, 
President; Claire O'Toole, Corresponding Secre- 
tary, (standing) Bob CoUini, Vice-President, and 
Joe Gilligan, Treasurer. 



245 



Blessed Oliver 
Plunkett Society 





Fr. Martin Harney, S.J. casts a critical eye on the financial statement of the Blessed Oliver 
Plunkett Society, but his displeasure is not shared by officers Marie Plunkett, Margie 
Lally, Terry Malloy, Tom Cummings, and President Jim Madden. 



Young Democrats Club 

The political situation in Ward 16 is discussed by the offlcers of 
the Young Democrats Club, Pat Thompson, Henry Remette, and 
Marty Nolan. 




In the social vein the BOP sponsors Irish folk dancing 
classes, and its choral group speciahzes in the traditional 
ballads associated with the Emerald Isle. The culmination 
of this preparation of songs and dances are the two annual 
Ceilidhes, old-fashioned Irish parties which feature reels, 
jigs, demonstration step-dancing, group singing, and, for 
refreshments, tea and Irish bread. 

Some Irishmen are interested more in the practical ac- 
complishments of the sons of Erin in America than they 
are in the culture and customs of their native soil. A few 
of this variety banded together three years ago to estab- 
lish the Young Democrats Club. But as the fortunes of 
the party rose, those of the club declined, so that the 
Democratic sweep in November found it almost totally 
inactive. During its brief history the club presented a few 
excellent speakers, many good ones, and a couple of mis- 
takes, with attendance at the meetings being usually 
proportionate to the quality of the speaker. Thus, while 
there was no great excitement on the part of the students, 
there was at least sufficient interest to maintain the 
organization. 



That the YDC floundered was due principally to poor 
management. Meetings were scheduled irregularly and 
often with little advance notice, and little imagination 
was shown in their planning. This year the club began with 
a few sparsely attended lectures, then late in the fall 
quietly ceased to operate. 

Much less quiet was the inauguration of the Young 
Republicans Club, with posters and front page news 
stories in The Heights announcing the event. More sub- 
dued was the dissolvment of the club a few weeks later. 
Behaving like the opposition, the Republicans began their 
activities with an intra-club dispute that split those who 
attended the organizational meeting and prevented even 
the election of officers. It seems that what the University 
lacks is not political interest but politicians. 

Supplementing the science curriculum in the same way 
that the preceding clubs supplement the arts curriculum 
are the academies for mathematics, psychology, physics, 
chemistry, and biology. The purposes and the formats of 
these clubs vary little from one another. Each seeks to 
broaden the knowledge of its members by presenting 
material outside the scope of the curriculum, to deepen 
it by re-evaluating the course matter under different as- 
pects, and to add practical information to it by assessing 
the opportunities for employment or graduate study in 
the various sciences. Almost all the meetings of these 
clubs consist in either lectures or films. 

One of the characteristics of the science academies is 
their interest in examining the relationships between dif- 
ferent types of knowledge, and in sythesizing their own 
branch of study with another science or with philosophy 
and the arts. To this end Mr. Robert O'Malley, chairman 
of the Chemistry department, spoke to the physics society 
on "Physics and Chemistry; Partners in Science," and 
Dr. Norman Wells of the Philosophy department, as the 



Ricci Mathematics 
Academy 



guest speaker at the annual banquet of the Psychology 
Club, discussed "The History of Ideas as Applicable to 
the Psychiatrist." 

These clubs drew to a great extent on the Boston Col- 
lege faculty for their speakers, so that a professor was 
sometimes called on to speak on the same topic two or 
three times, but always under a different aspect. As most 
of the lecture meetings were partly social gatherings, the 
attendance of members of the faculty contributed to the 
breaking down of the barriers between them and the stu- 
dents. At the same time the clubs did not neglect the vast 
reservoir of scientific films available to such groups, in- 
cluding such diverse offerings as the Bell Telephone Com- 
pany's animated "Gateways of the Mind" and the clinical 
documentary, "Caesarean Section with Emergency Hy- 
sterectomy." 

The Ricci Mathematics Academy, trying to survey its 
own rapidly expanding and changing field, combined 



Psychology Club 




Father Bezuszka and Ed Keough, President of the Ricci Math 
Academy, confer with Janet Coleman, John Benedetto, and 
Charles Brusard. 




Pausing during a meeting in tlie Physics lab are (seated) Jack Cremin, 
Bernie Savage, Bill Burlie, Steve Dean, (standing) Dave Land, Joe 
Manfreda, and George Holland, members of Sigma Pi Sigma. 



Sigma 

Pi 

Sigma 




practical demonstrations with discussions of the cultural, 
historical, and philosophical background of mathematics. 
As it had less opportunity than the experimental sciences 
to utilize films, the math academy based its program en- 
tirely on lectures. Fr. Stanley Bezuszka, S.J. chairman of 
the department, reported on the new educational ap- 
proaches to the field and on their possible influence in the 
future; the less theoretical side of the program included 
an explanation of the fundamentals of electronic com- 
puters and their use in business, science, and industry, 
and a description of digital computers and their applica- 
tion to scientific computing. 



The Psychology Club instituted a series of lectures and 
films of more general appeal than those of Ricci or the 
other science academies. Including sociology and psy- 
chiatry as well as psychology in its area of investigation, 
the club capitalized on the growing interest of the layman 
in these fields and attracted over one hundred members, 
representing nearly every department of the University. 
Among the films shown at its semi-monthly meetings 
were "Feelings of Rejection" and "The Development of a 
Personality," and, extending farther into the sociological 
vein, "The Boy with a Knife." Its lectures reflected the 
same interest in the anti-social personality and the crim- 
inal offender. Mr. Francis Kelly, State Clinical Director 
of the Youth Service Board, spoke on the treatment of 
the juvenile ofi"ender, and Mr. David Kan tor, co-ordinator 
of the State Alcoholic Commission, discussed the soci- 
ological and psychological implications of the same 
subject. 

Necessarily the interest of the Psychology Club was in 
a general dissemination of basic knowledge rather than 
in extensive investigation of any particular area. Quite 
the contrary was the program followed by Sigma Pi 
Sigma. As it was not merely a club but an honor society 
for physics majors, it could presuppose a great deal more 
than the other science clubs and consequently could em- 
bark on more ambitious plans. Departing from the course 
matter more than any of the other science clubs, it en- 
gaged in discussions of the nature and the foundation of 
all science. Fr. Zeno Vendler, S.J., spoke on the phi- 
losophy of science and the chairman of the department, 
Fr. William Guindon, S.J., elaborated on the graduate 
opportunities available to physicists. 

The demands which Sigma Pi Sigma makes upon its 
members are for the most part made prior to admission. 
In addition to possessing a dean's list average in physics, 
a prospective member must submit an extensive and orig- 
inal research paper on some aspect of that science. The 
quality of these papers is usually high and many of them 
were published this year in the undergraduate science 
journal, the Cosmos. Unfortunately, once they had met 
this challenge, the members were allowed to lapse into a 
passive participation in the society's activities. 

Less selective but more active was the Mendel Club. 
In presenting a series of programs designed for the pre- 
medical students, this club drew on the ample supply of 
medical talent from the Boston area. Dr. Robert Arnot 
of St. Elizabeth's Hospital spoke on "Rehgion and Psy- 
chiatry;" Dr. John J. Sullivan of Tufts explained "The 
Clinical Program in the Medical School's Curriculum;" 
and, going farther down the byways of the profession, 
Dr. John A. McLaughlin of the Hopkins Laboratory dis- 
cussed "Dinoflaglates in the Coral Reef." Lectures of 
more immediate usefulness were concerned with opportu- 
nities for biology majors in industry and in medical and 
graduate schools. 



248 




Above the Biology department, on the top floor of 
Devlin Hall, "closest to God and farthest from the snack 
bar," are the chemistry laboratories. Here are held the 
meetings of the Chemistry Club, a professional organiza- 
tion for chemistry majors and an affiliate of the American 
Chemical Society. In so diversified a field some fimitation 
of subject matter is necessary, and the club chose to con- 
centrate on organic chemistry. A series of films dealing 
with organic laboratory techniques and lectures on that 
and similar topics by professors from the department con- 
stituted the major part of the club's program. 

In general the programs of the science clubs were less 
imaginative and less diversified than those of the non- 
scientific clubs, but they were also more consistent in 
quality more serious than the programs of their sister 
organizations. The science clubs made fewer contributions 
to the University community, but offered more personal 
gain to their members than did the clubs devoted to the 
arts. They were, as a group, the most "academic" of all 
the clubs and academies. 



Father Drury, S.J., Moderator of the Mendel Club, meets in the 
lab with officers Ed Mulligan, Leo Sullivan, Bob Richards, Joel 
Jansky, and George Litzman. 



Mendel Club 



O 




Chemical Society 

The officers of the Chemical Society, Bob Trahe, Jack Harvey, 
Joe Rajunas, Tim Parsons, and Stan Pizseczynski, meet on the 
third floor of Devlin Hall. 




249 



Alpha Kappa Psi 




The Senior members of Alpha Kappa Psi are (seated) John Boussy, 
Secretary; Jim Sullivan, Vice-President; Bill Connell, President; 
Mr. James Dunn, Moderator; Joe Leary, Treasurer; Chet Blake, 
Master of Rituals, (second row) John Christiano, Charles Battaglia, 



Andy Gorey, Fred Kennedy, Paul Laincz, Frank Collins, Dan Joyce, 
Jack Madden, Tom Murray, Bill Fawcett, (third row) Pete Derba, 
Dave Brauer, John Mahoney, Vin O'Reilly, Jack Fitzgerald, Howie 
McClennan, Frank Horgan, Frank Ryan, Jim Myers. 



Just as the clubs devoted to language, philosophy, his- 
tory, government, and the physical sciences supplement 
the curriculum of the College of Arts and Sciences, so does 
the College of Business Administration have its own or- 
ganizations which serve a similar purpose for economics, 
finance, accounting, management, marketing, and other 
related fields. The leaders among these clubs are the pro- 
fessional business fraternities. Alpha Kappa Psi and Delta 
Sigma Pi. 

Chapters of these two national fraternities were estab- 
Hshed on the campus three years ago. As that was the 
first time that a non-honor fraternity had been organized 
at B.C., there arose immediately cries of protest from an 
outraged and strategically placed anti-fraternity element. 
The usual arguments were advanced concerning the de- 
moralizing effects of fraternities, the poor effect they have 
on the social development, character, intellectual training 
and health of the students, and the injury they bring to 
the reputation of the school. These arguments were in- 
effective then, and three years have shown them to be 
erroneous as well. The fraternities have proved themselves 
to be a decided asset to the University. 

It was expected that there would spring up between 
them a spirit of competition, a constant effort to attract 
the best pledges. This, however, did not materialize, and 
with the exception of an occasional football or basketball 
game there is little contact between the fraternities. The 
reason for this is not that they have divided the student 




Bill Connell, Joe Leary, Chet Blake, and Jack Boussy stop 
to talk in the Faculty Lounge. 



Delta Sigma Pi 




The Senior membership of Delta Sigma Pi Fraternity includes 
(seated) Jim Salvo, Historian; Vin Silvia, 'Secretary; Don Kelley, 
Vice-President; Jim McCormack, President; Paul Broughton, Treas- 
urer; Ralph Benware, Jr., Vice-President, (standing) Charles Roman- 



sky, Jack Wiseman, Tony Busa, Bob Collini, Joe Gilligan, Dave 
Lynch, John Crimraings, Bill Keough, Charlie White, Frank Ryan, 
Frank Kennedy, Don Woods, Jim Croake, Ted Shea, Gerry Bartush, 
and Gerry McElaney. 



body, but rather that they reflect a division that was al- 
ready present. 

Even in the short time since their inception the frater- 
nities have each developed a distinctive personahty. Al- 
though they both have fundamentally the same purposes, 
their scale of values and immediate objectives are dif- 
ferent. Each fraternity looks for different qualities in its 
prospective members, and consequently they attract dif- 
ferent types of students; the activities of each follow a 
correspondingly diff"erent pattern. Thus their relation to 
each other is one of complement rather than competition. 

Alpha Kappa Psi places the greatest emphasis on its 
professional and business aspects; Delta Sigma Pi, on the 
other hand, is decidedly more a fraternity than a profes- 
sional society. AKPsi in general accepts candidates who 
have indicated by their academic average and their par- 
ticipation in extracurricular activities that they have a 
serious and responsible interest in increasing their kno'ivl- 
edge of business theory and techniques and in improving 
their association with the business world. Delta chooses 
a prospective brother less on his past accomplishments 
than on his future value to the fraternity as a fraternity, 
which includes such considerations as compatibihty, gre- 
gariousness, and personality. Many of the top scholars 
and activity leaders are members of AKPsi, including the 
presidents of about fifteen clubs or classes; the Delta 
brothers hold fewer top positions but as individuals are 
in a greater number and wider variety of activities. 




Jim McCormack plans the agenda of the next meeting with Vin 
Silvia, Ralph Benware, Jr., Paul Broughton, Donald Kelley, and 
Jim Salvo. 



251 




Accounting Academy 



The officers of the Accounting Academy this year were 
Dave Curley, Secretary; John Christiano, Treasurer; 
Professor Glynn, Moderator; Bill Connell, President, 
and Ted Shea, Vice-President. 



Both fraternities this year sponsored a number of lec- 
tures by representatives of private and pubHc enterprise, 
who discussed careers in such fields as politics, insurance, 
manufacturing, retailing, and investments. Tours of 
neighboring industrial firms were also a part of the pro- 
grams of both groups. In addition AKPsi initiated the 
policy of co-sponsoring all the business luncheons held 
on campus, and on its own sponsored a Christmas Sing 
Night to raise money for needy families. Delta's most ex- 
tensive project was serving as co-host of the two-day 
Eastern Regional convention of the fraternity. 

The fraternities face the same problems as do the other 
clubs and organizations, but some of these they find par- 
ticularly confining. Perhaps the greatest problems are the 
lack of appropriate quarters and the difficulty of holding a 
pledge period when most of the pledges and brothers are 



Economics Academy 

Interrupted during a recent Economics Academy business meeting are 
Secretary Don Palmer, President John Madden, Treasurer Ed Colbert, 
and Vice-President Bob CoUini. 



Finance Club 



St. Mark's Academy 




^^ 




The Finance Club — Senior members. 



day-hops. The first of these problems will be solved with 
the construction of a Student Union in a few years; the 
second is already becoming less pressing with the gradual 
increase in number of campus students in relation to the 
total population. 

In addition to the fraternities there are clubs represent- 
ing each major field in CBA. These clubs are, as might be 
expected, among the best organized of all extracurriculars. 
Although they lack the imagination and concentration of 
effort of some of the language, arts, and science acad- 
emies, they are usually more successful in maintaining 
membership and achieving their aims than any of these 
other groups. On the average they are among the largest 




Checking the minutes of their last meeting are the officers of St. 
Mark's Academy, (seated) Gregg Voci, President; Margaret 
Kuhn, Vice-President, (standing) Myrna MacFarlane, Secretary, 
and Kathleen Bailey, Treasurer. 



and in some ways the most active clubs in the University. 
Actual participation by the students, however, is minimal, 
as most of the programs consist in lectures or demonstra- 
tions which the members can only attend but not take 
part in. 

Among the various clubs there is little distinction in 
program or scope of activities. They are all concerned 
principally with the practical side of their field of speciali- 
zation, and most of their speakers are the executives of 
businesses in the Boston area. These men are able both 
to explain the practical workings of the business world 
and to give up to date information on employment op- 
portunities. As the interests of the clubs often coincide or 
overlap, the same man was sometimes invited by two or 
three groups to give the same talk. This duplication evi- 
denced the need for a co-ordinating agency to prevent 
such inconveniences for both the speakers and the stu- 
dents. Some of the club presidents discussed the pos- 
sibility of forming such a group, but little positive action 
was taken. 

The topics discussed by the business club this year in- 
cluded manufacturing and production control, sales pres- 
entation, management techniques, Massachusetts indus- 
try, international commerce, stocks and bonds, right-to- 
work laws, and public accounting. Dean Vincent Wright 
of the Graduate School spoke on the opportunities for 
further study in the field of business and the advantages 
to be gained from such study. 

The Accounting Academy, being one of the clubs that 
deals almost entirely with technique rather than theory. 



253 





Officers of the Marketing Club are 
(standing) Charlie Sheehan, Coordinator; 
Chet Blake, Publicity Director, (seated) 
Bill Shea, Secretary ; Bill Shanahan, Vice- 
President; Andy Gorey, President, and 
Don Kelley, Treasurer. 



Marketing Club 



Foreign Trade Club 

Members of the Foreign Trade Club are John King, Vice- 
President; Bob Rudman, Secretary; Parker Davis, President, 
and Steve Connors, Treasurer. 




concentrated primarily on presenting to its members an 
explanation of the various fields in which they could work 
as accountants. Experienced accountants discussed with 
the members the pros and cons of industrial accounting 
as opposed to public accounting and the techniques most 
applicable to each. The outstanding event of the year was 
the traditional business luncheon at which Bill Connell, 
President of the academy, received the Haskins and Sells 
Foundation award as the top accounting student in the 
University. 

The Finance Club each year sponsors a trip to the 
financial center of the country, The Wall Street Stock 
Exchange. The fact that this trip coincides with New 
York's St. Patrick's Day celebration is one feature that 
helps to explain the club's popularity. The less social 
minded find much of interest too, including discussions 
with some of the most prominent men in the financial 
world. Among the guests this year were Mr. A.M. Sonna- 
bend, recently appointed director of the Studebaker- 
Packard Corporation, and Mr. Jack Lacey, head of the 
Lacey Sales Institute. 

Influenced perhaps by the Business and Citizen Semi- 
nars sponsored by the College of Business Administra- 
tion, the Economics Academy planned a series of discus- 
sions on a single topic, "Labor, Management, and the 
Right-to- Work Laws." At each meeting a diff'erent expert 
would explore some aspect of this problem, so that by the 
end of the series the members had heard a thorough and 
many-sided analysis of it and could weigh the proposals 
and solutions of the various points of view. During the 
second semester the academy did the same thing with 
the topic "Transportation," considering at successive 
meetings such aspects as railroads, MTA extensions, and 
freeways. 

St. Mark's Academy, centering in the School of Edu- 



254 



cation, is concerned not with business but with business 
education. Much of its attention is focused on the me- 
chanical and visual aids which can be used to improve 
both the content and methodology of business courses in 
the high schools. This academy was not so active as most 
of the business clubs, but it holds a combination business- 
social meeting once a month. At these meetings experts 
in the field were usually invited to speak. 

Concerned directly and immediately with the business 
world is the Marketing Club. Like the Accounting Acad- 
emy, it deals in technique rather than theory, and so it 
concentrates on practical problems and on an explana- 
tion of current markets together with advice on job op- 
portunities. The club attends the annual distribution con- 
ference in Boston each year, at which time the top mar- 
keting student is presented with an award. 

The domestic markets are not the only ones which in- 
terest the undergraduates. The Foreign Trade Club has 
as its area of investigation the trade and economic prob- 
lems of the world, paying particular attention to the busi- 
ness relationships among the western European countries 
and between Europe and the United States. First hand 
information on these matters is presented to the club 
members by the French and German consuls and by local 
import and export leaders. The activity of the club is how- 
ever, somewhat curtailed by the fact that the nature of the 



subject both limited the number of quahfied speakers and 
made field trips impossible. 

One of the more outstanding of the business clubs is 
the Society for the Advancement of Management. Viewed 
in some universities as a quasi-fraternity, it offers a dis- 
tinct advantage to its members in providing for post- 
college membership, thus facilitating an interchange be- 
tween students and men currently engaged in business. In 
the past year S.A.M. won first place in a national com- 
petition in which 110 chapters participated; it was con- 
sidered to have had the best undergraduate program with- 
in the national organization. 

More than in any other college the clubs of the College 
of Business Administration operate as extensions of the 
major fields of concentration. In every case nearly all the 
students of a given department are members of the 
affiliated club, and they are thus able to relate the work of 
the clubs to that of curriculum. This is an extremely 
efficient manner of organization, but at the same time 
one which could lead to a decided narrowness in point of 
view. Thus even if similar systems of operation were pos- 
sible for the language, arts, and other such clubs, it is 
doubtful whether their adoption would be wise. In the 
case of the business clubs, this is less a drawback, as they 
are more concerned with practical experiments, than with 
theoretical points of view. 



Society for the Advancement 
of Management 

Senior members of the University's cliapter of tlie Society for tlie Advancement of Manage- 
ment pose under tiie award banner signifying their latest achievement. Standing are John 
Murray and Lou Sabadini; seated are Dick Boudreau, Nicli Mastronardi, Paul McBrian, 
Frank Horgan, and John Moran. 






Toastmasters' 
Circle 



Debating Society 



Flanked by Jerry Ferarra and Andy Gorey, President of the Toastmaster's 
Club Tom Murray notes the remarks of the group's moderator, Professor 
Hughes. 



Among the clubs not connected directly with academics, 
but more closely allied than most with the traditional 
curriculum of the University, are the speaking and de- 
bating clubs. As the educated man should be also the 
articulate man, this part of his development is supplied 
by the Debating Society, Toastmasters' Circle, Public 
Speaking Club, and Bellarmine Speakers' Club. 

Recent years have seen a marked trend away from de- 
bating and toward an informal, even extemporaneous, 
approach to pubhc speaking. This is reflected on the 
campus by the presence of three clubs of this type to one 
debating society and by the great disproportion in mem- 
bership between the two types of organization. Such a 
trend is unavoidable as the formal debate becomes more 
and more a thing of the past, a victim of the populariza- 
tion by the mass communications media of panel discus- 
sions, question and answer sessions, and various types of 
informal debate. Perhaps the most striking indication of 
the gradual loss of the art of debating was the combining 
of the Marquette and Fulton Debating Societies into one 
organization, and this consisting of only a handful of 
members. Those who can remember the B.C. debating 



Officers of the Debating Society are (seated) Frank Collins, Presi- 
dent; Dr. John Mahoney, Moderator, (standing) Ralph Moore, Vice- 
President, and John Paris, Secretary. 



256 




Officers of the Bellarmine Speakers' Club include Mary A. Parkin, Secretary; 
Ralph L. Lespasio, President; and Edward Pettee, Vice-President. 

Bellarmine Speakers' Club 



society of twenty and twenty-five years ago will find little 
similarity between its public debates which often at- 
tracted two and three thousand spectators and the debates 
of today's society which are seldom delivered before an 
audience of more than two dozen. 

The growth of the Toastmasters' Circle and Public 
Speaking Club on the Chestnut Hill campus and the 
Bellarmine Speakers' Club in the Intown College has been 
as rapid as was the decline of their sister organization. 
The popularity of these clubs is due to the fact that their 
practice of allowing each member to give a brief talk every 
week serves to provide the members with more experience 
and to inject humor and interest into meetings. 

When they were first introduced a few years ago, the 
speaking clubs attracted more members than they could 
accommodate and within weeks they were numbered 
among the most popular campus activities. Recently, how- 
ever, the novelty has disappeared and the original impetus 
of the movement has considerably lessened. At present 
both the Toastmasters' Circle and Public Speaking Club 
have less than a full membership and many of their meet- 
ings during this year were sparsely attended. Yet the an- 
nual banquets of both organizations were as much of a 
success as they have always been, giving hope for the 
revival of the speaking clubs in the future. 



Public Speaking Club 



President Jack Cremin (extreme right) poses with members of 
the Public Speaking Club, Eugene Mulcahy, Joe Mullin, and 
Frank Vacca. 





Campion 

Choral 

Speakers 



Miss Mary Kinnane, Moderator of the 
Campion Ciiorale Speakers poses 
with members, Paul O'Brien, Presi- 
dent; Gerard Miller, John Altieri, 
Secretary; Timothy Brady, (second 
row) Gerald Rielly, Richard David, 
John Finn, (top) Charles Silva. 



Some of the extracurricular organizations conform to 
no set pattern. They are related to no course in the cur- 
riculum nor do they reflect any natural division of the 
student body. They exist principally because of the en- 
thusiasm of a single individual for this particular type 
of activity. 

Such a club is the Campion Choral Speakers, a group 
of male students in the School of Education who practice 
the centuries old but now almost forgotten art of reading 
in chorus. The members concentrated for the earlier part 
of this year on the ancient classical dramas, which were 
written expressly for such a presentation. Their emphasis 
was on developing a professional skill in delivering these 
works, but their public performances were few. This lack 
of any real objective resulted in a disinterest in the group 
on the part of the students. However, in the second 
semester, the Speakers broadened their scope to include 
some modern works which, although not written for 
choruses, could be adapted to their needs. They changed 
their emphasis also from the performance of works to an 
understanding of them, paying particular attention to the 
relationship between their content and their structure 
and rhythm. 

The newest of the "independent" clubs is the Film 
Society, begun this year by Professor Louis Sumberg. It 
is the function of the society to bring the campus a varied 
selection of film classics which the undergraduates would 
otherwise have little opportunity to enjoy. These films 



have included Henry V, All Quiet on the Western Front, 
Ten Days that Shook the World, The Little World of Don 
Camillo, and a Charlie Chaplin Festival. During the first 
semester difficulties in the scheduling and advertising of 
the performances resulted in generally poor crowds and 
the society had difficulty meeting expenses. The second 
semester saw a well-run publicity campaign coupled with 
an excellent selection of films and an improved schedule 
of showings. In spite of the competition from dances and 
other social events, the Friday afternoon and evening 
shows became one of the most popular campus functions 
for both the students and the faculty, requiring that some 
of the films be rescheduled in Campion Auditorium to 
accommodate the crowd. 

The Film Society deserves recognition as the most 
spirited group on the campus. In addition to advertising 
through the Heights and through posters and circulars, 
the members of the society sometimes drew attention to 
their films by such stunts as wearing cloaks, swords, and 
plumed hats on the day of the showing of Henry V. 

The inauguration of the society was principally an ex- 
periment on the part of Dr. Sumberg, an attempt to bring 
to the campus a facility which he believed would benefit 
the University. The experiment was a success and it be- 
came evident that a film society on a permanent basis 
could be established. To achieve this end. Dr. Sumberg 
turned the organization over to the undergraduates who 
had been assisting him, so that they could elect officers 



258 



and become recognized by the University. 

One of the difficulties which the society will have to 
face is the lack of adequate facilities. In order to operate 
effectively on the scale which it was approaching this year, 
it will need a projection room more acoustically perfect 
than those now available. Perhaps the new Student Union 
will be able to fill this need, for otherwise the society may 
be unfortunately and unnecessarily limited in its con- 
tribution to the University. 

Performing a similar function in its own context, al- 
though on a more limited scale, is the Graduate Nurses' 
Enghsh Academy. By means of discussions among the 
members and informal talks by members of the English 
faculty, the academy tries to bring an appreciation of 
literature to a world of technical studies. 

In addition to current books and plays, the subject 
matter of the club's discussions includes the works of the 
great authors of the past and such basic considerations as 
the values and standards by which literature should be 
judged. The English Academy is unique in that it is the 
only academic club devoted to a field foreign to the course 
pursued by its members. To this extent it best reflects the 
true university attitude. 





Snapped during a recent publicity drive are the members of 
the Film Society, Paul Ducharme, Rogette Abizaid, and Bill 
Friary with their Moderator, Professor Sumberg. 



Film Society 



Graduate Nurses' English Academy 



The Graduate Nurses' English Academy meet for a literary discussion with Dr. Clara Siggins (second 
row, second from left). 




259 



Rod and Gun Club 




JLL. 



Chess Club 



Don McKeon and Paul King look on, while John Daly and Harrison 
Hobbes explain the fine points of chess. 



260 




Rod and Gun Club members are on their latest field trip: 
Wally Kupchunas, John Reino, Joe Mazreimas, William Hy- 
land, John Miller, Ed Leavitt, Sam Panella. 



Radio Club 

Secretary Jim McKenzie, President Dick Cronin, 
and Vice-President Bill Hay den contact a dis- 
tant "ham." 




Scholars do not "scholar" all the time. In addition to 
these academic and semi-academic clubs there arise na- 
turally within a university associations of students having 
similar interests. Whether this interest be skin diving or 
mountain climbing, devotees find that the co-operation 
and competition of their fellows adds to both their in- 
terest and their skill. As the number and nature of these 
clubs depend on the current interests of the student body, 
they are less stable than most of the other organizations, 
often getting their impetus entirely from the ardor of one 
or two zealots and dissolving as soon as this force is gone. 

More enduring than most, because of the general popu- 
larity of the activities themselves, are the Chess Club, the 
Rod and Gun Club, the Radio Club and the Camera 
Club. Membership in all four clubs is unrestricted, so 
that the inexperienced tyro can learn the fundamentals 
side by side with the old pro who is trying to master the 
fine points of technique — a relationship which benefits 
both. 

In activities such as these, competition is essential to 
progress and those clubs which engage most actively in 
meets, tournaments, and contests are consistently the 
most popular and the most successful. The Chess Club, 
in keeping with the spirit of the game, is the most com- 
petitive organization. A member of the Metropolitan 
Boston League and the Jesuit Inter-Collegiate League, 
and proud possessor of five trophies, it has met with 
Harvard, Tufts, Holy Cross, Georgetown, Fordham, and 
St. Peter's. The five man team, class "C" champions in 
the Boston League, has competed also against the Walpole 
State Prison Checkmate Club, which is not a member of 
any of the collegiate leagues. 

Engaged in competition along somewhat different lines, 
the Rod and Gun Club has as one of its primary aims the 
teaching of safe hunting procedures, care of firearms, and 
observance of hunting and fishing laws, in addition to the 
developing of skills in both sports. Initiating its members 
through movies on such subjects as duck hunting and bass 





Camera Club members David Rochon, Bob Trahe, and Phil Gamma, 
inspect their latest achievement. 



Camera Club 



fishing, the club this year provided opportunities for put- 
ting theory into practice by sponsoring a skeet shoot and 
a deep sea fishing trip. Its rifie team, composed of the ten 
best marksmen, competes against similar teams from 
nearby colleges and universities. At Thanksgiving and 
Easter each year the Rod and Gun Club extends an invi- 
tation to the entire student body to participate in its 
"Turkey Shoot" and "Ham Shoot," with prizes for both 
skill and luck. 

The Radio Club deals with "hams" too, but rather 
than shoot them, it educates them. In their shack atop 
the roof of Campion Hall the members study morse code, 
learn how to build their own transmitting and receiving 
sets, and, when licensed, assist in operating the club's 
own station, WIPR. Because of the nature of the activity, 
competition is restricted to a striving among the members 
for honors in speed and accuracy. 

