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Full text of "Sub turri = Under the tower : the yearbook of Boston College"

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Once upon a time, there were little children and a heoch. 

One day, a little boy found himself standing before the rising sun 





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Once upon a time, there were little children and a beach. One 
day, a little boy found himself standing before the rising sun. His 
eyes were filled with wonder; he reached to hold the sea and sky in 
his fragile hands. A lonely seagull rose from the shore line and 
spread his wings across the golden sun. All at once, the boy discov- 
ered his first horizon. The lights glancing off the water blinded him, 
and as quickly, his beach world was shattered forever. 

He turned, bewildered, and sought a place to regain his sight. 
Searching again for his horizon, yet not knowing where, he reeled 
aimlessly on the beach. Crying in despair, yet not knowing why, he 
searched for whatever could make his dream real once more. 

First he spotted a tiny crab hurrying about his daily tasks. 
"Please sir, can you help me solve the mystery?", he pleaded. 

"No!", shouted the other emphatically. "The sea is the sea; there 
is no more," and angrily turned away. 

The frightened child began to run; the laughing shoreline mocked 
his plight. "Aren't the shifting sands enough when there is no 
more?" echoed the wiry tufts of grass which tripped him in his 
flight. 

He stumbled upon a dog chasing his tail in the sand. "Peace," 
pledged the flop-eared canine. 

"Where?" asked the child. 

"Inside," the puppy answered. 

"Not in me," sighed the child. 



A long time passed, yet the boy found no answers, and so he de- 
cided to cUmb the hill beyond the beach. Perhaps the view from the 
summit would show him his horizon once again. The boy climbed 
and climbed, yet the ground grew ever steeper beneath his soft feet. 
He found no trails, no signs that meant much of anything; no ar- 
rows to point the way. He began to feel he no longer cared. 

"What if it is not worthwhile after all? But 1 should go on. 

"I can't 

"But 1 must. I want to." 

He began his climb, losing his way again and again, only to begin 
anew. The way grew rough, the wind cold. Not thinking of looking 
back, he made his way higher and higher. Passing over bramble 
and rock, his past life was torn from him. 

Darkness fell on the child. He found himself alone in the length- 
ening shadows. Falling again and again, he wound his way upward, 
desire beating down his fatigue and decision overcoming his fear. 
More confident of his prowess, he continued. Bruised and battered, 
he looked up for the first time, and saw the peak looming ever near- 
er in the moonlight. 

Before long, the way became less steep. He collapsed exhausted 
on the summit and slept. 

Awakened by a seagull, the boy arose and stood before the first 
rays of the morning sun. As the light glanced over the waters, his 
eyes filled with understanding and he remembered. The mystery of 
the horizon vanished before his knowing eyes. Rejoicing, he shout- 
ed to the other children of the beach to come and join him. 

"It's wonderful, glorious!" the boy-man exclaimed, "lean see. . . 
myself ... as I am." 



SUB TURRI 1971 



Boston College 

Chestnut Hill, Massachusetts 



Editor in Chief - Edmond R. Tremblay 
Managing Editors - Mary Anne Checrallah 

M. Dennis Dranchak 
Business Manager - Charles E. Schmidt 
Faculty Advisor - John R. Trzaska, S.J. 





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Table Of Contents 

Prologue 1 

Academics 46 

Student Life 80 

Activities 108 

Sports 174 

Features 218 

Seniors 248 

Advertisements 376 




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Academics 





University 
President 
Rev. W. Seavej/ 
Joyce, SJ. 




University 

Administration 

and Services 




PHILIP J. STEINKRAUSS 
Director of Financial Aid 




GEORGE DONALDSON 
Director of Placement 



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REV. F. X. SHEA, S. J. 
Executive Vice President 





A 



)AMES P. MclNTYRE 

Vice President for Student Affairs 




REV. LEO Mcdonough, s. j. 

University Chaplain 




ALBERT G. JACOBBI 
Director of Student Activities 




KEVIN P. DUFFY 
Director of Housing 




REV. EDWARD ). HANRAHAN, S 
Dean of Students 




ALBERT ). KELLEY 

Dean, School of Management 




REV. JAMES A. WOODS, S. 
Dean, Evening College 




Academic 
Deans and 
Assistants 



LESTER PRZEWLOCKI 
Dean, School of Education 




RICHARD E. HUGHES 

Dean, College of Arts and Sciences 




RITA P. KELLEHER 

Acting Dean, School of Nursing 




HENRY ). McMAHON 

Associate Dean, College of Arts and Sciences 



tym 




CHRISTOPHER |. FLYNN 

Associate Dean, School of Management 





"I am the most redneck of redneck conservatives," 
Professor THOMAS ). BLAKELEY tells his class during 
his opening lecture, but he smiles then and says, 
"The only difference is that I'm willing to listen." Dr. 
Blakeley received his A.B. from Sacred Heart Semi- 
nary. Following two yea'^s spent with the military 
overseas in Germany, he spent another eight years 
studying at the University of Fribourg, Switzerland. 
Five of these years were devoted to a Ph.D. in Soviet 
Philosophy, specializing in the history of contempo- 
rary Marxism and Leninism. 

Cross-cultural communication is the focal point of 
all Dr. Blakeley's studies. What lends added poignan- 
cy to this frequently advanced concept is that he has 
acquired the experience to make it effective. He 
spent two years teaching in Africa to gain first hand 
knowledge of the African culture. Understanding of 
the basic difference in cultural attitude is the crucial 
point of black-white relations, according to Dr. Blak- 
eley. The difference lies in that Americans are analyz- 
ers of thought and Africans adopters of practicality. 
Where an American would study the science of eco- 
nomics, an African would use the currency for practi- 
cal ends. Dr. Blakeley feels that it must nevertheless 
be remembered that Africa does have a highly devel- 



I 



oped culture. The philosophK al significance of cul- 
tural difference must be recognized for a more com- 
patible global relationship. 

Dr. Blakeley also feels that the relationship be- 
tween East and West requires much more study. Now 
there exists only misunderstanding and, worse, misin- 
formation. Primarily to further the pursuit of knowl- 
edge in this area, he is the editor of a bibliography 
containing all available material concerning Soviet 
philosophy. This quarterly, entitled. Studies in Soviet 
Tiiought, lists between eighty and ninety percent of 
all works published in this field, both in the West 
and, more importantly, in the East. Furthermore, Pro- 
fessor Blakeley, in conjunction with Professors Adel- 
mann and Bochenski (both in the Philosophy Depart- 
ment of B.C.), and six graduate students have recent- 
ly completed an introduction to Marxist philosophy. 
This guide will contain a concise survey of Marxist 
thought and is intended for the student seeking to 
acquaint himself with this sub|cct. 

In a more academic sphere. Dr. Blakeley has 
crossed disciplinary boundaries to attempt a compre- 
hensive course in Marxism. Under the auspices of the 
Slavic Center, philosophers, economists, political sci- 
entists, educators, and linguists will be gathered to- 
gether to present a course. Perspectives on Marxism. 
The texts employed will be those now used in Com- 
munist schools, the core of the "party line." Dr. Blak- 
eley has great hopes for further cooperation among 
the disciplines to give birth to a new area of educa- 
tion. Within the limits of one program all segments 
of a given subject may be present to the student, al- 
lowing him to discover for himself all parameters of 
the field. 

Dr. Blakeley is a conservative. He believes in the 
old structure of a university. Teachers should lecture 
and students listen. He feels that the university is a 
place for study, and students should do just that. 
Those who know must instruct those who lack the 
knowledge. "How else could the university system 
survive?" Dr. Blakeley asks. Yet he has surprised him- 
self at times. Previously he felt that such experimen- 
tal programs as students outline would lead to aca- 
demic slowdown. Now he has found himself to have 
been too hasty. He emphatically maintains that his 
students are top-notch; he sees the students as re- 
sponsible planners, who greatly desire to improve 
themselves. 




Dr. Blakeley seems to be a very severe man; he is. 
Essentially a metaphysician, he is a thinker for think- 
ers. His task, as he sees it, is extending enlightenment 
to those who are capable of enlightenment. He may 
be severe, but he does listen, not only to those 
around him, but to students: they want to learn and 
he learns from them. Yes, Dr. Thomas |. Blakeley is a 
redneck conservative, but he smiles, listens and 
helps. 




Dr. lAMES BOWDITCH has gone a long, circular 
route since his childhood in Cambridge. He moved 
on to Yale, Western University, and Purdue, where 
he received his Ph.D. in psychology. Having served 
as a psychometrician in the army, he taught for a 
while at Purdue before arriving here at Boston Col- 
lege to become an Assistant Professor of Organiza- 
tional Studies. The circle is completed; with the rich- 
ness of varied experiences at his disposal. Dr. Bow- 
ditch appears as a dedicated educator, a concerned 
counselor, and a warm person. 

Organizational Studies at Boston College is not a 
major field, but a program of study under the market- 
ing department. According to Dr. Bowditch, it in- 
cludes both industrial and social psychology. The 
study of the part of a company involved diverges in 
two directions. Looking outward, it tries to judge the 
extent and locale of product demand and prospec- 
tive customer attitude, and from this, evolve adver- 
tisement tactics and procedures. The other facet is 
more introverted, involving gathering and analyzing 



data to determine patterns of organization that will 
promote optimal efficiency, and minimize potential 
and existing stresses, selecting and categorizing per- 
sonnel, and determining the most effective style of 
leadership. 

Going by these basic outlines. Dr. Bowditch has or- 
ganized an experimental introductory course for 
School of Management freshmen. Groups of students 
are allowed to undertake almost any project to get 
actual experience collecting and analyzing data, 
studying social dynamics, and testing hypotheses. 
The individual research is supplemented by group 
meetings and progress reports to Dr. Bowditch. In 
class he includes the admittedly tedious but neces- 
sary methodological concerns — questionnaires, in- 
terview techniques, inference, statistics — while the 
project is going on. He feels that this simultaneous 
learning brings immediacy and relevance to these 
facets of the course. 

Dr. Bowditch stresses that he finds and greatly ap- 
preciates much academic freedom at Boston College. 



He still would like to see some changes, however. For 
the Honors Committee of the School of Manage- 
ment, of which he is director, he would like to see a 
more open, highly personalized curriculum. Econom- 
ic and academic limitations, he feels, have prevented 
the program from attaining its full potential. Also he 
would encourage the School to liberalize and to gen- 
eralize its approach to business training, leaving the 
specialized skills to graduate school and in-service 
training. 

Personally, Dr. Bowditch is friendly, and very easy 
to talk with. Students often drop into his office to 
confide or just chat, and are received with sincerity 
and candor. Home to him is Wayland, where he lives 
with his wife, three children, and Indonesian retriev- 
er. Besides his duties at Boston College, he is ex- 
tremely active in church affairs, directing the Sunday 
School program and working on liturgical reform and 
ecumenical programs. He also enjoys sailing, skiing, 
and sporadic jogging bouts with his dog. 

Dr. Bowditch's optimism and enthusiasm are ex- 
tremely refreshing and encouraging. He sees perva- 
sive good in many things, and remediable problems 
in others. But his general attitude is one of great 
hope and trust in the inherent honesty and capability 
of others, for this he is respected and admired. 





DR. P. ALBERT DUHAMEL is undoubtedly one of 
the most, if not the most, respected professors at Bos- 
ton College. His extensive list of credits is only the 
beginning of an explanation. His formal education in- 
cludes an A.M. from Boston College ('42) and a Ph.D. 
from the University of Wisconsin ('45). He then 
served an assistant professorship at the University of 
Chicago until 1949, after which he came to B.C. as a 
professor. 

Dr. Duhamel's classroom activities at B.C. are only 
a partial indication of his devotion to literature. He 
has been the literary editor of the Boston Herald-Tra- 
veller since 1967. He also hosted a syndicated book 
reviewing program on educational television. How- 
ever, one of his most impressive credits is relatively 
unknown: the chairmanship of the Pulitzer Prize 
committee for fiction, on which he has served for the 
past three years. Dr. Duhamel holds the distin- 
guished title of Philomatheia professor in English. 
The Philomatheia Society provides the professor's 
salary, and in this case, an annual sum of money ear- 
marked for library purchases, undcv his auspices. 



Dr. Duhamel believes that a university the size of 
B.C. should have more such funded chairs, at least 
one in every department. The benefits are both short 
and long term. The position not only serves to reward 
professors for long service and distinguished accom- 
plishments, but also offer lucrative positions to 
bright, young professors. In long term benefits, it will 
contribute extensively to the library, thus attracting 
better professors as well providing an extensive 
enough research library to discourage sabbatical 
leaves of professors who simply can't find adequate 
research materials here at Boston College. 

A former student of Professor Duhamel comment- 
ed thusly: "His classes are a very traditional lecture 
type with rarely a superfluous sentence. It is hard to 
discern any of his attitudes on other subjects such as 
politics." Dr. Duhamel replied to this: "A teacher's 
obligation in the classroom is preeminently toward 
the subject matter. A teacher who discusses outside 
topics, gaining momentary popularity and momenta- 
ry bias, is not doing his job. As a teacher, I go to great 
lengths to disguise my personal beliefs." 

However, he makes no such attempts outside of 
the classroom situation. As well as being very amia- 
ble, easy to talk with and not the least bit pendantic, 
he is also quite opinionated. For example. Professor 
Duhamel found B.C.'s strike last year "most depress- 
ing." Students and faculty decisions were made 
under emotionally strained circumstances. "I am an 
extremely conservative person, I think . . . The most 
conservative institutions in America today are the 
Church, the University and the Army. When any two 
of these come together, such as in a Catholic Univer- 
sity, the effects are widespread." 

Dr. Duhamel seems to be much less conservative 
in his outlook than B.C. or American education is. He 
sees "a necessity of redefining goals in the Universi- 
ty. Tradition is too convenient to follow. There is too 
much belief in improving education by merely 
changing its content." 

Dr. Duhamel is able to view the problem of redefi- 
nition with more objectivity and authority than most 
professors. He was head of the Honors Program from 
1958 to 1966, and was dean of the first women en- 
rolled in the Graduate School of Arts and Sciences, in 
the nineteen-fifties. His favorite idea for change in 
education se(Mns to be the redefinition of education, 
the change from "X credit hours equals one degree" 
to a requirement of knowledge and competence in 




diverse basic areas. He believes the University should 
give marks and degrees based on competence in 
areas, not just single courses. This concept is hardly a 
revolutionary idea. "It's been done this way at Ox- 
ford and Cambridge for years." He also believes this 
would clean up student-teacher relationships, since 
the student receives no marl< from the individual 
course teacher. The student takes separate tests from 
an independent board of examiners. Consequently, 
the student will no longer look tor an easy marker, 
but for a good, competent teacher. These ideas are 
reflected in the new M.A. program in the English De- 
partment. 

Interesting insight into Dr. Duhamel's character 
can be gained by questioning him about the various 
pictures decorating his office. The two pictures con- 
cerned with Shakespeare indicate his obvious inter- 
est in this man's work. "Through Shakespeare, one 
can learn all of the problems of man." 

Over his desk hangs a picture of Albert Einstein. "I 
admire him because he displayed such competence 
in an area I couldn't understand. He was completely 



non-partisan. He had such a dedicated mind and 
creative spirit. They're just now getting around to 
proving many of his theories correct." 

Concerning a framed picture of Winston Churchill 
sitting all alone on a rock, taken from the rear, he 
said, "The world's most eloquent backside. You 
could see his contempt for the photographer." 

Elsewhere, he has a picture of Buzz Aldrin, taken 
during his historic moon walk. "The moon was a 
challenge. Now let's raise the ante. The dismantling 
of the scientific establishment after the moon shot 
was very disappointing. Use this knowledge for the 
good mankind. Perhaps make ecology the next goal 
We just have to keep raising the ante." 

Dr. Duhamel once said that the reason he liked his 
Herald-Traveller job and Pulitzer Prize Committee as- 
signment was that they enabled him to come in con- 
tact with "the great or near great." Perhaps that is the 
reason why, if you're not in line at 7:00 A.M. registra- 
tion day, you'll probably never see an I.B.M. card that 
reads, 
"SHAKESPEARE-HISTORIES, DUHAMEL." 




A dean of Students at any university today holds an 
extremely enigmatic position. Relations between stu- 
dents and administrators alternately deteriorate and 
reform along sometimes unprecedented lines. And 
FR. EDWARD HANRAHAN, Dean of Students at Bos- 
ton College, finds his role as intermediary and coor- 
dinator challenging and very rewarding. 

Fr. FHanrahan got his Ph.D. in physics from Woods- 
tock College in Baltimore. While in Baltimore, he got 
his first social service experience doing counseling at 
the Maryland Training School. Here, working with 
9-18 year old court-appointed youths, he acquired a 
great deal of exposure to the complex cultural and 
economic factors that affected their social develop- 
ment. Though he denies that his "warden" days had 
any direct influence on his later career at Boston Col- 
lege, it is obvious that the experience in dealing with 
people within an institution had prepared him for his 
duties here. 

Upon coming to Boston College in 1964, Fr. Hanra- 
han was named Director of Resident Students. At this 
time there was also a Dean of Men for each school 
within the university. In 1969, all these positions 
were deleted, and one Dean of Students, Fr. Hanra- 
han, was appointed. 

As Dean of Students, Father supervises all non-aca- 
demic student activities and functions. He is consult- 
ed with regard to housing and food matters, social 
and judiciary programs within the dorms, and drug 
education. These are the most techriical aspects of 
his job, however; it is the personal contact that he 
enjoys most. Despite rumors that he employs paid in- 
filtrators or ESP, "Father H." insists that it is only his 
frequent presence and communications among the 
students that causes his seeming omniscience, espe- 
cially where outbursts of exuberance of some sort 
occur. He attends social functions, visits dorm stu- 
dents, and generally tries to keep in constant touch 
with moods of the students and the atmosphere of 
the campus. 

In the years he has been here. Father Hanrahan has 
seen many changes in the students. He feels today's 
students are questioning and sensitive. Never belore 
have they questioned so much: the relevancy ol aca- 
demics, the rights of various oppressed minorities, 
and national and international problems. In the past 
the issues never were strong on campus, due to the 




taking the view that students are very informed 
about the dangers of drug abuse, yet still choose to 
take great risks. He questions the criteria used for 
judgments, important judgments, of what he terms a 
risk-taking generation. Another problem he feels is 
putting the proper label on student actions in order 
to explain them to the community. He must decide if 
behavior represents imagination, experimentation, or 
idealism to explain to others who lack insight into 
underlying causes and problems. 

The most important challenge Fr. Hanrahan sees is 
a process of amalgamation, of taking the inherent 
good from traditional sources and solutions and in- 
corporating these with new attitudes and innovative 
theories. In dealing with current evolving problems 
and issues, Fr. Hanrahan feels an open, searching ap- 
proach will produce the most profitable, beneficial 
results. 



traditional remoteness of the university from practi- 
cal affairs and general student apathy. And above all, 
students are more sensitive to. rights, politics, eco- 
nomics, and big business. 

This shift in student attitudes demands a whole 
new approach from administrators; it requires under- 
standing, patience, and insight. The insight necessary 
requires a leader to get involved and see issues from 
a student point of view. A great deal of flexibility is 
demanded to deal with present ferments, which lack 
any traditional format. It's a learn-as-you-go situation. 

Fr. Hanrahan finds B.C. students extremely cooper- 
ative, responsive to the demands of the community, 
and patient with the problems of the University. 
They are honest, open, eager to communicate and to 
discuss. 

There are obvious problems connected with the 
job. Fr. Hanrahan is quite concerned about drugs. 





"1 find the students here, both graduate and under- 
graduate, exciting. Boston College is a sleeping giant. 
There is a great potential here for both intellectual 
and civic leadership coupled with the talent required 
to fulfill these potentials." Dr. RITCHIE LOWRY, for- 
mer chairman of the Sociology Department, received 
his B.A., M.A., and Ph.D. from the University of Cali- 
fornia at Berkeley. Professionally, he is involved with 
political sociology, especially the new politics, and 
the study of the military-industrial complex in the at- 
tempt to determine the proper military force for the 
contemporary world, and its establishment. His avo- 
cation is community studies, i.e., social problems 
from a theoretical standpoint, in order to elucidate a 
more comprehensive view which lacks the extreme 
bias now prevalent in social theory. Yet for us. Dr. 
Lowry is a teacher, an educator. 

Concerning the Sociology Department, he feels it 
is a very good one. "The quality of professors, gradu- 
ate students, and undergrads is also commendable. 
There exists a genuine esprit here. The personal an- 
tagonism, existing so characteristically in some other 
institutions, is just about non-existent here." As to 
the future of the department. Or. Lowry feels that its 
nature is to expand. It must and will meet the re- 
quirements of modern students searching for a social 
ethic within which the world may develop. Yet he 
feels that disciplinary divisions must remain. There 
can be no sense of community without boundaries. 
Dr. Lowry has been exposed to such situations and 
states, "Without a home there can be no identity for 
an individual. Colleagues for both professors and stu- 
dents are required in order to have cohesive units 
acting together." Further, he feels, there is room, 
even need, for enormous cooperation between the 
faculties. Such innovations as joint course programs, 
students sharing professors, and professors sharing 
students are becoming increasingly necessary. But 
without the division of interests, all would be for 
nought. 

When asked how he felt about last springs strike. 
Dr. Lowry replied that he wished someone had re- 
corded its progress: the misinformation of the stu- 
dent body concerning the tuition increase, the origin 
of the strike itself and the process of its evolution. 
What emerged from the whole business, he felt, was 
that B.C. was struggling to become a real community. 




He was saddened by its occurrence, though; "All this 
was unnecessary. If we had developed the connmuni- 
ty context, it could have been avoided. But, all in all, 
it wasn't a bad price to pay for not having a climate 
in which all information is shared." He feels also that 
the strike reflected the inner strength of B.C. "The 
strike was for something important; we had none of 
the ritual violence which is now associated with 
demonstrations." 

The future of education consists in the fulfillment 
of the potential of the university, Dr. Lowry suggests. 
Most obviously we have the capacity for becoming a 
catholic (small "c") community, that is, one which 
has its ethnic origins in Catholicism. This process of 
development must be understood not only by us but 
by the surrounding community as well. It is our task 
to truly educate the community outside our halls as 
we need to receive their emotional support, or surely 
we shall stifle and wither. 

Much reform is needed in the organization of our 
governing bodies. The pyramid of governance is ob- 



solete; way must be made for the voices of both the 
faculty and the student body. Dr. Lowry added that 
education must be made really public. No longer 
must teaching be insitutionalized baby-sitting for the 
upper and middle class 18-24 year olds, and this 
merely to keep them out of the labor market. Dr. 
Lowry suggested that the reason we have no unique 
identity is that the university lacks real leadership. 
The leadership he speaks of is not that of an authori- 
tarian figure with a mighty fist, but rather one or a 
group who create the context in which we may con- 
sider our developing into a community, with definite 
goals, and in which we may seek out the direction in 
which we shall head. 

Dr. Ritchie Lowry strives for these ideals. He 
struggles to lead the way for understanding. His 
classes are open to all students, and to all rrvembers 
of the community as well. Perhaps a saying given to 
him while chairman of the department would best 
summarize Dr. Lowry's attitude: Nulle Bastardo Car- 
borundum. 




"Hold onto the dream that led you into nursing." 
Her warm eyes overflow with sparkle. MAUREEN 
O'BRIEN is a person who had and does actualize her 
dreams. To students and colleagues, she is seen as a 
sincere, supporting friend, especially to those who 
wish to cast their star-dust in her concerned direction 
for help in establishing a firmer commitment to the 
career which they have begun to pursue. 

People need people, an assumption all too often 
extracted from living, was a value alive at an early age 
for Miss O'Brien. Born in Somerville and working first 
as a nurse's aid, she decided to enter St. Elizabeth's 
Hospital School of Nursing. The idea of becoming a 
teacher had been placed aside for the time being. 
After graduation, staff nursing experience on a surgi- 
cal unit at Lemuel Shatuck Hospital soon merged 
with her hidden ambition to teach, as Miss O'Brien 
began to teach Fundamentals of Nursing to Licensed 
Practical Nursing students. After her baccalaureate of 
nursing degree was awarded her by Boston College, 
and having worked for a dental surgeon in the inter- 
im, she returned to Shatuck for care of elderly pa- 
tients. Miss O'Brien worked as a Professional Nursing 
instructor at the Peabody School of Norwood and 
was next employed as a freshman coordinator of 
Somerville Hospitaj School of Nursing. 

Teaching and learning being parallel in any profes- 
sion. Miss O'Brien began as a part-time and later full- 
time student in the Medical-Surgical Nursing Mas- 
ter's Program of Boston College. Student teaching at 
Newton Junior College enabled her to view even 
more carefully curriculum and faculty interreaction 




in education. Education blossomed into budgeting 
and staffing as Miss O'Brien was appointed Director 
of Nursing Services at Holy Ghost Hospital. Commu- 
nication and growth through confrontation of prob- 
lems together became concrete through frequent 
staff meetings which she held. All of these con- 
cerned the goal of meeting patient needs. Positive 
qualities had to be realized and recognized and rec- 
ognized to be actualized. 

After becoming an instructor in the Medical-Surgi- 
cal Department of Boston College, Miss O'Brien con- 
tinued to uphold this belief. She also lectured in the 
Boston area and has participated in many panel dis- 
cussions. Warm responses from her audiences 
prompted her to successfully seek publication in 
nursing journals. One such article titled, "Role of the 
Practical Nurse in Nursing Homes" caught the eye of 
an editor who nurtured the seeds of a book born last 
May. Miss O'Brien titled her book, THE CARE OF THE 
AGED: A GUIDE FOR THE LICENSED PRACTICAL 
NURSE. In it, she includes the research data collected 
from questionnaires and interviews of the elderly in 
apartments, homes and nursing homes. While writ- 
ing, she continued to teach in the school and clinical 
area. 

After a summer of renewed friendships and travel 
in Europe, so well deserved. Miss O'Brien took the 
elected position of coordinator of the Medical-Surgi- 
cal Department. She lectures and makes frequent vis- 
its to the clinical area, maintaining student contact so 
vital in any program of education, especially where 
principles of nursing are applied, and experiences are 
meaningfully selected. Miss O'Brien has been more 
than generous with her time spent outside the class- 
room as well. She has chaired the committee which 
formulated a revised philosophy for the School of 
Nursing and has been advisor to the sophomore 
class; she has been a member of the committee of 
grading for the University as well as the Investigating 
Committee for the junior year Nursing School curri- 
culum, and still serves on the Promotion and Tenure 
Committee. She is again a member of the Executive 
Committee, the Curriculum Committee and is on the 
Search Committee for a dean for the School of Nurs- 
ing. 

As person, nurse, teacher, researcher, and writer, 
Maureen O'Brien has such a warm, human capacity 
for eliciting positive qualities in order that those who 
meet her might also actualize their potential. Her en- 
thusiasm and dedication in helping people, renewed 
by people, is contagious. 




In the effort to enhance the communication be- 
tween the faculty and the President of the University, 
a new position has been created. The Faculty Assist- 
ant to the Office of the President is a teacher named 
Dr. THOMAS O'CONNOR. Through his efforts, per- 
haps one of the university's serious problems will be 
eliminated. Dr. O'Connor defines his position as that 
of a liaison. Without circumventing established chan- 
nels, he forms a buffer between the faculty and the 
president, Fr. Joyce. Individuals of the faculty bring 
their thoughts, suggestions and complaints to Dr. 
O'Connor, and he, in turn, may test the temper of the 
faculty's response to the policies of the president. 
The approach demands an innovative solution to an 
unquestionable need, and Dr. O'Connor admirably 
fulfills his role. 

Born in South Boston, Dr. O'Connor is a graduate 
of Boston Latin High School. He attended Boston 
College for a year and then spent three years in the 
army, a year and a half of which he spent in India. He 
returned to B.C. and graduated in 1949. Boston Col- 
lege awarded him his A.M. in 1950 and Boston Uni- 
versity his Ph.D. in 1958. He has taught at B.C. since 




1950, and was chairman of the History Department 
from 1962 to 1970. Dr. O'Connor taught on a part 
time basis at several institutions, including Bridgewa- 
ter State College and Harvard University. 

Dr. O'Connor's new position evolved through his 
work with the University Academic Senate during 
the strike of last spring, when he undertook some of 
his present duties. He does not convey extreme en- 
thusiasm on the question of strikes: "I conceive of 
myself historically as a sort of Henry Clay, a great 
compromiser. I'd rather see decisions evolve from di- 
alogues and discussions." But his suggestions as to 
the cause of B.C.'s particular strike show definite in- 
sight into the concept of his position: "There was a 
breakdown of communication and credibility. The 
students didn't understand the reasons for the finan- 
cial crisis and the tuition increase, and then they 
didn't believe them." He does admit to being im- 
pressed by the unity of the strike from the beginning. 
Observing how it progressed, he viewed the strike as 
moving out to broader questions like, "What's wrong 
with B.C.?" 

These broad questions are not to be limited to B.C. 
alone, however. Dr. O'Connor went on to say, "The 
area of higher education is going through a revolu- 
tion." He maintains that, "It'll be a slow and gradual 
one. it must take all types of shapes and forms. Aca- 
demically it will be a lessening of professionalism at 
the undergraduate level, and an increase in what are 
traditionally called the Liberal Arts." However, he is 
not striking out at the professional school. He sees 
two tendencies: a movement first away from pro- 
fessionalism and toward the Liberal Arts, and second, 
toward interdisciplinary education, suited to meet 
the demands of urban society. "Urban society now 
has problems that are complex and interdisciplinary. 
This is the challenge of higher education." 

According to Dr. O'Connor, both here at B.C. and 
at other universities, "There has been a basic assump- 
tion that if a student goes into interdisciplinary 
studies that scholarship will be lowered. I reject this. 
In a hospital, for example, all of the specialists work 
as a team in a particular operation. Likewise, students 
should be able to relate their specialty to other aca- 
demic fields. Boston College, like everybody else, is 
experimenting with new educational structures. As 




long as scholarship is maintained, I'd like to see more 
of it. B.C. could be a model." Dr. O'Connor believes 
that Boston College can exist as long as it answers the 
question, "What can we do better than others? A 
place like B.C. can afford to work out new, exciting 
technique. Jesuit schools have traditionally had more 
intellectual freedom. The Jesuits always adapt to 
changing circumstances." 

In the midst of hectic confusion. Dr. Thomas 
O'Connor is a cartoonist. Having begun his hobby in 
high school, he has continued to practice his art at 
B.C. He is noted for his contributions to the Heights, 
as well as to the Sub Turri on various occasions. Per- 
haps his most famous effort was the illustration for 
the cover of the first issue of the Bridge magazine. As 
he says, "It's therapy." 



The science of life, biology, still intrigues man as it 
has for the last two hundred years. Physics, the 
science of the materials of life, is even more steeped 
in our history. Blend the two together and a newly 
bred, bold and dynamic science is born, bio-physics. 
In it, each individual science compliments and aug- 
ments the other. 

Take DONALD ). PLOCKE, S.J. First, view him as a 
first-rate scientist and educator. View his credentials: 
undergraduate work at Yale University, a doctorate 
degree from the Massachusetts Institute of Technolo- 
gy and a few months work at Harvard Medical School 
and the Max Planck Institute in Germany. Next ob- 
serve Fr. Plocke as a man deeply involved in student 
affairs. The Fr. Plocke who is a member of the Educa- 
tional Policy Committee of Arts and Sciences of Bos- 
ton College, member of the University Government 
Commission, member of the Graduate Curriculum_ 
Committee and finally, resident student chaplain. 
Blend these elements together and your result is a 
man, who has since coming to Boston College in 
1966, been as new breed, dynamic and innovative as 
the bio-physics course he teaches. Truly, each side of 
his personality augments and compliments his alter- 
nate role. 

Contemporary is perhaps the best word to de- 
scribe Fr. Plocke as a scientist-educator. As a scientist, 
he offers Boston College a fine course in molecular 
bio-physics which is popular with those students 
who seek a molecular approach to the study of biolo- 
gy. As an educator, Fr. Plocke is both modern and 
moderate. He realizes that we live in a rapidly chang- 
ing world and that many of our institutions have 
trouble adapting to these changes. Fr. Plocke would 
like to see less rigidity in the outlining of course pro- 
grams and new opportunities for students at B.C. to 
be creative. As he states: "I would like to see B.C. as 
a place open to new and novel ways to approaching 
education." His only regret is that many of the stu- 
dents on campus do not realize and exploit the op- 
portunities available. 

On the moderate side, Fr. Plocke feels we must 
preserve that character of the university which is 
unique. "Certain tools cannot be ignored," he re- 
lates, and "our advantage lies in the fact that we have 
something different to offer students." Philosophy 
and theology are highlighted by Fr. Plocke as just two 
keys to Boston College's individuality and both 
should be strengthened, not lost. They have been the 
backbone to the educational body here on the 
Heights. The concern for the welfare of students at 




B.C. by Fr. Plocke, manifests itself in numerous and 
varied forms. There is the openness and availability 
that he attempts to foster both inside of and outside 
of the classroom. In his planning and participation of 
liturgical services for resident students. Clearly one 
can see Fr. Plocke's interest in the spiritual develop- 
ment of the student community. But perhaps the 
greatest, tangible example of his participation was 
the encouragement of a new type of "house" govern- 
ment which was initiated by the students of Williams 
Dormitory. It is sad that the seeds of responsibility 
sown there never reached maturation due to the con- 
version of Williams house into a girls' dormitory over 
the summer. Yet in retrospect, Fr. Plocke states, "Wil- 
liams house showed that students can take responsi- 
bility for their own life style." He definitely feels that 
this type of student activity should be continued 
somewhere else and should not be allowed to vanish 
from our campus. Finally, even when discussing last 
year's student strike, a sympathy for the student's 
point of view is conveyed by Fr. Plocke. As he puts it: 
"The strike made a lasting impression that students 
were concerned with their education and were not 
satisfied with the education they were receiving." He 
feels that the students felt they had an imperative to 
make their views known. Fr. Plocke would like to see 
the role of the University Academic Senate strength- 
ened as a forum for student opinion. Fr. Plocke is set- 
ting the example with his concern, involvement, and 
openness with the people and problems at Boston 
College. 



To a student who has become unfortunately accus- 
tomed to being an anonymous face before an over- 
loaded professor, experiencing Dr. JOSEPH TRE- 
•MONT may be initially very unsettling. Since the 
number of professors who ask frequently and abrupt- 
ly, "What do you think about what I just said?" is at 
best minimal, such provocation is unexpected. Jolt- 
ing. What's more, the answer given is carefully con- 
sidered by him, and is sometimes accepted in place 
of his own. There are few foregone conclusions in 
Dr. Tremont's classes; the roles of student and teach- 
er are frequently interchanged and this is only one of 
the innovations he encourages and adopts whenever 
possible. 

Dr. Joseph J. Tremont, assistant professor in educa- 
tion, specializes in elementary reading and language 





arts. Having received his degree in Education from 
Harvard University, he taught in several area schools. 
Most recently, he served as Supervisor of Elementary 
Language Arts for the Brookline Public School Sys- 
tem. In Brookline he revised the reading program for 
the entire elementary system. It was seeing an appall- 
ing number of poorly trained teachers that prompted 
him to direct his influence and energies to the teach- 
er-training colleges. Here he intended to try to effec- 
tively improve the curriculum and methods to be 
adopted by the future teachers. 

In two years at Boston College, Dr. Tremont has 
gathered a loyal and respectful following, and a like 
number of adversaries. He has found his personal 
philosophy of education much in opposition, in his 
attempts to promote much needed curriculum 
changes. While totally supporting the students dur- 
ing the strike of last year, he was equally concerned 
about the loss of valuable class time. 

To allay this situation, he arranged for his junior 
reading methods class to visit public schools and he 
also held afternoon seminars on his front lawn. These 
visits provided some of the many valuable learning 
experiences of last year. 





There are many specific curriculum changes Dr. 
Tremont would like to see for education majors. One 
of these is a more extensive, guided field experience. 
There are many insights and subtleties which occur 
in elementary teaching that cannot adequately be 
conveyed by a text, and he feels the most effective 
way of learning these is personal experience. He also 
favors a mixed media approach to teaching. 

The trademarks of Dr. Tremont, in class or over cof- 
fee, are informality, innovation, and honesty. He 
quickly learns first names, and always is willing to 
share an experience that might make an important 



point even at the expense of a little "professional- 
ism." He encourages field trips and visits to special 
classes for experience. His honesty has sometimes 
caused him to cross his fellow colleagues, but always 
with the conviction that he must say what he feels. 
Personalism is important to the man. He favors 
classes of ten or twelve but gets one hundred. Still he 
would like to reach each one, to share experiences, 
to establish and encourage dialogue. Curiosity and 
concern for everyone he encounters make Joseph 
Tremont a teacher to be respected and a friend to be 
trusted. 




"Law, like government, 
has no other justification than to serve men." 
As a professor of International Law and Politics, 
ROBERT K. WOETZEL adheres perhaps best to this 
philosophy of life, but, as a keenly interested mem- 
ber of society, both at B.C. and in the general com- 
munity, the keyword of his actions is "man's service 
to man." 

Educated at Columbia, Oxford, and Bonn, Dr. 
Woetzel's interests and involvements run the gamut 
from local levels to international spheres. Politically, 
his responsibilities range from a Consultant to the At- 
torney General of Massachusetts, to a former Consul- 
tant to the President's Commission on Violence, and 
finally to the President of the Foundation for the Es- 
tablishment of an International Criminal Court. How- 
ever, politics and international law are not his only 
areas of familiarity. As co-founder (with his wife) of 
the Amici Christi program at his local parish, he seeks 
to provide the active help of the laity to the clergy. 
On a larger scale, he is also a member of the joint 
Seminar on Church-State Relations in the Greater 
Boston Area. 

Although these qualities of involvement and re- 
sponsibility to the outside community can only serve 
to enhance his position and stature with respect to 
Boston College, perhaps of greater concern to the 
student are his feelings regarding education. 

Dr. Woetzel is a firm believer in the Medieval mae- 
stro-apprentice approach, staunchly rejecting the 
level of the "bull session" as a primary source of edu- 
cation. The principle aim of any university and there- 
fore of any professor should be to educate, and, to 
this end. Prof. Woetzel will not condone the dilution 
of academic standards. In his own words, "If I did 
not stress excellence at all, I would not be here." 
Coupled with his role as a disseminator of knowl- 
edge, he also sees himself as a transmitter of values, 
often obviously missing from students' backgrounds. 
His courses are always open to new methods of in- 
struction, but there is also a healthy emphasis on 
field projects as a means of obtaining empirical veri- 
fication of rational theories. As he says, "I like to re- 
late what is going on with what I am teaching." 

In terms of the future. Dr. Woetzel would like to 
see a small corner of B.C. set aside where the tradi- 
tional, classic style of Jesuit education could flourish. 
He feels that B.C. should offer something special: a 
plurality of academic settings. 




In his opinion, both the classical and the experi- 
mental approaches can and should stand side by 
side. He looks forward to a national system of Jesuit 
universities, enabling students to attend various insti- 
tutions. "I see ahead much growing together among 
national and international. I try to get students out of 
their background settings and into new situations." 
He also envisions an increased emphasis on faculty 
and students within the university, going as far as the 
subjugation of the administrative bureaucracy to the 
ideas and ideals of the learning community. In his 
eyes, the senior faculty should set the academic stan- 



dards and not be continually constrained by adminis- 
trative decisions. 

Although an advocate of student and faculty 
power within the university, he warns against going 
too far to gain one's end; "Close the universities and 
you open the door for the demagogues and the ex- 
tremists. The activists are tending toward rhetoric. 
They are not asking questions and learning." 

Professor Woetzel remains liberal in spirit; never- 
theless, he draws the line at radicalism,' holding, 
above all, his goal of the preservation of academic 
standards. 



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Student Life 



Perhaps the best way to approach student life in 
1971 is to first briefly examine the context of that life, 
Boston College is in many ways a well-suited back- 
ground into which students establish themselves. In 
numbers it is small enough so that there is some kind 
of communication between faculty, student body, 
and administration. That is, there is the possibility of 
human contact between these three that is lacking in 
universities which have an undergraduate enrollment 
of 10, 15, or 20 thousand students. On the other 
hand, it is large enough so that the student can bene- 
fit from the "university" experience: he can utilize 
the faculty and resources that a large university af- 
fords while, if he wishes, he can simultaneously regis- 
ter in an occupationally oriented school (manage- 
ment, education, nursing, etc.). B.C.'s proximity to 
other universities offers him an opportunity to fur- 
ther enrich his educational experience by offering 
him libraries 'for resource and contact with students 
from other campuses. The city, Boston, is tar away so 
that the B.C. student is not caught up within il, but is 
close enough so that he can use what it offers in op- 
portunities for theater, art, history, and involvement 




in social action. Besides these important factors that 
go into makmg the context or environment of stu- 
dent life, B.C. also presents to its students an estab- 
lished sports program (for participants and spectators 
alike!), ample opportunity for social activities, and a 
generally good intellectual atmosphere. 

How, then, does the student fit into this context? 
To this date, activity and energy on the campus have 
noticeably subsided. The general mood is one of si- 
lence, apathy, and fatigue — indicative of either sat- 
isfaction or subsurface tension. The latter seems the 
more plausible alternative. Some indeed are satisfied: 
there is for them unity, harmony, and association be- 
tween the different aspects of student life; they are 
comfortable in their dorms or, if commuters, in their 
homes, social life, academic pursuits, and extracurri- 
cular activities. However, for others, student life is a 
series of separates — disjointed, segmented, and de- 
tached. They are uncomfortable. They cannot make 
connections; they cannot feel at home in the dorms 
or at a dance, at a football game, or in the classroom. 
For this student some parts of his life at B.C. cannot 
be fit into the context of his life as a whole. This is 
what creates the subsurface tension; hopefully, this 
tension, this suspended energy will one day surface 
into new activity and a renewed concern for making 
Boston College a community in which all its mem- 
bers are alive with the search for a trul\ fulfilling edu- 
cational and living experience. 





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Activities 






Alpha Phi Omega 

Alpha Phi Omega extends the spirit and service of 
the Boston College community beyond the campus 
itself. Though technically a fraternity, it carries the 
spirit of brotherhood even further. It is an open orga- 
nization which involves itself in such worthwhile ac- 
tivities as raising money for the Jimmy Fund and 
sponsoring a Christmas party for orphans and under- 
privileged children. The creed of this organization 
makes it a meaningful element of B.C.'s campus. 










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Band 



The Boston College "Screaming Eagles" Marching 
Band is more than merely a halftime show. Its 150 
dedicated members support all athletic endeavors of 
B.C. At every hockey, football, and basketball game, 
the band provides the spirit that fires the frenzy of all 
fans. But just as their repetoire ranges from "For Bos- 
ton" to "Big Spender," the B.C. band varies its musi- 
cal activities. In addition to the Marching Band, 
which has entertained on national television for both 
Boston College and Boston Patriots games, there is 
the little known, but highly talented. Concert Band 
Another facet, the Pep Band, is the backbone of 
every B.C. sports rally, while the Parade Band has cap 
tured first place for the last five years in the St. Pat 
rick's Day Parade in New York City. The heart of Bos 
ton College beats in the band, a synthesis of sound 
enthusiasm and people. 









Cheerleaders 



Behind any winning team always lies the enthusi- 
asm and support of many loyal fans. The head and 
shoulders of that body at Boston College are the 
cheerleaders. This dedicated group has spurred the 
Eagles both on the field and on the court by taking 
hold of the multitude and generating energy and in- 
spiration, the necessary ingredients of an exciting 
game. These vocal dancers keep the games at a high 
pitch, whether it be a winning or losing cause. While 
masking frustration or bubbling over with excite- 
ment, they emphasize the fact that support is the key 
to success. 



Chorale 





The art of song, its arrangement and presentation, 
reflects the determination and talents of the compos- 
er, conductor, and, in this case, the University Cho- 
rale. The Chorale, founded in 1962 by C. Alexander 
Peloquin, is presently in its ninth season at Boston 
College. The first concert of the year was a great suc- 
cess with the chorale performing a program of mod- 
ern American music. Then, after only five short 
weeks of rehearsal, the Christmas program was born, 
which was very well received by the capacity audi- 
ence in McElroy Commons. The last major presenta- 
tion of the year featured the Chorale and Eilleen Far- 
rell, an excellent soprano soloist, in Poulenc's "Glo- 
ria." The concert was very successful and reflected 
the hard work, enthusiasm and spirit which charac- 
terize the Chorale and enable it, year after year, to 
bring such a fine series of musical programs to the 
Boston College campus. 





Commuters' Council 




The relationship of a commuter to a college that is 
increasingly geared toward the resident student is a 
very nebulous one. While the 'day-hops' have no less 
enthusiasm or dedication than their dormitory coun- 
terparts, it is perhaps a much harder job to tap these 
resources. In this vein, the Commuters' Council has 
done much in bridging the gap between the resident 
and the commuter. Providing organization to a prac- 
tically unorganizable mass, the Council supervises a 
'Rider's Service', sponsors Happy Hours, and, in gen- 
eral, attends to the needs and complaints of the com- 
muting student. While the Council's success can, of 
course, be measured in such concrete terms as these, 
its true achievement lies in the incorporation and in- 
tegration of the commuter into the mainstream of 
university life. 





117 




Dramatics Society 

Solidly good perhaps best characterizes the work 
of the Boston College Dramatics Society. Audiences 
have enthusiastically welcomed their efforts to bring 
not only novel but also exciting and interesting 
works to this campus. The function of the society 
has, for a little over a century now, been the intro- 
duction of its members to the nature and potential of 
drama, as well as their initiation with all phases of 
production. In conjunction, they attempt to fulfill a 
cultural responsibility by bringing worthwhile materi- 
al to their audiences. The tasks they have undertaken 
are accomplished in five productions during the 
course of the year. In their hands, the temptations in 
the Garden of The Serpent and the moralistic ravings 
of The Drunkard give rise to true entertainment and 
complete enjoyment. 




Fulton Debate 

The Fulton Debating Society of Boston College is 
perhaps the least known but most successful inter- 
collegiate organization on campus. What other activ- 
ity can boast of placing in the top ten nationally 
since 1960? There is strong evidence that this year 
will prove to be just as successful. Under the tutelage 
of its new debate coach Daniel Rohrer, formerly of 
Oberlin College, this society has earned well de- 
served forensic kudos at some of the top tourna- 
ments in the country as well as an intercollegiate 
rank in the top five. Encountering stiff competition at 
Harvard, Brown, Georgetown and Brandeis, Boston 
College teams have placed no lower than ninth in 
the seeding, which includes a first place victory at 
Brown University. It is in Fulton Debate that the qual- 
ity and character of its students as well as the name 
and reputation of Boston College is carried through- 
out the United States. 






