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Full text of "Sub turri = Under the tower : the yearbook of Boston College"

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ITALIAN CANTEEN 



Father 

William P. 

Leahy, SJ. 

President 





BOSTON COLLEGE 

CHESTNUT HILL, MASSACHUSETTS 02167 



OFFICE OF THE PRESIDENT 



Dear Members of the Class of 2001: 

Your years of study at Boston College are coming to an end, and I want to 
thank you for your many contributions to campus life, and also wish you well in 
the years ahead. 

Your class has been a bridge between the 20 th and 21 st centuries, and 
certainly Boston College has benefited in countless ways from your presence, 
initiative, and generosity. Your time at the Heights has been a period of your 
lives where you have explored new territory, and I hope that you have grown 
intellectually, spiritually, and socially. 

You have been blessed with many gifts, and my prayer for you is that you 
will go forth from the Heights committed to using your talents to help make our 
world a better place. Clearly, contemporary society very much needs faithful, 
dedicated, and caring people such as yourselves. 

Boston College has been fortunate to have you as students, and I pray that 
God continue to bless you. 



Sincerely, 

William P. Leahy, S.J. f 



President 




Nick Genevish 



16 




Pinch me 

Pinch me 

Cos I'm still asleep. 



Please God 
tell me that 

I'm still asleep, 



Chris Bowers 




Nick Genevish 



17 




Nick Genevish 




On an evening such 
as this 



If s hard to tell if I 
exist 



18 




Chris Bowers 



Pack a car and leave this town 



Who'll notice that I'm not around? 



19 



I could hide out 

under there. 

I just made you say 

'underwear' 



I could leave but Til 

just stay. 

All my stuff's here anyway. 




Kim Christina 




Kyelim Rhee 



20 




Nick Genevish 



21 




Chris Bowers 



It's like a dream - you try to 

remember but if s gone, then ya 

Try to scream but it only comes 

out as a yawn, when ya 

Try to see the world beyond your front door. 



22 




Chris Bowers 



Take your time cos the 

way I rhyme's gonna 

make you smile, when 

ya 

try to figure out what 

all this is for 




Kvelim Rhee 



23 




Chris Bowers 



24 




Try to figure out what 
all this is for. 



Try to see the world 

beyond your front 

door. 



Try to figure out what 
all this is for. 



Chris Bowers 




Nick Genevish 



25 



Current Events 




Though life on campus at 

Boston College can be 

busy enough, we must 

always remember to look 

beyond Chestnut Hill to 

be aware of the world. 

The academic year of 

2000-2001 has been a full 

one, including major 

events such as strife in 

the Middle East, the 

election of a new 

American President and 

the arrival of Vertical 

Horizon on campus. 



Editors: 

Torry Katsiroubas 

Amy Kauf old 

Brian Lerman 



BIG EAST CHAMPS! 

by Jim O'Sullivan 
Heights Editor 

A Boston College Team traveled to another state, 
played in arguably the biggest game in their program's 
history and returned victoriously to The Heights. 

The players weren't wearing shoulder pads -- they 
wore cleats. 

Head Coach Ed Kelly's men's soccer team put forth 
a heroic effort, winning the Big East Tournment by 
conquering Seton Hall, 2-1, in a game featuring goalie 
Chris Hamblin's brilliant saves and the extraordinary 
play of sophomore midfielder Bobby Thompson, the 
tournament's Most Outstanding Player. The win came 
in dramatic fashion, as the Eagles staved off a frantic 
last-minute Pirate attack. The win gave the Eagles 
their second Big East Championship, the first coming 
in 1990. 



Mod Fence Angers Seniors 

by Lacy O'Toole 
Heights News Editor 

Mod residents were welcomed back to campus by 
the news that a "decorative six-foot wrought iron 
fence" will be installed around the perimeter of the 
modular apartments with construction beginning later 
this week. 

In a letter sent to all Mod residents, Robert 
Capalbo, Director of University Housing, stated that 
the goal of the fence is to "create an attractive, dis- 
crete Senior living area." He further said his office has 
recieved numerous concerns over the past several 
years from seniors living in the Mods about the easy 
accesibility that underage individuals had to the Mod 
area and their homes. 

According to Assistant Vice President for Planning 
and Construction Tom Devine, the fence, when com- 
pleted, will have six vehicle gates, eight pedestrian 
gates and one service gate. The vehicle gates will be 
closed and locked with the exception of move-in and 
move-out dates. The pedestrian gates will always be 
unlocked. Devine said they may be closed at points, 
but that there was no current plans to lock them. 




courtesy of The Heights 



28 Current Events 




:ourtesy of The Heights 



Inth 



e 



Heights 



Leahy Announces 
Campanula's Departure 

by Lacy O'Toole 
Heights News Editor 

Leahy announced that Executive Vice Presi- 
dent Frank B. Campanella will step down at the 
conclusion of this academic year. 

"We have all benefited from his integrity, wis- 
dom and commitment," Leahy said. "I regard him 
as a loyal friend, someone I have especially 
enjoyed working with these past four years." 

Following a sabbatical, Campanella will re- 
sume teaching in the Carroll School of Manage- 
ment. A search for his successor will begin 
immediately. 

Leahy praised Campanella's role in the devel- 
opment of BC into a nationally recognized institu- 
tion. Leahy said that, in baseball terms, 
Capanella would be a "Twenty game winner and 
a hall of famer." 

"It's hard for me to imagine a life's work more 
satisfying," Campanella said as he began his 
final convocation speech. "We are today a very 
different BC than that of 1973, having been 
transformed by a constant, steady, persistent 
moving forward." 



Current Events 29 



On the Campaign 
Trail 

courtesy of AP 

Republican presidential candidate Texas 
Governor George W. Bush and Dick Cheney 
wave to media cameras after Cheney's arrival 
at the Governor's Mansion in Austin, Texas, 
Tuesday, July 25, 2000. 



Setting Records 

courtesy of AP 

U.S. Swimmer Misty Hyman celebrates 
winning the gold medal in the women's 200m 
butterfly Wednesday, September 20, 2000 at 
the Sydney International Aquatic Center 
during the Summer Olympics in Sydney. 
Hyman set a new Olympic record with her 
time of 2:0.88 




courtesy of AP 



30 Current Events 




In the 

USA 



Worlds Champions, 
Again 



courtesy of AP 

New York Yankees celebrate winning the 
American League Championship against the 
Seattle Mariners in Game 6 Tuesday, Octo- 
ber 17, 2000 in New York. From left are 
catcher Jorge Posada, closing pitcher 
Mariano Rivera, Derek Jeter, Chuck 
Knoblauch and Scott Brosius. The Yankees 
won the game 9-7. 



courtesy of AP 



Current Events 3 1 



Disaster in Russia 

courtesy of AP 



This 1999 image taken from video made 
available Thursday, August. 17, 2000, shows 
the crew of the Kursk nuclear submarine 
standing in front of their vessel at a navy base 
near Vidayayevo, Russia after their first patrol 
in the Atlantic. Underwater rescue capsules 
fighting to reach 1 18 seamen trapped on the 
Russian submarine failed again Thursday as 
new evidence suggested a massive explosion 
shattered lare areas of the vessel and many 
sailors had no time to escape. 



Tragedy in the Air 

courtesy of AP 

Accident investigators and emergency 
workers Wednesday, July 26, 2000 look 
through the wreckage at the scene of the Air 
France Concorde crash at Gonesse, near 
Paris, Tuesday that killed 113 people, mainly 
German tourists. An investigation was un- 
derway seeking clues to what caused the 
supersonic jet to catch fire during takeoff and 
crash into a hotel. 




courtesy of AP 



32 Current Events 




In the 

World 



Latin Groove 

courtesy of AP 

Colombian star Shakira performs during 
the first annual Latin Grammy Awards in Los 
Angeles, Wednesday, September 13, 2000. 
Shakira won for best female pop vocal 
performance and best female rock vocal 
performance. 



courtesy of AP 



Current Events 33 



^^■^^■■^nn 




Boston College is known 
throughout the country as 

a fine institution. During 
the 2000-2001 school year, 
the Boston College student 
body was the largest ever. 

Not only has the school 

increased in size but also 
in stature as today Boston 

College ranks among the 

top 40 universities in the 

country. Students here 

take their studies seriously, 

and the classroom offers 

an opportunity for intense 

discussion and 

participation on behalf of 
the students. 



Editors: 
Beth Bowers 
Stacey Feldt 



The Jesuit influence can be felt all 
over the Boston College campus, 
especially with such a sight as this 
cross on a snowy winter afternoon. 



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"The Catholic Jesuit university is founded upon the conviction that the religious and the 
academic are intrinsically related. The mission at Boston College is rooted in this dynamic 
integrity of the academic and the religious, a coherence of the divine and the human that reaches 
its fullest expression in Jesus Christ and often extends to all forms of human culture." 

The combination of spirituality, academics, and service seen at Boston College has been 
greatly influenced by the Jesuit Tradition. The Jesuit Society, founded by St. Ignatius of Loyola, 
has been leading the way in comforting and educating the followers of God since 1540. Boston 
College was founded by Jesuits in the South End of Boston in 1863. Today, it is one of the oldest 
and largest Catholic Jesuit universities in the United States. 

The Jesuit Tradition can be seen in many aspects of life at Boston College. There are curricular 
programs that address society's values and the specific choices one must make regarding his or 
her personal values, such as Pulse, Perspectives, and Capstone. There are research institutes that 
address how social and religious values and 
perspectives intersect with issues of contemporary 
culture and public life, such as the Social Welfare 
Research Institute, the Lonergan Institute, and the 
Jesuit Institute. There are numerous programs that 
attempt to make social, moral and religious values 
explicit, like the Emerging Leader Program, the Faculty 
Fellows Program, the Salt and Light Company, and 
substance-free housing. Service programs, such as the 
Jesuit Volunteer Corps, Jesuit International 
Volunteers, and 4Boston, stress service to those in 
physical, mental, and spiritual need. 

The Jesuits who live and teach at Boston College are 
continuing a long and respected tradition of excellence. 
The knowledge and guidance they share with all BC 
students helps to maintain and encourage the balance 
between academics and religion. 

Stacey Feldt '03 



5Jhz fatuit Jjfwtltute 

at Boston College 

presents: 



Analogy, Creation, and 
Theological Language 



by: 



David Burrell, C.S.C. 

Professor of Philosophy 
University of Notre Dame 



Thursday, October 19, 2000 
7:00 pm 
McGuinn Hall 121 





Left: Sermons given at St. Ignatius Church on 
Sunday evenings provide an excellent digression 
for students and other parishoners from their 
hectic schedules to a calm and relaxed under- 
standing of the self. 

Below: Students are asked to take part in the 
mass as a means of making all feel included in the 
spiritual life on campus. 




Shayla Ewing 




Above: Trinity Chapel on Newton Cam- 
pus gives freshmen the chance to 
celebrate with their friends and 
floormates in a more relaxed setting. 
Services held at the Chapel always wel- 
come all students. 

Far Left: Beautiful voices proclaiming 
a mix of faiths can be heard on the 
Heights and provide all who hear with a 
sense of peace and fulfillment. 

Left: Statues, paintings, crosses, and 
photographs are constant reminders to 
all who walk on Boston College grounds 
that BC is grounded in its Jesuit 

Tradition. Academics 37 



Kyelim Rhee 



Kyelim Rhee 



Pen^pectktei 

Jte/uo&i in Gwiluzn GIoUumxj, 



The faculty members at Boston College have 
helped to make our college experience a success. 
The professors, the deans, and the advisors who 
have become our friends have taught us lessons of 
caring, lessons of compassion, and lessons of life. 
Too often are the efforts of professors and admin- 
istrators forgotten as seniors prepare for gradua- 
tion and are bombarded with questions about ca- 
reers and future plans. It is these professors and 
administrators who have helped to make these 
futures possible, and their good works in and out of 
the classroom deserve attention and thanks. 

The graduating class was given the opportunity 
to express its appreciation and gratitude to those 
faculty members who have made a lasting impres- 
sion of excellence and dedication. Seniors were 
encouraged to honor their favorite professors and 
administrators by nominating them for a Faculty 
Perspective. These Perspectives recognize the val- 
iant efforts of the faculty members, and the kind 
words of their students show that their hard work 
and friendly encouragement have not gone unno- 
ticed or unappreciated. 

We would like to recognize these faculty mem- 
bers for their outstanding efforts in making a 
difference in the lives of the graduates. 

Stacey Feldt '03 



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Submitted by Dean Greed 



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Doctor Carol Green is an Associate Dean of the 
School of Arts and Sciences at Boston College. She 
received both her MA and her Ph.D. at George Wash- 
ington University. As an associate dean, her areas of 
focus include advisement of juniors, foreign study, 
interdisciplinary programs, transfer students and 
others. This helpful, caring woman has been a posi- 
tive influence in the lives of many students at Boston 
College. 

Dean Green is committed to women's issues and is 
very concerned with preventing discrimination. She 
is constantly increasing awareness of injustice and 
inequality, helping others to realize that these issues 
are still of great importance today. She has made 
Boston College a better place, and she continues to 
help students just like she helped those in the gradu- 
ating class. 

Dean Green lets the students at Boston College 
know how much she believes in them and how much 
she expects from them. She is always there to listen 
to a student's problems and concerns, and she gives 
counsel to those who are having a difficult time 
adjusting to college life. Her advice in times of need 
has helped students realize their potential and achieve 
their goals. Her office is a safe, welcoming haven 
where students go when they need any type of 
assistance. 

For some students, she has been the wind beneath 
their wings throughout their college careers. Thank 
you, Dean Green, for your continuing support of the 
students at Boston College! 

nominated by La'Shunda Reed 



John Cawthorne is the Assistant Dean of Students 
in the Lynch School of Education at Boston College. 
He received his MAT at the Antioch-Putney Gradu- 
ate School of Education. He is a talented writer with 
over 20 works in print. Among his publications are 
works regarding segregation and equality in schools. 
He is dedicated to helping others, and not just here 
at Boston College. For example, he has traveled to 
the Holy Family School in Natchez, Mississippi, to 
volunteer in an underpriveleged community with a 
group of Boston College students. 

Dean Cawthorne is always willing to make himself 
available to any student who needs guidance, en- 
couragement, or just someone to chat with. He is a 
wonderful professor, a helpful advisor, and a friend 
to all. He seems to have the gift of being able to put 
a smile on a lot of faces here on campus. He is 
magnetic; everyone wants to be near him, to hear 
what he has to say, and to watch how he interacts 
with other people. 

In addition to his comforting words of guidance 
and encouragement, Dean Cawthorne is also a pow- 
erful orator. He captures the attention of those 
around him with his stories, particularly those deal- 
ing with racial and segregation issues. He has had a 
meaningful impact on creating awareness among 
Boston College students and has influenced many to 
get involved in volunteering. 

Dean Cawthorne has been an influential figure not 
only to the students in the School of Education but 
also to the entire graduating class. He is one of few 
men who is immediately respected and loved. It is an 
honor to recognize such an outstanding person as 
Dean Cawthorne! 

nominated by Jennifer Fontana and Aimee Burke 

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Father John Howard is an Adjunct Senior Lec- 
turer in the School of Arts and Sciences Honors 
Program. He is well-known by the students in the 
Honors Program, and he is well-loved by all. 

Father Howard's passion for the subject material 
and his genuine concern for all of his students truly 
make him an asset to the Honors Program and to the 
Boston College community. In his teachings, he 
recognizes that relationships between classmates 
are often more important than the actual readings 
and academic lessons. The opinions and insights of 
each of his students are highly valued and praised, 
and the level of respect in his classroom is astound- 
ing. 

With the help and guidance of Father Howard, not 
only do the students become well-read and open to 
new ideas, but also his students discover who they 
are as individuals. Father Howard provides his stu- 
dents with the opportunity to discover where they 
stand in the world, in what they believe, and why 
their beliefs stand. 

Father Howard is both an outstanding teacher 
and a parental figure to his students. He goes out of 
his way to give advice and counsel, and he even 
approaches students when he feels that they may 
need to talk. He welcomes people into his home in 
St. Mary's and offers an ear to listen, a shoulder to 
cry on, and sound advice to take away. It is for this 
reason that Father Howard is affectionately known 
to his students as "El Padre." 

Father Howard has become a memorable profes- 
sor at Boston College both for his effective teaching 
methods and for his caring committment to his 
students. Thanks, El Padre! 

nominated by Sandi Birkeland 



Kim Christina 




Stephen Borgatti is an Associate Professor of 
Organizaion Studies in the School of Management 
at Boston College. He received his Ph.D. in Math- 
ematical Social Science at the University of Cali- 
fornia at Irvine. The people around him have great 
respect for him, and his influence on his students at 
Boston College has been enormous. 

Professor Borgatti is always willing to help and 
to make himself available to his students. He truly 
caters to their needs, willing to neglect his personal 
research and give up his spare time to talk with 
others who may be having difficulty. His unselfish 
nature and positive attitude earn him the respect 
and admiration of his students. 

In the classroom, Professor Borgatti uses ex- 
amples that pertain to life in the "real world," the 
world outside of Boston College, in order to make 
his lessons relevant and meaningful. Discussion is 
often focused on current world events and how 
they relate to what the class is studying. Professor 
Borgatti is down-to-earth and very understanding 
of the positions and beliefs of his students. 

Professor Borgatti's classroom provides students 
with an atmosphere conducive to learning, not just 
in the field of academics but also in the field of 
personal growth. He gives his students different 
perspectives on life, allowing them to form and 
change their own beliefs throughout the year. The 
lessons learned in his class prepare students to face 
the challenges of the real world. 

Professor Borgatti is genuinely a great man, and 
Boston College is very proud of and grateful for his 
contributions in the lives of his students. 

nominated by Lisa Grandy 





Beth Bower 



Michael Qcwuf, 

Michael Barry is an Adjunct Assistant Professor 
of Finance in the School of Magagement. Professor 
Barry not only teachesat Boston College, but he was 
also once a student here. He received his MBA and 
his Ph.D. at Boston College. He enjoys teaching 
corporate finance and business finance. He is a very 
caring person who is always ready and willing to help 
others. 

Professor Barry is a dedicated and talented 
teacher, but his influence reaches farther than just 
the classroom. He takes pleasure in advising stu- 
dents, taking time to help them make some of the 
most important decisions of their lives. He encour- 
ages achievement and growth, trying new things, 
and accepting challenges. He has helped students 
apply for and receive summer internships at presti- 
gious banking companies and investment firms. He 
coaches all seniors who ask for help, whether their 
questions are concerned with resume building, in- 
terviewing skills, or network contacts. He has greatly 
contributed to the School of Management's very 
high rate of job placements, and his advice and 
influence inspire students to perform to the maxi- 
mum of their potential. 

Professor Barry's door is always open. He will 
seriously and carefully respond to each of your 
questions with genuine advice and counsel. Many 
students are grateful to Professor Barry for his 
teachings both in and out of the classroom. He is a 
trusted advisor and a great friend to many. Profes- 
sor Barry has helped many students to maximize 
their opportunities and experiences at Boston Col- 
lege and in the finance world. The graduating class 
thanks you, Professor Barry, for your 
continued efforts. 

nominated by Ian Broff 



Or. William Lambert is the volunteer coordinator 
forthe Campus School in the School of Education at 
Boston College. With other student volunteers, he 
helps to organize programs and events designed to 
benefit the students of the Campus School as much 
as possible. His good works and dedication never fail 
to impress any and all who know him. 

Dr. Lambert is known as "Dr. Bill" and "Brodoc" to 
the students and volunteers around him. He has given 
himself completely to helping others, not just the 
students and volunteers at the Campus School but to 
the rest of the students at Boston College. He has 
beenafacultyadvisorforthe Fellowship of Christian 
Athletes and a faculty fellow for various Resident 
Assistants on campus. Said one student, "[Brodoc 
and I] took our Hardey basement residents to a new 
level they didn't even know they could reach." 

As the volunteer coordinator for the Campus 
School, Dr. Bill is responsible for one of the most 
successful service organizations in Boston. He and 
the Campus School volunteers show so much com- 
passion for the students with severe disabilities. The 
volunteers are caring, patient, enthusiastic and un- 
derstanding as they work and play with these stu- 
dents who face greater challenges every day than 
many of us will ever know. The volunteers follow the 
example of Dr. Bill, who is constantly encouraging 
them to do more and be more than they think they are 
able. His tremendous faith in those around him 
inspires others to give freely of themselves and to 
truly appreciate the world around them. 

Brodoc has made Boston College a wonderful and 
memorable experience for so many. He is truly an 
inspiration, and the graduates thank him. 

nominated by Joel Quintong 





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For those interested in taking a course in sociol- 
ogy, one name seems to stand out from the rest of 
professor recommendations: Eve Spangler. She is 
an associate professor who received her Ph.D from 
the University of Massachusetts Amherst. She is a 
strong advocate of women's rights and equality, 
and she has organized cross-national exchanges 
and curriculum planning in Eastern Europe and 
South Africa. Her courses are rumored to be very 
tough, but the truth is that she challenges her 
students to achieve at higher levels than ever be- 
fore. 

Professor Spangler's lectures are riveting, and 
she fuels her students' passions for sociology. Her 
enthusiasm about the subject matter inspires her 
students to challenge the institutions around them 
that can be oppressive and manipulative at times. 
She helps students grasp the important concepts 
while being understanding enough to make sure 
that they were comfortable and confident with the 
material. In addition to being a great lecturer, she 
also shows great compassion to her students out- 
side the classroom. Her office is a haven for stu- 
dents who need some comforting words in the 
sometimes lonely and chaotic world of Boston 
College. 

Professor Spangler's guidance and compassion 
help those around her gain control over their lives. 
She exemplifies a great and intellectual leader. She 
provides fuel to the flame of social responsibility 
here at Boston College. The graduates are grateful 
for her support, and they truly consider her a 
shining light at BC. 

nominated by Stephanie Wade 




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office of the dean 
College of Arts and Sciences 



Transition and change ~ the name of the game. 

You are drawing to a close what I trust was a wonderful experience, four years at 
Boston College, a premier liberal arts college with 138 years of experience educating 
undergraduate students for others, and a nationally and internationally respected research 
university, with masters and doctoral programs and professors on the cutting edge of 
scholarship in the sciences, social sciences and the humanities. 

You have been and will remain part of a dramatic transformation of your alma 
mater. We are not in Boston (well, most of the campus is not) and we are not a college, 
yet we are Boston College. Our campus reflects transition and change. You have studied 
in renovated Fulton and Devlin Halls, visited the wonderful McMullen Museum of Art, 
and watched the construction of the new Higgins Hall. You have studied in the Music 
and Theater departments, which did not exist a dozen years ago. You have witnessed a 
renewed, invigorated commitment to the sciences at Boston College, affirmed by both 
brick and mortar and by endowed Professorships. You have enjoyed the new annual Arts 
Festival and Kairos retreats. 

Boston, the nation and the world are changing as well. Some of us remember a 
town without the Big Dig, a nation with high unemployment and double-digit inflation, 
and a world without e-mail and web surfing but with a Berlin Wall. Your world will 
continue to change, and you will change with it. 

Your education at Boston College has prepared you well for a world of transition. 
The Core curriculum has given you insights into the human condition from a wide variety 
of perspectives, and your major has given you an in-depth understanding of at least one 
academic discipline. The lines between the traditional disciplines are becoming more 
and more blurred, and, inconveniently, few local, national or international problems 
come neatly packaged within disciplinary boundaries. 

You have learned how to think critically and write effectively, skills you will need 
whatever your choice of career. You are more likely to progress through a series of 
careers than your parents were. Your education is not over; it has barely begun. 

You now have a new family - the Boston College community, over 130,000 strong. 
You have met classmates whose friendships you will treasure the rest of your life, and 
special professors who have touched your life. (If you are reading this years after your 
graduation, write to a favorite professor now, and make her or his day!) Families take 
care of each other, and your new family is no exception. Boston College has prospered 
because of the commitment of your older BC brothers and sisters. I hope that you too 
will remain close, to each other and to the campus community. Help us continue to 
improve the educational experience of future generations of Boston College students and 
be true to our motto: Ever to Excel. 

Joseph F. Quinn 




V/? 



> 





Left: On their way to classes, students pass Gasson 
Hall, the headquarters of the Arts and Sciences de- 
partment. It is in this building that students can meet 
with Deans and advisors to discuss anything from 
registration times to final exam schedules. 

Below: Even though students in A&S cannot major 
solely in Pre-Med, most choose to study either Biol- 
ogy or Chemistry with hopes of going to medical 
school after Graduation. 





Shayla Ewing 





Far Left: Future scientists 
learn how to use lab equip- 
ment properly in Biology and 
Chemistry labs. 

Left: The lobby of Gasson dis- 
plays many religious and clas- 
sic statues, which help to keep 
the Gothic theme of the 
building's architecture alive. 



Shayla Ewing 



Academics 45 



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Boston College 



Office of the Dean 
The Wallace E. Carroll 
School of Management 



Dear Friends, 



On behalf of the faculty and staff of the Carroll school, I want to congratulate you on your graduation and 
wish you great journeys as you leave the gates of Boston College. In the years you have roamed the halls 
of Fulton, we have delighted in your enthusiasm, energy, talent, and compassion. The school has sought to 
challenge you in many ways, guide you when you stumble, and prod you to tackle opportunities beyond 
your courage. We hope we have fueled your passions. Now we eagerly await the pennants of your future 
success. 

Graduations are always times of reflection; the wonderful friends made on the fields, stage, ice, classroom, 
or dance floor; the special faculty member who nurtured your talents and corrected your missteps; and the 
consultations with Dean Keeley who provided order to the confusions in your early years. Boston College 
is a special place. As a newbie this year, I saw instantly the spirit of this school as I entered the gate. A 
colleague helped guide me by saying I needed to add extra time to my schedule as I traveled around the 
campus. " There are so many people to say hello to", he said, " you'll be late if you don't plan for those 
brief visits along the way". This helpful advice captures the essence of the school for me and I have 
enjoyed greeting you on campus, as I have become part of the Boston College family. 

As alumni now, you will have many ways to give back to Boston College for the wonderful intangibles you 
have gathered along the way. The pride you hold for the school, the helping hand you will give others, and 
the support and encouragement you will provide the University will help the community grow and meet the 
challenges of a changing world. Our peer institutions admire the Boston College alumni for their 
commitment to great things. You follow in wonderful footsteps and we know you will hold the banner 
high. 

You have many friends in the halls of Fulton and within the gates of Boston College. We hope you visit 
often along your way. We look forward to visiting with you on whatever paths your journeys may take. 

Best wishes, 



Tjjs^h^SRi^ 



Helen Frame Peters, Dean 



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Left: 4 CSOM student studies her accounting notes 
before a big test. Having this extra time to review 
gives students a feeling of relief before rushing in to 
take their exams. 

Below: The ground floor of Fulton is a place where 
students can study quietly or rest between classes. 
The School of Management is very demanding, and 
extra time to study or snooze is a luxury. 








Him mini mini 



Nick Genevish 





Nick Genevish 

Far Left: Between classes, 
students meet with friends 
and professors to review lec- 
ture notes and to chat. 

Left: With the help of the 
School of Management, stu- 
dents will walk through these 
doors with the knowledge 
and skills they need to com- 
pete and succeed in the com- 
petitive world of business. 



Nick Genevish 



Nick Genevish 



Academics 49 






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Academics 51 



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Boston College 



Office of the Dean 

The Peter S. and Carolyn A. Lynch 

School of Education 



Dear Lynch School Graduating Class of 2001, 

Congratulations ! The faculty, staff, and administration of the Carolyn A. and 
Peter S. Lynch School of Education join me in wishing you all the best in your personal 
and professional future. 

You begin your lives outside the Heights on the cusp of a new millennium. The 
country faces a severe and challenging teacher shortage; health and mental health care 
systems are in crisis; our economic successes have not changed the lives and life chances 
of many of the most disadvantaged families and children. Your skills, broad liberal arts 
knowledge base and social justice commitments are sorely needed in the century you 
enter as a new professional. 

Four years ago you were chosen for admission to Boston College because you are 
intelligent, skilled, and committed to the service of others. For the past four years you 
have been part of a community of scholars rooted in a Jesuit commitment to what the 32 nd 
Jesuit General Congregation said is, "the service of faith and the promotion of justice." 
For us in the Lynch School this means outreach to schools and communities that are in 
greatest need. It means we must form partnerships with the marginalized and stand with 
them as they chart the course to improving their life circumstances. It means that as we 
work to improve teaching and learning, we also work to remove the barriers to learning 
and the societal conditions that prevent every child from having a high quality education. 

As you leave us in the Lynch School, my hope is that you will use your education 
and your many gifts to improve the human condition by making the world more just. 

Congratulations, 




m.^«wJL 



Mary M. Brabeck 
Dean 



Left: The Educational Resource Center, located in 
the basement of Campion Hall, provides students in 
the Lynch School of Education with a place to study 
and learn with their peers. Within this one room is a 
plethora of teaching tools ranging from journals and 
magazines to manipulatives, diagrams, and charts. 

Below: This stain glass window provides potential 
teachers with the Jesuit inspiration that "He wi 
teach you all truth." After all, truth is the most 
important thing we can give our future. 




Liz Mahoney 

Far Left: This bus reminds 
future educators of their goal 
to make a difference in the 
ives of children. 

Left: The doors to the ERC 
are always open to students 
in the School of Education. 



Nick Genevish 



Liz Mahoney 



Academics 53 



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Office of the Dean 
School of Nursing 



Rakwt GoMi&i. 




Dear SON Graduating Class of 2001 : 



Congratulations to all of you on your graduation, and thank you for the many contributions 
you have made to this school during your time here. It is a time of new beginnings for you and for 
the profession of nursing. As we enter a new millennium, we look back to what the nurses of the 
20 th century have accomplished. We changed nursing from a hospital-based apprentice type 
occupation where nurses were trained to meet the needs of a given institution to a profession 
where nurses are educated in the finest schools in the world. They are prepared to work in the 
most technologically sophisticated settings and with those with the least resources, such as the 
homeless who live under bridges near the "Big Dig." 

We have been shaped by the events of the century. Some of the first nursing students at 
BC were RNs who had cared for troops in WW II and came here on the Gl Bill for their bachelor's 
degrees. We established our first research journal more than 50 years ago. We have an Institute 
for Nursing Research within the National Institutes of Health. Boston College has been in the 
vanguard of schools moving nursing into full status in the academy, establishing a master's 
program in 1958, and a PhD program in 1988. 

In the last ten years, there has been great upheaval in the health care industry. Most of 
this has been driven by financial considerations and we are still faced with a system in which 
serious inequities exist. A main area of political debate is how to improve a system that provides 
world-class care to some and third world care to others. Another area of great concern is the 
developing shortage of Registered Nurses. What is needed, according to experts in the health 
care industry, is not simply more nurses, but nurses who have been prepared to handle the 
complexities of the evolving health care environment. At Boston College, the nursing program is 
grounded in the liberal arts and in the Jesuit tradition of excellence in service to others. This 
preparation will prepare our students to succeed in an increasingly complex environment. 

We, the nurses of the 20 th century, are proud of what we have accomplished. No more the 
Charles Dickens' image of Sarey Gamp, we now are rated as one of the most trusted professions 
by the public. We have prepared a platform for you, the nurses of the 21 st century, from which 
you, as Isaiah the prophet said, may "soar as on Eagle's wings." The evolution of our profession 
in the next century is yours, and we are supremely confident that you will continue the Boston 
College tradition of excelling in service to others. 

May God continue to bless you, your parents, and loved ones, as you leave Boston 
College to commence the next phase of your life. 



Sincerely, 

Barbara Hazard Munro, Ph.D 
Dean and Professor 




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Left: Students in the School of Nursing are given the 
opportunity to work in the Health Services Office. 
The Clinic houses the medical records of all Boston 
College students. Through this work-study program, 
students are able to learn how a medical office 
functions. 

Below: To outsiders, this hallway may seem 
imposing. To students at Boston College, this 
hallway is a place to go for everything from allergy 
shots to ice for swollen ankles. The nurses and 
doctors are always helpful and caring. 



Far Left: The nurses in the 
Clinic are excellent examples 
for the nursing students to 
follow. 

Left: Patients are given time 
to catch up on their 
homework while waiting to 
be seen by a doctor. If you 
don't feel up to reading 
Organic Chemistry, there are 
plenty of pamphlets on 
pertinent diseases and 
viruses to read. 



Jeanette Shaw 



Jeanette Shaw 



Academics 57 



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Office of the Dean 

College of Advancing Studies 



To the Class of 2001: 

Great joy and accomplishment are yours as you celebrate graduation. You have achieved what 
you dared to dream. The talent, commitment and optimism you brought to studies will now be 
advanced in different directions, shared in new ways. 

You are on the cutting edge; the millenium offers unparalleled opportunity. A world community 
invites your vision, vitality and vigilant empathy for others. You are prepared to question, to 
seek answers and to respond. You have anchored your knowledge, convictions and attitudes in a 
commitment to others which is the essence of moral engagements. Life's many changes will 
now always be examined in a defined context. 

Your imagination and initiative link you today with distant continents and disparate cultures. 
With few strangers in an interactive world, limitless opportunities will prompt you to connect 
communities and carve a future of freedom and peace. 

You own the greatest human freedom: to choose your own attitude in any given circumstance. 
To secure your opinions under extreme conditions when there is no chance of changing them is 
the highest expression of personal autonomy. 

Respond to the compelling challenges with understanding and enthusiasm. Seize every 
opportunity with wisdom, optimism and a sense of humor. For seventy-two years, graduates of 
the College of Advancing Studies have gone forth into a world of upheaval and advanced the 
noblest human cause: freedom and moral concern for others. 



■ 



Prayerful best wishes for all the years ahead. 



Sincerely yours, 

James A. Woods, S.J. 
Dean 




Left: These students wait to speak with their advisor 
in McGuinn. While it may look like they have been 
called down to the principal's office, meeting with an 
advisor is a painless experience that is usually quite 
helpful. 

Below: The ledge in front of McGuinn is a great place 
to catch up on some reading. The offices and lounges 
of the College of Advancing Studies are located in 
McGuinn, but studying outside is preferable when the 
weather allows it. 




Kim Christina 





Kim Christina 



Far Left: Preparing for a 
Friday test, this student 
thinks to himself, "Only 50 
minutes until the weekend 
begins!" 

Left: After an inspiring 
lecture in McGuinn, these 
students are ready to ponder 
the deeper meaning of life... 
Or maybe they're just on their 
way to lunch! 



Kim Christina 



Kim Christina 



Academics 61 



Honors students are given ample time to 
just sit around and discuss theories and 
ideas with their professors. This 
undergrad chats with her Honors advisor 
over pizza. 



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clecm cmol wucjUt; ipu 



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Every student at BC has to fulfill core requirements in some way, but some students have 
chosen a unique option: the Honors Program. This program, encompassing all four years, allows 
students to take a single course each year combining philosophy, theology, literature, writing, 
and social sciences. Having been chosen to participate, these students begin their Freshman 
year taking the course The Western Cultural Traditions that continues through to the end of 
Sophomore year. In small classes of no more than fifteen people, students discuss the way 
people have thought through the ages. In Western Cultural Traditions, students begin reading 
Greek and Hebrew texts, then Roman literature, moving into Christian and Medieval works. 
Sophomore year begins with the Renaissance, con- 
tinuing into the Enlightenment and Romanticism 
culminating with 19 th century texts. The Junior year 
course, the 20 th Century and Tradition, allows stu- 
dents to contemplate and discuss how the people of 
the century have responded to the tradition of thought 
they inherited. Finally, during their senior year, 
students either write a senior thesis, often on a topic 
within their major, or take a seminar that reconsiders 
the important works studied during the previous 
years. Through this program, the oldest and largest 
at BC, students are given an exceptional foundation 
that not only aids in expanding their awareness of 
thought in general, but also enhances their under- 
standing of their desired major. 

Kathy Grabenstatter '04 



Professors of Honors classes don't lec- 
ture so much as guide their students to 
a higher understanding of learning. 




Kim Christina 




Left: The program of study in Honors ex- 
tends from History to English to Mythol- 
ogy. Students are encouraged to read clas- 
sic works and analyze them on their own as 
a more in depth study of a broader curricu- 
lum. 

Below: The Honors Program is not all work 
without play, as these LSOE Honors stu- 
dents prove during their pizza party. 



Kim Christina 




Below: The Honors Li- 
brary in Gasson provides 
this student with both the 
resources and the silence 
he needs to do his best 
work. 



Jess Burkhart 



TT 



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This student takes advantage of 
the pleasant fall weather to read 
outside. The dustbowl is a popu- 
lar study area, weather permit- 
ting. 



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timed- and duwende/i mtf&elff to- a 
woA, mt(uu^uecaMAe!j ca^uppen 
the ohwi again and 6ee a mtman 
lace dta/iina< at me. 





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At Boston College, there are those fortunate students who never seem to study and still do 
incredibly well in their academic courses. While these students may seem lucky, they have 
been missing some major aspects of life at BC that have become so familiar to the rest of 
us: the places we study. 

Students will study anywhere in order to get a few extra minutes of review. Groups of people 
gather in a study room in O'Neill for an econ review session; statistics notebooks are open 
in front of students as they eat breakfast in Lower and McElroy; the person in the next stall 
quietly recites the main points of the Peace of Augsburg. 

Some of the more popular study areas are the libraries, especially O'Neill and Bapst. O'Neill 
is the central research library at Boston College which holds study cubbies, laptop hookups, 
study rooms, and couches. Bapst contains resources related to Art and Art History. O'Neill 
and Bapst are joined by other important libraries and resource centers at BC, including the 
Educational Resource Center in, the Newton Resource Center, the Social Work Library, and 

Burns Library. 

Students who need an environment that is more 
"study friendly" than their dorm rooms also fre- 
quent study lounges in and around the dorms. 
These lounges are usually quiet and, unlike the 
libraries, are open around the clock. Whether you 
are a senior living in Gabelli or a freshman near 
O'Connell house, a study lounge is never far away. 
The famous Dr. Seuss poem, "Oh, the Places You'll 
Go!" has great relevance to the students at Boston 
College. We are experiencing new things every 
day, and the opportunites to learn and achieve 
seem never ending. We study hard all around 
campus, sometimes oblivious to the fact that we 
just stepped in a puddle of water or started reciting 
outloud the ideas of Plato. "Oh, the Places You'll 
Study!" 

Stacey Feldt '03 




Benches in the Quad and outside O'Neill are 
popular places to quickly flip through notes 
one last time before class or to just relax and 



Left: Diligent students line the tables in O'Neill to 
get late-night studying done without the 
interuptions of dorm living. 

Below: This coed uses the high-speed Internet 
connection in her dorm room to research papers 
on BC's interactive library search system. 




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1111 VI 





Middle: Beautiful and ever-so-silent, 
Bapst Library makes a great place to 
read 500 pages of Molecular Biology. 

Above: Even the noisiest spots on cam- 
pus, like the Eagle's Nest, make fea- 
sible study locations for getting work 
done during lunch, right before that 
1:30 class. 

Left: Study cubbies provide excellent 
privacy for reading and working on 
problem sets in the library. 

Far Left: The walkway to and from 
O'Neill is never daunting, even in the 
rain, if you run into friends. 

Academics 65 



Nick Genevish 



Students are able to show their creativity 
and enthusiasm for performing by audi- 
tioning for roles in the productions 
throughout the year. The theater pro- 
gram is a great asset to Boston College, 
and all are welcome. 



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Although Boston College may not be a school completely focused on theater, the Theater 
Department, the performance groups, and the numerous comedy troupes show that theater truly 
is a large part of the curriculum. Unlike schools specializing in theater, the program at BC allows 
students to develop a broad understanding of theater, enabling them not only to develop the 
ability to perform well and convincingly but also to expand their knowledge of theater itself. 
While gaining this education, students can participate in the numerous plays and musicals 
performed at Robsham Theater and the Bonn Studio. Some of the plays included Ring Round the 
Moon, Uncommon Women and Others, and Oklahoma. Other plays are part of the Student 
Workshop Program, in which Juniors who have 
completed the directing program can submit plays 
to be performed during their Senior year. Two such 
plays are chosen each year, showing the great 
prowess these students have gained from their hard 
work. All of these performances convey the 
enormous effort that these aspiring thespians put 
into developing their talents. Besides the Theater 
Department's aspect of BC life, student groups like 
the Dramatics Society also provide students an out- 
let for their creativity. These groups give 
students other chances to act, direct, and even write 
plays to be performed, showing a different 
form of theater at Boston College. 

Kathy Grabenstatter '04 



College Department of Theatre in 
Association with the Robsham Theatre Arts Center 
, Presents I / .'"■ 

Uncommon Women 



and Others 

A Play by Wendy 
Directed by Patricia RuSP 
November 2-4, 2(!bo 
8:00 PM 





Bonn Studio, Robsham Theatre 

Tickets $5.00 

Box Office 552-4800 



I 




Left : These students perform in the produc- 
tion "Uncommon Women and Others." So 
much practice, practice, practice made this 
show perfect. 




Jeanette Shaw 



Above: The setting for the comedy "Fool 
for Love" was the Old West. Sometimes, a 
student's role may call for uncomfortable 
costumes (like cowboy hats and boots) and 
uncomfortable exits (like being carried kick- 
ing and screaming from the stage). 



Academics 67 



In the fall of 2000, the exhibit dis- 
playing Russian Art was a big hit 
at the Art Museum in Devlin. 



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Biology, Mathematics, Philosophy, and Theology are all part of the core curriculum here 
at Boston College. Also a core requirement is a semester of what the University considers 
Fine Arts. This includes courses in Theatre, Art History, and Music. There are also 
drawing, painting, and sculpting classes to be taken. It is this core requirement that helps 
to round out BC's well-qualified, intelligent students. Known for its high quality of 
learning, Boston College also demands that its students have a knowledge and apprecia- 
tion of artistic culture, in any number of its forms. The 
appreciation for the artistic world can be seen all over 
campus on any given day. There are a cappella con- 
certs in Gasson 100. There is the Art Museum in Devlin, 
which sponsors many different exhibits throughout 
the academic year. There are student talent shows and 
dance recitals and plays. Laughter from sketch and 
improv comedy shows permeates the air of Chestnut 
Hill on Friday nights. When looking throughout the 
entire curriculum and Boston College's standards, it is 
not difficult to see why the Eagles of the new Millenium 
are more well-rounded than ever. 

Beth Bowers '03 




BOSTON 
COLLEGE 



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Left: Art Festivals provide students with the 
opportunity to view one another's work. 

Below: Art work takes its cues from both history 
and culture, as this though from Nikita 
Khrushchev indicates. 



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wor 


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lies in 


the 


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skill. 


clari 


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of t 


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positions. 






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Middle: Performances at such events as 
this Bach Festival fill the Heights with 
the sweet sounds of the classics. 

Above: Students bands are given the 
chance on the Dustbowl to show their 
talent to the rest of the student body. 

Far Left: This coed creates her own mas- 
terpiece at BC's Art Festival. 

Left: My Mother's Fleabag, a performance 
group at Boston College, performs sketch 
comedy that has its audience rolling in 
the aisles. 

Academics 69 



Beth Bowers 



H> 



Second semester study abroad stu- 
dents have the luxury of spending 
Spring Break in a foreign land. These 
BC undergrads team up to explore 
Louis XIV's Palace in Versailles, 
France. 



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dta/id,, oa dolled to- cm 
iutcUa^ted land, oa 
apmed a new- amsuuajf 

Ipsi me mwicm dplut. 



eMeteu Keii&L 








It is no wonder that Boston College's International Education program is so popular. With 
over 60 programs in more than 25 countries, students can take advantage of the opportunity 
of a lifetime, one that will take them to far off lands where they will experience new cultures 
and gain new perspectives. Nearly half of the students at Boston College participate in some 
type of international experience by the time they graduate. Most of these students will go 
abroad during their junior year or first semester of their senior year. There are full year and 
semester programs, and there are even opportunites to study and intern abroad over the 
summer. 

Students who choose to study abroad start planning as early as their freshman year. There 
are numerous applications to be completed, interviews to be scheduled, and study advisors to 
meet. Students who are accepted into the program are assigned to another college or university 
in their choice city. Here, they must register for a 
complete courseload in order to earn full BC credit. 
Living arrangements are specific to each university, 
but students generally live with host families, in 
dorms near the university, or with other exchange 
students in apartments or flats. 

Studying abroad is a chance for students to ex- 
change ideas, to learn about different ways of life, 
and to focus their program of study. Whether study- 
ing in Prague orthe Philippines, Morocco or Mexico, 
Scotland or South Africa, students will live in a 
challenging atmosphere that inspires both personal 
and intellectual growth. With placements around 
the globe, Boston College's International Studies 
program is sure to find the perfect spot for any 
interested student. 

StaceyFeldt'03 



m 



A 



Boston College 
The Center for International Studies 

The CIS is honored to announce the visit of, 

Mike Reddin 

Senior Tutor to the General Course 

The London School of Economics and Political Sciences (LSE) 

London, England 

When : Thursday, October 26 th from 2:00pm- 3:30pm 

Where : Hovey House Library 

Why : The London School of Economics boasts an outstanding 
international reputation in all the social sciences and closely 
related subjects such as history, law and philosophy. 

** London is one of the largest and most dynamic cities in the 
world. A great cultural, economic, and political center, London is 
home to the Buckingham Palace, St. Paul's Cathedral, Westminster 
Abbey and the British Museum. 

ALL ARE WELCOME TO ATTEND 



Please Note: Hovey House Library is located across from McElroy. 
For further information contact Peggy Ramirez at 2-3827. 



|PtEASEREMOVEAFH& 

\ OCT 2 7 2000 ^ \ 
{ ufb Approved I 




•*<*»£ 




■ ••••• 



7* i*- »| 



'■ ► . 



Below: Overlooking Segovia, Spain, two girls 
find this beautiful Aqueduct intriguing, There 
is much more to learning than books, as they well 
know. 





Left: On board a bateau-bus, Courtney Lemoine 
stops to capture an international keepsake in 
front of the Tourd'Eiffel! 

Above Middle: Who needs New Orleans when 
you can spend Mardi Gras with friends in 
Strasbourg, France?! 

Above: One of the most exciting elements of 
studying abroad are the ne w friends to be made. 
Here at the Alcazar in Se villa, Spain, BC stu- 
dentsand their "nuevosamigos" make memo- 
ries that will last a lifetime, long after verb tenses 
are forgotten! 



Academics 11 



Submitted by Courtney Lemoine 



At placements like Rosie's Place, 
Pulse students can help make nu- 
tritious lunches for their guests. 



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Boston College is an institution of higher learning that has been publically acclaimed for many 
things: its extensive alumni networking system, its nationally ranked hockey team, and its 
well-prepared graduates. In more recent news, Boston College has been in the spotlight for 
its many community service programs. Every year, more and more BC students take part in 
such programs as Appalachia, 4 Boston, and Pulse. 

Pulse is a full-year course which takes care of both the Theology and Philosophy core 
requirements. Pulse students attend weekly classes on Plato, Descartes, and the Bible, while 
spending another ten hours each week in a particular community placement. Placements 
include Rosie's Place, local soup kitchens, children's programs, and the Big Brother/Big Sister 
Program. When asked how they manage a very full academic schedule while also volunteering, 
Pulse students are quick to share the deep satisfaction 
they receive from not only learning but also giving 
back to the community. 

As years pass and Boston College receieves more 
attention for its thoughtful, giving students, there is 
hope that others will follow in our footsteps. Programs 
like Pulse do not merely teach students about selfless- 
ness and social justice. Rather, they force students to 
live the lives that they learn about. Pulse students 
learn to manage their time in an organized schedule 
while becoming more conscientious of their obliga- 
tions to the community around them. And it's not a bad 
way to get rid of some core requirements along the 
way! Beth Bowers '03 



This student prepares an answer on 
Aristotle's theory of the human condi- 
tion. 




Left: Pulse professors offertheir 
students a deeper awareness of 
life outside Boston College. 



Below: Students at their 
placements have a myriad 
of responsibilities that 
can include anything from 
folding laundry to child 
care to spending time with 
the elderly. 




Katy Rose Fritz 



Studying for finals permeates every 
aspect of life on campus, where stu- 
dents will not even take time out of 
their busy schedules to eat. 



J ^bomi depend time 
mcdina on a umzII 

it Unt& a axwi. 



V 




, ^ * 



tyii^Cnuwck 



It's that time of year, the week all college students across the United States dread. Every other 
human being is caught up in either the hustle and bustle of the Holiday season or the gorgeous 
weather of late Spring. For participants of "higher learning," it is time for Finals. They come 
twice a year, at the end of each semester, and they are rarely welcomed. Here at Boston 
College, finals mean many different things to different students. For some, it is crunch time: 
two study days spent cramming a semester's worth of knowledge into an already-full brain. 
For others, it is the end of a long stretch of weekly exams, papers, and projects. For many, 
it begins the long-anticipated Semester or Summer 
Break. As all BC students learn during their first 
semester, however, finals are a right of passage each 
college student must endure. We are faced with 24 
hour quiet hours (that no one ever follows), having to 
show a "valid Eagle-One ID" at the door because of 
increased security in O'Neill, over-crowded study car- 
rels and tables, the 11 P.M. scream in the Mods, and 
trying to both study and pack so the University can kick 
us out just "two hours after our last exam." Finals week 
is the storm before the calm of vacation. And for some, 
it is the debt we must pay for enjoying ourselves all 
semester long! 



Beth Bowers '03 



<6" 



Stressing out about studying? 

Need something fun before finals? 

Celebrate the season with us!! 



Holiday 
Party 



'-e, 



©// 



Friday Dec. 8 
8 p.m. -10 p.m. 
Cabaret Room 





Sponsored by 
Another Choice on Campus 

Contact Dana 5-8597 




Left: When tables in O'Neill Library are overly crowded 
during study days, it is perfectly acceptable to sit 
across from strangers, so long as there is work to be 
done. 

Below: This undergrad makes the most of quiet hours as 
she studies in her dorm room. 

Middle: More unconventional places to study are Addie '$ 
and the Rat, where the noise can't deter diligent 
students. 




Chad Elder Chad Elder 




Above: Fervent learners read and reread their 
texts to prepare for finals. 

Far Left: Group efforts to study in dorm 
lounges make the end ofthe semester a time 
not only to prepare for exams but also to 
spend time with friends before vacation. 

Left: When the weather permits, many 
students enjoy relaxing and reading on 
the benches outside O'Neill and in the 
Quad. 



Academics 75 



Chad Elder 




L SERVIC 




Organizations 

Organizations are a vital 

part of student life at 
Boston College. They have 

evolved into a source of 
commitment and education 

for students. 
Organizations include such 
groups as community 
service, government, 
a capella, publications, 
dance, religion and cultural 
groups. They add to a stu- 
dents college career and 
prove that some of the 
most important learning is 
not gained in the class- 
room. 



Editors: 

Jessica Burkhart 

Bob Salomone 




submitted by UGBC 



submitted bv UGBC 



one foot in the 

UGBC 

It is the mission of the Undergraduate Governmnet of 
Boston College to actively represent the undergraduate 
student population by programming according to the 
interests of the student body forcefully advocating the 
concerns of the student body to the University, and 
promoting issues of justice throughout the Boston College 
Community 

"I think UGBC.org, Homecoming, the Christmas Tree 
Lighting, Breaking the Barriers and our Board of Trustees 
presentation on Academic Advising have been our biggest 
successes this year." 

MikeReif '02 



T 



TJCFWI 



•«r 



A 



i 








1 |P *sf m3^M r 






78 Organizations 







Freshmen involved in the 
Mentoring Leadership 
Program run by UGBC take 
time out from their 
rock-climbing weekend to 
pose for a picture. 



Pausing during a UGBC get 
together, two members smile 
for the camera. They are able 
to take advantage of all the 
new activities UGBC has 
introduced to the Boston 
College community. 



ffe 



^r ^ 



President Alvin Barnett and 
Vice-President Rochelle 
Webb pose for a picture 
during a UGBC barbeque. 




running 



our 



own 



gpvemment 



The Under- 
graduate 
Government 
of Boston 
College 
plans 
activities 
and keeps 
students 
busy 



iubmitted by UGBC 



Organizations 79 



how to 
make 
I great 

leaders 



The 

Marketing 

Academy 

sponsors 

events to 

further 

professional 

development 

while the BC 

Democrats 

work to 

create future 

leaders. 



Watch over us 



The BC Democrats pose in 
front of their spot of choice: 
the Gasson rotunda. The 
Democrats hold monthly 
meetings and sponsor 
events like trips to the 
presidential debates, and a 
table at the Activities Fair to 
recruit new members. 



Talking with a professor 
from the School of 
Management, one student 
learns some helpful tips for 
how to give a successful 
interview. The Marketing 
Academy sponsored The 
Finishing School that 
provided many services to 
students going into the 
business field. 



»o I look ok 7 



Two students listen intently 
as a professor talks to them , 
about fashion etiquette in the 
business world. Among the 
services the Marketing 
Academy provided at its 
Finishing School were sales 
skills, interview skills, table 
manners, resume critique 
and fashion etiquette. 