Another club which subordinates competition to the 
mastery of fundamentals is the Camera Club. Allowing 
members the use of a fully equipped darkroom, it en- 
courages the mutual exchange of information and ex- 
perience as the means of progressing to competence in the 
techniques of both camera and enlarger. 



261 




New York Club 



The members of the New York Club are (front) Jim 
Marrinan, President; Charles Council, Vice-President; 
Charles Romanski, Bill Denn, Treasurer, (back) Tony 
Cashman, Kay Forbes, Bob Latkany, Bob Trahe. 



The number of student organizations and the variety 
of interests which they serve mark a striking contrast be- 
tween the University today and the small college from 
which it grew. An elaborate and complex system of clubs, 
societies, and publications has succeeded the few acad- 
emies, the debating society, and the single publication 
which once comprised all extracurricular life. But perhaps 
the best indication of the changes that have taken place 
during the last few decades are the regional clubs. 

Regional clubs were first established for the purpose of 
spreading the reputation of Boston College to such out- 
lying areas as Cambridge and South Boston. A secondary 
but also very important purpose was the raising of money 
to assist the senior class in such projects as the publishing 
of the Sub Turri. The Cambridge and South Boston clubs 
have been replaced by Western Massachusetts, Connecti- 
cut, New York, and Maine clubs, and their area of 
activity has been changed from Central Square and 
Andrew Square to Springfield, Hartford, New York City, 
and Portland. Somewhere in the process of this transition 
the secondary purpose of these clubs has sadly become 
lost. 

But at the same time they have acquired a new function 
— that of assisting freshmen from their states to adjust to 
university fife. The regional clubs provide a link between 
home and the University, an opportunity to associate 
with "fellow countrymen" while making the transition to 
a new and strange environment. It serves also as a link 
between the University and home. For not only is it an 
association of students from a particular state at B.C., 
but it becomes after graduation an association of B.C. 
grads in a particular state. 



Connecticut Club 

The Connecticut Club membership includes: (front) Andrew Esposito, 
President; Charles Wojcik, Vice-President; Edith Kikowski, Secretary; 
Bob Patterson, Treasurer; (middle) Jerry Fitzgibbons, Frank Wanat, 
Mike Jordan, Jim Cappelletti, (top) Dave Curlee. 




262 



To the extent that these clubs foster a separation of 
students on a geographical basis they can be considered 
an anti-university element, for it is the function of a uni- 
versity to promote a free exchange of ideas among stu- 
dents from many different areas. However, the clubs as 
they exist today avoid this indictment, as they seek not to 
separate the student from the rest of the University but 
to provide a more effective method of helping him to be- 
come a part of the University. 

The activities of the regional clubs are mainly social. 
Each club sponsors dances and other events both on 
campus and, during vacations, in their own states. Com- 
munion breakfasts and suppers during Lent are also a 



part of their program. In addition to the events run for 
their own members, the regional clubs also sponsored for 
the whole student body such affairs as victory dances 
after some of the football games and a rally in Orange, 
N. J. before the Seton Hall basketball game. 

Contributions to the social life of the campus are made 
also by the Women's Recreational Association and the 
Cadet Officers' Club. The WRA, the official social and 
athletic organization for women in the School of Educa- 
tion, reorganized this year into a closer knit and more 
active group than it had been in the past. Its activities in 
sports included the sponsoring of a basketball team, 
whose record is one of the best kept secrets of the school, 
and the establishing of archery and rifle teams. Its most 
enthusiastically received contribution to the athletic life 
of the university was the tradition-breaking introduction 
of co-ed cheerleaders at the Holy Cross rally. This was 
one, perhaps the only, innovation on the part of the 
women which was not met with a cold and critical eye by 
the male students. The social activities of the WRA were 
rounded out by a barn dance, a spring semi-formal, and 
a whist party. 

Performing for the ROTC the same functions that the 
WRA performs for the School of Ed., with a few modi- 
fications, the Cadet Officers' Club has as its chief aim the 
creating of a high espirit de corps. Composed of junior 
and senior ROTC students, it co-sponsors the corps' bas- 
ketball team, conducts open-house events at the training 




Western 
Massachusetts Club 



Maine Club 



Meeting in O'Connell Hall are tlie members of the Maine 
Club, (front row) William Casey, President; Rosanna 
Dawson, Secretary; Harrison Hobbes, Vice President, 
(back row) Thomas Johnson, George Elliott, Robert 
Vermette. 




Women's 
Recreational 

Association 



Martha Zimmerman, President, explains the plans of the Women's Recreation Association 
to members, (standing) Pauline LeBlanc, Ellen Lagney, Brenda Corwley, Peggy Kuhn, 
(seated) Margaret Doyle, Carolyn Shea, Frances McCauley, and Mary Casey. 




center, and furnishes aides to assist at the reception of 
visiting dignitaries. Once a year the cadets organize and 
run a field day at the Nazareth Home for children. 

The meetings of the Cadet Officers' Club usually feature 
programs closely associated with the military science 
course work. These have included films such as "Prisoner- 
of-War Escape Techniques," and lectures by Captain 
Walter Mayo on "Experiences of a Korean Prisoner-of- 
War" and by Lt. James Kelley on "Hints and Helps for 
the Newly Commissioned Officer." An annual formal 
dance and an outing in spring climax the activities of the 
club. 



264 




Cadet Officers' Club 

The officers of the Cadet Officers Club are Joe Lucas, Secretary; 
Jack Cremmings, Vice-President; Bob Quinn, President; Tom Sulli- 
van, Treasurer. 







''''-\W'^^"'rf 




• 


/ 17^ M^ 


^^ mm 








ROTC 




The ROTC's prize-winning Lewis Drill Team presents arms on the Bapst lawn. 



Summer camp had its lighter moments. 



. but not quite enough of them. 




266 




The Boston College unit of the Reserve Officers Train- 
ing Corps was established in 1947. Originally an artillery 
unit, it modified its emphasis five years ago to become a 
general military science course. This year 130 seniors will 
graduate from this course and receive commissions as 
second lieutenants in the U.S. Army. 

These men are the product of a four year training in 
the history, philosophy, and practical application of the 
science of warfare. Their training has included classwork, 
drills, experiments in tactics and organization, and a six- 
week hitch at summer camp. These six weeks at Fort 
Devens, unanimously considered to be both the most dif- 
ficult and most profitable part of the four years, included 
marches, drills, classes, field training tests, attack prob- 
lems, inspections, k.p., guard duty, and experience with 
many types of weapons from the carbine to the rocket 
launcher. 

During the course the cadets receive periodic promo- 
tions according to ability and performance in the classes, 
the drills, and summer camp. During their senior year 
they function according to rank as the officers of the 
corps, and as such are responsible only to the cadre for 
the administration, training, and performance of the 900 
man unit. Within the Cadet Brigade, which is composed 




The Military Ball is the highpoint of the ROTC's social activities. 



The Distinguished Military Students pose with Asst. Dean Henry J. McMahon, Very Rev. Michael P. 
Walsh, S.J., and Lt. Col. Philip R. Cibotti, Jr. 




267 



The color guard leads every demonstration with the banners of the 
country and the corps. 





of three battle groups of four companies each, the seniors 
serve as unit commanders, staff members, and platoon 
and assistant platoon leaders. The students who excel in 
every phase of this training are named Distinguished 
Military Students and are commissioned second lieu- 
tenants in the Regular Army, the same rank achieved by 
graduates of West Point. 

The undergraduates who are members of the ROTC 
find that the military becomes a major part of their col- 
lege life. The corps is for them a part of the curriculum, 
an extracurricular activity, and a social organization. In 
addition to his regular duties a cadet may choose to par- 
ticipate in the activities of the Drill Team, the Rifle 
Team, or, in his Junior and Senior years, the Cadet 
Officers' Club. He may spend more than the required 
three or five hours per week in class or drill, giving extra 
time to independent study or practice in the various 
skills which must be acquired. He will engage in the social 
activities sponsored by the corps, the most important of 
which is the Military Ball each year attended by over 
five hundred cadets and their dates. 

Military units have had an irregular history at Boston 
College. As the need or desirability for them arose, groups 
similar to the ROTC were established, and when condi- 
tions changed, these groups were modified and eventually 
discontinued. The ROTC, like these other groups, is a 
product of its time and could easily fall victim to its time. 
Should the possibility of war become so remote that the 
ROTC were considered unnecessary, the University 
would lose a valuable institution and influence. 



268 




Publications 



^ 




The mentors of the Heights are (seated) Sports Editor Gerry Fitzgibbons, 
Features Editor Brian McNiff, Editors-in-Chief Tom Tanous and Terry 
Logan, Business Manager Jack O'Leary, News Editor Jim Nee, (stand- 
ing) Features Editor Brian Moran and News Editor Chris Morton. 



Boston College was twenty years old before it acquired 
its first publication, the Stylus. Another twenty-nine 
years elapsed before a second publication, the Sub Turri, 
was added. Seven years later the first issue of the Heights 
appeared, and for a long time the situation remained 
relatively stable. In recent years, however, the number 
of undergraduate publications has tripled and the nature 
of the campus literary activity has undergone major 
changes. 

The year 1958-59 was a decisive year for the campus 
publications. It was a year which saw the addition of a 
science journal and a radio station, bringing the total 
number to nine, and a year which saw important de- 
velopments in the newer and in some of the older pub- 
lications. The centralizing of nearly all the major maga- 
zines and journals in the Student Activities Building 
helped to create a spirit of cooperation among them, and 
for the first time the editors had an opportunity to meet 
often in an informal way to exchange ideas and facilities. 

The effects of these changes were not felt immediately. 
In many ways this was a year of experimentation, of get- 
ting used to the fact that the publications were now a big- 
time operation. But as the new editors assumed their 
posts toward the end of the year it was obvious that they 
were benefiting from the new atmosphere and were in a 
better position to put their organizations on the profes- 
sional level that is expected and needed in a university 
of this size. 






The Heights meets a Tuesday 
night deadline. 



270 




The Heights in many ways holds the pre-eminent posi- 
tion among campus publications, first because it is cir- 
culated weekly, second because, as the most available 
source of information concerning the University, it is re- 
quired reading for anyone who wishes to keep informed 
about campus events. Unfortunately the quality of the 
reporting was not always in keeping with the position 
which the paper enjoyed. Although the Heights in gen- 
eral did a fairly complete job in news reporting, it be- 
came notorious for its inaccuracies, and occasionally it 
overlooked even a major news story. As it is the chief 
function of a campus newspaper to report items of in- 
terest to the student body, the Heights to this extent 
failed in its primary purpose. 

Its feature articles were erratic, ranging from the ex- 
cellent to the obvious fillers. Among the most promising 
innovations of the year was the faculty profile series, 
which performed the important function of informing 
the student body about its University. Sports coverage 
was good, but the writing often got in the way of what 
the writer was trying to say. 

Heights' editorials have rarely met with the approval 
of everyone. An editorial writer is usually faced with two 
choices, if he does not wish to resort to trivia. He can 
either view things from a solely personal standpoint or 
he can attempt to voice the opinions of a recognizable 
body of intelligent people within the University. It is the 
rare editor whose intelligence, tact, and acumen allow 




Heights' News Editors Chris Morton and Jim Nee (seated) appear un- 
dismayed by John Gallivan's report of "No news ! !" 




Planning another sports expose are (first row) Editor Tom Hughes, Joe 
Scalley, and Editor Gerry Fitzgibbons, with Jim Savage, Phil Langan, 
and Dan Byrne. 





"What deficit?" asks Heights' Business Manager Jack O'Leary, backed 
up by assistants Tom Regan, and Tony Anderson, but Mr. Fahey, S.J. 
seems unimpressed. 



271 



him to choose the uniquely personal view without loosing 
or needlessly offending his audience. At various times the 
Heights' editorials have fallen into all three categories, 
being sometimes trivial, sometimes overpersonal, and 
sometimes intelligent and constructive. 

Next to the Heights the most avidly read publication 
is the Stylus, the University's literary quarterly. In many 
ways the Stylus was greatly improved this year, par- 
ticularly in the imagination of its art and layout and the 
quality of its short stories. Aside from their literary work, 
the editors have demonstrated commendable energy and 
spirit in sponsoring three art exhibits and co-sponsoring 
the arts festival. 

In the poetry department the Stylus has remained 
stagnant. It has been unable to get out of a rut of im- 
agistic and Whitmanesque technique, which seems to be 
the easiest for neophytes to manage. The Stylus stories 
have exhibited a firmer handling of emotion and have 
avoided the neurotically oversensitive portrayal that was 
often its hallmark in former years. They have also for- 
tunately ignored the minute attention to physical detail 




Sam Blair (seated), Joe Tribble, and Andy McCusker ponder 
a few poetry submissions. 




Planning the Winter issue of the Stylus 
in their split level office are (bottom) 
George Higgins, Joe Tribble, John Mus- 
sells, (top) Jack Madden, Andy Mc- 
Cusker, Editor Sam Blair, Jim Whiting 
and Carney Gavin. 




Pausing for a picture during a Journal of Business board meeting in the CBA faculty lounge are 
Editors-in-Chief Bill Cratty and John Mussells, William McClemian, Henry Rioux, John Ma- 
honey and Hugh Duffy. 



that cluttered the pages of past issues. The Stylus writers 
and editors showed that they reaUzed that common sense 
is not out of place in literature. The chief problem which 
the Stylus faced was an apparent lack of qualified creative 
writers. The same names appeared in almost every issue, 




Editors John Mussells and Bill Cratty (center) join Marty Nolan and 
Henry Rioux in scanning copy for the next issue of the Journal of Business. 



with stories and drawings by junior Joe Tribble some- 
times comprising a sizable part of the magazine. 

In addition to the University publications, the colleges 
have their own journals. In the College of Arts and Sci- 
ences the Humanities in a very short time has established 
itself as the most vigorous magazine on the campus. Prior 
to its new format and change in purpose, the Humanities 
had been a rather specialized and one sided magazine, 
concerned almost exclusively with the ancient languages 
of Greek and Latin. With its spring issue of 1958, it con- 
siderably widened its field to the extent that it now re- 
sembles the old Humanities only in name. 

Its announced purpose is the publication of essays of 
historical interest in the humanistic disciplines. In accord 
with this purpose, papers on the fine arts, history, poli- 
tical thought, and literature have been published. Usually 
such essays have been placed in an historical context, and 
whenever possible articles of a topical importance have 
been included. 

In general, the essays have been of a superior quality, 
well writen without the customary attempt of the student 
writer to dazzle his readers. Unlike most scholarly maga- 
zines, it has combined a lively sense of humor with an 
imaginative approach to layout and design, creating a 
fresh and effective setting for its articles. Most of the credit 
for the success of the Humanities must go to Editor Carney 
Gavin and to Art Editor Sam Blair who worked togrther 
to establish the tone and format of the magazine and 
carefully supervised its production. 



273 




The editorial board of the Humanities includes (front) Editor Carney Gavin, 
Jack Madden, John MacNamara, Larry Gambino, Bill Sullivan, (back) Sam 
Blair, Dan Geagan, Sam Scott, Don McKeon, Bill Powers, Marty Nolan, and 
John Mussells. 



Within the limits which the Journal seems to impose on 
itself, it occasionally produces well written and competent 
analyses of current problems by both faculty and stu- 
dents. Too often, however, a considerable part of each 
issue is given over to articles that are not only extraneous 
but trivial. These are, for the most part, selections from 
speeches or articles by men having no connection with 
the University, or short reprints from other magazines. 
In general, whenever the Journal followed its announced 
purpose and gave some measure of freedom to the student 
or faculty writers it achieved its best results. 

The most outstanding development in the University's 
publications was the inauguration of a campus radio 
station, WBCR. Most of the year was spent in the pre- 
liminary work of organization— establishing program 
schedules, developing a workable organization, and dis- 
covering students qualified for the various jobs. Although 
the seniors benefited little from this innovation, the po- 
tential which the station possesses for the future is enor- 
mous. It will serve as a means of uniting the diverse ele- 
ments of a rapidly expanding campus and will be able 
to supplement the Heights as a disseminator of informa- 
tion to the student body. 

The Educational Review, published by the School of 



The Cosmos, the scientific counterpart of the Humani- 
ties and the newest of the campus journals, was first pub- 
lished in the winter of 1959. Replacing the former science 
journals, it greatly increased their effectiveness by allow- 
ing a greater concentration of effort and a freer inter- 
change of ideas. 

A surprisingly large proportion of Cosmos articles en- 
gage the average reader, the medical papers having the 
widest appeal. Generally, the articles give an historical 
background or demonstrate the interaction of one science 
with another. "Frost Heave" by senior Ray Friesecke in 
the first issue, noteworthy for its clear presentation of 
technical information, is an example of the type of article 
that gives an undergraduate science journal its unique 
value. 

The layout and design of the Cosmos differed markedly 
from that of its sister publication. Showing little interest 
in imaginative or artistic layouts, the scientists established 
a simple and business-like format that was extremely 
suitable to their type of magazine. 

The spirit of independence that is evident in the Hu- 
manities and Cosmos is noticeably lacking to the Journal 
of Business. For some years the Journal has been rigid in 
format and in style and content of articles. It is unique 
among campus publications in that both faculty and stu- 
dents contribute; being "devoted principally to questions 
of business theory and practice, and to problems of 
political economy" it has a wide area of coverage. Un- 
fortunately, little has been done with such a reservoir of 
talent and material. 



Cosmos' editors Bob Dennehy, John McCormack (Editor-in-Chief), 
and Ray Friesecke discuss layout with Fr. Zeno Vendler, S.J., as 
Dave Land, Dick Hinchey, and Bob Pieroni look on. 




274 



Education, graduated this year from a mimeographed to 
a printed format. The word which best summarizes its 
total effect is tame. This depressing fact could be the re- 
sult of a lack of interest among the students, lack of 
writing ability, or too rigid editing. Perhaps the overlong 
preparation of material also accounts for the noticeable 
absence of enthusiasm in a magazine so young. 

There is an all too evident reliance upon the work and 
thought of others. Articles are peppered with quotes, and 
in some instances the writer's words serve merely to tie 
the quotes together. The Review would be more interest- 
ing if a greater number of original articles were included, 
no matter what their quality, rather than a cautious re- 
hash of text books and speeches. A display of intellectual 
muscle is not out of place in an undergraduate magazine. 

The sole holdout in the merger of undergraduate sci- 
ence journals is the Scope. Rather than participate in the 
formation of the Cosmos, the Scope chose to continue its 
independent existence. Published by pre-medical students 
as an organ of the department and of its affiliated Mendel 
Club, this magazine has always been both intelligent and 
interestingly written. It was the best of the science jour- 
nals, and the talents of those responsible for it could have 
been put to good use on the Cosmos. By maintaining 
separate existence it placed itself in competition with the 
larger journal, which also accepts medical papers. As the 
Scope is published just once late in the year, only the 
future will tell whether it can maintain its high quality in 
the face of University competition or whether its greatest 




Ed Shaughnessy spins the first platter on the new campus radio sta- 
tion WBCR, as Fr. Saunders, S.J. and Dick Cronin loolc on. 



Examining the layout for their first issue of the Educational Review are (seated) Editor Pat 
Stankunas, Joan Breslin, (standing) Nancy Bonnazzoli, June Robinson, and Gregg Voci. 




275 




The editorial board of the Scope includes Tim Guiney, Henry McQueeny, George Litman, Joe 
Sullivan, Austin Bruin, Joe Furcinetti, Co-Editors Ed Callahan and Mary McHale, and Jim 
Halligan. 



contribution would be to join in the production of the 
Cosmos. 

The B.C. Eye, another of the smaller publications, is 
the student newspaper of the Intown College. Attempting 
in no way to compete with the Heights, it is designed 
simply as a news and opinion sheet for the students of 
the evening division. The complexity and diversity of a 
university such as Boston College does not permit a single 
news medium to give a coherent and adequate coverage 
of the entire campus. In a choice between interest and 
completeness, interest must always win out. The B.C. Eye 
thus concentrates on the news which falls outside the 
scope of the Heights but is of particular interest to stu- 
dents of the Intown Division. Still in its formative period, 
the Eye has the advantage of being sponsored by a stu- 
dent body whose enthusiasm for such projects has gen- 
erally exceeded its opportunities. 

The developments in the undergraduate publications in 
the recent years have outstripped the developments in 
most of the departments of the University. This is due to 
no overemphasis on the fields of journalism, criticism, 
and creative writing, but to new awareness of the im- 
portance of the publications media. A knowledge of 
public relations and an understanding of its tools and 
techniques are becoming increasingly important in the 
operation of almost every type of business or institution, 
and they are qualities which can be achieved only through 
the actual experience of writing, editing, and publishing. 
Thus, in addition to their chief function of developing 
articulate leaders, literate scholars and analysts, and 
skilled writers in a variety of fields, the campus journals 
and magazines are taking on even more immediately 
practical benefits. Already the most important of the 
extracurricular organizations, they will continue to grow 
and expand as their benefits are more widely appreciated. 
The work accomplished this year has helped to establish 
a solid foundation for such developments. 



At a staff meeting of the B.C. Eye are (seated) Editor Agnes Cumm 
and Associate Editor Marilyn Fitzgerald with Associate Editors Mary 
Baker and Ruth Harzbecker. 




276 




1959 SubTurri. 



BOSTON COLLEGE • CHESTNUT HILL 67, MASS. 




Dear fellow classmate. 

This book Is a little different from most college yearbooks . In 
addition to depleting the University's physical plant and faculty, the 
members of our class, and our activities of the past four years, we 
have tried In this volume to explain, to evaluate, and to Interpret 
these things. We have had as our goal the production of a yearbook 
possessing not only Interest but, above all, honesty and significance. 

Such an endeavor cannot be undertaken by any one man . If the 
19 59 Sub lurrl Is found to be of some value, this Is due to the com- 
bined efforts of over one hundred members of the senior class. This 
book has been truly a class project, and It stands as a tribute to the 
generosity of the men and women who contributed their time and tal- 
ents to Its production. 

To us who have lived with It for twelve months the Sub Turrt has 
been a great responsibility. But the discharging of this responsibility 
has been a great privilege. Through It we have come to know Boston 
College with some measure of clarity and completeness. We have dis- 
covered many things about this University, Including Its shortcomings 
and Its Imperfections . But we have learned to see them in their proper 
proportion, and we leave here with a profound respect for Boston 
College and for the men, both living and dead, who made It what It Is. 

Sincerely yours , 







111 




Meeting for an informal discussion are the editors of the Sub Turri, Joan Grindley, Dick Dowd, Nancy 
Pacious, Chet Blake, Marie Lunney, Jack Madden, and Jackie Starr. 



Charlie Battaglia and Martha Zimmerman 
check the ad and patron lists. 




The 1959 Sub Turri did not just happen. But neither was 
it systematically produced. It grew as the result of much 
work and many mistakes, of experiments, improvisations, 
and innovations, of bull sessions, jokes, arguments, sac- 
rifices, and good times. Its growth was a complicated and 
disorganized process, involving over one hundred people 
who represented over one hundred points of view. It was 
conceived, planned, executed, and pieced together in 
classes, in the caf, in the Tam, in cars, busses, and trains, 
and in the Sub Turri oflRce, as well as by phone and mail 
from such places as Lake Tahoe, Nevada, New York 
City, Buffalo, and Troy, N. Y., Keene, N. H., and Nan- 
tucket Island, Mass. 

As the work became more complex and pressing, the 
center of operations became Room 101 of the Student 
Activities Building, a room which in a very short time 
became more than an office, or, as some held, not an 
office at all. It was a club, a recreation room, an informa- 
tion center, a service bureau, a photo lab, a forum for the 
gripes and opinions of anybody who happened by, a 
restaurant, a boarding house, and, with its irreverent 
signs, curious decorations, and offbeat pictures, it was 
also one of the more unusual campus curiosities. But it 



278 




Frank Martin tabulates the senior poll. 



was, above all, the scene of some of the most ambitious, 
if unorthodox activity of the year. 

The staff began to drift in a few weeks before classes 
started in the fall, and immediately they set the tone for 
the rest of the year by refurnishing the office with eccen- 
tric furniture obtained in clandestine visits to other pub- 
lications and clubs. Convention having been thus dis- 
carded, the work progressed. The business department 
tried to maintain order, at least in its own affairs; but it 
was an attempt doomed to failure, as each collector de- 
veloped his own independent and indecipherable collec- 
tion procedure and the petty cash receipts were found 
more often than not to read, "Dear Chet, Took money 
for expenses. Thank you." 

The section editors ignored production schedules and 
deadlines, and changed their sections so often that the 
layouts were usually outdated by the time they were 
finished. But the goal was always perfection, and behind 
most of the irregularities was a striving for quality. Year- 
books from previous classes and from other universities 
were taken apart both figuratively and literally and ex- 



amined for both their good and bad qualities. Whenever 
possible improvements were discovered, the book was 
revised and rewritten to incorporate them, and often 
entire sections were discarded and begun again. 

As the work neared completion, the office often re- 
sembled a wastebasket, the lights burned all through the 
night, editors could be found at odd hours sleeping on 
couches or occasionally on desks, and the efforts some- 
times continued unbroken for days. But finally there was 
no more time and the 1959 Sub Turri was reluctantly sent 
to the publisher — not exactly what the staff" had hoped 
for but as near perfect as they could make it. 

And when the year ended, a hundred members of the 
staff knew that a good job had been done. Another year- 
book had been completed, the product of the hundred 
diff"erent talents of a hundred different people, who had 



Fr. Devine and John Mahoney balance the books. 




Dermott O'Toole sketches the 
presidents' portraits. 



279 




A formal pose is struck by section editors Bill Cratty, Ernie Ferneau, Bob Morton, and Charlie McCullagh. 



Social Chairman Dick Roche meets with committeemen 
Paul King and Bob Morton. 




come from all the schools of the University to co-operate 
in this project. Artists, salesmen, writers, typists, photog- 
raphers, businessmen, and workers of every description 
contributed their talents and combined with others whose 
talents they often could not appreciate but whom they 
nevertheless respected for their contributions. Friendships 
were made and lessons were learned while the Sub Turri 
was created. And so to some of those who worked to 
create it, the yearbook is more than a collection of mem- 
ories. It is itself a memory — the best of the lot. 



280 





ATHLETICS 



281 




REV. WILLIAM DEVLIN, S.J. 
Fifteenth President of Boston College 



Father William Devlin, S.J. assumed the presidency of Boston College 
at a crucial time in its history. Having just become established at the 
Heights, the College was entering a new era and was faced with many 
challenges, the greatest of them being the need to encompass broader 
fields of knowledge. Father Devlin met this challenge by laboring unceas- 
ingly to acquire facilities that would permit research and experimentation 
in the physical sciences. His success in this endeavor was born of a deter- 
mination and a strength of mind and will that enabled the young president 
to continue toward his goal for six years despite the setbacks, disappoint- 
ments, and temporary failures which he encountered. 

Such strength and perseverance are indispensable to any difficult and ex- 
tensive operation, but perhaps nowhere in the University community do 
they play a more obvious role than in sports. In the long hours of training, 
in the constant efforts to maintain fitness, and in the rigors of the contest 
itself they are the qualities that are so often the deciding factor between 
success and failure. Thus, whatever other value sports have had during the 
past four years, they may be remembered as the embodiment of that strong 
and determined perseverance which adds force and emphasis to the other 
contributions of the tradition. And they may serve also as a reminder of 
what has been and can be accomplished by men possessing this quality. 



282 




T4 




Roberts Center 



The Beginning of a New Era 





McHugh Forum 



in Boston College Athletics 





22 75 Bl 44 53 



f q -^7 If! 

83 ^6 ^3 10 34 



73.50 21 20 82 30 55 61 42 40 41 32 70 7 



FRONT ROW: George Mancini, Jerome Havrda, Cliff Poirier, Bill 
Brown. Don Allard, John Flanagan, Jim Cotter, Capt. George Larkin, 
Ed DeGraw, Alan Miller, Jim Colclough, James Duggan, Al DeLuca, 
Leon Bennett, Steve Bennett. SECOND ROW: Manager Jerry Bartush, 
Terry Glynn, Clem Kacergis, Bill Hodges, John Amabile, Mike Hurley, 
Tim Cronin, Al Pepin, John Sullivan, Jim Sullivan, Jim Connolly, Stan 
Gabis, Bob Keresey, Vin Hogan, Tony LaRosa. THIRD ROW: Larry 

George Larkin 
Football Captain 



Eisenhauer, Frank Robotti, Frank Fiscal, Jim O'Brien, Bill Robinson, 
Don Tosi, Anthony Abraham, Harry Ball, Jeff Sullivan, Ross O'Hanley, 
Tom Casey, George McHugh, Frank Moretti. FOURTH ROW: Bob 
Perreault, Frank Cronin, Bob Branca, Dick Gill, Jim Murphy, Bob 
LeBlanc, Tom Hynes, Tom Keaney, Frank Keaney, Jeff Linehan, Tom 
McNamara, Don Gautreau, Frank Casey, Trainer Frank Jones. 



286 






Scoreboard 




48 


Scranton 





14 


Syracuse 


24 


19 


Villanova 


21 


21 


Marquette 


13 


6 


Miami 


2 


25 


C.O.P. 


12 


40 


Detroit 





18 


Boston U. 


13 


12 


Clemson 


34 


26 


Holy Cross 


8 



Football 




Hope ran high just before the 1958 football season at 
the Heights. Coach Holavak had twenty-five returning 
lettermen and a talented group of sophomores, out of 
which he could build a potential bowl team. The new ad- 
ditions to his coaching staff, which included Neil Worden, 
the Notre Dame great, and a schedule which included 
some of the national football powerhouses made football 
experts sit up and take notice of the work being done 
at B.C. 

The bowl bids did not materialize, but the season was 
a success, with seven wins and three losses, two of the 



three losses coming at the hands of Syracuse and Clem- 
son, teams which played in the Orange Bowl and Sugar 
Bowl respectively. The other loss was to a fired-up Vil- 
lanova team. These defeats however were compensated 
by a decisive win over Boston University and a complete 
rout of Holy Cross. 

The national recognition and student spirit that has 
been lacking for many years at Boston College has re- 
turned as the result of a good schedule and a more excit- 
ing and imaginative brand of football. 



287 




Give me a "B" and the season starts. 




Don Allard straightarms a Scranton defenseman. 



Boston College 



48 



Scranton 




The Boston College Eagles, picked by many in the pre- 
season polls as one of the powerhouses in the East, 
swamped an undermanned Scranton team, 48-0, before 
15,000 Homecoming fans at Alumni Stadium. 

Led by AIl-American candidate, Don Allard, B.C. 
moved 58 yards in 12 plays, climaxed by AUard's rolling 
out and going the last six yards himself. Minutes later, 
Miller took an Allard pitchout and scampered 30 yards 
for another touchdown. Allard ran the conversion. 