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Gold Key 



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Although only thirty-four years old, the Cold Key 
Society is an organization rich in tradition and heri- 
tage. The Key's chief goal is to live up to its motto of 
"Service and Sacrifice." This society serves the Bos- 
ton College community by acting as the host and co- 
ordinator of cultural, spiritual, academic, athletic and 
social events. But the Key goes beyond the college 
community in its acts of sacrifice through its work 
with retarded adults, help at a Cambridge art center, 
and assistance in the recruitment drive of the Ameri- 
can Red Cross' Blood Bank and the Peace Corps. 
However, Cold Key members are not only ushers and 
ambassadors of good-will. They are members of a fra- 
ternal union which sponsors parties and social events 
of its own. At its Annual Awards Banquet, it honors 
those students and a person outside the campus who 
best exemplifies their motto. It is indeed an organiza- 
tion integral to the smooth operation of academic 
and social life at B.C. 




Heights 



If the pen is mighter than the sword, the Heights 
should be considered armed and dangerous. But it is 
dangerous only to those sacrosanct issues which are 
taboo to other B.C. media. The Heights is perhaps the 
most widely discussed if not the most widely read 
publication on campus. Its pursuit of journalism re- 
sults in its own unique style. The Heights chronicles 
the events of campus life, but ventures beyond being 
merely a social calendar by presenting articles that 
are informative and controversial. It is this controver- 
sy that either alienates or activates student opinion 
towards it. While life at B.C. doesn't necessarily cen- 
ter on the reporting of the Heights, it does prove to 
be an inevitable part of it. 





Judo Club 



Initiated only at the beginning of this year, the 
Judo Club has existed in the hearts of a few for the 
last several years. However, through perseverance 
and desire, the obstacles were overcome and the 
club began to function. Instructed by two black belt 
experts, the club has over one hundred members, in- 
cluding both men and women. The instruction in- 
cludes lessons in the traditional, formal judo as well 
as the more conventional aspects of self-defense. Pro- 
motion through the various ranks or belts is accom- 
plished by both written and practical tests. The out- 
look for the future is unlimited but the prospect of 
judo becoming a major collegiate sport at Boston 
College is only contingent upon both students and 
the administration providing the support and facili- 
ties necessary. 




Mental Health Volunteers Club 

With its approximately fifty volunteers, the Boston 
College Mental Health Volunteers Club, through sac- 
rifice and dedication three nights a week, attempts 
to bring every aspect of a normal life to the institu- 
tionalized mentally ill and handicapped in the Bos- 




ton area. At the Boston State Hospital, the club mem- 
bers socialize with the patients through conversa- 
tion, games and other activities in an effort to help 
them develop contact and rapport with the outside 
world. The Fernald School for the Mentally Retarded 
is the club's other area of concentration. In coopera- 
tion with other colleges, the members run behavior 
modification programs with school age children and 
adolescents. Here they attempt to implant the rudi- 
mentary social skills that will help the children lead 
productive adult lives. The work of the Mental 
Health Club is repetitious, time consuming, and 
sometimes frustrating but rewards its members with 
a satisfaction unparalleled by any other organization 
on campus. 




Pulse 




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130 




Teaching, learning, helping, sharing — that's what 
a PULSE is. Originally the Committee for Social Ac- 
tion, the organization strives to join academic reflec- 
tion with social experience to bring about a fuller life 
for its members and those they attempt to serve. 
Such problems as drugs, their legality and effect, 
modern cultural life, religious thought and belief, 
poverty, racism, violence, alienation all come within 
its scope. The program advisors employ case, tutorial, 
and seminar methods to establish complete exposure 
to human affairs. Outside of the classroom, observa- 
tion, interviewing, and participation are stressed. 
Most obvious to the B.C. community, perhaps, is the 
Joshua Center in Shaw House basement. This stu- 
dent-staffed, student-run "drop-in" seeks to make 
available both professional and personal contact to 
the community at large. If the essence of fulfillment 
is dedication and commitment, the PULSE program 
certainly succeeds in its efforts. 




Sodality 



The image of the Sodality as a group of Catho- 
lic zealots is as outdated as the Roman Mass. 
The Sodality's purpose is to foster not force reli- 
gious thought in the B.C. community. It is an or- 
ganization of social concern on the campus, 
reaching out to help all the needy in the true 
spirit of Christian charity. Whether it be teach- 
ing handicapped children how to swim, orga- 
nizing a Christian community or arranging a 
bake sale for the benefit of Pakistani tidal wave 
victims, the Sodality of Boston College is truly 
action catalyzed with meaning. 



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Mary Anne Checrallah, Managing Editor Charlie Schmidt, Business Manager 



134 




Ed Tremblay, Editor-in-Chief 




Sub Turri 



A great wise man once said that a yearbook is a 
book of the year. Which year he didn't say, but, then 
again, we've had so many, who could remember 
them all? Well, we wanted to and tried to make our 
memory yours. It's dissected, antiseptic, and the 
wound is clean, but it's yours, and you've got to heal. 
Since you're, presumably, reading this you know 
what we are, because it's there in front of you. You 
see, we're all kinda paranoid. Everybody seems to go 
from hot light to hot light and never learns or bothers 
to look back. Well, this was yours, and we wanted to 
give it back. But you know that, and so we say Thank 
you. 




Fr. John Trzaska, Faculty Advisor 



Dennis Dranchak, Managing Editor 




Ron Huebsch, Activities Editor 



Bill Kita, Prologue Editor 





Tom Caruso, Asst. Sports Editor 



Jay Breeze, Features Editor 




Fred Voss, Seniors Editor 




Steve Korta, Asst. Business Manager Angela Tremaglio 



138 



UGBC 



If the concept of government is characterized by 
participation, then its success at Boston College over 
the past year can be seriously questioned. Beginning 
with the strike last spring, the Undergraduate Gov- 
ernment incurred the criticism of many students for 
failing to represent them with a position that they 
were often too apathetic to uphold themselves. The 
fall semester was then marked by poor Congressional 
attendance and overall disillusionment with a sup- 
posedly "democratic" system. While the fault can 
not be attributed to the leadership, in most cases the 
success or failure of a government is too closely con- 
nected with its president. One must, however, re- 
member that any government is only as effective as 
those who want to participate and that, in the end, 
the guilt or accolades are borne, not by the one, but 
by the many. 





WVBC 



Disc Jockey, Newsman, Sportcaster, Businessman, 
and Technician; every member of WVBC is often re- 
quired to fulfill each role in the station's effort to en- 
tertain and reform. Supplying good listening to the 
dorms and McElory Commons, the fraterhally and 
professionally oriented sixty undergraduates make 
their own effort to cdmmunicate. To help them, 
WVBC has the top fifty popular albums each week, 
the services of the ABC News Network, the Ivy Net- 
work and United Press International. From early 
morning to late in the night, the top floor of Fulton 
FHall is a center of activity, handling the day to day 
problems of keeping the audience informed and en- 
tertained. Equipment breakdowns, missing records, 
producing commercials, public service shows and 
news reports are just a few of the things that go on 
behind the scenes. In the one hundred and ten hours 
of programming per week, the combination of 
friends and professional partners somehow works 
well for the people and listeners of WVBC — Boston 
College Radio. 





Pulse 




Gold Key Society 





^ 1f» 



Sodality 




Alpha Phi Omega 




Knights of Columbus 




Commuter's Council 




Mental 
Health 
Club 



PERFORMING ARTS 




Band 



Junior Show Cast 




Chorale 




Dramatics Society 




Fulton 
Debate 




PROFESSIONAL ORGANIZATIONS 




Math Club 




Accounting 
Academy 



Sigma Phi Sigma 





Alpha Kappa Psi 



Mendel Club 




Geology Club 




Kappa Delta Epsilon 



Pi Sigma Epsilon 




Blessed Oliver Plunkett Society 




Young Republicans 




Delta Sigma Pi 





ALPHA PHI OMCCA: (/ to r; 1st row) B. Cordon; 
■ . Fontaine; F. NUGouily; C. Murray; (2nd row) C. Buf 
Aers; S. Waketield; P. Battaglia; R. DiSc hino; |. Rull; 
iMahoney; F. Maicllano; |. Carlson; E. Saunders; E. 

Driscoll; C. Hammond; D. While; P. Coldberg; D. 

Cenlile; T. Dale; (3rd row) j. DeLorenzo; P. DeCour- 

cy; R. Farrington; P. Cardia; P. O'Donnell. 

/ 




GOLD KEY SOCIETY: (/ to r; kneeling) E. Saunders; |. 
Shannon; C. Farley; M. Karrat; A, Russo; T. Lynch, )r.; 
E. McAuliffe; ('Standing) C. Butters; 1. Garlirk; E. Mal- 
Oney; J. Rull; T. Stepka; M. LaBreque; 13. Dranrhdk; E. 
T-re,nnblay.; J- McCarthy. 



dan; D. Pellow; 




PULSE; 'iL-f^t mih'dm 
Jseated) P. Byrni 






SODALITY^ C/ g> r; 1st low ) | St. 

:.A-^!^.ini;3A. Hoffman; (seated) P. Carrier; P. Hal- 
bone; D. McCarthy; B. Andrews; (ird row) |. Delan- 
ey; R. Keeley; P^ Cinnetly; A. Cullen; C Ruhino 
Weigel. 



IlClTrTTTP~CC)l U\tBlT 
''tZ'readen; M. Airmo 





OMMUTERS' COUNCIL 
va[i,; H. Reynolds; A \hhiu//cse, N Smith, M. Cor 
■ (2nd row) E. McVinney; M. Cimolla 



rera; K. Hardin; K. Maher; K. Maitland; M. Melega; M, 
O'Brien; B. Piemonte; C. Richardson; M. Staley; G. 
Veroneau; K. Wagner; (Mezzo-Soprano) |. Andrews; 
L. Calarese; J. Mahoney; L. Murphy; L. Rosasco; |. 
Shaw; ). Stasiowski; P. Wade; A. Walsh; M. Walsh; M. 
Weisz; (Mezzo-Alto) B. Bartnick; M. Basiel; M. Claf- 
fey; L. Conklin; P. Corrigan; M. Crump; A. Dunne; M. 
Foley; |. LaCroix; M. Mullen; M. Riga; S. Redick; D. 
Russo; L. Santoro; C. Reilly; C. Spont; |. Ursini; E. Wil- 
liams; (Alto) K. Annulli; D. Deprez; B. Desmond; ). 
Donovan; C. Fiermonte; S. Flavin; M. Foster; N. Cabo- 
riault; B. Groppo; M. Hanley; A. Havens; A. Hawes; 
M. DeStefano; ]. Marshall; M. Trainor; M. Gill; M. Kel- 
leher; S. Mader; M. McKenzie; S. Menslage; K. Mone; 
). Mullins; ). St. Germain; D. Tehan; (Tenor I) T. At- 
wood; D. Burroughs; F. Gutierrez; M. Hackett; G. 
McColgan; A. Newcomb; R. Reinhart; R. Skiba; P. Thi- 
boutot; S. Caldwell; C. Vander Maelen; (Tenor II) |. 
Delia Russo; K. Fay; K. Fryzel; T. Gibbons; P. Hoff- 
man; R. Kenny; W. O'Neill; D. Waters, S.|.; (Baritone 
I) J. Allen; H. Barnaby; R. Cieri; D. Cronin; T. Flynn; P. 
larussi; T. Laily; T. Madden; G. Mulvey; P. Pantano; 
M. Puzo; R '^ullivan; D. Toussant; (Baritone II) E. 

Bctts, R. Casey; D. Castiglioni; ). Klements; 
. [3'Auria; A. DeCiacomo; |. Engler; L. 

eltner; J. Kozarich; |. Lewis; ). O'Toole; K. 

^no; F. Stinson; T. Strazar; C )urado; P. Garvin; P. 

Willemain; \. Winberry; (Bass) S. Bartos- 

aubon; R. Dillon; R. Dwelley, S.j.; J. Farrell; 
lly; j. Kenealy; ]. Kollasch; P. Lizotte; P. Mac- 
Donald, E. Maloney; P. McLaughlin, S.J.; E. Nuccio; ). 
Moiris; |. Seufert; R. Zapf. 




iORALE: (listing by alphabetical order: Sopi.ino 1) 
B. Bowler; D. Bullcr; K. Cantwell; L. Chatalian; L. Col- 
aluca; A. Due (,a; L. Freeman; K. Gallagher; E. Harring- 
ton; C. M( Manus; A. Melhtjt; M. Roberge; E. Shea; K. 
Shea; B. Smith; (Soprano II) H. Coleman; L. Corinne; 
A. Davin; S Cjilligdn; M. Glcnnon; |. Cotsell; M. Guer- 



BOSLON'TUCTFCE BAND; (listing l^y al^mSeHTal 
order) C. Aderholt; j. Alexander; D. Angiolillo; R 
Archer; G. Ardagna; E. Baechtold; R. Barbero; T. B$ 
tosek; M. Bartosiak; L. Battisla; B. Blotner; R. Breen; E. 
Brown; D. Brunelli; L. Bryan; |. Bubien; j. Campbell; 
C. Carrigan; J. Cenlorino; G. Chin; P. Cody; I. C;origo; 
J. Connell; L. Creighton; |. Cristello; I. Daelhausen; ). 
D'Agostino; S. Daly; W. Davis; |. Deluca; F. Delutis; S. 








DeWald; P. DiGiulio; C. Divino; P. Donahue; "RTTfgan; 
P. Ellison; P. Elter; C. Fava; |. Fay; B. Feathorston; H. 
Ferrant; M. Ford; C. Fowler; D. Frazee; E. Frederick; P. 
Fuedo; R. Cambone; D. Gangi; C. Gigante; P. Gillis; 
M. Guerrera; R. FHall; M. FHarrington; A. FHarrrs; K. 
F^art; J. FHavens; D. FHeaiy; R. FHeffernan; j. Hetens; M. 
FHofmann; M. Fiolihan; V, FHunt; M. FHurley; F. FHytler; 
P. larussi; B. Kavanah; M. Kelley; R. Keltner; |. Kolb; J. 
Kruper; P. Lake; ). Lanigan; D. Leavcy; M. Lebret; E. 
Levesque; J. Lincoff; T. Lynch; W. Lynch; A. Mac- 
Donald; C. Maloof; R. Marble; L. Markot; A. Marolda; 
T. Martin; J. McClain; C. McKenna; R. McNamera; J. 
Meola; G. Mish; R. Monroe; S. Morrissey; M. Mns- 
chella; L. Nicotra; |. Niles; F. Noonan; T. Noonan; R. 
Noyes; S. O'Donovan; M. O'Dwyer; P. O'Neil; E. 
Page; M. Paskowski; D. Petrulavage; R. Pettorulo; T. 
Philbrick; C. Piekarski; V. Piekarski; J. Pierni; C. Poole; 
R. Pouiiot; ). Powers; J. Qualters; A. Reed; J. Reidy; D. 
Ries; R. Rufo; A, Santorsola;-'A' ^anto'suosso; J. Scan- 
nell; D. Sickorez; G. Simmons; G. Sincavage; 1. Snow; 
R. Spinelli; K. Straub; A. Stroukolt; FH. Theberge, R, 
Thomas; G. Tirrell; J. Titlebaum; A. Tremaglio; M. 
Turner; S. Vernon; F4. Walsh; P. Warny; K. VVarzocha; 
B. White; F. Wilson; C. Yuknis; P. Siragusa (Director), 
). Casey (Drill Instructor); Fr Glavin (Faculty Ad 
sor); S, Collins (Assistant). 





RAMATICS SOCIETY: (in circle from I to r) Dr. ;\Uu 
coux; J. Lyness; L. Zaksheski; A. Guccione; D. Licht 
M. Roman; S. James; M. Brady; J. April; J. Plum; D. Fal 
clone. 



FIJLTON DEBATE bULIblY; (I iO /- sfaTiWng^ M. Af 
riold; ). McMillan; D. Rohrer (Coach); ). Pare; M. Moi 
eski; B. Kiggins; B. Rosenthal; B. Baker; M. Peterson 
(seated) R. Hampson; J. FHerman; M. Raux. 



ney; M. Riley; (standing) C. Baker; S. Roach; S. McEle- 
ney; P. Kelly; M. Aiesi; T. Lynch; ). Walsh; |. Dowd; K. 




KAPPA DELTA EPSILONi f/ fo r; kneeling) E. Martin; 
K. McCarthy; K. Moroney; C. Gunther; H. FHawksley; 
(standing) R. Popiak; K. Wagner; K. Greeley; M. Far- 
ragher; P. Mercailis; M. Durgin- A. Shannon; J. Got- 
sell; Marv Neumann 

0^" 





Pi SIGMA LPSILON- (/ to r) D. Kassar; |. Wilson; T. 
Maslowski; K. Greeley. 




BLESSED OLIVEk PLUNKETT SOCIETY: (I to r; seated) 
M. Fmnegan; D. Kenny; A. Dwyer; L. Burns; A. Rus- 
sell; M. Dermody; (standing) J. Crimlisk; M. La- 
Breque; J. Murphy; R. F^ar^ity; K. Fogartv. 

.* i 

_YOUNG REPUBLICAI^S: (I to r; 1st row, 
Intonucci; M. Bartosiak; J. Gallagher; {..,',' 
)ril; ). DeLuca; ]. Higgins; D. Sickoi' 





^_^CCOUNTING ACADEMY: (I to r) C. Ear; 
"tlilynn (Advisor); J. Niles; J. MacCarthy. 



SPORTING ORGANIZATIONS 




Flying Club 



Ski Club 




Cheerleaders 




Judo Club 



SPECIAL 

INTEREST 

GROUPS 




Chess Club 




Pierre Club 




158 




WlPR 




Cement 



WVBC 




Sub Turri 




Heights 




Stylus 







^^^.^'-i 




Recreation Association 



Fencing 
Club 




Women's Varsity Basketball 




162 




Figure Skating Club 



STUDENT 
SENATES 



A and S 
Senate 




Nursing Senate 






' '' 




' 


. 1 




e 





• 


' • 


• 







- 
















•..M ^ 








^ % > 



Education Senate 




Evening College Senate 




Congress 






Social Committee 



Beta Gamma 
Sigma 




Sigma Theta Tau 





HONOR SOCIETIES 




Cross and Crown 



FLYING CLUB: (I to r; seated) S. Korta; M. Crump; R. 
Reynold; R. Klimm; C. Overton; K. Groves; (standing) 
L, Bruyette; E. Levesque; W. Senisi; N. Cronin; A. 
Vazquez; C. K| 



HEIGHTS: (in circle from left) S. Marley; P. McElroy; 
D. Muething; T. Kelly; M. Kelly; D. Natchek; C. Cam- 
pos; T. Nelligan; B. Polito; B. Ruff; M. Berkey. 



SKI CLUB: (I to r; seated) S. Ingersoll; 
White. 



STYLUS: (I to r)\N. Grapes; M. Gaffer; C. Watson; W. 
Hooban; K. Reap; ]. Granger. 



CHEERLEADERS: (I to r; bottom) J. Dooley; C. Chalen- 
ski; A. Dray; R. Eckel; J. McDonough; C. Reddington; 
(middle) M. Plasse; D. Dolan; ). Traifaro; S. Derby; K, 
Redd; S. Boehler; K. Blunt; (top) I. Mayer. 

JUDO CLUB: (I to r; 1st row) G. Begin; D. Vishno; A. 
Sabatino; ). Wolosen; J. Pfeiffer; S. Kane; (2nd row) J. 
DeSantoro; j. Bularsek; D. Bacon; P. Collins; J. Birarel- 
li; T. Borgia; M. Smeglin; Y-^rd row) T. DeVries; M. 
Foncello; R. Dow; R. Lisewski; T. lanuzzi; (standing) 
C, Matsuura; M. Donnelly; Mike Karrat; R. Myers; W. 
Deckel; T. Mullen; K. Loeffler^j; 



CHESS CLUB: (I to r; seated) S. Rusconi; W. Petrillo; 
(standing) P. Czachorowski; B. Sperling; (absent) D. 
Roulston. 



PIERRE CLUB: Every loyal hockey fan v^hose support 
is so important to the team effort. 




SUB TURRI: (I to r; seated) L. Sweeney; D. Matthews; 
K. Hickey; K. Owens; M. O'Connell; E. Tremblay; P. 
Aloi; B. Lucas; K. Wiles; ). Wiles; R. Huebsch; W. Kita; 
S. Korta; (on floor) K. Carney; J. Roche; B. White; R. 
Thibault; C. Driver; C. Blank; W. Kendall; D. Dran- 
chak; F. Voss; T. Flanagan; J. Lewis; (in the bush) C. 
Schmidt. 



EDUCATION SENATE: (I to r) R. Faherty; M. Plasse; B. 
Casey; C. Canning; P. Corsi; D. D'Errico; T. Laly; P.- 
Doty; K. McDonald; A. Maher. i 

EVENING COTLEGE SENATE: (I to r; 1st row) R. Leon- 
ard; P. Redding; (2nd row) ). Crimlisk; J. Spencer; K. 
Tully; J. Sargent; R. Mohan; ). Feeney; K. Cantwell; 
(3rd row)]. Stanewick; B. Giffin; M. Hannon; J. Shine. 



^i^KJfiC^SSSt- 



UGBC PRESIDENT, VICE PRESIDENT AND CABINET 
K. Hackett; W. Moriarity; T. Caparvo; T. Fitzgerald, j 
Tierney; J. Maher; R. Palac; D. Degnan; W. Reillv, P 
Curtin. 



I 





ffftsmiifi^. 






CONGRESS: (I to r) Names withheld pending 
quorum. 




Donoghue; C. Borab; ). Fitzgmld; L, Ripley 
C. Spont; J. Bulgar; K. Murphy. 




SOCIAL COMMITTEE: (I to r; 1st row) C. Vigna; P. 
Mulhearn; (2nd row) M. Holland; P. Conley; W. 
Christianson; C. Dunne; |. Maher; (3rd row) B. Gallag- 
her; B. Burn; P. Megliola. 



BETA GAMMA SIGMA: (I to r; standing) D. Castig- 
lioni; ). Finning; (seated) ). Crowley. 



SIGMA THETA TAU: (I to r) E. Grady; E. Dart; M. Wil- 
cox. 



TENNIS: (I to r) A. Marinella; T. Hardigan; B. Voipe; 
D. Conetta; D. DeNicola; ). Melanson; M. Lawton; J. 
Herens; N. Schiller. 



FIGURE SKATING: (I to r; 1st row) M. Manning; E 
d'Angio; R. Scarbrough; P. Melega; K. Annulli; | 
Maguder; K. O'Leary; M. Glennon; (2nd row) R 
Howe; T. Howe; D. Connell; G. Slonneger, )r.; B 
Thomas; A. Murray; R. DiRuggiero; D. Epstein; C 
Murray; B. Bray; (kneeling) Mrs. D. Ferrald (Instruc- 
tor). 



CROSS AND CROWN: (I to r; standing) A. Pare; 
(seated) j. Moran; N. Schiller; B. Nardone; M. Sheri- 
dan; E. Moloney; S. Kelleher. 



ARTS AND SCIENCES SENATE: (I to r; seated) |. Mur- 
phy; D. Reznick; M. Schneider; Elsbeth; (standing) P. 
Silvia; D. Moroz; T. Flynn; ). Bularzik; K. Hickey; D. 
Hern; P. Goldberg; M. Gallagher; J. Antonucci; E. Kof- 
ron. 



WVBC: (I to r) C. Szely; G. Martelon; P. Raymondo; A. 
Naclerio. 



WOMEN'S VARSITY BASKETBALL TEAM: (/ to r; 
kneeling) S Cotter; L. Englor, A Wolfe, (standing) Vt 



NURSING SENATE: (I to r; seated) M. O'Connell; K. 
Nelson; P. Ball; M. Donohue; M. Harnett; M. Brady; 
G. Hunt; (standing) L. DeCarlo; D. Pisapin; E. Gerrari; 
P. Terreri; M. Foley; N. Harrington; B. Grady (Advi- 
sor); j. O'Brien; B. Donadio. 





-!»•"•'.;■-.• 



. * >*•.*'»• 



!»*■'*»#, ■ 



v,'-A?^ "v*^-^^-'^-''£i.^V 











Sports 



Football 



This was the year of final transition for the football 
program begun three years ago by Joe Yukica. When 
Jim Miller was dismissed as head coach following the 
1967 season, B.C. had acquired a reputation for losing 
to the big teams (Army, Penn State, Syracuse, et al.) 
and of linemen who were as mobile as the Maginot 
Line. Morale wasn't going to remind people of any 
"win one for the Gipper" spirit either. However, in 
his three years at B.C., head coach joe Yukica and his 
capable staff have reversed what could have become 
a steadily deteriorating situation. Beginning with the 
startling 49-15 opening game victory over Navy in 
1968, the Eagle football team has made its presence 
felt more and more in Eastern football circles. No 
longer could the large Eastern schools expect a 
breather when B.C. came to town or on a visit to 
Alumni Stadium. Syracuse found out what the new 
look Eagles meant in last season's finale. B.C. no long- 
er accepted defeat as a natural course of events. 



Last year was up and down. A young defense and 
an inconsistent offense had produced a 4-4 record 
with two of the losses being humiliating spectacles at 
the hands of Villanova (21-6) and Buffalo (35-21). 
However, the 35-10 shellacking of the Orangemen 
was the light at the end of the tunnel. This year saw 
the emergence from that tunnel. It could have been 
a disastrous year following two frustrating losses to 
Penn State and Air Force. But on the new Eagle style 
they fashioned five consecutive victories, one being 
a gutsy come-from-behind win over Army, another a 
convincing upset over Pitt. Like a phoenix rising from 
its ashes, B.C. football has returned to the gridiron 
wars fully capable of competing with the best. Re- 
newed spirit, mutiple offense, quick and hard-hitting 
defense are the new trademarks of Boston College 
football. This is the story of the 1970 season: Frustra- 
tion and Realization. 




Above: Offense lines up against Army, Right: Fred Willis, B.C.'s all-time leading rusher and scorer. 



B.C. had a score to settle with a few of the teams 
on its 1970 schedule. When the Villanova game was 
rescheduled for T.V. reasons, it only moved the re- 
venge game against the Wildcats up one month. On 
regional Eastern television, the Eagles defense proved 
its mettle in an often spasmodic, but thrilling 28-21 
victory. At the end of the first quarter via the marvel- 
ous rushing efforts of Fred Willis and two defensive 
stands inside the 20, the Eagles were up 14-0. Howev- 
er, the game Wildcats, taking advantage of a B.C. 
fumble, marched 27 yards to make it 14-7 at half. The 
third quarter answered any questions as to whether 
B.C.'s defense was of major college status. Although 
it did allow a tying touchdown, it blunted Villanova's 
drives on the Eagle 27, 8, and 14 yardlines. The first 
big play was George Gill's remarkable 78-yard touch- 
down reception. Accepting a 12 yard pass, George 
turned it into the game-breaking touchdown. Two 
minutes later he escorted Eddie Rideout on a flanker 
reverse, following a crushing block by Ralph Angel, 
which resulted in a 50-yard TD. The Wildcats scored 
with less than a minute to play as the mini-ends and 
the defense basked in the glow of a crucial, opening 
day victory. 

Annapolis the following week was a test of Eagles' 
conditioning and resilience. Using their superior size 




"I told them size 60 was too large." 

to great advantage the defense shut off most of the 
afternoon while the offense ground out huge chunks 
of yardage. This double dose proved unhealthy for 
the Middies as B.C. drew first blood on a Willis four 
yard touchdown run, but the Middies drove 22 yards 
following an Eagle fumble to knot the score at the be- 
ginning of the second period. A surprising Navy on- 
side kick backfired when Red Harris drove the Eagles 
in for a 14-7 halftime lead. This was increased to 28-7 
by the middle of the final period as the Eagles de- 
fense led by safety Steve Kirchner and defensive 
ends Mike Mucci and Greg Broskie completely 
stifled the Navy attack. 




Berridge, B.C.'s surety, adds the P.A.T. in the VMI game. 



The home opener against the V.M.I. Keydets 
proved to be a pleasant experience for all the parti- 
san fans but a nightmare for our Southern visitors. 
After a drive consuming just over two minutes was 
capped by a Willis TD run, the offense sagged for 
much of the remainder of the first quarter. A B.C. 
fumble resulted in a V.M.I, field goal. Once again the 
defense came through stopping the Keydets' drive 
following a V.M.I, penalty at the goal line. A dull 
game was soon turned around by the Eagle defense. 
Near the end of the quarter a perfect wall enabled Ed 
Rideout to scamper 86 yards on a punt return. Eol- 
low'"g the ensuing kickoff Steve Cipot recovered a 
V.M.I, fumble at the 29. Three plays later Willis skirt- 
ed right end and a tight ball game was now a rout. In 
the second quarter Freddie Willis demonstrated his 
talent at running back. Apparently tackled by a 
headon hit behind the line, Willis shook off the blow 
and rambled 31 yards for a 28-3 halftime lead. A 17- 
yard Harris to 6'Shea TD pass made it 35-3 at the end 
of three periods. Following a Gene Comella plunge, 
making it 42-3, the subs took over the festivities for 
the remainder of the afternoon. Directed by Ray 
Rippman, the hungry Eagle substitutes produced 



touchdowns on a play by Billy Knox and a pass to 
Tom Bougus. Even with the defensive subs playing 
much of the final quarter, V.M.I, was throttled. The 
offense wasn't too consistent, but aided by a much 
improved defense, the final score read 56-3 and ev- 
eryone eagerly awaited Penn State. 




Bill Thomas runs against Penn State. 




Clemente, Michaels, Fleck and Broskie hand VMI's Bowman a loss in yardage. 




Bonistalli snares Harris' toss. 




An example of Tri-Captain Corppoia's fine defensive play; 
Dhembe about to add finishing toucli. 



Frustration is defined in the dictionary as a deep 
sense of dissatisfaction arising from an unsolved 
problem. In the case of the B.C. fans, it was the inabi- 
lity of the Eagle offense to score, seven interceptions, 
and a blocked punt leading to a 28-3 defeat at the 
hands of the Penn State Nittany Lions. One could al- 
most feel the tension hanging in Alumni Stadium. 
B.C.'s defense came up with an outstanding effort in 
the first half and despite five Penn State intercep- 
tions, the halftime score read Penn State 7, B.C. 3. 
The Eagles had moved the ball consistently but due 
to their faltering aerial game, they were unable to put 
anything but Larry Berridge's 22-yard field goal on the 
scoreboard. Following an interception, Penn State 
drove 27 yards for their only score of the first half. 
The key play of the game occurred at the outset of 
the second half. As B.C. was forced to punt, Gary 
Cray crashed through to block John O'Hagan's boot. 
It was scooped up by Jack Ham and run 42 yards to 
make the score 14-3. The Eagles attempted to come 
back, but were stymied at the Lion 9 in the third 
quarter. Joel Ramich capped an 81-yard drive by div- 
ing for the third Penn State score with 7:05 remaining 
in the game. A final touchdown only rubbed salt into 
the Eagles' wounds as Penn State converted their 
breaks into points in contrast to their opponents. 
While the statistics showed a surprising evenness, it 
was not reflected in the score. Under the gray skies 
of Alumni Stadium, the frustration of this loss only 
heightened. 




Frustration: Penn Sidle inlereeptb a llcurib pas 





Dhembe zeroes in on Penn State quarterback. 



Harris sets in the pocket to throw. 



The big question was how B.C. would react in two 
weeks in Colorado against sixth-ranked Air Force. 
The answer was apparent from the start of the game. 
B.C. was not about to lie down and play dead for the 
nationally ranked Falcons. The Eagles drew first 
blood on John Kline's school record-breaking 51-yard 
field goal. Air Force came right back and made it 7-3 
on a Bob Parker 11-yard TD toss to Ernie Jennings. 
B.C. bounced back at 13:12 of the first period when 
Fred Willis raced 55 yards on a counter with the aid 
of a fine downfield block by Jim O'Shea. The first pe- 
riod ended with B.C. leading 10-7. Air Force scored at 
9:01 on a four yard run by Brian Bream to take a 14-10 
halftime lead. The defense which stood out all after- 
noon played another fine game. Led by Al Dhembe, 



the defense blunted Falcon drives four times before 
an Air Force interception led to a 30-yard TD drive 
and a 21-10 lead at the end of three' periods. The 
clincher was a 92-yard run with an interception that 
made the score 28-10. B.C.'s offense had moved the 
ball four times deep into Air Force territory but could 
not punch across a touchdown. This inconsistency 
coupled with four interceptions spelled the differ- 
ence. The defense continued its impressive rejuvena- 
tion but it couldn't hold all day. For the Eagles to be 
successful the offense would have to move the ball 
and score. The next game against an Army team 
which would be gunning for B.C. would truly test the 
Eagle mettle. 




Crush. 



At the outset the boo-birds were really on Frank 
Harris. For the third straight game the senior quarter- 
back from Maiden just didn't seem to have it. The of- 
fense was sputtering and with the aid of two inter- 
ceptions Army left the field at halftime with a 13-0 
lead. The margin might have been more if the de- 
fense hadn't played a brilliant first half. However, in 
as astounding reversal of form as seen at the Heights 
in many years the Eagles came out roaring in the sec- 
ond half. The defense shut off the Army attack com- 
pletely while four times the B.C. offense marched 
down the field over and through the bewildered Ca- 
dets. These drives resulted in three scores, two by the 
usually unexcitable Harris, who, after pulling off a 
beautiful bootleg for the clinching touchdown, 
threw up both arms in exultation. A Gary Hudson in- 
terception at the goal line in the final minute staved 
off the Army and the Eagles had scored a historic vic- 
tory 21-13. B.C. had not fallen to pieces as some crit- 
ics said they would. A spirited Eagle team fought an 
aroused Army team and ended two and a half frus- 
trating games with a dramatic comeback. The de- 
fense shone once again but the day belonged to 
Frank Harris. Much maligned after the team's losses 
to Penn State and Air Force the redhead never got 
down on himself and came up with a perfect second 
half to help up the season record to 4-2. More impor- 
tant was the feeling that B.C. teams do not throw up 
their hands in dismay anymore at the sight of adversi- 
ty. It would have been easy to abandon the season 
but this Eagle team hung in there and, as Coach Yuki- 
ca said afterwards, "If we ever needed a win, we 
needed this one." The manner in which it was se- 
cured speaks for itself as far as the maturation of 
football on the Heights goes. 




Mike Mucci attacks Cadet QB. 




Gill scrambles for running room after taking in a Harris pitch. 



Don't Shoot! 
Don't Shoot! 





Harris fires . . . 

Revenge game number two was against Buffalo the 
following week. Last year following their victory, one 
of the Buffs stated that they had intimidated the Ea- 
gles. Coach Yukica didn't really have to worry about 
a letdown since the Eagles from the opening kickoff 
seemed determined to teach Buffalo how intimidate 
is spelled. The first period was again a display of of- 
fensive ineptitude with the Eagles, aided by a pass in- 
terference penalty pushing across a score to make it 
7-0 at the quarter. Then as if on a cue the defense 
went to work. Mike Mucci covered a UB fumble 
leading to a Berridge field goal. Steve Kirchner inter- 
cepted following the ensuing kickoff and Frank Har- 
ris soon after passed three yards to John Bonistalli. 
Unable to move, the Bulls punted and Gary Hudson 
returned it 66 yards to score. On the next kickoff the 
Eagles recovered and three plays later Tom Bougus 
made it 31-0 at the half. Bougus scored on a three 
yard run to make it 38-0 at the end of three periods. 
Buffalo scored following the recovery of an Eagle 
fumble but the second stringers and subs combined 
in the final period to really sock it to the outmanned 
Bulls. Ray Rippman directed the attack that saw him 
throw TD passes of 13 and 11 yards to John Bykowsky 
and 11 yards to Dave Danker. Tom Bougus scored his 
third touchdown of the day in between as the Bulls 
finally succumbed 65-12. It was a day for the reserves 
to show their wares and the homecoming day crowd 
enjoyed every bit of action. With the upping of the 
Eagle record to 5-2 the Pitt Panthers lay in wait for 
B.C. the following week in the Steel City. 




O'Shea is open in defense zone and mal<es reception. 




Fred Willis drives for first down yardage against Army. 





■Redmen meet Eagle Bonistall 



Harris hands off as Bougus starts an end sweep. 

The dark, rainy day in Pittsburgh proved what 
many had believed since the Army game two weeks 
before. The football program at the Heights had 
turned the corner and the only avenue available was 
continued success. The Panthers struck first on a 
three play, 27-yard drive resulting from a B.C. fumble. 
On the ensuing series of plays the Eagles marched 64 
yards with Larry Berridge's kick making it 7-6 Eagles at 
the end of the first quarter. The second period saw 
B.C. march 89 yards in 13 plays and 75 yards scoring 
with three seconds remaining to enjoy a 21-6 half- 
time advantage. Unable to score in the second half, 
the Eagles did nevertheless move the ball well. As is 
now customary, the defense was again outstanding. 



SREff^ES 




Cornelia breaks U Mass defense on a draw play. 




Faked field goal against U Mass 



They blunted every Pitt drive after allowing the open- 
ing score while yielding only 208 yards the entire 
afternoon. Four interceptions and two fumble recov- 
eries all contributed to the Pitt demise. It was truly an 
outstanding team effort and a great win for B.C. 

The mark of a good football team is depth. With 
two starters on the offensive line out and two others 
playing with minor injuries the Eagle offense was 
slowed to a halt by the upset-minded Redmen of 
UMass. However, the defense forced two opportuni- 
ties which were turned into touchdowns and the Ea- 
gles recorded their fourth straight victory 21-10. The 
game itself was marred by inconsistent officiating, a 
wicked gale, and playing conditions reminiscent of 
one's backyard following the spring thaw. The Eagles 
had Fred Willis playing with a badly bruised leg and 
they appeared listless. Two seconds into the second 
quarter a Harris to Willis pass moved B.C. ahead 7-0. 
The Redmen tied it on a pass from Hughes to Pat Sca- 
vone. Then the inexplicable occurred. The UMass 
punter felt he saw heavy pressure and after attempt- 
ing to run was buried at his 43. The Eagles moved to 
the Redmen 13 where they lined up for a field goal 
attempt. A good fake was the real play as Harris 
threw a screen separate pass to Fred Willis for the TD 
which left the Eagles holding a 14-7 halftime lead. An 
interception led to a Redmen field goal and it was 
14-10. Luck again held for the Eagles as John Bonistalli 
recovered a fumbled punt on the UMass 17. It took 
one play, a Harris to Gill pass, to make the final score 
21-10. The fourth period was a battle of sluggish of- 
fenses and great defenses which produced a B.C. 
stand on their own 9. Thankful for the win, the Eagles 
prepared to end the season against this year's Charlie 
Brown of collegiate football, arch-rival Holy Cross. 




nets a TD. 




Eagle defense 
successfully 
halts Crusade. 






ii] 






iC A^"^- 



Asking football players, especially in college, to re- 
sume top-notch ball after sitting out a year is analo- 
gous to the Spartan stand at Thermopylae — impossi- 
ble. It was a long, frustrating year for the Crusaders. 
Trying to rebound from last year's hepatitis attack 
which wiped out the 1969 season after two games, 
the men from Mount St. James were plagued by inex- 
perience, injuries, penalties, and bad luck. One can- 
not but sympathize with the Holy Cross varsity and it 
is to their credit that except for Dartmouth and B.C. 
they were not outclassed in any game. The most 
shocking event occurred the week before against 
Connecticut when the Crusaders managed a 20-20 
tie. Due to the apparent mismatch, the game was not 
sold out. For those who did appear, it was apparent 
following a 60 yard TD pass from Frank FHarris to 
George Gill after 47 seconds of the first half that the 

Willis against Holy Cross for B.C. and New England records. 



Crusaders were badly outmanned. 

An Ed Rideout punt return made it 14-0 at the quar- 
ter. Two Frank FHarris touchdown tosses made it 26-0 
at halftime. On the Cross side, they had not moved 
past their 40 and, after Rideout's punt return, de- 
cided to kick it out of bounds rather than risk a re- 
turn. The slaughter continued unabated in the sec- 
ond half as Fred Willis and George Gill touchdowns 
made it 40-0 after three periods. In this game, Fred 
Willis became the leading runner in B.C.'s history 
and the top New England collegiate scorer. The final 
blows were Tom Bougus' TD run and Ray Rippman's 
touchdown pass to Dave Danker. The reserves held 
the Crusaders in check and the final score read B.C. 
54 — F1.C. 0. It put a cap on B.C.'s finest season since 
1962 when the Eagles also had an 8-2 record. 





BC 



FOES 



Yukica confers with his quarterback. 



With no bowl in sight, the Eagles could reflect all 
winter on the ramifications of the 1970 season. A 
new system and approach brought in by Coach Yuki- 
ca reached fruition this year. Although graduation 
will cut heavily into the offensive squad, the defense 
will return nine of eleven starters and will provide a 
strong base for the 1971 season. To the seniors who 
participated in Coach Yukica's first three years, they 
can leave with a tremendous sense of satisfaction for 
their spirit carried a young squad until their leader- 
ship could be followed by a resolute band of under- 
classmen who did not appreciate the stigma of de- 
feat. The unsung heroes are many. Ed Ransford, 
whose first class play at rover inspired those around 
him as well as John Brennan, Orrie Scarminach and 
Gary Guenther on the offensive line gave the team a 
big lift. To give each senior due justice is impossible 
so we hope that they will all remember fondly their 
comrades and the three winning varsity seasons that 
they were a part of. 



28 


VILLANOVA 


21 


28 


NAVY 


14 


56 


VMI 


3 


3 


PENN STATE 


28 


10 


AIR FORCE 


35 


21 


ARMY 


13 


65 


BUFFALO 


12 


21 


PITTSBURGH 


6 


21 


UMASS 


10 


54 


HOLY CROSS 






The game. 




Soccer 



The 1970 edition of the Boston College soccer 
team began with high hopes for a fine season — 
high hopes which were brought down to earth be- 
fore too long. Optimism was based on the return 
of a strong nucleus of veterans from the 1969 
squad. Among the returners were Captain Ken 
Daggett, high-scoring forward Charlie Mundhenk 
and Philip Chauannes, a fine fullback, all of whom 
received All-Greater League honors at the close of 
the last season. 

How cpuld a team with such fine individual tal- 
ent as this one had manage only a mediocre 4-9 
record? The answer appears to lie in the fact that 
this squad just did not have the overall depth of 
the 1969 team. Injuries during the season mounted 
and took their toll. Sophomores and freshmen 
were called in to fill in the gaps, and although they 
performed admirably under fire, their lack of expe- 
rience showed through as time and again the team 
failed to play as a cohesive unit. 

Though the team had trouble bouncing back 
from a few tough losses in the early going, the sea- 
son was not without its high points, nor was it 
without a glimmer of hope for next season. Behind 
by 3-0 at the half in the Stonehill game, the Eagles 
made a complete about face as they held Stonehill 
scoreless in the second half and went on to win on 
four goals by Charlie Mundhenk. Providence, un- 
beaten with a 10-0 record prior to their match with 
B.C., was forced to struggle all the way to gain a 
hard-fought 3-2 victory over an Eagle contingent 
whose ranks had already begun to thin. Finally, the 
injury-ridden Eagles, with only thirteen men availa- 
ble for duty, hustled their way to a 4-2 victory over 
Fordham in the final game. 





I' — ^^" 





m 



KUBIifiBB! 

'' mm 






1 

1 



^Jfc 




Tom Bonaccorsi 


defends against UNH. 




B.C. 




FOES 





U. MASS. 


3 


2 


HOLY CROSS 


4 


5 


MERRIMACK 


1 


2 


ASSUMPTION 


3 





TUFTS 


5 


4 


STONEHILL 


3 


1 


NICHOLS 


6 


1 


M.I.T. 


3 


2 


PROVIDENCE 


3 


5 


BRANDEIS 


1 





B.U. 


7 





U.R.I. 


8 


4 


FORDHAM 


2 





B.C.'s cross-country team entered the 1970 season 
with high hopes and came out with the best record 
of any B.C. team within living memory. Although 
there remains a tinge of disappointment and more 
than their share of injured and fallen harriers, still 
high hopes for the future persist. 

The season opened in blistering 90 degree heat 
against B.U. and Tufts. It continued through wind, 
rain and cold. Even a bit of snow was encountered at 
Amherst, the scene of B.C.'s best performance of the 
season over U. Mass, New England's premier cross 
country power outside the Ivies. The victory was a 
pyrrhic one, however, with the loss of two regulars 
including Jim Zabel, holder of the school record, a 24 
minute 40 second tour of the 5 mile loop at Franklin 
Park, B.C.'s home course. Dick Mahoney came along 
to fill Jim's shoes, however, and the team's remarka- 
ble depth, largely attributable to the presence of fine 
seniors. Captain Jack lies, Paul Bosco, Vin Catono, 
Dan Ricciato, and Jim Durkin, kept the team alive 
through a third place finish in the Greater Boston 
meet and a fourth place showing in the thirty team 
field of the New England I.C. 3-A Championships. 





Cross Country 



B.C. 



FOES 



22 


TUFTS 


53 


22 


B.U. 


55 


19 


HOLY CROSS 


42 


15 


M.I.T. 


50 


27 


U. MASS. 


29 


42 


NORTHEASTERN 


18 


29 


PROVIDENCE 


28 


18 


SPRINGFIELD 


42 





BC 



FOES 



3 


BROWN 


12 


3 


HARVARD 


8 


11 


BEACON HILL 


9 





BOSTON 


41 


8 


M.LT. 


3 


5 


MYSTIC RIVER 


6 


3 


FAIRFIELD 





9 


HOLY CROSS 
RECORD 3-4-1 


9 




Now in its third season, the Boston College Rugby 
Football Club is the largest, most vibrant club on 
campus. It has in excess of 60 members, who are di- 
vided into three teams according to ability and expe- 
rience. Each team plays its own games against com- 
parable opposition. Playing one of the most demand- 
ing schedules in New England, B.C. suffered its first 
losing season since the club's inception. After open- 
ing the season with successive losses to Brown and 
Harvard, the club displayed exceptional ball handling 
and ball control in defeating the defending New Eng- 
land champs. Beacon Hill Rugby Club, by 11-9. Team 
Captain Jerald Rotella, Maurice Aubochon, and Jo- 
seph Hamilton accounted for all of the team's points 
in the first three games. With five regulars missing 
due to injuries, the team suffered the worst defeat in 
its history to a strong Boston Rugby Club, 41-0. The 
team recovered the next week, Rotella, Hamilton, 
and Mike O'Boyle combining for the points as B.C. 
defeated M.I.T., 8-3. This was followed by a 6-5 heart- 
breaking loss to Mystic River Rugby Club. In the final 
two games of the fall season, B.C. finished strong 
with fullback Art Mead leading the attacks, scoring 
the only try in a 3-0 victory over Fairfield and scoring 
again in a 9-9 tie with Holy Cross. The driving force in 
B.C.'s success is Coach Ken Daly, former Rugby star 
in Ireland, who donates his coaching abilities to the 
Heights. With his help, the team looks forward to its 
coming spring season with considerable optimism. 
Under his direction, the team posted an 8-2 record 
last spring. They are the champions of the prestigious 
Harvard Sevens Tournament and will defend the 
crown this spring. 



