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Full text of "Sub turri = Under the tower : the yearbook of Boston College"

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OPENING 1 - CURRENT EVENTS 26 

ACADEMICS 34 - ORGANIZATIONS 76 

STUDENT LIFE 130 - SPORTS 178 



SENIORS 250 - BENEFACTORS 466 - CLOSING 482 



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SUB TURRI 2004 



Boston College 

McElroy Commons 103 

Chestnut Hill, Massachusetts 02467 

(6171 552 - 3493 

subturri@bc.edu 

copyright 2004 Jared Walsh 



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"Never shall I forget the time I spent with you Please 
continue to be my friend os you will always find me yours." 

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ALL THEM 







"It's a pleasure to share one's memories. Everything 

remembered is dear, endearing, touching, precious. At hast the 

past is safe --though we didn't know it at the time. We know 

it now. Because it's in the past; because we have survived." 

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Father 

William P. Leahy, SJ. 

President of 

Boston College 




14 Opening 




BOSTON COLLEGE 



OFFICE OF THE PRESIDENT 



Dear Members of the Class of 2004: 

Four years ago your class enrolled at Boston College. As an undergraduate here, 
you experienced the promise of the new millennium, but also witnessed the trauma of 
9/11, the crisis in the Catholic Church, the revelation of corporate corruption, and the 
war in Iraq. In these four years, we hope that your Boston College education has 
prepared you not simply to prosper, but also to be part of the solution to the challenges 
in today's complex global society. 

On behalf of the Boston College community, I thank you for the energy, 
commitment, and idealism that you have brought to our campus. Your dreams and 
aspirations have affected Boston College in so may ways, and I hope your classes, 
experiences, and activities have not only enabled you to identify and nurture your gifts, 
but also to grow intellectually, spiritually, and socially. Since our founding in 1863, this 
institution, has strived to assist its students in developing broader perspectives, 
deepening their awareness of critical issues in wider society, and preparing for life after 
Boston College. 

I encourage you members of the Class of 2004 to use your talents for the greater 
glory of God and in service of others, especially the poor and disadvantaged. Our world 
needs people like you who have vision, hope, and creativity. My prayer is that you will 
continue to draw strength and inspiration from what you have learned at "the Heights" 
and from one another. May your lives be marked by faith, integrity, and compassion, 
and may God always be with you in the years ahead. 

Sincerely, 

William P. Leahy, S.J. 
President 




Current' Events 15 





16 Opening 



"The roads we take are more important than the goals we 
announce. Decisions determine destiny" 
Frederick Speakman 









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It's not what's happening to you now or what has happened in you 

past that determines who you become. Rather, it's your decision 

about what to focus on, what things mean to you, and what you'n 

going to do about them that will determine your ultimate destiny. 

Anthony Robbiru 




Opening 





Opening 19 





20 Opening 



"The true past departs not no truth or goodness realized 
by man ever dies, or can die; but all is still here, and, 
-ecognized or not lives and works through endless change" 
[homos Carlyle 




Opening 21 



"There will come a time when you believe everything is finished 

Thot will be the beginning.'" 

Louis L' Amour 




22 Opening 



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Opening 23 



24 Opening 




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Opening 25 





ALL THAT YOU CAN'T LEAVE BEHIND 

CURRENT EVENTS 

The variety of places and faces splashed across the major supermarket tabloids and newspapers of 2003 testifies to the 
constantly changing situation of the world. Whose picture sat on your dorm room coffee table all semester? Earlier in the year, 
we could not escape the odd couple of Clay Aiken and Ruben Studdard as Simon Cowell, Paula Abdul, and Randy Jaakson 
judged yet another American Idol competition. Victory was the word of the year for the Terminator, as he accepted the 
position of California Governor and for the loyal MA fans that saw their Red Sox and Patriots advance through the playoffs. 
Our own Elizabeth Filarski was a survivor, yet again, as she earned herself a permanent place on the daily talk show, The View. 
And "talk" is exactly what surrounded the undeniable romance between Demi Moore the considerably younger Punk'd host, Ashton Kutcher. 
Moore and Kutcher stood proud despite speculation, though we cannot say the same for Don Zimmer, who lost his footing beneath the force 
of the fiery-tempered Pedro Martinez "Fiery" can also be used to describe the Sunshine State's summer, as flames consumed thousands 
of homes. At one point, reporters declared that the unstoppable fires were headed towards the home of "Newlyweds" Nick Lachey and 
Jessica Simpson. And though Jessica had trouble distinguishing between tuna and chicken, her rival, Britney Spears' bigger mistake left her 
deciding between marriage and an annulment. Both beautiful blondes, however, realized a new competitor in the fight for publicity, as 
Paris Hilton became the most searched for name on the Internet and the most glamorized farm girl since . . . well, since ... no one. Half 
way across the world, Saddam Hussein was living in his own sort of farmland. Who would have thought that one of the most dangerous 
men in the world would be holed up under a rug? Back home, famed architects were unveiling designs for the New Freedom Tower and 
bachelorette Trista Rehn was choosing veils for her wedding to firefighter Ryan Sutter. Putnam Investments could have used the money 
ABC spent on the wedding to resolve their mutual fund scandal and NBC could have used it to pay the monstrous per-episode salaries of 
the Friends cast. As Monica, Chandler, Ross, Phoebe, Rachel and Joey drift into the world of syndication they will become for our children 
what Ted Danson and the cast of Cheers was for us. And cheering is exactly what Justin Timberlake did not do as he watched his ex kiss 
Madonna. For Justin, however, 2003 has not been a year to complain about ... in addition to innumerable awards, he has been seen 
cozying up to Charlie's Angel, Cameron Diaz. 2003 has also had its share of losses, with television star John Ritter unexpectedly passing 
away and thousands of fearless soldiers selflessly putting our country's freedom before their own lives. The past twelve months have been 
days of both glory and mourning . . . exciting celebrations and unexpected discoveries . . . they are part of all that we can never leave behind. 




Edited by Jared Walsh, Myra Chai, and Natalia Quirk 



Current Events 27 




Counterclockwise from top: The kiss seen round the world! Pop princesses Britney Spears 
and Christina Aguilera shock the MTV Music awards audience and the world by lip 
locking the Music Industry's queen, Madonna, Though Britney would up her shock value 
a few months later with a quickie Vegas wedding that's an image we'll not soon forget! 

28 Cureent Events 



After the Yankees knock the Boston Red Sox out of the World Serif 
they falter and fall to the Florida Marlins. Debra Messing poses wi'J 
her award for outstanding lead actress in a comedy series for hi. 
work on Will & Grace at the 55th Annual Primetime Emmy Aware 



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The variety of places and faces splashed across 
the major supermarket tabloids and newspapers of 2003 
testifies to the constantly changing face of the world. Whose 
face sat on your dorm room coffee table all semester? 
Earlier in the year, we could not escape the odd couple 
of Clay Aiken and Ruben Studdard as Simon Cowell, Paula Abdul, 
and Randy Jackson judged yet another American Idol competition. 
Victory was the word of the year for the Terminator, as he accepted 
e position of California Governor and for the Red Sox as they advanced through the playoffs. 
Jur own Elizabeth Filarski was a survivor, yet again, as she earned herself a permanent place on the 
aily talk show. The View. And "talk" is exactly what surrounded the undeniable romance between 
emi Moore and the considerably younger Punk'd host, Ashton Kutcher. The two stood proud 
sspite speculation, though we cannot say the same for Don Zimmer, who lost his footing beneath 
e force of the fiery-tempered Pedro Martinez. As "fiery," perhaps, as the Sunshine State's summer, 
-, flames consumed thousands of homes. At one point, reporters declared ihaf the unstoppable 
;es were headed towards the home of newlyweds Nick Lachey 
:id Jessica Simpson. And though Jessica had trouble distinguishing 
stween tuna and chicken, her rival, Britney Spears' bigger mistake 
ft her deciding between marriage and an annulment. Both beautiful 
ondes, however, realized a new competitor in the fight for publicity, 
. Paris Hilton became the most searched for name on the Internet 
id the most glamorized farm girl since ... well, since ... no one. 
Half way across the world, Saddam Hussein was 
ing in his own sort of farmland. Who would have ever 
ought that one of the world's most dangerous men would be holed up under a rug? 
tick home, famed architects were unveiling designs for the New Freedom Tower and 
xhelorette Trista Rehn was choosing veils for her wedding to firefighter Ryan Sutter. Putnam 
/estments could have used the money ABC spent on the wedding to resolve their mutual fund 
andal and NBC could have used it to pay the monstrous per-episode salaries of the Friends 
ist. As Monica, Chandler, Ross, Phoebe, Rachel and Joey drift into the world of syndication 
=y will become for our children what Ted Danson and the cast of Cheers was for us. 
id cheering is exactly what Justin Timberlake did not do as he watched his ex kiss 
Madonna. For Justin, though, 2003 brought not only 
innumerable awards, but current sweetheart, Cameron Diaz. 
2003 has also had its share of losses, with television star John 
Ritter unexpectedly passing away and thousands of fearless soldiers 
selflessly putting our country's freedom before their own lives. 
The past twelve months have been days of both glory and 
mourning, exciting celebrations and unexpected discoveries . . . they 
are part of all that we can never leave behind. 






tney Spears can do nothing but smile at the 
iwd after being awarded her own star on 
i Hollywood Walk of Fame, March 17, 2003. 



And after all the excitement surrounding the 
NBA draft, recent high school graduate, 
LeBron James, signed with the Cavaliers. He 
has performed tremendously well this season. 



Faces in 
the Media 




Rapper P Diddy's motives were clear when he ran the 
marathon to raise $2 million dollars for children's charities. 




Celebutante Paris Hilton makes waves with her style, reality 
show and a sex tape released against her wishes by an ex- 
boyfriend. 




Couple Trista Rehn and Ryan Sutter of the Bachelorette are 
the darlings of Reality TV as their televised wedding draws a 
huge audience. 



Current Events 29 



HEADLINES 




Michael Jackson faces the 
most serious scandal of his 
career as he is charged 
with various counts of 
child molestation. Opinion 
is divided over whether 
the King of Pop is guilty 
or innocent while Jackson 
himself vehemently denies 
any wrongdoing. 




John Allen Muhammed, the 
main suspect in the sniper 
shootings that terrorized the 
Washington Area speaks in 
his own defense at his trial in 
Virginia Beach. Muhammed 
faces the death penalty for 
his role in the shootings in 
the fall of 2002. 




The east coast plunged 
into darkness in late August 
leaving all affected with 
a new "where were you 
when" moment. Luckily 
little damage was done 
as Americans from New 
York to Michigan united 
on porches with radios 
and candles to enjoy a 
momentary return to simpler 
times! 




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ational News 























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Clockwise from top: AAAAAAAAAAAAAnold holds Americas attention from the first announce- 
ment of his candidacy on Jay Leno to his victory speech. Martha Stewart leaves court with her 
lawyer upon hearing that the securities fraud charges against her would not be dropped. Stewart, 
famed home and garden guru denies the allegations of insider trading. The numerous democratic 
candidates pose at Rock the Vote in Boston's Faneuil Hall. Each democrat hoped to unseat President 
Bush over issues such as the economy and the war in Iraq. Brutal weather buries Boston in snow. 
Around the nation it also brings an epidemic of the flu and a dangerous shortage of the flu shot. 



Current Events 3) 




The Vatican beams beautifully on a roman night as Pope John Paul 
celebrates his 25th year as the first non-Italian pontiff in 455 years. 





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Two protestors in Canberra, Australia show their comedic sides in 
response to the arrival of George W. Bush in their country. 






Publicity and controversy welcome 19 year old Pfc. Jessica Lynch's 
return home after a harrowing experience as an Iraq War P.O.W. 



Large crowds gathered to witness the 3rd and final British Airways Concorde Jet makes its 
approach for landing at London's Heathrow airport for the last scheduled supersonic flight. 




September 11th 



Two years, one war, a dramatic cap- 
ture, and thousands of lives later, the 
pain is still there. In the empty lot that 
once held the World Trade Center 
towers there is an eeire sense that 
things will never be the same. The 
"Tribute in Light" during the second 
anniversary of the September 11th 
attacks was a fitting tribute to the 
men and women who lost their lives, 
and the potential new Towers hope 
to bring comfort to those who were 
deeply touched by the events of 
that day. Yet in the past two years, 



public opinion worldwide has moved 
from post-9/11 sympathy for the United 
States to disappointment over the 
country's pre-emptive actions regard- 
ing the war in Iraq. Resentment has 
centered on President Bush's indiffer- 
ence towards the United Nations and 
on the president himself, who many 
view as an ineffective leader bent only 
on controlling the world's oil. Sentiments 
aside, it has been a dramatic year with 
Pfc Jessica Lynch's rescue and the 
capture of former Iraqi president Sad- 
dam Hussein in a dirt hole near Tikrit. 








Clockwise from top: President George W. Bush speaks at the 
United Nations in an attempt to build an international consensus and 
coalition against the regime of Iraqi dictator Saddam Hussein. While 
the war was prosecuted without UN backing, debate circulated 
about the legitimacy of the organization as well as of the war 
itself. While others passively opposed the war, terrorists in Bagdad 
fought against the presence of the United Nations. The bombing of 
the UN building in the Iraqi capital in late June killed 23. Govern- 
ment employees light candles beside an international symbol on the 
fight against AIDS as they commemorate World Aids Day in subur- 
ban Manila. The once lavish Iraqi dictator sits defeated in the cus- 
tody of U.S soldiers. Public opinion in the U.S is mixed as Americans 
look to the capture of another elusive figure, Osama bin Laden. 

Current Events 33 



ALL THAT YOU CAN'T LEAVE BEHIND 

ACADEMICS 



If you had to describe your academic life, how would you do if? Freshmen might discuss the fact that they are simply taking 
classes to fulfill the core curriculum. English majors are enrolled in Survey of Biology while Biology majors are sitting through 
freshman writing seminars. Others would still swear to you that 9am is not that early. And still some would just sign up for 
classes that they really have no idea what they are about. Sophomores would describe their newfound knowledge of the 
registration process and the importance of the PEF"s. They have figured out that Pulse helps to alleviate some of the pressures 
of the core and they still feel comfortable changing their majors three different times throughout the year. Junior year is the time 
for Pre-Med's to re-evaluate the practicality of their aspirations as other students begin to question the feasibility of their double 
major with a minor. Actual schoolwork becomes more challenging, especially considering the fact that the library is so far from 
most apartments and the idea of a kegger on a Tuesday night is not as far-fetched as it used to be. Senior year academics 
tend to cover a wide spectrum. Deadlines and interviews once again become ever so important. Applications for law school, 
medical school, the fifth-year education program, and other graduate schools become top priority and an increasingly popular 
topic of conversation. This as the "Real World" suddenly means more than a group of good-looking twenty-somethings getting 
drunk and hooking up on MTV. People in Arts & Sciences watch their CSOAA friends interview with financial companies and 
LSOE students realize the grueling schedule of student teaching that will shortly become reality. Nursing students work another 
year in the hospital and Honors Program students chip away at their theses. Each year, the "academic" life encompasses 
drastically different experiences. However, what does not change is the impact imparted upon us through these classes and 
situations. These lessons, both in and outside the classroom, are part of all that we can't leave behind as we move forward. 




Edited by Katryna Dikansky and Katie Hayes 



Academics 35 




Th e Jesuit Traditi on 

Did you know.... 

...that Boston College is the 

largest Jesuit university in the 

country? 



...that the 120 Jesuits in the 

Boston College community 

comprise the largest Jesuit 

community in the world? 




36 Academics 








Boston College 
And the 

Jesuit Tradition 




Throughout its history, spanning over the past 140 
years, Boston College has been able to maintain its Jesuit 
character. Today, BCs Jesuit influence is noticeable in the varying 
components of the University. This tradition is one that strives 
towards the education of individuals. Thus allowing its students to 
question and to find God in the simplest of activities or moments. 

While the education here encompasses the ideals of 
St. Ignatius, the founder of the Jesuit order, it is not limited to 
these boundaries. Boston College offers more than the typical 
humanities and science courses found throughout the American 
educational system. The University goes beyond books as 
teaching tools for students. Through programs such as PULSE, 
4Boston, and the Jesuit Volunteer Corps, BC stresses the value 
of service to others and the importance of all human life. It is in 
programs such as Capstone and those within the core curriculum 
that students learn to develop their minds academically, while 
also learning to nurture their faith, relationships, and soul. 

The values of faith, knowledge, and service, present 
upon BCs creation in 1863, are still present and clearly seen in 
our 120 member Jesuit community. These professors, counselors, 
and friends are often favorites of students for their involved 
and caring attitude towards the undergraduate population. 

And it has been within the past two years, that both 
locally and nationally, BC has established a broader commitment 
to these original Jesuit ideals. With the creation of The Church 
in the 21 s1 Century, a nationally recognized campaign set 



Honors Commons in Fulton is a nice quiet place to sit, think, and 
get some work done 



An educational 
system isn't worth a 
great deal if it teaches 
young people how 
to make a living, but 
doesn't teach them 
how to make a life. 

upon the ideals of exploring the changes and 
foundations of the Catholic Church, the Boston 
College Jesuit community has demonstrated 
their commitment to combining faith, knowledge, 
and service in everyday life. Whether it is in 
the classroom, over coffee, or during mass, the 
Jesuit tradition is alive in all things big and small. 
By Liz Paulson 



"Higher education must 
lead the march back 
to the fundamentals of 
human relationships, to the 
old discovery that is ever 
new, that man does not 
live by bread alone" 
-John A. Hannah 



Academics 37 



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38 AcademWs 






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of Arts 
ciences 



Founded in 
1863 in Boston 

5853 Students 
Enrolled 

32 majors and 
over 20 minors 

Oldest and 
largest of 
the four 
undergraduate 
schools 

Moved to 
Chestnut Hill in 
1909 

First building 
on the new 
campus was 
Gasson Hall 



Academics 39 




Dean Joseph 
Quinn 



t 




Boston College 



Office of the Dean 
College of Arts and Sciences 



To the Class of 2004, 



As is the case each year, your graduating class is the most talented group of 
students ever admitted to Boston College. You have been taught by outstanding 
faculty, yet probably learned as much or more from your fellow students as you did 
from your teachers. Our curriculum provided both depth, through majors and our 
wide and expanding selection of minors, and breadth, though the Core curriculum 
and our many electives. You have learned to think critically, write persuasively and 
manage your time effectively. Many of you have studied abroad, and have given 
much to others. You have applied to your daily life both of our mottoes: "Ever To 
Excel" and "Educating Men and Women For Others." We are proud of your 
progress and growth during your years at Boston College. 

You are entering a world that seems to be changing and becoming more 
challenging each day. You are well prepared for this, with your background in 
theology and philosophy, literature and history, the natural and social sciences, and 
the arts. We call your departure a "commencement" because your education is just 
beginning. Most of you will have multiple jobs and careers. You may change your 
life's "major" as often as you changed your academic major here! 

I hope that you will remember your Boston College family, more than 
140,000 strong. Stay in touch with college friends, and especially with your 
favorite professors — those who made a difference in your life. Most of us have 
chose this career because of the wonderful opportunity to work with students. If 
you are reading this years from 2004, email one of your teachers today. A note 
from a former student still makes my day. 

On behalf of my fellow faculty and staff at the Heights, we wish you good 
fortune. Go forth and come back — soon and often. 




oseph F. Quinn 
/Dean 
College of Arts and Sciences 



Gasson Hall, 140 Commonwealth Avenue, Chestnut Hill, Massachusetts 01467-3803 
617-552-3270 fax 617-552-2145 



^. 



"No pessimist ever discovered the secret of the stars, or 
oiled to an uncharted land, or opened a new doorway for 

the human spirit. " 
-Helen Keller 




Academics 41 



j oto by Chris Bowers 




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Carroll 








pool 
ment 



Founded in 1938 

Enrolls 2200 students 

Namesake: Wallace E. 
Carroll, '65 

Origninally called 
the College of 
Business 
Administration 

Concentrations: 
Accounting, Econom 
ics, General Manage 
ment, Management 
Information Systems, 
Operations and Str 
ategic Managment, 
Managerial Econom 
ics and Operations 
Research, Computer 
Science, Finance, 
Human Resources, and 
Marketing 



Academics 43 




Dean 

M. H. Safizadeh 




BOSTON COLLEGE 



Wallace E.Carroll School of Management 
dean's Office 



Dear Graduates of the Class of 2004, 

On behalf of my colleagues in the Carroll School of Management, it is my 
privilege to congratulate you and wish you the best in all your endeavors. The friendships 
and relationships you forged in the last four years will continue to support and nourish 
you for life. You are now a member of a large, canng, and dedicated BC alumni network. 
Former graduates have done much to enrich your lot, and now it's your turn to extend a 
helping hand to those who will follow you. 

After years of nurturing by your parents, teachers, professors, and countless 
institutions, we are confident that you're intellectually and morally prepared to begin your 
journey towards greatness. As you walk away from the serene and friendly confines of 
the Boston College campus, stay true to your convictions and pursue your dreams. Show 
no hesitation and resolutely face the challenges that you will encounter. We need your 
steadfast commitment to craft effective solutions to the problems of violence, poverty, 
injustice, and misunderstandings that permeate the world over. In you we see the hope 
and opportunity for combining technology, dialogue, and human ingenuity to tackle these 
problems. We know that you will be good citizens and family members as well as valued 
employees. 

Please come back to see us when you get a chance. Remember that you always 
belong here, and though you may not be physically present, your presence can always be 
felt. May peace and happiness never leave your heart. 

Sincerely, 



M. H. Safizadeh 
Dean 



FULTON HALL510. CHESTNUT HILL. MASSACHUSETTS 02467-3808 
617-552-S420 FAX 617-552-8738 



at* 



"Good business leaders create a vision, articulate the vision, pas- 
sionately own the vision, and relentlessly drive it to completion " 

~Jack Welch 




Academics 45 







LYNCH SCHOOL OF EDUCATION 



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Founded in 1952 
Enrolls 700 students 
Namesake: Carolyn and 
Peter Lynch '65 
Students have the option 
of completing a five- 
year master's program 
in any major plus Visually 
Handicapped Education and 
Multihandicapped Education 
Students take a second 
major in the College of Arts 
and Sciences 



Academics 47 




Dean 

Joseph O'Keefe 



i 




BOSTON COLLEGE 

OFFICE OF THE DEAN 
THE CAROLYN A. AND PETER S. LYNCH SCHOOL OF EDUCATION 



Dear Members of the Class of 2004, 

When you walk away from this campus on May 24, 2004, you will leave behind 
the life of a college student, with all of its joys and all of its challenges. What you will 
not leave behind are the values that have shaped your experiences here. It is my hope 
that you will take with you an appreciation of the life of the mind, applying to the world's 
pressing needs thoughtful and honest inquiry. I hope that you will bring a desire to give 
generously of your time and energy to enhance the human condition, to expand the 
human imagination and to make the world more just. I hope that you will take with you 
the desire to live with integrity and purpose in your words and your actions. I hope that 
you will carry within you the flame of faith in God, which has been kindled on the 
Heights. And I hope that you take with you the joy of friendship and community, which 
are hallmarks of the Boston College experience. 

You join generations of alumni who have gone before you to make the world a 
better place. Members of Class of 2004, rich in talent and full of potential, I know that 
you will continue the best traditions of alma mater. You make us proud! 




God Bless you all. 



fi 



Joseph M. O'Keefe, S.J. 

Interim Dean 



campion hall, 140 commonwealth avenue, chestnut h 
tel; 617-552—4200 fax: 617—552—0812 web: v 



.. MASSACHUSETTS O2467— 3813 

/. bc.edu/lynchschool 



48 Academics 



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The best teacher is the one who suggests rather than dogmatizes, 
and inspires his listener with the wish to teach himself" 

~Edward Bulwer-Lytton 




Academics 49 



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Connell School 




Founded in 1947 
Enrolls 450 students 
Formally dedicated this year to 
William F. Connell '59, the winner 
of the Ignatius Medal (Boston 
Colleges highest honor) 
Currently rated 23rd among all 
national programs, 2nd among all 
programs at Catholic institutions, 
and 1st among Jesuit institutions. 
Mission: "To prepare professional 
nurses whose practice reflects 
a humanistic ethic and is 
scientifically based, technically 
competent, and highly 
compassionate" 



Academics 51 




Dean Barbara 
Munro 




BOSTON COLLEGE 

OFFICE OF THE DEAN 
•TLLIAM F. CONNELL SCHOOL OF NURSING 



Dear William F. Connell SON Graduating Class of 2004: 

Congratulations to all of you on your graduation, and thank you for the many contributions you have 
made to this school during your time here. We are proud of you and know that you will make the best 
use of your talents and your Boston College education to make a real difference for your clients and for 
health care in general. 

This was an exciting year for us as we celebrated the naming of our school for William F. Connell. 
Bill Connell exemplified what it means to be a graduate of this Jesuit school. He dedicated his life to 
improving the lives of others. Although he became an extremely successful individual, he never lost 
touch with his roots in the community, church, and school. We are all extremely proud to carry his 
name and hope that all of our graduates will use his life as an example of how one can make the most 
of one's God-given talents and educational opportunities. 

The Dedication reminded us of our mission and nurses' responses to the needs of their patients, 
communities, and nation. These have been disturbing, trying times. From world turmoil to local events, 
we have all faced uncertainty and upheaval. Nurses have always risen to meet the challenges whether 
in times of war or in the aftermath of disasters. You will be called upon to face new challenges, unheard 
of in the previous century. Of great concern, is the developing shortage of Registered Nurses. Recent 
research has demonstrated the devastating effects of inadequate nurse staffing, and the relationship 
between better educated nurses and improved patient outcomes. As graduates of the William F. 
Connell SON, you have been extremely well prepared for the current and evolving system. Your 
program, grounded in the liberal arts and in the Jesuit tradition of excellence in service to others, was 
designed to produce graduates who apply honed critical thinking skills to clinical decision-making. You 
will certainly rise to the challenges and bring the Boston College tradition and spirit to all you do. 

May God continue to bless you, your parents, and loved ones, as you leave Boston College to 
commence the next phase of your life. 

Sincerely, 



Barbara Hazard Munro, Ph.D., R. N., FAAN 
Dean and Professor 



i4o commonwealth avenue, chestnut hill, massachusetts o2467-3812 
tel: 617-552-4250 fax: 617-552-0931 



52 Academics 



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"It is one of the most beoutiful compesotions of life, thot no mon con 
sincerely try to help onother without helping himself" 

-Ralph Waldo Emerson 




Academics 53 



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Founded in 1929 
Namesake: Dean 
James A. Woods, S.J., 
the longest-serving 
dean in University 
Original name: Evening 



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ers courses in 



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disciplines 



Offers both full- and 
part-time study leading 
to both bachelor's and 
master's degrees 
Celebrating its 75th 
anniversary this year 





Academics 55 




Dean 
James Woods 




BOSTON COLLEGE 

OFFICE OF THE DEAN 
THE JAMES A. WOODS, S.J., COLLEGE OF ADVANCING STUDIES 



To the Class of 2004: 

Great joy and accomplishment are yours as you celebrate graduation. You have achieved what 
you dared to dream. The talent, commitment and optimism you brought to studies will now be 
advanced in different directions, shared in new ways. 

You face a new world. Unknown challenges now widen your horizons and demand a clear sense 
of mission. This world community invites your vision, vitality and vigilant empathy for others. 
You are prepared to question, to seek answers and to respond. You have anchored your 
knowledge, convictions and attitudes in a commitment to others which is the essence of moral 
engagements. Life's many changes will now always be examined in a defined context. You 
can't ever leave behind what now enlightens your dreams. 

Your imagination and initiative link you today with distant continents and disparate cultures. 
Your talents and many gifts call you to connect the world's communities and carve a future of 
freedom and peace. 

You own the greatest human freedom: to choose your own attitude in any given circumstance. 
To secure your opinions under extreme conditions when there is no chance of changing them is 
the highest expression of personal autonomy. 

Respond to the compelling challenges with understanding and enthusiasm. Seize every 
opportunity with wisdom and optimism. As the Woods College of Advancing Studies celebrates 
its 75 th Anniversary, we know that this year's graduates, like previous graduates, will go forth 
into a world of upheaval and advance the noblest human cause: freedom and moral concern for 
others. 



Prayerful best wishes for all the years ahead. 



Sincerely yours, 

James A. Woods, S.J. 
Dean 



mccuinn hail, chestnut hi 
tel: 617-552—3900 web: 



. MASSACHUSETTS 02467—3807 
ivi bc.edu/advancingStLldie5 




56 Academics 



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"Education is what survives when what has been learned has been 

forgotten. * 
-B.F. Skinner 





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Academics 57 




Students in Professor Chris Constas' Western Cultural Traditions class study in the Honors Library Photo by Katie Hayes 




mpressions 




'The honors program has provided me 
opportunity to combine my 
public speaking skills in order to mi e m> 

potential. In addition, I have learned to u 
perspectives, philosophies, and teachings to fc 

own opinions." 
-Sara Zhu, '07 




A student busy studying in the Honors Library Photo by Katie Hayes 



58 Academics 






Boston College 
Honors 



OGRAM 




\ 




The Honors Program of Boston College's School of Arts 
and Sciences is among the oldest in the United States and was 
started in 1958. The purpose of this four-year humanities pro- 
gram is to organize academically superior students into groups 
that will experience a more in-depth exploration of the core 
classes required of every freshman to give them a broader 
base from which to specialize for future majors. Students in the 
Honors Program, which stresses logic in examining broad core 
subjects , are challenged in many ways to reach their highest 
potential. The Honors Program accepts an average of 140 
freshmen each year. These students are usually in the top 5% of 
their high school class and have excellent SAT scores, although 
these are not the only factors considered in admission. About 
100 seniors graduate from the Honors Program each year. 
Students take classes called Western Cultural Traditions. 
Freshman year students read the Bible as well as texts by the 
ancient Greeks, including Plato amd Sophocles , before finish- 
ing the year reading Dante's Inferno. Sophomore year students 
study the Renaissance, the Enlightenment, and eighteenth-century 
Romantics before finishing the year with Dante's Inferno, and eigh- 
teenth-century Romantics before ending with texts from the end of 
the nineteenth century. Junior year, students take what they have 
learned and apply it to the twentieth century. Senior year stu- 
dents write a thesis related to their major, often drawing on what 
they have learned in their Western Cultural Traditions classes. 
Classes are rarely bigger than fifteen or sixteen students, 
which is perfect for their discussion-based format. Students 



in all sections read the same texts, but different professors choose 
to focus on different aspects or viewpoints. The classes the stu- 
dents take fulfill their core requirements for philosophy, theology, 
social science, literature, and writing. Ultimately, students in the 
Honors Program will take lots of valuable knowledge away from 
their time at Boston College, by Katie Dodd and Katie Hayes 

Honors is a four-yeor 
humanities curriculum as 
"studio humanitatis" was 
originally understood in 
the Renaissance: a shared 
search for what is humane, 
first in our studies, and then 
in ourselves. 



Academics 59 



Impressions 

Tm happy to be part of the prelaw 

program at BC because it provides the 

guidance needed for me to achieve my 

goal of attending law school, while at 

the same time it does not restrict me to 

specific courses" 

-Katryna Dikansky '07 








60 Academics 











** 












Boston College 
re-Professional 

Programs 




Many BC students come to The Heights with plans to continue 
their studies beyond the undergraduate level. Those with aspira- 
tions of going to medical, dental, veterinarian or law school may 
choose to have a career-specific pre-professional concentration. 
Students with a pre-medical or pre-law concentration may 
choose any major they wish, allowing opportunities to experi- 
ence the liberal arts education that our Jesuit community so 
wonderfully provides for its students. Students in the pre-medical, 
pre-dental, and pre-veterinary programs are required to take a 
number of science orientated classes, all of which include exten- 
sive lab work. Experience in a hospital or health care center is 
also necessary. Many BC students have the opportunity to gain 
first-hand knowledge of their future professions at any number 
of the Boston area's well-respected medical institutions, including 
Mass General Hospital and the Dana Farber Cancer Institute. 
Unlike its medical counterpart, the pre-law concentration does 
not require any specific classes or activities. Instead, students 
are strongly recommended to take classes ranging from logic to 
public speaking. The Mendel Society, a group for pre-med and 
dental students, sponsors various speakers on campus as well 
as runs prep classes for the Medical College Admissions Test 
(MCAT1 and the Dental Admissions Test DAT). The Bellarmine 
Law Academy does similar work for pre-law students, provid- 
ing important information to undergraduates on applying to law 
school, taking the LSAT and networking with alumni in the legal 
profession. Both programs have extensive advising systems that 
assist students in planning their academic careers while focusing 
on their professional goals. Extensive academic opportunities cou- 




So wait.J'm supposed to add the HCL first?" Photo by Kevin 
Lichtenbwg 



In 2002, 95 percent of 
pre-medical seniors with 
at least a 3.2 grade point 
average in the sciences 
and a score of 9 or 
better on the MCAT 
were admitted to at 
least one U.S. medical 
school. 80 percent of 
Boston College law 
school applicants gained 
admission to at least one 
American Bar Association- 
approved institution. 

pled with comprehensive advising and collabora- 
tion with fellow students are sure to leave those in 
Boston College's pre-professional programs well- 
prepared for graduate school and their future 
careers, by Katie Dodd and Katie Hayes 

*To be a doctor, then, 
means much more than to 
dispense pills or to patch 
up or repair torn flesh 
and shattered minds. To 
be a doctor is to be an 
intermediary between 
man and God" -Felix' 
Marti-lbanez 



Academics 61 



ons 




)ow was probably the 
it clc^s that I signed up for because 
it showed me what a Jesuit education 
was all about. It challenged both your 
mind and your spirituality, which was 
unlike any class that I have ever taken 
before." 
-Dustin Moore, *07 





Photo by Heather Page 




Photo by Heather Page 



62 Academics 




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Kc'tV 




Special 
Academic 

Programs 



Boston College offers students a liberal arts education 
through which they are taught various disciplines in an effort 
to produce well-rounded Men and Women for Others. In 
addition to the traditional math, science and history classes, 
BC offers several special academic programs which offer 
students a different prespective on the learning process. 

The Cornerstone Program consists of four individual 
courses designed to help freshmen adjust to their first year 
in college away from home. Courage to Know serves as a 
fifth class for first-semester freshmen in which small groups of 
students read and discuss stories relating to issues that many 
college students face. The Cornerstone Advisement Seminar 
is a twelve-student group that meets once a week with a 
mentor, who serves as their academic advisor. In addition 
to weekly classes, individual sessions are scheduled with the 
mentor, and activities outside of the classroom are planned. 
Perspectives is a two- semester, twelve-credit course which 
fulfills all core requirements for theology and philosophy. The 
Writing Seminar is a fifteen-student course meant to teach 
writing as a form of communication and source of learning. 
The class writes many papers with multiple drafts and reads 
a wide range of works, including nonfiction prose. The 
Cornerstone Program has been successful thus far in helping 
freshmen students with their adjustment to college life. 

This program is mirrored by the Capstone Program, a 
unique opportunity for seniors to review their educations and to 
preview their upcoming long-term commitments in life. 

The Pulse program is a full-year course which takes care 



Cornerstone, Capstone, 
and Pulse are just a few 
of the many unique educa- 
tional experiences offered 
to Boston College students 
throughout their four years 
on The Heights. 



of both the Theology and Philosophy core 
requirements. Pulse students attend weekly 
classes on Plato, Descartes, and the Bible, 
while spending another ten hours each week 
in a paticular community placement. Placements 
include local soup kitches, children's program, and 
the Big Brother/Big Sister Program. 

With so many opportunities to expand your 
academic horizon, there is certainly a style of 
education for everyone here at BC. by Katie 
Dodd 




that we learn 
lessons when we least 
expect them but always 
when we need them the 
most, and, the true "'gift 19 in 
these lessons always lies in 
the learning process itsei 
-Cathy Lee Crosby 




Academics 63 



Influential Professors 

These professors were all nominated anonymously by BC 
students who wish to recognize them as outstanding teach- 
ers who provided their students with valuable academic 
experiences that they can take away from their time at BC. 




Kathleen Bailey 



Which of these might interest you the most at 9:00 AM: the nature of Islamic 
political systems derived from the Arab caliphates, the Mongolian Khanates and 

Turkish conquests, or the fundamentals of political science? 
The answer is that they all would interest you if lucky enough to be enrolled 
in a class with Kathleen Bailey. She is a professor with her own style, a style 
that works, and a style that interests. Her fast-paced, energetic lectures are just 
one aspect of what makes Professor Bailey a standout. Her intelligence and 
knowledge of the subject matter covered cannot be questioned: the fact is that 

this woman knows her stuff. 
But her talents are not only restricted to the classroom. She has her name listed 
as primary author of "Clan and Politics in Uzbekistan," as well as other works. 
She heads up the Middle Eastern and Islamic Studies program which offers 
an undergraduate minor in the field. And, above all, she is an important name 
the areas of ethnic and regional politics. First semester, Professor Bailey had 
to cancel class to attend a meeting with the State Department in Washington, 

D.C. 

A woman who treats her students with the utmost respect, challenges normal 

ways of thinking, and pushes students to do their absolute best definitely 

deserves to be called out as one of Boston College's outstanding professors 




Kerry Cranin 



In teaching only one section of Perspectives on Western Culture, Kerry Cronin is 
only able to affect approximately thirty students a semester. But what she does 
is actually so much more. This part-time professor and administrative assistant in 
the Philosophy Department encounter students on an every day basis and they 

are better for it. 
Tackling the words of the ancient Greeks, the stories transcribed into the Bible, 
and the personal accounts of St. Augustine, Plato, and Machiavelli is no easy 
task- especially during your freshman year. However, Professor Cronin is able | 
to make these topics more manageable, and yes, actually interesting. She not 
only does this through her wonderful sense of humor and relaxed nature, but 
also through her intense, driving passion for both philosophy and theology. Class I 
discussions and debates are strongly encouraged and no question is ever that I 

"stupid" one to ask. 
Professor Cronin makes herself accessible to students anytime she is on campus- 1 
an action that allows her to be respected, but also a friendly, familiar face to be I 
seen on campus. Recently, she became an Adult Leader and participant for one I 
of the Ignition Society sponsored Kairos retreats. She wanted to experience J 

what many students on campus get to and are then able to talk about. 
As a Boston College alumna, Kerry Cronin knows what this campus stands for 
and is about. She knows how professors during her time here really impacted 
and educated her. And she knows what she wants to do with her time here. 
Those lucky enough to get to know Professor Cronin are leaving The Heights 
very lucky people; and for those who have not - she is a woman for others and| 
they should meet this influential lady. 



64 Academics 



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Nancy Fairchild 

Many students at Boston College have had to experience 
afternoon and night dasses that last about two and a half hours; 
Pathophysiology is one of these classes. And as most students will tell 
you, they often dread fifty-minute classes, but almost one hundred and fifty 
minutes? That could be near impossible. 

However, this is simply not the case when Nancy Fairchild is your 
professor. A registered nurse and professor in the Connell School of Nursing, 
Fairchild clearly has her hands full. But this woman has it all under control. 
She is able to balance her "real world* job with the challenges of preparing 
future health-care professionals to put forth their very best in all that they do. 
And students would agree, that Nancy Fairchild does just this. 

With a break after an hour or so, those in her classes do not 
mind coming back to finish up the remaining hour because they find the 
class informative, eye-opening, interesting, and fun. It is through her wisdom, 
stemming from personal and professional experiences, that Fairchild has been 
able to combine textbook knowledge with first hand reality. She is thorough 
and covers the material that is needed, but as with the nursing profession, she 
always has time for those individuals who need it. 

Nancy Fairchild is not only the nurse you hope to see as the exam 
room door opens at the hospital, rather, she is also the person that you want 
to be educating those who in the next few years we will encounter when 
suffering from the flu or when in need of stitches. 




Tom Koplan-Moxfield 

It is evident to all those who have either had Tom Kaplan- 
Maxfield in class or those who have observed his teaching methods, that this 
man truly loves what he does and cares for his students. 

For some freshman, and some upperclassmen as well, classes can 
be daunting due to the random questions from professors who feel you did 
not do the reading, the possibility of that pop quiz requiring every last detail, 
or the comprehensive syllabus that focuses on everything under the sun. 

This style may be for some, but certainly not for Tom Kaplan- 
Maxfield. This is a man who starts each class by playing a song and having 
the class guess the title and performer. This is a man who throws those minute 
details out the window and focuses more on the larger, more central ideas of 
selected short stories, poems, and novels. And this is a man who encourages 
students with varying opinions to speak their thoughts and feelings and for 
those others to listen with equally open minds. 

An informal and relaxed classroom works for this man and those 
who take his courses. He does not simply throw convention aside, but rather, 
he works with it, molding it into something all his own. What students are 
presented with is a man who cares passionately for his work, but also for his 
students. He is approachable, understanding, energetic, and quite friendly 
and fun. He is everything that you could hope for in a university professor. 




"Before the gates of excellence, the high gods have 

placed sweat; long is the road thereto and rough and 

steep at first; but when the heights are reached, then 

there is ease, though grievously hard in the winning" 

-Dr. Laura Schlessinger 



The 



FINAL 

Whatever the major, whatever the year, whatever the 
school, most Boston College students have one thing in 
common: a mutual hatred for finals. It is a week that seems 
to always sneak up on us, no matter how many years we 
have been here. The warning signs are there- professors 
cramming in as much reading as they can, items being 
deleted off the syllabus, and pop-quizzes testing what 
you actually do know- but often they are overlooked. 
So much for enjoying the end of the semester and things 

winding down, work seems to just pile on. 
This is when the stress piles up- the stress inspired by 
trying to cram a semester's worth of knowledge into 
our heads. Missed classes loom over our heads, lecture 
notes that are missing or incomplete because you were 
sleeping in class taunt you for knowing better, but not 
acting accordingly, and those questions you had for 
professors during class and after exams that were never 

asked don't sound so stupid right now. 
Study days hit and signs of finals are everywhere on 
campus. Libraries fill up, dorm rooms become like cells 
in a monastery, and professors' offices become more 
crowded. Banners and fliers boasting 24-hour quiet 
hours in the dorms, being D'd as you pass into O'Neill 
by that security guard who usually just looks for those 




Crunch 

"Although finals mark the 
end of a semester, they also 
mark the beginning of the 
average student's stress and 
worries for finally starting 
to take responsibility for the 
long forgotten courses of the 
semester" ~Sue Burton '04 

trying to sneak in drinks, the overcrowding study tables, 
and piles of Cliff Notes, let us know that after all the 
stress and craziness, we still have to say our goodbyes 

before we leave for break. 
There are the oral exams that you have to prepare 
yourself for focusing on your pronunciation and speed; 
making sure to drop those "likes" and "umms" There 
are those finals that you know are going to be open 
book and open note, but you still highlight and note 
certain pages to make sure you don't spend too much 
time flipping those pages back and forth. And then 
there are those finals that you feel no matter how 
many hours you spend holed up in Bapst, or ignoring 
everyone you know while studying in Lower, or fighting 
the crowds for table space in O'Neilll, you will still 
walk out that door feeling like you failed. But no 
matter what, finals are a sign of the time; our time here 
at Boston College... maybe something we will miss 
after graduation? By Liz Paulson 



Every BC student. 



'ithout exception, hates finals. Photo by Kotryno 
Dikonsky 




Photo by Kofryna Dikansky 




66 Academics 



KU 





Twas the Night before Finals 



Twas the night before finals, 
And all through the college, 
The students were praying 
For last minute knowledge. 

Most were quite sleepy, 
But none touched their beds. 
While visions of essays 
Danced in their heads. 

Out in the taverns, 
A few were still drinking, 
And hoping that liquor 
Would loosen up their thinking. 

In my own apartment, 
I had been pacing, 
And dreading exams 
I soon would be facing. 

My roommate was speechless, 
His nose in his books, 
And my comments to him 
Drew unfriendly looks. 



I drained all the coffee, 
And brewed a new pot, 
No longer caring 
That my nerves were shot. 

I stared at my notes, 

But my thoughts were muddy, 

My eyes went ablur, 

I just couldn't study. 

"Some pizza might help, " 
I said with a shiver. 
But each place I called 
Refused to deliver. 

Id nearly concluded 
That life was too cruel 
With futures depending 
On grades had in school. 

When all of a sudden, 
Our door opened wide, 
And Patron Saint Put It Off 
Ambled inside. 



His spirit was careless, 
His manner was mellow, 
He started to bellow: 

"What kind of student 
Would make such a fuss, 
To toss bock at teachers 
What they tossed at us?" 

"On Cliff Notes' On Crib Notes' 
On last year's exams! 
On Wingit and Slingif, 
And last minute crams!" 

His message delivered, 
He vanished from sight, 
But we heard him laughing 
Outside in the night. 

"Your teachers have pegged you. 
So just do your best. 
Happy Finals to All, 
And to All, a good test." 



Academics 67 




Imprt 



so ha r e year abroad 

in Oxford Oursiae of America, I got 
the chance to experience a new way 
of life, one that seemed a lot more con- 
tented I really enjoyed being a part 
of the miversity and recommend that 
everyone take the opportunityr 
-Elizabeth Winkowski '05 





Academics 




-; 



International 
Study at 

BC And Abroad 



From Argentina to Norway, Australia to South America, 
Boston College's Center for International Partnerships and 
Programs (GPP) has a study abroad program to fit every stu- 
dent. The Hovey House-based GPP staff report that studying 
abroad in one of over 40 countries through their 70 pro- 
grams provides students with a once in a lifetime opportunity 
to thoroughly explore another culture and, in doing so, get a 
greater grasp of their own. 615 BC students last year got to 
find this out for themselves, and most came back to the Heights 
having had one of the most enriching experiences of their lives. 
"I missed 20 oz Coke and being able to take a 
shower for more than 3 minutes a day," said Julianne 
Oberle, who studied in Spain last summer, "but I 
became very comfortable with Spanish. Madrid is 

a beautiful city, I'd love to go back there someday." 
The States may have been hard to leave at first, but 
these students have gained relationships, knowledge, 
and a broader understanding of the world — things 
learned abroad that they could never leave behind. 
Having similar experiences here in America are the 
over 60 International students that call BC home for a 
semester or a year. "I really like the US, but the students 
do too much work over here!" observed Myriam Sanz, a 
senior in CSOM from Madrid. "It was hard leaving the 
sun and the healthy Spanish food behind, and drinks are so 
expensive here, but the program is really great," she said. 
BC takes care of its international students by planning 
outings to Boston and other important sites and making 



"Thinking International" is 
part of the campus cul- 
ture, with students and 
faculty traveling annually 
to over 100 destinations 
worldwide. BC consis- 
tently ranks in the top five 
US Doctoral Institutions in 
terms of number of stu- 
dents studying abroad. 

sure they have a good support system to 
help them adjust to American life. "I've only 
been here a short while," said Sainz, "but 
I already have lots of great experiences 
to take back with me." by Liz Paulson 




Academics 69 



Boston College 
Academic Scholarship 

Award Winners 

"There are countless ways of achieving greatness, I 
but any road to achieving one's maximum potential I 
must be built on a bedrock of respect for the I 

individual a commitment to excellence, and a 

rejection of mediocrity " 
Suck Rodgers 






Oscar Romero 
Scholarship Winner: 
Stephanie Valencia 



: 




Oscar A Romero is a prominent and positive figure in Christianity. As Archbishop 
of El Salvador, Father Romero took it upon himself to give strength and guidance to the 
poor and oppressed of his country, speaking out against the excesses of the Salvadorian 
government. Although he frequently faced many obstacles and dangerous threats from 
those who opposed his beliefs, Father Romero continued to write and speak about the 
importance of justice. On March 24, 1980, while celebrating the Eucharist, Archbishop 
Romero was shot and killed at the altar by a death squad assassin. Because of his extreme 

commitment to justice, he became a martyr to all people in a struggle with oppression. Today, his sermons continue to serve as a reminder of the importance of fighting 
for a just society. Oscar Romero's life and values continue to be an inspiration to many. 

Each year the Oscar A. Romero scholarship is given to a junior who exemplifies Romero's ideals in both academic and community life. This year's award 
went to Stephanie Valencia, an international studies major here at Etaston College. In March of 2002, Valencia went on an immersion trip to El Salvador. Having 
been touched by her experience, she chose to spend the following semester at Casa de la Soladaridad where she worked in marginal communities and studied at the 
University of Central America. Valencia also spent time at the Iberoamericana University in Mexico City, Mexico. While home at The Heights, she has been actively 
involved with many culturally orientated programs such as the Romero Committee and OLAA. After graduation, she hopes to work for an agency that will create 
positive policies to help the oppressed. No matter what path she follows, however, Stephanie Valencia hopes to promote the causes so dear to Father Oscar Romero: 
peace, justice, and truth 



70 Academics 



Martin Luther King, Jr. 

Scholarship Winner: 

Roderick Carey 

Martin Luther King, Jr. Scholarship is awarded to a junior who best represents the ideals 
Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr., including leadership, service, and academic accomplishment. 

prestigious award, given in February of the recipient's junior year, covers seventy-five 
:ent of the recipient's senior year tuition. Founded in 1982 by a group of faculty and ad- 
strators, the Martin Luther King, Jr. Scholarship has become the model for other university 
ilarships. The goal of the scholarship is to enhance diversity, multi-cultural education, in- 
ultural communication and understanding, and social justice on the Boston College campus 
e continuing to realize Dr. King's dream of social justice and equality. 

Roderick Carey, an english and secondary education major from Wilmington, Delaware, was awarded the 2003 Martin Luther King, Jr. 
darship as a result of his dedication to numerous and diverse activities at Boston College. He has been a panelist for the Student Admissions 
gram and a representative for the Asian Caucus. In addition to performing as a trumpet player with the BC bOp and Concert Band, Carey 
volved extensively in community service at Tfie Heights. Not only has he volunteered with 4Boston at the St. Francis/St. Phillip After School 
gram, but he has also been on two immersion trips, one to Nicaragua and another to Natchez Mississippi. Returning to Boston after a year 
he National University of Ireland at Maynooth, Roderick Carey is the epitome of the ideals that Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. sought the entire 
■Id to possess. 




Asian American 
Scholarship Winner- 
Cindy Uh 

Since their first arrival in America in the early nineteenth century, Asian Americans 
have made many significant contributions to the development of our nationhood and 
the expansion of democratic institutions. In recognition of these achievements and of 
the important and expanding role Asian American play in our society, Boston Col- 
lege has established an annual scholarship to honor an outstanding student of Asian 
descent who exemplifies the highest Asian American ideals and aspirations. The Asian 
American Scholarship is presented annually to a junior who demonstrates academic 
salience, is committed to promoting Asian American awareness, and serves both the Asian American and the wider communities on and off campus. The selection 
x nnittee is composed of faculty members, staff, and administrators and is awarded at Boston College's annual Asian Culture Night Celebration. 

The 2003 recipient of the Asian American Scholarship is Cindy Uh. A senior from Jacksonville, Florida, Uh has been very involved with numerous activities 
i oston College since her freshman year. As a freshman, she participated in both the Mentoring Leadership Program and the Shaw Leadership Program. She 
x also been a member of the Shaw Leadership Mentoring Program. Cindy has been very involved in the Asian Caucus, serving as a Freshmen Representative, a 
T imen Outreach Program 

j dor her sophomore year, Co-President as a junior, and President as a senior. She has participated in the Cape Verde Summer Service Trip and the St. Francis 
n aster Service Trip. As a junior, she was a member of the AHANA Leadership Council Research Committee and of the NAACP Political Action and Education 
- lmittee (02-031. Additionally, she is Run for Relief Coordinator of True Colors Literary Publication. Despite her busy schedule, Uh hopes to leave behind an 
■ ession of the dynamic and energetic ways in which Asian Americans can improve life on The Heights. 




Academics 71 




nave my internship, 
rewarding and chal- 
I never would have 
imagined Iking working in downtown 
Boston so mudh, but I do, and its defi- 
nitely helped me decide where to apply 
once I graduate. 
-Morris Tang, X)4 




BOSTON COLLEGE CAREER CENT, 




72 Academics 



Careers 

59 AND 




Internships 



For many students, planning a post-graduation life for 
themselves begins with a trip to Boston College's Career 
Center. Their staff of career counselors and peer advisors 
is with the student every step of the way, from finding an 
internship to perfecting a resume and landing a dream job. 
Graduates of BC can also utilize the Career Center's vast 
resources available for BC alumni. Throughout the school year 
the Career Center offers workshops on resume writing and 
interviewing, "what can I do with a major in . . ." seminars, 
and a career night. Students can drop by for a walk-in 
appointment with a career counselor or browse their library 
containing the latest job-search publications and graduate 
school information. One does not, however, need to go to the 
Career Center to benefit from it. AHANA students can take 
advantage of the monthly newsletter published by Career 
Services and AHANA summer internship grants. The Career 
Services website boasts links to hundreds of job listings, alumni 
and parent contacts for potential networking, and internship 
opportunities all sure to set students on the right path towards 
a successful post-graduate career. 

One of the most valuable things an undergraduate can 
do while still in school is get an internship. The Boston College 
Internship Program can help students find an internship that will 
make the transition from student to professional much easier. 
The Career Center offers specialized advisors who will meet 
with students to determine which internship or program would 
be best for them. Many students choose to spend the summer 
between their junior and senior years as interns for some of 



The staff of the Boston 
College Career Center 
is committed to guiding 
members of the Boston 
College community 
through their personal 
discovery of unique gifts 
and talents and how they 
choose to integrate them 
into meaningful lives. 

the country's most prestigious companies. Other 
students take advantage of a lighter course 
load senior year and get internships in and 
around downtown Boston. 
Whether utilizing the Career Center's 
tremendous resources, job hunting on their own, 
or simply using alumni connections to find their 
place in the professional world, BC students 
are sure that their education will continue to be 
useful once they leave The Heights behind. 
by Liz Paulson 




Academics 73 





"It's not your blue blood, your pe 
what you do with your life 




74 




£££ 








Ligree, or your college degree. It's 
that counts!' -Millard Fuller 





75 



ALL THAT YOU CAN'T LEAVE BEHIND 

ORGANIZATIONS 

Take a look at www.bcedu, under the "A-Z* list and you will undoubtedly see numerous clubs and organizations. People here at BC say 
that there is something for everyone to take part in and those who say this are right. This is not a simple ploy used by admissions to lure 
future students and parents into selecting Boston College, but rather the truth being told - BC is an involved university. Involved in what?" 
some may ask. . .Well, the spirit of service is something that so many Boston College students exhibit. The Appalachia Volunteers help clean 
communities and build new homes all across the Eastern US, PULSE and 4Boston work within our community and city helping those in need- 
regardless of age, race, and sex, and the international trips performed by numerous groups extend helping hands across other countriesThere 
are such publications as The Heights and Stylus. These not only provide interested people with the chance to develop and display their 
writing skills, but also expose the campus to current events, opinion columns, and the creative sides of our peers. And a large number of 
people opt to take part in BCs undergraduate government, musical groups like the Heightsmen and the Sharps, or sporting clubs like rugby 
and ski team. There are also a variety of cultural clubs, dance organizations, and religiously-based associations for individuals to become 
members of. It is involvement in clubs and organizations that is one of the best ways to meet people at BC. Members of such groups 
typically come in contact with people who they might not have otherwise met. A majority of students on campus view the participation in 
something other than classes and parties to be a fulfilling experience. The students are often selfless with their time. They find something 
that they love and dedicate their abilities, skills, and free hours to it. . . whatever "it" may be. What have you done to make your years at 
BC worthwhile? Maybe your participation in campus groups brought you on a Kairos trip. Maybe it brought you face-to-face with the 
Harvard women's rugby team. Maybe it brought you to understand the importance of newspaper deadlines. Maybe it taught you how 
to harmonize with others of all different singing styles. Maybe it influenced you to appreciate your culture and ethnicity just a little bit (or a 
lot!) more. No matter what you, as a BC undergrad, have done to partake in student clubs and organizations, you have undoubtedly left a 
mark on the BC community ... a mark that your peers, advisors, teachers and all who share this campus will never be able to leave behind. 




Edited by Cristina Conciatori, Erin Klewin, and Rochelle Schneider 



Organizations 7 



UGBC 





ergraduate Government of Boston 

e (UGBC) is one of the most active 

on campus, comprised of close to 

ted and elected members, all of 

dedicated to serving their fellow 
Each member of UGBC belongs 

variety of departments or groups 

government. These departments 
and groups include Student 

Life, University Issues, Programming, Communications, Finance] 
Social and Cultural Issues, Mentoring Leadership Program, AHAN/ 
Leadership Academy, the Executive, Legislative Directors, and th I 
AHANA Leadership Council. 

Under the leadership of President Derrick Williams and Vic J 
President Tom Rochowicz, this year's UGBC took on the initiativj 
of achieving diversity and unity. The year has been spent workin 
hard as student advocates addressing issues such as student spao 
the recruitment and retention of AHANA faculty and administrate 
the development of an ethnic studies major, academic advisin 
student rights, improvement of dining services, and a variety of otfui 
issues that directly affect the students of Boston College. Anothi 
important aspect of the Undergraduate Government is the prograr 
and events it puts on for students, including the fall concert wi 
OAR and the Roots, Homecoming 2003. Michael Moore, fall fe: 

reaking the Barriers Ball, town hall 
meetings, movie nights, athletic events, 
and many more events that try to 
appeal to as many students' interests 
as possible. The Undergraduate 

Government is dedicated to 



serving the students of Boston 
College and continuing to 
improve the everyday life of 

each and every person on 

this campus. 



otos submitted by UGBC 



78 Organizations 




Emerging Leadership 
Program 

Now in its fifteenth year, the Emerging Leader Program (ELP) at Boston College is a year 
long leadership development program for a select group of fiifty first year students. 
ELP is desgined to: 1) enhance leadership po- 
tential, 2) foster interpersonal, social, ethical, and moral 
development, and 3) instill in these students a sense of 
social awareness and obligation. It is our hope that the 
students who complete the program will be prepared 
to assume roles of "thoughtful responsibility" in the orga- 
nizations and communities in which they are involved, 
during their years at Boston Collge and for the rest of 
their lives. 

Throughout the academic year, these fresh- 
men meet weekly to explore a wide variety of topics 
including, among others, intercultural awareness and 
diversity, group dynamics, leadership development, deci- 
sion making, organzational change, social justice and vol- 
unteerism, just to name a few. In recent years, a variety 
of individuals, both internal and external to Boston Col- 
lege, have addressed this group, including essayist James 
Carroll, former Governor Michale Dukakis, Channel 4 anchorwoman Liz 
Walker, former U.S. Attorney Wayne Budd, holocaust survivor and poet 
Sonia Weitz, first female bishop of the Episcopal Church Rev. Barabara 
C. Harris, and president of Hill Holiday Advertising Agency Jack Con- 




itted by ouson L-hudd & cir 



Jenks Leadership Program 

"he Jenks Leadership Program is strongly committed to high moral and ethical standards. Through an 

intensive two-year program that involves skills workshops, a "Living Servant Leadership" speaker 

series, retreats, planning, as well as carrying out service project, JLP endeavors to convey the Servant 

Leader model of leadership to its members and promote in them the humility, 

intelligence, courage and passion necessary to take up leadership roles in service 

of the common good. 

