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Full text of "Sub turri = Under the tower : the yearbook of Boston College"

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BOSTON COLLil 

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Opening 

1 

Current Events 

26 

Academics 

34 

Activities 
Student Life 

128 

Sports 
Seniors 

250 

Advertisements 

462 

Closing 

480 



Digitized by the Internet Archive 

in 2011 with funding from 

Boston Library Consortium IVIember Libraries 



http://www.archive.org/details/subturriundertow2000bost 




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BOSTON COLLEGE 

CHESTNUT HILL, MASSACHUSETTS 02167 



OFHCE OF THE PRESIDENT 



Dear Members of the Class of 2000: 

As the graduating class that will carry Boston College's standard into a 
new miUennium, I want to wish every one of you the best in the challenging 
years that lie ahead. 

When you came to Boston College four years ago, each of you brought the 
hope and expectations that your college experience would be an enriching and 
rewarding one. You were confident that at the Heights you would begin to 
recognize and develop those strengths and abilities that would help you to make 
your mark on the world, to make a difference. 

Today, you leave Boston College with a wealth of memories, personal 
achievements, strong friendships, and I hope, with the knowledge of how 
important it is to strive always for justice and peace. 

You have been blessed with many talents and gifts. As we enter the new 
millennium, our society needs generous, faithful, determined, and caring men 
and women - like you - more than ever. 

May you always draw sustenance and direction from your years at Boston 
College. And may God be with you now and in the future. 

Sincerely, 

William p. Leahy, S.J. / 
President 





Kyelim Rhee 



16 



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edge of the c^oHd and after a awhile theg forget 

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imaginations. " 

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Current Events 

Redefined at 

Boston College 

While here on the Heights it 
is easy to overlook anything more 
important than that paper due 
tomorrow or that lunch with a 
friend this afternoon. Although 
occasionally we opened up the 
Globe or heard from a neighbor 
about the plane crash that hap- 
pened this morning. This year 
several current events have ef- 
fected and touched our lives. 
They forever will be ingrained in 
our memories of our time here at 
Boston College. 



Editors 

Lissa Herrick 

Amy Kaufold 

Torry Katsiroubas 



27 



J 



ohn Kennedy Jr. and his wife, Carolyn Bessette-Kennedy, who fatally crashed their 
plane off the coast of Marthas Vineyard in July. 





Fatma Tandogan, 51 -year-old earthquake survivor, weeps as she looks for her 
belongings in her collapsed house in Golcuk, Turkey. Turkish officials acknowl- 
edged that the number of those left homeless by the massive earthquake could top half 
a million. 




The United States' Brandi Chastain 
celebrates by taking off her jersey 
after kicking the game winning overtime 
penalty shootout kick against China dur- 
ing the Women's World Cup Final at the 
Rose Bowl in Pasadena, in July. The U.S. 
won the shootout 5-4. 



Dave Matthews sings as Boyd 
Tinsley, left, plays the acoustic 
violin during Woodstock '99 Satur- 
day, July 24, 1999 at the site of the 
former Frifiss Air Force Base in Rome, 
N.Y. More than 225,000 people 
flooded the abandoned military base 
in upstate New York to hear acts like 
Limp Bizkit, Korn, Metallica, and 
Sheryl Crow. 




Current Everits^'2-9 




Singer Ricky Martin has come a long 
way from his Menudo days and 
helped start the Latin music craze of the 
I past year. 



Calista Flockhart of Ally McBeal the 
show set in a law firm here in Boston 
on her way into the 51st annual Emmy 
Awards. This appearance also sparked 
controversy regarding her thinness. 




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Singer Britney Spears rehearses for 
the MTV Video Music Awards at 
New York's Lincoln Center. Britney then 
went on to be nominated for several 
I Grammys and her song Baby One More 
I Time continued to top charts into the 
1 New Year. 



A man and boy sit on their front 
porch surrounded by water and a 
submerged car in their front yard in 
Lodi, N.J. September. Lodi is one of 
the towns around the state that was 
inundated by flood waters from Hurri- 
cane Floyd. 




Current Events 3 1 



Venus, left and Serena Williams, of Palm Beach Gardens, Florida, hold the winner's 
trophy after defeating Chan da Rubin, of Lafayette, La., and France's Sandrine Testu 
to take home the women's doubles championship. The Williams' won 4-6, 6-1, 6-4. 





Members of the U.S. Ryder Cup team pose with Ryder Cup trophy, Sunday night, 
September 26, 1999 in Brookline, Massachusetts, following the team's dramatic 
victory. Since the Ryder Cup was so close to campus EC students had the opportunity t 
be fans and have traffic from the event put a few kinks into any trip to Cleveland Circle, 




Bricks and other debris lie on top 
of a row of parked cars in Mexico 
City following an earthquake in Mexico 
City. A strong earthquake hit southern 
Mexico, over 200 miles southeast of 
Mexico City, causing buildings to sway 
, in the capital for several minutes. 




New York Yankees Derek Jeter, 
center, celebrates the Yankees' 3- 
win over the Texas Rangers with 
teammates Shane Spencer (47), Scott 
Brosius, second left, and Tino 
Martinez (24). Later in the season 
they went on to beat the Boston Red 
Sox to move on to win the World Se- 
ries. "The Curse" lives on. 



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Academics 



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Academics 

Redefined at 

Boston College 

Boston College is known for its 
rigorous academics. Students 
involved in any of the university 
schools; the School of Arts and 
Sciences, the Carroll School of 
Management, the Lynch School 
of Education or the School of 
Nursing know that BC s repu- 
tation is an accurate one. From 
CSOM and School of Educa- 
tion study groups to finding 
your own place in O'Neill, stu- 
dents use their fellow students, 
and faculty as resources in their 
studies here. 

Editors 

Jessica Burkhart 

Kristin Walker 



35 



the Jesuit Tradition : 

a lasting staple in our future's education 



when the Society of Jesus was formed in 1540, St. Ignatius of Loyola and his 
fellow brethren strived to comfort the unfortunate, to teach the values of 
catechism and to better the world in which they lived. The Jesuit Tradition, 
teaching followers of God, evolved throughout the years to be the Jesuits' 
trademark. They taught their students about God and His role in their lives. St. 
Ignatius' first school for non-Jesuits was established in Sicily in 1 547. By St. 
Ignatius' death in 1 5 5 6, 3 5 Jesuit colleges had been established around the world. 
Boston College, established in 1 863, is one of the twenty-eight Jesuit universities 
and colleges in the United States. 129 Jesuit priests reside in St. Mary's Hall, 
Barat House, and various other locations near the BC campus. This makes BC 
one of the largest Jesuit communities in 7\jmerica. The Society of Jesus employed 
men who were knowledgeable in many different fields such as astronomy, 
theology, language, architecture and art. The Jesuit Tradition nurtures a learning 
environment that encourages the intergration of many cultures. Graduates of 
Jesuit university, like the alumni before them, are prepared to face the world in 
many different arenas. 



36 Academics 





Ceremony 

Father Cleary presides over 
Sunday night mass in the 
Trinity Chapel on the New- 
ton Campus. 






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Participation 

As part of the redefining of tradi- 
tion, students participate in the 
mass. Singing in the choir is just 
one waystudents can participate. 

For others 

Father Casey upholds the old 
tradition of Jesuits being 
teachers for other people in 
his theology class. 



Academics 37 



Perspectives 



1999-2000 



As we journey through our Hves, there are certain people and rough times. These special people make BC our 
who have the ability to touch us in ways that we will home away from home. They help us create the road map 
never forget. These special people help us learn and of our lives through the jungle of the future. At such an 



grow. They open 
doors for us. They 
show us the numer- 
ous possibilities that 
this world holds for 
us. As students at 
Boston College, we 
meet these wonderful 
people everyday. Bos- 
ton College is the 
home to so many of 
these influential and 
caring individuals. 
They are the profes- 
sors who instill their 

passion for life into us. They are the mentors who listen 
to us sort out our thoughts on the future. They are the 
advisors who helped us find the right courses and intern- 
ships. They are the friends and role models who support 

us during finals 




important time of 
growth in our lives, 
the impact of the 
people around us can 
change our lives for- 
ever. After all of the 
help these people have 
given us, it is now time 
for us to show our ap- 
preciation. Boston 
College's Class of 
2000 has nominated 
the professors that 
have greatly influ- 
enced their lives. The 
following pages showcase only a few of the wonderful 
professors and mentors that make-up the Boston College 
family. 



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Dr. Michael Moore 

Psychology Professor 



Dr. Michael Moore became personally involved 
with many of his students' lives. He went beyond 
the classroom to really develop lifelong relationships 
with his students and act as a true mentor. He always 
challenged his students to think harder and deeper 
about what they wanted from life and what they was 
possible to get from life. His students felt that his 
workwas very pertinent to true-life situations. Many 
students had the opportunity to have dinner with 
him and visit his home. Every year Dr. Moore 
invited many of his students to his house on the 
Cape for an activity day. They always felt very 
welcomed by both Dr. Moore and his wife. Dr. 
Moore looked beyond the academic setting to truly 
know his students as people. 



Kerry Griffin, Class of 2000 



At Boston College, Dr. Kirschner was a member of 
the Biology Department. Outside of the classroom, 
Dr. Kirschner was an outstanding mentor who 
facilitated the lives of his students. Dr. Kirschner 
was not only a professor of Biology, but he was an 
advisor and a supporter. He helped his students 
with educational and career-oriented problems. 
Outside of the classroom and on campus, Dr. 
Kirschner was always willing to talk to his students 
about anything they wished to talk about. He was 
an excellent example of the personable relationships 
professors could have with their students outside the 
classroom. It was wonderful to feel comfortable 
around the people who educate us. 



Kate Bruya, Class of 2000 




Dr. David Kirschner 

Biology Professor 

"Being a professor at Boston College means that I get to do nearly everything 
that I love doing; pursuing and performing both science and music, discovering 
and enabling others to discover and mentoring and advising students who 
invariably remind me of my ovyn two kids." 



Academics 39 




Edward Skeffington 

Sociology Professor 

"Having spent thirty-five years supervising delinquent children and their families, 
the opportunity to teach at Boston College has been refi'eshing, exhilarating, 
challenging and extremely rewarding. It is an honor and privilege to be consistently 
associated with such talented and gifted young men and women." 



Professor Skeffington lives and breathes Boston 
College. He dedicates his entire life to the students 
here at BC. If there is ever a problem, he will try to 
help. Professor Skeffington takes action instead of 
just passing you off to another person or depart- 
ment. He is a true advocate for the students. Since j 
v^^e attend a school with so many people, it is 
sometimes difficult to find someone who cares 
about you as much as he does. He always asks how 
things are going, whether or not you are having fun, 
and what your fiiture plans are. Professor Skeffington 
sincerely cares for every student, and this has helped 
me figure out who I am. His sense of caring has also 
made me feel like I belong. 

Dawn Rood, Class of 2000 



Professor Quigley was a new professor to BC last 
year and he embodies what all history students want 
in a professor. Professor Quigley faces every class 
not only with a sense of confidence, but with a 
certain enthusiasm that truly evokes passion from 
his students toward the sometimes tenebrous field of 
history. His willingness and desire to connect with 
his students on a personal level, not just an academic 
one, exhibits a rare ability to balance scholarly work 
and personal pursuits. Professor Quigley under- 
stands the the importance of history and is not afraid 
to share that with his students and challenge his 
students to achieve their best work. 




Alejandro Velasco, Class of 2000 



David Quigjey^ 

Assistant Professor, History Department 

"One of my own college professors explained the good fortune of all teachers; wave the 
freedom to be unhurriedly serious about serious things in the company of attentive 
others. My two years on Chesnut Hill have only served to confirm that bit of wisdom. 
The BC classroom is a place where students seriously attend, to ideas and to each other." ' 



40 Activities 




Dr. Eric Strauss 

Biology Professor 



Dr. Eric Strauss is a member of the biology depart- 
ment at Boston College. He teaches the freshmen 
Survey of Biology course as well as the popular 
senior elective Animal Behavior. Dr. Strauss' teach- 
ing style incorporates many forms of media and 
variety to his class, to appeal to all of his students. He 
also runs a field station on Cape Cod where his 
students can come and research the world around 
them. Dr. Strauss is more than a biology professor 
at BC. He always offers support to all of his students 
and is available to help his students in any way 
possible. Dr. Strauss' love for learning and life is 
always a source of inspiration and encouragement. 



Kristin Walker, Class of 2003 



Dr. Cawthorne is never too busy to help out any of 
his students. He is the perfect example of the model 
professor/dean at Boston College. His efforts have 
effected the lives of many students at BC. Dr. 
CawTihorne has helped many students grow and 
adjust to being college students. His advice and 
guidance has had influence in many students' per- 
sonal and academic decisions. He is always willing 
to listen and to help his students in any way that he 
could. His kindness and patience has helped many 
students stay clear-headed and focused in their years 
at Boston College. 




Amanda Bemhard, Class of 2000 



Dr. John Cawthorne 

Assistant Dean of the School of Education 



"Teaching provides me an opportunity to contribute to the intellectual and social 
development of students and to learn from them. My students and I are responsible 
for the growth and well-being of each member of the class. Teaching and learning 
helps us modify our places in and our contributions to our community." 



Activities 41} 




Kyelirn Rhee 



Elliot Smith 

Finance Professor 



"Encouraging and stimulating inaction with the students permits me to view teaching 
responsibilities at Boston College, not at all as a job, but as a labor of love." 



Professor Smith has been a mentor and a source of 
advice for his students over the years. He was 
someone v^^ho continually provided encouragement 
and confidence to the students he taught. His classes 
were among the most valuable to students at BC due 
to his teaching style and ability to get his students to 
think "intuitively." He has constantly provided his 
students with advice and tips on getting a job and 
preparing to enter the business world. Much of his 
advice came from personal experiences that he had 
undergone and shared with his students. Professor 
Smith taught a new way of learning; one that didn't 
involve furiously taking notes and memorizing for- 
mulas, but instead involved listening, thinking, and 

critically analyzing. 

Lynette Darkoch, Class of 2000 



Teaching in the English Department of the College 
of Arts and Sciences, Professor O'Har has inspired 
many students to become English majors. His laid- 
back yet knowledgable style of teaching kept his 
students interested in his subject matter. His wit 
and cynicism encouraged his students to think about 
what was really going through his mind while also 
getting them to laugh and enjoy themselves. As a 
result of his teaching style, many of his students are 
inspired to pursue more in the field of English. 
Professor O'Har's book selection has been among 
the favorited of his students and many kept their 
books long after they left his classes. 

Adam Kampe, Class of 2000 




pho[o provided by George O'Har 




George O'Har 

English Professor 

"Teaching at Boston College is a privilege. I am not sure in the years I have taught here 
that I haven't learned more from students at BC than they have from me, but if that is 
the case, so be it. I am fortunate to have a job I so enjoy, and credit for that goes mainly 
to those students who talie an almost perverse delight in keeping me on my toes." 




Jessica Burkhan 



Karen Daggett 

Romance Language Department 



Professor Daggett may be classified as only a part 
time faculty member, but it was clear that she spent 
more time than most fiill-time professors planning 
her classes and giving students feedback and help. 
Professor Daggett was a truly amazing professor. 
Her classes inspired students to believe in their 
ability to speak and understand the language. She 
integrated the culture of South American countries 
as well as Spain into her lessons so students not only 
learned, but wanted to learn. Professor Daggett's 
enthusiasm and genuine love of her subject matter 
has helped me believe that I can achieve my dream 
of becoming fluent in Spanish. 



Rita Walker, Class of 2000 



"Professor Miller is such an inspiration to me. Not 
only is he an extremely intelligent scientist, but he is 
a great person who doesn't measure others in terms 
of grades or test scores, but rather as a function of 
their enthusiasm and desire to learn. Last spring, I 
decided that since I was considering graduate study 
in chemistry, I should get research experience: I met 
with him and asked him if I could join his team. 
Seeing that I had a strong interest in chemistry, he 
hired me. Since then, he has put a tremendous 
amount of time and effort into my research, and has 
broadened my horizons and solidified my desire to 
pursue a Ph.D. in chemistry. His attitude is conta- 
gious and has inspired me to do my best work, in and 

out of the lab." 

Andrew ]. Nation, Class of 2000 




ssica Burkhart 



Scott J. Miller 

Assistant Professor of Organic Chemistry 

"Sharing the thrill of discovery and the pace of the 'What if?' business with students 
is basically just a great time. I have a great job, and that's what I try to tell people." 



Academics 43 




Frances Clooney; S.J. 

Theology Professor 

"Human maairit)' balances many achievemencs, values, and gifts, but one key is opening the mind to 
think dearly and fully: to see the world as it is uncover what is hidden, smbbomly pursue the difficult 
questions, critique the status quo, and keep making sense of the lives we live. To think clearly and fiilly: 
for everyone this is a gift of wisdom, for many religious people it is a way to God, for Christians a way 
to Jesus Christ who is the Tmth. As a professor, I like to hope that my teaching aids students in learning 
to think clearly and ftilly, to shape ftitures where living and working and loving are deeply. 



Professor Clooney's Religious Quest class and ex- 
pertise combined not only the ideals at Boston 
College, but all the lessons one would expect to 
receive from college. He achieved this through the 
channels of exploring religion, experiences and his 
ow^n expertise. His class created a big picture of life 
and purpose for the students in it. Professor Clooney's 
encouragement guides his students to discover more 
about themselves, and through this process they 
discover more about what they want to do with their 
lives and what they want to get out of their time at 
BC. His influence is one that will not soon be 
forgotten among the students' whose lives he touched. 



Victoria Sloan, Class of 2000 



John McAleer 

English Professor 

Professor McAleer is more than an English professor at Boston College. He is a man who is able 
to inspire his students in many walks of life. As an English professor, Professor McAleer is able 
to instill his passion for English in his students. His ability to extract meaning from literary works 
and convey to his students why this material is important in their lives is unparalleled. His sense 
of humor adds to the impact of his message. Professor McAleer is a fair man who is sensitive to 
his students' needs. Professor McAleer strives to maintain a more personable student-teacher 
relationship with his students. His presence in the classroom is an inspiration because he loves 
what he does, and continues to teach and inspire despite his battle with leukemia. 

Jennifer Tulis, Class of 2000 



44 Academics 



David Karp 

Sociology Professor 



Professor Karp is more than a sociology teacher at Boston College. He is an inspiration to 
many of his students. Professor Karp has the outstanding ability to open so many doors 
of knowledge that his students never knew existed. He conveys his passion for sociology to 
his students, and in many cases has inspired his students to change their majors. His 
teaching style opens his students minds to new fields. He forces his students to think about 
the world around them at a deeper level than they ever had before. 

Erin Matticola, Class of 2000 

"As an 'old timer,' I've been asked once or twice offer a fewwords of advice to new employees at BC. I tell them not to miss one of the great 
opportimiries of working for a univeisity. It is to enjoy the intelligence, the vitality, the hope, and the idealism of the young people on campus. 
I truly consider it a gift to spend my days telling students about things matter gready to me while learning just what matters to them." 



Mariela Dakova 

Balkan/ Linguistics Professor 

Professor Dakova is a professor in the College of Arts and Sciences. She has played on 
important role in the lives of many of her students. As a teacher of Balkan Linguistics, she 
has done a lot to try to improve the variety and quality of these classes. Due to her phenomenal 
efforts, the enrollment and interest in these classes have increased. More and more students 
are becoming interested in going to Bulgaria as Fulbright Scholars. Professor Dakova's efforts 
to improve Boston College Balkan Linguistics classes have not gone unnoticed. She inspires 
and encourages her students to study abroad to fully enjoy and appreciate Balkan culture. Her 
enthusiasm, energy, and uniqueness make her a favorite among her students. 

John Skerry, Class of 2000 



Academics 45 




^-*. 



As the largest arid niost popiitous school at BC, the College oTAits and 
Sciences covers awide area of interests. With twenty-nine majors and a host 



of minors, students in the College of Arts and Sciences can study almost 



anything that interests them. 



The College of Arts and Scien^^ BW^W^ s A&S, is the school where 
most of what is known as the core classes are taken. Students from all 
schools within BC are required to take classes from A&S to receive 
degrees. The Jesuit tradition on which Boston College was founde 
executed ideally in the requirements for a student to receive a degree from 



A&S. The core classes are an overview of the basics of many different 




subjeetsf nMuding the natural science?fi^^P:s, and math, for example. A 

majorin A&S,. howe ver, requires ten additional courses to go along with 

f and expand upon the core requirements. After completing the core 

requirements and the classes required in a major, stOTerrts are free to choose 



'"^ny electives to help fdl their schedules senior year. 

A uniqueness exists in AS^."here(,St BC, There are no pre-medlcal, pre 
dental, or pre-veterinary fA^^s 4s ''sff.^ npd at many othef%sch^<^. 
Instead, these are'cftly pro^ujms ifiSvhich students participate. The 



restriction was made to ensure that*tudents always receive a \\ cll-rounded 



education. 



While most students who start out in the College of Arts and Sciences 
are there because thev were undecided about their major, they leave with 
a sense of assurance that they have received a valuable education and are 
equipped to go out into the real world. One thing about A&S that no one 
will disagree with was that once a person has graduates, they will have taken 
a multitude of courses to uphold the Jesuit ideal of becoming a person for 



others. 




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yportu- 

titrate, and 

•emical world. 

Right: This statue is 

exhibited in the heart of 

College of Arts and Sciences, 

Gossan Hall This foyer 

resses th^^^e of the great 

nkets that Lame before tts. 

Middle Right: In classes like. 

Dr. Strauss' Animal Behavior 

class, stud^ents have the 

opportunity to experience first 

hand the world around them. 



Bottom Left: Art History 

and Studio Art classes give 

students the opportunity to 

explore the aesthetic world 

that many great artists have 

sd before us. 




BoiSWmddle: With a 

multitude of classes that are at 

students' fingertdps in the 

College of Arts and Sciences, 

students tiy to squeeze in any 

amount of study time possible. 

Bottom Right: Students share 

their ideas outside of class to 

fully grasp some of the 

abstract ideas that they 

attempt to absorb inside the 

classroom. 



48 Academics 




Dear A & S Graduating Class of 2000, 

Greetings and congratulations from a veteran and a rookie. Although I 
joined the Economics Department at Boston College 26 years ago, I have been the 
Dean ofA&Sfor only a year. Yours is the first class (and I hope not the last!) 
that I will have the honor of presenting at Commencement, and I will always 
have a special affinity for the class of 2000. 

My quarter century at Boston College has been a wonderful journey, 
during which the Boston College landscape has been dramatically redefined. You 
have enjoyed the past four years of this impressive institutional growth. You have 
experienced troughs and peaks, disappointments and triumphs, but much more 
good than bad. You have suffered through the endless delays on the much needed 
middle campus project and leaks in the Rec Plex, but enjoyed the wonderful new 
McMullen Art Museum, the beautifully renovated Fulton Hall, and the brand 
new wing on Higgins. Please come back when the Higgins renovations are 
complete, and you will see one of the premier science buildings in the nation. 

There have been ups and downs in athletics, and a rejuvenated depart- 
ment under some great new coaches and new leadership. You have watched a 
heartbreaking loss against Notre Dame one autumn, and a heart-stopping victory 
the next, the development of a nationally ranked women 's basketball team (ah, 
that win over Connecticut in Conte!) and a men's hockey team a paint chip away 
from a national championship (ah, that overtime at the Fleet Center!) 

You were the most talented class to have been admitted to Boston College, 
and have been taught by an outstanding faculty. We are proud of your intellec- 
tual progress here. You have taken "Ever To Excel" seriously and have continued 
the BC tradition of service to others, locally, nationally and internationally. You 
have studied abroad in greater numbers than ever before, learning about other 
countries and teaching others about yours. 

There has been much change during your years here — a new university 
President, Academic Vice President and Dean, and an alumnus elected Governor 
of Massachusetts. Change will be the name of the game in the new Millennium 
which, despite the hoopla last year, has not yet quite begun yet. Be ready for 
change, but do not forget the core values you nurtured at Boston College. They 
will be your best guide to success. 

You have joined a special community, a second family, a home away from 
home. If your college experience was anything like mine, you have made friends 
whom you will treasure the rest of your life. Families take care of each other, and 
Boston College is no exception. Much is expected of those to whom much is given. 
Your experiences here were enriched because prior alumni and alumnae main- 
tained contact with the university, and supported the important work we do here. 
There is an unwritten, implicit contract between generations of Boston College 
graduates and students, each in turn assisting in the education of the next. We 
hope that you will do your part. 

Please stay in touch with us on the Heights, with the professors, mentors, 
administrators and staff who have touched your lives. Go forth, but come back 
soon. We will always be happy to see you. 

Sincerely, 

Dean Joseph Quinn 

Dean of the School of Arts and Sciences 














1 "^ 


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Academics 49 



**'; 



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The Wallace E. Carroll School of Management, more affectionately 
known as CSOM, is one of the five main schools of Boston College. Its 
steadfast tradition and rigorous courses have prepared thousands of men 
and women for careers in management and leadership. This year was no 
exception, with 2,387 undergraduate students and 650 part-time and 215 
full-time graduate students. Undergraduates were busy working toward a 
Bachelor of Science in Management degree. They took classes like Intro, 
to Ethics, Principles of Economics, Statistics, and Intro, to Law. There 
were also Basic Finance classes, Basic Marketing, and lessons 6n Strategy 
and Policy. Graduate students were earning one of three degrees: Master 
of Business Administration, a Master of Science in Finance, or a PhD in 
Management with a concentration in Finance or Organizational Studies. 

There are seven departments that make up the School of Management. 
Accounting concentrates on teaching "the language of business." Business 
Law made sure every CSOM studentis more familiar with atleast more the 
basics of managerial law. Computer Science gives students an opportunity 
to learn Information Systems or Computer Science. By the time students 
are ready to enter the work force, they are prepared for technical computer 
software development positions. There are the Finance and Marketing 
departments, because what's a business without them? Operations and 






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Strategic Management asks the big questions that turn up repeatedly in » 
every business the world over. This is where the students learn how to deal 
with ethical, environmental, technological, political, and economic dfiCT^ 
sions that will come up when they enter the workforce. Finally, there's the 
Organizational Studies Department, with its concentration in Human 
Resources Management, which is responsible for teaching CSOM students 
how to get employees to work efficiently and smoothly. 



t-H - >• 



Top Left: Imerrnediate 

Accounting is just one of the 

many bridges that CSOM 

students must cross to be 

knowledgeable in today's 

business world,^ 



Top Right: The attire of 

today's business people is quite 

different from the attire of 

college students. Ifotdy 

casual Fridays were everyday... 



Middle Right: There is 

alwaysv^^iet corner in 

Fulton lounge to do some 

serious studying. 

Bottom Left: Many new 

classes help familiarize CSOM 

students with the ever growing 

world'of today 's technology. 

These skills will greatly aid 

; in their ftiture. 




Botto^^/KKSmmt of quick 



studying in the comfortable 

couches in Fulto)i can never 

hurt. 

Bottom Right: Statistics, 

Finance, and Business and 

Management are all familiar 

books to a CSOM student. 




52 Academics 




To the Class of 2000: 

Congratulations on your graduation and on your many accomplishments here at 
Boston College. The faculty and staff join me in thanking you for your contributions 
to making our School a better place, and we wish you the best in your future endeavors. 
In many ways you may not feellike the same person you were whenyou first arrived 
at the Heights. Indeed, for most of us, our college years are a time for redefining 
ourselves. You have met new friends, learned new ways to think about issues, had new 
experiences, and discovered interests, talents, and aspirations you may not have known 
you had whenyou arrived at Boston College. Yet, in important ways you are the same 
individual who first came here. You have perhaps matured, grown and added new 
layers of experience, hut you are still the same unique bundle of talents, the same inner 
self and we thank you for sharing your gifts with us. 

In the years to come, you will all need to keep redefining yourselves as your careers 
and families develop and as business and other daily activities change in ways that we 
can 't even imagine now. Yet, while change is inevitable, you will always be able to deal 
with it by drawing on the same talents and values that have served you well here at 
Boston College. Indeed, we hope we have helped you develop those talents and values 
to enable you to deal with future change in thoughtful, constructive and creative ways, 
fust as you will need to keep redefining yourselves, so too will Boston College. You 
have already seen continual changes in the physical appearance of our School in your 
brief time here. While the nature of the educational process will inevitably evolve, I'm 
confident that Boston College's inner self, the shared values and community spirit that 
you have come to know and love here, will remain unchanged. Despite the surface 
alterations, I believe you will always recognize Boston College whenyou return to visit, 
and I hope that you will do so often. 

Best wishes 

Robert A. Taggart 

Interim Dean 






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Academics 53 



"No, Sam, I will not eat green eggs and ham." One does not often hear 
Dr. Suess quoted on a college campus, but it is not uncommon in the Lynch 
School of Education. It is not all fun and games, though there is serious 
work to be done. 

The mission of the SOE is to improve the human condition through 
education. This can be accomplished by being anything frotti a teacher to 
a psychologist. There are a variety of majors offered within the SOE, such 
as early childhood development and special education, for example. Hu- 
man development is the only major that does not prepare students to meet 
state requirements for teacher certification. Not only does education 
students have to complete one major from the SOE, but they also have to 
complete another one either from SOE or the College of Arts and Sciences. 

A wide variety of courses are offered to SOE students. These students 
master a variety of subjects in order to teach them to children. It is a 
daunting task and it is coupled with a required teaching practicum. 

For an absolute minimum of two semesters, students go into the 
classroom and interact with students. They have a chance to develop lesson 
plans as well as observe the teacher they are assisting. This gives a more 
realistic feel and hands-on experience in addition to regular classwork. 

Inside the main building. Campion Hall, is also where the Campus 
School. Students in the school have multiple disabilities and education 
students often volunteer their time there. 

The Lynch School of Education offers a path to maturity and also a 
directory to find the kid at heart in all of us. Students enrolled in this school 
learn how to be both a teacher and a student. 









Top Left: Frt'shmen in the 
School of Education study the 
Infants, Children, and 
Adolescents textbook i>i their 
Child Growth and Develop- 
ment classes. 



Top Right: Although stii 
is not always a welcome task, 
students in the School of 
Education, have a nice 
comfortable lounge area . 



Middle Right: The hallways 

of Campion, the building for 

the School of Education, are 

always filled with students 

studying on the benches built 

into the walls. 

Bottom Left: The School of 

Education has many classes 

where students sit in circles so 

that they can all see each other 

and thereby facilitate 

discussion between each other. 

Bottom Middle: Taking a 

last mimite look over some 

notes before finals, many 

students go to Campion to 

relax and concetrate on their 

work. 

Bottom Right: The Campus 

School volunteers are students 

who work with children in 

BC's Campus School, which 

serves children with severe 



handicaps. 



56 Academics 




Dear School of Education Graduating Class of 2000, 

Congratulations on your accomplishments at Boston College! The 
faculty and staff of the Peter S. and Carolyn A. Lynch School of Educa- 
tion join me in wishing you all the best in the future that lies ahead of 
you. 

You graduate at the birth of a new millenium. What is a new 
beginning for you, as you step out of the Heights and into your adult life, 
is also a new beginning for the world that you are entering. With 
Internet communications, new ways of creating knowledge, and our 
increasingly interdependent global community, the world is redefining 
itself every day. Your education at Boston College has prepared you to be 
a significant contributor as the world redefines itself in the new 
millenium. You have been educated to be a contributor with critical 
thinking skills, values formed within the Jesuit tradition, and a commit- 
ment to serve others. Of course, you will need to decide how you will use 
these gifis to shape the new world. What you do with your gifis, will 
redefitne your world. 

Of course, as you change the world around us, you also will be 
changed. When you reflect on your years at Boston College, I hope that 
you will recognize the times when your actions helped to define and 
redefine who you are. The work that you did to assist a child struggling 
to learn to read, the afier school program you built for 
teens, the curriculum you designed to teach about diverse cultures, the 
math lesson that finally helped a child understand a math concept, all 
helped to redefine the world of others and changed you. 

I hope that the friendships that you have formed during your 
four years on the Heights will support you during the transitions ahead. 
We will be here waiting for you to return to us, to tell us about your 
adventures. 

Sincerely, 

MaryM. Brabeck, Ph.D. 

Dean of the School of Education 






Jessica Burkhart 




Academics 57 



The course of a year for a Boston College nursing student redefines the 
expectations of any "normal" year at college. Outsiders' notions that_the 
nursing program only has a moderately challenging curriculum, as opposed 
to that of pre-med majors, are quickly proved false by observing the life of 
a BC nurse. The pressures endured should not to be underestimated. 

An example of this is the freshman nurse who wakes up early for an 8:45 
A.M. Chemistry lab and the universal experience that every nurse can tell 
you about: titrating their own urine. A structured curriculum makes 
registration easy for nurses. They have little choice when selecting their 
classes, unlike A&S majors who have more room for electives as the years 
go by,nursing students have more and more professionally oriented classes. 
If you met a nurse, you'd quicldy learn that his or her work load consumes 
many hours of the week. Seniors in the SON, in some cases, wake up before 
dawn to go to all day clinicals. While they warned the up and coming nurses 
of its difficulty, they also passed on the knowledge that the learning 
experience was irreplaceable. The nursing program is not conducive to an 
excessive social life, but it produces some of the best nurses in the nation. 



Another unique aspect of the SON is the small class size. With a 





freshman class of about fifty nurses, the atmospnere fosters a closeness and 
familial tightness that few other majors at BC can rival. The nurses learn 
to depend on each other and work together to figure out all of the 
fundamental skills needed in their field. After such a fulfilling four years, 
you can be guaranteed that the BC nurses of the new millennium will be 
ready to approach with confidence any challenge in the medical field, and 



of course the RN certification exam. 



i 





Ts gam 
branches 
'ing the neo- 
natal unit. 

Top Right: The students 

have the opportunity to intern 

in many of the hospitals in 

the Boston areUi including St. 

Elizabeth's, and Brigham and 

Women 's Hospital. 

Middle Right: In addition to 
their classroom learning, 
nursing students have the 
opportunity to "heal" each 
other in a clinical environ- 
ment. 

Bottom Left: By working 
ivith fellow classmates, Boston 
College nursing students 
develop their new skills in a 
hands^^l„harning environ- 
ment. 




Boi^^^^ffdle Nursing 

studen^m)rk chicly with 

nursing school faculty to learn 

helpful techniques that will 

help theyn in their future 

careers. 

Bottom Right: On the fourth 

floor ofCushing Hall, there is 

a clinic used by the nursing 

students to practice their 

iWTsing techniques before 



the medical world. 



60 Academics 




Dear SON Graduating Class of 2000: 

Congratulations to all of you on your graduation, and thank you for the many 
contributions you have made to this school during your time here. What an 
auspicious year to graduate! You are the face of nursing for the new millennium. 
Those of us who represent the 20th century can look back with pride at the 
development of the profession of nursing. Nursinghas evolved fom a hospital-based 
apprentice type occupation to a profession with a developingbody of knowledge that 
informs its practice. The changes that have occurred in our century are enormous. 
As nurses, we have been tempered by war and challenged by incredible advances in 
technology. We have traveled by horse and carriage, and by jet planes. What will 
happen in you century? Clearly, that depends on you. 

Your program, groundedin theliberalartsandthefesuittradition ofexceUenceinservice 
to others, hasffvenyou the preparation necessary to succeed in an increasingly complex 
environment. Critical thinking leadership, ethical decision-making and care across a 
variety of settings and encompassing clients from diverse backgrounds have been 
stressed. Those of you who studied in Ecuador have already demonstrated your 
ability to apply what you have learned in the most technologically sophisticated 
health care settings in the world to clients living in an area of acute poverty. In 
Ecuador andin other international sites whereyou have studied duringyourf unior- 
year abroad experiences, you have embodied the ideals of this school of nursing. 

We, the faculty and nurses of the Twentieth Century, salute you, the nurses of the 
Twenty First Century. We are very proud ofourgraduatingclass of 2000, andknow 
that our pride will increase as you dedicate yourselves to you chosen profession. May 
God continue to bless you, your parents, and loved ones as you leave Boston College 
to commence the next phase of your lives. 

Sincerely, 

Barbara Hazard Munro Ph. D 

Dean and Professor 







yr-IC* 








Kyelim Rhee 



Kyc-lini Rl, 



Academics 61 



Our world constantly undergoes many changes. Changes in technology, 
law, business, and many other fields of work occur every day, compelling 
individuals to adapt to their world. The College of Advancing Studies 
offers students the opportunity to learn about these changes. Students of 
the College of Advancing Studies at BC can prepare for a new career, 
immerse themselves in their own interests, or expand their intellectual 
horizons. This college has an interactive and motivational environment 
that fosters learning. The curriculum of the College of Adv ancing St udies 
has responded to our ever changing world by preparing its students fdr life 
outside Boston College. 

Students in the College of Advancing Studies have access to interactive 
programs that explore the emerging world of computer science. Such 
ciasses;is Internet and Beyond introduce students to this innovative field. 
Students have the opportunity to be exposed to many technological 
simulations of what they can expect in the working world. 

No matter what an individual's interests are, the College of Advancing 
Studies satisfies his or her curiosity. Classes in the fields of biology, 
theology, philosophy, accounting, architecture, and many others are 
available through this branch of Boston College. 

The atmosphere of the College of Advancing Studies provides an 
academic environment for people with many different lifestyles. Some 
students of the college manage a family and a career while they further their 
education. BC understandsd these challenges and continues to motivate its 
students. In our changing world we must have the knowledge necessary to 
stay competitive. This school helps students to be competitive in today's 
world. The BC School of Advancing Studies is the home of opportunity 
and intellectual expansion for those who attend. 



;^ 





Top Left: The College of 

Axlr:incirig Studies offers many 

lecture courses that incorporate 

other forms of media to 

communicate information to 

the students. 

Top Right: The College of 

Advancing Studies offers many 

classes is a wide variety of 

subjeef^^s to fiirther the 

advancement ofitss^dents in 

many different fields. 

Middle Right: The faculty of 
The Colleg^j)f Advancing 

Studies are excellent resources 
for students. These people 

create the nurturing environ- 
ment that is CAS. 

Bottom Left: Students of the 
College of Advancing Studies 

have the opportunity to take 
clasie^ at all times of the day. 

Th a flexibility alloius many 
< take classes. 




Bottom Mmdle: College of 

Advancing: Studies students 

listen intently to the lecture at 

band. Classes such as this 

stimulate the innovative 

minds of the students. 

Bottom Right: Many students 

take advantage of the facilities 

that the College of Advancing 

Studies offers. This choice 

opens many doors to the future 

of these students. 



64 Academics 




To the Class of 2000: 

Great joy and accomplishment are yours as you celebrate graduation. You have 
achieved what you dared to dream. The talent, commitment, and optimism you 
brought to studies will now be advanced in different directions, shared in new 
ways. 

You are on the cutting edge; first in the millennium. A world community invites 
your vision, vitality, and vigilant empathy for others. You are prepared to 
question, to seek answers, and to respond. You have anchored your knowledge, 
convictions, and attitudes in a commitment to others which is the essence of 
moral engagements. Life i many changes will now always be examined in 
defined context. 

Your imagination and initiative link you today with distant continents and 
disparate cultures. With few strangers in an interactive world, limitless 
opportunities will prompt you to connect communities and carve a future of 
freedom and peace. 

You own the greatest human freedom: to choose your own attitude in any given 
circumstance. To secure your opinions under extreme conditions when there is 
no chance of changing them is the highest expression of personal autonomy. 
Respond to the compelling challenges with understanding and enthusiasm. 
Seize every opportunity with wisdom, optimism, and a sense of humor. For 
seventy-one years, graduates of the College ofAdvancing Studies have gone forth 
into a world of upheaval and advanced the noblest human cause: freedom and 
moral concern for others. 
Prayerful best wishes for all the years ahead. 

James A. Woods, S.J. 
Dean, College ofAdvancing Studies 






Academics 65 



to study: 

to attempt to learn everything in one night. 

Studying. No matter what people said or told us about studying, it was the first 
thing put aside for a later date. You could study the night before the quiz/ test/ 
midterm/final and maybe even those ten minutes in class before the professor 
arrived, if you had that luxury. 

In any case, there were many different ways of studying and no one way worked 
for everybody. There were study-group people, the highlighter people, the "dog- 
eared" book people, the index-card people, the post-it notes, the notebooks, or 
any combination of the above and, finally the secret studiers. You know, those 
kids who were never caught studying but who got A's anyway. 

BC certainly has no lack of places for study. Every student had his or her room. 
Every dorm had a lounge or study room. There were about a million libraries on 
campus with tons of comfy study chairs and serious study cubbies. Some students 
were even sighted late-night with textbooks in one of the campus cafeterias. On 
those beautiful days when the temperature was just right there was plenty of grass 
to sit on, trees to sit under, and even the occasional bench. 

There shouldn't have been any excuse for not studying once you really felt the 
need to. Unless the test was last week, that is. 




fif jluiuiijinw 





^ Finding time to study To studyin an academic 

is halt ot che batde. Squeez- atmosphere many students 

ing in an hour between classes head to O'Neill Library. Here 

helps. Working outside can numerous resources can be 

be a relaxing change of pace. accessed to fulfill anyone's 





When the weather is 

beautiful outside many stu- 
dents camp out in the quad 
or in the dustbowl to study 
while catching some rays. 

Home Sweet Home! 

Some students attempt to 
study in the privacy of their 
own room despite roommates 
and other hallway distrac- 
tions. 



^MmAMpailF 



Foreign Study: 

a way to learn new things in a different world 

Life at Boston College is enriching and rewarding. It offers great experiences that 
other students cannot get anywhere else. One of the most popular experiences 
that BC offers does not take place anywhere near Chestnut Hill. These 
experiences take place overseas and on neighboring continents. The foreign study 
program sends many Boston College students all over the world to explore other 
cultures and education systems. About thirty percent of the junior class heads out 
into the the wide world of opportunity and adventure. Many popular venues of 
study include Australia, Ireland and Italy. Here the students pursue their 
requirements for graduation as well as obtaining an education with a foreign 
twist. The study of language is done all over the world as well. Many nursing 
students head to Ecuador to practice nursing in a third world country. Irish 
Studies minor flock to Galway and Dublin to research their roots as others travel 
to Eastern Europe to use the information that they have learned in EC's Balkan 
Studies program. No matter what your interest is, there is a foreign study 
program that adds to the enriching experiences that one acquires at Boston 
College. 




'<i 






ii 




68 Academics 




Wow! What a view! Towering above 

Not only does studying 



abroad allow students to learn 
in a new environment, but 
they benefit firom beautifial 
scenery. 



With the Eiffel Tower as a 
backdrop, many students visit 
France to study abroad and 
take in the sites. 





Exploring New Worlds 

Exploring foreign cities is a 
great way for one to become 
well acquainted with the na- 
tive culture. 

Community living 

Many students who go abroad 
\ 1 have apartments that allow 
them to truly experience liv- 
ing in another culture. 



Academics 69 



Art History: 

the study of the foundation of todays aesthetics 

Taking art history could lead to a career or it could merely fulfill a student's core 
requirement, but in either case it is an enriching experience. When a student 
takes an art history course, he/she not only learns about history, but also culture, 
philosophy, religion, and politics. Not only is art aesthetically and emotionally 
pleasing, but through analysis of the subject and the meaning, students can view 
history through the eyes of an artist. Using art as a medium the professor takes 
the class on a journey that spans the beginning of mankind to the present day. 
Students learn about the artistic styles and periods of different cultures and study 
some of the great masterpieces of art. What a student learns in art history will 




i 



enrich his/her college experience as a whole. Invariably, the strong foundation ^'"p''™ 



Murray 



that the art history core gives students will come in handy in other classes allowing 



them to make connections between art and life. 



IBH 



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70 Academics 




•■.': 



f Cross 



li 



Love from afar 

Viewing art from afar, two 
exhibits from the Irish Art 
Now exhibit can be appreci- 
ated together. 



Billy 

Bringing fame to BC, this painting caused 
people to question whether or not it 
should be exhibited at a Catholic institu- 
tion. 



Stephen Murray 



;r 



■Mi 



SU'phtn Murray 



All in line 

Spanning the years, photo- 
graphs were mounted in the 
Irish art exhibit located in 
Devlin Hall. 

Pucker up 

As part of the Irish Art Ex- 
hibit entitled Irish Art Now, 
this sculpture was displayed 
in Devlin Hall. 



Acadeftiics 71 



PULSE: 

a new way to carry on the Jesuit tradition 

PULSE is an exciting academic program that incorporates the disciplines of 
philosophy and theology into a twelve-credit, year-long course. In addition to the 
classroom experience, PULSE includes a community service component through 
which students complete 10-12 hours a week of service work at a placement of 
their choice. There were 48 placements to choose from and each one added to 
a student's awareness of social injustice and furthered his or her understanding 
of moral responsibility to the greater community. Not only did the students in 
PULSE explore the injustices and inequalities of the world through their 
coursework, but they also gained a compassionate awareness of the larger world 
through getting out and getting involved in the lives of people who were living 
in a variety of different situations. 

PULSE is a unique program that began thirty years ago and continues to enrich 
the lives of students by bringing a spiritual dimension to their studies. It has 
changed the way PULSE students look at the world and made them realize that 
each person is needed to make a difference in the world. 



72 Academics 





Break time 

Freshman Vicky Haley takes 
time out from working at her 
PULSE placement to take a 
picture with the kids. 



Smile 

At this elementary school, 

kids get the opportunity to 
work with college students 
through the PULSE program. 




Photo by Vicky Haley 




Work together 

Art projects and group activi- 
ties are just a couple of ex- 
amples of how BC students 
help younger students. 

Recess 

Taking a break from their 
studies, students at a PULSE 
placement elementary school 
hang out during recess. 



Academics 73 



Capstone: 

taking it from the Cornerstone to the top. 

Making many important transitions is a large part of college life. Boston College's 
Father Joe Marchese understands the stress and anxiety that these transitions 
impose upon his students. Fr. Marchese designed the Cornerstone and Capstone 
programs to help make many of these life altering transitions easier. As a freshman 
at Boston College, one must adjust to dorm life, a heavier work load and classes 
filled with two hundred students. In this seminar, students have the opportunity 
to talk to a small class of freshmen and an advisor who understand each other 
because they are experiencing the same problems. As seniors at Boston College, 
students must begin to face the real world. They must leave the safe haven of their 
Eagle's Nest to the pressures of today's society. Like Cornerstone, Capstone 
seminars allows students to work closely with an advisor and other students who 
are experiencing the same problems. "By working with other students, we realize 
that we are not alone and do not have to make these changes by ourselves." 
Thanks to Fr. Joe Marchese, these new programs are making the transitions 
students must make a little bit easier. 



74 Academics 





Who's the Blue Man? Bonding of Campus 

Many Cornerstone and This Cornerstone class met 

Capstone classes take "field in McElroy before making 

trips" to see shows such as the their way to Boston to see the 

"Blue Man Group." popular show, "Stomp." 





Exploring our world. 

As freshmen , Cornerstone classes 
have the oppotunity to explore 
the city of Boston. 

Eating in for dinner 

Some Cornerstone and 
Capstone advisors invite their 
classes over for a home cooked 
meal, which is always welcome 
change of pace. 



Academics 75 



s,^' 



Actiidty 

(akiv' i te)n. 

a sp( icific deed, ac- 3 

tion, function, or 

sphere of action: 

sociilactiviry. 




76 




^^*;.;<' 

"% 



yActivLties 

Redefined at 

Boston College 

Through the years at Boston 
College, a plethora of activities 
have evolved. Arts, music, and 
service groups have found homes 
at the University. They have be- 
come a way for the student to 
become a part of a community 
and to meet newpeople. Activites 
open the door to new friend- 
ships, exploring a new culture 
and learning from your peers. 

Editors 

Jennifer Wadenius 

Sharon Hwang 



77 



<Zke TiuUn^ <Hand - Zi^'BC 




Though they must be serious in office, 
UGBC members have fiin together in 
their firee time. 



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Alvin Barnett, as UGBC vice president, chris Goff, UGBC president, help- 
helped Chris GofFmake UGBC a sue- ing out at the Freshmen First Week 
cess this year activities. 




President- 
Chris Goff 
Vice President- 
Alvin Barnett 
Treasurer- 
Chief of Cabinet Affairs- 
Shauna Murray 
Chief of Academic Affairs- 
Kristen Keenan 
Chief of Community 
Affairs- 
Mark Dumas 
Ex. Appointees to Senate- 
Andrew Frey & 



O 



mar 



Parra 



Sliauna Murray 



^ke YAj^det^raduate (^ovetnment o-^ Boston (3oUe^e 

is the mission of the Undergraduate Government of Boston College to actively represent the undergraduate student 
)pulation by programming according to the interests of the student body, forcefully advocating the concerns of the 
ident body to the University, and promoting issues of justice throughout the Boston College community. The 1999- 
100 school year saw Wyclef in Conte, Homecoming with a Salsa theme, and the creation ofUGBC.org. 





Shjuiij Murray 



Students on the council may have 
to work hard but they play hard as 
well. 



Through working together, 
students form lasting friend- 
ships. 



Shauna Murray 



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^ctviHf the ^!>ubtLc 




This nursing student prepares for a 
real hospital atmosphere through 
practice at the SON here at BC. 



During a regular meeting, the SOMG This BC student gets pleasure from 
Officers inform the other members of her hand-on experiences through 
important information. the SON. 



Jennifer 1 



80 Aetiuiiies 




Advisor- 
Nancy Fairchild 
President- Julie Schonbeck 
Vice-President- 
Katie Brown 
Treasurer- 
Rebecca Johnston 
Secretary- 
Meghan Schloss 



School o-^ AiutsiH^ Senate 



le School of Nursing Senate is the undergraduate government of nursing at BC. Each class elects four officers to serve as 
iaison between students and faculty. The SON Senate provides services to the school and community, including class 
enrs, community volunteer projects, convocation preparation, and promotion of professional development. 




President- 
Jack Ru 
Vice President- 
Andrea Zezas 
Treasurer- 
Katie Ryan 
Secretary- 
Lindsay Crawford 
Representatives- 
Michael Armeno & 
Maureen McNamara 



Chris Bowers 



School o-^ /Kana^ement (^ovetnment 

he School of Management Government is the official governing body of the Carroll School of Management. The 
3MG promotes unity between students and faculty by sponsoring various events, including banquets and guest speakers, 
r CSOM students. The government assists students in fulfilling their studies and pursuing future careers. 



KeiActiviiies 81 



(^ovctnln^ 7^0 dU9 




Lourtesy 01 Republ: ; 



Under the watch of secret service 
guards, Presidential Candidate 
George W. Bush signs Ted 
Graboski's bag of Idaho potatoes. 



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BC For Bush students put their ideal- 
ism into action. 



During the activities fair, these 
two BC Democrats show their sup- 
port for Al Gore. 



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Boston CZotte^e democrats 



President- 
Justin Marceau 
Vice-President- 
Timothy Dube 
Co-Treasurers- 
Gabriel Bordenave 
Timothy Keelan 
Secretary- 
Stacie Powderly 
Pubhc Relations- 
Gabrielle Viator 



The goal of the BC Democrats is to further the Common Sense Platform of the Democratic Party. We do this through 
losting speakers, having political discussions, and volunteering ourselves in Democrats' campaigns. 




(3o(le^e TiefjubLicans o-^ 'Soston dotte^e 



Chairman- 
Sarah Bonner 
Vice-Chairman- 
Mark Grzelak 
Secretary- 
Liz Keohane 
Treasurer- 
Theodore Grabowski 
Co-Executive Directors- 
Eric Tuvey 
Charles Wilson 
Political Director- 
Timothy Libutti 
Director of Lectures- 
Sean White 
Asst. to the Chairman- 
Jason Recher 

Asst. to the Vice-Chairman- 
Ryan Kennedy 



he College Republicans of BC are committed to educating, activating, inspiring leadership and integrity, and supporting 
he Republican Party. We provide an intellectual environment in which politics are discussed, promote youth politics, and 
iltimately get out the vote while developing new Republican leadership for the 21st century. 



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Listening carefully to one another 
with trained ears, these Bostonians 
give their audience a flawless 
performance. 



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Anticipating the high point of their 
song, these two BC divas smile in 
expectancy. 



After months of practice, this 
dancer completes her routine with 
a last perfectly executed step. 




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^ostonians 



Business Manager - 
Kristin Marrone 
Musical Director - 
Dave Petrelli 
Treasurer - 
Genevieve Reiner 
Executive Director - 
Lori Trespicio 



stablished in 1986, the Bostonians of Boston College continue to entertain audiences both on and off campus with an 
clectic repertoire of songs and energetic stage performances. This year's group of seven men and eight women regularly 
erform a vast array of songs ranging from Frank Sinatra and Aretha Franklin to Tori Amos and Guster. 




"Trance Ot^anlzation 



Co-President - 
Claudia Zaborsky 
Co-President - 
Stephanie Wade 
Publicity - 
Beth White 



he Dance Organization of Boston College aspires to introduce and promote dance of all types to the BC community. To 
:hieve this, it offers students the opportunity to choreograph and experiment with different aspects of dance. Experienced 
ancers can further expand on their talents, while those just beginning are able to learn and advance their skills. 



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^o ^ou <fieax X^oicesl 




Though members of the Acoustics 
sacrifice personal time for rehears- 
als, the students find that singing 
together is an experience that re- 
wards all their efforts. 




The BC Sharps are an all female group 
that perform a wide variety of music 
all over Boston. 



The Acoustics not only provide an 
environment that fosters vocal tal- 
ent but also offers an opportunity 
to learn more about singing. 




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yAcouSticS 



Musical Director- 
Brian Sheehan 
President- 
Jon Geldert 
Secretary/Treasurer- 
Conor Mulcahy 
Business Manager- 
Jenni Mather 
Publicity Director- 
Elyssa Vasas 



JC^ith an extensive history, the Acoustics remain one of the most popular co-ed a capella groups on campus. They perform 
liverse programs that always draw a crowd. Their reputation has earned them invitations to perform everywhere from the set 
>f Jeopardy to the National Cathedral. In addition, they sing at numerous benefit concerts and record an annual CD. 




Musical Director- 
Beth Becker 
Treasurer- 
Joanne Domingo 
Group Manager- 
Julie Golia 
Publicity Director- 
Jocelyn Walters 
Business Manager- 
Amy Woodbury 



Jessica Supemaw 



'BC Skatps 

he BC Sharps were founded in 1990 and have influenced the Boston College community ever since. These 18 women 
erform both on and off campus at such events as the annual "Breaking the Barriers Ball," "Take Back the Night," and the 
Second Chances Benefit Concert." They arrange all of their own music and sing everything from country to hip-hop. 



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xptess ^outset-^ 




Exemplifying their expertise, these 
three BC Dance Ensemble mem- 
bers plie in perfect coordination. 



These dapper Heightsmen take a mo 
ment to prepare for their next piece, 



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Director- 
Jessye Ball 
Assistant Director- 
Peachie Manalo 
Production Director- 
Molly Baran 
Publicity Director- 
Mandy Marchioli 
Budget Director- 
Josette D'Ambrosi 
Costume Directors- 
Kristen Minger & 
Jenna Nobles 


'J 






V' 


Jenn Burns 

'Trance ^nsemUe 

"he Dance Ensemble is essentially an organization of people who love to dance. The group consists of thirty-five mem- 
ers, each of whom excel in areas of dance ranging from ballet to jazz, tap, hip-hop, etc. The Dance Ensemble is all about 
le love of dance and being able to share it with others. 




President- 
Paul Berens 
Business Manager- 
Charles Kehres 
Treasurer- 
Andy Andronikidis 
Music Directors- 
Hoon Choi & 
Chris Cummings 



ounded in 1989 by five students, the Heightsmen of Boston College is the only all-male a capella group on campus and 
as grown into a 13 current member and 40-plus alumni organization. They perform a variety of music from '50s classics 
3 the pop hits of today and perform various concerts throughout the year as their popularity continues to grow. 



iiiRni9Mp<9 



theatre: Old and AI^mi 




Fleabag struts their stuff in 
O'Connell House. 



Improvisational theatre at its best here A scene from the Dramatics per- 
at BC. formance of Private Eyes. 



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Co-Director - Brandon 
Patrick Hart 



Jessica Supernaw 



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oston College is home to the nations oldest collegiate improv troupe. For the past two decades Fleabag has been making 
eople laugh with their zany antics and improvisational comedy stylings. 




President - 
Andrew Russell 
Vice President - 
Desiree Matthews 
Publicity Director - 
Patricia Runcie 
Administrative Coordinator 
Katherine Brown 
Financial Director - 
Michael Salerno 
Technical Support - 
Charlie Veprek 



icannclH.- Shaw 



le Dramatics Society of Boston College, founded in 1865, provides opportunities for student directors, designers, and 
trors to share their talent with the BC community. By choosing works from a well-established canon of dramatic litera- 
; re to student-written works, the DS strives to make the arts an important part of universiry life. 



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y4 N^t^ y4d(iitLon 




These three Chorale members sin: 
in unison during rehearsal. 



This member of the Dynamics takes This BC singer concentrates hard 
the spothght at a performance in while practicing with the Chorale. 
Dunkin' Donuts. 



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I 




President- 
Dennis Klem 
Vice President/ 
Treasurer- 
Jamil Samara 
Men's Secretary/ 
Social Director- 
Brian Stuart 
Women's Secretary/ 
Social Director- 
Genevieve Reiner 



Chris Bowers 



esently one of the largest student-run organizations on campus, the University Chorale of Boston College began as an 
-male glee club in the late nineteenth century. Today, the group contains over 160 singers, consisting of male and 
Tiale students, Jesuits, and faculty. The Chorale's repertoire ranges from classical masterpieces to modern works. 




