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Full text of "Sub turri = Under the tower : the yearbook of Boston College"



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119 Tissn 



Opening 1 

Current Events 24 

Academics 32 

Student Life 76 

Organizations 140 

Sports 194 

Seniors 266 

Benefactors & Patrons 466 

Closing 482 



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Sub Turri 2006 




Boston College 

McElroy Commons 103 

Chestnut Hill. Massachusetts 02467 

(617)552 -3493 

SUBTURRI@B( .101 

Copyright 2006 Myra Chai & Marisa Fi s« 



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Our moments of inspiration 



ARE NOT LOST 



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For those experiences have left 



AN INDELIBLE IMPRESSION 



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And we are ever and anon 



REMINDED OF THEM. 



"It is certainly my hope that the past four 
years have enabled you to develop your tal- 
ents and prepared you for the years ahead... 
May you always have confidence in your- 
selves and trust in the providence of God'. 9 

- William R Leahy S.J. 





12 Opening 




BOSTON COLLEGE 



OFFICE OF THE PRESIDENT 



May, 2006 



Dear Members of the Class of 2006: 



Four years have gone by since your class enrolled at Boston College, and 
so much has happened in your lives and also in our world since them. 
Challenges remain not only for you as you move toward graduation, but also for 
BC, the United States, and our world. It is certainly my hope that the past four 
years have enabled you to develop your talents and prepared you for the years 
ahead. 

All of us in the Boston College community are grateful to you for your 
many contributions to campus life, especially your idealism and generosity. 
Since its founding in 1863, Boston College has sought to help its students grow- 
intellectually, spiritually, and socially, so that they in turn can go forth from "the 
Heights" being forces for good in wider society. 

You have accomplished much during your time at BC, and I encourage 
you to continue developing your gifts so that you can lead healthy, productive 
lives. At a time when our world is torn by war in Iraq and Afghanistan, troubled 
by the effects of poverty in the United States and abroad, and seeking peace and 
stability, it needs individuals like you, people with strength, compassion, and 
great zeal. May you always have confidence in yourselves and trust in the 
providence of God. 

Sincerely, 



(4/fo^PJLu~ t <$ 



William P. 1 eal 
President 



BOTOLPH HOUSE, 140 COMMONWEALTH AVINUt, CMtSTNUt Milt. MASSACHUSETTS O: '. 

Tti. 6'7-552-3J50 




14 Opening 




"We leave the Heights better prepared to meet the 
challenges of the Teal' world and its often over- 
whelming complexities. Although no two Stu- 
dents graduate with exactly the same academic 
experience, it is inevitable that he or she has 
been affected in some way b\ Boston College'.' 



• • 



-JIM LEOSARD. CLASS OF '90 



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16 Opening 




'At these nights one gets to love Boston 
College more unci more: (he seeds of 
loyalty and devotion are scattered broad- 
cast and the harvest is shortly forthcoming 

- THOMAS H.WROX CLASS OF 13 





IK Opening 




"College organizations, which came under the 
title 'extra-curricular activities' play an impor- 
tant part in the Jesuit 'Ratio Studiorum' and in 
the development of the educated man. Here at 
the Heights they are a necessary supplement 
to the academic exercises of the classroom 9 . 9 

- EDWARD STEGEMANK CLASS OF 54 





20 Opening 





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"I came to Boston College expecting a lot 
less out of football. I thought III be sitting 
on the bench for four years, taking advan- 
tage of the scholarship and getting an educa- 
tion. I never expected things to turn out the 
way they did. I'm just thankful I've been able 
to £r/Ve the University something in return'.' 

- DOUG FLUTIE. CLASS OF '85 






22 Opening 




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"Today: we are not looking buck on our tour 
years at Boston College. Instead, we look to 
the future boldly But. soon, we'll no longer be 
able to follow an active life—then we'll use out 
memories— of dances and banquets, of football 
games & rallies, of all our classmates, of all 
the little incidents that always live in memories. 
- MARTIN HASSBERRY CLASS OF '42 







Edited by: 
Myra Chai & Marisa Fusco 

When we think back on the past year, we cannot help but be reminded of unspeak- 
able loss. With the ramifications of the South Asian earthquake and tsunami 
still fresh in our minds, the world experienced countless natural disasters that 
influenced everyday life whether we wanted it to or not. Hurricane Katrina hit close to 
home as more than a thousand people lost their lives during the deadly floods and thousands 
more were displaced from the homes and lives they had become accustomed to. Selective 
residents from Louisiana, Mississippi and Alabama found temporary shelter within the New 
Orleans Convention Center and Superdome, while hospitals found the resounding demand 
for aid overwhelming. Then just months later, a 7.6 earthquake hit Pakistan, Afghanistan 
and northern India and left more than 87,000 dead in its wake. And as the world dealt 
with the stream of endless natural disasters, it was bombarded with unnatural disasters as 
well. London became the latest target of terrorist attacks and Paris experienced riots in the 
Muslim sectors of the city. This year also saw the rise of a health pandemic, as the Avian flu 
killed more than 70 people in Asian countries alone and sent health officials into a frenzy 
to find an antidote. Yet in spite of the disaster and the loss, the world found ways to unite 
more than they had ever before. Live 8, born out of Live Aid decades before, was a series of 
relief concerts held throughout the world and helped spawn a massive effort to increase the 
African aid package generated during the G8 summit. Also, the tsunami relief concert set 
an unprecedented bar for those to follow. Despite John Paul IPs death, the world united to 
remember the influence his benevolence and his charisma had on everyone he touched, while 
Rosa Park's passing was marked by gratitude for her life of social activeness. The world also 
united to watch Lance Armstrong win his seventh consecutive Tour de France, the Chicago 
White Sox break an 88 year curse to win the World Series and Harry Potter continued his 
magical fight through an enchanting new book. And yet, 
if we reflect and remember only that the year was filled 
with grief, we have not let it influence us completely. In 
this past year, we have learned more than any other time 
in the world's recent history that, despite loss, we can still 
find hope. We have learned that in our most difficult 
times, we must all influence each other and help one 
another the most that we can. Myra Chai 



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24 Current Events 




CmrranEvent- 



''Back in July, LIVE 8 rocked the world. We didn't 
ask for your money, we asked for your voice, and 
you shouted back in your millions. Five days 
later, the G8 leaders met... and they had heard us. 
If the promises made by the G8 are kept, they 
can save four million lives a year by 2010!' 

M -THE ONE CAMPAIGN 





26 Current Events 



Current Events of 2006 



In a year filled with disaster, loss and heartache, the world we have come to know changed drastically 
before our eyes. A tsunami, an earthquake, fatal storms and floods claimed more than 300.000 
lives and cost at least 100 billion dollars in damage. It began with the 2004 South Asian earthquake 
and tsunami, which ended with a final death toll of at least 220.000 and months of reconstruction. It 
became the most cataclysmic natural disaster of the modern era and sparked the largest relief effort in 
history. Hurricane Katrina inflicted unspeakable damage to southern parts of the United States, most 
heavily in New Orleans, as the world watched water break through barrier after barrier. It seemed as 
if the horror of natural disasters would never end as a 7.6 earthquake struck Pakistan. Afghanistan and 
northern India on October 8th. killed more than 87.000 and left more than 3 million homeless. Separate 
from these forces of nature came forces from humans themselves as the war in Iraq continued to wage 
amidst hope and despair, while London became the target of the latest terrorist attacks during the July 
7th transit system bombings, which killed 52 and wounded more then 700. The streets of Paris were the 
next victims of violence in October as poor and largely Muslim suburbs erupted in rioting and spurred 
debate in France about race relations and what it meant to be French. Finally, the deadly Avian flu pan- 
demic riveted the attention of health officials worldwide as more than 70 people in Asia died from the 
infection, making it the year's top health news story. Tension and unease gripped the world as citizens 
began to lose sense of the word safety. And yet in spite of this the) found a way to deal and a wa) to 
assimilate within the ever-changing world around them. They bid farewell to their beloved John Paul II 
and celebrated his down-to-earth and charismatic attitude that affected all around him before welcom- 
ing his successor Pope Benedict XVI. The G8 summit, influenced by the massive effort on the part 
of Live 8. created a new and stronger African aid relief package 
than ever before. The trial of former Iraqi dictator Saddam Hus- 
sein began in July and in October, nearly 10 million Iraqi voters 
turned out to pass a draft constitution. Israel completed its pull- 
out from the Gaza Strip in August, ending a 38-year occupation 
of the region and in late November, the Palestinian government 
celebrated the opening of the Ratal] border between the Gaza Strip 
and Eg\pt. When we reflect on these events, we realize that ever) 
part o\' us has been in some wa\ affected by all o\~ them, some 
more than others, but that we have become stronger and a more 
unified people as a result o\ them. \(\ ra Ch.u 




Cuiret* Even- - 



"The school I was teaching in was destroyed in 
the storm. The convent, where our Principal, 
Sister Bernadette, lived with two other sisters 
from Ireland, was flooded. This past week I have 
been helping her clear out the convent, as every- 
thing was destroyed. Thank you for your prayers'. 9 

- ELIZABETH STOWE. '05 





28 Current Events 



X&B NATION 

Current Events of 2006 



More than any other event in the past year, the horrors of Hurricane Katrina con- 
tinued to grip the nation long after the storm reeked havoc on the Gulf Coast on 
August 29, 2005. In its wake it left more than 1.300 dead and thousands of evac- 
uees still displaced months later, as coastlines in Louisiana. Mississippi and Alabama were 
engulfed. A month later. Hurricane Rita threatened Galveston. Texas, and though it weakened 
at the last minute, the seemingly infinite threat of devastation marked the most active Atlantic 
hurricane season ever recorded. Yet the past year was not marked only by unfortunate natural 
disasters. In March, the national debate over euthanasia reached a climax when the feeding 
tube of Terri Schiavo, who had suffered severe brain damage 15 years earlier, was removed 
for two weeks and the day before her death, the U.S. Supreme Court refused to have her tube 
reinserted. Then in May, W Mark Felt, the man famously known as Deepthroat. revealed 
his identity and his role during the Watergate scandal that brought down Republican president 
Richard Nixon after three decades of speculation. In July, the nation bid farewell to their much 
beloved news anchor. Peter Jennings, who died of cancer. Loss was evident not only in the news 
sector but also in the Supreme Court as Chief Justice William Rehnquist died in September and 
Sandra Day O'Connor, the first female on the Supreme Court, retired. Just a month later, the 
country lost one of its greatest civil rights protestors. Rosa Parks, who famously refused to give 
up her seat to a white man and who inspired powerful social and political change throughout 
her life. And then as Katrina hit the nation on all sectors. energ\ prices, already affected b> 
the Iraq War. sharply increased as prices reached S3 a gallon 
in September. And as the year ended. Congress drew back to 
the always hotly debated issue of Stem Cell research, as "pro- 
genitor cells" were discovered that could possibly be used to 
repair and replace diseased tissue. \et postponed easing leg- 
islature on its usage until 2006. The past 12 months have 
been marked by unspeakable loss on almost all levels. \et 
as America watched its foundations of life fall beneath it. it 
became stronger ami it allowed the events to influence its 
everyday life, yet Stood tall and looked forward to a more 
promising new year. \/\ ra Cluii 




Current Event ; 



"The White Sox championship run can be con- 
sidered one for the ages. Apart from a brief shaky 
stretch in early September, White Sox team dis- 
played sheer dominance as evident by the wire- 
to-wire first place in American League. Only the 
1927 Yankees were able to achieve such a feat" 

- ASSOCIATED PRESS 




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30 Current Events 







Current Events of 2006 




How much of us is really us? And how much is a product of mass media and consumerism. 1 
Blockbusters such as "War of the Worlds!" "Harry Potter IV: The Goblet of Fire** and "The 
Chronicles of Narniaj' among others, put fire back into the box office after a lackluster pre 
vious year, while amongst the blockbusters Harry Potter managed to rise to great heights with J.K. 
Rowlings release of the 6th book of the series over the summer. Whether were willing to admit it or 
not. the entertainment world cast an ever-present shadow over our everyday li\es this past year. Acting 
and reality seemed to blend seamlessly as power couples were created by the day and yet had dissolved 
within a matter of months, weeks, or even mere days. Americas sweethearts. Brad Pitt and Jennifer 
Aniston. finalized their divorce, then the not-so-Newlyweds Jessica Simpson and Nick Lache) official!) 
announced their separation and divorce after months of speculation, while the previously inseparable 
and ever feuding Paris Hilton and Nicole Riche each broke off their respective engagements that qiu 
tioned whether the trend was to break up rather than to unite. let there they all were again. Tom Cruise 
shouting his "love" for fiance Katie Holmes on Oprah's couch. Jennifer Aniston and Yince Vaughn refut- 
ing romantic rumors despite photos that indicated otherw ise, and Brad Pitt and Angelina Jolie jet setting 
to save the world. And in spite of all the break-ups. in spite of all the animosity the entertainers of the 
past year came together to create something new and more than themselves. The Chicago White Sox 
won their first World Series in X8 years, cancer survivor Lance Armstrong won his seventh consecutive 
Tour de France and Danica Patrick became the first woman to lead at least one lap in the Ind\ 500. Live 
(S brought together more than 1.000 artists on four continents to fight African poverty British Prime 
Minister Tony Blair declared Live 8 influential in the final aid package. Closer to home celebrities ral- 
lied to raise more than SIS million in tsunami relief And in spite 
of the loss of such monumental figures as Rosa Parks. Peter Jen- 
nings and William Relinquish each left an indelible impression 
on all to make a better and more tolerable world than the one the) 
were born into. With this hope for a better life, they welcomed into 
the work! a boom of babies: Brittle) Spears. Katie Holmes. Jen- 
nifer Gardner and Angelina Jolie all welcomed children into the 
world. If we ask ourselves how much o\ us is truh influenced b) 
the entertainment world, we find that we have each been impacted 
differently but that in the c\u\. 2006 would not have been the same 
w ithout it. \h r.i Chui 




Current Everr 



ACADEMICS 

Edited by: 
Nhu Huynh & Erin Klewin 



No two academic experiences at Boston College are ever the same. With over fifty 
programs of study in five undergraduate schools, Boston College offers unique 
opportunities to over 8,900 undergraduate students. Still, there are many common 
threads throughout the academic lives of students on the Heights. From our very first days, 
we are infused with the knowledge that our education will be influenced by the Jesuit tra- 
dition. Although we are learning as individuals, we are doing so with the hope of using 
that knowledge to become "men and women for others." First year students struggle with 
the demands of the University core and quickly learn that 9am classes were probably not a 
good idea after all. Special academic programs such as Pulse, Perspectives and the Honors 
Program work as supplements to the Core and give students a way to add to its liberal edu- 
cation basis. By sophomore year, students begin to pursue a major specific to their interest 
and abilities. Growing more accustomed to the University, sophomores truly start to leave 
their mark on the Heights. With a deep impression of life at BC already made on them, 
many students spend part or all of their junior year abroad, allowing the world outside of 
Chestnut Hill to impact them as well. For those that stay at Boston College, junior year is a 
time for solidifying plans for internships and major-related work. And as senior year comes 
and goes, students continue to face new academic challenges as well as manage familiar 
ones. The stress of finishing a thesis is often compounded with applications for graduate 
school and interviews for jobs. And though four years of academic experiences seem to go 
by quickly, our time here has left an incredible impression on all of us. Most of our time on 
campus was used for studies, test preparations and classes. And why not? We were here at 
Boston College to focus on learning. However, as our time here progresses, we often learned 
that the most valuable lessons could be had outside of class: working with classmates, meet- 
ing people with different backgrounds and experiences, 
and learning to manage our many responsibilities. All of 
these things, regardless of whether or not they show up on 
our diplomas, are signs of Boston College's outstanding 
academics. It is likely that they will look back to the les- 
sons learned for years to come and remember the Heights 
as the site of their greatest academic journey. Marisa 
Fusco 




32 Academics 



"My favorite part about the Jesuit Tradi- 
tion at Boston College is the service that is 
encouraged on campus. Students here really 
want to participate and create change in the 
world by lending a helping hand exempli- 
fied by the courses and activities available'.' j 

-AMYNIESKENS 





34 Academics 



% V> Established Foundations ^V 



With 110 members in Boston College's Jesuit community, some 70 of those living in 
St. Marys Hall. 54 active on campus as full or part time administration and foe 
ulty, plus 23 Jesuits visiting from 16 different countries, it is clear that the Jesuit 
ideal plays a strong role at Boston College. Boston College develops the student as a whole in the 
Jesuit ideal, studying in an orderly way and exposing them to the humanities, particularly those 
subjects that develop moral goodness, devotion to the truth, and a disposition to act for the eft ic 
good. All students at Boston College receive a well-rounded Liberal Arts education, taking 
core of classes encompassing the arts, cultural diversity history, literature, mathematics, natu- 
ral science, philosophy, social science, theology, and writing. The core curriculum focuses on 
critical thinking in a variety of concentrations. BC offers many auricular programs directK 
addressing Jesuit values including Pulse and Perspectives Programs; the Capstone courses; the 
Faith-PeaceJustice undergraduate minor: the School of Educations focus on urban schools; the 
ethics courses in the undergraduate and graduate programs of the Carroll School o\ Manage 
ment; and the Law Schools efforts to integrate legal ethics, jurisprudence, and a clinical program 
that serves the poor. The focus of these courses and endeavors are to help students find their 
vocations in the work field but also as human beings active in the community and the world. 
Boston College seeks to have students actively question their surroundings. Facult) reflect the 
Jesuit ideal by participating in seminars dealing with natural science and belief, religious values 
and the use of technology, the alienation o\~ intellectual and professional elites from religion 
in contemporary culture, the Catholic Church and the AIDS 
crisis, and public schools and the Church. Beyond scholastic 
endeavors. Boston College offers students numerous oppor- 
tunities to live out the Jesuit life. Student groups such as the 
Ignatian Society. CUR A. and Salt and Light provide students 
forums to enact their spirituality. Students .ire VCT) active 
in service groups such as 4 Boston and embark Ofl servk 
trips such as the Appalachia Volunteers, I than Immersion 
trips, and the Arrupe International Immersion trips m order 

to truly be "men and women for others! 1 Susie Kelt) Photos -m « % *m • 

b\ Boh McGrath and Caroline Ogonowski 








As the oldest and the largest undergraduate division, the College of Arts 
& Sciences was founded in 1863. Approximately 6,000 undergradu- 
ate students are enrolled in A&S, which offers a broad-based liberal 
arts education and academic excellence in the Jesuit tradition. A&S students 
pursue a program of study that includes an extensive multi-disciplinary core, 
intensive work in a major field, and the opportunity to explore and strengthen 
a liberal arts education with a wide variety of electives. There are 22 aca- 
demic departments in the areas of Humanities, Fine and Performing Arts, 
and Social and Natural Sciences from which the students can freely choose 
to major and/or minor. With a wide variety of departmental and interdisci- 
plinary majors and minors to choose from, graduates can earn the academic 



% Academics 




degree of either Bachelor of Arts i.\.R.) of Bachelor of Science H s From 
their major field. Furthermore, KSlS providea special academic programs 

for students to develop intelleetu.il. spiritual, and personal growth. Stu- 
dents can also enrich their knowledge and understanding of the multicultural 
world through a variety o\ BCademk and CO-CUrricular experiences, such as 
community awareness and service, divenit) in the curriculum and extracur- 
ricular opportunities In order to aid and enhance the Vx^ mdergraduate 
education. nearK 400 full-time faculty members are available to share their 
research and teaching interests. Led b> Dean Joseph E Qumn. the Col 

oi \its \ Scient ontinuea to grow and develop within a community 
vibrant, diverse, and full) committed students and faculty. Seungeun 






"Go forth, set the world 
aflame, but please remain 
engaged with vour alma 



Dean Joseph Quinn 




38 Academics 



Dear Friends in the Class of 2006, 

During the past five years, you have witnessed significant change and transition 
through a series of natural and unnatural disasters. From 9/11 during your senior 
year in high school to the hurricanes and floods that devastated the Gulf Coast during 
your senior year at Boston College, from the war in Iraq to the earthquakes in Indo- 
nesia and Pakistan, the landscape has changed. These monumental events bring out 
the best and the worst in people, as we have seen. 

Your liberal arts training at Boston College has prepared you well for change. The 
depth of your educational experience, through your major, and its breadth, through 
the Core curriculum, your electives, and, for an increasing number of our graduates, 
a departmental or interdisciplinary minor, have taught you how to look at the world 
and its challenges from a number of different viewpoints. Most pressing policy issues 
have ethical and moral, economic and political, historical and scientific dimensions, 
and you have experienced most or all of these various lenses. You have learned to 
think critically, to write persuasively and, I hope, to change your mind in the face of 
evidence. 

This is a world that needs help, a fact that makes me appreciate all the more our 
mottoes: "Ever to excel" and "To educate men and women for others!' The faculty 
and administration are proud of how these phrases have guided your experiences at 
Boston College and we are confident that they will continue to do so after you gradu- 
ate. 

As you depart, you will leave your friends in the faculty, the administration and the 
staff behind. Please stay in touch with your favorite teachers and mentors, as I know 
you will with your classmates. If you are reading this many years from 2006, write 
or email a friend on campus today, and bring him or her up to date on your journey 
since graduation. A note from a former student makes my day like little else can. 

You have joined a new family of more that 140,000 BC graduates, many of whom have 
remained engaged with Boston College, and who have helped to make it the great 
university that it is. Go forth, set the world aflame, but please remain engaged with 
your alma mater and come back, soon and often. 

Sincerely, 
Joseph F Quinn 



x^ 





left The Col i t SChemiMr.andBK4og\ Depart- 

ment receive*, financial an) for research from the pr 
eiou- Beckman Scholars Program. Photo rn \f\ ra CTui 




won Hall i* the Mgruturr buiMing for the College of 
Arts and Science^ Fr*v 




Mand* mfrom 




Housed in Fulton Hall, the Carroll School of Management (CSOM) 
offers undergraduate students a broad understanding of management 
practices as well as an understanding of ethics and social respon- 
sibility in business. Divided into six academic departments — Accounting; 
Business Law; Finance; Marketing; Operations, Information, and Strategic 
Management; and Organizational Studies — the CSOM undergraduate pro- 
gram offers a wide variety of areas of concentration. Students enroll in a 
core set of classes including Ethics, Statistics, Economics I & II, Comput- 
ers for Management, Financial and Managerial Accounting, Business Law, 
Organizational Behavior, Finance, Management and Operations, Marketing 
and Strategy and Policy. Students additionally choose one or more concen- 
trations from among the six academic departments to complete their Bach- 



40 Academics 



■ 







elor of Science in Management. This combination provides both depth and 

breadth of knowledge. Fi\e members of the highh accredited faculr 
< M )M have distinguished themselves h\ ranking among the top 250 of the 
worlds finance researchers during the last 50 years. The facult) of the Car- 
roll School of Management places equal emphasis on research and teaching 
allowing them to build upon their own scholarship and contribute to the busi- 
ness community meanwhile integrating that knowledge into the classroom. 
Students are engaged in lecture, guest gpeakei ud\. and hands-on 

learning incorporating multimedia technology to achieve the Inchest level 
of understanding The Carroll Scholl o\ Management prepares students for 
careers m management through a partnership of students, faculty staff, the 
business community, and the broader academic community. s ll\ 






" I encourage you to seek 
out new ideas today, tomor- 
row, next week, and for the 



Dean Andrew Boynton 




Dear Graduates of the Class of 2006, 

On behalf of the faculty and staff of the Carroll School of Management, it is a privilege and plea- 
sure to extend our heartfelt congratulations to you. 'tour graduation from Boston College begins 
one of life's most personal and important transitions. \bur years as an undergraduate student, 
with the surprises and challenges you've experienced, will give way to your life as a citizen of the 
world; a life filled with excitement and responsibilities that you will enjoy and, we are confident, 
will lead to tremendous personal success. 

I'm sure many of you feel that this period in your life is the beginning of something new, and the 
casting off of something old. Id like to challenge that notion a little bit. I don't think there is a a 
sharp distinction between your years here at Boston College and the years ahead as an important 
member of society. The time you have spent here at BC had an intense focus on learning. But I 
firmly believe that the rest of your life should also be focused on learning. I hope what we have i 
done here is to teach you how to learn, because your ability to learn throughout your life will bee 
the single best predictor of your future success. 

There is no doubt that we live in a knowledge economy. Universal access to knowledge has neu- 
tralized the competitive advantages that America and Western Europe have enjoyed for the last 
several generations. \bur success is much less likely to depend on the language you speak, the 
currency you spend and the economic prosperity of your parents. Instead, it will depend on your 
thirst for knowledge; your hunger for ideas. 

So, I encourage you to seek out new ideas today, tomorrow, next week, and for the rest of your life. 
Build your sources of information and knowledge just as energetically as you build your social 
and professional networks. Not only will this enrich your life, but it will enable you to reach your 
potential; to maximize your contribution to society. Take with you all the knowledge you have 
accumulated here at BC, and see it as a foundation upon which to build the ideas that will carry 
our society forward. 

Although your years as an undergraduate student have now passed, there is a big surprise in storei 
for you. \bu are not leaving Boston College now and you never will, for Boston College is a statei 
of mind. As a Son of Boston College myself, your years ahead, like mine, will be most enriched, 
when you continually commit your mind and soul to serving others, to learning, always learning,, 
and remembering ever to excel. Let Boston College provide you strength, insight, and guidance; 
in your years ahead. But remember, come back and visit us once in awhile. As someone wrote to 
me and my fellow graduates on these same pages years ago, you are always welcome back to this 
old pond. We salute you! 

Sincerely, 

&& 

Andrew C. Boynton 
Dean 



42 Academics 




Tubcm Hall aKr> feature* *< n»n lihra- ' HMOR 

Modems Vxa»cx1 nn the «cvnm1 f| - Nnkfcng. 

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Since its foundation in 1952 as Boston College's first coeducational school 
on the Chestnut Hill campus, the Lynch School of Education (LSOE) 
has been committed to a model of education that serves the goals of 
social justice and preparation for a career that will enhance the educational 
opportunities and lives of children, youth and families. Through collabora- 
tion between faculty, undergraduate and graduate students, counselors, par- 
ents, administrators, schools, human service providers and professionals in 
various fields, students gain a multi-faceted education. LSOE, housed in Cam- 
pion Hall, is comprised of four Academic Departments: Counseling, Devel- 
opmental, & Educational Psychology; Educational Administration & Higher 
Education; Education Research, Measurement & Evaluation; and Teacher 
Education, Special Education, Curriculum & Instruction offering both under- 






44 Academics 




graduate and graduate degrees .is well as masters and doctoral programs 
The School's 60 full-time and 35 part-time facult) members as well as 60 
researchers ami 800 undergraduate students work to achieve its mission to 
"enhance the human condition through education'' For example. I Sl H part- 
ners with Boston Public Schools and the YMCA of Greater Boston in Boston 
Connects, which is an innovative program to brine services to elcmentar\ 
school students throughout the Allston-Bnghton Mission Hill neighborhoods. 
most o\ whom face significant barriers to learning Va of 2005, the Lynch 
School o\ Education is ranked sixteenth among schools o\ education in the 
country second in New England and the onl> school at a Catholic um\ersit\ to 
be ranked in the top 50, according to US. N v World Report Susk Kelh 






"An appreciation of the 
life of the mind, apply- 
ing thoughtful and honest 



Dean Joseph O'Keefe 




Dear Members of the Class of 2006, 

This is a special year at the Lynch School, for we celebrate the 
first Golden Eagle alumni from the Lynch School, the 50 year 
anniversary class - members of the Class of 1956. On May 22, 
2006, fifty years later, you will join the ranks of the thousands 
of people who are proud to be Lynch School alumni. For sure, 
much has changed in fifty years. But some things remain the 
same: 

- An appreciation of the life of the mind, applying thoughtful 
and honest inquiry to the world's pressing needs. 

- A desire to give generously of time and energy to enhance 
the human condition, to expand the human imagination and to 
make the world more just. 

- The desire to live with integrity and purpose in one's words 
and one's actions. 



- The flame of faith in God, which has been kindled on the 
Heights. 

- The joy of friendship and community, which are hallmarks of 
the Boston College experience. 

Members of the Class of 2006, rich in talent and full of poten- 
tial, I know that you will continue the best traditions of alma 
mater. "Vbu make us proud! 



46 Academics 



May God bless you all, 




Joseph M. O'Keefe, S.J. 
Dean 




Left: The entrance of Campion Hall feati. Na> 

of poster^ noting the Mihoofc mottov Bottom The '■ 
feature 1 - a \arict\ of periodical rfh*>* M \/w H. 




lO I* »hCTt the mtf»H;. 

Sch It he*d ar> 

tkxi of the Campu* School f^* 






XI 



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X 




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IE 



NNEL 



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The Connell School of Nursing (CSON) was founded on January 27, 1947 
at the behest of Cardinal Cushing who believed that nurses should be 
educated in a Jesuit institution. It was named for William Connell 
'59, who donated $10 million to the school before his death in 2001. In 1988, 
CSON became the only nursing school in Boston to offer a doctoral program. 
Its undergraduate program is focused on the development of the professional 
nurse and is rooted in the liberal arts. There are approximately 230 under- 
graduate students enrolled in CSON, which was ranked the 19th best nurs- 
ing school in the country by U.S. News & World Report. After completing 
121 credits of liberal arts, physical and social sciences, and nursing courses, 
CSON students obtain the Bachelor of Science degree with a major in nursing. 
These preparations are designed to develop a student's diagnostic, therapeutic 
and ethical reasoning in nursing practice. Furthermore, CSON educates its 



48 Academics 






-~. 



' ^ 







>v^ 






-L 



-% ^ - 





student^ to become professional nurses whose practice embodies a humanistic 
ethic and is scientifically based, technically competent, and highl) compas- 
sionate. With increasing overall nursing shortages, and a particular shortage 
of nurses who teach. CSON prepares the experts who will educate future gen- 
erations of nurses. The school achieves its goals through offering programs in 
the following departments: Adult Health. Communit) Health. Maternal Child 
Health, and Psychiatric-Mental Health. For each department, the highl) com- 
mitted and responsive facult) allows students to learn in an excellent student 
to faculty ratio. Through providing an environment that supports the per- 
sonal development and scholarship o\ its facult) and students, the mission o\ 
the Council School of Nursing is to emphasi/e the development o\ the whole 
person, preparing each student as a lifelong learner, as a health pr< tnal. 

and as someone who will use knowledge in service to others Seungeuti 



i h\ Berth* lee 



Acadc 



// 



We know that you too 
will use your talents and 
your Boston College edu- 






Dean Barbara Hazard 




A- 



Dear William E Connell SON Graduating Class of 2006: 

Congratulations to all of you on your graduation, and thank you for 
the many contributions you have made to this school during your time 
here. During your four years, you have witnessed many changes in the 
world and in health care. Nurses have played major roles in responding 
to terrorism and natural disasters. We know that you too will use your 
talents and your Boston College education to serve the grater good. 

Ydu are entering the health care field at a challenging time. Cur- 
rently, about 12% of nursing positions are vacant. There is a projected 
demand for one million new and replacement nurses over the next 
ten years. Recent research has demonstrated the crucial role that well 
educated nurses play in shown to be associated with better educated 
nurses and adequate nurse staffing. There is a great need for Master's 
prepared nurses: Clinical Nurse Specialists, Nurse Anesthetists, Nurse 
Midwives, and Nurse Practitioners. We expect that most of you will go 
on for graduate degrees. Additionally, we need nurses with the PhD, 
who can conduct the studies that will improve the quality of care for 
our clients. There is no doubt that the opportunities are there for all 
of you. 

As graduates of the William E Connell SON, you have been extremely 
well prepared for the current and evolving health care system. \bur 
program, grounded in the liberal arts and in the Jesuit tradition of 
excellence in service to others, was designed to produce graduates 
who apply honed critical thinking skills to clinical decision-making. 
\bu will certainly rise to the challenges and bring the Boston College 
tradition and spirit to all you do. 

May God continue to bless you, your parents, and loved ones, as you 
leave Boston College to commence the next phase of your life. 

Sincerely 





Barbara Hazard, Ph.D., R. N, FAAN 
Dean and Professor 



50 .Academics 




Lett: (Tithing Hall has a variel\ of cla^room modeled 
afterhealth facilities Bottom Students perform exam- 
inations m an in class actiMtv /fxvo* M Erin Kie%nn 




Students learn ho* vdical equipment - 

in the facilities available through «. 
the Scrion< of N 







The Woods College of Advancing Studies (WCAS) originated from the 
Evening College that was established in the early 1900's. Through 
the generosity of University trustees Katharine and Robert Devlin, 
the WCAS was named for James A. Woods, S.J. — the school's dean since 
1968 — in May of 2002. For seventy-four years, it has been fully commit- 
ted to the mission of advancing the dialogue between religious belief and 
other formative elements of culture through intellectual inquiry, teaching and 
learning, and community life. In the atmosphere of a small setting within 
the resources of a large university, the Woods College of Advancing Studies 
offers both full- and part-time study opportunities for its students. It offers 
a serious education outside of the tradition of daytime schooling, which is 
perfect for those limited by other responsibilities or those who simply prefer 
a part-time schedule or the consistently small classes at the college within a 









52 Academics 




Ch*i 



college. In addition to da) courses, evening and Saturday courses .ire ottered 
for students pursuing bachelors and/or masters degrees Vppraximatel) 1,5 
undergraduate and graduate students in the Wl VS .ire provided the opportu- 
nit\ to grow intel lectualh within various programs including the Mastei 
Science program, Bachelor Of VrtS program, certificate programs, and non- 
degree programs. The Master of Science program offers a multidiseiplinar} 
curriculum in Administrative Studies, while the Bachelor of Arts program 
allows students to begin Studying tor an undergraduate degree or complete 
a degree initiated .it other institutions. Students can obtain a sound under- 
standing of an undergraduate discipline as well as current professional knowl- 
edge within that discipline through professional studies certificate programs 
The students o\ the Woods College of Advancing Studies are supported 
b\ an inclusive spirit and .) committed facult) that aid them in balancing 
career, family, and academic and social opportunities Se ngeun i 






// 



Unknown challenges 
now widen your hori- 
zons and demand a clear 



: 



Dean James A. Woods 




54 Acadcm ics 



To the Class of 2006: 

Great joy and accomplishment are yours as you celebrate graduation. 
You have achieved what you dared to dream. The talent, commitment 
and optimism you brought to studies will now be advanced in differ- 
ent directions, shared in new ways. 

You face a new world. Unknown challenges now widen your horizons 
and demand a clear sense of mission. This world community invites 
your vision, vitality and vigilant empathy for others. You are pre 
pared to question, to seek answers and to respond. You have anchored 
your knowledge, convictions and attitudes in a commitment to others 
which is the essence of moral engagements. Life's many changes will 
now always be examined in a defined context. You cannot ever leave 
behind what now enlightens your dreams. 

Your imagination and initiative link you today with distant continents 
and disparate cultures. Your talents and many gifts call you to connect 
the world's communities and carve a future of freedom and peace. 

You own the greatest human freedom: to choose your own attitude 
in any given circumstance. To secure your opinions under extreme 
conditions when there is no chance of changing them is the highest 
expression of personal autonomy. 

For seventy-seven years, graduates of the Woods College of Advanc 
ing Studies have gone forth into a world of upheaval and advance the 
noblest human cause: freedom and moral concern for others. Seize 
every opportunity with wisdom and optimism. Make learning a life- 
long goal. Respond to the compelling challenges with understanding 
and enthusiasm. 

Prayerful best wishes for all the years ahead. 

Sincerely vours, 

James A. Woods, S.J. 
Dean 



Left: Pt u fc aso t Murph> leaches a writing course to 
Students in (he Bottom: Dean \Kood<« does 

planning with a Mudent. Pfjofn 65 ij? 