Such aims seek to fulfill founder Sandy Jenks' original hopes for the 
program and strive to remain faithful to the motto of "Learning for Leadership, 
Leadership for Service." In addition to special events, the JLP members keep 
up with many community service activities and second year members work on 
independent projects in small groups. 




Organizations 79 



Chinese Students' Association 



T 



he Chinese Students' Association is an organization 
culture, as well as increasing diversity on and 
educate and foster 



community development, 
and showcase Chinese 
food, art, and history. 
Such events include Hot 
Pot Night, Dim Sum 
Outings, movie showings, 
educational speakers, and 
a culture show. CSA hopes 
to maintain and express 
the distinctive beauty of 
the Chinese culture to the 
students of Boston College. 





The mission of ['Association Haitienne at Boston College is to incre 
knowledge of the unique history of Haiti and its people, to prop 
discussion on contemporary, political, and social issues, and to foster a be 
understanding of Haitian culture. The club is in its sixth year at Boston College, 
aims to create an inclusive, rather than exclusive, atmosphere, attracting mem 
from all backgrounds. ['Association Haitienne strives to continue to educate 

community on Haitian ci 
through a series of 
educational and social & 
promoting unity. Some 
these events include w« 
Creole classes, He 
featured movie n 
organized guest lee 
focusing on Haiti's history and culture, co-sponsored events, forums, our ai I 
spring cultural/fashion show, and an annual Haitian Student Confen : 



L 'Association 

Haitienne 



Japan Club 

The Japan Club of Boston College IJCBCI has achieved greater 
presence in Asian Caucus and the BC community through 
strong core leadership. By electing representatives from JCBC 
to attend main meetings of other clubs, we build better awareness 
and increase our visibility, which contributes to the success of 
upcoming events. Members of JCBC are invited to join frequent 
events, gatherings, and discussions to foster the Japanese culture. By 
building strong friendships within the JCBC community, we hope to 
advance the friendship to interact with other cultural clubs and their 
events on and off campus, including the Japan Society of Boston. 



80 Organizations 




tes 
the 
ce. 



I Armenian 
Club 

The Armenian Club promo 
Armenian Culture through i 
forms of Armenian Music, Dan 
History, and Religion. We are especially 
.concerned with raising awareness 
of the Armenian Genocide of 1915 
jduring which 1.5 million Armenians 
:lost their lives. We participate in BC 
'multicultural events as well as hold 
-Armenian social events on our own. 
These include dinner at Armenian 
restaurants, dances and meeting with 
:other Armenian Clubs in the area. 




Photo by Rochelle Schneider 



Philippine Society of 
Boston College 



he Philippine Society 
of Boston College 
IPSBC) is a diverse 
ganization that strives 
foster Filipino culture on 
"mpus. PSBC promotes an atmosphere of education, understanding, and 
)st importantly, friendship. Now in our twelfth year, we hold the longest 
ending multi-cultural show, which showcases Filipino dances. Through our 
ow. newsletter, and forums, we endeavor to promote awareness of Filipino 
aditions and history. PSBC is also an active participant in the Filipino 
ercollegiate Networking Dialogue (FIND]. As a part of District One, PSBC 
arks with nine other schools in the greater Boston area to network Filipino 
jdent organizations and promote unity through events like Kamayan and 
s Fall Dialogue, which was held in MIT in October 2002. The club extends 

membership to all BC students; our 
" P A M I L I A " 
to 




Photos submitted by Philippine Society of Boston College 



Organizations 81 



German Academy 

The German Academy is the club on campus that promotes the 
German language in the university community and fosters friendships 
between German and American Students. We have Stammtisch 
(Regular table! every Wednesday at Roggies. Every week our German 
speaking foreign exchange students, Boston College Students 
studying German, and anyone else who speaks German meet 
for dinner. Stammtisch provides an informal atmosphere in which 
everyone can practice German. The club also promotes German 
cultural events. This year we have viewed two German films, the 
"Princess and the Warrior" and "Anatomy," and also threw an 
Oktoberfest Party. Our future plans for this semester include a 
traditional Thanksgiving dinner for our exchange students. 




Caribbean Culture Club 

"aribbean culture is a diverse and complex blend of many original cultures from all corners of the globe. 

The Caribbean people have struggled and strived to maintain ties with their ancestral links while creating 

'something entirely new and different. That is why wherever you go in the Caribbean, you will find a 

wonderful blend of the old and the new; a melding of European and African influences, 

Asian and Middle Eastern components, and the new forms which cannot themselves 

necessarily be traced to any other origin than that of the "Caribbean" 

Members of the Caribbean Culture Club of Boston College have come 
together to create a place where the bonds that bring us close can be shared with all. The 
colors that represent us are: Yellow, Green, and Red. The color yellow proposes a new era 
and unity for us, while green gives us faith and purpose to grow and expand. Finally, red 
expresses the pain and adversity that we have and will encounter. We as a club try to live 
by the words of Jamaica, "Out of many people, we are one." As a melting pot of cultures, 
values, and beliefs we come together through this organization, uniting all walks of life to 
educate those around us. 

This year's theme is "Total togetherness." In the words of the Trinidadian 

shield "Together we aspire, together we achieve," we believe that working together as 

a team not only brings about unity, but success as well. In a world of racial tension and 

discrimination we work to erase the lines that divide us. In return we promote unity through 

our events such as documentaries and our annual trip to Montreal for 

a Caribbean Conference. As 
individuals we may be weak, 
but in total unison we are 
strong. We promote the love 
and pride for the nations we 
come from and embrace all 

the ones around us. 




82 Organizations 



CA£ 



Hawaii Club 




The Hawaii Club was formerly known as "Ka Hui Ana O Napu'uwai," which means "the 
gathering of hearts" when translated from Hawaiian. The club was founded in 1994 
in efforts to unite the Hawaiian population in the student body. The Hawaiian Club 
strives to promote Hawaiian culture within Boston College and within the greater Boston 
Community. The club members wish to create and fortify a substantial cultural link between 
people from Hawaii, as well as to provide a "support group" for stu- 
dents from Hawaii who are experiencing transitional difficulties being 
;o far away from the culture of the Hawaiian Islands. 

The club sponsors such events as the Fall Hawai- 
■an Dinner, Univeristy of Hawaii football game parties, and the 

annual Hawaii Club of Boston 
College Luau. The Hawaiian 
Club has often volunteered at the 
AHANA Halloween Party for inner- 
city youth. With a focus on reaching 
out to the transitioning freshmen, 
they organized the Kaka'ako Fresh- 
man Picnic and Freshman Musubi 
Night. 




The Irish Society of 
Boston College 



The purpose of the Irish Society of Boston 
College is to preserve, promote, enjoy, 
and actively participate in the traditions, 
heritage, and cultural activities of Irish Ancestry 
on the Boston College campus. It is also our intent 
to encourage the celebration of these traditions 
with the surrounding community of Boston College 
and Boston as a whole by participation in and 
patronizing of local events. Furthermore, we hope 
to enlighten those in the community who aren't 
familiar with the rich Irish heritage and promote 
group unity through a series of organized events. 



Photos submitted by Rochelte Schneider 



Organizations 83 



Southeast Asian Students Association 




Organizations 



Photos submitted 



KU 



// Circolo ltd/ id no 





South Asidn Students Association 



The Boston College South Asian Students Association (SASAI founded in 1996 
and previously known as the Indian Students Association, is a student led 
group that represents the countries of Bangladesh, India, Nepal, Pakistan, and 
Sri Lanka. The purpose of the organization is to provide Boston College students 
(undergraduate and graduate! and faculty who are of South Asian descent, or 
those interested in South Asia, with an environment where they can meet, learn and 
participate in cultural events with others of the same interest. 

We take part in many activities in and around the Boston area dealing 
with South Asian related issues. On February 9th, 2002 we hosted our 5th annual 
culture show, HUNG AM A "A Night of Crgziness." The show consisted of many 
different dances (ranging from traditional folk dance to classic bhangra), a fashion 
show, singing, as well performances from other cultural groups and schools. The 
South Asian Students Association organization is open to all people who wish to 
participate in the fun and excitement that emanates from the group. We 
reach out to all members of the BC community, encouraging true cultural 
unity by celebrating our differences. 

Photos submitted by SASA 



... 



Organizations 85 



Indonesian Culture Club 



The Indonesian Culture Club began as an organization that would allow Boston 
College students to gather weekly for the purpose of exchanging ideas and 
thoughts about the growing concern of Indonesia's economy, politics, and 
social life. Furthermore, the members of this cultural club sought to promote their 
diverse cultures by organizing events and activities that would welcome anyone 
interested to join in celebrating their heritage. 

The more notable activities that this organization is responsible for plan- 
ning and hosting are the Indonesian Night and the Christian Celebration at St. 
Ignatius. The Indonesian Night takes place once a night and unites all the other 
Indonesian clubs from other schools in Boston and the surrounding areas. 




Hellenic Society 



the more notable ethnic clubs on campus, the Hellenic Soci- 
oston College celebrates Greek heritage and culture. With 
over 20 members, the group organizes and participates 
in activities that promote their Grecian roots. The club 
hosts Greek night at McElroy, which features a selection 
of Greek favorites to diversify the dining experience of 
Boston College students. 

In the past, the Hellenic Society has participated in 
the independent state parade, walking all over downtown 
Boston and wielding the national flag of Greece. More 
regular activities that are enjoyed by this club's members 
are dinners at Dionysis Restaurant and Clubbing at Venu. 
Most of the Hellenic Society's members have some degree 
of Greek ancestry. They find that the club's community 

permits them to promote 
and participate in activities 
that express their cultural 
heritage. 



Photos submitted by Hellenic Society 



86 Organizations 



Jamaica Association 



Founded in 2000, the Jamaican Association of 
Boston College aims to educate the Boston College 
community about the Jamaican culture, history, 
economics, and people. This goal is 
accomplished through lectures, culture 
shows, dinners, and performances by 
the Dance Troop. The Jamaican 
Association Dance Troop was 
founded in 2003 by Sannisha Dale. 




Photos submitted by Jamoica Association 




NAACP 



The Boston College chapter of the National 
Association for the Advancement of 
Colored People began in 1979 as a 
student-led vehicle for advocating the civil 
rights of African American people. The mission 
of the Boston College chapter is to uplift the 
minority community of all people as well as 
support the goals and ideals of the national 
body of the NAACP. They have pledged to 
uphold the innate civil rights that all people 
possess and to abhor, abstain from, and fight 
against injustice of any kind on our campus or 
in our community. Membership is open to all 
members of the undergraduate and graduate 
population of Boston College. Their large 
events are the DEF Poetry Jam, poetry cafe, 
speaker series, and on award celebration for 
a dedicated faculty or staff member of the 
AHANA community. 



.. 



Organizations 87 



Asian Caucus 



As representatives of the Asian American community here at Boston College, the Asian Caucus 
strives to foster relationships between its members and the greater Boston College and Boston 
communities. Through o balanced social, education, and political agenda, we are committed to 

creating a unified voice that is necessary in order to create awareness of issues that affect the Asian 

American community and contribute to the progress and betterment of society. 

Our Mission is threefold: 

1) Asian Cultural Organizations - The Asian Caucus is committed to the nine culture clubs that it 
comprises. We recognize that part of the task given to AC is to serve the culture clubs by supporting 
their efforts and serving as a resource. Furthermore, to serve as the unifying voice for the Asian 
American community at Boston College, the Asian Caucus is aware of the importance of creating 
and fostering strong relationships among the members of the cultural clubs. There must exist a mutual 
understanding of the support that is required in order to achieve this unity. Through its efforts, the Asian 
Caucus hopes to be truly representative of the community that it represents. 

AHANA Community - In order to accomplish its mission, the Asian Caucus understands the 
importance of solidarity. Recognizing the common struggles that are shared with members of the 
AHANA community, the Asian Caucus hopes to work with other AHANA organizations in the efforts 
taking place to create a better environment at Boston College. The Asian Caucus is dedicated to 
building coalitions that will allow us to most effectively address the issues pertinent to the AHANA 
community. 

Boston College and the Greater Boston Community - The Asian Caucus mission would not be 
complete without the participation and support of the Boston College community. Recognizing this, we 
commit ourselves to reaching out to the diverse audience that makes up Boston College. We hope 
to promote dialogue and foster relationships through our various events. The Asian Caucus strives 
not only to be active in the Boston College community, but also in the Greater Boston community. 
Through the strengthening of ties with Asian American alumni, collaboration in intercollegiate events, 
and service in the community, the Asian Caucus hopes to increase its presence in the Greater Boston 
community. 



2) 



31 



AHANA Leadership Academy 

Conceived in 1997, the AHANA Leadership Academy has provided training, resources, and advice to 
emerging AHANA freshman leaders. The need to promote high academic standards as well as an 
active social and political conscious has charged ALA with the task of developing a proving ground for 
freshman students. During the school year, ALA holds dorm talks, meetings, and group dinners, creating a forum 
for discussions of AHANA issues and methods by which to address them. ALA members are official members of 
the AHANA Leadership Council and are placed in various departments. Along with executive staff, department 
directors and ALC members, ALA members are surrounded with mentors and given opportunities to expand on 
their current and new found leadership skills. ALA is a beginning, not an end, to their leadership capacities. 




Photos submitted by AHANA Leadership Academy 



Organizations 



Korean Student Association 



The objective of the Boston College Korean Students Association IKSAI is to cultivate 
and promote an interest in Korean and Korean-American history, culture, and many 
other facets of the Korean and Korean-American experience by providing opportunities 
for Boston College students to come together on a political, cultural, and social level. KSA 
serves as an active academic support network for Koreans and Korean-Americans through 
events fostering community development and stimulating personal development in defining 
one's identity. KSA thereby embraces the responsibility to educate Boston College as 
a whole, as well as the surrounding community, in accordance to its objectives. Through 
these guidelines, Boston College's KSA will respectfully represent and share the Korean 
heritage. 

With focus on Korean and Korean American culture, increasing diversity, and cultural 
awareness on campus, KSA encourages discussion and consciousness about Korean 
and Korean-American issues. KSA hopes to promote interest in the cultural, social, 
and political aspects of the Korean and Korean-American experience through various 
programs including but not limited to the annual culture show in collaboration with 
the Chinese Students Association, documentaries, forums, lectures, and authentic 
Korean dinners. 




Organizations 89 



Artplosion 



We are a new student association that was created in January 
1995 to promote the expression of our generation through any 
form of art. Our organization runs like a production company, 
i.e. producing shows and events, in collaboration with numerous artistic 
and creative people of the Boston College Community. Since the 
creation of the club, Artplosion has produced and collaborated with 
numerous student clubs, presenting successful and innovative shows at 
Boston College. 

When a petition was placed in the rooms of Devlin in 1994 
for a student art gallery, our curiosity and interest arose. We were 
pleased to hear that efforts had been put towards the discussion of the 
possibility of having a student art gallery in the new Student Center. 
However, this project seems to have failed. To our disappointment, 
the layout of the new Student Center that was distributed on campus 
did not include any facility for student art exhibitions. We are still 
convinced that this is a matter of utmost seriousness and importance for 
both art majors and the student body at large. From our own personal 
experience and interviewing other students of the Boston College 
community, we believe that the artistic talent within the student body 
deserves more assertive attention. 



My Mother's Fleabag 



According to group legend, My Mother's Fleabag was founded in 1980, 
which makes them the oldest college improv troupe in the country. The 
group consists entirely of Boston College students, yet has in actuality no 
connection to the school. My Mother's Fleabag performs in and around Boston, 
in whole or in part, for fun or as a booked contract. 

The comedy organization performs the standard array of improv games, 
completely unscripted, based on live audience suggestions. Each semester, Flea- 
bag does a four-show, two-day run, mixing improv, skits, a group opera, and a 
live band. 




90 Organizations 



UdiA 




Symphony Orchestra 

t's 8:00 on a Saturday night in November. Do you know where your college student 
is? Well if they're cool, they're probably at a Boston College Symphony Orchestra 
concert. The BCSO is comprised of approximately fifty undergraduate and graduate 
students dedicated to playing music of the symphonic repertoire. This group of musicians 
graces the campus with four concerts each year, including the annual Christmas Concert 
with the BC Chorale. Led by the esteemed John Finney, the BCSO has nearly doubled in 
size in the last six years and has become one of the most talked about, up and coming 
artistic ensembles on the Heights. Don't be fooled by the dork-estra nickname. These folks 

mean business, and their groupies 
will agree. Just check out their next 
sold out performance in Gasson 
Hall. Although they will be losing a 
arge number of seniors this year, the 
BCSO looks forward to a promising 
uture of gracing Boston College with 
the classiest music on campus. Well 
classical-ist, anyway. 



Photos submitted by Symphony Orchestra 



Stylus 




Stylus is the Art and Literature magazine 
of Boston College. Stylus was founded 
in 1882, and is thus not only the oldest 
extracurricular activity at BC, but also the 
oldest journal of any Catholic university in 
Americas. 

Stylus originally served the role' 
newspaper, yearbook, and artistic jour 
With the advent of other groups on campus 
(The Heights and Sub Turril, Stylus is now able 
to focus on its original mission: presenting the 
artistic endeavors of undergraduates to BC and 
the outside world. 

We at Stylus always welcome input from 
our reading audience. Please drop us a line if 
you have any questions or comments. 



Dramatics 
Society 

The Dramatics Society of Boston 
College, founded in 1865, is the oldest 
student group on campus. We provide 
opportunities for student directors, designers, 
and actors to share their talent with the 
Boston College community. By choosing 
works from a well-established canon of 
dramatic literature to student-written works, 
the Dramatics Society strives to make the 
arts an important part of university life. 



Organizations 91 



Competition Dance Team 



The Competition Dance team is a relatively new 
organization here at Boston College. The 2003-2004 
is only their second season in existence. Even though last 
year was their novice year, they were selected to represent 
Boston College at The National Dance Competition in Florida. 
The Competition Dance Team is well on their way to making it 
again this year. They can also be seen performing their hip- 
hop, pom, and jazz style dances at other events, such as select 
basketball games and dance events at neighboring univesities. 
The Competition Dance Team aims at performing and competing 
artistically with high-precision and high-energy. 



Photo submitted by Sarah Richardt 



Marching Band 
Dance Team 



The Marching Band Dance Team performs as 
part of the Screaming Eagles Marching Band. 
They provide an entertaining and artistic visua 
element to the half time show that enhances the 
music and pictures performed by 
the marching band. The Marching 
Band Dance Team also helps get 
the crowd pumped during games 
by leading dances and cheers to 
the band stand shorts. The diverse 
mix of lyrical, jazz, and pom dance 
they perform helps to enhance the 
experience the marching band gives 
to the superfans. 



Swingkids 

I n the 1920s, Harlems 
I Savoy Ballroom gave 
I birth to a new style of 
dance: The Lindy Hop and 
Swing Dancing. Its wild 
and sexual movements 
challenged authority and 
its free spirit defied racial 
boundaries. Sadly, the tim 
move past swing dancing. 
90s embraced it with a 
appreciation and sparked a 
that will keep us swingin well th 
this century and into the 
Swing Kids is an organiza 
promotes keeping this movem 

92 Organizations 




Dance Ensemble 

he Dance Ensemble is an organization of people who love to dance, 
members that comprise the ensemble come from various training and 
backgrounds and use the ensemble as an opportunity to continue our tra 
love for our art here at Boston 



T 



College. The Ensemble puts on 

a student choreographed and 

directed show at the end of each 

semester. The shows feature many 
^different styles, such as ballet, 
cjazz, hip-hop, and tap. The money 

raised from ticket sales is donated 

to the Boston College Campus 
ISchool, contributing approximately 
:$15.000 per year to help Campus 
:School enhance their programming. 

The Ensemble also takes a part in 

mandatory ballet and jazz classes 
revery week, which are taught 

by professional dancers from the 

Boston area. In addition to the 

show, the Ensemble performs in 

events on and off campus, such 

as charity and general arts shows 

at Boston College, including Artists for AIDS, Second Chances 

Benefit, Dance Marathon, Arts Festival, Festival of Friendship, 

New England Collegiate Dance Collaboration, and Campus School. 





Dance Organization 

Dance Organization of Boston College promotes 
dances of all types to the Boston College student 
community. In addition to this, it provides students 
with the opportunity to choreograph and experiment with 
the art of dance. It allows more advanced students to 
utilize and expand their talents while providing beginners 
an open and fun environment to ^^^^^^^^^^^ 
learn about dance. We work hard 
to dance with a freedom that 
comes from the love of the art. 



. 



Organizations 93 




The 
Dynamics 



T 



he Boston College 

Dynamics are one of 

four co-ed a cappella 

groups on campus. Founded 

in the fall of 1998, we are 

now made up of 18 very fun 

guys and girls who simply 

have a great time doing 

what we do. We sing all 

kinds of popular music, from 

Top 40 to R&B, and even a 

little Country. The Dynamics 

have been known to sing 

all over campus in Cafe's, 

Benefit Concerts, and 

Invitationals, as well as up and down the East 

Coast touring at other schools and venues. 

We have recorded two CDs, and our third 

is expected to be out in the Spring of 2004. 



Photos submitted by The Dynamics 



The Sharps 



The Sharps were founded in 1990 as the only a 
female group on campus. Since those humble 
beginnings, we've grown into a polished 15-member 
group that transcends the traditional notion of girl groups. 
Built upon sisterly values, our goal is to share our joy 
with others by using our own voices to re-create songs 
everyone loves to hear. We have toured at colleges and 
universities up and down the East Coast, and performed 
at many corporate and private functions as well as 
campus events. We have recorded five albums and are 
looking forward to our sixth, coming out soon. 




94 Organizations 





The Acoustics 



ince 1993, the Acoustics have performed their way into 
many hearts with an uplifting, humorous, and theatrical 
brand of a cappella. In its eleventh year at BC, the 
group has developed a rich history of traditions 
and a devoted alumni of over 60 members. The 
Acoustics have released a total of five albums. 
Outside the studio, the Acoustics venture off on wild 
tours and compete in the International Championship 
of Collegiate a cappella. 

They have taken their high-energy 

performances everywhere from the Nation's capital 

to the sunny beaches of Florida and received 

numerous accolades and competitions (Regional 

Champions, Best Arrangements, Best Soloists). On 

campus, the Acoustics harmonize at many venues, 

including numerous benefits an charity concerts. At 

their famous Cafe performances, their wacky skits 

have confronted bizarre topics including infectious 

Disney medleys, game show violence, alien abduction, 

talk show trash, yellow journalism, underwear parties 

and PBS telethons. 



Photos submitted by 



Against the Current 



Against the Current's name is derived from the 
following passage in the book of Romans: "Do not 
conform any longer to the pattern of this world, but 
be transformed by the renewing of your mind. Then you 
will be able to test and approve what God's Will is - His 
good, pleasing, and perfect Will." (Romans 
12:2) As Christians, we aspire to a higher 
standard, not just the set of rules and laws 
of this world, but to live by the Word o 
God. Our goal as a Christian a cappella 
group is to worship God and share the 
Gospel message to Boston College through 
our music. 




Fhotos submitted by Against the Current 



Organizations 95 




The Boston i ant 



The Bostonians of Boston College is BO 
oldest a cappella group. At 17 year 
of age, this group is co-ed and use 
female and male soloists alike to supply c 
colorful show for all to enjoy. From slov 
to upbeat, pop to classics, the Bostonian 
not only demonstrate talent but musico 
diversity in all their performances. In th 
past the Bostonians have toured several U.S 
states. They plan to continue their travelin 
tradition this spring as well as return to thei 
old pastime: national competitions. With !■ 
members ranging from freshmen to senior 
the Bostonians will be putting out a ne\ 
CD this spring with which they hope t 
be selected for the Best of College , 
Cappella, an honor they have bee 
awarded for the past two CDs they hav 
produced. When in attendance of ar 
of their numerous campus performance 
it is easy to see, this is simply a grou 
of talented singers who like to have f 
and make music. 



Photos submitted by The Bostonic 



The Heightsmen 



The Heightsmen are Boston College's only all-male a cappella 
group dedicated to musical excellence. Founded in 1990, 
we have established ourselves as a prominent musical group 
on and off the BC campus. While maintaining a diverse musical 
repertoire that encompasses everything from 50's do-wops to 
contemporary hits, we entertain thousands of a cappella fans 
worldwide. 

The biggest shows of the year, as always, were the Fall 
Cafe in AAcElroy and the big alumni Show. However, the group 
was, as its custom, constantly performing. They also get together 
weekly for wine and cheese parties to build a sense of team. 





Voices of I man i 

he Voices of Imani Gospel Choir was organized in the 
of 1978. Created to celebrate the viability, potency, 
beauty of gospel music, the choir has served both as a 
source of spiritual inspiration and a needed source amongst 
students of color. "Imani," Swahili for "faith," is indicative 
of what the choir strives to reflect through our music. Under 
the direction of Professor Hubert Walters of Boston College 
iand Elan Trotman of Berklee College of Music, our ministry 
ihas been based on the will of God. Out goal is to explore 
.iand share the full wealth of Black musical culture as we 
ising, professing out faith through contemporary gospel music, 
jas well as traditional Negro spirituals. Out mission is to 
sing praises unto God and minister to our community using 
•the gifts that God blessed us with. In years past, Voices 
-has successfully completed tours 
■throughout the United States. Our 
ihope is to continue to minister through 
music wherever God leads us. 




University Chorale 

Starting out as a small, all-male glee 
club in 1912, the University Chorale 
is not co-ed and the largest arts 
organization at Boston College. Entirely 
student-run, the Chorale currently has 
about 160 singers, including students, 
Jesuits, and faculty members. The 

University Chorale displays its talents at 
numerous events both on and off campus. 
In the past, the croup has traveled to 
Rome to sing at St. Peter's Basilica. 
Domestically, they have traveled to New 
York City to perform a benefit concert 
for the Twin Towers Orphan Fund. 



Organizations 97 



Marching Band 



Whether it's on the turf of Alumni Stadium during halftime of a football game, or on the 
streets of New England for a parade, or in front of hundreds of high school students 
at an exhibition, wherever the Screaming Eagles Marching Band performs, you can feel 
the excitement in the air. This collection of highly spirited, talented, and committed individuals 
have provided thrills and excitement to audiences from across the nation -- and even as far away 

as Ireland. Founded in 1919, the Marching 
Band has become the embodiment ol 
New England Division I athletics through 
excellence in performance both on and of I 
the field. Currently, the Screaming Eagle: 
provide opportunities for instrumentalists 
color guard, dancers, anc 
managers. 




BC bOp! is a 28-piece jazz 
ensemble dedicated to the highest 
levels of instrumental and vocal 
jazz performance. The standard for 
musicianship is high, the repertoire 
challenging, and the work ethic rigorous. 
The group is now over fifteen years old 
and has frequently performed in both 
national and international arenas. The 
group's performances have included 
Carnegie Hall in New York City, the 
Walk Disney World Resort in Orlando, 
Florida, and the Jamaica Grande resort 
in Ocho Rios, Jamaica. BC bOp! provides 
Boston College students with numerous 
performances on campus, including thier 
concerts at the Breaking the Barriers Ball, 
and the AIDS Benefit Ball. 



BC bOp! 



■ 



98 Organizations 




Photo submitted by BC bOpi 



K3L&. 



Asinine 




Asinine is one of the few comedy groups around that 
incorporates both sketch and improvisational comedy into their 
shows. We write, direct and act in our own original sketches 
and video segments as well as perform an increasing repertoire of 
improv games. We pride ourselves on the fact that we are Boston 
College's only sketch AND improv group; there are also very few 
other groups beyond BC who work with both art forms simultaneously. 
We offer frequent and affordable shows to our fans, performing for 
$3 every month or so. Our website (http://www.asininecomedy.com) 
receives hundreds of hits each month by loyal fans. Founded in 2001 
by a rag-tag group of students, we have risen from performing in 
the Eagle's Nest with about 20 people in the audience to performing 
monthly shows that sell out hundreds of seats. We are an unstoppable 
juggernaut and will some day rule the world with laughter. 



Committee for Creative Enactments 

"T or those of you who are unfamiliar with the Committee for Creative Enactments ICCE), we 
l_— are a comedic theater troupe dating back to the mid 80's that layers improvised scenes 
on top of a scripted plot in a murder-mystery format. Made up entirely of Boston College 
tudents, there is no conventional stage, and this is not a performance to be passively 
matched. Actors move throughout the audience and converse with audience members 
lirectly. Audience members take on the pretence of the setting of the show and O'Connell 
louse Ian old mansion and BC landmark) is transformed into a medieval castle, or the estate 
>f William Shakespeare, or a Victorian era Hotel, or even (as a real stretch) a spooky old 
lansion. Audience members are guests of the event and there may be multiple scenes 
■ccurring simultaneously in several rooms in O'Connell House, audience members may follow 
neir favorite characters into a scene or engage them in conversation, even interrogate a 
uspect yourself. Listen closely and follow the clues and if you correctly guess: "whodunit?" 
ou may win a prize at the end of the night. All actors remain in character throughout the 
ight, making for an unforgettable evening that can't be compared to any other form o 

entertainment out there. 





Organizations 99 




Brass 
Choir 



The Brass Choir is like 
a chamber ensemble 
on steroids. The' 

year before David Healey 
accepted the conducting 
position for the group, 
the Brass Choir had' 

approximately a dozen 

members. In 2000, Brass 
Choir grew to 30 members, 
n 2001, the group had 45 
members, and last year the 
group grew to a membership 
of 60. As of right now there 
is no membership roster 
for this 

year, but 

the group 
anticipates 
that the 

number wi 
again be 

high. 






T 



Pep Band 



College Pep Band is an 
musical ensemble composed 



he Boston 

acoustic 

of wind instruments, drum set, and 
auxiliary percussion. Under the direction 
of one professional director and student 
conductors/coordinators, the Boston College 
Pep Band is one of the most highly visible of 
the Boston College Bands Program Ensembles. 
With a membership of approximately 50-60 
students per year, the band is split into 

Maroon and Gold ensembles to provide a 
well-balanced band at all athletic events. We 
support the Men's Hockey Team and Women's 
as well as Men's Basketball Teams, creating 
ample opportunity for the BC Pep Bander to 
support Boston College Athletics, travel to fun 
and exciting athletic events, as well as to get 
air-time on regional as well as national sports 
broadcasts. 




100 Organizations 



Photos submitted by Pep Band 



Role Players and 
Strategy Enthusiasts 

The Role Players and Strategy Enthusiasts organization (RPSE) was 
founded less than a decade ago by a small group of individuals 
interesting in role-playing, board, and strategy games. The club's 
purpose is to locate individuals at Boston College with an interest in 
engaging in role-playing or strategy games, to introduce them to each 
other, and to create an environment in which those individuals can find 
enjoyment and the opportunity for artistic expression through those games, 
■iln addition, the club maintains organization between the games so that 
(new members can be referred to games matching their areas of interest 
nand so that the games can be continued from year to year. Currently, 
s the club possesses a large library of challenging and eclectic games for 
members to borrow and enjoy. 




F.I.S.T.S. 



Females Incorporating Sisterhood Through Step (FISTS), Boston College's 
official female step team, is designed to build strong, talented, focused 
young ladies as well as excellent steppers. Out number one goal is 
to construct a sound sense of sisterhood amongst our members through the 
activity of step, so that as a team, we will be able to positively impact 

community. 




Organizations 101 



Music Guild 




The Music Guild provides a forum for musicians oi 
oil levels and styles to interact and perform or 
campus. With over 200 members, their website 
serves as a tool for musicians by allowing them to searcr 
a member directory, post messages, upload original mp3's 
reserve practice space, and keep informed on possible 
performance opportunities. In practice, the Guild sponsor: 
various types of events each year at BC, including ope 
mic nights, drum circles, guest lectures, battle of the 
bands, and concerts featuring well-known regional act 

of varying genres. The 
Music Guild dates bad 
before Boston Collegf 
had an actual mush 
program and today ha 
evolved into a trul 
unique organization no 
to be found at othe 
universities. 



Concert 
Band 



The Boston College Concert Band boasts a diverse membership, with a portio 

of the band comprised of BC alumni, staff, and graduate students, mixing amon' 
undergraduate students. This diversity contributes to an atmosphere of growth, a 
developing musicians mix with experienced players. The Concert Band performs a wid 
variety of both traditional and contemporary literature for wind band. The mission of th 
Boston College Concert Band is to provide students, faculty, staff and community member 
who share a passion for making music an opportunity to perform wind and percussion musi 
of outstanding composers in an educational setting. In the past, the Concert Band he 
performed a dynamic and varied concert schedule including holiday concerts, Pops dinne 
concerts, and seasonal concerts. The group has also performed a series of exchange concert 

with other Jesu 
universities 
i n c I u d i n 
G e o r g e t o w 
University, Joh 

Carroll Universit 
in Cleveland, Ohic 
and Tufts University 
The Concert Ban 
continues to see 
new and differer 
opportunities the 
will enhance th 
experiences of il 
members. 




rhoto submitted by Concert Dond 



102 Organizations 



College Republicans 



The mission of the College Republicans of Boston College is threefold. Our first goal is to represent the Republican Party to the student body, and to 
promote Republican goals and interests on campus. At BC, like any university in America these days, there's tons of work to do. Though a minority, liberal 
clubs here are quite vocal: leftist celebrities like Michael Moore and Noam Chomsky routinely receive praise and adoration on campus. The CRs here must 
be equally vocal, advocating the timeless Republican ideals of fiscal conservatism, personal responsibility, and love of country. BC CRs are not the Republicans 
your sociology professor warned you about young, edgy and politically incorrect, we're worse! We advocate all of the above, and have a blast doing it. 

Our second goal is to act on behalf of Republican candidates on and off campus, and to promote these candidates to the student body. Boston 
College CRs were a huge help to the Bush/Cheney campaign in 2000, canvassing New 
Hampshire, getting the vote out, and having tons of fun. BC CRs were also there for Mitt 
Romney, helping him secure the governorship of Massachusetts. And BC CRs will be there 
in 2004, giving Republican candidates, including our President, the support they needl 

Our third goal is to create a strong link among the club, the Republican Party, 
and College Republicans throughout the state and country. Each year we have exciting 
Republican speakers: Ben Stein, Dinesh D'Souza, Pat Buchanan, and Jay Severin have all 
::been to The Heights, and this year will be just as promising. And each year we attend 
; events with the Massachusetts Alliance of College Republicans, and stay in close contact 
with the National Committee. There are ample opportunities to network and make friends 
across the state and country, all the while having a great time. 




T, 



| Dtos submitted by College Democrats 



College Democrats 

he College Democrats of Boston College are both an officially registered 
student organization and a chartered member of the Massachusetts 
College Democrats, a subsidiary of the Massachusetts Democratic Party. 
Thus, our purpose is twofold. First, we strive to enhance political participation 
on campus, by involving college students in the process of political action. 
On campus, the club is active in student electoral campaigns, debating the 
Administration policy, and pursuing our own goals. This can be anything from 
issue campaigns to providing resources to help out on electoral campaigns. 
Our second purpose is to work to further the goals of the Democratic Party 
and the ideals for which it stands, including livable wages, equal access for all, 
regardless of whatever category the census may lump them into, to all forms 
of services, from education, to health care, to voting booths. This takes the form 
of actively recruiting voters, knocking on the doors of prospective voters, and 
other forms of direct electoral participation. 

As a club, we can play an important role in campus life. First, we 

are all college students. We have particular needs, distinct from those of other 

people interested in the political process. We are Democrats because we feel 

that our needs - and those of society - are best met by this ideology. Thus, as college students that happen to be Democrats, we 

can play an important role in campus life by politicizing campus issues. 

Second, we are Democrats. In this role, we are the traveling salesmen and saleswomen of the Party. For decades, the 
college student population has been the largest source of volunteers for campaigns of all sizes, in all parts of the country. Our role 
as Democrats is to educate others as to why they too should support Democratic candidates and Democratic Policies. 







Organizations 103 



The Acounting Academy 



The Boston College Accounting Academy is a 
student organization established by and run 
by accounting students. The Academy was 
established to provide declared and prospective 
accounting majors with services pertaining 
to their future careers. In order to provide 
opportunities to come in contact with prospective 

future employers, the 
Academy organizes 




Model United Nations 




T 



he Model United Nations i 
a simulation of the Unitei 
Nations system. Student 
assume the roles of ambassadors t> 
the United Nations and debate th 
current issues on the UN's agendc 
Through diplomacy and negotiatior 
Model UN students seek way 
that the world community ca 
deal with complex global concern 
such as the environment, economi 
development, refugees, AIDS 
conflict resolution, disarmamer 
and human rights. BC Model Uf 
travels to conferences througho 
the United States and Canad 
and has successfully represente 
various countries at these event 



Photo submitted by Model UN 



]04 Organizations 



CSOM Government 




The Carroll School of Management Government (SOMG) is the 
official governing body of the Boston College Carroll School of 
Management serving over 2,000 students. The purpose of the SOMG 
is to serve as a promoter of better relationships between students and 
faculty members, corporate recruiters and various CSOM organizations. 
We sponsored various keynote speakers, 
panelists, student-faculty integration events, 
publish newsletters, and perform service 
to our community. For the 2003-2004 
academic year, the government took on 
nine major committee roles. We relayed 
the voice of the CSOM student body with 
regards to the new CSOM Dean search 
process, the Ethics Initiative, and matters 
dealing with 

CSOM faculty 

promotion and 

tenure. Our 

goal was to 
foster unity while 
assisting students 
in pursuing their 
studies and future 
career paths. 



Mock Trial Program 




M= 



Photo submitted by Mock Tirol Progrom 



Trial is a student activity 
Boston College designed to 
provide a forum for undergraduate 
BC students interested in learning about our 
legal system. Mock Trial is for students 
interested in the field of law, or those that 
want to put their theatrical or debating 
talents to the test - students can participate 
as attorneys or witnesses lor both!), or 
take less theatrical roles as timekeepers or 
alternates. Students are placed on individual 
teams and work during the year to prepare 
both the defense and the plaintiff/prosecution 
arguments, questions, and witnesses based 
on the fact pattern we receive from the 
American Mock Trial Association. The 
BC Mock Trial teams compete at various 
intercollegiate competitions throughout the 
year, including the American Mock Trial 
Association's Regional Competitions held at 
other universities in the Northeast. All teams 
have a chance at competing in the National 
Tournaments held in St. Paul, Minnesota and 
Des Moines, Iowa. For the past 7 years, we've 
sent teams to Nationals where we competed 
amongst the toughest teams in the country. 



Organizations 105 



The purpose of this student chapter is to 
promote interest in the field of Computer 
Science. By bringing together students and 
faculty, we hope to provide a forum in which 
people can share 
common interests 

outside of the 

classroom. Aside from 
monthly meetings, this 
chapter hosts a guest 
lecture series, attends 
outside lectures at 
other Colleges and 
Universities, partakes 
in the annual ACM 
Programming Contest, 

and much more. 



Association for 
Computing Machinery 




Minority Association of 
Pre-Health Students 




Bellarmine Law 
Academy 

The Bellarmine Pre-Law Council stands 
as the only student organization 
providing leadership for those 
students interested in attending law 
school. The club works with students, 
the University Dean's Office. and 
outside professionals. organizations, 
and academic centers as a means to 
provide for these needs. Throughout the 
year, the BPLC organizes mock LSAT 
administrations, negotiates discounts for 
BC students on LSAT courses, coordinates 
speakers and presentations regarding law 
and the legal professionals, compiles data 
from law school applicants, and sponsors 
field trips and forums. 



106 Organizations 



Q1& 



Operations 
Academy 

The Boston College Operations Academy 
is a student run organization that aims 
to raise awareness of the Operations 
.concentration among those in the School 
of Management. We hope to facilitate job 
contacts in the business world by providing an 
.Operations community in which declared and 
•prospective Operations concentrators can feel 
confident in their role in the future business 
community. 




Fulton Debating Society 



The Fulton Debating Society is a nationally- 
competitive intercollegiate debate team with a 
strong tradition at Boston College. Members 
of the Fulton compete in two-person teams in policy 
debate against students from other colleges and 
universities across the country. 

Boston College competes in the Novice, Junior 
Varsity, and Varsity divisions of debate. Novice 
debaters are those who have no previous experience 
in policy debate in high school or college (although 
debaters with only Lincoln-Douglas and/or forensics 
experience are eligible to compete in novice debate). 
The junior varsity division is open to all students with 
less than two years of experience in college policy 
debate. Varsity debaters generally have extensive 
high school debate experience and/or two to three 
years of college debate. 

BC students debate the topic selected by 
the national Cross Examination Debate Association 
1CEDA) and National Debate Tournament (NDT). The 
topic is the same for all tournaments in the academic 
year. Each team will debate both the affirmative 
and negative sides of the topic several times at each 
tournament. 






Information 

Technology 

Club 

We are a club dedicated to bringing Boston 
College undergraduates more in tune with 
technology and technological developments 
in business. Through a membership in this club, 
students will have the opportunity to hear speakers 
from the industry, go to company headquarters in 
Boston, learn about technology through special 
tutorials, and more. 

Our club is an officially recognized 
student organization of Boston College. BC is 
a coeducational, two-campus university with four 
undergraduate schools and six graduate and 
professional schools. The University offers 14 degree 
programs and two certificate programs and enrolls 
8,900 undergraduates and 4,700 graduate 

students. Founded in 1863, Boston College is one of 
the largest Jesuit-affiliated university in the country. 
Committed to academic excellence and service 
to others, the University serves a diverse body of 
scholars from across the United States and more than 
90 foreign countries. A diverse community, Boston 
College boasts a full range of student organizations 
and activities to satisfy almost every interest. 



,. 



Organizations 107 



CSOM Honors Program 

The Carroll School of Management's Honors Program, the first of 
its kind to be established in a collegiate school of business, has as 
its membership a group of talented and highly motivated students 
who pursue academic excellence. Simply, the mission of the Honors 
Program is to educate its members to be the corporate and community 
leaders of the future. This is a body of energetic individuals with 
diverse interests and broad horizons. With only 30-35 members per 
class, the program's intimate size fosters an environment in which 
students have a marvelous opportunity to forge lifelong friendships 
and develop close working relationships. 



Photos submitted by CSOM Honors Program 




Order of the Cross and Crown 




Photos submitted by Order of the Cross and Crow 



Founded in 1937, the Order 
the Cross and Crown is 
oldest and most prestigi' 
honor society in the College 
Arts and Sciences. It recogni:| 
senior men and women who b'i 
demonstrate academic excellers 
by maintaining an overall cumulat 
grade point average of at le 
A- and establish records of unus 
service and leadership on the cam| 
over their undergraduate caree 
The selection committee, made up 
the deans and faculty of the Colle 
of Arts and Sciences, also sele 
particularly distinguished seniors 
Marshals and Chief Marshal of 
Order. 



108 Organizations 



Investment Club 



The Boston College Investment Club was founded in 1983 by Wil- 
liam Doty, a Junior Economics major, as one of the first undergrad- 
uate investment clubs in the country. He saw the value in a student 
run organization that managed its own real life portfolio of equities and 
could provide the skill sets Wall Street was looking for. Doty envisioned 
an organization where students would see first hand what goes into mak- 
ing financial decisions and where novice investors could gain experience. 
Economics Professor Harold Petersen understood the com- 
plexity introduced by the yearly turnover of students and suggested 
that the club be lead by a group of officers who would be elected at 
the end of every year. Their role was to lead discussion, arrangespeak- 
ers, and monitor the portfolio. The other members, who represent all 
classes and majors, have equal voting rights. The members are the 
lifeblood of the club, and are responsible for new investment ideas. 
Following Professor Petersen's model, Mr. Doty raised 
the initial $15,000 by soliciting donations and began to invest the 
money on behalf of the Boston College endowment. The first two 
securities purchased were MCI and EL Chico, both of which no 
longer reside in the portfolio. However, the assets of the club have 
grown to over $150,000 and the club now holds over 20 securities 



Political Science 
Association 



The Political Science Association attempts to establish 
relationships between the faculty of the Political 
Science Department and the undergraduate student 
body. We believe that by organizing events during 
which students and professors can interact, there can be 
a greater success level toward this goal. We are firmly 
committed to the discussion forum, which is the first step 
in understanding the science of politics. Another goal that 
this association attempts to accomplish is to spark interest 
in the field and study of politics. Since the September ll' 1 " 
terrorist attacks on the World Trade Center, there has 
been an increased national interest in current events and 
global politics. We plan to give students and professor an 
outlet to speak on issues that they believe have serious 
micro and macro consequences. As a result of greater 
interest in the field of politics, we foresee a greater 
number of students who will be drawn into fields relating 
to politics. We believe that any contribution toward the 
enlightenment of the student in this field will contribute 
toward the academic life at Boston College. 



Society of Physics 



The Society of Physics Students (SPSI is comprised of physics 
majors at Boston College, and its main purpose is to take 
physics beyond the classroom. We sponsor lectures by both BC 
and guest faculty, which have included Nobel Laureates, to present 
their theoretical and experimental research. Also, the SPS explores 
active research taking place outside of BC, 
such as laboratories of neighboring universities 
and science centers. The Society encourages 
physics majors of all levels to work together to 
increase our own appreciation for physics, as 
well as to help non-majors understand it better. 




fl os submitted by Society of Physics 



Organizations 109 



Residence Hall Association 

Your voice in the residence halls" 
The goal of the RHA is to be an advocate for residents' concerns and provide 
programming. Comprised of an executive board and representative councils from 
each housing area, the RHA is a student run organization sponsored by the Office 
of Residential Life. Past RHA programs include Mr. Boston College, Fall Movie 
Night, Breaking the Barriers Ball, and Spring Fest. Issues that have been addressed 

by RHA include smoking on campus and decisions with new 

residence halls. The programs and issues \ ; -^^(Q J^m are generated by 

the students and are constantly evolving ^^ to reflect current 

issues and trends. 




Photos submitted by RHA 



0' Conn el I House 



This fall the O'Connell House hosted a number of events for the student body. 
Early in the semester there were a series of Sundown Socials, with pizza 
dinners and outdoor music, as well as a 3 on 3 basketball tourney in the 
courts adjacent to the house. There was also a pumpkin carving contest in late 
October to benefit the American Cancer Society. 

Traditional events, such as Breaking the Barriers Ball, took place in 
different venues this year but still had the same amount of O'Connell House 
charm. The spring will feature more smaller events as well as the larger 
Middlemarch Ball, which will be held off campus. The house itself will also be 
open to numerous studiers. musicians, and movie-goers as well as just to hang 
out. The 2003-2004 staff consists of Grace Simmons. Mike Ward. Sarah Hostage, 
Agie Kasule. and Kate Nash. 



110 Organizations 



WZBC Radio 




w 



ZBC is Boston College's student run radio 
station. Originally founded as WVBC, the voice 
of Boston College, the radio station began in 
1960 as a ca rr i er -cur rent AM station, broadcasting 
solely to the university community through the electrical 
wiring of on-campus buildings and dormitories. After 
operating in this capacity for 13 years, Boston College 
Radio took a big step by applying for a license to open 
and operate WZBC-FM, a nine watt, educationally- 
oriented station at the frequency 90.3. With the 
advent of WZBC-FM, the radio station expanded its 
listenership to begin serving the outside community. 
Through locally based programs, WZBC proposed to link 
area residents with the university. 

WZBC has seen tremendous growth since its 
inception in 19Z3. A power increase was given to 
WZBC in 19Z4, bringing the station up to its current 
output of 1000 watts and allowing once again for 
an expansion in listenership. Another important touch was added in 19Z9 when our broadcast signal 
became stereo. However, arguably the most important change in WZBC history occurred later that 
year, or perhaps the following one (depending on whom you ask), when the station changed its format 
to something called modern rock. The frequency formerly home to James Taylor and his ilk became 
inundated with innovative new bands which commercial radio would not touch. At approximately the 
same time, WZBC also began broadcasting more experimental music under the moniker, No Commercial 
Potential, thus changing the future of WZBC irrevocably. Since the initial format change, WZBC has 
grown to become one of the most influential and respected college stations in the country. 

As it stands now, WZBC is actually two fully functioning broadcast entities. Besides the FM 
frequency, there is also WZBC-AM, which operates on a car r i er -current , much like the station's 
predecessor, WVBC. The signal is pumped directly to the Eagle's Nest cafeteria, as well as being 
simulcast with the community events calendar on the BC cable system. 



The Perch 



You may be asking yourself, "What 
is The Perch?" Briefly, The Perch is 
Friday nights at the Starbucks Cafe 
in McElroy. The Perch provides a venue for 
a variety of activities and student groups 
including student musicians, entertainment, 
movies, board games, talent nights, and 
poetry jams. All free of cost!!! It is also a 
place to hang out for those Friday nights 
when you have nothing to do. The cafe has 
recently been renovated with the addition 
of furniture and a 36" screen TV! It is a 
perfect place to enjoy a cup of coffee, play 
one of several board games we provide, or 
study. The Perch is open from 9pm-midnight 
Fridays throughout the semester. 
The Perch is programmed by a student 
committee with representatives from various 
student organizations including PEN (Peer 
Education Network). ACC (Another Choice 
on Campus), and UGBC (Undergraduate 
Government of Boston College). 



. 



WVBC 



W 



VBC 



the on-campus sister station 



WZBC - Newton 90.3 FM, Boston 



College radio, and broadcasts through 
BC Cable Channel 47. It encourages all students 
to get involved, even those with no previous 
radio experience. First and foremost, a WVBC 
DJ must have a love for music; everything else 
is secondary. To be a WVBC DJ you need no 
prior broadcast experience, and the music you 
play need not be a certain genre. WVBC is for 
the students, by the students! Just come by the 
studio and show us what you got. Come on. what 
are you afraid of? 



Organizations 



The Observer 



As the only independent, conservative voice at BC, The Observer has seen a remarkable 
transformation since its debut in the spring of 1983. During the most recent incarnation, 
developed by Editor-in-Chief Christopher L. Pizzo A&S '05, The Observer's mission has been 
to promote and defend traditional political and religious values both within Boston College and 
beyond. The Observer has strongly championed the ideals of Western Civilization, the free market, 
limited government, personal freedom and responsibility, and adherence to the Magesterium of the 
Catholic Church, along with the witty and sarcastic commentary that has made it famous. Taking 
seriously the values to which Boston College is committed as a Catholic university in the Western 
tradition. The Observer strives to promote the highest quality of journalism by providing a forum 
for news, opinion, and editorial at BC that otherwise would not exist. Combating what they view 



as the ever-leftward progression of modern 
the phenomena of "cafeteria Catholicism," 
taken controversial stances on such issues 
Action. Title IX, campus diversity questions, 
within the past year. Without question, The 
single most influential student publication 
liberals and conservatives alike. 




academia, and 

The Observer has 
as Affirmative 

and homosexuality 
Observer is the 
as it is ready by 



Photo submitted by The Observer 



The Heights 



T 




he Heights is the independent student weekly of Bosto 
College, established in 1919 and published by Th 
Heights. Inc. a non-profit corporation. The Height 

publishes most Tuesday 

during the academic year wit 
the goal of providing fair an 
accurate news of interest t 
the undergraduate student 
of Boston College and th 
greater BC community. Th 
newspaper also serves a 
an independent forum fo 
the opinions of the B( 
community. The Heights hold 
itself to the highest ethicc 
standards in its journalisti 
and business operations, an 
its primary responsibility is t 
its readers, particularly th 
students of Boston College 
The members of The Height 
editorial board and th 
newspaper's staff are a 
undergraduate students o 
Boston College. 



Photo submitted by The Heights 
112 Organizations 



Asian Christian 
Fellowship 



Asian Christian Fellowship (ACFI has large group meetings weekly 
that include singing praise songs, a talk by a guest speaker, and 
fellowship with food at the end. Occasionally we have a special 
event instead of regular meetings. Each member is also encouraged to join 
one of the small groups that meet during the week. These small groups 
range from doing a bock-study to having free discussion and prayer. 
ACF has a general prayer meeting once a week for anybody who needs 
prayer, or wants to pray for the fellowship, the campus, the world, or 
anything else. Also, ACF has one retreat each year in January. 




tos submitted by Asian Christian Fellowship 




Ignatian Society 




The Ignatian Society of Boston College is a group of BC undergraduate 
students committed to the promotion of Jesuit education and the 
Ignatian ideal. We offer all BC students opportunities to actively 
engage the Mission of the University through social, spiritual and service 
programs and events, and seeks to maintain a strong link between the 
Jesuit Community and the student body at BC. Members of the Ignatian 
Society are committed to promoting Jesuit education and Ignatian 
spirituality, and strive to make the BC community a fun, faith filled 
environment. We off such spiritual programs as the Kairos retreat and 
peer ministry. The Ignatian Society's social programs seek to strengthen 
the bond between two great communities here at Boston College; the 
undergraduate student and the Jesuits. We also offer both traditional 

and innovative community service 
opportunities to its members and 
the BC community based on the 
ideals of a Jesuit educational 
experience. 



■ o submitted by Inganatian Society 



Organizations 113 



Hillel Jewish 

Students 
Association 



Boston College Hillel serves as a center for 
Jewish life at Boston College. The Hillel 
helps to facilitate the social, cultural 
and religious needs of the small but active 
group of Jewish students who attend BC, as 
well as inform the BC community about what 
it means to be Jewish. BC Hillel is committed 
to a pluralistic vision of Judaism that embraces 
all movements and invites all members of the 
BC community to participate in its programs. 




InterVarsity Christian Fellowship 




Photos submitted i 



Asian Baptist 
Student Koinonia 



Coming from the Greek word "Koinonia," 
which means fellowship in Greek, Asian 
Baptist Student Koinonia is a student 
Christian group committed to their fellowship with 
God and each other. Our hope is to experience 
God's love concretely, whether by means of Bible 
studies, prayer, or fellowship (which consists of many 
forms, mainly fun indoor and outdoor activities, like 
sports, hiking, BBQs, and eating a lot of food). 
We study together, eat together, and make an 
effort to understand the meaning of life together. 



114 Organizations 



InterVarsity Christian Fellowship is a multi-ethnic. 
Catholic and Protestant, Christian movement at 
Boston College. It is a close-knit community of 
active students who seek to discover together how 
God and faith can impact our daily lives at BC and 
beyond. We meet weekly, as well as in various smaller 
group meetings, Bible studies, and prayer gatherings 
throughout the week, and retreats and conferences 
throughout the year. We also make regular trips into 
Boston to feed the homeless, tutor students in the inner- 
city and have spring break trips to serve the urban poor 
in Boston. We seek not only to reach out and love the 
people at BC and in the Boston area, but also to the 
outside world through summer trips to foreign countries. 




Salt and 
Light 



Salt and Light is a Christian 
group that serves the New 
England area by leading Con- 
I firmation retreats tor high school 
students. We have one training 
weekend every semester for mem- 
bers who are interested in leading 
these retreats. These weekends are 
■held at the Mellos Retreat House in 
peaceful Jacksonville, Vermont. Salt 
sand Light also meets for fellowship 
and fun every other week. Meetings 
usually consist of an icebreaker, wit- 
ness talks, small group sharing, and 
I snacks. 




Photos submitted by Salt and Light 



Chi Alpha Christian Fellowship 




c 



hi Alpha (XA) is a committed group of 
Christians who want to see a difference 
on Boston College Campus today. XA 
are two Greek symbols pronounced "chi alpha" 
and represent the letters C and A. These two 
letters stand for "Christ's Ambassadors." The 
group aims to change their school by living out 
their faith in Jesus Christ on a daily basis. XA 
is more than just a club; it is a community of 
students from various backgrounds who are able 
to join together around the common belief that 
Christ is their Savior. 

XA wants to show all people that the 
awesome life is possible with Christ and that a 
relationship with Him is more than just church on 
Sunday morning. Their weekly meetings serve as a 
nice break from the hectic workweek that allows 
its members to come together to be encouraged 
in the faith and to lift up the name of Christ as 
a community of believers. In addition to two 
retreats each year, the organization unites with 
Chi Alpha groups from other Boston schools in 
an event known as "Friday Night Live." 



Organizations 115 



Black Campus 
Ministry 



The mission of Black campus Ministry is rooted in the African American experience. We assume responsibility for the 
spiritual growth of the Boston College community at large. With God as our focus, we aspire to achieve these goals 
through various activities strengthening community relations. As Christians, we believe in serving the community of Boston 
College and the greater Boston area. All these things we do in the name of out Lord and Savior, Jesus Christ. 

As a ministry, we are a faith-oriented people dedicated to the enhancement of spiritual growth in both others and 

ourselves. Furthermore, the purpose 

of Black Campus Ministry is also to 
increase community relations, encourage 
involvement, promote outreach and 
demonstrate support to others 
guidance from God. 




BISCO 



BISCO, the acronym for the 
Boston Intercollegiate Com- 
munity Service Organization, 
was established at Boston Col- 
lege by John Lennn two years ago. 
BISCO works with other colleges in 
the city of Boston as an organization 
based on serving others as a vehicle 
of personal growth. BISCO conveys 
the idea of "service by choice." wel- 
coming all members, however small 
or large their level of commitment. 
As a result, it provides an outlet for 
many students who cannot make a 
full-time commitment to other orga- 
nizations. By working with other 
schools, BISCO has multiplied the 
size, scope and impact of projects 
to a greater degree, as well as pro- 
vided assitance in the research and 
devleopment of projects for other 
organizations. 



Project 2000 



Project 2000 is a mentoring and tutoring program which target 
4th and 5th graders from the John Marshall Elementary Schoo 
in Dorcester, MA. The volunteers spend Saturdays helping these 
children. This Saturday program combines educational as well a 
recreational activites that help create positive role models for the 
young students. 

Acitvities that are organized and hosted by Project 200( 
include Trick or Treating in the Mods, day trips to the Museum o 
Science, barbeques and many other bonding activites. Commoi 
interactions between the volunteer mentors and the children includ< 
basketball, football and arts and crafts. 



St. Thomas More Society 

The St. Thomas More Society is a student organization at Boston Cc 
lege dedicated to promoting the rich heritage of the Catholic fa 
on campus. Their mission is accomplished through both active or 
contemplative means. The St. Thomas More Society sponsers lecture 
debates and symposia discussing the most important issues of faith 
culture in today's world. 

The organization also sponsers biweekly Power Hours. T 
are times of quiet, reflective prayer in the form of traditional euchari 
adoration and benedictions. All students are welcome to participate 
any of the activites of the Society regardless of religious affiliation. 



116 



Habitat for Humanity 

Habitat for Humanity was created several years ago 
with the purpose of heling local Habitat Affiliates 
with day-builds on weekends. Habitat for Human- 
/ hopes to engage as many Boston College students in 
;aching the greater Boston community and in assisting, 
any way possible, in the building and construction of 
scent housing for families living in unacceptable living 
jndifions. There are usually two weekend day-builds per 
onth and an annual spring break trip. 