Kyelim Rhee 



80 Organizations 







I 



V 

1 













7':Tru. 




one foot in the 




Kvclim Rhee 



Marketing Academy 

The Marketing Academy educates students about their 
opportunities in marketing through interaction with 
professionals, professors, and peers. We coordinate a 
Distinguished Speaker Series where professionals in 
marketing and advertising fields speak to our members 
regarding their roles and experiences in marketing. The 
Academy also provides instruction on internships and 
jobs by utilizing the services of the Boston College 
Career Center and through networking with BC alumni. 

"I will miss the free food, t-shirts, and the creative flexibility 
to make the finest looking fliers on campus." 

Yelitza Hernandez, '01 




Nick Genevish 



Boston College Democrats 

The goal of the BC Democrats is to further the Common 
Sense Platform of the Democratic Party. We do this by 
hosting speakers, having political discussions and 
volunteering ourselves in the Democrats' campaigns. 



"Be there or be a republican!' 



T.J. Dube, '01 



Organizations 81 



one foot in the 




School of Nursing Senate 

Each class elects four officers to serve as a liason between 
students and faculty. The SON Senate works to provide 
a variety of services to the school and community, 
including class events, community volunteer projects, 
convocation preparation, and promotion of professional 
development. 




School of Management Government 

The School of Management Government (SOMG) is the 
official governing body of the Carroll School of 
Managment. The SOMG promotes unity between 
students, faculty and academics and sponsors various 
events including banquets, golf tournaments, and guest 
speakers for CSOM students. 





82 Organizations 




J 








Members ol the S( hool o! 
Nursing Senate have the 
opportunity to learn aboul 
medical offices by working 
in BC's Clinic. This student 
gains hands on experieme 
by particpating in the 
everyday activities ol (lie 
office. 



UUW.U.IJIIJM.WMl 

A student glances into the 
inner workings of theClinii 
in order to enhance her 
Boston College Nursing 
Education. The Clinic 
allows nursing students and 
members of the SON Senate 
to become active 

particpants. 



urrent Events 



This School of Management 
student takes time to be 
more aware of the 
happenings of the world 
around him. The SOMG 
encourage an active interest 
in Boston College's currenet 
events as well as those of the 
world. 




3 




governing 
bodies 



that 



Rule 



Two of BC's 

student 

government 

groups 

work 

to make 

change in 

their school 



Organizations 83 



create 



your 



own 



light 



Two 

groups on 

campus 

strive to 

make 

differences 

in 

students' 

lives. 



Reconstruhon 



During a meeting of the 
Asian Caucus, members 
look to their president while 
taking notes and throwing 
out suggestions for ways to 
develop their own voice, 
conscience and thoughts to 
be the backbone of the new 
AC. 



Two members of the Asian 
Caucus listen intently while 
the president speaks to the 
group. The Asian Caucus is 
working to lay a new 
foundation and break away 
from the status quo that has 
plagued it in the past. 



Let's talk 



During a weekend retreat, 
new members of the Salt and 
Light Company Katie 
Scherivsh and Nick 
Genevish talk about a speech 
that was just given. The 
weekend retreat gives 
students a chance to interact 
in another setting besides the 
BC campus and to share 
their faith with each other. 




Kyelim Rhee 



84 Organizations 




Kyelim Rhee 




one foot in th 




Kyelim Rhec 



Asian Caucus 



In unity, our mission is to act as the voice of resource 
and support for the Asian and Asian American students 
at Boston College and to promote cultural diversity and 
awareness with the Boston College community. 



"One and one for all. This does not necessarily mean a loss 
of our own particular culture, but a link between our 
similarities." 



Brian Lam, '02 




Salt and Light Company 

The Salt & Light Company is an organization sponsored 
and supported by tine University Chaplaincy of Boston 
College. The mission of the Salt & Light Company is to 
encourage Christian faith and action among all who 
choose to be a part of the community. This mission is 
accomplished by emphasizing Spirituality, Community, 
Ministry, Outreach, and Celebration. 

"Salt and Light is a great community on campus. We have a 
great time together and serve others at the same time. " 



Kelly Kroll, '04 



by Salt and Light Company 



Organizations 85 



one foot in the 




Campus School Volunteers 

BC Campus School serves students ages 3-21 with 
multiple disabilities including complex health care 
needs. The program provides student centered, 
educational and therapeutic services in a school based 
setting, as well as consultation and training to local 
school systems and families. 

"It is amazing to be a part of such an extraordinary group of 
people who work hard for the students of the Campus School. 
Seeing the smiles and hearing the laughter of the kids who 
benefit from what we do is overwhelmingly gratifying." 

Erin Gartland, '02 




Chad Elder 



Circle K 

To better the community and campus through service 
projects. Boston College Circle K makes the community 
at large accessible to students who can too often get 
wrapped up in events only on campus. It introduces 
them to the world of service outside the campus walls 
and facilitates their involvement in numerous activities. 

"Circle K is a great experience for college students. We get 
involved in our community through volunteering and it gives 
students a chance to meet other people who have the same 
goals and interests. " 

Suzanne Reed, '03 




Chad Elder 



86 Organizations 




I he Campus School 
Volunteers pose with their 

buddies during d I l.illow een 

party. I he children gol to 
dress up for the day and 
enjoy party favors and 
games. 



Talking to a full crowd, a 
member of Circle Kexplains 
the purpose of the Circle K 
Musicfest. It was organized 
to benefit the Kiwanis 
Peditric Trauma Institute 
and Iodine Deficiency 
Disorder. 



Everyone got in on the action 
when the college students as 
well as the students of the 
Campus School got dressed 
up for Halloween. 




a 



community 



of 

service 



Through 

service, the 

Campus 

School 

Volunteers 

and Circle K 

better the 

Boston 

College 

community. 



Organizations 87 



Course of action 



A 4Boston member maps out 
what needs to be done in the 
days ahead. 



providing 

hope 

and 

encouragement 



4Boston 
and 

Appalachia 
Volunteers 
assist in 
the daily 
lives of 
people 
both in 
Boston and 
beyond. 



All smiles 



Two Appalachia Volunteers 
find the program an 
excellent way to spend their 
Spring Break, receiving the 
rewards of meaningful 
contribution in smiles. 



Just having a good time 



Another 
Volunteer having fun and 
enjoying the company of her 
new friend. 



88 Organizations 






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one foot in the 




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31 



4Boston 

The aim of 4Boston is to provide students with a 
significant extended urban service experience which is 
enriched by regular opportunities for reflection on and 
analysis of the work in which they are engaging. 
Placements are available for students interested in 
working on issues of hunger and homelessness, health 
care and elder services, youth and tutoring work, and 
correctional services. 



"My 4Boston experience has served to keep me aware of the 
many problems that exist in our society as well as provide a 
forum from which I can make a difference, no matter how 
small." 

Mike Mancini, '03 




Appalachia Volunteers 

We are a student-run volunteer organization concerned 
with rural poverty, particularly as manifested in poor 
housing conditions. Through our volunteer programs 
we aim to realize a dual educational purpose: to provide 
hope for those victimized by the demoralizing 
conditions of poverty, and to enlighten BC about the 
extent of poverty in the United States. 
"I wanted to do Appalachia because 1 felt it was something 
worthwhile to do over Spring Break. I got to go somewhere 
that I had never been and meet people that I had never had 
the opportunity to be with before. They taught us a lot and 
in the end I got much more out of it than I put into it." 

Adrian Clark, '03 



Organizations 89 



one foot in the 




Habitat for Humanity 

Habitat for Humanity of Boston College organizes 
students to provide affordable, respectable housing for 
those who cannot afford it. To achieve this objective, 
students supply the manpower to build houses, seek to 
raise funds to support such construction, and provide 
advocacy on campus for those who are less fortunate. 

"I think it is a great chance to get out and work with other 
students that you might not normally meet and really get to 
see a different slice of life. It makes me realize that we're all 
in this together because it could be any one of us out there 
trying to raise a family; it all starts with a home. " 

Jake McKinstry, '01 




Red Cross 

The American Red Cross, a humanitarian organization 
led by volunteers and guided by its Congressional 
Charter and the Fundamental Principles of the 
International Red Cross Movement, will provide relief 
to victims of disasters and help people prevent, prepare 
for, and respond to emergencies. 

"American Red Cross has been a great experience. From 
sophomore year when we started the club at BC to now, the 
BC chapter of Red Cross has helped many people through 
organizing blood drives and Disaster Services day." 

Rita Johnson, '01 



90 Organizations 







Annette Fay can't help but 
laugh when a fellow Red 

Cross member cracks a joke 
during a meeting at Addies. 



we can 



To promote their benefit 
concert, Habitat for 
Humanity displayed this 
sign in the dustbowl where 
lots of students and faculty 
would see it. 



make 



a 



Looking up to her fellow 
Red Cross member, one 
student listens as the other 
talks about the upcoming 
blood drive. 



difference 




Habitat for 

Humanity 

works on the 

weekends to 

give families 

places to live 

while the 

Red Cross 

works to run 

blood drives 

and raise 

awareness. 



Organizations 91 



using 
all 



available 



Of utmost importance 



Two members of the EAC 
discuss one of the numerous 
environmental concerns 
affecting people both on 
campus and in the 
surrounding communities. 



Making a point 



Marisol Orihuela makes a 
suggestion to some of the 
women of the WRC on how 
to reach out to more people. 



resources 



Waiting for the group to 
quiet down, a member of the 
Environmental Action 
Coalition looks out to the 
membership. 



The 

Environtnental 

Action 

Coalition 

and 

Women's 

Resource 

Center help 

promote 

social action 

on campus. 






I\lick(_.LMievish 




Bob Salomone 



92 Organizations 






Nick Genevish 



one foot in the 




Environmental Action Coalition 

The Environmental Action Coalition strives to make the 
BC community more aware of environmental concern 
and to give students a chance to take part in 
environmental issues and action. 



"We didn't inherit the earth from our ancestors. We're 
borrowing it from our children... or something like that." 



The Environmental Action Coalition, '01 




Bob Salomone 



Women's Resource Center 

Our purpose at the Women's Resource Center is to reach 
out to the student body in order to explore and promote 
women's issues on campus. We look to raise awareness 
as well as promote social action in regards to women's 
rights. 



"The Women's Resource Center at BC is a place where all 
types of wonderful things happen. Women can come here to 
receive support, visit ivith friends, and celebrate wlmt it means 
to be a woman. To be part of a group with such a rich history 
is an honor. " 

Karen Walsh, '01 



Organizations 93 



one foot in the 




BC Hillel 



BC Hillel provides resources and serves as a community 
for Jewish students. Hillel also raises the awareness on 
campus of Jewish cultural and historical events. The 
group is active both here at BC and throughout the 
Boston area, raising awareness through lecture series 
and religious celebrations. 



"Hillel functions as an extended family 
that welcomes members with diverse 
Jewish backgrounds. We are committed 
to carrying on our Jewish traditions in a 
participatory, nurturing environment." 
Melissa Mariasch '03 





Asian Christian Fellowship 

ACF reaches out with the Gospel of Jesus Christ to the 
Boston College community. Also, ACF fosters spiritual 
growth and meaningful relationships within the body 
of believers, especially (but not limited to) Asian- 
American Christians. Lastly, ACF is committed to 
developing leaders and preparing for God's work. 

"I love ACF because it's a place where I can go and spend 
some time with brothers and sisters. It's a place where you 
can find God and not have to think about anything except 
you and how you are doing with Him. 

Joe Lin, '02 




Kyelim Rhee 



94 Organizations 







Members oi BC Hill. I g ( . 

together to talk about thru 
religion. 1 >iscussing their 
diverse ideas allows 
members to discover nunc 
about themselves and i-,u h 
other. 



able 



The Asian Christian 
Fellowship allows students 
from differing Asian 
backgrounds to come 
together and talk about their 
experiences. This creates a 
time away from the stresses 
of college life to concentrate 
on God. 



nside joke 



Smiling at one another, 
members of the Asian 
Christian Fellowship talk 
and laugh at one of the 
meetings. 




in the 



name 



of 



faith 



BC's 
religious 
groups get 
together to 
share their 
faith and 
fellowship 



yelim Rhee 



Organizations 95 



serving 
it up 



spoonhead 



style 

Men's and 
Women's 
Ultimate 
Frisbee 
take to the 
field in a 
fast- 
moving, 
fast- 
thinking 
sport 

unlike any 
other. 



Above the competition 








A BC player elevates above 
the rest of the competition to 
bring down the frisbee as 
others can only stand and 
watch. 




L .i :slL Jl £■. ) 




w 


<*m . ~^m h- -*^ •* yi 


Christina, Meryl and Tina 
having a little fun off the 
field performing a classic 
Superman pose. 




Just another day. 






The Spoonheads looking 
forward to trouncing yet 
another team. 

1 




*-.'" : ~|. ~'<Mw«rv " r B^| 




96 Organizations 





one foot in the 







4 



/ f. 



Jl. 



Men's Ultimate Frisbee 

When describing Ultimate, comparisons with other 
team sports are inevitable. But the truth is it's unlike 
any other sport. There are no referees. The rules are 
simple, but the strategies are complex. And it's played 
with a flying disc. To compete at the highest level, 
Ultimate players must possess a degree of speed and 
stamina that is matched in few other sports. 

"The Spoonheads are an institution built on a proud athletic 
tradition. Each year new talents work and aspire to one day 
join the ranks of legendary heroes past, and etch their names 
indelibly into Spoonhead lore." 

Chris Talarico, '01 




Women's Ultimate Frisbee 

Ultimate frisbee is a fabulous way to meet new people 
while learning to play a sport that most people do not 
know. It's a great bonding experience and a lot of fun. 



"We had an amazing season finishing with an undefeated 
record. We have a really great group of girls, all different 
grades, and look forward to the spring season." 

Christina Keller, '03 

Meryl D'Atri, '03 

Tina Plerhoples, '03 



Organisations 97 



one foot in the 




Boston College Partnership for Life 

Partnership for Life is a student organization concerned 
with protecting and respecting all human life — 
especially that of children, women, the elderly, and the 
unborn. Some events that BC Partnership for Life 
participates in are the Massachusetts Walk for Life and 
the National Respect for Life Walk. 



"This group is doing great things to raise 
awarenessabontlifeandtohelpprotectit. Also, 
the members have formed a close-knit 
community which really makes being in the 
club a great experience." 

Claudia Pouravelis, '03 




Kyelim Rhee 




Another Choice on Campus 

ACC is a social programming club that aims to provide 
and support opportunities on- and off-campus for BC 
students who want to participate in activities in a 
substance-free environment. It is not our position to 
condemn drinking but we support those who choose 
not to, whether it is for one night or consistently. 



"Being a part of ACC is fun because you 
get to meet so many wonderful people and 
do fun things in a safe, comfortable 
environment." 



Dana Keane, '01 




provided by ACC 




98 Organizations 



provided by Another Choice on Campus 



V 



Members of the BC 
Partnership for Life wait for 
a meeting to start. The BC 
Partnership for Life works 
to protect all forms of 
human life, as well as raising 
awareness around campus. 






Taking time out of their 
celebration, members of 
Another Choice on Campus 
pose for a picture. ACC 
raises awareness about 
alcohol and other drugs by 
sponsoring substance-free 
events throughout the year. 




ook into my eyes 



During a meeting of the BC 
Partnership for Life, Claudia 
Pouravelis looks to a fellow 
member to show her 
support. 




working 



to 



raise 



awareness 



BC 

organizations 

work to 

raise 

awareness 

in the 

student 

body about 

issues such 

as respect 

for human 

life and 

healthy life 

choices. 



Cyelim Rhee 



Organizations 99 



don't 
fade 



into the 



background 



Organizations 
delve into 
their 

cultural and 
spiritual 
backgrounds 
to form 
communirites 
atBC 



Service 



Discussing plans for a 
service opportunity, 

members of the Ignatian 
Society go over all their 
options. 



Two members of the 
Ignatian Society talk 
amongst themselves as they 
wait for the meeting to 
begin. The Ignatian Society 
focuses on bringing together 
graduates of Jesuit high 
schools. 



Trip Ross and other 
members of the Ignatian 
Society share jokes before 
starting the meeting. 





■ 




100 Organizations 



I 




one foot in the 




Ignatian Society 

The Ignatian Society is an organization run by graduates 
of Jesuit high schools. Our mission is to help make BC 
students aware of what it means to be at a Jesuit school. 
We attempt to educate others on Ignatian spirituality 
and ideals, and we try to bring together students with 
members of the Jesuit community at BC. 

"The best thing about my time working with the Ignatian 
Society lias been the people I have gotten to know. 1 have 
met so many students committed to Ignatian ideals in the 
areas of service work and spiritual development. For me, it 
has been the people, not necessarily the events, that have made 
my four years with the Ignatian Society so meaningful." 

Timothy Mcmanus, '01 




Jessica Burkhart 



Irish Society 

The Irish Society seeks to promote and further a 
consciousness of Irish culture to all interested members 
of the university community Our aim is first and 
foremost to organize and publicize events pertaining 
to academic, political, cultural, and social currents at 
Boston College. 

"Celebrating the heritage and tradition of the most storied 
people on the Earth. ..the Irish. " 



The Irish Society, '01 



Organizations 101 



one foot in the 




Chad Elder 



Dance Organization 

The mission of the Dance Organization is to promote 
dance of all types to the BC student communtiy. To 
achieve this, it provides students with the opportunity 
to choreograph and experiment with the art of dance. 
It allows more advanced students to utilize and expand 
their talents while providing beginners an open and fun 
environment to learn about dance. 



"I joined the Dance Organization because I had always 
wanted to dance. I had never taken classes and I thought it 
would be fun to try something new. " 



Katie Schervish, '03 




Bob Salomone 



Dance Ensemble 

The Boston College Dance Ensemble is a group of 
individuals brought together by their love of performing 
and fused in their pursuit of perfection. Created in the 
absense of a Dance Department, the Ensemble works 
hard to fill a void by providing regularly scheduled 
classes for its members and performing self- 
choreographed shows once a semester. 

"Working in conjunction with the Theater Department, the 
Dance Ensemble has grown significantly in talent and 
ambition over the past few years. We look forward to future 
seasons with confidence and optiism." 

Jessye Ball '01 




Bob Salomone 



102 Organizations 



Performing during the 

Second (h, lines Hen. til 
Concert, members ot the 
Dance Ensemble dance on 
the Robsham Theater stage. 
Dance Ensemble puts on 
two shows a year. 




Leaping in the air, two 
members of the Dance 
Ensemble dance during the 
Second Chances benefit 
Concert. Performance 
groups took part in this 
concert to raise money for 
battered women. 



fatch me 



Dance Organization Director 
Stephanie Wade teaches 
other officers and members 
of the organization the next 
step in preparation for their 
performance. The Dance 
Organization rehearses all 
year and puts on a recital in 
the spring. 




move 



to 



the 

music 



Boston 

College's 

dance 

organizations 

work hard 

to entertain 



Organizations 103 



for 
the love 



of 



smgmg 



BC's all 

female and 

Christian a 

capella 

groups 

spread 

their love 

of song to 

audiences 

nation 

wide. 



Just the two of us 



Tina Lim and Angela Bai 
performed to an full house 
at the Second Chances 
Benefit Concert. As 
members of Against the 
Current, the Chrsitian a 
capella group at BC, they 
often sing to large audiences 
of a capella fans. 



Singing a solo part, Mike 
Hang puts emotion into his 
song. Against the Current 
performs at many schools in 
the country while on their 
Spring Concert Tour. 




During the Second Chances 
Benefit Concert, members of 
the Sharps, the all female a 
capella from BC, sing to their 
fans. At the beginning of the 
year, when recruiting new 
members, the Sharps sing in 
the dining halls and also in 
seniors's mods. 



1 04 Organizations 



Bob Salomone 






m 



<*H 



>;> 



mm 




one foot in the 




Bob Salomon? 



Sharps 

The Boston College Sharps were founded in 1990 and 
have influenced the Boston College community ever 
since. These 18 women perform both on and off campus 
at such events as the annual "Breaking the Barriers Ball," 
"Take Back the Night," and the "Second Chances Benefit 
Concert." They arrange all of their own music and sing 
everything from country to hip-hop. 

"Success is failure turned inside out. You can never tell 
how close you are. It way be near yet it seems so far so stick 
to the fight when you 're hardest hit. It 's when things are the 
worst that you musn 't quit." 

Mikuni Gani '01 




Chad Elder 



Against the Current 

The purpose of Against the Current is to promote the 
Gospel of Jesus Christ through a combination of singing 
a cappella songs, presenting short skits, and sharing 
testimonies. The songs that we sing consist primarily 
of Praise and Worship Music, Contemporary Christian 
Music (CCM), other varieties of Christian Music and 
Contemporary secular music. 

"Do not conform any longer to the pattern of this world, but 
be transformed by the renewing of your mind. Then you 
will be able to test and approve zvliat God's will is-his good, 
pleasing and perfect will." 

Romans 12:2 



Bob Salomone 



Organizations 1 05 



one foot in the 




Bostonians 

Founded in 1986, the Bostonians are the oldest a capella 
group at BC. With a current group of 15 members, this 
co-ed group has a repertoire that includes songs from 
such renowned artists as the Beatles, Paul Simon, and 
Mariah Carey. The Bostonians have been performing 
across the United States this year. 

"Walk softly and carry a big stick." 



Oly Lubin, '01 




Bob Salomone 



Acoustics 

The Acoustics are a singing group dedicated to 
spreading the joys of crazy co-ed a capella, having as 
much fun as possible, and entertaining audiences both 
inside and outside the BC Community. The varied 
repertoire includes songs by Paula Cole, Aerosmith, Reel 
Big Fish, Sarah McLaughlin, U2, Britney Spears, and 
Santana. 

"We take pride in the fact that we know how to have a really 
good time. When not practicing or performing, we love just 
hanging out and spending time as a tightly-knit family." 



Juliana Tarris, '01 



1 06 Organisations 




Chad Elder 







Brian Peterick steps out 
from the crowd to sing his 
solo at the Circle K Benefit 
Concert. The Bostonians 
have a diverse song base 
from which they choose 
songs to perform at various 
functions and events. 






Lori Trespicio sings a slow 
song in front of the 
Bostonians as they perform 
to a full house. The 
Bostonians frequently travel 
to other colleges and 
universities around the 
nation to perform their 
music. 



tics and stones 



During the Second Chances 
Benefit Concert, members of 
the Acoustics wow the crowd 
with their vocal stylings. For 
one show during the year the 
Bostonians and the 
Acoustics, BC's two oldest a 
capella groups perform 
together. 




the 
desire 



to 



perform 



BCs oldest 

a capella 

groups 

perform to 

sold out 

crowds, 

frequently 

dazzling 

them with a 

diverse 

song base. 



3ob Salomone 



Organizations 107 



listen 



to 



these 

songs 



The only 
all male a 
capella 
group, the 
Heightsmen, 
and the 
Dynamics 
wow 
audiences 
with their 
vocal 
sty lings. 



Walk this way 



Performing in Starbucks, the 
Heightsmen use 

choreography to put moves 
with their music. The 
Heightsmen perform at 
several venues, including 
Starbucks one night a year 
for the Heightsmen Cafe. 



The Dynamics performed to 
a sold out crowd in Robsham 
Theater during the Second 
Chances Benefit Concert. As 
a co-ed group, the Dynamics 
sing a variety of songs that 
entertain audiences 

nationwide. 



Performing during the 
Second Chances Benefit 
Concert, the Heightsmen 
keep time by snapping their 
fingers. The Heightsmen is 
BC's only all-male a capita 
group. 




Chad Elder 




108 Organizations 



Bob Salomone 




Bob Salomone 



one foot in the 




Bob Salomone 



Dynamics 

The Dynamics is a co-ed a capella group that was 
founded in 1998. The Dynamics sing a diverse repertoire 
in an energetic style that keeps the Dynamics popular 
both on and off campus. These 17 students sing songs 
ranging from original songs to pop culture music. The 
first Dynamics CD was released this year. 

"In this short time since the Dynamics were started two years 
ago, I feel we have come really far. The group sounds great 
and we love to perform. We were really excited to releas 
first CD this year." 



Chrissie Mauriello '02 




Bob Salomone 



Heightsmen 

The Heightsmen are Boston College's only all-male a 
capella group dedicated to musical excellence. Founded 
in 1990, they have established themselves as a prominent 
musical group on campus. The members of the group 
also act as a family for each other. They maintain a 
diverse selection and they entertain thousands of fans 
worldwide. 

"The Heightsmen are all about brotherhood. We take our 
singing seriously, but only because that's our excuse to have 
fun and hang out together." 



Travis Coleman, '03 



Organizations 109 



one foot in the 




Jenks Leadership Program 

The Jenks Leadership Program at Boston College seeks 
to identify and prepare men and women to take up roles 
of leadership in the service of others and the common 
good. Since 1967, the JLP has advanced the belief that 
leadership and service are inextricably linked. The 
program emphasizes the development of leadership 
skills and the values of social service. 

"Learning for leadership. . .Leadership for service. " 



Jenks Leadership Program, '01 




Nick Genevish 



University Chorale 

Presently one of the largest student-run organizations 
on campus, the University Chorale began as an all-male 
glee club in the late nineteenth century. Today, the group 
contains over 160 singers, consisting of male and female 
students, Jesuits and faculty. The Chorale's repertoire 
ranges from classical masterpieces to modern works. 

"Chorale has been a wonderful and one of the most important 
experiences I have had in the past four years. I've not only 
been able to sing amazing pieces of music, but I have also 
had the opportunity to travel to incredible places with a great 
group of people." 

Nora Driscoll, '01 



110 Organizations 




Nick Genevish 




Performing for the first time 
with the accompaniment ol 

the orchestra, Chorale sings 
their Christmas concert 
songs to a packed house. 



ifted and talented 



Trinity Chapel is filled with 
gifted and always popular 
voices of the BC Chorale as 
they perform to a standing 
room only audience. 



adership for service 



Pope Carlos and his fellow 
Jenks members demonstrate 
the link between service and 
leadership as they work at a 
local food kitchen. 




lift 



up 
your 

voices 



While 

Chorale 

uses their 

voices to 

entertain 

audiences, 

Jenks makes 

their voice 

heard by 

working in 

the 

community 



■ovided by Jenks Leadership Program 



Organizations 111 



the 
sounds 



of 



laughter 



My 

Mother's 
Fleabag 
entertains 
audiences 
with their 
comedic 
skits, while 
Voices of 
Imani use 
their song 
to spread 
their faith. 



Show time 



Getting ready to perform, 
members of Voices of Imani 
Gospel Choir smile and look 
to their director for their 
cue. Voices of Imani 
practices two times a week 
and have performance each 
semester. 



112 Organisations 




Performing a skit during the 
Second Chances Benefit 
Concert, members of My 
Mother's Fleabag shovel 
things off stage. My 
Mother's Fleabag is a sketch 
comedy group that performs 
original skits that are acted 
in and directed by BC 
students. 



Raising his arm to draw 
attention to the side of the 
stage, a member of My 
Mother's Fleabag says his 
lines during the skit. My 
Mother's Fleabag perform at 
the Second Chances Benefit 
Concert, as well as having 
their own shows later in the 
year. 



Bob Salomone 




one foot in the 




Voices of Imani Gospel Choir 

Voices of Imani was created in 1978 as a mechanism to 
celebrate the beauty of gospel music. The choir serves 
not only as a source of spiritual inspiration, but also as 
a source of unity and strength among students of color, 
as well as others who want to experience the glory of 
the African-American gospel tradition. 



"Voices is more than a singing group; 
there's a spiritual opportunity to share and 
touch the lives of others. There's such a 
rich tradition and history to the music we 
sing, and I love being able to give a piece 
of that to my peers." 

Michael Cormac, '03 




Bob Salomone 




Bob Salomone 



My Mother's Fleabag 

Fleabag is the nation's oldest collegiate improvisational 
comedy troupe. We bring our unique form of 
improvisational comedy to the BC community and 
beyond. As a fully interactive form of entertainment 
dependent on audience input, no two shows are the 
same. 

"At Fleabag, we are in the business of making people laugh. 
Each time ice step onstage the show may be different, but 
our friendship and the strong connection with the audience 
is electric." 

J. Casey Lane '01 



Job Salomone 



Organizations 113 



one foot in the 




Vlike Dreher 



Dramatics 



The Dramatics Society is the oldest student group on 
campus. We provide opportunities for student directors, 
designers, and actors to share their talent with the BC 
community. By choosing works from a well-established 
canon of dramatic literature and student works, we 
strive to make the arts an important part of university 
life. 

"Dramatics Society functions as a stepping stone to a 
professional theatre company by giving opportunities to 
theatre majors and non-majors alike to participate in a 
completely run company. The working relationships we've 
developed at DS have given us lasting friendships." 

Desiree Matthews, '01 
Patricia Runcie, '01 




Chad Elder 



Hello.. .Shovelhead 



The purpose of "Hello. ..Shovelhead" is to provide 
sketch comedy here on the BC campus. We meet on a 
weekly basis writing and acting out comedic sketches. 
By the end of the semester we have over 40 sketches, 9 
of which are put together in an orderly fashion and are 
performed for the school. 



" Wliat these sketches are are live comedic scenes, very similar 
to that of "The Kids in the Hall", "Saturday Night Live", 
and "Mad TV." 

Kurt LaBelle, '01 



114 Organizations 




Chad Elder 



-a.-" 



I 



n 






During .1 performaru e oi I 
/VcriT Sang for nn/ Father, ■> 

member <>( the Dramatii s 

Si m hi \ has .1 poignanl 
moment with his mother in 



the play. 



As part of their usual 
repertoire of entertaining 
skits three of Shovelhead's 
male members don dresses 
and skirts to impersonate the 
fairer sex. Shovelhead 
performs a big show once 
each semester and also does 
a smaller show in Starbucks 
Cafe. 



rop me up 



During a lull in a skit, 
Shovelhead member Kurt 
LaBelle takes a sip from his 
beverage. Shovelhead uses 
many different props during 
their short skits. 




the 
need 



to 



entertain 



The 

Dramatics 

Society 

makes 

students 

think with 

their dramas 

while 

HelbJ^TOvelhead 

encourages 

it's audience 

to have a 

good time. 



:had Elder 



Organizations 115 



The 
embodiment 



of 



school 
spirit 

Whether 
on the field 



or in an 

auditorium, 

the Boston 

College 

bands 

represent 

the spirit in 

themselves 

and the 

university. 



Broadway BC 



Walking sideways, the 
members of the Screaming 
Eagles Marching Band move 
into their formation. The 
half time show was music 
from the Broadway show 
The Lion King. 



The woodwinds section of 
the Pep Band look to their 
conductor to follow along. 
Pep Band plays songs from 
a wide variety of musical 
artists such asThe Offspring, 
Mighty Mighty Bosstones, 
and The Muppets. 



Looking at each other in the 
middle of a song, two piccolo 
players make funny faces. 
The Pep Band has a relaxed 
atmosphere where the 
instrumentalists can have a 
good time while playing 
great music. 




Chris Bowers 




Chris Bowers 



116 Organizations 




one foot in the 




Screaming Eagles Marching Band 

The Screaming Eagles Marching Band is first-rate, 
representing the university with the honor and 
distinction. Band members enjoy the experience of 
playing before audiences near and far, the opportunities 
for advancing leadership positions, and knowing that 
they are a part of a 71 year old tradition, one on which 
they can leave their own mark. 



'You get so much more out of band than you put in." 

Mark Wetzel, '03 



n 

* 


m 


•J%«Sfri> 


«N*>II 


I -M- - 'm ^hv 


^MM 




1 



o 



Pep Band 

The mission of the band program is to provide students 
with opportunities to achieve performing excellence, 
pursue artistic and personal growth, and create a 
community which encourages students to develop 
positive, life-long values. 



"Pep Band was something I wanted to do because I love to 
play my instrument. I also enjoy playing songs that the 
crowd will like to hear. Pep Band is a good combination of 
both playing music and having fun at the hockey and 
basketball games." 

Erin Reynolds, '01 



;hris Bowers 



Organisations 117 



.—r- 



one foot in the 



The Heights 

The Independent Student Weekly of Boston College 



The Heights 

The Heights, an independent student weekly, has been 
Boston College's newspaper of record since 1919. The 
Heights strives to inform the BC community and the 
surrounding Boston area through news, sports, and 
feature articles. The paper tries to provoke thought and 
conversation through analysis, reviews, and columns. 

"Working on the Heights' staff has given me a sense of purpose 
in my otherwise lackluster life. " 



Larry Griffin, '03 




Liz Mahoney 



Naked Singularity 

A naked singularity is an infinitely dense mass point 
around which no black holes can develop. Now it might 
aptly be said that nature abhors a naked singularity. It 
is the hope of Naked Singularity to evoke some of that 
abhorrance, to push the bounds of acceptance, 
understanding and commenserability a few light years. 

"Naked Singularity seeks to lift the eyes of our readers, and 
expand their literary visions to what exists outside and 
beyond their realm of sight. The eye is the pathway to truth. 
We urge BC to experience what happens outside their comfort 
zones and internalize meaning through the outside world." 

KeUy Miller, '01 



L 



118 Organizations 




Liz Mahoney 







I eaning over to write- 

something down, .1 member 
nt the I leights' staff works 
on .1 story for the paper. The 

I leights publishes an edition 
every week. 



II alone 



Onstage by herself, one 
musician talks to the 
audience during Naked 
Singulairty's Open Mic 
Night. Other performers 
read poetry, sang, and 
displayed original art works. 






m've got mail 



Going throught the day's 
mail, one Heights staff 
member decides what needs 
immediate attention and 
what does not. 




power 
of 



the 



press 



Two of BC's 

publications, 

The Heights 

and Naked 

Singularity, 

spread 

news and 

literary 

works all 

over 

campus. 



iyelim Rhee 



Organizations 119 



a 



happy 



medium 



BC's 
literary 
magazine 
and 

student- 
run radio 
station 
spread 
students' 
voices all 
over 
campus. 



On with the show 



Deciding which song to play 
next, one of WZBC's student 
DJs changes the cd during 
his radio show. Student DJs 
can play any music they like 
during their show time. 



Submission 



Reading over a submission 
for Stylus, two members of 
the editorial board discuss 
the piece. Stylus accepts 
submissions from all BC 
students who wish to 
contribute to the literary 
magazine. 



Working the control panel 
during a live broadcast, one 
member of the WZBC team 
gets ready while a song is 
playing. WZBC is all 
student run and produced. 





120 Organisations 




one foot in the 




Stylus 

The art and literature magazine founded in 1882, the 
Stylus is the oldest magazine at a Catholic college in 
America. Undergraduate students are invited to submit 
original works of literature and two-dimensional art tor 
publication two to three times a year. The staff reviews 
submissions and decides which will be published. 



"We feel that Stylus is profound yet we 
do not understand the profundity!" 




Stephanie Hartman, '01 
Jason Cavallari, '01 



- ■cfl 

'to *U 


m r nL 




[ i 1 

Chad Elder 




>Bffi AMU 



WZBC 

WZBC is the carrier current radio station of Boston 
College which can be heard on BC cable channel 47. 
WZBC is operated completely by students and the DJs 
need not have prior broadcasting experience. They may 
play any genre of music during their time slot which 
gives WZBC an eclectic mix that reflects the kind of 
music BC students want to hear. 

"The voice of Boston College: Turn on cable 47 and hear our 
voice." 

Lauren Very 
Shaun Peterson, '01 
Timur Pakay, '02 
Greg Tartaglia, '01 



Organizations 121 



one foot in the 




Army ROTC 

The ROTC program prepares students to become the 
future officer leadership of the United States Army. The 
key goals of the program are to develop leadership skills, 
character, inculcate Army values and to ingrain in cadets 
what an officer should be, know and do. 



"Participating in Army ROTC at Boston College has had a 
tremendous impact on my life. I have learned a great deal 
about my peers and myself. It has made me physically and 
mentally tough, as well as a confident leader." 

Alex Sherman, '01 




Chad Elder 



Karate Club 



Karate Club practices Shotokan Karate, with emphasis 
on mastering each martial art technique through 
repetition. It is a disciplinary form of karate that requires 
the control of strength and mind. The main point is 
focus and to believe in the possibility of what we can 
do. 

"This form of martial arts has helped me gain a new strength 
within myself. I have also learned a new philosophy: that if 
ive believe we can, we can do what seems impossible, it is up 
to us." 

Bon Sajjacha, '01 





Chad blder 






provided by Kate Tooley 



if 



I 







122 Organizations 




_ 



j 







Kicking his le^ up in the air, 
.1 member ol the Karate* lub 

performs one ol tin- m.m\ 
moves thai i hallenges his 
body. 



ook out b 



During a training session, a 
member of the Army ROTC 
works his way over a pit 
using only a rope as a means 
to get across. 



Stretch 



During the warm-up at a 
meeting of the Karate Club, 
one member pushes to the 
side to stretch out his body 
and prepare for the workout. 




learning 

how 

to 

protect 



BC's Army 

ROTC and 

Karate Club 

teach 

students 

how to 

protect 

themselves 

as well as 

how to be 

disciplined. 



Chad Elder 



Organizations 123 



it's all 



part of 
the 

sport 



Three of 
BCs 
Sports- 
oriented 
organizations 
spread 
their love 
of their 
games to 
others 
around 
campus. 



Pass it to me 



Jumping in the air, a member 
of the women's rugby team 
attempts to catch a pass from 
her teammate. Rugby is a 
unique sport at BC in that 
none of the members of the 
team have ever played in 
high school. 



Give it a try. 



Running across the field, a 
member of the rugby team 
moves into position for a try. 
A try is when a rugby team 
attempts to score points for 
their team. 




124 Organizations 



Submitted by the Rugby team 





"Rugby is tough 

because no one 

plays in liigh 

school, so it 

requires a whole 

different mind 

c set than any 

| other sport. This 

t year's team has 

shown great 

determination 

and motivation 

as individuals 

-„•>■ , „ , and as a team." 

Women s Rugby 

The women's rugby team is a group of extremely 

dedicated and athletic young women who give of their 

time and effort to represent BC in this highly competitive t - ourtne y 

sport. ' Cappa/01 



one foot in the 




Women's Club Lacrosse 

Women's Club Lacrosse aims to provide female athlete*- 
at BC with an opportunity to play competitive lacrosse 
in a less demanding environment than the varsity sport. 



"This is a great way to get to know people 
in other classes and it proi'ides girls with 
an opportunity to play lacrosse in an 
atmosphere that is competitive, yet fun 
and friendly at the same time. " 
Meryl D'Atri, '03 





Ski and Snowboarding Club 

The BC Ski & Snowboard Club is an overwhelming 
favorite on campus. The club provides over 400 students 
a great time of skiing and riding for the least amount of 
money. With the traditional west and east coast trips in 
place, the Ski & Snowboard Club is taking on their 
biggest adventure yet, crossing the pond for a week in 
Austria and Amsterdam, which will undoubtedly make 
for a fun time. 

"In zohat other club can you and one hundred of your friends 
take a trip to Austria and Amsterdam for only 900 dollars. " 



Bill Berg, '03 



O rgan iza tio ns 125 



one foot in the 




Boston College Entrepreneur Society 

BCES will provide the Boston College community with 
a forum for exploring all aspects of successful 
entrepreneurship. BCES gives students the opportunity 
to learn about the world of entrepreneurship and the 
processes associated with it. We also inform students 
about the dynamics of working in a startup 
environment. 

"BCES is all about options. It shows 
if| \ Hk students that they can take the upper hand 
W^ »■ in their future. All they have to do is have 
V a dream and determination." 

Sean Daken, '01 




submitted by PEN 



Peer Education Network 

The Boston College Peer Evaluation Network (PEN) is 
an organization of students trained in addressing issues 
on alcohol, other drugs, sexual assault, HIV /AIDS , 
eating disorders and related social issues. The goal of 
the Network is to increase knowledge and 
understanding of these issues, and to encourage healthy 
choices among students. 



"Raising awareness and offering support 
for the Boston College community is what 
being a PEN member is all about." 

Ryan Travia '01 





Kyelim Rhee 



Fulton Debating Society 

The Fulton Debating Society is a nationally-competitive intercollegiate 
debate team with a strong history at Boston College. Debaters compete 
with students in an event that rewards effective combination of| 
argumentative substance with persuasive style. 



126 Organizations 



Climbing a rope spider web, 
.i member of the Peer 
Education Network takes 
part in a weekend retreat 
Exercises like these were 
done In help build 
i 1 infidence. 



ight my nre 



Working together, members 
of the Peer Education 
Network try to build a tire. 
The Peer Education 
Network sponsors training 
weekend for the students 
who volunteer to work wjth 
t. 




to 



learn 
and 

serve 



The 

Entrepreneur 

Society and 

Debating 

Society 

breed 

young 

go-getters, 

while PEN 

works to 

keep 

students 

grounded 



ibmitted by PEN 



Organizations 127 




^^■■1 




\ 



*■"«*. 




m*' 



m 



m 



i 



i 







Student Life 

While students are here to 

study, the time outside the 

classroom is just as 

valuable to a student's 

career. Many seniors 

found their home now 

surrounded by a fence 

I with much protest by 

many. Homecoming 

found people dressed 

in costume as the 

Mascarade theme was 

brought to life by all. The 

concert series on campus 

offered Vertical Horizon 

and Nine Days as well as 

many off campus concerts 

in the Boston area. 



Editors: 

Kristin Walker 

Jared Walsh 



. 



f%l 





We Will Knock Down Your Door 

Opponents of Boston College never escape intimidation when 
they walk into Alumni stadium and see the swarm of yellow 
shirts screaming in support of the Boston College Eagles. Liter- 
ally thousands of students show up at each game donning their 
golden Superfan shirts. Many students even go as far as paint- 
ing their bodies red and standing in the front row to strike fear 
into their opponents' hearts. Superfan mania provides the extra 
edge our teams need to win. This spirit resonates into every as- 
pect of student's lives. BC posters and banners adorn dorm 
rooms all over campus. The Boston College seal is stamped on 
the covers of notebooks kept in BC duffle bags thrown over the 
shoulders of a BC fleece. With the values of "For Boston" per- 
meating our Chesnut Hill campus, it's no surprise that the BC 
community has so much heart. -Jared Walsh 




■ 




The sea of golden shirts comes to support the Eagles at every home 
football game. The students truly come together for their school. 

The Choral, decked out in BC attire, came to support their school, 
to sing the National Anthem on Parents' Weekend. 



130 Student Life 




Even when just sitting around campus, BC students display their spirit. 



Hie Will of 
theSuperfens 




With the energy of the stands, it mav be a good 
idea to bring a helmet. 

"Being a sup erf an unites 

all students in support of 

Boston College sports" 

'Brian Klug '04 




Dr. Seuss makes a come back with a new color 
scheme to support the Eagles. 



Student Life 131 



The Eagle 
Rules! 




Chris Bowers 



The Eagle, Baldwin, 

needs to be energetic, 

photogenic and able to 

ice skate and box. 



Chris Bowers 
132 Student Life 





<r * 



The BC Screaming Eagle Marching Band marches downfield 
playing "The Lion King Melody" during half-time. 

BC's cheerleaders psych up the superfans. 




Football Saturday 

The fans are the 12th Man 

On Saturdays in the fall. The I [eights tranforms into a mecca 
of marroon and gold. Football games at BC demonstrate the 
essence of a Superfan, define the art of tailgating and encom- 
pass many important rituals. With the police force directing 
traffic, football games are like giant block parties. Hours before 
a u kickoff, barbecues are fired up at the Mods, in the parking lots 
and garages all over campus. Then, the sea of yellow shirts fill 
Alumni Stadium. The sounds of Build Me Up Buttercup, and 
"Eagles on the Warpath," resonate throughout the stadium. 
Who can forget the screaming eagle after every first down? The 
cheerleaders doing push-ups every time we score? How about 
all those fanatical people who get tossed up after every touch- 
down? BC fotball unites the student population body and spirit. 
We can all be together to remind everyone what BC is all about. 





Chris Bowers 

Students, patents, and alumni tailgate before a game, all over campus in Shea Field, the 
parking garage and the dormitory parking lots. 

The Superfans take their spirit to the extteme, filling the endzone with their red 
bodies, dyed hair and masks. 

Student Life 133 



Homecoming '00 

Celebrating the Past and the Present 

Homecoming weekend was kicked off at the Boston Crown Plaza 
on Friday the thirteenth of October. Music provided by G 2 ,a DJ 
from JAM'N 94.5 FM kept the masqueraders dancing all night 
long. As a night of masks and mystery, this UGBC sponsored 
event was a huge success! This success continued into the big 
game against the Syracuse Orangemen the following afternoon. 
The Eagles 20-13 win was major over their Big East rival. This 
victory was capped with touchdowns by Lenny Walls and 
William Green, interceptions by Ralph Parent and Sean Guthrie, 
great passing by quarterback Tim Hasselbeck along with criti- 
cal rushing and defense by the rest of the team. As always, the 
BC SuperFans past and present were proud to be Eagles! Home- 
coming weekend was a culmination of golden pride that exem- 
plifies the incredible energy that surrounds Boston College. 
-Megan Casey 




Photo Supplied by Meagan Casey 

The girls of Duchesne East get dolled up for their first homecoming 

dance at Boston College. 

These alumni came back to the Heights to celebrate a BC victory 

over the Syracuse Orangemen. 

134 Student Life 





These dancing fools are taking a photo break from cutting a rug in 
Copley Park Plaza. 

These girls are glad they made the effort to get dressed up tonight. 



Back in Alumni 



j» 




Mil 







Tim Hasselbeck looks lor an open receiver. 

"Something about the 

Homecoming Game 

makes it more exciting 

than the rest of the games 

during the season. '' 

^Kristin Walker 




Cedric Washington makes a break through the 
Syracuse defense. 

Student Life 135 



Packing it 




The rooms get a little sparse after all of the 
posters and sheets are packed up. 



"It's so odd to think that the 

people that you lived with 

everyday for a year wont be 

coming home with you. " 

-Katy Fritz '03 




During finals, everyone's things start coming out 
of their rooms. 





The problem of moving in is figuring out how to fit all of your 

things into your room. 

Cars are bombarded with Welcome Wagoneers to bring the cargo to 

their room. 




Moving in and Out 

Carrying it Over the Welcome Mat 

It was the first weekend back at school, and the campus was littered 
with U-Hauls and minivans stuffed with everything a college student 
would need for the upcoming year. The day was filled with laughter as 
friends were reunited and tears as families said good-bye. The Wel- 
come Wagoneers greeted the anxious freshmen and carried their lug- 
gage up to their rooms as they moved into their new home. While the 
freshmen were being assisted, the sophomores suffered in the heat to 
get everything up the numerous flights of stairs in Walsh because 
there were only two elevators. We were meeting new friends and 
keeping the old. Causing traffic jams around the city, juniors moved 
into their new apartments, living in a place of their own. As the 
school year drew to a close, the U-Hauls and minivans returned, as 
the seniors prepared to pack up their things and to close their door 
one last time. -dared Walsh and Kristin Walker 




The RA's of Duchesne begin their duties by assigning room and 
bathroom keys to the arriving freshmen. 

Davis Kessler, Bill Reeg, Kendell McClaine and Kevin Sprague made 
the trek up to the third floor of Duchesne to help a freshmen girl 



Student Life 137 



Parents' Weekend 

Families reunite on the Heights 

It had only been three weeks since move-in, but our parents were 
back on campus September 22 for Parent's weekend, bringing with 
them our forgotten CDs, extra clothes, and more food. The weekend 
was kicked off with the annual, Pops on the Heights concert. Every- 
one was in for a marvelous treat. John Williams guest conducted the 
Boston Pops and BC's Chorale. Saturday morning, cheering parents 
joined their children in Alumni Stadium for the first home footbal 
game of the year against the US Naval Academy. The remainder of 
this weekend gave families a chance to go out to dinner at the Cheese- 
cake Factory or in the North End. Students were also able to show 
their families a little of their home away from home, where they go to 
classes and what they do on a day to day basis. Parents weekend 
allowed BC parents to experience a taste of life at Boston College. 
They are welcome back anytime. -Kristin Walker and Jared Walsh 




p**i ! 



BOS ;s ^ 

PARENTS 




The Boston College family welcomed parents back to Chesnut Hill 

for Parents' Weekend festivities. 

Some parents got a personal tour around campus with their 
children. This way they got to experience everything, even the stairs. 



138 Student Life 






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Mother and students enjoyed lunch together in front of lower 
dinning hall. 

Father Leahy stopped to talk with students and 
their parents at the pops Concert. 



Welcoming 
a Legend 




Guest vocalist sang with the Boston Pops about 
his son's coming of age. 

"Parent's weekend is great 

because is gives our 

parents a window into 

our lives as students" 

<- Chris Wong VI 







hn Williams was the honored, guest conductor 
r the night. 



Stand Clear 
of the Doors 




The D-line brings students around Boston J 

"The T is affordable, 
despite the price jump, 
and it is convient and 
takes me to all my destina- 
tions" -Dan Chapin '04 




There are always interesting things to see at the 
Harvard T station. 




._ GREEN 

f : LINE 



INBOUND T - ' c E; 





The most famous form of transportation - the Newton and Comm 

Ave. Shuttles. 

The Reservoir T stop is where BC students go to 

get around Boston. 






Transportation 

From the Newton Bus to the T 

Oh the places we'd go if we could only get there. BC is one of those 
beautiful campuses located in the suburbs of Boston, but it can be frus- 
trating to try and get around. Supposedly running every 10 to 20 min- 
utes, the Newton and Comm. Ave. buses shuttle freshmen and juniors to 
and from campus. Most of the drivers are pretty friendly and willing to 
drop you off at the T-stop or in front of Conte Forum. Fortunately, the B 
line stops right at BC, but it takes forever; the D which is quicker, if you 
can only catch a Comm. Ave. bus. If you just can't take all of the waiting 
around, you can always find a cab just waiting for you to hop in. Cabs are 
especially useful late at night on the weekends when the T and buses have 
stopped running. So, the moral of the story is, if you don't have the time 
or patience to wait around, or the money to pay for a cab you'd better get 
used to walking, or you're never going to get where you need to be. 
-Kerry Salvo 




Freshman waiting at the McEIroy stop for the shuttle back to 
Newton Campus 

Freshmen and juniors definitely wait for more than twenty minutes 
for the shuttle buses. 



Student Life 141 



Bean Town 



America's Birthplace 

Often the question for BC students is not what IS there 
to do in Boston,but exactly what to do. With all the 
excitement Boston has to offer, its nearly impossible to 
take it all in. From Newbury St. to the clubs on 
Lansdowne St, from the Red Sox at Fenway to the Fleet 
Center, from the Comedy Connection to the Wang 
Center, this city has something for everyone. Or, you 
can walk the freedom trail and learn some history. If 
you're tired of feasting on the baked scrod on campus, 
just a short distance away is chinatown and the North 
End. From bars to parks, from clubs to theatres, Bos- 
ton brims with such excitement. It's no wonder so many 
college students choose to come here each year! 




Kyelim Rhee 

The Holocaust memorial pillars along the Freedom Trail remind us 

of the mistakes of the past. 



142 Student Life 





y^ 



The Boston Commons is a great place to go, relax, take a Swan Boat 
ride, or lie out in the sun. 

The skyline of Boston is a familiar sight to all BC students. 



The 
North End 




Kyelim Rhec 



''The North End is always 

a great place for a break 

from Lewers Food. * 

- Torry Katsirovbas '03 




Kyelim Rhee 



Student Life 143 



Trick of 
Treat 




Door decorating contests are always popular on 
the Upper and Newton Campi. 



"Boston College is one of 
the only schools I know 
that doesnt make a big 
deal about Halloween. ' 
'John Doroghazi '03 




Students getme courage to dress up for 
ialloween. 
144 SttallntLife 




The University Chorale goes caroling in front of O'Neill Library 

during the Christmas Tree Lighting. 
Blowing out 2 1 candles is always exciting for any college student. 




Holiday Spirit 

From Your Birthday to Christmas 

Holidays are always a lot ol fun because they give us an excuse to celebrate. Just by walking around Boston 



College one can sec all of the celebration taking place. The bay windows in 90 and Vanderslice are always deco- 



rated for a birthday, Halloween or Christmas. Many students head to the North End or CitySide Bar and Grille for 



birthday dinners. Every October dormitory hallways are transformed into haunted houses for the local children to 



come and trick or treat. Despite the mass exodus from campus on Thanksgiving, the dining halls take the opportu- 



nity to decorate with scarecrows and pumpkins. By the time we return, the modular residence put up strands ol 



Christmas Ifghts as the residents of Ignacio and Walsh dust of Christmas trees and set them up in their windows. 



The pinnacle of Boston College holiday decorating is located in O'Neill Plaza where UGBC sponsors a Christmas 



Tree lighting ceremony complete with The Crinch Who Stole Christmas, cookies, the caroling Chorale and 



egg nog. Once the Christmas tree is lit, the Christmas spirit takes off. Toy and food drives are launched as the 



acapella groups on campus have their holiday decafes. The Breaking the Barriers Ball in O'Connell house is an 



annual event that brings both students and teachers together. In addition, Christmas masses held on Newton, 



Upper and Lower campus help nurture the spiritual side of the holiday season. Resident assistants usually hold 



holiday study breaks for hallmates to enjoy the season during the pressures of finals. Despite the pressures of 



classes, students at Boston College know how to celebrate. -Kristin Walker 




One of the perks to getting a bay window in 90 or Vanderslice is 
being able to decorate the windows for your friends' birthdays. 

