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ARCHIVES 




"Zhe umersity called Boston College is no 
somnolent, other-worldly institution riding at 
anchor in the harbor of tradition, but a vital or- 
ganism sensitive to and reacting with the city of 
man as it is evolving today, as it may evolve for 
the betterment of man in the future. " 



bittersweet M^^^^^ories 





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BOSTON COLLEGE 




Chestnut Hill, Massachusetts 




Editor-in-Chief - JOSEPH J. BRITT, JR. 



Managing Editor - ALAN J. DEMERS 



Business Manager — LUCIA A. PIAZZA 



Published at Taylor Publishing 



Company at Dallas. Texas MCLXX 



J proud tradition and a dedication to e^ccdlence. 
Zke University, making a brave attempt 
to reform itself and influence its society. 





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Our progress is formally measured by eourses and grades, 
but the value of our years is a broader thing . . . 




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Zke defimtm of an mdividual 
through places, 
events, 
and people. 




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yet far richer for the people that use them 





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Zhe beauty of shared e^cperieHces 




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Panoramas of 
people and events 




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J cast of t hems a mis 

caught up m the spectacle of life 



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Zhe body, pushed to extremes of tmimng and skill 




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Strange beauty in a world of sweat and strain 




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Zhc soul, masked in a role and e^teptded in its enactment 




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Soaring and expanding in the rhythms and flows of sound 




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I^ut always returning to people 




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Stepping back 
to reassess 
ourselves . . . 




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because we care about others 



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Tmd'mg life within our pain ami commitment and care 




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Kef lections of a past . 
Shadows of a time 




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limg m loving 
Quo Vadis? 




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Academics 



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University President 
Very Rev. W. Seavey 
Joyce, SJ. 




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University 
Vice Presidents 




DR. SAMUEL ARNOFF 
Vice President for Research 



MR. THOMAS J. CUDMORE 

Vice President for Development and Public Relations 



50 




REV. F. X. SHEA, S.J. 
Executive Vice President 



DR. JAMES P. McINTYRE 
Vice President for Student Affairs 




MR. PAUL DEVLIN 

Vice President and Assistant Treasurer 




MR. JOHN E. MADIGAN 
Director of Financial Aid 



REV. FRANCIS B, McMANUS, S.J. 
Secretary of the University 



REV. ROBERT T. FERRICK, SJ. 

University Chaplain 



52 





REV. JOHN F. FITZGERALD, SJ. 

Registrar of the University 




University Administration 
and Services 



MR. GEORGE DONALDSON 
Director of Placement 



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REV. BRENDAN C. CONNOLLY, S.J. 
Director of Libraries 



MR. BRIAN T. COUNIHAN 
Assistant Director of Housing 



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REV. EDWARD J. HANRAHAN, S.J, 
Dean of Students 




MR. KEVIN P. DUFFY 
Director of Student Activities 



MISS ANN FLYNN 

Director of Housing, Dean of Women 




REV. EDMOND D. WALSH, S.J. 
Dean of Admissions 



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REV. OLIVA BLANCHETTE, SJ. 
Dean, School of Philosophy 





MARGARET M. FOLEY 
Dean, School of Nursing 




MR. HENRY J. McMAHON 

Associate Dean, College of Arts and Sciences 



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DR. RICHARD E. HUGHES 
Dean, College of Arts and Sciences 



Academic Deans 
and Assistants 




SR. MARGARET MARY, R.S.M. 
Assistant Dean, School of Nursing 



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DR. DONALD T. DONLEY 
Dean, School of Education 




MR. CHRISTOPHER T. FLYNN 
Associate Dean, School of Management 



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REV. JAMES A. WOODS, SJ. 

Dean, Evening College of Arts and Sciences and Management 




DR. NOEL J. REYBURN 
Associate Dean, School of Education 



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60 





U.A.S. 



The University Academic Senate of Boston College is a 
new creature, barely two years old. It is an experiment 
still, an attempt to enrich and in some areas replace the 
old hierarchical chain of command by administrators and 
Board of Directors. But its powers are vague, having 
"with the president, general authority over and responsi- 
bility for the academic matters of the University as a 
whole." How this authority is to be wielded has yet to be 
clearly shown, for the Senate is not really a legislative 
body with powers of making laws and rules, nor has it the 
power to enforce its resolutions. Rather, it must use 
whatever influence and prestige it can build up to achieve 
its goals. 

Originally planned as a means of giving the faculty a 
greater voice in university affairs, the UAS has expanded 
to a body representing faculty, students and administra- 
tion. Its meetings, both in formal session and committee, 
are forums for the preservation of order and the introduc- 
tion of innovation in the university. Covering almost 
every conceivable subject, the UAS provides a searching 
appraisal of a school, its aims, and the courses it will pur- 
sue. 



61 




62 




mittee. 

But it is in her personal involvement with the students 
that she makes her greatest contributions. As an instruc- 
tor, she focuses on those skills of medical care necessary to 
function in the hospital world. She sees a need for nursing 
students to know themselves, to express their difficulties, 
and to be listened to. She buffers the shock of human suf- 
fering, generating in her students an ability to give more 
than they receive. A nurse's first injection is never her eas- 
iest, her first bedbath never a skilled one. Yet under her 
guidance such experiences lose their negative impact as 
the student nurse develops her ability to care for the phys- 
ical needs of a patient. Miss Almeida teaches her students 
the importance not only of the development of skills but 
also of the development of self She feels that to be a nurse 
a girl must develop a philosophy of professionalism, de- 
fining its most important characteristic as a sense of the 
worth of a person, stressing the need to understand on- 
eself in order to care for others. 

Her ultimate goal is an appreciation of the humanity 
of a person. Her ultimate compliment is that she instills 
this in all who come in contact with her. 



Teaching a girl the foundations of nursing involves 
much more than a formulated discourse on equipment 
and procedures. It is much more the development of a 
sensitivity to the needs, thoughts, and feelings of a pa- 
tient. It is infusing in a girl a sense of the person, a knowl- 
edge of his ills and needs, and a personal dedication and 
love. All of this is not easy, for it requires someone who 
can completely share herself with others. To know MISS 
PRISCILLA ALMEIDA is to acknowledge that she is 
such a person. 

Miss Almeida comes to Boston College from Fall 
River, Massachusetts. She received both a Bachelor's in 
nursing and a M.S. from B.C., and is currently in her sev- 
enth consecutive year at the Boston College School of 
Nursing as an instructor in Medical-Surgical Nursing. 
Her influence is felt by all of her students, and her dedica- 
tion ranges far beyond the classroom. She has been class 
advisor twice and is in her second year as Faculty Advisor 
to the School of Nursing Senate. Her versatility has been 
seen in her service on the Social, Executive, Curriculum, 
and Ways and Means Committees. This year, in prepara- 
tion for the National League for Nursing Accreditation, 
she has been appointed to a Self Study for Students Com- 




64 





DR.JOHNDACEY: professional educator, member of 
the School of Education Educational Policy Committee, 
Director of the Junior Year Honors Program in Educa- 
tion, member of the University Academic Senate. An ac- 
tive role in student initiated studies in curriculum and 
course reform. Planning for future innovations in the 
School of Education. 

John Dacey: a teacher, who has invested in that role a 
strong dimension of involvement. A person who taps the 
reservoirs of creativity and feeling in his students. A belief 
that the primary objective of education is to provide in 
each of the potential teachers an ability and an opportuni- 
ty to arrive at an understanding of themselves and an un- 
derstanding of their chosen profession. An attempt to in- 
still a confidence in one's own abilities. Seeking compre- 
hension as an individual and as a member of the Boston 
College community. 

The overwhelming response of those who have dealt 
with Dr. Dacey is that he is a superb teacher and a com- 
plete person. His strong professional background, with 
undergraduate work at Harpur and graduate work at Cor- 
nell, is merely the beginning of his qualifications. With a 
strong belief in total involvement in the contemporary 
world, he stresses a knowledge of the past and an under- 
standing and acceptance of the present as the foundations 



for each student's career. Teaching Adolescent Psycholo- 
gy and the Psychology of Learning, his courses are im- 
mensely popular, drawing large numbers from all B.C. 
schools. Participation is the keynote of his method. 
Classes are conceived of as much more than a lecture. 
They are an exchange between the professor and the stu- 
dent, with each holding a unique perspective and each 
able to provide individualized and exceedingly valid in- 
sights into the matter at hand. Personal responsibility and 
integrity are the cornerstones of his philosophy, and an 
intense personal interest in each of his students is the cat- 
alyst that makes these doctrines firm parts of the student's 
life. Initial perceptions found in the classroom are supple- 
mented by meetings and discussions in the office or the 
corridor. The overwhelming impression becomes that of 
a man who cares and who is always available to the stu- 
dent and sympathetic to his problems. 

The final product is inevitably a sense of the man as 
more than a teacher in the traditional mold. One sees a 
professional; yet the essence of his professionalism is that 
he is more than a well-trained instructor. Rather, he is 
someone with a total dedication and a total involvement. 
The professor becomes the friend. The classroom be- 
comes a microcosm of life, and the learning process be- 
comes a process of growth and maturation. 




65 



In recent years the door to Carney 322 has carried a 
small, carefully lettered sign bearing the inscription chien 
mechant. In English, "beware the dog." As such, this is a 
curious counsel, for the door to that office is frequently 
open. But one need not fear trespassing here unless one 
regards stimulating conversation and thoughtful discus- 
sion as too great a challenge. 

For such is the atmosphere that pervades the office of 
the REV. JOSEPH GAUTHIER, S.J., Professor of Ro- 
mance Languages. He is an educated man, completely in 
command of his field. At the same time he is an engaging 
scholar, the product of a diverse background. Pre-med 
studies at Trinity College earned him a Bachelor of Sci- 
ences degree in 1930. Having spent the next five years as a 
special agent for the Hartford Accident and Indemnity 
Company, he entered the Society of Jesus in 1935. His 
ordination in 1944 followed his Bachelor's and Master's 
from Weston College. A Licentiate in Sacred Theology 
from Weston in 1945 and a Doctorate of Letters from 
Laval University in 1948 followed. 






66 



It was in 1948 that Father Gauthier came to Boston 
College as an Assistant Professor of Modern Languages. 
His career at B.C. has been marked by many things, but 
the most dominant have been broad scholarship and con- 
tinuing dedication to his field and his students. A strict 
personal regimen, involving the reading of at least two 
books a week and a continuous investigation of his many 
interests, complements his close involvement with his 
classes and his students. As a consequence, his under- 
graduate course in Twentieth Century French Literature 
is continually filled with students from all undergraduate 
schools. At the same time, graduate seminars in French 
Existentialism and Surrealistic Authors exhibit a wide 
range of knowledge and a deep professionalism. But the 
involvement does not end with the classroom, as Father 
Gauthier expends large quantities of time and energy as a 
member of the regional selection committee of the 
Woodrow Wilson Fellowship Competition. At the same 
time, writing, editing, and collaborating in a large num- 
ber of works on French Literature indicate a scholar deep- 
ening his own understanding and extending himself to 
other members of the scholarly community. 

It is however beyond all of this that the greatest contri- 
bution is made - in the example of a man dedicated to 
teaching and to life. Few who have been in contact with 
him can deny that one must indeed beware when one ap- 
proaches him - beware that is, of an appreciation and an 
involvement which constantly surprises one and con- 
tinually enriches all who know him. 




67 




The continuing objective of tiie School of Manage- 
ment is to provide the professional preparation for future 
business executives. The continuing dedication of 
PROFESSOR ARTHUR GLYNN is to further this aim. 
With a deep educational background, including a J.D. 
from Boston College Law School, graduate work at Bos- 
ton University, and professional stature as a certified pub- 
lic accountant. Professor Glynn is amply qualified to pur- 
sue this goal. His commitment is a continuing one. 



ened by an active role in professional organizations such 
as the American Institute of Certified Public Ac- 
countants, the Massachusetts Bar, and the United States 
Supreme Court Bar. Such diverse background enables 
him to offer a wide and realistic scope of information and 
a realistically oriented perspective to his students. 

Boston College is, however, the mainstay of his profes- 
sional career, with his involvement in the B.C. communi- 
ty dating back to 1946. Teaching courses in Finance and 



68 



Business Law. he has been a central figure in the evolu- 
tion of the School of Management and in the develop- 
ment of many of its students. Chairman of the Account- 
ing Department for the past seventeen years, his enthusi- 
asm goes beyond the classroom both as administrator and 
as a guide. He is currently a member ot the Executive 
Board of the Academic Senate, playing a vital role in the 
development of the entire university. As advisor to Beta 
Sigma, the only scholarship honor society in the field of 
business and commerce recognized by the American As- 
sociation of Collegiate Schools of Business, he lends his 
talent and experience to a group ot students, with profes- 
sional concerns in an informal and social context. 

Professor Glynn's central concern is the development 
of a professional attitude toward accounting. He believes 
in sound business ethics and a high standard of scholar- 
ship, and tries to instill both in each student that he 
comes in contact with. With a continuing smile, he gen- 
erates an atmosphere of concern and competence both in 
the office and in the classroom. His adept, professional 
approach to his courses is recognized by his students, and 
his contributions as teacher, counselor and friend have 
been instrumental in the development ot many. As such, 
he has become a key member of the School ot Manage- 
ment and a model to be followed by all who know him. 





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70 




Wandering around campus with a quizzical smile on 
his face and his nose buried deeply in a book. PETER 
KREEFT seems the embodiment ot the absent-minded 
intellectual. Yet his educational background and his 
human concerns belie this assumption. His timing was 
diverse, with undergraduate studies at Calvin College and 
graduate work at Yale and Fordham. and broad te.iching 
experience at Villanova. Fordham. Havertord and LaSalle 
prior to his arrival at Boston College in 1964. To those 
who know him beyond these facts, things seem to tvpity 
him: his serenity and his concern for the evolution of 
Boston College as a quality university. 

As a member of the University Committee on Liberal 
Education, he is playing an active role in B.C.'s develop- 
ment. His involvement is based on a perception of" liberal 
arts as not only practical but necessary to the lite ot every 
student. His belief is that just as B.C. has shed its mono- 
lithic Catholic superstructure, so too must education 
break outside the traditional bonds ot core curriculum 
and strict major orientation. He sees within this trend 
four central elements: general education, social service, 
multi-media forms, and individualized tutorials. Within 
such a structure, each program would be able to serve a 
smaller number ot students, and do so on a more intense 
and personal level. Given his experience in the Arts and 
Sciences Honors Program, he strongly believes that such 



liberal, interdisciplinary programs can work, breaking the 
bonds of form and humanizing education. 

To those who have experienced his classes, he is seen as 
a man who combines a liveh' humor and a colorful in- 
sight with the subject matter. His primary concerns are 
oriental philosophy, existentialism, and the philosoph\- of 
religion, and all ot his courses revolve around these con- 
cepts. The common denominator is a search for the 
meaning of lite, and the central attitude is one of peace 
and self awareness. His interest in Zen typifies these be- 
liets, and his scholarly activities attest to his competence 
in the area. Having spent an entire summer in Japan on a 
fellowship, he has come closer to the meaning of Zen by 
traveling, talking and experiencing. He views its doc- 
trines and Its new found popularit\- \\-ith a critical eye, 
stressing the necessit\' tor an understanding within its 
own cultural terms as opposed to the artificial back- 
grounds ot an American classroom. He perceives Zen not 
as a panacea but as a possible key to man\- of the problems 
we face today, and strives continually to broaden his and 
his students" understanding of this. 

Peter Kreett is then a ver\- simple man. His complexity 
IS mirrored in his broad education and his extensive con- 
cerns tor the university and the people within it. His sim- 
plicity is in his approach to life, a calm appraisal that 
seems to modity the pressures and doubts of the times, 
and to give those who come into contact with him a 
deeper insight into the human soul. 




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The university environment has long been one in 
which the prestige which a professor brings to his depart- 
ment through research and publication is considered 
more important than his abilities as a teacher. Only re- 
cently has this orientation begun to be seriously ques- 
tioned at Boston College. REV. FRANCIS A. LIUIMA. 
S.J.. however, is one professor who devotes himself ex- 
clusively to the education of his students. This is no small 
task, as Fr. Liuima's general physics course is required of 
practically every science, mathematics, or pre-med stu- 
dent. 

Originally from Lithuania, Fr. Liuima came to the 
United States in 1947 as a Jesuit philosophy student at 
Boston College. The results of the second world war pre- 
vented his return to his native country, so he remained at 
B.C., expanding his areas of study and receiving his M.S. 
in physics in 1954. Four years later, Fr. Liuima was award- 
ed his Ph.D. by St. Louis University, and since that time 
he has been a member of the Physics department at B.C. 
In addition to his general physics course, Fr. Liuima 
has taught a variety of courses, always energetically deliv- 
ered, with more than an occasional quip of which he only 
pretends innocence. 



In the past these courses have included an advanced 
physics elective in microwave spectroscopy, Fr. Liuima's 
field of specialization, discontinued because B.C.'s is not 
a large department and "it is a very specialized field." The 
summer institute courses for high school teachers per- 
ished more recently for lack of funds. Currently Fr. Li- 
uima is involved in the advanced laboratory courses. Stu- 
dents find him always available and eager to assist, as able 
a tinkerer as you'll find, and the possessor of a literally 
inexhaustible storehouse of small parts squirreled away 
over the years from sources unknown. 

The general physics course, however, due to its size, 
presents the most serious challenge to a teacher. A small 
class provides a personal atmosphere in which students 
can be encouraged to question and contribute, and the 
professor in turn can "look at the student's face and tell if 
he has to repeat something or not, without the student 
ever having to ask the question." In general physics class, 
however, while questions are anything but discouraged, 
they are far less practical. "If everyone in the class says one 
word, we have a long speech." 




72 




In an introductory physics course there is always a 
temptation to reduce the course material to a series of pre- 
scribed rules — pithy, readily-memorized statements; this 
kind of physics is what Fr. Liuima most hopes his stu- 
dents will not bring away from his course. "The student 
may try to memorize ten formulas; all he does is clutter 
up his mind. Better he should learn and understand one 
principle and be able to use it in ten ways." 

In a course which is for most of those taking it both 
their introduction to and their last formal contact with a 
subject, this is how it must be. The details, the accidentals 
of the subject, can be saved for the professionals. To the 
non-professional, what matters is the discipline itself: a 
different perspective, a way of thinking, or perhaps, by 
analogy, a way of attacking problems. This is what Fr. Li- 
uima tries to teach in a necessarily unglamorous science 
requirement. "I have," he says, "at least some success." 
Likely an understatement, but all things considered, an 
impressive record if no more than true. 




73 







One can often meet a genial, soft-spoken priest who 
wears a beret at the Lake Street station of the MBTA. It 
FATHER LEO McCAULEY. SJ. does not spend as 
much time on the Heights as he used ro, he has still been 
associated with Boston College, in one capacity or anoth- 
er, for most of his sixty-five years. Born in Brighton, lie 
camc to B.C. from B.C. High, but left before graduation 
to join the Society. As ajesuit, he has taught Classics here 
for nearly thirty years, spending fourteen oi them as chair- 
man of the department. "Far too long," he says, "for any 
one man." With time out during the war for service as a 
Navy chaplain in several northern European ports (he 
holds the rank of Lt. Commander in the Navy Reserve), 
and another year recently as Visiting Professor at Loyola 
University in Rome, he has been a full professor at B.C. 
since 1941. 

While he has never come to rest tor very long tar from 
his birthplace, travel and studies have taken Fr. McClauley 



across oceans of space and centuries of time. He has been 
abroad on a half-dozen occasions, and counts twenty- 
seven countries visited in Europe and the Middle East. 
Holding a doctorate from Johns Hopkins, he is active, 
and has held prominent ottice, in \arious learned so- 
cieties. Currently he is a member ot the Managing Com- 
mittee of the American Scluiol ot Classical Studies at 
Athens. Though his professional interests are extensive, 
perhaps his work in Patristics is most noteworthy; he is 
now preparing his thiri.1 \-olume toi- the Catholic L'niver- 
sity series on the Fatliers ot the C~hurch. 

In recent years Fr. McCauley has concentrated on tlie 
graduate program, but his courses in the Latin authors ot 
the Republic and the Silver Age, intallibly offered early in 
the morning in Gasson Hall, are among the most popular 
in the department. 

His metliod isot the old sthool: he directs his students 
to the text with a minimum ol oin.nnentation, since it is 



74 



content rather than comment that is oi primary impor- 
tance. Like many before him, Fr. McCauIey has found in 
the classics, no models ot perfection to preserve in rever- 
ence, but the universal concerns and sentiments of his 
own humanity in the concrete expression of classical cul- 
ture. It is impossible to lead another to this attitude pedi- 
gogically, but it is evident in the calm civilization and ac- 
tive spirit of a man like McCauley. 

It is impossible to describe the man in a manner that 
befits him. Such a style would have to be both vigorous 
and refined, both scholarly and colloquial. His conversa- 
tion is itscll" edifying. He has personally witnessed every 
stage of the transformation of a Boston College of 600 
students and three buildings into the present still- 
burgeoning universit\'. Apart from the sense of institu- 
tional anonymity he shares with many others, he has no 
regrets and few complaints; and while interest and enroll- 






ment in his department have fallen, Fr. McCauley is not 
one of those who wistfully remember things past. He be- 
lieves the classics can hold their own, and points to in- 
creasing numbers of graduate students and the place of 
the Greek and Roman authors in translation in the 
humanities curricula of colleges and technical schools. It 
is not surprising then that he .says he was "born too 
soon." Finding the world's population increasingly 
drawn together, he looks hopefully at the social and cul- 
tural possibilities of a world-community. 

Father McCauley is a patient and gentle man and so 
impres.ses everyone who speaks with him, but lie is also a 
warm and out-going man. His spry step and lean frame 
belie his years. He plays a good deal of golf, and his inter- 
ests otherwise range from Church History to classical and 
modern sculpture. Along with many members of the class 
of 1970, he is uncertain about his future. He retires from 
the faculty this spring, and talks of the possibility of or- 
ganizing a new liberal arts college and of the places he 
would like to visit or re-visit. Because of its blend of mod- 
ernity and antiquity, its fullness of history and art, Rome 
is his favorite city, and whether in a clerical or academic 
position, he would most choose to return there. 



75 




The individual in 1970 exists within many contexts. 
At Boston College, these mainly become those of a Uni- 
versity seeking prominence and quality, of a community 
seeking identity, and of a microcosm trying to relate to 
the world it draws from and tries to improve. Relevance 
becomes the keynote to all of these, especially individual 
disciplines and courses of the day. Nowhere are these 
doubts and aspirations more felt than in the department 
of English. In a scientific/mechanistic society, literature 
is seen more as an adjunct than as a necessary component. 
Its value becomes that of entertainment rather than of 
process and growth. Yet to those within the field, it is a 
vital element in the evolution of society. Their devotion 
is to its precepts and their dedication is to the refinement 
of its treatment and the communication of its values. 



Focus then on a single element of the Boston College 
community - 

The teacher is a professional. Trained at Boston Col- 
lege and at Harvard, he has a thorough knowledge of his 
field. As a scholar, he keeps abreast of its development 
and makes many and varied contributions to it. 

The chairman is an able administrator. He presides 
over one of the largest departments on campus, co- 
ordinating its programs and constantly innovating with- 
in them. A Ph.D. program grows under his guidance not 
as a response to university demands for a form, but as a 
consideration to the necessity for a complete and inten- 
sive preparation of the English major. 

The man is DR. JOHN L. MAHONEY. and as a man 
this alone can describe those who have come into contact 



76 



with him. The structures, forms and attributes fit him 
well, they flatter the man and provide stepping stones 
into his world. But the experience of the world is the ex- 
perience of the man himself, and that can never be gained 
by reading, but only bv the kind of intensive involvement 
which typifies his approach to his profession, his stu- 
dents, and his life. 

Technically, his fields of interest are encompassed by 
the descriptions of the catalogues — the Romantics, Criti- 
cism . . . More realistically, they are seen in the way he 
teaches. It is a process of involvement. The preparation is- 
intensive, founded in his thorough knowledge and deep 
understanding. The class itself is dynamic, as he reaches 
out to the student and draws him into the material. The 
process is never one of demands, but rather always a lead- 



ing, an illumination, a communication. An experience 
marked with sincerity, and continually adapting to the 
needs and responses of the students. Beyond the class, he 
is continually available, thoroughly concerned, and 
constantly a source of assistance and understanding. 

John Mahoney. The single element we spoke of is a 
highly complex human being. To the extent that the ster- 
ile words of the catalogue are said to do him injustice, so 
do these. For they are merely touchstones to his character, 
substitutes for the real man. And it is precisely because 
the real man is so full and alive that such substitutes can- 
not be tolerated . . . 
. . . a friend to man. to whom thou say'st 
"Beauty is truth, truth beauty," - that is all 
Ye know on earth, and all ye need to know. 




77 



To be a teacher one must convey truth. To be an artist 
one must create truth. To be C. ALEXANDER PELO- 
OUIN is to join these objectives. Mr. Peloquin lives as a 
teacher-artist. With passionate imagination and a strong 
sense of the present, he .seeks truth in a work of art. While 
not easilv classified, he is best described as one of the last 
romantics. His method ot communication is that of pas- 
sionate involvement. Regardless of the nature of his audi- 
ence, he tries to develop a confidence and a rapport with 
the recipients oi his words and works. 

Mr. Peloquin joined the Boston College faculty in 
1955 as composer-in-residence and director of the Univer- 
sity Chorale. His talent and diversity are mirrored in both 
these roles and in his positions as music director ot Sts. 
Peter and Paul Cathedral in Providence and of the re- 
nowned Peloquin Chorale. As a conductor he is alive, 
prodding and exhorting the orchestra and chorale into 
performances marked with precision and beauty. Con- 
tinually aware ot the audience, both his commentary and 





music reflect his desire to involve everyone in the per- 
formance, both spiritually and physically. 

Originally aspiring to be a concert pianist, he studied 
at the New England Conservatory ot Music and the Berk- 
shire Music Center. Having served as a band master in 
World War II, his interests turned toward conducting 
and choral music, forming in 1949 what was ultimately to 
become the Peloquin Chorale. 

Classifying himself as a "Christian artist," Mr. Pelo- 
quin deals chiefly in the realm ot liturgical music. He tries 
to bring to Church music not only a sense ot the modern, 
but also a distinctive American flavor, fusing elements of 
the traditional with the rhythms and style ot folk, rock, 
and jazz. In this way he has helped to revitalize and rede- 
fine Church music. In this vein he composed and conduct- 
ed the first high mass sung in English, wrote the "Missa 
Domini" tor the centennial of Boston College in 196.^, 
thecriti:ally acclaimed "Christ the Light of the Nations," 
and "The Four Freedom Songs" with lyrics by Thomas 



78 




Merton and dedicated to the memory of Martin Luther 
King, Jr. Recognized tar beyond the Boston College 
community, he composed and conducted the concluding 
Mass of Expo 67, has made numerous international con- 
cert tours, and has appeared on all three of the major tele- 
vision networks, with featured appearances on five one- 
hour specials on CBS. 

Yet to Boston College he is best known as a teacher 
and conductor. His appeal as a teacher is well known, and 
his imaginative involvement in education is acknowl- 
edged by the numerous undergraduates who have sought 
out his courses. As a conductor, his enthusiasm permeates 
the chorale. He is demanding, yet sympathetic, believing 
that "work is the foundation of achievement." His final 



goal is passionate involvement in the music, yet as an art- 
ist he continually tempers this passion with the precision 
to the forms and the exactness of its performance. 

Mr. Peloquin sees his role at Boston College as a con- 
stant challenge to involve, to entertain, and to educate. 
He tries to adapt to the needs and trends of human ex- 
pression, and to respond to his role in a way that is both 
understanding and constructive. His art is "the music of 
religious inspiration," and his dedication is to the love 
and involvement that flow from it. As an artist he creates 
new ideas and modes, as a teacher and a performer he con- 
veys them to others, and as a man he dedicates himself to 
a policy ot giving them meaning b\' always living them to 
their fullest. 



79 



Buried deep in rhe recesses of Higgins Hall is an office 
quickly sought our by some one hundred plus freshmen 
each year; it is that of MR. JOHN J. POWER, the Boston 
College pre-medical, pre-dental adviser. The search is al- 
ways worth the effort, for the treshmen discover in Mr. 
Power a professor who is both steeped in the traditions 
and ways of the school and also extremely quick to estab- 
lish individualized and open contacts with each ot his 
new visitors. 

Mr. Power's long association with Boston College 
began in 19.t1 as an undergraduate. In 1935 he received 
his BS, one of the two graduating physics majors. With 
the aid of a fellowship he continued his education 
through 1936, at which time he received his MS degree. 

Various outside teaching assignments and four years 
army service during World War II separated Mr. Power 
from the Boston College campus until 1948. In that year 
he returned as an assistant professor in the physics depart- 
ment. His courses through the ensuing years brought 
him into contact with three of the university's colleges as 
well as its summer program. He encountered A&S stu- 
dents until 1961 in his general physics course which was 
required of math, physics, chemistry, pre-medical, and 
pre-dental students. He similarly became familiar with 
the nursing school by teaching their physics course. A 
course in physical science for education students, taught 
from 1961-1967 acquainted Mr. Power with a great por- 
tion of that school's student body. His summer school 
experience included being Assistant Director ot an insti- 
tute entitled "Modern Industrial Spectography." 

A severe heart attack compelled Mr. Power to lighten 
his work load after 1967. The one job he did not give up, 
however, is the one he is most commonly associated with 
today, that of pre-medical, pre-dental adviser to Boston 
College students. Mr. Power's appointment to this post 
by Fr. Walsh in 1964 was a first in two ways; he is the first 
lay adviser and the first adviser not recruited Irom the 
biology department. 

Besides providing an all-important voice and ear for 
perplexed and tense students, Mr. Power organizes and 
maintains a program which yearly produces a large num- 
ber of outstanding candidates for medical school. 

Mr. Power emphasizes that the Boston College pre- 
medical, pre-dental student is encouraged to obtain a faF- 
reaching liberal education rather than just a concentrated 




ft^"^ 



science preparation. He is presently stressing strongly that 
biology is neither the required nor the expected major of 
such students, and points to such evidence as applications 
going out this year tor students working out of the 
School of Management. 

Mr. Power's approach to each of these students is a 
strong, personal attention that most of the students agree 
marks Mr. Power as a predominant feature of their pre- 
professional program. From each student Mr. Power seeks 
a willingness to work tor others as well as tor himselt and 
an ability to face himselt with the utmost honesty. Mr. 
Power speaks ot the promise and fulfillment method - a 
student's continuing honest evaluation of himself, aided 
by the resources of Mr. Power's up-to-date tiles, and the 



80 




student's candid assessment of how well he is keeping up, 
not with his fellow students, but with his own potential. 
Because of this appraoch Mr. Power emphasizes that the 
recommendation board never maintains a system of 
"rejection percentage " but rather it evaluates each appli- 
cant individually and not as a statistic in relation to sixty 
others. 

After five years as adviser, Mr. Power characterizes the 
students he works with as "cooperative and appreciative." 
They refer exactly the same way to Mr. Power. He pro- 
vides a calming voice, an honest assessment, and a willing 
ear. He helps the student look away from the require- 
ments and at himself, and to coordinate himself In the 
midst of what often seems to be utter confusion, Mr. 
Power is adept at restoring a necessary balance. 

To those who have been at Boston College for the past 
four years, Mr. Power's recovery from his illness has crys- 
tallized the nature of his service to them and to Boston 
College. He not only spoke of how to overcome the prob- 
lems and confusion; he offered the starkest example in 
himself As he continued to listen to and to help relieve 
others' problems, while facing a far worse tension him- 
self, he brought to the pre-medical and pre-dental stu- 
dents a realization of what such phrases as "dedication," 
"facing matters openly," and "striving to the limits of 



your ability" meant. Mr. Power maintains that the pro- 
gram he advises on should be no more formalized than it 
now is; that the flexibility it now permits is beneficial. 
His advisees agree; for it is in Mr. Power himself - in his 
open love for Boston College, his ability to individualize 
so deeply with so many people, his personal struggle vet 
continued attention to the program — that many of them 
found what their inclinations and strivings meant. Be- 
cause of this they found that they were able to face up to 
themselves and assess their own attitudes and orienta- 
tions. Boston College has been a close part of Mr. Power's 
life, and to many of the people that are Boston College 
Mr. Power is a close part of their life. 




81 



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St» Botolph's Town 

The richness of tradition, the vibrancy of the new; 
Haymarket Square opening to Government Center, Bea- 
con Hill sheltering Charles Street, the Commons march- 
ing grounds supporting a moratorium peace march. We 
have caught Boston basking in her individuality and 
struggling to imbibe the freshness of change; preserving 
Commonwealth Avenue and opening an aquarium. We 
deplaned at a sleek Eastern Airlines terminal to breathe 
the stale warmth of the MBTA. We complacently rode to 
the top of the Pru, yet found we were engaged in a rare 
conversation between ourselves and the potent contradic- 
tions delineating this city - the undulating Freedom 
Trail skirting just blocks away from the Dartmouth 
Street entrance to the still enslaved South End; Universi- 
ty Row promising the open future and blocking it with 
the war research at M.I.T. 

Boston gave us happy hours at Father's, dinners at 
Durgin Park, theater at Charles St. Playhouse, and parties 
along every mile of green line subway track. 





84 




But her pendulum always reversed its swing. By get- 
ting us away from it all, Boston has gotten us deeper in. 
Enjoying her uniqueness, we ask "how.^"; confronting 
her changes, we ask "why?" We learn, maybe, to live her 
secret of vitality - of mixing old and new, comedy and 
tragedy, permanence and flux. A colonial grazing ground 
that gathers together, even today, the spirit of revolution. 



85 



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86 




87 




O Great White Father - kill the pigeons. 



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Preview showing - for mother-killers only. 




89 



Moratorium Day 

October fifteenth - An idea whose time has come. 
The first Moratorium attracted one of the largest crowds 
ever to assemble in the Boston Common, the largest 
being on V.E. Day. Approximately 100,000 students, pro- 
fessors, newsmen, policemen and observers crammed into 
the quarter mile square park to demonstrate against 
American involvement in the Viet Nam conflict. 

This massive assembly was preceded by house to house 
canvassing in the morning, with a petition for presenta- 
tion to our President. The evening's agenda consisted of 
numerous meetings at various universities. At BC, the ac- 
tivities included a Mass on the green and several notable 
speakers, namely W. Sloane Coffin and Howard Zinn. 






91 




92 




Backstage 



Mission Impossible, anyone? Well, how about joining 
the Boston College Stage Crew? Their mission, which 
they invariably decide to accept, involves the miraculous 
transformation of Campion auditorium into a Theater of 
the Arts. By their fruits we know them. They are the peo- 
ple who put the three pennies in the Opera, who make the 
Macbeth witches witchier. Theirs is the day and the night 
in miniature, a convincing microcosm on which we proj- 
ect our roles in the world at large. 




93 



Renovation 



For years a serious drawback in Boston College's aca- 
demic system has been the inefficient, outdated, and mea- 
ger resources of Bapst Library. When originally con- 
structed in 1926 for a student population of 1000, the sec- 
ond floor was reserved for future stacks, but was later- con- 
verted into a much needed auditorium. Last year, it was 
finally decided to revert to the original plan, in order to 
meet the needs of expansion. B.C. at last can forge ahead 
with an alftiost-competitive information facility; it can 
boast of 600,000 volumes. 

As for the auditorium — 

maybe next year. 





94 




95 



The Saga Saga 

Filling a couple thousand faces a day is no bonus, but 
the youthful and vigorous crew of the Saga food service 
manages thrice daily (Sunday mornings excepted) to per- 
form this thankless task. Perhaps more important, how- 
ever, is the delightful, homey atmosphere that these 
friends bring to McElroy's third floor, from lavish baccha- 
nalian delights at holiday time (with games, prizes, rock 
n' roll) to a tasty cup of quick-before-classes-coffee. 
Indeed, in the four years that Saga has provided the eats at 
BC, the faces on these pages have become legends in their 
own right. Backed by the principles of "one student - 
one dessert" and "equally large portions for all," they 
have made cafeteria meals a gourmet's delight. 




Have you tried our pre-flavored silverware? 



96 





Our garbage disposal concocts the most delightful things. 



97 



Concerts 



To sweat and shuttle, to fight for a seat to get crowded 
off, to dress up in your best onh' to wrinkle it all up, to 
scream and shout until vou can hear nothing more - the 
excitement ot being entertained. 

As darkness fell, Diana, Cindy, and Mary "let the sun- 
shine in," beginning our concert year as their years came 
to an end. The cacophony of adulation, the comic kisses 
of a hero worshipper, the lithe rhythm of Diana Ross and 
her music, a final pledge of daring to dream - this was 
our beginning, and their supreme finish. 

"Was it worth the wait.-"" was the universal question. 
"Definitely" was the parch-throated, mumbled response 
from those Sly devotees who breathed the same air over 
and over again during the 90 minute lapse between 
"Swallow" and "The Family," Once the stormy weather 
outside subsided long enough for the arrival of Sly Stone 
and his family, the storm moved indoors. Their driving 
rhythms pulsed on uritil curfew curtailed the proceed- 
ings. To belabor the obvious, the sophisticated throng 
maintained its decorum throughout. 







Tom Rush slowed down the pace. His aloof appear- 
ance disappeared in the intimate rapport he established 
with his audience. Sitting pressed against the stage, the 
audience fully reciprocated the emotion and intensity of 
the concert. The excitement of the Supremes now bal- 
anced with the warm closeness of "The Child's Song." 

Winter Weekend brought the newest in-group, "The 
Band," to campus in the old tradition of huge crowds and 
locked doors at Roberts Center. The wait resolved itself in 
the ensuing performance - excited, lengthy, and totally 
devoted to just the performance of The Band. The audi- 
ence was typically cramped and appreciative; The Band 
uniquely talented and entertaining. 

And so we let our emotions explode and our feelings 
deepen. As with all truly human experiences, we under- 
went a genuine learning process - finding ourselves in 
the music and emotive telepathy of others. 



99 




Thoughts and Words 

To share not only a man's ideas, but the person inter- 
twined with such creativity - this is the distinction of a 
lecture series. So. we not only heard four black philoso- 
phies, but witnessed the confrontation of four believers; 
not only listened to Auden and Lowell poems, but exper- 
ienced the empathy of the artists expressing their works 
themselves. We found the wit and satire of Vonnegut in 
his novels, in himself Sometimes excited, sometimes 
bored, and occasionally made strikingly aware of the dy- 
namics that result in a Black Panther commitment, a 
"Moonshot," or perhaps a hearty Wetco??2e to the Monkey- 
house. 



hn Knowles 




KuiT \'onnei;ut. J 



101 




W. H. Auden 



Louis Kronenbcrger 




Masai Hewitt. Roy Wilkins, Rev. Ralph Abernathv. Rov limis 



102 




Robert Lowell 




H. D. F. Kitto 



103 




Homecoming Queen Joyce Tangal 




104 




BC vs. Tul.inc on .i chilh' October atternoon. 




College Weekends 

We thought they might be new and different, yet they 
were the same in their deepest respects — the concert fig- 
ures were new sights — the audience the same howling, 
yet appreciative mass of clapping hands. The homecom- 
ing queen, a new name, yet of the same good looks and 
envied style. The dances — the biannual tours ro the zoo. 

And they were enjoyed with traditional eagerness — 
the following weeks scorn only the ironic reminiscences 
of the weekend's most enthusiastic participants. 



105 



Masses 



In a day when the concept of Catholic education is a 
voice crying out in the wilderness ot rampart secularism, 
campus worship remains a small but potent force in uni- 
versity life. Masses at Boston College offer men and 
women of faith three distinct varieties of liturgical experi- 
ence. The intention is not liturgical roulette but an at- 
tempt to meet the student halfway in his religious needs. 

Commencing on the right, St. Mary's Chapel offers a 
respectfully subdued liturgy as solid as the stone masonry 
that comprise its walls. Farther up the hill, masses in St. 
Joseph's Chapel gravitate more toward the sense of cele- 
bration which Harvey Cox stresses in his Feast of Fools. 
Completely renovated last year, the new St. Joseph's fea- 
tures a church-in-the-round seating arrangement, involv- 
ing the assembly of the faithful more fully in worship and 
accentuating a sense of community. And for those who 
dislike large crowds, the Masses indorm lounges help 
create a sense of intimacy like that of the Last Supper. 




106 





107 




108 




It helps digest the meal. 




Who is that strange fellow running through the 
Eagle's Nest wearing an army helmet? Lusty is his name, 
and his minions are legion. Lusty. L'esprit de corps. Per- 
haps he can tell us. Where does BC spirit reside? In that 
impaled eagle in front of Gasson, maybe? If it could 
screech, it would do so — in beautiful shades of maroon 
and gold. Legend has it that when BC spirit fails, the 
same eagle will fold its wings and McElroy Commons 
will lay an egg. 



109 



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112 



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And next time we'll get here before the game ends! 




Band 



Growth, from 25 men 10 years ago to 125 men and 
women today. Diversification and specialization dis- 
played in its four units: marching, concert, pep and 
dance. From fall football games to the spring concert, 
band members work to add excitement, spirit and oc- 
casionally just noise to campus events. Their impact is 
quality, and the definition of that end is found in the en- 
thusiastic reception accorded them wherever they go and 
whatever they do. Majorettes with beauty and talent, a 
color guard with precision and spirit, musicians with flair 
and harmony; a unit, recognized for its quality and re- 
nowned for its devotion to B.C. 



113 




Let the sun shine in. 





Cheerleaders 

Enthusiasm unbounded in victory, undaunted in de- 
feat. Sixteen men and women who encourage athletes to 
feats of endurance, success, and courage. Infusing spirit at 
pep rallies and games. Changing uniforms but not at- 
titudes for winter sports. Laughing, clapping, jumping, 
cheering. 




115 




I told you to use mouthwash! 



116 




Chorale 



Auditions . . . rehearsals in Lyons . . . trouble with 
the altos and tenors (if we don't have them, we'll make 
them) . . . pre-concert tensions . . . blue gowns and 
black tuxedos, student soloists, harmony ■ . . culture in 
McElroy . . . Songs from Scandinavia . . . people, parties, 
more rehearsals . . . standing room only in St. Ignatius 
Church . . . seven tiers of risers . . . Hallelujah Chorus 
. . . The Dutchman's crew . . . talent . . , fun . . . Lin- 
coln Center, New York debut featuring Gilbert Price and 
the Boston Ballet . . . The Freedom Songs . . . excite- 
ment . . . C. Alexander Peloquin, conductor, composer, 
arranger . . . applause . . . artists. 




117 



Commuters' Council 

Responding to the needs of non-resident students, fill- 
ing the cultural and social vacuum. Diverse demands and 
varied solutions. A lounge in Lyons for relaxation and 
conversation. A newsletter. An annual ski trip for the 
potentially lame. Discussions for the uninformed, recep- 
tions for the lonely, parties for all. Five years of service to 
the individual and the University. 





118 




/(9 




Council for 
Exceptional Children 

People . . . guys and girls in special education . . . 
Steve Jankauskas, president . . . laughing, depressed, im- 
patient for change . . . loving unwanted, different chil- 
dren . . . meeting . . . formally and informally in the Al- 
lied Arts Room, Cheverus Lounge, McGuinn Auditori- 
um . . . listening to speakers and sharing thoughts, be- 
liefs, hopes, experiences . . . planning sales . . . donuts, 
coffee, cookies . . . making taffy apples . . . conferences 
. . . "Emotional Blocks to Learning - A Psychotherapeu- 
tic Approach" . . . seeking to understand and help . . . 
searching, grasping, learning from one another . . . vol- 
unteering time and energy at state schools . . .loving. . . 
living . . . looking for a better tomorrow ... for people. 




120 



121 




122 




Dramatics Society 

In its 104th season, the Dramatics Society continues to 
present plays of recognized artistic merit. For the mem- 
bers, a total experience in theater: production, crew, act- 
ing, direction. Small details that an audience never thinks 
of or sees become crucial to a quality production. The 
direction and insights of a J. Paul Marcoux. The sets of a 
Dan Field. Long hours of discussion and creation and re- 
hearsal to transform Campion Auditorium for the brief- 
est moments into a microcosm. The panorama of life. . . 
Macbeth. The Threepenny Opera. The Odd Couple . . . 
Hard-earned applause. A curtain call, the set is struck, the 
house is locked. An act and a memory, painfully created 
and well worth the remembrance. 




123 




124 




Fulton Debate 



There is often a great distinction between an image 
and tiie reality that lies behind it. The image of the Ful- 
ton is undeniably one of dedication and success. Its top 
team is the best in the nation. Its program both in terms 
of talent and accomplishment far outstrips that of any 
other school. Its members work long and intensively. 

Yet this is only a superficial perception of what Fulton 
means. For the content of the image is one of people, and 
their context is one of the impact they have on each other 
and their peers. The satisfaction of debate is more than 
the savor of victory; it is the feeling that what one does is 
done because one wants to rather than because one must. 
The rewards are in the respect of those who know one as a 
person rather than merely as a debater. In the long run, 
the visible indications of these ideas may never appear. 
But they cannot be denied and it is this small addition to 
the person which describes the value of Fulton. 



Of course, I construct my best arguments while sewing. 




125 




Gold Key 



As one of the oldest and most respected service organi- 
zations on campus, the Gold Key is best described as it is, 
200 men who exemplify their motto of service and sacri- 
fice. Their primary concern is a contribution of time and 
effort to the campus and the community. Ushering at 
cultural and social events. Organizing Orientation and 
Alumni Weekends. Working with mentally retarded 
adults at the Watertown Day Care Center, and on the 
Red Cross Blood Drive. Hosting Boston Citizen Semi- 
nars. An organization with a fraternal spirit and a vigor- 
ous dedication, indispensable to campus life. 




"Quiet, Jane, you can get out in 3 minutes.' 



126 




Boss Russo 




127 




Up against the wall. Heights! 



128 





Heights 



journal-ism, (jur'na-liz'em) n. The style of writing 
characteristic of material in newspapers and magazines, 
consisting of the direct presentation of facts or occurances 
with little attempt at analysis or interpretation. 

The Heights. 



Nowadays, when someone refers to a four letter man on cam- 
pus, you don't know whether he's an athlete or the editor of 
the campus newspaper. 



129 




H 



y 




Middle Earth 



Time . . . 

It is constantly there, a viable spectre, a continual fac- 
tor in every endeavor the student undertakes. Time and 
space close in on you, threatened, and each becoming de- 
structive in its own turn. 