Rugby 





Basketball 



The 1970-71 edition of the Boston College basket- 
ball team provided its fans with a hoop display of in- 
credible excitement and pulsating suspense. Fin- 
ishing the season with a 15-11 record, the Eagles had 
15 games decided by margins of less than five points. 
Rumor has it that Coach Daly and his assistant 
checked into a local clinic for a two-week rest imme- 
diately following the season's end. The only consist- 
ency emerging from this last season's malaise was the 
play of Jimmy O'Brien. As Providence, Holy Cross, 
and Duquesne found out, Jimmy at his finest can 
control an entire game. Seeing his display of round- 
ball wizardy would alone have made the whole sea- 
son worthwhile, but there were plenty of other thrills 
and exciting situations. At Fairfield, the Stags lost 
when they called a timeout when they didn't have 
one left; we beat the Friars of Providence; the first 
Holy Cross game was played without referees (at 
least it seemed that way), and the Duquesne game 
with boxing gloves. All things taken together, the 70- 
71 season was full of great individual efforts and 
gutsy team play. 

Boston College opened its season by squaring off 
against the Huskies of Northeastern in the opening 
round of the rejuvenated Beanpot Basketball Tourna- 
ment. Northeastern would give anything for a victory 
over BC, and Dick DukeShire once again had his 
team primed for a victory. Their slow, deliberate play 
produced a close, exciting game with neither team 
able to build a large lead. The game went right down 
to the wire before BC, behind jimmy O'Brien and 
Pete Schmid pulled out a well-deserved 62-58 victory. 
The Eagles made it two in a row when they staggered 
home in front of Fairfield 59-56. The teams played 
giveaway most of the game, but it was up to the Stags 
to be the generous host. With the score 58-56 in favor 
of BC, Fairfield rebounded a missed BC free throw 
and called timeout with ten seconds remaining. 
Smart play, you say. Not really, since with no 
timeouts left, they incurred a technical foul. BC con- 
verted, received possession of the ball, and held on 
for the win. Que sera, sera, Fairfield! On Monday the 
Eagles returned to Boston Garden for the Beanpot 
final against sophomore-studded Harvard. With a 
twelve point lead at the half, BC appeared on its way 
to an easy victory. Led by James Brown, the Crimson 
surged back to tie and had possession with sixty sec- 
onds showing on the clock. Their stall for the last 
shot went awry when Jimmy O'Brien intercepted an 
errant pass. BC stalled effectively, however, and OB 
threw in the gamewinner with four seconds to play. 
Final score read BC 73, Harvard 71. The key to the 
game, however, lay in a solid Eagle defense back- 
boned by Frank Fitzgerald's great coverage on Floyd 
Lewis, the other Harvard super-soph. 




"Fitzie" lays it in. 



193 




The Beanpot trophy is awarded to B.C. 



The blue hills of West Virginia were the backdrop 
for the fourth Eagle game of the year. In the opening 
round of the Mountaineer Classic BC drew top-20 
ranked Virginia. The game proved closer than expect- 
ed but the determined Cavaliers were not to be de- 
nied. Their speed and greater height proved the dif- 
ference as the ACC representatives prevailed 79-69. 
The following night in the consolation game against 
Army, the Eagles spurted to a seventeen point half- 
time lead. In a complete reversal of the first half BC 
turned ice cold and saw the Cadets chip away and 
eventually steal a 63-61 win. It would later prove to 
be the first of many such frustrating defeats for the 
Eagle quintet. 

The Eagles returned to Roberts Center the fol- 
lowing Wednesday to face the Lemoyne Dolphins in 
their home opener. The outclassed Syracrusans' one 
game exercise in self-destruction provided BC with 
an opportunity to play everybody as they won their 
fourth game in a romp, 105-68. Another frustrating 
evening was spent by the Eagles in University Park, 
Pennsylvania, the following Friday night. For the sec- 



ond year in a row Penn State had just enough steam 
to outlast the Eagles 66-63. It was another one of 
those, I'll wake up tomorrow and it will only be a 
dream, games. Unfortunately, the result was reality 
and the BC record was now 4-3. Invading Jamaica for 
its game with the then unbeaten and ninth-rated St. 
John's Redmen, the Eagles could have easily rolled 
over and played dead. However, in a game character- 
istic of this year's squad, the Eagles rebounded for a 
startling 66-63 upset victory. Jimmy O'Brien was sen- 
sational, but he received a solid team effort in sup- 
port. 

From New York it was off to North Carolina for the 
Charlotte Invitational. BC upped its record to 6-3 with 
an opening round victory over the favored Davidson 
Wildcats. In a well-played and close ball game the Ea- 
gles ran up a 72-67 victory. The next night's opponent 
was another top-20 team, the La Salle Explorers. The 
game was a good one but in the end it was All-Ameri- 
can Kenny Durrett who proved to be the difference. 
His 25 points and control of the boards enabled La 
Salle to gain a 76-63 win. 




Greg Sees goes up for one of his less-frequent inside shots. 



You've heard of the hard way? 



The first Sunday of the New Year saw St. Joseph's 
play host to BC at the Palestra in Philadelphia. It was 
another tight ball game with Hawk foul shooting in 
the late stages providing the cushion as the Hawks 
prevailed 78-70. The following Friday the Eagles re- 
turned home to face Providence. Each team wanted 
this annual blood game badly, and the context 
proved both exciting and satisfying for BC fans. 
Down at halftime, the Eagles rallied behind some hot 
outside shooting for a brilliant 83-71 victory. Roberts 
Center was the scene for another thriller the fol- 
lowing Tuesday. A lethargic BC quintet met stubborn 
resistance from a determined Connecticut team and 
was down by fourteen at the half. An inspired Eagle 
five returned for the second half and in bits and 
pieces chewed away at the substantial margin before 
pulling the game out 71-69. The following Saturday 
saw the first of two annual Jesuit fratricidal happen- 
ings, more commonly known as BC-Holy Cross bas- 
ketball. The game proved to be tense and exciting 
but was marred by the most incompetent officiating 
seen at the Heights in a long time. Missed calls, 
wrong calls, and a brawl all added to the confusion. 
The piece de resistance occurred when the referee 
allowed the game to run out as BC pleaded vainly for 
a timeout. When the dust settled the refs were es- 
corted to the locker room by Bill Flynn, the Boston 
College Athletic Director, and the Cross had hung on 
to a 75-73 win. The outcome left BC with an 8-6 rec- 
ord as they headed into exams. 

The Eagles opened the second half of the season at 
the Buffalo War Memorial Auditorium against 
Canisius. The Golden Griffins gave BC a severe test 
before Pete Schmid salted away the victory by scor- 
ing five points in the last fifty seconds. In another 
heartstopper the Eagles came out on top, 76-71. The 
Cornell game was postponed a day when the Cornell 
plane was grounded in Ithaca by heavy snow. The 
way the game turned out, the Big Red should have 
stayed grounded. After a slow first half the Eagles 




Junior Pete Schmid overpowers Northeastern. 










cleared the bench in the second half en route to a 
101-76 victory. The last Saturday in January saw BC 
travel to South Orange, New Jersey, to do battle with 
Seton Hall. Although having a mediocre year, the 
Hall remained close throughout but finally suc- 
cumbed to Jimmy O'Brien's late game heroics, 73-70. 
Looking ahead to Fordham, the Eagles almost stu- 
mbled over Rhode Island. BC played just well enough 
to win as they registered a 86-82 victory. Fourteenth- 
ranked Fordham was the next opponent for the Ea- 
gles. Before a capacity crowd both teams engaged in 
a spirited, exciting contest. The visitors displayed tre- 
mendous quickness and led throughout most of the 
game. BC rallied in the second half to tie in regula- 
tion at 68 apiece. The Rams spurted away quickly in 
overtime and held on for an 84-80 victory. It was a bit- 
ter pill for the Eagles to swallow, especially with U 
Mass waiting in the wings. Although the Eagles 
played an inspired game against the Redmen, it 
wasn't enough. Spurred on by a partisan throng. 
Coach Jack teaman's basketeers were not to be de- 
nied. Led by Ail-American Julius Erving U Mass led 
most of the way, posted an 87-79 triumph, and took a 
giant step toward a berth in the NIT. 



Frank Fitzgerald clears the boards at Worcester. 
Senior guard Mike Dunn spots the open man. 





When people around Boston speak of BU, every- 
one immediately thinks of hockey. However, even six 
men probably wouldn't have helped the Terriers as 
BC raced to a 56-22 halftime advantage. The most ex- 
citing aspect of the second half was a short fight be- 
tween Mike Dunn and two BU players. The final 
score was an easy 110-62 romp. The following week 
was one of utter frustration for the Eagles. Tuesday 
saw the BC five play a disappointing Georgetown 
team in the nation's capital. Late game free throws 
again proved to be BC's downfall as the Hoyas held 
for a 67-66 win. Four days later a seven foot center 
and 51% shooting spelled defeat for the Eagles. If De- 
troit's outside shooters missed, Gerald Ford was 
there to tap the missed shots in. A late game rally fell 
short, and the Titans of the Motor City left with an 
80-76 victory. With Duquesne, Holy Cross, and Villa- 
nova the next three opponents, the prospects for a 
better than .500 season looked rather bleak. 

For any disbelievers in emotion being part of col- 
lege basketball, consider well the events of Wednes- 
day, February 24. Duquesne, rated eighth in the na- 
tion, came to Roberts Center looking for their twenti- 
eth win of the season. Even diehards agreed the task 
facing BC was well-nigh impossible. Hoping for an 
upset, the Eagle supporters kept up a steady stream 
of noise throughout the game. It paid off handsome- 
ly, too, as the Eagles, working their game plan to per- 
fection, led the taller Iron Dukes 30-19 at halftime. At 
the start of the second half Duquesne, using its pre- 



"Defense! 



Walker in for two vs. B.U. 





More of Obie's slick passing as he feeds Vin Costello. 



historic Style of play, closed to within seven. At this 
point Vinny Costello scored four quick points, and 
with steady pressure being applied thereafter, the 
Maroon and Cold raced to one of the biggest upsets 
ever at the Heights, pulling away for a 67-52 decision. 
Jimmy O'Brien was sensational with 22 points and an 
unreal floor game. Jim Phelan, Dave Walker, Creg 
Sees, Mike Dunn, Dave Freitag, Pete Schmid, and 
Frank Fitzgerald all deserve applause for a great team 
effort. With this victory under their belts, the Eagles 
journeyed to Worcester to meet FHoly Cross. It was a 
game with a lot riding on the outcome. For the Cross 
a win probably would mean the NIT, while for BC it 
was an opportunity to knock FHoly Cross out of a 
tournament for the second year in a row. Jimmy O'- 
Brien played another superlative game, and Frank 
Fitzgerald put the clamps on the Crusaders' Bob Kis- 
sane as the Eagles mowed down the Crusaders 69-59. 
It was a tight ball game throughout the first half, with 
the first twenty minutes ending with FHoly Cross up 
by a digit, 35-34. It remained a nip-and-tuck affair well 
into the second half before Greg Sees with three 
twenty-footers and Bob Smith with one forged a 
slight lead for the Eagles. BC controlled the ball for 
the final two minutes and sank the last free throws in 
the game to register the win. Once again the Purple 
were left to languish on Mt. St. James. 

The season's finale was played at Roberts Center 
against eighteenth-ranked Villanova. It was a sad way 
to end the college basketball careers of seniors Vinny 
Costello, Mike Dunn, Frank Fitzgerald, Jimmy O'- 
Brien, and Creg Sees, but a big, well-disciplined Villa- 
nova team showed no sympathy whatsoever. Taking 
charge from the opening whistle, the Wildcats built 
up a 21-poJnt lead midway through the second half. 
Although the Eagles surged back to within ten, strong 
foul shooting by Villanova enabled them to carve out 
a fairly easy win, 90-77. 





Vinny looks to the basket. 



The 1970-71 BC basketball team finished the season 
with a 15-11 record. In retrospect it was a season of 
great victories and frustrating losses. It was one in 
which the Eagles hustled in every game but were 
often undone by cold shooting and turnovers. For 
the want of four points more a game the record 
could have had five or six more wins. As things 
ended, though, there were many moments to remem- 
ber. The style of play, the refusal to quit, and the 
great hustle displayed were assets which laid a strong 
foundation for future BC teams. In that one accom- 
plishment this year's seniors can reflect back with a 
sense of both pride and achievement. 




Head Coach Chuck Daly discusses strategy with assistant Bob 
Zuffelato. 





Jimmy O'Brien accepts the Courtside Club Trophy awarded annually to the outstanding 
senior. 



BC 




Foes 


BC 




Foes 


62 


NORTHEASTERN 


58 


73 


HOLY CROSS 


75 


59 


FAIRFIELD 


56 


76 


CANISIUS 


71 


73 


HARVARD 


71 


101 


CORNELL 


76 


69 


WEST VIRGINIA 


79 


73 


SETON HALL 


70 


61 


ARMY 


63 


86 


RHODE ISLAND 


82 


105 


LEMOYNE 


68 


80 


FORDHAM 


84 


63 


PENN STATE 


66 


79 


MASSACHUSETTS 


87 


66 


ST. JOHN'S 


63 


110 


BOSTON UNIVERSITY 


62 


72-^ 


DAVIDSON 


67 


66 


GEORGETOWN 


67 


63 


LA SALLE 


76 


76 


DETROIT 


80 


70 


ST. JOSEPH'S 


78 


67 


DUQUESNE 


52 


83 


PROVIDENCE 


71 


69 


HOLY CROSS 


59 


71 


CONNECTICUT 


69 


77 


VILLANOVA 


90 




Make a wish? 




Blow in my ear and I'll follow you anywhere. 




Wrestling 




For Jim Maloney's wrestlers this has not been a 
very profitable season — if one were to base his 
judgement solely on the consideration of wins and 
losses. Although the 3-6 record posted by the wres- 
tlers prior to the New England Championships can be 
considered mediocre at best, it reflects a fine overall 
effort in view of the obstacles encountered. 

First of all, to call this a rebuilding year is to put it 
quite mildly. There were no seniors. Except for Cap- 
tain Tom Bergfield, a junior, the team consisted of 
freshmen and sophomores. Secondly, the team was 
often forced to play out its matches short-handed; 
throughout most of the season there were only nine 
members to fill the ten positions available. Due to 
this lack of manpower two matches — one of them 
against powerful U Mass — had to be cancelled. 
Even so, the Eagles faced a tough schedule which in- 
cluded strong clubs from MIT and BU. The three vic- 
tories came against Brandeis, Tufts, and the Harvard 
Jayvees. Having no depth, the Eagles were forced to 
depend upon fine individual performances to carry 
them through, rather than on a total team effort. 

This past season was profitbale to the squad in that 
it provided the freshmen and sophomores with much 
needed experience. Hopefully, this experience will 
make itself felt next year. The standouts were sopho- 
mores Tom Hawes, John Lally, Rob Boova, and fresh- 
man Paul Cagliardi. Along with Cagliardi, several 
freshmen showed potential, one of the best of the 
crop being Bill Scanlon. The prospects for next sea- 
son look fairly good. This young team should return 
intact after a year of valuable experience. Tom Berg- 
field, who had an off-year due to injuries, should 
come back strong next season. No doubt the Eagle 
wrestlers will surprise us next year. 



Hockey 



As the 1970-71 season opened, it was sufficient to 
say that the Eagles were skating on the thin ice of un- 
certainty. Graduation had cut deeply into the ranks 
making Tim Sheehy and eight fellow lettermen only 
memories. One could only approach this season with 
the hope that B.C. was now on the-threshold of a 
new era in hockey. A sea of new faces — mostly 
sophomores — comprised the B.C. attack. However, 
the sole way to describe this year is that it was one of 
rebuilding and frustrations. Happily, there was the 
steady play of juniors Tom Mellor, Scott Godfrey, and 
Vin Shanley along with the improvement of other 
teammates such as Bob Haley and Joe Keaveney. 
Sophomores Ed Kenty, Bob Reardon, and Neil 
Higgins were also sparks that would hopefully ignite 
a winning future. 



Looking at the season, it opened on a relatively op- 
timistic note with successive victories over Yale and 
Princeton. However, December proved to be noth- 
ing but total disaster for the Eagles. It began with 
their third game at U.N.H. Inexperience magnified 
their inability to capitalize early on the Wildcats' de- 
fensive mistakes. Although they skated well and even 
outshot their opponent, a fine third-period effort 
highlighted by soph Ed Kenty's hat trick didn't pull it 
out. But youth and inexperience couldn't excuse an 
extremely poor performance against Providence. The 
Eagles allowed themselves to be totally dominated 
and did not take advantage of several early scoring 
opportunities. Uninspired offensive power and the 
aggressive play of Providence resulted in a 7-2 score 
and a preferably forgotten night. 






Bennett skates through B.U. defense. 



Lawrence breaks up Cornell pass. 




Noland starts B.C. attack. 



A real test came against Harvard at Watson Rink as 
B.C. began moving into the truly challenging portion 
of the schedule. This game was a tight-checking affair 
as the Eagles consistently outshot Harvard. But all 
their fine efforts proved to no avail and the team was 
shut out, 4-0, for the first time in 126 games. It was a 
heartbreaking loss. 

Next was the annual E.C.A.C. Christmas hockey 
tournament at the Boston Garden. In the opening 
game, B.C. faced Dartmouth, a team in a similar posi- 
tion — young, rebuilding. They squeaked by Dart- 
mouth, 2-1, in a relatively slow game as both teams 
made numerous mistakes and didn't skate well. Still, 
B.C. made the finals the next night versus Cornell. It 
was a different story here. The Eagles were hopelessly 
outshot, outskated, and outplayed by the Big Red 
Machine as was evidenced by a 12-2 score. 





Higgins eyes save. 




Score! 




Christmas vacation time gave rise to a new wave of 
optimism, Minnesota was next on the agenda at 
McHugh Forum. B.C. played well and hung on until 
the middle of the third period when three quick 
goals by the Gophers put the game out of reach. 
Soph Bob Reardon's hat trick was a highlight of the 
game. Two nights later, senior Don Callow paced the 
Eagles as B.C. crushed McMasters 10-2. After Christ- 
mas the team went on the road for the St. Louis Tour- 
ney. B.C. faced St. Louis University in the opening 
game and quickly got the jump on the young, tough 
Billikens. Neil Higgins' excellent goaltending and Ed 
Kenty's scoring led the way to a 9-5 victory. But it was 
the same situation as the E.C.A.C. tournament when 
B.C. went into the final game against Wisconsin. The 
Eagles were unbelievably outshot, 47-21, and only 
soph Harvey Bennett's two third-period goals saved 
them from the disgrace of another shutout. 



Godfrey and Bennett dig for puck. 




I ^ 



^ !«te 



"^ 



Picard prepares for a shot on goal. 





Eagle defenders check Clarkson drive. 





Godfrey waits as Callow fights for faceoff. 



It was then back to McHugh Forum to face Notre 
Dame and another tough defeat. However, the Eagles 
played well and didn't concede until the Irish scored 
with 1:50. The game was close with B.C. rallying 
twice and once more outshooting the opponent. 

January came and with it the University of Pennsyl- 
vania. B.C. looked great after the first period with a 
2-0 lead. But the death of their early game momen- 
tum was the major factor in 5-3 loss. The Eagles then 
traveled to Providence for another forgettable game 
— this time against Brown. To compound their 
troubles, Ed Kenty was lost in this game via an arthrit- 
ic shoulder. B.C. did not play well as was witnessed 
by their total of only four shots on goal in the second 



period. The Bruins beat B.C. for the first time in seven 
years. 

An emotion-charged crowd filled McHugh for an 
exciting game against the old nemesis — Boston Uni- 
versity. This year's contest matched B.C. against a 
team that was heralded as the prime candidate for 
the N.C.A.A. championship. B.U. scored quickly but 
B.C. frustrated the Terriers' offense and the score 
after two periods found the Eagles down by only 
two. The game was still close with 2:49 remaining 
when a small fight left B.C. two men short and B.U. 
with a one man advantage. Yet it was enough for 
three more B.U! goals making the final score 8-3. 




The Eagles were now starting to play some solid 
hockey. At Dartmouth, B.C. snapped a five game los- 
ing streak by coming home with a hard-earned 5-4 
win. They had jumped off to an early lead and never 
trailed; Scott Godfrey's late goal sewed it up. 

After the two week exam break, the Eagles enter- 
tained Clarkson and they proved to be another major 
test. B.C. responded with a fine performance. But 
they were continually foiled by goalie Bruce Bullock, 
an Ail-American candidate, and excellent defense. 
The Eagles' 37th shot on goal by Ed Kenty with 2 sec- 
onds left prevented the shutout. St. Lawrence faced 
B.C. three days later at McHugh Forum, and the 
Eagles were ripe for revenge after two losses at their 
hands last year. They put on an impressive show in- 
cluding five tallies in the second period, leading to a 
7-4 victory. The team's next opponents were the 
tough Providence Friars. It was a big game and a vyjn 
would have probably meant a chance for the last 
E.C.A.C. playoff spot; a loss would most likely erase 
that hope. After the exciting first period, B.C. had a 
2-1 lead. The second period changed that as Provi- 
dence dominated play and scored three times. The 
Eagles kept fighting back in the third period and 
were down by only one with four minutes left. But 
P.C. downed B.C. this time, 6-4. 



The B.C. prevent defense. 




Shanley heads up ice. 




Haley looks for a hole in the B.U. defense. 




That killed playoff chances, and the Eagles could 
only hope to adopt a spoiler role for the rest of the 
season. The Eagles warmed up for the annual Bean- 
pot tourney by putting on a fine offensive show 
against Northeastern. Bob Reardon and Ed Kenty ac- 
counted for seven of the goals in the 10-4 trouncing 
of the Huskies. But the ejection and suspension of 
Scott Godfrey proved costly as B.C. went against Har- 
vard. 14,000 Boston Garden fans were treated to two 
very exciting periods of hockey. The Eagles led most 
of the way thanks to fine checking, skating and goal- 
tending. However, the third period was a total disas- 
ter as Harvard scored six times. 



The season in a nutshell. 



The following weekend found the Eagles in up- 
state New York where they romped over Colgate 9-4. 
Scott Godfrey's six assists and goals by Kenty, Callow 
and Shanley highlighted the action. Boston Arena 
was the scene for the second encounter with B.U. 
Unfortunately, the jinx was still on, and the Eagles 
didn't stand a chance against the Terrier's superior 
play. Despite a couple of late goals by B.C., B.U. 
showed why they deserve to be rated tops in the 
East. Snooks Kelley's men could only wait for next 
year. The same could be said about the last home 
game against Cornell. B.C. again played fine hockey 
in the first period, tapered off toward the close of the 
second period, and were finally crushed in the third 
period. Harvey Bennett and Bob Reardon's late goals 
prevented another shutout and the home season 
ended with a 9-2 score. 

The Eagles closed off the season by defeating 
Northeastern again in the Beanpot consolation game 
and besting Army at West Point. 

The farewell was saddest for the three seniors on 
the team. Captain John Powers, Don Callow and Jim 
Barton combined efforts and leadership to leave a 
mark of dignity on a season less than successful but 
full of hope. While 1970-71 might be a year to forget, 
we are confident that 1971-72 will be a year to re- 
member. 




John "Snooks" Kelley in his 35th year as head coach of the Boston College 
Eagles. " 




Callow controls the puck. 




Higgins smothers puck. 



BC 




Foes 


BC 




Foes 


6 


YALE 


3 


3 


BROWN 




8 


PRINCETON 


2 


3 


BOSTON UNIVERSITY 


6 


4 


NEW HAMPSHIRE 


8 


5 


DARTMOUTH 


4 


2 


PROVIDENCE 


7 


1 


CLARKSON 


3 





HARVARD 


4 


7 


ST. LAWRENCE 


4 


2 


DARTMOUTH 


1 


4 


PROVIDENCE 


6 


2 


CORNELL 


12 


10 


NORTHEASTERN 


4 


5 


MINNESOTA 


10 


4 


HARVARD 


10 


10 


McMASTERS 


2 


9 


COLGATE 


4 


9 


ST. LOUIS 


5 


4 


BOSTON UNIVERSITY 


9 


2 


WISCONSIN 


7 


2 


CORNELL 


9 


3 


NOTRE DAME 


5 


8 


NORTHEASTERN 


2 


3 


PENNSYLVANIA 


5 


5 


ARMY 


2 



Freshman Sports 

First semester of freshman year is usually hectic for 
everyone. For freshman athletes the problems are in- 
creased because they are molding teams to compete 
in intercollegiate athletics. For these freshmen the 
usual rewards are not there; the crowds are sparse 
and the press coverage is meager. There is, however, 
the promise of future glory on the varsity level. This 
year's freshman teams showed potential with records 
of 3-11 for football 12-11-3 for hockey and 14-6 in bas- 
ketball. FHopefully this potential will develop further 
to continue the B.C. winning sports' tradition. 










m'^-^m 




Features 




The Housing 
Crisis Revisited 



October 20,1970 
Dear Aunt Gertrude, 

Thank you for the $10 check you sent me. When 
and if I find a bank that will cash it for me, it will 
come in handy. I'm sorry it's taken me two months to 
answer your letter, but lately I've been busier than 
heck with all this moving and getting resettled and 
everything. You ask me how everything's going in my 
second year hear at B.C.? Well, it's nothing like Lin- 
coln High, and not even like Uncle Harry described it 
when he went here back in '26. All in all, my profs 
and courses are O.K., but the living conditions leave 
much to be desired after Howard Johnson's — no 
pool, no sauna, no baths, and no maids. Things seem 
to be getting better, however, as we get more settled 
in the mod (modular apartment) down here on lower 
campus. 




Meanwhile . . 




220 




Uncle Harry wouldn't recognize it down here! 
We've just moved into modular 1-Z, the first of 86 
units being built by Arbor Modules, Inc., and the 
whole site is a sea of mud. We are afraid that, after 
we got settled the mod will do a little settling of its 
own — ha ha! (joke). A lot more people should have 
moved in by now, but there have been lots of delays 
in construction. When the first units arrived from 
Connecticut, they tried lowering them from a der- 
rick. But one unit came down faster than the other, 
and since they were connected, the whole thing fell 
with a crash. The housing office staff was there, and, 
boy, were their faces red! It served them right for all 
the times they made me wait in line. The Arbor Co. 
showed us a picture of how the mods will eventually 
look. If so, we won't live to see it. Right now it looks 
like a D.P. camp outside. 





Inside we like it fine, except when there's no heat 
or hot water. Humphrey (that's our pet cat) likes it 
too, as there are lots of rats he can chase. Sometimes 
the rats gang up on Humphrey and bite his tail. Then 
he beats a hasty retreat and hides in my footlocker. 
There are six of us sharing the apartment. We've got 
a good bunch of guys. George, my roommate, is very 
considerate. He drinks a lot, but he always manages 
to make it to the bathroom before he gets sick 
and/or passes out. This is fortunate as I have the 
lower bunk. George got a pair of giant amplifiers, the 
kind that rock groups use in Boston Garden, for our 
living room, and they're outasight. At full volume 
they can knock the pictures off the walls and clean 
the windows. In celebration over moving in, we've 
been throwing a lot of parties too. They're O.K., but 
lately a group of girls nobody knows and nobody in- 
vited has been showing up. But we found out that 
they live in another modular, so we went over to one 
of their social functions one night, and now every- 
one's acquainted. 




222 



I like this style of living much more than the 
dorms. There you have to put up with a whole corri- 
dor of guys and an occasional girl. Here you only 
have to put up with five guys, a cat, and two amplifi- 
ers. Like in a society, you have to decide who will put 
out the garbage that will probably never get collect- 
ed anyway. I used to think about joining a commune; 
now I would give it a second thought. If the guy next 
to you has no concern for neatness, you eventually 
come to the point where you must either kill him or 
go crazy. But, like I said, we have a reasonably good 
group, and no bloodshed so far. 

Everyone is very nervous this morning after reading 
in the Heights about the school's decision to use 
war-surplus U.S. Sealabs for student housing at the 
bottom of the reservoir. We all may have to move 
again. Ordinarily we'd dismiss this as still another 
example of rumormongering by the Heights, but last 
night a Newton resident, muttering something about 
"stoodents ruining the water supply," was arrested 
for shooting at (what he claimed was) movement on 
the reservoir. I'll keep you posted on further events. 
Does Uncle Harry still have that wet-suit he never 
uses anymore? 

Affectionately, 
Horace 



Cef to hxj 





The Zapping of Mr. Zip 




True to the mailman's pledge, the B.C. mail does 
get through. The problem this year centered around 
what happened to the mail once it did. True, some 
B.C. -bound letters came long distances, but, for most 
mail, the longest part of the trip took place in the 
mail room and the relatively short distance from the 
mail bag to mail box. The trick lay in matching up 
thousands of pieces of correspondence with the ap- 
propriate mail-box numbers. Add to this picture an 
overtaxed and shorthanded mail-room staff with in- 
complete but lengthy student number listings, and 
one gains a full perspective on the situation. Sacks of 
unsorted mail began to accumulate at various times 
during both terms as postal workers fell behind. Extra 
help allowed them to catch up on occasion, only to 
fall behind once again when back to regular num- 
bers. Students hoping for their first-class mail, were 
ecstatic when a magazine made it through the mo- 
rass. There were several proposals for decentraliza- 
tion, all unacted upon, and students in the dark re- 
cesses of South Street and the lower campus whis- 
pered about secession from the McElroy postal 
union. 






Orson Anderson, mineral pliyMo-,1 dnd letipient ol moon rocks from 
Apollos 11 and 13. 




Speakers 



William Arrowsmith speaking on "A Future for Education.' 




Arthur Mann, John King Fairbank and Eugene D. Cenovese in a discussion, "History and Politics.' 




Readings and comments by John Hawkes. 




Robert Penn Warren, Pulitzer Prize winning Author. 




Confrontation: William Kunstler 



And Russell Kirk 




Death of 

the Rock Concert 

In Cold-Rush era San Francisco, gritty entertain- 
ment-starved forty-niners found tinemselves with 
small fortunes and nothing on which to spend them. 
Rising to the occasion, entertainers from the East 
coast, as well as those of more sordid professions, 
flocked through the Golden Gate on Boston-built 
clipper ships to fleece the poor miners for all they 
were worth. Pandemonium reigned at concerts as 
miners brawled over tickets and savagely fought for 
the best seats. 

But times have changed. This year the shades of 
the forty-niners were avenged through the unlikely 
instrumentality of the San Francisco rock scene, as 
B.C. hosted the Jefferson Airplane at Roberts Center. 
The problems here were echoed at the Led Zeppelin 
and Santana concerts as well. The difficulty of keep- 
ing order at the Airplane concert, plagued from start 
to finish by countless disruptions, has seriously jeop- 
ardized the scheduling of future rock concerts here. 
In the case of Led Zeppelin last summer, the concert 
was a financial disaster for both its promoter and the 
school. As was the experience of other schools, even 
the Newport Festival, rock music can generate just as 
much ill-will as it does excitement. If music, as trends 
show, will become milder and more introspective in 
the seventies, then perhaps it can evoke a similar re- 
sponse in its audience, and once again B.C. wi 
schedule rock concerts. 




Papa John 




Grade Slick of the Jefferson Airplane 




Laura Nyro 




Santana 




Watering Holes 
And Other Oases 

(with apologies to Ben Jonson) 

Drink to me only witli thine eyes, 

And I will pledge with mine; 

Or leave your beer but in the Tam, 

And I'll not look for wine. 

The thirst that from Father's First doth rise 

Doth ask a drink divine, 

But might I in K-K-Katy's sup, 

I would not change for thine. 




Counseling Services 

When one speaks of "counseling services" at B.C., 
one does not mean a few individuals in one facility. 
Rather, one encompasses a campus-wide variety of 
personnel and facilities available for the diversified 
needs of that complex, hassled, and unique piece of 
humanity known as a college student. Their impor- 
tance in student life is underlined by the fact that at 
least 60% of every class make use of them before 
graduation. 

For students facing academic or personal crises, 
the counseling offices are major sources of assistance 
in a therapeutic atmosphere of complete confidenti- 
ality and minimal red tape. When appropriate, the 
student can undertake a long-term program of indi- 
vidual or group therapy, or he can be referred to the 
College Mental Health Center of Boston, offering 
complete psychiatric services. Affiliated campus ser- 
vices include the university chaplaincy and the Infir- 
mary, which can provide in-patient and out-patient 
facilities. Counselors also do academic and vocation- 
al guidance. Their major focus, however, centers 
around the student who experiences problems in re- 
lating to family, friends, college life, and most impor- 
tant, self. 

Included among counseling-office activities are 
the tutorial and the freshman assistance programs, 
two student-directed services. An in-service training 
program educates trainees in counseling techniques 
and supervises them in actual professional situations. 
Although not directly related to the counseling of- 
fices, Joshua Center, a student-run referral service 
founded by the Pulse program, fills an important 
function in the resident-student community. Located 
in the basement of Shaw House, the Center operates 
on a 24-hour basis, providing a comfortable atmo- 
sphere among peers for students who would feel ill 
at ease in approaching the counseling offices direct- 
ly. They can then be referred to the appropriate facili- 
ty. 





Ann Flynn, John Hennessy, and Rev. John Seery, S.J 




Dr. John Sturrock, Alice Jeghelian, David John Smith, Weston Jenks, Eugene Taylor and Rosemary Stringer. 





The Hub of 
The Universe 



Students flying into Logan for the first time from 
western cities are apt to notice what most Bostonians 
take for granted — the seemingly meaningless jum- 
ble of downtown streets that contrast so sharply with 
the orderly gridwork characterizing most American 
city cores. Tradition places the blame on cows who 
unwittingly laid out Boston's first street plan in beat- 
ing paths to the clover fields of Beacon Hill 341 years 
ago. In actuality, Boston's cramped pennisular loca- 
tion, back in the days when Back Bay was really a 
bay, made such a street plan necessary; from the be- 
ginning, the Puritans' New Jerusalem had a space 
problem. To an America in constant flux, Boston has 
become a symbol of unchanging tradition, but the 
truth is that Bostonians have been changing their city 
without respite ever since )ohn Winthrop set up 
housekeeping in 1630. 

Little remains of Puritan Boston, although dis- 
gruntled commuters occasionally suspect that the 
M.B.T.A. system dates from that period. Otherwise, 
Boston retains the finest examples of its many archi- 
tectural styles. A century-and-a-half ago, the top of 
Beacon hiill was shaved off for landfill, and on the 
scar arose the State hlouse and the Federal mansions 
of gas-lit Louisbourg Square. Fifty years later, the 
Commonwealth Avenue brownstones sprung up 
with all their zany Victorian ornamentation on the 
filled-in Back Bay. This new Lebensraum encouraged 
the expansion of Boston institutions, among them 
Boston College, which moved from the, South End to 
the farmlands of bucolic Chestnut Hill at the turn of 
the century. 



I w 


^•1 \ ^ 


/ 


^ 


||URBIN-Park' 

w MARKET 

DININB ROOM 
^ ENTRANCE ' 




1 


i 








■MiiiMt 



Boston's twin aspects (for some, virtues) of age 
and compactness hold many surprises for the unwary 
visitor. Not only is the old in close proximity with the 
new; it must also take on the functions of the new. 
Exclusive clubs occupy the Beacon Hill townhouses 
of the old Yankee Brahmins; students occupy many 
of the Back Bay brownstones, often with bad results 
for future upkeep. The Old Corner Bookstore, a stop 
on the Freedom Trail, earns its keep as the down- 
town office of the Boston Globe. 

Almost every downtown street corner offers a star- 
tling contrast. The marble-and-glass facade of The 
New England Merchants Bank skyscraper (1969) 
hangs ominously over the tiny Georgian-style Old 
State House (1713) as if to mimic Stanley Kubrick's 
monolith. The Old South Meeting House, where pa- 
triots plotted sedition, is almost lost in the mercantile 
jungles of Washington Street. Similarly, ultra-new 
Government Center rises over the ruins of Scollay 
Square, where "Charley couldn't get off that train" 
(what was the name of that folk group again?)- Bos- 
ton Garden is only a slap shot away at North Station, 
and Faneuil Hall is entirely washed in the afternoon 
shadows of its new and exciting albeit monstrous 
neighbor. New City Hall. From Faneuil Hall to the 
North End is the market district, offering marvelous 
sights and smells on a mild Saturday morning in 
Spring. And after shopping there is always Durgin 
Park with roast beef and Indian pudding topped with 
vanilla ice-cream to look forward to. Anc( a dark draft 
at Jacob Wirth makes a fitting conclusion to the hor- 
rors of bargain hunting in Filene's basement. 





The old and new Bostons converge on the com- 
mon, where history is still being made. In the Park 
Street Church William Lloyd Garrison preached his 
abolitionist doctrines before the Civil War. More re- 
cently, nearby at the State House, Governor Sargent 
signed the bill prohibiting the use of Massachusetts 
men in an undeclared war. The Common has seen in- 
numerable political rallies and moratoriums, youth 
cultures and concerts; it is a public park in the full 
sense of the term. And it is still legal for city residents 
to graze cows here, cows that will undoubtedly beat 
out still more paths to a new and greater Boston. 



m?''' 

W-:: 





"O.K. Smile and flex your head.' 



JAMES). ADAMS 
School of Management 
B.S. Accounting 




)OHN D. ALEXANDER 
Arts and Sciences 
A.B. Economics 



MARY F. ALLEN 
School of Nursing 
B.S. Nursing 



248 




FRANK ). AMARA 
School of Management 
B.S. Accounting 



DAVID P. AMBORSKI 
Arts and Sciences 
A.B. Economics 





JOHN R. AMBROCNE, |R. 
Arts and Sciences 
A.B. History— Political 
Science 



ROBERT M. AMEN 
School of Management 
B.S. Economics 



MICHAEL ). AMICO 
School of Management 
B.S. Marketing 



RICHARD B. AMIRAULT 
School of Management 
B.S. Management 





FREDERICK P. AMORE 
Arts and Sciences 
A.B. Political Science 



DONNA M. ANDERSON 
School of Education 
A.B. Special Education 



GABRIEL T. ANDRADE 
Arts and Sciences 
A.B. Psychology 



ADRIENNE ANDRIANI 

School of Education 

A.B. Elementary Education 




CHRISTOPHER E. ARTHUR 
Arts and Sciences 
A.B. English 




ANNE M. BACHALIS 
School of Education 
A.B, Special Education 




LOUIS ). ANDRONICA 
School of Management 
B.S. Accounting 




MAURICE A. 

AUBUCHON, JR. 
Arts and Sciences 
A.B. Political Science 



HAROLD S. BACHNER 
School of Management 
B.S. Finance 



THOMAS C ANSBRO 
Arts and Sciences 
A.B. Psychology 




CHARLES N. AVERY 
School of Education 
A.B. English 




EDWARD F. BAECHTOLD 
Arts and Sciences 
B.S. Chemistry 




JOHN M. ANTONIAZZI 
Arts and Sciences 
A.B. History 




CATHERINE M. AYLWARD 
School of Nursing 
B.S. Nursing 




MARGARET M. BAIRD 
School of Nursing 
B.S. Nursing 





RAYMOND F. BAKAITIS 
Arts and Sciences 
A.B. Psychology 



CHRISTOPHER L. BAKER, |R. 
School of Management 
B.S. Economics 




PAUL A. BAKSTRAN 
School of Management 
B.S. Accounting 





WILLIAM ). BALMAT 
School of Management 
B.S. Marketing 





PETER I. BALTREN 
School of Education 
A.B. History 



ERMINO BARBALUNCA, |R. 
School of Management 
B.S. Finance 





ANDREW I. BARTH, )R. 
School of Management 
B.S. Finance 



BARBARA A. BARTNICK 
School of Nursing 
B.S. Nursing 




MARIEN V. BASIEL 
School of Education 
A.B. Mathematics 



SANDRA BASSANELLI 
School of Education 
A.B. Mathematics 



HOWARD B. BARNABY, 
Arts and Sciences 
A.B. English 






lAMES M. BARTON, JR. 
School of Management 
B.S. Marketing 




DAVID E. BASTIAN 
Arts and Sciences 
B.S. Biology 



RICHARD T. BARRY 
School of Management 
B.S. Einance 




MATTHEW A. BARTOSIAK 
Arts and Sciences 
A.B. Sociology 




STEVEN C. BAUM 
School of Management 
B.S. Accounting 




DAVID J. BEAN 
School of Management 
B.S. Marketing 



PAUL). BEATTIE 
School of Management 
B.S. Finance 




BARBARA A. BEATSON 
School of Education 
A.B. Special Education 




RICHARD P. BEDNAR 

School of Education 

A.B. Elementary Education 





Aren't you glad this isn't in color? 



CHARLES A. BERCURY 
Arts and Sciences 
A.B. English 



PAUL L. BERRINI 
Arts and Sciences 
A.B. Economics 




k 



SR, PAMELA A. BEST 
School of Nursing 
B.S. Nursing 



lACQULYN L. BLACKWELL 
Scliooi of Education 
A.B. History 




JOHN J. BEYER 
School of Management 
B.S. Finance 




BRANDON R. BLADES 
Arts and Sciences 
B.S. Biology 




JANICE T. BIAZZO 

School of Education 

A.B. Elementary Education 




MARK D. BLAISDELL 
Arts and Sciences 
A.B. Economics 



JAMES O. BLOSE 
Arts and Sciences 
A.B. Sociology — Philosophy 




MICHAEL ). BISCONE 
School of Management 
B.S. Accounting 




CHARLES H. BLANK 
Arts and Sciences 
A.B. History 




BERNARD S. BLOTNER 
Arts and Sciences 
A.B. Political Science — 
Sociology 




JOHN R. BOCKO 
School of Management 
B.S. Management 



SUSAN E. BOEHLER 
School of Education 
A.B. Elementary Education 



CAROL A. BOLGER 

School of Nursing 
B.S. Nursing 




VINCENT A. BONGIORN 
School of Management 
B.S. Finance 



"Will I grow up to be a man?" 













MARGARET BONIFACE 
School of Education 
A.B. Special Education 




THOMAS S. BORON 
School of Management 
B.S. Marketing 



The good bandsman knows how to camouflage his mistakes on the 
field. 



FREDC, BOSSE 

Arts and Sciences 
A.B. History 



JOHN J. BONISTALLI 
School of Management 
B.S. Finance 



I 




PAUL J. BOSCO 
Arts and Sciences 
B.S. Biology 




SAMUEL R. BOTTARO 
School of Management 
B.S. Accounting 




VIRGINIA A BOWEN 
School of Nursing 
B.S. Nursing 




GERARD J. BOYLE 

School of Management 
B.S, Management 



MICHAEL K. BRADY 
Arts and Sciences 
A.B. Liberal Arts 




PHILLIP W. BOWES 
School of Education 
A.B. History 



JOHN F. BOYLE, |R. 
Arts and Sciences 
A.B. Political Science 
Russian 




WILLIAM J. BRANCA 
Arts and Sciences 
A.B. Political Science 




JANET M. BOYD 

School of Education 

A.B. Elementary Education 




MARY ANN BOYSON 
School of Nursing 
B.S. Nursing 




RICHARD J. BOYD 
Arts and Sciences 
A.B. History 




JAMES W. BRADY 
Arts and Sciences 
B.S. Biology 




STEVEN ). BREMS 
School of Education 
A.B. German 



JOHN A. BRENT 
School of Management 
B.S. Accounting 




JANE A. BROWN 
School of Nursing 
B.S. Nursing 



TIMOTHY BROWN 
Arts and Sciences 
A.B. Psychology 




COLLEEN A. BREAULT 
School of Nursing 
B.S. Nursing 




RICHARD E. BROGAN 
School of Management 
B.S. Accounting 



STEPHEN ). BRUTZA 
School of Management 
B.S. Accounting 




)AY A, BREEZE 
Arts and Sciences 
A.B. Psychology — 
Philosophy 




MARY D. BRONSKI 
School of Education 
A.B. Elementary Education 




BARBARA ). BUONOCORE 

School of Nursing 
B.S. Nursing 




JEANNE M. BURNS 
School of Education 
A.B. Enelish 





PHILIP). BURNS 
Arts and Sciences 
A.B. Psychology 



PATRICIA J. BUTLER 
School of Education 
A.B. English 




CHARLES G. BUTTERS 
School of Education 
A.B. History 



ELIZABETH A. BYRNE 
School of Nursing 
B.S. Nursing 




RICHARD J. BYRNE 
School of Management 
B.S. Economics 



JAMES W. BYRON 
School of Management 
B.S. Accounting 



NANCY E. CAHALANE 

School of Education 

A.B. Elementary Education 




JOHN T. CAHILL 
Arts and Sciences 
A.B. English 




MICHAEL A. CAIRA 
School of Management 
B.S. Management 



JOSEPH A. CALANDRELLI 
School of Management 
B.S. Accounting 



STEPHEN F. CALDER 
School of Management 
B.S. Accounting 



STEPHEN F. CALDWELL 
Arts and Sciences 
A.B. English 





MICHELLE L CALLAN 
School of Nursing 
B.S. Nursing 



MARLENEG. CALLINAN 
School of Nursing 
B.S. Nursing 





DONALD I. CALLOW 
School of Management 
B.S. Marketing 



VIRGINIA M. CAMPBELL 
School of Nursing 
B.S. Nursing 




CHARLES M. CAMPO 
School of Management 
B.S. Accounting 




ANTHONYS. CANALI 
School of Education 
A.B. History 




THOMAS ). CAPANO 
Arts and Sciences 
A.B. History 



PAUL H. CAPOBIANCO 
School of Management 
B.S. Accounting 





PETER R. CARDIA 
School of Management 
B.S. Accounting 



CAROL L. CARNEGIE 
School of Education 
A.B. English 





CLARE A. CARR 

School of Education 

A.B. Elementary Education 



DAVID J. CARROLL 
Arts and Sciences 
B.S. Biology 




JOHN T. CARROLL 
Arts and Sciences 
B.S. Biology 




P/^ULA M. CARROLL 
School of Nursing 
B.S. Nursing 




"Don't stare! Can you count to 15 on y/our fingers?" 




RALPH L. CARROLL 
School of Management 
B.S. Marketing 



JAMES J. CARTA 
School of Education 
A.B. English 




PAUL S. CARTER 
Arts and Sciences 
A.B. History— Political 
Science 



MADELINE C. CARUSO 

School of Education 

A.B. Elementary Education 



263 




THOMAS R, CARUSO 

School of Management 

B.S. Management and 

Computer Sciences 



MICHAEL F. CASEY 
School of Management 
B.S. Management 



ROBERT W. CASEY 
School of Education 
A.B. Speech 



WILLIAM M. CASHMAN 

School of Education 

A.B. Elementary Education 




'^i 



'No, this isn't the boys' dressing roonn. 