■ 



Stwdr 

Mud>t> ' 









"Boston College has a variety of resources 
found in the libraries ranging from Macin- 
tosh laptops to Bristish Parliament text. I 
have also found the libaries here to be very 
helpful and conducive to my study habits. " 

-LUCYDEFORD 





56 Academics 



LIBRARIES 

Educational Resources 



Boston College was the first institution to construct a building dedicated solely as a 
library in the 400-year history of Jesuit education. Today, its various research librar- 
ies contain over twelve million printed volumes, manuscripts, journals, government 
documents and microform items that range from ancient papyrus scrolls to digital databases. 
The largest central research library located on the main campus in Chestnut Hill is the Thomas 
P "Tip" O'Neill, Jr. Library, named for the former Speaker of the U.S. House of Representatives, a 
member of the Boston College Class of 1936. Opened in 1984. it contains over 14 million printed 
volumes on a broad range of subjects that reflect on the University's extensive curriculum. Studs 
spaces and workstations provide access to these resources. O'Neill also houses either centers and 
facilities such as the Media Center, the Connors Family Development Center, and the Thomas 
R O'Neill, Jr. Exhibit. Bapst Library was one of the original buildings on "the Heights;' and 
was named after the first president of Boston College, Johannes Bapst. SJ. Often praised as 
the "finest example of Collegiate Gothic architecture of America!' Bapst is distinctive in the 
richness of its architecture and stained class, and in the elaborate interior decorations such as 
tapestries, oriental rugs, statues and oil paintings. Gregan Hall, the soaring reading room on 
the library's upper floor, has been named the most beautiful room in Boston. Today it is also 
referred to as the Art Library as it contains over 29,000 resources in the fine arts, including art 
history, architecture, sculpture, ceramics, decorative arts, photograph) and museum studit 
The Honorable John J. Burns Library o\~ Rare Books and Special Collections houses the Univer- 
sity's rare books, special collections and archives. Located in the Bapst Library building, it is 
home to more than 150.000 volumes, some 15 million manu- 
scripts and important collections of architectural records, 
maps, art works, and papers that are housed in a climateeon- 
trolled, secure environment. Other BC libraries include the 
Social Work Library that serves the students and the faculty 
of Graduate School of Social Work and the undergraduate 
library on the Newton Campus. With such vast resources Bl 
their disposal, it is no surprise that Boston College is known 

both national!) and international!) for its research, accom- 
plishments and efforts. Seungeunl I ee Photos b) Mto Hmnh 





fefl^lfffi 


fli 











Academv 



Internships & Careers 




Advisors in the career centers can help stu- 
dents compile a resume. Photo submitted 



58 Academics 




FUTURE INITIATIVES 



Boston College actively prepares its students tor the professional 
careers on which they embark alter graduation. The Career 
Center serves its primary role in guiding members of the Boston 
College community through their personal discover) of unique gilts and 
talents and how they choose to integrate them into meaningful lives b\ 
offering a wide variety of resources. The) assist students, alumni, and 
staff in finding internships and jobs, making career choices, choosing a 
major, and considering graduate school. Indi\ idual career advising, resume 
and cover letter critiques, practice interviews, and daily Drop-In Ques- 
tion Hours all facilitate students as they proceed into their professional 
lives. Students prepare for their life after college by interning with orga- 
nizations of all types both during the summer and the academic sear and 
even abroad, often with BC alumni, thereb) fostering the BC community 
The Boston College Shadow Program, offered through the Career Center 
arranges for students to visit with an alumnus in a professional setting 
in order to gain insight into a typical workday, learn about different jobs 
and fields o\ employment and begin practicing networking skills. Addi- 
tionally, students ma\ participate in the PreProfessional Medical and I aw 
Programs. The Premedical Predental program provides advice on course 
selection, internships, and other issues that affect admissions. Kdvisors 
help students research health-related careers, learn interviewing tech- 
niques, prepare applications, and write personal statements. The Prelegal 
program sponsors \isits b\ law school admissions officers, workshops on 
preparing applications and writing personal statements, and a prepara- 
tory course for the LSAT. Advisors counsel students on course selection 
ami work with the student prelaw organization, the Bellarmme I aw Acad- 
emy, which fields a mock trial team, publishes a newsletter, and organ i 
legal panel discussions and \isits to law schools Through all of its depart- 
ments and programs, Boston College provides the support students need as 
the transition from college into the next phase of their lives s 5 Kdl) 



"There is .in 
increasii 

demand for 
computer 
skills in the 
world field" 
rie Kim 




cre.it location to 
find internships 
especially in the 
business district 

downtown " 
\$g Binder 







Above and right: Students are able to 
visit many interesting architectural sites 
while abroad. Photo by Marisa Fusco 



Study Abroad 




60 Academics 



EXPLORE YOUR WORLD 



The Study Abroad Program enables students to gain new perspectives 
on a variety of subjects, exchange ideas and information with people 
from different cultures, and live in a challenging atmosphere that 
inspires both personal and intellectual growth. The opportunity to stud) 
abroad is available to all students who meet academic requirements .is out- 
lined by their academic dean and major department. The final approval is at 
the discretion of the Center for International Partnerships & Programs (CTPP). 
the academic dean, and the maun department. Also, all students wishing 
to study abroad must have a satisfactory disciplinary record and receive the 
approval of the Office of the Dean for Student Development. Those who do 
not meet the requirements but feel they should be allowed to go abroad can 
have the opportunity to appeal. Before attending a CIPP Stud) Abroad Infor- 
mation Session, students are encouraged to begin research and preparation, 
such as declaring a major, discussing plans with an academic advisor, and 
taking foreign language courses. Next, students should set up a meeting with 
the appropriate International Stud) AdvisOf (ISA) b) the appropriate date 
The application process includes a preliminarx application reviewed D) an 
ISA and a formal application evaluated b) the host institution for students 
nominated for a program. It is encouraged that students make stud) abroad 
an integral part of their major or minor. There are thirty-three program 
countries available for students, and each COUntr) has different programs 
and requirements. The Summer & Winter Stud) and Internship Programs 
are also available for nine of these thirty-three countries Seugeun X I 



"Stud\mg a 

I wonderful 
exprience and 

I think e\er> 

undcrgraduat 

should do it" 

K'.i/e [\itten 



iriijfc 



^;id>ing 
abroad in 
Europe all 
you to tour the 






entire continent 
during breaks 
s'>en Chen 











Ac*demv 



Special Academic Programs 




Students learn about each other and them- 
selves during courses. Photo by Lee Pelligrini 



62 Academics 



INTELLECTUAL CHOICES 



Boston College otters several special academic programs ih.it foster 
the education of BC Students in unique ways. First year students 
may enroll in one of the five Cornerstone classes: The Courage 
to Know. Cornerstone Advisement Seminar. Perspectives, First-Year Writ- 
ing Seminar or Freshman Topic Seminar. These small classes explore 
academic topics in a unique way, allowing students to learn proton ndl\ 
about themselves as well as the greater issues and ideas of the world. The 
Capstone Program, ottered to seniors and second-semester juniors, allows 
students to reflect on their educations and to look towards their upcom- 
ing commitments in life. Rather than function as the final course oi one's 
major, the Capstone Program focuses on the student's personal development, 

including their relationships, academics, spirituality, career, and personal 
skills. The Perspectives Program is a four-year, interdisciplinary course 

o\ stud\ grounded in the great texts o\ Western Culture that seeks to mte 
grate the humanities and natural sciences. Founded upon Jesuit ideals, this 
program seeks to liberate the student from cultural indoctrination, habit. 

and prejudices. The PULSE Program combines supervised social service 
or social advocacy field work with the stud) of Philosophy, Theology, and 

other disciplines, pi I M students address the relationship ^\ self and K 

ety, the nature oi community, the myster) o\ suffering, and the practical 

difficulties ot developing a tust society Students applx the informational 
knowledge gained in the classroom to the experiences the> encounter in 

then service work m order to garner a more profound understanding 

socictx and social justice These J.i-v^ at post, mi College transform the 
academic classroom into places of unique scholastic centers Sus 



i enjo) the Pulse 
j ram be cause 
it puts the ethics 
learned in class 
^tion" 
ine 
Chi am. 

\A s j 




"The Persp 
lives Maior 
explores phi) 
phx while ^ 






bininc a \ar»ct\ 
of focus 

\ hu Hu\ nh. 

U 


±M 1 




a- a' 


■ v 4a 






"The Honors Program integrates the major- 
ity of the core requirements and aspects 
of the liberal arts in a comprehensive and 
unified way over the course of four years'.' 

- MEGAN GREEN 





64 Academics 



yV Broadening Academic Horizons r ./ 



The Honors Program within the College of Arts & Sciences was started in 1958 to chal- 
lenge superior students to work to the best of their potential and is one of the oldest 
in the country. The program is designed to provide a more integrated approach to the 
required core subjects, allowing students to have a solid foundation for the more specialized 
studies. The approximate 140 students participating in the Program annualK are chosen pri- 
marily for their academic excellence: the\ generalh have SATs in the ranee o\ 1450 and are usu- 
ally in the top 5 c /c of their high school classes. Other students ma\ be selected tor ha\ ing several 
years of Greek, founding literay journals, working at interesting jobs, or having unusual recom- 
mendations from their high school teachers. At the same time, superior first-sear students have 
the opportunity to be admitted to the Honors Program as sophomores each year with recom- 
mendations from their first-year course instructors. The program offers small classes that are 
no larger than 15 students, seminar discussion, and close personal attention o\ instructors 
demic advisor. Seminar conversations ask students the basic questions that put all specializa- 
tion into a humane context: What is the good? What should we value? What is truth.' Does truth 
even exist 1 In the first and second years, students are required to take a four-semester si\ credit 
course which covers two of each semesters five courses, entitled The Western Cultural Tradition, 
which begins with a study of the classical tradition and ends w ittl major l c )th century writers. In 
the third year, the\ will take an advanced seminar called The 20th (entur\ and the Tradition, 
which examines the 20th century's interpretation o\ the inherited cultural tradition. During 
the final year, students can choose either o\ two ways of fin- 
ishing the Program — writing a senior thesis or taking part 
in an integrative seminar where the> will reread pre\ unisK 
learned ke\ texts to understand their own experiences ol col- 
lege education. Those who have completed all courses ,\n { \ 
have maintained a minimum 340 CP\ will receive Honors 
Program designation in the commencement program and on 
permanent transcript. There are also honors programs m the 
Carroll School o\ Management, the Council School o\ Nui 
ing, and the Lynch School of Education. Seungeun I i 







I 



This past year, three exceptional Boston College juniors were 
awarded the Martin Luther King, Jr. Scholarship, the Asian 
American Scholarship, and the Oscar Romero Scholarship. 
The Martin Luther King, Jr. Memorial Committee, founded in 1981, 
sponsors the Martin Luther King, Jr. Scholarship, which is awarded 
to a junior who best represents the ideals of Dr. King, including lead- 
ership, service, and academic accomplishment. The scholarship also 
guarantees the winner 75 percent of his senior year turition. Chick- 
aelo Ibeabuchi, president of the African student organization, was 
awarded the prestigious 2005 scholarship from a group of five final- 
ists. In accepting the honor, Ibeabuchi acknowledged the efforts of 
King, and appreciated how far he has been able to proceed in life. 
The Asian American Scholarship, created in 1995, annually recognizes 
an Asian American junior who demonstrates academic excellence, is 
commited to promoting Asian American awareness, and their work 
as an Asian American leader both on and off campus. The 2005 recip- 
ient of this year's scholarship is Jina Moon, a double major in com- 
munications and political science with a minor in Asian studies. She 
is currently the vice president of the Asian Caucus and is an active 
member of the Asian Pacific American Heritage Month Celebration 
Committee, the Korean Students Association, the Phillipine Society 
of BC, and the Undergraduate Government of BC's ethnic studies 
committee, which is working to establish an ethnic studies minor. 
The 13th Archbishop Oscar A. Romero Scholarship was awared to 
Omar Gonzalez, one of three finalists, in recognition of his excellent 
academics and outstanding record of community service. Gonzalez 
embodies Romero's message to all when he states "I recgonize I am 
not a master builder, just a worker." He urges for each individual to 
take a proactive role in the community, but like all of the scholarship 
winners, he takes a humble yet powerful intiative towards leader- 
ship. Erin Klewin and Nhu Huynh 



66 Academics 




Jina Moon 




Chikaelo Ibeabuchi 



Asian American Scholarship 

"This scholarship is so important to the Boston College community in recogniz- 
ing the accomplishments of active student leaders on campus who embody the 
ideals of the scholarship: academic excellence, promoting Asian American aware 



ness and serving the Asian American and the greater Boston College community 
Ever since my freshman year, I\e seen student leaders that I have respected and 
admired receive this scholarship. I feel so pri\elagcd and honored to be added to 
the list of past scholarship recipients and honorable student leaders. Winning the 
Asian American Scholarship has added fuel to m> existing passion and has given 
me greater purpose to continue to educate the community through Asian Caucus 
as well as motivate me to continue to excel in my academics. I hope that I will be 
able to set an example for the young leaders on campus to continue to excel m their 
academic studies, and everything that the) doT 

Martin Luther King, Jr. 
Scholarship 

"The words by Martin Luther King Jr.. "Every man must decide whether he will 
walk in the light of creative altruism or the darkness o\ destructi\e selfishness" 
ultimately capture the essence o\ his legacy as well as serve as m> personal moti- 
vation upon which I choose to guide my life today What I admire most was his 
unyielding selfishness and his devotion to service others. When I reflect upon his 
life and vision what becomes increasingly apparent is self-perception as an active 
vehicle for change. It is his legacy that has not only inspired but challenged me 
to "be the change I wish to see in my future* - and to lead by example. I believe I 
am an example of his success. Because of his hard- work and self-sacrifice. I have 
been able to succeed, and for that I am truly grateful. Sir. Isaac Newton states it 
best when he says, "If I have seen further it's because I have stood on the back 
giants" forme one of the giants was [)t Martin Luther King Jr. In order to continue 
Dr. King's vision, I must continue to \ iew myself as a leader and like him lead b\ 
example, maintain my commitment to ser\e others, and above all challenge myself 
to be an active instrument of change.*' 




Omar Gonzalez 



Oscar Romero Scholarship 



"The Oscar Romero Scholarship was my first opportunit) to thank my mother 
and grandmother for their endearing and loving commitment to my education M 
success stands .Hop their sacrifices I he recognition proved that a student from the 
protects ot New lork (it\ can perser\ere at a top academic institution like Boston 

College. With family as ones backbone, any goal is possible Winning tlv 

Romero Scholarship added me to the ranks o\ Latinos who made great contribu- 
tions to the Boston College community and went on to do afftecl change in the 
community at large. \s a senior in the frantic cra/e to solve the eternal question 
of life after graduation, this recognition keeps me poised to take on the future. 
Whatever path my life takes, the spirit of Archbishop 0» LI Romero will alv 
be present!' 






J. William Fulbright 

Fellowships 



The Fulbright Program is sponsored by the 
U.S. Department of State. It is the larg- 
est U.S. international exchange program 
offering opportunities for students, scholars and 
professionals to undertake international gradu- 
ate study, advanced research, university teaching, 
and teaching in elementary and secondary schools 
worldwide. The program was established in 1946 
by the U.S. Congress to "enable the government of 
the United States to increase mutual understand- 
ing between the people of the United States and 
the people of other countries!' Approximately six 
thousand grants were awarded in 2004, at a cost of 
more than $250 million, to U.S. students, teachers, 
professionals, and scholars to study, teach, lecture, 
and conduct research in more than 150 countries, 
and to their foreign counterparts to engage in sim- 
ilar activities in the United States. The Fulbright 
Program receives its primary source of funding 
through an annual appropriation from Congress to 
the Department of State. Participating governments 
and host institutions in foreign countries, and in the 
United States, also contribute financially through 
cost-sharing and indirect support, e.g., as salary sup- 
plements, tuition waivers, and university housing. 
Since the establishment of the Program, more than 
42,000 students from the United States and 147,000 
students from other countries have benefited from 
the Fulbright experience. The Fulbright Program 
has provided more than 250,000 participants, chosen 
for their leadership potential, with the opportunity 
to observe each others' political, economic and cul- 
tural institutions, exchange ideas, and embark on 
joint ventures of importance to the general welfare 



of the world's inhabitants. From its inception, the 
Fulbright Program has fostered bilateral relation- 
ships in which other countries and governments 
work with the US to set joint priorities and shape 
the program to meet shared needs. In recent years, 
the Department of German Studies at Boston Col- 
lege has enjoyed unusual success in promoting its 
own graduating seniors for Fulbright Fellowships 
to Germany and Austria. Most recently in 2005, 
fourteen fellowships were awarded to Boston Col- 
lege students and recent graduates, eight of them in 
the German Studies Department. The Class of 05's 
winners and their hosting countries are as follows: 
Patrick Carey, a mathematics and philosophy major 
and German minor (Germany); Stephen Cottle, 
an international studies and German major (Ger- 
many). Colin Donohoe, a biology major and German 
minor (Germany); Kristen Faucetta, a political sci- 
ence major and East European studies and history 
minor (Bulgaria); Lindsay Jansen, a political sci- 
ence major (Germany); Erina Megowan, a history 
major (Germany); Christopher Noble, a philosophy 
and German studies major (Germany); Hannah 
Nolan-Spohn, an environmental geoscience major 
(Costa Rica); Michael Scahill, a biochemistry major 
(India); Christy Slavik, a French major and his- 
tory minor (France); Matthew Thompson, a sociol- 
ogy major and German and music minor teaching 
English a secondary school in Germany; Jessica 
Wuebker, a German major (Germany). Fellowships 
were also awarded to recent BC graduates Ryan 
Murray '03, a psychology major and French minor 
(Switzerland) and Scott Steinkerchner, OP, Ph.D. in 
theology '05 (Nepal). Nhu Huynh & Erin Klewin 



68 Academics 



Presidential Scholarship 



Progra 



M 




Presidential Scholars on Thompson Island during Summer 2005 Photo courtes) 
<>/ u \i wbcedu 



Each year since 1991, a sefecl group of young men and women 
of outstanding talent and character have come to Boston Col- 
lege to embark on an integrated honors educational experi- 
ence designed to embod) the best of the universit) and itv Jesuit 
heritage of educational excellence in service to SOCiet) - the Boston 
College ['residential Scholars Program. The Presidential Scholars 
Program works in conjunction with the Unrversitys honors cur- 
ricula, challenging Scholars over lour years through summer pro- 
grams focusing Oil communit) service, international experience 
and professional internships. During the academic year. Scholars 
interact with eminent guests through a biweekh Evening Speakers 
series, hone their leadership skills through a scries of biweekh work- 
shops, and take advantage o\ a variety of other enrichment Opp 
tunnies, all intended to nurture their development into the nation's 
future leaders. Presidential Scholars receive full tuition scholarships 
and all PSP - sponsored summer programs are fulls funded. These 
give the Scholars the Opportunity to integrate course work with per- 
sonal experience, and weave the universit) experience into a seam- 
less whole. The Boston College Presidential Scholars graduated its 
hist class o\~ Scholars in 1995 and is the premier merit scholarship 
program of its kind. The students form a communii Khoiars 

who are dedicated to the pursuit o\ knowledge In the pro, 
discovering that which ignites their intellectual passion, this com- 
munit) seeks to fulfill the highest ideals o\ the Jesuit educational 
tradition. That 450-year tradition casts the unixersit\ not merel 
a professional training ground, but as a starting point to begin the 
most fundamental and exciting human quest: the quest for individual 
meaning in relationship to the universe and the search for a path that 
expresses that meaning each (\a\ - in work, in lion, in lea 

ship practiced not for self-aggrandi/ement. but for the common 
The (lass of 2006 Presidential Scholars are as folio. iee 

lova, Michael Dixon. William Dowd, Scott Gentile. Tax lor Heyen. Wil- 
liam Hillman, Son Lee, Reena Pankh. Kris Parks. Micia Re/r 
Megan Rullson, Jena-Paul Sanday and < Wiles Vnu H:\nh 



"Clinicals are very demanding, but ulti- 
mately worthwhile. They provide a hands- 
on experience that not only teach you the 
technical skills but also the interpersonal 
skills needed to become a successful nurse" 

- KATIE MCLAUGHIN 





70 Academics 



¥ 



>Y>-^ First Hand Experiences ^*XJ 



Practicum experiences are designed to meet the requirements of the Massachusetts 
Department of Education, as well as the initial procedures and policies set forth by the 
National Council for Accreditation of Teacher Education (NCATE). These experiences 
are administered through the Office of Practicum Experiences &. Teacher Induction which 
provides a centralized system for overseeing placement, supervision, and outreach/collabora- 
tion activities for student teachers. Placement of both prepracticum and full practicum student 
teachers is based on the '"Creating a Community of Learners" Partnership model. Teachers are 
to learn from each other, and beginning teachers learn in supportive environments with other 
beginning and experienced teachers. All prepracticum and full practicum placements occur in 
Partnership Schools and are documented on a database to ensure a variety o\~ placement oppor- 
tunities for each student. Collectively, the student, supervisor and cooperating teacher move the 
preservice teacher along a developmental continuum toward a thoughtful, self-directed profes- 
sional who can rise to the many challenges posed by todays schools. The experience helps 
students explore and enhance the skills necessary for accepting the challenges o\ mentoring, 
supervising, and learning the standards of a vital profession. Clinicals similarly provide a 
hands-on experience in the profession of nursing. All junior and senior nursing students, plus 
half of the sophomore class, attend clinicals at hospitals in the surrounding area. Nursing stu- 
dents must attend a clinical in each specialty care area over the course of four years- Adult 
Heath. Child Bearing & Maternity, Pediatrics. Psychiatrics, and Community Health. At the 
clinicals. students are in charge of the complete care of a patient for the (\a\. and are responsible 
for administering medications, hygiene, and nutrition. The 
last phase of the clinical process taken during senior \ear 
is Synthesis, in which the student picks .i specific area the\ 
want to focus in and follows a particular nurse in that area 
around during their shifts. The aim of synthesis is to pro- 
vide a transition from the role of student to professional. The 
overall purpose of cluneals is tor students to gain a hands on 
expeirence in an actual nursing environment, and provid 
a time for students to final ly appl\ all the thoeretical con- 
cepts learned in class. v/m Huynh t \. Erin KJewin. Photos h\ 
Nhu Uu\ nh and submitted. 







Academic Diversity 




Above: Students engaging in discussions ol diversity 
in the classroom is common at BC. Photo submitted 



72 Academics 



MIND EXPANSION 



In the spirit of the Jesuit ideal of developing the person as a whole. 
Boston College offers several unique interdisciplinary studies that pro- 
vide students the opportunity to explore subject matter from various 
perspectives. Students are encouraged to think beyond the assumptions ol 
any single department. Students enrolled in the American Studies minor 
encounter a number of overarching debates within the field over subjects 
such as character and consequences of mass migration, the historical emer- 
gence of densely populated cities and how such urbanization affects culture 
and social order, the transformation of frontiers into borderlands, and the 
renewed academic interest in American imperialism. Offered as either a 
minor or a major, the Black Studies Program, founded in 196$ seeks to 
encourage the study of and research on the experience of African Ameri- 
cans and other peoples of the African Diaspora and to introduce students 
to the culture, arts. historx and literature ol the Black peoples ol \tiu 
America and the Caribbean. As pan ol an academic initiative to bring 
more African American students to Boston College and to make the under- 
graduate curriculum more relevanl to African American students. Boston 
College is one of the first major universities in the United States to estab- 
lish Black Studies as a permanent part of the academic curriculum. Irish 
Studies offers an interdisciplinary understanding o\ the culture and societx 
of Ireland. Students m the Irish Studies Program Stud) history literature, 
drama, music, art. theater, and the lush language Students max partici- 
pate in the partnership programs that the Irish Studies program and the 
Center for International Partnerships and Programs have developed with 
several universities in Ireland. The Women's Studies Program emphasizes 
the Stud) of women's past and present position in society analyzing the dif- 
ferences among women as a result ol such factors as race, class, religion, and 
Sexuality. The concept o\ gender relations is also an important emphasis as 
are issues that intersect with gender such as nationalism and post colonial- 
ism, health, labor, sexuality, race, familx work and welfare N - Kelly 



"The new 
Jewish Siuc. 
minor is a great 
addition to 
M( - academic 
program" 
- Rac! 



"It's nice 
have so mam 
options to 
choose from 
in the curricu- 
lum. 
- \ 





Rarely are there individuals who truly motivate and move other persons to 
fulfill their highest potential. In the university setting, professors are sup- 
posed to be individuals who transfer knowledge and experience to stu- 
dents. These four professors have been nominated and selected because of their 
ability to not only teach well but because they have been significant figures in the 
lives of students on a much more personal level. The professors are appealing not 
because of the the topics they teach but because of the passion they have for teach- 
ing. They are concerned with the lives of their students. Perhaps they see for their 




Photo by Lee Pelligrini 



Professor McNellis 

Father/Professor McNellis SJ is not only an extraordinarily 
intelligent Jesuit, he has also dedicated his life to helping 
others at Boston College and abroad. A former Green Beret 
who fought in the Vietnam War, Father McNellis now reaches 
out to students globally to promote justice and peace. He has 
taught at Boston College, in Rome, Vietnam and Cambodia. 
He is an admirable human being who is highly knowledgeable 
about various subject matters. Most importantly, he is con- 
cerned about the welfare of students at Boston College on many 
levels beyond academics. He is able to evoke from his students 
a genuine concern and passion for learning that other profes- 
sors fail to do. Lauren Sey fried, A&S V8 




Professor Jacobs 

Professor Jacobs is definitely one of the most dedicated and 
hardworking professors at BC. He is incredibly conscientious, 
always preparing flawless, captivating lectures that actually 
make students want to go to class every time. Professor Jacobs 
is also one of the most helpful professors I've had. He does all 
he can to have as many office hours as possible, or to find out- 
side times to meet with students, even setting up shop in the 
Chocolate Bar once a week. Also, as anyone who has taken 
one of his classes knows, Professor Jacobs is incredibly hilari- 
ous. Professor Jacobs epitomizes what a great professor should 
be. Lauren Zaccone, A&S V8 



Photo by Gary Gilbert 



74 Academics 







students a vision of the future or of brighter beginnings. These professors under- 
stand the persuit of knowledge in its essence. The Sub Turri 2006 Yearbook and the 

undergraduates of Boston College would like to commemorate them for their work. 
These professors embody the spirit of education at a liberal arts college and are 
what students hope to encounter at some point in their college careers. B\ going 
above and beyond what is expected of a college professor, each o\ these indh iduals 
has touched students on a new level. The) have taken the spirit o\ Boston College 
well bevond the walls of the classroom. Shu Hu\ nh 




Professor Himes 

Father Kenneth Himes is a Franciscan, and he lo\es to 
joke that the Jesuits think theyre doing affirmative action 
bv hiring him. Father Himes teaches undergraduate and 
graduate classes in the Theology Deaprtment. I had Father 
Himes for a professor for a class called The Moral Dimen- 
sion of the Christian Life. Father Himes told us to approach 
the class as time each week to reflect on how your life is 
going. He does not simply preach his \ lews about morality 
instead he gi\es students the tools the) need to develop their 
own views about what morals and values are important to 
them. Father Himes is one o\ the best professors I have had 
at Boston College. Jenm Kasyan, \\ S 7, f-> 




Professor Braman 

Professor Braman has been a monumental figure in my life. 
Students attend his classes with t IgOT. \s a philosoph) pro- 
fessor, he has joking!) commented on how the philosophy 
majors will be the onrj students to graduate with souls m 

likeh to persuade Students to change their majors His lec- 
tures tend to be \er\ moving because he himself is hichK 
concerned <\\m\ knowledgeable about the topics Moreover. 
he is m touch with all o\ students on personal level and 
wishes for students to build among themselves friendships 
of excellence. Students learn to think critical 1) about ethics 
and the broader world as political beings who are to activeh 
participate in their communities. \hu Huynh. \d s 






S f XJDENT Lli?£ 

Edited by: I 

Anita Isama & Vy Vy Vo 

First and foremost, we are students at Boston College. At least that is what the faculty 
and administration and certainly our parents would like us to believe. And for some 
time, we agree. Students at Boston College spend many hours each week in class 
and spend a lot of quality time studying (or cramming) at O'Neill and Bapst Libraries. Our 
majors and GPAs and transcripts are all very important to us. Still, we are also well aware 
that our time outside of the academic realm is equally as valuable to our collegiate experi- 
ence. In addition to the incredible commitments we make to our academic goals and our 
extra-curricular activities, we all manage to find the time to be college students. And what 
exactly does this mean? Life on a day to day basis at Boston College is probably similar to 
the life experienced by students at college campuses all across the country. However, there 
are certainly a few things that set us apart from the rest. We have attended Homecoming in 
the rain, we proudly wear bright yellow t-shirts and we actually want to eat in a place called 
"The Rat." While these things make the Boston College experience unique, we also happily 
put our own spin on common milestones such as Parents' Weekend, living in dorms, making 
fashion statements, entering college for the first time at Convocation and the thrill of turn- 
ing twenty-one. From common Saturday afternoon shopping trips on Newbury Street to 
trying to find a table at Roggies for Friday happy hour to parties in the Mods and the famous 
Gasson bells, the pages that follow depict the lives of students at Boston College. Though 
we all may have unique experiences on the Heights, we share the common bond of a love 
"For Boston." It is here at Boston College that we develop strong friendships that will be 
with us for many years to come. With our friends, we attend lectures, concerts and tailgates; 
we cheer with hundreds of other students in the Superfan sections of Alumni Stadium and 
Conte Forum; we study, volunteer, perform, workout and 
party. Most importantly, it is with our friends that we 
make the memories of live at Boston College that will be 
talked about many years from now when we return for 
the Heights for one more tailgate on Shea Field. With- 
out a doubt, we all leave Boston College with a lasting 
impression of some of the best years of our lives. Marisa 
Fusco 




76 Student Life 




Welcome to 
Fitzpatrick & Gonzaga 




7S Student Life 



I.cli Student 
Photo h\ \f\ rj Chai 



me prepared with arr> 







Moving In 



Boxes, Books, and More 



As late August and earl) September is just around the corner, students must 
begin thinking about repacking their life into suitcases and boxes to head 
back to school. Although students ma\ not be too excited about ha\tng to do 
homework, the) are excited to be moving back into the dorms with their friends for 
another great year! For some moving in is a stressful tune. Students must first check 
in and get then new code to their room, sign some papers, meet new people including 
their R.\. ami those living on lower campus must Hindi) piek a room I \. H. ( 01 P 
and get a ke\ to their new bedroom. The allotted twent) minutes to unpack and m 
ever) thing into your room is hart! enough, but then it is time to unpack Students must 
attempt to fit all of their clothes into the given spaces, make their bed. .\n<\ find a pi. 
for the TV However, once the hard things .ire taken care of, its time to decorate and 
put up posters, pictures, calendars and signs. Computers and room phones also get 
up so that students can begin getting weekl) phone calls from parents Once students 
are all unpacked .ind settled, the must sa) goodbye to their parents While SOUK 
exeited to sa) goodbye and start enjoying their college experience, some are sac 
leave, or, tor some, their parents don't want to let go However, when all i» tod 

done, moving in reall) is just the start of what ma) be a Student^ best col 
\dele Beekman 



Life 



Far Right: Game day is the most-antici- 
pated day of the week, allowing stu- 
dents to come out to support their team. 
Photo by Bob McGrath. 

Right: GO EAGLES! A few of BC's many 
diehard fans cheering in the stands. 
Photo by Bob McGrath. 








Above: Students go all out on game days 

I ust by wearing their yellow Superfan 

shirts or even painting their faces. Photo 

by Bob McGrath. 

Right: BC Superfans showing their pride 
at the long-awaited FSU game. Photo by 

Bob McGrath. 



5* 



V 



80 Student Life 





"Being a Supertan is more 
than just going to ihe sport- 
ing events. It's heme able to 
be a part of something much 
larger than \ou. The whole 
school comes out to support 
when BC's reputation is on 
the line. I just feel when I 
wear the > el low shirt and go 
to the games. I couldn't be 
an\ prouder to go to B( 

- Kateryn Collins 

*I had nc\er experienced 
an\ thing quite like a Boston 
College football game I was 
amazed b% the dedication of 
the loyal BC fans' 

- Jesse Benneficld '09 




I 



Superfans 



w 



.* 



&u* 



li 



i i 



r 



Representing the Maroon and Gold! 



You can always tell when it's game da) at Boston College b> the swarm 
of Superfans that seem to descend upon the Heights. Decked oul in 
their golden \ellow tee shuts, the Superfans are dedicated Screaming 
Eagles fans who are willing to do anything to show their support for their 
team, whether it be standing in the rain for three hours at the Virginia football 
game or camping out at Conte Forum to be the first in line fol kc> 

and basketball tickets. Superfans know to show up to the game earh decked 
out in as much maroon and gold as human 1) possible - face and bod> paint, 
hair ribbons, hats. Boston College temporal") tattOOS, Mardi ( fras-Styk beads, 
and outlandish outfits often accompam the standard Supertan tee slmt. 
course, the Supertan tee shirt is a source of pride and solidarity, in itself tor 
dedicated Boston College sports enthusiasts \ new slogan is printed on the 
back of the Supertan shirt each \ear. thcreb\ identifying students as beir 
member ot a specific class at games This \car's slogan. "Talons o\ Fir 
Ready* 1 is slishth confusing tor main students, who aren't quite sure what 
inspired this rather amusing slogan i Rumor has il might be a veiled Napo- 
leon Dynamite reference} The Supertan spirit has increased this year, if you 
can believe thai such a thing is possible, as Boston College joined the V 

Superfans are showing up to games earlier than before, putting together iv 
1 :lcs -inspired ensembles, and even making more creative signs | 
then favorite team lde/e Beekman 



# I & K 



Life W 



Right: Boston College students eat, drink, and 

have fun with friends and families before the 

game during Parents' Weekend at Shea Field. 

Photo submitted by Frances Macias-Phillips. 

Below: Tailgating is a tradition for not only stu- 
dents, but their families and BC alumni. The 
festivities begin two hours before and two hours 
after the game w ith plenty of good food. 
Photo submitted by Katelyn Collins. 






Above: Even if BC is winning or losing, tail- 
gating is fun for BC students, especially for 
seniors who get to party at the Mods. 
Photo submitted by Frances Macias-Phillips. 

Right: Football games put smiles on students' 

faces, giving them a chance to experience one 

of the best parts of the season. ..tailgating. 

Photo submitted by Katelyn Collins. 



S2 Student Life 







One of the most exciting and tun times at Boston College is 
the tailgating before the home football games. Tailgating is 
allowed in the William J. Fl\ nn Fund parking lots .is well .is 
Shea Field. Students and alumni come from all over campus and all 
over the countr) in order to tailgate and see the amazing games. This 
year, for the first time m Boston College's history, FSPVs Game I 
broadcasted from the Dustbowl tor the Florida State game. This was 
a momentous and exciting occasion tor BC students who all showed 
their support by going to the Dustbowl with signs and screams on 
that rainy afternoon. This year served as Boston College's firsl >ear 
in the ACC. and with that, came some new policies tor tailgating. 
Although you have always needed to have a ticket to get onto Shea 
Field, this year a hole needed to he punched in the ticket in order to 
be admitted and to prevent readmission onto Shea Field The long 
lines caused a longer wait to be admitted onto the field. However, the 
wait is well worth the fun that comes with tailgating. In addition, 
campus parking lots opened two ami halt hours prior to the game 
and Shea Field opened two hours before the game. Tailgaters were 
also told to leave tailgating about thirt\ minutes before kick off. 
One reason tor this was to have better attendance o\ Superfans at 
kick off. Alumni presence is \er\ big during tailgating ami football 
games. Sophomore. Adele Beck man. can testif) to this based on the 
FSU came. She said, Ah brothers graduated from Boston College 
ill 1998 and 2000 and the) came from New York and San DiegOJUSt 
to tailgate before game. Some of their friends also came all the wa\ 
from places like Chicago and Florida to tailgate and then venture 
into the Boston bars to watch the game.'' Alumni are obviousl) \er\ 
supportive of their alma mater and with as much fun as tailgating is. 
who can blame them. 1 \dclc Bcckmun 



Tailgating 



The Fun Begins Before the Game Does 



StefevNLife 



The Mods were filled with 

good times and good food 

during pregame activities. 

Photo by Myra Chai 



Students tried to catch the 
eye of the camaraman using 
creative signs and t-shirts, 
standing on chairs, and even 
wearing costumes. 
Photo by Myra Chai 




Right: Bright and early students rallied with full body paint for the 
tapping in the Dustbowl. Photo by Myra Chai 



84 Student Life 




Left: ESPN ho\i* Chn<. Fowler and Lee I 
their note^ during a commercial break Pho: 
Chai 



A New League Is In Town 

ACC Gets Expanded Coverage 



If one thought that being inaugurated into the prestigious and challenging ACC w.in exciting, try pic- 
turing Gameday at Chestnut Hill in the Dustbowl. The College Gameda\ crew from ESPN .raced the 
wide expanse of greenery, on what is actually called "the Campus Green"' and not the 'Dustbowl 
many know it to be. on Saturday September 17. from 10:3" \M to noon. Several students were on site as 
earls as S in the morning to be in the front of the action. Main pumped up superfans brought on waves 
enthusiasm to this exciting event, showing on national television the spirit that the Boston Colic lies 

had in support o\~ their team. The marching band ami cheerleaders were also present Boston College was 
chosen .is a prime Gameda) spol due largely in part to its inauguration as an official member into the 
\( ('. The opponent for the da\ was FSU and the game was considered a must see The show was hosted 
b\ Chris fowler, along with featured analysts I and Kirk Herbstreit. who went through the top 

football games starting at 10:45 AM. Throughout the day updates and halftones reports were given from 
the set until it was time for the game at 745 PM at Alumni Stadium against Florida State Cnivensty BC 
fans were always supportive On their teams, but being a part of the \C( took it up I notch. Julie Oh 



Ufr 



"Having Barack Obama speak to us about his life 
was inspirational. The procession to the Convo- 
cation was truly an experience I will never forget. 
From the walk down the stairs to gathering in 
front of the Church, the Convocation was truly a 
way to invoke a family between all the freshmen" 

- KEVIN JOHNSON '09 









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86 Studenl l.ilc 



OtfVOCAT/ojv 

^■^ The Beginning Of a Great Tradition * 



Last years Academic Convocation marked the beginning of a new tradition here at 
BC. The class of 2009 was welcomed into Boston College with a speaker. A trumpet 
sounded and the blessing of the torches took place. The procession then began going 
down Linden Lane, around Gasson. through the quad, between O'Neill Plaza and Devil, 
down Hiscins stairs and into Conte Forum. Senator Barack Obama shared his ideas and 
views on issues and problems throughout the world, leaving an impact on those who joined 
him in Conte Forum on Friday. September 16, 2003 during the Second Annual First Year 
Academic Convocation. Obama centered his speech on his 1995 autobiography Dreams From 
My Father during the Convocation. The class of 2009 was asked to read and reflect on the 
book over the summer. Sophomore Francesca Erts reflects on his speech. "It was great to 
have such an influential speaker come to BC and talk to the student body! 1 Barack Obama 
tried to pass on the importance of empathy and understanding of others through their times 
of need despite their race, heritage, or any other factors. He started his focus on the situa- 
tion of those suffering and in need due to the tragedies brought on by Hurricane Katrina. 
One could clearl) see the havoc that the storm brought to mam areas o\~ the nation, but the 
damage and upheaval in the victim's li\es were rooted much more deepl) than that brought 
on by Mother Nature. Obama stressed the importance of helping others at am point in their 
lives if one could clearl) see the need and suffering o\~ those around oneself. Coming from 
a diverse background. Obama could see that main issues of race, identity And eommunit\ 
stem from the lack of understanding and communication 
between people in the nation and around the globe, Ovei 
all. throughout his speech. Senator Obama tried to stress 
the importance of tolerance ami understanding oi others m 
order to promote a SOCiet) where race and color would not 
become an issue in matters of importance li COuM onh 
start if individuals took the initiative m their dail) lives \o 
make a difference and thus impact others on a greatei scale 
to make a more peaceful world. \Jclc ttcckiiun A Julie Oh, 
Photos b\ Susan ne Camarata A Chris Huang 




Siwfeni I 



Far Right: BC interviewed five students 
from Loyola University in St. Williams' 
Hall. The students shared their stories of 
Hurricane Katrina's impact on them, and 
their experiences at BC. Photo submitted 
by Trustees of Boston College website. 

