(navigation image)
Home American Libraries | Canadian Libraries | Universal Library | Community Texts | Project Gutenberg | Children's Library | Biodiversity Heritage Library | Additional Collections
Search: Advanced Search
Anonymous User (login or join us)
Upload
See other formats

Full text of "Sub turri = Under the tower : the yearbook of Boston College"

I c e 



'ijfcS 






®- 



^p^ 






Digitized by the Internet-Archive 

in 2011 with funding, from 

Boston Library Consortium IVIember Libraries 



http://www.archive.org/details/subturriundertow2002bost 



*o Contents 

SI 






Opening 1 
Current Events 26 
Academics 34 
Organizations 76 
Student Life 130 
Sports 178 
Seniors 250 
Advertisements 462 
Closing 488 




Boston College 



ft 



00 

c 




tj^ 




Chestnut Hill, 

Massachusetts 

Volume 90 



sgalloD noizoB 






C/1 

o 
o 



JliH JunJzsriD 

2}:t92uH3e226M 

09 amuloV 



1.: ¥m 



M,V 



1» *5- 




Jig: 




>,^ 



f 



7 • •* 



J 



*^ r .. 



^w 






^'- 



,1^ 



\, 




4i V 



je- 







^^^^^^k. ^^^^^^4 



Kristin Wall<er 



Kristin Wall<er 







Chad Elder 






^^-. 









^^H 

^^^^H 



^ 






Chris Bowers 



*!-;?*i 




%. 



-^»^ 



h£^=^ 



iB 










I p# 










- K 



t\l 





Chris Bowers 



/' 




I'ii'E'iifri^ 



■..■ /■«* 




Susan Burton 



W^^M 








, T^r '^-^ 




'^sLl- /';/, ;;■ 


'9 i ' 1 


f ^Hi^ 



t-i. . .if 



.k ^^i' 



/-^ 



^ ^-i^^^W: 









XOt! 



^ 



,^v 







% 




fc-sf 



Messag* 

from our 

President: 

Fr. William 









.|^BH| 




iMMlr^HW 


1- , ■ )■ ■ 




' - 'v.i., "■ 


■^■■■•'"■'ppj 


1 


1 
MM 


^^^^^^^^ul|k^jxi . '■ ,'^ r 'A ''^^^V^ '''^ "?!. 






r 




1 .,-s^..v5i. -.-f-i-rt^ 












jonPn^Hi ■ifipi^ if/^^^u^^l^V'^^ij ^"^BeH^^^^R^^B ^^^^v^^:^^^^I 








^ 




i 


' '^'""^ 






Boston College 



OpncE OF THE President 



Dear Members of the Class of 2002: 



You began your years at Boston College as the 1990's were coming to an 
end, and the 21" century lies before you. I am grateful for what your class has 
contributed to Boston College, and I wish you the best as you leave "the 
Heights" for new opportunities and careers. 

You arrived on campus with various expectations and hopes, and I have 
no doubt that you have grown intellectually, personally, and spiritually. During 
these past four years, Boston College has strived to help you develop broader 
perspectives, deeper awareness of our world, and grow in your own identity. 
Those have been our goals since our founding in 1863, and we still want our 
graduates to be prepared to live generous lives and also help make our world 
more peaceful and just. 

There is no doubt in my mind that the terrorist attacks on the World Trade 
Center and the Pentagon occurring on September 11, 2001, have changed our 
world; and I think they remind all of us that we must always work against 
violence and evil. While we will not forget September 11*, we also will recall the 
good that we have experienced and the gifts we have received. Our call is to 
work for a better world, and my prayer as you begin your life after Boston 
College is that you draw strength and vitality from what you have learned in the 
classroom and from one another, and that your lives be marked by faith, 
integrity, and compassion. May God continue to bless you in the years ahead. 



Sincerely, 

William P. Leahy 
President 




BoTOLPH House, 140 Commonwealth .Avenue, Chestnut Hill, Massachusetts 02467-3934 

617-552-3250 



■'i» .■i.isijr!.^'.'^^!.! 




Lnaa tiaer 




Chad Elder 










s* 



CONTE FORUM 



II 



-a^ 



4j| 



I 



B 




fr 



. i±:-im 





^.Jer 



ZONE VOICE 



^ 



^ 




Beth Bowers 



[ e d i to rs : To r ry Katsiroubas, ] 







"Terrorist attacks can shake 
the foundations of our biggest 
buildings but tJiey cannot 
touch the foundation of 
America. These acts shattered 
steel but they cannot dent the 
steel of American resolve ... 
Today we saw e\'il - the \'ery 
worst of human nature - and 
we responded with the best of 
America ... This is a day when 
all Americans, from e\'ery 
walk of life, unite in our re- 
solve for justice and peace ... 
None of us will e\^er forget 
this day. Yet we go forward to 
defend freedom and all that is 
good and just in our world." 

President George W. Bush, 
September 11, 2001 




current eve 




[ Kristin Wall<er, Beth Bowers ] 



current events 2 7 



Faces in Entertainment 




It all started out as what seemed to be a joke. Pop 
princess Britney Spears was caught wearing a Ma- 
donna tee-shirt. In response, reigning pop queen, 
Madonna, was seen wearing a Britney Spears tee- 
shirt. But it was no joke. Madonna and Spears have 
been compared so many times in the media that it is 
beginning to make America's head spin. Unlike 
Spears, Madonna has spent decades in the business, 
and has more than established herself as a bona fide 
musician. However, according to Madonna, Spears is 
"a victim of snobbery" that she can relate to. Parents 
and fans are in constant debate over Spears' respon- 
sibility to her young fans and her credibility as a 
musician. Afterthereleaseof her self-titled album, the 
debate continues as Spears seems to be following in 
Madonna's footsteps - to a controversial carreer. 



... v» ^A^a\A,.A.^ 



"■'■•"■ ■'■'■ - ■ ■ -> ' ^■''- " >" .>\,K..,>.>> v.Vv^A >. V 




Photographs Courtesy of the Associated Press. 



Lance Armstrog, of 
Austin, Texas, flashes the 
victory sign after win- 
ning the Tour de France 
cycling race during the 
twentieth and final stage 
between Cbrbeil Essones 
and the Champs Elysees 
in Paris on Sunday, July. 
= ,;- 29,2001;^ 






Venus Williams (right) 

and her sister Serena 

pose with their trophies 



in the U.S. Open J 

wonhen's singles final in if." 

New York on Saturday, ' 

September 8, 2001 . r 
Venus defeated Serena 
6-2, 6-4. 



En tertainmen t En tertainmen t En tertainmen t 




Many new trends have been set m 2002. and not 
just knee-high boots and eoloredNalgene bottles. 
In sports, perennial big shots hke the New York 
Yankees and the Green Bay Packers were, to the 
joy of every true Bostonian. shut down by the 
Arizona Diamondbacks and the \cu f-ngland 
Patriots. Michael Jordan decided it was aboui 
time to set an example for all older athletes as he 
made a comeback to support hi^ Washington 
Wizards. Familiar celebrity couples called ii 
quits to start new relationships, as Tom Cruise 
began dating Vanilla Sky co-star Penelope Cruz, 
and as tennis stars Andre Agassi and Stephi Gral 
have their first child. We also found ourselves 
saying good-bye to our "Friends" on NBC as the 
hit sitcom has entered its final season and finding 
new homes on many syndication networks. Now, 
shows like Boston Public, 24 and the West Wing 
have begun to make their way into our weekly 
television schedule. We also had to prepare 
ourselves for events in the music world. Britney 
Spears stunned us with her coming of age, Pufl 
Daddy confused us with his new name, P. Didd\ . 
and AJ McLean of the BackStreet Boys battled 
alcoholism in the eyes of so many young Ameri- 
cans. We have also seen celebrity icons, such as 
Aaliyah, Jack Lemmon, and Dave Thomas, pass 
away. 2001-2002 has seen many old favorites 
pass into halls of fame and back issues of People 
Magazine, as well as new faces begin to decorate 
the front pages of tomorrow's new stands. 






4^. 



Steve Finley of the 
Arizona Diamondbacks 
celebrates witii Ills 
teammates after 
defeating the defending 
World Champions 
Yani<ees 3-2 in Game 7 
of the World Serieis on 
Sunday, November 4, 
2001 at the Bank On« 



^H 



-♦'i.^v 



Washington Wizards' 
Michael Jordan drives on 
the Detroit Pistons in 
their exhibition game on 
Thursday, October 11, 
2001. Jordan, in his first 
game as a Wizard, scored "<®^ 
eight points in the first 1 7 
minutes of his third 



En tertainmen t En tertainmen t En tertainmen t 






- 4 V^'W^ 



This Just In ... 



This year's breaking news covers many aspects of 
our lives. Our business world was rocked by so 
many factors, in addition to the disaster on Sep- 
tember 11. Amazon.com finally gained positive 
operating cash flows, to the delight of its inves- 
tors. This is a sharp contrast as Kmart was forced 
to file Chapter 1 1 . One of the biggest business 
scandals of the year involved energy company 
Enron. Found to have been hiding income from 
the government on their tax returns, this scandal 
sent accounting firm Arthur Anderson into a tail- 
spin. The year wouldn't be complete without a 
political scandal. Ther world was once again 
horrified at the murder allegations against Cali- 
fornia congressman Gary Conditt. Months later, 
alleged victim Chaundra Levy has not been found. 
Also dominating news coverage were Anthrax 
scares across the country. After victims in Florida 
fell to the deadly disease, American citizens were 
frightened to even open their mail. In happier 
news. Salt Lake City, UT had the honor of hosting 
the 2002 Winter Olympics. Controversy, how- 
ever, infiltrated the Pairs Figure Skating as the 
French judge tainted the results and the integrity 
of the sport while honoring a previous agreement 
to support the Russian pair. In Snowboarding, the 
United States dominated the halfpipe, sweeping 
the men's division and taking the gold in the 
women's. Even the 2002 Winter Olympics can- 
not, however, overcome the overwhelming suspi- 
cion that our memories of 200 1 -2002 will forever 
be shadowed by September 1 1 . 




This undated photograph 

Saudi dissident Osama bin 

Laden has haunted the minds 

of American citizens since the 

terrorist attacks in New Yorl< 

City and Washington D.C. 

Bin Laden, a guest of the 

Islamic Taliban, is wanted by 

the U.S. government for the 



^ ^f-S" 5/ " ! 1 V " " " f^^ n »• fl fn p'^^ "/"v^, lyij!® \s r."^" 



Photographs Courtesy of the Associated Press. 



nm^immmmB:: 



A candlelight vigil held- 
on the Promenade in thi 
Brooklyn borough oj 
NYC was held on Sef*! 
tember 1 3, 2001 tdi 
allow mourners the*' j 
chance to sing and pray 
against a skyline which 
■as once graced by thej ;f- 
)wers of the V 









Breaking News Breaking News Breaking News 



Faces in the News 




The faces of America have never shone like this before. 
After September 11 , the United States underwent one 
of the most beautiful transformations in our history. 
Our television screens, newspapers, and magazines 
were flooded with visions of mourning families, pan- 
icked white collared business men and women, and 
determined state and city workers. Tearful husbands 
and wives said good-bye as American troops were 
mobilized. Down on Fullon Street and Broadway, 
members of every American race had soft eyes and lips. 
As street choirs serenaded visitors, they memorials in 
front of St. Paul's Chapel and smelled the smoke still 
seething behind the church. Ex-President Clinton 
himself could not bear to face the destruction of the 
once beautiful NYC. Despite the rubble, America itself 
has a new appearance. Homes and cars have the 
American flag flying from their windows. American 
pride has encompassed the spirit of American culture 
and the faces of American people. 








n eye on 

^y market activity on 

« ■ the floor of the Ne>' 

, York Stock Exchang 

j; this trader feels the 

; economic aftermat. 

of the terrorist . 

attacks in NYC on * 

I September 11, 20(1 




First Lady Laura Bush, 
'ywith British Prime 
fi pMlnister Tony Blair and 
^ ' '' New York Mayor 
'. Rudolph Guiliani, 
applauds after Presi- 
Ijdent Bush's address to 
jjCongress on Capitol 
feHill on Thursday, 
September 20, 2001 . 



Breaking News Breaking News Breaking News 







« . Vi' \\)\Ki\ .' a5<S'v\\**v *.'/!# vV<^V,^,,?«Vi **sMa 



Today, our fellow citizens, our way of life, our 



F/fed [D)(^w F/feoe T®W(S^(§dl dJJs M 



o o o 



v^ 


^H 






^ 


Si 




[u 


m^ 


^K^-^ 


*1rmM 


t.* 




^* • 






C*^fi^^^^^^B 


>-^ 




1 


^^^^^^^^ft'^'- 


^^1^ 


k 


f 





Dawn broke on Tuesday, September 1 1 , 2001 to begin a new day: a day of work, a day of school, 
a day of fear. As adults and children alike left their homes on that fateful Tuesday morning, none 
knew of the terror and destruction that was soon to come. Between 7:58 AM and 8:10 AM, four 
domestic airplanes left Boston, Rhode Island, and Washington D.C. At 8:46 AM, American Airlines 
Flightll crashed into the North Tower of the World Trade Center in NYC. Then at9:03 AM, United 
Flight 1 75 crashed into the South Tower. U.S. Federal Aviation Administration finally shut down 
all New York area airports and all bridges and tunnels leading into New York City were closed. 40 
minutes later and 300 miles away, American Flight 77 crashed into the Pentagon. At 1 0:05 AM, 
the South Tower at the World Trade Center collapsed. At the same time, the White House was 
evacuated. Five minutes later. United Flight 93 crashed in a wooded area in Pennsylvania, after 
passengers confronted hijackers. Then at 1 0:28 AM, the North Tower collapsed. Habitants of both 
NYC and Washington D.C. feared for their lives as horrified people across the United States 
witnessed the morning's events. Memorials were set up instantly in every town for the missing, 
wounded, and dead. At the end of that Tuesday, every American life had changed forever. 



i 


■• N 


i 


Hi 


11 ~ 


1 


\\ 


|S 


^^k 


^ 1 ■ 


1 iW 


**«ii 


i 










1 


Li 


kMi 




very freedom came under attack 



Pres. Bush, 09 1 1 Of 







Chris Bowers 



[ ed i to rs : J a red Walsh ] 






"Learning is a lifelong 
experience; Boston College 
has provided a sound 
foundation. Through its 
study abroad programs 
and interactive classroom 
settings, Boston College has 
provided students with 
the opportunity to expand 
horizons. Or, in other words, 
your education is like the 
Big Dig; it's never over 
and it's never paid for." 

Senior Lecturer Debbie Rusch, 
Department of Romance 
Languages and Literatures 




academic 




[ Lindsay Brainerd ] 



academics 3 5 



An education is a gift and, for Boston College 
students, this gift is one of substance and 
utility, one wrapped beautifully in the Jesuit 
Tradition. This tradition, which began with St. Ignatius, 
stresses educating the whole person and revealing God 
in a multitude of disciplines. Academics at Boston Col- 
lege are not limited to the typical science and humanities 
courses. 

The university offers programs that combine 
academics with faith and service, such as PULSE, the 
Jesuit Volunteer Corps, and 4Boston. 
Students are challenged to devleop their minds 
academically while learning to nuture their faith, 
relationships, and souls. 

The University Core Curiculum provides a broad base 
from which to launch the education of the person. 
Students are encouraged to recognize the connections 
between different areas of study. From here, students 
learn the roles other subjects play in their majors and 
lives. 

A Jesuit education focuses on combining faith, 
knowledge, and service to liberate students' minds, and 
it prepares them for more than a job. A Jesuit education 
prepares them for life. -Lindsay Brainerd & Jared Walsh 



36 The Jesuit Way 





Jhe aim of ec/uca/ion .snoi/fr/oe io leac/j us 

ral/ier hcjn) Io //j/n/\ i/jan aihal io l/iin/i - 

ralner Io improue oi//- minds, so as io enaole 

us Io inin/i for ourselves. . . 

- /)ill J)eaiiie 



The Jesuit Way 37 





{ \^l 



% 



ill 






a^iS' , 






-^■^ 



U 



m-^ 






■^'S^M 


■- -'v 


w*^ 


•' ^ 48! 


"58? k 




t^ 


BsBIl ^^~ 




I * 


HR 




^^ 







ftf.^ 



;'4r 



^•' 



38 Academics 



y 



V-- 






- • » • 






//' 



-4fcail^ 



%M 



I. *"- 



Vfc-^ 










m-^ 




Dean 
Joseph^ 




mn 



3 Arts & Science 




Boston College 



Ofhce of the Dean 
College of Arts and Sciences 



Dear Members of the Class of 2002, 

You are leaving Boston College for a world that is very different from the one that existed 
when you arrived four short years ago. The events of September 1 1 and the months that 
followed have shown men and women at their worst and at their best. Our hearts go out to all 
those who lost loved ones, friends and acquaintances, and to all the families that will never be 
the same. 

Your Boston College curriculum is designed to prepare you for the inevitable transitions that 
you and your world will face. You have studied in a wide variety of fields, and learned from 
theologians, philosophers, historians and writers, from social and natural scientists, and from 
each other. Your major has provided depth in at least one area of inquiry, and cross- 
disciplinary minors and courses are available to remind us all that disciplinary boundaries are 
arbitrary and that few issues of any interest fall within a single discipline. Your ability to 
think and analyze clearly and to express yourself eloquently will serve you well regardless of 
the career paths that you choose. 

The plural "paths" is probably correct here. I suspect that few of your generation will spend an 
entire work life with one employer, or even in one line of work. Your education at Boston 
College is coming to a close, but your life-long education is just beginning. You will use the 
learning skills acquired here for the rest of your life. 

During these troubled times, two particular strengths of the Boston College experience seem 
especially important — family and service to others. The bravery of so many people in New 
York and Washington and the willingness of people from around the globe to help those in 
need are inspirational, and illustrate that we can make a positive difference in the lives of 
others. The losses that so many have suffered remind us of the importance of our own families 
- the traditional one at home and the larger community you have joined here at Boston 
College. Please do keep in touch with your new family members, especially the professors 
who have made a difference in your life. 

Thanks for joining us for these four years and please help us in continuing to improve your 
alma mater and the educational experience of future Boston College undergraduates. 




/oseph F. Quinn 



eouca/ion snoulo 
eauip one /o enier^ 
iain inree ininqs: a 
rrjieno^ an idea and 
oneself. ^^ 
-^Unomas tjnrncn 





Above: A statue of Saint Ignatius in Casson Hall reminds 

us of our Jesuit heritage and the college's educational 

philosophy. 

Top Left: This bulletin board is a teastament to the myriad 

of opportunities students have to expand their learning 

beyond the classroom. 

Bottom Left: Casson Hall, the first building erected on the 

new campus, houses the College of Arts and Sciences. 



lim Rhee 




rv« ■ 




■m^ 




■N-^ 



f 







1 





'^ 





r^ • 



r\ 






^f^'f.^". 






'N 



'% ^.-. . -Sti; 










-<.- *■ 



Jl^-\ 



nMMP 



»• : ... 









42 Academics 



% * V ^-^ 



^ojyk 






=s ^Ki 



mi 



|1 



Tit 



^lilH! 



' i^ 



^ 






:^^^'' 











^^^ 



Dean 

Helen 

Peters 




Boston College 



Office of the Dean 
The Wallace E. Carroll 
School of Management 



Dear Graduates of the Class of 2001, 



44 CSOM 



On behalf of the Faculty and Staff of the Carroll School of Management, we congratulate you on 
your graduation and wish you great journeys and safe passages as you leave the gates of Boston 
College. You have worked hard and accomplished much and have seen tremendous changes in 
your four years at this campus. Beyond the physical and intellectual changes in you and this great 
university, you have experienced first hand a momentous shift in our worldview. You entered 
four years ago at a time of great prosperity and leave at a time of war and consternation. Our 
great nation and our community is in mourning for lost loved ones and beloved strangers at a time 
when we want to escape from it all and focus on celebrating your success. We know that you 
and many of your friends and colleagues will be asked to step up as leaders in ways you never 
expected. We are proud of you and know you are up to the challenge. 

As graduates of a business school you have learned to focus on the bottom line. But what is truly 
remarkable about the Carroll School graduate is that your focus is broader and looks more 
completely to the triple bottom line. Of course you understand balance sheets and income 
statements and are thoroughly grounded in the traditional financial results, but your experience at 
Boston College focused your concern on your environment and your community as well. Your 
experience in service and community outreach while a student will hold you in good stead in the 
years to come. You will stand as leaders prepared to understand a broader vision of business at 
its best. 

During the horrific events of terrorism this year, you have begun to recognize that our community 
and our environment cannot be as narrow as we may have thought before. No longer naive 
insolated Americans, we recognize that we must share in a greater partnership with our world. 
Our interests must be global and our leaders must be global as well. Our faculty and staff have 
tried our best to impart our wisdom, and conscious raising on your eager minds. The rest is up to 
you. We hope we have sparked your true passions, nurtured your integrity, and helped grow your 
stamina for the many challenges that lie ahead. 

During times of great strife our nation looks to the new generation for leadership. We expect to 
see you among the best. We are proud of you now and know that even greater things are yet to 
come. As your paths take different turns remember us and visit often. We are far stronger 
because you were here and will be ever so much stronger ^f we can maintain that connection in 
the years to come. 




& 



CSJJJLA^ 




Helen Frame Peters, Dean 



4 man to cany 
on a successful 
business, must 
have Imagination. 
He must see things 
as in a vision/' 
'-Charies Schwab 





Above: Fulton Hall, the home of the school of management, 
is lit up at night. 

Top Left: CSOM students gather in the Fulton Foyer. 

Bottom Left: Students take a break from studies 
outside of Fulton. 








l^i'.Jl^ 



^i<r : -Wx ^ 






46 Academics 



^^^aemsm 





Dean 




Boston College 



OmcE OF THE Dean 

The Carolyn A. and Peter S. Lynch 

School of Education 



Dear Graduates of 2002, 



The theme you have selected for Sub Turn, 2002 is "with one voice." It is an apt 
theme in the wake of the tragedies September 11, 2001. But I am struck by some of the 
paradoxes your theme suggests. Thomas Merton wrote, "We are all one silence and a 
diversity of voices." Perhaps you recall the collective silence of our gathering at O'Neill 
Plaza for a prayer service after we learned of the attacks on the World Trade Center and 
the Pentagon. There is great strength, as well as peace, that comes from such silence. I 
hope that you will draw on that strength in whatever you endeavor to do. 

Of course you feel a one-ness with your classmates, fellow graduates of 2002, 
who will cheer with you as one voice at your commencement. You are also closely 
connected to your family and your parents who have supported you in all your efforts 
over the past four years. They now stand ready to celebrate your accomplishments in 
your lives ahead. You also have been a member of a community of scholars and 
practitioners. We are joined by our common commitment to social justice and to 
enhancing the human condition through education. There are so many circles of 
relationships to which you belong and within which you can raise one voice! 

And at the same time, our strength as a community comes for our differences as 
well as our commonalities. We are a diverse community, each with individual aspirations, 
hopes and talents. You have been educated at Boston College to excel in the pursuit of 
knowledge and the practice of virtue. Our hope in the Lynch School is that you each will 
use your unique and special voice on behalf of those who are most in need, most silenced, 
and most marginalized in our fragile and needy world. 

The faculty, administrators and staff in the Carolyn A. and Peter S. Lynch School 
of Education and I are grateful to you for your many contributions to our Boston College 
community and we wish you success and joy in all your future endeavors. We hope you 
will return often to these grounds where you will always be welcome. Congratulations on 
your commencement! 

Sincerely, 



Aary M.>Brabeck 



Mi 
Dean 



48 LSOE 



"A teacher 
affects eternity; 
he can never 
tell where his 
influence 
stops. " 

-Henry Adams 





Above: A view of the newest part of Campion Hall, 
home to the School of Education. 

Top Left: Donators to the Lynch School of Education, 
Carolyn A. and Peter S. Lynch are honored by this 
plaque. 

Bottom Left: Students and their professor casually hold 
a discussion in a lounge in Campion Hall. 




jiSaii.^ 






.- 9i-\ii3i 



;J, 



Xl 



'*fc:;¥i:<^^^;. ^>i:.^2 




Dean 
Barba 



M 




Boston College 



Office of the Dean 
School of Nursing 



Dear SON Graduating Class of 2002: 

1 
Congratulations to all of you on your graduation, and thank you for the many contributions you 
have made to this school during your time here. Last year I was writing about our excitement as we saw 
our graduates move out to take their place as nurses in the new millennium. While, as faculty, we 
recognized the challenges posed by continuing financial instability in the health care industry, we were 
very optimistic about what nurses, especially Boston College prepared nurses, would be able to 
accomplish. Given how far the profession of nursing had come in the previous 50 years, we were all sure 
that our new graduates would have profound positive effects on the health care of our citizens. What none 
of us envisioned, was that our new graduates would face a very different world, one where terrorism can 
strike at the very heart of our country. 

This year, as I write this in October, my optimism is tempered by the events that have occurred 
this month. I am profoundly aware that before this letter is published in your yearbook, other dramatic 
events are likely to occur. Whatever we will be facing next May, I know that nurses will be called upon, as 
they have so many times before, to meet the needs of our nation and our people. Our school of nursing 
was established shortly after WW II and some of the first nursing students at BC were RNs who had cared 
for troops in WW II and came here on the Gl Bill for their bachelor's degrees. The post WW II era was a 
time of enormous growth for the profession as we moved from mainly apprentice-type education to 
professional preparation within the finest colleges and universities. Nurses have continued to serve their 
nation, as can be observed so poignantly in the memorial to the nurses who served in Vietnam. 

Of great concern is the developing shortage of Registered Nurses. What is needed, according to 
experts in the health care industry, is not simply more nurses, but nurses who have been prepared to 
handle the complexities of the evolving health care environment. At Boston College, the nursing program 
is grounded in the liberal arts and in the Jesuit tradition of excellence in service to others. Although the 
times are unsettled and troubling, I am still comforted by the fact that you are well prepared to pay a major 
role in advancing the health care of the nation. As Isaiah the prophet said, may you "soar as on Eagle's 
wings." The evolution of our profession in the next century is yours, and we are supremely confident that 
you will continue the Boston College tradition of excelling in service to others. 

May God continue to bless you, your parents, and loved ones, as you leave Boston College to 
commence the next phase of your life. 

Sincerely, 

Barbara Hazard Munro, Ph.D., 
Dean and Professor 



52 SON 



"Dearest lord, may I 
see you ... every day 
in ^ person of your 
sidi, and, vvhllst nurs- 
ing them, minister 
unto you." 
-Mother Hmesa 





Above: A secretary providing informatiori to patients at 
tiie infirmary. 

Top Left: There are many nursing-related seminar 
offerings such as those advertised by these displays. 

Bottom Left: Nursing students can get expereince in 
record keeping at the on-campus infirmary. 




iSJ^y* 




m^^^i^sammmse^" 



54 Academics 



1 i 

1 . . 'SI 



V- 



?*• SF 



A* ,♦ 



: 






^H- 




^?^ir/^ 




Dean 
Jamef 





Boston College 



Office of the Dean 

College of Advancing Studies 



To the Class of 2002: 

Great joy and accomplishment are yours as you celebrate graduation. You have achieved what 
you dared to dream. The talent, commitment and optimism you brought to studies will now be 
advanced in different directions, shared in new ways. 

You face a new world. Unknown challenges now widen your horizons and demand a clear sense 
of mission. This world community invites your vision, vitality and vigilant empathy for others. 
You are prepared to question, to seek answers and to respond. You have anchored your 
knowledge, convictions and attitudes in a commitment to others which is the essence of moral 
engagements. Life's many changes will now always be examined in a defined context. 

Your imagination and initiative link you today with distant continents and disparate cultures. 
Your talents and many gifts call you to connect the world's communities and carve a future of 
freedom and peace. 

You own the greatest human freedom: to choose your own attitude in any given circumstance. 
To secure your opinions under extreme conditions when there is no chance of changing them is 
the highest expression of personal autonomy. 

Respond to the compelling challenges with understanding and enthusiasm. Seize every 
opportunity with wisdom and optimism. For seventy-three years, graduates of the College of 
Advancing Studies have gone forth into a world of upheaval and advanced the noblest human 
cause: freedom and moral concern for others. 



Prayerful best wishes for all the years ahead. 



56 CAS 



Sincerely yours, 

James A. Woods, S.J. 
Dean 



I 



^ Hi 




'The whole 
purpose of 
education is to 
turn mirmrs 
into windows. " 
-Sydney Hams 





Above: McCuinn Hall, home of the College of Advancing 
Studies. 

Top Left: Student receives help from the administration. 

Top Right: Students getting ready for finals in the 
McCuinn lounge. 



4^ 



Voices of 2002 



^^ 




Do You Prefer 

Large or smaii 

Classes? 




58 Voices of 2002 




Which School is Ihe 
BEST? 

The College of 
Aiis& 



What Is . 

the Easiest! r/^ - 





Which Major Scares You 
the Most? 

fhemistry 



f 




Voices of 2002 59 



Mlitit 




The Boston College Center for International 
Partnerships and Programs provides BC students 
with the option to expand their horizons 
academically, socially, and culturally. The Study Abroad 
Program offers talented Boston College students the 
opportunity to pursue their chosen discipline of study in 
one of twenty-nine countries across the world. 
Students can select from these countries the institution 
that best fits their interests and expectations. Each 
program offers a wide curriculum in Arts & Sciences, 
Nursing, Education, and Law. BC students will acquire a 
new viewpoint on their major, minor, or favored 
department. Once a student has completed foreign 
study, he or she will become a valued resource for 
exchange students and for providing insight for his or 
her chosen discipline. The Study Abroad program at BC 
presents students the opportunity to experience the 
culture of another institution while pursuing their 
academic and career goals. Within the student's chosen 
region of the world, he or she will create lasting 
friendships with a diverse group of classmates and 
professors. Through communications with friends and 
educators, BC students can share opinions and 
knowledge, and gain a greater understanding of the 
world outside the Boston College community. With one 
voice, BC study abroad students can voice their 
experience with American academics and culture to a 
diverse foreign body of students and bring back the 
same voice, full of cultured experience in relationships 
and travel to the BC Community. ~ Elizabeth Sartori 



Melissa Irgens 




1 




United Voices 

Ending Ignorance Through Education 

Boston College Is generally seen as a predominately Irish- 
Catholic community, and many may assume that such 
homogeny exists in the classroom as well. However, this 
could not be further from the truth. BC students have access 
to a world of study in all aspects of human culture. 
Departments such as Theology, History, Black Studies, and 
English offer a wide range of course selections including Racial 
Relations, African/Caribbean Theatre and Drama, and Latin 
Literature. There are courses in Buddhism, Hinduism, Islam, 
and Judaism, as well as courses on the histories of China, Japan, 
Germany, and Cuba. A BC student who has not graduated 
having broadened his horizons past the borders of campus is a 
rare individual. 

BC's diversity is not just evident in the courses it offers. The 
large percentage of international students and faculty on 
campus and people of different races, religions, and cultures 
contribute to a beneficial learning experience in the classroom. 
In one class, your teacher could be a practicing Buddhist 
discussing Chinese culture, while the girl next to you could be 
a Jewish student from Germany. Whatever your major, 
whatever classes you take, you are sure to graduate having 
gained more than a traditional education; you will have gained 
an international perspective. One way that Boston College 
seeks to promote this diversity in the classroom is through the 
"Diversity Challenge" conference. -Jeannete Shaw 



ACADEMIC I 

DIUERSITY 

tuesday, October 23 

cusningOOl 

7:30pni 

eypavidimd Wsioiry coir e courses 
\oife dweifse Faculty m^ kUm\n\\o^ 

come and speak your mind 
aliont issues that concern yonIL 




Religion and the Arts 

Prof. Mathew Schmalz ♦College of the Holy Cross 



BEING CATHOLIC IN A 
NORTH INDIAN VILLAGE: 



What We 
Can Learn 

FROM A 

"Different 
Catholicism" 





62 United Voices 



r^tii 



ani 



approach to 

knowing the whole of a subject, is by hearing what can be said about it 

»y persons of every variety of opinion, and studying all modes in whi^tUt 

can be looked at by every character of the, mind'' 

~ John Stua# Mill 




Influential Voices 

Instilling Knowledge, l^romoting i>uccess 

Some of a college's most treasured resources are the educators who 
dedicate their hearts and their minds to furthering the development of 
each and every student. At Boston College, teachers often become 
more than guides along the road to graduation; they become the students' 
mentors and friends. Professors provide students with new perspectives on 
life and encourage them to use these perspectives to develop a plan for the 
future. Teachers become role models for their students. Dedicated to their 
profession, they are testaments to the gratification one receives from 
hardwork and devotion. Those professors who go beyond the boundaries of 
textbooks and step into the lives of their students are the professors who 
have a lasting impact. Whether their talent is challenging and intriguing 
their students or just making them laugh; these professors know the best 
way to perform their job is to earn respect. 

Seniors, having spent four years meeting and learning from a number of 
respectable individuals, can often describe certain professors who have im- 
pacted their lives in unforgettable ways. These professors have been influen- 
tial voices; they have given their students knowledge and instilled in them 
the desire for success. With one voice, the faculty members at Boston Col- 
lege have called upon their students to excel. ..at school and at life, and with 
one voice, their students thank them. -Lindsay Brainerd 




Father lohn Howard 



Every student in the Honors Program has probably 
heard of Father John Howard and, if he or she has 
been lucky enough, has had the chance to experi- 
ence his vibrant wit and effervescent personality. 
Every morning Father Howard would arrive with his 
teal visor, overflowing briefcase, and comforting 
smile. He made his wisdom apparent through his 
lessons in foreign languages, his attention-grabbing 
anecdotes, and his numerous attempts to expose the 
class to the world's diverse cultures.Though I learned 
a great deal about Virgil, Homer, and other famous 
literary icons of the past, my love for the class was 
based mainly upon the man that taught me every 
day. In Father Howard's class, every comment is 
considered a worthy contribution and every idea or 
thought is acknowledged. In addition. Father Howard makes sure that his students know that there is more: 
to life than books, papers, and grades; he taught us that there is a whole world waiting beyond the walls of 
the classroom. When snow covered the trees outside of Gasson Hall, Father Howard rushed the whole class 
outside for a picture. He wanted to capture the snowy scene before it disappeared. When the Christmas 
season arrived, he took interested students to listen to Handel's Messiah at Boston's Trinity Church. He 
exposed me to art, music, nature, and great literature while being a teacher, mentor, and friend. Father 

Howard's ability to bring the whole world into his 
classroom made my freshman experience a fondly 
remembered time. 




Debbie Rusch 




Debbie Rusch is an adjunct seniorlecturer for the Department of 
Romance Languages and Literatures. Debbie brings a unique and 
fresh style to Elementary Spanish as an instructor and as the coordina- 
tor of the course. Her interactive approach and extreme enthusiasm 
are contagious. Debbie is a superb reader of each student's disposi- 
tion and applies this skill engage her students. Her excellent sense of 
humor allows students to poke fun at her; and to willing students, 
she'll poke fun right back. Students interested in Spanish find her class 
exciting and their experience deepens their desire to explore Spanish 
further. fVlost students take her class to fullfill the foreign language 
requirement, yet they are pleasantly surprised to find a class that not 
only wakes them up, but also entertains them. Debbie is an advocate 
of the study abroad program. She believes, and will tell you, that 
fluency in a foreign language means more on a job application than a 

CPA. She is always available to any student seeking more information on a European or Latin American Semester. 

Most striking about Debbie is her desire to teach and have her students succeed. Debbie will often go out of her way 

to find an analogy or trick that helps a struggling student understand a concept. Many students use her tricks as 

resources in Intermediate Spanish. Debbie is an exceptional teacher. 



Andrew Sofer 



When I was considering all of my possible choices of studies 
here at Boston College, Andrew Sofer provided me with direc- 
tion. As a Studies in Poetry professor, Sofer introduced me to the 
english major in an extremely positive way. His enthusiasm for 
poetry inspired me to explore the discipline further. Professor 
Sofer is not only an enthusiastic and knowledgable professor, but 
he is also an accomplished poet. One of Professor Sofer's many 
poems was set to music in a production in New York in the fall 
of 2001. His personal talent becomes evident in his vibrant and 
magnetic teaching style. Even the most disinterested students 
find themselves participating and making an effort to interpret 
the words of the great poets Professor Sofer exposes them to. Andrew Sofer holds a wealth of information in 




his specialty, Shakespeare. He has been involved in bringing Shakespearean programs to Boston College, 
is a wonderful and dedicated member of the English Department and a great resource for all students. 



He 




Father Robert Barth 



I was looking for a class that I could really sink my teeth into. 
Father Earth's class Religious Dimensions of the Modern Novel 
was a class that I took a lot away from. Because of Fr. Barth's 
teaching style, I feel that I really got inside the works of Gra- 
ham Green and Franz Kafka; but I also saw inside areas of 
myself that I wouldn't have discovered. Fr. Barth's classroom 
is a comfortable forum for the realization and maintenance of 
personal beliefs and values. Fr. Barth evokes many ideas with 
his passion for literature, both sacred and secular. This combi- 
nation isrefreshing and it makes Dostoevsky and Faulkner 
come alive. Ironically enough, when this Jesuit decides to play 
devil's advocate, the best debates and ideas fill his classroom, 
e thrives off of the controversies his students put forth. Fr. Barth is a wonderful professor and a spiritual 
jide. His masses always end with one of his favorite poems. Fr. Barth always finds a way to relate the 
eces he shares to his students an congregation. Such efforts, and his jewels of wisdom are just one of the 
any ways Fr. Barth is a professor that deserves recognition. 

Facult}' Perspectives 65 



Final Exams 

rU Be Home for Christmas ... Maybe 



The day we have all been waiting for has 
finally arrived, the last day of classes. Now 
we can spend all day celebrating, sleeping, 
and. ..wait, STUDYING. For many of us, the last 
day of class is as much a curse as it is a blessing. It 
means that Finals Week has once again snuck up 
on us and caught us with a video game controller 
in our hands. This is the week where the dining 
halls offer free coffee, the pre-medical students 
have breakdowns, and the CSOM students finally 
discover the location of Bapst. It is also the week 
where we swear next semester will be different. 

Finals are preceded by two study days in which 
students try to cram a semester's worth of knowl- 
edge into a mind far more concerned with 
sleighbells or tanning oil. With 24-hour quiet 
hours rarely obeyed, most students flock to 
O'Neill, Bapst, and the Eagle's Nest to prepare for 
exams. For some students, the only release from 
the tension is the 1 1 pm Scream. In the midst of all 
this studying, we must also be packing. Semester 
break begins 24-hours after our last exam, which 
means we must also say our good-byes rather 
quickly. However, as stressful as exam time is, we 
all get through it for better or worse. 

-Jared Walsh 



'yes ^£e 

Jec/ures are 

opiional^ 



y^ 



'raoua/i'on is 



also 
opiional. " 




Twas the night before finals, 


1 drained all the coffee. 


"What kind of student 


And all through the college. 


And brewed a new pot. 


Would make such a fuss. 


The students were praying 


No longer caring 


To toss back at teachers 


For last minute knowledge. 


That my nerves were shot. 


What they tossed at us?" 


Most were quite sleepy. 


1 stared at my notes. 


"On Cliff Notes! On Crib 


But none touched their 


But my thoughts were 


Notes! 


beds, 


muddy. 


On Last Year's Exams! 


While visions of essays 


My eyes went ablur. 


On Wingit and Slingit, 


danced in their heads. 


1 just couldn't study. 


And Last Minute Crams!" 


Out in the taverns. 


"Some pizza might help," 


Her message delivered. 


A few were still drinking. 


1 said with a shiver, 


She vanished from sight. 


And hoping that liquor 


But each place 1 called 


But we heard her 


would loosen up their 


Refused to deliver. 


laughing 


thinking. 


I'd nearly concluded 


Outside in the night. 


In my own apartment, 


That life was too cruel. 


"Your teachers have 


1 had been pacing, 


With futures depending 


pegged you, 


And dreading exams 


On grades had in school. 


So just do your best. 


1 soon would be facing. 




Happy Finals to All, 




When all of a sudden. 


And to All, a good test." 


My roommate was 


Our door opened wide. 




speechless. 


And Patron Saint Put It Off 




His nose in his books. 


Ambled inside. 




And my comments to him 






Drew unfriendly looks. 


Her spirit was careless. 
Her manner was mellow. 
She started to bellow: 







Left: In front of O'Neill, not a creature was studying, not even a CSOM 

student 
Below: When what to my wondering eyes should appear, but eight 
chapters of reding that I forgot were there. 





1 



left: Pre-Med students were studying with care, in hopes that an A soon 

would be there. 
Middle: He spoke not a word and went straight to his work - then 

filled up his dreams with visions of homework. 
Above: When out on the lawn there arose such a clatter, the sound of 
history discussion and final-bashing chatter. 



Finals 67 



Arts & Theater 



Coming 



er in 



Talent 



The Fine Arts and Theatre Departments offer a variety of 
opportunities for students to display their creativity and 
talent. There are numerous classes, organizations and 
productions for both majors and non-majors to participate in. 

Music majors have opportunities to exercise their talents in 
organizations such as chorale and small chamber ensembles 
as well as in various performance classes that coincide with 
their concentration. In addition to a performance 
requirement, music majors must take courses in the theory, 
analysis, composition, and history of music, as well as courses 
that examine music of other cultures. 

The Fine Arts Department offers majors in Art History, Film 
Studies, and Studio Art. Film Studies majors take courses in 
the history of film, film criticism, and photography and 
utilize their skills in a related internship. Studio Art majors 
take courses that foster an appreciation for art and provide 
the opportunity to produce art. Courses in Art History offer 
the interested student with knowledge concerning the paths 
art has taken over time. 

The Theatre major intends for students to mix their class 
lessons with actual stage experience. In the classroom, 
students learn about dramatic structure, elements of theatre 
production, the history of theatre, and acting. The 
successful fall play, Dracula, the first of four productions this 
year, exemplifies the way students combine their own talent 
with their theatre education. -Kate Bartel 




68 Arts & Theater 



I 




#^;.^!^. 




siiie 



COLLEfiF 




I remember alwayi the need to know myself, because if I avoid Itnowing 
wlio I am inside, then I can't express what I have to say through the tal- 

f ent that I have. " -iudith famison M 




« 






70 Honors Program 



Andrew Logan 




Ji 




Boston College always prided itself on the 
intellecual prowess and academic abilities of its 
student body. However, certain ambitious 
students needed an exclusive program to enable 
them to reach their potential. This need was 
fullfilled in 1958, when the Honors Program was 
founded. Dean William Casey, S.J. established the 
program to provide students with an opportunity to 
fulfill all core requirements in a sequence that is 
unique to only a few colleges and universities nation- 
wide. Students enter the program as freshmen, 
although sophomores are also admitted. The criteria 
for incoming freshmen is high, with most scoring an 
average of 1450 on their SAT's and graduating in the 
top 5% of their high school class. Recently, the 
Honors Program expanded from the College of Arts 
and Sciences to the other four schools. The basic 
program remained the same, but was modified to 
include each school's own core. The course is de- 
signed to challenge students at a high level in a small 
class, seminar-style environment. Sophomore Dan 
Chapin comments, "The small class size allows for 
discussion and connections with the professor and 
other students that rarely exists in other classes and 
programs." The goal of the program is to ensure 
students receive the best education possible. All 
Honors Program graduates have an Honors Program 
designation on their transcript and receive a special 
announcement at Commencement. 

-Christopher Martin 



m 



Lindsay Brainerd 




An Early Start 

Pre-Professionals Preparing for the Future 

Although it may seem as if many college students are 
wandering aimlessly through their academic studies, 
a fair number have a clear goal in mind. These are 
the students enrolled in BC's Pre-Professional programs, 
which include Pre-Medicai, Pre-Dental, Pre-Vetenarial, and 
Pre-Law. These concentrations do not require specific 
majors; however, there are areas of study generally associ- 
ated with each. Many Pre-Medicai students are science 
majors, while majors of Pre-Law students are most fre- 
quently History, Political Science, and English. Advisors are 
available for consultation regarding course selection, 
internships, and researching careers. Although no specific 
academic major is required, the course loads of Pre-Profes- 
sional students are generally more challenging for the 
simple reason that expectations for grades are high. It is 
therefore rather comforting to know that students can 
receive help preparing their applications and personal 
statements for professional schools, learning interviewing 
techniques, and taking preparatory courses for the LSATs 
and MCATs. Extensions of these Pre-Professional programs 
outside the classroom take the form of the Mendel Society 
and the Bellarmine Law Academy. Both sponsor guest 
speakers and provide guidance for those applying to 
Medical and Law School. Overall, the Pre-Professional 
programs at BC provide great opportunities for those 
pursuing a challenging course of study. -Kristen Faucetta 



The Ultimate MCAT 
Prescription 



The Princeton Review 
Hyperleaming MCAT Course 

/ 41 class sessions — more than any other 

national course 
/ Eight-point average score improvement— 

the best in the industry 
/ Satisfaction guaranteed 
/ More than 3,000 pages of comprehensive, 

upHto-date materials 
/ Expert team of instructors 





i;sxc 

(UW SCHOOL ADMISSIONS COUNCIL^ 



e< 



,o^°l\ 



^e-t^-'^'' 



10AM-6Pf 



'^'^' At tte Copleg Morrioi 
pardflg. October M\ 



72 Pre-Professional Programs 



i 


k 1** 


y.. 


u 




:■ 



XI 




'Professionalism is Knowing fioiv to do fC*ivfien << 
" ^' doing it/ -Fr^nk Tyg^^,,^ 

■■c 



^%^ 



V 



^Ml 



^n educah'onal 



i/ei 



/worm 



/eacnes t/ourii 



sastem isn / won 

a oreai oeal ir a 

s aouno 

people now /o 

moAe a uoino oui 

ooesn { ieacn inem 

now io moRe a lire. 




% '^' 



,♦•' 



»■>'" 



tt 






liiiiiaiaMH Wii 






flissn^ 



1 




■'-'• -■■ ■^■: ..'.til.',;, 






»■■ 





;vjKlft> 






'■■VHi 



■i^^ 



'H 




Cjoucaiino 
ine mind 



an 



J/A^ 



sou 



■I... 



Ujosk 



on 



Golk 



eae 



•y 



tyKCH SCHOOL oy IPQC*:: 



14 •-„,,„,- 












Chad Elder 



[ ed i to rs : J a n et S u d n i k ] 







"At BC, I have noticed 
that when students com- 
mit to an organization, 
they completely dedicate 
their hearts and souls to 
the cause. This results in 
lessons that will stay with 
the student throughout 
their lifetime. BC ben- 
efits from this involve- 
ment as it helps create a 
greater sense of commu- 
nity. This would not be 
possible without the sup- 
port of countless faculty 
members who give much 
of their time providing 
support to our causes." 

Brian Davis '02, 
President of Appalachian 
Volunteers 



organizati 




[ Meaghan Casey ] 



Chris Bowers 





Amanda jack and Richie Moriarty, 
President and Vice President of UCBC 



UGBC Cabinet 



"UGBC has afforded me with the 
opportunity to work with 
motivated and intelligent 
students, faculty and adminis- 
trators at Boston College. 
Although it has been trying at 
times, I am proud of the goals 
our cabinet has accomplished 
this year." ~Richie Moriarty, 
Vice President 



Contributed by UCBC 



Contributed by UGBC 





Members hand out information about UCBC to the 
78 UCBC student body. 



Homecoming 200 1 at the Marriott Copley 

The Undergraduate Government of 
Boston College actively represents 
the undergraduate student popula- 
tion by programming according to 
the interests of the student body, 
forcefully advocating the concerns 
of the student body to the Univer- 
sity, and promoting issues of jus- 
tice throughout the Boston College 
community. 




Lonlnbuted by UCBC 



Cabinet members come together at their August retreat at Camp Hazen in Connecticut. 





Citributed by UCBC 

The Programming Department welcomes Adam Duritz of 
Counting Crows to perform at BC. 



I\4embers plan for the newly introduced late 
night TV show, "Boogie Heights. 



UCBC 79 



Contributed by CSOM govt. 




"Over the past four years, we have watched this 
club grow to nav heights. Ideas, energy, and 
dedication embody what we have become. Upon 
our departure, we leave our club behind with 
great confidence in the next class of leaders. With 
all their ambition, we see great things ahead. " 
Best of luck, 

Senior Officers -Mi, Liz, Lisa, Emily, Matt, and 
Mike 



The School of Management Govern- 
ment (SOMG) is the official gov- 
erning body of the Carroll School 
of Management. The SOMG acts 
as an umbrella organization that 
fosters unity and information ex- 
change between CSOM students, 
faculty, and the academies. The 
government sponsors various 
events for CSOM students during 
the academic year. Such events 
have included guest speaker series, 
student leader banquets, golf 
tournaments, newsletters, as well 
as workshops and socials designed 
to assist students in pursuing their 
studies and future career paths. 






CSOM Government brings together students, alumni and faculty of CSOM in 
events such as this Faculty-Student Integration Dinner. 



The Faculty-Student Dinner is designed to bring CSOM members 
closer, outside of the classrooms of Fulton. 

80 CSOM Government 



Lynch School of 
Education Senate 



Kyr<.m ttitt 




Kyelim Rhee 




Members discuss new projects to introduce 
to the Sctiool of Ed. 