'^\jnamics 



Business Manager - 
Chrissie Mauriello 
Music Direstor - 
Scott Turi 
President - 
Leland Cogliani 
Treasurer - 
Matt Dunbar 



Mary Bain 



he Dynamics are a co-ed a capella group founded in 1998. Our mission is to give the opportunity to share a love of 
lusic with performance. In performing we hope not only to entertain but promote a love of music on campus and have 
ame fun at the same time! 



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y^nd the ^and ^taifcd On • • • 




Two Pep Band members "blow" out 
their support for the BC Ice Hockey 
Team at one of their games. 



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Executive Board: 
Kristen Bowes 
Lisa Tulipani 
Ed Mills 
Jay Gelston 



Chris Bowers 



^cteamcH £a^Ces /Kaxckin^ T^ancL 



rhe mission of the Marching Band is to give the best experience for the greatest number of people by promoting and 
)roviding opportunities for excellence, quality performances, positive personal development, and satisfying social atmo- 
phere. 




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Pep Band 
Coordinators: 
Steph Seiss 
Laura Viklund 
Beth Reilly 



Chris Bowtrs 



he BC Pep Band's mission is to encourage enthusiasm at BC functions and provide opportunities for students to display their 
.Lisical talents around campus-especially at every hockey game. 



mmmmm 



^uck o-^ the 3ti9k 




This banner in the quad announces 
one of the many events the Irish 
Society hosts on campus. 



These Irish dancers perform for their This Irish dancer takes center stage 
fans in the Dunkin' Donuts Cafe. during a solo. 




JJtlsh SocietAj o-^ Boston dotte^e 



President- 
Sean Keithly 
Vice President- 
Kevin Meehan 
Treasurer- 
Kerrie Caulfield 
Secretary- 
Michael O'Conner 



le Irish Society of Boston College seeks to promote and further a consciousness of Irish culture to all interested members 
the university community. Our aim is first and foremost to organize and publicize events pertaining to academic, 
litical, cultural, and social currents at Boston College. Past activities have included major concerts, Irish dancing events 
eilis), community service outings, and member-wide social events. 




These BC students chow down on -j-^ree Irish dancers prepare to 

Irish cuisine during the Irish perform together by positioning 

Society's night at the Intercuitural themselves correctly. 
Cafe. 



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Executive Board 
Members: 
Jared Fields & 
Lisa Langdon 



pulton 'T^eiatin^ Socletxi 



Nick Genevisii 



Under the guidance of Father Robert Fukon, the Fukon Debating Society was founded shortly after Boston College was 
established. Participants compete in tournaments all over the country, speak on current issues from foreign policy to civil 
rights, and actively continue the 130-year-old tradition. 



L 




President- 
Chrissy Gruber 
Vice President- 
Avi Bappanad 
Secretary- 
Michele Estabrook 
Treasurer- 
Noel Auguston 
PR/Promotions- 
Brittany Follmer 
Programmer- 
Nicole Arena 
Web Designer- 
Avi Bappanad 



/Katketin^ yAcadcmxf 

The Marketing Academy serves as a resource to Marketing majors as well as all students at Boston College. The Acadamy 
aims to present a variety of career opportunities for students. This year they sponsored peer advisement workshops, 
lectures, internships, and social events. The Marketing Academy plans to enhance the opportunities for its members 
through other similar events. 
I 



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President- 
Debbie Harbey 
Treasurer- 
Liz Rocco 
Secretary- 
Suzy Casey 



Chris Bowers 



S^n^tisk yHssociatioH 



The English Association strives to bring together the community of Hterary lovers and give them a forum where their 
voices can be heard. With a continually growing membership, we hope to increase awareness of literary events in the 
surrounding Boston area as well as those hosted by EC's own literary scholars. 



t 




President- 
Elaine McNeil 



The Undergraduate Sociology Club was formed in 1997 to serve as an alliance between students and the faculty of the 
•Sociology Department. The members of the club advise one another on curriculum choices and on-campus issues, discuss 
urrent events, and plan activities. 



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These BC students welcome the 
incoming freshman class in 



These three members of the Black Vasco Eguira relaxes underneath a 
Student Forum pose together at their palm tree in sunny Puerto Rico. 
Halloween party. 



Courtesy of Puerto Rican Associati 1 






I 




ll 



President- 
Pauline Lugira 
Vice President- 
LaTanya Bennett 
Treasurer- 
Virginia Thomas 
Director of Publicity- 
Kalia Silva 

Director of Public Relations- 
Ebette Fortune 
Secretary- 
Sophia Mitchell 
AHANA Caucus Rep.- 
Beatriz Barros 



Lourlesy of Black student torum 



^tack Student ^otunx 

Hack Student Forum's goal is to provide a social, cultural, and political medium that targets the African American popula- 
ion of Boston College. As the oldest intercultural organization at BC, we have a diverse population. In striving for unity 
"irough our diversity, the intent of this organization is to leave a foundation where a stronger organization can be built. 




'^uento l^ican yAssociation 



Courtesy of Puerto Rican Association 



President- 
Camille Burckhart 
Vice President- 
Yamil Jaskille 
Treasurer- 
David Chafey 
Secretary- 
Susana Miranda 
Activities Coordinator- 
Jorge Canellas 
Class Representatives- 
Davey Kopel 
Annete Hils-Prats 
Camille Adsuar 
Edwin Perez 



Puerto Rican Association strives to unite the Puerto Rican community and welcomes active participation by all the 
-ommunity who are interested in learning from our culture. We have performed activities ranging from formal 
crences to literature distribution, field trips, community service activities, dances, and domino tournaments. 



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yApvateness 




The Muslim Students' Association 
promotes friendship among its 
members through events such as 
this group dinner. 



Members of Navajo Nation enjoy The Navajo Nation's service trip 
the view. provides students with a rare oppor- 

tunity to learn from and work for 
others at the same time. 



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President- 
Shaun Ali 
Vice President- 
Hozaifa Casubhai 
Imam- 

Karim Samfra 
Coordinator- 
Shadab Raziudin 
Treasurer- 
Omar Kazimi 



/Kustim Students' yAssociatLon 



he Boston College Muslim Students' Association is an on-campus Islamic organization that strives to promote unity 
pong Muslims and non-Muslims, promoting open-mindedness, tolerance, and peace. The MSA is open to all students. 




/Navajo /Nation 



Faculty Coordinator - 
Matt MuUane 
Student Leaders - 
Mary Kate Hanlon & 
Kristen Luppino 



Navajo Nation Service/Immersion trip is run through the Faith, Peace, and Justice academic minor. The experience 
s to expose students to Navajo culture to broaden their understanding of ethics and social justice. 



mmtmi'^m 



(Zetebtatin^ <fictita^e 










Members of the Cape Verdean Stu- 
dent Association visit Cape Verde. 




Students meet the people of the Cape The Cape Verdean Student Asso- 
Verde, learning about the country's ciation not only teaches about the 
society and cukure. land, but also creates an environ- 

ment to meet new people. 



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yAsian d^aucus 



President- 
Kohtaro Takeuchi 
Vice President- 
Aki Mizumoto 
Treasurer- 
Cindy Song 
Co-Executives- 
Brian lam 
Carolyn Lai 
AHANA Caucus Rep. 
Dawn Lozada 



Kyelim Rhee 



n unity, our mission is to act as the voice resource and support for the Asian/Asian-American students at Boston College 
jid to promote cultural diversity and awareness within the BC community. 




President- 
Mariza Goncalves 
Vice President- 
Keila Barros 
Secretary- 
Lisa Barros 



d^ape X^etdean Student -Association 

he Cape Verdean Student Association aims to educate the BC community on the Cape Verdean culture as well as being 
ivolved with other campus issues and clubs. 



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^tom ^7^ivet9it\^ to ^Z^Hitu 




At a Ryder Cup Tournament din- 
ner in September where Voices of 
Imani performed witli Broadway 
star Jennifer Holiday. 




These Intervarsity members huddle This InterVarsity officer gives out 
together to capture a memory. . important information to the mem- 

bers at a meeting. 




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I 




President- 
Susan LePeau 
Vice President- 
Erin Pacocha 



DntetvaisUif dhiistian ^cLLoivshif) 



Courtesy of InterVarsity 



1 response to God's love, grace, and truth: the purpose of Intervarsity Christian Fellowship/USA is to establish ourselves 
colleges and universities to create communities of students and faculty who follow Jesus as Saviour and Lord. We follow 
sus by growing in our love for God, God's word, God's diverse people, and God's purpose in the world. 




President- 
Gracie Taylor 
Vice President- 
Candace Ashir 
Tour Managers- 
Alexandra Calixte 
John Richardson 
Fundraising Coordinators- 
Pauline Lugira 
Jonathan Marsh 
Public Relations- 
La Tanya Bennet 
Myisha Roach 
Corresponding Secretary- 
Bridget Collachio 
Recording Secretary- 
Bonita Taitt 
Treasurer- 
Robert Ellis 



CCS Ol Imani 



X^oices o-^ 3n\ani 

'oices of Imani (Imani being a Swahili word for "faith") was created in 1978 as a mechanism to celebrate the beauty of 
ospel music. The choir serves not only as a source of spiritual inspiration, but also as a source of unity and strength 
mong students of color, as well as others who want to experience the glory of the African-American gospel tradition. 



mmmmMm' 



Jn Spirit and Sctvice 




Boston College and Nativity Prep 
students gather together before the 
BC students help them with their 
homework. 




Ignatian Society members and their Students both learn and have fun 
advisor take a break at the beach while at a barbecue during Ignatian 
on a retreat. Awareness Week. 




Jiii i O Jill 



I 




3^natian Socletvi 



rhe Ignatian Society of Boston College is a student group, started in 1996 by Jesuit high school graduates, which engages 
n social, service, and spiritual activities that foster and promote the experience of Jesuit education here at Boston College. 

President - Andrew Curran 

Vice President - Tim McManus 

Communications Chair - Brandon Hernandez 

Spiritual Chair - Sam Sawyer 



mmmm'^m 



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These three Hillel officers pose for 
a snapshot at the Activities fair. 



This student sings her heart out dur 
ing one ACF meeting. 



m«m^lmmim 




CORE: 

AHANA-UNITE- 
Joseph Lin 
Business- 
Michelle Tarn 
Public Relations- 
Sun Yong Ahn 
Committee Director- 
Hwan II Kim 



yAsian (Zktistian ^eUowsklp 



Kyelim Rhee 



\.C¥ reaches out with the gospel of Jesus Christ to the Boston College community. Also, ACF fosters spiritual growth and 
neaningful relationships within the body of believers, especially (but not limited to) Asian-American Christians. Lastly, 
i.CF is committed to developing leaders and preparing for God's work. 




President- 
Ari Shapiro 
Vice President- 
Brianne Nadeau 
Secretary- 
Melissa Mariasch 
Treasurer- 
Sarah Tierney 



^iUd 



ioston College Hillel provides resources and a community for Jewish students and raises the awareness on campus of 
ewish cultural and historical events. This is accomplished both through social gatherings and group trips to synagogues 
md other Hillel chapters. Raising Jewish awareness is achieved by hosting a lecture series and holding religious celebra- 
:ions. 



JllDDuMJ JJJ 



^ot ^ke ^reatet (^ood 




During Fall Field Training Exercise, Camoflauged and prepared for the 
these early-rising ROTC members 1999 Ranger Challenge, Nick 
pause in the midst of their warm-ups. Anderson and comrades are ready 

for action. 



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Jcbsicd Supurnaw 



/itmif Ticyzc 



Senior Officers - 
Ileana Acevedo 
Allan Cermak 
Sean Donnelly 
Michael Moynahan 
David Nautly 
Brent Osborn 
Edward Panetta 
Christopher Peterson 
David Sokolski 
Stephen Yahner 
Kurt Zwoboda 



I 



jmy ROTC provides intellectual, moral, physical, and military training to each cadet to commission the future leadership 
f the United States Army. 




President - 
Erin K. Flynn 
Vice President - 
Kevin Synder 
Secretary - 
Kristina Milik 
Treasurer - 
Tara Borlawsky 
Editor - 
Katie Gigliotti 
Fundraising Chair - 
Kim Pagella 
Service Chair - 
Bethany Pearson 
Social / Interciub Chair - 
Christina Gush 
MRDER Chair - 
Kari Knight 
Web Page Controller - 
Nick Scott 



CltcU K 

oston College Circle K is a branch of Circle K International, an organization of students who are responsible citizens and 
aders with a lifelong commitment to community service. Bettering the community and campus through service projects, 
iircle K makes the city of Boston accessible to students who can get wrapped up in events only on campus. 



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y4 Ni^kt /\t the Mall 




These students dance the night away These two party-goers pose together 
at the Campus School Semi-Formal. for a picture while taking a break 

from dancing. 



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President- 
Cara MacGilvrey 
Vice President- 
Aaron Patnode 
Treasurers- 
Katie Doran & 
Tracy Lituri 
Secretary- 
Sean Doyle 
Communication- 
Heather Ashley 



dampus School T^otunteets 



The Campus School Volunteers is a group of undergraduates who work with the BC Campus School. It is our goal to 
show how Campus School is the "best kept secret of Boston College." The Campus School Volunteers work both directly 
with the students in the classroom, and outside the school by organizing fundraisers and promoting awareness. 



President- 
Rosemary DiRita 
Vice President- 
Jake McKinstry 
Officers- 
Amanda Matrango 
Katie Norman 
Tom McGuiness 
Hans Pusch 
Lauren Very 




<H^^itat -^ot <f-{umanit\j 



[Habitat for Humanity of Boston College provides affordable, respectable housing for those who cannot afford it. To 
ichieve this objective, we organize students to provide the manpower to build houses, seek to raise funds to support such 
:onstruction, and provide advocacy on campus for those who find themselves homeless. 



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y^bovc and ^ev^ond the C^att 




At a 4Boston fall retreat, students 
learn about the importance of ser- 
vice while also meeting new people. 



Students speak about the lessons they Appalachia provides a hands-on 
have learned through their participa- way to volunteer, being one of the 
tion in 4Boston. few organizations on campus to 

offer such an experience. 



Courtesy of Appaiai . 



116 Activities 




Directors- 
Courtney GifFers, 
Matt Mannering & 
Bryan Head 
Assistant Coordinators- 
Andrea Marvin, 
Georgia Cheswick & 
Mike Gewirtz 

Alumni Program Coordina- 
tors- 
Maud Elias & 
Michelle Bielunis 
Technology Director- 
Phil Gabriel 



y^ppatackia X^otunteets 



We are a student-run volunteer organization concerned with rural poverty, particularly as manifested in poor housing condi 
ions. Through our volunteer programs we aim to realize a dual educational purpose: to provide hope for those victimized by 
he demoralizing conditions of poverty, and to enlighten BC about the extent of rural poverty in the United States. 



i 




uriesy of 4Boslon 



^T^oston 



Council- 
Kathy Aprea 
Jim Binkoski 
Jaime Corliss 
Matthew Daly 
Sonia Desikan 
Beth Domogala 
Kerri Griffin 
Vivian Horn 
Lauren Hostage 
Meghan Jenkins 
Katie Kane 
Tim Knievel 
Terry McCarron 
Meghan Miller 
Mary Mullin 
Michael Paulson 
Katie Phelan 
Jim Rowan 
Michael J. Sikora 



Susan Schutte 
Rebecca Tobin 
Matt Dickson 
Brendan Ryan 



The 4Boston program places 350 volunteers at 20 different placements to do 4 hours of weekly urban service and then 
^eeks to ground the experience in our guiding principles of community, spirituality, and social justice through biweekly 
placement meetings and program-side speakers and retreats. 



mmmmm^ 



JhS> 



ewix:e 




Though a lot of work must be done, 
students in the Women's Resource 
Center manage to have fun at the 
same time. 



Nick Gcnevii | 



*t§mlm 




^ke ^nvL^onmcHtat /\ction CLoaLltlon 



Nick Genevish 



President- 
Erin Boyd 
Vice President- 
Sarah Koehler 
Secretary- 
Chris Keswani 
Treasurer- 
Kelly Miller 



s Boston College's only environmental club, we strive to make the BC community more aware of environmental 
Docerns and give students a chance to take part in environmental issues and actions. 




Coordinator- 
Jennifer Tilghman 
Staff- 

Alesandra Calixte, 
Nandre Nafziger, 
Kim Wong, 
Devon Reber, 
Marisol Orihuela, 
Katrina Bichler 



a 



The Women's Resource Center exists to support and encourage 
women in the full attainment of their personal, professional, 
spiritual, and educational goals. Open to all members of the BC 
community, the Center sponsors many programs during the 
year, such as lunch discussions and Stop the Violence against 
Women Week in March. The WRC also offers confidential 
weekly support groups for women with eating issues and survi- 
vors of sexual assault. 



YOomens l^esoutce d^entet 



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^ot tke ^UH o-^ 3t 




The members of the Spoonheads 
take a break from the game as they 
unify as a team. 



Though The Ski & Snowboard Club Known as a recreational sport, Ul- 

is about learning or improving skills, timate Frisbee still requires the same : 

students find that the club is a perfect concentration and abilities of other 

opportunity to simply have fun. collegiate sports. 



'tMmlmmmm 




Seniors: 
Kris Brewer 
Dave Ellis 
Michael Holden 
Raphael Salas 
Jim Sullivan 



/Kens Ty{ttimate '^tlsbee ^eam: ^he SpoonkeacLs 

'he Boston College Men's Ultimate Frisbee Team, drawing upon a thirty year tradition, aspire toward a national title, 
^er a year of rebuilding, Co-Captains Jim Sullivan and Chris Talarico have led their team to a fresh start in the 1999 
eason, creating a formidable spring team. 




Co-Presidents- 
Brian Sullivan 
Dave Berger 
Secretary- 
Kim Norvelle 
Treasurer- 
Rich Chiovarelli 
Parliamentarian- 
Spruille Braden 



Ski &. Snoh^boaid C^Lub 

he BC Ski & Snowboard Club is one of the most established clubs on campus with a membership around 450 students. 
)ur goal is to get groups together and bring them skiing, riding, and grousing for the least amount of money. From day 
ps to week-long western excursions, we trundle around the country, always up for some funkadelicious good times. 



mmmmmm 



74 ^att o-^ the y^ction 




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^ 



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\ 




This field hockey player has her eye 
set on the ball and fights hard to get 





::x^: 




These three Club Field Hockey mem- 
bers pose together after a big game. 



This player hustles back into the 
action of the game for BC. 



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Courtesy Field Hockey Te. ; 




Courtesy Field Hockey Tea | 



4 




I 



President- 
Jennifer Benjamin 
Vice Presidenr- 
Katrina Zorka 
Secretary- 
Kristin Midura 
Treasurer- 
Meredith Berkel 



TOomens (Ztub jZacrossc ^eam 



Kyelim Rllee 



he purpose of the Boston College Women's Club Lacrosse team is to provide female athletes at BC with an opportunity 
) play competitive lacrosse in a less-demanding environment than the varsity lacrosse team. 




President- 
Erin Matticola 
Vice President- 
Ali Carey 
Secretary- 
Jennifer Butterworth 
Treasurer- 
Kate Barry 



YOomens dtu() '^ietd ^ockexf ^eam 



'He Boston College Women's Field Hockey team is an organization that has come a long way in the past few years. The 
um takes pride in the repore that they have established with various collegiate teams. We come together as dedicated 
ihletes, who become a family, and push each other to achieve new heights. 



I 



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^^oints o-^ Uicw 




An editorial meeting at the Stylus, 
which is where all the decisions are 
made! 



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Lissa Hernck 



A.T.T.U.D.E. meetings never cease Creative minds are always at work 
to be productive yet entertaining. in the Stylus office in the depths of 

McElroy 



JessTc^upema 



mi^mtmmim 





Editor-in Cheif - Charlotte 
Cahill 

Senior Associate Director - 
Homer Marrs 

Associate Editors - Amanda 
\ Chaloupka, Jason Cavallari, 
Brock Daniels, Stephanie 
Hartman 



Jessica Supernaw 



Stiitus 

he art and literature magazine founded in 1882, the Stylus is the oldest magazine at a Catholic college in Americas. 
Jndergraduate students are invited to submit original works of literature and two dimensional art work for publication 
wo to three times a year. The staff then reviews submissions and decides on which are ready for publication. 




President - Yoland Coentro 
Vice Presidents - Elissa 
Spellman and Shaheer 
Mustafa 



/i.^.^l.Zl.T^.^. 



^fming T.o T.each T.ogetherness U.ntil D.iscrimination E.nds created in 1997 is dedicated to making the BC commu- 
i . think about how discrimination manifests itself here and in the real world. They perform an ongoing play touching 
I issues from racism to sexism and homophobia. 






Actii'ities 125 



J)n the /hedU 




WZBC's broadcasts are created for 
students by students. 



The members of The Heights work Though the radio station of Bos- 
hard to provide the Boston College ton College must be continually 
community with a newspaper every preparing for their programs, the 
week. students still have fiin in the relax- 

ing environment. 



MiNpfMnMs 




^ke <HcL^kts 



Editor in Chief- 
Michael J. Marino 
Executive Editor- 
Mark Vernazza 
Business Manager- 
Aoife Temin 
News Editor- 
Lacy O'Toole 
Sports Editor- 
Michael Teevan 
Review Editor- 
Jennifer M. Keller 
Features Editor- 
Caroline Brancatella 
Marketplace Editor- 
Ernie Kapportis 
Photography/ Art- 
James Gallagher 
Copy Editor- 
Jim O'SuUivan 



The Heights, an independent student weekly, has been Boston College's newspaper of record since 1919. The Heights 
strives to inform the BC community and the surrounding Boston area through news, sports, and feature articles. The 
paper tries to provoke thought and conversation through analysis, reviews, and columns. 



t 




General Manager - 
Dan Figenshu 
Asst. General Manager 
C.J. Lind 
Sports Director - 
Ricky Doyle 
Music Director - 
Sandra Barrett 



i 



ro^-BC 



Sharon Hwang 



WZBC-FM provides services, information, and entertainment to Boston College and the greater Boston area. It also 
offers the community the opportunity to engage in a positive learning experience that consists of participation in a real-life 
station where students can display their creative talents, thus following the university's mission of self-enrichment. 



mtrnmrnmim 



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one 



Stu- deat 



^8- nt)n. 



A person 



y engaged 



mal 



in k arning, esp. 



enr 



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in 



a scliGol or col- 



lege 



exis 
the 
fain 



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Life 

A nioae or 
manner of 



W[\&, as in 
iVorldof af- 
or society. 



128 





student Life 

Redefined at 

Boston College 

The life of a student at Boston 
College is full of schoolwork, events, 
and ceaseless activity. Students in- 
volve themselves in many types of 
lives: inside and outside of the class- 
room as well as on and off campus. 
To redefine student life as it is seen 
through the tycs of a BC student is 
to remember the many aspects that 
are important to us, and those which 
expose us to many of the different 
things we will experience after 
graduation. 

Editors 

Katra Cuskaden 

Beth Bowers 



129 



Superfahs 



"Look for me at the game; I'll be the one wearing the 
yellow shirt!" A common joke among Boston College 
students, understood by anyone who has ever attended 
a football game. The student section of every game is 
a sea of gold cotton shirts, with an occasional maroon 
face mixed in. This is the excitement, the contagious 
nature, of the Superfan spirit. 

Started by two undergraduates two years ago, 
Superfan fever has spread to all areas of BC life. To 
further the tradition, a shirt was given to every incom- 
ing freshman at Orientation this summer. Anyone 
with even a little school spirit proudly wears his or her 
shirt to all games. This phenomenal sight demonstrates 
the passion these students bring to the game. It is 
evident at every game that the Superfans are really "the 
twelfth man" on the field! 

There is a certain camaraderie associated with these 
yellow t-shirts that brings everyone together, and puts 
everyone at the same level. Seniors and freshmen, 
parents and children, undergrads and graduate stu- 
dents alike, we all share the same thing: a love for 
Boston College. No matter where one sits in Alumni 
Stadium, the level of shared affection flows through- 
out. Even at away games the spirit is never lost. There 
are always the few die-hard fans who drive thousands of 
miles to support the Eagles. They can be seen on 
national television as the rest of the fans watch. This is 
what true school spirit is made of: a love for the school, 
a passion for the game, and an intimacy among the 
Superfans that makes each football game more exciting 
than the one before! 

Beth Bowers '03 



130 Student Life 



Rainbow clown hair and red men with yellow maskA 
Expect nothing else from Superfans! They know how t( 
dress, how to impress, and, most importantly, how to leac 
the Eagles to success! 




Crosses of maroon and gold give these Superfans renewed faith that their te; 
wul soar hign to victory!^ 



1 



lis Superfan, "getting his groove on," can hardly con- One, two, three, four, five, six, seven! Human push- 
: n his excitement as the Eagles yet again take the lead! ups are a common sight in the sea of yellow shirts. 




ith arms in the air and cowboy hats on, these Superfans are ready for anything! They clap their hands, they stomp their feet, they yell 
til their voices are coarse, all because the "Eagles are on the warpath!" 



Sfudeiif Life 131 



A Road 



At the hotel in Chicago the morning of tl 
game, the energy was high despite the fact th 
it was 8:30 am. 



Trip to 

Remember 



31-29. Students who made the trek all the way to 
South Bend, Indiana will remember this win as one of 
the best moments of their BC career. For Seniors 
especially, this road trip was not only something that 
they had been planning for 4 years but it was a chance 
to really show their support for their Eagles. 

This was the first year students rolled into South 
Bend with the now familiar Superfan shirt. As 
Superfans emerged from buses, RV's and cars after a 
1 8 hour adventure from the Heights their prescence 
was felt. The moment of rolling up to the stadium and 
seeing other students that made the trip made it all 
worth it. 

For many, the trip started Thursday evening and 
included a stop in Chicago. The mild weather in 
Chicago on Friday afternoon made the sidewalks of 
the Magnificent Mile and the elevators of the Sears 
Tower home to BC students. The next morning the 
roads from Chicago to Notre Dame were full of fans 
of both Notre Dame and Boston College on the way 
to tailgate. The energy was intense on both sides and 
everyone was anxious to see what the afternoon would 
bring. 

Although Notre Dame tried to put BC students as 
far from the field as possible, Superfans rallied with 
their team to a victory. The descent from the student 
section was nothing but screams of exhiration and the 
sounds of "For Boston". BC Students got back on 
their buses, RV's and cars and fed off the adrenaline of 
the win, and of course road trip staples: McDonalds, 
and Hardees. 



Lissa Herrick '00 



t^2 Student- tifr 




BC students had a bird's eye view from the visiting student section but j 
their prescence was known especially at 17-17 when the momentum beg; ' 
to shift. 



ailgating at Knute Rockney Stadium a few hours before the game including a few pictures, and a lot of 
leering for the Eagles in opposing Notre Dame territory. 




Lissa Herrick 

For many students Friday afternoon left time for a little bit of quick window shopping on 
die Magnificent Mile or a view from the Sears Tower. 



^11 I • I Lissa >lerrick 

The RV lot at Notre Dame was tilled with students 
preparing for the moment when they would overtake the 
stadium. Face paint was a must. 



ifymdenr Life 133 



Parents 
Week 



There is only one weekend during the school year that 
meets with such mixed emotions: Parents Weekend. Some- 
times this weekend is the first time freshmen will see their 
parents after having left ft)r school in August. Other times, 
this weekend is the last of a ft)ur-year tradition of brunches, 
presentations, and football games. No matter what, though, 
the feeling surrounding Boston College on Parents Weekend 
is quite different from all the other party until dawn and sleep 
until noon weekends. 

Having taken place this year during the first weekend in 
October, the event brought parents and students together for 
a weekend filled with endless activities to to participate in, 
spectacles to see, and food to eat! On Friday, parents were 
encouraged to follow their children to class. More people 
over the legal drinking age were spotted in and around 
McElroy Commons this day than ever before! After classes, 
parents were offered a series of programs to attend, some of 
which included the Jesuit Tradition at BC, the Career 
Center, and DiningServices. Finishing off a long Friday was 
the annual Pops on the Heights Scholarship Gala. Perform- 
ing along with the Boston College Chorale, the Pops proved 
once again to be a hit among all generations. 

Saturday was also a busy day, beginning with the Maroon 
and Gold Lunch held in the Plex. Eating to the accompani- 
ment of the Screaming Eagles Marching Band, parents and 
students geared up for the home football game that afternoon 
against Northeastern University. We did indeed show them 
who really owns Boston football, beating the Huskies 33-22. 
After the game, many students followed parents with laundry 
in tow, heading home to have Mom wash the clothes and 
cook a meal that could never compare to stir-fry Wednes- 
days, or into Boston to enjoy a nice night out with the family. 

Finally, the sun rose on Sunday, and BC students silently 
praised God that the hectic weekend was almost over. Up- 
perclassmen were especially relieved that they did not have to 
get up for the Freshman Receptions. Next up was the weekly 
Sunday liturgy, held in O'Neill Plaza and followed directly 
by the closing brunch in the Plex. This was also the last 
chance to buy a commemorative BC Parents Weekend t- 



Boston College always does its part to welcome the pareni i 




The whole family gets a tour of the dorms. 



shirt. Although long and chaotic, this weekend provided a 
nice break for students and parents alike. And if not, at least 
it resulted in a lot of clean laundry! 



Beth Bowers '03 



W^iifmimfiM^ 



hree venerations of women in one restaurant - that's what Parents' Weekend is all about! 




Proud parents take every opportunity to have pictures 
taken with their favorite BC students. 



rymg to fit more than one family in this tiny dorm room might have proved impossible. 



9miiemittfimm 



AHANA Boat 



This lucky guy receives affectionate kisses 
from two ladies. 



Cruise 



Tickets for the AHANA Boat Cruise sold out 
on the first day of sale. Some were surprised that 
it sold out so quickly, and angry they weren't 
quick enough to pick up a ticket of their own. But 
obviously this was going to be a popular outing. 
"Who wouldn't want to go out on a boat at night 
with friends, while meeting new people there?" 
asks Elena Sylos-Labini '02. 

The dress was formal and BC was represented 
with style. Below deck there were two floors of 
dancing, both packed with stylish people and wild 
moves. But even if you were unsure of your own 
rhythmic abilities, watching everyone dance and 
singing along with the music was a blast. Those 
who did brave the cold on deck were treated to the 
beautiful scenery of Boston Harbor, and the lucky 
ones got to cuddle up with their dates. But you 
didn't need a date to have a good time; all you 
needed was a few good moves and a smile to make 
the most of this short but sweet two hour cruise. 

Jillian Schedneck '02 



M^iiMnipMii 




Stephen Nhi 

Rough waters and high winds don't seem to bother these two dancers. 



'eople take time out from dancing to take photograpiis, showing off their fancy outfits. Everyone got 
Iressed up tor a good time and they weren't disappointed. 




hese three ladies smile for a memorable photograph after eating a delicious dinner. 



Annelice Morales 

This couple takes a brief pause in their dancing to 
capture the moment on film. The AHANA boat cruise 
provided music, dancing, and a great time for everyone 
who attended. 



ii§fmlmiititfi''99¥ 



Mod Life 



The Mods. They are the most coveted of all the 
senior housing. Students fight year after year for the 
cramped, dilapidated houses sandwiched together on 
Lower Campus. When the time comes for the housing 
lottery, soon-to-be seniors hope and pray for a good 
pick, just to get a Mod. 

The three bedrooms are barely livable. Desks and 
beds are almost on top of each other and there is hardly 
any walking space. The downstairs common room, 
however, is huge in comparison. 

"I've been looking forward to having a Mod since my 
freshman year," claims Tish Few. "Every year I'd keep 
saying to people, 'Jtist wait until I get my Mod.' Now 
that I have one, it's awesome. I wouldn't have wanted 
to live anywhere else. This is how it was supposed to 
be." 

Few's roommate agrees. "Having a Mod is definitely 
key to senior year. This is where all the action is. I'd be 
so bummed if I didn't get one. Living here was one of 
my goals for senior year." 

Many soon-to-be seniors are hoping to receive a 
prime lottery pick and continue the BC tradition of 
Mod-life. 

"I really hope we get a Mod," says Karen Hanna. "It 
would be cool to live in a place that you've wanted since 
first coming to BC. It would be the best way to end four 
years at school." 

The Mods are not the only senior housing available 
on campus, but year after year, they remain the most 
sought after, desired, and popular. Competition is 
fierce when it comes to picking a Mod, despite the size 
and responsibility that comes with living in one. But 
ask just about anyone at BC and you'll find that Mod- 
life is a big part of BC's college life. 



Katra Cuskaden '01 



Every once in a while the Mods have a 
moment, lilce here, in the shade. 




A famihar sight on a stroll through the Mods. 



Student Life 



ven'one wanted to get into the photo here at 19B. Wouldn't want to miss a chance to show off that Superfan 
)valr\'. 




,-y^^7^»#i^«*^:-U,^j^^ 



Nothing hke a birds eye view to realize the true beauty of the Mods. 



Jcanene Shau 



Sometimes even parents are allowed m the Mods for 
quick chat berore the game. 



Student Life 139 



Off" Cmpus 

Life 



Cleveland Circle. Juniors living off-campus get to 
know the area quite well. The Circle is one of the main 
highlights of student life on the outer rim of Boston 
College. Although most juniors complain about the bus 
system, especially those who lived on Newton Campus 
their freshmen year, all in all, juniors are having a blast 
down in Cleveland Circle. 

A lot of juniors experience cooking for the first time 
while living off-campus. However, there are endless 
options for good food located right at the heart of 
Cleveland Circle for students sick of the dining hall, sick 
of cooking, or for the simple pleasure of a different 
atmosphere. Roggie's is always a favorite. With good 
food, fun people, and an atmosphere conducive to a 
good time, the restaurant/bar is always packed with BC 
students. 

There are many other different restaurants, students 
have their pick. However, all this is dangerously tempt- 
ing which makes it nice that the Resevoir is so close to 
burn off any off those late night Presto Pizza splurges. 
When the weather is nice, or even not so nice, off- 
campus students have the luxury of running around the 
Res. Everyone can agree that running outdoors is a lot 
more exhilerating than running around the track inside 
of the Plex. 

Remember everything around Cleveland Circle that 
just seemed so far away? For juniors and other students 
living off-campus, everything is within reach. Renting 
a movie is no problemand there's no longer the bus 
factor to see a movie at Circle Cinema. And most 
importantly, you bump into your friends all the time. 
Remember how people who lived on Newton always 
said that it's one big community? Well, off-campus is 
another big community. All in all, off-campus life 
provides the BC student with more independence, 
freedom and responsibility. It's a once in a lifetime 
opportunity that shouldn't be passed up. Although 
apartment life is a great experience, most juniors express 
an eager anticipation for the luxuries or voice mail, 
utilities that are prepaid and life as a senior. 



Katra Cuskaden '01 



i^^^tmimmt^ 



Cleveland Circle provides a sense of comfort an 
familiarity to many BC students. 




The Circle is always a favorite for relaxation and entertainment. 
••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••• 



I!leveland Circle is packed with great eating establishments. Students without cooking skills, or those who 
imply wish to have "qualit)'" food for a change frequent Roggies, Prestos Pizza and City Sides. 




)ff-campus students face the time consuming process of waiting for the Comm. Ave. bus. 
tudents who did not live on Newton their freshmen year find this task particularly 
haJlenging. 



iMknp«9»^Pii> 



Dorm Life 



Birthday signs, pictures on doors, and marltti 
boards are all familiar sights in residence halii 
as these two students know! 




Staying up until the break of dawn to write a five- 
page paper, watching the Simpsons with your floormates, 
discussing philosophy and "the meaning of life," and 
sleeping, sleeping, sleeping! Ah, dorm life . . . where else 
can you find so much freedom with so few responsibili- 



ties r 



Every morning, yesterday's trash is removed, hard- 
ened toothpaste is chiseled away, and toilet paper is 
refilled by the bathroom cleaning staff The sinks are 
wiped down to remove any hair clogging the drain, and 
the showers are sprayed down to rinse off any leftover 
shampoo suds. The men and women who help the 
students out in this way deserve a lot of credit, having to 
pick up after so many coeds. 

Although there are no dining halls within dorms, 
Stuart, McElroy, the Rat, and Lower Campus Dining 
Hall are within walking distance for a quick breakfast 
before that 9 A.M. class. And when you return home 
from a long, hard day, there are always plenty of people 
to greet you and ask you to dinner. 

Dorm living is a change for some freshmen, and a 
chore for some upper-classmen, but almost everyone 
would agree that within the dorm you have some of the 
most memorable experiences. With late-night chats on 
the hallway window sill to modified "hall sports," to 
brushing your teeth and blow-drying your hair in the 
bathroom, the memories are bound to build up. 

Life in the dorm is home. A place to sleep, eat, share, 
laugh, cry, fantasize, love, socialize, gather, live together 
in a setting that will no longer exist after college. One 
off-campus undergrad was quoted as saying, "I miss 
dorm life. Wow, the memories!" 

Daniel Alperovich '03 



Only in a college dormitory could three girls laugh and gossip over brushins 
their teeth!! 



mn^mimmttfr 



laying video games, as well as watching television and listening to MP3's, is a typical dorm distraction, since 
lost people cannot bear to tear themselves away from Bond to do even a little calculus homework! 




Finding a clean dorm room in November is no small feat, 
to which this undergrad can attest. She may be looking 
for a clean pair of socks, but good luck to her in finding 



orm rooms are a popular place to meet, greet, and eat! These boys pick and choose from some anythmg under that bed. 

Ily beans, without even sitting down or taking off their backpacks after a challenging day of 

asses. 



[fliMiJiii JEiljC ii3 



Resident 
Assistants 



Sometimes RAs can be tough, but when 
comes to talking, understanding, and giviti 
out advice, they can be even sweeter th;i, 
Mom! 



Resident Assistants, what can't they do? Walking around 
the dorms, checking for trouble and anyone passed out, 
keeping down the noise level, and breaking up sudden "hall 
sports" tournaments makes life for an RA pretty intense, if 
one believes that watching paint dry is a pastime. Writing 
people up is not an easy task. Most RAs find no fun in 
writing people up. Most of them, anyway. But over all they 
are just doing their jobs. 

RAs have a tremendous responsibility to keep the dorm 
rooms safe and pleasing to all who live there. Freshmen get 
a fair share of write-ups, but so do the seniors in the Mods. 
Parties are usually broken up in the senior dorms to keep the 
campus quiet after certain hours and to remove those sneaky 
little freshmen who had managed to get into the party in the 
first place. 

If an RA is treated with respect, he or she will treat his or 
her residents with respect. RA's often take their residents 
into town, or to see an a capella group at Dunkin Donuts. 
They set up birthday swaps and food drives and often 
befriending their residents. Although sometimes the line 
between friend and authority figure is thin. 

Daniel Alperovich '03 



•••••••••••a 



«>«i^^imiinp4^ 




Making important phone calls to arrange floor events and contacting differe 
• • •,• f • « a.aV ••••,•••••«•••. •••••*,••• a^a • • 9 
people that their rloor members may need are just parts or being an KA. 



Heart-to-heart talks about dating and missing home, gossipping, venting about annoying roommates and too 
.nuch homework are a regular part ot any RA's evening. 




here is 
ast leav 



always someone on duty; all you need to do is check the board! And if your RA is MIA. 
e a message on her board; she's sure to find it there! 



Even RAs have homework to do. It is amazm 
find time to help out on the noor and keep up 
work! 



; that they 

• .• • • .•••••< 

with their 



knt Lifi 14S 



Halloween 



Everyone gets in the Halloween spirit, as ev b 
dent by this sign displayed in a Mod windovi^ 



Halloween came one night early this year. Having 
two nights of Halloween celebration, Saturday and 
Sunday nights, definitely made the Monday after an 
exhausting one! 

The costumes on this year's Halloween were ex- 
travagant and, seemingly, without limit. Two indi- 
viduals spent an entire Saturday afternoon shopping 
for and creating costumes of Ace and Gary from 
Saturday Night Live's "The Ambiguously Gay duo!" 
Even the Pillsbury Doughboy, the white piece of 
dough that giggles when you poke him, made an 
appearance at one Saturday night party. 

The Screaming Eagles Marching Band celebrated 
EC's victory over Syracuse along with Halloween on 
Saturday night by throwing a costume party of its 
own. One band member chose to dress up as a table, 
complete with a lamp! Cleverly created from card- 
board, a lampshade, and a bed sheet for a tablecloth, 
this costume was a big success! 

Sunday night was spent trick-or-treating in cos- 
tume around the neighborhoods of Chestnut Hill. 
The amount of candy given out by these residents 
was at times very generous! 

Over all, this year's Halloween weekend was filled 
with costumes that leapt way beyond the boundaries 
of political correctness, great weather, and parties 
that lasted until all hours of the morning. Vernon 
Mickle agrees: "It was a great weekend, a memory 
I'm sure will stick with me throughout my college 
career." 

Dan Alperovich '03 




This undergrad is ready for the trick-or-treaters that visit BC dorms every 
Halloween. Hopefully his Hercules-esque costume didn't cause any Disney- 
lovers to have nightmares! 



146 Student Lift! 



Streamers, hanging skeletons, pails of candy, and great costumes — these students are fully prepared for a 
Halloween night filled with fright, laughter, and memories to last a lifetime! 




\\ This cowgirl is ready for a long night of horse-back 
riding, shooting down the bad guys, and, of course. 



Nick Genevish pattymg! 

Welcome to the Dungeon!" greets this hockey player-turned-ghost. But is she refering to an 
ctual dungeon, or the "Garden Level" basement of her dorm? 



Student Life 147 



48 Hours 



Group skits that exemplify freshman life ; > 
Boston College are often the most amusinii 
part of the 48 Hours weekend. 




A weekend away from campus, filled with laugh- 
ter, music, and making new friends — what could be 
better? The 48 Hours retreat for freshmen, run by 
Chaplaincy, provides a weekend for new students to 
sit around and talk about how they are adjusting to 
life at Boston College. It gives the opportunity to 
meet new people and receive advice from group 
leaders, who are often seniors. 

A yellow school bus drives the freshmen to a hotel 
located somewhere in historic New England, where 
the upperclassmen lead the freshmen in songs and 
games. While there, before all the activites students 
and leaders facilitate icebreakers to raise the comfort 
level. 

A big part of 48 Hours is the talks led by the group 
leaders. On topics ranging from social pressures to 
friendships and relationships, the leaders share per- 
sonal stories with the confidence that they will re- 
main secret. Then, on Saturday night, the freshmen 
are able to sit in front of the whole group and share 
their own personal stories. It is the time for them to 
say what they need or want to say about what they 
have learned or what they hope to take from the 
retreat. 

Probably the most special part of the weekend are 
the bonds created among members of the small 
groups. Facilitated by a leader each of the groups 
discuss problems that the freshmen are having, or 
just day-to-day things, like eating breakfast alone or 
your roommate stealing your socks. Students also 
elaborate and discuss the topics the leaders them- 
selves brought up. Then, on Saturday night, the 
retreat takes a slightly spiritual approach, as each 
small group sits around a single lit candle and reflects 
on their weekend at 48 Hours and their life at BC 
thus far. This is what gives the retreat the amazing 
reputation it has — the sense of going with no idea 
about college life, and coming back with a new idea 
about who you really are. 

Beth Bowers '03 



Seeking out Plymouth Rock, a prominent landmark in historic New England 
was a field trip for many freshmen during free time and at night. 



■MiMfMlMHiiii 



Group leaders, an enthusiastic bunch of upperclassmen, had high energy levels, which quickly spread to their 
freshmen friends! 



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During "downtime" and the closing ceremonies, every- 
one was encouraged to share their musical talent with the 
large group. 



■Student Life 149 



Escort Service 



Being part of the Escort Service ii 
eludes wearing the all important jacke 



The next time you hear, "The men outside in the 
white jackets are only here to help you," remember that 
they really are. From 7 P.M. to 2 A.M. each and every 
night, four dedicated BC students walk the oftentimes 
empty campus to provide a little bit of safety. All it takes 
is a simple call, and within ten minutes, two undergrads 
wearing the white "BC Escort" jackets will be at your 
door. Although we often get asked why we do such a 
thing on such a "safe" campus in such a "safe" neighbor- 
hood, we just remind people that you can never be too 
careful. 

The safety provided by the Walking Escort does not 
necessarily fit the traditional definition of safety precau- 
tions. We are just ordinary students with no special 
weapons and no extraordinary fighting skills. The safety 
we do provide, however, is just a little bit of company. 
We operate on a theory that there is always safety in 
numbers. Whether you are going from Kostka to 
Edmond's or from Cheverus to Rubenstein, a 1:30 
A.M. walk on a cold February morning can seem a 
rather desolate experience. That's why we are here, to 
provide a few friendly faces and a friendly little chit-chat 
while you get to your destination. 

What's the secret to our success, you ask? Well, each 
night there are five students on duty to make this all 
possible. One student is stationed in the police depart- 
ment to receive calls for both walkers and the Escort 
Van. The four other students are divided into walking 
teams. With two walking teams, multiple calls can be 
responded to at once. As the calls are received, the 
"dispatcher" relays the necessary information to the 
appropriate people. Once the call goes out, the walker 
and/or van drivers get to work. From wherever the 
walkers are, a response is made within ten minutes. 
Although, the van is more popular, so sometimes there 
may be a longer wait. 

Just remember that the people in the white jackets are 
the "good guys." Every shift we are asked to go above 
and beyond the call of duty and get a few walks on our 
own. So before the walkers become overloaded with 
calls, you just might see them wandering about, asking 
to walk you wherever you are headed. Do not be 
nervous or scared, we are just doing our job. So the next 
time you are thinking, "Man, I wish I didn't have to 
walk back now," call us and let us make that walk a little 
more safe and enjoyable for you. 




Jessica Superni 

While safely walking students back to their dorms, the BC Escorts entertair 
their "walkees" as well. This one BC student in particular shares a good laugl ' 
with her escort. 



Tim LeBeau '01 



m &miAim > Bi)i> 



A bunch of the BC Escorts take time out from their busy late-night walking schedules to pose for a picture. 
Friendships are made while waiting for phone calls. 




4 



/ 



ca Supuriiau 



u 





Jessica Supernaw 



As calls are received throughout the night, the BC 
Escorts prepare themselves for busy and hectic schedule. 



im Murray answers a walking or driving request. He writes down the necessary informa- 
lon and assures the caller that an Escort will arrive shortly. 



mmimimf^m* 



Orientation 



The Orientation Leaders pose for a grouf|l 
photo during their training session. 




As the timid freshmen gathered for seven different 
orientations throughout the summer, Orientation Lead- 
ers were in high spirits, a feehng that quickly rubbed off 
on the freshmen. Before the first day was over, groups 
were bonding, people were laughing, and a sense of 
community was developing. We can thank our much- 
loved OL's for that. 

From the minute they introduced themselves to the 
weary parents and students, their enthusiasm was con- 
tagious. They led the freshmen through their first 
rendition of "For Boston," displaying their pride with 
cheers and claps. In the next few days they ate meals 
with their freshmen groups, talked to them about the 
opportunities at BC, danced with them at the social, 
and held discussions and friendly competitions be- 
tween groups. 

Possibly the most impressive (and most entertain- 
ing) aspect of Orientation was the series of skits written 
and performed by the OL's. They revolved around 
various events and problems that may arise at BC, and 
gave freshmen an idea of how to deal with different 
situations. Orientation ended with the distribution of 
the Boston College gold and maroon Superfan t-shirts. 
The freshmen filed out of Robsham Theater proudly 
displaying their BC pride as OL's cheered them on with 
the BC fight song. 

Freshmen came away from orientation with a 
newfound sense of community with the school, their 
fellow classmates, and the whole student body. The 
OL's made sure that each and every freshmen left that 
day with confidence in themselves and anticipation for 
the next four years. 

Gine DeStephano '03 



Lauren Pring 

The incoming freshmen and the Orientation Leaders end a hard day b;i 
dancing up a storm. Congo hnes are always a great way to loosen up and hav 
some fun. 



i'52. Student Life-^ 



3ne group poses for their photograph hoping that their sUde will win the most applause in the 
lide show presented at the end of each Orientation session. 




Lauri^n Pringk' 

Father Joe Marchese takes a moment to talk to parents 
of the incoming freshmen, reassuring them that life at 
Boston College is a wonderful experience. 



I.,u,r„n Pnngk- 



Irientation Leader Jeff jMathias appears to catch the attention of many of his female co- 
iders. It's hard to resist a man in uniform! 



mM\skmM)i> m 



Dustbowl 

and Quad 



It is the place where you cannot avoid that girl you 
never called back, or that boy you followed around all 
freshman year. Not when they are coming your way 
on the narrow strip down the middle of that famous 
meeting ground commonly called the Dustbowl, at 
least! "Where else can you find your one true love, 
your worst enemy, and your freshman year roommate 
all in one place?" asks Megan Chuprevich '02. 

But the Dustbowl is not just a place where we run 
into random people or a convenient walkway from 
McElroy. With poster sales, Activities Day, Spring 
flings, picnics on the lawn, campaigning, informal 
frisbee matches, and the reputation as the meeting 
spot of choice, this former football field has it all. 

On the other hand, from campus events to student 
life, the quad is where the action is. Filled with trees 
and surrounded by lampposts, the quad bombards us 
with bedsheets reminding us about that important 
meeting or this incredible concert, with people sitting 
on benches laughing loudly with friends, with anx- 
ious students hurrying to get to class . . . and we are 
right in the middle of it all. 

"One day I was really tired and I had a midterm that 
I still hadn't studied for, but as I walked through the 
quad I saw a bunch of my friends who all made a point 
of asking how my day was and what I was up to for that 
weekend, and suddenly my day wasn't as bad as I had 
thought," shares Nora Gillespie '02. Who has never 
woken up unready to face the day? But from the hours 
often until three, a walk through the quad smacks you 
in the face with BC culture. Once you see all those 
familiar and not-so-familiar faces, you think, "She's 
not wearing that today!" or "Look how cute he is!" or 
even "How glad am I not to be a Freshman anymore!" 
And suddenly you're not in such a bad mood, because 
at least you don't look as tired as that kid! 



Jillian Schedneck '02 



A popular place to crack open that new booi 
the Dustbowl is a mix of people, activities, an 
studies. 




The walkway from dreaded classes to McElroy is often pleasant, as students 
anticipate lunch with friends, or simply returning to their dorm rooms after a 
long, hard day. 



154 Student Life 



ablecloths are a favorite backdrop in the Quad, informing students of up-coming events as tiiey meet and study 
)gether under the trees or rush through between classes. 




Chris Bowers 

o matter rain or shine, sometimes all one needs is a litde nap after that 9am class. 



Kyelim Rhee 

i here is not only studying on the Dustbowl, but also a 
good deal of horseplay. On this crisp Fall afternoon, 
these two undergrads decide to take up a little botany! 



Student Life 155 



Dining Life 



"Would you look at him?" 

"Where did she come from? I've never seen her before." 

"Do you see a table with any cute guys?" 

If you listen very closely, these are some comments that 
can be heard throughout the Eagle's Nest. From eleven 
until two o'clock, this cafeteria is packed with students. 
After waiting in line for about forty-five minutes, you 
could seriously spend the rest of your lunch break looking 
for a place to sit. If luck happens to be on your side, and 
you find a few vacant seats, you can eat your lunch while 
checking out the rest of the Eagle's Nest crowd. The 
Eagle's Nest is a great place to eat, relax, and check out 
other people. Take a good look around the Nest, you 
might make eye contact with someone who's checking you 
out! 

"It just seems that all the cute guys eat at the Eagle's Nest 
at one o'clock," exclaims a girl who wishes to remain 
anonymous. "I used to eat in Carney all the time. One day, 
I had to meet some of my girlfriends at the Nest. The food 
wasn't that much better than Carney's, but there were way 
more cute guys! I've eaten at the Nest ever since." 

"I like sitting along the windows," said an anonymous 
sophomore. "Not necessarily to 'check' anyone out, but 
it's kind of interesting to just watch the people as they walk 
by. The way the tables along the back are set up allows you 
you to take in everything while you're eating. I've noticed 
that I see at least twenty people whom I've never seen before 
in my life every time I'm in the Nest." 

While interviewing people in the Nest, many people 
were embarrassed to admit that they spent their time 
watching people instead of eating their lunch. 

"Oh my God! Was I totally obvious?" cried a distraught 
freshman. "I mean, could you just tell by looking at me that 
I was staring at him?" 

"That's the lamest thing I've heard of yet," stated a 
junior. "I come here to eat. Why would anyone check out 
people in a cafeteria? Like you'd really pick someone up in 
a lunch line." 

His friend jabbed him in the side with his elbow. 
"You're just bitter 'cause no one checks you out!" 

Whatever the reason, the Eagle's Nest seems to have it 
all. Freshmen, upperclassmen, good food, and attractive 
people. Check it out! 



••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••• 



Katra Cuskaden '01 



J 56 Student Life' 



The sign to the Eagle's Nest is warm an 
inviting — all BC undergrads feel comfortab 
here! i 



agles 



'vxest 



I 




Yout mom always taught you not to talk with your mouth full. Unfortunately 
• ••••••,•«• viM. •••.•••••• • • ■•••••••••••••,< 

when you only have hrteen mmutes between classes and a great story to teL 

your friends, all manners fly out the window! 



) 



rhese rvvo friends find nothing to talk about when there's a full bowl of cereal before them! 




Forgetting your I.D. card is a big no-no, especially if 
• aHt • ap* • ••••••••• 9 •••••'•.• a^* • 

there are four or five hungry students in line behind you! 



• • • • • 



the dining hall food and laughing with friends doesn't warm you up during the long, cold 
inter months, bring along a hat and scarf. 



wSmdmmM^mim 



O'Connell 
House 



O'Connell House is one of the only Welch-inspired pieces 
of architecture in the United States. It was constructed at the 
beginning of the twentieth century for approximately 
$300,000, when all of Upper Campus was the estate of 
drugstore baron Louis K. Ligett. The mansion resembled a 
palace at the time, filled with lavish furnishings and sur- 
rounded by fragrant gardens and beautiful gardens. 

The house was later donated to Boston's Cardinal 
O'Connell, who used the house as his official residence and 
spiritual haven. After his death in 1937, the Church donated 
O'Connell House and its estate to the growing Boston Col- 
lege. Since then, it has served as a Jesuit residence, the 
birthplace of the School of Management, a James Cagney 
movie set, a classroom facility, and a football dorm. In the 
early 1970's, space constraints prompted a strong movement 
to tear down the house. However, students fought to save 
O'Connell House, and it survived only after a 1 million dollar 
renovation. 

O'Connell House's present goal is to entertain, educate, 
and facilitate all Boston College students. It is the home of 
such weekly events as live bands, rockin' coffee house concerts, 
student talent nights, lectures, and much more. This year, 
weekly events have included musical performances by groups 
such as Karl Denson's Tiny Universe, Gordon Stone, The 
Slip, and BC alum Ellis Paul. The last event of the semester 
was an Open Mic night where students showcased their 
talents and the best were rewarded for their efforts with cash 
prizes. In addition, some BC bands have stolen the spotlight 
on random Thursday nights. The house runs monthly 
programs as well, such as Middlemarch and the Breaking the 
Barriers Ball, as well as this year's Heritage Extravaganza. 

Middlemarch is the most popular event at the house. Two 
weeks are spent transforming the house into a new reality 
based on a specific theme. To get tickets, one must attend the 
annual scavenger hunt. One must outrun and outsmart 
crowds of screaming students, all striving for the same goal. 
When all the craziness is over, the costume ball ensues. 

O'Connell House is run by five students who work (and 
live) together to coordinate the activities of the House. They 
manage the study areas and games rooms, while also having 
their own individual responsibilities. Most importantly, they 
work as a team throughout the year to make O'Connell House 
the success it always is. 



Kyla Perfetuo '01 



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O'Connell House remains the heart of Up 
Campus by hosting many events. 




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The Breaking the Barriers Ball is a favorite among BC students and faculri 
Year after year, O'Connell house prepares for the event, making each one 
memorable experience. 



ne student fills O'Connell House with her piano playing. Besides providing entertainment for the rest of 
e House, she also gets in a few good hours of practice. 




Icssira Supernaw 

The doors of O'Connell House are always open to the 
students of Boston College. 



Jessica Supernaw 



asides hosting entertaining events year after year, O'Connell House also offers BC 
idents a quiet and conducive atmosphere for studying as Torry Katsiroubas has figured 
It. 



Wftrilmmmf^m 



9 

Dating Life 



This couple is caught by surprise, but the r 
surprise is that they are together at all!! 



BC dating life! Here's the question. Does it 
even exist? A lot of the BC population feels that 
dating is non-existent on campus. There are the 
two extremes found on campus, leaving the dating 
life at Boston College out in the cold, so to speak. 

The two extremes leave the campus and its 
students conflicted and uncertain of what to expect 
for future "relationships." The first extreme type of 
relationship found is the swinging single life. No 
committment, no strings, no nothing. This is 
perhaps the most common relationship found on 
campus. Although a lot of people tend to enjoy 
this lifestyle, after a while, the BC "look aways" 
become overwhelming as the campus seems to 
shrink as the years pass. The second extreme 
dating life style is the "marriage" relationship. 
Come on, you know who you are. These relation- 
ships consist of the ever-lasting declarations of love, 
anniversaries, and a permanant attachment to each 
other. These relationships are the "serious and 
committed" ones that are found every year in every 
class. 