Two years ago was its biggest, when Habitat for Human- 
/ took a spring break trip to Alabama and an Easter trip 
! Costa Rica. In addition to these notable outreach trips, 
abitat for Humanity has been working in cooperation 
ith local Boston chapters in helping them construct homes 
ithin their own communites. 



Festival of Friendship 

This is the thirteenth year that Festival of Friendship 
has been active at Boston College. It is a one day 
event help on campus for local special needs stu- 
dents. Over 200 BC volunteers are involved in making 
this day possible. Boston College clubs and organizations 
staff carnival games and activites while entertainment is 
provided by various BC perfomance groups. Volunteers 
are buddies for the day to assist special needs guests in 
enjoying festivites. Is is a fun and rewarding afternoon 
for both special needs guests and BC volunteers. 



4Boston 



4 Boston volunteers do service in and around the city of Boston for four 
hours each and every week during the academic year. Boston College 
undergraduate students are confronted with issues of homelessness, 
hunger, abuse, and many more during their service at shelters, lunch kitchens, 
schools, youth centers, hospitals, and live-in facilities. 

The aim of 4Boston is twofold: II to provide students with a significant 
extended urban service experience which is enriched by regular opportunities 
:for reflection on and analysis of the work in which they are engaging; and 2) 
to provide reliable, consistent assistance from the Boston College community 
to Boston agencies which work with and on behalf of the city's poor and 
marginalized. 




mbmtted by 4Boston 



Organizations 117 




Circle K 



The main goal of Circle K as a Boston College club is to provide students who are interested 
an opportunity to do community service when they can. We run various projects throughout 
the semester and have weekly programs at places such as the Stone Institute and the 
Allston/Brighton Food Pantry. At the Stone Institute, we traditionally visit The McLellan Center, a 
rehabilitative nursing facility for 82 short-term or long-term residents, where Circle K volunteers 
entertain residents with a game of Bingo, making for a good time for both residents and volunteers 
alike! At the Food Pantry, we join with Boston University students to serve meals to the local people. 
Student volunteers are encouraged to sit down and eat with the people to form relationships with 
the beneficiaries of the program. There is dancing, music, and even a little karaoke to give the 
dinners a feeling of celebration. Along with these weekly activities, we have also volunteered at 
the Greater Boston Food Bank, organized fundraisers, and held clothing drives. At our bimonthly 
meetings, we have speakers, do group activities, provide updates on upcoming 
events, and enjoy free food. 




Photos submitted by Circle K 




Appalachia 
Volunteers 



The Appalachia Volunteer Program is a student-run club sponsored by the Cam- 
pus Ministry of Boston College. Founded in 1978, the organization has grown 
to become one of the largest volunteer groups on campus and the largest 
group of Appalachia Volunteers in the country. Over spring break, the Appalachia 
Volunteer Program sends over five hundred Boston College students to travel to 
various sites throughout the Appalachia regions. 

The Appalachia region consists of the states of Kentucky, West Virginia, 
Virginia, North Carolina, South Carolina, Pennsylvania and Maine. The 

organization's main objective is to assist in the daily 
lives of those less fortunate than most. Appalachia 
Volunteers aim to provide hope and encouragement 
to the economically deprived people in these 
Appalachia Regions. 






118 Organizations 



■l£^ 



Best Buddies 



he mission of Best Buddies is to enhance the lives of people with intellectual disabilities by providing 
them with one-to-one friendships with Boston College students. Equally important is the enhancement of 
the lives of BC students who might not otherwise enter into such special relationships. 
;t Buddies began as a student organization at Georgetown University in 1987 when 
thony K. Shriver, Founder and Chairman, realized that many people with intellectual 
abilities lacked the opportunity to socialize with their non-disabled peers. Since then, it 
, grown steadily and is currently an international organization with 50,000 participants. 
In addition to attending scheduled meetings, College Buddies IBC students) 
ke a commitment to see their Buddies on a one-to-one basis two times a month. These 
ings can be as simple as having lunch at the dining hall or as involved as going to a 
seball game or a museum. College Buddies and Buddies also pledge to call each other 
ing the weeks in which they do not meet in person. In addition, our chapter plans group 
ivities for all members at least once a month, such as visiting the New England Aquarium, 
I 'ing a holiday party on campus, or going to a Celtics game. Students who wish to join 
it Buddies but do not want to be matched one-to-one with a Buddy can become an 
iociate Manager. These members attend all of our group events and become a friend- 
the-day to a Buddy whose College Buddy could not attend. 





Photos submitted by Best Buddies 




Campus School Volunteers 

he Campus School Volunteers of Boston College is an organization of undergraduate students 
who work with and for the students of the Campus School. Located on BC's campus, the 
Campus School is an independent school that serves approximately 40 children, ages 3 to 

21, who have multiple disabilities and special 
needs. Since 1996, the Volunteers have been 
creating lasting relationships with the Campus 
School students, as well as raising awareness 
about the school. Throughout the academic 
year, four fundraising committees organize 
events such as the sponsors for the Boston 
Marathon, the Hockey Tournament, the Golf 
Tournament, and a weekly recycling program. 
Last year, the Volunteers raised $105,000 
and presented the check to the school this 
October. Each year interest and participation 
continue to grow. Together we are "Reaching 
Out to Make a Difference." 



Photos submitted by Compus School Volunteers 



Organizations 119 



Operation Smile 




Photos submitted by Operation Smile 



Women's 
Resource Center 

The Women's Resource Center IWRC) offers a comfortable atmo- 
sphere in which to seek information, find peer support, participate in 
programs, and meet others. The WRC is located in McElroy and,; 
is open to all students, faculty and staff. The mission of the Women's 
Resource Center is to celebrate the gifts and contributions women offer 
to the Boston College community. WRC also strives to serve the needs 
of women on campus and in the community through service and social 
justice activities. It is committed to the exploration of gender issues 
and to the equality of women and men in all sectors of society. The 
center exists to support and encourage women in the full attainment of 
their personal, academic, professional, and spiritual goals through wide 
variety of services to the student body and the university community. 
The Center provides two peer-led support groups for female 
students at Boston College. The Eating Issues Group offers a place for 
women who are dealing with eating disorders to share their experi- 
ences and to witness the coping and healing strategies of others who 
care. The Support Group For Survivors of Sexual Assault is for women 
who have experienced any kind of sexual assault. Both support groups 
promote the individual decision-making and empowerment of each 
member. The groups offer a caring atmosphere where women can come 
together to find support, to share their experience or simply to listen. 



American 
Red Cross 



Photos submitted by American Red Cross 



e Life... Give Bloo 

There's Stil! No Substitute 
■Hi American Red Cross 




The American Red Cross is a humanitari 
organization, led by volunteers, that provides rel 
to victims of disasters and helps people preve 1 
prepare for, and respond to emergencies. It does t 
through services that are consistent with its congressior 
charter and the principles of the International R 
Cross Movement. In addition, the American Red Crt 
of Boston College, will develop and offer services th 
address critical human, health and safety needs of t 
communities which it serves and are consistent with t 
National AAission. 

Throughout it's five years at Boston College, the A 
of BC has successfully carried out its goals by maki 
itself the premier organization to sponsor blood dri\ 
on campus and to provide immediate disaster rel 

to the surroundi 
community alongsi 
the Red Cross 
Massachusetts Be 
It is also involvH 
in CPR trainii 

food distribute 

community eve 

and school supf 
collections. 




120 Organizations 



Allies 



Allies is based on the Catholic and Jesuit traditions, which teach that all human beings are created in the image 
and likeness of God and are thus to be valued, treated with respect, and enabled to feel welcome and 
appreciated at Boston College, whether they are heterosexual, homosexual, bisexual, transgender or questioning 
in regard to sexual orientation. The mission of Allies is to advance understanding of issues, concerns, and needs regarding 
sexual orientation among undergraduates at Boston College. Allies serves as both an educational and a support group. 
In our first semester as a student organization. Allies held regular meetings and sponsored a number of public events. The 
first event was a panel discussion, featuring four prominent gay and lesbian Boston College graduates: the Hon. David 
Mills (BC '64), a Massachusetts judge; Representative Elizabeth Malia (BC '71), a Massachusetts state representative; 
David Brennan (BC '861. a doctoral candidate in the Graduate School of Social Work; and Adam Baker (BC '031, the 
former president of the Undergraduate Government of Boston College. The group offered candid reflections about 
their experiences at Boston College. A second major event of the first semester was a trip to the Boston Jewish Film 
festival, co-sponsored with Hillel, to see Class Queers, a documentary film addressing the difficulties GLBT youth face 
in high school. At the end of the semester, the Allies were proud to bring British Theologian James Alison to campus, 
who gave a lecture titled: Hearing the Still Small Voice: Experience, Truth, and Argument as lived by Catholic around 
the Gay Question. The Alison event, which was co-sponsored by the Church in the 21st Century Initiative, also featured 
Gasson Professor James Keenan S.J. and Stephen Pope and Lisa Cahill of the Boston College Theology Department. 



Peer Education Network 



n 



e, the Peer Education Network of Boston College, are a select group of 
trained students committed to the betterment of lives through knowledge and 
empowerment. We are peer educators striving to achieve this goal through 
3ns of an active network of passionate individuals who work individually and as a 
m to positively impact the campus community; providing the resources and means 
sstablish foundations for leading healthy life-styles. PEN is subdivided into six topic 
as based on the issues that the group addresses on campus. These are: HEART, 
PPEN, HEAL, HOPE, STAR, and SANet. 

The goal of the Network is to increase knowledge and understanding of such 
lplex issues as Alcohol and other Drugs, Sexual Assault, HIV/AIDS Awareness, Eating 
orders and Body Image, and their impact on the University community. Through 
ative and interactive programming, members of PEN encourage good decision 
;ing and healthy choices among students, as well as work to assure 
late civility and respectful behavior on campus. These programs are 
he form of drama, interactive presentations, skits, question/answer 
:ussions, improvs, awareness campaigns, guest speakers, and other 
sentations and programs as requested. They range from campus-wide 
;nts to small-group programs (ie: one floor of a residence hall 




Organizations 121 



Another Choice 
on Campus 

Another Choice on Campus is a student-run organization that 
seeks to involve students who are looking for a fun alternative 
to weekend activities that involve alcohol. Our mission is to 
provide frequent and exciting activities for students who want to 
enjoy a fun weekend activity and do not want to drink. The club 
was founded five years ago by two students who found a void in the 
Boston College social life and wished to offer other options. The club 
pioneered the idea of substance-free events to offer students another 
choice for weekend activities. 




Photos submited by Another Choice on Campus 



Shaw Leadership Program 



Shaw House is the home of the twenty members if the Shaw Leadership 
Prgorgram. They spend the first year in weekly leadership sessions, 
then use what they've learned to create and complete their own 
leadership projects. With the goals of completing community service 
and pervading the Shaw spirit throughout Boston College, these twenty 
students, along with the sophomore, junior and senior members of the Shaw 
Leadership Program, embark on a year filled with memorable events. And 




Photos submitted by Show Leadership Program 



XZ1 Organizations 



ifi^ 



Boston College Student Agencies 



Boston College Student Agencies IBCSA) is sponsored by the Office of the Dean of 
Student Development (ODSD). Founded in 1983, Boston College Student agencies is 
a student-run organization, which provides a unique opportunity for BC Students to 
gain real world business experiences through on campus part-time employment, BCSA 
is currently composed of five agencies and four functional departments in order to fulf 
the needs and interest of everyone ranging from faculty to students to parents of the 
BC community. 

Our vision is to provide a professional setting embodying the entrepreneuria 
spirit, where Boston College undergraduate students can find meaningful employment, 
gain managerial experience, and offer practical and useful services to fellow students, 
parents, faculty and staff. BCSA currently operates five Strategic Business Units (SBUs), or 
agencies which include: Cheers!, Dry Cleaning, Travel, Advertising & communications and 
Storage/Shipping. In addition, we have five Functional departments, including; marketing, 
Human resources, Finance and IT. Each Agency and Department is managed by students 
and supervised by a second year MBA student. 




tos submited by BCSA 

Environmental Action Coalition 

The mission of the Environmental Action Coalition (EAC) is to get all Boston College students 
involved in thinking about the environment, their impact on it, and what they can do to help. 
We encourage the BC community to enjoy all the things that nature provides with annual hikes, 
clean-ups, and celebrations. Recent and ongoing projects of the EAC are the creation of recycled 
cereal box notebooks, river and reservoir clean-ups, weekend hiking trips to the White Mountains of 

New Hampshire, and the coordination 
of the annual Earth Day celebration 
in the Dustbowl every April. 




Organizations 123 



Eagle EMS 



Eogle Emergency Medical Services was founded 
five years ago in 1997 when Kevin Eidt col- 
lapsed in the Flynn RecreaMon Complex during 
a picfup basketball game. Friend and Emergency 
Medical Technician Mark Ritchie attempted to 
revive him while waiting for an ambulance to come 
and take him to a hospital but was unable to and 
Eidt died within an hour of fainting. This motivated 
Ritchie to create Eagle EMS. The group is made up 
of trained student Emergency Medical Technicians 
(EMTsl who assist the Boston College Police Depart- 
ment with medical emergencies. 

Today, students staff major events, such as 
BC football games and "Pops on the Heights". Eagle 
EMS also conducts CPR and Emergency Medical 
Technician certification classes and do daily night- 
time response on both Upper and Lower campus. 



Student Organization 
Funding Committee 



The Student Organization Funding Committee 
(SOFC1 is charged with funding student orga- 
nizations who meet the elegibility requirements 
set forth in the SOFC constitution. Approximately 
130 organizations at Boston College presently exist 
that can receive funding. The money allocated by 
SOFC comes from 47% of the Student Activities 
Fee. which is collected by the university along with 
tuition. SOFC is a separate and distinct organiza- 
tion from the Undergraduate Government of Boston 
College and operates under its own constitution and 
bylaws. The goal of the group is to assist student 
groups in putting on enriching events for the Boston 
College community without the group having to be 
overly concerned with the funding of the event. 



, 




Majong Club 



The Boston College Mahjong Club is established to provide 
all members of the BC community with the knowledge of 
mahjong's significance as Chinese consider mahjong the 
essence of the Chinese culture. Through this stress-releasing and fun 
entertainment, the mission of the Mahjong Club includes training 
students to think strategically and analytically based on the 
nature and concept of the game in combination with its variations. 
Mahjong acts as a medium for networking, cultural and knowledge 
exchanges. Our club serves to enrich Boston College's multicultura 
atmosphere through regular Mahjong gatherings. It once was a 

gambling 
game, but it has 
now evolved into 
a family game, 
which even young 
children play it in 
oriental families. 




124 Organizations 



fcJC,!^ 




Photo submitted by Partnership for Life 



Partnership 
for Life 



Partnership for Life is a pro-life group 
on campus that addresses all life issues, 
but focuses mostly on the topics of 
abortion, euthanasia, and the death penalty. 
Members take part in weekly educational 
outreach volunteer projects in Boston to aid 
mothers and children, and various walks 
and marches around the country, including 
the March for Life in Washington in 
January of each year. Members also have 
the opportunity to meet with other college 
students at various conferences throughout 
the year. As- a group, the members of 
Partnership for Life try to facilitate dialogue 
and provide education on life issues at 
Boston College by providing various 
speakers and programs throughout the 
school year, illamcommod erat praessectet, 
qui eras amcor senit et veriusc pisi. 



Student Judicial 
Board 



The members of the Boston College Student 
Judicial Board are representatives of the student 
body in its entirety. It is their responsibility to 
not only conduct hearings, but also educate the entire 
student body about its rights. Their role on campus 
is to offer students the opportunity to be heard in a 
fair and impartial environment by a board of peers. 
After hearing the cases, the J Board determines 
responsibility and issues sanctions to be reviewed by 
the Dean for Student Development. 

In addition to strictly hearing cases, the 
Student Judicial Board seeks to establish and maintain 
respect for truth, self, and others, in both the local 
and surrounding community. In each other the cases 
they adjudicate, their objective is to further educate 
students of both their rights and their responsibilities 
as members of the Boston College community. They 
strive to maintain and uphold community standards, 
and in keeping with the Jesuit tradition, encourage 
sound moral judgment. 



Ecopledge 



Ecopledge is part of a national organization that 
works on corporate campaigns, and demands that big 
companies adjust their business practices to better 
protect the environment. On campus we are working on 
the Dell computer campaign, which strives to get the 
company to take their computers back from customers 
once they have become obsolete. After taking them back 
we are demanding that the computers be recycled safely 
here in the United States rather than shipped to China, as 
they are now, where they are deconstructed in unsafe and 
unhealthy conditions by underpaid workers. As part of the 
national campaign, our group on campus participates in 
days of action by tabling in McElroy, getting people to 
sign petitions and postcards that we then send on to Dell. 
We also participate in days of action like these for the 
Shaws and Kraft campaigns, which are aimed at removing 
genetically engineered ingredients from these foods until 
sufficient testing has been done to prove that they are 
safe for the environment and for human consumption. 

Along with these national campaigns, we are 
working on several campus initiatives including getting 
the departments here to switch to using recycled paper. 
This is an option now because of our campaign last 
spring that worked with the Purchasing Department with 
student support to make the switch. We are also working 
on improving recycling on campus as well as removing 
styrofoam from the dining halls. 



Organizations 125 



Urban Immersion 



During both the semester and spring breaks, 25 students la 
different group each week) and a B.C. campus minister will live in 
Jamaica Plain, a neighborhood of Boston. Each day, we will work 
on a variety of projects which may include service in a foodbank, 
visitation with guests in one of Boston's shelters, and outreach to 
local elderly. During evening seminars, we study a variety of urban 
issues such as racism, homelessness. and theological perspectives 
on urban life. To ground our community in the love and justice of 
God. we end each day in a communal multi-faith prayer service. 





Cuernavaca, Mexico 



Towards the end of May and for two weeks, a trip to Cuernavaca, Mexico, is 
sponsored by Campus Ministry. A campus Minister, and other staff person or graduate 
assistant and two student leaders accompany the team to Mexico. It is a two week 
immersion program conducted at the Cuernavaca Center for Intercultural Dialogue on 
Development. The program provides direct experience with the poor people of Mexico 
and Latin American refuges in the their daily struggles for survival. In addition to the 
staff at CCIDD, professors, social workers, medical personnel and clergy participate 
in dialogue with the BC students. Visits to the squatter settlement in Cuernevaca, 
the indigenous peoples in the mountain, Christina-based communities and visits to 
historical sites round out the learning and intercultural dialogue. Biblical reflection, 
prayer and dialogue fill each day with the dynamic of processing the experiences. 



126 Organizations 



Nicaragua Immersion 



For the past eight years, students have traveled to Nicaragua, an impoverished country in Central America, to spend time 
in an economically impoverished campesino community and experience firsthand the lives of people who struggle each 
day to feed their families, obtain clean drinking water and find a way to support themselves both individually and in 
community. Through meetings with educators, health care workers, politicians and other community leaders, students spend 
time in both the capital city and in rural areas learning about the concerns of the people from various vantage points. 



Ignacio Volunteers - Jamaica 



Students immerse themselves in the urban reality of Kingston, Jamaica, 
by serving at several different outreach ministries, including an 
orphanage, a home for the elderly, and a home for children who 
are severely disabled. Additionally, students visit The Culture Yard, 
a museum dedicated to the artist who emerged 
from Trenchtown, Jamaica, and became a voice of 
liberation for Jamaicans living in oppressive situations. 





Photos submitted by Gompus Minsistry 



BorderLinks 

Students travel to the border that runs between 
Tucsan, Arizona, and Nogales, Mexico. Living 
together in both the U.S. and Mexico - including in 
homes of Mexican families - students are exposed 
to a wide range of perspectives related to life 
along the U.S. and Mexico border. BorderLinks, 
the non-profit organization that coordinates the 
immersion experience, organizes activities such as 
tours of maquiladoras and discussions with factory 
managers, meetings with workers and their families 
in their communities and discussions with activists 
who are committed to bringing about social change. 



Tijuana, Mexico 



Students travel to Tijuana, Mexico where they 
work with Amor Ministries. The AMOR mission 
trip is a short-term mission trip based on serving 
the local church in Mexico, and creating cross- 
cultural understanding through direct exposure 
to the Mexican culture. The goal of the Amor 
program is to understand the conditions of 
poverty through immersion, in addition to building 
a house in a developing nation. Combined with 
this project is a three day retreat over the course 
of the Easter Tridium. The retreat uses the act 
of service and the Passion of Christ to focus on 
a personal and spiritual experience of Christ's 
crucifixion on the cross, as seen through the 
suffering of our brothers and sisters in Mexico. 



Mozambique Service 
Program 



Established in 2000, the Mozambique Service Program is 
an intense, unrivaled, eight-week service and immersion 
experience. While in Mozambique, the participants teach 
English in a local parish, live in community with one another, have 
opportunities for group and individual reflection, and form lasting 
friendships with Mozambicans. Sponsored since 2002 by the 
Center for Ignatian Spirituality, the Mozambique Service Program 
supports participants in the embodiment of the Jesuit mission 
of "men and women for others". Last year's undergraduate 
participants were Craig Dorsett, Natasha Labbe, Claudia 
Miranda, Matthew Putorti, Corey Williams, and Amanda Wood. 
The coordinating graduate student was Stephanie Galeota. 




Photos submitted by Mozambique Service Program 



Belize Immersion Trip 

Students travel to Seine Bight, on the Placencia Peninsula, in Belize, Central America. 
Living in a community center and working with Belizean teachers, students run 
a one-week winter camp for village children and teach in the regular school 
system the following week. Additionally, students spend time in Belize City engaging 
in community service projects and meeting with members of the local community. 




128 Organizations 



Not Pictured 



African Student Association LGBC 

Against the Death Penalty LSOE Honors Program 

AHANA Management Academy Madrigals 

AIDS Awareness Committee Macintosh Users Group 

Amnesty International Marketing Academy 

Animal Rights Organization Martin Luther King, Jr. Student Activism Committee 

Arab Students Association Mathematics Society 

Arts & Sciences Association Mendel Society 

Biological Research Society Mentoring Leadership Program 

Careers in Management Minority Engineers 

Chiapas Immersion Trip Multiracial Club 

College Bowl Muslim Students Association 

Computer Science Academy National Student Nurses Association 

Contemporary Theater Organization of Latin American Affairs 

Crossroads Orthodox Christian Fellowship 

CSOM Academies People's Performing Art Company 

Cuban-American Students Associaton Percussion Ensemble 

Economics Association Project 2000 

Entrepreneur Society Puerto Rican Association 

Finance Academy Philosophy Association 

Fine Arts Society Psychology Club 

Floetry Rotoract Club 

Free Radicals Sexual Chocolate Step Group 

Geology Club Slavic Club 

Habitat For Humanity Society for Pre-Medical Experience (SCOPE) 

Haiti Immersion Sociology Club 

Heights Boys and Girls Club Student Admissions Program 

Hip-Hop Culture Club Students for a Free Tibet 

Information Technology Club UNICEF 

International Business Academy Student Nurses Association 

Ladies in Business Thai Student Association 

Vietnamese Student Association 



Organizations 129 




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ALL THAT YOU CAN'T LEAVE BEHIND 

STUDENT LIFE 

Glory days. The words of a screaming Bon Jovi are a fitting title for the four years of life we all spend here, at Boston College. When 
else in your lifetime will you be surrounded by thousands of people your own age? A decade from now, you will not be spending 
Saturday mornings discussing how you funneled a beer in three seconds the night before. Nor will you consider beating your roommate in 
Madden football your primary aspiration. Think about your life here, as a BC student. For everyone, the experience has been a different 
one- just as no two individuals have the same fingerprints, no two undergrads have the same Boston College experience. However, 
there are some aspects of the lifestyle here that are shared by a large majority of students. We all know what it is like to fear being late 
to a class in Devlin 008 freshman year. We all know what its like to spend hundreds of dollars on books that we cannot always sell 
back. And we know, for the most part, to avoid dining halls at 6 o'clock. We all know what it is like to get in a fight with a roommate 
about the volume of music and what is on the TV. We all know the risks of parking in the mod parking lot without a permit. We all knowthaf the Plex 
does not have enough machines for the university population, as well as knowing the annoyance of leaving your ID card on a tray in Lower Live. 
We all know how to call our siblings to intercept the discipline notice our Resident Hall Director has sent home about a night 
of drinking and the annoyance of party registration restrictions in Ignacio and Rubenstein. We 

all know the fun of home football games and the victory dance of Baldwin the eagle. 
We all have become experts at beer stain removal and navigating through late night after an evening of 
keg stands and case races. We know that Angora does sometimes forget to deliver the frozen yogurt you ordered 
and that Fast Eddie's will still serve you during after-hours. How would your life have been different if you had been 
somewhere else for these four years? The truth is that you can never know. Just be glad for the memories you DO 
have because you WERE here and take with you, into the future, those things you know you cannot leave behind. 



Edited by Lindsay Brainerd, Marisa Fusco, Brian Moynihan, and Jared 
Walsh with assistance by Ryan Keefe and Amanda Kavanaugh 



Student Life 131 




Moving In 

All Thai You Cant Live Without 



Your new room is 16' x 12". You have one dresser, 
one closet, one desk and an extra long bed. And 
you are sharing the room with someone else. Good 
luck fitting everything! This is the challenge of moving 
in for many students. Freshmen are greeted by 
Welcome Wagon volunteers who unload cars, vans, 
or U-Hauls and bring everything up to the students 
new "home" Parents try to stay calm as their sons 
and daughters quickly become immersed in the fast- 
paced first few days of BC: meeting more people 
than ever before, arranging and re-arranging 
your room, and adjusting to an entirely new life. 
While anxieties may subside by sophomore year, 
challenges still remain as you realize that, although 
the common room gives you more space, your room 
still won't fit everything you brought with you. Junior 
year the anxiety returns as moving in is no longer just 
about fitting things into a dorm room, it is now about 
the nuisances of living in an apartment: leaky faucets, 
pesky landlords, and the Boston Police who weren't 
too fond of your Welcome Back to School party. By 



"The funny thing about living 
at BC is that Freshman year 
you cry as you leave the 
place youve called home for 
18 years, and senior year you 
cry again when you leave 
the place youve called home 
for the past 4" 
"Chris Martin KM 

senior year, moving in becomes less about unpacking 
and putting things away and more about savoring 
every moment of your last year on The Heights. 
Each year of college may bring a new side to the 
moving in process, but every year the same thing is 
true: students leave home behind only to move into 
a second home at BC. by Marisa Fusco 




Photo Submitted 


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132 Student Life 



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Roommates kick off a new year in true BC fashion. Photo by Jared Walsh 




Carrying books to Lower from the Bookstore is tough without a break Photo by Jared Walsh 




The excitement of moving off-campus is damped by the actual moving process Photo Submitted 



"Be grateful for the home 
you have, knowing that at 
this moment all you have is 
all you need" 
"Sarah Ban Breathnach 



Student Life 133 




Parent's Weekend 



A Lesson in Hiding Hangovers 



Parents' weekend means new haircuts, clean rooms, 
and, usually, best behaviors. Parents from near 
and far travel to Chestnut Hill to see their sons 
and daughters during what amounts to one hectic 
weekend. For three days, Boston College students 
welcome their parents into their college life, taking 
them to class, tailgate parties, and a football game. 
Parents bring with them groceries, news from home 
and winter clothes, signaling the traditional end 
of flip-flop, short, and skirt season. There are the 
pictures taken with parents in EC gear, browsing 
through the BC Bookstores, dinner in the North 
End, and shopping on Newbury Street and in 
Quincy Market. Parents' Weekend 2003 began 
with the 11 th annual 'Pops on the Heights" benefit 
concert held in Conte Forum. Conductor Keith 
Lockhart struck up the Boston Esplanade Orchestra 
and the Boston College Chorale for a magically 
musical evening. The excitement of the weekend 
continued as the Eagles dominated Ball State on the 
gridiroa A packed Alumni Standium was treated to 



"You know its Parents 
Weekend when you dress 
up on Friday for the Pops, 
roll out of bed Saturday to 
play dad in beruit, and visit 
the North End for a Sunday 
evening meal" 
- Nick Dubrowsky V4 



a spectacular performance, culminating in a 53-29 
victory. Brunch with Fr. Leahy allowed parents a 
chance to rub elbows with the University President. 
It was a relaxing conclusion to another terrific 
weekend at Boston College. 
by Brian Moynihan 




134 Student Life 




Student Life 135 




Special Events 

Hot Concerts ond Cool Speokers 



It is hard to walk across BCs beautiful campus or 
even down a dorm hallway without seeing multi- 
colored fliers advertising and promoting one of the 
many special events happening on campus. From 
famous speakers to local bands to benefit concerts, 
practically every night of the week offers a special 
event for BC students to attend. BCs reputation as 
a thriving spot for intellectual minds attracts speakers 
of great fame on a regular basis. Tim Russert, host of 
NBCs Meet the Press, moderated a Church in the 
21 st Century panel featuring some of BCs finest in a 
lively discussion on the Church's place in our changing 
times. Controversial author and moviemaker 
Michael Moore spoke to an enormous crowd in 
O'Neill Plaza. With bodies lining the stairs and 
benches in the Plaza and even some hanging out the 
Gasson windows, Moore captured the attention of 
students, faculty, and neighbors alike as he discussed 
his Oscar winning film Bowling for Columbine and 
his latest book Stupid White Men . It is not just these 
famous names however, which draw large crowds. 
Speakers from within the BC community, including 
professors and administrators, lecture often and on 
numerous subjects to attentive audiences outside of 
the traditional classroom setting. In addition to these 
intellectually driven events, students are also offered 
some things to do to relieve the stress of a chaotic 
semester. Fall semester, The Virginia Coalition, The 
Roots, and O.A.R performed to a packed Conte 
Forum, leaving no one disappointed. And while 
these famous acts draw the big crowds, local groups 
also have a strong following within our community. 
"Battle of the Bands" showcased the talents of our 
own students throughout the year in the Rat. Kotter, 



44 Whether the stage belonged 
to Outkast Judy Shephard, 
or the ghost-hunting Warrens, 
we came away with a mes- 
sage about life and who we 
are becoming" 
"Kristen Grieco V4 

a BC favorite, is always sure to give their audiences 
a show to remember. Individual BC talents also 
come together for the good of others. Benefit 
concerts draw crowds that are ready to rock and 
raise money for worthy causes, such as winter and 
spring service trips. BC is a great place to get 
exposure to a variety of authors, poets, lecturers, 
writers, and musical talents- one that may not be 
afforded to us after graduation. 
by Brian Moynihan 




136 Student Life 





Student Life 137 



"I don't think anything will heat 

the road trip to South Bend junior 

year, but a nighttime tailgate at 

the Mods comes pretty closeZ 

-Ben Simms '04% 



"i 



'Painted faces, 

screaming 

fans, drunken 

students... and 

drunken alumni 

-GO EAGLES!" 

- Dana Howarth 

'04 





ymethii 

Yellow Shirt thatlH never forget, 

something so simple yet such a 

symbol of my four years here. If 

that shirt could talk..'. 9 

-Brian Klug '04 




energy or tms crowd is 

unben^^^iis great to come 

back after a year abroad to so 

much spirit" 

-Marisa Grillo '04 



138 Student Life 



■ai&k 




Worth Our Weight In Gold 



Opponents of Boston College never 
escape intimidation when they walk into 
Alumni Stadium and see the swarm of yel- 
low shirts screaming in support of the Bos- 
ton College Eagles. Literally thousands 
of student show up at each game don- 
ning their golden superfan shirts. Many 
students even go as far as painting their 
bodies red and standing in the front row 
to strike fear into their opponents' hearts. 
Superfan mania provides the extra edge 
our teams need to win. This spirit reso- 
nates into every aspect of students' lives. 
BC posters and banners adorn dorm 
rooms all over campus. The Boston Col- 
lege seal is stamped on the covers of 
notebooks kept in BC duffle bags thrown 
over the shoulders of a BC fleece. With 
the values of u For Boston" permeating our 



Chestnut Hill campus, it's no surprise that 
the BC community has so much heart. 
On any day of a football, ice hockey, or 
basketball game one can find what looks 
like trails of yellow-shirted ants heading to 
an anthill in the stands. Scores of fervent 
students pile together to stand and deliver 
the cheers throughout these BC sporting 
events. We work as a unit, yet we are di- 
vided. All Superfans, we are separated by 
the phrase branded on the backs of each 
golden t-shirt. Seniors are "Eagles on the 
Warpath", juniors "Always Believe in BC", 
sophomores tt Fly Like an Eagle", freshmen 
"Take it to the Heights", and then are those 
few who are just "Superdrunk" Whatever 
differences we may exhibit when sup- 
porting our Eagles, though, one thing is 
for sure: We are BC. By Jared Walsh 





m «F+ 



Student Life 139 




Tailgating 

Touchdowns and Hangovers 



Seven Saturdays. Seven days of the fall semester. 
Seven days that brought a flood of people to 
BCs campus for one day to do one thing... 
tailgate. While 8 o'clock on a Saturday morning 
is an hour rarely seen by most college students, 
by that time on a game day the Boston College 
campus is already buzzing with excitement, whlie 
the students are simply buzzing. With parking near 
campus restricted four hours before and three hours 
after games, alumni and parents utilize shuttle buses 
and the T to make their way to the home of the 
Eagles. The sea of maroon and gold extends up 
and down Comm. Ave and St. Thomas Moore 
Road, while BCPD directs traffic Two hours before 
kickoff, the barbecues are fired up in the Mods, the 
parking lots, the garages, and the coveted spots in 
Shea Field. The smell of hot dogs, hamburgers, and 
sausages carries through the air from the corners of 
Lower Campus. The bottles of "good" beer can 
be found primarily on Shea Field while the brews 
more common to BC students, namely Keystone, 
Genny, Busch, and Budlight, can be found in the 



"Next year, when I'm 
choosing between 401(kl or 
paying back loans, 111 always 
remember the "simple life" 
when my first decision on Sat- 
urday was Bud or Busch" 
"Lindsay Brainerd V4 

Mods. From the traditional "kegs and eggs" served 
in the Mods to the elaborate spreads displayed 
by Shea Field tailgaters, there is a pre-game party 
to fit everyone's taste. No matter how or where 
you spend the hours before (after and maybe 
during) the game, there is one thing that cannot be 
denied: tailgating at BC football games unite our 
population- past, present, and future. 
by Brian Moynihan 




0&£§ 





140 Student Lite 





Starting the morning early with roommates is the only way to start the day. 



? Burton 




BC Tailgating - It takes all kinds. Photo by Sue Burton 



BCPD 




By Lindsay Brainerd 
It's Saturday morning and the Boston College 
Police Department are on the prowl. Who 
Doesn't look 21? That is the question of the 
morning. The targets are random..The cap- 
tures are rapid.. The officer spots the baby- 
faced Bud drinker.. .Silent footsteps through 
the Mod Fence.. The amateur boozer does not 
sense danger.. The officer approaches, giving 
a quick tap, tap on the shoulder, "ID please?" 
The student smiles and asks "What ID?" 
"How old are you?" 
"21" 
The officer flashes a disapproving glare. 
"Okay, Okay, 20" replies the now truthful 

student. And with a write-up now 

inevitable, the student shrugs and finishes 

his Bud inside. 



Student Life 141 



1 




AHANA Cruise 



Unity Under the Moonlight 



The AHANA Leadership Council (ALC) hosted its 
annual Boat Cruise on The Spirit of Boston cruise 
ship on Friday, September 26, 2003. The cruise 
took students from the Seaport District near the 
World Trade Center in Boston through the Mystic 
River. The event sold out all 600 tickets in advance 
despite competition from Parents Weekend events. 
Aside from some transportation problems, the night 
went off without a hitch. Buses to the boat docks 
began loading at 8:30 p.m. near More Hall on 
Lower Campus. Once at the docks, students began 
boarding the boat at 10:30 p.m. for an 11:00 p.m. 
departure. On board, students enjoyed catered 
food and three different bars. Each level of The 
Spirit of Boston had its own dance floor and DJ, 
each spinning unique beats which kept the diverse 
crowd entertained for the evening as BC students 
left campus behind for the beauty of the Mystic 
River, by Amanda Kavanaugh and Ryan Keefe 



7 will never forget being 
on the deck with my friends 
looking out on Boston from 
the Harbor and just thinking 
how lucky I am to be here 
tonight surrounded by 
many different people" 
~ Sapna Thakkar V4 



so 




142 Student Life 





Student Life 143 




Homecoming 

All Dressed Up and Ready To Party 



On Saturday, November 15, 2003, glitz and 
glamour were the names of the game. For seniors 
this was one of their last chances to put on a new 
dress or suit and be with their friends. While the 
Comm Ave. bus was filled with Juniors who made 
the trek from off-campus to Conte Forum at the 
beginning of the night, Sophomores made the 
much shorter journey from Walsh. For Freshmen it 
was their first taste of the classy parties thrown 
by the Undergraduate Government of Boston 
College. And what a party it was! This special 
night brought over 2,000 of BCs undergraduates 
to the Sheraton Hotel in downtown Boston 
for Homecoming 2003: a night of dinner and 
dancing. After the prerequisite partying and 
taking of pictures while getting ready, students 
filled the walkways of Conte Forum, waiting to 
load the buses that would transport them to the 
Sheraton. A short bus ride later, accompanied by 
a small amount of aggravation, friends entered the 
gorgeous surroundings of the hotel and the real 



"For one night you trade 

jeans, polos, and red solo 

cups for heels, suits, and wine 

glasses, but what you dont 

lose is the great time with 

good friends and 

roommates." 

"Brian Moynihan V4 

partying began. As staffers circulated the room 
clearing plates and empty glasses, students mingled 
around the ballroom and lobby, waiting in line for 
drinks and catching up with friends. It didn't take 
long, however, for the dance floor to become 
packed. With a mix of R&B, rap, and pop music, 
the DJ kept everyone moving until the very end of 
the night, by Marisa Fusco 





144 Student Life 




Student Life 145 




AHANA Ball 



An Evening to Remember 



Sponsored by the AHANA Leadership Council, the 
AHANA Ball is one of BCs most highly anticipated 
events. As an event whose goal is to bring 
students together from all backgrounds, the Ball is 
an excellent follow-up to the Leadership Council's 
successful first semester event, the AHANA Boat 
Cruise, held at Boston Harbor. This is a night to 
have fun! More than 600 students, decked out in 
their finest gowns and suits, set aside any differences 
and work towards the goal of changing Boston 
College's inaccurate reputation as a homogenous 
campus. The AHANA Ball is held at the up-scale 
Copley Plaza Hotel in downtown Boston for a 
sold-out night of dinner and dancing. The hip-hop, 
reggae, and R&B music played by the DJ keeps 
everyone's energy level high and the dance floor 
crowded. After hours of dancing, laughing, smiling, 
and taking photos, the reluctant students return to 
their dorm rooms for much some needed rest. The 
light-hearted, up-beat atmosphere of the evening 
only adds to the powerfulness of the message: 



"'The Ball is a great chance 
to dance and have fun with 
friends and the enthusiasm 
that permeates the event 
proves that the celebration 
of diversity is not just a one 
night affair." 



diversity should not be a one-night event, but rather 
a way of life. And this message is then carried on in 
the hearts of students as they leave Boston College 
behind and pin the "real world" as individuals who 
see beyond heritage. 




146 Student Life 




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Student Lite 147 




Reason to Celebrate 



Starting Our Own Traditions 



As dedicated as they are to classes, sports, and 
volunteering, Boston College students never pass 
up an opportunity to celebrate. Birthdays, sporting 
events, snow storms, and actual holidays all give 
the BC community a reason to rejoice and take 
a break from their normal routines. This year was 
a particularly high point for celebrations at BC, 
beginning with the Yankees versus Red Sox ALCS 
games. Little to no work was done on campus as 
these rivals met in what would end up being one of 
the most memorial events in sporting history. Soon 
after the excitement of these games died down, 
students reveled in the joys of Halloween falling on a 
Friday. Starting off the day with traditional selfless 
acts, BC students hosted dorm trick or treating for 
inner city children. Halloween night encompassed 
everything from trips to Salem, ticket bar parties in 
Boston, "Pimps and Hoes" parties in the Mods, and 
bladdight parties off campus. After trips home for 
Thanksgiving, BC students returned and quickly got 
into the Holiday spirit. Mod residents hung lights 
from their windows, Ignacio and Walsh dwellers 
trimmed their trees and the entire community came 
together for the annual Christmas Tree Lighting. 
Complete with Santa Clause, free cookies and 
cider, and a blessing by Father Leahy, this event 
truly helped kick start the Christmas celebrations. 
The Breaking of the Barriers Ball, acapella concerts 
and Newton masses rounded out the Holiday spirit 
and gave BC students an opportunity to de-stress 
during finals. Sprinkled throughout the year are 
birthday celebrations that include decorating the 
bay windows in 90 and Vanderslice, posting fliers 
along the Dustbowl walkway, and birthday dinners 
everywhere from Cleveland Circle to downtown 
Boston to the North End. And who can forget 



"Whether its taking 21st birth- 
day shots or hosting holiday 
wine and cheese parties for 
friends, we are finally finding 
our own meaning and ways 
of celebrating the important 
moments in life* 
"Jared Walsh V4 

waiting in line at Mary Ann's at midnight for their 
first legal drink? Then, of course, there is the ultimate 
reason to celebrate at BC: snow. At the first signs 
of a major snowfall, work becomes nearly impossible 
to complete as students of all ages become children 
again, playing in the snow and wishing for snow 
days that very rarely come. 
by Jared Walsh 





148 Student Life 



BUL 





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O'Connell House winter wonderland Photo by Ryan Keefe 




These BC students show off their costumes in Eagle's Nest Photo by Sue Burton 




Red Sox mania rooks the BC campus Photo by Jared Walsh 




Matrix meets Wizard of Oz Photo by Sue Burton 



Student Life 149 



Weathering Heights 



Inability to Forecast the Future 



Ski jackets in October and skirts to a November 
football game? Torrential downpours for two 
hours and sun the rest of the day? Welcome to 
New England. If you don't like the weather, wait 
ten minutes. As unpredictable as weather here at 
Boston College can be, one thing is certain: from our 
fashion to our actions, the weather has an impact 
on all our lives. Students from traditionally warmer 
climates can be seen in sweaters and Northface 
fleeces as early as October while cold-hardened 
souls from the Northeast wear their flip-flops and 
polos well into December. No matter where you 
are from, extreme weather affects how you live at 
BC. And this year was particularly extreme. When 
the Boston area was hit by heavy rains on a Tuesday 
afternoon in October, BC was pounded. The Plex 
parking lot quickly turned into a small lake, forcing 
football players, swimmers and Plex employees to 
wade into the middle of the water and push cars 
to dry land and safety. Walsh residents returning to 
their dorms from class were greeted with a "moat," 
making entrance through the front door interesting 
to say the very least. We took the storm in stride 
and by the end of the day, there were only small 
puddles and pictures to remind us of the day BC 



"Degrees Fahrenheit times 
minutes spent waking to 
class plus wind chill factor 
equals freezing my butt off" 



went underwater. The weekend of December 5 th 
through 7* was supposed to be a time for paper 
writing and studying for finaL.and then it snowed. 
Blizzard conditions were just the excuse BC students 
were looking for to hang out and party rather 
than do work. Those brave souls who attempted 
to venture off campus ran into difficulty when BC 
Buses temporarily stopped running without warning. 
Those wise enough to stay on campus made light of 
the poor conditions, "skating" through the icy Mods 
and having snowball fights in the unplowed parking 
lots, by Marisa Fusco 





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150 Student Life 



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The Great Flood of 2003. Photo by Jared Walsh 



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Edmond's vs. Walsh Snowball Fight. Photo by Jared Walsh 




Tour guides, applicants^ and students brave the tourrential rains. Photo by Jared Walsh 




Walking around campus is not an easy task come December. Photo by Jared Walsh 



Student Life 151 







Spring Break 



Surfing and Serving 



The first" week of March always belongs to the 
students at Boston College. We have worked 
hard for the first semester and a half, doing exactly 
(well-close to it) what our professors, bosses, and 
advisors informed us that we ought to do. But 
not this week; this is our week, our time off. This 
is our spring break. As the snow melts and the 
cold air becomes totally unbearable, Boston 
College students flock to Logan and TF Green in 
Providence with bags and suitcases full of bathing 
suits, tank tops, and shorts. Hundreds of dollars 
are spent on hotel rooms and liquor, but it is all 
worth it in the end for these party-hardy spring 
breakers. For some, however, the crazy week of 
partying with friends isn't the ideal break. For some, 
spring break is all about volunteering and service to 
others. Approximately five hundred students each 
year travel across the country with the Appalachia 
program, doing habitat and community improvement 
based work Immersion trips, which allow students 
to spend a full week in places such as Jamaica and 



"On Appalachia we were 
exposed to the poverty that 
exists within our own coun- 
try and we got to interact 
with peers while helping to 
change strangers' lives" 
"Libby Riley V4 

Costa Rice, helping under-privileged communities, 
are also a popular alternative to the stereotypical 
spring break getaway. Whether you are hanging 
out on the beach with a drink in your hand and your 
best friend by your side, or you are in the Southern 
US with a hammer in your hand and a new friend by 
your side, a Boston College spring break is certainly 
an experience to remember. 
by Brian Moynihan 





152 Student Life 




Student Life 153 




















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Freshman 



TAKE II TO THE HEIGHTS 



School days are no longer from 8 to 3. You no 
longer have to report your every move to your 
parents. Hanging out with friends no longer requires 
a drive down the road, but rather just a walk 
across the hall. Everything changes. And that is 
part of the wonder that is freshmen year. Students 
quickly realize that 9 o'clock is a lot earlier than 
they thought, freedom is even more exciting than 
they had anticipated, and being bored at BC is 
nearly impossible. Freshmen year at BC starts at 
Orientation. These three-day sessions, held during the 
summer and led by upperclassmen, acquaint students 
with what will become their home tor the next four 
years. August means housing assignments, becoming 
acquainted with roommates and, for some, coming to 
terms with having to live on Newtoa After leaving 
their high school friends, home, and family behind, 
the class of 2007 arrived on The Heights ready 
to conquer a new challenge. Although separated 
onto two campuses, the residents of Newton and 
Upper come together for events during Freshman 



"Sloppy stair-climbing to 
Upper, with a stop at late- 
night to cure the hunger, only 
to suddenly realize you have 
an 8 o'clock class in the morn- 
ing - the priceless moments of 
Freshman Year" 
~Brian Gonzalez V7 

First Week, including a Lobsterbake and a trip to 
Fenway Park. By October, the class had settled 
into life at BC. Newton residents grew to love their 
semester abroad at BC, while Upper kids still mock 
their classmates for having to ride a bus to school. 
As the year continues, freshmen continue to forge 
friendships that last a lifetime and create memories 
they will never leave behind, by Marisa Fusco 





154 Student Lite 




Student Life 155 




Sophomores 



My Like An togle 



In September, sophomores move back to Chestnut Hill 
eager to start their second year. Most find themselves 
in Walsh, Vanderslice, or Ninety living in apartment 
style accommodations for the first time. While this 
initially offers the possibility of more privacy, it quickly 
becomes simply more rooms to decorate, more space 
to accumulate clutter and more roommates to avoid 
doing work with. Although most Roncalli, Welch, 
and Williams residents begin the year bitter about 
not living on Lower, by the end of first semester, 
sophomores are debating the merits of College Road 
versus Lower almost as vehemently as freshmen argue 
about Newton versus Upper. No matter where they 
live, sophomores become even more comfortable with 
themselves, their friends, and their knowledge of the 
campus as they start to truly find their niche at BC. An 
important part of sophomore year is planning for junior 
year. As early as the end of August, students begin 
getting swept up into the off-campus housing frenzy. 
Choosing roommates, searching for an apartment, and 
signing the all-important lease are important steps that 



"It's no longer a year about 
youre brothers roommates 
girlfriend having a party, but 
it's your friends inviting you 
to their apartments for a fun 
night out of the dorms."" 
"Taylor Goodell V6 

many sophomores must take to ensure that the will 
have someplace to live the following year. For many, 
attention also turns to the ever-important question of 
whether you will go abroad or if you will stay here 
at BC. Those who decide to leave must then chose 
a destination and begin again the dreaded college 
application process. With two years done and two 
remaining, there is still plenty of time to create your 
legacy and learn to "fly like an eagle!" 
by Brian Moynihan 




156 Student Life 





Student Life 157 




Juniors 



Always Believe In BC 



South Street, Foster, Kirkwood, Comm Ave. 
Vanderslice and Ninety. Upper, Newton, Lower. 
Dublin, Rome, Madrid, Sydney, Cape Town. The 
class of 2005 is certainly spread out. As the year 
begins, those living off campus realize the freedom 
of not having to deal with BCPD or strict RAs, but 
quickly learn the challenges of dealing with Boston 
Police and landlords. And sometimes freedom is 
not all it's cracked up to be. Who thought grocery 
shopping would be such a hassle? Many juniors 
choose to stay on campus. These students revile in 
the ability to party at friends' apartments and then 
come home to the comforts of Vanderslice or Ninety. 
For those who chose to be RAs, the year is filled 
with responsibilities and activity planning. Seeking 
to experience life outside of Boston and the United 
States, many juniors spend either a semester or the 
full year abroad having what most will describe as 
the time of their lives. At the beginning of your 
junior year, friends, family, and others will remind you 
that you seemingly are starting the beginning of the 



"Being abroad for a semester 
allows us the opportunity to 
become more cultured, meet 
new friends, and experience 
a different way of life" 
~ Caitlin Doran V5 

end - you are now halfway done with college and 
entering your final two years at school. And while 
there are glimpses of "real world" activity such as 
internships and resume critiques and rent bills, junior 
year is also a time of clinging to experiences that 
are uniquely college such as studying abroad and 
21 st birthdays. And as amazing as all that is, by the 
end of junior year, the class of 2005 was ready to 
reunite and come together as a full class for one last 

year on the Heights. 

by Brian Moynihan 





158 Student Life 




Student Life 159 




Seniors 

Eagles On The Warpath 



2000 to 2004. Four years of hard work, fun, 
studying, partying, tears, and laughter. Four years, 
gone too quickly for some and not fast enough for 
others. However, no matter how you look at the 
situation, it is time for the members of the class of 
2004 to graduate. A tremendous amount has 
happened during our time on The Heights. Our first 
year on The Heights, we saw the Mod fence go 
up, the Plex be renovated and our men's hockey 
team win the National Championship. The football 
team has won a bowl game each of our four years. 
UGBC and the Senate have been combined, the 
University approved Allies, the first gay-straight 
alliance on campus, and the New Administration 
Building was finally finished. And now, just as we 
have become settled in our role as leaders on 
campus, it is time to start anew. Whether we 
choose the graduate school path or that which 
leads us into the work force, we must now leave 
behind our carefree undergraduate identities. 
Gone are the days of waking up for 'early" noon 



"We thought that high school 
went by quickly but now 
we realize that college goes 
by even faster... the memo- 
ries created and the bonds 
formed will be a part of us 
forever. Thank you BCl" - 
Meaghan Casey '04 

classes, once a week classes, and internships. Here 
is the start of the new days, the new days that we 
have been preparing for during most of our college 
careers, the new days that BC has prepared us for. 
Our farewell to BC is mixed with tears, excitement, 
nervousness, and eagerness. Yet, one thing is certain: 
the Eagles of 2004 will leave on the warpath! 
by Brian Moynihan 





160 Student Life 





















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Rivalry 



Domes in Deanrown 



Roommates from Massachusetts and New York 
coexist peacefully throughout the Boston College 
community. Except when the Boston Red Sox are 
playing the New York Yankees. Then roommates 
from Massachusetts and New York stop being 
friends and become archenemies. Students visiting 
from nearby Boston University are welcomed onto 
The Heights lovingly. Except when the BU Terriers 
are playing the BC Eagles. Then students from 
Boston University are welcomed with chants of 
"Sucks to BU," *BC Rejects," and "Safety School." 
The word "Irish" is used to refer to the heritage of 
many Boston College students. Except when the 
Eagles take on "The Other Jesuit School." Then 
the word "Irish" refers to all things evil emanating 
from South Bend, Indiana. You don't have to be 
an avid sports fan to get swept up in the fervor 
that surrounds these storied rivalries. When these 
games are played, everyone becomes a sports fan. 
After all, how can you not love baseball games that 
professors will cancel classes for, hockey games that 



"Notice how Disney did not 
title their movie Hunchback 
of Boston College .... Four 
years of victory over the 
Irish, national hockey cham- 
pionships, and beanpot wins 
have shown our rivals the 
true meaning of Eagles On 
The Warpath" 
~ Jay Brown V4 

allow you to degrade students who live down the 

street, and football games that dictate road trips 

with your best friends? by Marisa Fusco 




$&$&% 





162 Student Lite 




Student Life 163 




Plexing It 

Beer Bellies and Barbells 



Whether you are at the Plex for a pickup game 
of basketball or for an intense workout, you will 
certainly be joined by a large number of Boston 
College students. As with most college campuses, 
BC is full of health conscious students. The cardio 
machines, located on the second floor mezzanine, 
are constantly in high demand. While some students 
simply listen to their favorite tunes while working 
out, an even greater number multi-task, reading and 
studying as they burn calories. Those who choose to 
avoid the chaotic treadmills and elipticals opt for 
running sprints or a few miles on the indoor track. 
Those seeking to sculpt and build their muscles, as 
opposed to just toning them, generally populate the 
first floor that boasts a number of free weights and 
universal machines. Students and faculty alike can 
"bulk up" with the help of the Plex's helpful training 
staff who can personalize a workout schedule for 
each individual. Even those who are not focused 
on "working out" can simply stay active with 
the many opportunities afforded to them at the 
Plex The basketball courts are home to pickup 
games, organized intramural teams, and students 
just shooting around. When not being used for 
bball, this area is occupied by volleyball players 
taking advantage of some court time. Behind the 
curtain, aerobics classes are offered on a regular 
basis. Whether its some high kicking in taebox or 



It's amazing how quickly 
you learn the evils of Late 
Night the burden of beer 
calories, and the immobility 
of Playstation football..... Time 
to grab a Michelob Ultra 
and hit the track" 
"Joe Costello V4 

relaxed mediation in yoga, the healthy opportunities 
seem endless. No matter the time of day or the 
season outside, the Plex is always alive with sound. 
Whether it be the constant whirring and humming 
of the treadmills and rowing machines, the echoes 
exploding from the racquetball courts, or the friendly 
chatter of those working out, the Plex always sounds 
like the place to be. by Brian Moynihan 





164 Student Life 



*V«Uk 




Student Life 165 




'With freezing showers on the cold- 
est mornings and 4am firedrills on 
the coldest nights .... dorm life was 
not always the greatest... hut having 
my best friends as neighbors makes 
up fork 



'Edmonds offers 
you a clean place 
to crash after tail- 
gates, while the 
Mod residents are 
left picking up em 
ties" 



'How many different ways can 

you find to not do work in a 12x12 

boxT 



"Only college students would view 

living in the Mods as living 

high-class. Who would of thought 

giant brown cubes could be 

granted palace-like status?" 



166 Student Life 






Just Like Home... Maybe Not 



Welcome to your new home. When taking 
a shower, make sure to wear flip-flops and 
be as quick as possible, there are thirty other 
girls waiting in line. Please do not destroy your 
roommate's property, even if his alarm clock has 
gone off every nine minutes for the past two 
hours while he sleeps through yet another class. 
Also, be sure to remember that a sock on the 
door means do not enter. If you choose to ignore 
this warning, you must pay your own therapy 
bills. You will party, eat, study, sleep, and hang 
out here for the next nine months. Decorate 
wisely. When arranging furniture, be advised 
that drunken stumbling is safest when there is a 
clear path from the door to your bed or couch. 
Place all PlayStations, board games, and DVD 
collections out of the reach of roommates who 
may feel as though doing work is more important 
than developing procrastination skills. Remember 
that the Internet is not just a place for research 
but also allows for effective communication with 
friends who live at distances in excess of ten 
feet from you. If utilizing the hallways for such 
strange purposes as walking to another room 



or leaving the building, please respect those 
eating, studying, and playing hockey. Those 
choosing to do work in their homes are advised 
that mandatory study breaks will take place 
every hour on the half-hour. These students are 
also advised that work is not permitted four 
hours before or two hours after BC football 
games. Personal belongings left in common 
areas become the property of the room after 
two weeks. This may include, but is not limited 
to, CDs, shoes, food and alcohol. When visiting 
other students' homes in the Modular Apartments, 
be respectful, throwing up only in the grass-lined 
patio areas. Also, be advised that any shoes 
which are hung from trees cannot and will not 
be returned. If there should be a problem with 
any of your appliances or light fixtures, call 
Work Order immediately and someone will 
fix the problem sometime during the following 
semester. Finally, please be aware that you must 
leave these residences behind at the culmination 
of your time at Boston College. Your are free, 
however, to take the friendships formed and 
the memories made with you. by Marisa Fusco 





Student Life 167 




Volunteerism 

Leaving A Mark Through Service 



The Jesuit ideal of men and women for others 
is exemplfied in BC students' commitment to 
volunteering. Each year, 4Boston attracts hundreds 
of students who are willing and eager to volunteer 
around the city in school settings, shelters, and soup 
kitchens. Other students volunteer by "giving up" 
their winter and spring breaks to travel across the 
United States and to other countries through such 
programs as Appalachia and Boderlinks. The 
helping hands of BC students are not just extended 
outside the gates of BC. Many groups on campus 
utilize student volunteers to improve the lives of 
those within our BC community. The Campus School 
Volunteers spend hours with the students of the 
Campus School — not only playing with them and 
teaching them, but also being their friends. Welcome 
Wagon, the popular sophomore volunteer option, 
helps incoming freshmen and their families move in 
and handle the pressures of a crazy first day. The 
Student Admissions Program allows BC students to 
give back to their own school by sharing their love 



It always amazed me how 
many people got involved in 
volunteer organizations here. 
BC provides a number of 
different opportunities and 
year after year the students 
accept the challenges these 
opportunities present" 

for BC with prospective students and assuage the 
fears that go along with the admissions process. 
Very few students leave BC without having done 
at least some volunteering. The lessons learned 
through volunteerism and the values these lessons 
instill is something that we will all carry with us once 
we leave BC. 
by Brian Moynihan 









168 Student Life 










Photo Submitted 



Helping out others in Starkville, Mississippi Photo Submitted 








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Student Life 169 





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Our Home 



boston College 



Boston College is constantly changing. Four years 
ago when the class of 2004 first walked onto 
campus, there was no fence around the Mods. 
There was no Lower Campus Administration 
Building. Higgins as we know it now did not exist. 
The Plex, the freshmen dorms, and College Road 
were all in the process of being renevated. Four 
years later, those projects have all been completed, 
but new ones have begun. A new residence hall 
is being built behind Vanderslice. Alumni Stadium 
is being expanded to include the new Yawkey 
Athletic Center. A walkway is still being built 
behind O'Neill Library. It seems that our home is 
in the perpetually process of getting a facelift. We 
may return here in five, ten, or twenty years to find 
that the campus no longer resembles the place we 
left behind. Yet there are certain features that will 
never change. The Golden Eagle looking on as you 
enter campus through Main Gate will always stand 
as a symbol of Our Home. Frisbee and sunbathing in 
the Dustbowl, leaves falling in the Quad as students 



"'Ten years ago the campus 
looked different - ten years 
from now the campus will 
look even more different 
- but the BC spirit stays 
the same and despite the 
campus' changing face, it will 
always be our home" 
~Daniel Chapin V4 



read on the benches, and superfan shirts filling 

Alumni Stadium and Conte Forum on game-days. 