Right: Visiting students adjusting to 
their newsurroundings enjoy lunch in the 
Eagle's Nest. Photo by Lee Pellegrini. 




J55JX 



<kunA 




mo*— 2 qt 



HURRICANE KATRIW 

BC 

H ^K YOU FOR Glf* 



| : '^IT RELIEF 
EFFORTS 



Ame#J 

REDC4 




Above: Every donation counts because 

giving will help rebuild all that was lost. 

Photo by Bob McGrath. 

Right: In response to the tragedy that hit 
the Gulf Coast, many BC students par- 
ticipated in a pregamc fundraiser. 
Photo by Bob McGrath. 










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88 Student Life 



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"BC was so generous b\ 
opening its doors and let- 
ting all of us come here to 
take classes and giving us 
housing while Loyola was 
recuperating. Even though 
BC is not really my school. 
I will always remember the 
football games and the long 
walks from St. Williams to 
class as my freshman year." 

- Ben Lawlor 09 

"I was so nervous about 
coming to a new school but 
BC students were extremely 
receptive and my fears were 
quickl) put to rest. It's hard 
to believe the semester is 
almost over and I will SOOD 
be returning to Loyola." 

- Sophie Siegel '07 



Visiting Students 




The Effects of Hurricane Katrina 



In the fall of 2005. the United States suffered a devastating natural disaster. 
Hurricane Katrina. The Hurricane, which hit the Gulf Coast, forced man) 
to evacuate their homes and towns and seek shelter elsewhere. Some were 
moved into the Superdome only to be transported soon after to new locations 
like the Houston Astrodome. Thousands of lives were lost and main were left 
stranded in the aftermath of flooding with no food, water or shelter. The hur- 
ricane was a shock to the millions watching and the country was more than 
willing to help out including Boston College. With the help of the community 
BC. like many other schools, participated in taking in students from Tulane 
University and Loyola University in New Orleans Boston College took in 
about 150 students from the schools and enrolled them in the Woods Col 
of Advancing Studies. Main of the students were housed in St Williams' Hall 
on BC's Brighton Campus. Boston College was more than happ> to help out 
with this cause b\ uniting these students into the community n Col- 

lege set out to help in other ways as well. During the B< > s \rm\ football 
game, a special collection was taken to help the hurricane victims. With the 
help of the Red Cross. BC also hosted a blood drive earlier in the \car where 
people were more than willing to participate. While the QulfCoasI continues 
to rebuild and gain back its strength, the BC communit\ continues to pra> tor 

the victims and help serve m whatever waj possible to help the cai 
Seek man 



Lifc 



Every club was ready with information and 

excited members who were ready to inform all 

who were interested. Photo by Myra Chai. 

Below: Dedicated members set up posters 
before the start of Activities Day. Photo by 

Myra Chai. 




Right: Many cultural groups used traditional 

decorations and clothing to help their tables 

stand out. Photo by Myra Chai. 



90 Student life 




Student Activities Da) is the one day in the beginning of the whole 
school year in which clubs activel) tr> to recruit new and old 
members into their folds to make their organizations more diverse 
and as strong a group as possible with different talents and perspecti 
in man\ areas. Club members sitting at their respective booths tr\ to 
entice students passing b\ with otters ofcand) and pens with their club 
names on it. Once the prospective future members are drawn to the 
booth, they are bombarded with information on the various events that 
each club will hold throughout the year and the level ot involvement 
required as a member. Also, clubs such as th I ling Club showed 
off their biking skills this year for all to see at their booth as well as 
comedy groups who presented samples of their acting skills on televi- 
sion as the) walked through the rows oi tables. The long row o\ booths 
down the pathway through the Dustbowl was not eas^ to jet through 
that day as throngs and throngs of eager students stopped constant!) 
to pause and sign up for activities that caught their eyes. Man) differ- 
ent types of clubs were available for students to join such as the intense 
dance/music organizations, cultural clubs, and sports clubs to name 
a few. Although there was a plethora o\ options to choose from, m 
students were able to pinpoint a select few that perked their interests 
throughout the day Julie Oh 



Student Activities Day 



Organizations and Clubs Take Over the Dustbowl 



* 







Below: After boarding the boat, students start off 

the night enjoying food provided by the ALC Boat 

Cruise or heading straight to the dance floor. 

Photo submitted by OLAA 



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S V> 1 U 1 T OF 




ALC Boat Cruise 



An Evening On the Water and Under the Stars 



Once again the annual ALC Boat Cruise sold out to an eager crowd of 600 people within just 
four hours of going on sale. On Friday, September 23, 2005, students, administrators, and fac- 
ulty alike went to this semi-formal evening on the Spirit of Boston, which left Boston Harbor 
and cruised along the Charles River until the early morning. The event was indefinitely successful 
with people enjoying themselves on all four floors of the boat. The night consisted of dancing and 
socializing as well as delicious food and a wonderful turnout. The Public Relations Director of ALC, 
Akim St. Omer '06 claimed, "It's always good to see everyone get dressed up for the Boat Cruise. The 
night was exactly the night like I imagined it to be - a wide array of people from all years, all races, 
and all social circles living it up together. The Boat Cruise was a blast." The AHANA Leadership 
Council (ALC) gives students of all different cultures a chance to celebrate diversity and to meet new 
people in a classy environment with good food and good music. The ALC focuses on improving the 
quality of life for AHANA students, and dedicates itself to the value of diversity at Boston College 
and the foundation of equality among all students of all races and cultures, reflecting the Jesuit ideal. 
The ALC Boat Cruise is one of the most anticipated and successful events that ALC holds each year, 
and will inevitably be a success for years ahead. Vy Vy Vo 



92 Student Life 




Left: Everv year (he event sella out, hut who wouldn't want to cxpenen. 
wonderful night on the Spirit of Boston dancing and mingling with friends' 
Photo by Vy Vy \h 

Below: The best part of the night has to he everyone dancing and enjoying 
themselves with good company The ALC Boat Cruise is a tot :ar 

Photo h\ \\ V) Vo 



SOS TOM 




eft While heading lo Ro«c< Wharf in Boston Harbor, student* find time lo 
?h.mre to remember a fun-filled e^ 
Pfnv 



SndeMLife 




Right: Several students enjoy a game of wiffle ball on 
the upper lawns. Photo by Anita Isama 



94 Student Life 




Friends can take ■ break from »ori and hang oul 
al the same time watching tv Phi>/.< b\ \\ \ 



Dorm Life 



Your Home 



With so many different dorms al Boston College, one reall) cannot go wrong. 
Dorms on upper campus house mainly freshman in either double, triple, or 
quad st\lc rooms. Newton campus houses freshman in double style rooms. 
College Road is home to main sophomores with double, triples, or quads. Lower 
campus is privileged to have sophomores, juniors and seniors living in the dorms m 
nine, eight, six or four person suites. Some are luck) to live in the mods and enjo 
small yard and house st\ie accommodations. Boston College was tuck) to have built a 

new dorm, St. Ignatius date, which was open to students to live in fall ol 2004 v 

dorms are equipped with various studs rooms An<,\ some have cardio rooms and game 
rooms. Main of the upperclassmen dorms come with a kitchen and air conditioning 
and all suites on lower campus have a common room to host company \ large percent- 
age of juniors live o\\ campus in apartments or houses fairl) close to l<* impus. 
Although it gives a small dose o\ what it is like to live on your own. main students 
cannot wait to get back on campus and once again indulge on campus life, Sophom 
Tin 1 1 > Harper, reflects on her living situation so tar: "1 was blessed freshman year 
to be a dormant of Cheverus Hall. The "T" style architecture was wild. 1 had such 
exhilarating experiences there that I am again living with m> former hall mates this 

year in Walsh. I am excited to live oft campus next year and. if I am lucky I will 
to live in the mods senior year? 1 \dele Seek man 



Ufr 



Far Right: Keith Lockhart put on a rivet- 
ing performance at Parents' Weekend. 
Photo by Myra Chai. 

Right: At Conte Forum, the University 
Chorale put on a spectacular perfor- 
mance for all the parents and students 

to enjoy. 
Photo by Myra Chai. 




iig««ag»s»^E J*nS0S«g 



* » 




Above: Students know to clean their 

rooms when Parents' Weekend rolls 

around the corner in order to make a 

good impression on their parents. 

Photo by Myra Chai. 

Right: Parents' Weekend is a good 

opportunity for parents and students to 

spend some quality time together fresh 

into the new school year. 

Photo by Myra Chai. 



■ » 



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tfirm. 



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96 Student Life 




"Parents' Weekend is great. I 
love seeing everyone together 
with their families, especially 
.it Mass in O'Neill Pla/a. 
There's such a sense of com- 
munitv You can |iisi feel the 
love." 
- Frances Macias-Phillips "07 



"It's nice to ha\e a weekend 
when m\ parents can come 
to \ ts.it me and experience 
a little hit of what m\ life at 
school is like. It's reassuring 
for them, too'" 
- Janice Pa nine 



mum to*' <■—'•<•" 



• I « 







V 1M 



Parents' Weekend 



Bringing Families to the Heights 



Parents' Weekend started off on September 30th with the onslaught of 
curious and loving parents going to classes with their children from 
9AM to 5PM. Faculty seminars were also given in Robsham Theater mi 
topics such as nanoscience (the study and manipulation of matter on an almost 
inconceivably small scale), liberal arts education (and how n is implemented 
at BC to help students create positive changes at home and elsewhere), and 
the role of faith in the students' lives at the university. In the afternoon Wil- 
liam R Leahy, the President o\~ Boston College, shared his perspectives on the 
university tor the first time ever outside on Bapst Lawn. The undergraduate 
research poster session went on in Higgins for biology, physics, geology and 

geophysics related topics, while research Findings in chemistry were displayed 
in Merkert. Later into the day, the 13th annual Pops on the Heights Scholar- 
ship Gala was held at Conte forum. A eappella groups performed throughout 
the night until the opening of the concert, in which Keith l.ockhart conducted 
the Boston Pops Esplanade Orchestra and the Boston College University Cho- 
rale lor a performance of a wide variet) o\ classical and popular music On 
Saturday, October 1st. the football team went hcad-to-hcad against Ball State 
University. A grand total of 40,162 tans, including Students, parents, alumni. 
and visitors, packed the sl.iiuls with their overflowing energy In the end. 

Boston College shut out Ball State University with a satisfying final score 

; ^ 0, lca\ ing shouts of happiness ringing throughout the stadium. The event- 
ful weekend came to a close on Sunday October 2nd. with a fa mi I) liturg> 
in O'Neill Pla/a where more than 3,000 students, parents, and members 
the BC Community were present. Parent's weekend had come and gone once 
again, leaving a mark on the whole community. Julie Oh 



Student L 



Right: BCs all-male a cappella group, the 

Heightsmen. rocked the crowd in Gasson Hall 

during their annual Heightsmen cafe. 

Photo by Anita Isuma 

Below: The Super Sweet Concert Series was a 

new event this year at the Chocolate Bar. Many 

BC students showed off their musical talents. 

Photo submitted bv Emily Krol 




Right: The Black Student Forum held the 2nd 

annual Neo-Soul Night featuring the up and 

coming R&B artist. Trey Song/., in concert. 

/'/io/o submitted by Klutlihth Daley 



9X Student Life 




The crashing of cymbals, the high trills o\ the violins, and the 
soaring voices of powerful voices combined together is a sight 
to behold. Even alone, the different sounds coming from instru- 
ments and vocalists have the power to move those watching and lis- 
tening, allowing them to experience the drama and emotions with the 
performers themselves. It takes years and \ears of practice to master an 
art. but the results coming from hard work and lung grueling hours of 
practice are rewarding to performers and audience alike. Boston Col- 
lege has all three elements of music under its \er> own roof: its bands, 
choirs, and orchestras are all successful entities that help to contribute 
to the culture and awareness o\ the beaut) o\ music to others. The con- 
certs held by the Cniversit) Chorale ever) >ear are great expenen 
to those with a trained ear and also to those who jusl enjo\ music tor 
its own sake. The performance at the Newton Trimt\ Chapel o\ Anto- 
nio Vivaldis and John Rutter's renditions of the Magnificat gave a rare 
opportunity to those who attended to be able to hear different inter- 
pretations of the idea that the two composers wanted to come; Boston 
College also offers small concerts from independent musicians who just 
want to play for fun in a more informal atmosphere. The Chocolate Bar 
is one of the few places that hosts such events, a small and intimate 
setting where the bands and groupies can get together to have a blast. 
The Super Sweet Concert Series this year was one o\ the few exciting 
events that went on there. Students are also \er\ conscious o\ the plight 
of those in need and use then musical abilities to help those people in 
some way. The "Continue to Care"" night was held to help provide relief 
for the victims of Hurricane Katrina. Not only were the individual tal- 
ents of the present musicians able to be appreciated, but a bigger issue 
was also able to be made more widel) known and acted upon by th 
who attended this benefit concert. Julie Oh 



Concerts 



The Musical Talent at Boston College 



teM Life 



Below: The Homecoming dance "Evening Under 

the Stars" sold out to 1,500 students, who danced 

the night away in the Mod parking lot. 

Photo by Marisa Fusco 





Homecoming 



Dancing the Night Away 



The Undergraduate Government of Boston College set up this year's Homecoming Week with a 
variety of activities planned for the students. A Newton vs. Upper dodgeball tournament was 
held (anyone who lives or has lived in either campus was welcome to play) in the Dustbowl, with 
the registration fee proceeds going to benefit the Pedro Arrupe Immersion Trips. There was pumpkin 
decorating later that week in the Dustbowl, as well as a daisy sale to benefit the victims of Hurricane 
Katrina and Harvest Fest, which drew focus on environmental issues. The most anticipated event of 
the week was the Homecoming Dance that was held in the Mod Parking Lot. Due to unruly incidents 
in previous years, the location of the dance was designated as such instead of being held at places like 
the Fairmont Copley and the Park Plaza. Many were disappointed in the lack of space within the tents 
that were set up outside for the dance area and in the low numbers of tickets that were available for 
purchase - 1,500 tickets sold out in a mere two days for this event. Most of all, the rain put a damper 
on many students' moods as many items got wet throughout the night as well as the disorganization 
at the end of the dance for the retrieval of coats in the coat check area. However, many students still 
seemed to have a good time in the company of good friends despite the many drawbacks to this out- 
door setup. The evening was a success, in which students enjoyed dressing up and dancing. Students 
look forward to more improvements for next year's Homecoming. Julie Oh 



100 Student Life 




Left: Students always enjoy themselves at Homecoming, which is a chance for 
them to get dressed up to dance the night away with good company. 
Photo by A.'r;\ Brewer 

Below: A white tent was set up over a wooden dance floor, tables, the buffet. 
and the cash bar. Despite the weather conditions and tight space, people enjoyed 
the food and music an opportunity to party on campus with good friends. 
Photo Mihmittcil h\ Jason Ander 





hough \- - 1 at the Fairmount Copley or the Pari 

i. students still got decked out to have fun. and some found the Mnd 
P.»rk< *>e a better location for a reason to attend lt- 

Left: Presulen' »kme. takes time it the 

in annual wcoevi planned by ' 



SUNfeTNUfe ITU 



In October, Tim Russert, the NBC News Washington 

bureau chief and the moderator of the news program 

Meef the Press, offered advice to students pursuing a 

future career in journalism. Photo by David Trudo 





^r 




Right: One of the many speakers that came to BCs 
campus was Kathleen O'Toole, who was named Bos- 
ton's first female police commissioner in 2004. 

Photo by David Trudo 



102 Student I. ik- 




/. 



Rjraik Obama gave the konoic a<) 

the Second Annual Fir»i 'i 

stressed ihe importance of tolerance and under 

standing "I othet 



JrO 



Voices to Hear on Campus 



A taste of life from outside of our com ton able campus in Chest nu I Hill is alwj 
welcome at Boston College, where different experiences and views are always 
looked upon with an open mind. Reading about policies Of theories on paper 
is not always as exciting as having real, live speakers from different institutions. This 
year, BC was fortunate enough to have several distinguished speakers come in to talk 
about their works and/or ideals. Among them include Boston Police Commissioner 
Kathleen OToole. Barack Obama. Sarah Willie, and Tim Russert. Kathleen O'Toolc. 
an alumnus o\' Boston College, presented to the audience the path that she took to 
to her career and the current status of police work in the cit\ t^f Boston. She Started 
OUt as Boston police officer to the state's secretar) o\ public safety, and became the 
founder of an international securit) and crisis management consulting firm. She also 
became a member o\ a panel recommending reforms for the Northern Ireland police 
force, and fi mil In ended up becoming the first female commissioner in 2004. Barack 
Obama. the junior senator from Illinois, shared his views during the Second \nnual 
I list Year Convocation. His talk was mostl) based on his auto 0777 

\/\ Father, which stressed the importance of expressing empatln and understanding 
to those in ucc(\. Sarah Willie, an associate pr< • Oi SOCtolog) and chair o\ black 

studies at Swarthmore College, also based her talk ou her book \cting Stack Colh 
Identity, and the Performance 0/ Race Willie talked about her observations from her 
research, on how race still plays a role in college life toda> despite the efforts taken 
b\ main to create equal it\ and unity. Tim Russert also came I in mid-tall to talk 

about his career ami share ad\ ice to those that aspire to be in the journalism field, lake 
Barack Obama and Sarah Willie. Russert also shared with the audience the lessons 
that he learned from his father in his book Big R ii v He These four speakers 
select tew o\ main that come to BC ever) >ear to impart with us their ideas and open 
up the minds of main Ihe leaders of tomorrow should take the opportunit) to meet 
such great people in order to make a better future. Julie Oh 



Sivdemi 



Right: Students use the popular cardio machines 

in order to stay in shape. 

Photo b\ Anita Isanm 



Below: The Plex offers a variety of facilities 
including the tennis courts, eight-lane swim- 
ming pool, and 1/8 mile track. 
Photo by Vy Vy Vo 





_ 


i 
I A 




.»♦ 



Above: Seniors John Knca and Ben Lindeman 

working out and spotting for each other. 

Photo by A nit u Isama 



Right: Students work out with the equipment 

and group exercise classes provided at the Plex 

such as weight training and toning. 

Photo by Vy Vy Vo 



\ 



104 Student Life 



The students at Boston College appear to be at the top end of the 
long list of colleges across the nation as being one of the fittest. 
This was reflected in the September 15 edition of the Heights, 
where it was stated that Boston College ranked 11th in Men's Fitness 
Magazines Poll of America's Fittest Colleges. The Hex, which stands on 
a total of 293.000 square feet, is at the center ot the hub oft all this high- 
energy madness, constantly teeming with health-conscious members ot 
the BC community. It contains an 1/8 mile indoor track, indoor/outdoor 
tennis courts, basketball courts, volleyball courts, squash cour: 
quetball courts, an X-lane. 25-yard lap pool, and a diving pool to name 
a few. The Fitness Center, a facility within the Plex, offers a variety if 
aerobic and resistance equipment. Many people throughout the da) can 
be seen using the 75 aerobic machines, the 25 Nautilus and Bod) Master 
strength training machines, and a new line o\ free weighl equipment. 
For those that don't have the time to commit to a varsitv sport, club 
and intramural sports are available at different points of the year. Club 
teams that are available at BC are crew, cycling, equestrian, field hockey, 
figure skating, golf, karate, lacrosse. ru<:bv. running, ski & snowboard, 
soccer. Special Olympics, volleyball, and water polo. Club teams are 
generally more intense than intramural teams, which are more laid back 
and have more flexible scheduling. The available intramural sports are 
softball. football, volleyball, racquetball. soccer, basketball, tennis, ice 
hockey, wiffleball, and futsal. For those who want to choose different 
workouts each week, group workouts are available each day including 
group cycling, which has become very popular this vear. rhumba. step. 
tae-bo\. several dance classes, muscle conditioning and cross/interval 
training classes, pilates, yoga, and some water-based workouts. There 
are main workout programs and machines available for use b\ health- 
conscious individuals at Boston College. Julie Oh 



Staying in Shape 



ShKtemLife 



Far Right: Freshman year is a time to 

build and cherish new friendships. Photo 

submitted by Mary Madden 

Right: The city of Salem attracts many 

students during the Halloween season. 

Photo submitted bv Anita Isama 








Above: The various games and icebreakers helped fresh- 
men get to know each other throughout the 48 Hours 
weekend at Snowy Owl Lodge in New Hampshire. 
Photo submitted by Oil ice ol First Year Experience 

Right: Special interest housing such as the Shaw Lead- 
ership House enable freshmen to make lasting bonds 
throughout the year. Photo submitted b) Mar) Madden 



. m 

■ A. 












warn »^M 

M< m ' m 




KK. Student Life 









"Freshman \ear is like a roller- 
coaster. ^ou have thai huge 
drop. \our stomach sinks, and 
you dont think cou're goin 
make it. As the ride goes on. 
you get used 10 it. and >ou 
look hack and s.i\. That was 

crazy. Let's I" u again"' 

Modele Oyewok 
Pbofo submitted b\ Michelle 
Andrade 

"I lo\e freshman year! I have 
met some real I) genuine 
people who have helped me 
to think outside of the boot I 
can't vxail tor the yean ahead 
at Boston Cbll 

- Chatequa Campbell TJ9 
Plnuo submitted b) Mary 

\l.nlilcn 



Freshmen 



The Class of '09: Talons of Fury..Get Ready! 



Freshmen year of college is met tor most with tear and excitement. After 
spending the past four years with the same people everyday it is finally 
time for students to venture o\\~ into a new world. From recei\ ing accep- 
tance letters in Ma> until the) are allowed to move into their dorms in Sep- 
tember, students are anticipating the kind of excitement and new expenen 
that college will present to them. Once stopping fool onto their new home, 
be it Upper or Newton Campus, students are forced to quickl) adapt to their 
surroundings and begin the next chapter o\ their h\cs. Meeting people and 
creating friendships is one o\ the major tasks in the beginning ol freshmen 
year. Students continuously introduce themselves, ask where others are from. 
ask about majors, or hope to find some sort ol similarity that will help form a 
friendship. Classes also serve as a great place to meet people Vssumir 

don't get too lost .i round campus the first week ofdas I attend the wr> 

class a few times, classes can serve as a great wa\ for students to be intro- 
duced to people that ma) not live in their dorm Freshmen >ear also set 
.is a time of exploration and learning. Students quick 1) learn the ro; the 

Comm. We. bus. where each o\ the T lines and how to get around in 

Boston. Although homework, papers and tests tend to get in the wa) o\ stu- 
dents having fun. freshmen >ear serves as the test run for how students will 
manage their time Main students learn that sometimes sta\mg up until 1 
a. m wasn't the best idea, while others figure out that on I) an hour or tw. 
sleep before that big hiolog\ test is all you need Either w tudents urc 

to sain a lot from freshmen Near be it friends, how to eet around or what suk1\ 
habits work best for them. \JcJc Heck wan 



StadnnLife rr 



Right: Being a sophomore is a step up from last 
year with new opportunities and a more com- 
fortable feeling around BC and Boston. 
Photo submitted by Khalilah Daley 

Below: Shown here are sophomores dressed up 

for a night on the town. 

Photo submitted by Adele Beekman 





tin 



Y w» 




m± w 




j^ j 


■ ^ ^K ' 


H iP^^^^JI 


k ■ j& ^r . ^^" 




It f^Kj% 







Above: Being able to live with friends is the 

best part of sophomore year, whether it involves 

living on Lower Campus or College Road. 

Photo submitted by Adam Vartabedian 

Right: The strong bonds formed from fresh- 
man year will help make the most out of a 
student's college experience. Photo submitted 

by Michelle Andrade 



IOX Student Life 





For man>. sophomore year serves as an exciting time in the college 
experience. As sophomores, they have taken in their freshman 
familiarity and expanded it. At the end of freshman year the) 
have decided who and where to live so even moving in is fun. They 
now get to live with their closest friends and build on those relation- 
ships. They have had a year of college already so they know what to 
expect. For the most part, sophomores have figured out how to balance 
school work, friends, and fun. They know their way around campus, 
know the best time to eat. know how the buses work and how to 
around Boston and the surrounding areas. With the fun ami com tort o\ 
sophomore year also comes some stress. For those without four years 
of housing, they must begin finding people and a place to live tor the 
following year. Also, for the many who wish to go abroad, they must 
begin preparing for that. During sophomore year, students must declare 
a major. For some this causes problems because they must really think 
about the direction their life is headed in. But. in the end. sophomore 
year serves as one of the most popular among students. Despite the 
pressures it brings, sophomores have it pretty easy. They are living with 
friends, getting their work done, and having fun in between. With two 
years left at school, sophomores are lucky to be so adjusted so they can 
make the most out of their time left. Adele Bcckman 



Sophomores 



Back for the Second Time 



Student Life 



Below: Juniors have more opportunities to 

have fun on the weekends with many living off 

campus. Photo by Myra Chai 





Juniors 



Taking Off from the Heights 



With only two years left at Boston College, juniors are sure to make the best of their time. 
This is the year when the class is separated the most compared to any other year because a 
majority of students are either off-campus or studying abroad. For some, they are enjoying 
another year living on campus. For others, they are enjoying the beginning of the real world, having 
to pay bills and experience off-campus living along such streets surrounding BC such as Comm. Ave., 
Sutherland, and Foster Street. But, no matter where people are living, students are sure to be having 
fun. Juniors are finally upperclassmen and enjoying the perks that come with that. For many juniors, 
it is an exciting year because they will turn twenty-one. With this new age students are finally allowed 
into Maryanne's and other bars in the Boston area. Junior year is full of new experiences. Living off 
campus, taking a semester or year abroad, attempting to fulfill majors and minors, and beginning 
to think about graduate school are all things that come with junior year. Students must also begin 
preparation for senior year. They are fortunate to get good registration times and anticipate living in 
the Mods (if they are so lucky). After already becoming more acquainted with life at Boston College 
for the past two years, juniors take it upon themselves to consider their future plans more seriously. 
Adele Beekman 



110 Student Life 




Right: With two yean umlcr their belts, students make the most of their lime 
left .it BC with old and new friendships and focus on plans for ihe future. 
Photo submitted b) Fr.mk Ci.nio 

Below: The best part of junior year is having another chance to h\c with 
friends, whether it is on or ofl campus. 
Photo suhmiitcil h\ Michelle \rnlr.nlc 




•«ll 



i.i«r in 



"Senior year is a culmination of everything that 
BC has stood for in my life. It's the chance to solid- 
ify my relationships with people while making 
new ones as I go on. Senior year is the time when 
I allow myself to experience the beauty of my BC 
family. Live hard, work hard. That is senior yeaf.' 



n 



c 



1ER '06 










1 *W > 


m . 

m 









SENIORS 



Fly Like an Eagle 



Thinking back on senior year of high school, it is hard to imagine how one ended up so 
quickly in senior year of college. After deciding to attend Boston College, students are 
excided to begin a new part of their life away from home and on their own but at the 
same time they must adjust to the new world of college. In September 2002. students arrive on 
their first college campus having no idea what lies ahead. Moving into their first dorm room, 
meeting their roommate, learning the ropes of the campus are just a few of the things learned 
within the first week. Students must venture onto the campus and find the right class in the 
right room in the right building. They were forced to interact and make connections to find 
new friends. Students were met with new challenges and adventures like exploring Cleveland 
Circle, Comm. Ave. and even Boston. Life seemed a little easier after that initial year. Students 
had their friends and knew how to make use of their time. Some of students' fondest memories 
are football games. Whether afternoon or evening games, students love taileatine on Shea Field 
in their Superfan shirts and painted faces. The excitement and energy of the student section 
at the football games will always be remembered. This \ ear's class got to experience BC's first 
year in the ACC. For some, this served as one of the best things to happen to Boston College. 
Students have grown over the past four years in more ways than one. Whether going on sen ice 
trips or just volunteering, students were always sure to give back to the BC community While 
at BC. students have learned more about themselves and who they want to be. Graduation is just 
around the corner and students are slowly being introduced to the "real world!" However, before 
they go. they will recall their four years spent in Chestnut 
Hill. The friends, the places, and the experiences will always 
be a part of them. Boston College has helped students find 
themselves. The lessons they've teamed will now cans over 

into the next stage of their lives. So. as the next chapter of life 
is about to start, remember all that has been accomplished 
anil learned in these four years. Keep a piece of Boston Col- 
lege with you where ever you go and remember to always "H> 
Like an Eagle!' AdeJe Beekman, Photos submitted b) Saman- 
tha Fontcllio. M.insj /usee & Pauline Khamo 




SlwfeTN Lite 113 



You are bound to see a familiar face while 
walking through Lower Live, McElroy or 
the Eagle's Nest. The dining halls have 
good locations for gathering with friends, 
clubs, and study groups. Photo submitted 
by Brittany Macklin 





Right: The dining halls have a good atmosphere to 

socialize over a delicious meal with friends. 

Photo by Bob McGrath 

Above: Lower Live is a favorite among upperclassmen 
for the renowned steak and cheese subs and the blaz- 
ing bowls during lunch. Photo by Bob McGrath 



114 Student Lite 





. . 




Friends can mcel .it (he ne»l\ nutlt Chocolate 
Bar for mam of the delicious chocolate del i. 

■ir iu*.t to ha\e a comfortaNe p udy 

Photo h\ Boh McGrath 



Dining Halls 



A Place of Socializing and Food 



One thing students could not survive without at college is food. Here at Boston 
College, students are fortunate enough to have numerous places to dine depend- 
ing on what they are in the mood to eat. Whether it is CameCs (better known 
as McElrov). Eagle's Nest. Lower Live, Stuart. "The Rat" in Lvonv Hillside. \dde\ s 
or the Chocolate Bar. students are always able to find something to satisf) their crav- 
ings. Students also learn the best times to eat to avoid the stampede of hungry students 
coming out of class. Depending on the da\ of the week, people know which dining hall 
has a delicious special tor that particular day. Whether you want a steak and chc 
from Lower Live, turkey and brie from Hillside, the renowned "Late Night* 1 after a 
night of studs inc. or Tuscan chicken from Easzle's Nest. B( Dining definite!) knows 
how to make some good food. \ new addition this year was the Chocolate Bar in 
McElrov. Now offering Starbucks brewed coffee as well as delicious chocolate delica- 
cies including frozen hot chocolate and fondue, the Chocolate Bar has been warml\ 
welcomed to McElrov The new set up also creates a nice atmosphere for Studying 
or socializing. Lower Live has also made some great chances this year. With a new 
arrangement and more freedom tor students to choose the amount of mod wanted. 
I OWer Live has become a favorite place tor main. Students at BC are sure to Stay happ> 
with all the options offered on campus \n omelet at breakfast, blazing howl at lunch. 
chicken parm at dinner with molten cake from \dde\ s for dessert - this is on I) OfM 

the main delicious combinations BC students ^.\w choose for their day's meals I 
Beekman 



Life 



"Diversity at BCis about much more than different li^N, I 
races. It is really about stepping outside of our own 
comfort zones to explore the full capacity of what 
every student has to offer to the BC community We 
each have unique stories and that diversity helps 
to make our experience here incredibly special" 




116 Student Life 



Appreciating the Boston College Community 



The United States from the beginning has been a melting pot of people from all over the 
world, never really being able to claim a single race as being the sole representative of 
the whole nation. Boston College has been in the same mindset in that it stri\es to rec- 
ognize the diversity of the student body and promote the awareness and tolerance of cultures. 
Different events are hosted bv the university throimh the constant efforts of the running cultural 
clubs on campus. The acronym AHANA stands for individuals who are of African-American. 
Hispanic, Asian, or Native American descent. This term was proposed by two students in 1979 
in response to the name that was originally used to describe the Office o\' Minority Programs. 
They felt that the term 'minority' was degrading because of its literal meaning of "being less 
than! After receiving approval from the University's Board of Trustees, the Office of Minor- 
ity Student Programs was chanced to the Office of AHANA Student Programs (OASPi. largeh 
thanks to the efforts of Alfred Feliciano and Valerie Lewis. OASP today develops, implements, 
and coordinates a lot of the cultural events that occur during the year in order to support and 
enhance the academic performance of undergraduate AHANA students and increase aware 
ness of the AHANA community. Some events that are held include the AHANA Boat Cruis.. 
the AHANA Leadership Council Retreat, the Black Family Weekend, the Caribbean Culture 
Club Service Trip, the Hispanic Alumni Weekend. .lapanimation. Latino Night. OLA \ Vol- 
unteer Day and Salsa Nicht. These events are run bv the organizations such as the VHANA 
Leadership Council and many other cultural clubs. If one looks at BC toda> one can see men 
and women, of all races and religions, working together to 
help create a future that it better for all. not just for one spe 
cific elite group. The cooperation of all is what will make 
the nation a better place to live and much more united in all 
fronts, creating a wave of enthusiasm and determination that 
will be hard to beat. The interaction of different peoples will 
also help open the minds of main to the different options 
and opportunities there are available (Hit there if one is brave 
enough to take the chance and plunge into something wholh 
new and exciting. Julie Oft, PflOtOS h\ Boh McGrath 




Life 



Far Right: The weather at BC is unpre- 
dictable, yet students take advantage of 
the nice days to enjoy their meals out- 
side of Corcoran Commons. 
Photo by Bob McGrath 

Right: BC is renowned for its beautiful 

campus. The greenness of the landscape 

helps to maintain this reputation. 

Photo by Bob McGrath 





Above: Two students sit outside of 
O'Neill for some fresh air and to appre- 
ciate one of BC's sunny days. 
Photo by Bob McGrath 

Right: The cold weather doesn't stop stu- 
dents from bundling up and going out to 
have fun in the rain or snow. 
Photo by Myra Chai 



US Student Life 




"I enjo\ the weather at B> 
College when n<> so nice oui 
lhal >ou can Mill wear 
dab ami shori-\lee\e» c%en 
though it's No\ ember The 
«>nl\ downside !>• Ihc <.n<>-.», and 
the unbearable 

I iDll" 

'»8 

Photo h\ Rob \h- (iralh 



-ion in the winter is 
unnaturally unhealthil) cold. 
The onl> good thing is the 

h BC ne^er cl 
- Ro\ann I 
Photo by fui 



Weather 



Umbrellas, Snow Boots, and Sandals 









r » 




Boston weather is about as unpredictable as weather can get. One da) 
n's sunn) and hot, the next irt raining, the next snowing. Check- 
ins the forecast in the morning is rareh sufficienl because onb 

tew hours later, the weather is doing something unexpected. While students 
who come from different parts of the country mainl) warmer areas, tend to 
have more trouble adjusting, most enjo) having all fbui mis ind getting 

a chance to pla) in the snow. The weather this year has been extreme!) oui of 
the ordinar) Be inning the yeat off with hoi summer days, most thought we 
were m for a long winter with the first snow coming before Halloween! H 
ever, with about a week of warm days following the snow, no one was quite 
sure what to think Vfter Thanksgiving it was clear that a Boston winter was 
final!) on its wa) and the surprising summer days were over. The weather 
also made for some interesting football games \ little rain would never keep 
B< "s Supet tans from coming oui and supporting the Eagles. Whether it's sun- 
shine, ram. snow, even some thunder and lightning, Bostons weather certain!) 
spues up a college students life. Although el ire rare!) cancelled for 

ither related issues, students d<^ get to enjo) walking through nan tb** 

that have been dug out in a fool of snow or jumping through pud i their 

W8) to elass No matter what the weather, students are prepared for irrytri 
and are always reads to head out into whatever weather de< 
k\.w \dele Seek man 



%r* 



Holidays are times for food, especially baking 

Gingerbread houses are a winter favorite 

Photo by Myra Chai 




Above: Decorations always help to put everyone in the 
holiday spirit. Photo by Anita Isama. 