Time and space are suspended in Middle Earth. The 
black walls stretch out towards an unseen horizon and the 
sense of space is replaced with a warm, human intimacy. 
Time disappears in the quiet conversation and in the 
warmth of music filtering through the smoke-fdled air. 
In a womb-like darkness, there is the time to be yourself 
and the space in which to be. Students, faculty, and ad- 
ministrators, each in their own way, have paused there to 
remove themselves from the world and to contemplate 
and to create. Music, ideas, poetry; meaningful friend- 
ships and even love have been fostered at Middle Earth. 

Born in the cold November of 1966 as the result of 
persistent work and dreaming on the part of a small core 
of students. Middle Earth exists today as a service organi- 
zation of the university at large, owned, managed, and 
operated independent of the university by a seven-man 
student board of governors. Versatile, unique, and alive. 
Middle Earth is a showcase for ideas and talents. 

For in the blackness, there is the limitless space needed 
to create, and in the musky air the infinite time in which 
to truly be. 




131 




'To you who aren't effete snobs, welcome!" 



132 




R.O.T.C. 



For students who spurn the prospect of khaki pants 
and P.F.C. status following the pomp of graduation, the 
Army Reserve Officer Training Corps offers an inter- 
esting alternative to the draft: a four-year program ot 
military science leading to a commission as a second lieu- 
tenant in the Army Reserves. 

Offering basic and advanced courses, as well as a six- 
week summer camp during Junior Year, the Department 
ot Military Science provides army officers as instructors 
and tits schedules to meet the academic and extracurricu- 
lar commitments ot participating students. 

The rather odd position of R.O.T.C. between universi- 
ty standards and army regulations has alwa\s been a pre- 
carious one. An unpopular war and the rise of student dis- 
sent were instrumental in isolating R.O.T.C. trom the 
pure academic concerns ot the university and stripping 
the program of academic credit. With its loss of status, 
R.O.T.C. often takes on the appearance ot a beleaguered 
minority, but it retains its appeal for the pragmatic stu- 
dent who sees the obvious advantages of a gold bar over a 
stripe. 



L'nitorm disapproval suits R.O.T.C. tinci 



133 




Keep practicing; they're bound to invite us to lead a Moratorium Day march. 



Lewis Drill 



The pattern is precise and the execution faultless. The 
appearance is one of professionalism and the performance 
one consistent with high standards. Yet the form is not 
one for its own sake. The satisfaction of acting together, 
of molding a corporate unit from a diverse group tran- 
scends the rewards of competition and success. Lewis 
Drill is a form, and the form is made meaningful by a 
sense of the individual interacting and the body repre- 
senting. 



134 




A. 




Rifle Club 



A bull's eye is a goal but not an end in itself. The acqui- 
sition of skill is the foremost concern of the Rifle Club. 
Such skill need not be defined in terms of perfection. 
Rather, it is sensed in a realization that one attains the 
fullest extent of one's abilities and is content in that end. 
In this context, individual development is redefined in a 
climate of mutual accomplishment and attains a deeper 
meaning. 



No, we don't take Cheverus first. 



Violation of registration procedures will be met with strict disciplin 



arv action. 




135 



Sodality 



Individuals with a purpose . . . developing an un- 
structured community . . . reflecting together on Chris- 
tian values . . . social concern and action . . . tutoring, 
teaching CCD in Roxbury . . . politically oriented work 
. . . Mike Boughton, president . . . Mary Redmond's 
dinner meetings . . . candlelight masses . . . speaker's lec- 
tures followed by lively discussions and playful fist fights 
. . . weekends in Gloucester . . . relevance, awareness, 
leadership . . . informality, unity, midnight mass, love. 





136 




m "«r 





137 



Sub Turri 



Events are isolated and frozen on a page. Some words 
are dredged up and the vaguest hint of a theme is im- 
posed. A multitude ot people trying to present a unified 
picture of a diverse experience. A truly personal message 
for ever\' member of the community is an impossible end, 
and satisfaction must be defined in terms of a single mo- 
ment ot recognition, an isolated instance of under- 
standing. Memories oi times and measures ot men. 





J.inics A. G.illiwin, Sen/or EJ/lo 



Fr. John Trzaska. S.J., Fdci/lty Adii 




\i 





\ 




Al.m J. DcmcTs. Mjiuf^iip^ liclilor 



I. Ik I.I A. Hi.!//.!, l]/i\/ih\\ .\l, ///./'' 



138 




Edmond R. Trcmblav, Lciyoi/t Edilor 



kilK AwjLiiiti lihtoi 




Joseph J. Brut, Eiliioy-ni-CJ^if 



139 




Henry Ellis. Sports Edit, 



William Kitii, Ihdtnn-s Eilito 



140 




Fred Voss, Ronald Huebsch, 

Act ivi ties Edilun 



UGBC 



gov-ern-ment (guv-ern-ment) n. 1. The act, or process of 
governing; especially, the administration of public poli- 
cies in a political unit: political jurisdiction. 

The acts are often best left undone. The process is best 
described as a spontaneously, disorganized, random 
movement toward an unidentified end. The public policy 
is a function of the group's whims and the political unit is 
more often a committee than a congress. The promise 
does not become the fulfillment. 

The standards of perfection are certainly never met. 
Yet the guide to success for UGBC is not its structural 
fidelity. Nor are its adherence to Robert's Rules and con- 
stitutional levies a measure of the service rendered to the 
University. We often tend to evaluate organizations more 
in terms of our own perceptions and demands than their 
abilities and limitations. UGBC is not now and never will 
be all things to all men. Its faults are myriad and virtues 
scattered; yet these are selective perceptions of a compre- 
hensive endeavor. The validity is not in absolute accom- 
plishment; it is, rather, in the effort invested and the dedi- 
cation exhibited. On such a scale UGBC may well 
succeed. On any other, judgement can never truthfully be 
made. 




Don't worry, St. Patrick will never be a second-class saint here! 





I still say he'd get more done in the men's room. 




143 




144 




WVBC 



The sun rises early on WVBC. In the cold grey of 
dawn a lonely student walks across campus to begin an- 
other broadcasting day with the theme of 2001. Through- 
out the day, in McElroy Commons and the dorm area, 
WVBC broadcasts music from a vast and diverse record 
library, news from United Press, ABC News, and the IVY 
Network, and second-by-second sports reporting by cam- 
pus reporters. All day, friendship, good times, and profes- 
sional concern produce the best in entertainment and in- 
formation. As the sign-off fades and the studio darkens, 
another lonely figure crosses the campus to a well-earned 
rest. A usual day in the Fulton Hall studios, only one day 
out of many, in the tenth year of programming for 
WVBC, the Voice of Boston College. 



145 




Order of the Cross and Crown 



Alpha 

and 

Omega 




146 




il 
Beta Gamma Sigma 



Honor 
Societies 




Sigma 
Theta 
Tau 



147 



Performing 
Arts 




Middle Earth 



148 



i 



Boston College Band 




University Chorale 




149 






■■E^i 


.^^^^^^^B ^^H^"^ ^^fe^b .^K. ^^B 


r^^^K^'^'^ft^^l^ ^W* " 3 


^^^^^^^JrHj^^^H '!!*'!'^^^l 




Professional Organizations 




Chemical Society 




Pi Sigma Epsilon 



151 



Mendel Club 




Kappa Delta Epsilon 




152 




Ricci Math Academy 




/53 



Accounting Academy 



i)^ 



Delta 

Sigma 

Pi 




^ ^^ 



154 




Kappa 

Phi 

Kappa 




Omega Alpha Psi 




155 



Alpha Kappa Psi 



■*-^<i 



Geology 
Club 




156 



Publications and Media 




Heights 



157 



Humanities 




WVBC 




158 




Sub Turri 




Stylus 



159 



^4 



^ 



^^ 



^^k ACCOUNTING AC ADEMY ; ^/ /r> rj}. Godsill; F. Catalano; 
^^^vE. Vozzella (President); A. Lawrence; A. Glynn (Advisor). 

^K ALPHA AND OMEGA: (/ to rj E. Reidy; M. Lanzo; R. 
Smith; L Gilhooly: D. Blanchard; B. Shanaiian; S. Jankaus- 
kas; I'doiim) K. Murphy; J. O'Brien; C Hannon; G. Cassidy. 

ALPHA KAPPA ?S\:(l to r: 1st rmj D. Bergen; A. Lawrence; 
P. Casev; R. Amopio; f2ii(^ row) P. Stout; S. McEleny; J. Bar- 
nett; P. Leonard; J. Maher;J. Hagan; E. Asip; (3rd rowjG. Sli- 
ney; K. McTigue; C. Frolich; T. Nuara; J. Ford; E. Hughes; 
(41/} row) M. Mullaheyr R. DeLucia; F. Parsecitti; B. Roder; 
r5tb row) M. White; R. Glaser; T. Lynch; W. Hession; T. 
Maccanni;J. Walsh. 

BETA GAMMA SIGMA: (I to r: 1st row)]. SuUo; P. Fraioli; 
A. Copani; R. Lesch; P. Gaivin (President); ('2fici row)]. Ne-- 
ville; M. Puopulo; A. Cellucci. 

BOSTON COLLEGE BAND: (I to r: 1st row) Fr. Glavin; G. 
Sullivan; V. Ferrante; C Ciano; C Page; G. Sincavage; J. Lani- 
gan; J. Titlebaum; D. Thierrien; D. Havens; S. Kruper; G. 
Vernon; P. Tibbies; D. Noves; B. Connor; V. Piekarski; T. 
VanCamp; B. McNeil; C. Poole; B. Lcveck; F. Delutis; (2m1 
row) C. Rosa; M. Ferraro; J. Tracy; J. Scannel; T. Ruto; M. Gu- 
errera; P. O'Neil; C. Piekarski; F. Hyder; S. Sheehan; M. Hoff- 
man; C McKenna; E. Farrell; R. Pouliot; J. O'Toole; H. The- 
berge; T. Bartosiak; B. Marble; R. Puerto; J. Faye; A. Trema- 
glio; T. Roberts; B. McKuskie; (3rd row) L. Creetin; A. Har- 
ris; T. Manning; J. McCurry; B. Gambone; B. Kelleher; P. 
Munier; K. Taylor; K. Carrigan; J. Snow; J. Collins; B. 
White; D. DeSandra; J. McClain; A. Stroukoff; R. Politano; 
J. Picrri;J. Casey;('4^A rowjC. Hinkley;J. DeLuca;J. Smith; L. 
Brigan; J. Daelhausen; T. Mish; T. Noonan; J. Botelho; B. 
Pewald; J. Tirrell; A. Reed; G. Compeau; L. De'Nofrio; L. 
Markol; D. Healy; T. Craig; J. Lincoff; A. Santosuosso; S. 
O'Donovan; P. Siraguso; (3th row) C. Hasey; T. Marolda; R. 
Sherf; M. Manna; L. Pegna; J. Alexander; B. Thomas; L. 
D'Agostino; J. Kolb; F. Powers; J. Centoriro; T. Martin; J. 
Cronin:J. Hogan; J. Fallon; E. Baechtold; R. Kavanaugh; D. 
Reason; B. Heffernin; P. Donahue; M. Turner; T. Bartosak; 
D. Archer; J. Gualtiere; D. Egan; A. Ciccotto;J. Ricdy; D. 
Ries; C. Peirno; G. Chin; R. Eckel; B. Lynch; R. Wilson; M. 
Paskowski; T. Bale; B. Parsons; R. McNamara; G. Hussa. 




COUNCIL FOR EXCEPTIONAL CHILDREN: (I to 
Jankauskas; |. Gleason: C. Gunther; M. Franco. 



DELTA SIGMA PI: J. Abbott; K. Andiorio; M. Bolvan'(Pi-«- 
idcnt);J. Bondi; T. Brogowski; J. Burnett; B. Callcry; J. Ca- M 
pone; C. Campo; D. Canepari; N. Cavallaro;J. Cj.ivdon;~Sr-~_ 
Connolly; T. Courain; J. Cronin; M. Coyne; B. Cuhna; J. 
Daly; A, DeVasto; S. DiFeo; R. Doherty; J. Dunn; T. Finn: J. 
Glynn; R. Grasso; R. Halv: ]. Hartlev; J. Herbert; W. Kelly, 
A.Lewis; D. McAulitfc; w" McAuliffe; M. McLaughlin; D. 
MacDonald; C M;tgliato; R. Maguire; M. Mingolelli; P. Min- 
golelli; K. Morris; F. Mucci; J. Murphy; J. O'Connell; M. 
O'Doherty; G. Peregrin; J. Spina; T. Smythe; J. Snyder; J. Sul- 
livan; R. Sullivan; S. Terranova; C. Toczylowski; P. Tracy; M. 
Trainor; V. Valvo; P. Vitins; J. Wass; P. Wood; B. York; P. 
Loring; E. Mulcahy. 

DRAMATIC SOCIETY: (I to r) S. James; K. Hughes; D. 
Fields. 

GEOLOGY CLUB: (I to r) L, Martin; G. Rosa; R. Judstrom; 
T. Hamilton. 

THE HEIGHTS: (I to r) G.Jordan; D. Natchek; L. Lazarick; 
T. Sheehan; J. Sullivan; T. Nuzzo; W. Reap, 

HUMANITIES MAGAZINE: (I to r: Ist row)]. Gallivan; T. 
Graham: (2)id roiv) R. Borucki; K. Hull. 

KAPPA DELTA EPSILON: (I to r) M. Sano; E, Martin; R, 
Popiak; A. Kcllv: G. Diotte; P, Pezzella; M. Dart; B, Beau- 
doin;J. Gotsell: C: MulhalhJ. McCoy: A. Shanahan; K. Wag- 
ner; M. McMalion; B. McCanthv; A. Esdale;S. Richard; J. Lal- 
lon; K. Greeley; J. Lallon; M. Morian; J, Guitla. 



KAPPA PHI KAPPA: A. MaKann; R. Smith; 
Baltren (President); G. Manning; J. Noone. 



Lucia; P. 



MENDEL CLUB: (I to r) S. Kelleher; R. Nardone; R. Bloute 
(President). 

MIDDLE EARTH: (I to r: 1st row) P. August; T. Strazcr; D. 
Borchelt; T. Kelley; (2nd row) P. Lanzikos; S. Thomas; P. 



in 



160 




Trembhiy; R. Lipsinski; D, Natchek; K. O'Hagen; P. Lizotre 



OMEGA ALPHA PSI: (Itn r: 1st row)]. Kerrigen, T. Hannen 
beny; J. Sylva; G. Rovcgno; R. Bollengicr; (2nd nu') M, Far 
niher; A. DeMambro; j! Svlva; T. Bergfidd; A. Vilkgas: / w., 
ro^-J.,, Lavey ; R. Flynn; J. Battista; J. Collins; G. Kcllehcr; 
"(MBJ^^^- Logan; D. Rull ; T, Moore; K. Russo; I'lth rmv) A. 
FeiTullo; J. Raw; R. Lagacc; (mhsnig)]. Croak; C Earlcv; J. 
Lopez; D. McDcvitt; M. Puopolo. 

ORDER OF CROSS AND CROWN: (I tu r: Isf row)]. Rau; 
T. Riccardelli; E. Selgrade; J. Rubin; A. Moritis; M. Ernewine; 
J. Britt; T, Robinson; M, D'Amhmsio; ( 2ih/ roivj ]. Carroll; L, 
Buckley; M. Killenbeck; D. Blaha; R, Blure; K. Wainwright; 
D. Harley; T. Bryk; F.Heiman; T. Sullivan; T. O'Connor'; R. 
Fragnoli; ('4il-> row) ]. McCurray; E, Doolev: B. Cash. 

RICCI MATH ACADEMY: (I to r; 1st row) W. Tomban; J. 
Paradise; E. Trcmblay; T. Stepka; M. Purr; A. Methot; (2nd 
raw) W. Kendall; F. Voss (President) ; (5rd rotv) E. Kofron; N. 
Petruccelli. 

SIGMA THETA TAU: (I to r: 1st row) K. McDonald; T. 
Copcland; E. Grady (President); B. Bartnic;; A. Bedard; J. 
Wilson;J, Chin; V.GKen; (2nd row)]. Sullivan; D, Williams; 
J. Coleman; A. Grcelv; i\L Gronell; V. Bleakley; B. Lucas; B. 
Wallace; (3rd row) P. Mtv; N. Turletes; G. Jarnis; T. Wilcox; 
J. Noyes; J. Stevenson; 1:, Carlson; J. "V'armalin; N. Walton; 
D. Sellinger. 

STYLUS: (i to r) W. Grapes; W. Reap; P. Nolan; J. Granger; 
M. Gaffer. 

SUB TURRL r7 to r) M. Chcaallah; D. Dionne; B. White; M. 
Campbell; C. Schmidt; M. Murphy; L. Piazza; K. Carnc)'; F. 
Voss; P. Burrascano; (". C^.issidy; B. Lucas; J. Lewis; R. 
Huebsch; E. Tremblav; R. Thibault; S. Korta; A. Lauer; W. 
Kita. 



SWEET CHARITY CAST: L. McGillycuddy; J. Keohan; T. 

Stankard; P. Mcc; B. Fiorentino; J. Emerson; T. Sweetser; M. 

,,King; M. Estwanik; f. Haydcn; M. Cassidy; C. Bregar; P. Di- 

Paulo; J. Tangal; J. Chin; O. Hanley; D. O'Laughhn; T. Mac- 



carini; L. Ueclos; R. Sylve,ster:; M. LfllVi'K. Carr; i. Shanley; 
D, Stone; M. Curran; S. Wosowski; D. Blanchard; J. Kelly; 
M. Murphy; J. Thomas; J. Cambria; J. Cavalen; Lois; M. 
Compo; M. McNiff; B. O'Kane; J. Dunn; J. Dwalaby; A. 
Langkopf; J. O'Brien; D. Spinelli; T. Bates; J. Thomas; K, 
King; C. Hannon; N. Turlete.s; J. DiMattina; P. Silbcr. 

UNIVERSITY CHORALE: J. Andrews; B. Cain; L. Colalu- 
Li A. Davin; C. Fiorentino; R. Fletcher; M. Gildca; S. Gilli- 
gan J. Gotsell; H. Hamilton; E. Harrington; L. Howes; E. 
Johnson; K. McGuirc; M. Melega; A. Methot; M. Roberge; 
K. Shea; S, Sullivan; V. Vetri; K. Wagner; B. Wallace; M. 
Cincotta; L, Clough; H. Coleman; L. Corinne; J. Dcstefano; J. 
Dyer; B. Piemonte; B. Siennic; M. Stalev; J. Stasiowski; C. 
Walsh; D. Bcaulieu; M. Claffey;J. Colanen;"A. Dolan;J. Do- 
novan; A. Dunne; C Gunther; M. Kelleher; K. Mone; L. 
Murphy; S. Redick; J. St. Germaine; M. Trainor; D. Wislrart; 
K. Annulli; P. Bau; M. Basicl; D. Chiaccha; S. Chin; L. Conk- 
lin; M. Crump; L. Demeo; B. Desmond; J. Dever; P. Dube; J. 
Dupont; C. Fiermonti; M. Foster; M. Gill; B. Groppo; M. 
Hanley; A. Havens; A. Hawes; M. Kelly; C LaCoste; V. Lcpa- 
ri; S. M:idcr; D. McGrath; M. McKenzie; S. Menslage; P. 
Monahan; J. O'Connor; L. Santoro; A. Simon; C Spont; D. 
Tchan; C Wood; T, Zachiarias; D. Burroughs; P. Canty; F. 
Catalano; J. Doran; F. Gutierrez; M. H;ickett; M. Hardiman; 
G. McCoulgan; A. Newcomb; R. Reinhart; R. Skiba; P. Thi- 
boutet; G. Tracy; C. Vanderm;ielen; D. Waters; M. Lojak; A. 
Bicrne; L, DiCarlo; M. Dixson; W. Mackenzie; K. Fav; R. 
Fiorentino; T. Gibbons; R. Gram; P. Hoffman; R, Mattson; 
W. Barker; H. Barnaby; L. Bochetto; M. Boughton; S. Cald- 
well; D. Castiglioni; R. Cieri;J. Cochrane; J. D'Auria; J. Delia 
Russo; R. Dillon; W. Donovan;J. Engler; P. Garvin; M. Hur- 
hhv;J, Holtham; P. larussi; L. Jejcr; D. Jones; B. Kelter; J. 
Kozarich; J. Lewis; W. O'Nicl; J. Seafert; B. Sullivan; D. 
Toussant; j. WiUcmain; J. Wmberry; W. War;'d; R. Zaph; T. 
Cas;iuban; L, Jacoby; C. Jurado; J, Kencaly; A. Langkopf; P. 
Lizzotte; P. iXiacDon.dd; P. McLaughlin; E. M;iloney; E. Nuc- 
cio; J. Phclan;J. Strazzar;J. Sullivan; E. Swiderski; P. L'gliet- 
to; P. Walsh; P. Zacharias. 

WVBC: (I to r) G. LaCrosse; P. Cuzzi; G. Martelon; A. Nac- 
lario; K. Gorman; C. Szely; T. Nelligan; A. Cennamo; D. 
MacDonald, Station Manager. 




161 



Senates 



Nursing 




Arts and Sciences 



162 




Education 




Evening College 



163 



Service Organizations 



Knights 

of 

Columbus 



Alpha Phi Omega 




BOSTON 
COLLEGE 






COUNCIL 
NO. 5278 



KNIGHTS OF COLUMBUS 




164 




Commuters' Council 



Mental Health Volunteers 




165 




Special Interest Groups 



Slavic 
Circle 




166 




Chess Club 




Italian 
Academy 



167 



Royal 
Order of 
the Buffalo 




Le Cercle Francais 




168 



Sporting Organizations 




%^ J* ■ "^ "*■ 



Cheerleaders 




Pierre 
> Club 



169 




Hopscotch 
Club 



Courtside Club 




Lewis Drill Team 




Rifle Club 



171 



UGBC 




President — Vice President 



Congress 



Cabinet 




/ 

f 



J I 



^~ 



( 



\ 




Social Committee 




Cultural 
Committee 



173 



ALPHA PHI OMEGA: (I to r. 1st row)}. O'ConnclhJ, Rull; 
R. Eckel; J. Ambrogne; C. Butters; D. McGiuliffe; F. Gia- 
colne; (2nd row) D. White; E. Saunders; C. DeCourcy; J. Can- 
tillon; J. Curran; G. Glennon; (5rd row) J. DeLorenzo; J. 
Loftus; J. Lee; E. Hurlev; P. Howard; A. Sbordone; P. Gold- 



ARTS AND SCIENCES SENATE: (I to r) R. Reiser; D. Ca- 
hiil; T. Polito; D. Dranchak; T. Anderson; T. Nuzzo; E. Du- 
Bestcr; D. Reznick; R. Gracefta. 

CHEERLEADERS: (front) G. Rovegno; (I to r. Ut row) R. 
Sylvester; J. Croak; R. Eckel;' L. Milkowski; J. Mayer; S. Wa- 
sowski; f2nd row) D. Dolan; M. Plasse; K. Redd; C. Chalen- 
ski; J. Cain; J. Dooley. 

CHESS CLUB: fl to r: seated) D. Roulston; S. Rusconi (Presi- 
dent); P. Czachorowski; (standing) M. Clerizo; L. Ashley; T. 
Connors; G. Davis. 



^MxMUTERS COUNCIL: (!■ torU£.. Driscoll; A. Abbruz- 
M. Cincotta; J. Ro^MJ^^KcrvarM K* Jennings; B. 
Lane. " 

CONGRESS: ilto r: 1st row)iA. Keefe; S. Mangano; P. Maho- 
ncv: D. Kwasnik: l2nd row) M. Holland; R, Maguirc; K. Mo- 
rianr\; W. Brndy: D. Beaulieu; P. Hanehan; P. DiPctro; J; 




OToolc; (.^rd row) T. G;nin; j. Goodyear; P. Ginnetty; D. 
Pcllow; K. Murph}'; R. Sullivan; E. Sclgrade, 

COURTSIDE CLUB: Every avid basketball tan. 

CULTURAL COMMITTEE: (I to r: seated) K. Murphy: D. 
Juechter (Chairman); T. Anderson; E. Beecher; M. Sandwell; 
(stai/d/ng) P. Donahue; J. D'Auria; D. Dohertv; ). W'inburv. 

EDUCATION SENATE: M. Lilly; S. Jankaukas; Dorothy 
Tehan; David Pallai; Richard Craig; Joan O'Brien; Fernando 
Guttieriz; Peter DiGulio; Thomas Walsh; Patricia Balbone; 
Robert Casey. 

r 

EVENING COLLEGE STUDENT COUNCIL: f/%e r: seated 
around table) A. TuUy; F. Redmond; E. Mason; D. Maskell; J. 
Ambrogne; R. Jordan; (standing) M. Mohan; J. Salecly; K. 
Clizauskas; K. Tully; P. Levine; M. Hannon; J. Feeney; R. 
Mohan; K. Plunkett; J. MacNeil; M. Curran. ^,gjf .. •- 

GOLD KEY SOCIETY: f//« r; 1st row) F. Heiman;J. Britt; S. 
Jankauskas; R. Walsh; R. Fragnoli; (.2nd row) D. Blanchard; 
M. Erncwin; B. McNamara; S. Ackerman; E. Vozzellar"R-.- 
Flynn (President); T. Callahan; W. Sullivan; F. Catalano; M. 
Boughton; R. Miola; D. Cahill; (3rd roiv) T. Goodman; T. 
Kiewlicz; L. Monks; M. Sullivan; T. Riccardelli; W. Ca.sh; E 






m 




SB 8 8 

*■ « «*• Mi 



k\ M\h\ -IliUIr, 



I'iir m 






Halk 



HOPSCOTCH CLUB: (ho r. 1st row) B. Pryslay; S. McLaugh- 
lin; M. DeStefeno; P. Bauer; (2nd row) P. Teague; P. Mason; 
(3rd mw) P. Abraham; R. Kenney; J. Ostergrem; A. Folkard 
(Coach). 

ITALIAN ACADEMY: (I to r) R. Monahan; R. Bouchard; J. 
Hanr.ihan; J. Lucia (President); D. Blanchard; M. Burek; J. 
McCurrv; B. Maki; R. Matson; R. Boruchi; T. Filtreau. 

KNIGHTS OF COLUMBUS: r//s /-JR. KelIev;T. Donohoe; 
R. RolFe; T. Robbins. 



LE CERCLE FRANCAIS: (I to r) R. Clarke; A. Lauer; C. 
Schmidt; L. Piazza; J. Gallivan (President). 

LEWIS DRILL TEAM: G. Walsh (Commander); R. Haley; 
R. Hennessey; R. Sturk; T. Giancristiano; R. Sliney; J. Do- 
noghuc: |. Donnells; H. Ohrenberger; A.Jones; D- Burns; C. 
Boop; P. Horrigan; J. Norton; F, Brock; A. Casey; T. Kerri- 
gan; T. Meade. 

MENTAL HEALTH VOLUNTEERS: (I to r) M. Cardinal: T. 
Hodapp; W. Standish; K. Bcgley; A. Methot; J. DT;iso, P Ja 



russi; T. Ansbro (President); C. VanderMaclen; P. Keane; M. 
Coyle; J. Murray; M. McNamara; J. O'Sullivan; M. Vida; D. 
Connel. 

NURSING SENATE: (I to r) S. Cotter; E. Witterschcin; G. 
Sebastio; M. Foley; L. DiCarlo; K. Cooney; D. Barry; A, 
McBride; J. Noyes; J. Farrell; (seated) V. Bleaklcy (President). 

PIERRE CLUB: Every avid hockey fan. 

PRESIDENT AND CABINET: (I to r) ]. Fitzpatrick (Presi- 
dent); M. Sheridan; K. Hackett; D. Bergan; D. Juechter. 

RIFLE CLUB: 

ROYAL ORDER OF THE BUFFALO: (I to r; front) F. Voss; 
W. Kita; D. Burke; (back) W. Morelli; S. J. (Advisor); R.' 
Huebsch (President); J. Wiles; S. Korta; K. Carney; B. Sander \j 
(inissing). 

SLAVIC CIRCLE: (clockwise from lower left) E. Sanda; E. Bar- 
ron; A. Bruno; M. Perko; E. Seibel; J. Morris; P. McShane. 

SOCIAL COMMITTEE: (I to r) S. Amoroso; F. Ciano; D. 
Zak: D. Lacivim; C Chalenski; W. Christensen; R. Byrne; J. 
Kcii L L(.\t>,t]ue. J Maher (Chairman); W. Healy. 



*; 




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Sports 










1 




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Football 



optimism was the keynote as Boston College prepared 
for the 1969 football season, the one hundredth anniver- 
sary of collegiate competition. The only dark cloud was 
the inexperience of the defense, but this factor seemed ov- 
ershadowed by the return of an offensive unit that was 
ranked third in the nation at the close of last season. But a 
pre-season loss against Dartmouth, in which the Eagles 
fumbled eight times, served to caution this optimism and 
foreshadow future problems. 

Navy came into Alumni Stadium hoping to avenge 
the 49-15 disaster of the previous year. The Eagle's de- 
fense proved surprisingly tough, but the offense had 
trouble mounting a sustained drive. It was not until 
Navy went ahead early in the second half that the offense 
began to put things together. Two Harris to Catone 
touchdown passes gave B.C. the lead and the defense pre- 
served a tough 21-14 win. 

Before a homecoming crowd, the Eagles took on the 
Green Wave of Tulane. Hoping to avenge a 28-14 upset 
of the previous year, the Eagles scored twice in the early 
minutes of the first quarter. But here the Eagles went flat. 
The offense failed to move the ball, and the defense began- 
to weaken. It was not until Tulane had forged ahead that 
the Eagles came to life. Running back Fred Willis scored 
three touchdowns, but it took a 62 yard dash by Jim Ca- 
tone to seal a 28-24 victory. 




Top: John Bonistalli brought down 27 passes this year, eight for touchdowns. 
Bottom: Senior Mondell Davis closes in. 



179 



Playing their third home game of the season, the 
Eagles hosted an explosive Villanova team. B.C. moved 
the ball well in the first half, but key fumbles and a touch- 
down nullified by an interference penalty prevented any 
sustained drive. Villanova took advantage of B.C. mis- 
takes, mixing a fine running game with accurate passing 
to keep the Eagles off balance. The only B.C. score came 
on a Harris to Bonistalli pass in the third quarter. The 
Villanova defense took over from there and the Eagles 
were on the short end of a 24-6 score. 

Travelling to West Point the Eagles hoped to get back 
on the right track against a mediocre Army team. Army 
shocked the Eagles on the first play from scrimmage, with 
fullback Lynn Moore going 82 yards for a touchdown. 
Playing without Willis or Jim McDonald, the Eagles' 
running game bogged down, while turnovers provided 
the Cadets with many scoring opportunities. Army 
walked away with a 38-7 victory. 




Below: Bill Thomas looks for daylight. 




180 




One of Gary Dancewicz's 3 interceptions. 




Fred Willis gained over 600 yards in 1969. 



181 




Below: Jitn Catone rambles for yardage against Navy. 



182 








■^ 




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.-*' 



A 



Against third ranked Penn State the Eagles played 
their best game to date. A touchdown off a perfectly exe- 
cuted faked field goal attempt gave B.C. a 13-10 half time 
lead. But the relentless Penn State defense caused too 
many turnovers. A blocked punt, a fumble inside the ten 
yard line, and a 48 yard punt return by Dennis Onkotz led 
to a 38-16 victory for the undefeated Nittany Lions. 

Returning to Alumni Stadium, the Eagles took on a 
tough Buffalo team, rated second in the nation on de- 
fense. After falling behind 13-0 in the first half, B.C. came 
roaring back to take the lead and seemed on the way to 
their third win. But Buffalo took advantage of fumbles 
and interceptions to regain the lead and fashion a 35-21 
victory. The game was highlighted by three touchdowns 
in the last forty seconds of play, the last a 97 yard touch- 
down return by B.C.'s Ed Rideout. 



Harris to Willis - Touchdown. 




The B.C. line stops Penn State. 



Tlic B.C. line stops Penn State. 



183 








ill ^T 




The Eagles then defeated a hapless Virginia Military Insti- 
tute team by a score of 49-32. The game was marked by nu- 
merous fumbles by both sides as well as a general lack of de- 
fense. After forging a 28-0 lead, the Eagles sagged and gave up 
17 points in the last minutes of the first half It took a Harris 
to Bonistalli touchdown to put the game out of reach. 

Yankee Conference champion UMass came into Alumni 
Stadium with its best team in recent years, looking for its first 
win over B.C. since the series began. The Eagles' secondary, 
led by Skip Copolla, and an intentional safety preserved a 
35-30 victory. 




Senior Joe McDonald was a steady performer during the season. 



184 




Action on the Syracuse goal line. 




Jim McCool stops Penn State's Pittman. 



185 



For the first time in recent memory, Boston College 
failed to end its season with traditional rival Holy Cross. 
The Cross was forced to cancel its final eight games due 
to an outbreak of hepatitis among its football team. Mu- 
tual rival Syracuse was added to the schedule as a replace- 
ment. The Eagles trailed 10-7 until Kevin Clemente in- 
tercepted a Syracuse pass. The game seemed to turn at this 
point as the Eagles overwhelmed the favored Syracuse 
team. Finally playing up to their potential, B.C. exploded 
to a 35-10 victory, handing coach Joe Yukica his second 
straight winning season. 












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The Season 




BC 




FOES 


21 


NAVY 


14 


28 


TULANE 


24 


6 


VILLANOVA 


24 


7 


ARMY 


38 


16 


PENN STATE 


38 


21 


BUFFALO 


35 


49 


VMI 


32 


35 


UMASS 


30 


35 


SYRACUSE 


10 




Coach Joe Yukica has had two successive winning seasons. 



187 




Soccer 

Now in its third year as a varsity sport, the soccer team 
posted a 5-4-3 record, placing in the top ten in the New 
England Soccer League. After opening the season with 
successive losses to Tufts and UMass, the Eagles came on 
to defeat Holy Cross by a score of 3-2. With goalie Stan 
Wasowski injured, the Eagles fell to Assumption 4-1, but 
came back to defeat Stonehill and B.U. by scores of 3-1 
and 3-0. The victory over B.U. was especially gratifying, 
since it was B.U.'s only loss in the Greater Boston Inter- 
collegiate Soccer League. MIT stopped the Eagles' win- 
ning streak at two, but Alonso Villegas, a senior from Co- 
lombia, South America, scored three goals as the Eagles 
routed Providence 8-1. B.C. went on to tie Brandeis, 
Nichols, and Fordham, while upsetting the University of 
Rhode Island team 2-1. 

Alonso Villegas and captain Stan Wasowski, who 
posted a fine 2.00 average in the nets, will be lost through 
graduation, but a fine nucleus, led by high scorer Charlie 
Mundhenk, will return next year. Coach George Lang 
can look forward to more improvement in 1970. 




Captain Stan Wasowski 



188 




> # / 



\ 




189 





190 







GBISL 




FINAL STANDINGS 




BU 




4-1 


TUFTS 




3-2 


MIT 




2-2 


B.C. 




1-2-1 


BRANDEIS 




0-3-1 



191 




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192 




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Cross-Country 



Relying only on junior and sophomore runners this 
year, cross country at Boston College enjoyed its finest 
season in history. Its record was five wins and three de- 
feats, including the first victory ever over Northeastern 
and the defeat of a strong Holy Cross squad led by NCAA 
third place-finisher Art Dulong. The distance runners 
also defeated local rivals B.U., Tufts, and M.I.T., while 
losing to U.Mass., and U. Conn., and Springfield. In the 
seven-team Greater Boston Championships, the Eagles 
placed third behind the perennial winner Harvard. Soph- 
omore Jim Zabel finished sixth in this meet, over the five 
mile Franklin Park course. The two most dependable run- 
ners besides Zabel were Dick Mahoney and Jack lies, who 
each recorded first place finishes during the season. 
Coaches Gus Gilligan and Bill McNeil look forward to 
even more improvement from this young squad, based on 
the core of these 3 runners plus the hopeful return of in- 
jured Vin Catano and Charley Diehe. 




193 



Basketball 



In 1963, Bob Cousy took over the floundering B.C. 
basketball program with the intent of building a national 
power. Although he had one of the best guards in the 
country in John Austin, Cousv's initial year was ham- 
pered by an overall lack of height and depth. The result 
was a mediocre 10-11 season. But with more emphasis on 
recruiting plus the time needed to adjust to Cousy 's race- 
horse style of basketball, Boston College soon became a 
national basketball power, being invited to five post- 
season tournaments in five years. 

In the 1969-70 season, the cycle returned. Cousy left to 
coach the Royals, leaving first year man Chuck Daly with 
the problems of Cousy's initial year. Although the Eagles 
possessed an outstanding guard in Jim O'Brien and a 
solid nucleus in seniors Tom Veronneau and Pete Sol- 
lenne, the height and depth needed to win consistently 
were gone. Added to this problem was the early season 
loss of center Pete Schmidt and sharpshooter Bob Dukiet 
to illness and injury. As a result, the Eagles played in- 
consistent ball, the crowds dwindled to a die-hard core of 
courtside club members, and the team had its worst sea- 
son since 1963. 





194 




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B.C. opened the campaign by taking on cross-town 
rival Boston University in cramped Sargent's Gym, The 
problems of adjusting to Daly's style were evident as the 
Eagles could not mount a consistent attack, nor stop 
BU's Jimmy Hayes. As a result, B.C. wound up on the 
short end of a 76-70 score. 

The problems continued when B.C.' took on Fairfield 
in the home opener. The Eagles could not maintain an 
early ten point lead and ran out of gas in the late going. 
The Stags won 74-69. It was only the second time in six 
years that the Eagles lost two in a row. 

Hopes rose when the Eagles beat Canisius tor their first 
victory, an unesthetic 70-56 win. But it became evident 
that the Eagles could rrot put it all together; losses to U 
Conn and Penn State indicated the Eagle five was in for a 
rough season. B.C. stood 1-4 at the Christmas break and 
with the next five games on the road, optimism reached 
its nadir. 

The Eagles rebounded, however, showing the kind of 
ball they were capable of playing by defeating a tough 
Cornell five 78-60. By routing Lemoyne, B.C. had a two 
game winning streak heading into the Holiday Festival in 
New York's Madi.son Square Garden. 

B.C. was paired with nationally ranked Penn in the 
opening round. The Eagles gave the Quakers a good run 
until Penn's superior depth took over late in the game. In 
the con.solation round, B.C. surprised a good Manhattan 
team 91-67, but lost the battle for fifth place to Cincin- 
nati 85-70. One bright .spot for the Eagles, however, was 
the play of Jim O'Brien. By scoring 63 points and setting 
a new Festival record for a.ssists, O'Brien earned a spot on 
the all tournament team. 




Captain Tom Vcronncau liad an amazing .612fl()()r PCT for the first 19 
games. 



196 



Junior Fnink Fitzgerald was the team's second high scorer, av- 
] craging 15.5 through 19 games. 




Returning to New England competition, the Eagles 
took on the Friars of Providence. Although ranked as one 
of the best teams in New England, Providence could not 
shake the persistent Eagles. But a missed rebound after a 
Providence foul shot enabled the Friars to hold on to a 
65-62 win. 

At Roberts" Center, the Eagles were challenged by St. 
Joseph's in front of a regional TV audience. With junior 
Vin Costello leading the way with 15 points, B.C. was 
able to stay with the favored Philadelphians. Jim 
O'Brien's last second shot won the game 62-60. The 
Eagles stood 5-7 at exam break and the toughest part of 
the schedule was yet to be played. 

The extra layoff seemed to hurt the Eagles as they were 
trounced by a larger Villanova team in Philadelphia. The 
following week, the Eagles travelled to Detroit. Playing 



198 





"'"■"'ff III! 




perhaps their worst basketball of the season, the Eagles 
were beaten by a mediocre Detroit team 80-67. Tom Ver- 
onneau's 21 and Pete Sollenne's 20 points were not 
enough to overcome an overall shoddy team perform- 
ance. 

Throughout the early losses, one of the bright spots 
was the play of Jim O'Brien and the improvement of Vin 
Costello. Added to this were the contributions of Greg 
Sees and the steady play of Dennis Doble. The return of 
center Pete Schmidt added much needed strength to the 
bench. And the.se developments began to show results. 
Returning from the disastrous Detroit exhibition, the 
Eagles trounced the usually pesky Northeastern Huskies 
95-64. The offense was moving and the defense was be- 
ginning to jell. The stage was set for the clash with arch- 
rival Holy Cross. 



199 



Holy Cross cime into Roberts Center nited number 
one in New England. Vaunted as better shooters and hav- 
ing a great height advantage, the Crusaders were rated 
overwhelming favorites. B.C. refused to fold, however, 
and the most exciting game played at Roberts this year 
resulted. B.C. was leading by four points when an at- 
tempted slowdown failed and H.C. regained the lead. Jim 
O'Brien's 23 points were nor enough as his last second 
jumper rolled off the rim. The Crusaders held on to win 
-2--0. 

Yankee Conference leader UMass was the next foe to 
enter Roberts, with a chance to break a six game losing 
streak against B.C. The Eagles had to battle back from a 
15 point first half deficit, but behind Vin Costello's 23 
points, B.C. rallied to an 83-76 upset victory. Next the 
Eagles took on the always tough Fordham Rams in New 
York. Jim O'Brien's 29 points and a zone defense were 
the principals in a 71-68 Eagle win. 

Another pretender to the New England Champion- 
ship invaded Roberts is the University of Rhode Island 
Rams. Using their fast break, the Eagles rolled to an elev- 
en point half-time lead. Tom Veronneau hit nine for nine 
h-om the floor, Jim O'Brien riddled the Rams with steals, 
and the Eagles rolled to a 96-79 rout. By winning four of 
Ave. dreams ot an outside bid to the N.I.T. were revived. 






Vin C^ostcllo's conrribution w;is .in important clement in the 
team's late season successes. 




"What the hell's a Hoya?" 

The dreams were rudely smashed by a poor perform- 
ance against a mediocre Seton Hall. In one of their worst 
shooting performances of the season, the Eagles fell to a 
14 point deficit. The Eagles finally came to life in the late 
going, but after erasing the early deficit, the Eagles could 
not maintain the pressure. Seton Hall held on to preserve 
an 83-71 victory. 

In 1969, Georgetown forced the Eagles into overtime 
before succumbing. Highly regarded, the Hoyas came 
into Roberts with a 15-4 record looking for revenge. 
What they found was a 79-69 upset. With Frank Fitzger- 
ald's 18 points leading the way, the Eagles were ab'; to 
win going away. 

Although the season can only be rated as mediocre, ex- 
citing victories over tough competition were recorded. 
There is definite optimism for the future; B.C. is a young 
team, and with a solid nucleus returning plus help from a 
good freshman team, perhaps the cycle will repeat. See 
you in New York next March. 




Action under the boards against Rhode Island. 



202 





Junior guard Jim O'Brien .ivcr.igcd over 16 points us well ;is 8.3 assists 
per game. Here he drives through the Holy Cross defense. 



70 BOSTON UNIVERSITY 76 

69 FAIRFIELD 74 

70 CANISIUS 56 
72 CONNECTICUT 77 
63 PENN STATE 67 

78 CORNELL 60 
76 LEMOYNE 56 
65 PENNSYLVANIA $6 
91 MANHATTAN 64 
70 CINCINNATI 85 
62 PROVIDENCE 65 
62 ST. JOSEPH'S 60 
6S VILLANOVA 96 
80 DETROIT 67 

95 NORTHEASTERN 64 

70 HOLY CROSS 72 
S3 MASSACHUSETTS 76 

71 FORDHAM 68 

96 RHODE ISLAND 79 
83 SETON HALL 7! 

79 GEORGETOWN 69 

72 DUQUESNE 105 
86 HOLY CROSS 73 
65 ST. JOHNS 7! 



203 




204 





Wrestling 



The Boston College wrestling team had a less than im- 
pressive season, ending with a 4-8 record. This in no way 
takes away from the fine individual performances turned 
in by the seniors Larry McDade (captain) and Tony Mac- 
carini. Both these players distinguished themselves by 
having an undefeated record for the year and two and one 
losses respectively for their three years of varsity wrestling 
in dual matches. 

The future strength of the team lies within the fresh- 
man members who have shown the potential of becom- 
ing excellent grapplers for the B.C. wrestling team. 



205 





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Hockey 



The fight that lost the Beanpot. 




The Crimson Tide fails to break through the nets. 



207 



All-American center Tim Sheehy led an explosive 
Eagle ottensive attack in a hockey season in which an un- 
tested defense held the key to the accomplishments ot 
1970. 

Sheehy and senior Kevin Ahearn, the center ice cata- 
lysts who ranked one-two in the East point race all year 
long, paced a vaunted scoring machine which produced 
six goals a game. 

Paul Schilling, completing two and a half years at the 
Heights after transferring from West Point, and sopho- 
more sensation, Tom Mellor, converted to defense, added 
to a power play without equal in collegiate hockey. 

Behind the blue line where the Eagles had only Cap- 
tain John Sullivan returning, new personnel were called 
on to solidify an inexperienced defense. Junior Jim Bar- 
ton earned the starting netminding job, while Sully and 
Mellor formed the first defense to provide Coach 
"Snooks" Kelly with a superior starting sextet. 





"Get in there! 



208 




209 







and stay in there. 



Opening on the road against Providence, the Eagles 
held on for a thrilling overtime victory which keynoted 
what would become a most exciting and unpredictable 
season. 

The Eagles opened with six consecutive wins includ- 
ing two significant triumphs, 8-3 over Brown and 6-5 
over Harvard, at friendly McHugh Forum. Both Ivy 
League toes emerged as ECAC contenders. 

The holiday season followed the B.C. hockey fortunes 
to Madison Squard Garden in New York City, Denver, 
Colorado, and South Bend, Indiana. An opening round 
setback suffered at the hands of St. Lawrence in the ECAC 
Holiday Tournament prevented a Cornell-B.C. show- 
down. Defending NCAA champs, Denver, hosted B.C. 
in a two-game series and were hard-pressed for a sweep by 
the aggressive Eagles. Notre Dame and Boston College 
engaged in a homc-and-home series and the Eagles dealt 
the up-and-coming Irish a double defeat. 




Come to Papa. 





211 



Returning home, B.C. continued to maintain a 
second-seated position in the ECAC hockey race. 
McHugh Forum had its moments: Tim Sheehy surpassed 
John Cunniffs and Billy Daley's shared, all-time scoring 
mark against UNH as Kevin Ahearn won this with an- 
other of his four, game-winning goals. RPI came to town 
and a donnybrook ensued as penalties and fistfights 
erupted en masse. 