"\ Unv bfiiij; a part of tlic mmuhc hccaiiM- it is 
lull of hi);hi\ nioti\att-d individuuK working to 
make a difference for tlie I.ukI) School of 
Education and the surrounding coiTiniunit\." - 
Lisa Samniarone, Secretan 



The LSOE Undergraduate 
Senate serves as a corps of 
volunters for diverse 
projects within the School 
of Education, on the Boston 
College campus, and In the 
surrounding community. 
Senate members serve as 
liaisons between the faculty 
and administration of the 
School of Education and the 
student body. 







Kyelim Rhee 


i%~ 


"Z^dHl 


■ 


^^c> 


_ Jh 


^^tf 


i^tflr 


—^3 


■El 


WBS^^^ i 


mm 


mm 


fHI 


HH 


^^ 1 



SOE Senate members at a meeting 



SOE Senate 81 



Caitlin Morrell 




"4Boston is a program grounded in service, but 
reflects on our relationship to the world. For 
some, this is faith in action. For others, this is 
social responsibility. And for others, this is a 
path of personal discovery. We hope for all of 
our members that 4Boston can become a way 
to live life. " -Meg Bissett, President 



4Boston is a volunteer organi- 
zation that serves Boston's 
homeless shelters, lunch kitch- 
ens, schools, youth-centers, 
hospitals, and live-in facilities. 
The aim of 4Boston is to provide 
the agencies of Boston with 
reliable, consistent assistance, 
and to provide BC students with 
a significant urban service expe- 
rience, in hopes that they will 
grow intellectually, morally, and 
spiritually though regular seryice 
to others and through disci- 
plined reflection on that service. 

Contributed by 4Bo5ton 




Caitiih Morrell 



2001/2002 4 Boston Council members 





:^M^^^^'' .''.I ' ">■ Contributed by 4Boston 

Council Members enjoy some free time while at 
their Retreat in Tiberton, Rl 



Members play in the water during their retreat. 



82 4 Boston 



Campus Sdiool 
Vblunteers 




itributed by CSV 



The Campus School Volunteers officers at their Fall Retreat. 





Throughout the /m^/ /- ;( 1 \iiiilcnts nfthe 

(amfiiis School bare laiijibl iiw Ihc iiiiincnsv talue 
of even one small ste/i. the s/jiril-liflinfi 
ca/jahllites of a hrtf>hl smile, and the importance 
of every small nift that (,od has f-iven lis. lessons 
that far oiitiiei^h anything ever ivritlen in a text 
book. " - lirin Cartland. President 

The Campus School Volunteers of 
Boston College are a group of under- 
graduates who work with and for the 
Campus School - an educational and 
therapeutic program that serves students 
with multiple disabilities. The group was 
established in 1996, and has become one 
of the largest volunteer groups on cam- - 
pus. The volunteers work directly with the 
students in the classroom setting, one-on- 
one in the buddy program or as a group 
during many of the special events orga- 
nized throughout the year. Members also 
work outside of the school organizing 
fundraisers such as hockey and golf tour- 
naments, from which the proceeds are 
donated to Campus School annually each 

Contributed b\ CS'. 



)ntributed by CSV -" V 

The tnoney raised from these fundraisers is presented to the 
school each fall during their "Spirit Oay. " 




.^Jhe 2001 "Ever to Excel" Award Recipients 

Campus Sc±iool Volunteers 83 



Contributed by Appaiachia Volunteers 




"We return from the trips feeling enriched by the 
discovery of new friends and blessed that we were 
able to share in their lives and make a difference." 
- Erin McManus '02, Coordinator 

The Appaiachia Volunteer Program 
Is a student-run club sponsored by 
the Campus Ministry of Boston Col- 
lege. Started in 1978, the organiza- 
tion has grown to become one of the 
largest volunteer groups on campus 
and the largest group of Appaiachia 
Volunteers in the country. Over 
Spring Break, over five hundred 
Boston College students travel to 
various sites throughout the Appaia- 
chia regions of Kentucky, West Vir- 
ginia, Virginia, North Carolina, South 
Carolina, Pennsylvania and Maine. 
The group's main objective is to 
assist in the daily lives and provide 
hope and encouragement to the 
economically deprived peoples in 
these Appaiachia regions. 

Contributed by Appalaciiia Volunteers 



Volunteers at the '01 trip to a Virginia site. 
84 Appaiachia Volunteers 



Appaiachia 
Volunteers 




Keylim Rhee 




Appaiachia members plan for gyring Bteak dating drie of their 
weekly Sunday meetings. 



■Mi- x:~ 





Lgft: Two volunteers show 
(fedication to the project. 

Below: It's a goup effort to 
finish one of the houses. 



Contributed by AppsfachfaVolunteers 




Corilributrd t»/ H. 





ributed by^abltat foi^umanity ' ^ 

A Habitat crew on a Spring Breal< trip to Belize. 




"What I lore most aboiil llahiltil is lin- feeling I 
have ervrytime I enter a uorksite. It is a/eeliiif; of 
dedication, care, and excitement tl>al encompasses 
ereryone in titeir tusli la l)el/) fiire <i needy family 
one of tlw greatest ififts they could ever reciere, a 
home. " - Tom Kudersdorf, Co. -President 

If-" 

Habitat for Humanity hopes to 
engage as many Boston College 
students in reaching the greater 
Boston community and in assisting, 
in any way possible, in the building 
and construction of decent and 
affordable housing for families 
living in unacceptable living condi- 
tions. This year, they have been 
working in cooperation with local 
Boston chapters in helping them 
construct homes within their own 
communities. Twenty members 
are taking a Spring Break Trip to 
Pheonix City to work on a Blitz 
Build, which is the construction of 
seven homes in one week. 



Contributed by Habitat for Humanity 



Contributed by Habitat for Humanity - -- 

The group bonds with the inhabitants of a newly built home. 




Croup members hammering it out at the worksite. 

Habitat for Humanity 85 




'Sr V.2^«9??=^S^5??^";' TES^KiirS?:- 



StSSiSTZTiy^^a^ :: i!;''^^.;- 



"We didn't inherit the earth from our 
ancestors. We're borrowing it from our 
children." - The Environmental Action 
Coalition, '02 



The Environmental 
Action Coalition strives 
to make the BC com- 
munity more aware of 
environmental concern 
and to give students a 
chance to take part in 
environmental issues 
and action. 



Environmenial Action 
Cocdition 




Chris Bowers 

The President poses as a flower to draw attention to the dub. 



Chris Bowers 




EAC members try to mal<e the world and the Boston College 
campus a better place to live in. 



86 Environmental Action Coalition 




Peer Education 
Network 



ConutKittO tn Pli- 




ntributed by PEN 



Peer Education Network members looking sttarp. 





Contributed by PEN 



Member attempt to start a ^campfire during a retreat. 




The best thing about PEN is that the different parts of 
the group work closely together to teach the campus 
how each part affects the other. For example, alcohol 

consumption is related to sexual assault. Each 

educator works hard to teach the campus about how 

one unsafe decision affects many other parts of a 

student's life. " ~ Keri Bayly 

The Boston College Peer Education 
Network (PEN) is an organization of 
selected students trained in addressing 
issues on Alcohol and other Drugs, 
Sexual Assault, HIV/AIDS Awareness, 
Healthy Eating and Living and related 
social issues. The goal of PEN is to in- 
crease knowledge and understanding of 
these complex issues and their impact 
on the University community. 
Through creative and interactive pro- 
gramming, members of PEN encourage 
good decision-making and healthy 
choices among students, as well as work 
to assure a climate of civility and respect- 
ful behavior on campus. These programs 
are in the form of skits, improvs, ques- 
tion/answer discussions, and other 
presentations as requested. 



PEN girls prepare for a rustic retreat. 

Peer Education Network 87 




Another Choice on 
Campus 



Contributed by ACC 

"It's great being part of an organization that 
provides fun alternatives for stdents who 
want to take a night f off from the party scene 
or are just looking for something different to 
do on weekends. " - Karen Stamm, Member 



Another Choice on Cam- 
pus is a student-run organi- 
zation that see[<s to provide 
students that don't drink or 
throse who are lool<ing to 
tal<e a night off from activi- 
ties that involve alcohol 
with a fun alternative, in an 
alcohol-free environment. 
They frequently sponsor 
karaoke nights, holiday 
parties, barbeques, and 
various other activities in 
O'Connell House. 




Kyelim Rhee 



Members of Another Choice on Campus gather to plan upcoming events. 




Contributed by ACC 



Karaol<e Night at OConnell House 



Students enjoy an alcohol-free night at the Halloween Master Bash 

Another Choice on Campus 



Partnership for life 




Kyclini RhC' 



Partnership for Life members meet to discuss issues and plan events for the year. 





Kyelim Rhee 



"Partnership for Lite promoter awareness and raped 
for life at ail stages. It is through active love, under- 
standing, education, and open communication ■ 
recruiting speakers, holding forums and debates, 
throwing baby showers, and participating in marches 
- that this is achieved. I'm so glad I was a part of this 
at BC!" - Rosemary Maffei, '02 

Partnership for Life is a pro-life 
group on campus that adresses all 
life issues, but focuses mostly on the 
topics of abortion, euthanasia, and 
the death penalty. Members take 
part in weekly educational outreach, 
volunteer projects in Boston to aid 
mothers and children, and various 
walks and marches around the 
country, including the March for Life 
in Washington DC in January of each 
year. Members also have the oppor- 
tunity to meet with other college 
students at various conferences 
throughout the year. As a group, 
they try to facilitate dialogue and 
provide education on life issues at 
BC by providing various speakers 
and programs throughout the year. 



Group members participate in a heated discussion. 




Kyelim Rhee 



A new topic is introduced... 



Partnership for Life 89 




Contributed by Campus Ministry 



Whether you want to help out 
with liturgy, go on a retreat, 
volunteer for service in the city 
of Boston or spend spring break 
in service in Appalachia, you 
will find information and op- 
portunities in the Campus Min- 
istry of Boston College. The 
ministry sponsors many pro- 
grams and organizations for all 
BC students. One of such is the 
Salt and Light Company which 
encourages Christian faith and 
action by emphasizing Spiritu- 
ality, Community, Ministry, 
Outreach, and Celebration. 
Another is the Ignatian Society, 
an organization run to educate 
others on ignation spirituality 
and ideals. The KAIROS retreat 
program offers six retreats per 
year. The ministry also pro^ 
vides students with counseling 
services and the opportunity to 
take part in immersion trips to 
Mexico, Nicaragua, El Salvador, 
Jamaica, Dominican Republic, 
and Belize. 




^«^ 



Salt & Light Members 



Contributed'by.,Ca'm^ Ministry 






Contributed by Campus Ministry 



Campus Ministry members attend thie School of 
Americas program. 



Contributed by Campus Ministry 

Members can donate their Easter breaks to the 

Tijuana Service Retreat. 
90 Campus Ministry 




Members relax and unwind at a retreat. 



Contributed by Campus MinistrN' 

Valuable experiences can be gained through the 
service of campus ministry. 

Campus Ministry 91 



Keylim Rhee 




"Circle K is a very fun place, just because of its 
atmosphere. So many people who are dedicated 
to service join together and have a good time 
doing something they love. It's wonderful to see 
so many college students making time to help 
others who are in need, and gaining so much in 
return. " ■ Laura Pyeatt, President 

I ■ 

The mission of Circle K at Boston College 
is to better the community and campus 
through service projects. Boston College 
Circle K makes the community at large 
accessible to students, introducing them 
to the world of service outside the campus 
walls. Some events that they volunteer at 
weekly include bingo at nursing homes, a 
soup kitchen in Brighton, an organization 
that makes and delivers meals for AIDS 
patients, reading and cafts with ESOL 
students, and a babysitting program with 
Newton Parks and Recreation. For larger 
projects this year, they painted the build- 
ings of the Hatian Multi-Sevice Center in 
Dorcester and organized an Acapella Fest 
to raise money for the Kiwanis Pedatric 
Trauma Institute. 

Contributed by Circle K 




" JB ga?" '^ 




Circle K 



Keylim Rhetft 



Circle K members 



Contributed by Circle K 





Circle K members working for the community 



These members help clean up a park. 



92 Circle K 




Jiew Luy.ir 



Project 2000 volunteers and the John Marshall kids at their Halloween 
weekend event in the Mods 




Andrew Logan 



The group gathers for a bbq in the Mods after a day of 
Trick or Treating. 




"I joined this group my treshman year not 
knowing what a huge part of my college 
experience it would become. Volunteering with 
this group of inner-city children has opened 
my eyes to the world outside of Boston College 
and I only hope that they take away as much 
from the program as I have. " - Lindsay Volk 

Project 2000 is a mentoring 
and tutoring program involving 
4th and 5th graders from the 
John Marshall Elementary 
School, in Dorchester, MA. This 
Saturday program combines 
educational as well as recre- 
ational activities that help cre- 
ate positive role models and 
goals for young students. Ac- 
tivities include Trick or Treating 
through the Mods, visiting the 
Museum of Science, barbeques, 
and many other bonding activi- 
ties such as basketball, football, 
and arts and crafts with the 
kids. 



Andrew Logan 




- ;.:::^^MatEU&:a^:fiaac.^ 



The girls meet in 'Connell House to do some activities. 

Project 2000 93 



Caitlin Morrell 




'We make great music and we have lots of fun. 
That's what the Acoustics are all about. " 
- Lance Lin, Acoustics President 



The Acoustics are one of Boston 
College's most popular a capeila groups. 
Since the group's inception in 1993, they 
have performed their way into the 
hearts of many a listener through an 
uplifting, humorous and theatrical brand 
of a cappella. The "stix" pride themselves 
on the diversity of their repertoire, 
wailing away on 70s rock, 80s pop, and 
90s miscellany. The group has arranged 
and recorded the works of Reel Big Fish, 
Lauryn Hill, Madonna, U2, and Heart, 
among others. This year they held their 
annual invitational with the UPENN 
Counterparts and the UVA Hullabaloos. 
The Acoustics have traveled extensively 
for many performances, including 
appearances in Salem, MA and Florida. 

Caitlin Morrell 




The 2001 Acoustics always attract a large audience at their performances. 



94 Acoustics 




President Lance Lin really gets into the music. 




"S^' 



Bostonians 



i 





"Without music, life is a journey through a 

desert. " - Pat Conroy 



Founded in 1986, IneBostonians are 
the oldest a capella group at Boston 
College. Their performances always 
draw a large crowd of screaming fans, 
alumni, and parents. This co-ed group 
has an extensive repertoire including 
songs from the Beatles, Paul Simon, and 
Mariah Carey. This year their shows 
featured current hits from U2, Custer, 
Nelly Furtado and Janet Jackson, as well 
as old favorites from Billy Joel, Bon Jovi, 
and Frank Sinatra. The Bostonians travel 
all over the United States on retreats, 
giving performances and having fun. 
The Bostonians have received much 
television coverange in the past year as 
they have sung on both The Price is 
Right and MTV's the Real Worid. 



Caitlin Morrell 



aitlin Morreil 

Members perform at the joint "Acoustonlan " concert. 



The group dresses it up for their cafe. 



Bostonians 95 



Caitlin Morrell 




"Sharps is one of my favorite parts of my college 
experience. We all support, encourage, and love 
each other. " ~Maricela Barbosa, Treasurer 



] The BC Sharps is Boston College's 
|?best (and only) all female a 
cappella group. Founded in 1990, 
the Sharps have toured up and 
down the east coast at various 
P colleges and universities, and have 
performed at many corporate and 
private functions. The Sharps have 
produced three CD's and one tape 
|;tn their 10 years of existence and 
pook forward to the production of 
many more! The girls perform 
songs from Garbage to Madonna 
to Whitney Houston. They have 
an annual cafe as well as an alumni 
show and are definitely a favorite 
among BC students. 



Caitlin Morrell 





Caitlin Morrel: 



are Boston College's only all-female a capella group. 





Caitlin Morrell 



These girls really enjoy what they do. 



The Sharps warm up at one of their many practices. 



,^ 



96 Sharps 




Mttg/ltan Ctiey 




The Senior members pose one last time. 



The Heightsmen are Boston 
College's only all-male a capella 
group dedicated to musical excel- 
lence. Founded in 1990, they 
have established themselves as a 
prominent musical group on 
campus. The members of the 
group also act as a family for ^ 
each other. They maintain a 
diverse selection and they enter- 
tain thousands of fans world 
wide. The boys release an annual 
CD and participate in many 
invitationals. Their setlists in- 
clude songs from groups as di- 
verse as Eagle Eye Cherry, Cut- 
ting Crew and Custer. 




leaghan Casey 

The boys practice one of their new songs for the year. 



The boys take a break to go over new material. 

Heightsmen 97 



Caitlin Morrell 




"The Dynamics have given me the chance to make 
wonderful music with people I have a great time with as 
well as truly admire. " - Dan Burns, Co-Music Director 

It all began in 1998 with a perfor- 
mance of the Buggies' famous an- 
them, "Video Killed the Radio Star." 
BCs youngest co-ed a capella group 
has quickly made a name for itself as 
an energetic and talented group. The 
rest is history, as the Dynamics have 
steadily been gaining fans and recog- 
nition as a household Boston College 
name. This year the Dynamics held 
their first cafe, performing hits from 
Belinda Carlisle, Blu Cantrell and their 
signature song, that Dirty Dancing 
hit, "I've Had the Time of My Life." 
The show included hilarious home- 
made group videos. Though only 
four years old, this group has matured 
in a very short time and has improved 
with each passing year. 



Cciitlin Morrell 





Dynamics 




Dynamics members pause for a group shot during retiearsal. 





Caitlin Morrell 



Ttie group warms up and prepares to sing. 



The Dynamics perform one of their hits. 



98 Dynamics 



^*^ 




llMJt \rttjfk 



University Cho 




ica Serock 



The University Ctiorale is at ttieir best during their Fall Concert. 



■!Sk,ii^Skt* 




hris Bowers 



The University Chorale performs at the Pops on the Heights 
concert, Parent's Weekend. 




I am stt liirky to Ixiiv Im-cii a /xirl nj llx' (Jxir/ilc. <)i tr Uh- 
fkLsl fimr yetirs. llx-f;n)ii/) Imls filU-d iin life iiilh iimsic. 
Iraii'l. ami frit'iuL\l)i/). ion cunt ask/or a niiin' aotulitfiil 
ofilxjrliinily." - (inirtnn (J)a/muiii. (Jx/ralc I'rvsidiiil 

One of the largest student-run 
organizations on campus, the 
University Chorale began as an all- 
male glee club in the late 19th 
century. Today, the group con- 
tains over 160 singers, consisting 
of male and female students, Jesu- 
its and faculty. Their repertoire 
ranges from classical masterpieces 
to modern works. Annually, the 
group performs during Parent's 
Weekend with the popular Boston 
Pops. They also perform a Fall and 
Christmas Concert. Each Spring 
Break, they travel to a different 
part of the world to tour the coun- 
tryside, experience the culture and 
perform in cathedrals and foreign 
universities. 




A great performance at the Fall Concert 

University Chorale 99 




Caifli^^TdrreTT 

"\Ne find that music is a great way to stiare 
witti others about Cod and what He is doing 
in our lives.." - Angela Bai, President ATC 



Against the Current is a Christian a 
cappella group that ministers to the 
campus community through their 
music and testimonies. The per- 
formers assembled with the inten- 
tion of starting a group that would 
worship God through a cappella 
music. Sure enough, later that Fall, 
God blessed the group with ten 
enthusiastic freshmen who had the 
desire to be part of their vision. 
Against the Current has grown to be 
a music ministry with members 
including members from each class, 
race, and denomination of students 
at Boston College. They hope to 
continue to do God's good work on 
BC campus and beyond. 



Caitlin Morrell 



Against the Current 




Caitlin Morrell 



Against the Current sings for Cod. Here, they pose for a group 
shot during one of many practice sessions. 





Caitlin Morrell 

Group members perform during the Second Chances Benefit Concert. 



The group makes beautiful music with their voices only. 

100 Against the Current 



Woes of Imani 




Kyelim Rhee 



The Women 's Choir of Voices of Imani perform during their 
Fall concert. 




Kyelim Rhee 



The Men 's Choir of Voices of Imani take their turn. 



Kyelim Riiee 



"Voices of Imani has been a positive outlet 
for me because this organization fosters an 
atmosphere that invokes Cod's presence and 
takes my mind off of everyday stresses. I've 
been truly blessed to meet the people that I 
have met through Voices because they all 
have contributed to my spiritual and personal 
growth, and have taught me so much 
through my four years in the choir. " 

-Myisha Roach ' 02 

President of the Voices of Imani 



The Voices of Imani Gospel Choir 
was organized in the fall of 1978. 
Created as a mechanism to celebrate 
the viability, potency and beauty of 
gospel music, the choir has not only 
served as a source of spiritual inspira- 
tion for all people. It also stands as a 
source of strength amongst students 
of color. "Imani",the Swahili word 
for "faith", is indicative of what the 
choir strives to reflect in our musk 
ministry which is influenced by their 
spirituality and faith in their dynamic 
history as a people of color. The 
Voices of Imani strives to explore and 
share the full wealth of the musical 
culture of African-American people 
through the performance of contem- 
porary gospel music, as well as tradi- 
tional American-Negro Spirituals. 
Their mission is to sing praises unto 
God and minister to the surrounding 
BC community. 




The Women 's Choir prepare for the next song. 

Voices of Imani 101 



Contributed by Marching Band 



?*»»>. 'flfj 



^ 





Screaming 



"Wherever the Screaming Eagles Marching 
Band performs, you can feel the excitement in 
the air. " - Robert Singagliese '02 

Whether it's on the turf of Alumni 
Stadium during halftime of a football 
game, or on the streets of New En- ^^ 
gland for a parade, or in front of huh- ' 
dreds of high school students at an 
exhibition, this collection of highly 
spirited, talented, and commited 
individuals have provided excitement y 
to audiences from across the nation -- 1: 
and even as far away as Ireland. 
Founded in 1929, the Marching Band 
has become the embodiment of New 
England Division I athletics through 
excellence in performance both on and 
off the field. Currently, the Screaming 
Eagles provide opportunities for instru- 
mentalists, color guard, dancers, and 
managers. This year the group per- 
formed an "American Show", featuring 
traditional pieces from America's musi- 
cal Histoix i%hopjg^^S^|^iT» b^ykl 




'Screaming Eagles MarcHiti 

home football game 



Contributed by Marching Band 




Entertaining during half-time 

102 Screaming Eagles Marching Band 



Contributed by Marching Band 



Onittntfi 



Pep Band 




The Pep Band plays for the Hockey team in Conte Forum. 





We have been throiigli jjood times and bad, 
but through it all we've made great music and 
and e\en stronger friendships and memories 
that will last much longer than our short time 
here at Boston College. Vie iire. and id\\a)s 
will be, BC." - Justin Pariseau 

The Boston College Pep Band Is an 
acoustic musical ensemble and one of 
the most highly visible of the Boston 
College Bands Program Ensembles. 
With a membership of approximately 
50-60 students per year, the band is 

.split into Maroon and Gold ensembles 
to provide a well balanced band at all 
athletic events, including both the 

'Men's and Women's Hockey as well as 
Men's Basketball games. It is a great 
way to support Boston College Athlet- 
ics, travel to fun and exciting athletic 
events, as well as to get air-time on 
regional as well as national sports «■ 
broadcasts. ^^ ^ 



Chfis Bowers 



Band members parade around before the ganfi. 




Pep Band sticks with BC through thick and thin. 

Pep Band 103 



Janet Sudnik 





The HeigKts 




"As the newspaper of record, The Heights strives 
to provide BC with a balanced and comprehensive 
view of campus life. Our independence from the 
University allows us to cover different kinds of 
news and events from an undergraduate perspec- 
tive. And for those of us who work here, it's just a 
lot of fun." -Jim O'Sullivan, Editor 

The Heights is Boston College's 
student-run, weekly, indepen- 
dent newspaper. Staffed with a 
large pool of BC writers, photog- 
raphers and editors, the paper 
covers on- and off-campus 
events, movies, sports, music, 
politics, religion, among other 
things, and presents It to the 
student body. They also feature 
a humor section with recurring 
weekly columns. The Heights 
has been BC's newspaper since 
1919. Their goal is to provoke 
thought and provide news 
through their work. 

Meaghan Casey 




The Heights section editors and staff writers. 




Editors hard at worl< lool<ing over articles 

104 The Heights 




ilKM ScfOCfc 



|:a Serock 



The staff of WZBC keeps BC on the air. Here, they take a break 
-• from manning the station. 




Erica Serock 

Members look over CDs and LPs for possible airplay. 




"WZM: Imis eiclH'iri'tl ti n'puUitioti ris ww o/IIh' most 
respected college radio stations in IIh- count r}: " 
-Jen liirlonfi. CM 

WZBC provides the Boston are 
communit with a high quality alterna- 
tive to the local and national status quo 
radio alternative on Boston's airwaves. 
It is in the pursuit of this goal that 
WZBC has become known as one of the 
most influential radio stations on a 
college campus. WZBC is a non com- 
mercial radio station which means they 
plays non commercial music - music that 
does not get played on other radio 
stations; music that for the most part, 
released on independant or non-major 
record labels; and music that the aver- 
age person would not necessarily be 
exposed to in daily life. WZBC strongly 
believes that the majority of creatice, 
innovatice and intersting music is yet to 
reach mainstream radio, and its listeners 
share this belief. 




Taking a break between sets. 



WZBC 105 



Meaghan Casey 




"Stylus not only opens the door for artists 
and writers to share their worl< with BC, 
but also sparks creativity and self-expres- 
sion. " - Christine Cordel<, President 

Stylus is the art and literature maga- 
zine of Boston College. Stylus was 
founded in 1882 and is not only the 
oldest extracurricular activity at BC, 
but also the oldest journal of any 
Catholic university in the Americas. 
Stylus originally served the roles of 
newspaper, yearbook and artistic 
journal. With the advent of these 
groups on campus. Stylus is now 
able to focus on its original mission: 
presenting the artistic endeavors of 
undergrads to Boston College and 
the outside world. They publish a 
magazine that features artwork, 
poetry, essays and photographs by 
students of Boston College. 



Meaghan Casey 




...■*■' ^Meaghan Casey 

Stylus exposes the student body to various forms of artistic 
expression. 



■'s^ 





. ^^ Meaghan Casey 

Members are busy preparing the first issue of the year. 



Members review various submissions for publication 
106 Stylus 



. 





"Creating this booi< is a challenge every year, it 
forces all of us to look at BC in a fresh way to 
portray our world in a unique yet familiar 
fashion for all our classmates. " - Kris tin Walker 



Sub Turri produces a 500 
page yearbook annually -jj^ 
with Jostens, Inc. which 
includes senior portraits, 
sports, student life, aca- 
demics, and the organiza- 
tions on campus. It is our 
goal to provide the stu- 
dent body with lasting 
memories of their lives at 
the Heights, from campus 
events that all will re- 
member to the inside 
stories that these pictures 
represent to certain indi- 
viduals. After all, it has 
been said, "a picture is 
worth more than a thou- 
sand words ".... 



Above: Academics Section Editors plan their layout 
Below: Meeting with the Editors-in-Chief 



Cropping student life photos 



Organizations section editors 




)anet budnik 




Janet Sudnik: 



Sub Turri 107 



Contributed by Dance Ensemble 




The officers of Dance Ensemble 



■oSS- , '■■^MKSKSJKJISS' " '^SJ 



le Dance Enserrfble is essen- 
tially an organization of people 
who love to dance. Many have 
danced for the greater part of 
their lives and see the ensemble 
as an opportunity to continue 
here at BC an activity that is 
ingrained somewhere in there 
hearts. The group consists of 
approximately 35 members, with 
varying strengths in varying 
areas of dance.life. The classes, 
conducted by professional danc- 
ers in the area, are designed to 
maintain and improve upon 
technique. The ensemble puts 
onf a show at the end of each 
semester involving a collection of 
ballet, jazz, modern, tap, and hip 
hop, with students choreograph- 
ing the performances. 



Contributed by Dance Ensemble 





A graceful ballet performance to "At Last" 
108 Dance Ensemble 



The dancers perform to "Winter. " 



Contributed by Dance Ensemble 




The dancers put their whole selves into the performances. 



Jl 




Dance Oiganization 




ntributed by Dance^if^^iza^ibn 



The officers of the 2001 Dance Organization 





"/{i'lNfi a /xirt of the Dance ()rf;(iiii:tili(tii has Iwcn 
such a reiiariliiifi cxfjcrii'iicefor inc. Dancing is 
sonielhinfi I loic lo do and Ibis has been a greal 
uayfor nte lo do thai here al liC." 
- Erin I/arper. IHreclor of DOliC 



The goal of the Boston College 
Dance Organization is to pro 
mote dances of all types to the 
Boston College student com- 
munity. In addition to this, it 
provides students with the 
opportunity to choreograph and 
experiment with the art of dance 
and participate in dance recitals. « 
It allows more advanced stu- 
dents to utilize and expand their 
talents while providing begin- 
ners an open and fun environ- 
ment to learn about dance. Ev- 
eryone is invited to join classes. 
They work hard but dance with a 
freedom that comes from the 
love of the art. 



Chris Bowers 



Dance Organization has classes for every type of dance. 



^v; Jpi m^ , 

it 


^f 


^^^^S..:^^'.' 


' i^f^ 


J*£^ 




m% 


I^H ^^m ^^ Jl 


^:^^^S - 






ll 


V "^^S^*' 



The members put in a lot of hard worl< at practice. 

Dance Organization 109 



Contributed by Swing Kids 




Boston College's Swing Kids 
have reignited the interest of 
swing dancing in the BC com- 
munity. This style of dance, 
introduced in the 1920's, dared 
to challenge athorities with its 
free spirit. Today, we have a 
new appreciation for this 
movement as well as the foot- 
work itself. Swing Kids offer 
weekly lessons to all levels and 
also organize frequent events 
with other colleges and trips 
into Swing City of Boston. 
They also perform at various 
events on campus, such as the 
annual BC Arts Festival. Above 
all, they aim to have fun, inter- 
act with new people and keep 
the spirit of swing alive. 



Swing Kids 




GdntribiSfed by Swing f 

Out for the night at a Brown dance, one of the many events 
Swing Kids organize 



Contributed by Swing Kids 



Contributed by Swing Kids 

!5 





Two members swing at a Spring dance on campus. 

110 Dramatics 



The group is looking lil<e professionals at "Hoppin' on the 
' ' Heights" 



i.?i. 



■.w^ 



BCbOp! 



1 



Contrlbulcd by BC bOp 




ntributed by BC bOp 



BC bOp performing at ther Fall concert. 




Contributed by BC bOp 

Everyone enjoys a mixture of singing.... 




BC bOp! is a group united by ;($ love for 

music. There is a real bond that runs 

through them, as all of their practices and 

commitments have made them more of a 

family. - BC bOp! 02 

^ -^ 

BC bOp! is Boston College's' "^ 
student jazz ensemble. The 
group, now over fifteen years 
old, and has frequently per- 
forms in both national and 
international arenas. bOp!'s 
performances include appear- 
ances at Carnegie Hall in New 
York City, the Walt Disney 
World Resort in Orlando, and 
% the Jamaica Grande Resort in 
Ocho Rios, Jamaica. BC bOp! 
also provides Boston College 
students with numerous per- 
formances on campus, includ- 
ing their appearances at the 
Breaking the Barriers Ball and 
the AIDS Benefit Ball. 



Contributed by BC bOp 




and fun at their perfromance. 



BCbOp 111 



Chad Elder 




"Fleabag has made my college experience 
wonderful. I can't imagine having not had 
this group in my life. " - Daniel linn, member 

According to group legend, My 
Mother's Fleabag was founded in 1980, 
which mal<es them the oldiest college 
improv troupe in the country. The 
group consists entirely of Boston Col- 
legie students, yet has in actuallity no 
official connection to the school. 
Fleabag performs in and around Boston, 
in whole or in part, for fun or as a 
booked contract. They preform the 
standard array of improv games, com- 
pletely unscripted, based on live audi- 
ence suggestions. Their standard 
performance is site is at B.C.'s O'Connell 
House, a restored mansion on the 
college campus. Each semester, they do 
a four-show, two-day run, mixing 
improv, skits, a group opera, and a live 
band. 




The improv troupe is always up for on-the-spot comedy. 





Chad Elde 

Members of Fleabag perform a scene at their cafe in l\/lcElroy. 



Skits often bring Fleabag members closer together. 

Ill My Mother's Fleabag 




Mr«9^Art Ca»«y 



Meaghan Casey 



Shovelhead members, ready to begin a night of improv 



-xfer. 





"There's nothing more satisfyinn than iiniling lo 
perforin a successful comeUic show. " 
-John Durbin. Asst. Director 



Hey. . . Shovelhead is a sketch 
comedy group comprised of stu- 
dents with a talent for humor. 
Their mission is to provide sketch 
comedy for BC students. They 
meet on a weekly basis where 
they write and act out original 
work. They end up with roughly 
forty scenes and choose nine to 
act out for any given performance. 
Their genre of comedy is similar 
to the sketches on Saturday Night 
Live and Mad TV. The group has 
been entertaining BC students for 
over a decade and is definitely 
here to stay! 



- ■ JBh^: ' -^---'-^- ' 



Kfeagnan cJasey 



These members can even perform a skit on the spot. 



Meaqhan Casey 





Many are even able to mal<e themselves laugh. 

Hev-. -Shovelhead 113 



Contributed by Los Spoonheads 




" Tltrowing a circular disc to people rather than dogs 
provided me with a way to have fan, stay as far from in 
shape as possible, and travel to exotic places like 
Maine. " - Peter D. Lee, Captain 



'i^fmmmw- ■•^ssmsmm' 



After a 2000-2001 season which saw the 
Boston College Men's Ultimate team 
travel to tournaments in Georgia, North 
Carolina and other wonderfully warmer 
places than Boston. The team, named 
Los Spoonheads, competed against 
teams from as far away as Minnesota 
and Califomia. This season's team hopes 
to rival the previous year's in distance 
traveled, amount of fun had and sur- 
pass the hefty record the team posted. 
Then maybe they can get their faces on 
the hallowed wall of the BC Hall of 
Fame that resides in Conte Forum. 



Contributed by Los Spoonheads 



Mens Ultimate 





Contributed by Los Spoonheads * ■: 



The Spoonheads fall in line as they prepare for a tournament in 
Savannah, Georgia. ^ 





Contributed by Los Spoonheads 

Like tal<ing candy from a baby. 



Los Spoonheads take the field in Savannah. 

114 Men's Ultimate Frisbee 



ConlnbutwJ by WoiTWft's '-■'■' 





ributed by Women's Ultimate Frisbee 

The Disk-ettes show their BC pride at a Connecticut tournament. 



^J 



"Irisbee is a such a fun nay lo he innilii-ii iil Ji(. 
and lo meet great /leo/tle. " 
~ Christina Keller. Captain 



As far as intramural sports at 
Boston College go, ultimate 
frisbee has got to be one of the 
most fun. The women's team, 
named the Diskettes, play 
teams from all over the New 
England area, including Boston - 
University and Northeastern. 
Highlighting this year was the 
team's success at the UCONN 
Ultimate Frisbee Tournament 
where the girls made a proud 
showing. The girls hope to 
continue grow in membership 
and add more to their victories. 




Contributed by Women's Ultimate Frisbee 



The girls tat<e a breal< at the beach between matches 



The girls await the first toss. 

Women's Ultimate Frisbee 115 



"The best thing about 
playing rugby is taking part in 
an incredibly pltysically 
demanding sport, one that 
carries with it a strong 
tradition and a sense of 
community amongst team- 
mates and other rugby players 
around the world. " 

- Matt Keck, President 

The BC Men's 
Rugby season was 
an interesting one. 
The league was very 
turbulent and full of 
surprise victories 
and defeats. BC 
started out the year 
strongly by winning 
it's first two league 
games over BU and 
Harvard. Subse- 
quently, BC was the 
talk of the league as 
they were ranked 
2nd in all of the 
Northeast. But the 
season became 
increasingly difficult 
with a series of 
tough losses against 
U-Mass, UNH and 
Amherst College to 
finish up 4th in the 1 
league. However, 
the team looks 
strong for next 
season with a 
high majority of 
experienced players 
returning for their 
senior year^. 




Mens Rugby 




The Men's Rugby Team prepare for one of their fall home games In Smith Field. 



McGrath Studios 




McGrath Studios 



McGrath Studios 
4 



116 Men's Rugby 




With balance, 
stamina, and a love of |i|' 
the game, these guys W 
show just how tough 
they really are!. 




McGrath Studios 




Contnbuted by Women'i RutKjy 




iiiiiibuted by Women's Rugby 

The Boston College Women's Rugby Club - these girls are tough! 



"Ladies, knock the stuffing out of them! -Ken Daly 

The Women's Kugby Club went | 
3-2 this season, defeating Boston 
University, Radcliffe, and Yale 
University and losing to 
Dartmouth and Brown. Their 
hard work and dedication paid 
off this fall as they made it to the 
New England Rugby Division I 
tournament for the first time in 
four years. Although they lost 
their match to Smith College, the 
game itself was one of the best 
of the season. The rugby club 
graduates five seniors this year: 
Kate Nash, Shannon Finnegan, 
Erika Maxian, Cristen Redeker, 
and Devon Noonan. They will be 
missed! 




The girls will go to great heights to win. 



Women's Rugby 117 



Kyelim Rhee 


■^T" 




ipM 




vj^Kj * ^Mk 




*'■■■■ '■-■:■>■. 



"Karate Club is a great opportunity in many aspects for 
people of all ages, athletic abilities, and experience in 
martial arts. We hope to teach more than just Ixnv to 
fight and defend oneself. We instill discipline, self- 
control, and a general feeling of well-being. 
- Arash Hajianpour, President 

Often seen kicking and punching at 
Jhe plex, the Boston College Karate 
Club has been an established sports 
club here at Boston College for more 
than thirty years. They are members 
of the New England Collegiate Ka- 
rate Conference (NECKC), an inter- 
collegiate group of karate clubs from 
the Boston area and beyond. The 
Boston College Karate Club is dedi- 
cated to the mental and physical 
teachings of the Shotokan Karate 
Style. They work on flexibility, fit- 
ness, and karate forms in addition to 
meditation techniques. The Karate 
Club also participates in the NECKC's 
semi-annual tournament where 
Boston College has won more tro- 
phies than any other college. 



Kyelim Rhee 



^Rr 





Kyelim Rhee 




The Karate Club appears in full fighting form this year. 



M M iftjfc«a.*'(>>^* 








These guys are kicking butt and taking names. 



118 Karate Club 



Karate is defintely a full-contact sport 




'•(ratil •» I ,:, 




s^eaghan Casey 



The Cadets just finish a tough Friday morning training 




Meaghan Casey RQTC UndercioSSmen 




"ROTC ii a phenomenal experience. The ikilli and 
lessom I've learned here have been extremely valuable 
and the camaraderie ii irreplaceable. " 
-lohnny McCabe 





Juggling both rigorous military 
training and a BC education, the 
ROTC is raising the military's best 
and brightest. Physical Training 
(PT) is conducted three times a 
week and works on building up a 
cadet's muscle strength and endur- 
ance. ROTC cadets maintain a high 
standard of physical fitness in 
order to prepare for the rigors of 
military training and military op- 
erations. 



I 



a 



Meaghan Casey 




A morning of hard practice is finally over, and its only 7:30 a.m. rotc ii9 



Contributed by AHANA 




Members of Xplosion Dancegroup perform in the 
O.L.A.A. Fashion/Culture show. 



'^^e term AHANA is often 
mistaken for a club. How- 
ever, it is an acronym tliat 
stands for Asian, Hispanic, 
African American and Native 
American. AHANA student 
clubs and organizations are 
all encompassed under this 
name. These clubs work to 
promote their ethnicity and 
expose the community to 
their culture. Though many, 
each club is very diverse and 
has its own agenda. The 
images featured here show 
some of these clubs at work 
atBC. AHANA hopes to 
promote unity and aware- 
ness among its members and 
the Boston College commu- 
nity at large. 

120 AHANA 



Contributed byAHANA 




The AHANA Ball is always a highlight. 




^Performers at the O.L.A.A. "To Mixano" show. 



AHANA 121 



Kyelim Rhee 




"The Hellenic Society has been a great way for me to 
connect with people of like minds on campus, and for us to 
spread our wings together while we forge relationships with 
people of every bacl<ground at 6C. " 
- Nick Tambakeras, Co-President 
I' 

One of many ethnic clubs. The 
Hellenic Society of Boston College 
celebrates Greek heritage and 
culture. With roughtly twenty 
members, the group participates In 
activities that promote Grecian 
roots. This year they marched in 
the Independence Day 2001 Pa- 
rade, walking all over downtown 
Boston wielding the national flag 
of Greece. They also host Greek 
night at McElroy, featuring a selec- 
tion of Greek favorites. Members 
have some sort of Greek ancestry 
and promote and participate in 
activities that allow them to ex- 
press their cultural heritage. 



Kyelim Rhee 



Hellenic Society 




Kyelim Rhee 



Hellenic Society members gather to discuss club business. 





The group listens intently to a speaker. 



Kyelim Rhee 



Members enjoy and celebrate their ethnicity. 

122 Hellenic Society 



Oiganizadon of Latin 
American Afeirs 





' OLAA are always there to speak, listen and 
direct advice, all the while guiding me to where I am 
today. " -Roystone Martinez, OLAA President 



Contributed by OLAA 

Members of OLAA celebrate their Latino heritage and invite the BC 
community to share in their culture. 



OLAA is a student run organization 
whose sold mission is to guarantee 
the Boston College campus a 
strong, poignant, creative and 
clear socio-political Latino voice. 
OLAA also serves as headquarters 
for its Latino community, ensuring 
a safe, calm and peaceful haven 
that fosters dialogue and family. 
Throughout the year, the group 
sponsors many events including a 
Latino fashion show, Cafe Night 
featuring Latino cuisine and music 
and a dance with salsa, merengue 
and hip-hop music. 



Contributed by OLAA 




Contributed by OLAA 



The OLAA girls get together for dinner. 



Members explore their Latino roots at an OLAA 

meeting. qlaa 123 



Mikaela Boyd 




'JENKS has been my most fulfilling experience at BC. I 
have had the unique opportunity to combine my 
passion for senice with m own growth as a leader. " 
- Mikaela Boyd JEMS Director 



Jenks is one of the oldest collegiate 
leadership programs in the country. 
The Jenks Leadership Program aims to 
bring together dynamic individuals who 
value the process of personal growth. 
Through leadership workshops and the 
experience of service, students come to 
appreciate the connection between 
service and leadership. This year the 
Jenks members participated in a num- 
ber of community service activities, 
including volunteering at the Greater 
Boston Food Bank. The JLP projects are 
designed to emphasize unselfish leader- 
ship in promoting the welfare of others 
both inside the Boston College commu- 
nity and also in greater Boston. 



Mikaela Boyd 





JENKS 



"Learning for Leadership. 
Lf^dershij. 




Mikaela Boyd 



Learning for leadersliip, leadership for service is the JENKS motto. 





Mikaela Boyd 

JENKS members participate in one of many leadership seminars 



Members volunteer at the Greater Boston Food Bank. 



124 JENKS 



i-:< 



Emer^ng Leader' 
Pro! 



"HIJ' tries its best to help sliidenls lit cwerae 
as leaders in the KC community and in the 

commiinily us a iih/lc. thai the iiorltl may 
bcnejil Ihroufih lln-ir leadership ■ Darrell 
Goodwin, '02 



1 


1 iBI 


4 
i 


^\tj^ 


rifr- 


IV i^ju: 






Members of ELP take a trip on the Boston Duck Tours. 



Coniibuied bv ELP 




Now celebrating its tenth year, the Emerging 
Leader Program (ELP), running out of the Office of 
the Dean for Student Development at Boston 
College, is a one year leadership development 
program for a select group of fifty-first year stu- 
dents. ELP is designed to enhance leadership skills 
and potential, foster interpersonal, social, ethical, 
and moral development, and instill an attitude of 
social awareness and responsibility. 



Contibuted by ELP 



Contibuted by ELP 



ELP members on retreat in Peterborough, NH 





Members enjoy kayaking as one of tlie retreat activities. 

Emerging Leaders Program 125 



Erica Serock 




"This is my first year uith SAP and I already feel like I'm 
making a difference. This is my chance to show prospec- 
tive students hmv much I love BC!" -BiUReeg '03 

The Student Admissions Program 
offers current BC students the 
chance to interact with and assist 
potential and beginning stu- 
dents. Members worl< as tour 
guides who lead families around 
campus and answer their ques- 
tions. Others act as greeters in 
the Admissions Office in Devlin. 
They converse with parents and 
prospective students, giving 
them any information they can 
offer. Often times, a member of 
the SAP will be the first ambassa- 
dor from Boston College to a new 
student. Members enjoy what 
they do as they get to meet many 
different people from all over the 
world. 



Erjca Serock 



Student Admissions 




The SAP coordinators go on a variety of retreats together 



I 



>"»?:>ssa(S^T^ 





A greeter is at worl< helping prospective students with ques- 
tions about Boston College. 



A tour guide in action. 

126 Student Admissions Program 



W)merfe Resource 
Center 






Meaghan Casey 



The staff of the Women 's Resource Center takes great pride in helping 
the women of BC. 



" The best part ofuorkiti); at the f enter has 
been working with st.v ofliCs most Intelli- 
gent, passionate, active and inspiring under- 
graduate women" - Ilelene Norton, President 



The Women's Resource Center is 
committed to the exploration and 
promotion of women's issues. 
Through educational programs and 
supportive resources, the center stives 
to empower women as they grow and 
develop. It is a resource open to all 
BC women and men concerned with 
women's issues including 
relationships,eating disorders and 
coping with rape. The WRC offers a 
supportive environment where all 
perspectives and opinions can be 
voiced and respected. The students 
involved take pride in their efforts to 
reach out to their peers. 



Meaghan Casey 




Meaghan Casey 



The girls gather to plan upcoming events. 



mmm^m 



The WRC office is always open for support. 

Women's Resource Center 127 



"llTe BC Ski an^Snbwboard 
Club provides over 400 stu- 
dents a great time of skiing 
and riding. Their trips in- 
clude Killington, Vermont; 
Steamboat , Colorado; Que- 
bec City; and the big Spring 
Break trip to ^itzerland. 



rT^Wm^vvMX^' 



TICT S ? 



Ski and Snowboard 
Club 



Part of the fun is staying at the lodge with friends 





Above: The 
boys tal<e a 

break to enjoys 
the view 

around them.. 



Left: The girls ^ 

get ready to 

hit the slopes. 



128 Ski & Snowboard Club 



Contributed by Ski &Snowboard Club 



Contributrd tr, 



Dramatics S(x:iety 



C Iributed by Lee Pellegrin 




Dracula graced the stage of Robsham this October. 




A scene from The Good Person of Szechwan 





"All the world's a stage, and all the men and 
women merely players. " ~ Shakespeare 



The Dramatics Society is 
the oldest student group ^ 
on campus and one that 
strives to make the arts an 
important part of university 
life. It provides opportuni- ■ 
ties for student directors, P 
designers, and actors to 
share their talent with the 
BC community. A few of 
the performances this year ' 
include Dracula, Old Times, 
Art, Pterodactyls, The Good 
Person of Szechwan, and the 
Spring performance of jesus 
Christ Superstar. 

Contributed by Lee Peiiegrini 




Acting becomes intense in this Dracula scene. 

Dramatics Society 129 



XONI VOICE 

fmm 





Chris Bowers 



[ editors: Chad Elder ] 







"As an Orientation Leader, 
I was given the opportunity 
to see freshmen 
coming in as Eagles. 
They had no idea of the BC 
pride they would 
develop as the years 
passed. By the time my 
freshmen are seniors, 
they will have cheered their 
athletes on to victory. 
They will have received 
awards and recognition for 
their academic work. They 
will have carried on the 
Jesuit tradition of volunteer 
service. The great thing 
about these kids is that 
they are given a chance 
to create their own 
community while also 
giving back to the larger 
Boston area." 



Kate Sorgi, 

Lynch School of Education '03 




Student 




rg.'Jj^gPTvtM 



[ Elizabeth Ethun ] 



jOSTMLEGE 




RA's help direct people to their 
rooms when they first get there. 

For freshmen, moving in also 
means meeting new people. 




Boxes, suitcases, everything. 
You have to move in your whole 
room. 

Buying books is also a part of 
the move in process. 



\ 


^^^^m 






'-> 1 


L \-- 


/ / 


f^ 


•"■'I 


m 




i 1 




ttif ij 




■ 


ll 


|r^^ 




I 








Chad Elder 








^^^H H^H^I 




■ ' 










H' 








^^ 


■ 


1 


''■^^^^1 


^HH 


1 


'1 


^.U/ 


/ ^^^^^^1 


|.,M<''!^^^H^H HHiM 


i! 


§ /| 


»i 


^H| 


^^^mJ[w|b|7 ^h^^^^^^^i 




^ 








Q 


^^^^y ■,;'. ' iW^^B 



c/o Elizabeth EthlJ 



Dtt 



ViaVS o 



"So many people, so 

many boxes, where' s 

myroom..Ahhhh!" 

-Heather McCooey V4 





1 32 Moving In 




Boxes, Boxes, Boxes 

Independence and freedom, at long last. Although moving into the dorms 

has a certain stressful atmostphere of meeting new roommates, dividing up 

closet space, and organizing a whole living space, the perks are definitely 

worth it. No adults yelling when you are not home before 2 am, no one 

complaining about how long you have been on the phone, and no one 

telling you when to do your assignments. Whether it's the first time, the 

second, third, or fourth, the excitement of moving in is just as potent. 