Right: BC students find time to get into the holiday 

spirit even during finals. 
Photo submitted by Adele Beekman. 



120 Student Life 





\ j roup of bin', in WaUh get into the Hal- 
loween -.pirn b\ dressing up a*, ihe Back- 
Streel Bo\s Photo submitted by Adam 
Vfartabedian 



Holidays 



Celebrations with Friends 



The smell of fresh 1) baked gingerbread wafting through the air. the delicate 
white beauty of the first snowfall, the cra/\ dressed Up (and perhaps drtll 
college students parading around the streets of Boston, and the flurn o\ shop- 
ping of men and woman alike all mark the wonderful beginning of the holula> season. 
Christmas. Thanksgiving, and Halloween are three of the mosl wonderful holid 
of all— one can get heaps and heaps o\ presents on one holida> and for another one 
can become a totally different character altogether and have the pleasure o\ getting 
on an immense sugar high from all the collected candy Thanksgiving allows famih 
and friends from all over a chance to sec each other again and allows for the massive 
overstuffing of one's bell) with the delicious turke> and all the side dishes and desserts 
that come along with it. These aren't the only holidays enjoyed b\ many— Marathon 
Monday and Valentine's Da\ are a few others that BC students celebrate However, 
the days o\~\~ give Stressed-OUl students a much needed break that are anticipated and 
looked forward to during the year. Columbus Da) weekend and Easter break are I 
major ones that allow students to unwind and catch up with famih and friends back 
at home or anywhere else. These small respites are relished until winter break rolls 
around, bringing a whole month devoid of grueling academics at Boston College to the 
poor overworked students. Julie Oh 



Below: Often students choose to study outside if 

the weather permits and if it's easier for them to 

concentrate before classes and exams. 

Photo by Bob McGrath 







■ft M 




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Exams 






Concluding the Semester 



That dreaded time of year always rolls around without fail much to the horror and dismay of 
many students everywhere, not just those who attend Boston College. Midterms and quizzes in 
between are just the beginning. Students can be seen lugging around overstuffed backpacks 
weighed down with enough books to equal their own weight. These poor students are usually unfortu- 
nate enough to be carrying it up and down the multiple long stairs scattered throughout the campus. 
Not only do students have back problems from carrying heavy books around, but some get neck and 
back pains from sitting in one place for hours on end, poring over endless pages of notes and chapters. 
Many get headaches from trying to learn and memorize all the info that should have been gone over 
before, compounded by the dehydration that occurs with massive caffeine intake. Coffee and drinks 
such as Red Bull get many students throughout this tough time — never has staying up late been such 
so much fun. The library is usually the prime spot for scholars to be at during midterm and finals 
weeks. Stress levels run high especially during the preparation for finals due to the huge amount of 
material covered and the fact that they are more heavily weighted than other exams. No matter what 
the situation, students usually manage to pull themselves together and get through this time with the 
help of fellow classmates and available tutors in the Connors Family Learning Center. Julie Oh 



122 Student Life 



Left: O'Neill Librar\ is .1 popular meeting place for students Jo stud> »UJ 
man) computers, chairs, desks, and prnale rooms for Mud) groups 

Photo by Bob \hGnith 

Belou: Some students find it easier to rela\ and gel ne b\ siitmc out- 

side in between classes 
Photo h\ Boh McGrath 





Imdia 



Right: The ALC Ball is an elegant and festive 

evening, becoming the event to attend. 

Photo submitted by Frank Gatto 

Below: Boston College students of all back- 
grounds attend the ALC Ball. Photo submitted 

by Nick Noel 




Above: The ALC Ball is a time for the BC com- 
munity to come together and enjoy a night that 

celebrates diversity. 
Photo submitted by Nick Noel 

Right: Students spend countless hours prepar- 
ing for the evening, showing off thai class that 
is ever so prevalent at Boston College. 
Photo submitted by Brandon Jackson 



124 Student Life 







The chance to dress up and dance the night awa> is rarely 
missed by students at Boston College, and the AI .(' Ball is 
no exception. Ever) year, this spectacular even! is hosted 
in the spring by the AHANA Leadership Council (ALC) to cel- 
ebrate the diversit) of the student bod) at Boston College. The 
Ball gives all students a chance to mingle and appreciate the dif- 
ferent styles of students from \anoiis cultures and rounds 
in a formal setting where everyone looks their best. Those 111 
enough to be able to obtain a ticket to go to this popular event are 
served catered food at a class\ hotel, usual 1) at the Cople) Hotel 
Plaza. This beautiful hotel is the perfect setting tor such an event 
with a spacious and elegant ballroom, used b) students to dance 
the night away. The good music complements the \ibrant atmo- 
sphere at the hotel, reflecting the high spirits and beaut) of all the 
students of different racial and cultural backgrounds who attend. 
The AHANA Ball is always looked forward to b> man) each year 
as they return again and again to celebrate the uniqueness { ^\ each 
individual on campus. Julie Oh 



ALC Ball 



A Night to Remember 









Far Right: Spring Break in March is 

an opportunity to travel and relax with 

friends at warm weather locations like 

Florida. Mexico, and the Caribbean. 

Photo by Marisa Fusco 

Right: Some choose to work over Winter 

Break, whereas others take the time to 

enjoy the month off from school to do 

activities they enjoy such as skiing. 

Photo by Marisa Fusco 





Above: After a long semester, students 

treasure Winter Break as a time to relax 

at home or even outside of the country. 

Photo submittal b\ Brittany Pickell 

Right: Winter Break is eagerly antici- 
pated by students lor the chance to go 
back home to spend quality time with 
family and friends. Photo submitted b\ 

Dalila Dc Pina 



126 Student Life 




ihc time Spring H 
arrives. I am definite!;- n 
f « »r it It h wonderful ii> be aWc 
10 forgel about papers, exam 
and inters ie- I md 

|iist lake time t<> rela\ with m\ 
friends 

Kane Kiefnei 
Photo b\ \ ' 



best memories of bt 
COmc from ids Appal.uhia 

trip Helping others real I) 
me a new outlook on life 
and made the rest of spring 
semester lesx stressful" 
- Evelyn Kelt;. 

Phoio submitted by Aaron 
Cheung 




s^ 






Spring break is possibl) the mosi anticipated time for a college student 
ever) year. After a nice long month break for Christina's, students are 
quick 1) thrown back into the homework, tests and papers mode s 

dents begin planning spring break \er\ early in the year to make sure the\ 
are well prepared for the tun. While spring break is an exciting time and a 
nice week awa) Mom school, main students also look forward to some time 

apart from the cold, winter weather. Spring break ser\ ;t lime to 

work on that tan in Jamaica. Florida, Puerto Rk" or Hawaii Spending the 
time abroad is anothci great option to get away Some choose to nist la> low 
and \iMt some Friends at other coll Either way the time awa) from the 

weather and work is highl) anticipated. Another exciting time is the month 
students have ott for winter break \tter first semester students canl wait to 
go home and see their tainih and friends. The\ are not bothered with home 
work or stud) ing and can jusl relax enjo) the time ott Students also have ihc 
option to stud) abroad over winter break BC offers this experience in main 
countries and students love spending the lime in a new atmosphe S lldents 
are always read) fol spring and winter break and lo\e having the time 

From the pressures of school. Whether home or abroad, students take full 
advantage o\ their time awa) from sehool \dele Bcckman 






"It is such a tremendous reflec- 
tion of the BC spirit to know 
that volunteerism is actually a 
competetive thing on campus. 
We are all anxious to serve and 
love doing it!" 
- Jim Conti '07 
Photo by Anita Isama 





"Every time I go to St. Fran- 
cis' Children's Hospital and see 
young cancer patients smil- 
ing and enjoying life, I am 
reminded just how precious 
our time on earth can be. It 
makes stressing about school- 
work seem trivial." 
- Tom Sweeney '07. 
Photo by Myra Chai 



"My service trip to Ghana 

opened my eyes to a whole 

new experience. Something as 

simply as helping young kids 

learn about computers can 

make a tremendous impact on 

their lives and I was glad to be 

a part of it." 

- Eskodar Dejene '06. 

Photo by Myra Chai 



Right: The PULSE Council help guide current PULSE students 

through the semester at their volunteer sites and in the course. 

Photo submitted by the PULSE Office 



I2K Student Life 




Far Let! Appalachia Volunteer^ »ent to Phcnn 
Alabama for a week, building four hou^c* from the 
foundation up to help tho*.c »ho were le»< fortunate 
Photo h\ \f\ rj Chat 



Left: Students contributed their time to a computer 
camp for children thi v pa^t summer for the Ghana Ser- 

\ice Immersion Trip 
Photo h\ \f. -.'. (hat 



Volunteerism 



Men and Women for Others 



At Boston College, volunteerism is a large part of the community. BC offers main different t>pcs of 
volunteering ranging from service trips over breaks to tutoring once a week. Main of the oppor- 
tunities for volunteering include sen ice and immersion trips. With over twent) o\ these programs 
offered here. Students ean choose from a \anei\ o\ opportunities for communit\-based learning experi- 
ences. The trips also allow students to reflect upon themselves while contributing to others Some of tb. 
programs include the popular Appal. ichia volunteers, Jamaica Mustard Seed Trip. Navajo Nation Sen 

Trip. Uganda Service Experience, and the Pedro Vrrupe International Solidarity Program Sophomore. 

Emily Harper, a participant ol Appalachia volunteers in the spring o\ 2004 recalls. "\|| m> wildest dreams 
came true in Opelika. Alabama. I met new people, the skies were so blue, and I learned how fun it is to 
help those who are less fortunate.* 1 BC also cues local opportunities to students to help gi\e back to the 
community. Whether through the PI I SI program or just on their own. man) students are sure to take 
part in some kind of volunteering while at BC Main students choose to tutor while others prefer helping 
out at a soup kitchen. The \anet\ of ways m which to volunteer is almost endless BC llso offers \olum 
opportunities on campus through the Campus School where volunteers can interact with students both in 
the classroom as well as out with opportunities like the Halloween Part\ hosted tor the Campus s 
Students each year With the opening of the Volunteer and I earning Centerjust three yean iter 

makes volunteering .1 much more accessible and important part of BO students' Ii\cs \ n 



Life 



Below: Students show off their BC pride with 

sweatshirts and hats that exemplify the renowned 

logo. BC students still look good dressed down. 

Photo by Bob McGnith 





Fashion Time 

Boston College Students Are Always In Style 



It is within people's nature to either try to blend in with the crowd or to stick out, proclaiming 
one's different sense of style — either method is used by individuals to express their personali- 
ties on many different levels. The usual collared shirts from brands such as Polo Ralph Lauren 
and Lacoste were seen frequently throughout the campus. The preppy look never fades away year 
after year at Boston College. The usual Ugg boots were seen with slightly different styles (laced up, 
trimmed with fur) this winter adding a slight flair to the usual warmth and comfort that is usually 
gained from it. Northface jackets and backpacks were also the standard gear that was donned by many 
students, men and women alike, as well as Boston College sweatshirts, hoodies, and other clothing 
displaying our school pride. No matter what the season, students are able to add accessories or other 
personal touches to their outfit to give their appearance a unique air (or just look like everyone else). 
From small pins to ribbons, the splash of color or sparkle always manages to give an edge, completing 
the outfit. This all depends on the unique taste of the individual however — it takes a good eye to put 
articles of clothing together that complement each other well. Julie Oh 



130 Student Life 



Left: In Boston, sweaters, hoodies, and jeans are a must to withstand ihe cold 
that the weather is known to hriny h> late fall and winter. 
Photo h\ Boh McGrath 

Below: To keep warm in the fall, mans students la\er their clothing, hut in 
a fashionable wa\ that represents individual^ own si\|cs BC h known to he 
preppy, but the reaht> is that students ha\e a variet) of attires thai reflect their 
different personalities and prelereiu 
Photo h\ Boh Mcdr.ith 




left I arge t«Me< and puw* for Mt »« 

»ell 1 Na/er* »ilh cut 



Right: Theater students spend time together 

beyond the classroom and the stage, forming a 

rather tight-knit community. 

Photo by Lee Pellegrini. 

Below: Dreaming Shakespeare took characters 
and speeches in plays by Shakespeare to formu- 
late an unique piece. 
Photo by Lee Pellegrini 





1 \\ '11' 3fc"B 


•: »K * Li f :'JA: 




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132 Student Life 




Above: The Theater Department offers many 

classes and producess six shows annually. 

Photo by Lee Pellegrini. 

Right: The musical pieces and songs in the 

Candide Edit were very entertaining, which 

showed the many talents of the actors. 

Photo by Lee Pellegrini 




The Boston College Theater Department has come a long wa\ 
since it's opening in 1865. The Theater major was established in 
the 197()'s as part of the Department of Speech, Communications 
and Theatre. The Rohsham Theater Arts (enter opened only twenty-five 
years ago. in 1981. Since then, the program has grown into an indepen- 
dent major intended to develop its students intellectually, artistically 
and personally The department produces six productions r, four 

of which are faculty directed and two which are student directed. The 
types of productions each year include musicals, classics as well as an 
original student's work. With shows this year including "The Collec- 
tion." a raw and menacing psychological drama. "Bat Bov" a classic I 
story told as a musical comed>. "Marisoir an apocalyptic urban fant; 
"Copenhagen?' an incisive drama and past winner of three Ton) Awards 
including best Play, and "Cabaret." the theater program definitely had 
a good selection this year. Sophomore. Megan Green, reflects on her 
time spent SO far as a theater major: "I hue theater people. The> are 
ridiculous and even more hilarious than the average Boston College stu- 
dent. Most students here have no idea what great work is going on in 
Robsham. I think everyone at BC should be more in touch with their 
artistic side, we theater kids sure are." The theater program at BC will 
continue to grow and allow students to identif) in new ways with others 
and themselves. Adele Beekman 



Theater Time 



The Performing Arts at Boston College 



SMPdenrUV 



"I've been working on campus 

since sophomore year. It's not 

that bad as long as you like 

who you work with. You see 

your friends all the time, who 

tend to visit just because you 

are working. On campus jobs 

are also good references." 

- Sahadia Berthaud '06 

Photo by Bob McGrath 



"I enjoy working off campus 

because it gives me a sense 

of independence, a source of 

income, and an insight into 

what to expect after my time 

here at Boston College." 

- Tania Freitas '08 

Photo by Bob McGrath 





"I like working on campus. It's 
convenient and has a comfort- 
able student atmosphere. An on 
campus job is more considerate 
as far as your classes go, and 
some managers are students so 
you don't feel the distance that 
you normally would feel at an 
off campus job." 
- Leonardo Maya '08 
Photo by Bob McGrath 



Above: Most parking spaces on campus are reserved for professors and 
so passes are hard to acquire. However, the T system enables students 
to go into Boston to work off campus and to travel easier without a car. 

Photo by Bob McGrath 

Right: Students also use the Comm. Ave. and Newton shuttle buses 
to get around the area, which is a reliable system of transportation. 

Photo by Bob McGrath 



134 Student Life 



I 




Rtf Lett Ofl Camp 

Mrcel from BC men .»■> ^ hue Mountain of ( jmpu* 

Convenience Pti th 

Left Some students work on campus at the di 
halU tor lo rruke a Manx of income 

Photo h I hcutif 



On & Off Campus Jobs 



Source of Money for Students 



While .11 M( '. man) students choose to gel .1 job. Whether h is to help p.i> for school or just to earn 
.1 few more bucks, students create time in their schedules to have .1 job. Students must be well 
organized to give up studying time to work, bul most feel thai it's well worth it BC otters man) 
opportunities for students to work on campus. Whether life guarding al the ple\. making 1 turkc\ ami 
brie at Hillside, helping students Find their books in the book store, or working for BC catering, BC ofl 
.1 variet) ot jobs to help students earn some money. Working on campus is not onl) .t great wa) lo m 
money, bul it also allow s students more chances to meet and interact w ith other students .mil faculty \1an> 
students prefer an off campus job as opposed to an on campus one With numerous restaurants m the ai 

Students ma) pursue .1 job .is .1 waiter, host, or bartender. Those who want to work in retail tv >k tor a 

job in Newton Centei Some even go so far as Newbur) N itontowork. No matter where students 

choose to work, the) are sure to pul in a lot ot hard work and take valuable working experience in addition 
to feelings of jo) on pa) ila> awa) with them \dek Beeknum 






Far Right: Boston is beautiful during the 

day with all the historical sites and the 

people, giving the city its own culture. 

Photo by Bob McGrath. 

Right: You can never be bored in Boston 

w ith a plethora of museums, restaurants, 

bars, clubs, and places to shop. 

Photo by Bob McGrath. 





Above: As the sun sets, many Boston streets are ilium 
nated by these unique lampposts. Photo by Myra Chai. 

Right: Fenway Park is infamous in Boston culture, espe- 
cially being the home to diehard Red Sox fans. Photo by 

Myra Chai. 



4- 

'■ 



136 Student Life 






V*~ K&\ 




\oi until I came to BC did I 
fulh appreciate the greatness 
of the cit\ of Boston. From 
sports to tood to culture 10 
scenery, it doesn't get much 
better. I'm so proud to he from 
Boston, and I wish everyone 
got a chance to live here at one 
point in their lives!'' 

- Bryan Connor OS 
Photo by Bob McCratb 

"Going to school at Boston 
College has given me the best 
of both worlds. I'm able toenjoy 
the small town atmosphere of 
Chestnut Hill while being just 
minutes away from one of the 
best cities m the country" 

- Becca Madson TJ6 
Photo b\ BobMcGrath 



Boston 



We Love That Dirty Water 




One of the many things that is so appealing about Boston College is its 
convenient location right outside the popular cit) of Boston. With its 
easy access on the green line, students are sure to take full advan- 
tage of everything that the city has to offer. Whether students want to enjo) 
a day of sports, museums, shopping, or food. Boston is definiteh the pi 
to indulge. Finding something to (\o is never hard and always fun. Main sm- 
dents, especially those who come from further distances, enjo) taking a duck 
tour around Boston. Quacking at people on the street, being quacked at. and 
beim: able to actualh drive the duck boat in the Charles are onh some of the 
perks o\~ the tour. If students want to enjo) a cultural day the) ma> check out 
the Boston Museum o\ Fine \rt. the symphony the Aquarium or even a play 
Should students want to enjo) a sporting event, Fenwa) Park is on I) a few T 
stops awa\ where the) can see the World Champion Boston R S el like 

a shopping spree 1 (heck out Newburx Street, the Prudential Mall. Copley, 
Park Street or laneuil Hall. Looking tor some great food Of a restaurant tor 
that first date 1 Head up to Boston's North End for some delicious tood but 
don't forget to stop at Mike's Pastries tor the best dessert around I 1 can't 

be beat with fun and exciting things to ^\i\ \</c kmnn 



« sas» ■« 



v RfeMl •• •- 



"Spirituality is a way of life that transforms 
to a genuine feeling. Only through spiritu- 
ality will God reveal His mysteries. Many 
people claim to be spiritual, but through their 
actions, they show that they lack the truth; 
that's something one must seek God fof.' 




S Y tfaTUALj7> 

^^ Attending a Jesuit Institution 



Boston College, being a Jesuit University, is focused on fine academics as well as a con- 
nection to the Catholic faith. Spirituality is a large part of lite at BC and this is shown 
in numerous aspects of the school. The university is fortunate to have about forty-five 
Jesuits teaching courses in addition to thirteen with administrative positions. The Jesuit Com- 
munity at BC is dedicated to "integrating intellectual, personal, ethical, and religious forma- 
tion and to uniting high academic achievement with service to others!' BC upholds these goals 
through various ways. First, as part of the core requirement, ever) student must take two semes- 
ters of theology. This allows for students to fully relate to and understand their Christian beliefs. 
In addition, community service is \er\ popular among students. Main students gel involved in 
the community through programs such as PULSE, but others choose and want to take time out 
of their lives to volunteer. BC strongly encourages the effort put forth by students to get involved 
in community service. BC also upholds the Jesuit tradition by holding various masses through- 
out the day in different locations around campus. This makes it more convenient for students 
to worship be it on Newton. Upper or Lower campus in the morning or even at night. Finally 
BC offers a number of service trips and retreats to students throughout the year. With Campus 
Ministry offering retreats such as Kairos and the freshman retreat, it is eas) for students to find 
time to reflect on themselves ami their beliefs. In addition, the universit) offers sen ice trips like 
Appalachia and Arrupe International Immersion Trips to those students who wish to take their 
volunteering outside of the Boston area. These trips also allow students to reflect on the wa> 
they're living their lives while simultaneously helping those 
less fortunate. Sophomore. Katie Schermerhorn. reflects. "I 
like how BC allows students to define their own spirituality 
Whether you regularly attend mass, join a service trip, or 
enter into a theological conversation, spiritual it) is present 
on campus" Spirituality is seen in main ways throughout 
BC. The new statue of St. Ignatius put in this fall is onl\ one 
wa> that BC shows that spirituality is alive. The Jesuit beliefs 
are present now and will continue to be a large part o\ the 
tradition here for years to come. Wc/c Beeknuui, Photos b) 
BobMcGrath 




i*» 



Q^GANIZATlOAfr 

Edited by: 

Marisa Fusco 

Sarah Alsamarai, Jessica Lee & Madeleine Rodriguez 



Want to learn about a different culture or find other Boston College students that 
share your religious beliefs? Want to publish a literary magazine or practice 
an instrument with likeminded classmates? Want to volunteer over Spring or 
Winter Break or spend time each week helping the city of Boston? No matter what your call- 
ing, Boston College helped provide students with diversity experiences as well as chances to 
learn more about each other through its plethora of organizations. With over two hundred 
registered clubs and student organizations, Boston College has so much to offer to fit every- 
one's tastes and opportunities certainly were not limited to the classroom or the athletic 
fields. Many of the lifelong memories that students will have of their time at Boston Col- 
lege will be of experiences outside the classroom. Students are encouraged to reach beyond 
their grasp and develop to their full potential. Following the "community standards" inher- 
ent to Boston College's Catholic, Jesuit background, students participate in activities and 
learn to become "men and women for others." Members of student organizations are often 
faced with the difficult task of balancing their many commitments. Here at Boston College, 
the answer to the problem seems to be only to aid more things to do. One would be hard 
pressed to find a member of the Boston College community that wasn't active in some way. 
Developing our own places in this vast, rich community has allowed each of us to not only 
receive something different from our BC experience but also to leave something important 
behind for those that follow. Whether it be through community service, musical groups, 
spiritual activities or something entirely different, students on the Heights dedicate them- 
selves thoroughly to each new endeavor they undertake. 
It is often said that the world needs leaders for tomorrow. 
Through the organizations they are a part of, the students 
who follow on these pages have developed the skills and 
qualities that will allow them to provide this leadership. 
After making a mark on the Heights, these students are 
excited to make an even deeper impression on the world. 
Marisa Fusco 




140 Organizations 




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UCBC 

Undergraduate Government of BC 



The Undergraduate Government of Boston College (UGBC) 
has the duty to take an active role in the governance of our 
university. The UGBC is committed to protecting the interests 
and opinions of the student body at large, as well as to serve as the 
collaborative voice for the students. Each member of UGBC belongs 
to one of a variety of departments or groups within the government. 
These departments and groups include Student Life, University Issues, 
Programming, Communications, Finance, Social and Cultural Issues, 
Mentoring Leadership Program, AHANA Leadership Academy, the 
Executive, Senate, and the AHANA Leadership Council. UGBC takes 
on the mission to be wholeheartedly committed to helping Boston 
College continue to build and strengthen a community that is morally 
grounded in the principles of justice, love, and service, and more-over 
guided by an overarching concern for the enrichment of student life. 
An important aspect of the UGBC is the programs and events it puts 
together for students. The Undergraduate Government is dedicated 
to serving the students of Boston College and continuing to improve 
the everyday life of each and every person on campus. 



AHANA 

Leadership Council 



The AHANA Leadership Council (ALC) was created in the 
Spring of 1995 with the mission of providing leadership and 
service to the AHANA community. In addition, the AHANA 
Leadership Council has sought to be a means of support to all 
AHANA clubs and organizations in a collective effort to uplift the 
community politically, academically, and socially. As part of the 
Undergraduate Government of Boston College (UGBC), the AHANA 
Leadership Council works to insure that the interests and needs of 
AHANA students are voiced and heard. The AHANA Leadership 
Council is truly establishing its presence at Boston College. 
Through increased communication and stronger relationships with 
the Undergraduate Government of Boston College and the greater 
Boston College community, legitimacy is established. With increased 
forums, rallies, and discussions, education is established. Through 
service and leadership, compassion is established. Together with 
other multicultural clubs, the AHANA Leadership Council organizes 
and hosts such events as the AHANA Boat Cruise and the AHANA 
Ball. The AHANA Leadership Academy is a party of ALC, providing 
training, resources, and advice to emerging AHANA freshman 
leaders. 







142 Organizations 



EMERGING 

Leaders Program 



The Emerging Leaders Programs (ELP) is a one year leadership 
development program tor a select group of fift) freshman 
students. The program is run out of the Office of the Dean 
for Student Development and is designed to help first-year students 
adjust to college life and develop enhanced interpersonal skills. ELP 
meets weekly to discuss leadership and service issues and concerns. 
Topics include intercultural awareness and diversity group dynamics, 
leadership development, decision making, and social justice and 
volunteerism. The Emerging Leaders Program is designed to instill 
an attitude of social awareness and responsibility ELP hopes that the 
students who complete the program will be prepared to assume roles 
of thoughtful responsibility in the Boston College community and 
throuuhout their lives. 





MENTORING 

Leadership Program 



The Mentoring Leadership Program is a leadership program 
involving over fift) freshman, created to continue the pro, 
fostering leadership skills This is achieved through leadership 
workshops, a retreat, a series of community service activities and rr 
importantly B pairing o\ the members with I cabinet member of < 
The goal of the program is to give B better insight into the student 
govern menl Of BC and prepare members | ime leadership roles in 

I GBC and other aspects of campus. 



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APPALACHIA 



Volunteers 



The Appalachia Volunteer Program is committed to working 
with the poverty-stricken populous of the US. The program's 
mission is to learn about the structural and societal realities 
of the US that leave some people impoverished, to discuss the 
injustices that create entrenched poverty, to consider a theological: 
and faith perspective on social justice, and to participate in local 
service opportunities. Over spring break, the program sends over' 
five hundred BC students to travel to various sites throughout the 
Appalachia region of the country. The organization's main objective; 
is to assist in the daily lives of those less fortunate than mosU 
Appalachia Volunteers seek to build a better future by entering into 
solidarity with the impoverished of Boston and beyond. 



4BOSTON 



4 Boston is a volunteer organization that utilizes undergraduate 
students who are willing to serve in Boston's homeless shelters, 
soup kitchens, inner-city schools, youth centers, hospitals and 
livein facilities. 4Boston volunteers do service in and around the city 
of Boston for four hours each and every week during the academic year. 
The aim of 4Boston is to provide students with a significant extended 
urban service experience, and to provide the agencies of Boston with 
reliable and consistent assistance from the BC community. 




144 Organizations 



SHAW 

Leadership Program 



Shaw House is the home of the twenty members of the Shaw 
Leadership Program. They spend the first year in weekly 
leadership sessions, and the) use what they have learned to 
create and complete their own leadership projects. With the goals 
of completing community service and pervading the Shaw spirit 
throughout Boston College, these twenty students, along with the 
sophomore, junior and senior members of the Shaw Leadership 
Program, embark on a year filled with memorable events. The road 
to leadership is filled with service to others, Shaw members learned. 
and they are better equipped to walk down that path with the skills 
they have learned and the friendships they have made in the house. 





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STUDENT 

Admissions Program 

he Student Admissions Program (SAP) is the largest volunteer 
organization on campus .u Boston College In an\ given >ear 
there are between 700 and 900 volunteer members in the 
program. Working di recti) w ith the Office of Undergraduate tdmission, 
SAP offers current Boston College students the chance to assist in the 
recruitment o\ prospective students. From serving as tour guides (who 
lead families around campus and answer their questions) and panelists 
to Dav Visit hosts and greets. Student Admissions Program voluntc 
often act as the first ambassadors for \isitors to Boston < The 

first moment a prospective student enters the admissions he 

Or she is greeted b> not onl) a wealth of on hand admins 
but current students as well who are onlv willing to help out with am 
questions or concerns Within the SAP there are nine programs The 
SAP Coordinators Council is made up of II students wtl h run a 

ram in SAP T he student Admissions Program culminate* 
year with the I I N thai is April - up to KX tors through the 

each and ever) d<\\ Volunteers enjo) what the) ^\o as the) eet to m 
main different people from all over the world Ever) year, it is through 
the help o\ the SAP \olunteers that accepted high school seniors are aWe 
to \ isit the campus and meet fellow accepted students, whi having 

the chance to talk with current students 



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GOLDEN KEY 

National Honor Society 

The Boston College chapter of the Golden Key National Honor Society strives to 
maintain an active presence outside the classroom through its leadership, service, 
and academic activities while recognizing outstanding and meritorious achievement 
of students inside the classroom. Each year, over two hundred of the top students at Boston 
College are honored with membership of the Society. However, student participation does 
not end after induction. Members are encouraged to participate in many of the activities 
that the Society plans and coordinates. 



OMICRON 

Delta Epsilon 



O micron Delta Epsilon is the International Honor Society in economics and one of 
the worlds largest academic honor societies. Founded in 1915, its goal is to honor 
students who have both excelled scholastically in economics and have an impres- 
sive overall academic record. The Boston College chapter of Omicron Delta Epsilon pro- 
vides career advising and peer advising to its members. The society also helps to facilitate 
career and academic discussions between members, professors, and alumni. 



ORDER 

Of the Cross and Crown 



Founded in 1937. the Order of the Cross and Crown is the oldest 
and most prestigious honor society in the College of Arts 
and Sciences. It recognizes senior men and women who both 
demonstrate academic excellence by maintaining an overall cumulative 
grade point average of at least A- and establish records of unusual service 
and leadership on the campus over their undergraduate careers. The 
selection committee, made up of the deans and faculty of the College 
of Arts and Sciences, also selects particularly distinguished seniors as 
Marshals and Chief Marshal of the Order. 





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146 Organizatii >n 



LSOE 

Senate 



The Lynch School of Education Senate is an undergraduate student senate that ser 
as an intermediary between the administration and the students in the L\ nch School 
of Education. It consists ot about twenty-five active members of all \ears and four 
student officers who work together to organize acti\ ities, to promote spirit, and to aid the 
student body. The Senate has organized Spirit of Ed Week. Cuisine and Conversations, a 
political discussion prior to the election, and sent items to support the troops in Iraq. 



PEER EDUCATION 

Network 

The Peer Education Network (PEN) of Boston College is a select group o\ trained 
students committed to the betterment of lives through knowledge and empowerment. 
Members are peer educators striving to achieve this goal through means of an 
active network of passionate individuals who work individual 1) and as a team to positive!) 
impact the campus community, providing the resources and means to establish foundations 
for leading healtln lifestyles. The goal of the Peer Education Network is 10 incre 
knowledge and understanding of such complex issues as alcohol and other drugs, sexual 
assault. HIV/AIDS awareness, eating disorders and bod\ image, and their impact on the 
BC community. 



CSOM 

Honors Program 



The Carroll School o\ Management Honors Program is a group ot students who are 
being educated to lead the business Am] communities of tomorrow The program 
demonstrates thai setting high expectations, giving students responsibility .nid 
encouraging cooperation among peers leads to levels o\ ichievemeni and understanding 

that are rewarding on main levels. This group o\ talented and highh motivated students 
pursue excellence inside and outside the classroom Scholarship, community service, and 

leadership, the precepts ot the Program, create an environment that is charged for growth. 

learning and enriched cxpcriciu Students receive an in-depth education coupled with 

a liberal arts eorc curriculum that is required of all Boston College students All students 
then choose one or more concentrations ill a specific management discipline 



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BCSA 

BC Student Agencies 



Boston College Student Agencies (BCSA) is sponsored by the Office of the Dean 
for Student Development. Founded in 1983, BCSA is a student-run organization, 
providing a unique opportunity for BC students to gain real world business 
experiences through on campus part-time employment. BCSA is currently composed of 
five agencies and four functional departments in order to fulfill the needs and interests 
of everyone ranging from faculty to students to parents. The vision of BCSA is to provide 
a professional setting embodying the entrepreneurial spirit, where BC students can find 
meaningful employment, gain managerial experience, and offer practical and useful 
services to fellow students, parents, faculty, and staff. 



LCBC 

Lesbian, Cay, Bisexual Community 

The Lesbian, Gay, and Bisexual Community at Boston College (LGBC) is a student 
organization, established in 1974. The organization exists to promote those basic 
rights to friendship, respect, and justice among students, faculty and staff of the 
Boston College community by encouraging an environment of understanding for all 
members of this community. The aim of LGBC within the BC community is to provide an 
environment where members of the University can address the range of issues which arise 
around minority sexual orientations in modern society. 



UNICEF 

Boston College Chapter 

The Boston College chapter of UNICEF seeks to continue the tradition upheld by the 
national organization in its quest to raise support for the programs implemented and 
proposed by the United Nations Children's Fund, among others. It also increases 
public awareness of the challenges facing the world's children. The chapter at BC raises 
money to add to that raised by at least hundreds of other schools and universities around 
the country as well as volunteering in campaigns to change policies that will greatly 
benefit the less fortunate. 



148 Organizations 



STUDENT JUDICIAL 

Board 

The members of the Boston College Student Judicial Board are representatives of the 
student body in its entirety It is their responsibility to nol onl) conduct hearin 
but also educate the entire Student bod) about their rights. Their role on campus is 
to offer students the opportunity to be heard in a lair and impartial em ironment b) a board 
of peers. After hearing the eases, the Student Judicial Board determines responsibilit) and 
issues sanctions to be reviewed b\ the Dean tor Student Development. In addition to strict!) 
hearing cases, the Student Judicial Board seeks to establish and maintain respect tor truth, 
self, and others, in both the local and surrounding community. In each other and lh( 
they adjudicate, their objective is to further educate students ol both their rights and their 
responsibilities as members of the Boston College community The) stn\e to maintain and 
uphold community standards, and in keeping with the Jesuit tradition, the) also encoui 
sound moral judgment. 



STUDENT ORGANIZATION 

Funding Committee 

The Student Organization Funding Committee (St H ■( !)is charged « ith funding student 
organizations u ho meet the eligibilit) requirements set forth in the S( )( ( constitution 
Approximate!) 130 organizations at Boston College presentl) exist that can receive 
funding. The mone\ allocated b\ SOIC comes from 479£ ol the Student Activities I. 
which is collected b) the Universit) along with tuition. The Student Organization Funding 
Committee is a separate and distinct organization from the Undergraduate Government o\ 
Boston College and operated under its own constitution and b\laws. The goal oi the group 
is to assist student groups in putting on enriching events for the Boston Coll mmumt\ 

without the group having to be overl) concerned with the funding ol the event. 



NAACP 

Boston College Chapter 



The Boston College chapter o\ the National Association tor the Advancement of Col- 
ored People began in l v) ~ v) as a student led vehicle for advocating the civil right 
\tncan- American people. The mission y->\ the Boston College chapter is to uplift the 
minorit) community o\ all people as well .is support the goals and ideals o\ the natki 
bod) ol the \ \ VCR 1 he\ have pledged to uphold the innate civil rights thai all people . 

and to abhor, abstain from and flight against injustice of .m> Kind op 
campus or in the community Membership is open to all members of the undergraduate and 
graduate population o\ Boston College \ \ v T- lat mts include the PI f P 

i \ cafe", speaker series, and .\n award celebration for a dedicated facult) or staff mem 

o\ the \H \\ \ community 



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CHINESE 

Students Associaiton 



The Chinese Students Association of Boston College is geared 
towards the development of a community environment and the 
advancement of cultural awareness. The CSAs goal is to not only 
reach out to Chinese and Asians in general, but the greater BC and 
Boston community as well. Through educational and social events such 
as Dim Sum Outings, a New Year's Banquet, and culture shows, the CSA 
invites students from all backgrounds to enter the family atmosphere 
and engage in Chinese culture. 



Photos submitted by CSA and by Myra Chai v. 





HELLENIC 

Society 



The goal of the Hellenic Society is to promote Hellenism and 
Greek culture to members of the community who may share an 
interest in Greek food, music, dancing, and history. Through 
such activities as Greek Night at McElroy, the Hellenic Society aims to 
enrich the dining and cultural experiences of Boston College students. 
We hope that our efforts create more of an awareness of Greek life within 
the BC community and the greater Boston area. 