Scranton was unable to move against the Eagles big 
forward wall and again, led by Bill Brown, the Eagles 
moved the length of the field and climaxed the drive with 
a six-yard pass. Brown to Tom Casey. 

B.C. completely dominated the second half. Allard 
spotted Jim Colclough and threw him a strike for a 22 
yard touchdown, and Brown hit Kacergis on a 16-yard 
pass play for B.C.'s fifth touchdown. In the final period 
sophomore quarterback, John Amabile passed 15 yards 
to sophomore Bill Robertson for their first varsity score, 
and late in the period, Bob Keresey ran 15 yards for the 
final score. 

Much of the credit for the 300 yards gained by rushing 
must go to the line, whose consistent high caliber play 
cut holes in the Scranton defense all afternoon. 



Jim Cotter gatliers in an Allard pass. 




A passing attack dominated tlie first half of tlie Syracuse game. 



Following their rout of Scranton, the team headed for 
Syracuse and competition of a different sort. Playing in 
the rain before 15,000 spectators, the Eagles completely 
overwhelmed the Orangemen for the first period and a 
half. They scored first when Don AUard found the handle 
on a punt which had been blocked by Don Tosi and, 
assisted by a perfect block from Leon Bennett, raced 55 
yards to pay dirt. AUard, attempting to pass for the point 
after, was downed before he could find a receiver. Nine 
minutes later, B.C. had the ball back on the Syracuse 39 
yard line and end Jack Flanagan, cutting neatly behind 
defender Tom Stephens, gathered in a perfect strike from 
AUard for the second score. Fullback Jim Duggan then 
drove over for the points. This was the last time that the 
Eagles would hit pay dirt. Syracuse scored once before 
the first half ended. 

Boston College came out for the second half without 
the services of Game Captain Cliff Porier, whose defensive 
play had been superb, and without Don AUard, the man 
responsible for the team's two first-period scores. The 
injuries of these two men made the difference between 
victory and defeat. Syracuse added six points when the 
Orange quarterback. Chuck Zimmerman scooped up a 
blocked punt by Billy Brown and raced 32 yards for the 
score. 

Bill Brown, filling in at quarterback, was never better 
as he completed 11 of 23 passes. Syracuse, however, took 
advantage of the breaks in the fourth period, recovering 
two B.C. fumbles and scoring on both. 

Halfback Jim Colclough was voted the outstanding 
back of the game, catching seven passes for 1 II yards and 
Jim Duggan averaged five yards per carry in 13 tries. 



Boston College 



14 



24 



Syracuse 



This was the story of the second half. 




289 






Without the services of their number-one quarterback, 
Don Allard, the Eagles met a spirited Villanova squad 
on the sun-drenched gridiron of Alumni Stadium. The 
outcome was a heartbreaking 21-19 loss. 

The Eagles' nemesis all afternoon was Jim Grazione. 
He made his presence felt throughout the entire game, 
running for two touchdowns, passing for another and 
knocking down a pass attempt by Bill Brown that would 
have tied the game. 

B.C. drew first blood when Jim Colclough plunged two 




Colclough plunges over for the first BC score. 



yards for the TD, climaxing a 64 yard march. Not dis- 
heartened by this quick strike, Villanova capitalized on an 
intercepted pass and drove to the goal. The conversion 
succeeded, giving them a half-time lead of 7-6. 

Neither team could muster up an offense in the early 
stages of the third period but another interception by 
Villanova put the Wildcats again in a position to score. 
This time Grazione spotted his halfback John Daniels 
and hit the speedster with a pass covering 44 yards and 
making it a 15-6 lead. 

B.C. retaliated, led by Frank Robotti, and Al Miller 
drove the last two yards to pay dirt. Jim Cotter's conver- 
sion was good. Three plays later. Grazione faked a pitch 
out and scrambled forty-eight yards for a touchdown. 

Moments later B.C. capitalized on a Villanova fumble 
and consecutive passes from Bill Brown to John Flanagan 
gave B.C. another touchdown. The all important pass for 
the conversion failed and a spirited Villanova squad re- 
turned to Philadelphia with a hard earned victory. 




Miller finds a big hole for another TD. 



Boston College 



19 



21 



Villanova 



Kacergis makes a grab for a 20 yard gain. 




290 



Mike Holavak's woes mounted prior to the team's trip 
to Milwaukee with Don AUard still out with a knee 
injury sustained in the Syracuse game. Bill Brown forced 
to quit football because of a ruptured spleen suffered in 
a scrimmage, and his third string quarterback, John 
Amabile suffering with a broken finger. 

Despite these handicaps, the Eagles came home with 
a 21-13 victory. They had to come from behind twice but 
once they got a 14-13 lead on Jim Cotter's placements 
they were not threatened. Marquette scored first in the 
second period on a one yard plunge by quarterback Hall. 
B.C. retaliated with a score on a pass from Amabile to 
Flanagan in the end zone. Cotter converted. Marquette 
scored again on a twenty-six yard pass, and their extra- 
point try was good. With twenty-three seconds left in the 
first half, Amabile threw to Jim Colclough in the end zone 
and the glue-fingered halfback wrested the ball from two 
defenders for a touchdown. Cotter's conversion put the 
Eagles ahead. During the second half it was a battle of 




The line makes a stand in the mud. 




Eisenhauer leaps high but comes a little short. 



Boston College 



21[ 
13 



Marquette 



the lines until Alan Miller broke away for a twenty-yard 
touchdown in the opening seconds of the final period. 
Again the point was made. 

Singled out for their fine performance in the game are 
Sophomore John Amabile for his brilliant job in filling in 
for the injured AUard, and Jim Cotter for his three con- 
versions. On the whole it was a fine team effort. The game 
ball was presented to Bill Brown who was recuperating 
from his operation. 



Again the line holds firm. 




A brave 11,000 fans shivered through one of the best 
and wettest games played at the Heights in years. In a 
6-2 victory over Miami, the Eagles' line was again the 
deciding factor. However, some much needed help came 
from Junior halfback Vin Hogan. In the third period, a 
quick kick by Bill Robinson from his own 19 fell dead 
on the Miami 35 yard line. Three plays later guard Frank 
Casey lay in the mud beneath a pile of players near mid- 
field with a Miami fumble tucked under his arm. Before 
the fans had taken their seats, speedy halfback Vin Hogan 
had dashed through the Miami line and was easily winning 
his race with the Miami secondaries to the corner of the 
end zone. 

The strong Eagle line, ankle-deep in mud, dug in and 
prevented Miami from penetrating beyond the B.C. 39 
yard line throughout the remainder of the game. Miami's 
talented quarterback, Fran Curci. was continually smoth- 
ered by the Eagle forward line. Except for Hogan's run, 
B.C.'s defensive action was the highlight of the afternoon. 
The outstanding defensive play of the game was a spec- 
tacular one-handed interception by Jim Cotter, who 
played the best game of his career. 

Miami's lone tally came in the first half when, Poirier's 
center, from the two-yard line, sailed out of the end zone 
— one of Cliff's very rare mistakes. 

It was a win that did much to build B.C.'s reputation. 



Tosi goes high in an attempt to catch a 
slippery ball in the final quarter. 



Boston College 



Miami 



The well-remembered Hogan run for a TD. 




292 




Flanagan lands an elusive Bass as Hogan backs him up. 






Boston College fans saw one of the best running backs 
in the country when Dick Bass and his College of the 
Pacific team came east. Bass put on a running show for 
16,000 fans that they are not likely to forget for many 
years. Taking the opening kick-off on his own goal line, 
he spurted and side-stepped 72 yards along the sidelines, 
leaving prostrate Eagles in his wake. He was responsible 
for both of COP's touchdowns. However, the B.C. line 



Duggan rolls in for another BC score. 



Boston College 



25 



12 



College of the Pacific 



Robinson punts from the end zone. 




once again dominated its opposition and managed to con- 
tain Bass to 53 yards from scrimmage in 22 carries, about 
70 yards under his pregame average. Also on hand to 
greet Mr. Bass and his team was a healthy Don Allard. 
Don completed nine of seventeen passes in three touch- 
down drives and edged Bass for "Back of the Game" 
honors in close press box balloting. 

Six plays after Bass ran the opening kick-off to the 
B.C. 28 yard line he crashed over from the six for a TD. 
The Eagles came back and scored on a pass from Amabile 
to Flanagan, who outmaneuvered a defender to make a 
sensational flag pole catch. The Eagles, sparked by the 
passing of Don Allard, then drove 51 yards to a second 
score, a drive climaxed by a final eight yard burst by full- 
back Frank Robotti. A 43 yard pass play and an eight 
yard dash by Bass gave the Californians their final score, 
and B.C. scored twice more on two and six yard runs by 
Jim Duggan. 



293 





Casey stretches for the pass in the end zone. 



O'Hanley outraces Titan linemen for a big gain. 



Before 18,000 fans at Alumni stadium the dazzling Don 
Allard led the Boston College team to a resounding 40-0 
victory over a powerful Detroit team. In the course of the 
afternoon, Don threw three touchdown passes and scored 
once himself. 

In the first period B.C. marched 50 yards on AUard's 
passing, and scored on a 10-yard pass to Jim Duggan for 
first blood. In the opening minutes of the 2nd period, 
Allard spotted Jim Colclough in the end zone and hit 
him with a 30 yard pass for the second score. Robotti 
passed to Colclough for the conversion. 

B.C. then capitalized on a Detroit miscue; with fourth 
down and 18 yards to go for a first, the pass from center 
was poor and B.C. took over on the Detroit 9 yard line. 
Allard hit Eisenhauer for the third touchdown. The same 
combination was successful in the conversion. 



Throughout the first half Detroit's line could not con- 
tain the running of Robotti and Duggan as the B.C. line 
opened large holes and created opportunities to gain big 
yardage. The first time the Eagles had possession in the 
second half Allard directed a 69 yard march in 13 winning 
plays for the next tally, Allard scoring from the one 
yard line. 

Before the 3rd period ended, B.C. had scored again 
when the reserves directed by Ross Hanley, moved 30 
yards. Bill Robinson racing from five yards out. In the 
waning minutes of the last period, sophomore John 
Amabile passed 23 yards to sophomore Jeff Sullivan for 
another touchdown. 

Don Allard had the best day of his career, and Col- 
clough's fine pass receiving was one of the highlights of 
the day. 



Coach Holavalt encourages from the sidelines. 



Boston College 



40 



Detroit 




294 



Boston College 




18 
13 



Boston University 



Hogan goes into the end zone with the winning touchdown. 



In the best game of the 65 year Boston College-Boston 
University rivalry, the men from the Heights beat the 
Terriers 18-13 before a capacity crowd at Alumni Stadium. 

The first half saw vicious line play with neither team 
scoring until the middle of the second quarter when B.C. 
sophomore Don Gautreau recovered a B.U. fumble on 
the B.U. 30 yard line. Five plays later Allard passed to 
John Flanagan for the score. 

After a spectacular half time show by the Boston Col- 
lege marching band, the 26,000 fans witnessed a complete 
reversal. During the third period each team scored two 
touchdowns within five minutes. 

B.U. scored first on a 35 yard pass, DeNitto to Maio. 
B.C. came back and on beautifully executed draw plays, 
Yin Hogan scampered 36 yards to pay dirt. On the suc- 
ceeding kick-off B.U.'s halfback Burgess returned the 
kick 88 yards for another B.U. score. The very next time 
B.C. got their hands on the ball they scored, Vin Hogan 
catching a screen pass from Don Allard and going all the 
way tor the winning score. 

The hard-hitting B.C. line led by John Flanagan, Steve 
Bennett, Ed DeGraw and Cliff Poirier contained the B.U. 
running attack to -8 yards. 



fm ^*s J .*# 












Colclough waits at the goal. 



Leon and Steve Bennett block BU's field goal attempt. 





Boston College 12 



Clemson 34 



Hogan picks up 6 yards against the Tigers. 



The Boston College Eagles entered the southland to 
play Clemson University, knowing that a win over the 
Tigers would assure them of a bid to the Gator Bowl. 
However, Clemson, playing before representatives from 
the Sugar Bowl and the Gator Bowl, was fired up enough 
to pin a substantial 34-12 loss on the Eagles. 

Until the final quarter, B.C. was unable to move into 
Clemson territory except for two brief occasions near mid- 
field. With the burly Clemson line containing the Boston 
College ground attack, the Clemson secondaries waited 
for Allard's aerial attack. Don, on one of his patterned 
roll-outs, was thrown for a loss and broke his collarbone. 
This was the beginning of the end for B.C. 

In the 2nd quarter Clemson scored on a 10 yard pass, 
Shingler to Cox. In the third quarter, Clemson's fullback 
Chne, raced 30 yards for their second tally, and in the 
fatal fourth period, Charlie Home, the fullback, crashed 
over from the one yard line climaxing a 92 yard march. 
The Tigers again scored on a 28 yard runback of a B.C. 
fumble. 




Jim Colclough builds up steam returning a Clemson punt. 




:: '• f^'t 



■t^r 







Jack Flanagan is wrestled to the ground 
after catching an Allard pass. 



The Eagles snapped right back with two fast touch- 
downs on the passing of sophomore John Amabile. He 
connected with Jim Colclough on two occasions, 31 and 
32 yards. A few minutes later B.C. moved 80 yards, 
largely on Amabile's passing, and Alan Miller took a two 
yard toss in the end zone for a B.C. score. To add insult 
to injury, Clemson's third-string quarterback passed 47 
yards for the final Clemson tally with 8 seconds remain- 
ing to play. It was a bitter pill to swallow — Allard out for 
the season and bowl hopes shattered. The one bright spot 
of the afternoon was sophomore John Amabile, who 
completed 7 of 10 passes for 126 yards, showing great 
promise for the future. 




The bench follows the game eagerly. 



The Eagle line was the deciding factor in the Cross game. 



Boston College 



26 



8 



Holy Cross 




Three NBC television cameras carried the Boston Col- 
lege-Holy Cross classic to an estimated eight million 
warm fans, while a capacity crowd of 26,000 shivering 
fans braved freezing temperatures to witness the game in 
person. The running game was the order of the day, and 
B.C. obeyed this order and thoroughly beat their arch 
rivals from St. James Hill 26-8. 

In the opening period, B.C. relentlessly pounded the 
Holy Cross line for short yardage until they reached the 
three-yard line when the period came to an end. With a 
fourth down and three yards to pay dirt, little John 
Amabile deftly faked to Jim Duggan and skirted the end 
for the score. This play proved to be the most spectacular 
one of the day. 

Before the cheering subsided. Tommy Greene, the 
Holy Cross quarterback, pitched a long pass to his end, 
Stecchi, who scampered 55 yards for the Cross's only 
tally. 

With Al Miller and Jim Duggan alternating carries, 
B.C. moved the ball from their own 31 to the Crusader's 
10 yard line. Then Amabile rolled out and threw a two- 
hand basketball pass to end John Flanagan who made a 
sensational diving catch for another Eagle score. 

The Eagles scored again before the half ended when 
Captain George Larkin intercepted a Greene pass and 
returned it to the Holy Cross 1 7. Again M iller and Duggan 



Al Miller charges through the Cross line 
for 5 yards and a first down. 






297 



vetf^aitm^!m^'f'*'iS^aa^- 





Duggan evades a Crusader defenseman and plunges into the end zone as 
Jim Colclough signals the touchdown. 




crashed the Holy Cross line until Duggan spun into the 
end zone for the score. In the second half the B.C. line 
forced Tommy Greene to waste his passes and many 
times tossed the quarterback for substantial losses. John 
Flanagan, Don Tosi, Steve Bennett. Ed DeGraw, and 
Leon Bennett were playing in the Holy Cross backfield 
all afternoon. 

There was no scoring in the third period, but in the 
opening minutes of the fourth quarter Al Miller thrust 6 
yards for a score climaxing a 67 yard march. The final 
two points came when Tommy Greene began to throw 
his desperation passes. He faded back just a little too far 
and the big end Jack Flanagan threw him for a safety. 

For his outstanding running, amassing a total of 156 
yards, Al Miller was awarded the O'Melia Trophy, desig- 
nating him the outstanding player of the game. Other 
O'Melia awards could easily have been given to Jim 
Duggan for his relentless driving. Jack Flanagan for his 
all-round good game, Jim Colclough for his outstanding 
defensive work, Ed DeGraw for his devastating blocking 
and tackling, Steve Bennett and Jim Cotter for their great 
work in holding the Crusaders' running attack. 




John Flanagan grabs Amabile's famous basketball 
pass for BC's second touchdown. 



The sweet taste of victory. 



298 




Senior members of the football team were (front) Jack Flanagan, Leon 
Bennett, Ed DeGraw, George Larkin, Al Pepin, Steve Bennett, Jim 
Cotter, Jerry Havrda, (back) Don Allard, Al DeLuca, Cliff Poirier, Jim 



Duggan, Al Miller, Jim Colclough, Bill Brown, George Mancini, Tim 
Cronin, and John Sullivan. 



Rev. Joseph L. Shea, S.J. 
Faculty Moderator of Athletics 



Mr. William J. Flynn 
Director of Athletics 





299 









4A" 













SEATED: Jack McAuliffe, Jim Power, Barry McGrath, Captain 
George Gierscli, Jack Magee, Bob Latkaney, Jack Schoppmeyer. 
STANDING: Manager Hank Bowen, Kevin Loughery, Ray Falvey, 



Frank Quinn, Rudy Von Burg, Ray Shaller, Vin McKeever, Frank 
McArdle, Chuck Chevalier, Coach Don Martin. 



George Giersch 
Basketball Captain 






Scoreboard 




80 


Rhode Island 


67 


72 


Holy Cross 


63 


79 


Northeastern 


38 


70 


NYU 


81 


81 


U. Connecticut 


55 


87 


Tufts 


40 


67 


Brown 


54 


74 


Seton Hall 


66 


98 


Brown 


78 


60 


Providence 


67 


70 


St. Bonaventure 


82 


66 


Fairfield 


56 


67 


Georgetown 


73 


73 


Suffolk 


51 


51 


Providence 


49 


78 


Syracuse 


71 


63 


Harvard 


49 


69 


Villanova 


85 


72 


Navy 


78 


79 


Brandeis 


65 


44 


Providence 


51 


65 


U. Massachusetts 


68 


76 


U. Detroit 


62 


55 


Boston U. 


54 


77 


Colby 


73 


72 


Holy Cross 


82 




Basketball 




Don Martin 
Basketball Coach 



In the first week of December the die was cast, so 
thought many of the people in basketball circles. Dino 
Martin now had what he had been waiting for since he 
first took the job as head basketball coach at the Heights. 
He had depth and a starting five which was capable of 
matching any team in the East. Each man possessed the 
capability of scoring 20 points on a given night. 



George Giersch, the team captain, had been a consistent 
scorer and rebounder since his sophomore year. Barry 
McGrath, although not a great scorer, relied mostly on 
his unique defensive ability and his rebounding strength. 
John Magee, whose court savey was responsible for many 
points, was outstanding for his commanding type of play. 
Joining these regulars from last year was a gifted group 



301 




Magee races down court against Detroit. 



Loughery controls the rebound. 





McGrath starts the Connecticut game. 



of sophomores who added much to round out the starting 
five. Among them were Kevin Loughery, whose scoring 
feats during his freshman year are still commented on, and 
the indomitable "Chuckle" Chevalier from Charles- 
town, who has often been compared to Bob Cousy. 

To back up this star-studded starting five was Frank 
McArdle, who could at any time replace one of the others, 
seniors "Luke" Latkany and Jim Power, juniors Rudy 
Von Burg, Jack Schoppmeyer, and Jack McAuliffe, and 
sophomores Dick Shaller, Frank Quinn, Tim McKeever 
and Ray Falvey. All were experienced players and Coach 
Martin had more confidence in his bench than ever be- 
fore in his B.C. career. 

The optimism of the early season grew with successive 
wins over Rhode Island, Holy Cross and Northeastern. 
In the Rhode Island game Kevin Loughery tossed in 34 
points, the team's high for the season, and led the Eagles 
to an 80-67 triumph. 

In the dedication game against Holy Cross at Roberts 
Center, Loughery and Magee combined to score a total 
of 41 points to down the floundering Crusaders 72-63. 
The game gave evidence of early season jitters, but B.C. 
set a precedent that was to continue throughout the sea- 
son, giving them an unbeaten record in all their home 
games. 

In Madison Square Garden the team met its first defeat 



of the season at the hands of a strong N.Y.U. squad. Led 
by Ail-American candidate Cal Ramsey who scored 21 
points, the New Yorkers downed the Eagles 81-70, but 
not without learning that the Martinmen were a team to 
be reckoned with. 

Following the N.Y.U. loss the B.C. Eagles ran off a 
string of four straight victories over the University of 
Connecticut, Tufts, Brown, and Seton Hail. Loughery 
led the scoring with 22 points against the strong U. Conn, 
team, 81-55. Tufts was completely outclassed by the 
talented Eagles, 87-40, and the story was the same in the 
Brown game which saw B.C. triumph over the "Little 
Staters" 67-54. Immediately before Christmas the Martin- 
men again invaded the New York area and beat a good 
Seton Hall team 94-66. Senior John Magee showed the 
way in this tilt netting 18 points and displaying his great 
instinctive court generalship. 

After a brief two day rest Dino Martin readied the 
Eagles for the Holiday Tournament at Providence. Before 
a sellout crowd of 3500, B.C. ran up its highest point 




The Team maps strategy 



McGrath leaps high for two points. 



& t40k 





Giersch sinks one against B.U. 



total of the season, defeating Brown 98-78 in the semi- 
finals. Charlie Chevalier topped the scorers with 23 
points. In the final, B.C. met a well-drilled Providence 
club, losing a thrilling game 67-60. 

The B.C. Eagles rode by limousine to Buffalo, New 
York, to meet St. Bonaventure's, one of the top teams in 
the nation. Here a tired Eagle squad met and lost to the 
taller Bonnies 82-70, before a packed Memorial Audi- 
torium audience. Kevin Loughery, the sensational sopho- 
more, again garnered scoring honors for B.C. by netting 
16 points. 

After a brief rest, the Eagles played host to one of their 
sister schools, Fairfield University. Although closely re- 
lated, the Martinmen showed no charity in pinning a 
66-56 defeat on the men from Connecticut. It was in this 
tilt that senior John Magee played his best game, throw- 
ing in 22 points and assisting in a great many more. 

Following a 74-67 loss to Georgetown, B.C. came 
through with four consecutive wins. After defeating 
Suffolk 73-51, the Eagles again met their old rivals, the 
Friars from Providence. In the most exciting game of the 
year at the Roberts Center, the team defeated the N.I.T. 
bound Providence unit 51-49, the winning score coming 
in the last two seconds of the game as Kevin Loughery 
tossed in one of his famous jump shots to give Dino 
Martin his triumph of the year. By winning this game B.C. 



Magee tries a jump sliot, while McGrath 
and Loughery wait for the rebound. 



304 




defeated one of the best defensive teams in the nation and 
a team which is known as a "giant killer" in basketball 
circles, having defeated St. John's of New York, Villa- 
nova, Notre Dame, and St. Bonaventure's. 

However, all the road trips were not disastrous. The 
Martinmen defeated a strong Syracuse squad 78-69, in a 
game in which Charlie Chevalier not only emerged as the 
top scorer with 24 points, but dazzled the Syracuse squad 
with his fantastic ball-handling antics. In a terrific display 
of teamwork, the B.C. quintet thoroughly demoralized a 
Harvard squad 63-49, Kevin Loughery again showing the 
way with 19 points. 

Just after mid-year exams the squad traveled to the 
city of Brotherly Love to meet the tough Villanova team. 
Against what was considered by many players the best 
team they faced all year, the Eagles met with a stinging 
defeat 85-69. The next night the B.C. hoopsters invaded 
Annapolis but met with defeat at the hands of the well- 
conditioned Middies in a game which could have easily 
gone into the win column. Kevin Loughery showed why 
he is considered one of the best players in New England 
by dropping in 26 points. 

Mid-year exams struck a blow to the basketball squad. 
Four members of the team were deficient scholastically 
and were forced to sit out the second semester. This loss 
was felt greatly when the Eagles met for the third time the 
Providence Friars. Tn a suspenseful tilt, the Eagles fell 



m 







The bench waits tensely. 



McGrath tips in two points against Providence. 




305 






/'*s 



before the charges of Joe Mulaney 51-44, a loss which 
almost completely shattered B.C.'s hopes of a post season 
tournament bid. 

After this game the Eagles journeyed to Amherst to 
meet the University of Massachusetts. Every good team 
during the course of the season has one or two bad games. 
This was B.C.'s. The team suffered a loss at the hands of 
a spirited U. Mass. squad 68-65. This defeat revived the 
floundering Eagles who picked themselves oif the floor 
and ran off three successive wins over a tough Boston 
University, Detroit, and Colby. 

In the tight win over Boston University, Senior Jim 
Power tossed in what proved to be the winning basket 
with only 20 seconds remaining in the game. The strong 
rebounding of George Giersch who controlled both 
boards during the contest proved to be a definite factor 
in this big win. Senior Barry McGrath was high man in 
this low-scoring contest with 15 points. 

Following the BU game the Martinmen played host to 




Kfll***''"**^*' 



George Gierscli races in for a lay-up. 



McGrath stretches for the rebound of Giersch's lay-up. 




306 




McGrath and Falvey co-operate on a tip in. 



the University of Detroit and defeated the Titians in over- 
time 78-62. At the end of the regulation game the score 
was 62-62, but in the overtime B.C. exploded for 16 points 
while holding Detroit scoreless. George Giersch was re- 
sponsible for 9 of the 16 points in the overtime period, 
while John Magee took scoring honors with 22 points. 

Preparing for the game with their arch-rivals. Holy 
Cross, the Eagles beat a determined Colby team 77-73. 
Sophomore Charlie Chevalier took scoring honors with 
25 points. In the exciting conclusion of the season at 
Worcester the Martinmen lost to a greatly improved Holy 
Cross squad 82-72. 

Credit must be given to Seniors George Giersch, John 
Magee, Barry McGrath, Luke Latkany, and Jim Power, 
and to Coach Don Martin for giving Boston College its 
third straight winning season. 




Magee passes off. 



Quinn controls the jump ball. 





FRONT ROW: James Logue, Robert Leonard, John Cusack, John 
Madden, Joseph Jangro, Donald O'Neill, Edward Smith, Ronald Walsh, 
Robert Rudman. SECOND ROW: Coach John Kelley, William Daley, 



Thomas Martin, Richard Riley, Robert Eamiglietti, Trainer Frank Jones, 
Owen Hughes, Clark Duncan, Kevin O'Donnell, John Zirkel, David 
Pergola, Jay Mahoney. 



Joe Jangro 
Hockey Captain 



308 




Scoreboard 



3 


Harvard 


1 


3 


Brown 


2 


7 


Yale 


3 


6 


Princeton 


3 


6 


St. Lawrence 


5 


2 


Clarkson 


6 


10 


R.P.I. 


5 





Michigan State 


6 


7 


Providence 


2 


8 


Northeastern 


2 


7 


Brown 


5 


3 


Harvard 


2 


I 


Boston U. 


5 


6 


Colby 


3 


6 


Harvard 


4 


3 


Dartmouth 


4 


8 


Army 


4 


7 


Boston U. 


4 


6 


Providence 


<■ 


2 


Clarkson 


7 


4 


St. Lawrence 


6 


5 


Harvard 


3 


1 


R.P.L 


4 


3 


Boston U. 


1 



\ 



Hockey 




The 1958-59 hockey season was one of a definitely new 
look at Boston College. The addition of the McHugh 
Forum, the superb leadership of Captain Joe Jangro, and 
the inclusion of many talented sophomores on the roster 
gave Coach Kelley an opportunity for which he had been 
waiting for many seasons. 



At the outset of the season, the hockey experts pre- 
dicted that the Eagles would be a mediocre team and could 
be expected to pull few major upsets during the course of 
the season. In March these same experts looked back 
and saw that the "Kelley skaters" had won the coveted 
Bean Pot Tourney symbolizing Boston Hockey supremacy 



309 




The disputed goal in the Clarkson game. 



Daley scores against Providence. 







^^a^ma^" 





Logue saves against Providence. 



Hughes is thwarted by B.U. goalie. 



and had received the nomination to represent the East in 
the NCAA College Hockey Championship at Troy, New 
York. 

The season began with the dedication of the new rink 
in early December before a crowd of 4000 fans who 
stayed to watch the Eagles win a decisive 3-1 victory over 
Harvard. This was the first of four victories over the 
Crimson during the season and set the Eagles off to a 
promising start. 

This win was followed by a string of four straight vic- 
tories over Brown 3-2, Yale 7-3, Princeton 6-3, and St. 
Lawrence 6-5 in overtime. In the most exciting game of 
the season, the Eagles beat the Larries, who had been 
considered the top team in the East. The five-game win- 
ning streak was snapped by the Canadian-laden Clarkson 
team 6-2 in a game which stands as an example of how 
hockey should be played. The Eagles bounced back and 
thoroughly beat a strong RPI sextet 10-5 in a game which 
saw sophomore Bill Daley score three goals. The end of 
December found the Eagles ranked as the number-one 
team in the East. 

In the Christmas Tournament at the Boston Arena, 
B.C. suffered their only shutout of the season by losing to 
Michigan State 6-0 in a game that was harder fought than 
the score indicates. 

The men from the Heights gathered their forces to- 
gether after Christmas and won four straight with vic- 
tories over Providence 7-2. Northeastern 8-2, Brown 7-5, 
and the second win of the season over Harvard 3-2 in 
overtime. 






Leonard drives through RPI defenders. 




Hughes scores on rebound against Dartmouth. 



312 



Daley is stopped by Dartmouth goalie. 





The third loss of the season came at the hands of Boston 
University, led by Canadian Bob Marquis, who with 
three goals demonstrated why he is considered by many 
the best college hockey player in the East. The Eagles 
bounded back and handed Colby a 6-3 defeat in Water- 
ville, Maine. 

The team which at the start of the season was supposed 
to be an also-ran now posted eleven wins and three losses 
at the mid-season. Hard-playing sophomores Jim Logue, 
Bill Daley, and Red Martin, and senior Captain Joe 
Jangro had changed the minds of the early season skeptics. 
Seniors Boyle, Madden, and O'Neil gave Coach Kelley's 
charges the experience that was necessary to turn this 
young team into an effective playing unit. 

The Eagles started the stretch drive with their third 
win over Harvard, beating the Johnnies 6-4 in the open- 
ing game of the Bean Pot Tourney. During the tourna- 
ment, the team journeyed to Hanover, New Hampshire 
where they sustained a 4-3 loss to Dartmouth. 

In the finals of the Bean Pot, the Eagles vindicated an 
earlier loss to BU by beating their "Commonwealth 



Smith crashes into RPI goalie. 