The Beanpot, Boston hockey's annual rite, culminated 
in a B.C.-B.U. final. Before 14,855 hockey-crazed specta- 
tors, the Terriers rallied from a 1-3 deficit to down the 
Eagles 5-4 and spoil a spectacular individual performance 
by busy Jim Barton. 



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212 





213 




214 




6 


PROVIDENCE 


5 


1 


PRINCETON 


3 


8 


BROWN 


3 


7 


NORTHEASTERN 


1 


6 


HARVARD 


5 


7 


NOTRE DAME 


3 


6 


ST. LAWRENCE 


7 


7 


R.P.I. 


1 


2 


DENVER 


6 


6 


DENVER 


7 


7 


NOTRE DAME 


4 


6 


NEW HAMPSHIRE 


5 


6 


YALE 


4 


5 


DARTMOUTH 


2 


4 


COLGATE 


1 


3 


BOSTON UNIVERSITY 


8 


5 


NORTHEASTERN 





13 


R.P.I. 


6 


4 


BOSTON UNIVERSITY 


5 


3 


CORNELL 


5 


5 


PROVIDENCE 


2 


5 


CLARKSON 


1 


2 


ST. LAWRENCE 


1 


1 


BOSTON UNIVERSITY 


8 


4 


ARMY 






February set in and the Eagles were up against the iron 
as thev journe\-ed north against Cornell. Clarkson, and St. 
Lawrence. At Lvnah Rink, where the undefeated Big Red 
are invulnerable, a super effort tailed to bring the prize. 
The following weekend a two-game trip to the Canadian 
border ended in similar fashion as Clarkson and St. Law- 
rence handed the visitors a double setback. 

Despite some fine efforts, notabh' in the Cornell and 
Clarkson games, the Eagles plummetted as February de- 
feats pushed them out of a high seeding in the post- 
.season ECAC playoffs. 



215 




Freshman Sports 

Although pubHcized very little, all the Frosh teams 
provided some exciting contests during the past season. 
Playing as the preliminary to the varsity games, the frosh 
provided the sparse crowds with a glimpse at the future of 
BC sports. 




216 





217 



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Orientation 



A freshman is a delicate creature. Thrust into the 
world of academe, he wanders aimlessly, untutored in the 
ways of the advanced and learned. But he does not de- 
spair. For beyond the grey horizon there lives the mighty 
rescuer of those who wander alone in the desert - Orien- 
tation. Orientation - the beast mightier than its masters, 
a creature able to surmount the greatest obstacles in its 
headlong pursuit of understanding -and acceptance. A 
many-welcome-headed-hydra, seldom relevant and spo- 
radically attended. Subsuming all before its path, mapped 
and mimeographed unto oblivion, it melds sports and 
masses and meetings and mixers and tours and people and 
faces and balloons and lectures and booze into a finely de- 
fined glob. Rolling relentlessly onward, the hot air it 
spews forth settles like a blanket on the sand, dispelled 
only in the end by gratuitous Gerta. 

Propaganda, enticement, involvement, exhaustion. 





1 

INFORMATION 




Are you sure you can't tell me where Bapst Library is?" 




"They'll never miss these! 




& 4 



"No, I don't thmk they really expect you to go to confession 
once a week." 



220 




Never compete with lunch hour at the Eagle's Nest. 




'Sorry about the rib cage!" 



221 



Nurses' Capping 

The flickering lights of the candles reflect the mixed 
emotions of the heart. The introductory stages are past. 
With the acceptance of the cap, you formally enter the 
world of the hospital and the responsibilities of your pro- 
fession. It is a moment of illusions and ideals. The illu- 
sions of a child looking into the magic world of medicine. 
The ideals of a girl taking the first step in her. progress 
toward a life of care and understanding. 

A step taken, but one scarcely understood. Expecta- 
tions give way to reality. The moment of wonder be- 
comes a moment of immersion, of long days in a hospital 
and long nights in a book. A process of learning is initiat- 
ed: a learning of self, of school, of life. The individual en- 
riched in a community acting together. 

A uniform and a cap. 

A candle and a prayer. 

A life and an involvement. 

With the spirit of an older sister 

I pass on to you the light of our school. 




222 






Bookstore 



What's a name? That which we call a bookstore by any 
other name would seem a farce. Prompt acquisition and 
efficient disbursement are the hallmarks of cheerful and 
considerate service. Deep discount pricing leads to all 
manner of ingenuity. Purchasers are quickly processed by 
a sympathetic and well trained staff, and the satisfied cus- 
tomer sallies forth well provisioned for the wars of aca- 
deme and the trials of life. 



I wonder if she'll fit under my coat with all those books. 



223 



Eagle's Nest . . . 




224 





And Lyons' Den 



A school day will begin early and end late. But the 
time between dawn and dusk is not all spent in the class- 
room or the library. The demand for variety is part of us 
all, and thus the Eagle's Nest and Lyons Den provide 
suitable outlets for these compulsions. While the cross- 
section of the inhabitants varies, the general tone remains 
the same as each offers a wide selection of diversions and 
sports. The only criteria for success is strategic posi- 
tioning, an art which has been refined to perfection by a 
hardy core of regulars. The intellectual climate is superb, 
a combination of good cards, local color, and good eyes. 
Rumor has it that food is also available. 



Ooh, it really does crawl 



225 




-iSiftPKut;.; 



Think it's been stolen - again? 




Like hell it'll tilt over! 




Commuting and Hitching 

A commuter: up and down innumerable steps. Spa- 
cious parking lots and well defined regulations. You 
enter the campus and redefine your life: son or daughter 
becomes student. The attempt to integrate without the 
complete sense of belonging — thin dividing lines and an 
existence in many ways richer for its diversity. 

A hitcher: the eternal hope and the continuing frustra- 
tion. Economy and speed if and when you are blessed by a 
pitying motorist. Constant uncertainty coupled with the 
risks of the road: dirty old men and dogmatic middle 
America. 



227 




Where's the "fickle finger of fate"? 



Vound in old SlJ-uur^ -WcK 




228 




On ^Campus 



The girls have arrived. "Dorms'" have become 
"Houses." The rules have vanished. Life in rhe shadows of 
Gasson towers - Meals and parties and parietals and sleep 
and noise and fun. A serious attempt to give new charac- 
ter to B.C. and new spirit to its residents. Transforming a 
concrete cube into a wonderland of life. 




229 



Off-Campus Residents 

South Street: the lower campus and then some. Physi- 
cally separate and often a primitive atmosphere. A strange 
sort of freedom which has in some ways been "integrat- 
ed" (enter the men) and some ways improved (exit Par- 
ker and Paine). A long way to the Heights, with uncer- 
tain buses and undependable services. Southwell and 
Greycliff: closer but no less removed. A community away 
from home yet not at school. A shadow world, inhabited 
by real people, with real trials and unlimited joys. 





230 





231 



Toward a Resident 
Community 

One defined the future in terms of town houses and 
towers, the present in Haley House and no money, New- 
ton animosity and administrative obstinacy. An overall 
sense of many backgrounds and many ideals, all moving 
toward a common goal: a community, a living, growing 
attempt to be alive and real. 




232 




Next piece - "The Alka-Seltzer Theme." 




." / 



233 




234 





Apartments 



Paper-thin walls and faulty plumbing. Bills that are 
never paid in the eyes of the creditor despite your can- 
celled checks. Neighbors who will never understand the 
noise and the worlds totally divorced from their own. A 
second-hand decor and a theme of confusion. Strain and 
indigestion and work. But the frustrations do not define 
the life. The rules are your own and the social life is free 
and spontaneous. Available space and wall-to-wall people. 
Living together on a shoestring and loving every minute 
of your self-sufficient chaos. 



Quiet, they'll never know I picked it off the floor. 



235 



Classes 



Give and take. The perspectives of authority and in- 
quiry molded into an experience defined by lectures and 
books and discussions. Calenders that are never finished 
and assignments that are never done. Three months of 
fun and one week of cram. An elaborate con game which 
somehow manages to result in a new understanding and a 
deeper commitment. On an objective scale success or fail- 
ure measured in terms of letters and numbers. In the real 
world, an experience that informs the mind and expands 
the person. 




I'm pretty sure the match has to be lit for the burner to start. 




236 




CBA Honors Seminar 




Dear Mother Superior, I'm flunking % ot PS 144 'Sex, Love and Marriage.' 



237 





Bless me. Father, for I must sin - to pass this test. 




238 




239 



Libraries 

Like our entrenched long-term professors, Bapst 
showed the most suffering from change at Boston Col- 
lege. McQuinn was born in modernity; Devlin and Cam- 
pion renovated with pastels and sleek new lines. Manage- 
ment offered the refreshing solitude of wide open spaces 
and Cushing dared to exist as a showpiece for the intel- 
lectually concerned. 

In this hectic world that is BC, these libraries provide a 
refuge and a hope. Within them, the inquisitive mind is 
able to shed light on the problems which it must daily 
confront in the course of academic development. As such, 
they are a meaningful component of the excitement and 
struggle that is learning. 





240 




241 




"Yea - anybody!" 




242 





Dating 



The individual is never defined in himself, but rather 
from a richness of life made meaningful by other people. 
An experience touches the soul and is given depth in the 
process of sharing it with another. The forms are varied: 
to call, to dance, to walk, to study. The content however 
is always the same: communication, understanding, feel- 
ing. A bittersweet expansion of life which frustrates and 
fulfills. Not always working the way you would wish: 
pleasure and pain. Valuable because it has happened here 
and now and together. 



The Kiss of Peace 



243 




244 



Zhe Rhythm of Cife 

Zhe heartbeat adjusts itself to the pulsing throb of the 
drums. Shadow forms gyrate oh the floor, responding only to 
the innermost demands of an uninhibited libido. 




245 



Intramurals 



For the briefest of moments, the ambitions harbored in 
the deepest part of the heart are realized. Skills suspected 
but never exhibited are given free exercise in a competi- 
tion every bit as serious as that of the professional athlete. 
What is in reality a spastic move or a bit of luck is trans- 
formed into a piece of precision and beauty. Random var- 
iables become exploits worthy of the greatest price. The 
whistle blows and reality returns. 






247 




Green Ins 



A community grows around a park or common or 
green. It is a center of life and a reflection of the institu- 
tion. Its activities are as varied as its population, its char- 
acter an ever changing pattern of people coming and 
going. Just as a central ideal gives direction and character 
to a person, a campus expression and substance to a uni- 
versity. It is ebb and flow, growth and function. Its varie- 
ty is the variety of its people, its faults and virtues a prod- 
uct of their hopes and fears. Above all, an art of love. 




For here, men are men 



248 




k 



The show-off! 



fRU 






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^ '•^ 




249 




M. 







"•^ «K^'^ 



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r^ 




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H 


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m 


m^^^^MMt M^^^^^^^^^^m^^^^KU 


I. 




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iJ 


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naSx«i 



u;>' 









Seniors 





ARTHUR A. ABBOTT 


RALPH F. ABBOTT 


CHRISTOPHER ABELL 


STEPHEN J. ACKERMAN 


Arts & Sciences 


Arts & Sciences 


Arts & Sciences 


Arts & Sciences 


A.B. Mathematics 


A.B. History 


A.B. History 


A.B. English 




"Who needs Parietals.''' 



SUELLEN M. ADERHOLDT 
School of Nursing 
B.S. Nursing 



252 




JOSEPH F. AGRESTA 
School of Management 
B.S. Marketing 



KEVIN J. AHEARN 
School of Management 
B.S. Marketing 



STEPHEN H. AHERN 
Arts & Sciences 
A.B. History 



JANE M. ALBANO 
School of Education 
A.B. Elementary Education 




ROBERT A. ALESSI 
Evening College 
A.B. Social Science 



ADELINE M. ALEX 

School of Education 

A.B. Elementary Education 



VICTOR J. ALIBRANDI 
School of Management 
B.S. Finance 



DOROTHY D. ALLEN 
School of Nursing 
B.S. Nursing 




ARNOLD E. AMIRAULT 


ROBERT M. AMODIO 


STEPHEN D. AMOROSO 


THEODORE L ANDERSON 


School of Education 


Arts & Sciences 


Arts & Sciences 


School of Management 


A.B. English 


A.B. Economics 


A.B. English 


B.S, Economics 



253 




LAWRENCE J. ANDOLINA 
Arts & Sciences 
A.B. Hisrorv 



MICHAEL D. ANGELICOLA 
Arts & Sciences 
B.S. Biology 



BRUCE E ANSELMO 
School of Management 
•B.S. Finance 



WALTER J. APPLETON 
School of Management 
B.S. Accounting 



ROBERT E. ASPELL 
Evening College 
B.S. General Business 



JEAN A. AUCOIN 
School of Management 
B.S. Management 




CARL P. ANTIGNANI 
Arts & Sciences 
A.B. Philosophy 




HELEN L. BABCOCK 
Evening College 
A.B. Social Science 




l^mk^ik 



JOAN E. BAHER 
School of Nursing 
B.S. Nursing 



RICHARD J. BAIR 

Arts & Sciences 

A.B. Mathematics, Economics 



JOHN N. BALBONI 
School of Management 
B.S. Finance 



LOUIS E BALDI 
Arts & Sciences 
A.B. Economics 



254 




"Is this course really a gut?'' 




TERRANCE E. BALE 
School of Management 
B.S. Finance 



TERRENCE BANE 
School of Education 
A.B. English 




AiMM 



PAUL T. BANKS 
Arts & Sciences 
B.S. Geology 



RONALD D. BARG 

Evening College 
B.S. Accounting 




WALTER J. BARONOWSKI 


PAUL BARREIRA, S.J. 


JEAN E. BARRETT 


CHARLES J. BARRY 


Arts & Sciences 


School of Philosophy 


Evening College 


Arts & Sciences 


A.B. Economics 


A.B. Philosophy 


A.B. Social Science 


A.B. Political Science 



255 




^ ^ f*, <i-f 1 




m^m^ 



DENNIS R. BARTON 
Arts & Sciences 
A.B. Sociology 



WILLIAM C. BARTON 
Arts & Sciences 
A.B. Political Science 



TIMOTHY F. BARRY 
School of Management 
B.S. Finance 



RALPH S. BARTHOLOMEW 
School of Management 
B.S. Accounting 




The Breakfast of Champions 
256 




m^ *1 



THOMAS S. BATES 
School of Management 
B.S. Accounting 



CARL F BATTAGLIA 
Arts & Sciences 
A.B. English 




GERARD F BATTISTA 
School of Management 
B.S. Marketing 



MARGARET M. BEAN 

School of Education 

A.B. Elementary Education 




#1^44 




RAYMOND C. BEATTIE 
School of Management 
B.S. Marketing 



CAROLYN K. BEDELL 
School of Nuising 
B.S. Nuising 



MICHAEL B BELDEN 

Afts & Sciences 
A.B. English 



OLIVER F, BEAUCHEMIN 
Arts & Sciences 
A.B. Mod. Languages 




BERNARD E. BECKER 
School of Management 
B.S. Finance 



PAUL BEDROSIAN 

School of Managemen 
B.S. Marketing 



JOAN MARIE BEHENNA 

School of Nursing 
B.S. Nursing 



ROBERT BENCH 

Arts & Sciences 
A.B. History 



CHARLES R. BENNETT 
Arts & Sciences 
A.B. Economics 



ANGELE BEDARD 
School of Nursing 
B.S. Nursing 




ANTHONY O. BEIRNE 
Arts & Sciences 
A.B. English 




DONALD P. BENSON 
Arts & Sciences 
A.B. Mathematics 



257 




DAVID D. BERGAN 
School of Management 
B.S. Accounting 



DENNIS J. BERRY 
Arts & Sciences 
A.B. Political Science 



MICHAEL L. BICKFORD 
School of Management 
B.S. Marketing 



DENNIS R. BLAHA 
Arts & Sciences 
B.S. Biology 



DONALD R. BLANCHARD 
School of Education 
A.B. French 



BRUCE B. BLANGIARDI 
School of Management 
B.S. Accounting 







ROBERT D. BLUTE 


LOUIS BOCCHETTO 


PAUL J. BOCHICCHIO 


Arts & Sciences 


School of Management 


Arts & Sciences 


B.S. Biology 


B.S. Accounting 


A.B. History 



DEBORAH E. BIGHAM 

School of Education 

A.B. Elementary Education 




VERONICA M. BLEAKLEY 
School of Nursing 
B.S. Nursing 




STANLEY M. BOCKO 
School of Management 
B.S. Marketing 



258 




MARK BOHAN 

Arts & Sciences 
A.B. Economics 



"Shall we take the next step? 





^kmh 



JAMES C BOKAL 


PATRICK R, BOLAND 


WILLIAM T. BOLAND 


JOSEPH W. BOND! 


School of Management 


Arts & Sciences 


School of Management 


Arts & Sciences 


B.S. Economics 


A.B. English 


B.S. Management 


A.B. Economics 



259 




RICHARD A. BONDI 


JAMES P. BONGARRA 


JOHN A. BONNAGE, SJ. 


ROBERT A BORUCKI 


Arts & Sciences 


Arts & Sciences 


School of Philosophy 


Arts & Sciences 


A.B. Philosophy 


A.B. Psychology 


A.B. Philosophy, German 


A.B. History 




ROBERT J. BOUCHARD 


PAUL BOUDREAU 


MICHAEL G. BOUGHTON 


ROBERT L. BOULEY 


Arts & Sciences 


School of Management 


Arts & Sciences 


Arts & Sciences 


A.B. Mod. Languages 


B.S. Marketing 


A.B. English 


A.B. Economics 




SUZANNE M. BOYLE 
School of Nursing 
B.S. Nursing 



'I was in good wit da mob 'til dey asked me to be a get-away driver!" 



260 




J. DEAN BRACKLEY, SJ. 

School of Philosophy 

A.B. Philosophy, Mathematics 



MARK W. BRADLEE 
School of Management 
B.S. Management 



JOAN M. BRADLEY 
School of Education 
A.B. Russian 



dA^ 



TIMOTHY C. BRADLEY 

School of Management 
B.S. Finance 




MARY L, BRADY 


JAMES J. BRANSFIELD 


CAROLYN A. BREGAR 


JAMES F. BRENNAN 


School of Education 


School of Management 


School of Nursing 


Arts & Sciences 


A.B. Special Education 


B.S. Accounting 


B.S. Nursing 


B.S. Biology 




PHILIP M. BRENNAN 


ALFRED A. BRIAND 


JEFFREY A. BRINE 


JOSEPH J. BRITT, JR. 


Arts & Sciences 


Arts & Sciences 


School of Management 


Arts & Sciences 


A.B. English 


A.B. Psychology 


B.S. Finance 


A.B. History 



261 




PAULA M. BROCK 
School of Education 
A.B. English 



PAUL R. BRODER 
School of Education 
A.B. English 



STEPHEN E. BRODEUR 

Arts & Sciences 
A.B. History 



WILLIAM G. BRODY 
Arts & Sciences 
A.B. Political Science 




Evening College 
B.S. General Business 



JOHN E BRONZO 

Arts & Sciences 
A.B. Political Science 



STEPHEN J. BROGAN 
Arts & Sciences 
A.B. Mathematics 



CHARLES C. BROWN 
Arts & Sciences 
A.B. Economics 



THEODORE P. BROGOWSKI 
School of Management 
B.S. Accounting 




STEPHEN L. BRYANT 
School of Management 
B.S. Accounting 



ANTHONY S. BRYK 
Arts & Sciences 
B.S. Chemistry 



KENNETH J. BROWN, JR. 
Arts & Sciences 
B.S. Biology 



262 




DONNA J. BUCKNAM 

School of Education 

A.B. Elementary Education 



LEO J. BULGER, S.J. 
School of Philosophy 
A.B. Philosophy, English 



MITCHELL J. BUREK 
School of Education 
A.B, Mathematics 



ROBERT L. BURKE 
Arts & Sciences 
B.S. Biology 



263 




FRANCIS X. BURNES 
School of Management 
B.S. Accounting 



JOHN R. BURNETT 
School of Management 
B.S. Matketine 



MARGARET BURRASCANO 

School of Nursing 
B.S. Nursing 



CARL J. BUSCH 

School of Management 
B.S. Finance 





MARY E. BUTLER 
School of Education 
A.B. Elementary Education 




DANIEL F CAHILL 

Arts Sc Sciences 
A.B, English 



All dressed up and nowhere to go. 



264 




MARY F. CAHILL 


THOMAS F. CAHILL 


JUDITH A. CAIN 


WILLIAM P. CAIN, S.J. 


School of Nursing 


Arts & Sciences 


School of Education 


School of Philosophy 


B.S. Nursing 


B.S. Biology 


A.B. Elementary Education 


A.B. Philosophy 




BARBARA M. CALLAHAN 


MADELINE T. CALLAHAN 


NEIL CALLAHAN, SJ. 


ROBERT D. CALLAHAN 


Evening College 


Evening College 


School of Philosophy 


Arts & Sciences 


A.B. Social Science 


A.B. Social Science 


A.B. French, Philosophy 


A.B. English 




THOMAS B. CALLAHAN 


BRIAN A. CALLERY 


JOANNE M. CALNAN 


GERALD F. CAMBRIA 


School of Management 


School of Management 


School of Education 


Arts & Sciences 


B.S. Economics 


B.S. Marketing 


A.B. Mathematics 


A.B. English 



265 




Tf 



l^h£m 




THOMAS J. CAMBRIA 


DAVID J. CANEPARI 


JOSEPH E. CANTILLON 


DAVID G. CAPONIGRO 


Arts & Sciences 


Arts & Sciences 


Arts & Sciences 


School of Management 


A.B. English 


A.B. Political Science 


A.B. Psychology 


B.S. Accounting 




"Give me a 'C'!" 
"Give me an 'H'! 
"Give me an 'R' 




FRANK J. CARBONE 
Arts & Sciences 
A.B. English 




MARCIA CAREY 

School of Education 

A.B. Elementary Education 



PAMELA J. CARLETON 
School of Nursing 
B.S. Nursing 



266 




CHARLOTTE A. CARR 
School of Education 
A.B. Special Education 



LENORA J, CARUSO 

School of Education 

A.B. Elementary Education 



JAMES J. CARR 
School of Management 
B.S. Management 



JOHN E. CARROLL 
Arts & Sciences 
B.S. Biology 






itf'l 



EDA M. CARLSON 


PATRICIA L CARNEY 


PATRICK CARNEY 


GEORGE W. CARPENTER 


School of Nursing 


School of Education 


Arts & Sciences 


Evening College 


B.S. Nursing 


A.B. Elementary Education 


A.B. Political Science 


A.B. Social Science 




^tlAti 



LAWRENCE P. CASILINO 
Arts & Sciences 
A.B. Political Science 



LOUIS A. CASCIELLO 
Arts & Sciences 
A.B. History 



i 


J 


11 


r 


j 


i 




1 


^^ 


Da, 


A:^ 


WrA . 



NANCY B. CARROLL 
School of Education 
A.B. Special Education 




JAMES A. CASELLA 
Arts & Sciences 
A.B. Policical Science 



267 



'I will keep them under control 




268 



Student 
Teachers 




Spill it on my sport coat and you flunk. 




DALE F. CASEY 
School of Management 
B.S. Marketing 



MARGARET A. CASEY 
School of Education 
A.B. Special Education 



tf^4<^ 



PAUL W. CASEY 
School of Management 
B.S. Accounting 



WILLIAM C. CASH 
Arts & Sciences 
A.B. History 




DANIEL R. CASO 
School of Management 
B.S. Accounting 



A. PETER CASTOLDI 
School of Management 
B.S. Finance 



CYNTHIA C. CASSIDY 
School of Nursing 
B.S. Nursing 



GERALYN M. CASSIDY 

School of Education 

A.B. Elementary Education 



MICHAEL D. CASSIDY 
Arts & Sciences 
A.B. Economics 




FREDERIC G. CATALANO 
School of Management 
B.S. Accounting 



JOHN S. CATALANO 
School of Management 
B.S. Marketing 



ANTHONY H. CATALDO, S.J. 
School of Philosophy 
A.B. Philosophy 



270 




lifi^l^ 



NORMAN G CAVALLARO 
School of Management 
B.S. Accounting 




JOSEPH J. CELLA III 
School of Management 
B.S. Accounting 






MARY ANN 



ARGEO P. CELLUCCI 
School of Management 
B.S. Accounting 






PAUL A. CENTOFANTI 
School of Education 
A.B. French 




SUSAN J. CERCE 
School of Education 
A.B. French 



MARK R. CHAFFEE 
School of Education 
A.B. Mathematics 



271 




"I think they smell fine; 





MARY ANNE C CHARDO 

School of Education 

A.B. Elementary Education 




RICHARD CHARLAND 

School of Management 
B.S. Economics 



^i^ ^ 




JENNIE CHIN 


PETER M. CIANFROCCA 


FRANK J. CIANO 


MARY E. CIOFFREDI 


School of Nursing 


School of Management 


School of Management 


School of Education 


B.S. Nursing 


B.S. Marketing 


B.S. Economics 


A.B. History 



272 








WALTER H. CIOVACCO 
School of Management 
B.S. Marketing 



MARIE CIPOLLA 
School of Education 
A.B. Elementary Education 



JAMES F. CLARK 
Arts & Sciences 
A.B. History 



JOHN J. CLARK 

Arts & Sciences 
B.S. Chemistry 




RICHARD F. CLARKE 

Arts & Sciences 
B.S. Biology 



SHEILA J. CLIFFORD 

School of Education 

A.B. Elementary Education 



PATRICIA ANN CLOONAN 
School of Nursing 
B.S. Nursing 



ROBERT W. COCHRANE 
Arts & Sciences 
A.B. Mathematics 




PHILIP A. CODY 
School of Management 
B.S. Marketing 



JEAN M. COLEMAN 
School of Nursing 
B.S. Nursing 



JAMES H, COLLINS 
Arts & Sciences 
B.S. Biology 



JENNIFER A. COLTON 
School of Nursing 
B.S. Nursing 



273 




JEFFREY J. COLUCCI 
Arts & Sciences 
A.B. English 



GENE W. COMELLA 
School of Management 
B.S. Management 



MARYANNE E. COMPO 

School of Education 

A.B. Elementary Education 



GERARD A. CONCANNON 
School of Education 
A.B. English 




WINIFRED CONNELLY 

School of Education 

A.B. Elementary Education 



GERALD J. CONNOLLY 
School of Management 
B.S. Accounting 



JOSEPH F. CONNOLLY 
Evening College 
B.S. Accounting 



PAUL M. CONNOLLY 
Arts & Sciences 
A.B. English 




JAMES M. CONNOR 
School of Management 
B.S. Finance 



ROBERT P. CONNOR 
School of Management 
B.S. Accounting 



STEPHEN M. CONSOLATTI 
Arts & Sciences 
A.B. Mathematics 



WILLIAM A. CONTI 
Arts & Sciences 
A.B. Political Science 



274 




JOAN M. CONVERY 
School of Education 
A.B. Speech 



GREGORY A. COOGAN 
School of Management 
B.S. Economics 



KEVIN COOPER 
Arts & Sciences 
B.S. Biology 



ANTHONY A. COPANI 
School of Management 
B.S. Economics 




JOSEPH P. COPPOLA 
School of Management 
B.S. Quantitative Management 



DIANE M. CORCORAN 
School of Education 
A.B. French 



ANN L. CONARO 
School of Education 
A.B. History 



RICHARD M, COSTA 

School of Management 
B.S. Economics 




FREDERICK COSTELLO 
School of Management 
B.S. General Business 



275 




MARY M. COTE 


SUSAN D. COTTER 


BRIAN L COUGHLIN 


THOMAS E. COURAIN 


School of Education 


School of Nursing 


School of Management 


School of Management 


A.B. Elementan' Education 


B.S. Nursing 


B.S. Marketing 


B.S. Accounting 




SANDRA COURTNEY 

School of Education 

A.B. Elementary Education 



ROBERT C. COVIELLO 

School of Education 
A.B. Speech 



CAROL A. COX 

School of Education 

A.B. Elementary Education 



DAVID J. COYLE 

School of Management 
B.S. Marketing 




JANE L. COYNE 
School of Nursing 
B.S. Nursing 



WILLIAM F. COYNE 
School of Management 
B.S. Finance 



JAMES R. CREAMER 
Arts & Sciences 
A.B. English 



PAUL J. CREEDEN 
Arts & Sciences 
B.S. Biology 



276 




JAMES F. CREHAN 
School of Management 
B.S. Finance 



JOSEPH J, CROAK 


PAUL J. CRONIN 


WILLIAM J. CRONIN 


School of Management 


Arts & Sciences 


Arts & Sciences 


B.S. Management 


A.B. History 


A.B. Mathematics 




JAMES J. CROWLEY 
School of Management 
B.S. Accounting 



277 




JOHN CURLEY 
Arts & Sciences 
A.B. English 



JOHN K. CURRAN 
School of Management 
B.S. Marketing 



MARYELLEN CURRAN 
School of Education 
A.B. Biology 



MICHAEL CURRAN 
School of Education 
A.B. Speech 



278 




it^ 



WILLIAM H. CURRAN 
School of Education 
A.B. Biology 





4ujt 



■ii A^H 



ROBERT P. D'ADDARIO 
School ot Man;igement 
B.S. Economics 



JOHN W. DAILY 
Arts & Sciences 
A.B. Economics 



STEPHEN H. CURRIER 
Arts & Sciences 
A.B. Sociology 




STEVEN A. DALY 

Arts & Sciences 

A.B. Economics, Theology 



MICHAEL P. D'AMBROSIO 

Arts & Sciences 

A.B. English, Mod. Languages 



JAMES M. DALY 
Evening College 
B.S. General Business 



JOSEPH M. DALY 

Arts & Sciences 
A.B. Economics 



279 




PAUL H. DAMOND 
Arts & Sciences 
A.B. English 



PAUL R. DAOUST 
Arts & Sciences 
A.B. Mathematics 



JAMES B. DARCY 
School of Management 
B.S. Accounting 



JOHN R. DAVIS 

Arts & Sciences 
A.B. Political Science 




MONDELL DAVIS 
Arts & Sciences 
B.S. Chemistry 



RICHARD J. DAVIS 
School of Management 
B.S. Accounting 



VERONICA J. DAVIS 
School of Nursing 
B.S. Nursing 



JOSEPH M. DAYS 
Arts & Sciences 
A.B. Economics 




GERARD M. DECELLES 


FRANCIS J. DeGEORGE 


HENRY A. DECOTIS 


CATHERINE R. DELANY 


School of Management 


School of Education 


Arts & Sciences 


School of Nursing 


B.S. Accounting 


A.B. Mathematics 


A.B. Political Science 


B.S. Nursing 



280 




iik «^ A A 



JOHN E. BELONG 
School of Management 
B.S. Finance 



GAETANO J. DELUCA 
School of Management 
B.S. Marketing 



ALAN J. DEMERS 
Arts & Sciences 
B.S. Physics 



DENNIS J. DEMPSEY 
Arts & Sciences 
A.B. English 



281 




LOUIS D. DiCARLO 
Arts & Sciences 
B.S. Biology 



SAMUEL X. DiFEO 
School of Management 
B.S. Finance 



'I was just Straightening out your drawers.' 




^K^i^ 



GILBERT F. DILLON, JR. 
School of Management 
B.S. Accounting 



JOSEPH A. DiMATTINA 
Arts & Sciences 
A.B. Psychology 



PAUL A. DiFRANZA 
Arts & Sciences 
A.B. English 



JOHN J. DIGIORGIO 
Arts & Sciences 
A.B. Psychology 



282 




CLAIRE R. DIONNE 
School of Education 
A.B. Mathematics 




PETER S. DiPAOLA 
Arts & Sciences 
A B. History 




MICHAEL J. DIXSON 
Arts & Sciences 
A.B. English 



JANICE L. DOHERTY 
School of Education 
A.B. English 



DENNIS S. DOBLE 
School of Education 
A.B. Mathematics 







> 



\J 



Wi 



RUSSELL E. DOHERTY 
Arts & Sciences 
A.B. Economics 



DANIEL L. DISCENZA 
Arts & Sciences 
A.B. Mathematics 



JEROME P. DOBLE III 

Arts & Sciences 
A.B. Political Science 



WILLIAM P. DiVITTO 
Arts & Sciences 
A.B. Political Science 




ELEANOR M. DOHERTY 

School of Education 

A.B. Elementary Education 




ROBERT J DOHERTY 

School of Management 

B.S. Quantitative Management 



KEVIN B. DOLE 

Arts & Sciences 
B.S. Biology 



283 




LOUIS A D'ONOFRIO 
Arts & Sciences 
A.B. Economics 



"Baby, Dream Your Dream" 




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ANNE E. DONLAN 
School of Education 
A.B. English 



ElAINE M. DONOVAN 
Evening College 
A.B. English 



FRANCIS F. DONOVAN 
School of Management 
B.S. Accounting 



MARYANN S. DONOVAN 
School of Nursing 
B.S. Nursing 



284 




ROBERT J. DONOVAN 
School of Management 
B.S. Finance 



WILLIAM A. DONOVAN 
Arts & Sciences 
A.B. Sociology 



DANIEL E. DOOLEY 

Arts & Sciences 

A.B. Modern Languages 



STEPHEN R. DOOLEY 
Arts & Sciences 
A.B. Economics 




DANIEL E DORAN III 

School of Management 
B.S. Finance 



BARBARA J DOUGLAS 
School of Education 
A.B. Special Education 



JOHN J. DOWD 
Arts & Sciences 
A.B. English 



JEFFREY E. DOWLING 
Arts & Sciences 
A.B. History 




JAMES G. DOWNEY 


FRANCIS A. DOYLE III 






School of Management 
B.S. Marketing 


School of Management 
B.S. Finance 


GREGORY P. DOYLE 

School of Management 
B.S. Marketing 


MICHAEL J. DRISCOLL 
School of Education 
A.B. History 



285 



Scholars of 
the College 

The Scholars: a pangeric tragedy in no acts 

Scene: Gasson Rotunda 
Time: The Future 

Argument: The deities gather to proclaim their truths. 
Projects stretched over long and tedious hours have 
reached fruition. The world lies eagerly at their feet, ready 
to receive axiomatic dogma and quintessential insight. A 
new day dawns, the hopes of humanity have been ful- 
filled. 

The Cast: J. Dean Brackley, S.J. 

C. Cecil Brown, Jr. 
A. Tony Bryk 

W. Bill Cash 

aldemers 

F. Frank Dubreuil 

J. P. Dobel III 

D. Dan Hurley 
F. Fred Heimann 

E. Louis Selgrade 




'I like not having classes, but I wish I had sonu 



play with. 




286 




'I wish I could burp.' 





PETER DRISCOLL 
School of Management 
B.S. Accounting 



MELANIE H. DROSDOWSKI 
School of Education 
A.B. Mathematics 



FRANCIS W. DUBREUIL 
Arts & Sciences 
A.B. Economics 



WILLIAM H. DUFF 
School of Management 
B.S. Accounting 




ROBERT K. DUKIET 
School of Management 
B.S. Finance 



WILLIAM J. DULLEA 
School of Management 
B.S. Economics 




JOHN P. DUNPHY 
Arts & Sciences 
A.B. Economics 



THOMAS C. DUNNE 
Arts & Sciences 
B.S. Biology 






JANET B. DUPONT 
School of Nursing 
B.S. Nursing 



JOSEPH P. DWAILEEBE 
Arts & Sciences 
A.B. Mod. Languages 




MICHAEL J. DWYER, SJ. 
School of Philosophy 
A.B. Philosophy, Biology 



THOMAS E. DWYER 

Arts & Sciences 
A.B. English 



288 




VINCENT H. EAGLES 


WILLIAM C. EASTMAN 


THOMAS J. EATON 


MARY E. EDWARDS 


Arts & Sciences 


Arts & Sciences 


School of Management 


School of Nursing 


A.B. History 


A.B. English 


B.S. Accounting 


B.S. Nursing 




MARY L. EGAN 

School of Education 

A.B. Elementary Education 



PETER A. EHRLICH 
School of Management 
B.S. Management 



HENRY E. ELLIS 

Arts & Sciences 

A.B. Psychology, Philosophy 



JANE M. EMERSON 
School of Nursing 
B.S. Nursing 





MICHAEL P. ENRIGHT 
School of Management 
B.S. Management 



289 




DIANNA D. ESTRELLA 
School of Education 
A.B. History ' 







i^^^ 


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. • • ^- ' 




,A . y^'. ■■■}♦■. • 


' 



Dear Algernon, the rabbit died. 




THOMAS J. ESPOSITO 


MICHAEL P. ESTWANIK 


MICHAEL J. ETTERS 


GEOFFREY D. FALLON 


Arts & Sciences 


Arts & Sciences 


School of Management 


Arts & Sciences 


A.B. Psychology 


A.B. Psychology 


B.S. Management 


A.B. Philosophy 



290 




FRANK R. FANTASIA 
School of Management 
B.S. Marketing 



JOHN F. FARRELL 
Arts & Sciences 
A.B. Political Science 



JANET E. FARINA 
School of Education 
A.B, English 



JOSEPH T. FARRELL 
Arts & Sciences 
A.B. Political Science 



EILEEN M. FARRELL 
School of Nursing 
B.S. Nursing 



KATHLEEN FARRELL 
School of Education 
A.B. Speech 







JOAN A. FARRELL 
School ot Nursing 
B.S. Nursine 




SUSAN M. FAULKNER 

School of Education 

A.B. Elementary Education 




JAMES FEED 


MARTIN FEENY 


MICHAEL W. FENLON 


SALVATORE FERRAIOLI 


Arts & Sciences 


School of Education 


School of Management 


Arts & Sciences 


A.B. Classics 


A.B. Speech 


B.S. Economics 


A.B. English 



291 




WILLIAM J. FIDLER 
Arts & Sciences 
A.B. Mathematics 



DANIEL T. FIELD 
Arts & Sciences 
A.B. English 



RAYMOND F. FIGLEWSKI 
Arts & Sciences 
A.B, Mathematics 



THEODORE L. FILTEAU 
Arts & Sciences 
A.B. History 




NANCY J. FINN 
School of Education 
A.B. Mathematics 




fell^ 



JOHN A. FINNIGAN, JR. 

Evening College 

B.S. Management, Production 



ROBERT D. FIORENTINO 
Arts & Sciences 
A.B. Economics 



WILLIAM X. FISCHER 
Arts & Sciences 
A.B. English 




BERNARD L FITZGERALD 

Arts & Sciences 
A.B. Sociology 



BRIANNE R, FITZGERALD 
School of Nursing 
B.S. Nursing 



DANIEL P. FITZGERALD 

School of Education 
A.B. Mathematics 



JOHN R FITZGERALD 

School of Management 
B.S. Management 



292 




"To hell with the Asian flu!" 




JOSEPH S. FITZPATRICK 
Arts & Sciences 
A.B. Political Science 



MARK D. FITZPATRICK 
School of Management 
B.S. Marketing 



MAUREEN J. FITZPATRICK 
School of Education 
A.B. History 



ELLEN C. FLAHERTY 
School of Education 
A.B. Special Education 




JOHN J. FLAHERTY 
School of Management 
B.S. Management 



JAMES D. FLAHERTY 
Arts & Sciences 
A.B. Mathematics 



RICHARD C. FLAHERTY 
Arts & Sciences 
B.S. Biology 



ROBERT FLAJOLE 
School of Management 
B.S. Accounting 



293 




DAVID B. FLINT 
Arts & Sciences 
A.B. Psychology 



"I came back 




CHERYL A. FLOODSTROM 

School of Education 

A.B. Elementary Education 



ARTHUR E. FLYNN 
School of Management 
B.S. Accounting 



KEVIN R. FLYNN 
School of Management 
B.S, Accounting 



MARY L. FLYNN 
School of Nursing 
B.S. Nursing 



294 




MARK N. FOHLIN 
Evening College 
B.S. General Business 



WILLIAM S. FOGARTY 
Arts & Sciences 
A.B. Economics 



PAUL J. FLYNN 
School of Management 
B.S. Finance 



ROBERT H. FLYNN 
Arts & Sciences 
A.B. History 




ir^HE 




MICHAEL J. FORSYTHE 
Arts & Sciences 
B.S. Biology 



MALCOLM W. FOSTER 
Arts & Sciences 
A.B. Mathematics 



NORMAN E. FORGET, JR. 

Evening College 

B.S. Management-Production 



LOUISE M. FONTAINE 

SchcKil of Nursing 
B.S. Nursing 





ia^ 




RAYMOND R. FRAGNOLI 
Arts & Sciences 
A.B, History 



PAUL J. FRAIOLI 
School of Management 
B.S. Marketing 



CHARLES F FOWLER 

Evening College 

B.S. Management-Production 



ARTHUR G. FOX 
Arts & Sciences 
B.S. Biology 



295 




s«ia 




BRIAN J. FRANCIS 
School of Management 
B.S. Finance 



JEAN M. FRATTA 
School of Education 
A.B. Spanish 



DANIEL E. FRECHETTE 
Arts & Sciences 
A.B. English 



DAVID S. FREDERICK 
School of Management 
B.S. Accounting 




JEANNE G. FREEMAN 


BARBARA ANNE FRISOLI 


MARIA FRUGGIERO 


ALBERT J. FUCILLO 


School of Education 


School of Education 


School of Education 


School of Education 


A.B. English 


A.B. Elementary Education 


A.B. Elementary Education 


A.B. Mathematics 




THOMAS P. FULCHINO 


LAWRENCE W. FUSCO 


VIRGINIA M. GAFFNEY 


PHILIP R. GAGAN, SJ. 


School of Management 


School of Management 


School of Nursing 


School of Philosophy 


B.S. Accounting 


B.S. Accounting 


B.S. Nursing 


A.B. Philosophy, History 



296 




STEVEN A. GALIPEAU 
Arts & Sciences 
A.B. Mathemitics 



JAMES A. GALLIVAN 
Arts & Sciences 
A.B. History 



PAUL F. GALVIN 
School of Management 
B.S. Accounting 



JOSEPH GARDINO 
School of Management 
B.S. Accounting 




ROBERT J. GARRITY 
School of Management 



297 




JUDITH D. GAUDET 
School of Education 
A.B. Biology 



RICHARD J. GARVEY 
Arts & Sciences 
B.S. Biology 



GERALDINE M. GARVIN 
School of Education 
A.B. English 



FRANK J, GIACALONE 

Arts & Sciences 
B.S. Biology 



MARY J. GEIST 
School of Education 
A.B. English 



WILLIAM J. GERITY 
Arts & Sciences 
A.B. Sociology 



^^^T 



m^ 



FRANK D. GIANFRANCESCO 
Arts & Sciences 
A.B. Economics 



./ 



r^in^. 



p 



THOMAS F GIBSON 

Arcs & Sciences 
A.B. English 



LAWRENCE GIANINNO 

School of Education 

A.B. Elementary Education 



THOMAS M. GAVIN, S.J. 

School of Philosophy 

A.B. Philosophy, Mathematics 




THOMAS GIANCRISTIANO 
School of Education 
A.B. History 




RICHARD F. GILL 

School of Education 
A.B. History 



298 




EDWARD M. GILLIS 
Arts & Sciences 
A.B. Sociology 



LOIS A. GILLOOLY 

School of Education 
A.B. Special Education 



Bfe, 



ifik 



ROBERT H. GIRARD 

School of Management 
B.S. Accounting 




ELAINE M. GIROUX 
School of Nursing 
B.S. Nutsing 




;v 



m»^ 



MARY E GITTO 
School of Nursing 
B.S. Nursing 





WALTER F. GLENNON 
School ot Management 
B.S. Marketing 




EILEEN M. GLYNN 
School of Education 
A.B. English 



299 




JAMES A. GOODE 
Arts & Sciences 
A.B, English 



THOMAS B. GOODMAN 
Arts & Sciences 
B.S. Physics 



PETER C GOODWIN 
Arts & Sciences 
A.B. English 



JOHN E. GORDON 
School of Management 
B.S. Accounting 



300 




ANNE L GORDY 
School of Education 
A.B. Elementary Education 



MICHAEL A. GORMAN 
Arts & Sciences 
B.S. Physics 



ANN MARIE GREELEY 
School of Nursing 
B.S. Nursing 



CATHERINE M. GORMAN 
School of Nursing 
B.S. Nursing 



mk^ik 



JOHN J. GORMAN 
School of Management 
B.S. Accounting 



JOHN J. GRADY 
Evening College 
B.S. Accounting 



DIANE M. GREEN 
School of Nursing 
B.S. Nursing 



DAVID M. GRAHAM 
School of Management 
B.S. Economics 



DOROTHY M GREENE 

School of Education 

A.B. Elementary Education 



KENNETH F. GORMAN 
School of Management 
B.S. Marketing 




MARY P. GRAHAM 
School of Education 
A.B. English 




MICHAEL F. GRICH 
School of Management 
B.S. Quantitative Management 



301 




MARY T. GRONEU 
School of Nursing 
B.S. Nursing 




WILLIAM F. GROSS, JR. 
Arts & Sciences 
A.B. English 



JOSEPH R. GUALTIERI 
School of Education 
A.B. Speech 



MARY A. GUERIN 
School of Nursing 
B.S. Nursing 



DOREEN A. GUGLIELMETTl 
School of Education 
A.B. Mathematics 



302 




DAVID V. GUINEE 
School of Education 
A.B. History 



WINNIFRED G. GUNDERSON 
School of Education 
A.B. Mathematics 



RICHARD E. HABECKER 

Arts & Sciences 
A.B. Psychology 



JOSEPH V. HAGGERTY 

Arts & Sciences 
A.B. Sociology 




MARY LOU HAGGERTY 
Evening College 
A.B. Social Science 



'Ah, just what the drink needed." 



J. SHEILA HAGGERTY 
School of Education 
A.B. French 



303 




ROBERT J. HALEY 
School of Management 
B.S. Accounting 



ROGER L HAMEL 
School of Management 
B.S. Accounting 



TERRANCE J. HAMILTON 
Arts & Sciences 
B.S. Geology 



JOSEPH W. HANAFIN 
Arts & Sciences 



B.S. Chemistry 




LINDA A. HANDLEY 
School of Education 
A.B. Mathematics 



STEPHEN J. HANLEY 
Arts & Sciences 
A.B. Psychology 




VINCENT P. HANLEY, JR. 
Arts & Sciences 
A.B. English 



CATHERINE E. HANNON 
School of Education 
A.B. Special Education 



JOHN J. HANRAHAN 
Arts & Sciences 
A.B. English 



MARY ANN HANSON 
Evening College 
A.B. Social Science 







PAUL J. HARLOW 
Arts & Sciences 
B.S. Biology 



DAVID L. HARRIGAN 

Arts & Sciences 
A.B. English 



304 




MICHAEL HARRINGTON 
School of Management 
B.S. Marketing 



and the back is cut just the same as the ftont." 