Because students can only buy one dance ticket, 
people either go stag or they put themselves 
through the hassle of trying to coordinate ticket 
buying times with a potential date, unless of course 
you have a steady significant other. Everything on 
this campus seems to emphasize both extreme 
behaviors. Can there ever be a happy medium? 

What would Boston College be like if there was a 
dating scene? Would the student body be entirely 
different? Or would everything seem basically the 



samer 



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With a group like this, there's no need for a date. The only problem is, whJ 
lovely lady sits out on the slow dances? 



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rhese friends like ro kick back and enjoy eacii oriiers company without the pressures and constraints of dating and 
omance. 





Katra Cuskade] 



Dating and romance can actually be very nice. This 
couple is a prime example of young love. 



Cory Wallington 

here s nothmg better than a good "Girls' Night Out." Having fun with good friends makes 
ver\' night enjoyable. 



[ i Twuiiiii jjy iLfj 



ass of 2000 



"The best four years of your life." That's what we 
expected arriving in Chestnut Hill as freshmen, and that's 
probably how most of us feel as we spend our last days at 
Boston College. We have experienced happiness and love, 
sadness and death, personal challenges and personal growth. 
We are forever changed, each individually yet collectively 
molded by the hands of BC. 

We ordered late night cookies. We faithfully invaded 
Alumni Stadium in our Superfan t-shirts, serenading the 
football team with the "Hey Song." We moved from 
Upper and Newton, to 90 and Walsh, to Comm. Ave and 
South St., to the Hillsides and the Mods. We exposed 
ourselves to Mary Ann dollar draft glasses. We danced in 
the strobe lights and fog at the Kells. We ran to make the 
last T and we piled into Red cabs. We cringed at the new 
ID cards. We studied abroad. We road-tripped to Notre 
Dame in buses, winnies, and cars. We had snowball fights 
in the April Fools' Day blizzard. We laughed, drank, and 
made fools of ourselves at parties. We pulled all-nighters 
for exams and papers, downing coffee and pizza to keep us 
awake. We dined at Roggie's and Anna's Taqueria. We 
enjoyed the Mighty Mighty Bosstones, David Spade, 
Maya Angelou, and Chris Rock. We volunteered at Pine 
Street Inn, in Jamaica, and on Appalachia. We were the 
epitome of living life to the fullest. 

"The best years of your life"-perhaps. But we also have 
the rest of our lives. At twenty-one, twenty-two, the world 
and all of its beauties are spread before us. The good times 
don't have to end simply because our BC careers are 
winding down. With the advent of the new millennium 
and our graduation, now comes the time to look forward. 
We should not dread the future, but instead open our 
arms in embrace. It's okay to be scared, nervous, or 
unsure. The power to achieve is in all of us. 

As we prepare to leave the realm of meal cards, dorms, 
and waking up at noon, let us remember those people and 
experiences at BC who have touched out souls, minds, and 
hearts, and take what they taught us to the next stage of our 
lives. Linked by memories, let us confidently step forward 
to tomorrow. 

Saya April Hilman '00 



Seniors kick back and relax. This year is a tinni 
to hang out with friends and create lastini 
memories. 




4^2^ -SmtdenP Life- <* 



Getting ready for a part}' in tiie Mods is always fun when it's with friends. 



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Nick Genevish 




Nick Genevish 



Senior year isn't just fun and games. For some, it 
eniors frohck in the dustbowl to celebrate their brings serious study time in order to prepare for 
ast year at Boston College. grad schools. 



^^ Student Life 163 



ass of 200 1 



Junior year. The year of off-campus housing. The 
year of going abroad. We are no longer underclass- 
men, but we are not quite upperclassmen either. We 
are caught between the two worlds. Not quite twenty- 
one, but not still eighteen either. It is a hard year, 
filled with adjustments to the Co mm. Ave. bus sys- 
tem, negligent landlords, real cops, home cooking, 
and much more. 

It is also a year filled with twenty-first birthdays, 
actually recognizing people at parties, feeling at ease 
and comfortable with yourself and the campus, going 
abroad, getting the classes you really want, and finally 
finding a place for yourself at BC. 

Everything seems to be clicking into place. We are 
at the age where things seem to start happening. We 
know more people, we know which professors are 
"good," we know where the hangouts are, what food 
to avoid, and the way the system really works. It 
seems, however, that once we get the hang of life at 
Boston College, our time is almost up. 

It seem like j ust yesterday we were freshmen. Now 
Sophomore year has come and gone, and Junior year 
is flying by. Easy summer days are gone, traded for 
jobs and internships that will help shape our futures 
afi:er Boston College. Thoughts about LSATs and 
MCATs are prevalent, and decisions that seemed far 
away are coming up fast. 

Junior year, although easy in some ways, makes us 
confront some of the hardest questions that we will 
ever have to face. We only have one year left. Only 
one more year of football games, tailgating, eating at 
the Rat, partying in the Mods, and, for the most part, 
being a kid. We have one more year of memories, and 
one year left to create them. 

Katra Cuskaden '01 



No longer afraid to get close, these Junior boy 
are confident in their budding fi-iendship. 





Kalra CuskadiK 

These Juniors enjoy a tailgate, with the newfound freedom of being twenty-onii 



itgiMtoMlmpA^ 



After rheir third Halloween at BC, these guys really know how to strut their stuff; some just strut more than 
others! 




Kacra Cuskaden 

•ri««.^l^ Football games are old news to these Juniors, who 
Kaira Cuskaden ^^^^ j^^^ about the pkycts and morc about Kodak 



■^^^P^ Lounging around in common areas or living rooms 

■.alra Cuskaden o o o 

ometimes it takes a lifetime to cement friendships 's a priveledge that these Juniors greatly appreciate! 
ke this, but for these two, it took only three years. 



moments: 



mmmmmp'^fm 



ass of 2002 



Whether they have their whole future mapped 
out or are still deciding on a major, sophomores are 
definitely enjoying their second year at Boston 
College. 

"Everyone told me that sophomore year would 
be the best, and so far they're right. We already 
have good friends and an idea of what we want to 
do with our lives, but we still have two years to 
figure it out. Basically, the pressure is not on us 
yet, and I am enjoying this year with the rest of my 
friends," says Mary Andrew '02. It's true, the 
classes aren't that hard yet, no one's gone to study 
abroad, and most sophomores are still on campus. 
Living with old friends and making new ones all 
the time, sophomores get to spend their time 
making new memories while reveling in the old. 

Not treated like freshmen anymore, sophomores 
have the confidence and respect to become leaders. 
With all this in mind, sophomores keep telling 
themselves that this just may be as good as it gets. 

Jillian Schedneck '02 



These Sophomores know that the place ta 
meet, greet, and eat is the Quad! 




Jitlian Schednec 



Second-year college students are a little youiig to plan marriage, but it's always 
run to pretend with friends. 



ji'iin i fliul.imJiiJiC 



These Sophomores party in a common room; maybe they are celebrating that they have a common room? No 
more Newton buses for rhem! 




This Sophomore most likely trying to catch up on 
Jancing, posing, and grooving in dorm rooms are her sleep, but, as usual, it's impossible to get quiet 
icill fun for some SophomoresI time in a dorm! 



IMinrtfiBf^ 



Class of 2003 



To be starting college at the dawn of a new century is 
almost ironic; the changes every other freshman has gone 
through have multiplied for the Class of 2003. Everything 
is so new. All of a sudden you are living with a complete 
stranger, with whom the most conversation you have had 
is a brief phone call in August to sort out who was bringing 
the TV or the stereo. You are eating in a dining hall serving 
what is not exactly Mom's turkey and stuffing. You can 
go to classes, but there is no one around to make sure you 
actually do. In short, there are many new challenges to 
overcome as a freshman. 

Despite these challenges, there are so many exciting 
new opportunities for a freshman on the brink of the 
twenty-first century. There is first and foremost the 
freedom that comes with living away from home. You can 
stroll in at 4 A.M. on a Friday morning with no one to 
answer to except an angry, sleepy bunkmate. You can have 
that cute boy from the first floor spend the night. You can 
go out dancing wearing no more than a skirt and tank top 
that cover the bare necessities. In addition to this freedom, 
there is the internet, which is new to some freshman. 
Whole nights can be wasted on Instant Messanger with 
friends from home, or with the girl down the hall. The 
constant beeping of incoming IMs blocks out the guilt 
from not finishing your French homework. E-mail sud- 
denly becomes a choice mode of communication. You 
cannot go for breakfast, leave for class, or climb into bed 
without first checking to see just how many forwards you 
have received in the past hour. And no matter how many 
forwards there are, there is always the incomparable 
excitement of receiving a "real" letter, complete with your 
name and an actual message! These are some of the plusses 
of being a freshman going into the twenty-first century. 

At Boston College specifically, being a freshman means 
so much more. We are the ones who will carry the Eagle 
spirit into the millennium. We will go to Homecoming, 
semis, and Middlemarch with memories of the twentieth 
century left behind. When we are seniors, we can tell the 
freshman what it was like for us right now. We are 
growing and changing and adjusting to life at Boston 
College, and we are loving every second of it! So bring on 
the twenty-first century, because the Class of 2003 is ready 
and willing to face it as Eagles! 



These boys think they work fon 
AT&T, because in this basemenn 
room, "it's all within their reach!'! 




Beth Bowi 

Freshman girls wait for the bus; as much of a pain as the shuttle can be, they \o\ 



l^' 



Newton Campus just the same! 



^•^e 



Beth Bowers '03 



J 68 Student Li^ 



Ar their first home football game, these Freshmen bring an extra dose of the Superfan spirit! 




his Freshman shows off his hula hooping skills at 
le First Week Luau. 



Beginning a life of crime early here at BC, these 

girls stole a CAUTION sign, which reappeared in 
• ••••••••••••••••••••••••• (P* •••, ••••^••j*'« a^ •,«««'f««. ~ 

Hall sports, including gymnastics and dance par- 
ties, are a common sight on Freshman halls. 



scattered rooms 
I 



jghout rreshmen dormito- 



uiijdMiiii mj|E iJj 



Homecoming 



Students take a break for pictures and drink 
after a salsa session. 



Homecoming. Every year it is a much anticipated 
event. When Homecoming's salsa theme v^^as an- 
nounced this year there was a mad rush to learn the 
moves before the big night. Ricky Martin CD's were 
brought back to life as the students of Boston College 
prepared to get their groove on. 

"Lastyearwas so much fun," stated Kyla Perfetuo. "I 
had the best time swing dancing. Or I guess you'd say, 
learning to swing dance that night. After last year, I 
knew I'd have to go this year, and I'm glad that I did. 
I didn't know how to salsa, but I faked it pretty well. I 
had an awesome time." 

"I couldn't go," said Denise Mencel. "I was so 
bummed out. I went last year and it was great. I didn't 
have time to buy a ticket or a dress. Everyone I talked 
to said that they had a great time. I wish I had gone. 
Hopefully, next year they'll come up with another great 
theme. I would have loved to salsa." 

"I've been to Homecoming since freshmen year," 
claimed Steve Walkowiak. "Every year it just gets 
better and better. Homecoming weekend is always 
such a great weekend. You have the dance and the 
football game. There's something to do every day. It's 
great." 

"Everyone always looks so nice," exclaimed Kim 
Dammuth. "It's a nice change to see everyone all 
dressed up. I also like the fact that all four classes go 
everyyear. I like being able to hang out with people that 
I don't ordinarily see on the weekends." 

"This was the first BC event that I went to," admit- 
ted Taber Gonzales. "I had a great time. Themusicwas 
awesome and it was nice to see everyone kick back and 
have a terrific night. I'm really glad that I went this 
year. Homecoming was awesome." 

Katra Cuskaden '0 1 




Stephen Murra 

One student practices dipping his partner for the camera. The dance floor is 
filled with couples showing off their best moves. 



l.7'0- Student Life 



Iroups of friends take time out to capture the moment before the big night. 




Stephen Murray 

Couples crowd the dance floor, salsa-ing up a storm. 



Stephen Murray 
! . . . . 

omecoming night provides students with a relaxed atmosphere, fast music, and a good time. 
he evening proved to be highly entertaining. 



Student Mfal?-^ 



Life in the 
City 



Okay, so it's the weekend, and you have two mid- 
terms and a ten-page paper due on Monday, but what 
can you do when Boston is calhng your name? From 
hanging out in Harvard Square to dancing the night 
away on Lansdowne St., Boston is definitely a ftin place 
to be for college students. 

After staying mostly on our relatively small campus 
during the week, who isn't relieved to hang out in the 
city and get away for a little while? Whether you're after 
some culture at the Museum of Fine Arts, or just some 
shopping at the Prudential, Boston has something for 
everyone. "It's great to be able to go to a concert in 
Cambridge one night and then go ice skating in the 
Common the next," comments Diane Mirable '02 on 
the wide range of fun activities Boston offers. And every 
night as we enter the city once more, we may be thinking 
that this is why we chose Boston College. 



Jillian Shedneck '02 



This sign welcomes visitors, residents, and students of Boston to tiie city theyi 
love! 




The buildirigs and statues of Boston are what make it such a beautiful city, anc 
a tourist trap that BC students try to avoid! 



172 Student Lif» 



brisk walk on a fall day through town can rejuvenate even the most tired student's spirits! 




Nick Genevish 

■utdoor concerts are popular during spring, summer, and early fall months, but studying or 
Itching up with friends is always fun too! 



Busy streets are a welcomed sight for BC students after 
• •■••.••••••••.•••"•••••••••••••a 

a long day or classes and meetmgs. 



mmimmmfiim^ 



Life on the 

Weekends 



Ahhh. The weekends, every student looks forward 
to them. For some they start on Thursday. For 
others, they start as early as Wednesday. Still others 
find an excuse for the weekend to go on all week 
long. There is never a shortage of opportunities to 
kick back and have a good time. However, the way 
in which each Boston College student chooses to 
spend his or her weekend varies with different tastes. 

Weekends are jam-packed and always seem to end 
too soon. Where does the time go? Whether you are 
choosing to catch up on sleep, attend football games, 
cram for an upcoming exam, or attempt a seventy- 
two-hour party session, EC's student body always has 
something to do. 

Flyers are posted all over campus advertising guest 
speakers, new and exciting bands, cultural nights, a 
capella cafes, theater productions, and comedy sketch 
groups. On top of all that, there are the usual 
football games, hockey games, basketball games ... 
the list could go on. Because the average BC student 
is not just an average fan, but a Superfan, attendance 
at these games and going all out is considered the 
norm. 

That just takes care of the on-campus weekend 
activities. Down at Cleveland Circle are movies, and 
such established dining delights as Roggies, the 
Ground Round and CitySide. Whew! 

After a hearty meal, the D line is just a hop, skip, 
and a jump away, leading to some of Boston's most 
happening spots. There are the Roxy, the Comedy 
Connection, the Crimson, Who's on First, or MFA- 
you name it, Boston's got it. 

Just when it seems as though you've just started to 
have fun, Monday morning is right around the 
corner and being the dedicated students we are at 
Boston College, we have to hit the library and the 
books. The weekdays are packed with study sessions, 
library research, classes, exams, papers, and projects 

. . . ,^h^jpi^p¥i %^ih s.tu4Fy'»%'.aji,eai4aii:^ ^^.^ipatgc^ , . 

weekend. 



Sarah Love and Marisa Consolla pass time 
on the T by making faces and getting laughl 
from their friends and other passengers. 



Katra Cuskaden '01 



tudent Ufgi 




These guys pose for the camera while celebrating a long weekend. 



Girls' nights out alway proves to be successful. This group of girls is having a blast with good food and 
great company. 




Laughter is always the best medicine. These two 
friends get plenty of laughs every weekend. 



^C students gather around a fireplace for a cozy weekend of skiing, snow, and good times. 



mlmmmf^i^m 



New Veaf s 



Eve2000 



Across the nation, and the world, all Boston College 
students, seniors and freshmen alike, were in the same 
spirits as the clock struck midnight on December 31,1 999. 
The dawning of a new millennium was an exciting moment 
for everyone, regardless of the fact that they were not all 
together. With parties, concerts, or staying home with Dick 
Clark, and streamers, balloons, and more confetti than ever 
before, New Year's Eve 2000 was an experience that no BC 
student will ever forget! 

Boston College has been through a lot during this past 
decade, so with the new decade and new century, things are 
starting to look up. 1 999 was a good year, with the football 
team's victory over Notre Dame and the improvements 
being made around campus. Still, there were very few 
undergrads, and faculty and staff as well, who were not 
looking forward to 2000 in hopes of more victories and 
improvements than ever before! Imagining the endless 
opportunities that now lie before us is an amazing feeling for 
all. 

Inspiteofall the j oy and excitement that came along with 
the start of the year 2000, there was some sadness on the big 
night. For the Class of 2000, with the change of the century 
came an enormous sense of their futures. Now they are 
faced with graduation, and the grown-up world that they 
have dreaded so long. As one senior so diplomatically puts 
it, "If I had to chose between the real world and four more 
years at Boston College, there is no doubt in my mind that 
I would stay here and relive it all. Come on, it has got to be 
scary out there!" Most seniors would probably agree with 
this statement, as their college years wind to a close. 

All in all, New Year's Eve 2000, a much anticipated 
event, brought what everyone expected . . . good times, 
friendships, newfound hope, and a little apprehension for 
what is to come. With all of this, it is no wonder that 
Boston College will continue strong into the new 
millennium. 



2000 sunglasses adorned faces From coast 



Beth Bowers '03 



tPiaiMI^PIpAl^ii 




Crowns and a little champagne complete even the most Y2K-compliar 
festivities. 



he crowds in major cities, like Boston and New York, can't even faze these BC seniors as they party well into the 
ew Millennium. 




Toasts were definately in order as friends parried well 
into the new year. 



'CTiether you were at a parry with family and friends or outside joining in the street 
elebrations, New Year's 2000 proved to be a memorable night. 



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178 





1^ 




Redefined at 

Boston College 

At Boston College sports are 
redefined. Sports are no longer 
just for athletes, they are also for 
the spectator. Fans flood the 
stadiums and arenas wearing 
their Superfan shirts to support 
the Eagles. Fans come alive at 
the sporting events to cheer BC 
to a win. Althletes combine their 
strength, endurance and perse- 
verance to bring home victory. 
Boston College fans and ath- 
letes redefine sports. 

Editors 

Brian Lerman 

Tom Pelissero 



179 



Waterpolo is a vicious sport of hand-to- 
hand combat in water that combines aspects 
of many sports all while trying to stay afloat 
(and alive) in a turbulent sea of players. The 
1999-2000 season proved to be a good one, 
despite the team being plagued with injuries. 
The BC Waterpolo team had a heart of gold 
and, playing through thick and thin under 
leadership of head coach Chris Ford, they 
produced a winning season. 

The team was led by captains Nader 
Masserweh and Mike Pietch. They were the 
hearts of a team with a lot of determination. 
They never failed to give 1 00% in any of their 
games, and motivated the team to do their 
best. Besides the captains the team had two 
great standouts: Will Estes and Dan 
O'Connell. These great athletes also encour- 
aged the team to do their best while providing 
effective examples of leadership and team- 
work. 

The Boston College Waterpolo team con- 
tinues to be a force in the country. Their 
winning spirit continues to motivate the team 
to strive for better and better seasons and they 
are doing just that. With head coach Chris 
Ford at the helm, the waterpolo team will 
continue to be a force to reckon with for years 
to come. 

- Aaron Butler '03 






Kyelim Rhee 



A BC player looks to move the ball up the pool. 



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The forwards look to attack the goal. 




(left) The players gather in unity before the match. 

(below) The team comes together before the game to discuss its strategy. 




he BC defense struggles to clear the zone. 



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A BC player shoots on net. 



Kyulim Rlice 



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Oh yes, the sweet taste of victory was at last ours. 
After last year's goal line stand by Notre Dame on 
Senior Day at Alumni Stadium, the Boston College 
Football team went to South Bend looking for revenge 
and got it. Touchdown Jesus seemed to gaze benevo- 
lently upon Boston College as the squad went on to 
defeat them by two points. The Boston College 
Superfans came out in full force and, to the amaze- 
ment of the Notre Dame fans, cheered louder. The 
Superfans had great reason to cheer as the Eagles put 
on their greatest performance of the year. 

Tim Hasselbeck had an exceptional game, leading 
the Eagles to four touchdowns; three via his arm and 
one by his fleet feet. Senior tight end Bryan Arndt led 
the team with 5 receptions for 80 yards, while senior 
7\11-American Chris Hovan led the defense in shutting 
down the Irish. The game was far from over until 
senior Pedro Cirino snared an interception with 2:05 
remaining. The freshman star was Jamal Burke who 
caught two touchdowns. The game was Boston 
College's with a superb final score of 31-29. 

With this extraordinary victory, Boston College 
was able to reserve a place in the Insight.com Bowl. 
Poor Notre Dame was held high and dry as BC dashed 
their hopes of even having a winning season. Maybe 
next time Notre Dame. The victory against the Fight- 
ing Irish came exactly six years to the day of and with 
the same exact score as Boston College's epic upset of 
Notre Dame in 1993. 

The bowl bid would take BC to Tucson, Arizona 
for a game against the mighty Colorado Buffaloes. 
The Eagles were pumped up for the postseason romp 
on New Year's Eve. The team was excited because 
1999 had been a year of great achievement and victory 
for BC. The team had finally made it to a bowl game 
and knew they had a chance for victory. Then harsh 
reality set in when seven members of the starting 
defense came down with the flu. This was a major 
blow to the Eagles, but they would now not be kept 
down. The team played with all their heart in their 
final bowl game of the millennium. Despite the efforts 
of those left standing they came out on the losing end 
of a 62-28 romp. Still, 1 999 was a season of success for 
the BC Eagles. The team beat Notre Dame for the first 
time in five years and finished with an 8-4 record. The 
Eagles did not disappoint their fans and gave them an 
exciting season. 




(^ -rfr i ii«ii>W |ft«i ii < »wi ;;, 
^~ 





- Aaron Butler '03 



The team celebrates the win. 



(left) Quarterback Tim Hasselbeck hands the ball off to running back Cedric 
Washington. 




lasselbeck and Washington prepare for the snap as they look onto the Dedrick Dewalt celebrates after making a touchdown run. 

fenders. 



[gjJUillJ JIDJ 




At the beginning of the 1999 football season, 
head coach Tom O'Brien stated, "We've got a 
long way to go." The Eagles took that advice and 
went got off to their best start in many years. 
Under the leadership of O'Brien, the Boston 
College football team has improved dramatically 
to a team with great potential. As each year goes 
by, the Eagles become a better and more competi- 
tive team. 

This year the team exhibited an arsenal of 
weapons on both the defense and offense. Quar- 
terback Tim Hasselbeck, who played courageously 
while injured, led the team while his back-up, 
redshirt freshman Brian St. Pierre, also played 
some crucial downs. The Eagle's explosive of- 
fense was enhanced by star running back Cedric 
Washington, and an offensive line that opened 
up many holes for Washington and back-ups 
Carlton Rowe and Will Green. All-American and 
All-Big East Defensive Lineman Chris Hovan led 
the defense with his consistent ability to put 
pressure on opposing quarterbacks and to clog up 
the run inspired his teammates 

After a devastating loss to Temple during the 
middle of the season Coach O'Brien commented 
to Sports Illustrated that "We're not very tal- 
ented. If we don't play as hard as we possibly can, 
we won't win." The Eagles took this to heart and 
played excellent football as they battled back to 
defeat Pittsburgh. 

The Eagles gave it their all this year; they played 
with all their heart and soul. They provided a 
challenge for every team they played, a challenge, 
that often ended in victory. The explosiveness of 
the offense and the determination of the defense 
added up to one of the best Boston College 
football seasons in many years. 

- Aaron Butler '03 



186 Sports 




McGrach Studios 



Offensive lineman Darnell Alford, Butch Palaza, and Paul LaQuerre 
try to get the crowd into the game as they line up for another play. 



(left) Quarterback Tim Hasselbeck looks to make a game-winning pass, 
(below) Running back Carlton Rowe makes an amazing catch for a touchdown. 




McGrath Studios Ch"s Bowers 

'.unning back Cedric Washington breaks through a hole for a long gain. Wide receiver Dedrick Dewalt holds on to the ball to make the touchdown. 



(below) The Women's Volleyball team starts off the match with a display of 
their excellent team unity. 

(right) The defensive players prepare their serve-receive for the perfect pass to 
setter Kyleen Charlton. 



i 




Nick Gcricvish Nick Gem 

Junior all-around player Julia El-Hag serves an impressive floater. After a time-out, players and coaches get together for a cheer. * 



tmmSpmm 




Nick Gencvish 



n oven'iew shows the Eagles squad setting up to run their offense 
id gain a side-out. 



Under the guidance of second-year coach 
Jackie Hadel, the 1999 Women's Volleyball 
team wished to improve on last year's record 
of 12-19. The team realized that with what 
Coach Hadel called the "strongest recruiting 
class" ever at Boston College and the experi- 
ence of the returning players, it had over- 
whelming potential to be a contender in the 
Big East. Hadel said, "I know that we have the 
physical ability, and now we are aiming to 
successfully combine that talent with desire 
and determination." Captain Laura DeLong, 
the lone senior on the team, led the 1999 
squad to an improved record at the close of 
the season, finishing at 13-17 overall, 3-8 in 
the competitive Big East conference. Junior 
setter Kyleen Charlton recorded a school 
record in assists last year and again proved to 
be the helm of the team's offense this season. 
Other key Eagles included junior middle 
blocker Kristin Sprinkel, who posted double- 
digit kills fourteen times this year, junior 
outside hitter Julia El-Hag, and freshmen 
standouts Lauren Schwer, who played both 
offensive and defensive positions, and left- 
handed right side hitter Rachel Bach. Both 
players Improved as the season progressed. 
With the young team's accomplishments this 
year, the Boston College Women's Volleyball 
program looks to have continued success in 
years to come. 

-Kate Schrinsky '03 




Nick Gtilovish 



The team covers the right-side hitter as the opposing team reaches 
to attempt a block. 



Sporti J 89 



(right) Sophomore Angela Hutchins pulls away from her defender en route to 
another scoring opportunity. 

(below) Jennifer Hall prepares to strike the ball and give the Eagles the advan- 
tage. Hall, a junior, was an extremely dominant player on the field hockey team ^ 
this year and in past seasons. 




Using her outstanding speed in the open field, junior Nichole Bukowski 
protects the ball from defenders. Bukowski has been a three-time Big East 
Academic All-Star. 



Freshman Christy Zider beats her opponent to the ball and keeps the 

Eagles in scoring position. Last year, Zider was named to the National 

Field Hockey Coaches Association Regional Team as an Ail-American. 








iack Amy Suchanek pushes out on a corner and shows the focus and 
ntensity that has made her an important member of the field hockey 
earn this year and in her three preceding seasons. 



■t>±mj 



Women's Field Hockey head coach Sharren 
Granese's main goal in the 1 999 season was to 
replace the loss of seven senior starters from 
her 1998 squad, which won the Big East 
Conference Regular Season Title. In Septem- 
ber Boston College earned a national ranking 
of eighteenth, and competed in an extremely 
competitive schedule this year, with seven of 
the opposing teams ranked in the top seven- 
teen. The first step in achieving success in '99 
was to build a strong defense, beginning in 
goal with returning starter Jill Dedman (1998 
Goaltender of the Year). Other returning 
players, including forwards JulianneMarrone, 
Kellie Misiaszed, Amelie Wulff, and Gina 
Dinan, midfielders Jennifer Hall and Nichole 
Bukowski, and backfielder Amy Suchanek, 
were all important parts of this season's 9-11 
record. Newcomers, freshmen Elizabeth 
Flood, Kimberly French, and Christy Zider, 
competed for starting positions, and all three 
were voted to the All-Rookie Team. 

After winning important games against 
such Big East opponents as the University of 
New Hampshire, ranked in the top twenty 
nationally, Northeastern, and Syracuse in the 
regular season, the Eagles suffered a devastat- 
ing loss in the opening round of the Big East 
Field Hockey Tournament to second seeded 
Syracuse. The 1999 season came to an end 
with the 1-0 overtime loss at Coyne Field in 
Syracuse, NY. Individually, Jen Hall was 
voted to the Big East All-Star Team, while 
teammates Jill Dedman and Morgan Brady 
were voted to the Second Team. 

- Kate Schrinsky '03 




Junior back Morgan Brady leads the BC charge. Brady contrib- 
uted minutes both as a starter and off the bench for the Eagles. 



Sports 191 



The Eagles hoist their teammates in a battle for the ball with Dartmouth. 



Arriving a week early for spring training, 
the Boston College Rugby Club approached 
the oncoming season with anticipation and 
something to prove. The young but talented 
team began to practice at St. John's Seminary 
in late August, focused and determined to 
give their all against this year's fierce rivals. 
Combining Coach Nick Murphy's expertise 
and love of the game with the leadership of 
senior captain Eric Hauser, the team mentally 
and physically prepared for the regular sea- 
son. The team suffered two tough losses to 
start the season, competing against the swift 
tactics of Dartmouth and the strength of 
Norwich on their home field. This only mo- 
tivated the A-side, made up mostly of juniors 
and seniors, to raise their intensity for the rest 
of the season. The talented squad of ruggers 
met their opposition head on as they won the 
next two games, defeating Harvard and Bos- 
ton University. Unfortunately, plagued with 
a wide range of injuries, the team had trouble 
maintaining the same starting lineup. Facing 
Northeastern, New Hampshire, and Massa- 
chusetts, the team suffered three upsetting 
losses to finish the season. 

While the team finished with a record of 2- 
5 after a tough spring, the club must regroup 
and prepare for the upcoming fall season of 
tournaments and rivalries. They must focus 
on their strengths and weaknesses to prepare 
for the competition ahead, while maintaining 
the teamwork and camaraderie that have made 
the club so successfol in the past. With some 
more practice and a healthy lineup on the 
field, the millennium will bring an impressive 
display of elegant violence from the Boston 
College Men's Rugby Club. 

- Vinnie D 'Eramo '01 



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The men's A-side squad engages in a vigorous scrum on a rainy day. 



rhe A-side scrum tries to clear the ball from their opponent. 





eth Venit throwing the ball to Courtney Cappa in a line out. 



f-u.]. 



The Women's Rugby Club team ended its sea- 
son with a disapointing loss to the University of 
Massachusetts (Amherst) which went undefeated 
in the regular season. The season also included 
games against Radcliffe, Amherst, Dartmouth, 
and Yale. Although they only posted a record of 1 - 
4, their play on the field often outperformed that 
of the opponents, and was superior in all ways 
except for what the scoreboard displayed. The 
team was led by senior captain Angle Northam and 
junior captain Jen Covell. The women were coached 
by Ken Daly, who has coached the team since its 
inception. They started the season with high ex- 
pectations after a successful performance in the 
Beantown Tournament and a decisive 2 1 -7 victory 
against rival Radcliffe. 

Although the season did not end as well as 
expected, the team is looking forward to next 
season. The starting team (A-side) was dominated 
by juniors, who accounted for ten out of the fifteen 
players, and lost only three starting seniors. With 
the combination of the experience and individual 
talents of the juniors, who have been playing 
together for a couple years, and of talented under- 
classmen, they hope to advance to the Northeast 
Rugby Football Union Tournament and on to 
Nationals next fall. 

- Mary Bain '01 




^■m^.-^'v 



■■*■■ ' ■>■ 











NfcoIii Harris 



A-Side posed with Coach Ken Daly after their victor)' over 
Radcliffe. 



Sports 193 



When Hans Pusch returned to the Savin Hill 
Yacht Club in late August, he knew that this year's 
sailing team had the potential to surpass last year's 
successful season. Coming off big wins such as the 
1999 Priddy Trophy and the 1999 McMillan Cup, 
the Sailing Eagles returned for the fall season with 
twenty-eight returning sailors, two transfer students, 
eight freshmen recruits, and one new coach. Joe 
Aleardi, a 1986 BC graduate and two-year Sailing 
Eagles captain, eagerly retuned to his alma mater to 
coach the team into another winning season. 

The new leadership seems to be working. For the 
first time ever, the BC Sailing Eagles qualified for the 
Sloops Nationals, which were held in late Novem- 
ber. TJ Pascalides, senior, top sailor, and skipper of 
the third place qualifying boat, showed much prom- 
ise heading into the event. The other seniors, Hans 
Pusch, Craig Stryker, and John Edenbach, also per- 
formed extremely well this season and took second 
place at the McMillan Cup this fall. 

The women's team also got off to a good start with 
a jump in the preseason national rankings to number 
fifteen, thanks in part to the return of women's team 
captain Mandy McDonnell '00 and crew Megan 
Aleardi '00 from a semester abroad in New Zealand. 
The women's team qualified for the Atlantic Coast 
Championship, one of the largest and most presti- 
gious events in sailing. 

AAer a successful fall season, the BC Sailing Eagles 
are confident about the spring season. Hans Pusch 
is especially optimistic. "Right now we're ranked 
thirteenth in the nation, but in the spring we should 
definitely be in the top ten, and we should have a 
good chance of reaching our goal, which is to qualify 
for the spring Nationals. The Eagles are one of the 
top sailing teams in New England, and we are looked 
upon as the best in the college division. And they will 
do whatever it takes for it to stay that way. 

- Meredith Roberts '03 



194 Sports 




McGrath Studii' 



BC Eagles push off to a good start. 



A 



(left) The perfect day for a sailing regatta on the Charles River, 
(below) The Sailing Eagles blow past their competition. 




McGrath Studios 



McGrath Studios 



iC skippers gather for a quick pep talk before the race. 



^Sports 193 




The 1999-2000 season for the Boston 
College Men's Tennis team was one of hard 
work and perserverance. Coming off their 
first winning campaign in many years, the 
team was looking forward to an excellent 
season. At the outset, Jason Cowett '01 com- 
mented "Last year was our first winning sea- 
son in a while. I think it had a lot to do with 
last year's captain, Chris Frahm. We have a lot 
of injuries and new players this year. Once 
everything falls into, I think that we will have 
a pretty good season." 

The Eagles started their season at the North- 
east Intercollegiate Tournament with a prom- 
ising singles and doubles showing, earning 
records of 1 - 1 and 1 -0, respectively. The team 
came up wins against such competitors as the 
University of New Hampshire and rival Bos- 
ton University. Led by senior captain Anand 
Annigeri, the young team would be energized 
throughout the fall. "We have a young team 
this season. We have senior and a junior in the 
top two spots but we have more talent than 
we've ever had before," said Annigeri. "The 
team has come a long way since I was a 
freshman. Our winning percentage has gone 
up dramatically, and we have a legitimate 
chance to be in the top five of the Big East this 
season. The men's tennis team is on its way 
up. 

With the spring schedule still remaining, it 
appears that men's tennis is on the way up. As 
Annigeri sees it, "The future looks good as 
long as we stay motivated." 

- Kristen Walker '03 




SiL'plKii Mun 



Senior captain Anand Annigeri rips a forehand across court. 




(left) Senior captain Anand Annigeri and Junior Jason Cowett work on their 
serves. Both players are intrigal pieces to the 1999-2000 team. 

(below) Senior Brad Hughes hits a serve while the team practices inside for the 
upcoming spring season. 






StL-pllL-n Murray Stephen Murray 

1' .n Cowett works on his forehand. Cowett, a junior, has taken on a Senior Anand Annigeri works on his overhead. Annigeri, a four year player, has 

rgc role on the young team. seen much improvement in the program. 



(righc) Seniors Kim Arbuckle, Mercedes del Valle, and Barbara Privrel, 
bring leadership and experience to the team. 

(below) Barbara Privrel concentrates on her groundstroke. 




Kim Arbuckle serves her way to victory. 



Kyelim Rhee 



Kyelim 'i 



Mercedes del Valle is all smiles about her successful season. 




Kyelim Rbee 



Mercedes del VaJle sets herfself up for a forehand smash. 



The Boston College Women's tennis team is 
creating quite a racket this year. Coming off a 
hugely successful 1998-1999 season, the Eagles 
have somehow managed to surpass themselves 
once again. With big wins at the Crissie Leary 
Team Invitational, the Brown Invitational and 
the ECAC/ITAChampionshiop, the BC women 
converted talent, leadership, and experience into 
solid groundstrokes, powerful serves, and excit- 
ing victories. 

Head Coach Mark Burns knew that the 1999- 
2000 roster was stronger than ever. The team 
didn't lose one player to graduation, and in- 
stead, gained two highly ranked, talented fresh- 
men. Under the leadership of senior co-captains 
Kim Arbuckle and Mercedes del Valle, the Eagles 
went so far in eastern and regional play that 
Burns is optimistic in their chances of winning 
the Big East Conference this spring. 

Although the team showed enormous poten- 
tial, it was the individual players that really 
shined through. Senior Mercedes del Valle had 
an impressive season with a 3-0 singles record at 
the Brown Invitational, where she defeated in 
straight sets opponents from Temple Univer- 
sity, Dartmouth, and Seton Hall. And only a 
month before, junior Cynthia Tow reached the 
finals of the Third Annual Crissie Leary Team 
Invitational, losing only a total of twenty-one 
games the whole tournament. All the BC singles 
competitiors reached at least the third round in 
the invitational. 

All of this makes Coach Burns excited. "This 
is the best team Boston College has ever had," he 
said. Predicting that the team should be in the 
Top 20 in the nation this year, Burns hopes to 
earn a berth and advance in the NCAA tourna- 
ment this spring. It is a definite challenge, but 
with hard work day in and day out, the Eagles 
have what it takes to rally their way to the top. 

- Meredith Roberts '03 



The Men's Crew Team of the new 
millenium boasts many new faces this year. 
However, through all the changes there has 
been one constant: the guys moving boats up 
and down the river. 

This year's team is lead by six seniors. Four 
are varsity rowers (Capt. John Dziedzic, James 
Loftus, Matthew Houtsma, and Marc 
Underbill) and two are lightweights (Capt. 
Mike Dipierro and Capt. John McKenna). 
The seniors are the strongest group ever, and 
are what remain of the novice eight that went 
undefeated in the regular season back in 1 997. 
Now they have secured for Boston College 
the school's best finish ever at the Head of the 
Charles. 



The Eagle rowers push to the finish. 




The Eagles compete in the Head oFthe Charles where they had 
their best finish ever. 



200 Sports 



rhe lady Eagles prepare for the race. 




McGralh Sludio^ 



le lady Eagles working hard to maintain their status among the country's elite 
I .w teams. 



Have you ever seen the sunrise over the 
Charles River? Have you ever fek the perfec- 
tion of eight blades catching in unison as they 
lift the boat up and through another crew? Do 
you know what it is like to look forward to a 
spring break full of three practices a day, 
blistered hands, and going to bed before nine? 

The Boston College Women's Crew team 
has a history of being one of the finest club 
teams in the country. Every year they con- 
tinue to compete at the highest level, bringing 
home hardware from the Big East, New En- 
gland Championships, and Champion Re- 
gattas. This year is no exception and is espe- 
cially exciting because it is the last year that 
the women will be competing at the club 
level. Beginning in the fall of 2000, the 
women's crew team will become a funded 
varsity sport. An entirely new coaching staff 
has been brought in by the athletic depart- 
ment. Headed by Steve Fiske, program direc- 
tor and varsity women's coach, the staffs goal 
is to maintain the tradition that has already 
been established by past rowers and coaches. 

This year's team has had a successful fall 
season, competing in the Head of the Textile, 
the Head of the Connecticut, the Head of the 
Charles, and the Head of the Schuylkill, and 
imporved significantly in each. Although the 
team is young, and composed mostly of sopho- 
mores, it will benefit from hard work during 
winter training. This spring the Boston Col- 
lege Women's Crew team has tremendous 
potential for a fast sprint season hopes to 
medal in May. The two returning senior 
captains, Robin Miller and Sarah Lynch, are 
excited to be leading a team that enjoys being 
on the water and hope that they can help this 
year's team surpass its expectations. 

Have you ever woked so hard for some- 
thing and acheived perfection for a moment? 
Did you know all the pain was worth it? 

- Sarah Lynch '00 



Junior goalie Courtney Schaeffer takes the goal kick. Schaeffer 
started all 38 games in her first two seasons. 



Junior defenseman Katherine Murphy dribbles the ball in the midfield 
Murphy started every game the past two seasons. 







: ^^ 









(above) Junior forward Rachel Klemanski gets help in her battle for the ball. 
Klemanski was an unselfish player who evolved into a team leader. 



m| 



202-^Sporm 



Freshman sweeper Colleen Danaher breaks away from a defender. 
Danaher was one of seven freshman who contributed this season. 





» .' 



I- 



The 1999 Women's Soccer team featured 
many familiar faces complemented by an 
impressive freshman class, but the results 
remained much the same as a year ago. The 
Eagles got off to a strong start, winning eight 
of their first eleven games thanks to the play of 
a number of veterans. 

Junior Courtney Schaeffer contributed 
strong minutes in net for the third consecu- 
tive year, posting a career high 12.5 shutouts 
during her All-Conference season. Tri-cap- 
tains Janice Collein, Mary Guarino, and fifth- 
year senior Leigh Coffran tutored the six 
newcomers in the art of winning at the Big 
East level. Each played a key role in the team's 
early success. Hopes remained high as the 
squad again picked up the pace as the regular 
season came to a close, finishing conference 
play on a 5-0-1 tear. Other experienced play- 
ers began to step up, led by seniors Debra 
D'Allessandro and Kristine Klagges, juniors 
Katherine Murphy and Rachel Klemanski, 
and sophomores Meghan Moore and Mor- 
gan Page. 

Improving play also led to a number twelve 
ranking in the coaches' poll. The Eagles hit 
the road for the first round of the Big East 
tourney, and eked out a thrilling victory over 
the Wildcats of Villanova. Overtime would 
not be as kind to the Eagles in round two, as 
they fell to the fifth-ranked Connecticut 
Huskies. Guarino scored her second goal of 
the tourney, while senior goalie Alice Lehne 
made nine saves in a rare start, but the Eagles 
only mustered three shots in the game. A 
second life would be granted to the talented 
squad as the NCAA blessed them with a berth 
in the national tournament. The Eagles ad- 
vanced further than ever before, making it to 
the sweet sixteen before being defeated by the 
UConn Huskies, 5-0. The experience gained 
by all during the successful campaign gives a 
positive outlook for the 2000 season. 

- Tom Pelissero '03 



Sports 203 



The 1999 Boston College Men's Cross- 
country team has gone the distance after last 
year. Injury and sickness plagued the team in 
1998, and they hoped that 1999 would be a 
better year. Indeed 1 999 has been a great year 
for the men's team. They came to make a 
statement and did so by placing high at both 
the New England Championships and the 
Big East Championships. "I'm actually really 
excited about the season," remarked head 
coach Randy Thomas. His team proved to be 
up to the challenge of a competitive season. 

Senior co-captains Marshall Armitage and 
Derek Holland and junior Justin Burdon led 
the team but it took a team effort to make 
1999 a winning season for the Men's Cross- 
country team. Justin Burdon took third at 
the New England Championships to lead the 
team to a second-place finish at the meet. 
Burdon also led the team at the Big East 
Championships to give the team a fifth place 
finish. Derek Holland on the other hand, led 
the team to sixth place at the lona Meet of 
Champions. 

The men's team had an extremely produc- 
tive year to carry it above the rest. They gave 
it their best by running the distance of many 
grueling cross-country meets. The team had 
leaders like Justin Burdon, Derek Holland, 
and Marshall Armitage to help guide the 
whole group, but the entire team contributed 
to the success of the 1999 season. 




McGrath Studi 



Senior captain Marshall Armitage chases down a Univesity of New 
Hampshire runner. Armitage, a four-time letter winner, placed in the 
top five twice during his senior campaign. 



204 Sports 



(left) Sophomore Colin Wolfe moves to the front of the pack at the NCAA 
Qualifier where the Eagles NCAA Championship hopes were quelched. 

' (below) Freshman Brian Mahoney pushes himself to move ahead of two 
s Buffalo runners. Mahoney was one of eight freshman to contribute to the 
varsity squad in 1999. 




McGralh Studios 



McGrath Studios 



Junior captain Justin Burdon looks over his shoulder to gauge his lead. Sophomore Colin Wolfe gives the extra effort as he approaches the finish line. 

Burdon finished in the top four individually in three races; with a career Wolfe got off to a strong start with a win at the season's first meet, the Central 
best second-place at the Central Connecticut Invitational. Connecticut Invitational. 



i ipi| [ jH«j)1>ti^ 



The Men's Varsity Soccer Team faced a 
difficult schedule this year. Taking on Big 
East rivals Rutgers, UCONN, Providence, 
Seton Hall, and St. Johns made coming out 
on top a daunting task. They were led by 
senior captain Paul Cornoni and junior cap- 
tain Paul Bourke, who both played in the 
back as defenders, and Head Coach Ed Kelly 
in his twelth season. Many of their games 
were close, decided by one goal and in over- 
time. Junior goalkeeper Chris Hamblin out- 
worked the opposing goalkeepers in many 
games close to wire. He also earned honors as 
Big East Goalkeeper of the Week early in the 
season. The Eagles ended their season in a 
matchup with Rutgers on November 3. The 
game remained scoreless for 76 minutes be- 
fore Rutgers snuck one past Hamblin for the 
win. The Rutgers loss gave the Eagles a final 
overall record of 6-9-2 (Big East record of 2- 
9-0). 

Although their record did not allow them 
to continue into the Big East Tournament, 
the Eagles are looking forward to next season. 
Only graduating three seniors, they are a 
young team with eight freshmen, a few having 
seen a good amount of playing time. They 
hope to capitalize next season and combine 
playing experience and skills to take advan- 
tage of the young talent. 

- Mary Bain '01 




Freshman midfielder Bob Thompson husdes the ball up field against 
Brown. Thompson was one of eight freshmen on the squad. 




Mike Dreher 



Junior foi-ward Kevin Boyd works his way up the sideline against 
Sacred Heart. The 6'3" Boyd was BC's tallest player and one of 
its most experienced. 



I 



206 Sports 




Midfielder John Munko eludes a Brown defender. Munko was heavily 
recruited out of Rhode Island's Lasalle Academy. 



A jump ball is contested in the Brown game. The ball did not bouce the team'; 
way in 1 999 as they staggered to a disappointing finish in the Big East. 




(above) Junior goalie Chris Hamblin is congratulated on a good effort by his 
teammates after the Brown game. Hamblin and backup John O'Halloran will 
both return for the 2000 campaign. 

(left) Defenseman Andrew Stein maneuvers past a St. John's defender. Stein 
contributed to the varsity program in each of his four seasons. 



Sports 207 



(right) Katie Ryan pulls away during the NCAA district qualifier. The Eagles 
qualified on an at large bid. 

(below) The big start at the NCAA qualifier. After a long stay in the Bronx, the 
qualifier was moved this year to Franklin Park in downtown Boston. 




McGrath Studios 



Cate and Maggie Guiney warm up before a big race. The twin freshmen Junior Lisa Mclsaac battles for position. Mclsaac, a native of Canada, 

contributed heavily to the Eagles NCAA tournament run and were both named had a strong showing at the Big East where she finished twenry-fifth. 
to the All-Big East squad. 



208 Sports 




The Guiney rwins and captain Shannon Smith close in on a Provi- 
dence runner. The trio were the top three finishers for the Eagles in 
the Big East championship. 



Excitement and enthusiasm ran high at the 
first practice session of the 1 999 Women's 
Cross-Country team. The young but talented 
team, uniting an accomphshed returning 
squad with an exceptional recruiting class, 
had their sights set on a trip to Bloomington, 
Indiana, the site of the NCv^A Champion- 
ships. "This team has the tools to have a great 
year; they are talented, enthusiastic, and I see 
a great chemistry amongst the members of the 
team. We are shooting for a top ten finish at 
the NCAA's." The team also hoped for a top 
finish at the New England Championships, as 
well as a strong showing in the Big East 
Conference. 

The team was led by their tri-captains: 
seniors Shannon Smith and Kyla Bourbor 
and junior Lisa Mclsaac. Freshman standout 
Cate Guiney, her talented twin sister Maggie, 
and sophomores Nicole Portley and Katie 
Ryan rounded out the top seven. Freshmen 
Mehan Andrade and Mary Tomer also played 
key roles for the team. 

Starting the season strong, the team fin- 
ished third to Providence College and Brown 
University at the lona Invitational, led by the 
Guiney's twins' fifth and sixth place finishes. 
The team was runner-up in the New England 
Championships, once again to Providence, as 
Shannon Smith took home the individual 
win. Two weeks later the team traveled to 
New York City, the site of the Big East 
Championships, and brought home a disap- 
pointing fourth-place finish, just four points 
out of third. Perennial cross-country giants 
Georgetown, Providence, and Villanova 
grabbed the top three spots. As the season 
neared a close. Coach Randy Thomas kept his 
team focused on the NCAA championships, 
where their impact surely was felt. The dy- 
namic group of underclasssmen armed now 
with big-time experience will certainly make 
the 2000 squad fun to watch and competitive 
in the quest for the elusive Big East title. 

- Shannon Smith '00 



Sports 20') 



Under first year coach Trevor Drum, and 
led by Patrick Dunn, Mike Rich, Rich 
Tilghman, Mike Tegnelia, and Josh Folkerth, 
the Boston College Men's Golf team had a 
successful 1999 season. The team finished 
fifth at the ECAC North/Northeast Quali- 
fier, which was shortened to nine holes be- 
cause of rain. Senior Patrick Dunn qualified 
to advance to the ECAC Championships in 
Hamilton, New York as an individual, where 
he finished tied for forty-fourth place. The 
team continued to improve in the spring, and 
their effort during cold months was rewarded. 

- Kate Schrinsky '03 



I 



Star player Patrick Dunn displays his flawless follow-through on a cold autum 
day. 




]^:i Phou.graphy 

Mark Sullivan lines up a short-iron shot that falls just short of the 
pin. 



Ii; Sports 




Using a fairway wood, Rich Tilghman eyes his ball as it approaches the green. 



Katie Shields unleashes a drive on the first tee. Shields led the team in 
many of the team's competitions. 




)it Photography 

Suzanne Carrazza looks over her putt. Carrazza was a very steady player for 
the Eagles, and finished second on the team in the ECAC championship. 



The Women's Golf team, comprised of mem- 
bers Katie Shields, Suzanne Carrazza, Meghan 
Donoghue, Jackie Shea, Tina Haydu, and Carolyn 
McDonald, had a successful 1999 under the direc- 
tion of first-year coach Kristin Lindgren. After 
placing eleventh at the ECAC Championship at 
Bucknell University's Golf Club in October, the 
squad seemed poised to make a run at the Big East 
title in the spring. The Eagles placed in the top ten 
at the majority of the tournaments in which they 
played, reaching as high as third in the Mount 
Holyoke Invitational in a field of fifteen teams. 
Coach Lindgren said of her women's team, "We 
lowered our team average by seven shots from last 
season. Several players broke or tied their indi- 
vidual career low rounds this season. " Senior Shields, 
returning after a year's absence due to injury, was 
:.the team's top finisher in each of her team's meets. 
The Eagles look to the leadership of Shields and 
other seniors to stay on the path to a championship. 

- Kate Schrinsky '03 




JtL F''h!,Mui;rapliy 

Meghan Donoghue hits her iron shot into the par-3. Donoghue 
contributed greatly to the team. 



Sports 211 



(right) Maria Misci, Mindy Aguirre, Marsia Bixenman, and Carolyn Burbach 
cheer on the crowd before the Miami game. 

(below) Jenna Person, Michelle Munroe, Natalie Marabello and Mindy 
Aguirre, are held by Jon Olsson, Mike Castelo, Sal DeSantis, and Landon 
Clark,their respective partners as the Eagles kick an extra point. 




Maria Misci, held up by Audrey Tan and Carolyn Burbach as well as the rest of 
the squad, shows her strength while getting the attention of the BC crowd. 



Carolyn Burbach shows supreme balance as she is held up on only one 
foot by Robbie Bubalo. 



mm 







Mindy Aguirre, Marsia Bixenman and Maria Misci show their 
excitement at the end of the Notre Dame game. The game was the 
highlight of the season for the squad. 



This year, the Boston College cheerleaders 
had plenty to cheer about. The cheerleading 
program at BC consists of a coed and an all-girl 
squad who provide spirited support for men's 
and women's athletics. The squads attended 
NCA summer camp as well as the NCA National 
Collegiate Cheerleading Championships. The 
coed squad's dedication and hard work paid off 
as they placed 1 1 th, competing in division I-A at 
the Nationals held April 1 -6 in Daytona Beach, 
FL. This was the best finish ever of any BC squad 
competing at the event. They missed the top ten 
by a mere 0.009 points. They went up against 
such power house I-A teams as Louisville, Vir- 
ginia Tech, UNC Chapel Hill, and the Univer- 
sity of Texas at Austin. This past spring the all- 
girl team hoped to place high in their first 
appearance at the NCA National Cheerleading 
Competition. 

The '99 football season provided nothing but 
excitement, and the cheerleaders were there ev- 
ery step of the way. They have successfully led 
the student body at pep rallies and the Superfans 
at Alumni Stadium, cheered the team on in their 
victory against Notre Dame in South Bend, and 
supported the Eagles all the way to the 
Insight.com Bowl in Tuscon, Arizona, on New 
Year's Eve day. Whether the girls were flipping 
in the endzone or the guys were demonstrating 
their strength by tossing their partners in the air, 
they never ceased to amaze the crowd. The 
cheerleaders also supported the BC basketball 
teams, cheering at all of their home games and 
traveling to the Big East Tournament in March. 

Boston College cheerleaders embrace the ide- 
als of team spirit and sportsmanship, and they 
enthusiastically support BC athletics. They re- 
flect the pride and the spirit of the BC commu- 
nity. The hard work, dedication, and commit- 
ment shown by all of the cheerleaders contrib- 
uted to the overall success of the BC athletic 
program. On and off the field, the BC cheerlead- 
ers upheld their responsibility in attending ath- 
letic as well as non-athletic functions, thus main- 
taining the immortal spirit of the Boston College 
Eagles! 

- Mindy Aguirre '01 & 
Marsia Bixenman '01 





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The Boston College Men's Basketball team 
dashed out of the gate to compile a 9-4 record in 
the first half of the season. Though they faced a 
schedule packed with tough competition, the 
Eagles were ready to prove themselves, and their 
optimism did not fail them. Unfortunately the 
team then indured a double digit losing streak in 
the Big East which put a damper on their hopes. 
However, coming off a disappointing 1998-99 
season, the team made a tremendous improve- 
ment. Coach Al Skinner effectively utilized the 
team's athleticism, depth, and flexibility. Ex- 
traordinary efforts by individual players also con- 
tributed to the team's success. These included 
senior Dwayne Pina, a point guard who ranked 
among the Big East leaders in assists last season, 
and senior small forward Michael Cotton. These 
two workhorses averaged 30.0 and 29.1 minutes 
per game last season respectively, and showed no 
signs of slowing down this year. Other players 
who made significant contributions included 
impressive freshman guard Troy Bell and power 
forward Uka Agbai. Juniors Kenny Harley, who 
ranked third in the league in long range shooting, 
and Kenny Walls shared the wing. Coach Skinner 
looked to junior guard Xavier Singletary as a 
consistent scorer, and was rarely disappointed. 
Junior power forward Jonathan Beerhorm en- 
tered the season as the team's principal shot- 
blocker, while his teammate, sophomore forward 
Brian Ross, was expected to serve as a perimeter 
shooter. In addition, the team gained two big 
newcomers in freshman centers Andrew Dudley 
and Erik Witt. With such raised expectations, the 
BC Men's Basketball team looked forward to a 
season of vast improvement. 





Coach Skinner and Assistant Coach Tim O'Shea look on during the 
UMass game. 



(left) Senior Dwayne Pina moves the ball upcourt as Uka Agbai trails. 

(below) Kenny Harley and Xavier Singletarry look on as the team battles 
UMass. 




:nior Michael Cotton jumps up for a shot. 



6'!" freshman Troy Bell slam dunks. As a newcomer, Bell became a major 
player on this year's team. 



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Junior Danielle O'Banion shoots the jump shot as teammate Becky Gottstein 
boxes out an opponenet. 



The team comes together before their Big East opener against Villanova 




, ( Ol I M.I l||k K'»vM>\</^' K»k 



Jason Liang 

(above) The girls on the bench look on in the final moments of the Villanova 
game. 

(right) Junior Jamie Cournoyer goes up for a jump shot. At six feet-three inches 
tall, her height advantage raises her above her competition. 




Point guard Brianne Stepherson handles the ball. Brianne started 
twent)' six games as a freshman and looks to contribute greatly during 
her sophomore campaign. 





In review, the Women's Basketball team had 
a record-breaking season in 1998-1999. For 
starters, they beat two Top Twenty-Five teams, 
hosted their first-ever sellout crowd of 8,606 
fans at Conte Forum, and advanced to the 
NCAA tournament for the first time. In addi- 
tion, Alissa Murphy was named the Big East 
Most Improved Player and was honored on the 
All-Big East Second Team. Becky Gottstein 
and Brianne Stepherson represented Boston 
College on the All-Rookie Team, and head 
coach Cathy Inglese was named Big East Coach 
of the Year. Murphy was also selected to the 
Preseason Big East Second Team for the 1999- 
2000 season. 

Coming off a very successful season in '98- 
'99, the members of the Boston College 
Women's Basketball team set very high stan- 
dards for themselves when stepping on the 
court in October. They opened on November 
15th against Maine in the first round of the 
Preseason NIT (National Invitaional Tourna- 
ment). There were sixteen teams participating 
in the tournament, including Duke and Geor- 
gia, two 1999 Final Four participants. 