Good-bye Mommy and Daddy, hello sweet freedom! 



With One Voice... 



"Being a Superfan is 
a way for me to 
feel iii<e a part of 

BC pride. " 
-Beth Bowers '03 



-'-^31^^^^ 



M,. 



^ rT7i,»' 



L 




531 11 






■ 




• 



The maroon and gold crowd 
responds to the excitement of 
the game. Let's Go Eagles! 

High above Alumni Stadium, 
proudly waving for all to see, is 
the BC flag, a symbol of the 
pride and spirit of this school. 




Superfans can always be found 
with friends, one of the best 
things about going to the 
games. 



1 34 Superfans 




MaroonandGolil! 

The Superfans of Boston College can be seen anytime, any place. They fill 

up Alumni Stadium and Conte Forum with cheers for the Eagles, and 
proudly wear their gold Superfan shirts not only on campus, but off it too. 
But not just their clothing reveals the true Superfan. If one is in attendence 
at a BC football game, one might notice some unique things going on in the 
Superfan student section. After every touchdown, certain smaller individu- 
als can be seen lifted in the air and tossed up for each point BC has total, 
causing an interesting visual effect for anyone who happens to be on the 
other side of the stadium. But no matter what sporting event, BC's colors, 
spirit, and Superfans will always be there in the chanting sea of gold. 



Superfans 135 




These Sophomores have fun at 
the Homecoming dance this 
year. 

Kristin Walker and Pat Sullivan 
(both '03) get close while danc- 
ing. 




Dave Rice ('03), the man in 
charge of putting together the 
dance, gives a little speech at 
Homecoming. 

These five girls stop dancing to 
smile for the camera. 




c/o Beth Milewski 



"The gome was really 

exciting, and If was 

liearfbreaking when 

we lost. Oh yeah, the 

dance was fun, foo. " 

-James Chanes V3 





136 Homecoming 








Aim we're Daiidn'! 



Homecoming, To some it meant tlie game in which we were 9 yards away 
from beating Miami. To others it simply meant a chance to get dressed up 
and go into town for a huge party. This year's Homecoming dance, held at 
the Marriott at Copley, was sold out with around 2000 tickets bought. Al- 
though there were no complaints about the D.J., the issue of the bar was 
another story. Due to an unexpected shortening of the hours of service, 
students became a little incensed, and when it was all over, damage had 
been done to certain tables, rugs, and potted plants. We will never have 
Homecoming at the Marriott again, but it was a night to remember. 



/ 



Homecoming 137 



With one voice. 



"Normally I consider 
people who dress in 
bright yellow leisure 

suits weird, but 
since my boyfrined 
does It every bas- 
ketball game, I'm 
used to It now. " 
-Jess Burkhart V3 



r- • ■ • 1 




>?=^ -T-. 




'/ftft, ^^ \ ^^ ^" 


>"> 


■^^hJ ■ w^^Ssk-"" ' ' 


=i 




'^ 


-4 



BOSTMLEGj 




You know you have to have a 
lot of pride (or a lot of beer!) to 
wear the BC Eagle head. 

BC pride is everywhere, even 
underfoot! 




Beth Schuiz 

Everyone loves the BC Eagle, Even the choir is decked out in 

and the BC Eagle loves every- BC gear. 

one! 



138 BC Pride 



Susan Burton 




Its Everywhere 

Look around, what do you see? Obviously, in the minds and hearts (and 

accessories) of BC students there is no such thing as too much school pride. 

Whether it's shorts, sweatshirts, or hats, notebooks, coffee mugs, or stuffed 

animals, BC paraphenalia is everywhere. It may begin with the gold 

Superfan T-shirt every student receives at orientation, but it doesn't stop 

there. The bookstore is a regular mini-mall where one can find any amount 

of BC stuff any time of year. And not only students, but faculty, parents, 

siblings, second cousins of half sister's best friends are all touched and 
clothed in the spirited garb of the BC Eagles. Whatever the connection to 
BC, school pride is sure to reach out, grab hold, and have you chanting for 

more maroon and gold. 



BC Pride 139 




Obviously someone has no re- 
spect for Baldwin. 

These two students casually 
walkthrough the BC halls wear- 
ing the wrong sweatshirts. 



Here, hidden amoung BC 
sweats, is a pair of NAVY shorts. 

Even while lounging around on 
the phone, this BC student 
wants to be in California. 



■^11 


J'f" 


i|: 










r 


■ 


Chad Elder 





Chad Eldiii 



"Who cares about 

other schools? 
Everyone should be 

proud to go to BC. 
I know I ami" 

-Chris Capano '04 



h ©[QKe w©k( 





140 BC Pride? 




Where are weP 

What school do we got to? I forgot. And sometimes It Is hard to tell. 

Hanging around campus you are bound to see someone walk by in a 

Somewhere Else University sweatshirt. What, does maroon and gold 

not bring out your eyes? In a crowd of gold there is almost always at 

least one sore thumb with blue or red or green colors on. If a person 

loves Notre Dame so much why don't they just transfer there? If you're 

already planning to do so, that's fine. Otherwise, give your Fighting 

Irish gear to your little brother/sister, because this is maroon and gold 

wearing. Screaming Eagles supporting, ever excelling, Boston College! 



BC Pride? 141 



"If is our last 
chance to enjoy 
the benefits of 
freedom before we 
have to be respon- 
sible adults. " 
~Cal Mooney '02 



With One Voice... 






Michelle Rananski, Melissa 
Quinn, and Shannon Smith 
('02) proudly pose under their 
year's BC banner. 

Lisa Ciabatton and Julie 
DeSimone ('02) are happy to 
be in the middle of BC. 




The girls from Walsh 206 as 
sophmores, now all seniors, 
have had fun throughout the 
years. 



142 Seniors 2002 




Whatever it Takes! 

As we, the Class of 2002, stepped back onto campus for our final year at BC, 

we were sure that there would not be any surprises. There was a mixture of 

old faces, that we had not seen since Late Night at Stuart or since they left 

for their study abroad program. As seniors, we finally know the ideal time 

to enter the football games, we have learned how to avoid the long lines in 

Lower, and most importantly we are the kids throwing the parties in the 

mods. The lessons we learned here, have helped us survive on the Heights, 

but life as we know it will change come May. The routine that we have 

mastered will no longer apply. As we approach the real world that has 

always seemed so far away, we will take the concepts, facts, and experiences 

we have acquired at BC and apply them to life beyond the Heights. 



Seniors 2002 143 




These juniors get in touch with 
their childhood by playing video 
games. 

Working hard as usual, these 
juniors like to stay up late. 





1 

J 


i 


f^ 


( 


00^'% ^ 


i 




^^''(^^M 



Partying is a large part of living 
off campus junior year. 

juniors at a Halloween party (I ^. 
hope!) 




c/o Diana DiBacco 



Heather Mc C 




"I'm pumped that every- 
body will be back on cam- 
pus together next year!" 
-Jot)n Walsti V3 




144 Juniors 




Go Eagles! 



It's the downward slope of four years here at Boston College. For some of 

us, this year means reliving Newton campus nightmares of waiting for a bus 

in the rain and snow, the difference being that this year "home" means an 

apartment, not a Newton triple. For those of us who were so lucky as to 

have been granted the infamous "Four Years On Campus Housing," 

Edmonds and 90 are home. Despite separate living conditions, all juniors 

experience BC. We are finally upperclassmen, have been Superfans for 3 

years, know what professors to take, and how to cheat the registration 

system. With only a year left at BC, it's time to prepare to say goodbye. 



Juniors 145 




Sophomores are a close knit 
group. 

Sophomores like to hang out 
with famous people. Buffy 
stopped by to hang out with 
Morris Tang ('04). 



Some Sophomores keep in 
touch with their crazy child- 
hood days. 

Those crazy kids! 




Heather McCooey 



. Vt iiliv 




rr 








1L ^ 




^^M 


Cj 




W 


^iMgiif 


/'fmi^ 


sk ■? 






% 




Hedther Mc Cooey 




Uh ©ond ¥(Q)k( 




146 Sophomores 




Eagles on the Warpath! 

United on main campus for the first time, the class of 2004 returns to BC as 
sophomores, a little more comforatble with college life and ready to surge 
forward. Our second year started out with a flurry of activity as we rushed 
around trying to find the best apartment at the cheapest price, or the per- 
fect place to study abroad. It didn't stop there. Throughout the year we 
stayed up until all hours of the night finishing papers, studying for exams, 
and partying. Half of our college career is now over, and with our majors 
declared (hopefully), we look forward to our last few years at BC. 



Sophomores 147 



jOSTMUBlH 




Construction on Upper Cam- 
pus wasan issue formany Fresli- 
men this year. 

This Freshman tal<es time to 
get in some studying. 




Wall<ing to and from class on 
Upper is not so bad. ..better than 
Newton! 

This all freshmen Intramural 
Volleyball team won the Cham- 
pionship! 




c/o Elizabeth Ethun 




DftP ©011(1 ¥(0)DC( 



"As freshmen, the 

question isn't wtiat 

are we going to do, 

it's wtiot aren't we 

going to do!" 

-Mary Aiiison Timby '05 





148 Freshmen 




Always Beieve in BC 

It's the beginning of the rest of our lives. Our first year without parents, 
gaurdians, or anyone looking over our shoulders and telling us what needs 
to be done and how. Starting with orientation, first day of school nerves, 
first weekend freedoms, and first grades, the class of 2005 has finally pro- 
gressed to feelings of comfort. Now we know our way around campus, have 

figured out not to take 9am classes, and have our first year tucked safely 
under our belts (along with an extra 15 pounds, or so). So we're on to our 

next few years of BC, ready for chosen majors, better housing, and more 

parties. And perhaps Boston College has even begun to feel like home. 



Freshmen 149 




RA's trust each other, even 
when things get a little crazy. 

Two Duchesne RA's cut the cake 
at summer training. 



RA's get to have fun, too, some- 
times. 

A bulletin board in Cheverus 
introduces some RA's to the new 
Freshmen. 




c/o Erin O'Dea 






ift 




150 Resident Assitant 




The Leaders 

As freshmen, we look up to our RA's because they are older and more expe- 
rienced. Once we become juniors ourselves, we are offered the chance to 
become the very people that we once admired from our underclassmen 
status. Those of us who do embark on the long road to the Residential 
Assistant way of life are rewarded with a rare and unique opportunity for 
college students to experience two very different lifestyles that both take 

place in a dorm situation. 



/ 



Resident Assistant 151 



jOSMUEOE 




The O'Connell House staff 
makes sure all students have 
what they need. 

O'Connell House offers a place 
for students to hang out. 




O'Connell House is a great place 
to find a quiet study area. 

They even have a piano for les- 
sons and practice, and even just 
for simple enjoyment. 





Dftth) ©Pd w@k( 



"Wowl This place is 
cool! I never knew 
this was here!" 
• -Anonymous — 




152 O'connell House 




VUho s hous^ 

It is a well know fact that BC does not have a "Student Center," but there 

are still many places where students can go to find both silence and fun. 

Located in the heart of Upper Campus, O'Connell House offers an escape 

from the boredom of dorm life. With a pool table and a ping-pong table, 

students can have fun not otherwise possible in their dorms. The large 

study rooms are also popular when your roommate is having an all-night 

party and you need to study for your organic chemistry test. Whether you 

seek competition or quiet, the O'Connell House has what you need to get 

away from it all. 



O'Connell House 153 



50S1MUEG5 




Meeting friends for lunch keeps 
people sane during the day. 

Dining halls are also good places 
to get in some last minute study- 
ing. 



Working at late night can be 
fun, and can earn you some 
good money. 

The dining halls offer many 
foods for dine in or take out. 






Morris Tang 




Ottih (B{n\(B ^©k( 



"I'm in love with the 
frozen yogurt. " 
-Jeff Ritchie V3 





■vSk '■'''■ 


Wj^ 


D ..^09mOI^^v ' 


^ ^^^H 


''') 


!•;■ 


^ Jp-W" 


^Si^^H 




v^ 


/.jH^ 


te?r, ./. 


H.^^^^H 


■ l 


■ 


% 


^^R« 


jSEv^ ,, 


^^F^y'^^^^^^^^^M 


mk' ■ 


H 


I 


P^ 


^ 


P^ 


Wa 


1 



154 Food 




Hungry. anyoneP 

Prices at the dining halls at BC are high, quality is not. In the Eagles's Nest 
there is an article giving the prices of BC food versus those of popular fast- 
food chains. It is wonder that a hamburger here costs 20 cents less than a 

hamburger at a no-name restaurant. But, it is not that the students are 

being overcharged, it's that they're being overcharged for bad food. But I 

mean, really, what else would you expect from a college campus' dining 

services? The staff persons are usually very nice upon talking to, and the 

atmospheres are good for grabbing a bite to eat after working out, for 

finding a quiet corner to study and snack, or for just meeting with friends. 



Food 155 




The plex has everything from 
tennis courts to weights. 

Runners can be seen all around 
campus. 



Weight machines are't just for 
athletes. Anyone can use the 
Plex and its equiptment. 

Intramural sports are popular 
and fun for everyone. 




Chad Elder 





less Kelly 



less Kell; 






(Q)[n](i W(Q)DC( 



"Where's, the 
weight room? I'll 

check it out. " 
-Tommy Callahan 




156 Working Out 




Pump sou up! 



I 



Working out seems to be a part of college life. Whether you want to trim 

down, stay fit, or just have fun, BC has numerous facilities where students 

can do all of these for free. The Plex has a extensive weight room as well as 

indoor and outdoor basketball and tennis courts, raquetball and squash 

courts, an indoor swimming pool and track, and offers a variety of personal 

fitness classes from yoga to cardio funk. Even if you do not want to make a 

trip to the Plex there is a place to workout on Upper, and even one on the 

Newton Campus. And staying fit is not limited to the campus. Running in 

the neighborhood or around the Reservoir is just as enjoyable. 



Working Out 157 



^osMUege 




Professor Taylor discusses 
homework with a student. 

BC professors are always around 
to help students out. 



Students find professors easy 
to approach, even when walk- 
ing in the dustbowl. 

Professors are a well of knowl- 
edge. 




Beth Bowers 





Kyelim Rhee 



Ith ©^(i w@k( 



"Vou see them 
everywhere, 

Starbucks, the 

dining hail, even at 

the radio station. " 

-Wendy Lee W 






7 




158 Professors 




mey're 



I rl I 



pie, too! 



Trying to reach a professor outside of class may sound lil<e an impossibil- 
ity, but at Boston College, it's definitely is not. In or out of class, professors 
are happy to give extra help. They can be found during their office hours, 
after class, and sometimes participanting in the very same clubs you are 
involved with. In fact, it is easier to contact a professor than get a cup of 
coffee in the morning from Starbucks! But more than just helping with 
work, professors can turn out to be advisors, confidants, and even friends. 
Most of them love getting to know students - it's the reason they chose this 
profession - so don't be afraid to get to know them right back. 



Professors 159 




The T takes students into Bos- 
ton for dinner, dancing, and 
concerts. 

For just going around campus, 
bikes are a popular choice, and 
you can avoid the stairs! 



Parking is a problem on the BC 
Campus, so few students actu- 
ally drive at school. 

The BC Shuttle takes you either 
to the Newton Campus or the 
Resevoir T Stop. 








Chad Elder 

R!9lllll>niPIK 






\ 


"T 


_„„!_ 







"The D line is faster 
ttian the B line. I'd 
rather ride my bike. 
-Ryan Riehle '04 



[\th ®p(e ¥®Bc(io 





Going,Going,Gone 

It all bolls down to whether or not you desire to deal with the horrific 
traffic and then scour for a parking spot, or sit on a train for an hour.The 
BC shuttles have been improved but still remain unreliable and unpredict- 
able, especially for those freshmen on Newton Campus and for those stu- 
dents living off campus. The B line Green Line service remains the most 
aggravating of all options. Stopping every 100 yards, it takes a good hour 
to get into the city, which is why most students opt to wait for the shuttle 
to take them to the D Line which only takes half an hour. With these op- 
tions, the taxis services and keeping your sanity seem much more appealing. 











_^ -*- ^fc 


With One Voice... 


ikS^^^^^^^^ "^^^^^^^^^^^^B 


. JK 


^^ 


•^ ^ ;. 




■ 


W "1 absolutely LOVE y 

BosfonI That was I is 
one of the resons 1 ■ ' r 

came to BC. " i^^P '"^" 
-Molly Betiymer '05 fj 


1 ^- M 


E^i^i &.J «^fl 


( 


^m tV- ^ 


I . ,,>».> OIK ., _, .Nlff 


^^J... L „. . 1 


"^" JuJ 




\^- -^ , 













The Boston Harbor is famous 
for its history, and it's the place 
to find great seafood! 

Being right on the water en- 
ables all different forms of en- 
joyment, notthe least of which 
is sailing. 




Even though it's not really in 
Boston Proper, Cleveland 
Circle hosts a good number of 
places to get off campus. 



162 In Boston 



Kyelim R 




Out on die TDHin 

Where do you like to hang out on the weekends? Whether you enjoy 
iceskating on the Frog Pond in the Commons or spending all day Saturday 
shopping and hanging out in Harvard Square, whether you like to grab a 
bite at the North End or at Quincy IVlarket, and whether you enjoy relaxing 
by the Charles River or clubbing in Downtown Boston, you have to appreci- 
ate being so close to such an amazing city. Boston has whatever you desire 
in the form of concerts, clubs, bars, food, parks, everything to make a col- 
lege kid happy. After a long and frustrating week, it is nice to have an 
opportunity to experience a little life off campus. So no matter what you do 
to spice up an otherwise repetitive school life, it is awesome to be able to 

call Boston your home. 



In Boston 163 




Spiderman makes a guest 
apearance as drummer for this 
BC Band. 



BC students not only like music, 
they also create it. 



This BC student looks for a nice, 
relaxing CD. 

WZBC 90.3, the College station, 
shows off some of its all time 
favorite artists. 




Chad Elder 






WoltCii ©[Qid ¥(Q)k( 



f 



"Every genre of music is 

floating around this 

campus. " 

-Carl Kruse W 





164 Music 




The Sound of. . . 

Walking around campus, you are bound to notice an abundance of head- 
phones on the heads of students. Without a doubt, you can be guaranteed 
that each headphone is playing music totally different from one another, 
ranging from classical music to heavy metal music. In a single dorm room, 
for instance, one can find multiple band posters ranging from Dave 
Matthews Band to Weezer to AC/DC. This eclectic mix of music is also 
greatly reflected by the student-run campus radio station, WZBC 90.3 FM, 
whose purpose is to only play music that has no commercial possibility, 

which assures much variety! 



Music 165 




The differences between styles 
don't come between friends. 



Halloween is the perfect time 
for everyone to get creative 
with clothing. 





Maureen Okea 






v^^^^^^^^^^^H 


^^^^^^Bi^^^ "*' ik^^ 


.1 C ■'"^ 


^- 




inlP 


\ 

i 



Kyellm Rhee 



These girls smile while sport- 
ing distinct do's. 



Margaux Pena 

This Sophomore finds a new 
use for duct tape. 



166 BC Underground 




Heather McCooey 




Why fit ii? 



Typical Boston College fashion consists of Abercrombie & Fitch 

and J. Crew type styles. However, there is a present a still growing 

sub-culture of alternative style on campus. Students here are 

neither shy about wearing what they please nor about making a 

statement of their confidence and personal flair. From the baggy 

pants and rainbow beads of ravers to the multicolored spikey 
hairdos of punks, these students definitely add a unique flavor to 

our school. Though they may not fit the stereotypical Dave 

Matthews-listening, Gap-wearing BC student, these kids add to 

our community in their own way. Alternative style is just one 

more way Boston College celebrates diversity! 



BC Underground 167 




Christmas and Halloween are 
friendly holidays. 

Rudolph made an appearance 
at the Tree Lighting Ceremony, 
a favorite Christmas tradition 
atBC. 



Walking down the hallways 
during Halloween is like going 
through a really bad haunted 
house. 



The Christmas Tree Lighting 
Ceremony was a time of joy and 
cookies! 



jm^ 


!P^ 


Wl 


■■ 


' . ': ' \ 




1 


1^1 


'■'■■ '■'■; 


\ ^ 


4 j 


1 




\ 




^H 




Jm 




m 








Chad Elder 



^hristmas 

^■^ Tree Lighlin 









i y 




Chad Elde 



s «. 

M 


^ 


r 


I^H 


■^. ^T"^/' , ^^ 








^^^^^^^^^V '^lii^^Bfe?'-' :-'-^'^??-':v^'-' " ■■ 


K^IW 


flH^. 


- 


i^F'- ' 



Chad Elde 




otCii ©pd w(Q)k( 



"/ make sure my 

room is decorated 

for every season!" 

-Chrissy Wain V5 




168 Holidays 




Break nme! 



Students at BC get into the holiday spirit. They can be as bad as some 

commercial companies and decorate everything for a holiday weeks in 

advance. They love to decorate especially for Halloween and Christmas. 

Pumpkins and reindeer are in abundance during these times. The most 

important part of the holiday season is the breaks, whether they come in 

the middle of the semester or after a long haul through finals. Thanksgiving 

and Christmas breaks give us the opportunity to go home and rest with 
family and old friends. After one break is over, we start a countdown until 

the next holiday season. 




Holidays 169 



y "My parents come y 

up all the time 

anyway, but 1 still 

lovettiem." j^mL 
-Dan Mullins V4 ,^^^ 


With One Voice... 





This parent matched the flags 
on the field during the pre- 
game memorial for the victims 
of September 11. 

Most parents were able to en- 
joy their student's company at 
the BC vs. Army football game. 




Some families and friends trav- 
eled internationally (in this 
case from Canada) to show 
their support of BC. 



1 70 Parent's Weekend 



Chad Elder 




Suieet Home, BC! 

It just looks different: adults swarming around campus with lost looks on 
their faces. These are not professors, yet they look hauntingly familliar. 
They are in the bookstore, at the football game, and at the Boston Pops 
performance. They are our parents and they come bringing promises of 
good food (at least for the weekend), forgotten items, and. In some cases, a 

little bit of home. They often come accompanied by siblings and pets, 
whose presence adds to the now-larger mixture of people around campus. 
And thus the phenomenon known as Parents' Weekend begins. Some love 
it, some hate it; but regardless, it comes every year and it's nice to know 

that our parents will come too. 



Parent's Weekend 1 71 




This girl discovers what it's 
lil<e to have a reading disor- 
der. 

Learning what it's lil<e to be 
blind can promote better 
understanding. 




The Big Brother's table during 
the activities fair was pretty 
popular. 

By writing in front of the 
mirror, a girl can sympathize 
with a person with dyslexia. 



Chad Eld 




Chad Eld.l 



"Community service is 

sucli a huge port of 

my life of BC. " 

-Anonymous 




1 72 Community Service 




Helping Hands 

Boston College is recognized for many things: one being a record of com- 
munity service that makes all other Jesuit schools insanely jealous. Commu- 
nity service is present at the Campus School, where students give their time 
to help handicapped children and in Boston itself through programs such as 
Pulse and 4Boston. It reaches far beyond Chestnut Hill as well. Every year, 

hundrends of BC undergrads travel in goups to provide support and hous- 
ing construction in impoverished communities thorught the Appalachia 
program. So at home and abroad, BC students are making a positive impact 

in the lives of others through the giving of their time, care, and company. 



/ 



Community Service 173 




Dear Member of Boston College Community 

know that all of us at Boston College remain shocked and horrified by 
the airline hijackings and related attacks on the World Trade Center 
and the Pentagon. We join people throughout the world as we mourn 
the deaths of the innocent crews and passengers on the airplanes, as 
well as those who died in New York City and Washington D.C. What 
happened is so unbelievable; and, understandably, it has left us with 
feelings of sadness and concern for the future. Yet I have no doubt 
that our nation will work through this situation, and I know that the 
Boston College community will be sustained by its faith and strong 
sense of community. I have already witnessed on this campus in the 
last day so many examples of people coming together in prayer and in 
support of one another. 

As we deal individually and as a community with these terrorist attacks 
on America, I ask that we use the strengths and resources of Boston 
College to assist our community during this extaordinary time. I en- 
courage faculty and staff to take every opportunity to help our students 
understand and cope with these events. I hope students will continue 
to support one another and to engage in conversation with faculty and 
staff. A list of services and activities will be updated regularly on 
BCInfo, and I recommend that you check this web site frequently to 
become aware of the resources available. 



In the days ahead, we need to remind ourselves that we are one com- 
munity, one world. We cannot allow the hatred and evil that lie in the 
heart of yesterday's attacks and senseless loss of life to deprive us of our 
vitality and dreams. In addititon, we have to remain respectful of all, 
and do everything we can to be a welcoming community. 

In the coming days and weeks, both as individuals and as a commu- 
nity, let us focus on channeling our thoughts and efforts to help in any 
way we can the victims of September 11. I ask that all of us keep 
remembering in prayer those who died and those who remain missing. 
I prey that we emerge from this overwhelming tragedy with a new 
commitment to work for lasting peace and justice. 



174 USA 



f ' 



W*:v: --^ '• > 



^•^ . 



^■.^.'^!: ^Jr 



,*^1 



'4 



JJUJi 



%ry^ 





// 



We ar 





The organization for Jewish stu- 
dents, Hillel, goes to Isreal. 

BC provides students conve- 
nient Mass services to go to. 




The Catholic tradition can be 
found everywhere on campus. 

Many students help out with 
Mass here at BC. 




Mike Mergen 



Mike Merger 




wm ©[rDd ^©DC( 



"With such a strong 

Catholic tradition, 

sometimes it's hard if 

you oren 't Cathoiic. " 

-Anonymous 





1 76 Religion 





BC's Spirituality 



BC, as we know, is a Jesuit Institiution. The Jesuit tradition and the Christian 
morals that accompany it not only manifest themselves in the pews of St. 
Mary's and the names of our residentail halls, but also pervades the very 
essence of our academic experience. The exploratory nature of the Jesuit 
character embraces the practices and cultures of a diversity of religions. 
Through various student organizations and the facilities of Boston, BC stu- 
dents have woven their personal traditions with their fellow classmates to 
create a spiritual atmosphere that is unique to the Heights. 




Religion 1 77 



N t V 




I 






Chris Bowers 



[ editoriTom Pelissero ] 







"Boston College has a rich 
and long-standing tradition of 
attracting premier student- 
athletes. I'm proud to say 
that our student-athletes 
exemplify students who are 
truly outstanding students as 
well as athletes. With an 
overall graduation rate that 
ranks fifth best in the nation, 
BC puts forth young men and 
women who succeed both in 
the classroom and on the 
playing fields. These student- 
athletes will not only perform 
at high levels in both sports 
and academics, but their all- 
around education at BC will 
also allow them to perform at 
a high level in the real world." 

Gene DeFilippo, 
Director of Athletics 







student 



-Hthletes 













i^^^4>^.^ 





When thinking about college sports, 
one nnust not overlook the commit- 
ment to academics. After all BC Eagles 

are Student-athletes, not athlete- 
students. Rising as one to represent our 
school on the national level, we must 
pay homage to the dedication it takes 
to live these dual lives. Go Eagles. 



./'•«i!§^~">*^" 



■*^^* ,*w.*. ^^ 



.*PAi ""^ -* ^^j-'. 



"•«§««- 





180 Year in Review 



student 



-Rthletes 




V ^^^^-^^l^^^Mf. 



^tvmV's., 




Year in Review 181 



001 in Review 






^J 



<v 



7 



T^ 



':s^' 



A- 




^-^P* -.^S^ 



M^ 



inother year of Eagle sports past, and another thrilling 
Odyssey of triumphs and travails, wins and losses, jubilation and 
heartbreak, vindication and devastation. From the so-called 
glory sports of football, hockey and hoops down to the most 
obscure of squads like fencing, wrestling, and water polo, the 
student-athletes of Boston College once again made the school 
proud. Sportsmanship, dedication, and an unyielding desire to 
seek victory at all costs remained earmarks of this time-honorsi 
tradition. While never sacrificing their honor as representatives 
of all that Boston College stands for, the Eagles of the field, pool, 
:^^ — A . 4-^ — ^^ -. — :« |g^ ^|-,J5 university stand proud. 



ice. ani 



■ Vb>\iyviuU UaSJ ^ii/fJ'JJ\*BSiL2.lVii 11. 





•^ 



>^-&m&^- 



/ 



2001 in Revie 



'Mi 




i 









!^9S 



COlltBC^ 



■f -•■ ■ ■>■»/' ,^^ 



'IMl} 




L 



wsroU 



1^3Jf" 




M^M^M^h 







Senior co-captain Amelie Wulff, widely regarded as one of tine best defenders in 
school history, was named the Big East Defensive Player of the Year. 




SHck It to 'Em 

The field hockey Eagles made a late-season push to get to the Big East seminfinals, and finished with an overall record of 11-8 in 

what was certainly a solid season. 

The squad started out slow with a loss to Ohio University and UMASS, but came back strong with big wins over Americanj 

University and downtown rival Boston University. The win over American was founded on a steller performance by Big East) 

Defensive Player of the Year and All-Big East P' Team selection, Amelie Wulff The senior from Germany scored all of the fivei 

goals in the 5-1 win over American. BC played a very emotional game against BU and the win was well deserved. 

The Eagles had highs and lows during the rest of their campaign. Some of the highlights were the stellar performances against alll 

but one Big-East teams, such as Providence, Rutgers, Villanova and old UConn. The Eagles showed tremendous effort and heart' 

in all of their five league games, collecting four wins. BC lost a very hard-fought game against conference champion Syracuse andc 

lost in the last 30 seconds of the game. Junior Kim French, an All-Big-East 1 ^' Team selection along with Wulff, was BC's top scorer i 

and was always relied upon for a big contribution in the crucial match-ups. French handled the pressure extremely well, scorings 

countless important goals for her squad. The squad was also lucky to have goaltender and All-Big-East 2""' team selection Lauren i 

Hill behind them, as the sensational sophomore kept BC in the game on many occasions. 

The Eagles ended the season with a heart-breaking loss on their own turf against Big East semifinal opponent Villanova. After a 

2-2 tie at the end of regulation, the teams went scoreless in the first overtime before falling seven minutes into the second extra 

session. 

The squad displayed not only great talent, but also a plethora of pride, which led them to a great Big East regular season. The girls 

focused on an improved work ethic, upon which they will continue to build to be competitive down the road. Coach Sherren 

Granese's squad will return all but two starters, and the team will push for further Big East dominance in the fall of 2002. 

- Christy Zider, '03 



184 Field Hockey 



Senior defender Amelie Wulff (Dusseldorf, Germany) and junior forward Kim 
French (Shrewsbury, MA) earned spots on the 2001 STX/NFHCA Division I 
Regional All-America squad selected by the National Field Hockey Coaches 
Association (NFHCA), one of the largest honors in the sport. 




Field Hockey 185 




BC upset the 19th-ranked Georgia Bulldogs in the Music City Bowl, 20-16. The Eagles 
were led by running back Will Green, who rushed the ball 35 times for 1 49 yards. 





\ winning campaign in the Big East. A victory over archrival Notre Dame. A near- 
upset over the undefeated number one team in the nation, IVliami. A bowl victory over 
#1 9 Georgia, the first win over a ranked team in four years. A ranking in both national 
polls at season's end. 

In other words, just another stellar year for Tom O'Brien's BC Football Eagles. 
With the departure of so many key members from the 2000 squad, it would have 
been tough to imagine O'Brien could turn his team into a winner for the third straight 
season, but he was never one to listen to critics. Players who many predicted would 
fizzle with added responsibility showed the naysayers the fallibility of their statements. 
Brian St. Pierre: a unanimous choice for second-team All Big East. Offensive linemen 
Marc Colombo, Marc Parentau, and Dan Koppen, defensive linemen Antonio Garay 
and Sean Guthrie, linebacker Scott Bradley, and punter Kevin McMyler: each a selec- 
tion to the All Big East squad. Running back Willie Green: All-Big East, Co-Big East 
Player of the Year, consensus Ail-American, 
Individual stars with one team goal: another season of excitement and success. Con- 







Quarterback Brian St. Pierre, written off by many as a career bacl<up, 
stepped into the large shoes left by Tim Hasselback quite comfortably, 
cruising to an All-Big East campaign. 




188 Football 



With their bowl defeat of 19th-ranked Georgia, the Eagles moved back 
into the national polls; months later, the women's basketball team also 
moved into the polls, marking the first time in BC history that the four 
"major" sports had been simultaneously ranked. 



funnel Uision 

Football Season Successful, 
nine Yards Shy of Greatness 

At the outset of the season, Nashville may not have been the goal for the season's end, but at that 
moment it was more than all right for everyone involved. After a drought against ranked opponents, 
the Eagles of the gridiron had finally overcome the obstacle with a 20-T 6 win over the No. 1 9 Bulldogs 
of Georgia in the Music City Bowl. Highlighting the win were the stats of no turnovers for the offense 
while the defense posted four takeaways against the fourth place SEC team. In the race for the Big East 
regular season championship right up until the end, the team rose to the occasion and posted eight 
wins in their third straight bowl appearance. 

The bowl win may define the brilliant season the team had, but looming just beyond is what could 
have been. Chestnut Hill played spectator to the only game that did not go smoothly for eventual 
undefeated national champion Miami. Had that final drive gone the nine yards for the score in the 
allowed forty-six seconds, this season would have been one comparable to the greatest feats on the 
Heights, but alas, the effort came up just short and on a fluke play, the Hurricanes luck bailed them out 
of their first loss of the season. 

As for the rest of the regular season, the club did exactly what was expected of them: win the games 
they were favored to win and lose those that they were supposed to. Of those, Notre Dame was the 
most exciting. It came down to the wire to defeat the Irish on that chilly night, but the win ensured 
that the Eagles were the best Catholic college football school in the country. Convincing wins over 
Pittsburgh and West Virginia, 45-7 and 34-10 respectively, were especially enjoyable after losing to 
both teams last year. Continuing dominance over the military academies gave BC the edge over Army 
and Navy for much needed early season victories. Big East basement-dwellers Temple and Rutgers 
were also stomped all over to make way for the success of the Eagles. 

The Eagles were never outworked; the only poor performances came against teams that were, to put 
it simply, better. Virginia Tech, Syracuse, and a pesky Stanford team all played host to Tom O'Brien's 
crew. Outmatched and outplayed in those games, BC saw all three opponents go on to other suc- 
cesses and outstanding bowl bids. 

In a well-rounded Big East conference this season, BC outscored their opponents 337-227 in a sea- 
son that can only predict good things to come. With a twelve-game schedule lined up for next year, 
including seven at Alumni Stadium, and a boatload of quality recruits that as a group ranked in ESPN's 
top twenty in the country, there is no doubt in either coaches' or players' minds that the success of the 
past few seasons will continue. As for that goal for the season's end, 'Big East Champion Boston Col- 
lege' is a distinct possibility in the near future. 



Chris Conlon, '03 



Football 189 



''M 



Green rushed for 21 3 yards and a touchdown in his personal homecoming game at Rutgers. 
Green, who hails from Atlantic City, New )ersey, rebounded from a one-game suspension a 
week earlier in leading the Eagles to a 38-7 rout of the Scarlet Knights. 




.^■.».^;;^.^.:.^ii.y«>.=^^«^i^«^»n.ai^.. 



190 Football 



All photos by Chris Bowers 



The junior tailback scored on plays of 70 and 71 yards as 

Dame 21 -1 7 at Alumni Stadium. Performances in the big games earned Green 

consideration for the Heisman Trophy and the Doak Walker Award. 




illiam Green provided a major-league highlight reel for the gridiron 
Eagles during a successful bowl-bound campaign. The junior running back 
strode into the national spotlight as perhaps the best back in America thanks to 
his unique combination of a bruising running style and 4.3 speed. Green 
climbed the ladder in BC football history for both single-season and career 
yeards en route to an All-Big East, All-American season. As one of Boston 
College's truly-remarkable physical specimens, Green brought the BC commu- 
nity together both at Alumni and across the country. Despite being only a 
junior. Will already accomplished his college goals.. .next stop: the National 
Football League. 




FootbaU 191 



The hockey Eagles opened Rivalry Weekend 2001 with a 4-1 bashing of the Fighting 
Irish. Senior captain Jeff Ciuliano and freshnnan Dave Spina each contributed one goal 
and one assist, with junior Tim Kelleher getting the win in net. 




Kerry Healey 



Kerry Healey 




192 Rivalry Weekend 



The BC gridders completed a perfect weekend on Saturday night as a national 
television audience watched the Eagles edge Notre Dame in a 21 -1 7 thriller. 





Perhaps we should listen when Notre Dame makes light of this rilvary. Perhaps we should bow to their Golden 
Dome and their Touchdown Jesus and their pudgy little walkons. Perhaps we should roll over and die, and bow to 
;heir athletic tradition. 

Or perhaps we should sweep them in two sports and let them cry all the way back on that nice flight to 
loppin' South Bend. 

If for just one weekend, BC proved that there might be room for two Catholic sports powerhouses in this coun- 
;ry. The Eagles opened the weekend by unfurling the 2001 National Hockey Championship Banner while the poor 
rish stood on the blue line, squinting into the lights for a prize they have never owned. Their vision never im- 
Droved as the eagles of the ice skated to a 4-1 win. 

Then came the biC| one: football. Under the lights in a rare night game at Alumni Stadium, the Eagles con- 
ounded the ND attack with a suffocating defense, and Will Green ran wild as a national TV audience saw the Irish 
all too defeat. 

A month later, BC rolled to a bowl victory. A month later, Irish football Head Coach Bob Davie was fired. Once 
again, no one in Eagleland shed a tear. 

The year was ours. 




Rivalry Weekend 193 



The Eagles took third in its opening meet of the season, a competition on its 
home turf at Franklin Park. 



mercury men < 

Running: Just Half the Battle 

The men's cross country Eagles saw a common theme to their 2001 campaign: coming up just short. The leader- 
ship of seniors Colin Wolfe and Nathan Buttrick kept a young team focused, but the squad simply could not seen 
to get over the hump. 

The team appeared to be coming on strong by the midway point of the season, as displayed by a solid effort at tl 
New England Championships. Behind a 1 7th-place finish by Wolfe and solid marks from sophomore Byron Gattre 
Buttrick, and junior Shawn Wallace, the Eagles came in sixth in a field of 42. As the final tune-up before the Big Ei 
Championships, the New Englands appeared to be a good omen before the squad's biggest test. 
However, no momentum could carry BC into the top six, a goal Coach Randy Thomas had placed on the heads c 
his runners in the preseason. The Eagles still finished strong, taking eighth out of 14 entries, led by a 21st-place 
showing by Wolfe. Still, the disappointment was evident in the team's final race two weeks later, a frustrating 19t 
in the NCAA District I Qualifier. Gattrell was able to crack the top 50, with his 45th good enough to take 45th in 
highly competitive field, while Wolfe, Wallace, and Buttrick also posted for the Eagles. 

The loss of Wolfe, Buttrick, and fellow seniors Steve Lester, James Mann, and Sean Ruday will cause Thomas to do 
some major regrouping for the future, but the presence of ten promising freshman along with Gattrell, Wallace, 
and junior Matthew Kootman bode well for 2002. 

Tom Pelissero, ' 




194 Men's Cross-Country 



BC flexed its muscle at the New England Championships October 12th, 
finishing at close to the top in a large field of 42, with a 6th-place mark. 




i 




/, 




tism^ 



Senior Colin Wolfe was a leader on every level 
for the 2001 Eagles. A four-year veteran and a 
notorious hard worker, Wolfe set the example 
for the droves of underclassmen around him. 
He posted the best mark in every race except 
the NCAA Qualifier for BC, slipping into the 
top-20 on two occasions. Coach Randy 
Thomas turned to Wolfe and his co-captains, 
senior Nathan Buttrick and junior Brian 
Mahoney, to keep younger members of the 
team focused in what proved to be a trying 
and somewhat unfulfilling season. Despite 
coming up short in the pursuit of some goals, 
Wolfe always competed like a champion, a 
dedication that his teammates will try to 
emulate down the road. 





The squad finished 6th at the NCAA tournament, as junior Maggie Guiney led 
the way with a lOth-piace indivudal marl<. 




196 Women's Cross-Country 



Coach Randy Thomas was named the NCAA National Coach of the Year. Thomas, in his 
eighth season at the helm, led the Eagles to a first-place finish at the NCAA qualifier and a 
runner-up trophy at the Big East Championships. 




The Eagles rebounded from a runner-up finish in the Big East 
championship October 26th by winning the NCAA District I 
Qualifying Meet two weel<s later at Franklin Parl<. Boston College 
blew away the competition, finishing with a total score of 53. 
Providence College was the closest to dethroning the Eagles, 
but finished with 95 points. From an individual standpoint for 
the Eagles, junior Maggie Guiney continued her hot streak. She 
took first place in the six-kilometer race, finishing with a time of 
20:29. Guiney edged out Kate O'Neill of Yale and Boston Col- 
lege teammate Maria Cicero, who both finished with a time of 
20:33. Senior Katie Ryan and junior Laura Smith also turned in 
strong performances for National Coach of the Year Randy 
Thomas' squad. Ryan turned in sixth-place result, finishing with 
a time of 20:54, while Smith placed 1 4th with a time of 21 :23. 
As usual, individual performances were merely the catalysts in a 
truly terrific team performance. 



7,A 




Fleet of Feet 




Ulomen's Cross-Country 
nssaults the nation 



rhe women's cross-country team set their sights high and reached nearly all of them. 

rhe team returned all seven runners from last years squad and started the season off by being ranked second in the national poll. Coach 
^andy Thomas entered the season optimistically. "It is going to be tough to repeat on last year's success," Thomas said. "But the team 
s ready for the challange." Leading the way for Thomas' 2001 squad were his co-captains, senior Katie Ryan and junior Maggie Guiney. 
iach returned with experience as an Ail-American recipient. That experience guided the squad through a rollercoaster ride of a season. 
rhe Eagles posted first place finishes in three of six regular season meets: the BC Invitational, lona Meet of Champions and the Regional 
[Qualifier. The regional qualifier was an incredible turning point for the team as it built momentum en route to the NCAA Champion- 
ihip. The team capped off an incredible season by placing sixth at the 2001 NCAA Cross Country Championship at Furman University 
n South Carolina. Leading the way individually for the Eagles was Guiney, who finished in 10th place. She was followed by freshman 
^aria Cicero, who finished in the 16th spot. Both Guiney and Cicero earned All-America honors with their top-30 finishes. Ryan also 
inished her career nicely with a 39th place finish, just missing All-American honors. Other scoring finishers for Boston College were 
unior Julie Spolidoro, who finished in 107th, sophomore Jennifer Kramer in 119th, and sophomore Jennifer Donovan at 183rd. 
rhe recent success of the Boston College cross country program kicked off a tradition that will continue to attract attention and respect 
rom all over the country. The dedication of the talented individuals remaining leaves hopes high for future returns to the national 
potlight. 

Maria Cicero, '05 

Women's Cross-Country 197 



The Eagles scored their first win of the Spring season with a 6-1 win over Vermont, 
including an across-the-board sweep in doubles. 



Swing Proud 

The men's tennis team endured a trying 
season as the struggled to earn respect in the 
Big East. 

BC kicked off the season with a trip across 
town to the Harvard Invitational. Although no 
players advanced beyond the second round 
in singles play, two BC pairs were pitted 
against each other in the consolation doubles 
final; senior Tim Brennan and sophomore 
Paul Colahan bumped freshmen Robert 
Murray and Derrick Chou nine games to 
seven. 

The second tournament of the season was 
the Northeast Intercollegiate Tournament in 
Providence, Rl, \A/here freshman Derrick Chou 
(Great Neck, NY) advanced as to the fourth 
round in singles. In doubles competition, the 
combination of Colahan and sophomore Ross 
Pytko swung into the third round. A week 
later at the Connecticut Invitational, senior 
Marc Lucero and freshman Jonathan Ounjian 
won their respective singles brackets while 
the pairings of Brad Anderson and Justin 
Slattery and Brennan/Colahan won their 
doubles brackets. Lucero won four straight 
matches without dropping a set. At the ITA 
East Regional Championship, Anderson and 
Slattery represented the Eagles strongly in the 
main draw of singles and doubles. 

With the coming of the spring schedule, 
the Eagles looked to continue to work to- 
gether in the pursuit of consistency. 

- Jessica Burkhort, '03 







198 Men's Tennis 



Senior Marc Lucero was among the BC student-athletes that visited public elemen- 
tary schools over the winter as part of the HEAR program, encouraging respect 
among the youngsters. 




Men's Tennis 199 



In singles play at the ITA Regional Qualifier, Boston College was represented by Nida 
Waseem in the regional draw and Allison Ashley and Ashley Backus in the qualifying draw. 
In doubles play, the tandems of Backus and Emily Hellberg as well as the team of Waseem 
and Ashley represented BC. 




String 'Em Up 

Ulomen's Tennis Hits tlie Hardcourt in Stride 

A strong performance in fall matches allowed the women of Eagles 
to tennis to debut at #66 in preseason ITA rankings in 2002, and BC 
would not let the voters down. 

Behind lone senior and four-year standout Ruta Veitas, the squad 
swung through its Fall schedule with great success, always a key to 
setting the tone for the Spring. In the opening meet at William & 
Mary, freshman Morgan Landes took home a consolation title in 
singles play, while fellow rookie Nida Waseem posted a pair of 
singles wins. Junior Anisha Fernando won the draw in Flight #3 a 
week later at the Harvard Invitational, and three Eagles managed to 
crack the top four at the Brown Invitational. 
BC truly hit their stride in the final full-squad match of the Fall sea- 
son, October 19th-21st at Dartmouth. Landes, freshman Amy 
Molden, and Fernando each captured the singles crown in their 
respective draws. 

With an exciting young group and the coaching of New England 
veteran Nigel Bentley, the Eagles looked to make 66th, however 
distinguished, seem like an underestimation. 

Tom Pelissero, '03 



200 Women's Tennis 




The Eagles were rewarded for strong play in the Fall with a #66 ranking in the 
nation by the Intercollegiate Tennis Association in January. 




Freshman outside hitter Katie Andersen led the Eagles with 1 1 kills and 14 
digs as BC swept Providence College 3-0 on November 9th. 



file Golden Spihe 

The women's volleyball team had a season full of victories and successes. With only one senior, the team relied 
on the ability of the underclassmen, especially the domineering freshmen. Fourth-year coach Jackie Hadel once 
again led the squad through a season with tough competition and enormous talent. Junior outside hitter Rachel 
Bach, sophomore middle blocker Kim Carlson and sophomore middle blocker Nancy Legan were the three cap- 
tains that took control on the court. California native Brooke Shull was the only senior on the team, although the i 
team returned four other starters, all underclassmen. 

The 2001 freshman class was certainly something to talk about. Freshman setter Jessica Brizzolara earned Big 
East Rookie of the Week accolades for the week of September 1 0, while outside hitter Katie Andersen provided 
strong, solid defense for the team throughout the entire season. Bach was a powerful presence as she continuously 
led the squad in kills and blocks. 

The squad pulled off some tremendous victories over the course of the year. One of their biggest was over Big 
East rival St. John's University, whom the Eagles rallied to defeat despite a two game deficit. The 3-2 defeat of the 
Red Storm instilled a lot of confidence throught the ranks. Another enormous conquest was over Northeastern, 
with the Eagles defeating the Huskies 3-1 on their home court in Chestnut Hill. 

A loss to a different set of Huskies, those from Uconn, kept the Eagles out of postseason play, BC finished 9-4 on 
their home floor, and walked away from the season with confidence in their future. Throughout the season the 
girls played with pride and determination to represent the Boston College well. 



Nicollete Reilly, '0. 





202 Volleyball 



Rachel Bach came up with 1 8 kills and 1 1 digs as BC rallied from a 2-0 deficit to 
knock off St. Johns 3-2 in a five-game thriller on October 26th. 





^ mff 



T»: 





"One person never sticks out in my mind; 
only great teams do. That is because indi- 
viduals are easy to beat, but it is a challenge 
to beat a great team." j«a^ ^^U 

- Sophomore Captain Nancy Legan 



Volleyball 203 



i'«^-' 




Push It Through! 

They're there. They cheer. They lead. The 
2001-2002 Varsity Cheerleading squad had an- 
other successful year leading the BC Superfans 
to one voice. A satisfying football season 
segued into another spirited basketball seasoni 
in which the squd excelled. Acrobatic flips, 
innovative pyramids, and toothy grins personi-i 
fied this year's cheerleaders. "The best part 
of the year was making a connection with the 
fans," stated one the many cheerleaders known 
only by his first name, Shaun. "I really feel 
like my cheering efforts made a difference." 
And what a difference they did make. Never 
before in BC History have Superfans been so 
spirited and outlandish. And it can all be 
accredited to the wonderful efforts of the 
Varsity Cheer squad. 

- Boots desert, '03 



All photos by McGrath Studios 




204 Cheerleading 





All photos by McGralh Studios 



Uieaty Guys Rolling Hround... 

Athough it seems absurd, Boston College knew 2002 would be their last campaign, after which they would be relegated to club 
tatus under the rules of Title IX, a litigational monster ostensibly in place to promote gender equality in college sports. 