Photos submitted by Hellenic Society 



BRAZILIAN 



Club 



The Brazilian Club of Boston College is commited to sharing 
Brazil and its culture with the Boston College campus, as well 
as reaching out to the Brazilian Intercollegiate network and 
surrounding Brazilian communities. The club holds events to exhibit the 
lively traditions of Brazilian food, folklore, music, and dance, in addition 
to raising awareness of historical, political, and social issues concerning 
Brazil and its global position. Working with the ever growing Brazilian 
population, specifically at local schools, the club wishes to ease the 
hardships that Brazilians and Brazilian- Americans face in this country 
and celebrate their triumphant accomplishments. Anyone with a love for 
or interest in Brazil is welcome. 



150 Organizations 



Photos submitted by Brazilian Club 





VIETNAMESE 

Students Association 



The Vietnamese Students Association is commited to educating 
members about the Vietnamese culture by providing cultural and 
traditional enrichment through our events and also developing 
a deeper sense of pride, identity, and leadership. The clubs goals are 
to inform our members and peers about the historical and cultural 
aspects of Vietnam through art. music, and cuisine. The association 
further wants to strengthen the VSA internal lv by fostering a stronger 
sense of unity through better communication with the members and 
their families. They hope to strenghten their presence on campus by 
showing their support for other AHANA cultural clubs and participating 
in community service projects outside of Boston College. 



Photos submitted b\ Annie Le 



HAWAI' 

Club 



The Hawaii Club was established in 1991, making this its fifteen 
year anniversary. It was established to promote and celebrate the 
Hawaiian culture and people with the Boston College community, 
while providing support to cultureshocked students from the Islands of 
Hawai'i. The club is a small organization with some events to spread the 
aloha of Hawai'i such as lei making classes and hula lessons. However, 
food is the main aspect of Hawaiian culture, and the events usually 
include plenty of it. This Hawai'i Club is defined by luau, which through 
lokani (unity), Aloha (love), and kokua (help) is the club's favorite event 
of the year. 




INDONESIAN 

Culture Club 



The Indonesian Culture Club began as an organization that would allow Boston College students to gather weekh for 
the purpose of exchanging ideas and thoughts about the growing concern on Indonesia's economy politics, and social 
life. Furthermore, the members of this cultural club sought to promote their diverse cultures b> organizing events and 
activities that would welcome anyone interested to join in celebrating their heritage. The more notable activities that this 
organization is responsible for planning and hosting are the Indonesian Night and the Christian Celebration at St. Ignatius. 
The Indonesian Night takes place once a year and unites all the other Indonesian clubs from other schools in Boston and the 
surroundiim areas. 



Organisation^ 151 



INVESTMENT 

Club 



The Investment Club was founded in 1983, focusing primarily on value based investments. Through a real life portfolio, 
the Investment Club manages a certain amount of Boston College's endowment. Members hope to expand students' 
knowledge of finance. Presently, there are approximately 200 members who meet weekly. The primary purpose of 
these meetings is to propose stock pitches which involve either selling stock currently in the portfolio or purchasing new 
stock. The club also holds tutorials which help teach new members various aspects of the stock market. Speakers with a 
background in finance also come to meetings to expand upon topics and share their experiences. Professor Peterson has been 
the advisor of the club since its inception. 



LADIES IN 

Business 



The purpose of Ladies in Business is to develop a positive perspective and understanding of the dual roles of today's 
businesswomen. Students at Boston College need more exposure and knowledge of the intricacies involved in balancing 
a business career and family. Positive female role models, who have succeeded in blending the role of mother and 
executive, are essential. Such women would provide students with helpful information as they continue their studies and 
eventually enter the workforce. Ladies in Business will provide a female perspective of the business world through events and 
programs. 



CSOM GOVERNMENT 



The purpose of the Carroll School of Management Government (CSOM) is to serve as a promoter of better relationships 
between students, faculty, members, and corporate America. Serving over 2,000 students, the organization's goal is to 
sponsor various activities that are designed to assist students in pursuing their studies and future career paths. CSOM 
hosted various prominent keynote speakers, panelists, student-faculty integration events, published newsletters, and bridged 
communications between CSOM clubs and organizations throughout the year. Furthermore, CSOM Government has been 
involved with the CSOM Dean search process, the Ethics core initiative, University Strategic Planning process, and matters 
concerning profssor promotion and tenure. 



152 Organizations 



ECONOMICS 

Association 



The purpose of the Economics Association is to promote a better understanding of economics, and to further the 
economics-related knowledge and opportunities available to interested students. These initiatives are achieved through 
the encouragement and facilitation of interactions between students and faculty through regular meetings and a number 
of social and informational events. The Association strives to provide helpful information for students concerning economics- 
related internships, post-undergraduate study options, and careers. The group has general meetings as well as events catered 
to various speakers discussing different economics-related topics. These topics are chosen by a vote of all active members to 
ensure that the Economics Association is providing members with information that they are interested in. Being able to provide 
information is one of the most satisfying of the Association's accomplishments. 



FINANCE 

Academy 



The Boston College Finance Academy is a student-run organization whose intent is to inform students of all the opportunities 
available to them in the world of finance. A main objective of the academy is to bring together the academic and business 
worlds through meetings, panels, and career nights. Events are planned to benefit members in matters such as general 
information on current topics in finance, career planning, and possible job placement. The Finance Academy offers services 
such as career and academic peer advisement. 



FULTON DEBATE 

Society 

The Fulton Debate Society is a nationally-competitive intercollegiate debate team u nh a strong tradition at Boston College. 
Members of the Fulton Debate Society compete in two-person teams in policy debate against students from other 
colleges and universities across the country. Boston College competes in the \o\ ice. Junior Varsity and Yarsit) di\ lsions 
of debate. Novice debaters are those who have no previous experience in polic) debate in high school or college (although 
debaters with only Lincoln-Douglas and/or forensics experience are eligible to compete in novice debate). The Junior Varsity 
division is open to all students with less than two years of experience in college policy debate. Varsit) debaters general!) ha\e 
extensive high school debate experience and/or two to three years of college debate. Boston College students debate the topic 
selected by the national Cross Examination Debate Association (CEDA^ and National Debate Tournament <NDT). The topic is 
the same for all tournaments in the academic year. Each team will debate both the affirmative and negative sides of the topic 
several times at each tournament. 



Orcani/atiom 153 



DANCE 

Ensemble 



The Boston College Dance Esemble consists of 35 students joined 
together by a passion for dance. Most have received intense 
dance training for years and welcome the opportunity to continue 
developing their love for their art. Members of this completely student- 
run organization train together all year, taking classes in ballet and jazz 
taught by professional dancers and instructors in the Boston area. They 
spend countless hours choreographing and rehearsing for performances 
at the end of each semester. These performances consist of about 20 
dances ranging in style from ballet, hip-hop, jazz, flamenco, tap, and 
musical theater. All proceeds from the performances directly benefit 
the Boston College Campus School's music therapy resources. 



Photos submitted by Dance Ensemble 





BC bOp! 



BC bOp! is a 28-piece jazz ensemble dedicated to the highest 
levels of instrumental and vocal jazz performance. The 
standard for musicianship is high, the repertoire is challenging, 
and the work ethic is rigorous. The group is now over fifteen years 
old, and has frequently performed in both national and international 
arenas. The group's performances have included Carnegie Hall in 
New York City, the Walt Disney World Resort in Orlando, Florida, and 
the Jamaica Grande resort in Ocho Rios, Jamaica. BC bOp! provides 
Boston College students with numerous performances on campus, 
including their concerts at the Breaking the Barriers Ball, and the 
AIDS Benefit Ball. 



Photos submitted by Priscilla Chen 



CONCERT BAND 



The Boston Col lege Concert Band boasts a diverse membership, with a portion of the band comprised of BC alumni, staff, 
and graduate students, mixing among undergraduate students. This diversity contributes to an atmosphere of growth 
as developing musicians mix with experienced players. The Concert Band performs a wide variety of both traditional 
and contemporary literature for wind band. The mission of the Boston College Concert Band is to provide students, faculty, 
staff, and community members who share a passion for making music an opportunity to perform wind and percussion music 
of outstanding composers in an educational setting. In the past, the Concert Band has performed a dynamic and varied concert 
schedule including holiday concerts, Pops dinner concerts, and seasonal concerts. The group has also performed a series of 
exchange concerts with other Jesuit universities, including Georgetown University, John Carroll University in Cleveland, Ohio, 
and Tufts University. The Concert Band continues to seek new and different opportunities that will enhance the experiences 
of its members. 



154 Organizations 



PEP BAND 



The Boston College Pep Band is an acoustic musical ensemble composed of wind instruments, drum set. and auxiliary 
percussion. Under the direction of one professional director and student conductors/coordinators, the Boston College 
Pep Band is one of the most highly visible of the Boston College Band Program Ensembles. With a membership of 
approximately fifty to sixty students per year, the band is split into Maroon and Gold ensembles to provide a well-balanced 
bond at all athletic events. The Pep Band supports the Men's Hockey Team and both Women and Men's Basketball Teams, 
creating an ample opportunity for the BC Pep Band member to support Boston College Athletics, travel to fun and exciting 
athletic events, as well as to get air-time on regional and national sports broadcasts. 



SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA 



The Boston College Symphony Orchestra (BCSO) is comprised of approximately fifty undergraduate and graduate students 
dedicated to playing music of the symphonic repertoire. This group of musicians graces the campus with four concerts 
each year, including the annual Christmas Concert with the Boston College Chorale. Led by the esteemed John Finney, 
the BCSO has nearly doubled in size in the last six years, and has become one of the most talked about, up and coming artistic 
ensembles on the Heights. 



UNIVERSITY CHORALE 



Starting out as a small, all-male glee club in 1912. the University Chorale is now co-ed and the largest arts organization 
at Boston College. Entirely student-run. the Chorale currently has 160 singers, including students. Jesuits, and factllt) 
members. The University Chorale displays its talents at numerous events both on and off campus. In the past, the group 
has traveled to Rome to sing at St. Peter's Basilica. Domestically, they have traveled to New York City to perform a benefit con- 
cert for the Twin Towers Orphan Fund. 



Organi7ation^ 1.1 s 



BOSTONIANS 



Founded in 1986, the Bostonians is Boston Colleges oldest a cappella 
group. The group is co-ed, using female and male soloists alike to 
supply a colorful show for all to enjoy. From slow to upbeat, pop to 
classics, the Bostonians not only demonstrate talent, but musical diversity 
in all their performances. In the past, the Bostonians have toured several 
states in the U.S. They plan to continue their traveling tradition this 
spring as well as return to their old pasttime: national competitions. With 
fourteen members ranging from freshmen to seniors, the Bostonians will 
be putting out a new CD this spring with which they hope to be selected 
for the Best of College A Cappella, an honor they have been awarded for 
the past two CD's they have produced. 



Photos by David Trudo 





DYNAMICS 



The Boston College Dynamics is the youngest of the co-ed a 
cappella groups on campus, but also one of the most active. 
Founded in the fall of 1998, the group has steadily been gaining 
fans and recognition as a household Boston College name. Consisting 
of about sixteen undergraduate students, the group maintains a varied 
repertoire ranging anywhere from Motown to 80's hits to popular music 
of today. Each year, the Dynamics perform at different events both on 
and off campus, and hold three shows of their own. They aim to please an 
audience with enjoyable music in a way that is exciting to watch through 
hard work, friendship, and lots of fun. They have been known to sing all 
over campus in cafe's, benefit concerts, and invitationals, as well as up 
and down the East Coast touring at other schools and venues. 



Photos by David Trudo 



SHARPS 



The Sharps were founded in 1990 as the only all-female a cappella 
group on campus. Since those humble beginnings, the Sharps has 
grown into a polished fifteen-member group that transcends the 
traditional notion of girl groups. Built upon sisterly values, the group's 
goal is to share their joy with others by using their own voices to re 
create songs everyone loves to hear. The Sharps has toured at colleges 
and universities up and down the East Coast, and performed at many 
corporate and private functions as well as campus events. 



156 Organizations 



Photos by David Trudo 





HEICHTSMEN 



The Heightsmen of Boston College is Boston College's only all-male 
a cappella group dedicated to musical excellence. Celebrating 
their fifteenth year in 2005. the group has established itself as a 
prominent musical group on and off the Boston College campus. Last 
February, they released their seventh album. "False." While maintaining 
a diverse musical repertoire that encompasses everything from 50's do- 
wops to contemporary hits, the Heightsmen entertain thousands of a 
cappella fans worldwide. 



Photos by David Trudo 



AGAINST THE 

Current 

A against the Current is a non-denominational Christian a cappella 
group that ministers to the campus community through their 
music and testimonies. The performers assembled in the Spring 
of 1998 with the intention of starting a group that would worship God 
through a cappella music. The auditions that followed that year brought 
ten enthusiastic freshmen, who helped to form the group for the purpose 
of bringing the Gospel through a cappella music to the Boston College 
community. Against the Current has grown to be a music ministry 
including members from each class, race, and denomination of the 
Boston College student population. The musical group aspires to serve 
God on the campus of BC in conjunction with the campus fellowships, 
churches, and other organizations. 



Photo* by David Trudi 





ACOUSTICS 

Since 1993, the Acoustics have performed their wa\ into many hearts 
with an uplifting, humorous, and theatrical brand of a cappella. 
In its thirteenth year at Boston College, the group has developed 
a rich histor) of traditions. The Acoustics have released a total of five 
albums. Outside the studio, the Acoustics venture off on wild tours, and 
compete in the International Championship of Collegiate \ Cappella. 
The) have taken their high-energy performances ever) where from the 
Nation's capital to the sunny beaches of Florida, and received numerous 
accolades (Regional Champions. Best Arrangements. Rest Soloists). On 
campus, the Acoustics harmonize at main venues, including numerous 
benefits and charit) concerts. At their famous Cafe performances, their 
wack) skits have confronted bizarre topics including infectious Disne> 
medleys, game show violence, and talk shovi trash. 



Plioto* Hibmincil b\ Acoustics 



Organization^ 



BRASS CHOIR 



The Brass Choir is like a chamber ensemble on steroids. The year before David Healey accepted the conducting position 
for the group, the Brass Choir had approximately a dozen members. In 2000, the group grew to thirty members. In 2001, 
Brass Choir had forty-five members, and in 2002, the group grew to a membership of sixty. As of right now, there is no 
membership roster for last year and this year, but the group anticipates that the number will again be high. 



MUSIC GUILD 



The Music Guild provides a forum for musicians of all levels and styles to interact and perform on campus. Currently, 
the Guild consists of over two hundred members. Their website serves as a tool for musicians by allowing them to 
search a member directory, post messages, upload original mp3's, reserve practice space, and keep informed on possible 
performance opportunities. The Music Guild provides an opportunity for students who are interested in music both recreationally 
and professionally. In practice, the Guild sponsors various types of events each year at Boston College, including open mic 
nights, drum circles, guest lectures, Battle of the Bands, and concerts featuring well-known regional acts of various genres. The 
Music Guild dates back before Boston College had an actual music program, and today has evolved into a unique organization 
not to be found at other universities. 



MY MOTHER'S 

Fleabag 



According to group legend, My Mother's Fleabag was founded in 1980, which makes them the oldest college improv 
troupe in the country. The group consists entirely of Boston College students, yet has in actuality no connection to the 
school. My Mothers Fleabag performs in and around Boston, in whole or in part, for fun or as a booked contract. The 
comedy organization performs the standard array of improv games, completely unscripted, based on live audience suggestions. 
Each semester, the group does a four-show, two-day run, mixing improv, skits, a group opera, and a live band. 



158 Organizations 




MARCHING 

Band 

Whether it's on the turf of Alumni Stadium during half-time 
of a football game, or on the streets of New England for a 
parade, or in front of hundreds of high school students at an 
exhibition, wherever the Screaming Eagles Marching Band performs, 
you can feel the excitement in the air. This collection of highly spirited, 
talented, and committed individuals have provided thrills and excitement 
to audiences from across the nation - and even as far away as Ireland. 
Founded in 1919, the Screaming Eagles Marching Band has become the 
embodiment of New England Division I athletics through excellence in 
performance both on and off the field. Currently, the Screaming Eagles 
provide opportunities for instrumentalists, color guard, dancers, and 
managers. 



Photos b\ Bob McGrath 



DRAMATICS 

Society 



The Dramatics Society of Boston College, founded in 1865, is the oldest student group on campus. The Dramatics Societ\ 
provides student actors, designers, directors, playwrights, and producers another outlet to voice their creativity and to 
share their talent with the Boston College community. By choosing works from a well-established canon of dramatic 
literature to student-written works, the group strives to make the arts an important part of university life. 




COMMITTEE 

for Creative Enactments 

The Committee for Creative Enactments (CCE) is a comedk theater 
troupe dating back to the mid sov that layers improvised scenes 
on top of a scripted plot in a murdcr-m\ster\ format. Made up 
entirely of BC students, there is no conventional stage, and the perfor- 
mance is interactive. Actors move throughout the audience, and converse 
with audience members directly. Audience members take on the pretense 
of the setting o\ the show and O'Conncll House is transformed into a 
medieval castle, or the estate of William Shakespeare, or a Victorian era 
hotel, or even a spook) old mansion. The\ are guests of the event where 
multiple scenes ma) occur simultaneously in rooms in O'Connell House. 
The audience follows their favorite characters into a scene, engage them 
in conversation, or even interrogate a suspect themselvi 



Photo submitted b\ CCE 



Orcani7atiom 159 



HELLO... 

Shovelhead! 



Hello.. .Shovelhead! is a sketch comedy group comprised of students with a talent for humor. Hello.. .Shovelhead's goal 
is to entertain the Boston College community with sketch comedy. The club members meet on a weekly basis where 
they put together their creative ideas and write and act out original work. They end up with roughly forty scenes after 
each meeting. Of all the scenes they comprise in their practices, the group chooses nine to act out for any given performance. 
Hello.. .Shovelhead! puts together a genre of comedy that is similar to the sketches on Saturday Night Live and Mad TV With 
their innovative skits, they have managed to make Boston College students laugh for over a decade. 



ROLE PLAYERS 

and Strategy Enthusiasts 



The Role Players and Strategy Enthusiasts (RPSE) is an organization founded less than a decade ago by a small group of 
individuals who were interested in role-playing, board, and strategy games. The clubs purpose is to locate individuals 
of Boston College with an interest in engaging in role-playing and strategy games, to introduce them to each other, and 
to create an environment in which those individuals can find enjoyment and the opportunity for artistic expression through 
those games. In addition, the club maintains organization between the games so that new members can be referred to games 
matching their areas of interest, as well as for the games to be continued from year to year. Currently, the club possesses a large 
library of challenging and eclectic games for members to borrow and enjoy. 






ASININE 



Asinine is one of the few comedy groups around that incorporates both sketch and improvisational comedy into their 
shows. Members write, direct, and act in their own original sketches and video segments as well as perform an 
increasing repertoire of improv games. Asinine's purpose at Boston College is first and foremost to entertain, but also 
to get more people involved in the production of the performing arts of improvisational and sketch comedy. The group prides 
itself on the fact that it is Boston Colleges only sketch AND improv group; there are also very few other groups beyond BC 
who work with both art forms simultaneously. They offer frequent and affordable shows to their fans, performing for $3 every 
month or so. The Asinine website receives hundreds of hits each month by loyal fans. Founded in 2001 by a rag-tag group 
of students. Asinine has risen from performing in the Eagle's Nest with about twenty people in the audience to performing 
monthly shows that sell out hundreds of seats. 



160 Organizations 



CONTEMPORARY 

heater 



C 



ontemporary Theater is a dramatic club on campus in addition to the Dramatics Society. Performing productions 
written by playwrights within the last two decades, they represent the trends in present-day theater and put a modern 
spin on things. 



LITURGICAL ARTS 

Croup 



The Liturgical Arts Group (LAG) serves the community of Boston College by sharing their special gift of music at the 
regular weekend liturgies of the campus and at various events at Boston College. With song and instrument and dance, 
the LAG provides a wide repertoire of music to enliven and enrich the experience of worship. As pilgrims on a journey, 
the students in the Liturgical Arts Group envision facilitating liturgical participation as a privelege. Through praise of God in 
song, the community at prayer finds its way to greater depth and joy in its service to others. LAG meets regularly for rehearsal 
and prayer, and especially tries to foster community among freshman members. LAG has released CDs in the past and its group 
number goes up considerably each year. The groups contributions make masses feel much warmer and bring the students closer 
together through the sharing of their gifts. 



HIPHOP 

Culture Club 



The Hip-Hop Culture Club of Boston College was founded to help promote and spread the message of hip-hop through 
the student body community. As a largely misunderstood media of music, the group seeks to educate others about the 
history and actual culture that exists beneath the surface. Frequent meetings with dance help to bring further life to 
the group and the club can sometimes be seen performing in events around campus. 



•nation* I6J 



ASIAN CHRISTIAN 

Fellowship 



Asian Christian Fellowship (ACF) has large group meetings weekly that include singing praise songs, a talk by a guest 
speaker, and fellowship with food at the end. Occasionally, ACF has a special event instead of regular meetings. Each 
member is also encouraged to join one of the small groups that meet during the week. These small groups range from 
doing a book-study to having free discussion and prayer. Asian Christian Fellowship has a general prayer meeting once a week 
for anybody who needs prayer, or wants to pray for the fellowship, the campus, the world, or anything else. ACF has one retreat 
each year in January. 



BLACK 

Campus Ministry 



The mission of Black Campus Ministry is rooted in the African-American experience. Members assume responsibility 
for the spiritual growth of the Boston College community at large. With God as their focus, they aspire to achieve these 
goals through various activities strengthening community relations. As Christians, the group believes in serving the 
community of Boston College and the greater Boston area. Everything Black Campus Ministry does is in the name of the Lord 
and Savior, Jesus Christ. As a ministry, members are faith-oriented people dedicated to the enhancement of spiritual growth 
in both others and themselves. Furthermore, the purpose of Black Campus Ministry is also to increase community relations, 
encourage involvement, promote outreach and demonstrate support to others with guidance from God. 



CHI ALPHA 

Christian Fellowship 



The Chi Alpha Christian Fellowship (XA) is a committed group of Christians who want to see a difference on Boston 
College campus today. XA are two Greek symbols pronounced "chi alpha" and represent the letters C and A. These two 
letters stand for "Christ's Ambassadors." The group aims to change their school by living out their faith in Jesus Christ 
on a daily basis. XA is more than just a club; it is a community of students from various backgrounds who are able to join 
together around the common belief that Christ is their Savior. The Chi Alpha Christian Fellowship wants to show all people that 
the awesome life is possible with Christ and that a relationship with Him is more than just church on Sunday morning. Their 
weekly meetings serve as a nice break from the hectic workweek that allows its members to come together to be encouraged in 
the faith and to lift up the name of Christ as a community of believers. In addition to two retreats each year, the organization 
unites with Chi Alpha groups from other Boston schools in an event known as "Friday Night Live." 



If>2 Organizations 




HILLEL 

Jewish Students Association 



Boston College Hi 1 lei serves as the center for Jewish life at Boston 
College. The H i 1 lei helps to facilitate the social, cultural, and 
religious needs of the small but active group of Jewish students 
who attend Boston College. The organization is committed to a pluralistic 
vision of Judaism that embraces all movements and invites all members 
of the Boston College community to participate in its programs. It serves 
to educate the Boston College community about Jewish life and culture 
and offers itself as a resource to those interested in learning more. 



Photos submitted by Hillel 



SALT AND LIGHT 



Salt and Light is a Christian ministry group that serves the Greater Boston area by leading Confirmation retreats for high 
school students. The group has one training weekend every semester for members who are interested in leading those 
retreats. These weekends are held at the Mellos Retreat House in peaceful Jacksonville. Vermont. Salt and Light also 
meets for fellowship and fun every other week. Meetings usually consist of an icebreaker, witness talks, small group sharing, 
and snacks. 




INTER-VARSITY 

Christian Fellowship 

InterVarsity Christian Fellowship is a multi-ethnic, Catholic and Prot- 
estant, Christian movement at Boston College. It is a dose-knit com- 
munity of active students who seek to discover together how God 
and faith can impact their daily lives at Boston College and beyond. The 
group meets weekly, and has smaller group meetings. Bible studies, and 
prayer gatherings throughout the week as well as retreats and confer- 
ences throughout the year. The InterYarsitx Christian Fellowship makes 
regular tups into Boston to feed the homeless, tutor students in the inner- 
city and has spring break trips to serve the urban poor in Boston. Mem- 
bers seek not only to reach out and love the people at Boston College and 
in the Boston area, but also to the outside world through summer trips 
to foreign countries 



Ptioto^ b\ \f\ni Chai 



iizat»ons 163 



ST THOMAS MORE 

Society 



The St. Thomas More Society seeks to promote a rich Catholic culture at Boston College. The group sponsors lectures 
and debates about important religious and cultural issues. The organization also sponsors biweekly Power Hours. These 
are times of quiet, reflective prayer in the form of traditional Eucharistic adoration and benedictions. All students are 
welcome to participate in any of the activities of the Society regardless of religious affiliation. 



ASIAN BAPTIST 

Student Koinonia 



Coming from the Greek word "Koinonia," which means fellowship in Greek, Asian Baptist Student Koinonia (ABSK) is 
a student Christian group committed to their fellowship with God and each other. The group's hope is to experience 
God's love concretely, whether by means of Bible studies, prayer, or fellowship (which consists of many forms, mainly 
fun indoor and outdoor activities, like sports, hiking, BBQs, and eating a lot of food). Members study together, eat together, 
and make an effort to understand the meaning of life together. 



IGNATIAN 

Society 



The Ignatian Society of Boston College is a group of Boston College undergraduate students committed to the promotion 
of Jesuit education and the Ignatian ideal. The group offers all BC students opportunities to actively engage the Mission 
of the University through social, spiritual, and service programs and events, and seeks to maintain a strong link 
between the Jesuit Community and the student body at Boston College. Members of the Ignatian Society are committed to 
promoting Jesuit education and Ignatian spirituality, and strive to make the Boston College community a fun, faith-filled 
environment. The Ignatian Society offers spiritual programs such as the Kairos retreat and peer ministry. Its social programs 
seek to strengthen the bond between two great communities here at Boston College: the undergraduate students and the Jesuits, 
The group also offers both traditional and innovative community service opportunities to its members and the Boston College 
community based on the ideals of Jesuit educational experience. 



164 Organizations 



COLLEGE REPUBLICANS 



The mission of the College Republicans of Boston College is threefold. The organization's first goal is to represent the 
Republican Party to the student body, and to promote Republican goals and interests on campus. The College Republicans 
must be vocal, advocating the timeless Republican ideals of fiscal conservatism, personal responsibility, and love of the 
country. Their second goal is to act on behalf of Republican candidates on and off campus, and to promote these candidates 
to the student body. The third goal of the organization is to create a strong link among the club, the Republican Party, and 
College Republicans throughout the state and the country. Each year there have been exciting Republican Speakers: Ben Stein. 
Dinesh D'Souza, Pat Buchanan, and Jay Severin have all been to The Heights, and this year will be just as promising. Members 
attend events with the Massachusetts Alliance of College Republicans each year, and stay in close contact with the National 
Committee. There are ample opportunities to network and make friends across the state and the country, all the while having 
a great time. 



COLLEGE DEMOCRATS 

The College Democrats of Boston College is both an officially registered student organization and a chartered member 
of the Massachusetts College Democrats, a subsidiary of the Massachusetts Democratic Party. The organization seeks 
to involve and educate the student body with regard to. not only politics, but also public service. Its purpose is to show 
students the benefits of public service both on and off campus. This year saw the launching of two major initiatives for the 
College Democrats. First, the group began the Progressive Speaker Series, which features Boston City Councilor Felix Arro\o. 
Congressman Barney Frank, and former Governor and Presidential Candidate Howard Dean. This program was easily the larg- 
est in the history of the organization, and helps to represent its incredible growth. The club aimed to involve as many people in 
the Presidential Election as possible, registering close to two hundred students and helping nearly six hundred students obtain 
absentee ballots. The College Democrats attempt to voice the progressive message in hopes of carrying out an expansion of 
the Democratic Party and its beliefs and ideals. 



ACCOUNTING 

Academy 



The Boston College Accounting Academy is a student organization established by and run b> Accounting students. The 
Academy was established to provide declared and prospective Accounting majors with serxices pertaining to their 
future careers. In order to provide opportunities to come in contact with prospective future emplo>ers. the Accounting 
Academy organizes events where students, teachers, and employers can come together in a relaxed environment. 



Organizations 165 



IW#|pN.C 

Mahjong originated in China, and it remains an integral part 
of that culture as a massively popular form of entertainment. 
It is played during spare time, and especially during large 
family gatherings. Both young and old, male and female, play this game 
with the same enthusiasm and fervor (not to mention plenty of noise). 
It is a game comparable to the card game of Rummy, both in rules and 
excitement. The Mahjong Clubs officers have taken it upon themselves 
personally to introduce this game of little tiles to anyone who wants to 
learn. Our goal is to not only make this game accessible to Chinese and 
other Asians in BC who are already familiar with mahjong, but also to 
the rest of the community who may not even know what it is. 





CAMPUS SCHOOL 

Volunteers 

The Campus School Volunteers of Boston College is a student 
lead organization that works to support the students and 
faculty of the nationally acclaimed Campus School through 
participation in classroom activities as well as extensive fundraising. 
The Campus School Volunteers devotion to students with special 
needs continues to improve with programs ranging from swimming 
therapy to the EagleEyes technology which enables the students to 
play computer games. Campus School Volunteers' fundraisers include 
the annual Campus School Classic golf tournament, a broom hockey 
tournament, and fundraising by BC runners who complete the Boston 
Marathon. 



WOMEM'S RESOURCE 

Center 



The Women's Resource Center, located in McElroy 141 is a safe 
place on campus that seeks to build a community of equality 
and support for all BC students. Througout the year the WRC 
organizes several programs to address the needs of the BC community. 
These range from stopping in on cookie Mondays for a free snack, to 
the Love Your Body campaign, and CARE (Concerned About Rape 
Education) weeks in the spring. The WRC also provides resources on 
a variety of gendered issues, from brochures to peer counseling, to a 
library of great books. 



166 Organizations 





IWENjDEL 

Society 



The Mendel Society is the prehealth professions and biology club 
of Boston College. Although the majority of members are pre 
medical students, others include prevet. pre-dent. and research 
orientated students. Club activities include inviting alumni physicians 
as well as current medical students to speak, the annual bioethics 
conference, and medical school admissions night. Our goal is to help 
expose current students to health related careers and support their 
pursuit of such ambitions. 



SENJOR 

Task Force 



The Senior Task Force is responsible for planning individual Senior 
Consilium programs as well as the third annual Campus Crawl. 
These programs give seniors the space necessary to explore 
vocational discernment, reducing their anxiety of deciding what to do 
next year, and getting them excited for life after graduation. The Senior 
Consilium program has been very successful and will continue to be 
hosted by members of the Senior Task Force. The Campus Crawl was a 
huge success this year with over 250 seniors participating. 









Of Student Life Committee 

The Quality of Student Lite Committee (QSLO works with Vice 
Presidents. Deans, Administrators, and Academic Departments. 
striving to provide students with a means to understand BC and 
create opportunities to better their environment. It was formed in 
November 2001 b) six freshman who wanted to further understand their 
surroundings and to improve life on and around campus. The QSLC 
was formed for the stttldents and b> the students. Today, the Committee 
is a registered student organization made up o\ over 25 active members 
and over 170 general members \s g non-political group. QS1 I al is 

to act as an advocac) group for the students and a vehicle for students to 
further define and create their own initiatives effectively and construe 
lively. 



Organizations 16 




Boys & Girls Club 



The Heights Boys and Girls Club is composed of about forty Boston 
College students ranging from freshman to seniors. Each BC 
volunteer is paired up with a "little buddy" from St. Columbkille's 
Elementary School located in Brighton. Many of the elementary-aged 
children come from underprivileged home environments. The members 
of our club bring a fun and exciting activity to these children at least 
once a month. Some of our events include apple picking, bowling, roller- 
skating, a visit to the children's museum, a trip to the movies, ice skating, 
or an activity day on BC campus. The children are able to receive the 
opportunity to form a friendship with their "BC buddy" while really 
enjoying the events. The Boston College members of the club also have 
just as much fun participating and attending all of the events. 






The Boston College Karate Club trains in the Shotokan style under 
the guidance of several black belt instructors. Shotokan was 
brought to the United States by Sensai Kazumi Tabata, The BC 
Karate Club welcomes all students regardless of experience level. Train- 
ing is divided into basics (kihon), forms (kata), and sparring (kumite), 
with emphasis placed on self-defense, meditation and control. Every 
semester, a tournament is held at one of the local universities. These 
competitions provide practitioners with valuable sparring experience, 
and give them the chance to demonstrate what they have learned over 
the course of the semester. Boston College in the New England Colle 
giate Karate Conference (NECKC) and is consistently well-represented 
at these tournaments. 



BEST BUDDIES 



The mission of Best Buddies is to enhance the lives of people who with intellectual disabilities by providing them with one 
to-one friendships with Boston College students. The program began in 1987 at Georgetown University when Anthony 
K. Shriver, Founder and Chairman, realized that many people with intellectual disabilities lacked the opportunity to 
socialize with their non-disabled peers. College Buddies (BC students) meet with their buddies at least twice a month, with 
activities ranging from having lunch to going to a movie. 



I6S Organizations 




BICSO was established at Boston College by Jon Lennon four years ago. The organization works with other colleges 
in the city of Boston as an organization based on serving others as a vehicle of personal growth. BICSO conveys the 
idea of "service by choice," welcoming all members, however small or large their level of commitment. As a result, it 
provides an outlet for many students who cannot make a full-time commitment to other organizations. By working with other 
schools, BICSO has multiplied the size, scope, and impact of projects to a greater degree, as well as provided assistance in the 
research and development of projects for other organizations. 



CIRCLE K 



The mission of Circle K at Boston College is to better the community and campus through service projects. Some projects 
that Circle K volunteers help out with on a weekly basis are located at places such as the Stone Institute and the Allston 
Brighton Food Pantry. At the Stone Institute, the organization traditionally visits the McLellan Center, a rehabilitative 
nursing facility for 82 short-term and long-term residents, where volunteers entertain residents with a game of Bingo. At the 
Food Pantry, members join with Boston University students to serve meals to the local people. Boston College's chapter o\ 
Circle K makes the community at large accessible to students who can too often get wrapped up in events only on campus. 
Circle K introduces them to a world of service outside the campus walls, and facilitates their involvement in numerous ser\ ice 
activities. 



LEARNJKC TO SERVE 



Learning to Serve is primarily a second semester service and mentoring program tor freshmen led b\ .1 council of 
upperclassmen. Small groups of freshmen, each led by one or two council members, spend four to five hours a week 
volunteering in the Boston community. Student involvement at placements ranges from tutoring at local schools to 
participating in organized activities at Boss and Girls Clubs or assisting in local homeless shelters. Bi-weekly the small 
groups met for reflection upon their service experiences, as well as to discuss Boston College freshman issues m general. In 
the remaining weeks, the group meets as a whole to either take part in orientation or communit\-building activities or to hear 
from various speakers like BC Residential Life employees to community leaders ami organizers. Learning to Serve is not on I) 
and exciting opportunity for freshmen to get acquainted with each other and the city of Boston, but it is also an introduction 
to what it really means to be "men and women for others'" 






nization* ¥W 



imO-LIF 

Club 




The Pro-Life Club of Boston College is dedicated to addressing all 
life issues, focusing mostly on the topics of abortion, euthanasia, 
and the death penalty. Members take part in weekly educational 
outreach and volunteer projects in Boston to aid pregnant women in 
need, mothers, and children. The organization participates in various 
walks and marches around the country including the Respect Life Walk 
in Boston each October and the March for Life in Washington, DC, in 
January. We have monthly prayer vigils on campus in the Dustbowl and 
at the local Planned Parenthood. Members also have the opportunity to 
meet with other college students at various conferences throughout the 
year. As a group, we try to facilitate dialogue and provide education on 
life issues at BC by providing various speakers and programs. 






Eagle Emergency Medical Services was founded in 1997 when Kevin Eidt collapsed in the Flynn Recreation Complex 
during a pickup basketball game. Friend and Emergency Medical Technician Mark Ritchie attempted to revive him 
while waiting for an ambulance to come and take him to a hospital, but was unable to and Eidt died within an hour of 
fainting. This motivated Ritchie to create Eagle EMS. The group is made up of trained student Emergency Medical Technicians 
(EMTs), who assist the Boston College Police Department with medical emergencies. Today, students staff major events, such as 
Boston College football games and "Pops on the Heights." Eagle EMS also conducts CPR and Emergency Medical Technician 
certification classes, and do daily night-time response on both Upper and Lower campus. 



/WERICAH 

Red Cross 



The American Red Cross (ARC) of Boston College is a humanitarian organization, led by volunteers, that provides relief to 
victims of disasters, and helps people prevent, prepare for, and respond to emergencies. It does this through services that 
are consistent with its congressional charter and the principles of the International Red Cross Movement. In addition, 
the American Red Cross of Boston College will develop and offer services that address critical human, health, and safety needs 
of the communities, which it serves, and are consistent with the National Mission of the American Red Cross. 