Santa gets attacked by one of his killer elves at the tree lighting. 



Student Life 145 



The Work Week 

Our Lives Between Weekends 

When our friends from home ask how school is going many students, 
without even thinking reply, u Awesome." You may tell them about 
the Friday night or the day of shopping on Saturday. However, there 
is also the life in between. Now that we are essentially on our own, we 
must take care of some of the tasks that our parents used to take 
care of. We feed ourselves, wash our clothes, study for classes and 
work for a source of income. Life in between weekends means mak- 
ing the trip in a snow storm to visit friends for a couple of hours. It 
means catching up with friends from home over Instant Messenger. 
It means spending hours in the bowels of McElroy for Hillel, Stylus, 
4 Boston, or UGBC Senate. This includes going to late night, print- 
ing out a paper in the computer lab and enjoying the BC Movie Chan- 
nel. But it also means taking advantage of the little things that we 
will rememer about our time here. -Kristin Walker 




Cramming in-between classes in the quad for that big exam that 

starts in five minutes 

Why is the laundry room in Walsh always full? And why do 
Freshman on Upper need to go to O'Connell House to do their 

laundry 



146 Student Life 

















Nick Genevish 




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Stopping by the ATM is a must every Friday afternoon to get money 
to last you the weekend; don't you hate those fees? 

Students chilling on the front steps of O'Neill waiting for their 
friends. 




•^-»hat 



% n 



Lite Night 




Late night at McElroy is the best way to cure the 
late night munchies. 

"It's eleven o'clock, Vm 
hungry, lets go get some 

late night. '' 

'Any student at Boston 

College 




You can only study for so long before getting a 
jj&aving for pizza at Lower. 



Diversi 




Contrary to popular belief, Boston College students come 
from different backgrounds other than the stereotypical 
Irish, Caucasian, and Catholic. As students in our expand- 
ing world, we are interested in broadening our understand- 
ing of other cultures. AHANA, the African-American, 
Hispanic, Asian and Native American organization spon- 
sored the annual AHANA boat cruise for a night of dancing 
around Boston Harbor. In addition, cultural experiences are 
held every Wednesday in the Starbuck's Cafe, allowing stu- 
dents to enjoy cultural dishes while listening to traditional 
music. Many students also have strong opinions about 
international current events, such as the conflict in Israel. 
Their awareness is conveyed to the student body through 
demonstrations and seminars. BC sponsors many trips 
students can take part in, such as study abroad or traveling 
to Mexico for service projects. Boston College may not be 
the most ethnically diverse"school, but we are trying to 
learn more about the cultures and peoples around us. 

-Jared Walsh 




Nick Genevish 




Nick Genevish 



148 Student Life 




c No man is an island? 
entire ofitselfi every man 
is apiece of the conti- 
nent. " "John Donne 



Physical Fitness 

Breaking a sweat on the Heights 

Whether they're doing it for BC athletics, training for the Boston 
Marathon or simply burning off that bacon cheeseburger they ate at 
The Rat for lunch, students at Boston College seem to be spending a 
lot of their free time working on staying in shape. Throughout the 
day, students have been seen jogging around campus and doing bench 
presses in the Plex. While some students hit the machines, others 
exercise in a more competitive setting. Intramural sports are also a 
popular way for students to stay in shape while having fun with their 
friends at the same time. Flag football, volleyball and softball are 
the most popular leagues. Basketball games are always going on in 
the new Plex or in the Quonset Hut. Another way students get their 
exercise is chasing down the last bus to Newton or Comm. Ave. at 2 
am. Whatever the preferred method of staying in shape is, students 
at BC take their physical fitness seriously. -Jared Walsh 



Although the Plex was supposed to be finished during the summer, 

the construction to the North Wing has moved the cardio 

equiptment to the West Wing. 

Some people try to squeeze some studying in whenever they can, 

even during a workout. 



150 Student Life 






The BC Crew Teams have regular ERG tests that are a very difficult 
workout. 

Intramural basketball always gets the heart pumping. 



Running 
Outdoors 




One lap around the reservoir is 2.2 miles. 

"It is always good to know 

that it will be easier to get 

up all those stairs in the 

morning if I continue 

training * ^Evan 

McCarthy '03 




Many BC students find themselves training for 
the Boston Marathon in September. 



The Daily 
Threads 




These girls strike a pose in Campion. 



''Expressing your personal 

style can be a problem at 

college because of the lack 

of space. ' J 

- Laura King '03 




Whether you are a guy or a girl red heads are 
popular. 




BC students usually dress in comfortable clothes for 
class with a messenger bag or a hiking like pack. 

Knee high boots are stepping out once again. 




A La Mode 

Stepping Out of the Red Door 

Before we walked through the door out of our aparment or dorm 
room, we had to make a conscious decision about what we were going 
to wear. It could be a struggle to find the perfect ensemble that was 
in keeping with the changing times. We have searched Newbury Street, 
Downtown Crossing, the Garment Districts, the Salvation Army, and 
the BC Bookstore. The 2001 academic year saw the return of the 
jean jacket and the debut of cell phones. All around BC's campus, 
we have seen many different styles that reflect a piece of ourselves. 
We have worn J. Crew sweaters, cargo pants, leather skirts, and fleece 
vests. A myriad of styles, colors and textures streamed through the 
quad everyday. Fabrics varied from denim to leather to vinyl to fur. 
Despite all of these variations, whether you were wearing a tube top 
and capris or a tee-shirt and jeans, comfort and style were the most 



important. 



■Kristin Walker 







Both Cinderella and He-Man can pull oft die doo-rag look. 

Handkercheives and bandanas are making their appearance on the 
heads of both male and female students. 



Student Life 153 



Appalachia 



Building a Door to Come Home to 

As BC students, our desire to help others is evident every Sunday 
night at six o'clock in the Eagle's Nest as five hundred students gather 
to prepare for their trip to Appalachia. Students travel to a wide 
range of venues, such as Dirty Dancing's Mountain Lake or New Road. 
Once there, volunteers may repair horse trails, build community 
centers and form friendships with the people in the community. 
Probably the most rewarding experience is working alongside the 
people whose house you were building. The people who are going to 
be living there in a few months are hammering away right next to you. 
They are so excited to be building toward their future and tell you 
what they are going to do in their new house. It is pretty amazing to 
be a part of their future by spending a week putting up walls and a 
roof. Not only does it allow us to help others, but it gives us exposure 
to a new and different world full of love. -Paul Proto 




Photo supplied by Mike Gewitz 



BC students twirl the jump rope for the children of New Road after 
a morning of other types of volunteer work. 

After the morning chores each day, the volunteers at New Road get 
to play with the children in the community. 



154 Student Life 





BC students get a chance to interact with the people of Spartenburg, 
NC after they work on the housing projects. 

With the help of a BC student, this little girl can dunk! 



Laying the 
Groundwork 




The BC students learn to be very careful when 
hoisting ply wood upward several feet. 

"I've gone on Appalachia 

twice and the trip with 

the longest car ride was 

the best because my group 

really bonded. '' 

<- Tina Cocuzza VI 




|£ is definitely a group effort to erect a building 
from scratch. 




A great place to sleep is by the rolling waves. 

"Going on Spring Break is 

a great chance to relax 

and get a tan 

(or a burn!) " 

-Mary Bain VI 




Frisbee on the beach is always a fun pass time. 
156 Studtnt Life 




Boston College takes on the University of Connecticut in Madison 

Square Garden in New York City. 

These girls head under the sea for an aquatic adventure. 



DIE BE 



V 







\ 




DIVIivu 




Spring Break 

Stepping Beyond the Gates of BC 

Once the month of March rolled around, as students we were tired. 
By this time in the semester, classes were in fulls wing. Midterms have 
hit or will soon arrive. It was high time to escape with friends and 
family from the stresses of Boston College. To get a healthy summer 
glow, many students took trips to Cancun or the Bahamas. Others 
flocked to the cold weather and headed out to Big Sky in Montana or 
Vail in the Rocky Mountains of Colorado. Some Eagles went on trips 
to Madison Square Garden with the BC basketball team to cheer them 
on as others like the University Chorale went to Europe to grace Aus- 
tria with their voices. Others decided it to best to simply go home and 
sleep and maybe study if we found the time. Still others found it more 
profitable to make a few dollars to bring back to the Heights with them. 
No matter how one chooses to spend it, Spring Break is a much needed 
reprieve from work at BC. -Kristin Walker 




The University Chorale took Austria by storm and enjoyed the 
things that the country had to offer. 

These cabana boys are enjoying the relaxing atmosphere of their 
shaded sanctuary. 



Photo Supplied by Pat Sullivan 



Student Life 157 



Should 




Every February, the junior class crosses their fin- 
gers in the hopes of living in one of the legendary 
modular apartments, located in the heart of BC's 
lower campus. The Mods are the center of the 
tailgating madness and a hot spot for weekend 
activity. This year Boston College administrators 
decided to erect a wrought iron fence around this 
coveted real estate. Upon hearing of this endeavor, 
UGBC printed hundreds of "Fight the Fence" signs 
that could be seen in dormitory windows all over 
campus. UGBC also organized student petitions and 
meetings between administrators and students to stop 
the erection of the fence. However, almost immedi- 
ately, construction began and sod was placed in front 
of the mods, preparing for the birth of the fence. On 
football game weekends, signs were placed at the 
entrances to the mod area restricting crowds from 
entering the area. Gaps were left during the construc- 
tion of the fence for future card access to further 
restrict modular activity. ~K. Walker 




Kristin Walker 




Kristin Walker 



158 Student Life 



"It is possible to provide 
security against other ills y but 
as far as death is concerned^ we 
men live in a city without^ 
walls. " ^Eph 




It was possibly the longest and most controversial 
election in American history. Boston College hosted 
many events that debated the issues that surround 
elections, such as religion, when David Brooks and 
E.J. Dionne came to speak to students. Nationally, 
George W. Bush was declared the winner of the 
election on November 7, but then that declaration 
was retracted. A long process of recounts after re- 
counts of hundreds or thousands of ballots in Florida 
followed. The candidates took their election battles all the 
way to the U.S. Supreme Court. This was the first time the 
U.S. Supreme Court became involved in an election dis- 
pute. Candidates haggled over butterfly ballots and 
dimples. This was also the third time in American history 
that a candidate lost the electoral vote, but won the 
popular vote. To add even more controversy, math- 
ematicians say that because the vote was so close in 
Florida and it is statistically impossible to declare 
the 43 rd president, George W. Bush will have a long 
road ahead of him. -Jared Walsh 




Kyelim Rhee 




Kyelim Rhee 



160 Student Life 



"Apparently, a democracy is 
a place where numerous 
elections are held at a great 
cost without issues and in- 
terchangeable candidates" 

r-Gore Vidal 




Seniors 



Dorit Forget to Turn in Your Key 

The members of the class of 2001 are proud of our title as the first 
class of the new milennium. We are the ones living in the height of the 
technology age. But we wouldn't be worthy or ready for this challenge 
without the experiences we have had in col lege, especial ly as seniors. We 
already graduated from Newton to Lower to off-campus to the mods, 
from dining hall food to what we can cook for ourselves, and most 
importantly, from asking questions to answering them. We've grown a 
tremendous amount since we arrived at BC.The lessons learned, both in 
and out of the classroom are what wil I help us shape our future. Though 
activities like drinking in the mods or taking a winnebago out to Notre 
Dame may not seem like the best way to prepare for the Veal world, 
those experiences are the ones we cherish most, the ones we wil I remem- 
ber, the ones that have become a part of who we are - each of us 
members of the Boston College Class of 2001. -Amy Kaufold, y 01 




Photo supplied by Brian Walsh j hese senior gir j s werg relaxing on the wee kends with the 

best of company. 

Capstone seminar is a class that helps prepare Boston 
College seniors for the real world. 

162 Student Life 





The modular apartments will always be legendary. 



Roommates 
and Friends 




Brian Walsh helped form new friendships as an R.A. 

"By senior year, you know 
who your friends truly are 
and it is a chance to spend 
time with those people in 
a smaller intimate setting. " 
-Brian Walsh VI 




Having great roommates is essential to a great 
college experience. 



What's for 




Convenience bucks satisfies an appetite when you 
are on campus all day. 

"Living off campus saves a 

lot of money because I 

spent $1,700 on food last 

semester and this semester 

I've only spent $400. " 

^Nick Pappas '02 




j||ast night's dinner was a little interesting - the 
Eagle's Nest seems to be a better idea. 



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Some juniors get involved in extracurricular activities that give them 

just another reason to party. 

Though they are juniors, the Newton RAs still have to wait for the bus. 



..{.jf^SSB 5 



•Si 




Juniors '02 



Anxiously Turning the Knob 

We were back to school for our third year. For many, our first day back 
was September first - move in day. All of Brighton was turned upside 
down as students moved into their new apartments. On their own for the 
first time, we had to contend with grocery shopping, commuting and 
bills. Living off campus detaches us from campus somewhat so we now 
have to rnake the extra effort to retain the BC community feel. Studying 
habits are a bit askew because getting to library takes much more time. 
Some were lucky, as they were able to live on campus in Vanderslice 
while others played the role as RA's. Some students were anticipating a 
semester abroad in Florence, Australia, or Ireland. As we began this 
year, we had to begin thinking about resumes and finishing that pesky 
core when all we wanted to do was plan Friday night's party. We were 
happy about what we had done and were getting excited about what was 



to come. 



■Kristin Walker '03 




Sweet Basil's and White Mountain are always a good place to grab a 
bite off campus. 

Many juniors enrolled in the PreMed program begin to worn' about 
the MCATs that they were to take place in April. 



Student Life 165 



Sophomores '03 

Putting the Key in the Door 

So we came back. We have been to Newton and we have taken Cor- 
nerstone. Our second year at BC had begun. We were one year wiser. 
We had a better idea of how to balance an academic and a social life. 
However, there was still a lot of things we needed to figure out. Yet 
again, we were thrown into the mix. We were on the lookout for the 
perfect major. We were meeting new friends and keeping the old. 
We strove to get the professors that we had heard so much about. 
Life's little lessons were cropping up everywhere. We were acclamating 
ourselves to our new homes on Lower Campus and College Road. We 
learned what cleaning your own bathroom is really like. We learned 
to deal with seven or three other roommates instead of just one. Just 
when we felt settled, we learned how to look for our own apartment. 
We kept enjoying ourselves and pushing ourselves to the next level. 
Junior year, here we come! -Kristin Walker 




Photo supplied by Jen Worsham 



These Eagles fans are ready to support their team during the 
relatively warm football season this year. 

Who is going up next? Which one of these sophomore guys are 

going to be thrown up next? 



166 Student Life 





You can never make it to that 9 o'clock class without that 
steaming hot cup of coffee to wake you up. 

Yuki, So-in and Laura hit the shopping scene and let the fun go to 
their heads! 



Rebuilding 
College Road 




The sophomores on College Road must deal with 
loud banging at 7:30 am! 

"The construction bothers 

me because not only did they 

not tell us it as happenmg 

but it started right before 

finals!" 

-Lindsay Hudnut '03 




The sophomores look out their window and what 
do they see? A Johnny on the Pot! 




After being at BC for a few weeks, this freshmen 
gets very pumped for the football games. 



"It's great to be abl&to 
show the colors for 

my new school" 
-Sapna Thakkar l 04 




These freshmen perfect their face paint in the 
bathroom in Keyes North. 




This year all of the forced triples have been placed on Upper 
Campus as opposed to Newton Campus. 

The Superfan shirts, given out at orientation come in handy. 




Freshmen '04 

Welcome to your New Home 

Walking around the Boston College campus, I cannot find the words to 
describe the immense feelings of pride that I feel in regards to this place. 
There is nothing I enjoy more than standing, on a clear, quiet night, 
adjacent to the O'Neill library, simply gazing. I cannot help but see the 
magnificence of Gasson Hall. The moonlight reflects off of the medieval 
architecture, making the scene among the most beautiful I have 
encountered. When I gaze into the distance and see the many lights of 
Boston and the surrounding communities, I am reminded of how lucky I 
am to be here. However, it is only when I look past the handsome buildings 
and see the faces of the many students whomatriculate here that I can 
truly grasp the magnitude of my good fortune. When I gaze into the 
distance, and see the many lights of Boston I can fully acknowledge the 
gift that my life has become. I think to myself, "This is why I have come 
to Boston Col lege. "-Jake Berry 




Die hard Superfans learn quickly that full face paint is a true sign of 
an Eagles fan. 

Freshmen soon realize that Boston has so much to offer and make 
use of the Boston College T stop to go exploring. 



SapnaThakkar 



Student Life 169 




The average college student stays up all hours of the 

night, and then tries to make up for it by sleeping late in 

the morning, in between classes, in the library, or 

anywhere possible. While everyone has the intention of 

getting a good night's sleep, the distractions of dorm life 

are too overpowering. It is always one in the morning 

when the best movies come on, the take-out arrives, your 

floormates stop by, or you realize you have an exam 

tomorrow. Whatever the excuse, getting a good night's 

sleep is virtually impossible. Powernaps throughout the 

day won't relieve that constant tiredness. The weekends 

don't offer relief either being that we all go to bed when 

the sun comes up. This is why the cycle of staying up late 

and trying to cram in some extra z's during the week will 

keep haunting us - but after all, it's one of the new joys 

and freedoms of college life, right?! Besides, current 

research shows that sleep deprivation slows or prevents 

the progress of nasal influenza viruses into the lungs. 




Beth Bowers 




Kristin Walker 



170 Student Life 







"Anyone can escape into sleepy 
we are allgeniitses when we 
dream, the butcher is the poets 
equal there. " r v 

^E.M. Goran 



m.\ 





A local band, Mighty Purple, plays at O'Connell 
House. 



"Boston College offers 

many opportunities to 

listn to and get involved 

in great music " § "Jeff 

Nedelka 




Local bands set up for a concert at O'Connell 
House. 




Chris Bowers 



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The Heightsmen entertain parents in Conte Forum over Parent's i»fu 

Weekend. 

Local BC bands perform in front of The Harvard Coop store. 




^— 




Music in Our Lives 

Carrying it Over the Welcome Mat 

Music is a huge part of life at Boston College, like any other 
college in America. However, unlike other schools, BC stu- 
dents don't limit their musical experiences to Napster. Many 
students take advantage of Boston, the Fleet Center, the 
Orpheum, and the House of Blues to see their favorite groups 
live. Occasionally, throughout the year bands come to Boston 
College and perform in Conte Forum. The past few years have 
seen Vertical Horizon, Wyclef, Eminem, Run DMC, and several 
others performing on campus. In addition to big bands, stu- 
dents often attend concerts performed by local bands at 
O'Connell House. Many of BC's talented guitarists often 
play in the Dustbowl during lunch. No matter where you go 
on campus, you are assured that there's a concert, formal 
or informal, going on. -Jared Walsh 




The Chorale sang in O'Neill Plaza at the Arts in Action Festival. 

Many students who play the guitar bring their talents to the 
dustbowl to entertain their fellow classmates. 



Student Life 173 



* The D line is faster than the B line * Natalies Pizza delivers at 3 o'clock in the morning * 



What we learned . . . 



During our time here, we have been exposed to physical 
chemistry, classroom assessment, mass communications 
and many other subjects that will help us break into the 
world beyond BC's front door. Our everyday experiences 
have enlightened us as much as each of the three thou- 
sand dollar classes that we have taken each semester. We 
now know first hand that Boston is a fabulous college 
town with a great community feel. This town has taught 
us that there is a balance between social and academic 
life. Finding this balance has taught us to accept our- 
selves. We will never get this time back again, but we will 
use it in such a way to enrich the rest of our lives. We will 
show our true selves and take advantage of each opportu- 
nity that is thrown our way. We will set our priorities 
and enjoy life for what it is. BC has become a corner- 
stone in our lives. We cannot wait to see what else we 
can become. Thanks BC! -The Class of 2001 




. . . beyond our front door. 



* You really can get addicted to a computer * Some people have actually never seen snow 



Nine o'clock is really early * You can tell what time it is by the bells ofGasson 



sr 



We learned that a sixteen hour 

car ride to South Bend was 

definitely worth it! 



* WHY 



NORMAL? 




We learned that the BC 

bookstore was a one stop 

shopping experience for eveiy- 

one on your Christmas list. 




■nihil inn 



We learned that one per- 
son can truly make a 
difference. 





We learned that a package 
from Mom or a letter in 
your mailbox can make you 
k feel on top of the world. 




Doug Flutie is a hero here * We need to find a job * We will really miss this place * 











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Sports 

Sports at Boston College 
are a part of life not only 
for athletes but also for stu- 
dents. Highlights of the 
2000-2001 season were nu- 
merous. We watched the 
Men's Soccer team win the 
Big East and go to the first 
round of the NCAA tour- 
nament. The Women's 
Cross Country team won 
the Big East and placed 

fourth in National 

rankings. We cheered on 

the Football team to a 

winning season and a 

place in the Aloha Bowl. 

Atlhetics are a key part of a 

BC student's life. 



Editors: 

Tom Pelissero 

Chris Wong 



Before the Men's cross coun- 
try team began the season, coach 
Randy Thomas focused most of the 
success to come on senior captain 
Justin Burdon. Along with junior cap- 
tains Andrew Shaffer and Colin Wolfe, 
Justin led the improvement of a team 
with a great future. Included in the 
Eagles future were BC High grad 
Byron Gartrell along with Massachu- 
setts runners Matthew Clapstick and 
Jared Peterson. 

The season was one of im- 
provements, with the highpoint be- 
ing a third place finish in the 



(clockwise from top left) Star junior Colin Wolfe traverses 

the uphill terrain on the course at Franklin Park; senior 

Daniel Fitzgerald pulls ahead of the pack; sophomore Brian 

Mahoney duels a Colby runner for position at the finish line; 

freshman Matthew Capstick (left) and Daniel DAmato 

sandwich an opponent on the back stretch. 




Nick Genevish 



Nick Genevish 



Born to Run 



Men's Gross Country season marked by steady improvement 



Dartmouth Invitational tournament, 
led by Colin Wolfe's third place fin- 
ish. Improvements throughout the 
season led to personal bests by most 
of the team, and helped prepare the 
younger runners for a promising fu- 
ture. The team made a good showing 
at the NCAA Qualifying Meet finish- 
ing in eighth place overall. In a pool 
of 215 runners, the BC Eagles made 
a strong showing, highlighted by Colin 
Wolfe's 34th place finish. 

By Chad Elder, '04 




180 Sports 



The Men's Cross Country team finished sixth in the Big East Cross Country 
Championships held at Franklin Park with three runners placing within the top 

31 times. 




Nick Genevish 




(above) Sophomore Anthony Catalfano 
expends the last of his energy in an effort 
to overtake a challenger from Dartmouth. 

(left) The New England Championships 
get underway as the mass of runners 
struggle to maintain both balance and 
position. 



Nick Genevish 



John Dudley led the Eagles to an top ten finish in the Northeast Regional Cross 
Country Meet, placing sixteenth with a time of 31:42.1. 




(above) Junior Celeste Sedo negotiates the upward climb in 
Franklin Park as the pack tries to keep pace. 

(right) Junior Meredith Millet accelerates into position in an effort 
to overtake her Maine opponent. 




182 Sports 



The Eagles placed six runners in the Top 25 to win their first Big East 

Cross Country Championship in 15 years. Maggie Guiney placed second 

out of 114 runners with a time of 17:03. 



Run-Away Winners 

Women's Cross-Country Soars to 4th at Nationals 



At the outset of the women's cross-country 
season, coach Randy Thomas said, "There is little 
doubt that this is the most talented and deepest 
team. ..that we have ever had at Boston College" 
Maybe this was a mere prophecy that the Eagles 
would rise to sixth in the national rankings. Maybe 
he foresaw the NCAA Northeast Regional Qualifier 
where Boston College would place four runners in 
the top ten. Whatever Coach Thomas meant when 
he spoke those words, one can safely assume that 
everything he dreamed for his squad became 
reality during the course of the season. 

It is difficult to see things any other way about 
a season in which the Eagle runners finished first 
in every meet they competed in, and received a 
birth to the NCAA Championships by winning the 
Big East. Coach Thomas, of course, couldn't have 
made it happen without the outstanding effort of 
his talented team. Led by senior captain Lisa 
Mclsaac and junior captain Katie Ryan, the Eagles 
came off a season that yielded no first-place team 
finishes and 28th place in the NCAA champion- 
ship. This campaign got off to a very different 
start when the Eagles finished first in Durham, 
New Hampshire behind a winning individual run by 
Ryan. From that first meet, the Eagles didnothing 
but get better, finishing first in the Iona College 
Meet of Champions and the Big East Champion- 
ship. Taking their strong season performance into 
the NCAA championship was not difficult for this 
tight-knit group of competitors, and women deliv- 
ered with an impressive 4th-place finish. 

With their able veteran leadership and strong 
commitment to win, the Eagles put BC on the map 
as a hotbed for cross-country champions. 

By Chad Elder, '04 




*M 




N'icV. Genet i>h 




llfejgferf^ 



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(top) Celeste Sedo strides toward the front of the pack at the 
New England Championships. 

(above) Kelly Millet, Meredith's twin sister, paces herself for a 
late charge at Franklin Park. 

(left) The crowd of runners takes off at the New England 
Championships in Boston. 



NickGeiU'vish 



Sophomore Maggie Guiney finished in thirteenth place with a time of 21:05, 

leading the Eagles to a fourth place finish at the NCAA Championship, the best 

finish by any Boston College Women's varsity sport. 






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Taking Care of Business 

Aloha! Football posts winning record and bowl victory 

The Boston College Football team set their sights high this year, as they prepared to step through the door to na- 
tional prominence with an outstabding followup year to last season's breakthrough 8-3 finish. While the team was hit 
throughout the year with a rash of injuries, they still managed to prevail against the odds and posted a winning 6-5 
record for the year. 

This year's edition was led once again on offense by senior quarterback Tim Hasselbeck. Hasselback showed even 
greater improvemnt from last year, as he led the Eagle's offense in aerial scoring barrages virtually every game by 
tallying 1,810 yards and 16 touchdowns on the season. Halfback Cedric Washington was the second leading rusher 
on the team, despite being injured for the majority of the year. He was augmented by super soph Willie Green, who 
stepped into the line of great BC running backs with a breakthrough season of 1,164 yards and 13 touchdowns en 
route to being named to the All-Big East First Team. .The deep wide recieving corps, including junior Dedrick Dewaltl 
and sophomore Jamal Burke gave Hasselbeck plenty of targets The air and ground game were both anchored by an 
outstanding offensive line. Guard Paul Zukauskas, a starter since his first year at the Heights, was named First.teami 
All-America by the American Football Coaches Association. Former walk-on placekicker Mike Sutphin had an out- 
standing year and was named to the AII-BigEast First Team, after converting all but two field goals during the sea- 
son. 

The young defense, which many percieved as a weakness, improved immensely and became one of the team's 
strengths over the course of the season. The de- 
fense made a name for itself as a nationally promi- 
nent squad. In passing defense, the team ranked 
first in the Big East and eighth nationally. Up and 
coming talents such as defensive lineman Sean 
Guthrie, corner back Lenny Walls, and safety 
RaMon Johnson bolstered and led the young de- 
fense that grew up quickly and impressively. 

After a slow start that included a season opening 
loss to West Virginia, the Eagles hit their stride by 
posting wins against Army, Navy, UConn, Syracuse, 
Rutgers, and Temple.Despite heartbreaking losses 
to Virginia Tech, rival Notre Dame and Miami, all of 
which were ranked within the top 15 when BC 
faced them, the Eagles finished off with their 
second consecutive winning season, as well as their 
second consecutive bowl bid with an invitation to 
play at the Jeep Aloha Bowl on Christmas Day. 

The Eagles' seniors shined in Oahu, as Washing- 
ton pounded the ball in for two touchdowns, Aloha 
Bowl MVP Hasselback tossed for two, and Sutphin 
was perfect on the day, including his career long 
(50 yards), in the 31-17 beatdown of Arizona State. 

With many players still returning with eligibility, 
O'Brien hopes to see his team to a third-straight 
bowl trip in 2001. 

By Chris Wong, '01 and Tom Pelissero, '03 

Cornerback Lenny Walls takes a second quarter 
interception of Syracuse's Troy Nunes into the 
endzone for the score and the lead. Walls posted six 
interceptions on the year to lead the team. 




Chris Bowei I 



186 Sports 



Guard Paul Zukauskas was named First Team All-America by the 
Walter Camp Association. 



(right) Sophomore RB 
Willie Green cuts to the left 
and breaks for the hole 
opened up by T Marc 
Colombo (75), G Paul 
Zukauskas (66), and TE 
Mike Guazzo (80). 



(below) Senior QB Tim 
Hasselbeck looks to launch 
the ball as C Dan Koppen 
(77) and G Paul LaQuerre 
keep his line of sight open. 




C hm ; 




Chris Bowers 



Sophomore RB Willie Green was the third 1,000 yard rusher in three 
consecutive years for the Eagles, following teammate Cedric Washing- 
ton and current Kansas City Chief Mike Cloud. 




188 Sports 




Sophomore running back Willie Green had a career day against UCONN, 

rumbling 225 yards on 19 carries for 3 touchdowns. The 225 yards 

are the most by a BC player since 1991. 





On October 14, the Eagles defense shutdown the then-4th rated passer in the 

nation, Troy Nunes, in a hard fought 20-13 win over Syracuse. 3 Eagles posted 

4 interceptions: DE Sean Guthrie, DB Lenny Walls, and DB Ralph Parent (2). 




Sports 189 







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'1 knew that somewhere down the 

line, Coach O'Brien was going to 

have this program turned around. 

I'm glad I stayed here." 



190 Sports 



#35 



Cedric Washington 



senior.halfhack.5 10 203IDS holvokema 



1999 All-Big EaSt first Team 

2000 bc Eagles Co-captain 

2000 UnSling HerO Award Winner 




Chris Bowers 
Sports 191 




Can You Dig It? 

Volleyball steps up to a higher standard this season 

The Boston College volleyball team looked to improve from their 1999 season with an even stronger year, 
and with a school record of four Big East wins and an overall record of 13-17, they succeeded in their goals. 
This improvement was even more impressive considering a schedule that featured perennial volleyball powers 
Purdue and Notre Dame. With three strong recruiting classes under her belt, head coach Jackie Hadel looked 
for an increasingly-positive mental attitude among the players towards the season, and their record and season 
reflected that her urges had been heeded. 

Captaining the Eagles were a trio of seniors: outside hitter Julia El-Hag, setter Kyleen Charlton, and middle 
blocker Kristen Sprinkel. They led a talented corps of returning players that provided strong leadership for the 



Sophomore outside hitter Brooke Shull earned Big East Conference Player of 

the Week honors for the week of November 13. Over the Eagles two wins, she 

recorded 37 kills, 17 digs, and a .472 kill percentage. 



1 

192 Sports ! 

i 


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Kim Christina 



Shayla Ewing 



team. Along with the three seniors was rising junior star Brooke Shull at 
outside hitter. Also contributing to the offensive attack were hard 
hitting sophomore opposite Rachel Bach and sophomore outside hitter 
Lauren Schwer, both of whom contibuted greatly during the season. The 
team was also bolstered by the incoming recruiting class, which featured 
Freshmen Jenna Boyle and Nancy Legan. 

The team started the season slowly, only winning three out of their 
First eight games. However, this adversity prepared them for the second 
half of the season, in which they would achieve a winning record, going 
11-6 until the end. The volleyball team closed out their season impres- 
sively, with consecutive wins over Central Connecticut and Big East foe 
Providence. With the momentum from the season intact, as well as a 
deep well of returnees, the Boston College volleyball team looks forward 
to future seasons of success. 

By Chris Wong, '01 



(left) Outside hitter Brooke Shull at the 
top of her jump as she spikes the ball 
against Villanova. 

(top right) Sophomore Lauren Schwer 
keeps the ball alive as opposing Villanova 
players look on. 

(bottom right) The team celebrates a 
successful match with a high five all 
around. 



The Lady Eagles set a new Boston College volleyball record by 
recording 4 Big East Conference victories this season. 



Sports 193 



(right) Freshman Ricky Merritt 
engages in a preliminary hold 
with his Seton Hall adversary. 

(bottom right) Senior Steve 
Pregiato gets on top of an 
opponent during a late-season 
home match. 

The 2000-01 Eagles wres- 
tling team was more than 
a bunch of sweaty guys 
hugging each other in 
awkward positions; they 
were men among men. 
Each afternoon, while you 
were playing your 
Playstation, the Eagles 
wrestling team was en- 
gaged in a grueling prac- 
tice. Led by the coaching 
staff of Rod Buttry, Jim 
Gallagher, Justin Harty, 
and seniors David 
DeAngelo, Dan Degan, 
Steve Pregiato, and Gary 
Whitehouse, the Eagles 
embarked on one of the 
most difficult seasons in 
their history. In the first 
few matches, the Eagles 
finished in the top ten in team competition, while 
Degan and Pregiato had strong individual perfor- 
mances. The Eagles looked forward to finishing 
strong in their conference, while boasting a strong 
showing in the competitive ECWA Championships in 
March. The Eagles were a young team with several 
freshmen, and looked forward to building a strong 
future in years to come. Despite its move to club 
next season, the team remained focused and dedi- 
cated to the common cause of going out with a 
bang. 

By Boots Giesen, '03 

Graceful 
Grapplers 





i 

Sf>orts 194 

i 


1 


1 
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Senior Dave DeAngelo and junior Jared McLaughlin led the 

Eagles in a win against MIT and a close match against AIC by 

picking up two wins apiece. 




w 



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Kyelim Rhee 



Horseless 
Headmen 

In a year filled with emotions, the men's water 
polo team fought through a season that would have 
made it easy to pack it in and quit. Knowing that 
they would be a casualty of the unfortunate Title IX 
rule to provide more balance between the 
distribution of scholarships to women's sports, the 
team stuck with the task at hand and turned in an 
admirable performance. 

Under the direction of Coach Christopher Ford, 
the team struggled for victories, but still finished 
the season with strong performances against the 
likes of Occidental, Fordham University, and the US 

Merchant Marine Acad- 




emy. Two of the more 
impressive victories came 
against Connecticut 
College, a 14-1 thrashing, 
and Grove City College, a 
demolishing 20-6 tally. 
Led by the experience of 
seniors Will Estes and 
Simon O'Connell, the 
team never let up. Al- 
though Title IX's jaws 
came clamping down on 
the men's water polo 
team, they'll be donning 
their swim caps and 
diving in for another 
season at the club level. 

By Kevin Swatt, '03 



(top left) An Eagle encounters 
competition on his way to the 

ball. 

(left) A BC player clears the 

ball out of the corner of his 

own zone. 



Kyelim Rhee 



On October 8, the Men's Water Polo team scored one of their most 

impressive victories of the season, soundly defeating Connecticut 

College by a score of 14-1. 




(left) Gina Dinan scoots the ball past a defender towards 
the goal and another BC scoring opportunity, 
(below) Sophomore Meredith Russell puts presssure on 
Yale in a fierce game. 



Chris Bowers 



(above) Senior tri-captain Jennifer Hall weaves her way through 
a web of Yale players. Hall netted two assists in the game, 
(right) Gina Dinan prepares to strip the ball from a defender. 
Dinan was looked to provide an offensive presence this year and 
she took notice of that with a hat trick against Pacific. 




Chris Bowe 



mm 



196 Sports 




Angela Hutchins, Morgan Brady, and Jill Dedman swept the Big East awards for 

the week of October 16 by winning Offensive Player of the Week, Defensive 

Player of the Week and Goalkeeper of the Week awards. 




below) Meredith Russell locks in on a Yale player as she 
egains possession of the ball for BC. Russell rebounded 
rom an injury-plagued freshman campaign to become an 
ntergal part of the field hockey team. 



We Don't 




No ice 

By Chad Elder '04 




The women's field hockey always gets off to a quici; 
§Mrt, but this season was earlier than most, as the team 
emtjarked upon a two-week long summer trip to Australia. 
toAfter a first round loss in last year's Big East tournament, 
^••ach Sherren Granese felt that the trip gave the women a 
^diance "to gel and compete at an extremely high level." 
*„The trip definitely seamed to m <flka difference, as the 
.Eagles rose to 13 th in the nat , surpassing even last 
yelWofty ac^mplislnentme team returned eight of 
last year's top ten scorers, as well as many young players 
who made an impact in the team's previous starting 
lineup. 

Team captains Morgan Brady, Jennifer Hall, and 
Nichole Bukowski led a team that included many sopho- 
mores with starting experience already under their belt, as 
well as six promising recruits. Coaeri Granese felt that, 
!"one of our strengths lie inthe goal cage" with senior Jill 
Dedman, who has started fir the Eagles inJvery game 




an's season ifB ^ing 
alkeeper of the Week" Hue 1 1 
nation's best teams, 
home ganQ of their career at 
defeated VilRmW However, 



since the 1998 season. D 
honored as the Big East ' 
as shutting out some of 
In the seniors' fi 
Boston College, the Eagl 
two road losses to close out the regular season 
BC from seeking out revenge against top-ranked 
to whom they lost a heartbreaking two overtime ga 
Said senior captain Nichole Bukowski, of ending her 
sensational career at Boston College, "It would be a 
ing to go out with a bang. I came in winning the Big 
as a freshman, and I'd love to go out winning." 




Chm. Bowers 



(left) Sophomore Elizabeth 
Reh guns the ball as opposing 
defenders look on. Reh im- 
proved on a successful fresh- 
man season with an outstand- 
ing sophomore campaign. Reh 
scored the first goal of her 
career in an 8-0 blowout against 
Pacific. 



Chris Bowers 




Over the course of the season, All-Big East goalkeeper 
Jill Dedman registered a league-leading 6 shutouts. 




Clockwise from top left: 
Junior Marc Lucero warms 
up for his singles match 
against BU; rookie coach 
Robert Miller talks strategy 
before the UNH match; 
freshman Justin Slattery 
winds up for a two-fisted 
backhand; captain Jason 
Cowett aims for the line in 
a fall singles contest. 




Shayla Ewing 



Shayla Ewin 



serve rr up 



Men's Tennis Swings for Success Behind Freshman Phenoms 

Coach Rob Miller knew he had his hands full when he signed on with BC after a pair of successful sea- 
sons at rival BU. The Eagles had been struggling to break away from the middle of the pack in the Big East for 
the past several seasons, and had lost a number of players, including captain Anand Annigeri, to graduation 
following the 1999-2000 campaign. Luckily for Miller, BC had unquestionably its best recruiting class in a 
decade at his disposal, and the new-look Eagles thrived under the pressure. 

The season opened at the New England Intercollegiate Tournament, where a few of the veterans set up 
the team for success early on. Junior Marc Lucero and sophomore Damon Vartabedian each posted 3-1 singles 
records, while newcomer Ross Pytko broke through with a 2-1 finish. The team used the confidence gained 
from that impressive showing in its first team match, a 9-0 shutout of Miller's former squad, the Boston Univeri 
sity Terriers. Just a week later, the Eagles returned to blank New Hampshire, 7-0, setting a new Eagles record 
with two shutouts in one season. Heading back into tournament play, the Eagles traveled to the UConn Invita 
tional. Captain Jason Cowett teamed with rookie Justin Slattery to advance to the semifinals in flight 'A', while 
Slattery, Pytko, and freshman Paul Colahan each reached their respective singles quarterfinals. In the final 
match of the fall season, the freshmen left a mark that will surely set the stage for three more years, as 
Slattery, Colahan, Pytko, and fellow freshman Brad Anderson provided all the points the Eagles would need to 
down UConn in singles, 4-3. 

There is little question that the freshman phenoms proved they were for real early on. With their contin- 
ued contribution, combined with leadership of Miller and senior captains Cowett and Matt Stutz, the Eagles 
looked to make their presence felt at the Big East tournament and beyond. 

By Tom Pelissero, '0 



Freshmen Justin Slattery, Paul Colahan, Brad Anderson, 
and Ross Pytko swept singles in the win against UConn. 




Junior Tim Brennan perfects his 
toss in preparation for the BU 
match outside the Flynn Recre- 
ation Complex. 













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The Eagles set a new school record with two shutouts in one 

season: a 9-0 win over BU on October 5 and 7-0 match over 

UNH on October 13. 




Sports 199 



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BC Women Volley with Success 



200 Sports 

A 


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(above) Senior captain Kiren Fernando 
returns a passing attempt in an early- 
season singles match in the Plex. 

(right) Junior Ruta Veitas grimaces as she 
fires yet another backhand in a grueling 
singles match. 



At the Brown Invitational, Cynthia Tow led the Eagles to an impressive finish 
by capturing the Flight A singles title while three of the four doubles teams 

won their respective flights. 



(right) Ruta Veitas lines up for a backhand in her singles match 
outside the Plex. 

(below) All-Big East singles player Kiren Fernando slices through 
her serve. 





jTrrT^^jTUgnff 



The Eagle women got off to a superb start in the 
fall portion of their tennis schedule. Led by senior 
co-captains Cynthia Tow and Kiren Fernando, along 
with rookie coach Nigel Bentley, the squad used the 
fall schedule to solidify itself as one of the top 
programs in the country. 

Tow, ranked 70th in the nation in the ITA pre- 
season poll, made it to the final in each of the 
team's first two tournaments, and posted a win at 
the Brown Invitational. Losing only two sets in her 
Flight "A" matches, Tow also teamed up with 
Fernando for the Flight "A" doubles title. Kiren 
Fernando's younger sister, Aneisha, hooked up with 
sophomore walk-on Brooke Moldenhauer for the 
championship at Flight "D", while junior Ruta 
Veitas teamed with freshman phenom Allison 
Ashley to grab the win at Flight "B" doubles. The 
Eagles continued their strong play into the 
Dartmouth Invitational, despite the absence of Tow 
and Kiren Fernando, both of whom were selected to 
play in the prodigious Riviera ITA Ail-American 
Individual Tourney in Los Angeles, CA. The co- 
captains represented BC well, as Tow capped the 
trip with a startling, straight-set upset of 
Pepperdine's Monica Horvath, who at the time was 
ranked fifth nationally. Back in Hanover, the Eagles 
pressed on, as sophomore Jessica Engel snagged 
the Flight "D" title, while Veitas advanced to the 
championship match of Flight "C". 

With continued strong play at the final event on 
the fall schedule, the national ITA tournament, the 
Eagles looked to use momentum heading into the 
all-important spring docket. Under the leadership of 
its stars and its ambitious young coach, the squad 
continued to maneuver its way into the national 
tennis conscious. 



ByTomPelissero'03 



Cynthia Tow solidified her place as a national competitor by defeating the fifth 

ranked player in the US, Pepperdine's Monica Horvath, at the Riviera ITA 

Ail-American Individual Tournament in Los Angleles. 



k 


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_ Sports 201 


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(below) A BC women's duo cuts 
through the choppy waters out- 
side Savin Hill Yacht Club, the 
home of BC Sailing. 



(above) BC sailors fight for posi- 
tion in a tight race. 



(right and top) A pair of BC's 
nationally-ranked Co-ed team set 
sail at the BC Invite. 





The tandem of Tyler Pruett and Elise Mazareas was selected to represent 

BC at the Goodwill Regatta, the premiere international college regatta, 

held over Thanksgiving weekend in California and placed sixth. 



(below) The Co-ed race at the BC 
Invite cuts toward the Boston 
skyline. 



Come Sail Away 



By Tom Pelissero '03 




The BC sailing Eagles enjoyed one their most suc- 
cessful seasons ever in the fall of 2000. The Women's 
and Co-ed teams each rose rapidly in the national polls 
after strong performances in the early regattas. As the 
season drew toward a close, many of the seabound 
Eagles garnered individual honors in addition to their 
contributions to the team. 

Led by senior captain Joe Fava, the co-ed squad 
ascended to its highest national ranking in three years, 
soaring as high as fifth in the country by midseason. 
The team's best combination throughout the course of 
the year was the nearly-unstoppable duo of Tyler 
Pruett and Elise Mazareas. In back-to-back matches at 
Tufts and the Coast Guard Academy, Pruett and 
Mazareas brought home a pair trophies, taking second 
and first place, respectively. ^^^^^^ 

In singlehanded racing, Mark Teborek was a force to 
be reckoned with. Missing nationals by just four points 
the sophomore sailor still qualified for the New En- 
gland Singlehanded Championships. With two years of 
eligibility left, he is sure to continue to have a major 
impact at the national level. 

The lady sailors also made their presence felt in the 
polls, rising to twelfth in the nation by midseason. 
Guided by junior captain Cryssa Byers, the women's 
team made a strong showing at the Atlantic Coastal 
Championships, the season's final regatta. With many 
of the team's most talented sailors, including Byers, 
returning, the women's team is certain to build upon 
their success in the coming seaso 



a 
3 




(right) The Eagle's Co-ed repre- 
sentatives at the BC Invite pre- 
pare their boat for launching on 
a cool October afternoon. 



By midseason, both the Co-ed and the Women's Sailing teams were 
ranked within the top 15 teams in the country, with the Co-ed team 
ranked #5 and the Women's team ranked #12 




Sports 203 



(right) The men roll down the river in a quest for 
position during the New England Championships. 

(far right) The BC women stroke in unison as 
they pass under a bridge of spectators on the St. 
Charles. 

(below) The men's heavyweights cruise alone at 
the Head of the Charles. 

(bottom) The crowd gathers on the banks and 
bridge over the St. Charles as the women's crew 
race nears the finish. 








Kyelim Rhee 



With both the Heavyweight boat and Lightweight Boat 

teams coming off successful campaigns in the Spring of 

2000, the Men's Crew squad looked forward to similar 

results this season. The Lightweights continued 

delivered first, stretching their reign 

over both the New England 

Championships and the Champion to 

six and five years, respectively. The 

Heavyweights also finished the 

season strong, garnering a bronze 

medal at the New Englands. Heading 

into the Spring, the returning leaders 

of the squad broke in the 

newcomers, readying them for the 

rigors of the mean Spring schedule. 

With returning coach Seamus Hussey 

working with the Heavyweights and 

BC alumnus Dan Beaton guiding the 

Lightweight bunch, both crews prepared for an 

undoutedly solid effort in the Spring. 

By Victoria Haley, '03 



Smoke 





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The Men's Crew team finished an impressive 28 out of 57 boats in 
the Head of the Charles Championship Eights race on October 22. 






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It was a groundbreaking year for Boston College Women's 

Rowing, as the squad undertook its first year as a varsity 

sport. The women were very excited about the move, which 

served as a big step toward national recognition of the 

program. Judging by the great 

success achieved by the women in 

the Fall, there will be much to look 

forward to in future seasons of 

Division I rowing at BC. With strong 

finishes at all the fall races, the team 

took it to the next level in the 

Spring, their main racing season. 

Returning coach Steve Fiske hoped 

to repeat his performance from the 

2000 season, during which he guided 

the team to its most successful 

campaign ever, capped by a 3rd-place 

finish at the Champion. Having lost 

only two rowers, the women's crew looked to fulfill its 

potential in the Spring, and set the stage for a new tradition. 

By Victoria Haley, '03 



Kyelim Rhee 



The Women's Crew Team finshed in eighteenth place on Octo- 
ber 21 in the Club Eights race at the Head of the Charles. 



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206 Sports 




The cheerleading squad is much 
more than a bunch of pretty faces; 
they are the heart and soul of the 
Superfan spirit. Given the success 
of the football team and rise of the 
basketball team, they have had 
plenty to cheer about in recent 
seasons. The Boston College 
cheerleading program consists of a 
co-ed and an all-girl squad who 
provide spirited support for men's 
and women's athletics. These teams 
are divided into the varsity squad, 
which performs at all home and 
away events, and the larger junior 
varsity squad, which does not 
travel. 








Situated directly in front of the 
student body at most home events, 
the squad leads the masses in the 
their favorite cheers, such as the 
"first down spin" and the ever- 
popular "S" chant. This year's 
seniors will be sorely missed by the 
rest of the team, who looked to 
them for energy even during BC's 
poorest athletic performances. The 
eight seniors, including co-captain 
Mindy Aguirre, will leave a legacy 
that sophomore co-captain Jeffrey 
Jonas hopes to carry on. With the 
mob of Superfans behind them, 
there's no doubt that the cheer- 
leaders will always lift BC's spirits. 
By Boots Giesen, '03 



Chris Bowers 



The cheerleaders practice several 

times a week in preparation for 

their performances at sporting 

events and pep rallies, plus various 

other school functions. The squads 

attend the National Cheerleading 

Association summer camp, as well 

as the NCA National Collegiate 

Cheerleading Championships. The 

team works hard on new stunts 

during the summer, producing the 

intricate pyramids and graceful 

male backflips BC fans have come 

to know and love. "I love to watch 

their moves," mused sophomore 

Superfan Matt Frazier. "I try to get 

closer, but the police barricade is 

too much for me to fight through." 




Chris Bowers 

(top) The varsity squad prances across the end zone in celebration of a BC score. 

(middle) Members of the JV team perform their routine to the Screaming Eagles 
Marching Band's rousing rendition of "For Boston". 



(bottom) The co-ed varsity team forms a pyramid during a timeout in the Syracuse 
football game. s „ orts 20 7 




By Ryan Maguire '03 



(below) Chris Cleary, second on the team in goals as 
a sophomore, defends against the top ranked team, 
UConn. Cleary was depended upon this year to 
provide experience and leadership in the midfield. 



JillflliWIWIMiMHHMBWHlBB^BWlBnBinWW^BBHHHHHBBWI 




rship from Head 
senior captains, Paul 
les had a solid base for 
g defense, consisting 



Coming off a lackluster 1999 season of 6*9-2, the 
Boston College Men's Soccer squad looked forward to 
changing their fortunes in the new millenium. With 
such Big East powerhouses as UConn, Rutgers, Seton 

-lall, Pittsburgh, and St. Johns to contend with, the 

Eagles had virtually no room for error but still managed 
to turn things arou 
With strong, ex 

loach Ed Kelley an 
jBourke and Kevin Bo; 
success. Anchored by 
of exceptional senior goalkeeper Chris Hamblin and 

heir co-captain defensemen Bourke and Boyd, the 

iagles stifled opposing offenselithroughout the year 
On the other side of the ball, the 1 was led by 

tron#mrdfteld core of seniors Sjur Guflderllen, 

spcm Skj^g. and Jorgen Lie, along with last year's 
eonjgl ading scorer, junior Chris Cleary, and sopho- 
ore Bobby Thompson. At the head of the Eagle's 

ffense lies a solid group of outstanding young players 

he team, with the help of sophomore superstar Casey 
Schmidt, last year's leading scorer and Big East All- 
Rookie team member, has made a pronounced improve 
ment from the '99 slSfpt* 

The Eaglegiuccess was evident in impressive victo- 
ries against BU, Seton Hall, Pittsburgh, and an unex- 
pected tie against top-ranked UConn. The Eagle's 

trong play earned them a Big East Tournament bid 
here they shocked conference powerhouses by sweep 

ng the three game tournament. The title earned them a 

)id in the NCAA tourflymew,SiyH^ 

n the first round by Rhadillsl 

The breakthrouhg season, combined with the remain 
ing eligibility of many star players, gave Ed Kelley 
much to look forward to for years to come. 



(right) Casey Schmidt gets the 
upper hand as he battles for 
possesion of the ball. The Eagles 
won every game that Schmidt 
scored a goal. 





Chris Be Irs 




208 Sports 



Sophomore Casey Schmidt was named Offensive Player of the week by 

the Big East and Player of the Week by Soccertimes.com for the week of 

October 9. Schimdt scored two goals in two games against Pittsburgh and UConn. 



(right) Freshman sensation Ramon Smith strips the ball from a 
UConn player. 

(below) Senior Martin Cantillo dribbles the ball into opposing terri- 
tory to set up a teammate. 





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Chris Bowers 



(above) Midfielder Casey Schmidt outruns a defender while 
directing the Eagles offense. Schmidt followed up an outstanding 
freshman campaign as a member of the Big East All-Rookie Team 
with a phenomenal sophomore season, 
(left) Senior goalkeeper Chris Hamblin boots a goal kick back 
onto the field. Hamblin was a steady defensive presence between 
the poles for the Eagles this season. 



Chris Bovvers 



The Eagles went 2-1-1 against 4 Top-25 teams during October, 

including a clutch tie against the then # 1 team, UConn. ..Senior Chris Hamblin was named 

Goalkeeper of the Year and a First Team Ail-American. 







Sports 209 





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■ 



Jet Commercial 



Jet Commercial 



A solid squad that made an impressive 
showing in the fall, the BC men's golf 
team posted top ten finishes in each of 
their matches, a mark of their consider- 
able development and imminent success. 
At the New England Championships the 
Eagles stroked their way to a fifth place 
finish, a strong showing among forty-six 
teams. Rich Tilghman, a junior, placed 
third in the competition as he closed the 
fall season with his consistent low scores. 