These are the images that will come to mind when 

we think of the place we called home. 

by Marisa Fusco 





170 Student Life 





The Dustbowl is a great place to study while enjoying the warm weather / 




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Lower campus as seen from the Higgins Stairs Photo by Heather Page 




The new St Ignatius Gate Residence Hall Photo by Jared Wak 




Now if they can only get the students to follow these rules Photo by Jared Walsh 



Student Life 171 




Our Community 



Newton-Allston-Brighton 



The towns of Newton, Allston, and Brighton offer 
BC students a community beyond the confines of 
campus, but away from the chaos of Boston. BC 
students are able to eat non-dining hall food, shop 
for everything from liquor to groceries to skis, and 
do a multitude of other activities without going 
more than ten minutes from campus. Union Street in 
Newton Centre offers great brunches, burgers, and 
beers at prices that fit nicely into a college student's 
budget. BC students stocking up on the necessities 
that just can't be found in the BC Bookstore frequent 
the Star Markets of Brighton. Alston's Perfect Tan 
keeps students looking their summer best even in 
the middle of winter. The B and C lines, which 
are avoided when going into Boston, are utilized 
to travel short distances to these nearby locations. 
These trips are guaranteed to generate memorable 
stories. BC students dominate Cleveland Circle. 
Whether it is happy hour at Roogies and Mary Ann's, 
Godzilla Burgers at Eagle's Deli, late night "meals" 
at 7-11, movies at Circle Cinemas, or a run around 



"You dont have to go far from 
BC to find what you need, our 
neighborhood has everything 
from haircuts at Newton 
Centres Styles and Profiles 
to Happy Hour at Roggies in 
Cleveland Cirde to Movies at 
Cirde Cinemas" 
~Kevin Lamb V4 

"The Res," there is something for everyone in this 
hub of our community. While our community may 
not always embrace BC, the undergraduates here 
clearly embrace the community. It affords us the 
opportunities of a big city school while allowing 
us to thrive in the culture of a small suburban 




172 Student Life 




With Baskin Robbins now open in D&D, there's nothing you can't find in Cleveland Circle 



Student Life 173 




Our City 



Boston 

If you can't find what you're looking for on campus 
or in the surrounding towns of Newton, Allston and 
Brighton, Boston is only a quick T ride away. If 
you can't find it in Boston, you aren't looking hard 
enough. Home to thousands of college students, 
the Bay State's capital truly has something for 
everyone. History buffs can spend the day in 
America's Birthplace, walking the Freedom Trail or 
admiring monuments to leaders such as Ben Franklin 
and Paul Revere. Those interested in a relaxing 
break from their hectic class schedule can wander 
the Commons or stroll along the Charles, finding 
calm in a fast-paced city. If shopping is in your 
plans, our city never disappoints. Newbury Street, 
the city's premiere shopping district, offers designer 
stores and chic boutiques. Downtown Crossing and 
Quincy Market house many major department 
stores and clothing chains, while the Prudential 
Center and Copley Plaza provide an upscale 
shopping experience. Always grateful to avoid 
dining hall food, BC students can find incredible fare 
in the North End and treat themselves to dessert 
at world famous Mike's Pastry. If drunken friends 
are no longer providing enough entertainment, we 
can head into Faneuil Hall's Comedy Connection or 
the Science Museum's Omni Theatre. Not only is 



"The best part about BC 
is that we have our Own 
Community, yet a short 
distance away lies Boston 
with its offers of culture, 
sports, and the opportunity 
to interact with other college 
students. 19 
~Katina Tsagaroulis V4 



Boston an ideal city for students to grow in, it is 

also the perfect place for us to evolve into the up 

and coming professionals that many of us hope to 

become. 

by Lindsay Brainerd 





174 Student Life 



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Even Yankees fans appreciate a Red Sox game every now and then, well.... Photo by Bob McGrath 



Student Life 175 



"' 



The D line is foster than the B Line 9 o clock is reolly eorly 






ALL THAT WE. 

As we take our first steps off campus into the world, we cannot 
forget the time we have spent at Boston College. Our every- 
day experiences have taught us as much as the classes that tend 
to consume our schedules. Over the past four years we have 
graduated from Newton to Main Campus, from party chasers 
to party throwers, and from asking questions to answering them. 
We have built lasting friendships, challenged ourselves to grow, 
and even survived the core curriculum. We can never get this 
time back again, but we will carry it forward with us wherever 
we travel. We have learned the balance between academ- 
ics and social life, the importance of being part of something 
larger than ourselves, and not to touch the walls of the elevators 
in Rubenstein and Ignacio. We have learned to believe in our 
fellow man through our many service trips and volunteer activi- 
ties which define this school. While road trips to Notre Dame, 
drinking in the Mods with friends, and watching the BC movie 
channel with your roommates at 1 a.m. dont seem to be the typi- 
cal way to prepare for the real world, these are the experiences 
we will cherish the most, the ones we will hold in our hearts, as 
we move forward as graduates of the Class of 2004 of Boston 

College, by Jared Walsh 




...CAN'T LEAVE 



Towing is not o joke here Natalie's delivers pizza at 3am 



Some people have never seen snow * You must catch the T by 12:59 



O'Neill Plaza in 

the wintertime can 

be a liability 




Apartment mice 
can be our 
friends too 




Never drink from 
the glasses at 
Mary Anns 




Watching the Red 

Sox is more 

important than 

Class 




BEHIND 



Avoid Lower at 6 o'clock We will really miss this place 













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ALL THAT YOU CAN'T LEAVE BEHIND 

SPORTS 

Being a student at Boston College means a lot of things to a lot of people. First and foremost, it means that we will be educated in 
the Jesuit tradition, becoming men and women for others. It means that we will go on to serve our communities in whatever field we 
may enter when we leave The Heights. It means that we will build friendships and develop personalities that will remain with us long 
cfter we leave Chestnut Hill. And woven in between the academics, the service and the friendships are the glorious sports moments 
and memories that we will remember fondly long after our time at BC has come to an end. Inextricably linked to our years at Boston 
College are the victories that we will remember fondly in the years to come. Notre Dame. Beanpot. BIG EAST. ACC Mentioned 
to any BC student or alumni and these seemingly insignificant phrases take on a life of their own when mentioned in terms of athletics. 
Whether a varsity or club student athlete or simply a screaming Superfan, every student on The Heights has a strong connection to our sports 
programs. The past year has provided a multitude of events that made all of us proud to be Eagles. Begun on unsure footing, the 2003- 
2004 sports season was quickly shifted into overdrive as it became a goal for a majority of the Eagles to leave the BIG EAST behind on 
a high note. The ACC will be our new home soon and as we prepare for the transition, we continue to amaze opponents. As the football 
team again dominated Notre Dame and the Men's Hockey program lighted the path to the Fleet Center for the Hockey East Championship, 
the Women's Soccer Team has the best season in school history and the Field Hockey team was crowned BIG EAST Champions. Superfans 
turned out in there ever intimidating yellow to cheer on the Men's Basketball team to big wins against Rutgers and Conte was louder than 
ever as the Women continued to have their presence felt in their intimidating hoops conference. Eagles spread their wings to the Charles, 
to Shea Field, to Newton, to the Plex and beyond as victories were won from coast to coast. With over thirty varsity teams and new club 
sports emerging each year, Eagles are leaving their mark on the sports annals as never before. The men and women who bring victory to 
the Heights as well as the tremendous student population which supports them has proven that sports are a major part of what it means 
to be an Eagle. In the few pages in which we attempt to depict the year that was in the life of so many proud Eagles and attempt to 
capture so many wonderful athletic moments, we learn that as John Wooden once said, "Sports do not build character. They reveal it." 




Edited by Marsa Fusco and Shane Stryzinski 



Sports 179 



FOOTBALL 



Completing the Drive for Five 



If was a year of highs and lows, twists and turns, bumps and bruises. But despite the plot twists, this story had a happy ending. Heading down the home stretch 
at 5-5. the Boston College football team rallied the troops to take a road victory over a feisty Rutgers team and then hand 12th-ranked Virginia Tech its only 
home loss of the season. The result - a 7-5 regular-season record - earned the Eagles a spot in the Diamond Walnut San Francisco Bowl, where they took on 
7-5 Colorado State from the Mountain West Conference. With a 35-21 at the bowl, the Eagles have won four consecutive bowl games, the longest current win 
streak in Division l-A. The Eagles now have won seven or more games for five consecutive seasons for the first time in Boston College football history. 

The season with a happy ending got off to a rocky start as the Eagles lost their season opener to Wake Forest, 32-28. The combination of seasoned veterans 
and talented youth which started for BC for the opening of the 106th season of Boston College football wasn't enough to outlast the Demon Deacons. 
Despite some brilliant individual performances, including a 144-yard rushing day by senior tailback Derrick Knight, fumbles and penalties cost the Eagles 
dearly. One week later, though, it was a happy day in "Happy Valley" as the Eagles marched into Beaver Stadium, took a shocking 24-0 first-half lead, then 
held on with a valiant defensive effort to beat 25th ranked Penn State, 27-14, before a national television audience and the largest crowd (106,445) ever to wit- 
ness a Boston College football game. The next week, all signs pointed to danger as the Eagles took a 92-mile road trip to Rentschler Field, the new home of the 
UConn Huskies. The pressure of the game, billed as the most eagerly anticipated game in UConn's brief history in Division l-A football, was not enough to derail 
the Eagles, however, who met the mental and physical challenges to defeat the Huskies 24-14. Confident after back-to-back road wins, the Eagles flew high into 
Alumni Stadium in front of a full house and an ESPN prime-time audience in search of an upset of the second-ranked Miami Hurricanes. But after four straight 
Alumni Stadium meetings with the Hurricanes in which the game was not decided until the final play, this one was decided early as Miami cruised to a 33-14 
victory. Next, the Eagles got just what the doctor ordered as they defeated Ball State 53-29 to pick up their first home victory of the season and score the most 
points since a 55-3 win over Connecticut in October of 2000. Derrick Knight rushed for 175 yards and Greg Toal, a senior Eagle leader, caught his very first 
touchdown pass from Quinton Porter to lead the Eagles to this impressive Parents' Weekend victory. Racking up 648 yards in total offense, the second-highest 
amount in BC football history, the Boston College Eagles descended upon the new home of the Philadelphia Eagles, Lincoln Financial Field, and got their first BIG 
EAST victory of the year, a 38-13 win over Temple. Quinton Porter completed 18 of 24 passes for 308 yards and three touchdowns and was named BIG EAST 
co-offensive Player of the Week for his efforts. The next week, however, off-the-field distractions proved to be the real story of the game as Syracuse took a 
decisive 39-14 win in the Carrier Dome. The Eagles experienced a six-hour delay the night before the game due to malfunctioning equipment at the airport and 
did not arrive at their beds in the Syracuse suburb of Auburn until 3 am, just nine hours before kickoff. This, combined with the fact that the Orangemen had been 
whipped into a frenzy by BC's announcement earlier in the week to join the ACC, set the stage for an ugly match-up. Archrival Notre Dame was next. San- 
dra Sciortino connected on a 26-yard field goal with 38 seconds remaining in the game to salvage a 27-25 win for the Eagles after they gave up an 18-point 
second-half lead to the Fighting Irish. The win was Boston College's third in a row and fourth in five tries against the Irish. In a game crucial to the bowl hopes of 
both teams, Pittsburgh scored 14 unanswered points in the fourth to take a 24-13 win over the Eagles. A week later, West Virginia rallied from a 14-point first half 
deficit to hand the Eagles a 35-28 loss on Senior Day in Alumni Stadium. That loss evened BC's record at 5-5 and dimmed hopes of a fifth straight postseason 
bowl game appearance. 

But in what Coach Tom O'Brien called "the greatest gut-check I've ever been around," the Eagles shrugged off a sluggish first-half performance to hold 
Rutgers to 131 second-half yards and take a 35-25 win, their ninth in a row and 11th in 12 meetings against the Scarlet Knights. The win made BC bowl- 
eligible for the fifth straight year. Derrick Knight carried the ball 27 times for a career-high 224 yards, eclipsing his previous career high of 205 yards, set 
in 2002 against Rutgers. And then, the icing on the cake. Knight became BC's all-time leading rusher and the Eagles ended a seven-game losing streak against 
Virginia Tech as BC marched into Blacksburg and took an impressive 34-27 win over the 12th ranked Hokies in the 1,000th game in BC football history. With 
the win, BC improved its road record to 5-1 this season, a far better mark than its 2-4 record at home. This season, the Eagles notched two road victories over 
ranked opponents for the first time since the 1984 season. 




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180 Sports 



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Sports 181 





'me inhere and we were 4-7, we had a belief thai something good Wasgoir 

=? made .i\ ^happen. It's been a phenomenal ride. The whole 'experience for me 

the friendships Tve developed These guys are going to continue what we 

started here. 

-Qegjct Koigk}L ^^^ 

-1 






182 Sports 



MiU 




Seniors Leave Behind Four Bowl Victories 



When Derrick Knight thinks of his 
place in Boston College history, 
his rushing records will not be 
the only part of his legacy that thrills him. 
He will also treasure his place in a class of 
seniors who changed the program. When 
Knight and his classmates came to The 
Heights, they took their spots on a team that 
was coming off an embarrassing showing 
at the 1999 Insight.com Bowl, losing 62-28 
to Colorado University. Since that time, 
the Eagles have become a dominant BIG 
EAST team, upsetting nationally ranked 
opponents and providing their fans with a 
host of memorable moments. Conference 
play, however, is not the only place that the 
Eagles have showed their strength. With 
four consecutive winning seasons, the 
Eagles have garnered national attention 
not felt on The Heights since the Miracle 
in Miami. In the past three seasons, the 
Eagles have upset opponents and won the 
Aloha, Music City and Motor City Bowls. 
Under the leadership of Derrick Knight, 
Augie Hoffmann and Josh Ott, the 2003 
Eagles squad embarked on the "Drive for 
Five," determined to participate in their 



fifth straight bowl game. After an up- 
and-down year that included amazing 
wins over Notre Dame and Virginia Tech, 
just to name a few, the Eagles flew to the 
West Coast to take on Colorado State 
in the San Francisco Bowl. The game 
matched the top offenses from the schools' 
respective conferences, but Colorado State 
had difficulty making big plays. Boston 
College, fortunately, made enough big 
plays in the first and fourth quarters to 
secure an easy victory. The Eagles started 
2004 off right with an impressive 35-21 
win over the Rams. This victory made the 
Boston College Eagles the only Division 
I-A program with four consecutive bowl 
victories. This mark puts BC in a category 
all its own, leaving behind Oklahoma, 
Ohio State, Miami, Notre Dame and all 
the other schools that critics claimed the 
Eagles could not compete with. The senior 
class is convinced that their legacy will be 
carried on and are proud to leave behind 
a program much different than that which 
they entered into. They leave behind 
success, national respect and the desire to 
continue the Eagles' streak of bowl victories. 





Sports 183 



The price of success is hard 
work, dedication to the job at 
^^ hand, and the determination 
that whether we win or lose, we 
have applied the best of ourselves 
to the task at hand. 
-Vince Lombardi 





Photo by Heather Pc 



Photo by Heather Page 




Photo by Heather F p 




Photo by Sue Bi I 



184 Sports 



CHEERING 



Leading the Superfan Section 




by Heather Page 



Sports 185 



SOCCER 



The Goal: Success 






NFa 


1 i 


'-»; ' 




he person who wins may 
have been counted out 
several times, but didn't 
hear the referee. 
--Anonymous 



Photo by Angela Kim 



Photo by Elizabeth Wey n 



186 Soccer 




1 >fo by Elizabeth Weyman 



Photo by Angela Kim 



Soccer 18/ 



WOMEN'S 





I he individual stories are incredible. Sophomore keeper Kate Taylor was named Big 
East Goalkeeper of the Year and New England Women's Intercollegiate Soccer 
Association First Team. The NEWISA also selected Sarah Rahko and Beth Totman 
to its first team. Molly Dane stood out as a tremendous freshman asset to the team and 
was recognized with second team NEWISA honors. Mary Schneck was named defensive MVP 
of the Eurosport Hoya Classic. Even coach Alison Foley got in on the accolade shower and was 
named NEWISA Coach of the Year. 

nd although these individual accomplishments are tremendous, it would be the last thing 
' \ an y °f these Eagles would mention in an interview. They boast, instead, of their team 
Xsuccess. And what a success this team was. A final record of 15-3-3 was the best record 
ever in the history of women's soccer on the Heights. After beginning the season 8-0, including 
an impressive win of the Eurosport Hoya classic as well as a domination of previously unbeaten 
Villanova, the Eagles caught the eye of national pollsters and were ranked as high as 19th during 
the regular season. One of only two regular season losses came to UConn, a team that lost to 
North Carolina in the national championship. The Eagles were able to take the Huskies to overtime 
but fell just short, losing 2-1. 

he women went into the Big East tournament with a tough task. After beating host Rutgers 

12-1, the Eagles had to face No. 3 Notre Dame in the semi-finals. Talk of this tremendous rivalry 
were heard throughout the day leading up to the big game. With tensions high, the Eagles 
pulled through in typical fashion and defeated the Irish 2-1. The next night, in front of a large crowd 
and a national television audience, the Eagles lost a heartbreaker in the finals to Villanova. After 
playing to a 1-1 tie, it took seven rounds of penalty kicks before the Eagles were defeated 7-6. 
Still, the Eagles dominated play throughout the tournament and were rewarded with a No. 15 
seed in the NCAA tournament and home-field advantage for the first two rounds. Unfortunately, 
— n were stunned by Central Connecticut University and eliminated in the first round. 




Photos by Elizabeth Weyi ' 



i Sports 




n 2002, the men's soccer team was Big East regular season and tournament 
champions. In 2003, they began the season ranked number 13 in the national 
poll. Captains Bill Arnault, Guy Melamed, and Paul Chase were determined 
to make this season even more successful than the previous. Mike Cardenas, a 
senior goalkeeper transfer from Boston University, was finally eligible to play. With 
Cardenas in net and five talented freshmen giving the Eagles new life, 2003 looked 
promising at the start of September. 

Ve Eagles began the season with a 1-0 loss to Pittsburgh. Despite out shooting 
Pitt 17-9, the men were unable to find the back of the night. So would be the 
story for the remainder of the season; the Eagles came within inches of having a 
tremendous season. Instead, they finished 6-7-4, a letdown from the preseason hype 
that had surrounded them. In all, the men went into double overtime six times, losing 
twice and tying the remaining four times. And as if playing 110 minutes wasn't exciting 
enough for the Eagle faithful, they were also treated to several incredible plays. In a 
loss to Farleigh Dickinson, in which the Eagles out shot their opponent 21-7, there 
was one last chance to win With one minute remaining in regulation, a penalty kick 
sailed just wide, crushing the Eagles hopes of sending the game into overtime. Also, 
Uri Magen-David missed scoring a game winning goal against No. 9 St. John's by 
inches when his shot hit the far post. 

The season, however, was not without its bright spots. Late in the season, a 
struggling Eagles squad was able to pull together and beat No. 16 Yale 2-0. In 
addition, the 14 goals allowed by the Eagles this season was the fewest goals 
scored against Boston College since 1980. Captain Guy Melamed was awarded 
All-Big East first team honors and Bill Arnault garnered second team recognition 
Arnault was also named to the Verizon Academic All-American second team for his 
outstanding performance off the field. 




'cs by Angela Kim 






Sports 189 



CROSS COUNTRY 



Racing Ahead of the Pack 




190 Sports 



The freedom of 
Cross Country is 
so primitive. It's 
men and women vs. 




i by McGrafh Studios 



Sports 191 



MENS 



SpeediiV Eagles 




Many view cross country as an individual sport. Try 
telling that to the Eagles. These men run together. 
The race may come down to one runner against the 
clock but to the Eagles, they are a team, and a team that 
started off strong. The Boston College Select Meet, held 
at Franklin Park in Boston, saw the men finish third among 
nine teams. Senior captain Byron Gartrell finished fifth with 
a time of 24:35. In the Roy Griak Invitational, the Eagles 
finished a disappointing 26th out of thirty teams. The men. 
however, turned this disappointment into motivation to 
improve for the remainder of the season. In the New England 
Championships, this determination was most evident. Finishing 
third out of 47 teams, all five of the Eagles scorers were in 
the top fifty and all seven runners were in the top seventy 
five of a 255 man field. Byron Gartrell finished fifth (24: 
311 and sophomore Drew Bouchard finished 10th 124:43). 
Individual times improved throughout the season, but more 
importantly to the Eagles, the team finished strong. Whoever 
said cross country was an individual sport clearly never met 
the BC men's cross country team. 



192 Sports 




Goinq the Distance 



J 



I Select Meet at Franklin Park. With a tremendous home course 
advantage, the women were determined to capitalize. The 
Eagles finished just shy of victory, placing second out of ten teams. 
Senior captain Jennifer Kramer finished third with a time of 17:17. 
Jennifer Donovan finished fourth (17:38) and Melissa Sherman (18: 
23) and Jessica Flinn (18:25) finished tenth and eleventh respectively. 
Next, the Eagles traveled to the University of Minnesota to 
compete in the annual Roy Griak Invitational. In a field of 254 
runners, Jennifer Kramer finished tenth (21:07). With a time of 21: 
17, teammate Jennifer Donovan finished 14th. Kramer and Donovan 
would also excel at the Big East Championships. Kramer (20:48) 
finished fourth and Donovan (21:271 finished 13th. Both women 
received first team all Big East honors. Kramer finished the season 
in stellar fashion with a 34th place finish at the NCAA National 
Championships. Kramer's time of 20:42 was a mere one minute and 
twelve seconds behind national champion Shalane Flanagan of North 
Carolina. Kramer's time was fast enough to gain her All-American 
honors. This was the sixth consecutive season the women's cross 
i country team has had an All-American runner. 





Sports 193 



CREW 



At Home on The Charles 



j " he Eagles started the season off right at the 29 lh annual Head of the Connecticut Regatta. In 


1 


Championship Four competition, Boat "A" won the event for Boston College beating out Community Rowing 


Inc. and Boston University, who finished nip-and-tuck for second and third, by 11 seconds. The Eagles' te 


am fl 


lit up the leader board placing all three boats competing in the top 15. The team also grabbed first place in 


the Novice Four event finishing in a time of 24:50:07, over 10 seconds faster than second-place Dartmouth. 




A t the 39 lh annual Head of the Charles Regatta, the Eagles' Championship Eight boat finished 24 lh in a 




/ \ field of 40. Stroking the Championship Eight was senior Anne Nelson followed by Katie Stainken in 




/ \ the seven seat, Tess Casey, Stephanie Guertin, Sarah Burns, Liz Millar, Laura Bustos and Amy Boyle. 


n 


Youth Four competition, BC captured sixth place in the field of 33 teams and finished just 40 seconds behind 




event-winner Princeton University. 




S ""* ontinuing the successful fall season, the Eagles competed well at the Princeton 3-Mile Chase in New 




( Jersey and then returned home for the Foot of the Charles. At this event, the Eagles grabbed a fifth 




V«. ** place finish in Varsity Eight competition, while all three of their A-boats placed in the top 10 in the 




three races rowed. 




he Eagles entered the spring season on a high from such steady improvement throughout the fall. Key 




events included the Jesuit Invitational in Camden, New Jersey and the Dad Vail Championships in 




1 Philadelphia, PA. 


_J 




Photo by Sarah E>\ s 



194 Sports 




pwing is a sport for dreamers. As 

long as you are dedicated and 

ut in the work, you can own the 

dream. 

-Jim Dietz 




Photo by Betsy Juarez 



Sports 195 



FIELD HOCKEY 



i i 1 1- 1. 




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Epjassic 












uccessful people 

are successf u 

because they forn 

the habits of doing thos< 

things that failures don 1 

like to do. 

--Albert Gray 




196 Sports 



The Eagles finished the 2003 field hockey season at 17-7 overall, qualifying for their first 
NCAA Tournament since 1998. With a 4-1 BIG EAST mark and two conference tourna- 
ment victories, the Eagles were 2003 BIG EAST Field Hockey Champions. Junior back Kerri 
Doherty, sophomore back Kristen Madden, sophomore forward Sara York, senior forward Kim 
French, senior midfielder Virginia Drozd, and sophomore midfielder Bronwen Kelly earned a spot 
on the 2003 STX/NFHCA Division I Regional All-America team as announced by the National Field 
Hockey Coaches Association. Madden was also named to the Division I All-America second team 
and was named the BIG EAST Defensive Player of the Year. However, it is not the overall record 
of the team or these personal accomplishments that this Eagle squad will remember long after their 
time on The Heights has come to and end. Instead, the will remember the many memorable moments 
of a very successful 2003 campaign. 

The Eagles opened the 2003 season with a tough 3-2 loss to Northwestern in a neutral site 
game at the University of New Hampshire. Boston College outshot Northwestern by a whop- 
ping 27-6 margin and had seven more penalty corners than its opponent but Northwestern's 
Sherry-Anne Nyberg sparkled in net as she collected 15 saves. The women evened their record with 
a 2-0 shutout win over Massachusetts. Shutouts would become the name of the game for goalies 
Jillian Savoy and Lauren Hill who split time in net and combined to lead their team to eight shutout 
victories. On September 10th, the 20th ranked Boston College Eagles upset No. 17 Boston Univer- 
sity, 1-0 in double overtime, handing the cross-town rival Terriers their first loss of the season. Both 
teams played to a scoreless tie through regulation and nearly two overtime periods before a single 
offensive player could crack the staunch defense from both sides. BC goaltender Jillian Savoy and 
BU goalkeeper Erin Prediger were both superb in net, collecting eight and 10 save respectively. In 
the 98th minute of play, however, BC found the back of the net. Sophomore Bronwen Kelly scored 
the game-winner on a rebound put-back of an initial Virginia Drozd shot on goal. Another memo- 
rable victory came when the then 15th-ranked Eagles strengthened their hold on first place in the 
BIG EAST with a 2-1 victory over No. 12 Connecticut on October 8th. Later in the month, the 12th 
ranked BC team was upset by Villanova 4-2. The loss marked BC's fourth consecutive defeat at 
the hands of rival Villanova. Keeping this loss in mind, the Eagles entered the BIG EAST tourna- 
ment looking for revenge. The Eagles upended Villanova 5-1 in the semifinal round of the BIG EAST 
Championship at Alumni Stadium. Two days later, the Eagles defeated No. 10 Connecticut, 4-3 in 
overtime to win the 2003 BIG EAST Championship. The third-seeded Eagles jumped out to a 3-0 
advantage over the top-seeded Huskies and needed overtime to claim the victory. 

Despite exiting the NCAA Tournament in the first round after a disappointing loss to top- 
seeded, top-ranked Wake Forest, the Eagles ended the season confidently. Not only did 
they ensure that their legacy on The Heights would include the title BIG EAST Champions, 
but the 2003 Field Hockey team made certain that they gave their fans some memorable moments 
along the way. 




tos by Heather Page 






I 



Sports 197 



SWIMMING & DIVING 



1 



Making a Big Splash 



t is often said in sports that to have a truly outstanding team, you must 
have outstanding individuals who come together to form a cohesive 
group. The saying goes that any given member or an incredible team 
could be the star on any given day. There is perhaps no better example 
of this than the 2003-2004 Women's Swimming and Diving Team. Eight 
different Eagles, representing all four classes, were named Perform of 
the Meet during the women's sensational season. These individual stars 
came together, however, to carry a 9-1 team record into the BIG EAST 
Championships. 

The Eagles started their season off right with back-to-back victories 
in late October and never looked back. Swim captains Lauren 
Keibler, Michelle Lane and Caitline Healey and dive captain Katelyn 
Cox lead the Eagles to several impressive victories as they welcomed 
an incredibly strong freshmen class onto The Heights. Highlighted by the 
success of Carolyn Bowman, Kim Garcia, Leigh Going and Juliet Paradine, 
the Class of 2007's first season at Boston College was certainly one to 
remember. Bowman and Paradine not only enjoyed remarkable individual 
glory but also joined with sophomores Liz Byron and Torey Thelin to give 
the Eagles a dominate 200 Medley Relay. This "A" squad was in constant 
competition, not only from other schools, but also from BC's own B-relay 
of Heather Page, Lane, Keibler and Megan Hurd. Not to be outdone by 
the swimmers in the pool, the Women's Diving Team demonstrated enormous 
talent throughout the season. Jennifer Rhines earned 248.75 points on the 
one-mater board and 254.33 points in the three-meter competition to lead 
the Eagles passed the University of New Hampshire. Likewise, Cox' 236.32 
point effort on the one-meter board paced the field in an important win 
over UMass-Amherst. 







198 Sports 




u 



Tom Groden knew coming into the season that he would have a 
dedicated squad. He also knew that that was going to be pivotal 
if he was going to integrate 13 new members into an upperclassmen 
heavy team. Despite early season setbacks and road blocks along the way, 
Groden was able to put together an overwhelmingly successful team that 
has transformed splashes in the Plex pool into nationally recognized splashes 
in an ever increasingly competitive field of swimmers and divers. 

nlike their female counterparts, the 2003-2004 Men's Swimming 
and Diving Team got off to a rough start. At an early meet against 
the University of Louisville, the Eagles continually came up short in 
big races. Despite impressive wins by Brandon Twitchell and Tim Tully, 
the Eagles were defeated by the Cardinals, 140-122. Nevertheless, this 
early season loss was a learning experience for the dedicated Eagles 
squad. When faced with margins of defeat as small as hundredths of 
a second, BC's men knew that victory was within their reach. Starting 
with a home victory over Brandeis University in early November, the men 
went on a tremendous win streak that featured decisive victories over 
Boston University and the University of Rhode Island. Senior captains Chris 
Hawkins, Andy Naumann and James Russo demonstrated their inspiring 
leadership ability as they welcomed a 13-member freshmen class onto the 
u&jj squad. These young athletes wasted no time making their presence known 
on The Heights. In the meet against Brandeis, freshmen Matt Northrup and 
Andy Faughnan finished one-two in the 100-meter freestyle. Not to be 
outdone by the newcomers, returning swimmers Tully, Twichell and Naumann 
also had outstanding times for the Eagles. With an exceptional mix of 
newcomers and veterans, Tom Groden's team has certainly left The Plex as 
winners. 




Sports 199 



SKIING 



Taking On The Slopes 



he frigid temperatures of the Northeast are dreaded 
by most students. But the thought of extra layers, cold 
weather, and snow are more than welcome by the men's 
and women's ski teams. To these student-athletes, the winter 
can only mean one thing: it's time to hit the slopes. After 
an extensive fall conditioning program, the Eagles hit the 
slopes for their first competitive carnival in early January 
and travel from New Hampshire to California in search of the 
freshest powder. 

/ ith the leadership of seniors Lindsay Murray, Erica 
\/\/ Pylman and Jennifer Ruco. the women's team hoped 
* to build off their strong second place finish at 
last year's USCSA Nationals. The men's team, which also 
finished second at the USCSA Nationals, had a large core 
of returning members who looked to dominate in both the 
slalom and downhill races. Both teams welcomed the advice 
of assistant- turned-head coach Gordie Megroz and looked 
to return to national competition in March for a repeat 
performance. 




200 Sports 




Gordie Megroz is no stranger to the Eagles. 
Not only did Megroz excel on the slopes 
during his four years at Boston College, he 
also served the Eagles in various other capacities 
before being named head coach of both the Men's 
and Women's Ski teams in the summer of 2003. 
After graduating in 1998, Megroz spent one year 
in the ski industry in Vail, Colorado and one year 
as a teacher and coach at Vermont Academy in 
Saxtons River, Vermont before returning to Boston 
College as assistant ski coach. 

During his tenure as assistant coach, Megroz 
coordinated the team's recruiting effort, 
organized its fall conditioning program 
and worked as on-site coordinator of the Boston 
College Winter Carnival. The Eagles' men's and 
women's ski teams both earned berths in the 
U S C S A National Championships in each of his 
three seasons. Megroz hopes to use his previous 
experience to lead the Eagles down the mountains 
to success. 



tos Couiesy of Sports Marketing 



Sports 201 




Coming into BC, I just always wanted to win. We have a very special bunch of guys and 
111 do anything I can to see us succeed and keep on winning. 

-Ben Eaves 




202 Sports 










Seniors Try to Leave The Heights the Way They 
Came In: National Champions 



Ben Eaves, JD Forrest, Ty Hennes, 
Tony Voce, Brett Peterson and Justin 
Dziama remember it as vividly as if 
it were yesterday. Playing hockey in April 
meant only one thing for the Eagles: they 
had made it to the ultimate game in 
hockey After a trip to Albany, New York 
for the Frozen Four and a 3-2 win over 
North Dakota in the Finals, the Eagles were 
National Champions. The fury that was 
the next few days is forever engraved in 
the minds of those who took part in them: 
a celebration in Conte, a trip to the State 
House, a meetmg^w^mSenators^^rry and 
Kennedy, a visit to the White House and 
a congratulatory speech from President 
Bush. Things have changed slightly since 
then. Star of the 2000-2001 team, Brian 
Gionta, is now a star of the NHL's New 
Jersey Devils. His brother, Steven, is now 
an active member of the Eagles squad. Ben 
Eaves has been joined by his brother Pat. 
A new goalie, Matti Kaltiainen has made 
his presence known on The Heights with 
two consecutive winning seasons. Even 
Senator Kerry's role has changed — he's 
now running for President of the United 



States. Yet, with everything that has 
changed since 2001, the Eagles remaining 
from the championship squad that finished 
33-8-2 overall and 17-5-2 in Hockey East, 
remember things that are the same. They 
are once again number one in both Hockey 
East and the nation and, after two seasons 
without it, The Heights is once again home 
to the coveted Beanpot Championship 
Trophy. As the season rolls on, the seniors 
continue to lead their squad to victory 
after victory. There have been memorable 
moments for sure, including a dominating 
sweep of rival Boston University. 
However. Ben, JD, Ty, Tony, Brett and 
Justin will not settle for just memorable 
moments. The goal for them is to once 
again hale a celebration in Conte, a trip to 
ffle Stat|§House, a meeting with Senators 
Kerry and Kennedy, a visit to the White 
House and a congratulatory speech from 
President Bush. The only thing they want 
to be different is that this time, they want to 
be the leaders of the squad. They want to 
leave The Heights with two different, yet 
equally as amazing, sets of memories of 
what it is like to be National Champions. 





Sports 203 



HOCKEY 



| Dominating Hockey East 



Head coach Jerry York had high hopes for the 2003-2004 season. His tenth at his alma-matter, York was sure that the 
campaign would be a successful one for the Eagles. His confidence was far from misplaced. Returning all but a couple of 
players from a successful 2002-2003 squad, the Eagles were ready to dominate Hockey East again. Captain Ben Eaves 
wanted to end his career at The Heights the same way he started. His goal of becoming a two-time National Champion was 
echoed by Assistant Captains J.D. Forrest and Ty Hennes as well as fellow seniors Tony Voce, Brett Peterson and Justin Dziama. 
Championship desires spread well beyond the seniors, however, as a strong group of returning players, including beloved goalie 
Matti Kaltiainen and sophomore standout Pat Eaves, looked to avenge last years disappointing end to an otherwise successful 
season. An overtime loss to Boston University in the Hockey East semifinals as well as a loss in the Frozen Four left the Eagles 
squad with even stronger craving for a championship. The Superfans of Kelley Rink would settle for nothing less. 

In the home opener, the Eagles were stunned by arch-rival Notre Dame 1-0. Superfans left Conte with shocked and prayed 
that the rest of the season would look up. One week later, their prayers were answered. The Eagles began an amazing 
twelve game unbeaten streak with a win again UMass-Lowell on November 5. Two days later, to the delight of a sold-out 
crowd, the Eagles trounced the then top ranked University of Maine squad. Chants of "Overrated" filled Conte as 7,884 fans 
relished an impressive 4-1 victory. 

Although the Eagles would continue to win throughout November, in the eyes of the fans the first real test came in 
December. It didn't matter that BU was a paltry 4-5-4 when the Terriers came to Chestnut Hill for the first meeting of 
the rivals this season. It didn't matter that the Eagles were favored to win. When it comes to BU, nothing is guaranteed. 
For three periods on a Friday night in December, the Superfans busted out their best chants and the Eagles showed up with their 
best moves. The Terriers would travel back Comm. Ave. disappointed after a devastating 5-2 defeat. The Eagles had set the 
tone for the rest of the season. 

Despite a shocking loss to bottom-feeder Northeastern University to begin 2004, the Eagles quickly regained momentum. 
And what better way to do so with a home and home series against BU? The Eagles not only won both games 
against Boston University, they also rolled over Providence and Northeastern in January competition. When the first 
two Mondays of February arrived, the Eagles were 19-3-3. They were the only team in this year's Beanpot with a winning 
percentage over .500. They were tops in Hockey East. Better still, they were tops in the nation. Yet, as the Terriers reminded 
the Eagles last season, regular season records do not matter when you travel to the Fleet Center. For two Mondays in February, 
everything else is forgotten and Boston becomes engulfed in the greatest hockey tournament in the world. And the 2004 
Beanpot did not disappoint. After defeating Harvard 4-1 in the semifinals, the Eagles faced BU in a rematch of last year's finals. 
This year, the finals would go into overtime before a sell-out crowd at the Fleet Center. Ryan Murphy potted the game winner 
at 6:07 of the overtime period to seal BC's 13 ,n Beanpot title. The last time the Eagles won the coveted trophy? 2001, the 
same year they hung the National Championship banner high above Kelley Rink. 

Even though they dropped the final three games of the regular season, including two straight against rival University of 
Maine, the Eagles looked to the regular season with high expectations for dominance. Jerry York and his squad looked 
to finish the season sweep of the Terriers in the Hockey East quarterfinals and travel to the Fleet Center, not only for the 
Hockey East Finals but also for the Frozen Four. The 2003-2004 Men's Hockey Team left a legacy behind that will not soon be 
forgotten! 



VILIGE 





Photos by Jored Walsh 



204 Sports 



bu miss 100% of the 

shots you never take. 

-Wayne Gretzky 




rhoto by Jored Walsh 



Photo by Jared Walsh 

Sports 205 



WOMEN'S HOCKEY 



New Coach Experiences Ups and Downs 



"^ om Mutch has what one might call pretty decent credentials. That is of course if you consider an Olympic Gold medal pretty 

I good. Tom Mutch, a graduate of cross-town rival Northeastern University, entered his first season as head coach of the Eagles with 
accolades that made him a perfect fit for the position. As a student at NU. Mutch was a starter for the Huskies from 1986 to 1988. 
t graduation, and several years at the semi-professional level, he turned his attention to coaching. In 1996, he accepted a position 
as the US Women's National and Olympic Hockey team assistant. The team captured an Olympic gold medal in 1998. After brief stints 
at the University of Nebraska-Omaha and Northeastern, Mutch has started his career at Kelley Rink as coach of the Women's Ice Hockey 



A utch wasted no time in bringing victory to Kelley Rink, as the Eagles brought home several important early season victories. 
I \ / \ including decisive wins against Quinnipiac, Union and Brown. In these wins, captains Kaitlin McGrath and Sarah Carlson 

/ \ led the Eagles squad to what would amount to some of their most dominant play of the season. As the season progressed, 
unfortunately, the Eagles ran into some difficult. Faced with stiff competition from Hockey East foes, the squad was unable to secure a 
conference victory, despite incredible games against powerhouses Harvard, Northeastern and Connecticut. During the conference-victory 
dry spell, however, bright spots emerged for the Eagle squad. Throughout a particular span, junior Kerri Sanders scored a goal in seven 
out of ten games. Also, junior goaltender Lisa Davis recorded several impressive games. 

Still, hockey in Boston always comes down to one event — the Beanpot — and. as usual, the Eagles produced a star. In 26' u Annual 
Women's Beanpot Tournament, the Eagles were defeated by #3 Harvard, 4-0 in the first round. Following the Men's lead, however 
the Women came back to beat Boston University 7-1 in the Consolation Round. Lisa Davis earned the Bertagna Award for the 
tournament's Outstanding Goaltender for the second consecutive year. For her impressive 59 save game against the crimson. Davis was 
also named Hockey East Defensive Player-of-the-Week. That total tied the third most made by a BC goaltender in the program's history. 
IT also marked the 10 !h game in Davis' career in which she has saved 40-plus shots. 

Although he may have experienced more downs than he had initially expected. Coach Mutch's first season on The Heights left him 
with enough positive memories to ensure that he will return and continue to strive to bring victory to a growing Women's program. 



A 







206 Sports 



1. 



n hockey, you have to 

prove yourself every shift, 

every game. It's not up to 

anybody else. You have to 

take pride in yourself. 

--Paul Coffey 




otos Courtesy of Sports Marketing 



Sports 207 




Catchin' The Wind 



nas demonstrated 

I once again their capabilities of being a dominant force 
on the water. The Eagles finished fourth out of a field 
of 18 at the Spring I n tersec t iona I Regatta in Charleston, South 
Carolina. Competition at the University of South Florida's 
Women's I n tersec t iona I was fierce, but the women were able to 
pull out a second place finish, just as the co-ed team was able 
to accomplish the same placing at the Eckerd I ntersect iona I . 
Rankings by the Inter-Collegiate Sailing Association of North 
America had BC as 13 th in the nation. One of the teams most 
important races took place right here on our own turf, the 
Boston Dingy Club Cup, with the team finishing third out of 16 
teams in this oldest continuously sailed event in college sailing. 
The women's sailing team had a great end of the season 
accomplishment, sailing to a sixth place finish out of 18 at the 
New England Women's Championships. Senior Carrie Howe 
and sophomore Jen Doyle were named to the Women's All-New 
England sailing team, proving that BC Sailing is a force not to 
be reckoned with. This dedicated squad hoped to translate its 
previous success into positive outcomes in the spring. 




pfiFPFfirr 




208 Sports 




I 3fos by McGratb Studies 



wenty years from now you will be more disappointed by 
the things that you didn't do than by the ones you did 
do. So throw off the bowlines. Sail away from the safe 
harbor. Catch the trade winds in your sails. 
Explore. Dream. Discover. 
-Mark Twain 

Sports 209 




f've been here •-anaTknbwevenbeksrB I was* 

way our team is, we always believe we can win. 

\aureen it 




210 Sports 




Men and Women Bring Victory to The Heights 



You hear it all the team: it's the men's 
teams that bring the crowds to The 
Heights. The women may be good, 
but really, it's the men that are truly suc- 
cessful. Well stop believing what you hear. 
This year, the men AND women are bring- 
ing success to Conte Forum unknown in 
previous years. This year, both teams are. 
competing for spots in the NCAA tourna- 
ment. This year, both teams are playing 
before sell-out crowds. This year, both 
teams are winning games in big ways. 
This year, both teams are successful. Head 
coaches Cathy Inglese and Al Skinner have 
given their teams the guidance necessary 
to give direction to their unbelievable 
drive. Coach Skinner's college success 
(his number was recently retired at his 
alma matter) has translated into a supreme 
knowledge of the game which has led 
his team to yet another winning season 
on The Heights. Coach Inglese is experi- 
ence similar success. With a win against 
UNC-Greensboro, Coach Inglese notched 
her 300th career victory. Still not satis- 
fied that the Eagles of 2003-2004 are teams 
to remember? Consider these facts: The 



women's team has been ranked as high as 
number 20 in the country. Junior star Jes- 
salyn Deveny scored her 1000 th point in a 
remarkable victory West Virginia in which 
the Eagles had a prefect night at the free 
throw line. The Eagles came within sec- 
onds of toppling the number one UConn 
Huskies and defeated BIG EAST rivals 
Rutgers and Pittsburgh in impressive 
fashion. The men, though never ranked 
as high as the women, certainly held 
their own. Returning stars Craig Smith. 
Nate Doornekamp and Uka Agbai have 
blended well with freshmen standouts 
Jared Dudley and Sean Marshall. One 
of the Eagles most impressive wins came 
against in-state f ival UMass, 76-75 in over- 
time. Even the traditional BIG EAST pow- 
erhouse Seton Hall Pirates couldn't handle 
the pressure of Conte Forum, falling to the 
Eagles 72-63. And before a sell-out crowd 
in late February, the Eagles embarrassed 
then-bubble-team Rutgers 76-44. It is hard 
to argue that the Eagles' basketball teams 
are two of the best Boston College has ever 
seen. If the fans are the judge than let it 
be known: Conte has never been so loud. 




Sports 211 




A Season of Exciting Moments 




One man can be a 
crucial ingredient 
on a team, but one 
man cannot make a team. 
-Kareem Abdul-Jabbar 



Photo by Chns Be 3ft 



212 Sports 



n his first six seasons on The Heights, head coach Al Skinner has established the Boston College 
program as a constant contender for BIG EAST titles and perennial player on the national stage. 
His coaching abilities have already resulted in two BIG EAST regular-season crowns, one BIG EAST 
Tournament title and three postseason tournament berths. After leading BC to NCAA Tournament bic 
in 2001 and 2002, Skinner guided last year's team to a berth in the National Invitation Tournament. In 
the last three seasons, Boston College has won 66 games, the second-highest three-year total in program 
history. 

oping to continue this impressive streak, the Eagles boasted a tough line-up of returning players. 

IUka Agbai, the lone senior on the 2003-2004 squad, was joined in the campaign for BIG EAST 
dominance by returning standouts Craig Smith and Nate Doornekamp. Sparking the Eagles squad 
this season were four members of the Class of 2007, including Jared Dudley, who would go on to win 
BIG EAST All-Rookie honors. 

Vs the season got underway for the Eagles, the squad went on an eight-game win streak that 
included victories over Boston University and Holy Cross. Atlantic Ten powerhouse St. Joseph's 
\ handed BC it's first lost of the season in early December. The Eagles bounced back however, one 
started 2004 with major wins against St. Bonaventure and Georgetown. Conference play continued in 
January as the Eagles met BIG EAST foes throughout the month. Despite losing to defending national 



champions Syracuse as well as Villanova, West Virginia and Pittsburgh, Boston College rolled over Seton 
Hall, and edged out victories against Notre Dame, St. John's and Miami. A Valentine's Day loss to 
Providence would be the Eagles last conference loss of the regular season. The men finished the season 
with five consecutive BIG EAST wins, including an explosive 76-44 victory over Rutgers and a wonderful 
last game of the season. The Eagles avenged that last conference loss, beating the twelfth ranked 
Providence Friars 63-54 in early March. The loss allowed the Eagles to enjoy the possibility of an early 
tournament bye. As standout Dudley said the Eagles were "peaking at the best possible time." 
.i strong finish to the regular season left Coach Skinner hopefully that his goal of an NCAA 



tournament berth would be fulfilled, 
the Eagles hoped to secure a high tou 



le most surprising omission from last year's field of ( 
lament seed with a strong showing at the BIG EAST 



Championship Tournament at Madison Square Garden in New York City. 




Photo by Todd Seekircher for THE HEIGHTS Photo by Christy Berkery lor THE HEIGHTS Photo by Todd Seekircher for THE HEIGHTS Photo by Todd Seekircher for THE HEIGHTS 

Sporte 213 



WOMEN'S 




1 ntering her 10 lh season on The Heights, Head Coach Cathy Inglese had high expectations for her squad. After exiting the NCAA 

' Championship Tournament early in 2003, Inglese was determined to lead her team back to the "Big Dance" and have an even more success 

, season. The 2003-2004 Eagles were well aware of the fact that BC Women's Basketball was a "bubble team:" they were good, but there 

was questions as to whether or not they could be nationally competitive. This season, the Eagles proved that they were worthy of the national 

recognition they were garnering. No longer a bubble team, the Eagles were a BIG EAST powerhouse. 

The Eagles began their season with the best opening run in team history. During an initial seven game win streak, there were several 
highlights for the talented lineup. In their first regular season game, the Eagles pulled out a victory against Oakland University in nail-biter 
fashion. Trailing Oakland for most of the game, the women pulled out a 68-60 victory in the final two minutes of action. Senior guard 
Amber Jacobs led the Eagles with 21 points, including four down the stretch to seal the win. Jessalyn Deveny also chipped in with 19 points, 
seven rebounds and four assists. In their first in-season tournament, the women defeated both Alabama and host Colorado State to seal a 
championship at the Coors Rocky Mountain Invitational. Deveny was named tournament MVP and was joined on the All-Tournament team by 
Jacobs. The following weekend, the Eagles won the Brown Classic, slipping by Liberty in the opening round and then dominating Brown in the 
championship game. These in-season tournament wins continued a streak during which BC has won at least one in-season tournament in four of 
the last five years. 

n the final game of a three-week long road trip, the Eagles were handed their first lost of the season by George Washington. The then-23'°- 
ranked BC team suffered its first lost of the season as George Washington's Marsheik Witherspoon drove the lane for a layup with 10 seconds 
left in overtime to give the Colonials a 76-75 overtime victory. Although disappointed by the loss, the Eagles came back immediately with a 
four-game win streak. Highlights of this streak included a win against Sacred Heart in which sophomore center Lisa Macchia had a career high 
28 points and a road-win against UNC-Greensboro which marked Cathy Inglese's 300 lh career victory. Even these career feats, however, would 
not make up for two big losses in mid-January. Before a remarkable crowd at Conte Forum, the Eagles committed a season-high 26 turnovers in 
a 70-66 loss to BIG EAST foe Miami. An impressive turn around for their next game allowed the Eagles to keep it close against the outstanding 
UConn Huskies, but the women fell just short, losing 69-61 before a sell-out crowd. 

With two months of basketball remaining, however, the Eagles took their losses in stride and continued to work hard to preserve their 
winning record. Big wins against BIG EAST rivals Seton Hall, Pitt, West Virginia and Rutgers gave the Eagles an impressive record 
heading into the final stretch. The goal was to reach New Orleans, the home of this year's NCAA Women's Final Four. With a strong 
group of dynamic players, Coach Inglese's team had high aspirations to leave The Heights behind for the Bayou. 



th a strong 




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Photos by Chris b '& 



214 Sports 




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them. 
-Michael Jordan 



rhoro by i_nns tower 



Sports 215 



Digging Out Victories 



l%W 



he Volleyball team knew coming into the 2003 season that they would 

I be met with challenges. Although extremely talented, the Eagles were 
lacking a crucial component for big game success: experience. There 
were no seniors on the Eagles 12-woman squad, and only two juniors. As 
a result, the women turned to sophomore captains Vererna Rost and Emily 
Stegner for leadership as they tried to win while acclimating six freshmen to 
collegiate volleyball. And while head coach Andrea Leonard certainly has 
experience (she lead the University of New Hampshire to three post season 
appearances), she too was getting used to life on The Heights as she started 
her tenure as coach of the Eagles. 



The year started out on a positive note, with Boston College quickly 
earning a 3-1 record at the Western New York Tournament. The Eagles 
would continue on a five match win streak, before having it halted by 
New Hampshire, Leonard's former team. The Eagles were up 9-3 before BIG 
EAST action began the last weekend of September. 



I oston College snapped its first conference win against West Virginia, 
. 3-2. The Eagles would be disappointed the following Sunday, losing 
to Pittsburgh in a feisty 3-1 match against assistant coach Melissa 
Alpers' alma mater. The rookie led team would go on to upset Virginia Tech 
in Blacksburg the following week, and snatch their biggest win of the season 
against Syracuse at home in mid-October. The match against the Orangewome 
was intense, with SU taking the early lead. The Eagles rallied back and tied 
up the match at two games apiece. A serving error by Syracuse's highly tout 
right-side Kelly Duan would score BC the match point. The Eagles would end 
up losing their remaining BIG EAST matches, but claiming victory in several 
non-conference meetings scattered through the end of the season. 

The Eagles closed out the regular 2003 season 9th in the conference, an 
improvement from their preseason poll ranking of 12. 



W J ■ 




uccessful people are successful because they form the habits of d 
ing those things that failures dont like to do. 

--Albert Gray 



216 Sport's 





art of being a champ is acting like 

a champ. You have to learn how 

to win and not run away when you 

ose. Everyone has bad stretches and 

real successes. Either way, you have to 

be careful not to lose your confidence 

or get too confident. 

--Sir Eric Geddes 









Sports 2)7 



SOFTBALL 




very team has a saying. Something that gets them motivated, keeps them going throughout the season. 

Take it to the Heights! Ever to Accelerate! These rallying calls give players something to scream. 

something to give them that extra boost. The Softball team's slogan is much more than that. For these 
dedicated women, "Can't Stop. Won't Stop" is a way of life. Each woman has a sense of determination thai 
would blow anyone away. 



ake, for example, senior Elyse Meredith. Not only does she dominate on the Softball field, Meredith is 

I a vital asset of the varsity soccer team as well. This two-sport standout also excels in the classroom 
and was awarded the Athletic Director's Award for Academic Achievement two consecutive years. Thi 
greater than average dedication is also seen in senior outfielder Jacqui Goodchild. An Academic All-Star h 
first three seasons on the Heights, Jacqui spends her summers coaching a youth softball team. In addition to 
their personal commitment to their sport, Meredith and Goodchild have instilled this sense of pride into the 
younger players as well. With the guidance of upperclassmen leadership, sophomore standout Elena Ferrero 
earned a spot on the NCAA Region 1 All-Tournament team. Over the course of four games in the national 
tournament, Ferrero hit an unbelievable .700 with seven hits and four RBI. 



r Jacqui Goodchild. An Academic All-S 
aching a youth softball team. In additi 



tournament. 



I 



n 2004, these passionate women hope to continue their dominance on the diamond and bring home the Big 
East Championship title to Chestnut Hill. In their strive for glory they "can't stop" and they "won't stop" 
until the title is theirs. 




^ 



w! 



V^i 




d 



he winning team has a dedication. It 
will have a core of veteran players 
who set the standards. They will not 

accept defeat. 

--Merlin Olsen 




Photos Couiesy of Sports Mark 



218 Sports 



Kim Ryan was named Big East Pitcher of the Year, the team earned an a I • large 
bid into the NCAA tournament (the first time since 1998 that the Eagles have 
played in the tournament), and the season ended with a heartbreaking loss 
to South Carolina. One strike away from victory, the Eagles allowed USC to come 
back and win the game 5-2. Nevertheless, the Softball team finished the 2003 
season with high aspirations for the fall and even bigger expectations for 2004. 

Erin Mackey, who earned Louisville Slugger/NFCA Division I Regional A I I - 
American honors for her performance throughout the 2003 season, returned 
to lead the Eagles on their march to victory in the Big East. With six 
senior leaders and a strong core of returning players, the Softball team hoped 
to translate previous success into future triumphs. Head coach Jennifer Finley, 
^entering her eighth season with the Eagles, hoped to improve on last year's 3 5- 
_22 mark. As the season began with a tough road trip to the West Coast, the 

Eagles preserved to continue to establish their team as a Big East and national 
ipowerhouse. 





e way a team plays as a whole determines its success. You may 

have the greatest bunch of individual stars in the world, 

but if they dont play together, the club won t be worth a dime. 

-Babe Ruth 



Sports 219 




Ground Ball Leaders Strive for More 



he Boston College women's lacrosse program finished the 2003 campaign 

I as the National Leader in ground balls per game. Lacrosse star Jacklyn 
Yovankin averaged the most ground balls per game nationwide with 5.93. 
The Eagles' star midfielder added this accolade to a long list of praise after 
a sophomore season where she was also named to the All-BIG EAST Second 
Team and earned All-BIG EAST Defensive Player of the Week honors twice. 
Yovankin was named to the 2003 Brine Intercollegiate Women's Lacrosse 
Coaches Association/US Lacrosse Division I All-Northeast Region second team, 
oining the Eagles' coaching staff in 2004 was Chris Moxhay, a Bowdoin 
College graduate. No stranger to college sports, Moxhay played one 
year of football and lacrosse for the Polar Bears before joining the women's 
lacrosse coaching staff. He will coach goalies and defense for the Eagles. Head 
coach Shari Krasnoo, a former All-American at Colgate, also brings extensive 
experience to the squad as she enters her fourth year on The Heights. 

\X /ith momentum from the 2003 season, the Eagles looked to 
/ \ / improve their record and hoped to combine this with the personal 
V achievements which certainly were not lacking in passed years. Senior 
Captain Meggie O'Neill, who has started all but one game in the last three 
years, hoped to again excel in scoring and assists. Co-Captain Courtney Legath, 
who led the team in coring in 2003, returned as a star attacker for the Eagles. 
Dominate leadership coupled with an impressive class of ten freshmen, the Eagles 
opened the season with impressive back-to-back wins over Stony Brook (18-81 
and BIG EAST rival Villanova (8-5). 





220 Sports 



SCi^ 




Marketing 



set definite objective must be established if we are 

to accomplish anything in a big way. 

-- John Mcdonald 



Sports 221 



BASEBALL 



Taq "Em All 



o many students at Boston College, Shea Field means only one thing: prime tailgating location. To 

I the Eagles of the baseball team however, Shea means one of the best home field advantages in 
college baseball. The Eagles, who finished 33-12 overall (13-11 in the Big East! last year, were 18- 
4 on Sheo Field, an amazing record compared to the 7-12 mark posted on away fields. Neutral fields 
were also dominated by the Eagles where they were able to win 8 out of 13 games. This year's squad, 
led by nine returning seniors, hoped to continue their winning ways at Shea and extend this success to 
other schools. 



I he Eagles also had high expectations for their pitching staff. Coached by Mikio Aoki, a new 
assistant acquired from Columbia University where he spent five years, the pitching rotation looked 
strong at the beginning of the 2003-2004 season. Chris Lambert, a junior standout, hoped to turn 
his summer success in the Cape Cod League into victories for the Eagles. New pitching prospects among 
the freshman players also gave the Eagles high expectations for the spring season. 



_. . 1 ! i ~ 



































y 

ou owe it to yourself to be the best you can possib/ 1 

be, in baseball and in life. | 

-Pete Rose 



222 Sports 




tos Couiesy of Sports Marketing 



'very day is a new opportunity. You can build on yesterdays success or put its 
'failures behind and start over again. That's the way life is, with a new game 
i every day, and thafs the way baseball is. 