170 Organizations 



Ecopledge is an environmental activism group that seeks corporate responsibility, demanding that big companies 
adjust their business practices to better protect the environment. Recent victories include Dell. Office Max. Staples. 
Office Depot, and Citigroup. Last year, Ecopledge was working on the Dell computer campaign, which st rived to get 
the company to take their computers back from customers once they became obsolete. After taking the computers back. 
Ecopledge demanded that the computers be recycled safely here in the United States rather than shipped to China, where the> 
were deconstructed in unsafe and unhealthy conditions by underpaid workers. Another noteworthy event includes rallying in 
Boston asking Shaw's Supermarkets to remove genetically engineered ingredients from their storebrand products. The group 
on campus participates in days of action for campaigns by tabling in McElroy. educating students on the issues and getting 





Organization 



The Animal Rights Organization (ARO) was founded in 2001 by Kaitlin Amalthea '03. The organization works to 
help expose the ways in which animals are mistreated and abused in our society, and to help inspire people to make 
compassionate choices in their everyday lives. In order to make people aware of the benefits of a vegetarian diet and 
to encourage them to be conscious consumers, the ARC has events including baking and giving away vegan food, video 
screenings of the award winning documentary The Witness, and Peaceable Kingdom, as well as having speakers come talk on 
a variety of topics like mad cow disease. The group tables in McElroy. and hands out information on vegetarianism, and also 
asks people to sign a pledge to give up meat for one day. Other activities include volunteering at animal shelters in the area, 
attending conferences in Boston, having bands come play, and working on getting better veggie options in the dining halls. 




EN,VIRQNjVEN.TAL 

Action Coalition 



The mission of the Environmental Action Coalition f V is to 
preserve .\nd appreciate nature through mutually encouraging 
components of en\ lonmntal action and direction environmental 
experience. The 1 \( encourages the RC community appreciate nature 
with annual hikes, clean-ups. and recycled cereal box notebook making. 
This year, members are trying to educate themselves and the community 
more about the environmental issuee in the news, in politics, and at 
Roston College. 



Organizations 171 



DANCE 

Organization 



The goal of the Boston College Dance Organization is to promote 
dance of all types to the BC student community. In addition to 
this, DOBC provides students with the opportunity to choreograph 
and experiment with the art of dance. It allows more advanced students 
to utilize and expand their talents while providing beginners an open 
and fun environment to learn about dance. The dancers work hard to 
dance with a freedom that comes from the love of the art. 





FISTS 



Females Incorporating Sisterhood Through Step (EI.ST.S), 
Boston College's official female step team, is designed to build 
strong, talented, and focused young women as well as excellent 
steppers. The number one goal of the group is to construct a sound 
sense of sisterhood amongst members through the activity of step, so 
that as a team, they will be able^to positively impact the community. 



FLOETRY 



Floetry's purpose is to provide a dynamic forum for students to express themselves 
through urban verse and receive feedback from their peers, as well as discuss issues 
pertaining to the urban lifestyle. Furthermore, they wish to foster an appreciation and 
understanding of a musical/cultural movement that is often perceived as negative by opening 
the forum to the general student population. 



172 Organizations 




PERCUSSION 

Ensemble 



The Boston College Percussion Ensemble is a 14 member group thai 
performs at the annual spring Arts Festival and in the combined 
performances at Gasson Hall, which occur frequently throughout 
the year. Literature includes unconventional arrangements of classical 
pieces in addition to contemporary works by renowned composers. 



SEXUAL CHOCOLATE 

Step Group 

The Sexual Chocolate Step Squad of Boston College was formed as another outlet to 
express ones dance creativity. While several dance groups are formed and exist on 
campus, none have been dedicated to the sole focus on dancing. The group practices, 
held weekly in McElroy Commons, can be detected from far distances by their upbeat and 
lively movements on the floor of the building. Sexual Chocolate offers a limited number of 
performances throughout the year, usually in collaboration with fellow BC dance and music 
groups. 



SWINGKIDS 



In the 1920s. Harlem's Savoy Ballroom gave birth to a new style of dance: The Liltd) Hop 
and Swing Dance. Its wild and sexual movements challenged authority and its free spirit 
defied racial boundaries. Sadly, the times would move p<iM swing dancing However, the 
90s embraced it with a newfound appreciation, and sparked a movement that will keep us 
swinging well throughout this century and into the next. BC Swing Kids was started five 
years ago by a group of then-sophomores in a successful effort to reign ite the interest of 
swing dancing in the BC community. The organization offers weekh lesson^ to all levels of 
experience, and organizes frequent events with other colleges. Above all. Suing Kids aim to 
have fun. interact with new people, and keep the spirit of suing alive. 



nizatKnv 



SYNERGY 

Hip Hop Dance Company 

Synergy Hip Hop Dance Company, mixes several different styles 
of hip hop dance, including street jazz/ jazz fusion, break-dance, 
pop-and-lock, acrobats, among many other aspects. We take pride 
in being a diverse group, both culturally and dancewise. In our '05-'06 
season, we performed at several on-campus and off-campus functions! 




VOICES 



of Imani 



The Voices of Imani was organized in the fall of 1978. Created to celebrate the viability, 
potency, and beauty of gospel music, the choir has served both as a source of spiritual 
inspiration and a needed source amongst students of color. "Imam," Swahili for "faith," 
is indicative of what the choir strives to reflect through its music. The goal of Voices of Imani 
is to explore and share the full wealth of black musical culture as members sing, professing 
their faith through contemporary gospel music, as well as traditional Negro spirituals. Their 
mission is to sing praises unto God and minister to the community using the gifts that 
God blessed them with. In years past, Voices of Imani has successfully completed tours 
throughout the United States. 



WOODWIND 

Ensemble 

The Boston College Woodwind Ensemble, the newest performing group of the Bands 
Program, made its inaugural debut in the spring of 2003 at the BC Arts Festival. 
Membership is still growing but is currently comprised of 25 - 30 woodwind 
instrumentalists. The ensemble emphasizes smaller group endeavors such as the flute choir 
and saxophone quartet. The ensemble performs with The Percussion Ensemble and the 
Brass Choir at the Boston College Arts Festival and at the annual spring concert given at St. 
Ignatius Church. 



174 Organizations 














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MODEL 

United Nations 



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he Model United Nations (Model UN) is a simulation of the United 
Nations system. Students assume the roles of ambassadors to 
the United Nations, and debate the current issues on the UN's 
agenda. Through diplomacy and negotiation. Model UN students seek 
ways that the world community can deal with complex global concerns 
such as the environment, economic development, refugees. AIDS. 
conflict resolution, disarmament and human rights. The Model IN 
travels to conferences throughout the United States and Canada, and has 
successful represented various countries at these events. 



EAGLES 

On the Weekend 



Eagles on the Weekend will provide the B.C. community with eleven social events for 
the 2005-2006 academic year. Some events include Karaoke, a Red Sox outing, sports 
tournaments at the Plex, a movie night, talent show. Valentine's Day dance, and a St. 
Patricks Day event. The Red Sox outing will offer subsidized tickets while the rest of the 
events will be completely free. Hope to see you at one of our gatherings! 




RESIDENCE HALL 



Association 



Your voice in the residence halls. The goal of the Residence Hall 
Association (RHA) is to be an advocate for residents' concerns 
and provide programming. Comprised of an executive board and 
representative councils from each housing area, the RHA is a student- 
run organization sponsored b\ the Office of Residential Life. Past RH \ 
programs included Mr. Roston College. Rail Movie Night. Breaking the 
Barriers Ball, and Spring Feat. 



Oreani7at»on- 



THE HEIGHTS 

The Heights is the University's independent student newspaper and one of its largest 
student groups with about 150 students on staff. Last semester, the newspaper began 
printing twice a week. This is the largest initiative the Heights has accomplished. 
Its goal is to provide fair and accurate news of interest to the undergraduate students of BC 
and the greater Boston community. The newspaper also serves as an independent forum for 
the opinions of the BC community. The Heights holds itself to the highest ethical standard 
in its journalistic and business operations, and its primary responsibility to its readers, 
particularly the students of Boston College. 



NAKED 

Singularity 



As the description of this independent magazine of Boston College states: A "naked 
singularity^' as we all know, is an infinitely dense point mass around which no 
black hole can develop. Several centuries ago, the buzz around the (Dead White 
Male) world was "Nature abhors a vacuum." Now it might aptly be said "Nature abhors a 
naked singularity!' (Stephen Hawking said it, and he had a guest spot on Star Trek The Next 
Generation, so, in fact, it might be more than aptly said). Therefore, it is the hope of Naked 
Singularity to invoke some of that abhorrence, and to push the bounds of acceptance, 
understanding and commensurability forward a few light years. 



STYLUS 



Stylus is the Art and Literature magazine of Boston College. Stylus 
was founded in 1882, and is thus not only the oldest extracurricular 
activity at Boston College, but also the oldest journal of any 
Catholic university in the Americas. Stylus originally served the roles of 
newspaper, yearbook, and artistic journal. With the advent of other groups 
on campus (The Heights and Sub Turri), Stylus is now able to focus on 
its original mission: presenting the artistic endeavors of undergraduates 
of Boston College and the outside world. Stylus always welcomes input 
from its reading audience. 




176 Organizations 




STITCH 



Students Taking an Interest Towards Creative Heights (STITCH. i 
is a student-run organization that seeks to enrich and enhance 
the lives of the Boston college community by recognizing the 
domestic arts and reintroducing this lost art form to both men and 
women. The crafts made in STITCH, are sold, and the proceeds are 
given to charity. This will be the organization's second year, but it hopes 
to have many great memories. ST.IT.C.H. will be participating in the 
Arts festival, and will have a cafe where crafts will be sold for charitv. 



WVBC/ WZBC 



90.3 FM 



WZBC is Boston Colleges student-run radio station. Originally 
founded as WVBC. the voice of Boston College, the radio 
station began in 1960 as a carrier-current AM station. After 
operating in this capacity for 13 years, BC Radio took a big step by 
applying for a license to open and operate WZBC - FM, a nine watt, 
educationally-oriented station at the frequency 90.3. With the advent of 
WZBC - FM, the radio station expanded its listenership to begin serving 
the outside community. A power increase was given to WZBC in 1974, 
bringing the station up to its current output of 1000 watts and allowing 
once again for an expansion in listenership. Since the initial format 
change, WZBC has grown to become one of the most influential and 
respected college stations in the country. 





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ELEMENTS 



lements. Boston College's firsl and onl\ undergraduate research 
journal, was founded in September 2004 b\ a group of twenty 
undergraduate students. The journal published its first issue in 
April of 2005, featuring research articles written b\ BC undergradu- 
ates along with shorter special features. The goal o\ the publication is 
to become a forum tor the exchange o\ original ideas within and across 
disciplines at the university. Staff members will read and evaluate all 
submitted manuscripts and select the best articles on the basis o\ quality 
o\ scholarship as well as readability Faculty members will be consulted 
to assist staff members in the evaluation process 



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Organization- 



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ARMENIAN 

Club 



The Armenian Club was created in an effort to promote awareness 
for the Armenian culture, and to bring together the Armenian 
community of Boston College. They focus specifically on 
appreciating the language, music, food, and customs. One of the 
important social issues that they strive to promote understanding about 
is the Armenian Genocide. The organization is active in many of the 
Boston College multicultural events such as lectures and cultural cafes 
in McElroy. The club also has several independent activities including 
group dinners at Armenian restaurants, dances, and meetings with other 
Armenian clubs in the area. The Armenian Club serves as a source of 
community for those who enjoy their heritage. 





AFRICAN 

Students Organization 



The African Student Organization of Boston College is a primer 
cultural group that strives to introduce the diversity of Africa's 
culture, traditions, customs, and politics to the Boston College 
community. The organization is not exclusive or limited to student of 
African descent, and welcome all who have an interest in promoting 
the diversity of Africa's richness. The African Student Organization 
is committed to the recruitment of potential African students to the 
Boston College campus, and provides support for students of African 
descent in the form of mentoring with academic and social issues. 



ASIAN 

Caucus 



As representatives of the Asian American community here at Boston College, the 
Asian Caucus (AC) strives to foster relationships between its members and the greater 
Boston College and Boston communities. Through a balanced social, educational 
and political agenda, the organization is committed to creating a unified voice that is 
necessary in order to create awareness of issues that affect the Asian American community 
and contribute to the progress and betterment of society. The Asian Caucus is committed to 
the seven culture clubs that it comprises, recognizing that part of AC's task is to serve the 
culture clubs by supporting their efforts and serving as a resource. Through its efforts, the 
AC hopes to be truly representative of the community that it represents. Recognizing the 
common struggles that arc shared with members of the AHANA community, the AC hopes to 
work wither AHANA organizations in the efforts taking place to create a better environment 
at BC. 



178 Organizations 



KOREAN 

Students Association 



The objective of the Boston College Korean Students Association (KSA) is to cultivate 
and promote an interest in Korean and Korean-American history, culture, and 
many other facts of the Korean and Korean-American experience by providing 
opportunities for Boston College students to come together on political, cultural, and 
social level. KSA serves as an active academic support network for students through events 
fostering community development and stimulating personal development in defining one's 
identity. The KSA thereby embraces the responsibility to educate Boston College as a whole, 
as well as the surrounding community, in accordance to its objectives. 



CUBAN 

American Students Association 



The Cuban-American Student Association (CASA) serves the purpose of 
educating the Boston College community of Cuban culture through social. 
cultural, and political events. IN fostering awareness of and preserving Cuban 
culture in the Boston College community through programming, the Cuban-American 
Student Association serves to unite the student body through cultural appreciation. 
By socially, culturally and politically enhancing the community at Boston College 
through Cuban culture, the organization takes part in diversifying the Boston College 
campus. 



BLACK 

Student Forum 



The Black Student Forum's mission is to provide an innovative platform that encour- 
ages political, intellectual, and social growth of the student body, and in doing 
to allow the Boston College community to experience the sum of the many elements 

that combine to make the black experience. The BSF sponsors such forums as The Black 
Male and His Sexuality, as well as the Freshman Mentoring Program and the Joe Clark 
keynote address during Black History Month. 



Organization* I?9 



MOCK TRIAL 

Program 



Mock Trial is a student activity at Boston College designed to provide a forum for undergraduate Boston College 
students interested in learning about our country's legal system. Mock Trial is for students interested in the field of 
law, or those that want to put their theatrical or debating talents to the test. Students can participate as attorneys or 
witnesses (or both), or can take less theatrical roles as timekeepers or alternates. Students are placed on individual teams and 
work during the year to prepare both the defense and the plaintiff/prosecution arguments, questions, and witnesses based on 
the fact pattern the program receives from the American Mock Trial Association. The BC Mock Trial teams compete at various 
intercollegiate competitions throughout the year, including the American Mock Trial Association's Regional Competition held 
at other universities in the Northeast. All teams have a chance at competing in the National Tournaments held in St. Paul, 
Minnesota and Des Moines, Iowa. For the past seven years, the Mock Trial Program has sent teams to Nationals where they 
competed amongst the toughest teams in the country. 



BELLARMINE 

Pre- Law Council 

The Bellarmine PreLaw Council (BPLC) stands as the only student organization 
providing leadership for those students interested in attending law school. The 
club works with students, the University Dean's Office, and outside professional 
organizations, and academic centers as a means to provide for those needs. Throughout 
the year, the BPLC organizes mock LSAT administrations, negotiates discounts for 
BC students on LSAT courses, coordinates speakers and presentations regarding law 
and the legal professionals, compiles data from law school applicants, and sponsors 
field trips and forums. 



SOCIETY OF PHYSICS 

Students 

The Society of Physics Students at Boston College is a group of undergraduates 
majoring and interested in the field of physics. In particular, we aim to explore 
physics outside of the classroom and in its many applications. This includes 
visiting active laboratories of neighboring facilities which are engaged in cutting-edge 
research, as well as becoming more closely involved with the research done by the 
faculty at Boston College. The SPS encourages interaction and mentoring between the 
undergraduate classes as well as with graduate students and faculty, which is a crucial 
part of scientific pursuit. 



ISO Organizations 




AIDS AWARENESS 



Committee 



The AIDS Awareness Committee (AAC) is an organization of 
students involved in bringing education about HIV/AIDS to 
Boston College and the local community: From volunteering 
in Boston to sponsoring speakers on campus, the AAC is looking for 
individuals interested in helping others learn about the AIDS epidemic. 
The organization hopes to bring a better sense of reality to the campus 
of Boston College, and to also have a positive impact upon the larger 
community. Some of the AIDS Awareness Committee's annual highlights 
include a benefit concert entitled Artists for AIDS, the 5-K Run for Relief, 
additional other fundraising events, and bi-weekly general meetings, 
which host speakers and other educational opportunities for the Boston 
College community. 



ALLIES 



The mission of Allies is to advance the understanding of issues, concerns, and 
needs regarding sexual orientation among undergraduates at Boston College. 
Allies offers undergraduate courses concerning sexuality and sexual orientation 
in the context of the University's Jesuit. Catholic tradition. Allies recognizes that 
psychosexual development is a critical component of personal identity and that all 
personal development is a critical component of personal identity. The focus of Allies 
is education and support, not advocacy. 



FACES 



FACES seeks to foster a greater sense of unit) among the different ethnic and 
racial groups at Boston College b> creating an environment of patience, respect, 
honesty, and open-mindedness. Through interactive programs that engage stu- 
dents, faculty, and administration. FACES stmes to eliminate the ethnic and racial 
Stereotypes that still persist today. 



nizatmn- 



CAPE VERDEAN 

Student Association 

The Cape Verdean Student Association (CVSA) aims to promote and preserve the 
Cape Verdean culture and heritage here at Boston College through educational 
fundamentals, such as discussion panels and lectures, and through social 
proceedings, such as cultural events and festivities. In order to develop awareness within 
Boston's Cape Verdean community, the organization annually hosts a program called 
Prospective Weekend. This program is directed to high school students in the Boston 
area who are interested in attending college after graduation, mainly Boston College. The 
emphasis of the program is to convince Cape Verdean students of the importance of going 
to college. Although the Cape Verdean Student Association sees it necessary to reach out 
to the Boston community, the group also focuses its attention to giving service to their 
native country. 




CARIBBEAN 

Culture Club 

The Caribbean Culture Club was founded in October 1988 by 
Lisa Morgan of Jamaica. The drive behind such a big move 
was made in hopes that the Caribbean Culture Club would I 
become the forum for members to express the common bond that : 
they all share. While building a home of unity, the organization i 
hopes to be successful in providing a familiar atmosphere for all j 
members. It strives to foster an understanding of the diverse cultures 
of the Caribbean. In an effort to accomplish these goals, the club 
is structured to educate members and others concerning the social, 
economical, and political problems of the Caribbean. The leaders 
believe that being involved in social outreach programs helps them 
relate to minority Caribbean groups living in Boston. 



GERMAN 

Academy 



The German Academy is the organization on campus that promotes the German 
language and culture in the university community, and fosters friendships between 
German and American students. The group has Stammtisch (regular table) every 
Wednesday at Roggie's. Every week, German-speaking foreign exchange students, Boston 
College students studying German, and anyone else who speaks German meet for dinner. 
Stammtisch provides an informal atmosphere in which everyone can practice German. 
The club also promotes German culture events. The German Academy also organizes 
social functions including a Christmas party. 



182 Organizations 



IL CIRCOLO 

Italiano 



The purpose of II Circolo Italiano is to spread the Italian culture to Boston College 
students through language, movies, food, soccer, bocci and experiences. The 
organization often has dinners at Lucia's in the North End and holds a bocci 
tournament in the Dustbowl. 



RISH 

Society 



The purpose of the Irish Society of Boston College is to preserve, 
promote, enjoy and actively participate in the traditions, heritage. 
and cultural activities of Irish Ancestry on the Boston College 
campus. The intent of the organization is to encourage the celebration 
of these traditions with the surrounding community of Boston College 
and Boston as a whole by participation in and patronizing local events. 
Furthermore, the Irish Society of Boston College hopes to enlighten 
those in the community who are not familiar with the rich Irish heritage 
and to promote group unity through a series of organized events 




JAMAICA 

Association 



Founded in 2000. the Jamaica Association of Boston College aims to educate the 
Boston College community about the Jamaican culture, history economics, and 
people. This goal is accomplished through lectures, culture shows, dinners, and 
performances by the Dance Troop. The Jamaican Association Dance Troop was founded 
in 2003 by Sannisha Dale. 



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JAPAN 

J Club 



The Japan Club of Boston College has achieved greater presence in 
Asian Caucus and the Boston College community through strong 
core leadership. By electing representatives from the Japan Club 
to attend main meetings of other clubs, the organization builds better 
awareness and increases visibility, which contributes to the success of 
upcoming events. Members of the Japan Club of Boston College are 
invited to join frequent events, gatherings and discussions to foster the 
Japanese culture. By building strong friendships within the Japan Club 
community, the club hopes to advance the friendship to interact with 
other cultural clubs and their events on and off campus, including the 
Japan Society of Boston. 




11 ASSOCIATION 

Haitienne 

The mission of LAssociation Haitienne at Boston College is to increase knowledge of 
the unique history of Haiti and its people, to promote discussion on contemporary, 
political, and social issues, and to foster a better understanding of Haitian culture. 
The club aims to create an inclusive, rather than elusive, atmosphere, attracting members 
from all backgrounds. LAssociation Haitienne strives to contine to educate the community 
on Haitian culture through a series of both educational and social events promoting unity. 
Some of these events include weekly Creole classes, Haitian featured movie nights, organized 
guest lectures focusing on Haiti's history and culture, co-sponsored events, forums, its 
annual spring cultural/fashion show, and an annual Haitian Student Conference. 



OLAA 

Organization of Latin American Affairs 

The Organization of Latin American Affairs' purpose is to 
articulate and promote the needs of the Latinos at Boston 
College and to foster and encourage an attitude of academics, 
religious beliefs, and social awareness. OLAA aids, supports and assists 
in the recruitment of prospective Latino/a students. The group raises 
awareness regarding the state of Latin America, and incorporates the 
use of bilingual and bi-cultural knowledge in providing exposure of the 
college experience to Latino communities. Throughout the year, this 
organization sponsors many events including a Latino fashion show, the 
Hermandad Retreat, programs about Latinos in the United States and in 
Latin American, forums on issues pertinent to the Latino community, 
and participation in protesting the School of the Americas. 



1K4 Organizations 




PHILIPPINE 

Society 



The Philippine Society of Boston College (PSBC) is an organization that celebrates 
the beauty and richness of the Filipino culture. It fosters communit) spirit through 
the meetings as well as the special events it hosts. As a club, the Philippine Society 
of Boston College adheres to three main objectives including strengthening the bonds of 
its members. Secondly, the PSBC strives to develop an understanding of and appreciation 
of Filipino and Filipino-American culture. Lastly, the organization works to network with 
other Filipino organizations in the greater Boston area. PSBC is family. It is culture. It 
is unity. PSBC welcomes everyone and thrives on its diversity. 



PUERTO RICAN 

Association 

The Puerto Rican Association of Boston College wants to communicate to the student 
body the influence and importance of the Puerto Rican community by creating a 
liaison between island and mainland Puerto Ricans, by maximizing intercollegiate 
relations, and by breaking down stereotypes. The PRA holds forums and seminars to show 
a full image of Puerto Rican culture, and helps the local Puerto Rican community with 
aide and community service. The Puerto Rican Association of Boston College wants to 
educate and create a better understanding of what it means to be a Puerto Rican. 



SLAVIC 

Club 



The Slavic Club is a joint effort D) native Slavs, students, and fecult) across pri- 
ons departments to learn from one another about Slavic cultures and langua 
Throughout the year, the Slavic Club organizes a wide range o\ social and educa- 
tional acti\ ities such as group trips to film festivals and plays, volunteering at conferen. 
social gatherings to celebrate Eastern European holidays, and a faculty-student banquet at 
the end of each semester. 



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SNAP 

Society of Native American Peoples 

The Society of Native American Peoples (SNAP) represents all Native American Boston 
College students, including all descendants of Native Americans from the contiguous 
United States and its territories, Canada, Native Hawaiians, Native Alaskans, and 
people indigenous to Latin America. The organization welcomes all BC students who 
wish to learn about and participate in Native American history, culture and current issues, 
and to be active members. SNAP is dedicated to providing a helping hand to fellow Native 
Americans through service projects in communities outside of BC, in particular to Indian 
reservations in predominantly Native American regions. In addition, SNAP pledges to assist 
in creating a more diverse BC community by reaching out to prospective Native American 
students as well as fostering the success of those on campus. SNAP acts as both the political 
and cultural voice of the Native American community at Boston College. 



SOUTH ASIAN 

Student Association 

The South Asian Students Association (SASA) founded in 1996 and previously known 
as the Indian Students Association, is a student-led organization that represents the 
countries of Bangladesh, India, Nepal, Pakistan and Sri Lanka. The purpose of 
the organization is to provide Boston College students and faculty who are of South Asian 
descent, or those interested in South Asia, with an environment where they can meet, learn, 
and participate in cultural events with others of the same interest. The South Asian Students 
Association is open to all, and strives for true cultural unity by celebrating differences in 
a fun and exciting atmosphere. Their biggest event of the year is the annual cultural show, 
consisting of many different dances ranging from traditional folk dance to class bhangra, a 
fashion show, singing, as well as performances from other cultural groups and schools. 



SOUTHEAST ASIAN 

Student Association 

As a student organization, the Southeast Asian Students Association (SEASA) 
strives to educate, promote, and uphold the beautiful traditions of the Southeast 
Asian cultures through various campus activities. SEASAs objectives on campus 
are to support fellow Southeast Asian students and to provide a voice themselves in student 
government. Along with other Asian student organizations, SEASA brings diversity and 
creates a sense of community. However, it is in its own community that members hope to 
make the biggest difference by instilling pride and confidence in the younger generation 
to pursue higher education with its annual Prospective Weekend program. 



IS6 Organizations 



MAPS 

Minority Associ ation of PreHealth Students 

1 T" 1 




he Boston College Minority Association of Pre-Health Students 
(MAPS) strives to prepare and support under-represented pre- 
health students with the knowledge, skills, and experience 
necessary when pursuing and attempting to enroll in health institutions 
for future careers as health professionals. With frequent meetings 
throughout the year led by Dr. David Krauss. the group offers a wealth 
of information to the students of Boston College and offer many 
opportunities to connect with alumni in the medical field. 



AHANA 

Management Academy 



The AHANA Management Academy provides networking and socializing opportunities 
for AHANA students in the Carroll School of Management. The Academy sets up 
students with alumni of the school as well as internships throughout the year so that 
the students will gain invaluable work experience and connections that will help them later 
in their pursuit for a career in management. 



URBAN 

Project 



The Boston College Urban Project (BCUP) will engage the larger Boston College 
community in social, political, and economic topics and public polic) questions 
relating to city life and government. Through forums, speakers, historic tours 
of the Boston metro-region, and student polic) research and initiatives, the BCl P will 
endeavor to understand urban problems and issues through on-eampus stud> and diseus- 
sion and through off-site visits. 



Organisation^ 



ACM 

Association for Computing Machinery 

The purpose of this student chapter of the Association for Computing Machinery 
(ACM) is to promote interest in the field of Computer Science. By bringing together 
students and faculty, the ACM hopes to provide a forum in which people can share 
common interests outside of the classroom. Aside from monthly meetings, the Boston 
College Association for Computing Machinery hosts a guest lecture series, attends outside 
lectures at other colleges and universities, and partakes in the annual ACM Programming 
Contest. 



INFORMATION I 

Technology Club 

The Information Technology Club is dedicated to bringing Boston College 
undergraduate students more in tune with technology and technological developments 
in business. Through a membership of this club, students will have the opportunity 
to hear speakers from the industry, go to company headquarters in Boston, learn about 
technology through special tutorials, and more. 



MACINTOSH 

Users Group 

The purpose of the Boston College Macintosh Users Groups (BCMUG) is to provide 
a community that is informative, social and supportive for those interested in the 
Macintosh and related technologies. Macintosh users are not highly represented on 
the BC campus but the group strives to promote its computers as well as products released by 
Apple Computers in the hopes that more will embrace its technology. In the past the group 
has sponsored video competitions with possible prizes such as a 20GB iPod. The group also 
attends the annual Mac users convention to discuss the latest news in the Macintosh world. 



1X8 Organizations 



CAREERS 

In Management 



The Careers in Management club works to offer opportunities to undergraduate 
students with an interest in pursuing a job in the management field. Each year it 
sponsors the Career Launch, which is a free full-day event for juniors from all majors 
that gives them the opportunity to get interviewing, internship-searching, and etiquette 
skills to sharpen them for upcoming internship and job searches. The Launch features a 
panel of seniors who share their internship search stories, presentations by employers on 
behavioral interviewing, etiquette and networking. Resume critique are also offered on a 
first come first serve basis. 



■ 



I 



ENTREPRENEUR 

Society 

The Boston College Entrepreneur Society (BCES) provides the Boston College 
community with a forum for exploring all aspects of successful entrepreneurship. 
BCES has a twofold focus. Firstly, to give students the opportunity to learn about the 
world of entrepreneurship and the processes associated with it. Secondly. BCES strives to 
inform students about the dynamics of working in a startup environment. 



INTERNATIONAL 

Business Academy 

The International Business Academy of Boston College (IBA) strives to bring inter- 
national economic awareness to students at Boston College. Through meetings and 
global guest speakers the group has addressed issues o\' the emerging markets of 
a variety of countries around the world in the hopes o\ broadening the horizons of their 
future business leaders. 



Organization*. IS9 



ENGLISH 

Association 



The English Association strives to bring together the community of literary lovers 
and gives them a forum where their voices can be heard. With a continually 
growing membership, the English Association hopes to increase the awareness of 
literary events in the surrounding Boston as well as those hosted by Boston College's own 
literary scholars. They also host a career fair with alumni who have built careers in the 
English and literary fields to help the English majors here at Boston College plan for their 
features. 



GEOLOGY 

Club 



The Geology Club of Boston College focuses on research and educational activities that 
are supported by the Geology and Geophysics programs within the school. The club 
sponsored a Coyote walk at the beginning of the school year to investigate the habits 
of the animals in the forests close to the Newton campus. The group also sponsors guest 
speakers who come to talk about the complex issues facing the world and the ecological 
problems facing the world in light of pollution and environmental degradation. 



MARKETING 

Academy 

The goal of the Marketing Academy is to coordinate events for undergraduates to 
gain a better understanding of careers in the field of marketing. Events include 
speakers, such as the director of marketing for the Patriots, presentations, including 
a proper business dress at Bloomingdales, a trip to New York City to visit an ad agency, and 
the Finishing School, a way for students to prepare for interviews and other social events 
in business. 



190 Organizations 



POLITICAL SCIENCE 

Association 

The Political Science Association attempts to establish relationships between the 
faculty of the Political Science Department and the undergraduate student body. 
The organization believes that by organizing events during which students and 
professors can interact, there can be a greater success level toward this goal. The Political 
Science Association is firmly committed to the discussion forum, which is the first step 
in understanding the science of politics. Another goal that this association attempts to 
accomplish is to spark interest in the field and study of politics. 



O'CONNELL HOUSE 

Student Union 

O'Connell House was constructed at the turn of the 20th century for approximately 
$300,000; the mansion resembled a royal palace at the time, filled with lavish 
furnishings and surrounded by fragrant gardens and beautiful fountains. The house 
was later donated to Bostons Cardinal O'Connell. who used the house as his official residence 
and spiritual haven; the Church donated the house to the crowinc Boston College. Since the 
fall of 1972, the O'Connell House has served the Boston College community as the home 
of the official student union in addition to providing office space for the Office of First 
Year Experience and the Alcohol and Drug Education Program. On a social level. O'Connell 
House seeks to entertain, educate, and facilitate all Boston College students throueh events 
such as the Middlemarch Ball, the Breaking the Barriers Ball, and Harvest Night. Its the 
home of weekly events including live bands, coffee house concerts, student talent nights, 
lectures, and more. 



SCOPE 

Student Community Outreach for Pre -Health Experience 

The Student Community Outreach for PreHealth Experience (SCOPE' is an organi- 
zation committed to placing Boston College students in health-related volunteering 
positions. SCOPE is predominately affiliated with Bngham and Women's Hospital. 
Children's Hospital, and Beth Israel Medical Center. Besides volunteering, the organization 

holds advisory and reflection based meetings. The club's goal is to provide upperelassmen 
with an opportunity to get exposed to the health field and to learn from the experiences o\ 
upperelassmen who have had such experiences 



Organization*. 191 



DANCE 

Marathon 



Dance Marathon at Boston College is a yearly event held in February where the 
student body comes together to enjoy a night of dancing in celebration of money 
raised for a charity. For the last three years Dance Marathon has raised money to 
support the Children's Hospital in Boston. Dancers and Moralers participate in this 16- 
hour event, which is held in the Plex, and students are invited to join in the festivities and 
to support their friends and classmates. 



FESTIVAL 

Of Friendship 



Festival of Friendship is an organization dedicated to establishing a strong relationship 
with the mentally handicapped community in Boston. The organization provides a 
one day event held on campus for local special needs students. Over two hundred 
Boston College volunteers are involved in making this day possible. Boston College clubs 
and organizations staff carnival games and activities while entertainment is provided by 
various Boston College performance groups. Volunteers are buddies for the day to assist 
special needs guests in enjoying the festivities. Through fund-raising and volunteer efforts, 
special needs guests are connected with the Boston College community. 



PROJECT 

2000 



Project 2000 is a mentoring and tutoring program, which targets fourth and fifth 
graders from the John Marshall Elementary School in Dorcester, MA. The 
volunteers spend Saturdays helping these children. This Saturday program combines 
educational as well as recreational activities that help create positive role models for the 
young students. Activities that are organized and hosted by Project 2000 include Trick 
or Treating in the Mods, day trips to the Museum of Science, barbecues, and many other 
bonding activities. Common interactions between the volunteer mentors and the children 
include basketball, football, and arts and crafts. 



IM2 Organizations 



NOT FEATURED 

CSON Senate 
Woods College of Advancing Studies Student Senate 

Alpha Epsilon Delta 

Alpha Sigma Nu 

Beta Gamma Sigma 

Dobro Slovo 

Phi Alpha Theta 

Phi Beta Kappa 

Pi Delta Phi 

Psi Chi 

Sigma Theta Tau 

Arab Students Association 

French Club 

Anime, Role Playing, and Care Came Club 

Art Club 

University Symphonic Band 

Martin Luther King, Jr. Student Activism Coalition 

Biological Research Society 

Black Law Student Association 

Free Radicals 

LSOE Honors Program 

Mathematics Society 

Middle Eastern and Islamic Studies Student Association 

Minority Engineers 

National Student Nurses Association 

Operations and Strategic Management 

Philosophy Association 

Psychology Club 

Society for Neuroscience 

Sociology Club 

Nights on the Heights 

The Boston College Review 

Buddhist Club 

Muslim Students Association 

Orthodox Christian Fellowship 

United in Christ 

Eagle Volunteer Corps 

Operation Smile 

Rotaract Club 

Amnesty International 



Organizations 193 



SPORTS 

Edited by: 
Katie Modzelewski & Aubrey Timm 



A New League is In Town!" So read the banners, bumper stickers, t-shirts and more 
that greeted students when we returned to school in September to begin our first 
full season as an official member of the Atlantic Coast Conference (ACC). With 
BIG EAST losses and lawsuits behind us, the entire Boston College community cheered 
its varsity athletes on to great success in their new league. Despite a few tough losses, the 
football team finished 9- 3 and surprised many of its critics. With a victory over Boise 
State in the MPC Computers Bowl, the Eagles won their seventh consecutive bowl game, 
currently the most of any school nationwide. While Will Blackmon, Mathias Kiwanuka and 
Jeremy Trueblood led the Eagles on the gridiron, Craig Smith and Corey Schneider took 
over in Conte Forum. In his senior season, men's basketball captain Smith has learned that 
ACC hoops might be even tougher than the BIG EAST. With impressive wins over Virginia 
Tech, UNC and Georgia Tech and an incredibly close home game against powerhouse Duke, 
Smith and company demonstrated to the pundits that they belonged in their new league. 
The women's basketball team refused to be overshadowed as they too had an impressive 
campaign as newcomers to the league. When the basketball teams weren't in Conte, things 
cooled down with the help of Corey Schneider and the #1 ranked Eagles ice hockey. Though 
not affected by the move to the ACC, the Eagles continued to dominate Hockey East as 
Schneider wowed the crowd with extraordinary saves and seniors Peter Harrold, Chris Col- 
lins and Stephen Gionta helped give leadership to a young team. And though the big three 
sports sometimes steal the headlines, all of Boston College's varsity athletes deserve to be 
recognized. It is our hope that the following pages give the honor that is rightfully due to 
each athlete, both varsity and club. Each athlete on campus makes a decision to participate 
in a sport, knowing that this commitment will take time away from other aspects of life at 
Boston College. Boston College's athletes practice hard, 
play harder, and continue to perform off the field in class. 
For these Eagles, college life is about balancing all of 
these responsibilities from school to social activities to 
sports. In the 2005-2006 season, ahletics at Boston Col- 
lege have left an impression on the ACC and on each of its mgmr^2'w/c Coa^t ^ " 
Superfans. Go Eagles! Murisu Fusco 




194 Sports 




Sf>on< 195 



ISigsassgi nuti mi M!© 



Coming off a successful 2004 season, the Eagles had high expectations for their first season in the ACC A final 
record of 93, a decisive 37-24 win over North Carolina in the Continental Tire Bowl, and a final ranking of 21 in 
the country and 1 in the BIG EAST left the Eagles feeling hopeful for the 2005 season. The loss of quarterback 
Paul Peterson left a gap that was quickly filled by senior Quinton Porter. Senior captain Mathias Kiwanuka was named 
the ACC Preseason Player of the \ear. BC was predicted to finish second in the ACC Atlantic Division, after Florida State. 
In the preseason polls, the Eagles were ranked 22 in the country. The 2005 season started off with a 203 win at Brigham 

I Young. Porter opened the season by passing for 232 yards and two touchdowns. Chris Miller was the receiver for both of 
the touchdowns. This impressive start was followed by a victory over Army in the first home game of the year. Porter threw 
for 206 yards and two touchdowns again, with backup quarterback Matt Ryan throwing for 83 yards in the fourth quarter. 
Five different Eagles scored touchdowns in the impressive victory. Much hype surrounded the first game in the ACC for the 
Eagles, including ESPN College Gameday being hosted at BC for the first time ever. In their ACC opener, a close played 
game was lost 28-17 to Florida State. After falling behind 14-0 early in the first quarter, the Eagles regrouped and found 
their offensive game. They responded with 17 points to take the lead from the Seminoles, but were unable to hold it. A field 

I goal by Ryan Ohliger and touchdowns by Blackmon and IV Whitworth brought life back into the Eagles, but Florida State 
scored 14 more points and secured the victory. The loss prepared the Eagles for their new league and new competition. The 
Eagles won their next four games, including three ACC contests. A 16-13 win over Clemson marked the first victory for BC 
in the ACC. Matt Ryan made his first start of the season in place of the injured Porter, scoring a touchdown and throwing 
for 221 yards. Ryan propelled the Eagles to a 38-0 shutout of Ball state and Porter returned for a 28-17 victory over Virginia. 
A comeback 3530 win over Wake Forest continued to streak. After trailing 17-0 at the beginning, BC came back, but was 
trailing 30-21 with 3 and a half minutes left. Ryan replaced Porter at this point and was able to complete two touchdown 
passes in that time. This victory secured bowl eligibility for the Eagles. A 30-10 loss to powerhouse Virginia Tech ended the 
four game winning streak, and was followed by a heartbreaking 16-14 loss to North Carolina, who the Eagles had beaten i 
the Continental Tire Bowl in 2004. The team was able to recover from these defeats, and the regular season was finishe 
strongly with two victories over ACC opponents. Decisive wins over North Carolina State and Maryland finished out the 
season and the Eagles were invited to the MPC Computers Bowl with a regular season record of 83. The MPC Computers 
Bowl represented the seventh straight bowl game for the Eagles. Going into the game with the longest current winning 
streak in bowl games at five, there was a great deal of pressure to keep the streak alive. Jumping ahead 27-0, the Eagles hel 
off the second half surge by Boise State, winning the game 27-21. Matt Ryan completed three touchdown passes and thre 
262 yards. Tony Gonzalez caught two touchdown passes, and Will Blackmon received the third touchdown. Ryan Ohliger 
kicked two field goals in the victory to secure the win. In the last minute of play, Ryan Glasper intercepted a Boise State pass 
in the end zone to save the win for the Eagles. Winning their 6th straight bowl game capped a strong season by the Eagles 
and gave them high expectations for 2006. 