^■1 W^' 



'■<** 



^r^^ 



ROSEMARY T. HARRINGTON 

School of Education 

A.B. Elementary Education 



JOHN T. HAYDEN 
Arts & Sciences 
A.B. History 



RICHARD J. HAYES 

School of Management 
B.S. Management 




hAih 





idl 



JAMES L. HEARNS 
School of Management 
B.S. Management 




FRANCIS T. HEGARTY 


FRED H. HEIMANN 


ROBERT S. HENDLER 


MARY K. HENNESEY 


Arts & Sciences 


Arts & Sciences 


Arts & Sciences 


School of Education 


A.B. Economics 


B.S. Physics, Mathematics 


B.S. Biology 


A.B. History 



305 



Nurses 




I want to sing the Blood, Sweat, and Tears' "And When I Die" for all you patients in Ward 4. 



306 




For medicinal purposes, of course. 



307 








PATRICK R. HENNESSEY 
Arcs & Sciences 
A.B. Political Science 



THOMAS J. HESSLER 
Arts & Sciences 
A.B. Mathematics 



RICHARD J. HENNESSEY 
Arts & Sciences 
A.B. Political Science 



DANIEL G. HEPPNER 
School of Management 



MICHAEL C. HICKEY 
Arts & Sciences 
A.B. Mathematics 



FRANK E. HILL 
Arts & Sciences 
A.B. English 



MARTIN J. HERNON 
Arts & Sciences 
A.B. Economics 




ALAN P HILTON 
School of Management 
B.S. Marketing 



308 





STEPHEN F, HILTON 

School of Management 

B.S. Quantitative Management 




KEVIN T. HINES 
Arts & Sciences 
A.B. Political Science 



SUSAN J. HINES 

School ot Education 

A.B. Elementary Education 



RONALD J. HOENIG 
Afts & Sciences 
A.B. Economics 



BRIAN M. HOGAN 
School of Management 
B.S. Accounting 




KATHLEEN M. HOGAN 


MICHAEL F. HOGAN 


KATHLEEN M. HOLIHAN 


CHRISTOPHER HOLLAND 


School of Education 


School ol Management 


School of Nursmg 


School of Management 


A.B. English 


B.S. Fmance 


B.S. Nursmg 


B.S. Marketmg 




ROBERT E. HOLLAND 


EDWARD T. HOLLER AN 


BRENDA M. HOPKINS 


FREDERICK R. HOUDE 


School of Management 


Arts & Sciences 


School of Nursini; 


Schixil of Management 


B.S. Finance 


A.B. Sociology 


B.S. Nursing 


B.S. Economics 



309 




MARY L. HOWES 
School of Nursing 
B.S. Nursing 



ROBERT E. HUGHES 
Arts & Sciences 
A.B. Mathematics 



MARY B. HUNTER 
School of Education 
A.B. Special Education 



EDWARD P. HUGHES 

School of Management 
B.S. Finance 



DOROTHY M. HOYLE 
School of Nursing 
B.S. Nursing 



WILLIAM D. HUGHES 
School of Management 
B.S. Economics 



STEPHEN J. HUGHES 
Arts & Sciences 
B.S. Biology 



PAUL D. HURLEY 
School of Management 
B.S. Accounting 



DANIEL J. HURLEY, JR. 
Arts & Sciences 
A.B. Psychology 



JOHN J. HUGHES, JR. 
School of Education 
A.B. History 




MARIE A. HUNSON 
Evening College 
A.B. English 




RICHARD W, HUTCHINS 
Arts & Sciences 
A.B. Mathematics 



310 




THOMAS F IMBRIGLIO 
School of Education 
A.B. History 




JOSEPH P. IMBROGNO 


PATRICIA J. IRISH 


ROBERT J. JACKSON 


STEPHEN C. JANKAUSKAS 


Arts & Sciences 


School of Nursing 


Arts & Sciences 


School ot Education 


A,B. Mathematics 


B.S. Nursing 


A.B. Mathematics 


A.B. Special Education 



311 




GLORIA M. JARNIS 
School of Nursing 
B.S. Nursing 



ROBERT L JOHNSON 
School of Management 
B.S. Accounting 



JCEVIN E. JENNINGS 
School of Management 
B.S. Finance 



HAROLD V. JOHNSON 
School ot Management 
B.S. Accounting 



MICHAEL B. JOHNSON 
School of Management 
B.S. Accounting 








PHILIP T. JONES 
School of Management 
B.S. Management 



WILLIAM F. JONES 
Arts & Sciences 
A.B. Mathematics 



CHRISTOPHER M. JOYCE 
School of Management 
B.S. Finance 




SANDRA M. JOYCE 


PETER W JUDGE 


DAVID A, JUECHTER 


EDWARD P. JULIANO, JR. 


School of Education 


School of Education 


Arts tk Sciences 


Arts & Sciences 


A.B. Elementary Education 


A.B. Histor)' 


A.B. Economics 


A.B. Economics 



312 




PAUL KAUFMAN 
Arts & Sciences 
A.B. English 



"Southern Connecticut will rise again." 



KATHERINE M. KEANE 

School of Education 

A.B. Elementary Education 




MARY P. KEEGAN 


RICHARD A, KEENE 


GREGORY T, KELLEHER 


BRUCE D. KELLEY 


School of Nursing 


School of Management 


Arts & Sciences 


Arts & Sciences 


B.S. Nursing 


B.S, Accounting 


A.B. Economics 


A.B. History 



3/3 





JAMES A. KELLY, JR. 
School of Education 
A.B. Biology 



JULIANNE B. KELLY 

School of Education 

A.B. Elementatv Education 



"Candy sure went a lot quicker.'' 




JOHN M. KELLY 
Arts & Sciences 
A.B, English 




LAWRENCE P. KELLY 
School of Management 
B.S. Economics 



LORRAINE KELLY 
School of Education 
A.B. Mathematics 



JOYCE A. KENNEDY 

School of Education 

A.B. Elementary Education 



MARY E KENNEY 
School of Nursing 
B.S. Nursing 



314 




ROBERT E. KENNEY 

Arts & Sciences 

A.B. Economics, English 



BRUCE W. KENNY 
School oi^ Education 
A.B. English 



JOYCE A. KEOHAN 

School of Education 
A.B. Special Education 



JAMES P. KEOHANE 
School of Management 
B.S. Economics 




THOMAS R. KERR 
Arts & Sciences 
A.B. Histoiy 



HELEN M. KICIN 
School of Education 
A.B. French 



BRIAN KIELY 
Afts & Sciences 
A.B. Mathematics 



ANTHONY P. KIERNAN 
School of Management 
B.S. Accounting 




THOMAS A, KIEWLICZ 


MARK R. KILLENBECK 


STEPHEN J. KILMAIN 


GEORGE F. KING 


Arts & Sciences 


Arts & Sciences 


School of Management 


Arts & Sciences 


A.B. History 


A.B. Enghsh 


B.S. Finance 


A.B. English 



315 




JOHN P. KING 
Arts & Sciences 
B.S. Geology 



KATHRYN M. KING 
School of Nursing 
B.S. Nursing 



MICHAEL J. KING 
School of Management 
B.S. Management 



ADRIAN J. KINNANE 
Arts & Sciences 
A.B. Psychology 








STEPHEN T. KIVES 
Sch(X)l of Management 



CHARLES J. KLOTZBUCHER 
Arts & Sciences 
B.S. Biology 



JOHN F. KNASAS 
Arts & Sciences 
A.B. Philosophy 



DAVID P. KOCHANOWSKY 
Arts & Sciences 
A.B. Political Science 




WILLIAM B. KOFFEL 


RICHARD M. KONDRAT 


JOHN J. KONEVICH 


DAVID A. KONKEL 


Arts Hi Sciences 


Arts & Sciences 


School of Management 


Arts iS: Sciences 


A.B. English 


B.S. Biology 


B.S. Accounting 


B.S. Chemistry 



316 




JAMES S. KREIDLER 
Arts & Sciences 
A.B. Mathematics 



Source of Error #1: Not knowing how these machines work. 





MM^iM 



PHILIP L KREMSREITER 
School of Management 
B.S. Accounting 



CHRISTINE F. KUHLMAN 
School of Nursing 
B.S. Nursing 



CHARLES L. KUNSMAN 
School of Management 
B.S. Marketing 



ROBERT J. LACKAYE 

Arts & Sciences 
A.B. History 



317 





LAWRENCE J. LaFARO 
Arts (Si Sciences 
A.B. English 



RAYMOND C. LaGACE 
Arts & Sciences 
A.B. Economics 



WILLIAM J. LAFFEY 
Arts & Sciences 
B.S. Geology 




JOHN P. LALLY 
School of Management 
B.S. Accounting 




PATRICIA J. LALLY 
School of Education 
A.B, French 



DANIEL J. LAMMON 
Arts & Sciences 
A.B. Economics 



318 




ANDREW J. LANGKOPF 

Arts & Sciences 
A.B. Psychology 



JOSEPH G. LaPOINTE 
School of Education 
A.B. Bioloey 



CHARLES W. LANAGAN, JR 
Arts & Sciences 
A.B. History 



STEPHEN D LANDRIGAN 
Arts & Sciences 
A.B. English 




RONALD J. UPOINTE 
Arts & Sciences 
A.B. History 



VINCENT J. LARAIA 
Arts & Sciences 
A.B. Mathematics 



ROBERT G. LARKIN 

Arts & Sciences 
A.B. History 



GUY M. LATERZA 
Arts & Sciences 
A.B. Mathematics 



MARY P. LARKIN 
School of Education 
A.B. Elementary Education 



PAUL H. LARKIN 
Arts & Sciences 
A.B. Psychology 





mMt 



ROBERT J. LATOURELLE 
School of Management 
B.S. Economics 



STEPHEN J. LAURENT 
School of Management 
B.S. Accounting 



319 




KATHLEEN LAWLESS 
Evening College 
A.B. English 



ALBERT G. LEAVY, S.J 
School of Philosophy 
A.B. Philosophy, English 



EDWARD R LEMBO 

School of Management 
B.S. Finance 



CHARLES J. LAWSON 
School of Management 
B.S. Finance 



ARTHUR A. LAWRENCE, JR 
School of Management 
B.S. Accounting 



MICHAEL J LEAHY 
School of Management 
B.S. Accounting 




THOMAS J LeCLAIR 

Arts & Sciences 
A.B. Economics 



KEVIN A. LEGROS 
Evening College 
B.S. General Business 



JOYCE V. LEE 
School of Education 
A.B. Mathematics 




DAVID A. LEMOINE 
Arts & Sciences 
A.B. Economics 



JOHN R. LESCH 
School of Management 
B.S. Marketing 



JAMES F. LEMBO 
Arts & Sciences 
A.B. Mathematics 



320 




THOMAS F. L'ESPERANCE 
School of Management 
B.S. Finance 



LOUIS A. LEVESQUE 
School of Management 
B.S. Accounting 



MARC A. LEVESQUE 
School of Education 
A.B. English 



NANCY J. LICITRA 
School of Nursing 
B.S. Nursing 




■|g>^ 




m i k h»k 



MARY JANE A. LILLY 


PAUL J. LINNEHAN, S.J. 


ROBERT A. LIPSINSKI 


EDWARD J. LITTLE 


School of Education 


School of Philosophy 


Arts & Sciences 


Arts & Sciences 


A.B. History 


A.B. Philosophy, English 


A.B. Mathematics, Physics 


A.B. Classics 






JAMES R. LOGAR 
Arts & Sciences 
A.B. History 



'I like the way he moves his hands.' 



321 




LAWRENCE J LOGUE 

School of Management 

B.S. Quantitative Management 



THOMAS T. LONARDO 

Arts & Sciences 
A.B. Political Science 



RICHARD D. LOONEY 

Arts & Sciences 
A.B. Mathematics 



PAUL LOSCOCCO 
School of Education 
A.B. Elementary Education 




D. GEORGE LOPEZ 

School of Management 
B.S. Management 



JOSEPH A. LOPEZ 
Arts & Sciences 
A.B. Economics 



PATRICIA M. LOUZAN 

School of Education 

A.B. Elemcntarv' Education 



WINSTON LOWE 
School of Management 
B.S. Accounting 




322 




WILLIAM E. LUCEY 
Arts & Sciences 
A.B. Mathematics 




DANIEL F. LYNCH 
School of Education 
A.B. English 



ANTHONY MACCARNI 
School of Management 
B.S. Accounting 



JAMES B. LUCIA 
School of Education 
A.B. History 



DONNA M. LUONGO 

School of Nursing 
B.S. Nursing 



PETER F LUPOLI 
School of Management 
B.S. Marketing 




d^A^ 




PETER S. LYNCH 


WILLIAM LYNCH 


MARY LOUISE LYONS 


Arts & Sciences 


Arts Sc Sciences 


School of Education 


A.B. Economics 


A.B. English 


A.B. Elementar)' Education 




BRIAN L MacDONALD 
Arts & Sciences 
A.B, English 



DANIEL H. MacDONALD 
Arts & Sciences 
A.B. Political Science 



RONALD J. MacDONALD 
Arts & Sciences 
B.S. Biology 



323 




Married Couples 

Plans are made tor today ratlier tlian tor tomorrow. 
Obligations are defined in terms of a family, decisions 
made together rather than alone. The double burden of 
student and husband or wife makes responsibility some- 
thing to be experienced rather than imagined. Pleasure 
and pain, together. 





KATHLEEN E. MacEVOY 
School of Education 
A.B. English 



JAMES B. MACHUM 
Arts Sc Sciences 
A.B. Psychology 



JOAN E. MacNEIL 
Evening College 
A.B. Social Sciences 



MARY JO MacPHAIL 
School of Education 
A.B. French 




JEAN MARIE MacPHERSON 
School of Nursing 
B.S. Nursing 



SUSANNE M. MADDELENI 
School of Education 
A.B. French 



JOANNA M. MADIGAN 
School of Education 
A.B. Speech 



MICHAEL MAGEE 
Arts & Sciences 
A.B. English 




FRANCIS X MAHONEY 
Arts & Sciences 
A.B. English 



PAUL D. MAHONEY 
School of Management 
B.S. Accounting 



WILLIAM G MAHONEY 

School of Management 
B.S. Marketing 



MICHAEL R MAIORINO 
Arts & Sciences 
A.B. Mathematics 



326 




BRUCE W. MAKI 
Arts & Sciences 
A.B. Political Science 



STEPHEN W MALAQUIAS 
Arts c& Sciences 
B.S. Biolog)' 



PETER E MALATESTA 
Arts & Sciences 
B.S. Biology 



RICHARD K MALLEN 
School of Management 
B.S. Accounting 




PATRICIA A. MALMSTROM 

School of Nursing 
B.S. Nursing 



"Tell me I'm #1; Canada, here I come.' 



327 




RICHARD P. MALONEY 

Arts & Sciences 
A.B. History 



STEVEN R. MALOY 
School of Management 
B.S. Marketing 



JULIE ANNE MANCINI 
School of Education 
A.B. Special Education 



HENRY R. MANIACE 
School of Management 
B.S. Accounting 




MICHAEL A. MANNA 
School of Management 
B.S. Accounting 



JOHN P. MANNING 
School of Management 
B.S. Finance 



THOMAS K MANNING 
Afts & Sciences 
A.B. Mathematics 



JUAN R. MARCHAND 
School of Management 
B.S. Finance 




CHARLES A. MARCIANO 
Arts & Sciences 
A.B. English 




^^^^ ^^ ^^^^^ ^HHM 




ROBERT R. MARECHAL 
Arts & Sciences 
A.B. Sociology 



JOHN M. MARINI 
School of Management 
B.S. Finance 



MICHAEL J. MARKS 
School of Management 
B.S. Finance 



328 




CHARLES J. MARRO 
Arts & Sciences 
A.B. English 



"No Comment/ 





ROBERT D. MARINICK 

School of Management 
B.S. Marketing 




EDWARD P MARTIN 
Arts & Sciences 
B.S. Physics 




M^.%4M^ 



■'^::^ 



t 




JAMES A. MARTIN 


LEO G. MARTIN 


CHARLES J. MARTINDALE 


JUAN J. MARTINEZ 


School of Management 


Arts & Sciences 


School of Management 


Arts & Sciences 


B.S. Accounting 


B.S. Geology 


B.S. Finance 


A.B. Political Science 



329 




EDWARD L. MARUT 
Arts & Sciences 
B.S. Biology 



RONALD E. MATTSON 
Arts & Sciences 
A.B. English 



ANNE BRENDA McCARTHY 
School of Education 
A.B. Elementary Ed. 



JAMES G. MARZ 
Ans & Sciences 
A.B. Economics 



MICHAEL J. MASON 
Arts & Sciences 
A.B. English 



ENRICO J. MASTRONARDI 
School of Education 
A.B. English 




NANCY F. McALOON 
Evening College 
A.B. Social Science 



^^^^fW'" ^fl^^^^^^^^l 




im^^ 


^K- '' 


» ^ 



TERENCE J. McATEER 

Arts & Sciences 
A.B. English 



JANE F. McCarthy 

School of Education 
A.B. Elementary Ed. 



P. JOSEPH McCarthy 

School of Management 
B.S. Marketing 



DANIEL McAULIFFE 
Arts & Sciences 
A.B. Economics 




LINDA E. McCarthy 

School of Education 
A.B. English 



330 




SUSAN L McCarthy 

School of Education 

A.B. Elementary Education 



WILLIAM K. McCarthy 

School of Management 
B.S. Finance 



JOAN E. McCAULEY 

School of Education 

A.B. Elementary Education 



THOMAS J. McCAULEY 
Evening College 
B.S. General Business 




GEORGE F. McCORMACK 
School of Education 
A.B. History 



I'll bet you did!" 



331 




"Observe all traffic signs." 





JOHN T. Mccormick 

Arts & Sciences 
A.B. Political Science 




PATRICIA A. McCORMICK 
School of Education 
A.B. Biology 




dth A^ t^ 



DOUGLAS W. McCOY 
School of Management 
B.S. Finance 



LEO J. McCUE, JR. 
School of Management 
B.S. Accounting 



JAMES E. McCURRY 
Arts & Sciences 
A.B. English 



LAWRENCE G. McDADE 

Arts & Sciences 
A.B. Economics 



332 




JOSEPH F. McDERMOTT 
School of Management 
B.S. Management 



MARY G McDERMOTT 

School of Nursing 
B.S. Nursing 



KATHLEEN McDONALD 
School of Nursing 
B.S. Nursing 



EDWARD S. McDONALD 
School of Management 
B.S. Marketing 



WILLIAM G. McDONALD 
School of Management 
B.S. Economics 



JOSEPH C. McDONALD 

School of Management 
B.S. Marketing 




JAMES P. McDONOUGH 
Arts & Sciences 
A.B. English 



THOMAS J. McDONOUGH 
School of Management 
B.S. Marketing 



MATTHEW A. McENTEE 
Arts & Sciehces 
A.B. Psychology 



JOHN J. McEVOY 
Arts & Sciences 
A.B. English 



MARY ALICE McDONOUGH 

School of Nursing 
B.S. Nursing 




MAUREEN McGANN 
School of Education 
A.B. English 



3313 




ELIZABETH C. McGILLICUDDY 
School of Education 
A.B. Special Education 



JOHN T. McGinn 

School of Management 
B.S. Accounting 



DONALD A, McGOWAN 
Arts & Sciences 
B.S. Chemistry 



DENNIS L. McGRATH 
School of Management 
B.S. Finance 




PETER J. McGRATH 
School of Management 
B.S. Finance 



HENRY J. McGUIRE 

Arts & Sciences 
A.B History 



LEO A. McHUGH 
Arts & Sciences 
A.B. English 



DANIEL J. McINERNEY 
Arts & Sciences 
A.B. English 




TIMOTHY D. McINERNEY 


PAUL M. McISAAC 


DAVID J McKAY 


MARK M, McKENNA 


School of Management 


School of Management 


School of Management 


School of Management 


B.S. Finance 


B.S. Accounting 


B.S. Accounting 


B.S. Marketing 



334 




ARTHUR D. McKEY 
Arts & Sciences 
A.B. Political Science 



"How cum I nevah ged da ones wid da pretty pitures?" 







PAUL M. McKINNON 
School of Management 
B.S. Marketing 



RICHARD J. McLaughlin 

School of Management 
B.S. Marketing 



ARTHUR D. McLEAN 
School of Management 
B.S. Management 



BRIAN R. McMAHON 
School of Education 
A.B. English 



335 




JOHN C. McMANAMA 


SUSAN C. McMANAMA 


THOMAS J. McMANAMON 


ROBERT W. McMANUS 


Ans & Sciences 


School of Education 


Arts & Sciences 


Arts & Sciences 


B.S. Biology 


A.B. English 


A.B. Psychology 


A.B. English 




"They can laugh, but I'm stuck on the door handle.' 



336 




KERRY J. McMURRAY 
Arts & Sciences 
A.B. Sociology 



BRIAN L. McNAMARA 

School of Management 

B.S. Quantitative Management 



BRYAN R. McNAMARA 
Arts & Sciences 
A.B. Mod. Languages 



JAMES T. McNAMARA 
School of Management 
B.S. Accounting 




ROBERT J. McNAMEE 
Arts & Sciences 
B.S. Biology 



STEPHEN R. McNAUGHT 
School of Management 
B.S. Marketing 



ROBERT M. McNEIL 
School of Management 
B.S. Accounting 



PAUL D. McNELIS 

Arts & Sciences 

A.B. Philosophy, Economics 




JOHN J. McSWEENEY 


PATRICIA C MEE 


GARY A. MEEHAN 


MICHAEL J. MELIA 


School of Education 


School of Nursing 


Arts & Sciences 


School of Management 


A.B. History 


B.S. Nursing 


A.B. English 


B.S. Finance 



337 




DANA J. MERLONI 
School of Management 
B.S. Accounting 



JOHN A MESSINA 
Arts & Sciences 
A.B. Mathematics 



JOHN F. MESSINA 
Arts & Sciences 
B.S. Biology 



PAUL F. MEUNIER 
Arts & Sciences 
B.S. Chemistry 







DANIEL D. MICHERONE 
Ans & Sciences 
A.B. Philosophy 



JAMES W. MILAZZO 
Arts & Sciences 
B.S. Biology 



LOUIS MILKOWSKI 
School of Management 
B.S. Accounting 



GREGORY M. MILLER 
School of Management 
B.S. Accounting 




PAUL A. MILLER 
Arts & Sciences 
A.B. Political Science 



JOSEPH MILLETTE 
Evening College 
B.S. General Business 



MICHAEL A. MINGOLELLI 
School of Management 
B.S. Marketing 



RALPH A. MIOLA 

School of Management 
B.S. Finance 



338 



■ig^^ 




^ \ 




MADELYN T. MISITE 
School of Education 
A.B. French 



MARY M. MITCHELL 

School of Education 

A.B. Elementary Education 



THOMAS E. MITCHELL 
School of Management 
B.S. Marketing 



CANAHAUTI A. MITRE 
Arts & Sciences 
A.B. History 




JANE P. MOLONEY 

School of Education 

A.B. Elementary Education 



"For here men are men 



339 






THOMAS S. MONAHAN, JR 
School of Management 
B.S. Marketing 



ROBERT P. MONGAN 
School of Management 
B.S. Management 




LAWRENCE E. MONKS 
Ans & Sciences 
A.B. Mathematics 



EDWARD A. MOOERS, JR. 

School of Management 
B.S. Marketing 




JOHN M. MOORE 
Arts & Sciences 
A.B. Economics 



GERARD T. MORAN 
Arts & Sciences 
A.B. History 




'It he'd only shave.' 



340 



I 




MARY ELIZABETH MORAN 
School of Education 
A.B. History 



ALAN E. MORITIS 
Arts & Sciences 
B.S. Biology 



MARY ELIZABETH MORETTI 

School of Education 

B.S. Elementary Education 



ROBERT C MORAN 

Atts & Sciences 
A.B. Histoty 



GERARD T. MORRIS 

School of Education 

A.B. Elementary Education 



JOANN MORIN 
School of Nursing 
B.S. Nursing 




M 


f""^ 




IbsS^,. ^S^^^Bt 




^^k tm^ y ^^^H 




m ^ 




■/> 



ROBERT W. MUIR 
Arts & Sciences 
A.B. History 



ALBERT J. MORGEN, JR. 

Arts & Sciences 
A.B. Mathematics 




KATHLEEN M. MORRIS 
Evening College 
A.B. Social Science 




MARY K. MULCAHY 
School of Education 
A.B. History 



ROBERT P. MORRIS 
Arts & Sciences 
A.B. Philosophy 



JOYCE M. MOYNIHAN 
School of Education 
A.B. Special Education 



341 




PAUL V. MULKERN 
Arts & Sciences 
A.B. History 



DAVID F. MULLARE 
School of Management 
B.S. Marketing 



MARGRET ANN MULLEN 
School of Nursing 
B.S. Nursing 



WILLIAM R. MULLEN 
Arts & Sciences 
A.B. PoliticaJ Science 



ROGER M. MULLIGAN 
School of Management 
B.S. Management 



KEVIN J. MULVANEY 
School of Management 
B.S. Finance 



JAMES R. MURGIA 
School of Management 
B.S. Accounting 



DENISE L. MURPHY 

School of Education 

B.S. Elementary Education 



DANIEL J. MURPHY 
Arts & Sciences 
B.S. Geology 



ROBERT J. MULLEN 
School of Management 
B.S. Accounting 




JAMES F. MULVOY 
School of Management 
B.S. Economics 




KATHLEEN M. MURPHY 
School of Education 
A.B. History 



342 



» 



'M 




^ 



W 





>.' 



7.^,.^'-tVj4 





^ m 




MARGARET M. MURPHY 
School of Nursing 
B.S. Nursing 



MICHAEL S. MURPHY 
Arts & Sciences 
A.B. English 



PAUL C. MURPHY 
Arts & Sciences 
A.B. Mod. Languages 



PAUL J. MURPHY 
School of Management 
B.S. Accounting 




BRIAN MURRAY 
School ol Management 
B.S. Accounting 



CHARLES A. MURRAY 
Arts & Sciences 
A.B. Psychology 



EDWARD W. MURRAY 
Arts & Sciences 
A.B. Psychology 



JOHN J. MURRAY 
School of Management 
B.S. Management 



343 




Open the doors! Open the doors! 



344 




4n 




Sweet 
Charity 



^M 




HI 


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^^^^^^1 


v^^^l 


^^^^^^^^^ 


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L ^Y_/MP 


^Hr. ^BS^i^ 


^H^ 


oJb. 


,^^^^^H 


VJI^I 


^^^^^^^^H 


jgfej^j 


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ll^ 


Hh 


^^^^^^1 


liy^^^H 


^H 


IIPm 


wm^ 


^m^ 




1 


^^^^^"""'^^i^^M 


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W^^mm 


hmKmi^^^I 


m^^m 


Rf^^jJ 


H 


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p^^N 


El 


1 i^ 




Hpi^i 


|v^^i*%^m| 


H 


''^^^K 


LjHBffiiKSiliii 


^Mft^H 


ti^^Sr^ 


pmm 


^m 


■■ 


mW ^ 


H^|- 


m) 


rS 


^K 


tu' ^'^^H 


S^nj^H B 


^^H 


Ih 


Wij0ft*' ,, 


^m ^B 


m\ 


Pi 


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Mm ^'^ W ^ 


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B.C. Warehouse. 



345 




ANN MARIE NEHME 
School of Education 
A.B. Chemistry 



JAMES P. NEILAN 
Arts & Sciences 
B.S. Chemistry 



WILLIAM L, NEST 
School of Management 
B.S. Accounting 



CHARLES A. NESTER 
Arts & Sciences 
B.S. Chemistry 



346 




4ih ^1% 



JOHN G. NEYLON 
Arts & Sciences 
A.B. Mathematics 



WILLIAM J. NEWMAN 
Arts & Sciences 
A.B. History 



JOHN P. NEVILLE 

School of Management 

B.S. Quantitative Management 




^iiM M 



JUDITH NOYES 
School of Nursing 
B.S. Nursing 



THOMAS E. NOONAN 
Arts & Sciences 
A.B. English 



THOMAS C. NOVARAL 
School of Management 
B.S. Finance 



JOAN N. O'BRIEN 
School of Education 
A.B. Elementary Education 



WAYNE W. OAKES 
Arts & Sciences 
B.S. Biology 



JOHN J. O'BRIEN 
Arts & Sciences 
A.B. English 



SISTER PATRICIA NOLAN 

School of Nursing 
B.S. Nursing 




THOMAS C. NUARA 
School of Management 
B.S. Marketing 




JOSEPH P. O'BRIEN 
Arts & Sciences 
A.B. Economics 



347 




VINCENT L. O'CONNELL 
School of Education 
A.B. Special Education 



TIMOTHY G. O'CONNOR 

Arts & Sciences 
A.B. History 



WILLIAM D. O'BRIEN 
School of Management 
B.S. Economics 



ROBERT F. O'CONNELL 

School of Management 
B.S. Accounting 




MICHAEL J. O'DONNELL 
School of Education 
A.B. German 



PAUL M. OGIBA 
School of Management 
B.S. Accounting 



"What do you mean it doesn't flush? 



348 




JOHN S. O'HARE 
School of Management 
B.S. Finance 



BERNARD R. O'KANE 
School of Management 
B.S. Finance 




"I told you it didn't flush! 



PATRICIA O'LEARY 

Graduate School of Nursing 
B.S. Nursing 



DAVID J. O'LOUGHLIN 
School of Management 
B.S. Marketing 



^> 




JOHN F OLIVERI 
Arts & Sciences 
A.B. Mathematics 




KEVIN P. O'MALLEY 
Arts & Sciences 
A.B. Political Science 



t^k 




PAUL W. O'NEIL 
School of Education 
A.B. History 



LOUIS P. ORSINI 
Arts & Sciences 
A.B. English 



349 




MARK A. OSBORNE 
School of Management 
B.S. Finance 



DANIEL A. PAGLIA 
Evening College 
B.S. General Business 



THOMAS H. OTOOLE 

School of Management 
B.S. Maiketing 



JOHN F. OTTO, JR. 

School of Management 
B.S. Accounting 



FLORENCE PAGLIARULO 

School of Nufsing 
B.S. Nursing 



ROCCO D. PAOLINO 

School of Management 
B.S. Finance 




ROBERT W. OWENS 
School of Management 
B.S. Accounting 




PETER F. PARKER 
Arts & Sciences 
A.B. English 








WAYNE R. PARKER 


ANDREA L. PASQUALE 


THOMAS R PATNAUDE 


MICHAEL S. PATTEN 


Arts & Sciences 


School of Nursing 


Arts & Sciences 


School of Management 


A.B. Psychology 


B.S. Nursing 


B.S. Biology 


B.S. Finance 



350 




JOSEPH P. PATTON 
School of Management 
B.S. Accounting 



PEGGY A. PENKALA 

School of Nursing 
B.S. Nursing 



FRANCIS M. PERKO, S.J. 

School of Philosophy 

A.B. Philosophy, Latin, English 



JEAN PERRENOD 
Graduate School of Nursing 
B.S. Nursing 



DENNIS J. PERRONE 
School of Management 
B.S. Economics 



JOSEPH F. PESCE 

Arts & Sciences 
A.B. Mathematics 



CHARLES V. PERNETTI 
Arts & Sciences 
A.B. English 




kdik 




JOAN K. PETERSEN 
Graduate School of Nursing 
B.S. Nursing 




'My next all-nighter I'm going to spend studying. 



35; 




JAMES E. PHELAN 
Arts & Sciences 
B.S. Chemistrv 



BARBARA A. PHELON 
School of Nursing 
B.S. Nursing 



THOMAS M PHILLIPS 

Arts & Sciences 
B.S. Biology 



LUCIA A. PIAZZA 
School of Education 
A.B. Elcmentar)' Education 




JOSEPH T. PICARIELLO 
School of Education 
A.B. History 



STEPHEN F. PICKUL 
School of Management 
B.S. Accounting 



DONALD R. PIECUCH 

Arts & Sciences 
B.S. Chemistry 



EDWARD J. PIERSON 
School of Management 
B.S. Finance 




JOSEPH J. PIETRAFITTA 
Ans & Sciences 
B.S. Biology 



JAMES C. PIETRASZEK 
Arts & Sciences 
B.S. Biology 



JOHN A. PINO 
School of Management 
B.S. Accounting 



JOHN A. PIRNAT 
Arts & Sciences 
A.B. Economics 



352 




ROBERT R. PLANTHOLD 

Arts & Sciences 
A.B. History 



RICHARD S. POELAERT 
School of Management 
B.S. Finance 



"My mother was always handy with burlap. 




JOHN F. POMARICO 

Arts & Sciences 
A.B. Economics 



JOHN J. POMEROY 

School of Management 
B.S. Marketing 



PAMELA A. PORTER 

School of Nursing 
B.S. Nursing 



N!7ILLIAM E. PORTER 

Arts & Sciences 
A.B. English 



353 




MICHAEL W POTTER 

School of Management 
B.S. Accounting 



DAVID F. POWELL 
School of Education 
A.B. EngHsh 



ALICE M. POWER 

School of Nursing 
B.S. Nursing 



RICHARD D. POWER 
School of Management 
B.S. Accounting 




JOANNE POWERS 
School of Education 
A.B- Elementar)' Education 



LESLIELYNNE A POWERS 
School of Nursing 
B.S. Nursing 



MICHAEL J. POWERS 
Arts & Sciences 
B.S. Chemistry 



PAMELA M. PRATT 

School of Education 

A.B. Elementary Education 




JOHN R. PREVIS 


THOMAS W. PROULX 


MICHAEL PUOPOLO 


Arts & Sciences 


Arts Sc Sciences 


School of Management 


A.B. English 


B.S. Chemistry 


B.S. Quantitative Management 



ANDREA E. PURCELL 

School of Education 

A.B. Elementary Education 



354 




DANIEL A. QUARANTO 
School of Management 
B.S. Accounting 



MARK A. RAGOLIA 
School of Education 
A.B. Histor)' 



CONSTANCE M. READY 
School of Education 
A.B. Speech 






^l^^t 




WILLIAM P. RABADAN 
School of Management 
B.S. Marketing 



MARTIN L RACANELLI 
Arts & Sciences 
B.S. Biology 



VIRGINIA E. RAPP 
School of Education 
A.B. Special Education 



JOHN E. RAU 
Arts & Sciences 
A.B. Economics 



ROBERT A RACIOPPI 
School of Education 
A.B. Special Education 




DONALD A. RAYMOND 
Arts & Sciences 
A.B. English 





CHARLES E. REAGAX 
School of Management 
B.S. Marketing 



TIMOTHY J. REARDON 
School of Management 
B.S. Accounting 



CYNTHIA L. REICHARDT 
School of Nursing 
B.S. Nursing 



DOREEN A. REIDY 
School of Education 
A.B. Special Education 




"It beats crying over it! 



THOMAS RICCIARDELU 
Arts Si Sciences 
A.B, Economics 



356 




JOSEPH J ROCKWELL 
Arts & Sciences 
A.B. Political Science 



CAROL A. ROBERTS 

School of Education 

A.B. Elementary Education 



JOHN T. ROBINSON 
Arts & Sciences 
A.B. Economics 



ELLEN K. RODDY 
School oi Education 
A.B. Elementary Education 




PIERRE G. RONDEAU 
Arts & Sciences 
A.B. History 



JAMES S. ROONEY, JR. 
Evening College 
A.B. English 



JAMES M. ROGERS 
Arts & Sciences 
A.B. English 



VIRGINIA G. ROMANO 

School of Education 

A.B. Elementary Education 



357 




BRUCE E. ROPER 
School of Management 
B.S. Marketing 



CHRISTINA A. ROSA 
School ot Education 
A.B. Special Education 



k^^ 



jp^^jfn 




ALFRED G ROTONDI 
Arts & Sciences 
A.B. Philosophy 



41k i^ 



GEORGE F. ROVEGNO 
Arts & Sciences 
A.B. Economics 



JAMES F ROWEAN 
Arts & Sciences 
A.B. English 



JANE F. ROWLINSON 

School of Education 

A.B. Elementaty Education 



JOHN J. RUBIN 
Arts & Sciences 
A.B. Political Science 



CHARLES A. RUDINSKY 
School of Management 
B.S. Accounting 



MARY J. RUDMAN 
School of Education 
A.B. Special Education 



TIMOTHY F. ROURKE 
Arts & Sciences 
A.B. English 




PAUL J. ROY, SJ. 
School ot Philosophy 
A.B. Philosophy 




JON A. RUEL 
Arts & Sciences 
B.S. Biology 



358 




EDMOND F. R'l-AN 
Arts & Sciences 
A.B. Marhemarics 



KATHLEEN A. RYAN 

School of Education 

A.B, Elementaty Education 



DANIEL K. RYAN 
School ot Management 
B.S. Marketing 



DENNIS M. RYAN 
School ot' Management 
B.S. Finance 



359 




MICHAEL C RYAN 
Arts & Sciences 
A.B. English 



PETER K. RYAN 
Arts & Sciences 
A.B. Political Science 



"Is a hangnail good for a draft deferment.' 



ROBERT J. RYAN 
School of Management 
B.S. Accounting 



WILLIAM M, RYAN 
Evening College 
A.B. History 





mu^ik 



PAUL D. SABEL 
Arts & Science. 
B.S. BiolofiV 



LEONID F. SAMODELOV 
Arts & Sciences 
B.S. Biology 




ELEANOR M. SANDA 
School of Education 
A.B. Russian 



MARGARET SANDWELL 
School of Education 
A.B. English 



360 





k 4iii mt 



WILLIAM E. SANFORD 
School of Management 
B.S. Finance 



FRANK C. SAPIENZA 
Arts & Sciences 
B.S. Biology 



JOHN J. SASTRI 
Arts & Sciences 
A.B. Mathematics 




KATHLEEN M. SAVAGE 
School of Education 
A.B. Mathematics 




ALBERT J. SBORDONE 
Arts & Sciences 
A.B. Sociology 



RUDI R. SCHERFF 
Arts & Sciences 
A.B. Political Science 



FREDERICK]. SCHRAMM 
Arts & Sciences 
A.B. Economics 



LOUIS S. SCIARRONE 
School of Education 
A.B. English 




JUDITH J. SCIMONE 


JAMES J. SCIMONE 


JOHN J. SEARS 


EDWARD L. SELGRADE 


School of Education 


Arts & Sciences 


School of Management 


Arts Si Sciences 


A.B. Elementary Education 


A.B. Mathematics 


B.S. Economics 


B.S. Physics, Mathematics 



361 



Junior Prom 
and Concert 




Good Vibrations. 




362 




^H 


^^H 




Fl 


i j M 


^^1 


^^^H 




f'-M 




1 


MB 




i,'-' 


1 1 K ^ 


1 




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' 


li^' ' 




"This night should be enough to convince her to work for 
the yearbook." 



'After a dip in the Riviera, we can fly to my chalet in the Alps , 



363 




JEANNE M. SELVITELLA 

School of Education 

A.B. Elemental- Education 



THOMAS G. SEXTON 

School of Managcnnenc 
B.S. Accounting 



THOMAS J. SHARKEY 
Arts & Sciences 
B.S. Chemistry 



DOROTHY A. SELLINGER 
School of Nursing 
B.S. Nursing 



ALAN F. SENDKER 
School of Management 
B.S. Marketing 



JOHN J. SEXTON 
Arts & Sciences 
B.S. Biology 




ELAINE V. SHAKER 
School of Education 
A.B. Mathematics 



ELIZABETH B. SHANAHAN 
School of Education 
A.B. Special Education 



TIMOTHY M. SHANLEY 
School of Management 
B.S. Accounting 




MARGARET M. SHEEHAN 

School of Education 

A.B. Elementary Education 



SUSAN R. SHEEHAN 
School of Nursing 
B.S. Nursing 



TIMOTHY K. SHEEHY 
School of Management 
B.S. Finance 



364 




JOAN R SHERIDAN 
School ot Nursing 
B.S. Nursing 



JOHN B. SHORTON 
Evening College 
B.S. General Business 



JOAN M, SHORTT 
School of Education 
A.B, French 



SCOTT G. SHULGA 
Arts & Sciences 
A.B. Mathematics 




KATHLEEN J. SKINNER 
School of Education 
A.B. English 



365 




KENNETH G. SLADKIEWICZ 
School of Management 
B.S. Economics 



BRENT L. SMITH 
School of Management 
B.S. Finance 



BRENDA M. SMITH 
Scliool of Nursing 
B.S. Nursing 



BRADLEY R. SMITH 
School of Education 
A.B. History 




366 




SHARON JEANNE SMITH 
School of Nursing 
B.S. Nursing 



TIMOTHY E. SMYTHE 
School of Management 
B.S. Marketing 



JOHN K. SNYDER 
School of Management 
B.S. Accounting 



ANNE E. SODWITH 

School of Education 

A.B. Elementary Education 




PETER R. SOLLENE 
School of Management 
B.S. Accounting 



FREDERICK S. SOUSA 
Evening College 
B.S. General Business 



MARGARET M. SPIDEL 
School ot Nursing 
B.S. Nursing 



DIANE M. SPINELLI 
School of Education 
A.B. English 




RUTH E. SPINELLI 
School of Education 
A.B. Elementary Education 



EILEEN F. SPRATT 
School of Education 
A.B. English 



MICHAEL R. SQUILLANTE 
Arts & Sciences 
B.S. Chemistry 



THERESA A. STANKARD 
School of Education 
A.B. English 



367 




JUDITH A. STANLEY 
School of Education 
A.B. Special Educacion 



JAMES J. STEFANINI 
School of Management 
B.S. Management 



PHILIP J. STEFANINI 
School of Management 
B.S. Marketing 



THOMAS K. STEEL 
Arts & Sciences 
A.B. Political Science 




4i^i£li 



TIMOTHY F. STEVENS 
Arts & Sciences 
A.B. History 



JANICE F. STEVENSON 
School of Nursing 
B.S. Nursing 



JAMES R. STINSON 
School of Management 
B.S. Finance 



THOMAS J. STOODLEY 

Arts & Sciences 
A.B. Mathematics 







DONALD J. STREET 
Arts & Sciences 
A.B. History 



CHARLES J. STRUZZIERY 
School of Management 
B.S. Marketing 



ALAN L. SUGERMAN 
School of Management 
B.S. Marketing 



ANN C. SULLIVAN 
Evening College 
A.B. Social Science 



368 




I wouldn't walk a mile for anything. 




GERALD J. SULLIVAN 
School of iManagement 
B.S. Accounting 



1^^^ 



^t^^^ 



JOAN M. SULLIVAN 


JOANNE M. SULLIVAN 


JOHN B. SULLIVAN 


JOHN J. SULLIVAN 


School of Education 


School of Nursing 


School of Management 


School of Management 


A.B. Elementary Education 


B.S, Nursing 


B.S. Finance 


B.S. Accounting 



369 




JOHN L. SULLIVAN 
Arts & Sciences 
A.B. Classics 



KATHLEEN SULLIVAN 
Schcx)! of Nursing 
B.S. Nursing 



KEVIN J. SULLIVAN 
School of Management 
B.S, Marl<ering 



PATRICIA R. SULLIVAN 

School of Education 

A.B. Elementary Education 








THOMAS J. SULLIVAN 
Arts & Sciences 
B.S. Chemistry 




THOMAS M. SULLIVAN 
Arts & Sciences 
A.B. English 




iikiiCb 



WILLIAM J, SULLIVAN, JR. 
School of Management 
B.S. Finance 



THEODORE H. SWEETSER 
Arts & Sciences 
A.B. Mathematics 



NANCY J. TANNUZZO 

School of Nursing 
B.S. Nursing 



JOHN A. SULLO 

School of Management 

B.S. Quantitative Management 




MARILYN L. SWANSON 

School of Education 

A.B. Elementary Education 



DENNIS P. SWEENEY 
Arts & Sciences 
A.B. Eni^iish 




JOHN R. SYLVA 
School of Management 
B.S. Marketing 



RAY E. SYLVESTER 

School of Education 

A.B. Elementary Education 




JOYCE A. TANGAL 
School of Nursing 
B.S. Nursing 



RICHARD M. TATARONIS 

School of Management 

B.S. Quantitative Management 



^ikd 




JOSEPH A. TERILLl 
School of Management 
B.S. Economics 



DONALD W. THERRIEN 

School of Management 
B.S. Marketing 



371 




JANET P. THOMAS 

Schixil of Education 

A.B. Elementary Education 



CHARLES TOCZYLOWSKI 
School of Management 
B.S. Marketin 



CHERYL L THOMPSON 

ScIkxjI of Education 

A.B. Elementarv Education 



PAUL A. TIBBETTS 
Schcx)! of Management 
B.S, Finance 



JOSEPH A. THOMAS 
School of Management 
B.S. Accounting 




A.B. Psychology 



PAUL G. TONON 
School of Management 
i.S. Finance 



LORETTA A. TRANIELLO 
School of Education 
A.B. Mathematics 



LOUIS P. TOTINO 
Arts & Sciences 
A.B. Mathematics 




ROBERT J. TROY 
School of Management 
B.S. Finance 



PATRICIA M. TOTO 

School of Education 

A.B. Elementary Education 



MAUREEN B. TOTTEN 
School of Nursing 
B.S. Nursing 



372 




ANNE M. TULLY 
Evening College 
A.B. English " 



NEAL C, TULLY 
Arts & Sciences 
A.B. Hisrorv 



LINDA J. TURCOTTE 
Scliool ot Nursing 
B.S. Nursing 



DAVID T. TURCOTTE 
Scliool ot Management 
B.S. Accounting 




NANCY J. TURLETES 
School ot Nursing' 
B.S. Nur-,in,i; 



373 




u3 

Mi'h ia ^ 




EDWIN J. TURNER 
Arts & Sciences 
A.B. English 



RICHARD W. TYNER 
Arts & Sciences 
A.B. English 



JOSEPH M. URCIUOLO 
School of Management 
B.S. Marketing 



FRANCIS D. UTTARO 
School of Education 
A.B, History 




ELAINE RACCARO 
School of Nursing 
B.S. Nursing 



PAMELA S. VALENTI 
Schixil of Nursing 
B.S. Nursing 



THOMAS VERONNEAU 
School ot Management 
B.S, Finance 



ALONSO A. VILLEGAS 

School of Management 

B.S. Quantitative Management 




STEPHEN M. VINCENT 
Arts & Sciences 
A.B. Histor\' 



PETER J. VOYT 
Arts Sc Sciences 
A.B. History 



EDWARD J. VOZZELLA 

School of Management 
B.S. Accounting 



WILLIAM J. WAGNER 
Arts & .Sciences 
A.B. SociologN' 



374 




WESLEY T. WALLACE 
Arts & Sciences 
A.B. Economics 



EDWARD P. WALSH 
Evening College 
B.S. Accounting 



KENNETH J, WAINWRIGHT 
Arts & Sciences 
A.B. History 



BARBARA C. WALLACE 
School t^t Nursing 
l.S. Nursing 




JOSEPH F. WALSH 
Arts cS; Sciences 
A.B. Psychology 



RICHARD L WALSH 
Arts & Sciences 
A.B. English 



375 




^/h gith 



)OH\ F. Wi;HB 
SlIiooI (>r M;in;ijrcmcnt 
lis. AccouncinF 



CHARi.F.s w wi;ili;r 

School ot l-.tlui.arion 
A.H. Six-cth 



RANDY M. WATERMAN 
School of Management 
B.S. Accounting 



LAWRENCE J. WATTS 
School of Education 
A.B. Historv 



376 




SUE ANN WETTERHOLM 

School of Education 

A.B, Elementary Education 



MICHAEL J, WHITNEY 
Arts (S; Sciences 
A.B. Mathem;itics 



IRENE E. WEZDECKI 

Schcxjl of Education 

A.B. Elementary Education 



ALLAN F. WHITTY 
School of Education 
A.B. HistoH' 



CHRISTINE WHALEN 
School of Education 
A.B. Special Education 



WILLIAM A. WHITE 
School of Management 
B.S. Marketing 




NANCY J. WILSON 

School of Education 

A.B. Elementary Education 



THERESA A. WILCOX 
School of Nursing 
B.S. Nursing 



JOAN B. WILSON 
School of Nursing 
B.S. Nursint; 




THOMAS J. WOODLEY 
Arts & Sciences 
B.S. Physics 



BARBARA L. WYAND 

School of Nursing 
B.S. Nursini; 



ROBERT J. WYNNE 
Arts & Sciences 
A.B. Political Science 



377 




PHYLLIS WYSOCKl 
Graduate School ot Nursing 
B.S. Nursing 



JOANNE A. YARMALA 
School of Nursing 
B.S. Nursing 



ARLENE M. YEAPLE 

School of Education 

A.B. Elementary Education 



GEORGE J, YOST 
Scliooi of Management 
B.S. Economics 




And next year's class is going to learn ro write. 