Tilgham posted solid scores all season, 
including his first place 68 at the Beanpot 
Tournament and second place at the 
ECAC tournament. Seniors Josh Folkerth 
and Mike Rich continued with solid contri- 
butions for the squad in their final fall 
season. Folkerth posted an important 11 th 
place at the annual Beanpot Tournament, 
while Rich led all BC golfers with a second 
place finish in the qualifier of the ECAC 
tourney. 

The Eagles looked to soar through the 
spring season in impressive fashion once 
again, and with the constant improvement 
and burgeoning talent of the squad, that 
goal appeared more than attainable. 

By Kevin Swatt, '03 



Grip 



(far left) Junior Rich Tilghman follows through on an iron from the rougf 

(left) Senior Mike Rich grips down tight for a short iron into the green. 

(below) Freshman Chris Sanossian prepares to pound his ball out of the 
medium cut. 






Jet Commerc ' 




Rip 



210 Sports 



The Men's Golf Team garnered top ten finishes in all seven of their 
fall outings, including a fifth place finish at the New England Cham- 
pionships. 






Fain/iray to Heaven 





The Lady Eagles took the links this 
fall and never looked back. A win at 
the Beanpot and a respectable fifth- 
place finish at the ECAC tournament 
to close out the season marked a very 
successful season. A young team, the 
Eagles gained much of their success 
from newcomers Lauren Panneck and 
Channing Lovejoy, as well as from 
sophomore Roxanne Sonboonsiri. 

Panneck was one of the reasons for 
the Eagles' success in the Beanpot, 
leading all Eagles with a two round 
total 158. Lovejoy won silver honors at 
the Beanpot, and finished the season 
with three top ten finishes. 
Sonboonsiri was a force all season 
long, leading the Lady Eagles in four 
of the six events. 

Closing out her career in fall compe- 
tition, senior Meghan Donoghue led 
the team with her experience, compet- 
ing in three events in the fall. Her 
squad looked to continue with this 
success and build on the solid founda- 
tion laid during the early portion of the 
season, and make an impact in the Big 
East Tournament. 

By Kevin Swatt, '03 



(top left) Freshman Kerry Whalen 

sets up her putt on the greens of 

Brookline Country Club. 

(left) Senior Meghan Donoghue 

and her Eagles teammates warm 

up before a fall match. 



Channing Lovejoy 



In one of their most impressive outings this year, Boston College's 
Women's Golf team took first place honors at the annual 
Beanpot Tournament. 





(left) Senior Rachel Klemanski takes the corner kick against 

Syracuse. 

(below) Big East Preseason Defensive Player of the Year, Sarah 

Powell clears the zone, as goalie Courtney Schaeffer looks on. 



Chris Bowers 



(above) Junior forward Meghan Moore slide tackles a startled 
UConn opponent at the BC Soccer Complex on Newton Campus. 

(right) Meghan Moore eludes a UConn defender, something she has 
done many times since starting every game during her first three 
seasons at BC. 





Goalkeeper Courtney Schaeffer was honored as three time Goalkeeper 

of the Week, and former high-school Ail-American Sarah Rahko 

was honored during two consecutive weeks as Rookie of the Week. 



■■■■M^MMMMMMMH 






(below) Meghan Moore takes a shot on a breakaway 




Kick This! 

By Chad Elder '04 





agles Women's soccer team loo 
to pick up where their predecessors left off: in the 
NCAA national tournament. With nine of eleven start- 
ers returning for the 2000 season, the NCAA champi- 
onship was well within their grasp. This year the team 
set their sights higher, challenged by Coach Alison 
Foley before the season, as he asked, "How can we 
elevate ourselves to the next stage?" 

Senior goalkeeper Courtney Schaeffer and 
senior defenders Sarah Powell and Katherine Murphy 
were put in charge of taking the nationally-ranked 
Eagles to that next stage. As captains of the 2000 
Eagles, they led a team comprised mostly of veterans 
and some outstanding young recruits. Other standout 
included Meghan Moore and Katherine Halloran, who 
were amongst the team leaders in points and goals. 
The Eagles schedule included games against the top 
ranked team in the nation, Notre Darnj, as well as 
their cross-town rivals Harvard. £ 

The Eagle's hopes of a second consecutive 
NCAA tournamnet run were dashed when the squad 
fell in the semifinals of the Big East Tournament to 
host Notre Dame. Although the squad was 
dissapointed by their earj^xit, the team once again 
flejflj its muscle in t Pbig East and continued to aim 
fifl ley's goal as feeing recognized as a Big East 



lexfl it! 
idwerho 



uriLpowerhouse. -^Jr 




Chris Bowers 

(left) Freshman midfielder 
Sarah Rahko battles for the 
ball in a crucial Big East 
contest. Rahko was one of 
the top playmaking recruits 
in the country in 2000, and 
stepped directly into a 
starting spot for the 
women's squad. 



Chris Bowers 



■■■■^^^^MHI^^HI 



During the month of September, the Lady Eagles compiled a 9-3 
record, outscoring their opponents by a 36-9 margin. Goalkeeper 
Courtney Shaeffer registered seven shutouts during that stretch. 




■ ■; •■ 




BC Men's Swim Team coach Tom Gordon believed that the potential of this year's team was incredible, with 
what he believed to be his most talented squad in a decade. His team's performance in the pool confirmed his 
fortuitous suspicions. 

The swimming and diving teams' 2000-2001 season started with a bang on October 28 with a win against 
Stonybrook (157-130) in Boston, and was a sign of many victories to come. Sophomore freestyle sprinter Matt 
Baker and senior backstrokers Brian O'Neill, Dave Santcroce and Jonathan Hartigan all played key roles in the 
team's success. Strong showings were also turned in by the 200-medley relay team as Paul Callahan, Marc 
Manganiello,Russ Keil and Chris Murphy turned in excellent times. 

On the diving side, senior captain Mike Wilt was victorious on both the three meter and one meter boards. 
With the addition of a strong freshmen class, including John Sourbeer and Andy Nauman, the Eagles were on 
their way to Big East prominence. Senior captains Callahan, Manganiello, and Robert Foley provided the leader 
ship the Eagles needed for a strong finish to the campaign. The Eagles picked up huge wins over UNH (175.5- 
122.5), URI (177-112), as well as slim defeats of Maine and Georgetown. The Eagles had a solid season behind: 
them as they enter post season action in the UConn invitationals and the ECAC championships in February. 

By Kristin Walker, '03 



114 Sports 



Against Holy Cross, Mike Wilt picked up his 21st win of the season in one-meter 
diving. Wilt then followed up with another win in the 3-meter diving event. 






iC 






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(opposite) Senior diving 

standout Mike Wilt 

executes a complicated 

twister dive in a home 

meet against Rhode 

Island. 

(above) A member of the 

4x400 medley relay team 

strokes forward during the 

freestyle portion of the 

event. 

(left) Freshman Andrew 

Fromm lunges forward 

during a butterfly event. 



Mike Dreher 



Against Georgetown and Maine, the men's swimming and 

diving team finished with an astounding eight first place 

finishes out of thirteen events. 



Sports 215 



(right) Junior Lauren 
Ohtake warms up in the 
butterfly. 

(below) Senior Erica Allen 
gets ready to spring off 
the wall in the back- 
stroke. 




',16 Sports 



Kristen Gray won both the one-meter and three-meter 
diving events in leading the Eagles to eleven first-place finishes in 
a trouncing of Northeastern University on January 31. 



UnderwaterWorld 

Led by senior captains Cathleen Blaston, Pamela Foschi and Caroline Griffith and diving captains Kristen Gray and Shannon Lents, 
the Women's swimming and diving Team showed exceptional strength in the swimming pool. The Eagles began the 2000-01 season 
with wins against William & Mary and UVA, later returning to Virginia to claim third place at the George Mason Invitational. After 
intense training in Aruba, the team was on a warpath with a desire for dominance in the water. On January 18, Lauren Schwartz led 
the team to victory against UNH with three wins. Two days later against URI, the ladies claimed triumph by capturing 12 out of 13 
first places. The Eagles continued their conquest by defeating Bl) and Maine with the help of seniors Erin Murphy, Erica Allen and 
Megan Smith. The diving team carried the rest of the squad on its shoulders in the January 31 meet against Northeastern, where 
Kristen Gray defeated her opponents by breaking both the one and three meter diving records. The winning streak continued until 
Big East Championships where they placed a disappointing 10th, however, posted new BC records in the 400-medley and 800- 
freestyle relays. The Eagles pursued a greater glory to end their season by traveling to the ECAC Championships, where the 200- 
medley relay of Nina Suryoutomo, Michelle Lane, Lauren Schwartz and Alexis Kostopoulos broke another school record to lead the 

way for a second place finish. Indeed, the season was a splashing success for the women's 

swimming and diving team. 

By Kristen Gray, '01 




(left) Senior Co-Captain 

Kristen Gray performs a 

reverse dive against 

Northeastern U. on 

January 31st. 



Through the month of January, the Boston College women's 
swimming and diving team had compiled an impressive 10-2-0 

record. 



Sports 217 




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(below left): Freshman guard Ryan Sidney pushes the ball up the floor against Rutgers as his teammates anxiously look on. 
(below right): Senior Jon Beerbohm elevates for a board as two Scarlet Knights aim to thwart his efforts. 



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Miracle . 

Hardwood 




Eagles shock nation with 9-1 Big East start 



Perhaps the only twelve men in the world who believed the BC men's basketball team would turn around an 
atrocious 1999-2000 campaign to ascend to the pinnacle of the Big East pile were the guys on Al Skinner's 
Eagles. The Cinderella story of college basketball burst into the American sporting conscious with a 9-0 start in 
non-conference play, floor-rush inducing upsets of conference kingpins Connecticut and Syracuse, and a style 
of play Eagle fans only dreamed of watching a year earlier. 

Sophomore superstar guard Troy Bell led the young team back to winning ways in the early season with the 
type of unrelenting play that earned him Big East Freshman of the Year honors in his rookie campaign. He was 
joined in the Eagles' consistent starting lineup by a fellow sophomore, big man Uka Agbai, junior swingman 
Kenny Walls, and senior captains Kenny Harley at guard and Xavier Singletary at forward. Depth also factored 
into the Eagles success thanks to the readiness and dedication of captain Jon Beerbohm, junior center Brian 
Ross, and freshman guard Ryan Sidney, who was a defensive standout all season. 

After running the table in the early going with impressive wins over UMass and Vanderbilt, Skinner's tight- 
knit unit carried the tide over into the conference season with a resounding 85-68 win over the tenth-ranked 
UConn Huskies. The next week featured two wins over Miami, sweeping the season series, as well as BC's first 
national ranking in four years, as they appeared at #24 in the ESPN/USA Today poll. Although they would drop 
a one-point decision to conference foe St. John's for their first loss of the season, the Eagles bounced back to 
win seven consecutive games in the Big East, the most impressive of which came in a barnburner against Syra- 
cuse. With the Forum Fanatics out in full force, Conte was rocking as the Eagles withstood several surges from 
the seventh-ranked Orangemen to chalk up a 65-63 win. 

It had been four years since the Heights had been a part of the big dance, but 2001 would change all that. 
With the scoring punch of Bell and the guiding hand of Skinner, the Eagles looked to make noise on an even 
grander stage come the end of March. g y j om p e lissero, '03 



Z20 Sports 



At 18-2, the Eagles jumped out to their fastest start since the 1966- 
67 team, coached by Bob Cousy, which went 23-2 before losing in 

the NCAA tournament. 




Sophomore phenom 
Troy Bell drives 
through the Holy Cross 
defense and hangs for 
the layup, while fellow 
sophomore C Uka 
Agbai trails on the 
break. 



On February 12th, the Eagles were ranked #9 in the Associated Press 
Poll, their first appearance in the Top 10 since 1983. 



Sports 221 



••-■■■ ^^5*^ 



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Mike Dreher 




'It doesn't matter Who we play. It 
matters how we execute." 





sophomore.guard.6'l".l7llbs.minneapolis 



1999-2000 Big East Freshman of the Year 

2000-2001 Preseason All-Big East First Team 




Sports 223 




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Freshman guard 
Janelle McManus takes 
a shot against Virginia 
Tech as junior guard 
Nicole Conway looks 
on. 





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The Eagles were ranked #22 coming into the season, while junior 
forward Becky Gottstein was named to the Preseason All-Big East 

second team. 



right) Captain Jamie Cournoyer finds the open woman on the 
opposite end of the court for BC. 

below) Coach Cathy Inglese pulls the team together before an 
important Big East contest. 




olding Court 



ris Bowers 



Women's Basketball struggles to find a winning line-up 

Coming off of the best season in Boston College women's basketball history, the 2000-2001 season was much antici- 
pated. The solid core of returnees, including senior co-captains Jamie Cournoyer and Danielle 0'Banion, were joined 
by talented freshmen Amber Jacobs, Janelle McManus, and Carolyn Gottstein as well as transfer Rachel Byars. The 
Eagles were led in the front court by Gottstein and Jacobs, who averaged 15.4 and 12.7 points per game, respectively. 
Under the guidance of head coach Cathy Inglese, the Eagles faced a difficult schedule, featuring matchups with top 
ranked teams such as Notre Dame, Tennesse and Connecticut. The Eagles jump-started their season with solid wins 
over Tennessee Tech and Michigan State, but later fell in overtime to #12 Rutgers (75-66) and Fairfield University 
(89-84). The team would rebound, however, to take home their biggest conference win of the season, a 75-36 smash- 
ing of St.Johns, which was punctuated by a 20-0 run at the end of the first half. The Eagles fell back into some bad 
habits during a 1-9 spell between the beginning of January and the end of February, only to put on a late-season surge. 
Four straight wins, including last-second thrillers against Georgetown and Pittsburgh at home, brought the Eagles 
closer to a .500 record in conference play, although still shy of their NCAA expectations. With just the Big East Tour- 
nament left to make one final statement, the Eagles looked toward the future to rebound to the conference precipice. 
By Kristin Walker, '03 



The Eagles had their best performance of the season in a drubbing St. 

John's by a score of 75-36. BC dominated the boards in that game, out 

rebounding the Red Storm 53-21. 






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Chris Bowen 



Men's hockey 



Hockey East, wins Beanpoi 



Three years. Three Frozen Fours. No national titles. No Beanpots. The message was clear: winning the big 
ones was the only thing that mattered for the 2000-01 Eagles. 

Coach Jerry York, hockey's National Coach of the Year, knew he had lost some great leadership and a great 
scoring punch in graduates Mike Mottau and Jeff Farkas, but he also knew that the freshman class would make 
an immediate impact. Combined with two-time Hobey Baker finalist Brian Gionta leading the first line and 
senior goalie Scott Clemmensen back between the pipes, the outlook was good on the Eagles' chances. Junior 
defenseman Brooks Orpik, a member of the U.S. Junior National team, and sophomore forward Krys Kolanos 
both passed on NHL opportunities prior to the season, giving BC even more depth and returning talent. Senior 
tri-captain Bobby Allen returned as well to lead the defense, while fellow tri-captain Jeff Giuliano would anchor 
the second line. 

The squad never experienced the early season jitters, rolling to the Omaha tournament title on opening 
weekend, and going 7-1-1 to open Hockey East play. Freshmen J.D. Forrest, Ben Eaves, Chuck Kobasew, and 
Tony Voce all stepped directly into the line-up for the Eagles; the latter two each took home multiple Hockey 
East Rookie of the Week honors early on. The BC skaters bounced around the top five in the rankings consis- 
tently, ascending to #1 in the nation on several different occasions. 

In its biggest mental test of the season, a Beanpot Championship matchup with six-time defending champiom 
Boston University, who were struggling through a down-season, but still appeared poised to prevail again. It 
was the Eagles who would be showing off the 'Pot that night, however, as Beanpot MVP Krys Kolanos led the 
way with a goal and an assist in a thrilling 5-3 victory. 

Coming down the stretch, the Eagles had already wrapped up the Hockey East title, but their aspirations 
were focused much higher. By maintaining a high level of intensity and getting solid performances out its 
young talent, BC seemed poised to take yet another run at college hockey's ultimate glory. 

By Tom Pelissero, '03 



130 Sports 



For the month of November, Boston College freshmen swept the 
Rookie of the Week honors, while freshman Chuck Kobasew took 

Rookie of the Month. 




»* 




On February 12th, the Eagles defeated the Boston University Terriers 

5-3 at the Fleet Center to clinch their first Beanpot in a decade, with 

sophomore forward Krys Kolanos taking home MVP honors. 



Chris Bowers 

(above) Freshman 
defenseman J.D. 
Forrest follows up on 
fellow freshman Chuck 
Kobasew's shot on the 
Northeastern 
netminder. 

(left) The impregnable 
objects: senior goalie 
Scott Clemmensen 
looks for the puck 
while a fellow senior, 
defenseman Bobby 
Allen, assists. 



Chris Bowers 



Sports 231 




"People tell me I'm tOO Small .1 

just use it as motivation. 



232 Sports 



#12 



Brian Gionta 



senior.forward.5'7 M70lbs.rochester 



3-time HObey Baker Finalist 
3-time AII-HOCkey East First Team 
1999, 2099 Team USA Member 
NCAA record 5 OOBlS in one period 




Chris Bowers 



Sports 233 




*•* 



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(above) Junior forward 
Jaclyn Kryzak winds 
up for a slapper in the 
Women's Beanpot. 

(left) The defense 
tandem of Carla Hess 
and Michelle Snyder 
join sophomore 
forward Thia Connelly 
in receiving congratu- 
lations for her goal. 



238 Sports 



Jen Buckley scored the winning goal in an upset of Middlebury on 
January 16th with just forty-five seconds remaining on the clock. 



(right) Freshman for- 
ward Renee Taylor goes 
top shelf on the BU 
netminder. 

(bottom right) Senior 
captain Jen Buckley 
plays the puck out of the 
corner. 




Lighting the Lamp 



While wins were few and far between for the women's ice 
hockey team, the true success of this year's squad can be mea- 
sured by its heart and dedication. Following the lead of second- 
year coach Tom Babson and senior captain Jen Buckley, the 
jwomen made big strides in building for the future. Facing such 
teams as Yale, Harvard, Dartmouth, and Princeton, the Eagles 
hung tough and showed signs of progress. Only a member of the 
ECAC conference since its varsity inception in 1995, the im- 
provement has been quite impressive in such a small timeframe. 

Many of these strides were made courtesy of Buckley, who 
turned in another fine year at forward. An Ail-American in high 
school, Buckley made an immediate impact in college play, 
scoring a team-high twenty-three goals in her frosh year of '97- 
98. She never cooled off, rattling off another amazing season as 
a senior. In a startling 2-1 victory over then 7-1 Middlebury, 
Buckley netted the game-winner with a mere forty-five seconds 
left in the final period. Although her presence as a scoring threat 
and a leader on the ice will be sorely missed, she set a great 
example for the young players who will continue to help turn 
around the struggling program. 

The squad was obviously disappointed in a season that yielded 
the fruits of victory only five times, but they also understand 
that it is the accomplishment and improvement that shows their 
promise of one day skating as a dominant force in women's 
hockey. 

By Kevin Swatt, '03 



Junior goaltender Amy Coletta recorded 21 saves and junior Kelly 
McManus scored both Eagles goals in a road victory versus Yale on 

November 11th. 




. 




McGrath Studios 

(above) Edina, MN natives Julie Ramsland and Hans Gustafson prep for their first 
runs of the morning. 

(above right) Senior captain John Valentine eases past the gate in his slalom race, 
(below) Senior captain Tad Davis negotiates the hill during his initial slalom run. 




McGrath Studio: 




240 Sports 



The Boston College Men's ski team got off to 
an impressive start to the 2000-2001 season by 
posting strong finishes at their first meets. 
Guided by coach Brad Vermeulen and encouragec i 
by senior tri-captains Tad Davis, Eric Klein, and 
John Valentine, the team looked to push its 
rookies to improve and take strides as a team in 
pressure-packed events. In each of the first few 
meets the Eagles were represented in the top fou 
finishers respectively. At the UMass Carnival, 
Valentine placed 10 th in the slalom individuals, 
while the team earned a third place finish. Junion 
Michael Duran also contributed to the impressive || 
team showing, coming in 13th in the same event. 
A week later, at the Brown/UConn Carnival, the 
talent of freshman Seth Therrien was showcased^ 
as he earned a silver medal in the slalom and a 
gold in the Giant slalom. Duran turned in a seconi, 
consecutive strong run with an 8th-place finish ii 
slalom en route to the Eagles' third-place finish i 
the event. Although occasionally overshadowed 
by the prominence of the lady Eagles, the BC 
men's skiing squad continued to assert its legiti- 
macy in competitions, and the future appears 
bright for the young squad. 

By Boots Giesen, '01 



Freshman Seth Thierren became the first BC Men's skier to win a 
competition since 1998 by winning the giant slalom at the Plymouth 

State College Carnival. 



oei 

0( 




McGrath Studios 



The Boston College women's ski team shot out 
if the gates, ascending directly toward the preci- 
lice of the national spotlight. The squad mounted 
i heavy assault on traditional womens skiing 
lowers, and rose as high as #2 in the nation by 
inid-February. Julie Ramsland, the lone senior, was 
joined in co-captainship by junior standout Chris- 
tina Gush. The Eagles finished second in the team 
ompetitions in each of their first two meets. At 
he UMass Carnival, Gush earned the silver medal 
n the slalom, posting an impressive time of 
1:24. 71, while sophomore Lori Williams provided a 
ifth-place finish. The team looked forward to a 
trong finish to their season. A week later, at the 
ilrown/UConn Carnival, Gush repeated her perfor- 
mance, while Williams stepped up her game with a 
ilver in the Giant slalom. Freshmen Erica Pylman 
find Jennifer Runco also raced well as the Eagles 
Maimed their second-straight runner-up weekend, 
following the second carnival, skiing Superfan 
Kevin Swatt commented, "In the two years I've 
been following the teams to every meet, this is as 
ocused as I've ever seen them." The success 
jvould only mount as the season wound to a close, 
I irmly placing BC at the peak of its sport. 

By Boots Giesen, '03 




McGrath Studios 

(above left) Senior captain Julie Ramsland springs out of the block. 

(above) Junior Christina Gush kicks up some powder as she flies over a gate. 

(below) Sophomore Lori Williams cruises down the slope during her run in the 

slalom event at the Plymouth State Carnival. 



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The women's ski team secured a first place finish in the slalom 
and a second place finish in the giant slalom at the Brown/ 

UConn Carnival. 



Sports 241 



'■■'■■ 




Run D-M-C may have been the biggest 
rap group of the 80's, but the 2000-01 
Eagles simply ran F-A-S-T. Guided by 
Coach Randy Thomas, the squad also had 
an abundance of senior leadership from co- 
captains Justin Burdon, Dan Fitzgerald, 
Mark Johnson, and Jeff Normant. Follow- 
ing the example of its veterans, the young 
Eagles developed a cohesive unit amidst its 
sizable squad, improving greatly during the 
course of the season. 

A 96-48 team drubbing at the hands of 
Harvard to open the indoor season may 
have looked bad in the papers, but the 
match was highlighted by five first-place 
finishes in individual competition. Normant 
opened the day with a 500-meter victory, 
and was mirrored by Fitzgerald in the 800- 
meter, sophomore Vernon Mickle in the 
1,000-meter, and junior Tony Beirne in the 
shot put. The 4 x 400 relay team nailed 
down the fifth gold. 



Track Daddies 




(top) Sophomore Gabe Verdaguer flops over the bar in the 

high jump. 

(above) Sophomore Jamal Burke exerts all his energy to the 

Tead in the 100-meter dash. 

(opposite) Freshman Byron Gartrell sets the pace in the first 

distance event of the URI Invite. 



Mickle provided the lone bright spot in a 
disappointing showing in the team's next 
event, the Dartmouth Invitational, by 
taking home the 800-meter win. The Eagles 
would have more luck a week later at the 
Husky Invitational, a day which saw the 
second-fastest 55-meter time in BC history 
(6.34) posted by football star Jonathon 
Ordway in the preliminaries, and a long- 
awaited win in the mile for Burdon. Ordway 
continued his efforts a week later at the 
Rhode Island Open, in which he finished 
second in the same event. Mark Johnson 
would do the same in the 400-meter, as 
well as Normant in the 500-, and Mickle in 
the 1,000-. 

Combining high school track stars, 
cross-country standouts, and athletes from 
other realms of the sporting world, the 
Eagles looked to finally make some noise 
in Big East track. 

By Tom Pelissero, '03 



Senior Justin Burdon, also a standout on the cross country team, 
won the mile event at the Husky Invite with a time of 4:17. 




0O5TO N 
COLLEGf 







Winning the preliminary 55-meter dash at the Husky Invite, 

Jonathan Ordway ran a 6.34, the second best 

time in Eagle history. 



All phtos by McGrath Studios 



Sports 243 




0OSTQH 
COLLEGE 







'/! 



At the Dartmouth relays, the women's team dominated the mile 

event, with junior co-captain Katie Ryan finishing first in a time of 

4:55 and sophomore Cate Guiney finishing second at 4:59. 





After the Eagles posted their best cross-coun- 
try numbers of all-time in the fall, hopes were 
high that many of the same girls would lead the 
track squad to equal glory. With obvious leader- 
ship coming from the winning-knowledge of the 
cross-country cross-overs, the team also looked 
to its veterans for motivation, as well as re- 
spected head coach Randy Thomas. Senior dis- 
tance runners Lisa Mclsaac and All-American 
Shannon Smith, junior distance runner Katie 
Ryan, and senior sprinter Kate Sullivan 
captained the Eagles through an up-and-down 
campaign that would show growth and frustra- 
tion. 

The team suffered a discouraging manhan- 
dling in its opening meet against Harvard, al- 
though the cross-country stars showed signs of 
continuing their dominance. Ryan won the 
3,000-meter race, followed close behind by Cate 
Guiney, whose sister, Maggie, was busy drafting 
behind Smith en route to their 1-2 finish in the 
mile. Junior Zoey O'Sullivan, sophomore Melissa 
Connell, Sullivan, and senior Kristyn O'Brien 
each posted a runner-up finish in their respective 
events. 

After more than a month off, the team 
regrouped for the Darthmouth Invitational, in 
which Shannon Smith took home the 3,000- 
meter gold in the fastest time of the year nation- 
ally (9:28.38). Maggie Guiney fired the third-best 
national time, taking second with a career-best 
9:34. A week later, at the Greater Boston Club 
Invitational, Smith would up the ante again, 
setting the best time in the NCAA Division I 
mile, with an amazing time of 4:41.98. In a non- 
scoring meet at Boston University's Terrier 
Classic, her All-American legend would only 
grow as she finished the 3,000-meter race with a 
BC record-shattering time of 9:20.31. Overshad- 
owed by Smith would be the individual perfor- 
mance of Maggie Guiney, who completed an- 
other strong meet with a victory in the 5,000- 
meter. 

Clearly Smith was the leader of the pack 
for much of the season, but the rest of the 
Eagles were not content to merely jump on her 
back for the ride. The Eagles continued to im- 
prove as a cohesive unit through the end of the 
season, and looked to the Big East Champion- 
ships to prove that they were more than just a 
bunch of cross-country castoffs; they were also 
a solid track-and-field squad. 

By Tom Pelissero, '03 




Gold 
Mile 




(opposite) Sophomore long jumper Christina 
Regan soars at the Rhode Island Invitational. 

(top) The 4x400 relay team makes yet 

another clean pass of the baton. 

(above) Senior captain Kate Sullivan hurdles 

the competition in a late-season meet. 



On January 29, ail-American junior Shannon Smith raced to a 

second place finish in the 3,000 meter at the Terrier Classic, 

setting a new school record of 9:20.31 



T 



(right) The men's and 
women's teams gather 
around Head Coach Sydney 
Fadner before a meet. 



(below) A member of the 
BC Women's fencing team 
with her Duke opponent. 




McGrath Studios 



Won't Get Foiled Again 



The Boston College Fencing teams had another 
successful year of competition. The men's season 
began promisingly with the team's first-ever defeat 
Brandeis in a dual meet on December 2nd. The 
women's team started the year shorthanded, with 
two of its top fencers studying abroad, but the 
efforts of their teammates help compensate for 
the loss. In the first meet of the year at Smith 
College, four women placed in the top five in their 
respective events, with Michelle Guevera placing 
first in the foil competition. Other top five finishes 
at that tournament were epeeists Regina Lennox 
and Kate Boyle, and in the sabre competition, 
Meagan Kenny. Four BC underclassman fencers 
qualified to compete in the Under 20 Olympic 
Championships. Sophomores Kate Boyle and Dave 
Moyston and freshmen Paul Taylor and Jessica 
Peakes all looked qualified for the meet, and 
Peakes attended and competed in the prestigious 
event in Salt Lake City in February, finishing 42nd. 
The men's and women's teams both finished the 
season with a florish at the Northeastern Champi- 
onships; the men went undefeated in five matches, 
while the women went 5-1, dropping only a narrow 
match to Tufts. With continued improvement by 
the teams' four nationally-recognized fencers as 
well as the rest of the sizable squad, the team will 
continue to make itself known on the national 
intercollegiate fencing scene. 

By Chad Elder, '04 




McGrath Studk 



Fencing Eagles Kate Boyle, Paul Taylor, Dave Moyston, and Jessica 
Peakes were selected to participate in the Junior National Olympics. 




(above) Senior epeeist 
Zakee Howard scores a 
point on his opponent. 

(left) A female BC fencer 
gets low to attack her 
opponent. 



McGrath Studios 



On November 4, the men's and women's fencing teams 

boasted 11 top-10 finishes at the New England Invitational, 

with senior Michelle Guevera taking first-place overall. 




Turning Two 



Coach Peter Hughes was encouraged by 
his team's steady progress in his first two 
years as coach, and hoped it would im- 
prove upon its 9-12 Big East record of a 
year ago in 2001. The Eagles came out 
swinging under the leadership of senior 
captain Mike Hubbard, a standout at 
shortstop who had batted .263 with 25 
RBIs in his junior season. The squad also 
returned eight other seniors, most nota- 
bly power-hitting catcher Chris Rosado, 
RBI leader Joe Kealty, and right-handed 
starter Erik Olson. With the continued 
progress of the underclassmen and a solid 
recruiting class, the Eagles looked to 
overcome their opening four-game losing 
streak to make an impact during the Big 
East schedule. 

By Tom Pelissero, '03 



Chris Bowers 



Junior C Jeff Mackor hoped to lead to the Eagles in the 2001 season. 



Cradling High 
Aspirations 

The 2001 men's lacrosse team was well- 
aware that it would be the last for BC on 
the varsity level thanks to Title IX; what 
they didn't know was whether or not they 
would continue last year's disappointing 
string, or leave a legacy for the program. 
A fine crop of seniors had left the program 
after the 2000 season, leaving holes in 
many key positions, namely in goal, where 
junior James Kambaray would be asked to 
take over for four-year starter Tom 
Gallagher. Attackers Michael Adair and 
Andy Koch, middies Cort Duda, James 
Garth, Nick Hayman, and Tom Smith, and 
defensemen Dan Doucette and Brendan 
Sullivan would also figure into the plans as 
senior leaders. Despite its lack of a con- 
ference or an assured future, BC men's 
lacrosse looked to put its best foot for- 
ward and leave a good memory in the 
minds of Eagles lax fans. 

By Tom Pelissero, '03 




The Men's Lacrosse team finished their year with strong play from a bevy of 

seniors. 



248 Sports 




Bases Juiced 



Academic All-American Summer Jarratt and key 
comeback player Jennifer Perrota led the young 
softball Eagles onto the field in 2001. Sixth-year 
coach Jennifer Finley hoped that her only two 
seniors would help their inexperienced teammates 
to climb back to the top of the Big East Confer- 
ence. Some of the underclassmen, including sopho- 
mores outfielder Jennifer Asbury, shortstop Cara 
Blumfield, and First Team All-Big East/ Big East 
Rookie of the Year pitcher Kimberly Ryan, all had 
shown how much they could do on the field in their 
freshman season, and would be asked to assume 
even larger roles in the team's success. With only 
Jarratt and Perrota graduating, the Eagles appeared 
poised for several seasons of future success. 

By Tom Pelissero, '03 



Sports Information 

Senior C Summer Jarratt swung for the fences in 2001. 



Rocket Shot 

Women's lacrosse was one sport that 
did not need to search too hard to find 
its stars. The Preseason All-Big East 
First Team included two Eagles who had 
already proven themselves to be both 
talented individuals and team players, 
senior attacker Emily Ryan and junior 
attacker Lauren Miller. Head Coach 
Shari Krasnoo had her team in the 
Alumni bubble throughout the latter 
half of winter, determined to make 
them into winners this season. Along 
with Ryan and Miller, Krasnoo would 
look to three-year letter winners Honor 
Crowther and Kelly Boyle to pick up the 
slack for the team's inexperience be- 
tween the pipes, a position given out of 
necessity to freshman Rachel Zeller. 
Despite the problems generated by this 
lack of familiarity on the defensive side, 
Krasnoo seemed confident that the 
Eagles would turn it around in 2001. 

By Tom Pelissero, '03 




Kyelim Rhee 



Junior attacker Lauren Miller was a key leader for the Women's Lacrosse team. 



Sports 249 













tr 



Seniors 

The Class of 2001 has been 

well prepared to look 

beyond their front door. 

The experiences lived 

during their time here 

such as the fencing in of 

the mods, the switch of 

the OCF to the SLSC and 

redecorating of the 
McElroy dining hall have 

made them ready to 
embark on one of the most 
important ventures of 
their lives - graduation. 
They are anxious to look 
beyond the gates of B.C., 
to learn about life in the 
"real world," and to be- 
come the leaders they 
were meant to be. 



Editors 

Lesley Johnston 

Amanda Orlando 



2001 



Have you ever reused a plate because you didn't think it 



252 Seniors 



needed washing? Did you ever wish that Upper Campus had an elevator? 




Seniors 253 




254 Seniors 




Seniors 255 



Perspectives 




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256 Seniors 



Jennifer SayanJar 

Jennifer Sayanlar views her greatest accomplishment as the journey and the 
hardships that she overcame to get to the point she is at now. And the accomplish 
ments that she has done are certainly something of which to be proud. Origionally 
from New Jersey, Jennifer came to BC and immediately involved herself in activities. 
She is a member of the Mendel Society, a peer advising program, the Orthodox 
Christian Fellowship, as well as the Middle Eastern Club. Jennifer volunteers for the 
student admissions programs, is a pre-med advisor, and she volunteers a large portion 
of her time at the Boston Children's Hospital. She feels most rewarding activity that 
she is involved in however, is 4Boston. This activity involved going each week to 
Genesis 2, which aids single parents. 

In addition to her involvment in multiple activities, this Chemistry/Pre-med majc 
had been recognized for her academic excellence. She has been awarded Dean's List, 
and invited into the Golden Key National Honor Society. Additional, she was 
awarded two educational scholarships from the Syrian Orthodox Church as well as 
the 

Sirazi Scholarship for Academic Excellence. Aside from everything that she learned 
from extracurricular activities and classes, Jennifer feels that what she learned most 
from BC was about herself. Coming from a small town in New Jersey with only 50 
girls in her graduating class, she was exposed to a large amount of diversity and new 
relationships. Additionally," Jennifer is not Catholic, so in coming to a Jesuit school sh 
learned a lot about her religion and spirituality. For the year after school, Jennifer has 
applied to medical school, as well as looked into jobs in healthcare. Jenniferis long- 
term goal, however, is to go to medical school, finish her residency, and get a job in 
the field of pediatrics. 



Meghan Reynolds 



The first tiling that stands out about Mcg.m Reynolds i-< hei smile and 
charming personality. An amazingly outgoing person, Megan has spent 
ler time here at Boston College enriching herself not only 
cademically, hut also personally. Boston College is the only school tli.it 
vlcgan ever wanted to attend, ami she has enjoyed her time here in the 
idlest. Meghan, a psychology and I're-med major, runs Project 2000, a 
nentor program for 4th and 5th graders from Dorchester, with two other 
tudents. She is also an Appalachian Volunteer, and went on the 
juemavaka Summer Emersion trip. The most rewarding activity for 
Meghan was when she was a R.A. for the freshman in Kcyes. For her, this 
vas extremely challanging and pushed all her talents to the limit. And as she 
nentioned, "it is so nice to be able to enjoy the satisfaction of something 
hat you had to work so hard for". 

Meghan has also achieved an abundant amount of awards 
or her achievments. She was a Sohpomore Scholar, Dean's Scholar, and a 
nember of the Order of the Cross and Crown, the oldest honor society 
t Boston College. Aside from her academic excellence and the 
ctivities in which she is involved, Megan also finds time to be a 
)art-time caretaker for four children and be an Undergraduate Neuroscience 
Research Fellow in the laboratory of Dr. Michael Numan, to prepare 
or writing her Senior Thesis. Megan feels that the most important 
esson that she learned at Boston College came from her friendships, 
ihe comments, "Many people have a hard time recognizing 
heir gifts, and it is really important to recognize your own gift, 
mt in a humble way. And in recognizing your gift, that is how you 
;ive yourself to others and that is what is important in life". 




"Character is who you are when you think no one is watching" 




•*■ »"- 



__ 



!■■■! 



^B 



Ryan Travia 



Ryan Travia is one senior who truly exemplifies the motto "Ever to 
Excel". Ryan loves working with people, and that is resembled by his 
focus of activities here at Boston College. Ryan was a R.A. on Newton, a 
member of the Student Judiciary Board, and UCADA. Ryan was also 
the first male at Boston College to be a Sexual Assualt Network 
Advocate, and he paved the path for others to follow his lead. 
For Ryan, his involvement in the Peer Educational Network was the 
most rewarding experience that he had here at Boston College. Ryan 
helped coordintate the HAPPEN and the HIV/AIDS prevention programs 
after his first semester, and since the second semester of his 
sophomore year, he has been the student co-ordinator. This activity 
has been the biggest influence in his decision to be an R.A. and as well 
as to help decide what he would like to do as a career. 

Ryan has also recieved awards for his achievments at Boston 
College. From ODSD, Ryan recieved an award as an R.A, for excellence 
in programming, and was invited to be a member of the St. Louis Bacchus 
and Gamma, the largest Peer Education Network in the world. 

Ryan is in the School of Education and is majoring in 
Elementary Education. When he finishes Boston College, he plans to go 
on to graduate school for Education Administration. He would love to 
be the Dean of Students (perhaps even here at Boston College) or a 
teacher. Boston College has taught Ryan to be more 
open-minded, and respect the differences that people have. He 
explains that many joke that eveyone at Boston College is the same, 
but he says, "there is a great diversity here- many different races, 
cultures, economies, and sexual orientations- and my interaction with 
people here has taught me to pay attention to detail, to pay 
attention to needs and feelings of others". 



Seniors 257 




Chris Hamblin 



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When Chris Hamblin was living in Bristol, England he never dreamed 
that one day he would be looking back on four years at an American 
university. However, as is often the way, chance stepped in and before he 
realized it, he had committed to a soccer scholariship at Boston College. 
He finds that his four years here have been instrumental in helping him 
develop from a person who was happy to simply accept the world he lived 
in to a person with broader horizons and new perspectives on life. He is 
proud that he was able to come here and embrace academic pursuits as 
well as athletic. Chris's academic achievements are many. He has made 
the BC Dean's List numerous semesters, was a member of the National 
Dean's List, a Student All-American in Soccer, and was a Big East 
Academic Allstar. His athletic achievements include being a member of 
the Big East Champion Men's Soccer Team, a Big East Goalkeeper of the 
Year, and being a part of the Big East All Conference Team. Chris has 
also been an Orientation leader and is part of the Student Athlete 
Advisory Board of Directors. 

As a Human Development/Communications major, Chris would son* 
day like to be in the sales or advertising management field. In the immedi 
ate future, he hopes to play professional soccer and sees being a soccer 
coach in England as part of his future. 

Whatever his future may be, Chris counts on his personal strengths of 
being a fun-lovin, peopleg person to help him in life. He thanks his 
roommates for helping to make the four years at BC the best time of his 
life. Chris says that he lives by a saying coined by Paul Burke, "The more 
you know, the more you realize you don't know." 



Lacy O'Tbole 



Lacy O'Toole, who hails from Timonium, Maryland, had never visited 
Boston College before she decided to come here. However, she says that all 
along she knew it was the school for her. She found BC attractive because of 
its high Jesuit ideals and its strong academics. 

Lacy has found that BC is a place where everyone can make the most of 
who they are by finding their place here. Of all the activities which she has 
done, Lacy found her place in being a part of The Heights, eventually 
becoming the News Editor. She has found working on the newspaper 
rewarding because it is putting out a product which works to make others 
more knowledgeable about the world in which they live. In addition, she 
responded to the teamwork which made up the staff and the friends she has 
made there. Lacy feels that being a part of The Heights has helped her to 
leave a little bit of herself with BC after she leaves, and she is grateful for 
that. Lacy's other activities have included being a Tour Guide and Greeter, a 
leader of the Sophomore-Junior Retreat, a tutor for Kids on Campus, and a 
member of the Mary Kaye Waldron Award Committee. 

Lacy feels that her strengths include her organization and ability to 
communicate well with people. She states that her failures lie in her 
inability to delegate and to take on too much so that she becomes over- 
worked. However, she counts as her greatest accomplishment the ability to 
always be true to herself and being a good friend and daughter. 

As a Marketing/Communications major, Lacy hopes to someday be 
involved in writing, perhaps with a magazine someday. Looking far into the 
future, she aspires to being a writer/journalist, perhaps writing biographies. 
Lacy feels that her years at BC have taught her to learn from others and to 
share herself with them in return. She uses as a guideline the motto that "If 
you don't take a chance, you'll never know what you can accomplish." 



258 Seniors 





,. ...mumum 



Ryan Heller 



Originally from Chicago, Ryan Heller chose Boston College because 
he wanted to be closi to a big city. However, he has derived much more 
from his years here. I le has learned to keep questioning things and that 
frustration breeds creativity, and thus, he never lets roadblocks stop him 
from trying. 

This mentality is helpful in his involvement as program manager of 
O'Conncll House, where he is in charge of organizing performances and 
activities, and constantly publicizing these events. He has found program- 
ming to be the most rewarding becasue he enjoys watching programs 
from start to finish, coming to completion. It also allows him to show 
others what is important or interesting to him. Ryan wishes to always 
encourage people to operate outside of their comfort zones and to try 
something new, a belief he himself lives by. Ryan is also involved with 
writing features and reviews for The Heights and Crossroads, and is the 
guitarist for the band Aberdeen. 

Ryan's accomplishments include being a Dean's Scholar, a Sophomore 
Scholar, and doing a recording with his band. He counts as his greatest 
accomplishment getting through four years of college and being able to 
pursue his interests. As a Sociology/Film Minor, Ryan seems his immedi- 
ate future as exploring his interests of filmmaking and music, and in the 
long run to work in the arts in some capacity. Ryan lives by the personal 
motto that success comes from achieving something in regards to your 
passion, so, he says, "Follow your passion." 



Ari Shapiro 

Originally from South Euclid, Ohio, Ari Shapiro decided to attend Boston 
College for a number of reasons. He was attracted to the Boston College 
:ommunity, the proximity to Boston and the university's positive energy. Ari is a 
jiology major and a mathematics minor. 

Ari's extracurricular activities are quite impressive. During his freshman and 
iophomore years, Ari directed a senior citizen acting group . The USA Today 
■ecognized this involvement by naming him a member of their All-USA Academic 
Second Team in 1999. Over spring break 2000, Ari traveled to Mountain Lake, 
Virginia to assist with environmental conservation through trail repair, grounds 
mprovement and newsletter design. This year, Ari continues to volunteer four 
lours each week at Haley House as part of a community service program called "4 
"oston." 

Of all his activities, Ari's primary involvement is with Hillel, the Foundation for 
[ewish Campus Life. He is serving his third year as president of Boston College 
Hillel and his second year as one often students on the International Hillel Board of 
Directors. He finds his work with Hillel the most rewarding of all his activities. "It 
is a joy to create Jewish life on campus as invested in spirituality and self-exploration 
it BC. The Jewish community at BC has been one of my greatest sources of strength 
tnd encouragement." 

Ari has received numerous awards and honors including Presidential Scholarship 
it Boston College, Rhodes State Finalist, Order of Cross and Crown, Phi Beta 
Kappa, Alpha Sigma Nu, Golden Key National Honor Society, National Society of 
Collegiate Scholars, Dean's Scholar, Brian Hall Leadership Award, Robert Byrd 
Leadership Scholarship, Bausch and Lomb Science Award. 

According to Ari, his personal strengths include working hard, dedication, 
passion, optimism, generosity and kindness. He feels his greatest accomplishment 
Iwas discovering an unknown passion for the study of animal behavior and cognition 
while working at a research program at the Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution. 

After graduation, Ari plans to take a year off to travel and do field work before 
pursuing a Ph.D. in animal behavior and cognition. He hopes to complete his Ph.D. 
in animal behavior and integrate environmental policy and education reforms into 
his career as a professor of biology. 




Ari's experiences at Boston College have helped him develop a better under- 
standing of his academic interests in biology and his attraction to Judaism. "I have 
learned how important it is to appreciate the present while simultaneously reflecting 
on what has been and considering with enthusiasm what has yet to come." 

Seniors 259 



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When Espen Skaug was living in Oslo, Norway, he knew that he did noi 
have a chance to play sports and get an education. Thus, when the chance 
to come to BC and play soccer arrived, he jumped at the opportunity. After 
four years here, Espen has learned about different cultures through his 
roommates and friends and finds that people are interested in getting to 
know him because he is from a different culture. He is thankful that he had 
the opportunity to come here and have this experience. 

As a midfield player on the Big East Champion Men's Soccer Team, 
Espen has had the opportunity to travel and meet alot of people. He is 
excited to find that in America the popularity of soccer is growing. As well 
as being part of the championship team, Espen has also been on the Dean's 
List. 

Espen counts as his strenghths his ability not to judge people before he 
gets to know them and holds as one of his personal mottos, "Treat others as 
you would want to be treated." Espen states that his greatest accomplish- 
ment was coming to the United States and embracing this new and 
unfamiliar place. 

As a General Management/Finance/Info. Systems triple major, he hopes 
to stay in the U.S. for a fe.w years and find a job in computer research/ 
engineering. He sees himself traveling between both countries. He says 
that he will miss his roommates and the friends he's made here at BC and 
hopes that the soccer team will do as well in the future. Espen offers this 
piece of advice to athletes and students, "If you fail to prepare, then prepare 
to fail." 



Maria Maratoli 



Originally from New Haven, Connecticut, Maria Maratoli felt a pull 
towards Boston College because of its strong Catholic element. She felt 
comfortable here after spending twelve years in Catholix school and says she 
still feels that strong connection. 

Of all of Maria's activities, the one she feels is most rewarding is being 
part of the Peer Education Network. She joined PEN because she wasn't 
happy freshman year and felt that she should help freshmen overcome the 
feelings of confusion so often experienced in the first year of college. As part 
of the leadership group and Healthy Eating and Living, Maria helps to 
provide a forum for those with eating issues and disorders, and she is also an 
advocate on the Sexual Assault Network. Maria' accomplishments include 
being on the Dean's List, the Psychology National Honor Society, Golden 
Key National Honor Society, and receiving a Leadership Achievement 
Certificate from ODSD. However, Maria cites her greatest accomplishment 
as making through four years at BC, learning about her friends and trying to 
take a step back from the rush of life to appreciate her time here. 

Maria states as some of her strenghts the ability to be a good listener, 
having a good sense of humor, and being sensitive and perceptive to people. 
These strenghts will help her next year as she enters the graduate program in 
Social Work and in her future as she hopes to be working in social work, 
perhaps at a college health clinic and doing programming to help those with 
eating disorders. 

Maria states that she has learned most from BC that you can do anything 
if you can trust others to help you. She thanks all her friends and roommates 
for being there for her. She says that she is honored to be a part of the Class 
of 2001. 

260 Seniors 




a£ 



Samantha Buchan 



< Originally from Hershey, PA, Sam decided to come- to Boston < ollege 

after she visited and felt the special spirit which pervades the campus. She 
describes that day as a gorgeous fall day when she spent time looking at the 
quad filled with students talking and laughing and decided that this is where 
she wanted to spend her four ycras. Looking back on her time here. Sam 
says that she has learned the effect that other people and experiences have 
had on her and that she will never stop growing or learning. 

Sam's many activities include being the Director of Faculty and Student 
relations of UGBC, being part of Learning to Serve, a member of the Pulse 
Council, leading El Salvador trips, MLP, Appalachia Volunteers and 
4Boston volunteer. However, Sam says that being part of UGBC has been 
the most rewarding because of the people that she's met and the friendships 
she's made. She has felt able to shape some of the life at BC and to improve 
things. Most of all, it has given her the opportunity to give to the BC 
community. 

Sam's accomplishments include being on the Dean's List, a Sophomore 
Scholar, and a Junior Dean's Scholar. She cites as her greatest accomplish- 
ment bringing together all of her interests at BC and learning to understand 
herself and the world. This understanding will help her in her International 
Studies major and her hope to work in a service field in the future. 

Sam says that she understands the responsibility which comes with 
having a BC education and experience and hopes to help others. Her 
personal motto which she lives by is, "Living every day to the fullest." 



Alvin Burnett 



When Alvin applied to BC from his home on Long Island, it was one of 
32 schools to which he did. He decided to come to BC when his high school 
friend convinced him to come and says that after the first month, BC had 
become his home. Alvin syas that the BC student population is different 
from all other campuses, and that it is the perfect institution for him. 

Alvin's many activities include being part of the Black Student Forum, 
Ahana Leadership Council, Student Admissions Program, Cape Verde 
Student Association, Orientation leader, and Vice President and President of 
the UGBC. He says that being part of UGBC has been the most rewarding 
of all his activities because he has been able to make a difference as well as 
meet so many of his classmates through the election process. Alvin has 
received the Martin Luther King Scholarship, an award which he is honored 
to have because of its name as well as the people he has met through it. 
jHowever, he cites his greatest accomplishment as being the friendships he 
Jhas formed at BC and the special experiences he has shared with his cote 
group of friends. 

As a Psychology major, Alvin plans to attend law school and get into 
corporate law. In the long run, he hopes to be involved in the entertainment 
field, where only one in twenty-five lawyers is a minority. He says that he 
hopes to never put limitations on himself and states that his father's words 
area always with him, "Reach for the starts, or at least touch the sky." Alvin 
says that his best memories have been with"my boys in the O.N." 




Seniors 261 



2001 



Have you ever walked to the Fenway T stop to avoid paying at Kenmore? Did you 




262 Seniors 



fear falling down the O'Neill stairs? Have you ever been to the Ml Ar I he Science Museum.' The Aquarium? 




Seniors 263 




264 Seniors 




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Seniors 265 





Edwin A. Abrahamsen 

Arts & Sciences 

Political Science 

Economics 



Jasmine M. Acevedo 

Arts & Sciences 
Psychology 



Kathryn M. Ackerman 

School of Management 
Finance 



Amy L. Abate 

Arts & Sciences 
Economics 



Emily A. Abbott 

School of Management 
Marketing 




Timothy J. Abernethy 

School of Management 
Finance 



Jillian Ablondi 

Arts & Sciences 
Communications 




Michael J. Adair 

Arts & Sciences 
History 



Alyson L. Adams 

School of Education 
Human Development 




Jennifer Adams 

Arts & Sciences 
History 



Robert B. Adams 

School of Management 
Finance 



Karen Adams 

Arts & Sciences 
Political Science 



Michael A. Agliata 

Arts & Sciences 
Economics 



Mindy Aguirre 

Arts & Sciences 
English 



266 Seniors 



Nicholas J. Ahearn 

Arts & Sciences 
History 



Samuel H. Aim 

Arts & Sciences 
Computer Science 



Meredith R. Ahr 

Arts & Sciences 
English 



Maria Aiello 

Arts & Sciences 
Mathematics 



Joy Ainsworth 

School of Mangement 

Accounting 




Denise Ajewski 


Glizhelle T. Alarkon 


John Alati 


Tunku M. Alauddin 


Marimar AlberU 


School of Nursing 


Arts & Sciences 


Arts & Sciences 


School of Management 


Arts & Sciences 


Nursing 


Psychology 


Communications 


Marketing 


English 




Melissa A. Alcantara 

Arts & Sciences 

Communications 

English 



Steven Alcauskas 

School of Management 
Finance 
History 



Natalie S. Alderete 

School of Management 
Marketing 



Kathleen Aleardi 

Arts & Sciences 
Psychology 



Judy L. Alexander 

School of Education 

Elem./Mod. Spec. Needs 

Elementary Ed. 