Regardless of the politics, the Eagles were determined to work hard and make one last stand. Head Coach Rodney Buttry looked 
Drward to a solid year out of his veterans, as well as freshman standout Nate Poole. However, with only one win against Davidson 
oming early in the season, some were left frustrated and disappointed. 

"We're all used to losing by now," said Poole. "We just go out there and give it all we got. I mean, we have nothing to lose. Our 
notto is 'Leave it all on the mat." 

Win, lose, or draw, it didn't really matter. The BC wrestlers admirably seemed to gain a lot more from the process than the outcome, 
^raining unfailingly every day at practice and fighting on the mat may not have produced many wins, but, much more important things 
vere accomplished. 

"Some of the guys are hurt and we're not having the greatest year, but we're still coming into practice working hard, doing what we 
leed to do. It's still fun, with the guys, just hanging out," stated Buttry. 

The Eagle wrestlers days on a varsity team may have been brought to an end, but their fight would be remembered by all. 

Boots Giesen, '03 



Wrestling 205 



Tiffany Wernig and Kerry Whalen led the way with scores in the top-25 as the 
Eagles completed another top-ten outing at the ECAC Championships. 




All photos by McGrath Studios 



UnhsLatfeS 

The Eagles of women's golf experienced a trennendously 
successful Fall schedule, finishing in the top ten in each of its 
four invitational tournaments. From the top ten individual 
finishes of Channing Lovejoy and Tiffany Wernig to solid 
contributions from senior Suzanne Carrazza, juniors Jennifer 
Mitchell and Roxanne Somboonsiri, sophomore Kerry Whalen; 
and freshmen Elizabeth Gallery and Moira O'Connell, the 
Eagles proved to be solid from tee to green. 
The ladies came out of the gate slowly in the season-opening 
Yale Invitational, only to return for a great second day and 
take ninth place. The team rolled back into Massachusetts at 
the Mt. Holyoke Invitational and stormed into a fifth place slot 
in the twenty team field. Heading south to New Jersey and 
the Princeton Invitational the Eagles placed sixth. The squad 
took their name and high finishes into the season-closing 
ECAC Championship, pulling out a seventh place mark and 
setting their place in the East Coast golf scene for the 
schedule's Spring half. 

Returning to action March 4*^ one could expect nothing 
but great things from BC's ladies of the links. A team that 
relies so heavily on a communal determination by all its mem- 
bers undoubtedly is capable of even further great accomplish- 
ments. 

Chris Conlon, '03 




206 Women's Coif 



Sophomore Chris Sanossian and freshman Tim Connors each drove into the top-ten 
at the ECAC Championships as the Eagles hammered out a fifth-place finish. 





'he men's golf squad did their best to come away with some 
Dlid performances, and build upon a burgeoning pride that 
agles, too, can master the course. The young group relied on 
ne senior leadership of Rich Tilghman and the guidance of 
ihird-yera coach Trevor Drum. Other veteran contributors 
Tcluded sophomores Dave Giulietti, Sean McReynolds, and 
Chris Sanossian, while Tim Connors, Brendan Lynch, and Matt 
/lonaghan represented the talented freshman class. 
;>C shot straight off the first tee, and finished a strong tenth 
»lace at their first invitational of their opening contect, the 
lack Knight/Habecker Invitational. After 36 holes, the team 
lad really played like one, with all five members of the squad 
vithin ten strokes of ?ach other. The Eagles moved on to 
jreater highlights as well, including a fifth-place finish at the 
iCAC Championships in Hamilton, NY. Coming a mere two 
trokes from sliding into second place, the Eagles were led by 
hree golfers in the top twenty; Connors in fifth, Sanossian 
ilose behind in the eighth, and Tilghman at sixteenth in the 
18-hole tournament. The fall season ended on a positive note 
vhen, traveling to Leesburg, VA, the Eagles picked up a 
welfth place nod in the Georgetown Hoya Invitational. 
A/ith experience and new talent, the road ahead looked 
jromising for the young Eagles. The George Washington 
nvitational in late March would be the next test as BC worked 
:o establish itself in the fairway of East Coast collegiate golf. 

Chris Con Ion, '03 

King's Putt 



photos by McCrath Studioi 




Men's Golf 207 



Senior forward Kelly McManus registered her first hat trick of her 
Boston College career to lead the women's ice hockey team past 
Maine, 5-2, in February. 



Freshman goaltender Lisa Davis is a formidable foe in 
net. With a .916 save percentage she stops nearly every- 
thing that comes her way. Davis averages 2.60 goals 
against her per game, but has faced nearly 800 shots this 
season. Her record of 7-15-4 doesn't tell her story as 
well as her 3.5 recorded shut outs for the season. Davis 
is BC's up and coming superstar. 





All photos by Chris B( 



208 Women's Hockey 



Freshman forward Lindsey Bazzone scored a goal and assisted on three others to 
lead the Boston College women's ice hockey team to a 8-0 exhibition victory over 
Boston University in the opening round of the 2002 Beanpot Tournament. 



I 





^ 







I 



Shots at Respect 

With a pre-season ranking of 6'^ place in the Eastern Collegiate Athletic Conference 
Eastern League cpaches poll, the wonnen's hockey team was not expected to do well. 
U least not by the rest of the league. BC head coach Tom Babson knew his team 
yould be much improved over last year's squad. The team returned 16 players, nine 
)f which played in every game last season. With four veteran seniors, the Eagles 
ooked forward to a better season. ..they did not disappoint. 

Although a winning season was not accomplished, and overall record of 8-16-4 was 
omething to be proud of. Senior forward Kelly McManus led the team in points with 
19 and in scoring with 13 goals in 27 games played. She also netted conference and 
lational titles by being named U.S. College Hockey On-line Offensive Player of the 
Meek for playing an integral part in BC's wins over Bowdoin College (4-1), Quinnipiac 
University (5-1) and the Braves (5-0) in which she had three goals and two assists, all 
n the same week. Kelly was also named ECAC Eastern Player of the Week for leading 
he Eagles to another 3-win week. Freshman goaltender Lisa Davis was an important 
)art of the Eagles' defensive game, backing up McManus' offensive efforts. 



Jessica Burkhart, '03 

Women's Hockey 209 



The Eagles defeated Notre Dame 4-1 on November 26th to kick off rivalry 
weekend on a good note. The evening also marked the unveiling of the 2001 
NCAA Championship banner. 







Junior netminder Tim Kelleher recoreed his first two shutouts in back-to-back 
home games, against Harvard (1-0) and UMass (4-0). The solid golakeeping 
helped the Eagles to five consective wins in November. 





Men's Hockey 211 



iB/R 




Alt photos by Chris Be 




212 Men's Hockey 





Puck 'Em Up 

There are few ways to follow up a national 
championship season. Losing over half of con- 
ference games after a fast start is not ideal. Still, 
the unfortunate circumstances of graduation 
and mass exodus to the pro ranks made BC all 
too vulnerable in 2002. 



Men's Hockey 213 



yu.^t 



The only two senior Eagles, Jeff Giuliano and Ales Dolinar were forced into the 
roles as team leaders after underclassmen Brooks Orpik, Krys Kolanos, and Chuck 
Kobasew all bolted for the professional ranks. 




The 2001 -2002 Eagles had to deal not only with being the defending 
National Champions, but also with playing without mostbf those who 
earned the title. With a special crop of seniors that had played in four 
straight Frozen Fours departed, along with several others who chose to 
turn professional early, BC sported a fresh look, albeit an inexperi- 
enced one. Senior captain Jeff Giuliano and assistant Ales Dolinar 
would be asked to mold a team featuring ten freshmen and no estab- 
lished goalie into a contender. Junior Tim Kelleher and freshman Matti 
Kaltiainen shared duties between the pipes, with the veteran Kelleher 
seeing a majority of the action. Sophomore stars J.D. Forrest and Ben 
Eaves were asked to play beyond their years, and teach the youngsters 
the value of winning. Despite some early season struggles, the Eagles 
rebounded to land right back in the thick of the Hockey East race. 



214 Men's Hockey 



Sophomore Ben Eaves was named the the United States Junior National Team on 
December 5th, which had featured fellow sophomore |.D. Forrest in 2000-2001 . 




Hie Hunted 



Men's Hockey 215 



In its second match of the year, the men's water polo team dropped 
Navy AC 1 0-8 in a heated contest in Annapolis. 



I n Too Deep 

Boston College's men's water polo team was led through their final season of varsity existences 
by senior captains #1 2 Chris Godfrey of Mercer Island, WA and #8 Jay Stephens of Perrysburg, OH. 
The Eagles opened the season with a twelfth-place finish at the 2001 U.S. Naval Academy Labor Dayv 
Open in Annapolis, MD. The squad downed Navy AC 1 0-8 before falling to Bucknell and MIT. The)'| 
lost the eleventh place game to the Merchant Marine Academy with a 8-6 score. 

Though the Eagles would not find much success in the later season, including losses to Harvard am 
UMass in a tournament at Harvard, the young team, comprised mostly of sophomores and juniors, 
was grateful for lost last chance to compete against the nation's best. Godfrey and Stephens, along 
with fellow seniors #1 Richard Hobbie of Duncannon, PA and #6 Brad Barron of West Chester, PA, 
completed their college careers, but so did many of the underclassmen. The graduates hope that 
their underclass teammates can continue the BC water polo tradition at the club level for years to 
come. 

; Beth Bowers, 'a 



Photos courtesy BC Sports Information 




216 Water Polo 



The Women's First Varsity Eight finished 1 9th at the internationally 
renowned Head of the Charles in October. 




Pholos courtes\ BC i:: 



The Women's rowing team enjoyed an extremely successful fall season. Coming off its most successful stretch 
?ver in Spring 2001 , which included a 1 -2 finish at the Dad Veil Regatta and the Team Points Trophy at the New 
ingland Championship Regatta, the team was looked forward to continuing its success. That anticipation pushed 
he team towards finishing more competitively than they ever had in the past at every regatta the team attended 
|:his past fall. Leading those efforts was third-year coach Steve Fiske, who was named Women's Coach of the Year 
bf the Northeast Region. Returning Captain Kristin Henny and Co-Captain Kristin Cary provided additional guid- 
ance for an otherwise young squad. 

After the first varsity eight scored a IP'^'-place finish at Head of the Charles, the team continued to build 
momentumm. In the last event of the fall, the top squad finished 1 1'^ in the Open Eight race at the Princeton 
Chase, a solid finish amidst stiff competetion at Head of the Skuylkill. With nothing but success rippling in their 
wake, the women rowers were looking forward to another amazing Spring. 

Vicky Haley, '03 




Rowing 217 



Junior Carrie Howe and fresinman Jen Doyle raced against top squads from across 
the Eastern seaboard to earn a fourth place finish at the Yale Women's Intersec- 
tional regattain Oct. 2001 . 



Ride the Wind 

Lead by a strong senior class the Boston College sailing team has had a solid 2001 fall season. The Eagles 
have been able to successfully competed against talented teams from the west coast and all across the 
Eastern Seaboard. This season has challenged the eagles with varying wind conditions. At the Navy Fall 
Intersectional in Annapolis, Maryland, juniors MarkTeborek and Justin Dieckerhoff, and freshmen Julie Wil- 
son sailed in southeasterly, 8 knots winds on Saturday and 10-20 knot winds from the same direction. 
After adjustments the eagles were able to pull away with a 1 0th place finish. At the Sharpe Team Race at 
Brown University, junior Neil McLaughlin, sophomores Lora du Moulin and freshmen Frank Ustach, Ben 
Gent and Joy MacDougall combined their efforts to beat Connecticut College in a head to head tie breaker 
October 2001 . In addition to competing against the teams of the Atlantic Coast. The BC eagles have also 
been successful here at home against MIT at the No Ringer Invite and Harvard's Horn Trophy. The Eagles 
sent two boats in the MIT No Ringer Invite. These teams brought an overall seventh place finish out of 
twenty-nine teams back across the Charles. Sailing under many different conditions, both wind and water, 
the Eagles have proved themselves as a very versatile team. -Kristin Walker 





Sailers sloop to success 



Junior Mark Teborek and freshman Julie Wilson sailed their way to a second place 
finish at the November 10-1 1 Coed Atlantic Coast Championships hosted by the 
College of Charleston. 





The Boston College sailing team has a solid upperclassmen base that has welcomed 
an impressive freshmen fleet comprised of fourteen new sailors. These new eagles 
have transitioned well into college level sailing, as they have earned a third place 
finish in the Nickerson Trophy for Freshmen. This finish qualified this talented squad 
for the Frosh Atlantic Coast Championships at Brown University in November 2001 . 
Rookie sailors, Jeff Bonanni, Ben Gent, Spencer Heydt, Eric Deichmann, Frank Ustach, 
Caitlin Rolfes raced for the Eagles, taking fifth place in the A division and sixth place in 
the B division. Sailing under the guidance and example of the experience their upper 
classmen teammates, freshmen Jeff Bonnanni, Jen Doyle, Joy MacDougall and Julie i 
Wilson, have found success in double handed and single handed events. The Eagles' 
have successfully incorporated new faces to the team. Senior Tyler Pruett and 
MacDougall took fifth place in the A-division at the Atlantic Coast Championships as 
junior Mark Teborek and Bonnanni represented Boston College ath the New England 
Singlehanded Championships hosted by Yale in early October. With such a busy and 
experience filled fall season, we can expect big things from the BC sailing team in 
upcoming seasons. -Kristin Walker ■ 






:^mm. 



The Eagles knocked off previously-unbeaten Brown University, with sophomore 
Paul Taylor tallying 1 3 victories in 1 5 chances. 




Duel Efforts 

The 2002 fencing season was frustrating one for tiie BC 
Men's Fencing Team. After coming off last year's winning sea- 
son (15-8), a finish of 12-1 1 was hardly what the team had 
hoped for. "We lost a lot of close matches. We lost to UNC 
Chapel Hill and Brandeis by just one bout," says junior Chris 
Bodnar. 

The Eagles started their season on November 4 at the 
annual Fall Invitational at Smith College. Sophomore Paul Taylc 
placed second overall as freshman Matt Sztuk and Will Lawrie 
placed fifth and sixth respectively. On January 28, the men's 
fencing team faced their most difficult meet of the entire seasoi 
as teams, including MIT, Harvard, Brandeis and Dartmouth, fro 
the Northeast Fencing Conference made their way to Boston 
College. Despite a 2-3 record on the day, senior Dave Slocum 
led his squad to a victory over the undefeated Brown University 
Taylor also had a successful day as he won thirteen of his fifteer 
challenges. The Eagles ended their season as they started it. In 
Durham, New Hampshire, Dave Moyston, Corbin Rhodes and 
Mike Capozzi were key elements in the Eagles' victory, as BC 
won each of their team matches. Led by seniors Mike Capozzi, 
Rick Klein, Steve Orosz, Dave Slocum, and Steve Sztuk, the 
Eagles worked hard, even if the fruits of their labor were never 
fully realized. 

- Chris Bodnar, '( 




220 Fencing 



BC finished the regular season undefeated in the Northeast Fencing Conference, 
and three Eagle fencers also finished their individual schedules without a loss. 




pholoi by McCrdih Studioi 



The BC women's fencing team was a formidable 
force once again; in fact, unstoppable. Tlie team ben- 
efitted from the experience of four seniors, Cece 
Boudreau, Ellen Coats, Becky King, and Megan Kinney, 
as they breezed through a flawless campaign. 

Their victorious season began on November 4 as 
Jessica Peakes and Boudreau earned third and eighth 
place finishes, respectively. In late November, freshmen 
Maureen Traynor, Vanessa Eulo, Tiffany White and 
Genevieve Peeples, along with male teammates Corban 
Rhodes and Will Lawrie, qualified for the February Junior 
Olympic Championships in Columbus, Ohio. 

Teams in the Northeast Fencing Conference 
(NFC) came to BC on January 28. Kate Boyle and Gena 
Koufos contributed to successful day as the lady Eagles 
moved into third place in the conference at the end of 
the season. On February 9, in Durham, NH the Eagles 
finished the season undefeated in the NFC. Traynor, 
White and Eulo were undefeated on the day, as foilists, 
while Sue Boyle and Alison Maher had records of 14-1 
and 1 1 -1 respectively. 

Promising freshmen Alexis Rossi, Jen Dowty and 
Laura Buckley will look to pick up the slack of the four 
graduates in continuing an unprecedented win streak in 
BC fencing. 

- Chris Bodnar, '03 



Cute mask^ 




Fencing 221 






^^:':a 



juiM^^uard Troy Bell, who was featured on the cover of ESPH the Magazine s 
College Basketball Preview issue, broke his personal scoring record twice con- 
secutively, dropping 34 on UMass and 42 on Iowa State, both at Conte Forum. 




222 Men's Basketball 



Sophomore sparkplug Ryan Sidney had his jaw broken in a December practice, 
but came back just two days later with a double-double to help the Eagles to a 
Commonwealth Classic win over UMass, 80-78. 




Mi 




for nu Hges 



Men's BasketbaU 223 



BC avenged a tough road loss at the hands of Providence College with an 89- 
79 drubbing of the Friars at Conte Forum on February 1 3th. Uka Agbai led the 
way with a career-high 1 3 boards. 




All photos by Chris Bowers 



Ballif 






3^ v^J . 




^^^^^^^Bf' ' "'Mf '^^^Bj^lfc 










f r 


*pi -^BnO? li 



224 Mens Basketball 



BC proved its road upset of #16 Miami was no fluke by beating the Hurricanes, 
by then ranl<ed 1 1 th for the second time in a week, 76-63 in Chestnut Hill. 





Mens Basketball 225 



The Eagles scored a big road win over Villanova in overtime on January 9tii. Troy 
Bell hit a floater in the lane with just 6.5 seconds remaining to force the extra 
session, in which BC was victorious, 88-81 . 









( 


N ' 




* 11^ 


<■>• ■■*■■ •- 


*U.«J^ 


i 


m 




1^%..^^ 






-1 






- s X 








l^tk 


^■Mi^^^^BIV^ .ix'J 




i>^ UM 




ikn 


c ' ■ i. ^IP^~ 






(w«C 


TC I . LZJLIU^. 





elite Gght 

Coach ni Skinner's octoshufne of playing 
time kept everyone ready to play 






226 Men's Hoops 



After falling to Miami (OH) in the opening round of the Rainbow Classic, its first loss 
of the season, the Eagles rebounded to down Arkansas State and Holy Cross to 
capture the consolation crown in Honolulu. 




Men's Hoops 227 




Uka Agbai took on NBA prospect Carlos Boozer when BC faced top-ranked Duke in 
January, and although the Eagles fell, Agbai busted his career-high with 20 points, 
confirming his presence as one of the most versatile power fowards in the country. 



Play it hi the Kfii 

The tone for the Eagles' 2001 -2002 campaign may have been set back in January 
of 2000, when the Eagles took on the Duke Blue Devils at Cameron Indoor Sta- 
dium. Late in the Eagles' loss, Duke star Jason Williams taunted began to taunt the 
Eagles, leading erstwhile junior Kenny Walls to toss a forearm to the instigator's 
face. 

The moment the next year's schedule came out, Ken-Bone circled the date when 
the Dukles would visit Conte Forum: January 24th. Sure, the Eagles lost that game 
88-78, and revenge \A/as not attained, but for the first time in several years, BC had 
the national basketball spotlight. 

Dick Vitale w/as in the house. Joey Mclntyre on the national anthem. The Forum 
Fanatics going \A/lld for ESPN. BC was on the map. 

Unfortunately for the Eagles, the rest of their season was not quite as exciting; In 
fact, it could only be described as a rollercoaster ride that no one wants to be on. 
After guard Ryan Sidney's bold prediction that BC could make it to Ne\A/ Year's un- 
defeated was th\A/arted by a pesky Miami (OH) squad In Honolulu, the Eagles 
seemed to lose a bit of their swagger. Despite coming back to \A/in the consolation 
championship of the tournament, and continuing their \A/inning Nways in the confer- 
ence opener at Seton Hall, BC seemed to be playing tight. 

Expectations had risen to extraordinary heights; NA/hen television analysts are 
deeming your 1 7-9 record "inadequate", it may be a backhanded show of respect, 
but certainly disappointing. Wins over tough teams such as Miami (t\A/lce), lo\wa 
State, and UMass, \A/ere countered with Inexplicable setbacks against lightly re- 
garded Virginia Tech and Providence. Entering the final \A/eek of the season, the 
Eagles stood at just 6-7 in the Big East, needing a late season charge and a deep 
foray into the conference tournament to keep their NCAA hopes alive. 

With the imminent graduation of Walls and Brian Ross, combined with the ru- 
mored departure of junior guard Troy Bell for the professional ranks, BC's future, 
much as its present, remained uncertain. 

Tom Pelissero, '03 



Co-captain Kenny Walls had the talent and energy to be a leader both on 
and off the court. Walls, a senior fronn San Francisco, California, was a 
dangerous swingman with a deadly three-point stroke. Behind the arch, he 
often utilized his nasty crossover dribble to beat his defender and launch up 
deep bombs. Kenny played in every game during his career at Boston 
College, which displayed both durability and dedication. His twin brother, 
Lenny, was an integral part of the Boston College football team. Kenny and 
Lenn, extremely close friends and brothers, were fixtures at each other's 
games over their college careers. 



228 Men's Basketball 



Freshman Nate Doornekamp, one of the very few Canadian players in college 
basketball, got a thrill when his new squad took on his brother and Queen 
College in an early exhibition. 



•r *^ 






Ryan Sidney, a resilient shooting guard from Ann Arbor, Michigan, suffered a 
broken jaw early in the season after an accidental collision in practice. 
Sidney practiced the very next day after his injur, and played against UMass 
just two days later. A relentless player who never would give up, Sidney 
proved to be a powerful, energetic addition to the starting lineup. Often 
called the "spark plug" off the bench in 2000-2001, he quickly began excit- 
ing the crowd with his improving long range shooting and remarkable re- 
bounding knack for a smallish guard. Along with Troy Bell, Sidney formed 
one of the best backcourts in the country. His tenacious defense and 
perchance for jabbering at even the largest of opponents made him a valu- 
able catalyst for the Eagles' success. • 






^ ^^^ i-gl^'^^^^K^ 


R'- 






^^^^^^KHISfei ? J^^S 



All photos by Chris Bowers 




Men's Basketball 229 



Seniors Nicole Conway (Clenmont, N.Y.) and Rachel Byars 
(Morganfield, Ky.) were named to the Verizon Academic All-District I 
first- and second-teams, respectively. 




230 Womens Basketball 



Coach Cathy Inglese was named one of 20 finalists for the Naismith Women's 
College Basketball Coach of the Year, the nation's highest coaching honor. 




Womens Basketball 231 



L^J 



West Virginia, Pittsburgh, and Syracuse were among tine victims of a BC roll as the 
Eagles concluded the Big East schedule playing some of theirbest ball all season. 




232 Women's Basketball 



The Eagles knocked off Florida International to capture the Sun and Fun Tourna- 
ment championship. 



She Got Game 



Head Coach Kathy Inglese could not have been more pleased 
vith their women's basketball team's meterioric rise into the top 
IS. In September, faced with sixteen Big East opponents and a 
lumber of non-Conference games, the Eagles were eager to 
)egin their exciting season. 

Then, in October, the squad was ranked by Doug Herakovich 
rom the Women's Basketball Journal at 28 and reported by 
.everal websites as a potential place holder in the BIG EAST 
onference, second only to preseason favorite Connecticut. In 
slovember, BC won their non-conference season-opener against 
he Lady Stags of Fairfield University. After only two losses, to 
Arkansas and Tennessee, the Eagles defeated Northeastern on 
December 22, 2001 with a score of 72-59. The win also gave 
reshman Clare Droesch BC's first Big East Rookie of the Week 
;his season. 

In January, with a BIG EAST record of 2-0 and overall record of | 
1 1 -2, the Eagles cracked the Associated Press Top 25 for the first 
ime since November. 

The women completed the month of January by playing nine 
games, winning seven and losing just two, in conference games 
against Connecticut and Notre Dame. Just as the team ap- 
peared unstoppable, the Eagles were dealt a serious blow with 
the loss of star forward Becky Gottstein. Despite suffering from 
the injuries on and off all season, Gottstein had still averaged 
12.3 points and 5.8 rebounds per game, among the team's 
leaders in both categories. 

Minus Gottstein, the Eagles came on strong, winning three 
straight as they hit the home stretch before the Big East tourna- 
ment. With a little less bad luck and the continued strong play 
of seniors, the Eagles planned to make a run at an NCAA tourna- 1 
ment title. 

Beth Bowers, '03\ 




Women's Ba^ 



L-^1 



Freshman Brandon Twichell won both the 200-yard individual medley and the 
200-year breaststroke, finishing with times of 1 :58.95 and 2:08.27, as BC took out 
rival Georgetown in the regular season finale. 



making a Splash 



"\ usually have a balanced team in terms 
of numbers through the classes, but this 
year the numbers are weighted in the 
lower classes and that bodes real well for 
the future, too." 



- Coach Tom Groden 




234 Men's Swimming and Diving 



Freshman David Herman and junior Matthew Baker picked up two 
individual victories apiece sd NV downed lona and Loyola (Md.) on 
February 9th. 




uiimmers Do It Freestyle 



Splashdown was a success, with the men of both swimming and diving excelling in the water. 

On the swimming side, the Eagles dropped off only slightly, with an 8-7 record, although their performance 
was by all accounts the individual competitors were much improved. The season culminated in a meet at 
Georgetown, in which the Eagles needed a win in order to secure a winning campaign, having entered the match 
at 1-1 overall. The meet came down to the final event, the 4x400 free relay, (400 free relay) with junior Matt Baker 
anchoring the team to victory. The Eagles also beat rival UNH for the second year in a row, only the second time in 
nine years that BC has come out triumphant in the heated border rivalry. 

Breaststroker Brandon Twitchell led a solid freshman class that gave the team a huge boost, which also 
included freestyle specialist Rob Keely. IVlike Dellamano, Matthias Schildwater, and Nick Riolo contributed veteran 
poise in the butterfly, while Baker and freshmen John Ewing and Justin Welch were terrfic in the sprint freestyles. 
Sophomore Andy Nauman contributed greatly in the backstroke and IM events, and lone senior jay Stephens 
assumed a leadership role. 

In diving, 2002 BC graduate Mike Wilt began his first season as head coach. Despite inheriting a team com- 
prised of many walkons. Wilt utilized senior captain Steve Hunter and some of the squad's elder statesmen to give 
BC the direction it needed. 

Splish splash, the Eagles swam fast. 

- Trav/s McGahey, '03 



Men's Swimming and Diving 235 



Freshman Katie McCann set a new Boston College school record in the 
200 individual medley, with a time of 2:05.58. 



iiM 




Photos courtesy BC Sports Informatior 



biks bd in h Poo 

The BC women's team scored an 8-6 campaign that once again established them as a solid 
program. 

Led by senior captains Lauren Schwartz, a butterfly specialist, and Brianne Sullivan, a 
backstroker, the Eagles got contributions for its entire throng of student athletes. Senior Alexis 
Kostopoulos had multiple first-place finishes in the sprint freestyle events, and could be counted on 
in the breaststroke events as well. Senior Lauren Ohtake was the squad's utility swimmer, capable in 
coming through in any event. Sarah Dreyer, Nicole Duffy, Lisa Delsignore, and Caitlin Leahy swam 
well in the distance events, and Caitlin Healey and Christa ehlers enjoyed great success in both dis- 
tance and IM events. Lauren Keibler Nina Suryoutomo, Joanne Paleo, Caitlin Click, and Michelle 
Lane were joined by talented freshmen Erin Fransen and Katie McCann to round out the Eagles main 
contributors. 

In diving, new Coach Mike Wilt had only two women on his squad, neither with a great deal 
of experience. Sophomore Katelyn Cox and freshman Keri Rubeis ventured out virtually on their 
own, but still delivered a respectable performance throughout the season. 

With another winning record tucked under their caps, women's swimming and diving continues to 
command respect in the Northeast. 

- Travis McCahey 



236 Women's Swimming and Diving 



Freshman Kathleen McCann led the Eagles to a win against Boston University, 
taking home three first-place finishes as BC handily defeated the Terriers. 



Muing deep 




Women's Swimming and Diving 237 



Junior Vernon Mickle joined seniors Michael McKenzie, James Mann and junior 
Shawn Wallace in qualifying for the ICAAAA Championships in the 4x800-meter 
relay with their performance at the BIG EAST Indoor Championships. 








L 




'|/A^ 


« 






mt<^\ 


\., KS 




■f i 


r^i 


n 


m ' 








...-^-•■--^ 






■■ 


Jfi-^r^ 




Mt'' ' ' ^S 


'"^ ^g ■ ^B 






/^ 


4 ^i^ffaP^^H 




238 Men's Track and Field 



Sophomore Doug Goodwin earned a BIG EAST qualifying mark in the shot put, 
finishing with a throw of 49'04.25" in a February meet against UNH and Vermont, 




Dash to Glonj 

After an uncommonly slow start at the Harvard Dual Meet on December 1st, the BC men's track and field squad 
[urned their season around. The moment calendars flipped to a new year, the Eagles were ready to fly. 

Senior tri-captain Mike McKenzie and freshman Ryan Sullivan helped their team with individual victories at the 
Boston University Challenge Cup, as the team came in second. Two weeks later, a third-place finish in a field of 
eight at the Rhode Island Invitational instilled further confidence in the Eagles. Another surprise hero emerged on 
February 1 1th, with Keith Normant's tandem wins in the triple jump and 55-meter hurdles to lead the Eagles to 
another runner-up finish in a regional meet. 

BC was unable to translate those early successes into Big East glory, however. At the Big East Indoor Champion- 
ships on February 1 7th, the squad finished at the basement of a 14-team field, far from their goal of sneaking into 
the top half of the conference. 

With only the outdoor schedule remaining, seniors Tony Burne, Nate Buttrick, Pat Filice, Steve Lester, James 
Mann, Ryan O'Hagan, and Collin Wolfe would be given one last time to shine, looking for a positive final impres- 
sion to cap their college careers. The large number of underclassmen gives Coach Randy Thomas the hope that 
coming seasons will bring less frustration and more victories. 

- Chris Bowers, '03, and Kristin Waker, '03 



Men's Track and Field 239 



Freshman Maria Cicero broke a 15-year-old Boston College record in 
the 5,000 meters, and also was BC's highest finisher in any event at the 
Big East Indoor Championships. 










Tracking the Trachsters 

Captains Christina Regan, Katie Ryan, and Zoey O'Sullivan led the young women's track and field team 
through an up-and-down season. The success of the cross-country team had hopes high, but the Eagles 
never found the right formula from top to bottom. 

In the field events, junior Christina Regan returned as a talented heptathalete; the addition of freshman 
Liz Ahsson in the multievents only made the team stronger. In throws, Megan Kearney also returned as 
one of the top throwers, having broken a school record in discus a year earlier. In sprints, O'Sullivan 
helped the newcomers make the transition into competition. With the leadership of senior Ryan and the 
addition of several solid freshmen, including phenom Maria Cicero, the team looked tough to beat in the 
early-going. 

As in previous seasons, the team was once again faced with a tough schedule. In both indoor and out- 
door competition the team competed against many New England rivals, including Harvard, Dartmouth, 
and Boston University. 

Despite all the new talent and a growing confidence, BC finished a disappointing llth at the Big East 
Indoor Championships, and looked to turn the program around in the spring outdoor competition. 

- Maria Cicero, '05 



240 Women's Track 



Senior Katie Ryan (Elmira, N.Y.) was recognized with the 2001-02 BIG EAST/ 
Aeropostale Scholar-Athlete Award, which included a $2,000 scholarship 
toward future pursuit of graduate studies. 






Women's Track 241 



The Eagles bumped off the Georgetown Hoyas in a thrilling overtime match 
October 28th. Sophomore Neil Kraus scored his second goal of the game just 43 
seconds into the extra session to give BC the 3-2 win. 




Freshman Bill Arnault made terrific contributions 
^the Eagle attack in his first season. The jump 
TOm high school to college was a great one, but 
■ jtl^e work ethic and tutoring of the upperclass- 
Wkn often left him in awe. He says "Looking at 
him, you wouldn't think Chris Cleary could do 
the things he does. But each game, when I have 
the opportunity to play beside him, my respect 
grows. He literally leaves it all on the field. The 
same could be said for Paul Chase, who just flies 
up and down the left flank. Paul plays with the 
grit and passion that everyone on the field 
should try and emulate. Although such work 
often goes unrecognized, it's tough not to 
notice what they put in every game." 



242 Men's Soccer 



The Eagles reeled off an impressive four-game win-streak from Sep- 
tember 22nd-October 7th downing Virginia Tech, Harvard, BU, and 
Villanova by a combined margin of 8-3. 



Brand Hew Kicks 





A 



ny team that wins a championship hopes to meet or beat that accomplishment the following year: 
the men's soccer .Eagles were no exception. Although the year contained more setbacks than could have 
been imagined, including a devastating injury to leading scorer Casey Schmidt, the team made their 
second NCAA tournament appearance in as many years. 

The Eagles dominated in Newton, compiling a 7-1 record on their home turf, en route to a 10-8 finish 
overall. Big wins were in no shortage, including defeats of Syracuse, Harvard, Boston University, and 
Georgetown. Even in defeat, the Eagles played tough, with 1 5 of 1 8 contests being decided by just one 
goal. 

The defense led the way for BC once again, guided by seniors Martin Cantillo and Paul Bourke. Eyvind 
Aasen and Chris Clearly also completed their BC careers, playing their hearts to overcome adversity and 
get the team back into the national arena. 

Finishing sixth out of 1 3 teams in the Big East, the Eagles were forced to face off against conference 
power St. John's in the first round of the conference tournament, a one-nil loss. Despite the early exit, the 
squad was still rewarded with one of six Big East bids in the NCAA tournament, the most of any confer- 
ence. Three overtimes and 121 minutes of excitement ended in disappointment as the Eagles fell to 
Farleigh Dickinson in the first round, 1 -0. With eight of eleven starters returning for another season, 
Coach Ed Kelly can only hope for a third straight bid, and with a little more luck, a national title. 

- John Munko, '03 



Men's Soccer 243 



Sophomore Seth Thierren got the Eagles out of the blocks fast with a third-place 
finish in the Slalom at the UMass Carnival as BC took home runner-up honors. 




All photos by McCrath Studios 



Pouider Playen 

No one would accuse the men's ski team of taking advan- 
tage of experience in 2002. However, the fountain of youth 
would prove equally powerful, as sophomore standout Seth 
Thierren led the Eagle to a strong charge in the Eastern Colle- 
giate Ski Conference. 

Coach Brad Vermeulen relied heavily on the unquestionabli 
talent of Thierren to propel the rest of the young team towani 
the top of the ECSC. Spending much of the year solidly in 
fourth place in the tough conference, the Eagles hit the slopet 
each week knowing that merely complimenting their 
underclass leader would lead to a top finish. 

BC opened strong with a 2"'^-place mark at the Umass 
Carnival, led by Thierren's podium finish in the Slalom, as wel 
as top-20 contributions is both the Slalom and Giant Slalom 
from junior Barry Connolly and sophomore David Giuletti. A 
week later, the veterans jumped aboard to propel the Eagles 
into third, with seniors Michael Duran and Hans Gustafson 
each posting fast times in the Slalom. 

The trio of Thierren, Duran, and Gustafson combined for 
another strong showing at the Brown University Carnival in 
February, and were joined by Giuletti in posting tandem 
fourth-place marks at the BC Carnival. 

With youth on their side and the seniors not quite ready to 
pass the torch, the Eagles looked to makes waves in the ECSC 
tournament and beyond. 

Tom Pelissero, '0. 





244 Skiing 



The lady Eagles took home first-place in honors in each of their first five compe- 
titions of the season, and seven of their first eight. 




If the women's skiing squad came down witli altitude sickness, 
t would not be blamed on tine height of Mount Ascutney; the 
Eagles just spent too much damn time on the podium. 

Taking first place in each of their first five races, and seven of 
eight, BC quickly ascended to the precipice of the Eastern Colle- 
giate Ski Conference. Led by senior Christina Gush, a four-year 
standout on the Heights, the Eagles were literally unbeatable for 
a majority of the early season. 

Gush won the Slalom event at three early carnivals, at Ply- 
mouth State, Brown, and on her home turf. Junior Lori Williams 
and sophomore Erica Pylman were stellar in the Giant Slalom; 
Williams twice managed a runner-up finish in the event, while 
Pylman scored the victory at the Boston College Carnival. 

Seniors Erin Holmes and Liz Maher and sophomore Jennifer 
Runco also contributed as the Eagles sprayed across the national 
college skiing scene, with eyes on the ECSC title in March. 

Tom Pelissero '03 



All photos by McCrath Siudios 




'^^ 



Sophomore midfielder Sarah Rahko was named an Ail-American by two publica- 
tions, as well as the Northeast Player of the Year. Rahko had nine goals and eight 
assists for the Eagles, raising her two-year point total to 56. 



Use Your Header 







18'-. >' I- -f 




3 




[ 


- i 


m 





, .je biggest win of the season was undoubtedly the 
startling upset against 9* ranked Connecticut. The 
Huskies were also ranked first in the Big East Northeast 
Hvision, and BC had not downed Connecticut in 
eleven years. Senior IVleghan Moore and freshman 
Lindsey Fairweather scored the only two goals of the 
game, both coming in the first half. Elyse Meredith 
made ten saves in net, holding a powerful Connecticut 
offense in check. The upset punctuated a mid-season 
hot streak that propelled the Eagles back into the 
upper echelon of Big East women's soccer. The smiles 
on the faces of the Eagles after the game showed that 
the thrill of an upset is a feeling that these women will 
never forget. 




246 Women's boccer 



BC avenged a regular season, 1 -0 loss to Rutgers by ending the Scarlet Knights' 
season in the NCAA tournament. The Eagles notched two goals late to edge 
their Big East rivals 4-3 in Piscataway, N.J. 




Women's Soccer Kicks Through the Competition 

I he lady Eagles of soccer team scored an exciting campaign. Behind the leadership of head coach Alison Foley 
and a core of five seniors, BC kicked its way to a 1 0-8-1 overall record and a berth In the Big East Tournament. Trl- 
captalns Lindsey Marshall, Meghan Moore, and Rachel ParrI helped mold the veteran squad to success from start to 
finish. "The captains are very good by leading by example," said Foley of her seniors. "They are very determined and 
motivated people. They get after things right away, and they are our best athletes on the field." Forward Morgan 
Page and back Meghan Buckley also contributed four years of experience to the team's success In 2001 . 

The highlights came early and often for the Eagles. During a hot streak In the middle of the season, BC posted 
back-to-back wins over powerhouse Connecticut, 2-0, and nationally-ranked Miami, 4-2. Strong victories over Rhode 
Island, Virginia Tech, Georgetown, Harvard and Boston University added to the squad's growing confidence. Tough 
losses to Big East foes Rutgers and Vlllanova late in the season were the only blemishes during a 3-2-1 conference 
campaign. 

A strong group of young players augmented the presence of the seniors. Meredith gave the Eagles terrific consis- 
tency in net, twice being selected as Big East Goalkeeper of the Week. Sophomore midfielder Sarah Rahko earned 
honors as a Big East Player of the Week. Juniors Katherine Halloran and Carolyn lacobelll, sophomore Rebecca Brooke 
and freshman Lindsey Fairweather also made sizable contributions for the Eagles. 

- Nicollete Riley, '02 

Women's Soccer 247 



S:fe--': 



'^ 




Photos courtesy BC Sports Information 



Who's in First? 

BC Baseball opened the 2002 season with a perfect 3-0 
start and their eyes on the Big East Championship. Led 
by seniors Brian Macchi, Brian Durkin and junior Matt 
Lederhos, the Eagles expected to have one of the 
strongest outfields in the Big East. In 2001, the trio 
combined for 28 home runs, 102 RBIs and a .340 
batting average. In their first three games against 
Davidson and Delaware State, the Eagles exploded for 
40 runs and 42 hits. After such impressive opening 
weekend, the Eagles traveled to California-Berkley and 
looked forward to a strong season. 

- Chris Bowers, '03 




After putting in four years of hard work and enduring many tough losses, seniors David 
Bartolomew, Brendan Brady, Sean Connelly, James Gotfredson, James McCeney, James 
Karambay, Rory Smith and Gary Tripmacher looked to improve upon the team's past struggles 
in 2002. Ironically, it was not only the seniors' last season playing on the Heights, but rather 
that of the entire team. 2002 was the last season for men's lacrosse as a varsity sport at Boston 
College, thanks to Title IX constraints. With nothing to lose, the entire team worked hard to 
make its last year on the Heights a memorable one. 

- Chris Bowers, '03 



248 Spring Sports 




Led by senior pre-season All Big East selection Lauren Miller, the BC women's lacrosse team looked to prove 
critics wrong.The Eagles were picked to finish 7'^ in the seven-team Big East Conference in preseason polls. 
With ten returning starters, including Miller, who led the Eagles with 20 points 1 1 goals and nine assists in 
2001 Big East games, the Eagles were confident about the coming campaign. Seniors Rachael Telia, Keiiy 
Boyle, Chrissie DeMichele, and Miller looked forward to the challenge of proving the pollsters wrong. 

- Chris Bowers, '03 



Hie Suieet Sound of fliuminum 

rhe Softball squad got off to a tough start, with a 
lough tournament trip to College Station, Texas. 
jn the Aggie Invitational, the Eagles dropped their 
irst four games, three by shutout, before finally 
ijowning Utah to get into the win column. Despite 
Ihe early setbacks, Coach Jennifer Finley remained 
)ptimistic about his squad. Seniors Leah Kamtoris 
ind Brooke Schull were part of a team that went 
)1 -24 in 2001 , and the 5-4 edging of the Utes 
eturned that winning feeling to a squad that had 
)egun to doubt itself. With the onset of home 
)ames and the Big East schedule, the Eagles 
ooked to find their comfort level and get back to 
heir winning ways. 

- Chris Bowers, '03 





Spring Sports 249 



XONE VOICt 



» 




Mam U 




[ ed i to rs : Al i SO n Caso ] 



m6 







"Everything is ending and 
all we can think is, This is 
the last time I'm going to 
Homecoming, a home 
football game. Spring 
Break.' We all knew it was 
going to end, but we can't 
help but be scared. Even 
though we're prepared, 
leaving behind all these 
incredible people will be 
hard. The only things we 
have left to depend on are 
the wonderful experiences 
we've shared over the last 
four years." 



Kelly Driscoll 

Arts & Sciences '02 




se n I 



,.f;j??3«'^<;wtiL 




[ Jessica Burkhart ] 




Alyson Dudkowski, Tom Breslin, Mikel Emery, Scott Foley 



Kim Hinds, Alyson 

Dudkowski, Megan 

Maloof, Evonne 

Maokhamphiou, Nicole 

Magdline, Holly 

Dietrich, Sarah Logue, 

Rosie Doherty 



Christina Ha\'erly, Jennifer Diaz, Danielle Frank, Lisa Perry 




252 Seniors 



Halloween, 2000 



Shane Hwenmpfner, Ben Slaughter, Duff Janus, Brandon Maitre, Kristi 

Rosenthal, Jess Lasher 

Jared 
McLaughlin, 
Pete 
Manderino, 

(^^^^^^^■^^^■B. ~ -'^^^K'\'^ ' T ^^^^^^^^^^^^^H Brandon 

Maitre, 
Jay 

Surabian, 
Duff 



A 



jgrniA 



^1.*,- 



Janus 



lonathan Blk 



ifl n r 



Julie Bott, Meghan Jenkins, Kristen Lebo 



Qass U 2082 



Seniors 253 







Catherine Murray, Michaela Crawley, Liz Mocarski, Erin Murray, and Tricia 
Finnerty 




Dave Slocum, Alison Lawlor, and Rob Chii 



Hanging out in the 
Mods 



254 Seniors 



Miles 
Delaney, 
onathan 
Buck, 
Shaun 
OTarrell, 
Pat 
Connell 




anie Ho, Katie Rascl\ke 
^drea Blaise, Lauren 
'allon, Stephanie 
•ladore, Stephanie 
filler 



Semors 253 



outstanding members of the class of 2002 



Senior Fie r s p ek: t i v e s 



Christopher Fagiani 

Taking his own motto to heart, Christopher Fagiani 
is one senior who has achieved a great many 
things at BC and tal<en many along for the ride. 
As a computer science major, Christopher has been 
doing research for three years on a computer system 
that allows severely disabled people to communicate 
using the computer. "If my research has any impact 
on the lives of the severely disabled or their families," 
said Christopher, "then that is what is rewarding for 
me." 

Christopher believes that BC has been a good 
match for him. He has won such honors as being 
named a Dean's Scholar, and being a member of Phi 
Beta Kappa, the National Society for Collegiate schol- 
ars and Golden Key. After leaving BC, Christopher 
plans to work for NBC as part of their two-year 
information technology program where he hopes to 
earn a full-time spot upon completion of the program. 
"BC has taught me that the best lessons aren't taught 
in the classroom," said Christopher. "It's the people 
you know that make things worthwhile." 




"Success is achieving as much as you can and taking as many people alone, 
with you for the ride. " 




Toni Mardirossim 

As the leader of the UGBC Women's Issues Coui 
cil, Toni Mardirossian has found that to be he 
most gratifying experience. "We raised $200 
to support the Battered Women's Council at oi 
Second Chances Benefit Concert," said Toni. "Thj 
was such an exciting night." 

As well as working on UGBC, Toni is passionat 
about social justice issues. "Both of my parent 
immigrated here and really believed in the America 
Dream," said Toni. "They thrived here in America an 
gave me so many opportunities. Coming to BC ha 
helped me to see that not everyone has those oppor 
tunities. There is a lot of inequality in our country an^ 
BC has reminded me of our obligation to give back.: 
In the future Toni wants to go to law school but fir; 
wants to be a part of a program like Teach for Americ 
for a couple years. Eventually she would like to wor 
in public interest law as a women's rights advocate c 
a civil rights attorney. "I love to talk to people am 
bring them out of their shell," said Toni. "I want t 
work with people no matter what I do." 



"Injustice anywhere is a threat to justice everywhere." 

~ Martin Luther King, jr. 



256 Senior Perspectives 




R 



Farah Bemier 

arah Bernier's long list of activities speaks about 
her caring nature. Though self-admittedly she 
has a tendency to take on too much, Farah puts 
00% into everything she does. She has been a RA for 
le past two years and is also involved in the Shaw 
?adership Program, the Martin Luther King Student 
ctivism Coalition, of which she is the founder, the 
?arbook at BC and the Marketing Academy. 

"I always knew that I wanted to go into business," 
iiid Farah. "BC's business program allowed me to get 
general overview while I decided what part of 
usiness I wanted to study." Next year Farah hopes to 
ave won the Fulbright Fellowship to study in an 
dvertising agency in France, but if that doesn't work 
ut she plans to stay in the Boston area to work. In the 
iture she would like to be teaching about diversity 
lanagement at a university. "Life is not a sprint, it's 
lore of a marathon," said Farah quoting Terry Withera II 
f the BC career center. "BC has taught me that even 
lough there is always something that needs to get 
jone, we need to remember to stop and think about 
he little things." 




"Everything comes in due time. Tal<e time to listen to tiie bells. 




Tim O'Donnell 



Being the director of operations for UGBC TV has 
taken up a large percentage of Tim O'Donnell's 
time at BC. "I feel like I am doing something 
important," said Tim. "I feel good about what I do 
because it affects the whole school." 

Although many know Tim because of his position 
with UGBC, everyone who knows him knows how he 
enjoys pulling the occasional prank on friends. "This 
year I decided to jokingly apply for MLP as a senior 
(only freshmen can apply) ," said Tim. "I showed up 
for the group interview in a pin stripe suit with a paisley 
shirt, pipe and attache case. I think the freshmen were 
very confused." 

On a more serious note, Tim is very proud of his 
efforts that resulted in the UGBC TV production Boogie 
Heights. Next year he plans to move to New York and 
make a "buttload" of money. He sees himself produc- 
ing a sitcom in the next ten years. 

His time at BC has taught Tim how to be a good, 
productive member of a community. "BC did a very 
good job of teaching me to be a member of the 
community not just in sen/ice but in all aspects of life," 
said Tim. 



"Success is i<nowing tinat winat you are doing is right and good and being 
happy with it. " 



Senior Perspectives 257 




"Each time a man stands up for an ideal, or acts to improve tine lot of others, or 

strikes out against injustice, he sends forth a tiny ripple of hope, and crossing each 

other from a million different centers of energy and daring, those ripples build a 

current which can sweep down the mightiest walls of oppression and resistance. " 
~ Robert F. Kennedy 



Mikaela Boyd 

s her second year as a director of the \& 
Leadership Program nears its end, Mikaela Be 
counts that experience as her most reward 
activity at BC. "I became director in my junior year c 
was lucl<y enough to have the opportunity to m. 
widespread changes to the program," said Mikad 
"The program has been reshaped and changed for 
better for the future." 

Although reshaping Jenks has been the most 
warding aspect of her activities at BC, Mikaela coui 
becoming the person she is as her great' 
accomplisment. "All the things that I have be 
invloved in have shaped me into who I am now," s 
Mikaela. The atmosphere at BC has helped her to 
this. "The amount of opportunities that BC offered 
undergraduates is the main reason I decided to co 
here," said Mikaela. "I wanted a smaller school tli 
had the amount of interest that BC takes in its s 
dents." 