DAVID L. CASTIGLIONI 
School of Management 
B.S. Accounting 



VINCENT J. CATANO 
School of Education 
A.B. English 




JOSEPH A. CAULFIELD 
Arts and Sciences 
A.B. English 





THOMAS E. CAVELLIER 
School of Management 
B.S. Finance 



MARIANNE CAVICCHI 
School of Education 
A.B. English 



lAMES R. CENTORINO 
Arts and Sciences 
B.S. Geophysics 




CHERYL I, CHALENSKI 
School of Nursing 
B.S. Nursing 







MARY ANNE CHECRALLAH 

School of Education 

A.B. Elementary Education 




SUE ANN CHIN 
school of Nursing 
B.S. Nursing 





PAUL W. CHISHOLM, ]R. 
Arts and Sciences 
A.B. Economics 




MARK F. CHOTKOWSKI 
School of Management 
B.S. Accounting 



JANE M. CIAVARDONE 

School of Education 

A.B. Elementary Education 






SHELLY ). CIROLO 

School of Education 

A.B. Elementary Education 



CLAUDIA CISCO 
School of Education 
A.B. Mathematics 



RICHARD M. CIERI 
School of Management 
B.S. Accounting 



LOIS J. CIPOLLA 
School of Education 
A.B. Special Education 






MARYLOU CLIGGETT 
School of Nursing 
B.S. Nursing 



THOMAS I.CLINTON 
Arts and Sciences 
A.B. Mathematics 



JEFFREYS. CIUFFREDA 
School of Management 
B.S. Accounting 



CHARLES A. CLERKIN 
School of Management 
B.S. Management 






DANIEL A. CLUNE 
Arts and Sciences 
A.B. English 



THOMAS A. COLACCHIO 

Arts and Sciences 

B.S. Biology — Psychology 



JANICE R. COLANERI 

School of Education 

A.B. Elementary Education 



FRANCIS A. COLLINS 
School of Management 
B.S. Marketing 





JOSEPH M. COLLINS 
School of Management 
B.S. Marketing 



PATRICIA E, COLLINS 
School of Nursing 
B.S. Nursing 




PAUL). COLLINS 
School of Management 
B.S. Marketing 





SUSAN COLLINS 
School of Education 
A.B. English 




CHARLES F. COLOMBINO 
Arts and Sciences 
A.B. Psychology 




lOHN P. CONATY 
School of Education 
A.B. Enelish 




)OHN S. CONEYS 
Arts and Sciences 
A.B. Economics 



SUSAN M. CONLEY 
School of Education 
A.B. Elementary Education 




CATHERINE CONNELL 
School of Education 
A.B. Special Education 




FRANCIS CONNOLLY 
School of Management 
B.S. Marketing 




JOHN M. CONNOLLY 

Arts and Sciences 

A.B. English — Philosophy 




MARY A. CONNOLLY 

School of Education 

A.B. Elementary Education 




JAMES J. CONNORS 
School of Management 
B.S. Accounting 




CATHERINE CONROY 
School of Education 
A.B. Special Education 




ELENA A. CONTE 

School of Education 

A.B. Elementary Education 




PAUL C. COOGAN 
School of Management 
B.S. Finance 





p 


\^.' 





KATHLEEN M. COONEY 
School of Nursing 
B.S. Nursing 




JOHN P. CORBETT 
Arts and Sciences 
A.B. History 



PAULA A. CORRICAN 
School of Nursing 
B.S. Nursing 




LINDA J. CORINNE 
School of Nursing 
B.S. Nursing 



MICHAEL J. CORRICAN 
Arts and Sciences 
A.B. History 



PAUL A. CORSI 
School of Education 
A.B. History 




LINDA A. COSGROVE 

School of Education 

A.B. Elementary Education 



WILLIAM ). COSGROVE 
School of Management 
B.S. Marketing 



VINCENT X. COSTELLO 
School of Management 
B.S. Marketing 



RICHARD P. CRAIG 
School of Education 
A.B. Mathematics 




JOSEPH K. CRAWFORD 
Arts and Sciences 
A.B. Mathematics 



CHARLES). CREEDEN 
School of Management 
B.S. Accounting 




LAURENE D. CREIGHTON 
School of Education 
A.B. Speech 



FRANK D. CRIVELLI 
Arts and Sciences 
A.B. History 





PAUL T. CRONIN 
School of Management 
B.S. Finance 




FRANCIS G. CROSBY 
Evening College 
B.S. General Business 



Student 
Nurses 





BARBARA P. CROSS 
Graduate School of 

Nursing 
B.S. Nursing 




)AMES M. CROSS 
Arts and Sciences 
A.B. Economics 




JAMES C. CROWLEY 
School of Management 
B.S. Marketing 




KATHRYN CROWLEY 
School of Nursing 
B.S. Nursing 






DIANE L. CULLEN 
School of Nursing 
B.S. Nursing 



BRIAN R. CUNHA 
School of Management 
B.S. Finance 



KENNETH R. CUNHA 
Arts and Sciences 
A.B. Mathematics 




NANCY A. CUNNIFF 
School of Education 
A.B. Special Education 




DENNIS L. CURRAN 
Arts and Sciences 
A.B. History 




BRIAN P. CURRY 
School of Management 
B.S. Marketing 




SUSAN M. CUSICK 
School of Nursing 
B.S. Nursing 



KATHLEEN A. CURTIN 
School of Education 
A.B. English 




KENNETH E. DAGGETT 
School of Management 
B.S. Finance 







LEON G. DANISH 


LINDA D. DANKESE 


GREGORY A. DAOUST 


ANN M. DARGAN 


Arts and Sciences 


School of Education 


School of Managament 


School of Education 


B.S. Biology 


A.B. English 


B.S. Economics 


A.B. Elementary Education 




ROBERT S. DARCAN 
School of Management 
B.S. Accounting 



EILEEN M. DART 
School of Nursing 
B.S. Nursing 




STANLEY A. DASH 
Arts and Sciences 
A.B. Mathenriatics - 
Economics 



JOHN ). DAUER, JK. 
School of Education 
A.B, English 




'Why did they put the seat belt buckle there?" 




FRANK D'AVETA 
School of Management 
B.S. Marketing 




FREDERICK). DAVIES 
Arts and Sciences 
A.B. Economics 





ANN M. DAVIN 
School of Nursing 
B.S. Nursing 



MARYANNE E. DEAN 
Evening College 
A.B. English 




MICHAEL A. DeANGELIS 
Arts and Sciences 
A.B. Psychology 



ELLEN M. DECOURCEY 
School of Nursing 
B.S. Nursing 



PAUL J. DECOURCY 

School of Management 
B.S. Marketing 



ROBERT P. DECRESCE 

Arts and Sciences 
B.S. Biology 






JAMES DeDOMINICI 
Arts and Sciences 
A.B. Mathematics 



ANNE M. DEFELIPPO 
School of Nursing 
B.S. Nursing 



ROBERTA. DEFRINO 

Arts and Sciences 
A.B. Political Science 



PAULA C. DEGNAN 
School of Education 
A.B. Mathematics 







CATHLEEN M. DELANEY 

School of Education 

A.B. Elementary Education 



ELLEN T. DELANEY 

School of Education 

A.B. Elementary Education 



JOAN M. DELERY 
School of Nur?ing 
B.S. Nursing 



JOHN E. DELONC 
School of Management 
B.S. Finance 





JOHN J. DELORENZO 
School of Education 
A.B. Speech and Theatre 



FREDERICK F. DELUTIS 

School of Education 

A.B. Elementary Education 





JOSEPH A. DeMAINA 
School of Education 
A.B. English 



EDWARD A. DEMBITZ 
Arts and Sciences 
A.B. History 






LINDA M. DeMEO 
School of Education 
A.B. Special Education 



SUZANNE DEMERS 
School of Education 
A.B. Elementary Education 




MARIE E. DEMILLE 

School of Education 

A.B. Elementary Education 



DEBORAH C. DENICOLA 

School of Education 

A.B. Elementary Education 




DIANNE M. DeRAMIO 

School of Education 

A.B. Elementary Education 




PETER D. DEROEVE 
School of Management 
B.S. Accounting 






MARY A. DESTEFANO 
School of Education 
A.B. Biology 



JAMES I. DEVENEY, )R. 

School of Education 

A.B. Elementary Education 



BARBARA A. DESMOND 
School of Nursing 
B.S. Nursing 



WILLIAM F, DESMOND 
School of Managennent 
B.S. Marketing 




)AMES R. DEVENEY 
School of Management 
B.S. Accounting 



RICHARD K. DEVENEY 
Arts and Sciences 
A.B. Mathematics 






JEAN MARIE DEVER 
School of Education 
A.B. English 



JOHN E. DEVITO- 
School of Management 
B.S. Accounting 




PASQUALE ). DEVITO 
Arts and Sciences 
A.B. Psychology 



ELIZABETH M. DiCARLO 
School of Nursing 
B.S. Nursing 





GREGORY C. DIEBOLD 
Arts and Sciences 
A.B. Political Science 



DAVID T. DIERKER 
School of Education 
A.B. History 





DIANE M. DIGIOVANNI 
School of Education 
A.B. English 



VINCENT DIGIOVANNI 
School of Management 
B.S. Marketing 





RAYMOND T. DILLON 
Arts and Sciences 
A.B. Psychology 



SUSAN E, DINAN 
School of Nursing 
B.S. Nursing 





SUSAN L. DION 
School of Nursing 
B.S. Nursing 



VIRGINIA DIOTTE 

School of Education 

A.B. Elementary Education 




STEWART M. DOBSON 
School of Management 
B.S. Management 



DENISE A. DOHERTY 
School of Nursing 
B.S. Nursing 




MICHAEL A. DISABATINO 
Arts and Sciences 
A.B. English 




PAUL C. DOHERTYJR. 
Arts and Sciences 
B.S. Biology 



.CYNTHIA DISTEFANO 

School of Education 

A.B. Elementary Education 




DONNA J. DOLAN 
School of Education 
A.B. Elementary Education 




JOHN B. DOLAN 
School of Management 
B.S. Marketing 




LAWRENCE J. DOLAN 
School of Education 
A.B. Mathematics 






PATRICIA E. DONAHUE 
School of Education 
A.B. Mathematics 



PATRICIA A. DONATO 
School of Education 
A.B. Special Education 




JOHN L. DONDERO 
School of Management 
B.S. Management and 
Computer Sciences 



JAMES M. DONNELLS 
School of Management 
B.S. Economics 





JOHN E. DONNELLY 
School of Management 
B.S. Finance 



MICHAEL J. DONNELLY 
Arts and Sciences 
A.B. Mathematics 





^^i^ 



JAMES J. DONOGHUE 
School of Management 
B.S. Management 



THOMAS M. DONOHOE 
School of Management 
B.S. Finance 




CHARLES DONOHUE 
School of Education 
A.B. English 



MAUREEN A. DONOHUE 
School of Nursing 
B.S. Nursing 




KATHERINE DONOVAN 
School of Nursing 
B.S. Nursing 



STEPHEN A. DONOVAN 
School of Education 
A.B. Mathematics 



JANE FRANCES DOOLEY 

School of Education 

A.B. Elementary Education 




JAMES E. DORAN 
Arts and Sciences 
B.S. Biology 




DANIEL R. DOUCETTE 
School of Management 
B.S. Accounting 



DENNIS DOYLE 
Arts and Sciences 
A.B. History 




FRANCIS R. DOYLE 
School of Management 
B.S. Marketing 




M. DENNIS DRANCHAK 

Arts and Sciences 

A.B. History — Philosophy 





with a side order of Alka Seltzer; 



ANNE T. DRAY 

School of Education 

A.B. Elennentary Education 




BRIAN J. DRISCOLL 

Arts an'd Sciences 

A.B. Economics — Psychology 




EDWARD T. DRISCOLL 
School of Management 
B.S. Finance 




"When they get to the 30 yard line, cut loose with the 
mortars." 




CARMENl^. DRIVER 
School on^lursing 
B.S. Nursing 



LAWRENCE L. DROLET 
Arts and Sciences 
B.S. Biology 



GEORGE DRUSANO 
Arts and Sciences 
B.S. Physics 




THELMA DUNCAN 
School of Education 
A.B. English 






JAMES P. DUNN 
School of Management 
B.S. Finance 



MICHAEL F, DUNN 
School of Management 
B.S. Finance 



MARIA K. DURGIN 
School of Education 
A.B. Elementary Education 



JAMES). DURKIN 
School of Education 
A.B. History 






CHARLES S. FARLEY 
School of Management 
B.S. Accounting 



LEWIS W. EATON 
School of Management 
B.S. Finance 



MARTHA A. EGAN 
School of Education 
A.B. History 



MARY LOU EGAN 

School of Education 

A.B. Elementary Education 





THOMAS ). EGAN 
School of Education 
A.B. English 



PATRICIA EISERT 
School of Education 
A.B. Special Education 





HENRY W. EKBERC 
School of Education 
A.B. History 



PHILIP D. ELIAS 
School of Management 
B.S. Accounting 




ROBERT ). ENG 
School of Management 
B.S. Marketing 



JAMES A. ENCLER 
Arts and Sciences 
B.S. Chemistry 





ANTONIO EVANGELISTA 
School of Management 
B.S. Finance 



BARBARA A. EVERETT 
School of Education 
A.B. French 




r^^tid 




WILLIAM P. FAHY 
Evening College 
B.S. Accounting 



NANCY M. FALCIONE 

School of Education 

A.B. Elementary Education 





ROGER ). FALCIONE 
School of Management 
B.S. Marketing 



)EAN M. FALLON 

School of Education 

A.B. ElementaryEducation 





JOAN L. FALLON 
School of Education 
A.B. History 




RALPH L. FARNHAM 
School of Management 
B.S. Marketing 



"They're almost all dead, but I wish you'd wash your hair more often.' 




MARY F. FARRAGHER 
School of Education 
A.B. Special Education 



MICHAEL J. FARRAHER 

School of Management 
B.S. Marketing 




JACQUELYN A. FAY 
School of Education 
A.B. Speech 



KEVIN T. FEE 

School of Management 

B.S. Finance 



Bcai' ss:e5 bsb bss; isee 




EILEEN M. FELECIAN 
School of Education 
A.B. History 



RONALD P. FERDICO 
School of Management 
B.S. Accounting 



THOMAS ). FERGUSON 
Arts and Sciences 
A.B. Mathematics 



HARRIET A. FERRANT 
School of Nursing 
B.S. Nursing 




PHILIP FERRARA 
Arts and Sciences 
A.B. Mathematics 



LAWRENCE S. FERREIRA 
Arts and Sciences 
A.B. Political Science 






EUGENE ). FERRIS 
School of Management 
B.S. Accounting 



CAFFNEY). FESKOE 
School of Management 
B.S. Finance 



MICHAEL E. FIANDER 
School of Education 
A.B. French 



CAROL). FIERMONTI 

School of Nursing 
B.S. Nursing 





JOAN M. FINNEGAN 
School of Education 
A.B. Elementary Education 



JOHN T. FINNING 
School of Management 
B.S. Accounting 




ELIZABETH A. FITCH 
School of Education 
A.B. French 



FRANK ). FITZGERALD 
School of Management 
B.S. Marketing 




MICHAEL A. FITZGERALD 
Evening College 
A.B. History 



THOMAS M. FITZGERALD 
Arts and Sciences 
A.B. History 





m 



EDWARD L. FITZMAURICE 
Arts and Sciences 
A.B. History 




RICHARD FLAHERTY 
School of Management 
B.S. Marketing 





DERMOT). FITZPATRICK 

Evening College 

A.B. American Studies 



THOMAS A. FLEMING 
Arts and Sciences 
A.B. Sociology 




KENNETH M. FOLEY 
School of Management 
B.S. Economics 



MAUREEN FOLEY 
School of Nursing 
B.S. Nursing 



BROTHER JOHN F, 

FLAHERTY 
School of Nursing 
B.S. Nursing 




JOHN T. FLYNN 
School of Management 
B.S. Economics — 
Accounting 




ROBERT E. FOLEY, )R. 
School of Management 
B.S. Finance 




MARYANN E. FLAHERTY 

School of Education 

A.B. Elementary Education 




STEPHEN J. FOGARTY 
Arts and Sciences 
A.B. Mathematics — 
Economics 




STEPHEN R. FOLLANSBEE 
Arts and Sciences 
A.B. Histor_y 




WILLIAM A. FONIRI 
School of Management 
B.S. Finance 



JOSEPH F. FONTANA 
School of Management 
B.S. Accounting 





KATHLEEN FORD 
Arts and Sciences 
A.B. Mathematics 



LAWRENCE ). FORTIER 
Arts and Sciences 
B.S. Biology 




293 





JOHN M. FORTUNATO 
Arts and Sciences 
B.S, Biology 



JOHN J. FOTl 
Arts and Sciences 
A.B. Political Science 



"I realize it's 3 AM, Father, but my roommate won't let me back in 
the room." 




THOMAS J. FRACKLETON 
Arts and Sciences 
A.B. Sociology 



MICHAEL R. FRANCO 
Arts and Sciences 
A.B. Political Science 



KAREN A. FREDRICKS 
School of Nursing 
B.S. Nursing 




MICHAEL A. FOSTER 
School of Education 
A.B. Special Education 




PAUL R. FOURNIER 
Arts and Sciences 
A.B. Psychology 




DOMENIC J. FUCCI 
School of Management 
B.S. Accounting 




NORMA L. CABORIAULT 

School of Nursing 
B.S. Nursing 



NEAL H. CALLAGHEf 
Arts and Sciences 
A.B. History 




JANICE M. CANNON 
School of Education 
A.B. Special Education 




JOHN ). GAFFNEY 
School of Management 
B.S. Accounting 




PATRICIA CALLE 
School of Education 
A.B. Mathematics 




MARVIN P. CANS 
Arts and Sciences 
A.B. German 




DIANE M. CALLETTI 
Arts and Sciences 
A.B. English 




ANN E. GARDINER 
School of Education 
A.B. Elementary Education 




ROBERT L. CAMBONE 
Arts and Sciences 
A.B. History 




BERNARD H. GAREAU 
School of Management 
B.S. Management 




ELAINE A. CARERI 
School of Nursing 
B.S. Nursing 



THOMAS B. GARLICK 
School of Education 
A.B. Speech 




H. PATRICIA CARREPY 
School of Nursing 
B.S. Nursing 




RICHARD F. GARRITY 
Arts and Sciences 
A.B. Psychology 




PATRICIA A. GARVIN 
School of Education 
A.B. English 



J. MICHAEL GAUDREAU 
Arts and Sciences 
A.B. Philosophy 




ELIZABETH GAVIN 
School of Education 
A.B. English 




MARY GAVIN 
Arts and Sciences 
A.B. Psychology 




CAROL ). GAY 

School of Education 

A.B. Elementary Education 



HOWARD F. GAYNOR 
School of Management 
B.S. Finance 




STEPHEN M. GEARY 
Arts and Sciences 
A.B. History 




JAMES L CELORMINI 
Arts and Sciences 
A.B. Mathematics 





TIMOTHY F. GENS 
Arts and Sciences 
A.B. Political Science - 
Philosophy 




BETTY A. CEOCHECAN 
School of Education 
A.B. Mathematics 




LOIS M. GIARLA 
School of Nursing 
B.S. Nursing 




PATRICIA A. GENTILE 
School of Education 
A.B. Special Education 




JOHN E. GERETY, ]R. 
School of Management 
B.S. Finance 




PATRICK W. GILES 

School of Education 

A.B. Elementary Education 




START 
HERE 



THE 

BOSTON 
COLLEGE 
CAME 

or "You Mean After Four Years of This, I'm a Success? 



Moving in 



First visit to Town 





Dionne 



The Coronation 



1 


1: ^M W^ ■ ^"^ 




Bapst Research Facilities 



^BlBITCITY 



The City Rediscovered 



if you've 
Made it this 
far . . . 
cont. on 
pg. 350 



The Lyons Den 



A Victory in Defeat at the NIT 




GEORGE M. GILL 
School of Management 
B.S. Accounting 




JOHN ). GLEASON 


JOHN J. GLENNON 


MICHAEL J. GLYNN 


MICHAEL R. GONDEK 


School of Education 


School of Education 


School of Managennent 


Arts and Sciences 


A.B, Special Education 


A.B. History 


B.S. Finance 


B.S. Biology 




RUSSELL S. CONNERINC 
Arts and Sciences 
A.B. History 




ANN CORDON 
Arts and Sciences 
A.B. Mathematics 



IAMBS P. GRABMAN 
Arts and Sciences 
B.S. Biology 




JUDITH A. GOODYEAR 
School of Education 
A.B. Mathematics 




STEPHEN P. CORMICAN 
Arts and Sciences 
A.B. Mathematics 



CHRISTOPHER L. GORCONE 
School of Management 
B.S. Accounting 





DOROTHY E. GRAHAM 

School of Education 

A.B. Elementary Education 



ROBERT C CRACEFFA 
Arts and Sciences 
A.B. History 




DANIEL C. GOUNARIS 
School of Management 
B.S. Finance 




WILFRED A. GRAPES III 
School of Education 
A.B. English 




MICHAEL ). GREALY 
Arts and Sciences 
A.B. History 



KATHLEEN GREELEY 
School of Education 
A.B. Special Education 



'Everybody puts yer hands up. This is a bust!" 




ROBERT). GREELEY 
Arts and Sciences 
A.B. Political Science 




JOHN ). GREEN 
School of Education 
A.B. English 




LINDA J. GREEN 
School of Nursing 
B.S. Nursing 







MARK R. GREENBLATT 
Arts and Sciences 
A.B. Psychology 



SUSAN E. GREGORY 
School of Education 
A.B. Elementary Education 



VIRGINIA M. GREW 
School of Nursing 
B.S. Nursing 



BROTHER ROBERT 

Arts and Sciences 
A.B. French 



GREEN 





PAULA E. GRIFFIN 
School of Education 
A.B. Speech 



RICHARD J. GRIFFIN 
Arts and Sciences 
B.S. Chemistry 



ROBERT E. GRIFFIN 
School of Management 
B.S. Finance 



ROBERT F. GRIFFITH 
Arts and Sciences 
A.B. English 




BETTY ). GROPPO 

School of Nursing 
B.S. Nursing 



CLAIRE GRODEN 
Evening College 
A.B. Sociology 




GEORGE I. GUEPEROUX 
Arts and Sciences 
A.B. Psychology 




)OHN P. HAGAN 
School of Management 
B.S. Marketing 




ELLEN M. HALEY 
School of Education 
A.B. Speech 




GERALD D. HANFORD 
School of Management 
B.S. Marketing 



KATHLEEN M. HALL 
School of Nursing 
B.S. Nursing 



MARY E. HANLEY 
School of Education 
A.B. Special Education 




HUNTER A. HAMMILL 
Arts and Sciences 
B.S. Biology 








^:. 




w^- 


w^ n 


V 


^ 


> 


/ 


fSj 


1^ 



MARY C. HANNON 
Evening College 
A.B. English 




NANCY T. HANDY 
School of Nursing 
B.S. Nursing 




LINDA HANRAHAN 

Arts and Sciences 

A.B. English — Philosophy 





DENE T. HARPER 
School of Education 
A.B. Mathematics 



ELLEN F. HARRINGTON 
School of Education 
A.B. History 



WILLIAM J. HANSBURY 
School of Management 
B.S. Marketing 






HENRY A. HANSEN 
Arts and Sciences 
A.B. Economics 




NANCY M. HARRINGTON 
School of Nursing 
B.S. Nursing 



ANN M. HARRIS 

School of Education 

A.B. Elementary Education 



305 




BRIAN W. HARRIS 
Arts and Sciences 
B.S. Biology 





RICHARD HARRITY 
School of Management 
B.S. Management 




DAVID M. HARTICAN 
Arts and Sciences 
A.B. English 



'Oooh. You go to Harvard?' 




CANDACE O. HASEY 

School of Education 

A.B. Elementary Education 



ANITA I. HAVENS 
School of Nursing 
B.S. Nursing 




SCOTT HAY 
School of Education 
A.B. English 




WILLIAM M. HEALY, JR. 
Arts and Sciences 
A.B. English 




ROBERT E. HAYDEN 
Arts and Sciences 
A.B. Psychology 



DAVID A. HEDSTROM 
Arts and Sciences 
A.B. History 




JAMES M. HAYES 
Arts and Sciences 
A.B. English — History 
Political Science 



THOMAS J. HEENAN 
School of Management 
B.S. Marketing 



DANIEL A. HEALY 
Arts and Sciences 
A.B. Mathematics 




DONNA M. HENDERSON 

School of Education 

A.B. Elementary Education 



3o;r 




THOMAS F. HENNEBERRY 

Arts and Sciences 

A.B. Mathennatics — History 



RICHARD F. HENNESSEY 
School of Management 
B.S. Accounting 






WILLIAM ). HESSION, |R. 
School of Management 
B.S. Accounting 



WILLIAM F. HICKEY III 
Arts and Sciences 
A.B. History 



ROBERT P. HENNESSY 
Arts and Sciences 
A.B. Russian 



KATHLEEN M. HERR 
School of Nursing 
B.S. Nursing 






CHRISTOPHER M. HINCHEY 
Arts and Sciences 
A.B. English 



CLAIRE HINCKLEY 

School of Education 

A.B. Elementary Education 



WILLIAM ). HIGGINS 
Arts and Sciences 
A.B. English 



PAUL R. HILL 
School of Education 
A.B. English 




MARK D. HLAVATY 
Arts and Sciences 
A.B. History 




JOHN C. HOELL, JR. 
Arts and Sciences 
B.S. Biology 




RICHARD E. HOCAN 
Evening College 
B.S. Accounting 




URSULA HOLDEN 
School of Nursing 
B.S. Nursing 



MARK W. HOLLAND 
School of Management 
B.S. Accounting 



THOMAS F. HORIGAN, JR. 
Arts and Sciences 
A.B. English 




PAUL M. HOWARD 
School of Education 
A.B. English 













RICHARD S. HOWE 
School of Management 
B.S. Accounting 



MARGARET HRINCHUK 
School of Education 
A.B. French 



WILLIAM A, HUBLER 
School of Management 
B.S. Accounting 



MARY L, HUGHES 
School of Education 
A.B. French 





EILEEN R. HUNT 
School of Education 
A.B. Mathematics 



EDWARD E, HURLEY, JR. 
Arts and Sciences 
A.B. English 



PAULA M. HUTCHINSON 

School of Education 

A.B. Elementary Education 



MICHAEL S. ILLSLEY 
School of Education 
A.B. Mathematics 




JOHN IMMIC 
Evening College 
B.S. Management 



ALAN A. INNES 
Arts and Sciences 
A.B. English 



ANTHONY J. ISACCO 
School of Management 
B.S. Management 




KRISTIN A. JACKSON 
School of Nursing 
B.S. Nursing 




LEO P. JACOBY 

Arts and Sciences 

A.B. English — Philosophy 




BIRUTE R. JARAS 
School of Education 
A.B. English 




FRANCIS W. JENKINS 
School of Education 
A.B. History 



JEANNE M. JERAY 
Arts and Sciences 
A.B. Mathematics 




JEROME A. JOHNSON 
Arts and Sciences 
B.S. Chemistry 



DANIEL J. JOHNSTON 
Arts and Sciences 
A.B. Mathematics 






GEORGE J. JORDAN 
Arts and Sciences 
A.B. History 



MARIE B. JOSEPH 
School of Nursing 
B.S. Nursing 



GERARDJ. JOYCE, JR. 
Arts and Sciences 
A.B. Economics 



ROBERT J. KANE 
Arts and Sciences 
A.B. English 






MICHAEL J. KARRAT 
Arts and Sciences 
A.B. Psychology 



DOUGLAS KASSAR 
School of Management 
B.S. Marketing 



GARY S. KAUFFOLD 
Arts and Sciences 
A.B. Psychology 



SHEILA A. KEADY 
School of Education 
A.B. English 







ROBERT L. KEANE 
Arts and Sciences 
A.B. French — Philosophy 



JOSEPHINE A. KEAVENEY 
School of Nursing 
B.S. Nursing 



MARY E. KEEFE 

School of Education 

A.B. Elementary Education 



DANIEL I. KELLEHER 
Arts and Sciences 
A.B. History 




STEPHEN P. KELLEHER 
Arts and Sciences 
B.S. Biology 



PETER C. KELLEY 
School of Managenrient 
B.S. Finance 




"No little girl, I don't want a piece of candy. 




R. MICHAEL KELLEY 
School of Education 
A.B. English 



WILLIAM W. KENDALL 
Arts and Sciences 
A.B. Mathematics 



ANNE KENNEY 

Arts and Sciences 

A.B. English — Psychology 



ROBERT E. KELLIHER, |R 
School of Management 
B.S. Economics 





ANTHONY C. KENNEDY 
Arts and Sciences 
A.B. Philosophy 



LAWRENCE A. KENNEY 
School of Management 
B.S. Accounting 



FRANK B. KELLY 

Arts and Sciences 

A.B. Romance Languages 



DAVID C. KENNEDY 
School of Management 
B.S. Marketing 



EDWARD ). KERR 
School of Management 
B.S. Finance 



PAUL D. KELLY 
School of Management 
B.S. Accounting 




KEVIN C KENNEDY 
Arts and Sciences 
B.S. Biology 




THOMAS ). KILMURRAY 
School of Management 
B.S. Accounting 




BRIAN R. KING 
Arts and Sciences 
A.B. Sociology 



JOSEPH A. KING, )R. 
School of Management 
B.S. Accounting 



RICHARD T. KINNIER 
Arts and Sciences 
A.B. Psychology 







PAUL F. KIPPENBERGER 
Arts and Sciences 
B.S. Biology 



EDWARD I. KOERON 
Arts and Sciences 
A.B. Mathematics 



NORINE A. KOFRON 
School of Education 
A.B. English 



JOHN F. KOLB 
Arts and Sciences 
A.B. Mathematics 







JOHN W. KOZARICH 
Arts and Sciences 
B.S. Chemistry 



WILLIAM P. KRANT 
Arts and Sciences 
A.B. Mathematics 



JOSEPH J. KRISTAN 

Arts and Sciences 

A.B, English — Philosophy 



PAUL H. KRUECER 
Arts and Sciences 
A.B. English 




"One of these days I gotta learn how to read." 




STEPHEN C. KRUG 
Arts and Sciences 
A.B. English 




MARY |. KUPPtNS 
School of Nursing 
B.S. Nursing 




DENNIS ). KWASNIK 
Arts and Sciences 
A.B. Political Science 



GRACE A. LABOZZETTA 
School of Education 
A.B. Spanish 




MARK A. LABRECQUE 
Arts and Sciences 
A.B. History 




JOHN R. LACASSE 
Arts and Sciences 
A.B. French 



DAVID M. LACIVITA 
Arts and Sciences 
A.B. English 



DAVID L. LAHAISE 
School of Management 
B.S. Marketing 








JOHN L. LaMATTINA 
Arts and Sciences 
B.S. Chemistry 




DEBORAH LANCKOPF 

School of Nursing 
B.S. Nursing 




GAIL A. LAMONT 
School of Nursing 
B.S. Nursing 




lAMES F. LANICAN 
School of Education 
A.B. Biology 




CHRISTINE L. LANDREY 
School of Nursing 
B.S. Nursing 




JOHN K. LANICAN 
Arts and Sciences 
A.B. History 




i. 



\ 



JOSEPH A. LANDRICAN 
Arts and Sciences 
B.S. Biology 




BARBARA F. LANZELOTTI 
School of Nursing 
B.S. Nursing 




VICTOR P. LARONGA 
Arts and Sciences 
A.B. English 



MARK LARSEN 
School of Management 
B.S. Finance 



■S^^B 



MAJORIE A. LATTA 
School of Nursing 
B.S. Nursing 



)OHN F. LAVEY 
School of Management 
B.S. Accounting 



ROBERT ). LEIST, JR. 
Arts and Sciences 
A.B. English 



ALBERT P. LENGE 
Arts and Sciences 
A.B. English 




SANTO I. LATORES 
School of Management 
B.S. Economics 






LAWRENCE T. LAWLER 
Arts and Sciences 
A.B. Mathematics — 
Economics 




CHARLES F. LEONARD, )R. 
School of Management 
B.S. Finance 



JAMES N. LATOURELLE 
School of Management 
B.S. Marketing 




RICHARD N. LECENDRE 
School of Management 
B.S. Management 




FREDERICK C. LEONARD 
School of Management 
B.S. Marketing 




MARCARETTE L. LEONARD 
Evening College 
A.B. English 




DEBORAH A. LEONE 
School of Nursing 
B.S. Nursing 




ROBERT W. LEONARD 
School of Educatio'n 
A.B. Special Education 




ARTHUR ). LEWIS 
School of Management 
B.S. Marketing 





GERARD). LIEB 
Arts and Sciences 
A.B. History— Political 
Science 



JOHN F. LINDBERG 
Arts and Sciences 
B.S. Biology 




^=^ 



SONIA LINCOS 
School of Education 
A.B. English 




MARY A. LINKO 
School of Nursing 
B.S. Nursing 




JOAN M. LINNEHAN 
School of Education 
A.B. Elementary Education 




'Mmm. Cherry flavored." 




KATE L. LJUNGGREN 

School of Education 

A.B. Elementary Education 



JOHN W. LORETZ 
Arts and Sciences 
A.B. English — Philosophy 



BARBARA A. LUCAS 
School of Nursing 
B.S. Nursing 




)OHN |. LOFTUS 
Arts and Sciences 
A.B. English 



ROBERT E. LONGDEN 
Arts and Sciences 
A.B. History 



JOHN H. LOTT 
School of Education 
A.B. French 



JAMES J. LOVETT 
Arts and Sciences 
A.B. Economics 



JAMES A. LUCCIO 
School of Management 
B.S. Marketing 



JANET L LUKAS 

School of Education 

A.B. Elementary Education 




LEO J. LORANGER 
School of Management 
i.S. Finance 





JAMES E. LOZIER 
School of Management- 
B.S. Finance 




JOHN M. LUKIN 
Arts and Sciences 
A.B. English 




Multiple Choice 

The above people are: 

a) watching a fight in the stands 

b) hearing about another tuition hike 

c) watching the infirmary at work. 




JANET P. LUKOSIUS 
School of Nursing 
B.S. Nursing 




ELIZABETH A, LUND 
School of Education 
A.B. Special Education 




JOY A. LUTZKO 

School of Education 

A.B. Elementary Education 



BROTHER GEORGE J. LYE 
School of Management 
B.S. Accounting 




MARK F. LYNCH 
Arts and Sciences 
A.B. History 



THOMAS J. LYNCH, JR. 
School of Management 
B.S. Marketing 




ANNET. LYONS 
School of Nursing 
B.S. Nursing 




GEORGE G. LYONS 
School of Education 
A.B. Elementary Education 




JAMES W. LYONS 
Arts and Sciences 
A.B. Economics 




KATHLEEN LYONS 
School of Nursing 
B.S. Nursing 




DOMINIC MACADINO 
School of Management 
B.S. Management and 
Computer Sciences 




MARYANNE MacCUNE 

School of Education 

A.B. Elementary Education 





ift Aifl 



JOHN J. MacDONALD 
Arts and Sciences 
A.B. History 



STEPHEN R. MacDONALD 
Arts and Sciences 
A.B. English 



JAMES R. MACHO 
Arts and Sciences 
B.S. Biology 



GREGORY MacDONALD 
School of Management 
B.S. Marketing 




JOHN J. MACKIN 
School of Management 
B.S. Finance 




PETER C. MAGUIRE 
School of Management 
B.S. Economics 



KENNETH MacLEISH 
School of Education 
A.B. Mathematics 




•xisP&l^i 



ROBERT F. MAGUIRE 
School of Management 
B.S. Finance 



)OHN C. MADDEN 
Arts and Sciences 
B.S. Chemistry 



TIMOTHY G. MADDEN 
School of Management 
B.S. Finance 





THOMAS H. MACUIRE 
Arts and Sciences 
A.B. Sociology — Political 
Science 




JOSEPH C. MAHER 
School of Management 
B.S. Accounting 




DANIEL P. MAHONEY 
School of Management 
B.S. Finance 




FRANK A. MAIELLANO 
School of Management 
B.S. Accounting 




RICHARD P. MALLETTE 
Arts and Sciences 
A.B. English 




MAUREEN D. MALLON 
School of Nursing 
B.S. Nursing 




THOMAS J. MALLON 
School of Management 
B.S. Accounting 



EDWARD W. MALONEY, 
Arts and Sciences 
B.S. Biology 



RICHARD I. MALYNN 
Arts and Sciences 
A.B. English 




GERALD C. MANNING 
School of Education 
A.B. History 




Do they really think that new uniforms will increase campus security? 







PHILIP). MANNIX 
School of Management 
B.S. Management and 
Computer Sciences 




LINDA A. MARKOL 
School of Nursing 
B.S. Nursing 




THOMAS S. MAROUN 


JEAN A. MARSHALL 


PAMELA A. MARSHALL 


STEPHEN MARSHALL 


Arts and Sciences 


School of Nursing 


School of Nursing 


School of Management 


A.B. Psychology 


B.S. Nursing 


B.S. Nursing 


B.S. Economics 




NANCY A. MARSZYCKI 
School of Education 
A.B. Special Education 



JOHN D, MASHIA 
School of Management 
B.S. Finance 




GEORGE F. MARTELON, )R. 
Arts and Sciences 
A.B. History 




THEODORE |. MASLOWSKI 
School of Management 
B.S. Marketing 




M. ROBIN MARTIN 
School of Education 
A.B. Elementary Education 



LOUISE C. MASSA 

School of Education 

A.B. Elementary Education 




LOUISE E. MASCIA 

School of Education 

A.B. Elementary Education 




JAMES T. MATTERA 
Arts and Sciences 
A.B. History 





FRANCES I. MAY 
School of Nursing 
B.S. Nursing 



CATHRYN D. MAZANOWSKI 
School of Education 
A.B. Special Education 





DAVID B. McARDLE 
School of Management 
B.S. Marketing 





DAVID M. McAULIFFE 
School of Management 
B.S. Accounting 




EUGENE F. McAULIFFE 
School of Management 
B.S. Marketing 



CHARLES F. McBRIDE 
Arts and Sciences 
A.B. Economics 




JOHN E. McCANN 
School of Management 
B.S. Finance 



JOHN F. McCarthy 

School of Management 
B.S. Accounting 




PETER J. McCarthy 

School of Management 
B.S. Marketing 




CAROL A. Mcdonald 

School of Education 

A.B. Elementary Education 



SHEILA McGLINCHEY 
School of Education 
A.B. English 



JOHN C. McCLAIN 
Arts and Sciences 
A.B. Psychology 




JEANNE D. McDonald 

School of Education 

A.B. Elementary Education 




MARK M. McGOVERN 
School of Management 
B.S. Marketing 



EDWARD G. McCOURT 
Arts and Sciences 
A.B. History 




STEPHEN F. McELENEY 
School of Management 
B.S. Economics 




WILLIAM McDERMOTT 
Arts and Sciences 
A.B. History 




WILLIAM F. McENROE 

Arts and Sciences 

A.B. Mathematics Economics 




MICHAEL E. McCRATH 
School of Management 
B.S. Management and 
Computer Sciences 



THOMAS W. McCRATH 
Arts and Sciences 
A.B. History 





DIANE R. McGUIRE 
School of Nursing 
B.S. Nursing 





THOMAS W. McKEANEY 
Arts and Sciences 
A.B. History 




MAUREEN M. MckENNA 
School of Nursing 
B.S. Nursing 



MAURA E. Mclaughlin 

School of Nursing 
B.S. Nursing 




PAUL ). McLaughlin 

Arts and Sciences 
B.S. Biology 







RICHARD McNABE 
Arts and Sciences 
A.B. Economics — 
Psychology 



STEPHEN M. McPARLAND 
School of Management 
B.S. Accounting 



SHARON A. McWEY 
Evening College 
A.B. English 



ARTHUR C. MEAD 
Arts and Sciences 
A.B. Mathematics — 
Economics 




DAVID P. MEAD 
Arts and Sciences 
A.B. Economics 






JOAN M. MEADOWS 
School of Nursing 
B.S. Nursing 



JAMES V. MECONE 
School of Management 
B.S. Accounting 



GREGORY B. MEEHAN 
Arts and Sciences 
B.S. Biology 




JOHN P. MEEHAN 
School of Management 
B.S. Marketing 




JAMES F. MEERE 
School of Education 
A.B. Mathematics 



FREDRICK J. MEHLINGER 
School of Education 
A.B. Speech 




JEAN L. MENARD 
School of Education 
A.B. Special Education 



HARRY F. MILLER 
Arts and Sciences 
A.B. Mathematics ■ 
Economics 



PATRICIA A. MERCAITIS 
School of Education 
A.B. Speech 



JAMES W. METZ 
Arts and Sciences 
A.B. History — English 




JAMES M. MILLHAM 
School of Management 
B.S. Finance 




BARRY A. MILLS 
Arts and Sciences 
B.S. Biology 



JOHN M. MEMORY 
School of Education 
A.B. History 




JOHN N. MICLIACCIO 
Arts and Sciences 
A.B. Psychology — 
Philosophy 




ELEANOR M. MILLS 
School of Education 
A.B. Special Education 







JOSEPH J. MINGLE 

School of Education 

A.B. Elementary Education 



DAVID B. MITCHELL 
School of Education 
A.B. Elementary Education 



MARYANN B. MOHAN 
Evening College 
A.B. English 



KATHERINE K. MONE 
School of Education 
A.B. Special Education 






FRANCINE MONTANE 
Arts and Sciences 
A.B. English 



JOHN S. MOONEY 
School of Management 
B.S. Management and 
Computer Sciences 



TERENCE M. MORAN 
School of Education 
A.B. English 




MARGARET R. MORIAN 

School of Education 

A.B. Elementary Education 




MICHAEL A. MORRIS 
Arts and Sciences 
A.B. Psychology 



RITA M. MULLANE 
School of Education 
A.B. Mathematics 




JOHN V. MURPHY 
School of Management 
B.S. Accounting 



DANE A. MORRISON 
Arts and Sciences 
A.B. History 




CELINE M. MURPHY 
School of Nursing 
B.S. Nursing 





STEPHEN S. MOSHO 
School of Management 
B.S. Economics 



TIMOTHY MULCAHY 
Evening College 
B.S. Management 





EDWARD J. MURPHY 
School of Management 
B.S. Marketing 



JAMES T. MURPHY 
Arts and Sciences 
A.B. English 



KATHLEEN J. MURPHY 
School of Education 
A.B. English 






STEPHEN D. MURPHY 
Arts and Sciences 
A.B. Political Science — 
Philosophy 



STEVEN J. MURPHY 
School of Management 
B.S. Marketing 



JANE C. MURRAY 
School of Education 
A.B. Special Education 



ROBERT B. MURRAY 
Arts and Sciences 
A.B. English 






THOMAS C. MURRAY 
School of Management 
B.S. Economics 



RONALD P. MUTASCIO 
School of Management 
B.S. Accounting 



ALPHONSE NACLERIO 
Arts and Sciences 
A.B. History 



ANDREW C. NAJBERC 
Arts and Sciences 
A.B. Russian 





ROBERT C. NARDONE 
Arts and Sciences 
B.S. Biology 



THOMAS M. NARY 
Arts and Sciences 
A.B. English 




MADELINE A. NAZZARO 
School of Education 
A.B. Special Education 



ROBERT W. NELSON 
School of Management 
B.S. Marketing 





ALFRED R. NEWCOMB 
Arts and Sciences 
A.B. English 



GEORGE J. NEWMAN 
School of Education 
A.B. History 




LINDA S. NILAND 
School of Nursing 
B.S. Nursing 




JAMES NILES 

School of Management 

B.S. Accounting 




EUGENE ). NUCCIO 
Arts and Sciences 
A.B. Psychology 



ANTONIO D. NUNES 
Arts and Sciences 
A.B. Mathematics 





DONALD L. OAT, )R. 


PETER P. OBERTO 


JAMES D. O'BOYLE 


CATHERINE M. O'BRIEN 


Arts and Sciences 


School of Management 


School of Management 


School of Nursing 


A.B. Sociology 


B.S. Finance 


B.S. Finance 


B.S. Nursing 




lAMES). O'BRIEN 
School of Management 
B.S. Marketing 



ROBERT M. O'BRIEN 
School of Management 
B.S. Finance 




k 4;«^ 



JAMES E. O'CONNELL 
Arts and Sciences 
A.B. English — Political 
Science 




THOMAS O'CONNELL 
School of Management 
B.S. Accounting 




LINDA E. O'DAY 

School of Education 

A.B. Elementary Education 




KENNETH O'DONNELL 
School of Management 
B.S. Marketing 




SHEILA F. O'DONOVAN 
School of Education 
A.B. Special Education 



RICHARD E. O'GRADY 
Arts and Sciences 
B.S. Biology 





WILLIAM D. O'HALLORAN 
Arts and Sciences 
A.B. Political Science — 
Philosophy 




FRANCIS). O'HARA 
School of Education 
A.B. Elementary Education 



•^ Jt- 



"Why? When are you moving into your modular?" 




HENRY W. OHRENBERGER 
Arts and Sciences 
A.B. History— Political 
Science 




THOMAS L. OKNER 
Arts and Sciences 
B.S. Biology 







ROBERT M. O'LEARY 
School of Management 
B.S. Marketing 



RALPH A. OLIVIER! 
School of Management 
B.S. General Business 



MARIAN O'LOUCHLIN 

School of Education 

A.B. Elementary Education 



JAMES ). O'NEIL 
Arts and Sciences 
A.B. Mathematics 







ANNE O'NEILL 

School of Education 

A.B. Elementary Education 



DANIEL ). O'NEILL 
Arts and Sciences 
B.S. Biology 



JAMES E. O'SHEA 
School of Management 
B.S. Finance 



PETER V. O'SULLIVAN 
Arts and Sciences 
A.B. History 




MICHAEL F. O'TOOLE 
School of Management 
B.S. Accounting 



STEPHEN I, OTT 
Arts and Sciences 
A.B. Sociology 




PRISCILLA J. OWEN 
School of Education 
A.B. Special Education 




ELEANOR A. OWENS 
School of Nursing 
B.S. Nursing 




WILLIAM ). OWENS )R. 
School of Management 
B.S. Marketing 





SHEILA A. PACKARD 
School of Nursing 
B.S. Nursing 




"Does it always taste that way?" 