; 



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1% Spoils 




)pposite Page: The team stands oil (he sideline prior to the Ball State game. Above: Matt Ryan looks for an open teammate as the linesmen block for him. Bottom Lett: Andre Calleru!. 
ies the ball and avoids a defender. Bottom Right: Senior captains Pat Ross and Mathias Kiwanuka celebrate a tackle. Photos b) D;i\ id Trudo 




Spom 



FHHsrirMyL, 




198 Sports 




/ 



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>p: Senior quarterback Quinton Porter has plent\ of time against the Virginia defense thanks to his offensive line. Abate left Sophomore running back Andre Calender take* n in for a 
luchdom n Above Right: Senior Will Blackmon keeps his eye on the hall and pushes past a Ball State defender Opposite page: Senior captain Mathias Kiwanuka goes after the Ball State 
uarterback. Photos bj Dai nl Trudo and Mh ra Qui, 



Sports 199 




lop Right: Quarterback Quintan Porter looks to make a pass. lop Lett: Kay I lenderson blocks a Florida State player. Above: The team looks on from the sideline during a night game. 
Photos ( burtes) of Bob McGrath/McGrath Studios 



200 Sports 







Vbcve: A BC Cheerleader pumps up the croud. Top Right: Cheering the 
DOtball team to success. Bottom Right: A cheerleader watches the game 
hoping for .1 BC win. 
toofos Cburtes) of Bob McGrath McGrath Studios 



Sports 



The men's soccer team had a strong 2004 season 
as they left the Big East with a record of 13-5-2. 
This earned the team a preseason ranking of 
15th in the country. The transition to the ACC was dif- 
ficult for the Eagles as they faced better competition. 
In the first game of the season, the Eagles jumped out 
to an early 1-0 lead, but Fairleigh Dickinson scored two 
unanswered goals to secure the victory. The injury of 
sophomore offensive standout Charlie Davies during 
the game was a great loss. The ACC opener against 
Virginia Tech gave the team hope for their inaugu- 
ral season. Jamen Amato opened the scoring with his 
first goal of the season. Virginia Tech answered with 
a goal late in the second half. Goalie Issey Maholo 
made five saves in the game, including one in over- 
time, to preserve the tie. More success was seen as 
BC took on ranked Wake Forest. After falling behind 
1-0, Reuben Ayarna connected with Sherron Manswell 
for Manswell's ninth goal of the season. Issey Maholo 
again preserved the tie through two overtimes as the 
Eagles had a confidence boost. Maholo remained the 
ACC saves leader as he turned away six shots during 
the game. The rest of the ACC season proved tough for 
BC as they did not have any victories over ACC oppo- 
nents, but the team stayed close in most of the games. 
Entering November with a 4-7-2 record, the Eagles 
gained valuable experience against tougher opponents 
and had high hopes for next season as they adjusted to 
the tough ACC competition. 




HH 




Goalie Issey Maholo and Sam Brill prepare to defend against a Wake Forest 
offensive play. Photo h\ David Trudo 



Top: Freshman Ryan Sherman looks for an open teammate as he dribbles up the field. Above: Hadrien Tour 
fights a Wake Forest defender for the ball as the goalie tries to block him. Photos by David Trudo 



202 Sports 




yarna passes to Sherron Manswell for a goal. Top Right: Lennie McMillian controls the ball a* defender^ turrrHind him. 
Dai id Tnnlo 



1BBBBBBBBBBBBBBBBBV 

Bottom Bill Arnault pu<.be* paM a Wake I 






The women's soccer team made the most of their final 
season in the Big East in 2004. An overall record of 
175-1 and a Big East record of 7- 3-0 gave the Eagles a 
final rank as 17th in the nation. With a strong Big East exit, 
BC showed they were prepared to move up to the ACC. The 
women's soccer team started out the 2005 season with six 
straight victories, affirming their preseason rank of 16th in the 
nation was not a mistake. The season opener against Boston 
University was dominated by BC. Out of their 13 shots, two 
found the net as freshman Caroline Walden scored her first 
collegiate goal and sophomore Kia McNeill added an insur- 
ance goal. This success was mirrored in their next 6 matches 
as the Eagles did not allow a goal to be scored against them. 
Against teams not in the ACC, the team was undefeated for 
the season. New competition from the ACC led to a tougher 
schedule of opponents. To begin their ACC season, the Eagles 
faced Clemson. After falling behind 1-0 early, the Eagles came 
back strongly with goals by Kia McNeill and Katie McGregor 
in the second half. Arianna Criscione stopped five shots on 
goal and preserved the victory for the Eagles. The women's 
soccer team finished the season with a record of 11-4-2 (5-4-1 
in the ACC) with 10 shutout victories. Junior Laura Georges 
earned a spot on the 2005 All-ACC first team and freshman 
Caroline Walden earned a spot on the 2005 All-ACC freshman 
team. Finishing the regular season ranked 8th in the country, 
the Eagles had high hopes for the ACC tournament, where 
they were ranked 5th. 





Top: Kia McNeill avoids a defender as she dribbles towards (he goal. Bottom: The women's soccer team sets up on the field as they wait for the start of their inaugural ACC game 
against INC. Photos b) K;iiic Modzelewski 



204 Sports 




>p: Korri McNicholas lights .1 UNC player to ho.nl the ball. Above; Heather Perron 
targes forward ;is she defends against .1 l NC player. 



Jenny Maurcr controls a pass from Heather Perron \ll Photos b} f 






The Women's Cross Country team enjoyed a win- 
ning season in 2005, with many athletes setting 
personal best times and earning various recog- 
nitions as new members of the ACC. Under the leader- 
ship of six seniors, including captains Laurel Burdick 
and Maria Cicero, ten new freshman Eagles found their 
place on the team. Coaches Randy Thomas (who was 
named Northeast Regional Women's Cross Country 
Coach of the Year), John Mortimer, Erin O'Reilly, and 
Amy Mortimer kept the team on track for a successful 
season. The Eagles began the season in early Septem- 
ber finishing second of nine teams in the Dartmouth 
College Invitational. Freshman Mallory Champa led 
the team to a fourth place overall finish at the Quin- 
nipac Invitational when she finished second. The 
team finished ninth out of 31 teams at the Roy Griak 
Invitational in Minnesota thanks to Burdick's seventh 
place finish out of 287 runners. The team continued 
to finish strong throughout October with contribu- 
tions from many team members. BC was second in 
the Murray Keating Invitational, eighth in the NCAA 
pre-meet, and sixth in the Mayor's Cup in Boston. Four 
BC runners (Burdick, Kristen Coon, Cicero, and Nich- 
ole Lister) finished in the top 25 out of a field of 94 
runners, to earn the eagles a fourth place finish at the 
ACC Championships. The team won the NCAA Noth- 
east Region Championship which was held at Franklin 
Park in Boston, beating out 37 other teams. BC ended 
their season with an 18th place finish at the NCAA 
Championships in Indiana in November. They are 
expecting more success and improvement next year. 




Above: Senior Alexis Lake jogs before a race. Below Left: Two BC runners talk with a coach while stretch- 
ing before a meet. Below Right: BC runners warm up by jogging before a race. Photos Courtesy of Bob 
McGrath/McGrath Studios 




206 Sports 




\bo\e: The RC unmon's cross countr\ team lines up at the starting line awaiting the start of a race. Below Left: BC runner- push around a curve as the} tr\ to overtake their opponents 
Belon Right: A BC runner paces herself during a meet. Photos GoiUles) of Bob McGr.nh McGruth Studio-. 




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The Boston College community approached 
the 2005 sports seasons looking forward to 
competing in a new league of talented teams, 
and the Mens Cross Country team was no different. 
Influenced by the leadership of the coaching staff of 
Randy Thomas. John Mortimer, Erin O'Reilly, and 
Amy Mortimer, the Eagles faced their new ACC foes 
with determination, and were successful despite these 
challenges. Led by captains Joseph Lesniak and Mark 
Alizzi. Boston College welcomed eleven freshmen to 
the Men's Cross Country team. Lesniak had a positive 
impression of the 2005 team. "Being a part of the BC 
cross country team was like being a part of another 
family while away from home, a family that I will still 
be a part of after graduation," he commented. "It's 
also been amazing to see the way the team has pro- 
gressed from when I was a freshman, how as a team 
we were able to improve as much as we did." Beginning 
its season in early September, the Men's team started 
by placing fifth of nine teams in the Dartmouth Col- 
lege Invitational. The Eagles improved on their previ- 
ous season's record, with successes at the Quinnipiac 
Invitational in Pennsylvania and the Murray Keating 
Invitational in Orono, Maine. In October, BC finished 
third of 47 teams in the New England Championship 
and ninth at ACC Championships. The team placed 
ninth out of 37 teams at the NCAA Northeast Regional 
Championship, which was held November 12 at Frank- 
lin Park in Boston. The team will train throughout 
the year in preparation for the 2006 season. 




Above: BC runners pace each other during a race. Below: The BC men's team sets up at the starting line of a 
race. Photos Courtesy of Bob McGrath/McGrath Studios 




208 Sports 





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The Women's Field Hockey team was happy to start the 
season on their brand new high-tech astro turf field 
this fall. The Eagles received a new home field, com- 
plete with bleachers with 750 seat, on Boston Colleges Newton 
Campus after playing their home games at a nearby college in 
previous seasons. The field hockey team also hired a new head 
coach for the 2005 season, Ainslee Lamb. Lamb, the former 
head coach at Yale University, brought valuable experience to 
Boston College. Head captain Bronwen Kelly and assistant 
captains Kristen Madden and Sarah York also provided strong 
leadership for the Eagles. The team was eager to build off their 
17-6 season last year and happy to have 15 returning varsity 
players, including nine starters. The team got off to a great 
start with a 3-1 win over Kent State in their first home game 
on September 4. 2005. They also won their last home game of 
the season, a decisive 4-0 victory over Harvard. In November, 
the team went to the Atlantic Coast Conference Field Hockey 
Championships. BC went into the event ranked 14th in the 
nation, and were seeded fifth. They lost to fourth seeded North 
Carolina 2-1, despite dominating play for nearly the whole 
game and out-shooting the Tarheels. The team was selected to 
play in the 2005 NCAA Field Hockey Championship at Princ- 
eton where they were defeated by number 10 Connecticut. The 
team finished their season ranked 13th in the nation with a 
record of (13-7-0). They were proud to have 5 team members 
(Kelly. Madden. Jillian Savoy, Crystal Frates, and Bob Dirks) 
named to the Division One Northeast All-Region Team and to 
have Madden honored with her second appearance on the first 
team of the NFHCA 2005 All-American Field Hockey Team. 



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Above: Members of the field hockey team practice a give and go. Below: The team lines up 
before a game. Photos Courtesy of Bob Dirks 











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Above Alvss.i Em rick avoids the defense and waits tor a pass during .1 game. Bottom Lett: The team celebrate^ a \ ictor) o\er Harvard. Bottom Right: Member-- of the team take turn* during 
practice drills. Above and Bottom Right Photos Courtesj of Bob Dirk-. Rottotv Left Photo b) K.me Modzekwski 




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The Women's Swimming and Diving team finished last season off 
in style by winning their fourth ECAC title. They were happy to 
return many of their swimmers for the 2005-2006 season. The 
diving team returned only one senior and gained four new freshman, 
making for a young and talented group. The team was led by head coach 
Tom Groden. The 2005-2006 season marked his 33rd year with the BC 
mens and women's programs. The women were also coached by diving 
coach Deanna Berswinger and assistant coach Michael Pahorylo. The 
Eagles beat Brandeis 157-118 in October. Diver Jennifer Rhines won both 
the one meter and three meter events. They also defeated Fordham in 
the beginning of November 153-88. Sisters Caroline and Elizabeth Byron 
were both members of the winning 400-yard freestyle relay. Caroline 
also won the individual 200-yard free and Elizabeth won the 100-yard 
freestyle. The swimmers topped Williams College at a home meet at the 
Flynn Complex 168-138. Tanya Surymoto won three events for the Eagles. 
After a loss to the University of New Hampshire, BC came back with 
a strong performance at the Nutmeg Invitational. Held in New Haven, 
Connecticut at Yale University, the Invitational was the last event of the 
fall semester for the women's team. The women did well in the relays 
and were happy to finish first and second in the 200-yard free relay. The 
team went on a winter training trip to Florida over the break. In the 
spring semester they compete at ACC Championships in College Park, 
Maryland in February. NCAA Championships are held in Atlanta Geor- 
gia in March. 




Above: A BC Swimmer competes in the breaststroke. Photo by Myra Chai 







Above: As a teammate approaches the end erf a lane, another swimmer cheers her on. Photo by Myra Chai 



Above: A diver exhibits excellent form. Photo by Myra Chai 



212 Sports 




\bove: A BC diver sets herself up in position and pushes oft during a Above The BC women's su imming team battles Colgate in the backstroke. Below: Swimmers take their mark and 

neet. Photo by Myrn Chin dive into the pool at the start of a race. Photon h\ \l\ ra Chat 




SfnrH 213 



The Men's Swimming and Diving team came into the 2005-2006 
season looking to build off their team-best record seventh place 
finish at ECAC's in the 2004-2005 season. This year the team was 
under the strong leadership of senior co-captains Brandon Twichell 
and David Herman. They were happy to have head ccoach Tom 
Groden back for his 33rd year at Boston College. Groden also attended 
BC and graduated in the class of 1972. Diving coaches Deanna Ber- 
swinger and Deanna Zechman, along with assistant coach Michael 
Pohorylo rounded out the coaching staff. The Eagles beat Brandeis 
at the Flynn Complex 154-107 on October 27th. Diver Christopher 
Wilson-Byrne won the one and three meter diving events. After a 
loss to Fordham in the Bronx, the team rebounded to beat Prov- 
idence at home on November ninth 150-107. BC won many events 
including David Lins win in both the 100 and 200-yard backstroke. 
The swimmers earned another home win over Colgate, which fea- 
tured a strong performance by Andrew Faughan who won the 50, 
100, and 200-yard freestyle events as well as being on the winning 
200 free relay. The men lost to Williams College 166-125. They came 
back with a huge win over New Hampshire of 208-70 in November. 
The team finished off their first semester competition at the Nutmeg 
Invitational at Yale University at the beginning of December. The 
team completed a winter training session in Tampa, Florida over 
break. They also compete throughout the second semester with their 
first meet on January 21 and their season continuing until the ACC 
Championships in February and the NCAA Zone A Diving Meet in 
March. The strong start in the fall season prepared the Eagles for 
tough competition during the the spring season. 





A BC swimmer churns through the pool during a meet. Photo by Myru Chili 



Top: A diver starts a flip as he competes in a meet. Above: Swimmers take their starting 
places as they await a race. Photos by Myru Chai 



214 Sports 




i>p Left: Vn Eagle takes .1 breath while swimming freestyle. Top Right: A BC diver positions himself on the diving board. Abo\e: As a race starts, the swimmers jump off their starting 
narks. Photos h\ \l\r.i Chai 



Sports 215 



The 2004-2005 season was a memorable one for the men's 
basketball team. They began the season 20-0, finishing 
255 and ranked 19th at the end of the 2005 season. The 
men's basketball team began the season ranked 11th in pre 
season polls and was picked to finish 2nd in the ACC. Craig 
Smith was named to the All-ACC preseason first team. The 
team jumped out to a 6-0 record at the start of the season, pro- 
pelling them into the top 10 in the country. In their first ACC 
contest, the team lost a close game to Maryland by a score of 
73-71. Trailing 3533 at halftime, the Eagles and Terrapins bat- 
tled for the lead throughout the contest, with BC coming up on 
the short end. Following their first ACC contest, BC won their 
next five games over non-ACC opponents. Their next confer- 
ence opponent was Georgia Tech. Craig Smith scored 26 points 
to lead the Eagles, but it was not enough to overtake the Yel- 
lowjackets, with BC losing 6058. A loss to NC State followed, 
but the Eagles then proved they were ready to compete with 
their ACC opponents by beating Florida State. Craig Smith had 
a doubledouble, scoring 28 points and grabbing 14 rebounds, 
while Jared Dudley scored 25 points to lead the Eagles. The 
Eagles have remained in the top 15 in national rankings during 
the entire season, and looked to improve upon that. After secur- 
ing their first ACC win, the Eagles were prepared to face their 
new opponents throughout the remainder of the season and 
hoped to repeat the success that they had in the 2005 season 
again in 2006. 




Above: Craig Smith shoots a lay-up over a defender. Photo by Myra Chai 



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Above: Sean Williams and Louis Hinnant set up a zone defense. Photo by Myra Chai 



216 Sports 



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kbove: Louis Hinnant and the men's team got pumped up before a game. Photo b\ Myra Chui 




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Above: Aja Parham drives to the net. Photo by Katie Modzelewski 



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Sports 219 




The women's basketball team had a strong 2004- 
2005 season, finishing with a record of 20-10. 
The loss of seniors Clare Droesch and Jessalyn 
Deveny left questions of who would fill in for them 
this season. Seniors Aja Parham and Brooke Queen- 
ana, as well as junior Sarah Marshall were named 
captains of the team for the 2005-2006 season and 
immediately set to work to repeat the success seen the 
previous year. The Eagles were picked to finish 5th 
in the ACC. The first two contests of the year were 
won easily. Perennial power Connecticut was the third 
opponent of the season, setting the Eagles back with a 
60-46 loss. Victories in their next four games brought 
the team to their second game against a ranked team, 
4th place Ohio State. BC lost a hard-fought game in 
overtime 66-61, showing that they were not a team to 
be ignored as a threat. The Eagles won their next six 
games by large margins as they broke into the rank- 
ings, including an upset victory as the 24th ranked 
Eagles defeated 14th ranked Stanford. Their next vic- 
troy gave Coach Inglese her 350th career victory and 
Brooke Queenan was named ACC Player of the Week. 
After their early season success, the Eagles began 
conference play, losing close games to Maryland, Vir- 
ginia Tech, and Duke in their first three ACC games. 
The team hoped for greater success against confer- 
ence opponents as the season progressed and they got 
to play all of the ACC teams. 




Above: Aja Parham shoots a layup between two defenders. Below Left: Sarah Marshall dribbles up the 
court. Below Right: Kindyll Dorsey defends against a Drexel player. Photos by Katie Modzelewski 




220 Sports 



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Above: Brooke Queenan, Kathrin Ress, and Kindyll Dorsey set up a zone defense aginst Drexel. Below Left: Aja Parham and Kathrin Ress block a shot. Below Right: Brooke Queenan set- 
herself before taking a foul shot. Photos by Katie Modzelewski 




Sports :: 



The Boston College ski team competes in the winter season, 
which stretches from mid-January to March. The Ski team 
competes in Giant Slalom and Slalom events throughout 
the winter, primarily in New Hampshire, Massachusetts, Ver- 
mont. In September, Boston College announced that it had hired 
a new head coach, Peter Endres, to lead the men's and women's 
ski programs. Endres had a memorable skiing career himself as 
captain of the Williams College ski team and two-year captain 
of the Ephs ski team. The BC ski team opened its season at the 
UConn Carnival located in Cranmore, New Hampshire on Janu- 
ary 13th. Only the giant slalom races were held, as inclement 
weather forced the cancellation of the slalom races on the 14th. 
The men finished fourth, placing six skiers in the top 25. Andy 
Wallman led the Eagles with a seventh place finish and Greg 
Avallon followed in eighth place. The women's team opened their 
season at the UConn carnival with an impressive second place 
finish. They were edged out by Boston University which won 
with a total combined time of 226.88 seconds - about a quarter 
of a second faster than Boston College's team total of 227.14. The 
women placed three skiers in the top six; Courtney Wilson was 
fourth, Courtney Culnane was fifth, and Courtney Hollis fin- 
ished sixth. Coach Endres was happy to see a consistent, strong 
opener. The team hopes to have great success throughout the 
season. 





Above: Peter Bohlin crosses the finish line during a race at Pat's Peak. 
Photo ( 'ourtesy of Peter Bohlin 

222 Sports 



Top: Shawn Radman and Ben Moloney take a break during a meet. Above: Courtney Culnane 
relaxes after finishing a race. Photos Courtesy of Peter Bohlin 







Vbove: Captain Peter Bohlin races down a mountain during a meet. Below Left: Captain Andy Wallman maneuvers around a gate at Pat's Peak. Belou Right: Member-- or the womenfc team 
iose following a race. Photos Courtesy of Peter Bohlin 







A strong 2004-2005 season for the men's hockey team fea- 
tured a 26-7-7 record and both the regular season and 
tournament titles for Hockey East. While this success was 
exciting, the loss of 10 seniors from the team left some questions 
about the depth of the team. Prior to the season, Peter Harrold 
was named team captain, and Stephen Gionta and Chris Collins 
were named assistant captains. The team began the 2005-2006 
season with a record of 16-4-2. A 3-2 loss to Michigan started 
the season for the Eagles, followed by a decisive 9-6 victory over 
Bowling Green. A 10-game streak without a loss was seen in 
the middle of the season as the Eagles saw more and more sue 
cess. The season began with a lot of close won or lost games, but 
progressed to one with bigger and bigger margins between the 
scoring for the teams. Wins were recorded over rivals Boston 
University and Providence College as the Eagles soared up the 
rankings. Any questions after the loss of so many seniors the 
previous season were erased as the Eagles stayed comfortably 
within the top 10 in rankings throughout the season. Nathan 
Gerbe, Tim Filangieri, and Benn Ferriero were named Hockey 
East's rookie of the week. Chris Collins was named Hockey East 
Player of the month for December, and player of the week several 
times during the season. Joe Pearce and Cory Schneider were 
named defensive player of the week. 2006 was also an impor- 
tant year for BC hockey alumni, as former players Brian Gionta 
and Bill Guerin were both named to the U.S. Olympic Men's Ice 
Hockey Team for the 2006 Olympics. With many achievements 
for both current and past men's hockey team members, the 2006 
season was full of excitement as well success. 





Top: Senior Stephen Gionta calls for a pass as he skates up the ice. Bottom: The Eagles celebrate a goal during a victory over Providence. Photos by David Trudo 



224 Sports 




Above: Dan Bertram takes a faceoff against Providence. Bottom Left: Senior Chris Collins approaches the blue line while controlling the puck. Below Right: Cor\ Schneider posi- 
tions himself in coal. Photos b\ David Trudo 




Sports 225 




lop: Deborah Spillane takes a faceoff. Above: Peter Harrold skates onto the ice after a line 
change. Photos by David Trudo 



Above: Alison Quandt waits for the opponents to attack. Photo by David Trudo 



226 Sports 




Above: Brian Boyle takes a faceoff for the Eagles. Photo by David Trudo 



Above: Maggie Taverna waits for a pass. Below: The mens hockey team celebrate-, a \ ictor\ 
Photos bv David Trudo 




ts 227 



The women's hockey team came into the 2005-2006 season 
looking for a fresh start after posting a 10-20-4 record 
in the 2004-2005 season. Sarah Courtney and Alison 
Quandt were selected as co-captains, and Nancy Gillis was 
named assistant captain of the team. The women's hockey team 
began the season with a record of 12-7-4, and 11-2-1 in conference 
play. The first game of the season was a 43 overtime victory 
over Quinnipiac. Meghan Fardelmann scored the first goal for 
the Eagles, followed quickly by a goal by Sarah Feldman. Deb 
Spillane then scored the next two goals to secure the victory and 
Alison Quandt stopped 22 shots. A string of overtime ties fol- 
lowed, as the Eagles battled tough opponents. The Eagles then 
put together six straight victories to improve their record and 
confidence. In February, the women's hockey team captured its 
first-ever Beanpot championship, defeating Harvard 2-0 in the 
finals on two goals by Spillane. Spillane was named player of 
the week and Hockey East's Player of the month for October. 
Becky Zavisza was named Hockey East's Rookie of the month for 
November and December was named rookie of the week several 
times. Quandt was named goaltender of the week several times 
and was Hockey East's Goaltender of the month for December. 
Johanna Ellison was named defensive player of the week for her 
goaltending efforts. In addition to the team members winning 
honors, assistant coach Katie King was named to the Olympic 
Team for women's hockey for the third time. With many acco- 
lades during the season, the women's team hoped to continue its 
winning streak and have a successful season. 




Above: Cristin Stuart checks a Dartmouth player into the 
boards. Photo by Myru Chai 




Top: Senior Nancy Gillis skates up ice with the puck. Above: Becky Zavisza and Rachel Wedig fight for the puck 
along the boards. Photos by Myru Chui 



228 Sports 




Above: Sarah Feldman makes her way between defenders and takes a shot on goal. Bottom Left: Sarah Courtney takes a face off for the Eagles. Photo*, b) M) ra Chai 




Sport •« 



The women's volleyball team had their best season 
to date in 2004, finishing 20-12. This marked the 
first time that BC volleyball registered 20 wins in 
a season. The transition to the ACC was not expected to 
be easy as the team was picked to finish 11th in the ACC 
for the 2005 season. However, the team was not discour- 
aged and began the season strongly. Starting the season 
against NCAA defending champion Stanford, the Eagles 
were shut out, but showed improvement as the match 
progressed. A tough schedule saw the team coming up 
short in many close matches. In their first ACC match, 
the Eagles faced undefeated Maryland. The Eagles won 
the first game of the match on a kill by Tori Thompson. 
Maryland then came back and took the next three games. 
Even with the defeat, it was clear that the women's volley- 
ball team was ready to play with the top teams and would 
not go quietly. Many tough matches against perennial 
ACC powers saw BC losing close games and ultimately, 
matches as well. The Eagles went into November with a 
record of 6-17. Against non-ACC opponents the team was 
5-4, showing that the adjustment to the new competition 
was a difficult one. Although the season was not the most 
successful, a young BC team learned a lot from the other 
teams and was able to improve throughout the season 
as they became more confident in their new league. The 
team hopes that the experience in the 2005 season would 
better prepare them for the future against top-ranked 
teams in the ACC. 




The team cheers after a match point. Photo by Myra Chai 



230 Sports 





Top: Shandal Da> is jumps high into the air to spike down the ball as her teammates look on. 
Above: Yerena Rosi serves to the opponent. Photos b\ \h ra Chni 



Allison Anderson \olle\s the ball to be set up for a kill. Ph<vo b\ \f\ra Chai 



Sports 



The mens and women's fencing teams compete 
throughout the winter season in dual meets in saber, 
foil, and epee events. The 2005 men's team was led 
by captains Steve Koza and Will Lawrie. At the end of 
January, the men competed in the Northwest Conference 
Meet held at Brown. They defeated Dartmouth 14-13, and 
lost to Brandeis, MIT, and Brown. In February, the team 
earned a 23-4 win over Yeshiva. They finished out their 
dual meet season at Tufts, where they beat Tufts, Massa- 
chusetts, Boston University, and New Hampshire. The team 
was fourth in their league with a 53 conference record. 
The fencers came in second at the New England Collegiate 
Championships held at MIT with a total of 68 victories 
at the meet. The team's final competition was the NCAA 
regionals in New York City where two fencers made it to 
the round robin final; Steve Koza in saber and Jon Tong in 
epee. Captains Genevieve Peeples and Tiffany White led 
the women's team. The women competed at the Northeast 
Conference Meet, defeating Smith, Brandeis, Brown, and 
Dartmouth and a losing to MIT . White led the Eagles 
winning 11 of her 12 matches. In February the team went 
15 in a two-day meet in Cambridge held at Harvard and 
MIT. The women finished their dual meet season with a 
strong performance at Tufts University where they won all 
of their matches against Massachusetts, Wellsley, and New 
Hampshire. The women earned second in their conference, 
finishing 9-1. The team competed at the New England Col- 
legiate Championships where they had 77 wins. The wom- 
en's final competition was the NCAA Regionals in March. 
Three Eagles finished in the top 20; White, Clara Yum, and 
Peeples. The team hopes to improve on the 2005 season 
with more wins and consistency in the 2006 season. 




Above: Alison DiQuollo, Jane Leahy, 
match. Below: A member of the fenc 
Mariconda 



Stephanie Mariconda, and Laura Buckley pose following a 
ng team attacks an opponent. Photos Courtesy of Stephanie 




232 Sports 




Above: Stephanie Mariconda advances toward an opponent during a bout. Photos courtesy of Stephanie Mariconda 




Above: Stephanie Mariconda. Andrew Lee. and Alison DiQuollo smile after a victorious bout. Photos Oourtes) of Stephanie Mariconda 



Sports 



The mens baseball team completed the 2005 spring 
season with the highest number of wins in program 
history, finishing the season with a 37-20 record. 
The Eagles were happy to improve upon their 32-27 record 
in the 2004 season. The Eagles were honored for their 
accomplishments by being named Division I New Eng- 
land Baseball Team of the Year. The team was run by head 
coach Peter Hughes, assistant coaches Mikio Aoki, Steve 
Englert, and Peter Pasquarosa. The Eagles also benefited 
from the leadership of captains Dave Preziosi and Jason 
Delaney. Their team opened the season in February with a 
loss to Vanderbilt. The team quickly came back with mul- 
tiple wins throughout the spring. Early in the season the 
Eagles went to Ft. Myers to play the World Champion Red 
Sox in their annual exhibition game. BC first competed 
against the Red Sox in 1916 and have played them every year 
since 1993. Although the team lost 115 this year and have 
yet to beat the Sox, it is a tradition that the players look for- 
ward to every year. The Eagles finished second in the Big 
East regular season standings. They made it to the Big East 
Baseball Championship, but were eliminated by Pittsburgh 
in a 12 inning game. Several team members received per- 
sonal honors. BC had 5 players selected for Major League 
Baseballs Amateur Draft in June. They were also proud to 
have seniors Jason Delaney, Joe Matinez, and Mike Wlo- 
darczyk named All-New England. The team is looking for- 
ward to continued improvement and new challenges in the 
2006 baseball season when they will make the move to the 
Atlantic Coast Conference. 




Above: Dave Preziosi follows through on 
dugout. Below Right: Terry Doyle winds 



a swing. Below Left: The team watches a game from the 
up for a pitch. Photos Courtesy of the Baseball Team 




234 Sports 






Above: The team celebrates a victory by home plate. Below: The team lines up before a game. Photos Courtesy of Jason Delaney 




Sports 



The 2005 season was a rebuilding year for the 
Boston College women's softball team. They fin- 
ished their last season in the BIG EAST confer- 
ence with an overall record of 20-25 and were 6-10 in 
conference play. The team began their season with away 
games against tough opponents in warm climates, estab- 
lishing a 9-13 record. In their first game back in Boston, 
the Eagles won a 10-1 game over BU and also saw fur- 
ther success in their first home games, a pair of 4-1 
victories over Connecticut. The end of the season was 
marked by several close and disappointing losses, includ- 
ing a split doubleheader with Notre Dame that keep their 
playoff hopes alive, and losses to Pittsburgh and UMass 
Amherst. However, the team bounced back to win their 
final two games against Dartmouth, ending their season 
on a positive note. Sophomore Britney Thompson was 
honored as the BIG EAST pitcher of the week following 
her seven-inning shutout against Dartmouth. It was her 
third shutout of the season. The Eagles also had two play- 
ers named to the All-BIG EAST team. Sophomore Ashley 
Obrest, a utility player, was named to the second team 
and Kimmy Hopkin, a junior outfielder, was named to 
the third team. Head coach Jennifer Finley recruited a 
talented new class of players for the 2006-2007 season, 
which was encouraging for the future of the softball pro- 
gram. The team will open the 2006 season in Tulsa, OK 
against Louisiana Monroe and will have their first home 
game against Sacred Heart. The softball team looked 
forward to new challenges and further improvements as 
it entered its first year in the ACC. 




Above: Kimmy Hopkin, Elena Ferrero, Michelle Daly, and Kristin Allain pose after a game. 
Photo Courtesy of Kimmy Hopkin 




Above: The team lines up before a game. Above Right: Kimmy Hopkin connects with a ball while at-bat. 
Photos Courtes) ofKimmj Hopkin 

23d Sports 







Fop: The team gathers at the mound during a time-out. Above Kmim\ Hopkin la>^ down a drag bunt. Plioto* CbuTfesj ot'Kimmy H 



ts : : 



After establishing a 15-6 record in the 2003-2004 season, the 
best year in Boston College women's tennis history, the team 
entered the 2004-2005 season ranked 59th nationally. Play- 
ers Szilvia Szegdi and Nida Waseem each earned preseason national 
rankings of 84 and 114 respectively from the ITA, which ranks the 
top 125 collegiate players in the preseason. The team was led by head 
coach Nigel Bentley in his fifth year with the women's tennis program 
after coaching the men's program for four years. Captains Morgan 
Landes and Nida Waseem headed up the squad which returned six 
letter-winners from the previous season. The team struggled through 
injuries in the beginning of the season. In the fall, they competed in 
the William and Mary Invitational, the USTA Invitational, and the ITA 
Easter Regional Women's Championships. The team resumed play in 
the spring season with a loss in their season opener to Oregon in the 
first round of the Minnesota Court Classic at the end of January. The 
team dropped the consolation match against Minnesota. The team 
bounced back in February with a 43 victory over Columbia in the 
home opener followed by another home win over Cornell. After a dis- 
apointing loss to Notre Dame, the team went on a six game winning 
streak. Near the end of the season the team beat Syracuse 6-1. However 
they were not as successful against them in the Big East tournament 
in April. BC, seeded second, lost to Syracuse (seeded third) in the 
first round of play. They lost to St. John's in the consolation match and 
finished fourth overall in the Big East, ending with an 11-11 record. 
Waseem and Gia Nafarrete earned all-Big East Tournament Honors 
for their play in the tournament. The Eagles earned 2005 ITA Divi- 
sion I All-Academic Team Honors, and Amy Molden, Szgedi, Lindsey 
Nash, and Caitlin Arnould earned individual scholar-athlete honors. 
The team will move into the ACC in the 2005-2006 season. 