While Mikaela is not sure about what her event 
career path will be, she know s that it will have a hun- 
side to it. She sees herself working for a non-pn 
organization sometime in the future. 



Sarah Bonner 

Sarah Bonner made the decision to come to BC to 
learn more about Catholicism and the Demo 
cratic point of view. "I basically wanted to try to 
understand view points that were different from the 
ones I had experienced growing up," said Sarah. 
Originally from Glen Mills, Pennsylvania, Sarah has 
worked hard at BC live up to the role models she 
adopted at an early age. "People like Susan B. Anthony 
and Elizabeth Cady Stanton who got the vote for 
women have been role models of mine," said Sarah. 
"They have helped me to believe that you can change 
reality to make it better." 

To help make her reality better, Sarah started a 
group called the Massachusetts Youth for Bush where 
she organized students to help work on George W. 
Bush's presidential campaign in New Hampshire for 
the primary. She also took a semester off from school 
in the Fall of 2000 to work as a staffer in the Delaware 
office of Bush's campaign. 

Despite her national efforts, Sarah has come to 
count her friendships as the most rewarding aspect of 
her life. "Having people who support you and encour- 
age you, give you meaning in life," said Sarah. "Shar- 
ing yourself with people and learning from them is 
what life is about." 




"Failure is impossible. " 

~ Susan B. Anthony 



258 Senior Perspectives 




Tom Sullivan 



Tom is the type of person that everybody loves. 
He is always looking out for other people and 
would do most anything for one of his friends. 
In the past four years he has been involved in the BC 
community, most notably through The )enks Leader- 
ship Program. 

He holds strong ties with his BC friends that will last 
well into the future. From Fitzpatrick to Vanderslice, 
to Wallingford to the Mods, together they have shared 
some of the most memorable experiences of their 
lives. He enjoyed living off campus his junior year and 
was able to spend the summer living and working in 
Boston with most of his friends. 

BC was very lucky to have Tom leave his hometown 
of Annapolis, Maryland and help to make BC a more 
caring and friendly environment. He is a leader on the 
BC campus and will take the skills he has developed 
here and put them to good use on the future. 



'The most wasted of all days is one without laughter. 



E.E. Cummings 



Lauren Miller 



When Lauren Miller decided to come to BC, 
the women's lacrosse team benefitted im 
mediately. Notonly did they gain who was 
to become one of the most valuable collegiate players, 
but also a strong leader off of the field. Her hard work 
and dedication to her team resulted in being nomi- 
nated as a co-captain this year. She is extremely 
committed to her teammates and makes sure that 
everyone is playing hard and having fun. 

Lauren never could have imagined the number 
amazing memories that she would gain at BC when 
she first left her hometown of Baltimore, Maryland. 
She shares many close friendships here including her 
teammates. When she's not on the field she's out in 
the city. She lives life to the fullest, taking advantage 
of every opportunity. 

Her four years at BC have given her a lifetime of 
memories including crazy weekends, nights at Mary 
Ann's, BC football games and trips to Notre Dame, 
accidentally being caught in the middle of fights, and 
of course, lacrosse. 




'Remember that true happiness is a way of travel- not a destination. " 

~ Roy M. Goodman 



Senior Perspectives 259 




"Hard work and dedication can tal<e you anywiiere. " 



Erin Mohan 



It's hard to catch Erin without a smile on her facii 
She is certainly one of the most hard-workinc 
dedicated students at BC. The way she manage t 
her time between Navy ROTC at Boston University, th \ 
Jenks Leadership Program, her nursing requirement 
and spending time with her friends is truly admirabli 
Erin is a native of Holbrook, MA and her decision t 
attend BC was certainly a good one. She has enjoye 
great success both inside and outside of the classroon 
She is especially honored to have worked at th 
campus school for her PULSE placement during hf 
sophomore year. It is there that she learned a lot aboL 
herself and her dedication to helping others. She is 
leader among her friends and the entire BC commi 
nity. 

Erin has grown into a beautiful young lady and a 
amazing person. After graduation she will join th 
Navy and work towards a masters degree. As sh 
continues into the future she will always have increc, 
ibie memories of her fellow nursing students, ROTT 
friends, and roommates. ..especially thefewcrazynighi 
when they were in the same place! 



Mike Reif 

Mike's experiences at BC have taken him all 
over the world. Hailing from St. Paul, 
Minnesota it did not take long for this Mid- 
westerner to jump into BC life. During his four years 
at BC he has dedicated a lot of time to volunteering 
through Appalachia and Ignacio Volunteers. He even 
spent a few weeks doing service in Europe through the 
Presidential Scholars Program. 

As if that were not enough, he has also been 
extremely active in UGBC. After having been exposed 
to it as a member of the Mentoring Leadership Pro- 
gram his freshman year, he then went on to become 
the Co-Director of Peer Advising and Chief of Aca- 
demic Affairs for the past two years. He has been a 
student representative on the Educational Policy Com- 
mittee, the Academic Advisory Council, as well as the 
Globalization and Inequalities Series planning com- 
mittee. 

What has shaped his success at BC has been his 
outstanding relationship with his professors, friends, 
Jesuits, and other student leaders. Certainly the skills, 
people, and knowledge that Mike acquired at BC will 
help him to continue the kind of success he has 
enjoyed here well into the future. 



260 Senior Perspectives 




'Character is who you are when no one else is watching. 





Liz Henry 



Never stop smiling and reaching for tine stars. 



As one of the friendliest faces on tiie BC campus, 
Liz has certainly helped others to enjoy their BC 
experiences as much as she enjoyed hers. From 
the moment that she arrived from Milwaukee, Wl she 
has overcome many challenges and achieved a great 
deal. In addition to being an academic leader, she has 
participated in the Mentoring Leadership Program, 
the Jenl<s Leadership Program, Appalachia Volunteers, 
and helped to reshape the Carroll School of Manage- 
ment Government. 

Liz's best memories are of the wonderful friendships 
she has acquired in the past four years. They have 
helped her to realize her strengths and to be proud of 
who she is. She has shared great moments with them 
dancing in the hallways, singing out loud through 
campus, traveling to Notre Dame her sophomore and 
junior year, working with a kids after school program 
through her PULSE placement, and spending an amaz- 
ing semester in Italy. 

Liz will certainly put her finance degree to good use. 
She will start her career at CNN in New York next year 
working in financial news. 



Meghan Jenkins 

From the moment that Meghan first visited Bos 
ton, she knew that it was where she wanted to be. 
Since she arrived here from Perry, Ohio she has 
Deen helping to make BC an even better place. As a 
:ouncil person for three years she has devoted quite a 
3it of her time to the 4Boston Volunteers. The pro- 
gram has been one of themost influential experiences 
Df her life, exposing her to poverty, substance abuse, 
and mental illness. In addition to volunteering weekly 
through 4Boston she has spent time on trips with the 
Appalachia Volunteers and Urban Immersion Pro- 
gram. Additionally Meghan was an RA for Duchesne 
Hall her junior year as well as a greeter and tour guide 
in the admissions office. 

What Meghan truly cherishes are the amazing 
friendships that she has made over the past four years. 
They are the heart of her memories here. Together 
they have shared so many wonderful experiences 
including: BC hockey games, theme parties, 21st 
birthdays, and the World Cup Soccer match. 

Meghan's optimism has been the key to her success 
at BC and hopes that it will contribute to her future 
success as well. Aftergraduation Meghan hopes to use 
the skills she has gained in CSOM to help reduce some 
of the inequality in our society. 




"Never get too cynical about the world. There is good, and there is love. 
While some people may call me naive, I call myself OPTIMISTIC and it's 
worked so far. " 

Senior Perspectives 261 




Jim Evans, Chris Murphy, Holly Dietrich, Jessica Cox, Megari Maloof, Rosemary Doherty 





Jonathan Buck and a Notre Dame police 
officer ■ 

if 




Brett Bannon, Keith Garrick, James Sheppard, Jared Treiber, Mike Papamichael, Ian 
Kimball, Kevin Sanginario 



Denise Bracken, Terri McGrath, Kristy 
Cahill, Liz Mocarski, Christine Cotter, 
Meghan Flaherty 




Sue Denihan, Jane Kuehne, Kim Cormors, Courtney Beer, Catherine McAleavey, Randy Tibbetts 

262 Seniors 




Kristin Orlovsky, Jenny Wilson, Mary Root, Erika Mikkis, I ,i/ 



k'lr 



Megan Maloof, Chris MurphN 





Nikki Reilly, Mollie Roan, 
Anna Geraty, Louis Sullivan 



Rosemar\- Doherty, Alyson 
Dudkovvski, Megan Maloof, Lindsey 
Hambleton, Evonne Maohkamphoiu, 
Patty Ritze, Nicole Magaline 




Seniors 263 




Kirsten Lebo, Meghan Jenkins, Theresa Clifford, Katie Basta, Hope Villella 
264 Seniors 




Matt Lang, Mark Tryder, Brian Doherty, Donny Payne, Brendan Coughlin, Eric Ryiin, JoIth 

3uckley Scott I oley 





^■I^^^^^^^^^^^^H^HHi 


" ■,'■ « ■..■ 


^W. I , - s » a iif « M ■j'j 


■' % '^ is (, . 






T L 





/'' 



30nya Roncevich, Anthony Duncan, Todd McGee 




Brittany Follmer, Rich Frank, Alyson Dudkowski 




Alyson Dudkowski, Kelly Millet, Meredith Millet, Ana Menezes, Meghan Robinson, Andrea Fox 



Seniors 265 




Ana Aboitiz Kathryn Abrahamsen Michael Abren Wilson Acevedo Andrea Achimovic 

School of Arts and Sciences School of Arts and Sciences School of Management School of Arts and Sdences School of Arts and Sciences 
Studio Art Env Ceo Science Finance Poll Science English 




Alexander Acree Peter Adams 

School of Arts and Sciences School of Arts and Sdences 
Psychology Psychology 



Cina Addonizio 
School of Education 
Human Development 



Thomas Adrian Camille Adsuar 

School of Management School of Arts and Sdences 
Information Systems Poli Science 



266 Seniors 




Kathryn Ahern Sun Ahn 

School of Arts and Sciences School of Arts and Sciences 



International Study 



English 



Courtney Alan 

School of Arts and Sciences 

Communication 



Raymond Albright 

School of Education 

Secondary Education 



Slandah Aldophe 

School of Arts and Sciences 

Communication 




Shannon Altman Claire Anderson Kimberly Anderson Lauren Anderson Mary Andrew 

School of Education School of Arts and Sciences School of Arts and Sciences School of Arts and Sciences School of Arts and Sciences 
Elementary Education Economics Communication History Economics 




Maria Ang Jesse Angeley Michael Angeline Katherine Anson Stacy Antonio 

School of Management School of Arts and Sciences School of Arts and Sciences School of Arts and Sciences School of Education 
English Poll Science Biology Psychology Human Development 




Tiffany Anzalone 

School of Arts and Sciences 

Communication 



Angela Apodaca 

School of Arts and Sdences 

Theater Arts 



Barbara Apostol 

School of Arts and Sciences 

Communication 



Dana Aprea Jonathan Aprile 

Sdnod of Arts and Sciences School of Management 
Communication Finance 



Seniors 267 




Peter Arcoma Kelly Arenson Maxi Arias Katharine Armstrong Ellen Arrigoni 

School of Managennent School of Arts and Sciences School of Management School of Arts and Sciences School of Arts and Sciences 

Accounting Philosophy Finance Biology Mathematics 




Julian Arthur Michael Arvikar Karim Aryeh Achanun Asavabhokin Lauren Ash 

School of Arts and Sciences School of Management School of Arts and Sciences School ofArts and Sciences School of Arts and Sciences 
Biology Accounting Economics Poll Science Art History 




James Atcheson loanna Athanasiadis Christine Atkinson Daniel Auerbach Noel Auguston 

School of Management School ofArts and Sciences School of Management School of Management School of Management . 

Marketing Biology Computer Science-Csom Finance Marketing 




Mian Azmy Elizabeth Babinski Jaime Baccarella Bhim Bachchan Stephen Bacon 

School of Management School of Education School of Management School ofArts and Sciences School of Management 
Finance Secondary Education Accounting Poll Science Marketing 



268 Seniors 




Yeo Bai Catherine Bailey Evan Bailey Kate Bailey Michelle Baird 

School of Education School of Arts and Sciences School ofArts and Sciences School of Arts and Sciences School of Management 
Elementary Education Communication Chemistry Theater Arts Accounting 




Agnes Bak Michael Baker Ryan Baker James Ball Erin Ballard 

School of Arts and Sciences School of Management School of Arts and Sciences Schoolof Arts and Sciences School ofArts and Sciences 
Chemistry Unclassified English Physics English 




Paul Ballas Marya Bandola 

School of Management School ofArts and Sciences 
Information Systems English 




Michael Bane Brett Bannon 

School of Management School of Arts and Sdences 
Economics-Som Economics 




Seniors 269 




«sc~ 



Christopher Barbier Maricela Barbosa James Barch Alexander Bardzik John Barker 

School of Management School of Arts and Sciences Sdiool of Arts and Sciences School ofArts and Sciences School of Managemen 
Finance Art History English International Study Marketing 




Lisa Baroletti Noah Barrett Reagan Barrett Sean Barrett Katrina Barrios 

School of Education School ofArts and Sciences School of Management School ofArts and Sciences School of Management)|! 
Elementary Education Economics Marketing Economics Marketing 





Bradford Barron Kyle Barron Caitlin Barry Kristin Barry Michelle Barsa 

School of Arts and Sdences School of Management School of Management School of Management School of Management 

Biology Information Systems Finance Marketing Finance 



i^ 


m 


IA-" 


m 


Ev iin 


^^^gd 




Lauren Barsanti David Bartholomew Anna Bartolini-Barboza Julie Barton Aaron Barulich 

School of Arts and Sciences School of Arts and Sciences School ofArts and Sciences School of Arts and Sdences School of Management 
History Psychology Poll Science English Operations/Strategic 



270 Seniors 



Marybeth Baselice 

School of Education 

Communication 



IVIary-Beth Baseliu 

School of Education 

Communication 



Robin Baskerville Gregory Basso 

School of Arts and Sciences School of Management 
English Information Systems 



Kathryn Basta 

School of Management 

Human Resources 

Management 




Brad Bateman 

School of Arts and Sciences 

History 



Katherine Battle 
School of Education 
Secondary Education 



Anne Batz 

School of Arts and Sciences 

English 



David Baxter 

School of Arts and Sciences 

Communication 



Keri Bayly 

School of Arts and Sciences 

Sociology 




Christopher Bean Danielle Beare John Beary Raymond Beattie Amanda Beaudette 

School of Management School of Management School of Management School of Arts and Sdences School ofArts and Sciences 
Accounting Finance Finance Communication Communication 




Joseph Beaulieu Kristin Beckman Tracy Beddeos Adam Bedel Nicole Bednarski 

School of Management School ofArts and Sciences School of Management School ofArts and Sdences School ofArts and Sdences 

Accounting Poll Science Accounting Psychology Poll Science 



Seniors 271 




Denise Braclhen, 


Jen 


Russo, Kristy Cahill, Terri McGrath 


f^ 


k 


r-^lft ^ 


ri 


L 




Jw'il 


[i 


^^^ ^B SMii^SyH^ 


^^\Ji 


m 


^^^,_,^^^ I,.m»m^ ^^^B^^H 



Catherine McAleavey, Katherine Hickey 



m^m 



Dan Portnovf, Pat Mooney, Joe Salerno, Paul Fadakar, Bob Martin, Dave VanSon, Steve Pagano 

272 Seniors 




ary Root, Erika Miklus, Liz Herr, Kristin Orlausky, Gretchen I^fizenmayer, Molly 
Linford, Yvonne Podzikaski, Ashley Brown, Christine Cotter 



Kate Warren, Janie Ho 








^ 



Jenn Diaz, Selam Kiflom, Farah 
Bernier 



Mollie Roan, TLni Ruhfus, Kathy 
Tucker, Nikki Reilley, Caz Tracy, 
Anna Geraty 



lass df 2002 



Seniors 273 




Christina 1 landnomihalii, Kohemai y Doherty, Jessica Cox, Kristen Spellain, Megan 
Maloof, Jill Geismar 




Dan Moran, Wes George, Sonya Roncerick, Justin Incardone, Ronan Kennedy, Casey 
Stanley 




Erin McNomara, Kristen Mongel 




Steve Marini, Kate Higgins, Corie Davino, Tom Aduah, Andrew Nelson 
274 Seniors 




'legan Maloof, Rosemary Doherty, Evonne Maokhamphiou, Lindsey Hambleton 




viollie Roan, Louisa Sullivan, Nicki Reilly 



Liz Herr, Erika Miklus, Annie Joel 




Colin Kennedy, Shaun 
OTarrell, Omar Kazimi, 
Chris Murphy, Chris 
Shneider, Jonathan Buck, 
Alejandro Cortes, Pat 
Kane, Tom Villaro 



Seniors 275 




Courtney Beer Anna Befort Bridget Begley Anthony Beirne Jr Lisa Belden 

School of Arts and Sciences School of Arts and Sciences School of Management School of Arts and Sciences School of Arts and Science 
Communication Communication Computer Science-Csom Mathematics English 




Adria Bell Jessica Bella Michael Bellezza Daniel Bellino Amanada Belt 

School ofArts and Sciences School of Education School of Arts and Sciences School of Arts and Sciences School of Education 
English Human Development International Study Communication Human Developmen! 




Mary Bench 

School of Management 

Marketing 



Amanda Benevides Latanya Bennett Laura Benson Kenneth Bereski 

School of Nursing School of Management School ofArts and Sciences School ofArts and Sciences 
Nursing Marketing Biochemistry Philosophy 




Amanda Berger Bria Berger Lynn Berman Farah Bernier Roy Beverage 

School ofArts and Sdences School of Arts and Sciences School of Arts and Sciences School of Management School of Management 
Communication Mathematics Communication Marketing Operations/Strategic Mg ml 



276 Seniors 




I^wtaii 



Matthew Bianchetto Benjamin Biddle Erin Biddle 

iSchool of Management School of Arts and Sciences School of Arts and Sciences 
Accounting Hispanic Study Psychology 



Laura Biello 
School of Education 
Secondary Education 



Meghan Bissett 

School of Arts and Sciences 

Biology 




«---il^ 



Martin Black 
jchool of Arts and Sciences 
' Chemistry 



Andrea Blais 

School of Nursing 

Nursing 



Jacqueline Blais Christopher Blanchard Jeanette Blanco 

School of Arts and Sciences School of Arts and Sciences School of Arts and Sciences 
Env Geo Science Poli Science Psychology 




Jeffrey Boardman 
School of Arts and Sciences School of Arts and Sciences 
Theater Arts History 



Seniors 277 





Caroline Boggs 

School of Nursing 

Nursing 



Morgane Boissel 

School of Arts and Science 

Psychology 




Kara Bolesky Andrew Bombardier 

School of Arts and Sciences School of Arts and Sdences 
English Env. Ceo Science 




Nicholas Bonamo Katherine Bonanno Christine Bonavita Bryan Bonk Sarah Bonner 

School of Management School ofArts and Sciences School of Education School ofArts and Sciences School of Arts and Sciences 
Finance Psychology Elementary Education Economics History 




Kristin Booher Valerie Boosalis Robert Boova Jillian Bordeaux Elizabeth Borge 

School of Arts and Sciences School of Arts and Sciences School of Management School of Management School ofArts and Sciences 
Communication Psychology Finance Economics 



278 Seniors 



Robert Borges Carolyn Borkowski Kathrine Borowiecki Kristen Borsari Monica Bortolussi 

ichool of Management School of Education School of Management School of Education School of Arts and Sciences 
Finance Elementary Education Accounting Human Development Communication 




Lauren Bosco Julia Bott Joseph Bottani Michael Bouche Cecilia Boudreau 

ichool ofArts and Sciences School of Arts and Sciences School of Arts and Sciences School of Management School of Arts and Sciences 
Poli Science English English Marketing Poll Science 




Nicole Boudreau " Matthew Bouffard Ann Bower Kerrin Bowers Ellen Bowman 

ichool ofArts and Sciences School ofArts and Sciences School of Education School of Arts and Sciences School of Management 
English Physics Elementary Education Economics Marketing 




Maureen Bowman Mikaela Boyd Emily Boyle Denise Bracken Catherine Bracy 

School of Arts and Sciences School of Arts and Sciences School of Arts and Sciences School of Arts and Sciences School of Arts and Sdences 
Biology Sociology Communication English Communication 



Seniors 279 




Spruille Braden Maryanne Bradford Brendan Brady Joseph Brandt-Hammar Kathryn Brazier 

School of Arts and Sciences School of Arts and Sciences School of Management School of Arts and Sciences School ofArts and Science! 
Computer Science-A&S Communication Information Systems English Theater Arts 




Norah Breen 

School of Education 

Early Childhood 



Michael Brennan Timothy Brennan Erin Brenner Thomas Breslin 

School of Arts and Sciences School of Management School of Arts and Sciences School ofArts and Science^ 
Studio Art Finance English Poll Science 




Erin Brie 

School ofArts and Sciences 

English 



Brian Brickley 
School of Arts and Sciences 
Computer Science-A&S 



James Bride 

School ofArts and Sciences 

Geophysics 



Alexis Broder 

School of Education 

Elementary Education 



Jeffrey Brooks 

School ofArts and Science^j 

Biology 




Angela Brosnan 

School of Nursing 

Nursing 



Andrew Brown Ashley Brown 

School ofArts and Sciences School of Management 
Economics Accounting 



Michele Brown 

School of Arts and Sdences 

Communication 



Stephanie Brown 

School ofArts and Science^ 

Communication 



280 Seniors 



Colleen Browne 
School of Education 
Secondary Education 



Jonathan Buck 

School of Management 

Marketing 



Meghan Buckley Sean Buckley 

School of Management School of Arts and Sciences 
Marketing Classics 



Derek Buckowsky 

School of Management 

Finance 




Anna Buffone 

School of Arts and Sciences 

Communication 



Katherine Bundra 

School of Education 

Human Development 



Lauren Burgoyne 

School of Arts and Sciences 

Psychology 



Heather Burke 

School of Arts and Sciences 

Communication 



Jamal Burke 

School of Arts and Sciences 

Communication 




Jordan Burke 

School of Arts and Sciences 

Poll Science 



Kevin Burke 

School of Arts and Sciences 

English 



Leah Burke 

School of Arts and Sciences 

Biochemistry 



Mary Burke 

School of Education 

Human Development 



Timothy Burke 

School of Arts and Sciences 

English 




Elisabeth Burns 

School of Arts and Sciences 

Communication 



Laura Burns 

School of Arts and Sciences 

History 



Keith Bush 

School of Arts and Sciences 

Biology 



Jamie Buskey 

School of Education 

Early Childhood 



Caroline Bussey 

School of Art5 and Sciences 

Communication 



Seniors 281 




Jenny Walsh, Katie Malone, Nikki Reilly, Caroline Tracy, Molly Ounford, Katie Joyce, Lindsay Prendergast, Chrissy DelDuque 

282 Seniors 




m Connors, Catherine McAleavey, Sue Denihan, Danielle Stapleton Emily Eiben, Jessica Orsina, Chrissy Demichele, Rachel Telia 




Seniors 283 




Hanna Mak, Brian Jones, Tarah Olsen, Rosemary Maffei, Eva Wallman, Ben Steinbuhler Julian Rocco, Brittany Follmer, Scott Foley 




Erica Graf, Tricia Finnerty, Liz Mocarshi, Kelly Arehjan, Michaela Crowley, Erin Murrray, Dan IVloran, Catherine Murray 

284 Seniors 




nathan Buck, Kyle Barron 



Meghan Silhan, Claire Anderson, Jessies Orsina, Ellie Bowman, 
Emily Eiben 




Deceiis Escano, Kimberly Paul, Krystal Mims, Myisha Roach 



Jessica Sullivan, Mary Wightman, Kerrin Bowers, Anne Batz, Mary 
Reynolds, Kristen Sinocore, Erin Lairq 

Seniors 285 




Natalie Byrdsong James Byrne Michael Caban Andrew Cadotte John Cagney 

School of Arts and Sciences School of Arts and Sciences School of Arts and Sciences School of Arts and Sciences School of Arts and Sciences; 
Communication Psychology Biochemistry Philosophy Philosophy 



ai 




Michael Cahalane 

School of Arts and Sciences 

Poli Science 



Allison Cahill 

School of Arts and Sciences 

Biology 



Kristine Cahill 

School of Arts and Sciences 

Psychology 



William Cahill 
School of Arts and Sciences 
Computer Science-A&S 



Laura Callahan 

School of Arts and Sciences 

Psychology 



286 Seniors 



Megan Callahan 
ichool of Education 
lementary Education 



Matthew Calner 

School of Management 

Economics-Csom 



Melissa Calvo 

School of Arts and Sciences 

French 



Christopher Cambron 

School of Arts and Sciences 

Sociology 



Brian Campbell 

School of Arts and Sciences 
Philosophy 







Jocelyne Campese Maria Campo Jorge Canellas Bernard Caniff Joyce Cannata 

jchool of Arts and Sciences School of Arts and Sciences School of Management School of Management School of Arts and Sciences 
' Sociology English Accounting Finance Communication 




Carlos Canto Joseph Capalbo Nicole Capellupo David Capozza Matthew Capozzi 

chool of Arts and Sciences School of Management School of Management School of Education School of Arts and Sdences 

History Information Systems Finance Secondary Education Psychology 




Michael Capozzi 

School of Arts and Sciences 

English 



Elizabeth Cappelluti 

School of Education 

Human Development 



Moria Cappio 

School of Education 

Elementary/Moderate 

Special Needs 



Kaitlin Carey 

School of Arts and Sdences 

English 



Kristin Carey 

School of Nursing 

Nursing 



Seniors 287 




Jeffrey Carman Suzanne Carrazza Tara Carrino Kelly Carruthers 

School of Management School ofArts and Sciences School of Education School of Education 
Accounting Communication Human Development Human Development 



Jean Carson 
School of Education 
Elementary Educatio 




Melissa Carubia Emily Carver Kristin Cary Catherine Casemyr Lisa Cashel 

School of Arts and Sciences School ofArts and Sciences School of Management School of Management School of Arts and Science 
Physics Communication Marketing Finance Env. Ceo Science 




Alison Caso Janelle Casper Jonathan Castillo Meredith Cataldo Jana Cerullo 

School of Management School ofArts and Sciences School of Arts and Sciences School of Arts and Sciences School ofArts and Science 
Economics-Csom Psychology Psychology Communication Biochemistry 




K. Rachel Chacko Anthony Chalifoux Carol Chan Edmund Chaney Esther Chang 

School of Arts and Sciences School of Arts and Sciences School of Management School of Management School ofArts and Science 
Psychology Physics Marketing Marketing Poll Science 



288 Seniors 





Ivan Chang Kristen Chang Courtney Chapman Emily Chapp Kate Charlebois 

.(hoolofArts and Sciences School of Arts and School of Arts and Sciences School of Arts and Sciences School of Arts and Sciences 
j Communication Sciences Psychology Communication Geophysics Psychology 




Brooke Chase Erin Chase Vikram Chellaram Erika Chen Stephanie Chen 

phool of Management School of Education School of Management School of Arts and Sciences School of Arts and Sciences 
General Mgmt Secondary Education Finance English Economics 




Alexander Cheney Sabian Cheong 

chool of Arts and Sciences School of Management 
Sociology Marketing 





Cynthie Cheung James Cheung 

school of Management School of Arts and Sciences 
Marketing Communication 



^f.^ 




Seniors 289 




^tM^M^^k 




Paul Cheung Robert Chi Keith Chiang Amy Chiaverini John Chiesa 

School of Arts and Sciences School of Management School of Management School of Arts and Sciences School of Managemei 
Computer Science-A&S Information Systems Marketing Poll Science Marketing 




Sarah Chimini Kelli Ching Tracy Chiou Emily Cho Sally Choi 

School of Education School of Arts and Sciences School of Education School ofArts and Sciences School of Managemer 
Elementary Education Economics Elementary Education International Study Finance 





Emelene Chu Kathy Chu Lisa Ciabattoni Erica Ciarlo Julie Ciollo 

School of Management School ofArts and Sciences School ofArts and Sciences School ofArts and Sciences School ofArts and Science., 
Marketing Computer Science-A&S Psychology Communication English 




Megan Clark Melissa Clark Daniel Clary Patrick Clavin Christopher Cleary 

School of Management School of Arts and Sciences School of Arts and Sciences School of Management School of Arts and Science |] 
General Mgmt Poll Science Linguistics Finance Communication 



290 Seniors 



Patrick Cleary 

School of Arts and 

Sciences History 




Thomas Clements 

School of Arts and Sciences 

Communication 



Caitlin Clifford 

School of Education 

Human Development 



Theresa Clifford 

School of Arts and Sdences 

English 



Stacey Cloninger 

School of Arts and Sciences 

English 




Ellen Coats 

chool of Arts and Sciences 

Psychology 



Courtney Cocopardo 

School of Arts and Sciences 

Sociology 



Mary Coddaire 

School of Nursing 

Nursing 



Andrew Codispoti Danielle Coffin 

School of Management School of Arts and Sciences 
Finance Communication 




Eric Coghlin Thatiana Coimbra Beth Colalella Brian Cole Bj Coleman 

school of Management School of Management School of Arts and Sciences School of Management School of Arts and Sciences 
Finance Economics-Som English Economics-Som Communication 




Cailin Coleman 

School of Nursing 

Nursing 



Erin Coleman Michael Colgan Mark Collins Paul Collins 

School of Arts and Sciences School of Management School of Management School of Arts and Sciences 
Hispanic Study Information Systems Marketing Communication 



Seniors 291 




Amy Vautour, Karin Wissmann, Katie O'Brien, Christine Bonamia, Michaela Boyd, 
Lauren Crocco, Megan Zito, Melissa Senz, Katie Garvey 




^, 




John O'Rourke, Mike Jeralt 



Chris Murphy, Pat Connell, Kevin McSherry, Megan Maloof, Rosemary Doerty, Terri McCrath, Denise Bracken, Erica Graf, Kristy Cahill, 

Holly Dietrich, Evonne Maokhamphiou, Christina Hondromihalis Michaela Crowley, Tricia Finnerty 




Kaitlin Carey, Lindsay Prendergast, Nicki Reilly, Kathy Tucker, Kim Haydon, Louisa Sullivan, Mollie Roan, Caroline Tracy, Tini Rufhus 

292 Seniors 




ara Osborne, Dana Aprea, Kaitlin Rose, Mary Beth Gallagher, Kristin Henny, 
hris Frey, Kate Boron, Stephanie Fellingham, Kate Halloran, Seth Pil<en, 
lathaniel Gori, Carlos Canto, Pat Scora, Paul Hogan 



Sonya Roncevich, Katie Skeffington, Anne Sargeant, 
Melissa Irgens 





Ashley Brown, Megan 
Flynn, Karleen Greene, 
Kristin Lary, Kim 
Donohue, Bridgett 
Seimone, Erin McNamara, 
Jenna Nobles, Kristen 
Minger, Kate Northrop, 
Sarah Debbink, Virginia 
Martinez 



Amy Hesselschwerdt, 
Kolleen Skoney, Angela 
Yingling, Joanna Mclnnis 



Seniors 293 




Brittany Follmer, Scott Foley, Jason Rae, Neil Flynn, Mikel Emery 



Kaitlin Rose, Melissa Kupferberg 




Courtney Anderson, Katie Garvey, Lauren Crocco, Christine Bonavita, Karin Wissmann, Katie O'Brien 

294 Seniors 




3rittany Follmer, Ana Menezes, Eric Coughlin, Scott Kilpatrick, Neil Flynn 



Seniors 295 




Ryan Collins Aimee Comeau Kevin Comprelli Alvin Concepcion Kaitlin Conley 

School of Management School of Arts and Sciences School of Management School of Arts and Sciences School of Education 
Finance Env Ceo Science Finance Biology Elementary Education 





^A hiM 



Michael Connaway Kelly Connell Patrick Connell Terence Connell Oria Connolly 

School of Management School of Education School of Management School ofArts and Sciences School of Management 
Finance Human Development Finance Sociology Accounting 




Jennifer Connor Kimberly Connors Erin Conroy Vanessa Conte Nicole Conway 

School ofArts and Sciences School ofArts and Sciences School of Management School of Education School of Education 
Communication History Finance Elementary Education Elementary Education 




Patrick Conway Abigail Cook Susan Cook Lilianne Cooper 

School of Arts and Sciences School of Arts and Sciences School of Arts and Sciences School of Nursing 
English English English Nursing 



Paul Coppola 

School of Arts and Sciences 

History 



296 Seniors 



Kristin Corapi Lauren Corazzini Christine Cordek Vincent Cordero Timothy Corsi 

chool of Arts and Sciences School of Arts and Sciences School of Arts and Sciences School of Arts and Sciences School of Arts and Sciences 

Psychology English English Biology Poll Science 




Alejandro Cortes Jennifer Costello Timothy Costello Jessica Cote Sarah Cote 

:hool of Arts and Sciences School of Arts and Sciences School of Arts and Sciences School of Arts and Sciences School of Arts and Sciences 
History Psychology History Communication English 




Nicole Cotroneo " Christine Cotter 
chool of Arts and Sciences School of Arts and Sciences 
English Communication 




ri/i ^^k ^ li 



John Cotter John Cottone 

chool of Management School of Management 
Economics-Som Information Systems 




Seniors 297 





Michael Coughlan Wayne Coury 

Schcxjl of Arts and Sciences School of Management 
Communication Finance 




Mark Covelle Anna Coward 

School of Education School of Arts and Sciences 
Secondary Education Theater Arts 




Jessica Cox Victoria Cozzi Mildred Crisostomo Lauren Crocco Christopher Crocetti 

School of Education School of Management School of Arts and Sciences School ofArts and Sciences School of Arts and Sciences 

Elementary/Moderate Finance Communication Biology Theater Arts 
Special Needs 




James Croke Daniel Cronin Lauren Cronin Brian Crowley Meghan Crowley 

School ofArts and Sciences School ofArts and Sciences School of Education School of Arts and Sciences School of Education 
Economics Communication Child In Society Economics Human Development 



298 Seniors 



Michaela Crowley 

School of Education 

Elementary Education 



Jennie Croyle 

School of Arts and Sciences 

Biology 



Patricia Cucci 

School of Arts and Sciences 

Psychology 



Carolina Cruz 

School of Arts and Sciences 

Communication 



Michael Cruz 

School of Arts and Sciences 

Philosophy 



Emily Cucchiarella 

School of Management 

Finance 




Amy Culver 

School of Arts and Sciences 

Poll Science 



Kerri Cummings 

School of Arts and Sdences 

Biology 



Justin Cuniff 

School of Arts and Sciences 

Communication 



Meghan Cunniff 

School of Education 

Elementary Education 




Owen Cunningham 

School of Arts and Sciences 

English 



Jason Cuomo 

School of Arts and Sciences 

Psychology 



Edward Curd 

School of Management 

Finance 



Benjamin Curelli 

School of Arts and Sciences 

Psychology 



John Curnutte 

School of Arts and Sdences 

History 




Mary Curtin 

School of Nursing 

Operations/Strategic 

Management 



Patrick Curtin 

School of Management 

Nursing 



Amy Cusano 

School of Nursing 

Nursing 



Joseph Cutrone 

School of Arts and Sdences 

Mathematics 



Sarah Dailey 

School of Management 

Marketing 



Seniors 299 




Nikolay Dakov 
School of Arts and Sciences 
Computer Science-A&S 



Suzanne Dalby 

School of Nursing 

Nursing 



Diandra D'Ambrosio Daniel Dammrich Shelagh Danaher 

School of Education School ofArts and Sciences School of Education 
Human Development English Human Development 




Kim Dang Abbie Daniel Meghan Daniels Claire Darby Kristen Darci 

School of Arts and Sciences School of Arts and Sciences School of Arts and Sciences School ofArts and Sciences School of Managemen 
Classics Communication English Theater Arts Finance 




Eamon Daul Corie Davino Adam Davis Ashana Davis Brian Davis 

School of Arts and Sciences School of Management School of Management School of Arts and Sciences School of Management 
Biology Finance Finance History Information Systems 




Patricia Davis Shirmah Davis Timothy Davis Adriana Deamicis Christopher Deangeli: 

School of Arts and Sciences School of Arts and Sciences School of Arts and Sciences School of Arts and Sciences School of Arts and Science 
Psychology Psychology Music Biology Communication 



300 Seniors 



Brian Decaro Andrea Decataldo Craig Dececchis Mark Defrancesco Yukiko Degaetano 

School of Arts and Sciences School of Arts and Sciences School of Management School of Arts and Sciences School of Arts and Sciences 
English Theater Arts Marketing History Biology 




Lisa De Gennaro Michael De Jesus Brian Delaney Jeffrey Delaney Miles Delaney 

School of Management School of Management School of Management School of Management School of Arts and Sciences 
Marketing Finance Accounting Accounting Economics 




Timothy Delaney Kristen Delduca 

School of Management School of Management 
General Mgmt Marketing 



Candice Del Rio 

School of Education 

Communication 



Michael Delucco 

School of Arts and Sciences 

Mathematics 



Christina Demichele 

School of Arts and Sdences 

Communication 




Claire Dennison 

School of Education 

Elementary Education 



Casey Depalma 

School of Management 

Marketing 



Matt De Pasquale 

School of Arts and Sdences 

Biology 



Jose Depina 

School of Arts and Sdences 

Poli Science 



Justin Derose 

School of Arts and Sdences 

English 



Seniors 301 




I 




Julie Barton, Tim Davis, Siobhan McGarry, John Thomas 




Mollie Roan, Lindsay Prendergast, Kathy Tucker 



Rosemary Maffei, Sarah DesRoches, Cina Dinan, Robin Leane 




Katie Higgins, Carolyn Feenaghty, Robin Wheeler, Kerry Halgin, Michelle Lynch, Sarah Dailey 

302 Seniors 




( 



i 



^ 



fF\ 



Katie O'Brien, Karin Wissmann, Mikaela Boyd, Shaun O'Farrell, Lauren Crocco, Pat Connel 




Seniors 303 




Caroline Tracy, Kathy Tucker, Mollie Roan, Anna Geraty, Nicki Reilly, Kim Haydon 



Julie Barton, John Thomas 




Sarah Logue, Alyson Dudkowski, Nicole Magaline, Evonne Maokhamphiou, Rosemary Doherty 

304 Seniors 




arin Wissmann, Amy Vautour, Chris Bonavita, Katie O'Brien 



Alyson Dudkowsl<i, Brittany Follmer, Mil<el 
Emery 




exander 



tich Frank, Scott K ilpatrick 



Seniors 305 





Jennifer Derrah 

School of Nursing 

Nursing 



Melinda Desanctis 

School of Management 

Finance 




Susan Deschenes Michael Desilets 

School of Education School of Arts and Sciences 
Human Development English 




Julie De Simone Gregory Desista 

School of Arts and Sciences School of Arts and Sciences 

Psychology Economics 



Sarah Desroches 

School of Nursing 

Nursing 



Joseph Dethlefs Catherine Devaney 

School of Arts and Sciences School of Education 
History Elementary Education 




Adam Devito Robert Devlin Mark Devoto Bertha Diaz Jennifer Diaz 

School of Arts and Sciences School of Arts and Sciences School of Arts and Sciences School of Arts and Sdences School of Arts and Sdences 

Economics Mathematics History Poll Science Sociology 



306 Seniors 



Jennifer Diaz Melissa Dibbs Joseph Di Bello Holly Dietrich Michael Di Marzio 

chool of Arts and Sciences School of Management School of Arts and Sdences School of Management School of Arts and Sciences 
Biology Finance Sociology Finance Biochemistry 




Gina Dinan 
School of Education 
Human Development 



Noelle Diorio 

School of Arts and Sdences 

English 



Allen Dippel 

School of Management 

General Mgmt 



Peter Disch 

School of Management 

Finance 



Sarah Disotto 

School of Management 

Finance 




Lisa Jean Divincenzo 

ichool of Arts and Sciences 

Economics 



Erin Djerf 

School of Arts and Sciences 

English 



Leah Dobbins 

School of Arts and Sciences 

Economics 



Julie Doherty 

School of Nursing 

Nursing 



Rosemary Doherty 

School of Arts and Sdences 

Psychology 





^m^i'M^Lk 




Bryan Dominguez 

School of Arts and Sdences 

Communication 



Brian Donato 

School of Education 

Elementary Education 



Hugh Donnelly Anthony Donofrio Jeffrey Donofrio 

School of Management School of Arts and Sdences School of Management 

Finance Biology Finance 



Seniors 307 



Julie D'Onofrio 

School of Management 

Information Systems 



Kelly Donohue 

School of Arts and Sciences 

Art History 



Kimberly Donohue 

School of Arts and Sciences 

Biology 



Evan Dooher 

School of Management 

Accounting 



Katie Doran 

School of Arts and Sciencesi 

Communication 




John Dorney 

School of Management 

Finance 



Lisa Doten Joseph Dougherty 

School of Management School of Arts and Sciences 
Marketing Economics 



Raya Doyle 

School of Arts and Sciences 

Psychology 



Sarah Dreyer 

School of Management 

Accounting 




Kelly Driscoll 

School of Arts and Sciences 

Economics 



Eric Drouin 
School of Arts and Sciences 
Computer Science-A&S 



Timothy Dube 

School of Arts and Sciences 

Poll Science 



Jeremy Dubois 

School of Management 

Marketing 



Dafney Dubuisson 

School of Arts and Sciences!' 

Psychology 




Herve Duchemin 
School of Arts and Sciences 
Computer Science-A&S 



Jennifer Ducie 

School of Arts and Sciences 

Biology 



Jessica Duckett 

School of Arts and Sciences 

English 



Alyson Dudkowski 

School of Arts and Sciences 

Psychology 



John Dulay 

School of Management 

Marketing 



308 Seniors 



Matthew Dunbar 
hool of Management 
Marketing 



Anthony Duncan 

School of Arts and Sciences 

Poll Science 



Kimberly Dunfey 

School of Arts and Sciences 

English 



Molly Dunford 

School of Arts and Sciences 

Communication 



Coleen Dunkiey 

School of Management 

Computer Science-Csom 




Rachel Dunleavy 
hool of Arts and Sciences 
English 



Michael Dunn 

School of Arts and Sciences 

English 



Bonnie Dunne 

School of Arts and Sciences 

Psychology 



Christopher Durand Brian Durkin 

School of Arts and Sciences School of Arts and Sciences 
Computer Science-A&S History 




Gretchen Earle 
hool of Arts and Sciences 
Psychology 



Kristine Eco 

School of Arts and Sciences 

English 




Allison Eddy 
School of Education 
luman Development 



Stephen Edwards 

School of Arts and Sciences 

Physics 




Seniors 309 




Nicholas Egirous Vasco Eguia Emily Eiben Laura Eliasof Meghan Elliott 

School of Management School ofArts and Sciences School of Arts and Sciences School of Management School of Education 
Marketing Philosophy Art History Finance Math/Comp Science 



k 




Ryan Ellis Melissa Ely Mikel Emery Monica Encina Daniel Eng 

School ofArts and Sciences School of Education School ofArts and Sciences School ofArts and Sciences School of Arts and Science 
Communication Elementary Education English Sociology Communication 




Elizabeth Engelhardt Alina Enggist Anna Entemann 

School ofArts and Sciences School ofArts and Sciences School of Nursing 
Communication Philosophy Nursing 



Ryan Erbeck Diecelis Escano 

School of Arts and Sciences School of Arts and Sciencs 
Biology Poll Science 





Jessica Euler 

School of Nursing 

Psychology 



ilMimtiiliiiiMeiiii 

James Evans Patrick Fabics Mark Fabrizio Paul Fadakar > 

School of Arts and Sciences School of Arts and Sciences School ofArts and Sciences School of Arts and Scienc : voIq 

English Psychology Computer Science-A&S Economics 



310 Seniors 



i 




Janel Fadrigo Christopher Fagiani Kevin Faherty Elizabeth Faletra Elsa Fall<enburger 

'school ofArts and Sciences School of Arts and Sciences School of Managennent School of Arts and Sciences School of Arts and Sciences 
Chemistry Computer Science-A&S Economics-Csom Communication Economics 




Geoffrey Fallon Lauren Fallon Timothy Fallon Ryan Fandetti William Fanning 

jichool of Management School of Management School of Management School of Arts and Sciences School of Management 
I Marketing Marketing Marketing English Finance 




Gustavo Fano ' Sanya Fanous Jonathan Farina Megan Fedorenchik Kathryn Feeney 

chool of Management School of Arts and Sciences School of Management School of Education School of Arts and Sciences 
Finance Psychology Finance Human Development Theater Arts 




Margaret Felice Anna Feliciano 

:hool of Arts and Sciences School of Arts and Sdences 
Music Psychology 



Adam Felzani 

School of Education 

Human Development 



Timothy Fenningham Christal Fenton 

School of Arts and Sciences School of Arts and Sdences 
English Psychology 



Seniors 311 




Steve Beverage, Becca Tehrani, Alison Caso, Angela Brosnan, Chris Lillemoe 






^1 




^1 








P 




1 


i 9 






K 


■^f yi^t; 


■■■' 








■ ^ 


'^i^mH'' 


^ 






I^^^^HIIBbsi 


H'X. 