Katie Alexis 


Erica M. Allen 


Robert P. Allen 


Michael A. Allegretti 


Adrienne Allen 


jrts & Sciences 


School of Management 


School of Management 


Arts & Sciences 


Arts & Sciences 


Psychology 


Accounting 


Marketing 


History 


Sociology 



Seniors 267 



Meredith A. Almquist 

Arts & Sciences 
Communications 



Alena C. Altmayer 

Arts & Sciences 
English 



Sandra M. Alves 

School of Management 

Marketing 

Communications 



John P. Amara 

Arts & Sciences 
Chemistry 



Jason Amentas 

Arts & Sciences 
History 




Sarah R. Ames 

Arts & Sciences 
Sociology 



Jill M. Amitrani 

School of Education 
Human Development 



Christopher Amore 

School of Management 
Information Systems 



Jacquelyn M. Anadore 

School of Education 

Elem. Education 
Math/Comp. Science 



Brian D. Anderson 

Arts & Sciences 
Communications 



David Anderson 

School of Management 
Accounting 



Kaitlin M. Anderson 

Arts & Sciences 
Psychology 



Katherine M. Anderson 

Arts & Sciences 
French 



Jill Andersen 

Arts & Sciences 

English 
Communications 




Lisa R. Anderson 

Arts & Sciences 
Biology 




Nicholas O. Anderson 

Arts & Sciences 
Economics 



Thomas J. Anderson 

Arts & Sciences 
English 



Jessica L. Andreoni 

Arts & Sciences 
Economics 



Kerry Andrews 

Arts & Sciences 
Sociology 



Anastasios Andronikidis 

Arts & Sciences 
Computer Science 



268 Seniors 



Tulin l\. Apruhamian 

School of Management 
Accounting 



Nicole Aronzon 

Arts & Sciences 
Economics 



Nicole M. Arena 

School of Management 

Marketing 

Communications 



Katherine A. Ariemma 

School of Education 

Elem./Mod. Spec. Needs 

Elementary Ed. 



Jeffrey Armstrong 

Arts & Sciences 
English 



Lauren AronofT 

School dI Management 

Marketing 




Julia C. Arrotti 

Arts & Sciences 
English 



Allyson C. Augusta 

Arts & Sciences 
Sociology 



Daryl N. Auguste 

School of Management 
Finance 



Rachel F. Augustine 

Arts & Sciences 
Communications 




Lorilee A. Auriemma 

Arts & Sciences 
Communications 



Karim M. Awad 

Arts & Sciences 
English 



Christie J. Avraamides 

Arts & Sciences 
Biology 




Ryan C. Aylward 

Arts & Sciences 
Psychology 
Philosophy 




Seniors 269 




Timothy J. Baier 

Arts & Sciences 
Political Science 



Jonathan Baker 

Arts & Sciences 

Sociology 
Political Science 



Jessica Bailey 

Arts & Sciences 
History 



Cheryl L. Bain 

School of Management 

General Mgmt 

Marketing 




Eralda Azizaj 

Arts & Sciences 
International Studies 



Tengka Azlan 

School of Management 
Human Resources Mgmt 




Natalia E. Azuero 

Arts & Sciences 
Political Science 



Renata D. Bacellar 

Arts & Sciences 

English 
Communications 




Mary R. Bain 

School of Management 
Marketing 



Victoria R. Bain 

School of Nursing 
Nursing 




Revathi Balkrishnan 

Arts & Sciences 

Psychology 

Biology 



Jessye M. Ball 

Arts & Sciences 

Political Science 

Economics 



Sam J. Ballweg 

School of Management 
Human Resources Mgmt. 



Erik A. Balunis 

School of Management 

Finance 

Economics 



270 Seniors 



Christine A. Balzano 
School of Education 

Elem./Mod. Spec. Needs 
Philosophy 



K riii n Bansfield 

Arts & Sciences 
Social Sciences 



Jennifer J. Barbosa 

Arts & Sciences 
Psychology 



Brooke A. Barker 

School of Education 

Elementary Ed. 
Human Development 



Jeffrey A. Barlekamp 

Arts & Sciences 
History 



Kenneth F. Barnard 

School of Management 
Finance 



Crista Barnes 

Arts & Sciences 
Art History 



Alvin R. Barnett 

Arts & Sciences 
Psychology 



Ceorjje \\ . Barker 

Arts & Sciences 
Economics 




Kristy Barrell 

Arts & Sciences 
Philosophy 




Julie K. Barrera 

School of Management 
Marketing 



Jason Barreto 

Arts & Sciences 
Biology 



Thomas J.Barrett 

Arts & Sciences 
English 



Beatriz Barros 

Arts & Sciences 
English 



Keila S. Barros 

Arts & Sciences 
Communications 




Kate Barry 

School of Education 

Elementary Ed. 
Human Development 



Matthew H. Barth 

Arts & Sciences 
Philosophy 



Kenneth A. Barton 

Arts & Sciences 

Philosophy 

English 



Nicole A. Basabe 

School of Management 

Marketing 
Op. & Strategic Mgmt 



Henry Baskerville 

Arts & Sciences 
Philosophy 



Seniors 271 



Have you ever gone to class in your pajama pants? Did you 




272 Seniors 





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ever run the Boston Marathon? Did you ever watch the Boston Marathon: 




Seniors 273 









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274 Seniors 




Seniors 275 




Andrew J. Baxter 

School of Management 

Marketing 

Finance 



Chrystie A. Baydala 

School of Education 

Elem./Mod. Spec. Needs 

Child in Society 



Carolyn M. Bayley 

School of Management 
Accounting 




Ryan Bass 

School of Management 

General Mgmt 

Mgmt. Info Systems 



Suzanne Bates 

School of Management 

Finance 

Marketing 




Vanessa Battista 

Arts & Sciences 
Philosophy 



Kayleen Baur 

Arts & Sciences 
Communications 




Michael Bazdarich 

Arts & Sciences 
History 



Allison B. Beardsley 

Arts & Sciences 
Hispanic Studies 




Heather N. Beardsley 

Arts & Sciences 
Political Science 

Theater Arts 



Kristina A. Beattie 

Arts & Sciences 
Sociology 



Christopher Beattys 

School of Management 

Marketing 

Finance 



Susan C. Becka 

Arts & Sciences 
Economics 



Kristen L. Bedford 

Arts & Sciences 
Communications 



276 Seniors 




Matthew G. Begley 

.School of Management 
Accounting 



Ryan Benner 

Arts & Sciences 
Economics 



1 



Danielle .1. Hehonick 

Arts & Sciences 
Biology 



Marta B. Beier 

School of Education 
Human Development 



Monica Bellapravalu 

Arts & Sciences 

Sociology 
Communications 



Eric Bennett 

Arts & Sciences 
Biochemistry 



David L. Berger 

Arts & Sciences 
Biology 



Meredith Berkel 

Arts & Sciences 
Communications 



Matthew B. Benfer 

School of Management 

Finance 

Mgmt. Into Systems 




Sharla E. Berry 

School of Management 
Marketing 




Melissa M. Betts 

School of Management 
Finance 



Katrina L. Bichler 

School of Nursing 
Nursing 



Michael R. Billeri 

School of Management 

Finance 

Accounting 



Debbie Binikos 

School of Management 
Accounting 



Sandra M. Birkeland 

School of Management 
Accounting 



Adam M. Birnbaum 

Arts & Sciences 
Computer Science 



Jill T. Bisognano 

School of Education 

Elementary Ed. 

French 



Jeremy D. Bixenman 

School of Management 

Finance 
Mgmt. Info Systems 



James P. Binkoski 

Arts & Sciences 

Mathematics 

Philosophy 




Marsia Bixenman 

Arts & Sciences 
Psychology 



Seniors 277 



Ryan Blackmail 

Arts & Sciences 

Biology 

Philosophy 



William C. Blackmer 

Arts & Sciences 
Communications 



Meleana H. Blaich 

School of Education 
Human Development 



Charles A. Blake 

Arts & Sciences 
History 



Margaret M. Blake 

Arts & Sciences 
Communications 




Daniel Blakesley 

Arts & Sciences 
English 



Amy R. Bogosian 

School of Nursing 
Nursing 



Katherine A. Blanco 

School of Education 

Elementary Ed. 

English 



Cathleen Blaston 

Arts & Sciences 
Sociology 



Nicholas T. Blevins 

School of Management 
Marketing 



Kathy J. Blum 

Arts & Sciences 
Communications 




Tara Bohannan 

Arts & Sciences 
Communications 



Paul J. Boisi 

Arts & Sciences 
Economics 



Michael J. Boland 

Arts & Sciences 
English 



Carina K. Boling 

Arts & Sciences 
Communications 




Diana K. Boiling 

Arts & Sciences 
French 



Thomas Bolton 

School of Management 

Op. & Strategic Mgmt 

Mgmt. Info Systems 



Marc L. Bonaguide 

Arts & Sciences 
Sociology 



Joey Bonano 

Arts & Sciences 
Economics 



Stacey Bookman 

School of Management 
Finance 



278 Seniors 



Jeffery S. Boorjian 

Ails & Sciences 
Communications 



Lori A. Bourassa 

Arts & Sciences 
Biology 



Erin M. Boyle 

Arts & Sciences 
History 



Travis Borden 

School of Management 

Finance/ Info. Systems 

Philosophy 



Tara Borlawsky 

Arts & Sciences 
Mathematics 



Simon Borucki 

Arts & Sciences 
Biology 



Christine E. Bouvet 

Arts & Sciences 
International Studies 




Jessica M. Bradbury 

Arts & Sciences 
Communications 




Michael Bradbury 

Arts & Sciences 
English 



Morgan L. Brady 

School of Education 
Human Development 



Ryan M. Bowen 

Arts & Sciences 
Biology 



Kevin M. Boyd 

Arts & Sciences 
Economics 



Stacej \. Boughrum 
Arts & Sciences 

Studio Art 
English 




Mary E. Boylan 

School of Education 

Elem./Mod. Spec. Needs 

Human Development 




Seniors 279 





Timothy P. Brady 

Arts & Sciences 
Economics 



Kristin M. Brandt 

Arts & Sciences 
Hispanic Studies 




Matthew C. Branning 

School of Management 

Marketing 

Finance 



Jonathan Brauman 

Arts & Sciences 
Economics 




Kathryn J. Brennan 

School of Management 

Marketing 

Theater Arts 



Kevin F. Bresnahan 

School of Management 

Marketing 

History 



Erin L. Briere 

School of Nursing 
Nursing 



Lindsey C. Brink 

School of Management 
Marketing 



Lisa J. Brittain 

Arts & Sciences 
Psychology 




Michele E. Brockmyre 

School of Education 

Elem./Mod. Spec. Needs 

Human Development 



John P. Broderick 

School of Management 

Finance 

Marketing 



Patricia Brodie 

School of Management 
Marketing 



Nancy C. Brotherton 

School of Management 
Marketing 



Darius Brown 

Arts & Sciences 
Political Science 



280 Seniors 



i 




Jacqueline R. Brown 

Arts & Sciences 
Psychology 



Katherine Brown 

Aits & Sciences 
Theater Arts 



Meghan J. Broz 

Arts & Sciences 
Mathematics 



Nicholas Brumleve 
School of Management 

Finance 
Op. & Strategic Mgmt 



Daniel I). Brunei 

Arts & Sciences 

Theater Arts 

I ilin Studies 




Migdalia I. Bruno 

Arts & Sciences 
Political Science 
Communications 



Jon A. Brunzell 

School of Management 
Marketing 



Samantha L. Buchan 

Arts & Sciences 
International Studies 



Jennifer Buckley 

Arts & Sciences 
Communications 



Justin P. Buckle) 

Arts & Sciences 
Biology 




Scott T. Buckley 

Arts & Sciences 
Political Science 
Communications 



Jennifer Bunt 

School of Education 

Elem./Mod. Spec. Needs 

Human Development 



Melissa Buntin 

Arts & Sciences 
Studio Art 



Darren J. Buonocore 

Arts & Sciences 
Chemistry 



Carolyn S. Burbach 

Arts & Sciences 
Psychology 




Justin P. Burdon 

School of Management 
Accounting 



Abby M. Burgoyne 

Arts & Sciences 
Music 



Meghan B. Burk 

Arts & Sciences 
Sociology 



Aimee M. Burke 

School of Education 
Human Development 



Kathryn A. Burke 

School of Management 
Marketing 



Seniors 



281 



2001 



Have you ever played flipcup on table that 




282 Seniors 



was balancing on two chairs?. ..Have you ever road-tripped to an away gamer' 




Seniors 283 




284 Seniors 




Seniors 285 




Rebecca Burville 

School of Management 

Finance 

Mgmt. Info Systems 



Megan E. Byrnett 

Arts & Sciences 
Political Science 



Nicole Butler 

School of Nursing 
Nursing 



Rachel A. Byars 

School of Management 
Accounting 



Lise Byrne 

Arts & Sciences 
Communications 



Kimberly Byrnes 

School of Education 

Elem./Int. Spec. Needs 

Math/Comp. Science 




Rhoumela Cabanban 

Arts & Sciences 
International Studies 



Brendan M. Caffrey 

School of Management 

Marketing 

Mgmt. Info Systems 



John R. Cahill 

School of Management 

Finance 

Mgmt. Info Systems 



Abigail L. Cain 

School of Management 

Op. & Strategic Mgmt 

Mgmt. Info Systems 



286 Seniors 



Jeffrey C. Caldwell 

Arts & Sciences 
Communications 



Rebecca Calisi 

Arts & Sciences 
Psychology 



Alexandra Calixte 

Arts & Sciences 
Sociology 
Psychology 



Michael .1. Callahan 

Arts & Sciences 
Political Science 



Paul .1. Callahan 

Arts A: Sciences 
Economics 




Dominic Cameratta 

School of Management 

Accounting 

Finance 



Molly F. Campanella 

Arts & Sciences 
English 



Kristin A. Campbell 

School of Education 

Elementary Ed. 
Human Development 



Matthew C. Cannavale 

School of Education 

English 

Secondary Ed. 



Cara Cannella 

Arts & Sciences 
English 




Martin Cantillo 

School of Management 
Finance 



Kaylee Cantlin 

Arts & Sciences 
English 



Peter M. Canty 

Arts & Sciences 
English 



Maria Capozzi 

Arts & Sciences 

Biology 

Mathematics 



Courtney E. Cappa 

Arts & Sciences 
Communications 




Rebecca E. Carbeau 

Arts & Sciences 
English 



Barbara Carbonaro 

Arts & Sciences 
Sociology 



James Cardia 

Arts & Sciences 
Biochemistry 



Colleen M. Carey 

Arts & Sciences 
Economics 



Emily P. Carey 

School of Education 
Human Development 



Seniors 287 



Stephen Carey 

Arts & Sciences 

English 

Philosophy 



Elizabeth A. Cariseo 

Arts & Sciences 
Psychology 



Joseph Carline 

Arts & Sciences 
Political Science 



Andrea A. Carlino 

Arts & Sciences 
History 



James Carpenter 

Arts & Sciences 
Political Science 




Michael A. Carpenter 

School of Management 
Finance 



Anne M. Carpinelli 

Arts & Sciences 
English 



Mary K. Cartier 

Arts & Sciences 
Psychology 



Miriam N. Carty 

Arts & Sciences 

Theology 

French 



Brian C. Caruso 

School of Management 
Unclassified 




Karen L. Carusone 

Arts & Sciences 
Psychology 



Christopher M. Casano 

School of Education 
Secondary Ed. 



Michael C. Cassano 

School of Education 

Human Development 

Psychology 



Mary K. Castiglione 

Arts & Sciences 
Communications 



Jason Cataldo 

Arts & Sciences 
Biochemistry 




Paul J. Catanese 

Arts & Sciences 

Political Science 

Economics 



Kevin P. Cavanaugh 

Arts & Sciences 
English 



Jennifer M. Cerami 

School of Management 
General Mgmt 



Cara A. Ceraso 

Arts & Sciences 

English 
Political Science 



Amanda B. Chaloupka 

Arts & Sciences 
English 
German 



288 Seniors 



Lena Chamberland 

School of Management 

Accounting 



Keri Charles 

Arts & Sciences 
International Studies 



Timothy Chezar 

Arts & Sciences 

Mathematics 

Economics 



kalhrvn Chambers 

Arts & Sciences 
Philosophy 



Jason Chi Veung Chan 

School of Management 
Accounting 



William Chan 

Arts & Sciences 
Computer Science 



Dana < '., ( haniler 
School of Education 

ElemTMod. Spec. Needs 
Child in Society 




Kyleen Charlton 

Arts & Sciences 
History 




Elisia Chi 

Arts & Sciences 
Sociology 




Avi S. Chiat 

School of Management 
Finance 



Bernadette Chichioco 

School of Management 

Mgmt. Info Systems 

Finance 



Sambath Chau 

Arts & Sciences 
Political Science 



Ashley H. Chernove 

Arts & Sciences 
English 



Georgia L. Cheswick 

School of Education 

Elementary Ed. 

Psychology 




Seniors 289 




Estelle Chow 

School of Management 
Finance 



Gillian Christian 

Arts & Sciences 
Communications 



Rania Chryssis 

Arts & Sciences 
Communications 




Richard Chiovarelli 

Arts & Sciences 
Psychology 



David R. Chludzinski 

Arts & Sciences 
Political Science 




Edward H. Cho 

School of Management 
Mgmt. Info Systems 



Jessica S. Chu 

School of Education 
Elementary Ed. 
Child in Society 



Brian Ciabotti 

School of Management 
Marketing 



Catherine Cianci 

Arts & Sciences 
Psychology 



Carla L. Ciano 

Arts & Sciences 
Economics 



Christine A. Cicon 

School of Management 
Mgmt. Info Systems 
" Marketing 



Laura Y. Choi 

Arts & Sciences 
English 




Kevin Ciabattoni 

Arts & Sciences 
Computer Science 




Maria K. Claridad 

Arts & Sciences 

Psychology 

Theology 



290 Seniors 



Erik R. Classon 

School of Management 

Marketing 

Finance 



Lauren Claudia 

Arts & Sciences 
Philosophy 



Jonathan Claydon 

Arts & Sciences 
English 
History 



Scott L. Clemmensen 

School of Management 
Marketing 



Jennifer \. Close 

School of Education 

l arly Childhood 

English 




Sarah B. Clune 

Arts & Sciences 
Political Science 



Tina A. Cocuzza 

Arts & Sciences 

Biochemistry 

Theology 



Matthew F. Coelho 

School of Management 
Economics/Finance 
Mgmt. Info Systems 



Jonathan C. Cof'sky 

Arts & Sciences 
Studio Art 



Theresa A. Cojohn 

School of Education 

Secondary Ed. 

Mathematics 




James G. Coker 

School of Management 
Marketing 



Bridget Colacchio 

Arts & Sciences 
Sociology 



Mariann Colclough 

Arts & Sciences 
Communications 



Melissa A. Cole 

School of Education 
Human Development 



Patrick Coleman 

Arts & Sciences 

English 




Jaclyn M. Coletta 

Arts & Sciences 
Biology 



Ellen A. Colleran 

Arts & Sciences 

Political Science 

Philosophy 



Randall J. Collette 

School of Management 
Finance 



James F. Collin 

Arts & Sciences 
History 



Elizabeth W. Collins 

Arts & Sciences 
Psychology 



Seniors 291 



2001 



Do you remember?... the silence in Bapst? ... long nights in 



O'Neill? ... the Superman stripper during finals? ... the 1 1 :00 scream? ... finals: 



M J^fjjl 1 




K */^i W v ' *• ■ 1 4 






Seniors 293 




294 Seniors 




Seniors 295 





Marc E. Colombo 

Arts & Sciences 
Sociology 



Danielle Colon 

School of Education 

Human Development 

English 




Sara A. Conahan 

School of Education 
Human Development 



Candice L. Condon 

School of Management 
Marketing 




Julie A. Conneely 

Arts & Sciences 
History 



Meghan Connolly 

Arts & Sciences 
Env. Geo. Scien. 



Shannon L. Connor 

Arts & Sciences 
English 



Lisa Connors 

Arts & Sciences 
Communications 



Nicholas J. Connors 

Arts & Sciences 
History 




Nichole Connors 

School of Management 
Accounting 



Marisa Consolla 

Arts & Sciences 
Theology 



Carrabeth Constantine 

School Of Nursing 
Nursing 



Christopher M. Conte 

School of Management 
Accounting 



Susan S. Conway 

School of Education 

Human Development 

Elementary Ed. 



296 Seniors 



Christopher D. Cook 

Arts & Sciences 
Biology 



Daisy A. Cook 

Arts & Sciences 

English 
Communications 



Mary Cooley 

Arts & Sciences 
Communications 



Kevin Coone} 

School ni Management 
Finance 



Tara ( loone) 

Arts & Sciences 
Communications 




Gretchen M. Cooper 

School of Education 

Elementary Ed. 
Human Development 



Katherine M. Cooper 

School of Management 
Mgmt. Info Systems 



Ronald G. Cooper 

Arts & Sciences 
English 



John Cope 

Arts & Sciences 
Biology 
English 



Mario Coppola 

Arts & Sciences 
Political Science 




Amy L. Corbett 

Arts & Sciences 
Communications 



Crystal Cordell 

Arts & Sciences 
Political Science 



Jennifer L. Cornelia 

Arts & Sciences 
Communications 



Jane R. Correia 

Arts & Sciences 

English/ French 

Mathematics 



Stephen V. Corsale 

Arts & Sciences 
Biology 




Chad Cotter 

Arts & Sciences 

History 

Philosophy 



Brendan M. Coughlin 

School of Management 
Marketing 



Jamie L. Cournoyer 

Arts & Sciences 
Communications 



Jennifer Covelle 

Arts & Sciences 
Econ-Oper Res 



Jason Cowett 

School of Management 

Op. & Strategic Mgmt 

Marketing 



Seniors 297 



Sarah J. Coyle 

School of Management 
Marketing 



Karen Craig 

School of Education 

Secondary Ed. 

History 



Sally Creedori 

School of Management 
Marketing 



Sean T. Creegan 

School of Management 
Accounting 



Brian M. Crimmins 

Arts & Sciences 
Hispanic Studies 




Sara Crisafulli 

Arts & Sciences 
Political Science 



Erin A. Cromack 

Arts & Sciences 
Political Science 



David Crosta 

Arts & Sciences 
Communications 



Timothy Crowley 

School of Management 
Finance 



Honor E. Crowther 

Arts & Sciences 

English 
Communications 




Thomas M. Cullen 

Arts & Sciences 
English 



Tracey Cullen 

Arts & Sciences 

History 

Sociology 



Christopher Cummings 

Arts & Sciences 
Theology 



Megan Cunningham 

School of Management 

Finance 

Mgmt. Info Systems 



Paul J. Cunnigham 

School of Management 

Finance 

Marketing 




Kathryn Cuppett 

Arts & Sciences 
Psychology 



Matthew R. Curran 

Arts & Sciences 
History 



Douglas Curren 

School of Management 

Finance 
Op. & Strategic Mgmt 



Michael T. Curry 

Arts & Sciences 

English 
Political Science 



Matthew T. Curtin 

Arts & Sciences 
English 



298 Seniors 



-5 • 



j 



Marc Cusano 

School of Managemenl 
Accounting 



Katra L. Cuskaden 

Arts & Sciences 
Communications 



James M. Czapla 

Arts & Sciences 
History 



Leah IJ. Oarnecki 

Arts & Sciences 
Sociology 



Lech J. Czerski 

School "t Managemenl 

Finance 

Mgmt. Into Systems 




Vincent D'Eramo 

Arts & Sciences 
English 



Sean Daken 

School of Management 

Mgmt. Info Systems 

Computer Science 



Rebecca L. Dalton 

Arts & Sciences 
Chemistry 



Patricia E. Daly 

Arts & Sciences 
History 



Kimberlv Damuth 

School of Education 
Human Development 




Holly Ann Danault 

School Of Nursing 
Nursing 



Jeffery Danis 

Arts & Sciences 
Biology 




Joseph E. Dauenhauer 

School of Management 

Accounting 

Finance 



David De Angelo 

Arts & Sciences 
Economics 




Seniors 299 





Pamela J. De Braal 

School of Management 
Accounting 



Peter M. De Caro 

School of Management 
Finance 
History 




Julie N. De La Cruz 

Arts & Sciences 
English 



Sandra M. De Luca 

School of Education 

Elem./Mod. Spec. Needs 

Math/Comp. Science 




Christian De Luke 

Arts & Sciences 
History 



Enrico M. De Maio 

Arts & Sciences 
Psychology 



Jennifer E. De Nino 

School Of Nursing 
Nursing 



Adam J. De Panfilis 

Arts & Sciences 
Economics 
Psychology 



Marc De Saint 

Arts & Sciences 
Economics 




Salvatore De Santis 

Arts & Sciences 
Biology 



Nicholas J. De Simone 

School of Management 

Marketing 

Mgmt. Info Systems 



Elizabeth A. Deady 

School of Education 

Elem./Mod. Spec. Needs 

Math/Comp. Science 



Kathryn A. Decourcy 

Arts & Sciences 
Communications 



B. Defaria 

Arts & Sciences 
Political Science 



300 Seniors 



Daniel Degan 

Arts & Sciences 
Communications 



Alexis C. Degelmann 

Arts & Sciences 
Communications 



Timothy A. Degnan 

Arts & Sciences 
English 

Economics 



Matthew R. Deuraff 

Arts & Sciences 
Computer Science 

Communications 



Anthony J. Deo 

Arts & Sciences 
Biology 



Kelly Depina 

School Of Nursing 
Nursing 



Leslie E. Desantis 

School of Management 
Finance 



Sonia S. Desikan 

Arts & Sciences 
Biology 



Walter ( . Denujjlielmo 
Arts & Sciences 
Political Science 




Ravi Desilva 

Arts & Sciences 
Biology 




Christine Desontis 

School of Management 
Accounting 



Sean P. Devaney 

Arts & Sciences 
Political Science 



Joseph D. Di Chiara 

School of Management 
Finance 



Jennifer Di Mare 

School of Education 

Human Development 

Early Childhood 



Cathleen S. Di Marzo 

School Of Nursing 
Nursing 




David R. Diangelo 

Arts & Sciences 

Theater Arts 

Philosophy 



Anna M. Diaz 

School of Management 
Accounting 



Daisy B. Diaz 

Arts & Sciences 
Communications 



Honey Diaz 

School of Education 

Human Development 

Elementary Ed. 



Kristin Elyse Dibarnaba 

School of Management 
Economics 



Seniors 301 



2001 



Have you ever waited for the bus for 20 minutes and then 



302 Seniors 



have it go right by? Did you ever wait an hour and 1 12 for the Newton Bus? 




Seniors 303 




304 Seniors 




305 





Matthew A. Dicarlo 

Arts & Sciences 
Political Science 



Katie Dickens 

Arts & Sciences 
Communications 




Karen M. Diep 

Arts & Sciences 
Psychology 



Jeanette S. Dieu 

School of Management 

Finance 

Marketing 



Michelle Dilisi 

School of Management 
Human Resources Mgmt. 



Julia K. Dimick 

Arts & Sciences 
Political Science 



Joanne Dineen 

School of Education 

Secondary Ed. 

English 




Christopher P. Dionot 

Arts & Sciences 

Political Science 

Philosophy 



Joseph Dipalo 

Arts & Sciences 
History 




Gail Dirschberger 

School of Management 

Op. & Strategic Mgmt 

Human Res. Mgmt 



Jill H. Disabato 

School of Education 
Early Childhood 
Child in Society 



Gabrille A. Disaverio 

School of Management 

Marketing 

Finance 



Alyson L. Dischino 

School of Education 

Early Childhood 

English 



Courtney Dischino 

School of Managemen 

Computer Science 

Mgmt. Info Systems 



306 Seniors 



t 



ItllM 



Brian I). Ditucci 

School of Management 
Economics 






Kathryn (J. Dobrowski 

School of Management 

Accounting 

Mgmt. Into Systems 



Robert V. Doehner 

School of Management 

Finance 

Accounting 



Kerry Dohertj 

Arts & Sciences 
English 



Bibbe Dombovarj 

Arts it Sciences 
International Studies 




John A. Donahoe 

Arts & Sciences 

History 

Philosophy 



Meghan Donoghue 

Arts & Sciences 
English 



Amy S. Donovan 

Arts & Sciences 

Political Science 

Philosophy 



Maire E. Donovan 

Arts & Sciences 

Political Science 



Margaret Donovan 

Arts & Sciences 
Communications 




Jennifer Doolin 

School Of Nursing 



Nursing 



Daniel A. Doucette 

Arts & Sciences 
Economics 



Kara J. Dowal 

Arts & Sciences 
English 



Lauren N. Dowling 

Arts & Sciences 

Biology 



Ricky J. Doyle 

Arts & Sciences 
Communications 




Sean K. Doyle 

Arts & Sciences 
Communications 



Therese L. Drapeau 

Arts & Sciences 
Sociology 



Carissa M. Drew 

Arts & Sciences 
Communications 



Nora E. Driscoll 

Arts & Sciences 
Theater Arts 



Jennifer R. Duane 

Arts & Sciences 
Psychology 



Seniors 307 



Akua D. Ducard 

Arts & Sciences 
Communications 



Allisson Dugan 

Arts & Sciences 
Computer Science 



Kelly Dugan 

Arts & Sciences 
English 



Maura E. Dugan 

School of Education 

Elem./Mod. Spec. Needs 

Child in Society 



Christine M. Dulla 

Arts & Sciences 

English 

Theology 




Mark E. Dumas 

Arts & Sciences 

Political Science 

Economics/Theology 



Thomas L. Dunigan 

Arts & Sciences 
Philosophy 



Elizabeth Dunn 

Arts & Sciences 
English 



Jonathon S. Dunn 

Arts & Sciences 
Biology 



Thomas C. Durbin 

Arts & Sciences 
Biology 



Kellie E. Dyer 

School of Education 

Human Development 

Elem./Int. Spec. Needs 



Andrea H. Eagerman 

School of Education 
Human Development 



Kenneth J. Eaton 

Arts & Sciences 
Communications 
Computer Science 



Jennifer Egan 

Arts & Sciences 
Political Science 



Kathryn M. Egan 

Arts & Sciences 
Psychology 



Julia A. El-Hag 

School of Management 
Marketing 



Kyesha Elliott 

Arts & Sciences 
Philosophy 



Nicolas M. Dunn 

School of Management 

Finance 

Computer Science 




John Edwards 

Arts & Sciences 
Economics 





Blake C. Ellis 

Arts & Sciences 
Biology 



308 Seniors 



Jonathan Eng 

Arts & Sciences 
International Studies 



Marian A. England 

School of Education 

Human Development 

Elementary Ed. 



Willem N. Enthoven 
School of Management 

Finance 



Nancy E. Eskay 

Arts & Sciences 

Psychology 

History 



Natalie Esposito 

School of Education 

Human Development 

Elementary Ed. 



Maria R. Evidente 

Arts & Sciences 
Biology 



Will S. Estes 

School of Management 
General Mgmt 



Cesar R. Estrada 

School of Management 

Mgmt. Info Systems 

Finance 



Nicole Estvanik 

Arts & Sciences 
English 



Gwenmarie Ewing 

Arts & Sciences 
Theater Arts 




Susan M. Eylward 


James R. Fagan 


School of Management 


Arts & Sciences 


Accounting 


History 




Theology 




I. ana ('. Espim-li 

School of Management 
Accounting 




Cynthia Evans 

School of Management 
Finance 




c* 







Seniors 309 



■ .--rs. 





Nikki D. Faldman 

Arts & Sciences 
English 



David S. Falzarano 

Arts & Sciences 
Psychology 



Heidi Lyn Falkenberg 

School of Management 

Accounting 

Finance 




Christopher Farady 

Arts & Sciences 
Biochemistry 




Kelly Fargo 

Arts & Sciences 
Communications 



Christine A. Faria 

School of Education 
Human Development 



Alicia Fasi 

Arts & Sciences 
Hispanic Exp. 



Meridith A. Faust 

School of Management 
Marketing 



Joseph C. Fava 

School of Management 
Accounting 




Elizabeth Feeley 

School of Management 
Marketing 



Timothy P. Fennell 

Arts & Sciences 
Computer Science 



Dana A. Fenner 

School of Education 
Human Development 



Michel Fernandez 

Arts & Sciences 
Hispanic Studies 



Patricia M. Fernandez 

Arts & Sciences 
Mathematics 



310 Seniors 






Kiren A. Fernando 

Arts & Sciences 
Psychology 



Brandon I). Ferrara 

School of Management 
Human Res. Mgmt 
Computer Science 



Christine M. Ferrara 

School of Education 

Elementary Ed. 
Human Development 



Matthew ('. Ferroni 

School of Management 

Finance 

Sociology 



Leigfaton S. Feuer 

School ol Management 
Marketing 




Jared C. Fields 

Arts & Sciences 
Political Science 



Anthony A. Figueroa 

Arts & Sciences 
Theater Arts 



Kenneth A. Filarski 

Arts & Sciences 
Philosophy 



Suzanna Filip 

Arts & Sciences 

English 

Economics 



Kevin Fiore 

Arts & Sciences 
Economics 




Eileen M. Firstenberger 

Arts & Sciences 
English 



Heather M. Fish 

School of Education 

Elementary Ed. 
Human Development 



Daniel M. Fitzgerald 

Arts & Sciences 
Economics 
Philosophy 



Kelly I. Fitzgerald 

Arts & Sciences 
Psychology 
Theater Arts 



Darren P. Fitzpatrick 

Arts & Sciences 
Biochemistry 




Erin E. Fitzpatrick 

Arts & Sciences 
Communications 



Elizabeth Fitzsimons 

Arts & Sciences 
Communications 



David M. Flaherty 

School of Management 

Finance 

Economics 



Polivios P. Flessas 

Arts & Sciences 
Economics 



Amy S. Flick 

Arts & Sciences 
Psychology 



Seniors 311 



2001 



Did you ever run up "Heart Break Hill"?... Have you ever propped a door open for 




312 Seniors 



m 



ore than 30 seconds?. ..Did you ever lock your keys in your room?...] lave you ever lost vour II) card? 




Seniors 313 




314 Seniors 




Seniors 315 







Lauren C. Flick 

School of Education 

Elementary Ed. 
Human Development 



Ryan F. Flood 

School of Management 
Finance 




Katherine E. Flynn 

School of Management 

Finance 

Marketing 



Erin Foley 

School of Management 
Op. & Strategic Mgmt 




Jillian D. Foley 

Arts & Sciences 
Sociology 



Katherine Foley 

Arts & Sciences 
Psychology 



Robert E. Foley 

School of Management 
Finance 



Stephen F. Foley 

School of Management 
Finance 



Jennifer F. Fontana 

School of Education 
Human Development 




Suzanne T. Foody 

School of Education 
Human Development 



Carolyn V. Forbes 

School of Education 
Human Development 



Shanynn N. Forbes 

Arts & Sciences 
English 



Amanda Fordham 

Arts & Sciences 

Human Development 

Sociology 



Ebette M. Fortune 

Arts & Sciences 
Political Science 



316 Seniors 



Pamela C. Foschi 

School of Education 

Child in Society 

Elcm/Mod. Spec. Needs 



Jared B. Fotis 

Arts & Sciences 

Economics 
Communications 



Kara K. Fox 

Arts & Sciences 
History 



Lynze E. Fox 

Arts & Sciences 
Communications 



Stacj E. Francoeur 

Arts & Sciences 
Biology 




William M. Frank 

Arts & Sciences 
Biology 



Gregory R. Franzone 

School of Management 
Marketing 



Sarah S. Freeman 

School of Education 

Elem./Mod. Spec. Needs 

Human Development 



Marissa A. Freitas 

Arts & Sciences 
History 



Jennifer French 

School of Education 
Human Development 




Andrew Frey 

Arts & Sciences 
Philosophy 



Kristen Frey 

Arts & Sciences 
Communications 



Ronald Freytag 

School of Management 
Finance 



Laura Friedlander 

School of Management 
Marketing 



Christopher Froeb 

Arts & Sciences 
English 
History 




Mark Fruechtnicht 

School of Management 

Finance 

Marketing 



Megan L. Fry 

Arts & Sciences 
Political Science 



Linda Fung 

School of Management 

Human Resources Mgmt. 

Marketing 



Melissa R. Funsch 

Arts & Sciences 
History 



Michael J. Gabriel 

School of Management 

Finance 

Mgmt. Info Systems 



Seniors 317 



Alexis M. Gage 

School of Management 

Accounting 



Amy E. Galasso 

Arts & Sciences 
Economics 



Amy C. Gallagher 

School of Education 

Human Development 

Early Childhood 



Brendan M. Gallagher 

Arts & Sciences 
History 



Ellen Gallagher 

Arts & Sciences 

Political Science 

Philosophy 




James B. Gallagher 

Arts & Sciences 
Economics 



James L. Gallagher 

Arts & Sciences 
Biology 



Janet M. Gallagher 

Arts & Sciences 
English 



William C. Galligan 

School of Management 
Economics 



Elizabeth Gallishaw 

School of Education 
Communications 




Jennifer Gallivan 

Arts & Sciences 
Communications 
Hispanic Studies 



Todd C. Gallo 

Arts & Sciences 
Economics 



Kathryn Galvin 

School of Management 

Finance 



Charles J. Gannon 

Arts & Sciences 
Psychology 



Michael H. Gansfuss 

School of Management 
Finance 




Marianne Ganster 

Arts & Sciences 
Economics 



Brandon M. Gantus 

Arts & Sciences 
Political Science 



Aida Garcia 

Arts & Sciences 
Communications 



Ana M. Garcia 

School of Management 

Finance 
Op. & Strategic Mgmt 



Corrie A. Garlick 

Arts & Sciences 
Political Science 



318 Seniors 



Mary Garner 

Arts & Sciences 
Sociology 



Melissa A. Gasbarro 

Arts & Sciences 
Communications 



Allison Gebo 

Arts & Sciences 
Psychology 



Abigail A. Garnl'alo 
School of Education 

Human Development 
English 



Matthew T. Garolalow 

Arts & Sciences 
English 



Kevin \V. Garn 

School of Management 

Marketing 



Janus B. Garth 

School of Management 

Finance 




Gayle L. Gastineau 

Arts & Sciences 
Psychology 



Tracy L. Gaudette 

School of Education 

Elem./Mod. Spec. Needs 

Psychology 



Thomas M. Gaukin 

Arts & Sciences 

Mathematics 



Elizabeth V. Gavin 

School of Education 

English 

Earlv Childhood 




David Gelineau 

School of Management 
Accounting 




Gregg Genova 

School of Management 
Finance 



Rebecca Geragonis 

School of Management 
General Mgmt. 




Seniors 319 





Lourdes German 

Arts & Sciences 

Sociology 
Political Science 



Michael Gewirtz 

Arts & Sciences 

Philosophy 
Communications 




David R. Giannino 

School of Management 

Finance 

Marketing 



Jacob A. Giannotti 

School of Management 

Marketing 

Finance 




Michael P. Giarratano 

Arts & Sciences 
Communications 



Daniel W. Gibson 

School of Management 
Marketing 



James W. Gibson 

School of Education 
Elementary Ed. 
General Science 



Carrie A.Gilbert 

School of Education 

Elem./Int. Spec. Needs 

Child In Society 



Jason R. Gilboy 

Arts & Sciences 
Economics 




Lisa C. Gill 

Arts & Sciences 
Communications 



James M. Gillespie 

School of Management 

Finance 
Mgmt. Info Systems 



Matthew R. Gilmartin 

School of Management 

Finance 
Op. & Strategic Mgmt. 



Michael F. Ginty 

Arts & Sciences 
Political Science 



Brian J. Gionta 

Arts & Sciences 
Communications 



320 Seniors 



Thomas A. Giordano 

Arts & Sciences 
English 



Amanda K. Godfrey 

School of Nursing 
Nursing 



Julie A. Golia 

Arts & Sciences 
History 



Jeffrey L. Gipson 

Arts & Sciences 
Economics 



Maxwell Frederic Glick 

Arts & Sciences 
Theater Arts 



Meghan ('. Gnazzo 

Arts & Sciences 
Mathematics 



Jillian GodnskJ 

School ot Management 

Accounting 

Mgmt. Into Systems 




Ann R. Godoy 

Arts & Sciences 
Political Science 



Jonathan Goldblatt 

Arts & Sciences 
Economics 
Philosophy 



Laura D. Golden 

Arts & Sciences 
English 



Todd Goldenberg 

Arts & Sciences 
Communications 




Mariza Goncalves 

Arts & Sciences 
Philosophy 



Abraham Gonzalez 

Arts & Sciences 
Psychology 



Benjamin R. Gonzalez 

Arts & Sciences 
Philosophy 
Economics 



Isabel M. Gonzalez 

Arts & Sciences 

Biology 

Philosophy 




Brian Robert Goodman 

Arts & Sciences 
Psychology 



Samantha A. Goodman 

School of Education 

Secondary Ed. 

History 



Christopher M. Gosselin 

Arts & Sciences 
Economics 



Robert J. Goulet 

Arts & Sciences 
Biology 



Gordon Gouveia 

Arts & Sciences 
Political Science 



Seniors 321 



2001 



Lighting the X-mas tree?... Movies on O'Neill Plaza?... hockey 



322 Seniors 



riots?. ..College Road?. ..the infirmary?. ..sleeping in the dustbowl?... the first snowstorm? 




Seniors 323 




324 Seniors 




Seniors 325 





Christie Governor 

School of Education 

Elementary Ed. 
Human Development 



Alan M. Gowell 

Arts & Sciences 
Psychology 




Alvin Gozali 

School of Management 
Finance 



Alison Graham-Smith 

Arts & Sciences 

Communications 

Theology 




Alison M. Gramaglia 

Arts & Sciences 

French 

Economics 



Lisa M. Grandy 

School of Education 
Human Development 



Margaret A. Grattan 

Arts & Sciences 
Computer Science 



Kristen L. Grauman 

Arts & Sciences 
Computer Science 



Vennesa J. Graure 

Arts & Sciences 
Political Science 




Marc R. Gravel 

School of Management 
Finance 



Kristen Gray 

School of Management 
Marketing 



Rebecca Green 

School of Management 

Mgmt. Info Systems 

Marketing 



Stephen F. Green 

Arts & Sciences 
International Studies 



Tina Greenberg 

Arts & Sciences 

English 

Studio Art 



326 Seniors 



Michelle Greenfield 

School of Education 

Human Development 



Keith Gregoretti 

School of Management 
Mgmt. Info Systems 



Christine Grella 

Arts & Sciences 
Mathematics 



Corey L. Griffin 

Arts & Sciences 
English 



Jessica Griffin 

Arts & Sciences 
Biol> 




Caroline Griffith 

Arts & Sciences 
Chemistry 



Matthew Griffith 

Arts & Sciences 
Computer Science 



Brendyn T. Grimaldi 

School of Management 

Economics 

Finance 



Peter W. Grow 

School of Management 
Marketing 



Luis Grullon 

School of Management 
Finance 




Michelle A. Guevara 

Arts & Sciences 
International Studies 



Sjur Gundersen 

School of Management 
Finance 



Ramon K. Gupta 

School of Management 

Finance 

Mathematics 



Zachary Gustin 

Arts & Sciences 
History 



Tom Haak 

School of Management 
Finance 




Emily C. Haas 

Arts & Sciences 
Communications 



David P. Haddad 

School of Management 
Finance 



Gregory J. Hagin 

Arts & Sciences 

History 

Philosophy 



Bradd Haley 

Arts & Sciences 
Geology 



Jennifer Hall 

Arts & Sciences 
Communications 



Seniors 327 



Christopher P. Hamblin 

School of Education 

Human Development 

Communications 



Mollie Hamlin 

School of Management 

Computer Science 

Mgmt. Info Systems 



Andrea Dora Hanel 

School of Nursing 
Nursing 



Phi Hang 

Arts & Sciences 
Sociology 



John P. Hanna 

Arts & Sciences 
Economics 




Karen A. Hanna 

Arts & Sciences 
Communications 



Mark Gregory Hansen 

Arts & Sciences 

Psychology 
Political Science 



William Hansen 

School of Management 
Accounting 



Constantine Hantzis 

Arts & Sciences 
Info. Tech. 



Erin M. Haran 

Arts & Sciences 
English 




Stefania A. Harangus 

Arts & Sciences 

International Studies 

Mathematics 



Paige Harden 

School of Education 
Human Development 



Elizabeth A. Harmon 

Arts & Sciences 
Italian 



Heather Harrington 

School of Education 
Communications 



Nicole Harris 

School of Management 
Accounting 




Jonathan Hartigan 

School of Management 

Finance 

Accounting 



Katharine M. Hartman 

School of Education 

Human Development 

Theology 



Stephanie Hartman 

Arts & Sciences 
English 



Michael Hartmann 

School of Management 

Finance 

Mgmt. Info Systems 



Jeffrey D. Harvey 

Arts & Sciences 

Political Science 

Theology 



328 Seniors 



%fj 



William H. Harwood 

Arts & Sciences 
Philosophy 



Robert Hatcher 

Arts & Sciences 
Computer Science 



Patrice M. Hayden 

Arts & Sciences 
Communications 



Melissa Haydon 

Arts & Sciences 
English 



Daniel I). Haves 

Arts &: Sciences 
Biology 




Matthew J. Hayes 

School of Management 
Finance 



Michael W. Hayes 

School of Management 
Accounting 



Danniel A. Haynes 

School of Nursing 
Nursing 



Lauren C. Heading 

Arts & Sciences 
English 



Jonathan Heagle 

School of Management 
Finance 




Patrick James Healey 

School of Management 

Accounting 

Finance 



Mary Heath 

School of Education 
Human Development 



Michael C. Hearns 

Arts & Sciences 
History 




Clare F. Heffernan 

Arts & Sciences 
Communications 



Seniors 329 





Danielle Henderson 

School of Management 
Marketing 



David Henderson 

School of Management 
Finance 



Katharine M. Henderson 

Arts & Sciences 

Psychology 

Sociology 



Katherine Heffernon 

School of Management 
Finance 



Andrea M. Heimanson 

School of Management 

Finance 

Marketing 




Ashley M. Heins 

School of Education 

Elementary Ed. 
Math/Comp. Science 



Alexander Helm 

Arts & Sciences 
Political Science 




Alexandra Henriquez 

School of Management 
Marketing 



Laura Hernandez 

Arts & Sciences 
Hispanic Studies 




Yelitza Hernandez 

Arts & Sciences 
Communications 



Richard S. Herring 

Arts & Sciences 
Biology 



Timothy Heston 

School of Management 
Finance 



Glenn R. Heywood II 

Arts & Sciences 
Communications 



Marissa L. Higgins 

Arts & Sciences 
History 



330 Seniors 



* 



Jorge Highland 

School of Management 

Op. & Strategic Mgmt 
Mgmt. Info Systems 



Westyn L. Hinchey 

Arts & Sciences 
Communications 



Jennifer Hill 

Arts & Sciences 
Economics 



Lauren Hill 

Arts & Sciences 
English 



Sean C. Hill 

Ails & Sciences 
Political Science 



Courtney Hilliard 

Arts & Sciences 
English 




Wendy 1 Human 

Arts & Sciences 
Communications 



Christine Histed 

Arts & Sciences 
Economics 



Perthranne Hobson-Greer 

Arts & Sciences 
French 



Jamie Hodgin 

School of Nursing 

Nursing 




John Hoefer 

School of Management 
Finance 



Donna M. Hofmann 

Arts & Sciences 
Psychology 



Kevin Patrick Hogan 

Arts & Sciences 
Political Science 



Philip Michael Hogan 

Arts & Sciences 
Economics 



Michelle ML Holcomb 

School of Management 

Finance 

Marketing 




Cristina A. Holder 

School of Management 
Accounting 



Kevin Holzapfel 

Arts & Sciences 
Communications 



Samuel T. Hooker 

Arts & Sciences 
History 



Joseph D. Hopkins 

School of Management 
Finance 



Alison Horning 

School of Management 
Accounting 



Seniors 331 



2001 



Have you ever walked through 90 looking for someone who 




332 Seniors 



actaully lived in Vanderslice? Remember your first Parent's Weekend? 




Seniors 333 



2001 



Have you ever walked up and down Comm. Ave. looking for 




334 Seniors 




fe^. J 










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that party you heard about? Do you rancher playing frisbee in the Dustbowl? 




Seniors 335 





Meghan C. Horrigan 

Arts & Sciences 
Mathematics 



Molly Houston 

Arts & Sciences 
English 




Zakee S. Howard 

Arts & Sciences 
Psychology 



Matthew Hrynkiewicz 

School of Management 
Marketing 




Priscilla Huang 

Arts & Sciences 

English 

Philosophy 



Cara M. Hubbard 

School of Management 
Finance 



Michael P. Huelin 

School of Education 
Elementary Ed. 
Math/Comp. Sci 



Katie Elizabeth Huffling 

School of Nursing 
Nursing 



James M. Hufnagel 

Arts & Sciences 
Philosophy 
Economics 




Kerri A. Hughes 

School of Management 
Accounting 



Martin F. Hughes 

Arts & Sciences 
Communications 



Michelle Hughes 

Arts & Sciences 
Philosophy 



Eunice J. Huh 

School of Management 
Accounting 



William Wells 
Humphrey 

Arts & Sciences 
Sociology 



336 Seniors 



Christine M. Hunker 

Arts & Sciences 
Biology 



Michele A. Hunton 

Arts & Sciences 

Env. Geo. Scien. 

Philosophy 



Joseph F. Hurley 

School of Management 

Computer Science 
Op. & Strategic Mgml. 



John J. Hwang 

Arts & Sciences 

Economics 



Damen K. H\nus 

Arts & Sciences 
Sociology 




Christopher J. Iacoi 

Arts & Sciences 
History 



Caroline F. Iacono 

Arts & Sciences 
Psychology 



Dana Iannacone 

Arts & Sciences 
English 



Yoriko Ikeda 

School of Management 
Marketing 



Teresa Immediata 

Arts & Sciences 
History 




Drew W. Ingraham 

School of Education 

Secondary Ed. 

English 



Kimberly S. Inouye 

Arts & Sciences 
Psychology 



Elizabeth Iovino 

Arts & Sciences 
Psychology 



Maurice Iragorri Jr. 

School of Management 
Mgmt. Info Systems 



Kelly A. Irish 

School of Management 
Mgmt. Info Systems 




Darsana Irma 

School of Management 
General Mgmt 



Noland Villegas Izar 

School of Management 
Mgmt. Info Systems 



Kathryn W. Jackson 

Arts & Sciences 
Communications 



Kerry Shannon Jacobs 

School of Education 

Elem./Mod. Spec. Needs 

Human Development 



Kathleen F. Jacobsen 

School of Education 

Elementar> Ed. 
Human Development 



Seniors 331 




Matthew R. Jacques 

Arts & Sciences 

Computer Science 

Philosophy 



Hope Jankunas 

Arts & Sciences 
Biology 



James P. Jewell 

Arts & Sciences 
Biochemistry 



Joanna Ewa Jacunski 

Arts & Sciences 
Biology 



Christina M. Jaeger 

School of Management 

Finance 

Mgmt. Info Systems 



Stephanie Elizabeth 
James 

Arts & Sciences 
English 



Shareef Jandali 

Arts & Sciences 
Biology 




Summer M. Jarratt 

Arts & Sciences 
Economics 



Yamil Jaskille 

Arts & Sciences 

Sociology 
Hispanic Studies 



Robert E. Jennings 

School of Management 
Accounting 



Trapier B. Jervay 

Arts & Sciences 
Philosophy 





Mary Alice Jewell 

School of Management 
Marketing 



Jeani Elizabeth John 

School of Management 
Marketing 



Christina Johnson 

School of Management 
Marketing 



Joshua Johnson 

School of Management 
Marketing 




Mark J. Johnson 

School of Management 
Accounting 



Paul M. Johnson 

Arts & Sciences 

Music 

Psychology 



Peter Robert Johnson 

Arts & Sciences 
Sociology 



Rita Anne Johnson 

School of Education 

Psychology 
Elem/Mod. Sp. Needs 



Oritse Justin Johnston 

Arts & Sciences 
History 



338 Seniors 



Ashley E. Jones 

Arts & Sciences 
English 



Brandy L. Jones 

Arts & Sciences 
Communications 



Brian M. Jones 

School of Management 
Accounting 



Ernest ('hiippell Jones 

Arts & Sciences 
Economics 



i 



\ 



" 



Karen L. Jones 

Arts A; Sciences 

Psychology 




Matthew R. Joyce 

Arts & Sciences 

History 
Political Science 



Christine Ann Judware 

Arts & Sciences 
Political Science 




Meghan Leray Kalinich 

School of Education 
Human Development 



Paula Georgia Kaltezas 

Arts & Sciences 
Sociology 




Jsa Marie Kanan 


Brian R. Kane 


School of Nursing 


Arts & Sciences 


Nursing 


Chemistry 




Philosophy 



Miguel Angel Juliao 

School of Management 
Finance 



Laura Jane Kahl 

Arts & Sciences 
English 



Rayna Kahn 

School of Management 
Marketing 




Seniors 339 





Divya Dilip Kapasi 

Arts & Sciences 
Political Science 



Matthew P. Kaplan 

Arts & Sciences 
English 



Cynthia Kaschub 

Arts & Sciences 
Psychology 




Ernest Kappotis 

School of Management 

Finance 

Accounting 



Christina A. Karas 

School of Education 

Elem./Mod. Spec. Need: 

General Science 




Dionyssis Kaskarelis 

School of Management 
Finance 



Julie Lyn Kasperzyk 

Arts & Sciences 
Biochemistry 



Konstantinos Katsaros 

Arts & Sciences 
Chemistry 



Andrew Katuari 

School of Management 
Finance/ Marketing 
Mgmt. Info Systems 




Esther Rosaline Kau 

School of Management 

Accounting 

Finance 



Michael E. Kaufmann 

School of Management 

Finance 

Philosophy 



Amy Elizabeth Kaufold 

Arts & Sciences 
Communications 



Gerald P. Kazan jian 

Arts & Sciences 
Physics 



Lauren N. Kazarian 

Arts & Sciences 
Psychology 



340 Seniors 



Joseph Michael Realty 

Arts & Sciences 
Communications 



Dana B. Keane 

Arts & Sciences 
History 



Elizabeth F. Keane 

Arts & Sciences 
History 



Krin Keaney 

Arts & Sciences 

English 



\\ illiam Janus kearins 
Arts & Sciences 
Communications 




Timothy Keelan 

Arts & Sciences 
History 



Bryan R. Kelley 

Arts & Sciences 
Communications 



Brian M. Kelly 

School of Management 

Economics 

Finance 



Kristen Ann Keenan 

Arts & Sciences 
Psychology 
Economics 



Russell D. Keil 

School of Management 
Finance 



Catherine A. Keith 

Arts & Sciences 
History 



Ryan Kelleher 

School of Management 
Finance 




Jennifer Kelley 

School of Education 

Elementary Ed. 