378 




THOMAS P, ZOLAD 

Arts Ik Sciences 
BS. Biology 



FREDERIC T. ZUEGG 
Arts tk Sciences 
A.B, English 



"I'm the Golden Girl. 



379 






V VtW- 



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^ .." -//^i 


;%V^? 


1-'.' _;-''-.<■* 





Patrons 



The publication of the preceding pages is due in good 
measure to the financial assistance we received. To the 
parents of Boston College students and the businesses 
who supported us, the 1970 SUB TURRI says, "Many 
thanks." 




MR. AND MRS. WILLIAM S. ABELL 
MR. AND MRS. FRANK ACCATTATIS 
MR. AND MRS. STEPHEN J. ACKERMAN 
MR. AND MRS. C. SHELLEY ACUFF 
MR. AND MRS. F. WILLIAM AHEARN 
MR. AND MRS. JOSEPH E. AHERN 
GORDON ALVES 

MR. AND MRS. STEPHEN D. AMOROSO 
MR. AND MRS. ALBERT A. ANDIORIO 
MR. AND MRS. S. J. ADRIANI 
MR. AND MRS. CARL ANSTETT 
MR. AND MRS. WALTER APPLETON 
MR. AND MRS. LOUIS A. ARCARESE 
MR. AND MRS. INGLIS ARCHER 
MR. AND MRS. LOUIS H. ASHLEY 
MR. AND MRS. ARTHUR N. AVALLONE 
MR. AND MRS. JOHN J. BACHALIS 
MR. AND MRS. WILLIAM I. BAIR 
MR. AND MRS. ARTHUR W. BALE 
MR. AND MRS. JOHN T. BARAN 



HOWARD BARNABY 

JOSEPH F. BARNETT, SR. 

MR. AND MRS. ALFRED BARRY 

MR. AND MRS. THOMAS E. BARRY 

EMIL BARTOSEK 

THE BASEMENT BOYS OF 41 SOUTH 

MR. AND MRS. ALFREDO BATTISTA 

MR. AND MRS. FRANK J. BEAUREGARD, SR. 

MR. AND MRS. KENNETH G. BECKER 

MR. AND MRS. J. M. BEDDES 

MR. AND MRS. JEROME J. BEDELL, JR. 

HUGH H. BEGLEY 

MRS. BERNARD BEIRNE 

MR. AND MRS. EMMETT BELL 

DR. AND MRS. JOHN M. BELL 

MR. AND MRS. C. V. BELLM 

MR. AND MRS. FRANK BERGAMO 

WILLIAM R. BERGFIELD 

MR. AND MRS. HOWARD BERNSTEIN 

MR. AND MRS, E. J. BIANCHI AND FAMILY 



382 



MR. AND MRS. H. E. BICKFORD 

EDWARD T. BIGHAM, JR., ATTORNEY 

MR. AND MRS. BRANDON BLADES 

MR. AND MRS. ROBERT BLEAKLEY 

MR. AND MRS. JAMES J. BLISS 

MR. AND MRS. HARRY BLOTNER 

DR. AND MRS. ROBERT D. BLUTE, SR. 

MR. AND MRS. ANTHONY J. BOKAL 

ALFRED E. BOLLENGIER, ESQ. 

MR. AND MRS. WALTER C. BORCHELT 

MR. AND MRS. EDWARD BORUKI 

BOSTON MECHANICAL CORP. 

MR. AND MRS. F. BOTICA 

MR. AND MRS. JOSEPH L. BOUCHARD 

MR. AND MRS. THOMAS F. BOYD 

DR. AND MRS. JOHN M. BRADY 

MRS. JAMES A. BRAGAN 

DR. AND MRS. ALFRED W. BRANCA 

MR. AND MRS. MELVIN BREITSTEIN 

MR. AND MRS. JAMES F. BRENNAN 

MR. AND MRS. JOSEPH J. BRITT 

MR. AND MRS. EUGENE P. BRODEUR, JR. 

JOHN J. BROWN 

MR. AND MRS. PETER CAMPBELL BROWN 

DR. AND MRS. W. J. BUGGY 

MR. AND MRS. ANTHONY BURRASCANO 

MR. AND MRS. JOHN A. BUSCH 

MR. AND MRS. JOHN BYKOWSKY 

THE CAGNEYS 

MR. AND MRS. ANTHONY J. CAMBRIA 

MR. AND MRS. JAMES A, CANALI 

DR. AND MRS. C. P. CANCELLIERI 

G. A. CAPODILUPO, M.D. 

DR. AND MRS. JOSEPH H. CARAZOLA 

MR. AND MRS. FRANK CARERI 

MR. AND MRS. GEORGE H. CARLETON 

MR. AND MRS. WILLIAM J. CARLIN 

MRS. HUGH JAMES CARNEY 

MR. AND MRS. JOHN E. CARROLL, SR. 

MR. AND MRS. JOHN M. CARROLL 

NICHOLAS J. CARUSO 

MR. AND MRS. PETER L. CASALINO 

RICHARD J. CASEY 

T. P. CASEY INS. AGENCY 

MR. AND MRS. F. W. CASIOPPO, SR. 

MR. AND MRS. ALFRED J. CASSIDY 

MR. AND MRS. FRANK CASEY 

JOSEPH A. CAULFIELD, JR. 

MR. AND MRS. JAMES CAVALEN 

MR. AND MRS. ARGEO R. CELLUCCI 



EDWARD J. CERRA 

MRS. NORMAND L. CHARLAND 

EDWARD G. CHMIEL, SR. 

DR. AND MRS. NICHOLAS J. CHRIST 

ANTHONY F. CIPOLLA 

MR. AND MRS. ANTHONY J. CIPOLLA 

MR. AND MRS. THOMAS A. CLEMENTE 

MR. AND MRS. SPIRO CODY 

MR. AND MRS. FRANCIS J. COLBY 

MRS. JAMES H. COLLINS 

MR. AND MRS. JOHN G. COLLINS 

RALPH F. COLOMBINO 

MR. AND MRS. ANTHONY F. COMPO 

CONGRESS CAFE 

T. W. CONNELL 

MRS. JOHN B. CONNOR 

HON. AND MRS. SILVIO O. CONTE 

MR. AND MRS. FREDERICK J. CORONA 

JOHN T. CORRIGAN 

JAMES AND MARGARET CORSO 

MR. AND MRS. WILLIAM P. CORVINI 

E. J. COSTIGAN 

MR. AND MRS. RICHARD H. COTE 

MR. AND MRS. JOHN W. COTTER 

GERARD T. COUGHLIN 

MR. AND MRS. WILLIAM COYNE 

WILLIAM F. COX 

ROBERT W. CREAMER 

MR. AND MRS. JOSEPH A. CREEDEN 

MR. AND MRS. MICHAEL CROWLEY 

ELMO E. CRUMP 

MR. AND MRS. JAMES L. CUNNINGHAM 

MR. AND MRS. JOSEPH V. CURRAN 

MR. AND MRS. FRANCIS H. CURTIN 

MR. AND MRS. CHARLES A. DAILY 

JOSEPH D'ALONZO 

MR. AND MRS. JOHN J. DALY 

DR. AND MRS. FRANCIS A. D'AMBROSIO 

MR. AND MRS. JOHN A. D'AMBROSIO 

LINDA D'AMBROSIO 

J. H. DAOUST & CO., ACTUARIES 

MR. AND MRS. PHILIP E. DAVIS 

BERNARD A. DAYS 

MR. AND MRS. JOSEPH DEFRANCIS 

DR. JAIME DE JESUS 

MR. AND MRS. ROBERT E. DELANY 

MRS. VICTOR J. DELCLOS 

DELLA VILLA BROS. CONSTRUCTION 

JOHN B. DeLONG 

MR. RUDOLPH J. DELUTIES 



383 



MR. AND MRS. FRANK DeiMAMBRO 

JOSEPH DePASQUALE 

DR. AND MRS. FRANCIS J. D'ERRICO 

MR. AND MRS. EDGAR A. DESCHENES 

MR. AND MRS. RENE DESCHENES 

MR. AND MRS. RENE DESCHENES 

DR. AND MRS. RENE A. DESJARDINS 

MR. SAM C. -DiFEO 

DR. AND MRS. JOHN DiFRANCESCO 

JOHN A. DIGIORGIO 

MR. AND MRS. ANTHONY DiGIOVANNI 

MR. AND MRS. VINCENT DiGIOVANNI 

MR. AND MRS. MICHAEL F. DILLON 

MR. AND MRS. ANTHONY J. DiPAOLA 

MR. AND MRS. STANLEY L. DiSTEFANO 

MICHAEL J. DOBROVICH 

MR. AND MRS. JAMES J. DOHERTY 

MR. AND MRS. JOHN V. DOLE, JR. 

MR. AND MRS. THOMAS J. DONOVAN 

MRS. JEANNETTE E. DOTY 

MR. AND MRS. JAMES J. DOWD, JR. 

DR. AND MRS. CORNELIUS J. DRISCOLL 

MR. AND MRS. JOHN DROSSOS 

MR. AND MRS. JAMES F. DUFFY 

MR. AND MRS. WALTER W. DUKIET 

DR. AND MRS. THOMAS J. DUNNE 

MR. AND MRS. PAUL J. DUNPHY 

ROGER E. EGAN 

MR. CARL J. EISERT 

MR. AND MRS. TRYGVE ELIASON 

MR. AND MRS. HAROLD ESDALE 

MR. AND MRS. JOHN ESTRELLA 

MR. AND MRS. ANTHONY EUK 

MR. AND MRS. JOSEPH FANNUZZO 

MR. AND MRS. FRANCIS M. FARRELL 

MR. AND MRS. FRANK J. FEE, JR. 

MR. AND MRS. BERNARD R. FEED, JR. 

DR. AND MRS. JAMES A. FELTMAN 

MR. THEODORE F. FERRANT 

MR. AND MRS. JOHN J. FERRO 

MR. AND MRS. LOUIS FILIPELLI, SR. 

MR. AND MRS. MATTHEW FITZPATRICK 

THE EDWARD FLAHERTY FAMILY 

MR. AND MRS. FRANK C. FLAHERTY 

MR. AND MRS. JOHN F. FLAHERTY 

MR. HUGH L FLANAGAN 

MR. AND MRS. DONALD J. FLEMING 

MR. AND MRS. JOHN C FLYNN, JR. 

MR. AND MRS. WILLIAM A. FOGARTY 

MR. AND MRS. MALCOLM W. FOSTER 



MR. AND MRS. SHEPPARD FOX 

MR. AND MRS. JOHN W. FRANCIS 

S. W. FREDERICK 

MR. AND MRS. OLIVER F. FREDERICKS 

MR. AND MRS. PASQUALE A. FUCCILLO 

MR. AND MRS. ANDREW FUSCO, JR. 

MR. AND MRS. ARTHUR GALIPEAU 

MARGARET M. GALLIVAN 

C. J. GALVIN 

BERNARD H. GAREAU 

MR. AND MRS. SALVATORE D. GARZONE 

DR. AND MRS. B. GAYNOR 

MR. AND MRS. JOHN C. GEIST 

GENERAL BEER DISTRIBUTORS 

PETER E. GENOVESE 

MR. AND MRS. ARTHUR J. GEOGHEGON 

MR. GENNARO GIANFRANCESCO 

MR. AND MRS. JAMES J. GLENNON 

MR. AND MRS. WALTER F. GLENNON 

MR. AND MRS. CHARLES M. GODDARD, JR. 

MR. AND MRS. MEYER GOLDBERG 

MR. AND MRS. AL GORMAN 

MR. AND MRS. DAVID GRAHAM 

MR. AND MRS. ALLEN GREENOUGH 

MR. AND MRS. EDWARD R. GRICH 

DR. AND MRS. JOHN R. GRIFFITH 

JOSEPH B. GRINDON, M.D. 

MR. AND MRS. T. JOSEPH GRONELL 

EDWARD AND HELEN GUERTIN 

MR. AND MRS. JOHN V. GUINEE 

DR. AND MRS. WILLIAM GYVES 

CLARENCE A. HADDEN 

MRS. JOHN C. HAGEN, JR. 

MRS. JOSEPH HALEY 

LAWRENCE HAMEL 

MR. AND MRS. JOHN F. HANAFIN 

MR. AND MRS. VINCENT P. HANLEY 

MR. AND MRS. JOSEPH J. HANNON 

MRS. JOHN P. HANRAHAN 

JAMES J. HARRINGTON 

MR. AND MRS. JOSEPH R. HARRINGTON 

MR. AND MRS. STEPHEN A. HARRINGTON 

MR. AND MRS. BERNARD HARRIS 

MR. AND MRS. JOHN J. HEALEY 

MR. AND MRS. BERTRAND HECKEL 

MR. AND MRS. FRANCIS T. HEGARTY 

DR. AND MRS. ALBERT HENDLER 

MR. AND MRS. JAMES J. HERKENHAM, JR. 

MR. AND MRS. THOMAS HICKEY 

MR. AND MRS. PAUL HOFFMAN, SR. 



384 



DR. AND MRS. GORDON V. HOLAHAN 

DANIEL G. HOLLAND 

MR. AND MRS. EDWARD T. HOLLERAN 

MR. AND MRS. THOMAS HOPKINS 

MARTIN M. HOPWOOD 

FREDERICK R. HOUDE 

J. ALFRED HOULE, JR. 

MIKE HUBER 

MR. AND MRS. RAYMOND A. HUEBSCH 

MR. AND MRS. EDWARD P. HUGHES 

MR. AND MRS. JOHN J. HUGHES 

RAMON HUIDOBRO 

MR. AND MRS. S. ROBERT IMBROGNO 

MR. AND MRS. KENNETH IRISH 

MR. AND MRS. SIDNEY JAFFE 

MR. AND MRS. ANDREW JAREMA 

DR. AND MRS. O. KENNETH JOHNSON 

MR. AND MRS. BERKLEY JONES 

MR. AND MRS. JAMES J. JOYCE 

MRS. RAYMOND JUECHTER 

EDWARD F. JULIANO, SR. 

FRED JURGES 

MR. AND MRS. M. J. KEARNEY 

CORNELIUS J.KELLEHER 

JOHN F. KELLIHER 

MR. AND MRS. EUGENE F. KELLY 

MR. AND MRS. FRANCIS D. KELLY 

FRANK L. KELLY 

MR. AND MRS. ROBERT B. KELLY 

MRS. EDWARD J. KENNEALLY 

WALTER AND DOROTHY KEOHAN 

MR. AND MRS. DONALD KERR 

MR. AND MRS. A. J. KEVORKIAN 

MR. AND MRS. PAUL P. KICIN 

MR. AND MRS. H. A. KILLENBECK 

SPENCER KING FAMILY 

DR. AND MRS. GUY R. KLINE 

MR. AND MRS. ALFRED B. KNASAS 

MR. AND MRS. FRANK J. KOFRON 

MR. AND MRS. L. A. KONKEL 

MR. AND MRS. STEPHEN E. KORTA 

MR. AND MRS. A. J. KRAJEWSKI 

MR. AND MRS. JOSEPH KURUC 

MR. AND MRS. J. R. LaCASSE, SR. 

MR. AND MRS. LEO R. LaFLEUR 

MR. AND MRS. THEODORE J. LAGACE 

MR. AND MRS. JOHN J. LALLY 

MR. AND MRS. JOHN P. LALLY 

MR. AND MRS. JEROME A. LaMANNA 

MR. AND MRS, D. J. LAMMON 



MR. AND MRS. FRED LANZILLO 

MRS. HENRY R. LAPREL 

VINCENT J. LARAIA FAMILY 

ROBERT G. LARKIN 

MR. AND MRS. FRANCIS V, LaRUFFA 

MR. ALLEN LASOFF 

MR. AND MRS. C. PAUL LeBEAU 

DR. AND MRS. GERARD A. LESOH 

STEPHEN J. LESLIE 

DR. AND MRS. GERARD A. LESCH 

MR. AND MRS. PAUL E. LEVESQUE 

MR. AND MRS. JOHN LICITRA 

MR. AND ANDREW F. LIPINSKI 

MR. AND MRS. ROBERT R. LODI 

MR. AND MRS. A. EMMET LOGUE 

MR. AND MRS. THEODORE LONARDO 

MR. AND MRS. RICHARD V. LOONEY 

MR. AND MRS. VINCENT A. LOPEZ 

MR. AND MRS. T. LORENZETTI 

DR. AND MRS. JOHN P. LoSARDO 

MR. AND MRS. MAURICE W. LUCAS 

MR. AND MRS. THOMAS LAWRENCE LUCAS 

MRS. JOHN F. LUCEY 

MR. MICHAEL J. LYONS 

DOMINIC J. MACCARINI 

MR. AND MRS. JOHN P. MacEVOY 

JOHN J. MAGEE 

MR. AND MRS. JOSEPH C. MAHER 

HENRY J. McMAHON 

mr. john p. mahoney 

walter j. mahoney 

mr. and mrs. g. s. maiorino 

mr. and mrs. henry a. malasky 

mr. and mrs. edward w. maloney 

robert h. maloy 

mr. and mrs. michael manna 

dr. and mrs. john e. manning 

mr. and mrs. james w. marley 

rafael j. martinez 

nicholas l. martone 

mr. and mrs. edward a. marut 

dr. and mrs. allan j. mccarthy 

lt. colonel and mrs. william d. 
McCarthy 

mrs. francis h. mcconville 

mr. and mrs. george f. mccormack, sr. 

RAdm. AND MRS. W. M. McCORMICK 
MR. AND MRS. NORVIN W. McCOY 
COL. AND MRS. ROBERT F. McDERMOTT 
EDWARD S. McDonald, SR. '42 
DR. AND MRS. JOSEPH J. McDONALD 



385 



MR. AND MRS. VINCENT P. McDONALD 

MR. AND MRS. JOHN McDONNELL 

DR. AND MRS. JAMES F. McDONOUGH 

MATTHEW A. McENTEE 

MRS. EUGENE L. McGOWAN 

MR. AND MRS. JOHN F. McGRATH 

MR. AND MRS. LEO J. McGRATH 

ATTY. TIMOTHY J. McINERNEY 

MR. AND MRS. ROBERT McKEE 

MR. AND MRS. PHILIP E. McKEON 

MR. AND MRS. ROBERT C McNALLY 

MICHAEL B. McNAMARA FAMILY 

MR. AND MRS. LAWRENCE C. McNEIL 

DR. AND MRS. FRANCIS L. McNELIS 

MR. AND MRS. JOHN C McWILLIAMS 

ARTHUR E. MEAD 

DR. AND MRS. JOSEPH M. MELE 

DR. AND MRS. DOMINIC J. MERLONI 

MRS. LUCIENNE METHOT 

MR. AND MRS. ROMEO MEUNIER 

LEO D. MEUSE 

DR. AND MRS. P. S. MILAZZO 

MR. LOUIS S. MILKOWSKI 

DR. AND MRS. CHARLES O. MILLER 

CLAUDE H. MILLER, M.D. 

GUY J. MILLER 

JOHN J. MOLLOY 

MR. AND MRS. FRANCIS X. MOLONEY 

LEO J. MONAGHAN 

MRS. LEO E. MONKS 

MR. AND MRS. JOHN J. MONROE 

MR. AND MRS. VICTOR A. MORETTI 

MR. AND MRS. PHILIP K. MORRIS 

MR. AND MRS, EARLE D. MULLARE 

MR. AND MRS. THOMAS R. MULLEN 

MR. AND MRS. GERARD J. MULVEY 

MR. AND MRS. RAYMOND J. MURGIA 

MR. AND MRS. CHARLES L MURPHY, SR. 

MR. AND MRS. DANIEL I. MURPHY 

JOHN M. MURPHY 

STEPHEN D. MURPHY 

MR. AND MRS. CHARLES A. MURRAY 

MR. AND MRS. B. F. NACHTMAN 

MR. AND MRS. JAMES J. NALLY 

WILLIAM C. NASH, M.D. 

EDWARD C. NEVINS 

MR. AND MRS. JOSEPH G. NEWMAN, JR. 

MR. AND MRS. WALTER NIEDZIELA AND FAMILY 

AUREL J. NOEL 

MR. AND MRS. THOMAS B. NOONAN 



CLARENCE NOVAK 

MR. AND MRS. STANLEY NOVARAL 

MR. AND MRS. CHARLES NUARA 

PETER P. OBERTO 

MR. AND MRS. CHARLES W. O'CONNELL 

MR. AND MRS. HAROLD J. O'CONNELL, SR. 

MR. AND MRS, VINCENT L O'CONNELL 

MR. AND MRS. MICHAEL J. O'DOHERTY 

MR. AND MRS. STANLEY J, OGIBA 

THOMAS P. O'NEILL, JR., '36 

L. A. ORSINI 

MR. AND MRS. JOHN F, OTTO 

MR. AND MRS. JOHN PABIAN 

MR. AND MRS. CARMEN A. PASTORE 

MR. AND MRS. LOUIS J. PEGORARO 

MR. AND MRS. JOSEPH E. PERRONE 

MARY J. PHILLIPS 

MR. AND MRS. CARMINE PIANTEDOSI 

MR. AND MRS. CHARLES R. PIAZZA 

MR. AND MRS. SALVATORE PIAZZA 

MR. AND MRS. ANGELO PICUCCI 

MR, AND MRS. FRANK PIECUCH 

MR. AND MRS. CHARLES PIRRO 

MR. AND MRS. EDWARD PLASSE 

MRS. MILDRED ANN POLITO 

MR, AND MRS, CHARLES A, POOLE, SR. 

KENNETH W. PORTER 

EDWARD A. J. POSKUS 

DR. AND MRS. H. W. POUNCY, JR. 

SALVATORE PRISCO 

MR. AND MRS. FRANK J. PRIZIO, SR. 

MR. AND MRS. ALFRED T. PROULX 

GILBERT G. PUZIN 

MR, AND MRS. ROBERT A. QUAGLIERI 

MR. AND MRS. S. D. RABADAN 

JOHN RACANELLI 

CALVIN E. RAFUSE 

ROBERT RANSFORD 

MR, AND MRS. E. RAU 

CHARLES L. REARDON 

ROBERT G. REINHART 

MR. AND MRS, FREDERICK RICCIARDELLI 

BRUCE RIBAS 

MR, AND MRS. JOHN J, RIBEIRO 

PETER W, RIEBLING 

DR, AND MRS. S. F, ROACH 

HENRY RODRIGUEZ 

FRANCIS J. ROGAN, M.D. 

MR. AND MRS. CARL E, ROSTOK 

MR. AND MRS. ALFRED ROTONDI 



386 



ROURKE FAMILY 

MR. AND MRS. GEORGE F. ROVEGNO, SR. 

MR. AND MRS. GEORGE ROWLINSON 

MR. AND MRS. F. A. RUDMAN 

MR. AND MRS. EDWARD J. RUEL 

MR. AND MRS. DANIEL J. RULL 

MR. AND MRS. D. RUSSO 

MR. AND MRS. CYRIL R. RYAN 

MR. AND MRS. PAUL R. RYAN 

MR. AND MRS. LOUIS SAKS 

MR. AND MRS. SAMUEL SANTORO 

MR. AND MRS. ANGELO A. SAPIENZA 

MR. AND MRS. JOSEPH SARMIR 

MR. AND MRS. S. J. SASTRI 

MR. AND MRS. DOMENIC SCHEFILITI 

TONY SCHIANO 

MR. AND MRS. VINCENT SCHILLER 

MR. AND MRS. HARLAN M. SCHLESINGER 

WILLIAM J. SCHNEIDER 

JOHN C. SCHRAMM 

DR. AND MRS. SALVATORE SCIARRONE 

STANLEY J. SERON 

MR. AND MRS. GEORGE D. SHANLEY 

MR. AND MRS. JOSEPH F. SHARKEY 

JOHN H. SHEA 

MR. AND MRS. GEORGE SHERBONDY 

MR. AND MRS. JOHN SHULGA 

MR. AND MRS. EMMANUEL A. SIFAKIS 

MR. AND MRS. MAURICE W. SILBER 

MR. AND MRS. H. G. SIMON AND FAMILY 

MR. AND MRS. LOUIS SIMS 

MR. AND MRS. -EUGENE V. SIWEK 

MR. AND MRS. GEORGE J. SLADKIEWICZ 

MR. AND MRS. BRENT L. SMITH 

SHERIFF AND MRS. JOSEPH A. SMITH 

ROBERT J. SMITH FUNERAL HOME 

MR. AND MRS. TINO A. SPATOLA 

MR. AND MRS. RALPH SPINELLI, SR. 

NORMAN J. SPITZIG 

MR. AND MRS. THOMAS J. SPRING 

MR. AND MRS, A. STASKO 

MR. AND MRS. NICHOLAS STEPKA 

MRS. THOMAS J. STOODLEY 

MRS. HARRY H. STRAUS, JR. 

MR. AND MRS. ROBERT F. SULLIVAN, '44 

T. F. X. SULLIVAN 

WALTER F. SULLIVAN 

MR. AND MRS. WILLIAM J. SULLIVAN 

MR. AND MRS. JOHN SULLO 

DR. AND MRS. T. H. SWEETSER, JR. 



COLEMAN AND MILDRED SZELY 

MR. AND MRS. VICTOR SZOCIK 

MR. AND MRS. DANTE TANCREDI 

MRS. EDWARD S. TANGAL 

MR. AND MRS. ARTHUR S. TAYLOR 

PETER S. TERRANOVA 

DR. AND MRS. D. JOSEPH TERRERI 

MR. AND MRS. ERNEST THOMAS 

MR. AND MRS. RICHARD J. THOMS 

MR. AND MRS. CHARLES E. TIMMONS 

MR. AND MRS. JAMES A. TIRRELL, JR. 

JOHN P. TONZI 

MR. AND MRS. WILLIAM L. TORY 

MR. ROBERT W. TOTTEN 

MR. AND MRS. CHARLES G. TOURNAS 

MR. AND MRS. JOHN P. TOUSIGNANT 

MR. AND MRS. ALBERT TRAVAGLINI 

MR. AND MRS. ANTHONY TROMBINO 

DR. AND MRS. GEORGE L. TULLY 

MR. L. T. TURCOTTE 

EDWIN J. TURNER 

CHARLES M. TYNER 

JOHN AND SHIRLEY URBAN 

JOSEPH M. URCIULO 

MR. AND MRS. JOSEPH E. VALENTI 

FRANK J. VASILE 

VINCENT VISCONTI 

J. KENNETH WAINWRIGHT, SR. 

LILA J. WALKER 

MR. AND MRS. JAMES F. WALSH 

MR. AND MRS. JOSEPH F. WALSH 

MR. AND MRS. STANLEY F. WASOWSKI 

MR. AND MRS. SILAS M. WASS 

WATERBURY SWISS AUTOMATICS 

MARION A. WEBER 

MR. AND MRS. EDWARD B. WEEDON, JR. 

MR. AND MRS. CHARLES WEILES 

MRS. MARION M. WELBY 

MR. AND MRS. JOHN H. WEST 

MR. AND MRS. JOSEPH J. WHITE 

MR. AND MRS. MICHAEL WILENTA AND FAMILY 

MR. AND MRS. LEO F. WILSON 

MR. AND MRS. ARTHUR T. WINCEK 

MRS. JOHN P. WOODS 

ROBERT J. WYNNE, SR. 

MR. AND MRS. ADAM WYSOCKI 

MR. AND MRS. JOSEPH YARMALA 

MR. AND MRS. GEORGE J. YOST 

MR. AND MRS. SYLVESTER J. ZICARI 

MR. AND MRS. JOSEPH M. ZLATOPER 



387 



H. C, WyilXWRIGHT ^ CO. 

Established 1868 

MEMBERS 
Boston and New York Stock Exchanges 

INVESTMENT SECURITIES 



60 State Street 
Boston 

120 Broadway 
New York 



Salem, Mass. 
Framlngham, Mass. 
Fltchburg, Mass. 
Providence, R.I. 
Portland, Maine 
Lewlston, Maine 
Bangor, Maine 
Manchester, N.H. 
Keene, N.H. 



GROUP CHARTER BUS TOURS 

CUSTOM PACKAGE PLANS TAILORED 
TO YOUR TASTE 




Modern Comfortable Air Conditioned Coaches 

BRUSH HILL TRANSPORTATION CO., INC. 

Agents tor Plymouth and Brockton St. Rwy. Co. 

109 Norfolk St., Dorchester Tel. 436-4100 



No shifting 
at Elbery 



Satisfied customers come back for more. 

That's why Elbery is one of New England's 

largest Ford dealers. 



547-3820 



ELBERY MOTOR CORP. 

360 River St., Cambridge 

Take Cambridge exit from Mass. Pike 



HOME SUPPLY CO. 

HARDWARE • PAINTS • WALLPAPER 
LINOLEUMS 

366 Washington Street 
Brighton, Mass. 

STadium 2-0240 
ELI SOKOLOVE 



388 



D. W. DUNN CO. 

Exclusive Metropolitan Boston Agent 
Aero Mayflower Transit Co., Inc. 

World-Wide Moving Service 
HAncock 6-8000 Boston 

BOB DUNN, '42 DAN DUNN, '42 


TYPEWRITERS— ADDING MACHINES 

Rented 
Sold 

Repaired 

PETER PAUL 

OFFICE EQUIPMENT 

CO., INC. 

II PINE STREET WALTHAM, MASS. 
TVV 3-8920 


SULLIVAN D.C. & CO., 
INC. 

Specialists in 

Industrial Security 
Undercover Operators — Guards 

24 HOUR SERVICE 
6 Beacon Street CApitol 7-0349 


ATTENTION GRADUATION SENIORS: 

GET YOUR UNIFORMS AND 
FATIGUES FROM US NOW 

NO PAYMENT UNTIL YOU GO 
ON ACTIVE DUTY. 

All uniforms by Allied are approved by the Army 
Quality Control Board and are guaranteed for ex- 
cellence of workmanship, materials, and correct fit. 

ALLIED UNIFORM 
COMPANY 

260 East Berkeley St. 

Boston, Massachusetts 02118 

Telephone: 542-9600 

Outfitters of Boston College Army R.O.T.C. 



389 



The 
cJass 

ofTO 
gawa 
,aaiiin 
about 

draught 






122 HARVARD AV /ALLSTON, MA 7254 9342 



822 BEACON ST /BOSTON, MA /262 4689 



390 




PINO'S 
PIZZA HOUSE 





1970 Football 


Sept. 
Oct. 


26 
3 


*Navy 
VMI 


Oct. 


10 


Penn State 


Oct. 


17 


*Villanova 


Oct. 


24 


*Air Force 


Oct. 

Nov. 


31 

7 


Army 
Buffalo 


Nov. 


14 


* Pittsburgh 


Nov. 
Nov. 


21 
28 


*Massachusetts 
Holy G-oss 





1920-A Beacon St. 




Cleveland Circle 




Tel 


. 566-6468 




'70- 


71 Hockey 


Dec. 


2 


Yale 


Dec. 


5 


*Princeton 


Dec. 


8 


* Brown 


Dec. 


11 


Providence 


Dec. 


15 


* Harvard 


Dec. 


18-19 


ECAC 


Dec. 


21 


Minnesota 


Dec. 


23 


Loyola 


Dec. 


27-28 


St. Louis Tourn. 


Dec. 


30 


Notre Dame 


Jan. 


2 


Pennsylvania 


Jan. 


6 


*UNH 


Jan. 


9 


BU 


Jan. 


13 


* Dartmouth 


Jan. 


19 


*RPI 


Jan. 


26 


Clarkson 


Jan. 


29 


St. Lawrence 


Feb. 


1 


* Providence 


Feb. 


5 


Northeastern 


Feb. 


8 


* Harvard 


Feb. 


13 


* Colgate 


Feb. 


16 


*BU 


Feb. 


19 


Cornell 


Feb. 


22 


Beanpot Finals 


Feb. 


27 


*Armv 

Come on Down 
Everyone Knows It's 
the Best Pizza in Town/ 



''Away 




391 




ELSIE'S 

LUNCH OF HARVARC? SQ. 

Famous for Roast Beef Sandwiches 

Wishes All The Best 

To The 

Class of 1 970 



BEST WISHES FROM 

ALPHA PHI OMEGA 

NATIONAL SERVICE FRATERNITY 



1^1 • 





Tom, our results speak for themselves. The 
finest printing organization In the East to- 
day for both science and Industry is the 
Fandel Press. 
brochures • reports • letters • 

stationery • sales literature • 

labels • tags • business cards • 

checks • envelopes • business fornns 



UPSILON ZETA CHAPTER 
BOSTON COLLEGE 




//^■^^ \HQ. 



59 McBride Street • Jannaica Plain 
Dial . . . 524-0203 



392 



Compliments of 

SAGA 
FOOD SERVICE 



be a Liquor Picker 

atMartignetti's 



m^rtlgneHi 
■ touORS „ 




Compliments of a Friend 



BEST WISHES 

TO THE 
CLASS OF 1970 



Will Scientific, Inc. 

293 Broadway 

Cambridge, Mass. 



Compliments 

of the 

BOSTON COLLEGE 

ATHLETIC 

ASSOCIATION 


CROWN 
LINEN SERVICE 

Rental Service of 

BED LINENS, TABLE LINENS, 

APPAREL 

Serving 
HOTELS, RESTAURANTS, 
INSTITUTIONS, INDUSTRY 

39 Damrell St. 

So. Boston, Mass. 

Springfield — Worcester — Hyannis 

Reading — Manchester N. H. 








CHARLES F. MURPHY, INC. 

1 4 Wood Road 
Braintree, Massachusetts 02184 

CHARLES F. MURPHY, 1955 
JOHN E. MOYLAN, 1951 




^^H^^QS^^^IH^I 






1700 Beacon Street 

Lunch and Dinner, 

Served 12:00 to 10:30 

ntimate Cocktail Lounge 'til 1 :00 AM 

Entertainment Nightly 





394 




Best Wishes to the Class of 1970 

THE UNIVERSITY CHORALE OF 
BOSTON COLLEGE 




WILLIAM H. SULLIVAN, JR, '37 JOHN J. GRIFFIN, '35 
President Vice President 



JOSEPH F. TOWER, JR, '53 
Treasurer 



ROBERT F. LARKIN, "51 

Sales Representative 



JOHN F. SULLIVAN, '59 

Sales Representative 



i 




METROPOLITAN PETROLEUM COMPANY 

©ilheat 



500 NEPONSET AVENUE • BOSTON, MASSACHUSETTS 02122 • 288-1100 

A DIVISION OF THE PITTSTON COMPANY 



395 



Congratulations 

and Best Wishes 

to the Class of 1970 

From 

The Office of 

University Development 




396 



Compliments of a Friend 



John Bowen & Co. Inc., 1 1 5 Newbury St., Boston, Mojs. 



397 



Welcome to the Class of 1970 
Boston College Alumni Association 




BE9T WIQHEQ TO THE CLA99 OF 1970 FROM 
THE BR0THER9 OF DELTA 9IGMA PI 



398 



^^m. Pf 




Ipc 



TAYLOR PUBLISHING COMPANY 

PAUL J. DELANEY • UNIVERSITY AND COLLEGE CONSULTANT • PHONE 226-0600 
BOX 528 . NORTH ATTLEBORO, MASSACHUSETTS 



SERVICE 'f SACWnCE 

nsTON COLLEGE 



Complimenil 



GOLD KEl 




399 



ffiampltm^nt^ ^f: 



(Dtarl^^ (£. J)thmtbt 



400 




401 



Best Wishes from the 



UNDERGRADUATE GOVERNMENT 
OF BOSTON COLLEGE 




402 




Compliments of the School of Education Senate 




403 




225 PARK AVENUE SOUTH 
NEW YORK, N. Y. 10003 



404 



J. H. McNAMARA, INC. 



READY MIX CONCRETE 



Sand, Gravel and Roofing Gravel 



298 North Harvard Street 
Allston, Mass. 

STadium 2-3350 
TW 3-7562 



Best Wishes to 

the Class of 1 970 

From 



Mass. Gas & Electric Light 
Supply Co. 

193 Friend St., Boston, Mass, 



GREETINGS— 

to Our Good Friends 
at Boston College, 



CHARGELESS 
CHECKING ACCOUNTS 

• 

EDUCATIONAL 

LOANS 

• 

SAVINGS ACCOUNTS 



NEWTON-WALTHAM BANK 
and TRUST COMPANY 

IvIEI^BER F.D.I.C. 



BEST WISHES 

to 


Best Wishes 

to the Class of '70 


the Class of 1970 


SULLIVAN 




BROTHERS 


WILLIAM J. KICKHAM, '48 
JOHN J. CARROLL, '50 


PRINTERS 


NORTHEAST SECURITY, INC. 

310 Harvard Ave., Brookline 

Tel. 232-3022 


LoNvell, Mass. 


DAVID H. LEAHY JOHN F. LEAHY 




BOSTON TEXTILE CO. 


YOUNG'S FURNITURE 


Our 37th Yr. 


COMPANY, INC. 


INSTITUTIONAL 




DRY GOODS 

Distributors of 


1036 Great Plain Ave. 

Needham, Mass. 

Tel. 444-2278 


CANNON SHEETS AND TOWELS 

CHATHAM BLANKETS 

BATES BEDSPREADS 

CHURCH LINENS 

CASSOCK GOODS 




93 Summer Street Boston, Mass. 02110 




Telephone 542-8630 





406 



for wisdom will come into your hearts, 
and knowledge will be pleasant to your soul . . . 

THE COMMUTERS' COUNCIL 
OF BOSTON COLLEGE 


BEST WISHES 

TO 

THE CLASS 

OF '70 

H. J. Dowd Co., Inc. 

300 Bent Street 

Cambridge, Mass. 


Congratulations 

from 

Bunratty's! 

No Cover, No Minimum 
Open until 2:00 a.m. 

1 86 Harvard St. 
Boston, Mass. 
Tel. 254-9804 


COMPLIM^NTQ 

OF: 

The Dunton Corp. 
124 Summer Street 

Boston, Mass. 

Tel. LI 2-7124 

/nsfifufional Furniture 



407 



Compliments of 
a Friend 



The College Sub Shop 

Where America's Finest 
Sandwiches Are Served 



2197 COMMENWEALTH AVE. 

(Next to Boston College Station) 
Tel. 254-9724 



COMPLIMENTS OF 

PAUL E. P. BURNS CO., INC. 

316 Summer Street 
Boston 10, Mass. 

ACADEMIC CAPS. GOWNS AND HOODS, 

CHOIR ROBES 

AND ACCESSORIES 

FOR SALE AND RENTALS 

LI 2-1513 LI 2-1514 

PAUL E. P. BURNS, '53 



408 



Best Wishes to the Class of 1970 

from 
The University Store 

Mcelroy commons • boston college 

THE BOOKSTORE IS A TRUE ACADEMIC BRANCH OF ANY UNIVERSITY 

Textbooks • Required and Recommended 

Paperbacks From Al! Publishers • Reference Books 

Sportswear • Jewelry • Stationery • Glassware 

Greeting Cards • Supplies 

Boston College Songs Recorded by the University Chorale 

Classical and Popular Records 

GIFT ITEMS FOR ALUMNI AND FRIENDS 



RINGS 

PINS 
MEDALS 
CHARMS 

CUPS 
PLAQUES 
TROPHIFS 



excellent 

design 

skilled 

craftsmanship 

superb 

quality 



The Official Boston College Ring 
by 

DIEGES & CLUST 

Providence, R. I. 

Available Through 

The Bookstore 

Chestnut Hill 



BEST WISHES 
TO THE CLASS OE 70 




BOSTON-NEWTON 

399 GROVE STREET, ROUTE 128 AND GROVE STREET 
NEWTON LOWER FALLS, MASSACHUSETTS 02162 



969-5300 



409 



Meredith and Grew Inc. 



Serving New England's 

Real Estate Needs 

Since 1875 



125 High Street Boston 02110 
482-5330 



410 




thhk ffiarth 

(0 (Tmnu'll tuui'sc Bn'5tnn (Tnlloijo 



(Tiiff^t* 



%mi«? 



/^ 



^^ ^ / 



/ 




3Fnlk - '^liux - Blue-s - piietri? - Jftlm^ - iCcrturc>s 



411 




412 



Best Wishes 
From 

VALLE'S STEAK HOUSE 

Famous 1-Lb. Broiled 

SIRLOIN STEAK $3.95 

EVERY WEDNESDAY AND FRIDAY 
DOUBLE LOBSTER SPECIAL 

Broiled, Boiled, or Baked Stuffed 
CHOICE OF MANY COMPLETE DINNERS 

$2.95 and up 
COMPLETE LUNCHEONS $1.25 and up 

ALL PRICES SUBJECT TO CHANGE 




ALLES 



STEAK HOUSE 

Newton • Open I I AM To Midnight 
969-9 1 60 




Compliments of 




NEWTON CHARTER HOUSE HOTEL 

Route 9 Chestnut Hill, Massachusetts 






413 




414 




4/5 



(lIxim:plTm^nt0 




416 



^^■i^ 




Congratulations From: 
The Boys in the Band 



417 




^Qjomphmenis ^ 



o, 



iDusiu^s loeoion 



418 




419 



William's Subculture 
Basement Cuisine 




420 




421 




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""W-,- ...V,;*'- . . ■:-|ffCati£.T4;"l 


Senior Index 


1 




Senior Index 



ARTHUR A. ABBOTT 

6 Brook Farm Rd. 

West Roxbury, Mass. 

RALPH F. ABBOTT 

99 Webster St, 

Arlington, Mass. 

CHRISTOPHER S. ABELL 

25WestKirkeSt. 

Chevy Chase, Md. 

STEPHEN J. ACKERMAN 

1830 Plymouth St. 

Washington, D. C. 

MARY S. ACUFF 

15RicheyPl. 

Trenton, Mass. 

SUELLEN M. ADERHOLDT 

43 Sharon Dr. 

Poughkeepsie, N. Y. 

JOSEPH F. AGRESTA 

85 East St. 

Dedham, Mass. 

JAMES E. AHERN 

48 Tower St. 

Jamaica Plain, Mass. 



KEVIN J. AHERN 

52 Barton Lane 
Milton, Mass. 
STEPHEN H. AHERN 
51 Lewelyn Rd. 
Stamford, Conn. 
JANE M. ALBANO 
30 Shawnee Rd. 
Arlington, Mass. 
SR. M. DELLIS ALBERT 
3221 South Lake Dr. 
Milwaukee, Wise. 
ROBERTA. ALESSI 
8 Ridge Rd. 
Revere, Mass. 
ADELINE M.ALEX 
6 Chestnut PI. 
Framingham, Mass. 
VICTOR J. ALIBRANDI 
3331 Brown Ave. 
Manchester, N. H. 
DOROTHY D. ALLEN 
94 Safford St. 
Hyde Park, Mass. 



ARNOLD. E. AMIRAULT 
75 Robin St. 
West Roxbury, Mass. 
ROBERT M.AMODIO 
51 Lewelyn Rd. 
Stamford, Conn. 
STEPHEN D. AMOROSO 
580 Grant Ave. 
Baldwin, N. Y. 
JUDITH M. ANDERSON 
2134 Haven Rd. 
Wilmington, Del. 
THEODORE L 

ANDERSON 
85 Pleasant Ave. 
Naughtuck, Conn. 
LAWRENCE J. ANDOLINA 
105 Belknap St. 
Rochester, N. Y. 
MICHAEL D. 

ANGELICOLA 
43 Anthony Ter. 
Waterbury, Conn. 
BRUCE F. ANSELMO 
32 Beryl St. 
Roslindale, Mass. 
CARLP. ANTIGNANI 
258 Pleasant View Ave. 
Bridgeport, Conn. 
WALTER J. APPLETON 
28 Elm St. 
Winchester, Mass. 
RICHARD J. ARCHER 
94 Erie Ave. 
Midland Park, N.J. 
EDWARD T.ASIP 
81 Intervale St. 
Rockville Center, N. Y. 
ROBERT E. ASPELL 
343 Vermont St. 
West Roxbury, Mass. 
JEAN A. AUCOIN 
12 Appleton St. 
Waltham, Mass. 
PAUL E. AUCOIN 
RFDl 

Orrington, Me. 
HELEN L. BABCOCK 
201 Kelton St. 
Brighton, Mass. 
JOHN C. BACON 
48 Gaslight Lane 
South Weymouth, Mass. 
JOAN E. BAHER 
52 East High St. 
Avon, Mass. 
RICHARD J. BAIR 
70 Hollywood Ave. 
Albany, N.Y. 
STEPHEN A. BAISDEN 
1713 Commonwealth Ave. 
Brighton, Mass. 