--Bob Feller 



Sports 223 




Individual Honors, Team Success 



n Friday, November 21, 2003, Paul Taylor was an exceptional person — to his family, 
I friends and teammates at least. To most other people on campus, he was just another 
' name. Just another varsity athlete walking around campus in his sweats proclaiming 
him as such. And then, on Saturday, the announcement was made: Fencer Paul A. Taylor was o 
of two Boston College students who earned a Rhodes Scholarship. Taylor and Brett T. Huneycutt 
were the first Eagles to win the prestigious world award. And then everything that had made 
Taylor exception to his family and friends and teammates was made known to the world, 
aylor was the New England collegiate foil champion his sophomore year. The three-time 

I NCAA regional participant also qualified for the NCAA Championships in both his freshman 
and junior campaigns. Most recently, in the 2003 NCAA Championships, Taylor earned 
24th place in the men's foil division, helping his team to 19th overall in the team competition. The 
2003-04 fencing season marks the second time that Taylor has been elected team co-captain 
(2002-031. 

cademically, the senior physics and classics double major earned both science and Latin 
/ \ awards, culminating into a Goldwater Scholar award. He also holds a patent, tutors 
\ students in both physics and calculus and was named volunteer of the year in a soup 
kitchen. Taylor will join 31 other Rhodes scholars at Oxford University next October for two to 
three years of study, complete with full scholarships and living allowances, to study theoretical 
astroohysics. 

aylor may go back to being just another varsity athlete in his sweats, but his legacy at 
Boston College will be much more than that. Taylor will forever be remembered as the first 
Eagle to be named a Rhodes Scholar. And while he will eventually leave that legacy be- 
hind, Paul Taylor will carry the academic achievement, personal integrity, leadership potential, and 
physical vigor which made him worthy of being a Rhodes Scholar with him for the rest of his life. 



What is the recipe for 
successful achieve- 
ment? To my mind 
there are just four essential 
ingredients: Choose something 
you love, give it the best there is 
in you, seize your opportunities, 
and be a member of the team. 
--Benjamin F. Fairless 




I 



t 




Photos by Shane Stoiw- 



224 Sports 





Experience and leadership were certainly not lacking for the 2003-2004 Eagfes Fencing Teams. Senior 
Paul Taylor and junior Will Lawrie captained the men's squad, while juniors Laura Buckley and Tiffany 
White bad the women's team White and Taybr are no strangers to success, having competed at the 
2003 NCAA Fencing Championships with fellow teammate sophomore Brian Sohn The strong leadership of 
these Eagles, combined with the guidance of head coach Syd Fadner, was just the right combination to bring 
victory to The Pieights. 

Eagles' season got under way on November 1st at the New England Fall Invitational, hosted by Smith 
University. Dubbed "The Big One," this competition highlighted the freshmen dass and the returning 
members of the squad from a successful 2002-2003 campaign Three out of four BC men's foilists 
made the final of eight at the Fall Invitational. Seniors Taylor and Corban Rhodes and junior Lawrie all earned 
bids to the final matches. Freshman Alex Rios placed an impressive third in the epee competition after making 
a recent switch from foil. Strong performances by three sophomores highlighted the women's results. Ali 
Diquollo took third and Stephanie Mariconda sixth in saber and Clara Yum placed fifth in epee. 

The season rolled on as the Eagbs hosted their first invitational fencing meet on November 23rd, welcom- 
ing Vassar, Brown, Brandeis, MIT and St. John's to the Flynn Recreational Complex. On the women's 
side, Tiffany White was 11-4 in epee as the strong epee squad went undefeated. Clara Yum and 
Genevieve Peeples each went 9-6 in their first appearances as freshmen epee starters for BC. Paul Taylor 
4 in foil! and Steve Koza (10-5 in saber) lead the men's team, who took two of their five competitions 

With these early season success stories under their belts, the Eagles hoped to leave behind a legacy 
of individual accomplishments as well as team success as they continued their season in the spring 
Important competitions included the New England Championships and the IFA Championships. 




Sports 225 



TRACK & FIELD 




t's simply a matter of doing what you do best and not worrying about whjif 

the other fellow is going to do. 
-John R. Amos 



226 Sports 




Sports 227 



WOMEN S 



Setting Hew Standards 




Although the women's track and field team improved their overall 
standings in the Big East with a ninth place finish at the Conference 
Championship, the story of the 2003 season is truly in the impressive 
individual feats of these women athletes. Jennifer Donovan continuously broke 
her own school record in the 3.000 meter steeplechase. At the end of the 
season. Donovan placed ninth at national competition with a BC record time of 
10:04:52. As a result of this excellent season, Donovan received All-America 
honors. While Donovan garnered national attention many other athletes were 
breaking school records and making their names known on the collegiate level. 
Christina Regan set a record of 4.609 points in the heptathlon as well as a 
record height of 5V1/4" in the regular high jump competition. Saki Sugano 
and Megan Mara competed throughout the season for the BC pole vault 
record, eventually tying with bar clearing vaults of 12 feet. Finally, Megan 
Kearney improved her own discus record with a new mark of 150-4. 

The best part about all these feats is that all of these tremendous athletes 
returned for the 2004 season. Donovan and fellow captains Julie Heyde 
and Jennifer Kramer looked to continue making strides in BC's struggles to 
compete at the highest levels of track and field. The strong base of returning 
athletes was added to by twelve new freshmen members who were anxious to 
leave their own marks on the Heights. 



Guts are a combination 
of confidence, courage, 
conviction, strength of 
character, stick-to-itiveness, pugna- 
ciousness, backbone, and intestinal 
fortitude. They are mandatory for 
anyone who wants to get to and 
stay at the top. 
-- D. A. Benton 



Photos CoLrtesy of Sports Morke J 



228 Sports 



' 



IftiA. 







f 




Inlike its women s counterpart", the men s track am 
team graduated many of its individual stars. Although 
losing Brian Mahoney and Vernon Mickle, who had both 
performed exceptionally well, the men's team also had a strong 
field of returning athletes. Trevor Rozier-Byrd and Drew 
Bouchard both placed well at the New England Championships 
at the University of New Hampshire. Captains Pat Filice, Keith 
Normant and Shawn Wallace hoped to lead a very young team 
to success in the Big East and beyond. 

he season started off with numerous Boston meets at 
Harvard, Northeastern, and Boston University. The men 
hoped to use this "home-field" advantage to begin on 
a positive note. The teams nine freshmen athletes hoped to 
acclimate themselves to collegiate competition early before th 
season moved to more daunting locations such as Raleigh, Nor 
Carolina and Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. 




Sports 229 



TENNIS 



Serving Up Trouble 



cott Wilkins has tremendous experience with success. As a member of the University of North Carolina tennis team, Wilkins finished 10' h on 
-» the school's career singles list. As head coach at Babson College in 1998, he coached his number one player (David Weismanl to the 1998 

Division III individual national championship. Later, his contributions as full time assistant at UMass helped the team garner a second place 
finish in the 2000 Atlantic 10 Tournament. Now, as head coach of the men's tennis team at Boston College, Wilkins hopes to bring success to a 
talented Eagles line-up. 



""" he 2003-2004 season brought mixed results to the Eagles. Senior captain Justin Slattery, competing in the "1 singles flight, finished ninth at 

I the Northeast Invitational hosted by Brown University. Dennis Reardon, a newcomer to the team, also fared well with a fifth place finish in 
the "6 singles flight. Later in the season, after a disappointing first two days, the men bounced back to defeat St. Joseph's on the final day 
of the ECAC Championships held at the USTA National Tennis Center in Flushing Meadows, New York. The Eagles looked to better their fall 
record as the season heated up with tournaments at the University of Las Vegas, Stoney Brook University, and Rutgers University, among others. 



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serves. 
-Arnold J. Zarett 




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230 Sports 



m&. 



The women's tennis program welcomed Teryn Ashley to the Eagles' 
coaching staff at the beginning of the 2003-2004 season. 
Ashley brings with her enormous amounts of personal experience. 
Currently, she is a professional tennis player with the Women's Tennis 
Association (WTA) and has been ranked in the top 150 in the world 
in singles and 65 in doubles. Ashley took home the doubles title at 
ASB Bank in Auckland, New Zealand and participated in all four 
Grand Slam Events in 2003. The Eagles benefited enormously from 
Ashley's professional guidance. 

From the very beginning of the season, the women experienced 
tremendous success against stiff competition. Bright spots early 
on for the Eagles were freshman Lindsey Nash and juniors Nida 
Waseem and Morgan Landes. Despite losing her first round match 
at the USTA Invitational in October, Nash cruised through the "Feed 
in Flight C" bracket winning four straight. Landes advanced to the 
"Flight D" championship match but came up short against tournament 
standout Serena Fermin of LMU. Waseem advanced to the third 
round of the ITA Championships before falling to the tournament's 
number one seed. Unfortunately, junior Amy Molden and top singles 
player, sophomore Szilvia Szeged, were forced to withdraw form 
several tournaments due to injury. The team hoped to regroup and 
finish the season with strong individual performances and a dominate 
team presence at the NCAA Championships in May. 



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Sports 231 



GOLF 



Victories From Coast to Coast I 



Seniors Sean McReynolds and Chris 
Sanossian and junior Tim Collins are 
leading the men's golf team through 
another season of stiff competition. The first 

tournament of the year, The McLaughlin Cup 
at Bethpage, New York, was a success for the 
team. Not only did the men come away with an 
impressive sixth place finish, but personal skills 
were also on display as Jim Roney. Tim Conners 
and Matt King all finished in the top twenty- 
five. The Eagles continued posting victories 
when they traveled to Seven Oaks Golf Course 
to participate in the ECAC Championship 
Tournament. In a weather-shortened tournament, 
the men placed third out of 14 teams. Eric 
Recher had an impressive round, finishing with a 
74 and tying for fourth overall in the field of 
70 players. Under the guidance of head coach 
Trevor Drum, the men's golf team continued 
competition in the spring and was determined 
to solidify its position as a powerhouse amongst 
New England collegiate golf teams. 



Golf is very much like a love 
affair, if you dont take it 
seriously, it's no fun, if you 
do, it breaks your heart. Dont break 
your heart, but flirt with the 
possibility. 
--Louise Suggs 




232 Sports 




' -x Courtesy of Sports Marketing 



Sporhs 233 



CLUB SPORTS 






n order to excel, you must be 

completely dedicated to your chosen 

sport. You must also be prepared 

to work hard and be willing to accept 

destructive criticism. Without 100 percent 

dedication, you wont be able to do this. 

--Willie Mays 




234 Sports 



I*. 



MENS CREW 



Fiqhtinq the Current 



ight rowers follow the coxswain's explicit instructions as 
temperature is just above freezing, the sun isn't even 01 
dreaming, practice begins. 



they carry their boat to the dock. The 



I he Boston College men's crew team repeats this experience six days a week from before school 
starts until the Charles River freezes over and then again from early March well into June. When 
they are not fighting off brutal conditions on the Charles, these dedicated men can be found at the 
■"lex or their winter training "home," the Erg Hall. 



he men's crew team is hoping to build off an impressive season last year, which was highlighted by 
respectable finishes against traditional Ivy powerhouses in the Dad Vail Regatta and IRA as well as 
capturing the New England's Team Point Trophy. BC men's crew has some great competition this 

season, but they have proven that they are ready and willing to take on the challenge with a spirit that 

grows stronger with every practice and race. 





Ned Borgman 


'05 




Patrick Carey 


'05 




Will Downey 


05 




Steve ILoul Ferrigno 


'04 


Captain 


Kevin Fox 


06 




Robert Fullerton 


•06 




Jackie Horan 


•05 




Doyle Hunt 


■05 




Chris Jackson 


•05 




Chris Kratz 


06 




Scott Laio 


•06 




Claudia Larson 


•04 




Alex Lockwood 


'05 


Captain 


Scott Mallozzi 


'06 




Justin Muto 


'05 




Jeff Newton 


'06 




Bill Powell 


05 




Marci Robles 


■06 




Jack Rotundo 


■06 




Rafiq Salim 


■06 




Nick Sarno 


06 




Mike Schainfeld 


05 




Ankit Shah 


'06 




Nick Spina 


05 




Shane Stryzinski 


•06 




Fred Treseler IV 


•04 




Nick Tresp 


•06 




Daniel Trovato 


06 




Greg Wiles 


•06 




Jessica Woodward 


•06 




Head Coach: 


MJ Curry 01 


Assistant Coaches: 


Mike 


DiPierro '00 




Victor 


a Haley '03 




Fred Treseler III 



'as Couiesy of Doyle Hint 



Sports 235 



Memories On and Off the Field] 




f you like football than you'll love rugby. 

--Anonymous 







Rugby is abou 
much more thai 
teammates anc 
competition. It' 
about brotherhood. 

--Michael Murray 



£*&* 



Photos by Natalia Q'l ■ . 






WOMEN'S 



Gettirf Down and Dirty 




ugby is a lot more fun when you don't know the rules, 
that way you're on the same page as the referees. 

--Anonymous 



Ashley Amato 
Linsdey Principe 
Mededith Hart 
Cait Donnelly 
Kim Straceski 
Anita Christy 
Jessica Jamison 
Lindsey Eulberg 
Jasmine Cutting 
Carolyn Walsh 
Andi Fraser 
Jackie Rada 



President 
Vice President 
Secretary 
Treasurer 
Captain 
Captain 
Social Secretary 
Match Secretary 
Field Secretary 
Field Secretary 
Alumni Relations 
Public Relations 



' os by Natalia Quirk 




Sports 237 



CYCLING 



Ever to Accelerate 




he cycling team has had a very productive '03 season, 
with the team placing 10 ,h at nationals in division two. 
Their success can be attributed to senior Kate Riedell, 
Eastern Collegiate Cycling Conference downhill champion. / 
a member of the mountain bike team, Kate finished second a 
the National Collegiate Cycling Association's Mountain Bike 
Nationals. Andrew Armstrong, a junior on the road team, 
has high expectations for the team, stating that "this year's 
team is a great balance of experienced riders and new your 
riders." Each member practices individually for the most pai 
displaying the imprtance of dedication. Even in the winter, 
team can be found practicing after a snowfall or in spinning 
classes, where high-resistance stationary bikes are utilized t 
prepare the team for competition. The cycling team contribi 
a great attitude of commitment to the Boston College 
atmosphere and has great potential to become one of the 
cycling clubs in the ECCC. 



er , the 




Photos Courtesy of Andrew Armsti 1 



238 Sports 



EQUESTRIAN 



Ride or Die 




t; 



■i 



here is something 
about jumping a 
horse over a fence, 
something that makes 
/ou feel good. Perhaps 
is the risk, the gamble, 
n any event it's a thing 
I need. 
William Faulkner 



Stephanie Johnson 
Amanda Crowley 
Taylor Goodell 



Jennifer Whitson 



Alana Mahoney 
Jillian Diffazio 



06 


President 


04 


Vice-President 


06 


Secretary 


05 


Treasurer 


04 


Point Secretary 


05 


Web Page Edito 


06 




06 




05 






M s Courtesy of Taylor Goodell 



Sports 239 



WOMEN'S SOCCER 



Getting Their Kicks 



Liz Anearn 


07 


Jenn Arens 


•07 


Kaf Cad well 


'05 


Lauren Cataldo 


•06 


Caitlin Dolan 


•05 


Colleen Fitzgerald 


•05 


Laura Frado 


•05 


Emily Hardy 


'05 


Alison Hayden 


•07 


Jen Kendall 


•07 


Colleen Kenrick 


•04 | 


Yejih Kim 


•04 i 


Carolyn LaMonica 


•07 


Brittany Loreno 


•07 ; 


Meghan Martinez 


•04 


Caitlin McManus 


•04 


Emily Neusel 


•04 | 


Kate Pierce 


•07 i 


Jenna Woodall 


•06 


Katie McDaniel 


'06 


Pepi Mendez 


'04 


Tara Morley 


'04 


Kristen O'Connell 


'04 


Kate O'Keefe 


'04 


Jeannine Oury 


'06 


Debbie Pare 


•05 


Kristi Palmsten 


'04 


Julie Predki 


•05 


Sarah Sullivan 


•04 


Jenny Theiss 


•06 


Ashley Walther 


06 


Maureen Welsh 


'05 


Emily Yank 


'04 




Photos Courtesy of Kristi F I 



240 Sports 



Tiny Numbers 




o Couiesy of Gary Mak 



Johnathon Duff 


President 


Middle Hitter 




Kyle Benedetti 


Vice President 


Outside Hitter 




Gary Mak 


Secretary 


Libera 




Stanley Thomas 


Treasurer 


Outside Hitter 




Galen "Raf Fisher 




Setter 




Manuel Colon 




Outside Hitter 




Matthew Leyden 




Outside Hitter 




Michael Grant 




Middle Hitter 




Tim Linehan 




Outside Hitter 




Kevin Hess 




Defensive Spa 




Mark Mayeda 








Sam Browne 








Kevin Kemper 








Phil George 








Tony Lee 








Rob Liess 






1 



SKATING 



, 






Synchronized Success 




Katelyn D'Alessandro 
Jessica Smith 
Kelly Techar 
Meredith Halpin 
Mary-Elizabeth Wightman 
Allyson Fortier 
Tara Behr 
Krista Benson 
Rebecca Levy 
Meghan Lortie 
Andrea Fraser 
Allison McDonough 



Pede 



oeiie rederson 



Sporte 241 



KARATE 



, 

Bringing Shotokan to the Heights; 




he Boston College Karate Club, established in 1971, is dedicated to the mental and physical 

I teachings of the Shotokan karate style. Sensei Kazumi Tabata, 8th degree black belt, came 
directly from Japan in the late sixties to teach. He immediately founded over a dozen college 
teams in the Boston area. In addition to regular meetings on campus, members frequently attend clinics 
and training sessions with other clubs. The karate club also participates in the semi-annual tournament 
between the clubs. Boston College is traditionally the best represented club at all these events and has 
won more combined trophies than any other club. 



MaryAnne Barr 


'04 






Megan Bright 


'07 




Chris Brown 


'07 


Nicholas Caputi 


'05 




Brian Carney 


'07 




Emily Cersonsky 


'07 


LiQing Chen 


'07 




Dan Cheron 


'04 


Advisor 


Sarah Choi 


'07 




Tobin Craig 


'04 


Instructor 


Patrick Cronin 


'07 




Mike Distefano 


'07 




Will Dorsey 


'07 


J 


Juan Pablo Equi 


'07 


Asia Evans 


'07 


Luke Flynn 


•03 




Erik Hayman 


•07 




Kasey Hill 


•07 




Jared Justice 


•06 




Sean Keck 


•07 




Samantha Koller 


'07 




Alex Koon 


'03 


Alumni Instructor 1 


Alex Kritchevsky 


"07 




Prince Kyereme 


'07 




Nicole Landi 


'07 




Kin Leung Leow 


'06 




Melissa Maisch 


"04 






Mike Mariani 


'07 






Joe Mayerle 


'05 


Vice President 


^ 


Irene Novae 


'04 






Srey Pan 


•04 


Secretary 




Stefano Pataro 


'07 






Jack Poitis 


'07 






Brandon Russell 


•06 






Will Schatz 


•06 






Susan Seo 


•05 






Amanda Sindel 


'06 






Alvin Siu 


'07 




[' 


Andrew Smith 


'07 






Phineas Sprague 


'04 


President 




Greg Stachura 


•05 




Shauyi Tai 


•04 




j Bethany Tung 


•07 




Kat Zharkova 


•04 


Treasurer 





Photos Coaiesy of BC Kc m 



242 Sports 



_. 



BC EAGLES 



Supreme Dedication 




he mind is the limit. As 
long as the mind can en- 
vision the fact that you 

can do something, you can do 

it, as long as you 

really believe 100 percent. 

--Arnold Schwarzenegger 






IV 10 CONTE FORUM 




he important thing to recognize 
is that it takes a team, and the 
team ought to get credit for the 
wins and the losses. 
--Philip Caldwell 



Sports 243 



SUPERFAKS 



LOUD AND PROUD!!! 




i 






^3^***^^ 


0l5> 


l^sF^fe 





244 Sports 




»lt^ 
























>re is no better feeling than knowing that some- 
how your cheering helped the Eagles win. 
That is the essence of being a Superfan. 
-Katie Poff 






Sports 245 



LEAVING THE B 




EAGLES 




Leahy announced on 



II l"hat Boston College would join the Atlantic Co 

II Conference. And with the announcement, athlet 

at BC changed forever. Earlier in the year, Miami c 
Virginia Tech had accepted invitations from the ACC 
switch from the Big East Conference to the southern do 
nated ACC. Needing a twelve member in 
order to have a conference title qame in 



to have a conference 



'ball, the 



I en ts o I 



Me game in 
CC schools 



decided to invite Boston College to join 
their ranks. The move to the ACC will 
keep BC amonc 



>e upper echelon team 



le conference 



evenue fw 



ways, including a share of the title game, 
which will compensate the Eagles tremen- 
dously. In addition to financial improve- 
ments, sports at BC will also experience 
various other alterations as a result of the 
move. BC is the only team from the north- 
east region in the ACC, with Maryland as its 
closest conference rival. Athletic director G 
assured university officials that travel expenses and mi 
class time should not rise when a new ACC schedule is 
into effect. What will rise, however, is the level of 



move. D L_ 



246 Sports 



.. 



EAST BEHIND 



DIN ACC 








VIRGINIA 





; Eagles will now face. Duke, Maryland, 
3 r t h Carolina, and Wake Forest have been perennial pow- 
houses in basketball and the remaining schools never fail 
shock the competition on the gridiron. With such stag- 
ring competition, the Eagles may find it hard to compete 
their early years in the ACC. However, playing such 
high quality competition will only ensure a 



Doisrenng or [ 

ibility. Entering the ACC will force the 
athletic department to assess the value of 
all BC varsity sports. If a program does 
not fit the ACC mold, it may be dropped 
in the next two years. On the other hand, 
some programs may be added by default. 
Men's lacrosse, which has a huge follow- 
ing among the ACC member schools, could 
make the jump back to varsity to share in 
the sport's revenues. As the Eagles leave 
the Big East behind, the future of athlet- 
ics at Boston College may seem uncertain, 
vertheless, what is certain is that competition will only 



irove as a result c 



e move and 



the challenge. The south won't know what hit if when the 
: fales storm into the ACC ready to excel like never before. 



Sports 247 



CLASS 



Superfans and Superstars 



NATIONAL 
CHAMPIONS 



■ I 











248 Sports 




■ 



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*-.. 




Sports 249 




ALL THAT YOU CAN'T LEAVE BEHIND 

SENIORS 

Where did the time go. . . Remember how it felt during the summer to get your roommate assignment and working up the courage to 
first call them? Remember the "Hi.... How are you^s. ... Where are you living?" that became a staple in almost every conversation. 
And looking back what were we thinking doing dinner with almost everyone on the floor?Remember how happy you were the second 
year? No longer the freshman! No more buses to divide our class. No more 15 by 15 boxes to live in, but rather suites for most in 
Walsh, Vandy, and 90. This is the year of meeting new faces and trying to place the old. You remember "that kid" from the early 
morning Newton bus rides. You still do not know his name. You know "that girl" who did laundry at the same time in Walsh, but you 
do not know her either. You always say "Hi" to "that boy with the hat" but don't remember how you know him... Junior year was just 
a blur. For travelers abroad, the year seemed especially short. One minute your plane is taking off for Spain and the next minute you 
are telling your old roommates about all the adventures on the other side of the world. For those who traveled to Sutherland, Radnor, 
and Comm. Ave, there was the dreaded September 1 st move in day, the grocery shopping at 7-11 and CVS, and the 21 st birthdays at 
MaryAnn's. There was the conversion of dollars to euros and trying to pay for your Metro pass and the hiking to and from the Fleet 
stop since the T closed Resevoir, but one thing that all juniors shared was the anticipation of senior year. Now here we are. Together. 
The class of 2004. This year we are back on campus- no more T or bus rides to visit friends or to actually go to class, no more sketchy 
landlords, no more bills to manage ... although missing the short walk to happy hour at Roggies and AAA's, the no RA's, and parties 
lasting beyond 1:30. And now experiencing the bittersweet of all our "lasts": Notre Dame weekend, Homecoming, registration for 
classes, Spring Break, and final exam.... In four years, it is amazing to think that there are still many people that we would like to know 
more about, but have not had the chance to talk to or hang out with. Yet if everyone in the Class of 2004 revealed the names of all 
their friends, everyone would somehow be connected to everyone else. It is because BC is a place where people from all different 
groups of friends are often given a chance to interact in some way that the class is all somehow connected. As we move forward 
with our lives, we will remember the most important ties and connections we have made. These friends are the ones that are likely to 
remain with us through life. They are the ones that will take us out for a drink when we are promoted, the ones that will backpack 
across Europe with us at the drop of a hat, the ones that will attend our weddings and the ones that will be godparents to our children. 
If is our time here, these past four years, on The Heights that the members of the Class of 2004 will never leave behind. 




Edited by Meaghan Casey and Brian Moynihan 



Seniors 251 



The good times, the 

memories, beating 

Notre Dame 3 years in 



a row: 



- John Decaro 




When the fall rolls around 

at BC, it usually means one 

thing - football! And this year, 

perhaps, was best of them all, 

filled with added enthusiasm 

that only a senior can have! 

Memories were made, luaghs 

were had, and BC pride was 

shown throughout. It's been an 

amazing trip! 

- Tricia Garrity 



Heidi Scheer, Caitlin McManus 





Katie West, Nicole Barone, Rosa Kuak 




Emily Hull, Leah Tseronis. Sarah Sullivan, Liza Hammond, 
Danielle Hildebrandt, lauren McEnteggart 





Christopher Rizzo, Jason Yuen 




*0*» 



Courtney AAcKinney, Kate Kennedy, Emily Leary 



Lindsey Hogan, Alissa Marzetti, Lauren Southard, Meaghan Casey, Dana Howarth 



252 Se 





Jeff Rallo 



Jaclyn Oleary, Caitlin Healey 




Eagles on the Warpath 



What's better than waking up at 9 

am to go out and party with all your 

roommates and friends on a Saturday 

morning? The memories of tailgating 

before the football games are ones that 

won't easily be forgotten 

- Stephanie Bitonfi 





Lindsey Hogan 




Ally Willson, Angela Rubertino, Megan Callihan 




Stu Leslie, Joe Madaus, J.D. McMillan, Alec Harris, Tony Ruggeri 



Seniors 253 







Evan Mactavish, Chelsea Woods, Chris Jimenez 




photo by Meoghan Casey 



r 




Corey Strader, Diane Cotter 





Courtney MoKinney, Joni Swarts, Amanda Froga, Jordana Winn, Emily leary, Moneer AAasih-tehrani 




Pat Lally, Cindy Uh, Kinga Krisko 



Kristen Connall, Jen Deragon, Kerri Anderson 



From Monday 



254 Seniors 







photo by Sue Burton 




Joni Swarts, AAoner MasiMehrani, Lindsey MocCombs, Jordanna Winn, Tanya Kilabuk 




Lauren Buich, James Newton, Jen Savage 

lb Sunday 



Alissa Marzetti, Kim Gassner, Meaghan Casey 




MmJmL 




photo Py oue Durton 




Heidi Scheer, Rosa Kwak, Maggie Ward, Nicole Barone 



Seniors 255 



Senior 
Perspectives 



£ 



■ 



These ten seniors were chosen by their peers to be among the 
Outstanding Seniors of the Class of 2004. 
They represent the Boston College moto, "Ever to Excel" 
in their academic, co-curricular and everday lives. 




Adwoa Antwi- Barf i 



Adwoa Antwi- Barfi, a Mathematics major in A&S, 
emits the term involved. In her four years at BC, she 
has participated in and held leadership positions in a 
variety of different clubs and organizations. Adwoa 
is an AHANA Coordinator for the Student Admissions 
Program and the secretary for the BC Chapter of the 
National Society of Black Engineers. She volunteers 
as a College Bound mentor for high school students. 
She also sings in the Voices of Imani Gospel Choir. 
In addition to all of this, Adwoa is a member of the 
African Students Organization and in the Step Club. I 
the future, she would like to continue giving back to the 
community by joining Teach for America. 



256 Seniors 



Juan DeJesus 



ran DeJesus, a native of Dorchester, AAA, exempli- 
3S the BC motto, "Men and Women for Others" He 
3S served on the board or directors of the Bird Street 
ommunity Center and the Dorchester Bay Economic 
evelopment Corporation, to bring about change in his 
immunity. Juan has established the BC to Bird Street 
Mentoring Program. He is also active in OLAA and 
ee AHANA Management Academy, which he helped 

re-establish. During his Junior year, Juan studied at 
Aorehouse College, becoming the first CSOM student 

study at a Historically Black College. In the future, 
can hopes to go into the fields of investment banking or 
corts management. 





Elizabeth Evans 



Liz Evans is one Senior who has given her time and 
dedication to the BC community. She is a Resident 
Assistant in Rubenstein Hall, arranging programs and 
lending a helping hand to fellow classmates. She is 
also an active member of Intersections, organizing 
events such as the Senior Campus Crawl and the 
Senior Consilium, a three-part series to help seniors 
reflect on their passions, gifts, and career choices. 
Liz is also an active participant in events sponsored 
by the Women's Resource Center. Because of 
her positive volunteer experiences within the BC 
community and beyond, Liz hopes to continue in the 
spirit of service in the future, joining the Peace Corps. 



rock pile ceases to be a rock pile the moment a single man contemplates 
bearing within him the image of a cathedral " Antoine de Saint-Exupery 



Seniors 257 




Damien LaRock 



Damien LaRock is an amazing leader, admired 
by many. He has revolutionized Best Buddies, an 
international organization which facilitates friendship 
between adults with intellectual disabilities and 
college students. Since Damien has been Director, 
BC has received the Most Outstanding Chapter 
Award each year. His patience, extreme care and 
devotion to service are an inspiration. Anyone who 
comes in contact with Damien will notice his kindness 
and compassion. Though Best Buddies will surely 
miss Damien, he will continue his work in the future 
by pursuing a graduate degree in Special Education, 
dedicating his life to serve others. 



"Everyone needs to know that individuals with intellectual disabilities are 
people, too. We have dreams and hopes and ambitions. We laugh and have 
fun, and we can be serious and do a good job. We can do lots of things if 
people give us the chance." - Chris Burke, Actor, "Life Goes On" 



Chris Martin 



Chris Martin is one of those people that you hope to have 
come in contact with at least once while he was here at 
BC. This personable, fun-loving, and dedicated individual 
has worked hard to make his time here at The Heights 
count. As a four year officer in the Ignatian Society and 
the out-going president, Chris leaves behind many 
programs, such as Kairos, that he has been involved with 
since high school. And while he dedicated much of his 
heart, soul, and time to the Ignatian Society, Chris also 
found the time to serve on the Student Judicial Board and 
be a part of the Emerging Leader Program's (ELP) coun- 
cil. Urban Immersion is another of Chris's programs that 
brought this warm soul into the community of Boston during 
winter breaks. The passion that is inside Chris is pushing 
him towards attending graduate school in hopes of earning 
a degree in higher education and eventually become a 
college administrator. And to those who know Chris 
Martin, there is no place better suited for him than 
sculpting the minds of our future leaders. 




"Leading a good life is important. Not because life is so short, but because 
death is so long. " - Dr. Robert Capalbo 



258 Seniors 




'Trust is the emotional glue that holds every team together... In times of trial, 
t transforms a group of committed individuals into a team of individuals 
:ommitfed to each other. " 



Brian McLaughlin 



Brian McLaughlin serves as an inspiration to his teammates, 
coaches, classmates, professors, and many others in the 
Boston College community and beyond. A varsity member 
of the swim team, Brian does not let cerebral palsy deter 
him from competing aggressively. He performs in the 50- 
yard freestyle, as well as in the 100 and 200-yard events. 
Brian has been able to travel to various schools across 
the state and speak to other students about his disability 
and about his role as a student athlete. Brian, an English 
major hoping to pursue a law degree, is a member of the 
Order of the Cross and Crown, of which he serves as 
a marshal. He has also received the Exceptional Young 
Leader of the Year Award from the Franciscan Children's 
Hospital in Brighton. He has volunteered both within and 
outside of the BC community and is always willing to lend 
a helping hand or offer a smile. Brian is a role model to 
all, overcoming the challenges set before him and achieving 
great success academically, athletically, and in all other 
aspects of his life. 



Ben Simms 



Ben Simms clearly demonstrates the BC motto, "Ever 
to Excel." Despite the time commitment he gives 
to academics in order to maintain a commendable 
GPA as a biology major, Ben still finds time to 
participate in and lead many organizations on 
campus. He has participated in Appalachia 
Volunteers since his Sophomore year, and has been 
a trip leader to Pennsylvania. Ben has also been 
actively involved in Kairos, leading a group this year 
to the Cape. Through PULSE, Ben began tutoring 
inner city children and organizing their after-school 
activity programs. He has also spent considerable 
time working in Professor Sefreid's lab for cancer 
research. Above all, he is an outstanding role model 
and still manages to stay modest despite his many 
accolades. 




"Love to live; live to /< 



'ove. 



Seniors 259 



Stephanie Valencia 



Whether it's mentoring students from the Shaw Leadership 
Program or protesting the School of Americas, Stephanie 
Valencia puts the words of faith and justice into action 
everyday of her life. Stephanie, majoring in International 
Studies, has traveled to El Salvador on an immersion trip, 
and spent her fall semester of junior year at Casa de la 
Solidaridad, working in marginal communities and studying 
at the University of Central America. The following 
spring, Stephanie continued her travels and mission work, 
studying at Iberoamericana University in Mexico City. 
At BC, Stephanie has been a member of the Emerging 
Leaders and Shaw Leadership Programs and the UGBC 
Senate. She has also been actively involved with the 
Oscar Romero Committee and OLAA and is the 2003 
Oscar Romero Scholarship recipient. Yet, even with such 
a full schedule, Stephanie still finds time to help a friend in 
need, give a hug, or even a simple smile. 




( 



We may never see the end results, but that is the difference between the 
master builder and the worker. We are workers, not master builders; minis- 
ters, not messiahs. We are prophets of a future not our own. 
- Archbishop Oscar Romero 




Derrick Williams 



Derrick Williams, a major in political science with a minor 
in economics, is certainly a recognizable face on campus. 
In addition to serving as president of UGBC, Derrick is 
involved in numerous organizations on campus. He has 
been an active participant in the Fulton Debating Society 
winning the honors of best speaker at competitions even 
as a freshman. He is also president of the Black Student 
Forum and is Student Representative to the Education 
Policy Committee for the College of Arts and Sciences. 
Derrick is also a member of the Voices of Imani Gospel 
Choir. In the future, Derrick hopes to attend law school 
and pursue a career in public service. 



"And it ought to be remembered that there is nothing more difficult to 
undertake or more uncertain of success, than to try to introduce a new order 
of things." - Machiavelli 



260 Seniors 



aut. 



Allison Willson 



Ally Willson has the heart of a true BC volunteer, 
dedicating herself to the community both on and off 
campus. Ally has been an active member of 4Boston, 
volunteering at the Jackson-Mann Elementary School and 
the Commonwealth Housing Development After School 
"Vogram. She has served as the 4Boston Quad Captain 
for the past two years. In addition, Ally volunteers for 
the Commonwealth Tenant's Association. She has also 
oeen a leader for the Easter Break Tijuana immersion 
rip through Pedro Arrupe, and a leader on 48 Hours. 
Ally has also been involved in InterVarsity and puts her 
"eligious beliefs as a top priority in her life. The impact 
}f all of her service work is reflected in her spirit. Ally 
glows when she talks about the children she works with 
and never complains when her schedule affords little time 
or herself. 




All I can do is engage with complete sincerity. Then, whatever happens, 
there is no regret." 
- The Dalai lama 



"Live as if your were to die tomorrow. Learn as if you were to live forever." 

- Gandhi 



'The final test of a leader is that he leaves behind him in other men the 
conviction and the will to carry on. " -Walter Lippmann 



"Nothing great in the world has ever been accomplished without passion. 

- G. W. F. Hegel 



Congratulation to our Senior Leaders of 2004! 
Continue to excel in all of your future endeavors. 






Seni 



261 




Charlie Ring 



Mike McMahon, Deirdre Jennings, Mike Whittaker, Diana Fairchild-Carbonell 




Su Park, Alexis Sun, Michelle Cherng, Jenny Chnag, Ina Kwan 



262 Seniors 



IH 




Kinga Krisko, Laura Vichick, Cameron Esposiro, Casie Mazilly 



Tom Hook 





Greg Bertieff, Chris Jimenez, Doug King 



Emily Lewry, Kate Kennedy, Amanda Fraga, Tanya Kilabuk, Courtney McKinney 



Seniors 263 



Looking Back... 






264 Seniors 



ICkS, 





Do You Remember... 



Gettinq on the Comm Ave Bus thinking it was the Newton bus? I'fc' Mispronouncing McElroy? L'E' 
Constant introductions during the first f our months of the gear? LikJ Forced tripl es? LikJ Com- 
munal bathrooms and shower shoes? 



rm 



Exploring Boston for the first time? LikJ Going to a 



partg hosted bg people you've nev er met before in your life? I'fcl Figu ring out buildings in the Quad 
by "Doug Flutie likes girls'? lik] Pasta Night Wednesdays at Stuart? LikJ Who's On First Thurs- 
days? I'kJ Waiting for the bus for 2 minutes and having it drive right by? LikJ Wh en e ating at 
Lower seemed like the high life? LikJ Waking up to the sounds of n ew c onstruction? LikJ The 

first snow?.. Sledding behind Kost ka?.. Skiing down the Duchesne hill? i*»i Thinking you were sp eci al 
being invited to a Walsh party? L 1 ^' When the hockey team won the nat ional championship? LikJ 
When the Mod fe nce went up?... and when the Mod fence went down? I 1 *' Watching the housing lot- 
tery on BCTV? i'fci Getting no work done in the s tud y lounges? LikJ Spending study days out- 
side in the sun? LikJ How fast the year went by? LikJ The feeling of packing to go home at the end 
of the year? 




Seniors 265 



Elizabeth J Abbott 

School Of Arts & Science 

Psychology 



John B Abbott 

School Of Arts & Science 

Philosophy 



Matthew W Acalin 

School Of Management 

Finance 

Information Systems 



Nicholas A Accomando 

School Of Arts & Science 

Theology 



Grant M Adams 

School Of Management 

Finance 




Kenneth W Adams 

School Of Arts & Science 

Biology 



Susan M Adams 
School Of Arts & Science 
Computer Science -A&S 



Ashley M Adamson 

School Of Arts & Science 

English 



Sheila J Agrawal 

School Of Management 

Finance 

Accounting 



Kristin L Aguiar 

School Of Arts & Science 

Rom Lang-Hispanic Study 

International Studies 




Eileen M Ahearn 

School Of Arts & Science 

Communications 



Katelyn L Ainsworth 

School Of Management 

Accounting 

Marketing 



Eli C Akerstein 

School Of Management 

Marketing 



Stephanie D Albanese 

School Of Management 

Accounting 

Marketing 



Patrick F Albertson 

School Of Arts & Science 

Communications 




Benjamin M Albuquerque 

School Of Management 

Computer Science-CSOM 

Information Systems 



Kelley K Alexander 

School Of Management 

Economics-CSOM 



Michael D Alexander 

School Of Arts & Science 

Economics 



Carrie L Alexandrowicz 

School Of Arts & Science 

Sociology 

English 



Milisa A Alexis-Manners 

School Of Arts & Science 

History 



266 Seniors 



HfiiS. 



Stephen T Allen 

School Of Management 

General Mgmt 

History 



Peter S Aloisi 

School Of Arts & Science 

Psychology 



Shiffaun L Alston 

School Of Education 

Early Childhood 

Communications 



JudithS Alter 
School Of Education 
Elementary Education 



Sarah M Alvarez 
School Of Arts & Science 
Political Science 
Psychology 




Robert J Amara 

School Of Arts & Science 

History 

Economics 



Ashley Amato 

School Of Arts & Science 

Art History 



Daniel J Amato 

School Of Arts & Science 

Political Science 



Courtney V Ambrose 

School Of Arts & Science 

Economics 



Corey Ames 

School Of Arts & Science 

English 




Bradley K Anderson 

School Of Management 

Finance 

Marketing 





Courtney G Anderson 

School Of Arts & Science 

English 



Justin T Anderson 

School Of Management 

Computer Science-CSOM 

Economics-CSOM 



Seniors 267 





Kerri Anderson 

School Of Education 

Elementary Education 

English 



Sarah Anderson 

School Of Education 

Elementary Education 

Rom Lang-Hispanic Stdy 




Meridith S Andrews 
School Of Education 
Elementary Education 



Sophia Andriotis 
School Of Education 
Human Development 




Adwoa V Antwi-Barfi 

School Of Arts & Science 

Mathematics 



Derek H Apfel 

School Of Management 

Economics-CSOM 



Christina Apostolakis 

School Of Arts & Science 

Mathematics 



Nairi M Aprahamian 

School Of Arts & Science 

Communications 



Michael R Archambault 

School Of Arts & Science 

Economics 




Bradley D Arguello 

School Of Arts & Science 

Economics 



Raymond J Ariola 

School Of Management 

Finance 



Severine M Armand 

School Of Management 

Accounting 



Melissa Arnold 

School Of Arts & Science 

Psychology 

Philosophy 



Brendan Y Arrieta-Joy 
School Of Arts & Science 

English 
Rom Lang-Hispanic Stdy 



268 Senic 



^aii&jk 



Kathleen C Arsenault 

School Of Arts & Science 

Chemistry 



Timothy C Arth 

School Of Arts & Science 

Communications 



Talin Arukian 

School Of Management 

Accounting 

Information Systems 



Allison M Ashley 

School Of Arts & Science 

Rom Lang-Hispanic Study 



Ryan M Auer 

School Of Arts & Science 

Philosophy 



Deborah Augusta 

School Of Arts & Science 

Social Sciences 



Lisa M Augusto 

School Of Arts & Science 

Political Science 



Elizabeth J Auty 
School Of Education 
Human Development 



Michael J Atwater 

School Of Management 

Finance 




Lauren K Avalony 

School Of Nursing 

Nursing 




Matthew R Avellar 

School Of Arts & Science 

Economics 



Dina M Aversano 

School Of Arts & Science 

History 



Kamal Bakhazi 

School Of Arts & Science 

Political Science 



Justin L Bakota 

School Of Arts & Science 

Political Science 



Trevor M Balboni 

School Of Arts & Science 

English 




Joseph G Ballard 

School Of Arts & Science 

Communications 



Adam P Balthrop 

School Of Arts & Science 

English 



Thomas M Bane 

School Of Arts & Science 

English 



Nathalie J Banker 

School Of Arts & Science 

Communications 



Marc A Banks 
School Of Education 
Secondary Education 



Seniors 269 





William T Banning 

School Of Arts & Science 

Economics 

Philosophy 



Amy Barber 

School Of Arts & Science 
Sociology 




Jillian M Barber 

School Of Arts & Science 

Psychology 



Zachry A Barber 

School Of Management 

Marketing 




Josyl L Barchue 

School Of Arts & Science 

Philosophy 



Brandon R Barford 

School Of Arts & Science 

History 



Sean Barkulis 

School Of Management 

Finance 

Mathematics 



Christopher H Barnard 

School Of Arts & Science 

Political Science 

Theater Arts 



Lindsay N Barnett 

School Of Management 

Human Resource Mgmnt 

Philosophy 




Tania Barnett 

School Of Arts & Science 

Chemistry 



Nicole M Barone 

School Of Arts & Science 

Biology 



Maryanne Barr 

School Of Arts & Science 

Biology 



Tiffany N Barr 

School Of Arts & Science 

English 



Melissa L Barrett 

School Of Nursing 

Nursing 



270 Seniors 



iltk 



Evan F Barros 

School Of Arts & Science 

English 



Matthew R Barshied 

School Of Management 

Accounting 



Adam D Basarich 

School Of Management 

Human Resource Mgmnt 

Information Systems 



Jillian B Battaglia 

School Of Management 

Economics 

Marketing 



Robert Battistuzzi 

School Of Arts & Science 

Political Science 




Kevin T Baumann 

School Of Management 

Accounting 



Kristen E Benakis 

School Of Arts & Science 

Biology 



Rachel M Bausch 

School Of Management 

Accounting 



Marika E Beaton 

School Of Arts & Science 

Political Science 



William A Beaulieu 

School Of Arts & Science 

Psychology 



Elizabeth C Bender 

School Of Management 

Finance 



Andrew G Beaver 

School Of Management 

Finance 

Marketing 




Seniors 271 




Chris Wigand, Tom Null, Teresa Ho, Kari White 



<&L m pro \ xA 



Caitlin Healey, Jim Russo 



272 Seniors 




Jeff Rallo 



Seniors 273 




nm 



Joe Ballard, Mike Lucarelli, Sef Ghanem, Stas Haciski, Jason Buttorf, Jen Savage, Lauren Bruich, Rich Freed 




Nairi Apraphamion, Christi Crowly, Val LaVoie, Sara Hart, Kristyn Bunce, Marcy LaAAonica, Claire Walters 




I 



T 






Beth Ketianeok, Nicole Barone 




Jason Yuen, Joseph Shanahan, RiaSard Egelhof, Alan Viglione 




Tricia Garrity, Lisa McGinn, Kyla Smith 



274 Seniors 





Dave Howarth, Ryan Dono, Pat Chadwick, Rosa Kwak, Davis Thurber 



;***&■ %. 







Ben Hain, Matt Gaul, Elana Caldwell, Mindy Holmes, Karen Bukowick, Lara Romanowski, Kate Irwin 



Diana Fairchild Carbonell, Michaelle Contu, Fabio Guazzo, Jane Vantura 

Seniors 275 




Kyle J Benedetti 

School Of Management 

Accounting 



Eliza ] Bent 

School Of Arts & Science 

Philosophy 



Kristyl M Berckes 

School Of Arts & Science 

English 



Toni M Berejik 

School Of Nursing 

Nursing 



Justin Berens 

School Of Management 

Finance 




Erin L Berg 

School Of Education 

Secondary Education 

English-LSOE 



Sarah E Berger 

School Of Arts & Science 

History 



Elizabeth M Bernardi 

School Of Arts & Science 

English 



David J Berry 

School Of Management 

Accounting 



Jacob H Berry 

School Of Arts & Science 

Communications 

Sociology 




Julienne L Berryman 
School Of Education 
Elementary Education 



Gregory S Bertleff 

School Of Arts & Science 

History 



Benaifer S Bhadha 

School Of Arts & Science 

Communications 



Peter Bianco 
School Of Management 

Finance 
Operations /Tech Mngmt 



Clare E Bigelow 
School Of Education 
Human Development 

Child In Society 




Matthew J Billeri 


Sara G Birnbaum 


Patrick A Bitonti 


Stephanie J Bitonti 


Kahleil V Blair 


ool Of Arts & Science 


School Of Arts & Science 


School Of Arts & Science 


School Of Management 


School Of Arts & Science 


Psychology 


English 


Computer Science-A&S 


Finance 
Marketing 


Communications 



rt Sen 



Craig T Blanchfield 

School Of Arts & Science 

Economics 



Kevin B Blane 

School Of Arts & Science 

Economics 



Daniel B Blatt 

School Of Arts & Science 

Psychology 



Juliana Blazuk 

School Of Arts & Science 

Communications 



David J Bliss 

School Of Arts & Science 

English 




Elizabeth J Block 
School Of Education 

Communications 
Human Development 



Kelly M Bloom 

School Of Arts & Science 

Art History 



Chenelle S Boatswain 

School Of Arts & Science 

Psychology 




|^ iftfl 



Bryan P Boisi 

School Of Arts & Science 

History 




Vanessa Bolano 

School Of Arts & Science 

Communications 



David Bonilla 

School Of Management 

Operations /Tech Mngmt 

Human Resources Mgmnt 



Gregory J Bodine 

School Of Arts & Science 

Philosophy 



Joanna L Bogado 
School Of Education 
Human Development 




Seniors 277 




Molly Boone 

School Of Arts & Science 

Mathematics 



Christina E Boova 

School Of Arts & Science 

Communications 




Christopher M Bottaro 

School Of Arts & Science 

Economics 



Kevin R Boucher 

School Of Arts & Science 

Economics 



Denise M Bovce 

School Of Arts & Science 

Communications 



Anthony F Boyer 

School Of Arts & Science 

Biology 



Karly Steiner Braden 

School Of Management 

Marketing 

Communications 




Emily C Brady 

School Of Arts & Science 

English 



Lauren Brady 

School Of Education 

Human Development 

Child In Society 



Lindsay A Brainerd 

School Of Arts & Science 

Communications 



Laurence VV Braun 

School Of Arts & Science 

Theater Arts 

English 



Katherine L Brenan 

School Of Arts & Science 

History 



278 Seni 



Peter J Brennan 

School Of Arts & Science 

English 



John P Breslin 

School Of Arts & Science 

Political Science 



Maeve K Bresnahan 

School Of Education 

Human Development 

Philosophy 



Justin M Brill 

School Of Management 

Marketing 



Francois L Brochu 

School Of Management 

Finance 




Rebecca J Brooke 

School Of Arts & Science 

Psychology 



Ashley F Brown 

School Of Arts & Science 

Communications 



Katrina R Brown 

School Of Arts & Science 

International Studies 



William F Browne 

School Of Arts & Science 

Chemistry 

Philosophy 



Drew Brownell 

School Of Management 

Finance 

Marketing 




Willis M Brucker 

School Of Management 

Finance 

Accounting 



Lauren A Bruich 

School Of Management 

Finance 

Marketing 



Vincent Bruno 

School Of Management 

Accounting 



Kathleen M Buchheit 

School Of Arts & Science 

Economics 



Ryan J Buckley 

School Of Arts & Science 

Political Science 




Laura K Bucks 

School Of Management 

Marketing 



Alexa C Buffum 

School Of Arts & Science 

Rom Lang-Hispanic Stdy 

Psychology 



Anthony Buglione 

School Of Arts & Science 

Communications 

Sociology 



Karen E Bukowick 

School Of Arts & Science 

English 



Sarah Bulin 

School Of Education 

Elementary Education 

Human Development 



1 



Seniors 279 




Shawn M Burdick 
School Of Arts & Science 
Computer Science-A&S 



Christopher J Burke 

School Of Arts & Science 

Music 




Kevin Burke 

School Of Management 

Finance 



Leonard K Burke 

School Of Management 

Finance 



Christine D Burns 

School Of Arts & Science 

Communications 



Christopher M Burns 

School Of Arts & Science 

Sociology 



Thomas W Burns 

School Of Arts & Science 

Political Science 




Susan H Burton 


Robin A Butterhof 


Jason W Buttorf 


Maura E Byrne 


Susanna M Byrne 


" 


School Of Arts & Science 


School Of Arts & Science 


School Of Management 


School Of Arts & Science 


School Of Arts & Science 


ii 


Psychology 


English 
Communications 


Finance 
Accounting 


Communications 


Economics 


"in 



280 Sen 




Taylor M Byrnes 

School Of Management 

Accounting 



Diana C Calderon 

School Of Arts & Science 

Economics 



Ellen M Cahill 

School Of Management 

Accounting 



Alison M Cain 

School Of Arts & Science 

Sociology 



Ian C Cain 

School Of Arts & Science 

Political Science 



Jordan R Calabrese 

School Of Management 

Finance 

Economics-CSOM 




Elena C Caldwell 

School Of Arts & Science 

English 



Megan E Callihan 

School Of Arts & Science 

Political Science 



Gabriel J Camacho 

School Of Management 

Finance 

Economics-CSOM 



Aaron C Campini 

School Of Arts & Science 

Biology 




Christopher J Capano 

School Of Arts & Science 

Psychology 



Jeffrey R Capotosto 

School Of Arts & Science 

Communications 





Matthew G Capstick 
School Of Arts & Science 
Environment Geoscience 



Rowena Capuno 

School Of Arts & Science 

English 



Seniors 281 




Mike Alexander 



Cheers to Senior year! photo submitted by Daniela Colognari 



282 Senic 




Nicole Borone, Rosa Kurok 



Su Park, Jennifer Chong, Michelle Chemg 



Seniors 283 




Dana Howarth, Kim Gassner, Alissa MarzeHi, Meaghan Casey, Teri Colwell, Sheila Kilbane 



Diana Fairchild Carbonell, Liz White 



284 Seni 




Catelyn Cox, Lizzy Eldon, Laura Sanchez, Julie McCartney, Beth Ketainec, Kara Castagna, Heidi Scheer, Rosa Kuak, Maggie Ward 



Seniors 285 



Marissa A Caputo 

School Of Arts & Science 

Communications 



Christopher M Caradec 

School Of Arts & Science 

History 



Joseph ] Carapiet 

School Of Arts & Science 

Political Science 



Karen L Carberry 

School Of Management 

Finance 



Bradley J Carbone 

School Of Arts & Science 

Communications 




Melissa B Carboni 
School Of Education 
Elementary Education 
Human Development 



Thomas M Carco 

School Of Arts & Science 

Theology 



Mark Carden 

School Of Management 

Finance 



Caitlin Carey 

School Of Arts & Science 

English 



Roderick L Carey 
School Of Education 
Secondary Education 





A;fc^l 



Denise E Carlon 

School Of Arts & Science 

English 

Sociology 



Courtney B Carlson 

School Of Arts & Science 

English 



Edward A Carlton 

School Of Arts & Science 

Political Science 



Brad C Carney 

School Of Management 

Finance 



Scott C Carol 

School Of Arts & Science 

Communications 




Corwin J Carr 

School Of Arts & Science 

Philosophy 



Derek W Carr 
School Of Arts & Science 
Computer Science-A&S 



Donna Carroll 

School Of Arts & Science 

Chemistry 



Lauren A Carroll 

School Of Education 

Early Childhood 

Communications 



Salvatore A Caruso 

School Of Arts & Science 

Theology 



286 Seniors 



iL*^ 



Christopher D Case 

School Of Arts & Science 

English 



Kevin M Casey 

School Of Arts & Science 

Film Studies 



Meaghan S Casey 

School Of Arts & Science 

English 

Communications 



Daniel J Cashman 

School Of Arts & Science 

Psychology 



Jaclyn F Cashman 

School Of Arts & Science 

Communications 




Kara E Castagna 

School Of Arts & Science 

Economics 



Allison C Castaldi 

School Of Arts & Science 

Economics 




Michael R Castele 
School Of Arts & Science 
Environment Geoscience 



David F Castillo 

School Of Arts & Science 

Communications 



Eric D Castillo 

School Of Arts & Science 

Biology A&S B.A 



Meaghan C Caulfield 

School Of Arts & Science 

Communications 




Thomas J Cavanagh 

School Of Arts & Science 

History 



Joseph E Celia 

School Of Management 

Finance 

Accounting 



Katherine A Celli 

School Of Arts & Science 

Computer Science-A&S 

Sociology 



Seniors 287 





Lauren A Centofanti 

School Of Arts & Science 

English 



Vinay Chadha 

School Of Management 

Accounting 




Patrick G Chadwick 

School Of Arts & Science 

Communications 



Jason R Chalifoux 

School Of Arts & Science 

Biochemistry 




Ana C Chamberlain 

School Of Arts & Science 

Communications 



Jenny P Chan 

School Of Management 

Computer Science-CSOM 



Andrew J Chang 
School Of Management 
Operations / Tech Mngmt 



Jennifer Y Chang 

School Of Arts & Science 

Economics 



Daniel B Chapin 

School Of Arts & Science 

Political Science 




Amy L Chapman 
School Of Education 

History 
Secondary Education 



Paul R Chase 

School Of Arts & Science 
Economics 



Eric Chen 
School Of Arts & Science 
Math /Computer Science 
Computer Science-A&S 



Miin-Jiun Chen 

School Of Management 

Marketing 



Tanya Z Chen 

School Of Arts & Science 

Economics 



288 Seniors 



! 