Martin scrambles for rebound. 




K^Vt 



313 





Pergola is foiled by B.U. goalie. 



Cusack scores winning goal against Dartmouth. 



Daley scores against Providence, with assist by Walsh. 




Avenue cousins" 7-4 before 8,500 in the Boston Garden. 
In this contest, the Eagles scored four goals in the first 
period and held Bob Marquis, BU's sensational Canadian, 
scoreless for the first time in the season. 

Before leaving for up-state New York, the team de- 
feated Providence 6-4. The New York games were disas- 
trous for the highly rated Eagles. They suffered defeats 
to Clarkson 7-2 and St. Lawrence 6-4, and after their 
fourth win over Harvard, returned to New York to lose 
4-1 to R.P.I. 

These losses dimmed the prospects of a berth in the 
N.C.A.A. tournament and great pressure was put on the 
Eagles to finish the rest of the season undefeated. 

In the big game of the year before an overflow crowd 
at the McHugh Forum, B.C. decisively beat B.U. 3-1. 
Again the Eagles blanked the high scoring Terrier center, 
Bob Marquis. Another loss was vindicated when the 
Eagles thoroughly demoralized a Dartmouth team 5-1 in 
their final game at the McHugh Forum. Two days later, 
B.C. received a bid to the N.C.A.A. Tournament. 





Cusack screens for Martin. 



B.U. defensemaa clears puck from Eagle attackers. 




315 




Coach Kelley keeps a watchful eye on the proceedings. 



NCAA 
TOURNAMENT 

A Triumph 

for 

Boston College Hockey 



316 




At the conclusion of the season the hockey team flew 
to Troy, N. Y., followed by a hundred fifty fans, for the 
annual NCAA Invitational Hockey Tournament. Oppos- 
ing such teams as North Dakota, Michigan State, and St. 
Lawrence, B.C. was decidedly the underdog, and was 
expected to finish a poor last. But by playing a brand of 
hockey that amazed the experts and surprised even the 
most avid rooters the team defeated their eastern rival, 
St. Lawrence, and lost to the powerful Michigan State 
team by only a point to return home as eastern champs 
and as a respected power in national collegiate hockey. 

Facing Michigan State in their first game, the team 
showed itself to be a hard, fast, and disciplined fighting 
unit. A spectacular defense held the western team to 4 
points, while an unrelenting offense was responsible for 3, 
resulting in a nip and tuck contest that until the final 
whistle could have gone either way. 

On the following afternoon a team exhausted from its 
efforts of the previous night took the ice against a well- 
rested St. Lawrence sextet. In a game that lasted through 
one and a half overtimes and that was played for forty 
minutes on sheer will power. Captain Joe Jangro led the 
icemen to as thrilling a victory as hockey fans are likely 
to see for many years, defeating their opponents 7-6. It 
was a true team effort, one which required the efforts of 
every member of the squad and which saw many of the 
players remain in their positions or return to them even 
when sustaining injuries. 

Singled out for exceptional performance during the 
tourney were Joe Jangro who was elected to the All-Star 
Team and Jim Logue who made the second team. Coach 
"Snooks" Kelley, the man responsible for B.C.'s hockey 
successes for over three decades, was justly rewarded by 
being chosen the NCAA's "Coach of the Year." 




Daley races in fur another unassisted goal. 




Daley races for a loose puck. 



The net is well protected by Walsh, Jangro, Logue, and Martin. 




N 




•^^ W X 




Walsh to Hughes for a score against Michigan. 



317 



The mainstays of the pitching staff, 
George Giersch, Karl Burgess, and 
Jim Curtin. 



Hard-hitting outfielders Pete 
McLaughlin and Jim Cotter. 



Two members of a solid infield, 
Joe Kelley and Al DeLuca. 



318 





Ray Stebbins 
Baseball Captain 




Starting his second year as head coach at the Heights, 
Eddie Pellagrini will continue his attempts to put Boston 
College back in the top ranks of eastern NCAA circles. 
This year he will look to a strong pitching staff and a 
talented infield for a long awaited winning season. The 
squad, led by Captain Ray Stebbins, is an experienced 
one with twelve lettermen returning from the 1958 season. 

The big bats of Joe Kelley, Pete McLaughlin, Dick 
Tierney, and Jim Cotter will supply the punch, while the 
strong arms of such veterans as George Giersch, Karl 



Burgess, and Jim Curtin should prove adequate to check 
the opposition's bats. Giersch, last year's workhorse on 
the mound, compiled a 4 and 4 record, and Jim Curtin 
was second in the win department with a record of 
3 and 2. 

Last year's team was comprised also of many talented 
sophomores. Having gained some much needed experi- 
ence, they will assist the returning veterans in providing 
the Eagles with a very bright future on the diamond. 



319 







COLLESE 






COLLGBe 






51- 



1958-59 Track Team 



Jack Dempsey 
Track Captain 




Under the guardianship of Coach Bill Gilligan, track 
is again coming to the fore in the Boston College athletic 
picture. With the new facilities in the Roberts Center and 
a new and enthusiastic group of underclassmen, the pros- 
pects of the cindermen are far more promising. 

Led by Captain John Joyce and senior Jack McCor- 
mack, the cross-country squad, though undermanned, 
made good showings in their dual meets with New 
England colleges and finished fifth in the New England 
Intercollegiate Championship at Storrs, Connecticut. 

During the indoor season, the trackmen entered all the 
major meets in Boston and New York, and defeated both 
Northeastern and Bowdoin in dual meets. In both these 
meets, senior John Joyce won the two mile and Captain 
Jack Dempsey took the 35 lb. weight throw. 




The outdoor season was highly successful. With Jack 
Joyce in both the two mile and the mile, Captain Jack Demp- 
sey in the weights, O'Shaughnessey, O'Leary and Quinn in 
the middle distances, and Falla in the sprints, Coach 
Gilligan came up with a nucleus of a strong cinder squad. 



The hard work and fortitude of Coach Bill Gilligan are 
the essential elements of the new rise of the sport which 
in years gone by was on a par with football. It seems now 
certain that under his guiding hand, track will again reach 
the heights of former years. 



321 




1958 Cross-Country Squad 




Dempsey hurls 35 lb. weight. 



McCormack, O'Leary, and Joyce practice a few laps. 



322 





Golf team members are (front) Dick Ganong, Jim Mahoney, Kevin 
Folan, (rear) Tony Busa, Jim Power, Dick Manning, and Larry 
Martin. 



Jim Mahoney 
Golf Captain 



This year the ranks of the Boston College golf team in- 
clude some of the outstanding golfers in the state. Led 
by former state champion Charlie Volpone and CYO 
champion Dick Ganong, the Eagle hnksmen have the 
potential to be the best team in New England. Behind 
Volpone and Ganong will be Captain Jim Mahoney, 
Dick Manning, Jack McAuliffe, Larry Martin, and Ted 
Huff, all potential winners in any match. A vast improve- 
ment in the club's standing is expected this year, with 
Fordie Pitts, former Boston College captain and one of 
the top golfers in New England, as the team's new coach. 

The schedule includes the Annual Miami Invitational 
Tournament and the Eastern and New England Inter- 
collegiate Tournaments. The team also played twelve of 
the leading colleges and universities in the New England 
areas in individual matches. 




323 



With the arrival of the long-awaited Roberts Center, 
the intramural system greatly expanded. The IM office 
reported the largest participation in intramural sports in 
B.C. history, as the new gym made available to all facili- 
ties for squash, hand-ball, boxing, wrestling and weight- 
lifting. The new physical plant at the Heights has given 
the student body more incentive for participation in the 
University's extensive intramural program. 

The football title was won this year by the "Under- 
takers," a senior section from C.B.A., who defeated the 
"Mau Mau," a senior team from A&S in a thrilling 
game — 7-0. 

The "Assets," a tall, well-rounded junior squad from 
C.B.A., played the "Morticians" for the basketball 
championship. The "Morticians," who emerged victori- 
ous 22-17, were the same C.B.A. seniors who won the 
football title under the name "Undertakers." 




Malcom McLoud 
Director of Intramurals 



Bill Clarke passes as "Undertakers" win IM football championship. 





Bob Miller and Bill Taupier were among the many who 
kept the squash courts in constant use. 




Jim Duggan scores in the semi-flnals of the IM basketball championship. 



The weight-lifting room was one of 
the most popular innovations. 



Intramurals 




325 



The School of Education prepares 
to invade the Heights. 




Womens Sports 




The School of Education basketball team 
poses before a game with Regis. 



Co-ed sports this year experienced a rapid and exten- 
sive development. Under the auspices of the Women's 
Recreational Association the basketball team in the 
School of Education enjoyed one of its more successful 
seasons, defeating Regis, Boston Teacher's College and 
Emmanuel College. The Nursing School sponsored its 
own basketball team, which also fared well in its games 
against other nursing schools and colleges. 

One of the most popular innovations on the Chestnut 
Hill campus was the Women's Rifle Team, under the 



direction of Sgt. Nickerbocker of the ROTC. The sched- 
ule of this team included both classes in the use of the 
rifle and actual competition against other schools. 

These sports, together with volleyball and archery, 
constituted a well-rounded sports program for the coed, 
and the enthusiasm with which this program was re- 
ceived ensured the future growth and development of all 
women's sports both in the School of Ed and the Nursing 
School. 



326 






FEATURES 



327 




REV. CHARLES W. LYONS, S.J. 
Fourteenth President of Boston College 



Great works are seldom accomplished with one bold stroke. More often 
they are the result of long planning and slow, painstaking work. The 
monuments which Father Charles W. Lyons, S.J. left behind him were 
built in just such a way. Fr. Lyons was not a spectacular man, but he was a 
man of great energy and perseverence, and above all of extraordinary 
foresight and discretion. Proceeding cautiously but always with imagina- 
tion and intelligence, he brought to Boston College improvements and in- 
novations that were far ahead of their time. In every project that he under- 
took Fr. Lyons maintained that most difficult of balances — a careful at- 
tention to individual details combined with a broad and far-reaching out- 
look. 

These same qualities, so prominent in the former president, are among 
the specific goals of the University today. Education is neither a com- 
pilation of information nor a sudden illumining experience; it is rather an 
awareness that develops as the result of all the information and experiences 
not only of these four years but of a lifetime. And it is the educated man 
who can see the events and experiences of his life as having an importance 
beyond themselves, as parts of a larger and more significant design. Like 
Fr. Lyons, he can maintain the difficult balance between life's trivial events 
and its larger meaning. 



m 



/"•i - 



M» 



»- r* ^ *" 



/ ii-' 



ifl I 






:nii 





In many ways St. Mary's Hall is the center of life on the Boston College campus. 



It is a place of many activities 



330 





and meditation. 




331 



But even more varied than 
the activity in St. Mary's is 
the life of the undergradu- 
ates. 




A life that is sometimes com 
pletely undisciplined 



332 



... at other times strictly 
disciplined 



or even totally inactive 





occasionally serious 



O Ci 



more often social. 






333 




It is a life that can be thought of as a search — for direction 




. for linowledge 



for books 



or for mail. 





The answers which we seek are 
found in solitary study 




in practical experience 



and in instruction. 




335 




To find these answers is 
a task which demands 
patience and attention. 



Some persevere. 



Others don't. 




336 




But the life of a student is 
not entirely serious. 




There is time also for congregation 



¥m 



*„t' 



\\ 


i 




a li i 


f 




i! .. ' 
ii U 

1 
( 


"1 
1 
1 ^ 


1 

» 



for conversation 



and for contemplation. 



WWj 



II 
11 



, SlSi ill: ilj 



SI It ill s^ i 



337 




For many, the center of activity is 
the caf , a place of gregariousness 




But not all leisure time is spent 
in such noisy surroundings. 




Usually quieter 




. more secluded 



. . . and more familiar places 
are frequented. 




339 



Access to these places is a problem 
solved only by the reckless, 




340 



The undergraduate life was enriched 
by a series of lecturers of varied back- 
grounds and areas of accomplishment, 
each of them making a distinct con- 
tribution, 





historical insight 



Samuel Eliot Morison 



. intellectual piety 




W.H. Auden 



Helen C. White 




poetic depth 




Richard Cardinal Gushing, Francis Carduial Spelhnan, Rev. Michael P. Walsh, S.J. 

. . . religious vitality 
. . critical acumen 




. homely wisdom. 



Carl Sandburg 




343 



P^-v-;-- , 






^^T''' -''■■ . 






■■*»&"■- y ' ' ■ ■ i' 






j^1^^v;^-4^/- 












tS^i%v"- 








c'^M 






'::.-. "'■'i^*#l 











Life does not cease at day's end. 



Familiar objects are 
seen in a new light. 



344 





And the campus presents a 
face unknown to many. 



■ 


11 ^ J|?r^^ *'•• ' " ^ 


^M 


9.y^ . - ^- ■ 
__ <-^ 




B 




^^^H 


Ml Mlil 









It is a time for the 
patient scientist 



and the staunch sentinel. 




345 




Night is also the time when activity 
in the dorms reaches its peak. 



Some spend their time 

in group discussions ^ 




. . . some prefer more 
active recreation 



346 





. . . some seek the solace 
of the chapel 



... and some just enjoy 
candy and conversation. 






For each group there was a different source of 
dissatisfaction — the quality of the food, 



the variety of the food, 




348 



or the lack of food. 






Yet, there are times when the differences 
disappear and all students engage 
in the same activities, 



well, almost 




349 



The activities of some 
are channeled away 
from the campus. 




350 




They extend to many places and 
encompass many events. 




M':*% 




Whatever the type of event, 
formal or informal, in a 
ballroom or a gymnasium 





. . . there are always those 
who manage to have a 
"smashing" good time. 



352 





Junior Week, a time of 
songs and skits, 
dancing and drinking, 





^ 

# 



... ended on a characteristically 
high note with the 
Junior Outing. 



353 



P ilC5*j 



>% ^ 



'A 



d 



Queen and court pose with escorts at The 1959 Senior Prom. 



Jeanne McCarthy, Queen of The 1959 Senior Prom. 




354 




Every major social event 
climaxed in a salute to beauty, 
poise, and charm — the 
selection and coronation of 
The Queen of The Ball. 





Miss Barbara Boisse receives her crown as Queen 
of The 1958 Junior Prom. 



Queen Lee Fuller, with her escort Cadet George Bulger, promenade 
beneath the crossed swords of the Honor Guard at The 1959 Military 
Ball. 






Among the traditional social events there was 
always something new 




or, something unusual. 



356 



But the innovations 
could not replace the 
old standbys. 



A familiar face 




a familiar place 



. . . and so it ends. 




Epilogue. 



This is Boston College — the buildings, the faculty, the students, the 
activities, the sports, the everyday events. This is what has constituted 
a major part ofour life for the past four years, this and much else that 
cannot be expressed in pictures or in words: the friendships that we 
formed, the lessons that we learned, the experiences both good and 
bad that we shared, and the thousand personal memories that we 
shall retain. 

But there is more than this. Boston College is not just what we 
have known and experienced. The University today is but a part of 
the College and University that has existed for ninety-six years; it is 
but the surface of an ever-growing reservoir of tradition. Boston Col- 
lege is the whole tradition, our own four years and all that preceded 
them and made them what they were. 

The real tradition on which Boston College rests must not be con- 
fused with the mock traditions which are often more prominent. The 
tradition does not exist in "For Boston" or "Hail, Alma Mater" nor 
in football victories or reunions, nor are tower bells and linden trees 
and golden eagles a part of it. It is a tradition of sweat and frustra- 
tion, of loyalty and dedication, of courage, intelligence, and persever- 
ance, a tradition composed of the labors of all the men who built this 
institution. It exists in Gasson, Bapst, Fulton, Devlin, and Lyons, 
and in all like them, both living and dead, who give generously of 
themselves to make Boston College great. 

This is the tradition of which we have become a part. It is a tradi- 
tion of which we must strive to become worthy inheritors. And it is a 
challenge which we must rise to meet. 



358 



1959 Sub Turri 



Editor-in-Chief 

John A. Madden 

Business Manager 

Chester F. Blake 

Managing Editor 

Richard A. Dowd 

Associate Editors 

Marie Lunney 
Nancy Pacious 
Joan Grindley 
Jacquiline Starr 

Assistant Editor 

Francis J. Martin 

Assistant Business Manager 
John D. Mahoney 



Faculty Editor 

WilUam E. Cratty 

Activities Editor 

Ernest W. Ferneau 

Sports Editor 

Charles B. McCuUagh 

Features Editor 

Robert S. Morton 

Theme Editor 

James M. Nee 

Copy Editor 

Adrian J. Sullivan 

Art Editors 

Samuel R. Blair 
Dermott P. O'Toole 



Advertising Manager 

Charles C. Battaglia 

Patron Manager 

Martha Zimmerman 

Social Chairman 

Richard B. Roche 

Head Collectors 

Ralph K. Benware 
John W. Canavan 
Donald L. Delisle 

Troubleshooter 

Edward J. Shaughnessy 

Moderator 

Rev. J. Frank Devine, S.J. 



Production Stajf 



Joe Gilligan, Bob Collini, Dan Rosen, Paul Laincz, John Blake, Tom Whalen, Dave Milbury, Jack Mullen, Pete 
Carroll, Paul King, Bob Keating, Tom Hughes, Pete Delmonico, Jim Cotter, Pete McLaughlin, Paul Kelly, Ray 
Asselin, Carney Gavin, Dan Geagan. 



Clerical Stajf 



Mary Watts, Mary McHale, Margie Lally, Joan Wall, Helen Foley, Anne Cullinane, Peggy Weafer, Carole Bates, 
Claire O'Toole, Carolyn Shea, Alice Kaiko, Ann Fagen, Gerry Steele, Pauline Mathieu, Anne Marie Faria, 
Frannie Besson, Sheila Mullen, Mary Pasquale, Carol Coughlin, Helen Goodwin, Anne O'Neill, Marion Rabbit, 
Nancy Langton, Anne O'Meara, Maureen Jackson, Roberta Berrane, Jeanne McGuiggin, Lydia McCarthy, 
Eleanor Frank, Wilma Fallon, June Kelly, Claire Malis, Mary Powell, Pat O'Neil, Pat Zielinski. 



Business Staff 



Dick Boudreau, Charlie Lynch, Grace Enos, Maureen Donnellan, Jeanne McCarthy, Elaine Karrol, Joan Breslin, 
Gail Collins, Helen Pastry, Tony Busa, Fred Pratson, John Fitzgerald. 



Collectors 



Pete Delmonico, Joe Hagan, Sam Scott, Joe Connolly, Joe Sayers, Bill Parks, Bill York, Jim Johnston, Bob Berra, 
Howie McClennan, Joe Leary, Bill Sherman, Al Greenberg, Bill Keough, George O'Brien, Tom Guilderson, 
Karl Burgess, Bob Manzelli, Jim Rogers, Carol Loome, Bill McCarron, Gerald Reilly, Bill MacKinnon, Joe 
Murphy, Eleanor Radzwill, Ruth Trainor, Pat Nally, Pat McGuirk. 



360 



Patrons 



Richard Cardinal Gushing 

Most Rev. Eric F. MacKenzie, D.D. 

Most Rev. Jeremiah F. Minihan, D.D. 

Very Rev. Michael P. Walsh, S.J. 

Rev. William V.E. Casey, S.J. 

Rev. Charles F. Donovan, S.J. 

Rev. W. Seavey Joyce, S.J. 

Rev. Charles B. Toomey, S.J. 

Rita P. Kelleher 



Rt. Rev. Monsignor Robert P. Barry 

Rt. Rev. William J. Daly 

Rt. Rev. Msgr. Charles A. Finn 

Rt. Rev. Msgr. Joseph M. Fitzgibbons 

Rt. Rev. Msgr. J. Furlong 

Rt. Rev. Msgr. Thomas F. Garrity 

Very Rev. Msgr. Francis J. Lally 

Rev. William J. Linehan 

Rt. Rev. Msgr. Joseph F. McGlinchey 

Rt. Rev. Msgr. Stephen F. Moran 

Rt. Rev. Msgr. Thomas J. Riley 

Mr. & Mrs. George Abel 

Dr. & Mrs. Roger J. Abizaid 

Mr. & Mrs. Joseph P. Andrews 

Mr. & Mrs. William J. Assehn, Sr. 

Mrs. Daniel J. Bailey 

Banner Cleaners 

Mr. Norman F. Barbeau 

Mr. & Mrs. B. J. Bartush 

Mr. & Mrs. Frederick Battaglia 

Mr. & Mrs. George P. Belliveau 

Mr. & Mrs. William F. Bench 

Mr. & Mrs. Leon H. Bennett 

Mr. David H. Bessom 

Mr. Ralph Beneware 

Mr. & Mrs. Gordon J. Berrane 

Mr. & Mrs. Chester W. Bielawski 

Mrs. Ruth M. Blair 

Mrs. Jessie Coakley Blake 



Mr. & Mrs. Michael Bongette 

Leopold F. Bonvouloir 

Mrs. Yvonne Boudreau 

Bourne Distributing Co. 

Mr. & Mrs. Francis G. Bowden 

Mr. Henry G. Bowen 

Mr. & Mrs. Cornelius J. Brady 

Col. & Mrs. Thomas Brady, Jr. 

Mr. Curtis N. Brauer 

Miss Helen R. Broughton 

Mr. & Mrs. H. M. Brown 

Mr. & Mrs. John P. Buckley 

Mr. & Mrs. Joseph A. Callahan 

Mr. & Mrs. William J. Campbell 

Mr. James J. Cannon, Sr. 

Mr. John Cappelletti 

Mr. Daniel J. Carney 

Mr. & Mrs. William H. Carey 

Mr. William T. Carroll 

Mr. & Mrs. Orphir Cartier 

Dr. & Mrs. Louis Cartnick 

Mr. & Mrs. Emmett M. Casavant 

Mr. & Mrs. John M. Caskin 

Mrs. Helen J. Cassidy 

Mr. Joseph W. Cece 

Mr. Julian H. Cloutier 

Mr. & Mrs. F. G. Coffey 

Mr. Edward W. Colbert 

Mr. William Colclough 

Mr. & Mrs. Charles Collini 

Mr. & Mrs. John E. Coney 

Mr. & Mrs. William J. Connell 

Mr. & Mrs. Milton E. Connelly 

Mr. Joseph M. Connolly 

Mr. & Mrs. Daniel F. Connors 

Mr. Vincent J. Coppola 

Mr. Thomas T. Considine 

Mr. Anthony D. Costa 

Mr. James P. Costello 

Mrs. Margaret E. Costello 



361 



Mr. & Mrs. Thomas L. Cotter 

Mr. John J. Cox 

Mr. & Mrs. William E. Cratty 

Mrs. John F. Crimmings 

Mr. & Mrs. Arthur A. Cronin 

Mr. & Mrs. Joseph N. Cronin 

Mr. & Mrs. Frank L. Crowley 

Mr. James A. Crowley 

Mr. Patrick J. Crowley 

Mr. & Mrs. Joseph T. Cunning 

Mrs. Doris C. Curlee 

Mr. Dominick H. D' Andrea 

Mr. L. J. DeGraw 

Mr. & Mrs. Lorenzo R. Delisle 

Mr. & Mrs. Albert DeLuca 

Mr. & Mrs. Julian S. Demeo 

Mr. & Mrs. Peter J. Derba 

Mr. Wallace J. Desautels 

Mr. Leonard J. Desmond 

Mr. & Mrs. Bernard DeSavage 

Mr. & Mrs. John R. Devine 

Mrs. James E. Devlin 

Doctor & Mrs. William F. Dewire 

Mrs. Edward A. Doherty 

Mr. & Mrs. Matthew L. Dolan 

Mr. & Mrs. John Parker Donahoe 

Mr. Martin Donahy 

Mrs. Leona L. Donovan 

Mr. John S. Dooley 

Mr. & Mrs. John F. Dowd 

Mrs. John Dowling, Sr. 

Mr. & Mrs. William Downing 

Mrs. Thomas G. Duggan 

Mr. Leo Dunn 

Mr. & Mrs. John F. Durkin 

Mr. Charles P. DriscoU 

Mr. & Mrs. Richard C. DriscoU 

Mr. Gerald E. Eisenhaur 

Mrs. Margaret Elliott 

Mrs. William F. Fagan 

Dr. William T. Fallon 

Mr. & Mrs. William W. Fallon 

Mr. Manuel Faria 



Mr. & Mrs. Thomas L. Farley 

Mr. & Mrs. Joseph P. Farmer 

Mr. & Mrs. Frederick S. Fawcett 

Mr. & Mrs. Walter J. Fitzgibbon, Sr. 

Mr. & Mrs. G. Dewey Fitzpatrick 

Mr. George F. Flanigan 

Mr. John J. Flynn 

Mr. & Mrs. John E. Folan, Jr. 

Mr. & Mrs. Gerald L. Foley 

Mr. & Mrs. James E. Foley 

Mr. & Mrs. Raymond Fontaine 

Mr. & Mrs. Herbert G. Fothergill 

Mr. Joseph H. Frates 

Mr. & Mrs. Leo P. Furcinitti 

Mr. Alfred A. Garibaldi 

Mr. Thomas J. Garrity 

Mr. & Mrs. Patrick F. Geary 

Mrs. Renton L. Giblin 

Mr. George H. Giersch 

Mr. & Mrs. William H. Gilgun 

Mr. & Mrs. Jack Giordano 

Mr. & Mrs. Leon Gosselin 

Mr. Guerino Govoni 

Mr. Ignatz Gray 

Mr. Edward S. Grennan 

Mr. Charles W. Grinnell 

Mrs. Eleanor Groden 

Mr. A. F. Guarrera 

Dr. & Mrs. Thomas F. Halpin 

Mrs. Edward T. Hanley 

Mr. & Mrs. Charles L. Harding 

Mr. & Mrs. John R. Harrigan 

Mr. & Mrs. Joseph R. Harrington 

Mr. & Mrs. Paul A. Harrington 

Mr. William L. Hartnett 

Mr. & Mrs. Jerry Havrda, Sr. 

Mr. & Mrs. George E. Hayes 

Hilco Appliance & Radio Co. 

Mrs. Ralph H. Hilsinger 

Dr. Paul R. Hinchey 

Mrs. Evelyn F. Hobbs 

Mr. John Hopkins 

Mr. & Mrs. Paul C. Hughes 



362 



Mr. John P. Hunt 

Mr. & Mrs. W. E. Huegel 

Mr. & Mrs. Harold G. Jackson 

Mr. & Mrs. Joseph F. Jordan 

Dr. J. A. Jodoin 

Mrs. Thomas E. Johnson, Sr. 

Mr. & Mrs. A. N. Johnston 

Mr. & Mrs. Harold F. Johnston 

Dr. Daniel L. Joyce, F.A.C.S. 

Mr. & Mrs. Bernard W. Judge 

Mr. & Mrs. Benjamin Kaiko 

Mr. & Mrs. Lawrence Katz 

Mr. John M. Keane 

Mr. & Mrs. Eugene B. Kelly, Sr. 

Mr. & Mrs. Joseph L. Kelly 

Mr. Thomas F. Kenney 

Mr. & Mrs. Jeffrey J. Keating 

Mr. & Mrs. Kendall H. Kiely 

Mr. & Mrs. M.F. Kiley 

Mr. & Mrs. Alfred C. King 

Mr. John Kuliesh, Sr. 

Mr. & Mrs. James Lally 

Mr. & Mrs. Andrew F. Lane 

Mr. & Mrs. William T. Langton 

Mr. Maurice S. Lapierre 

Mr. & Mrs. Frank L. Larkin 

Mr. Mark Larkin 

Mr. Alex Latkany 

Mr. & Mrs. Thomas J. Legere 

Mr. Robert C. Leonard 

Mr. Thomas W. Livingston 

Mr. Anthony LoConte 

Mr. & Mrs. Joseph W. Lucas, Sr. 

Mr. Patrick J. Lucey 

Mrs. Margaret Lunney 

Mr. & Mrs. Paul M. Lyons 

Mr. & Mrs. Robert E. Lyons 

Mr. Albert J. Lynd 

Mr. & Mrs. Charles R. MacDonald 

Mr. & Mrs. G. Milton MacDonald 

Mr. William F. Mack 

Mr. & Mrs. Edward J. MacMillan 

Mr. & Mrs. Frank J. Macolini 



Mr. & Mrs. Edward G. Madden 

Mr. Joseph V. Madden, Sr. 

Mr. Thomas F. Madden 

Mr. Joseph Magennis 

Mr. & Mrs. John E. Mahoney 

Mr. & Mrs. Joseph R. Mahoney 

Mr. & Mrs. William H. Mahoney 

Mr. Paul A. Mahony, Sr. 

Mr. & Mrs. Joseph N. Manfreda 

Mrs. Gertrude M. Manning 

Mrs. William P. Manning 

Mr. Arthur Manos 

Mr. Harold P. Mantos 

Mr. & Mrs. Alfred M. Martin 

Mr. William W. Masson 

Mr. L V. Mathieu 

Mr. & Mrs. G. Mazzola 

Mr. & Mrs. Albert J. McCarthy 

Mr. & Mrs. Jerome F. McCarthy 

Mr. John H. McCarthy 

Mrs. Mary A. McCarthy 

Mr. & Mrs. John P. McCarthy 

Mr. Thomas D. McCarthy 

Mr. William H. McClennan 

Mr. John J. McCormack, Sr. 

Mr. Eugene James McCrohan 

Mr. & Mrs. Daniel H. McElaney 

Mr. James McElhinney 

Mr. Orrin F. McGoldrick 

Mr. Joseph C. McGuill, Sr. 

Mrs. John L. McGurk 

Mrs. Ellen McGurl 

Mr. & Mrs. J. F. McHale 

James V. McHugh, M. D. 

Mr. & Mrs. Frank J. McKeever 

Mrs. Rose C. McKenna 

Mr. & Mrs. H.B. McLaughlin 

Mr. & Mrs. Philip J. McNiff 

Mr. & Mrs. James J. McRae 

Mr. Bernard F. Meagher, Sr. 

Dr. & Mrs. L Irwin Miller 

Mr. & Mrs. Arthur Moore 

Mr. & Mrs. Robert S. Morton, Sr. 



363 



Mr. & Mrs. Anthony J. Morose 

Mr. E. J. Mullen 

Mr. & Mrs. Edward C. Mulligan 

Mr. Cornelius J. Murphy 

Mr. & Mrs. Edward Murphy 

Mr. & Mrs. Thomas J. Murray 

Mr. Frank J. Musmanno 

Mr. Ralph M. Myers 

Mr. & Mrs. Edward J. O'Connell, Jr. 