Boston College opened their Big East sched- 
ule this season with Villanova on December 
8th. After Christmas, the Eagles played in the 
University of Florida Tournament and began 
the Big East Tournment on March 3rd. of the 
new year. Returning for the Eagles was Senior 
Captain Cal Bouchard, along with Alissa 
Murphy and Tish Few. 

-Jamie Cournoyer '01 



Sports 221 




BC takes four out of fiv 



After starting the season strong by finishing in 
second place at the Canadian-American Invitational 
Meet, the BC Men's Swimming team hoped to come 
up strong against some of their toughest Big East 
rivals, including the University of New Hampshire, 
Rhode Island, and Boston University. 

The Eagles hoped to accomplish this goal by 
getting personal best times in individual races, as well 
as by coming together in support of their teammates. 
Led by captains Colin Feichtmeier, Fletcher Evans, 
and Greg Dwyer, the men looked to the support of 
their teammates all year for motivation. According to 
Colin, it is this "positive peer pressure from each 
other" that keeps the team going late in the season. 

The team's training trip to Hawaii also served to 
prepare the team for their late-season rivalries, and 
especially for the Big East tournament at the end of 
the season. By keeping their eyes set on achieving 
their best times of the season in the Big East tourna- 
ment, the Eagles felt prepared to achieve this goal. 
For freshman Matthias Schildwachter, the "great 
balance of individuals, the tight friendships and [the 
team's] hard work" are what made this team special 
to him and what helped them do their best in the 
1999-2000 season, as well as in future seasons. Also, 
by ranking eighth in the nation academically, the 
Eagles set new standards in academic achievement 
for Boston College athletics, and can be confident 
that they will be successful both in and out of the 
pool. 

With the team leadership of the captains as well as 
the strong underclassmen, all of the members of the 
men's swimming team looked to achieve their fastest 
racing times and to carry the team to victory in the 
1999-2000 season. 

- Matt Caminiti '03 



BOSTON COLLEGE ^- 



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Coach Tim Gordon looks to the crowd during the meet. 



Teammates congratulate each other on a job well done. 




(above) The BC swimmers get ready for a big home meet against Holy Cross, 
(left) The swimmers take the mark at the beginning of a race. 



u&pmni ^ mm 



(right) A BC swimmer leads the pack in the butterfly. BC at the front was a 
common occurrence over the last year. 

(below) A BC swimmer gasps for air while competing in the free-style. 




A BC diver prepares her dive. The divers proved to be a very important part of -A- swimmer competes in the back stroke, 
this year's team, contributing greatly to the team's scoring. 



Following up a season that saw them 
finish eighth in the Big East conference 
finals and fifth in the nation academically, 
the BC Women's Swimming Team looked 
to unify and move forward in the 1999- 
2000 season. 

Under the leadership of seniors Kendra 
Johnson and Joanna Myer, the team hoped 
to accomplish several specific goals this 
year: to dominate such rivals as the Univer- 
sity of Conneticut and Notre Dame, to 
improve their Big East ranking, and to "be 
dedicated and talented students," Myer 
said. 

Team unity was at a high, according to 
the captains. Despite the size of the squad, 
the absence of any individual was easily 
noted. And although swimming is often 
viewed as an individual sport, their team 
truly worked together, cheering for and 
supporting each other. "I really get moti- 
vated by the team," admitted Johnson. 
"We work hard and have ftin together." 

The women traveled to Hawaii during 
the winter for extra training and to prepare 
better for the mental and emotional strain 
of competition. With an ever-optimistic 
outlook, the team viewed their tough regu- 
lar-season schedule as a way to prepare the 
team for the difficulties of the Big East 
championship. 

With a single-minded team that included 
the strong leadership of underclassmen and 
seniors, the women's swimming team 
looked to go far in the 1999-2000 season. 

- Lauren Houlihan '03 & 
Matthew Caminiti '03 



This swimmer does the butterfly and looks ahead to the end of the pool 





±. 




4» Wil 



f 





(right) BC Eagles team together to defend their goal. 



(below) Freshman Genevieve Richardson glides toward the goal for a winnin 
shot. 




Goalie Christy Nentwig positions herself for a save. In her fourth year on the Junior Jen Buckley squeezes past the competition, 

team, Nentwig delivered a shutout against RPI. 



mm 











n Buckley positions herself for a pass to teammate Jessica Griffin. 



Although the '99-'00 season proved to be a 
cold and frustrating one for the BC Women's 
Ice Hockey team, the players' dedication and 
hard work were as fierce as ever. Coach Tom 
O'Malley had no trouble inspiring his women 
to play hard and work hard. Under the en- 
couraging guidance of captains Jen Buckley 
and Gena Nolin, the BC Eagles tackled such 
tough opponents as Niagara, Vermont, and 
Wesleyan. The quality of this year's team was 
not accurately reflected by the frequent losses. 
The Eagles have come a long way since 1 970, 
when the team was started as a club sport. 
Compared to BC's main competitors, who 
have had teams in the ECAC Conference for 
more than twenty years, the Eagles only gained 
varsity status in 1995. Without scholarships, 
BC relies on its solid name to recruit top 
players, and through many hours of team 
practice the women's team continued to 
strengthen the foundation for a great ice 
hockey program. 

Senior Gena Nolin would agree. As captain 
of two hockey teams in high school, Nolin 
arrived at BC and quickly made her presence 
known. As a forward, she played in all 32 
games last year and emerged third on the team 
with 13 goals and 12 assists. This year she 
upheld her reputation with even more scores 
and assists. 

The men's ice hockey team may get all the 
press and attendance, but the women's ice 
hockey team is quickly developing its talent in 
the background. It won't be long before 
O'Malley meets his goal of climbing to the 
top of the ECAC and becoming a major 
Division I competitor. The women will con- 
tinue to skate on towards success. 

—Meredith Roberts '03 



Sports 229 



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Beginning the season ranked as the 
nation's number one ice hockey team in 
the U.S. College Hockey Online Poll as 
well as the Sporting News' Hockey pre- 
season poll, the 1999-2000 Eagles were 
determined to fulfill that ranking. Last year 
the Eagles held a strong record of 27-12-4, 
along with a second consecutive Hockey 
East Tournament crown and a second trip 
to the NCAA Frozen Four. This year, the 
program continued to be strong, returning 
four of its six leading goal scorers, includ- 
ing Jeff Farkas (who was the nation's top 
returning goal scorer), Brian Gionta, Blake 
Bellefeuille, and Mike Lephart. Led once 
again by head coach Jerry York, a graduate 
of Boston College, and this year's captain 
senior defenseman Mike Mottau, the squad 
promised to be tough competition from 
the very beginning of the season. Junior 
goaltender Scott Clemmensen returned in 
his third season as a starter, and provided 
the main defense in the Eagles' success. 
Though early losses prevented the Eagles 
from maintaining their first place ranking, 
the team still showed superb determina- 
tion and talent. Amazingly, eight current 
team members have already been chosen in 
the NHL's annual entry draft, and will 
continue their hockey careers as profes- 
sionals. 

- Kate Schrinsky '03 





McGraLl) Studios 



riit Men's Hockey team displays their sense of unity and 

leamwork. 



Spurn 




Stephen Murr. 

After a celebration, the players on the ice huddle to plan tactics for the 
next play. 



(left) Freshman star Krys Kolanes prepares to receive the puck from a team- 
mate. 

(below) Jeff Giuliano gets in scoring position and battles for possession of the 
puck. 




Slephen Murray Stephen Murray 

ssistant captains Brian Gionta and Blake Bellefeuiile aggressively Giuliano races his opponent towards the opposing goal on his way to a goal for 

tack the goal. Boston College. 



i gpmsmm 



The 1 999-2000 Men's Hockey team came 
out as a powerhouse of players with only one 
thing on their minds: victory. The team had 
the talent and the know-how to prove to the 
nation that they were number one. No one 
person or group of individuals stood out from 
the pack. Instead, every single person on the 
team played their role, and each received 
honors for the performances they put on 
every time they went onto the ice. The team, 
led by head coach Jerry York, gave it their 
best, which was exceptional, in every game. 

The BC hockey team was guided by senior 
captain Mike Mottau along with assistant 
captains Blake Bellefeuille and Brian Gionta. 
Each of these great players received Hockey 
East honors sometime during the year, and 
they deserved it every time. Two other players 
on the team, senior Jeff Parkas and sopho- 
more Brooks Orpik, were essential to the 
team's victories. They, like the captains, re- 
ceived honors from Hockey East. Farkas led 
the team and the conference in goals. Orpik 
was selected to join the U.S. National Junior 
Hockey Team. The Eagles were on fire be- 
cause of this great show of talent. 

1999-2000 turned out to be a victorious 
year for the men's hockey team. They utilized 
their talent especially on the big stages of the 
Beanpot and Hockey East tournament. The 
BC Hockey team was on the warpath this 
year, proving that Boston College always has 
one of the best hockey teams in the nation. 

- Aaron Butler '03 





Goalie Scott Clemmensen looks pensively, waiting for the puck. 



(left) Jeff Farkas makes a shot around a defender. 

(below) Mike Mottau gets the puck away from an opposing player. 




Steven Murray 



Steven Murray 



\evin Caulfield checks an opponent into the wall. 



The team celebrates a goal. 



Senior Cliff Young brushes past a gate in the slalom event. 



The 1999-2000 Men's Ski team followed 
an impressive 1998-99 season with the lead- 
ership of senior captain Gary Sheehan and 
first-year coach Brad Vermeulen at the helm. 
Other important individual competitors on 
the Eagles squad included juniors Tad Davis, 
Eric Klein, and John Valentine, and sopho- 
more Peder Gustafson, all of whom had strong 
finishes last year in both slalom and giant 
slalom competitions. Competing in various 
races alongside the women's team, the men's 
team competed strongly, receiving many run- 
ner-up and third-place honors. 

- Kate Schrinsky '03 




AdajD VVexiet 

Senior Kevin Merk races toward the finish in the giant slalom. 




Senior Gary Sheehan flies through a gate on the giant slalom course. 



Senior Rebecca Babin prepares to turn the corner in the slalom. 




Adam Wexler 



L-nior Recca Cogswell leans past a gate in the giant slalom. 



The Boston College Women's Ski team 
repeated their successful 1998-1999 season, 
led by several returning contributors. Senior 
captain Rebecca Babin returned after a suc- 
cessful third year in which she placed as high 
as first in the Brown/Connecticut Carnival in 
Lincoln, New Hampshire. Other key return- 
ees included senior Rebecca Cogswell, sopho- 
more Christina Gush, junior Julie Ramsland, 
and senior Natasha Zaitzeff, all of whom led 
the 1999-2000 squad to another string of 
athletic accomplishment for Boston College 
and the women's ski program. Both the male 
and female skiers competed at a range of 
Carnivals on slopes in Vermont, New Hamp- 
shire, and Massachusetts. 

- Kate Schrinsky '03 




Senior Natasha Zaitzeff kicks up some snow in the slalom event. 



Sporti 237 



If the BC Eagles' early impressive finishes 
at Temple University, Smith College, and 
Brown University are any indication of the 
1 999-2000 season, the Men's Fencing team is 
in great shape. 

Senior Luke Mountain set the pace for 
success with his first-place win at the Temple 
Open. Jeff Marston followed up the victory 
only a week later at the New England Invita- 
tional with a first-place epee victory. Junior 
Zakee Howard and sophomore Bobby Kim 
secured two more top-ten finishes, and Luke 
Mountain, junior Greg Shea, and senior Rob 
Cutler gave BC another three top-five fin- 
ishes. The Eagles' winning streak continued 
through the end of November, resulting in 
two crushing victories over John's Hopkins 
and Tufts University. Both Mountain and 
Shea went 6-0 in the saber and foil competi- 
tions, respectively. 

With two experienced seniors and two 
freshman recruits, the twenty-two-man ros- 
ter was one of the strongest in years. The BC 
Eagles faced a tough season goakto secure 
their fifth New England Championship in six 
years. But with rigorous daily practices and 
special training sessions with assistant coaches, 
coach Syd Fadner and captain Luke Moun- 
tain were ready to lunge into the challenge. 

-Meredith Roberts, '03 




^^^HMUj^I^i^^^,. : 



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^ 



^ 



A BC Fencer relaxes before the match. 



238 Sports 




Junior Zakee Howard gets ready for his match at Brown University. 
Howard began the season undefeated, winning his first six bouts. 



(left) Junior Greg Shea battles his opponent during an early season match. 
Shea would prove to be an important part of the team. 




nior captain Luke Mountain takes a seat as his teammates fight. Mountain The team comes together before the tournament, 
irted the season very strong. 



i lJjJUitJ JJJ 



(right) The squad prepares for the big tournament at Brown University 
(below) The lady Eagles relax before their matches. 




Two lady fencers enjoy some food between their matches. 



Sophomore Becky King awaits her chance to fight. King proved to be 
major part of this year's team. 



iMaii^PPtPi 




di 



A lady Eagle watches her opponent. 



The BC women foils collided to the 
metallic sound of success. After only a 
month of competition, the Eagles emerged 
victorious in contests at Temple Univer- 
sity, Smith College, and Brown Univer- 
sity. With a team of returning competitors 
and new, but experienced freshmen, the 
BC Women's Fencing team was at its top 
form. 

Along with changes to the roster came 
changes to the sport. For the first time ever 
the women's NCAA fencing dual meets 
would consist of three fencers in each of the 
three weapons (foil, epee, and sabre), in- 
stead of four fencers in only foil and epee. 
The Eagles apparently liked the new regu- 
lations, for they quickly scored wins in 
sabre. Sophomore Becky King won ten 
bouts out of twelve in the meet at Brown 
University to give Boston College a 4-0 
victory. Junior Regina Lennox and fresh- 
man Kate Boyle in epee, and senior Holly 
Russell and j unior Michelle Guevara in foil 
also had ten wins each. 

The Eagles' early wins over Johns 
Hopkins, Army, Wellesley College, and 
Tufts University forshadwed a victorious 
season. Captains Regina Lennox and Hollie 
Russell were optimistic that the team could 
go far in the new millenium. 



- Meredith Roberts '03 

vvpqiPVF 




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The lady Eagles watch and support their teammates. 



Sports 241 



The 1999-2000 BC Men's Varsity Track 
team came in hoping for a big season. Led by 
senior captains Marshal Armitage, Erik 
DeMarco, and Ruben Marin, the Eagles 
looked forward to a promising season begining 
on December 4 at Harvard. The Eagles looked 
strong in the sprints, led by freshmen Shawn 
Wallace and Vernon Mickle. "This year's 
training is the same as last year's except that it 
was more speed-intensive," says captain 
DeMarco. "The 4x400 relay team has been 
the focus of many of the sprinters. We quali- 
fied for IC4A Championships in both the 
indoor and outdoor seasons. Five runners will 
split time in the four legs of the relay this year: 
Erik DeMarco, Peter Vaglio, Jeff Normant, 
Bennett Valenci, and Mark Johnson." 

In field competition, Ruben Marin leads 
the team in high jump with a personal best 
jump of 6' 11.5", and was the reigning Big 
East Champion in the high jump. After fin- 
ishing third at the Big East Championship 
last year, senior Neil Koenig was expected to 
perform well throwing the javelin. Senior 
Greg Mihal placed seventeenth in the world 
in javelin at the International Paralympic 
Committee's World Championships in Bir- 
mingham, England in August 1998. He is a 
hopeful for the U.S. Paralympic team in 
Sydney 2000. Other strong athletes include 
seniors Bobby Stancil and Jason Pink, junior 
Joel Quintong, sophomores Tony Bierne and 
Ryan O'Hagan, and freshmen Joseph Miller 
and Gabe Verdaguer. 

With many returning athletes, including 
Matt Adams and Mark Johnson, and many 
promising freshmen; the Eagles will have a 
well-balanced team. The outlook for this sea- 
son was promising, as the fifteen remaining 
seniors looked to make a name for the BC 
Eagles. 

- Kristen Walker '03 






Pole vaulter Jason Pink warms up before his first attempt at the 
Harvard Invitational. 



(left) Jason Pink gets some last-minute advice from BC assistant coaches beft)re 
a meet at Harvard. 

(below): Sprinter Jeff^Normant receives the baton during the 4x400 relay at the 
Harvard Invitational. 




McGrath Studio 

irik Demarco leaves the competition in the dust en route to a victory in 
he 4x400 relay. 



Mairaili Sludios 

Dan Fitzgerald prepares for a showdown with a UMass runner at the Harvard 
meet. 



(right) Kristyn O'Brien successfully clears the bar on her initial jump at the 
Harvard Invitational 

(below) Christina Regan talks strategy with an assistant coach before her first 
event 




MaJr.uli Sludi 



McGrath Studit 



Pole vaulter Kristyn O'Brien takes the bar down with her after failing an 
ambitious jump. 



Christina Regan warms up for the shot put competition at the Harvard 
Invitational. 



Wi^^^pmm' 




McGrath Studios 

\risry'n O'Brien chats with a race official before her first vauk at the 
^a^^•ard track. 



Head coach Randy Thomas was excited and full of 
anticipation for the indoor and outdoor track sea- 
sons. Armed with an experienced and successful 
group of veterans, and loaded with potential impact 
freshmen, Thomas expected great things from this 
young but balanced team. 

Led by the experience of junior co-captains Lisa 
Mclssac and Shannon Smith, the middle and long 
distance teams were very competitive in the Big East. 
Last winter, Smith was the New England Champion 
in the 3000M and is a former NCAA qualifier in the 
same event. Mclssac was All-ECAC and runner-up 
at New England's in the mile last year. Senior Kyla 
Barbour added depth in the 5K and the lOK races. 

A great recruiting class brought many new faces to 
the Heights who were expected to make an immedi- 
ate impact for the team. Newcomers Rachel D'Amora 
and Jennifer Vendetti hold state records and looked 
to contribute this year. Sisters Cate and Maggie 
Guiney had a successful cross-country debut and 
hoped to continue their successes on the track. 

In the sprints and hurdles, sophomore Zoey 
O'Sullivan and senior Marcia Furr led the young 
team. Freshman Nikki Pouge would also be counted 
on to add depth to the squad. Furr leads the longer 
sprints, running the 200M through the 400M. Jun- 
iors Lauren Claudia and Kate Sullivan would return 
to compete in the sprints in the indoor season. 
D'Amora and Vendetti also added depth and strength 
to this sprint squad. 

In the multi-events, freshman Cristina Regan 
would compete in the hurdles and triple jump, for 
which she earned significant accolades during her 
high school career. Meghan Kearney was the Con- 
necticut State Champion in the discus and added 
hammer and 20lb. weight to her arsenal at the 
Heights. Tierney Oslin also added depth in the 
throws. Kristyn O'Brien, a junior, would return to 
the pole vault while looking to increase her school 
record jump of 9'6". 

The women's track team made the transition in 
the 1999-2000 season to a more balanced team than 
in years past, with great strength in all areas. They 
were poised not only to be successful in the Big East 
Conference, but also to take aim at some of the top 
teams in the country. 

- Shannon Smith '00 



This year's Boston College Varsity Wres- 
tling team was a small one,but one with much 
determination. Head coach Rod Buttry said, 
"You have to take a beating before you stop 
taking it and fight back." That is exactly what 
the 1999-2000 Wresding team did. They 
were small in number, but big in heart and 
persistence. They never wavered in the face of 
an opponent and fought to the last point and 
minute. 

A remarkable trio of captains led the team 
to a great year in the 1 999-2000 season. These 
three captains, Pat Purcell, Dan Degan, and 
Steve Preggiano, were the core of the team 
and guided their teammates to do their best in 
every tournament and every meet. The team, 
including captain Dan Degan, had a few 
injuries that held them back in a few tourna- 
ments, but that did not stop them in the long 
run. Injury could not stop this team because 
they were a motivated group set on the goal of 
winning and did so with the expertise of head 
coach Rod Buttry. 

The Boston College Varsity Wrestling team 
is in its last two years of existence because of 
conflicts with Title IX. This is a disappoint- 
ment to Coach Buttry, but he will continue to 
coach the team with the same spirit that has 
brought the team to many a winning seasons 
inthe past. The 1999-2000 Wrestling team 
pulled off a winning season through their 
strong will and determination. 

- Aaron Butler '03 




Senior Dan Degan tries to bring his opponent down. 



(left) Seniors Jeff Finley (right) and Chris Celantano match up for practice, 
(below) Head coach Rod Buttry contimplates the team's strategy to win. 




enior Chris Celantano concentrates on n:\aking the next move. Senior Pat Purcell sets up to take his opponent down. 



i§pmmim^ 



Senior captain Mike Quirk. Missing: Captain Andy Sullivan. 



The 1999 Eagles baseball team left a 
solid foundation for the 2000 campaign. 
Nine seniors, all of whom played a signifi- 
cant role last season, returned, along with a 
sizable flock of newcomers. Pitcher Andy 
Sullivan and outfielder Mike Quirk were 
selected as captains during fall practices, 
while pitchers Stephen Langone, Brendan 
Nolan, Jamie Quiros, and David Conley, 
infielders Mike Gambino and Eric Olson, 
and outfielder Aaron Sabo also took on 
leadership roles. Second-year coach Peter 
Hughes also added seven freshmen to his 
26-23-1 team of 1999 in what was antici- 
pated to be a breakthrough season for BC 
baseball. 

- Tom Pelissero '03 



Changes were inevitable in the Men's 
Lacrosse program after a 1 999 campaign in 
which futility was the norm. That explains 
why the retirement of Coach Ed Moy after 
fourteen seasons came as little surprise 
within the Athletic Department. He was 
replaced immediately by long-time assis- 
tant Dave Curnicle, whose task was to turn 
around a program that had been in a tail- 
spin for three years. One positive was the 
presence of seniors Tom Gallagher, Jason 
Wren, Ted Wagenknecht, Kiernan 
O'Connor, Mike Sullivan, Jeff Mathias, 
Dan Hayden, and MarcAlbano. There was 
a large turnover among the lower-classmen 
as well, and many walk-ons and freshmen 
recruits were immediately thrust into the 
fray. With nowhere to go but up, the Eagles 
aimed to erase the memories of a year ago. 

- Tom Pelissero '03 




(clockwise from top left) Captains Tom Gallaher, Jason Wren, Mike Sullivan, and 
Marc Albano. 



left to right) Gretchen Thompson, Cristin Brown, Lauren Fischetti, JuHe Ulrich, and 
Zhris Vicari. 




If the Eagles softball team needed a vote 
of confidence for their 2000 season, they 
needed to do no more than look at the end 
of the 1999 Big East schedule. After an 
atrocious start, the squad pulled together 
to run off twelve wins in its final fourteen 
games. Despite bowing out after three games 
in the Big East tournament, the six seniors 
who would return saw the potential for an 
entire season of success in the coming year. 
Cristin Brown, Mary Dietz, Chris Vicari, 
Lauren Fischetti, Julie Ulbrich, and 
Gretchen Thompson provided leadership 
for Jennifer Finley's veteran squad. Com- 
bined with the input of an impressive re- 
cruiting class, the Eagles were poised for a 
Big East title run in 2000. 

- Tom Pelissero '03 



Captains Jamie Baldante (left) and Emily Ryan. 



Coach Mary Ann Foley Schiller of the 
Women's Lacross team had no problem 
turning over her line-up after a 4- 1 1 season 
that left her job in question. Just three 
seniors, midfielder Jaime Baldante and at- 
tackers Susan Pitt and Emily Santos, re- 
turned, while junior standout Emily Ryan 
was rewarded for her efforts in the disap- 
pointing season with a co-captainship 
shared by Baldante. Eight freshmen were 
expected to see significant playing time, 
while sophomore Valerie Leuchs and jun- 
ior Melissa Cole were projected as a pla- 
toon in goal. Progress was steadily made 
during fall ball, and the spring season was 
viewed by Schiller as a chance for redemp- 
tion. 

- Tom Pelissero '03 



Seii-ior 

(se iL fe£}h. 
Bei ig of higher 
ofFi De or rank; 
referring to the 
last year of hi^ 
sch >ol or college. 



'v^■^T'■. 






250 




^m 



<,:-.'.\ 









■'<' ♦ >, r 






SENIORS 

Redefined at 

Boston College 

The words, I am a senior at Bos- 
ton College, have taken on a 
whole new meaning as we real- 
ized their true meaning. Each of 
our experiences here has been 
unique, yet we are forever linked 
by our common memories of 
this campus, this city and the 
fellow members of our class. We 
are the Boston College Class of 
2000 and nothing can ever 
change that. Boston College 
held four unforgetable years of 
our lives and has changed us all. 

Editors 

Nancy Delpidio 

Lesley Johnston 



251 




Robbie Monteyne, Doug Marshall, and Katie Herrick 



Nando DiFino and Josette D'Ambrosi 




Liz vShevlin, Carrie Connolly, Katie Williams, Kristen Grabowski, Kathleen Pollock, Anna Kelleher 



'i^emSmmmm 




t^-« 



i^g 




Lauren Peterson and Jodi Nichols 



Marissa Jacobs and Vanessa Ajjan 




Adria Reimer, Sarah Stiglemeier, Emily Spooner, Cailleen Louth 




Eric Silva and Chris McTammany at the Gasson Hall Bell Tower 




Marissa Jacobs, Sarah Rodrigues, and Megan McNamara 



Will Kemeza 



PERSPECTIVE: 



'eniors chose 12 of their fellow classmates who exemplify EC's motto "Ever to Excel, 
'outstanding students. Please hold your applause until page 261. 



We would like to present to you these 



GREG GAGLIARDI 




"Among those I like or admire, 1 find no common denominator; 
but among those I love, I can: they all make me laugh." -Greg 



Greg Gagliardi's personal motto describes the way he ap- 
proaches life — always with a sense of humor. "It's not 
like I am looking for my wife to be a standup come- 
dian," Greg explains, "but humor is something I value." Greg values 
humor so much he hopes to replace David Letterman someday — he 
already sent his resume to CBS. But, in case the whole late night talk 
show host gig doesn't work out, Greg plans to teach English, maybe 
write for educational magazines or newspapers, and be a guidance 
counselor. 

When Greg came to Boston College, he wanted to make an impact. 
He has reached his goal. Greg is enrolled in the School of Education 
Honors program, served as the Heights' Features editor for two years, 
played an active role in the School of Education Ambassadors program, 
served as a senator, treasurer, and president of the Undergraduate 
Government for the School of Education throughout his four years, and 
was a residence assistant for the past two years. Among his many 
activities, Greg feels his role as Heights' Features editor is the most 
rewarding. "I can't disconnect the Heights with my life at BC," Greg 
explains. "They are so interlocked." And according to Greg, his humor- 
ous weekly Heights stream-of-consciousness column entitled "Progres- 
sive Revelations" has been his greatest accomplishment. "The column 
almost didn't continue past the second week," says Greg. "I made a 
website with an archive of the column — now I'm waiting for the 1 000''' 
hit." Thank you for keeping us laughing, Greg. We wish you the best 
of luck next year. 



Sam Sawyer's Boston College experience has been one of aca- 
demic achievement, BC community involvement, and loyalty 
to the Jesuit tradition. As a Presidential Scholar in the Honors 
Program, Sam has excelled in academics, receiving the Sophomore Scholar 
Award and membership in the National Honor Society. Sam has also devoted 
much of his time to being a residence assistant at Greyclifif 

Freshman year, Sam co-founded JUSTICE, Jesuit University and 
College Students Concerned with Empowerment, which succeeded in 
bringing a Jesuit national conference to Boston College in the fall of 1997. 
Sam also helped to resurrect BC's Ignatian Society, which JUSTICE soon 
joined. Through the Ignatian Society, Sam and seven other students 
established Kairos, a spiritual retreat, at BC. According to Sam, Kairos has 
become increasingly popular and has positively affected the student body. 
"I've noticed a real change on campus from freshman to senior year," Sam, 
the Spiritual Chair for the Ignatian Society, explained. "There is more 
concern for spiritual and religious matters. Kairos has to do with that." 
Next year, Sam will continue to be actively involved in the Jesuit tradition, 
teaching underprivileged inner city boys at a Jesuit middle school in 
Baltimore. He then hopes to attend graduate school for Philosophy and 
Theology. Sam's long-term goal, however, is to join the Jesuits. 




M^^mmm 



"To the Greater Glory of God" 



LAUREN HOSTAGE 




Lauren Hostage is one senior who truly exemplifies the BC motto "Ever 
to Excel." She has found her place here at BC and made it her home. 
"I was an air force brat, so I never really lived in any place longer than 
3 years." So, she decided to stay on the East Coast near some family, and chose 
BC because of the Human Development Program in the School of Education. 
In the future, Lauren says she plans to work in family advocacy or social work 
with families and children, helping "to give children a voice." Lauren is 
committed to serving others, and in fact, most of her involvement at BC 
revolves around community service. Lauren devotes her time to her two most 
rewarding activities, 4Boston and her position as an RA. Lauren served on the 
4Boston council as both a junior and a senior. Of 4Boston she says, "it's truly 
been a source of inspiration, by giving me support and encouragement to try 
new things. It has been one thing that kept me here and made me be a good 
RA." As a junior, Lauren was an RA for freshmen, and in her senior year as 
an SA, she chose again to work with freshmen. "The reason," she explains, "is 
that I love being part of the first year experience. To see them come to school 
overwhelmed and leave with confidence- just to know that I have a hand in 
their progress." Lauren was recognized by housing with an award for her all- 
around contribution and for setting an example of men and women for others. 

When asked what she learned most from BC, she replied, "I have 
learned 1 ,000 different things, but what has stuck with me the most is this: 
let people know when you need their help, and when you do, you receive 
the most amazing gift, and that is friendship." 



"Learn as if to live forever, and live as if to die tomorrow" -Ghaiidi 



ALLEN CERMAK 



The Jesuit education at BC fosters the ideal of developing the whole 
person. Allen Cermak is one student at BC who has spent his four 
years not only enriching himself academically, but also person- 
ally. A hard and enthusiastic worker, Allen has shown real leadership 
qualities in all he does. 

Leaving his hometown of Nashville, TN and coming to BC, he says is 
one of his greatest accomplishments. The reason, he says, is "it takes 
courage to leave home, to be on your own, become involved, and make 
your own niche." Allen has been involved in a multitude of activities, 
including ROTC for four years, where he has received the honor of Top 
Cadet, a leader for 48 hours, an Appalachia Volunteer, Habitat for 
Humanity, and a 4Boston Volunteer, where he was on the council and in 
charge of his particular site. Of all the activities that he is involved in, Allen 
says that the Jenks Leadership Program is the most rewarding. He is now 
the director of the program, and when organizing projects he loves seeing 
how excited and enthusiastic new people are towards the program. 

As the next step in ROTC, Allen will enter the Army. He hopes to work 
in field artiller)' and do his stint in Korea, mostly to experience the culture 
and the challenge. After that he hopes to return to Nashville and enter 
business school. 

BC has truly taught Allen the Jesuit ideal. He says, "developing the 
whole person is crucial. Life is more than money, it's the 80 year test. 
This means you must look at the big picture. If you can look back at 
who you were and see your impact on people, that matters more than 
any amount of wealth you could possibly gain." 




auiiUiJ BSF 



THOMAS SLY 




Over the past four years, Tom Sly has been a recognizable 
leader in all facets of BC life. On any given day, Tom 
could be found anywhere from Robsham Theater to the 
UGBC Office, in O'Connell House or out reading stories to young 
children. His involvement in such activities as the Emerging Leader,' 
Program, Mentoring Leadership Program, Jenks Leadership Program, 
and 48 Hours Program demonstrated his ability to provide guidance 
and inspiration to his peers and those in the community around him. 

Tom describes one of his most rewarding experiences to be his 
time spent as a resident of O'Connell House, where he served as 
Budget and Physical Plant Manager. He was able to work and live 
with others and made four great friends in the process. Tom also 
cherishes the time he spent as a 48 Hours Leader, which served as a 
reality check in his life as he learned to focus on the remaining time 
he had at BC, rather than on what was to come in the future. 

Not only has Tom left an impression on those he has met on 
campus, but he has also left his mark on the stage. He was one of two 
cast members in the production of "Laughing Wild," and he also took 
part in the performance of "Sophistry. " Other honors he has received 
include the Dean's List, the Honors Program for the Communications 
Department, and Cross and Crown. 

One may wonder what motivates a student like Tom to 
involve himself in so many activities. He explains that his parents 
serve as an inspiration to him because of their success and devotion 
to each other. He strives to model his life after them and through his 
work at BC. He has been very successful and serves as an inspiration.; 



Omar Chaudhary has been a very visible member of the BC 
community throughout his four years. He believes 
that he is not the typical student because of his desire to 
change the face of BC, which he has done through his involvement 
in South Asian Student Association (SASA) . At least ten hours of 
each week have been devoted to organizing the religious and cultural 
events as well as the second annual fashion show the program 
sponsors. He also participates in the Muslim Student Association, 
organizing prayers in O'Connell House and speakers. 

Due to his performance in the CSOM Honors Program he 
was selected to serve as the sole student representative on the CSOM 
Board to select the future Dean. He is a part of the Alumni Relations 
Program that facilitates the networking between students and alumni. 
Omar actively serves on FirstServe, providing service to the surrounding 
communities. He has worked to refocus the Another Course to 
College (ACC) Program, a mentoring program for high school 
students who did not succeed in Boston Public Schools, in order to 
motivate them to attend college. 

Omar has no regrets about his time at BC. He believes the 
motto Ever to Excel is truly motivating in that it pushes students to 
their full potential, and it has driven him to leave an impression on 
those around him. "Omar has the ideal balance of a likable personality 
and an amazing work ethic," a friend wrote, and he should be 
recognized for his spirit of success. 

258 Seniovs 



OMAR CHAUDHARY 




CLAYTON SAMUEU 




Dynamism and devotion are two words to describe Clayton 
Samuels. Admired by professors, administrators, and 
students alike, he involves himself in all aspects of BC life. 
He has served in the UGBC cabinet as the executive director of the 
finance department, as a student representative on the educational 
policy committee for A & S, as an orientation leader, as well as 
finding time to intern for Pioneer Investment Management, Inc. 

Clayton distinguishes himself from the crowd at BC. He was 
selected to speak at Father Barth's departure reception, where he 
represented the opinions of the faculty, deans, and students. Due 
to his spirit and amiability, he was chosen to be a co-host of Lower 
Live, a program on BC Cable. The program was so successfiil that 
people have been begging for it to be brought back. 

Clayton is motivated by "the innate desire to right the 
wrongs surrounding him. " He believes that he possesses the qualities 
that will be of benefit to others if utilized correctly. It is apparent that 
Clayton's efforts have been of tremendous benefit to his peers, as well 
as to the entire BC community. 

When asked what his most rewarding experience at BC has 
been, he responded, "the experience that happens on a daily basis." 
As fellow students at BC we can all relate to this experience. Clayton 
expressed that through his interactions with others, he has come to 
know himself on a deeper level and has realized that there are many 
people backing him who he is not willing to disappoint. His personal 
motto is that "we must work hard in the present, to make it a past, 
that we may look upon with favor in the future." (Case- I'm down 
for you.) 



Kristen Conboy exemplifies the true spirit of a Boston College 
student. As a member of the honors program in the 
School of Education she has received numerous honors in 
the past four years. She belongs to the Golden Key and Alpha Sigma 
Nu Honor societies and she has managed to gain first honors on the 
Dean's List every semester. However, Kristen contributes 100% to 
all aspects of her life, not just her studies. 

The most rewarding experience Kristen has had at BC was 
restructuring the Club Soccer program from the shambles it was in 
to the organized team it is today. She has participated in this program 
for four years, and as a senior she serves as the president. Kristen was 
also very active in the intramural basketball, softball, and volleyball 
programs. 

Much of her time has been focused on her student teaching 
and volunteerism. Not only has Kristen been a substitute teacher but 
she has also volunteered for the Special Olympics, and she worked 
at a summer school for advanced learners. 

Overall, Kristen has managed her time well in order to have 
a well-rounded BC experience. She has been motivated by her inner 
strength, the support of others, and the desire to make her family and 
those around her proud. Her time at BC has given her the "gift of 
great friends, knowledge and preparation for life, and the responsibility 
of living on her own." In the end Kristen believes it's all about who 
you walk away knowing and meeting. 



KRISTEN CONBOY 




Seniors 2^9 



HEATHER RATLIFF 




Heather Ratliff seems to thrive on being active and being with 
people. During her four years at Boston College, 
Heather has participated in activities that allow her to be 
both. As a tour guide, a RHA executive council member, an Kairos 
leader, and an Emerging Leaders Program facilitator, she embodies 
EC's motto, "Ever to Excel." 

Heather loves her varied involvements at BC, explaining that 
they have been her most rewarding experiences. Because her activities 
have provided her with outlets to incredible people, she has chosen to 
participate in something different each year. Heather is motivated by 
the opportunity of meeting new people. She feels privileged to have 
been able to know so many unique and incredibly spirited people. 
Her biggest accomplishment has been the opportunity to 
help others come to know themselves spiritualy through her position 
as a Kairos leader, specifically when a student confided that he had 
seen God because of her. As a Kairos leader, Heather presented the 
discussion on knowing yourself, a perfect topic since two of her 
biggest attributes are being confident and knowing herself spiritually. 
Heather is highly accomplished academically as well. As a double 
major in English and Women's Studies, Heather is a member of the 
Arts and Sciences Honors Program and holds a place on the Dean's 
List. 

Heather wants to incorporate her active nature and love of 
people into a possible career in outdoor education. She hopes to be 
able to influence teenagers, teaching them team building, spirituality, , 
and risk taking. Heather's personal motto is a short statement, but 
one with tremendous impact: "Live it." 



JTeremy Zipple gives new meaning to the term outstanding. In four 
I years at Boston College, Jeremy has devoted himself to practically 
I everything. He has served as the Executive Director of 
ommunications for UGBC, the Director of the Mentoring Leadership 
Program, a member of the Liturgical Arts Group, and the Coordinator 
of the Outreach Program. 

Besides working towards making Boston College a better place 
for his peers, Jeremy has found time to serve the Boston community as 
well. Jeremy has volunteered at both St. Francis House and the Suffolk 
County Jail. The motivation behind his service work is a result of his 
relationship with God. Jeremy strives to serve God through serving 
others. 

Jeremy is also motivated to be involved because of the oppormnity 
to meet incredible people, and the chance to use his talents to make BC 
better in some way. Jeremy uses his musical talents at the 9:30 Student 
Mass, at which he plays the piano. He is also the Director of Music for 
this Mass. 

Jeremy's biggest accomplishment has been his involvement with 
diversity issues through UGBC. Jeremy's accomplishments do not end 
with his dedication to increasing diversity on the BC campus. He is a 
Presidential Scholar, a member of Alpha Sigma Nu and Omicron Delta 
Epsilon, a Dean's Scholar, and Rhode's Scholar Finalist. 

Jeremy's favorite quote seems to embody his empathic and 
friendly nature, which must contribute to his great success at Boston 
College: "Before I judge someone, I always go around behind them and 
walk in their shoes for a mile. And after I've done that, I usually find out 
that I like them." -Will Rogers 



JEREMY ZIPPLE 




CAITLIN MURPHY 




Caitlin Murphy truly exemplifies the Jesuit ideals of service and 
social justice. Attracted to Boston College because of its 
mission, Caitlin has dedicated her four years here to fiolfiUing that 
mission by serving others. As a member of the PULSE Council for two 
years, service work had a great impact on her life. She founded a Service 
Learning Program through UGBC to teach others the importance of 
service. 

Caitlin has found time to serve both the Boston community, 
teaching inmates at the Suffolk County Jail, as well as the BC community. 
She has been a member of the RHA for four years, the co-director of the 
factilty-student relations division of UGBC, and an orientation leader. 
Caitlin is a Dean's Scholar, and had been inducted into Cross and Crown, 
BC's oldest honor society. 

Caidin credits the Jesuit influence for helping her find her mission 
at BC. Her involvement with PULSE has been the center of her college 
experience, and her most rewarding one. Through her service work Caitlin 
has become aware of how she wants to live life. Though Caitlin has had a 
tremendous impact on others' lives, she feels she always leaves with more 
than she could ever give. 

Her motivation is simply a love of being with other people, and the 
fact that her numerous activities and involvements make her happy. 
Echoing the works of Faulkner, Caitlin describes how she tries to keep what 
she does in perspective - tracing everything back to love, honor, beauty, 
compassion, and sacrifice. Caitlin's peers think her actions already 
exemplify these traits. A friend offers a quote which he belives defines what 
Caitlin has accomplished, "No one has ever risen to the real state of spiritual 
maturity until they have found it finer to serve someone else than to serve 
themselves." 



Freshman year, Yolanda began her mission, to "work for... 
those who are oppressed," when she co-founded the Diver- 
sity Club, now called A.T.T.I.T.U.D.E., Aiming to Teach 
Individuals Togetherness Until Discrimination Ends. When it 
began, the club had ten members and diligently practiced a 
diversity play, performing in freshmen dormitories. As Yolanda 
explained, "nooneknewwhowewere." Sophomore year, Yolanda 
assumed responsibility as president of the club, and by senior year, 
A.T.T.LT.U.D.E was part of the Undergraduate Government of 
Boston College. Their diversity play, performed in Robsham 
Theater, became an integral component of the First Year Experi- 
ence, and over sixty people signed up with the club. Working with 
A.T.T.LT.U.D.E., according to Yolanda, has been her most re- 
warding activity at Boston College. Her second-most rewarding 
activity, however, was serving as a Residence Assistant on the multi- 
cultural floor of CLX. 

Yolanda also volunteers with Christian Soldiers, Inc., where 
she teaches inner-ciry youth about God, values, and morals, 
while also encouraging children and teenagers to do well in 
school and strive to go to college. Yolanda is also proud of her 
achievement in ceramics, which she calls "feminist multimedia 
self-portraiture." And as a sociology major and part-time 
graduate student in social work, Yolanda plans to work in social 
activism around diversity after graduation. She hopes to start 
her own holistic treatment center for children and teenagers 
with eating disorders. 



YOLANDA COENTRO 




"I try my hardest to model my life after Jesus. I try to give to 
others and work for other people, especially those who are 
oppressed and can't speak out." 




Kathryn Hartmere and Marc Blanchette 



Lynne O'Neill, Loubna Salhab, Mike lannuzzi, Chris Mossa, Paul Springer 




Meg Miles, Kelly Resnick, Sarah Stiglmeier, Kelly Sharman 



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Michael Cianfrocca, Ryan Agastino, Dan Noonan, Steve McManama, Brian Flynn 




Amy Brown, Carolyn Canty, Becky Johnston 




Shannon Bansfield, Kristin "Moose" Rielley 



Aaron Patnode, Karen Fasana, Kristen Wilcox, Debbie 


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Alexis Baine, Ryanne Foley, Allison Duff, Lisa Pistillo, Leigha Zedros, Gate 
Sebastian, Garrie Hamilton-Jones 



Kalia, Gandace, LaTesha, Sahar, Erika, Tiffany, Lorraine, Natalie 




Gathy Tomaszewski, Andrea Goleman and Meghan McLaughlin 



Kathy Terry, Katharine Fogarty, Megan Guillet 



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John E. Abell 

Arts & Sciences 
Political Science 



Ramon E. Abola 

Arts & Sciences 
Chemistry 



Ileana Acevedo 

Arts & Sciences 
Political Science 




Jesse W. Abair 

Arts & Sciences 
English 



Maria T. Abbott 

School of Education 
Human Development 




Carine Abdelnour 

School of Management 

Finance 

Marketing 



Jennifer R. Abele 

Arts & Sciences 
Political Science 




Daniel B. Adams 

Arts & Sciences 
Economics 
Philosophy 



Kristine K. Adams 

Arcs & Sciences 

Computer Science 

Hispanic Studies 




Matthew R. Adams 

School of Management 
Economics 
Accounting 



Charles G. Adanalian 

Arts & Sciences 
Sociology 



Sean S. Agopian 

School of Management 
Marketing 



Ryan L. Agostino 

Arts & Sciences 
History 



Christopher J. Ahern 

School of Management j 
Finance 






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Robert A. Aiello 

Arts & Sciences 
Mathematics 



Kimberly Aime 

Arts & Sciences 
Communication 



Vanessa R. Ajjan 

vVrts & Sciences 
History 



Nicholas Albanese 

Arts & Sciences 
History 



Jenna Albano 

Arts & Sciences 
Psychology 




Marc K. Albano 

Arts & Sciences 
Economics 



Bader Mousa Al-Saif 

Arts &C Sciences 

Political Science 

History 



Dennis P. Andrade 

Arts &C Sciences 
Political Science 



Megan M. Aleardi 

Arts & Sciences 
Sociology 



Shaun S. All 

School of Management 

Accounting 
Mgmt. Info. Systems 



Christine M. AJiperti 

School of Management 

Economics 

Finance 



Elizabeth Amaral 

Arts & Sciences 

Biology 

Psychology 



Andrew M. Ancel 

Arts & Sciences 
Psychology 



Eric J. Anderson 

School of Management 

Mgmt. Info. Systems 

Finance 



Diana M. Andrade 

Arts & Sciences 
Psychology 



Kari L. Andrews 

Arts & Sciences 
Psychology 



Benjamin T. Andrulot 

Arts & Sciences 
Psychology 



Danielle M. Almeida 

School of Management 

Accounting 
Mgmt. Info. Systems 




Timothy K. Anderson 

School of Management 
Finance 




Jeanenne J. Angelini 

School of Education 

Secondary Education 

English 



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Laura B. Angelini 

Arts & Sciences 
English 



Gregory T. Angelo 

Arts & Sciences 

Theater Arts 

Enghsh 



Anand Annigeri 

School of Management 

Finance 

Mgmt. Info. Systems 



Susan K. Antani 

Arts & Sciences 
Mathematics 



Todd A. Antico 

School of Management 
Finance 




Janine P. Antoine 

School of Management 

Marketing 

Human Resources Mgmt 



Stephen A. Antonelli 

School of Management 
Finance 



Omar A. Aponte 

Arts & Sciences 
Economics 



Cara C. Aprile 

School of Education 

Elem. Ed./Mod. Sp. Needs 

Human Development 



Stephanie L. Aranyos 

School of Management 

Finance 

Marketing 




Kimberly W. Arbuckle 

Arts & Sciences 
Communication 



William A. Arellanes 

Arts & Sciences 
Economics 
Sociology 



Maria Argos 

Arts & Sciences 
Biology 



Michael D. Armeno 
School of Management 

Finance 
Op. and Strategic Mgmt. 



Tracey A. Armstrong 

Arts & Sciences 

English 




James P. Arrajj 

School of Management 
Accounting 



Noelle M. Arton 

School of Management 
Economics 



David J. Ascoiti 

School of Management 
Finance 



Candace L. Ashir 

Arts & Sciences 
Communication 



Jennifer L. Ashkar 

Arts & Sciences 
Environ. Geosciences 



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Heather L. Ashley 


Georgia J. Asimakopoulos 


George Atallah 


Catherine A. Attardo 


Michelle A. Auguste 


School of Education 


Arts & Sciences 


Arts & Sciences 


Arts & Sciences 


Arts & Sciences 


Human Development 


Political Science 


English 
Philosophy 


Political Science 


Psychology 




Ke^^n C. Aulbach 

Arts & Sciences 
Psychology 



Maria E. Baco 

Arts & Sciences 
Communication 



Nicole L. Aurillo 

Arts & Sciences 
Biochemistry 



Deborah A. Avitabiie 

School of Education 
Human Development 



Catherine E. Ayotte 

School of Education 

Elementary Education 

Human Development 



Catalina E. Azuero 

Arts & Sciences 
English 




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Colleen M. Baker 

School of Nursing 

Nursing 



Yusuke Bando 

Arts & Sciences 

Computer Science 

Music 



Brett M. Balavender 

Arts & Sciences 
Economics 



Jaime M. Baldante 

Arts & Sciences 
Communication 



Alison M. Ball 

Arts & Sciences 

Hispanic Studies 

Sociology 



Michael Ballan 

Arts & Sciences 
Economics 




Jennifer K. Bang 

Arts &; Sciences 
Sociology 



Erin M. Bannon 

School of Education 

Elem. Ed./Mod. Sp. Needs 

Child in Society 



Shannon J. Bansfield 

School of Management 
Mgmt. Info. Systems 



Avinash Bappanad 

School of Management 

Finance 
Mgmt. Info. Systems 



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Molly K. Baran 

Arts & Sciences 
Communication 



James M. Baranowski 

Arts & Sciences 
Communication 



Joseph J. Baratta 

Arts & Sciences 
Art History 



Kevin A. Bargon 

School of Management 

Political Science 

Finance 



Lee B. Barnett 

School of Management 
Human Resources Mgmt. 




Christina M. Barone 

School of Management 
Marketing 



Kathryn L. Barrett 

School of Nursing 
Nursing 



Dave M. Barron 

Arts & Sciences 
Political Science 



Jessica M. Barros 

Arts & Sciences 

Political Science 

English 



Alexis A. Barry 

School of Education 

Elementary Education 

Hispanic Studies 




Kevin P. Barry 

School of Management 

Finance 
Mgmt. Info. Systems 



Meghan Barry 
Arts & Sciences 
Political Science 



Genevieve P. Bartels 

Arts &C Sciences 
Psychology 



Brooke E. Bartlett 

School of Management 
Mgmt. Info. Systems 



Todd A. Barton 

Arts & Sciences 

Psychology 

Philosophy 



Jacqueline A. Baselice 

Arts & Sciences 

History 

Economics 



Danielle M. Basso 

Arts & Sciences 
Economics 



Elizabeth M. Bassotti 

Arts & Sciences 
Mathematics 



Jennie Bartlett 

School of Nursing 
Nursing 




Kathleen M. Bateman 

School of Nursing 
Nursing 



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Patrick M. Baumann 

School of Management 
Finance 



Megan S. Bearer 

Arts & Sciences 
Psychology 



Kerry A. Beauchemin 

School of Management 
Accounting 



Timothy P. Beaupre 

Arts & Sciences 

English 
Communication 



Richard C. Beekman 

Arts & Sciences 
History 



Rebecca Behen 

Arts & Sciences 
Communication 



Blake A. BellefeuiUe 

School of Management 
General Management 



Melyssa D. Belletti 

Arts & Sciences 
Communication 



Melissa B. Bellizzi 

School of Nursing 

Nursing 



Peter Belmont 

Arts & Sciences 
Biology 



Christopher J. Beane 

Arts & Sciences 
Economics 




Jeanine M. Beatty 

School of Education 
Elementary Education 
Human Development 




Nicholas P. Belitz 

Arts & Sciences 
English 




Jennifer R. Benjamin 

Arts & Sciences 
English 




Andrea L. Bennett 

Arts & Sciences 
Biology 



Jeffrey H. Bennett 

Arts & Sciences 

Political Science 

History 



Mark S. Beppu 

Arts & Sciences 
Computer Science 



Brian H. Berejik 

Arts & Sciences 
Computer Science 



Paul M. Berens 

Arts & Sciences 
Philosophy 




Joseph F. Bernardi 

School of Management 
Accounting 



Amanda C. Bernhard 

School of Education 
Human Development 



Cleo V. Bertrand 

Arts & Sciences 
Computer Science 



Lauren J. Berube 

School of Management 

Marketing 

Human Resources Mgmt. 



Brooke C. Bessette 

School of Management 
Marketing 




Scott D. Best 
School of Management 
I Marketing 



Elizabeth J. Betta 

Arts & Sciences 
History 



Lisa Bevacqua 

Arts & Sciences 

Psychology 



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Michelle Z. Bielunis 

Arts & Sciences 

Chemistry 

English 



Craig W. Bijou 

School of Management 

Finance 

Accounting 




Erin L. Billman 

Arts & Sciences 

Biology 



Emily M. Bissonnette 

Arts & Sciences 
Psychology 



Wyndell G. Blair 

Arts & Sciences 
Communication 



Matthew M. Blake 

Arts & Sciences 
International Studies 



Stephen J. Blake 

School of Management 
Accounting 



Thomas C. Bligh 

School of Management 
Finance 



Justin Boggs 

Arts & Sciences 
PoUtical Science 



Justin R. Hodden 

School of Management 

Finance 

Philosophy 



Kevin J. Bodkin 

Arts & Sciences 
History 



Christian M. Boehk 

School of Management 
Accounting 



Gerard R. Boelstler 

School of Management^ 
Human Resources Mgmtil 





Timothy S. Bogle 

School of Management 
Finance 



James J. Boland 

Arts & Sciences 
Economics 



Kevin W. Boland 

School of Management 
Accounting 



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Victoria L. Bombara 

School of Management 
Accounting 




Marnie M. Bonifacio 

School of Nursing 
Nursing 



Gino J. Borrani 

Arts & Sciences 
Economics 



Susan L. Borst 

School of Management 

Marketing 



John T. Bosco 

School of Management 
Finance 



Kathryn C. Botica 

Arts & Sciences 
Psychology 




David J. Bottaro 

Arts & Sciences 
Biology 



Carolin R. Bouchard 

School of Management 
Accounting 



Peter J. Boumenot 

Arts & Sciences 
Biology 



Emmanuel Boursiquot 

Arts & Sciences 
Communication 



Amanda M. Bower I 



School of Education 

Human Development 

Child in Society 



jornoi i i iPiJM i iii i i iii j 




Kristen K. Bowes 

Arts & Sciences 
Political Science 



Kathryn F. Bowser 

Arts & Sciences 
Psychology 



Erin M. Boyd 

Arts & Sciences 
Communication 



Kalina M. Brabeck 

Arts & Sciences 
English 



Kathryn M. Bradbury 



School of Nursing 
Nursing 




Jennifer Bradley 

Arts & Sciences 
Communication 



Mark J. Breaugh 

Arts & Sciences 
English 



Jennifer A. Brennan 

Arts & Sciences 

Mathematics 



James P. Bradley 

Arts & Sciences 

Communication 

English 




Bridget R. Brennan 

Arts & Sciences 
Communication 



John B. Brennan 

Arts & Sciences 
Communication 



Patrick F. Brady 

Arts & Sciences 
Computer Science 



Paul A. Brandano 

School of Management 
Marketing 



Peter D. Brandano 

Arts & Sciences 
Computer Science 






Jonathan B. Breviu 

Arts & Sciences 

Political Science 

Philosophy 



Cristin K. Brown 

Arts & Sciences 
English 



Kristoffer T. Brewer 

Arts & Sciences 
Political Science 




Brendan T. Brier 

School of Management 

Marketing 

Finance 



Amy M. Brenner 

School of Nursing 
Nursing 



Michael F. Brescio 

School of Management 

Accounting 

Mgmt. Info. Systems 



Amanda B. Brodish 

Arts & Sciences 
Psychology 



Katie L. Brown 

School of Nursing 
Nursing 



Lindsay A. Brown 

School of Education 

Elementary Education 

Communication 



Lindsay H. Brown 

Arts & Sciences 
English 



Susan Brenner 

School of Management 

Marketing 

Finance 




Colleen P. Breslin 

Arts & Sciences 
English 




Amy M. Brown 

School of Education 

Human Development 

History 




Meredith M. Brown 

School of Management 

Finance 
General Management 



Noreen A. Brown 

Arts & Sciences 
Communication 



Roger C. Brown 

Arts & Sciences 
Computer Science 



Shannon K. Brown 

School of Education 
Human Development 
Elementary Education 



Terri-Ann Brown 

Arts & Sciences 
Communications 



Colette L. Brungardt 

Arts & Sciences 

Theater Arts 

English 



Christopher W. Bruno 

School of Management 
Accounting 



Meaghan Brusch 

School of Education 

Early Childhood Education 

Human Development 



Katherine J. Bruya 

Arts & Sciences 
Biology 



Robert D. Bubalo 

ichool of Management 

(Accounting 
Mgmt. Info. Systems 



Danielle R. Buchholz 

Arts & Sciences 
Hispanic Studies 



Melanie A. Buck 

Arts & Sciences 
Communication 



Adrienne Bucuvalas 

School of Nursing 
Nursing 



Scott M. Bugbee 

)chool of Management 

Finance 



Lauren M. Bullaro 

School of Management 

Accounting 

Finance 



Simon B. Burce 

Arts & Sciences 
Theology 
Philosophy 



Ryan A. Burch 

School of Management 
Marketing 



Carol E. Brozenske 

School of Management 
Marketing 




David A. Bryand 

School of Management 
Computer Science 




Nathan E. Buerstatte 

Arts & Sciences 
Biology 




Brendon J. Burek 

Arts & Sciences 
Economics 



mnm ' fMim 




Allison Dembowski, Cameron Cole, and Karen Miller 



Chris Ahearn and Abigail Galmiche 




Tony Khouri, Eric Silva, Chris McTammany, Javier Salom, and Pete Terry 



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Mike Maida, KoKo, Nancy Delpidio 





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;enior 

POLL 



WHAT'S 
WIRED 



The Kells 

Super Fans 

Domino's 

Garciaparra 

Taxis 

Dawson's Creek 
North End 

Anywhere Else 

Cell Phones 

DVDs 

eRecruiring 

Who's on First 

JAMN 94.5 

Boy Bands 
2000 



WHAT'S 
TIRED 



The Crimson 



Groupies 



Papa Gino's 



Jeter 



The "T" 



90210 



Vinny Testa's 



Abercrombie 
& Fitch 



Pagers 

Video Cassettes 

Maihng Resumes 

Who's on First 

MIX 98.5 

Spice Girls 
1999 




Casey McCormick, Lauren Peterson, Katie Pyrek, Megan Gerson 




Mike Cummings, Brett Bean, John Occhipinti, Rob 

Maloney, Owen O'Malley, Keith Heisier, David 

Ascoti, Peter SaUes, Neil Koenig, Jay O'Connell, Andy 

Wokman, Kevin Kelly, Jim Bambino, Jim Spadazzi 



Chrissie Aliperti, Natalie DiCostanzo, Chrisi 
Ahearn, Katie Medinger, Jennifer Benjammin 




Debbie Avitabile, Shannon Tyree, Alison 
Turenne, Sarah Richards, Joan Demarco 



Lisa Herskowitz, Cecelia Galcota, 
Lynne O'Neill, Tara Dophin, Maureen Dowling 





Tom Sly, Vivian Horn, Mike Montague, Eric Cataldo, Leslie Walters 



Rob Anguina, Dave Chiaruttina, Mike Peters, 
Neil O'Leary, Gary Sheehan, Scott Bugbee 




Tandy McNamara, Suzy Casey, 
Jen Lou, Liz Rocco 



Karen Jeffords, Marissa Jacobs, 
Lissa Herrick 



Melinda Wood, Chrissy Connors, 
Hugh Slater 




Danielle Sutton, Carolyn Canry, Amy Brown, Danielle Kinon, Jessica Giudici, 
Sarah Gordon, Jenna Albano, Meghan Schloss, Becky Johnston 



Mike Brescio, Joan Demarco, Neil Crawford, Kristen Wilcox, 
Mike Long 




Patricia M. Burke 

Arts & Sciences 
English 



Alison Burt 

Arts & Sciences 
History 




Robert B. Burnett 

Arts & Sciences 
Computer Science 



Colleen E. Burns 

School of Management 

Accounting 

Finance 



Eileen T. Burke 

Arts & Sciences 
Communication 



Julie N. Burke 

School of Education 

Human Development 



Jennifer R. Burns 

School of Nursing 
Nursing 



Fahad J. Butt 

Arts & Sciences 
Computer Science 



Jennifer L. Butterworth 

Arts & Sciences 
Art History 



Sean P. Byrne 

Arts & Sciences 
Communication 



Heather M. Burke 



School of Education 

Secondary Education 

History 




Matthew S. Burke 

Arts &C Sciences 
Economics 




Ryan D. Burns 

Arts & Sciences 
Communication 
English 




M. Justin Byron 

Arts & Sciences 
Psychology 
Philosophy 



286 Seniors* 



Diane E. Cabo 

>i;hool of Management 

Finance 

Marketing; 




David C. Cacciapaglia 

School of Management 
Finance 



Michael J. Cafarella 

Arts & Sciences 
Psychology 



Charlotte M. Cahill 

Arts & Sciences 
History 



Kerrie M. Cahill 

Arts & Sciences 
Communication 




Xenia X. Calderon 

Arts & Sciences 
Sociology 



Kevin J. Calkins 

Arts & Sciences 
Philosophy 



Alison L. Callahan 

Arts & Sciences 

Psychology 

Music 



Jason T. Canger 

Arts & Sciences 
English 



David Canning 

Arts & Sciences 
Eccmomics 




Catherine Cannon 
Arts & Sciences 

English 
Psychology 



Delia T. Cannon 

School of Management 
Finance 



Rosa O. Cano 

Arts & Sciences 
Studio Art 



Beatriz De Leon Cantada 

School of Management 
Human Resources Mgmt. 