Ying Chen 
School Of Management 

Finance 
Computer Science-CSOM 



Michelle D Cherng 

School Of Education 

Elementary Education 

Communications 



Daniel M Cheron 

School Of Arts & Science 

Psychology 



Philip Y Chiang 

School Of Management 

Finance 



Cyrus T Childs 

School Of Arts & Science 

Economics 




Kimberly A Chin 

School Of Management 

Accounting 

Information Systems 



Mi-Goung Choi 

School Of Management 

Accounting 



Jennie J Choy 

School Of Management 

Finance 

Accounting 




Adam Chmielewski 
School Of Arts & Science 
Computer Science-A&S 



Austin K Cho 

School Of Arts & Science 

Economics 

Philosophy 



Frank Cho 

School Of Arts & Science 

Economics 



Ernest D Choi 

School Of Arts & Science 

Economics 




Grace E Chon 

School Of Education 

Early Childhood 

Communications 



Brian R Choquette 

School Of Management 

Marketing 



Yi-Chih Chou 

School Of Management 

Finance 



Jennifer C Chow 

School Of Arts & Science 

Biology 




Marion J Christensen 

School Of Nursing 

Nursing 



Timothy Christensen 

School Of Management 

Computer Science-CSOM 



Gregory T Christian 

School Of Arts & Science 

Chemistry 

Economics 



Caitlin T Christie 

School Of Arts & Science 

Psychology 



Seniors 289 





Anita M Christy 

School Of Arts & Science 

Psychology 



Danwei Chu 

School Of Arts & Science 

History 




Brian H Chung 

School Of Arts & Science 

Political Science 



Jae Y Chung 

School Of Arts & Science 

English 




Christopher C Ciano 

School Of Arts & Science 

Psychology 



Kenneth A Cicuto 

School Of Arts & Science 

Biochemistry 



Christine Cingari 

School Of Nursing 

Nursing 



Mark J Cintolo 

School Of Arts & Science 

Economics 

Mathematics 



Lisa S Cioffari 

School Of Arts & Science 

English 




Gregory J Ciparelli 

School Of Arts & Science 

Political Science 



Amy Claffey 

School Of Arts & Science 

Communications 



Alaina Clark 

School Of Arts & Science 

Communications 



Rebekah Clark 

School Of Arts & Science 

Psychology 



William T Clark 

School Of Management 

Marketing 



290 Seniors 



Nicole L Clemens 

School Of Arts & Science 

Economics 




1 



Matthew P Colantonio 

School Of Arts & Science 

English 



Aundrea J Cline Thomas 

School Of Arts & Science 

Communications 



Katherine A Coakley 

School Of Arts & Science 

English 



Ingrid C Coats 

School Of Arts & Science 

Communications 



Kevane L Coleman 

School Of Arts & Science 

Theater Arts 



Elizabeth L Collins 

School Of Arts & Science 

Economics 



Karinn E Cologne 

School Of Arts & Science 

Theater Arts 



Paul J Colahan 

School Of Arts & Science 

Political Science 

Communications 




Daniela B Colognori 

School Of Arts & Science 

Psychology 




Aidan J Colton 
School Of Arts & Science 
Environment Geoscience 



Katherine J Commito 

School Of Management 

Accounting 



Theresa M Colwell 

School Of Arts & Science 

Psychology 




Kyle R Conley 

School Of Arts & Science 

Economics 




Seniors 29] 




Caitlin Papszycki, Diane Cotter, Bryan AAcKeon, Lindsey Tnorn-Bingham 



Mike Galvin, Andy Maples, Jen Savage, Chris Jones, Drew Tuozzolo 



292 Seniors 



**_fc 




Carmen Manrara, Kinga Krisko, Billy Clark 



Taryn Marino, Barbara Cusumano, Bemette Green, (Crystal Lee, Anion Klein, 
Elizabeth Gnney, Vanessa Bolano, Lairen Avalony, Alicia Corbosiero 

Seniors 293 




Julia You, Shannon Gherty, Maura Byrne, Pepi AAendez 



Javier Herrera, Sam Porter 



294 Seniors 




Jen DeRagon, Matt Tnorton, Vivian Sotomayor 



Seniors 295 



Stephen Conlev 

School Of Arts & Science 

Philosophy 



Kristin E Connall 

School Of Management 

Finance 

Marketing 



Allison B Connors 
School Of Education 
Elementary Education 



Nicholas Connors 
School Of Management 

General Mgmt 
Information Technology 



Carela Contreras-Catigano 

School Of Arts & Science 

Economics 




Theodore G Cook 

School Of Arts & Science 

Mathematics 



Alexis B Cooke 

School Of Arts & Science 

English 



Howard J Coomes 

School Of Management 

Finance 

Economics-CSOM 



James Cooper 

School Of Management 

Marketing 



Michael R Coppola 

School Of Education 

Elementary Education 

Communications 




Richard A Coppola 

School Of Arts & Science 

History 



Julia F Coquillerte 

School Of Arts & Science 

Psychology 



Alicia M Corbosiero 

School Of Nursing 

Nursing 



Christina E Corda 

School Of Arts & Science 

Psychology 

Communications 



Kyle V Corigliano 

School Of Management 

Finance 

Accounting 




John P Corrigan 

School Of Management 

Finance 

Accounting 



Nicole S Corvini 

School Of Arts & Science 

History 

Romance Lang-French 



Christopher Cosentino 

School Of Management 

Operations /Tech Mngmt 

Information Systems 



Joseph T Costello 

School Of Arts & Science 

Political Science 



Diane W Cotter 
School Of Education 
Elementary Education 
Human Development 



296 Seniors 




Michaella L Coutu 

School Of Management 

Marketing 



Katelyn M Cox 
School Of Education 
Elementary Education 



Adam Cozzini 

School Of Management 

Finance 



Jill M Crawford 

School Of Arts & Science 

Economics 



James J Cristiano 

School Of Arts & Science 

Economics 




Stephen Thomas Cromack 

School Of Arts & Science 

Comp Sci A&S B.S 

I 



Daniel P Cronyn 

School Of Arts & Science 

English 




Amanda J Crowley 
School Of Education 
Human Development 



Christopher L Crowley 

School Of Arts & Science 

Communications 



Christal M Crowley 

School Of Education 

Sociology 




Elizabeth J Crowley 

School Of Arts & Science 

History 



Anthony Crosson 

School Of Management 

General Mgmt 



John L Crouse 

School Of Arts & Science 

Theology 

American Studies 



Kimberly R Crowe 

School Of Management 

Accounting 

Economics 




Seniors 297 





Kevin J Crowley 

School Of Arts & Science 

Communications 



Kelly L Crowther 

School Of Management 

Finance 

Marketing 




Monique C Cunin 

School Of Arts & Science 

Biology 



Elizabeth A Cunney 

School Of Arts & Science 

Communications 




Alison M Cunningham 

School Of Arts & Science 

Political Science 



Emily H Cunningham 

School Of Arts & Science 

English 



Genevieve E Curcio 
School Of Education 
Human Development 



Jennifer L Curcio 
School Of Education 

Early Childhood 
Human Development 



Barbara Cusumano 

School Of Arts & Science 

Communications 




Molly E Cutcliffe 

School Of Arts & Science 

Psychology 



Michael D'Agnese 

School Of Arts & Science 

Chemistry 



Michael J Dailey 

School Of Arts & Science 

Psychology 



Sannisha Dale 

School Of Arts & Science 

Psychology 



John J Dalebroux 

School Of Arts & Science 

Political Science 

Psychology 



298 Seniors 




Bryan A D'Alessandro 

School Of Management 

Finance 

Accounting 



Doris Dalrymple 

School Of Arts & Science 

Communications 



Gerard Daly 

School Of Arts & Science 

Biology 



William M Daly 

School Of Management 

Finance 



Uma J Damle 

School Of Arts & Science 

Mathematics 

Economics 




Emily J D' Amour 

School Of Arts & Science 

English 



Molly E Dando 

School Of Management 

Marketing 



Nika K Daragan 

School Of Arts & Science 

Political Science 



Michael J Davies 

School Of Arts & Science 

History 

Theology 



James Dawson 

School Of Education 

Secondary Education 

History 




Katherine M Dawson 

School Of Arts & Science 

English 



Michael L Day 

School Of Arts & Science 

Comp Sci A&S B.S 



Bryan M Deangelis 

School Of Arts & Science 

Political Science 

Economics 



Felecia Deangelis 

School Of Arts & Science 

Communications 



Kristen Debay 

School Of Arts & Science 

Psychology 




John Decaro 

School Of Arts & Science 

Mathematics 



Jessica A Decker 

School Of Management 

Finance 

Marketing 



Jannine E Decosta 

School Of Nursing 

Nursing 



Jonathan P Dee 

School Of Arts & Science 

Communications 



Timothy X Deely 

School Of Arts & Science 

Philosophy 



Seniors 299 




Allison Delaney 

School Of Management 

Marketing 




Sophie B De Figueiredo 

School Of Arts & Science 

Psychology 

English 



Susan L Degregorio 
School Of Education 
Human Development 



Anna Deligianidis 

School Of Management 

Corporate Systems 



David J Delia Penna 

School Of Arts & Science 

Psychology 



Lisa Delsignore 

School Of Arts & Science 

Biology 



Peter E Demartini 

School Of Arts & Science 

Political Science 

Theology 



Henry Dematteis 

School Of Management 

Finance 



Alexander A Demidov 

School Of Arts & Science 

Physics 



Peter Dennis 

School Of Arts & Science 

History 



Andrew J Degaravilla 

School Of Arts & Science 

Economics 




Juan De Jesus 

School Of Management 

Finance 

English 




Jean C Del Vecchio 
School Of Education 
Elementary Education 




Tracy M Dennis 
School Of Education 

English 
Secondary Education 



300 Senic 




Jennifer Deragon 
School Of Education 
Elementary Education 



Jason Deramo 

School Of Arts & Science 

Philosophy 



Anna DeSista 

School Of Arts & Science 

Psychology 



Raphael R Desouza 

School Of Management 

Finance 



1 



Naomi J Destaffarny 

School Of Arts & Science 

Biology 




Nina I Detwiler 

School Of Management 

Accounting 



Meghan M Devaney 

School Of Management 

Finance 

Economics 



Michael D'Hemecourt 

School Of Arts & Science 

Communications 



Julie A Diberardino 
School Of Education 
Human Development 



Stephen Dicheck 

School Of Management 

Information Systems 

Marketing 



Christina Difeo 

School Of Arts & Science 

Communications 



Michael G Devine 

School Of Management 

Finance 



Emily Devita 

School Of Management 

Marketing 

Finance 



Kerri L Devlin 

School Of Nursing 

Nursing 






Seniors 301 





pwi.ia 




1 ^ i 




k 
\ -'I ^K _i 




Vivian Sotomayor, Meghan McGuinn, Anna Sweeney, Jen DeRagon, Kerri Anderson 




Jeff Rallo, Bobby Amara, Andrew Goedert, Tim Carraher 




Nicole Barone, Maggie Ward, Rosa Kwak, Heidi SaSeer, Lauran Mateus 



302 Seniors 




Casie Mazilly, Cameron Esposito, Jasmine Matthews 



Kairiin MacDonald, Erin Goulding, Taryn Marino, Elizabeth Cunney, Dana Lopreato 

Seniors 303 




Lauren Tallevi, Danielle Evers, Emily Keams 



Jaclyn Oleary, Caitlin Healey, Lisa DelSignore 



304 Seniors 





Lauren Southard,, Meagban Casey, Alissa Marzetti, Dana Howarth, Sheila Kilbane, Teri Col well 



Natalia Martinez, Kaitlin Macabnald, Erin Goulding, Taryn Marino, 
Barbara Cusumano, Dana Lopreato, Kari Russ 



ill I Mi 




Jennifer Salerno, Leticia Campos, Liz Abbott, Gina Naranjo, Christina 
Apostolakis, Katine Tsagaroulis, Natalia Mendez, Lea Rosemurgy 




Seniors 305 




John Dimanno 

School Of Arts & Science 

Biology A&S B.A 



Katherine Dimare 

School Of Nursing 

Nursing 



Cynthia Dimascio 
School Of Education 
Elementary Education 



Michael J Di Martina 

School Of Arts & Science 

History 



Anthony M Dinallo 

School Of Arts & Science 

Psychology 




Andrew C Dipaola 

School Of Arts & Science 

History 



Mark A Dipierro 

School Of Management 

Marketing 



Paul Dipilato 

School Of Management 

Computer Science-CSOM 

Information Systems 



Rose A Disalvo 

School Of Arts & Science 

Sociology 



Lindsey E Disch 

School Of Arts & Science 

Sociology 




Michael P Disch 

School Of Management 

Accounting 



Andrew H Dix 

School Of Arts & Science 

Computer Science-A&S 

Theology 



Diana T Doan 

School Of Arts & Science 

English 



Elizabeth Doan 

School Of Education 

Secondary Education 

Mathematics 



Horace G Dodd 

School Of Arts & Science 

Communications 




Patrick M Doherty 

School Of Management 

Finance 

Marketing 



Sheila K Doherty 

School Of Arts & Science 

Psychology 



Daniel M Dolan 

School Of Arts & Science 

Psychology 



Jessica Dolan 

School Of Education 

Psychology 



Matthew Dolan 

School Of Arts & Science 

Political Science 

Communications 



306 Seniors 




Maureen M Dollinger 

School Of Arts & Science 

Political Science 



Meghan R Donnelly 

School Of Arts & Science 

Sociology 



Angela Doucette 

School Of Education 

Elementary Education 

Sociology 



Diana R Dombrowski 

School Of Arts & Science 

Political Science 



Chris Donadio 

School Of Arts & Science 

Political Science 

History 



Jacqueline Donahue 

School Of Arts & Science 

Psychology 



Nathaniel J Donahue 

School Of Arts & Science 

Art History 




Ryan J Dono 

School Of Arts & Science 

Psychology 



Elizabeth F Donovan 

School Of Education 

Elementary Education 



Jennifer S Donovan 

School Of Arts & Science 

Biology 



Ryan Donovan 

School Of Management 

Finance 




Brian C Doucette 

School Of Arts & Science 

Economics 





Kali A Downer 

School Of Arts & Science 

Communications 



Terrence F Doyle 

School Of Arts & Science 

History 



Seniors 307 





Adam D Draves 

School Of Arts & Science 

English 



Vytautas Drazdauskas 

School Of Management 

Finance 

General Mgmt 




Colette P Dribben 

School Of Arts & Science 

Psychology 



Danielle M Driscoll 

School Of Arts & Science 

English 

Philosophy 




Monica A Driscoll 

School Of Arts & Science 

Sociology 

Communications 



Patrick Driscoll 

School Of Arts & Science 

Economics 

History 



Adam S Drucker 

School Of Management 

Marketing 

Finance 



Leslie M D'Souza 
School Of Education 

Communications 
Human Development 



Nicholas Dubrowsky 

School Of Arts & Science 

Political Science 




Kevin C Duff 

School Of Management 

Marketing 



Cameron H Duffy 

School Of Arts & Science 

History 

Romance Lang-French 



Connor F Duffy 

School Of Arts & Science 

Economics 



Jane R Duket 

School Of Arts & Science 

Sociology 



Damien P Dumouchel 

School Of Arts & Science 

Psychology 

Sociology 



308 Seniors 




Justin Dumouchelle 

School Of Arts & Science 

Chemistry 

Economics 



Lora A Du Moulin 

School Of Arts & Science 

History 



Steven P Dunlap 

School Of Arts & Science 

Psychology 



Adrienne Dunn 
School Of Education 
Elementary Education 



Kristin M Dunn 

School Of Management 

Accounting 

Finance 




Matthew Dunn 

School Of Arts & Science 

Psychology 



Anna M Dunne 

School Of Arts & Science 

Political Science 



Kevin Dunphy 

School Of Management 

Marketing 



Michael E Durand 

School Of Management 

Finance 



Alyssa R Durbec 

School Of Education 

Secondary Education 

Mathematics 




James V Durgana 

School Of Arts & Science 

Political Science 

Communications 



Sara Durgin 

School Of Arts & Science 

Communications 



Aine L Durkin 

School Of Arts & Science 

Sociology 



Sean M Dwyer 

School Of Education 

History 



Michael Early 

School Of Management 

Finance 

Information Systems 




Kathryn E Eaton 
School Of Education 
Human Development 



Richard Egelhof 

School Of Arts & Science 

History 



Elizabeth A Eidson 

School Of Arts & Science 

Psychology 



Chad Elder 

School Of Arts & Science 

Psychology 



Jennifer Elfstrom 

School Of Arts & Science 

Psychology 



Seniors 309 




Daniel M Elman 

School Of Arts & Science 

Psychology 



Coleen A Elstermeyer 

School Of Arts & Science 

Political Science 




Brandon G Emrick 

School Of Arts & Science 

Economics 



Gerard P Erbeck 
School Of Management 
Operations /Tech Mngmt 



Sarah K England 

School Of Arts & Science 

Communications 



Nick Enos 

School Of Arts & Science 

Biology 



Mark Enright 

School Of Arts & Science 

History 

Political Science 



James D Ensign 

School Of Management 

Accounting 




Kathryn K Erno 
School Of Arts & Science 

Communications 
Rom Lang-Hispanic Stdy 



Marisella Escalante 

School Of Management 

Accounting 



Michael C Estes 

School Of Arts & Science 

Biology 



Iliana E Estevez 
School Of Arts & Science 

English 
Rom Lang-Hispanic Stdy 



310 Seniors 



lUk. 



Caroline E Ettman 

School Of Arts & Science 

English 



Danielle M Evers 

School Of Arts & Science 

Biochemistry 



Emily Eule 

School Of Nursing 

Nursing 



Christopher J Eustance 

School Of Management 

Finance 



Elizabeth M Evans 

School Of Arts & Science 

Romance Lang-French 



Shayla T Ewing 

School Of Management 

Finance 



Alexis Exarhopoulos 

School Of Arts & Science 

Biology 



Yewande Fadarey 

School Of Arts & Science 

Economics 

Mathematics 



Jonathan Evans 

School Of Education 

Human Development 

English 




Alison Fahey 

School Of Arts & Science 

Communications 




David W Faleris 

School Of Arts & Science 

Music 



Thomas C Farrell 

School Of Arts & Science 

Political Science 



Seniors 311 




Chris Lai, Eddie Choi, Julie Lee, Diana Suh, Brandon Wong, Tina Rhee, Henry Hail 



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Peter Brerman, Pavan Rajwanijim Kolesk 



Ally Wilson, Brian Moynihan 



312 Seni 



feii-A. 




AAollly Cutdiffe, Rina Majiddal, Chase Smith, Leks Strauss 



Evan Gwyn, Mike Coppola, James Favreau, Matt Sequin 



Seniors 313 




John Mclnnes 


Amy Morrow 


Adam Thompson, Jessica Seaver 


















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AAeoghan Casey, Kim G 


assner, Milisa Abas-Mamers 







Alexis Exarhopoulos, Katina Tsagaroulis, Christina Apostolakis, Anthi Phermatikos 



k Night Out at CitySide photo SLbmiffed by Caitlin Morrell 



314 Seniors 




Coed Recreation Softball Team Trades Sweats and Hats for Dresses and Suits photo submitted by Amy Morrow 



Seniors 315 



Bernie Farwell 

School Of Arts & Science 

Biology 



Michael J Fassel 

School Of Management 

Marketing 



Miguel Faustino 

School Of Management 

Finance 

Accounting 



Brian J Favat 
School Of Management 

Finance 
Operations /Tech Mngmt 



James J. Favreau 

School Of Arts & Science 

Computer Science-A&S 

History 




Anthony J Fazio 

School Of Management 

Finance 



Christopher C Fernando 

School Of Management 

Finance 



Allen M Ferrucci 

School Of Arts & Science 

Biology 



^m^M t 




Katie Feder 

School Of Management 

Finance 



Joseph Federico 

School Of Arts & Science 

Communications 



Edward Feeley 

School Of Management 

Accounting 



Michael B Fenton 

School Of Management 

Finance 




Jonathan T Ferrara 

School Of Management 

Finance 



Steven W Ferraro 

School Of Management 

Finance 



Brian Ferrasci-OMalley 
School Of Arts & Science 

Biology 

Music 



Steven B Ferrigno 

School Of Arts & Science 

Economics 




Kora N Fikes 

School Of Arts & Science 

Biology 



Patrick M Filice 

School Of Management 

Finance 



Doriana Filipi 

School Of Arts & Science 

Biochemistry 



Catherine Finegan 

School Of Arts & Science 

Psychology 



316 Seniors 



i£U*_ 




Alexander J Finigan 

School Of Arts & Science 

History 



Casey K Finn 

School Of Nursing 

Nursing 



Erin C Finnigan 

School Of Management 

Accounting 



Aliza Finn Welch 

School Of Arts & Science 

Communications 



Katherine L Fiorile 

School Of Arts & Science 

Communications 



Laura M Fitzgerald 
School Of Education 
Elementary Education 



Lauren Fitzgerald 

School Of Arts & Science 

Sociology 



Theresa Fitzgerald 

School Of Nursing 

Nursing 



liichard A Fiore 

School Of Management 

Accounting 

Finance 




Matthew H Fitzpatrick 

School Of Arts & Science 

Communications 




Katherine M Fleming 

School Of Management 

Marketing 



William E Floeckher 

School Of Management 

Accounting 

Finance 



Seniors 31/ 





Osly J Flores 

School Of Arts & Science 

Psychology 



Terric Seong Y Foong 

School Of Management 

Marketing 



Stefanie L Foster 

School Of Arts & Science 

Psychology 

Hispanic Experience 



Robert F Fountain 

School Of Arts & Science 

Economics 



Sarah Fox 

School Of Arts & Science 

Germanic Studies 

Political Science 



Arthur M Fraas 

School Of Arts & Science 

Theology 



Jessica A Franco 

School Of Management 

Accounting 



Kathryn L Frangos 

School Of Management 

Marketing 



Jennifer L Frankel 

School Of Nursing 

Nursing 



Jennifer Frates 

School Of Management 

Accounting 

Finance 



Mary M Flynn 

School Of Arts & Science 

Economics 




Lauren Forger 

School Of Education 

Secondary Education 

Mathematics 




Amanda C Fraga 

School Of Arts & Science 

Sociology 

Communications 




Phillip Frattaroli 

School Of Arts & Science 

Political Science 



318 Seniors 



■cut. 



Richard A Freed 

School Of Arts & Science 

Communications 



Matthew French 

School Of Management 

Finance 



Adam J Friedman 

School Of Management 

Finance 



Nicole Friscia 

School Of Management 

Marketing 



Kevin Froeb 

School Of Management 

Marketing 




Andrew B Fromm 

School Of Arts & Science 

Economics 



Ayisha L Fryer 

School Of Arts & Science 

Economics 



Sacha E Fung Kee Fung 

School Of Arts & Science 

Mathematics 

Economics 



Elizabeth A Furbish 

School Of Arts & Science 

English 



Nicholas T Gagner 

School Of Arts & Science 

Biology 



Scott A Gagnon 

School Of Management 

Finance 

Information Systems 



Matthew J Gaimari 

School Of Arts & Science 

History 



Juliana D Gaita 

School Of Arts & Science 

Communications 



A fe^^ 



Denis Gallagher 

School Of Management 

Marketing 

Finance 



Elizabeth J Gallagher 
School Of Education 
Human Development 



Jennifer Gallagher 

School Of Management 

Finance 

Marketing 



Caroline B Galle 

School Of Management 

Marketing 

Psychology 



Joseph A Gabelli 

School Of Arts & Science 

English 




Kenneth A Galbraith 

School Of Arts & Science 

Biology 




Michael Galvin 

School Of Arts & Science 

History 



Seniors 319 








Jennifer M Garbach 
School Of Management 

Economics-Csom 
Operations /Tech Mngmt 



Denise Garcia 

School Of Arts & Science 

Biology 




Joie Garfunkle 

School Of Arts & Science 

Chemistry 



Karen Elizabeth Garnier 

School Of Education 

Elementary Education 

English 




Brian B Garrett 

School Of Arts & Science 

History 



Patricia A Garrity 

School Of Education 

Human Development 

Sociology 



Patrick Garrity 

School Of Arts & Science 

Mathematics 



Colin F Garstka 

School Of Arts & Science 

Theater Arts 



Stephen Garvey 

School Of Management 

Marketing 




Nicholas P Gaspari 

School Of Arts & Science 

History 



Kimberly D Gassner 
School Of Education 
Elementary Education 
Human Development 



Matthew S Gaudette 

School Of Arts & Science 

History 



Matthew H Gaul 

School Of Arts & Science 

Philosophy 

Theology 



Stanislav V Gayshan 

School Of Managemen 

Russian 



320 Seniors 



^ 




Jordan Gellatly 

School Of Management 

Finance 

i Operations / Tech Mngmt 



Andrea C Giokas 
School Of Arts & Science 



Biology 



Margaret M Giorgio 

School Of Arts & Science 

Philosophy 

Political Science 



Michael A Gentile 

School Of Management 

Accounting 

Finance 



Christopher D George 

School Of Arts & Science 

Political Science 



Melanie Getreuer 

School Of Arts & Science 

International Studies 



Gabrielle K Ghafari 

School Of Arts & Science 

Psychology 






^LJm^Mjik 



Yousef H Ghanem 


Shannon Gherty 


Maureen E Gibbons 


Brad Gibson 


Kathryn M Gillick 


School Of Management 


School Of Arts & Science 


School Of Arts & Science 


School Of Arts & Science 


School Of Arts & Science 


Finance 


Communications 


English 


History 


English 


Marketing 






Economics 


Communications 




Michael C Giordano 
School Of Management 

Finance 
Operations /Tech Mngmt 





Amy Gips 

School Of Management 

Finance 



Seniors 321 





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Christina Apostolakis, Becca Brooke 



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Rachel Bausch, Brenna Bonner, Kate Sulliv 



Jim Belushi, Jill Landry, Suzie Pomponio, Karen Zelenka 



322 Seniors 




Retire Time While Out at the Bars submitted by Caitlin Morrell 



Mike Shold, Bing Wo, Daamsh Ahmad, Mark Cintolo, Kevin Crowley, Roger Smareage 




Great Times With a large Group of Great People photo submitted by Christina DFeo 



Seniors 323 




Meg Weake, Ellen Rains, Chris Rizzo, Laura Frado. Rob Klein 



Mike DisaS, Meghan Maugeri 



324 Seniors 




Maura O'Day, Jill Crawford 



Joe Lee, Rob Sohn, Mi-Goung Choi, Eddie Choi, Paul Joo, Brian Chung, Julie Lee, Tina Rhee 



Jared B Giroux 

School Of Arts & Science 

History 



David M Giulietti 

School Of Management 

Marketing 



Stephen P Giusti 

School Of Arts & Science 

Chemistry 



April L Glazier 

School Of Education 

Early Childhood 



Christopher L Glennon 

School Of Arts & Science 

English 




Vincent Godin 

School Of Management 

Accounting 

Finance 



Daniel Goehry 

School Of Management 

Marketing 

Finance 



Andrew Goldberg 

School Of Arts & Science 

Biology 



Stacy H Goldberg 

School Of Arts & Science 

Communications 



Jaron Goldstein 

School Of Management 

Marketing 




Jessica LGolman 

School Of Arts & Science 

Psychology 



Bianca M Gomez 

School Of Arts & Science 

Communications 

English 



David Goodman 

School Of Arts & Science 

Political Science 



Douglas M Goodwin 

School Of Arts & Science 

Psychology 



Amanda E Gordon 

School Of Management 

Marketing 

Political Science 




Noelle Gorgis 

School Of Arts & Science 

Sociology 



Tara Gormel 

School Of Management 

Finance 



Lauren C Goslin 
School Of Arts & Science 
Rom Lang-Hispanic Study 



Carolyn Gottstein 

School Of Arts & Science 

Communications 



Erin Goulding 

School Of Education 

Human Development 

Sociology 






326 Seniors 



Kk£t 



Katherine L Grabenstatter 

School Of Management 

Finance 

Accounting 



Christina Graceffa 

School Of Arts & Science 

Communications 



Christine Grad 

School Of Management 

Marketing 



Patrick W Grady 

School Of Management 

Finance 

Economics 



Emily Graefe 

School Of Arts & Science 

History 

Music 




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Elizabeth L. Graves 

School Of Arts & Science 

English 



Benjamin M Grayson 

School Of Arts & Science 

History 




Nicole R Gregorio 
School Of Education 
Elementary Education 



Elizabeth R Gregory 

School Of Arts & Science 

Sociology 




Rima K Griauzde 

School Of Arts & Science 

Biology 



Melissa E Gridley 
School Of Education 
Elementary Education 



David M Grazioli 

School Of Management 

Accounting 

Finance 



Michael Greco 

School Of Management 

Information Systems 



John J Green 

School Of Arts & Science 

History 




Sen 





Kristen A Grieco 

School Of Arts & Science 

Communications 

Psychology 



Michael Gries 
School Of Management 

Marketing 
Information Technology 




Caroline Griffin 

School Of Arts & Science 

Communications 



Mary C Griffin 

School Of Arts & Science 

Biology 




Oliver Grigsby 

School Of Arts & Science 

English 



Marisa E Grillo 

School Of Arts & Science 

Chemistry 

Linguistics 



Michael A Grippaldi 

School Of Arts & Science 

Biology 



Jacqueline Grondin 

School Of Management 

Marketing 



Patrick J Grucela 

School Of Education 

Secondary Education 

History 




Alexander J Gschwend 

School Of Arts & Science 

History 



Matthew B Guanci 

School Of Management 

Economics 



Charles Guardia 

School Of Arts & Science 

Biology 



Rainer Gude 

School Of Arts & Science 

Theology 



Dean P Gudicello 

School Of Arts & Science 

Political Science 



328 Seniors 



Stephanie Guertin 

School Of Arts & Science 

Psychology 



Gina Guillaume-Joseph 

School Of Arts & Science 

Computer Science 



Nicole Gunderson 
School Of Education 
Elementary Education 



; ...I 

Koustantiu Gundilovich 

School Of Arts & Science 

Biology 




Sean M Gurdak 

School Of Arts & Science 

Biology 



Kristin Haffizulla 

School Of Arts & Science 

Biology 



Benjamin Hain 

School Of Arts & Science 

History 



Ak#/ 



Mark A Guzzetta 

School Of Arts & Science 

Political Science 



Evan W Gwyn 

School Of Arts & Science 

Economics 



Thomas J Hackney 

School Of Arts & Science 

Economics 



Omorogieva Guobadia 

School Of Arts & Science 

Economics 




Zaid Haddadin 

School Of Arts & Science 

Biology 




Anne E Hagbom 

School Of Nursing 

Nursing 



Filmon B Hagheray 

School Of Arts & Science 

History 



Linda Y Hah 

School Of Arts & Science 

English 



Henry C Hail 

School Of Arts & Science 

Sociology 




James M Hairston 

School Of Arts & Science 

Political Science 



Jennifer E Hall 

School Of Arts & Science 

Philosophy 



Rebecca A Hall 

School Of Arts & Science 

History 



Michael Halliburton 

School Of Arts & Science 

Communications 



Seniors 329 





Kevin M Hansberry 

School Of Management 

Finance 

Accounting 



Jennifer L Halliday 
School Of Management 
Operations /Tech Mngmt 
Information Technology 



Meghan Hammond 
School Of Arts & Science 

English 
Rom Lang-Hispanic Study 




Ashly E Hanna 

School Of Arts & Science 

Political Science 

Romance Lang-French 



John Hannick 

School Of Management 

Accounting 

Finance 




Robert G Hansen 

School Of Management 

Finance 



Robert M. Harper 

School Of Management 

Finance 

History 



William A Harris 

School Of Arts & Science 

English 

Communications 



Christy Harrison 

School Of Education 

Elementary Education 

Math /Computer Science 




Donald M Harrison 

School Of Arts & Science 

English 



Katharine V Harrison 

School Of Arts & Science 

Biology 



Melissa A Hart 

School Of Arts & Science 

Biology 



Meredith M Hart 
School Of Education 
Elementary Education 



Sara B Hart 
School Of Education 
Elementary Education 



330 Senic 




Leslie L Harvey 
! School Of Arts & Science 
Physics 



Lisa M Harwood 

School Of Arts & Science 

Economics 



Kristina K Hashizume 

School Of Arts & Science 

Biology 



Tanner J Hatch 

School Of Arts & Science 

Music 


Ian Hawes 

School Of Management 

Marketing 


Philosophy 






Christopher M Hawkins 

School Of Arts & Science 

Psychology 



Emily K Hayden 

School Of Arts & Science 

Political Science 



John Haydon 

School Of Management 

Accounting 

Finance 



Erin E Hayes 

School Of Management 

Finance 



Caitlin Healey 

School Of Arts & Science 

Psychology 




Craig S Healy 

School Of Arts & Science 

Economics 



David T Healy 

School Of Arts & Science 

Economics 




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Mary Catherine Healy 

School Of Arts & Science 

Psychology 



Taylor P Healy 

School Of Arts & Science 

English 

Germanic Studies 



1. 



Seniors 331 




Courtney Snyder, Rayann Torres, Shannon Gherty, Nicole Gregorio, Pepi Menclez, Maura Byrne 



332 Seniors 





Chrissy Norton, Joe Shanahan, Anna Sweeney, Kerri Anderson, Meghan McGinn 




Sandy Rocca, Diane Cotter, Cailin Papszyoki 







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Megan Monaghan, Matt Gaudette 



Erin Goulding, Laura Fitzgerald, Kaitlin McDonald 



Seniors 333 




Joie Garfunkle, Leah Tseronis, Sarah Sullivan 



Kahleil Blair, Didier Sylvian 



334 Seni 




Go Red Sox! Submitted by Nicole Scillia 



Seniors 335 



Thomas P Healy 

School Of Arts & Science 

Economics 



Meghan A Hennessey 

School Of Arts & Science 

Sociology 



Julie T Heyde 

School Of Arts & Science 

English 

Philosophy 



Kate B Heckel 

School Of Arts & Science 

History 



Matthew Hedstrom 

School Of Arts & Science 

Psychology 



Emily Hellberg 

School Of Arts & Science 

Theology 

Political Science 



Stephanie M Henderson 

School Of Education 

Early Childhood 

Child In Society 





MiMMiM 



Megan E Herceg 

School Of Arts & Science 

History 



Rebecca J Herhold 

School Of Arts & Science 

History 



Christian M Hernandez 

School Of Arts & Science 

Political Science 

Economics 



Gregory C Highberger 

School Of Management 

Finance 

Accounting 



Robert A Higney 

School Of Arts & Science 

English 

Philosophy 



Danielle Hildebrandt 
School Of Arts & Science 

Communications 
Rom Lang-Hispanic Stdy 



Alexandra C Hlozek 

School Of Arts & Science 

Communications 



Teresa C Ho 

School Of Management 

Information Systems 

Accounting 



Anne Hodgson 

School Of Education 

Elementary Education 

Rom Lang-Hispanic Stdy 



Ryan Hoffmeister 
School Of Management 
Operations /Tech Mngmt 



Javier L Herrera 

School Of Arts & Scienct 

Psychology 




Adriane K Hinman 

School Of Education 

Communications 




Emily Hogan 
School Of Education 
Human Development 



336 Seniors 



ftki. 




Lindsey A Hogao 

School Of Management 

Marketing 

Economics-CSOM 



Devon Holcomb 

School Of Arts & Science 

English 



Michael B Holder 

School Of Management 

Finance 



Lisa Marie Holladay 

School Of Management 

Finance 



Melinda C Holmes 

School Of Arts & Science 

Psychology 



Rachel Holt 
School Of Education 
Secondary Education 



Stephanie Hood 

School Of Management 

Accounting /Inf Tech 

Finance 



Thomas J Hook 

School Of Arts & Science 

Psychology 




Brian Horvath 

School Of Arts & Science 

Philosophy 

Political Science 



William A Hosking 
School Of Education 
Human Development 
Elementary Education 




\ 



Tyler Hollinger 

School Of Management 

General Mgmt 




Kristin Hopwood 

School Of Management 

Finance 






Angela Hou 

School Of Nursing 

Nursing 



James M House 

School Of Management 

Economics 




Seniors 337 





Brendan Housler 

School Of Arts & Science 

Psychology 

Theology 



Dana M Howarth 
School Of Education 

English 
Secondary Education 




David Howarth 

School Of Management 

Finance 

Economics 



Rae C Huang 
School Of Education 

Theology 
Human Development 




Wei Huang 

School Of Arts & Science 

Communications 



Zhan T Huang 

School Of Management 

Finance 

Comp Sci A&S B.S. 



Jamie P Huba 

School Of Management 

Marketing 

Finance 



Kathleen C Hubner 

School Of Arts & Science 

International Studies 

History 



Emily L Hull 

School Of Arts & Science 

Art History 




Mary Hunt 

School Of Management 

Marketing 



Barry Hunte 

School Of Management 

Accounting /Inf Tech 

Finance 



Erik S. Hynes 

School Of Management 

Finance 

Marketing 



David Iacovelli 

School Of Management 

Accounting 



Nicole Ibanez 

School Of Arts & Science 

English 



338 Seniors 



tf£ 



Nsisong A Ikpa 
S School Of Arts & Science 
Biology 
Philosophy 



Kate Ilukowicz 

School Of Management 

Accounting 

Economics-CSOM 



Sandra M Ingravallo 

School Of Management 

Finance 



Kathleen C Irwin 

School Of Arts & Science 

Film Studies 



Jennifer M Jackson 

School Of Arts & Science 

Economics 

Romance Lang-French 




Kevin L Jackson 

School Of Arts & Science 

Political Science 



Marques N Jackson 

School Of Arts & Science 

English 



Kimberly Jacobs 
School Of Education 
Human Development 



Ashley N Jacobson 
School Of Education 
Elementary Education 



Sara B Jacoby 

School Of Arts & Science 

Political Science 




James V Jakobsen 

School Of Management 

Finance 



Danielle M Jelley 

School Of Arts & Science 

English 



Julia AJakubek 

School Of Arts & Science 

Economics 



Anthony G James 

School Of Management 

Finance 

Economics-CSOM 



Jessica Jamison 

School Of Nursing 

Nursing 



Minwoo Jang 

School Of Management 

Accounting 

Finance 




Deirdre Jennings 
School Of Education 
Human Development 



Jun Jeong 

School Of Arts & Science 

Economics 



Chris Jimenez 

School Of Arts & Science 

Economics 



Zanifer John 

School Of Arts & Science 

Biology 



Seniors 339 



imii i in i 





Amy Johnson 

School Of Arts & Science 

History 

Communications 



Christopher Johnson 

School Of Management 

Finance 

Marketing 




Melissa Johnson 

School Of Education 

English 



Michele D Johnson 

School Of Management 

Marketing 




Sumei L Johnson 

School Of Management 

Marketing 



James A Johnston 

School Of Arts & Science 

History 



Eric A Jokinen 

School Of Arts & Science 

English 



Charles Jones 

School Of Arts & Science 

Political Science 



Christopher A Jones 
School Of Management 

Finance 
Operations /Tech Mngm 




Nathan Jones 

School Of Arts & Science 

Biochemistry 



Sarah C Jones 

School Of Arts & Science 

Communications 



Maureen J Josephsen 

School Of Arts & Science 

Biology 



Matthew Journalist 

School Of Management 

Finance 



Michael Joyce 

School Of Arts & Sciena 

English 



340 Seniors 



^£1 



James Judge 

School Of Management 

Finance 



Stefanie E Juell 

School Of Arts & Science 

Philosophy 



Elizabeth Kabacinski 

School Of Arts & Science 

Political Science 



Richard J Kabobjian 

School Of Management 

Finance 



Anthony Kahr 

School Of Arts & Science 

History 




Roger E Kaiser 

School Of Arts & Science 

Psychology 



Aristea Ka Kounis 
School Of Education 

History 
Secondary Education 




Seok-Ho R Kang 

School Of Arts & Science 

Political Science 



Tanakorn T Karunphan 

School Of Arts & Science 

English 



Alexis Karsant 

School Of Management 

Marketing 




Susan M Kasper 
School Of Arts & Science 

Chemistry 
Rom Lang-Hispanic Stdy 



Andrew E Kampf 

School Of Arts & Science 

Political Science 



Daniel J Kane 

School Of Arts & Science 

Classics 

Philosophy 



Jacquelyn S Kane 

School Of Arts & Science 

Political Science 




Seniors 341 



342 Seniors 




Shannon Gherty, Pepi Mendez, Teddy Tenev, Meg Robinson, Courtney Snyder, 
Elizabeth Spatola, Sue Byrne, Will Lane, Dave Bonilla 



say 




Carela Conteras-Catigano, Danielle Hildebrandt, Matt Dunn, Emily Hull, LoAn Nguyen, Lauren McEnteggart, 
Sarah Sullivan, Lawrence Braun 



Caroline Kita, Lindsay Magura, Kara Robbins, Sara Birnbaum 



Seniors 343 




Stephanie Henderson, Monica Driscoll, Sara Durgin 



Halloween Fiesta Anyone? submitted by Katherine DiMare 



344 Seniors 




Quick Picture, Then Getting Ready for Homecoming photo submitted by Nadjejdo Nelson 



Seniors 345 



Anna C Kavaliunas 

School Of Management 

Marketing 



Kathryn F Kavanah 
School Of Education 
Human Development 



Megan A Kayser 
School Of Arts & Science 

Biochemistry 
Rom Lang-Hispanic Stdy 



Scott M Keaman 

School Of Arts & Science 

Sociology 

Communications 



Emily Kearns 
School Of Education 
Elementary Education 
Human Development 




Joshua Kedzierski 

School Of Management 

Information Systems 



Thomas Q Keefe 

School Of Arts & Science 

English 



Lisa Keegan 

School Of Arts & Science 
Political Science 



Brennan Keeler 

School Of Management 

Information Systems 

Marketing 



Zachary J Keenan 

School Of Arts & Science 

Economics 




Lauren M Keibler 

School Of Management 

Marketing 



Courtney Kelleher 

School Of Arts & Science 

English 



Andrew Kelley 

School Of Arts & Science 

English 



Erin M Kelly 

School Of Arts & Science 

Economics 



Kristin Kelly 

School Of Arts & Science 

Economics 

History 




Kristyn E Kelly 

School Of Arts & Science 

International Studies 



Michael J Kelly 

School Of Arts & Science 

History 

Communications 



Patrick A Kelly 

School Of Management 

General Mgmt 



Ryan W Kelly 

School Of Management 

Marketing 



Thomas Kelly 

School Of Management 

Finance 



346 Seniors 



m&i 




Thomas A Kelly 

School Of Arts & Science 

English 



Margaret C Kelty 

School Of Arts & Science 

History 



Patrick T Kelty 

School Of Management 

Finance 



Thomas J Kempa 

School Of Arts & Science 

Chemistry 



Kate Kennedy 

School Of Arts & Science 

Psychology 




Kakrasna Keo 

School Of Arts & Science 

Mathematics 

II 







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Cristina M Kerdel 

School Of Arts & Science 

Psychology 



Daniel Kerrigan 

School Of Arts & Science 

Film Studies 

Theater Arts 



Beth Ketaineck 

School Of Arts & Science 

Psychology 



Andrew C Killian 


James M Killian 


School Of Arts & Science 


School Of Management 


English 


Finance 


History 


Accounting 



Kyle Ketcham 

School Of Arts & Science 

Philosophy 




Seniors 347 





Katie Killian 

School Of Education 

Elementary Education 

Human Development 



Anna Kim 

School Of Management 

Marketing 

Human Resources Mgmnt 




Caroline Y Kim 

School Of Education 

Elementary Education 

Theology 



Hyunjean Kim 

School Of Management 

Marketing 





^m^M 



Tae E Kim 

School Of Management 

Information Systems 



Yejrn L Kim 

School Of Arts & Science 

Communications 



Meredith M Kimpel 

School Of Arts & Science 

Philosophy 

Theology 



Douglas ] King 

School Of Arts & Science 

Communications 



Jason P Kinsella 

School Of Arts & Science 

Economics 

English 




Kristine Kirwin 
School Of Education 
Human Development 



Karishma Kishnani 

School Of Management 

Information Systems 



Caroline A Kita 

School Of Arts & Science 

History 



Anina S Klein 

School Of Arts & Science 

Sociology 

Clinical Social Work 



Rob V Klein 

School Of Management 

Finance 

Information Systems 



348 Seniors 



K£-t 




Stephen Klein 

School Of Management 

Finance 

Information Systems 



Kimberly A Koch 

School Of Management 

Marketing 



Dimirrios L Kotsinonos 

School Of Arts & Science 

Economics 

Romance Lang-French 



Andrew Krill 

School Of Arts & Science 

Physics 



David K Klos 

School Of Management 

Accounting 

Finance 



Brian Klug 

School Of Management 

Economics 



Erica J Kluge 

School Of Education 

Human Development 

Child In Society 



Timothy Kolesk 

School Of Arts & Science 

History 

Accounting 



Christopher M Kolodziej 

School Of Arts & Science 

Chemistry 



Sarah R Korval 

School Of Arts & Science 

Music 

Communications 



Sarah Kozik 

School Of Arts & Science 

Mathematics 



Carolyn S Kozlak 

School Of Arts & Science 

Political Science 



Jennifer L Kramer 

School Of Arts & Science 

Communications 



Kinga Krisko 

School Of Arts & Science 

International Studies 

History 



KellyAKroll 

School Of Education 

English 



Edward V Kulschinsky 

School Of Arts & Science 

Theology 



Haynes Ko 

School Of Management 

Finance 




Matthew I Kossack 

School Of Arts & Science 

English 




Neil W Krause 

School Of Arts & Science 

Psychology 




Phyllis J Kung 

School Of Arts & Science 

English 



Seniors 349 





Lindsey R Kurnath 

School Of Arts & Science 

Biology 



Brian Kwak 

School Of Arts & Science 

Mathematics 




Rosa E Kwak 

School Of Arts & Science 

Biology 



[Catherine Kwasnik 

School Of Arts & Science 

Physics 




Ina Kwon 
School Of Education 

English 
Human Development 



Jamie Nicole Labukas 

School Of Arts & Science 

English 

Communications 



Keith Lacy 

School Of Arts & Science 

Economics 



Stephanie E Ladam 

School Of Arts & Science 

English 

Political Science 



Cynthia Laesch 

School Of Arts & Science 

Unclassified 





▲ fc£ 




Laura E Lagomasino 

School Of Management 

Finance 

Economics-CSOM 



Po-Chen Lai 

School Of Management 

Accounting 

Finance 



Patrick J Lally 

School Of Arts & Science 

Theater Arts 



Emily W Lalone 

School Of Arts & Science 

Communications 



Michael J Lamastra 

School Of Arts & Science 

Biology 



350 Seniors 



-t 




Kevin D Lamb 

.School Of Arts & Science 

Communications 



Kimberly Lamendola 

School Of Arts & Science 

English 



Kristen M Lamonica 

School Of Management 

Accounting 



Marcy Lamonica 

School Of Nursing 

Nursing 



Michelle L Lamothe 

School Of Management 

Marketing 




Jillian Landry 
School Of Education 
Human Development 



Michelle E Lane 

School Of Arts & Science 

Political Science 

Communications 



William M Lane 

School Of Arts & Science 

Economics 

Mathematics 



Shannon Langan 

School Of Management 

Accounting 



Julie Lanney 

School Of Management 

Marketing 




Michael T Larsson 

School Of Arts & Science 

Communications 



Christopher Laszlo 
School Of Arts & Science 

Philosophy 
Rom Lang-Hispanic Stdy 



Seniors 351 




Megan McGinnis, Shannon Gherty, Katie Gillick, Katherin Bodde, Lauren Tallevi, Megan Matisck, Emily Keams 




Laura Fitzgerald, Emily Keams, Erin Goulding, Brian Napleton, Kaitlin McDonald 




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Stephanie Prudente, Katie Stainken, Kara Robbins 




Chris Martin, Jared Walsh, Matt Gaudette 



John Decaro, Sue Burton, Tim Arth 



352 Seni 



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Moggie Ward, Nicole Barone, Philip Chiantg, Rosa Kwak 



Brian AAoynihan, Linasey Hogan 



Seniors 353 




Meg O'Donnell, Izzy Crowley, Becoa Krugel, Alex Zubowicz, Ally Trowbridge 



Lauren McEnteggart, MiaSael AAancini, Leah Tseronis, Joie Garfuikle 



354 Seniors 



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Seniors 355 





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Cherise M Lathan 

School Of Arts & Science 

Physics 



Sara M Laubenstein 

School Of Arts & Science 

Biology 



William T Lauten 

School Of Arts & Science 

Philosophy 



Benjamin R Lavallee 

School Of Arts & Science 

History 

Theology 




Kurt J Lavetti 

School Of Management 

Economics-CSOM 

Finance 



Valerie M Lavoie 

School Of Management 

Accounting 



Caitlin C Leahy 

School Of Arts & Science 

Economics 



Emily E Leary 

School Of Arts & Science 

Communications 



Geoffrey D Lee 

School Of Management 

Finance 

Marketing 



Joseph Lee 

School Of Management 

Accounting 



Julie S Lee 

School Of Arts & Science 

English 



Krystal C Lee 
School Of Management 
Human Resource Mgmnt 



Kaitlin Lavery 
School Of Education 

English 
Human Development 




Robin W. Leek 

School Of Arts & Science 

English 




Cherie Lefebvre 

School Of Nursing 

Nursing 




Catherine Lefloch 
School Of Education 
Human Development 



Annette N Leger 

School Of Arts & Science 

Biology 



Kathleen M Leland 

School Of Management 

Finance 

Marketing 



Stephanie C Lentz 

School Of Arts & Science 

Romance Lang-French 



Victoria B Leonard 

School Of Management 

Human Resource Mgmn 

Economics 



356 Seniors 



Stuart T Leslie 

School Of Arts & Science 

History 

Economics 



Matthew J Leyden 

School Of Arts & Science 

Mathematics 

Chemistry 



Kristen A Lindquist 

School Of Arts & Science 

Psychology 

English 



Megan Litman 

School Of Arts & Science 

Psychology 



Timothy S Leslie 

School Of Management 

General Mgmt 



Ryan W Levitt 

School Of Management 

Finance 



Jill M Levy 

School Of Arts & Science 

English 



Joshua R Levy 

School Of Arts & Science 

Communications 




Joel A Lieginger 

School Of Arts & Science 

Political Science 

Economics 




Jasper Y Liou 

School Of Arts & Science 

Philosophy 




YiLiu 

School Of Management 

Accounting 



Christopher Lindahl 

School Of Arts & Science 

History 



James Lindberg 

School Of Arts & Science 

Biology 



Jessica L Lindor 

School Of Arts & Science 

Economics 

Psychology 




Seniors 357 





Christina R Lizza 

School Of Management 

Finance 

Accounting 



Jennifer Lo 

School Of Management 

Management 

Economics-CSOM 




Brady Locher 

School Of Arts & Science 

Theology 



Matthew C Lockwood 

School Of Arts & Science 

Psychology 




Stephen R Lockwood 

School Of Management 

Computer Science 



Richard S Loftus 

School Of Arts & Science 

Political Science 



Lisa M Logerfo 

School Of Arts & Science 

English 

Communications 



Benjamin O Looker 

School Of Management 

Finance 



Howard Loomes 

School Of Management 

Finance 

Economics 



Glenn Lopes 
School Of Education 
Human Development 



Adriana L Lopez 

School Of Management 

Marketing 



Edmundo A Lopez 

School Of Arts & Science 

Political Science 



Travis Looker 
School Of Managemenl 

Finance 
Operations /Tech Mngrr 




Joseph A Lopez 

School Of Arts & Scienc 

Economics 



358 Seniors 



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Dana L Lopreato 

School Of Arts & Science 

Communications 



William M Lorenzo 

School Of Management 

Information Systems 

Marketing 



Michael K Loretta 

School Of Management 

Accounting 

Philosophy 



Michael C Lucarelli 

School Of Management 

Finance 

Accounting 



Victoria Lucia 

School Of Arts & Science 

Communications 




Rebecca M Lui 

School Of Arts & Science 

Chemistry 



Katherine M Lummis 

School Of Arts & Science 

History 



Brian J Lunardi 

School Of Arts & Science 

Biochemistry 



Maeve E Luthin 

School Of Arts & Science 

English 



John J Lynaugh 

School Of Arts & Science 

Political Science 




Clinton C Lynn 

School Of Management 

Finance 



Todd Lyons 

School Of Arts & Science 

Biochemistry 



Kaitlin Macdonald 

School Of Education 

Elementary Education 



Caitlin Macginnis 

School Of Arts & Science 

Communications 



Kristen K Mac Isaac 

School Of Management 

Finance 







Angela T Mack 

School Of Arts & Science 

Theology 

Communications 



Sarah Mack 

School Of Arts & Science 

Communications 



Erin E Mackey 

School Of Arts & Science 

Economics 



Edward F Mackinnon 

School Of Arts & Science 

History 



Harold L Mackins 

School Of Arts & Science 

Philosophy 

Political Science 



Seniors 359 






*4J 



Evan Mactavish 

School Of Arts & Science 

Communications 



Joseph P Madaus 

School Of Management 

Marketing 

Film Studies 




Daniel Madden 

School Of Arts & Science 

Psychology 



Stephanie M Madden 

School Of Education 

Elementary Education 

English 




Lindsay Magura 

School Of Arts & Science 

Biology 



John R Maher 

School Of Arts & Science 

History 



Sarah A Mahler 

School Of Nursing 

Nursing 



Dennis M Mahoney 

School Of Management 

Accounting 



Melissa S Maisch 

School Of Arts & Scienct 

Mathematics 









Alexis Maisenbacher 
School Of Education 
Human Development 



Rina Majmudar 

School Of Arts & Science 

History 

Political Science 



Gary Mak 

School Of Arts & Science 

Communications 



Mary Malabanan 

School Of Arts & Science 

Communications 

Economics 



Andrew R Malachowski 

School Of Management 

Accounting 

Finance 






360 Seniors 



Anne L Malchodi 

School Of Arts & Science 

English 



Kurt M Malec 

School Of Arts & Science 

Art History 



Christopher R Malis 

School Of Arts & Science 

Political Science 



Erin Maloney 

School Of Arts & Science 

Communications 



Sarita Manigat 

School Of Arts & Science 

Romance Lang-French 




Karen Mardey 

School Of Arts & Science 

Economics 

History 



Carissa M Mann 
School Of Arts & Science 

Communications 
Computer Science-A&S 




Brendan Mansfield 

School Of Arts & Science 

English 



Thomas J Marchitelli 

School Of Management 

Finance 



Andrew Maples 

School Of Arts & Science 

Biochemistry 




Taryn E Marino 

School Of Arts & Science 

Psychology 



Lindsay V Mannering 

School Of Arts & Science 

English 



Kaitlin Mannix 

School Of Arts & Science 

Economics 



Carmen Manrara 

School Of Arts & Science 

Sociology 




Seniors 361 




Patrick Grucela, John Mclnnes, Justin Zbrzezny, Adam Thompson, Mike Dailey 



Alison Cunningham, Monica Driscoll 



362 Seniors 




RaKiya Watts, Adwoa Antwi-Barfi, Katina McCrory 



Chris Case, Chris Rizzo, Conor Brady, Jaime Huba, Jasmine Mathews 




Jennifer Chang, Ina K 



Jaron Goldstein, Diana Dombrowski 



364 Seniors 




Girls' night out tailgating 



Seniors 365 



Benjamin D Marks 

School Of Management 

Finance 



Andrew C Marsh 
School Of Management 

Finance 
Operations /Tech Mngmt 



Matthew Marshall 

School Of Arts & Science 

Psychology 



Leslie E Martell 

School Of Management 

Finance 

Marketing 



Amelia A Martella 
School Of Education 
Human Development 




Christopher C Martin 

School Of Education 

Human Development 

Philosophy 



Erika L Martin 

School Of Education 

Elementary Education 

English-LSOE 



Holly Martin 

School Of Education 

Elem/Mod Special Needs 



Marisol Martinez 

School Of Arts & Science 

Psychology 



Meghan L Martinez 

School Of Arts & Science 

Biology 

Sociology 




Robert Martinez 

School Of Management 

Marketing 



Angela F Martino 
School Of Education 

Mathematics 
Secondary Education 



Joseph J Martucci 

School Of Arts & Science 

English 



Jeffrey H Martyn 

School Of Management 

Finance 

Economics 



Christina B Marzelli 

School Of Arts & Science ' 

Communications 




Alissa M Marzetti 
School Of Education 
Human Development 



Moneer Masihtehrani 

School Of Management 

Finance 



Dini Mary Massad 

School Of Arts & Science 

Communications 



Samantha E Massie 

School Of Arts & Science 

History 



Katherine A Matarazzo 
School Of Management 

Finance 
Operations/Tech Mngnv' 



366 Seniors 



i 



*iii 




Lauran M Mateus 

School Of Nursing 

Nursing 



Jasmine C Mathews 

School Of Arts & Science 

Psychology 



Megan J Matiasek 

School Of Nursing 

Nursing 



Meghan M Maugeri 

School Of Arts & Science 

English 



Andrew F Maury 

School Of Arts & Science 

Communications 




Brian J May 

School Of Arts & Science 

English 

Music 



Chika C Mba 

School Of Management 

Marketing 



Sean J Mayes 

School Of Arts & Science 

Communications 




Chukwudi U Mba 

School Of Management 

Unclassified 




Kevin C McAdam 

School Of Arts & Science 

International Studies 



John McCarthy 

School Of Arts & Science 

Communications 



Casie L Mazilly 

School Of Arts & Science 

English 



Alanna C Mazzarella 

School Of Arts & Science 

Economics 



Raymond R Mazzeo 

School Of Management 

Finance 

Marketing 




Seniors 367 





Katie L McCarthy 
School Of Education 
Elementary Education 



Stephen J McCarthy 

School Of Arts & Scieno 

English 




Julie A McCartney 

School Of Arts & Science 

History 



Elizabeth H McClure 
School Of Education 
Human Development 




Linsey D McCombs 
School Of Education 
Secondary Education 



Heather E McCooey 
School Of Education 
Human Development 



Katina S McCrory 

School Of Management 

Marketing 



Breeda M McDermott 

School Of Arts & Science 

Sociology 



Daniel McDermott 
School Of Arts & Sciem 
English 




Deirdre McDermott 
School Of Education 
Human Development 



Andrea M McElaney 

School Of Management 

Marketing 

Human Resources Mgmnt 



Elizabeth A McElaney 

School Of Arts & Science 

English 



Margaret T McElduff 

School Of Management 

Marketing 



Lauren E McEnteggar 
School Of Arts & Sciem 
Communications 



368 Seniors 



Kiic 




Conor P McEvily 

■6chool Of Arts & Science 

English 



Richard H McFarlane 

School Of Arts & Science 

English 

Philosophy 



Sarah McGarrell 

School Of Arts & Science 

History 

Film Studies 



Amanda S McGarry 

School Of Arts & Science 

History 



Kaitlin N McGarry 

School Of Arts & Science 

English 




Lisa A McGinn 

School Of Arts & Science 

Economics 

Communications 



Meghan McGinn 

School Of Arts & Science 

Psychology 



Kevin A McGowin 

School Of Arts & Science 

History 



Kaitlin E McGrath 

School Of Arts & Science 

Economics 



Timothy McGrath 

School Of Arts & Science 

English 



Brendan McGuiness 

School Of Management 

Accounting 



Meghan K McGuinness 

School Of Arts & Science 

Art History 



John D Mclnnes 

School Of Management 

Finance 



Brendan J McKasy 

School Of Management 

Marketing 



Kent McKeanik 

School Of Education 

Human Development 

Music 



Kathleen E McKenzie 

School Of Education 

Elementary Education 



Bryan Q McKeon 

School Of Management 

Accounting 



Thomas P McGrath 

School Of Management 

Finance 




Maura M Mclntyre 

School Of Arts & Science 

English 




Courtney A McKinney 
School Of Education 

Sociology 
Human Development 



Seniors 369 




Christopher R McLaughlin 

School Of Arts & Science 

Physics 



Erin McLaughlin 

School Of Management 

Accounting 




Michael J McMahon 

School Of Arts & Science 

International Studies 



Bryce McManus 

School Of Arts & Science 

Sociology 



Caitlin B McManus 

School Of Nursing 

Nursing 



John McMillin 

School Of Arts & Science 

Communica tions 



Elizabeth A McNally - 
School Of Arts & Scieno 
English 




Brendan M McNamara 

School Of Arts & Science 

English 



Sean P McReynolds 

School Of Management 

Finance 



Margaret E Meador 

School Of Arts & Science 

Rom Lang-Hispanic Stdy 

Sociology 



Gretchen Medina 

School Of Arts & Science 

Sociology 



Katie A Meehan 

School Of Arts & Sciencs 

Computer Science 



370 Seniors 



imi 



Rachel M Mellard 

school Of Management 

Finance 

Marketing 



Kristina L Melton 

School Of Arts & Science 

Communications 



Minal M Melwani 

School Of Arts & Science 

Psychology 



Communications 



Denise Menaker 

School Of Arts & Science 

English 

Theology 



Josefina S Mendez 

School Of Arts & Science 

Communications 




Natalia Mendez 
School Of Arts & Science 

Theater Arts 
Rom Lang-Hispanic Stdy 



Elyse L Meredith 

School Of Arts & Science 

Economics 




Natalia M Metwally 

School Of Education 

Secondary Education 

Romance Lang-French 



Michael J Meyer 

School Of Management 

Economics-Csom 

Marketing 




Natalie Meyers 

School Of Nursing 

Nursing 



Theodore R Mikesell 

School Of Management 

Finance 



Fabio F Mesa 

School Of Management 

Finance 

Accounting /Inf Tech 



Randall T Messer 

School Of Arts & Science 

Chemistry 



Phillip Mettling 

School Of Management 

Marketing 




Seniors 371 



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Kimberly Ward, Elizabeth Furbish 




Ally Trowbridge, Izzy Crowley, Becoa Krugger 




reak From Drinks For a Pidure 



372 Seniors 



fi^ 




Sarah Williamson, Jen Velys, Shannon Langan, Shannon Gherty, Coleen Elstemneyer 



Seniors 373 




Anne Marie Marten, Katie Gillick, Garin Strobl, Aliza Finn-Welch 



Nice Background for a Cute Picture 



374 Seniors 





Meaghan Casey, Tim Wilson-Byrne, Lauren Southard 




Jennie Choy, Chika Mba, Minwoo Jang 


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Sue Byrne, Tom Burns, Beth O'Loughlin, Mike Atwater 