ELOISE M. BALASCO 
29 Shafter St. 
Providence, R. I. 
JOHN N. BALBONI 
4 Smiths Lane 
Kingston, Mass. 
LOUIS E. BALDI 
216 Bradford St. 
Everett, Mass. 
TERRANCE E. BALE 
2473 Rhonda Dr. 
Vestal, N. Y. 
ELIZABETH A. 

BALLANTYNE 
13 River St. 
Mattapan, Mass. 
TERRENCEBANE 
7 Nicod St. 
Arlington, Mass. 
JENIFER R. BANEVER 
122DustinSt. 
Brighton, Mass. 
PAUL T.BANKS 
96 Washington St. 
Milton, Mass. 
GARY J. BARAN 
610 Plant St. 
Utica,N.Y. 
JOYCE J. BARAN 
47 Englewood Ave. 
Brookline, Mass. 
RONALD BARG 
South Great Rd. 
Lincoln, Mass. 
CHRISTINE BARNETT 
424 Great Rd., Apt 6 
West Acton, Mass. 
WALTER J. 

BARONOWSKI 
2 Alden St. 

Newton Center, Mass. 
MANUEL BARRERA 
196 Sumner St. 
Newton Center, Mass. 
LEOG. BARRILE 
4 Fitz St. 
Lawrence, Mass. 
CHARLES J. BARRY 
30 Trowbridge Ave. 
Newtonville, Mass. 
MARIE C.BARRY 
21 Adams St. 
West Medway, Mass. 
STEPHEN T. BARRY 
684 East Merrimack St. 
Lowell, Mass. 
THOMASJ. BARRY 
117 Falcon St. 
East Boston, Mass. 
TIMOTHY F. BARRY 
32 Lenox St. 
West Newton, Mass. 



424 



RALPH S. 

BARTHOLOMEW 
5 Jordan St. 
Portland, Me. 
DENIS R. BARTON 
49 South Bay Rd. 
North Syracuse, N. Y. 
WILLIAM C. BARTON 
105 Wright St. 
Arlington, Mass. 
ROBERT S. BASSETT 
11 Boston Post Rd. 
Larchmont, N. Y. 
THOMAS S. BATES 
11 Hilltop Rd. 
Cheshire, Conn. 
CARLF. BATTAGLIA 
176 Broadmoor Dr. 
Tonawanda, N. Y. 
GERARD E. BATTISTA 
11 Wellington Rd. 
Winchester, Mass. 
MARGARET M. BEAN 
75 Stowecroft Rd. 
Arlington, Mass. 
RAYMOND C. BEATTIE 
159 Corey St. 
West Roxbury, Mass. 
OLIVER F. BEAUCHEMIN 
42 Washington St. 
Charleston, Mass. 
ALBERT J. BEAUPRE 
1591 Wiltshire St. 
Berkley, Mich. 
BERNARD E. BECKER 
3340 Rocky River Dr. 
Cleveland, Ohio 
ANGELE BEDARD 
Lowell Rd. 

North Reading, Mass. 
CAROLYN K. BEDELL 
46 Dellwood Ave. 
Chatham, N.J. 
PAUL BEDROSIAN 
1 Upland Rd. 
Watertown, Mass. 
JOAN M. BEHENNA 
87 Nightingale Ave. 
Quincy, Mass. 
ANTHONY O.BEIRNE 
77 Buckingham Rd. 
West Hempstead, N. Y. 
ROBERT P. BELANGER 
4lCyrSt. 
Providence, R. I. 
MICHAEL D. BELDEN 
225 21st St. N.W. 
Canton, Ohio 
CHARLES R. BENNETT 
38 Brazil St. 
Melrose, Mass. 
DONALD P. BENSON 
159Glezen Lane 
Wayland, Mass 



PETER E. BENSON 
99 Ashworth St. 
Manchester, Conn. 
DAVID D. BERGAN 
356 South Fifth St. 
Fulton, N. Y. 
DENNIS J. BERRY 
37 East Plain St. 
Cochituate, Mass. 
JOSEPH M. BESSETTE 
176 Chestnut St. 
Randolph, Mass. 
MICHAEL L BICKFORD 
Bayberry Lane 
Greenwich, Conn. 
DEBORAH E. BIGHAM 
4 Plymouth Rd. 
Weston, Mass. 
FRANCIS A. BIONDO 
Marist College 
Framingham Center, Mass. 
DENNIS R. BLAHA 
1418 East Oklahoma Ave. 
Milwaukee, Wise. 
DONALD R. BLANCHARD 
493 Hatherly Rd. 
North Scituate, Mass. 
BRUCE B. BLANGIARDI 
2 Franklin St. 
Medford, Mass. 
VERONICA M. BLEAKLEY 
21 Williams St. 
Malverne, N. Y. 
ROBERT D. BLUTE 
37 Kenilworth Rd. 
Shrewsbury, Mass. 
LOUIS BOCCHETTO 
47-50 4lst St. 
Long Island, N. Y. 
PAULJ. BOCHICCHIO 
340 South Regent St. 
Port Chester, N. Y. 
STANLEY M. BOCKO 
32 Mount Pleasant St. 
North Billerica, Mass. 
RONALD J. BOEHLER 
10 Augusta Rd. 
Milton, Mass. 
MARK BOHAN 
115 Codman Rd. 
Norwood, Mass. 
JAMES C. BOKAL 
429 Oakdale Rd. 
Johnson, City, N. Y. 
PATRICK R. BOLAND 
48 Lebanon St. 
Melrose, Mass. 
WILLIAM T. BOLAND 
Independence Rd. 
Concord, Mass. 



GAIL ANN BOLDUC 

39 Montello St. 

Lewiston, Me. 

JOHN V, BOND 

156 Albemarle Rd. 

Norwood, Mass. 

JOSEPH W. BONDI 

4472 Groveland Rd. 

Cleveland, Ohio 

RICHARD A. BONDI 

Stigmatine Fathers 

Wellesley, Mass. 

JAMES P. BONGARRA 

62 Hawthorne Dr. 

New London, Conn. 

JOHN A. BONNAGE 

Weston College 

Weston, Mass. 

ROBERTA. BORUCKI 

76 East St. 

Southampton, Mass. 

SR. LAURA BOUCHARD 

1071 Blue Hill Ave. 

Milton, Mass. 

ROBERT J. BOUCHARD 

881 Bay St. 

Taunton, Mass. 

ELLEN M. BOUDREAU 

44 Billings Park 

Newton, Mass. 

PAUL BOUDREAU 

19 Winn St. 

Wakefield, Mass. 

MICHAEL BOUGHTON 

7 Colonial Rd. 

Old Bethpage, N. Y. 

ROBERT L. BOULEY 

459 Commercial Rd. 

Weymouth, Mass. 

J. DEAN BRACKLEY 

300 Newbury St. 

Boston, Mass. 

MARK W. BRADLEE 

399 Chapman St. 

Canton, Mass. 

JOAN M. BRADLEY 

9 Windsor St. 

Arlington, Mass. 

TIMOTHY C. BRADLEY 

100 Wyndham Ave. 

Providence, R. I. 

MARY L.BRADY 

14 Porter Rd. 

Waltham, Mass. 

JAMES J. BRANSFIELD 

586 Riverside Ave. 

Medford, Mass. 

CAROLYN A. BREGAR 

3841 Highpoint Dr. 

Allentown, Pa. 

FERNANDO BREILH 

418 Beacon St. 

Boston, Mass. 



JAMES F. BRENNAN 
25 Tallmadge Ave. 
Chatham, N.J. 
PHILIP M. BRENNAN 
77 Standard St. 
Mattapan, Mass. 
ALFRED A. BRIAND 
19 Usher Rd. 
Medford, Mass. 
JEFFREY A. BRINE 
157 South St. 
Brookline, Mass. 
JOSEPH J. BRITT JR. 
Westmoreland Dr. 
Whitesboro, N. Y. 
PAULA M. BROCK 
5 East St. 
Whitehall, N.Y. 
PAULR. BRODER 
9304 N.E. 5th Ave. 
Miami, Fla. 

STEPHEN E. BRODEUR 
14 1 Essex St. 
Marlboro, Mass. 
WILLIAM G. BRODY 
709 South Lindell Rd. 
Greensboro, N. C. 
STEPHEN J. BROGAN 
21 Bolton St. 
Somerville, Mass. 
THEODORE P. 
BROGOWSKI 

300 Fouth Ave. 

Spring Lake, N.J. 
JOHN F. BRONZO 

258 Duxbury Rd. 

Purchase, N. Y. 

ROBERT W. BROOKS 

14 Appletree Rd. 

Tewksbury, Mass. 

WILLIAM J. BROOKS 

7 Allston St. 

Dorchester, Mass. 

CHARLES C BROWN 

1368 Washington Blvd. 

Cleveland, Ohio 

KENNETH A. BROWN JR. 

420 North Ave. 

Weston, Mass 

STEPHEN L. BRYANT 

67 Pond St. 

Watertown, Mass. 

ANTHONY S. BRYK 

706 Terhune Dr. 

Wayne, N.J. 

LOUIS V. BUCKLEY 

12 Pickwick Rd. 

Marblehead, Mass. 

STEPHEN R. BUCKLEY 

38 Old Colony Rd. 

Arlington, Mass. 



425 



DONNA J. BUCKNAM 

75 Massachusetts Ave. 
Braintree, Mass. 
LEO J. BULGER 
48 Beacon St. 
Boston, Mass. 
MITCHELL J. BUREK 
6 Barbara St. 
Chicopee, Mass. 
JOHN P. BURKE 
55 Walnut St. 
Natick, Mass. 
ROBERT J. BURKE 
142 Park Ave. 
Portland, Me. 



DANIEL F.CAHILL 
llWoodbridgeRd. 
North Andover, Mass. 
JOHN B. CAHILL 
62 Charles St. 
Natick, Mass. 
MAR 1 r. CAHILL 
15 Holmes Rd. 
Dedham, Mass. 
THOMAS F.CAHILL 
1 Ashcroft St. 
Auburn, Mass. 




ROBERT L BURKE 
401 Canton Ave. 
Milton, Mass. 

FRANCIS X. BURNES III 
4 Loockerman Ave. 
Poughkeepsie, N. Y. 
JOHN R. BURNETT 
42 West Lake Rd. 
Trumbull, Conn. 
SR. ELIZABETH BURNS 
Maryknoll House 
Maryknoll, N. Y. 
MARGARET C. 

BURRASCANO 
445 Highview Rd. 
Englewood, N.J. 
CARLJ. BUSCH 
24 Madison PI. 
Roslyn Heights, N. Y. 
MARY E. BUTLER 
475 Poplar St. 
Roslindale, Mass. 
THOMAS W.BYRNE 
160 Grove Ave. 
Leominster, Mass. 
JAMES R. CAHALANE JR. 
52 Barbara Rd. 
Needham, Mass. 



JUDITH A. CAIN 

1 5 Lafayette St. 
Waltham, Mass. 
WILLIAM P. CAIN 
188 Beacon St. 
Chestnut Hill, Mass. 
BARBARA M. CALLAHAN 

16 Rae Ave. 
Needham, Mass. 
MADELINE T. CALLAHAN 
16 Rae Ave. 

Needham, Mass. 
NEIL E.CALLAHAN 
188 Beacon St. 
Chestnut Hill, Mass. 
ROBERT D. CALLAHAN 
11 Richardson St. 
Winchester, Mass. 
THOMAS B. CALLAHAN 
645 Washington St. 
Abington, Mass. 
BRIAN A. CALLERY 
1803 Washington St. 
Canton, Mass. 
JOANNE M. CALNAN 
27 Springfield St. 
Watertown, Mass. 



PAUL R. CAMACHO 

256 Pleasant St. 
Arlington, Mass. 
GERALD F.CAMBRIA 
64 Anita Dr. 
East Hartford, Conn. 
THOMASJ. CAMBRIA 
25 Springfield Ave. 
Hasbrouk Heights, N. J. 
DAVID G. CAMPBELL 
14 Farragut Ave. 
Somerville, Mass. 
LAWRENCE R. CAMPION 

115 Roxbury St. 
Hartford, Conn. 
DAVID J. CANEPARI 
Litchfield Turnpike 
Woodbridge, Conn. 
DAVID G. CAPONIGRO 
91 Lincoln St. 

Rever, Mass. 

KATHLEEN C. CARAZOLA 

407 McClelland Rd. 

Canonsburg, Pa. 

ROBERTO CARBERRY 

520 Andover St. 

Lawrence, Mass. 

FRANK J. CARBONE 

96 Barbara St. 

Providence, R. I. 

MARCIA L. CAREY 

116 Bacon St. 
Natick, Mass. 
PAMELA J. CARLETON 
32 Elmira St. 
Brighton, Mass. 

EDA M. CARLSON 
4908 Braddock Rd. S.E. 
Washington, D. C. 
JOHN J. CARNEY 

48 Cypress St. 
Watertown, Mass. 
PATRICIA L. CARNEY 
2 Townly Rd. 
Watertown, Mass. 
PATRICK CARNEY 
966 Tucker Rd. 

North Dartmouth, Mass. 
WILLIAM H.CARNEY 
51 Prindiville Ave. 
Framingham, Mass. . 
DON L. CARPENTER 
243 Tower Hill Rd. 
Osterville, Mass. 
GEORGE W. CARPENTER 
19 Arlington Rd. 
Dedham, Mass. 
CHARLOTTE A. CARR 

49 Salmon St. 
West Rosbury, Mass. 
JAMES J. CARR 

5 Fuller Ter. 
Swampscott, Mass. 



KEVIN V. CARR 

165 Washington St. 
Melrose, Mass. 
JOHN E. CARROLL 
2815 East Hartford Ave. 
Milwaukee, Wise. 
NANCY B. CARROLL 
55 Warren Ave. 
Hyde Park, Mass. 
THOMAS S.CARROLL 
12 Dear Run Circle 
Chatham, N.J. 
LENORAJ. CARUSO 
38 Nuack St. 
Watertown, Mass. 
PAULJ. CARVEN 
30 Beechcroft Rd. 
Newton, Mass. 

LAWRENCE P. CASALINO 
219 Myrtle Ave. 
NewMilford,N.J. 
LOUISA.CASCIELLO 
26 Broad St. 
Plainville, Conn. 
JOHNJ.CASCIO 
16 Harvard St. 
Westfield, Mass. 
JAMES A. CASELLA 
132 Ottawa Ave. 
Hasbrouk Heights, N.J. 
DALE F. CASEY 
89 Colborne Rd. 
Brighton, Mass. 
MARGARET A. CASEY 
1063 Massachusetts Ave. 
Lexington, Mass. 
PAUL W.CASEY 
14 Academy St. 
Kingston, N.J. 
WILLIAM C. CASH 
IsTupper Dr. 
Stamford, Conn. 
DANIEL R.CASO 
84 Vine St. 
Saugus, Mass. 
CYNTHIA C. CASSIDY 
92 Arcadia Ave. 
Bridgeport, Conn. 
GERALYN M. CASSIDY 
208 Fenno St. 
Revere, Mass. 
MICHAEL D. CASSIDY 
69 Felsmere Ave. 
Pawtucket, R. I. 
PETER A. CASTOLDI 
38 EastQuinobequin Rd. 
Waban, Mass. 

FREDRIC G. CATALAN© 
84A Clinton St. 
Chelsea, Mass. 
JOHN S. CATALANO 
4 Captains Lane 
Old Saybrook, Conn. 



426 



ANTHONY H. CATALDO 
45 Cooper St. 
Boston, Mass. 
JAMES F. CATONE 
34 Fidelis Way 
Brighton, Mass. 
JANETA.CAVALEN 
32 Dewey St. 
Watertown, Mass. 

NORMAN G. CAVALLARO 

140 Lynn Rd. 

Bristol, Conn. 

JOSEPH J. CELLA III 

5707 Ovcrlea Rd. 

Washington, D. C. 

ARGEO P. CELLUCCI 

157 Lincoln St. 

Hudson, Mass. 

PAULA. CENTOFANTI 

72 Sparkill St. 

Watertown, Mass. 

SUSAN J. CERCE 

121 Walnut St. 

Brockton, Mass. 

MARK R. CHAFFEE 

105 Henderson Dr. 

Penfield, N. Y. 

AROLJ. CHARBONNEAU 

Autumn St. 

Goffstown, N. Y. 

MARY ANNE C CHARDO 

34 Golden Ave. 

Medford, Mass. 

RICHARD L. CHARLAND 

4755 North Main St. 

Fall River, Mass. 

JENNIE CHIN 

77 Harrison Ave. 

Boston, Mass. 

DANIEL D.CIAMPA 

58Cedrus Ave. 

Roslindalc, Mass. 

PETER M. CIANFROCCa 

102 Fearing Dr. 

Westwood, Mass. 

FRANK J. CIANO 

83 Orvis Rd. 

Arlington, Mass. 

MARYF. CIOFFREDI 

22 Hollywood Ave. 

Eastchester, N. Y. 

WALTER H. CIOVACCO 

4 Shute Ave. 

Hingham, Mass. 

MARIE L. CIPOLLA 

65 Appleton St. 

Arlington, Mass. 

JAMES F. CLARK 

90 Anawan Rd. 
Pawtucket, R. I. 



JOHN J. CLARK 
7 Old Morton St. 
Boston, Mass. 
MAUREEN CLARK 
365 East Main St. 
Avon, Mass. 

RICHARD F. CLARKE 
Stoney Hill Ter. 
Ridgefield, Conn. 



JAMES H.COLLINS 
193 Wolcott Rd. 
Chestnut Hill, Mass. 
DOLORES A. COLORIO 
36 Edward St. 
Worcester, Mass. 
JENNIFER A. COLTON 
29 Beacon St. 
Hyde Park, Mass. 




SHEILA J. CLIFFORD 
35 Marion Rd. 
Watertown, Mass. 
PATRICIA A. CLOONAN 
33MagalettaDr. 
Westwood, Mass. 
MARIE L. CLORY 
71 Standish Rd. 
Watertown, Mass. 
ROBERT W. COCHRANE 
17 Foch St. 
Cambridge, Mass. 
PHILIP A. CODY 
11 Locust Way 
Nahant, Mass. 
ROGER W.COLETTI 
10 Oceanside Dr. 
Beverly, Mass. 



JEFFREY J. COLUCCI 

151 Rockaway Ave. 

Garden City, N.Y. 

GENEW.COMELLA 

30 Phelps St. 

Lyons, N.Y, 

MARYANNE E. COMPO 

25 Camore St. 

Stamford, Conn. 

RITA M. CONLIN 

27 Glendale Rd. 

Milton, Mass. 

THEODORE W. CONNELL 

532 Beech St. 

Haworth, N.J. 

WINIFRED CONNELLY 

180 Wren St. 

West Roxbury, Mass. 



GERALD J. CONNOLLY 
36 Westwood Rd. 
Stoneham, Mass. 
JAMES J. CONNOLLY JR. 
55 Meadowbrook Rd. 
Brookline, Mass. 
JOSEPH F. CONNOLLY 
24 Chestnut St. 
Wakefield, Mass. 
PAULM. CONNOLY 
38 Sydney St. 
Dorchester, Mass. 
JAMES M. CONNOR 
28 Magdala St. 
Dorchester, Mass. 
ROBERT P. CONNOR 
301 Sixth St. 
East Northport, N. Y. 
STEPHEN M. 

CONSOLATTI 
88 Brayton Rd. 
Brighton, Mass. 
WILLIAM A. CONTI 
164 Maplewood Ave. 
Torrington, Conn. 
JOAM M. CONVERY 
6 Foster St. 
Everett, Mass. 

GREGORY A. COOGAN 
26 Sargeant Rd. 
Belmont, Mass. 
DONALD W.COOKE 
215 Dearborn PI. 
Ithaca, N.Y. 

ANTHONY A. COPANI 
65 East Haverhill St. 
Lawrence, Mass. 
JOSEPH P. COPPOLA 
117 West Centennial Ave. 
Roosevelt, N.Y. 
DIANNE M. CORCORAN 
83 Perkins St. 
Jamaica Plain, Mass. 
MICHAELJ. CORLESS 
28 William St. 
Cambridge, Mass. 
ANN L. CORNARO 
75 Sheridan St. 
West Newton, Mass. 
RICHARD M. COSTA 
Cape Cod Ave. 
Manomet, Mass. 
SR. MARY A. COSTELLO 
20 Manet Rd. 
Chestnut Hill, Mass. 
MARY M. COTE 
25 Homer St. 
New Bedford, Mass. 
BRIAN L. COUGHLIN 
Finca Irlanda 4 
El Salvador, C. A. 



427 




THOMAS E. COURAIN 
233 Ward PI. 
South Orange, N.J. 
SANDRA COURTNEY 
190 Lexington Ave. 
Cambiidge, Mass. 
ROBERTO COVIELLO 
5 Mountain Ave. 
Peabody, Mass. 
CAROL A. COX 
399 Forest Hills St. 
Boston, Mass. 
ROBERT F. COX 
29 Johnston St. 
Newburyport, Mass. 



DAVID J. COYLE 
3 Parker Hill Terr. 
Roxbury, Mass. 
JANE L. COYLE 
122 DustinSt. 
Brighton, Mass. 
JOAN M. COYNE 
457 Adams St. 
Quincy, Mass. 
WILLIAM F. COYNE 
53 Cary Ave. 
Milton, Mass. 
JOHN F. CRAIGEN 
51 Veteran's Memorial Dr. 
Peabody, Mass. 



JAMES R. CREAMER 

44 Fulling Ave. 

Tuckahoe, N. Y. 

PAUL J. CREEDEN 

4 Kimball Rd. 

Chelsea, Mass. 

JAMES F. CREHAN 

3 Buckley Ave. 

Jamaica Plain, Mass. 

JOSEPH J. CROAK 

125 Pond Plain Rd. 

Westwood, Mass. 

JAMES P. CRONIN 

54 Grampion Way 

Boston, Mass. 

JOHN P. CRONIN 

655 Front St. 

Weymouth, Mass. 

PAULJ. CRONIN 

21 Clover St. 

Belmont, Mass. 

WILLIAM J. CRONIN 

155 Coleman St. 

Maiden, Mass. 

LAWRENCE E. CROOK 

9 Appleton Ter. 

Watertown, Mass. 

JAMES J. CROWLEY 

2 Shrewsbury Rd. 

Roslindale, Mass. 

MICHAEL P. CROWLEY 

81 Butler St. 

New Bedford, Mass. 

ROBERT T. CROWLEY 

74 Pine Hill Rd. 

Springfield, Mass. 
JAMES A. CUART 

17 Winter St., Apt. 13 

Watertown, Mass. 

WALTER F. CULLEN 

87 Fairview Ave. 

Peabody, Mass. 
JOSEPH D. CULLINAN 

8 Hodge Rd. 

Arlington, Mass. 

BRUCE E. CUNNINGHAM 

103 Court St. 

Dedham, Mass. 
JOHNJ.CURLEY 

106 Kensington Ave. 
Jersey City, N.J. 
JOHN K. CURRAN 
63 Warwick Ave. 
Waltham, Mass. 
MARY L. CURRAN 
112 Dalessio Ct. 
South Boston, Mass. 
MARYELLEN CURRAN 
Box 431 Little Cove 
West Dennis, Mass. 
MICHAEL F. CURRAN 
130 Bald Eagle Rd. 
South Weymouth, Mass. 



WILLIAM H. CURRAN 

155 Springview Dr. 

Lynn, Mass. 

STEPHEN H. CURRIER 

52 Congress St. 

Lawrence, Mass. 

MICHAEL A. CYR 

86 Little Nahant Rd. 

Nahant, Mass. 

PAUL R. CYR 

204 Bennington St. 

East Boston, Mass. 

ROBERT P. DADDARIO 

137 Prospect Ave. 

Revere, Mass. 

RICHARD C. DAIGLE 

9 Alfred St. 

Fort Kent, Me. 

JOHN W. DAILY 

66 Sargent St. 

Winthrop, Mass. 

GERALD M. DALEY 

368 High St. 

Medford, Mass. 

PAULJ. DALONZO 

235 Beech Hill Rd. 

Wynnewood, Pa. 

PETER M. DALTON 

12 Chestnut St. 

Beverly, Mass. 

DENNIS F. DALY 

321 Lafayette St. 

Salem, Mass. 

EDITH H. DALY 

25 Lake St. 

Arlington, Mass. 

JAMES M.DALY JR. 

14 Saunders St. 

Allston, Mass. 

JOSEPH M. DALY 

44 Dale Ave. 

Quincy, Mass. 

STEPHEN A. DALY 

29 Oakhurst Rd. 

Scituate, Mass. 

MICHAEL P. DAMBROSIO 

387 Upham St. 

Melrose, Mass. 

PAULH. DAMOND 

1371 Exeter St. 

Baldwin, N. Y. 

PAUL R. DAOUST 

660 Woodcrest Dr. 

Dearborn, Mich. 

JAMES B. DARCY 

119 Silver Book Rd. 

Milton, Mass. 

JOHN R. DAVIS 

807 Ashland Ave. 

River Forest, 111. 



428 



MONDELL DAVIS 
19 Rose Park Ave. 
Stamford, Conn. 
RICHARD J. DAVIS 
45 Endicott St. 
Stoneham, Mass. 
SR: VIRGINIA DAY 
1561 North Benson Rd. 
Fairfield, Conn. 
JOSEPH M. DAYS 
143 Bradford St. 
Provincetown, Mass. 
GERARD M. DECELLES 
549 Winter St. 
Woonsocket, R. I. 
HENRY A. DeCOTIS 
198 Broadway 
Watervliet, N, Y. 
FRANCIS J. DeGEORGE 
148 Franklin St. 
Stoneham, Mass. 
PHILIP DIETCH 
520 East 90 St. 
New York, N. Y. 
CATHERINE R. DELANY 
ISOGaylordRd. 
Scarsdale, N. Y. 
VICTOR R. DELCLOS 
1513TunlawRd. 
Baltimore, Md. 
LEO J. DELICATA 
6Jewett PI. 
Newton, Mass. 
DAVID A. DELLA PORTA 
99 Fairgate St. 
Rochester, N. Y. 
PAUL DELLA VILLA 
357 Notre Dame St. 
Schenectady, N. Y. 
JOHN E. DELONG 
50 Longview Rd. 
Port Washington, N. Y. 
JOHN L. DELOREY JR. 
4 Jenison St. 
Newton, Mass. 
GAETANOJ. DeLUCA 
31 Chickatawbut St. 
Dorchester, Mass. 
RAYMOND R. DeLUCIA 
26 Richard Dr. 
Hamden, Conn. 
ALAN J. DEMERS 
1 1 Mt. Pleasant Dr. 
Peabody, Mass. 
DENNIS J. DEMPSEY 
43 Clapp Ave. 
Weymouth, Mass. 
PHYLLIS DeROBERTS 
45 South Stone Ave. 
Elmsford, N. Y. 
JOHN E. DESCHENES 
61 Rogers St. 
West Quincy, Mass. 



HELEN C DESCHENES 
17 Reardon St. 
Quincy, Mass. 

ROBERT R. DESJARDINS 
3 Quadrant Rd. 
Salem, Mass. 

RICHARD A. DESMOND 
358 Elm St. 
Braintree, Mass. 
JAMES K. DEVANEY 
38 Perciaval St. 
Dorchester, Mass. 
KEVIN DEVINE 
664 Blackstone Ave. 
East Meadow, N. Y. 
PHILLIP E. DEVINE 
69 Adams St. 
Dorchester, Mass. 
LOUIS D. DiCARLO 
503 North St. 
Schenectady, N. Y. 
SAMUEL X.DiFEO 
92 Gifford Ave. 
Jersey City, N.J. 
PAULA. DiFRANZA 
74 School St. 
Saugus, Mass. 
JOHN J. DiGIORGIO 
7 Highfield Rd. 
Roslindale, Mass. 
GILBERT F. DILLON JR. 
3 16 Washington St. 
Arlington, Mass. 
ROBERT DILLON 
225 Grove St. 
Cambridge, Mass. 
JOSEPH A. DiMATTINA 
4020 Avenue I 
Brooklyn, N. Y. 
CLAIRE R. DIONNE 
5 Morgan St. 
Nashua, N. H. 
PETER S. DiPAULA 
112-20 72nd Dr. 
Forest Hills, N. Y. 
STEVEN W. DiRUSSO 
63 Smith St. 
Leominster Mass. 
DANIEL L. DISCENZA 
101 Ashland Ave. 
Springfield, Mass. 
RICHARD C DiVINO 
ll6BellevueRd. 
Watertown, Mass. 
WILLIAM P. DiVITTO 
154 East Main St. 
Milford, Mass. 
MICHAEL J. DIXSON 
614 East Grant St. 
Appleton, Wise. 
JEROME P. DOBEL III 
540 East 56th St. 
Kansas City, Mo. 



DENNIS S. DOBLE 
26 Maple St. 
Rockland, Mass. 
ELEANOR M. DOHERTY 
49 Rowe St. 
Milton, Mass. 
JANICE L. DOHERTY 
306 Liberty St. 
East Braintree, Mass. 
ROBERT J. DOHERTY 
88 Chesbrough Rd. 
West Roxbury, Mass. 
RUSSELL E. DOHERTY 
76 Edwin St. 
Quincy, Mass. 
KEVIN B. DOLE 
30 Orchard Lane 
Norwood, Mass. 
WILLIAM D. 

DONALDSON 
29 Myrtlebank Ave. 
Dorchester, Mass. 
MARK E. DONELAN 
101 Commercial St. 
Weymouth, Mass. 
ANNE E. DONLAN 

49 Champney St. 
Brighton, Mass. 
LOUIS A. DONOFRIO 
770 Ridge Rd. 
Hamden, Conn. 
FRANCIS E. DONOVAN 
57 Harris St. 
Brookline, Mass. 
ROBERT J. DONOVAN 
5lPerhamSt. 

West Roxbury, Mass. 
WILLIAM A. DONOVAN 
312 Poplar St. 
Roslindale, Mass. 
D. EDWARD DOOLEY 
15 DreemeSt. 
Saugus, Mass. 
STEPHEN R. DOOLEY 
19 Wellington St. 
Arlington, Mass. 
DANIEL F.DORAN III 
33 Locust Ave. 
Lexington, Mass. 
JOHN F. DORFF JR. 
24 Clive St. 
North Quincy, Mass. 
BARBARA J. DOUGLAS 

50 Garden Parkway 
Norwood, Mass. 
JAMES J. DOWD 
91 Pleasant St. 
Holyoke, Mass. 
JOHN J. DOWD 
35 Fairmount St. 
Randolph, Mass. 



JEFFREY E. DOWLING 
67 Mount Terrace Rd. 
West Hartford, Conn. 
DANIEL F. DOWNEY 
1048 Washington St. 
Dorchester, Mass. 
JAMES G. DOWNEY 
125 Old Suffolk Rd. 
Monroeville, Pa. 
FRANCIS A. DOYLE III 
14 Plymouth Ave. 
Milton, Mass. 
GREGORY P. DOYLE 
19 Orchard St. 
Wellesley Hills, Mass. 
TIMOTHY S. DOYLE 
1319 Linden Ave. 
Highland Park, 111. 
MICHAEL J. DRISCOLL 
44 Lockeland Ave. 
Arlington, Mass. 
PETER DRISCOLL 
54 Bradley St. 
Marshfield, Mass. 
MICHAEL J. DROSSOS 
459 South Main St. 
Haverhill, Mass. 
MELANIE H. 

DROZDOWSKI 
17 Bellflower St. 
Dorchester, Mass. 
FRANCIS W. DUBREUIL 
553 Gifford Rd. 
Westport, Mass. 
WILLIAM H. DUFF 
49 Fullers Lane 
Milton, Mass. 
ROBERT K.DUKIET 
53TremontLane 
Livingston, N.J. 
WILLIAM J. DULLEA 
14 Berlin Ave. 
Milton, Mass. 
BRIAN J. DUNFEY 
90 Trowbridge Cir. 
Stoughton, Mass. 
JOAN V. DUNN 
45TremontSt. 
Brockton, Mass. 
THOMAS C. DUNNE 
1039 Forest Ave. 
Staten Island, N. Y. 
JOHN P. DUNPHY 
11 Huntingdon Rd. 
Lynnfield, Mass. 
JOSEPH P. DWAILEEBE 
631 North Union St. 
Olean, N. Y. 
MICHAEL J. DWYER 
161 Foster St. 
Brighton, Mass. 



429 



THOMAS E. DWYER 
1101 Westgate 
Mt. Prospect, III, 
JOHN F. EAGAR 
761 Broadway 
South Boston, Mass. 
VINCENT H. EAGLES 
285 Minot St. 
Dorchester, Mass. 
WILLIAM G. EASTMAN 
49 Cedar Crest Rd. 
West Roxbur\', Mass. 
THOMAS J. EATON 
9 Moss Hill Rd. 
Jamaica Plain, Mass. 
MARY E. EDWARDS 

28 Buttermilk Lane 
Branford, Conn. 
MARY S. EGAN 
9 Moody Rd. 
Harwich, Mass. 
MARY J. EGLESTON 

29 Winter St. 
Watertown, Mass. 
JEFFREY W. EGNER 
8325 North Greenvale Rd. 
Milwaukee, Wise. 
PETER A. EHRLICH 

47 University Rd. 
Brookline, Mass. 
HENRY E. ELLIS 
65 Bond St. 
Marlboro, Mass. 
CAROL A. ELY 

17 Madison Ave. 
Everett, Mass. 
JANE M. EMERSON 
15 Grove PI. 
Winchester, Mass. 
KENNETH E. ENRIGHT 
26 Norcross St. 
Rockville Center, N. Y. 
MICHAEL P. ENRIGHT 
299 North Main St. 
Natick, Mass. 

MICHAEL E, ERNEWEIN 
16400 Lucille Ave. 
Cleveland, Ohio 
ROBERT P. ERWIN 

18 Highland Ave. 
Beverly, Mass. 
THOMAS J. ESPOSITO 
182 Shore Ave. 
Groton, Conn. 
DIANNA D. ESTRELLA 

54 Springfield St. 
Somerville, Mass. 
MICHAEL P. ESTWANIK 
3899 Savory Dr. 
Fairview Park, Ohio 
MICHAEL J. ETTERS 

55 Grove St. 
Chelsea, Mass. 



ENEA EVANGELISTA 
40 Boston St. 
Somerville, Mass. 
WILLIAM F. FAHEY 
70 Glen St. 
Maiden, Mass. 
GEOFFREY D. FALLON 

18 Greenway Dr. 
Farmingdale, N. Y. 
MICHAEL FALLON 
15 Berkley Rd. 
Scotia, N. Y. 
THOMAS K. FALLON 

47 Reedsdale Rd. 
Milton, Mass. 
FRANK R. FANTASIA 
959 Broadway 
Somerville, Mass. 
EILEEN M. FARRELL 
97 Gallivan Blvd. 
Dorchester, Mass. 
JOAN A. FARRELL 
1523 Unionport Rd. 
Bronx, N. Y, 

JOHN F. FARRELL 
11717 Stonirogton Pi. 
Silver Sprinc, Md. 
JOSEPH T. FARRELL 
2 Garrigus Court 
Wolcott, Conn. 
KATHLEEN FARRELL 
21 Manson Rd. 
Needham Hts., Mass. 
NANCY A, FARREN 
87 Marlboro St. 
Chelsea, Mass. 
SUSAN M. FAULKNER 
57 Lavis Rd. 
Belmont, Mass. 
MARTIN D. FEENEY 
805 Main St. 
Winchester, Mass. 
JAMES E. FEED 
5 Dix Rd. 
Woburn, Mass. 
MICHAEL W. FENLON 

19 Sargent St. 
Winthrop, Mass. 
SALVATORE FERRAIOLI 

48 Tenth St. 
Stoughton, Mass. 
FRANK J. FERRO 
1965 Eastern Pkwy. 
Schenectady, N. Y. 
WILLIAM J, FIDLER 
1 2 Lodge St. 
Milton, Mass. 
DANIEL T. FIELD 
2227 Lorraine Ave. 
Kalamazoo, Mich. 
RAYMOND F. FIGLEWSKI 
920 East Center St. 
Wallingford, Conn. 



THEODORE L FILTEAU 

39 S. Bowdoin St. 

Lawrence, Mass. 

NANCY J. FINN 

25 Garden St. 

Portsmouth, R. I, 

JOHN A. FINNIGAN, JR. 

68 Sierra Rd. 

Hyde Park, Mass. 

MICHAEL J. FINUCANE 

35 Church St. 

Newton, Mass. 

ROBERT D. FIORENTINO 

79 E. Main St. 

Marlboro, Mass. 

WILLIAM X. FISCHER 

822 W. 58 St. 

Kansas City, Mo. 

BERNARD L 

FITZGERALD 
11 Sunset St. 
Roxbury, Mass. 
BRIANNE R. 

FITZGERALD 
34 Harrison St. 
Newton Highlands, Mass. 
DANIEL P. FITZGERALD 

2 Bryant St. 
Salem, Mass. 

JOHN R. FITZGERALD 
153 March St. 
Southbridge, Mass. 
JOSEPH S. FiTZPATRICK 
900 Palmer Rd. 
Bronxville, N. Y. 
MARK D. FITZPATRICK 
152 Centerwood Rd. 
Newington, Conn. 
MAUREEN J, FITZPATRIC 
11 Adams, St. 
Newtonville, Mass. 
ELLEN C. FLAHERTY 

3 House St. 
Dorchester, Mass. 
JAMES D. FLAHERTY 
25 Patterson Way 

S. Boston, Mass. 

JOHN J. FLAHERTY 

84 Ridgewood Rd. 

Milton, Mass. 

RICHARD C. FLAHERTY 

113 Richland Rd. 

Norwood, Mass. 

ROBERT FLAHOLE 

15 South St, 

Brighton, Mass. 

DAVID J, FLANAGAN 

24 Druid Hill Dr, 

Parsippany, N, J, 

HUGH L, FLANAGAN, JR, 

17EarleSt, 

Norwood, Mass, 



DAVID B. FLINT 
130 Winter St. 
Wrentham, Mass. 
CHERYL ANN 
FLODSTROM 
27 College Ave. 
Arlington, Mass. 
ARTHUR E. FLYNN 
36 Temple St, 
Framingham, Mass, 
KATHLEEN T, FLYNN 
29 Northwood St, 
Chicopee, Mass. 
KEVIN R. FLYNN 
98 Forbes St. 
Boston, Mass. 
MARY L FLYNN 
18WhittenSt, 
Dorchester, Mass. 
PAUL J. FLYNN 
66 Harvard St. 
Chelsea, Mass. 
ROBERT H. FLYNN 
35 Pembroke Rd. 
Wellesley, Mass. 
WILLIAMS. FOGARTY 

115 Porter Lane 
Orange, Conn, 
MARK N, FOHLIN 

38 Brook St. 

Shrewsbury, Mass. 
JOHN J. FOLEY 

1239 1st St. 

LaSalle, 111. 

LOUISE M. FONTAINE 

128 Wilmington Ave. 

Dorchester, Mass. 

NORMAND E. 
FORGET, JR. 

16 Park St, 

Uxbridge, Mass, 

MICHAEL J. FORSYTHE 

4208 Columbia Pike 

Arlington, Mass, 

MALCOLM W. FOSTER 

571 Centre St. 

Milton, Mass, 

MICHAELJ, FOSTER 

30 Porter Ave. 

Lynn, Mass. 

CHARLES F, FOWLER 

10 Shady Lane 

Franklin, Mass. 

ARTHUR G, FOX 

423 Washington Ave. 

Chelsea, Mass. 

RAYMOND R. FRAGNOLI 

14769 S, Gallatin 

Brook Park, Ohio 

PAULJ. FRAIOLI 

45 Sutton Pi. 

New York, N, Y, 



430 



BRIAN J. FRANCIS 
Box 434 

Dennisport, Mass. 
PETER N. FRANCIS 
41 Canaan St. 
Hartford, Conn 
SYLVESTER M. FRATINI 
720 Wynnewood Rd. 
Philadelphia, Pa. 
JEAN M. FRATTA 
23 Lynn Heights Rd. 
Torrington, Conn. 
DANIEL E. FRECHETTE 
2 Edwards Rd. 
Natick, Mass. 
DAVID S. FREDERICK 
117Derry St. 
Salem, Mass. 

BARBARA A. FRISOLI 
291 School St. 
Watertown, Mass. 
MARIA C. FRUGGIERO 
187 Common St. 
Belmont, Mass. 
ALBERT J. FUCCILLO 
43 Atwill Rd. 
W. Roxbury, Mass. 
THOMAS P. FULCHINO 

13 Hancock St. 
Revere, Mass. 
LAWRENCE W. FUSCO 
412 Central Ave. 

New Haven, Conn. 

TERENCE J. GAFFNEY 

1309MedfordRd. 

Wynnewood, Pa. 

VIRGINIA M. GAFFNEY 

230 Orchard Hill Ln. 

Fairfield, Conn. 

PHILIP R. GAGAN 

300 Newbury St. 

Boston, Mass. 

STEVEN A. GALIPEAU 

583 First St. 

Westfield,N.J. 

THOMAS M. GALLAGHER 

2435 Devor Terr. 

Bronx, N. Y. 

JAMES A. GALLIVAN 

15 WoodbrigeSt. 

Holyoke, Mass. 

HELENE M. GALLO 

239 State St. 

Ludlow, Mass. 

PAUL F. GALVIN 

84 Dartmouth Ave. 

Dedham, Mass. 

KENNETH A. GANDOLFO 

14 Sylvan Cir. 
Lynnfield, Mass. 



MARY LOUISE 
GARDINER 

24 Celestia Ct. 

N. Kingstown, R. I. 
JOSEPH GARDINO 
68 Newton St. 
Everett, Mass. 
JANE D.GARDNER 
49 Notre Dame Rd. 
Bedfore, Mass. 
JOHN D. GARRETT 
418 Meadow St. 
Agawam, Mass. 
ROBERT J. GARRITY 
224 Turtle Pd. Pkwy. 
Boston, Mass. 

GERALDINE M. GARVIN 
3 Silloway St. 
Dorchester, Mass. 
RICHARD J. GARVEY 

25 Norwood Ave. 
Milford, Conn. 

MARY ELLEN GASPARD 
Peabody Terr. 
Cambridge, Mass. 
PHILIPJ. GATELY 
11 Hawthorne St. 
Natick, Mass. 



JUDITH D. GAUDET 
Elm Farm Route 1 
Cape Neddick, Me. 
THOMAS M. GAVIN 
137 Commonwealth Ave. 
Chestnut Hill, Mass. 
WILLIAM J. GAVIN 
27 Hartford St. 
Dorchester, Mass. 
ROBERTO GEISEL, JR. 
70 Pigeon Hill Rd. 
Windsor, Conn. 
MARY J. GEIST 
2205 Henderson Ave. 
Wheaton,Md. 
WILLIAM J. GERITY 

36 Blake St. 
Newtonville, Mass. 
FRANK J. GIACALONE 
47 Oak St. 
Winchester,Mass. 
THOMAS 

GIANCRISTIANO 
97 Condor St. 
E. Boston, Mass. 
FRANK D. 

GIANFRANCESCO 

37 Myrtle St. 
Watertown, Mass. 



LAWRENCE GIANINNO 
1531 BrookwoodDr. 
Elkhart, Ind. 

SR. PAULINE GIBBONS 
Maryknoll House 
Maryknoll, N. Y. 
THOMAS F. GIBSON 

6 Hawthorne Pk. 
Cambridge, Mass. 
RICHARD F. GILL 

7 Fidelis Way 
Brighton, Mass. 

EDWARD M. GILLIS 

25 Alfred St. 
Woburn, Mass. 

LOIS ANNE GILLOOLY 
117 Garfield Ave. 
Hyde Park, Mass. 

ROBERT H.GIRARD 

19 Princeton St. 
Peabody, Mass. 

ELAINE M. GIROUX 
234 Douglas Rd. 
Warwick, R. I. 
MARY F. GITTO 
2lBromfieldSt. 
Watertown, Mass. 




431 



JOSEPH E. GLEASON 

138 Wilkenda Ave. 

Watcrbur}', Conn. 

WALTER F. GLENNON 

130 Foster Crossing 

Southampton, N. Y. 

EILEEN M. GLYNN 

12 Carlson, Rd. 

Milton, Mass. 

JOHN B. GLYNN 

9 Elton St. 

Dorchester, Mass. 

CHARLES J. GODDARD 

55 Whitman Ave. 

W. Hartford, Conn. 

JAMES H.GODSILL 

12 Jacob St. 

Brockton, Mass. 

JEANNE G. GOLDIN 

102 Phelps Rd. 

Framingham, Mass. 

JOHN F. GOLLINGER 

136 School St. 

Waltham, Mass. 

JAMES A. GOODE 

Angus Way 

Centerville, Mass. 

THOMAS B. GOODMAN 

RED- 1 

Wonewoc, Wise. 

PETER C. GOODWIN 

149 Weston St. 

Waltham, Mass. 

JOHN E. GORDON 

18 Braewood St. 

Hyde Park, Mass. 

ANNE LYDIA GORDY 

157NilssonSt. 

Brockton, Mass. 

CATHERINE M. GORMAN 

7 Oak Sq. Ave. 

Brighton, Mass. 

JOHN J. GORMAN 

86 Cherry St. 

Brockton, Mass. 

KENNETH F. GORMAN 

34NicodSt. 

Arlington, Mass. 

MICHAEL A. GORMAN 

2250 Aqueduct 

Florissant, Mo. 

WILLIAM R. GOYETTE 

Stafford Rd. 

Wales, Mass. 

JOHN J. GRADY 

5 Catherine Rd. 

Framingham, Mass. 

DAVID M. GRAHAM 

25 Champney St. 

Brighton, Mass. 

MARY PATRICIA 

GRAHAM 
Morse Ave. 
Wilmington, Mass. 



ANN MARIE GREELEY 
7 Sylvan Circle 
Lynnfield, Mass. 
DIANE M.GREEN 
15 Harley Ave. 
Everett, Mass. 

DOROTHY M. GREENE 
19 Leahaven Rd. 
Mattapan, Mass. 
CONSTANCE I. 