Carolyn A. Canty 

School of Management 

Human Resources Mgmt. 




Victoria Lee Capalbo 

School of Management 
Finance 



Brian C. Capell 

Arts & Sciences 
Biology 



Nicole B. Capuano 

Arts & Sciences 
Sociology 



Brian J. Caputo 

Arts & Sciences 
Computer Science 



Nicholas P. Caputo 

School of Management 
Finance 



<Mnp<«r 



Joseph R. Caravano 

Arts & Sciences 
Biology 



John T. Cardillo 

Arts & Sciences 

English 
Political Science 



Jennifer Cardoso 

School of Education 

Early Childhood Education 

Child in Society 



Alison L. Carey 

Arts &C Sciences 

English 
Communications 



Michael J. Carey 

Arts & Sciences 
History 





Michael M. Carlson 

Arts & Sciences 
Philosophy 



Rebecca L. Carney 

Arts & Sciences 
Biology 



Michele L. Carol 

School of Education 

Elem. Ed. /Int. Sp. Needs 

Human Development 



Erin E. Carr 

School of Management 
Marketing 
Economics 



Brian Carroll 

School of Managemenii 

Computer Science 

Finance 




Michael A. Carson 

Arts & Sciences 
Political Science 



Britney M. Caruso 

Arts &C Sciences 
Biology 



Marlene N. Carvajal 

Arts &; Sciences 

Economics 



Suzanne C. Casey 

Arts & Science 
English 



Erica Cashman 

Arts & Sciences 
Sociology 




Steven T. Casker 

Arts & Sciences 
Political Science 



Hozaifa Y. Cassubhai 

Arts & Sciences 

Communication 

History 



John P. Castanino 

Arts & Sciences 
History 



Altagracia M. Castillo 

School of Management 
Marketing 



Rafael Y. Castillo 

Arts & Sciences 

Biology 

Psychology 



tS§§KSmmm 



Lora A. Cataldi 

School of Education 
Elem. Ed. /Int. Sp. Needs 
Math, and Comp. Science 



Maria A. Catino 

School of Management 
Accounting 



Kristin Cattafesta 

Arts & Sciences 
Communication 



Kerrie Caulfield 

School of Nursing 
Nursing 



Cara B. Cavazza 

Arts & Sciences 
Psychology 



Christopher J. Celentano 

Arts & Sciences 
Political Science 



Allen Cermak 

School of Management 
Economics 



Lauren S. Chai 

Arts & Sciences 
Psychology 



Hugh R. Cauthers 

Arts & Sciences 
Computer Science 




Brianne Chai-Onn 

School of Education 
Human Development 




Jessica B. Chalmers 

School of Education 

Elementary Education 

Theater Arts 



Matthew F. Chambers 

School of Management 

Finance 

Op. and Srrat. Mgmt./MIS 




Giselle T. Chan 

Arts & Sciences 

Psychology 



Robin S. Chan 

Arts & Sciences 
Biology 




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Jonathan B. Chang 

School of Management 
Finance 



Mui A. Chang 

Arts & Sciences 
Mathematics 




Syagean Chang 

Arts & Sciences 
Psychology 



Lauren E. Charles 

Arts & Sciences 
Mathematics 



Omar J. Chaudhary 

School of Management 

Finance 

Economics 



Alisha M. Chaudry 

Arts & Sciences 

Psychology 



Jasmin Y. Checo 

School of Management 
General Management 




Edward X. Chen 

School of Management 

Accounting 



Kadie Chen 

School of Education 

Human Development 

Philosophy 



Yumi Christine Chen 

Arts & Sciences 
Mathematics 




Cindy Cheng 

Arts & Sciences 
History 



Deborah J. Cheng 

School of Management 
Marketing 



Jamie B. Cheung 

School of Management 

Economics 
Mgmt. Info. Systems 



James A. Chiarieri 

School of Management 

Finance 
Mgmt. Info. Systems 



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David T. Chiaruttini 

School of Management 
Finance 



Nichola E. Chin Lee 

Arts & Sciences 
Biology 



Ded Chinsupakul 

School of Management 

Mgmt. Info. Systems 

Finance 



Isareit Chirathivat 

Art & Sciences 
Economics 



Jeffrey L. Cho 

School of Management 
Finance 




Vincent Cho 

Arts & Sciences 

English 

Philosophy 



Edward H. Choi 

Arts & Sciences 
History 



Hoon Choi 

Arts Sciences 

Theology 

Art History 



Mandy M. Choi 

School of Management 

Accounting 

Mgmt. Info. Systems 



Yon K. Choi 

Arts & Sciences 

Political Science 

Economics 




Amy E. Choquette 

School of Management 
1 Finance 



Bridget E. Chow 

Arts & Sciences 
Biochemistry 



Denise I. Chow 

Arts & Sciences 
Biochemistry 



Adrienne W. Choy 

Arts & Sciences 
Hispanic Studies 



Emily C. Christner 

Arts & Sciences 
Communication 
Political Science 




Catherine Cianci 

Arts & Sciences 
Psychology 



Michael Cianfrocca 

Arts & Sciences 
English 



Marissa J. Ciccia 

Arts & Sciences 
Communication 



Christine M. Ciccolini 

Arts & Sciences 
Chemistry 



Julia V. Cimbalo 

School of Education 

Human Development 

English 




Heather Ward, Liz Hauck, Danielle Buckolz 



Maggie Gould and Chris Franklin 




Lisa Pistillo, Ryanne Foley, Leigha Zedros, Carrie Hamilton-Jones, Colleen O'Keefe 



Crystal Cloutier, Steph LoConto, Kristen Luppino 



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ed Wagentnecht, Beth Hontley, Jared, Jeniie Bartlett, Nelse Winder, Eileen Jessica Dickman, Megan Keaney, Beth Huntley 

Burke 




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Sarah Healy, Lauren Corapi, Janine Antoine 



Tina Haydu and Pat Dunn 



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Matt Norcini, Katie Pyrek, Donna Pimentel, Mary Mullin, Beth Domogala, Megan Guillet, Mary Kate Hanlon 




Chris Kolkhorst 



Jyl Tesler, Sarah Tesler, Alex Pohdori, Sarah Singer 



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Kelly Gallagher, Robin Ure, Kristine Adams, Liz Murphy, Jeanne Tyhacz, Debbie Nagle 



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Alyson Clifford 

School of Management 
Marketing 



Lauren J. Clifford 

Arts & Sciences 
English 



Crystal A. Cloutier 

School of Education 

Elem. Ed./Mod. Sp. Needs 
Child in Society 




Robert M. Cinguina 

Arts & Sciences 
Communication 



Loren Cioffi 

School of Management 
Accounting 




Landon L. Clark 

Arts & Sciences 

Communication 

Economics 



Krista M. Clarkson 

Arts & Sciences 

Theater Arts 
Political Science 




Julie Codair 

School of Management 
Accounting 



Rodney P. Coe 

Arts & Sciences 
Biology 




li^olanda Coentro 


Nicole Coghlan 


Leland Cogliani 


Rebecca J. Cogswell 


Arts & Sciences 


Arts & Sciences 


Arts & Sciences 


Arts & Sciences 


Sociology 


Biology 


International Studies 


Biochemistry 



Sean C. Cohane 

Arts & Sciences 

English 
Communication 



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Brian M. Cohen 

Ichool of Management 

Finance 

Marketing 




Lyndsey H. Colburn 

Arts & Sciences 
Evironmental Geosciences 



Cameron A. Cole 

School of Education 

Elem. Ed./Mod. Sp. Needs 

Human Development 



Heather M. Cole 

Arts & Sciences 
English 



Andrea D. Coleman 

Arts & Sciences 

English 

Theology 




Janice L. CoUein 

School of Management 
Economics 



Megan M. Collier 

Arts & Sciences 
Sociology 



Celia L. Collins 

School of Nursing 
Nursing 



Kevin R. Collins 

Arts & Sciences 
Political Science 



John W. Coiontrelle 

Arts & Sciences 
Communication 




Stacey L. Colucia 
School of Education 
em. Ed./Mod. Sp. Needs 
lath, and Comp. Science 



Kristen A. Conboy 

School of Education 

Elem. Ed./Mod. Sp. Needs 

Math, and Comp. Science 



Caroline L. Conley 

School of Education 
Human Development 



David M. Conley 

Arts & Sciences 
Communication 



Michael J.Connery 

Arts & Sciences 

English 

Philosophy 




Christine L. Connolly 

School of Management 

Finance 

Marketing 



Jennifer L. Connor 

Arts & Sciences 
History 



Christine E. Connors 

School of Education 

Child in Society 
Human Development 



Ryan J. Connors 

Arts & Sciences 
Marketing 



William D. Connors 

Arts & Sciences 
Philosophy 



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Jessica M. Conway 

School of Nursing 

Nursing 



Joshua N. Cook 

Arts & Sciences 
Philosophy 



Shannon T. Cook 

School of Management 
Accounting 



Tiffany M. Cooper 

Arts & Sciences 
Psychology 



Andrew S. Coppolecchi 

School of Management 
Finance 




Lauren E. Corapi 

School of Education 

Secondary Education 

History 



Natalie A. Corrigan 

School of Education 

Human Development 

History 



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pel 
ilk 

Steven J. Covelluzzi 

Arts & Sciences 
Sociology 



Kelly M. Corigliano 

Arts & Sciences 
Psychology 



Shannon R. Corkery 

Arts & Sciences 
Communication 



Jaime M. Corliss 

Arts & Sciences 
Sociology 



KimberlyA. Cosgrove 

School of Education 

Elementary Education 

Mathematics 



Allison Costa 

School of Management 
Accounting 



Manuela V. Costa 

School of Education 
Human Development 



Paul J. Cornoni 

Arts & Sciences 
Sociology 




Fred T. Costantino 

Arts & Sciences 
Biology 




Katie F. Cowden 

Arts & Sciences 
Biology 



Leonard Coyer 

School of Management 
Economics 



Lindsay Crawford 

School of Management 
Economics 
Marketing 



Neil S. Crawford 

School of Management 

Accounting 

Finance 



Robert J. Cristiano 

Arts & Sciences 
Histor)' 



Danielle Croffy 

School of Management 
Economics 



Meghan J. Cronin 

Arts & Sciences 
Communication 



Jason Crook 

Arts & Sciences 
Communication 



George D. Cross 

Arts & Sciences 
Music 




Kelly K. Crowe 

School of Management 
Accounting 



Moira Crowley 

Arts & Sciences 
Biology 



Steven Cro^vley 

Arts & Sciences 
Communication 



Antonio Cruz 

Arts & Sciences 
Biology 




Amanda M. Cryan 

Arts & Sciences 

Psychology 

Biology 



Bernardo G. Cuadra 

Arts & Sciences 

Chemistry 

Psychology 



Michael J. Cummings 

School of Management 

Accounting 




Rachel A. Cuomo 

Arts &C Sciences 

Sociology 



Andrew Curran 

Arts & Sciences 
Communication 




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Matthew P. Daly 

School of Management 
Finance 



Josette M. D'Ambrosi 

Arts & Sciences 
Communication 



Anthony M. D'AmeHo 

Arts & Sciences 
International Studies 



Michael J. Custer 

Arts & Sciences 
Political Science 



Debra L. D'Alessandro 

School of Education 

Secondary Education 

Mathematics 



Peter J. D'Angelo 

Arts & Sciences 
English 



Robert A. Cutler 

Arts & Sciences 
Political Science 



Carmela A. Daley 

Arts & Sciences 

Political Science 

Economics 



Atiya M. Dangleben 

Arts & Sciences 
Political Science 




Rachel M. Daniels 

School of Management 
General Management 



David C. Danker 

Arts &C Sciences 
English 



Steve Dapra 

Arts & Sciences 
Sociology 



Lynette M. Darkoch 
School of Management 

Finance 
Op. and Strategic Mgmt. 



Susan E. Darmofalski 

Arts & Sciences 
Economics 



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James C. David 

Arts & Sciences 
History 



Jon Day 

School of Management 
Finance 



Natalia Davila 

Arts & Sciences 
Communication 



Cassandra Y. Davis 

Arts & Sciences 
Sociology 



Hallie E. Davis 

Arts & Sciences 
Communication 



Janine Dawson 

School of Management 

Marketing 

Human Resources Mgmt. 




Lori E. De Angelis 

Arts & Sciences 
Psychology 



Christine E. De Lorenzo 

Arts & Sciences 
Sociology 



Joan R. De Marco 

School of Management 
Accounting 



Christopher M. De Rito 

Arts & Sciences 
Chemistry 




Tamara J. De Rosa 

School of Education 

Elementar}' Education 

General Science 



Jeff Dearden 

Arts & Sciences 
Economics 



Anthony Debiase 

Arts & Sciences 
Communication 
Political Science 



Ryan T. Debin 

School of Management 
Finance 



Catherine M. Deely 

Arts & Sciences 
Communication 



Dominique Del Rosario 

School of Management 
Finance 



Mercedes Del Valle 

Arts & Sciences 
International Studies 



Angelica Del Villar 

Arts & Sciences 
Communication 



Eilene Decembre 
Arts & Sciences 
Political Science 




Elizabeth A. Delaney 

Arts & Sciences 
Biology 



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Lauren, Sheila Milligan, Katherine Lacson, Kathryn Hartmere 



Rob Mosesiah 





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Chrissy Connors, John Gannon, Tim Lesnick, Alison Turenne, 
Mike Long, Marc Serafino, George Rassas 




Dan Stone 




Tim Nolan, Jim Maher, Dave McLean, Matt Lee, Brendan, Dolan, 
Tim Phair, Paul Cornoni, Andrew Stein, Ryan Heald, Steve Rini 




Nicole Capuano and friends 




Tcia Navin, Catherine Dimon, Abigail Galmiche, 
Joe Strazzeri 



Brian Capulo, Dan O'Brien, Micheal Shea, Colby Muscarelle 




Caryn Prestigacamo, Diane Cabo, Erin Coakley, Katie Herrick, 
Bridget Kiely, Nat Corrigan 



Erin Lynch, Marc Blanchette, Kathryn Hatmere 



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Dave Chlaruttini, Neil O'Leary, Gary Sheehan, 
Mike Peters, Scott Bugbee 




Saya Hillman and Mike ZuUo 




Katie Medinger, Kate Brunya, Ciirissie Alupierti, Natalie Discostanzo 




Kalia, Jahaan, LaTesha, Erika, Cietta, Candace 




Meghan McLaughlin, Kelly Deneen, Melanie Buck, Liz Fitzpatrick, 
Crystal Rask, Adrienne Choy, Andrea Coleman, Cathy Tomaszewski 



Bill Fezzie, Dave Bryand, Matt Keeting, Tim O'Rourke, Patrick Wadd 




Myrna Gunawan 



John Courtney 



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rett Balavender, Marc Blanchette, John Courtney, Steven Crowley, Pat Uiterwyk, Michael Ungari 



Cara MacGilvary 




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Erik J. Demarco 

School of Management 
Mgmt. Info. Systems 



Nicole E. Demasi 

Arts & Sciences 
English 



Kristen R. Demayo 

School of Education 
Elem. Ed./Mod. Sp. Needs 
Math, and Comp. Science 



Susan E. Delaney 

Arts &C Sciences 
Communication 



Nancy E. Deipidio 
Arts & Sciences 
Communication 



Alison R. Demibrowski 

School of Education 
Elementary Education 
Human Development 



Laura A. Delong 

School of Management 

Finance 

Marketing 



Danielle C. Deluca 

Arts & Sciences 
Sociology 



Dennis Demori 

Arts & Sciences 
Political Science 




Kelly M. Deneen 

Arts & Sciences 
History 



Elizabeth A. Denney 

Arts & Sciences 
Political Science 



Jason D. Denoncourt 

School of Management 

Marketing 

Finance 



Thomas H. Dent 

School of Management 

Mgmt. Info. Systems 

Marketing 



Jessica L. Desantis 

Arts & Sciences 
Communication 



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Erica L. Desanto 

Arts & Sciences 
English 



Noelle K. Deschenes 

School of Education 

Elem. Ed. /Mod. Sp. Needs 

Human Development 



Deanna M. Deskin 

School of Education 
Elem. Ed./Mod. Sp. Needs 
Math, and Comp. Science 



Amanda B. Deveaux 

Arts & Sciences 
Communication 



Grace M. Deveney 

School of Nursing 
Nursing 




Stephanie T. Deviney 

School of Nursing 
Nursin^ 



Jennie L. Devlin 

School of Education 

Elementary Education 

Child in Society 



James E. Devos 

Arts & Sciences 
Political Science 



John Di Bari 

Arts & Sciences 
Economics 



Joseph M. Di Paulo 

School of Management 
Accounting 




Kadiatou Diallo 
School of Management 

Accounting 



Alexander Dick 

Arts & Sciences 
English 



Laura G. Dickman 

Arts & Sciences 
Economics 



Natalie A. Dicostanzo 

School of Education 

Elem. Ed./Mod. Sp. Needs 

Hispanic Experience 



Christian V. Dieckmann 

School of Management 
Economics 




John W. Diehl 

Arts & Sciences 
Biology 



Mary A. Dietz 

Arts & Sciences 
Psychology 



Ferdinando M. Difino 

Arts &C Sciences 
History 



Anne B. Dilauro 

Arts & Sciences 
Chemistry 



Amy L. Dimattia 

Arts &C Sciences 
English 



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Edward A. Dimayuga 

Arts & Sciences 

Political Science 

Philosophy 



Paul Dirienzo 

Arts & Sciences 
Political Science 



Lindsey Doering 

School of Management 
Accounting 



Catherine J. Dimon 

School of Management 
Marketing 



Brett C. Dinatale 

Arts & Sciences 
Biochemistry 



Michele J. DiPaolo 

Arts & Sciences 
English 




Rosemary Dirita 

School of Education 

Human Development 

English 



Nicholas Disalvatore 

Arts & Sciences 
Theology 



Ellis V. Disch 

School of Management 
Finance 



Kelly Doherty 

Arts & Sciences 
History 



Liam Doherty 

Arts & Sciences 
History 



Brendan Dolan 

Arts & Sciences 
Communication 



Michael A. DiPierro 

School of Management 
Finance 




Maria-Gizela F. Dizon V 

School of Education 

Elementary Education 

Human Development 




Amy L. Dold 

Arts & Sciences 
Psychology 




Tara E. Dolphin 

Arts & Sciences 
Communication 



Joanne M. Domingo 

Arts &C Sciences 
Communication 



Elizabeth K. Domogala 

Arts & Sciences 
Communication 



Meghann E. Donahue 

Arts & Sciences 
Political Science 



Nicole D'Onofrio 

School of Management 

Marketing 



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Heather A. Donovan 

Arts & Sciences 
English 



Bridget K. Dooling 

Arts & Sciences 
Psychology 



Joshua R. Doolittle 

Arts & Sciences 
Philosophy 
Theology- 



Jordana Dopazo 

School of Management 
Human Resources Mgmt. 



Alison O. Doran 

Arts & Sciences 
Sociology 




Danielle S. Doucette 

Arts & Sciences 
Psychology 



KimberlyJ. Doughertj' 

Arts & Sciences 

Biochemistry 

Psychology 



Joseph Doumar 

School of Management 
Finance 



Tylden B. Dowell 

School of Management 
Marketing 



Maureen A. Dowling 

Arts & Sciences 

English 
Communication 




Christine L. Doyle 

Arts & Sciences 

English 



Colleen K. Doyle 

Arts & Sciences 

History 

Theology 




John Paul Doyle 

Arts & Sciences 

English 



William E. Doyle 

School of Management 
Accounting 




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Kristen E. Dubee 

School of Management 

Marketing 

Finance 



Ashley N. Dubin 

School of Education 

Secondary Education 

English 



Amy L. Dubrule 

Arts & Sciences 
Psychology 




itthew G. Drapeau 

Arts &C Sciences 


Meghann M. Drayna 

Arts & Sciences 


English 
Philosophy 


Psychology 



MelindaJ. Drozd 

Arts & Sciences 
Biology 
English 



Andrew G. Drozdowski 

Arts & Sciences 
Communication 



Allison A. Duff 

School of Management 

Finance 



Elizabeth K. Duffy 

Arts & Sciences 
Political Science 




Eric J. Dugas 

School of Management 
Accounting 



James E. Dunbar 

School of Management 
Finance 



Stephen M. Duncan 

Arts & Sciences 
History 



Alexander N. Dunev 
School of Management 

Finance 
Mgmt. Info. Systems 



Michael P. Dunn 

Arts & Sciences 

History 
Political Science 



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Patrick]. Dunn 

Arts & Sciences 
Communication 



William J. Dunn 

Arts & Sciences 
Political Science 



Richard Dunne 

Arts & Sciences 
Economics 



Joseph Durkin 

School of Education 
Human Development 



Kerry A. Darning 

School of Management 
Marketing 




Richard M. Dutko 

Arts & Sciences 
English 



John Dziedzic 

Arts & Sciences 

History 

Economics 



Greg T. Dwyer 

Arts & Sciences 
Chemistry 



Kelly C. Dwyer 

School of Education 

Human Development 

English 



Shannon Q. Dwyer 

Arts & Sciences 
Economics 



Elizabeth J. Eagan 

Arts & Sciences 
Economics 



Alexis R. Eastman 

School of Management 
Marketing 



John N. Edenbach 

Arts & Sciences 
Economics 



Christine L. Dziadul 

Arts & Sciences 
Economics 




Howard G. Einhorn 

School of Management 

Finance 




Mariana J. Elias 

Ans & Sciences 
Psychology 
Philosophy 



Christine C. Elliott 

School of Management 
Accounting 



David A. Ellis 

School of Management 
Finance 



Tevonne T. Ellis 

Arts & Sciences 
Communication 



Kevin W. English 

School of Management 
Finance 



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im Nolan, Dave McLean, Jim Maher, Steve Rini, Brendan Dolan, Ryan Heald 





Roiy Moore, Eric Hauser, Catherine Dimon 



Karen Klocko, Katherine Harveli, Laurin Mottle 




Carrie Everett, Julianne Marrone, Kellie Musiaszek, Tony Hutchins and Adam Newman 



TRAVEL ABROAD 



On the left: Universityi 

Exchange in Florence, 

Italy 




Kerry Griffin 



Brooke Means in Oudshoorn, South Africa 



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Beck)' Moore and Anne Kern at Queen's Day in Amsterdam 





Anna Marie Wienholz and Caey McCormick 



ureen Shepherd, Lynne O'Neill, Melanie Mason, Allison Blurton on The Aran 
Islands in Galway, Ireland 




Jenn Ranta and Grace Francis at the Chipingale Wildlife 
Orphaancy in Zimbabwe 




Cindy George and Danielle Doucette in Belgium 



Allison Dufif and Kethryn Botica in Florence, Italy 







Daniel H. Erskine 

Arts & Sciences 

Political Science 

Philosophy 



Andrea E. Fabsik 

Arts & Sciences 
English 




Patrick W. English 

Arts & Sciences 
History 



Briana M. Erickson 

Arts & Sciences 



Susan M. Espinosa 

School of Education 

Secondary Education 

English 



Michele M. Estabrook 

School of Management 

Finance 

Marketing 



Jasara N. Evangelist 

Arts & Sciences 

Sociology 



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James B. Faddis 

Arts & Sciences 
Philosophy 



Daniel P. Fairweather 

School of Management 

Finance/Theology 
Op. and Strategic Mgmt. 



Joseph G. Famighette 

Arts & Sciences 
English 



Joanna C. Enstice 

School of Management 
Accounting 
Art History 




Nina M. Erk 

School of Management 

Accounting 



Carrie L. Everett 

Arts & Sciences 
Communication 




Kathryn D. Fanning 

School of Management it 
Philosophy 
Finance 



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Louis R. Fantozzi 

School of Management 
Finance 



Christopher J. Farrell 

Arts & Sciences 
History 



John P. Farren 

Arts & Sciences 
Philosophy 



Julie M. Farricy 

Arts & Sciences 
Sociology 



Tomeeka J. Farrington 

Arts & Sciences 
Communication 




Karen V. Fasano 

^Arts & Sciences 

Art History 

English 



Joseph G. Fawkner 

Arts & Sciences 
International Studies 



Kevin T. Fee 

Arts & Sciences 
Theater Arts 



Matthew Feeney 

Arts & Sciences 
History 



Timothy M. Fegan 

Arts & Sciences 

Communication 

English 




Colin A. Feichtmeir 
School of Management 
I Finance 



Michael D. Felix 

Arts & Sciences 
Economics 
Philosophy 



Tara M. Ferguson 

Arts & Sciences 
Psychology 



Richard D. Ferman 

Arts & Sciences 
Communication 



Elizabeth A. Fernandes 

School of Management 
General Management 




Latisha P. Few 

Arts & Sciences 
History 



Kathleen H. Fienup 

School of Management 
Marketing 



Daniel J. Figenshu 

School of Management 
Finance 



Mino Fijii 

School of Education 
Elementary Education 



Paul E. Findlen 

Arts & Sciences 

Music 

Philosophy 



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Jeffrey S. Finley 

School of Management 
Finance 



Ellen M. Finnigan 

Arts & Sciences 
English 



Lauren E. Fischetti 

Arts & Sciences 
Communication 



Courtney L. Fish 

School of Education 

Elem. Ed./Mod. Sp. Needs 

Communication 



Peter J. Fitch 

School of Managemen 

Finance 

Marketing 




Alice M. Fitzgerald 

School of Nursing 
Nursing 



Sean E. Fitzgerald 

Arts &C Sciences 
Mathematics 



Elizabeth M. Fitzpatrick 

Arts & Sciences 
English 



Ryan J. Fitzpatrick 

Arts & Sciences 
English 



Melissa J. Flanagan 

School of Management 
General Management 




Kathryn A. Flatley 

School of Education 

Human Development 

Communication 



Peter T. Fleming 

Arts & Sciences 
Computer Science 



Danvers D. Fleury 

School of Management 
General Management 



Carrie A. Fling 

Arts & Sciences 
English 



Matthew J. Flynn 

Arts & Sciences 
Psychology 



Katharine Fogarty 

School of Management 

Finance 

Marketing 



Lauren A. Fogarty 

School of Management 

Finance 

Marketing 



Jeremy Foldesy 

Arts & Sciences 
Studio Art 



Christine M. Flynn 

Arts & Sciences 
English 




Ryanne R. Foley 

School of Education 

Secondary Education 

Mathematics 



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Martin J. Foncello 

Arts & Sciences 



English 



Mark Fonnemann 

Arts & Sciences 

Computer Science 

Mathematics 



Lisa A. Foresto 

Arts &C Sciences 
Psychology 



Kathryn A. Fortier 

School of Nursing 
Nursing 



Marianne E. Fraczek 

School of Education 

Human Development 

English 



Christina G. Fraga 

School of Education 

Secondary Education 

English 



Thomas M. Frechette 

School of Management 
Finance 



Felicia A. Freilich 

Arts & Sciences 

Psychology 



Ryan D. Freimann 

School of Management 

Operations and Strategic 

Management 



Caitlin Frey 

Arts & Sciences 
Economics 



Christopher B. Franklin 

School of Management 

Finance 

Economics 



Kimberly A. Franko 

School of Management 

Finance 

Marketing 





Adrienne Fowkes 

Arts &; Sciences 

History 

Theology 




Paolo Frattaroli 

Arts & Sciences 
Economics 




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Benjamin P. Freyinger 

Arts & Sciences 
Art History 



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Julie A. Frisoli 

School of Education 
Human Development 



Michelle A. Fumai 

Arts & Sciences 
Political Science 



Laura L. Funken 

Arts & Sciences 

Political Science 

English 



Kevin G. Furey 

Arts & Sciences 
Economics 



Philippe J. Gabriel 

Arts & Sciences 
Biochemistry 



Gregory Gagliardi 

School of Education 

Secondary Education 

English 



Michael Galano 

Arts & Sciences 

Economics 
Political Science 



Cecelia K. Galeota 

School of Nursing 
Nursing 



Colin Gallagher 

School of Management 
Finance 



M>. 



Lisa Frias 

Arts & Sciences 
Psychology 




Mary E. Frydenlund 

School of Nursing 
Nursing 




Jeffrey M. Gaffey 

Arts & Sciences 

Economics 




Kelly A. Gallagher 

Arts & Sciences 
English 



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Kerr}' L. Gallagher 

School of Education 
.em. Ed. /Mod. Sp. Needs 
Human Development 



Abigail L. Galmiche 

School of Management 
Marketing 
[gmt. Info. Systems 



Cara L. Gardner 
School of Management 

Marketing 
luman Resources Mgmt. 



Daniel M. Garry 

School of Management 

Marketing 

Finance 



Lisa M. Gallagher 

School of Nursing 
Nursing 



Thomas M. Gallagher 

Arts & Sciences 
Communication 



Anaysa Gallardo 

Arts & Sciences 

Political Science 

Philosophy 



Colin B. Galloway 

Arts & Sciences 

Economics 
Communication 




Lisa C. Galvin 

Arts & Sciences 
Psychology 



Maria L Gamboa 

Arts & Sciences 
Psychology 



Jeffrey S. Garabedian 

School of Management 
Marketing 



Randall B. Garnick 

Arts & Sciences 
English 



Laura J. Garofalo 

Arts & Sciences 
Biology 



Elizabeth J. Garratt 

Arts & Sciences 
Economics 



Timothy W. Garry 

Arts & Sciences 
English 



Elizabeth Garstka 

Arts & Sciences 
Sociology 



Janine T. Garzia 

Arts & Sciences 

Psychology 
Hispanic Studies 



Jonathan M. Gardere 

School of Management 
Finance 




Chenell Garrido 

School of Management 

Marketing 

Philosophy 




Ravi B. Gatha 

School of Education 

Human Development 

Psychology 



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Matt Kosciak, Sebastiano Visentini, and John Stergiou 




Elisabeth SuOivan, Katie Moran, and Patty Mahoney 



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Janine Antoine and Sarah Healey 



Sarah Singer and Amy Cryan 
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Kelly Gallagher, Lauren Berube, and Cathleen Schmidt 



I 



SENIOR 

POLL 

Favorite Place 

To Meet 

Between Classes 

The Quad 

O'Neill Steps 

Eagle's Nest 

The Dustbowl 

Best Senior 
Hangout 

The Mods 

Career Center 

Mary Ann's 

Roggie's 

The Kells 

Best Late-Night 
Food 

Natalie's 

Addie's 

The Club 

Chi-Chi's 

24 hour Star Market 

Favorite 
Restaurant 

Cheesecake Factory 

Ciao Bella 

Cityside 

North East Brewing Co. 

Big City 




Danielle Almeida, Marisa Kubicko, Lauren Meikus, Kimberly Arbuckle 




Pat Dunn, Tina Haydu 



Liz Shevlin, Liz Lane, 
Erica Cashman, Natasha Zeitzeff 




Rich Kruczeki gets a kiss Brigid Greenway, Melissa Bellizzi, Maria Knebl, Monique Reyn i 




Anna Kern 



Genevieve Reiner, Amy Dold 



Jeff Mathias, Tommy Bligh, 
Beth Hogan, Matt Mannerihg 




Emily Santos, Jeff McGinn, Tim O'Malley 



Mike Maione, Pete Gregory, Jason Wren and friends 




Jonathan K. Geldert 

Arts & Sciences 
English 



James G. Gelston 

Arts &C Sciences 
Communication 



James M. Gentile 

School of Management 

Finance 

Philosophy 



Michael M. Geraty 

School of Management 

Finance 



Ronald J. Geron 

College of Advancing 

Studies 

Administrative Business 




Michelle L. Gerosa 

School of Management 
Marketing 



Kelley M. Gerrity 

Arts & Sciences 
International Studies 



Megan A. Gerson 

Arts & Sciences 
Communication 



Talin Getzoyan 

School of Nursing 

Nursing 



Sarah M. Gayer 

Arts & Sciences 
Biology 



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Brian Gibbons 

Arts & Sciences 
Political Science 



Courtney A. Gieffers 

School of Management 

Marketing 
Mgmt. Info. Systems 



Natalie Gilks 

Arts & Sciences 

Biology 

Philosophy 



Meghan E. Gilligan 

School of Nursing 
Nursing 



KerryA. Gillin 



School of Management 

Finance 

Economics 



Ann Gillis 

College of Advancing Studies 
Communication 



Matthew J. Gill 

Arts & Sciences 

Economics 
Communication 



Erin A. Gillis 

Arts & Sciences 

Communications 

English 



Steven M. Gill 

Arts & Sciences 
English 




Emily M. Gilman 



Arts & Sciences 

Communication 

Sociology 




David A. Giordano 

Arts & Sciences 

Chemistry 



Christopher F. Girard 

Arts & Sciences 
History 



Namrod Girmai 

Arts & Sciences 

Communication 

Sociology 



Jessica L. Giudici 

Arts & Sciences 
Political Science 



Jessica Glassberg 

School of Management 
Marketing 



Melinda Glassy 

School of Education 

Secondary Education 

History 



Kara Glynn 

Arts & Sciences 

Communication 

Computer Science 



Anne E. Gnazzo 

School of Education 
Human Development 



Isabel S. Glading 

School of Education 

Human Development 

English 




Samir M. Goal 

School of Management 
Finance 



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Christopher T. Goff 

School of Management 
Finance 



Gravity Goldberg 

School of Education 

Elem. Ed./Mod. Sp. Needs 

English 



Alyson M. Gomeau 

College of Advancing Studies 
English 



Taber Gonzales 

Arts & Sciences 
Economics 



Elizabeth F. Good 

Arts & Sciences 

Studio Art 

English 



Joshua S. Goodman 

School of Management 
Marketing 



Sara Gordon 

School of Education 

Elem. Ed./Mod. Sp. Needs 

Human Development 



Kara M. Gordy 

Arts & Sciences 
Communication 



Margaret A. Gould 

School of Education 
Elementary Education 
Human Development 



Kristen A. Grabowski 

Arts & Sciences 
Economics 



Vanessa L. Grace 

School of Management 

Marketing 



Erika Grahl 

Arts & Sciences 

Theater Arts 
Communication 



Elizabeth A. Grande 

Arts & Sciences 
Philosophy 



Paige Ellen M. Granger 

Arts & Sciences 
International Studies 



Megan A. Grant 

School of Education 

Early Childhood Education 

English 



Bruce W. Gray 

Arts & Sciences 
Communication 



Barbara A. Gonzalez 

School of Education 

Secondary Education 

English 




Matthew M. Gosselin 

Arts & Sciences 
Philosophy 




Lauren E. Gramly 

Arts & Sciences 

English 




Jonathan F. Greatorex 

School of Management! 
Accounting 



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Keith M. Green 

Arts & Sciences 
Mathematics 



Brigid A. Greenway 

School of Management 
Marketing 



Peter G. Gregory 

Arts & Sciences 
Biology 



Navanjun Singh GrewaJ 

Arts & Sciences 
Chemistry 
Philosophy 



Deirdre A. Griffin 

Arts & Sciences 
Theology 




Elizabeth A. Griffin 

Arts & Sciences 
English 



Kerry Patricia Griffin 

School of Management 

Economics 

Finance 



William Marshall Griffin 

School of Management 

Finance 



David K. Griffith 

School of Management 
Finance 



Leah E. Grip 

Arts & Sciences 
Communication 




Christine L. Gruber 

School of Management 

Accounting 

Marketing 



Antonina L. Guarino 

Arts & Sciences 
English 




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Mary K. Guarino 

School of Management 
Marketing 



Matthew W. Guarnieri 

Arts & Sciences 
Communication 




Chris A. Gucciardo 

Arts & Sciences 
Psychology 



Megan E. Guillet 

Arts & Sciences 
History 



Thomas Phillip Gulick 

Arts & Sciences 
Communication 



Myrna A. Gunawan 

School of Management 

Marketing 

French 




Josh M. Gunnels 

School of Management 

Marketing 

English 



Aram K. Gupta 

School of Management 

Marketing 

English 



Rishi K. Gupta 
Arts & Sciences 
Communication 




Austen A. Habershaw 

Arts & Sciences 
English 



Daniel J. Hagan 

Arts & Sciences 

English 
Communication 



Allison M. Hajjar 

School of Management 
Human Resource Mgmt. 



Peter J. Halberstadt 

School of Management 
Finance 



Lucy M. Hale 

Arts & Sciences 
Art History 



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Daniel S. Halgin 

School of Education 
Human Development 



Joanna Halpin 

Arts & Sciences 
Hispanic Studies 



Carrie E. Hamilton-Jones 

Arts & Sciences 
English 



Brian R. Haney 

Arts & Sciences 
Biology 



MaryKate E. Hanlon 

Arts & Sciences 
History 




Keith W. Hannon 

Arts & Sciences 
Environ. Geosciences 



William M. Hannon 

School of Management 

Accounting 

Finance 



Brooke M. Hansen 

Arts & Sciences 

Biology 

Psychology 



Ethan C. Hansen 

Arts & Sciences 
Biology 



Sarah Anne Hanson 

Arts & Sciences 
Biochemistry 




Caroline Hargreaves 

Arts & Sciences 
Sociology 



Michael Alan Harma 

Arts & Sciences 
Biology 



Eileen M. Harney 

Arts & Sciences 
English 



Allison P. Hart 

Arts & Sciences 
Biology 



Brandon P. Hart 

Arts & Sciences 
History 




Sara J. Hart 

Arts & Sciences 

English 



Kathryn Hartmere 

Arts & Sciences 
International Studies 



Deborah E. Harvey 

Arts & Sciences 

English 
Communication 



Elizabeth Frances Hauck 

Arts & Sciences 

Hispanic Studies 

English 



Stephanie A. Haug 

Arts & Sciences 

Communication 

English 



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Mickey Durgin, Joan DeMarco, Alison Turenne, Chrissy Connors, Katie Riciiter, Christine Sample 




Danielle Doucette and Alice Lehne 




I.'bby Krans, Lauren Peterson, Casey McCormick, Stacey Colucia, and Anna Marie Wienholz 






I 




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Carrie Hargreaves, Liz Lane, Kara Gordy, Carrie Everett, and Emily Santos 




Conor O'Kane and Josette D'Ambrosi 



Maiymargaret Griffin and Susan Delaney 



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Maria Knebl and Monique Reynes 




Laurin Mottle, Ryan Harley, Andrew Thau, and Katherine Harvell 






Eric C. Hauser 

Arts & Sciences 
Biochemistry 



April M. Hawkinson 

School of Management 
Accounting 



Daniel J. Hayden 

Arts & Sciences 
Mathematics 



Tina M. Haydu 

Arts & Sciences 

Psychology 

English 



Bryan Head 

Arts & Sciences 
Sociology 



Ryan R. Heald 

School of Management 
Marketing 



Sarah E. Healy 

Arts & Sciences 
Theology 



Sarah Marie Hearn 

Arts & Sciences 
Communication 



Ryan C. Heffernan 

Arts & Sciences 
Political Science 



Joseph K. Hegarty 

Arts & Sciences 
History 



Danyale Hawkins 

School of Management 
Marketing 




Takayuki Hayano 

Arts & Sciences 

Economics 
Germanic Studies 




Sarah Christine Healc) 

Arts & Sciences 
English 







Keith Richard Heislet , 

Art & Sciences 

Psychology 
Communication 



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Sara Helfrich 

School of Education 
Elem. Education/ Mod. 
pecial Needs/ Psychology 



Michele G. Helies 

Arts & Sciences 
Communication 



Cara Westby Helms 

School of Management 
Marketing 



Katharine Lynn Henderson 

Arts & Sciences 
Economics 



Adam Henley 

School of Management 
Finance 




Gregory N. Herbowy 

Arts & Sciences 
English 



Arturo Hernandez 

College of Advancing Studies 
General Studies 



Sarah lies Herndon 

Arts & Sciences 
Political Science 



Katharine W. Herrick 

School of Education 

Secondary Education 

English 



Lissa M. Herrick 

Arts & Sciences 
Communication 




Megan Alisha Hess 

School of Education 

Secondary Education 

Mathematics 



Patrick M. Hess 

Arts & Sciences 
History 



Sarah L. Hession 

Arts & Sciences 
Psychology 



Thomas J. Heston 

School of Management 
Finance 



Saya A. Hillman 

Arts & Sciences 

English 

Sociology 




James Hinchey 

Arts & Sciences 
Biology 



Laurie A. Hinck 

School of Management 

Finance 



Karrin Ann Hoesing 

Arts & Sciences 
Geology 



Maria E. Hofilena 

School of Education 

Elementary Education 

Child in Society 



Elizabeth N. Hogan 

Arts & Sciences 
Communication 



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Thomas E. Hollenberg 

Arts & Sciences 

English 

Economics 



Kevin S. Holmes 

School of Management 
Finance 



Scott Anthony Holowicki 

School of Management 
Finance 



Dean D. Hong 

School of Management 
Accounting 



Marie Hong 

School of Nursing 
Nursing 




Vivian L. Horn 

Arts & Sciences 
Political Science 



Mary E. Horner 

School of Education 

Human Development 

Elementary Education 



Matthew Harvey Hoskins 

Arts & Sciences 

Geology 
Hispanic Studies 



Lauren Margaret Hostage 

School of Education 

Human Development 



Michael D. Hough 

School of Management 
Economics 
Accounting 



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Neil A. Hourihan 

Arts & Sciences 
Economics 



Filip Hristic 

Arts & Sciences 

Philosophy 

English 



Jennifer E. Howe 

Arts & Sciences 
Sociology 



Sean C. Howell 

Arts & Sciences 
Economics 



Timothy Wadsworth Howell 

School of Management 

Finance 
Mgmt. Info. Systems 



Clifford Hoyle 

Arts & Sciences 
English 




Amanda K. Hubbard 

School of Management 

Marketing 

Human Resources Mgmt. 



Adam C. Hughes 

Arts & Sciences 

Mathematics 

Philosophy 



Elizabeth M. Hughes 

School of Management 

Economics 

International Studies 



Megan Moira Hughes 

School of Management 

Op. and Strategic Mgmt. 

Finance 




Jonathan Lao Hugo 


Megan E. Humphreys 


Erick C. Hunt 


Meagan L. Hunter 


Elizabeth B. Huntley 


Arts & Sciences 


Arts & Sciences 


Arts & Sciences 


School of Education 


School of Management 


Biology 


French 
Communication 


Political Science 


Human Development 


Finance 




Jessica A- Hutchins 

Arts & Sciences 
History 



Michael J. Huthwaite 

School of Management 

Marketing 

Finance 



Jennifer M. Hutton 

School of Education 

Early Childhood Education 

Human Development 



Matthew J. Hux 

Arts & Sciences 
Communication 



Thu Minh Huynh 

School of Management 
Mgmt. Info. Systems 



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Santina lannello 

Arts & Sciences 
Political Science 



Michael C. lannuzzi 

School of Management 

Mgmt. Info. Systems 

Op. and Strategic Mgmt.il| 



Jennifer Ibach 

Arts & Sciences 
Psychology 



Lisa Marie Ilaria 

Arts &C Sciences 
Psychology 



Gia Gabrielle Incardone 

Arts & Sciences 
Psychology 



Kristin M. Irwin 

Arts & Sciences 
Pohtical Science 



Lauren E. Irwin 

Arts & Sciences 
English 



Tatyana Ishutkina 

College of Advancing Studies 
Business Administration 



Andrew S. Isleib 

Arts & Sciences 
Communication 




Alexander C. Ives 

Arts & Sciences 
Political Science 



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Marissa A. Jacobs 

Arts & Sciences 

Political Science 

Philosophy 



Suzanne K. Janeczko 

School of Nursing 
Nursing 



Jennifer M. Jefferson 

Arts &C Sciences 
History 



Karen A. Jeffords 

School of Management 
Marketing 



Kathleen H. Jennings 

Arts & Sciences 
English 



Amanda C. Johnson 

Arts & Sciences 

Psychology 

English 



Brian Johnson 

School of Management 

Finance 

Accounting 



Brian C. Johnson 

Arts & Sciences 
History 



Christopher M. Johnson 

Arts & Sciences 
Economics 




Daniel W. Johnson 

Arts & Sciences 
Biology 



Diane M. Johnson 

School of Management 
Accounting 



Kara E. Johnson 

School of Management 
Accounting 



Kendra Johnson 

Arts & Sciences 
Psychology 



Kyle A. Johnson 

Arts & Sciences 
Communication 




Ra Mon Johnson 

School of Management 
Finance 



Ruth Marie Johnson 

School of Education 

Secondary Education 

English 



Susanna A. Johnson 

Arts & Sciences 
Biology 



Kelly E. Johnston 

Arts & Sciences 
French 



Rebecca L. Johnston 

School of Nursing 

Nursing 




Megan K. Jones 

Arts & Sciences 
English 



Shannon Joski 

College of Advancing Smdies 
Business Adminstration 



Kevin A. Joyce 

School of Management 
Accounting 



Thomas P. Joyce 

School of Management 
Finance 



Jennifer L. Kacewicz 

Arts & Sciences 
English 



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Jessica Lockman, Sara Glading, Andrea Strutt, Vanessa Monico, Diane Cabo 




^4-2 SenioY^ 





Lauren Suprenant, Dave Ellis, Tim Heston, Dan Melillo, Christian Boehk, Jim Dunbar, Tom Heston, Eddy Choi, Carl Lesaca, 

Lauren Chai 




John Stergiou and Lindsay Brown 




Mary Kate Hanlon, Jamie Corliss, Alison Stankus, Mary MuUin, Beth Domogala, Lauren Fogarty 



ii^^MMmm 




Angela Rufatto, Alexandria Polidori, Alison Burt, Kristin 
Mead, Dawn Delmonica, Alison Casey 



Kristin Rieliy, Carlos Rodriguez, Brooke Bartlett, Hugh O'Kane 




Lauren Rennard, Loren Cioffi, Lauren Chai, Amy Dold, Lauren Suprenant 



Sheila Miligan, Kathryn Hartmere, Erin Lynch 



mmi 3 is 





Sandeep Raj Kancherla 

School of Management 
General Management 
M^mt. Info. Systems 



Brian S. Kane 

Arts & Sciences 
History 



E. Kathleen Kane 

Arts & Sciences 
English 



Daniel P. Kalamaras 

Arts & Sciences 

Computer Science 

Economics 



John A. Kalin 

Arts & Sciences 
Biology 




Keiyu Kamatani 

Arts & Sciences 
Communication 



Adam A. Kampe 

Arts & Sciences 
English 




Julia Ann Kane 

School of Education 

Secondary Education 

English 



Jacqueline A. Kappler 

Arts & Sciences 
Biology 




Paul K. Kapur 

School of Management 
Finance 



Alexis Karr 

School of Management 
Finance 



Hiromitsu Kate 

School of Education 
Elementary Education 
Human Development 



Grace Marie Kavadoy 

Arts & Sciences 
Psychology 



Kerry Kavanaugh 



Arts & Sciences 
Communication 



MMMn^ 



Meghan E. Kavanaugh 

School of Management 
, Accounting 



Danielle L. Kayal 

Arts & Sciences 
English 



Kathleen M. Kearney 

School of Nursing 
Nursing 



Kathleen S. Kearney 

School of Management 

Op. and Strategic Mgmt. 

Finance 



Matthew A. Keating 

School of Management 
Finance 




Megan A. Kehoe 

Arts & Sciences 
English 



Richard John Kehoe 

Arts & Sciences 
Economics 



Charles P. Kehres 

Arts & Sciences 
English 



Jessica A. Keintz 

School of Management 

Finance 

Marketing 



Sean L. Keithly 

Arts & Sciences 
Political Science 




Anna P. Kelleher 

School of Management 
Accounting 



Christopher R. Kelley 

School of Management 
Economics 



Lisa Marie Kelley 

School of Education 

Elem. Ed./Mod. Sp. Needs 

Environmental Geoscience 



Meaghann K. Kelley 

Arts & Sciences 
Philosophy 



Jennifer A. Kelly 

School of Education 

Elem. Ed./Int. Sp. Needs 

History 




Kevin G. Kelly 

ichool of Management 

Finance 



Robert J. Kelly 

School of Management 
Finance 



Richard P. Kenney 
School of Management 

Marketing 
Op. and Strategic Mgmt. 



Ann Jeanette Kern 

Arts & Sciences 
Sociology 



Tristram B. Kersey 

School of Management 

Marketing 



m8mmm3*0 



ISA 
Chris Keswani 

School of Management 

Marketing 



AdamJ. Kidd 

Arts & Sciences 
Communication 



Syed S. Khan 

School of Management 

Finance 

Mgmt. Info. Systems 



Anthony E. Khouri 

School of Management 
Finance 



Fadi E. Khuri 

School of Management 
Op. and Strategic Mgmt. 



Bridget S. Kiely 

Arts & Sciences 
Psychology 



Kathleen C. Kienzie 

Arts & Sciences 
Classics 



Chris Kim 

Arts & Sciences 

Philosophy 

International Studies 



Cietta Kiandoli 

Arts & Sciences 
History 




Jee-Won S. Kim 

Arts & Sciences 
Biology 




Yul L. Kim 

Arts & Sciences 
Biology 



Liza A. Kimball 

School of Management 
General Management 



Lynn E. Kimball 

vVrts & Sciences 
Psychology 



Peter M. Kindrachuk 

Arts & Sciences 
History 



James M. King 

Arts & Sciences 
Biology 







Mary Ellen R. King 

Arts & Sciences 
Psychology 



Michael P. King 

School of Management 
Accounting 



Joan M. King 

Arts & Sciences 
Mathematics 



Danielle C. Kinon 

School of Management 
Accounting 



Kjristine L. Klagges 

Arts & Sciences 
Psychology 



§48 Senior!^ 



Erica D. Klaus 

School of Nursing 
Nursing 



Dennis A. Klem 

Arts & Sciences 
Mathematics 



Karen M. Klocko 

Arts &C Sciences 

French 

Mathematics 



Maria R. ICnebl 

Arts & Sciences 

Geology 

Music 



Patrick D. Kneib 

School of Management 
Computer Science 




Timothy M. Knievel 

Arts & Sciences 
History 



Brooke K. Kolconay 



Arts & Sciences 
Communication 



James F. Knott 

School of Management 
Finance 



Naerisa Koletschka 

School of Education 

Early Childhood Education 

Studio Art 



Jennifer M. Kolloff 

School of Management 

Marketing 
Mgmt. Info. Systems 



Michael G. Kopischke 

Arts & Sciences 

Communication 

Computer Science 



Neil G. Koenig 

School of Management 

Finance 





Alexander L. Kogan 

School of Management 

Accounting 

Finance 



Cassandra J. Kogelschatz 

School of Management 
Marketing 




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Sarah E. Krauss 

School of Nursing 
Nursing 



Marisa A. Kubicko 

School of Management 
Finance 



Matthew J. Krebs 

Arts & Sciences 
Biology 



\ i 

Richard J. Kruczek 

School of Management 
Finance 



Matthew P. Kosciak 

School of Management 
Marketin 



Debby R. Krans 

School of Management 
Economics 



Kristin N. Krupka 

Arts & Sciences 

English 



Robert Allen Kosowsk; 
School ot Management 
Finance 




Kathleen Anne Kraska 

Arts & Sciences 
Psychology 




Amy Michelle Kruse 

School of Management i 

Op. and Strategic Mgmt.i 

History 




Robert F. Kuehn 

School of Management 
Computer Science 



Patricia C. Kulp 

Arts & Sciences 
History 



Ben N. Kuruvilla 

Arts & Sciences 

History 

Classics 



Anna A. Kuznetsova 

Arts & Sciences 

Economics 

Mathematics 



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^1 AmyW. Kwok 
'School of Management 
Marketins: 



Allen Kwong 

School of Management 

Economics 
Op. and Strategic Mgmt. 



Brian D. La Forgia 

Arts & Sciences 
Biology 



Catherine C. Lacson 

School of Management 

Finance 

Marketing 



Eric Lahaise 

School of Management 

Marketing 
Mgmt. Info. Systems 



Sally Lai 

School of Nursing 
Nursing 



Wei-Fan Lai 

Arts & Sciences 
Computer Science 



Joan M. Laitinen 

College of Advancing Smdies 
German Studies 



Ariel S. Laguilles 

Arts & Sciences 

Hispanic Studies 

Sociology 




Eric J. Lammers 

Arts & Sciences 
Psychology 



Dawn M. Lamonica 

Arts & Sciences 
Sociology 



Elizabeth W. Lane 

Arts & Sciences 
English 



Katherine A. Lane 

Arts & Sciences 
Political Science 



Benjamin T. Lally 

School of Education 

Secondary Education 

English 




Walter E. Lang 

Arts & Science 
English 




. Stephen X. Langone 
School of Management 
Finance 



James H. Lannan 

Arts & Sciences 

Political Science 

Philosophy 



Paraskevi V. Lappas 

School of Management 
Finance 
French 



Paul A. Laquerre 

School of Management 
Marketing 



Steven D. Larosa 

School of Management 

Economics 

Marketing 



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Do you remember... 



FRESHMAN YEAR 



THE BET THAT ROCKED THE HEIGHTS 

Where were you when you heard the news 
that Boston College was under investiga- 
tion for alleged gambling and bookmaking 
operations involving the football team? It did 
not seem real, yet the news was everywhere. We 
heard it on the radio, we saw it on ESPN, and 
people from home called to see what we knew. 
It was national news; it was also the earmark of 
our freshman year. Just two years after losing 
head coach Tom Coughlin to the NFL's 
Jacksonville Jaguars, the BC football team was 
now experiencing another major setback and 
losing another head coach. There was a formal 
investigation conducted at the school and 
conclusive evidence of student athletes gambling 
in violation of NCAA rules was found. A total 
of thirteen players were suspended and another 
two expelled for their involvement in the 
gambling "incident." It took three years for the 
new head coach Tom O'Brien to repair the 
damage done by the scandal and produce a 
winning team. And it took hockey riots to turn 
the tables of conversation on campus. 