Mr. Daniel J. O'Leary 

Mr. & Mrs. P.P. O'Meara 

Mr. & Mrs. Vincent O'Reilly 

Mr. John E. O'Rourke, Sr. 

Mr. A. F. Orlando 

Mr. & Mrs. Ernest O'Toole 

Mr. & Mrs. Charles N. O'Shea 

Mr. & Mrs. Vernon M. Ovelton 

Mr. & Mrs. Joseph Palmucci 

Mr. J. Herman Parent 

Mr. William F. Pashby 

Mr. & Mrs. Albert J. Pepin 

Mrs. Felix Perriello 

Mr. & Mrs. Stanley Piaseczynski 

Mr. Charles F. Pobuda 

Mr. Dennis Porter 

Mr. & Mrs. Raymond J. Powell 

Mrs. Margaret Powers 

Mr. John Pratson 

Mr. Owen F. Quinn 

Mr. John J. Rearden 

Mr. John E. Redington 

Mrs. John Reino 

Mrs. James B. Reynolds 

Mr. Arthur J. Rioux 

Mr. Martin F. Roach 

Mr. William J. Romero 

Mr. Isaac Rosenthal 

Mr. Frank X. O'Regan 

Mr. & Mrs. Ourelio Sabatini 

Mr. & Mrs. A. Sarno 



Mr. & Mrs. Samuel Scott 

Normand Seguin 

Mr. & Mrs. Joseph M. Sergi 

Mr. H.P. Sexton 

Mr. & Mrs. Edward J. Shaughnessy 

Mr. & Mrs. John J. Shea 

Mr. J. Lester Shea 

Mr. Thomas A. Sheehan 

Mr. & Mrs. William D. Sherman 

Mr. Theodore R. Silva 

Mr. & Mrs. John G. Spanbauer 

Mr. & Mrs. John L. Spence 

Mr. & Mrs. Lawrence F. Stanford 

Mr. & Mrs. M.F. Steele 

Mr. Arthur H. Stein 

Mr. Francis J. Sullivan 

Mr. Francis T. Sullivan 

Mr. & Mrs. Lawrence F. Sullivan 

Mr. & Mrs. Leo J. Sullivan 

Mrs. Mildred B. Sullivan 

Mr. & Mrs. Roger Sullivan 

Mr. Timothy L. Sullivan 

Mr. & Mrs. Walter L. Sullivan 

Mr. & Mrs. Leon L. Sylvestre 

Mr. Louis G. Sylvia 

Mr. & Mrs. Angelo Taranto 

Mr. & Mrs. Thomas J. Tuohey 

Mr. William Trahe 

Mr. & Mrs. B. H. Tyrrell 

Mr. S.J. Vermette 

Mr. &. Mrs. Anthony Visalli 

Mr. & Mrs. Thomas A. Walsh 

Mr. & Mrs. Louis A. Welch 

Dr. Robert F. Welch, M.D. 

Mrs. Arthur J. Whalen 

Mr. & Mrs. William P. Whalen 

Mr. & Mrs. Albert E. Wisialko 

Mrs. Frances M. Woelfel 

Mr. Benjamin Zanor 

Mr. & Mrs. William G. Zimmerman, Sr. 



364 



Senior Poll 

A Profile of the Class of 1959 



Everyone is interested in himself. This is as true of 
groups as of individuals. Just as we each strive to follow 
the ancient Greek injunction, "Know Yourself," and to 
discover who we are and what we are, so have we a simi- 
lar interest in learning the nature of the groups to which 
we belong. That this is so is seen from the fact that when- 
ever seniors gather for an informal bull session one of the 
most frequently discussed subjects is their fellow students, 
the 1081 men and women who make up the class of 1959. 
What is the class like? What is its background? What are 
its accomplishments? What are its prospects for the fu- 
ture? These are questions which we have discussed for 
four years and which we have tried to answer by means 
of this poll. 

Having heard these questions asked many times in 
many different ways, we compiled a questionnaire in- 
cluding those that were asked most frequently. This we 
sent to the seniors in the College of Arts and Sciences, the 
College of Business Administration, and the School of 
Education, the other three schools unfortunately having 
to be passed over because of the demands of time. Of the 
800 questionnaires sent out 512 were returned. Thus 
while the results tell nothing of the 288 seniors who did 
not return the questionnaire, they do represent a very 
large segment of the class. Although no claim is made to 
scientific accuracy, great care was taken in the tabulation 
of the results and whatever parts were able to be checked 
were found to be substantially correct. 

Perhaps the best way to summarize the information 
obtained is to describe the student who would be most 
typical of the class by giving the mean answer to each of 
the questions asked. The average member of the class of 
1959 is a 21 year old male, neither married nor a veteran. 
He is a native of Greater Boston and is presently living at 
home. His family is of Irish descent and has an income of 
$5,000 to $10,000 per year. Both his parents attended 
high school. Politically he labels himself an Independent, 
but chances are he will vote Democratic. He has traveled 
very little. He came to Boston College chiefly because of 
its academic advantages, its proximity, and its religious 
training. During his four years here he has maintained 
a C+ average, has studied between 10 and 20 hours a 



week, and has worked about the same amount of time. 
This work has been necessary, for he has paid his tuition 
himself, with some help from his parents. He cut 5 to 10 
classes per semester and he knows about three faculty 
members well. He reads only about five unrequired books 
per year. In extracurricular activities he has been semi- 
active. 

Next year he plans to 20 to work and he intends to 
marry within 2 to 4 years. He will restrict his choice of a 
spouse to a Catholic with at least a high school education. 
During his four years at Boston College the training and 
atmosphere here has made him more religious. If he were 
just beginning college now, he would again choose to 
attend B.C. He thinks that the University's best feature 
is the philosophical and religious nature of its curriculum, 
and that its worst is the relationship between the students 
and the administration. 

Like most "average" people such a student probably 
does not exist. But these are the qualities and characteris- 
tics most found in the class as a whole. A statistical 
breakdown, however, may give a more revealing picture 
of the class, both as a unit and in its divisions. 

Matrimony has already claimed 7% of the class, the 
largest percentage (14%) being in A&S, the smallest 
(3%) in the School of Ed, while CBA holds the middle 
with 9%. Veterans constitute 23% of the class; although 
the School of Ed is the lowest in this respect with 13%, if 
only the male students were tallied the percentage would 
be equal to A&S and CBA which have approximately 
30%o each. 

Greater Boston is the home of 80%, of the seniors, with 
another 13% coming from other parts of New England. 
Of the remainder the largest percentage (3%) hail from 
the Middle Atlantic States. Almost all the students from 
Greater Boston live at home, as do some from the sur- 
rounding areas, bringing the percentage of day-hops to 
83%. 8% of the seniors live in the dormitories and 9% 
have off-campus quarters. 

A large majority (69%,) is of predominantly Irish back- 
ground, the smallest number(6Kf) being in A&S and the 

{Continued on page 369) 



365 



Compliments of 

THE CLASS OF 1960 



Compliments of 

THE CLASS OF 1961 



Compliments of 

THE CLASS OF 1962 



366 



Compliments of 

COLLEGE OF ARTS AND SCIENCES 

STUDENT SENATE 



Compliments of 

COLLEGE OF BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION 



STUDENT SENATE 



BEST WISHES 
of 

V. p. ROBERTS & CO. 



367 




COMPLIMENTS 
OF 

MAYOR 
WILLIAM J. DONOVAN 

SOMERVfLLE 
MASSACHUSEnS 



Congratulations 

to the 
CLASS OF 1959 

GOVERNOR 
FOSTER FURCOLO 



BOSTON COLLEGE 
ALUMNI ASSOCIATION 

CHESTNUT HILL 67 
MASSACHUSETTS 



368 



largest (75%) in CBA. Italians are the second largest 
ethnic group, constituting 11% of the student body, and 
the French with 9% are a close third. Germans account 
for 5%, while the remaining 6% is divided among many 
European and Asiatic races. 

Almost all students come from families in the low or 
middle income groups, 35% making less than $5000 per 
year and an additional 49% making between $5000 and 
$10,000. 10%, of the families earn between $10,000 and 
$15,000; 4% are in the $15,000 to $25,000 bracket; and 
only 2% have an income of over $25,000. The differ- 
ences among the schools in this matter are slight, the only 
major variations being that CBA has more students from 
the lower income groups than either of the other schools, 
while the incomes in the School of Ed run a bit above the 
average. 

This financial situation is reflected in the matter of 
tuition payments. 41% of the tuition is paid by the stu- 
dents themselves and another 6% by loans taken out by 
the students. 30% of the expense is financed by the stu- 
dents' parents or other relatives, 12% is paid by the 
government under the GI bill, and 11% is taken care of 
by scholarships. The smallest percentage of family help 
(22%) is given to students in CBA, the largest (42%) in 
the School of Ed. 

Politically the student body is divided between Inde- 



pendents and Democrats, with Republicans running a 
poor last. 47% of the class claim affiliation with no 
party; 45% profess to be Democrats, and only 8% Re- 
publicans. The largest percentage of Democrats (60%) 
come from the School of Ed, the smallest (39%) from 
A&S, while exactly half the students in CBA are Dem- 
ocrats. The percentage of Republicans varies little from 
one school to another, remaining between 6% and 10%. 
Independents are found chiefly in A&S where they con- 
stitute a majority of 53%, least of ah in the School of Ed, 
which has 34%. 40% of the seniors in CBA are Inde- 
pendents. 

The educational backgrounds of the students vary 
widely, some having parents who received no education 
at all, others having both a father and mother who are 
graduates of college and graduate school. In general the 
mothers are better educated than the fathers, 73% of 
them having received at least a high school training as 
opposed to 64% of the fathers. 14% of the fathers have 
had a college education, and another 12% have attended 
graduate or professional schools. Fewer mothers have 
gone on to higher education, 13% having been to college, 
6% to graduate or professional school. 36% of the fathers 
and 26% of the mothers received only grammar school 

{Continued on page 372) 



Established 1902 



Incorporated 1911 



GEORGE F. DRISCOLL COMPANY 

General Contractors 

Building Construction 



41 EAST 42nd STREET 



NEW YORK 17, N. Y. 



MUrray Hill 7-4200 



Builders of 

MARTYRS' COURT 
FORDHAM UNIVERSITY 

GYMNASIUM 
CRANWELL PREPARATORY SCHOOL 

PHARMACY-SCIENCE BUILDING 
ST. JOHN'S UNIVERSITY 

FACULTY RESIDENCE 
ST. JOHN'S UNIVERSITY 

SCIENCE BUILDING 
MANHATTAN COLLEGE 

NEW YORK FOUNDLING HOSPITAL 



369 



You Can't Make a Mistake on Any 
Purchase You Make at . . . 



This is more than a promise — it's a guarantee 
that you'll never risk a penny on any item you 
buy at A&P. At A&P the sale is never completed 
until you're completely satisfied. The sale must 
measure up to your every expectation — or A&P 
will promptly refund your money — no questions 
asked. 

You can't make a mistake on any purchase you 
make at — 



A&P SUPER MARKETS 



370 



"•^■""^ -gyr KcviNG 



gUNN 



STORKS JSP- SHIPPING 

Established 1896 

Exclusive Metropolitan Boston Agent: 
AERO MAYFLOWER TRANSIT COMPANY, INC. 

World-wide Service 

• 

3175 WASHINGTON STREET 
BOSTON 30, MASS. 

• 

HAncock 6-8000 JAmaica 2-3300 CAnton 6-2860 

OLympic 3-0400 Pioneer 4-1820 



Compliments of 


E F P BURNS >NC 


Formal Clothes for Rental 


(par excellence) 


• 


100 SUMMER STREET 


Phones: LI 2-3572 and DE 8-8033 


• 


PAUL E. P. BURNS, B.C. 1953 



371 



BEST OF LUCK 



to the 



CLASS OF 1959 



from the 



GOLD KEY SOCIETY 



"SERVICE and SACRIFICE" 





^ 




"d 




1 


COMPLIMENTS 


OF 


CLASS OF 1980 



training or less. The differences among the schools in re- 
gard to educational backgrounds are slight, except that a 
somewhat higher than average percentage of the parents 
of School of Ed students have received at least a college 
education. 

The extent to which students have been able to travel 
has undoubtedly widened in recent years, particularly in 
view of the number of veterans in college. Yet 41% of the 
seniors claim to have done very little travelling. The 
largest percentage of these (55%) is from A&S,the smallest 
(36%) from the School of Ed, CBA being in the middle 
with 42%. 28% of the seniors have travelled extensively 
in the U.S., 15% have travelled in Canada, 8% in Europe, 
3% in Mexico, 3% in Asia, 1% in South America, and 
1% in other parts of the world. CBA holds the edge in 
United States travel, 37% of its students having seen 
this country, and the School of Ed leads in foreign travel. 

The activities and accomplishments of the seniors dur- 
ing the past four years have varied considerably, ranging 
from a serious, steady pursuit of education on the part of 
some to a complete devil-may-care attitude on the part 
of others. The class encompasses the opposite poles of 
great responsibility and complete irresponsibility, some 
studying much, working part time, reading a great deal, 
cutting little, being active in extracurricular activities, and 
maintaining a good average, while others studied prac- 
tically not at all, did not work, read very little, cut often, 
did not participate in extracurriculars, and had a poor 
average. 

3% of the class have an A average, 5 1 % have a B, and 
46% have a C. The percentages in A&S and CBA are 
very close to the average, the only major variation oc- 
curring in the School of Ed, in which 64% of the students 
have a B average and only 34%, have a C. 

30% of the seniors cut fewer than five classes per 
semester, 32% cut between 5 and 10, 25% between 10 and 
20, 1 1% between 20 and 30, and a reckless 2% cut over 
30. The maximum number of cuts which a student may 
take is, on the average, 36. A&S has a slight edge in heavy 
cutters, as 15% cut over 20 classes, as opposed to 1 1% in 
CBA and 5% in the School of Ed. 

The relationship between cuts and grades was not 
marked enough to warrant the drawing of any conclu- 
sions. The A students, as in so many things went to ex- 
tremes, eight cutting fewer than 5 times a semester and 
three going over 30. Only one took a middle course, hav- 
ing between 5 and 10 cuts. The average number of cuts 
for B students was 8, for C students 1 1 . 

While the class as a whole could be termed conservative 
in the matter of cuts, it was somewhat more cavalier in 
its study habits. 8% of the students study under 5 hours 
per week, and 25%; study only between 5 and 10 hours. 
The largest number (40%,) spend from 10 to 20 hours in 
academic pursuits. 22% study from 20 to 30 hours, 5% 
from 30 to 40, and less than 1% exceed 40 hours. There 
is very little difference among the schools in this regard. 

{Continued on page 375) 



ill 



COMPLIMENTS 



OF THE 



PHILOMATHEIA 
CLUB 



Women's Auxiliary 

of 

Boston College 



MRS. V. P. ROBERTS, President 



373 



Compliments of 

M. S. KELLIHER COMPANY 

BOSTON, MASS. 



General Contractors 



HOW DOES TODAY'S NEWS AFFECT THE 
BUSINESS OUTLOOK — AND YOU? 

Listen to 

IT'S YOUR BUSINESS 

By John Harriman 

WEE! • 590 AM • 103.3 FM 

Monday through Friday 
6:35 - 6:45 P. M. 

BROUGHT TO YOU BY 

SECOND BANK -STATE STREET 
Trust Company 

Head Office: 1 1 1 Franklin St., Boston 6, Mass. 

Member Federal Reserve System 
Member Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation 



ANDREW T. JOHNSON 
COMPANY, Inc. 

Three Locations: 
15 TREMONT PLACE 173 MILK ST. 



103 NEWBURY ST. 
Rl 2-1610 . . . Connecting All Plants 



BLUEPRINTERS AND PHOTOSTATERS 

DRAWING MATERIALS 

REPRODUCTION PROCESSES 



374 



H. C. WAINWRIGHT & CO. 

Established 1868 
• 

INVESTMENT SECURITIES 
• 

Members 

New York Stock Exchange 

American Stock Exchange (Associate) 

Boston Stock Exchange 



60 STATE STREET 120 BROADWAY 
BOSTON NEW YORK 



JOHN F. CLUNAN 
New York Life Insurance Co. 

Specializing in Estate Planning and Life Insurance 

Bus.: HUbbard 2-4900 
Res.: NOrmandy 5-3314 

75 FEDERAL STREET BOSTON, MASS. 

3 HUNNEWELL ST. MELROSE, MASS. 



Compliments 
of 

A FRIEND 



Between the amount of time a student studies and the 
number of cuts he takes there was no observable relation- 
ship. The connection between the number of hours a stu- 
dent gives over to study and the grades he receives was 
more obvious. Those who maintain an A, study an aver- 
age of 23 hours per week, those who have a B, 16 hours, 
and those with a C, 13 hours. Of the A students, however, 
the majority study only between 10 and 20 hours, their 
average being brought up by a couple who go over 40 
hours. 

For some, work occupies as much or more time than 
study. 36% of the class do not work at all, this group 
ranging from a low of 25% in CBA to a high of 50%, in 
the School of Ed. 41%, of the students in A&S do not 
hold jobs during the academic year. 15% work under 10 
hours and 28% between 10 and 20. 14% spend between 
20 and 30 hours working and 7% between 30 and 40. 
Just under 1% hold full time jobs, working 40 hours or 
more. The CBA students work longer hours than those 
in the other schools, 32% exceeding 20 hours, as com- 
pared with 16%o in A&S and 9% in the School of Ed. 
There is no evidence that the amount of time a student 
works has any influence on the other aspects of his col- 
lege life. "A" students work an average of 7 hours a 
week, "B" students 1 1 hours, and "C" students 12 hours. 
There seems to be no relationship between the number of 



hours a student works and the amount of time he studies 
or the extent to which he participates in extracurricular 
activities, except that there was a slight drop in both 
studying and extracurricular participation among those 
who work over 30 hours. 

In extracurricular activities 33% rate themselves as 
active, 57% as semi-active, and 10% do not participate 
at all in such activities. These figures must be suspected, 
for the question as asked involved a self-appraisal on the 
part of the student and an interpretation of the words 
active and semi-active, rather than a mere listing of fac- 
tual information, such as the number of hours one en- 
gages in a particular activity. 

The majority of the seniors read little, 74% reading 
fewer than 10 unrequired books a year, with 41%, of these 
reading fewer than 5. 15% of the class read between 10 
and 20 books, 5% between 20 and 30, 3% between 30 
and 40, and 3%, over 40. Only 6% of the students in 
CBA read more than 20 books a year, and only 16'7 ex- 
ceeded 10. A&S and School of Ed students read more 
books on the average, about 40% in each school reading 
more than 10 and about 17''^, going over 20. 

Although few students mentioned a reserved or distant 
attitude on the part of the faculty as one of the Univer- 

(Continued on page 37S) 



375 





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or Burner Serv 

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ice 




GAETA 


BROS. OIL 


CO. 




24 Hour Service 




12 


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TW 3-8014 





LI 2-8025 



Wells 3-3275 



PATRICK J. GILL & SONS, INC. 

RELIGIOUS GIFTS, RINGS and MEDALS 

♦ 

Sales 
387 WASHINGTON ST. BOSTON, MASS. 

Office, Factory and Sales 



9 FOWLE ST. 



WOBURN, MASS. 



Established 1895 

PIERONI'S 

HOTEL and RESTAURANTS 



7-S PARK SQUARE 
HA 6-1100 

601 WASHINGTON STREET 
HA 6-8287 

BOSTON, MASSACHUSETTS 



ALFRED F. DeSCENZA 
& SON, Inc. 

DIAMOND MERCHANTS 
and JEWELERS 

Since 1915 

♦ 
387 WASHINGTON STREET 



ROOM 609 



BOSTON, MASS. 



Engagement Rings Our Specialty 

♦ 

Special Consideration Given to B.C. Men 



SAINT PAUL CATHOLIC BOOK 
AND FILM CENTERS 

315 WASHINGTON STREET 
Tel. CA 7-5414 Boston 8, Mass. 

318 DORCHESTER STREET 
Tel. AN 8-8811 Boston 27, Mass. 

* 

Good, Wholesome, Entertaining Books for Everyone! 

Religious and Diverting 16 mm. Sound Films - Rental 

• 

Centers Operated by the 

DAUGHTERS of SAINT PAUL 



Co 


mplintents of . 








GARDNER 


NURSING 


HOME 




47 CENTRE STREET 






ROXBURY, MASS. 








Kathleen 


Daley, R.N. 



376 



Compliments 



of 



THE 

TAM O'SHANTER 

ROOM 



1648 BEACON STREET 



BROOKLINE, MASS. 



JAMES YPHANTIS, Manager 



377 



CIRCLE BARBER SHOP 

"Four Barbers . . . No Waiting" 

* 

Try Us for Satisfaction 

• 

1964 Beacon Street At Cleveland Circle 

P. Cambria, Prop. 





RUBY 


NEWMAN 


ORCHESTRAS 




400 


COMMONWEALTH 


AVENUE 






BOSTON, 


MASS 




Bill 


Crosby 






Ruby Newman 



Compliments of 

THE CHAMPION KNITWEAR 
CO., INC. 

ROCHESTER, N. Y. 

• 

Manufacturers of 

ATHLETIC KNIT GOODS FOR SCHOOLS 

AND COLLEGES 



JOHN S. DOOLEY 
Photographer 

Phone Columbia 5-9801 
43 Roslin Street Dorctiester, Mass. 



sity's poor features, 56% of the class know fewer than 
three faculty members well, 13% of this number knowing 
not even one of their professors. 25% know between 3 and 
5, 12'rj between 5 and 8, and a gregarious 7% know 
more than 8. Again in this question there is the difficulty 
of interpretation, this time of the word well. Some took 
this to mean merely a speaking acquaintance, while 
others adopted a more strict interpretation. Thus these 
percentages have less statistical validity than the others, 
but even so there is no reason to doubt that they do indi- 
cate the general condition of student-faculty relationships. 
It was chiefly the students in CBA who knew few or no 
professors; those in the School of Ed were on much better 
terms with their faculty. 

The greatest differences among the schools are in re- 
gard to the immediate plans of the students. Taking the 
University as a whole, 47% plan to go to work, 24% 
expect to attend graduate school, 22% will be entering 
the service, and a confused 7% do not know what they 
will be doing next year. The smallest number of those 
seeking gainful employment (18%) is in A&S, CBA and 
the School of Ed far exceeding this with 62% and 70% 
respectively. 46% of the A&S seniors will be attending 
graduate schools next year, as compared with 8% in 
CBA and 16% in the School of Ed. 27% of A&S students 
and 25% of CBA students will be fulfilling their military 
obligations next year, but for the School of Ed the figure 
is only 5%,. Confusion reigns almost evenly in the three 
schools, the percentages of those who, in February at 
least, did not have any definite plans for next year being 
5% in CBA and the School of Ed and 9% in A&S. 

Love being no respecter of schools or courses, there 
was little difference among the students on this basis in 
respect to their plans for marriage. 22% of the class plan 
a trip to the altar soon after graduation; 30%, will wait 
from 2 to 4 years; and 15% do not think they will be 
married for at least 5 years. 19% have given no serious 
thought to the matter, and 7% do not plan to marry at all. 

Regarding the choice of a spouse most of the seniors 
were very selective in the matter of religion. 75% will 
marry only a Catholic, and an additional 11% will re- 
strict their choice to a Christian. 14% will not allow re- 
ligion to be a deciding factor in their choice of a husband 
or wife. There are almost no differences among the 
schools in this matter. 

In general the class is less restrictive in regard to edu- 
cational requirements. 28% insist that their future spouses 
be college graduates, and an additional 36% require at 
least a high school education. 36% claim that formal 
education will play no part in their choice of a husband 
or wife. The school that is most restrictive in this matter 
is the School of Ed, where 50% of the seniors will marry 
only college graduates and only 25% will impose no re- 
strictions. In A&S 27% insist on a college education, 
while 35% do not consider the extent of formal educa- 

{CotUinued on page 387) 



378 



FANDEL PRESS, INC. 

Complete 
Printing Service 



59 McBRIDE STREET 



JAMAICA PLAIN 30, MASS. 



JAmaica 4-0203 — 4-0204 — 4-0205 



BEST WISHES 
from 

SOCIETY FOR 

ADVANCEMENT 

OF MANAGEMENT 



FIRST PLACE WINNERS . . 
NATIONAL COMPETITION 



HOWARD JOHNSON'S 



For 



GOOD FOOD 



and 



DELICIOUS ICE CREAM 



379 



roi 


^ 


FM 


POLE 


NORUMBEGA 


PARK 


COMMONWEALTH AVENUE NEWTON 


DANCING EVERY FRIDAY AND SATURDAY 


8:30 -MIDNIGHT . . . COUPLES ONLY 


BOB BACHELDER and HIS ORCHESTRA 



380 



Compliments 
of 

HIGHAM, NEILSON, 
WHITRIDGE & REID, Inc. 

50 CONGRESS STREET 
BOSTON 9, MASSACHUSETTS 



BOSTON - PHILADELPHIA - ATLANTA 
CHICAGO - LOS ANGELES 



Designers and Administration 

of 

STUDENT INSURANCE PROGRAMS 



Compliments of 

BOSTON FUEL TRANSPORT INC. 

36 NEW STREET 
EAST BOSTON 28, MASSACHUSETTS 



"Where Good Food Prevails" 

PETE CHARLTON'S FAMOUS STEAK 
4040 RESTAURANT 

FA 5-4040 

4040 WASHINGTON STREET 

ROSLINDALE, MASS. 



M. B. FOSTER 
ELECTRIC COMPANY 



368 CONGRESS STREET 
BOSTON, MASSACHUSETTS 



BEST WISHES 


NEW OCEAN 


HOUSE 


SWAMPSCOTT, 


MASS. 


* 




Clement Kennedy, 


President 



BEST WISHES 
TO THE CLASS OF '59 

SCOTT & McDonald, inc. 

Designers and Manufacturers 
of 

SETUP PAPER BOXES 



108 EAST DEDHAM STREET 
BOSTON 1 8, MASS. 



ARTHUR J. McDonald, jr. '59 
Sales Representative 



381 



TYPEWRITERS . . . ADDING MACHINES 

Rentals — Sales — Service 

PETER PAUL 
OFFICE EQUIPMENT CO., INC. 

TW 3-8920 
n PINE ST. WALTHAM, MASS. 



CONTRACT 


SALES, INC. 


• INTERIOR 


• HOSPITALS 


FURNISHINGS 




• OFFICES 


• CHURCHES 


• BANKS 


* HOTELS 


* INSTITUTIONS 


* RESTAURANTS 


• SCHOOLS 


* CLUBS 


• COLLEGES 


• CAFETERIAS 


• DORMITORIES 


• FACTORIES 


KE 6 


-1515 


713 BEACON STREET 


BOSTON, MASS. 



REARDON and TURNER 



150 CAUSEWAY STREET 



BOSTON 14, MASSACHUSETTS 



REGISTERED 
PROFESSIONAL ENGINEERS 



M. J. FLAHERTY CO. 

ENGINEERS and CONTRACTORS 

♦ 

29 WAREHAM STREET 
Tel. HU 2-4920 BOSTON 18, MASS. 

♦ 

Heating, Ventilating, Air Conditioning, 

Power and Process Piping, 

Cooling Systems, Oil Burners 

♦ 

VICTOR J. GALLENI, President 

FREDERICK J. CASEY, Treasurer 

Mechanical Contractors Association of America 



THE 


MARSHARD ORCHESTRAS 




The Outstanding Favorite of 






America's Universities 






♦ 






BOSTON 






73 Newbury Street 






KEnmore 6-5173 




NEW YORK BAR 


HARBOR 




MILK 



The Name You Know 
You Can Trust 



382 



HOWLAND LINEN SUPPLY 
CO., Inc. 

40 BRISTOL STREET 

BOSTON 18, MASS. 

HUbbard 2-6955 



73 CHANCERY STREET 
NEW BEDFORD, MASS. 

Tel. 2-4981 

• 

CORNER RTE. 28 and BEARSE'S WAY 
HYANNIS, MASS. 

Tel. 2245 



BOSTON CHAIN LINK 
FENCE CO. 

350 ADAMS STREET 
DORCHESTER, MASS. 



Expert Erectors 

o 

Tennis Courts — Backstops 
Fences of All Types 

TA 5-1 800 GE 6-6680 GE 6-6681 

WILLIAM R. ENGLISH '49 
Sales Manager 



FRIEND 



383 



SERVICE UNIFORM 
COMPANY, Inc. 

1 5 SCHOOL STREET BOSTON, MASS. 

CApitol 7-0670 



Outfitters of Boston College 
R.O.T.C. 



ATTENTION GRADUATING SENIORS: 

See Us for Your Uniform Needs 

and Accessories on 

Going Into Active Service 



'Good Food in a Friendly Atmosphere' 



CAMPUS RESTAURANT 



2197 COMMONWEALTH AVENUE 



(Across from St. Ignatius) 



RINGS 

PINS 

MEDALS 

CHARMS 

CUPS 

PLAQUES 

TROPHIES 



excellent 
design 

skilled 
craftsmanship 

superb 
quality 



YOUR CLASS JEWELER 

♦ 

DIEGES & CLUST 

17 JOHN STREET, NEW YORK 8, N. Y. 

BOSTON • PROVIDENCE 

MANUFACTURING JEWELERS 



I 



TO THE BOSTON COLLEGE 
CLASS OF '59 

OUR VERY BEST WISHES 

• 

THE SHERATON-PLAZA 



H. de F. NYBOE 

General Manager 



384 



(compliments oP 



DGLim STUDIOS 



I notoarapnerd 

Iror 

1959SuLDi 



UPPl 



385 



EDWARD S. QUIRK 
& COMPANY 

QUALITY TIRES 

QUALITY RECAPS 

QUALITY REPAIRS 



Emergency Service . . . 
Nights, Sundays and Holidays 

Tel, WA 4-8700 



275 ARSENAL 
WATERTOWN, MASS. 



LAKE STREET BOOK STORE 



2193 COMMONWEALTH AVENUE 
BRIGHTON 35, MASSACHUSETTS 



CASA BARBI 

The Aristocrat of Restaurants 

1277 COMMONWEALTH AVENUE 

ALLSTON, MASS. AL 4-9790 

• 

For the Best in Pizza . . . Try Our Patio 



BEST WISHES 

to the 
CLASS OF 1959 



SULLIVAN BROS. 



PRINTERS 



LOWELL, MASSACHUSETTS 



Compliments of 




CIRCLE LOUNGE & GRILLE, 


INC. 


I960 BEACON STREET 




AT CLEVELAND CIRCLE 





CA-7 


2741 
9474 


FRANK DePRISCO 




WHOLESALE JEWELER 




ROOMS 447-448 




333 WASHINGTON STREET 




BOSTON, MASS. 