Math/ Comp. Sci. 



Jill Colleen Kelley 

Arts & Sciences 
Biology 



Ryan Francis Kelley 

Arts & Sciences 
Computer Science 



Conor Stewart Kells 

Arts & Sciences 
Philosophy 




Mary C. Kelly 

Arts & Sciences 
Communications 



Matthew James Kelly 

Arts & Sciences 
English 



Meghan Kathleen Kelly 

School of Education 
Human Development 



Ryan Kelly 

School of Management 
Finance 



Seniors 341 



Did you sing along to the fight song? Do you know the words to 




342 Seniors 



'Hail Alma Mater"? Do you know the words to any of the songs sung at games? 




Seniors 343 




344 Seniors 




Seniors 345 





James Edward Kemp 

School of Management 
Finance 



Mikaela Kempf 

School of Nursing 
Nursing 




Courtenay Kennard 

Arts & Sciences 
Psychology 



Douglas L. Kennealey 

Arts & Sciences 
Economics 




Mary Margaret Kenney 

Arts & Sciences 
History 



Christina Marie Keough 

School of Nursing 
Nursing 



Kathleen A. Keough 

Arts & Sciences 

Studio Art 
Communications 



Melissa Lynn Kerchner 

Arts & Sciences 

French 

Philosophy 



Dina Khani 

School of Education 
Math/ Comp Sci. 




Andrew Miles Khatri 

School of Management 

Finance 
Op & Strategic Mgmt. 



Anne Khoobiar 

Arts & Sciences 
English 



Elizabeth O. Kidder 

Arts & Sciences 
International Studies 



Greg J. Kiely 

School of Management 

Finance 

Marketing 



Donald G. Kikta 

Arts & Sciences 
Biology 



346 Seniors 



M.. 



4& 



Calani Michelle Killacky 

Arts & Sciences 
Sociology 



Joy M. Killgoar 

School of Nursing 

Nursing 



Jason Michael Kilpela 

School of Management 

Finance 

Mgmt. Info Systems 



Bobby K. Kim 

School of Management 
Finance 



Mark Stephen Kimberling 

Arts & Sciences 
History 



Tara A. King 

School of Education 

Elem./Mod. Spec. Needs 

Elementary Ed. 



Rebecca N. Kinyon 

Arts & Sciences 
International Studies 



Jessica Elkins Kiracofe 

Arts & Sciences 
Sociology 



Carol A. Kitay 

Arts & Sciences 
Psychology 



Susan J. Kivlehan 

Arts & Sciences 
Communications 



Eric James Klein 

School of Management 

Finance 

Marketing 



Jessica L. Klein 

School of Management 

Marketing 

Finance 



Rachael S. Klemanski 

Arts & Sciences 
Mathematics 



Patricia Fell Klemballa 

School of Education 

Elem./Mod. Spec. Needs 

Human Development 



Frank J. Klemovitch 

School of Management 

Computer Science 

Mgmt. Info Systems 



Lara Klingenmaier 

Arts & Sciences 
Computer Science 



Joshua Patrick Kimher 

Arts & Sciences 

Philosophy 




Meghan Kissane 

School of Education 
Elementary Ed. 




Megan J. Klein 

Arts & Sciences 
French 
English 




Emily Klug 

Arts & Sciences 
Psychology 



Seniors 347 



Kimberly Klunich 

Arts & Sciences 
Biology 



Paul A. Knapic 

School of Management 
Finance 



Eleanor W. Knight 

Arts & Sciences 

English 

Philosophy 



James F. Knipe 

Arts & Sciences 
History 



Charles Andrew Koch 

School of Management 
Marketing 




Matthew Koch 

Arts & Sciences 
Economics 



Henry James Koehler 

Arts & Sciences 
Political Science 



Sarah Helen Koehler 

Arts & Sciences 
Communications 



Chris Kolkhorst 

School of Education 
Communications 



Michael William Komm 

Arts & Sciences 
Political Science 




Lisa Claire Konikowski 

School of Management 
Finance 



Kristina Marie Koskey 

School of Management 
Accounting 



Wade Alan Kotula 

School of Management 
Finance 



Raymond J. Kotulski 

Arts & Sciences 
Biology 
English 



Pheng B. Kouch 

Arts & Sciences 
Biology 




George D. Kourkoulis 

Arts & Sciences 
Biology 



John Elliott Kowaleski 

School of Management 

Finance 

Marketing 



Kenneth W. Kozack 

School of Management 
Finance 



Thomas H. Kryzanski 

School of Management 

Finance 
Op. & Strategic Mgmt. 



Vincent R. Kudirka 

Arts & Sciences 
Economics 



348 Seniors 



"<ar 



i 




Geoffrey Kuesters 

Arts & Sciences 
Biology 



Kirsten Lynne Kull 
School of Education 

Flem./Int. Spec. Needs 
Human Development 



Angela C. Rung 

Arts & Sciences 
Psychology 



Preston J. Kuo 

School of Management 
Marketing 



Stephen Joseph kurxriHrg 

Arts & Sciences 

Psychology 




Roberto C. Kury 

School of Management 

Finance 

Mgmt. Info Systems 



Eva June Kurz 

School of Management 
Marketing 




Devie Kusumaputri 

School of Management 

Finance 

Accounting 



Kevin La Fleur 

School of Management 

Finance 

Marketing 




Danielle La Pierre 

School of Education 

Human Development 

English 



Kurt J. Labelle 

Arts & Sciences 
Communications 



Matthew William Kuser 

Arts & Sciences 
Economics 



Kristin R. Kusmierz 

Arts & Sciences 
Psychology 



Sean E. Kussner 

Arts & Sciences 

Mathematics 




Seniors 349 




Andrew Dennis Lafiura 

Arts & Sciences 
History 



Morgan Trevor Laholt 

Arts & Sciences 
Mathematics 



Luke G. Laidley 

Arts & Sciences 
Communications 




Kevin Labonge 

School of Management 
Finance 



Donna Marie Lacroce 

School of Education 
Human Development 
Sociology 




Jennifer Lacy 

School of Management 
Finance 
English 



Spyros Ladeas 

Arts & Sciences 
Economics 




Thien M. Lam 

School of Management 

Mgmt. Info Systems 

Finance 



Heather M. Lamb 

School of Education 
Human Development 




Rosita Lamberti 

School of Management 
Marketing 



Melissa Braun Lambrecht 

School of Nursing 
Nursing 



Michelle M. Lammers 

Arts & Sciences 
English 



Steven John Landgraber 

School of Management 
Accounting 



Christina Lane 

Arts & Sciences 
Psychology 



350 Seniors 



la Jaw Am 





Joseph Casey Lane 

Arts & Sciences 
Communications 



Lisa Renee Langdon 

Arts & Sciences 

International Studies 



Christopher I). Langlais 

School of Management 

Finance 

Mgmt. Info Systems 



Adam II. Langton 

School of Management 
Economics 



Ld«ard J. Lanni 

Arts & Sciences 

Sociology 




Karen G. Lannutti 

Arts & Sciences 
Biology 



Stacy Marie Lantagne 

Arts & Sciences 
English 



Brigette S. Lapointe 

Arts & Sciences 
Psychology 



John Larocca 

School of Management 
Finance 



Marisa LaRocca 

Arts & Sciences 
English 




Yanique Irene Laroche 

School of Education 

Elementary Ed. 

Math/ Comp Sci. 



Mary F. Laurine 

School of Education 

Elementary Ed. 

English 



Cary G. Lat 

Arts & Sciences 
Geophysics 



Alerica L. Lattanzio 

Arts & Sciences 
Biology 



Jeffrey D. Laughman 

School of Management 
Finance 



Robert J. Lauria 

School of Management 
Finance 




Michael Louis Lautersack 

Arts & Sciences 
Biology 



Bryan Matthew Lazzara 

Arts & Sciences 
Biology 



Timothy J. Leary 

Arts & Sciences 
English 



Alicia M. Lebar 

School of Management 
Accounting 



Seniors 351 



2001 



Have you ever stayed up until 3AM on a Tuesday, just talking 



352 Seniors 



to your roommate? Have you ever gone out clubbing the night before an exam? 




Seniors 353 




354 Seniors 




B#> »5k_ 6 


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Seniors 355 




356 Seniors 




Seniors 357 




Laura Anne Lee 

School of Education 

Elementary Ed. 
Human Development 



Regina A. Lennox 

Arts & Sciences 
Political Science 



Thomas S. Lee 

Arts & Sciences 
English 



Wendy Lee 

School of Education 
Human Development 



Brian S. Lelen 

School of Management 

Finance 

Mgmt. Info Systems 



Courtney C. Lemoine 

Arts & Sciences 

Economics 

French 




Kimberly Joy Lenoci 

Arts & Sciences 
Theology 



Shannon A. Lents 

Arts & Sciences 
Sociology 



Susan M. Lepeau 

School of Education 

Elementary Ed. 

English 



Christopher N. Leslie 

Arts & Sciences 
Psychology 



358 Seniors 





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Adrian A. Lesmono 

School of Management 

Mgmt. Info Systems 

Computer Science 



Kevin S. Lester 

Arts & Sciences 
Computer Science 



Valerie A. Leuchs 

Arts & Sciences 
Studio Art 



Jaclyn K. Leung 

Arts & Sciences 
Political Science- 



Carrie A. Levitt 

School of Management 
Finance 



Kara Elizabeth Levy 

Arts & Sciences 
Mathematics 



Beth Anne Lewis 

School of Education 

Elementary Ed. 

Math/ Comp. Sci. 



Blair P. Lewis 

School of Management 

General Mgmt 
Marketing/ HR Mgmt. 



Teresa J. Lin 

School of Management 
Marketing 



Christopher John Lind 

Arts & Sciences 
English 



Scott E. Lipman 

School of Management 
Finance 



Virginia A. Lipscy 

Arts & Sciences 

Philosophy 

Mathematics 



Lauren M. Locascio 

Arts & Sciences 
Political Science 



Renee Alison Lockhart 

Arts & Sciences 
Psychology 



Joseph George Loeffler 

Arts & Sciences 
Political Science 



Rebecca Lohse 

Arts & Sciences 
International Studies 



John M. Levenlck 

Arts dt Sciences 
Philosophy 
Theology 




Margaret E. Liegel 
Arts & Sciences 
Hispanic Studies 




Jillian A. Livolsi 

Arts & Sciences 
Sociology 




Jill Lombard 

Arts & Sciences 
Economics 



Seniors 359 



Heather M. Lombardo 

School of Management 
Arts & Sciences 



Kathleen Long 

School of Management 
Marketing 



Sarah M. Long 

Arts & Sciences 
Philosophy 



Cassandra Doris Lopez 

Arts & Sciences 
Communications 



Jessica A. Lopez 

School of Education 
Elementary Ed. 
Hispanic Exp. 




Mariana F. Lopez 

School of Management 

Marketing 

Finance 



Alberto J. Lopez 

Arts & Sciences 
Biology 



Jillian Lopiano 

Arts & Sciences 
Communications 



Katherine A. Lotas 

Arts & Sciences 
Communications 



Dunsteadler D. Louis 

Arts & Sciences 
Psychology 




James William Louttit 

Arts & Sciences 
History 



Sarah Ann Love 

School of Education 
Human Development 



Julie G. Lowder 

School of Management 

Finance 

Mgmt. Info Systems 



Kristin Sigrid Lowe 

Arts & Sciences 
Economics 



Timothy P. Lowney 

Arts & Sciences 
English 




Oliver H. Lubin 

Arts & Sciences 
Computer Science 



James P. Lucarelli 

Arts & Sciences 
Economics 



Jennifer L. Lucas 

School of Nursing 
Nursing 



Amy F. Luckiewicz 

Arts & Sciences 
Communications 



Julie Lufkin 

School of Education 

Human Development 

Political Science 



360 Seniors 



Pauline A. Lugira 

Ails & Sciences 
English 



Minelle Marie Lugo 

Arts & Sciences 
Biology 



Loretta Kit-Ling Luk 

Arts & Sciences 
Chemistry 



Britta Loren Lukomski 

Arts & Sciences 
English 



\\ end) k. Luong 

Arts & Sciences 
Communications 




Adriane Marie Luongo 

School of Education 

Elementary Ed. 
Human Development 



Anne C. Lynch 

Arts & Sciences 

Theology 

Film Studies 



Richard T. Lynch 

Arts & Sciences 
Economics 



Gillian H. Mac Donald 

School of Management 
Marketing 



Andrew W. Mac Intosh 

Arts & Sciences 

Economics 

Theology 



Mark T. Macaluso 

School of Management 
Accounting 



David W. Lynch 

Arts & Sciences 
Mathematics 





Jonathan D. Lynch 

Arts & Sciences 
Political Science 



Mary Lynch 

School of Nursing 
Nursing 




Seniors 361 





Timothy J. Macfarland 

Arts & Sciences 
Computer Science 



Rosemary E. Mack 

Arts & Sciences 
English 




Theresa Ann Madison 

School of Education 

English 

Secondary Ed. 



Carmella Maffeo 

Arts & Sciences 
Communications 




John Magee 

Arts & Sciences 

Computer Science 

Mathematics 



Laura C. Magnani 

Arts & Sciences 

Communications 

Economics 



Jennifer Mary Magri 

Arts & Sciences 
Biology 



Abbey Mahady 

Arts & Sciences 
Sociology 



Catherine Fallon Maher 

Arts & Sciences 

English 
Communications 




John F. Mahon 

Arts & Sciences 
History 



Megan Ann Mahoney 

Arts & Sciences 
English 



Patrick Foulke Mahoney 

Arts & Sciences 
English 



Charles Sean Mailloux 

Arts & Sciences 
Political Science 
Communications 



Matthew F. Mainelli 

School of Management 

Finance 

Mgmt. Info Systems 



362 Seniors 



f 


1 


t 


t 



Ryan Theodore Maione 

School of Management 

Computer Science 
Marketing 



Joanna I \ n Malinowski 

School of Management 
Marketing 



Sarah B. Mallov 

School of Nursing 
Nursing 



Jonathan Robert Maiulle 
School of Management 

Marketing 
Finance 



Man I). Manganiello 

Arts & Sciences 
Psychology 




Brian Joseph Manley 

School of Management 

Finance 

Philosophy 



Margaret Mary Manning 

Arts & Sciences 
Psychology 



Matthew R. Manning 

School of Management 

Accounting 

Finance 



John M. Mannix 

Arts & Sciences 

English 



Tammi L. Mansolf 

Arts & Sciences 
Theology 




Gary A. Mantoosh 

Arts & Sciences 

Communications 

Theater Arts 



Isaac J. Manzo 

Arts & Sciences 
Economics 



Ryan B. Mara 

School of Management 
Op. & Strategic Mgmt 



Mari A. Marchionte 

Arts & Sciences 
English 



Kimberly A. Marino 

School of Education 

Elem./Mod. Spec. Needs 

Math/Comp. Sci. 




Leah A. Marino 

School of Management 
Accounting 



Maria Marottoli 

Arts & Sciences 
Psychology 



Jose A. Marquez 

Arts & Sciences 
German 



Jonathan M. Marsh 

Arts & Sciences 

Political Science 

Theology 



Margot E. Marsh 

Arts & Sciences 
Communications 



Seniors 363 



2001 



No snow days. ..The DustbowL.The Fight Song.. .The Eagle Mascot... The new 



364 Seniors 



inflatable eagle mascot.. .Going to Who's. ..Thursday night at the Kells...Roggies...Keg stands... I tilgating.. 




Seniors 365 




366 Seniors 




Seniors 367 





Jeffrey W. Marston 

Arts & Sciences 
Computer Science 



Joseph F. Martel 

Arts & Sciences 
Economics 



Leon P. Martin 

School of Management 
General Mgmt 



Steven R. Martin 

Arts & Sciences 
English 



Timothy G. Martin 

Arts & Sciences 
Sociology 



Laurie Martindale 

Arts & Sciences 
English 



Jasmine Martinez 

Arts & Sciences 
Sociology 



Bradley W. Marxer 

Arts & Sciences 
Communications 



Christopher M. Mashia 

School of Management 

Finance 

Accounting 



Laura Mason 

Arts & Sciences 

Computer Science 

Film Studies 



Jonathan T. Marston 

School of Management 
Accounting 




Katie Martin 

School of Management 
Accounting 




Michael A. Martinelli 

Arts & Sciences 
Communications 




Stephen J. Massimi 

Arts & Sciences 
Psychology 



368 Seniors 



Alyson Mathews 

Arts & Sciences 
English 



Audric P. Mathurin 

Arts & Sciences 
Political Science 



Amanda H. Matragrano 

Arts & Sciences 
English 



Heidi L. Matt 

Arts & Sciences 
Psychology 
Philosophy 



Desiree T. Matthews 

Arts & Sciences 

Theater Arts 

English 




Camille R. Mattia 

Arts & Sciences 
History 



Jean Mattson 

School of Management 
Finance 



Nydia J. Mauras 

School of Education 

Elem./Mod. Spec. Needs 

Theology 



Christina L. Maurielio 

School of Education 

Elem./Mod. Spec. Needs 

Human Development 



Nicholas A. Mauro 

Arts & Sciences 

Philosophy 

English 




Jonathan W. Mautschke 

Arts & Sciences 
Biology 



Brandie Maxwell 

Arts & Sciences 
Sociology 



Mlcaela E. Maxwell 

Arts & Sciences 
Economics 



David May 

Arts & Sciences 
Biology 



Steffan J. May 

Arts & Sciences 

Biology 

Philosophy 




Elise C. Mazareas 

Arts & Sciences 
Env. Geo. Scien. 



Laura A. Mazor 

Arts & Sciences 
Biology 



Scott G. Mazzola 

Arts & Sciences 
Philosophy 



Brendan McCabe 

Arts & Sciences 

Economics 

Finance 



Robert A. McCaffrey 

Arts & Sciences 
Communications 



369 



John E. McCann 

Arts & Sciences 
Philosophy 



Owen McCarron 

Arts & Sciences 
English 



Terrence M. McCarron 

School of Management 
Marketing 



James P. McCarthy 

School of Management 
Finance 



Jenny A. McCarthy 

School of Education 

Elem./Mod. Spec. Needs 

Human Development 




Thomas W. McCarthy 

School of Management 
Human Resources Mgmt. 



Kevin D. McCartney 

Arts & Sciences 
English 



Joshua B. McCaully 

School of Management 

Marketing 

Mgmt. Info Systems 



Clay S. McClure 

Arts & Sciences 

Env. Geo. Scien. 

Economics 



Mary C. McConnachiei 

Arts & Sciences 
Sociology 




Kelly M. McCoy 

Arts & Sciences 
Sociology 



Elizabeth B. McDermott 

School of Education 
Elementary Ed. 



Jesse J. McDermott 

Arts & Sciences 
English 



Shannon C. McDermott 

Arts & Sciences 
Sociology 



Gavin B. McDonagh 

Arts & Sciences 
History 



370 Seniors 



Brent M. McDonald 

Arts & Sciences 
Sociology 



Carolyn M. McDonald 

Arts & Sciences 
Biology 



Courtney R. McDonald 

Ails & Sciences 
Communications 



Krin L. McDonald 
School of Education 
Human Development 



Matthew .1. McDonald 

School oi Management 
Finance 




Ryan P. McDonough 

Arts & Sciences 
Communications 



Kevin McGarr 

School of Management 
Marketing 



Michael A. McGinty 

School of Management 
Marketing 



Michael F. McGoohan 

Arts & Sciences 
History 



Mark T. McGregor 

Arts & Sciences 
Political Science 




Mary D. McGregor 

Arts & Sciences 
Psychology 



Todd S. McGuire 

Arts & Sciences 
History 




Mairead McGurrin 

Arts & Sciences 
History 



Maureen M. Mclntyre 

School of Education 

Human Development 

English 




Seniors 371 





Lisa E. Mclsaac 

School of Management 
Accounting 

Finance 



Jennifer C. McKay 

School of Management 
Marketing 




Taja McKinney-Richards 

Arts & Sciences 
International Studies 



Jacob S. McKinstry 

Arts & Sciences 
English 




Shawn P. McLaughlin 

Arts & Sciences 
English 



Brian J. McMahon 

School of Management 
Accounting 



Douglas F. McMahon 

Arts & Sciences 
Biology 



Julie M. McMahon 

School of Management 
Finance 



Olivia A. McMahon 

School of Education 
Elementary Ed. 




Maura B. McManmon 

Arts & Sciences 
English 



Timothy C. McManus 

Arts & Sciences 
Biology 



Susan McNally 

Arts & Sciences 
Political Science 
Communications 



Brian C. McPeake 

Arts & Sciences 

Political Science 

Economics 



Tracy K. McSweeney 

School of Management 
Marketing 



372 Seniors 



Maeve G. Meany 

School of Education 

Human Development 

Sociology 



Krista C. Melien 

Arts & Sciences 
Biochemistry 



Sean I). IVIeenan 

School of Management 

Finance 

Mgmt. Info Systems 



Matthew S. Melanson 

Arts & Sciences 
History 



Kduardo Melchior 
Arts c\; Sciences 
Political Science 



Jessica EL Melgej 

Arts & Sciences 
Biolog) 




Caroline Meltzer 

Arts & Sciences 
International Studies 



Joshua Keith Memaio 

Arts & Sciences 
English 



Denise M. Mencel 

School of Education 
Secondary Ed. 



Jarett G. \V. Mendoza 

Arts & Sciences 
Env. Geo. Scien. 




Ramesh G. Menon 

School of Management 
Finance 



Bethany A. Merck 

School of Nursing 
Nursing 



Christopher A. Mercurio 

School of Management 



Marketing 



Mark P. Merlini 

Arts & Sciences 

Communications 

English 



Ryan T. Merrell 

School of Management 

Marketing 
Op. & Strategic Mgmt. 



Tihtina E. Mersie 

Arts & Sciences 

Communications 

Economics 



Christine L. Merullo 

School of Management 
Finance 



Peter Messina 

Arts & Sciences 
Sociology 



Nicole M. Merlo 

Arts & Sciences 
Communications 




Margaret M. Messitt 

Arts & Sciences 
Communications 



Seniors 373 



2001 



Did you ever take the bus from Lower to McElroy? 




374 Seniors 



Have you ever made snow angels in the Dustbowl? a snowman? had a snowball fight? 




Seniors 375 




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376 Seniors 





Sports 377 




Stacia A. Michel 

Arts & Sciences 
Psychology 



Jill F. Migliero 

School of Education 

Elem./Mod. Spec. Needs 

Child in Society 




Kenneth P. Meszkat 

School of Management 
Finance 



Mary Meyer 

Arts & Sciences 

Political Science 

Philosophy 




Megan K. Meyer 

Arts & Sciences 
Computer Science 



Robert G. Meyer 

School of Management 
Finance 



Kathryn Mikus 

School of Education 

History 

Secondary Ed 



Kathleen G. Milbier 

Arts & Sciences 
Psychology 



Kristina Miletic 

Arts & Sciences 
Political Science 




Matthew D. Milewski 

Arts & Sciences 
Chemistry 



Diana L. Miller 

Arts & Sciences 
Theology 



Jenilyn K. Miller 

Arts & Sciences 
History 



Kelly M. Miller 

Arts & Sciences 
English 



Lisa A. Miller 

Arts & Sciences 
Communications 



378 Seniors 



Caron M. Mineo 

School of Management 
Computer Science 



Julie E. Minihane 

School of Education 
Early Childhood 
Child in Society 



Jamie S. Minkoff 

Arts & Sciences 
Psychology 



Susiina Miranda 

Arts & Sciences 

Psychology 

Theology 



Maria Misci 

School ol Nursing 

Nursing 




Mirella M. Misiaszek 

Arts & Sciences 
English 



Katherine A. Misko 

Arts & Sciences 
English 



Samir M. Mistry 

Arts & Sciences 
Computer Science 



Michael F. Mita 

School of Management 
Marketing 



Kahlil A. Mitchell 

Arts & Sciences 

Biochemistry 




Constantine Mittendorf 

Arts & Sciences 
Communications 



Daniel A. Mon 

Arts & Sciences 

History 

Philosophy 



Frank N. Modica 

School of Management 
Finance 



Martin E. Moline 

School of Management 
Accounting 



Katherine A. Moliterno 

School of Education 

Secondary Ed. 

English 



Brian Mollo 

Arts & Sciences 
General Msmt. 




Kristen E. Monaco 

School of Education 

Psychology 

Early Childhood 



Mark D. Monahan 

Arts & Sciences 
Economics 



Laura J. Monks 

Arts & Sciences 
Economics 



Nicholl D. Montgomery 

Arts & Sciences 
Psychology 



Seniors 379 



Jameel S. Moore 

Arts & Sciences 

Political Science 

English 



Frank J. Morano 

Arts & Sciences 

Communications 

Psychology 



Seamus M. Morley 

Arts & Sciences 
Political 



Wellesley Morris 

School of Management 
Accounting 



Michael Richard Moore 

Arts & Sciences 

History 
Political Science 



Allison L. Morabito 

Arts & Sciences 
Mathematics 



Annelice M. Morales 

Arts & Sciences 
International Studies 



Noria A. Morales 

Arts & Sciences 
English 




Jessica E. Moreira 

Arts & Sciences 
English 



Rebecca Morgan 

Arts & Sciences 
Mathematics 



Ashley Morganti 

Arts & Sciences 
Psychology 



Katie A. Morganti 

School of Nursing 
Nursing 




Alina S. Morris 

Arts & Sciences 
Political Science 



Andrew T. Morris 

School of Management 

Finance 

Computer Science 



Jeffrey J. Morris 

School of Management 
General Mgmt 



Kevin Morris 

School of Management 
Finance 




Tim Morrison 

School of Management 
Finance 



Patrick M. Morrissey 

Arts & Sciences 
Economics 



Jessica Moschner 

School of Management 

Mgmt. Info Systems 

Marketing 



Carrie A. Mosier 

Arts & Sciences 
Communications 



380 Seniors 



Michael P. Mothes 

Arts & Sciences 
Theology 



Heather K. Mull 

Arts & Sciences 
Communications 



Michael J. Motyl 

School of Education 

Mathematics 

Secondary Ed. 



Jennifer Rana Muhawi 

School of Management 
Marketing 



Andrew H. Mui 

Arts & Sciences 
Computer Science 



William J. Mullally 

Arts & Sciences 
English 



Pauline L. Mulleady 

Arts & Sciences 
Psychology 



Brian R. Mullen 

School of Management 
Marketing 



Jason \l. Mnlgreti 
Vrts & Sciences 

History 




Arsima A. Muller 

Arts & Sciences 
Political Science 




Brian P. Murphy 

Arts & Sciences 
History 



Bryan Murphy 

Arts & Sciences 
Communications 



Seniors 381 



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Gregory T. Murphy 

Arts & Sciences 
Political Science 



Katherine C. Murphy 

School of Education 

Elem./Mod. Spec. Needs 

Communications 



Katie M. Murphy 

School of Management 

Marketing 

Communications 




Christopher P. Murphy 

Arts & Sciences 
Political Science 



Elizabeth G. Murphy 

Arts & Sciences 
Political Science 



Laurie B. Murphy 

Arts & Sciences 
Communications 



Shannon M. Murphy 

School of Education 
Elementary Ed. 
Child in Society 



Timothy Murphy 

School of Management 
Marketing 



Catherine A. Murray 

Arts & Sciences 
Biology 



Shaheer M. Mustafa 

Arts & Sciences 
Sociology 



Colleen M. Murphy 

School of Education 

Elementary Ed. 
Human Development 




Erin E. Murphy 

School of Education 

English 

Elementary Ed. 




Megan C. Murphy 

Arts & Sciences 
Communications 




Katherine M. Muxie 

Arts & Sciences 

Political Science 

English 



382 Seniors 



Amy L. Muzyka 

School of Education 
Elementary Ed. 
Child in Society 



kimmI.i n. Nafziger 

Arts & Sciences 

Sociology 



Carmen A. Nappa 

School of Management 

Finance 

Economics 



Sujata M. \ara\ana 

Arts & Sciences 

English 



Shannon S. Naogbton 

s>. In ml ot Managemenl 
Marketing 




Michael D. Naylor 

School of Management 
Finance 



Daniel G. Nelson 

Arts & Sciences 
Communications 



Sara L. Nemchek 

Arts & Sciences 
Political Science 



Brian D. Nesbitt 

Aits & Sciences 

English 

Theater Arts 



Peter J. Newell 

Arts & Sciences 
Communications 




Kathryn W. Newman 

School of Nursing 
Nursing 



Todd W. Newman 

School of Management 
Economics 
Philosophy 



Thuy-Thao D. Nguyen 

School of Management 
Mgmt. Info Systems 



Brian D. Nicholas 

Arts & Sciences 
Bioloav 



Timothy D. Nichols 

Arts & Sciences 
Psychology 




Sarah M. Nickerson 

Arts & Sciences 
Psychology 



Merry L. Nickl 

Arts & Sciences 
Chemistry 



Karolyn Nielsen 

Arts & Sciences 
Psychology 



Francesca M. Niro 

Arts & Sciences 
Hispanic Studies 



Ermenegildo Niutta 

School of Management 

Finance 

Accounting 



Seniors 383 



2001 



Did you ever slide down the muddy Duschene Hill in the rain?... Have you ever 



384 Seniors 



fallen asleep in the Dustbowl?...Have you ever been (I 



irown up in a limn 



.in push-up :... Remember late nightr 




Seniors 385 




386 Seniors 




Seniors 387 





V 



Kensuke Niwa 

School of Management 
Finance/Info Systems 
Op. & Strategic Mgmt 



Mary C. Nix 

School of Education 

Elementary Ed. 
Human Development 




Angela M. Niznik 

Arts & Sciences 
Psychology 



Julie Ann Noble 

School of Management 
Finance 



Nicole Noonan 

School of Education 
Communications 



Shaun C. Noone 

School of Management 

Computer Science 

Mgmt. Info Systems 



Katherine M. Norman 

Arts & Sciences 
Psychology 




Jeffrey S. Normant 

School of Management 
Finance/ Accounting 



Robert E. Norton 

Arts & Sciences 
Economics 




Daniel T. Novellano 

Arts & Sciences 
Political Science 



Marie C. Nycz 

Arts & Sciences 
Mathematics 



Christopher A. Nylen 

School of Management 
Finance 



Danielle J. O'Banion 

Arts & Sciences 
Psychology 



Kristyn E. O'Brien 

School of Management 

Marketing 

Human Res. Mgmt. 



388 Seniors 



Robert M. O'Brien 

Arts & Sciences 
Philosophy 



Megan H. O'Day 

School of Nursing 
Nursing 



Patrice K. O'Leary 

Arts & Sciences 
Psychology 



Ann K. O'Connell 

Arts & Sciences 
Psychology 



Liam P. O'Connell 

School of Management 

Finance 

Marketing 



Meghan K. O'Connel 

Arts & Sciences 
Economics 



Patrick (,. ()*( onnell 

School of Management 

Finance 

Op. & Strategic Mgmt. 



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John T. O'Halloran 

Arts & Sciences 
Communications 



Stacey O'Halloran 

Arts & Sciences 

Psychology 
Communications 



John A. O'Keefe 

Arts & Sciences 
Studio Art 



Jennifer A. O'Keeffe 

Arts & Sciences 
Communications 




Carrie T. O'Neil 

School of Education 

Elementary Ed. 
Math/Comp. Science 



Paul C. O'Neil 

Arts & Sciences 
Mathematics 



Brian T. O'Neill 

Arts & Sciences 
Biochemistry 



Cormac E. O'Neill 

Arts & Sciences 
Biology 




Gerald M. O'Neill 

Arts & Sciences 
Biology 



Leigh C. O'Neill 

Arts & Sciences 
Classics 



Meghan E. O'Neill 

Arts & Sciences 
History 



Erin A. O' Reilly 

Arts & Sciences 

Theater Arts 

English 



Thomas F. O'Reilly 

School of Management 
Marketing 



Seniors 389 



Cristin K. O'Rourke 

Arts & Sciences 
International Studies 



Katelin B. O'Rourke 

Arts & Sciences 
History 



Brendan D. O'Shea 

Arts & Sciences 

Political Science 

Philosophy 



Lacy K. O'Toole 

School of Management 

Marketing 

Communications 



Thomas D. O'Toole 

School of Management 
General Mgmt 




Kazuhito C. Obara 

School of Education 
Human Development 



Jonathan H. Oberman 

Arts & Sciences 
History 



Linda S. Oh 

Arts & Sciences 
Communications 



Sharif J. Okasha 

Arts & Sciences 
Psychology 



Raul F. Oliva 

Arts & Sciences 
Biochemistry 




Erik J. Olson 

School of Management 
Finance 



Jonathan P. Olsson 

Arts & Sciences 
Political Science 



Amanda Orlando 

Arts & Sciences 
English 



Ekunayo B. Osimboni 

Arts & Sciences 
Biochemistry 



Reid T. Oslin 

Arts & Sciences 
Political Science 




Andrew J. Padilla 

Arts & Sciences 
Communications 



Matthew G. Pallai 

Arts & Sciences 
Mathematics 



Louis A. Pallante 

Arts & Sciences 
Sociology 



Anthony V. Pane 

Arts & Sciences 
English 



Brian S. Pantaleo 

Arts & Sciences 
Political Science 



390 Seniors 



Dana N. Panzarino 


Charles A. Papazian 


Ariel J. Paredes 


Lia M. Parico 


Lil\ Park 


Arts & Sciences 


School of Management 


Ails & Sciences 


Arts & Sciences 


Arts & Sciences 


English 


Finance 


Communications 


Chemistry 


Mathematics 




Bradley M. Parker 

Arts & Sciences 

Theater Arts 

English 



Omar E. Parra 

Arts & Sciences 

International Studies 

Independent 



Melissa E. Parson 

Arts & Sciences 
Philosophy 



Evan Pasqua 

Arts & Sciences 
Communications 



Christopher Pasquale 

Arts & Sciences 
Psychology 




Jill D. Patten 


Timothy R. Paulus 


Arts & Sciences 


School of Management 


Biology 


Finance 



Seniors 391 





Robert E. Pease 

School of Management 

Finance 

Economics 



Mark Pedulla 

Arts & Sciences 
English 




Marianne Peirce 

Arts & Sciences 
International Studies 



Gina P. Pelaez 

Arts & Sciences 
Psychology 



Matthew Pelletier 

Arts & Sciences 

Computer Science 

Philosophy 



Michelle Pelletier 

School of Education 
Human Development 



Brian J. Peltonen 

Arts & Sciences 
Computer Science 



Xue-Fun Peng 

School of Management 

Mgmt. Info Systems 

Finance 



Plamyenne T. Penka 

School of Education 
Human Development 




Jonathan C. Penta 

School of Management 
Finance 



Victor M. Pereira 

Arts & Sciences 
Biology 



Clara M. Perez 

Arts & Sciences 

Communications 

Theater Arts 



Yvonne Perez-Zarraga 

Arts & Sciences 
Communications 



Kyla R. Perfetuo 

School of Management 

Marketing 

Finance 



392 Seniors 



Jesse Perillo 

Arts & Sciences 
History 



Jennifer L. Perrotta 

Arts & Sciences 
Computer Science 



Jenna M. Person 
School of Education 

Elementary Ed. 
Child in Society 



Heather A. Peterson 

Arts & Sciences 
English 



Shaun E. Peterson 

Arts & Sciences 
Biolog) 




Jason K. Petrek 

Arts & Sciences 

English 

Economics 



Thomas J. Pettit 

Arts & Sciences 
History 



Marjorie M. Pew 

Arts & Sciences 
English 



Erika E. Pfeifer 

School of Management 
Finance 



Cathleen M. Phelen 

Arts & Sciences 
Philosophy 



Alison H. Piazza 

School of Education 

Secondary Ed. 

English 



Michael T. Picone 

School of Management 

Economics 

Finance 



Lauren B. Pisano 

Arts & Sciences 

Finance 
Hispanic Studies 



Despina Pitsis 

Arts & Sciences 
International Studies 



Renee A. Pitts 

Arts & Sciences 
Psychology 



Kelvie M. Pleas 

School of Nursing 
Nursins 



Ryan F. Poe 

Arts & Sciences 
Political Science 



Katharine M. Phalan 

Arts & Sciences 
History 




Gina M. Piscopiello 

School of Education 

Early Childhood 

Psychology 




Lauren E. Poile 

Arts & Sciences 
Communications 



Seniors 393 



2001 



Do you remember the bonfire in the Mods? ... Cheap beer? 



394 Seniors 



Climbing the O'Neill Stairs? ... Climbing the stairs to Upper at the end of the day? 




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Seniors 395 




396 Seniors 




Seniors 397 





Grecory C. Polcsa 

School of Management 

Marketing 

Human Res. Mgmt. 



Conor J. Politz 

Arts & Sciences 
Economics 




Mary E. Polizzotti 

Arts & Sciences 
English 



Shaun M. Polke 

School of Management 

Economics 
Op. & Strategic Mgmt. 




Adam D. Pollock 

Arts & Sciences 
History 



Daniel Pond 

Arts & Sciences 
Theology 



Vincent P. Poon 

Arts & Sciences 
Sociology 



Sylvie Potookian 

Arts & Sciences 
English 



Erik T. Potter 

Arts & Sciences 
Political Science 




Jason A. Pouncy 

School of Management 
Finance 



Stacie C. Powderly 

Arts & Sciences 
Political Science 



Sarah A. Powell 

Arts & Sciences 
Sociology 



Gregory M. Powers 

School of Management 
Finance/ Accounting 



Mary K. Prangley 

Arts & Sciences 
Communications 



398 Seniors 



Meghan M. Pressman 

Arts & Sciences 
Theater Arts 



Christina Price 

Arts & Sciences 
Biology 



Nicolas J. Priselac 
School of Management 

Op. & Strategic Mgmt. 
Philosophy 



David S. Proctor 

School of Management 
Finance 



Jeffrey M. Prokop 

Arts & Sciences 
History 




Kimberly J. Prokop 

School of Education 

Child in Society 

Elem. Mod. Spec. Needs 



Amy L. Pupko 

School of Management 
Marketing 



Nicole D. Puppo 

School of Nursing 
Nursing 



John F. Purciello 

Arts & Sciences 
Studio Art 
Art History 



Kathleen Quackenbush 

Arts & Sciences 
English 




David J. Quaile 

School of Management 

Finance 

Accounting 



Caitlyn J. Queenin 

School of Education 

Elem. /Mod. Spec. Needs 

Human Development 



Meredith R. Quick 

School of Management 
Finance 



Michael W. Quilter 

School of Management 
Accounting 



Ryan T. Quinn 

School of Education 

Human Development 

English 




Joel R. Quintong 

School of Management 
Accounting 



John M. Racanelli 

Arts & Sciences 
English 



Katherine M. Rado 

Arts & Sciences 
Communications 



Lucy Radovinsky 

School of Nursing 

Nursing 



John J. Raffaele 

Arts & Sciences 
English 



Seniors 399 



Stephen F. Ragalevsky 

School of Management 
Mgmt. Info Systems 



Robert G. Rahilly 

Arts & Sciences 

Philosophy 
Political Science 



Dominique M. Rakiec 

Arts & Sciences 

English 

Philosophy 



Ana R. Ramirez 

Arts & Sciences 
Communications 



Elyssa A. Ramirez 

Arts & Sciences 
Computer Science 




Julie E. Ramsland 

Arts & Sciences 
Sociology 



Elizabeth J. Randall 

Arts & Sciences 

English 

Philosophy 



Kathryn E. Ray 

Arts & Sciences 
English 



Kristine A. Raymond 

School of Nursing 
Nursing 



Micaela A. Rea 

School of Education 

Elem./Mod. Spec. Need: 

English 




Kristin M. Reagan 

Arts & Sciences 
English 



Robert J. Reardon 

School of Management 

Finance 

Mgmt. Info Systems 



Stephen Rebelo 

School of Management 
Accounting 



Devon K. Reber 

Arts & Sciences 
Sociology 



Anne C. Rechkemmer 

School of Nursing 
Nursing 




James G. Reece 

School of Education 

Elem./Mod. Spec. Needs 

General Science 



400 Seniors 



Daniel C. Reed 

School of Management 
Finance 



Lashunda C. Reed 

Arts & Sciences 
English 



Gregory F. Regan 

Arts & Sciences 
Communications 
" Economics 



Sarah E. Regensdorf 

Arts & Sciences 
Communications 



I 1 fc f 


1 


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Sarah C. Reiley 

Arts & Sciences 

Internationa] Studies 

Philosophy 



Beth Ann Rcilly 

Arts & Sciences 
History 

Political Science 



Charles T. Reilly 

School of Management 
Marketing 



Karen M. Keilly 

School of Management 

Finance 



Jessica S. Keimelt 

Arts & Sciences 

History 




Kimberley A. Reimers 

Arts & Sciences 
Human Resources Mgmt. 



Stacy N. Reiter 

Arts & Sciences 

English 
Political Science 



Kristine Rembach 

Arts & Sciences 
Chemistry 



Christopher J. Reynolds 

Arts & Sciences 
History 



Megan D. Reynolds 

Arts & Sciences 
Psychology 




Julie A. Rianna 

School of Education 

Elem./Mod. Spec. Needs 

Human Development 



Christopher Riccobono 

School of Education 

Elem. 

Child in Society 




Cheryl A. Rice 

School of Management 
Marketing 



Rebecca E. Rice 

School of Education 

Secondary Ed. 

History 




401 




Barbara Ritacco 

Arts & Sciences 
English 



Samantha L. Ritchie 

Arts & Sciences 
Communications 



Benjamin J. Ritzo 

Arts & Sciences 
English 



Michael S. Rich 

Arts & Sciences 
Economics 



Margaret M. Rickard 

School of Management 
Marketing 



Christine E. Rizzo 

Arts & Sciences 
Economics 



John T. Richardson 

Arts & Sciences 
Psychology 



Emily F. Rine 

Arts & Sciences 

Germanic Study 

Linguistics 



Sarah T. Roach 

Arts & Sciences 
English 




Jessica E. Roan 

Arts & Sciences 
Biology 



Pamela S. Robertson 

School of Education 
Human Development 



Kate M. Robichaud 

School of Education 
Human Development 



Jonathan P. Rocafort 

School of Management 
Marketing 
Philosophy 



John T. Roche 

School of Managemeni 
Finance 



402 Seniors 



Christina M. Roder 

Arts & Sciences 
Sociology 



Julio Rodriguez 

Arts & Sciences 
English 



Liliana Rodriguez 

School of Management 
Marketing 



Gerald F. Rogers 

Arts & Sciences 

Economics 



Tfmothj P. Rogers 

School ot Management 
Finance 




Joshua K. Rollins 

Arts & Sciences 
EnviroGeoScience 



Randy S. Romano 

School of Management 

Finance 

Mgmt. Info Systems 



Marie Romelus 

School of Management 
General Mgmt 



Lucia Romeo 

Arts & Sciences 
Communications 



Jessica G. Roos 

Arts & Sciences 
Communications 
Political Science 



Christopher R. Ropiak 

Arts & Sciences 
Biology 



Christopher Rosado 

School of Management 
General Mgmt 



Daenya A. Rosbeck 

School of Education 

Elementary Ed. 
Human Development 



Cara A. Rooney 

School of Management 
Human Resources Msmt. 




Steven J. Ross 

Arts & Sciences 
Political Science 




Kathleen Rossy 

Arts & Sciences 
Biology 



Jean E. Rothe 

Arts & Sciences 
Biology 



James C. Rowan 

School of Management 
Mgmt. Info Systems 



Katherine G. Rowan 

Arts & Sciences 

English 

Philosophy 



Abigail L. Rowland 

School of Management 
Marketing 



Seniors 403 



2001 



What would you do to get a parking sticker? How many parking 



404 Seniors 



tickets have you gotten? How many times have you been towed by BC: 





Seniors 405 




406 Seniors 





I 
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1 






Seniors 407 





James P. Rubera 

Arts & Sciences 
Communications 



Joanna Rubin 

Arts & Sciences 
Communications 




Alexandra J. Rueckel 

School of Management 

Marketing 

Finance 



Arienne Rueda 

Arts & Sciences 
Economics 




Patricia P. Runcie 

Arts & Sciences 
Theater Arts 



Tara M. Rupp 

Arts & Sciences 
Computer Science 



Matthew D. Rush 

Arts & Sciences 
Biology 



Christopher A. Russell 

School of Management 
Marketing 



Matthew S. Rutledge 

Arts & Sciences 
Economics 




Monica N. Rutt 

Arts & Sciences 
International Studies 



Christen R. Rutter 

Arts & Sciences 
Political Science 



Edward P. Ryan 

Arts & Sciences 
Political Science 



Emily J. Ryan 

School of Education 

Human Development 

Communications 



Eric A. Ryan 

Arts & Sciences 
Communications 



408 Seniors 



John l>. K\ ;m 

Arts & Sciences 
Communications 



Jonathan P. Ryan 

Arts & Sciences 
Political Science 



Siobhan L. Ryan 

Arts & Sciences 
History 
English 



Patricia A. Ryder 

Arts & Sciences 

Communications 

Theology 



Taksapong Sajjachaiyanont 

School of Management 

Finance 

Economics 



Teresa M. Sala 

Arts & Sciences 
Philosophy 
Psychology 



Kara E. Saldarini 

Arts & Sciences 
Communications 
Political Science 



Richard E. Salerno 

School of Management 

Accounting 

Finance 



'Veronica Sanchez- Varela 

Arts & Sciences 
Psychology 



Stefanie Sandello 

School of Education 
Human Development 



David M. Sansevero 

Arts & Sciences 
History 



David A. Santacroce 

School of Management 

Economics 

Finance 



John Rydzynski 

Arts <fc Sciences 

Communications 

English 




Claire C. Sammon 

Arts & Sciences 
English 




John P. Santucci 

School of Management 
Finance 




Laura Sarrasin 

School of Management 

Finance 

Marketing 



James M.Sartori 

School of Management 

Finance 

Mgmt. Info Systems 



Todd B. Sauer 

Arts & Sciences 
History 



Matthew C. Savage 

School of Management 
Finance 



Brandon D. Saxon 

Arts & Sciences 
Economics 



Seniors 409 




Jocelyn M. Saxon 

Arts & Sciences 

History 
Germanic Studies 



Jennifer L. Sayanlar 

Arts & Sciences 
Chemistry 



Kristin A. Scaduto 

School of Management 

Finance 

Marketing 



Catherine E. Scanlon 

Arts & Sciences 
History 



Colleen Scanlon 

Arts & Sciences 
English 




Michael J. Scannell 

Arts & Sciences 
History 



Kristin L. Scerra 

Arts & Sciences 
Psychology 



Courtney J. Schaeffer 

Arts & Sciences 
History 



Brian J. Scheid 

Arts & Sciences 

Communications 

Economics 



Cristiana Schiketanz 

School of Management 

Finance 

Mgmt. Info Systems 



Steven J. Schlegel 

School of Management 

Accounting 

Mgmt. Info Systems 



Glenn M. Schley 

Arts & Sciences 
Philosophy 

English 



Carl G. Schmid 

School of Management 

Finance 

Marketing 



Paul A. Schofield 

Arts & Sciences 
Computer Science 



Dustin E. Schones 

Arts & Sciences 
Physics 



Brian S. Schubert 

Arts & Sciences 
Political Science 



Kirsten A. Schubert 

School of Management 
Marketing 



Michael Schell 

Arts & Sciences 
Political Science 




Ronald D. Schneider 

Arts & Sciences 
Psychology 




David H. Schulte 

Arts & Sciences 
Computer Science 



410 Seniors 




Annie Schultz 

Arts & Sciences 
English 



Peter T. Schultz 

Arts & Sciences 
Geology & Geophysics 



Jennie L. Schulze 

Arts & Sciences 

Political Science 

History 



John VV . Schuster 

Arts & Sciences 

History 
Political Science 



Joseph I.. Schwab 
Arts & Sciences 
Communications 




Matthew D. Scieszka 

Arts & Sciences 
English 



James L. Scordamaglia 

School of Management 
Marketing 



Benjamin R. Scott 

School of Management 
Economics 
Marketing 



Jeffrey M. Scott 

Arts & Sciences 
English 



Tiffany A. Scrudato 

School of Management 
Accounting 




Rebecca L. Seaman 

Arts & Sciences 
Political Science 



Erica Sedano 

Arts & Sciences 
Communications 




Matthew Paul Sefick 

Arts & Sciences 
Communications 



Katherine Dacey Seib 

Arts & Sciences 

Political Science 

Philosophy 




Seniors 411 





Caroline E. Sekula 

Arts & Sciences 

English 

Psychology 



Molly Jackson Sell 

Arts & Sciences 

English 

Economics 




Marcelo S. Serafini 

School of Management 

Op. & Strategic Mgmt 

Mgmt. Info Systems 



Joseph Shabouk 

School of Management 

Finance 

Mgmt. Info Systems 




David Bakr Shafei 

School of Management 
Op. & Strategic Mgmt 



Andrew Shaffer 

Arts & Sciences 
Political Science 



Cheryl H. Shah 

School of Management 
Marketing 



Erin Marie Shamroth 

Arts & Sciences 
English 



Ari Daniel Shapiro 

Arts & Sciences 
Biology 




Sarah Hope Shapiro 

School of Education 

Human Development 

Psychology 



Scott Shapiro 

School of Management 

Finance 

Mgmt. Info Systems 



Vipra Sharma 

Arts & Sciences 
Psychology 



Lindsey Michelle Shaw 

School of Management 
Finance 



Gregory Michael Shea 

Arts & Sciences 
Philosophy 



412 Seniors 



Jennifer Alice Shea 

School of Management 
Finance 



Catherine Sheeny 

Arts & Sciences 
English 



Michael Klias Shekane 

Arts & Sciences 
Economics 

English 



Alex S. Sherman 

Arts & Sciences 
Communications 



Amy E. Sherwin 

Arts & Sciences 
Env. Geo. Scien. 



Miriam Yong Shin 

School of Education 

Human Development 

Sociology 



Jamie C. Shinn 

School of Management 
Finance 



James Anthony Short 

Arts & Sciences 

Political Science 

English 



Adam Jeffrey Shub 

Arts & Sciences 
Communications 



Jonathan D. Shumeyko 

Arts & Sciences 
Psychology 



James Russell Sias 

Arts & Sciences 
Communications 



Lindsay K. Siberry 

School of Education 
Human Development 



Ke%in I). Sberrj 

School of Management 

Computer Science 

Mgmt. Into Systems 




Lane T. Shriner 

School of Education 
Human Development 




Kathleen Siciliano 

Arts & Sciences 
Enalish 




Rachel L. Sijgers 

Arts & Sciences 
Env. Geo. Scien. 



Michael J. Sikora 

Arts & Sciences 
Communications 



Linsley Beth Sikorski 

School of Management 
Op. & Strategic Mgmt 



Jennifer Lynn Sime 

School of Education 

Elem./Mod. Spec. Needs 
Elementary Ed. 



Meredith A. Simon 

School of Education 

Mathematics 

Secondary Ed. 



Seniors 413 



Have you ever slept through an exam? Have you slept through 




414 Seniors 



a final? Have you ever actually had to use your card to get into Walsh? 




Seniors 415 




416 Seniors 




Seniors 417 







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Chelsea M. Simons 

Arts & Sciences 
English 



Lauren M. Siracusa 

Arts & Sciences 
Political Science 
Communications 




Candice T. Sisca 

Arts & Sciences 
Sociology 



Knut Espen Skaug 

School of Management 
General Mgmt 




Christopher S. Skillman 

Arts & Sciences 
Economics 



Nicholas J. Skrine 

Arts & Sciences 
Computer Science 



Tanya Slesinger 

Arts & Sciences 
Communications 



Kerry Sloan 

Arts & Sciences 
History 



Michael C. Slosek 

School of Management 

Finance 

Marketing 




Lauren E. Slusser 

Arts & Sciences 
Sociology 



Marisa A. Smacchia 

School of Management 

Accounting 

Mgmt. Info Systems 



Brian S. Smetana 

Arts & Sciences 
History 



Adam Smith 

Arts & Sciences 
History 



Jayne Smith 

School of Education 
Human Development 



418 Seniors 



*•> <■ 




I 



I 



Matthew C. Smith 

School of Management 
Marketing 



Meghan Smith 

Arts & Sciences 
History 



Shane P.Smith 

School of Management 

Finance 

Marketing 



Thomas B. Smith 

Arts & Sciences 
Communications 



Danielle E. Smyth 

School of Management 

Finance 
Op. cV Strategic \1ymt. 