"I was in the marching band then. I remember running from the cameras because w 

did not want to be on TV." 
-Anonymous Saxophonist, SOE 



Lynn Yarmey, Laurin Mottle, and Amy DiMattia 



WALKING m A WINTER WONDERLAND, „IN THE SPRING 




\ 










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\'i' 



It was freshman year second semester: what we thought 
was the biggest snow storm of the year. It kept many 
students in from classes, but those who ventured outside 
were able to rehve childhood memories of playing in the 
snow. Sometime in the afternoon, as we were getting out 
of classes and walking up the staits to Upper, it dawned 
on everyone that we should be throwing the snow that 
was around us, not just admiring it. Those who had 
classes that let out late didn't know what they were in for. 
The ones who got out of class early eagerly waited on top 
of the platform by the chapel in Gonzaga to drop snow 
bombs onto the victims below. And so it began, what 
seemed like an endless chain of snowball fights in every 
section of Upper Campus. 

Michael Cianfrocca describes what he experienced 
from one area of Upper Campus. "All of a sudden, we 
noticed that we (the Medeiros kids) were on one hill and 
the Kostka kids were on another. We just ran down the 
hill and started throwing snowballs and didn't stop until 
we ran right through the other group. It was like a scene 
out oi Braveheart... hut without the skirts." 



Its snowing in April, now what do you suppose Ma Nature had to 
drink last night?" Nellie Gedney, A&S 





^^ 



^^SUSI^ 



Kendra Johnson and Katherine Harvell 

was the perfect April Fool's Day. BC students staggered back from their Easter break, not at all looking forward to getting back into 
le groove. Then it happened-a snowflake hit the ground, then another and another. Soon they were like an army, furiously invading 
New England area. This is a joke, right? It's April. ..does Mother Nature not know how to keep a calendar? Apparently not. On 
April Fool's students were anything but joking. In fact they were stranded at airports, stuck on trains, trapped at Logan. The "T" 
t down, most major airports in the region closed, ground transportation was suicide, so what was a BC student to do? Well lots, we 
snowball fights, we made snowmen and snow angles, we jumped out of second story windows (because the first story doors were 
ved in), we revisited our youth. We also got the last laugh. ..what actually was the biggest snow storm of the year left BC closed on 
il 2nd. 






m 

m 






m 



DO YOU ALSO REMEMBER WHEN? 



You were late for orientation? 

We lost to Notre Dame? 

You could not find Devlin 008? 

Lower had the best food ever? 

You were too cool to go home for Columbus Day? 

You thought you'd never be a senior? 




Every night during finals of sophomore year, there was more to look forward to 
than just the primal scream . . . there was SPIDERMAN! Students from Walsh and 
Edmond's would rush to their windows facing the Mods to watch the spectacle that was 
about to start. Each time the Spiderman would come out and do a dance and strip show 
to music. What made it so exciting was that he would always do something different. 
One night he rode in on a motorcycle to his Mod and proceeded to dance. Another night 
he climbed out of the second floor window of his Mod to dance and strip off his 
Spiderman costume. There were strobe lights, fog machines, fancy dance moves, and 
very loud music. After the Spiderman suit came off, he was usually left wearing a skimpy 
Speedo, and the routine would end with Spiderman getting doused with a bucket of cold 
water. 




so:^:h::omo: 


i;^ YiAi 






1 "\ uring sophomore year, first semester, something roared 
JL .-^ through our quiet library during finals. Those who saw it 
will never forget what happened, and all the rest of us have only 
heard through rumor. Well, here is the proof, picture and all, 
that some "Mystery Streaker" ran through the library. As 




Lindsay Crawford remembers, "We heard rumors that some- 
thing was going to happen that night in the O'Neill Library, but 
nothing could have prepared us for anything so hysterically 
funny." 

Apparently, someone rolled in a garbage bin, music started 
playing, and the "Mystery Streaker" jumped out of the bin and 
started dancing on the tables. He began stripping off his clothes 
down to his diaper and socks. When he was finished, he was left 
in a g-string running around the library. Whatever his goal was 
that evening, he managed to lift the tensions of finals for many 
and create a legend for himself as the "Library Streaker." 


F^mZ^*^ 


^^^^v K^^SC^l^Ir ^"^^^k^^^^B ' 




' 


^^g|^l^l^PHAp^^|k 9^\^^|' 



#$NMniiipna 



THE MODS ARE ON FIRE WITH PASSION AND LOVE 




The best part of the evening was being hosed down by the Fire Department. How 
lany people can actually say that happened to them?" Ileana Acevado, A&S 



Saturday April 4, 1998 was one of the most memorable nights in 
Boston College history. The newly revamped Men's Hockey team 
had been the surprise of the 1998 season. It only took head coach Jerry 
York four years to rebuild BC into the hockey powerhouse it once was. 
-After a 15-game winning streak, the men's team had found itself in the 
NCAA Finals against Michigan. Following a 3-2 overtime loss in that 
game the BC campus erupted in celebration. In what has come to be 
known as the "Hockey Riots," BC students rallied to show their support 
for a hockey team that was underrated for the entire year by sports 
writers, opponents, and even the BC fans. The outpouring of support 
b\' students began in the form of a rally at the Conte Forum waiting for 
the bus to arrive from the Fleet Center. Bonfires were ablaze throughout 
rhe Mods. The Boston Fire Department showed up in an attempt to 
dampen the fires and the crowds. Instead, they unwittingly provided a 
forum for the mud wrestling. This was definitely one of the highlights 
oi our four years at BC. 




Seniors 333 



LIVING OFF CAMPU, 




Yellow House, Foster Street, Brighton 



South Street, Brighton 

Living ofF campus junior year was one of the many memorable 
experiences during life at Boston College. All the newfound 
responsibilities of living on our own were quite overwhelming: paying 
rent, gas, electric, and cable bills, buying groceries, and dealing with a 
landlord. Having a landlord was very different from having a hall 
director, and it was not necessarily better. Landlords didn't like dealing 
with obnoxious college students, but did so because they knew they 
could charge outrageous rents. Although we could have parties in our 
apartments, there were occasional run-ins with the cops. The great part 
about being off campus, however, was that feeling of finally being on 
the other end. We were the ones throwing the party and not aimlessly 
walking around Comm. Ave looking for a party with 20 of our closest 
friends. Even though living on our own seemed rough at times, it was 
a time in our lives that we will never forget! 





(L to R) Ryan Fitzpatrick, Mike Rowley, Brian Capell, Nick Belitz, Ryan Welch 




^^^^'Swmmm 



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WHEN THE BC 
BUS WAS STOLEN 



From the Heights' Police Blotter: 

February 22, 1999- Officer reported a BC bus was 

stolen. Officers stopped the bus and arrested the BC 

student for theft of a motor vehicle. 



TUDYMG ABROAD 



While many of us moved off campus for junior year, some moved half 
way around the world. Students participated in study abroad 
programs in Europe, Asia, Africa, and South America. For some, it was 
like freshman year all over again. It took a while to learn where everything 
was and how to get there. Meeting people seemed awkward, but getting to 
know them was one of the best parts of the experience and was key to 
learning about the culture. 

There was no real formula for studying abroad, however. Everyone's 
experiences were unique. Some who went ended up in a situation or 
environment that was not pleasant, while others loved it so much they did 
not want to leave. Either way, studying abroad was a memorable part of 
the college experience. 










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Shannon Corkery and Danielle Doucette in Scotland 



Eiffel Tower in Paris, France 



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Nathan B. Lasher 

School of Management 

Marketing 

Finance 



WilHam C. Lau 

School of Management i 
Economics 
Marketing 




Clell J. Laugharn 

Arts & Sciences 
Communication 



Christina R. Laurita 

Arts & Sciences 
English 



Troy A. Lavallee 

Arts & Sciences 

Theater Arts 

English 



Susan M. Lavelle 

School of Management 

Finance 

Mgmt. Info. Systems 



Jonathan Lay 

Arts & Sciences 
Political Science 



Kirsten E. Leahy 

Arts & Sciences 

Sociology 



Courtney C. Leavitt 

Arts & Sciences 
Chemistry 




Andre M. Lebeau 

Arts & Sciences 
Biology 



Katrina L. Leblanc 

Arts & Sciences 
Communication 



Karen Leclair 

Arts & Sciences 
Political Science 



Thomas Ledbetter 

Arts & Sciences 

English 

Economics 



Daehyon Lee 

Arts & Sciences 
Sociology 



Jason T. Lee 

Arts & Sciences 
Economics 



Johnny B. Lee 

School of Management 
Finance 



Joohyun Lee 

School of Management 
Marketing 



Matt C. Lee 

School of Management 
Accounting 



Nicole T. Lee 

School of Education 

Early Childhood Education 

Child in Society 




Nadia M. Lehmejian 

,Arts & Sciences 

Political Science 

Sociology 



Alice A. Lehne 

School of Management 
Finance 



Jared N. Leland 

Arts & Sciences 
Political Science 



Jeanne M. Lenzinger 

Arts & Sciences 
English 



Carl R. Lesaca 

School of Management 
Accounting 



Tim P.Lesnick 

Arts & Sciences 
Communication 



Erika M. Lestingi 

Arts & Sciences 
English 



Su-Ying Leung 
Arts & Sciences 
Political Science 



Angela L. Leone 

School of Nursing 
Nursing 




Jessica A. Leveroni 

School of Education 

Human Development 




Yong K. Li 

School of Management 
Finance 



William Licata 

Arts & Sciences 
History 



Janice A. Lichtenberger 

Arts & Sciences 
Biology 



Elizabeth A. Lidstone 

Arts & Sciences 
Economics 



Peter K. Liegel 

School of Management 
Marketing 



iDluiluiJ JJJ 



Say Keat Lim 

Arts & Sciences 
Economics 
Psychology 



Jessica Lima 

Arts & Sciences 
Communication 



Tracy L. Lituri 

Arts & Sciences 
Communication 



Dianne H. Liu 

School of Management 
Marketing 



Emily Lo 

Arts & Sciences 

English 
Communication 




Jessica L. Lockman 

School of Management 

Accounting 



Stephanie C. Loconto 

Arts & Sciences 
History 



Elizabeth Ann Lodise 

School of Management 
Accounting 



James G. Loftus 

Arts & Sciences 
Political Science 



James S. Loisou 

School of Managemeni 
Marketing 




Maxim L Lojevsky 

School of Management 
Finance 



Elizabeth A. Lombardo 

School of Education 
Elem. Ed./Mod. Sp. Needs 



Human Development 



Laura E. Lombardo 

Arts & Sciences 
Communication 



Melissa Lombardo 

School of Nursing 
Nursing 



Randal R. Lombardo 

Arts & Sciences 
English 




Emily Long 

School of Nursing 
Nursing 



Meghan F. Long 

School of Management 
Marketing 



Michael T. Long 

Arts & Sciences 

Political Science 

Economics 



Elizabeth A. Longacre 

Arts & Sciences 
Psychology 



Michaela A. Looser 

School of Managemer 
Finance 



gi i ig M ia i imimp 



Gloribell Lopez 

Arts & Sciences 
Sociology 



Maria C. Lourido 

School of Education 
Human Development 



Natalie L. Lorenti 

Arts & Sciences 
Political Science 



Elizabeth A. Loring 

School of Management 
Finance 



Kathryn N. Losavio 

Arts & Sciences 
History 
French 



Jennifer Lou 

School of Management 
Marketing 




Cailleen C. Louth 

Arts & Sciences 
History 



Cristin E. Luck 

Arts & Sciences 
Art History 



William S. Lundell 

School of Management 
Marketing 



Kristen N. Luppino 

Arts & Sciences 
Psychology 




Matthew P. Lyberg 

Arts & Sciences 

Russian 



Karen E. Lynch 

Arts & Sciences 

English 



Erin K. Lynch 

School of Education 

Early Childhood Education 

Economics 




James G. Mabli 

Arts & Sciences 

Economics 

Mathematics 





Anthony G. Macapugay 

School of Management 

Computer Science 

Me;mt. Info. Systems 



Katharine F. Macaulay 

Arts & Sciences 
EngUsh 



Lori Maccario 

Arts & Sciences 
Economics 



Craig A. Macchi 

Arts & Sciences 
Mathematics 



Nita B. MacDonnell 

School of Education 

Child in Society 

Elem. Ed./Mod. Sp. Need 




Cara MacGilvray 

Arts & Sciences 
Communication 



Jeremy B. Maco 

Arts & Sciences 

English 

Philosophy 



Mary M. Madden 

Arts & Sciences 
English 



Laura R. Maestranzi 

Arts & Sciences 

French 

Economics 



James M. Maher 

School of Management 
Accounting 



men i ierm 



Amanda J. Mahoney 

Arts & Sciences 
Mathematics 



Lorryn I. Mai 

School of Management 
Accounting 



Megan A. Mahoney 

School of Education 
Elem. Ed./Mod. Sp. Needs 
Math, and Comp. Science 



Patricia E. Mahoney 

Arts & Sciences 
Sociology 



Melissa C. Mahony 

Arts & Sciences 
English 



Be T. Mai 

Arts & Sciences 

Psychology 

English 




Michael A. Maida 

Arts & Sciences 
Biology 



Lindsay A. Maiman 

Arts & Sciences 
Art History 



Michael J. Maione 

Arts & Sciences 
Economics 



Kristin E. Mallek 

School of Education 
Human Development 




Arathi B. Malliah 

Arts & Sciences 

Biology 

Psychology 



Adriana Mallozzi 

Arts & Sciences 
Communication 



Jason W. Maloney 

Arts & Sciences 
Chemistry 



Jennifer L. Maloney 

School of Nursing 
Nursing 



Brendan M. Maloy 

Arts & Sciences 
Ps)'chology 



Noel C. Manahan 

School of Management 
Finance 



Patricia J. Manalo 

Arts & Sciences 
Communication 



Lynn A. Mangiaracina 

Arts & Sciences 
Psychology 



Robert M. Maloney 

School of Management 
Finance 




Peter Manley 

Arts & Sciences 
Political Science 



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Tatyana Vorobyova, Rita Walker, Moira Crowley 




Justin Boggs, Joe, Shelly,skier 





Megan Majuire, Liz Long, Jenn Ranta, Rob Ross, Julie Suprock, Dave, Kristen 
Lucke, Karrie, Jenn Shea 




Tracy Kilpatrick, Scott Ballum, Mike King, Janine Antoine, Eric Lattaise, 

Lauren Curapi 



[ |!j ii i» i l)| i | ll ii i p i 




j-Vmv Cn'an, Mark Breaugh, Jyl Tesler 



Stephanie Ridge, Tandy MacNamara 





Early Birds 



Ben Andrulot 




Jyl Tesler 



Joe Bernardi and Cailleen Louth 



Erik Hauser and Raffy Salas 




Joanne Domingo and Leslie Walters 



Genevieve Thiers, Jennifer Butterworth, Sarah Hearn 



Tom Shaub and Steven Covelluzzi 




sjistin Rielley, Keith Swiniarski, Alison Dembowski, Shannon Bansfield, Brooke Bartlett 



Brendan Nolan and Katie Moran 




Natalie Marabeilo and Abbey Galmiche 



Donna Pimental, Mary Mullin, Katie Pyrek, and Megan Guillet 




Nancy Delpidio, Mike Maida, and Michele DiPaolo 



Victoria Capalbo,Neil O'Leary, and Bridget Kiely 





Matthew A. Mannering 

Arts & Sciences 

English 

Philosophy 



Gretchen E. Mansfield 

Arts & Sciences 
History 



Natalie Marabello 

Arts & Sciences 
English 



Justin F. Marceau 

Arts & Sciences 
Philosophy 



Amanda L. Marchioli 

School of Management 
Marketing 



Ruben I. Marin 

Arts & Sciences 
Mgmt. Info. Systems 



Cara A. Marino 

Arts & Sciences 
Communication 



Christopher Marino 

School of Management 

Finance 

Marketing 



Nicholas J. Marino 

Arts & Sciences 
Political Science 



Michelle D. Marrocco 

School of Management 
Finance 



Wilbur C. Manning 

School of Management 

Finance 
Mgmt. Info. Systems 




Brandy L. Manza 

School of Education 

Secondary Education 

Theology/English 




Craig G. Marinho 

Arts & Sciences 

Communication 

Philosophy 




Julianne Marrone 

School of Education 
Human Development 



m& lOl i WIP 



Homer L. Marrs II 

Arts & Sciences 

English 

Psychology 



Amy E. Martin 

Arts & Sciences 
Political Science 



Christopher A. Marshall 

Arts & Sciences 
Biology 



Douglas K. Marshall 

School of Management 
Finance 



Jason R. Marshall 

Arts & Sciences 
History 



Donald J. Martin 

Arts & Sciences 
Biology 



Ryan C. Martin 

School of Management 
Finance 



Thomas B. Martin 

Arts & Sciences 
Music 



Jennifer L. Marsico 

School of Management 
Accounting 




Kristen L. Martone 

School of Nursing 
Nursing 




Alessandro Martuscelli 

Arts & Sciences 

Political Science 

Italian 



Andrea S. Marvin 

Arts & Sciences 
Theology 



Marissa L. Marzilli 

Arts & Sciences 
Psychology 



Alicia C. Marzullo 

Arts & Sciences 
English 



Melanie S. Mason 

School of Education 

Elementary Education 

Moderate Special Needs 

Human Development 



Nader N. Massarweh 

Arts & Sciences 

Biochemistry 



John J. Mastrantonio 

Arts & Sciences 
Psychology 



Jennifer J. Mather 

Arts & Sciences 

Theology 
Communication 



Michael J. Masceri 

Arts & Sciences 
Economics 
Philosophy 




Jeffrey R. Mathias 

School of Management 
Marketing 



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Masanori Matsui 

Arts & Sciences 
Computer Science 



Erin Matticola 

School of Education 
Elementary Education 
Human Development 



Lauren A. Mauceri 

Arts & Sciences 
English 



Rebecca E. Maurer 

Arts & Sciences 
History 



Erika S. Maxel 

School of Managemen 
Marketing 




Zachary Maxfield 

School of Management 
Finance 



Jennifer P. Maya 

School of Management 
Accounting 



Daniel J. Mayerick 

School of Management 
Marketing 



Justin A. Maynard 

Arts & Sciences 

Communication 

Philosophy 



Matthew B. Mcardle 

Arts & Sciences 
Political Science 




Megan K. McCabe 

School of Education 

Human Development 

Theater Arts 



Shannon L. McCabe 

Arts & Sciences 
Sociology 



Matthew J. McCaffrey 

Arts & Sciences 

History 



Matthew K. McCallum 

Arts & Sciences 
English 



Michael B. McCarthy 

Arts & Sciences 
History 




Sean P. McCarthy 

School of Management 

Marketing 

Mgmt. Info. Systems 



Dennis M. McCloskey 

Arts & Sciences 
Political Science 



Heather P. McCormack 

School of Education 

Elementary Education 

Moderate Special Needs 

Child in Society 



Casey M. McCormick 

School of Education 

Elementary Education 

Math, and Comp. Science 



Walter T. McCormick 

Arts & Sciences 
English 



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Kathryn E. McCorry 

School of Education 

Secondary Education 

Hispanic Studies 



Axnanda L. McDonnell 

Arts & Sciences 

Communication 

Human Development 



Shawn M. McGinn 

School of Management 

Finance 

Economics 



Gregory McGowan 

Arts & Sciences 

Sociology 



Denise Y. McCort 

Arts & Sciences 
Computer Science 



Timothy F. McCourt 

Arts & Sciences 
Political Science 



Anne-Courtney McCraw 

Arts & Sciences 

Communication 

English 



Meghan L. McDonald 

School of Nursing 

Nursing 




Marissa K. McFarland 

Arts & Sciences 
Psychology 
Theater Arts 




Kevin P. McGovern 

Arts & Sciences 
Economics 




Michelle L. McGowan 

Arts & Sciences 
Sociology 



John C. McGiU 

School of Management 

Marketing 

Finance 



Kaitlen M. McGillivray 

Arts & Sciences 

English 
Communication 



Jeffrey M. McGinn 

Arts & Sciences 
History 




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Myles P. McKenna 

School of Management 
Marketing 



Matthew C. McLaughHn 

Arts & Sciences 
Computer Science 



Meghan E. McLaughlin 

Arts & Sciences 
Economics 



James M. McMahon 

Arts and Sciences 
History 



Stephanie M. McMahoi 

Arts & Sciences 

Sociology 




Steven M. McManama 

School of Management 
Marketing 



Catherine E. McManmon 

Arts & Sciences 
Sociology 



Kathleen A. McMorrow 

School of Management 

Economics 

Finance 



Andrew J. McNamara 

School of Management 

Finance 



Tandy G. McNamara 

Arts & Sciences 
English 



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Catherine M. McNeil 

School of Education 

Human Development 

Child in Society 



Vincent S. McWade 

Arts & Sciences 

Philosophy 
Communication 



Elaine A. McNeil 

Arts & Sciences 

Sociology 

English 



Lawrence J. McSheffery 

Arts & Sciences 
History 



Colleen P. McStravick 

School of Management 

Accounting 

Finance 



Christopher McTammany 

School of Management 
Marketing 




Kristin L. Mead 

School of Nursing 
Nursing 



Brooke A. Means 

Arts & Sciences 
Sociology 



Suzanne Medeiros 

Arts & Sciences 
Psychology 



Kaylen M. Medinger 

School of Management 
Marketing 




Kevin M. Meehan 

Arts &C Sciences 
Computer Science 



Laurence P. Melia 
Arts & Sciences 
Political Science 



Meghan V. Meehan 

Arts & Sciences 
Economics 



Pooja Mehta 

School of Management 

Finance 

Economics 



Seth C. Meiller 

Arts & Sciences 
Psychology 
Philosophy 



Christopher R. Melella 

Arts & Sciences 
Communication 




Marissa A. Melia 

School of Management 

Finance 

Accounting 



Daniel J. Melillo 

School of Management 
Accounting 



Lauren E. Melkus 

School of Management 
Marketing 



Jennifer L. Melvin 

School of Education 

Human Development 

English 



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Sarah Healy 




Meg Miles, Erika Lestingi, Beth Naldi, Nicki D'Onofrio, 
Mandy Johnson, Jenn Powers 



Lauren Peterson, Stacey Colucia, Lauren Hostage, Casey McCormick 



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Neil S. Mendelow 

Arts & Sciences 

Economics 



■Pierre J. Mendoza 

Arts & Sciences 

Psychology 

Biology 



Jaqueline Mercier 

School of Management 

Finance 

Philosophy 



Kevin A. Merk 

Arts & Sciences 
Biology 



Cathryn P. Metzger 

School of Education 

Elementary Education 

Theater Arts 



Kori C. Michalek 

School of Management 
Finance 



Jon E. Mendicina 

School of Management i 

Finance 

Theology 




Louis N. Mendys 

Arts & Sciences 
Political Science 
Communication 




Kristin M. Midura 
School of Management [| 
Marketing I 




Gregory B. Mihal 

School of Management 
Marketing 



Amanda M . Mihaly 

Arts & Sciences 
Theology 



Laura A. Miles 

Arts & Sciences 

English 



Margaret A. Miles 

School of Education 
Elem. Ed./Mod. Sp. Needs 
Math, and Comp. Science 



Ashley E. Miller 

School of Education 

Elem. Ed./Mod. Sp. Need 

Human Development 



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David M. Miller 

Arts & Sciences 
Political Science 



Hesketh G. Miller 

Arts & Sciences 

History 



Karen L. Miller 

School of Management 
Accounting 



Megan E. Miller 

Arts & Sciences 
History 



Robin A. Miller 

School of Management 
Marketing 




Sara E. Miller 

Arts & Sciences 
Psychology 



Sheila M. Milligan 

Arts & Sciences 
International Studies 



Edward J. Mills 

Arts & Sciences 
Political Science 



Francesca A. Mills 

School of Management 
Marketing 



Elizabeth Milonopoulos 

School of Management 

Finance 
Mgmt. Info. Systems 




Jason D. Mineo-Goggin 

Arts & Sciences 

Computer Science 



Lisa Mingolla 

School of Management 

Business 



Dina M. Misail 

School of Education 

Elementary Education 

Math, and Comp. Science 



Eduardo Misan 

School of Management 
Economics 



Kellie A. Misiaszek 

School of Management 

Marketing 

Finance 




John D. Mitchell 

School of Management 

Finance 



Aid Mizumoto 

School of Management 

Mgmt. Info. Systems 



Erin N. Moeur 

Arts & Sciences 
History 



Aby G. Moeykens 

Arts & Sciences 

Biology 

Philosophy 



Jay S. Mofenson 

Arts & Sciences 
Political Science 



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Aaron M. MoUer 

Arts & Sciences 
Computer Science 



Peter R. Molloy 

Arts & Sciences 
Economics 



Brendan N. Monahan 

Arts & Sciences 
Political Science 



Denise A. Monahan 

Arts & Sciences 
Psychology 



Vanessa T. Monico 

School of Education 
Human Development 




Lauren M. Monson 

Arts & Sciences 
International Studies 



Corinne A. Montanaro 

Arts & Sciences 
Psychology 



Nicolas Monies 

Arts & Sciences 

Economics 

Philosophy 



Roberta A. Monteyne 

School of Education 
Human Development 



Maria D. Montilla 

Arts & Sciences 
Theater Arts 




Justin F. Montisano 

Arts & Sciences 
Computer Science 



Brian D. Moore 

Arts & Sciences 
Economics 



Matthew E. Moore 

Arts & Sciences 
English 



Rebecca S. Moore 

Arts & Sciences 

Sociology 



Rory K. Moore 

Arts & Sciences 
Communication 




Arts & Sciences 
Psychology 



Christopher J. Moran 

Arts & Sciences 
Chemistry 



Kathryn K. Moran 

Arts & Sciences 
Psychology 



Kristine L. Moran 

School of Management 
Economics 



Laura A. Morelle 

School of Education 

Secondary Education 

English 



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Robert D. Moriarty 

.■Vrts & Sciences 
Economics 



Sahar Moridi 

Arts & Sciences 
Economics 



Martha M. Morrison 

Arts & Sciences 
Communication 



Kelly M. Morrison-Gale 

School of Management 
General Management 



Robert J. Mosesian 

School of Management 
Finance 




Christopher P. Mossa 

School of Management 

Finance 

Accounting 



Karen A. Muehl 

j\rts & Sciences 
Psychology 



Laurin J. Mottle 

School of Education 

Secondary Education 

English 



Kelly A. Moudy 

Arts & Sciences 
French 



Luke W. Mountain 

School of Management 
Accounting 



Michael D. Moynahan 

Arts & Sciences 
Political Science 




Thomas J. Mullen 

School of Management 
Marketing 




Jeanine M. Muller 

School of Management 
Marketing 



Keith M. MuUervy 

Arts & Sciences 
Computer Science 




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Mary M. Mullin 

Arts & Sciences 
Computer Science 



Brian J. Mulvey 

School of Management 

Finance 
Op. and Strategic Mgmt 




Alissa K. Murphy 

Arts & Sciences 
Economics 



Caitlin R. Murphy 

Arts & Sciences 
History 




Elizabeth A. Murphy 

School of Nursing 



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Timothy M. Murphy 

Arts & Sciences 
English 



Elizabeth P. Murray 

Arts & Sciences 
English 



James W. Murray 

Arts & Sciences 
Environmental Geoscience 



Shannon M. Murray 

School of Education 

Elem. Ed./Mod. Sp. Need 

Human Development 




Colby M. Muscarelle 

School of Management 
Accounting 



Adelina C. Musilli 

School of Education 

Early Childhood Education 

Human Development 



Joanna K. Myer 
Arts & Sciences 
Communication 



Stephanie Myers 

Arts & Sciences 
Sociology 



Charles J. Nabhan 

School of Management 
Finance 



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Debra A. Nagle 

School of Nursing 

Nursing 



WiUiam V. Nagle 

Arts & Sciences 
Biology 



Elizabeth A. Naldi 

Arts & Sciences 
Psychology 



Taeuk Namkoong 

School of Management 

Mgmt. Info. Systems 

Finance 



Alicia S. Nardi 

School of Education 

Elem. Ed./Mod. Sp. Needs 

Human Development 




Kalea M. Nassif 

Arts & Sciences 

Theater Arts 

English 



Andrew J. Nation 

Arts & Sciences 
Chemistry 



Tricia L. Navin 

School of Nursing 
Nursing 



James P. Neal 

Arts & Sciences 
English 



i Elizabeth Negri 

School of Education 

- Jem. Ed./Mod. Sp. Needs 

Child in Society 



Glorimar Negron 

Arts & Sciences 
Communication 



Garrett H. Nehl 

School of Management 

Marketing 



Ashley B. Nelson 
Arts & Sciences 
Hispanic Studies 
Political Science 



.VIonique L. Nelson 

School of Education 

Human Development 



Christina S. Nentwig 

School of Education 

Human Development 

Sociology 



Gerard T. Nesbitt 

Arts & Sciences 
Computer Science 



Lisa K. Ness 

School of Education 

Elementary Education 

Child in Society 



Stephanie L. Nearhos 

School of Management 
Accounting 




Eric R. Nelson 

School of Management 

Finance 




Eliza P. Ng 

Arts & Sciences 
Communication 



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Cara MacGilvray and Lisa Pompei 



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Debbie Nagle and Michael Cianfrocca 



Jackie Kappler 




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Brett Dinatale, Peter D'Angelo, Michael Felix, Drew Isleib 




Mike Peters, Nat Corrigan, Bridget Kiely, Joe Daly, Neil O'Leary, 
Gar}' Sheehan,Victoria Capalbo, Katie Herrick, Scott Bugbee, Dave Chiaruttini 



Kelly Deneen 





Danyelle Ostreye, Marissa Ciccia, Jodi Speigel 



Kathryn Hartmore, John Courtney 







Cameron Cole, Alison Dembriwski, Karen Miller 



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WHAT 


WE'LL 


WE 


MISS 


WON'T 


Money from 
our Parents 


The Housing 
Lottery 


Dunkin, Donuts 


The Plex 


on our 
mealcards 




Paul at 

McElroy, Marge 

at Lower 


No parking 


Tailgatlng 


BCPD 


Vacations 


The Stairs 


Partying in 
the Mods 


Party 
Restrictions 


Free 

BC Cable, 

voicemail, and 

the internet 


The line 
for IBMs 


Belgian Waffles 


BCBus 


Mod Riots 


The B Line 


The Bagpiper 


RAs 


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Deanna Deskin and Kathy Ryder 



ErikAbell 




Kevin Collins, Derek Vandegrift, Erik Abell 




Liz Milonopoulos, Colin Feichtmeir 



Courtney McCraw, Ryan Agostino 




BC Fans at Notre Dame 



Dan Noonan, Chris Marino, Steve McManama 




Katherine R. Nickel 

School of Management 

Marketing 



Gadyflor Nicolas 

Arts & Sciences 

Communication 

Sociology 



Paul J. Niemiec 

School of Management 

Finance 



Andres A. Nieto 

Arts & Sciences 
Biology 



John A. Niro 

Arts &C Sciences 
English 



David J. Nix 

Arts & Sciences 
Theology 



Danielle A. Nohe 

Arts & Sciences 
Economics 



Brendan J. Nolan 

Arts & Sciences 
Communication 



Tracey A. Nini 

Arts & Sciences 
Psychology 




Timothy J. Nolan 

School of Managemeni 

Finance 
Mgmt. Info. Systems 



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Gena L. Nolin 


Daniel A. Noonan 


Matthew D. Norcini 


Natira Norpanlob 


Angeline K. Northam 


Arts & Sciences 


Arts & Sciences 


School of Education 


School of Management 


School of Education 


Psychology 


English 


Secondary Education 


Finance 


Elementary Education 






History/English 


Economics 


Human Development 




Sarah E. Northrup 

Arts & Sciences 
nvironmental Geosciences 



Helene M. Norton 

Arts & Sciences 
Sociology 



Jennifer L. Novicki 

School of Education 

Elementary Education 

Child in Society 



Kirby A. Nowlin 

School of Education 

Elementary Education 

Human Development 



Kathleen C. O'Brien 
School of Management 



Marketing 



Katie L. O'Brien 

Arts & Sciences 



Sociology 



Matthew F. O'Brien 

Arts &: Sciences 
Communication 



John E. Occhipinti 

Arts & Sciences 
Communication 



Kelly R. O'Connell 

School of Management 
Accounting 



Laura M. O'Connell 

School of Education 

Elementary Education 

Moderate Special Needs 

Child in Society 



Lisa S. O'Connell 

School of Education 

Elementary Education 

Moderate Special Needs 

Human Development 



Michael O'Connell 

School of Management 

Finance 
Mgmt. Info. Systems 



Daniel P. O'Brien 

School of Management 
Marketing 




Jason T. O'Connell 

School of Management 



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Andrew T. O'Connor 

Arts & Sciences 
Philosophy 



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Kieran O'Connor 

Arts & Sciences 
History 



Michael F. O'Connor 

Arts & Sciences 
Economics 



Rosemary E. O'Connor 

Arts & Sciences 
English 



Meghan I. Getting 

Arts & Sciences 
Communication 



Diane Ogilvie 

Arts & Sciences 
Communication 




Catherine A. Oglebay 

Arts & Sciences 
English 



Maureen T. O'Grady 

Arts & Sciences 
English 



Justin D. O'Horo 

School of Management 
Accounting 



Conor L. O'Kane 

Arts & Sciences 

Theater Arts 

Theology 



Melissa R. Olear 

Arts & Sciences 
Communication 



David E. O'Leary 

Arts & Sciences 
History 



Tara M. O'Leary 

School of Education 

Elem. Ed./Mod. Sp. Needs 

Human Development 



Donald E. Oliveira 

Arts & Sciences 
History 



Tracy A. Olson 

Arts & Sciences 
English 



Owen R. O'Malley 

Arts & Sciences 
English 



Kerry M. O'Neill 

Arts & Sciences 
Communication 



Lynne M. O'Neill 

Arts & Sciences 
Communication 



Hugh R. O'Kane 

School of Mangement 
Finance 




Erika A. Olson 

Arts & Sciences 
Economics 




Jill M. Opulski 

School of Education 

Elementary Education 

Moderate Special Needs 

Psychology 



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Meghan A. O'Regan 

i School of Education 
Elem. Ed. /Int. Sp. Needs 
Human Development 



Timothy W. O'Rourke 

Alts & Sciences 
Theology 



John P. Orsina 

Arts &C Sciences 
Psychology 



Roman A. Ortega-Cowan 

Arts & Sciences 
Economics 
Philosophy 



Jason C. Orzechowski 

School of Management 
General Management 




Brent A. Osborn 

School of Management 
Marketing 



Sean M. O'Sullivan 

School of Management 
Accounting 



Michael M. Oue 

Arts & Sciences 
Biochemistry 



Erin L. Pacocha 

School of Nursing 
Nursing 



Anne T. Padilla 

Arts & Sciences 
Political Science 
Communication 




James Pak 



School of Management 
Finance 



Maria Palaganas 

School of Education 

Human Development 

Communication 




Theresa M. Palascak 

School of Nursing 
Nursing 



Sonja L. Palmquist 

Arts & Sciences 
Economics 




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Edward A. Panetta 

Arts & Sciences 
Sociology 
Theology 


James G. Papadopouloi 

School of Management! 

Finance 

Economics 




Kristine L. Papamichael 

Arts &C Sciences 
Psychology 



Christopher J. Papp 

Arts & Sciences 
English 



Christopher J. Pappas 

School of Management 
Finance 



Tushar S. Parildi 

School of Management 
Finance 



Matthew J. Parisi 

Arts & Sciences 
Biology 



Michael J. Parisi 

Arts &C Sciences 

Mathematics 

Computer Science 



Chun Y. Park 

Arts &C Sciences 
Chemistry 




Hyunok H. Park 

School of Management 
Finance 



Jahaan R. Parker 

Arts & Sciences 
Psychology 



Dana R. Parlato 

School of Management 
Finance 



Theodore James Pascalides 

School of Management 
Finance 



Heidi J. Pascuiti 

Arts & Sciences 
Sociology 




Deep V. Patel 

Arts & Sciences 
Economics 



Michael Paulson 

Arts & Sciences 

History 



Jigna Patel 

School of Management 

Mgmt. Info. Systems 

Computer Science 



Rupal Kantilal Patel 

School of Management 

Mgmt. Info. Systems 

Computer Science 



Aaron N. Patnode 

Arts & Sciences 
Communication 



Bonnie C. Paulsen 

School of Nursing 
Nursing 




Eric Peter Pawlowski 

School of Management 
Accounting 



Michael J. Pearce 

Arts & Sciences 

Biology 



David D. Peck 

School of Education 
Human Development 



Kate Marie Peczynski 

Arts & Sciences 
Psychology 




Michael David Pelletier 

Arts & Sciences 

History 



Christian H. Pennotti 

Arts & Sciences 
English 



Franklin R. Pena 

Arts & Sciences 
Political Science 



Patrick A. Pendergest 

Arts & Sciences 
Psychology 



John P. Penders 

Arts & Sciences 

Political Science 

History 



D. Chad Percival 

Arts & Sciences 
Psychology 



Brette L. Perlman 

School of Education 

Elementary Education 

Moderate Special Needs 

Human Development 



Michael J. Perna 

School of Management 

Finance 

Accounting 



Cheng Peng 

School of Management 

Finance 




Kristen M. Perras 

Arts & Sciences 
Biology 



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Maria Knebl, Brigid Grienway, Jen Ashkarm, Monique Reynes 




Mark McNulty, Katherine Harvell, Kris Savajian 



Carrie Hamiliton-Jones, Ryanne Foley, Kathryn Botica 



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Amanda Hubbard, Jodi Nichols, Cleo Bercrand 




Meg Miles, Jess Geier, Beth Naldi, Laura Morelle, Jenn Powers 




Sarah Healey 



Heather Ward, Kristin Wesoiaslci, Amy Rebert 




Lauren Suprenant and Lauren Rennard 



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Kara Gordy and Carrie Everett 




Tom Velonis, Debby Krans, and Michele DiPaolo 



Michael King 





Mark Dennis Perreault 

Arts & Sciences 
Music 



Katharine M. Pescatore t 
School of Management 
Finance 




Marco E. Peschiera 

Arts & Sciences 
Computer Science 



Michael G. Peters 

School of Management 
Finance 




Lauren Rose Peterson 

Arts & Sciences 

English 



Da\'id Marc PetrelU 
Arts & Sciences 

Communication 



Ashling K. Petro-Roy 

Arts & Sciences 

Geology 



Joseph G. Pexton 

Arts & Sciences 
Physics 



Uyen Th Pham 
Arts & Sciences 

Communication 
Philosophy 




Jason L. Phillips 

School of Management 
Finance 



Joshua Phillips 

School of Education 

Secondary' Education 

History 



Daniel Paul Picone 

Arts & Sciences 
Communication 



Trieste M. Pierandri 

Arts & Sciences 
Economics 



James A. Pietras 

Arts & Sciences 
Geophysics 



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Michael B. K. Pietsch 

School of Management 
Marketing 



John D. PUkington 

Arts & Sciences 
Comniunication 



Donna M. Pimentel 

School of Management 
Accounting 



Jason Pink 

School of Management 

Accounting 



Michelle Pirelli 

School of Management 

Human Resources Mgmt. 

Accoimting 




Leigh Allyn Pires 

School of Management 

Marketing 

Human Resources Mgmt. 



Lori A. Piscatelli 
Arts & Sciences 

English 
Communication 



Judy Pisnanont 

Arts & Sciences 
History 



Lisa Arme Pistillo 

School of Management 

Finance 



Susan C. Pitt 

Arts & Sciences 

Psychology 




Brian Robert Poile 
Arts &C Sciences 
Communication 



Lisa Pompei 

School of Education 
Elementar)' Education 
Intense Special Needs 
Human Development 



Alexandria Polidori 

Arts & Sciences 

Sociology 



Allegra Lea Pollock 
Arts & Sciences 

English 



Beth A. Pollock 

Arts & Sciences 
Communication 



Joseph J. Pontrello 

Arts & Sciences 

Biolog}' 

Philosophy 



Danielle R. Porceili 

Arts & Sciences 

English 

Theater Arts 



John M. Porchia III 

Arts & Sciences 
Economics 



Kathleen Anne Pollock 

School of Education 

Elementarv' Education 

Human Development 




Kristie Marie Porpora 

School of Management 

Finance 



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Anna P. Porter 

School of Education 

Elementary Education 

Math/Computer Science 



Amanda E. Poverchuk 

Arts & Sciences 
English 



Jennifer A. Powers 

School of Education 

Early Childhood Education 

Human Development 



Elizabeth K. Pratt 

School of Education 
Human Development 



Lauren Beth Premerlani 

School of Management 
Finance 



Ryan L. Pressley 

Arts & Sciences 
Economics 



Caryn A. Prestigiacomo 

Arts & Sciences 
Psychology 



Nathalie A. Price 

Arts & Sciences 
Communication 



Christopher P. Principe 

Arts & Sciences 
History 




Elizabeth Anne Provasoli 

Arts & Sciences 
Communication 



Kristina Provencher 

Arts & Sciences 
English 



Kimberley S. Prygocki 

Arts & Sciences 

Psychology 



Michael J. Pryor 

Arts & Sciences 
History 



Martina Marie Pugni 

School of Management 
Marketing 




Jessica L. Pulzetti 

Arts & Sciences 
Classical Studies 



Patrick J. Purcell 

School of Management 
Marketing 



Scott Lee Purdy 

Arts & Sciences 
Biochemistry 



Ronald A. Purpora 

School of Management 
Finance 



Hans B. Pusch 

School of Management 
Finance 



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Elizabeth R. Putman 

Arts & Sciences 
English 



Mary Elizabeth Puzo 

Arts & Sciences 
History 



Kathryn Lisa Pyrek 

School of Education 

Early Childhood Education 

Child in Society 



Emily Gillian Quevedo 

School of Management 

Finance 

Marketing 



Meredith A. Quimby 

Arts & Sciences 
Communication 




Courtney E. Quinn 

Ai'ts & Sciences 
Sociology 



Keleigh M. Quinn 

Arts & Sciences 

Psychology 

English 



Maura E. Quinn 

School of Management 

Human Resources Mgmt. 

Marketing 



Molly K. Quinn 

Arts & Sciences 
Economics 



Kelly A. Quintal 

School of Nursing 
Nursing 




Michael P. Quirk 
Arts & Sciences 
Communication 



Jaime Quiros 

Arts & Sciences 
Economics 



Adam J. Rack 

Arts &c Sciences 
Political Science 





Anthony J. Rack 

Arts & Sciences 
Political Science 



Molly E. Rackley 

School of Management 

Economics 

Finance 



Elizabeth R. Radetic 

Arts & Sciences 
English 




Laure C. Rakvic 

Arts & Sciences 
Psychology 



ZacharyJ. Rashman 

Arts & Sciences 

History 

Sociology 



Mark T. Ralabate 

School of Management 
Finance 
History 



Matthew R. Ramsey 

Arts & Sciences 
Biology 



Crystal A. Rask 

School of Nursing 
Nursing 



Jennifer L. Rath 

School of Management 

Marketing 

Human Resources Mgmt. 



Peter A. Rankel 

Arts & Sciences 

Mathematics 

Computer Science 




Heather Leigh Ratliff 

Arts & Sciences 
English 




Jonathan D. Raelin 

School of Management 
Marketing 




Shawna M. Rainer 

School of Education 

Elementary Education i 

Child in Society 




Rebecca K. Ratner 

School of Management 
Marketing 




Mona Rawashdeh 

Arts & Sciences 
Computer Science 




Shannon M. Raye 

Arts & Sciences 

Sociology 
Communication 



Anthony J. Raymond 

School of Education 

Human Development 

English 



Kathleen M. Raynor 

Arts & Sciences 
Psychology 



Shadab Raziuddin 

Arts &C Sciences 
Economics 




Amy Elizabeth Rebert 

School of Education 

Elementary Education 

Spanish 



Emily K. Rehwinkel 

School of Management 
Finance 



Lee W. Reiber 

Arts & Sciences 

English 

Philosophy 



Kristin Lee Reilly 

School of Management 

Finance 

Accounting 



Marie Reilly 

Arts & Sciences 
Art History 




Genevieve N. Reiner 

LArts & Sciences 
History 



Erika P. Reis 

Arts & Sciences 
International Study 



Laura Reis 

Arts & Sciences 
Political Science 



Nicholas E. Reiser 

Arts & Sciences 

Psychology 



Julia P. Rendon 

Arts & Sciences 
Communication 



Kara Lyn Rendzia 

Arts & Sciences 
English 



Kathryn A. Renna 

Arts & Sciences 
Communication 



Lauren A. Rennard 

School of Management 
Accounting 



KimberlyA. Renaud 

School of Education 

Elementary Education 

Child in Society 




Kellyann Resnick 

Arts & Sciences 

Communication 

Sociology 



<MMP4M 




Robin Ure, Kathy Maureen Dowling, Hugh O'Kane, Carlos Rodrigues, Shannon Cooke, Kelly Gallagher, Beth McGuire, Kristina, Marissa Ciccia, 

Debbie Nagle 




Kate McKee and Katie Fienup 



Laurin Mottle and Nellie Gedney 



mtimmmm 





Jennifer Tulis, Kristin Wesolaski, Lorryn Mai, Meaghan Brusch, Nina Erk 




Todd Antico, Mike Carey, Chris Goff, Mike Maida 



THE BATTLE AT SOUTH BEND 







l..i-L..L...-..LiliiiIii 



The Notre Dame game has been called many things: the Holy War, the 
Jesuit Conference, the Catholic Bowl. This year BC students called it 
VICTORY!! During the weekend of November 20, 1999 upwards of 
1,000 Boston College students, most of whom were seniors, made their way to 
South Bend, Indiana for what would be their final game against the University of 
Notre Dame. BC students herded to Indiana in droves, and took the place over. 
It was amazing to see so much hope, enthusiam and dedication in so many people 
after a 1 5 hour car ride or a 1 8 hour bus ride. That however, was not the best part. 
The best was what they left with: the memories. The pilgrimage to Notre Dame 
was much more than a Superfan bonanza. It was the mother of all road trips. Think 
about it: driving 2,000 miles with your closest friends or people you hardly know, 
sleeping 2-3 in a bed in a crowded hotel (if you were lucky enough to get one) just 
to stand at a football game for four hours in single degree weather and then drive 
1 8 hours back. It was surreal. It was a journey that will not be soon forgotten and 
never duplicated. 




Robin Ure and Kelly Gallagher at Touchdown T: Karen Hanna, Molly Webster. M: Ann-Marie Tenn, Marissa Jacobs, Andrea Marvin, Liz | 

Jesus. Egan. B: Vanessa Ajjan, Becky Carney I 




The Boston College mobile home park at Notre Dame 




COLLEGE 
31 



T 



Julia Kane and Tiffany Symanski 




Kim ArbuckJe, Tara Williams, Lauren Melkus, Jim Maher, Andy Sullivan, Tim Nolan 



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The Boston College Victory Dance 



wlm^m^ 




Marguerite M. Reynolds 

Arts & Sciences 

Political Science 

Economics 



William A. Reynolds 

Arts & Sciences 
History 



Kathryn J. Rhodes 

School of Management 
Marketing 



Debby N. Ribeiro 

School of Education 

Secondary Education 

History 



Sarah K. Richards 

Arts & Sciences 
English 



Kerry M. Richmond 

Arts & Sciences 

History 

Sociology 



Kathleen B. Richter 

School of Education 
Human Development 



Stephanie G. Ridge 

Arts & Sciences 
Psychology 



Bryan D. Richards 

School of Managemen 
Finance 




Christian J. Riesch 

School of Managemen 
Accounting 



L 



Megan K. Riley 

School of Education 
Elementan' Education 
Human Development 



Robert T. Ripley 

Arts & Sciences 

Biochemisty 



Allyson B. Rinella 

Arts & Sciences 

Communication 

Sociology 



Mark S. Ritchie 

Arts & Sciences 
Psychology 



Kendra L. Ringer 

School of Education 

Human Development 

Sociology 



Steven M. Rini 

School of Management 
Finance 



Michelle M. Riordan 

Arts & Sciences 
Mathematics 




John K. Riter 

School of Management 
Finance 



Nelson G. Ritter 

Arts &C Sciences 

Theology 



Nathalia S. Rivaroia 

Arts &C Sciences 

History 




Tara E. Roafk 

Arts & Sciences 
Biology 



Elizabeth A. Rocco 

Arts & Sciences 
English 



David B. Robbins 

Arts & Sciences 
English 



Kelly L. Robinson 

Arts & Sciences 
English 



Margaret V. Robinson 

College of Advancing Smdies 
Computer Info. Technology 



Ryan T. Robson 

School of Management 

Accounting 
Mgmt. Info. Systems 




Gregory A. Rodetis 

School of Management 
Finance 



Sarah A. Rodrigues 

Arts & Sciences 
Communication 



Carlos Rodriguez 

School of Management 
Accounting 



Jan C. Rodriguez 

School of Management 
Finance 



ftrntm^^Sf 



Jonathan R. Rodriguez 

Arts & Sciences 
Economics 



Josanna M. Rodriguez 

Arts & Sciences 
French 



Robert C. Rogan 

Arcs & Sciences 
Physics 



Victoria M. Roger 

School of Management 
Marketing 



Lukas Rohr 

School of Management 
Finance 




Adriana G. Rojas 

School of Management 
Marketing 
Economics 



Adam J. Rominger 

Arts & Sciences 
Economics 



Dawn E. Rood 

School of Education 

Human Development 

Sociology 



Patrick Roscoe 

Arts & Sciences 
Communication 



Chadron M. Rose 

Arts & Sciences 
Economics 




James J. Rosenbaum 

Arts & Sciences 
Psychology 
Economics 



Scott G. Rosenthal 

Arts & Sciences 
Economics 



Matthew T. Rossini 

Arts & Sciences 
Op. and Strategic Mgmt. 



Abigail R. Rote 

Arts & Sciences 
Communication 



Lisa A. Roth 

School of Management 

Finance 

Marketing 




Jennifer S. Rothenberg 

School of Management 

Marketing 

Finance 



Michael S. Rotondo 

Arts & Sciences 

Political Science 

Economics 



Stephanie M. Rotondo 

Arts & Sciences 
Psychology 



Timothy R. Rotz 

School of Management 

Operations and Strategic 

Management 



Vincent E. Routel 

Arts &C Sciences 
English 



J i J l iH i llit i W I !) 



Julie Roux 

Arts & Sciences 
Germanic Studies 



Carlton J. Rowe 

Arts & Sciences 
Sociology 



Brian J. Rowland 

Arts & Sciences 
Sociology 



Michael A. Rowley 

Arts & Sciences 
Biology 



Kevin Rozanski 

School of Management 
Finance 




Jack C. Ru 

School of Management 

Finance 
Mgmt. Info. Systems 



Jennifer L. Rubino 

School of Management 
Marketing 



Angelina R. Ruffatto 

Arts & Sciences 
International Relations 



Jennifer L. Ruggiero 

Arts & Sciences 
Political Science 
Communication 



Andrew J. Russell 

Arts & Sciences 

Theater Arts 

English 




Eliza C. Russell 

Arts & Sciences 
Biology 



Holly A. Russell 

j\rts & Sciences 
Biochemistry 




Elizabeth A. Russo 

School of Education 
Elementary Education 
Human Development 



Krzysztof J. Rutkowski 

Arts & Sciences 

Biochemistry 

Computer Science 




I 



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Brendan M. Ryan 

Arts & Sciences 
Biology 



Katharine E. Ryan 

School of Management! 
Finance 




Michael Ryan 

School of Management 

Accounting 

Finance 



William K. Ryan 

School of Managemeni 
Finance 




Kathleen E. Ryder 

Arts & Sciences 
Communication 



David M. Rys 

Arts & Sciences 
Mathematics 



Aaron T. Sabo 

School of Management 

Marketing 

Finance 



Kwesi B. Sackey 

School of Education 

Human Development 

Communication 



Melissa M. Salas 

Arts & Sciences 
Political Science 




Rafael M. Salas 

School of Management 
Marketing 



Michael C. Salerno 

Arts & Sciences 

Theater Arts 
Political Science 



Loubna M. Salhab 

Arts & Sciences 
Communication 



Peter J. Salles 

School of Management 
Marketing 



Joseph R. Salois 

School of Management 

Finance 



mmmm 



Javier Salom 

Arts & Sciences 
Psychology 



Andrea J. Salter 

Arts & Sciences 

Germanic Studies 

Classics 



Jamil A. Samara 

Arts & Sciences 
Computer Science 



Gavin C. Sammarco 

School of Management 

Finance 

Marketing 



Christine M. Sample 

Arts & Sciences 

Mathematics 

Computer Science 




Erica J. Sandman 

Arts & Sciences 
Communication 



Stephen G. Sanko 

Arts & Sciences 
Biology 
English 



Emily N. Santos 

Arts & Sciences 

English 
Communication 



Sean E. Santry 

Arts & Sciences 

Computer Science 

Philosophy 



Kristopher E. Sarajian 

Arts & Sciences 
Economics 




Victor C. Saratella 
Arts & Sciences 

History 
Economics 



Joshua Sarmir 

School of Management 

Finance 

Mgmt. Info. Systems 



Sophia R. Sasaki 

Arts & Sciences 

Political Science 

Philosophy 



Jino J. Savaglio 

Arts & Sciences 
Computer Science 



Gandhar S. Savur 

School of Management 
Marketing 




Samuel J. Sawyer 

Arts & Sciences 
Computer Science 



Paul W. Scanlan 

School of Management 
Finance 



Paul M. Scansaroli 

School of Management 

Accounting 



Matthew F. Scarlato 

Arts & Sciences 

Political Science 

Psychology 



Megan K. Schiller 

School of Management 
Marketing 



i*» 



THE TWELFTH MAN 




Mike Galaho, Matt Moore (eagle), Becky Johnston, Tom Ledbetter, Carolyn Canry, Danielle Kinon, Stephanie Aranyos 




Liz Fitzpatrick and Becky Maurer 



Liz Rocco, Carol Brozenske, Missy Barry, Suzy Casey, Kyleen Charlton, Jiji 
Lou, Robin Miller, Laura Delong ! 



Mi^iiMnP 




Casey McCorrmick and Stacey Colucia 



Melinda Wood, Karen Blanton, Ashley Dubin, Alison Tureene, Debbie 
Avitabile, Chrissy Barone, Sarah Richards, Joan Demarco 




Jamie Corliss, Mary Kate Hanlon, Alison Staukus 



Lauren Suprenant, Amy Dold, Lynette Darkoch 




Tim Nolan and Buzz Winchester 



Kelly Resnick, BCPD, Sarah Stiglmeier 





Matt Parisi, Chris Kolkhorst, Fadi Khuri 



Andy Sullivan, Tim Nolan, Jim Maher 




Rob Maloney, Marc Masso, Mike Cummings, John Occhipinti, Keith Heisler 









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Sheila Milligan, Erin Lynch 





Patty Mahoney, Susan Schutte, Elisabeth Sullivan 



Third Row (L to R): Peter Manley, Brett Balavendar 

Second Row (L to R): Brian Fitzgerald, Kathyrn Hartmere, Steven Crowley, 

Kathy Nichols, Erica Olsen 

First Row (L to R): John Courtney, Marc Blanchette, Erin Lynch, Sheila Milligan 




Moira Crowley, Julia Kane, Tiffany Simanski 



Chris Mossa, Mike lannuzzi 



<MPP4i^ 




Stacy A. Schmitz 

Arts & Sciences 

Psychology 



Adrienne B. Schnaper 

Arts & Sciences 

Psychology 
Communication 



Julie V. Schonbeck 

School of Nursing 
Nursing 



Andrea C. SchonhofF 

Arts & Sciences 
Chemistry 



David W. Schopfer 

Arts & Sciences 
Biochemisrty 




Paul E. Schrotenboer 

Arts & Sciences 
International Studies 



James E. Schubert 

School of Education 

Secondary Education 

English 



Susan M. Schutte 

Arts & Sciences 
Biochemistry 



Jeremy S. Schwartz 

School of Management 

Finance 

Philosophy 

Economics 



April D. Scoville 

School of Managemem 

Marketing 



^t^n^miimm 




* Daniel P. Scribner 

Arrs & Sciences 
Environmental Geo Science 



Heather Scull 

School of Management 
Marketing 



Carrie S. Scuorzo 

Arts & Sciences 
Communication 



Stephanie J. Seiss 

Arts & Sciences 

Chemistry 



Hans M. Senn 

Arts & Sciences 
English 



Joseph R. Serrano 

School of Management 

Marketing 

Finance 



Sarah C. Sebastian 

School of Education 

Secondary Education 

History 



Amanda T. Seirup 

School of Education 

Elem. Ed./Mod. Sp. Needs 

Human Development 




Ryan M. Sell 

School of Management 

Finance 



Sumantha R. Selvakumar 

School of Management 

Finance 

Marketing 



Mackie Senay 

Arts & Sciences 
Slavic Studies 



Kathryn L. Senesi 

School of Education 

Elem. Ed./Mod Spec Needs 

Child in Society 




Anna E. Sense 

Arts & Sciences 

Theology 

English 



Daniel W. Sec 

School of Management 
Finance 



Marc L. Serafino 

School of Management 
Finance 



Christopher B. Serico 

Arts & Sciences 

English 
Communication 




Alison B. Setterberg 

Arts & Sciences 
Economics 



Kristine A. Severino 

School of Education 

Secondary Education 

Mathematics 



Shannon L. Seymour 

School of Education 

Elementary Education 

Child in Society 



Justin W. Shaghalian 

School of Management 
Marketing 



^9mlmmit§ 



Sharon Sharma 

School of Management 
Finance 



Kelly A. Sharman 

School of Education 
Early Childhood 
Child in Society 



John R. Sharpe 

Arts & Sciences 
Computer Science 



Shannon E. Sharpe 

Arts & Sciences 
Marketing 



Preeti S. Shastri 

Arts & Sciences 
Psychology 




Trevor B. Shaughnessey 

Arts & Sciences 
Political Science 



Jacqueline C. Shea 

School of Management 
Mgmt. Info. Systems 



Jennifer A. Shea 

School of Management 
Mgmt. Info. Systems 



Michael W. Shea 

School of Management 

Finance 



GaryM. Sheehan 

Arts &C Sciences 
English 



Holly K. Sheldon 

Arts & Sciences 
History 



Elizabeth A. Shelvin 

Arts & Sciences 
Communication 



Dianna L. Shepard 

Arts & Sciences 

English 

Sociology 



Bradley W. Sherwin 

Arts & Sciences 
Economics 
Psychology 



Taylor E. Shields 

Arts & Sciences 
Communication 



Kendall Short 

Arts & Sciences 
Germanic Studies 



Nicholas H. Shortle 

Arts & Sciences 
Biology 



Brian J. Sheehan 

School of Management 

Finance 
Mgmt. Info. Systems 




Maureen A. Shepard 

School of Education 

Elementary Education 

Communication 




Mark K. Sieczkowski 

Arts & Sciences 
Computer Science 



^mtSmm 




[arian E. Silliman 


Eric J. Silva 


Kalia E. Silva 


Tiffany M. Simanski 


Natalie R. Simmonds 


Arts & Sciences 


Arts & Sciences 


Arts & Sciences 


School of Management 


Arts & Sciences 


English 


English 


Communication 


Accounting 


Communication 
English 




Edward B. Simmons 

Arts & Sciences 
Economics 



Leanne E. Simpson 

School of Nursing 
Nursing 



Roland F. Singer 


Sarah E. Singer 


Alan E. Siroy 


School of Management 


Arts & Sciences 


Arts & Sciences 


Marketing 


Sociology 


Biology 
Theology 




David L. Sivillo 

Arts & Sciences 
Computer Science 



Kathleen Siwy 

School of Management 
Accounting 





John V. Skerry 

Arts & Sciences 
Political Science 



Allison A. Sldbbs 

School of Management 
Finance 




Elizabeth L. Skinner 

School of Management 
Human Resources Mgmt. 