ROBERT PALAC 
Arts and Sciences 
B.S. Biology 



GEORGE J. PALMER 

School of Management 
B.S. Finance 




RICHARD T. PALMER 
School of Management 
B.S. Marketing 




NANCY PALMISCIANO 
Arts and Sciences 
A.B. History 




JOHN P. PANNETON 
Arts and Sciences 
A.B. English 



MARILYN A. PANORA 

School of Education 

A.B. Elementary Education 




ALPHONSE 1. PARADISE 
Arts and Sciences 
A.B. Mathematics 




ARMAND M. PARE, )R. 
Arts and Sciences 
A.B. History 




CHARLOTTE C. PARLA 
Evening College 
A.B. English 




MICHAEL E. PASKOWSKI 
School of Management 
B.S. Finance 





MICHAEL T. PASSANISI 
Arts and Sciences 
A.B. French 



CARMEN M. PASTORE 
School of Management 
B.S. Management 




JOHN L. PATENAUDE 
School of Management 
B.S. Accounting 



JAMES H. PATTERSON 
'Arts and Sciences 
A.B. Economics — 
Political Science 





RUSSELL J. PAVLA 
School of Management 
B.S. Marketing 



DENNIS H. PEASE 
Arts and Sciences 
A.B. Mathematics — 
Economics 




DONALD F. 

PEGNATARO 
Arts and Sciences 
A.B. Psychology 





JOSEPH PELZMAN 
School of Management 
B.S. Economics 



VICTOR A. PEPI 
School of Management 
B.S. Management and 
Computer Sciences 



LINDA PETRINO 

School of Education 

A.B. Elementary Education 







JOSEPH D. PETRUCCELLI 
Arts and Sciences 
A.B. Mathematics 



DONNA PETRULAVAGE 
School of Education 
A.B. English 



LUCILLE A. PHENIX 
School of Education 
A.B. Elementary Education 



MICHELE M. PICARDI 

School of Education 

A.B. Elementary Education 







STEVEN A. PICARDO 


VICTOR). PIEKARSKI 


JUDITH K. PIERCE 


School of Management 


Arts and Sciences 


School of Education 


B.S. Finance 


A.B. History 


A.B. Historv 



PHILLIP F. PIERCEJR. 
Arts and Sciences 
B.S. Biology 





ROBERT W. PIRRO 
School of Education 
A.B. History 





C. Alexander Peloquin 



Cont. 
from 
pg. 299 





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Threepenny Opera 




The Roberts Strike Meeting 




Middle Earth 







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Wih ii 


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^ar. 



Diana Ross & the Supremes 



The First M-Day 




Congratulations! 
You may now begin 
the game! 



The Tarn O'Shanter Lounge 



The Final Bow 






DIANNE M. PISAPIA 
School of Nursing 
B.S. Nursing 



JANE M. PODOLSK! 
School of Education 
A.B. Spanish 



TERESA POLTRINO 
School of Education 
A.B. Spanish 



JOSEPH S. POPOWSKI 
School of Management 
B.S. Accounting 





MICHAEL F. POWER 
School of Education 
A.B. Elementary Education 



JOHN C. POWERS 
School of Management 
B.S. Marketing 



MARGARET E. POWERS 

School of Nursing 
B.S. Nursing 



DOMINICK P. PREZIOSI 
Arts and Sciences 
A.B. History 





lOHN ). PURCELL 
Arts and Sciences 
B.S. Biology— Psychology 




MICHAEL M. PURR, JR. 
Arts and Sciences 
A.B. Mathematics 







\ 



LINDA E. PUZIN 
School of Nursing 
B.S. Nursing 



JOHN QUALTERS 
School of Education 
A.B. Speech 



EDWARD J. QUINN 
School of Education 
A.B. Elementary Education 



JANE M. RADOCHIA 

School of Education 

A.B, Elementary Education 




THOMAS A. RACAN 
School of Management 
B.S. Management and 
Computer Sciences 




WILLIAM B. REDFERN 
School of Management 
B.S. Marketing 




I \ 



PAUL M. RATTIGAN 
School of Management 
B.S. Marketing 



STEPHEN V. REDGATE 
Arts and Sciences 
A.B. English 




DONNA RAY 
School of Education 
A.B. Chemistry 




SYLVIA A. REDICK 
School of Nursing 
B.S. Nursing 




PHILIP). RAYMONDO 
Arts and Sciences 
B.S. Physics 




FRANCIS). REDMOND 
Evening College 
A.B. Social Studies 




ELIZABETH A. REGAN 

School of Education 

A.B. Elementary Education 



)OSEPH A. REIDY 
School of Education 
A.B. Speech 




KATHLEEN M. REILLY 
School of Education 
A.B. Mathematics 




WILLIAM T. REILLY 
School of Management 
B.S. Accounting 



SHARON A. RENES 
School of Education 
A.B, Elementary Education 



BRADLEY). REYNOLDS 
School of Managment 
B.S. Economics 






JOSEPH C. REZUKE 
School of Managment 
B.S. Accounting 



RENEE ). RIEMAN 

School of Education 

A.B. Elementary Education 





DAVID C. RIES 
Arts and Sciences 
A.B. Political Science 



JAMES D. RIORDAN 
School of Managment 
B.S. Marketing 




BARBARA A. RIVERS 
School of Nursing 
B.S. Nursing 



ROBERT F. ROACH 
Arts and Sciences 
A.B. Mathematics 




THOMAS I. ROAN 
Arts and Sciences 
A.B. Economics 




ROBERT E. ROBY 
Arts and Sciences 
B.S. Biology — Physics 




DONALD P. ROCHE 
School of Management 
B.S. Finance 




JEANNE R. ROCHE 
School of Nursing 
B.S. Nursing 





FRANK A. ROCKETT 
Arts and Sciences 
B.S. Biology 



CAROL A. RODDY 

School of Education 

A.B. Elementary Education 




JOHN F. ROGERS 
School of Management 
B.S. Management 



PAULA M. RONCARY 
School of Nursing 
B.S. Nursing 




PHILIP J. ROONEY 
School of Management 
B.S. Accounting 



MARTIN J. ROPER 
School of Management 
B.S. Accounting 





GERALD D. ROTELLA 
Arts and Sciences 
A.B. History 



SALLY A. RUSCITO 
School of Education 
A.B. History 



JOHN M. ROWAN 
Arts and Sciences 
B.S. Biology 




EUGENE ROSA 
Arts and Sciences 
B.S. Geology 



STEVEN A. RUSCONI 
School of Management 
B.S. Economics 



STEPHEN F. ROWE 
Arts and Sciences 
B.S. Biology 



ANGELO M. RUSSO 
School of Management 
B.S. Marketing 



STEPHEN ROSSETTI 
School of Education 
A.B. Elementary Education 




JOSEPH E. RULL 

School of Education 

A.B. Elementary Education 




BARRY W. RYAN 
School of Management 
B.S. Management 




CHRISTINE E. RYAN 
School of Education 
A.B. Elementary Education 




EDWARD L. RYAN 
School of Management 
B.S. Accounting 




JAMES V. SABBIA 
School of Education 
A.B. English 




BARBARA F. SACER 
School of Nursing 
B.S. Nursing 




TIMOTHY P. SADLER 
School of Management 
B.S. Accounting 




GERARD A. ST. AMAND 
Arts and Sciences 
A.B. Mathematics — 
Economics 




"Good God! I had an idea. I actually had an idea! My 
very own!" 



4^ 




JEANNE E, ST. CERMAINE 
School of Nursing 
B.S. Nursing 





GREGORY G. ST. )OHN 
Arts and Sciences 
A.B. Modern Languages 





JOHN A. SAMMARCO 
Arts and Sciences 
A.B. Mathematics 



GLENN I. SANISLO 
School of Education 
A.B. English 



MARK H. ST. ONGE 
School of Management 
B.S. Management 



DOROTHY SALVATO 

School of Education 

A.B. Elementary Education 





MICHAEL P. SANIUK 
Arts and Sciences 
B.S. Chemistry 



LINDA L. SANTORO 
School of Education 
A.B. History 





ANDREA SANTOSUOSSO 
School of Education 
A.B. Mathematics 



ANN M. SARDINI 

School of Education 

A.B. Elementary Education 




ROBERT V. SARTINI 
School of Management 
B.S. Marketing 



EDWARD F. SAUNDERS, JR. 
Arts and Sciences 
A.B. Sociology 




PETER R. SAUNDERS 
Arts and Sciences 
A.B. Classics 



MARY A. SAVA 
School of Education 
A.B. Special Education 





JEAN SAVIGNANO 
School of Nursing 
B.S. Nursing 



ORRIE SCARMINACH 
School of Management 
B.S. Marketing 






NEAL L. SCHILLER 
Arts and Sciences 
B.S. Biology 



LINDA SCHULMAN 
School of Education 
A.B. Elementary Education 



RICHARD T. SCOTT 
Arts and Sciences 
A.B. Psychology — 
Philosophy 



JOHN T. SCHULLANE 

Arts and Sciences 

A.B. Sociology — Philosophy 





E. GREGORY SEES 
School of Management 
B.S. Accounting 



JUDITH SEMER 
Arts and Sciences' 
A.B. Mathematics 



RICHARD J. SERON 
Arts and Sciences 
A.B. History 



JOSEPH T. SHANNON, JR. 
Arts and Sciences 
A.B. Political Science 



362 




KATHLEEN M. SHEA 
School of Nursing 
B.S. Nursing 




THOMAS E. SHEA 
School of Management 
B.S. Accounting 



DOUGLAS M. SHELL 
School of Management 
B.S. Management and 
Computer Science 




MICHAEL P. SHEA 
Arts and Sciences 
A.B. English 





CAROL SHEEHAN 

School of Education 

A.B. Elementary Education 



CHRISTINE SHEPARD 
School of Education 
A.B. Special Education 




"Dear Grace, I put this note in a cracker because 
didn't know how else to get in touch with you . . ." 




THOMAS C. SHIPPEY 
School of Management 
B.S. Economics 



DONN G. SICKOREZ 
Arts and Sciences 
A.B. English 





FRANCIS R. SILVESTRI 
Arts and Sciences 
A.B. History 



lOHN SILVIA 
Arts and Sciences 
A.B. Political Science 



DONALD SKEHAN 
School of Education 
A.B. Spanish 



STEPHEN SKOPELITES 

School of Education 

A.B. Elementary Education 





GEORGE F. SLINEY 
School of Management 
B.S. Marketing 



ROBERT E. SLINEY, JR. 
School of Management 
B.S. Accounting 



DENIS). SMITH 
School of Education 
A. B. Mathematics 



PATRICIA F. SMITH 
School of Education 
A.B. Mathematics 





PATRICIA M. SMITH 
School of Education 
A.B. German 



RICHARD E. SOUSA 
School of Management 
B.S. Economics 



STEPHEN P. SPENLINHAUER 
School of Management 
B.S. Marketing 



STEPHEN ). SPERANDIO 
School of Management 
B.S. Management and 
Computer Sciences 





LAWRENCE C. SPEZZANO 
Evening College 
B.S. Management 



ANNE SPILLANE 
School of Education 
A.B. Special Education 



ROBERT P. SPRING 
A.B. Political Science 




GEORGE M. STANLEY 
School of Education 
A. B. English 





lANICE A. STASIOWSKI 
School of Nursing 
B.S. Nursing 



JAMES T. STEBBINS 
Arts and Sciences 
A.B. English 



THOMAS N. STEPKA 
Arts and Sciences 
A.B. Mathematics — 
Economics 



GARY F. STIGLMEIER 
School of Management 
B.S. Accounting 




CHRISTINE STONE 
School of Education 
A.B. French 




^■^ 



FRANCES H. STRUZZIERY 
School of Nursing 
B.S. Nursing 




EDWARD A. STUDZINSKI 
Arts and Sciences 
A.B. History 



EILEEN M. SULLIVAN 
School of Education 
A.B. English 





HENRY I. SULLIVAN 
Arts and Sciences 
A.B. English 



JOHN R.SULLIVAN 
School of Management 
B.S. Accounting 




KATHLEEN SULLIVAN 
Arts and Sciences 
A.B. Philosophy 




LINDA A. SWEENEY 
School of Education 
A.B. History 



ROBERT J. SULLIVAN 
Arts and Sciences 
A.B. English 



CARL J.SYGIEL 
School of Management 
B.S. Marketing 



EDWARD A. SUPPLE III 
School of Management 
B.S. Marketing 



WILLIAM TENBRUNSEL 
Arts and Sciences 
A.B. English 




CHARLES SURDYKA 
School of Education 
A.B. Mathematics 




PAMELA A. TERRERI 
School of Nursing 
B.S. Nursing 




SHEILA M. TERRY 
School of Education 
A.B. French 



ROBERT M. THACKER 
Arts and Sciences 
A.B. Political Science 



EDWARD J. THOMPSON 
School of Education 
A.B. French 






JOHN A. THOMS 
School of Management 
B.S. Finance 



THELMA E. THORN 
School of Nursing 
B.S. Nursing 



SHEILA A. TOBIN 
School of Education 
A.B. History 






NEILM. TOCCI 
School of Management 
B.S. Marketing 



WILLIAM M. TOMBARI 

Arts and Sciences 

B.S. Biology — Mathematics 



PAMELA |. TORREY 
School of Education 
A.B. English 





ANTHONY J. TORRISI 
Arts and Sciences 
A.B. Political Science 



ROBERT M. TOSTI 
Arts and Sciences 
A.B. Psychology 



THOMAS A. TOTINO 
School of Management 
B.S. Accounting 



MICHAEL W. TRAINOR 
School of Management 
B.S. Accounting 




"We've come for the beer.' 





THEODORE C. TRACY 
School of Management 
B.S. Marketing 



EDMOND R. TREMBLAY 
Arts and Sciences 
A.B. Mathematics 



PAUL L. TREMBLAY 

Arts and Sciences 

A.B. Modern Languages 



RICHARD G.TRIPP 

Arts and Sciences 
B.S. Biology 






KATHLEEN ). TULLY 
Evening College 
A.B. Social Science 



MEREDITH TURNER 
School of Education 
A.B. Special Education 



ALLAN ). URBANIC 
Art and Sciences 
A.B. Russian 



JAMES M. VADEN 
School of Management 
B.S. Accounting 





JANET A. VAICH 

School of Education 

A.B. Elementary Education 



JUDITH A. VAICH 

School of Education 

A.B. Elementary Education 



i70 






JOSEPH A. VALIQUETTEJR. 
Arts and Sciences 
A.B. History 



BROTHER CHRISTOPHER 

VALLEY 
Arts and Sciences 
A.B. Sociology 





NICHOLAS VALORIE 
School of Management 
B.S. Finance 



CAMIEL VANDER MAELEN 

Arts and Sciences 

B.S. Biology — Psychology 






JANET M. VEASEY 
School of Education 
A.B. Special Education 



CLAIRE VERRIER 
School of Education 
A.B. Special Education 



VIRGINIA VETRI 

Arts and Sciences 

A.B. Romance Languages 



PETER E. VITINS 
School of Management 
B.S. Management and 
Computer Sciences 





KEVIN C. VOLLMAR 
School of Management 
B.S. Marketing 




GEORGE E. VON TRAPP 
Arts and Sciences 
A.B. Economics 




FRED J. VOSS 
Arts and Sciences 
A.B. Mathematics 




STEPHEN WAKEFIELD 
School of Education 
A.B. German 




RICHARD A, WALEGA 
Arts and Sciences 
A.B. Political Science 




DAVID G. WALSH 
School of Management 
B.S. Accounting 



FRANK L. WALSH JR. 
School of Management 
B.S. Marketing 




HELEN F. WALSH 

School of Education 

A.B. Elementary Education 





kdlJ 



MARY M. WALSH 

School of Education 

A.B. Elementary Education 



GEOFFREY J. WARD 

School of Management 
B.S. Accounting 



DONALD E. WEBER 
School of Management 
B.S. Marketing 




GEORGE J. WEINER 
Arts and Sciences 
A.B. Economics — Political 
Science 




JOHN D. WELSH 
Arts and Sciences 
B.S. Biology 



CAYLE WETMORE 

School of Education 

A.B. Elementary Education 




CHRISTOPHER WHALEN 
School of Education 
A.B. Mathematics 




GERTRUDE WHELAN 

School of Education 

A.B. Elementary Education 




DENNIS R. WHITE 
School of Education 
A.B. English 



373 




ELEANOR F. WHITE 
Evening College 
A.B. Sociology 



KENNETH j. WHITE 
Arts and Sciences 
B.S. Geology 



{ 


^t]t '^'^^H 




... .J 



DENNIS M. WILCOX 
School of Management 
B.S. Marketing 




DAWN ). WILLIAMS 
School of Nursing 
B.S. Nursing 



JOHN L. WILSON 
School of Management 
B.S. Marketing 



MARY C. WINSLOW 
School of Education 
A.B. Elementary Education 




PETER T. WOLOSCHUK 
Arts and Sciences 
A.B. History 



CHERYL L. WOOD 
School of Nursing 
B.S. Nursing 




DANIEL A. WREN 
Arts and Sciences 
A.B. Economics — History 



BRIAN E. YATES 
Arts and Sciences 
A.B. English 




JOANNE YOUNG 

School of Education 

A.B. Elementary Education 




STANLEY S. YUTKINS 
School of Management 
B.S. Management and 
Computer Sciences 




ROBERT L. ZAILCKAS 

School of Management 
B.S. Finance 





CRAIG J. ZICARI 
Arts and Sciences 
A.B. Economics 



ANTHONY V. ZINNA 
School of Management 
B.S. Accounting 



DONALD F. ZAK 
School of Management 
B.S. Finance 



JUDITH ZALEWSKI 
Arts and Sciences 
A.B. Mathematics 



Yearbook Advertising 

This is authorization to insert om adverti- in ihe 19 

to be published by. 



School and Town 



Size of the adv* 



r\\\ In 1)0. 



Copy and hiyout to Ik- furnished by. 

suihiJ)K> ad. 



l>il''('. fof wllicll 



. ()lh« 



Received $ 
Date -. 



Signed 



Advertising Solicitor 



Si^nt'tl 




I 



Ads and Patrons 



Patrons 



The publication of the preceding pages was due in large measure 
to our patrons. In times of "tight money," every little bit helps an 
organization which is unsubsidized by the University and operated on 
a non-profit basis. Five per cent of the parents of undergraduates 
responded generously to our plea for financial assistance. While we 
had hoped for and even anticipated greater support, these people 
have helped keep the Yearbook on a sound financial bottom and we 
could not have done it without them. We would like all who read 
this book to know what a great assistance these people and our 
advertisers have been to us. My heartfelt gratitude and that of the 
entire staff of the 1971 Sub Turri goes out to them. 

CHARLES E. SCHMIDT 
Business Manager 



MR. AND MRS. JOSEPH E. AHERN 

MR. AND MRS. PAUL J. ALOI 

DR. AND MRS. LEONARD E. AMBORSKI 

DR. AND MRS. FREDERICK R. AMORE 

MR. AND MRS. STEPHEN D. AMOROSO 

MR. AND MRS. ALBERT ANDIORIO 

MR. AND MRS. S. J. ANDRIANl 

MR. AND MRS. CARL ANSTETT 

MR. AND MRS. LOUIS A. ARCARESE 

MR. ROBERT DOUGLAS ARDIZZONI 

MRS. ROLANDE D. AUBUCHON 

MR. AND MRS. JOHN J. BACHALIS 

MR. LIONEL BACHAND 

MR. AND MRS. R. W. BAECHTOLD 

MRS. HOWARD BARNABY 

MR. AND MRS. ALFRED BARRY 

MR. AND MRS. EDMUND P. BARTNICK 

MR. AND MRS. EMIL BARTOSEK 

MRS. ISABELL BARTOSIAK 



MR. AND MRS. SANTE D. BASSANELLI 

MRS. ANN BEGROWICZ 

MR. AND MRS. EMMETT BELL 

DR. AND MRS. JOHN M. BELL 

MR. AND MRS. LOUIS E. BENDER 

MR. AND MRS. EDMUND T. BERCURY 

MR. AND MRS. WM. R. BERGFIELD 

MR. AND MRS. HOWARD BERNSTEIN 

MR. AND MRS. EDWARD L. BEYER, SR. 

MR. AND MRS. E. J. BIANCHI 

MR. AND MRS. C. BIAZZO 

MR. AND MRS. CHARLES J. BIRARELLI 

MR. AND MRS. JOHN J. BISCONE 

MR. AND MRS. BRANDON BLADES 

MR. AND MRS. ARTHUR L. BLAISDELL 

MR. AND MRS. R. H. BLANK 

MR. JAMES J. BLISS 

MR. AND MRS. HARRY BLOTNER 

MR. WILLIAM F. BOLGER 



MR. ALFRED E. BOLLENGIER 

MR. PARTICKJ.BOLLETTIERI 

MR. AND MRS. LOUl F. BONACCORSI 

MR. J. F. BONISTALLI 

MR. WARREN J. BOO 

MR. AND MRS. WILLIAM BOWES 

MR. AND MRS. THOMAS F. BOYD 

DR. AND MRS. JOHN M. BRADY 

JOHN J. AND CATHERINE M. BRENNAN 

MR. AND MRS. JOHN J. BROWN 

MR. AND MRS. PETER CAMPBELL BROWN 

DR. AND MRS. W. J. BUGGY 

MRS. ANN E. BURKE 

MR. AND MRS. EDWIN F. BUTTERS 

MR. AND MRS. EDWARD T. BYRNE 

MR. FRANCIS M. BYRNES 

THE CAGNEYS 

MR. AND MRS. JOHN T. CAHILL 

THE JOSEPH CALANDRELLI FAMILY 

MR. AND MRS. JOSEPH CALDERA 

MR. AND MRS. JAMES A. CANALI 

DR. AND MRS. C. P. CANCELLIERI 

MR. AND MRS. LOUIS J. CAPANO 

MR. AND MRS. R. J. CAPOBIANCO 

MR. AND MRS. WILLIAM J. CAREY 

MR. AND MRS. JOHN A. CARINO 

MR. AND MRS. NICHOLAS J. CARUSO 

MR. AND MRS. F. W. CASIOPPO, SR. 

MR. AND MRS. ALDO CASTIGLIONI 

MRS. ALFRED J. CATENACCI 

MR. JOSEPH A. CAULFIELD, JR. 

MR. AND MRS. JAMES J. CENTORINO 

MR. AND MRS. JAMES J. CHAP 

DR. AND MRS. NICHOLAS J. CHRIST 

MR. JOHN CICERO 



MR. AND MRS. A. F. CIPOLLA 

MRS. MARY CIUFFREDA 

MR. AND MRS. MARTIN CLANCY 

MR. THOMAS A. CLEMENTE 

MR. AND MRS. CHARLES CLINTON 

MR. AND MRS. DOMINIC COLANERI 

MR. RALPH F. COLOMBINO 

MR. AND MRS. JOHN G. CONNOLLY 

DR. AND MRS. JOSEPH B. CONNOLLY 

MR. ROBERTJ.COONEY 

MR. AND MRS. JOHN J. CORRIGAN 

MR. AND MRS. JOHN J. COSTELLO 

MR. EDWARD J. COSTIGAN 

MR. AND MRS. RICHARD H. COTE 

MR. AND MRS. LOUIS J. COVINO 

MR. AND MRS. VINCENT CRAIG 

MR. JOSEPH CROWE 

MR. AND MRS. JOHN C. CULLEN 

MR. AND MRS. JAMES R. CUMMINGS 

MR. AND MRS. WALLACE CUPP 

MR. AND MRS. J. STANLEY CURRAN 

MR. JOHN V. CURRY 

MR. FRANCIS H. CURTIN 

DR. AND MRS. FRANCIS A. D'AMBROSIO 

MR. JOSEPH H. DAOUST 

MR. AND MRS. DANIEL P. D'AURIA 

MR. WILLIAM DAVIES 

MRS. HAROLD F. DE COURCY 

MR. AND MRS. MARIO DE FELIPPO 

MR. AND MRS. JOSEPH DE FRANCIS 

MR. AND MRS. JOSEPH F. DELANEY 

MR. ROBERT J. DELERY 

MRS. JOHN B. DE LONG 

DR. AND MRS. ADELARD A. DEMERS 

MR. ROMULUS L. DE NICOLA 



MR. ROBERT G. DENKEWALTER 

MR. AND MRS. JOSEPH A. Dl CARLO 

DR. AND MRS. JOHN Dl FRANCESCO 

MR. AND MRS. VINCENT Dl GIOVANNI 

DR. VICTOR Dl LEO 
MRS. JAMES DILLON 

MR. AND MRS. STANLEY L Dl STEFANO 

MR. AND MRS. J. J. DONAHUE, JR. 

MR. AND MRS. EDV/ARD J. DONNELLY 

DR. STEPHEN M. DONOHUE 

MR. AND MRS. S. ARNOLD DONOVAN 

MR. JOHN S. DOOLEY 

MR. AND MRS. EGBERT K. DOYLE 

MR. AND MRS. FRANK J. DOYLE 

MR. AND MRS. JOHN DUARTE 

MR. AND MRS. F. W. DUCCA 

MR. AND MRS. THOMAS G. DUNN 

MR. AND MRS. WILLIAM E. DUNN 

MR. AND MRS. JAMES F. DV\/YER 

MR. AND MRS. CHARLES V. EARLEY 

MR. AND MRS. ROGER EGAN 

MR. AND MRS. CARL J. EISERT 

MR. AND MRS. PHILIP T. ELIAS 

MR. AND MRS. E. B. ELLIOTT, JR. 

MR. CHARLES A. ELLISON 

MR. AND MRS. GUY D. FALCIONE 

DR. AND MRS. D. FARION 

MR. AND MRS. FRANK J. FEE, JR. 

MR. AND MRS. DANIEL T. FELIX 

MR. THEODORE F. FERRANT 

MR. AND MRS. GEORGE J. FESKOE 

MR. AND MRS. ALBERT T. FIORE, '39 

THE ED FLAHERTY FAMILY 

MR. AND MRS. JOHN FLANNIGAN 

MR. AND MRS. DONALD J. FLEMING 



DR. AND MRS. NORMAN L. FORTIER 

MR. AND MRS. OLIVER F. FREDERICKS 

MR. AND MRS. EUGENE GAGEN 

MR. AND MRS. PRESTON S. GARDINER 

MRS. FRANCIS J. GALLAGHER 

MR. AND MRS. R. E. GALLAGHER 

MR. AND MRS. ARTHUR L GAMBONE 

MR. AND MRS. BERNARD H. GAREAU, SR. 

MR. PETER E. GENOVESE, SR. 

MR. AND MRS. VINCENT GENTILE 

MR. AND MRS. ANTHONY E. GERACI 

MR. LAURENCE S. GIFFORD 

MR. AND MRS. NICHOLAS H. GIULIANO 

MR. AND MRS. JAMES J. GLENNON 

DR. AND MRS. JAMES B. GOYNE 

MR. AND MRS. JOSEPH P. GRANDFIELD 

MR. JOHN GRIMA 

DR. J.B. GRINDON 

MR. ROBERT GRIP 

MR. AND MRS. GEORGE W. GUENTHER 

MR. AND MRS. ROBERT P. HANEHAN 

MR. AND MRS. GEORGE E. HANLEY 

MR. AND MRS. ALBERT F. HARRINGTON 

MR. EDWARD J. HART 

DR. AND MRS. E. S. HERNANDEZ 

MR. AND MRS. WILLIAM F. HICKEY 

MR. AND MRS. JAMES F. HOLDEN 

MR. AND MRS. DANIEL G. HOLLAND 

MR. MARTIN HOPWOOD 

MR. J.ALFREDHOULE, JR. 

MR. AND MRS. EDWARD F. HURLEY 

MR. AND MRS. ERNEST P. IMRI 

MR. EDWARD J. JANTZEN 

DR. AND MRS. O. KENNETH JOHNSON 

MR. AND MRS. TAFFY JOWDY 



MR. AND MRS. M. J. KEARNEY 

MRS. JOHN T. KERRIGAN 

MR. AND MRS. T. KILCULLEN 

MR. AND MRS. PAUL J. KINCHLA 

MR. AND MRS. LEROY H. KINNIER 

MR. AND MRS. JAMES P. KIRN 

DR. AND MRS. GUY R. KLINE 

MR. AND MRS. JOHN KOBER 

MR. AND MRS. STEPHEN E. KORTA 

MR. AND MRS. JOHN L. KOUSHOURIS 

MR. AND MRS. LEO J. KRANT 

MR. THOMAS S. KRUMMENACHER 

MR. AND MRS. JOSEPH KWASNIK 

DR. AND MRS. FREDERICK C. LA BREQUE 

MR. JAMES F. LANIGAN '71 

PROF. AND MRS. L LAPIDUS 

THE LA PORTE FOUNDRY COMPANY 

MR. AND MRS. DONALD LA SALA 

MR. AND MRS. A. LEAVEY, SR. 

MR. ROBERT H. LEHMAN 

MRS. CHARLES F. LEONARD 

MR. MILTON L. LEVY 

DR. AND MRS. JOHN LINGOS 

MR. AND MRS. HENRY LUTHIN 

MR. AND MRS. GEORGE A. LYONS, '39 

MR. JAMES W. LYONS 

MR. JOHN M. LYONS 

MR. AND MRS. IGNATIUS LUKOSIUS 

MRS. MARYJ.MACKIN 

MR. AND MRS. KENNETH G. MACLEISH 

MR. AND MRS. GEORGE W. MADDEN 

MR. AND MRS. JOHN P. MADDEN 

MR. AND MRS. FRANCIS X. MAGUIRE 

MR. WALTER MAHONEY 

MR. AND MRS. JOSEPH C. MAIELLANO 



MR. AND MRS. ARTHUR H. MALLON 

MR. AND MRS. EDWARD W. MALONEY 

MR. AND MRS. JAMES W. MARLEY 

MR. AND MRS. EDWARD J. MARTIN 

COL. JOHN T. MARTIN 

MR. WILLIAM J. MARTIN, JR. 

MR. AND MRS. NICHOLAS L. MARTONE 

MRS. SUE MASHIA 

MR. AND MRS. CHARLES A. MASSA 

DR. JOSEPH T. MATARAZZO 

MR. JOHN A. LA MATTINA 

MRS. DONALD L MC ARDLE 

DR. AND MRS. EUGENE F. MC AULIFFE 

MR. JOHN E. MC CANN 

MR. AND MRS. JOHN J. MC CARTHY 

MRS. F. H. MC CONVILLE 

MR. AND MRS. WILLIAM J. MC DONALD 

MR. AND MRS. JOSEPH F. MC ELENEY 

MRS. WILLIAM F. MC ENROE 

DR. JOHN J. MC GILLICUDDY 

MR. AND MRS. ARTHUR F. MC GINN, JR. 

MR. AND MRS. AUSTEN B. MC GREGOR 

MR. AND MRS. FRANCIS J. MC KEON, JR. 

MRS. LUCIENNE METHOT 

MR. CHARLES L MEYER 

MR. AND MRS. FRANK MICHAELS 

MR. JOHN N. MIGLIACCIO 

DR. AND MRS. CHARLES O. MILLER 

MR. RICHARD J. MILLER 

DR. AND MRS. THOMAS J. MOORE 

MRS. MABEL C. MORRAN 

MR. AND MRS. JAMES B. MORRIS 

MR. AND MRS. JOSEPH MOSS 

MR. EDWINJ.MULHERN 

MR. AND MRS. JAMES J. MURPHY 



MRS. LOUIS R. MURPHY 

MR. AND MRS. THOMAS E. MURRAY II 

MR. AND MRS. THOMAS G. MURRAY 

MR. AND MRS. WILLIAM J. MURRAY 

DR. AND MRS. GEORGE F. MARTELON 

MR. AND MRS. ALEXANDER NACLERIO 

MRS. JAMESJ.NALLY 

MR. THOMAS M. NARY 

MR. THOMASA. NEUFELD 

MR. EDWARD C. NEVINS 

MR. AND MRS. JOSEPH G. NEWMAN, JR. 

MR. AND MRS. JAMES F. NICK, JR. 

MR. E. T. NOLAN 

MR. THOMAS B. NOONAN 

MRS. JAMES G. J. O'BRIEN AND FAMILY 

MR. AND MRS. JOHN G. O'BRIEN 

MR. AND MRS. HAROLD J. O'CONNELL 

MR. AND MRS. JAMES J. O'DAY 

MR. AND MRS. LUKE OKNER 

MR. AND MRS. MICHAEL J. O'LEARY 

MRS. ALBERT F. O'NEIL 

CONGRESSMAN AND MRS. THOMAS P. O'NEILL, JR. 

MR. AND MRS. MAURICE O'REILLY 

MR. AND MRS. PETER V. O'SULLIVAN 

MR. AND MRS. ALFRED M. PACICCO 

MR. AND MRS. PAUL F. PAQUEREAU 

MR. AND MRS. JOHN J. PASSANISI 

MR. AND MRS. H. PEASE 

MR. AND MRS. DONALD PEGNATARO 

MR. AND MRS. ROBERT A. PHENIX 

REP. AND MRS. ANGELO PICUCCI 

MR. RICHARD J. PIELLISCH 

MR. AND MRS. CHARLES A. PIRRO 

MR. AND MRS. MATTHEW A. PISAPIA 

MR. AND MRS. EDWARD PLASSE 



MRS. MILDRED ANN POLITO 

MR. AND MRS. CHARLES POOLE 

THE PURCELL FAMILY 

MR. AND MRS. ALBERT G. PUZIN 

MR. AND MRS. ROBERT A. QUAGLIERI 

MR. HAROLD L. QUALTERS, '28 

MR. JAMESJ.QUINN 

MR. AND MRS. RAYMOND RADZIVILA 

MR. AND MRS. ANTONIO P. RAPOZA 

MR. GEORGE E. RAY 

MR. AND MRS. BERNARD RAYMONDO 

MR. AND MRS. JOHN R. REAP 

MR. AND MRS. HOWARD V. REDGATE 

MR. AND MRS. JOSEPH REIDY 

MR. AND MRS. WILLIAM P. REILLY 

MR. AND MRS. JOHN J. RIBEIRO 

MR. PAUL F. RICHARDSON 

DR. AND MRS. FRANK RIEMAN 

MR. AND MRS. STEPHEN F. ROACH 

MR. AND MRS. WILLIAM ROCHE 

MR. AND MRS. ALBERT J. ROHNER 

MR. EDWARD A. ROSENTHAL 

DR. AND MRS. PAUL V. ROUSE 

MR. AND MRS. FRANK RUBINO 

MR. AND MRS. PAUL R. RYAN 

MR. AND MRS. ROGER S. RYAN 

MR. DAVID A. SALETT 

THE SANDLER FAMILY 

MR. AND MRS. SAMUEL S. SANTORO 

MR. AND MRS. ANTHONY SARDINI 

MR. THOMAS E. SARTINI 

DR. JOHN W. SAUNDERS, JR. 

MR. AND MRS. ANTHONY F. SAVA 

MISS JACQUELINE SCANNELL 

MR. TONY SCHIANO 



MR. AND MRS. HARLAN M. SCHLESINGER 

MR. AND MRS. DONALD J. SCHMIDT, SR. 

MR. AND MRS. WILLIAM E. SCHMIDT 

MR. AND MRS. NICHOLAS J. SCOBBO 

MR. AND MRS. STANLEY J. SERON 

MR. AND MRS. MILTON S. SHAPIRO 

MR. JOHN H. SHEA 

MR. JOHN J.SHEEHAN 

MR. AND MRS. GEORGE F. SHERBONDY 

MR. AND MRS. J. SHERMAN 

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MR. AND MRS. M. SICKOREZ 

MR. AND MRS. FRANK R. SILVESTRI 

MR. AND MRS. H. G. SIMON AND FAMILY 

MR. JOSEPH SPERT 

MR. AND MRS. THOMAS J. SPRING 

MR. AND MRS. ANTHONY STASKO 

MR. AND MRS. EDWARD C. STEARNS 

MR. MARTIN G. STEIN 

MR. AND MRS. WILLIAM E. STEMPSEY 

MR. AND MRS. NICHOLAS J. STEPKA 

MR. FREDRIC J. STINSON 

MR. AND MRS. GERARD ST. LAURENT 

MRS. HARRY H. STRAUS, JR. 

MR. AND MRS. JOHN F. SULLIVAN 

MRS. PATRICK J. SULLIVAN 

DR. AND MRS. RICHARD L. SULLIVAN 

MR. ROBERT F. SULLIVAN, '44 

MR. AND MRS. EDWARD A. SUPPLE 

MR. AND MRS. ARTHUR S. TAYLOR 

DR. AND MRS. D. JOSEPH TERRERI 

MR. AND MRS. ERNEST THOMAS 

MR. AND MRS. RICHARD J. THOMS 

MR. AND MRS. JAMES A. TIRRELL, JR. 

MR. AND MRS. ALFRED J. TOMBARI 



MR. JOHN P. TONZI 

MR. AND MRS. CLARENCE E. TORREY 

MR. AND MRS. SEBASTIAN A. TORRISI 

MR. AND MRS. EDWARD R. TOZZI 

MRS. JOSEPH F. TRAINOR 

MRS. ALBERT TRAVAGLINI AND FAMILY 

MR. AND MRS. RENE J. TREMBLAY, JR. 

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MR. AND MRS. MICHAEL VETRI 

MR. AND MRS. JOHN F. WALSH 

MR. AND MRS. JOHN M. WALSH 

MR. PHILIP A. WALSH 

MR. AND MRS. JOSEPH WAPPEL 

MR. AND MRS. PIERRE RAYMOND WARNY 

MR. AND MRS. SILAS M. WASS 

MR. AND MRS. ROBERT WATERS 

MR. AND MRS. EDWARD B. WEEDON, JR. 

THE WEINER FAMILY 

MRS. MARION M. WELBY 

MR. AND MRS. RICHARD J. WELSH 

MR. AND MRS. THOMAS C. WESTROPP 

MRS. PATRICK J. WHELAN 

DR. AND MRS. DONALD J. WHITE 

MR. AND MRS. JOSEPH J. WHITE 

MR. AND MRS. WARREN F. WHITE 

MR. AND MRS. MICHAEL WILENTA AND FAMILY 

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MRS. JOHN P. WOODS 

MR. AND MRS. ROBERT J. WYNNE 

MR. AND MRS. A. SELIG YANES 

MRS. NICHOLAS R. ZACCARO 

MR. GERARD J. ZELLER 

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■1 



PINO'S PIZZA 

1^^ SmARINES'UKE OUT ORDERS^ BS6-6468 









Pino's 




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1920-A Beacon St. 




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71- 


■72 HOCKEY 


Nov. 


24, 


25,26 


Holiday Tournament 


Nov. 


30 




Providence* 


Dec. 


3 




Princeton 


Dec. 


7 




Brown 


Dec. 


II 




Northeastern* 


Dec. 


14 




Harvard 


Dec. 


18 




Notre Dame* 


Dec. 


20,21 


E.C.A.C. Holiday 








Tournament* 


Dec. 


28 




Boston State 


Dec. 


30 




Dalhousie of Halifax 


Jan. 


4 




Providence 


Jan. 


7 




U.N.H. 


Jan. 


14 




B.U.* 


Jan. 


22 




Cornell* 


Jan. 


28 




St. Louis 


Feb. 


1 




Vale* 


Feb. 


4 




Colgate 


Feb. 


7 




Beanpot Opener 


Feb. 


10 




Dartmouth 


Feb. 


14 




Beanpot Final 


Feb. 


18 




Clarkson* 


Feb. 


19 




St. Lawrence* 


Feb. 


23 




B.U. 


Feb. 


25 




Army 


Feb. 


29 




Bowdoin* 


March 4 




U. Penn* E.C.A.C. 






Come 


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the Best Pizza in Town 



1971 FOOTBALL 


Sept. 


II 


W. Virginia* 


Sept. 


18 


Tennple* 


Sept. 


25 


Navy 


Oct. 


2 


Richmond* 


Oct. 


9 


Villanova 


Oct. 


16 


Texas Tech* 


Oct. 


23 


Pittsburgh 


Oct. 


30 


— Open — 


Nov. 


6 


Syracuse* 


Nov. 


20 


U. Mass 


Nov. 


27 


Holy Cross* 
*Away 




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Ipc 



TAYLOR PUBLISHING COMPANY 

PAUL J. DELANEY • UNIVERSITY AND COLLEGE CONSULTANT • PHONE 226-0600 
BOX 1 030 • NORTH AHLEBORO, MASSACHUSETTS 




WILLIAM H. SULLIVAN. JR, '37 
President 



JOHN J. GRIFFIN, '35 

Vice President 



JOSEPH F. TOWER, JR, '53 

Treasurer 



ROBERT F. LARKIN, '51 

Sales Representative 



JOHN F. SULLIVAN, 59 
Sales Representative 



A 




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brochures • reports • letters • 

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Compliments of: 

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CHARLES F. MURPHY, 1955 
JOHN E. MOYLAN, 1951 


Best Wishes to 

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From 

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39] 



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Compliments of 
a Friend 



BEST WISHES FROM 

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BOSTON COLLEGE 



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BEST WISHES 
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AND B9QrWia4^ 



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The Closest Hotel to Boston College 



CHESTNUT HILL HOTEL 

— Formerly the Charterhouse Hotel — 



160 Boylston Street (Route 9) 
Newton, Massachusetts 

Telephone 527-9000 



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•o. 


Compliments of: 
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Best Wishes to the Class of 1971 

from 
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Mcelroy commons • boston college 



THE BOOKSTORE IS A TRUE ACADEMIC BRANCH OF ANY UNIVERSITY 

Textbooks • Required and Recommended 

Paperbacks From All Publishers • Reference Books 

Sportswear • Jewelry • Stationery • Glassware 

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Classical and Popular Records 

GIFT ITEMS FOR ALUMNI AND FRIENDS 




Best Wishes to the Class of 1971 

THE UNIVERSITY CHORALE OF 
BOSTON COLLEGE 




Congratulations to the Graduating Class 
Compliments of the Boston College Dramatics Society 



/4n^on> ^OMCA, ^ftc. 



ARBOR 

MODULES 

INC. 



A SUBSIDIARY OF ARBOR HOMES 

1261 MERIDEN ROAD, 

WATERBURY, CONNECTICUT 06720 

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Compliments of 

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MR. AND MRS. J. BARRON FITZPATRICK 
MR. AND MRS. MICHAEL M. FORTUNATO 
MR. AND MRS. EDWARD GUERTIN 
MR. AND MRS. ROBERT A. KENKEL 
MR. AND MRS. ROBERT LONGDEN 
MR. AND MRS. JOSEPH T. PERNA 
MRS. GERARD N. VERRIER 



Introducing 
ournew _ 
impimed 
viarning: 



Warning: The Surgeon General Has Determined That 
Cigarette Smoking is Dangerous to Your Health. 



By Act of Congress, the 
above warning must be placed on all 
cigarettes nnanufactured forsale 
in the United States on or after 
November 1,1970. 



U.S. DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH, 
EDUCATION, AND WELFARE 

Public Health Service 

This space contributed as a public service. 



COMPLIMENTS OF CHARLES E. SCHMIDT 








Senior Index 




Senior Index 



ABANY, STEPHEN S. 
135 Glenwood Ave. 
Hyde Park, Ma. 
ABBOTT, JOHN R. 
101 Abigail Adams C 
Weymouth, Ma. 
ABBOTT, THOMAS 

MICHAEL 
6 Brook Farm Road 
W. Roxbury, Ma. 
ADAMS, JAMES J. 
14 Parkinson St. 
Needham, Ma. 
AHERN, JOSEPH F. 
48 Tower St. 
Jamaica Plain, Ma. 



AINSWORTH, RICHARD 

T. 
14 Sunset Ave. 
Concord, N. H. 
ALBERT, M. DELLIS, SR. 
3221 S. Lake Dr. 
Milwaukee, Wi. 
ALBUQUERQUE, MARK 

R 
33 Chathann Street 
Cambridge, Ma. 
ALEXANDER, JOHN D. 
325 Turrell Ave. 
S. Orange, N. J. 
ALLEN, MARY F. 
7 Westview Rd. 



Worcester, Ma. 
AMARA, FRANK J. 
50 Bowen Ave. 
Medford, Ma. 
AMBORSKI, DAVID P. 
26 Cherrywood Dr. 
Williamsville,.N. Y. 
AMBROGNE,JOHN R., 

JR. 
292 Oakland Avenue 
Arlington, Ma. 
AMEN, ROBERT M. 
619 Ely Ave. 
Pelham Manor, N. Y. 
AMICO, MICHAEL J. 
29 Glendale Drive 
Danvers, Ma. 
AMIRAULT, RICHARD B. 
95 Patricia Lane 
S. Weymouth, Ma. 
AMORE, FREDERICK P. 
167 Maple St. 
New Haven, Ct. 
ANDERSON, DONNA M. 
6 May Ave. 
Braintree, Ma. 
ANDERSON, THOMAS 

W., JR. 
Farmersville Rd., RD 
Califon, N. J. 
ANDRADE, GABRIEL T. 
32 Bradford Ave. 
Fall River, Ma. 
ANDRIANI, ADRIENNE 
64 Bank St. 
New York, N. Y. 
ANDRONICA, LOUIS J. 
61 Marlboro St. 
Belmont, Ma. 
ANSBRO, THQMAS C. 
124 Walnut Street 
Ridgewood, N. J. 
ANTONIAZZI, JOHN M. 
713 Beechmont St. 
Hyde Park, Ma. 
ANTONUCCI, JAMES A. 
370 Broadway 
Maiden, Ma. 

ARDIZZONI, ROBERT D. 
8 Riverside Avenue 
Bedford, Ma. 
ARTHUR, CHRISTOPHER 

E. 
18 Evergreen Ave. 
New Hyde Park, N. Y. 
AUBUCHON, MAURICE 

A., JR. 
Hoodkroft Manor #10 
Derry, N. H. 
AVERY, CHARLES N. 
154 Emerald Ave. 



Willimantic, Ct. 
AYLWARD, CATHERINE 

M. 
6 Stanton St. 
Dorchester, Ma. 
BACHALIS, ANNEM 
30 Burning Tree La. 
Trenton, N. J. 
BACHNER, HAROLDS. 
16 Coolidge St. 
Brookline, Ma. 
BAECHTOLD, EDWARD 

F. 
5349 Fenwick Ave. 
Norwood, Oh. 
BAIRD, MARGARET M. 
44 So. Chestnut St. 
Augusta, Me. 
BAKAITIS, RAYMOND F. 
1521 Cordova Ave. 
Lakewood, Oh. 
BAKER, CHRISTOPHER 

LJR. 
12 Hammondswood Rd. 
Chestnut Hill, Ma. 
BAKSTRAN, PAULA. 
53 Baldwin Ave. 
Framingham, Ma. 
BALASCO, ELOISE M. 
29 Shaffer St. 
Providence, R. I. 
BALM AT, WILLIAM J. 
156 East 219th St. 
Euclid, Oh. 
BALTREN, PETER J. 
35 Battle St. 
Orange, Ma. 
BANKOWSKI, 

ELIZABETH A. 
41 Commonwith Ave. 
Newton, Ma. 
BARBALUNGA, 

ERMINO, JR. 
25 Gravesleigh Ter. 
Pittsfield, Ma. 
BARKER, JOHN F. 
46 Lawrence Rd. 
Reading, Ma. 
BARNABY, HOWARD B., 

JR. 
748 Hunt Lane 
Manhasset, N. Y. 
BARONOWSKI, ROBERT 

J. 
2 Alden St. 
Newton, Ma. 
BARRETT, JOHN H. 
8 Bradlee Park 
Hyde Park, Ma. 
BARRY, RICHARD T. 
62 Clement Terrace 



Quincy, Ma. 