)^ 


m*^ ' 




ViP:' 4f> fj3 


^b^ 


.^K Iri 


^ 


J^ • 




^■k V .^m 


Hp' 




7' 








mt 


r 






\ 


AfH^ 


3 




f 








1 il 


l^jjl^p ;>|f*^":| 


f^ 


'"^''^^---\r 




i 


t 


1 jt 1 


l_ 


^.^ :^ ¥ 


% 




..itr^ - T 



Ashley Brov\/n, Kristi Rosenthal, Sonya Roncevich, Michael Kopech 
Mary Fitterer 



Maura McLoud, Corey Viafore, Lauren Ziobro, Kristin Henny, 
Norah Breen, KaitlinRose, Mary Beth Gallagher, Sara Osborne, 

Dana Aprea, Melissa Kupferberg 




Rachael Telia, Chrissie DeMichele, Mii<e Marrett, John Foster-Moore, 
essica Orsina 




Ryan Vandetti, John Perizzi, Justin Incardore, Ronin Kennedy 

312 Seniors 




Slandah Aldophe, Farah Scott Foley, Raya Doyle, 
Bernier Brittany Follmer, Mikel Emery, 

Janelie Casper, Neil Flynn 



lass 6f 2002 



Seniors 313 




Martha Plante, Sarah DesRoches, Hanna Mak 




Katie Garvey, John O'Rourke, Katie O'Brien, Mike Jeroult, Laureen Crocco 







anie Ho, Stephanie Madore, Katie Raschke, Andrea Blais, 
Stephanie Miller 




Will Gage, Michelle Marling, Dave St. Jean, Andrew Nelson, Rob Gall, Ryan, Colin 

314 Seniors 




vlatt Kelly, Sara Osborne, Seth Piken, Anthony, Dana Aprea, Lorie Davino, Sarah Dailey, Katie Higgins 

slathaniel Cori, Kristin Henny, Mary Beth Gallagher, Carlos Canto, 
(aitlin Rose, Kate Boron 




Dan O'Reiiley, Chris 
Worth, Rich Franl<, Rory 
O'Hailoran, Rob 
Hammond, Bryan Rose, 
esse Shopro, Neil Flynn, 
Scott Reload, Anthony 
Duncan, Scott Kilpatricl< 



Michaela Crowley 



Megan Maloof, Chris Murphy 



Seniors 315 



John Feore Rebecca Ferguson Craig Fessenden Jennifer Figueiredo Sarali Fillion 

School of Arts and Sciences School of Education School of Arts and Sciences School ofArts and Sciences School of Education il 
Poli Science Human Development Poll Science Communication Elementary Education^ 




Matthew Findlan Shaun Finn Shannon Finnegan Patricia Finnerty Lauren Fisher 

School of Management School of Management School of Arts and Sciences School of Arts and Sciences School ofArts and Sciences 
General Mgmt Marketing Economics Biology Psychology 




Cameron Fiske Mary Fitterer Erin Fitzgerald Charles Fitzpatrick Kevin Fitzpatrick 

School ofArts and Sciences School of Management School of Arts and Sciences School of Management School of Arts and Sciences 
English Accounting Psychology Finance Poli Science 




Kathleen Fitzsimmons Ryan Flachbart John Flaherty Meaghan Flaherty Elizabeth Flamino 

School of Arts and Sciences School of Management School of Arts and Sciences School ofArts and Sciences School ofArts and Sciences 
Poli Science Accounting Economics English Poli Science 



316 Seniors 




^ -^ 




Kathleen Flanagan Erin Fleck Brian Fleming Robert Flesco III Ellen Flipse 

>chool of Arts and Sciences School of Management School of Arts and Sciences School of Management School of Arts and Sciences 
English Accounting Poll Science Accounting Economics 





Ibtii 



Erik Flynn Erin Flynn Griffin Flynn Neil Flynn Torrey Flynn 

ichool of Management School of Arts and Sciences School of Management School of Arts and Sciences School of Arts and Sciences 

Finance History Finance Economics Psychology 




Robert Fogerty Colin Foley 

School of Arts and Sciences School of Arts and Sciences 
Economics History 




Elizabeth Foley Keri Foley 

School of Arts and Sciences School of Arts and Sciences 
English Theology 




Seniors 317 





Scott Foley Brittany Follmer 

School of Arts and Sciences School of Arts and Science 
Economics Art History 




Priscilla Pontes Lauren Forbes 

School of Arts and Sciences School of Nursing 
History Nursing 




Bethany Forcucci Virginia Foreman Joshua Foster Jonathan Foster-Moore Andrea Fox 

School of Arts and Sciences School of Management School of Arts and Sciences School of Management School of Management 
Communication Finance English Finance Information Systems 




Elizabeth Fox Jennifer Fox Lindsey Fraher Danielle Frank Richard Frank 

School of Education School of Arts and Sciences School of Education School of Arts and Sciences School of Management 

English Biology Human Development Hispanic Study Finance 



318 Seniors 



Kristen Franks 
:hcx)l of Alts and Sciences 
Communication 



Max Frause 

School of Arts and Sciences 

Communication 



Molly Freitag 

School of Education 

Human Development 



Thomas Freyvogel 

School of Arts and Sciences 

History 



Bruce Fuery 

School of Arts and Sciences 

Psychology 




Casey Fullerton Jennifer Furlong Mary Furman Gary Gabor Valerie Gaetjens 

School of Education School of Arts and Sciences School ofArts and Sciences School of Arts and Sciences School of Management 
Human Development History Env Geo Science Mathematics Accounting 




William Gage Robert Gall Lisa Gallagher Mary Gallagher Patrick Gallagher 

chool of Management School of Management School of Management School of Arts and Sciences School of Management 
Finance Finance Marketing Env Geo Science General Mgmt 




Jeffrey Gallant 

chool of Arts and Sciences 

Communication 



Justin Galletti 

School of Arts and Sciences 

History 



Danielle Gamache 

School of Arts and Sciences 

Communication 



Quincy Gambrell 

School of Arts and Sciences 

International Study 



Sonali Ganguly 

School of Arts and Sciences 

Communication 



Seniors 319 



Sean Carahan Antonio Caray Anthony Garcia Claudio Garcia Sarah Garcia 

School of Arts and Sciences School of Management School of Management School of Arts and Sciences School of Arts and Science 
Poll Science Marketing Computer Science-Csom Studio Art History 




Christina Gardner 

School of Arts and Sciences 

Economics 



Robert Gardner 



Keith Garrick 



School of Arts and Sciences School of Management 
Biology Finance 



Erin Gartland 

School of Arts and Sciences 

Psychology 



Katharine Garvey 

School of Education 

Elementary Educatiof 




Marcus Gatto 

School of Arts and Sciences 

Biology 



Megan Gavin 

School of Education 

Child In Society 



Lauren Gehrig 

School of Arts and Sciences 

English 



Jill Geismar 

School of Arts and Sciences 

Mathematics 



Melissa Gentile 

School of Nursing 

Nursing 




Wesley George 

School of Management 

Finance 



Anna Geraty 

School of Education 

Human Development 



Brandon German 

School of Arts and Sciences 

Biology 



Brian Gerson 

School of Arts and Sciences 

Communication 



Laura Geselbracht 

School of Nursing 

Nursing 



320 Seniors 




Erin Gething David Gewirtz Alicia Gibson Kate Gibson Lauren Gibson 

choolofArts and Sciences School of Managennent School of Arts and Sciences School of Arts and Sciences School of Management 

Classics Accounting Philosophy Biochemistry Marketing 




Anna Gigante 

School of Nursing 

Nursing 



Joseph Gillan Michael Gilleberto Nora Gillespie Sean Gillespie 

School of Management School of Arts and Sciences School of Arts and Sciences School of Management 
Finance Poli Science English Marketing 




Shanon Gilmartin Kelly Gilmore Daniel Gilson Katrina Ginther Katrina Giordano 

choolofArts and Sciences School of Arts and Sciences School of Education School ofArts and Sciences School of Management 
Poli Science History Human Development French Accounting 




Kevin 

Ichool of 

Fi 



Giordano 

Management 

nance 



Christopher Giovanis 

School of Arts and Sciences 

Poli Science 



Elizabeth Girolamo 

School of Arts and Sciences 

Economics 



Jeffrey Giuliano Donato Giuseppi 

School of Management School of Management 

Finance Finance 



Seniors 321 




Evan, Jenn Diaz, Charlie Kane 



Celeste Sedo, Alison Caso, Elizabeth Henry 




Charles Wilson, Meredith McLaughlin, Mil<e Shehorn, Brian DeCaro, Meghan Jenkins, Erik Tuvey, Julie Bott 

322 Seniors 



i.'^y> 



iff 



r 








my Cheverini, Erin Mohan 




I 



/ 



\ 



J^^ 




Toben, Al Murphy 



»f«^ 


r 




k 


p^^pBV 


•'I'*- 


>^J 


III 


Kl 1 


^^ 


^^' ■ 


H 




Bl ^«m« 


^ ^ 


1 




f 




1 




^^^ 




^^1 



Beck, Jenn Diaz 



Catherine Sullivan, Mary 
Patricia Rasmussen 



Class df 20B2^ 



Seniors 323 




Erin Mohan, Angela Brosnan, Lauren Miller 



Melissa Melvin, June Webers, Catherine English, Terr! Ann Puliafico, 
Emily Eiben, Jessica Orsina, Steph Brown 




Gretchen Pfizenmayer, Katie Joyce, Jenny Wilson, Annie Joel, Yvonne Podikowsky, Jenny Walsh, Mart Root, Kristin Orlovsky, Liz Herr 

324 Seniors 




onica Tarasco, Ceci Bergerit 



Denise Bracken, Bill Fanning, Scott Kilpatrick, Scott Foley, Kristy Cahill, 
Nell Flynn, Scott Peloso 




like Dellaporta, Jon Croyle, Jennifer Diaz, James Stanton 



Seniors 325 





Christopher Glaser Jeff Glass 

School of Arts and Sciences School of Managemen 
Computer Science-A&S Information Systems 




Daniel Glenn 

School of Education 

Elementary Education 



Benedict Gmuer 

School of Managemen 

Finance 




Bridgid Godbout 

School of Nursing 

Nursing 



Lauren Godden Andrew Goldberg Aaron Goldman James Goldsack 

School of Arts and Sciences School of Management School of Management School of Arts and Science 
History Finance Information Systems Theater Arts 




Traci Gomes Alejandra Gomez Laura Gomez Ramon Gomez Monica Goncalves 

School of Arts and Sciences School of Education School of Arts and Sciences School of Management School of Arts and Sdence 
Communication Elementary Education Psychology Information Systems Biology 



326 Seniors 



Hector Gonzalez 

jchool of Arts and Sciences 

Sociology 



Kerry Goodwin 

School of Management 

Finance 



Janet Gorgone 

School of Arts and Sciences 

English 



Nathaniel Gori 
School of Management 
Computer Science-Csom 



Linda Gorman 

School of Art5 and Sciences 

English 




Scott Gorman 

Jchool of Management 

Finance 



Kerr! Cosselln 

School of Arts and Sciences 

Chemistry 



Adam Gottsch 

School of Management 

Marketing 



Rebecca Gottstein 

School of Education 

Human Development 



Caroline Gould 

School of Arts and Sciences 

English 




Erica Graf 
)chool of Management 



Marketing 



Brenna Graham 

School of Management 

Marketing 



Meredith Grant 

School of Arts and Sciences 

English 



Casey Graves 

School of Arts and Sciences 

History 



Christopher Green 

School of Management 

Economics-Csom 




Karleen Greene 

School of Arts and Sciences 

Communication 



Timothy Greenspan 

School of Arts and Sciences 

Communication 



James Gregory 

School of Arts and Sciences 

Communication 



Jamie Grenon 

School of Arts and Sciences 

Music 



Cristin Griffin 

School of Arts and Sciences 

Sociology 



Seniors 327 



Sean Griffin Tiffany Griffin Kathryn Griffith 

School of Management School of Arts and Sciences School of Arts and Sciences 
Finance Communication Communication 



Ann Grillo 

School of Nursing 

Nursing 



Michael Grippo | 
School of Arts and Sciencecp 
Psychology ' 




Lea Gross Matthew Gruber Mark Grzelak Craig Gugger Gregory Guido 

School of Education School of Arts and Sciences School of Arts and Sciences School ofArts and Sciences School of Managemer 
Elementary Education Poll Science Economics Env Geo Science Finance 




Catherine Guimaraes Hans Gustafson Erik Gutierrez Colin Gwin Timothy Haake 

School of Arts and Sciences School of Arts and Sciences School ofArts and Sciences School ofArts and Sciences School of Managemenr 
Communication Theology Biochemistry Poll Science Marketing 




Michael Habib 

School ofArts and Sdences 

Philosophy 



Brian Haddad Alyssa Hale 

School of Arts and Sciences School of Arts and Sciences 
English Communication 



Mark Haley II 

School of Arts and Sdences 

Mathematics 



Kerry Halgin 

School of Education 

Elementary Educatior 



328 Seniors 




Kathryn Hallahan Justin Hallberg Anne Halli Kathleen Halloran Christine Halsey 

iSchool of Arts and Sciences School of Arts and Sciences School of Arts and Sciences School of Arts and Sciences School of Arts and Sciences 
English English English English Poll Science 




Martin Halum Lindsey Hambleton Celeste Hamilton Stacy Hamilton Robert Hammond 

School of Management School ofArts and Sciences School ofArts and Sciences School of Education School of Management 
)perations/Strategic Mgmt Theology Psychology Elementary Education Finance 




Andrew Han Sin Han 

School of Arts and Sciences School of Management 
Mathematics Finance 




Susan Han Natalie Haney 

School of Arts and Sciences School of Arts and Sciences 
Communication English 




Seiiiors 329 



Conrad Hanley George Hanna Freddie Hannah Patrick Hannon Kathleen Hansbury 

School of Arts and Sciences School of Arts and Sciences School of Management School of Arts and Sciences School of Arts and Sciences 
Chemistry English Human Resources Mgnt. Poli Science Mathematics 




E. Lydia Hansell Caroline Hansen Morgan Hansen Amanda Harkins Chastity Harmon 

School ofArts and Sciences School of Arts and Sciences School of Arts and Sciences School of Arts and Sdences School of Management 1 
International Study Communication Env Geo Science Psychology Human Resources Mgnt. 




Brian Harney Matthew Harper Conor Harris Suzanne Harte H. Michael Hartmann 

School ofArts and Sdences School ofArts and Sciences School ofArts and Sciences School of Education School of Management 
History English English Elementary Education Marketing 




Leanne Hartmann Kevin Hartzell Emily Harvey 

School of Arts and Sciences School of Arts and Sciences School of Education 
Psychology History Secondary Education 



Meredith Hasenkopf Allison Hassett 

School ofArts and Sdences School of Management 
Poli Science Accounting 



330 Seniors 



Michael Hatch Nia Hatsopoulos Juliann Hauck 

chool of Management School of Arts and Sciences School of Education 
Finance Film Studies Human Development 



Aili Haulala 

School of Arts and Sciences 

Psychology 



Christa Haverly 

School of Education 

Elementary Education 




Kimberly Haydon Brian Hayes 

chool of Management School of Arts and Sciences 
Accounting History 



— V - 

Colleen Hayes 

School of Nursing 

Nursing 



Meaghan Hayes Robyn Hayes 

School of Arts and Sciences School of Arts and Sciences 
Communication Poll Science 




^^1 ^n JfcMT ^ 



Charlotte Haygood • Benjamin Haynes John Healey Seth Heckman Lindsey Heller 

chool of Arts and Sciences School of Arts and Sciences School of Arts and Sciences School of Arts and Sciences School of Arts and Sciences 
French Psychology Poll Science Biochemistry Biology 





Joseph Hellrung Ericka Helwig Matthew Hennessey Kristin Henny Elizabeth Henry 

ichoolofArts and Sciences School of Arts and Sciences School ofArts and Sciences School of Education School of Management 
English Communication Psychology Elementary Education Marketing 



Seniors 331 




Jesse Shapiro, Claire Andeson, Katie Altern, Mike Lombardi, Mary Root, Erin Luizzi, Joinn Posatl<o, Kevin Sanginario, Sean Kane 




Nicole Scivoletti, Maureen Bowman, Pete Manderino, Mary McDonald, Brandon Maitre 
332 Seniors 




irissy Johnsons, Kate Nash, jillian Schedneck, Katie Higgins, Michaela Crowley, 
Jte Fitzsimmons, John Warchol 



Jennifer Delfina Diaz, Jennifer Marie Diaz 




s 6| 2002 



Seniors 333 




en Keller, Kristen Spillane, Michelle Marling, Janelle Nanos, Jen Ducie, Kerri Cummings, 
Briget Rivers, Maricela Barbosa 






Tim Preston, Jessica Cote, Allison Zisko, Kristine Ivers, Maria Campo 



Kristen Sinacore, Jessica Sullivan, Kerrin Bowersj 
Mary Reynolds 




Jenn Diaz, Carolina, Jenn Diaz, Christa Haverly, Lisa Perry, Danielle Frank 

334 Seniors 




lyson Dudkowski, Vicki Cozzi, Evonne Maohkamphoiu, Erin McManus, Sarah Logue, Megan Maloof, Nicole Magaiine 



Seniors 335 




Erica Hepp Dariel Heron Elizabeth Herr Daniel Hershel Amy Hesselschwerdt 

School ofArts and Sciences School of Management School ofArts and Sciences School of Education School ofArts and Science 
Communication Marketing Communication Secondary Education Psychology 




Theodore Hesson Matthew Hesterberg Brendan Hickey Katherine Hickey Kristina Hicks 

School of Arts and Sciences School of Arts and Sciences School of Arts and Sciences School of Arts and Sciences School of Arts and Science 
English Poli Science Sociology Communication Communication 




Senien Hicks Gareth Higgins Kathleen Higgins Jason High Sheila Hindle 

School of Arts and Sciences School of Management School of Education School of Management School of Arts and Science 

Psychology Economics-Csom Elementary Education Finance Psychology 




Kimberly Hinds Janie Ho Ricky Ho Richard Hobbie Alexandra Hochreitei 

School of Arts and Sciences School of Arts and Sciences School of Arts and Sciences School of Management School of Arts and Science 
Psychology Communication Poli Science Accounting English 



336 Seniors 



^.^A 



Brian Hogan 

chool of Arts and Sciences 

Economics 



Jacqueline Hogue 

School of Arts and Sciences 

International Study 



Annsley Hohm Richard Holahan Jessie Holeman 

Schoolof Arts and Sciences School of Management School of Arts and Sciences 
Psychology Information Systems Biology 




Vleaghan Hollenbeck Erin Holmes 

chool of Management School of Management 
Finance Finance 



ChristinaHondromihalis 

School of Arts and Sciences 

Psychology 



Andrew Hopkins Paula Hopkins 

School of Management School of Arts and Sciences 
General Mgmt English 




Elizabeth Horan 

School of Education 

Early Childhood 



Katherine Horan 

School of Arts and Sciences 

Theater Arts 




Maura Hossack 

ichool of Arts and Sciences 

Independent 



Patrick Houlihan 

School of Arts and Sciences 

Poli Science 




Seniors 337 



■ ^B' 





Allison Howard Ann Howard 

School of Arts and Sciences School of Arts and Science _ 
English English 




Laura Howson Amy Hribar 

School of Arts and Sciences School of Arts and Science 
Communication Computer Science-Af 




Christy Huelskamp Shane Huempfner Carol Huezo Christopher Hughes Tiesha Hughes 

School of Arts and Sciences School of Management School of Education School of Arts and Sciences School of Managemen' 
English Operations/Strategic Mgnt. Human Development English Marketing 




Erin Humphries 



Kyle Hunker 



Stephen Hunter Michael Hurley Patrick Hurley 

School of Management School of Arts and Sciences School of Management School of Arts and Sciences School of Arts and Science 
Marketing Geology & Geophysics Human Resources Mgnt. Communication Poll Science 



338 Seniors 



Lauren Huston 

School of Education 

Human Development 



Nancy Hutcheson Angela Hutchins Steven Idccarino 

School of Arts and Sciences School of Arts and Sciences School of Management 
Psychology Communication Finance 



Elizabeth larrapino 

School of Education 

Human Development 




Justin Incardone Amir Ingram Michael Innes Jessica Iredale Melissa Irgens 

School of Arts and Sciences School of Arts and Sciences School of Arts and Sciences School of Arts and Sciences School of Arts and Sciences 
Poll Science Economics English English English 




Shalini Iswara James Ivers Kristine Ivers Colleen Ives Amanda Jack 

School of Management School of Arts and Sciences School of Management School of Education School ofArts and Sciences 
Accounting Mathematics Accounting Elementary Education English 




Katrina Jackson Polly Jackson Stacey Jacobs Suzanne Jacobson Eric jacocks 

School of Arts and Sciences School of Management School of Arts and Sciences School of Arts and Sdences School of Arts and Sdences 
Biochemistry Accounting Biology English Poll Science 



Seniors 339 



Vincent Jacques 

School of Arts and Sciences 

Tlieology 



David Jaehnig 
Sciiooi of iVlanagement 



Kelly James 

School of Arts and Sciences 

Psychology 



David Jamieson 

School of Art5 and Sciences 

History 



Robyn Janak 

School of Managemeni 

Marketing 




Brent Jansen 

School of Arts and Sciences 

Biochemistry 



Jonathan Janus Ami Jastrzemski 

School of Management School of Arts and Sciences 

Finance Sociology 



Margaret Jeary 

School of Arts and Sciences 

Theater Arts 



Meghan Jenkins 

School of Managemen' 

Information Systems > 




Emily Jensen Eric Jensen David Jeshiva Michael Jirout Anne Joel 

School of Arts and Sciences School of Arts and Sciences School of Management School of Management School of Arts and Science 
History Theater Arts Economics-Som Marketing Poli Science 




Christine Johnsen 

School of Education 

Elementary Education 



Darren Johnson 

School of Education 

Human Development 



Ginger Johnson 

School of Arts and Sciences 

History 



Mollie Johnson 

School of Education 

Early Childhood 



Brian Jones 

School of Arts and Science 

Env Geo Science 



340 Seniors 



Brian )ones 
School of Education 
:lementary Education 



Erica Jones Jonattnan Jones Lindsey Jones Thomas Jones 

School of Management School of Management School of Arts and Sciences School of Management 
Finance Information Systems Communication Marketing 




Anne Jorgensen George Jorges Kathleen Joyce Lisa Julian Yabome Kabia 

hool of Arts and Sciences School of Management School of Arts and Sciences School of Management School of Arts and Sciences 
Communication Finance Poli Science Operations/Strategic Mgnt. Economics 




onathan Kaczorowski ■ Benjamin Kadamus Mina Kaddis Lisa Kahle Trinette Kahm 

chool of Arts and Sciences School of Arts and Sciences School of Arts and Sciences School of Arts and Sciences School of Education 
Theater Arts Theology Theology Psychology Elementary Education 




jane Kalista Hellene Kallis Isabelle Kallis Robert Kalutkiewicz Leah Kamataris 

chool of Arts and Sciences School of Arts and Sciences School of Arts and Sciences School of Management School of Management 
History Psychology Psychology Finance Finance 



Seniors 341 




Tom Breslin, Rob Hammond 



Ed Mullins, Roya Doyle 




Hunter Larson, Meredith Roberts 

342 Seniors 




Qass df 2002 



Seniors 343 




Pat Clavin, Tom Pohlad, Mike Marett, Kevin Comprelli, Jon Foster-Moore, Greg Cuido, Amir lagram 




Anna Ceraty, Nicki Reilly, )on Timmons, Mollie Roan, Kathy Tucker Stephanie L.ubin, Myisha Roach, Cristal Fenton 




Rosemary Doherty, Nicole Magaline, Sarah Logue, Megan Maloof, Holly Dietrich, Alyson Dudkowski 

344 Seniors 




Shauna Murray/ Claire Darby, Christine Mahoney, Melissa Calvo, Jessica Cote, 
Rosemary Maffei, Maria Campo 



Seniors 345 




Keith Kaminski 

School of Management 

Finance 




Jasmyn Kandel 

School of Education 

Human Development 




Meghan Kane 

School of Education 

Human Development 




Michael Kane Patrick Kane Sean Kane Luke Kaplan Kimberly Karagosian 

School of Arts and Sciences School of Arts and Sciences School of Management School of Management School of Management 
Poll Science Biology Marketing Marketing Marketing 




James Karambay Denise Kardonski Joseph Katchpole Courtney Katsur Sara Katz 

School of Arts and Sciences School of Management School of Management School of Management School of Arts and Sciences 
Biology Information Systems Finance Finance Communication 



346 Seniors 



Brian Kaufman Kerry Kavalauskas 

jchool of Management School of Nursing 



Marketing 



Nursing 



Alexandra Kazanovicz Elizabeth Kazes Omar Kazimi 

School of Arts and Sciences School of Management School of Management 
History Human Resources Mgnt. Finance 




Elizabeth Kearney Nathaniel Kearney Laura Kearns Michael Keaveny Alice Kelleher 

ichool of Arts and Sciences School of Arts and Sciences School of Arts and Sciences School of Management School of Arts and Sciences 
English History Psychology Marketing Communication 




Moira Kelleher " Jennifer Keller Jeffrey Kelley Michael Kelliher 

school of Arts and Sciences School of Arts and Sciences School of Arts and Sciences School of Management 
Communication Poll Science Economics Accounting 



Colleen Kelly 

School of Education 

Elementary/Moderate 

Special Needs 




Justin Kelly Kristen Kelly Matthew Kelly Patrick Kelly 

School of Arts and Sciences School of Arts and Sciences School of Management School of Arts and Sciences 
Psychology Psychology Marketing English 



Robert Kelly 

School of Management 

Finance 



Seniors 347 




Bridget Kelty Timothy Kenah Colin Kennedy Edward Kennedy Jennifer Kennedy 

School ofArts and Sciences School of Arts and Sciences School of Management School of Management School of Nursing 

English Computer Science-A&S Operations/Strategic Computer Science-Csom Nursing 

Mgnt. 




John Kennedy Paul Kennedy Ryan Kennedy Allison Kenney Meagan Kenny 

School of Management School of Arts and Sciences School ofArts and Sciences School of Management School of Managemen 
Accounting History History Accounting Human Resources Mgn 




Jody Kent Elizabeth Keohane Erica Keough Brooke Kerkorian Kimberly Kessler 

School of Arts and Sciences School of Arts and Sciences School of Arts and Sciences School of Arts and Sciences School of Arts and Science 
Communication History English Economics Biology 




Cara Kettenbach Courtney Keyser Lydia Khalil Meghan Kiernan Jessica Kierulf 

School ofArts and Sciences School of Arts and Sciences School of Arts and Sciences School of Arts and Sciences School of Managemen 

Sociology Communication International Study Mathematics Finance 



348 Seniors 



Karen Kiley Colleen Kilfoyle Lara Killian George Killory Scott Kilpatrick 

School of Arts and Sciences School ofArts and Sciences School of Arts and Sciences School of Arts and Sciences School of Management 
Theater Arts History English Economics Economics-Csom 




Ahyeong Kim Chris Kim Grace Kim Soo Kim Then Kim 

School of Education School of Arts and Sciences School of Management School of Management School of Arts and Sciences 
Elementary Education Psychology Information Systems Information Systems Sociology 




J. Ian Kimball Lauren King 

School of Management School of Education 
Marketing Secondary Education 




^^ 



Rebecca King Robert Kinlin 

School of Arts and Sciences School of Management 
French Marketing 




Seniors 349 



Kathryn Kish Elizabeth Klaes 

School of Management School of Arts and Sciences 
Accounting Biology 



Richard Klein Eric Knakal Tara Koenig 

School of Education School ofArts and Sciences School of Managemen 
Secondary Education Biology Marketing 




^▲li 



James Kolbeck Swapna Komakula Michael Kopech Robert Koplar Daniel Koppen 

School ofArts and Sciences School of Management School ofArts and Sciences School of Management School of Managemen 

Biochemistry Information Systems Psychology Finance Accounting 




Alexis Kostopoulos Bethany Kovar Michelle Kozlov 

School of Arts and Sciences School of Arts and Sciences School of Arts and Sciences 
Psychology Communication Economics 



Michael Kredel Connor Kriegel 

School of Management School of Arts and Science 
Finance Poli Science 




Jaclyn Kryzak Jane Kuehne Matthew Kunkel Melissa Kupferberg Kevin Kurtz 

School of Arts and Sciences School of Education School of Management School of Arts and Sciences School ofArts and Science 
Sociology Human Development Finance Biology Communication 



350 Seniors 



Kristin Kutch David Kuzminski Eunice Kwak Raymond Kwan Joyce Lai 

)Chool of Management School of Arts and Sciences School of Management School of Management School of Arts and Sciences 

Marketing 



Finance 



Communication 



Economics-Csom 



Communication 




Joseph Laimo Kevin Lam Christopher Lambrix Bradley Lamers Elizabeth Lamothe 

school of Management School of Arts and Sciences School of Arts and Sciences School of Arts and Sciences School of Management 
Finance Computer Science-A&S Communication Communication Marketing 




Timothy Landry Brian Lane Brian Langan Andreas Lange Kara Langley 

school of Arts and Sciences School of Management School of Arts and Sciences School of Management School of Education 
Poll Science Finance Economics Economics-Csom Human Development 




Kelly Langton Sara Lantz Erin Lanzafame Rachel Laquatra 

School of Arts and Sciences School of Arts and Sciences School of Management School of Management 

Sociology Theology Marketing Marketing 



Tara Larosee 

School of Nursing 

Nursing 



Seniors 351 




Pat Clavein, Mike Marett, Kevin Comprelli, Amir Ingram, Jon Foster-Moore, Greg Cuido 

352 Seniors 



». 



i 



•enise Bracken, Erica Graf, Terri McGrath, Tricia Finnerty 




atherine Hickey, Annette Keane, Danielle Stapleton, Catherine 
Icaleavey, Kim Connors 



Lindsey Prendergast, Rachael Telia, Chrissie DeMichele, Meg 

Silhan 

Kev Camprelli, Mike 
Bouche, Mike Marett, 
Ryan Prime, Carl 
Serafino, Dave 
Kuzaminski 




Ia& of 20 




Seniors 353 




Katie Raschke, Jeanie He, Stephanie Madre, Amy Cusano, Andrea Brian Boova, Randy Tibbetts, Mike Ciilis, Chrissy Madick, Katherint! 
Blais. Hickey, Kim Connors, Nae Salley, Chris Mulvey, Kerry Twomey, 

Catherine McAleavey, Monica Bortok 




354 Seniors 




)ave Bartholomew, Liz Henry, Alison Case, Lauren Miller, Kelly Boyle, Erin Mohan 



Seniors 355 




Liz Henry, Kelly Boyle, Lauren Miller. Becca Tehran!, Chrissie DeMichael, Rachael 

Telia 

r 




Eric Coghlin, Jesse Shapiro, Scott Peloso, Scott Kilpatrick 




Jennifer Walsh, Yvonne Podzil<asl<i, Anne Joel 



!lilB?33!2 



■im^i!:: :■!!:;!:■ =3*1* B fill ■■ 

I! ii I 




Greg Reilly, Doug Tyre, Lauren Miller, Andrew Matzin, Becca Tehrani, Mike Bellezza, Pat Ryan, Emily Carver 

356 Seniors 




mmy Stanton, jen Croyle, Mary Pat Rasmussen, Mike Dellaporta, jen Diaz, 
lattFindlan, Mil<e Nardy 



Mil<aela Boyd, Chris Bonavita, Amy Vautour, Mike 
Reif 




vloah Kuhn, Ryan Fandetti, Tom Sullivan, JayTini 



Keri Foley, Erica Peters, Brianne Puleo 



Seniors 357 





Elizabeth Larson Hunter Larson Jessica Lasher Jennifer Lau Heidi Laughlin 

School ofArts and Sciences School of Management School ofArts and Sciences School of Management School of Education 
Economics Computer Science-Csom Psychology Finance Elementary Education 




Andrew Lavallee Timothy Lavin Alison Lawlor Sarah Lawton Steven Leblanc 

School of Education Schoolof Arts and Sciences School ofArts and Sciences School of Arts and Sciences School of Managemen 
Early Childhood English Poll Science English Accounting 




^^^I'^u 




Kirsten Lebo Merisa Leclerc Elias Ledesma Adam Lee Adrienne Lee 

School of Arts and Sciences School of Management School of Arts and Sciences School ofArts and Sciences School of Management 

Psychology Finance English Biochemistry Marketing 




Andrew Lee Esther Lee Jung Lee Peter Lee Mark Lefave 

School ofArts and Sciences School of Arts and Sciences School ofArts and Sciences Schoolof Arts and Sciences School of Arts and Science 

Psychology Chemistry Philosophy History Economics 



358 Seniors 



Michael Leflar Daniel Lemoine Brilton Lenahan Julie Leondis Jenny Leong 

:hool of Arts and Sciences School of Arts and Sciences School of Arts and Sciences School of Education School of Management 
Communication Economics Communication Elementary Education Marketing 




David Leopold Rebecca Lesiak J. David Leslie Stephen Lester Daniel Lever 

ichool of Management Schoolof Arts and Sciences School of Management School of Arts and Sciences School of Management 
Bations/Strategic Management Biology Computer Science-Csom English Finance 




Corinne Lewis Ernesto Leyba 

School of Management School of Management 
Finance Marketing 




Eric Libra Thomas Lieber 

ichool of Arts and Sciences School of Arts and Sciences 
Chemistry English 




Seniors 359 





Lauren Liggett Christopher Lillemoe 

School of Arts and Sciences School of Arts and Science 
Economics Communication 




Joseph Lin Tina Lin 

School of Arts and Sciences School of Managemeni 

Psychology Marketing 




John Lindsay Julie Linnehan Jennifer Liou Virginia Lipscy William Lisman 

School of Management School ofArts and Sciences School ofArts and Sciences School ofArts and Sciences School of Management 
Management English Computer Science-A&S Philosophy Marketing 




Julieann Little Eddie Liu Anne Livoisi Janette Lo Molly Logan 

School of Education School ofArts and Sciences School of Arts and Sciences School of Management School of Arts and Science 
Math/Comp Science Computer Science-A&S Sociology Accounting Poll Science 



360 Seiiiors 




Sarah Logue Jennifer Lombardi Michael Lombardi Allyn Londregan John Long 

ichool of Arts and Sciences School of Arts and Sciences School of Management School of Arts and Sciences School of Managennent 
English Mathematics Accounting Chemistry Information Systems 




Abigail Lootens Annette Lopez Nicole Lopreato John Lotzer Garrett Loughlin 

School of Arts and Sciences School of Arts and Sciences School of Arts and Sciences School of Management School of Arts and Sciences 
Communication Psychology Communication Finance Poli Science 




Elizabeth Lovel! " Todd Lowen Dawn Lozada Andrew Lozier Stephanie Lubin 

School of Education School of Management School of Arts and Sciences School of Management School ofArts and Sciences 
Human Development Finance Psychology Finance Psychology 




Jessica Lubrano Marc Lucero John Lucey Allegra Lugo Erin Luizzi 

School of Management School of Management School of Arts and Sciences Schoolof Arts and Sciences School of Arts and Sciences 
Finance Economics-Som Poli Science Communication Poli Science 



Seniors 361 



Briana Lund Moira Lundell 

School of Arts and Sciences School of Arts and Sciences 

Art History Psychology 



Matthew Lutynski 

School of Arts and Sciences 

Biology 



Michelle Lynch 

School of Arts and Sciences 

Biology 



Sinead Lynch 

School of Arts and Sciences 

English 




Andrea Lytle 

School of Arts and Sciences 

Biology 



Kenneth Lytle 

School of Arts and Sciences 

Mathematics 



Brian Macchi 

School of Education 

Elementary Education 



Hilario Machado 

School of Arts and Sciences 

Psychology 



Kimberley Mackie 

School of Arts and Sciences 

Sociology 




Jeffrey Mackor Christina Madek Daniel Madison Stephanie Madore Heather Maffei 

School of Management School of Arts and Sciences School of Arts and Sciences School of Arts and Sciences School of Education 
Marketing History Economics Biology Human Development 




Rosemary Maffei Nicole Magaline Jennifer Magary Amanda Magee Badr Maghrabi 

School of Management School of Arts and Sciences School of Arts and Sciences School of Management School of Management 

Marketing Economics Communication Marketing Finance 



362 Seniors 




Kathleen Magner Sondra Magnus Joshua Magri Megan Mahaffey Elizabeth Maher 

chool of Arts and Sciences School of Nursing School ofArts and Sciences School of Management School of Arts and Sciences 
History Nursing Economics Marketing Economics 




Bethany Mahler Christine Mahoney Donald Mahoney Kathryn Mahoney Paul Mahoney 

School of Arts and Sciences School of Management School ofArts and Sciences School of Arts and Sciences School of Arts and Sciences 

Poll Science Accounting English English Psychology 




Sara Mahoney 

School of Nursing 

Nursing 



Brandon Maitre 

School of Arts and Sciences 

Economics 




Thomas Majdanski Hanna Mak 

School of Arts and Sciences School of Arts and Sciences 
English Psychology 




Seniors 363 




364 Seniors 




lass 6f 2002 



Seniors 365 




Angela Brosnan, Kelly Boyle 



Liz Henry, Becca Tehran! 




Tom Sullivan, Clorimar Reuter, Beth Schultz, jay Tini 

366 Seniors 







hrissie DeMichael, Rachael Telia, Kelly Boyle, Alison Caso 

W^: 



Chris Lillemoe, Wes George 





Celeste Sedo, Megan Elliot, Kate Griffith, Rachael Parri 




Lisa Cashel, Lauren Ostrom, Claire Dennison, Taryn Stone 



■Jatalie Soler, Meg Phoenix 



Seniors 367 





Ralia Malakidis Wendell Malalis 

School of Arts and Sciences School of Arts and Science 
Sociology Psychology 




Keith Maley Amalia Mallard 

School of Arts and Sciences School of Arts and Science 
Poll Science Poll Science 




A 

Lauren Mallen Ryan Malloy Anne Malone Kaitlyn Malone Kate Maloney 

School of Arts and Sciences School of Arts and Sciences School of Management School of Arts and Sciences School ofArts and Science 

Sociology Communication General Mgmt Sociology Biology 




Megan Maloof Ann Mancuso Peter Manderino Nikolay Mandinga Joseph Mangubat 

School of Management School ofArts and Sciences School of Management School of Management School of Arts and Sdence 
Finance English Computer Science-Csom Accounting Computer Science-A& 



368 Seniors 



Alexis Mann James Mann Emily Manning Nicole Manning Rohan Manning 

chool of Arts and Sciences School of Arts and Sciences School of Management School of Arts and Sciences School of Management 
French Computer Science-A&S Accounting Poli Science Finance 




Moira Mannix Walkiria Manzueta Evonne Maokhamphiou Edward Marchildon Toni Mardirossian 

hool of Arts and Sciences School of Management School of Management School of Arts and Sciences School of Arts and Sciences 

History General Mgmt Information Systems Poli Science Poli Science 




Toni Mardirossion " Michael Marett Eric Marfat Mikhail Margolin Stephen Marini 

chool of Arts and Sciences School of Arts and Sciences School of Arts and Sciences School of Arts and Sciences School of Management 
Philosophy Communication Economics Env Geo Science Finance 




Michelle Marling Aimee Maron Matthew Maronick Lindsey Marshall David Martens 

chool of Arts and Sciences School of Arts and Sciences School of Arts and Sciences Schoolof Arts and Sciences School of Management 
Communication Sociology History Sociology Accounting 



Seniors 369 




Adam Martin Robert Martin Roystone Martinez Virginia Martinez Dewayn Marzagalli 

School of Arts and Sciences School of Arts and Sciences School of Education School of Arts and Sciences School of Arts and Science 
Poll Science English Human Development Communication Philosophy 




Jennifer Massoni Andrew Matteo David Matteo Meagan Maurer David Mawhinney 

School of Arts and Sciences School of Education School of Management School of Education School of Arts and Sciencea 
English History Marketing Elementary Education Philosophy 




Erika Maxian Deepinder Mayell Amanda Mayfield Donato Mazzaro Catherine McAleavey 

School of Management Schoolof Arts and Sciences School of Arts and Sciences School of Management School of Management 
Operations/Strategic Management Poll Science French Finance Marketing 




Thomas McCabe Kate McCarron Neal McCarthy Robert McCarthy 

School of Arts and Sciences School of Arts and Sciences School of Arts and Sciences School of Arts and Sciences 

Psychology English Sociology Philosophy 



Sarah McCarthy 

School of Nursing 

Nursing 



370 Seniors 



Meghan McClure Kaitlin McColgan Gavin McCollunn David McCormick Christopher McCottry 

chool of Arts and Sciences School of Arts and Sciences School of Arts and Sciences School of Arts and Sciences School of Arts and Sciences 
Communication Poll Science Mathematics Poli Science Theology 




Kathleen McCourt Lauren McCourt Caitlin McDermott Eraina McDonald Marianne McDonald 

chool of Arts and Sciences School of Management School of Arts and Sciences Schoolof Arts and Sciences School of Arts and Sciences 

English Information Systems Communication History History 




Gregory McDonough William McDonough 
ichool of Arts and Sciences School of Management 
Poli Science Finance 



Seniors 371 





Siobhan McGarry Todd McCee 

School ofArts and Sciences School of Management 
French Information Systems 




Katherine McGinnes David McGowan 

School ofArts and Sciences School ofArts and Sciences 
Economics Sociology 




Courtney McGrath 

School of Education 

Elementary Education 



Janel McGrath 

School of Education 

Early Childhood 



Therese McGrath Kristina McGuire Ruth McHenry 

School of Arts and Sciences School of Arts and Sciences School of Management 
English Psychology Marketing 




i:!^^- 



^^ . ns^ 





Abigail McHugh Joanna Mclnnis Carly McKee Keith McKenna Kimberly McKenna 

School ofArts and Sciences School of Arts and Sciences School of Arts and Sciences Schoolof Arts and Sciences School of Management 

English Hispanic Study Psychology Biology Finance 



372 Seniors 



Michael McKenzie Matthew McKinney Todd McKniff Martin McLaughlin Kelly McMahon 

chool of Management School of Arts and Sciences School of Management School of Arts and Sciences School of Arts and Sciences 
Marketing English General Mgmt Chemistry History 




Robert McMahon Kerry McManama Erin McManus Kathleen McManus 

ichool of Arts and Sciences School of Arts and Sciences School of Education School of Arts and Sciences 
Computer Science-A&S Communication Elementary/Intense Special Needs Sociology 



Thomas McManus 
School of Arts and Sciences 

Economics 




Kevin McMyler Edward McNabb Brigid McNamara Erin McNamara Jeffrey McPartlan 

ichool of Arts and Sciences School of Management School of Arts and Sciences School ofArts and Sciences School of Arts and Sciences 
English Economics-Csom Poll Science Economics Computer Science-A&S 

1 




Heather McRoberts Kevin McSherry Kevin McStravick Michael McWade Andrew McWeeney 

School ofArts and Sciences School of Management School of Management School of Arts and Sciences School of Management 
Biology Marketing HLmanResouces Management Theology General Mgmt 



Seniors 373 




Mellisia Simpson, Jon Worchol, Kyle Lytle, Shirmah Davis, Priscilla Pontes, Marl< Nameless, Dafney Dubuisson, Joseph Lamino 

374 Seniors 




/lolly Freitag, Kim Dunfey, Su Ryan, Carmen Poo, Kim Miller, Rachel Prothero Allison Eddy, Mike Reif, Mikaela Boyd 





Norah Breen, Dana 
Apnea, Mary Beth 
Gallagher 



Camille Thelin, Nicole 
Cotroneo, Christone Eco, 
Daniele Wilson 




Qass df 2002 g 



Seniors 375 




Jennifer Steudte, Siobhan McGarry, Kristin Waidron, Lydia Hansel!, Aimee IVIaron 

376 Seniors 




Brad Barron, Jen Spencer, Peter Lee 



Ann Russo, Courtney McGrath, Michelle 
Brown 





1^1*% «M>«1 



Dan Lever, Kristin Waldron, Steve Bacon, Joe Cutrone, Wil Cage, Wilson 
Acevedo, Stephen Salazar, Joe Brandt-Hammar, Mike Meier, Andrew 
Nelson, Carole Simon, Kriston Wladron, Mike Watkins, Bob Watkins, 
Aimee Madron 



lillian Petrucelli, Anne Jorgenson 



Seniors 377 



InV 




Jennifer Meade Dorothy Medeiros Michael Meehan Sejal Mehta Michael Meier 

School of Education School of Nursing School ofArts and Sciences School of Management School of Managemen 

Human Development Nursing Economics Finance Marketing 




Sandra Mejia Santiago Mejia Livia Mello Melissa Melvin David Mendoza 

School of Education School of Arts and Sciences School of Management School of Education School ofArts and Science 
Human Development Theology Accounting Human Development Biology 





Ana Menezes John Menezes Katherine Meny Gina Mercuric Andrew Merrill 

School ofArts and Sciences School of Management School of Arts and Sdences School ofArts and Sdences School of Management 

Poll Science General Mgmt Poll Science History Accounting 





Laura Mestre Cathryn Meyer Thomas Meyer Matthew Miceli Anne Michener I 

Schoolof Arts and Sciences School of Arts and Sciences School of Management School of Arts and Sciences School ofArts and Sciences 
Communication Physics Accounting History History 



378 Seniors 



Lisa Mikes Eril<a Mil<lus David Mikullitz Krislina Milik Heather Milkiewicz 

choolof Arts and Sciences School of Arts and Sciences School of Managennent School of Arts and Sciences School of Arts and Sciences 
English Communication Accounting Psychology Economics 





Ruben Millares Christopher Miller David Miller 

ichool of Management School of Arts and Sciences School of Arts and Sdences 
Accounting Communication History 



Jacob Miller Kimberly Miller 

School of Arts and Sciences School of Education 

Poll Science Elementary/Moderate Special Needs 




Kyle Miller 

School of Education 

Elementary Education 



Lauren Miller 

School of Education 

Human Development 



if 


U| 




I 


r 


\' 










f 


•^ 


J 


i 


'^W 4 \ 


" 




1 


L 


Jk 


i 



T^ 



Nelle Miller Rebecca Miller 

School of Management School of Arts and Sciences 
Economics-Som Communication 




Seniors 379 









^ 




'ijs ^ 


^^/ /^^^Hb ''^^HRir^ '^iESHIflHi^B*''^^^^i^H 


H^ 


L ik.......A.fl^^^^^^^^^K. 


^SjEhT 




Sheila Miller Stephanie Miller 

School of Arts and Sciences School of Managemen 
Communication Accounting 




Kelly Millet 

School of Education 

Elementary Education 



Meredith Millet 

School of Managemen 

Information Systems 




Mary Mills Krystal Mims Kristen Minger Christopher Minkiewicz Diane Mirabile 

School of Management School of Arts and Sciences School of Arts and Sciences School of Arts and Sciences School of Arts and Science 
Marketing English Poll Science Communication English 




Kevin Miskel Paul Mistovich Roy Mizukami Elizabeth Mocarski Richard Moffitt 

School of Arts and Sciences Schoolof Arts and Sciences School of Management School of Management School of Arts and Sciences j 
Communication Poli Science Computer Science-Csom Finance Computer Science-A&5[ 



380 Seniors 




Erin Mohan 

School of Nursing 

Nursing 



Michael Molloy Sarah Moloney Stephen Monaco Sean Monaghan 

School of Management School of Arts and Sciences School of Management School of Arts and Sciences 

Finance History Marketing Biology 




Kate Monahan Jennifer Montague Aileen Montana Courtney Montgomery Calvin Mooney 

Jchool of Arts and Sciences School of Arts and Sciences School of Arts and Sciences School of Education School of Arts and Sciences 
Communication Communication English English History 




Patrick Mooney Brendan Moore Eric Moore Meghan Moore Robert Moore 

Ichool of Arts and Sciences School ofArts and Sciences School of Management School of Arts and Sciences School of Management 
English Communication Marketing History Finance 




Daniel Moran Jennie Moran Lori Moran Richard Moriarty Jeffrey Morin 

School of Management School ofArts and Sciences School ofArts and Sciences School of Arts and Sciences School ofArts and Sciences 

English Communication Biology Communication Biology 



Seniors 381 



Claire Moroni Ann Morris Katherine Morrissey Luke Mott Matthew Moynihan 

School of Arts and Sciences School of Management School of Education School of Arts and Sciences School of Education 

English Marketing Elementary Education Music Secondary Education 




John Moysey 

School of Education 

Human Development 



Angela Muccino Natalie Muench 

School of Arts and Sciences School of Education 
Sociology Human Development 



Conor Mulcahy Ryan Mulderrig 

School of Arts and Sdences School of Arts and Science 
English Economics 




Jonathan Mulhern Kathleen Mullen Steven Mullenbrock Edward Mullins Victoria Mulvaney 

School ofArts and Sciences School of Management School ofArts and Sciences School ofArts and Sciences School of Arts and Science 

English Marketing Biology Poli Science English 




Martin Mulvey Alfred Murphy Bryan Murphy Carolyn Murphy Christopher Murphy 

School of Arts and Sciences School of Arts and Sciences School of Arts and Sciences School of Arts and Sciences School of Arts and Science 
English Economics Communication English History 



382 Seniors 



Daniel Murphy Daniel Murphy Elizabeth Murphy Emily Murphy James Murphy 

chool of Arts and Sciences Schoolof Arts and Sciences School of Education Schoolof Arts and Sciences School of Arts and Sciences 
Communication Communication Human Development Biology English 




Karleigh Murphy Robert Murphy Catherine Murray Erin Murray Gerard Murray 

chool of Management Schoolof Arts and Sciences School of Education School of Arts and Sciences School ofArts and Sciences 
Finance Theology Human Development English Mathematics 




Meghan Murray Shauna Murray 

School of Arts and Sciences School of Arts and Sciences 
Poll Science Communication 




Stephen Murray Brianne Nadeau 

chool of Arts and Sciences School of Arts and Sciences 
English Poll Science 




Seniors 383 




Kerrie Sorentino, Julie DeSimone, Ann Mancuso, Lisa Ciabattoni 



Stacey Hamilton, Sarah Towne, Kelly 
McMahon, Jen Stahl, Jen Conger 




jim Evans, Brian Horney, Shagha Tousi, Farah Bernier, Slandah Aldophe, Burt Howell 

384 Seniors 




Keri Sullivan, Courtney Chapman, Laura Panneton, Allison Cahill, Lisa Kahle, Lauren 
Schusten, Kadie Steinburg, Kelly Langton 



Bethany Forcucci, Paula Hopkins 




Monica Tarasco, Terri 
McGrath 



lass df 2002 



Seniors 385 




Claire Dennison, Lisa Casliel, Taryn Stone, Ericl<a Helwig, Lauren Ostrom 

386 Seniors 





3lin Kennedy, Tim Corsi, Merisa Leclerc, Amy Culver, Lauren Ziobro, Tim 
anchilla 



Morgan Hansen, Keri Foley 





Laura Panneton, Keri Sullivan, Aimee Whitlock, Allison Cahill, Kelly 
Langton, Amanda Bergen, Ray Albright, Courtney Chapman 




achel Sabella, Julie O'Rourke, Devon Noonan 



Lindsay Prendergast, Nicki Reilly, Mollie Roan, Kim Haydon 



Seniors 387 





Tarek Nahabet Talene Najarian 

School of Arts and Sciences School of Arts and Science 

Economics Econonnics 




Sally Nail Janelle Nanos 

School of Arts and Sciences School of Arts and Science 
Psychology English 




Brian Napoli Lawrence Napoli Michael Nardy Kate Nash Ellen Navarro 

School of Arts and Sciences School of Arts and Sciences School of Arts and Sciences School of Arts and Sciences School of Education i 

Communication Poli Science English English Human Development 




Bridget Navin Roopika Nayar Andrew Nazar Andrew Nelson Meghan Nering 

School of Education School of Arts and Sciences School of Arts and Sciences School of Arts and Sciences School of Arts and Scieno 
Human Development English History Poli Science Communication 



388 Seniors 



larrie-Ann Newman Megan Newrones Derik Newton Stephen Newton Kelly Ngo 

hool of Management School of Arts and Sciences School of Management School of Management School of Arts and Sciences 
Marketing Communication Computer Science-Csom Finance Communication 




Christine Nguyen Huong Nguyen Mary Nicholson Emily Niebauer Matthew Niner 

hool of Arts and Sciences Schoolof Arts and Sciences School of Management School of Education School of Arts and Sciences 
Chemistry Economics Marketing Secondary Education Psychology 




Devon Noonan 

School of Nursing 

Nursing 



William Norberg Katherine Northrup Kimberly Norvelle jacek Nowacki 

School of Management School of Arts and Sciences School of Management School of Arts and Sciences 
Accounting Communication Information Systems Mathematics 




Amanda Nowak Matthew Nowinski Bryan Nowlin Maureen Oakes Colleen O'Brien 

hool of Arts and Sciences School of Arts and Sciences School of Arts and Sciences School of Arts and Sciences School of Arts and Sciences 
Communication English History Philosophy Psychology 



Seniors 389 



Jason O'Brien Kathleen O'Brien Lindsay O'Brien Sliannon O'Brien Melissa Ochal 

School of Education School of Management School of Arts and Sciences School ofArts and Sciences School of Arts and Scienc 
Human Development Marketing Psychology Communication Psychology 




Casey O'Connell 

School of Arts and Sciences 

History 



Dennis O'Connor Megan O'Connor 

School of Management School of Management 

Marketing Marketing 



Molly O'Connor 

School of Arts and Sciences 

History 



Ryan O'Connor 
School of Arts and Scienc 
Biology 



k 


W^'""' "^^ ' ■''■'"■""""',''] 








Kathryn O'Dea 

School of Arts and Sciences 

Psychology 



■ 


H^ 


1, ■,■ ;y. .,:,^,^,,, 




Ik.. 