Jon TTtaokery, Patrick Foster, Tom Burns, Kate O'Keffe, John Dalebroux, Leslie Harvey 

Seniors 375 



Julie E Milinazzo 

School Of Arts & Science 

Communications 



Matthew Millea 

School Of Management 

Finance 

Marketing 



Christopher C Miller 

School Of Arts & Science 

History 



Joseph M Miller 

School Of Arts & Science 

English 



Patrick C Miller 

School Of Management 

Finance 



Rebecca Miller 

School Of Management 

Accounting 



Sebastien P Millet 

School Of Management 

Economics 



David R Milligan 

School Of Management 

Finance 



Julianne Mineo 
School Of Education 
Elementary Education 



Jennifer Mingucci 

School Of Arts & Science 

Philosophy 

Theater Arts 



Thomas R Mitchel 

School Of Management 

Philosophy 



Kristen R Mitchell 

School Of Arts & Science 

English 




Matthew Moen 

School Of Management 

Finance 



Melissa Mohan 

School Of Arts & Science 

Political Science 



Douglas V Moliterno 

School Of Arts & Science 

Economics 



Robert Moller 

School Of Arts & Science 

History 



Meegan E Miller 

School Of Arts & Science 

History 



1 




Richard J. Milligan 

School Of Management 

General Mgmt 




David C Moebius 

School Of Arts & Scienct 

Chemistry 




Brendan J Moloney 

School Of Arts & Scienct 

Theology 



376 Seniors 



■fifaA 



Thomas P Moloney 

School Of Management 

Marketing 



Bridget M Monohan 

School Of Arts & Science 

Theology 



Megan M Monaghan 

School Of Arts & Science 

English 



Sean E Monahan 

School Of Arts & Science 

Economics 

Communications 



Andrea Mondello 

School Of Arts & Science 

Psychology 



Belzie Mont Louis 

School Of Arts & Science 

Political Science 



Jennie A Montoya 
School Of Education 
Human Development 



Jonathan E Moody 

School Of Arts & Science 

Communications 



Norlyne Mondesir 

School Of Arts & Science 

Psychology 




Maureen T Mooney 
School Of Education 
Human Development 




Lindsey Anne Moore 

School Of Management 

Marketing 

International Studies 



Patrick Moore 

School Of Arts & Science 

Political Science 



Seniors 377 





Jane A Moorehouse 

School Of Education 

Elementary Education 

English 



Kathleen S Moran 

School Of Arts & Science 

English 



Brian C Moran 

School Of Management 

Finance 




Michelle A Morgan 

School Of Management 

Marketing 




Stuart R Morgan 

School Of Arts & Science 

Comp Sci A&S B.S 



Kevin A Morris 

School Of Arts & Science 

Political Science 



Tara K Morley 

School Of Management 

Marketing 



Stephen Morneau 

School Of Arts & Science 

Psychology 



Jeremy T Morowitz 

School Of Management 

Marketing 



Caitlin Morrell 
School Of Education 

English 
Secondary Education 




Amy Morrow 

School Of Arts & Science 

Communications 



Brianne N Moskovitz 

School Of Arts & Science 

Mathematics 



Brian P Moynihan 

School Of Arts & Science 

Communica tions 

Sociology 



John D Muething 

School Of Management 

Accounting 

Finance 



378 Seniors 



fii£i 




Kristen K Mulhearn 

School Of Arts & Science 

Communications 



Drew Mullen 

School Of Arts & Science 

Biology 



Daniel J Mullins 

School Of Arts & Science 

Biology 



Jacquelyn Mullins 

School Of Arts & Science 

Studio Art 



Olivia J Mullins 

School Of Arts & Science 

Psychology 




Alejandro Munoz 

School Of Management 

Accounting 



Megan C Murphy 

School Of Arts & Science 

Art History 




Rebecca L Munoz 

School Of Arts & Science 

English 



Allison M Murphy 

School Of Arts & Science 

Biology 



Kerry F Murphy 

School Of Arts & Science 

Communications 

English 



Ryan D Murphy 

School Of Management 

General Mgmt 



Lindsay W Murray 

School Of Nursing 

Nursing 



Patrick Murray 

School Of Management 

Accounting 

Finance 



Annabelle H Nahra 

School Of Management 

Finance 



Brian F Napleton 
School Of Management 
Operations/Tech Mngmt 



Christopher J Napleton 

School Of Management 

Finance 

Marketing 



Eric Napoli 

School Of Management 

Accounting 

Finance 



Lauren E Murphy 

School Of Arts & Science 

Communications 




Shaun M Naedele 

School Of Management 

Finance 

Marketing 




Kristan Natale 

School Of Nursing 

Nursing 



._ 



Seniors 379 




f*s 




Andrew Naumann 

School Of Arts & Science 

Comp Sci A&S B.S 



Joshua E Navarro 

School Of Management 

Ecomonics 

Finance 




Kristen L Nazar 

School Of Arts & Science 

Sociology 



Sahir E Nazarov 

School Of Management 

Economics 




Jeffrey C Nedelka 

School Of Arts & Science 

English 



James W Newton 

School Of Arts & Science 

Communications 



Anne Nelson 

School Of Arts & Science 

History 



Nadjejda R Nelson 
School Of Arts & Science 
Human Resource Mgmnt 
Ene 



Tristan H Nelson 

School Of Arts & Science 

Computer Science 



Emily E Neusel 

School Of Arts & Science 

Mathematics 




Calvin M Nguyen 

School Of Management 

Information Systems 



Chuong V Nguyen 

School Of Management 

Accounting/Inf Tech 



Hathi H Nguyen 

School Of Management 

Finance 

Psychology 



Thuvan T Nguyen 

School Of Arts & Science 

Biology 



380 Seniors 



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Emily Nicholson 

School Of Education 

Elementary Education 

English 



Thomas R Nigrelli 

School Of Management 

Information Systems 

General Mgmt 



Marion Nolan 
School Of Education 

English 
Secondary Education 



Caroline K Noonan 

School Of Arts & Science 

Economics 



Katharine W Noonan 

School Of Arts & Science 

Biology 




Timothy E Noonan 

School Of Education 

Early Childhood 

English 



Kristan E Norgrove 

School Of Arts & Science 

History 

Political Science 



Keith D Normant 

School Of Management 

Economics 

Information Systems 



Christine K Norton 

School Of Arts & Science 

English 



Altagracia T Nova 

School Of Arts & Science 

Communications 

Theater Arts 




Jennifer Nowell 

School Of Arts & Science 

Biology 


Thomas R Null 

School Of Management 

Finance 

English 


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Elizabeth A Nyitray 
School Of Education 


Patrick W Oakes 
School Of Arts & Science 



Elementary Education 
Hispanic Experience 



Physics 



Seniors 381 




Mike D'tsch, Meghan Maugeri 



Sox Fans photo by April Glazier 



382 Seniors 




Shannon Gherty, Lauren Talleri, Emily Keams, Shannon Langan 



Seniors 383 



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Heading Back to Boston After a Great Week With Friends submitted by Jennie Choy 



Teri Colwell, Lindsey Hogan, Milssa Alexis-Manners 



384 Seni 




Nicole Friscia, Omar Wilson 



Theresa Ho, Linda Hah Miin Chen, Lauren Pembroke, Karinn Cologne, Lauren Quinn, Sarah Kozik, Kerry Salve 



Seniors 385 



Julianne R Oberle 

School Of Arts & Science 

Chemistry 



Shari L Obert 

School Of Arts & Science 

English 

History 



Caitlin O'Brien 

School Of Arts & Science 

English 



Meghan H O'Brien 

School Of Management 

Marketing 

Finance 



Richard P O'Brien 

School Of Management 

Marketing 




Daniel T O'Connell 

School Of Arts & Science 

Philosophy 



Kathleen L O'Connor 

School Of Arts & Science 

English 



James E O'Donnell 

School Of Arts & Science 

English 



Kaithlin Oconnell 

School Of Education 

Elementary Education 

Human Development 



Kristen E O'Connell 

School Of Management 

Marketing 



Carolyn R O'Connor 

School Of Education 

Elementary Education 



Catherine R O'Connor 

School Of Arts & Scienc 

Sociology 




Maureen R O'Connor 

School Of Arts & Science 

History 

International Studies 



Michael O'Connor 

School Of Management 

Finance 



Timothy M O'Connor 
School Of Arts & Science 
Environment Geoscience 



Maura E O'Day 

School Of Nursing 

Nursing 




Meghan A O'Donnell 

School Of Education 

Elementary Education 



Lynn Ofgand 

School Of Arts & Science 

Management 



Katelyn E O'Keefe 

School Of Arts & Science 

Economics 

Sociology 



Justina O Olatunde 
School Of Arts & Sciem 
English 



386 Seniors 



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Jaclyn S O'Leary 

chool Of Arts & Science 

Communications 



Peter L Olinits 

School Of Arts & Science 

Biology 



Elizabeth M O'Loughlin 

School Of Management 

General Mgmt 



Maureen R Olsen 

School Of Arts & Science 

Political Science 



Kathleen A O'Neill 

School Of Management 

Finance 

Marketing 




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Margaret G O'Neill 

School Of Management 

Finance 



Michael Tolan O'Neill 

School Of Arts & Science 

History 



Thomas P O'Neill 

School Of Arts & Science 

Political Science 



Andres Orrego 

School Of Arts & Science 

Psychology 



Robert P Orthman 

School Of Arts & Science 

Political Science 




Kristen Osborne 

School Of Arts & Science 

Communications 



Benjamin J Ostrander 

School Of Arts & Science 

Philosophy 





Michele A Osztrogonacz 

School Of Arts & Science 

Psychology 



Luna N Otero 
School Of Education 

Psychology 
Human Development 



Seniors 387 





Naomi M Otto 

School Of Arts & Science 

Economics 

Communications 



Andrea R Overall 

School Of Education 

Human Development 




Carissa M Padovano 

School Of Management 

Finance 



Joanne Paleo 

School Of Arts & Scieno 

Communications 




Kristin K Palmsten 

School Of Arts & Science 

Biology 



Anthony J Palumbo 

School Of Arts & Science 

Biochemistry 



Sabrina S Pan 

School Of Education 

Elementary Education 



Matthew Panaro 
School Of Management 

Accounting 
Operations/Tech Mgmnt 



Jessica Pandolfi 
School Of Arts & Scienc 
English 
Philosophy 
I 




Dino Pappas 

School Of Management 

Finance 

Economics 



Cailin M Papszycki 

School Of Arts & Science 

History 



Timothy M Parcel 1 

School Of Management 

Marketing 



Christopher Pardo 

School Of Arts & Science 

English 



Alyssa M Parian 

School Of Arts & Scienc 

Biology 

Psychology 



388 Seniors 



it&i 




fciA^t 



Su J Park 

. School Of Arts & Science 

Economics 



Phil E Paro 

School Of Management 

Accounting 



Jeffrey T Pasqua 

School Of Management 

Finance 

Accounting /Inf Tech 



James Pasquesi 

School Of Arts & Science 

Film Studies 



Marian N Patel 

School Of Management 

Finance 

Accounting / Inf Tech 




Noah Patel 

School Of Education 

Elementary Education 

Math/Computer Science 



Jason T Patregnani 

School Of Arts & Science 

Biology 



Ariel Patterson 

School Of Arts & Science 

History 



Kristine A Pattin 

School Of Arts & Science 

Biology 



Nicholas H Pauleit 

School Of Management 

Accounting /Inf Tech 

Finance 





Elizabeth M Paulhus 

School Of Arts & Science 

Theology 



Elizabeth Paulson 

School Of Arts & Science 

English 



Michael Payack 

School Of Arts & Science 

Psychology 



Jessica M Peakes 

School Of Arts & Science 

Political Science 



Jeffrey W Pearlin 

School Of Arts & Science 

Political Science 

Slavic Studies 




Brent J Pearson 

School Of Management 

Accounting 



Mark Pecora 

School Of Management 

Economics 

Finance 



Lauren E Peddicord 
School Of Education 
Human Development 



David S Pedulla 

School Of Arts & Science 

History 



John J Peles 

School Of Management 

Finance 



Seniors 389 





Nora A Pelizzari 

School Of Management 

English 

Marketing 



Adam J Pelletier 

School Of Arts & Science 

Communications 




Nicholas P Pellicani 

School Of Management 

Finance 



Lauren A Pembroke 

School Of Management 

Accounting 




Frank J Penna 

School Of Arts & Science 

Biology 

Philosophy 



Victor L Perez Labiosa 

School Of Arts & Science 

History 



Marco C Pereira 

School Of Arts & Science 

Communications 



Natalie Pereira 

School Of Arts & Science 

Marketing 



Aneurys Pereyra 

School Of Management 

Information Systems 



John T Perry 

School Of Management 

Marketing 

Political Science 



Jennifer Peter 

School Of Arts & Science 

English 



Jared M Peterson 

School Of Management 

Finance 



Rachel E Perez 

School Of Arts & Science 

Economics 




Kathleen Peterson 

School Of Management 

Marketing 



390 Seniors 






Ann Pettrone 
School Of Education 
Elementary Education 



Ayisha Phillips 

School Of Arts & Science 

Psychology 



Edward M Pickett 
School Of Education 
Secondary Education 



Daniel W Pflug 

School Of Management 

Finance 

Accounting 



Courtney G Phalen 

School Of Management 

Marketing 

Organization Studies 



Andrea Phiambolis 

School Of Arts & Science 

English 



Claire E Phillips 

School Of Arts & Science 

Theology 




Alyssa M Pierce 

School Of Arts & Science 

Mathematics 




Lisa M Pillitteri 

School Of Nursing 

Nursing 



Jeffrey S Pinkham 

School Of Management 

Accounting 



Michael Phillips 

School Of Management 

General Mgmt 



Jarrod T Phipps 

School Of Management 

Information Systems 



Andrew R Phillips 

School Of Arts & Science 

History 




Eric G Piascik 

School Of Arts & Science 

Biochemistry 




Seniors 391 




Christopher Bamnard, Sophie Defiguiredo, Auisho Fryer, Nathalie Banker, Rayann Torres 



Ensieh Sarrami, Kinga Krisko 



392 Seniors 










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Michelle Van Name 



Kaitlin O'Comel!, Lindsey Disch, Catherine LeFloch 




Senior Girb Tailgating photo by Katherine DiMonee 



Seniors 393 




Kaitlin Mannix, Maeve Bresnahan, Rowena Capino, Meghan Maugeri 
394 Seniors 



Cameron Esposito, Kingo Krisko, Laura Vichick. Annabelle Nahra, Casie Mazilly, Stephanie Bitonti 




Pat Moore, Jamie Newton, Mark Wincnester, Will Roeckher, Nick Vitanza, Jim Lindberg 



Seniors 395 




Michael A Pinto 

School Of Arts & Scienc 

Biology 



Alexa J Pombo 

School Of Arts & Science 

Sociology 



Stephen J Pizzimenti 

School Of Management 

Finance 

Information Systems 



Anthi Pnevmatikos 
School Of Education 
Human Development 



Marisa K Policastro 
School Of Management 

Computer Science 
Information Technology 



Suzanne N Pomponio 

School Of Education 

Elementary Education 



Ryan W Pontier 

School Of Arts & Science 

Rom Lang-Hispanic Study 



Pasquale Pontoriero 

School Of Management 

Finance 



Patrick Pollock 

School Of Arts & Science 

Marketing 




Lauren F Poplawski 

School Of Arts & Science 

English 




Mairin Porpora 

School Of Education 

Elementary Education 

Math/Computer Science 



Christian A Poyant 

School Of Management 

Finance 



Samuel D Porter 

School Of Arts & Science 

History 



Philip Potter 

School Of Arts & Science 

Communications 



Matthew V Povolny 

School Of Arts & Science 

Political Science 



Jessica L Powell 
School Of Education 
Elementary Education 




Nicole Prairie 
School Of Arts & Science 

Philosophy 
Rom Lang-Hispanic Stdy 



Julie H Prassas 

School Of Education 

Child In Society 



Joanne P Prendergast 

School Of Arts & Science 

History 

Communications 



Christina M Priest 

School Of Arts & Science 

Biology 



396 Seniors 




Lindsey T Principe 
: School Of Management 
Accounting 
Mathematics 




Saphen Pring 

School Of Management 

Finance 



Sarah E Prior 

School Of Arts & Science 

English 



Nicole A Privitera 

School Of Education 

Human Development 



Jesse D Proctor 

School Of Education 

Secondary Education 



Stephanie S Prudente 
School Of Education 
Elementary Education 



Anna M Pruitt 

School Of Arts & Science 

English 



Alexis Przyhylski 

School Of Arts & Science 

Philosophy 

International Studies 



Allison Puca 

School Of Management 

Accounting 

Marketing 



Daniel Pufahl 

School Of Management 

Marketing 




Michael K Pullano 

School Of Arts & Science 

Communications 



Ann Marie Purr 

School Of Arts & Science 

Studio Art 

Economics 





Erica J Pylman 

School Of Arts & Science 

Economics 



Ross A Pytko 

School Of Arts & Science 

Psychology 



Seniors 397 





Lauren K Quinn 
School Of Education 
Elementary Education 



Kevin T Quirk 

School Of Arts & Science 

Sociology 




Natalia T Quirk 

School Of Arts & Science 

International Studies 



John Radzik 

School Of Arts & Science 

Economics 




Jessica D Ragosta 

School Of Arts & Science 

Political Science 



Ellen M Rains 

School Of Nursing 

Nursing 



Pavan Rajwani 

School Of Management 

Finance 



Jeffrey T Rallo 

School Of Arts & Science 

Biology A&S B A. 

Psychology 



Raymond A Ramirez 

School Of Arts & Science 

History 

English 




Karen R Rampersad 
School Of Education 

Mathematics 
Secondary Education 



Jennifer A Ranahan 

School Of Arts & Science 

Communications 

Economics 



Lindsay A Ravens 

School Of Management 

Accounting 



Nancy E Reardon 

School Of Arts & Science 

Political Science 



Shannon M Reardon 

School Of Arts & Science 

Communications 



398 Seniors 



HAi 







Daniel H Reed 
■ School Of Management 

Finance 
Information Technology 



Gregory E Reid 

School Of Arts & Science 

History 



Robert C Reed 

School Of Arts & Science 

Psychology 




Robert R Reiling 

School Of Arts & Science 

International Studies 



David T Reese 

School Of Arts & Science 

Biology 



Allison L Reilly 

School Of Arts & Science 

Sociology 



Stephanie Regan 

School Of Nursing 

Nursing 



Christopher J Reilly 

School Of Arts & Science 

Communications 



Arnaldo Rego 

School Of Arts & Science 

Economics 




Elizabeth Remby 

School Of Nursing 

Psychology 




Keith M Rennard 

School Of Management 

Accounting 



Marie Rialoli 

School Of Arts & Science 

History 



Katherine E Reuter 

School Of Arts & Science 

Communications 



Kalidia M Reyes 

School Of Arts & Science 

Communications 



Kanya D Rhedrick 

School Of Arts & Science 

Geology & Geophysics 



Danielle M Riccardi 

School Of Arts & Science 

Biology 



Kristen M Ricchi 

School Of Education 

Elem/Mod Special Needs 

Human Development 



Domenica R Ricciardi 

School Of Arts & Science 

Chemistry 



Martina K Rhee 

School Of Management 

Finance 

Marketing 




France Ricciarelli 

School Of Arts & Science 

Theology 



Seniors 399 





Kristen Richard 

School Of Management 

Finance 

Accounting 



Katrina D Richardson 

School Of Arts & Science 

Communications 




Jonathan M Riches 

School Of Arts & Science 

Political Science 



Arm B Rickley 

School Of Arts & Science 

Economics 




Kate E Riedell 

School Of Education 

Elementary Education 



Jennifer A Riehl 

School Of Arts & Science 

Psychology 



Mark H Riesmeyer 

School Of Arts & Science 

Economics 

Sociology 



Elisabeth A Riley 

School Of Arts & Science 

Geology & Geophysics 

English 



Michelle D Riston 

School Of Management 

Finance 

Marketing 



Bairam Rizai 

School Of Management 

Marketing 



Andrea A Rizzo 

School Of Management 

General Mgmt 



Angela Rizzo 
School Of Education 

Psychology 
Human Development 



Jeffrey P Rinehimer 
School Of Arts & Science 
Environment Geoscience 




Christopher P Rizzo 

School Of Management 

Finance 



400 Seniors 



i 



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Sarah B Rizzo 

■.School Of Arts & Science 

Communications 



Kela A Roberts 

School Of Arts & Science 

Chemistry 



Lacey A Roback 

School Of Arts & Science 

Sociology 



Ann K Robbins 
School Of Education 
Human Development 



Kara J Robbins 

School Of Arts & Science 

English 



Margaret M Robinson 

School Of Arts & Science 

English 



Richard E Robinson 

School Of Arts & Science 

History 



Sandra Rocca 

School Of Arts & Science 

English 



Christopher H Roberts 

School Of Arts & Science 

History 

Communications 




Courtney Roche 
School Of Education 
Human Development 




Nicole Roco 
School Of Management 
3perations/Tech Mngmt 
Information Technology 



Stephanie M Rodetis 

School Of Nursing 

Nursing 



Seniors 401 




Jill Urbanus, CaiHin O'Brien, Angela Rizzo, Carolyn O'Connor 



Kate Heokel, Nicole Clemens 



402 Seniors 



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Bethie McElaney, Monica Driscoll, Meredith Kimpel 



Sapna Thakker, Erin Olander, Ben Simms, Sarah Prior, Bob Shank Meghan Martinez 



Seniors 403 



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Christi Crowley, Kaitlin O'Connell, Kerry, Katelyn Cox, Jen 



404 Seniors 



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avage, Stauiskew Haciski, Joe Ballard, Sef Ghauem, Lauren Bruich, Jason Buttorf, Coleman Barnes, Mark Winchester 



Kelly Crowther, Coleen Elsterymer, Greg Bertleff, Nicole Friscia 




Having Fun Away From The Heights photo submitted by Shannon Gherty 



Seniors 405 



Adrianna S Rodriguez 

School Of Arts & Science 

Biology 



Kathryn C Rolewick 

School Of Arts & Science 

Psychology 



Lara Romanowski 

School Of Arts & Science 

Communications 



Jennifer S Romeo 

School Of Management 

General Mgmt 



Virginia M Romero 

School Of Arts & Scienc 

Comp Sci A&S B.S 




Lesley A Roper 

School Of Nursing 

Nursing 



Kimberly A Rose 
School Of Education 
Human Development 

Child In Society 



Zachary T Rosenstock 

School Of Arts & Science 

Economics 

History 



Dana R Ross 

School Of Arts & Science 

English 

Theater Arts 



Holly Rothe 

School Of Arts & Sciem 
International Studies 




Megan Rothemich 

School Of Management 

Finance 

Economics-CSOM 



Kimberly Rothrock 

School Of Management 

Accounting 



Brian P Rowan 
School Of Arts & Science 

Economics 
Computer Science-A&S 



David M Roy 

School Of Management 

Finance 



Jaclynn Rozansky 
School Of Arts & Scieni 
English 




Angela Rubertino 

School Of Arts & Science 

Romance Lang-French 



Tania Rudnitsky 

School Of Arts & Science 

Communications 



Anthony Ruggeri 

School Of Arts & Science 

Communications 



Roberta Ruiz 

School Of Management 

Finance 



Jennifer E Runco 
School Of Arts & Sciem 
Biochemistry 



406 Seniors 



iU 



Kari A Russ 

School Of Arts & Science 

English 



Bredan Russell 

School Of Management 

Finance 

Marketing 



Michael J Russillo 

School Of Management 

Finance 

Philosophy 



James J Russo 

School Of Management 

Finance 

Economics 



Jonathan A Rust 

School Of Arts & Science 

Communications 




acqueli Rutkowski-Murgia 
School Of Arts & Science 

Psychology 

Sociology 



Stephanie A Sabol 

School Of Arts & Science 

English 



Janet L Rutledge 

School Of Arts & Science 

English 



Anne B Ryan 

School Of Management 

Accounting 



Patrick C Ryan 

School Of Arts & Science 

Economics 



Stephen M Ryan 

School Of Management 

Finance 




William J Sadler 

School Of Arts & Science 

Economics 

Communications 



Seniors 407 




Lisa Sammarone 
School Of Education 
Elementary Education 



David L Sandberg 

School Of Arts & Science 

Political Science 




Jennifer A Salerno 

School Of Arts & Science 

Psychology 



Kerry M Salvo 

School Of Arts & Science 

Sociology 

Romance Lang-French 



Richard R Samuels 
School Of Management 

Finance 
Human Resource Mgmnt 



Cari Amanda Sanchez 

School Of Management 

Marketing 



Jessica J Sanchez 

School Of Arts & Science 

English 



Serene A Saliba 

School Of Arts & Science 

Economics 




Raffi Samkiranian 

School Of Management 

Accounting 




Laura A Sanchez 

School Of Arts & Science 

Communications 




Jetta C Sandin 

School Of Arts & Science 

Political Science 



Christopher Sanossian 

School Of Management 

Finance 

Marketing 



Cristina P Santiago 

School Of Arts & Science 

English 



Gauri Saraf 

School Of Management 

Marketing 



Seni 




Ensieh Sarrami 

School Of Arts & Science 

Political Science 

Economics 



Elizabeth M Sartori 

School Of Arts & Science 

English 




Joe M Sasanuma 

School Of Arts & Science 

Political Science 

Mathematics 



Amir Satvat 

School Of Management 

Finance 



Stephen R Savage 

School Of Arts & Science 

English 



Derek A Sbrogna 

School Of Management 

Finance 



Lauren A Scalpato 

School Of Arts & Science 

English 



Gregory S Scandariato 

School Of Arts & Science 

Economics 



Molly E Scannell 

! School Of Arts & Science 
Physics 
Theology 



Andrew Schaffer 

School Of Arts & Science 

Biology 

Political Science 



Heidi Scheer 

School Of Nursing 

Nursing 



David M Scheffler 

School Of Arts & Science 

Political Science 



Mar>' Benitta C Schickel 

School Of Arts & Science 

Sociology 



Erik D Schmella 

School Of Management 

Finance 



Gayle R Schmidt 

School Of Arts & Science 

Biology 



Michael Schmitt 

School Of Management 

Finance 



Jennifer Savage 

School Of Management 

Marketing 




Gillian L Scanlon 

School Of Education 

Human Development 




Sara Schenk 

School Of Management 

Human Resource Mgmnt 

Marketing 




Andrew G Schneider 

School Of Arts & Science 

History 



.. 



Seniors 409 





Rebecca Schneider 

School Of Arts & Science 

Psychology 

Studio Art 



William O Schrecker 

School Of Arts & Science 

Psychology 




Christopher Schroeck 

School Of Arts & Science 

Philosophy 



Deirdre Schroeder 
School Of Education 
Elementary Education 




Paul Schutz 

School Of Arts & Science 

English 



Kevin R Schwartz 

School Of Arts & Science 

Communications 

English 



Nicole M Scillia 

School Of Management 

Finance 



Andrew J Scordamaglia 

School Of Arts & Science 

Art History 



Jennifer L Sczerbinski 

School Of Arts & Science 

English 



Camille N Sealy 

School Of Management 

Economics 

Philosophy 



Matthew B Sears 

School Of Arts & Science 

Theater Arts 



Jessica N Seaver 

School Of Nursing 

Nursing 



Stephen Scovotti 

School Of Management 

Finance 




Jessica Selden 

School Of Education 

Elementary Education 



410 Seniors 



II* 



Kendra D Sena 

School Of Arts & Science 

Political Science 



Heather Seo 
School Of Education 
Human Development 



Matthew } Sequin 

School Of Arts & Science 

Mathematics 



John D Serpico 

School Of Management 

Finance 



Courtney Shackleton 

School Of Education 

Elementary Education 




Zahra H Shakur Jamal 

School Of Arts & Science 

Political Science 

Communications 



Joseph W Shanahan 

School Of Arts & Science 

History 





\ 




Laura M Shaughnessy 

School Of Management 

Finance 



Andrew M Shea 

School Of Management 

General Mgmt 



Joseph H Shaw 

School Of Arts & Science 

Political Science 




Courtney Shea 

School Of Arts & Science 

History 

Communications 



Hilarie Shanley 

School Of Management 

Marketing 



William F Shanley 

School Of Management 

Finance 

Marketing 



Joseph Shannon 

School Of Arts & Science 

English 







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Seniors 411 




Jamie Bunyan, Ben Wiegand, Katie DiMare, Julia Yuo, Tom Burns, Maggie McElduff, Mike Atwater 



412 Seniors 




Kimberly Ward, Megan Litman, Meghan O'Brien, Andrea Gioka 



Julie Prassas, Bethie McClaney, Stephanie Henderson, Monica Driscoll, Sara Durgin, Alison Cunnigham 




Devon Wyatt, Kristin Hopwood, Diana Wood, Nicole Scillia, Yejin Kim 



Seniors 413 




Jim O'Donnell, Chris Fernando, Tom Buns, Justin Berens 



414 Seniors 




Kimberly Ward, Amy Baker 



Meg Robinson, Will Lane, Patrick Albertson, Shannon Gherty, Elizabeth Spatola 



Seniors 415 




Courtney K Shea 

School Of Arts & Science 

Economics 



Peter R Shean 

School Of Management 

General Mgmt 



Gordon E Shemin 

School Of Arts & Science 

History 



Robert Shenk 

School Of Arts & Science 

Theology 



Casey C Sherman 
School Of Arts & Science JL 
Sociology 




Julia Shin 

School Of Arts & Science 

Psychology 



Robert J Shoemaker 

School Of Management 

Accounting 



Lauren N Shurtleff 

School Of Arts & Science 

History 



IBIMIMIB 

Leah J Sibilia 

School Of Arts & Science 

Sociology 



Taryn A Sibley 
School Of Arts & Science | ,, 
Biology 




Adam Siebert 

School Of Arts & Science 

Chemistry 



Joseph M Silva 

School Of Management 

Finance 

Accounting 



Tiara M Silva 
School Of Education 
Human Development 



Cory J Silveira 

School Of Management 

Finance 



Taylor Silver 

School Of Education 

Human Development 

Child In Society 




Maeghan B Silverberg 

School Of Arts & Science 

Political Science 



Sara Alyson Silverstein 
School Of Education 
Elementary Education 



Michael J Silvestri 

School Of Management 

Finance 



Wanntha Sim 

School Of Education 

Human Development 

Communications 



Rebecca L Simmons 

School Of Arts & Science 

Chemistry 

Romance Lang-French 



416 Seniors 




Benjamin Simms 

chool Of Arts & Science 

Biology 



Michael Skold 

School Of Arts & Science 

Political Science 



Daniel R Simon 

School Of Management 

Finance 

Accounting 



Jonathan Simone 

School Of Arts & Science 

Political Science 




David M Skovran 

School Of Nursing 

Nursing 



Jennifer Sladek 

School Of Arts & Science 

Philosophy 



Steven C Sintra 

School Of Management 

Economics 

Finance 



Justin J Slattery 

School Of Management 

Finance 



Courtney E Sirhal 

School Of Management 

Marketing 




Jessie E Sloan 

School Of Arts & Science 

Chemistry 




Michael Slomienski 

School Of Management 

Finance 



Roger Smerage 

School Of Arts & Science 

History 




Andrew R Smith 

School Of Arts & Science 

History 

Communications 



Chase Smith 

School Of Arts & Science 

Theater Arts 




Seniors 417 




Kelly L Smith 

School Of Arts & Science 

Theology 

Psychology 



Kyla M Smith 

School Of Arts & Scienc 

Psychology 




Michael Smith 

School Of Arts & Science 

Political Science 



Tia J Smith 

School Of Arts & Science 

Computer Science 



George Snarberg 

School Of Arts & Science 

Geophysics 



Lynn N Sniffen 

School Of Arts & Science 

Communications 



Courtney Snyder 

School Of Arts & Scienc 

Biology A&SB .A 




Katherine Sobocienski 

School Of Management 

Marketing 



Alexander Solodyna 

School Of Arts & Science 

Economics 

Philosophy 



Victoria A Somers 

School Of Arts & Science 

English 



Brandon J Song 

School Of Management 

Marketing 



Jeffrey R Soohoo 

School Of Arts & Scienc 

Biology 



418 Seniors 



KkX 




Robert Soohoo 

School Of Management 

Computer Science 



Vivian Sotomayor 

School Of Arts & Science 

Psychology 



John N Sourbeer 

School Of Management 

Finance 

Marketing 



Lauren Southard 
School Of Education 
Elementary Education 



Kate Souza 
School Of Education 
Elementary Education 
Human Development 




Elizabeth Spatola 

School Of Arts & Science 

Communications 



Benjamin J Spera 

School Of Arts & Science 

Economics 



Phineas M Sprague 

School Of Management 

Accounting 



Sarah R Srivastava 

School Of Arts & Science 

Economics 

Psychology 



Michael Stack 

School Of Arts & Science 

Economics 




Katherine E Stainken 

School Of Arts & Science 

Chemistry 

Germanic Studies 



Christopher Stallwood 

School Of Arts & Science 

Biology 



Thomas J Stancil 

School Of Education 

Elementary Education 



Liam G Stanton 

School Of Arts & Science 

Mathematics 

Physics 



John R Staudinger 

School Of Management 

Finance 

Economics-CSOM 




Jacquilyn Stavroff 

School Of Management 

Economics 

Marketing 



Sara E Steinberg 

School Of Arts & Science 

Psychology 



Matthew L Steinkrauss 

School Of Management 

Finance 

Accounting 



Heather J Stepanek 

School Of Arts & Science 

Political Science 



Rebecca E Stern 

School Of Education 

Secondary Education 

Mathematics 



Seniors 419 





Tyler F Stewart 

School Of Arts & Science 

Mathematics 



Martin Stezano 

School Of Arts & Science 

Communications 




Sarah Stipho 

School Of Arts & Science 

Biology 



David Storey 

School Of Arts & Science 

Philosophy 




Kimberlee Straceski 

School Of Management 

General Mgmt 



Matthew Suchy 

School Of Arts & Science 

Biology 



Christopher D Strader 

School Of Arts & Science 

Biochemistry 



Courtney J Strader 
School Of Education 
Elementary Education 
Human Development 



Aleksandra Strauss 

School Of Arts & Science 

Psychology 



Cindy K Suh 

School Of Arts & Science 

Communications 



Diana L Suh 

School Of Management 

Accounting 



Bridget F Sullivan 
School Of Management 

Marketing 
Human Resource Mgmnt 



Garin Strobl 

School Of Arts & Science 

Communications 




Jennifer L Sullivan 

School Of Management 

Finance 

Marketing 



420 Seniors 



tetu 




Jennifer M Sullivan 

.School Of Arts & Science 

Psychology 



Kathleen Sullivan 

School Of Management 

Finance 

Accounting. 'Inf Tech 



Kathleen M Sullivan 

School Of Management 

Accounting 



Matthew C Sullivan 

School Of Arts & Science 

History 



Meghan Sullivan 

School Of Arts & Science 

History 

Economics 




Sarah A Sullivan 

School Of Arts & Science 

Economics 

Communications 



Thomas R Sullivan 

School Of Arts & Science 

Philosophy 



Trammell D Summers 

School Of Management 

Finance 



Alexis C Sun 

School Of Arts & Science 

Communications 



Lian-Hwa M Sun 

School Of Arts & Science 

Finance 

Chemistry 




Lars E Swanson 

School Of Arts & Science 

Chemistry 



Sujata R Swaroop 

School Of Arts & Science 

Psychology 





Joni M Swarts 

School Of Arts & Science 

Economics 

Mathematics 



Anna Sweeney 

School Of Management 

Human Resource Mgmnt 

Philosophy 



Seniors 421 




Emily Hull, Sarah Sullivan, Carela Catigano 



Danielle Hildebrandt, Joie Garfunkle, Lauren McEnteggart, Leah Tseronis 



422 Seniors 




Jamie Huba, Mind Melwani, Lindsey Moore, Jasmin Matthews, Kimberly Ward, Meghan O'Brien 



Katherine Dimare & CatGiri 



Seniors 423 




These Fans Brave the Cold to Support Their Eagles photo by Michael Lucarel 
424 Seniors 



Celebrating Red Sox's Game 7 Victory Over Oakland photo by Sara Durgin 



tti^ 




Kara Castagna, Casey Sherman, Julie Diberardino, Diana Dumbrowski, Amy Niego 



Seniors 425 




Richard L Sweeney 

School Of Management 

Economics 

Political Science 



Jennifer Sweet 

School Of Arts & Science 

Biology 



Joseph A Swenson 

School Of Management 

Finance 



Amy C Swiderski 

School Of Arts & Science 

English 



Christopher M Swigart 

School Of Arts & Science 

History 




Hussain Y Syed 

School Of Management 

Finance 

Marketing 



Didier Sylvain 

School Of Arts & Science 

Economics 



Sandra Szabados 

School Of Management 

Marketing 



Fran X Taglia 

School Of Arts & Science 

Biology 



Shauyi Tai 

School Of Arts & Science 

Communications 




Michael Tait 

School Of Management 

Finance 



David A Talakoub 

School Of Management 

General Mgmt 



Ethan B Talbert 

School Of Arts & Science 

Communications 



Lauren Tallevi 

School Of Arts & Science 

History 



Morris Tang 

School Of Arts & Science 

Communications 




Jessica Tarro 

School Of Arts & Science 

Sociology 



Jonathan S Tashjian 

School Of Arts & Science 

Communications 



Kelly R Techar 

School Of Arts & Science 

Psychology 



Amy Techtmann 

School Of Arts & Science 

Communications 



Adam T Tecza 

School Of Arts & Science 

Sociology 



426 Seniors 




Newton Tedder 
. School Of Arts & Science 
> Environment Geoscience 



Feven Teklu 

School Of Arts & Science 

Communications 



Theodor 1 Tenev 

School Of Arts & Science 

Economics 



Aldo Terranova 

School Of Management 

Accounting 



Emily Terry 

School Of Management 

Accounting 

Information Systems 




Alec Tervenski 

School Of Arts & Science 

Communications 



Dayna M Tewal 

School Of Arts & Science 

Psychology 



Jonathan E Thackeray 

School Of Management 

Finance 



Sapna A Thakkar 

School Of Arts & Science 

Economics 



Seth R Therrien 

School Of Management 

Accounting 




Michael Thiel 

School Of Management 

Finance 

Marketing 



Marget C Thomas 

School Of Arts & Science 

Sociology 

Communications 



Rajveer S Thind 

School Of Arts & Science 

Economics 





Adam Thompson 

School Of Management 

Economics 



Seniors 427 





Kelly Thorne 


Lindsey T Thorne-Binghar 




School Of Education 


School Of Arts & Science 


Elementary Education 


Communications 




B 






mM* m 






HuF'K^ ^H 






Kfia 







Joshua Thornhill 

School Of Arts & Science 

Computer Science 



Matthew D Thornton 

School Of Arts & Science 

Romance Lang-French 




Davis C Thurber 

School Of Arts & Science 

Psychology 

Music 



Susan Tily 
School Of Education 
Elementary Education 
Human Development 



Elizabeth S Thuvanuti 

School Of Arts & Science 

English 

Communications 



Michael J Ticcioni 

School Of Arts & Science 

History 



Lindsey Tillack 

School Of Arts & Science 

Biology 



Alexandra E Tillson , 
School Of Arts & Science 
Sociology 




Terence Tirella 

School Of Management 

Computer Science 



Douglas A Tompsett 

School Of Arts & Science 

Chemistry 



James M Toof 

School Of Arts & Science 

Communications 



Maureen Toomey 
School Of Education 
Elementary Education 



428 Seniors 






Olivia C Torres 

.School Of Arts & Science 

Studio Art 



Rayann Torres 

School Of Management 

Economics 



Jasmine B Toussaint 

School Of Arts & Science 

English 



Tom Tramontin 

School Of Management 

Finance 



Dat B Tran 

School Of Management 

Finance 

Marketing 




Lynh M Tran 

School Of Management 

Marketing 



Ekaterini Tsagaroulis 

School Of Arts & Science 

Economics 



Nathaniel J Turner 

School Of Management 

Accounting 



Steven Trapani 

School Of Management 

Finance 

Film Studies 



Kathleen L Trong 

School Of Education 

Human Development 

English 



Andrew Trossello 

School Of Arts & Science 

Biochemistry 



1 * \ 

Allyson Trowbridge 

School Of Arts & Science 

Psychology 





William Tseng 

School Of Management 

Accounting / Inf Tech 



Leah M Tseronis 

School Of Arts & Science 

History 



Megan E Tuite 

School Of Arts & Science 

Communications 



Andrew Tuozzolo 

School Of Arts & Science 

Economics 




Thomas Turner 

School Of Management 

Accounting 

Information Systems 



Joseph M Tyburczy 

School Of Arts & Science 

Sociology 



Julie Ann Uanino 

School Of Education 

Elementary Education 

Human Development 



Cindy Uh 

School Of Arts & Science 

Communications 



Seniors 429 





Michael P Valentine 

School Of Arts & Science 

History 



Colin Van Hook 

School Of Arts & Science 

Psychology 



Jill Urbanus 

School Of Arts & Science 

English 


Edgar J Valdez 

School Of Arts & Science 

Philosophy 

Mathematics 


' J 








BBJll i^B 


; \ 



Stephanie Valencia 

School Of Arts & Science 

International Studies 



Courtney A Valentine 
School Of Education 

Psychology 
Human Development 




Bria M Valentino 

School Of Arts & Science 

History 



Julian Van Cole 

School Of Arts & Science 

Biology 

Philosophy 



David Van Dam 

School Of Arts & Science 

Political Science 



Jason Vanderburgh 

School Of Arts & Scienct 

History 

Philosophy 




Michelle A Van Name 

School Of Arts & Science 

Biology 



Joseph P Van Saun 

School Of Management 

Finance 



Michael Vanzandt 

School Of Arts & Science 

History 



Carla M Vassallo 

School Of Nursing 

Nursing 



430 Seniors 




John F Yautour 
fiool Of Management 
Computer Science 



Danielle Vellucci 

School Of Arts & Science 

Chemistry 



Jennifer Velys 

School Of Management 

Accounting 



Jane F Ventrone 

School Of Arts & Science 

Psychology 



Robert Vetterl 

School Of Management 

Accounting 

Finance 




Laura Vichick 

Ichool Of Arts & Science 

History 

Communications 



Alan Viglione 

School Of Arts & Science 

Biology 



Nicholas A Vitanza 

School Of Arts & Science 

English 



Christopher J Vivino 

School Of Management 

Accounting 



Andrea Vollman 

School Of Arts & Science 

Communications 




Audrey Vosnos 

chool Of Arts & Science 

Biology 



Lauren Wahlers 

School Of Management 

Finance 

Economics 





Jessica A Walker 
chool Of Arts & Science 

Economics 
Romance Lang-French 



Tiffany C Walker 

School Of Arts & Science 

Communications 



Seniors 431 




Joe Costello, Nick Dubrowsky, Brian Klug 



Leks Strauss, Jamie Labukas 



432 Seniors 




Coutney McKirmey, Breanne Bonner 



Team "Elton John's Greatest Hits" Celebrates an Intramural Baseball Game photo by Tom Buns 



Seniors 433 




434 Seniors 



Katie Meehan, Lindsay Williamson, Kaitlin Mannix, Maeve Bresnahan, Erin Finnegan, Jenny Runa, 
Meghan Maugeri, Amanda Crowley 



Daniela Colognori, Kim Young 



r 




Amy Morrow, Jessica Seaver, Emilie Winterton, Meg Caulfield, Mary Hunt Raren Zelenka 



Seniors 435 




Whitney A Walker 

School Of Education 

Early Childhood 

Mathematics 



Kelly A Wallace 

School Of Arts & Science 

Mathematics 



Elizabeth M Walsh 

School Of Arts & Science 

Economics 



Tared Walsh 

School Of Arts & Science 

Psychology 



Julie Walsh 

School Of Education 

Human Development 

Child In Society 




Thomas B Walsh 

School Of Arts & Science 

English 



Claire M Walters 

School Of Arts & Science 

Communications 



Lillian Wang 
School Of Management 

Accounting 
Econ-Oper Res/CSOM 



Yan Wang 

School Of Arts & Science 

Biochemistry 



Melissa M Wangenhein 
School Of Arts & Scienc 
Psychology 




Alexandra Ward 

School Of Arts & Science 

Biology 



Kimberly C Ward 

School Of Arts & Science 

Economics 

Russian 



Margaret S Ward 

School Of Arts & Science 

Communications 



Matthew G Ward 

School Of Arts & Science 

English 



Sarah M Wasson 

School Of Arts & Scienc 

English 




Lisa Watson 

School Of Arts & Science 

Biology 



William Watt 

School Of Arts & Science 

Economics 

Philosophy 



Meghan A Weake 

School Of Nursing 

Nursing 



Melissa M Webber 

School Of Education 

Elementary Education 



Sara P Webby 

School Of Arts & Scienc 

English 



436 Seniors 







Vanessa M Weibel 

School Of Arts & Science 

Art History 



Andrew A Welshons 

School Of Arts & Science 

Mathematics 



Erica Wheatley 

School Of Arts & Science 

Economics 

Communications 



Mary E Weicher 

School Of Arts & Science 

English 



Alexandra E Weiskopf 

School Of Arts & Science 

English 

Communications 



Jasmine Weiss 

School Of Management 

Finance 



Katherine M Weiss 

School Of Arts & Science 

Music 

History 




Paul S Wenger 

School Of Arts & Science 

Mathematics 



Lauren Wenzel 

School Of Arts & Science 

English 



Erich A Werner 

School Of Arts & Science 

English 



Katherine E West 

School Of Management 

Communications 




Michael J Whitaker 

School Of Arts & Science 

History 

Communications 



Seniors 437 





Edward G White 

School Of Management 

Finance 

Economics-CSOM 



Elizabeth B White 
School Of Management 
Operations / Tech Mngm 




Kari L White 

School Of Arts & Science 

History 

Political Science 



Lauren M White 

School Of Nursing 

Nursing 




Jennifer A Whitson 

School Of Arts & Science 

History 



Christopher J Wholey 

School Of Arts & Science 

Economics 



Benjamin C Wiegand 

School Of Management 

Finance 

Accounting 



Timothy M Wientzen 

School Of Arts & Science 

English 



Christopher Wigand 

School Of Management 

Accounting 

Finance 




Mary-Elizabeth J Wightman 

School Of Management 

Marketing 



Elizabeth A Wilber 

School Of Arts & Science 

Art History 



Brittany A Wilcox 

School Of Arts & Science 

Sociology 



Talia Wildes 

School Of Arts & Science 

Political Science 



Christopher Williams 
School Of Arts & Science 



History 






438 Seniors 



U&4 



Corey S Williams 
School Of Education 
Human Development 
Elementary Education 



Jenelle M Williams 

School Of Arts & Science 

Communications 



Karen Williams 

School Of Arts & Science 

Biology 



Lindsay E Williamson 

School Of Education 

Secondary Education 

History 



Robert E Williamson 

School Of Arts & Science 

Psychology 





Timothy Williamson 

School Of Arts & Science 

History 



Laura Willis 

School Of Arts & Science 

Economics 



Allison Willson 

School Of Arts & Science 

Theology 

Philosophy 



Zachary C Wilske 

School Of Management 

Marketing 



Hilary H Wilson 

School Of Arts & Science 

Art History 





Omar B Wilson 

School Of Management 

Finance 



Timothy Wilson Byrne 

School Of Arts & Science 

Chemistry 



Mark C Winchester 

School Of Management 

Marketing 



Megan A Winder 

School Of Arts & Science 

History 



Jordana Winn 

School Of Arts & Science 

Psychology 




Scott M Winter 

School Of Management 

Accounting 




Emilie Winterton 

School Of Nursing 

Nursing 



Rebeca E Wolfe 
School Of Arts & Science 

History 
Rom Lang-Hispanic Stdy 



Trevor M Wolfe 

School Of Arts & Science 

Philosophy 



Brandon Wong 

School Of Arts & Science 

Economics 

Communications 



Seniors 439 




Catherine M Woods 
School Of Education 
Elementary Education 



Chelsea M Woods 

School Of Arts & Scienc 

English 




Elizabeth M Woods 
School Of Arts & Science 
Rom Lang-Hispanic Study 



Ashley E Wright 

School Of Arts & Science 

Sociology 



Eric T Wright 
School Of Education 
Human Development 



James Wright 

School Of Arts & Science 

Political Science 



Kevin M Wright 

School Of Managemen 

Finance 




Bing Wu 

School Of Management 

Marketing 



Jennifer Wu 

School Of Arts & Science 

Chemistry 



Steve Wu 

School Of Management 

Marketing 

Finance 



Michael M Wurst 

School Of Arts & Science 

Philosophy 



Devon Wyatt 

School Of Management 

Operations/Tech Mgmn 

Marketing 



440 Seni 



Klr&t 



Sean D Wylie 

School Of Management 

Economics 



ShuXia 

School Of Management 

Finance 



Miho Yamaguchi 

School Of Arts & Science 

Sociology 



Talya Yaylaian 

School Of Arts & Science 

Communications 



Hale Yazicioglu 

School Of Arts & Science 

English 




Julia F Yeh 

School Of Management 

Accounting 

Finance 



Helena Yoo 

School Of Management 

Accounting 



Emily H York 

School Of Arts & Science 

History 



Elizabeth Young 

School Of Arts & Science 

English 



Julia K Yuo 

School Of Arts & Science 

English 



Keriann Yutkins 

School Of Arts & Science 

English 



Kimberly A Young 

School Of Arts & Science 

History 




Seniors 441 




Omis, Bido, Razor, Wombat 



442 Seniors 



Karen Rampersal, Adwoa Antwi-Barfi, Tiffany Barr, Tania Barrett, Katina McCrory, Mario AAcKinney, Marajs Jocks 

Patrick Kelly, Coney Williams 



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Dana Howarth, Linasey Hogan, AAarisa Grillo, Meaghan Casey, Milisa Alexis-Manners, Alissa Marzetti, Kim Gassner 



Seniors 443 



444 Seniors 





Laira Fitzgerald, Emily Eule, Stephanie Regan 



Emily Gnningham, Sara Durgin, Dave SaSeffler, Oan Dolan, Sara Webby, Kristen Mitchell 



Seniors 445 




Cristina Zamora 


Justin M Zbrzezny 


Karen M Zelenka 


Rachel S Zeller 


Christopher E Zolcinski 


School Of Arts & Science 


School Of Arts & Science 


School Of Arts & Science 


School Of Arts & Science 


School Of Management 


Chemistry 


Biology 


Communications 


English 


Accounting 
Finance 




Katherine E Zorzi 


Elizabeth A Zubowicz 


Chiara M Zuccarino Crowe 


Cecilia G Zuger 


Joseph V Zujkowski 


School Of Management 


School Of Arts & Science 


School Of Arts & Science 


School Of Management 


School Of Arts & Scien 


Marketing 


Psychology 


Biology 


Marketing 


History 



Those we love are never really lost to us- 
we feel them in so many special ways- 
through friends they always cared about 

and dreams they left behind. 

in beauty that they added to our days... 

in words of wisdom we still carry with us 

and memories that never will be gone... 

Those we love 

are never really lost to us~ 

for everywhere their special love lives on. 

~ Amanda Bradley ~ 



The Class of 2004 would like to honor the memory of Kia Rozier 

(1029031. 



~ 




\ 



Stephanie Bachiero 



You'll be with us in our hearts as we walk. 