BARTH, ANDREW )., JR. 

25 Merwin Circle 
Cheshire, Ct. 
BARTNICK, BARBARA A. 

26 East 235 St. 
New York, N. Y. 
BARTON, JAMES M., JR. 
107 Bigelow St. 
Brighton, Ma. 
BARTOSIAK, MATTHEW 

A. 
2 Clark Street 
Plymouth, Ma. 
BASIEL, MARIAN V. 
19 Edgewood Rd. 
Portland, Ct. 
BASSANELLI, SANDRA 
814 N. Cayuga St. 
Ithaca, N. Y. 
BASTIAN, DAVID E. 
40 Ramsey Paek 
Rochester, N. Y. 
BATTISTO, PETER A. 
1036 North 67th St. 
Philadelphia, Pa. 
BAUM, STEVEN C. 
33 Kirkwood Rd. 
Brighton, Ma. 
BAXTER, LOIS M. 
24 St. Marks Road 
Dorchester, Ma. 
BEAN, DAVID J. 
75 Stowecroft Rd. 
Arlington, Ma. 
BEATSON, BARBARA A. 
231 Common St. 
Quincy, Ma. 
BEATTIE, PAUL J. 
56 Stevens Rd. 
Needham, Ma. 
BEATTIE, RAYMOND C. 
159 Corey St. 
W. Roxbury, Ma. 
BEDNAR, RICHARD P. 
9318 Anderson Ave. 
Cleveland, Oh. 
BEDNARZ, CAROL 
101 Read St. 
Fall River, Ma. 
BEECHER, EDWARD 
20 Amherst St. 
Hamden, Ct. 
BEGG, ELIZABETH A. 
7894 Kirkville Rd. 
Kirkville, N. Y. 
BELL, JAMES T. 
162 Dubois Ave. 
Sea Cliff, N. Y. 
BENCH, ROBERT J. 
2 Upland Rd. West 



Arlington, Ma. 
BENKOSKI, SR. RUTH 
Box 152 Route 80 
Kingston, Ma. 
BERCURY, CHARLES A, 
185 Pomeroy Avenue 
Pittsfield, Ma. 
BERGERON, CHARLES J. 
29 Kendall Park 
Waltham, Ma. 
BERRINI, PAUL L. 
43 Trafford Street 
Quincy, Ma. 
BERTRAND, RICHARD 

D. 
18 Radnor Rd. 
Brighton, Ma. 
BEST, PAMELA ANN, SR. 
2 Ipswich St. 
Boston, Ma. 
BEYER, JOHN J. 
25 Frankel Blvd. 
Merrick, N. Y. 
BEZOARI, UBALDO C. 
372 Weld St. 
W. Roxbury, Ma. 
BIAZZO, JANICE T. 
231 Grove St. 
Bridgeport, Ct. 
BIRCH, KATHLEEN M. 
15 Harvard Ave. 
Shrewsbury, Ma. 
BISCONE, MICHAEL J. 
12 Hillcrest Drive 
Ravena, N. Y. 
BISSON, GREGORY P. 
181 Center St. 
Chatham, N. J. 
BLACKWELL, JACQULYN 

L. 
6 Esmond St. 
Dorchester, Ma. 
BLADES, BRANDON R. 
32 Clinton Park Dr. 
Bergenfield, N. J. 
BLAISDELL, MARK D. 
251 School St. 
Groveland, Ma. 
BLANK, CHARLES H. 
23 Great Oak Lane 
Pleasantville, N. Y. 
BLOSE, JAMES O. 

5 Blue Hills Terr. 
Green Brook, N. J. 
BLOTNER, BERNARD S. 

6 Laurel St. 
Chelsea, Ma. 
BOCKO, JOHN R. 
32 Mt. Pleasant St. 
N. Billerica, Ma. 
BOEHLER, SUSAN E. 



10 Augusta Rd. 
Milton, Ma. 
BOLGER, CAROL A. 
76 Lincoln St. 
Melrose, Ma. 
BONACCORSI, 

THOMAS J. 
10 Severance Street 
Claremont, N. H. 
BONGIORNI, VINCENT 

A. 
195 Lang St. 
Springfield, Ma. 
BONIFACE, MARGARET 
88 Western Ave. 
Lynn, Ma. 

BONISTALLI, JOHN J. 
338 Carnation Ave. 
Floral Park, N. Y. 
BORON, THOMAS S. 
2 Lockwood Place 
Park Ridge, N. J. 
BOSCO, PAUL J. 
565 Lincoln St. 
New Britain, Ct. 
BOSSE, FRED C, JR. 
20 Heath Road 
Valhalla, N. Y. 
BOTTARD, SAMUEL R. 
44 Piper Lane 
E. Hartford, Ct. 
BOWEN, SIDNEY R., Ill 
28 S. Carolina Ave. 
Mason City, la. 
BOWEN, VIRGINIA A. 
2 Michaud Dr. 
Framingham, Ma. 
BOWES, PHILIP W. 
16 Manor Ave. 
Natick, Ma. 
BOYD, JANET M. 
116 Carver Rd. 
Newton Hglds., Ma. 
BOYD, RICHARD J. 
30 Elm Ave. 
Holbrook, Ma. 
BOYLE, GERARD J. 

2 Moccasin Path 
Arlington, Ma. 
BOYLE, JOHN F., JR. 
1501 Lyndhurst Rd. 
Lyndhurst, Oh. 
BOYSON, MARY ANN 

3 Fenton St. 
Peabody, Ma. 
BOZENICH, PHILIP 
902 South Second St. 
Champaign, II. 
BRACKEN, ELAINE M. 
14 Houston St. 

W. Roxbury, Ma. 



BRADY, JAMES W. 

8 Woodedge Rd. 

Manhasset, N. Y. 

BRADY, MICHAEL K. 

7 Margin Terrace 

Peabody, Ma. 

BRAMLEY, WILLIAM J. 

13 Kendal Drive 

Woburn, Ma. 

BRANCA, WILLIAM J. 

1152 Brook Road 

Milton, Ma. 

BRAY, ROBERT J. 

1820 B Dole St. 

Honolulu, Hi. 

BREAULT, COLLEEN A. 

13 Hood Rd. 

Danvers, Ma. 

BREEZE, JAY A. 

137 Commwealth Ave. 

Chestnut Hill, Ma. 

BREMS, STEVEN J. 

269 Lexington St. 

E. Boston, Ma. 

BRENNAN, JOHN H. 

6 Cedar St. 

Charlestown, Ma. 

BRENT, JOHN A. 

19 Goff Street 

Hyde Park, Ma. 

BROGAN, RICHARD E. 

Sturbridge Rd. 
Sturbridge, Ma. 

BRONSKI, MARY D. 
3 Roseland St. 

Dorchester, Ma. 
BROWN, JANE A. 
418 North Ave. 
Weston, Ma. 
BROWN, TIMOTHY 
47 Dogwood Court 
Stamford, Ct. 
BRUTZA, STEPHEN J. 
82 Marston St. 
Medford, Ma. 
BUCHANAN, SR. JANICE 
236 Pleasant St. 
S. Weymouth, Ma. 
BUDKIEWICZ, MARY R. 
41 Drew Rd. 
Belmont, Ma. 
BUONOCORE, 

BARBARA J. 
Half Mile Rd. 
Norwalk, Ct. 
BURKE, DANIEL P. 
RD 1 Box 152 
Duanesburg, N. Y. 
BURKE, RICHARD F. 
8 McKinely Ave. 
Beverly, Ma. 



409 



BURKE, THOMAS J. 
143 Pleasant St. 
Winthrop, Ma. 
BURKE, THOMAS W. 

8 Todd Road 
Cohasset, Ma. 
BURKE, TIMOTHY F. 
15 Holiday Road 
Wayland, Ma. 
BURNS, JEANNE M. 
36 Mason Rd. 
Needham, Ma. 
BURNS, PHILIP J. 

41 Lila Road . 
Jamaica Plain, Ma. 
BUTLER, PATRICIA J. 
7 Willow Place 
Cazenovia, N. Y. 
BUTTERS, CHARLES G. 
75 Landseer St. 
W. Roxbury, Ma. 
BYRNE, ELIZABETH A. 
74 Bennett St. 
Brighton, Ma. 
BYRNE, RICHARD J. 
5 Nottingham Dr. 
Natick, Ma. 
BYRON, JAMES W. 
1111 Brook Rd. 
Milton, Ma. 
CAHALANE, JAMES B. 
52 Barbara Rd. 
Needham, Ma. 
CAHALANE, NANCY E. 
52 Barbara Rd. 
Needham, Ma. 
CAHILL, JOHN T. 
48 Wilton Ave. 
Norwalk, Ct. 
CAIN, GEORGE E. 

9 Mallet Street 
Somerville, Ma. 
CAIRA, MICHAEL A. 
188 Chestnut St. 
Wilmington, Ma. 
CALANDRELLI, JOSEPH 

A. 
287 Silver Hill La. 
Stamford, Ct. 
CALDER, STEPHEN F. 
11 Indian Trail 
N. Scituate, Ma. 
CALDWELL, STEPHEN F. 
2912 Glenview St. 
Royal Oak, Mi. 
CALHOUN, WILLIAM H. 
1340 Commonwealth Av. 
Allston, Ma. 
CALLAN, MICHELLE L. 
43 Lochnavar Pkwy. 
Pittsford, N. Y. 



CALLINAN, MARLENE G. 
11 Arrowhead Rd. 
Weston, Ma. 
CALLIS, MARY SUE 

6 Damon Road 
Scituate, Ma. 
CALLNAN, WILLIAM J. 
Cripple Creek Rd. 
Washburn, Me. 
CALLOW, DONALD J. 
46 Brett St. 
Brockton, Ma. 
CAMPBELL, VIRGINIA 
37 Temple St. 
Mattapan, Ma. 
CAMPO, CHARLES M. 
62 Congreve St. 
Roslindale, Ma. 
CANALI, ANTHONYS. 
129 Gorham St. 
Canandaigua, N. Y. 
CAPANO, THOMAS J. 
4627 Weldin Rd. 
Wilmington, De. 
CAPLICE, JOSEPH M. 
46 Lantern Lane 

N. Abington, Ma. 
CAPOBIANCO, PAUL H. 
1066 Hyde Park Ave. 
Hyde Park, Ma. 
CAPODILUPO, PAUL 
80 Brook Farm Rd. 
W. Roxbury, Ma. 
CARDIA, PETER R. 
520 Washington St. 
Brighton, Ma. 
CARNEGIE, CAROL L. 
2 Avon Lane 
Natick, Ma. 
CARNEY, GERARD B. 

102 Winthrop St. 
Brockton, Ma. 
CARON, CHRISTINA M. 
15 Barstow St. 

Salem, Ma. 
CARR, CLARE A. 
98 Corey St. 
W. Roxbury, Ma. 
CARR, GEORGE P. 

103 Demarest Ave. 
Bloomfield, N. J. 
CARROLL, DAVID J. 

7 Indian Hill Road 
Arlington, Ma. 
CARROLL, JOHN T. 
140 Boulter Road 
Wethersfield, Ct. 
CARROLL, PAULA M. 
7 Lyons Place 
Larchmont, N. Y, 
CARROLL, RALPH L. 



73 Oregon Rd. 
Ashland, Ma. 
CARROLL, SR. 

KATHERINE 
236 Pleasant St. 
S. Weymouth, Ma. 
CARTA, JAMES J. 
92 Glenwood Ave. 
Hyde Park, Ma. 
CARTER, PAUL S. 
17 Cedar Street 
Newton Ctr., Ma. 
CARULLO, NICHOLAS 

D. 
10 Staples Ave. 
Everett, Ma. 

CARUSO, MADELINE C. 
730 Boston Post Rd. 
Weston, Ma. 
CARUSO, ROBERT F. 
8 Lincoln St. 
Somerville, Ma. 
CARUSO, THOMAS R. 
6801 Shore Rd. 
Brooklyn, N. Y. 
CASEY, MICHAEL F. 
57 Gray St. 
Arlington, Ma. 
CASEY, ROBERT W. 
23 Richardson St. 
Billerica, Ma. 
CASHMAN, JOHN E. 
720 Mearns Rd. 
Warminster, Pa. 
CASHMAN, JOHN J. 
79 Grayfield Ave. 
W. Roxbury, Ma. 
CASHMAN, WILLIAM M. 
451 Eastern Ave. 
Lynn, Ma. 

CASHTON, STEVEN B. 
17 Linwood St. 
Maiden, Ma. 
CASSIS, LOUISA. 
1051 Adams St. 
Dorchester, Ma. 
CASTIGLIONI, DAVID L. 
133 Savage Hill Rd. 
Berlin, Ct. 

CATANO, VINCENT J. 
8 Preston Rd. 
W. Roxbury, Ma. 
CAULFIELD, JOSEPH A. 
440 W. Roxbury Pkwy. 
W. Roxbury, Ma. 
CAVELLIER, THOMAS E. 
45 Chestnut Hill Ave. 
Brighton, Ma. 
CAVICCHI, MARIANNE 
91 School St. 
Whitman, Ma. 



CENTORINO, JAMES R. 
71 Columbus Ave. 
Salem, Ma. 
CHAISSON, PATRICIA 

M. 
27 Barbara Rd. 
W. Newton, Ma. 
CHALENSKI, CHERYL 

104 Fern Ave. 
Lyndhurst, N. J. 
CHAMPION, DAVID J. 
2857 Court Land Bl. 
Cleveland, Oh. 
CHAP, MARY C. 

14 Victoria Dr. 
Nanuet, N. Y. 
CHATEAU, JOSEPH E. 
Marist College and Sem. 
Framingham, Ma. 
CHECK, ANGELA C. 
1069 Commonwealth 
Brighton, Ma. 
CHECRALLAH, MARY A. 
1432 Plumtree Rd. 
Springfield, Ma. 
CHIACCIA, RONALD A. 
6 Manhattan Terrace 
W. Newton, Ma. 
CHIN, SUE A. 
66 Reed St. 
N. Cambridge, Ma. 
CHIPMAN, JOHN T. 
4 Leyton Rd. 
Norwood, Ma. 
CHISHOLM, PAULW., 

JR. 
32 Ramsdell Ave. 
Roslindale, Ma. 
CHOTKOWSKI,MARKF. 
36 Indiana Terrace 
Newton, Ma. 
CIARELLI, DONNA M. 
10 Parkland St. 
Brighton, Ma. 
CIAVARDONE, JANE M. 

105 Taylor St. 
Waltham, Ma. 
CIERI, RICHARD M. 
18 Lincoln St. 
Bloomfield, N. Y. 
CIPOLLA, LOIS J. 
65 Appleton St. 
Arlington, Ma. 
CIRINCIONE, JOSEPH 
231 Thornton St. 
Hamden, Ct. 
CIROLO, SHELLY J. 
92 Willow St. 
Cambridge, Ma. 
CISCO, CLAUDIA 
185 Thompson Drive 



Torrington, Ct. 
CIUFFREDA, )EFFREY S. 
18 Egremont Ave. 
Pittsfield, Ma. 
CLANCY, JAMES E. 
88 Decker St. 
Milton, Ma. 
CLARK, LAWRENCE K. 
16 St. Mary St. 
Maiden, Ma. 
CLARKIN, STEPHEN C. 
64 Brookside Rd. 
Portland, Me. 
CLAYDON, JOHN M. 
117 Plymouth Ave. 
Trumbull, Ct. 
CLERKIN, CHARLES A. 
9 Warren St. 
Lexington, Ma. 
CLICGETT, MARY L. 
243 Itasca St. 
Mattapan, Ma. 
CLINTON, THOMAS J. 
99 Border Street 
Dedham, Ma. 
CLOUTTERBUCK, 
QUACO T. 

9 Linwood Square 
Roxbury, Ma. 
CLUNE, DANIEL A. 
720 Boston Blvd. 
Sea Girt, N. J. 
COCCIA, FRANK H. 
277 Saxton St. 
Rochester, N. Y. 
COLACCHIO, THOMAS 

A. 
3 Overbrook Place 
Hillsdale, N. J. 
COLANERI, JANICE R. 

10 Gary Ave. 
Revere, Ma. 
COLLINS, FRANCIS A. 
31 Roseland St. 
Dorchester, Ma. 
COLLINS, JOHN F. 

22 Orchard St. 
Holyoke, Ma. 
COLLINS, JOSEPH M. 
9 Rhodes Drive 
New Hyde Park, N. Y. 
COLLINS, PATRICIA E. 
203 Camp Ave. 
Newington, Ct. 
COLLINS, PAUL J. 
8 Thornton Rd. 
Winchester, Ma. 
COLLINS, SUSAN 
63 Governors Rd. 
Milton, Ma. 
COLOMBINO, CHARLES 



23 Orient St. 
Warwick, R. I. 
COLSON, JOHN A. 
15 Park Vale 
Brookline, Ma. 
COMELLA, GENE 
30 Phelps Street 
Lyons, N. Y. 

COMENZO, RONALD A. 
611 Crambrook Rd. 
Cockeysville, Md. 
CONATY, JOHN P. 
15 Nottingham Dr. 
Natick, Ma. 
CONGA, MICHAEL P. 
5 Norfolk Rd. 
Randolph, Ma. 
CONGANNON, GERARD 

A. 
74 Grant St. 
Portland, Me. 
CONEYS, JOHN S. 
15 Capen Road 
Braintree, Ma. 
CONGO, JAMES A. 
Moose Hill Rd. Rte 1 
Livermore FIs., Me. 
CONLAN, WALTER J. 
300 Newbury St. 
Boston, Ma. 
CONLEY, SUSAN M. 
80 Fernwood Ave. 
Revere, Ma. 

CONNELL, CATHERINE 
99 Moreland St. 
Somerville, Ma. 
CONNOLLY, FRANCIS 

10 Pine St. 
Belmont, Ma. 
CONNOLLY, JOHN M. 
416 North Avenue 
Wood-Ridge, N. J. 
CONNOLLY, MARY ANN 

11 Ridgewood St. 
Dorchester, Ma. 
CONNOLLY, THOMAS ]. 
54 Gushing Road 
Maiden, Ma. 

CONNORS, CHARLES H. 
20 Revere St. 

Everett, Ma. 
CONNORS, JAMES J. 
25 Cotton St. 
Roslindale, Ma. 
CONROY, CATHERINE 
549 5th Ave. 
Troy, N. Y. 

CONROY, JAMES P., JR. 
90 Brookway Rd. 
Roslindale, Ma. 



CONTE, ELENA A. 
71 Ayer St. 
Methuen, Ma. 
COOGAN, PAUL G. 
96 Grover St. 
Everett, Ma. 

COONEY, KATHLEEN M. 
473 Turnpike Rd. 
Billerica, Ma. 
COOPER, RONALD L. 
49 Clinton Ave. 
Jamestown, R. I. 
COPPOLA, JOSEPH 
117 W. Centennial Ave. 
Roosevelt, N. Y. 



41 Frost Rd. 
Belmont, Ma. 
CORSARO, CARMEN R. 
38 Exeter St. 
Lawrence, Ma. 
CORSI, PAULA. 
367 Langley Rd. 
Newton, Ma. 
COSGROVE, LINDA A. 
Sunset Ave. 
Rockville, Ct. 
COSGROVE, WILLIAM J 
314 Savin Hill Ave. 
Dorchester, Ma. 
COSTA, JOANNE H. 




CORAPI, LUIGI M. 
12 Worcester St. 
Belmont, Ma. 
GORBETT, JOHN P. 
26 Bedford Street 
Lexington, Ma. 
CORBO, DORICK E. 
40 Roberts Dr. 
S. Weymouth, Ma. 
CORINNE, LINDA J. 
8 Grant St. 
Marlboro, Ma. 
CORREIA, MICHAEL E. 
74 Barque Hill Dr. 
Norwell, Ma. 
CORRIGAN, MICHAEL 
18878 Canyon Rd. 
Cleveland, Oh. 
CORRIGAN, PAULA A. 



72 Grafton St. 
Arlington, Ma. 
COSTELLO, MICHAEL J. 
20 Montvale St. 
Roslindale, Ma. 
COSTELLO, VINCENT X. 
15 Glenburnie Rd. 
W. Roxbury, Ma. 
COTE, ROGER B. 
95 Steinmetz Dr. 
Manchester, N. H. 
COTRARO, GREGORY L. 
231 Rantoul St. 
Beverly, Ma. 
COVENEY, MICHAEL P. 
47 May Street 
Needham, Ma. 
CRAIG, RICHARD P. 
240 Andover St. 



Danvers, Ma. 
CRAWFORD, JOSEPH K. 
1 Cobb Avenue 
Portland, Me. 
CREAN, DORCAS ). 
60 Vanderveer Ct. 
Rockville Ctr. 
N. Y. 

CREEDEN, CHARLES ). 
42 Underwood Park 
Waltham, Ma. 
CREIGHTON, LAURENE 

D. 
138 Water St. 
N. Pembroke, Ma. 
CRIVELLI, FRANK 
35 Willwood St. 
Chicopee, Ma. 
CRONIN, GERALD J. 
45A Jordan Ave. 
Wakefield, Ma. 
CRONIN, KEVIN C. 
591 Beech St. 
Roslindale, Ma. 
CRONIN, PAULT. 
25 Margaret Rd. 
Newton Hglds., Ma. 
CROSBY, FRANCIS G. 
20 Mellen Street 
Dorchester, Ma. 
CROSS, BARBARA P. 
151 School St. 
Taunton, Ma. 
CROSS, JAMES M. 
201 Blenheim Rd. 
Baltimore, Md. 
CROWLEY, JAMES C, IV 
44 Eddy Clover Blvd. 
New Britain, Ct. 
CROWLEY, KATHRYN E. 
1405 Morrissey Blvd. 
Quincy, Ma. 
CROWLEY, KEVIN T. 
8 Mountain Ave. 
Somerville, Ma. 
CULLEN, DIANE L. 
80 Otis St. 
Medford, Ma. 
CULTRERA, PAUL S. 
7 Prescott St. 
Salem, Ma. 
CUMMINGS, 

CONSTANCE 
190 Adams St. 
Dorchester, Ma. 
CUMMINGS, PAUL F. 
43 Aberdeen Rd. 
Milton, Ma. 
CUNHA, BRIAN R. 
30 Eaton Rd. 
Lexington, Ma. 



CUNHA, KENNETH R. 
6 Gregory Drive 
Attleboro, Ma. 
CUNNIFF, NANCY A. 
218 Chestnut St. 
Brookline, Ma. 
CURLEY, EDWARD A. 
28 Puritan Avenue 
Dorchester, Ma. 
CURRAN, DENNIS L. 

16 John Alden Rd. 
W. Roxbury, Ma. 
CURRAN, ROBERT P. 
6 Hobson St. 
Roslindale, Ma. 
CURRAN, ROBERT P. 
73 Winslow Ave. 
Norwood, Ma. 
CURRY, BRIAN P. 

17 Taft Dr. 
Winchester, Ma. 
CURRY, JAMES T. 
300 Newburry St. 
Boston, Ma. 
CURRY, TERRENCE W. 
418 Beacon St. 
Boston, Ma. 
CURTIN, KATHLEEN A. 
22 Sheafe St. 
Chestnut Hill, Ma. 
CUSICK, SUSAN 

66 Edmunds Rd. 
Wellesley, Ma. 
DAGGETT, KENNETH E. 
RED 1 Pine Rd. 
Stafford Spg., Ct. 
DALY, CAROLYN 
24 Falcon St. 
Worcester, Ma. 
DALY, KEVIN E. 
230 Fairmount Ave. 
Hyde Park, Ma. 
DALY, VALERIE 
181 Summer Street 
Maiden, Ma. 
DANAHY, WILLIAM 
3 Commonwealth Ave. 
Hopkinton, Ma. 
DANCEWICZ, GARY F. 
24 Grant Rd. 
Lynn, Ma. 
DANISH, LEON G. 
12 W. Glenwood Dr. 
Latham, N. Y. 
DANKESE, LINDA D. 
87 Lincoln St. 
Lexington, Ma. 
DANSEREAU, MAURICE 

A. 
237 Query St. 
New Bedford, Ma. 



DAOUST, GREGORY A. 
660 Woodcrest Dr. 
Dearborn, Mi. 
DARGAN, ANNE MARIE 
62 Oakland St. 
Brighton, Ma. 
DARGAN, ROBERT S., Ill 
67 Richards Place 
W. Haven, Ct. 
DART, EILEEN M. 
400 W. Roxbury Pkwy. 
W. Roxbury, Ma. 
DASH, STANLEY A. 
31 Bodine Court 
Stratford, Ct. 
DAUER, JOHN J., JR. 
34 Thurton Place 
Yonkers, N. Y. 
DAURIA, JOHN P. 
939 Lakeville Rd. 
New Hyde Park, N. Y. 
DAVETA, FRANK 
46 Sunset Rd. 
Somerville, Ma. 
DAVIES, FREDERICK J. 
2 Albany St. 
S. Portland, Me. 
DAVIN, ANN M. 
49 Hobart Rd. 
Sudbury, Ma. 
DEAN, MARYANNE E. 
34 George Street 
Norwood, Ma. 
DEANGELIS, MICHAEL A. 
31A Cambridge Court 
Yorktown Hgts., N. Y. 



DECOURCEY, ELLEN M. 
30 School St. 
Milton, Ma. 
DECOURCY, PAUL J. 
136 Washington St. 
Winchester, Ma. 
DECRESCE, ROBERT P. 
19 Riverside Dr. 
Rumson, N. J. 
DEDOMINICI, JAMES 
67 Warren Ave. 
Hyde Park, Ma. 
DEFELIPPO, ANNE 

MARIE 
27 Adelaide Avenue 
Pittsfield, Ma. 
DEFRANCIS, 

MARYANNE 
2902 Avenue N 
Brooklyn, N. Y. 
DEFRINO, ROBERTA. 
8 Gilman Street 
Hartford, Ct. 
DEGNAN, PAULA C. 
57 Rockridge Rd. 
Waltham, Ma. 
DELANEY, CATHLEEN M. 
29 Hawthorne Ave. 
Albany, N. Y. 
DELANEY, ELLEN T. 
55 Lyndhurst St. 
Dorchester, Ma. 
DELANEY, WARREN R., 

JR. 
Brantwood Rd. 
Norwell, Ma. 




412 . 



DELERY, JOAN MARIE 
124 Brookings St. 
Medford, Ma. 
DELONG, )OHN E. 
50 Longview Rd. 
Prt. Washington, N. Y. 
DELORENZO, JOHN J. 
141 Summit Dr. 
Cranston, R. I. 
DELUCA, JOSEPH J. 
188 Beacon St. 
Boston, Ma. 
DELUTIS, FREDRICK F. 
Box 433 

S. Harwich, Ma. 
DEMAINA, JOSEPH A. 

2 Bel Nel Rd. 
Hyde Park, Ma. 
DEMARCO, JUSTIN R. 
259 Andover St. 
Lawrence, Ma. 
DEMBITZ, EDWARD A. 
28 Elmwood Road 
Springfield, N. j. 
DEMEO, LINDA M. 

3 Social St. 
Hopedale, Ma. 
DEMERS, SUZANNE L. 
624 Eastern Ave. 

Fall River, Ma. 
DEMILLE, MARIE E. 
25 Eastman St. 
Dorchester, Ma. 
DENICOLA, DEBORAH 

C. 
378 Adams St. 
Milton, Ma. 

DENKEWALTER, PAUL E. 
620 Standish Ave. 
Westfield, N. J. 
DENNIS, MICHAEL L. 
470 Watertown St. 
Newton, Ma. 
DERAMIO, DIANNE M. 
96 Irving St. 
Waltham, Ma. 
DEROEVE, PETER D. 
12 Mount Vernon St. 
Charlestown, Ma. 
DERR, MICHAEL E. 
69 Farmers Avenue 
Plainview, N. Y. 
DESLOGES, ARTHUR T. 
16 Avon Street 
Saugus, Ma. 

DESMOND, BARBARA A. 
23 Old Common 
Wethersfield, Ct. 
DESMOND, WILLIAM F. 
15 Allerton Rd. 
Milton, Ma. 



DESTEFANO, MARY A. 
335 E. Eagle St. 
E. Boston, Ma. 
DESTEPHANO, LINDA 
39 Robinwood Rd. 
Belmont, Ma. 
DEVANEY, THOMAS A. 
787 Prospect St. 
New Haven, Ct. 
DEVENEY, JAMES I., JR. 
67 North St. 
Medford, Ma. 
DEVENEY, JAMES R. 
59 Forest Ave. 
Greenfield, Ma. 
DEVENEY, RICHARD K. 
38 Percival Street 
Dorchester, Ma. 
DEVER, JEANMARIE 
407 Highland Ave. 
Quincy, Ma. 
DEVITO, JOHN E. 
20 James St. 
Woburn, Ma. 
DEVITO, MICHAEL J. 
359 Main St. 
Everett, Ma. 
DEVITO, PASQUALE J. 
33 Jarvis Rd. 
Old Saybrook, Ct. 
DICARLO, ELIZABETH 

M. 
15 Beecher Place 
Newton Ctr., Ma. 
DIEBOLD, GREGORY G. 
14 Grover Lane 
Caldwell, N. J. 
DIERKER, DAVID T. 
196 Schuyler Rd. 
Allendale, N.J. 
DIGIOVANNI, DIANE M. 
2745 Overbrook Ter. 
Ardmore, Pa. 
DIGIOVANNI, VINCENT 
151 Dean St. 
Belmont, Ma. 
DIGREGORIO, ALBERT 

D. 
300 Forest St. 
Waltham, Ma. 
DILLON, RAYMOND T. 
29 Blackburn Place 
Summit, N. J. 
DINAN, SUSAN E. 
Riverview Rd. 
Irvington, N. Y. 
DION, SUSAN L. 
135 Kimberly Ave. 
E. Haven, Ct. 
DIOTTE, VIRGINIA 
58 Sterling St. 



Braintree, Ma. 
DISABATINO, MICHAEL 

A. 
21 Tufts Ave. 
Everett, Ma. 
DISTEFANO, CYNTHIA 

19 Springwood Manor 
Loudonville, N. Y. 
DOBSON, STEWART M. 
128 Allerton Rd. 
Newton Hglds., Ma. 
DODGE, LAUREL A. 
187 Prospect St. 
Ashland, Ma. 
DOHERTY, DENISE 

ANNE 
141 Beacon St. 
Hyde Park, Ma. 
DOHERTY, PAUL C, JR. 
5 Burton Rd. 
Burlington, Ma. 
DOLAN, DONNA J. 
204 Alanson Rd. 
Syracuse, N. Y. 
DOLAN, JOHN B. 
115 Grove St. 
W. Roxbury, Ma. 
DOLAN, LAWRENCE J. 
38 Second St. 
Lynbrook, N. Y. 
DONAHE, PHYLLIS M. 

20 Charlesgate West 
Boston, Ma. 
DONAHUE, CHARLES 
24 Daniels Rd. 
Framingham, Ma. 
DONAHUE, DENIS P. 
57 Laurel Lane 
Bellingham, Ma. 
DONAHUE, PATRICIA E. 
7 Westview Rd. 

Lynn, Ma. 

DONATO, PATRICIA A. 
59 Riverside St. 
Watertown, Ma. 
DONDERO, JOHN L. 
59 Cohasset St. 
Roslindale, Ma. 
DONNELLS, JAMES M. 
307 East Elm St. 
Penn Yan, N. Y. 
DONNELLY, JOHN E. 
607 Chicago Blvd. 
Sea Girt, N. J. 
DONNELLY, MICHAEL J. 
96 Burley St. 
Danvers, Ma. 
DONOGHUE, JAMES J. 
30 Bigelow St. 
Brighton, Ma. 
DONOHOE, THOMAS 



M. 

31 Forest Drive 
Short Hills, N. J. 
DONOHUE, CHARLES K. 
24 Daniels Rd. 
Framingham, Ma. 
DONOHUE, MAUREEN 

A. 
19 Valley View Dr. 
Windsor, Ct. 
DONOVAN, AGNES M. 
15 Fairmount St. 
Dorchester, Ma. 
DONOVAN, EDWARD F. 

32 Chatham Street 
Arlington, Ma. 
DONOVAN, JAMES J. 
31 Glen Road 
Brookline, Ma. 
DONOVAN, KATHERINE 

3 Glenburnie Rd. 
Roslindale, Ma. 
DONOVAN, STEPHEN A. 
117 Jefferson Dr. 
Norwood, Ma. 
DOOCEY, EDWARD C. 
15 Adrienne Dr. 
Canton, Ma. 
DOOLEY, JANEFRANCES 

M. 
125 Strasser Ave. 
WEstwood, Ma. 
DOOLIN, THOMAS F. 
143 Falcon Street 
Needham, Ma. 
DORAN, DANIEL F., Ill 

33 Locust Ave. 
Lexington, Ma. 
DORAN, JAMES E. 
5 Lawndale Rd. 
Stoneham, Ma. 
DOUCETTE, DANIEL R. 
6232 Washington Cir. 
Wauwatosa, Wi. 
DOUGHERTY, MICHAEL 

4 Loring Rd. 
Levittown, N. Y. 
DOWD, JAMES J., Ill 
91 North Pleasant St. 
Holyoke, Ma. 
DOWD, PATRICIA 
35 Fairmount St. 
Randolph, Ma. 
DOYLE, DENNIS J. 
511 Crossley Street 
Detroit, Mi. 
DOYLE, FRANCIS R. 
94 Blakeman Rd. 
Madison, Ct. , 
DOYLE, WILLIAM J. 
77 Heath St. 



Somerville, Ma. 
DRANCHAK, M. DENNIS 
207 Dorcas Court 
Moorestown, N. J. 
DRAY, ANNE T. 
37 Warren Ave. 
Hyde Park, Ma. 
DRINKA, GEORGE F. 
2616 North 97th St. 
Wauwatosa, Wi. 
DRISCOLL, BRIAN J. 
41 Brooksbie Road 
Bedford, Ma. 
DRISCOLL, EDWARD T. 
3 Guernsey St. 
Roslindale, Ma. 
DRIVER, CARMEN M. 
201 Willowwood Drive 
Wantagh, N. Y. 
DROLET, LAWRENCE L. 
13 Seagrave Road 
Cambridge, Ma. 
DRUSANO, GEORGE L. 
3231 Ramona Avenue 
Baltimore, Md. 
DUNCAN, THELMA 

18 Page St. 
Dorchester, Ma. 
DUNN, JAMES P. 
425 10th Street 
Carlstadt, N. J. 
DUNN, MICHAEL F. 

19 Murdock Ave. 
Quincy, Ma. 
DURGIN, MARIA K. 
5 Cheryl Dr. 
Milton, Ma. 
DURKIN, JAMES J. 

8 McFarlin Rd. 
Chelmsford, Ma. 
EARLEY, CHARLES S. 
295 Walnut St. 
Wellesley, Ma. 
EATON, LEWIS W. 
783 High St. 
Westwood, Ma. 
EATON, ROBERT J. 

9 Moss Hill Rd. 
Jamaica Plain, Ma. 
EBERSOLE, RICHARD J. 
1440 Honsicker Rd. 
Lancaster, Pa. 

EGAN, MARTHA A. 
21 Westminster St. 
Somerville, Ma. 
EGAN, MARY LOU 
25 Elmore St. 
Arlington, Ma. 
EGAN, THOMAS J. 
75 Marshall St. 
Braintree, Ma. 



EHLERS, GEORGE J. 
567 Salem End Rd. 
Framingham, Ma. 
EISERT, PATRICIA 
540 East Gate Rd. 
Ho-Ho-Kus, N. j. 
EKBERG, HENRY W. 
313 Quinnipiac Ave. 
N. Haven, Ct. 
ELIAS, PHILIP D. 
127 Cross St. 
Lowell, Ma. 
ENG, ROBERT J. 
57 WEstmoreland St. 
Dorchester, Ma. 
ENGLEHARDT, 
RICHARD W. 
21 Broad St. Ext. 
Groton, Ct. 
ENGLER, JAMES A. 
608 Windsor Place 
Moorestown, N. J. 
ENRIGHT, JOHN P. 
6541 Winona Avenue 
St. Louis, Mo. 
EREMIAN, THOMAS 
Bradstreet Lane 
Topsfield, Ma. 
EUK, STEPHEN M. 
8721 90th St. 
Woodhaven, N. Y. 
EVERETT, BARBARA A. 
21 Arlington Rd. 
Waltham, Ma. 
FAGO, DAVID P. 
4 Hertzel St. 
Warren, Pa. 
FAHY, WILLIAM P. 
32 Deady Avenue 
Stoughton, Ma. 
FAITS, PAUL H. 
12 Ridgeway Drive 
Feeding Hills, Ma. 
FALCIONE, NANCY M. 
40 Lochland St. 
E. Milton, Ma. 
FALCIONE, ROGER J. 
21 Riverside Ave. 
Milton, Ma. 
FALLON, CHARLES G. 
999 Brook Rd. 
Milton, Ma. 
FALLON, JEAN M. 
18 Howitt Rd. 
W. Roxbury, Ma. 
FALLON, JOAN L. 
18 Howitt Rd. 
W. Roxbury, Ma. 
FARNHAM, RALPH L. 
45 Dedham St. 
Newton, Ma. 



FARRAGHER, MARY F. 
43 Sparkill St. 
Watertown, Ma. 
FARRAHER, MICHAEL J. 
212 Adams St. 
Maiden, Ma. 
FAUBERT, ROBERT A. 
284 Foster St. 
Brighton, Ma. 
FAY, JACQUELYN A. 
360 LaGrange St. 
W. Roxbury, Ma. 
FEE, KEVIN T. 
72 Berkshire Rd. 
Rockville Ctr., N. Y. 
FELDMAN, MICHAELS. 
10 Intervale Ave. 
Peabody, Ma. 
FELECIAN, EILEEN M. 
7 Massasoit Rd. 
Wellesley, Ma. 
FELIX, DANIEL T., Ill 
392 Beechwood Rd. 
Ridgewood, N. J. 
FERDICO, RONALD P. 
66 E. State St. 
Gloversville, N. Y. 
FERGUSON, THOMAS J. 
39 Willoughby St. 
Brighton, Ma. 
FERRANT, HARRIET A. 
21 Roaring Brook Rd. 
Chappaqua, N. Y. 
FERRARA, PHILIP 
51 Sprague Ave. 
Brockton, Ma. 
FERRARA, VINCENT M. 
134 Prince St. 
Boston, Ma. 

FERREIRA, LAWRENCE S. 
65 Raymond St. 
Falmouth, Ma. 
FERRIS, EUGENE J., JR. 
15 Leahaven Rd. 
Mattapan, Ma. 
FESKOE, GAFFNEY J. 
Glen Park Rd. Bx. 51 
Purchase, N. Y. 
FIANDER, MICHAEL E. 

38 Tower Ave. 

S. Weymouth, Ma. 
FICKETT, MARVIS M. 
90 Indian Ridge Road 
Sudbury, Ma. 
FIERMONTI, CAROL J. 
23 Stony Corners Cir. 
Avon, Ct. 
FILTEAU, MARC J. 

39 So. Bowdoin St. 
Lawrence, Ma. 
FINNEGAN, JOAN M. 



I Newbrook Dr. 
Barrington, R. I. 
FINNERTY, JOHN T. 
14 Windermere Rd. 
Dorchester, Ma. 
FINNING, JOHN T. 
54 Dresser Ave. 

Cr. Barrington, Ma. 
FITCH, ELIZABETH A. 

II Hillcrest Rd. 
Framingham, Ma. 
FITZGERALD, FRANK J. 
180 Plainfield Ave. 
Edison, N. J. 
FITZGERALD, JOHN M. 
41 Fendale Ave. 
Dorchester, Ma. 
FITZGERALD, MICHAEL 

A. 
648 West Main St. 
Avon, Ma. 
FITZGERALD, THOMAS 

M. 
105 Olcott St. 
Manchester, Ct. 
FITZMAURICE, 

EDWARD L. 
39 Oak Road 
Milton, Ma. 
FITZPATRICK, DERMOT 

J. 
156 Brayton Road 
Brighton, Ma. 
FITZPATRICK, JOHN F. 
18 Evelyn Street 
Burlington, Ma. 
FITZPATRICK, 

MATTHEW R. 
2611 NE Alameda St. 
Portland, Or. 
FLAHERTY, BRO. JOHN 

F. 
St. Mary's Hall B C 
Chestnut Hill, Ma. 
FLAHERTY, MARY ANN 

E. 
36 Lochstead Ave. 
Jamaica Plain, Ma. 
FLAHERTY, PAUL]. 
307 Edge Hill Road 
Milton, Ma. 
FLAHERTY, RICHARD 
22 Mellen St. 
Dorchester, Ma. 
FLANAGAN, JAMES 
11 Christopher Rd. 
Brockton, Ma. 
FLEMING, JAMES M. 
18 Longwood Rd. 
Milton, Ma. 
FLEMING, PAUL D. 



49 Idaho St. 
Mattapan, Ma. 
FLEMING, THOMAS A. 
156 Summit St. 
Hyde Park, Ma. 
FLYNN, )OHN T. 
1920 37th St. NW 
Washington, D. C. 
FOGARTY, STEPHEN ). 
1235 Park Ave. 
New York, N. Y. 
FOLEY, )OHN E. 
150 Woodland Rd. 
Southboro, Ma. 
FOLEY, KENNETH M. 
195 Elbow Lane 
Mt. Laurel, N. J. 
FOLEY, MAUREEN 
80 Park Blvd. 
Stratford, Ct. 
FOLEY, ROBERT E., JR. 
73 Mayfield St. 
Dorchester, Ma. 
FOLEY, TIMOTHY D. 
414 Pleasant St. 
Utica, N. Y. 
FOLEY, WILLIAM J. 
17 Peirce Avenue 
Everett, Ma. 
FOLLANSBEE, STEPHEN 

R. 
129 Pierce Rd. 
Weymouth, Ma. 
FONIRI, WILLIAM A. 
561 Country Way 
N. Scituate, Ma 



FONTANA, JOSEPH F. 
24 Montvale St. 
Roslindale, Ma. 
FORD, JOHN J. 
37 Chase St. 
Newton Ctr., Ma. 
FORD, KATHLEEN 
60 Lakeshore Rd. 
Brighton, Ma. 
FORDE, KEVIN T. 
31 Hunnewell Ave. 
Brighton, Ma. 
FORTIER, LAWRENCE J. 
70 Sheep Hill Dr. 
W. Hartford, Ct. 
FORTIER, RONALD R. 
152 Orchard St. 
Portsmouth, N. H. 
FORTUNATO, JOHN M. 
4 Sherman St. 
Everett, Ma. 
FOSTER, MICHEAL A. 
14 Stevens St. 
Methuen, Ma. 
FOTI, JOHN j. 
17-31 Elliott Ter. 
Fair Lawn, N. J. 
FOUGERE, RICHARD J. 
19 Vernon St. 
Medford, Ma. 
FOURNIER, PAUL R. 
380 East Main St. 
Madawaska, Me. 
FOURNIER, RONALD G. 
397 Maple St. 
Holyoke, Ma. 



FOX, JOHN K. 
5915 Green Spring Av. 
Baltimore, Md. 
FRACKLETON, THOMAS 

J. 
72 Greaton Rd. 
W. Roxbury, Ma. 
FRANCO, MICHAEL R. 
58 Lincoln Ave. 
Swansea, Ma. 
FREDETTE, PAUL A. 
Marist College and Sem. 
Framingham, Ma. 
FREDRICKS, KAREN A. 
44 Cyli Place 
Waldwick, N. J. 
FRIEL, JAMES P. 
20 Sherborn Street 
Arlington, Ma. 
FROEHLICH, CRAIG F. 
Box 408 
Stamford, Ct. 
FUCCI, DOMENIC J., JR. 
120 Edenfield Ave. 
Watertown, Ma. 
GABORIAULT, NORMA 

L.. 
11 Holden Rd. 
Paxton, Ma. 
GAFFNY, JOHN J., Ill 
Heath Circle 
N. Andover, Ma. 
GALLAGHER, FRANCIS I. 
76 Woods Avenue 
Somerville, Ma. 
GALLAGHER, JOHN J. 




10912 Oakwood St. 
Silver Springs, Md. 
GALLAGHER, NEAL H. 
22 Bruce Park Ave. 
Greenwich, Ct. 
GALLE, PATRICIA 
1152 Commonwealth Av. 
Allston, Ma. 
GALLETI, DIANE M. 
30 Wallace St. 
Springfield, Ma. 
GALLO, HELENE B. 
250 Miller Rd. 
Ludlow, Ma. 
GAMBONE, ROBERT L. 
32 Yale Avenue 
Wakefield, Ma. 
GANNON, JANICE M. 
32 Rice St, 
Cambridge, Ma. 
CANS, MARVIN P. 
1002 Beacon St. 
Newton Ctr., Ma. 
GARDINER, ANNE E. 
24 Celestia Ct. 
N. Kingstown, R. I. 
GAREAU, BERNARD H. 
40 School St. 
Northbridge, Ma. 
GARERI, ELAINE A. 
12 Bradley Rd. 
Danvers, Ma. 
GARLICK, THOMAS B. 

4 Brigham Pk. 
Fitchburg, Ma. 
GARREPY, H. PATRICIA 
26 Cummings Rd. 
Newton Ctr., Ma. 
GARRITY, RICHARD F. 

5 Thompson St. 
Woburn, Ma. 
GARVEY, HENRY J. 
160 Main St. 
Woburn, Ma. 
GARVIN, PATRICIA A. 
3 Silloway St. 
Dorchester, Ma. 
GAUDREAU, J. MICHAEL 
44 Westgate Rd. 
Wellesley, Ma. 
GAVIGLIA, LOUIS R. 

20 Hayes Street 
Maynard, Ma. 
GAVIN, ELIZABETH 
845 North St. 
Walpole, Ma. 
GAVIN, MARY C. 
86 Roosevelt Square 
Englewood, N. J. 
GAY, CAROL JAFFE 
35 Lisbon St. 