Nancy Smyth 

School of Education 

Communications 

Elementary Ed. 



Christopher J. Snow 

School of Management 
Mgmt. Info Systems 



Kevin Snyder 

Arts & Sciences 

History 

Economics 



Andrew Sodl 

Arts & Sciences 
Economics 



Katherine Solimine 

School of Education 
Elementary Ed. 

Human Development 




Michael M. Sounds 

Arts & Sciences 
Biology 



Brian Michael Sousa 

Arts & Sciences 
English 



Daniel Owen Southey 

Arts & Sciences 

Economics 

Philosophy 



Joseph A. Spataro 
Arts & Sciences 
Political Science 



Thomas Spataro 

Arts & Sciences 
Music 




Thomas Spellman 

Arts & Sciences 
History 



Paul A. Spelman 

School of Management 

Finance 



Matthew Joseph Spencer 

School of Management 

Accounting 

Mgmt. Info Systems 



Gregory Spicer 

Arts & Sciences 
English 



Matthew V. Spiegel 

School of Management 

Economics 



Seniors 419 



Kristin E. Spriano 

Arts & Sciences 
History 



Kristen Sprinkel 

Arts & Sciences 

Communications 

Studio Art 



Konstadinos J. Spyris 

Arts & Sciences 
Chemistry 



Janna M. Stanhope 

School Of Nursing 
Nursing 



Jennifer M. Stanis 

Arts & Sciences 
Communications 




Nora H. Stanulonis 

School of Management 
Marketing 



Anna Stanzione 

School of Education 

Elem./Int. Spec. Needs 

Math/ Comp Sci. 



Anna Rachelle Stark 

School of Management 
Marketing 



Zachary Stauffer 

Arts & Sciences 
History 



Bruce Steinberg 

School of Management 
General Mgmt 




Kadie A. Steinberg 

Arts & Sciences 
Sociology 



Molly Lueck Steinkrauss 

School of Management 
Marketing 
Philosophy 



Matt Steutterman 

School of Management 
Finance 



Jon Thomas Stevenson 

Arts & Sciences 
Geology & Geophysics 



Kristen M. Stevenson 

Arts & Sciences 
Psychology 




Morgan J. Stiles 

School of Management 
Finance 



Vanessa M. Stolzer 

Arts & Sciences 
Biology 



Keith Straw 

School of Management 
Finance 



Amanda Renee Strzelec 

Arts & Sciences 
Chemistry 



Michael Stuart 

School of Management 
Marketing 



420 Seniors 



f-3- ; 



1 



Courtney Ann Stucker 

School of Management 
Marketing 



Brian J. Sullivan 

Arts & Sciences 
Sociology 



Kate J. Sullivan 

Arts & Sciences 

Sociology 
Communications 



Jessica Ann Suarez 

Arts & Sciences 
Biology 



Gregory Sugalski 

Arts & Sciences 
Independent 




I 



Brendan K. Sullivan 

Arts & Sciences 

Economics 
Communications 



Brendan F. Sullivan 

Arts & Sciences 
English 




Christine Sullivan 

Arts & Sciences 
Political Science 




Mark D. Sullivan 

School of Management 
Finance 




Mary E. Sullivan 

Arts & Sciences 
English 



Meghan K. Sullivan 

Arts & Sciences 

Theater Arts 
Political Science 



Christopher Sullivan 

School of Management 
Op. & Strategic Mgmt 



Claire Deidre Sullivan 

School of Education 

Human Development 

Child in Society 



Daniel E. Sullivan 

School of Management 

Finance 

Accounting 




Seniors 42 1 




Noora Sweid 

School of Management 
Finance 



Craig Andrew Swenson 

Arts & Sciences 
English 



Erica L. Swenson 

School of Management 
Mgmt. Info Systems 



Stephen Swiatocha 

School of Management 

Finance 

Mgmt. Info Systems 



Shaun T. Swick 

Arts & Sciences 
Computer Science 




Meghan M. Sylvester 

School of Management 
Accounting 
Marketing 



Karina Symkoputro 

School of Management 
Finance 



Aaron E. Tabela 

Arts & Sciences 

English 

Economics 



Brain P. Taffe 

Arts & Sciences 
Communications 



Gloria E. Talamantes 

Arts & Sciences 
Biology 



422 Seniors 




v\ 



Christopher C. Talarico 

Arts & Sciences 
Communications 

English 



l / i w. 




Paul G. Talusan 

Arts & Sciences 
Psychology 



Jessi A. Tamayo 

Arts & Sciences 
English 



Natalia Tamayo 

Arts & Sciences 
Communications 



Andre) J. Tan 

Arts & Sciences 
Biology 




Marichelle C. Tanag 

Arts & Sciences 
Computer Science 



Diane A. Tanigawa 

Arts & Sciences 
Psychology 



Christen N. Tarantino 

Arts & Sciences 
English 



Juliana Tarris 

Arts & Sciences 
Psychology 



Thomas Tarro 

Arts & Sciences 
Biology 




Michael S. Tarshi 

Arts & Sciences 
Communications 



Gregory Tartaglia 

Arts & Sciences 
Communications 



Amy Tavares 

School of Education 

Early Childhood 
Human Development 



Gracie Ann Taylor 

Arts & Sciences 
Psychology 



Kelly C. Taylor 

School of Management 
Accounting 
Marketing 




Kristen Nicole Taylor 

School Of Nursing 
Nursing 



Lisa M. Taylor 

School of Education 

Elementary Ed. 

Theology 



Justin E. Tease 

Arts & Sciences 
Computer Science 



Michael Teevan 

School of Management 
Marketing 



Aoife P. Temin 

Arts & Sciences 
English 



Seniors 423 



2001 



Parties off-campus... parties on-campus...Mod parties... Fresh Fudge 



424 Seniors 



signs. ..The student section. .."The fans are the twelfth man"...Midcllemarch...semi-formals 




Seniors 425 



. 9 


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All Day Tuesday ^ 
Free Giveaways ^ 

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426 Seniors 




Seniors 427 





Kelly D. Temme 

School of Management 

Marketing 

Finance 



Robert A.Terranova 

Arts & Sciences 
Political Science 




Charisse M. Terry 

School of Education 

Psychology 

Early Childhood 



Justin Bates Terry 

Arts & Sciences 
Psychology 




Karyn A. Tessitore 

School of Education 

English 

Secondary Ed. 



Lauren L. Theos 

School Of Nursing 
Nursing 



Brian R. Thibeault 

School of Management 

Finance 

Economics 



Kathryn E. Thomas 

Arts & Sciences 

Communications 

Philosophy 



Matthew Steven Thomas 

School of Management 
Finance 




Natacha Thomas 

Arts & Sciences 
Sociology 



Virginia Thomas 

Arts & Sciences 
English 



Zeke A. Thomas 

Arts & Sciences 
International Studies 



Sean K. Thompson 

Arts & Sciences 

Political Science 

" Philosophy 



Melissa Anne Thomson 

Arts & Sciences 
Communications 



428 Seniors 



Samuel Tirtasuputra 

School of Management 

Finance 

Mgmt. Info Systems 



Torrey T. Tobin 
Arts & Sciences 
Communications 




Julia A. Todhunter 

Arts & Sciences 
English 



Christine L. Tomasello 

Arts & Sciences 
English 
French 



Karen Tong 

School of Management 
Marketing 



May Tong 

School of Management 

Finance 

Accounting 



Kate E. Tooley 

Arts & Sciences 
Philosophy 




Mary Glynn Toomey 

Arts & Sciences 
Communications 



Michael Torok 

School of Management 

Accounting 

Finance 



Maureen E. Torpey 

Arts & Sciences 
English 



Mark S. Tosches 

Arts & Sciences 
Communications 



Ryan M. Tosi 

Arts & Sciences 
Political Science 




Bernadette Gwen Tosti 

Arts & Sciences 
Economics 



Cynthia M. Tow 

School of Management 
Marketing 



Mark Tower 

School of Education 
Communications 



Matthew A. Tower 

School of Management 
Finance 



Maeve Townsend 

Arts & Sciences 

English 



Seniors 429 



Michael A. Travalini 

School of Management 
Accounting 



Ryan M. Travia 

School of Education 

Human Development 

Elem. Ed./Mod. Sp. Needs 



Charlene B. Traylor 

Arts & Sciences 
Psychology 



Lori J. Trespicio 

School of Education 
Human Development 



Suzanne Trested 

Arts & Sciences 
Communications 




Heather A. Tripp 

School of Education 

Elementary Ed. 
Human Development 



Tara True 

School of Management 
Finance 



Austin R. Tschernach 

Arts & Sciences 
English 



William M. Tschoegl 

School of Management 

Finance 

Marketing 



Brendan John Tuohy 

Arts & Sciences 
History 




Richard Jude Turano 

School of Management 
Finance 



Scott A. Turi 

School of Management 
Marketing 



Erin E. Turick 

Arts & Sciences 
Sociology 



Zach Turner 

Arts & Sciences 
English 



Jennifer Turri 

School of Management 
Finance 




Christopher Twardzicki 

School of Management 

Computer Science 

Mgmt. Info Systems 



Stephanie Tzouganatos 

Arts & Sciences 
English 



Michael Ullrich 

Arts & Sciences 
Economics 



Lenny N. Umar-Slamet 

School of Management 

Finance 

Marketing 



Ryan R. Utzler 

School of Managemen 
Marketing 



430 Seniors 



^ 




George Vacchio 

School of Management 

Accounting 

Finance 



Debra Vail 

Arts & Sciences 
Psychology 



Marissa Victoria 
Valencia 

School of Management 
Finance 



David C. Valente 

School of Management 
Finance 



Andrew Stephan Valeras 

Arts & Sciences 
Biology 




Timothy Van Ness 

Arts & Sciences 
Communications 



Margaret C. Vanegas 

School of Management 
General Mgmt 



Christian A. Vardeleon 

School of Management 

Finance 

Accounting 



Evelyn Vega 

Arts & Sciences 
Hispanic Studies 



Alexis J. Vena 

Arts & Sciences 
Communications 




Patrick L. Venanzi 

School of Management 

Economics 

Finance 



Elizabeth L. Venit 

Arts & Sciences 
Biology 




Shelley L. Ventura 


Paul R. Venuti 


School of Management 


Arts & Sciences 


Marketing 


English 




Seniors 43 1 





Brian Veroneau 

School of Management 
Human Resources Mgmt 



Joseph M. Vesel 

School of Management 

Computer Science 

Mgmt. Info Systems 




Robert F. Viggiano 

Arts & Sciences 
Economics 



Shaina M. Vigue 

Arts & Sciences 
Political Science 



Laura Marie Viklund 

Arts & Sciences 
Political Science 



Mark Viana 

Arts & Sciences 
History 



John M. Vieira 

School of Management 

Finance 

Marketing 




Philip L. Vineburgh 

Arts & Sciences 
Communications 



Joseph G. Visciano 

School of Management 
Finance 




Matthew L. Vittiglio 

Arts & Sciences 
Political Science 



Jennifer A. Vlachos 

School of Education 

Early Childhood 
Human Development 



Stephan W. Vogel 

School of Management 
Finance 



Salvatore Vonella 

Arts & Sciences 
Economics 



itiftt 



Vong Vongsavang 

Arts & Sciences 
Studio Art 



432 Seniors 



-5? 



James H. Wachtendorf 

Arts & Sciences 
Psychology 



Stephanie Ann Wade 

Arts & Sciences 
Sociology 



Malti Kanayu Wadhvvani 
School of Management 

Finance 



Michael J. H aid 

Arts & Sciences 
Physics 



Kendall Mitchell Walker 

Arts & Sciences 
Env. Geo. Scien. 




Steven V. Walkowiak 

Arts & Sciences 

Political Science 

Philosophy 



Brian M. Walsh 

School of Management 
Marketing 



Cullen D. Walsh 

School of Management 

Accounting 

Finance 



Katherine Tierney 
Walsh 

Arts & Sciences 
Communications 



Kathleen Ellen Walsh 

Arts & Sciences 
History 




Mallack M. Walsh 

School of Management 
Finance 
History 



Jocelyn Walters 

Arts & Sciences 
Communications 



Elizabeth A. Waniewski 

Arts & Sciences 
English 



John Andrew Ward 

Arts & Sciences 
Philosophy 



Stephan D. Wark 

School of Management 
General Msmt 




£mily Jane Warmerdam 

Arts & Sciences 
Communications 



Robert Charles Warner 

Arts & Sciences 
Psychology 



Teisha Warren 

School of Education 

Communications 

Theology 



Robert J. Watkins 

Arts & Sciences 
Computer Science 



Rochelle Adriana Webb 

Arts & Sciences 

Communications 

English 



Seniors 433 



2001 



Have you ever pushed the Emergency Button on a call-box by accident?... 



434 Seniors 



Has your laptop ever died in the middle of a paper?. ..Have you ever been completely lost in Boston?. 




Seniors 435 




436 Seniors 





Seniors 43 7 




Alison Welch 

School of Education 
Human Development 



Jeffrey S. Wells 

School of Management 
Finance 



Matthew S. Wells 

Arts & Sciences 
Political Science 



Sean F. Welsh 

Arts & Sciences 
Philosophy 



Elizabeth J. Weppler 

School of Education 

Elem./Mod. Spec. Needs 

Child in Society 



Andrew C. Wetzler 

School of Management 

Finance 

Mgmt. Info Systems 



Kate D. Wexler 

Arts & Sciences 
Communications 



Sean P. Whalen 

Arts & Sciences 
Physics 



Colleen Wenke 

Arts & Sciences 
Psychology 




Lynn H. Whang 

Arts & Sciences 
Economics 
Philosophy 



438 Seniors 



**l 



1 






Sunyoung V. Whang 

Arts & Sciences 
International Studies 



Allyson S. Wheelock 

Arts & Sciences 
Biology 



Stacey Whelan 

Arts & Sciences 
Theology 



Deviii Brewer White 

School of Management 
Marketing 



(iur\ Todd W hiUlmiist 

School of Management 

Marketing 

Mgmt. Into Systems 




Taylor P. Whitman 

School of Management 
Marketing 



Jacqueline Wicker 

School of Management 

Economics 

Mgmt. Info Systems 



Vitalia Widjaja 

School of Management 
Marketing 



Jenny Widjaja 

School of Management 
Finance 



Ashyka Wiggins 

School of Management 
Accountine 




Kathryn N. Wilkinson 

Arts & Sciences 
Biology 



Pollie Willhite 

School Of Nursing 
Nursing 



David Williams 

School of Education 

English 

Elem../Mod. Sp. Needs 



Noelle Williams 

Arts & Sciences 
Biology 



Shinique D. Williams 

School of Management 
Human Resources Mgmt. 




Gregory A. Wilmot 

Arts & Sciences 
Psychology 



Erica C. Wilson 

Arts & Sciences 

Communications 

English 



Martha Wilson-Byrne 

Arts & Sciences 
Physics 



Michael Wilt 

School of Management 

Op. & Strategic Mgmt 

Marketing/ Mgmt. Info 

Systems 



Clair Windsor 

Arts & Sciences 
Sociology 



Seniors 439 




Tonya A. Winter 

School of Education 

Secondary Ed. 

English 



Randall Michael Winters 

School of Management 
Finance 



Leslie Ann Wlodyka 

School Of Nursing 
Nursing 



Joseph Wolenski 

School of Management 
Finance 



Courtney E. Wolf 

Arts & Sciences 
Communications 




Jung C. Won Yoon 

School of Education 
Early Childhood 



Christopher Brian Wong 

Arts & Sciences 
Communications 



Kyung S. Woo 

Arts & Sciences 
Sociology 



Amy E. Woodbury 

Arts & Sciences 
English 



William T. Woods 

Arts & Sciences 
English 




Benjamin H. Woodward 

Arts & Sciences 

Political Science 

Philosophy 



Pamela Wu 

School of Management 
Marketing 



Julia Wozniak 

School of Education 

Elementary Ed. 
Human Development 



Ann L. Wright 

School of Management 
Finance 



Kerri K. Wright 

Arts & Sciences 
Biology 



Andrea C. Wyson 

Arts & Sciences 
Communications 



Daniel C. Yager 

Arts & Sciences 

Computer Science 

Film Studies 



Justin Yang 

Arts & Sciences 
Biochemistry 



Kristina E. Wright 

School of Education 

Elem./Mod. Spec. Needs 

Math/ Comp. Sci. 




Charlene Yap 

Arts & Sciences 
Sociology 



440 Seniors 



Iva E. Yates 

Arts & Sciences 
English 



John P. Yorro 

Arts & Sciences 
International Studies 



Kelly Ann Yurechko 

School of Education 

Human Development 

Child in Society 



Shireen Zaman 

School of Education 
Human Development 



Janice I. Yllana 

School of Management 

Mgmt. Info Systems 

Accounting 



Sarah Yocum 

Arts & Sciences 
History 



Suzanne M. ^ oesl 

Arts & Sciences 
Biology 



Jason Paul Young 

Arts & Sciences 
Biology 



Joseph A. Zadlo 

School of Management 
Finance 



Amy E. Zimmermann 

Arts & Sciences 
Sociology 



Jeanne M. Young 

School of Education 
Human Development 



Melissa Young 

School Of Nursing 
Nursing 




Hye E. Yoon 

Arts & Sciences 
Sociology 




Cheuk-Ling Yu 

School of Management 

Finance/ Economics 
Human Resources Mamt. 





Seniors 441 



Matthew J. Zisler 

Arts & Sciences 
Economics 



Lauren K. Zitnay 

School of Management 
Marketing 



Sarah E. Zoccolante 

School of Education 
Human Development 



Paul M. Zukauskas 

Arts & Sciences 
Communications 



Jeanine C. Zurkus 

Arts & Sciences 
Communications 




Brooke E. Zwarg 

Arts & Sciences 
Mathematics 



442 Seniors, 




Seniors 443 



The Newton Buses... Carney's "tents"... Where's Addies pizza?... The 



444 Seniors 




Boston Marathon... Mary Ann's.. .Superfan T-shirts.. .The trip to Notre Dame. ..School Dances. 







Seniors 445 




446 Seniors 




Seniors 447 



Camera Shv 



Paul M. Abbruzzese 


Keith Auclair 


Jeffrey B. Beardsworth 


Ian C. Broff 


Ronald F. Castro 


School of Management 


Arts & Sciences 


Arts & Sciences 


School of Management 


Arts & Sciences 


Finance 


Economics 


Englishg 


Finance 


Communications 


Stephanie L. Abreu 


Julie L. Autieri 


Jonathan R. Beerbohm 


Nichole Bukowski 


Caroline A. Catano 


Arts & Sciences 


School of Education 


Arts & Sciences 


Arts & Sciences 


School of Managemen 


Biology 


Human Dev. 


Communications 


Communications 


Oper/St. Mgmt 


Rasha Abughazaleh 


James W. Avery 


Richard M. Benjamin 


Camille Burckhart 


Jason R. Cavallari 


School of Management 


Arts & Sciences 


Arts & Sciences 


School of Management 


Arts & Sciences 


Marketing 


Psychology 


English 


Finance 


French 


Communications 


Philosophy 


Sean M. Benoit 


Kathryn L. Burge 


History 


Khadijah el Alamin 


Viveka Ayala 


Arts & Sciences 


Arts & Sciences 


Shannon K. Cawley 


Arts & Sciences 


Arts & Sciences 


English 


English 


Arts & Sciences 


Economics 


Psychology 


Michael F. Black 


History 


English 


Douglas C. Albers 


Michael J. Bacotti 


Arts & Sciences 


Casey M. Burns 


Matthew Cerrone 


School of Management 


Arts & Sciences 


English 


Arts & Sciences 


School of Managemen 


Marketing 


Biology 


Caroline F. Blanchet 


English 


Accounting 


Rodney J. Alberto 


Roba Bahareth 


Arts & Sciences 


Megan E. Byrnett 


Josh A. Cervi 


Arts & Sciences 


School of Management 


Communications 


Arts & Sciences 


Arts & Sciences 


Economics 


Marketing 


Eric Blanco 


Political Science 


Communications 


Khaled F. Alrajaan 


Berke I. Bakay 


Arts & Sciences 


Nat P. Calamis 


Marjory V. Cesar 


School of Management 


School of Management 


Psychology 


School of Management 


Arts & Sciences 


Finance 


Finance 


Jesse M. Bless 


Oper/St. Mgmt 
Mgmt. Info. Systems 


Political Science 


Samantha L. Alvarez 


Allan X. Baker 


Arts & Sciences 




David H. Chafey 


Arts & Sciences 


Arts & Sciences 


Political Science 


Brianne K. Calandra 


Arts & Sciences 


Psychology 


Philosophy 




Arts & Sciences 


Psychology 


Sociology 


Classics 


Albert E. Boston 

School of Management 


Computer Science 


Fares N. Chamoun 


Claire E. Anderson 


Reia Balchan 


Oper/St. Mgmt 


Lauren Campbell 


School of Managemen 


Arts & Sciences 


Arts & Sciences 




Arts & Sciences 


Accounting 


Economics 


Political Science 


Paul Bourke 

Arts & Sciences 


Psychology 


Finance 


Nicole Anthony 


Michelle S. Bang 


Economics 


Lorraine D. 


Andrew A. Chang 


Arts & Sciences 


School of Management 




Campozano 


Arts & Sciences 


Political Science 


Finance 


Tyler C. Bradford 


Arts & Sciences 


Economics 


English 


Mgmt. Info. Systems 


Arts & Sciences 
Communications 


Sociology 


Seevon Chau 


Katherine L. Apreah 


Christopher M. 




Jeffrey Carroll 


Arts & Sciences 


Arts & Sciences 


Barone 


Kelley L. Brennan 


Arts & Sciences 


Studio Art 


History 


Arts & Sciences 
Economics 


Arts & Sciences 
Psychology 


English 


Communications 


Marcus K. Asante 


Political Science 




Giancarlo Casalino 


Carolyn B. Childers 


School of Management 




Sean P. Brennan 


School of Management 


School of Managemen 


Mgmt. Info. Systems 


Edgardo C. Basaca 


Arts & Sciences 


Marketing 


Finance 


Finance 


Arts & Sciences 


Political Science 








Biology 




Michael L. Castelo 


Hsueh-ling Chin 






Peter R. Bridgeman 


Arts & Sciences 


School of Managemen 






School of Management 


Psychology 


Oper/St. Mgmt 






Economics 


Theater Arts 




448 Seniors 




Finance 







Eunmyung S. Choe 


David l'>. Coppola 


Philip J. Dannie 


Vlasta Dolinar 


Genevieve \i. 


Ails & Sciences 


School of Management 


Arts & Sciences 


Arts & Sciences 


Fitzgerald 


Psychology 


Marketing 


English 


Biology 


Arts & Sciences 

English 


Staci S. Choe 


Mary E. Corhelli 


Patricia 1. Darsana 


Lindsey YY. Donner 




Arts & Sciences 


School of Education 


School of Management 


School of Education 


Bridget ('. Fleming 


Political Science 


Secondary Ed. 


General Mgml 


Elem/Mod. Spec. Needs 


Arts & Sciences 




Biology 




English 


Philosophy 


Jong-Moon J. Choi 




Davison W. David 






Arts & Sciences 


Marcus A. Curderu 


School of Management 


Kevin W. Doonan 


Neil P. Fluckiger 


Economics 


School of Management 


Marketing 


School of Management 


School di Management 




Finance 




Finance 


Marketing 


Karmen Chung 




Bruno D. De Faria 






Arts & Sciences 


Brian J. Coughlin 


Arts & Sciences 


Laura E. Druan 


Joshua J. Folkerth 


Communications 


Arts & Sciences 


Political Science 


Arts & Sciences 


School of Management 




English 




Psychology 


Accounting 


Sou J. Chung 




Kelly De Pina 


English 




School of Management 


Kelly C. Cuughlin 


School of Nursing 




David M. Freda 


Finance 


Arts & Sciences 


Nursing 


Elizabeth C. Drude 


School o f Management 




Communications 




Arts & Sciences 


Finance 


Yun Sik Chung 




Brian R. De Rocco 


Psychology 


Marketing 


Arts & Sciences 


Kevin J. Crane 


Arts & Sciences 






History 


School of Education 


English 


Heather A. Egan 


Emir R. Frisby 




Human Dev. 




Arts & Sciences 


Arts & Sciences 


Stacy E. Cichaski 




Joshua T. De Souza 


Sociology 


Communications 


Arts & Sciences 


John M. Creedon 


Arts & Sciences 






Communications 


School of Management 


Economics 


Elizabeth A. Eldred 


Nathan Funk 




Economics 




School of Education 


Arts & Sciences 


Jonathan R. Clark 




Joshua K. DeMaio 


Elementary Ed. 


English 


Arts & Sciences 


Heather E. Cross 


Arts & Sciences 


Child in Society 




Economics 


Arts & Sciences 


English 




Adam B. Fuss 




Psychology 




Matthew R. Endreny 


Arts & Sciences 


Aidan M. Cleary 




Christine A. Desantis 


Arts & Sciences 


History 


Arts & Sciences 


Michelle M. Croze 


School of Management 


History 




English 


Arts & Sciences 


Accounting 




Monica A. Gaetan 


Philosophy 


French 




Daniel Eng 


Arts & Sciences 




Theater Arts 


Dedrick D. Dewalt 


Arts & Sciences 


Theology 


Michael C. Cohen 




Arts & Sciences 


Communications 


Sociology 


Arts & Sciences 


Rory E. Cullman 


Sociology 






Economics 


Arts & Sciences 




Robert E. Everhart 


Katrina Gambol 


Political Science 


Communications 


Joseph F. Di Palo 


Arts & Sciences 


Arts & Sciences 






Arts & Sciences 


Political Science 


Sociology 


Sara M. Cohen 


Carroll Cunningham 


History 


Economics 




Arts & Sciences 


School of Management 






Christopher Gannon 


Psychology 


Mgmt. Info. Systems 


Matthew S. Dickson 


Charles W. Falzone 


School of Management 






School of Management 


Arts & Sciences 


Mgmt. Info. Systems 


Timothy J. Cunlun 


Lisa A. D'Ambruoso 


Accounting 


Political Science 




Arts & Sciences 


Arts & Sciences 






Ryan T. Garms 


Political Science 


Biology 


Gregory J. Doble 


Claudia F. Fam 


Arts & Sciences 






School of Management 


Arts & Sciences 


Sociology 


Jennifer A. Cuuk 


Hang K. Danh 


Marketing 


Psychology 




Arts & Sciences 


Arts & Sciences 


Accounting 




Gary M. Gaskins 


Psychology 


Economics 




Rachel A. Fawson 


Arts & Sciences 






Andrew H. Doehler 


Arts & Sciences 


Sociology 


Devon M. Cuuney 


Brock F. Daniels 


Arts & Sciences 


English 




School of Management 


Arts & Sciences 


History 




Lenin Germosen 


Finance 


Chemistry 


Economics 


Sean T. Finn 

Arts & Sciences 


Arts & Sciences 
Political Science 


Jonah B. Cuuperman 


Stephanie R. Darcy 


Timothy J. Duherty 


Political Science 


Communications 


Arts & Sciences 


School of Management 


Arts & Sciences 






History 


Marketing 


Economics 




Seniors 449 



William J. Giblin 


Kimberly Teresa 


Kerri K. Hilleren 


Matthew R. Jones 


Aliza E. 


Arts & Sciences 


Griffith 


Arts & Sciences 


Arts & Sciences 


Kimhachandra 


Chemistry 


School of Education 


English 


English 


Arts & Sciences 


Hispanic Studies 


Elem. Ed/ Int. Sp. Needs 




Theology 


Sociology 




Theology 


Annette Hils-Prats 




Economics 


Marne E. Gifford 




Arts & Sciences 


Hana Kang 




Arts & Sciences 


Christina Grimm 


Biology 


Arts & Sciences 


Romina P. King 


Linguistics 


Arts & Sciences 




English 


Arts & Sciences 


Mathematics 


Political Science 


Michael A. Hirsiger 

School of Management 


Christopher R. 


Economics 


Meghann M. Gilligan 


Joshua Grob 


Finance 


Kauffman 


Meng H. Kit 


Arts & Sciences 


Arts & Sciences 


Economics 


Arts & Sciences 


Arts & Sciences 


Philosophy 


Communications 


Howard Ho 


Independent 


Computer Science 


Natali E. Gingras 


Sean I. Guthrie 


Arts & Sciences 


Emily R. Kearney 


Susan J. Kivlehan 


Arts & Sciences 


School of Management 


English 


Arts & Sciences 


Arts & Sciences 


Communications 


Accounting 


Philosophy 


Mathematics 


Communications 


Andrew Girard 


Hunter A. Hammill 


John. C. Honer 


Brendan P. Kelly 


Allison E. Kleva 


Arts & Sciences 


Arts & Sciences 


Arts & Sciences 


Arts & Sciences 


School of Managemen 


English 


Political Science 


History 


Economics 


Marketing 


Marisa L. Glaser 


Kenny Harley 


Pia Hong 


Phillip Russell Kerr 


Izumi Konishi 


Arts & Sciences 


Arts & Sciences 


Arts & Sciences 


School of Management 


School of Education 


English 


Sociology 


English 


Economics 


Early Childhood 






Communications 


Finance 


Theology 


Philip T. Gleason 


Edward L. Harner 








Arts & Sciences 


School of Management 


Caroline Hosman 


Nadim S. Khalaf 


Michael J. Krashes 


History 


Accounting 


Arts & Sciences 


Arts & Sciences 


Arts & Sciences 






English 


International Studies 


Biology 


Jason Z. Goon 


Katherine M. Harvell 








School of Management 


Arts & Sciences 


Clayton C. Howard 


Hwan I. Kim 


Albert Ku 


Marketing 


Economics 


Arts & Sciences 


School of Management 


School of Managemen 


Finance 




History 


Finance 


Finance 




Nicholas B. Hayman 


Theater Arts 


Economics 




Theodore S. Graboski 


Arts & Sciences 






Matthew R. Kubacki 


Arts & Sciences 


Communications 


Michael C. Hubbard 


Jane C. Kim 


School of Education 


Marketing 


Economics 


School of Management 


Arts & Sciences 


Secondary Ed. 






Finance 


Communications 


English 


David J. Graf 


Jay D. Heidbrink 








Arts & Sciences 


Arts & Sciences 


Kyle M. Ingram 


Jee-Won S. Kim 


Marta M. Kulikowsk 


Theology 


Political Science 


School of Management 


Arts & Sciences 


Arts & Sciences 






Finance 


Biology 


Philosophy 


Shannon Grant 


Michael C. Heim 








School of Education 


Arts & Sciences 


Stephanie J. Jalbert 


Ki-Chang S. Kim 


Marisa S. La Rocca 


Secondary Ed. 


Computer Science 


School of Nursing 


Arts & Sciences 


Arts & Sciences 


English 


Economics 


Nursing 


Economics 


English 
Communications 


Brian Gray 


J. Ryan Heller 


Cassandra Jenner 


Samuel K. Kim 




Arts & Sciences 


Arts & Sciences 


Arts & Sciences 


Arts & Sciences 


Luke G. Laidley 


Independent 


Political Science 


Film Studies 


Psychology 
Political Science 


Arts & Sciences 
Communications 


Yvonne Rebecca Gray 


Carlos Hickey 


Ian Johnston 






School of Nursing 


Arts & Sciences 


Arts & Sciences 


Simon T. Kim 


Regis V. Lake 


Nursing 


Political Science 


Computer Science 


Arts & Sciences 
Computer Science 


Arts & Sciences 
Philosophy 


Timothy J. Griffin 


Silvia E. Hidalgo 


Deddah F. Jones 




Economics 


School of Management 


School of Management 


Arts & Sciences 


r 




Marketing 


Finance 


Political Science 




Wilbur Lau 


Finance 


Marketing 






Arts & Sciences 


450 Seniors 








Psychology 



Susannah E. Lawrence 

Arts & Sciences 
Studio Art 
Art History 

Chung-Liang A. Lee 

School of Management 

Finance 

Marketing 

Edward J. Lee 

School of Management 

Finance 

Accounting 

Jin M. Lee 

Arts & Sciences 

English 
Hispanic Studies 

Ju-Hyun Lee 

School of Management 
General Mgmt 

Kelly Lee 

School of Management 

Finance 

Economics 

Quinton Lee 

Arts & Sciences 
Communications 

Wonjoon Lee 

School of Management 

Finance 

Accounting 

Michael S. Lephart 

Arts & Sciences 
Communications 

Kim M. Leus 

School of Education 

Elem/Mod. Spec. Needs 

Math/Comp. Science 

George F. Leydon 

Arts & Sciences 
Biology 

Jenni R. Liebig 

Arts & Sciences 
Hispanic Studies 

Marc B. Lim 

School of Management 

Oper/St. Mgmt 

Marketing 



Mark J. Lim 

School of Management 
Finance 

Jillian K. Lo Piano 

Arts & Sciences 
Communications 

Leslie S. Loggans 

School of Management 
Finance 

Alberto J. Lopez 

Arts & Sciences 
Biology 

Rafael Lopez 

Arts & Sciences 
Psychology 

Elena M. Lozano 

School of Education 

Human Dev. 

French 

Angela K. Lumba 

Arts & Sciences 
Biology 

Kethia S. Ly 

Arts & Sciences 

Psychology 

Sociology 

Christian J. Lynch 

School of Management 
Finance 

Laura Mackey 

Arts & Sciences 
Psychology 

Daniel M. Madden 

School of Management 

Finance 
Mgmt. Info. Systems 

Abbey K. Mahady 

Arts & Sciences 
Sociology 

Shanna M. Mahan 

School of Education 

Elementary Ed. 

Human Dev. 

Craig A. Maier 

Arts & Sciences 
Biology 



Michelle R. Malalis 

Arts & Sciences 
Philosophy 
Sociology 

Gladys I. Malihiran 

Arts & Sciences 

Communications 

Art History 

Roger Malouf 

School of Management 
Finance 

John A. Mancuso 

School of Management 
Finance 

Louis D. Mangin 

Arts & Sciences 
Computer Science 

Kelly Marabello 

Arts & Sciences 
Communications 

David E. Marchitto 

Arts & Sciences 
Germanic Studies 

Matthew C. Marino 

Arts & Sciences 

Communications 

Philosophy 

Michael J. Marino 

Arts & Sciences 
Economics 

Theodore J. Markos 

Arts & Sciences 
Psychology 

Anthony P. Marzetti 

Arts & Sciences 
Economics 

Alison Mason 

Arts & Sciences 
Economics 

Kyle D. Mason 

Arts & Sciences 
Communications 

Pamela A. Mattera 

Arts & Sciences 
History 



Jesse J. McDermott 

Arts & Sciences 
English 

Thomas P. McGuinnes 

Arts & Sciences 
Economics 

Thomas F. Mclntyre 

School of Management 
Finance 

Mark P. McLennan 

School of Management 
Finance 

Justin McMahon 

Arts & Sciences 
Biology 

Michael T. McMahon 

School of Management 
Finance 

Kevin McNeil 

Arts & Sciences 
Communications 

Michael L. Meng 

Arts & Sciences 
History 

Chris Min 

School of Management 

Mgmt. Info. Systems 

Marketing 

Michael Miranda 

Arts & Sciences 
Communications 

Matthew T. Mitchell 

School of Management 
Marketing 

Lisa C. Molvar 

Arts & Sciences 
Sociology 

Derrick G. Moncayo 

School of Management 

Finance 

Marketing 

Wesley G. Moons 

Arts & Sciences 

Psychology 
Communications 



Jeffre) K. \Ioran 

Arts & Sciences 

Philosophy 

English 

Hanako Mori 

School ni Management 

Marketing 

Sheria Morrison 

School of Education 

Elementary Ed. 

Philosophy 

Meaghan M. 
Mulholland 

Arts & Sciences 
English 

John P. Murray 

Arts & Sciences 
Philosophy 

Aya Nagaoka 

Arts & Sciences 
Political Science 

John P. Nagle 

School of Management 
Finance 

Brito D. Nascimento 

School of Management 
Marketing 

Kerry A. Nason 

Arts & Sciences 

Political Science 

International Studies 

Robert T. Naumes 

Arts & Sciences 
History 

Kaarin S. Nelson 

Arts & Sciences 
Sociology 

Kathleen M. Neylong 

School of Education 

Elementary Ed. 

Psychology 

Anh T. Nguyen 

Arts & Sciences 
Sociology 

Kimvy T. Nguyen 

Arts & Sciences 
Art History 



Seniors 451 



Tapida Norplanlob 

Arts & Sciences 
Economics 

Simon D. O'Connell 

Arts & Sciences 
History 

Timothy P. O'Connor 

Arts & Sciences 
Sociology 
Philosophy 

Joseph J. O'Donnell 

Arts & Sciences 

Sociology 

History 

Shadi L. O'Doinnell 

Arts & Sciences 
Psychology 

Thomas D. O'Leary 

Arts & Sciences 
Communications 

Daniel P. O'Neill 

Arts & Sciences 
History 

Jesse G. O'Neill 

School of Management 

Finance 
Mgmt. Info. Systems 

Chang Oh 

Arts & Sciences 
Biochemistry 

Ngozi U. Onunaku 

Arts & Sciences 
Psycology 

Jonathan D. Ordway 

School of Education 
Human Dev. 

Jessica L. Oshier 

Arts & Sciences 
Psychology 

Erin E. Owens 

Arts & Sciences 

Theater Arts 
Communications 

Rebecca C. Pacheco 

Arts & Sciences 
Biology 

452 Seniors 



John S. Palmerson 

Arts & Sciences 
Political Science 

Bhavin M. Pardiwala 

School of Management 
Finance 

Miriam D. Park 

Arts & Sciences 
Communications 

Marcin L. Partyka 

Arts & Sciences 
Economics 

Megan C. Patrick 

Arts & Sciences 
Biology 

Andrew R. Peck 

Arts & Sciences 
Biology 

Tony W. Pepper 

School of Management 
Finance 

Damali Y. Peters 

School of Management 
Accounting 

Erastie N. Philip 

Arts & Sciences 
Communications 

Tara Pickstock 

School of Education 

Elementary Ed. 

English 

Elizabeth T. Pimentel 

Arts & Sciences 
Studio Art 

Ryan B. Pollak 

Arts & Sciences 
Psychology 

Chariya Preap 

Arts & Sciences 
Communications 

Steven V. Pregiato 

School of Management 
Accounting 

Jordan M. Price 

Arts & Sciences 
Art History 



Erik G. Pursino 

Arts & Sciences 
Biology 

Vu D. Quang 

Arts & Sciences 
Philosophy 

Emilee L. Quinn 

Arts & Sciences 
Communications 

Brendan T. Quirk 

School of Management 

Accounting 
Mgmt. Info. Systems 

Drew C. Rabe 

Arts & Sciences 
Philosophy 

Mateo R. Rando 

Arts & Sciences 
Communications 

Claudine S. Randolph 

Arts & Sciences 
Sociology 

James G. Reinhart 

Arts & Sciences 
History 

Corey R. Reynolds 

Arts & Sciences 
History 

Jaafar A. Riazi 

Arts & Sciences 
Economics 

Juan P. Ribadeneira 

Arts & Sciences 
Political Science 

Jason R. Richter 

School of Management 
Finance 

Jeffrey D. Roberts 

Arts & Sciences 
Political Science 

Susan L. Robinson 

School of Education 

Secondary Ed. 

English 

Melissa L. Rockett 

School of Nursing 
Nursing 



Isaac J. Rolle 

Arts & Sciences 
Sociology 

Kittrick J. Rosser 

School of Management 
Mgmt. Info. Systems 

Christine L. Ryan 

School of Education 

Child in Society 

Human Dev. 

Peter G. Saber 

School of Management 
Accounting 
Philosophy 

Ana C. Sala 

Arts & Sciences 
Psychology 

Melanie C. 
Sapiandante 

Arts & Sciences 
Biology 

Settenah I Savoy 

Arts & Sciences 
Psychology 

John Paul Scaggs 

Arts & Sciences 
English 

Nicole M. Scalfani 

Arts & Sciences 
Psychology 

Robert M. Scannell 

Arts & Sciences 
Mathematics 

Brenna T. Schaffer 

School of Education 
Elementary Ed. 
Child in Society 

Melinda N. Schlegel 

School of Education 

Human Dev. 

Child in Society 

Joseph B. Sconyers 

Arts & Sciences 
Sociology 

Robert J. Scuderi 

School of Management 
Marketing 



Robert W. Segal 

Arts & Sciences 
History 

Lorena M. Segura 

Arts & Sciences 
Communications 

Katie M. Senauer 

Arts & Sciences 
Biology 

Todd E. Shaw 

Arts & Sciences 
Political Science 

Brian J. Shea 

School of Management' 
Accounting 

Joong-Won Shin 

Arts & Sciences 
Chemistry 

Mahala Silver-Lofberj 

Arts & Sciences 
Communications 

Ajay P. Singh 

Arts & Sciences 
Economics 

Rachel M. Skiba 

Arts & Sciences 
Political Science 

Michelle M. Snyder 

Arts & Sciences 
Communications 

Chanel L. Soares 

School of Management 
Finance 

Dong- Woo Sohn 

School of Management! 

Finance 

Economics 

Jamie E. Song 

Arts & Sciences 
Biology 

Kyle S. Sontgerath 

Arts & Sciences 
Germanic Studies 



Kristopher J. Stark 

Arts & Sciences 
History 



Kelly I). Staunton 

School of Education 
Early Childhood 
Child in Society 

Dominick J. Stellato 

Arts & Sciences 
Biology 

James R. Stewart 

Arts & Sciences 
Communications 

Gregory P. Stowe 

Arts & Sciences 
Psychology 
Philosophy 

Neil Stratton 

School of Management 

Finance 

Economics 

Matthew Stutz 

School of Management 
Marketing 

Adrian Sudirgo 

Arts & Sciences 

Computer Science 

Mathematics 

Blakely R. Sullivan 

Arts & Sciences 
Env. Geo Science 

Marvin G. Sutton 

Arts & Sciences 
Communications 

Lauren A. Szewczyk 

School of Education 
Human Dev. 

Karen A. Sznyter 

Arts & Sciences 
English 

Maki Terukina 

School of Management 
Mgmt. Info. Systems 

John D. Tezber 

Arts & Sciences 
Communications 

Tan P. Tran 

Arts & Sciences 
Computer Science 



Daniel Trombly 

Arts & Sciences 
Communications 

Aaliyah I. Turner 

Arts & Sciences 
Mathematics 

Muriel R. Unanue 

School of Nursing 
Nursing 

Ryan C. Valente 

Arts & Sciences 
Economics 

John C. Valentine 

School of Management 
Finance 

Liliana Valiente 

Arts & Sciences 
Economics 

Edward P. Vallejo 

Arts & Sciences 
Psychology 

Matthew A. Vander 
Werff 

Arts & Sciences 
Psychology 

Vinita Veravit 

School of Management 
Mgmt. Info. Systems 

Mark Vernazza 

Arts & Sciences 

History 
Communications 

Lauren H. Very 

School of Education 

Human Dev. 

Communications 

Lauren F. Vitali 

School of Education 

Human Dev. 

Early Childhood 

Elizabeth Walsh 

School of Education 

Secondary Ed. 

History 

Margaret A. Walsh 

School of Management 
Accounting 



Ka-chun Wan 

School of Management 

Marketing 

Mgmt. Inlo. Systems 

Chiao-yi Wang 

School of Management 

Finance 
Mgmt. Info. Systems 

Brian Ward 

School of Management 
Marketing 

Nicole Warner 

Arts & Sciences 
Mathematics 

Brent J. Wein 

Arts & Sciences 
English 

Timothy J. Wesley 

Arts & Sciences 

Philosophy 

Theology 

Holly Whidden 

Arts & Sciences 
Communications 

Asha Z. White 

Arts & Sciences 
Sociology 

Jared B. White 

School of Management 
Finance 

Sharif L. Williams 

School of Management 
Mgmt. Info. Systems 

Christopher E. 
Williamson 

Arts & Sciences 

Philosophy 

English 

Brian B. Winegar 

Arts & Sciences 

Philosophy 

Theology 

Herbert K. Wong 

Arts & Sciences 
Economics 



Huang-Wei D. Wu 

School of Management 

Finance 

Oper./St. Mgmt 

Helen P. Weh 

School of Management 

Mgmt. Into. Systems 

Oper./Sl. Mgmt 

Daniel Yoo 

School of Management 

Finance 

Accounting 

Jung W. Yoon 

School of Education 

Early Childhood 

Human Dev. 

Soo K. Youn 

School of Management 

Finance 
Mgmt. Info. Systems 

Sharon Yun 

Arts & Sciences 
Psychology 

Jenny Zhen 

School of Management 

Finance 

Economics 

Carey I. Zolper 

Arts & Sciences 
Psychology 



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The staff of Sub Turri 2001 
would like to extend our 
appreciation to the organi- 
zations and individuals who 
have so generously supported 
our efforts. Because of their 
kindness, we were able to 
capture a full year of memo- 
ries, and preserve them for 
the future. You have our 
most sincere gratitude. 



i Z 



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.--, 





,^^L> ^^^^ .^fe^. 

The Office of 

Student Services would 

ike to congratulate its 

student employees and a 

the graduates of the 

Class of 2001. 

I3est wishes! 



-^^f ^^* "^pr 




^ 



464 Ads 



Congratulations Seniors 
on a Job Well Done ! ! 




NAACP 

Boston College Chapter 

Graduating Seniors 

Teisha Warren 

President 



Audric Mathurin 

Co-President 



Charlene Traylor 

2nd Vice-President 




Tara Pickstock 

Treasurer 



Ads 465 



Jostens, Inc. 



Would Like to Congratulate 



the Graduating Members 



of the Class of 2001. 



Best of luck in the future! 



2505 Empire Drive 

P.O.Box 5867 

Winston-Salem, NC 

27103 



466 Ads 



McGrath Studio 



The Official Yearbook Photographer 

of 
Boston College 



Congratulations and Best of 

Luck to 

the Boston College 

Class of 2001! 



8 Elm Street, Suite 2 

Braintree, MA 02184-9920 

1-800-767-1155 



Ads 467 



It has been our pleasure 
to serve your dining needs! 








Congratulations, graduates! 



The Boston College Dining Services Team 



Congratulations 

from 
Campus-Ministry 




The Student Admissions Program 

wishes to congratulate its 

graduating seniors. 

Thank you for four years of dedicated 
service and spirited committment. 




Good luck and Best Wishes. 



We'll miss seeing you in the office! 



From the 
BOSTON COLLEGE CAREER CENTER 

BEST WISHES TO THE CLASS OF 2001! 

Career Center services are always 
available to you as alumni. 

* Career Advisory Network 

* Job Listings On-Line 

* Career Resource Library 

* Job Search Workshops/ 
Career Programs 

* Individual Appointments 

* Evening Hours on Tuesdays 
and Wednesdays during the 
academic year 

* Visit our homepage at 
http://careercenter.bc.edu 



468 Ads 




Congratulations 

3B of imt 



Boston College 

BOOKSTORE 




Serving the Heights 
with excellence 



From the 
Bookstore Staff 




THE OFFICE OF RESIDENTIAL LIFE 

thanks and congratulates all members of the Resident Staff, 

especially those in the Class of 2001. 

Your service, dedication, and loyalty 

to Boston College sets new standards of excellence. 



Robert F. Capalbo 

Director 
Residential Life 



Linda Riley 

Associate Director 
Residential Life for Operations and Financial Management 



Robert O. Jose 

Associate Director 
Residential Life 



Ads 469 




Congratulations Class of 2001 

from the Carroll School of Management faculty and stafj'. 




Light a flame! 




Congratulations to the 
Class 0/2001 



LYNCH 
SCHOOL 

OF EDUCATION 




"I have come to spread fire. 
What more can I want than 
that it take flame." 

Words from the Gospel of Luke 
inscribed on the cornerstone 
of Campion Hall 



470 Ads 



Best wishes to the Boston College Class of 2001 
It has been our pleasure working with you! 




Serving students as educators by encouraging responsible decision making and accountability, fostering an appreciation of 

diverse cultures, values and justice, and promoting respect for all members of the University Community. 

McElroy 233, McElroy 141, McElroy 1 14, O'Connell House 109 



r CONGRATULATIONS 



to the 



Class of 2001 



L 



from the faculty and staff of the School of Nursing 




The nurses of the 20th century 

salute 

the nurses of the 21st century! 



Ads 471 



'SlaMv oft 200J ! 



Business Communication Center, Inc. 

Offset Printing • Typesetting • Graphic Design 
Business Cards & Stationery • Desktop Publishing 
Mailing • Banners & Signs • Business Forms 
Invitations • Bindery • and much more! 




You'll find us in Boston 
at The Prudential Tower Lower Lobby 
(617) 262-3920 • Fax (617) 262-6442 
email: bccpru@aol.com 



and in Chestnut Hill at 

BC Press • Boston College 

(617) 552-3418/3419 




ongratulations to the senior classi 



! 



Falmouth Hospital 

100 Ter Heun Drive 

Falmouth, MA 02540 

Phone: (508) 457-3555 



Cape Cod Hospital 

27 Park Street 

Hyannis, MA 02601 

Phone: (508) 862-5700 



CapeCod Healthcare 



Visit us at:www.capecodhealth.org 



472 Ads 



Congratulations 

to the 

Class of 2001 



from the staff at the office 



of AHANA 



student programs. 



Congratulations 
Seniors ! 



Tim McManus Chip Abraham sen 

Mark Hansen Lara Klingenmaier 



Tom Haak 



Brian Walsh 



Kelvie Pleas 



Well Miss You, 
The Ignatian Society 



The Deans and Faculty of the College of Arts and Sciences 

Congratulate 
the new members of the Order of the Cross and Crown 




And all of the members of the great Class of 2001 



Ads 473 




■**$ 



Dr. and JKrs. Daoidg. C%hr 

Drs. J?ena/o and GPriscilla Jtloer/o 

jBihcfa andOlffredCTlffeyretli 

JKr. andjKrs. JfanhJlffen 

Dr. Ghris/ine ^A. [Aueru 

Susan Ujannon and jim lOowe 

liJiffiam CP. [Benedict andCflnn S. Benedict 

jerry andDiane Jjleuins 

JKicnael and Susan JJli/zer 

03oo and Jtathu j3loom 



Cnnaela and Joseph Cope 

Une Grisarulli Jamilu 

Jefferson and \Alison Grow/her 

Dr. J aul JC. J iontAowshi 

lOouise and Jim Jarina 

JKr. and JKrs. J\aumond J. Cflood 

JKr. and JKrs. Uvooert J. Joscni 

JKr. and JKrs. Lfrederic S Uriedman 

Uhe Jroeo [Jamily 

Oscar and \Jlmelia Staefan 



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jfhe LBoisi [Jamiw 

JKaria and John Gapano 

Dr. and JKrs. yteuin U. Gareu 

David 3~f. Ghafeu 

Cassandra and Sheldon Gnernoue 

SJeorae and JKarao Gnrussis 

JKr. and JKrs. Uvolf Glasson 

iRooert and Joan Glifford 

JKichael and \Arlene Gojohn 

jo/in JS. Gonnor 



JKr. and JKrs. George O. ^Jage 

JKrs. Francis Is), ^allishaw 

JKr. and JKrs. CRofandls). Willis 

Mir. and JKrs. JKarin iR. S^ilmarh'n 

JCaren and Joel Gtoldolatt 

3~fugh and J amela Jiart 

Susan and Uerru Jieafn 

JranA and Gecilia Jierrera 

JKicnael and Suvimol Jiill 

S/sao and JKicniAo SJaarasni 



■:-■■■:. 



*y 



Dr. and DKrs. Jvodert S. GooA, Jr. 

Srreg and Joan JKcGfiniu 

Guan and Garolan JKel/zer 

Dr. and JKrs. jozefjGznih 

Sinda JKcGar/hy 0'!73rien 

i/j ill and OCancu O'Jfafforan 

JKr. and JKrs. Dennis J. O^Searu 

JKr. and JKrs. jSrian J. (Joerman 

Jvooer/ and-Jia/hleen iPaufus 

JKanuel and bfeoraina J elaez 




Gwa and Jll jacunsAi 

LRooert G. jenninas, Jr. 

JKichael and Jielun Jewell 

^reorae and GHelena -Jtaltezas 

Debbie and JCicA GKaisirouoas 

JKr. and JKrs. Jfenru JCaufmann and family 

JKr. and JKrs. Saleem DChatri 

Joseph and Garol Jlielu 

Jim and \Jtaren yiina 

Dr. and JKrs. James G jHJein 



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Platinum Benefactors 








Dr. and JKrs. Juan 7/. J J ressman 


Chris and Deborah Alua 






Jiarbara and Jac/t Jva/iiili/ 


cJer/j/fy /Lruuosheua 




Mr. and Mrs. Jiradleu c5. Troche 


Dennis and c la//// J\ ane 




JlLr. and JKrs. James C JZowan, Jr. 