GREGOIRE 
14 Martin Court 
Pawtucket, R. I. 
ROBERT J. GRELA 
34 Glen Rd. 
Westwood, Mass. 
MICHAEL F.GRICH 
1 29 Greenrale Ave. 
Wayne, N.J. 
WILLIAM E. GRIFFIN 
185 South St. 
Quincy, Mass. 
WILLIAM J. GRIGLOCK 
445 Stonybrook Rd. 
Stratford, Conn. 
MARYT. GRONELL 
29l6CarlyleRd. 
Wantagh,N. Y. 
WILLIAM F. GROSS 
17 S. Charles St. 
Bradford, Mass. 



JOSEPH R. GUALTIERI 
35 Marshall St. 
Revere, Mass. 
MARY A. GUERIN 
790 South Main St. 
Bellingham, Mass. 
DOREEN A. 

GUGLIELMETTI 
99 Clematis Ave. 
Waterbury, Conn. 
DAVID V. GUINEE 
7 Rush St. 
Somerville, Mass. 
WINNIFRED M. 

GUNDERSON 
32 Woodchester Dr. 
Milton, Mass. 

RICHARD E. HABECKER 
434 Maple St. 
Rochester, N. Y. 
JANE HAGGERTY 
12jenison St. 
Newtonville, Mass. 
JOSEPH V, HAGGERTY 
75 Woodsode Ln. 
Arlington, Mass. 
MARYLOU HAGGERTY 
12 Jenison St. 
Newton, Mass. 
ROBERTJ. HALEY 
6 Wales Ave. 
Randolph, Mass. 



WILLIAM ¥. HALL 
1076 Washington St. 
Norwood, Mass. 
SR. MARIE HALLIGAN 
200 Lake St. 
Brighton, Mass. 
DENNIS J. HALLORAN 
297 Central St. 
S. Weymouth, Mass. 
ROGER L HAMEL 
492 Burgess St. 
Berlin, N. H. 
HENRIETTA J. 
HAMILTON 
126 Beaver St. 
Framingham, Mass. 
RICHARD J. HAMILTON 
135 Davis Ave. 
Brookline, Mass. 
TERRANCEJ. HAMILTON 
123 Luther Ave. 
Somerset, Mass. 
JOSEPH W. HANAFIN 
6 Ashmont Court 
Dorchester, Mass. 
JAMES L HANDLEY 
229 Adams St. 
Newton, Mass. 
LINDA ANN HANDLEY 
54 Forest St. 
Brookline, Mass. 
JAMES G. HANLEY 
97 Newton St. 
Lawrence, Mass. 
STEPHEN J. HANLEY 

88 Hammond St. 
Chestnut Hill, Mass. 
VINCENT P. HANLEY, JR. 
150 Imperial Ave. 
Westport, Conn. 
MARYE. HANNER 

5 Ichabod Ln. 
Albany, N. Y. 

CATHERINE E. HANNON 
485 Washington Ave. 
W. Haven, Conn. 
JOHNJ. HANRAHAN 
31 AusdaleRd. 
Cranston, R. I. 
CHRISTNE ANN HANSEN 

89 Foss St. 
Medford, Mass. 
MARY A. HANSON 
54 Samoset Ave. 
Quincy, Mass. 
PAULJ. HARLOW 
22 Porter Ave. 
Lynn, Mass. 

DAVID L.HARRIGAN 
112 Lancaster St. 
Springfield, Mass. 
JAMES E. HARRINGTON 
14 James St. 
Somerville, Mass. 



432 



MARYANN 

HARRINGTON 
171 Beech St. 
Belmont, Mass. 
MICHAEL HARRINGTON 
311 Beaver St. 
Waltham, Mass. 
ROSEMARY T. 

HARRINGTON 
470 Ocean St. 
Marshfield,Mass. 
JOSEPH P. HARTIGAN, JR. 
6 Meadowbank Ave. 
Matapan, Mass. 
JOHN B. HARTNETT 

6 Lonfbow Cir. 
Lynnfield, Mass. 
DEANE B. HASKELL 
15 Oakwood Dr. 
Randolph, Mass. 
ROSEMARY HATHAWAY 
30 Parlee Rd. 
Chelmsford, Mass. 

MARK S. HAUSHERR 
228 Westminster Ave. 
Watertown, Mass. 
JOHN T. HAYDEN 
2450TunlawRd. N.W. 
Washington, D. C. 
RICHARD J. HAYES 

7 Hardy St. 

S. Boston, Mass. 

JEREMIAH J. HEALY 

3 Charles St. 

Natick, Mass. 

LYN MARIE HEALY 

6 Greenbriar Rd. 

Canton, Mass. 

JAMES L. HEARNS 

230 Corey St. 

W. Roxbury, Mass. 

MICHAEL V. HERBERT 

284 Foster St. 

Brighton, Mass. 

FRANCIS T. HEGARTY, JR. 

57 Prince St. 

Jamaica Plain, Mass. 

FRED H. HEIMANN 

580 Forest Rd. 

W. Haven, Conn. 

ROBERT S. HENDLER 

6645 Country Clb. Cir. 

Dallas, Tex. 

MARY K. HENNESSY 

393 Peakham Rd. 

Sudbury, Mass. 

PATRICK R. HENNESSEY 

37 Sixteenth Ave. 

Madawaska, Me. 

RICHARD J. HENNESSEY 

87 Sassamon Ave. 

Milton, Mass. 



RICHARD P. HENRY, JR. 

329 High St. 

Lowell, Mass. 

DANIEL G.HEPPNER 

61 Clifton Ave. 

Kingston, N. Y. 

MARTIN J. HERNON 

37 Fox St. 

Dorchester, Mass. 

THOMASJ. HESSLER 

8 Sutton Dr. 

Matawan, N.J. 

KATHLEEN LAWLESS 

68 Sartell Rd. 

Waltham, Mass. 

MICHAEL C.HICKEY 

254 S.Bedford Dr. 

Beverly Hills, Calif 

WILLIAM J. HIGGINS 

20 Stanfield Terr. 

Rochester, N. Y. 

FRANK E.HILL III 

6 Old Wood Rd. 

Framingham, Mass. 

ALAN P. HILTON 

97 Armour Rd. 

Mahwah, N.J. 

STEPHEN F. HILTON 

16 Westville St. 

Dorchester, Mass. 

KEVIN T. HINES ' 

33 Clark St. 

Newton Center, Mass. 

SUSAN J. HINES 

1 5 Lakeview Terr. 

Woburn, Mass. 

RONALD J. HOENIG 

56 Dorothy Ave. 

Rochester, N. Y. 

BRIAN M. HOGAN 

23 Grove St. 

Salem, Mass. 

KATHLEEN M. HOGAN 

19 Stowecroft Rd. 

Arlington, Mass. 

MICHAEL F. HOGAN 

98 I St. 

S. Boston, Mass. 

WILLIAM T.HOLDEN 

92 Chestnut St. 

Lynn, Mass. 

KATHLEEN M. HOLIHAN 

52 Madison Ave. 

Newtonville, Mass. 

CHRISTOPHER 

HOLLAND 
39 Norman St. 
Magnolia, Mass. 
ROBERT E.HOLKAND 
49 S. Main St. 
Milford, Mass. 




EDWARD T. HOLLERAN 
16 Plaermo St. 
Cambridge, Mass. 
PETER A. HOLLIS 
137GlendaleSt. 
Everett, Mass. 
BRENDA MARIE 

HOPKINS 
53 Atkins Ave. 
Lynn, Mass. 

FREDERICK R. HOUDE 
14 Limewood Ave. 
Branford, Conn. 
ROBERT F.HOUSER 
65 County Courthouse 
Garden City Park, N. Y. 
JAMES F. HOWARD 
40 Rockland St. 
N. Faston, Mass. 
PATRICK J. HOWARD 
157 Greystone Rd. 
Rockville Center, N. Y. 
MARY L. HOWES 
Nate Whipple Hgwy. 
Cumberland, R. I. 
DOROTHY M. HOYLE 
25 Thompson St. 
Quincy, Mass. 
ANNE MARIE HUGHES 
43 Tuttle St. 
Dorchester, Mass. 
EDWARD P. HUGHES 
16 Center St. 
Closter, N.J. 
JOHN J. HUGHES,JR. 
6 Farrant Rd. 
Natick, Mass. 
ROBERT E. HUGHES 
416 Mt. Vernon St. 
Dedham, Mass. 
STEPHEN J. HUGHES 
16 Euclid Rd. 
Tewksbury, Mass. 



WILLIAM D. HUGHES 
6 Shawnlee Rd. 
Canton, Mass. 
MARIEA. HUNSON 
Vi Inman St. 
Cambridge, Mass. 
MARY B. HUNTER 

42 Greenwood Ave. 
Hyde Park, Mass. 
DANIEL J. HURLEY, JR. 
19 Mendum St. 
Roslindale, Mass. 

PAUL D. HURLEY 

5 Pond Cir. 

Boston, Mass. 

RICHARD W. HUTCHINS 

43 Lonsdale St. 
Dorchester, Mass. 
LANCE HYLANDER 
11 Rich St. 
Waltham, Mass. 
THOMAS F. IMBRIGLIO 
28 Terrace Ave. 
Tiverton, R. I. 
JOSEPH P. IMBROGNO 

16 Peabody Rd. 
Stoneham, N. Y. 
ROLAND INDRISANO 
4 Bradley Woods Dr. 
Hingham, Mass. 
PATRICIA J. IRISH 
RFD - 3 Box 15 
Litchfield, Conn. 
ROBERT J. JACKSON 
76 Pierpont St. 
Salem, Mass. 
STEPHEN C. 

JANKAUSKAS 
133 Edgewood Ave. 
Methuen, Mass. 



433 




GLORIA M.JARNIS 
55 Highland St. 
Waltham, Mass. 
MARIEP.JELLINEK 
34A Harvard Ave. 
Brookline, Mass. 
JOHN B.JENNINGS 
15 Sherman St. 
Natick, Mass. 

KEVIN E.JENNINGS 
4 Lee St. 

Somerville, Mass. 
HAROLD V.JOHNSON 
1678 Columbia Rd. 
S. Boston, Mass. 



MICHAEL B. JOHNSON 

4405 Tularosa St. 

El Paso, Tex. 

ROBERT L.JOHNSON 

74 Page Rd. 

Newtonville, Mass. 

PHILIP T.JONES 

52 Iron Hill St. 

E. Weymouth, Mass. 

WILLIAM F.JONES 

95 Fayette St. 

Quincy, Mass. 

CHRISTOPHER M.JOYCE 

70 Stockdale Rd. 

Needham, Mass. 



SANDRA M.JOYCE 

13 Franconia St. 

Worcester, Mass. 

PETER W. JUDGE 

7 Fidelis Way 

Brighton, Mass. 

DAVIDA.JUECHTER 

123 Demarest Ave. 

Closter, N.J. 

EDWARD F. JULIANO, JR. 

1 Springhill Rd. 

Wayland, Mass. 

ROBERT A. JUTSTROM 

75 Oak St. 

Weymouth, Mass. 

DAVID C.KANE 

31 Farragut Rd. 

Swampscott, Mass. 

WILLIAM J. KATES 

20 Rose Garden Cir. 

Brighton, Mass. 

PAUL KAUFMAN 

46 Stonehill Rd. 

Hyde Park, Mass. 

KATHERINE M. KEANE 

104TerrillRd. 

Stratford, Conn. 

MARY P. KEEGAN 

450 Prospect St. 

S. Orange, N.J. 

RICHARD A. KEENE 

437 Somerville Ave. 

Somerville, Mass. 

GREGORY T. KELLEHER 

12 Chestnut PI. 

Ho-HoKus,N.J. 

BRUCE D. KELLEY 

185 Tudor Rd. 

Needham, Mass. 

ROBERT W. KELLEY 

7 Beechwood Rd. 

Ho-HoKus,N.J. 

EUGENE F. KELLY 

4 Cataumet St. 

Jamaica Plain, Mass. 

JAMES. A. KELLY, JR. 

10 Museum Rd. 

Danvers, Mass. 

JOHN MICHAEL KELLY 

2914 Poplar St. 

Erie, Pa. 

JOSEPH P. KELLY 

12 Kerrigan PL 

Brookline, Mass. 

JULIANNE M.KELLY 

140 Cottage St. 

New Bedford, Mass. 

LAWRENCE P. KELLY 

1 Bronxville Rd. 

Bronxviile, N. Y. 

LORRAINE E.KELLY 

17 Harvard St. 

Arlington, Mass. 



JOYCE A. KENNEDY 
noAthertonSt. 
Milton, Mass. 
MARY ELSIE KENNEY 
29 Myrtle St. 
Belmont, Mass. 
ROBERT E. KENNEY 
2360 Lalemant Rd. 
University Heights, Ohio 
BRUCE W.KENNY 
74 Chestnut St. 
Lynn, Mass. 
JOYCE A. KEOHAN 
40 Irving St. 
Melrose, Mass. 
JAMES P. KEOHANE 
37 Brastow Ave. 
Somerville, Mass. 
THOMAS R. KERR 
68 N. Ashby Ave. 
Livingston, N.J. 
BRIAN KIELY 
4StuyvesantOval 
New York, N. Y. 
ANTHONY P. KIERNAN 
144 Lincoln St. 
New Britain, Conn. 
THOMAS A. KIEWLICZ 
71 Linden St. 
Dorchester, Mass. 
MARK R. KILLENBECK 
184 Terrace Pk. 
Rochester, N. Y. 
STEPHEN J. KILMAIN 
24 Charles St. 
Wellesley Hills, Mass. 
GEORGE F.KING 
23 Cross St. 
Waltham, Mass. 
JOHN PHILIP KING 
5 Putney Ave. 
Concord, N. H. 
KATHRYN M. KING 
12 Spring St. 
Windsor, Conn. 
MICHAELJ. KING 
71 St. Marys St. 
Brookline, Mass. 
RUSSELL A. KING 
27D Jacqueline Rd. 
Waltham, Mass. 
ADRIAN J. KINNANE 
1804Metzerott Rd. 
Addphi,Md. 
HELEN M.KICIN 
26 Maud St. 
Torrington, Conn. 
STEPHEN T. KIVES 
13802 Emery Ave. 
Cleveland, Ohio 
CHARLES J. 

KLOTZBUCHER 
21 Glen Mills Rd. 
Thornton, Pa. 



434 



JOHN F. KNASAS 
63 Sumner St. 
Quincy, Mass. 
DAVID P. 

KOCHANOWSKY 
111 MarlinRd. 
New Britain, Conn. 
WILLIAM B. KOFFEL 
695 Reynard Dr. 
Cincinnati, Ohio 
RICHARD M. KONDRAT 
22 Bradford Rd. 
Framingham, Mass. 
JOHN J. KONEVICH 
14 Nickerson Rd. 
Peabody, Mass. 
DAVIDA. KONKEL 
2717 31st St. S.E. 
Washington, D. C. 
MARY ROSE KOTT 
40 Lansing St. 
Auburn, N. Y. 
LINDA J. KRAJEWSKI 
67 Landmark Rd. 
Warwick, R. I. 
HAROLD B. KRAUSE, JR. 
22 Weir St. 
Newton, Mass. 
JAMES S. KREIDLER 
711 Pepper St. 
Blacksburg, Va. 
PHILIP L. KREMSREITER 
5005 N. 84th St., Apt. 1 
Milwaukee, Wise. 
CHRISTINE F. KUHLMAN 
10 Downing Ct. 
Exeter, N. H. 

CHARLES L. KUNSMAN 
589 Somerville Ave. 
Somerville, Mass. 
ROBERT J. LACKAYE 
3 Merrick Rd. 
Poughkeepsie, N. Y. 
LAWRENCE J. LAFARO 
50 Poningo St. 
Port Chester, N. Y. 
WILLIAM J. LAFFEY ' 
40 Pratt St. 
AUston, Mass. 
RAYMOND C. LAGACE 
396 Spring St. 
Manchester, Conn. 
JOHN P. LALLY 
7 Richardson St. 
Woburn, Mass. 
PATRICIA J. LALLY 
650 Chestnut Hill Ave. 
Brookline, Mass. 
DANIELJ. LAMMON 
llBriarcliffDr. 
Corning, N. Y. 



J 



CHARLES W. LANAGAN 

27 Maxfield St. 

W. Roxbury, Mass. 

MARK H. LANCE 

6731 Orchid Ln. 

Dallas, Tex. 

STEPHEN D. LANDRIGAN 

215 Willow St. 

W. Roxbury, Mass. 

KENNETH E. LANGILLE 

8 Carmody St. 

S. Boston, Mass. 

ANDREW J. LANGKOPF 

23 Westbourne Rd. 

Rochester, N. Y. 

MARY ANN LANZO 

2 Sunnyside St. 

Jamaica Plain, Mass. 

JOSEPH G. LaPOINTE 

67 Maple St. 

W. Roxbury, Mass. 
RONALD J. LaPOINTE 
357 S. Quaker Ln. 
W. Hartford, Conn. 
VINCENT J. LARAIA 
21 Orient Ave. 
Brooklyn, N. Y. 
MARY P. LARKIN 
65 Clewley Rd. 
Medford, Mass. 
PAUL H. LARKIN ■ 
274 Pleasant St. 
Lunenburg, Mass. 
ROBERT G. LARKIN 
330WaldenRd. 
Wilmington, Del. 
JOHN J. LARUFFA 
63-50 77th PI. 
Middle Village, N. Y. 
GUY M. LATERZA 
100 Fells Ave. 
Medford, Mass. 
ROBERT J. LATOURELLE 
RD2 

FortAnn, N. Y. 
STEPHEN J. LAURENT 
211 Shore Dr. 
Laconia, N. H. 
KATHLEEN LAWLESS 

68 Sartell Rd. 
Waltham, Mass. 
ARTHUR A. 

LAWRENCE, JR. 
3597 Beacon Dr. 
Beachwood, Ohio 
PETER LAWRENCE 
26 Pleasant St. 
Charlestown, Mass. 
CHARLES J. LAWSON 
8230 S. Calumet Ave. 
Chicago, 111. 



MICHAEL J. LEAHY 
20 Reed Ave. 
S. Weymouth, Mass. 
JOHN J. LEARY 
29 Forbes St. 
Jamaica Plain, Mass. 
ALBERT G. LEAVY 
188 Beacon St. 
Chestnut Hill, Mass. 
THOMAS J. LeCLAIR 
62 Richfield Rd. 
Arlington, Mass. 
JAMES R. LEDWELL 
174 North Ave. 
Rockland, Mass. 
JOYCE V. LEE 
322 Mt. Vernon St. 
Dedham, Mass. 
JAMES D. LEGGIO 
2182 Redmon Rd. 
N. Merrick Li., N. Y. 
KEVIN A. LEGROS 
25 Clifton St. 
Cambridge, Mass. 
EDWARD R. LEMBO 

374 Commonwealth Rd. 
Cochituate, Mass. 
JAMES, F, LEMBO 

3 Bow St. Ct. 

Stoneham, Mass. 

DAVID ALBERT LEMOINE 

7 Tapley Rd. 

Lynnfield, Mass. 

PETER J. LEONARD 

331lBrookviewRd. 

Rockford, 111. 

JOHN R. LESCH 

240 Owasco Rd. 

Auburn, N. Y. 

THOMAS F. LESPERANCE 

32 Barbara Rd. 

Needham, Mass. 

LOUIS A. LEVESQUE 

284 Round Hill Rd. 

Bristol, Conn. 

MARC A. LEVESQUE 

7 Taft St. 

Nashua, N. H. 

NANCY J. LICITRA 

74 Atlas Ave. 

Malverne, N. Y. 

ELLEN F. LIFTAR 

375 Benefit St. 
Providence, R. I. 
MARY JANE A. LILLY 
3245 Beech St. 
Washington, D. C. 
PAULJ. LINNEHAN 
Weston College 
Weston, Mass. 
ROBERT A. LIPSINSKI 
29809 Southbrook La. 
Framinston Township, Mich. 



ALFRED M. LISTON 
184 Crescent Ave. 
Revere, Mass. 
EDWARD J. LITTLE 
158 Lenox Ave. 
Providence, R. I. 
ROGER F. LIZOTTE 
108Calef Ave. 
S. Swansea, Mass. 
JAMES R. LOGAR 
23 Halmore Dr. 
Rochester, N. Y. 
LAWRENCE J. LOGUE 
15 Bay Ridge Rd. 
Scituate, Mass. 
THOMAS T. LONARDO 
6 E. Hawkins St. 
Derby, Conn. 
RICHARD D. LOONEY 
62 Almont St. 
Medford, Mass. 

D. GOERGE LOPEZ , 
38WoodcliffDr. 
Waltham, Mass. 
JOSEPH A. LOPEZ 
36-43 Crest Rd. 
Wantagh, N. Y. 

TULLY MAUREEN LOPEZ 
171 A South St., Apt. 17 
Jamaica Plain, Mass. 
PAUL LOSCOCCO 
15 Old Stagecoach Rd. 
Bedford, Mass. 
PATRICIA M. LOUZAN 
52 Elmer Rd. 
S. Weymouth, Mass. 
WINSTON LOWE 
1472 Corrimonwealth Ave. 
Brighton, Mass. 
THOMAS F. LUCAS 
62 Oxford St. 
Arlington, Mass. 
WILLIAM E. LUCEY 
2 Elliston PI. 
Bronxville, N. Y. 
JAMES B. LUCIA 
236 Notingham St. 
Springfield, Mass. 
DIANE V.LUKOWSKI 
4929 Merrill Dr. 
Liverpool, N. Y. 
DONNA M. LUONGO 
180 Bradford St. 
Everett, Mass. 
PETER F. LUPOLI 
121 Robert Dr. 

E. Haven, Conn. 
ANN C. LYNCH 
274 Canton Rd. 
Randolph, Mass. 



435 



DANIEL F. LYNCH 
784 Felisway 
Medford, Mass. 
DONALD LEO LYNCH 
220 Almont St. 
Mattapan, Mass. 
PETER S. LYNCH 
162 Oak St. 
Weymouth, Mass. 
JANET S. LYONS 
20 Shanley St. 
Brighton, Mass. 
NAN MARY LYSAGHT 
252-74th St. 
Brooklyn, N. Y. 
ANTHONY G. 
MACCARINI 
Hear)' Dr. 

Wappingers Falls, N.Y. 
BRIAN MacDONALD 
17 Reynolds St. 
Canton, Mass. 

DANIEL H. MacDONALD 
171 Sherman St. 
Wollaston, Mass. 
KEVIN J. MacDONALD 
17 Reynolds St. 
Canton, Mass. 

NORMAN J. MacDONALD 
45 Colonial Ave. 
Waltham, Mass. 
RONALD J. MacDONALD 
5 Day Cir. 
Woburn, Mass. 
KATHLEEN E. MacEVOY 
108 Hopping Ave. 
Staten Island, N. Y. 
JAMES B. MACHUM 
917 Winthrop Ave. 
Revere, Mass. 
JOAN E. MacNEIL 
269 Beach St. 
Quincy, Mass. 
MARY JO MacPHAIL 
90 Plain Rd. 
Nabnasset, Mass. 
JEAN MARIE 

MacPHERSON 
89 Adams St. 
Dorchester, Mass. 
SUSANNE M. 

MADDALENI 
5 Dyer Ave. 
Everett, Mass. 

JOANNA M. MADIGAN 
67 Curran Rd. 
W. Lynn, Mass. 
MICHAELJ. MAGEE 
llOHoltshireRd. 
Orange, Mass. 
ROBERT E.MAHER 
134 Eastwood Cir. 
Gardner, Mass. 



FRANCIS X. MAHONEY 

15 EustisSt. 

Chelsea, Mass. 

PAUL D. MAHONEY 

29 Murdock St. 
Brighton, Mass. 

SR. REGINA MAHONEY 
Box 2 Rt. 80 
Kingston, Mass. 
WILLIAM G. MAHONY 
18 R. Atlantic St. 
W. Gloucester, Mass. 
MICHAEL R. MAIORINO 
71 City View Dr. 
Rochester, N. Y. 
RONALD G. MAKARA 

30 Liminster Rd. 
Dedham, Mass. 
BRUCE W.MAKI 
10 Alpine Ct. 
Gloucester, Mass. 
STEPHEN W. MALAQUIAS 
398 Commercial St. 
Provincetown, Mass. 
PETER E. MALATESTA 

60 Butters Row 
Wilmington, Mass. 
RICHARD K. MALLEN 
23 Quincy St. 
Methuen, Mass. 
PATRICIA A. MALSTROM 
75 Raiidal Ave. 
W. Hartford, Conn. 
RICHARD P. MALONEY 
29 Waldo Rd. 
Milton, Mass. 
STEVEN R, MALOY 
RD 3 Topstone Rd. 
W. Redding, Conn. 
JULIE ANNE MANCINI 
26 Harwood Ln. 
E. Rochester, N. Y. 
HENRY R. MANIACE 
15 Sanderson Rd. 
Waltham, Mass. 
MICHAEL A. MANNA 
60 Eagle Rim Rd. 
Upper Saddle River, N.J. 
JOHN P. MANNING 
573 High St. 
Fall River, Mass. 
THOMAS K. MANNING 
50 Belcher Cir. 
Milton, Mass. 
ANDREA L MARANE 
HilbraeApts. - 126 
Poughkeepsee, N. Y. 
JUAN R. MARCHAND 
H12 Green HI. Garden 
Bayamon, P. R. 
RICHARD 

MARCH ELLETTA 
91 WescottSt. 
Maiden, Mass. 






If JWF • If^- 




CHARLES A. MARCIANO 

12 Benham St. 

Medford, Mass. 

WILLIAM L MARCOTTE 

100 Ruggles St. 

Quincy, Mass. 

ROBERT R. MARECHAL 

39 Woodlawn Rd. 

UnionViUage, R. I. 

JOHN M. MARINI 

20 Sterling St. 

Maiden, Mass. 

ROBERT D. MARINICK 

173 Warren Ave. 

Quincy, Mass. 

MICHAELJ. MARKS 

44 Carter Rd. 

Lynn, Mass. 

JAMES R. MARKUSEN 

4001 Lynn Ave. 

Minneapolis, Minn. 

CHARLES J. MARRO 

17 Hillcrest Rd. 

Rutland, Vt. 

EDWARD P. MARTIN 

12 Valley Rd. 

Lexington, Mass. 

JAMES A, MARTIN 

8 Mt. Auburn St. 

Lawrence, Mass. 

LEO G. MARTIN 

6 Beal Rd. 

Waltham, Mass. 

PETER J. MARTIN 

37 Turner Rd. 

Wellesley, Mass. 



ROBERT D. MARTIN 

2284 Locust St. 

Merrick, N. Y. 

CHARLES J. MARTINDALE 

15 WhitridgeSt. 

Dorchester, Mass. 

JUAN J. MARTINEZ 

593 Austral 

Altamira, P. R. 

EDWARD L MARUT 

114 Abbe Ln. 

Clifton, N.J. 

JAMES G.MARZ 

155 Ampere Ave. 

Oakhurst,N.J. 

ELAINE D.MASON 

2 Pebbett St. 

Medford, Mass. 

MICHAELJ. MASON 

99 Mahoney Rd. 

Rodeo, Calif 

ENRICO J. 

MASTRONARDI 

1376 Hintington Tpke. 
Trumbull, Conn. 
SHARON JOY MATLAND 

39 Elm Ave. 

Fairhaven, Mass. 

MARGUERITE A, MATTOS 

15 Union St. 

No. Andover, Mass. 

RONALD E. MATTSON 

597 Tremont St. 

Boston, Mass. 

GARY E. MATZ 

113 BelmoreRd. 

LutherviUe, Mass. 

NANCY F. McALLON 

69 Irving St. 

Waltham, Mass. 



436 



TERENCE J. McATEER 
150 Kent St. 
Brooklyn, N. Y. 
DANIEL McAULIFFE, JR. 
54 Hillside Dr. 
Cohasset, Mass. 

ann brenda 
McCarthy 

1180 Mass. Ave. 
Arlington, Mass. 

frederick e. 
McCarthy 

50 W. Central St. 
Natick, Mass. 

JANE F. McCarthy 

225 Fairmount Ave. 
Hyde Park, Mass. 

LINDA E. McCarthy 

239Montvale Ave. 
Woburn, Mass. 

P.JOSEPH McCarthy 

16 Lorraine Rd. 
Medford, Mass. 

SUSAN L. McCarthy 

3 Winslow Rd. 
Braintrec, Mass. 

WILLIAM K. McCarthy 

42 Abbott Rd. 
N. Reading, Mass. 
JOAN E. McCAULEY 
l6WilmotRd. 
Waltham, Mass. 
THOMAS J. McCAULEY 
22 Myrthe St. 
Watertown, Mass. 
JAMES F. McCOOL 
59 Paul Gore St. 
Boston, Mass. 

GEORGE F. McCORMACK 
32 Hayes Ln. 
Lexington, Mass. 
JOHN THOMAS 
McCORMICK 
446 Robin Dr. 
W. Chester, Pa. 
PATRICIA A. McCORMICK 
115 Scenic Rd. 
Springfield, Pa. 
DOUGLAS W. McCOY 
727 Linwood Ave. 
Ridgewood, N.J. 
LEOJ. McCUE,JR. 
6 Iroquois Rd. 
Ossining, N. Y. 
JAMES E. McCURRY 
63 Myrtle St. 
Indian Orchard, Mass. 
LAWRENCE G. McDADE 
144 Oak St. 
Needham, Mass. 
JOSEPH F. McDERMOTT 
20 Webster St. 
Westwood, Mass. 



MARY G. McDERMOTT 

2843 N.E. 28th St. 
Ft. Lauderdale, Fla. 
DANIEL J. McDEVITT 
98 Richmond St. 
Dorchester, Mass. 

EDWARD s. McDonald 

140 Brooks St. 
Brighton, Mass. 

JOSEPH c. McDonald 

30 Brockton Ave. 
Quincy, Mass. 

KATHLEEN McDONALD 
917 Ray Rd. 
Hyattsville, Md. 

WILLIAM G. McDonald 

960 Scott St. 
San Diego, Calif. 
JAMES P. McDONOUGH 
11 Grandview Dr. 
Ridgefield, Conn. 
MARY ALICE 

McDONOUGH 
71 WildwoodSt. 
Winchester, Mass. 
THOMAS J. McDONOUGH 
2018 Commonwealth Ave. 
Brighton, Mass. 
MATTHEW A. McENTEE 
332 Van Buren Ave. 
Teanect, N. J. 
JOHN J. McEVOY 
23 Algonquin Rd. 
Quincy, Mass. 
MAUREEN McGANN 
20 Hilltop Terr. 
Woburn, Mass. 
ELIZABETH 

McGILLYCUDDY 
1 3 Farview Terr. 
Suffern, N. Y. 
JOHN T. McGINN 
34 Forbes St. 
Riverside, R. I. 
GREGORY F. McGINTY 

60 Glenwood Ln. 
Roslyn Heights, N. Y. 
DONALD A. McGOWAN 
5 Robinview Terr. 
Danbury, Conn. 
DENNIS L. McGRATH 

61 Gordon St. 
Yonkers, N. Y. 
MARY L McGRATH 
156 Linden Ave. 
Maiden, Mass. 
PETER J. McGRATH 
23 Neville Rd. 
Framingham, Mass. 
JOSEPH H. McGUIRE 
Main St. Box 176 
Aurora, N. Y. 



LEO A. McHUGH 

79 Hall PI. 

Quincy, Mass. 

DANIELJ. McINERNEY 

20 Harwich Rd. 

W. Sprmgfield, Mass. 

TIMOTHY D. McINERNEY 

62 Chestnut Hill Rd. 

Chestnut Hill, Mass. 

PAULM. McISSAC 

92 University Rd. 

Brookline, Mass. 

DAVID J. McKAY 

34 New Balch St. 

Beverly, Mass. 

MARK M. McKENNA 

7 Laurel St. 

Concord, Mass. 

DOROTHY JEAN 

McKEON 
167 Harbor St. 
Branford, Conn. 
ARTHUR D. McKEY 
3610 Livingstn St. N.W. 
Washington, D. C. 
PAULM. McKINNON 
7 Sunset Rd. 
Arlington, Mass. 
BARBARA J. McKUSKIE 
3 Chautuqa Ave. 
Nashua, N. H. 



BRIAN R. McMAHON 
3 Moreland Ave. 
Newton Center, Mass. 
JOSEPH P. McMAHON 
3 Moreland Rd. 
Newton, Mass. 
SR. MARY McMAHON 
Bethany Antigonish 
Nova Scotia, Can. 
JOHN C. McMANAMA 
44 Ellison Pk. 
Waltham, Mass. 
SUSAN C McMANAMA 
44 Ellison Pk. 
Waltham, Mass. 
THOMAS J. McMANAMON 
1269 Bonnie View 
Lakewood, Ohio 
ROBERT W. McMANUS 
9101 Shore Rd. 
Brooklyn, N. Y. 
KERRY J. McMURRAY 
7217 Valleycrest 
Annandale, Va. 
BRIAN L McNAMARA 
33 Pershing Rd. 
Jamaica Plain, Mass. 
BRYAN R. McNAMARA 
7520BrooksideDr. 
Cleveland, Ohio 
JAMES T. McNAMARA 
115 Clay St. 
Wollaston, Mass. 









richard j. 
McLaughlin 

3 Morley St. 
Needham, Mass. 
ARTHUR D. McLEAN 
25 Strathmore Cir. 
Braintree, Mass. 
ROBERT A. McMACKIN 
41 Windsor Rd. 
Milton, Mass. 



ROBERT J. McNAMEE 
216 St. Theresa Ave. 
W. Roxbury, Mass. 

STEPHEN R. McNAUGHT 
81 Ellis Farm Ln. 
Melrose, Mass. 
ROBERT M.McNEIL 
30 Rustlewood 
Milton, Mass. 



437 



PAUL D. McNELIS 

418 Beacon St. 

Boston, Mass. 

MARY ANNE McNIFF 

43 Bay View Ave. 

Salem, Mass. 

PATRICIA L. McPARTLIN 

89 Fayette St. 

N. Quincy, Mass. 

JOHN J. McSWEENEY 

34 Montval Rd. 

Newton Centet, Mass. 

DONALD MEADE 

27 Doncaster Cit. 

Lynnfield, Mass. 

PATRICIA C. MEE 

7 Menlo St. 

Boston, Mass. 

GARY A. MEEHAN 

998 Chestnut St. 

Manchestet, N. H. 

MICHAEL L.MELIA 

40 Oakside Ave. 

Lawrence, Mass. 

MICHAEL J. MELLETT 

21 Alicia Rd. 

Dofchestet, Mass. 

DANA J. MERLONI 

330 Singeltary Ln. 

Ftamingham, Mass. 

JOHN A. MESSINA 

136MoultonDf. 

Lynnfield, Mass. 

JOHN F. MESSINA 

115 Ridge St. 

Aflington, Mass. 

ROBERT METCALF 

24 Moieland Rd. 

Gloucester, Mass. 

PAUL F. MEUNIER 

4 Tacoma St. 

Springfield, Mass. 

DANIEL D. MICHERONE 

167 I St. 

S. Boston, Mass. 

JAMES W. MILAZZO 

26 Ivy Close 

Forest Hills, N. Y. 

JAMES B. MILBURN 

7 Waugh Ave. 

Glyndon, Md. 

GEORGE V. MILBURY 

246 Wolcott Rd. 

Chestnut Hill, Mass. 

JOHN F. MILITELLO 

284 Foster St. 

Brighton, Mass. 

LOUIS MILKOWSKI 

39 Fieldmere Ave. 

Glen Rock, N.J. 

MARY A. MILLARD 

217 Farm Ln. 

Westwood, Mass. 



GREGORY M. MILLER 

13 Everett Rd. 

Salem, Mass. 

PAULA. MILLER 

20 Wildwood Ave. 

Arlington, Mass. 

JOSEPH A. MILLETTE 

32 Garrison Rd. Box 243 

Brookline, Mass. 

MICHAEL A. MINGOLELLI 

39 Lamson St. 

E. Boston, Mass. 

STEPHEN P. MINIHAN 

27 Glenellen Rd. 

W. Roxbury, Mass. 

RALPH A. MIOLA 

10 Barker St. 

Brighton, Mass. 

MADELYN T. MISITE 

70 Gay St. 
Needham, Mass. 
MARY M. MITCHELL 

71 Tower St. 
Jamaica Plain, Mass. 
THOMAS F. MITCHELL 
12 Boston Rd. 

Groton, Mass. 
CANAHUATI A. MITRE 
24 Chestnut Hill 
Greenfield, Mass. 
FRANK J. MOFFETT 

27 Cotton St. 
Roslindale, Mass. 
JOHN J. MOLLOY 
9 Whipple Rd. 
Lexington, Mass. 
JAMES P. MOLONEY 
100 Dunster Rd. 

Jamaica Plain, Mass. 
HILDA E. MONAGHAN 
126 2nd Ave. 
Pelham, N. Y. 
RICHARD LEO 
MONAGHAN 
80 Embassy Rd. 
Springfield, Mass. 
ANNEO. MONAHAN 
22 Chiswick Rd. 
Brighton, Mass. 
PARTICIA MONAHAN 

28 Fisher Rd. 
Commack, N. Y. 
THOMAS S. 

MONAHAN, JR. 
5 Cricket Cir. 
Scituate, Mass. 
ROBERT P. MONGAN 
389 Hawthorne St. 
Manchester, N. H. 
MARY L MONKOVSKI 
Tara Garden Aprs. 
Weymouth, Mass. 



LAWRENCE E. MONKS 

20 Boy State Rd. 

Natick, Mass. 

EDWARD A. MOOERS, JR. 

19 Fairview Rd. 

Weston, Mass. 

JOHN M. MOORE 

Killam Hill Rd. 

Boxford, Mass. 

JOHN W. MOORE 

7 Agassiz Ave. 

Belmont, Mass. 

GERARD T.MORAN 

3445 Holland Ave. 

Bronx, N. Y. 

MARY ELIZABETH 

MORAN 
112 Greenacre Rd. 
Westwood, Mass. 
ROBERT C. MORAN 
103 Wildwood St. 
Winchester, Mass. 
MARY ELIZABETH 

MORETTI 
24 River St. 
Cranston, R. I. 
ALBERT J. MORGEN, JR. 
.75 Sunnyside Rd. 
Norwood, Mass. 
MAURICE P. MORIARTY 
75 Forest St. 
Manchester, Conn. 
JO ANN MORIN 
IV2 Spring St. 
Augusta, Me. 
ALAN E. MORITIS 
36 Wooster Ave. 
Waterbury, Conn. 
GERARD T. MORRIS 
7 Celia Rd. 
W. Roxbury, Mass. 
KATHLEEN M. MORRIS 
248 Manchester St. 
Mattapan, Mass. 
ROBERT P. MORRIS 
60 Dunkiek Rd. 
Baltimore, Md. 
PETER E. MORSE 
23 Sheraton Pk. 
Arlington, Mass. 
DAVID J. MORTIMER 
17 Jackson Terr. 
Newton, Mass. 
THOMAS A. MOSCHETTO 

26 Sunny Ave. 
Methuen, Mass. 
JOYCE M. MOYNIHAN 
13 Stevens St. 
Winchester, Mass. 
ROBERT W.MUIR 

27 Holmes St. 
N. Easton, Mass. 



CHARLES A. MUISE 
28lmrieSt. 
Randolph, Mass. 
MARY K. MULCAHY 
76 Landseer St. 
W. Roxbury, Mass. 
PAULV. MULKERN 
1 1 Spafford Rd. 
Milton, Mass. 
DAVID F. MULLARE 
24 Braemoor Rd. 
Brockton, Mass. 
JOSEPH K. MULLEN 
463 Winter St. 
Framingham, Mass. 
MARGARET ANN 

MULLEN 
14 Metropolitan Oval 
Bronx, N. Y. 
ROBERT J. MULLEN 
8 Medway St. 
Dorchester, Mass. 
WILLIAM R. MULLEN 
5 Temple St. 
Franingham, Mass. 
ROGER M. MULLIGAN 
89 Center St. 
Concord, N. H. 
ALICE T. MULREADY 
42 Shawmut St. 
E. Weymouth, Mass. 
KEVIN J. MULVANEY 
11 Audubon Rd. 
Milton, Mass. 
SUZANNE M. MULVEY 
62 Oxford St. 
New Haven, Conn. 
JAMES E. MULVOY 
22 Lonsdale St. 
Dorchester, Mass. 
JAMES R. MURGIA 
33 Adams St. 
Roxbury, Mass. 
DANIEL J. MURPHY 
250 Blue Hills Pky. 
Milton, Mass. 
DENISE L. MURPHY 
31 PontiacRd. 
Brockton, Mass. 
KATHLEEN M. MURPHY 
248 Belmont St. 
Watertown, Mass. 
MARGARET M. MURPHY 
170W. Upper Ferry Rd. 
W.Trenton, N.J. 
MAUREEN L. MURPHY 
5 Cunningham Rd. 
Wellesley Hills, Mass. 
MICHAELS. MURPHY 
40 Elmwood Cir. 
Peabody, Mass. 



438 



PAULA, MURPHY 
200 Appleton St. 
Cambridge, Mass. 
PAUL C. MURPHY 
16 Maryland Ave. 
Winthrop, Mass. 
PAUL J. MURPHY 
78 Mayfield St. 
Dorchester, Mass. 



JOHN J. MURRAY 

20 Locust St. Brockton, Mass. 

MARKS. MURRAY 

73 Hale St. Beverly, Mass. 

JOSEPH O. NACHTMAN 

451 PellettDr. 

Bay Village, Ohio 




BRIAN J. MURRAY 
17111 Fernway Rd. 
Shaker Heights, Ohio 
CHARLES A. MURRAY 
209 Kemah Rd. 
Ridgewood, N.J. 
EDWARD W. MURRAY 
42 Vernal St. 
Everett, Mass. 



MAUREEN NAGELHOUT 

4611 ParticiaDr. 

Niagara Falls, N. Y. 

ELLEN M. NALLY 

92 Otis St. 

Milton, Mass. 

JOHN DENNIS NASH 

7 Grant Rd. 

Marblehead, Mass. 



ANN MARIE NEHME 
727 N. Sumner Ave. 
Scranton, Pa. 
JAMES P. NEILAN 
166 Plant St. 
New London, Conn. 
WILLIAM L NEST 
3 Hillside Dr. 
New City, N. Y. 
CHARLES A. NESTER 
3921 FedererPi. 
St. Louis, Mo. 
JOHN P. NEVILLE 

9 St. Mary St. 
Medford, Mass. 
WILLIAM J. NEWMAN 
221 NeyHydePk. Rd, 
Garden City, N. Y. 
JOHN G. NEYLON 
110 Barnard Ave. 
Watertown, Mass. 

SR. PATRICIA NOLAN 

10 Pelham Rd. 
Lexington, Mass. 
PETER K. NOLAN 
17 Parkland Dr. 
Cochituatc, Mass. 
THOMAS E. NOONAN 
51 Marble St. 
Springfield, Mass. 
THOMAS C. NOVARAL 
Dunn Ave. 

Stamford, Conn. 
JUDITH NOYES 
63 Carpenter Rd. 
Walpole, Mass. 
THOMAS C. NUARA 
1446 Gray Mill Dr. 
Scotch Plains, N.J. 
WAYNE W.OAKES 
517 Central St, 
Stoughton, Mass, 
HUGH J, O'BRIEN 
12 Westwood Rd. 
S. Easton, Mass. 
JOAN N. O'BRIEN 
12Brettwood Rd. 
Belmont, Mass. 
JOHN J. O'BRIEN 
61 Huron Cir. Dorchester, 

Mass. 
JOSEPH PAUL O'BRIEN 
146A Summer St. 
Somerville, Mass. 
STEPHEN V. O'BRIEN 
800 Centre St. 
Jamaica Plain, Mass. 
WILLIAM D. O'BRIEN 
31 Stetson St. 
Brookline, Mass. 
DANIEL W. O'CONNELL 
17 Howard Dr. 
Huntington, N. Y. 



JOHN D. O'CONNELL 
71 Brook Run Ln. 
Stamford, Conn. 
ROBERT F. O'CONNELL 
153 Landsowne Rd. 
Warwick, R. I. 
VINCENT L. O'CONNELL 
48 Agassiz Ave. 
Belmont, Mass. 
ANDREW S. O'CONNOR 
376 South St. 
Weston, Mass. 
DAVID F. O'CONNOR 
783 Pleasant St. 
Worcester, Mass. 
JOHN F. O'CONNOR 
24 Oneida Rd. 
Winchester, Mass. 
TIMOTHY G. O'CONNOR 
144-41 Santord Ave. 
Fluching, N. Y. 
KEVIN L ODEA 
570 Ft. Washington Ave. 
New York, N.Y. 
COLEMAN S. O'DOHERTY 
177 Franklin St. 
Newton, Mass. 
JAMES A. O'DONNELL 
261 Railroad Ave. 
Norwood, Mass. 
MICHAEL J. O'DONNELL 
358 Pleasant St. 
Melrose, Mass. 
KEVIN P. O'FLAHERTY 
35 Richview St. 
Dorchester, Mass. 
PAULM. OGIBA 
29 Reynolds Rd. 
Peabody, Mass. 
JOHNS. O'HARE 
35 Eastman St. 
Boston, Mass. 
BERNARD R.O'KANE 
560 Heath St. 
Chestnut Hill, Mass. 
THOMAS R. O'KEIE 
518 Pleasant St. 
Framingham, Mass. 
PATRICIA R. O'LEARY 
15MalbertRd. 
Brighton, Mass. 
JOHN F. OLIVERI 
75 Carol Dr. 
Dedham, Mass. 
DAVID J. O'LOUGHLIN 
194 Claflin St. 
Belmont, Mass. 
LEON M. OLSZAMOWSKI 
Marist College Sem 
Framingham, Mass, 



439 



KEVIN P. O'MALLEY 

11 Woodland Rd. 

Maiden, Mass. 

PAUL W. O'NEIL 

7 Wolcott Rd. 

Winchester, Mass. 

STANLEY E. ORLOWSKI 

137 Pine Ridge Rd. 

Waban, Mass. 

LOUIS P. ORSINI 

154KildareRd. 

Garden City, N. Y. 

LLOYD J. OSBORN 

30 Old Tavern Rd. 

Cochituate, Mass. 

MARK A. OSBORNE 

30 Victor)' Ave. 

Milton, Mass. 

MICHAEL M. O'SULLIVAN 

1257 Jennings, Rd. 

Fairfield, Conn. 

THOMAS H. OTOOLE 

5^HollisSt. 

Milton, Mass. 

JOHN F. OTTO, JR. 