!'■:.:■:'■':■ 






■Pl'"'"'"' " -^Wv 


'-e^^BMH 


H 


Vl 


w^aJ^ 


1 


PI 



Catherine O'Donnell 

School of Education 

Human Development 



Timothy O'Donnell Margaret Oellrich 

School of Arts and Sciences School of Arts and Science 
Communication History 




Shaun O'Farrell David Ofenloch Ryan O'Hagan Rory O'Halloran Lauren Ohtake 

School of Management School ofArts and Sciences School of Arts and Sciences School of Management School of Arts and Scieno 

Marketing English English Finance History 



390 Seniors 



Bernadette O'Keefe Kate O'Keeffe Tarah Olsen Christine Olszewski Claire Olszewski 

jchoolof Arts and Sciences School of Arts and Sciences School of Nursing School of Arts and Sciences School of Education 
Theology English Nursing Psychology Elementary Education 




Patrick O'Mea Lindsay O'Mealia David O'Neil Nikol O'Neil Allison O'Neill 

khool of Arts and Sciences School of Arts and Sciences School of Arts and Sciences School of Arts and Sciences School of Arts and Sciences 

English History Communication Economics History 




Peter O'Neill Daniel O'Reilly 

School of Arts and Sciences School of Management 
Philosophy Finance 




Kristin Orlovsky Stephen Orosz 

School of Arts and Sciences School of Arts and Sciences 
Psychology History 




Seniors 391 





John O'Rourke 

School of Management 

Finance 



Julie O'Rourke 

School of Nursing 

Nursing 




Victoria Orrino Jessica Orsina 

School ofArts and Sciences School of Management 

Psychology Marketing 




Bethany Osborne Sara Osborne Lauren Ostrom Zoey O'Sullivan Martha Ott 

School of Arts and Sciences School of Arts and Sciences School of Arts and Sciences School ofArts and Sciences School of Management 
Communication English Communication Psychology Information Systems 




Jennifer Overbeck Mehmet Ozarslan Linda Paez Stephen Pagano Morgan Page 

School ofArts and Sciences School of Management Schoolof Arts and Sciences School of Arts and Sciences School of Education 
History Finance Psychology Sociology History 



392 Seniors 



Kimberly Pagella Indra Pagliarulo Timur Pakay Lauren Paladino Daniel Pallen 

ichool of Arts and Sciences School of Arts and Sciences Schiool of Arts and Sciences School of Management School of Management 
Economics Poli Science Communication Finance Economics-Csom 




Andrew Palmacci Kyle Palmer Nicholas Panagiotopoulos Laura Panneton Michael Papamichael 

chool of Arts and Sciences School of Management School of Management Schoolof Arts and Sciences School of Arts and Sciences 

English Marketing Accounting Communication Economics 




Nick Pappas ' Caroline Paray 

ichool of Arts and Sciences School of Management 

Biology Marketing 



Joel Pardalis 

School of Education 

Elementary Education 



Jonathan Parisi Nicholas Parker 

School of Arts and Sciences School of Arts and Sciences 

Communication Env. Geo. Science 




Pamela Parker Saskia Parker 

chool of Arts and Sciences School of Arts and Sciences 
Sociology Communication 



Shannon Parks 

School of Arts and Sciences 

English 



Christopher Parra Melissa Parsons 

School of Arts and Sciences School of Arts and Sciences 

English English 



Seniors 393 



■yi 




Rachael Telia, Stef Bando, Miles Delaney, Steve Beverage, Celeste Sedo, Mike Bellezza 




Alison Caso, Celeste Sedo, Angela Brosnan, Becca Tehrani, Liz John Pesatco, Steve Beverage, Kelly Boyle, Rich Hobbie 

Henry 





i 



Seniors 395 




Hugh Donnelly, Ted McNabb, Adam Devito, Shannon Smith, Melissa Quinn 



eremy Dubois, Brooke Chase 




Notre Dame 
395 Seniors 



s^ 



f-rtnded by the 



A Congree 






S^^ 


i 
1 


..^ 'WM«l' 


''^ " i^^^^^JM^^^^^H^I 




^K \ ^^^^^^1 


9 • 


***• 







Dave St. jean, Will Cage, Andrew Nelson, Michelle Marling, Rob Gal 




John Thomas, Michelle Marling 





Dan Portnov, Andy Noname, Ted Marchildon, Dave Okenloch, Nick 
Egiros,Joe Salerno, Mike Lombardy, Steve Pagano, Mike Jirout, Ray 
Beattie, Paul Fadakar 



Kathryn Feeney, Meaghan Flaherty 



Seniors 397 



Eric Patry Marcus Patterson Donald Payne Regina Payton Jannes Peiser 

School of Arts and Sciences School of Arts and Sciences School of Management School of Management School of Arts and Sciences 
History Communication Accounting Accounting Theater Arts 




Daniel Pekala Scott Peloso Lucheie-Ly Penka Renee Pento Evan Pepe 

School of Arts and Sciences School of Management School of Arts and Sciences School of Education School of Management 
Biology Finance Philosophy Elementary Education Finance 




^^My-k^^ y^J^ 




Oliver Perez Michael Pergam Amanda Peroulakis 

School of Management School of Management School of Management 
Finance Marketing Marketing 



Donald Perreault 

School of Nursing 

Nursing 



Lisa Perry 

School of Education 

Elementary Education 




Richard Perry Erica Peters Elizabeth Peterson Elizabeth Peterson Samantha Peterson 

School of Arts and Sciences School of Arts and Sciences School of Arts and Sciences School of Arts and Sciences School of Education 
Theology Psychology Economics Psychology Human Development 



398 Seniors 



Leonard Petitti Velimir Petkov Jonah Petri )illian Petrucelli Elena Pezzo 

hool of Management Schoolof Arts and Sciences School of Arts and Sciences School of Arts and Sciences School of Arts and Sciences 
Finance Biology Computer Science-A&cS Biology English 




Danielle Pfister Gretchen Pfizenmayer Reagan Philipp Emmerson Phillips Ryan Phillips 

hool ofArts and Sciences School of Management School of Management Schoolof Arts and Sciences School of Management 
Communication Accounting Finance Sociology Finance 




Seth Piken Jeffrey Pilley 

hool of Arts and Sciences School of Management 
Psychology Computer Science-Csom 




JLi...^^ 



Jared Pinsker Nicholas Pishvanov 

hool of Arts and Sciences School of Management 
English English 




Seniors 399 





Elisse Pitucco Martha Plante 

School of Arts and Sciences School of Arts and Scienc 
Psychology Theater Arts 




Catherine Pleil Andrew Plodkowski 

School of Arts and Sciences School of Arts and Scienc I 
Theology Biology | 




Yvonne Podzikowski Thomas Pohlad Lorin Polidora James Polizzi Amy Pollano 

School ofArts and Sciences School of Arts and Sciences School ofArts and Sciences School ofArts and Sciences School of Arts and Scienc 
Psychology History Psychology Communication Communication 




Carmen Poo Derek Popp Daniel Portnov John Posatko Andrew Poston 

School of Management School of Management School ofArts and Sciences School ofArts and Sciences School of Manageme 
Information Systems Finance Economics English Accounting 



400 Seniors 



.indsay Prendergast Timothy Preston Carrianne Preziosi Ryan Prime Lauren Prinn 

hool of Arts and Sciences School of Arts and Sciences School of Arts and Sciences School of Arts and Sciences School of Arts and Sciences 
Communication History Psychology Env Geo Science Communication 




Tyler Pruett Brianne Puleo Teri Puliafico Kathleen Puzo Charles Quinn 

hool of Management School of Management School of Arts and Sciences School of Arts and Sciences School ofArtsarxl Sciences 

Finance Marketing Psychology Communication Economics 




Kelly Quinn "' Melissa Quinn Victoria Quirk Jason Rae Patrick Rafter 

hool of Arts and Sciences School of Management School of Arts and Sciences School of Arts and Sciences School of Arts and Sciences 
English Finance Theater Arts Economics Biology 




Johanne Rameau Katherine Raschke Mary Rasmussen Timothy Rauer Erin Raughley 

hool of Arts and Sciences School of Arts and Sciences School of Arts and Sciences School of Arts and Sciences School of Arts and Sciences 
Communication Biology History Computer Science-A&S Biology 



Seniors 401 



Marissa Ravenna Alicia Ray Barbara Ray!! Cristen Redeker Austin Reece 

School of Management School of Arts and Sciences School of Arts and Sciences School of Arts and Sciences School of Arts and Science , 
Marketing English History Communication Philosophy 




Michael Reif Gregory Reilly Jennifer Reilly Nicollette Reilly Thomas Reilly 

School of Arts and Sciences School of Management School of Arts and Sciences School of Arts and Sciences School of Arts and Science 
History Marketing Film Studies Communication Chemistry 




^~-'' ii 





Elizabeth Reinecke Rachel Reinhart Antonina Renda Paul Rendeiro Gina Renzulli 

School of Arts and Sciences School of Management School of Management School of Management School of Management 

Psychology Finance Accounting Marketing Human Resources Mgnt, 




Glorimar Reuter 

School of Education 

Human Development 



Erin Reynolds 

School of Education 

Elementary Education 



Kate Reynolds 

School of Nursing 

Nursing 



Mary Reynolds Amanda Rhein 

School of Arts and Sciences School of Arts and Sciences 

Psychology Sociology 



402 Seniors 



Barbara Ricatti Emily Ricci Daniel Ricciato James Rice Andrea Richards 

hool of Management Schoolof Arts and Sciences School of Arts and Sciences School of Arts and Sciences School of Arts and Sciences 
Marketing English English Economics Communication 




Camden Richards Anne Elizabeth Rickard Richard Ridge Teresa Rini Michelle Rioux 

lool of Arts and Sciences School of Arts and Sciences School of Arts and Sciences School of Management School of Arts and Sciences 
English History Psychology Finance English 




Daniel Ripp " Ihab Riskalla 

hool of Management School of Management 
Sociology Economics-Csom 




Kenneth Rispoli Lucus Ritchie 

hool of Arts and Sciences School of Arts and Sciences 
Economics History 



Seniors 403 




Meghan Slihan, Terri Ann Pulifalo, Jess Orsina 



Brittanny Follmer, Anna Menezes, Mikel Emery, Jesse Shapiro 



^M 


1 




^^^^Etr ^^ht *"^ 


1 


1 


1 


^M 


^^^^^P 


w 




^^^^F <i^' . ^^^L ' 


n 


■ 


1 


H^^^H 


^^^^^|r 


■ 


^ ^Sv-jfl 


Wm.. iJV 


m 


B 


p 


i^^^H 


^^^pVr 


■^^■^'l 






1 


fh 




'v w ^^^ffllH^I 


^^n^^' 


J 








1 




V ^1 


^^1^^ 


^ 






— ■- 


f 


x 


J| 


^^^^r i^^.^^g 


1 






^ 


h 


■ 




1 iJ^ 


1 








^'^ w. 


., 


k H 


^^V A^'-V'V' 










S^^ 


^^ 


jHD^ ^^IH^H 


■Li^i^iii^j/^ ,' 








M 


n 


n 


L^lni^H 



Rosemary Doherty, Alyson Dudkowski, Dan Cronin, Evonne Maohkamphoiu, 
Holly Deitrich, Tim Kanaugh, Sarah Logue, Nicole Magaline 




ake Miller, Emily Worth, Matt Dodge, Natalia Soler 




Dana Aprea, Tom Lieber, John Jones, Jef Boardman, Nathan Gori, Melissa Kupferberg, James Goldsack, Kaitlin Rose, Seth Piken, Mary 



Beth Gallagher 

404 Seniors 




\my Chiverini, Erin Mohan, Liz Henry, Lauren Miller 




Dave Mawhiney, Nathaniel Gori, Sara Osborne, Mary Beth 

Gallagher 




Lauren McCourt, Melissa Irgens, Krissy Delouca, Catherine Bailey, 
Sonya Roncerich, Anne Sargent, Katie Skeffington 





Celeste Sedo, Stephanie 
Brown 



Allison Bean, Megan 
Newrones, Aimee Maron 



lass 6f 2002 



Seniors 405 




Hope Villella, Theresa Clifford, Jen Spencer 



Morgan Hansen, Keri Foley 




Ann Russo, Sue Ryan, Kim Dunfey, Courtney McGrath 

406 Seniors 




idam Felzani, Stacey Hamilton, Eric Sjoberg, Rachel 
abella, Brent Jansen, Jen Conger, Mike Cilleberto, Jen 
tahl, Sara Towne, Kelly McMahon 



Seniors 407 





Brigeth Rivera Jennifer Rizzo 
School of Arts and Sciences School of Arts and Scienc 
English Biology 




m. 



Myisha Roach Mollie Roan 

School of Arts and Sciences School of Managemet 

Poll Science Marketing 




Meredith Roberts Deborah Robertson Jillian Robey Brenna Robinson Colin Robinson 

School of Management Schoolof Arts and Sciences School of Arts and Sciences School ofArts and Sciences School of Arts and Scienc 
QiDerations/Stiategc Management Psychology Psychology Psychology History 




:iv. 

Julian Rocco Mary Rod Elizabeth Roebke Stefan Rogalski Jacqueline Rohrer 

School of Management School ofArts and Sciences School of Arts and Sciences School of Management School ofArts and Scienc 
Marketing Biology Art History Marketing Biology 



408 Seniors 



Jacqueline Rollins Michelle Romano Andrew Romanowsky Michelle Romanski Sonya Roncevich 

School of Arts and Sciences School of Arts and Sciences School of Arts and Sciences School of Management School of Arts and Sciences 
Psychology Sociology History Accounting Biology 




Mary Root Theodore Roper Bryan Rose Kaitlin Rose Erica Rosenthal 

Jchool of Arts and Sciences School of Management School of Arts and Sciences School of Management School of Arts and Sciences 
Psychology Accounting Philosophy Marketing Communication 



^ 



'\ 





Kristi Rosenthal ' Jacqueline Rousseau Julie Roust Amanda Roy Thomas Rudersdorf 

School of Education School of Arts and Sciences School ofArts and Sciences School of Management School of Arts and Sciences 
Human Development Communication Economics Human Resojces Management Biology 




Sheila Rudy Katrin Ruhfus Brian Rusnica Ann Russo Daniel Russo 

School of Arts and Sciences School of Management School of Arts and Sciences Schoolof Arts and Sciences School of Arts and Sciences 
History Finance Communication Env Geo Science Computer Science-A&S 



Seniors 409 



Jennifer Russo Vanessa Russo John Rutkowski Caroline Ruttner Katie Ryan 

School of Management School of Arts and Sciences School ofArts and Sciences School of Arts and Sdenoes School of Managemer 
Finance Communication Psychology Sociology Information Systems 




Patrick Ryan Susan Ryan Martin Rybak Joshua Ryder Diana Rzemien 

School of Management School of Arts and Sciences School of Arts and Sciences School of Management School of Arts and Science 
Marketing Env Ceo Science Economics Economics-Som Psychology 




Rachel Sabella Matthew Safaii Cristin Sager Vanessa Salas Roman Salasznyk 

School ofArts and Sciences School of Management School of Management School of Arts and Sciences School ofArts and Science 
Poll Science Finance Marketing International Study Biology I 





Stephen Salazar Nathan Salley William Sample Marissa Sams Kevin Sanginario 

School of Arts and Sciences School of Management School of Arts and Sciences School ofArts and Sciences School of Arts and Science 

Poll Science Finance Mathematics Communication Economics 



410 Seniors 



Anne Sargent 

jchool of Arts and Sciences 

English 



Carrie Sargent 

School of Nursing 

Nursing 



Julie Sautter 

School of Nursing 

Nursing 



jason Savage Tanya Scales 

School of Arts and Sciences School of Management 

Chemistry Finance 




Doreen Scanlon Courtney Scatuorchio Kari Scavotto Jillian Schedneck John Schellman 

ichool of Arts and Sciences School of Management School of Management Schoolof Arts and Sciences School of Arts and Sciences 

Communication Marketing Human Resources Management English Communication 




Richard Schibell Thomas Schiera 

School of Arts and Sciences School of Arts and Sciences 
Philosophy English 




Gregory Schmidt Claire Schnabel 

School of Arts and Sciences School of Arts and Sciences 
Economics Economics 




Seniors 411 




jOSTMLEGE 





Christopher Schnieder 

School of Arts and Sciena 

Poli Science 




Jamie Schuler Elizabeth Schuiz 

School of Management School of Managemen 
Marketing HimanResoLicEsManagemer 




Amelia Schumacher Jessica Schwartz Lauren Schwartz Jaclyn Schwarz Amanda Schweitzer 

School of Arts and Sciences School of Education School of Arts and Sciences School of Arts and Sciences School of Arts and Science 
English Human Development Poli Science Psychology Sociology 





.aw 






Bridgett Scimone Nathan Sciortino Nicole Scivoletti Lavette Scott-Smith Patrick Scura 

School of Arts and Sciences School of Arts and Sciences School of Arts and Sciences School of Arts and Sciences School of Managemen 
Psychology Psychology Biology Biology Accounting 



412 Seniors 



Celeste Sedo Jessica Selander Annette Seminario Rahul Sen Rahul Sen Shamna 

chcx)l of Arts and Sciences School of Arts and Sciences School of Arts and Sciences School of Management School of Management 
Communication Biology Psychology Marketing Marketing 




Melissa Senz Carl Serafino Cara Serio Eva Setiady Paul Seuc 

chool of Management School of Management School of Arts and Sciences School of Management School of Management 
Accounting Finance Economics Finance Finance 




Edward Seyfried " Brett Shaad Tousi Shaghayegh Anand Shah Kevin Shah 

chool of Arts and Sciences School of Arts and Sciences School of Management School of Management School of Management 
History International Study Finance Accounting Accounting 




Jesse Shapiro Julie Shapiro Priya Shastri Brian Sheehan Matthew Sheehan 

chool of Management School of Arts and Sciences School of Arts and Sciences School of Management School of Management 
Finance English Psychology General Mgmt Communication 



Seniors 413 




414 Seniors 



Catherine Murray, Tricia Finnerty, Michaela Crowley, Erin Murray, Terri McGrath, Liz Mocarski 




ec Bardzik, Bethany Kovar, Mike Marett, Andrew Matteo, Kevin Comprelli, Val Boosalis, Erin Motnan, Amy Chiverini 

n Foster-Moore 





T 

■i 


^fi 


^£ 




li 


-^* 1 


i 


^<fi 1 


\ 


# 


% 1 


■ « 


/ yH 


H ^ 


> .JH 


■Is 



Jen Connor, Tara 
Koenis 



iryn Mahoney, Diandra 
D'Ambroso, Amanda Belt, Katherine 
Gonanno 



lass m 



Seniors 415 




416 Seniors 



Brittany Follman, Allison Cahill, Lisa Kahle, Aimee Whitlock, Janelle Casper, Amanda Berger 




nn Diaz, Christa Haverley 



Seniors 417 



Michael Shehorn Isabel Shen Patrick Shepherd James Sheppard Corey Sherman 

School of Management School of Education School ofArts and Sciences School ofArts and Sciences School of Arts and Science 
Finance Elementary Education Theater Arts History Communication 




Justin Shim Lisa Sholk Stefanie Shrout Brooke Shull Kristina Shultz 

School ofArts and Sciences School of Arts and Sciences School ofArts and Sciences School ofArts and Sciences School of Nursing 
Biology Psychology Communication History Nursing 




Nina Shum Christine Sieberg Anne Siegal 

School ofArts and Sciences School of Education School of Education 

Economics Elementaiy/Moderate Special Needs Early Childhood 



Jacob Sifers Szymon Sikorski 

School of Management School ofArts and Science 
Marketing Hispanic Study 




Meghan Silhan Acel Silva Jason Silva Amanda Silvia Carole Simon 

School of Arts and Sciences School of Management School of Arts and Sciences School of Arts and Sciences School of Arts and Science 
English Economics-Som Biology English Economics 



418 Seniors 



Alison Simons Dawnmarie Simpson Mellesia Simpson Matthew Sims Kristen Sinacore 

;hool of Management Schoolof Arts and Sciences School of Arts and Sciences School of Arts and Sciences School of Education 
Marketing Communication Psychology Communication Human Development 




Robert Singagliese Jason Sinnarajah Kari Siviski Eric Sjoberg Vanessa Skawski 

hool of Arts and Sciences School of Management School of Arts and Sciences School of Management School of Arts and Sciences 
History Finance Economics Information Systems History 




Katie Skeffington ' Kevin Skelly 

chool of Management School of Arts and Sciences 
Marketing Economics 




Kolleen Skoney 
hool of Management 
Finance 



Elizabeth Skora 

School of Nursing 

Nursing 




Seniors 419 





Benjamin Slaughter Jennifer Sloan 

School of Management School of Arts and Science 
Marketing English 





David Slocum Carolyn Smith 

School of Arts and Sciences School of Arts and Science 

History Classics 




Rory Smith Shannon Smith Ellyse Soedjasa Natalia Soler Mehreteab Solomon 

School of Arts and Sciences School of Management School of Management School of Education School of Managemen 
Communication Information Systems Information Systems Human Development Information Systems 




Dean Somes Cynthia Song Peter Sorge Kerrie Sorrentino Nicholas Soupios 

School of Arts and Sciences School of Management School of Management School of Management School of Arts and Science* 
Theater Arts Marketing Finance Accounting Poll Science 



420 Seniors 



Jennifer Spencer 

School of Nursing 

Nursing 



Kristen Spillane 

School of Nursing 

Nursing 



Brian Spitser Kalherine Springfield Chitrawan Srisanan 

School of Management School of Arts and Sciences School of Arts and Sciences 
Finance Studio Art Economics 




Katherine Staab David Stachura 

hool of Arts and Sciences School of Arts and Sciences 
Art History History 



Jennifer Stahl 

School of Education 

Human Development 



Theo Stamoulis Casey Stanley 

School of Arts and Sciences School of Management 

Economics Marketing 




Vanessa Stanley " James Stanton Ryan Stanton Danielle Stapleton Cristopher Stauffer 

hool of Arts and Sciences School of Management School of Arts and Sciences School of Arts and Sciences School of Arts and Sciences 

International Study Finance Psychology Biology Computer Science-A&S 




Ben Steinbuhler Jason Stephens Brianne Stepherson Jennifer Steudte Brody Stevens 

chool of Management School of Management School of Arts and Sciences School of Education School of Management 
omputer Science-Csom Finance Communication Elementary Education Finance 



Seniors 421 



Bridgette Stewart Brooke Stewart Christopher Stockel Kathryn Stone Megan Stone 

Schoolof Arts and Sciences School of Arts and Sciences School ofArts and Sciences School ofArts and Sciences School of Education 
Poli Science Psychology Philosophy Communication Human Developmen 




Taryn Stone Brian St Pierre Anna Strike Daniel Suchecki Matthew Sugarman 

School of Education School of Arts and Sciences School of Arts and Sciences School of Management School of Managemer 
Child In Society Economics Psychology Information Systems Finance 




jeong Suh Brianne Sullivan Bridget Sullivan Catherine Sullivan Erin Sullivan | 

School of Arts and Sciences School of Education School ofArts and Sciences School ofArts and Sciences School ofArts and Science 
Communication Human Development English Sociology Sociology 




Jessica Sullivan 

School of Management 

Accounting 



Keri Sullivan 

School of Nursing 

Nursing 



Kristin Sullivan 

School of Nursing 

Nursing 



Laura Sullivan Louisa Sullivan 

School ofArts and Sciences School ofArts and Science 
Sociology Sociology 



422 Seniors 



Mark Sullivan Meghan Sullivan Russell Sullivan Thomas Sullivan Timothy Sullivan 

chool of Management School of Education School of Management School of Management School of Arts and Sciences 
Finance Child In Society Marketing Marketing Poli Science 




Peggy Sung Jay Surabian Trevor Swanberg Rebecca Swanner Ryan Sweeney 

chool of Arts and Sciences School of Arts and Sciences School of Management School of Arts and Sciences School of Arts and Sciences 
Computer Science-A&cS History Finance Communication Psychology 




Alison Swicker Elena Sylos Labini 

>chool of Arts and Sciences School of Management 

History Finance 




Stephen Sztuk Dean Szumylo 

chool of Arts and Sciences School of Arts and Sciences 
Poli Science Biology 




Seniors 423 




Jennifer Stahl, Stacy Hamilton, Sarah Towne 



Kerrin Bowers, Jessica Sullivan 




Stacey Hamilton, Sarah Towne, Jen Conger, Kelly McMahon 

424 Semors 





%. m^ 



V 



^ 



>v 



ooke Molloy, Tracy Beddeos, Claire Weiss, Abbi Daniel, Sara Tully 



Mouicela Baubosa, Nina Shum, Brigeth 
Riveria 







Brigeth Riveria, 
Camille Thelin 



Camille Thelin, Slandah Adolphe, 
Vasco Equia, Nikki Kadomiya, Mia 
Johnson, Johnny Jones, Brigeth Riveria, 
Maria Marottoli 




la9|^f 200 




Seniors 425 




Chris Lillimoe, Jay Tini, Andrew Goldberg, Wes George, Tim Haal<e 

426 Seniors 




f 



/" 





t/lichelle Marling, janelle Nanos 



Liz Cappelutti, Vicl<i Cozzi, Kim Karagosian 





Virginia Mortirua, Tomi Mardison, Vicl<y Noname, Caitlin Barry, 
Kim Donohue, Kriston Gary 




Lisa Kahle, Amanda Berger, Kadie Stemburg, Kelly Langton, 
Courtney Chapman, Aimee Whitlock, Lauren Modeen, Lauren 
Panneton, Keri Sullivan, Meghan Kane 



iourtney McGrath, Ann Russo 



Seniors 427 





Ani Tahmassian Amanda Tai 

School of Arts and Sciences School of Managemen 
Biochemistry Accounting 




Chien Tai School of Sakura Takano 

Management Information School of Management 
Systems Finance 




Ken Takeyama Michelle Tam Nicholas Tambakeras Paul Tamburro Yolanda Tammaro 

School of Arts and Sciences School of Management School of Arts and Sciences School of Management School of Arts and Science i 

Economics Finance English Marketing Biochemistry 




Monica Tarasco Aileen Tarpey Kelly Tarr Michael Tata S Amanda Tauss 

School of Arts and Sciences School of Management School of Arts and Sciences chool of Management School of Arts and Sciences 

Poll Science English Biology Finance Psychology 

428 Seniors 




f 

Peter Tavolacci Bryan Taylor Rebecca Tehran! Rachael Telia Hannah Temple 

chool of Management School of Arts and Sciences School of Management School of Arts and Sciences School of Education 

Finance History Marketing Communication Elementary Education 




Noelle Tenpenny Anne Terry AmyTetreault Alex Thai Camille Thelin 

Ichool of Arts and Sciences School of Arts and Sciences School of Arts and Sciences School of Management School of Arts and Sciences 
Economics English Psychology Information Systems Poll Science 





Adrian Thibodeau Aye Thiha Brett Thomas John Thomas Perren Thomas 

chool of Arts and Sciences School of Management School of Management School of Arts and Sciences School of Management 
History Economics-Som Finance Poll Science Finance 




Amanda Thompson Ryan Thompson Kelly Thurman Matthew Tibbetts Stephen Tibbetts 

chool of Arts and Sciences School of Arts and Sciences School of Management School of Arts and Sciences School of Management 
Biochemistry Poli Science Marketing Economics Marketing 



Seniors 429 



Michael Tierney Sarah Tierney Richard Tilghman Kenneth Tilton Jonathan Timmons 

School of Arts and Sciences School of Management School of Management School of Arts and Sciences School of Managemen 
Computer Science-A&S Marketing Finance Env Ceo Science Finance 




Jay Tini Miroslava Tixi Joanne Tjandranegara Ryan Toben Stephanie Tobia 

School of Management School of Arts and Sciences School of Management School of Arts and Sciences School of Arts and Science 
Finance Sociology Finance English Biology 




Katherine Tobin 

School of Arts and Sciences 

English 



Paula Todisco 

School of Nursing 

Nursing 



Amanda Tollar Angela Tolliver William Toof 

School of Education School of Arts and Sciences School of Arts and Sciences 
Human Development Sociology Communication 



!.«!Ssi«SS!S^SSS!S^!^SS!SSi^5S.-: 




Michael Torbert Nicole Torniero Shaghayegh Tousi Andrew Towers Sarah Towne 

School of Arts and Sciences School of Education School of Management School of Management School of Arts and Sciences 
Poll Science Elementary Education Finance Finance Communication 



430 Seniors 



David Trainor Vanessa Tramontozzi Timothy Tranctiilla Amanda Trapp Laurence Tree 

:hool of Arts and Sciences School of Arts and Sciences School of Arts and Sciences Schoolof Arts and Sciences School of Arts and Sciences 
Communication Communication International Study Communication History 




Jared Treiber Janelle Tribble Gary Tripmacher RosarieTucci Kathryn Tucker 

chool of Arts and Sciences School of Education School ofArts and Sciences School of Arts and Sciences School of Management 
English Human Development History Communication Marl<eting 




Kelly Tufts ' Sara Tully 

ichool of Arts and Sciences School of Education 
Psychology Secondary Education 




Tina Turilli 

School of Nursing 

Nursing 



Erik Tuvey 

School ofArts and Sciences 

Philosophy 




Seniors 431 





Kerry Twomey Christopher Tynan 

School of Arts and Sciences School of Arts and Science 
English History 




Kevin Tynan Kristen Ulrich 

School of Arts and Sciences School of Nursing 
History Nursing 




Caroline Urda Eric Uva Amit Vagal Bennett Valencia Kyle Valenta 

School of Management School of Management School of Arts and Sciences School of Management School ofArts and Science 
Human Resources Managennent Accounting Psychology General Mgmt English 




MiAtf^ki 




Kristin Valentine David Van Michael Van Joanna Vanden Sharon Van Tuyl 

School of Nursing School of Management School ofArts and Sciences School ofArts and Sciences School of Arts and Sciena 
Nursing Finance History History Psychology 



432 Seniors 




L 

Brian Vassallo 



Amy Vautour 



Amanda Veazley 



Ruta Veitas 



chool of Management School of Management School of Education School of Arts and Sciences School of Arts and Sciences 



Finance 



Marketing 



Elementary Education 



English 



Communication 




Marc Velasq 
:hoolof Artsand 
English 



uez James Vender Robert Verdier Christopher Verioti Corey Viafore 

Sciences School of Arts and Sciences School of Management School of Arts and Sciences School of Education 

English Finance Biology Elementary/Intense Special Needs 




Tanya Villalobos " Thomas Villano Ana Villaveces Hope Villella Sara Vlasak 

chool of Management School of Management School of Management School of Arts and Sciences School of Education 
Finance Finance Accounting Psychology Elementary Education 




Lindsay Volk 

School of Nursing 

Nursing 



Phuong Vu 

School of Management 

Management 



Kathleen Wack 

School of Education 

Human Development 



Shawna Wagner 

School of Nursing 

Nursing 



Katrina Wain 

School of Nursing 

Nursing 



Seniors 433 




Sean Kane, Ted Hesson, Jesse Shapiro, Lauren Ostrom, Kathleen Wack, Mike 
Lombardi, Kevin Sanqinario 






Tricia Finnerty, Erica Graf, Sarah Cole 



^m 



Brandon Maitre, Jay Surabian, Jared MacLaughlin, Pete Manerino, Duff Janus Megan Maloof and Rosemary Doherty 





434 Seniors 




anie Ho, Stephanie 
Laemoa, Skye Chang. 



^p*^"~-' 



.:!!eUiiia 



Seniors 435 




Lauren Miller, Angela Martinez Brosnan, Erin 


Mohan, Kelly Boyle 






Alyssa Hale, Dave McGowan, Kate Feeney 






Scott Gorman, Jen Spencer, Dave Leopold, Ben Kadamus, Katie 
Basta, Theresa Clifford, Hope Viilella 




Hanna Mak, Robin Loone, Rosemary Maffei, Martha Plante 

436 Seniors 




att Dunbar, John Dorney, Garry Murray, Spunky the Clown, Jarret Wright, 
wson Tree, Matt Gruber 



Kristen Sicamore, Kerrin Bowers 




att Gruber, Eric Knakai, Matt Dunbar, Eric 
itry, jarret Wright 



Seniors 437 



Dana Walczak Kristin Waldron Adanna Walker Matthew Walker Scott Walker 

School of Management School of Arts and Sciences School of Arts and Sdences School of Management School of Education 
Accounting Biology Psychology Finance Elementary Educatior 




Eva Wallman Brian Walsh Christopher Walsh Jennifer Walsh Kevin Walsh 

School of Management School of Management School of Management School of Management School of Managemer 

Marketing Finance Information Systems General Mgmt Finance 




Jonathon Warchol Courtney Warco Katherine Warren Michael Waryasz Timothy Wassler 

School of Arts and Sciences School of Arts and Sciences School of Education School of Arts and Sciences School of Arts and Science 
History Poll Science Elementary Education History Communication 




Christopher Waters Michael Watkins Michael Weber June Webers John Weeks 

School of Management School of Arts and Sciences School of Management School of Management School ofArts and Science 
Finance Poll Science Economics-Csom Marketing Psychology 



438 Seniors 



Eric Wei John Weicher Andreya Wein Alyssa Weinberg 

:hool of Arts and Sciences Schoolof Arts and Sciences School of Arts and Sciences School of Management 
English Computer Science-A&S Communication Marketing 



Robin Weingarten 

School of Nursing 

Nursing 




Claire Weiss Brienne Wesoiek Leah Westra Kathleen Whalen Robin Wheeler 

School of Education School of Arts and Sciences School of Arts and Sciences School of Arts and Sciences School of Arts and Sciences 
Elementary Education Biology Economics Communication History 




Johanna Whelan " Charles White 

School of Education School of Arts and Sciences 
Early Childhood Philosophy 




Sean White 
;hool of Arts and Sciences 
History 



Aimee Whitlock 
School of Education 
Secondary Education 





^ 



/ 



Seniors 439 





Matthew Whittaker Alexis Wildenauer 

School of Arts and Sciences School of Arts and Science 
Economics French 




Christopher Wilkie Courtney Williams 

School of Arts and Sciences School of Arts and Science 
English Chemistry 




Kathryn Williams Mark Williams Angelica Wilshire Amy Wilson Charles Wilson 

School of Arts and Sciences School of Arts and Sciences School of Management School of Education School of Management 
Psychology History Human Resources Management Secondary Education Information Systems 




Daniele Wilson 

School of Arts and Sciences 

Sociology 



Kristen Wilson 

School of Nursing 

Nursing 



Todd Wilson Yolande Wilson Daniel Wilzbach 

School of Arts and Sciences School of Management School of Managemen 
English Finance Finance 



440 Seniors 



Karin Wissmann 
School of Education 
Secondary Education 



Bethany Withers Lidia Witkowski 

School of Arts and Sciences School of Management 
English General Mgmt 



Jaclyn Woilkowski 

School of Education 

Elementary Education 



Theresa V. 'j:j..!m 

School of Arts and Sciences 

Poli Science 




Jessica Woldt Cheryl Wolensky Colin Wolfe Cindy Wong Kimberly Wong 

School of Education School of Arts and Sciences Schoolof Arts and Sciences School of Arts and Sciences School of Arts and Sciences 

Human Development Poli Science Poli Science Communication Computer Science-A&S 




^i^ 




L 

Yujin Woo " Christopher Worth Emily Worth Jarret Wright Kristen Wright 

chool of Management School of Arts and Sciences School of Management School ofArts and Sciences School of Education 

Accounting International Study Accounting History Human Development 




Christopher Wyvill 
chool of Management 
General Mgmt 



Alison Yanes 

School of Education 

Child In Society 



Cindy Yang Kenneth Yarmosh 

School of Education School ofArts and Sciences 
Elementary/ModeratESpedalNeedsComputer Science-A&S 



Andy Yen 

School ofArts and Sdences 

English 



Seniors 441 



David Yesue Chung-Wei Yi Sungnam Yi Elaine Yin Angela Yingling 

School ofArts and Sciences School of Management School of Arts and Sciences School of Management School of Arts and Scieno 
Economics OperatJons/Strategc Management English Finance English 




Kerry Yip James Yong Thomas Young Youngha Yu Jiyon Yun 

School ofArts and Sciences School of Management School ofArts and Sciences School of Arts and Sciences School of Arts and Science 
Economics Finance Computer Science-A&S Mathematics Biology 




Albert Yuravich Gregory Zannella Courtney Zecevich Susan Zelasko Bryan Zembrowski 

School ofArts and Sciences School ofArts and Sciences School ofArts and Sciences School ofArts and Sciences School of Arts and Science 
English Economics English Theology Biochemistry 




Diana Zentko Shi Zheng Benjamin Zimmerman Lauren Ziobro Megan Zito 

School of Arts and Sciences School of Management School of Arts and Sciences School of Education School of Arts and Science 
Biology Finance Communication Human Development Psychology 



442 Seniors 



Julianne Dyer 



jared McLaughlin Kevin Murphy 



Dean Szumylo Robert Singagliese 




Seniors 443 




Rosemary Doherty, Holly Dietrich, Alyson Dudkowski, Nicole Magaline, Megan Maloof, Sarah Logue 




Katherine Hickey, Joey Mclntire (New Kids on the Block), 
Catherine McAleavey, Kim Connors, Beth Daley 




Michelle Marling, Kate Gibson, Carole Simon-Verarct, Kristin Waldron, Siobhan McCarry, Emily Murphy, Swapna Karrakuler 

444 Seniors 









1^ 


#A 




rw y 


\ '-T^^'^^lBHslgjilBi 


V i si^ 


/ 


^^ 


\ -T^ 


>-^s@p)i^^^^, 


s ^ 


\ 


1- 


k : n^' 


iii, ] 


( 


V 






t 




Celeste Sedo 




Tom Pohlad, Greg Guido, 
Kevin Comprelli, Jon Foster- 
Moore, Andrew Matteo 



f 201)2 



Seniors 445 




Matt, Tio Yano, Mary Beth Gallagher, Nathaniel Gori, Tom Lieber 

446 Seniors 




anya Scales 



Meredith Cataldo, Emily Ricci, Angela Muccino 



Seniors 447 




Raya Doyle, Ana Menezes, Alyson Dudkowski 



Brittany Follmer, Jason Rae 




Katie Joyce, Matt Kunkel, Gretchen Pfizemnayer, Yvonne Podzikowski, Anne Joel, Jennie Willson, Erika Miklus 

448 Seniors 




rinh Nouyen 



Seniors 449 




Kim Haydon, Lindsay Prednergast, Mollie Roan, Anna Geraty, Nicki Reilly, 
Louisa Sullivan, Kathy Tucker 



Bob Deflesco, Brandon Maitre, Garrett Loughlin, 
John Flaherty 




Jenny Wilson, Kristin Orlovsky, Liz Herr, Erika Miklus, Yvonne Podzikowski, Gretchen Pfitzenmayerl 

450 Seniors 




atie Kish, Katie Joyce, Noel Auguston, Lilly larrapino, Katie Doran 



Kristin VValdron, Michelle Vlarling, Carole 
Simon-Vermot 



• c.f f 




v ,\ jjij::>li' 



C 





Carole Simon-Vermot, Kristin Waldron, Michelle Marling, Katie 
Gibson, Emily Murphy, Swampna Kamakula 







Tom Vilano, Tim Haake, Chris Sclinieders 



/lichelle DiMarzio, Alyssa Hale, Ryan O'Connor, Kathrjm Feeney 



Seniors 451 




Rosemary Doherty, Megan Maloof 



Dave Leopold, Erin McNamara, Karleen Greene 




Mark Williams, Meredith Roberts, Ginger Johnson, Hunter Larson 

452 Seniors 




arah Logue, Nicole Magaline, Megan Maloof, Rosemary Doherty, Evonne 
laokhamphiou, Holly Dietrich, Kin Hinds 



Tini Rufus, Lindsey Heller 




enn Diaz, Greg Johnson 



Seniors 453 




Monica Diaz, Mary Pat Rasmussen, Katie Sullivan, jen Croyle, Jenn Diaz 

454 Seniors 




Jucelis Escano, Myisha Roach 




Rachel Sabella, Stacy Hamilton, Julie O'Rourke, )en Stahl, 
Sarah Towne, Kelly McMahon 




Traci Gomes, Roystone Martinez 










p 






^^B^ <=:^ i 






^^^kk^-Ur*S 



Kate O'Keeffe, Emily Ricci 



Kerri Cummings, Nina 
Shim 



lass of 2002 



Seniors 455 




Brian Flemming, Jeremy Dubois, Lynn Berman 



Nikolay Mandinga, Lillanne Cooper 




Bonu, Katie, Miroslava, Jonathan, Bibi, Elsa, Joanne 

456 Seniors 




Meghan Niering, Siobhan McCarry, Carol Simon, Michelle Marling Kate O'Keefe, Angela Muccino, Emily Ricci, Brooke Kerkorian 

Seniors 457 




Sara Osborne, Dana Aprea, Mary Beth Gallagher 



eremy Dubois, Pete Arcoma, Mike Lombardi 










Lauren Prinn, Kerri Cummings, Brigeth Rivera 



Brooke Chase, Amanda Tauss, Caroline Paray, Kim 
Mandara 




Holly Dietrich, Kimberly Hinds, Evonne Maokhamphiou, Megan Maloof, Rosemary Doherty, Sarah Logue 

458 Seniors 




elly Boyle, Lauren Miller, Alison Caso, Celeste Sedo, Liz Henry Kevin Fitzpatrick, Kerrie Sorrentino, Ted Curd 











Caroline Paray, Brooke Chase, Amanda Tauss, Kim 
Mandara 




atie O'Brien and Ali Weinberg 



Kim Miller, Jen Montague, Megan Sullivan, Kim 
McKenna, Carly McGee, Courtney McCrath, Ann 
Russo, Kim Dumfey 

Seniors 459 




Ninia Renda, Kate O'Keeffe, Brooke Kerkorian, Emily Ricci 

460 Seniors 




ngie Brosnan and Lizzy Henry 




enn Stahl, Rachel Sabella, Sarah Tonn, Jennifer 
Conger 




Rich Hobbie, Wes George, Ryan Fandetti, Casey 
Stanley, Chris Lillemoe, James McCeney 








Gerry Murray, Jarret Wright, Lawson Tree, Matt 
Gruber, John Dorney, Matt Dunbar 



/laricela Barbosa and Carole Siman-Vermot 



Seniors 461 




&^^ * 



4p^ 



^ktet^ 




-*»««> 



The staff of Sub Turri 2002 

would like to extend our appreciation 

to the organizations and individuals 

who have so generously supported 

our efforts. Because of their kindness, 

we were able to capture a full year of 

memories, and preserve them for the 

future. You have our most sincere 

^ gratitude. 








r ■'^■^-v'J^ 



.^fsRi 



-.--■^M 



r% 






\ 












^ 






.^^^ 



^^(IlS^ 







14 



%rtS^" 






^r^ 



'4iAik1 



Congrattdations 
Class of 2002 




BOSTON COLLEGE 

tJF^HRnRHnnn cfntfr 



464 Advertisements 



From the 
BOSTON COLLEGE CAREER CENTER 

BEST WISHES TO THE CLASS OF 2002 

Career Center services are always 
available to you as alumni. 

*^Career Network 
*^Job Listings online 
'^^Career Resource Library 
*Job Search Workshops / 

Career Programs 
*^Individual Appointments 
"^Evening Hours on Tuesdays 

and Wednesdays during the 

academic year 
*^Visit our homepage at 

http://careercenter.bc.edu 



I 





Boston College 

4 BOOKSTORE * 



www.bc.edu/bookstore 



Your link to BC merchandise on and off campus. 



THE OFFICE OF RESIDENTIAL LIFE 

thanks and congratulates all members of 
the Resident Staff, especially those in 

the Class of 2002. 

Your serviccy dedication, and loyally to Boston College 

sets new standards of excellence. 



--^■^«".^»-y ,<?>K^.,.■;^-.i .■■>-iMJ-;*;.—4,-^-./,-:'Q s;*i,v-s:^v»-;i.:-*'. ,- ■Jtfts'j:*- *sfiK.v. „„^ iiL-uss -.■'i^'ijs-z^*.'."? 



Advertisements 465 



ODSD 









■^ 



.0^ 



<b^ 



i^'= 









J^ 



.0^ 






Best wishes to the Boston College Class of 2002. 
It has been our pleasure working with you! 



^ 



<«. 



\ 



% 






''<^. 






Ci 







^D on V 



The Office of the Dean for Student Development 

Seiying students as educators by encouraging responsible decision malcing and accountability, fostering an appreciation of 
diverse cultures, values and justice, and promoting respect for all members of the University Community. 
McElroy 233, McElroy 141, McElroy 114, O'Connell House 109 ' 



Congratulations 

Class of 2002 



ii 




from 
Campus-Ministry 



406^ Advertisements 



-::^!!.> ',*'■' ""i- 



Congratulations 
to the Class of 2002 

Best Wishes for a 
successful future 

from the staff at the office 

ofAHANA 

Student Programs 



Mt^tr^.'.i^:^-. 




Business Communication Center, Inc. 

Offset Printing • Typesetting • Graptiic Design 
Business Cards & Stationery • Desktop Publisliing 
[G)) Mailing • Banners & Signs • Business Forms 
Invitations • Bindery • and much more! 




You'll find us in Boston 
at The Prudential Tower Lower Lobby 
(617) 262-3920 • Fax (617) 262-6442 
email: bccpru@aol.com 



and in Chestnut Hill at 

at BC Press • Boston College 

(617) 552-3418/3419 



The Student Admission Program wishes 
to congratulate its graduating seniors. 

Thank you for four years of dedicated service and spirited 

committment. 




Good luck & Best Wishes. We'll miss seeing you in the office! 






Advertisements 467 





rPUl 




-jJij^^S 


iSPl 



jm'-^^, 



1,942 exams 
197 term 
'^'^, al 



1 BC 



m 



I 



Congratulations Class of 2002 

from the Carroll School of Management faculty and staff. 








RATULAT. 



to thi 





from the faculty and staff of the School of Nursing 



The nurses of the 20th century salute the nurses of the 21st century! 




468 Advertisements 



Congratulations Seniors! 



Katie Abrahamsen Katie Basta 



Tim Fallon 



Tim Landry Dave McGowan Kate O'Dea 




Well Miss You. 
The Ignatian Society 



The Deans and Faculty of the College of Arts and Sciences 

Congratulate 

the new members of the 

Order of the Cross and Crown 




And all of the members of the great Class of 2002 



Advertisements 469 



misi.^. 



•k- 



Light a flame! 

Congratulations to the 
Class of 2002 



This year, we mark the 50th anniversary of the founding 
of the School of Education at Boston College. 

Our Golden Anniversary will be a time of 
great celebration. 

We extend an invitation to the Class of 2002 
to return in 2052 for two celebrations — 

the Golden Anniversary of your graduation 
and the Centennial of the Lynch School. 




LYNCH SCHOOL 

"I have come to spread fire. What more can I want than that it take flame." 
Words from the Gospel of Luke inscribed on the cornerstone of Campion Hall 



470 Advertisements 



The Carroll School of Management Government 

congratulates the Class of 2002 
and appreciates the contributions and guidance 

of its senior officers. 



Thank Yotiy 



Ali Weinberg 

Liz Henry 

Lisa Julian 

Matt Sheehan 

Mike Abren 

Emily Manning 



You will all be missed. 



! 






■fes 




Advertisements 471 





I 



Jostens, Inc. 



Would Like to Congratulate 



the Graduating Members 



of the Class of 2002 



Best of luck in the future! 



2505 Empire Drive 

P.O.Box 5867 

Winston-Salem, NC 

27103 



472 Advertisements ._ . . . ,. „,, ^..^ ^,.. ,.. . ,, .. , , .. ,, ^ ..^,^,, ,^. .,.,^^^ ^, 




McGrath Studio 



The Official Yearbook Photographer 

of 
Boston College 



Congratulations and 

Best of Luck to 

the Boston College 

Class of 2002 



8 Elm Street, Suite 2 

Braintree, MA 02184-9920 

1-800-767-1155 



iiSiiSC-"- i' J ^ . _■ v^is^f ^Jj.!j_Si:2S:^"10i;ij v:-. ,t;.y^, ■; Advertisements 473 



Tilton Securities, LLC 

Congratulates 



The Class of 2002 

Tilton 
Securities 




Limited Liability Corporation 

211 Bellevue Ave. 

Upper Montclair, NJ 07043-1820 

WE'RE PROUD OF YOU ALL, 



STEPHEN R. TILTON, SR. 



JUDITH A. TILTON 



STEPHEN R. TILTON, JR. CLASS OF 1988 



MARGARET A. MAGALDI CLASS OF 1995 



474 Advertisements 




^m^ _^^ ^^ 



The Office of 
Student Services 

would like to 
congratulate its 

student 

employees and 

all the graduates 

of the 

Class of 2002. 