Jennifer L. Skinner 

Arts & Sciences 
English 



Sean O. Skrypek 

Arts & Sciences 

Political Science 

English 



Jennifer D. Slane 

Arts & Sciences 

English 

Studio Art 



Hugh O. Slater 

School of Management 
Economics 




Matthew J. Slattery 

Arts & Sciences 
Communication 



Victoria M. Sloan 

School of Management 

Economics 

Finance 




Jeffrey L. Slothower 

Arts & Sciences 
Economics 



Thomas J. Sly 

Arts & Sciences 

Theater 
Communication 



Amy K. Smith 

Arts & Sciences 
Psychology 



Christine R. Smith 

School of Manangement 
General Management 



Kristin R. Smith 

School of Education 

Secondary Education 

Hispanic Studies 



MiaiMnPi 



Rebecca Smith 

School of Education 
Elementary Education 



Shannon L. Smith 

Arts & Sciences 
Geology & Geophysics 



Kevin T. Smosky 

School of Management 

Finance 

Philosophy 



Adam D. So 

Arts & Sciences 

Political Science 

Philosophy 



David K. Sokolowski 

Arts & Sciences 
History 



Bensen V. Solivan 

Arts & Sciences 
Sociology 



James J. Spadazzi 

School of Management 
Marketing 



Joseph N. Sparacino 

School of Management 

Finance 



Elizabeth C. Scares 

School of Management 
Marketing 




Elissa G. Spelman 

School of Education 

Elem. Ed./Mod. Sp. Needs 

Child in Society 




Sandra P. Spencer 

Arts & Sciences 

Biology 



Katherine M. Spinola 

School of Management 
Finance 



Emily E. Spooner 

School of Education 

Elem. Ed./Mod. Sp. Needs 

Math/Computer Science 



Elizabeth A. Spranzani 

Arts & Sciences 

Psychology 

Computer Science 



Paul J. Springer 

School of Management 

Finance/Mgmt. Info. 

Systems Op./Strat. Mgmt. 




Bharath T. Srikrishnan 

School of Management 

Finance 
3p. and Strategic Mgmt. 



Aaron M. Stanecki 

Arts & Sciences 
Economics 



John J. Stanisz 

Arts & Sciences 
Computer Science 



Alison L. Stankus 

Arts & Sciences 
English 



Claire L. Starling 

School of Education 
Human Development 



I 



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Derek Vandegrift and Joshua Cook 



iMi^Mm 



Debbie Wilkinson, Briane Chai-Onn, Jennifer Rath, and Maureen O'Grady i 




iV5'. 




Debbie Nagle, Keliy Gallagher, and Robin Ure 



Vanessa Ajjan and Marissa Jacobs 







Erin Bovd, Catherine Lacson, and Lisa Ness 




I 



Amy Suchanek and Brian Poile 



Brian Haney, Vince McWade, Paul Summers, Mike 



Catherine Lacson, Patty Mahoney, Danielle Nohe, Stephanie Aranyos, Jen Rothenberg, Amy Vaghini 




Dave Canning and Marissa Jacobs 



Michael Carson, John Stergiou, Tim Beaupre, Pat Dunn, Sebastiano Visentini, Matt 

Kosciak 



^^ifSmmm 



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Alison Turenne, Katie Richter, Katy Senesi, Joan DeMarco, 
ilaudia Zaborsky, Kelly Corigliano, Christy Connolly, Heather Ashley, Jeni Jefferson, Debbie Avitable, Kristen Wilcox, Susan Brenner, Chrissy 



Elizabeth Sweeney 



Cc 











Cr)'stal Rask, Cathleen Tomaszewski, Anna Kern, Andrea Coleman, Cara MacGilvray, Kelly Deneen, Meghan McLaughlin 



'm 





Amy L. Starzynski 

School of Education 

Secondary Education 

Mathematics 



Kate E. Steffek I 

Arts & Sciences f 

Chemistry ' 




Andrew E. Stein 

Arts & Sciences 

English 
Communication 



John J. Stergiou 

School of Management 

Finance 

Communication 



Sarah B. Stiglmeier 

Arts & Sciences 
Communication 



Beth E. Stiller 

School of Education 

Human Development 



Allyson P. Stoll 

School of Management 

Finance 

Accounting 




Matthew T. Stratton 

School of Management 

Computer Science 

Finance 



Joseph A. Strazzeri 

Arts & Sciences 
Environ. Geosciences 



Andrea E. Strutt 

School of Management 
Accounting 



Craig R. Stryker 

School of Management 

Economics 

Mgmt. Info. Systems 



Brent E. Stephens 

School of Management 
Finance 




Daniel D. Stone 

Arts & Sciences 
History 




Anne K. Subourne 

Arts & Sciences 

English 
Communication 



Bf^iP<Mnp 



Amy C. Suchanek 

School of Management 

Human Resources Mgmt. 

Marketing 



Elisabeth A. Sullivan 

Arts & Sciences 
Communication 



Meghan K. Sullivan 

School of Management 

Accounting 

Finance 



Sara Suglia 

Arts & Sciences 
Communications 



Jessica J. Suh 

School of Education 

Secondary Education 

English 



Amy P. Sullivan 

Arts & Sciences 
Chemistry 



Andrew J. Sullivan 

Arts & Sciences 
Communication 




James C. Sullivan 

Arts & Sciences 
Biology 



Jonathan F. Sullivan 

School of Management 
Finance 



Kathryn A. Sullivan 

Arts & Sciences 

Theology 

History 



Kerry J. Sidlivan 

Arts & Sciences 
History 




Michael F. Sullivan 

Arts & Sciences 
Computer Science 



Michael J. Sidlivan 

Arts & Sciences 
Communication 



Ryan M. Sullivan 

Arts & Sciences 
English 



Timothy M. Sullivan 

Arts & Sciences 
Art History 




Elizabeth L. Summers 
Arts & Sciences 

Economics 
Communication 



Paul J. Summers 

Arts & Sciences 
Computer Science 



Lauren A. Suprenant 

Arts &C Sciences 
English 



Julia L. Suprock 

Arts & Sciences 
History 



Li,™^^. „ . „l L.-J 

Michael S. Sutphin 

School of Management 

Accounting 



I 



IDUIJ iOOJ 



Danielle J. Sutton 

Arts & Sciences 
Psyciioiogy 



Gregory J. Sutton 

Arts & Sciences 
History 



Karina R. Svalya 

Arts & Sciences 
English 



Jeffrey H. Swart 

School of Management 
Marketing 



Elizabeth A. Sweeney 

Arts & Sciences 
Psychology 




Matthew T. Swenson 

Arts & Sciences 
English 



Andrew T. Swetonic 

Arts & Sciences 
Communication 



Keith C. Swiniarski 

School of Management 
Accounting 



Dorothy Szpet 

Arts & Sciences 
French Literature 



Tanya K. Tai 

School of Education 
Human Development 




Koji Takagi 

Arts & Sciences 
International Studies 



Melissa A. Tardiff 

School of Education 

Elementary Education 

Moderate Special Needs 



iiiiipiiiitonuiMP 



Kohtaro Takeuchi 

Arts & Sciences 

Philosophy 
Communication 



Vincent J. Tamuzza 

Arts & Sciences 
Biology 



Anne-Marie H. Tan 

Arts & Sciences 

English 

Psychology 



Amanda A. Tappen 

School of Management 
Finance 




Susan M. Tarrant 

Arts &C Sciences 
Sociology 



Robert M. Tasman 

Arts & Sciences 
Communication 



James A. Tavelli 

Arts & Sciences 
Biology 



Mary R. Taylor 

Arts & Sciences 
English 



Kevin M. Teaken 

I School of Management 



Accounting 



Alissa A. Tears 

Arts & Sciences 
Germanic Studies 



Giulia L. Tedesco 

Arts & Sciences 

Political Science 

Italian 



Kacey A. Tedesco 

School of Management 

Accounting 

Finance 



Elizabeth E. Tegins 

Arts & Sciences 
Biology 




Michael D. Tegnelia 

School of Management 

Mgmt. Info. Systems 

Finance 



Annmarie A. Tenn 

Alts & Sciences 
Political Science 



Kathleen L. Terry 

Arts & Sciences 
Sociology 



Peter F. Terry 

Arts & Sciences 
Communication 



Kristen A. Tertzakian 

Arts & Sciences 

Psychology 
Political Science 




Jyl A. Tesler 

School of Educaiton 

Elementary Education 

Communication 



Marianna Thacker 

School of Management 
Accounting 



Julia J. Tesoriero 

School of Management 
Accounting 




Robert M. Thacker 

Arts & Sciences 
Political Science 






Andrew M. Thau 

Arts & Sciences 
Political Science 



Brian D. Thomas 

Arts & Sciences 

English 
Communication 



Lauren Tilelli 

Arts & Sciences 
Communication 



Jennifer M. Theriault 

Arts & Sciences 
English 



Jennifer E. Thomas 

Arts & Sciences 
Communication 



Latoya Thomas 

School of Nursing 
Nursing 



Gretchen L. Thompson 

School of Management 
Finance 



Rebecca L. Tobin 

Arts & Sciences 
English 



Cathleen J. Tomaszewski 

Arts & Sciences 
History 



Ryan C. Tomlinson 

Arts & Sciences 

English 

Philosophy 



Joseph C. Theis 

Arts & Sciences 
Political Science 




Genevieve F. Thiers 

Arts & Sciences 
English 
Music 




Ronald B. Thompson 

School of Managemenn 
Accounting 
Marketing 




Ross D. Tompkins 

School of Mangemen 
Marketing , 

Philosophy I 



ji^imiaSmmm 



Barbara Torrellas 

School of Education 
Secondan' Education 



Christopher P. Tortorella 

Arts & Sciences 
Political Science 



Matthew Touhey 

Arts & Sciences 
English 



Justin W. Tourney 

Arts & Sciences 
Sociology 



Pamela A. Tracey 

School of Management 
Accounting 




Quyen T. Tran 

Arts & Sciences 
Biology 



Marina Travayiakis 

Arts & Sciences 
Economics 



Daniel R. Troiano 

School of Management 

Computer Science 

Finance 



Christopher M. Trotta 

Arts & Sciences 
History 



Brian P. Tsu 

School of Management 

Accounting 



Lisa M. Tulipani 

School of Nursing 
Nursing 



Jennifer K. Talis 

Arts & Sciences 
English 



Joseph G. Tully 

School of Management 

Mgmt. Info. Systems 

Finance 



Irena Tsirulnik 

Arts & Sciences 
Studio Art 




Kathleen M. Tully 

Arts &C Sciences 
Political Science 




Michael Tuohy 

Arts & Sciences 
History 



Elizabeth W. Turchyn 

Arts & Sciences 
English 



Alison B. Turenne 

Arts & Sciences 
Sociology 



Shannon K. Twomey 

School of Education 

Elem. Ed./Mod. Sp. Needs 

Human Development 



Jeanne E. Tyhacz 

Arts & Sciences 
Political Science 



igmnmmm 




Kathryn Botica and Allison Duff 



Tandy McNamara 




Andy Sullivan and Amy Vaghini 



«^^!^itmmm 



Kara Glynn, Kim Arbuckle and Carol Brozenki 



s 



}f^ % 




A 





Jen Ashkar and Sheila Milligan 



Nancy Delpidio and Amanda Hubbard 




Katy Senesi, Tish Few, Joan DeMarco, Alison Turenne and Chrissy Barone 



Elyssa Vasas 




Amy Cryan and Tom Frechette 



Kristen Reilly, Shannon Bansfield and Brooke Bartlett 



SENIOR 
POLL 

Best Additions 
to Campus 



The Candy Bins at Lower 
The Stadium Bubble 

Carney's 
The Doors on Lyons 

Outdoor Tables at Lower 

Best Events 

Chris Rock 

David Spade 

Maya Angelou 

Pops on the Heights 

Tribe Called Quest 

Best Trips 

South Bend, Indiana 
Bahamas, Jamaica, Cancun 

Kairos 

Ignacio Volunteer Programs 

Foxwoods 

Best Boston 
Activities 

The Duck Tour 

Newbury Street 

Skating on Frog Pond 

Broadway Shows 

MFA 

Museum of Science 

The Aquarium 

BC Hockey at the 

Fleet Center 




Tim Beaupre, John Stergiou, Pat Dunn, Matt Kosciak, Mike Carson, Randy Vera, Sebastiano Visentinh 




Vanessa Monico, Liz Pratt 



Chris GofF, Mike Carey 




Tatyana Vorobyova, Moira Crowley, Rita Walker, Liz Bassotti, Sonja Wong 




Mike Rowley, Ryan Fitzpatrick, James King, Rebecca 
Carney, Erin Lynch 



Lynette Darkoch, Loren Cioffi, Lauren Chai, Lauren Suprenant, 
Lauren Rennard, Genevieve Reiner, Amy Dold 




Chris McTammany, Tony Khouri, Eric Silva, Father Terry Devino 



Lauren Meikus, Michael Tegnelia, Kim Arbuckle, Raui 




Sae Uchida 

Arts & Sciences 
History 



Julie E. Ulbrich 

Arts & Sciences 
English 



David C. Underdown 

School of Management 
Finance 



Marc P. UnderhiU 

Arts & Sciences 
Biochemistry 



Michael A. Ungari 

Arts & Sciences 
Psychology 




Robin A. Ure 


Patricia A. Vacca 


Amy M. Vaghini 


Peter M. Vaglio 


Fiorella A. Valdesolo 


Arts & Sciences 


School of Management 


Arts & Sciences 


Arts & Sciences 


Arts & Sciences 


Political Science 


Mgmt. Info. Systems 
Finance 


Communication 


Communication 


English 
Studio Art 



n f i^ii>iSfe 




Abigail Valencia 

School of Nursin" 



Nursing 



Daniell M. Valenti 

School of Management 
Mgmt. Info. Systems 



Jennifer L. Vallario 

School of Education 

Human Development 

English 



Lauren L. Van Ausdall 

School of Education 

Elementary Education 

Child in Society 



Derek J. Vandegrift 

Arts & Sciences 
History 



Melanie Vanstry 

Arts & Sciences 
Biochemistry 



Jorge Vargas 

Arts & Sciences 
Psychology 



Elyssa B. Vasas 

School of Nursing 

Nursing 



Peter A. Vanaria 

Arts & Sciences 
Classics 
History 




Alejandro Velasco 

Arts & Sciences 

History 
Communication 




Thomas E. Velonis 

Arts & Sciences 
Political Science 



Eric Viksnins 

School of Management 

Computer Science 

Finance 



Charlie A. Veprek 

Arts & Sciences 
Theater Arts 



Charles Vesceri 

School of Education 

Elementary Education 

Math/ Computer Science 



Gabrielle Viator 

Arts & Sciences 
Political Science 



Christine M. Vicari 

School of Management 
Accounting 




Elena P. Villasenor 

Arts & Sciences 
International Studies 



Jeffrey J. Vincent 

School of Management 

Finance 



Danielle R. Vincenti 

Arts & Sciences 
Biology 



Kimberly Vinick 

Arts & Sciences 
Communication 



Sebastiano Visentini 

School of Management 
Finance 



Blythe E. Vito 

School of Management 

Op. and Strategic Mgmt. 

Philosophy 



Erika C. Vog;t-Lowell 

Arts & Sciences 
Hispanic Studies 
Communication 



Gretchen E. Volpe 

Arts & Sciences 
English 



Tatyana Vorobyova 

Arts & Sciences 
Biochemistry 




Patrick T. WaddeU 

Arts & Sciences 
Computer Science 



Taryn C. Wallace 

Arts & Sciences 
Psychology 



Theodore H. Wagenknecht 

Arts & Sciences 
English 



Brendan J. Wagner 

School of Management 
Finance 



Kristen A. Wales 

Arts & Sciences 
Economics 



Marc M. Wallerce 

School of Education 

Finance 

Marketing; 



KimberlyA.Walsh 

School of Management 
Accounting 



Timothy D. Walsh 

School of Management 

Accounting 

Finance 



Rita M. Walker 

School of Education 
Secondary Education 
Mathematics 




James E. Walson 

Arts & Sciences 
Philosophy 




Leslie R. Walters 

Arts & Sciences 
Sociology 



Jennifer Wan 

School of Management 
Marketing 



Jillaire Wangsgard 

Arts & Sciences 
History 



Heather K. Ward 

Arts & Sciences 
Hispanic Studies 
Political Science 



Matthew S. Warner 

Alts & Sciences 
Economics 



I 



44§" i §mmw 



Luiza D. Wasielewska 


Titipong J. Watana 


David W. Waterfall 


Roderick A. Waters 


Arts & Sciences 


School of Management 


Arts & Sciences 


Arts & Sciences 


Economics 


Finance 


Enghsh 


Sociology 


Chemistry 




Philosophy 





Nasya N. Watler 

Arts & Sciences 

Psychology 




Joseph M. Watts 

Arts & Sciences 
Biology 



Raquel J. Webster 

Arts & Sciences 

Sociology 

English 



Brandon S. Weiss 
School of Management 

Finance 
Op. and Strategic Mgmt. 



Matthew J. Welch 

Arts & Sciences 
English 



Ryan M. Welch 

Arts & Sciences 
Communication 




Jennifer C. Welter 

School of Management 

Marketing 

Human Resources Mgmt. 



Kristin J. Wesolaski 

School of Education 

Secondary Education 

Hispanic Studies 



\ 9LiM\i //J 




Jessica E. White 

Arts & Sciences 
Psychology 



Raymond F. White 

Arts & Sciences 
Economics 



Kathleen L. Whitledge 

Arts & Sciences 
Communications 




Heidi A. Weygandt 

Arts & Sciences 
English 



Jeffrey J. Whelpley 

Arts & Sciences 
Computer Science 



Anna M. Wienholz 

School of Management 
Marketing 



Christa M. Whelan 

Arts & Sciences 
Biology 




Matthew C. Whitaker 

Arts & Sciences 

Economics 
Political Science 




Justine M. Wilbur 

Arts & Sciences 
Chemistry 




Michael P. Wilbur 

Arts & Sciences 
History 



Kristen M. Wilcox 

School of Management 
Accounting 



Jason H. Wild 

Arts & Sciences 
Economics 



Kristin M. Wildt 

School of Management 
Finance 



Jason M. Williams 

School of Management 
Accounting 




Jennifer Williams 

Coll^ of Advancing Studies 
Business Administration 



Kathleen V. Williams 

School of Education 

Human Development 

Sociology 



Kevin D. Williams 

Arts & Sciences 

Philosophy 
Political Science 



James W. Winchester 

Arts & Sciences 
Economics 



Ryan T. Winmill 

vVrts & Sciences 
History 




Neve A. Winspeare 

Arts & Sciences 
Communication 



Michael J. Winter 

School of Management 

Economics 

Finance 



Michael G. Winters 

Arts & Sciences 

Mathematics 

Computer Science 



Sarah L. Wolke 

Arts & Sciences 
Psychology 
Studio Art 



Kim L. Welters 

Arts & Sciences 
Philosophy 



Andrew R. Woltman 

School of Management 
Finance 



Connie K. Wong 

Arts & Sciences 
Biology 



Jospeh T. Wong 

School of Management 
Computer Science 



Jeffrey P. Welters 

Arts & Sciences 
Biology 




Tricia J. Wong 

Arts & Sciences 
Biology 




Melinda K. Wood 
Arts & Sciences 
Communication 



Brian M. Woods 

Arts & Sciences 

Biology 

Economics 



Matt G. Woods 

Arts & Sciences 
Communication 



Craig J. Woythaler 

Arts & Sciences 

Theater Arts 

English 



Jason M. Wren 

School of Management 

Marketing 



mmmmim 




(L to R) Liz Lane, Carrie Everett, Michael Sullivan and Carrie Hargreaves 



Eddie Simmons 




•^«i^ 



Hoon Choi 





Lauren Chai and Amy Dold 




Grace Deveny and Beth Hundey 



Stephanie LoConto 




Deanna Deskin and Kristen DeMayo 



Dave Chlaruttini, Nat Corrigan, Doug Marshall, Bridget Kiely, and Mike Peters 




Allen Cermak, Doug Radigan, Mike Gallano. Aaron Patnode, Jeff Mathias, Kevin 
Collins, Tim McCourt, and Brendan Brier 



Kathy Rider and Brendan Nolan 



*. 




^N\^5l|l% 




1 



Amanda Greene, Nina Erk, Kristin Wesolaski, 
Lorryn Mai, Meaghan Brusch, and Jennifer Tulis 




Liz Rocco, Carol Brozenske, and Kara Glynn 




(L to R) Mike Carson, Matt, Sid, John Sturgio, and Tim B. 



Rebecca Carney and Elizabeth Eagan 




Brendan C. Wright 

Arts & Sciences 
Computer Science 



Christine R. Yancey 

College of Advancing Studies 
Business Management 



Kristina A. Wylie 

Arts & Sciences 
English 



Tara L. Williams 

Arts & Sciences 
Communication 



Kathy Yacinthe 

School of Nursing 
Nursing 



Charlene L. Yan 

Arts & Sciences 
Chemistry 




Lynn R. Yarmey 

Arts & Sciences 
Geophysics 



Nana Yazaki 

Arts & Sciences 
English 



Casey J. Yetman 

Arts & Sciences 
Environ. Geosciences 



Livia C. Yeung 

School of Management 

Marketing 

Finance 




Kozue Yokota 

School of Management 

Finance 

Marketing 



Clifford T. Young 

School of Management 
Marketing 



Mary A. Yoixng 

Arts & Sciences 
English 



Klmberly A. Youngquist 

School of Management 
Financing 



Delia Yu 

School of Management 
General Management 




Kristen M. Yurkerwich 

School of Management 

Accounting 

Finance 



Claudia Zaborsky 

School of Education 

Human Development 

Theater Arts 



Corinne A. Zadigan 

Arts & Sciences 
Communication 



Elisabeth M. Zajoc 

Arts & Sciences 
Music 



Joseph A. Zambella 

Arts & Sciences 
Computer Science 



//l3 iU II DU I J 





sffrey L. Zannella 


Kelly A. Zaremba 


Sevag Zargarian 


Steve M. Zaun 


Sara M. Zawadzkas 


ool of Management 


School of Management 


Arts & Sciences 


School of Management 


School of Education 


Marketing 


Finance 


Economics 


Finance 


Elementary Education 
Human Development 




Leigha M. Zedros 

Arts & Sciences 
Psychology 



Andrea M. Zezas 

School of Management 



Lisa C. Zievers 

School of Management 
Marketing 



Krista E. Zilnicki 

School of Management 
Finance 



Christian Zinn 

School of Management 

Theology 

Human Resources Mgmt. 




Jeremy K. Zipple 

Arts & Sciences 
Economics 



Neil Zuber 

Arts & Sciences 

History 



Michael S. Zullo 

Arts & Sciences 
Philosophy 



Elizabeth Q. O'Connor 

Arts & Sciences 
Psychology 



Justin Began 

Arts & Sciences 
Computer Science 



• 



Class of 2000!! 




RASHY 



Andrew A. Abbott 


Marshal S. Armitage 


Kyla M. Barbour 


Joanna E. Bergida 


Arts & Sciences 


.Axts & Sciences 


Arts & Sciences 


Arts & Sciences 


Computer Science 


Chemistr)' 


Communication 


Communication 


Dahlia G. Abdul-Jawad 


Jose A. Arroj'O 


Joseph A. Basto 


Theodore Bertzeletos 


School of Management 


School of Management 


Arts & Sciences 


Arts & Sciences 


Finance 


Finance 


Economics 


Economics 


Marketing 




Philosophy 






Mario A. Arroyo 




Elane F. Beyrodt 


Amaya C. Aboitiz 


Arts & Sciences 


Brett T. Bean 


School of Management 


School of Education 


Political Science 


Arts & Sciences 


Marketing 


Early Childhood Education 




Psychology' 




Child in Societ}' 


Fransiskus R. Arjawan 


Political Science 


Scott M. Bezzini 




School of Management 




Arts & Sciences 


Matthew G. Adelhardt 


Finance 


Troy A. Beaulieu 


Psychology 


Aks & Sciences 




Arts & Sciences 




Computer Science 


Rebecca B. Babin 


Histor)' 


Eric W. Bhark 


Economics 


.\rts & Sciences 


Political Science 


Arts & Sciences 




Economics 




Geology and Geophysia 


Bader M. Al-Saif 




Elizabeth A. Becker 




Arts & Sciences 


Brian J. Bair 


School of Nursing 


Shalini Bhojwani 


Political Science 


Ans &c Sciences 


Nursing 


School of Management 


History- 


Histor\' 




Marketing 






Michael C. Bedar 


Finance 


Jessica V. Alberti 


A. X. Baker 


Arts & Sciences 




Arts & Sciences 


Arts & Sciences 


Computer Science 


BronsonJ. Bigelow 


English 


Philosophy 




Arts & Sciences 




Classics 


Francesca M. Behr 


Economics 


Darnell L. Alford 




Arts and Sciences 




School of Education 


Munesh Balani 


Psycholog)' 


Susan A. Biolsi 


Human Development 


School of Management 




Arts & Sciences 




Finance 


Malik L. Bell 


Biochemistry 


Tawndria K. Allen 




Arts & Sciences 




Arts & Sciences 


Jessye M. Ball 


Political Science 


Gretchen E. Bishop 


International Studies 


Arts & Sciences 




School of Management 




Pohtical Science 


EUen A. Bender 


Economics 


Brian T. Allwood 


Economics 


School of Education 




Arts & Sciences 




Elementar)' Education 


Marc A. Blanchette 


Economics 


James V. Bambino 


Child in Society- 


School of Management 




Arts & Sciences 




Economics 


Peter J. Anderson 


English 


Anne M. Berberick 




Arts & Sciences 




School of Nursing 


Allison Blurton 


Biology 


Young M. Ban 


Nursing 


Arts & Sciences 




School of Management 




Psychology 


Gabriella Araujo 


Mgmt. Info. Systems 


Robin P. Berghaus 




Arts & Sciences 


Economics 


Arts & Sciences 




Art History 




Biology 





Colleen M. Bolger 



I School of Education 
Earlv Childhood Education 
Human Development 



I 



I 



Giovanni Bonarelli 

School of Management 

Finance 

Anik D. Bonham 

School of Education 

Elementar}' Education 

General Science 

Kimberly N. Booth 

School of Management 

General Management 

James P. Bradley 

Arts & Sciences 
Communications 

Patrick F. Brady 

.\ns & Sciences 
Computer Science 

Damian M. Branch 

School of Management 

Operations and Strategic 

Management 

Paul A. Brandano 

School of Management 
Marketing 

Nathaniel D. Briscoe 

Arts & Sciences 

Psychology 

Ellen M. Bronchetti 

Arts & Sciences 
Psychology 

Abigail E. Bronner 

Arts & Sciences 

EngUsh 

Amy K. Bro\\'n 

Arts & Sciences 
French 

Brooke L. Buchanan 

School of Management 

Marketing 

Communication 



Jennifer M. Buchholz 


Daniel P. Canny 


Anna A. Chemova 


School of Education 


Arts & Sciences 


Arts & Sciences 


Human Development 


Endish 


International Studies 


Martha R. Bunker 


Timothy M. Carey 


Judy Chong 


School of Education 


Arts & Sciences 


Arts & Sciences 


Elemental,' Education 


Histot)' 


Psychology 


Sociology 








Robert D. Carson 


Katherine K. Chimg 


Carolyn S. Burbach 


School of Management 


Arts & Sciences 


Arts & Sciences 


Finance 


History' 


Psychology 








Christin M. Carter 


Kelda K. Chung 


Heather C. Burns 


School of Education 


School of Management 


School of Education 


Elementary' Education 


Finance 


lem. Ed./Int. Sp. Needs 


Child in Societ}' 


Mgmt. Info. Systems 



Theology 

Brian J. Bush 

School of Alanagement 

Marketing 
Mgmt. Info. Systems 

Edward B. Bush 

School of Alanagement 
Finance 

Puja M. Buxani 

Arts & Sciences 
Hispanic Studies 

Courtney A. Byers 

School of Education 

Elem. Ed./Mod. Sp. Needs 

Himian Development 

Joseph P. Byers 

Arts & Sciences 

Sociology 

Kristian M. BjTne 
7\rts & Sciences 
Commtmication 

Kenny S. B}iin 

School of Management 

General Management 

Tracy-Ann M. Calder 

School of Management 

Marketing 

Jessica L. Camp 

Arts & Sciences 

French 

Philosophy 



Paul E. Case}' 

Arts & Sciences 
Histor)' 

Juan B. Casillas 

School of Management 

Accotmting 

Finance 

Tanya M. Casimiro 

Arts & Sciences 

School of Aianagement 

Ps}'cholog}' 

Kevin J. Caidfield 
Arts & Sciences 
Commimication 

Scott V. Cedeno 

Arts & Sciences 
Philosophy 

Beatrice M. Ceruelos 

School of Management 

Finance 

Ann A. Chaglassian 

^Arts & Sciences 
Political Science 

Frank J. Chamberlin 

Arts & Sciences 

Computer Science 

Nicholas J. Chase 

Arts & Sciences 

English 



Pedro E. Cirino 

Arts & Sciences 
Sociology- 

Darr}'ll Coates 

School of Management 

Finance 

Lindsay E. Collin 

School of Management 
Htunan Resource Mgmt. 

Addrain S. Conyers 

Arts & Sciences 

Ps\'chology 

Sociology 

Michael A. Cook 

School of Education 

Elementary Education 

Sociology 

Shannon T. Cook 

School of Management 
Accoimting 

Jane E. Corsiglia 

School of Management 
Human Resoiurce Algmt. 

Matthew J. Costa 

School of Education 

Mathematics 
Secondan- Education 



Kevin D. Costello 

Arts & Sciences 
Economics 

Amanda Cote 

School of Management 
Marketing 

Robert F. Cotter 

School of Management 
Marketing 

Michael G. Cotton 

Arts & Sciences 
Psychology 

John A. Courtney 

Arts & Sciences 
Economics 

Steven J. Covelluzzi 

Arts & Sciences 
Sociology 

Brenda C. Cowley 

School of Education 

Secondary Education 

English 

Shannon B. Coyle 

Arts & Sciences 
English 

Shannon D. Crocker 

School of Education 

Elem Ed./Inter Sp. Needs 

Sociology 

Margaret M. Croke 

Arts & Sciences 

Theology 
Communication 

Christopher J. Cucinelli 

Arts & Sciences 
Psychology 

Jennifer L. Cuculich 

Arts & Sciences 
Psychology 
Economics 



Catherine M. Cummings 

School of Education 
Human Development 

Chental S. Cunin 

School of Nursing 
Nursing 

Nicole D'Onofrio 

School of Management 
Marketing 
Sociology 

Natasha P. Da Rosa 

Arts & Sciences 
Sociology 

WiUiam O. Daily 

Arts & Sciences 
English 

Natalie A. Danglade 

Arts & Sciences 
Communication 

Sara B. Davidson 

Arts & Sciences 

Linguistics 

English 

Kathryn E. Davis 

Arts & Sciences 
Theatre Arts 

Ana E. Ds Campossalle 

Arts & Sciences 

History 
Env. Geo. Science 

Nicole E. De Masi 

Arts & Sciences 
English 

James E. De Vos 

Arts & Sciences 
Political Science 

Suzannah S. Deady 

Arts & Sciences 
English 



Jill H. Dedman 

School Education 
Elementary Education 
Human Development 

Edwin E. Delacruz 

School of Education 
Human Development 

Michael S. Deland 

Arts & Sciences 
History 

James P. Dempsey 

Arts & Sciences 
International Studies 

John E. Deplitch 

Arts & Sciences 
Geophysics 

Andrew C. Devine 

Arts & Sciences 
History 

Jessica A. Dickman 

Arts & Sciences 
English 

Nhatha V. Dinh 

School of Management 

Op. & St. Mgmt. 

Daniel DiPietrantonio 

Arts & Sciences 
Philosophy 

Scott J. Dolan 

Arts & Sciences 

History 

Computer Science 

Meghann E. Donahue 

Arts & Sciences 
Political Science 

Sean P. Donnelly 

Arts & Sciences 
Economics 



Ayanna A. Dougan- 
McKenzie 

Arts & Sciences 
English 

Timothy J. Driscoll 

Arts & Sciences 
Political Science 

Jonathan A. Ducote 

School of Management 
Human Resource Mgmt. 

Matthew Duskis 

Arts & Sciences 
History 

Julia S. Dyett 

School of Nursing 
Nursing 

John D. Eckert 

Arts & Sciences 
Psychology 

Kyesha Elliot 

7\rts & Sciences 
Psychology 

Robert E. Ellis 

School of Management 
Marketing 

Fletcher B. Evans 

Arts & Sciences 
English 

Israel J. Encinosa 

Arts & Sciences 

History 
Political Science 

Eli Escobar 

School of Management 
Marketing 

Juan A. Espinal 

Arts & Sciences 
Political Science 

Fletcher B. Evans 

Arts & Sciences 
English 



I 



Jeffrey T. Farkas 


Andres Forero 


Nicholas Geib 


Amanda Greene 


Arts & Sciences 


School of Management 


Arts & Sciences 


Arts & Sciences 


Sociology 


Marketing 


Philosophy 


Biology- 


English 










Kenneth M. Forte 


Nataliya Gekht 


Hugh C. Gregg 


Michael B. Farrell 


School of Nursing 


Arts & Sciences 


Arts & Sciences 


Arts & Sciences 


Nursing 


Psychology 


Economics 


Mathematics 










Andrea Freile 


Cynthia A. George 


Marymargaret E. Griffin 


Timothy T. Farrell 


School of Management 


Arts & Sciences 


Arts & Sciences 


Arts & Sciences 


Finance 


Art History 


Unclassified 


Studio Art 








Philosophy 


Stephen Y. Fung 


James C. Gerchow 


Michael J. Guazzo 




Arts & Sciences 


School of Management 


Arts & Sciences 


Kevin W. Fay 


Economics 


Marketing 


Communication 


Arts & Sciences 








English 


Marcia L. Furr 


David B. Gilchrist 


Marta Guerreiro 




School of Education 


School of Management 


School of Management 


Catherine M. Fellet 


Elementary Education 


Finance 


Finance 


Arts & Sciences 


Human Development 


Marketing 




Biochemistry 






Serdar Gunduz 




Paul D. Furrer 


Anne E. Gnazzo 


School of Management 


Ana Ferreira 


School of Management 


School of Education 


Finance 


Arts & Sciences 


Marketing 


Human Development 




Biochemistry 






Gilbert Guzman 




Michael M. Gabelli 


Carl S. Goebel 


Arts & Sciences 


Paulina N. Fibak 


Arts & Sciences 


Arts & Sciences 


Sociology 


School of Management 


Sociology 


Computer Science 




Finance 






Rex Hamano 




Timothy P. Gallagher 


Jason Z. Goon 


Arts & Sciences 


Michael R. Findlay 


School of Management 


School of Management 


Psychology 


Arts & Sciences 


Marketing 


Finance 




English 




Marketing 


Emmeline Hambali 


Philosophy 


Tom Gallagher 




School of Management 




School of Management 


Christopher J. Gould 


Mgmt. Info. Systems 


Kevin L. Fisher 


Marketing 


Arts & Sciences 


Finance 


Arts & Sciences 




Biochemistry 




Sociology 


Noah R. Callico 


English 


Randolph Handal 




Arts & Sciences 




School of Management 


Megan K. Flannery 


Theatre Arts 


Adam C. Grace 


Marketing 


Arts & Sciences 




Arts & Sciences 




English 


Bradley R. Galvin 


Computer Science 


Erik D. Hane 


Communication 


Arts & Sciences 




Arts & Sciences 




Psychology 


Maureen K. Graefe 


Biology 


Erin E. Flynn 


Economics 


School of Education 




Arts & Sciences 




Elementary Education 


Carolyn E. Haney 


History 


John S. Gannon 


Human Development 


School of Education 


English 


Arts & Sciences 




Human Development 




Communications 


Ebonee K. Green 




Katharine C. Fogarty 




Arts & Sciences 


Danielle E. Harlovs^e 


School of Management 


Janine T. Garzia 


English 


Arts & Sciences 


Finance 


Arts & Sciences 


Studio 7\rt 


Psychology 


Marketing 


Psychology 
Hispanic Studies 







Franz J. Hard 

Arts & Sciences 
Philosophy 

Natasha C. Harvey 

Arts & Sciences 

Political Science 

Sociology 

Timothy T. Hasselbeck 

School of Management 
Marketing 

John P. Hatjopoulos 

School of Management 
General Management 

Andrew J. Heim 

Arts & Sciences 
Physics 

Craig Heins 

Arts & Sciences 
Physics 

Elvis R. Henriquez 

School of Education 

Elementary Education 

Child in Society 

Siobhan Henry 

School of Education 

Human Development 

Elem. Ed./Int. Sp. Needs 

Gregory N. Herbowy 

Arts & Sciences 
English 

Jeffrey E. Herlihy 

Arts & Sciences 
Hispanic Studies 

Robert W. Herpen 

Arts & Sciences 
Communication 

Lisa A. Herskovs^itz 

Arts & Sciences 
Political Science 

Sean J. Hinton 

School of Nursing 
Nursing 



Rie Hirose 

Arts & Sciences 
International Studies 

Michael T. Holden 

School of Management 
Marketing 

Derek S. Holland 

Arts & Sciences 
History 

Adam J. Holmes 

School of Management 
Finance 

Harrison Hong 

Arts & Sciences 
Computer Science 

Matthew A. Houtsma 

Arts & Sciences 
Economics 

Christopher James Hovan 

Arts & Sciences 
Communication 

Kenneth K. Hsu 

School of Management 
General Management 

Margaret Milton Hunt 

School of Education 

Secondary Education 

Hispanic Studies 

Daniel C. Hurley 

Arts & Sciences 
Economics 

Nicholas Hurt 

Arts & Sciences 

Theology 
Communication 

Sarah Rosinta Hutauruk 

School of Management 

Accounting 

Finance 



Anthony John Hutchins 

Arts & Sciences 
Communication 

Michelle A. lovanna 

Arts & Sciences 
Psychology 

Amy Ruth Isaacson 

Arts & Sciences 
History 

Tara C. Jackman 

School of Nursing 
Nursing 

Patrick A. Jackson 

Arts & Sciences 

Philosophy 

English 

Donald J. James 

Arts & Sciences 
Music 

Christian T. S. Jaquier 

School of Management 
General Management 
Mgmt. Info. Systems 

Jennifer M. JeflFerson 

Arts & Sciences 
History 

Cristina Jimenez 

Arts & Sciences 
Economics 

Megan L. Johns 

Arts & Sciences 
Psychology 

Thomas P. Joyce 

School of Management 
Finance 

David Jusino 

Arts & Sciences 
Communication 

Steven H. Kang 

Arts & Sciences 

Political Science 

Economics 



Justin D. Kanive 

School of Management 
Finance 

Andrew C. Karberg 

Arts & Sciences 
Philosophy 

Megan Alanna Keaney 

Arts & Sciences 

Sociology 

Will Dallison Kemeza 

Arts & Sciences 
English 

Heather K. Kennedy 

School of Management 
Finance 

Alexia N. Kiamos 

School of Management 

Finance 

Marketing 

Adam M. Kiessling 

Arts & Sciences 
English 

Chrissy Hyung-Mi Kim 

School of Management 

Accounting 

Mgmt. Info. Systems 

Eric Jun Kim 

School of Management 

Finance 

Economics 

James K. Kim 

School of Management 
Marketing 

Jeeil Kim 

Arts & Sciences 
Economics 

Taewoo Kim 

Arts & Sciences 

Computer Science 

Mathematics 






Marissa King 

Arts & Sciences 
English 

Andrew J. Knight 

Arts & Sciences 

Economics 
Communication 

VijayA. Koilpillai 

Arts & Sciences 
EngUsh 

Jan Michael Kostrzewski 

Arts & Sciences 
Economics 
p Political Science 



» 



Daniel M. Krause 

Arts & Sciences 
History 

Jessica M. Kubiak 

Arts & Sciences 
English 

Bryan D. Lackaye 

Arts & Sciences 
History 

Richard Laksana 

Arts & Sciences 

Economics 

Computer Science 

Andrea K. Lang 

Arts & Sciences 

Communication 

English 

Dennis Lauria 

School of Management 
Finance 

Susannah E. Lawrence 

Arts & Sciences 

Studio Art 

Art History 

Jason Joon Lee 

Arts & Sciences 

Economics 
Communication 



Jinwoo Lee 

Arts & Sciences 
English 

Jonathan Lee 

School of Management 
Marketing 

Robert Lee 

School of Management 
Marketing 

Ryan Huey Ching-Yung Lee 

School of Management 

Finance 

Accounting 

Steven S. Lee 

School of Management 

Finance 

Human Resources Mgmt. 

Yoonkyoung Lee 

School of Management 

Mgmt. Info. Systems 

Finance 

Bonnie A. Leibowitz 

Arts & Sciences 

Mathematics 

Philosophy 

Karen Leverich 

Arts & Sciences 
Political Science 

Pin Li 

School of Management 

Marketing 

Mgmt. Info. Systems 

Michael C. Liberman 

Arts & Sciences 
History 

Johanna K. Liparini 

School of Management 
Marketing 

Latesha A. Lipscomb 

Arts & Sciences 
Political Science 



Autumn K. Loftus 

Arts & Sciences 

Biology 

Psychology 

James S. Loisou 

School of Management 
Marketing 

Jennifer Long 

Arts & Sciences 
Psychology 

Jennifer A. Longo 

School of Education 

Elem. Ed. / Mod. Sp. Needs 

Hispanic Experience 

Andres J. Lopez 

School of Management 
General Management 

Rafael Lopez 

Arts & Sciences 

Psychology 

English 

Courtney Marie Lordi 

School of Education 

Elem. Ed. / Mod. Sp. Needs 

English 

James E. Lozier 

Arts & Sciences 
Communication 

Jennifer Anne Lucey 

7\rts & Sciences 
History 

Kristen E. Lucke 

School of Education 

Elem. Ed. / Mod. Sp. Needs 

Human Development 

Sarah Elizabeth Lynch 

Arts & Sciences 
Psychology 

Stefan Lysak 

School of Management 
Marketing 



Olesya Lyubinina 

School of Management 
Finance 

Juliana E. Macan 

Arts & Sciences 
Psychology 

Lorraine M. Mack 

School of Education 

Human Development 

Child in Society 

Brendan James Maguire 

School of Management 
Marketing 

William F. Mahoney 

Arts & Sciences 
Computer Science 

Joseph Kenneth Malek 

School of Management 
Computer Science 

Christina Marie Mallett 

School of Nursing 
Nursing 

Rupesh M. Manglavil 

Arts & Sciences 
Psychology 

Ross C. Maradian 

Arts & Sciences 
Political Science 

Matthew J. Marzetti 

Arts & Sciences 
Political Science 

Chad Gerard Mazoue 

Arts & Sciences 
Philosophy 

Uzoma Nneka Mba 

Arts & Sciences 
Economics 

Timothy James McCaffrey 

Arts & Sciences 
Communication 



w mmm^m 



Benn C. McCallister 

School of Management 
Marketing 

Thomas Joseph McGariy 

Arts & Sciences 
Biology 

David Shields McLean 

Arts & Sciences 
Communication 

Laya Bachs McLean 

Arts & Sciences 
Biology 

Katherine M. McNamara 

Arts & Sciences 

Germanic Studies 

Economics 

Maureen Frances McNamara 

School of Management 
Marketing 

Megan Bearden McNamara 

Arts & Sciences 
English 

Mark Robert McNulty 

School of Education 

Elem. Ed. / Mod. Sp. Needs 

Communication 

Orlando Menendez 

School of Management 

Economics 

Finance 

Jason P. Mercurio 

School of Management 
Finance 

Catalina Mesa 

School of Management 

General Management 

Marketing 

Communication 

Abby E. Meshberg 

Arts & Sciences 
Psychology 



Jennifer L. Messier 

Arts & Sciences 
Philosophy 

Joseph Peter Michel 

Arts & Sciences 
Psychology 

Joseph Mickens 

Arts & Sciences 
Sociology 

Aleida F. Miranda 

Arts & Sciences 
Sociology 

Judd Mitchell 

Arts & Sciences 
Communication 
Germanic Studies 

Jermaine R. Monk 

Arts & Sciences 
Communication 

Michael J. Montague 

Arts & Sciences 
Biology 

Ana Barreto Monteiro 

Arts & Sciences 
Mathematics 

Ana Rosa Monies 

Arts & Sciences 
Psychology 

Alessandra Moore 

Arts & Sciences 
Economics 

Jason Moschella 

Arts & Sciences 
History 

Michael J. Mottau 

Arts & Sciences 
Communication 

Stephen E. Mulcahy 

School of Management 
Accounting 



Sean Kevin MuUaney 

School of Management 
Accounting 

Luke Murdoch Mullins 

School of Education 

Secondary Education 

History 

Thomas Flynn Mulvoy 

Arts & Sciences 
Economics 

Gregory Thomas Murnion 

Arts & Sciences 
Philosophy 

Megan M. Murphy 

Arts & Sciences 
Psychology 

Michael P. Murphy 

Arts & Sciences 
Mathematics 

David Stephens Naidty 

School of Management 
Finance 

Jermaine Wuan Tse Nei 

School of Management 

Op. and Strategic Mgmt. 

Communication 

Adam L. Newman 

Arts & Sciences 
Communication 

Lam T. Nguyen 

Arts & Sciences 

Economics 

Mathematics 

William Thomas Noonan 

School of Management 

Finance 

Accounting 

Erin Marie O'Brien 

School of Nursing 
Nursing 



Joseph R. O'Brien 

Arts & Sciences 
Philosophy 

Shipra D. Palriwala 

School of Management 
Finance 
English 

Melissa E. Panagrossi 

Arts & Sciences 
Psychology 

Antonio Giacomo Papale 

School of Management 
Computer Science 

Ji H. Park 

School of Management 
General Management 

Nam Park 

Arts & Sciences 
Biology 

Richard Park 

School of Management 

Computer Science 

Mathematics 

Kathryn Parnello 

Arts & Sciences 

Theater Arts 

English 

Joey Lynn Pascarella 

School of Nursing 
Nursing 

Andrew Caleb Patton 

Arts & Sciences 
Political Science 

Jennifer Anne Patula 

Arts & Sciences 
Political Science 

Alexander S. Peck 

Arts & Sciences 
Political Science 

Richard A. Pellegrino E 

Arts & Sciences * 
Physics 



I 



I 



David Condon Perkins 

School of Education 
Human Development 

Justin Persico 

Arts & Sciences 
Biology 

Latiya B. Peters 

Arts & Sciences 
Sociology 

Stephanie Peters 
Arts & Sciences 
Political Science 



Christopher Dana Peterson 

Arts & Sciences 
International Studies 

Timothy J. Phair 

Arts & Sciences 
Economics 

Joseph Allen Piccirillo 

Arts & Sciences 
Communication 



♦ 



I 



Dwayne A. Pina 

Arts & Sciences 
Communication 

Vanessa Guaira Pocock 

Arts & Sciences 
English 

Timothy N. Popadic 

Arts & Sciences 
Psychology 

Jonathan R. Prendergast 

School of Management 
Marketing 

Lauren Murphy Pringle 

Arts & Sciences 
Philosophy 

Thomas M. Prokop 

Arts & Sciences 
History 

Kristina Provencher 

Arts & Sciences 
English 



Joseph Edward Provey 

Arts & Sciences 
Economics 

Rene Deborah Puopolo 

School of Education 

Elem. Ed. / Mod. Sp. Needs 

Communication 

Megan M. Purcell 

Arts & Sciences 

Psychology 

History 

Amy Adele Racicot 

Arts & Sciences 

French 
Hispanic Studies 

Anthony James Rack 

Arts & Sciences 
Political Science 

Sukhjeet Singh Rai 

vVrts & Sciences 
Economics 

Jason D. Raichle 

School of Management 
Finance 

Sanjeev Rajaratnam 

School of Management 

Accounting 

Mgmt. Info. Systems 

George James Rassas 

School of Management 
Marketing 

Adria L. Reimer 

Arts & Sciences 
Geology 

Melissa H. Rhim 

School of Management 
Finance 

Amy K. Rice 

Arts & Sciences 
History 
English 



Brendan C. Richards 

School of Management 
General Management 

Christine Anne Richmond 

Arts & Sciences 
English 

Ana R. Riojas 

School of Management 
General Management 

Patrick Daniel Riordan 

Arts & Sciences 
Germanic Studies 

Frank Rizzo 

Arts & Sciences 
History 

Yoojung Ro 

Arts & Sciences 
Political Science 

Jade S. Robino 

Arts & Sciences 
Art History 

Jeffrey W. Robinson 

Arts & Sciences 
Sociology 

Diana E. Rocco 

Arts & Sciences 
Economics 

Teresa Cecilia Rodriguez 

Arts & Sciences 
Biology 

Charles Anthony Rogers 

Arts & Sciences 
Political Science 

Carlos X. Roman 

School of Management 

Finance 

Economics 

Melanie Rooth 

Arts & Sciences 
Communication 



Victor Rosa 

School of Management 
Finance 

Raspberry Rosen 

School of Management 
Mgmt. Info. Systems 

Catherine C. Rotchford 

Arts & Sciences 
Sociology 

Lisa A. Roth 

School of Management 

Finance 

Marketing 

Katherine G. Roussos 

Arts & Sciences 
International Studies 

Zynthia M. Ruiz 

School of Management 

Human Resource Mgmt. 

Theology 

Heather Marie Russell 

School of Education 

Elem. Ed. / Mod. Sp. Needs 

Human Development 

Michael Damien Russo 

Arts & Sciences 
Sociology 

Amy Elizabeth Ryan 

Arts & Sciences 
Sociology 

Douglas M. Ryan 

Arts & Sciences 
Philosophy 

Christian C. Ryther 

Arts & Sciences 
Economics 

Agneta Sakalyte 

Arts & Sciences 
Psychology 



Christine M. Sample 


Andleib Seth 


Bryan K. Short 


Nicole A. Spain 


.Arts & Sciences 


Arts & Sciences 


Arts & Sciences 


Arts &C Sciences 


Mathematics 


Economics 


Germanic Studies 


Histor)' 


Computer Science 


Hispanic Studies 


English 


Andrea Lyn Sperrazza 


Karim H. Sampra 


Brian S. Shafer 


Jeannie Lo Shu 


School of Management 


.Arts &: Sciences 


Arts &: Sciences 


School of Management 


Marketing 


Histot)' 


Psychology 


Human Resource Mgmt. 








Marketing 


Bobby E. Stancil 


Clapton Deniro Samuels 


Stephanie Marie Shalkoski 




Arts & Sciences 


.\ns & Sciences 


Arts & Sciences 


Brian F. Shuell 


Communication 


Political Science 


History 


School of Management 




Economics 




Finance 


Rose K. Staram 




Beata Shapiro 


Economics 


Arts & Sciences 


Rosevelyn Sanchez 


Arts & Sciences 




Psychology 


School of Management 


Economics 


Allison Hanna Silvestri 




Geneial Management 




School of Education 


Patricia A. Stark 




Ritesh Sharma 


Secondary Education 


School of Management 


Jose G. Santiago 


School of Management 


English 


Marketing 


School of Management 


Finance 






Ps}'cholog}' 




Anna Simkin 


Cameron D. Stebbins 




Christopher O. Shehan 


School of Management 


Arts & Sciences 


Elizabeth Susan Sattely 


Arts &: Sciences 


Finance 


Economics 


Arts & Sciences 


Histor}- 






Chemistt}' 




Nigel C. Simon 


Kate Steinbuhler 




Colleen Elizabeth Sheehy 


Arts & Sciences 


Arts & Sciences 


Brendan Hayes Scanlon 


School of Education 


Economics 


English 


.\rts & Sciences 


Elementary Education 


Philosophy 


Communication 


History 


Human Development 










Roland Francis Singer 


Joshua K. Stello 


Anthony M. Schaefer 


Ian Christopher Shempp 


School of Management 


School of Management 


School of Management 


Arts & Sciences 


Marketing 


Finance 


Finance 


ChemisttA' 










Christopher M. Smernoff 


Amy Louise Stender 


Adam Joseph Schermerhorn 


Liangj'in Shen 


School of Management 


Arts & Sciences 


School of Management 


^\rts & Sciences 


Accounting 


Geology 


Finance 


Political Science 


Finance 






Economics 




Petar Stojanovic 


Desiree Scorcia 




Ashiya Nichole Smith 


Arts & Sciences 


j\rts & Sciences 


Elizabeth A . Shevlin 


Arts & Sciences 


Economics 


Physics 


Arts & Sciences 


Communication 






Commnnication 




Andrew James Stone 


Whitney Vehling Scott 




Jason C. Smith 


Arts & Sciences 


j\rts & Sciences 


Randy Y. Shimanuki 


Arts & Sciences 


Studio Art 


Biochemistry 


Arts & Sciences 

Economics 


Psychology 


English 


Robert Brian Seibert 




Nikolas Anthony Smith 


David J. Struck 


School of Management 


Alex H. Shin 


Arts & Sciences 


Arts & Sciences 


Marketing 


School of Management 
Finance 


English 


Computer Science 


AH Murat Sekban 


Mgmt. Info. Systems 


Stephanie A. Smith 


Brian R. Stuart 


School of Management 




Arts & Sciences 


Arts & Sciences 


General Management 


Jenny Shin 

Arts & Sciences 


Communication 


Political Science 


Lisa M. Senay 


Economics 


Jessica C. Snyder 


Daniel Erich Sullivan 


Arts & Sciences 




School of Education 


Arts & Sciences 


Slavic Studies 


Jung Keun Shin 


Human Development 


Economics 




School of Management 


Elementan,' Education 




Tony R. Senes 


Finance 




Daniel M. Sullivan 


School of Management 


Mgmt. Info. Systems 


Richard B. Soroa 


Arts & Sciences 


Finance/Mgmt. Info. Systems 




School of Management 
Marketing 


English 



Meghan M. Sullivan 
School of Education 

Child in Socien' 
Elementar)' Education 

Tyeke Sullivan 
Arts & Sciences 
Communication 

Edward Andrew Swingle 

School of Management 
Finance 

Bonita L. Taitt 

Arts & Sciences 

Ps}'cholog)- 

Sociology 

Michael S. Takayama 
School of Management 

Op. and Strategic Mgmt. 
Marketing 

Human Resource Mgmt. 

Christopher James Tarpey 

Arts &C Sciences 
Chemistr}' 
Economics 

Joseph C. Taveira 

School of Management 

Op. and Strategic Mgmt. 