446 Seniors 



JfT 




Seniors 447 




Judy Acter, Lauren Gentofant 



Helena Yoo, Michelle Cherng, Mi Goong-Choo 



448 Seniors 




Seniors 449 




Tailgating - photo by Natalie Meyers 



Jared Phipps, Meghan O'Brien, Lindsey Moore 



450 Seniors 



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Breanne Bonner, Diana Wood 





Liz McClure, Carolyn O'Connor, Jim Killian, Mary Flynn, Jill Urbanus 



Erik Graham-Smith, Kinga Krisko 



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MiaSael Foley, Chris Marchand, Emily Eule, Stef JaaSman, Stephanie Regan, Kevin Froeb, Greg Reid 



Seniors 451 




Naveen Ganesh, Jay Yuen, Chris Rizzo, Derek Milke, Joe Zeidman, Rob Klein 



Adam Thompson, Amy Morrow, Mike Dailey, John Mclnnes 



452 Seni 



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Jamie Geiger, Jeni Runco, Denise Menaker, Kerry Parker, Danielle Evers, Lauren Scalpato, Rachel Mellard, 
Julia Jakubek, Jill Levy, Roxane Handal 



Lauren Centofanti, Judy Alter 



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Seniors 453 




Kim Chin, Dave Skovaran 





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Marisa Grillo, Lindsey Hogan 



Jamaican Assocation Dance Troop at the Unity Dinner 



454 Seniors 



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Jay Yeun, Joe Zeidman, Chris Rizzo, Ursula Rodriguez, Patty Rodriguez, Don, & Lindsey 



Seniors 455 



Camera Shy 






ADAMS, DELO 
AHMAD, DAANISH 
ALDEN, LINDSAY 
ALFIERI, CARMELA 
ALLAN, DANIEL 
ALPHONSO. PETER 
ALSAADY, SINAAN 
AMATO, ASHLEY 
ANDERSON, KERRI 
ANDRESEN, DANIEL 
ANDRIAS, DAVID 
ARNOLD, MELISSA 
ARUKIAN, TALIN 
AVELINO, MELISSA 
BACHIERO, STEPHANIE 
BADRAWI, DALIA 
BAER, JILLIAN 
BAEZ, PATRICIA 
BAKER, AMY 
BAKER, MATTHEW 
BARBER, AMY 
BARKULIS, SEAN 
BARLOW, ALEIA 
BARRON, BEAU 
BARROS, EUTYCHIUS 
BASKINS, SYDNEY 
BAVARO, CHRISTINA 
BENCH, ROBERT 
BENEDICT, WILLIAM 
BERTRAND, DANIEL 
BHARGAVA. ASHISH 
BIANCO. PETER 
BLOHM, ALBERTO 
BOATWRIGHT, ERIC 
BOC, DEREK 



BOLANO, VANESSA 
BOMMARITO, ANTHONY 
BOONE, MOLLY 
BORCK, BRETT 
BOUCHARD, NATHAN 
BOWLEY, PETER 
BRADEN, KARLY 
BRADLEY, PAUL 
BRADY, CONNOR 
BRENT, DANIEL 
BROMLEY, WILLIAM 
BROOKS, JORDAN 
BROUILLARD, MICHAEL 
BROWN, JADE 
BROZENSKE. MATTHEW 
BRUNO, VINCENT 
BRYANT, ANDREW 
BUCHWACH, AMY 
BUCKLEY, STEPHEN 
BUFFINTON, BRYAN 
BUGLIONE, ANTHONY 
BULIN, SARAH 
BURKE, ELLEN 
BUXANI, NAVIN 
BYE, TIMOTHY 
CALE, JENNIFER 
CALLAHAN, MATTHEW 
CAMPANA. PETER 
CARDEN, MARK 
CARLSON, JOHN 
CARNEY, PATRICK 
CARRAHER, TIMOTHY 
CASSIS. JACLYNE 
CASTRO, ALMA 
CAVALIER, VINCENT 



CELLA, JOHN 
CHAN, JONATHAN 
CHANG, MICHAEL 
CHIOU, JANICE 
CHIU, PHILIP 
CHMIELEWSKI, ADAM 
CHO, HOWARD 
CHOI, EDWARD 
CHOI, ABRAHAM 
CHOU, YU HENG 
CHRISTENSEN, TIMOTHY 
CHRISTINA, KIMBERLY 
CHU, PHILLIP 
CIFUNI, STEPHEN 
CLAFFEY AMY 
CLARK, DAVID 
CLARK, JASON 
CLEMENTE, AMY 
CLIFFORD, TRACY 
COLE, ODESSA 
COLEMAN, LISA 
CONLEY, STEPHEN 
CONNELLY, PATRICK 
COOPER, JAMES 
COPPO, JOSEPH 
CORDIANO, BENJAMIN 
CORMIER, JASON 
COSENTINO, 
CHRISTOPHER 
COTTER, JOSEPH 
COUGHLIN, KATHLEEN 
COX, JAMES 
CREEGAN, JOHN 
CROKE, GERALD 
CROMACK, STEPHEN 
CROTTY, MEREDITH 









456 Seniors 



Camera Shy 



CRUSSANA, DAVID 
CRUZ, FERNANDO 
CRYDER, SCOTT 
CURREY, DAVID 
CURRIE, JONATHAN 
CZOPOR, CAROLYN 
D'AGNESE, MICHAEL 
D'ARPINO, ANTHONY 
DAVENPORT BRADLEY 
DAVIDSON, ABIGAIL 
DAVIS, WARREN 
DE BLOIS, MATTHEW 
DE SISTA, ANNA 
DEBOY, KRISTEN 
DECKER, CAILIN 
DEGNAN, RAYMOND 
DEIESO, CARA 
DELERME, JERRY 
DELORME. LUKE 
DELUISE, WILLIAM 
DESAI, PRANAY 
DIAZ, MARTIN 
DIAZ, OLIVIA 
DICHECK, STEPHEN 
DIETRICH, CHRISTINA 
DIMANNO, JOHN 
DIMASCIO, CYNTHIA 
DIPERSIA, ALEXANDER 
DISCIPIO, JOSHUA 
DO AN, ELIZABETH 
DOHRN, BLAKE 
DONADIO, CHRISTOPHER 
DONAHUE, JAQUELINE 
DONICS, ALEXANDER 
DONOVAN, KEVIN 



DONOVAN, RYAN 
DORSETT, KIRT 
DOUCETTE, ANGELA 
DUBROWSKY, NICHOLAS 
DUFFY, CHRISTINA 
DUFFY, RYAN 
DUMOUCHELLE, JUSTIN 
DUNPHY, PATRICK 
DVIVEDI, DEVAL 
DZIAMA, JUSTIN 
EAVES, BENJAMIN 
EDZIE, AMA 
EGAN, PATRICK 
EMANUEL, KRISTIN 
ENRIGHT MARK 
ERIAN, PAUL 
ESPOSITO, CAMERON 
FAHEY, KEVIN 
FARRINGTON, LAURA 
FAVREAU, JAMES 
FENTON, NEIL 
FERGUS, TROY 
FERRARO, NICHOLAS 
FILIPOVIC. DRAG AN 
FINEGAN, CATHERINE 
FISCHER, BRYAN 
FITZGERALD, THERESE 
FOLEY, MICHAEL 
FORGER, LAUREN 
FOX, RYAN 
FRANKOSKI, IAN 
FRENCH, CHRIS 
FRENCH, MATTHEW 
FRITZSCHE, ALFRED 
GAGE, RYAN 



GAGLIARDI, JEFFREY 
GAHL, THOMAS 
GALINDO, LUIS 
GALLAGHER, DENIS 
GALLAGHER, KATHLEEN 
GALVIN, MICHAEL 
GANESH, NAVEEN 
GANZ, JASON 
GARCIA, JOHN 
GARCIA, KELLY 
GARNIER, KAREN 
GARRITY, PATRICK 
GARTRELL, BYRON 
GOUTHIER, MICHAEL 
GEIGER, JAMIE 
GEORGE, MICHAEL 
GIANNONI, JASON 
GIESEN, BRIAN 
GIL, GERARD 
GLOVER, EVAN 
GLOVER, GORDAN 
GODDARD, TIMOTHY 
GOEDERT, ANDREW 
GOEHRY, DANIEL 
GOGGINS, JOHN 
GOODCHILD, JACQUELINE 
GRAEFE, EMILY 
GRAVES, ELIZABETH 
GREEN, STEPHEN 
GRIFFIN, CAROLINE 
GRUNSTRA, ADAM 
GUNDILOVICH, 
KONSTANTIN 
HAGE, RAYMOND 
HAIN, BENJAMIN 
HAM, YOUNG 



Seniors 457 



Camera Shy 



HAMBURG, ROBERT 
HAMDY, GERARD 
HAMMOND, LIZA 
HAN, AROOM 
HANDAL, ROXANNE 
HANSON, JONATHAN 
HARPER, ROBERT 
HASSAN, REHANUL 
HAVEL, NICOLE 
HAYES, MARGARET 
HAZARD, JOEL 
HEALY, MARY CATHERINE 
HENNES, TY 
HESS, KEVIN 
HILL LAUREN 
HILLER, STEPHEN 
HINDS, JUSTIN 
HIOS, JOHN 
HOEGER, LAURA 
HOLLADAY, LISA 
HOLLINGER, TYLER 
HOSKINS, KEVIN 
HOWARTH, DAVID 
HUNTER, MYRAN 
HWANG, EDWARD 
HYNES, ERIK 
IACCARINO, LISA 
IACOVELLI, DAVID 
IGARASHI, YUSUKE 
IMAMI, OERD 
INFANTE, CARLOS 
JACKMAN, STEPHANIE 
JACKSON, COURTNEY 
JACKSON, TIMOTHY 
JAGGER, REID 



JANKOWSKI, LAUREN 

JASTREMSKI, MICHELE 

JENKINS, MAUREEN 

JENSEN, ERIK 

JOHARI, PRAKASH 

JOHNSON, CONSTANCE 

JOHNSON, MIA 

JOO, JIN 

JOYCE, LAUREN 

JOYCE, LAUREN 

KABACINSKI, ELIZABETH 

KADAM, NITASHA 

KAM, RYAN 

KAMMERER, PETER 

KANTOROWICZ, NASTASSIA 

KARAM, BACHIR 

KARASANYI, MUTONI 

KASHETT, DAVID 

KEELER, BRENNAN 

KEIL, BERNIDET 

KELLEY, ERIC 

KELLNER, SARA 

KELLY, KATHERINE 

KENEALY, KATE 

KILBANE, SHEILA 

KIM, AMIE 

KIM, CHRISTINA 

KIM, HYUNJEAN 

KIM, JUNEYOUNG 

KIM, SUN 

KING, CHRISTOPHER 

KLOSE, STEPHANIE 

KO, HAYNES 

KOBLI, KATALIN 

KOENIGSAMEN, JONATHAN 



KOLIMAGA, ELIZABETH 
KRAMER, HEATH 
KRUGER, REBECCA 
KRYVOSHEYA, YURIY 
KUO, LINDA 
KWON, GINA 
LABUKAS, JAMIE 
LAI, CHRISTOPHER 
LAI, PO CHEN 
LAMPARELLO, MARK 
LANSTEIN, JONATHAN 
LARSON, CLAUDIA 
LEAHY, MAUREEN 
LEAHY, RYAN 
LEAVITT, KEITH 
LECK, ROBIN 
LEE, CINDY 
LEE, I CHEN 
LEE, WEICHIN 
LEE, WENDY 
LEFLOCH, CATHERINE 
LEGAN, NANCY 
LEMIEUX, PAUL 
LENT, GEORGEANNA 
LEUFFEN, ROBERT 
LEVINSON, MICHAEL 
LIBBY HAINES, NOAH 
LILLIE, REBECCA 
LIM, HYOUN 
LIN, WEN HUA 
LINDAHL, CHRISTOPHER 
LISAGER, MATTHEW 
LITMAN, MEGAN 
LIU, NANNAN 
LOPEZ DE HARO, FABIANA 



458 Seniors 



H£& 



Camera Shy 



LUCARZ, CHRISTOPHER 
MAC NEIL, THERESA 
MACEDO, DIANE 
MACH, HUY 
MACK, SARAH 
MADDEN, DANIEL 
MADIGAN, KEVIN 
MAGNUSON, MATTHEW 
MAJOCH, THOMAS 
MALANDRIS. TEKAE 
MANN, AARON 
MANNING, TROY 
MANNIX. KAITLIN 
MANRARA, CARMEN 
MAPLES. ANDREW 
MARA, DANIEL 
MARCIEL, JAVIER 
MARKOWSKI, KRISTEN 
MAROTO, MICHELLE 
MARTEN, ANNE 
MARTIN, THOMAS 
MARTINEZ, ROBERT 
MARTINO, CHRISTOPHER 
MASONER, SARAH 
MATHIAS, MARK 
MATOS, KATHERINE 
MATSON, LINDSEY 
MCCAIN. CHRISTOPHER 
MCCOUBREY, SAMUEL 
MCDERMOTT, DANIEL 
MCELENEY, KEVIN 
MCGARREL, SARAH 
MCGINN, MEGHAN 
MCGUINNESS, BRENDAN 
MCHUGH, ANDREW 



MCINNIS, ELIZABETH 
MCKEAN, KENT 
MCKINLEY, JAMISON 
MCLAUGHLIN, ERIN 
MCMANUS, BRIDGET 
MCMANUS, BRYCE 
MCMILLAN, QUENTIN 
MCMILLAN, JOHN 
MCMILLAN, BRYAN 
MEDINA, GRETCHEN 
MENAKER, DENISE 
METLING, PHILLIP 
MEYER, KATHRYN 
MILKE. DEREK 
MILLER, BENJAMIN 
MILLER, COURTNEY 
MILLIGAN, RICHARD 
MINEO, JULIANNE 
MINTE, LUCAS 
MIRAKIAN, JAMES 
MIRANDA, PETER 
MIRAZIMI, PASHA 
MOEN, MATTHEW 
MOLLER, ROBERT 
MONTANIEL, KATERINA 
MOONEY, EDWARD 
MOORE, LINDSEY 
MORIYAMA, CAROLINE 
MORNEAU, STEPHEN 
MORRILL, ERIK 
MULHERAN, PAUL 
MULLEN, CHRISTOPHER 
MURPHY, AMANDA 
MURPHY, ANDREW 



NAPOLI, ERIC 
NATALE, KRISTEN 
NAUMANN, ANDREW 
NAUMES, CHRISTOPHER 
NEDD, KASHAKA 
NG, DEREK 
NGO, KIM 
NGUYEN, LOAN 
NGUYEN, SAMMI 
NICHOLSON, EMILY 
NICOLAS, DRUDYS 
NICOSIA, JOSEPH 
NIEGO, AMY 
NOBLE, TIMOTHY 
NOLAN, MARION 
NOVAC, IRENE 
NURIMBA, CLARISSA 
O'CONNELL, KAITLIN 
O' CONNER, MICHAEL 
O' CONNER, MICHAEL 
O'DONNELL, MICHAEL 
O'DONNELL, MICHAEL 
O' GRADY, MICHAEL 
O'NEILL, MICHAEL 
OLMO, VALERIE 
OLMSTEAD, MEGAN 
OLSZEWSKI, ROBERT 
ORREGO, ANDRES 
OYEDELE, ABIDEMI 
PANARO, MATTHEW 
PANDOLFI, JESSICA 
PAPPAS, DINO 
PARK, ASHLEY 
PARK, JUNG 



Seniors 459 



Camera Shy 



PARK, JUNHO 
PARK, MINSUN 
PASQUALE, RAFFAELLA 
PASWUESI, JAMES 
PATEL, AMAN 
PAULSON, ELIZABETH 
PAXTON, TIMOTHY 
PECORA, MARK 
PENA, RADHY 
PENDERGAST, ALICIA 
PEREZ, JAIME 
PERKINS, HAVEN 
PERRON, DAVID 
PETER, JENNIFER 
PETERSON, BRETT 
PETTAS, JOANNA 
PFISTER, JONATHAN 
PHIAMBOLIS, ANDREA 
POST, SHAWN 
POTTER, PHILIP 
PRESCOTT, BRINGHAM 
PREVITERA, JOSEPH 
PRUITT, JENNIFER 
PRZYBYLSKI, ALEXIS 
PUFAHL, DANIEL 
PUSCH, DUSTIN 
PYEATT, LAURA 
QUACH, HOA 
QUALLS, RODERICK 
RAGUSA, KATHERINE 
RAHKO, SARAH 
RANDALL, ROGER 
REGO, JENNIFER 
REILLY, NATASHA 
REINOSO, KATHERINE 



REITTINGER, MELISSA 
REMBY, ELIZABETH 
REYES JIMENEZ, FLORA 
RHODES, CORBAN 
RICHARD, KRISTEN 
RICHMOND, CARLA 
RIEHLE, RYAN 
RINALDI, MARIE 
RING, CHARLES 
ROBOTTI, MICHAEL 
ROCHE, COURTNEY 
ROSE, VANESSA 
ROSE, WILLIAM 
ROSEMURGY, LEA 
ROWLAND, JOHN 
RUMSEY, MELISSA 
RUSH, SARAH 
RUSSELL, BRENDAN 
RUSSO, CHRISTIAN 
RYNDAK, SARAH 
SADOWSKI, TODD 
SAILLANT, JASON 
SALAZAR, LEANNE 
SAMMARONE, LISA 
SANCHEZ, CARI 
SAVELYEV, SIMON 
SCANNELL, MEAGHAN 
SCHAFFER, ANDREW 
SCHEER, HEIDI 
SCHENK, SARA 
SCHMITT, MICHAEL 
SCHROECK, CHRISTOPHER 
SCHRUTH, PETER 
SCHULTZ, LAUREN 
SCHUPMANN, BENJAMIN 
SCHUTZ, PAUL 



SCHWARTZ, KARLA 
SELDEN, JESSICA 
SHANLEY, HILARIE 
SHAW, COLIN 
SHEA, COURTNEY 
SHEEHY, ANNA 
SHKURTI, GENTIAN 
SIDNEY, RYAN 
SIEGEL, YURII 
SIGMUND, KRISTINA 
SILVERIA, JONATHAN 
SILVERSTEIN, SARA 
SLADEK, JENNIFER 
SLATON, JESSICA 
SLINN, MARGERY 
SMITH, CHASE 
SMITH, JEFFREY 
SMITH, KRISTEN 
SMITH, RAMON 
SMITH RUIZ, JENNIFER 
SNEE, CHRISTOPHER 
SOLANO, NATALIA 
SONG, SUNG JU 
SOTOMAYOR, KERRI 
SOTOMAYOR, VIVIAN 
SPALATIN, CHRISTOPHER 
STEVENSON, JESSICA 
STONE, KATHLEEN 
STRAUSS, ALEKSANDRA 
SUCHY, MATT 
SUH, SUNG 
SULLIVAN, HEATHER 
SULLIVAN, MICHAEL 
SZABADOS, SANDRA 
SZABO, ELIZABETH 
TALARICO, ALEXANDER 



460 Seniors 



Camera Shy 



TANCABEL, DAVID 
TARRO, JESSICA 
TAYLOR, NICHOLAS 
TAYLOR, PAUL 
TAYLOR, RENEE 
TERWILLIGER, JESSICA 
THOMAS, LINDSAY 
THOMPSON, JOHN 
TILY, SUSAN 
TIM AS, VALKIRIA 
TOOMEY, MARK 
TORRE, CARLOS 
TRESELER, FREDERICK 
TUOZZOLO, ANDREW 
TURNER, CHAD 
TYCHSEN, JESSICA 
UNIS, SHANNON 
VAN PARIDON, MARJOLEIN 
VANNI, LAUREN 
VASQUEZ, ALEXANDER 
VASSOS, KATHERINE 
VEINO, MATTHEW 
VELOZ, JESSICA 
VERDINI, DANIEL 
VETTERL, ROBERT 
VIGLIONE, ALAN 
VILLARREAL, MARIA 
VOCE, ANTHONY 
VOSNOS, AUDREY 
WALLER, MARISSA 
WALSH, NICOLE 
WANG, YAN 



WARD, ANDRE 
WASSERBURGER, MATHEW 
WATSON, AKIO 
WEBLEY, DEREK 
WEBSTER, AMY 
WEEKS, CHARLES 
WEISSBACH, EMILY 
WESSEL, DAVID WILLIAMS, 
AMANDA 

WILLIAMS, DANIEL 
WILLIAMS, DEREK 
WILLIAMS, RYAN 
WILSON, PEGGY 
WOOD ALL, MATTHEW 
WOYTOWICH, ROBERT 
WRIGHT, SCOTT 
WYREMSKI, STEPHEN 
YARDAN, CHRISTOPHER 
YARNELL, LISA 
YATES, HOPE 
YEE, STEVEN 
YEMELANOVA, NATALIYA 
YOON, CHONG 
YOON, ELIZABETH 
YORIMOTO, TAMI 
YOSHIDA, HIDEYO 
YUEN, JASON 
YUTKINS, KERIANN 
ZEIDMAN, JOSEPH 
ZHARKOVA, KATHERINE 
ZIAD, SHWAN 
ZLATANOV, EVGENY 



CAMERA SHY LIST 

SUBMITTED BY 
MCGRATH STUDIOS 



Seniors 461 




Partyin It Up 80's Style photo by Christina DiFeo 



Jaron Goldstein, Diana Dombrowski 



462 Seniors 




Naveen Ganesh, Oris Rizzo, Mike Alexander, Jay Yeun, Tommy Nigrelli, Derek Milke, Meg Weake, Ellen Rains 



Seniors 463 




Adam Siebert, Tim Kolesk, Peter Brennan 



464 Seniors 



Daniela Colognori, Philip Frattaroli, MiaSelle Van Name, Liz Auty, Tony Rue 
AAatt Billeri 




Leah Sibilia, Kimberly Ward 



Laura Sanchez, Breanne Bonner 



Seniors 465 









i\ 







— 



M£d 



ALL THAT YOU CAN'T LEAVE BEHIND 

BENEFACTORS & PATRONS 

"You are told a lot about your educa- 
tion, but some beautiful, sacred memory, 
preserved since childhood is perhaps 
the best education of all. If a man 
carries many such memories into life 
with him, he is saved for the rest of his 
days. And even if only one good memory 
is left in our hearts, it may also be the 
instrument of our salvation one day!' 

-Fyodor Dostoevski 




xm 



Edited by Lindsey Scarindo 



Patrons 467 



— 



Platinum Benefactors 


David & Jana Agliano 


Mr. &Mrs. Joseph C. Grasso 


David and Christine Auer 


Mr. & Mrs. Robert F Harper 


Mark and Barbara Boisi 


Mr. & Mrs. Thomas B. Hecke 


Frederick & Jaclyn Brown 


Mr. &Mrs. Albert Hessberg j 


Maria & John Capano 


III 


Dan Ciauri 


E. Bruce and Diane Johnson 


Boh and Joan Clifford 


Randolph and Maria 


Robert & Carmen Cochrane 


Kantorowicz 


Vincent & Patricia DiPano 


Dr. & Mrs. Paul D Kountz, Jn 


David and Margaret 


Kenneth & MaryKozik 


DuMouchel 


Jim & Chris Lentz 


Mike & Fran Dunphy 


Ken and Dr. Connie Magura 


John & Carol Gabelli 


Bernadette & Michael 


Denis & Mary Gallagher 


McCormick 






-^^^^ I 







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Platinum Benefactors 



[rank & Sharon Menaker 
harry A. Mills, M.D. 



Susan and Bill Shea 



Nils & Maggie Thiel 



: & Mrs. Eugene Montrone Mr. and Mrs. Robert D. Vetterl 



I obi n & Tom Morley 
'. he Morneau Family 
UaryMorrell 
ick & Jo Moynihan 



Dr. Clifford P. Williams 



Mr. &Mrs. Richard B. Wyatt, 



Jr. 



Drs. Tony & Debbie Zancanaro 



\r. & Mrs. Richard Padovano Mr. & Mrs. R. Kent Zirkle 
\r. & Mrs. L. Robert Pasquesi Wayne & Sherry Smith 
larcel & Mary Jane Poyant Alexander & Doreen Rodetis 



eve & Anne Reed 



- m & Maggie Rountos 

\~ederic Rust 

It. & Mrs. John T Scully 



Mr. & Mrs. Martin M 

HopwoodJr. 
Mike & Patricia Ryan 



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4& Patrons S Bs 



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Gold Benefactors 






The Gregg W. Anderson Michael & Marcia Kelty 
Family Joseph R. and Barbara A 

John J Breslin '69 Lizza 



Mr. & Mrs. Nicholas 

Caputo 
Ed and Jan Caldwell 
Ed & Vicky Connolly 
Robert L. CurreriMD 
Charles and Elizabeth 

D'Amour 
Thomas & Frances Delia 

Penna 
Janet Dowling Sauds 
The Froeb Family 
Anthony & Elaine Grillo 
Richard and Carol Hain 
Janice & Robert Horvath 



Matthew Magnuson \ 
Alan and Margaret i 

Metwally I 

Linda and Allen Meyer 
Mrs. Maureen Mitchell 
Vincent & Deborah 

Napoli \ 

Mr. & Mrs. Joseph S. 

Pawelczyk i 

Steven & KathyPidgeon 
Mr. Gary W. Rada 
Robert & Anne Marie 

Ranahan 
Debra M. Reny 




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Gold Benefactors 



?d Reuter 

)/Lr. and Mrs. Frank J. 

Roney 
\ue M. Schaffer 
Catherine A. Offinger 
ohn C. Stewart 
%ric & Cynthia Svenson 
Ar. & Mrs. Jonathan E. 



Thackeray 
)r. and Mrs. Richard 
Wilber 



Pamela Wilson & H. 

Michael Byrne 
Ar. & Mrs. L. Randall 

Yates 
^onna & Peter Aloisi 
^huck & Carole Lamendola 



Dr. & Mrs. Joseph 

Cutcliffe 
Mr. & Mrs. Richard A. 

Freed Jr. 
Diana L. Suh 
George & Patricia Juell 
Mr. & Mrs. Richard Fiore 
Bill & Mary Kelly 
Dr. & Mrs. H. Timothy 

Dombrowski 
Joseph & Lucille Bianco 
Jerry & Stephanie 

Drucker 



5 




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Silver Benefactors 



Mr. & Mrs. Wm. Ahearn Agris and Marianne 



Rod and Kathy 
Armstrong 
Charles & Sarah Asiedu 
John and Sheila Bell 
Dr. Thomas F. Claffey 
Justin F.Fernando 



Krautmanis 
Dr. & Mrs. Mark S. 

Lavetti 
Ralph & Katie Loretta 
Mr. & Mrs. Paul 

McEnteggart 



Stephen & Deborah Galle Richard and Michele 
John, Mary & Sean McEvily 

(2006) Hanlon Mr. & Mrs. Richard H. 



Paul and Barbara 

Hedstrom 
The O'Grady Family 



McFarlane 
Mr. and Mrs. Michael 
Moorehouse 



... 









■■■■■■■M 



Silver Benefactors 



ihe Noonan Family 
Mr. & Mrs. Michael 

O'Halleran 
ohn and Laura 

Osztrogonacz 
larilou and John 



Reardon 
)r. & Mrs. David 
lodgers 
)avid and Susan 

Rolewick 
dr. & Mrs. Richard 

Samuels, Sr. 



Angelo & Pat Messina 
Dr. and Mrs. Steven 

Selden 
Dr. Paul and Ms. Marlene 

Wangenheim 
Mary Kay & John Wood 
Dr. & Mrs. Anthony 

Salerno and Family 
William & Lydia 

Keephart 




?r»efactor|^H 

^ V J 




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Patron Benefactors 



Joseph & Jean (Menard) 

Alexandrowicz 
Mr. And Mrs. Albert J. 

Alvarez 
Roger & Judy Anderson 
Thomas and Kathleen 

Vanderslice 
Mr. And Mrs. Robert 

Avellar 
Thomas & Jane Baer 
John & Kathleen Balboni 
Joseph G. Ballard 
Dr. & Mrs. John Balthrop 
Mr. & Mrs. Pravin Banker 
Sylvia MBarchue 
Ross & Sherry Centanni 
Jack & Rose Barros 
Mr. And Mrs. William R. 

Bates, Jr. 
Kathleen & Thomas 

Battaglia 
Richard and Bonnie Berg 



Ralph & Beverly Billeri 
Bob & Kathy Bloom 
Glenn and Carole Bolles 
Bernard, Nancy & Lisa 

Brill i 

Thomas & Kathryn Browi 
David & Ka thy Bruno 
Ron & Jan Bulin 
Jack and Linda Bunyan , 
Mr. And Mrs. Dennis \ 

Burke 
Thomas and Cynthia 

Burns 
The Burns Family i 

Kathleen & John Cain i 
Bill and Karen Callihan 
Francis and Pa tricia j 

Canali I 

Helen & Roland Capuno 
Joseph Carapiet \ 

Mr. & Mrs. Harmon R. 

Carey 



— 



t§ 



' 





<n 


1 Patron Benefactors 


Me & Dennis Cates 


Dr. & Mrs. Anthony 


kfr. Aud Mrs. 7izai3 Chu 


DiPaula 


kfr. & Mrs. Stephen P. 


Jeffrey and Karen 


Colahan 


Donahue 


losemary J. Bruno & 


Mike & Lucy Driscoll 


I David P. Cooke 


Leonid and Marilyn 


Mary Dale Peterson & 


Dubrowsky 


Rafael Coutin 


David & Christine Early 


ennifer Coyle & Family 


David and Judy 


lavid and Lynne Crowther 


Easterbrooks 


lobertA. Curcio, Jr. 


Steve & Bambi Elder 


Mr & Mrs. Robert Cushing 


Mr. & Mrs. David Elliott 


ames & Rosemary Daley 


Marge & Gene Elwood 


if m & Peggy DeBoy 


Frank & Debra Emolo 


Zathy& Jeff Dee 


Allan W.Englehardt 


4r. & Mrs. Del Vecchio 


Mr. & Mrs. David Ettman 


inonymous 


Mr. & Mrs. James W. 


Ar. & Mrs. Robert 


Evans 


j Dicheck 


Mr. & Mrs. James E. 


n he Difazio Family 


Fagan 9 Jr. 


Catherine M. DiMare 


The Fassel Family 


JiPierro Family 


Mrs. Chuck Filice 




M 



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Patron Benefactors 



Michael J. & Karen G 

Fiorile 
Fischl Family 
Thomas & Joyce Fitzgerald 
Dr. and Mrs. Martin 

Fleming 
Mr. & Mrs. George O. 

Fowler III 
Robert & Diane Fox 
Fred and Kathleen Fromm 
Dr. & Mrs. Kieron Fung- 

Kee-Fung 
Robert and Gail Gallagher 
Capt. & Mrs. Stephen R 

Garrity USCG 
Mr. and Mrs. Joseph 

Garrity 
Dr. Alan Garstka & Ellen 

Fonfara 
Marie and Alviro Gaspari 

'04 
Kimberly D. Gassner 



Michelle & Bill Gelnaw 
Mr. & Mrs. Peter and 

Anna Marie Coady i 
Judy Oliver Ghanem 
Mike and Linda Gillick ! 
Dr. and Mrs. Richard I 

Gillis | 

Mr. & Mrs. William I 

Giokas I 

Kevin Gipson 
Gary & Mary Ellen I 

Giulietti i 

Camille and Scott Goodb 
Mr. & Mrs. Douglas M. I 

Goodwin, Sr. I 

Dolores and Bob Graceffi 
Dr. & Mrs. Charles Grad 
Mr. & Mrs. Michael I 

Gregory 
David & Janet Griffith j 
The Grosart Family 
Michele E. Gryga 




~~* 



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t 

1 

Patron Benefactors 


jseph & Monika Gude 


Emily Lewis Hull 


\vter & Christine 


Herman and Santi Indra 


Gudicello 


Gary & Gloria Jacobson 


Halliburton Family 


Stanislaw & Eva Jakubek 


llr. & Mrs. Philip VHanel 


Mr. And Mrs. Ronald 


arbara and Tom Hanlon 


Johnson 


shly Hanna 


Robert & Diane Johnston 


llr. & Mrs. John Harr 


Jessica Q. Johnston 


>r. and Mrs. Michael 


John & Glennis Jones 


Hayman 


C. Alan and Diane R. 


tichael and Donna Healy 


Jones 


rordon & Marylynn 


Peggy and Stan Kayser 


1 Hellberg 


Brian & Patty Keck 


ruce and Sue Herman 


Gary and Joyce Keibler 


\m & Kathy Highberger 


Mr. & Mrs. James 


tephen & Rosemary 


Kennedy 


Holodak 


Mr. & Mrs. James 


"harles and Elizabeth 


Kennedy 


Hopkins 


Julie and Bryan Killian 


dbert & Susan Horan 


Mr. & Mrs. William J. Kita 


j lr. & Mrs. James House 


Kenneth M. & Constance 


larry & Gail Housler 


Wise Klein 







Poire 



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Patron Benefactors 



Jerry & Denise Klos 
Michael P. Korb 
David and Peg Kritzler 
Hsien-Chien & JeYu 

Susanna Kuh 
Anonymous 
Bob & Karen Lane 
Ernie and Helen Lareau 
Jack and Cecilia LaRock 
Bradley & Barbara 

Lauderdale 
Dr. and Mrs. Robert 

Kossack 
Eshelman-Lavallee Family 
Elizabeth Lawrence 
Donald & Mary Jo Layden 
Mr. & Mrs. Richard F. 

Leahy 
Mr. & Mrs. Brian Leek 
David K. & Margaret Lee 
Aveline and Stephen Leslie 
Susan & Michael 






Fitzsimmons 
Lynne & Bruce Levy I 
George Litman, MD. j 
Philip R.&P. j 

Lockwood I 

Mr. And Mrs. Michael 

Lucarelli & 

Tina and Jim Lunardi k 
Lori and John MacGinni 
Carol and John Madden 
Faze Mahoney I 

Mr. & Mrs. Rod 

Malabanan 
George and Diane 

Karagianis 
James & Leah Marmon I 
Edward & Pa tricia i 

Martella 
Joanne & Kevin Martyn r 
Mr. & Mrs. Willie J. Mayti 

III 
Mr. & Mrs. Ray Mazzeo I 



n 















■■■MM^ 



■ 










Patron Benefactors 


William & Laurie 


Mr. & Mrs. John J O'Day 


McCarthy 


Thomas O'Neil 


uike and Peggy McKasy 


Michael O'Neil 


i Ir. & Mrs. David C. 


Rhoda & Louis Obermeier 


McMillin 


Barbara Palumbo and 


W. & Mrs. John P. 


Family 


McConnell 


Eugene G. Pandolfi 


r. Richard H. Mikesell 


Robert & Kyu Park 


ir. & Mrs. James S. Millea, 


Chip & Maryann Pattin 


Jr. 


Normand and Judy Paulhus 


Yilliam and Cathleen 


John & Viola Peles 


Miller 


Mr. & Mrs. Michael 


win & Anna Morrow 


Pembroke 


: r r. & Mrs. Edward 


Haven and Susan Perkins 


Napleton 


Susan Diane Doak 


ffrey and Susie Naylor 


Patrick and Jean Pizzimenti 


homas Nedelka 


Mr. & Mrs. Frank Pond 


he Neville Family 


Steven A. Potter 


icolai Family 


Jack & Irene Prendergast 


ftiomas J. & Judy B. 


Timothy Pusch 


igrelli 


Gordon & Linda Reabe 


1 >hn & Mary O'Connor 


Maryellen & Richard Reid 






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__ 




•-" 



' 



Patron Benefactors 



John Riston 

Mr. & Mrs. Harry S. 

Robinson III 
Theodore and Amy Roper 
Lydia Cornier 
Dr. & Mrs. Johnny B. Roy 
Anthony & Carol Ruggeri 
Bill & Joanne Russell 
Jim and Eileen Rutledge 
Ryndak Family 
Dr. & Mrs. Salerno and 

Family 
Buz & Patty Sandberg 
Mr. & Mrs. Frank Santora 
Nick Sarno 
Mr. & Mrs. Joseph C. 

Savino 
Judith L. Sbrogna 
Dr. and Mrs. Anthony 

Scalpato 
Thomas & Sharon 

Schaefer 



Jack & Katy Schoellerma 

Anonymous 

Daryl Schutz 

Parents of Kevin Schwam 

Trevor and Annie Sealy I 

The Seery Family I 

Dr. & Mrs. Anthony 1 

Scillia I 

James & Judy Seidewand 
Cathy & Dave Semenoff 
James & Marguerite 

Sequin 
Francine A. Serpico I 
Tom & Diana Sheldon 
Hal and Alane Shoemaki 
Dr. and Mrs. David SibleV 
Mark and Eileen 1 

Silverberg I 

Elizabeth Sima I 

Dr. & Mrs. Gary Sladek 1 
Maureen and Kenneth I 

Slomienski \ 



r 



li 



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itk. 




Patron Benefactors 



I 



\lndsay Smith 

Irs. William J. Smith 

Peggie Smith 

Han and Gailann Spera 

thomas & Linda Spina 

(r & Mrs John J Stack 

ks. A.S. andH.D. Stipho 

Donald and Laurie 

Straceski 
w. And Mrs. Thomas E. 

Sullivan 
r nie and Candace Sutcliffe 
li & Patricia Talakoub 
; ose & Mark Tervenski 
fi Tsagaroulis 
\ r uce and Nina Van Dam 
kssallo Family 
'isela Viglione 
mm & Laura Von Ahn 
hna Hayes Walker '65 
lirbara and Gary Walters 
Donald and Patricia Ward 



Leslye & David Weaver 
Linda Sharron, Derek 

Webley's #1 Fan 
The Weibel Family 
KamayandJim Weiskopf 
Dr. and Mrs. Frederick 

Wigand 
Buddy and Penny Wolf 
Mark & Cheryl Wolfe 
Dr. & Mrs. Stephen W 

Yardan 
Mr. & Mrs. Yazicioglu 
Mr. & Mrs. Thomas J. 

Young 
Sang Ho&Hae So ok Yuo 
Dr. & Mrs. Jose Zamora 
Christopher Zolcinski 

CSOM '04 
Mr. & Mrs. Patrick F. Zorzi 
Marlorene Martinez 
Tom and Marie Kelly 






■ 



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ALL THAT YOU CAN'T LEAVE BEHIND 

CLOSING 

You complained about 9 AM classes and the lack of treadmills at the Plex. You moaned when the shower was spraying cold water 
and the fire alarm sounded at 2 AM. You wanted to quit school during finals and you rolled your eyes at the price of a hamburger 
from Lower. But, at the end of the day, you loved it all. You served. Okay, so you did steal one or two trays from the dining hall, 
but you have given so much more. Each and every one of us, if we think hard enough, will realize a way in which we have made 
this campus a better place whether it be through Appalachia Volunteers, working at Haley House or Rosie's Place, being involved with 
UGBC and AHANA. It is through all these, all of BCs wonderful program that we have impacted our campus, our predecessors, and 
our community. . . a way for us to not be forgotten and in an attempt to never leave them behind. You studied. Sure it might have been 
between the Snood Super-Championship and the many 48 hour party weekends, that you learned where the library was or at least 
opened a book for enough time to earn the credits needed to graduate. But you studied too as you were that duo who opened up 
Bapst every study day and the study group who took over two of the huge tables at Lower for three days. But no matter what, it is 
because you studied that you will not be left behind. You cheered. And for most of us it was not as a cheerleader on the field, but it 
was in showing Superfan support. Yes, it was often frigid and yes, Superfan shirts were not the best piece of clothing for those fashion 
gurus who enjoyed fully matching outfits. However, most of us still have and wear that gold piece of school spirit that we received 
one summer day during orientation. If you weighed less than those around you, you were tossed up for every touchdown. If you were 
not tossed then you were usually the support, making sure the "tossed-one" didn't "touch down" You snuck in without a ticket ... you 
don't remember half the game thanks to a little man named Sam Adams ... you STILL don't know what a first down is ... but the 
important thing is that you were there as a member of the Superfan network. You will never leave Alumni Stadium memories behind. 
You sought true friends. Maybe you still live and are best friends with the people you met the first day of freshman year. Maybe 
your closest friends you met in class or through a volunteer program. And maybe you have just met friends of friends so many times 
that they are now your friends. But no matter how you met your BC friends, you have someone to hang out with at Happy Hour, to 
throw a birthday party for, to accompany to a mod party, and to polish off a box of Franzia and throw a dance party. Somewhere 
along the way, a person that had been unknown to you three years ago became your friend . . . and you will never leave them behind. 
So, as you pack up your boxes... filling them with older clothes worn on service trips, books that the college would not buy back, 
face paint from the Notre Dame game, and pictures of great times with friends ... remember the importance of holding onto these 
objects. They will forever be the tangible forms of all the service, studies, "Superfan'ing'', and friends that you can't leave behind. 



Closing 483 





csfctt 




For Boston, For Boston, 
We sing our proud refrain! 

For Boston, For Boston, 
Tis Wisdoms earthly fane. 

For here we are one 

And our hearts are true 

And the towers on The Heights 

Reach to Heavris own blue. 

For Boston, For Boston, 

Thy glory is our own! 

For Boston, For Boston, 

'Tis here that Truth is known! 

And every with the right 

Shall thy heirs be found, 

Til time shall be no more 

And thy work is crownd. 

For Boston, For Boston, 

For Thee and Thine alone! 



484 For Boston 







^--^ »- 





((/llTf/IW^ 







^X^-*"^ 






III 



will 



Hail! Alma Mater! 
Thy praise we sing. 
Fondly thy memYies 
'Round our hearts still ding. 

Guide of our youth, 
Through thee we shall prevail! 
Hail! Alma mater! 
Hail! All Hail! 

Lo! on the Heights, 

Proudly thy tow'rs raised for the Right. 

Cod is thy master, 

His law they sole avail! 

Hail! Alma Mater! 
Hail! All Hail! 




Tfat/I Ji/ama jXldfcrf 



Hail! Alma Mater! 485 



•*.'•»■ 



Everyone cm the 2004 editorial staff has devoted an incredible an 
of time and energy to this 92 nd edition of Sub Turn. Attemptiry to 
capture All That You Can't Leave Behind into a five hundred page book 

hi 

challe 



was a challenge to say tr 



II, it is our hope that this book is at the 



£ : 



very least a representation of the academic, service, sports and general 
student life moments and memories that we will recall fondly long after 
our time on The Heights has come to an end. And so it is with great 
joy and tremendous pride that we present to you, students, parents, and 



faculty alike the 2004 Sub Turri. 




486 Sub Turri 



mL£. 



lib Turri 2004 




SubTurri 487 



Copy Editors 




Let us go then, you and I, 

When the evening is spread out against the sky 

Like a patient etherised upon a table; 

Let us go, through certain half-deserted streets, 

The muttering retreats 

Of restless nights in one-night cheap hotels 

and sawdust restaurants with oyster-shells: 

Streets that follow like a tedious argument 

Of insidious intent 

To lead you to an overwhelming question ... 

Oh, do not ask, 'What is if? 

Let us go and make our visit. 

In the room the women come and go 
Talking of Michelangelo. 

The yellow fog that rubs its back upon the 

window-panes, 

The yellow smoke that rubs its muzzle on the 

window-panes 

Licked its tongue into the corners of the evening, 

Lingered upon the pools that stand in drains. 

Let fail upon its back the soot that falls from 

chimneys, 

Slipped by the terrace, made a sudden leap, 

And seeing that it was a soft October night, 

Curled once about the house, and fell asleep. 

And indeed there will be time 

For the yellow smoke that slides along the street 

Rubbing its back upon the window-panes; 

There will be time, there will be time 

To prepare a face to meet the faces that you 

meet; 



There will be time to murder and create. 
And time for all the works and days of hands 
That lift and drop a question on your plate; 
Time for you and time for me, 
And time yet for a hundred indecisions, 
And for a hundred visions and revisions. 
Before the taking of a toast and tea 

In the room the women come and go 

Talking of Michelangelo. 

And indeed there will be time 

To wonder, Do I dare? and. Do I dare? 

Time to turn back and descend the stair. 

With a bald spot in the middle of my hair-- 

(They will say: 'How his hair is growing thin!') 

My morning coat, my collar mounting firmly to the chin, 

My necktie rich and modest, but asserted by a simple 

pin- 

(They will say: 'But how his arms and legs are thin!') 

Do I dare 

Disturb the universe? 

In a minute there is time 

For decisions and revisions which a minute will reverse. 

For I have known them all already, known them all- 
Have known the evenings, mornings, afternoons, 
I have measured out my life with coffee spoons; 
I know the voices dying with o dying fall 
Beneath the music from a farther room. 

So how should I presume? 



-IS. Eliot 





Danielle Hildebrant 



Nicole LeClair 




Tory S' 



omers 






Copy Editors 



Susan Chudd 

Graduate Intern 



I can't believe how quickly my first year in Boston has gone by. Thank you to the staff of Sub Turri, the Office of 
the Dean for Student Development, and my Higher Education Administration Peers for making me feel so welcome 
and my first year so enjoyable! 



A note to all BC students: I'm awed by you. Your dedication to the school is evident in the numberous BC 
sweatshirts and other paraphanalia you wear on a daily basis, and in your attendance at all the games which 
were sold out before some graduate students even knew how to get tickets! Coming from a school with little to 
no school spirit, the dedication of BC students to their school is inspiring. I've also been amazed by how nice and 
considerate you are. I can see this in the numerous service activities you participate in and even the way you go 
through doors - I've seen people almost fall over themselves to hold a door for another person after they went 
through it first. Believe me, these random acts of kindness don't go unnoticed! 



To the staff of Sub Turri: You've worked hard, and put together a wonderful book, yet again. Through watching 
you, I've learned more than I thought there was to know about putting together a yearbook - and perhaps more 
than I wanted to know! For those of you who are graduating, it's been great working with you; for those of you 
staying on, I'm looking forward to working with you again! 

To Jared: Your dedication to the yearbook and to your dreams is inspiring. It's been great getting to know you 
and working with you. Thank you for making me feel welcome and helping figure out what my role with Sub Turri 
would be. I know you'll go far and do great things. Good luck next year! 



To Men Thank you for being a great boss, advisor, and friend. I've learned so much from you this year, and I'm 
looking forward to working with you next year, on Sub Turri, ELP, and other projects. Thank you for being such a 
great part of my first year! 










Thank you Katryna for being an awesome co-editor, for 
taking good pictures, and for listening to "Stacy's Mom" 
EVERY SilNGLE WEEK during office hours! Thank you Jared 
for all your helo. Thank you to our staff members, Liz Paulson 
and Katie Dodd,, for your articles. Thank you to the other 
section editors for keeping us company during our late nights 
in AAcElroy. Thank you to all my friends who helped me with 



Hayes 

|_|QAG2 



4 v 



this yearbook, especially with professor nominations and informatior 
articles, you were such a big help! Thank you to my rooommates. Y 
are awesome and I am lucky to have you. And thank you to all m) 
friends, especially those responsible for corrupting the Kid. I love y<L 
and I know I can always depend on you. 

"'You have to be yourself. Be very honest about who and what you are. Am 
people still like you, that's fine. If they don't , that's their problem" 
- -Sting 



^M 



Thank you Katie for being such a great editor to work with 
my first year. I'll always think of our office hours when I hear 
"Stacy's Mom". Thank you mommy and dad for supporting 
me in anything I take on. I'll also never forget the night I came 
back to my room after working on the yearbook till 1 am to 
find out you reported me missing to the bcpd. I love you! 
Thank you to my grandma for being the most caring person I 
have known. She will forever be my 



Katryr 






guidance. Kendre-you really should have been here with me. Tl 
you to all my friends for ever single memory of my first year of 
college. You mean the world to me. : ) BC 2007 

Turns out not where but who you're wth that really matters." 
- -DMB 



Dik 



;ans 




i 



7- 



Organizations - Cristina Conciatori 




AHANA Editor - Shauyi Tai 



it's been a tremendous four years highlighted by luck, 
ove and laughter. Moments of ridiculous silliness and 
Tiisery are now softened by the rosy filter of nostalgia. 
Much to my chagrin, friends, near and dear, will 
soon become penpals, some too far even by car. 

I'm grateful for the organizations, faculty and 
"staff that have encouraged an investigation for 
one's own history and present circumstance. The 
AHANA Leadership Council and intercultural groups, 
for example, serve a distinct service by not only 
validating, but also bolstering, the composite identity 
of "hyphenated" Americans. My role as the Sub 
Turri Multicultural/AHANA Editor - and also as 
an Asian-American — is in debt to such advocates. 

Finally, many thanks to the entire Sub Turri staff, and 
Jared especially, for their dedication and creativity. 





Working on the Organizations section has 
been quite an experience for me, to say the 
least. From calling people almost every day 
to finally pulling everything together in the end, it has 
been a fun ride. I would like to thank my co-editors, 
as well as all of the clubs who responded promptly to 
our requests because it made our jobs the slightest bit 
easier. I would also like to say "Hi" to all of my family 
and friends: Mom, Dad, Jeff, Monica, Marisa, Chip, 
Elizabeth, Kate, Rupa, Ivy, Denise, Kristen, Saya, and 
the 315 Foster crew! I hope everyone had a great 
year, and I cannot wait for next fall! 





Being an Organizations editor this year has 
been such a great experience for me. First 
of all, thank you to my co-editors, Rochelle 
and Cristina, for working so hard to make the 
most difficult section of the yearbook so great, for 
calling and hunting down every club and working 
6 hours straight with me in the office. Thanks also 
to the entire Sub Turri staff, who made me feel so 
welcome as a freshman. Of course, many thanks to 
my family, who have always supported me in every- 
thing I do, and all of my amazing friends here at BO 
my Gonzaga girls, Jenny, Melissa and Ryan among 
others. Hope you all had as great a year as I did! 



Rochelle Schneider 

WGANIZATIONi 

Erin Klewin 



\ 




492 Organizations 




fltt 




Amand a Kavanaugh 

F ■ I Never take it seri- | 




Never take it seri- 
ously... if you never 
take it seriously- 
you never get hurt- 
if you never get 
hurt- you always 
have fun. 
Almost Famous 




*BC specializes in suburban 
Catholic kids who are sweet, 
sheltered, and extremely 
well dressed. The entire 
campus looks like a J. Crew 
catalog with a slight hang- 
over' -Boston Magazine 

Thank you to my roommates- 
-the lovely ladies of Walsh 
305-who have made this 
year the best yet, my family, 
especially my brother Patrick, 
Steve, my BC boys, and of 
course the Sub Turri staff! 



There's never been any- 
body like me and after 
I'm gone there ain't ever 
gang to be anybody 
like me again. ~ Truman 
Capote 




1 Maybe nothing lasts for- 
ever not the mountains or 
the sea, but the times we 
had together they will 
always be with me. 
~ The Samples 




A good frii 
wilF bail you 
out of jail, 
but your best 
friend will be 
the one sitting 
next to you 
saying "that 
was awe- 
some!" 




Student Life Editors 

Amanda Kavanaugh 

and 

Ryan Keefe 









In Gratia: Td like to thank Cod and Mom, Dad, and Garrett for always being there for me. Frotch, 
Beast head, Fetus, X, Rigby; you all know who you are. Now some shout outs are in order... 2nd Floor Loyola, 
Pat my roommate, for always saying, " Why dont you just quit yearbook?", Chipotle, my mom's brownies, my 
hving grandparents, Amanda, for being a great person to workwith, the Triplets, especially Sarah and all of 
her camera help, Popeyes, the Simpsons, Family Guy(The Guy, Matt), Zeppelin, the Who, this beautiful weather 
in Boston, Professor O'Har, MST3k, T.P.TB, M-train, stuff, MoCo, St. Albans, anything and everything. A few 
quotes: "The Blank' you will"- Matt, "Thanks, friend."-Chris, "Beeeerrr?!?r-Lou, "Anyone want to order food?- 
Tmac, "Wow, you re like an ex-friend now"-Rohan, "Noone sees the pictureisouthern belle/generaTf-Pat, "Did you 
see her, shes judging"-Lou "Whats that smell? Anyone who has come into T.P.TB, "Dude, Tm like the Titanic, 
unsinkable m Bill Well, its been real, thanks. 



Student Life 493 



The secret of life is enjoying the passinq of time. 

—James Taylor 

Despite the lack of pictures, the intense amount of stress and the constant struggle to meet deadlines, somehow 
we pulled it off. Shane, thank you for being such a great co-editor, for putting up with my insanity and for "pica- 
ing" all our pages — our section wouldn't have been as wonderful as it is without all your hard work. Brian and 
Meaghan, I couldn't have asked for better people to share my time in the office with. Thanks for showing me 
that even the most stressful times can be fun if you are with friends. Good luck in everything you do. Jared, there 
are no words to do justice to how much you have meant to me. I wake up everyday thinking what I can do to 
make you happy! Thank you for showing me the ropes, for listening to my stories and, most importantly, for being 
such an amazing friend. I love you and will miss you tremendously. 

To my Tiki girls, thank you for always making me smile, for the fabulous dance parties, for being there for me 
through so much this year and for making 224 such an incredible place to come home to after so many long hours 
in the office. Much love to the TEAM!! To all my other BC friends, you are all amazing — thank you for all the 
good times, no one compares. To Bobby, you deserve all the credit in the world for keeping me grounded and 
for listening to me all the time. I love you and appreciate your friendship more than you will ever know. To my 
family, I promise that the lack of phone calls simply means I'm having the time of my life. Thank you for all your 
support. To my Jersey girl, can't waif for the diner and the drama. And to Nick, no matter what, you will forever 
be my favorite athlete. 





«M0S-— 






Marisa Fusco ^ f* ^J §^ || ^ Shane Stryzinski 

Sports do not build character. They reveal it. 

-John Wooden 

i 









? 



Marisa, it was great working with you. I had a lot of fun. You re awesome, sweet, 
and special. I look forward to working with you again because yeah, you know! T/TH 
Crew IJared, Meaghan, and Brian), enjoyed our time together and will miss you guys! 
Keep in touch and remember the good times. Thanks for all the encouragement mom- 
we will always be close in the heart even though we are separated by distance. Of 
course, Vandy 308— awesome times with more to come! Now, not to get into any 
trouble, no name listing! All my people from V6! I have been influenced by you guys 
tremendously (in a positive way!} and appreciate it. We have two more years here so 
let's make the best and most of it!!! 

m 





494 Sports Editors 



IfiL 







These are the days.... 

never thought I'd be writing this so quickly, but here it is Senior 
/ear... It's been an unforgettable four years! Thanks to everyone who 
nelped put this yearbook together. Jared - it's been great woi 
with you - we couldn't have had a better editor! Brian. I'm so glad 
you joined the crew this year - it's been such a good time! Marisa & 
Shane. HI miss those office hours! To my D54/D53 girl for all 

he memories! You've been the best roommates! Mom and Dad. thank 
r all your love and encouragement. 

These are the days.... 
These are the days between your hopes and f< 
These are the moments that are still undear 




Seniors 

Meaghan Casey & 
Brian Moynihan 









Thanks to my parents for everything. And to my sister Caitlin-for anything and 
everything- bve you so much. To Marisa and Shane who shared the yearbook office 
with us, there was certainly some interesting moments-the section looks great! Marisa, 
to you, for hanging out with Jared and I too much over break, finishing those sections, 
we will always have The Comet. Meaghan, what can I say? Working with you has 
been great. We certainly are the Dynamic Duo, but it is knowing you for the past three 
years that has been the best. To my BC girls and guys, thanks for the memories- best of 
luck next year, and you know I mean that. Christine, we met at orientation and are still 
going strong- thanks Lil One. K32, you have forever changed me. I love you all so very 
much To those from home, you know who you are and how much you meant to me- 
we are still in touah and forever will be! Joe, Matt, Nidc, Kevin, Chris, and Brian thanks 
for always kept my life interesting. Jared, thank you for everything-you're truly a great 
fri end. Todd, there's too much to say, but it's just understood. Lo ve always, Brian 







Senior Editors 495 





Lindsey Scardino 

Business Manager 



i 



f( 



11 



Wow.. .The time really flies by. 

Thanks to all my roommates and friends for all the fun times 
had and the memories made this year. You guys are the bes ] 
Thanks to the Business Staff, Jessica Bennett '07, Suzanne * 
Dominick '06, Zhan Huang '04, Brian Klug '04, and Inna 
Shaykevich '07, for all your help. I couldn't have done it witl i 
you all. Congratulations to the staff of the 2004 Sub Turri f( 
all your dedication, hard work, and another great book. 

~ Lindsey 



496 Business Manager 




Lindsay Brainerd 

Marketing Coordinator 

i, I need to thank Dan, Suzanne, Christine & Kate for their hard 
k and pleasant company over the semester. Also, a big thank you 
9ired Walsh ... one of the most amazing people I have met at BC... 
&.d, you always brightened even my worst days and I still pray that 
t>eday I will have even a small part of the amazing sense of calm that 
i ounds you. Every Senior needs to know that this book would not be 
jta if not for your dedication and drive. You did a wonderful job and I 
1 1 vou all the best at medical school. 



nnot believe that I am a Senior... I have met so many people and 
Is so many memories. Meghan M... remember the pictures from the 
I :ntation toga party? Colette ... remember freaking potential room- 
r es out with my ceiling biology notes? Maureen ... Remember our 

: encounter and our nervousness about college? Dana ... Remember 

self operating stereo? Doug ... Remember our talks and trip to 
li itucket? Vince ... Remember when I yelled at you for your stealing 
lit and you're abuse of Kim's laundry skills? Joe ... Remember our 

trip and my numerous falls? Kim ... Remember our similarly shared 
sh on a certain boy upstairs? Ani ... Remember our amazement at 
i's procrastination skills? Liz ... Remember our early morning jogs? 
'ion ... Remember the night I drank a little too much champagne (we 
did) or the nights we partied together 'till the wee morning hours? 
sten ... Remember our infamous game of strip poker in a certain 
iverus dorm room? Ally... Remember our many talks and you're 
ivincing me to go on Kairos? thanks by the way. Val ... Remember 
' summer as roommates and my numerous career changes - or your 
Khday... (maybe you don't remember that too well...) I love you all ... 
i to those that I have met this year ... hopefully more memories to 
me. 

amazing to think about the people you cross paths with in a mere 
ears. You have all touched my life ... You all deserve the best. I will 
>s you. Congratulations on Graduation. 



idsay 




Marketing Coordinator 497 






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PHoToGRaPHY! 

First and foremeost, a heartfelt thanks qoes to Jared for all his hardwoi, 
with the yearbook as a whole. None of this would have been possib 
without his remarkable dedication. Thank You also to all the editors f< 
putting up with all the run around to qet the pictures taken, develop 
and into the book. We are qreatful to our staff for puttinq up with o 
millions of emails filling their in boxes, runninq out at the last minui 
to qet the pictures done, and jumpinq throuqh hoops to qet the equi| 
ment where it needed to be. And of course we will miss our wednesde 
meetinqs and qirl talk (and thank you to Andrew and Chris for puttinq i 
with it!). To Bob and the rest of McGrath Studios for all their behind tr 
scenes work to simply qet the pictures out there. Thanks is not enouq 
Thouqh many do not know the value of your work with us, we apprecia 
it qreatly! And of course we cannot forqet the patience, encouraqemer 
and the occassional pretendinq to be one of our photoqraphers from o 
friends throuqhout all the time spent with the yearbook. 

post script - Thank You Sue for everythinq! Good luck in all your futu 
holds. I and the rest of Sub Turri will miss you and your thouqht I 
thouqht e-mails. 

Heather - your humor, support, and quidance has brouqht me throu 
the stress of yearbook, school, and life in qeneral. I'm qrateful for o 
friendship. I wish you the best of luck! I'll miss you and the staff. 
To my family and friends - your patience and understandinq throuqho 
my very busy four years has brouqht me throuqh smiles and tears. Wi 
the support you qave me throuqh all the decision makinq you kept n 
focused. Thanks for remindinq me to put happiness first. 




498 Photography 



■ tf 




Myra Chai 

Managing Editor 



I'd just like to say thanks to Jared 
and the entire Sub Turri staff for an 
amazing year. It's been an incredible 
experience and I can't believe that 
I've been able to spend and get to 
know all of you guys during my fresh- 
man year. I've enjoyed all the hours 
we spent finishing and freaking out 
about spreads and deadlines. What 
more can I say? Best luck, Jared, with 
all your future plans, I know this book 
is going to look great! I just hope that 
next year is as successful as this one 
has been and that we can live up to 
the great work produced by the staff. 





Managing Editor 499 



Jared Walsh 

Editor-in-Chief "" 




er 6 years, this is the last yearbook page I will do...To everyone < 
Turri staff, you guys produced an amazing book, Congrats! Myra, great job, ; 
know you love Newton! Mer, I don't know where to begin, thank you for being 
an amazing advisor and friend. Suz, you had a great first year, thanks for all 
your help. Special thanks go out to the winter break camels, the book wouldn't 

have been finished without your hard work. K35, remember the love, never 
lose touch, words cannot say how much you mean to me. CT folk, I love you all, j 
thanks for another great year, miss and love you all. To all the friends I've made 

over the past four years, thanks for the memories, I couldn't imagine the past 

years without you Marisa, I can't believe I didn't meet you until this year, you're 

awesome, selfless and just plain fun, don't lose touch. Lindsay, knowing you these 

past 3 years has been great! Never lose faith in yourself, you are amazing. Sapna, 

Naomi, and Jade - so many memories, so many "talks," will miss you guys terribly, 

love you, and thanks for the memories. Brian the Lion, you've been a great friend 

since the beginning, thanks for everything and we'll get our tailgating spot. Chris, 

aka Tfie Masked Berdini, you're an awesome person, amazing friend, and have 

always been there for me, thanks for everything. Brian, aka Stringbean, where to 

begin, you're just a great friend, thanks for everything over the past three years 

Mom, Dad, and Greg - you guys have always been there for me, I love you 

,^^^^J|jMuch love too all - Jared 









500 Editor-in-CM 



Ktf 



Strip off 2003.. 




W 



Take what you can from your 
dreams, Make them as real as any- 
thing..* "DMB 



'Celebrate we will cause life is short 
but sweet for certain...* ~DMB 

Thanks for the memories... 

K23 

K35 

Sub Turri 

and most of all... 

The greatest friends evenlove you 

all, and always just a phone call T 

ride, or road trip away. 

All That You Cant Leave t3ehind... 




Aw ww they have matching bikes 



Editor-in-Chief 501 




Mer Zovko 

Thank you for helping us create another amazing 

Sub Turri; Thank you for your reassuring words 

during stressful times; Thank you for being more 

than just an advisor, but also a friend. 

Peter Greer 

Thank you for sharing your incredible computer 
knowledge; Thank you for taking our amazing 
cover photo; Thank you for all the time you gave 
us to get up and running; Thank you for taking a 
personal interest in our work 

Susan Chudd 

Thank you for breaking the tension with your 
humor; Thank you for always being around to 
help with our endless tasks; Thank you being a 

good friend. 



Arnie Lohnmann and Sandy Moses 

Thank you for your patience; Thank you for your 
advice; Thank you for taking the extra steps you 
took to look out for us; Thank you for the plant 
tours and junk food; Thank you for being our friends 

Bob McGrath 

Thank you for the beautiful portrait photos; 
Thank you for the fun equipment; Thank you for 
hiking around campus; Thank you for the cookies 
and candy; Thank you for caring about us in a 
personal manner. 

Rick Brooks 

Thank you for another AMAZING cover; Thank 
you for all the amazing creative input throughout 
the book; Thank you for your jokes; Thank you for 
always being around when we seemed lost for 
ideas. 




502 Thank You 



tkldi 




The 2004 edition of Sub Tumi was printed by Jostens. Ire in their 
Winston-Salem, NC plant. This 92nd volume constists of 504 
pages and has a press run of 2,100 copies. The cover, end sheets, 
dividers, and vellum tip-in were designed by Rick Brooks, a Jostens 
designer. The theme, "All That You Can't Leave Behind" was 
generated by the Editor-in-Chief Jared Walsh and the Marketing 
Coordinator Lindsay Brainerd and incorporated into the book by 
our 25 Editors. The final cover was designed by Melissa Bagwell, 
a Jostens designer, from digital photos taken by Peter Greer, 
Christopher Maddern, Jared Walsh, and Sue Burton. Covers 
were printed on 100% gloss stock, using four-color process inks, 
then laminated with UV coating, and grained with "Levant'The 
opening two signatures were printed on 100 true dull stock paper. 
Pantone 500 was used in the Duotone section. The balance of the 
book was printed on 80 dull stock paper and sewn using sixteen 
page signatures and bounded with black on black headbands. All 
theme-related copy and layouts were designed by the Editor-in- 
Chief and Section Editors. All pages were created using InDesign 
2.0 and Jostens Yeartech CD. All senior portraits were taken by 
McGrath Studios, Inc. 8 Elm St., Suite 2, Braintree, MA, 02184. 
McGrath Studios was contracted by Boston College to be the 
official photographer for the 2004 Sub Turri, under the direc- 
tion of photography editors Sue Burton and Heather Page. Any 
other photographs were taken by the Photography Staff and the 
Editorial Staff or were submitted by Boston College students and 
organizations. Current Events pictures were taken by the Associ- 
ated Press. Photos were taken using a variety of cameras and 
lenses manufactured by Nikkon, Canon, Quantum, and Mamiya. All 
body copy is 10 pt. AYTMaximo Bold with 13pt leading. Captions 
are 8pt. AYTMaximo Bold. Photo Credits are 8pt. AYTMaximo 
Italic The remaining typography was chosen by the section edi- 
tors. Copyright: Sub Turri 2004, Jared Walsh, Editor-in-Chief. 
No portion of this yearbook may be reproduced or transmitted 
in any form, electronic, mechanical, digital, or otherwise, without 
the expressed written consent of the editor-in-chief. Sub Turri was 
produced entirely by a staff of undergraduate students. Sub Turri 
generates revenue from yearbook sales, ads, and donations. Please 
direct all inquires to: Sub Turri, the yearbook of Boston College, 
McElroy Commons, Room 103, Chestnut Hills, MA 02467. Phone: 
(617) 552-2393. subturri@bc.edu, www.subturri.com 



Colophon 503 














504 Closing 



Who's to soy where the wind will toke you? 

Who's to soy whot it is will breok you? 

I dorit know which way the wind will blow 

Who's to know when the time is come around? 

Don't wanna see you cry 

I know that this is not goodbye." 

-U2 



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