♦ 




Special Discount to B. C. Students 





386 



DELICIOUS FOOD BAR, Inc. 

2193-B COMMONWEALTH AVE. 

BRIGHTON 35, MASS. 

AL 4-9347 

Delicious Treats for Entire Family 



38 KINDS OF PIZZA 

SUB SANDWICHES 

featuring 

Pepper Steaks, Roast Beef, Sausage, 

Peppers and Meat Sauce 

• 

HALF BA-BA-CUE CHICKEN 
French Fries and Rolls . . . 99c 



KELLY'S 
PRESCRIPTION DRUG STORE 

389 WASHINGTON STREET 

BRIGHTON CENTRE 
Corner Leicester Street 

<■> 

Call: ST 2-2912 for Free Delivery 

A, 

CHARLES P. KELLY '28 
Reg. Phg. 

* 

We Desire Your Friendship 

We Appreciate Your Patronage 



tion important; in CBA only 18"^ consider a college 
diploma a requirement for marriage, while 449f. will 
marry regardless of the education of their intended wife. 

The concern with religion which the seniors evidence 
in their choice of a spouse is reflected also in their re- 
sponses to the question, "Has B.C. made you more or 
less religious?" 52% claim that it has made them more 
religious, and 16% say less religious. 32% answered that 
the University has made them neither more nor less re- 
ligious. The responses to this question were similar in 
each of the schools. 

The seniors had many different reasons for having 
chosen to attend Boston College four years ago, most 
having come for a combination of reasons. Academic 
considerations led the list, accounting for 28% of the 
total, with proximity close behind, having drawn 26%. 
The third most popular reason, with 22%, was the re- 
ligious training which the University offers. Financial 
considerations were responsible for 14%, while sports 
drew 2%, and the social life 1%,. The remaining 7%, came 
for a wide variety of reasons, including family tradition, 
the influence of high school teachers, and, as one student 
expressed it, "an immature evaluation of the alterna- 
tives." 

Most of the seniors, however, do not agree with this 
last bitter appraisal of these four years. If they were be- 



ginning college again, 74% would choose to attend Bos- 
ton College. The 26% who dissented were divided in their 
choice of an alternative, some preferring a smaller col- 
lege, some a non-Catholic college, some a state university, 
and some a technical or other specialized institution. In 
the three schools the percentages of those who would 
again attend B.C. are 77%, in CBA, 73% in A&S, and 
69% in the School of Ed. 

The last two questions in the poll asked the seniors 
what they considered the best and worst features of Bos- 
ton College. Many took advantage of this opportunity 
to write long and often thoughtful essays on the Univer- 
sity, its positive and negative aspects, the ways in which it 
could be improved, and the improvements that have al- 
ready been begun and should be continued. In asking 
these questions we departed from the multiple choice 
type question in order to give the student complete free- 
dom of expression. This was necessary so that we might 
avoid predisposing the student and thus obtain the most 
objective and honest answers possible. Because of this 
we were not able to develop a set of statistics, but we did 
obtain an analysis of the answers which does reveal cer- 
tain unmistakable trends. 

The predominant opinion in all the schools is that 

{Conlinued on page 390) 



387 



Waterproofing Leaking Masonry 
Walls Above Ground 



w 



estern 

aterproofing Co., Inc. 



Repointing, Open, Weathered Joints 

in Masonry Walls 

82 W. Dedham Street Boston 18, Mass. 



CHARLES F. MURPHY, INC. 

24 SCHOOL STREET 
BOSTON 8, MASSACHUSETTS 

• 

INSURANCE 



EDMAND'S COFFEE CO. 

68 INDIA STREET 
BOSTON 10, MASS. 



Compliments of 

FRANK A. FOWLER 

'THE COLLEGE RING MAN'- 

27 SCHOOL STREET 
BOSTON 8, MASS. 

Richmond 2-0161 



Rep.: HerfF-Jones Co.-Murchison Division 



STERLING LIQUOR MART 

411 WASHINGTON STREET 
BRIGHTON, MASS. 



SID' 


S DELICATESSEN 


"For 


a Whale of a Sandwich" 




• 


391 


WASHINGTON STREET 




BRIGHTON, MASS. 



388 



TIMPANY ELEVATOR COMPANY 

22 CUSTOM HOUSE STREET 

BOSTON, MASS. 

O 

J. A. Timpany '43, General Manager 





FRANK ELBERY 






Sales - 


— FORD — Service 

• 

MOTOR CO., INC. 






ELBERY 




360 


River Street 


Cambridge, 
Kl 7-3820 


Mass. 




See 


Jim Elbery, B.C. '51 






For a New Ford or A-1 Used Car 





Telephone BIgelow 4-0760 

HAHN DRUG STORE, inc. 

Established 1907 

Carl H. and John C. Alvord, Pharmacists 

105 UNION ST. NEWTON CENTRE 59, MASS. 

Nights and Emergency — Call BIgelow 4-0360 



CORBIN - SCHLAGE 

— Dealer — 

CAMPBELL HARDWARE, INC. 

REAR 274 CENTRE STREET 
NEWTON 58, MASS. 



COMPLIMENTS 



OF 



A FRIEND 



389 



Boston College's most outstanding advantage is the type 
of education which it offers, i.e. a liberal education with 
emphasis on philosophy and on ethical and moral values. 
Following this there is much difference of opinion on the 
University's other positive features. The variety and depth 
of the curriculum, the academic standards, and the 
faculty tied for second place. However, there is an equal 
number of students who claim that Boston College has 
no good features. Considered by some to be B.C.'s best 
features are such things as the student body, the sports 
facilities, and a particular department or program, the 
English department and the Honors program receiving 
the most praise. 

Chief among the things which the students found to 
criticise is the administration in its dealings with the 
students. The aspect which was most censured is "the 
regimentation of the student body"; the financial policies 
of the administration, its policy on cuts, and its seeming 
lack of consideration for the students' interests followed 
close behind. Also mentioned as the University's worst 
features are the same aspects that are considered by some 
to be its best features. Leading this list are the student 
body, particularly its homogeneity and its anti-intellec- 
tualism, the academic standards, the curriculum, and the 
faculty. The students find fault also with the library, the 
size of the University, and the emphasis on sports. 



BOSTON STATUARY CORP. 

Manufacturers of 

RELIGIOUS ARTICLES 

* 

206 EUSTIS STREET ROXBURY, MASS. 

HI 5-3355 



HELEN'S PASTRY SHOPPE 

specializing in 

WEDDING, BIRTHDAY and PARTY CAKES 

Tel. Ml 3-7573 
315 BROADWAY ARLINGTON, MASS. 



Compliments 
of a 

FRIEND 



BRADFORD HOTEL 

BOSTON • MASSACHUSETTS 

Headquarters for Functions of 
All Types and Sizes 
Boston's most extensive and complete 
function facilities. Healthfully air- 
conditioned for your added comfort. 

Home of BRADFORD ROOF 

unusual night club-restaurant 

Dancitig — Floor Shows 

ir 

For further information, contact the 

Function Department, HAncock 6-1400 

Robert N. Appleton, Manager 



BOSTON S 
DISTINCTIVE STORE 




Cjpafnous for 

Qood C^oods &f T)e/tcacies 

S. S. PIERCE CO. 

Stoirs in Boston, Belmont, Brookline 6? Newton 
Mail and Telephone Orders 



390 



Compliments of 

CADET OFFICERS CLUB 

of 

BOSTON COLLEGE 

BOB QUINN, President 



Compliments 
of 

DELTA SIGMA PI 
FRATERNITY 



Best Wishes For A Prosperous Future 
TO THE CLASS OF 1959 

NEW YORK CLUB 

of 

BOSTON COLLEGE 



Compliments of 


ECONOMICS 


ACADEMY 


AND 




DORMITORY 


COUNCIL 



Compliments of 

ALPHA KAPPA PSI 

PROFESSIONAL FRATERNITY 
In BUSINESS 



Compliments of 

ACCOUNTING ACADEMY 

of 

BOSTON COLLEGE 

WILLIAM CONNELL, President 



Compliments of 

FINANCE CLUB 

of 
BOSTON COLLEGE 

DAN JOYCE, President 



CONGRATULATIONS 

TO THE 

CLASS OF 1959 

BLESSED OLIVER PLUNKETT 
SOCIETY 



391 



CONGRATULATIONS AND BEST WISHES 

to the 

CLASS OF 1959 

from the 

Women's 
Recreation 
Association 

SCHOOL of EDUCATION 



L. G. BALFOUR COMPANY 

"Known wherever there are Schools and Colleges" 

CLASS RINGS and PINS 

Commencement Invitations - Diplomas 

Personal Cards - Club Insignia - Medals & Trophies 

♦ 

Mr. William F. Frazier, Representative 

♦ 

1103 STATLER OFFICE BUILDING 

BOSTON, MASSACHUSETTS 



Compliments of 

MARKETING CLUB 

of 

BOSTON COLLEGE 

ANDREW GOREY, President 



E. T. RYAN IRON WORKS, INC. 

Established 1917 
Specializing in 

NO-BOLT STAIR CONSTRUCTION 

Ornamental Iron, Bronze and 
Aluminum Work 

• 

Telephones: Stadium 2 

3418, 3419, 3180 

E. T. RYAN "1910", President and Treasurer 

19 Braintree Street Allston Station 

BOSTON 34, MASSACHUSETTS 



FRANCIS H. CURTIN 
INSURANCE AGENCY, INC. 

* 

689 CONCORD AVENUE 

CAMBRIDGE, MASSACHUSETTS 

UNiversity 4-4780 



CONGRATULATIONS CLASS OF '59 

FORMAL WEAR 

by 

^CCC0^29) 

Special Rates to 
B.C. Students 

• THE RIGHT FIT 

• THE RIGHT LOOK 

• THE RIGHT SERVICE 



LA 7-9339 
44 LANGLEY ROAD • NEWTON CENTRE 




392 



COURTEOUS • DEPENDABLE 
TAXICAB SERVICE 

BOSTON CAB 




KEnmore 6-5010 



WITH ALL BEST WISHES 



SENATOR JOHN L POWERS 



President of the 



MASSACHUSETTS SENATE 



Compliments of 



DeMAMBRO RADIO SUPPLY CO., INC. 



393 



w 



^^^i 



'■lis'' . - -J* "-^ 




SENIOR CLASS DIRECTORY 
Arts and Sciences 



Paul J. Andrews, 26 Green St., Woburn, Mass. 

Ronald V. Arcieri, 1 Grace St., Cochituate, Mass. 

Raymond B. Asselin, 24 Kimball St., Chicopee, Mass. 

John F. Baer, Jr., Main St., Boxford, Mass. 

David P. Bailey, 484 Green St., Weymouth, Mass. 

David P. Battles, 22 Hopkins St., Wakefield, Mass. 

David P. Belliveau, 15 Alden Rd., Watertown 72, Mass. 

Ralph K. Benware, 7 Spencer St., Medford, Mass. 

Herbert M. Blackwell, 3 Salem Rd., Beverly, Mass. 

Samuel R. Blair, 32 Wellington St., Waltham, Mass. 

John G. Blake, 155 Orvis Rd., Revere, Mass. 

Paul A. Bongiorno, Boston Post Rd.. East Wayland, Mass. 

John A. Boussy, Brantwood Rd., Norwell, R.D., Mass. 

Michael J. Boyle, 59 Bourne St., Jamaica Plain, Mass. 

James E. Brady, 68 College Ave., Arlington, Mass. 

David J. Breen, 434 Poplar St., Roslindale, Mass. 

Augustine D. Brewin, Jr., 19 Ocean St., Nahant, Mass. 

Charles E. Brusard, 1 1 Tufts St., Cambridge, Mass. 

George R. Bulger, 48 Sherman St., Roxbury, Mass. 

John F. Burke, 6 Fremont St., Woburn, Mass. 

William Joseph Burke, Jr., 77 Tampa St., Mattapan 26, Mass. 

John C. Burnham, 39 Washington St., Ayer, Mass. 

Arthur V. Burns, Jr., 32 Cottage St., Norwood, Mass. 

Paul J. Burns, 91 Adams St., Dorchester, Mass. 

Frederick A. Busconi, 16 California Pk., Watertown, Mass. 

Arthur H. Bush, 93 Gardner St., Allston, Mass. 

James C. Cabral, Boston St., Middleton, Mass. 

Arthur Cahill, 55 Hilma St., Quincy, Mass. 

Daniel M. Callahan, 15 Jefferson St., Lynn, Mass. 

Edward W. Callahan, Jr., 60 West Tremlett St., Dorchester 24, 

Mass. 
James J. Campbell, 32 Short St., Marlboro, Mass. 
James A. Cappelletti, 10 Scrub Oak Rd., Wallingford, Conn. 
Charles F. Carroll, 57 Pearson Rd., W. Somerville, Mass. 
James M. Carroll, 128 Church St., Torrington, Conn. 
Marcel C. Cartier, 53 St. Louis Ave., Willimansett, Mass. 
George E. Casavant, 422 So. Main St., Manchester, N. H. 
William L. Casey, Jr., 300 Capisic St., Portland, Me. 
Donald J. Cece, 11 Harold St., Cos Cob, Conn. 
George P. Cernada, 85 Beacon St., Somerville, Mass. 
James F. Chambliss, 1115 Chestnut St., Wilmette, 111. 
Raymond R. Chase, 22 Samoset Ave., Nantasket, Mass. 
Francis E. Chisholm, 9 Summit Ave., Everett, Mass. 
Robert W. Churchville, 1301 Center St., Newton Center, Mass. 
Thomas M. Cibotti, 111 Glenwood Ave., Hyde Park, Mass. 
Edward F. Clark, 35 Parkdale St., Somerville, Mass. 
William J. Clifford, 33 Clifford St., Roxbury, Mass. 
George W. Coffey, Box 655 Richboro Rd., Newtown, Pa. 
Edward W. Colbert, 20 Latin Rd., West Roxbury, Mass. 
Robert J. Collini, 18 Derby Rd., Watertown, Mass. 
Francis E. Collins, Jr., 79 Centre St., Roxbury, Mass. 
Lawrence J. Collins, 117 Bowdoin St., Dorchester, Mass. 
John F. Concannon, 67 Jordan Ave., South Portland, Me. 
John J. Connolly, 5 Andrew Rd. Nantasket P.O., Hull, Mass. 
Joseph E. Connolly, 13 Fountain Ave., Somerville, Mass. 
Charles F. Connors, 74 Tonawanda St., Dorchester, Mass. 
David Conroy, 8 St. Martin St., Charlestown, Mass. 
David W. Considine, 18 Berkshire Rd., Waltham, Mass. 
John M. Coppola, 14 Vivien St., Revere, Mass. 
Joseph E. Corcoran, 30 Cushing Ave., Dorchester, Mass. 
Eugene M. Costello, 5 Silver Mine Rd., Woburn, Mass. 



James F. Costello, 50 Florida St., Dorchester, Mass. 
James M. Costello, 72 Child St., Jamaica Plain, Mass. 
William H. Costin, Jr.. 189 Wren St., West Roxbury 32, Mass. 
John E. Cox, 24 White Ave., Wakefield, Mass. 
Robert E. Coyne, 5 Telegraph St., South Boston, Mass. 
Mark F. Crehan, Jr., 613 Parker St., Roxbury 20, Mass. 
John D. Cremin, 266 Market St., Brighton, Mass. 
Arthur A. Cronin, Jr., 51 Thaxter St., Hingham, Mass. 
Richard F. Cronin, 525 Western Ave., Brighton, Mass. 
Stephen G. Cronin, 40 Corinthian Rd., Somerville, Mass. 
Timothy M. Cronin, 177 Taft St., Revere, Mass. 
David F. Crowley, 20 Grand Blvd., Binghamton, N. Y. 
Richard P. Crowley, 47 Concord Ave., Milton 87, Mass. 
William M. Daley, 97 Library St., Chelsea, Mass. 
Robert A. D'Andrea, 513 East 3rd St., South Boston, Mass. 
Lewis F. Day, Jr., 2 Desmond Ave., Manchester, Mass. 
Edward J. DeGraw, 138 Washington St., Norwich, Conn. 
Gerald T. Delaney, 16 Traverse St., Newton, Mass. 
Peter A. Delmonico, Jr., 300 Mannel Ave., Shafter, Calif. 
Albert J. DeLuca, 70 Morton St., Stoughton, Mass. 
John F. Dempsey, 94 Greenleaf Ave., Waterbury, Conn. 
John H. Dempsey, 49 Fairview Terr., Maiden 48, Mass. 
Robert F. Dennehy, 31 Walden St., Jamaica Plain, Mass. 
Robert J. Desautels, 25 Goddard Ave., Turners Falls, Mass. 
Anthony R. DeSalvo, 249 Walker St., Lowell, Mass. 
Bernard F. De Savage, 63 School St., Walpole, Mass. 
Ralph R. DeSimone, 1 1 1 Addington Rd., West Roxbury, Mass. 
Robert J. Desmond, 28 Holbrook Ave., Lowell, Mass'. 
James E. Devlin, 39 Surrey St., Brighton 35, Mass. 
Kevin J. Diggins, 53 Parley Ave., Jamaica Plain, Mass. 
Frederick A. Dilorio, 36 Winter St., Belmont, Mass. 
David W. DiNardi, 1 1 Solaris Rd., Hyde Park, Mass. 
Philip J. Doherty, 36 Winter St., Dorchester, Mass. 
Paul L Dooley, 30 Romsey St., Dorchester, Mass. 
Calvin J. Dorsey, 10 Wescott St., Maiden 48, Mass. 
James F. Dowd, 580 Ashmont St., Dorchester, Mass. 
John P. Dowling, 41 Old Dock Rd., Kings Park, L.L, N. Y. 
Charles J. Downey, 3 Norway Rd., Milton 87, Mass. 
Robert J. Dugan, 15 Robin Hood St., Dorchester, Mass. 
William J. Dunn, 25 Old Commack Rd., Kings Park, N. Y. 
George A. Elliott, 123 Monument St., Portland, Me. 
George E. Espindle, 44 Essex St., Lynn, Mass. 
Joseph J. Fallo, 408 River St., Waltham, Mass. 
Daniel J. Feeney, Jr., 314 Elmwood Ave., Wollaston, Mass. 
Ernest W. Ferneau, Jr., 13 Henshaw Terr., West Newton 65, 

Mass. 
John W. Fitzgerald, 101 Pleasant St., Dorchester, Mass. 
Edward Fitzgibbon, 22 Chiswick Rd., Apt. No. 8, Brookline, 

Mass. 
J. Gerald Fitzgibbon, 33 Winham St., Hartford 6, Conn. 
George M. Fitzpatrick, 94 Liberty St., Marlboro, Mass. 
Richard L. Flanigan, 19 Fessenden St., Newton 60, Mass. 
John J. Flanagan, 337 King St., Hanover, Mass. 
Thomas A. Flatley, 501 Washington St., Apt. 9, Brighton, Mass. 
Donald J. Fleming, 100 Thurston St., Somerville, Mass. 
John F. Flynn, Jr.. 35 Meridian Ave., Kings Park, L.L, N. Y. 
Robert F. Flynn, 406 Washington St., E. Walpole, Mass. 
James E. Foley, 4 Blake St., Woburn. Mass. 
Raymond W. Fontaine, 395 High Rock St., Needham, Mass. 
Raymond F. Friesecke, 321 Trapelo Rd., Belmont, Mass. 
Joseph F. Furcinitti, 50 Mt. Pleasant St., Milford, Mass. 



395 



Edward G. Furlong, 9 Waverly St., Brockton, Mass. 
Lawrence F. Gambino, 327 Border St., E. Boston 28, Mass. 
Paul G. Garrity, 199 South St., Jamaica Plain, Mass. 
Carney E. Gavin, 124 Westchester Rd., Jamaica Plain, Mass. 
Daniel J. Geagan, 16 Stearns Rd., Watertown, Mass. 
George J. Giersch. 1601 Metropolitan Ave.. Bronx 62, N. Y. 
Edwa'rd A. Gill. 20 Adelaide St., Jamaica Plain 30, Mass. 
Joseph E. Gilligan, 68 Lindberah Ave., West Newton, Mass. 
Ronald A. GillTs. 143 Westfield^Rd., Holyoke, Mass. 
Robert J. R. Goulet, 368 Longwood Ave., Boston, Mass. 
David W. Govoni. Tempest Knob Terr., Wareham, Mass. 
Jan R. Gray. 71 Prospect St.. Little Falls, N. Y. 
Richard J. Greene. 35 Lincoln St., Winthrop, Mass. 
Edward S. Grennan, Jr., 222 Elm St.. West Concord, Mass. 
Dennis F. Griffin, 46 Denmark Ave., Milton, Mass. 
Charles W. Grinnell. 358 Geneva Ave., Dorchester, Mass. 
Joseph E. Hagan, 321 Neponset Ave., Dorchester 22, Mass. 
Paul P. Hagerty, 28 Cummings Ave., Wollaston, Mass. 
James B. Halligan. 97 Bay Rd., Sharon, Mass. 
Thomas F. Halpin, 26 Linden St., Reading, Mass. 
George L. Harkins, 85 Halcyon Rd., Newton Center, Mass. 
Joseph M. Hart, 39 Belmont St., Charlestown, Mass. 
William L. Hartnett, 30 Northbourne Rd., Jamaica Plain 30, 

Mass. 
Jerome J. Havrda, 964 Naugatuck Ave., Milford, Conn. 
Edward J. Hayes, 7 Warren St., Lawrence, Mass. 
Joseph B. Hayward, 7 Carmody Ct., South Boston 27, Mass. 
Richard A. Healey, 8 Albany St., Lynn, Mass. 
James F. Healy, 69 Bellevue Hill Rd., West Roxbury, Mass. 
Richard J. Hinchey, 355 Essex St., Salem, Mass. 
Harrison E. Hobbs, 726 Washington St., Bath, Me. 
George E. Holland, 36 Lynde St., Maiden, Mass. 
Paul F. Hughes, Maple Ave., Greenland, N. H. 
Thomas A. Hughes, 93 School St., Belmont, Mass. 
Robert E. Hunter, 55 Corbet St., Dorchester 24, Mass. 
Harold G. Jackson, 37 Oliver Rd., Belmont, Mass. 
Richard J. Jodoin, 118 Atlantic Ave., Marblehead, Mass. 
James G. Johnston, 35 Spring Valley Rd., Belmont, Mass. 
Michael Francis Jordan, 520 New Britain Ave., Hartford 10, 

Conn. 
John E. Joyce, 68 Weld Hill St., Jamaica Plain 30, Mass. 
John J. Joyce, 23 Josephine St., Dorchester, Mass. 
William D. Joyce, 23 Josephine St., Dorchester, Mass. 
Robert A. Katz, 76 Campbell Ave., Revere, Mass. 
Robert E. Keane, 95 Murdock St., Brighton 35, Mass. 
William J. Kearney, 5 Dexter St., Maiden, Mass. 
John W. Keegan, 16 Hamilton St., Dorchester, Mass. 
Robert E. Kellan. 90 Main St., North Andover, Mass. 
John J. Kelleher, 283 Torrey St., Brockton, Mass. 
George T. Kelley, 107 Myrtle St., Lynn, Mass. 
Paul Kelly, 467 Washington St., Brighton 35, Mass. 
Franklin T. Kennedy, 11 Wait St., Springfield, Mass. 
John F. Kennedy, 601 E. Seventh St., South Boston, Mass. 
Robert L. Kenney, 131 E. Water St., Rockland, Mass. 
Thomas J. Kenney, 181 Ruskindale Rd., Mattapan 26, Mass. 
Edward L. Keough, 17 Gilbert St., Waltham, Mass. 
Kendall F. Kielyr37 Wallace Rd., Quincy, Mass. 
Bernard F. King, 70 Belcher St., Sharon, Mass. 
Paul R. King, 32 Burton St., Brighton, Mass. 
Eugene P. Koury, 35 Magoon Ave., Medford, Mass. 
Paul C. Laincz, 19 Pinehurst Ave., Natick, Mass. 
David John Land, 120 Peterboro St., Boston 15, Mass. 
Frank Lane, 14 Saxon Rd., Newton Highlands, Mass. 
John J. Lane, Jr., 73 High St., Quincy, Mass. 
Maurice E. Lapierre. 6013 Meridian St., Los Angeles, Calif. 
George F. Lawlor, 47 Alton St., Arlington, Mass. 
Robert F. Leonard, 15 Acadia Pk., Somerville. Mass. 
Thomas M. Lester, 139 Williams St., Jamaica Plain 30, Mass. 



Robert F. Levangie, 123 High St., E. Weymouth, Mass. 
Dana R. Levine, 60 Magazine St., Cambridge, Mass. 
Charles L. Lindsey, 112 Union St., Franklin, Mass. 
Joseph F. Livingston, 1 16 Ardale St., Roslindale, Mass. 
Paul A. LoCont'e, 17 Charles St., Hyde Park 36, Mass. 
Terence P. Logan, 16 Sheridan St., Milton, Mass. 
John W. Lotus, 21 Clifford St., Roxbury 19, Mass. 
Robert R. Lundy, 18 Halford Rd., W. Roxbury 32, Mass. 
David M. Lynch, 22 Healy St., West Springfield, Mass. 
Robert J. Lynch, 1 1 Tacoma St., Hyde Park, Mass. 
James E. Lyons, 27 Ridge St., Montpelier, Vt. 
William J. Lyons, 47 Fenwood Rd., Roxbury, Mass. 
Domenic P. Macaione, 183 School St., Franklin, Mass. 
Terence M. MacDonald, 7 Regina Terr. Auburndale, Mass. 
Richard E. MacDougall, 1 O'Donnell Terr., Dorchester, Mass. 
Francis P. MacMillan, 60 Windsor St., Everett, Mass. 
Raymond J. Maczuba, 24 Third St., Lowell, Mass. 
James J. Madden, 103 Boston Ave., Somerville, Mass. 
John A. Madden, 573 Gallivan Blvd., Dorchester, Mass. 
Richard Madden, 42 Chetwind Rd., Somerville, Mass. 
Jay J. Mahoney, 41 Linnaean St., Cambridge, Mass. 
Thomas R. Mahoney, 8 Ray St., Peabody, Mass. 
Paul A. Mahony, Jr., 5011 Wooddale Lane, Edina, Minn. 
Andrew F. Majewski, 115 Beacon St., Chelesa, Mass. 
George F. Malloy, 734 Centre St., Newton 58, Mass. 
Francis J. Malone, 12 Radcliffe Rd.. Melrose, Mass. 
Joseph Manfreda, 255 No. Main St., Wallingford, Conn. 
David L. Manning, 179 Baker St., Manchester, N. H. 
Joseph A. Manning, 10 Lincoln St., Portland, Me. 
Paul N. Manos, 55 Norwood Ave., Manchester, Mass. 
James T. Marrinan, 261 East Kings Bridge Rd., Bronx 58, N. Y. 
Francis J. Martin, 34 Barton St., W. Somerville, Mass. 
James R. Masson, 37 New Bridge St., Hingham, Mass. 
Joseph A. Mazrimas, 168 Chestnut St., Chelsea, Mass. 
Claude J. Mazzola, 63 Brayton Rd., Brighton, Mass. 
Jerome F. McCarthy, 19 Pearson Rd., Somerville, Mass. 
Leonard M. McCarthy, 15 McCarthy Rd., Cambridge, Mass. 
Charles J. McCarthy, III, 85 Orchard St., Jamaica Plain 30, 

Mass. 
Russell C. McConnell, 41 Nikisc Ave., Roslindale, Mass. 
John J. McCormack, 218 Chestnut St., Brookline, Mass. 
Charles B. McCullagh, 493 Washington St., Apt. 3, Brighton, 

Mass. 
Henry P. McDonald, 74 Stanton St., Rockland, Mass. 
Daniel F. McGrath, 31 Glenwood St.. Lynn, Mass. 
Joseph C. McGuill, Jr., 284 Snell St., Fall River, Mass. 
Robert J. McHugh, 498 Beechwood St., Cohasset, Mass. 
Ronald A. Mclntyre, 648 W. Roxbury Pkwy., Boston, Mass. 
Donald B. McKeon, 15 Gardner St., Allston 34, Mass. 
Peter J. McLaughlin, 45 Garfield St., Cambridge, Mass. 
Francis R. McLellan, 87 Warren St., West Medford, Mass. 
John A. McMurrer, 28 Davis Ave., Arlington 74, Mass. 
Owen J. McNamara, 74 Marlborough St., Boston, Mass. 
Joseph F. McNeil, 92 Greaton Rd., West Roxbury, Mass. 
Brian S. McNiff, 101 Waban Hill Rd., Chestnut Hill 67, Mass. 
Donald P. McRae, 37 Farragut Ave., Somerville, Mass. 
Edward D. Meagher, 88 Weed St., Lowell, Mass. 
Keelan D. Milbury, 12 Wellington Rd., Medford, Mass. 
John L. Monahan, 1045 Center St.. Newton Center, Mass. 
Ralph R. Moore, 7 Whitman St., Lawrence, Mass. 
Anthony J. Morose, 88 Liberty St., Danvers, Mass. 
Brian T. Morrissey, 55 Lynn St., Peabody, Mass. 
Rodney J. Morrison, 48 Pleasant St., Wakefield, Mass. 
Robert S. Morton, 37 Wellesley Pk., Dorchester 24, Mass. 
Peter F. Mueller, 3 George St., Reading, Mass. 
Edward T. Mulkern, 53 Dix St., Dorchester, Mass. 
Edward C. Mulligan, 3 Homer St., Revere, Mass. 
Thomas H. Mullowney, Jr., 2 Thorndike St., Brookline, Mass. 



396 



Anthony D. Murphy, 134 Lynnfield St., Lynn, Mass. 

Paul H. Murphy, 63 Iroquois Rd., Arlington, Mass. 

Peter K. Murphy, 26 Lloyd St., Winchester, Mass. 

Robert W. Murphy, 14 Bellaire Rd., Roslindale, Mass. 

William M. Murphy, 24 Pilgrim Rd., Waban 68, Mass. 

Richard D. Murray, 661 La Grange St., West Roxbury, Mass. 

WiUiam E. Murray, 5 Butler St., Dorchester, Mass. 

Francis J. Musmanno, 12 Hillside Ave., Holbrook, Mass. 

James M. Nee, 96 Walter St., Roslindale, Mass. 

John H. Nolan, Jr., Cottage St., Marion, Mass. 

Thomas J. Norton, 165 Canton St., North Randolph, Mass. 

John O'Connor, 28 Malcolm Rd., Jamaica Plain 30, Mass. 

John F. O'Leary, 12 Buckingham St., Somerville, Mass. 

John C. O'Malley, 247 Prospect St., Norwood, Mass. 