Christine J. Thalmann 

^\rts & Sciences 
English 

John-Paid Thomas 

Asis & Sciences 
Economics 

Daniel William Thomason 

School of Management 

Finance 

Liam M. Timmons 
Arts & Sciences 
Political Science 

Katherine Gaud Tinker 

School of Education 

Elementar}' Education 

Human Development 

Stephen T. Todoro\ich 

School of Management 

Economics 

Annie Tong 

Arts & Sciences 

Computer Science 



Tosha Bianca Toomey 

^Arts & Sciences 
English 

Theresa L. Torchia 

Arts & Sciences 
Independent 

Chris Townsend-Small 

Arts & Sciences 

Philosophy 

Loc T. Tran 

Arts & Sciences 

Chemistry 

Tammie Tran 

Arts & Sciences 

Economics 

Xia V. Tran 

School of Management 

Accounting 

Christina Trullols 

Arts & Sciences 
Economics 

Hong-Anh Thi Tu 

School of \Ianagement 
Finance 

Patrick T. Uiterwyk 

Arts & Sciences 
EngUsh 

Jason Matthew Urbanus 

Arts & Sciences 

Classics 

R. J. Vahey 

.Arts & Sciences 
Histor}' 

Christian T. Van Dijk 

School of Management 
Marketing 

Nitin Sudan Varma 

.\rts &C Sciences 
Communication 

Vicki Jo Vaughn 

Arts & Sciences 
Philosophy 

Richard J. Veguilla 

Arts & Sciences 
Computer Science 

Joseph Domenic Venezia 

School of Education 
Human Development 



Christine M. Vicari 

School of Management 

Accounting 

Ketsy Vila)thong 

School of Management 
Marketing 

Richard D. ViUa 
Arts & Sciences 
Pohtical Science 

Brian R. Von Kraus 

Arts & Sciences 

Philosophy 

Geoffrey Nicholas Vrba 

School of Alanagement 

Marketing 

Brigid E. Walsh 

.Arts & Sciences 
English 

Timothy G. Walsh 

School of Management 
Accoimting 

Kerry A. Wasgart 

School of Alanagement 
Marketing 

Cedric Gerard Washington 

Arts & Sciences 

Sociology 

Corey HiU Wailington 
Arts & Sciences 
Pohtical Science 

Stefan S. Wejman 

Ans &: Sciences 
English 

Ryan H. Weldon 

School of Education 

Secondat}' Education 

Enghsh 

Jessica WeUrang 

School of Management 
Finance 

Laura M. WeDter 

School of Education 
Himian Development 

George Rodney White 

School of Education 
Elementar}' Education 
Human Development 



Vitaha P. Widjaja 

School of iVianagement 

Mgmt. Info. Systems 

Marketing 

Debbie Wilkinson 

School of Management 

Marketing 

Human Resources Mgmt. 

Ernesto Ray ^Tlshire 

Arts & Sciences 
Communication 

James E. Winchester 

Arts & Sciences 
Economics 

Nelse T}ier Winder 

School of Niusing 

Nursing 

Samson S. Wong 
School of Management 

Finance 
Xlgmt. Info. Systems 

Stephen P. Yahner 

Arts & Sciences 
Political Science 

Hee-Jung Taylor Yoon 

School of Management 

Finance 
Msmt. Info. Systems 

Melissa Lee Yost 

Arts & Sciences 

Ps}xholog\' 

Soon KjTing Youn 

School of Management 

Finance 
Mgmt. Info. Systems 

Jennifer A. Young 

School of Nursing 

Nursing 

Shanee M. Young 

Arts & Sciences 
Enghsh 

Natasha Z. ZaitzefF 

.,\rts & Sciences 

Histor}- 

Katrina M. Zorka 

Arts & Sciences 
Biolog}' 



In Memory of Kevin Eidt 




"For the sword outwears its sheath, 

and the soul wears out the breast, 

and the heart must pause to breath, 

and love itself have rest." 






"Kevin was a great friend, he positively affected everyone that knew^ him. I feel 
lucky to have known him just the short time that I did." -Jay Kanive 



In Memory of Berkley Matthews 



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"Some people come into our lives 

and quickly go, others stay a while and leave 

footprints on our hearts, 

and we are never the same." 




'I could never talk about Berkley without mentioning her smile 

it lit up our lives and has remained in our hearts. 

What a blessing she was to each of us." -Courtney McCraw 



i mmm' ' 4m 



Benefactors 



71oe stajf of Sub Turri 
2000 would like to extend 
our deepest appreciation to the 
organizations and individuals 
who so generously supported our 
efforts. Because of their kindnesSy 
we were able to capture a year of 
memorieSy andpreserve them for 
the future. You have our most 
sincere thanks and gratitude. 



^9lmtfi^^i§ 



Who offers 
fantastic career 



opportunities in 

professional services to 

the nation's finest college 

graduates? 



the answer is 



Touclie 



©1999 Deloitte S Touche LLP and DeLoitte Consulting LLC. 
Deloitte S Touche refers to DeLoitte 8 Touche LLP, Deloitte Consulting LLC and related entities. 

Oeloitte S Touche, one of the nation's leading professional services firms, provides accounting, 
auditing, tax and management consulting services through a national network of more than 23,000 
nrefespionals in more than 100 U.S. cities. Deloitte & Touche is part of Dsloitte Toucha Tohmatsu.a 
global leader in professional services with more than 82,000 people in over ^133 countries. 

For more information, 
please contact your career services office. 



'^^'imtslm 



Jostensy Inc. 



Would Like to Congratulate 



the Graduating Members 



of the Class of 2000. 



Best of luck in the future! 



2505 Empire Drive 

P.O. Box 5867 

Winston-Salem, NC 27103 



Mmm.mm MJ 



Congratulations 

and Best Wishes to the 

Boston College Class of 20001 

Thank you to the graduating members of Sub Turri: 

Lissa Herrick - Co-Editor Amy Choquette - Senior staff 

Nancy Delpidio - Senior Section Co-Editor Courtney McCraw - Senior staff 
Laurin Mottle - Senior staff Marissa Ciccia - Senior staff 

SUB TURRI 

The Yearbook of Boston College 



Congratulations, 

Class of 2000! 



Business Communication Center, Inc. 



Offset Printing • Typesetting • Graphic Design 
Business Cards & Stationery • Desl<top Publishing 
Mailing • Banners & Signs • Business Forms 
Invitations • Bindery • and much more! 




You'll find us in Boston 

at The Prudential Tower Lower Lobby 

(617) 262-3920 



and in Chestnut Hill 

at BC Press • Boston College 

(617) 552-3418/3419 



i^AMr^ 



McGrath Studio 



The Official Yearbook Photographer 

of Boston College 



Congrattdations 

and Best of Luck 

to the Boston College 



Class of 20001 



f 



8 Elm Street, Suite 2 

Braintree, MA 02184-9920 

1-800-767-1155 



liiimmmmrm^^i 





Congratulations 

to the _ 

Class of 2000 i i 1 

from the faculty and staff of the 
School of Nursing! 

The nurses of the 20th century salute the nurses 



of the 21st century! ^^ 



Congratulations and Best Wishes 

to the Class of 2000 

from the 

Wallace E. Carroll School of Management 

Faculty and Staff 



.SfeSli. 







.kf^t ^v.:.: ; ■ *^ V--. /, 






-liVfSSK.'i^** 



The Office of Student Services 

would like to extend sincere 
thanks to all our sttuknt employees 




L. IV'llL-pini 



and especially the graduating 
sttddents from the Class of 2000. 

Congratulations! 



m^ 



^m 



(SSSV 



( H>si ) o^\) ( >i)si) oi)^ ( )i.»s! ) ( i;>si ) < )!)sfc) ( M ) Six losi.) o^si) oixsD (m^i ) ()!>si) (,)[:)Si,) oi^si) 

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Best wishes to the Boston College Class 0/2000. 
It has been our pleasure working with you! 



*^Dsi) oi)sr)d|Di:).si) (Xxsr.) (^.>so cja^si) o 

()!lm( )!),SD cH^D ODSi"?^!^.) OD^^O 



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ODSD On^:) ODSD (%&D ODSD ODSD OD^ OD SD ODSI )1^:>SD ODSD'^SD ODSD ODSD C:^D 



The Office of the Dean for Student Development 

Serving students as educators by encouraging responsible decision making and accountability, fostering an appreciation of 

diverse cultures, values and justice, and promoting respect for all members of the University Community. 

McElroy 233, McElroy 141, McElroy 114, 0'Connell House 109 




THE OFFICE OF UNIVERSITY HOUSING 

thanks and congratulates all members of the Resident Staff, 

especially those in the Class of 2000. 

Your service, dedication, and loyalty to Boston College 

sets new standards of excellence. 



Robert F. Capalho, Ph D. 

Director of University Housing 



Linda J. Riley 

Associate Director 
Operations/Financial Maimgement 



Robert O. Jose 

Associate Director 
Residential Life 



4m iMmmimvm. 



} 



Congratulations 

to the 

Class of 2000 




BOSTON COLLEGE 

THE PETER S. AND CAROLYN A. LYNCH 

SCHOOL OF EDUCATION 




Boston College 

* BOOKSTORE * 



im/hk'm<memim-tS' 471 



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Platinum Benefactors 



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J\,icnard and Qjorol ^nionelli 

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^nau ana ytaren jSeaupre 

IDeonara ana (SJanaa JJeppu 

Mjcnael ana <uusan ^Jiifzer 

jKr. ana jIlts. LRoogH jK. L/joale 

JKr. ana jRrs. Jvooeri ^. Ujomoara 

Une yJor/oIussi Jamilu 

!jCarin Loranscomoe 

'Donaia^. Lorenner 

JKr. anoMirs. Unomas Cn. Mrown 

JKicnael ana jKaureen Cacace 

■Don ana&ilen Gacciapaqlia 

jKr. ana Mirs. Cjarauano 



^o/in 7*. ancf jBi'ncfa 03. Garcfiffo 

jKt. ancfJKrs. ^ames G. Gonlei/.^ j^r. 

(SJilliain J. Gonnell 

Gorwi'n anaC^rhne Gowarcf 

Gonnie ana <3teuen Growleu 

jKt. anJUICrs. DCennein !j3. Gulfer 

Uincent ancf iBrencfa D Inlessancfro 

JKr. ancfJKrs. "Peier CP. D'C^nyefo 

jICt. ancfJICrs. ^eorqe ^. 'T)oe£ner 

Uiuian J . Don's 

JICt. ancfJKrs. ^osepnU. l)ou[e 

&cfa)arcf ana J asffua Dziacjul 

jKt. ancfJKrs. Uafaf &icf 

IJCeu/n U. iJee 



:i 



■*"■ ■ 






% 





•\. , .^.s^^: 



Platinum Benefactors 







J/Lr. ancfJlLrs. iJrecferic S [Jriecfinan 

-Or. ana jKts. loenjainin U. ^amooa 

[jTea ancf Donna Sreaiorix 

JKr. anJJI&s. T'auf^. 9r/ffin 

Dr. anoJlLrs. Gourliancf /o. Jfarfow, ^r. 

jKicnael and Cjffie 'Jannuzzi 

Deoo/e and yCic£ Dtalsirouoas 

Mir. andjlirs. LBenjamin CR. IDacson 

Jlur. andjKrs. Serald Ij. iDasner 

Daniel and Sisa See 

JXjZlson and Carole Miarcnioii 

^osepn andDiane JKeenan ^66 

Jjaroara JS. J\.iemiec and jeFFreu S. jQe/niec 

jKicnael and Cjlizaoein U Connor 

Dr. andUKrs. iDawrence U?. Connor 



jKr. andjlLrs. Jluan (J J7uzi7e, jr. 

jRr. andjKrs. Unomas (J J/CalJeiy 

jKr. and jILts. ^reqoru J eau 

jKicnaefj DCainu, and JKicnaef ^r. [Pisiiflo 

J eqaa andUom J ollocA 

Carol and CnucA J^ini., cjr. 

0?/exander andDoreen iRodetis 

Dr. and JlLrs. DCwesi <OacseiJ 

^oe ana Joanne cJaJo/s 

(fosep/i and iDaurene Ciauaalio 

jKr. andjltrs. Unomas Js). 'Oluarf 

Dr. andjlLrs. LBuunqse <3un 

'CTliiorneu andJKrs. UKicnael^. Uarsni 

LRatJ and Crern UeooreA 

[Alan and <3usan (OJei'ss 






■^J^i^ ^ 




\^ 



■■*!*? 



jKts. Jjoininic£ J', ^qosiino 

!jCaintJ ^Saselice 

Miarino Jjaselice 

Dr. ana JKrs. J\.ou ^joelsiler 

^o£n ^. !Bresfin, 999 

Jltr. ana JJCrs. JLicnoIas (japu/o 

Dr. ancfjKrs. ^onn Gnaqlassian 

"Mr. ancfJICrs. S. JC. G£oi 

Antonio ana J a/rocinia (jruz 

9jin, jKaru.1 h>ijne{ie.j ana j^usiin DarAocn 



jILt. andjltrs. Dennis j. jBeary 
Dr. £JKrs. J{ug£&. 0'9?e/ffy 
jILt. anaUItrs. [Brian ThlfocA 

JKr. ancfJKrs. ^. Jvoux 

ISJilliam ancf 9Ca/nfeen Scnu//e 

[JAomas 9: <ufa/er 

j^im ana Ouluia 9enn 

jILt. anajlirs. younqancfuamznulSJaianasoojkcnai 

9^i/fancf9^a6s Js)riy£{ 



^^m 




ISJilliam ano^wen /oaSuerre Dij 

Qjinoi ana Uim 9inniqan 

jJCr. anajltrs. Dauicf9. ^riffiin 

Dr. ana JKrs. U\ooeri O. 9{auser 

(Jwa ana Cnloer/ ^acunsAi 

J eqqu and ^oe jenninqs 

JILt. ana JKrs. j^. 9iiien 9losows£u 

9reaericA C. anojill9f. 9Cuenn 

Jvooeri ana Cjarole iDonq 

Douqlas 9C. jliarsnall 



Jr-WS^- 







■-.yi' /.-.-'•■ ^^a^sa;^. . 






Silver Benefactors 


^SMgg^g^g^l 


^■ 






1 




; 






'Mr. £■ 'Mrs. CRo6ertS. CMearn 


1 

U£e ^iqens£us '^'amify 








'T)r. anJJTCrs. ^osep£ C^fearcfi 


Mr. and Mrs. [Jiizyerald 




t 




Dr. ancfJICrs. Samuel CTlncfrews 


Denis and Ujeisy Jlynn 




'■". 




JICi\ ancfJlCrs. S^eoryes &. C^iaJlah 


Jdarilaf andlTlmefia 9al£a 








JKr. ancfjKrs. ^osepn Cnzznara 


j^ames andUicioria S?erc£oa) 




i^- 




jKr. ancfjKrs. iRooerio Maco 


U£e Si£6ons [family 




'■, 




CAhusni ana jKiaori Manao 


jCorman and j^udy Qlassoery 




' 




Snaron Marion 


Mr. and Mrs. 'Jlri£ur 9: 9rani 








DapAne ancf^o£n 3iertrancf 


Dr. Dennis and Jliaura ^rinin 




'■■' 




CPa/rice C^. CBifou 


Mr. and Mrs. JrranA id- ^arueu 








JKr. ancfjKrs. ^ames G. Ujofancf 

[^onafcf ancfjCoreen L/jrancn 

iPaufanaCnfice Lorennan 

Donna ana J^airic£ Ujuiler 

&cfancf^an Galawell 


U£e Jfauc£ Jamily 

SPuy and S^aif yfeafd 

Dr. and Mrs. Manuel G. Jdu^o 

Mr. and Mrs. Cjdaiard ^aneczMo 

Dr and Mrs. G£arfes &. ^o£nsion, 99 




V 




Dr. anJJI&s. Jeffrey 3i. Gorier 

<5iiepnen ana Susanne Gauan 

^oyce O. Gnarles 

^on ana Sariia Gnarlion 

Dr. ancfJICrs. D. GAiari'eri 

Une Gleary L/ami/y 


Mr. and Mrs. CPeier 9CaJamaras 

Dr. and Mrs. 9rederic£ 91. 9layal 

iRic£ard and 9ainela 9Ce£oe 

Mr and Mrs. G£arfes 9 9Ce£res 

Dr and Mrs. Mar£9l. JCeffey 

Dr 9airicia JCef/y^Sii/es 




i 




J^auf Goa£[an 


Jjoo and Jvosemaru LitilpairicA 




a 




JKr. ancfJKrs. J^cAarJ^ Go/fier, ^r 


9auf and 9ris 90na 








U£e Guriin Jamifu 


^o£n and&Iiza£ei£ 9Gi£ic£o 








JGi£ie Daily 


Mr. and Mrs. Dominic£ loalRosa 








Uion ancfZIerry D ^yim£rosi 


9iia and9ion SomSardo 








l^uieiie ancfU£omas Deefy 


9eorae G. Iouc£e 




- 




Dr. Sanio anaDeooie DiJino 


Susan and9l[[en MacDuffie 




> 




iSouis and Gyni£ia De/piaio 


Mr. and Mrs. Dennis 9. Maiman 




:" 




GolomSo and Jlaren DiSafuaiore, jr. 


'jCic£ andOfya Mananan 




' 




jltr. anajlirs. grosep£ Doumar 


Mr. and Mrs. 9£omas ^. Mariin 




-. 




Dr. anajIirs. G£risiop£er Drayna 


9£omas and9lnn Marie Marusak 








Dr. ancfJKrs. '5aru "JC DuSin 


^oe and'J?ose Marzeiii 








Jom ana Gasnie Gaan 


ls)i[Iiam and Mary Massara)e£ 








l^oSeri G. Cjsia6roo£, y^r. 


Dr. and Mrs. 9o£n Masiranionio 




; 




'3£e Ja.sano Jamily 


9eoer[y Medinyer 







p*' 




95 







.J. . . 'v^raRI^HI. ^Wk 






- ' 


Silver Benefactors 


^^ 


1 

'•-/'S 






CMfan and JlCaryaret JKeiwaffy 


JKr. and JKrs. JKe[£em JC. SafAa£ 




- 




C^KeHWsan 


Gandy and^onn Scan/on 




'i 




JKr. ancfJlCrs. Scoo£y !Jll'offoy 


ofay and Janice Ocansaroli 








JKicnael anJUricia JlConico 


JKr. and JKrs. ^ames Sca/uorc£io 








Une jlion^man 'Jamilu 


J^aulo and C)[isa£eln Serafini 






i 


jSynn ana'VicAjIioran 

'Til ancf r^/iaron JlCuIueu 

Janice ancf Sarru 'jCa/c/i 

CRic£, jKarifun and Gnehea Jxassif 

jILt. ancfjKrs. ^osepnOCyo 


JKr. and JKrs. Leonard <5erafi no 

J)r. and JKrs. ls)alier J^. SAayAafian 

JKarcy JKc 9inn and Jjernard Onapiro 

JKr. and JKrs. JSrendan T S£ee£an 

^o£n ^. and Susan JC Siecz£ows£i 








9Kr. ancfjKrs. 9era[cf £. O'JSrien 


Daniel^. Si/oa 


1 




j'im and Jeanne 0''Searu 


Ur. and JKrs. Cjdwin ^. Siroy 


1 




Garofe ancf^oAn O'JKalfey 


Sandra S. S/ane 


1 


1 


•Jl&. anJJI&s. Mn 'J>. 0"XeifJ' 


^onai£an G. Slaion 


1 


JKr. ancfJItrs. 'Jancis JK. 0^'J?eaan 


J<2uJand^oan Soryi 




1 


1 


'JKr. ancfTFCrs. Uyaniel 0^'J^our^e 


^o£n Id. and JKary J. Spadazzi 




.' 


1 


'JlCrs. CRo£eH CPapp 


y^osepn ana lounn Sparacino 








Grnes/ and ^uL'e iPappas 

Suo£asn [Parian 
Tllec ancf [Patricia iPecA 


Seorqe and Susan Spe£ar 

[7£e Stolf Jamily 

JCat£ryn andUiic£ardSuorize 




' 


4 


Ujoro ana ^onn iPnair 


&ileen and J<2ul Summers 






[/?o6er/ an(/'J?e£ecca CPo£facf 


9eorye and Jlamerine Jan 




B 




Uionnie ancfSAelcfon CPoIfoc^ 


Jeanne uan and JamiltJ 




5 




JKr. andJICrs. JKic/iael Dl. iPowers 
jlCaureen and [Patrick CPurce/f 


JKr. and JKrs. JKic£aeUalosian., ^r. 
JKr. and JKrs. CJlni£ony 3. Jeqne/ia and iJami/y 








'JKt. and JIG'S. 'IBenito Q.uevedo 

T)auid and Joouise j^ei[[y 

Uvicnard and iPauia iReimer 


JKr. and JIG'S. Julian Uerry 

iMnmony andJKaureen Jilelli 

U£e Uully family 








rbusan andlAnyelo U\enna 


J^ifland^oyce Uyree 




' 




T)r. andJKrs. CBenjamin U. [Ric/iards 


yCisnan ana Diana Uar/aoedian 




i 




Warren and Jennifer Uiic£mond 


J/ie Uassaf/o 'Jamify 




; 




JlCr. and!Mrs. GAarfes 9K. 9iic£ier 


'J£e Uicari iJamiiy 




■' 




T)onaIdCP. CRic£Iefs 


JKr. and JKrs. J^oSertlnIinters 




" 




Gofonef and 'JlCrs. C/Aomas ^. Uiini 


Suzanne andWayne Isloltman 








'Dr. and JKrs. ^o£n CRominqer 


Samson Islony 








J\ay and Uil iRozansJii 


Dennis and j^ean 7joInows£i 








J/Cr. and JKrs. JCeuin ^. Jlyan 


















:j^- 



#4 ■ 



^^ V 







,-..:.y«>3wti^ii^>.^^ 



Patron Bene&ctors 




^aime ancf Ouelun Cnoofa 

Lnnihoni/ ancf Gamille inzelfo 

{Jne inmore U'amuu 

jILt. and Jlirs. Unomas Lnnqelo ancf Lrojn/Iy 

^Ufwal ^nnioeri 

(Jmar Zn. Capon/e 

Diane C.>. ^rmitaae 

jKr. anajKrs. U/iomas Malaanie 

T)onaId and <C>nertJl CBansfiela 

iPalricia andlRicnard LSaran 

iRicnard and ijaurie LBarqon 

^acA and Deooran LBarlow 

!Mr. andJI&s. Uio£eH ^. !j3arreff 

IjTon and JlCarA LOarron 

Uucnard and jKarcia Jjassotii 

jILt. andjKrs. jaime CBasio 

^onn ^ames and Miaraarei ^ean 'JjeaittJ 

<0{eue andT)iane !jjir£efand 

ISJilliain and /oha iBlacAmer 



Janice and Jjerb Glifford 

Cnnne and jJuAe Gonnollu 

Donald and Joouise Cos/effo 

JliartJia Jli. Gronin 

rOieue and Dtai/iq Gzt'cA 

Unomas ^. and Garol jK. '.Dammricn 

jILt. andJKrs. S?eorqe Zn. Dauid^ 'Or. 

DicAandjKilhe Delaneu 

<Ousan and J\.ooeri DelDaureniis 

Saeiano ^. and Diane JK. Delouca 

JCerrie and JranA De/ouca 

Oileen and Od Dempseu 

Jjarhara De<Oaniis 

Cjrnes/ andC)usan DijKaliia 

"PauIDiJKaliia 

DCevin and Jtainleen Donouan 

OCef/ie DudnicA 

JlGcnaef andOCancu Duncan 

^onn and ^anel Dunn 



i^ 



jKr. andjiLrs. ^osepn Looland 
JKr. andJI&s. ^osepAC^. CBoHani, 999 

JKt. andjKrs. Uiicnard Jjowers 

Gnarles ^., ^r. and Denise UK. Jjowser 

Une Mrennan 9amifu 

J am and Jvod JSrown 

ISJilliam 9i. andUKarianna 9irown 

JKr. andJKrs. ISJilliam S JSruno 

IPauf and Carole Djurnetl 

JranA and Deooie 9jutterwortn 

Louise Gananan 
jKt. andjKrs. james jK. Gareu 

JKicnael and y^anice Garson 

Lorraine and Jrancis Gnamoers 

Dr. andjKrs. G. CJ. Gnan 

^o/in and Dtaren G/ianq 

Dr. andJKrs. JKic/iaef J~[. Gnow 




jKariJ [Ann and 9jrendan DurAin 

^oan and Gnarles Gdenoacn 

u^ooeri and Soreiia &llis 

JKr. andJKrs. JCeuin M &nyfisA 

Gecilia U. Ospinosa 

CAdele, ^oe andLAleoc Ouanqelis/ 

Joouis Ijaniozzij <Or. 

(Jonn 9arricu '69 

Dr. andjKrs. ^onn J . Jarricu 

Juarez and Unomas ^arrinqion 

Cilizaoeln and David iUawAner 

^onn 9l. ireorey ^r. 

Dr. andUKrs. ^on UK. 9esse/ 

UKr. andUKrs. william CUienup 

UKr. andUKrs. Ulooerl Lriscne//i 

9?ay andCnlice Jiizqerald 
Ularola and joanne JHzpalricA 





;..(■ ,. 


\^^\^'it^£\^\ \k.C 








Jr d^irOIl m 

C/?/c£ardO^. 5^% 


J£e loimlaniai Jamilu 






Syncfa ancf ^osepn i^ran^fin 


Bucille /oiluri 




mG'. anojKrs. Sre^oru C7l. Jureu 


CP£iif/p and Glaudeile J3o6o 




iPa/ricia CReiffu 'Saffa^/ier 


JlCariy and DCai£leen SomSardi 




U£e &</warcfC7. ^affowaa, SISJSJ 'Jamilu 


Dr. andjlirs. 'j£omas Ul. jGom£ardo, ^r. 




7Kr. anJTICrs. JKicIiaef Sansj-uss 


Dr. andjlirs. C^nl£ony Sopez 




jILt. ancfjKrs. ^ames ana Miaru SPe/s/on 


Tltr. and JIG'S. jCic£ofas Joosaoio and family 




Mis. LBaroara Sih'nsAu 


Dr. and TIG'S. U£omas JKanqiaracina 




CRic£ ancf jliaru S^fynn 


JIG. ana JIGs. Jrancis Jliarino 




ytaren and ^oef ^ofcf£fa// 


TIG. and JIGs. ^o£n 9. Tlta/dnas, ^r. 




Xa(£y ^. SoMsiein 


JKr. and JIGs. ^o£n JITcO^rdfe 




JKr. andJKrs. CPaufO?. 9reen 


JKarianne and 9erry JIicGari£y 




CBeiie {JKic£aMi:BGS'X^63) 9reene 


U£omas and Jfefen JItdDermolt 




jKr. ancfjKrs. jliichael Suarnieri 


JIG. and JIGs. ZIimot£y JICcDonald 




Uiicnarcf and Sue life Jfalqin 


JIG-, and JIG'S. J3arry iP. JltcTarfand 




Jilt, ana Jlirs. tjrnesi jfjamanoAa 


Donald andUictoria JIic9oIdric£ 




jILt. and'Jlirs. Ornest U\. Jiau^ 


^osep£^. JKcJGnna 




jICt. andjKrs. IsJiffiam Jleqartu 


SJail andUioSerl JKead 




'JKr. andJKrs. ^ames DC. yfes^on 


^o£n^.JKeIm,^r. 




JlCr. andJl&s. GLffordD. Jioyle 


9ra£am and DCat£leen JIier£ 




"Dennis and jliaru J~{uy£es 


JIG. and JIGs. U£omas Jliifone 




JlCr. andjlirs. G£arles OC J^untieu 


JIG-, and JIG'S. Barry 0. JKofler 




^udii£ Gamosse ^iroul 


CPa/ric/a and Uiic£ard JIG JIGoniaque 




9Kr. andJKrs. S/ep£en j^ones 


Txooeri ana J\osemaru Jlionieqne 




JKr. andJl&s. 'DonafdCTl. JCane 


Jlir. and JIGs. ^ames Jl. JKoran 




jKarq and ^ferry Xane 


Jliary Jlioreda- 9 all or do 




jIlt. andjltrs. 1PauO(,auanuy£, ^r. 


Jlir. and JIGs. S/ep£en and DCim Jliorris 




^ac£ and Susan JCeaiin^ 


!j^o6 and Xat£y JKosesian 




jBindsay S DUmSalf 


Jeanne JKoiile 




J£onias ^. UtlocAo 


JJiarA ana Uris£ JliuiuotJ 




'yilEeri and Sracijefa JCnapic 


O^min andOara£ jCao£an 




U£e DCoyelsc£aiz U'amily 


9?eo. JIG-. Wdl/am V. 'Xayfe 




C/lnn G. /oaf/refo 


Uuc£ard and Jliaureen J\jc£oIs 




Miaureen andUom jQamorix 


Dr. and JIGs. J^amon jQeio 




G£eryl and Jerome /oeSo 


JIG. andJKrs. Syrian JK. 'Xo£e 




J{a£9?. Bee 


Garofe and9reyory O'Gonneil 




iirrederic£ and mCary G^nn Sesnic£ 


Dr. and JIG'S. ^eremia£ O'Gonnelf 


. - 







jt'vn 



■neflm 



]/^f- 



^i3l>' 




fev 



9P 



'^i^.^ 



LB^ • ilSfc-^". 



■■■-j.?F-- .. .la." 



>«.^ jr J-.< 



Patron Benefactors 




iRicharcf and Utaren U^Connejf 

Jennifer U an vie 
iRoqelio anci uDucfia J alaqanas 

JKHzi ana Jlloerl J apoi/ans 

JKr. ana jKts. ^ames U: J arisi 

9Kr. ancfjKrs. OCe/f CParisi 

C>/an ana Jvosemaru J afien 

iPete and^oan lPeteri£ 
Uom ana Ljaroltjn J eierson 

<uiie anocfonn J orcni'a 

JjicA ana UicAi J remerlani 

SPeorae ana J aisu J ressieu 

Unomas ana iDinaa J.uinn 

<Ciamue[anoJina iRaia 

loernara ana 'Onaron iRaimo 

O/eue ana 'blue Ulatner 

JKr. andJKrs. U£omas ^. CReiffy, 999 

yjarlolla ana Cismeralao J\eis 

JKr. and TIG. G. 6coH U^eh 

Jlir. ana JiLrs. Dtennein J\esnic£ and IJamilu 

jIG-. Ual iRicnards 

^onn and ^iidUn iRiescn 

Donna and S^ary iRoseninal 

9^c£ardCR. and^udH£G. CRoh 

Unomas and jKaraarei Jxusso 

JKr. and JKts. JKUcnell C andiAnn <Oarajian 

Xancu tOaum 

JKr. ana JKrs. Q^canJon 

J aul and Carol C>canlan and Jamilu 

Joanne 'bcarlalo 

JKr. and JKrs. Jiarold 'Ocnonoecx 

Jjomeni'ca <ucnulz--'3carpulla 

Une Scr/oner Jamiw 

y^osepn and J airicia 'uharman 

T)r. and JKrs. ^onn SAarpe 

Jj/'ff and Sandu Snea 

Jjruce and Jjrenda <C)nerwin 

JKr. and JKrs. Jimol/iu ^. S£eufin, ^r. 

T)r. and JKrs. W/ff/am S. S/y 



JKr. and JKrs. &dSn2i/£, ^r. 

JKr. and JKrs. ^ames Cimi'm 

(JlzzaoeiA Sradu and Duncan Opef/nan 

Garl and Jjeila <bp/nola 

JKr. and JKrs. Jzona/d Opranzan/ 

Jjaroara and iljnI'Ouliiuan 

Seorqelle and^onn rOuffiuan 

JKr. and JKrs. ^onn o. <Jujfiuan 

JranR and CjmiliJ <3zpei 

J^arique ana JSaroara Uai 

Jiarra and (Jonanna Uaw 

JKicnael ana JKaru Jinn L/ears 

JKr. and JKrs. iRooert JK. [JnacAer.^ ^r. 

yjlauoe ana Jieriina Unau 

^aru and DtaintJ Unompson 

U\on and yCainiJ Unompson 

^osepn andJnloerta uoin 

y^im and lotjnn Uraceq 

JKr. and JKrs. Joseph UroHa 

Dr. and JKrs. Ouqene Uqrrell 

O/epnen and JKarianne Qdndernifl 

JKariJ (Jan JCess 

ISJilliam and<Ouzanne Wales 

JKarc andOnerru (OJalferce 

Wiffiam and Garo/ls)ard 

Grata and Garter Wellinq 

LrranA andjvancy (SJildl 

JKarie and^erru (SJilliams 

9errence ana <L)anora (BJillis 

JKr. and JKrs. Dennis &. ls)o[lers 

JKaiinew SJran/JdJoods 

Jjernadelle andJiooer/younq 

Unomas ^ and j^aune younq 

^o/in and JKirie Zjajac 

JKr. ana JKrs. Jrllan Jjaremoa 

C^/exander and J^eiiu 2jedros 

Diane and Jjifl Zjiooro 

[Jrancis and 9(,ainu Zjipple 

JKr. and JKrs. <Oawa{ore Zjullo 









w> 







4 'f' 




Haiti f)lma Mater( 

Haiti f)(ma iriaterl 

Thcj praises 6)e sing. 

foancKy thy mem ries 

round our heart stiff cfing. 

Guide of your youth, 

thro' thee u>e shaft preoaift 

HaitiOfama Materl 

Haiti, (hff HaiflHaifl. Ofma 

tflateri 

Lot on the height, 

Rroudfy thy tooi'rs are 

raised for the Right. 

God is thy master, 

His Labi thy safe aoaif( 

HaiflRfma t/later! 

Haiti f) ft Haiti. 



For Boston 

for Boston, for Boston, 
Gie sing our proud refrainl 

for Boston, for Boston, 
Tis (i}isdom s earthty fane. 

for here we are one 

find our hearts are true, 

find the tourers on the Heights 

Reach to Heao'n's ooin btue. 

for Boston, for Boston, 

Tit the echoes ring againl 

for Boston, for Boston, 

Thy gtory is our ooinl 

for Boston, for Boston, 

Tis here that Truth is knooin. 

find eoer U)ith the flight 
Shat thy heirs be found, 
Tit time shaft 6e no more 
find thy oiorfc is crooin d. 

for Boston, for Boston, 
for Thee and Thine atonel 




a storcf of the year, at Boston College 

The Class of 2000, Boston College in the new 
milleniumy the Sub Turri staff, and our society 
have all been redefined this past year. We wanted 
to tell a story, your story of the past year on the 
Heights, our story of working on Sub Turri and 
the story of Boston Colleges place in the year 
2000. We hope we have succeeded in capturing 
your experiences here and you look back to this 
book and can see part of your time here at Boston 
College. Good Luck to the Class of 2000. 




t^W^^t^^^^^tOjP 



Sa6 Tarri'—^OOO 



usauld like, to thank. . . 

Brandi Stemerman: Technically she is our advisor but truly a wealth of knowledge 
about everything that is yearbook at Boston College. Brandi has all the answers 
and never complained about our constant inquiries (even those days when we 
called 7 or 8 times). Thank you Brandi for bringing us all together as a staff and 
for being a constant friend and support. 

McGrath Photography: Bob, Karen and Nicole and co., thank you for always find- 
ing a way to solve our photography crisis of the moment. Thank you for the sev- 
eral trips from Braintree, for the candy, for the great pictures, and for keeping our 
photo staff happy. 

Jostens: For putting our book together. Arnie, thank you for giving us the confi- 
dence that we would create an incredible book and that it would be ON TIME, 
also for keeping us on the right track, and for answering all our pages. 
Kristen, thank you for always keeping us informed on the technical end and for 
getting to the nitty gritty. 

Rick Brooks: For designing a cover that will Redefine Sub Turri forever. 

Melissa Bagwell: For giving the cover design life. 

Mer Zovko: Thank you for believing in us, an entirely new staff. 





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Sa6 Tarri 2000 
Editoriaf StafiT 



iSimtng"^ 



Sub TUrri Photo 2000 




Kyelim Rhee 

Chris Bowers 

Editors 

What a year it has been. To our wonderful staff, 
thanks a million. This book would never have 
happened without your time and dedication. The 
hours were many and random, but you guys 
stuck with it and turned out work to be proud of. 
We'd also like to thank our fellow editors, who 
have not only been great co-workers, but have be- 
come great friends. 

Tempus Fugit... 



Copy Editor - Matt Nowinski 



Around of thanks to all who have helped me get this far: my parents, both for reading to me when I was 
very little and fostering my interest in English, and for never letting me settle for doing less than that of which I 
was capable; to my English teachers throughout the years, particularly Mr. Richard Clancy of U of D Jesuit, who is 
an amazingly smart man for a Notre Dame graduate; to Christa, Brad, Dean, Judy, Jeff, Carol, and the rest of the 
crew at Visible Ink Press, who gave me my first taste of the editorial world (too bad about the closing, but Brad, 
you'll be better off without having to deal with Xander and his typewriter); to my friends at BC and elsewhere, for 
putting up with my endless moaning about all the copy I had to read; to the Sub Turri editorial staff, for getting me 
the copy (mostly) on time; to the University of Chicago Press, who produced my bible, the Chicago Manual of Style; 
and again to my mother, specifically for her advice that I should "never get into publishing." 



Finally, I'd like to share a few words from an unknown author about the ever-present need for the copy editor. 
Apologies to the author, whoever you are. 



An Owed to Spelling Checker 



I 



/ have a spelling checker 
It came with my PC 
It plane lee marks four my revue 
Miss steaks aye can knot sea. 

Eye ran this poem threw it. 
Your sure reel glad two no. 
Its vary polished in it's weigh 
My checker tolled me sew. 

A checker is a bless sing. 

It freeze you lodes of thyme. 

It helps me right awl stiles two reed, 

And aides me when aye rime. 

Each frays composed up on my screen 
Eye trussed to bee a joule 
The checker pours o'er every word 
To cheque sum spelling rule. 

Be for a veiling checkers 
Hour spelling mite decline. 
And if were lacks or have a laps. 
We wood be maid to wine. 



Butt now bee cause my spelling 
Is checked with such grate flare, 
Their are know faults with in my cite, 
Ofnon eye am a wear. 

Now spelling does know phase me. 
It does knot bring a tier. 
My pay purrs awl due glad den 
With wrapped words fare as hear. 

To rite with care is quite a feet 
Of which won should be proud. 
And wee mussed dew the best wee can, 
Sew flaws are knot aloud. 

Sow ewe can sea why aye dew prays 
Such soft ware four pea seas. 
And why I brake in two averse 
By righting want too please. 






Academics Rules!!! 



We're So Cure 



"I only see 
blue. I no 
longer see 
red ... or yel- 
low. I know 
these colors ex- 
ist because 
know that on my 
palate there 
red, yellow, a spe- 
cial green, a cer- 
tain violet; I 
longer see them ; 
once did, and yet I 
remember very well 
which they gave me. 
Monet 




the colors 
-Claude 



Jess Burkhart & Kristin Walker 



"Slow down you crazy child You'r* 

so ambitious for a juvenile But then 

if you're so smart tell me why you arc 

so afraid? Where's the fire 

what's the hurr 

about? You bettei 

cool it off before yoii 

bum it out You goi 

so much to do and 

only So many hours in 

a day But when thi 

truth is told That yoii 

can get what you want o) 

you can just get old You'r< 

gonna kick off before yoi 

even get halfway through 

When you realize. . . Vienna 

waits for you" -Billy Joel 



Thanks to... Joe Newcomb for all the last minute stories, the Sub Tlirri Posse for all the enjoyable meet- 
ings, Brandi for all tlje candi, Lissa for rescuing the proofs. Amy for the advice and the laughs, Torry for 
the stories during meetings, and Chris and Kyelim for iridescent professors. Thanks to alljhe seniors and 

professors who contributed to the Faculty Perspective pages. / ^^ ^^ ^ . / 









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Activities Editors . . . 



I want to thank everyone who listened to me 
complain these past five months— G 317, 309, & 
324. Sharon—thanks for putting up with my 
never-ending frantic phone calls and for coming 
to the office with me for those great late night 
crises! To our staff— thanks for being there when 
we needed you! Thanks to the whole editorial 
staff— it has been an incredible experience meet- 
ing and working with you. Amy, Lissa, and 
Torry— thanks for letting Activities know the 
"real" deadlines! Lissa— you helped us so much 
that without you our deadlines would never 
have gotten done. Thanks for your help, kind- 
ness, understanding, and friendship— I'll miss 
you! 




Sharon 




It's been a long few months but we 
finally finished the book! And despite a 
few bumps in the road here and there, 
the finished product came out pretty 
smoothly, don't you think, Jenn? I think 
that we really have to thank Lissa for 
helping us so much (thanks Lissa!) 
through all our frustrations. 
Hmm... looking back, i don't think I've 
ever said "argh!" so much in my entire 
life! That's ok.. .it was worth it, I 
think... hehe! 



^Stoto M iilwr 



student Life 2000 





Junior year was a blast and it j ust wouldn't have been the 
same without the love and unconditional support from all 
of my friends and my family. A special thanks to my mom 
and dad who are my constant source of wisdom and 
strength. To my roommates of 41 Orkeny, you girls are 
the best. Thank you for an unforgettable and happy year. 
The bad housing curse has been broken thanks to you 
guys! To C-dog! My best bud! Together we can toss the 
dice! To my future roommates, Karen, my partner in 
crime, Denise, since frosh year babe, Kyla, looking for- 
ward to next year and of course, thanks to Ash and Molly. 
Steve, like Chicago-You're the Inspiration. Tish, I don't 
know what I'm going to do without you next year. John 
R. and Jeff D., thanks for all the scary movies. Frank, class 
just wasn't the same without you. Kim, the talks we had 
were awesome. Taber and Roland, I'll miss my Hawaiian 
guys next year! To everyone else, thank you for the 
friendship and the love. 

Katra Cuskaden 
Student Life Co-Editor 



Working on this book has been a lot of fun ~ special 
thanks are deserved by: my co-editor, Katra, for her love 
of typing and knack for captions; everyone who wrote 
stories, for making my life that much easier; my fearless 
leaders, Brandi, Lissa, Amy, and Torry, for their under- 
standing and saving grace; everyone else at Sub Turri, 
especially K, Jess, Brian, Chris, and Kyelim, for the 3 
A.M. pep talks, reassuring hugs, and directions; my 
darling roommates, Becca and Megan, for putting up 
with my moods, the late nights, and bra-ta-ta; my 
Cushing 3rd girls, for taking my mind off deadlines; Bill 
and Carl, for always listening and making me laugh; 
Carter, for making me stick it out more than once; the, 
Duchesne W. crew, for their entertaining nightly esca- 
pades; and my AC girls, for knowing how I get and still 
dealing with me even though we're miles apart. To the 
Class of 2000: "Give yourselves to your dreams and 
follow them wherever they take you in glorious pur- 
suit." Until next year . . . ggth Bowers 

Student Life Co-Editor 






ff^ 



^ 



OK, IF YOU'RE READING THIS PAGE, YOU UNDOUBTEDLY HAVE READ EVERYTHING ELSE IN THE 
BOOK, BECAUSE WHO WANTS TO READ ABOUT THE EDITORS ANYWAY? IN OTHER WORDS, YOU'RE 
ALREADY AWARE OF ALL THE GOOD THINGS (AND THE BAD ONES) THAT HAVE HAPPENED, SO 
WE DON'T EVEN NEED TO TALK ABOUT THAT. IN OTHER WORDS, HERE YOU GO, BRIAN L.ERMAN 
AND Tom PELISSERO, giving SHOUTS OUT TO OUR HOMIES FROM ALL OVER CAMPUS AND A FEW 
OTHER RANDOM PEOPLE WHO WE'VE TOSSED IN JUST FOR FUN. IF YOU HAVE ADD, DON'T EVEN 
ATTEMPT TO GET THROUGH THIS LAUNDRY LIST WITHOUT CONSULTING YOUR DOCTOR. 

FIRST OF ALL, WE WOULD LIKE TO THANK THE FOLLOWING PEOPLE FOR THEIR ORGASMIC 
CONTRIBUTIONS TO THE COVERAGE OF BC SPORTS IN 1 999-2000: MlNDY AGUIRRE, BLAKE 

BAILEY, Mary Bain, Jessica "Don't Call Me Dana" Barros, Ross Blacker, Chris "The 
Man" Bowers, Aaron Butler, Jamie Cournoyer, Matt Caminiti, vonnie D'Eramo, 
Nicky Harris, Lauren Houlihan, Richard Kelley, Tom Uee, Sgt. Ed "You Can't Prove 
It" lennon, Kyelimm Rhee, Meredith Roberts, Kate Schrinsky, Shannon Smith, 
Brandi Stemmerman, Kristen Walker, Adam Wexler, Anne Wheelwright, Chris "The 

MESSIAH" WONG, the WHOLE PHOTOGRAPHY STAFF, LlSSA, AMY AND TORRY, AND ALL OUR CO- 
EDITORS WHO SUPPORTED US THROUGH LOVE TROUBLES AND VARIOUS LEGAL PROBLEMS. 

On the OTHER SIDE OF THE COIN, THERE ARE THE ATHLETES THAT KEPT OUR LIVES 

interesting over the past scholastic year. we'd like to thank them, the sub turri 
Sportsmen of the Year. ..Chris Hovan, for scaring the daylights out of every 
OPPONENT. ..Tim hasselbeck, for consistently giving away games only to WIN them 
right back. ..Troy Bell, A.K.A. the greatest athlete of all time, for bringing back 
excitement to bc hoops, and for providing tom with the opportunity to get on espn 
so many times, albeit occasionally in a confrontation with a referee or arena 
security. ..timmy kelleher, for turning around a hockey season that was quickly 
headed down the drain with his inspired play... jeremy wilson, for attaining the 
highest penalties-per-shift margin in hockey east history. ..nicole conway, solely 
because we need to adhere to title ix and her picture was the first one we saw on 
the website. 

so that is it, we're out of time. ..for this year. we sincerely hope you all enjoyed 
the book, and since our buyers are primarily seniors, let me be the first to inform 
you that your wonderful degree in american studies qualifies you to work in 
Mcelroy for the rest of your life. Oh well, good luck you overqualified young 

ADULTS. 



Peace and love 
Tom & Brian 




1^^ Sports Editors 

Brian Lerman and Tom Pelissero 







^m». 



^mm 



SENIORS 




When I was told I was a senior section co-editor iovSub Turri this 
year, I had no idea what to expect. I had never worked on the 
yearbook during my 3 years at Boston College, nor had I ever 
really flipped through one. But, fond memories of working on 
my high school yearbook brought me to McElroy 103 this past 
fall. Now as the spring approaches, I can proudly say that I will 
have fond memories of being part of Boston College's 2000 
yearbook staff. I worked with so many intelligent and dedicated 
students and made some new friends along the way. I must 
admit, however, that there were many long, grueling hours spent 
inside the yearbook office. During the last week of our winter 
break, Lesley and I spent every waking hour typing names, 
double-checking spellings, putting tiny stickers on all 1,873 
pictures, in addition to many other mind-numbing tasks. We 
successfully finished it all by deadline, but could not have done 
it without our unbelievably dedicated staff—Laurin Mottle, 
Courtney McCraw, Amy Choquette, and Marissa Ciccia— and 
our editors— Lissa, Amy and Torry. Thanks guys for all of your 
help and wisdom! And thank you Lesley for making it fun! I wish 
everyone involved in the 2000 yearbook the best of luck next 
year! 



Senior Section Co-Editor Nancy Delpidio 

When I decided to work on the yearbook here at BC, the last section 
that I thought I would work on was the senior section. Being a 
freshman and relatively inexperienced in comparison with the rest 
of the staff, what could I possibly contribute to the senior section? 
I discovered I had the ability and strength to type 1,873 names, 
schools, and majors, not to mention double checking each thing I 
wrote. I do not think this is the only aspect of yearbook I'll 
remember, but the week Nancy and I spent in the yearbook office 
was definitely the most interesting and memorable experience I 
have ever had while working on a yearbook. I am proud to say that 
being a part of the BC 2000 yearbook staff has truly been satisfying 
and I know that I had a tremendous, but fun, task in producing the 
210 page senior section. However, I could not have done it without 
the help of all the amazing people on my staff: Laurin Mottle, 
Courtney McCraw, Amy Choquette, and Marissa Ciccia — and 
our editors — Lissa, Amy, and Torry. I would also like to say thank 
you to Nancy for being the best co-editor I could ask for. She is 
incredibly talented and patient, and will surely succeed in the years 
to come. Thank you again, Nancy, for the funny memories... and 
to everyone, enjoy! 




i#c--.-6ifesfjRi^ 



Senior Section Co-Editor Lesley Johnston 



Sub Turri Business Staff 



'The price of success 
is responsibility. " 

"Anyone can tal<e tlie 
tielm wtien the 
seas are calm." 

^ "You'll always miss 100% 
of the shots you 
don't take." 
'0 



Offer a flag of truce." 




'The race is not to the 
swift, but to those 
ft who keep on running." 

"Don't wait for your ship 
to come in. Swim 
out to it." 



Working for Sub Turri has provided a superb 
opportuniry to experience something new and 
exciting while acclamating myself to the "college" 
way of life. Special thanks are due to all the parents 
and organizations that donated to our cause, with- 
out whom we would not have been able to create 
such a world-class production. In addition, to this 
year's staff, the editors, Ms. Stemerman, and friends 
at BC and home, I give my most sincere gratitude 
for your assistance and faith. Also, to my parents, 
whose care and encouragement made attending 
Boston College a reality. And to think that I 
almost went to Notre Dame... 



Brad Swift 
Business IVIanager 




Advertising Manager Wendy Luong and Friends 

It's amazing how two and a half years have gone by so quickly since I came to BC. During this short time span, I was able to 
accomplish a great deal. But I didn't do it alone. I want to thank my parents and family for their endless support and 
inspiration, especially my sister Elaine for her encouragement and words of wisdom. I also want to give a big thanks to my 
vet)' close friends at BC (you all know who you are) who have become almost like my extended family. We make an awe- 
some group; growing together, redefining ourselves together, and making lifetime memories together. Last but not least, I 
want to thank the Sub Turri staff for all their help and for making my yearbook experience worthwhile. =) 
P.S. Jiggy, Congrats and best wishes in the future!! 



Closing 49'i 




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"You will find as you reflect on your life that 
the moments in which you have really lived 
are those in which you were surrounded by 
friends. " 

So this is it. My first year on the Sub Turri 
of Boston College has been completed as has my 
first year of Boston College. I don 't really know 
what it means to be the Managing Editor. 
That is something that we never really could 
figure out. But I do know that it has been a 
memorable and exciting experience working 
along side with two of the most amazing people 
that I have met at BC, Lissa and Amy. This 
book never would have been accomplish 
without you two guiding the terrific editorial 
staff that we had. I also wanted to thank 
Brandifor believing that even a little oT 
freshmen can do the job of Managing Editor. I 
know Lissa, I need to get over my Freshmen 
complex! I want to thank my family, my 
friends from BC; Bethany, Margaux, Kate, 
Steph, Cash, Bob and Mark, Drewie, Dan, 
Sean and my girls at home, Claudia, Niki, 
Marisa, Tricia, Allison, Reap, Sarah T, Carp, 
Devon, Tressa and also Jen, Gary, JK, Ben, 
Chad, and Henry for everything they have 
done for me this year even though they prob- 
ably don 't think they have done much! Thank 
you all. 

Managing Editor, 
Torry Katsiroubas 

"I'm learning to fly but I ain 't got 
wings Coming down is the 
hardest thing. " 

-Tom Petty 








To you: 

I haven't gotten to thank you yet. I have so much to thankyoufor. I get 

congratulated for putting this yearbook together, hut I couldn 't have done it 

withoutyou. 

Thankyoufor not making me mind being in the yearbook office in the 

bowels ofMcElroy both late at night and early in the morning for sayingyes 

when 1 askedyou to do something for takingpictures, for your ideas, for 

visiting me in the office, for getting things done when you saidyou would, 

for making those phone calls, for going to meetings, for keepingme informed 

on voicemail and email, for being interested, for calling and emailing me 

back, for the questions, for the answers, for the support, respect, for 

listening for the smiles, for the supplies, for cropping for going to 

office hours even when there was nothing to do, for makingyearbook a 

priority when there was a lot to do, for filling out the application, for 

going to the interview, for waiting to be reimbursed, for teaching me the 

procedures,for checking the mail, for folding and sealing for separating 

into buildings for mailings, for payingfor my mistakes, for the laughs, for 

writing copy, captions and headlines, for pushing me to do better, for 

understanding for signing up, for being on time, for meeting deadlines, for 

being enthusiastic, for the encouragement, for the birthday cake, for buying 

more film, for answering the phone, for hanging the banners, for coming in 

over break, for being there when I couldn't be. 

Thankyoufor being who you are. Thankyoufor making me fall in love 
withyearhook again. 
This book isyours, too. 







Byefor now 
Take care of you 

AmyK 

Co-Editor in Chief 

2000 Sub Turri 




Lf'ssa f/errick - Co-Editor 

"ft is f)RT that makes fife, 

find f knooi of no substitute for the 
force and heautij of its PROCESS. 



1 his book has been nothing if not a process. So many people put so much time, 

creative juice, and energy into this book. I am 6ooorc^ and still amazed 
that I had an opportunity to help with the creation of Sub Turri 2000. I am 
incredibly proud of how our staff ftedeputed yearbook at Boston College, specifically this year, 
but more importantly for the future. 




Mor the most part I stayed ^IkMM,^ but only because I was lucky enough to 
^^^ have a tireless, dedicated co-editor Amy K., a responsible, Pagemaker wizard of a 

managing editor, Torry, a talented motivated staff, and a wealth of resources. 




wv Thank you Amy and Torry for always being willing to work around my hectic schedule 
>» •^^ ^''^d meeting me in the office on those Sundays at 11 pm, for not being upset when I 



I>H 



call you at the wee hours of the morning, for listening to my myriad of stories, for 

keeping me sane during my CRAZY times, for teaching me Pagemaker, for 
answering the Sub Turri email, and for keeping the whole process fun. 



Thank you Brandifor being Ms. Stemerman at times and a friend at others. I really 
^^j^ appreciated your wealth of knowledge and your iu^p^po^ and belief in me person- 

^^* ally as an editor. 




On 



•^ Thank you to MA. my editors who always had good questions, who turned pages in on 
time, who spent days in the office staring at the computer, for TIRESSLY chasing 
down photo assignments, for coming on Monday nights, and for putting up with my 
occasional silliness. I could not have asked for a more responsible and fun group to 
work with this year. Good luck next year. 

Thank you to all my friends, roomates and family who listened to my cBYnsisuai yearbook 
chatter, who I never have to question and who constantly amaze me. 

Lissa Herrick 

Co-Editor 

Sub Turri 2000 - Redefined 



i^^-y^:/ii| 



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en 



The 2000 edition of Sub Turri, the yearbook of Boston College, was printed by the Jostens, Inc. The 88th volume, consisting 
ot 496 pages , has a press run of 2200 copies and was printed at the Winston-Salem plant. Cover: The cover, endsheets, 
dividers, vellum tip design, and opening pages design were designed by Rick Brooks, Jostens designer. The theme and cover 
ideas were generated by the editorial staff including our advisor Brandi Stemerman. The final creation of cover and tip-in 
artwork were done by Melissa Bagwell, Jostens designer, using supplied slides from the staff, and created in Photoshop, Illustra- 
tor and by hand illustrations. The covers were printed on 100# gloss stock, using 4-color process inks, then laminated with 
gloss lamination. They were casemade on 150 pt. binder's boards. The theme, title and school name were all embossed and top 
silk screened with ink number 373 Maroon. Paper: The endsheets are from Gilbert Esse 80# cover weight stock, white gray 
with textured finish, imprinted with warm gray PMS ink, foilstamped with Whispertone foil, and embossed to register. The 2- 
page tip-in before page 1 used 17# UV Ultra II stock, imprinted with black ink. The opening signature was printed on #100 
MOE Gloss text paper with the balance of the book printed on #80 MOE gloss text paper. Special matte black ink was used on 
the opening signature. The books were smyth sewn using 16-page signatures and rounded with black headbands. 




Design: All theme related copy and designs including the Opening and the Dividers were created by the Editorial staff. All 
sections were designed and created by their respective section editor. All pages were created on the three Power Mac 7600 using 
Adobe Pagemaker 6.5 and Jostens' Yeartech Templates. The pages were printed by our Hewlett Packard 4MV LaserJet Printer, 
Cicero. Photography: Senior portraits were taken by McGrath Studios, Inc., 8 Elm Street Suite 2, Braintree MA, 02184. 
Phone: 1-800-588-7681. McGrath Studios was contracted by Boston College to be the Official Yearbook Photographer for 
2000 Si{b Turri. Current Events photos were purchased through Associated Press Yearbook Photos, New York City. All other 
photos were taken by the Sub Turri staff under the direction of the photography editors. Any other photos were graciously 
submitted by students or a variety of University departments. All four-color reproduction was produced from transparency film 
and all film was developed by McGrath Studios. The photos were taken using a variety of cameras and lenses manufactured by 
Nikon, Canon, Quantum, and Mamiya. Typography: All Body Copy is 12pt. AGaramond, captions are lOpt. AGaramond, 
photo Credits are 6pt. Johanna, and folios are lOpt. AGaramond Italics. Rick Brooks designed the type used for the cover. The 
remaining fonts and sizes of all other types were determined by the section editors. Copyright, 2000, by Sub Turri, the Year- 
book of Boston College. No portion of Sub Turri may be reproduced or transmitted in any form, electronic, mechanical, 
digital, or otherwise, without the expressed written consent of the current Editors-in-chief Sub Turri wzs produced entirely by a 
staff of undergraduate student volunteers. Sub Turri generates revenue from yearbook sales, ads, and donations. Please direct all 
inquiries to: Sub Turri, the Yearbook of Boston College, McElroy Commons, Room 103, Chestnut Hill, MA 02467. 
Phone: (617) 552-3493, 



mm 



Sa6 Turri 2000 
^ Redefined 




upper . io near rne message agam 




EKcef- Ceifics 



LET'S HEAR SffiME 
TOP 25 



the Quad , the Mods . Life an the Heights