Best wishes! 








ii''' ■ '/^Ei£^Ka£;- '■ •* 



Advertisements 475 




♦^ 



ylfoer/ ds jKarcia JiunAer 

^flen ancf/oinoa MLei/er 

^nn ano Jjarru vjonnell 

-yiris and jKarianne MLaroirossian 

Loernaro and Jyosemarie DeUiio 

iOooandjoan GhjTord 
yjnarles O. £: ylrJ/ne Jj. Cjoward 

Cj/irishne and JJau/d yluer 

CjoJoneJ and J/Lrs. Unomas j. J\ini 

Dauid dz z^^ail Jjroojn 

T)avidj. Jollerud £: z^uzanne J. £/iosiad 

Jjeooie and yCicA Jtaisirouoas 

Donal Jj. Uooi'n 

Donald and iDouise Qjosiello 

joe S <L)andra ^lauonier. 

J)r. and JKrs. Gerard Jiardner 

^acA Cjonnor £ ^Inne Jucnard 



l)r. andjiLrs. Jxooeri Jjamoleion 

I)r. d3 jKrs. J)auio (jaoan 

Dr. J a/r/cia y(eili^'r3hies 

Cjric and CjJaine Jjedel 

Jran and Jliaureen JSarion 

^eorae and JJCarilan (Junjiani 

J~f. <L)coil dj Sandra Jj. (umiin 

^ames (Q: ^na z^cnwar/z 

^ames and j\.anca Kjoanlin 

jKr. £ jKrs. James V? ^ialia 

JKr. ds JKrs. JKai^iin S'. yialunn 

JKr. £ JKrs. J aul J. Ursina 

JKr. £ JKrs. (SJilliajn j. JCnowies 

jLeal and J airicia Jiarie 

J aul and jean JKoran 

J aula JKassoni 

(b/epnen C Worm 



.■;xM 



Dr. and JKrs. Jrancis ^. D ^ yimorosio jr. JK. D 

c^feorae J\. ^I'rardi] jr. and judiiJi ^. ^I'rard 

James U. £ JKarion JKc Donnell 

jean and Dennis /joinowsAi 

JO Jin and LjJIen (OJalsn 

jonn and janei Ualsn 

JJie JKazzaro ^amiltJ 



Ji^ 



i^ 




ji^- 



F.4 - <: 



i'"Ss.' 



m 



Platinum Benefactors 



yosepn and tjiizaoeui Jvetyno/ds 
A aren and Jxandi/ Jnurman 

Jl ar/andCPa/ IPJafczaJ^ 
jLeu/n cG J airicia \Arnsiein 

iDeonard and joan Dioos 

jRadeline and ^ara yiprea 

JKaria ds ^onn Qjapano 

JKariftyn j. Ijeer 

JKr (CjILts josepn tj. ijeiia ^^r 

jKt. andjlirs. Jvooeri \J: ^ariland 

Dr. andJlLrs. ^eorae J\. JRcColfu/n 

JKr. £ JKrs. Cjric Jensen 

Jxicnard and JKara (L)cnioeiI 

^amilu or Jjrana Jj. JJuiler 

loarru and J\uin tj. JCoajJin 

JKr and JKrs Jjoo (famieson 

JKr. and JKrs. J)an Warmen/iouen 

JKr. and JKrs. Daniel J . Groni'n 

JKr. and JKrs. DauidJ. 9Hffiif2 



JK: and JKrs. ^ousif J). ^/2afari 

JKr. <£' JKrs. Jlnionio Jlpos/of 

JKr. d3 JKrs. Dennis ^. (yBearij 

JKr. (€' JKrs. Cjuaene JKonlrone 

JKr. £: JKrs. Jran^ Onaiisn 

JKr. ds JKrs. j'. o^ca/uorcnio 

JKr. (C JKrs. y^ames ^\ JKcyjormicJi 

JJie Jjoriolussi Jamih/ 

JKr. and JKrs. josepJ JKcJlee J J J 

ISJiiliain j^. JieepJiari cC Izt/dia 

Uaooro Jleepnart 

J)onaidO. andcJanda ^er/na 

ZJne J aren /s of Jorreu J'lann 

Jom andOneen JKcJntare 

Jom £ iDinda <L>pina 

Uozn Thiers and JKicJielle \\icnofs 

J\lersJKimi JILelion 

Kj)aida iDee (G tjarl JUiIian 

^eoraiana ds iDes 'u/ocAei 

J^aul £: JKartj Gainer 




JKr. and JKrs. j^oJm Jyeilli/ 

JKr. and JKrs. Ji. JKicJiael Jiartmann 
JKr. and JKrs. (b/epnen J\. Jilion, ^r. 




r..^ 



^ 




}-m 



"■=4*'V 



.^" 



_2&. Xen and Dr. Qjonnie JKaqura 

JlCr. £ jKrs. Dennis Jb. jKurpntJ 

jILt. (£ jILts. James J nelps jr. 

jKt. £ jKts. Jvonalo Wilson 

jKr. (G JKrs. [Jnoinas Jj. (J^J\.ourAe 

JKr. (G. JlCrs. UimolntJ j. (jonnors jr 



lR.atJ S [Tern UeooreA 

J\.ooeri (Q (ja/nen'ne Jiaiseu 

Jvonalo and JJCartJ yjnarieoois 

^alltj and Uom vjurlin 

\Jed and Jimy Jvoper 

Une Oassallo [rainntJ 



vjora ^. <uerio 

(HJi'IIiain (jnan 

jonn Jv. ^eorejr. 

^nne d2 jim J,uirA 

Diane JJi. Jjronico 

jacA (Q J auhnejKoii 

Dauid and J airicia Jvasmussen 

Drs. William £ (L)aran ^rmsironq 

Jilippo and ^nna Lfla/Zaroli 

Francois and Jtamerine JJii/on 

jonn and Mtarqarei jKcAinnetJ 

JKr and JKrs ^rinur [yrani 

JKr. and JKrs. JK. JamoaJeras 

Jrindrea <£ JKaria iDuisa (L^alos-lDaoina 




-^ 



■ ■■4s**c-^N v>r^ 



L^stei. 



„> 




m 


'<P»- 


- ■« '♦^ i^W 


f _ 






Silver Bene 


factors 


-^>^ JJH 


fi 




^^H^^^£. 










w- 






ylnne ancf Donala Jranson 


Ur. (C- jILts. jo/in J Tjearu 




II 


CTlnne Jf. I^o.s.s 


Dr. d:7Krs. JU^erlJl. Durfjin 




1 


^nlliona ana tjiaine ^r/llo 


Dr. yCanct/ Jlellu Jrei'oer 




m 




C^rfene ^auolacci 


Ocfancfjan Ga/c/we// 








^urel/'o ana Jjeria Lrernanoez 
!j^arry9l.mi[sJK.'D. 
!j3ar/ ancfjufie /d/uoIsi 


&cf ancfJiiJendu Galla/ian 

dcfwarcf £: S7re//a yl/6r/^/j/ 

LJileen ^ilmore 




h 




!j3e//y ^ane ancf Joseph T^e Si'mone 

Jj ill ana Alison ^reaa 

CBo£ ancf 3€al£u 'IBisseil 

iOruce £ jKarqarel U/iompson 

Cj/iarron (uunoman ana jo/in Doran 

Gnrisiine Ui'/ofo 

KJinau d3 Miarc joi/ce 

Cjornenus j. Jjeluis 


tjiaine £ JJCarcelo J arra 

Lrrancesca ^imon-JuJinau 

^aru £ Donna Jiosen/nal 

Jiarry J3ajra£lari 

yfecfy Uan Jjelcfen 

Jiei/io ana Jjaroara Jlieuer 

S/pniaenia Jielen Ganon/s 

J. JlCar^/iam ^reen 




*- ■ 




Deora Jvenu 


^ames ana juaiui Dieller 






Don d3 (uusan iDamers 


^ames £ Uneresa Mic-Jienna 








DonafcG U/'c^y jKc^ofcfric£ 


j^an and [Paul yl/^i'ns 








T)onafcf S. ls)ojnar 


^ane/ £ james ^neppai^a 








Douglas jK. Garnwaf^69 


j^effrey ancfjanis Strauss 








Jjr. ana JKrs. Jjarru G. Uufh 


j^im ana jan Dwt/er 








\Dr. ancfjKrs. Grai^ O^Gonneff 


jim £ jKaraie iDane 




-'." \ 




7)r. and JKrs. Jfu^Jj O'CReiffy 
-Dr. ana jKrs. ^oel^reen 


^o9lnne O^DCe/ff 
joe £ CPeaaij Jleffe/ier 




#■:■ 




Dr. ancfjKrs. j^osepJi Sauriceffa 


jo£n ^cfams 








jo/in ana Gorinne DLelliner 






^<Ix Benefaci 



t^- 



Silver Benefactors 



jo£n ancf f5neifa CBefi 

jonn ana Urisn JJarsanii 

^oJin £' ^ai[Duc£er 

jonn U. ds iPairicia ^. J oUano 

juacf (£ Jielen Os/ro/n 

JtamtJ ancjOcj jCapieion 

Mir. ancfjiirs. james W. OvanSj jr 

jKr. anajltrs. jonn .Jl. iorennan, jr. 

jKr. ancfjKrs. j^onn ^. Jiayes jr. 

jILt. ancfjiirs. jonn 9aoeiii 

jIlt. ancfjKrs. yCeu/n ^inner/y 

JKr. ana Jlirs. loeonara ^erafino 

Mir. anoMirs. Miicnaeij. jeara 

JKr. ana JKrs. J auiyeomans 

JKr. ana JKrs. iRicnara Jjowers 

JKr. and JKrs. CRoSert &. IsJe/zef 

JKr. ana JKrs. Jxooert Qlroain 

JKr. anJJKrs. 'William 91. Joof 

JKr. Jininona JJernaoo 

JKr £ JKrs. Jin/nony Janaeiii 

JKr. £ JKrs. Carlos O. Jvossy 

JKr. £ JKrs. J)anielUveiniiari 

JKr £JKrs J)onala J. (bcnroeaer 

JKr. £ JKrs. tjrnesi JHamanaAa 

JKr £ JKrs iJranA J~f. JKena^er 



jonn and Joanne Jvo/irer 

JKr. £ JKrs. S joraes 

JKr. £ JKrs. ^reaoru Jt. SJrenon 

JKr. £ JKrs. JierSeriU. J^e/erson jr. 

JKr £ JKrs. Barnes 7). CSriJe 

JKr. £ JKrs. James J. Jarrell, Lrr. 

JKr. £ JKrs. JCenne/n Jvispoii 

JCeuin ana JCamy Jiammar 

JCeuin £ JCancy Qjonoon 

JtirA ana J'rancine J anneion 

iDawrence Cn. anaJjer/na G. JCapoii 

ioean ana JKicnael Jjaileu 

/oeonaroo £ jane JKalalis 

iDtjnn ana jau Jvice 

JKaraarei £ diaries JMansen 

JKarlna ana ^nmony SJarrapino 

JKary JJe/n £ S^eorae ^uimaraes 

JKara jane £ joJin Jjef/ 

JKaryanne ana ^Jan Jnnes 

JKaureen ana tja Jiowara 

JKicnael ana J)eora iJranAs 

JKic/iaeJ J. ana Donna JK. S^orman 

JKicnael £ Jane O'lJarrell 

jonn ana Jtaren JKcJ arilan 

iReqia JK. CRotJ 




480 Benefactors 



■■■uT 



i 



y^O- .*■ 



'^^M^ 



■fT •■ 



r\ 



»,- 



Silver Benefactors 



9Kr. <£■ JIG-.s. JUjcH ('. Murp/jfy 

Mr. ,0 TKrs. S/ep/ien ,9. M^cTI/eaoey 

JRj: lL JR/'s. J/ifjinas Jjur/ee 

JlCr. (0 TIfr.s. 'y/jomas ^. JiemoA 

Mr. £• jKts. ULomas ^. JKurrau ^r. 

jKt. (C JiCrs. Uuomas Is). Slucu-is 

JKr. (Q. jKts. LKeuin 'JjracAen 

JlLr. (£ MLrs. jlCic/iael S/ieliorn 

JKr. cQ JKrs. IsJallace ls)£nIoc^ 

JKicnele /oanara ancf Andrew Goldman 

JiLr. anojlirs. G. jlCic/iael 0'' Ji^afforan 

JKr. anc/JK^s. DauiJG. JKc'JKiIIzn 

JKr. anJJKrs. JranAV. J^aiife 

JKr\ and JKrs. LrranA J( Go/roneo and ^esu 

JKr. £ JKrs. JK/c/ie/e J?. "Jefice 

JKr. (£• JKrs. J^airicj^ J€ainins£i 

JKr. £ JKrs. J aulJ. Gouan/an 

JucJiaro ana Donna JKafei/ 

iRicnara £: Garof J~fain 

UvicJiarcf (£ joan Guomo 

J\ooeri and Joanne JKcGarron 

LRooert dz ~^nne JKarie J^anaJian 

J^oSeri 9 JKiceffi 

Jlooer/ Jlopecn and JKicJjefe 'iJaSrizio 

J rofessor and JKrs. 



^/ep/jen and Oeoora/i ^Jalle 

^leue (C- cJusan J'ellina/jam 

^usan ana Xooerl j\izzo 

'uulu/a Id. Gonnors 

Jne Jjus/j Jamih/ 

dne Cyeeru Jamil t/ 

Unom £■ Uincenza ScA/era 

Jin2 Jlansen 

dom cC Dianne J^eiflu 

Uom lC JKaureen /oamorix 

Ual (G O^fex Jieslerfjera 

Uinceni andueron/ca 'Jrippo 

Uinceni ds Golfeen GampoJjasso 

William and Gat/ifeen JKif/er 

William dO Gunt/iia J)uoe 

William £ J atricia J)eJ^aIma 

JKicAae/J^. Deulin 

JKs. cat/ierine <L)adlaK 

JCancu £ U\au WoitAows^i 

jCiAAi and Od Jvicnards 

yCiis £ JKaaaie Jniel 

J atricA £ J atricia <L)cura 

J aul £ y^oan ^orai 

J eier £ JKarae Jrapp 

Dauid J . Uwomeu 



T 



"^^^isii 



n^. 




actors, 481 



^V ■■":/,:*:■ r^ 



•t^ 



^ft: ::---y-¥.l^.:-:.--S 



^^.'^1 













Wil 



'yiffrecfj. ancf jBorraine ML. MLurpntJ 

^lise ana Uai Jiut^nn 

Connie cG C^fain C^alAenour^er 

^rlene dc jonn Jraner 

^ucfleiJ ancf £/nez Wilson 

iSaroara ana ^ara Jouile 

jSaroara JiarAins 

Cuen (£ WenotJ Jloenzq 

CSeuerfu ancf ^erafcf JltcSee 

fjjiff dc Constance CjoHer 

^Soo ancf KJonnie vjfiase 

fjjoo ancf Diaren loane 

Ujoo (Q ^nn jKarie ^uqaer 

f/joo (£ yCanca Jjracfj-orcf 

^jrenoo ana ^enna J\ae 

USrian ana JJtaru JfaUaJian 

ffjrian £ ifjeltu i/jrennan 

Mruce ancf Cjnr/sh'ne S^enriq 

Can. Jfir. £ Jftrs. JJiason jfeycf/ 

Garf ancf Doreen ^uraoian 

Carof ana JSoo ^pifiane 

Garofancf Darreff^cree 

Gamerine ^. Offinqer 

Gam J ancf jKicnaef Jfaneria 

Gliaries Jfenri £ JlLarqueriie JJianain 

Gnarfie ancf Ga/ny Gqirous 

GAarfie £ ^nerru U\ousseau 

Gneraf ana Jerome ^eoo 

Dr. ancfj/Lrs. U\.. jeffreu fDooiens 

J aul ana JSaroara S:'niuer 

J auf ancf Gamie Saiio 



Gtjniliia and ^req JterAorian 

DacR £ jKarcia Daframpfe 

Jjanief and Jliarqarei Jforan 

Darqf and y^ou <C>zniif2 

Dauicf ana Garof fljooner 

Dauid and Jtailiq Jjonqnqe 

Jjauid z^. and Janice p. UJsen 

Daoicf J airicA Orenfocn 

-Dauicf £ <L)andra f/juc£ 

Dean Jjaqard ^omes 

7)e££ie andWaf/ Ofien 

Deooie £ ^eorqe Uai 

Deooran G. ^napi'ro 

Deooran £ Gnr/s !ylfuq 

Diance and (SJiffiam /ji'ooro 

Diane jIl. J erraufi 

Dieqo and JJCarian Jrl. Jjueii 

DominicA ancf Lfjaroara J reziosi 

Donna and J\ofand ^iifis 

'Dr. ancfjKrs. ^ndrej. Godispo/i 

Dr. ancfjfCrs. ^ninontJ jCapofi 

Dr. ancf^Mtrs. Gfive Dafou 

'Dr. anJJICrs. Graiq Dieiricn 

Dr ancf^I&s. Danief^. "Mayer, JIC.D. 

Dr. ancfJKrs. ^arq S SfadeA 

"Dr. andjftrs. ^onn Gurnuiie 

Dr. and Jfirs. ^onnnq Jj. Jvou 

Dr. ancfjltrs. JKcLrcus Ad CBfacA 

Dr. ancfJlirs. LPaufLBeresfora-Jfiff 

J auf and jCan Jjouc/ie 

J auf and J amefa Jfennesseu 




X 'S"T<': 



'tfil^ 





'mip^^>..-w^ ■ . 


^ 


^W^. ^ 




Patron Benefactors 






7)r 


and Tlfrs. Snc/jaf 7/fe/j/a 


Jlenn and Susan uoIk 






Dr. and jR/:s. r^iep/ien ( nilner 


Gordon £ Jennifer J/eron 




'Dr. ana Jnr.s. J/iuma.s J erone 


5/'e^ £ /oinda 'diirs/no 




Or and 'Mrs. l9)a[ler^. Murp/jij ^/r 


J fans <C- J lediliJis.'iman 




Dr. ^reaori/ ana jlCrs. joanne Ar/^o 


jfefene and^Jim Laoelle 




Dr d- JI&^s. "J.^. 9Kc£aucf/dm 


Jienru and Jnanca Jonzafez 




7)r cG 9Krs. Ufiomas ^. Maronic^ 


Jlenru and ^ancy S/e^a/ 




Dr. IsJilL'arn ana/oisa (L)are//e 


Jjonnie yiranicK 




Drs. jKic/iaei £: Cjarol (iueinaar/en 


Jjrad and Su.'ian JJloun^eu 




Drs. S/eue anJ^udy 'J^undra 


Jiuona- So A Joee 




Oo ana /ouci'a (iinerman 


9rene JCelfu 




&daardo GUaffe/o 


ysao ana JKicnmo yaaras/ii 




Odwara ana i/?ene jKailen 


J. Douyfas and Sis Mar/in 




&c/warc/^. JICc'XaSB^r 


jacA £ Gee ilia IzaJ^ocA 




Oileen ana L/jrian Jiuni 


James anJSeaJiJlLarmon 




Ofizaoe/n loHrocapes 


James anoDCancu Sodden 




&u^ene iPandoffi 


James JC. and Janice TdJi/son 




urrances £ Frances Uaraas 


Jan ana jCicA Guccniarella 




CTran^ anJ Susan Garrazza 


Jan anJ'^icA GuccAiare/Ia 




IJranA d2 Deoo/'e iJjutierwoHn 


^ean Marie £ J^eier QylffanJ 




'Jred^G. 'Joffmer 


Jeanne and MiAe CjufSery 




^aif and ^Cennei£ CPresion 


Jesus JVoariauez-lArrouo 




S^aru and jliarion J icAerina 


Jim andlJicAy GooA 




S^ary an J Mary dffen ^iufie//i 


Jim £ S^retc/ien J~fenri/ 




^ene £ JKarae Ofivooo 


^im £ ^iff^uinn 




9ene £ DoniOrosz 


Jim £ JuJy SeidewanJ 




^eorae £ Garol J\.ioux 


Joanne £ Uvoss \Aian 




Seorae £ J ai DGlioru 


joAin ana Eileen J^arsons 




9fen anJiPamefa OSomSarJier 


JoJin and Jane Gureffi 




J aul £ jhi'uia Miaxian 


O^eier andDAeresa MaccAi 




J eqau ana jim Dei/Jou 


CPeier £ Jeanne O^dams 





Benefactors 483 





/ 


. ■ '■■■ ■ ■ ,j;r'.J''(%,' 






'■- '^ 




rliuiin Jot 

^o£n ancf Dlate iPei'ser 


HtjUl^i^UTS 

'jKic£aef [7: £ Joanne U. O'Gonneff 




■'■■ ■-■- 


^o/in and JKa[ JKarsello 


'jKic£aef £ Xaren jKurp£y 




^o£n anc/7'amefa IKcC^rcffe 


!JlQ£e £ JKaryCflnn T)urAin 




^onn ancfyuonne DLelley 


Mionica £ j\ier iPayacA 




^o£n £ Gnris jlicSau^nlin 


JKr. ancfjl&s. CMffan ^. TT/fLecv/cz 




^o£n ^ofey, [Trances U'oiey 


jILt. ancfJlCrs. C^nqefo 71. Oa^^iomo 


Mn "Pefes 


TfCr. ancfJKrs. CMni£ony T)onalo 


'^^ 


^osepn £ Jimparo loucero 


mLt. ancfjlirs. Tiurefio Miarh'nez 




^osep£ and ^erafcfine '3iufiano 


Jltr. ancfJfCrs. Dauicf Jlfiffer 




^osepn S ana Susan j/ijICeny 


jKt. ancfjifrs. T)avicfUansaun 


.., 


^osep£CR. GapafBo^r., Glass of 1973 


TfCr ancf [Mrs DonafcfT: IsJarJ 




^oa £ [JreJ iPefoso 


MLT. ancfjlirs. 'Donafcf ^f- Gomeau 


■/ 


Jiaren <bc£un2ac£er 


TKr. ancfJf&s. 7os/er Jft. ^o£ns, 999 




Jlarf anc) SourJes jKaaer 


JfCr. ancfJIG^s. 9ran£ 9?ie£fe 




JCal£[een anJU£omas Jeena^£iu 


jILt. ancfjfirs. Qeor^e 7eaorenc£i£ 




DCen anJ JlCiJae iPeUearino 


JIG-. ancfJi&s. 9eorye ^ Beffar 999 




Xennei££ CjuaJICoffiil 


9IG: ancfJfCrs. JfafTl. S£oema£er 


-. 


Jurish'ne ancfWnfi'am Siauffer 


JlG: ancfjlirs. ^ames ^o£nson 


. ■,:'■; 


jBarry £ S£aron C^nderson 


jfir. ancf'jftrs. ^ames jfiic£ener 


- 4 


/oee £ jSincfa Jlteier 


JfCr. ancfTfCrs. ^ames w)ofanin 


■ • 


jBincfa £ Ckinyye£ 


jfir. ancfjfirs. jo£n G. 9ennin^£am 




Sorraine ancf &rnie Jelzani 


Jltr. anJJI&s. ^o£n Doerr 




/Souis 2 !Mare// 


9fCr. £ Jltrs. 'Donafc/T^fais, ^r. 


^M 


Bouise £ JiilllKiffer 


Tftr. ancfJfCrs. ^o£n ^. GoHer 


^mi 


jSynn £ J\ic£ar(J Mioran 


JfCr. ancfJfCrs. fou£e &. Sims 


Ih 


JlCanuel ancf Soreiia Gampo 


9f&. anJTf&s. JfCencfez 


1^^ 


jKarcia an</G£ris S?or^one 


jffr. ancfjfG's. jfCic£aef ^ Sc£ajeifzer 




JKaroaret £ Ldoui's tjlxasr 


JfCr. ancfJfCrs. 'Jftic£aef J\. Gann/zzaro 




JKarie £ 7ony [Pe/Mi 


Tffr. ancfJfG^s. !jfljc£aefUen/ura 




jliar£ £ OCancy Jialey 


Mir. ancfjfirs. J\afp£ T)e9rancesco 




MLars£au ancf jKiriam [Pauf 


9f&. anJJfCrs. ^o£n Jf. Siffespie 


■'■ \ .; 


jfCaruia jKeay£er 


9I&: ancfJfCrs. 9^c£arcf'7l. 7reecf^r. 




jfCary ^ean £ z)auicf Gocfcfair 


jf&: ancfjKrs. lRic£arcfT)auf 


. i" 


'JfCic£aef ancf G£arfene 1)tincan 


9fCr. ancfJffrs. 9^o£erl S. Jy'ns£er 


; • 


JfC/cnaeJ ana Gunai jffuen^prner 


9I&: ancfjfirs. UioBerllSiJofcft 


': 


9Kic£aef ancf ^anis jBarosse 


9fCr. anJJfCrs. 9?onafcf^. 93ancfofa 




JKic£aef anJ ^ucfy Scauotto 


JfCr. anJJICrs. 9^oy 7. T^eueraae 


1 


'JfCic£aef ancf ^une Hiouffarcf 


TfCr. an77fG-s. Sam 7am 


■ ^ 


JICic£aef ancf DCal£y CBrainercf 


TfCr. ancf7f&-s. S/ep£en G. 7fofa£an 




JKic/iael ancj yCancu Ganalane 


Tftr. ancfTfCrs. 7errence ^. 73ane 




Jfu'cnaeJ Gni'ana 


Tftr. ancfjfCi-s. 7£omas ^. youn^ 



•M; >F'«r».'' 



fe4a«^^»r^' 



\ 





JU-/: and JRj:s. (Ji/)(.-ef!l I/. Jjar/'ii, ,'//'. 

IJtr. ami Mrs. lihlliam T?. JlCcOonoacj/j 

JUr. and JKra. TiJtJI/a/n 'S. Cjona/ary ^r 

Mr. andJKrs. ISJiflie 'M. JKat/es 

Mr. and Mrs. ZacfiM. ISJ/fson 99 

9Kr. ^ams/iiycfO{^. '^ocfrej 

UKr. £ JKrs. Dan JKcJOnley 

TIG: £ JKrs. Dofia/c/ 'j3/ah, ^r. 

jKr. (£• jKrs. Cifi jKisloo/c/> ana Jamilt/ 

UKr. £ 7IG-S. 9-. a 9aAer/y 

jKt. £ JIG-s. '9rea Ocamial 

JKr. £ jICts. y^ames 9fouse 

Jltr. £ JlCrs. Barnes 0. Wtcfief 

jILt. £ mLts. ^osepn Ujonanno 

jKt. £ UKrs. 9lennetn 9{err 

9Kr. £ TIG'S. Souis y. 'VeSennaro 

JKr. £!Mrs. 9>M7)i!Marz/o 

MLr. £ MLrs. J\ain TlruiKor 

Jlir. £ jKrs. 9\icnara 9j. Gamoron 

jICt. £ jKrs. J^icnara Jx^. 9ooia 

9I&. £ JKrs. J^onalcfOC. 9?u/ofo 

Mir. £ jILts. S/anfey 'Jjuswelf 

JlCr. £ JKrs. S/euan 5? SancfSerq 

jCana and '9rainpa J ereira 

OCancij £ 9fowara jlLcJX^aUtv 

JVicK ana Jjrenoa Osposilo 

J at ana ^i/n <OuIIiuan 

U^at and 9-'£if 9Cue£ne 

J alricia ana9\icnarajKjKonlaaue 

9<a/ricia jBis/er 

iRamola £ ^anesn LPraonu 

iRat/ ana^fuau 95aoinsRi 

9?eu. ana JKrs. z)avia ^acA 

Ulicnara ana Darlene 9arr 

Jlicnara ana '3ailJ\usso 

Jiicnarcf ana Sucine Jfalqin 

J\icnara £ rOnaran Gliffora 

9\uss C)mHn ana ^eannie <0/apfe/on (bmi/n 

JKr. and JKrs. /Saurence Jientfeu Uree 99 

JKr. £ JKrs. OhJKistouic/2ano9ainii(j 
J roua J arents of JKeqnan offio/t 



A'o/jL'rl and L inda LJafjIer 

j\ooarl and j^ancu J''elrucelli 

7<o6erl £ Jial/ileen I'Jf/s 

[nod £ jial/iu Mrmslmna 

J?on £ ^an Jiulin 

J\onald £ jiaren Gapozza 

Jzoss and ^j/ierru Genlanni 

(bam £ Ousan Jjufjone 

<5am£9ina Jiridoers 

Sana Gaul and grunqsoon See 

(Deo// £ Garoli/n G/ialifoux 

<Onaron and J)ruce J)aird 

Sharon £ Dauid yK.ormrup 

S/iaron liJt/u/ll 

Soopanee Sr/sanan 

Spru/lle Jiraden 

Sleuen £ Jlelen J\iuiere 

Sue and Sam JjrooRe 

Susan Ouffi/ JKadison 

Susan J'lunn 

Susan £ Jienl J err/n 

9errt ib. Jjrown 

Jerru £ Gnrissy J)eUo(o 

9£e LJIacAoar/ 9amtJu 

9/ie Jlalliourton J'amiliy 

9ne Jieslin 9amilt/ 

9ne Jfiqains J'amilu 

Une 9Coro 9amnq ofWaqne 

Une Snanes - Jiernandez Jamilt/ 

9£e ls)iniam Jf. Shea, ^r. 9amtfy 

Unomas and ^ot/ce 9Hzaerald 

unomas 9oq Glaffei/, JK. D. 
9om and 9\osemart/ J ardalis 

Uincent andDiane Sqncn 

Uincent and Jacqueline Uucci 

Islilliam andJ)eoora Jienuon 

ISltlfiam Jf. JKarl/n^ 

J-^ifip andGlaudette jEooo 

J^ilip andJKary Gappio 

J^Aiffip £ DCancy 'J)auino 




%r 




Benefactors 485 



The Editorial Staff of 
the 2002 Sub Turn 





We have definitely come 
a long way this year. 
Second semester, after 
losing two great editors 
to the wonders of study- 
ing abroad, the third- 
year veterans were glad 
to add some fresh faces 
to their Sunday night 
meetings. In the midst 
of friends and without 
the benefits of a lock-in, 
they were able to put 
together this beautiful 
book. Unfortunately, this 
year they have to say 

5j good-bye to two of their 
senior editors, Meredith 
Roberts and Alison Caso, 
who have shown both 
devotion and expertise in 

^ their own ways. Best of 
^■^i^^^ luck to Merry and Alison 



and every other editor 
who has spoken and 
been heard in this 90th 
volume of Sub Turn. 



Closing 487 



9- 



iT- 






Papa Fitzsimmons, 

We're glad we were able to secj 






The determined faces of Sub Turri. . . 

Aside from the usual 



Because Torry just could 

not look at another 

yearbook proof this 

year, she escaped to 

London in the Spring 

2002. We missed you 

Tor, welcome home! 



488 Closing 




discussions about stale 

men's cologne, Beth 

Bowers and Jess Burkhart 

take a time out to 

critique Chris Bowers' 

photo work. 




your true colors shine through! 



r-w 





L I . Ji' .1» --Ti 





From Washington DC 
to the Heights, Jess and 
Tom breal< one of the 
cardinal yearbool< rules, 
"Thou Shalt not date. " 
But they make dead- 
lines, so it is okay. 





ft« "^j^^^H 


m^^^ 


J' ^Bl 


II^H 


B^^'': 


^^!^^H 



Cropping slides is a 
mysterious task that 
no one at Sub Turri is 
sure how to do. Yet, 
jared and Lindsay do 
a good job creating 
their own methods. 



Closing 489 



Spread the word and you'll be free 

Spread the word and be like me 

Spread the word I'm thinking of 

Have you heard the word is love? 

It's so fine, it's sunshine 

It's the word love 

Every where I go I hear it said 

In the good and bad books that I have read 

Say the word and you'll be free 

Say the word and be like me 

Say the word I'm thinking of 

Have you heard the word is love? 

It's so fine, it's sunshine 

It's the word love 

Now that I know what I feel must be right 

I'm here to show everybody the light. 

These words, taken from John Lennon and Paul 
McCartney's song "The Word," exemplify the fruits of 
the self-exploration we have nurtured during our time 
at Boston College. We came in as impressionable fresh- 
men waiting to hear the melody that is BC. After shar- 
ing whirlwind football seasons in the Mods and Alumni 
Stadium, delving into the depths of O'Neil, exploring 
the wonders of the North End, we began to live that 
melody. From the lessons we have endured over the 
past four years, we have learned to live with others, to 
think big and small, and to appreciate the world 
around us. As we compose our own movements and 
step out into a strange, new world, we will take the 
warmth and knowledge we have acquired here and 
share that light with everyone around us. We can now 
effectively voice our opinions, our cares, our desires and 
beliefs. Ever to Excel. We can now sing. . . 



With One Voice 



490 Closing 






For Boston 

For Boston, For Boston, 
We sing our proud refrain! 
For Boston, For Boston, 
Tis Wisdom 's earthly fane. 

For here we ore one 

And our hearts are true. 

And the towers on the Heights 

Reach to Heav'n's own blue. 

For Boston, For Boston, 

Til the echoes ring again! 

For Boston, For Boston, 
Thy glory is our own! 
For Boston, For Boston, 
Tis here that Truth is known 

And every with the Right 
Shall thy heirs be found. 
Til time shall be no more 
And thy work is crown 'd 
For Boston, For Boston, 
For Thee and Thine alone! 



Hail! Alma Mater! 

Hail! Alma Mater! 

Thy praises we sing. 

Foundly thy memories 

round our heart still cling. 

Guide of your youth, 

thro' thee we shall prevail! 

Hail! Alma Mater! 

Hail! All Hail! Hail! Ama Mater! 

Lo! on the Hight, 

Proudly thy tow'rs are raised for the Right. 

Cod is thy maaster, 

His Law thy sole avail! 

Hail! Alma Mater! 

Hail! All Hail! 

Closing 491 




I 




CHRIS BOWER 



Kristin and lorry and all of our fellow editors fot their hard work, vision, undeMl 
standing and most of all friendship. As usual this thing sorta took on a life ofm 
its own, and we could not have done our job without the help of our staff. Tcm 
those of you who stuck around for the ride: Thanks a million. We would alscm^ 
like to thank Bob McGrath and the rest of the Mcgrath Studios Staff for all the\\ 
help and service they have given to us during the year We've both been 
doing this for awhile now , and along the way we've gotten to meet a lot of 
people. We've gotten to see a great many things, collect a great number ofm 
stories, and gain a great number of friends. . . ^*** -^ 



KY HLIJVI K 




Here s To Another Tear! 



ACADEMICS 




^nd so another yearbook year has come 
md gone; it's all finished. To everyone on 
>ub Turri, you all rule, this year was great! 
want to thank my awesome co-editor 
.indsay, you rock! Who knew we could 
lave so much fun while spending 3 hours 
)n a Saturday morning doing our simplest 
)age. I also want to thank Torry, Kristin, 
md Beth, you all did a great job this year 
md we had lots of laughs. Also a major 
hanks to our staff, Chris, Elizabeth, 
Cristen, jeanette, and Kate, you guys did a 
)reat job and really helped Lindsay and I 
ivoid as much story writing as possible. 
Ne are very thankful. Kyelim and Chris, 
'ou guys did a great job with all the pic- 
ures.. Also, of course, I'd like to thank 
-isa - this summer is going to rule! (I'm 
joing to get major points for this). Spe- 
:ial thanks to everyone on Roncalli First 
■loor, Welch Fourth Floor, Walsh First 
■loor, and my CT people. 

-Jared 



~% >••... 


d 


■ r^ iW^ "^iHk 


K 


SM. 


^ 


1 


^^^^Ki^\'i^9^V^^Hr ;s 




1 



If 



I ■ 



Working on Sub Turri this year was a great 
experience. I want to thank Jared for 
being my guide through this and for put- 
ting up with my constant stressing and 
early morning meeting times. I could not 
have asked for a better co-editor. Torry, 
Kristin and Beth: Thanks for giving me the 
opportunity to work with you; it has been 
a pleasure. I would also like to thank our 
awesome writing staff - Great work guys! 
To Dana, jen, Kristen, and Kali - thanks for 
helping me out. A special thanks to my 
girls: KG, DR, KD, AW, NC, AP, and CA for 
always being there and the guys of 202 for 
listening to my Sunday night breakdowns. 
Bernie - congratulations on graduating ... 
I'll miss you being my surrogate brother 
here and on our VT roadtrips. Oh and by 
the way: KACKLAND '01 rules. -Lindsay 




)anet and Meaghan^^^i 



♦ f 



J 



w 



-M^^'''^''S^ 



'^^^CAH 



For our first year as editors it's been 
quite an adventure! We've had so much 
fun working on the staff. To all the other 
editors, it was so great working with you! 
Thanks Kristen and Torry for this opportu- 
nity and for your help along the way - you 
girls are great!! Thanks to the photogra- 
phers for dealing with our endless photo 
requests. A big thanks to our staff - 
Molly, Laura, and especially Erika for all 
your work and for running around with us 
taking pictures and getting quotes during 
our crazy times! This has been such a 
great experience and we can't wait for 
next year!! 
-Meaghan Casey '04 & Janet Sudnik '03 



/ 



} Ccsey 



fan& 



^AN 



ij^ 



494 Organizations 



ORGANIZATIONS 




Thanks to Kristin^ Torry, 
Beth, and everyone else 

who helped! 

Special thanks to: Lee Pellegrini, Mike Mergen, and Chi-Duc. 




If you have never danced, fished, or been in a boat with a cat, you have never lived.' 

- Chad & Elizabeth 



Student Life 495 




Business Stan 






We would like to extend our deepest 

appreciation to the organizations and 

individuals who have so generously 

supported our efforts. Because of their 

kindness, we were able to capture a year 

of fond memories that will be preserved 

well into the future. Special thanks are 

due to all our patrons, this year's staff, 

the editors, and to the volunteers who 

selflessly gave their time to the creation 

of this year's book. 



Brad Swift 
Business Manager 

Meredith Roberts 
lAdvertising Editor 

496 Closiiig 





Well, another year down. As 
I am writing this in Novem 
ber, I hope it all went well. 
As dlvv.iys, I want to thank my co- 
editor Alison for her help and I would 
also like to thank my staff. Nicki, Lisa 
nnd Farah, you guys have been great. 
I hope you all do well in your post-BC 
I'xperiences. My roommates and 
t<imily also deserve a big thank you for 
lu'lping me and supporting me during 
this busy and tough year. Without 
them, 1 probably would have had a 
mojor spaz attack. ..or at least more 
major than usual :-). Torry,Kristin and 
Beth, along with all my fellow editors, 
you guys were awesome and I am so 
^iad to have gotten another year of 
bonding with you. My biggest thank 
you goes out to Tommy for all of his 
unending support and love. 



Jessica Burkhart 





Alison Caso 



[cannot believe that my years at BC 
have come to an end. They have 
been wonderful and I am so happy 
have had the opportunity to work on 
j.e yearbook. Thank you so much to the 
laff, especially to Kristin who got my 
ot in the door and to Jess whose 
Jtience amazes me! I will always keep 
' e memories of my friends and our 
iventures here together close to my 
;art! 





Senior Secti 



Closing 497 






antstogetrti 

Oh Jade Monkey, that 

funky monkey. It's been 

another wild year.. .and 

way too quick. But hell, 

what am I talking about, 

I'm writing this in January 

and the book doesn't 

come out for four more 

months. ..so basically I'm 

lying to you. 

OK, someone told me I 

have to thank people on 

this page. ..so let's start 

with people who did 

something: Eric Gyasi, 

Maria Cicero, Chris 

Conlon, Boots Giesen, Ken 

Poggi, Nicollette Reilly, 

John Munko, Vicki Haley: if 

your name isn't 

there. ..better luck next 

year. 

More thanks to Torry, 

Kristin, and Beth, of 

course, for shuffling stuff 

constantly for my benefit, 

especially to Kristin for 

tracking down pics that 

photog forgot (but if 

there's no text on the 

sailing page its ALL YOUR 

FAULT). Kyelim and Chris - 

thank you for the 472 rolls 

of football and one usable 

field hockey pic; I know, I 

demand too much, but 

thanks for working with 

what you had. Thanks as 

well to Jess - even though 

you know nothing about 

sports... you always tried, 

and I appreciate that, even 

if you are a total spaz. 

Thanks to the SigEpChi 

guys for scamming 
DirecTV and making sure 

the kegerator always 

tasted like butter. If I live 

to see next year, life will be 

grand. 

The bookies beat him to 

death anyway. So he's 

dead. That's it. Bye. 

Pefssero 

The Sports Guy 

wiggle puppy - larry's futon - troy bell fan club - tnt - tfie bum - the rabbi - lucky wafi! - corky's all-stars - murphy's 'problem' - the monkey - sigma epsilon chl - uass U , 
498 Closing 







I L O LI 1%:. J f 1%Z^I l\.lO UKJli l^tifi l^LJIl Lit ^ J 1.1^1 l/lLil /t, Itliiy f ItKll IL, / . 



\JI VJLt^l/IL/ l/iLt ir* / /lKt/lHi.tli f/ If. KJI I/IL tin/ llj / fr* f/I/l li/ltLii. 






"NO 



1 



Svj 

1 

I 
1 



I 






■I 



Beth Bowers 

Managing Editor -" 




•X- 



I 




Three years of taking classes, making friends, creating yearbooks — Gone. So many thanks are deserxed by 
everyone who made this year as wonderful as it's been. Torry and Kristin, you guys are awesome. Between 
all the planning and all the setbacks, you've been steadfast and committed. Thanks for all the silly stories 
and for tolerating my less-than-helpful schedule. Alison, Jess, Chris, Kyelim, Tom, Eric, Jared, Lindsay, 
Chad, Elizabeth, Janet, Meaghan, Brad, and Meredith, your voices speak volumes. Thank you for all your 
hard work and your constant smiles and, above all, your friendship. Without you, we'd have nothing. Bee, 
Kris, and Diana, thank you for being great roommates and even better friends. All the dinner conversations, 
Saturday night snack sessions, and party planing have made all the difference in me. Thanks for sharing 
and listening and making 1905 Beacon a true home. Pratik, you're still my most favorite person. Thanks 
for listening when I'm upset, for arguing when I'm being dumb, and for always being able to make me laugh. 
You've got it forever. Katy, I miss having you right down the hall. Thanks for being there through it all. 
You're my favorite stalker! Megan, Kelly, Sarah, Allison, Britt, and Jess, thanks for being such sweet girls. 
It's nice to have more estrogen around! Bill, Rob, Carter, Carl, Val, Davis, Justin, Carl, James, Travis, Ed, 
Evan, Kevin, Eric, Matt, and Carlos, you guys are my comic relief. Thanks for helping me keep my sanitsi 
My ACHS girls, all you've done for me is just starting to pay off and I am thankful for all the years of 
friendship we've shared. Ma, Daddy, and Nana, thanks for always believing in me. I love you all. God bless. 
~*~ This book may not be perfect, but it comes from the heart ~*~ 




"If there ever comes a day when we can 't be together, keep me in your heart and I will stay there forever. 



Kristin Waiiier 



Co- Editor-in- Chief ■ 




I can't believe that we've finished yet another 
year. Torry - thank you so much for all of your 
training, patience and funny 24 stories. Beth - 
Thank you for being the best friend and creative 
partner I could ask for. Jared, Jess, Tom, Lindsay 
Meaghan, Elizabeth, Chad, Chris, Kyelim, Janet, , 
Brad, and Eric, thanks for putting up with me 
and producing such beautiful pages. YourworkI 
made this book the wonder that it is. Alison 
and Meri - we will miss you next year; good lua 
in everything you do. We'll be thinking of you. 
Arnie, Brandi, Kristin and Mer - your confidence 
in me is unparalleled. Your support was a con- 
stant comfort. To Diana and Becca - thank you 
for the late night talks over EZ Mac, the Shakira 
dance sessions and your incredible calming ways. 
Bill, Carl, Marc, Carter, Paul, Rob, P-Funk, James, 
Davis, Val, Justin, Carlos, Ed, Carl, Travis, Tim, 
Darren and John - 1 love you guys! You are always 
a constant outlet! Kait, Sarah, Kelly, Alison, Britt, 
Katy, Megan, Jen and Ali our girl talk was always SG 
refreshing, thanks for reminding me so I wouldn't 
forget how. Mom and Dad - Thank you for always 
reminding of the invisible rabbits. You always 
make them appear. I love you all! Thank you foi 
helping me create my own voice. 



"Someday we'll find it, the Rainbow Connection. The lovers, the dreamers and me. " ~ Kermit 






Torry Katsiroubas 

Co-Editor in-Chief 

2000-2002 

Learning to Fly 

Well it started out down a dirty road 

Started out all alone 

And the sun went down 

As it crossed the hill 

And the town lite up and the world got still 

I'm learning to fly but I ain't got wings 
Coming down is the hardest thing 

Well the good old days may not return 
And the rocks might melt 
And the sea may burn 

I'm learning to fly but I ain't got wings 
Coming down is the hardest thing 

Some say life will beat you down 
Break your heart and steal your crown 
So it started out from God knows when 
I guess I'll know when I get there 

I'm learning to fly around the clouds 
What goes up, must come down. 

Tom Petty 






The Staff of 

the 2002 Sub Turri 

would like to thank • • • 

Brandi Stemerman : Even though you 

ouldn't be with us in body, we know you 

/vere here in spirit. Thanks for helping us 

find the strength in our voices. 

Mer Zovko : Your patience and readiness 
to fight for us in every battle made this 

, year fly with far fewer glitches than we 
deserve. Thanks for being our "people 

person!" 

Arnie Lohmann. Kristin Ellerbe. and 
Sandy Moses : For keeping us on sched- 
ule, even when we resisted. Amazingly 
inough, you guys can keep it all together 
whenever we can't and we completely 

appreciate it. 

McGrath Studios : As far as photogra- 
phers go, you are the best bunch we 
could ever hope to have taking care of 
our seniors. As co-workers, you are dedi- 
cated, energetic, and trustworthy! 

Rick Brooks : For your incredible way of 

somehow understanding what we want 

n our cover even when we're not so sure 

ourselves. Your talent is incomparable! 

502 Closing 





Colophon 



The 2002 edition of of Sub Turri, tfie yearbook of Boston 
College, was printed by |ostens, Inc. The 90th volume, 
consisting of 504 pages, has a press run of 2500 copies and 
was printed in the Winston-Salem plant. Cover: The cover, 
endsheets, dividers, and vellum tip design were created by the 
talented Rick Brooks, )ostens designer. The theme and cover 
ideas were largely generated by our fabulous advisor and 
friend, Brandi Stemmerman. Her I deas came to life with the 
creative efforts of the 2002 editorial staff. The final creation of 
the cover college was done by Melissa Bagwell, jostens 
designer, using supplied slides from McCrath Studios, Eliza- 
beth Bowers and Kristin Walker. The collage was constructed 
with Adobe Photoshop Illustrator and hand illustrations. The 
covers were printed on 100% gloss stock, using four-color 
process inks, then laminated with matte lamination with a 
twist grain. The covers were case made on 150 pt. Binder's 
boards. The theme, title and school name were all embossed 
and top screened with ink number Process color Maroon 317 
and Rich Cold 327. Paper: The opening signature was 
printed on 1 00 MOE Gloss paper with the balance of the book 
on 80 gloss text paper. Special matte maroon ink was used in 
the opening signature. The books were smyth sewn using 16- 
page signatures and rounded with black on black headbands. 
Design: All theme related copy and designs including the 
Opening and Dividers were created by the Editorial staff. All 
sections were designed and created by their respective section 
editors. All pages were created on Power Mac 7600 using 
Adobe Pagemaker 6.5 and Jostens Yeartech software. The 
pages were printed by a Hewlett Packard 4050TN Laser Jet 
printer, though valiant efforts were made by Cicero. Photog- 
raphy: All senior protraits were taken by McCrath Studios, 
Inc., 8 Elm Street Suite 2, Braintree, MA, 021 84. (phone 1 - 
800-588-7681) McCrath Studios was contracted by Boston 
College to be the Official Yearbook Photographer for the 2002 
Sub Turri staff uner the direction of the photography editors, 
Kyelim Rhee and Christopher Bowers. Any other photographs 
appearing in this book were taken by fellow staff members and 
graciously submitted by the officers of student organizations of 
Boston College as well as members of the student body and 
university departments. The entire Current Events section 
contained photos from the Associated Press. All four color 
reproduction was produced from transparency film and all film 
was sdeveloped by McCrath Studios and Hana One-Hour 
Photo Lab. The photos were taken usng a variety of cameras 
and lenses manufactured by Nikon, Canon, Quantum and 
Mamiya. Typgraphy: All body copy is 12 pt. Stone Sans, 
captions are 10 pt. StoneSans, photo credits are 6 pt. Stone 
Sans, and folios are 10 pt. Stone Sans. The Cover font is Stone 
Sans Semibold. The remaining fonts and sizes were chosen by 
the discretion of the section editors. Copyright, 2002: by Sub 
Turri, the Yearbook of Boston College. No portion of Sub Turri 
may be reproduced or transmitted in any form, electronic, 
mechanical, digital, or otherwise, without the expressed 
written consent of the current Editors-in-Chief. Sub Turri was 
produced entirely by a staff of undergraduate stdent volun- 
teers. Sub Turri generates revenue from yearbook sales, ads 
and donations. Please direct all inquiries to: Sub Turri, the 
Yearbook of B oston College, McElroy Commons, Room 103, 
Chestnut Hill, MA, 02467. Phone: 617-552-3493 

Closing 503 



i ,