John E. O'Malley, 13 Thurman St., Everett, Mass. 

Owen L. O'Malley, 1684 Commonwealth Ave., West Newton, 

Mass. 
Donald J. O'Neill, 74 Meagher Ave., Milton, Mass. 
James D. O'Neill, 59 Mystic St., West Medford, Mass. 
Richard A. Orlando, 666 Common St., Walpole, Mass. 
Richard J. O'Shaughnessy, 30 Wesley St., Somerville, Mass. 
Martin O'Sullivan, Cove Neck Rd., Oyster Bay, L. L, N. Y. 
Dermott P. O'Toole, 23 Brighton Ave., Allston, Mass. 
Robert G. Paquette, 20 Bean Ct., Roxbury, Mass. 
WiUiam J. Parks, 635 La Grange St., West Roxbury, Mass. 
Robert A. Pelosi, 143 Trenton St., East Boston, Mass. 
Albert J. Pepin, Jr., 16 Summer St., Beverly, Mass. 
Felix A. Perriello, 44 Otis St., Medford, Mass. 
John F. Peterson, 434 Concord St., Framingham, Mass. 
Stanley J. Piaseczynski. 101 Fountain St., Medford 55, Mass. 
Robert E. Pieroni, 19 Levant St., Dorchester, Mass. 
Ronald C. Pine, 38 Fenwick St., Somerville, Mass. 
John M. Pizzolante, 12 Park PI., Arlington, Mass. 
James E. Plouffe, 176 East Central, Natick, Mass. 
Louis L. Poczatek, 2112 Acushnet Ave., New Bedford, Mass. 
Edward A. Porter, 12 Roycroft Ave., Weymouth, Mass. 
William L. Powers, 321 Wood Ave., Hyde Park, Mass. 
Andris Priede, 28 Turner St.. Salem, Mass. 
Joseph T. Procito, Jr., 106 Thorndike St., Cambridge, Mass. 
Philip A. Puccia, 152 Salem St., Boston, Mass. 
Paul E. Radtke. Silver Lake, Minn. 
William J. Reagan, Jr., 12 Oak Rd., Medford 55, Mass. 
Richard F. Regan, 79 Coleman St., Dorchester, Mass. 
William S. Regan, 46 Park St., West Roxbury, Mass. 
Robert E. Richards, 14 Greenough Ave., Cambridge, Mass. 
Robert J. Riley, 10 Chesterfield Rd., Milton 86, Mass. 
Richard B. Roche, 78 Hunnewell Ave., Brighton, Mass. 
Martin B. Roddy, 86 North St., Fitchburg, Mass. 
Daniel E. Rosen, 167 Talbot Ave., Dorchester, Mass. 
Joseph L. Rosenthal, 7 Elven Rd., Roslindale, Mass. 
Louis J. Roy, 6 Potter St., Brunswick, Me. 
John F. Ryan, 73A Bartlett St., Somerville, Mass. 
Frank K. Samu, 277 Howard Ave.. Bridgeport, Conn. 
Eugene W. Sargent, 41 Mellen St., Needham Hgts., Mass. 
Joseph A. Sarno, 47 A North Margin St., Boston, Mass. 
Joseph G. Sayers, 16 Exeter St., Arlington 74, Mass. 
Anthony P. Scapicchio, 20 Waite St., Revere, Mass. 
Robert E. Scigliano, 176 Vinal St., Revere, Mass. 



Francis S. Scimone, 33 Clyde St., Belmont, Mass. 
Samuel F. Scott, 12 Scott Rd., Weymouth, Mass. 
Roland N. Seguin, 723 Hathaway Rd., New Bedford, Mass. 
Joseph A. Selvitella, 103 Saint Andrew Rd., East Boston, Mass. 
Joseph K. Sergi, 166 Cherry St., Brockton, Mass. 
Harold P. Sexton, 7 Dexter Ave., Watertown, Mass. 
Edward J. Shaughnessy, 570 Riverside Ave., Medford 55, Mass. 
George A. Shediack, 1304 New Boston Rd., Fall River, Mass. 
William F. Sirois, 10 Cabot St., Salem, Mass. 
Charles J. Smith, 50 Ashland St., Lynn, Mass. 
Earle L. Smith, Jr., 48 Richard Cir., Woburn, Mass. 
Francis J. Smith, 20 Bacon PL, Newton 64, Mass. 
John H. Smith, 173 Maple St., West Roxbury, Mass. 
Charles F. Spanbauer, 30 Willoughby St., Brighton, Mass. 
Robert O. Spence. 23 George St., Hyde Park 36, Mass. 
Raymond U. Stebbins, 55 High St., Tilton, N. H. 
Adrian J. Sullivan, 4 Eileen Rd., Milton, Mass. 
Arthur F. Sullivan, 30 Wildwood St., Winchester, Mass. 
David A. Sullivan, 380 West Roxbury Pkwy., Roslindale, Mass. 
James M. Sullivan, 8 Sunnyside St., Jamaica Plain, Mass. 
John F. Sullivan, 658 Cummins Hwy., Mattapan, Mass. 
Leo R. Sullivan, 17 Cufflin St., Brighton, Mass. 
Paul T. Sullivan, 10 Pierce Ave.. Dorchester, Mass. 
Peter M. Sullivan, 68 Kenwood St., Dorchester 24, Mass. 
Robert R. SuUivan, 5 Leo Dr., Chicopee Falls, Mass. 
Roger J. Sullivan, 324 East Squantum St., North Quincy, Mass. 
Thomas F. Sullivan, 15 Medford St., Arlington, Mass. 
William D. Sullivan, 44 Dover St., Cambridge, Mass. 
Norman T. Swain, 714 East 5th St., South Boston, Mass. 
Joseph D. Swan, 116 Walnut St., Somerville, Mass. 
Harold A. Swanson, 358 Washington St., Quincy, Mass. 
Philip W. Thibedeau, Walnut Rd., South Hamilton, Mass. 
Richard N. Tierney, 42 Paul Gore St., Jamaica Plain 30, Mass. 
Timothy F. Tobin, 126 Calumet St., Roxbury, Mass. 
Robert M. Trahe, 198 Argyle Rd., Stewart Manor, N. Y. 
Thomas G. Tuohey, 480 Crafts St., West Newton, Mass. 
Roger J. Twyman, 1372 Penbroke St., Bridgeport, Conn. 
Julius J. Underwood, 170 Saint Botolph St., Boston, Mass. 
Leo G. Van Beaver, 68 Roosevelt Ave., North Attleboro, Mass. 
Robert S. Vermette, R. F. D. No. 6, Caribou, Me. 
James D. Villiotte, 30 Bryant St., Revere 51, Mass. 
Francis J. Visalli, 159 White St., Belmont, Mass. 
Roscoe V. Wade, 15 Coolidge St., Brookline, Mass. 
John E. Walker, 273 Madison St., Wrentham, Mass. 
John T. Wall, 10 Western Ave., Lynn, Mass. 
Daniel P. Walsh, 11 Colbert St., West Roxbury, Mass. 
Peter J. Walsh, 12 Robin Rd., Wakefield, Mass. 
Francis E. Wanat, 263 Pratt St., Meriden, Conn. 
Brendan J. Welch, 83 Fenwick St., Springfield, Mass. 
William L. Welch, 145 Edinboro St., Newtonville, Mass. 
Thomas H. Whalen, 22 Winona St., Auburndale, Mass. 
Richard T. Whelan, 114 Pearl St., Newton 58, Mass. 
Henry H. Wieman, 39 Percival St., Dorchester, Mass. 
John R. Wiseman, Jr., 182 Powder House Blvd., Somerville, 

Mass. 
Paul F. Woelfel, 553 East Sixth St., South Boston, Mass. 
William R. York, 89 Cross St., Maiden, Mass. 
James H. Young, 31 Poole St., Woburn, Mass. 



Business Administration 



Arthur T. Abele, Jr., Fairview St., Middleboro, Mass. 
Richard K. Acchione, 66 Clinton St., Newton, Mass. 
Donald G. Ackroyd, 30 McCabe Ave., Millis, Mass. 
John R. Akin, ill, 106 Prospect St., Wakefield, Mass. 
Nicholas E. Altobelli, 732 Waverly St., Framingham, Mass. 



William T. Appleyard, 67 Presley St., Maiden, Mass. 
Charles R. Aronis, 217 Webster Ave., Chelsea 50, Mass. 
Gerald P. Ball, 19 Hallron St.. Hyde Park, Mass. 
Robert E. Barrett, Arch Rd., Avon, Conn. 
Robert F. Barry, 503 La Grange St., West Roxbury, Mass. 



397 



B. Gerald Bartush, 663 Shirley St., Birmingham. Mich. 
Carmen C. Battaglia, 35 St. Edward Rd., East Boston, Mass. 
Thomas M. Beatfy, 36 Standish St., Cambridge, Mass. 
Edward H. Beianger, 18 Arborough Rd., Roslindale, Mass. 
William F. Bench" Jr., 2 Upland Rd. West, Arlington, Mass. 
Leon H. Bennett, Jr., 53 Adella St., Auburn, Mass. 
Stephen F. Bennett, 53 Adella St., Auburn, Mass. 
Robert A. Berra, 33 Porter St., Somerville. Mass. 
William E. Berrigan, 42 Day St., Jamaica Plain 30, Mass. 
Chester W. Bielawski, 62 Wicklow Ave., Medford, Mass. 
Chester F. Blake, 27 Newton St., Brighton, Mass. 
Ralph Bloom, Greenwich Rd., Ware, Mass. 
J. Laurent Boisvert, 316 Salem St., Lawrence, Mass. 
Joseph A. Bondi, 3 City View Rd., Boston, Mass. 
John E. Bonner, 14 Judson St., Braintree, Mass. 
Henry W. Botte, Jr., 166 Perkins St., Melrose, Mass. 
Richard J. Boudreau, 58 High St., Sanford, Me. 
Francis G. Bowden, 24 Harris St., Quincy 69, Mass. 
Henry G. Bowen, 333 Tufts St., Manchester, N. H. 
Robert F. Boyle, 56 Martin Rd., Milton 86, Mass. 
Cornelius W. Brady, 19 Cortes St., Boston, Mass. 
Thomas Brady, III, 619 Beacon St., Newton Center, Mass. 
David P. Brauer, 16 Kenneth St., West Roxbury, Mass. 
Paul L. Broughton, 5 River St., Arlington. Mass. 
William W. Brown. 115 Main St., Maiden 48, Mass. 
John F. Burke, 32 Stellman Rd., Roslindale, Mass. 
Karl J. Burgess, 66 Fern St., New Bedford, Mass. 
James J. Burke, 71 Grove St., Chestnut Hill 67, Mass. 
Richard M. Burns, 266 Beacon St., Somerville, Mass. 
Anthony C. Busa, 46 Lowell St., Lexington, Mass. 
James E. Butler, Jr., 1406 Plainville Rd., New Bedford, Mass. 
Joseph F. Callahan, 33 Brayton Rd., Brighton, Mass. 
Joseph P. Callahan, 20 Plymouth Ave., Milton, Mass. 
John W. Canavan, 42 Victoria St., Somerville, Mass. 
William J. Canniff, 84 Penn St., Quincy, Mass. 
Thomas M. Carey, 118 Speen St., Natick, Mass. 
William M. Carnes. 26 O'Brien Ct., Charlestown, Mass. 
Edward J. Carroll, 276 Pine St., Dedham, Mass. 
John D. Christiano, 632 Grier Ave., Elizabeth 2, N. J. 
Corvin R. Cianci, 220 Hanover St., Boston, Mass. 
Andrew Ciarletta, Jr., 12 Hilton Ct., Lynn, Mass. 
William F. Clarke, 64 Murray Hill Rd., Roslindale, Mass. 
Paul M. Cloonan, 104 Westminster Ave., Watertown, Mass. 
Alan J. Cloutier, 27 Central Rd., Somerville, Mass. 
Alfred A. Cocca, 159 Cottage St., East Boston, Mass. 
Frank A. Colley, 141 Main St., Woburn, Mass. 
Manuel E. Conceison, 15 Fortune Rd., Woburn, Mass. 
John E. Coney, Jr., 110 Congress St., Bangor, Me. 
William F. Connell, 539 Summer St., Lynn, Mass. 
Robert W. Connelly, 87 Alban St., Dorchester 24, Mass. 
Justin J. Connor, 20 Monadnock Rd., Newton, Mass. 
Francis X. Connors, 1 Woodland Rd., West Concord, Mass. 
Francis J. Costello, 12-24 116 St., College Pt., L. I., N. Y. 
James E. Cotter, 371 Savin Hill Ave., Dorchester, Mass. 
Richard M. Cotter, 45 Cottage St., Wellesley, Mass. 
William E. Cratty, 66 Commonwealth Ave., Marlboro, Mass. 
John F. Crimmings, 180 School St., Belmont, Mass. 
James J. Croak, 121 Glenville Ave., AUston, Mass. 
Charles L. Cronin, 78 Webcowet Rd., Arlington, Mass. 
John J. Cronin, 43 Mayberry Ave., Medford, Mass. 
Joseph V. Cronin, 23 Winthrop Ave., Revere, Mass. 
Paul E. Crowley, 419 East Seventh St., South Boston, Mass. 
Robert V. Crowley, 38 Carolina Ave., Jamaica Plain, Mass. 
David W. Curlee, 65 Sherbrooke Ave., Hartford, Conn. 
Martin J. Danahy, Jr., 98 Oakdale Rd., Newton Highlands, 

Mass. 
Parker A. Davis, 53 Broad St., Salem, Mass. 
Larry DeAngelis, 195 Watertown St., Watertown, Mass. 



Angelo A. DelPriore, 9 Stillman St., Boston, Mass. 
Francis Demeo, 23 Spring St., Waltham, Mass. 
John J. Deneen, 20 Spafford Rd., Milton, Mass. 
Peter J. Derba, 5 Barbara Lane, Medford, Mass. 
Anthony J. DiMatteo, 42 Matchett St., Brighton, Mass. 
John DiPerna, 96 Bailey Rd., Somerville, Mass. 
Anthony J. Dire, 486 Main St., Watertown 72, Mass. 
Thomas J. Doerr, 70 Garrison Ave., Somerville 44, Mass. 
Edward A. Doherty, 1486 Commonwealth Ave., Brighton, 

Mass. 
Kevin L. Dolan. 103 Cedar St., Framingham, Mass. 
Thomas E. Dolan, 42 Washburn Ave., Wellesley, Mass. 
John P. Donahoe, 9 Oliver St., Randolph, Mass. 
Richard B. Donahue, 296 Belgrade Ave., Roslindale 31, Mass. 
Joseph J. Donovan, 136 School St., Somerville, Mass. 
Harold W. Downing, 41 Montvale St., Roslindale, Mass. 
William J. Driscoll, 52 Boundary Rd., Maiden, Mass. 
John F. Drummey, Jr., 32 Bellevue Ave., Norwood, Mass. 
Hugh G. Duffy, 1 Remington St., Dorchester, Mass. 
Francis X. Dunne, 14 Paisley Pk., Dorchester, Mass. 
Gerald E. Eisenhaur, Jr., 33 Dimick St., Somerville, Mass. 
Thomas A. English, 9 Pillon Rd., Milton 86, Mass. 
Thomas J. Faherty, 101 Lonsdale St., Dorchester, Mass. 
William A. Fallon, 71 Glen Ave., Port Chester, N. Y. 
John C. Farley, 291 Pleasant St., Winthrop, Mass. 
Raymond A. Farmer, 41 Phillips Ave., Lynn, Mass. 
William F. Fawcett, 97 Lafayette St., Marblehead, Mass. 
Joseph H. Feltz, 106 Boston Ave., Medford, Mass. 
William A. Ferioli, 82 Cotting St., Medford, Mass. 
John F. Fitzgerald, 422 Ashmont St., Dorchester, Mass. 
William Fitzgerald, 8 Quinlan St., Milford, Mass. 
Joseph E. Flaherty, 24 Wellington St., East Braintree, Mass. 
Ramon Alvarez Florez, Calzada No. 505, Vedado, Habaua 
Dennis J. Folan, 86 Winter St., Norwood, Mass. 
Gerald S. Foley, 111 Milton Ave., Hyde Park 36, Mass. 
Martin J. Foley, 975 Dorchester Ave., Dorchester, Mass. 
William J. Foley, 47 Sprague St., Revere, Mass. 
Rocco L. Fonti, 62 Tileston St., Everett, Mass. 
H. Frederick Forrester, 39 Hemenway St., Boston, Mass. 
William J. Fothergill, 415 Eastern Ave., Chelsea, Mass. 
Richard J. Ganong, 119 Rand Terr., Newton, Mass. 
Murray L. Gardler, 419 Weston Rd., Wellesley, Mass. 
John Garvey, 132 Tonawanda St., Dorchester, Mass. 
Stephen J. Garvey, 10 Romsey St., Dorchester, Mass. 
George G. Gately, 72 Huntington Ave., Boston, Mass. 
Joseph F. Gately, 10 Rugby Rd., Mattapan, Mass. 
Edward P. Geary, 61 Adamson St., Allston 34, Mass. 
John M. Geraci, 82 Oakdale Rd., Newton Center, Mass. 
Robert F. Gibson, 19 Minot St., Reading, Mass. 
John J. Gilfoyle, 84 Cottage Ave., Winthrop, Mass. 
Anthony M. Giordano, 52 Penfield St., Roslindale 31, Mass. 
Robert R. Giordano, 98 Lawrence St., Framingham, Mass. 
Andrew J. Gorey, Jr., 179 Upland Rd., Quincy, Mass. 
D. Robert Gori, 1205 Brook Rd., Milton 86, Mass. 
James F. Gosselin, 24 Fairview Ave., Lebanon, N. H. 
Joseph P. Greelish, Jr., 15 VanNess Rd., Belmont, Mass. 
Alan Greenberg, 40 Centennial Ave., Revere, Mass. 
Stephen V. Guarrera, 71 Walnut Ave., Waterbury 4, Conn. 
Thomas W. Guilderson, 9 Woodland St., Arlington, Mass. 
James W. Hagan, 299 Tappan St., Brookline 46, Mass. 
Thomas J. Hagerty, 41 Laurel St., Somerville 43, Mass. 
Daniel S. Hantey, Main St., Westford, Mass. 
Lawrence F. Harding, 70 Landseer St., Boston 32, Mass. 
John M. Harkins. R. F. D. Primrose St., Katonah, N. Y. 
David J. Harrigan, 87 Bird St., Dorchester 25, Mass. 
Charles F. Harrington, 311 Beaver St., Waltham, Mass. 
Laurence P. Harrington, 311 Beaver St., Waltham 54, Mass. 
William J. Harris, 67 Montcalm Ave., Brighton, Mass. 



398 



Joseph M. Hart, 95 Grant Ave., Medford. Mass. 
Paul F. Hayes, 72 French St., North Quincy 71, Mass. 
Kevin W. Hayes, 52 Wyatt St., Somerville, Mass. 
David A. Healy, 8 Pond St., Milton, Mass. 
Kenneth P. Healy, 35 Fayette St., Arlington, Mass. 
Gerald R. Hegarty, 32 Brock St., Brighton, Mass. 
Edward F. Henneberry, 8 Malbert Rd., Brighton, Mass. 
Pierre E. Henry, 60 Aspinwall Ave., Brookline, Mass. 
Peter C. Hernon, 19 MacArthur St., Somerville 45, Mass. 
John M. Higgins, 18 Margin Terr., Peabody, Mass. 
Alan R. Hilsinger, 89 Bates Rd., Arlington, Mass. 
Richard K. Hopkins, 877 Commonwealth Ave., Newton, Mass. 
Francis 1. Horgan, 461 East Eighth St., South Boston, Mass. 
John P. Huegel, 12 Sutherland Rd., Brighton, Mass. 
Joseph P. Hurley, 38 Denmark Ave., Milton, Mass. 
Anthony D. lannuccillo, 9 Buswell St., Lawrence, Mass. 
Joseph Jangro, 42 Melrose St., Melrose, Mass. 
Thomas E. Johnson, 569 Main St., Lewiston, Me. 
Daniel L. Joyce, Jr., 269 Main St., Woburn, Mass. 
William J. Joyce, 250 Park St., Dorchester, Mass. 
Matthew F. Judge, 20 Beckett St., Peabody, Mass. 
Leonard M. Jukins, 204 Phillips St., Lawrence, Mass. 
Arthur F. Kaplan, 1638 Commonwealth Ave., Brighton 35, 

Mass. 
Alan D. Kaufman, 39 Clements Rd., Newton, Mass. 
John W. Keane. 154 Metropolitan Ave.. Roslindale 31, Mass. 
William G. Keane, 10 Highland PL, Weymouth, Mass. 
Geoffrey J. Keating, 27 Glenmont Rd., Brighton 35, Mass. 
John F. Keaveney, 74 Hillsdale St., Dorchester, Mass. 
Joseph F. Kelliher, Jr., 168 Pleasant St., Norwood, Mass. 
Donald F. Kelly, 39 Cleveland Ave., New Rochelle, N. Y. 
Frederick L. Kennedy, 383 Eastern Ave., Lynn, Mass. 
Donald Kenney, 83 Webster St., Needham, Mass. 
William H. Keough, 69 Irving St., Millis, Mass. 
Kevin J. Kiley, 133 Waverly Ave., Melrose, Mass. 
John J. King, Jr., 199 Chestnut St., E. Lynn, Mass. 
Martin J. King, Jr., 4 Boylston St., Lynn, Mass. 
Richard L. Kingston, 280 Corey Rd., Brighton, Mass. 
William D. Kryzovic, 63 Bow St., Everett, Mass. 
John F. Kuliesh, 90 Margin St., Haverhill, Mass. 
Romeo J. F. Labbe, 394 Sabattos St., Lewiston, Me. 
Robert J. Ladd, 150 Austin St., Hyde Park, Mass. 
Constantine C. Laganas, 102 Clark Rd., Lowell, Mass. 
Joseph R. La Monica, 127 Leverett St., Boston, Mass. 
Michael R. Landolfi, 104 Fuller St., Dorchester, Mass. 
Thomas G. Larkin, 50 North Crescent Circuit, Brighton, Mass. 
Robert P. Latkany, 34 77th St., Brooklyn, N. Y. 
Joseph F. Leary, Jr., 480 Brook Rd., Milton, Mass. 
Harold E. LeBonte, 21 Woodward St., Newton Highlands, 

Mass. 
Thomas J. Legere, 82 Hutchinson Rd., Arlington, Mass. 
Thomas P. Lenehan, 53 Mallet St., Dorchester, Mass. 
Bernard B. Leonard, 9 McDonough Way, South Boston, Mass. 
Joseph W. Lucas, 47 Willoughby St., Brighton, Mass. 
Paul J. Lucey, 21 Bainbridge St., Maiden, Mass. 
Charles O. Lynch, Jr., 70 Mayfield St., Dorchester, Mass. 
David J. Lyons, 39 Sheldon St., Milton, Mass. 
Francis X. MacDonald, 808 Main St., So. Weymouth 90, 

Mass. 
William F. Mack. 50 Brush Hill Rd., Milton, Mass. 
Frank L. Macolini, 60 Sycamore St., Belmont 79, Mass. 
Arthur M. Madden, 34 Oldis St., Rochelle Park, N. J. 
John J. Madden, 71 Euston Rd., Brighton, Mass. 
John S. Madden, 32 Belvidere Rd., Framingham, Mass. 
John F. Magee, 1438 Hollywood Ave., Bronx, N. Y. 
James P. Magennis, 5 Fresno St., Roslindale, Mass. 
James J. Mahoney, 33 Larch St., Brighton, Mass. 
John D. Mahoney, 90 Church St., Westwood, Mass. 



Edward J. Malone, 115 St. Rose St., Jamaica Plain, Mass. 
George J. Mancini, 740 Highland Ave., Maiden, Mass. 
Paul F. Manning, 63 Fenwood Rd., Boston 15, Mass. 
Richard J. Manning, 27 Belmont St., North Quincy 71, Mass. 
Paul H. Mantos, 14 Maxfield St., West Roxbury 32, Mass. 
Robert A. Manzelli, 17 Whitney St., Watertown, Mass. 
Lawrence R. Martin, 165 Andover St., Lowell, Mass. 
Armand G. Martineau, 1 Stoughton Terr., Boston 25, Mass. 
Paul J. McBrien, 247 Stratford St., West Roxbury, Mass. 
James J. McCabe, 42 Patridge Ave., Somerville 45, Mass. 
Brian M. McCarthy, 78 Arlington St., Hyde Park 36, Mass. 
Thomas J. McCarthy, 24 North Crescent Circuit, Brighton 35, 

Mass. 
William A. McCarthy, 26 Gurney St., Cambridge, Mass. 
William H. McClennan, Jr., 29 Windermere Rd., Dorchester 25, 

Mass. 
James M. McCormack, 272 South Main St., Wallingford, 

Conn. 
Leo J. McCormack, 147 Franklin St., Arlington, Mass. 
James J. McCormick, Jr., 15 Myrtle St., Jamaica Plain, Mass. 
Harry A. McCormick, 141 Pleasant St., Milton, Mass. 
Arthur J. McDonald, 26 Preble Gardens Rd., Belmont, Mass. 
John E. McDonald, 108 First St., Medford, Mass. 
John J. McDonough, 102 Grove St., Lynn, Mass. 
Gerard J. McElaney, 58 St. Mary's Rd., Milton, Mass. 
John J. McEleney, 16 Rutledge St., West Roxbury, Mass. 
James McElhinney, 34 Hart St., Beverly Farms, Mass. 
William F. McGonagle, 1 1 Farrar Ave., Hyde Park 36, Mass. 
Robert E. McGurk, 672 Beacon St., Newton Center, Mass. 
John A. McHatton, 27 Clinton St., Chelsea, Mass. 
James V. McHugh, 100 Main St., Leominister, Mass. 
Edward F. McKenna, 861 North Shore Rd., Revere, Mass. 
Francis J. McKeever, Jr., 390 Marlborough St., Boston, Mass. 
Chester G. McLaughlin, P.O. Box 573, Wilmington, Mass. 
Paul F. McLaughlin, 143 Forest Hills St., Jamaica Plain, Mass. 
Joseph P. McMahon, 20 Burke St., Apt. No. 192, South Boston, 

Mass. 
Thomas P. McNamara, 383 Broadway, Somerville, Mass. 
Edwin A. Mercer, Jr., 10 Hutchinson Rd., Lexington, Mass. 
Alan R. Miller, 181 Housatonic Dr., Devon, Conn. 
Robert S. Miller, 675 Sanford Ave., Newark, N. J. 
Denis V. Minihane, 14 Glenmont Rd., Brighton, Mass. 
Pasquale P. Mobilia, 63 Harland Rd., Wahham, Mass. 
John B. Moran, 127 Coleman St., Maiden, Mass. 
Francis L. Moran, 125 Greenfield Rd., Mattapan, Mass. 
George A. Morris, 3 Oxford Ave., Belmont, Mass. 
James J. Mulrennan, 121 Thorndike St., Cambridge, Mass. 
John J. Murphy, 169 Tremont St., Somerville, Mass. 
Kevin M. Murphy, 35 Kelley St., Cambridge 38, Mass. 
Matthew G. Murphy, 28 First St., Medford, Mass. 
Thomas O. Murphy, 54 Gilbert Rd., Belmont, Mass. 
Andrew E. Murray, 18 Niles St., Brighton, Mass. 
John E. Murray, 160 East Elm Ave., Wollaston 70, Mass. 
Thomas J. Murray, Jr., 124 East Madison St., Sandusky, Ohio 
John D. Mussells, 4 Curve St., Wakefield, Mass. 
James H. Myers, 74 Commonwealth Ave., Chestnut Hill 67, 

Mass. 
Angelo A. Napolitano, 220 Buckman St., Everett, Mass. 
Paul H. Natale, 14 Rockwell St., Cambridge, Mass. 
George D. O'Brien, 70 Larchwood Dr., Cambridge, Mass. 
Robert F. O'Brien, 55 Dover St., Somerville, Mass. 
Daniel F. O'Connell, Jr., 22 Melbourne Rd., Milton 86, Mass. 
Edward J. O'Connell, HI, 17 Delano Pk., Roslindale, Mass. 
Kevin M. O'Donoghue, 186 Washington St., Belmont, Mass. 
Thomas J. O'Malley, 133 Williams St., Jamaica Plain, Mass. 
Edmund W. O'Leary, 304A Norfolk St., Dorchester, Mass. 
Francis G. O'Loughlin, 33 Brimmer St.. Watertown, Mass. 
Thomas J. O'Malfey, 133 Williams St., Jamaica Plain, Mass. 



399 



Francis J. O'Reilly, 28 Morse Rd., Newton, Mass. 
Vincent M. O'Reilly, 77 Pierce Ave., Dorchester 22, Mass. 
John E. O'Rourke, Jr., 2 Park Slope, Holyoke, Mass. 
John M. Overton. 134 Porter St., Stoughton, Mass. 
David F. Parent, 173 School St.. Lowell, Mass. 
Joseph R. Plati, 220 Bradford St.. Everett, Mass. 
Victor J. Palmucci, 56 Thoreau St., Concord, Mass. 
Alessio J. Peona, 58 Boston St., Somerville, Mass. 
Herbert A. Peterson, 427 East Seventh St., South Boston, Mass. 
Thomas A. Phelan, Jr., 228 LaGrange St., West Roxbury, 

Mass. 
John D. Pisacreta, 21 Courtland St., Everett, Mass. 
James M. Power, 22 Francis St., Roxbury, Mass. 
Robert G. Power, 18 Pleasant St., Nahant, Mass. 
Frederick J. Pratson, 66 Julius St., Hartford, Conn. 
Owen R. Quinn. 14 Cheney Ct., Newton Upper Falls, Mass. 
Peter B. Quinn. 29 Irving St.. Newton Center, Mass. 
John J. Rearden, 56 Eton Rd., Longmeadow, Mass. 
Martin T. Redington, 76 Grove St., Chelsea 50, Mass. 
Philip J. Regan, 68 Middlesex Ave., Swampscott, Mass. 
Richard P. Regan, 59 Farnham St., Belmont, Mass. 
John S. Reino, 3 Adamson St., Allston, Mass. 
Edward P. Reynolds, 451 Lindell Ave., Leominister, Mass. 
Henry A. Rioux, 83 Reservation Rd., East Milton, Mass. 
Martin F. Roach, 72 Grafton St., Arlington 74, Mass. 
Edward J. Rogers, 50 Lincoln St., Winchester, Mass. 
James F. Rogers, 366 Putnam Ave., Cambridge, Mass. 
Ralph L. Rogers, 11 Pearl St. Ext., Beverly, Mass. 
Charles J. Romanski, 494 Plandome Rd., Manhassett, N. Y. 
William R. Romero, 42 Grant St., North Attleboro, Mass. 
Charles R. Ryan, 23 Cleveland St., Norwood, Mass. 
Francis C. Ryan, 20 Acadia Pk., Somerville, Mass. 
Joseph F. Ryan, 70 Boston Ave., Somerville, Mass. 
Robert E. Ryan, 46 Oliver St., Avon, Mass. 
Louis Sabadini, 30 Clive St., North Quincy, Mass. 
George Sabatini, 257 Walnut St., Brookline, Mass. 
James D. Salvo, 650 County St., Fall River, Mass. 
Robert M. Scanlan, 11 Harbor View St., Dorchester, Mass. 
Leo A. Schofield, 195 Summer St., Somerville, Mass. 
James T. Seluta, 30 McLean St., Boston, Mass. 
John W. Shanahan, 20 Crocker Ave., Turners Falls, Mass. 
Edward J. Shea, 138 Elm St., North Cambridge, Mass. 
Paul M. Shea, 100 Winthrop St., HoUiston, Mass. 
William M. Shea, Box 97, Lowell Rd., Concord, Mass. 
Louis W. Sheedy, 43 Saint Margaret St., Dorchester, Mass. 