Maiden, Ma. 
CAYNOR, HOWARD F. 
1621 Concord St. 
Framingham, Ma. 
GEARY, STEPHEN M. 
14 St. James St. 
Newton, Ma. 
GEARY, STEPHEN M. 
14 St. James St. 
Newton, Ma. 
GELORMINI, JAMES L. 
712 Milton Ave. 
Syracuse, N. Y. 
GENS, TIMOTHY F. 
29 Rockwood St. 
Jamaica Plain, Ma. 
GENTILE, PATRICIA A. 
35 N. Winifred Rd. 
Brockton, Ma. 
GEOGHECAN, BETTY A. 
85 Rose Hill Ave. 
New Rochelle, N. Y. 
GERETY, JOHN E., JR. 
45 Washington St. 
Woburn, Ma. 
CIARLA, LOIS M. 
85 Belgrade Ave. 
Roslindale, Ma. 
GIFFORD, JAMES K. 
12 Burhans Place 
Delmar, N. Y. 
GILES, PATRICK W. 
459 Wildwood Rd. 
Northvale, N. J. 
GILL, GEORGE M. 
355 Appleton St. 
Arlington, Ma. 
GINGRAS, NORMAND 

A. 
Marist College and Sem. 
Framingham, Ma. 
GIUFFREDA, FRANCIS A. 
5805 33rd Place 
Hyattsville, Md. 
GLEASON, JOHN J. 
27 Teresa Dr. 
Wolcott, Ct. 
GLENNON, JOHN J, 
1391 Union St. 
Manchester, N. H. 
GLIDDEN, RICHARD J, 
35 Milk St. 
Nantucket, Ma. 
GLYNN, MICHAEL J. 
26 Arrowhead Rd. 
Weston, Ma. 
GOGGIN, RICHARD M. 
50 Mill St. 
Randolph, Ma. 
GONDEK, MICHAEL R. 
3035 N. 88th St. 



Milwaukee, Wi. 
GONNERING, RUSSELL 

S. 
7416 W. Wisconsin Ave. 
Wauwatosa, Wi. 
GOODROW, RICHARD 

A. 
50 Jefferson Ave. 
Watertown, Ma. 
GOODYEAR, JUDITH A. 
RD 2 Miller Dr. 
Boonton, N. J. 
GORDON, ANN 
148 Woodland St. 
Natick, Ma. 
GORGONE, 

CHRISTOPHER L. 
115 Crest Rd. 



GRAHAM, DOROTHY E. 
63 Studley Ave. 
Brockton, Ma. 
GRAINGER, JOHN C. 
Box 423 RR#1 
Westerly, R. I. 
GRANDFIELD, MICHAEL 

P. 
105 Hampton Place 
Ridgewood, N. J. 
GRANSKI, JEFFREY 
8 Fidelis Way 
Brighton, Ma. 
GRAPES, WILFRED A., Ill 
259 Wiswall Rd. 
Newton Ctr., Ma. 
GREALY, MICHAEL J. 
25 Midvale Rd. 




Wellesley, Ma. 
GORMICAN, STEPHEN P. 
590 Thomas Ave. 
Rochester, N. Y. 
GORSKI, MARK F. 
42 Roslin St. 
Dorchester, Ma. 
GOUNARIS, DANIEL G. 
20 Sunrise St. 
Haverhill, Ma. 
GRABMAN, JAMES P. 
2 Delancey Drive 
Geneva, N. Y. 
GRACEFFA, ROBERT C. 
16 Westland Terr. 
W. Newton, Ma. 



W. Roxbury, Ma. 
GREELEY, KATHLEEN 
9 Westwood Rd. 
Somerville, Ma. 
GREELEY, ROBERT J. 
232 Burt Rd. 
Springfield, Ma. 
GREEN, JOHN J. 
1 Brandon Rd. 
Milton, Ma. 
GREEN, JOYCE, SR. 
56 Franklin St. 
Waterbury, Ct. 
GREEN, LINDA J. 
50 Greenfield St. 
Brockton, Ma. 



GREEN, ROBERT, BRO. 
99 Crystal St. 
Maiden, Ma. 
GREENBLATT, MARK R. 
1097 N. High St. 
E. Haven, Ct. 
GREGORY, SUSAN E. 
110 Bradford Ave. 
E. Providence, R. I. 
GRESCO, WALTER E., JR. 
140 A St. 
Lowell, Ma. 
GREW, VIRGINIA M. 
Walpole St. 
Dover, Ma. 
GRIFFIN, MICHAEL J. 
188 Beacon St. 
Chestnut Hill, Ma. 
GRIFFIN, PAULA E. 
98 Carey Ave. 
Lexington, Ma. 
GRIFFIN, RICHARD J. 
121 Woodbole Ave. 
Mattapan, Ma. 
GRIFFIN, ROBERT E. 
31 Lincoln St. 
Winchester, Ma. 
GRIFFITH, ROBERT F. 
3 Pickett Lane 
Bloomfield, Ct. 
GRODEN, CLAIRE 
42 North Street 
Newton Ctre., Ma. 
GROPPO, BETTY J. 
14 Woodside Circle 
Simsbury, Ct. 
GUDZINOWICZ, 

MICHAEL J. 
5 1/2 Pleasant St. 
Maynard, Ma. 
GUENTHER, GARY L. 
7 Arthur Rd. 
Newtonville, N. Y. 
GUEPEROUX, GEORGE J. 
66-15 52nd Ave. 
Maspeth, N. Y. 
GUERTIN, EDWARD C. 
585 Haverhill St. 
Lawrence, Ma. 
GUIDA, JOANNE M. 
381 Cambridge St. 
Cambridge, Ma. 
HACKETT, KEVIN R. 
14 Locust Avenue 
Larchmont, N. Y. 
HAGAN, JOHN P. 
7 Morton Terrace 
Milton, Ma. 
HAGEN, JOSEPH B. 
76 Mylord St. 
Norwood, Ma. 



416 



HALEY, ELLEN M. 
44 Boynton St. 
Jamaica Plain, Ma. 
HALL, KATHLEEN M. 
93 Peacedale Rd. 
Needham, Ma. 
HALL, WILLIAM T. 

32 Goodrich Road 
Jamaica Plain, Ma. 
HAMILTON, HENRIETTA 
126 Beaver St. 
Framingham, Ma. 
HAMILTON, JOSEPH L. 
92 Chestnut St. 
Haverhill, Ma. 
HAMILTON, MARGARET 

S. 
622 Van Duzer St. 
Staten Island, N. Y. 
HAMMILL, HUNTER A. 
500 Herkimer Ave. 
Haworth, N. J. 
HANDY, NANCY T. 
215 LaGrange St. 
W. Roxbury, Ma. 
HANFORD, GERALD D. 
1180 Clover St. 
Rochester, N. Y. 
HANIFY, WILLIAM B. 
271 Washington St. 
Belmont, Ma. 
HANLEY, MARY E. 
54 Daniels St. 
Hopedale, Ma. 
HANNON, JOSEPH J. 
220 So. Irving Ave. 
Scranton, Pa. 
HANNON, MARYG. 

33 Mt. Vernon Street 
Dorchester, Ma. 
HANRAHAN, LINDA 
933 St. Marks Ave. 
Westfield, N. J. 
HANSBURY, WILLIAM J. 
31 Savin Hill St. 
Canton, Ma. 
HANSEN, HENRY A. 
377 Broadwell Ave. 
Union, N. j. 
HARDING, KEVIN L. 

21 Battle Green Rd. 
Lexington, Ma. 
HARE, DAVID E. 
284 Foster St. 
Brighton, Ma. 
HARPER, DENE T. 
84 Clairmont St. 
Lynn, Ma. 

HARRINGTON, ELLEN F. 
220 Atlantic St. 
N. Quincy, Ma. 



HARRINGTON, NANCY 

M. 
64 Fairfield St. 
Cambridge, Ma. 
HARRINGTON, 

THOMAS E. 

9 Victoria Street 
Somerville, Ma. 
HARRIS, ANN M. 
128 Watson Rd. 
Belmont, Ma. 
HARRIS, BRIAN W. 
119 Peach Orchard Rd. 
Waterbury, Ct. 
HARRIS, FRANK W. 

48 Boundary Rd. 
Maiden, Ma. 
HARRITY, RICHARD 
103 Washington St. 
Hudson, Ma. 
HARTIGAN, DAVID M. 
844 East 5th St. 
S. Boston, Ma. 
HASEY, CANDACE O. 
126 Walton Park 
Melrose, Ma. 
HASTINGS, MARY O. 
52 Bradford Road 
S. Weymouth, Ma. 
HAVENS, ANITA J. 
4274 Taunton Hgts. Dr. 
Syracuse, N. Y. 
HAY, SCOTT 

10 Brandon Ave. 
Fitchburg, Ma. 
HAYDEN, ROBERT E. 
23 Red Cedar Avenue 
Uncasville, Ct. 
HAYES, BRIAN E. 

2 Canna St. 
Warwick, R. 1. 
HAYES, JAMES M. 
1006 W. Boylston St. 
Worcester, Ma. 
HEALY, DANIEL A. 
36 Jason St. 
Arlington, Ma. 
HEALY, WILLIAM M., JR. 
63 Ash Street 
Concord, Ma. 
HEDSTROM, DAVID A. 
2 Lee St. 
Tewksbury, Ma. 
HEENAN, THOMAS J. 
5 Kieran Rd. 
N. Andover, Ma. 
HENDERSON, DONNA 

M. 
23 Meade Ave. 
Hull, Ma. 
HENEBERRY, JAMES 



PAUL 
30 Zoar Ave. 
Dedham, Ma. 
HENNEBERRY, THOMAS 

F.JR. 
9 Deering Ave. 
Lexington, Ma. 
HENNELLY, JEAN F. 
25 Maple Ave. 
Newton, Ma. 
HENNESSEY, RICHARD F. 
115 Nonantum St. 
Newton, Ma. 
HENNESSY, ROBERT P. 
49 Elmwood St. 
N. Andover, Ma. 
HERR, KATHLEEN M. 
108 Churchill Lane 
Fayetteville, N. Y. 
HESSION, WILLIAM J., 

JR. 
25 Lyman Rd. 
Framingham, Ma. 
HICKEY, WILLIAM F., Ill 
55 Meadowcrest Lane 
Watertown, Ct. 
HIGGINS, WILLIAM J. 
248 Third St. 
Troy, N. Y. 

HILAIRE, STAFFORD G. 
204-20 100th Ave. 
Hollis, N. Y. 
HILL, PAUL R. 
128 Lakeview Ave. 
Falmouth, Ma. 
HINCHEY, 

CHRISTOPHER M. 
355 Essex St. 
Salem, Ma. 
HLAVATY, MARK D. 
2814 Bembridge St. 
Royal Oak, Mi. 
HOELL, JOHN C, JR. 
16 Springvale Rd. 
Reading, Ma. 
HOGAN, RICHARD E. 
349 Lexington St. 
Newton, Ma. 
HOLDEN, URSULA M. 
100 Chester Place 
Englewood, N. J. 
HOLLAND, MARK W. 
164 Elgin Street 
Newton Ctr., Ma. 
HORAN, MARGARET D. 
Meadow lane 
Cohasset, Ma. 
HORIGAN, THOMAS F., 

JR. 
7 St. Marys Road 
Milton, Ma. 



HOULE, JAMES A. 
34 Union St. 
Biddeford, Me. 
HOULE, SR. LILLIANNE 
1051 Blue Hill Ave. 
Milton, Ma. 
HOWARD, PAUL M. 
65 Woodlawn St. 
Jamaica Plain, Ma. 
HOWE, RICHARD S. 
133 Tamarack Rd. 
Westwood, Ma. 
HRINCHUK, MARGARET 
36 Beacon St. 
Woburn, Ma. 
HUBLER, WILLIAM A. 
1999 Comm Ave. 
Brighton, Ma. 
HUGHES, JOHN D. 
60 Commonwealth Ave. 
Boston, Ma. 

HUGHES, KATHLEEN M. 
Bx. 242 White Oaks Dr. 
Bedminster, N. J. 
HUGHES, MARY L. 
25 Ashland St. 
Melrose, Ma. 
HUNT, EILEEN R. 
31 Pleasant St. 
Hyde Park, Ma. 
HURLEY, EDWARD F., JR. 
1446 Cambridge St. 
Cambridge, Ma. 
HUTCHINSON, PAULA 

M. 
238 Savin Hill Ave. 
Dorchester, Ma. 
HUTH, THOMAS R. 
1446 Thorwood Drive 
Cincinnati, Oh. 
ILES, JOHN F. 
1086 Morton St. 
Mattapan, Ma. 
ILLSLEY, MICHAEL S. 
1039 Belmont St. 
Watertown, Ma. 
IMMIG, JOHN 
18 Innitou Road 
Woburn, Ma. 
INNES, ALANA. 
259 Ford Avenue 
Rochester, N. Y. 
ISACCO, ANTHONY J. 
One Patton Dr. 
Pittsburgh, Pa. 
JACKSON, KRISTIN A. 
165 Common St. 
Watertown, Ma. 
JACOBSON, KENNETH E. 
30 Pilgrim Road 
Natick, Ma. 



JACOBY, LEO P. 
444 North Main St. 
Creensburg, Pa. 
JACQUES, DONALD T. 

20 MacArthur Ave. 
Closter, N. J. 
JAMES, STEPHEN J. 
3820 Penhurst Ave. 
Baltimore, Md. 
JARAS, BIRUTE R. 
18 Garfield Ave. 
Norwood, Ma. 
JENKINS, FRANCIS W. 
5 Corman Rd. 
Mattapan, Ma. 
JENKINS, MARY-GAIL 
404 Stevens St. 
Lowell, Ma. 

JERAY, JEANNE 
10 Crown Rd. 
Westford, Ma. 
JOHNSON, GREGORY!. 
37 Dawson Drive 
W. Caldwell, N. ]. 
JOHNSON, JEROME A. 
1802 W. Houstonia Ave. 
Royal Oak, Mi. 
JOHNSTON, DANIEL J. 
Ill Lexington St. 
Lawrence^ Ma. 
JORDAN, GEORGE J. 
224 Ferry St. 
Everett, Ma. 
JORDAN, MICHAEL J. 
Wedgewood Drive 
Woodbridge, Ct. 
JORDAN, ROBERT B. 

21 Allen Street 
Pembroke, Ma. 
JOSEPH, MARIE B. 
South Pamet Rd. 
Truro, Ma. 

JOYCE, GERARD J., JR. 
46 Ridge Rd. 
Milton, Ma. 
KAHWATY, VICTOR J. 
46 Hubbard Place 
Brooklyn, N. Y. 
KANE, ROBERT J. 
49 Smith Ave. 
Bergenfield, N. J. 
KARPICZ, JOSEPH P. 
52 Bartholomew St. 
Peabody, Ma. 
KARRAT, MICHAEL 
23 Woodberry Rd. 
New Hartford, N. Y. 
KASSAR, DOUGLAS 
1 _ 74th St. 
Brooklyn, N. Y. 
KAUFFOLD, GARY S. 



2 Allston Drive 
Walpole, Ma. 
KAVANEY, JAMES H. 
222 N 12 Street 
Bismark, N. D. 
KAY, EDWARD D. 
71 Valley St. 
Pembroke, Ma. 
KEADY, SHEILA A. 
164 West St. 
Needham, Ma. 
KEANE, JOSEPH F. 
381 Huntington Av. 
Hyde Park, Ma. 
KEANE, ROBERT L. 
418 Beacon St. 
Boston, Ma. 
KEARNEY, HENRY T. 
1625 N. Webster Ave. 
Dunmore, Pa. 
KEAVENEY, JOSEPHINE 

A. 
342 Needham St. 
Dedham, Ma. 
KEEFE, MARY E. 

23 Victoria Rd. 
Arlington, Ma. 
KELLEHER, DANIEL J. 
46 Russell Avenue 
Watertown, Ma. 
KELLEHER, JAMES H. 
284 Foster St. 
Brighton, Ma. 
KELLEHER, STEPHEN P. 
42 Chilton St. 
Cambridge, Ma. 
KELLEY, MICHAEL F. 
12 Ward Avenue 
Newport, R. I. 
KELLEY, PETER C. 

24 Clarke St. 
Lexington, Ma. 
KELLEY, ROBERT M. 
103 Woodsvale Rd. 
Madison, Ct. 
KELLEY, WALTER J. 
35 Marjorie Rd. 
Braintree, Ma. 
KELLIHER, ROBERT E., JR. 
105 Anawan Ave. 
Boston, Ma. 

KELLY, FRANK B. 
3300 Netherland Av. 
New York, N. Y. 
KELLY, JOHN R. 
300 Newbury St. 
Boston, Ma. 
KELLY, LORRAINE 
37 Harvard St. 
Arlington, Ma. 
KELLY, PAUL D. 



40 Greenwood Rd. 
Burlington, Ma. 
KELLY, THOMAS P. 
12 Hubbardston Rd. 
Dorchester, Ma. 
KELTNER, ROBERT J., JR. 
169 Beach 137 St. 
Belle Harbor, N. Y. 
KEMMITT, WILLIAM N. 
282 Lisa Drive 
Brockton, Ma. 
KEMPS, JUDITH 
322 Cross Rd. 
Belmont, Ma. 
KENDALL, WILLIAM W. 
5 Crescent St. 
W. Boylston, Ma. 
KENNEALLY, JOHN J. 

54 Potomac St. 
W. Roxbury, Ma. 
KENNEDY, ANTHONY C. 
5 Liguanea Ave. 
Kingston 6, Jama, West 

Indies 
KENNEDY, DAVID C. 
18 Webster St. 
Arlington, Ma. 
KENNEDY, GILBERT E. 
18 Radnor Rd. 
Brighton, Ma. 
KENNEDY, KEVIN C. 
11 Denny St. 
Dorchester, Ma. 
KENNEDY, T. FRANK 

300 Newbury St. 
Boston, Ma. 

KENNEY, LAWRENCE A. 
130 Cherry Lane 
Wynnewood, Pa. 
KENNY, ANNE C. 

55 Drew Rd. 
Belmont, Ma. 
KERR, EDWARD J. 
22 Wayside Ave. 
Framingham, Ma. 
KIEFFER, THOMAS M. 
779 Evangeline Road 
Cincinnati, Oh. 
KIGGINS, ROBERT J. 
462 Spencer Rd. 
Rochester, N. Y. 
KILMURRAY, THOMAS J 

301 Lake St. 
Newark, N. J. 
KILPATRICK, RICHARD J 
57 Madison Ave. 
Hartford, Ct. 

KILRAY, JOHN G. 
86 Valley View Drive 
Wethersfield, Ct. 
KINCHLA, JOHN E. 



55 Adella Ave. 
W. Newton, Ma. 
KING, BRIAN R. 
1133 Drexel Ave. 
Drexel Hill, Pa. 
KING, JOSEPH A. 
75 Greer St. 
Waltham, Ma. 
KINNIER, RICHARD T. 
27 MacArthur Dr. 
Old Greenwich, Ct. 
KIPPENBERGER, PAULF., 

JR. 
30 Harrington St. 
Revere, Ma. 
KOFRON, EDWARD J. 
5138 S. Kilbourn Ave. 
Chicago, II. 
KOFRON, NORINE 
5138 S. Kilbourn Ave. 
Chicago, II. 
KOLB, JOHN F. 
1327 Oakview Drive 
Worthington, Oh. 
KOZARICH, JOHN W. 
248 Court Avenue 
Lyndhurst, N. J. 
KRANT, WILLIAM P. 
47 Walker St. 
Somerville, Ma. 
KRISTAN, JOSEPH J. 
230 Kelly Road 
Vernon, Ct. 
KRUEGER, PAUL H. 
1 Wildemere Terrace 
Concord, N. H. 
KRUG, STEPHEN G. 
206 Concord St. 
E. Williston, N. Y. 
KUPPENS, MARY J. 
204 Eliot St. 
Milton, Ma. 
KUROWSKI, RICHARD 

A. 
503 Park Dr. 
Norristown, Pa. 
KUSSY, EDWARD R., JR. 
128 Warren Street 
Revere, Ma. 
KWASNIK, DENNIS J. 
13 Streuli Ct. 
E. Paterson, N. J. 
LABAHN, WILLIAM S. 
5722 Glenhaven Ct. 
Riverside, Ca. 
LABOZZETTA, GRACE A. 
9 Woodland Dr. 
Old Bethpage, N. Y. 
LABRANCHE, ALAN j. 
6 Jane Rd. 
Methuen, Ma. 



418 



LABRECQUE, MARK A. 
132 Columbia Blvd. 
Waterbury, Ct. 
LACASSE, JOHN R. 
113 Thornton Cir, No. 
Camillus, N. Y. 
LACIVITA, DAVE M. 
1710 Hamilton Dr. 
Valley Forge, Pa. 
LAHAISE, DAVID L. 
76 Rockridge Rd. 
Waltham, Ma. 
LAM, JUNE 
301 Shawnut Ave. 
Boston, Ma. 
LAMATTINA, JOHN L. 
1401 73rd St. 
Brooklyn, N. Y. 
LAMONT, GAIL A. 
51 Tracey East St. 
Atlantic Highland, N. J. 
LANDREY, CHRISTINE L. 
334 Conestoga Rd. 
Wayne, Pa. 

LANDRICAN, JOSEPH A. 
50 Frankland Rd. 
Hopkinton, Ma. 
LANGAN, JAMES K. 
44 Washongton St. 
Brookline, Ma. 
LANGKOPF, DEBORAH 
440 Albermarle Rd. 
Newton, Ma. 
LANIGAN, JAMES F. 
4 Cabot Rd. 
Lawrence, Ma. 
LANIGAN, JOHN K. 

86 Plymouth Ave. 
Milton, Ma. 
LANZELOTTI, BARBARA 

F. 
47 Walcott Ave. 
Inwood, N. Y. 
LANZILLO, JOHN T. 
7 Priscilla Lane 
Winchester, Ma. 
LARDNER, MICHAEL D. 
60 Arrandale Ave. 
Great Neck, N. Y. 
LARONGA, VICTOR P. 
88 East St. 
Milford, Ma. 
LARSEN, MARK 

87 Livingston Rd. 
Wellesley, Ma. 
LASOFF, SAMUEL A. 
194 Woodland Rd. 
Milton, Ma. 
LATORES, SANTO ). 
49 Morrison Ave. 
Somerville, Ma. 



LATORRE, FRANCIS P. 
553 Broadway 
Everett, Ma. 

LATOURELLE, JAMES N. 
RD 2 

Fort Ann, N. Y. 
LATTA, MAJORIE A. 
42 Belknap St. 
Somerville, Ma. 
LAURETANO, LINDA A. 
216 Daniels St. 
Franklin, Ma. 
LAVEY, JOHN F. 
63 Watervale Rd. 
Medford, Ma. 
LAWLER, LAWRENCE T. 
Box 151 R.D. 1 
Lafayette, N. J. 
LAWRENCE, DAVID A. 
31 Inness Place 
Manhasset, N. Y. 
LAZARICK, LEONARD 

W. 
215 Crafts Rd. 
Brookline, Ma. 
LAZIN, MELVIN N. 
27'/j Priscilla Rd. 
Brighton, Ma. 
LEAHY, MAUREEN MCG. 
356 A Chane St. 
Fort Devens, Ma. 
LEARY, DANIEL L. 
131 Blue Hills Rd. 
New Haven, Ct. 
LEBLANC, ROBERT D. 
21 Dolloff Ave. 
Beverly, Ma. 

LEGENDRE, RICHARD N. 
114 South Ave. 
Lewiston, Me. 
LEIST, ROBERT J., JR. 
332 Longview Dr. 
Mountainside, N. J. 
LENGE, ALBERT P. 
40 West Normandy Dr. 
W. Hartford, Ct. 
LEONARD, CHARLES F., 

JR. 
56 Lyman Rd. 
Milton, Ma. 
LEONARD, FREDERICK 

C. 
5 Leewood Rd. 
Wellesley, Ma. 
LEONARD, 

MARGARETTE L. 
536 Washington St. 
Brighton, Ma. 
LEONARD, ROBERT W. 
100 Keith St. 
W. Roxbury, Ma. 



LEONE, DEBORAH A. 
74 Sunset Ridge Dr. 
E. Hartford, Ct. 
LESAGE, MARIE A., SR. 
101 College Pkwy. 
Winooski, Vt. 
LESPERANCE, THOMAS 

F. 
32 Barbara Rd. 
Needham, Ma. 
LEVASSEUR, DIANNE P. 
644 Varnum Ave. 
Lowell, Ma. 
LEWIS, ARTHUR J. 
34 Princeton 
E. Boston, Ma. 
LIEB, GERARD J. 
87-46 Chelsea St. 
Jamaica Estates, N. Y. 
LiNCOFF, JOSH P. 
14 Coburn St. 
Maiden, Ma. 
LINDBERG, JOHN F. 
1129 Parkside Dr. E. 
Seattle, Wa. 



LINEHAN, JOHN J. 
646 Beech St. 
Roslindale, Ma. 
LINGOS, SONIA 
24 Bassett Rd. 
Brockton, Ma. 
LINKO, MARY A. 
49 Ash Rd. 
Wapping, Ct. 
LINNEHAN, JOAN M. 
54 Homestead Cir. 
Hamilton, Ma. 
LISTON, ALFRED 
184 Crescent Avenue 
Revere, Ma. 
LjUNGGREN, KATE L. 
27 Houghton St. 
Dorchester, Ma. 
LOFTUS, JOHN J. 
231 Reservation Rd. 
Hyde F'ark, Ma. 
LONCICH, ANTHONY V. 
580 East 7 St. 
S. Boston, Ma. 
LONG, ELIZABETH A. 




34 Hobomack Rd. 
Quincy, Ma. 
LONGDEN, ROBERT E. 

35 Laurelwood Rd. 
Holder), Ma. 
LORANCER, LEO J. 
376 Old Fall River 
N. Dartmouth, Ma. 
LORETZ, JOHN W. 
1495 Dolores Place 
Seaford, N. Y. 
LORMON, JOHN J. 
900 Washington St. 
Wellesley, Ma. 
LOTT, JOHN H. 

73 Birchwood Dr. 
Millington, N, J. 
LOVETT, JAMES J. 
66 Chickatawbut St. 
Dorchester, Ma. 
LOZIER, JAMES E. 
850 Ellery St. 
Jackson, Mi. 
LOZITO, BRUNO V. 
18 Radnor Rd. 
Brighton, Ma. 
LUCAS, BARBARA A. 
4 Champy Lane 
Methuen, Ma. 
LUCAS, ROY J. 
36 Garner Rd. 
Dorchester, Ma. 
LUCCIO, JAMES A. 
69 Capen St. 
Milton, Ma. 
LUCEY, ROBERT F. 
39 Clark St. 
Maiden, Ma. 
LUCICH, JOHN C. 
Marist College and Sem. 
Framingham, Ma. 
LUE, FREDRICK P. 
188 Beacon St. 
Chestnut Hill, Ma. 
LUKAS, JANET L. 

4 Belknap St. 
Arlington, Ma. 
LUKIN, JOHN M. 
133 Salisbury Ave. 
Moosup, Ct. 
LUKOSIUS, JANET P. 

5 Plovar St. 

W. Roxbury, Ma. 
LUND, ELIZABETH A. 
33 Hathavi^ay Ave. 
Beverly, Ma. 
LUTZKO, JOY A. 
1337Sloane Blvd. 
Plainfield, N. j. 
LYDON, AUSTIN T. 
10 Heritage Dr. 



Salem, Ma. 

LYE, GEORGE J., BRO., SJ 
18 Radnor 
Brighton, Ma. 
LYNCH, MARK F. 
10 Woodland Way 
Haverhill, Ma. 
LYNCH, MARTIN A. 
327 Washington Ave. 
Dumont, N. J. 
LYNCH, THOMAS J., JR. 
116 Eleanor Dr. 
Braintree, Ma. 
LYONS, ANNE T. 
27 Oakland Ave. 
Arlington, Ma. 
LYONS, GEORGE G. 
1332 Union St. 
N. Marshfield, Ma. 
LYONS, JAMES W. 

42 Manor St. 
Dorchester, Ma. 
LYONS, KATHLEEN M. 
1025 Hancock St. 
Quincy, Ma. 
MacADINO, DOMINIC 
50 Harvard St. 
Winchester, Ma. 
MacCUNE, MARYANNE 
24 Brush Hill Terr. 
Hyde Park, Ma. 
MacDONALD, DAVID 

M. 

43 Edward Ave. 
Lynnfield, Ma. 
MacDONALD, 

GREGORY 
92 Bacon St. 
Winchester, Ma. 
MacDONALD, JOHN 
99 Highland Ave. 
Watertown, Ma. 
MacDONALD, STEPHEN 

R. 
411 Webster St. 
Needham, Ma. 
MACHO, JAMES R. 
31 Garwood Ct. 
N. Garfield, N. J. 
MACKIN, JOHN J. 
8 Lantern Lane 
W. Roxbury, Ma. 
MACKINNON, DENNIS 
3 Wing Terr. 
Burlington, Ma. 
MacKINTOSH,JOHNJ 

JR. 
40 Hillcrest Avenue 
Dedham, Ma. 
MacLEAN, ALEXANDER J. 
i34 Fulton St. 



Medford, Ma. 
MacLEISH, KENNETH 
42 Bhasking Ridge Rd. 
Wilton, Ct. 
MADDEN, JOHN G. 
96 Draper St. 
Dorchester, Ma. 
MADDEN, TIMOTHY G. 
317 2nd St. 
Libertyville, II. 
MAGLIATO, CHARLES 
86 Second St. 
Garden City, N. Y. 
MAGUIRE, JAMES G. 
9 Curtis Circle 
Canton, Ma. 
MAGUIRE, PETER G. 
371 Mt. Vernon St. 
Dedham, Ma. 
MAGUIRE, ROBERT F. 
34 Robbins Rd. 
Lexington, Ma. 
MAGUIRE, THOMAS H. 
52 Buckingham Rd. 
Milton, Ma. 
MAHER, JAMES R. 
5 Ridgewood Rd. 
Paxton, Ma. 
MAHER, JOSEPH C 
33-23 163rd St. 
Flushing, N. Y. 
MAHER, ROBERT E. 
117 Kent St. 
Brookline, Ma. 
MAHONEY, DANIEL P. 
Bellevue Ave. 
Rye, N. Y. 

MAHONEY, GERALD T. 
300A Commonwealth 

Ave. 
Boston, Ma. 
MAHONEY, JOHN A. 
44 No. Payne St. 
Quincy, Ma. 
MAHONEY, RUTH A. 
21 A Myrtle Terrace 
Wakefield, Ma. 
MAIELLANO, FRANK A. 
208 Goden Street 
Belmont, Ma. 
MALIA, ELIZABETH A. 
110 West Union St. 
Endicott, N. Y. 
MALLETTE, RICHARD P. 
133 Orchard Hill Dr. 
Fairfield, Ct. 

MALLON, MAUREEN D. 
3034 Battersea Lane 
Alexandria, Va. 
MALLON, THOMAS J. 
4725 Lansing St. 



Philadelphia, Pa. 

MALLON, WILLIAM G. 

27 Parkway 

Montclair, N. J. 

MALONEY, EDWARD 
W., JR. 

26 Rockland St. 

Swampscott, Ma. 

MALYNN, RICHARD J. 

35 Fifth Ave. 

Haverhill, Ma. 

MANNING, GERALD G. 

81 St. Gregory St. 

Dorchester, Ma. 

MANNING, KENNETH L 

290 Vermont Street 

W. Roxbury, Ma. 

MANNIX, PHILIP J. 

74 Faxon Rd. 

Quincy, Ma. 

MARCIL, RICHARD P. 

1025 Knoll Drive 

Endwell, N. Y. 

MARINO, LAWRENCE H. 

79 Grant St. 

Somerville, Ma. 

MARKOL, LINDA A. 

Depot St. 

Montague, Ma. 

MARKUNS, JOHN F. 

119 G St. 

S. Boston, Ma. 

MAROUN, THOMAS S., 

JR. 
49 Leroi Dr. 

Pittsfield, Ma. 
MARSHALL, JEAN A. 
253 O Oak Bucket Rd. 
Scituate, Ma. 
MARSHALL, PAMELA A. 
146 Weatherbee Dr. 
Westwood, Ma. 
MARSHALL, ROBERTA. 
246 Grant St. 
Framingham, Ma. 
MARSHALL, STEPHEN 
56 Flintlocke Dr. 
Duxbury, Ma. 
MARSTON, JOHN E. 
112 Marine Road 
S. Boston, Ma. 
MARSZYCKI, NANCY A. 
78 Washington Ave. 
Islip Terrace, N. Y. 
MARTELON, GEORGE F. 
14 Eighth Ave. 
Milford, Ct. 
MARTEN, JOHN S. 
5015 Plantation Dr. 
Indianapolis, In. 
MARTIGNETTI. DENNIS 



58 Franconia St. 
Dorchester, Ma. 
MARTICNETTI, 

PATRICIA 
175 W. Wyoming Ave. 
Melrose, Ma. 
MARTIN, ALAN G. 
5026 Tenth St. 
Washington, D. C. 
MARTIN, ANNE M. 

11 Mt. Ida Terrace 
Newton, Ma. 
MARTIN, M. ROBIN 
2 Woodland Rd. 
Jamaica Plain, Ma. 
MARTORANO, )AMES 

M. 

10 Newhall St. 
N. Quincy, Ma. 
MASCIA, LOUISE E. 

12 Garden Way 
Dedham, Ma. 
MASHIA, JOHN D. 

11 Hillandale Rd. 
Westport, Ct. 
MASLANKA, PHILIP M. 

7 Glines Ave. 
Jamaica Plain, Ma. 
MASLOWSKI, 

THEODORE J. 
22 Jefferson St. 
Newton, Ma. 
MASSA, LOUISE C. 
1200 Brook Rd. 
Milton, Ma. 
MATT, DAVID L. 
164 Woodland St. 
Bristol, Ct. 
MATTERA, JAMES T. 

8 Michael Drive 
Old Bethpage, N. Y. 
MAY, FRANCES I. 
61 Mt. Walley Rd. 
Waltham, Ma. 
MAZANOWSKI, 

CATHRYN D. 
Terryville Rd. RD 2 
Harwinton, Ct. 
McARDLE, DAVID B. 
94 Surrey Lane 
Lowell, Ma. 

McAULIFFE, DAVID M. 
736 Mildred St. 
Teaneck, N. J. 
McAULIFFE, EUGENE F. 
4 Gary Ave. 
Milton, Ma. 
McBRIDE, CHARLES F. 
Valley Rd. Wilson Pt. 
S. Norwalk, Ct. 




McCain, WILLIAM Y. 
24 Murdock St. 
Brighton, Ma. 
McCANN, JOHN E. 
56 Narragansett Ave. 
Pawtucket, R. I. 

McCarthy, JOHN f. 

158 Parmenter Rd. 
W. Newton, Ma. 

McCarthy, peter j. 

23 Midland Ave. 
White Plains, N. Y. 
McCLAIN, JOHN G. 
3610 Bellecrest Ave. 
Cincinnati, Oh. 
McCONVILLE, M. F. 
1127 E Ave., Apt. 2 
Rochester, N. Y. 

Mccormick, Frances 

M. 
350 No. East 90th St. 
Miami, Fl. 

McCOURT, EDWARD G. 
294 Mt. Auburn St. 
Watertown, Ma. 
McDERMOTT, WILLIAM 
201 Milton St. 
Dorchester, Ma. 

McDonald, CAROL 

ANN 
66 Reedsdale Rd. 



Milton, Ma. 

McDonald, JEANNE d. 

276 Albion St., Apt. 1 
Wakefield, Ma. 

Mcdonough, JOSEPH 
p. 

42 Brookfield Rd. 
Waltham, Ma. 

Mcdonough, 

PATRICK 
34 Arthur Ave. 
Dracut, Ma. 

Mcdonough, PAUL 

M. 
1322 Columbia Rd. 
S. Boston, Ma. 

Mcdonough, 

THOMAS H. 
163 Ridgewood Rd. 
Milton, Ma. 
McELANEY, LANCE M. 
11 Haven Rd. 
Braintree, Ma. 
McELENEY, STEPHEN F. 
45 Glenbrook Rd. 
W. Hartford, Ct. 
McEnroe, WILLIAM F. 
572 Sandford Ave. 
Newark, N. J. 
McGILVRAY, SR. JANET 
1051 Blue Hill Ave. 



Milton, Ma. 
McGLINCHEY, SHEILA 
14 Lori Lane 
Randolph, Ma. 
McGOVERN, MARK M. 
62 Sias Lane 
Milton, Ma. 
McGRATH, MAUREEN 
78 Charles St. 
Boston, Ma. 
McGRATH, MICHAEL 
4 W. Main St. 
Hopkinton, Ma. 
McGRATH, MICHAEL E. 
43 Sunset Ave. 
N. Attleboro, Ma. 
McGRATH, THOMAS W. 
1854 Chester Drive 
E. Meadow, N. Y. 
McGUIGAN, PATRICK J. 
4321 Hugh Bennett Dr. 
Annandale, Va. 
McGUIRE, DIANE R. 
21 Frawley St. 
Boston, Ma. 
McGUIRE, JAMES A. 
19248 Dalby Street 
Detroit, Mi. 
McHUGH, PETER M. 
19Muirfield Rd. 
Orange, Ct. 



MclNERNEY, TIMOTHY 

D. 
62 Chestnut Hill Rd. 
Chestnut Hill, Ma. 
MclNTYRE, VIRGINIA A. 
17 Robinwood Dr. 
Canton, Ma. 
MclSAACSR. FRANCIS 

P. 

35 Creighton St. 
Jamaica Plain, Ma. 
McKEANEY, THOMAS 

W. 
5249 No. Sixth St. 
Philadelphia, Pa. 
McKENNA, HENRYJ. 
338 Medford St. 
Maiden, Ma. 
McKENNA, MAUREEN 

M. 
58 High St. 
Winchester, Ma. 
McKENNEY, WILLIAM D. 

36 Hurd Rd. 
Belmont, Ma. 

Mclaughlin, MAURA 

E. 

91 Westglow St. 
Dorchester, Ma. 

Mclaughlin, paul j. 

3 Edgewater Place 



Winchester, Ma. 
McLOUGHLlN, PETER P. 
284 Foster St. 
Brighton, Ma. 
McNABB, RICHARD 
S. Main St. 
Brookline, N. H. 
McPARLAND, STEPHEN 

M. 
35 Fern St. 
Natick, Ma. 
McTIGUE, A. KEVIN 
30 Henry St. 
New London, Ct. 
McWEY, SHARON A. 
65 Crosby Road 
Chestnut Hill, Ma. 
MEAD, ARTHUR 

COLEMAN 
176 Calvin St. 
Fall River, Ma. 
MEAD, DAVID P. 
155 Locust St. 
Garden City, N. Y. 
MEADOWS, )OAN M. 
105 Babcock St. 
Providence, R. I. 
MECONE, JAMES V. 
30 Mars St. 
Weymouth, Ma. 
MEDEA, WILLIAM L. 




942 Laurel Ave. 
River Edge, N. J. 
MEEHAN, GREGORY B. 
998 Chestnut St. 
Manchester, N. H. 
MEEHAN, JOHN P. 
18 Hilltop Rd. 
Watertown, Ma. 
MEERE, JAMES F. 
7 Walnut Rd. 
Chelmsford, Ma. 
MEHLINGER, FREDERIC 

J. 
4 Longfellow Dr. 
Wilbraham, Ma. 
MELVIN, TIMOTHY 

JAMES 
96 Walnut St. 
Brookline, Ma. 
MEMORY, JOHN M. 

25 Endicott Ave. 
Somerville, Ma. 
MENAGHAN, WILLIAM 

M. 
80 Lafayette Ave. 
Maywood, N. J. 
MENARD, JEAN L. 
Orchard St. 
Blackstone, Ma. 
MERCAITIS, PATRICIA 
11 Gorham St. 
Allston, Ma. 
MERCAITIS, PAUL J. 
31 Maxfield St. 
W. Roxbury, Ma. 
METZ, JAMES W. 

26 Fieldstone Dr. 
Syosset, N. Y. 
METZGER, GARY O. 
245 Elm St. 
Agawam, Ma. 
MICHAELS, JOHN T. 
7717 Alhambra Blvd. 
Hollywood, Fl. 
MIGLIACCIO, JOHN N. 
320 N. Beverwyk Rd. 
Parsippany, N. J. 
MILLER, HARRY F. 
1726 Lake Drive 
Monroe, Wi. 
MILLERICK, GEORGE B. 
171 Trapelo Rd. 
Waltham, Ma. 
MILLHAM, JAMES M. 
14 N. Meadow Dr. 
Glen Burnie, Md. 
MILLS, BARRY A. 

105 Bailey St. 
Lawrence, Ma. 
MILLS, ELEANOR M. 
1 Hartranft Ave. 



Norristown, Pa. 
MINGLE, JOSEPH J. 
254 Upland Rd. 
Cambridge, Ma. 
MIRABITO, TERESA A. 
58 Kirkwood Rd. 
Brighton, Ma. 
MISITE, MADELINE M. 
35 Flynt St. 
N. Quincy, Ma. 
MITCHELL, DAVID B. 
435 Quincy St. 
Dorchester, Ma. 
MITCHELL, KEVIN M. 
71 Tower St. 
Jamaica Plain, Ma. 
MITCHELL, ROBERT W. 
89 Temple Rd. 
Waltham, Ma. 
MOHAN, MARYANN B. 
24 Salem St. 
Lynn, Ma. 

MOLE, CHARLES C. 
357 Fort Hill Rd. 
Scarsdale, N. Y. 
MOLL, PETER E. 
337 Sherwood Drive 
Paramus, N. J. 
MOLLOY, JOHN BRIAN 
18 Mt. Hood Road 
Brighton, Ma. 
MONAHAN, ROBERT B. 
74 Plymouth Rd. 
N. Bellingham, Ma. 
MONE, KATHERINE K. 
12 Broomstick Way 
New Seabury, Ma. 
MONTANE, FRANCINE 
9 Brackett St. 
Brighton, Ma. 
MOONEY, JOHN S. 
8 Driftwood Rd. 
Marblehead, Ma. 
MORAN, MICHAEL R. 
1212 Boylston St. 
Chestnut Hill, Ma. 
MORAN, TERENCE M. 
34 Blauvelt St. 
Teaneck, N. J. 
MORANO, CHARLES A. 
40 Prospect St. 
Ardsley, N. Y. 
MORIAN, MARGARET R. 
28 Paul Gore St. 
Jamaica Plain, Ma. 
MORIARTY, ANN |. 
14 Furnival Road 
Jamaica Plain, Ma. 
MORIARTY, WILLIAM!., 

JR. 
117 Knapp St. 



Stamford, Ct. 
MORLEY, JAMES T., JR. 
63 Willow Ave. 
Larchmont, N. Y. 
MORRIS, KENNETH J. 

40 Greentree Terrace 
Tenafly, N. J. 
MORRIS, MICHAEL A. 
7547 Ardwick Ardmore 
Landover Hills, Md. 
MORRISON, DANE A. 
104 Pleasant St. 
Lexington, Ma. 
MORRISON, JANET L. 
48 Forest Street 
Rockland, Ma. 
MORRISON, KEVIN J. 
43 Algonquin Rd. 
Chestnut Hill, Ma. 
MORRISSEY, EDWARD 

P. 

41 Sunset Hill Rd. 
W. Roxbury, Ma. 
MOSCHELLA, WILLIAM 

A. 

8 Creylock Rd. 
Allston, Ma. 
MOSHO, STEPHEN S. 

9 Burpee Rd. 
Swampscott, Ma. 
MULAIRE, DOUGLAS W. 
22 Sound Ave. 
Stamford, Ct. 
MULCAHY, EDWARD P. 
38 Richfield Rd. 
Arlington, Ma. 
MULCAHY, JACQUELINE 

W. 
20 Donazetti Road 
Wellesley, Ma. 
MULCAHY, TIMOTHY 
12 Stults Road 
Belmont, Ma. 
MULLANE, RITA MARIE 
18 Meacham Rd. 
Cambridge, Ma. 
MULLEN, FRANCES T. 

10 Victory Rd. 
Dorchester, Ma. 
MULLEN, JAMES M. 
135 Jewett Ave. 
Jersey City, N. J. 
MURPHY, CELINE M. 
17 Henry St. 
Brookline, Ma. 
MURPHY, EDWARD J. 
8 Garden Rd. 
Concord, Ma. 
MURPHY, JAMES T. 

5 Meadowbrook Dr. 
Barrington, R. I. 



MURPHY, JOHN V. 
651 Main St. 
Hingham, Ma. 
MURPHY, KATHLEEN J. 
91 Birch Hill Dr. 
S.Windsor, Ct. 
MURPHY, KEVIN S. 
821 Taylor Ave. 
Scranton, Pa. 
MURPHY, ROBERT D. 
26 Circuit Rd. 
Brookline, Ma. 
MURPHY, SR. EILEEN, 

MSBT 
402 South Street 
Hyannis, Ma. 
MURPHY, STEPHEN D. 
578 Park Rd. 
W. Hartford, Ct. 
MURPHY, STEVEN J. 
74 Austen Rd. 
Hamden, Ct. 
MURPHY, THOMAS J. 
45 Beechcroft St. 
Brighton, Ma. 
MURPHY, VINCENT 

BRIAN 
485 Washington St. 
Brookline, Ma. 
MURRAY, JANE C. 
61 Walnut St. 
Somerville, Ma. 
MURRAY, JOSEPH T. 
19 Regan Rd. 

Dorchester, Ma. 
MURRAY, ROBERT B. 
7005 Ridge Crest Ter. 

Brooklyn, N. Y. 

MURRAY, THOMAS G. 

31 Dunham St. 

Norwich, Ct. 

MUSCATO, JOANNA M. 

279 Centre St. 

Dorchester, Ma. 

MUTASCIO, RONALD P. 

42 Perham St. 

W. Roxbury, Ma. 

MUZYK, CHRISTINE 

6520 Broxburn Dr. 

Bethesda, Md. 

MYLES, TERRENCE F. 

33 Swan Place 

Arlington, Ma. 

MYSLINSKI, JOHN F. 

137 Commonwealth Ave. 

Chestnut Hill, Ma. 

NACLERIO, ALPHONSE 

2 June Court 

White Plains, N. Y, 

NAJBERG, ANDREW C. 

880-72 St. 



Brooklyn, N. Y. 
NALLY, JAMES J. 
92 Otis St. 
Milton, Ma. 