Meads Point 

Greenwich, Conn. 

ROBERT W.OWENS 

46 Waban Ave. 

Waban, Mass. 

JOHN M. PABIAN 

63 Pinckney St. 

Somerville, Mass. 

DANIEL A. PAGLIA 

16 Evergreen Ave. 

Burlington, Mass. 

FLORENCE PAGLIARULO 

68 Winthrop St. 

Winthrop, Mass. 

ROCCO D. PAOLINO 

44 Stafford Ave. 

Newington, Conn. 

JEANNE A. PARISEE 

68 Byron Rd. 

Chesnut Hill, Mass. 

PETER F. PARKER 

42 Monadnock St. 

Dorchester, Mass. 

WAYNE R. PARKE 

37 Shaker Rd. 

Concord, N. H. 

ROBERT T. PARSONS 

22 Edith Rd. 

Framingham, Mass. 

ANDREA LISE PASQUALE 

147 Chestnut St. 

Andover, Mass. 

THOMAS R. PATNAUDE 

60 Leeds St. 

Lowell, Mass. 

MICHAEL S. PATTEN 

14 Mayfair St. 

Lynn, Mass. 



JOSEPH P. PATTON 

13 Hubinger St. 

New Haven, Conn. 

CHARLES PELLEGRINO 

111 Milton Ave. 

Dorchester, Mass. 

RONALD O. PELLETIER 

84 Park St. 

Holyoke, Mass. 

PEGGY A. PENKALA 

31 VennerRd. 

Arlington, Mass. 

ANTHONY F. PENNA 

Stigmatine Fathers 

Wellcsley, Mass. 

JOSEPH G. PENNINI 

209 Ridge St. 

Millis, Mass. 

GEORGE W. PERKINS, JR. 

110 Broad St. 

Hudson, Mass. 

FRANCIS M. PERKO 

284 Foster St. 

Brighton, Mass. 

CHARLES V. PERNETTI 

28 Oakdale Ct. 

N.Haledon,N.J. 

DENNIS J. PEROONE 

103 Connecticut Ave. 

Pittsfield, Mass. 

JEAN PERRENOD 

20 Norden Rd. 

New York City, N. Y. 

JOSEPH F. PESCE 

75 Baldwin Ave 

Everett, Mass. 

JOAN K. PETERSEN 

Quakerridge Rd. 

Croton Hudson, N. Y. 

MARIE A. PETRANIC 

868 East 95 th St. 

Cleveland, Ohio 

ROBERT N. PETRUS 

34 Melody Ln. 

Marlboro, Mass. 

JAMES E, PHELAN 

54 Bradstreet Rd. 

N. Andover, Mass. 

BARBARA A. PHELON 

65 PeekshiU Ave. 

Springfield, Mass. 

THOMAS M.PHILLIPS 

840 Madera Cir. 

Elm Grove, Wise 

LUCIA A. PIAZZA 

38 Hamlin PI. 

Staten Island, N. Y. 

JOSEPH T. PICARIELLO 

74 Woodland Rd. 

Waltham, Mass. 

STEPHEN F. PICKUL 

l49TopsfieldRd. 

Ipswich, Mass. 



ROBERT PICONI 
33 Elliott St. 
Beverly, Mass. 
DONALD R, PIECUCH 
44 Wilson St. 
Ludlow, Mass. 
JAMES. L. PIERCE 
300 Newbury St. 
Boston, Mass. 
EDWARD J. PIERSON 

8 Donald Ln. 
Ossining, N. Y. 
JOSEPH J. PIETRAFITTA 
18 Daisy Ave. 

Taunton, Mass. 

JAMES C. PIETRASZEK 

234 Eastland Pkwy. 

Buffalo, N. Y. 

JOHN A. PINO 

12 Heritage Ln. 

Milton, Mass. 

JOHN A. PIRNAT 

22771 Nicholas Ave. 

Euclid, Ohio 

ELAINE M. PISTORINO 

llOBelnelRd. 

Mattapan, Mass. 

PETER D. PIZZUTO 

386 Fifth St. 

Jersey City, N.J. 

PATRICK P. PIZZUTO 

I6l Grove St. 

Cambridge, Mass. 

ROBERT R. PLANTHOLD 

1524 Telegraph Rd. 

Lemay, Mo. 

RICHARD S. POELAERT 

3 Lawrence Rd. 

Milton, Mass. 

JOHN F. POMARICO 

51 Pembroke Rd. 

Hamden, Conn. 

JOHN J. POMEROY 

40 Overlook Ave. 

Brockton, Mass. 

FRANCIS J. PORTER III 

10 Powers St. 

Beverly, Mass. 

PAMELA ANN PORTER 

60 Salter St. 

Webster, Mass. 

WILLIAM E. PORTER 

9 Linden Ave. 
Swampscott, Mass. 
MICHAEL W. POTTER 
21 Fair Oaks Terr. 
Lexington, Mass. 
HILLARD W. POUNCY 
58 Ardcn St. 

Somerset, N.J. 



DAVID F. POWELL 
315 Washington St. 
Somen'ille, Mass. 
ALICE M.POWER 
251 Washington St. 
Canton, Mass. 
RICHARD D.POWER 
134 Prince St. 
Needham, Mass. 
JOANNE POWERS 
157DorwinDr. 
W. Springfield, Mass. 
LESLIELYYNE A. POWERS 
RED Milton Mills 
Milton Mills, N.H. 
MICHAELJ, POWERS 
33 Kent St. 
Brookline, Mass. 
PAMELA M. PRATT 
170 Common St. 
Watertown, Mass. 
JOHN R. PREVIS 
3106DennisonRd. 
Bethel Park, Pa. 
THOMAS W. PROULX 
16 Pine Ave. 
Haverhill, Mass, 
PAUL D. PUBLIA 
112 Beech Ave. 
Melrose, Mass. 
DAVID R. PULSON 
320 Haven St. 
Reading, Mass. 
ANDREA E. PURCELL 
30 Lila Rd. 
Jamaica Plain, Mass. 
DANIEL A. QUARANTO 
590 Broadway 
Somerville, Mass. 
THOMAS P. QUINN 
44 Governors Rd. 
Milton, Mass. 

WILLIAM P. RABADAN 
1171 Queen Anne Rd. 
Teaneck, N.J. 
MARTIN L RACANELLI 
329 Massapequa Ave. 
Massapcqua, N. Y. 
ROBERTA. RACIOPPI 
19Centruy St. 
Somerville, Mass. 
STANLEY V. 

RAGALEVSKY 
130 O Street 
S. Boston, Mass. 
MARKA. RAGOLIA 
929 Bellcvue Ave. 
Trenton, N.J. 
VIRGINIA E.RAPP 
3204 Fo.\ Mill Rd. 
Oakton, Va. 
JOHN R. RAU 
1204KavanaughPl. 
Wauwatosa, Wise. 



440 



DONALD A. RAYMOND 
23 Crescent View Ave. 
Cape Elizabeth Me. 
CONSTANCE M. READY 
10 Dorset Rd. 
Belmont, Mass. 
CHARLES E. REAGAN 
64 Hammond Rd. 
Belmont, Mass. 
TIMOTHY J. REARDON 
31 BelvoirRd. 
Milton, Mass. 

WILLIAM HENRY REGAN 
20 Pelham Terr. 
Arlington, Mass. 
CYNTHIA L REICHARDT 
148 Madison St. 
E. Hartford, Conn. 
ROBERT P. REID 
131 Mass. Ave. 
Arlington, Mass. 
DOREEN A. REIDY 
31 1/2 BuffumSt. 
Salem, Mass. 
EDWARD REIDY 
57 '/2 Cherry St. 
Somervilk, Mass. 
JAMES M. REILLY 
401 Bruce Rd. 
Cherry Hill, N.J. 
GEORGE J. REZK 
7713 Ft. Hamilton Pkwy. 
Brooklyn, N. Y. 
BARBARA A. RICCI 
38 Boulevard Terr. 
Brighton, Mass. 
THOMAS P. 

RICCIARDELLI 
960 Summer St. 
Lynnfield, Mass. 
JAMES OWEN RICE 
761 Gabriel Dr. 
St. Louis, Mo. 

DAVID A. RICHARDSON 
1049 Kensington Ave. 
Grosse Point Park, Mich. 
PETER J. REIBLING 
916 Brent Dr. 
Wantagh, N. Y. 
JOAN M. RIEHM 
230 Mass. Ave. 
Arlington, Mass. 
GEORGE R. RILEY 
1 Mulligan St. 
Natick, Mass. 
THOMAS P. RIORDAN 
49 Waldeck Rd. 
Milton, Mass. 
THOMAS G. RITZ 
719 E. Seventh St. 
S. Boston, Mass. 



WILLIAM D.RIZER 

35 Thurston St. 
Somervilk, Mass. 
ROBERT M.RIZZO 
83 Tonawanda St. 
Dorchester, Mass. 
CAROL A. ROBERTS 
648 Annursnac Hill Rd. 
Concord, Mass. 
JOHN T.ROBINSON 
39 Sunset Rd. 
Arlington, Mass. 



PIERRE G. RONDEAU 

137 Maples Ave. 
Eorestdale, R. I. 
JAMES S.ROONEY, JR. 
35 Trapelo St. 
Brighton, Mass. 
BRUCE E. ROPER 
3 Memorial Way 
Arlington, Mass. 



JANE F. ROWLINSON 
109 LandseerSt. 
W. Roxbury, Mass. 
PAUL JOHN ROY 
45 Cooper St. 
Boston, Mass. 
JOHN J. RUBIN 
6920WalmerSt. 
Overland Park, Kansas 
CHARLES A. RUDINSKY 
611 East 7th St. 
S. Boston, Mass. 




JOSEPH J. ROCKWELL 

1 Straub Rd. 
Rochester, N. Y. 
ELLEN K. RODDY 
1024 South St. 
Roslindale, Mass. 
JAMES M. ROGERS 
162 Lake Shore Rd.A4 
Brighton, Mass. 
JOHNJ. ROGERS 
25 Neillian Crescent 
Jamaica Plain, Mass. 
VIRGINIA G. ROMANO 
224 Fanfuil St. 
Brighton, Mass. 



CHRISTINA A. ROSA 
58 Valleyfield St. 
Lexington, Mass. 
ALFRED G. ROTONDI 
230 Cedar Ave. 
Arlington, Mass. 
TIMOTHY F. ROURKE 
3830 Kensington Rd. 
Detroit, Mich. 
GEORGE F. ROVEGNO 
Bouton Rd. 
Lloyd Harbor, N.Y. 
JAMES F. ROWEAN 
1 Drummond Rd. 
Stoneham, Mass. 



MARY J. RUDMAN 
5300 Bayou Gkn 
Houston, Tex. 
JON A. RUEL 
17A Bretton Rd. 
Dover, Mass. 
DANIEL J. RULE 
385 Beak St. 
Wollaston, Mass. 
DARCYJ. RUNNING 
301 N. Hill St. 
Marshall, Minn. 
LUCY A. RUSCITO 
18 Donna Terr. 
Hyde Park, Mass. 



441 



CHARLES K. RYAN 
3 Capital St. 
W. Roxbun-, Mass. 
DANIEL K. RYAN 

11 Valley View Rd. 
Waltham, Mass. 
DENNIS M.RYAN 
84 Fenno St. 
Quino', Mass. 
EDMOND F. RYAN 
30 Cedar Ave. 
Newark, N.J. 
EILEEN F. RYAN 
148 Marlboro Rd. 
Glen Rock, N. Y. 
KATHLEEN A. RYAN 
17 Florence Ave. 
Medford, Mass. 
MICHAEL C.RYAN 
3424 82nd St. 
Jackson Heights, N. Y. 
PETER KEVIN RYAN 

12 Merton St. 
Newton, Mass. 
ROBERT J. RYAN 
88 Car)' Ave. 
Milton, Mass. 
WILLIAM M. RYAN 
Box 24 Hamilton Mill 
W. Townsend, Mass. 
ALLEN C. RYBERG 
3 Woodlawn Ave. 
Waltham, Mass. 
PAULD. SABEL 

115 Tiffany Rd. 
Norwell, Mass. 
LEONID F. SAMODELOV 
24 Elm Ave. 
Wollaston, Mass. 
ELEANOR M. SANDA 
27 Story St. 
S. Boston, Mass. 
CHARLES A. SANDOVAL 
323 Blackshear Ave, 
Los Angeles, Calif 
MARGARET SANDWELL 
141 Four Mile Rd. 
W. Hartford, Conn. 
WILLIAM E. SANFORD 
91 Centre St. 
Brookline, Mass. 
JOHN SANTINO 
52 Woodard Rd. 
W. Roxbury, Mass. 
MICHAEL J. SANTORO 
47 Hovey St. 
Watertown, Mass. 
FRANK C.SAPIENZE 
33 Wildwood Rd. 
Andover, Mass. 
RICHARD H. SARACUSA 
76 Chester St. 
Allston, Mass. 



FRANCIS SARGENT 
86 Chauncey Ave. 
Lowell, Mass. 
JOHN J. SASTRI 
70 Lebanon St. 
Hamilton, N. Y. 
KATHLEEN MARIE 

SAVAGE 
11 Cranch St. 
Quincy, Mass. 
JOSEPH G. SAVING 
282 South St. 
Murray Hill, N.J. 
ALBERT J. SBORDONE 
200 Summer St. 
Watertown, Mass. 



LOUIS S.SCIARRONE 

Canal Rd. 

S. Barre, Mass. 

JAMES J. SCIMONE 

64 Saville St. 

Saugus, Mass. 

JUDITH A. SCIMONE 

33 Clyde St. 

Belmont, Mass. 

JOHN J. SEARS 

20 Berry Ave. 

Portland, Me. 

EDWARD L SELGRADE 

8407 14th Ave. 

Hyattsville, Md. 




WARREN T. 

SCAGLIARINI 
45 Sachem St. 
New Britain, Conn. 
RUDI R. SCHERFF 
24 Oak Hollow Rd. 
Springfield, Mass. 
PAUL G. SCHILLING 

2 Marvin St. 
Clinton, N.Y. 
RICHARD T. SCHNAIDT 

3 John St. 
Montvale, N.J. 
FREDERICK J. SCHRAMM 
65 Greenhill Rd. 
Westwood, Mass. 
FRANCINEP. SCIACCA 
38 West Dalton St. 
Lawrence, Mass. 



DOROTHY ANN 

SELLINGER 
6735 Westway Rd. 
St. Louis, Mo. 
JEROME E.SELISSEN 
58 Radcliffe St. 
Medford, Mass. 
JEANNE M. SELVITELLA 
31 Hillside Ave. 
Medford, Mass. 
ALANF. SENDKER 
lOSlocum Rd. 
Jamaica Plain, Mass. 
JOHN J. SEXTON 
20 Humphrey St. 
Wakefield, Mass. 
THOMAS G. SEXTON 
670 Boston St. 
W. Lynn, Mass. 



ELAINE V.SHAKhK 
464 S. Maine St. 
Waterbur\', Conn. 
ELIZABETH B. 
SHANAHAN 
240 North St. 
N. Weymouth, Mass. 
TIMOTHY M. SHANLEY 
89 Notre Dame Ave. 
Hicksville,N. Y. 
THOMAS J. SHARKEY 
94 Glen Oak Dr. 
Springfield, Mass. 
DOUGLAS X. SHATTUCK 
567 Salem End Rd. 
Framingham, Mass. 
SUSAN E. SHAUGHNESSY 
176HighgateSt. 
Needham, Mass. 
JAMES M. SHEA 
284 Foster St. 
Brighton, Mass. 
MARGARET M. SHEEHAN 
60 Dover Terr. 
Westwood, Mass. 
SUSAN RITA SHEEHAN 
30 Knoll St. 
Roslindale, Mass. 
TIMOTHY K. SHEEHY 
849 Riverside Dr. 
Internat. Falls, Minn. 
JOAN F.SHERIDAN 

180 Tower Hill Rd. 

N. Kingstown, R. I. 

ROBERT L. SHERRY 

19 Keys Dr. 

Peabody, Mass. 

HAZEL SHIELDS 

1175 BoylstonSt.-7 

Boston, Mass. 
JOHN B. SHORTON 

268 California St. 

Newton, Mass. 
JOAN M. SHORTT 

56 Russett Rd. 

W. Roxbury, Mass. 

SCOTT G SHULGA 

7 Olds Woods Rd. 

Wallingford, Conn. 

NICHOLAS J. SICILIANO 

61 PclhamSt. 

Newton, Mass. 

PATRICIA E.SILBER 

106 Salisbury Rd. 

Brookline, Mass. 

NANCY F. SJOSTEDT 

17HilmaSt. 

Worcester, Mass. 

KATHLEEN J. SKINNER 

1 Perkins St. 

Arlington, Mass. 



KENNETH G. 

SLADKIEWICZ 
25 LoringSt. 
Cranston, R. I. 
BRADLEY R. SMITH 
75 Main St. 
Oakland, R. I. 
BRENDA M. SMITH 
116 Summer St. 
Worcester, Mass. 
BRENT L. SMITH 
301 Clark Rd. 
Lowell, Mass. 
PETER J. SMITH 
34 Chesljrough Rd. 
W. Roxbury, Mass. 
RALPH O. SMITH 

53 Fuller Rd. 
Watertown, Mass. 
RAYMOND;. SMITH 
325 Huron Ave. 
Cambridge, Mass. 
SHARON JEANNE SMITH 
47 Winship St. 

Brighton, Mass. 
TIMOTHY E. SMYTHE 
Lake Placid Club 
Lake Placid, N. Y. 
JOHN SNYDER 
1 Castle Dr. 
Potsdam, N. Y. 
ANNE E. SODWITH 
89 Western Dr. 
Lakewood, N.J. 
PETER R. SOLLENNE 
42 Phelps St. 
Lyons, N. Y. 

FREDERICK S. SOUSA 
121 Walk Hill St. 
Jamaica Plain, Mass. 
MARK W. SPANG 
18 Calumet Rd. 
Winchester, Mass. 
MARYANN SPECIALE 
27 Victor St. 
Saugus, Mass. 
MARGARET M. SPIDLE 
39 Beechcroft St. 
Brighton, Mass. 
DIANE M.SPINELLI 
15 Williams St. 
Canton, Mass. 
RUTH E. SPINELLI 
39 Fairbanks Rd. 
Lexington, Mass. 
MARK J. SPLAIN 
68 Cleveland Dr. 
Croton Hudson, N. Y. 
CHARLES P. SPOSATO 
Marist College 
Framingham Center, Mass. 
EILEEN E. SPRATT 

54 McKinley St. 
Maynard, Mass. 



MICHAEL R. SQUILLANTE 

50 Edwin Rd. 
Waltham, Mass. 
THERESA A. STANKARD 

51 HartcroftRd. 
Stamford, Conn. 
JUDITH A. STANLEY 
10 Albany St. 

Lynn, Mass. 

WILLIAM J. STANLEY 
l620Northwood Blvd. 
Royal Oak, Mich. 
THOMAS K. STEEL 
148 Albion St. 
Somerville, Mass. 
CHARLES STEELE 
Norrrian Ave. 
Magnolia, Mass. 
MARCIAJ. STEPHAN 
76 Lionel Ave. 
Waltham, Mass. 
JAMES J. STEFANINI 
14 Bryant Rd. 
Framingham, Mass. 
PHILIPJ. STEFANINI 
88 Oregon Rd. 
Ashland, Mass. 
JOHN E. STEFANONI 
303 Fairmont Ave. 
Hyde Park, Mass. 
TIMOTHY STEVENS 
16 Douglas Rd. 
Lowell, Mass. 

JANICE F. STEVENSON 
2 Rugby Rd. 
Manhasset, N. Y. 
JAMES B. STINSON 
2 Windmg Way 
Harwichport, Mass. 
DAVID C STONE 
3070 Halsey Dr. 
Warren, Ohio 
THOMAS J. STOODLEY 
49 Pearl St. 
Everett, Mass. 
JOHN R. STRAUCHON 
19 Warren Place 
Montclair, N.J. 
DONALD J. STREET 

22 E. Mill St. 
Pittsfield, Mass. 
CHARLES J. STRUZZIERY 
73 Belbvue Hill Rd. 

W. Roxbury, Mass. 
ROLAND M. STURK 

23 Laurel Ave. 
Haverhill, Mass. 
ALAN L SUGERMAN 
18 Eisenhower Rd. 
Peabody, Mass. 




ANN C SULLIVAN 
159 Forest Hills St. 
Jamaica Plain, Mass. 
DONALD F. SULLIVAN 
562 Andover St. 
Lawrence, Mass. 
EILEEN A. SULLIVAN 
4271 Kepler Ave. 
Bronx, N. Y. 
GERALD J. SULLIVAN 
26 Carruth St. 
Dorchester, Mass. 
JOAN M. SULLIVAN 
52 Bostonia Ave. 
Brighton, Mass. 
JOANNE M. SULLIVAN 
123 Hammond Rd. 
Belmont, Mass. 
JOHN B. SULLIVAN 
55 South Normend Ave. 
Cambridge, Mass. 
JOHN J. SULLIVAN 
15 Berwick St. 
W. Roxbury, Mass. 
JOHN L. SULLIVAN 
463 Poplar St. 
Roslindale, Mass. 
KATHLEEN SULLIVAN 
65 Lenos St. 
W. Newton, Mass. 
KEVIN J. SULLIVAN 
625 Brigham St. 
Marlboro, Mass. 
PATRICIA R. SULLIVAN 
10 Thacher St. 
Milton, Mass. 



T. MICHAEL SULLIVAN 

209 Summer St. 

Somerville, Mass. 

THOMAS J. SULLIVAN 

30 Nahanton Ave. 

Milton, Mass. 

WILLIAM J. SULLIVAN, JR. 

89 Governors Ave. 

Medford, Mass. 

JOHN A. SULLO 

87 Bailey Rd. 

Somerville, Mass. 

JOHN R. SUMBERG 

35 Copeland Av. 

Reading, Mass. 

MARILYN L SWANSON 

56 Clearwater Dr. 

Mattapan, Mass. 

DENNIS P. SWEENEY 

1750 Ashland Ave. 

St. Paul, Minn. 

SUSAN M. SWEENEY 

111 Grove St. 

W. Roxbury, Mass. 

THEODORE H. SWEETSER 

4401 W. 44th St. 

Edina Minneapolis, Minn. 

EDWARD M. SWIDERSKI 

25 Llewellyn Rd. 

W. Newton, Mass. 

STEVEN F. SYLVIA 

30VaillSt. 

New Bedford, Mass. 

JOHN R. SYLVA 

45 Avon St. 

Somerville, Mass. 



443 



RAY E. SYLVESTER 

125 Cambridge St. 

Winchester, Mass. 

BRIAN T. TALBOTT 

17 River Pk. Dr. 

Atlanta, Ga. 

THOMAS W. TAMBONE 

637 Comm. Ave. 

Brighton, Mass. 

JOYCE ANN TINGAL 

43 Fullerton Ave. 

Newburgh, N. Y. 

NANCY J. TANNUZZO 

19 De Mars St. 

Maynard, Mass. 

CONSTANCE TARANIS 

19 BoUne PL 

Woburn, Mass. 

DAVID A. TARPINIAN 

80 Bartley Ave. 

Portland, Me. 

RICHARD M. TATARONIS 

16 Clarence Terr. 

Lawrence, Mass. 

JOSEPH A. TERILLI 

87 Byron St. 

E. Boston, Mass. 

DONALD W. THERRIEN 

21 Stevens Ave. 
Lawrence, Mass. 
JANET P. THOMAS 
3021 Irouquois Rd. 
Wilmette, 111. 
JOSEPH A. THOMAS 
225 Edin Ave. 
Waterbur)', Conn. 
CHERYL LEE THOMPSON 
1 Lincoln St. Ext. 

Natick, Mass. 
PAUL A. TIBBETTS 

22 Trescott St. 
Dorchester, Mass. 
EDWARD TIERNAN 
185 Bacon St. 
Natick, Mass. 
DAVID M. TINE 
120StandishSt. 
Hartford, Conn. 
CHARLES TOCZYLOWSKI 
1 Kensington Rd. 
Arlington, Mass. 
PAULG.TONON 

223 Center St. 
Bristol, Conn. 
WILLIAM TOOF 
19 Stonehill Rd. 
Wilmington, Vt. 
JOSEPH P. TOOMEY 
41 Newcastle Rd. 
Brighton, Mass. 
ROBERT B. TOOMEY 
12 Dexter Rd. 
Newton, Mass. 



LOUIS P. TOTINO 

38 Sunset Rd. 

Bedford, Mass. 

PATRICIA M. TOTO 

33 Barbara Rd. 

W. Newton, Mass. 

MAUREEN B. TOTTEN 

135MedfordSt. 

Arlington, Mass. 

SUSAN D. TOURNAS 

15 Spruce Rd. 

Lynn, Mass. 

LORETTA A. TRANIELLO 

83 Boston St. 

Somerville, Mass. 

RICHARD D.TRAINOR 

70 Chouteau Ave. 

Framingham, Mass. 

ROBERT J. TROY 

8 Jason Rd. 

Belmont, Mass. 

JAMES V. TUCKER 

143 Russell St. 

New Haven, Conn. 

JOAN POWERS TULLEY 

68 Pleasant St. 

Methuen, Mass. 

ANNE M. TULLY 

33 Boynton St. 

Waltham, Mass. 

NEAL COLEMAN TULLY 

851 Mercer St. 

Albany, N. Y. 

DAVID T.TURCOTTE 

35 Bodwell St. 

Somerset, Mass. 

LINDA JEAN TURCOTTE 

Ned S. Point Rd. 

Mattapoisett, Mass. 

LOUIS T. TURCOTTE, JR. 

358 Stone Chur.Rd. 

Twerton, R. I. 

THOMAS J. TURICK 

14 Morningside Dr. 

Ansonia, Conn. 

NANCY JO TURLETES 

Haight Ave. 

Millbrook, N. Y. 

EDWIN J. TURNER 

121 Circuit Rd. 

Winthrop, Mass. 

FRANCIS T, TWIGGS 

497 Washington St. 

Brighton, Mass. 

RICHARD W.TYNER 

86-10 34th Ave. 

Jackson Heights, N. Y. 

RONALD J. 

UNDERWOOD 
7719 S.Calumet St. 
Chicago, 111. 



JEAN M. URBAN 
19 Sagamore Ave. 
Medford, Mass. 
JOSEPH M. URCIUOLO 

52 Hull St. 
Belmont, Mass. 
FRANCIS D. UTTARO 

53 Williams St. 
Waltham, Mass. 
ELAINE VACCARO 
84 Thurston St. 
Somerville, Mass. 
PAMELA S. VALENTI 
Fairview St. 

Lee, Mass. 

JEAN VAN NESTE 
1810 Comm. Ave. 
Brighton, Mass. 
THOMAS VERONNEAU 
53 Cambridge Dr. 
Newington, Conn. 
ALONSO A. VILLEGAS 
Calle 41 No 1366 
Medellin Colum, S. A. 
STEPHEN M. VINCENT 
2740 W.Lake of Isles 
Minneapolis, Minn. 
JOHN V. VISCONTI 
29 Central St. 
Winchester, Mass. 
ELIZABETH S. VOGEL 
16 S. Oak Glen Dr. 
Oakmount, Pa. 
FREDERICK W. VOTE 
94 Middle St. 
Lexington, Mass. 
PETER J. VOYT 
1900 Eglindale 
Cleveland, Ohio 
EDWARD J. VOZZELLA 
21 HowittRd. 
W. Roxbury, Mass. 
EDWARD C. WADE 
55 Pitcher Ave. 
W. Medford, Mass. 
WILLIAM J. WAGNER 
20 Woodward Ave. 
Bloomingdale, N.J. 
J. KENNETH 

WAINWRIGHT 
28 Dehart Place 
EUzabeth, N.J, 
PRINCE ALBERT 

WALKER 
461 Cresent Ave. 
Chelsea, Ma.ss. 
BARBARA C. WALLACE 
62 Bourne St. 
Auburndale, Mass. 
WESLEY T. WALLACE 
Westview Dr. 
Yorktown Heights, N. Y. 



EDWARD P. WALSH 

34 Capital St. 
Newton, Mass. 
FRANCIS G.WALSH 
37 West St. 
Wilmington, Mass. 
GERALD A. WALSH 
30 Thornton St. 
Wollaston, Mass. 
JOSEPH F. WALSH 
554 Prospect St. 
Maplewood, N.J. 
RENA WALSH 
109 Strathmore Rd. 
Brighton, Mass. 
RICHARD L WALSH 
26 Aldworth St. 
Jamaica Plain, Mass. 
ROBERT E. WALSH 
7310 Geneva Ln. 
Washington, D. C. 
ROBERTS. WALSH 
34 Regis Rd. 
Braintree, Mass. 
THOMAS M. WALSH 
147 Ashcroft Rd. 
Medford, Mass. 
NANCY MARIE WALTON 
39 Irma Ave. 
Watertown, Mass. 
LAWRENCE J. WARD 
236 Kelton St. 
AUston, Mass. 
PATRICK G.WARD 
61 Marion Rd. 
Watertown, Mass. 
WILLIAM H. 

WARDELL,JR. 
98 Cedar St. - 25 
Wakefield, Mass. 
MICHAEL D.WARREN 
109 Brainerd St., Apt. 1 
Allston, Mass. 

STANLEY F. WASOWSKI 
28 Hiram PI. 
Harrison, N.J. 
RANDY M. WATERMAN 
257 Round Is Pear La 
Greenwich, Conn. 
HENRY C. WATTERS 
105ChanningRd. 
Belmont, Mass. 
LAWRENCE J. WATTS 
10 Marie Ave. 
Cambridge, Mass. 
JOHN F. WEBB 
14 Estabrook Rd. 
Wollaston, Ma.ss. 
JOSEPH A. WEBBER 
1 GlencUen 
W. Roxbury, Mass. 



RICHARD A. WEBER 
4364 Harrison Ave. 
Cincinnati, Ohio 
CHARLES W. WEILER 
80 Kinsman St. 
Everett, Mass. 
KEVIN P. WELCH 
119B King Ave. 
Weymouth, Mass. 
NORMAN WELCH 
644 Weld St. 
W. Roxbury, Mass. 
DAVID M. WESSLING 
6 Brookway Terr. 
Roslindale, Mass. 
MARK J. WESSLING 
6 Brookway Terr. 
Roslindale, Mass. 
SUE ANN WETTERHOLM 
328 Centre St. 
Brockton, Mass. 
IRENE E. WEZDECKI 
63 Lewis Rd. 
Swampscott, Mass. 
JANICE WHARTON 
415 Greendale Ave. 
Needham, Mass. 
JOSEPH WHEELER 
261 Boylston St. 
Chestnut Hill, Mass. 
WILLIAM A. WHITE 
22 Austin Rd. 
Milford, Conn. 
CRAIG R. WHITNEY 
14 William St. 
E. Lynn, Mass. 
MICHAEL J. WHITNEY 
10 Epping St. 
Arlington, Mass. 
ALLAN F. WHITTY 
6 Spruce Rd. 
Norwood, Mass. 
THERESA ANN WILCOX 
99 Twin Eawn Dr. 
Hanover, Mass. 
MARY HANN WILDE 
175 Hemenway St. 
Boston, Mass. 
MARY E. WILLIAMS 
9657 Holman City Rd. 
Sauquoit, N. Y. 
JOAN B. WILSON 
10 Milton St. 
Dorchester, Mass. 
NANCY J. WILSON 
5 Malvern Rd. 
Norwood, Mass. 
SR. C. M. WILTRAKIS 
402 South St. 
Hyannis, Mass. 
ALICE MARY WOLF 
75 Alexander St. 



ROBERT P. WOOD 

45 Spruce St. 
Shrewsbury, Mass. 
THOMAS J. WOODLEY 
3118 So. 112th St. 
Omaha, Neb. 
PATRICIA M. WRIGHT 
51 Dart St. 
New London, Conn. 
RICHARD WRIGHT 
78 Garfield St. 
Laconia, N. H. 
WILLIAM D. WURZEL 
33 Kent St. 
Brookline Mass. 
BARBARA L. WYAND 
1824 Beach Ave. 
Atlantic City, N.J. 
ROBERT J. WYNNE 
44 Clifford Dr. 
W. Hartford, Conn. 



PHYLLIS WYSOCKI 

218 Idlewood Blvd. 
Baldwinsville, N. Y. 
JOANNE A. YARMALA 
Straits Turnpike 
Middlebury, Conn. 
ARLENE M. YEAPLE 
36 Centre Ln. 
Milton, Mass. 
WILLIAM F. YORK 
235 Mt. Auburn St. 
Watertown, Mass. 
GEORGEJ. YOST 
10 Mildred Rd. 
Danvcrs, Mass. 
LOUIS YUAN 
33-11 4ChomeNishi 
Tokyo, Japan 



JOHN M. ZABLOCKI 

1185 Morton St. 
Dorchester, Mass. 
ELAINE M.ZACCARI 
29 Pleasant View St. 
Mcthuen, Mass. 
BRIAN R. ZAPP 
87 Dosoris Ln. 
Glen Cove, N. Y. 
GEORGE A. ZIECAK 
5 RoyceRd.,Apt. 10 
Allston, Mass. 

DOROTHY ANN ZIROLIS 
23 Walnut Pla. 
Dedham, Mass. 
THOMAS P. ZOLAD 
3034LydiusSt. 
Schenectady, N. Y. 
FREDERIC T. ZUEGG 
17 Lynnfield Dr. 
Heightstown, N.J. 




445 



General Index 



Academic Deans and Assistants 56 

Academics 46 

Accounting Academy 154 

Activities 110 

Ads and Patrons 380 

Aeire 157 

Almeida, Priscilla 62 

Alpha and Omega 146 

Alpha Kappa Psi 156 

Alpha Phi Omega 164 

Apartments 234 

Arts and Sciences Senate 162 

Backstage 92 

Band 112, 149 

Bapst 94 

Basketball I94 

Beta Gamma Sigma 147 

Bookstore 223 

Cheerleaders 114, 169 

Chemical Society. 151 

Chess Club I67 

Chorale 116, 149 

Classes 236 

College Weekends 104 

Commuters' Council 118, 165 

Commuting and Hitching 226 

Concerts 98 

Council for Exceptional Children 120, 153 

Courtside Club 170 

Cross Country 192 

Cultural Committee I73 

Dacey, Dr. John 64 

Dating 242 

Delta Sigma Pi I54 

Dramatics Society 122, 148 

Eagle's Nest 224 

Education Senate I63 

Evening College Senate 163 

Features 82 

Football 178 

Fulton Debate Society 124, 150 

Gauthier, S.J., Reverend Joseph 66 

Geology Club 156 

Glynn, Arthur 68 

Gold Key Society 126, 166 

Green Ins 248 

Heights 128, 157 

Hockey 206 

Honor Societies 146 

Hopscotch Club 170 

Humanities Magazine 158 

Intramurals 246 

Italian Academy I67 

Joyce, S.J., Reverend W. Seavey 48 

Junior Prom and Concert 362 

Kappa Delta Epsilon 152 

Kappa Phi Kappa 155 

Knights of Columbus 164 

Kreeft, Peter 70 



Le Cercle Francais 168 

Lewis Drill Team 134, 171 

Libraries 240 

Liuima, S.J., Reverend Francis A 72 

Lyons' Den 225 

Mahoney, Dr. John L 76 

Married Students 324 

Masses 106 

McCauley, S.J., Reverend Leo 74 

Mendel Club 152 

Mental Health Volunteers 165 

Middle Earth 130, 148 

Moratorium Day 90 

Nurses 306 

Nurses' Capping 222 

Nursing Senate 162 

Omega Alpha Psi 155 

Order of Cross & Crown i46 

Orientation 220 

Peloquin, C. Alexander 78 

Performing Arts 143 

Pierre Club 169 

Pi Sigma Epsilon 151 

Power, John J gO 

Professional Organizations 151 

Publications and Media 157 

Resident Students 228 

"Rhythm of Life" 244 

Ricci Math Academy 153 

Rifle Club 135, 171 

ROTC '.132 

Royal Order of the Buffalo 168 

Saga Saga, The 96 

St. Botolph's Town 84 

Scholars of the College 286 

Senates i62 

Senior Index 422 

Seniors 250 

Service Organizations 164 

Sigma Theta Tau i47 

Slavic Circle 166 

Soccer 188 

Social Committee 173 

Sodality 136 

Special Interest Groups 166 

Spirit 108 

Sporting Organizations 169 

Sports 176 

Student Teachers 268 

Stylus 159 

Sub Turri 138, 159 

Sweet Charity 150, 344 

Thoughts and Words 101 

Underclass 218 

Undergraduate Government of Boston College . . 142, 172 

University Administration and Services 52 

University Vice Presidents 50 

Wrestling 204 

WVBC 145. 138 



446 



Sub Turri 1970 



Joseph J. Britt, Jr. 
Eclitor-iii-Chief 



Alan J. Demers 
McDidging Eel it or 



Lucia A. Piazza 
Business Aiunager 



John R. Trzaska, SJ. 
Faadty Advisor 



M. Robert Killy 
'Associate Editor 



Editors 

Edmond R. Tremblay 
Layout Editor 
Robert E. Kenney 
Academics Editor 
William J. Kita 
Features Editor 
Mary Anne Checrallah 
Ronald A. Huebsch 
Fred J. Foss 
Activities Editors 
Henry E. Ellis 
James Neilan 
Sports Editors 
Linda A. Sweeney 
Underclass Editor 
James A. Gallivan 
Senior Editor 
Michael Murphy 
Senior Index Editor 
Stephen Korta 
Charles E. Schmidt 
Asst. Business Managers 



Contributors 
Thomas Bates 
Dana Bisbee 
Maryanne DeFrancis 
Elizabeth Malia 
Bryan McNamera 
Daniel Natchck 
William O'Brien 
T. Michael Sullivan 



Photo Staff 
Kevin Carney, Chief Photographer 
Joseph S. Botelho William Gigliotti 

Joseph J. Bntt, Jr. Robert Guaraldi 

Margaret Burrasczao Barbara Lucas 

Peter Contalone Kathleen McDonald 

Cynthia Cassidy Margaret Murphy 

Henry Ellis Charles Schmidt 

James A. Gallivan Robert Thibault 

Philip Young 



General Staff 



Robert Beddes 
Dennis Blaha 
Robert Boruck 
Jay Breeze, S.J. 
Margaret Campbell 
Jonathan S. Carey 
Eda Carlson 
John Carroll 
William Cash 
Richard Clarke 
Suzanne Demers 
Dorice P. Dionne 
Ann M. Greely 



Mary Gronell 
Stephen Jankauskas 
Arthur C. Lauer 
James D. Lewis 
Bro. Robert Lynch, C.F.X. 
Philip Raymondo 
Maryann Speciale 
Edward Sullivan 
Robert Thibault 
Barbara White 
John Wiles 
Gerard Zyla 



The 1970 Sub Turri of Boston College has been printed by 
Taylor Publishing Company, Dallas. Paper stock was 10 lb. 
Matte Finish enamel for the body of the book, with a special 80 
lb. Saxony embossed for the first 48 pages. Body copy is 12 on 
14, Garamond CLC. Captions are 10 pt., major headings 24 pt. 
Lydian CLC. Senior portraits are the work of Delma Studios, 
New York. The cover has a base color of maroon ,^09 with a 
cut-our silkscrccn in gold. 



447 



SPRING SUPPLEMENT 









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Potpourri 




Brian Hall Benefit Basketball Game 



The Odd Couple 




Senior Education Skit - That's What Bathrooms Are For 



Strike 




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JNITED 
WESTAND 
DIVIDED' 

^E PAY 





March 20: The Board of Directors, facing a cumulative debt of 4 
million dollars, authorizes and recommends a tuition increase of 



April 9: President Joyce addresses 4000 students in Roberts to ex- 
plain the tuition increase need. The deans hold open forums but 
the unified reaction of students is: We won't pay. Later, Fr. Joyce 
meets with undergraduate government and offers to settle for an 
increase of $300 - with the understanding there will be another 
increase for 1971-72 of at least $300. In the evening, UGBC rejects 
the Administration's compromise. 



April 10: The President announces a $500 increase for the incom- 
ing freshmen; the amount of the increase for other classes will be 
considered. 







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ITRIKE fl 



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April 13: STRIKE! Students, recalling last year's increase of $400, want 
any increase reconsidered. Pickets appear at the gates and in front of all 
buildings. Classes are boycotted, strike literature is given to all who come 
on campus. Talks, which will continue throughout the week, begin as stu- 
dents question the financial management of the treasurer's office. The fac- 
ulty announces their sympathy with the students. 



t^ 



April 21: By a 3-1 margin, the student body rejects a package of ne- 
gotiated points that includes a $240 tuition raise. More important- 
ly, students test their power and right to take part in the decisions 
that affect them. 





April 22: The Hughes proposal, that provides guide- 
lines for the university until the conclusion of the 
spring semester, is approved by the University Aca- 
demic Senate. 

April 23: Botolph House is occupied by a group of 
students to reassert the pressure of the strike. 







April 25-29: Negotiations break off when administrators 
reject student proposals calling for a ceiling of $100 on 
the 1971-72 tuition increase and student veto power on 
the University Budget Committee. 

May 5: Students accept 16 agreed on points and, while re- 
jecting two disputed Administration proposals, vote to 
end the strike by submitting to binding arbitration. 





April 30: The Coalition for Aid to Private Higher 
Education (CAPHE), a group of 24 colleges, spon- 
sored by B.C., fly to Washington, D.C. seeking the 
financial support of the federal government, which, 
to this date, has been lacking. 



Joe Vilimas, Vice President of External Affairs, confers with Fr. 
F. X. Shea, S.J. 

18 




Joe Angland, MIT; Jane Dotor, Emmanuel; Congressman John Brade- 
mas (Ind.); John Mitchell, Tufts; Fr, Joyce; John Hanson, Northeastern. 



Tennis 





B.C. Opponents B.C. 

5 

9 Brandeis 3 10 

11 Colby 8 5 

4 Massachusetts 16 6 

3 Harvard 6 5 

5 Tufts 11 

2 Boston Univ 1 3 

1 Tufts 2 5 

Holy Cross 5 3 

Providence 7 2 

12 MIT 

9 Boston Univ 7 

Won 13 



Opponents 

Northeastern 

Northeastern 

Fairfield 11 

Springfield 2 

New Hampshire 3 

Providence 4 

Connecticut 7 

Dartmouth 6 

Holy Cross 

Holy Cross 1 

Lost 8 








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I wish I could say to you graduates that you are emerg- 
ing into a well ordered world where the only ingredients 
essential to your success and happiness in your chosen 
field are diligence and honesty in addition to your native 
intelligence and the training you have received from this 
university. But that would not be an honest observation. 
The world is out of joint in more respects than at any 
time within the memory of living persons . . . 

— Earl Warren, Commencement Address 

Boston College in 1970 was a microcosm of that 
world. At no time in the history of this university were 
there more questions raised and less answers found. But it 
was equally true that at no time in the history of the uni- 
versity was it more alive, more responsive to its environ- 
ment, its students, and the needs of the society that shel- 
tered it. The educational process became a vibrant, living 
thing. It was a dialogue, an inquiry not into the static 
vaults of learning, but rather into the continuing process 
of growth and maturation in the individual and the com- 
munity. 

We cannot pretend to have captured all that it meant 
to be a part of this process. It was in many ways a rebirth, 
something that had to be lived to be understood. All that 
we can hope to do is to mirror it, to give some sense of 
what it meant to be here and to live within a community 
come alive. In many respects, the academic year of 1969- 
70 can only be best understood by the seniors, whose time 
at Boston College gave them the span of old and new 
which enabled them to appreciate the changes and quali- 
fied them to evaluate them in terms of the B.C. that was 
and the B.C. that will be. But for all it was a year of in- 
quiry, a year which may well mark the turning point in 
Boston College's quest for a legitimate place among those 
institutions which can truly call themselves universities. 
The commuter school has grown up, the Jesuit institu- 
tion on the hill has entered the world. And because we 
have lived in that world and have related it to our educa- 
tion, we can now begin to evaluate what the piece of 
paper that we are given after four years really means, and 
appreciate the opportunities for a truly good life that it 
can offer. 







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A Final Word 



It is customary for the editor-in-chief of a yearbook to 
write a final commentary. Frequently, this is nothing 
more than a further list of credits or a philosophy on what 
a yearbook should be. In the light of the events of the past 
semester, I have instead chosen to write the following 

The strike itself was a disaster. This may seem to be a 
surprising statement in the light of the self- 
congratulatory messages coming from the offices of Fr. 
Joyce and UGBC. While everyone at the university 
knows the true extent of this "peaceful" strike with the 
intimidation of professors and students who wished to re- 
main in class, with the complete disruption of university 
services, and with the lack of moral backbone shown by 
many during the takeover of Botolph House, these events 
in themselves did not make the strike a disaster. They 
only aggravated the condition. Rather the fact that the 
strike occurred at all was a disaster. In the one place where 
reason is supposed to reign supreme, where there is sup- 
posed to be a calm and rational discussion of issues, and 
where differences of opinion should be settled peacefully, 
these things did not happen. 

Instead the idea of a university itself suffered a stagger- 
ing blow from which it may not recover and was further 
undermined by the actions which various individuals 
among the administration, the faculty, and the student 
body saw fit to take regarding the extent of this country's 
involvement in Southeast Asia. A university by its very 



nature should not take a position in political affairs. Indi- 
viduals yes, but the university no. Academic freedom is 
not the sole possession of the radical left, however, rfluch 
they may truly try to make it so. A student has as much 
right to take a course in ROTC and receive credit for it as 
he has to take one from the president of the campus SDS 
on Revolution in America. 

The argument is, however, that this is a Catholic uni- 
versity and as such should take a stand on moral issues. I 
find it truly ironic that those people who most loudly ad- 
vance the idea that this university should take a moral 
stand on a national issue whose morality is hotly debated 
are the same people who even more loudly declare that 
this university should not be concerned with the drugs 
and sexually aberrant and promiscuous behavior which 
can be found in its own dormitories, issues whose morali- 
ty has been clear for centuries. There is some old saying 
about having your cake and eating it too which would 
seem here to be eminently applicable. 

It this situation is allowed to continue, then the uni- 
versity called Boston College will no longer exist. The in- 
stitution called Boston College will remain but it will not 
be a university. 

This should not be taken as an editorial against in- 
novation and change. There is much in this university 
and this society that cries out for change. But it should be 
done carefully, based on reason and not emotion. 

Joseph J. Britt, Jr. 
Editor-in-Chief- 
Sub Turn 1970 



36 






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