Thomas A. Sheehan, Jr., 6 Edgebrook Rd., West Roxbury, 

Mass. 
William A. Sherman, 231 Powderhouse Blvd., Somerville, Mass. 
Robert J. Sievens, 127 Clarence St., Everett, Mass. 
Frederick J. Smith, 1853 Commonwealth Ave., Brighton, Mass. 
Eugene P. Smolinsky, 18 Wigglesworth St., Roxbury, Mass. 
Edward F. Snow, 368 Arborway, Jamaica Plain, Mass. 
Francis A. Spera, 99 Madison Ave., Arlington 74, Mass. 
Lawrence M. Stanford, 108 Reed St., No. Cambridge, Mass. 
Joseph J. Stefanowicz, 62 Calumet Rd., Holyoke, Mass. 
Anthony C. Stein, 42 Dear Park Rd., Great Neck, L. L, N. Y. 
Robert B. Stewart, 234 Gannett Rd., North Scituate, Mass. 
James J. Sughrue, 22 Stoddard St., Woburn, Mass. 
Francis X. Sullivan, 122 Bowdoin St., Medford, Mass. 
James W. Sullivan, 51 Brooklawn St., New Bedford, Mass. 
John F. Sullivan, 147 Bay Ave., Green Harbor, Mass. 
Robert W. Sullivan, 1 1 Upland Rd., Watertown, Mass. 
Roger F. Sullivan, 89 Waltham St., West Newton, Mass. 
Roger J. Sullivan, 177 North St., North Reading, Mass. 
Thomas M. Sullivan, 34 Pelton St., W. Roxbury, Mass. 
Richard F. Sylvestre, 118 Woodland Rd., Woonsocket, R. L 
Vincent P. Sylvia, 47 Calumet St., New Bedford, Mass. 
Frederic B. Taintor, 15 Gloucester St., Boston, Mass. 
John N. Tammaro, 45 Vernal St., Everett, Mass. 
William S. Taupier, 89 Hillside Ave., Holyoke, Mass. 
Joseph S. Tebeau, 78 Grant St., Waltham, Mass. 
Richard E. Tiernan, 20 Marsh Rd., Needham, Mass. 
Thomas E. Tierney, 15 Burton St., Arlington 74, Mass. 
James S. Tobin, 7 Bowditch Rd., Jamaica Plain 30, Mass. 
Frederick Tolland, 1044 River St., Hyde Park, Mass. 
Paul G. Touhey, 42 Claflin St., Milford, Mass. 
James M. Tully, 33 Boynton St., Waltham, Mass. 
Joseph A. Venuti, 16 Cambridge St., Belmont, Mass. 
Joseph J. Vitale, 25 Jeffries St., East Boston, Mass. 
Charles J. Volpone, 1 Eagle St., Newburyport, Mass. 
Arthur J. Whalen, 183 Adams St., Maiden, Mass. 
David J. Whelton, Jr., 168 Washington St., Reading, Mass. 
Charles W. White, 87 Alban St., Dorchester, Mass. 
John W. White, 31 Newtowne Ct., Cambridge 39, Mass. 
Paul F. White, 85 Rogers Ave., Somerville, Mass. 
Robert A. Wilson, 255 91st St., Brooklyn 9, N. Y. 
Albert J. Wisialko, 68 Orange St., Chelsea, Mass. 
Donald J. Wood, 99 Mt. Washington St., Lowell, Mass. 
Vincent P. Zabbo, 252 Plain St., Lowell, Mass. 
Walter P. Zanor, 244 Pearl St., Maiden, Mass. 



School of Education 



Burton Francis Abel, 627 High St., Westwood, Mass. 
Rogette C. Abizaid, 22 Cedrus Ave., Roslindale, Mass. 
Nancy J. Atkinson, 51 Bates Ave., Winthrop, Mass. 
Eileen R. Atwater, 51 Alma Ave., Belmont, Mass. 
Carole A. Bates, 20 Hampshire St., Everett, Mass. 
Roberta M. Berrane, 45 Halbrook St., Jamaica Plain, Mass. 
Frances A. Bessom, Main St., E. Orleans. Mass. 
Pauline Bongette, Dobbs Rd., Peabody, Mass. 
Joan Bourgeois, 15 Grant St., Waltham, Mass. 
Faith M. Buckley, 3 Myles Standish Rd., West Roxbury, Mass. 
Herbert W. Busch, Jr., 52 Rosewood Ave., Billerica, Mass. 
James J. Cannon, Jr., 38 Fiske St., Waltham, Mass. 
Marion Carey, 30 Martell Rd., West Quincy, Mass. 
Diane M. Carney, 40 Codman Hill Ave., Dorchester, Mass. 
Paul F. Carroll, 89 Josephine Ave., Somerville, Mass. 
Lorraine M. Cassidy, 2051 Commonwealth Ave., Brighton, 

Mass. 
James M. Colclough, 68 Albertina St., Quincy, Mass. 



Madeline C. Collins, 553 Summer St., Arlington 74, Mass. 
Mary E. CoUins, 35 Partridge Ave., Somerville, Mass. 
John T. Conrad, Jr., 23 Washington St., North Chelmsford, 

Mass. 
WiUiam N. Corey, 10 Regent St., Newton 65, Mass. 
Ellen M. Costa, 137 Brooks St., Brighton, Mass. 
Leo P. Costello, 45 California Ave., Milton, Mass. 
Anne C. Cullinan, 6 Cypress St., Cambridge, Mass. 
James P. Curtin, 11 Raymond St., Somerville, Mass. 
Katherine A. Deinlein, 34 School St., Hatfield, Mass. 
James J. Delaney, II, 64 Pinckney St., Beacon Hill 14, Mass. 
Donald L. Delisle, 1066 Lakeview Ave., Dracut, Mass. 
Mary L. Demeo, 37 Milo St., West Newton, Mass. 
Kathleen E. Desmond, 7 Treadway Ave., Norwich, Conn. 
Ann E. Dewire, 167 Elm St., Somerville, Mass. 
Francis A. Donnelly, 92 Doris Dr., Weymouth, Mass. 
Leona M. Donovan, 72 Putnam St., Quincy, Mass. 
Catherine M. Dooley, 43 Roslin St., Dorchester, Mass. 



400 



Richard A. Dowd, 53 Cherrelyn St., Springfield, Mass. 

Beverly M. Driscoll, 28 King Ave., Medford, Mass. 

Alice M. Duffy, 18 Vose Ave., Hyde Park, Mass. 

Cecile M. Duggan, 12 Vinal Ave., Scituate, Mass. 

James J. Duggan, 1 Tremont St., Maynard, Mass. 

Ann B. Fagan, 24 Park PI., Pascoag, R. I. 

Anne M. Faria, 589 South Main St., Fall River, Mass. 

Mary E. Farrey, 32 Shornecliffe Rd., Newton, Mass. 

John J. Finn, 18 Holbrook St., Jamaica Plain, Mass. 

Helen G. Foley, 72A Clifton St., Dorchester, Mass. 

Carol L. Garibaldi, 15 Myles Standish Rd.,West Roxbury 32. 

Mass. 
Winifred R. Gibbons, 19 Barna Rd., Dorchester 24, Mass. 
Carol A. Giblin, 56 Claflin St., Belmont, Mass. 
Marianne G. Hagerty, 4065 Washington St., Roslindale, Mass. 
Paul A. Harrington, 131 Franklin St., Allston, Mass. 
Carl A. Hendrickson, 141 Fairview Ave., Belmont, Mass. 
Roberta Higbee, 421 Walden St., Cambridge, Mass. 
Beverly F. Hubert, 86 Hutchinson Rd., Arlington 74, Mass. 
Lucille R. lovino, 36 Ashmont St., Melrose, Mass. 
Brenda J. Jackson, 67 Waterston Ave., WoUaston, Mass. 
Maureen A. Jackson, 14 Dale St., Needham, Mass. 
Alice Kaiko, 54 Soule St., Jewett City, Conn. 
Joseph M. Kelly, 73 Standish St., North Weymouth, Mass. 
Margaret A. Lally, 119 Hudson St., Somerville, Mass. 
Nancy Langton, 485 Washington St., Braintree, Mass. 
George Larkin, Jr., 21 Lincoln Rd., Peabody, Mass. 
Joan Larkin, 21 Hammond Rd., Natick, Mass. 
Carol M. Loome, 109 Milton Ave., Dorchester, Mass. 
Mary E. Lynch, 52 Ellsworth Rd., Peabody, Mass. 
Marguerite A. MacDonald, 2173 Massachusetts Ave., 

Lexington, Mass. 
Peter J. Macione, Humboldt Ave., Burlington, Mass. 
William MacKinnon, 64 Captin's Walk, Quincy, Mass. 
Sheila A. Mahoney, 40 Goden St., Belmont, Mass. 
Patricia R. Manning, 36 Great Road, Maynard, Mass. 
Brian K. Marron, 46 Cedar Lane Way, Boston 8, Mass. 
Patricia A. Martin, 37 Beacon St., Natick, Mass. 
Pauline Mathieu, 22 Canterbury Turnpike, Norwich, Conn. 
William A. McCarron, 32 Belmont Pk., Everett, Mass. 
Mary E. McCrohan, 76 Division St., Newport, R. L 
Sister Mary Ruth (McGoldrick), 103 Commonwealth Ave., 

Chestnut Hill, Mass. 
John B. McGrath, 4 Bay Edge Dr., Worcester 4, Mass. 
Jeanne M. McGuiggin, 10 Woodville Pk., Roxbury 19, Mass. 
John P. McGuire,1l5 Grimes St., South Boston 27, Mass. 



Francis W. McGurl, 8 Summer St. PL, Arlington, Mass. 

Mary C. McHale, 30 Crest Ave., Melrose 76, Mass. 

John N. Meade, 64 Linden St., Brookline, Mass. 

Mary C. Miller, 87 Newburg St., Roshndale 31, Mass. 

Neil Moran, South Pond Hill, Amesbury, Mass. 

Sheila D. Mullen, 58 College Rd., Chestnut Hill 67, Mass. 

Joseph A. Murphy, 47 Samoset St., Dorchester, Mass. 

Donald J. Nelson, 32 Stacy St., Randolph, Mass. 

Nancy M. Neville, 321 Huron Ave., Cambridge 38, Mass. 

Paul J. Oates, 9 Preston Rd., Somerville, Mass. 

Constance S. O'Brien, 1524 Commonwealth Ave., Boston 35, 

Mass. 
Paul A. O'Brien, 110 Draper St., Dorchester 22, Mass. 
John O'Donnell, 33 Southborne Rd., Boston 30, Mass. 
Agnes M. O'Leary, 22 Robeson St., Boston 15, Mass. 
Sheila A. O'Leary, 10 Gilmore Terr., West Roxbury, Mass. 
Ann R. O'Meara, 45 Curtis Rd., Milton, Mass. 
Charles T. O'Shea, 16 Putnam St., Peabody, Mass. 
Claire T. O'Toole, 70 Burt St., Dorchester, Mass. 
Michael P. Papa, 249 Auburn St., Auburndale 66, Mass. 
John Paris, 669 Tremont St., Boston, Mass. 
Rosemarie J. Pashby, 68 Henry Ave., Lynn, Mass. 
Stephen A. Paterna, 34 Sheafe St., Boston 13, Mass. 
Charles P. Peterson, 27 Elm Dale St., Dorchester, Mass. 
Clifford Poirier, 10 Lawton PL, Waltham, Mass. 
Robert M. Pollock, 31 Warren St., Weston 93, Mass. 
Eugene Prior, 51 Main St., Somerville 45, Mass. 
Margaret M. Quinn, 166 Sumner St., East Boston, Mass. 
Eleanor J. Radzwill, 551 Washington St., East Walpole, Mass. 
Gerald S. Reilly, 8 Cushing Ave., Dorchester, Mass. 
Pauline B. Rooney, 996 South St., Roshndale, Mass. 
Carolyn M. Shea, 8 Bowdoin St., Somerville, Mass. 
Charles W. Silva, 41 Norton Rd., Quincy, Mass. 
Geraldine A. Steele, 1807 Fort Davis St., S.E., 

Washington 20, D. C. 
Richard J. Sullivan, 71 Sherwood St., Roshndale 31, Mass. 
Thomas Tanous, 515 Stevens Ave., Portland, Me. 
Angelo J. Taranto, 13 Wadsworth Ave., Waltham, Mass. 
David P. Tenney, 7 Lyndhurst St., Dorchester, Mass. 
John J. Tobin, 114 Woodhaven St., Mattapan, Mass. 
Barbara A. Vazza, 88 Cottage St., East Boston, Mass. 
Joan P. Wall, 10 Lapham St., Medford, Mass. 
Mary E. Watts, 20 Melbourne Ave., Melrose, Mass. 
Margaret A. Weafer, 170 Mount Vernon St., Winchester, Mass. 
Carolyn E. Whittaker, 71 Cottage St., Natick, Mass. 
Martha J. Zimmerman, 15 Richardson Ct., Keene, N. H. 



School of Nursing 



Priscilla Almeida, Spring St., Hanover Center, Mass. 
Arlene Barbeau, 67 New Park St., Lynn, Mass. 
Lorraine Bonvouloir, 141 Illinois St., Central Falls, R. L 
Elizabeth Bourre, 724 Park Ave., Woonsocket, R. I. 
Frances Bruya, 11 Weston St., Waltham, Mass. 
Barbara Cartnick, 228 Hillcrest Ave., Wood-Ridge, N. J. 
Mary V. Caskin, 159 Hohen St., Danvers, Mass. 
Helen E. Connelly, 21 Archdale Rd., Roshndale, Mass. 
Nancy Cunning, 597 High Rock St., Needham, Mass. 
Betty Ann Denisevich, Broadway, GraniteviUe, Mass. 
Marion Devine, 17 Dellwood Rd., Worcester, Mass. 
Nancy V. Dolan, 26 Ellsworth Rd., Peabody, Mass. 
Ellen Durkin, 1 Abbott St., Salem, Mass. 
Wilma Fallon, 147 Claflin St., Belmont, Mass. 
Dorothy Fenelon, 1225 Park Ave., New York, N. Y. 
Mary A. Fennell, 11 Beach Ave., Salem, Mass. 
Barbara Frates, 323 Prospect St., Norwood, Mass. 



Virginia M. Frediani, 19 Crabtree Rd., Squantum, Mass. 

Elaine M. Geissler, 49 Calumet Rd., Holyoke, Mass. 

Mary J. Gibbons, 61 Westbourne St., Roshndale 31, Mass. 

Elizabeth Grady, 64 Stuart St., Watertown, Mass. 

Claire L. Haynes, 5 Preston St., Danvers, Mass. 

Frances Galassi, 14 Embankment Rd., Boston, Mass. 

Nancy Holmes, 5 Madeline St., Brighton, Mass. 

Nancy Hunt, 18 Clayton St., Maiden, Mass. 

Vida V. Jaskievicz, 92 Sawyer Ave., Dorchester, Mass. 

June Kelly, 31 HiOsdale Rd., Arlington, Mass. 

Janet Knight, 49 Forest Rd., Brockton, Mass. 

Mary G. Knowles, 35 Cass St., Melrose, Mass. 

Sister M. Claire Angela Lemire, 229 Watertown St., Newton, 

Mass. 
Catherine M. Lunney, 757 Broadway. Chelsea, Mass. 
Mary Lynd, 9 East Tenth St., New York, N. Y. 
Claire A. Malis, 54 Chickatawbut St., Dorchester, Mass. 



401 



Catherine McGuinness, 1 16 Westminster St., Hyde Park, Mass. 
Carol A. McHugh, 45 Whittemore Rd., Newton, Mass. 
Mary E. Mullins, 134 Packard Way, Brockton, Mass. 
Patricia M. O'Neil, 13 Church St., Franklin, Mass. 
Patricia L. O'Neill, 252 Broadway, Lynn, Mass. 
Helen A. O'Regan, 35 Hilldale Rd., South Weymouth, Mass. 
Nancy Pacious. 18 Cottage St., Medford, Mass. 
Sandra J. Pobuda, 24 Radmore Rd., Worcester, Mass. 
Sister M. Anne Elise Pontbriand, 229 Watertown St., Newton, 
Mass. 



Mary Powell, 171 Holworthy St., Cambridge, Mass. 
Elizabeth Power, 47 Ackers Ave., Brookline, Mass. 
Beatrice Rae, 1 Leland Rd., E. Natick, Mass. 
Patricia Rae, 1 Leland Rd., E. Natick, Mass. 
Josephine Ryan, 46 Oxford St., Springfield, Mass. 
Eleanor Sullivan, 181 Wren St., W. Roxbury. Mass. 
Anna Supple, 2 BushcHflF Rd., Winchester, Mass. 
Katherine Vierra, 5 Lennoco Rd., Jamaica Plain, Mass. 
Frances E. Welch, 36 Lincoln Rd.. Brockton 16, Mass. 
Patricia Zielinski, 146 Pearl St., Chelsea, Mass. 



Intown College 



James B. Barron, 82 Plymouth St., Quincy, Mass. 
Beverly M. Blake, 10 Keith St., West Roxbury, Mass. 
Sara P. Burgess, 63 Weld Hill St., Boston, Mass. 
Charles H. Burnes, Jr., 3 Cedar St., Mattapan, Mass. 
David W. Caliagy, 27 Albion St., Newton, Mass. 
William H. Clea'ves. 531 Brook Rd., Milton, Mass. 
Catherine Cody, 49 Houghton St., Dorchester, Mass. 
Richard B. Coleman, 101 Walk Hill St., Jamaica Plain, Mass. 
Delia Concannon, 20 Charlesgate West, Boston, Mass. 
George P. Cronin, 35 Graves Ave., Lynn, Mass. 
James J. Curran, 38 Bellevue St., Dorchester, Mass. 
John L. Dennehy, 2 Caltha Rd., Brighton, Mass. 
Lionel G. Dion, 7 Messervy St., Salem, Mass. 
Harold H. Donnelly, Jr., 62 St. Rose St., Jamaica Plain, Mass. 
John J. Donoghue, 67 Tyler St., Hyde Park, Mass. 
Maurice F. Donovan. 911 Canterbury St., Roslindale, Mass. 
Gerard N. Duffy, 5 Burnside Ave., Somerville, Mass. 
Robert A. Dumas, 16 Banton St., Dorchester, Mass. 
Sister M. Michaela Durkin, 106 Smith St., Roxbury, Mass. 
Lawrence F. Eddy, 120 Cambridge St., Winchester, Mass. 
Maeve O. Finley, 58 College R±, Chestnut Hill, Mass. 
Robert B. Flanagan, 5 Wyola PL, Dorchester, Mass. 
John M. Flaherty, 7 DriscoU Dr., Dorchester, Mass. 
Joseph J. Flynn, 16 Wrentham St., Dorchester, Mass. 
Lawrence H. Foley, 6 Parkway Rd., Brookline, Mass. 
Santo J. Forte, 754 Huntington Ave., Boston, Mass. 
Bro. Alvin Gallant, C.F.X.,'"274 Washington St., Somerville, 

Mass. 
John J. Gillis, 32 Moncrief Rd., Rockland, Mass. 
Claire J. Glynn, 22 Roseway St., Jamaica Plain, Mass. 
William N. Goudey, Jr., 1 1 Wilbur St., Everett, Mass. 
Joseph A. Guinta, 94 Blake St., Mattapan, Mass. 
Robert F. Hart, 181 Westminster St., Hyde Park, Mass. 
Margaret A. Hayes, 244 Market St., Brighton, Mass. 
David W. Henning, 3 Lothian. Rd., Brighton, Mass. 
Marie Higgins, 790 Fourth St., So. Boston, Mass. 
Mary Evans Hooper, 74 Livingstone Ave., Beverly, Mass. 
John D. Ingalls, 12 A Belknap St., Arlington, Mass. 
John F. Jordan, 6 Armandine St., Dorchester, Mass. 
Rosalie Kane (nee Bingham), 497 Huntington Ave., Boston, 

Mass. 
Harold L. Karle, 1 1 Edison Green, Dorchester, Mass. 
Margaret A. Keeley, 135 Homes Ave., Dorchester, Mass. 
Robert R. Koch, 6 Savoy Rd., Needham, Mass. 



Gerald E. Lattimer, 43 Brent St., Dorchester, Mass. 
Rudolph P. Lebel, 3 Stafford Rd., Danvers, Mass. 
Jeanne M. Linnehan, 47 Prince St., Jamaica Plain, Mass. 
Francis J. Lundy, 143 Beale St., Wollaston, Mass. 
Barbara C. McCann, 194 Fellsway West, Medford, Mass. 
Maurice F. McCormack, 99 Hudson St., Somerville. Mass. 
James J. McCurdy, 1662 Commonwealth Ave., Boston, Mass. 
Francis E. MacDonald, 117 Bartlett St., Charlestown, Mass. 
John R. MacDonald, 4 Waldemar Ave., Winthrop, Mass. 
Norma F. MacDonald, 34 Wrentham St., Dorchester, Mass. 
Catherine M. McHugh, 25 Wilson St., Worcester, Mass. 
Robert A. McKay, 22 Penfield St., Roslindale, Mass. . 
John P. MacMunn, 235 Webster St., West Newton, Mass. 
Roland D. Mahoney, Depot Rd., North Falmouth, Mass. 
Edward G. Malone, 67 Burton St., Brighton, Mass. 
Robert W. Meade, 115 Franklin St., Allston, Mass. 
James A. Morrissey, 12 Parkside Ave., Braintree, Mass. 
Anna P. Murphy, 33 Cornwall St., Jamaica Plain, Mass. 
Patricia A. Nally, 218 Eliot St., Milton, Mass. 
Alice A. Neary, 48 Sherwood St., Roslindale, Mass. 
Bro. Cassian O'Brien, C.F.X., 743 Parker St., Roxbury, Mass. 
Mary F. O'Brien, 18 Sanborn Ave., Somerville, Mass. 
Clare A. O'Connell, 52 Union St., North Easton, Mass. 
Marie O'Neill, (nee Campbell), 35 Bow St., Salem, Mass. 
Adolph A. Pasuik, 68 West Chestnut St., Brockton, Mass. 
Louis L. Peters. 24 Moraine St., Brockton, Mass. 
Arion C. Pierce, 9 Linden Ave., Salem, Mass. 
James L. Rice, 20 Cazenove St., Boston, Mass. 
John F. Ruck, 15 Harris Ave., Jamaica Plain, Mass. 
Leonard J. Russell, 5 Hawthorne Pk., Cambridge, Mass. 
Albert J. St. Hilaire, 132 Franklin St., Maiden, Mass. 
Edward J. Savill, 92 Bow St., Arlington, Mass. 
Lawrence Sindoni, 35 Claybourne St., Dorchester, Mass. 
Jacqueline M. Starr, 74 Phillips St., Boston, Mass. 
John E. Sullivan, 72 Mt. Pleasant Ave., Roxbury, Mass. 
John E. Sullivan, 2405 Massachusetts Ave., Lexington, Mass. 
Edward G. Tobin, 19 Kingsley St., Allston, Mass. 
Ruth M. Trainor, 77 Devir St., Maiden, Mass. 
Michael Trodden, 58 Grace St., Maiden, Mass. 
John A. Walsh, 6 Pinedale Rd., Roslindale, Mass. 
John G. Wallace, 23 Beacon St., Hyde Park, Mass. 
Barbara P. White, 18 Chauncy St., Cambridge, Mass. 
Charles H. Zibell, 1075 Pleasant St., Waverly, Mass. 



Graduate Nursing 



Elaine M. Baird, 901 Park Ave., Albany, N. Y. 
Adelaide Louise Banks, 279 Main St., Dexter, Me. 
Nancy M. Begley, 239 Elizabeth St., Derby, Conn. 
Caliope Marion Belezos, 317 Pond St., Jamaica Plain, Mass. 



Carole Claire Bemis, 144 Main St., Melrose, Mass. 
Josephine Mary Benson, 21 Whitman St., Leominister, Mass. 
Joan Marie Borgioli, 12 Sigourne, St., Revere, Mass. 
Mary F. Brogan, 59 Clearvale Dr., Buffalo, N. Y. 



402 



Elizabeth Anne Byrne, 45 Oriole St., West Roxbury, Mass. 
Barbara Marie Cahill, 106 Chestnut St., Athens, Pa. 
Dorothy M. Cantall, 471 N. E. 50th St., Ft. Laud., Fla. 
Jeanne A. Cardon, 64 Maple St., Woonsocket, R. I. 
Marilyn Ann Chouinard, 158 Main St., Wickford, R. I. 
Elizabeth Mary Corcoran, 411 Salem St., Medford, Mass. 
Charlene L. Crosby, 179 College Ave., Waterville, Me. 
Rose Marie DiMaggio, 3 Twitchell St., Wellesley, Mass. 
Georgiana Esa, 64 Tallman St., New Bedford, Mass. 
Marolun Elsie Fader, 75 Aborn St., Peabody, Mass. 
M. Elaine Falls, 201 Burgess Ave., Westwood, Mass. 
Leona Frances Fidrych, 86 Armington Ave., Providence, R. I. 
Marguerite A. Fosmire, 48 Birch St., Greenfield, Mass. 
Frances Joanne Gralassi, Southweer Hall, Berkley St., Boston, 

Mass. 
Mary Jane Geary, 69 Ravenwood Ave., Providence, R. I. 
Rosaleen Frances Gilroy, 1 Greenwood Ct., Utica, N. Y. 
Sarah Johnette Gibson, Franklin Square House 
Elizabeth A. Glynn, 8 Cherry St., Westfield, Mass. 
Joan F. Grindley, 60 St. Mark's Rd., Dorchester, Mass. 
Joan T. Hartnett, 25 Pearl Ave., Revere, Mass. 
Sara A. Healey, 56 Hillsdale St., Dorchester, Mass. 
Catherine Teresa Houton, 6 Pearl St., Dorchester, Mass. 
Marie Rose lannocone, 32 Third St., Fitchburg, Mass. 
Kathleen Rosalie Jacey, 12 Wildrose Ave., Waterford, Conn. 
Marie Helen Keaveney, 114 School St., Waltham, Mass. 
Mary Elizabeth Keefe, Perry Hill, Waterbury, Vt. 
Florence Carol Keegan, 17 Dwight St., Jersey City, N. J. 
Mary Joan Killbride, 86 Lombard St., New Haven, Conn. 
Jean Anne Kinnare, 135 Church St., Guilford, Conn. 
Marion Rachel Kirley, 8 Atlantic St., Winthrop, Mass. 
Mildred E. Leber, 16 Lexington Ave., Cambridge, Mass. 
Eileen Mary Leeburn, 572 Huntington Ave., Boston, Mass. 
Mary Anna Lichtenberg, Flanders Rd., Southington, Conn. 
Mary A. Luddy, Keith PI., East Bridgewater, Mass. 
Dorothy Mary Mahoney, 12 Arden St., Allston, Mass. 



Katherine Elizabeth Mahoney, 134 Beacon St., Boston, Mass. 
Carol Elaine Malo, 400 Scott Hill Rd., So. Bellingham, Mass. 
Mary Dolores Maloney, 18 W. Raymond St., Hartford, Conn. 
Barbara E. McCormick, 31 Homecrest St., Longmeadow, 

Mass. 
Catherine Anne McDonough, 20 Willis St., Dorchester, Mass. 
Mary Lorraine McDougall, 66 Pleasant St., Stoneham, Mass. 
Noreen Theresa Meinhart, 16 Shawmut St., Maiden, Mass. 
Elaine A. Mello, 663 Allen St., New Bedford, Mass. 
Dianna Louise Misenti, West Pine St., Plaistow, N. H. 
Helen Agnes Moran, 3 Dalton Pkwy., Salem, Mass. 
Alice T. Morrison, 15 Osborne St., Peabody, Mass. 
Virginia Marie Mostyn, 67 Vassall St., WoUaston, Mass. 
Mary Kathleen O'Brien, 1089 Beacon St., Brookline, Mass. 
Josephine A. O'Callagan, 11 Mossland St., Somerville, Mass. 
Catherine Teresa O'Donnell, 33 Southbourne Rd., Jamaica 

Plain, Mass. 
Ruth A. O'Toole, 27 Cameron St., Dorchester, Mass. 
Ann Marie Owens, 221 West Gates St., E. Syracuse, N. Y. 
Marcia Ann Parisien, 1001 Mohawk Trail, North Adams, 

Mass. 
Catherine Marie Reilly, 44 Blake St., Hyde Park, Mass. 
Ann Marie Romano, 107 Franklin Ave., Brooklyn, N. Y. 
Claire Eleanor Roy, 91 Beaver St., North Adams, Mass. 
Mary D. Russo, 115 Charles St., Waltham, Mass. 
Joan Mary Rutledge, 106 Helen St., Hamden, Conn. 
Marie Theresa Ryan, 32 Cleveland Ave., Worcester, Mass. 
Patricia Anne Schoeneck, R.D. No. 2, Verona, N. Y. 
Alice S. Simard, 34 Cabot St., Salem, Mass. 
Rose Marie Sparico, 85 Grandview Ave., Hamden, Conn. 
Marie Therese Spring, 359 Glover Blvd., New Britain, Conn. • 
Sally Rose Stevens, Milton Mills, N. H. 
Joanne M. Sweeney, 16 Delaney Ave., Buffalo 23, N. Y. 
Jean Mary Walsh, 16 Berkly St., Baldwin, N. Y. 
Anne Patricia Whelan, 8 Philip PL, North Haven, Conn. 
Kathryn Cullen Yager, 204 Sterling St., Watertown, N. Y. 



403