NARDONE, ROBERT C. 
176 River St. 
Waltham, Ma. 
NARY, THOMAS M. 
1376 California St. 
Woodbridge, Va. 
NAZAR, EDWARD J. 
5 Cedar Lane 
Scotia, N. Y. 
NAZZARO, MADELINE 
2100 Gulf Shore Blvd. 
Naples, Fl. 
NEILL, JAMES P. 
284 Foster St. 
Brighton, Ma. 
NELSON, ROBERT J. 
17 Dale St. 
Waltham, Ma. 
NELSON, ROBERT W. 
83 Edgewood Rd. 
Westwood, Ma. 
NEVES, EDMUND F. 
64 Common St. 
Walpole, Ma. 
NEWCOMB, ALFRED R. 
56 Selwyn St. 
Roslindale, Ma. 
NEWMAN, GEORGE J. 
23 Sampson Ave. 
N. Providence, R. I. 
NIENBERG, MICHAEL W. 
3842 Columbia Pike 
Arlington, Va. 
NILAND, LINDA S. 
20 Hawthorne St. 
Portsmouth, N. H. 
NILES, JAMES 
5 Monson Park 
Foxboro, Ma. 
NOBLE, GEORGE D., Ill 
148 Country Dr. 
Weston, Ma. 
NOEL, HENRY W. 
418 Derrah St. 
Berlin, N. H. 
NOLAN, DORIS M. 
352 Central Ave. 
Milton, Ma. 
NOWAKOWSKI, 

VIRGINIA 
446 Newfirld Rd. 
Torrington, Ct. 
NUCCIO, EUGENE J. 
141 Park St. 
Beverly, Ma. 
NUNES, ANTONIO 

DECA 



621 Edgewood Rd. 
Edgewood, Md. 
OAT, DONALD L., JR. 
25 Church St. 
Noank, Ct. 
OATIS, WILLIAM W. 
34 Gould St. 
Melrose, Ma. 
OBERTO, PETER P. 
67 Spring Valley Rd. 
Belmont, Ma. 
BOYLE, JAMES D. 
1 George Ave. 
Peabody, Ma. 
OBRIEN, BRENDEN 
38 Albion Street 
Somerville, Ma. 
OBRIEN, CATHERINE M, 
54 Margin St. 
Peabody, Ma. 
OBRIEN, EDWARD J., JR. 
22 Lenoxdale Ave. 
Dorchester, Ma. 
OBRIEN, JAMES J. 
373 Sackett St. 
Brooklyn, N. Y. 
OBRIEN, JOHN M. 

28 Ontario St. 
Dumont, N. J. 
OBRIEN, JOHN P. 
132 Hillside Ave. 
Norwood, Ma. 
OBRIEN, MICHAEL J. 

29 Arlington Ave. 
Beverly, Ma. 
OBRIEN, ROBERT M. 
49 Schrade Rd. 
Briarcliff Manor, N. Y. 
OCONNELL, JAMES E. 
64 Porter St. 
Somerville, Ma. 
OCONNELL, THOMAS 
76 Park St. 
Arlington, Ma. 
OCONNOR, JOHN L. 
88 Belmont St. 
Somerville, Ma. 
ODAY, LINDA E. 

264 E. Cottage St. 
Dorchester, Ma. 
ODONNELL, JOHN F. 
18313 Flamingo Ave. 
Cleveland, Oh. 
ODONNELL, JOSEPH P. 
39 Horace Rd. 
Belmont, Ma. 
ODONNELL, KENNETH 
24 Dalton Road 
Concord, Ma. - 
ODONOVAN, SHEILA F. 
36 Donnybrook Rd. 



Brighton, Ma. 
OCRADY, RICHARD E. 
72 Keeney St. 
Manchester, Ct. 
OHALLORAN, WILLIAM 

D. 
86 Parkway Drive 
Trumbull, Ct. 
OHARA, FRANCIS J. 
■495 Washintgon St. 
Brighton, Ma. . 
OHARA, JOHN S., JR. 
4 Laurel St. 
Woburn, Ma. 
OHRENBERGER, HENRY 
W. 

147 School St. 

Milton, Ma. 

OKNER, THOMAS L. 

76 Silver Spring Rd. 

Short Hills, N.J. 

OLEARY, ROBERT J. 

88 Central Street 

Holliston, Ma. 

OLEARY, ROBERT M. 

16 Langdon Ave. 

Watertown, Ma. 

OLGUIN, MARYC, SR. 

II Newcomb Street 
Boston, Ma. 
OLIVER, ROBERT J. 

51 Dalton Road 
Belmont, Ma. 
OLIVIERI, RALPH A. 

III Oak Street 
Ashland, Ma. 
OLOUGHLIN, MARIAN 
53 Hurd Rd. 
Belmont, Ma. 
ONEIL, BARBARA 

37 Franklin St. 
Belmont, Ma. 
ONEIL, JAMES J. 

52 Hall Rd. 
Easton, Ct. 
ONEILL, ANNE 
104 Otis St. 
Milton, Ma. 
ONEILL, DANIEL J. 
11 Avon St. 
Stoneham, Ma. 
OROURKE, PAUL R. 
1585 Queen Ann Gate 
Westlake, Oh. 
OSHEA, JAMES E. 

67 Rand St. 
Lynn, Ma. 

OSULLIVAN, MICHAEL 
4 Elko St. 
Brighton, Ma. - 
OSULLIVAN, PETER V. 



220 Abbott St. 
Lawrence, Ma. 
OTOOLE, MICHAEL F. 
200-16 36th Ave. 
Bayside, N. Y. 
OTT, STEPHEN J. 
4 Brier Rd. 
W. Roxbury, Ma. 
OWEN, PRISCILLA J. 
39 Reed St. 
Lexington, Ma. 
OWENS, ELEANOR A. 
389 Ocean Ave. 
Stratford, Ct. 
OWENS, WILLIAM J., JR. 
148 Pine St. 
Auburndale, Ma. 
PACKARD, SHEILA A. 
137 Helaine Rd. 
Manchester, Ct. 
PALAC, ROBERT T. 
2316 Albany Ave. 
Chicago, 11. 

PALMACCI, JOSEPH C. 
96 Hartley St. 
Portland, Me. 
PALMER, GEORGE J. 
46 Rutler Dr. 
Trumbull, Ct. 
PALMER, RICHARD T. 
290 Red Fox Rd. 
Stamford, Ct. 
PALMER, SR. MARGARET 
Carney HospitaJ 
Dorchester, Ma. 
PALMISCIANO, NANCY 
36 Liege St. 
Providence, R. I. 
PANNETON, JOHN P. 
4982 Brightwood Rd. 
Bethel Park, Pa. 
PANORA, MARILYN A. 
118 Sassamon Ave. 
Milton, Ma. 
PAONE, STEPHEN T. 
73 Sewall St. 
Revere, Ma. 
PAQUEREAU, PAUL D. 
115 Broadmeadow St. 
Marlboro, Ma. 
PARADISE, ALPHONSE J. 
51 Old Main St. 
Marshfield Hills, Ma. 
PARE, ARMAND M. 
159 Williston Way 
Pawtucket, R. I. 
PARKER, JOHN H., JR. 
152 Newton St. #6 
Brighton, Ma. 
PARLA, CHARLOTTE C. 
9C Jacqueline Rd. 



Waltham, Ma. 
PASKOWSKI, MICHAEL 

E. 
28 Church St. 
W. Roxbury, Ma. 
PASQUALE, ANDREW 
715 River St. 
Haverhill, Ma. 
PASSANISI, MICHAEL T. 
138 Beacon St. 
Hyde Park, Ma. 
PASTORE, CARMEN M. 

24 Doncaster Circle 
Lynnfield, Ma. 
PATENAUDE, JOHN L. 
Box 403 

Derby Line, Vt. 
PATTERSON, JAMES H. 
46 High Rock Rd. 
Wayland, Ma. 
PATTERSON, JANE C. 

17 Franklin St. 
Lynn, Ma. 
PAVIA, RUSSELL J. 
179 Parkway Drive 
Syracuse, N. Y. 
PEASE, DENNIS H. 
30 Lorraine St. 
Glen Ridge, N. j. 
PEGNATARO, DONALD 

F. 
21 Dogwood Circle 
Woodbridge, Ct. 
PELZMAN, JOSEPH 

25 Dwight St. 
Brookline, Ma. 
PENZA, PHILIP A. 
667 West St. 
Walpole, Ma. 
PEPI, VICTOR A. 
147 Park Ave. 
Medford, Ma. 
PERKINS, GEORGE W., 

JR. 
110 Broad Street 
Hudson, Ma. 
PERRAULT, JAY S. 
835 Mammoth Rd. 
Dracut, Ma. 
PERRY, RONALD V. 

18 Radnor Rd. 
Brighton, Ma. 
PESCATORE, JOSEPH C. 
31A Trull St. 
Somerville, Ma. 
PETERS, BRUCE J. 

51 Donna Drive 
Hanover, Ma. 
PETERSEN, JOAN BAHER 
54 Ford Street 
Brockton, Ma. 



PETKUNAS, SR. M, 
261 Thatcher St. 
Brockton, Ma. 
PETRIE, STEPHEN C. 
35 Forest St. 
Milford, Ma. 
PETRINO, LINDA 
38 -Wiley Rd. 
Belmont, Ma. 
PETRUCCELLI, JOSEPH 

D. 
6 Paine Rd. 
Simsbury, Ct. 
PETRULAVAGE, DONNA 
1566 Tremont St. 
Boston, Ma. 
PFEIL, WALTER G„ III 
38 Ridge St. 
Devon, Ct. 
PHENIX, LUCILLE A. 
57 Barlow St. 
Fall River, Ma. 
PIAZZA, ANTHONY C. 
6 Berkeley St. 
Lawrence, Ma. 
PICARDI, MICHELE M. 
135 Dow Ave. 
Arlington, Ma. 
PICARDO, STEVEN A. 
40 Russell, St. 
Ma^den, Ma. 
PICUCCI, JOHN A. 
148 Ninth St. 
Leominster, Ma. 
PIEKARSKI, VICTOr J. 
424 High St. 
Lawrence, Ma. 
PIERCE, JUDITH K. 
322 Cross St. 
Belmont, Ma. 
PIERCE, PHILLIP F., JR. 
18 Bowers St. 
Manchester, Ct. 
PIERNI, JANET M. 
31 Lynnway 
Revere, Ma. 
PIETRUSZEWSKI, 

CORNEL L. 
4610 S. 49 St. 
Greenfield, Wi. 
PIRRO, ROBERT W. 
31 West View PI. 
Riverside, Ct. 
PISAPIA, DIANNE M. 
280 Washington St. 
Holliston, Ma. 
PIZZO, ANTHONY C. 
249 Rintin St. 
Franklin Square, N. Y. 
PLEASANTS, PETER L. 
52631 Gumwood Rd. 



Granger, In, 
PODOLSKI, JANE M. 
99 Sandy Valley Rd. 
Dedham, Ma. 
POLTRINO, TERESA 
65 Lewis St. 
Lynn, Ma. 

POMROY, RONALD 
Marist College and Sem. 
Framingham, Ma. 
POPOWSKI, JOSEPH S, 
331 Maple St. 
Bridgeport, Ct. 
POWER, FRANCIS G. 
143 Milton Ave. 
FHyde Park, Ma. 
POWER, MICHAEL F. 
168 Temple St. 
W. Roxbury, Ma. 
POWERS, JOHN C. 
573 Baker St. 
W. Roxbury, Ma. 
POWERS, JOHN J. 
26 Curney St. 
Cambridge, Ma. 
POWERS, MARGARET E. 

29 Holmes Dale St. 
Albany, N. Y. 
PREZIOSI, DOMINICK P. 
91 Boulevard 

New Milford, N. J. 
PRIMAVERA, THOMAS E. 
55 Farm Rd. 
Middletown, N. J. 
PUCCI, STEPHEN C. 
55 Fenno St. 
Quincy, Ma. 
PUMPHREY, JOHN P. 
24 Evergreen St. 
Jamaica Plain, Ma. 
PURCELL, JOHN J. 
145 Canoe Brook Pkwy. 
Summit, N. J. 
PURR, MICHAEL M., JR. 

30 Prospect Ave. 
Pompton Plains, N. J. 
PUZIN, LINDA E. 
879B Lexington St. 
Waltham, Ma. 
QUALTERS, JOHN, II 
136 Church St. 
Mansfield, Ma. 
QUINLAN, JEREMIAH J. 
149 Old Mamarenck Rd. 
White Plains, N. Y. 
QUINN, EDWARD J. 
675 Ellington Rd. 
Ridgewood, N. J. 
QUIT, BERNARD 

1334 Highland St. 
Holliston, Ma. 




RADOCHIA, JANE M. 
25 Willoughby St. 
Somerville, Ma. 
RACAN, THOMAS A. 
31 Newton St. 
Brighton, Ma. 
RANSFORD, EDWARD 

N. 
22 Cottage St. 
Fredonia, N. Y. 
RATH, MRS. AGNES S. 
68 Sterling Place 
Stamford, Ct. 
RATTIGAN, PAUL M. 
45 Hyde Ave. 
Newton, Ma. 
RAY, DONNA M. 
13 Speridakis Ter. 
Cambridge, Ma. 
RAYMONDO, PHILIP J. 
31 Norton Drive 
Hamburg, N. Y. 
REAP, WILLIAM 
1874 Comm Ave. 
Brighton, Ma. 
REDDEN, THOMASINE 

M. 
1 Auburn Court #2 
Brookline, Ma. 
REDFTRN, WILLIAM B. 
95 Erie Ave. 

Newton Highlands, Ma. 
REDGATE, STEPHEN V. 
875 Greendale Ave. 
Needham, Ma. 



REDICK, SYLVIA A. 
2 Puffer St. 
Lowell, Ma. 

REDMOND, FRANCIS J. 
24 Laurel Lane 
Dedham, Ma. 
REGAN, ELIZABETH A. 
48 Hollingsworth St. 
Mattapan, Ma. 
REID, ROBERT P. 
131 Mass Ave. 
Arlington, Ma. 
REIDY, EDWARD F., JR. 
8 Norman St. 
Cambridge, Ma. 
REIDY, JOSEPH A. 
36 Main St. 
Gilbertville, Ma. 
REILLY, KATHLEEN M, 
41 Seven Pines Ave. 
Cambridge, Ma. 
REILLY, THOMAS J. 

15 E. Main St. 
Southboro, Ma. 
REILLY, WILLIAM T. 
214 Lentz Ave. 
Paramus, N. J. 
RENES, SHARON A. 
104 Pleasant St. 
Gardner, Ma. 
REYNOLDS, BRADLEY J 

16 Marianne Rd. 
Darien, Ct. 
REZUKE, JOSEPH C. 
50 Douglas Ave. 



Maynard, Ma. 
RICCIATO, DONALD 
46 Everett St. 
Waltham, Ma. 
RIEMAN, RENEE J. 
100 77th St. 
N. Bergen, N. J. 
RIES, DAVID G. 
145 Richmond Circle 
Pittsburgh, Pa. 
RILEY, JOHN P. 
38 Madison Ave. 
Cambridge, Ma. 
RIORDAN, JAMES D. 
396 Andrews Rd. 
E. Williston, N. Y. 
RITCHIE, MARTHA 
843 Tice Place 
Westfield, N. J. 
RIVERS, BARBARA A. 
85 Rockwell Ave. 
Plainville, Ct. 
RIZZUTO, ANTHONY P. 
316 Washington St. 
Melrose, Ma. 
ROACH, ROBERT F. 
94 Burley St. 
Danvers, Ma. 
ROAN, FRANCIS S. 
73 Elm Ave. 
Brockton, Ma. 
ROAN, THOMAS J. 
628 Valley View. Rd. 
Ardmore, Pa. 
ROBINSON, THOMAS F. 



69 Bourne St. 
Jamaica Plain, Ma. 
ROBY, ROBERT E. 
3014 Edgewood Ave. 
Parkville, Md. 
ROCHE, DONALD P. 
248 Palmer St. 
Quincy, Ma. 
ROCHE, JEANNE R. 
14 Glenwood Lane 
Roslyn Heights, N. Y. 
ROCKETT, FRANK A. 
158 Monsen Rd. 
Concord, Ma. 
RODDY, CAROL A. 
1024 South St. 
Roslindale, Ma. 
RODDY, JOHN F. 
61 Stratford St. 
Boston, Ma. 

RODRIGUES, FRANK A. 
3077 Riverside Ave. 
Somerset, Ma. 
RODRIGUEZ, JAIME J. 
661 Jose Marti 
Santurce, P. R. 
ROGAN, PAUL J. 
37 Swarthmore Rd. 
Wellesley, Ma. 
ROGERS, JOHN F. 
11 Kevill Rd. 
Lynn, Ma. 

RONCARY, PAULA M. 
63A Bradbury Ave. 
Medford, Ma. 
ROONEY, PHILIP J. 



181 Summer St. 
Framingham, Ma. 
ROOP, STEPHEN R. 
6 Kern Dr. 
W. Bilierica, Ma. 
ROPER, MARTIN J. 
64 Halifax St. 
Jamaica Plain, Ma. 
ROSA, EUGENE 
29 Oakes St. 
Everett, Ma. 
ROSSETTI, STEPHEN 
94 Derby St. 
Salem, Ma. 

ROTELLA, GERALD D. 
253 Princeton Ave. 
Rahway, N. J. 
ROWAN, JOHN M. 
55 Ronald Rd. 
Arlington, Ma. 
ROWE, STEPHEN F. 
35 Elliott St. 
S. Portland, Me. 
ROY, ROBERT R. 
Marist College and Sem. 
Framingham, Ma. 
RULE, JOSEPH E. 
52 Rose Way 
Holbrook, Ma. 
RUSCITO, SALLY A. 
18 Donna Terrace 
Hyde Park, Ma. 
RUSCONI, STEVEN A. 
15 Oak St. 
Weymouth, Ma. 
RUSSO, ANGELO M. 



80 Antonio Barcelo 
Cayey, P. R. 
RUSSO, JOHN K. 
1505 Main St. 
Stratford, Ct. 
RUSSO, RICHARD 
692 East Drive 
Oradell, N. J. 
RYAN, BARRY W. 
5329 Post Rd. 
E. Greenwich, R. I. 
RYAN, CHRISTINE E. 

II Valley View Rd. 
Waltham, Ma. 
RYAN, EDWARD L. 
82 So. Windsor Ave. 
Brightwaters, N. Y. 
RYAN, JOHN P. 
525 Western Ave. 
Brighton, Ma. 
RYAN, KENNETH F. 
26 Spruce St. 
Watertown, Ma. 
RYAN, LOIS A. 

387 Huntington Ave. 
Hyde Park, Ma. 
SABBIA, JAMES V. 
41 Irvington Rd. 
Medford, M^. 
SADLER, TIMOTHY P. 
840 Mackler Dr. 
Chicago Heights, II. 
SAGER, BARBARA F. 

III Emerson Gardens 
Lexington, Ma. 
SAKER, WAYNE H. 








53 Parker St. 
Chelsea, Ma. 
SALA, MICHAEL J. 
418 Beacon St. 
Boston, Ma. 

SALAMONE, NANCY A. 
131 Plymouth Rd. 
Needham, Ma. 
SALVATO, DOROTHY 
52 Brookline St. 
Watertown, Ma. 
SAMMARCO, JOHN A. 
5 Weld St. 
Framingham, Ma. 
SANISLO, GLENN J. 
29 Hazel St. 
Darien, Ct. 

SANIUK, MICHAEL P. 
12 Howell St. 
Dorchester, Ma. 
SANTORO, LINDA L. 
57 Kaufman Rd. 
Somerset, Ma. 
SANTOSUOSSO, 

ANDREA 
1000 Brook Rd. 
Milton, Ma. 
SARDINI, ANN MARIE 
136 Wilmington Ave. 
Dorchester, Ma. 
SARTINI, ROBERT V. 
1721 Wedgewood 

Cmmn. 
W. Concord, Ma. 
SAUNDERS, EDWARD F, 
11 Vista St. 
Roslindale, Ma. 
SAUNDERS, JAMES P. 
118 Hope St. 
Stamford, Ct. 
SAUNDERS, PETER R. 
991 Main St. 
Melrose, Ma. 
SAVA, MARY ANN F. 
125 Manthorne Rd. 
W. Roxbury, Ma. 
SAVAGE, THOMAS J. 
161 Foster St. 
Brighton, Ma. 
SAVARD, GERARD 
99 Oak St. 
Middleboro, Ma. 
SAVIGNANO, JEAN 
31 Cleveland Rd. 
Watertown, Ma. 
SCARMINACH, ORRIE 
612 Park St. 
Syracuse, N. Y. 
SCHIAVONE, NICHOLAS 

P. 
21 W. Bradst Rd. 



N. Andover, Ma. 
SCHILLER, NEAL L. 
6 Martin St. 
Lowell, Ma. 

SCHMIDT, THOMAS E. 
11 Miller St. 
Wallington, N. ). 
SCHOFIELD, EDWARD J. 
15 Rutledge Street 
W. Roxbury, Ma. 
SCHULMAN, LINDA 
282 Grove St. 
Auburndale, Ma. 
SCIABA, PAUL F, 
20 Mossdale Rd. 
Jamaica Plain, Ma. 
SCOTT, JOSEPH F. 
360 Highland Ave. 
Wood-Ridge, N. J. 
SCOTT, RICHARD T. 
7021 Noble Ave. 
Cincinnati, Oh. 
SCRIBNER, SAMUEL A. 
Box 3404 

Panama City, Pana. 
SCULLANE, JOHN T. 
10 Cross St. 
E. Pepperell, Ma. 
SEBASTINO, GRACINDA 
475 Purchase St. 
Milford, Ma. 
SEES, GREGORY 
512 W. Bloomfield St. 
Rome, N. Y. 

SEMENSI, JOSEPH J., JR. 
22 Tileston Rd. 
Randolph, Ma. 
SEMER, JUDITH 
38 Spruce St. 
Milton, Ma. 
SERON, RICHARD J. 
15 Ferriter St. 
Quincy, Ma. 
SHAKESPEAR, PAUL 
529 Burtman Dr. 
Troy, Mi. 

SHANAHAN, MARK R. 
151 Leicester St. 
Auburn, N. Y. 
SHANNON, JOSEPH T., 

JR. 
75 Hollett St. 
Scituate, Ma. 
SHAUGHNESSY, BRIAN 

C. 
110 Woodland St. 
Sherborn, Ma. 
SHAUGHNESSY, KEVIN 

A. 
4 Brentwood Rd. 
Woburn, Ma. 



SHEA, KATHLEEN M. 

10 Wyola Drive 
Worcester, Ma. 

SHEA, LAWRENCE L., JR. 

35 Francis Street 
Melrose, Ma. 
SHEA, MICHAEL P. 
64 Hovey St. 

N. Quincy, Ma. 
SHEA, SR. MARY XAVIER 
Box 152 Route 80 
Kingston, Ma. 
SHEA, THOMAS E. 
180 Longhill St. 
Springfield, Ma. 
SHEEHAN, CAROL 
28 Brook St. 
Brookline, Ma. 
SHEEHAN, JOHN F. 
66 Spruce St. Ext. 
Braintree, Ma. 
SHEEHAN, KEVIN P. 
97 Prospect St. 
Stoughton, Ma. 
SHEEHAN, THOMAS J. 
3300 Netherland Ave. 
New York, N. Y. 
SHELL, DOUGLAS M. 
4 Foshett 
Sommerville, Ma. 
SHEPARD, CHRISTINE 
9 Villa St. 
Waltham, Ma. 
SHEPARDSON, 

MICHAEL J. 
19 Cardinal Ave. 
Albany, N. Y. 
SHERBACK, GEORGE M. 
28 Falmouth Rd. 
Watertown, Ma. 
SHERIDAN, MICHAEL J. 
204 Russell Ave. 
Gaithersburg, Md. 
SHIPPEY, THOMAS C. 
4 Soljer Dr. 
Waterford, Ct. 
SHORE, HARVEY R. 

36 Brandon Rd. 
Milton, Ma. 
SHURTLEFF, ROBERT 

11 Oak St. 
Coachituate, Ma. 
SICKOREZ, DONN G. 
16 Ellis St. 
Woburn, Ma. 
SILVESTRI, FRANCIS R. 
146 Marcy St. 
Southbridge, Ma. 
SILVIA, JOHN, JR. 

41 Truman Ave. 
Somerset, Ma. 



SIMMONS, JANET F. 
11 Park St. 
Brookline, Ma. 
SIMOES, MARIA E. 
104 Ellery Street 
Cambridge, Ma. 
SIROIS, RAYMOND G. 
241 Forest St. 
Methuen, Ma. 
SKEHAN, DONALD 
110 Ashburnham St. 
Fitchburg, Ma. 
SKOPELITES, STEPHEN 
3 Sheila Rd. 
Lexington, Ma. 
SLINEY, GEORGE F. 
52 School St. 
Arlington, Ma. 
SLINEY, ROBERT E„ JR. 
155 Maple St. 
Framingham, Ma. 
SMITH, DENIS J. 
54 Gould St. 
W. Roxbury, Ma. 
SMITH, PATRICIA F. 
41 Corcoran Park 
Cambridge, Ma. 
SMITH, PATRICIA M. 
9 Culbert St. 
Mattapan, Ma. 
SMITH, WILLIAM M. 
197 Middle Road 
Southboro, Ma. 
SOUSA, RICHARD E. 
296 Auburn St. 
Cranston, R. I. 
SPENCER, BRO. JOHN P. 
418 Beacon Street 
Boston, Ma. 
SPENLINHAUER, 

STEPHEN P. 
Sea View Ave. 878 
Wianno, Ma. 
SPERANDIO, STEPHEN J. 
50 Lincoln St. 
Watertown, Ma. 
SPEZZANO, LAWRENCE 

C. 
148 Theodore Parker 
W. Roxbury, Ma. 
SPILLANE, ANNE 
54 Dean St. 
Harrington Park, N. J. 
SPLAINE, RICHARD D. 
18 Marcella St. #2 
Cambridge, Ma. 
SPRING, ROBERT P. 
490 Brook Rd. 
Milton, Ma. 
ST. ONGE, MARC H. 
125 Mt. Washington St. 



Lowell, Ma. 

STAMAND, GERARD A. 
589 So. Bridge St. 
Holyoke, Ma. 
STANISH, WALTER 
118 Rochelle Ave. 
Philadelphia, Pa. 
STANLEY, GEORGE M. 
83 Randolph Ave. 
Meriden, Ct. 
STAPLETON, MARGARET 

M. 
116 Oceanside Dr. 
Scituate, Ma. 
STASIOWSKI, JANICE A. 
46 Hall St. 
Fall River, Ma. 
STEARNS, JAMES M. 
2 West Beechcroft Rd. 
Short Hills, N. J. 
STEBBINS, JAMES T. 
110 Wellwood Dr. 
Fayetteville, N. Y. 
STEPKA, THOMAS N. 
1822 Reservoir Ave. 
Bridgeport, Ct. 
STGERMAINE, JEANNE E. 
161 Broadway 
Norwich, Ct. 
STHILAIRE, GERALD E. 
45 Montvale Road 
Gardner, Ma. 
STIGLMEIER, GARY F. 
52 No. Helderbegg Pky. 
Slingerlands, N. Y. 
STJOHN, GREGORY G. 
38 Revere St. 
Waterbury, Ct. 
STONE, CHRISTINE 
408 Bedford St. 
Concord, Ma. 
STOODLEY, TIMOTHY J. 
49 Pearl St. 
Everett, Ma. 

STROHECKER, SR. ROSE 
27 Park Rd. 
W. Hartford, Ct. 
STRUZZIERY, FRANCES 

H. 
73 Bellevue Hill Rd. 
W. Roxbury, Ma. 
STUDZINSKI, EDWARD 

A. 
16 Charles St. 
Peabody, Ma. 
SULLIVAN, CHARLES F. 
174 Cherry Street 
Maiden, Ma. 
SULLIVAN, COIEMAN J. 
16 Fuller St. 
Dorchester, Ma. 



SULLIVAN, EILEEN M. 
56 Milton Rd. 
Braintree, Ma. 
SULLIVAN, HENRY J. 
37 Truman Rd. 
Newton Center, Ma. 
SULLIVAN, JOHN P. 
18 Kemp Street 
S. Boston, Ma. 
SULLIVAN, JOHN R. 
4 Gulf St. 
Hudson, N. H. 
SULLIVAN, KATHLEEN 
4252 E. Genesee St. 
De Witt, N. Y. 
SULLIVAN, RICHARD J. 
3 Lincoln St. 
Watertown, Ma. 
SULLIVAN, RICHARD W. 
212 Warren Rd. 
Framingham, Ma. 
SULLIVAN, ROBERT F. 
1129 Beacon St., Apt. 4 
Brookline, Ma. 
SULLIVAN, ROBERT J. 
104 Goodenough St. 
Brighton, Ma. 
SUPPICICH, GERALD 

ALLAN 
32 Townehouse Lane 
Wethersfield, Ct. 
SUPPLE, EDWARD A., Ill 
199 Bacon St. 
Natick, Ma. 
SURDYKA, CHARLES 
15 Fairmont St. 
Wethersfield, Ct, 
SURIYAMONGKOL, 

THIRA 
1472 Comm Avenue 
Brighton, Ma. 
SWEENEY, LINDA A. 
28 Ransom Rd. 
Brighton, Ma, 
SWEENEY, THOMAS M. 
164 Ocallaghan Way 
S. Boston, Ma. 
SYGIEL, CARL J. 
Sygiel Rd. 
Ware, Ma. 
SYLVA, JOSEPH F. 
45 Avon St. 
Somerville, Ma. 
TAMBONE, THOMAS W. 
85 Sutherland Rd. #7 
Brookline, Ma. 
TENBRUNSEL, WILLIAM 
944 Woodbriar Lane 
Cincinnati, Oh. 
TERRANOVA, 

SALVATORE R. 



10 Spruce Park 
Syosset, N. Y. 
TERRERI, PAMELA A. 
30 High St. 
Morristown, N. J. 
TERRY, SHEILA M. 
86 Pennsylvania Ave. 
Newton, Ma. 
TESSIER, SUZANNE N. 
170 Chestnut St. 
Albany, N. Y. 
THACKER, ROBERT M. 
17 Claudette Circle 
Framingham, Ma. 
THAYER, RONALD H. 
67 Brook St. 
Quincy, Ma. 
THERRIEN, SR. AGNES 
Harrison Road 
Salem, Ma. 
THOMPSON, EDWARD 

J. 
101 Beech St. 
Clinton, Ma. 
THOMS, JOHN A. 
372 Beech Street 
Stirling, N. J. 
THORN, THELMA E. 
67 Washington Elms 
Cambridge, Ma. 
THORNTON, JOSEPH D. 
29 Glen Haven Rd. 
Portland, Me. 
THORNTON, PATRICIA 
614 Montauk Ave. 
New London, Ct. 
TITLEBAUM, JOSEPH E. 
18 Warren Pk. 
Hyde Park, Ma. 
TOBIAS, CHARLES R. 
18 Hewlett Rd. 
Poughkeepsie, N. Y. 
TOBIN, SHEILA A. 
54 Montclair Ave. 
Quincy, Ma. 
TOCCi, NEIL M. 
169 Hampton PI. 
Ridgewood, N. J. 
TOHER, LORRAINE G. 
79 Burwell St. 
Little Falls, N. Y. 
TOMBARI, WILLIAM M. 
34 Edgemont Rd. 
Braintree, Ma. 
TONZI, DONALD P. 
7805 Skile St. 
Auburn, N. Y. 
TORREY, PAMELA J. 
107 Paddock Drive 
De Witt, N. Y. 
TORRISI, ANTHONY |. 



9 Rose Garden Circle 

Brighton, Ma. 

TORRISI, JOHN P. 

92 Fourth St. 

Medford, Ma. 

TOSTI, ROBERT M. 

54 Halsted St. 

Newark, N. J. 

TOTINO, THOMAS A. 

38 Sunset Road 

Bedford, Ma. 

TRACY, PHILIP A. 

433 W. Roxbury Pkwy. 

W. Roxbury, Ma. 

TRACY, THEODORE C. 

46 Smith St. 

Marblehead, Ma. 

TRAINA, RICHARD C. 

67 Border St. 

N. Scituate, Ma. 

TRAINOR, MICHAEL J. 

9 Ravenhurst Ave. 

Staten Island, N. Y. 
TRAINOR, MICHAEL W. 
140 Billings St. 
N. Quincy, Ma. 
TRAVERS, ROBERT M. 
57 Dix St. 
Dorchester, Ma. 
TREMBLAY, EDMOND R. 
137 Oliver St. 
Fall River, Ma. 
TREMBLAY, PAUL L. 
5 South Waverly 
Brighton, Ma. 
TRINGALE, DOMENICA. 
34 Sixth St. 
Medford, Ma. 
TRIPP, RICHARD G. 
1101 Main St. 
Walpole, Ma. 
TROIANO, MICHAEL J. 
11 Pilgrim Dr. 
Winchester, Ma. 
TRYON, RICHARD B. 
c/o 19 Marlboro St. 
Westbury, N. Y. 
TULLY, KATHLEEN J. 
34 Lonsdale Street 
Dorchester, Ma. 
TURNER, MARGARET E. 
2990 Main St. 
Bridgeport, Ct. 
TURNER, MEREDITH 
24 Beverly Circle 
Randolph, Ma. 
UNGARO, FERDINAND 

N. 
20 Plumer St. 
Everett, Ma. 
UNITT, KURT L. U. 



472 Washington St. 

Canton, Ma. 

URBANIC, ALLAN J 

974 E. 76 St. 

Cleveland, Oh. 

VADEN, JAMES M. 

28 Carver St. 

Cambridge, Ma. 

VAETH, DAVID T. 

4607 Glenarm Ave. 

Baltimore, Md. 

VAICH, JANET A. 

79 Waban Pk. 

Newton, Ma. 

VAICH, JUDITH A. 

79 Waban Pk. 

Newton, Ma. 

VALIQUETTE, JOSEPH A. 
JR. 

55 Shiretown Rd. 

Dedham, Ma. 

VALLEY, BRO. 
CHRISTOPHER 

567 Salem End Rd. 

Framingham, Ma. 

VALORIE, NICHOLAS 

26 Metcalf Ave. 

Milford, Ma. 
VALVO, VINCENT L. 
19 Pickthorn Dr. 

Batavia, N. Y. 
VANDER, MAELEN 

CAMIEL 
880 Exchange St. 
Vermilion, Oh. 
VEASEY, JANET M. 
41 Webster St. 
Quincy, Ma. 
VEEDER, MICHAEL H. 
418 Beacon St. 
Boston, Ma. 
VENNE, DAVID P. 
12 Maybury Rd. 
Sudbury, Ma. 
VERNEZZE, MICHAEL P. 
7322 26th St. 
Kenosha, Wi. 
VERRIER, CLAIRE 
76 Clifton St. 
Cambridge, Ma. 
VETRANO, NICHOLAS R. 
46 Marlboro St. 
Everett, Ma. 
VETRI, VIRGINIA 
140 Cleveland Ave. 
Hasbrouck Heights, N. J. 
VIEIRA, JOHN M. 
185 Pleasant St. 
Lowell, Ma. 
VITINS, PETER E. 
14 Townsend St. 



Roxbury, Ma. 
VOLLMAR, KEVIN C. 
10 Highland View Ave. 
Winchester, Ma. 
VONTRAPP, GEORGE E. 
Main Rd. 
Adamsville, R. I. 
VOSS, FRED ). 
67 W. Shore Ave. 
Dumont, N. J. 
WADE, EDWARD C. 
55 Pitcher Ave. 
Medford, Ma. 
WADE, MICHAEL J. 
332 Riverview Ave. 
Drexel Hill, Pa. 
WAKEFIELD, STEPHEN 
26 North Lowell St. 
Methuen, Ma. 
WALEGA, RICHARD A. 
54 Main St. 
Acushnet, Ma. 
WALLACE, ROBERT B. 
427 Summer Street 
Rockland, Ma. 
WALSH, DAVID G. 1 
37 Hamden Circle 
Wollaston, Ma. 
WALSH, DAVID G. 2 
85 Parsons St. 
Brighton, Ma. 
WALSH, FRANCIS L., JR. 
136 Fulton St. 
Norwood, Ma. 
WALSH, HELEN F. 
2 Chase Rd. 
Stoneham, Ma. 
WALSH, JOHN M. 



63 Minot St. 
Dorchester, Ma. 
WALSH, MARY M. 
100 Bartlett St. 
Charlestown, Ma. 
WALSH, PETER T. 
6 Rinedale Rd. 
Roslindale, Ma. 
WALSH, THOMAS D. 
15 Littlejohn St. 
Arlington, Ma. 
WALSH, THOMAS M. 
22 Davis St. 
Marlboro, Ma. 
WARD, GEOFFREY J. 
116 Pinehurst Ave. 
New York, N. Y. 
WARNER, STEPHEN D. 
8 Birch Hill Rd. 
Melrose, Ma. 
WATERS, DAN 
284 Foster St. 
Brighton, Ma. 
WEBER, DONALD E. 
7212 Westmoreland Dr. 
St. Louis, Mo. 
WEINER, GEORGE J. 
2590 Inglewood St. 
E. Meadow, N. Y. 
WELSH, JOHN D. 
6300 Pinehurst Rd. 
Baltimore, Md. 
WETMORE, GAYLE 
10 Garland St. 
Everett, Ma. 
WHALEN, 

CHRISTOPHER 
74 Wayne Ave. 




Waltham, Ma. 
WHELAN, GERALD B. 
68 Westbourne St. 
Roslindale, Ma. 
WHELAN, GERTRUDE 
67 Welles Ave, 
Dorchester, Ma. 
WHELAN, MICHAEL L. 
14 Glen Rd. 
Verona, N. J. 
WHELEHON, DAVID M. 
139 Fairfield Dr. 
Short Hills, N. j. 
WHITE, DENNIS R. 
16 Houghton St. 
Lynn, Ma. 

WHITE, ELEANOR F. 
130 Nonantum Road 
Newton, Ma. 
WHITE, KENNETH J. 
9 Plummer Rd. 
Lawrence, Ma. 
WHITE, RICHARD F. 
161 Bigelow St. 
Brighton, Ma. 
WHOLLEY, CLAIRE H. 
71 Burnside St. 
Salem, Ma. 
WILCOX, DENNIS M. 
87 Chester Ave. 
Chelsea, Ma. 
WILLIAMS, DAWN J. 

42 Hopkins St. 
Wilmington, Ma. 
WILLIS, FREDERICK F. 
12 Fidelis Way 
Brighton, Ma. 
WILSON, FRED R. 
72-74 Turkey Hill Rd. 
Newburyport, Ma. 
WILSON, JOHN L. 

5 Malvern Rd. 
Norwood, Ma. 
WILSON, ROBERT D. 

43 Young Street 
N. Quincy, Ma. 
WILTRAKIS, SR. C. M. 
402 South Street 
Hyannis, Ma. 

WING, SUSAN CUSICK 
66 Edmunds Rd. 
Wellesley Hills, Ma. 
WINSLOW, MARY 
39 Oakland Rd. 
Brookline, Ma. 
WOLOSCHUK, PETER T. 
2032 Dorchester Ave. 
Dorchester, Ma. 
WOOD, CHERYL L. 
Hartford Ave. West 
Mendon, Ma. 



WOOD, PAUL G. 
229 Whaley St. 
Freeport, N. Y. 
WOODS, JOSEPH F. 
28 Parker Rd. 
Wellesley, Ma. 
WOODS, RICHARD C. 

1 Adams St. 
Charlestown, Ma. 
WOZNIAK, RONALD E. 
18 Radnor Rd. 
Brighton, Ma. 

WREN, DANIEL A. 
120 Capitolian Blvd. 
Rockville Center, N. Y. 
YAS, KENNETH M. 
18 University Rd. 
Brookline, Ma. 
YATES, BRIAN E. 
1094 Chestnut St. 
Newton, Ma. 
YOUNG, GEORGE W. 
26 Perkins Ave. 
Maiden, Ma. 
YOUNG, JO ANN 
79 Orient St. 
Meriden, Ct. 
YOUNG, PHYLLIS L. 

2 Old Colony Lane 
Arlington, Ma. 
YOUNG, THOMAS J. 
223 Beacon Street 
Chestnut Hill, Ma. 
YUTKINS, STANLEY 
13 Windsor Rd. 
Somerville, Ma. 
ZACCARO, MICHAEL J. 
11 Sprague Rd. 
Wellesley, Ma. 
ZAILCKAS, ROBERT L. 
827 Watertown Ave. 
Waterbury, Ct. 

ZAK, DONALD F. 
132 Radnor Ave. 
Naugatuck, Ct. 
ZALWESKI, JUDITH 
30 Shurtleff St. 
Chelsea, Ma. 
ZELLER, GERARD J. 
34 York Court 
Baltimore, Md. 
ZICARI, CRAIG J. 
184 Orchard Pk. Blvd. 
Rochester, N. Y. 
ZINNA, ANTHONY V. 
704 Saratoga St. 
E. Boston, Ma. 
ZINNO, RICHARD J. 
25 Windmill St. 
Pawtucket, R. I. 



General Index 



Academic Deans and Assistants 54 

Academics 48 

Accounting Academy 149 

Activities 106 

Ads and Patrons 376 

Alpha Kappa Psi 151 

Alpha Phi Omega 106, 143 

Arts and Sciences Senate 164 

Band 110,145 

Basketball 192 

Beta Gamma Sigma 168 

Blakeley, Thomas J 58 

Blessed Oliver Plunkett Society 153 

Bowditch, James 60 

B.C. Game 298, 350 

Cement 159 

Cheerleaders 112, 157 

Chess Club 158 

Chorale 114, 146 

Commuters' Council 116, 144 

Counseling Services 236 

Cross Country 188 

Cultural Committee 167 

Delta Sigma Pi 152 

Dramatics Society 118, 147 

Duhamel," P. Albert 62 

Education Senate 165 

Evening College Senate 165 

Features 216 

Fencing Club 162 

Figure Skating Club 163 

Flying Club 156 

Football 174 

Freshman Sports 214 

Fulton Debate Society 120, 148 

Geology Club 150 

Gold Key Society 122, 142 

Flangouts 234 

FHanrahan, S.J., Edward 64 

Heights 124, 161 

Hockey 204 

Honor Societies 168 

Hub of the Universe 238 

International Relations Club 158 

Joyce, S.J., Rev. W. Seavey 48 

Judo Club 126, 157 

Junior Show 146, 324 

Kappa Delta Epsilon 151 

Knights of Columbus 144 



Lowry, Ritchie 66 

Mailroom 226 

Mendel Club 150 

Mental Health Club 128, 145 

Middle Earth 147 

Modulars 218 

Nurses 272 

Nursing Senate 164 

O'Brien, Maureen 68 

O'Connor, Thomas 70 

Order of Cross and Crown 169 

Performing Arts 145 

Pi Sigma Epsilon 152 

Plocke, S.J., Donald 72 

Professional Organizations 148 

Prologue 1 

Publications and Media 159 

Pulse 130, 142 

Recreation Accociation 162 

Ricci Math Academy 148 

Rock Concerts 232 

Rugby 190 

Senates 164 

Senior Index 406 

Seniors 246 

Service Organizations 142 

Sigma Phi Sigma 149 

Sigma Theta Tau 169 

Ski Club 156 

Soccer 186 

Social Committee 167 

Sodality .132, 143 

Speakers 228 

Special Interest Groups 157 

Sporting Organizations 156 

Sports 172 

Student Life 78 

Stylus 161 

Sub Turri 134, 160 

Tennis Club 162 

Tremont, Joseph J 74 

UGBC 138, 166 

University Administration and Services 50 

Woetzel, Robert K 76 

Women's Varsity Basketball 163 

WIPR 159 

Wrestling 202 

WVBC 140, 160 

Young Republicans 153 



Edmond R. Tremblay Editor-in-Chief 

Mary Anne Checrallah Managing 

M. Dennis Dranchak Editors 

Charles E. Schmidt Business Manager 

John R. Trzaska, S. J Faculty Advisor 



Sub Turri 1971 



EDITORS 



PHOTO STAFF 



LAYOUT STAFF 



John Wiles Literary Editor 

William J. Kita Prologue Editor 

Linda De Meo Academics Editor 

Linda A. Sweeney Student Life Editor 

Ronald A. Huebsch Activities Editor 

William W. Kendall Sports Editor 

Thomas Caruso Asst. Sports Editor 

Jay Breeze Features Editor 

Fred J. Voss Senior Editor 

Stephen Korta Asst. Business Manager 



Kevin Carney 
Photography Editor 

Paul Aloi 
Joseph Collins 
Carmen Driver 
Thomas Flannigan 
Barbara Lucas 
Jeff Roche 
Philip Young 



Barbara White 
Layout Editor 

Margaret Campbell 
Dorice Dionne 
Chet Franczyk 
Karen Hickey 
Debbie Mathews 
Kathy Owens 
Bob Thibault 
Thomas Turek 



GENERAL STAFF 



CONTRIBUTORS 



Mary O'Connell 
Arthur Lauer 
James Lewis 
Ammy Rizzo 
Christine Rydsewicz 
Cindy Stebbins 
Angela Tremaglio 
Gerald Zyla 



Gabriel Andrade 
Charles H. Blank 
David Castiglioni 
William Cauley 
Anne Marie DeFilippo 
Robert Guaraldi 
John McClain 
Dennis McCool 
Daniel Natchek 
The Rugby Team 



A Final Word 



In these times of transition many people look to 
the future and direct their lives to it. The yearbook, 
however, is based in the past, and this has caused 
some to question its relevance. The yearbook does 
not attempt to present a complete, detailed account 
of the events of the past year; all it can do is to high- 
light areas of interest to students in general. It does 
not have a philosophy as such, but instead concen- 
trates on variety in its subject matter. Whether or not 
it serves a useful purpose is a matter to be left to the 
reader. If this book can be a source of enjoyment in 
the years to come to graduates wishing to look back 
on their life here, then no more should be asked of it. 
In the sense of providing future satisfaction, the year- 
book is indeed future-oriented. 



Will the yearbook become extinct? Can it change 
with the times? More important, does it need to alter" 
itself drastically to have it be considered "relevant" 
again? I don't think so. To incorporate sweeping revi- 
sions would serve to transform the purpose into 
something better handled by a news magazine, for 
example. To encompass the entire scope of affairs 
would be impossible, since a book that could ade- 
quately present campus life would be a work several 
times larger than this. No, this work is not designed 
specifically to inform but more to recapture mo- 
ments in the past. Any other direction can only result 
in the loss of the yearbook's true relevance. 

Edmond R. Tremblay, Editor-in-Chief 












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BASEBALL 






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B.C. 






5 


PROVIDENCE 


2 


5 


M.I.T. 





3 


AMHERST 


12 





HARVARD 


16 


2 


B.U. 


6 


5 


TUFTS 


1 


3 


FAIRFIELD 


6 





U.R.I. 


6 


1 


U. CONN. 


2 





SPRINGFIELD 


8 


7 


U. MASS. 


5 


8 


NORTHEASTERN 


3 


1 


HOLY CROSS 





6i 


TUFTS 


3 


1 


DARTMOUTH 


14 


3 


TRINITY 


1 


3 


COLBY 


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4 


PROVIDENCE 


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7 


BRANDEIS 


6 


4 


B.U. 


8 





HOLY CROSS 


6 


4 


NORTHEASTERN 


3 


3 


HOLY CROSS 


4 




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