Oauid Si. Jhemoine and Marry C jotter- Lemoine 




JiieJ and Jlurora J\uoin 


J J atricia and Jeffrey Lipman 




Jim and Jliarcia JXi/an 


Mir. ana JKrs. James h.opez 




JKise ana J atricia Jvyan 


Charles j£>uh Sin £ jYannah Oe L ///■ 




James 5 'and JXosemarie cbar/ori 


Joseph C and Joan J: Maher 




Mir. and Jlirs. J. <bca/uorcnio 


J3ill and £>unn JKafec 




Dr. and JKrs. J eier <Onapiro 


William and Carol JKazif/y 




Dorie ana Jeffrey Snu6 


Uhomas and Jielen JKc Dermott 




Jolin C and Jiatlileen Oiraccisa 


LOrian and JKiriam JKc Donaah 




S?eora/anna and loes cb/ocAel 


Denis and Jvobin IdaJjonge 




Jjrian and <L>usan Oulfiuan 


Cua and O/an Jahubeh 




Jnttornei/ ana Jlirs. JliicnaelUarsni 


Constance and Unomas DijKarzo 




Jliar/in and Clizabe/n Ueeuan and Lramilu 


James and JKaureen yoanez 




J am Unorn 


Mir. and Jlirs. Seoas/ian Siuofsi 




JTCr. ana Jlirs. Joseph LP: Uower 


CPefer9.Vi[hinsD.O. 




J\.ober( and JliurieJ Hinanue 


Joe and Joan J isano 




"Dr. an J JKrs. John S. We/fs 


J\on and Cuelyn CooA and Uamili/ 




^fenoa and LPeter iS)ifson 


Mir. and JKrs. Stephen LJiI6oi/ 




JimWo/f 


JKr. and Jlirs. James Ocatuorchio 




JKicnaeJ and Jfanne&e Ontnouen 


Jne ueboreh family 




Jiirosni yosnida 


JKaru Jlnne ana Jim Walsh 




JKr. and JKrs. UvanoaflG. Ljisfer 


Jay and JJaroara JKahoney 




Jean and Dennis /jolnowsAi 


Jvandolph and Jliaria Jlantorowicz 




Jlie Jjortolussi Lramili/ 




o5w«^^^^^^ 



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. 






Benefactors 







!'. J '46 



: >-f 






UAe ^Alali Oamilu 
UAe Armstrong Uamily 
^uAe andUlnnei/e UJarone 
and Jars. UintAonu J . Ua/isi 
Id. and Ulnn UCeuy Carpenter 
Denis and JLancu Cjole 
jRr. and Jars. 'Ueorgej. DoeAner 
Dr. and Jars. Jvooert \A. Duroin 

Oswar Uamily 

janet andDauid ^riffitn 

Dr. <bamuel juliao and jTTerci juliao 

Jar. andUIirs. JaicnaeiOC UCafinicn 

U\.ussell and Julie UCeil 

Ulan/ana and J ramod iDutAra JaD. 

JRr. and jKts. joAn U. jICcQjaffreu 

UAe JKigliero Uamilu 

Uassallo Uamilu 

JosepA and Uanya (Jena 

jIlt. and Jars. CRoSertD. Ue/ferf 

Glaire UiAfund 

Ull and Jliarina (Ji/anza 

UranA & Weoers 

One WeiAef Uami/y 



Jlis. JlLaru jKorrell 

UranA and Jeanne jCappa 

Jan and joe Ue/erson 

Colonel and Jars. UAomas J. J\ini 

Dr. (QJilliam and Jliarg Uvossu 

Mir. and Jars. Jonn Uvooert ' Scadu/o 

Jar. andjKrs. CarfrJcnmicf 

cjusan and George Mi. <bpenar 

UlCr. andJKrs. ls)iffiam U~f. SAea, jr. 

Dr. andjKrs. Jonn iP. Sneeny 

jKr. and Jars. OdcvardiQ). Uoomeu 

iRooert and Urances Josh' 

jKargaret ano 'William Uogel 

Ulngelo Ul. JoJeoer 

GAina-yin CjAien 

UAe (SJenAe Uamilu 

Ulrline and CdwardWeppler 

Jar. and Jars. JoAnUv. WAifman 

StepAien G l$)ort£ 

Janice ylla 



lana 



jKaru Ulnn and Jjrian Zjino 

Dr. Is). U). TjofperandUKrs. c5. luolpe. 

^jreg and Carole U'Gonne// 



Ovobert and Donna Uaofino Qlrciuofi JV74 



476 Benefac 









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Silver Benefactors 



Dbm andtfoan nooMQ/au 

'710; and Mrs. , f /osc TIauirre 

Dr. and 'Mrs, Salomon U. Jtlcantara 

Dr. and 'JIO^s. f/o.sep/i stfearai 

PioS and PeqyiQ r 7lnderson 

Po6 and ' yimt/ Mndreoni 

Garlos and Jelct/s vlzuerzo 

'ZYn. andMrs. Peter 21. PSaile.j 

Ponafd and Garof Peaitie 

GfarA and Sesfie Bedford 

ToJilfiam and Sisa CBfacftmer 

■Mr. andMlrs. David 9. WaAe 

Garfos Jf. 'Pfo£m 

Marft and DeBoran Jjonner 

3iat£y and GAucA Pouvei 

'Mr. and Mrs. CdmundM. IBrady $r. 

Mr. and Mrs. PicAard PucAfey 

Mr. and Mrs. J. Jjuonocore 

Qdandjan Gafdweff 

Mrs. PaufD. Gampaneffa 

'Dr. Marcel G. Gar tier 

OCat and S£eifa Garuso 

Mir. and Mrs. U£omas G£an 

2)/*. andMrs. GAirunomufa 

Janet andjacA Gicon 

Unomas. 117. Gfafjey 

Jo£n and Paroara Gfaydon 

[Pal and jacA Gfose 

Mr. andMlrs. frames Gonneelu 

PoBin Mc9innitu andDanief J . Gonneffy 

Paula and Odward Gonnoffy 



GArisline Snea Gonwa. 



y 



ndCTlnn Go< 



\J£omas and Jinn Kjooneu 

jSoB and Janet Gome/fa 

Mr. and Mrs. Daniel P. Gronin 

foaura and J au Grouse 

"Don and G£risiine DeSuAe 

Dr. andMlrs. {fames M. Devaney 

Jfunq Diep, J{a Ma, and Gnrisiina Diep 

Dr. andMlrs. JoAm DoorowsAi 

Mir. and Mir s. Pic£ard du Moulin 

Jteffy G. Duyan 

JKaru Cjustance 

PoSert G &winy,M.D. 

Mr. andMrs. Micfiefe P. Uefice 

jo£n P. 17eore 

PCennei£ $ DifarsAi and ClfizaBel£ Zfl. Del Padre 

and J~amilij 

Mir. andMrs. Peter Ufa£eriy 

Denis and OfizaSel£ Hrfynn 

PoS and Diane Jox 

Hfifippo andCnnna Uratiarofi 

Mir. andMrs. James Ureeman 

Painer and Unqrid H7ruec£tnic£i 

Mir. andMlrs. JfanA H7unsc£ 

Stepnen andDeBora£ 9alfe 

9fenn and Julia 9aroacn 



Joan ' ' Jenofa ami ' s'r<'gg ' M'noua 

Plnne and J J at ' ina/su 

Pilar) and Pun n iv c sold stem 

llenru and Jilanva f J',r>/ai*w 

OCancy Saurn 

PoS and f)anti>tL> r irifltlii 

Pic/jard and Garol J lain 

jo£n G. Jfanna Pamify 

PoSert and Sinda Jlanna 

Mr. andMrs. IPoSerl 7. Pfarper 

~Jrancois and Jtat/j lean Mayrand 

Mr. and Mir s. DAiomas P. Jfodejson 

Mr. and 'Mrs. Pic£ardS. Muff 

Joanne and PoSert Urisn 

Maru See and 9ranSery jacAson, 171717 

Sois and MicAaef jacoSs 

Ponafd and Jlaren jo£nson 

Mrs. OCancy Judware 

Dr. Patricia JCeffy- S/ifes 

Mir. andMlrs. $ames IP. G JCennedy 

Mr. andMrs. Monte JCfein 

UlfBert and 9raci/'efa Pinapic 

ITAe Uinipe Uramify 

IPen ancfWenoy Ploeniy 

HPqnes and John Jioon 

■Joanne 3. JtotufsAi 

Mir. andMlrs. got t fried Jtuesiers 

Mr. andMlrs. Saverio Sacroce 

Dennis and Mary tSa 'Uriura 

Uom and Maureen foamoriy. 

UranA and Patricia SaPocca 

Mir. andMlrs. Joseph fodPocca 

Sunne and Pjruce foeuy 

Gordon and d)usan tbipscy 

Dr. anJJKrs. Josepfi 9. Bcefffer 

Sinda and Picnard Somoard 

Mr. andMrs. PafpA 9. Boretta 

Maqda Sopez-Hzotis 

Dieuin M. foyons 

HKeitfi and'lTlfice Macfarfand 

Mr. HKen andDr. Gonnie Mayura 

ITlnna PousAouri-Peicne 

CBiff and OCancy Mansion 

PoS and foynn Martin 

jfeanne and Micnaef Marline ffi 

Dauid and OCoreen Matt 

PoSert and CjfizaSetn Malison 

Qdward and Monica McGaoe 

33;ffar,JJCa/A;e JKcCarl% 

cjustin andwendy McGari/iy 

Donald andiJicloria McS^ofdricA 

ITAomas and Oifeen McSfraln 

Mr. andMrs. Martin % McManus 

Mr. andMrs. CTran Mendoza 

Mr. andMrs. Micfiaef Merfo 

'Mr. andMrs. Ufiomas Jl. Misci 

Js)ifma and cjames Mitcnef 



Ui. fflofi/cr/ro family 

iid uint h-.iulhij IIFonJt\ 
Ifarru and ' anafora fl> 

( 'a/At -///.'.- <//■"/ ' aarfoi WurpaL 

fner L Tlfurpin/ 
Carol and • fat •■ s apfa/on 
Aatfttj or- fan 

-,/. . and Marilyn O l ■'' ■ 
Dr, and Mr\. TCauitiW 0' XJt/l 

Tom and Mnne O ' Peillr/ 

JfCs. Susan O'Pour^e 

Pon and Gindy Olander 

tfonn and llaura Osztrotjonacz 

Many $o Snyder 

Mr. andMrs. ffosepfi S. J J almerson 

Mr. andMlrs. Daniel 17. J J erez-Z*arra<]a 

Pon andDenise Pitts 

tfim and Sftaron Potenza 

Mr. and Mrs. josep/i d J risefac f ifr. 

Donald and efanet Queenin 

JJirqinia P. Juinlonq 

PoSerl and jlnne- Marie Pana/jan 

Picnard and cjane Peece 

Mr. andMrs. Steven 9. 7. Peed 

Maureen and joe PicAard 

Dave andSuz PofewicA 

Mr. andMlrs. PonafdP Poos 

Mir. andMlrs. Armando Pijuifa 

Mir. andMlrs. jo£n josepfi PusA 

Pita, Steven, and IBiffPyder, and Steven jonn 

Drs. Wiffiam 0. and Sisa PartyAa Sarelte 

Jf ossein and Ljonren Sarrami 

Dr. Uoicni Sasanuma 

Mir. andMrs. DevfiA Sayanfar 

OGc andMjsly Scaffaroilo 

PiaiAarine U. Scanfon 

Mrs. c^o/in G Scanneff 

Mir. andMrs. Sawrence Sc£feyef 

Dr. andMrs. <Jlnt£ony Sciffia 

Mr. andMrs. PalricA C Scura 

Mait£ew SeficA 

ls)arren and 17tai£y S£ea 

Puss Smii£ and cjeannie Siapfeton Smitn 

Paul and joan Soryi 

jo£n and Jiat£y Spicer 

Mic£aefP SieinBery 

Mr. andMrs. U£omas Is). Siuart 

Dr. andMlrs. jo£n Suffivan 

Sue and IPernando Jamayo 

Mir. andMrs. ^. Dan and Uamify 

Mir. andMlrs. ^erry Uarlayfia 

PoSert and Maria 1/erranova 

OCifs and'Mayyie D£ief 

Sarry and Jan Uosi 

MliAe andjovan Urapani 

OCancy and Peter Urue 

Diana andOOs£an Uartaoedian 



W 






Benefactors 47/ 



?*«i.=*"' 




-■-. - **■ 



_ 



Patron Benefactors 




JKr. and JKrs. games Ul. Jldams 

JKr. and JKrs. games g. 3ndams 

JKicnaei and Jrma Cfl/ewsAi 

J auf and Sfrene [Jtmiirani 

3fne 3/lmore Jamify 

33arru and '3Kicneffe Cnndersen 

Sffenn and Suzanne 33tnderson 

gon and Gieanor Anderson 

SiepJien and JKaru Jinne Jnnderson 

JKr. and JKrs. [Robert [Augusta 

foinda jSartfeit 'JSaJirenourq 

JKr. and JKrs. '33arry Manner 

Georqe and Jinn JSarAer 

Jzoss and Snerru Genlanni 

JKr. ano'JKrs. 3Ro6ert jSarreff 

JKr. and JKrs. 33ranA Mates 

JKr. and JKrs. 33ranA JSatife 

Grnie and /Ductile JSaur 

JKr. and JKrs. David O. 3f3auscn 

Jltr. and Jilts. Ji/nolJiu JJat/dafa 

JKicJiaei and 33elsu 33azdaricn 

JKeenaJisfii and Snarad JSeffaprauafu 

UXooert and goz/ce 333erqer 

Jlir. and JKrs. gosepJi jSianco 

Steve and Diane 3jirAefand 

Steven LB fane 

3fom and Gfaine Jjliqii 

Dr. and JKrs. [Peter 3Soor/ian 

jSaroara and Dixon JJrandt 

GJiarles and foinda Jjriere 

gaclun and Jred JJrown 

JKr. and JKrs. geffreu J3runet 

3tXon andgan '33 u fin 

gosepn and geanne JSurAe 

Dr. and JKrs. gonn OSurviffe 

33ranA and DeoSie JSutierwortJi 

Jltr. and JKrs. JXodriqo Gaoanoan 

Sonya and gacA Ganiff 

Janice ana [Pauf Gaff aJian 

Mr. and Mrs. Jsliffiam Caffi£an 

Mr. and Mrs. Mffiam 111). Canlfin 

tfames O. and Marqare/ Jf. Caret/ 

Mr. ana Mrs. William Gaseu 

Mr. one/Mrs. $on~ll). C£ar//on 

■Jut a and 3xicA Gniouareffi 

David GnfudzinsAi 

($). JSruce and Gatnerine GfarA 

Susann and gosepn Gofetta 

Diane and 33o£ Goffetie 

•Mr. and Mrs. X 9. Coffier, %r. 

foinda and gust in Gofon 

Dr. and JKrs. JranA GonaAan 

Garoi and games Connor 

3?oyer and tBoreiia Gonsoffa 

Jleith and fodDonna Goueffe 

Kr. JKicJiaef Gowett and gudqe J^airicia Goweit 



JKr. and JKrs. 3Pauf Griscuofo 

33ranA G. Grow feu 

Jftr. anaJfirs. JKicnaef Gunninynam 

Jocnard and gean Gunninqfiam 

JKr. and JKrs. Jxooert Y? Gurran 

Sath/ and Gfom Gurtin 

gosepn and Do fores Dauennauer 

JKauro and Julvia De JKaio 

JKr. ana JKrs. JKario DeGaro 

Douq and Jzosemarie DecAer 

Jatiana and 33lndrey Demidov 

goJm and Susan De3?aqon 

Mr. anJMZRs. UioSerl 92)e<5an/is 

JKanasen and Oifeen DeSifua 

Jxonafd and JKary dfeen DimicA 

JKr. ana JKrs. Stepnen DiJCardo 

33ranA and Diane 'DiJafo 

Jranf? and JKaria DiJucci 

gacA and 3foni Donoqnue 

Delia and JSarru Donovan 

SAip and JJrea Doufe 

JKr. and JKrs. foouis Drapeau 

'JKr. ancfJtTrs. J^aufDrew 

gonn g. and Oifeen JtT. Driscoff 

JKr. and JKrs. UAiomas Duffu 

JJrendan ancf JKicnefe Dunn 

Mr. anJMi-s. "XaGil '£/- Jfaa 

uAe tj/fuward D'amifu 

Jftr. and Jfirs. Dauid '33. Qnq 

Dr. Strover dspinoza and 33raufia (Jspinoza 

Jjrenda younq Cjsposito 

Dr. and 'JKrs. Gfifford G. C'vans 

games 33. J"asi 

Jom and 33eiie [Jifip 

JKic/iaet and Jlaren 33iorife 

JKr. and JKrs. J eier Lrfessas 

J eier and foorraine 3rficA 

GaroJ and Gd Jrfunn 

JKr. and JKrs. goJm [freiias 

3Jim and Gfare IJreu 
Jielen and Jttan Jriedlander 

Ocfand JXosafie ^aSrief 

UXooert and Jjaroara ^affiuan 

goe and gone Gannon 

JKr. anaJfirs. ^aru /3. ^asiineau 

J^iuf and Gatnie ^Patto 

3fom and Susan ^JauAin 

JKr. and JKrs. JKicAiaet 33. ^tiarraiano 

Deora 3?enu 

3?ary and JKaru Offen SJiufietti 

mXt. andJRrs. Sianfey *3ficA 
JKr. ana JKrs. Donald SJocinsAi 

33aroara SJofoen 

gosepAi and 3?aoriefa S?onzafez 

J/Cr. and JKrs. 33ennq 3i. 3?raoosAi 

JKrs. Donna fo. ^raoef 



efactors 



W 1 






JKarie JKef33rau 

games and Taufa Greenfield 

mthafene 3?riffo 

Suis S. Srruffoiu 

J eier and GJirisiine 3?uoiceffo 

Mr. anJMrs. 9eralcf$. Jfaa£ 

JSaroara and ~Jreq Jfaqin 

JXoo anaJKei Jfaif 

JOcnard and fouciffe 3fafqin 

33ne Jfaffiourion 33amifu 

Garol and goJm Jfaran 

JKr. and JKrs. JKicnaef g. Jfarimann, Sr. 

JKr. and JKrs. 37. JfaicAer 

JKr. anJJKrs. g. 7lni£ony Jfaytfen 

Gflen and'Dan Jfaues 

JXon and JSaroara Jfeaqfe 

JKr. and JKrs. J airicA S Jfeafeq 

TtoEert 91M and~Xal£feen33. Jfeins 

gim and Jiittq Jfeston 

JKr. ana JKrs. 3?fenn J?. Jfeuwood 

gim and Jlatnu Jfiq/iSerqer 

Sreorye ana Diane 33fiffiard 

JKr. anaJfirs. gerry JfisieJ 

Jilt an and fJrene Jfofmann 

William and gean Jfrt/nAieaicz. 

Dr. Jfuny g. Jffsien 

J?eAecca Is). Jfufnayef 

JKr. ana JKrs. gosepn Sfacoi 

Dr. and JKrs. [JlntJioniy 3t. Jmmediata 

JKr. and JKrs. iWencfeff 0. SJnqranam 

Drs. Wiifard and 3iaren Jnqram 

JKr. ana JKrs. Urapier g. gervay 

gonn Is), andgan 33. gonnson 

uOifiiam 3f. gonnson 

Joenore and GarJ gones 

Gfifford and Steffa Jfeizer 

Jnifip andDorotny 3iasperzyA 

JKr. and JKrs. SPerafd J\ Jtazanjian 

JKr. ana JKrs. Dennis S Jleffeu 



JKr. and JKrs. Jleuin Jleffei 



Gerard and Jlainfeen Jlenneafey 

Owen andJLancu DiifEane 

JKr. and JKrs. D.g. JGm£er 

Glfiot and JSaroara Jliiau 

Jlir. and JKrs. Dennis g. Jlfein 

JKr. and JKrs. 33ranA DUemovitcn 

JKonA and 'JSelsy Jlocn 

foeonidas D. Jiolsinonos 

Jeter 33. Jtoumoufis 

Seorqe D. JtourAoufis 

Dauid and gane foacu 

JKicJiael andJKartJia foadam 

fouAe 3JraJiam foaidfeu 

JKr. and JKrs. '3?oqis a. foaAe 

(SJiffiam Ji. Sam 



:1. 











JKr and Mrs, ('(/wan/!/. Banni 

£/av/t and ( iaci/ia /3a jXoc/t 

Mr and JKrs. WonafdJ. Befen 

Mr. and 'Mrs, Joseph B. Lents 

David and Ji atlifeen Coqqins 

Mr. and Mrs, Stephen Beslie 

Pam and y?ochy Beuhuficn 

Mr. and 'Mrs. Joseph 9?. Bizza 

Maureen and Jirady Bocher, jr. 

Dr. and Mrs. Tjatt 

7%ifip J?. andWochelle 7>. Bochwood 

Peter and Maureen Boyerfo 

Myriam C. Bopez 

Dr. ddward and '9lileen BuhomsJa' 

Orchard and Jherese Bunch 

[Peter and Catherine Macafuso 

93etiy and John Mayee 

joJm ~J. JlCaJion 

JJrian and Carol Mahoney 

Joseph and 9Saroara Mahoney 

Joann and'J?oy Mainelli 

Mr. and Mrs. Michael Malinowshi 

9he Mandfe 9amily 

Vinceni $ Marolloli, Th. D. 

Mrs. Willie Mayes 999 

Mr. and Mrs. games $. McCarthy 

Mr. and Mrs. gohn C. McDermolt 

Mr. and JKrs. J?ichard JY. McJarlane 

David, J?uth, and Susan JKcJlay 

'Mr. andMrs. David JKcJlau and Susan 

Mr. andMrs. HaoidG. McMiUin 

Mr. andMrs. ^opinalh Menon 

9Janh Meuer and \Pai Meyer 

Uladimir andDaqmar Misho 

Me/ina and Mums JJCilchell 

9?auland 9rene Mofine 

9he Matter Jamily 

[Patricia and iRic/iord JK. JKonlayue 

9homas and Mary are I Moore 

Jfumoerto andOCancy Morales 

/Dunn and \Kicliard Moron 

[Paul and Dtat/ii JKorqanii 

Mr. andMrs. Danie/ 9. Morley 

Jxooin andUnomas JKorteu 

Jfafina and JranJ? Murphy 

•Mr. andMrs. 'PaulU. MurpAy %r. 

Carmen Jt. JKurrau 

Mr. and Mir s. Bane 9. DCielsen 

John and J^at DCoone 

Jiaren and Michael JCorman 

JoJm and 9tnnemarie JCorman/ 

Mr. andMrs. OXichardC/l. OCylen Jr. 

Michael and Joanne O'Connell 

Dr. andMrs. Milliam O'DCe/ff, $r. 

jerru and JXoseanne U'JCei// 

try ( 



Susan 0' Donne// O'Ooole 
&G andJf.d OA 

Mr. andMrs. Ttaul 7, 0//oa 
Ms. J J am Ofmsiead 

71 tan // (J/sson 
Mr. and Mrs. 7? f s'art/ Parson 
Maureen J J asqua/e- 1/a/l 
Stan and J\osemary J J atten 
JKr, andMrs. tfohn Peiser 
Mr. and Mrs. $ohn Te/es 
John and Jialhu J e/tonen 



jar men an- 



J7& 



osenxary 



Tenia 



Uictor M. and9lrminda M. J J ereira 

Jfauen and Susan [Perhins 

Claudia and joe [Person 

9he J eieri/i Jami/u 

Jzooert and (Jileen J eterson 

9he [Piscopieffo 9amily 

Stephen 9. 9 > oe and Janice M Mc9ntyre 

JKr. andJKrs. fosephj 7 Tolizzolt/ 

David and Maryo J^ollah 

9ranh and Carolyn [Poplawshi 

Sieve and Baurie J oiler 

JKr. andMrs. Q'eorqe [Powers 

Dennis and [Pat J J n'ce 

J^osanne Pupho 

Steve and J\utti9inn J uppo 

Dr. and JKr s. Martin Jcacanetti 

Jane Jtandali 

Mrs. Jlea/riz 9?e£elo 

OCoreen and Jach 9?eed 

J?on and Binda J?eyan 

Marh andls)anda 9rwin 



fr 



eanne and James 



d James Jceillt. 



'y 



9he J?ichler and Schanbacher 9ami/ies 

9lndrew andJ/ie/ma Jzooerlson 

Mrs. 9uan $. 9?ocafort 

JKr. andMrs. 9erafd9. Jtoyers $r. 

Mr. and Mrs. Stephen [P. J?oyers 

Deborah O. J?omano 

~?erafd and tjoe La/tieri 

JKr. andMrs. 9 ames -P 9coa>an 

JKr. and JKr s. Uinceni J?uoertino jr. 



Men 



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'Car/an and JJruce Jvupp 

Christopher 9i. JXussett 

Jennifer Jr. and 9nomas Jt. J\ussell 

Silvia and JKario Jtutiaiiano 

~yveile J?ut/edqe 

John and jeanette JXyan 

[Pau/and 9rancine Jvuan 

Dave and Sheifa JXundaA 

Mariann and 9S ill Sadler 

JKr. and Mrs. Steve Sanchez 

JKr. andMrs. J?occo Sanseuero 

JKa, Jjaoa, /jiqqu and Sammie Sauer 

Dauid and Jjaroara Saxon 



JKr and tff r . '/,/,/.,■ I 
JKr and JKr \ T&)itfian "• / 

1 a/her/ne // OfFingei 

1 h ana JKr\ n>J/tf t ( cauoeri 
•if <md JKr-. Wiftiami Schuster 
W JKiv/jael and > (fei 

'! .j.'/j. t ■'."■■ ' '■ i v 

Or and JKrs. ( <arlu\ Jl St'uc- Jt- 

J J arcnt\ of i rm f< >/iamr<tt/i 

JKr. and Mrs, J/al Jl. Shoemaker 

Susan and rfichard S/iriner 

OCancy and /Jiv6 Jiernan 

Chris/opjjer Sjaliman 

Dr. andMrs. f Jary Stade/e 

9iaren and J J lnl c V/.v/// 

Ghar/es and C./izaoeth Snyder 

Philip and Joraine Spelman 

JKr. and JKrs. ^eorqe Til. Spencer 

Dr. andMrs. JtichardJl. Spriano 

Dr. andMrs. Jimolhy J J . Sullivan 

9/iomas and C/aine Sullivan 

Dr. Ciduardo Jaludsan and Jlraceli Jaludsan 

J?o6ert and ZXoriho 9aniqawa 

9tarru and Jo Ji anna 9aa> 

olizaoelh Orr 

Dr. andMrs. 9homas J". 9erry 

Betty andJony 9homas 

jim and \ancy 9ooley 

Marylou andQeorye Jripp 

David S. 9schemach, Bon' 9?. 9schernach 

9ed and Csperanza McOonouyn 

Maru Uan \ess 

JKr. and Mrs, 9ranhuisciano 

9ranh and J?achele Uonella 

JKr. and JKrs. $effreyl0. tlald 

JKr. and JKrs. J?aymondC (OalAer 

JKr. and JKrs. Donald 9. QJard 

JKr. andMrs. Z/an Coolidqe (SJeoo, 99 

JKr. andMrs. Douylas B. ItJeidner 

Mr. and JKrs. Qary ls)exfer 

john and Marion (Jhiie 

JSrian whitehouse 

Gddie and Jlalhy whitson 

9herese and John Wilcox 

JKr. and JKrs. D. ls)illen£ory 

Mr. and JKrs. Zach M l&inson 99 

SPlenn andDorothy ISJriynt 

Joanne 93. ~Wriyht 

zTjita and Dionisio yorro 

Diane and Jj ill /joioro 

Diane O. Zjocco/ante 

&d and JKarq ZjolcinsAi 

JKr. and 'JKrs. Mahendra V. JKislry 

9CeithX. and Sandra S. Wells 

93ernadelle and Jtooert ^Jouny 



*■■£>< 






&V' 




IHfr>'' 


4t z.-^t 




Jk'-'^^ 




For Boston 

For Boston, For Boston, 
We sing our proud refrain! 
For Boston, For Boston, 
Tis Wisdoms earthly fane. 

For here we are one 
And our hearts are true, 
And the towers on the Heights 
Reach to Heavris own blue. 
For Boston, For Boston, 
Til the echoes ring again! 

For Boston, For Boston, 
Thy glory is our own! 
For Boston, For Boston, 
Tis here that Truth is known 




And ever with the Right 
Shal thy heirs be found, 
Til time shall be no more 
And thy work is crownd 
For Boston, For Boston, 
For Thee and Thine alone! 
















' M' ■ , *" 1 >»J& ft,. - • , ► 




Hail! Alma Mater! 

Hail! Alma Mater! 

Thy praises we sing. 

Foundly thy memries 

round our heart still cling. 

Guide of your youth, 

thro' thee we shall prevail! 

Hail! Alma Mater! 

Hail! All Hail! Hail! Alma Mater! 

Lo! on the Height, 

Proudly thy towrs are raised for the Right. 

God is thy master, 

His Law thy sole avail! 

Hail! Alma Mater! 

Hail! All Hail! 



f80 Closing 




The theme of the 2001 edition of the Sub Turri was 
chosen as a symbol of Boston College, its graduat- 
ing class and their commitment to experience the 
world around them. The phrase, beyond your 
front door, was borrowed from a song entitled, 
Pinch Me, by the Barenaked Ladies which ad- 
dresses a life lead by simple pleasures, but that does 
not ignore their meaning. We live our everyday 
lives experiencing these small wonders, but often 
forget to see them as a link from ourselves to the 
world around us. 

As the graduating class of 2001 moves 'beyond the 
front door' of Boston College, the community as a 
whole is reminded to look at the bigger picture and 
to not only observe our world, but to become an 
active participant in it. The students who have not 
yet completed their stay at Boston College take 
steps 'beyond their front door' everyday as they 
learn, both in and out of the classroom, about who 
they are and how they can make our world a better 
place. 

We present to you this collection of memories in 
the hopes that it will serve you as an accurate record 
of the 2000-2001 academic year. 



Beyond Your 
Front Door 



The Editorial staff herewith presents to 

the Class of 2001, the Alumni, 

students, faculty, staff and friends of 

Boston College, this years edition of 

Sub Turri. 




Closing 481 



The Editorial Staff of the 2001 

Sub Turd 





Abercrombie & Fitch 

& Elder 




482 Closing 




Closing 483 



Student Life 

\Jmsi it up with Student life 

Jared Walsh and K Walker 




Thank you every 

the Suli Turri 

Thank you Am|y and 

Torry fc 

out with 

rules fo 

college 



all the new 
producing a 
yearbook. 
Brian- thank you for 



helping 
volved 



Be friendly but not friends! No way! Thank you to all 
of the Sub Turri staff who have once again made year- 
book one my best experiences at BC. Brandi, Amy, 
Torry and Brian - thanks for all of the patience. In 
two words:Y o u ROCK! Jared ■ First ones. done! You 
are an awesome co-editor; it's been fabulous. Erica, 
Meaghan,and Kerry - your literary talents are unpar- 
al l eled. J ess -We're soo CUTE!!! B eth and Becca - 
thanks for being the best friends anyone could ever 
ask for. Chris, Jess, Beth and Tom ■ t he midnight shifts 
were awesome. DC Crew - we definitely bonded! 

Chris - thanks fpr the par- 
ties and good times. Tom 
-Yay! Lock-in! To all of 
the Rone Penthouse, 90 
boys, 206 and 303, thanks 
for everything, including 
the trips to the load. This 
year has been great and 



me to (jet in- 
in yearbook 



Chad!!! 



again aid listening to my freshman problems. 
Thank y )u to my co-editor, who in addition to Beth 
always lept me lentertained T for putting up with a 



freshman who had no idea what to say in write- 
ups at the beginning of the year. I would like to 
thank o ur staff, Meaghan, Erica, and Kerry, for their 
great write-ups. Also thanks to the photo editors! 
and staff for all the pictures. Thank you Jake Berry 
for all your help in last minute write-ups. Thank; 
you Keyes North fourth floor for all your pictures - 
Newton RULES!!! -Jared 



here's 



to many more 



times beyond 



our front 
a!~K 




Senior Section Editors 



m rfi ill UL ■ m 


1 <^^^^^^j 


1 &^^. 


^^^1 "'■ *»2§fiP?ll 


i3)§\ HH&atiU 








Amanda 



Working on the yearbook this year has been a great adventure. I really 
enjoyed learning so much about my class and nr, school through my 
involvemeni with it. I want io thank Amy and I orn tor giving me this 
incredible opportunity. I hanks to Brandi for being there to help us through 
this long week, and to our wonderful staff member. Nicole. And to I cslev, 
thanks for everything-all of your advice, patience, and good humor. Yon are 
unbelievable to work with and I appreciate everything you did to help me 
navigate through this big task. I think the finished product looks pretty 
good, too. 

Looking back on my four years at BC, I can honestly say that I have 
loved every minute of these past four years. I have learned so much about 
myself here. I'll miss all of the friends that I've made and I'll cherish even' 
memory I have. In a small way, I leave some of me here at BC with his 
book, and I'm very thankful for that. Mom and Dad, thanks for giving me- 
ttle chance to have this wonderful journey. Lisa and Joe, thanks for being 
constant comic relief and the best siblings 1 could ask for. Kevin, thanks for 
being such a great light in my life. I love you all! 

Congratulations to the Class of 2001! Our adventure continues! 



& 



Lesley 






They say that the second time around is always better, and this year 
on the yearbook staff proved that saying to be true. It took a long 
time to come together, but the finished product is pretty impressive, 
don't you think, Amanda? Things seemed to flow a slight bit easier this 
year, and I owe that to the wonderful people that I got to work with. I want 
to thank Amy and Torry for always being there: You both are terrific, and 
Amy, I'm going to miss you next year. Also, thanks to Brandi, for being 
there during our week in McElroy 103- you are the best. Our ONE person 
staff deserves the biggest thanks- Nicole, you have been the greatest help in 
the completion of the senior section, you rock! Thank you for all of your 
help. Lastly but not least, I want to thank my co-editor Amanda. It has 
been awesome working with you on this section- you deserve a lot of credit 
for having to put up with me! Anyway, I wish you the best of luck next year 
when you travel beyond the doors of BC. :) 




Bdk& 




Never have I laughed so much while doing "work." Thanks are deserved by 
Stacey, my fabulous co-editor, without whom I would have gone insane (thanks 
for listening to all my silly stories, Stac); AmyK, Tor, Brian, and Brandi, for their 
enthusiasm and encouragement; evejymnejHse at Sub Turri, especially my fellow 



DC-travelers (all I have to say is: Concierge Lounge, 12 year old stalkers, and 
getting lost in the Hyatt!); Becca, my adorable roommate, who let me scream and 
cry and never let me feel stupid (I love you, Bee!); K, Katy, DD, Meg, & Robin, my 
Rone | mthouse girls, who kept me in hysterics and listened to my tales of woe; 
Bill, C 'I, and Carter, who will forever be my basement boys and are the most fun 
people in the world to do nothing with; everyone else at BC (including but not 
limited to Val, Oliveri, Walter & The Dude, Trav, the Hardy girls, and Meg) who 
has held my hand and made me smile; andlastly, my ACHS girls, for being rocks 
and wings. You guys are all the best. "It turns out not wherefcut who you're with 
"^hat really matters, and it hurts not much when you're around." 

Beth Bowers '03 





First year on the Sub Turri staff has been fab. I never would have ha 
a clue if my funky co-editor had not been there every step of the way 
Beth, you're awesome. You made me feel right at home with all of you 
"yearbook gossip" and crazy stories every Tuesday and Thursdaj 
morning. You'll always be my first and favorite "co". Thanks to ou 
staff member, Kathy. You really came through for us writing you \ 
articles. Thanks to the fabulous leadership of our editors in chief ■ 
great advice, great ideas, great dedication. Thanks to Chuck anu 
Eddie, the best brothers a guy could have. To my Irish relatives, muT 
British family, and my Brazilian sister. Thanks to my fellow volunteer ! 
at Jackson Mann - Caty, Lisa, and Tim. Thanks to all of the craz 
kindergarteners who sing "Say My Name" and say "Yeah, Baby!!" TU 
my faves, Nicole and Kate. We've been buddies since birth, am 
remember the promises! My roommates, Laura and Jenn, for wishin 
me luck on my long walk from Walsh to McElroy 103. A big shout-oui 
to the girls down the hall, especially Erin and Felicia. Sorry that wf 
couldn't get a good picture of you for this page. And thanks to thi 
photo staff for chasing down faculty members for the Fac. Perspecl 
tives pages. This year has been fab, and I can't wait until next year J 

Stacey Feldt '03 1 



>s 




486 Closing 



Academlai 200 f 




Well, if you are reading this, that means we actually 
finished the yearbook. It's been an incredibly arduous 
task running the newly renamed Organizations section, 
but a fun and rewarding one. 

More than anyone, I would like to thank my co-editor 
Jess. She is forever organized and dedicated to making 
our section the best possible. Not only did she create the 
new layouts, but she was always one step ahead of me 
and largely responsible for getting this done on time. 
With mono and some large class projects, I often found 
myself stressing out about getting this thing done, but 
Jess was always there to calm me down. 




On that note, I would also like to thank, and apologize 
to all of my roommates and friends who put up with me 
this year. The staff this year was extremely helpful for 
which Jess and I are grateful, and finally I would like to 
thank Amy, Torry, and Brian for giving me the oppor- 
tunity to contribute to this book. 

So as I leave Boston College in the fall for a year abroad, 
I challenge the rest of you to take a foot outside your 
door and experience life in a new way. 



Yeah, we made it! First, I would like to thank 
my co-editor Bob. He has been the best, even 
when he had to fight through mono and huge 
advertising projects. I would also like to thank 
my roommates and the girls upstairs for put- 
ting up with all my complaining and freaking 
out episodes. A huge thank you has to go out 
to the photo staff, especially Chad. Although 
we've never met, I am forever in his debt for all 
the pictures he has taken for the Organizations 
section. I also want to thank Amy, Torry and 
Brian for their help with finding pictures and 
contacts. To the fabulous Organizations staff. 
Janet, Laura, Emily and Jean: you guys are the 
best. Bob and I could never have done it with- 
out all of you. Finally, I would like to thank all 
the co-editors. Without all of you the days, and 
nights, in the office would have been unbear- 
ably long. I am glad we are friends and not 
just friendly, (wink, wink) 






^Y^\ 





3 



P 




Closing 487 





chris 



wong 



thank you to all those who stuck with me through 

thick and thin, the ups and downs; you all know 

who you are. 

it was quite the ride, and i wouldn't have given it up £SC3P8 jpst WltCH 

for anything. 

to my family, especially my parents: thank you for 

your undying faith and love; i'm a better man for it. 

leaves are falling all around, 

it's time i was on my way. 

thanks to you, i'm much obliged 

for such a pleasant stay. 

but now it's time for me to go, 

the autumn moon lights my way. 

for now i smell the rain, 

and with it pain, 

and it's headed my way. 

ah, sometimes i grow so tired, 

but i know i've got one thing i got to do, 

ramble on, 

and now's the time, the time is now 

to sing my song. 

i'm goin' 'round the world, 

i got to find my girl, on my way. 

i've been this way ten years to the day, ramble on, 

gotta find the queen of all my dreams. 

got no time to for spreadin' roots, 

the time has come to be gone. 

and tho' our health we drank a thousand times, 

it's time to ramble on. 

- led zeppelin 

i'm only this far and only tomorrow leads my way 

- dave matthews band 



sports editors 

domo arigato mr. roboto mata ah-oo hima de 
domo arigato mr. roboto liimitsu wo shiri tai 
you're wondering who i am machine or manne- 
quin with parts made in japan I am the modren 
man i've got a secret i've been hiding under my 
skin my heart is human my blood is boiling my 
brain i.n.m. so if you see me acting strangely 
don't be surprised i'm just a man who needed 
someone and somewhere to hide to keep me 
alive just keep me alive somewhere to hide to 
keep me alive i'm not a robot without emotions 
i'm not what you see i've come to help you with 
your problems so we can be free i'm not a hero 
i'm not a saviour forget what you know i'm just 
a man whose circumstances went beyond his 
control beyond my control we all need control 
i need control we all need control i am the 
modren man who hides behind a mask so no 
one else can see my true identity domo arigato 
mr. roboto domo domo domo arigato mr. 
roboto domo domo domo arigato mr. roboto 
domo domo thank you very much mr. roboto for 
doing the jobs that nobody wants to and thank 
you very much mr. roboto for helping me 
needed to thank you thank 
you thank you i want to thank you please thank 
you the problem's plain to see too much 
technology machines to save our lives ma- 
chines dehumanize the time has come at last 
to throw away this mask so everyone can see 
my true identity 

i'm kilroy! kilroy! kilroy! kilroy! 





torn ■■ 

pehssero 

another year down, another year closer to 
the real world, it's been a fun ride so far, but 
at the same time a tough one; this book, for 
instance, has been the salt to my open 
wound, oh well, it's done now and there's no 
one to blame but me. 

much love to the walsh lo's, the troy bell p- 
patrol, the maine road trippers, the sub turri 
d.c. faction, and everybody else who made 
my year all too interesting, special thanks to 
the photoggers, brandi, my fellow editors, 
that guy from indiana who told us that we 
should put in way more effort (wow that 
really was a kick in the...) and all the peeps 
who came through in the slightest way 
during our eighty-two crunch times this year, it 



don't damn me 

when i speak a piece of my mind 
'cause silence isn't golden 
when i'm holding it inside 
'cause i've been where i have been 
an i've seen what i have seen 
i put the pen to the paper 
'cause it's all a part of me 

be it a song or casual conversation 

to hold my tongue speaks 

of quiet reservations 

your words once heard 

they can place you in a faction 

my words may disturb 

but at least there's a reaction 

-guns n' roses 



since most of our staff quit, and our computer just killed our thank you list, there's not a whole lot to write here, first off, we need 

to thank ourselves. ..good job torn and chris. secondly, we did get some help from a few outsiders. ..chris and kyelim for ensuring 

that there were always a few photos of half-naked men in each roll. ..chad for agreeing to temporarily change his name to jesus 

'42.... boots for the extremely appropriate cheerleading article. ..swatt for chipping in. vikki haley for knowing something about 

crew.. .the staff at sports info, namely michael enright, for hooking us up with free passes to everything. ..brandi for somehow 

convincing ugbc to finance our trip to that casino resort, i mean yearbook conference. ..kristen for her various miracles. ..bob 

mcgrath for the candy. ..and everyone else who helped us out, but whose names were eaten by the crash of our apple II. 



Photo Edi 










Chris Bowers and Ky 





First and foremost we ivould like to thank our great staff for thai 
dedicaton throughout the semester. Chad "The Man" Elder, Kim, Shay 
Nick and Mike... you guys are the best. Amy and lorry, we couldn't ham 
better editors-in-chief... thanks for all the help, support, and damage c-o 
of our friends on the editorial staff: Kristin, Beth, Jess, Tom, Chris, 'Brad, 
Brian. ..thanks for another great year and for making the dungeon, thai h 
not such a bad place to be. Thanks for being great friends inside and out- 
office. Kristin, Beth and Jess, thanks for the help with getting pictures 
saved us on multiple occasions. Thanks Tom and Chris for hooking us 
photo passes. Chris and Amy, thanks for the parties and the fun. Fit 
to thank McGrath Studios and Bob McGrath in particular for his prom 
dedicated service and helping us bring our ideas to fruition. 

Thank You All. 
~ Chris Bowers, KyeltmRhee- 
Sub 'Turn 20.01 ' 



d work and 
feaneiie, Liz, 



had for 



„ide the 
aken. You've 

■ 

P with the 

- 

y, we'd like 
Pi a iid 




x^A&il 





Closing 489 







We would like to extend our deepest appreciation 
to the organizations and individuals who have so 
generously supported our efforts. Because of their 
kindest, we were able to capture a year of fond 
memories that will be preserved well into the 
future. Special thanks are due to all our patrons, 
this year's staff, the editors, Ms. Stemerman, and 
to the volunteers who selflessly gave their time to 
the creation of this world-class production. 



Brad Swift 
Business Manager 

Meredith Roberts 
Advertising Editor 




490 Closing 






Brian Lerman 

- Managing Editor 



So it's all over. My sophomore year, and another 
yearbook. It's hard to believe how far we've come. Now 
a second yearbook is complete, even better than the first. 
Two great editors-in-chief this year kept 
us organized and really taught me a lot. 
The staff was truly incredible, and were 
great when it came to getting stuff done. 
Our trip to Washington, D.C. was 
truly a memorable one. We learned how 
to do things many of us never dreamed 
could happen. I would like to first thank 
Torry and Amy for an amazing job. With- 
out their hard work, the book would have 
been nothing. Thank you Brandi for your 
great help to us over the last two years, 
and teaching us the ropes. 

It's hard to believe that my sophomore 
year is complete. It feels like only yester- 
day, I was a scared soon-to-be-freshman. 
Thank you Ryan, Justin, and Curran for 
helping this place feel like home. Thank 
you Jen for brightening the last year in a 
way I didn't think possible. Thankyou Mom 
and Adam for always being there when I 
needed you. 

Thank you all for your help. Each day, 
you give me a hand. I hope each of you 
remember the book which so many of us 
have put long hours into its production. To 
the reader I say... .ENJOY. 










Closing 491 














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Hey my friend It seems your eyes are 
troubled Care to share some time with 
me Would you say your feeling low and 
so a good idea would be to get it off 
your mind See, you and me have a 
better time than most can dream Have 
it better than the best So can pull it 
through Whatever tears at us Whatever 
holds us down And if nothing can be 
done We'll make the best of what's 
around Turns out not where but who 
you're with that really matters And 
hurts not much when you're around 
And if you hold on tight to what you 
think is your thing You may find 
you're missing all the rest Well she run 
up into the light surprised Her arms 
are open Her mind's eye is Seeing 
things from a Better side then most can 
dream On a clearer road I feel Oh you 
could say she's safe Whatever tears at 
her Whatever holds her down And if 
nothing can be done She'll make the 
best of what's around Turns out not 
where but what you think That really 
matters We'll make the best of what's 
around 

-Dave Matthews Band 




r* 




it took me a nealUf. lona time to decide wkat to wAite in, mu iection, io i beaan to think about how- i iee thii ueanltook, and 
kow i iee the pnoceiA- oj makina it into- wkat you hold now- in uoun, kanwi. the miMion that wai accepted by, a anoup ol people wai- 
timitan, to the mii4ion oj cneatina a dtoonwau. i fael it hoi been put toaethen, pesbfactlu-, and i coutdnt have aikedfan. a better anoup 
oj iuppont on, kelp. 

i want to thank bnandi fan. fatdina all tke mateAiali and bninaincf. them, to ud-, includina ken. expentiie in the ueanltook 
pnoceiA. and ken. talent in chooiinq. people mho can wonJz toaethen, well, i thank ken. fan, ken. vidian, ol the pentect doonwau and ton. 
kauina faith that we could cneate it. 

i want to thank tonnu- fat. beina next to me euenu- itep o^ the waif, me toaked at all o^ the piecei and knew- juit kow- to put 
them toaetken, to create tke penned daonuMiu-. tt^Axmakout alt oj thii, ike became a cl&ie faiend o^ mine, iuf^ontin^, me not only in 
the G>jjice, but on tke walkA to and faom it. i tkank ken fan. makina thii- pnoject io much faun.. 

i thank bnian fan. ihanina kiA talent fan, knowina whene all the piecei ihoutd ao, and kow- to fat them, toaetken,. it wai kiA 
dgtenmiMotkm that motiuated uAtodo oun beit and awe, fOO% juit ai ke did. 

i thank bnad, meneaitk, chniA, kuelim, amanda, teileu-, kuitin, janed, beth, itaceu, chniA, torn, jeAA and bob fan, the teawonk 
tkeu- did in. puttina IkiA doonwau toaetken,. i thank tkem fan, tke oletian oj tke doon,, fan. makina it one tkat otken, people wilt want to 
iee, fan. p&intina it and auUnxj, it colon,, they weAe tke onei who n^membened all the delaild-, who put in tke lona kounA and wtio 
kept timtincj, tke wkole time, i tkank tkem fan, thein, amitant dedication. 

to my, faiendi and family, uou know- who uou one, i thank you fan. youn, neven&ndina iuppont oj- my endeaoon,, and mone 
importantly, at IkiA lime in mu. Ufa, fan, cjuuna me Ike counaye i need to walk beyond Ike doonway we ae cneated to iee wkat [ i on 

tke. otken, tide, without each and evenu- one oj- uou, IkiA. book would be ieaenely lackina imnetkiny, and io- would i. 






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4mA Ut/iAl 200 f 

"ketpnol ifM4/i yumt dam 



Closing 493 



The Staff of the 2001 Sub Turri 
would like to thank. . . 



Brandl Stemerman: For not only being our advisor but our friend 
and for utilizing your yearbook expertise as a tool in the redefini- 
tion of this book and for taking steps with us to look beyond our 
front door and try new ideas. 

McGrath Studios: Bob, Karen, Erin, Billed Nicole and co., thank 
you for always having a smile on your face and meeting all of our 
photography needs. 

1 

Jostens: For putting together our book. Arnie for your constant 
support and knowledge. Thanks for answering our many ques- 
tions. Kristin, for your sweet southern accent and attitude that 
calms our nerves and keeps us smiling. Eric, for your patience and 
technical wisdom. 

Rick Brooks, for surprising us every year by creating a cover that 
was even better than the last. Melissa Bagwell, for using your talent 

to help make a cover Boston College can be proud of. 

Mer Zovko: for taking time every week to discuss our progress and 
for having confidence in our abilities as a yearbook staff. 



494 Current Events 



Coloph 



on 



r 



he 2001 editon of Sub Turri, the yearbook of Boston College, was printed 
by Jostens, Inc. The 89' 1 ' volume, consisting of 496 pages, has a press run of 
2200 copies and was printed in the Winston-Salem plant. Cover: The cover, 
endsheets, dividers, vellum tip design, and opening were created by Rick 
Brooks, Jostens designer. The theme and cover ideas were generated by the 
editorial staff including our advisor Brandi Stemerman. The final creation of 
cover and tip-in artwork were done by Melissa Bagwell, Jostens designer, 
using supplied slides from the staff and created in Photoshop, Illustrator and 
by hand illustrations. The covers were printed on 1 00% gloss stock, using 4- 
color process inks, then laminated with gloss lamination. They were casemade 
on 150 pt. Binder's boards. The theme, title and school name were all 
embossed and top screened with ink number 373 Maroon. Paper: The 
opening signature was printed on #100 MOE Gloss text paper with the 
balance of the book printed on #80 MOE gloss text paper. Special matte black 
ink was used on the opening signature. The books were smyth sewn using 1 6- 
page signatures and rounded with black headbands. Design: All theme 
related copy and designs including the Opening and Dividers were created 
by the Editorial staff. All sections were designed and created by their 
respective section editors. All pages were created on Power Mac 7600 using 
Adobe Pagemaker 6.5 and Jostens Yeartech Templates. The pages were 
printed by our Hewlett Packard 4M V LaserJet Printer, Cicero. Photography: 
Senior portraits were taken by McGrath Studios, Inc., 8 Elm Street Suite 2, 
Braintree MA, 02184. Phone: 1-800-588-7681. McGrath Studios was 
contracted by Boston College to be the Official Yearbook Photographer for 
2001 Sub Turri staff under the direction of the photography editors. Any 
other photos were graciously submitted by students or a variety of University 
departments. All four-color reproduction was produced from transparency 
film and all film was developed by McGrath Studios. The photos were taken 
using a variety of cameras and lenses manufactured by Nikon, Canon, 
Quantum, and Mamiya. Typography: All Body Copy is 1 2pt. Bell Gothic 
Black, captions are lOpt Bell Gothic Black, photo credits are 6pt Bell Gothic 
Black, folios are lOpt BI Goudy Boldltalic. The Cover is in Bickham. The 
remaining fonts and sizes of all other types were determined by the Section 
Editors. Lyrics: The lyrics for the opening where borrowed from the song 
"Pinch Me", written by the Barenaked Ladies as found on the album 
"Marooned". Copyright, 2001: by Sub Turri, the Yearbook of Boston 
College. No portion of Sub Turri may be reproduced or transmitted in any 
form, electronic, mechanical, digital, or otherwise, without the expressed 
written consent of the current Editors-in-Chief. Sub Turri was produced 
entirely by a staff of undergraduate student volunteers. Sub Turri generates 
revenue from yearbook sales, Ads, and donations. Please direct all inquires to: 
Sub Turri, the Yearbook of Boston College, McElroy Commons, Room 103, 
Chestnut Hill, MA 02467. Phone: 617-552-3493. 












Current Events 495 



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