Above: Alina Sullivan and Dasha Cherkasov take a break during a match. Below: 
Szilvia Szegedi waits for a shot to b e returned during a match. Photos Courtesy of 
Szilvia Szegedi 




23K Sports 












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Left: Szilvia Szegedi sets up tor an overhand \olle\ as doubles partner Lana 
Krasnopolsky watches. Above Senior Szilvia Szegedi follows through on a 
forehand shot. Below: Lana Kiasnopolsk) and Szihia Szegedi relax during a 
break in a match. Photo* Courtes) of Szilvia Szecedi 






T 



he men's tennis team plays primarily in the spring 
season but also had events during the fall. The 
2004-2005 season marked head coach Scott 
Wilkins' second year with the Boston College tennis 
program. Assistant coach Todd Champeau joined the 
team for his first year. Senior captains Derrick Chou 
and Chris McCoy provided strong leadership for the 
Eagles. The team finished out their regular season play 
in mid-April with a win over Big East opponent Rutgers, 
establishing an overall record of 11-11 and a 3-1 record 
in conference play. They earned the second seed in the 
Big East Tournament but then lost to third-seeded Rut- 
gers. They went on to drop the consolation match against 
St. John's 43 to finish with a season record of 11-13 and 
fourth in the Big East. Boston College sophmore Soma 
Kestheley earned All-Big East Tournament Honors for his 
strong performance at the Big East tournament. Kesth- 
ley primarily played number one singles, and he led the 
team with twenty victories throughout the season. He 
had an overall winning percentage of .586. The tennis 
team is looking forward to more great tennis competition 
as they move into the ACC for the 2006 season. 




Above: Jason Sechrist waits for a return during a practice. Below: Geoff Mueller concentrates on return 
ing a shot. Above Photo Courtesy of the Men's Tennis Team, Below Photo Courtesy of Geoff Mueller 




240 Sporis 




U}ove: Geoff Mueller returns a backhand shot against Middlebury. Below Left: Soma Kesthely watches the ball cross the net. Below Right: Dennis Reardon hits a shot near the net. Above 
} hoto Courtesy of Geoff Mueller.. Below Photos Courtesy of the Men's Tennis Team 




Spoils 



The 2005 season was a season of improvement for the 
women's lacrosse team. An overall record of 10-7-0 
showed the success achieved in the season, espe- 
cially at home, where the team went 7-1-0. This marked the 
first time in 13 years that the women's lacrosse team won 10 
games in a season. For the first time since joining the BIG 
EAST, the Eagles were invited to the ECAC Championship, 
where they lost to a strong UConn team by a score of 9-1. 
While the game was close early, the Huskies pulled away on 
their way to victory. While they lost, the women's lacrosse 
team was pleased with the accomplishment of making it to 
the ECAC tournament. Graduated seniors Suzie Breaznell 
and Carley St. Lucia were both named to the All-BIG EAST 
first team, and Jackie Yovankin was named to the second 
team. The loss of Breaznell, St. Lucia, Yovankin, and 
Courtney Legath left a large gap in the offense that was 
quickly filled by younger players. Seniors Elizabeth Kadi- 
son, Alana Vivolo, and Brooke Wilson were named captains 
for the 2006 team. In 2006, the team will face a mixture 
of opponents from the ACC and from non-conference play. 
Following their success in 2005, the women's lacrosse team 
hoped to continue improving and have a winning season 
in their new league. Since many schools in the ACC have 
strong lacrosse programs, the women's lacrosse team will 
be facing a new level of opponent, so it will be a learning 
experience as they face their new competition. 




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Above: Shauna Culhane attacks the net and prepares to take a shot. Below: BC defenders fight for 
control against Japan. Photos by Myra Chai 





Above: Alana Vivolo cradles the ball and looks for an open teammate. 
Photo by Myra Chai 



Above: Brennan Joyce takes the starting faceoff of the game against Japan. Below: Goalie Tara McKennett and 
two BC defenders guard the net as a Japanese player looks for a pass. Photo< by M\ ra Chai 




Sport- MS 



The Sailing team is active almost all year long. The 
sailors compete in both the spring and fall seasons. 
The fall season consists of mostly fleet racing, and 
the spring season is mainly team racing. The sailors usu- 
ally sail 420s but also compete in FJs and Lasers. The team 
competes in the women's division as well as the co-ed divi- 
sion. After a dissapointing spring season in 2005, the team 
bounced right back for a spectacular 2005 Fall season. On 
October sixth, the co-ed team was named the number one 
team in the country, according to Sailing World. They main- 
tained that ranking throughout fall and finished as the top 
collegiate team in the country. Head Coach Greg Wilkinson 
brought in a talented new class of freshman this year, who 
contributed greatly to BC's success this fall. The freshman 
won the Nickerson Invitational in October and went on to win 
the Atlantic Coast Championship for the second year in a row 
at Brown University. The Women's team started their seson at 
the Yale Women's Intersectional on the tenth. They finished 
seventh at the Urn Trophy and earned at national ranking of 
13th. The women also qualified for and finished 11th at the 
Atlantic Coast Championship, which were held at Coast Gaurd. 
The Co-ed team won six intersectionals this fall. They hosted 
and finished second at the Norm Reid Invitational, in honor 
of former BC sailing coach and father of current sailor, Alden 
Reid. They placed fourth at the Atlantic Coast Championship 
at St. Mary's. The team is looking forward to continued suc- 
cess in the 2006 spring season. 




Above: Keeping the boat flat and fast at a regatta. Photo coutresy ofLealand McManus 
Below: The team competes at a regatta on the Charles in Boston. Photo Courtesy of Jessica 
Schmierer 




244 Sports 




Above: The sailing team gathers for a group picture in the fall. Photo Courtesy of Jessica Schmierer Below left: The team racing at Savin Hill. Photo Courtesy of Jay Connolly Below 
Right: Adam Roberts and Alyson Whitehead take a break between races during a regatta at MIT. Photo Courtes\ of Jessica Schmierer Bottom right: Members of the women's team staj 
focused during a race. Photo Courtesy ofLenlund McManus 




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Sport- 



At the BIG EAST championships, the team finished 10th, 
with 5th place finishes from Frank DiVittorio in the 800 
meters and Jeremy Zagorski in the 1,500 meters. Look- 
ing for improvement in 2006, the men's team started off the 
season with an 80-63 win over Harvard. BC won 11 of 17 events, 
including two first place finishes from Patrick Mellea. In their 
second meet, the Eagles fell to Sacred Heart and Boston Univer- 
sity in the Boston University Tri-Meet. Mellea, Sebastian Mans- 
son, and Benjamin Kocarnik all claimed first place finishes for 
the Eagles. Mellea won the 1,000 meters, Mansson won the 400 
meters, and Kocarnik finished first in the pole vault. In their next 
meet, the Eagles finished fourth, with Mellea again collecting a 
pair of first place finishes, in the 800 and 1,000 meters, and the 
4x800-meter relay team also claimed first place. At the Reebok 
Boston Indoor Games, the men finished in seventh place. Mellea 
won the mile, and Dan Springer took third. Dan Lafave won the 
800 meters, and the men's distance medley team won first place. 
At the Valentine Classic, the Eagles saw further succecss as a 
team. Josh Springer finished fourth in the 800 meters, while 
LaFave won the 500 meters, with Mansson and Jeff Klatsky fin- 
ishing third and fourth. Percy AddoYobo finished third in the 
triple jump and Kocarnik was third in the pole vault. While they 
had a rough start to the season, continued improvement was seen 
throughout the season as the Eagles captured more victories in 
a variety of events. 




Above: A BC runner rounds a bend with the pack during a race. Below Left: Adam Moitoso 
paces himself during a race. Below Right: A BC runner prepares to pass the baton during a 
relay. Photos Courtesy of the Mens Track Team 




246 Sports 



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Above: A BC runner pushes himself on a straight stretch of a relay. Below Left: Jeremy Zagorski carries the baton during a race. Below Right: A BC runner pulls ahead of the 
pack during a race. Photos Courtesy of the Men's Track Team 




For the women's track team, the 2004-2005 season 
was a great success. The Eagles finished 5th in 
the BIG EAST championships, a large jump from 
the 11th place finish seen the year before. The 4x800- 
meter relay team broke the BC record for fastest time at 
the championship. After this marked improvement, the 
Eagles went into the 2005-2006 season with high expec- 
tations. In their first meet of the season, the women's 
team lost to Harvard 46-80. Anne Hessberg and Jess 
Flinn finished first and second in the mile run for the 
Eagles, and Alison Fogarty won the 400 meters. In the 
field events, Jessica Fazekas, Chelsea Jones, and Stepha- 
nie Ho finished first, second, and third in the shot put. 
In their second meet, the Eagles finished second at the 
Boston University Quad Meet behind Boston Univer- 
sity. Fogarty won the 500-meter dash and Flinn won the 
1.000 meters. Katherine Sherman was victorious in the 
55-meter hurdles. In the high jump, the Eagles took the 
top three places, and also won the pole vault and shot put. 
In their third meet, the women's track team placed first 
out of four teams, winning 12 events in the process. This 
early success showed strong potential for the remainder 
of the season as the team continued to improve and win 
more events. 




Above: A BC runner stays in the middle of the pack. Below Left: Laurel Burdick warms up for a race. 
Below Right: Maria Cicero leads a group of runners around a bend. Photos Courtesy of Maria Cicero 




248 Sports 







Above Left: A BC runner speeds around a bend. Above Right: A member of a relay carries the baton. Below Left: Alexis Lake competes in the steeplechase. Below Right: A BC runner holds 
the inside lane during a relay. Photos Courtesy of Maria Cicero 




Sport- 



The Women's Golf team was under the leadership of head coach 
Trevor Drum and assistant coach Peter Powers for the second 
year in a row. The team competes in tournaments in both the 
fall and spring seasons. In the 2004-2005 spring season the Eagles 
finished tenth at the Lady Hoya Invitational in April. Katie Napleton 
led Boston College with a 26th place overall finish. The team came 
in 12th at the Bonnie Hoover Invitational in Harrisonburg, V\. Naple- 
ton, who was the top golfer in every spring event for Boston College, 
placed 21st overall. BC finished the season with a fourth place finish 
at the conference tournament at Notre Dame. Napleton finished with 
an 86 to place ninth overall. All three senior captains had strong 
finishes to end their golf careers at Boston College: Moira O'Connell 
finished 10th with an 87, Tiffany Werig placed 15th with an 89, and 
Elizabeth Callery placed 17th with a 91. Elizabeth Friel also scored 
for the Eagles. The 2005-2006 team was young after loosing all three 
senior captains from last year. Led by senior Elizabeth Friel, the 
team was rounded out by two freshman and three sophomores. The 
underclassmen stepped up to the plate and made great contributions 
in the fall season. The women opened their season with a thirteenth 
place finish at the Notre Dame invitational. Laura Smilnak was the 
top BC finisher at 26th place overall. On September 17 and 18 the 
team competed at the Dartmouth Invitational and came in seventh. 
Freshman Emily Cannon was the top BC golfer, coming in tied for 
tenth place followed by sophomore Courtney Tincher who finished 
17th. The team finished third at the Tribe Intercollegiate tournament 
in Williamsburg, VA. Cannon was once again the top Eagle with a 
even par 72 which included 5 birdies. The team is looking forward to 
a strong showing in the 2005-2006 spring season. 





A BC golfer watches the result of a drive. Photos Courtesy ofMcGrath Studios 



liip: Reading the green. Bottom: Lining up a drive on the tee box. Photos Courtesy o 
McGruth Studios 



250 Sports 







Ibp \ golfer shows how to successful!} exit .1 sand trap. Bottom: Focus and concentration on the green fh.vov < th Stud** 




Sport- 



The 2004-2005 mens golf team finished strong, 
despite being a rather young squad. In April, 
the team went to the 2005 Big East Champi- 
onships at Notre Dame. The tournament, which was 
supposed to be 54 holes, had to be shortened to 18 
holes due to severe weather. Boston College finished 
fourth, led by freshman Jim Granello who finished 
fifth overall with an eight over par. Kyle Kelly and 
Jim Roney tied for 16th place. The team earned a 
spot in the East Regionals in May, which BC had not 
been to since 1995. The squad was also proud to 
have Alex Snickerbacker named to the New England 
All-region Team over the summer. The 2005-2006 
fall season marked the team's eighth year under the 
leadership of head coach Trevor Drum. It was the 
second year for assistant coach Peter Powers. The 
team also benefited from the experience of senior 
captain Kyle Kelly. The squad was rounded out with 
juniors Ryan Sturma, Phil Holden, and Tim Holden 
as well as sophomores Snickerbacker, Rob Reed, and 
Granello. The team finished 19th at their opening 
tournament for the fall season, the Mid Pines Invi- 
tational. They were led by Reed who placed 24th 
overall. Boston College placed third at the Blue 
Devil Invitational when Granello finished at one 
over par to lead the Eagles in the two-day tourna- 
ment. Reed was also BC's top finisher in their tenth 
place finish at the Towson Invitational, second place 
finish in the Joe Agee Invitational, and seventh at the 
Pirate Invitational. The team is looking forward to 
more strong play and a good finish in the 2005-2006 
spring season. 



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252 Sports 




I Ins Page: Top Left: A BC golfer tecs off in a tourna- 
nent. Top Right: A member of the golf team displays 
jood form on a drive. Right: The team warms up on the 
iriving range before a day on the course. Below: Getting 
v.ul\ to tee off. 

Ipposite Page: Top: Perfect form on the driving range. 
Bottom Left: A BC golfer watches his putt. Bottom 
^ight: A member of the golf team lines up his putt. 
RlOtOS b) Bob MeGrnth/McCmith Studios 



Sport ^ 



The Women's Crew Team competes in 
both the fall and spring seasons. The 
Spring season is the biggest season for 
the rowers, but they train all year long. This 
devoted group rises at five otlock to row each 
morning on the Charles River. The Eagles' 
first big regatta of the 2005 spring season was 
the Knect Cup. The varsity eight team had a 
disappointing finish, as they did not qualify 
for the finals. Other BC boats finished strong 
with the second varsity eight winning the gold 
medal, a third place finish by the varsity four, 
and another third in the second varsity four 
event. A huge highlight of the season was the 
rowers' second place overall finish in the Big 
East Championships at the End of April. It 
was the best Boston College has ever done in 
the conference championships, topping the 
previous best of third place in 2002. The first 
varsity eight placed third in their event, and 
the second varsity eight garnered a second 
place. The team was very proud to have head 
coach Steve Fiske honored as Big East Coach 
of the Year. The Eagles also finished second 
overall in the ECAC Metro Championships in 
May. Most of the races were cancelled due to 
inclement weather, however the varsity eight 
event was held and BC's boat earned the silver 
medal. In the Fall 2005 season, the team com- 
peted in the Head of the Charles in Boston. 
They raced multiple boats in the regatta and 
were happy to have the novice four finish high 
enough to guarantee a spot for that boat in the 
2006 Head of the Charles. This was a great 
accomplishment, as it is very hard to get boats 
into the popular regatta which boasts boats 
from all over the world, including Olympic 
teams. The team competed in the Princeton 
Chase at the end of October. They ended the 
fall season with the Foot of the Charles regatta, 
placing two boats in the top eight. The team 
signed received letters of intent from three 
high school rowers in December, who will be 
joining the team as freshman in the fall 2006 
season. The team looks forward to continued 
improvement and success in both the 2006 
spring and fall seasons. 



Top Right: The crew team racing at a regatta in the 2005 spring 
season. Right: The varsity team gathers tor a group shot and 
displays their medals at the Big East Championships in Wooster. 
Photos courtesy of Liz Millar 




254 Sports 





lop: The varsit) eight leaves the dock at Rig Bast. Above; The rowers practice at home on 
the Charles River. Photos courtesj ofliz jvfi//ar 



Above The second varsit) eight racing in the 2005 Head of the Charles Regatta in F 
Photo courtesy of Liz Millar 



Sf 




lop: BC fans show their enthusiasm on game day. Above: Baldwin the Eagle takes a well-deserved break between 
plays. Photos by Bob McGntth/McCirath Studios 



A loyal Superl'an cheers on BC against Ball State. Photo 
David Trudo 



256 Sports 




bp: Dedicated Eagles' Fans show support their team during the RC vs. Florida State 
nno. Vbove: Superfans arc going to work for the team. Photos b\ Boh McGnith 
kCrath Studios 



The Supertan section cheers on the football the team. Photo* 6) Bob McGnth WcGrath 
Studios 



^Bfliw 




Hal^@ll 




A Tradition Of Excellence. 
Then, Now and Always 




On July 1, 2005, Boston College officially left the Big East and entered the Atlantic Coast Conference. A charter 
member of the Big East in 1979, BC was invited to join the ACC as its twelfth member. The ACC was founded 
on May 8, 1953. It originally had only seven members, but additional schools have been admitted to the conference on 
four occassions, the most recent being BC. The ACC has been considered an athletic powerhouse conference since its 
introduction, boasting 91 teams winning national championships over the years in a variety of sports. By joining the 
ACC, Boston College accepted a challenge to compete at the highest level of collegiate athletics in the country. BC was 
officially invited to move to the ACC on October 12, 2003 and immediately acccepted the offer. The move guarantees 
tougher competition for all sports, a more secure athletic future, and greater revenue. As new opponents are faced, old 
rivalries are left behind. Within the ACC, there are 11 varsity men's sports and 12 women's sports. BC participates in 
all of the supported women's sports and all of the men's sports except for lacrosse and wrestling. Since the ACC also 
features men's lacrosse, at BC it may make the jump from club to varsity in the future. Of the 12 schools in the league, 
BC has the distinction of having the most varsity sports, a total of 31, and also of being the only school to have men's 
and women's ice hockey, sailing, and skiing. While these sports will remain independent of league, the other sports 
will face a new level of competition from the southern schools. In its inaugural season, BC hopes to follow the motto 
of the ACC, A Tradition Of ExcellenccThen, Now and Always^' as a new era in BC athletics begins. 






ISS®HB3@ DC0@DC 



The women's equestrian club provides 
opportunities for riders of all levels. The 
organization provides riding lessons for 
members and allows them to enter horse shows. 
Within the club, there is an equestrian team that 
participates in IHSA intercollegiate horse shows. 
The team participates in six horse shows in 
the fall, and they compete in three more in the 
spring, followed by the regional tournament. In 
November 2005, Boston College hosted a horse 
show at their home Volo Farm. For the 2005-2006 
season, Michala Mulhern was selected as club 
president and Eileen Walsh is the vice president. 
In addition to riding, the Equestrian club provides 
opportunities at horse rescue farms, handicapped 
riding centers, and equestrain-care education. 




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260 Sports 



The mens rugby team opened the 2005 season 
in a new, more challenging conference. The 
team's impressive 2004 season was highlighted 
by winning the Green League Championships, earn- 
ing them a place in the White League for 2005. The 
Eagles performed well against their new opponents, 
finishing the season with a record of 53. The squa- 
dof about 50 members played several games on its 
practice field at St. John's Seminary. The rugby team 
emphasized fitness, dedication to a cause, scholastic 
accomplishment, and service as key components of 
their success. Not only did the team push themselves 
physically on the field, coming to school several weeks 
early to train and participating in rigorous work-out 
sessions throughout the year, but they also value what 
they accomplished off the field. The rugby players 
volunteered in the community a great deal. They were 
involved in the MDA Passion Plunge in which they 
took a dip into the ocean on Valentine's Day to earn 
money for the MDA. The rugby team also sponsored 
and ran a field day for the underprivileged students 
of the nearby Nativity Prep. The team also benefited 
from the leadership of Coach Brendon Worley. and the 
2005 rugby officers: Kevin Brady. Tom Case, Mark 
Ciccone, Sean Hanel, Andy Walsh, Brian Ciccarelli. 
Stephen Pettruti, and Kyle Ramachandran. This core 
group of individuals kept the large group organized 
and focused throughout the season. 





Sport- 



The Women's club rugby team had another active 
fall season. This popular team was proud to 
have a well-rounded roster with numerous 
members of each class, including seven new fresh- 
man. The team had one win this season - a 24-10 vic- 
tory over Brown. The team also competed against the 
University of Massachusetts at Amherst, Williams, 
Radcliffe. and Dartmouth. They were proud that 
their coach received the William J. Dolan award and 
was inducted into the Boston College Athletic Hall of 
Fame. The rugby squad is looking forward to further 
improvement and fun in the future. 







v.t'yflri, 




262 Sports 




The Boston College Cycling Club is a co-ed team which offers many 
riding opportunities to students. Its members ride recreational 1\ as 
well as racing road and mountain. There were 21 members on its 
roster this year, but numerous others joined the team for their group rides. 
Mountain racing occurred during the fall season, and the spring season 
consisted of road racing. During the seasons, the team trained with out- 
door group rides. To stay in shape between seasons they trained two days 
a week in the plex. The cylcing team competed in races all over New Eng- 
land, New York. New Jersey and Pennsylvania including the Boston Road 
Race and the Boston Beanpot Classic. The Classic took place at Tufts and 
was organized by several Boston schools, including BC. The team is look- 
ing forward to welcoming new riders to the squad and more strong racing 
in the 2006 spring season. 







The Mens Crew Team races in both the fall and spring seasons. 
Although it is a club team, it competes against many varsity teams 
from schools across the country including the top leightweight 
boats from Navy, Harvard, Yale, and Cornell. The Spring 2005 season 
was marked by great victories and a major loss for the team. BC won 
the lightweight eight event at the Jesuit Invitational Regatta They also 
won repeat championships in the lightweight events of the ECAC Rowing 
Championships and the Dad Vail Championship Regatta. They closed 
out the spring season racing in the lightweight eight event at the Intercol- 
legiate Rowing Association Championships. The season was not without 
it's share of hardship. At the Dad Vail championship regatta in May 2005, 
the mens crew team suffered the loss of one of its teammates, Scott Liao, 
after the lightweight 8 won a gold in their event. Laio was an amazing 
oarsman, student, and friend. They would like 
to dedicate this page to him. The Fall 2006 
season was marked by three big regattas. The 
crew team raced in the Head of the Charles 
Regatta, the Princeton Chase, and the Foot 
of the Charles. In the upcoming 2006 spring 
season, the team looks to become the first ever 
to three-peat at the Dad Vail Regatta. 





Up 




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264 Sports 



The Boston College Figure Skating team is a 
very active club that has been growing since the 
2001-2002 academic year. It now boasts a large 
roster composed of skaters from all grades. The team 
is led by Coach Merita Mullens and Faculty Advisor 
Dr. Judith Schindul-Rothschild. The team competes 
in both synchronized and freestyle events. The syn- 
chronized skaters started the 2204-2005 season with a 
third place finish in the collegiate division of the 2005 
Eastern Synchronized Skating Sectional Champion- 
ships. At the 2005 US Synchronized Team Skating 
Championships, the team placed third in the quali- 
fying round and went on to finish tenth in the final 
round. The freestyle team competed in events held by 
Boston University and MIT, finishing fourth in both. 
The team is looking forward to another full schedule 
for the 2005-2006 season, in which they will be travel- 
ing a great deal to places including Deluth, Georigia 
and Grand Rapids, Michigan. They hope to qualify for 
the Eastern Sectional Championships again, as well as 
the Freestyle National Championships. 







SENIORS 



Edited by: 
Kathleen Ahearn, Carolyn Dorazio & Shane Stryzinski 

Life is different from one year to the next at Boston College. At first, everything is 
new and exciting. Freshman Orientation showed us, through skits and laughter and 
Father Himes, exactly what to expect when we got to the Heights. Well, maybe not 
exactly. Those first few days in September of 2002 seem like a blur of "Where do you live? 
What's your major? Where are you from?" We got lost a few times on the bus and in Boston 
and we were thrilled to find our way back to the welcoming embrace of Chestnut Hill (or 
Newton). By sophomore year students have settled into a routine and try to bring stability 
to life. The key word in that sentence would be "try!' Finding off-campus housing, making 
plans for abroad, discovering the Career Center and finally picking a major all seemed to 
leave very little time for enjoying the present moment. Still, we celebrated as we beat Notre 
Dame in Alumni stadium and we celebrated as we won the Beanbot. We also celebrated 
the major every-day victories such as actually going to all of our classes and passing most 
of our exams. Junior year allows students to reflect on past experiences and make changes 
to better their Boston College lives. For some, we took time abroad to reflect on just how 
little of the world we know and also to remember that as wonderful as crepes and pints and 
sangria all are, Chestnut Hill is our home. For those that stayed put, junior year meant 
off-campus parties, a road-trip (and a win!) to Notre Dame, and finally, finally turning 21. 
We solidified friendships and internships, decided against picking up yet another major 
and/or minor and finally learned exactly how to not fall in O'Neill in the middle of a bliz- 
zard. Now, after four years of life in Chestnut Hill, Massachusetts, these Eagles are ready 
to celebrate one final journey, together as seniors. We have conquered theses and term 
papers and lab reports. We have mastered waiting in line at MaryAnn's (with our passports) 
and we have learned that a good night always ends up in the Mods. We have beaten Notre 
Dame (3 times!) and have chanted insulting things at BU 
fans. We have finished our degrees and started friend- 
ships. We have done a lot during our four years on The 
Heights. Most importantly, we have left impressions of 
friendships on each other. Let these pages act as a record 
of those impressions as we "fly like an ealge" to set the 
world aflame. Mnrisa Fusco 




266 Seniors 




Senior* 




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Becca Madson, Katherine Path, Jayshree Mahtani, Liz Weyman, Taylor Goodell & Marisa Fusco 



it 





Jenny Theiss, Shannon Hennessy, El lie Nasser, Bethany Knight & Rebecca Goula 
268 Seniors 



Stephanie Mariconda, Bria Walling & Margaret Chow 




Anne Hessburg, Alexia Lake & Kate Ouenette 



Jenm P innon V 






'Time keeps on slipping slipping 
slippin' into the future 
I want to fly like an eagle, to the sea 
Fly like an eagle, let my spirit carry me 
I want to fly like an eagle, till I'm free 
Oh, Lord, through the revolution.!. 9 

-STEVE MILLER BAND 





270 Seniors 



w U^E AN B4G/. 

V *^ ACHIEVING NEW HEIGHTS *C? 



We became the newest addition to the Heights in September 2002. We lived on Upper and 
Newton, tailgated in the Mods, studied in Bapst until 5AM during finals, partied off- 
campus, traveled abroad for studies and service trips, and sang "For Boston" more times 
than we know. The past four years have truly taught us to Fly Like An Eagle. Our time in Chestnut Hill 
is marked by events on many levels, all of which have undoubtedly made us who we are. The sexual 
abuse scandal in the Catholic Church and the War in Iraq both emerged. Hillside and St. Ignatius Gate 
were constructed and opened. Cardinal Joseph Ratzinger succeeded Pope John Paul II. and the Atlan- 
tic Coast Conference replaced the Big East. We have seen the transformation of Lower into Corcoran 
Commons and the addition of the Yawkey Center to Alumni Stadium. Road trips to Notre Dame. March 
Madness with BC ranked #4. and the Frozen Four fostered the spirit of all Boston College Eagles. 
Storming the court after defeating Syracuse, going to the Fleet Center for the Beanpot. and the toss up 
of Superfans with Alumni Stadium roaring in excitement will be fond memories of BC history which 
we shaped. We have had internships and jobs in Boston, taken T rides into the city for food, shopping, 
and entertainment, and walked Linden Lane with students studying and playing frisbee on Bapst Lawn. 
From ordering season tickets by mail in the summer to waiting in line at Conte and the evolution of The 
Chocolate Bar replacing The Perch, we have been a part of this experience. The community of Boston 
College has been there throughout it all. with friends, staff, and professors undoubtedly impacting us; 
challenging us to discover where we are. why we are, and who we are. As we leave the Heights to take 
on new challenges, we are prepared with the compass which Boston College has provided. The growth 
of campus with new land across Comm Ave., consistent national 
rankings academically and athletically, and one of the highest and 

qualitative applicant pools in the countrx is indicative of the sue * 

cess we as members of the BC community are poised to achieve. 
The statue of St. Ignatius of Loyola on the Higgins Green alludes 
to the idea that we. the community of BC. are aspiring to some 
thing great, something higher than us. As men and women for 
others, we are constantly reminded of our obligation to be true to 
both ourselves and others, and to truly Fly Like An Eagle. Wo are 
Boston College just ;is much as it is us. We arc the Class of 2006 




Sen 




U)MM('Nm /tf i: OF MASS AC 11 US El IS 
Ml I ROI'oWv* DIM RU I COMMISSION 

CASTLE ISLAND 

FORT INDEPENDENCE 

A NATIONAL REGISTER SITE 




Patrick Lewis. Mai-Linh Lai. Karen Maciolek, Kristen Gorham & Monica Santis 




Liz Weyman. Taylor Goodell. Amanda Kearns, Natalie Caruso &Alana Mahoney 




Taileatine before the FS Who? same 




Seniors kicking back on the beach 



272 Seniors 















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Carolyn Dorazio & Maureen Kelly 




BOSTON 



taking a break at Conte Form 



The ability to combine fashion and school spirit is an unmatched skill 



Seniors 



"We were just wasting time, let the hours roll by, 
Doing nothing for the fun, a little taste of 
the good life, whether right or wrong, 
makes us want to stay, stay, stay for a while. 
I shall miss this thing when it all rolls by!! 

- DAVE MATTHEWS BAND 





274 Seniors 



AND LEAVING OUR MARK ON THE TOWN 



If we have learned anything by the time senior year is upon us. we have learned the value of time 
management, and the importance of being able to balance two very essential elements of college life: 
hitting the books then hitting the bars, although not necessarily in that order. Once we've honed this 
skill, there is nothing holding us back. We are no longer limited to shady places with loose ID policies, 
or places where we know the guy at the door: we are not limited by time nor distance. Boston College 
seniors are out everyday of the week in all the reaches of the city. Despite the distances some may travel 
for a night on the town, many chose not to venture beyond the comforts of Cleveland Circle however, as 
there is are lack of options in our own backyard. Despite the complaints we may have about BC favorites 
like Roggies, CitySide, or the often criticized but always populated Maryanns. there is nothing quite like 
being able to guarantee that you will find your classmates out partying just a short walk from campus. If 
those choices are too limiting, throughout the wonderful city of Boston it is possible to find a social scene 
for everyone: be it pubs, clubs, chic wine bars, or our favorite local dive: there is something for all of us. 
The Kells and Harvard and Brighton Avenues in Allston have recently grown into BC favorites, adding to 
the allure of Bostons nightlife. Although your parents may not enjoy the thought of their children out until 
all hours of the night every day of the week, at times like these it becomes necessary to realize that time 
is up. it is year four, the final round, the victory lap. When will you ever in your life get the opportunity to 
waste so much time? The answer is never again. After graduation there is graduate school or job applica- 
tions; in some cases, there are both. After graduation we are expected to be grown ups, to work a nine to 
five, and to pay our own bills while living in our own places. Much to our dismay there is no longer time 
for pub crawls or daily happy hours, because once we leave these 
Heights, it is on to the dreaded real world. While we are here, while 
there is time to spare, drinks to be had. and bars to be danced in. let 
none of that time be wasted. This is our time, our opportunity, to 
live life w ithout regret. We should not be afraid to live it up. because 
college happens only once. So while there is time, lets all raise a 
glass to the Boston College class of 2006. to four years of memories, 
and to years and years of possibilities, and of course, to Maryanns. 




Sen 




Rahul Patcl & Irene Marinakis 



Lauren Brennan, Jessica Mantas & Rebecca Finck 



276 Seniors 




Malt Ltvadary, Alyssa Richman, Megan Rtzpatrick & Matt R( 



Jessie Chou & Serena Wonc 




\\ana Miller. Laura \\arnienho\en. .Vhlc\ Christie. Mikacla O'Connor. Mia Johnson. Heather Jones. Amber Clarke. Melhsa Langone & Nina Clark 



Senior^ 



"They will see us waving 
from such great Heights 
'Come down noW, they'll say 
but everything looks perfect from 
far away 'Come down noW, 
but well stay.'.' 

- THE POSTAL SERVICE 





278 Seniors 



^oviftS to ^e 4 Cc 

VH >* Eagles already soaring to glory y _ r 



On July 1. 2005. Boston College became the twelfth member of the Atlantic Coast Conference. 
The northern-most university with the largest array of varsity programs in the conference. 
BC distinguished itself from the onset. This was a huge development for the community 
since it introduced new and exciting competition for the Eagles. Since ACC standards require its foot- 
ball teams to have their own weight room facilities. Boston College quickly added the Yawkey Center 
to campus this summer. On Wednesday. September 28. the day before student season hockey and bas- 
ketball tickets would officially be sold. Boston College Superfans came out in the thousands, hinting 
at the enthusiasm of being in the ACC. Conte Forum became a temporary home for the Superfan 
faithful, lining up throughout the day in anticipation of purchasing tickets the following morning at 7 
AM. Hundreds of (mostly upperclass) students waiting in front of Hillside Cafe were dismissed at 10 
PM after being informed that 3000 students already occupied the halls of Conte Forum. Juniors and 
seniors wished to use their own 'Talons of Fury" against the many freshmen and sophomores who now 
possessed the opportunity to purchase the inaugural year tickets. Weeks later, an email from the Athlet- 
ics Department offered a lottery to win one of two season packages of basketball tickets. This allowed 
many more upperclassmen to attend Eagles games before graduation. BC had shown it belonged in the 
ACC. Early morning wakeups and tailgating now had a greater purpose. ESPN's College Game Day 
came to campus for our debut in the ACC. broadcasting live from the Dustbowl. Students crowded the 
background, covered in maroon and gold. The FSU game drew national attention, and BC was going to 
make sure it was recognized and respected. "For Boston" echoed from the infamous sea of gold shirts 
in Alumni Stadium. Despite the cold and rain, the stands were 
always filled in Chestnut Hill. Eager Superfans even traveled for 
hours to attend the Maryland football game the weekend before 
Thanksgiving break. Our football team proved itself by winning 
the Atlantic division of the ACC over Florida State \\ ith an overall 
record of 83. The promising start to the inagural season finds the 
Eagles already soaring to glory in the Atlantic Coast Conference. 




Sen 




S\lvi;t lleckema & Jihan Mandilaui 



Meredith DuMais, Jean Blosser, Taylor Heyen. Klisc Melvine, Kaitlin O'Malley & Shannon Slump 



280 Seniors 




Liz Zembruski, Tina Corea A Lisa Quinn 



Margaret Kilcoyne. Emih Gend Eamonn Kell\ 



Seniors 



"Well it's down the road I go 
Well I got the blues 
from way down in New Orleans 
way on down the road... 
Trying to find my way back home" 

- VAN MORRISON 





282 Seniors 




i ^^ Rn^TONF Pot t fof Rf^pond^ to tr AOFnY r > 



'4 



From August 23 through August 31, 2005 Hurricane Katrina blew through the Central Gulf Coast 
of the United States with winds reaching 175 miles per hour, leaving behind damage ranging 
from 70 to 130 billion dollars, and taking the lives of upwards of 1.325 people. The storm caused 
large amounts of damage in areas such as the Bahamas. South Florida, Mississippi, and Alabama, but 
no part of the nation was so damaged and devastated as the Greater New Orleans area of Louisiana. 
When the storm surged on the coast near Buras-Triumph. Louisiana, the levee system that protected 
New Orleans was destroyed, and the entire city was flooded. People were forced from their homes not 
only out of the city, but also out of the state. 90,000 square miles of the United States was designated as 
federal disaster zones, with over five million left without power, and the possibility of electricity being 
absent for up to four months. Homeland Security Secretary Michael Chertoff described Katrina's after- 
math as being "probably the worst catastrophe, or set of catastrophes in the county's history' There was 
an immediate outpouring of help by groups like the Salvation Army and the Red Cross, who worked on a 
large scale to raise money and provide food and shelter for those displaced. But help was necessary still 
on a smaller scale, as thousands of students were left without schools. Boston College was there to lend 
a hand. Boston College accepted 150 visiting students from Loyola and Tulane into the Woods College 
of Advancing Studies, and was able to provide 100 students with emergency housing on the university's 
Brighton Campus. There were also several students enrolled in a variety of Boston College's gradu- 
ate programs. Although the students are studying here on a non-matriculating basis, they will always 
be a part of the Boston College community Until their schools reopen and they are able to return to 
New Orleans, we would like to recognize the students who w ill be 
remaining with us for what will be a large portion of their senior 
year of college, and remind them that they are here as Eagles, and 
are truly a part of the heights. Most importantly, we want them to 
know that both they the students and their families will he in our 
thoughts and prayers throughout their sta\ here and still yet when 
they return home. Kathleen Aheam. Photos I sec/ with Permission 
of The United States Na\ \ 




Sen jots 




fill /abet h Lee & Ju Lin Tham 



Zach Zinsli, Ethan Gregor, Mike Scott & Andrew Cole 



284 Seniors 




Victoria O'Kane, Carolyn Hassel. Alison R\pkenia & Alyson Bern-item 



Senior*. 



"I used to worry about the future, 
but then I threw my caution to the wind. 
I had no reason to be carefree, no no no, 
until I took a trip to the other side of town. 
You know I heard that boogie rhythm, 
hey, I had no choice but to get down down down'. 9 

- JAMIROQUAI 





286 Seniors 



sB tfioRins 

The curse of enjoying yourself 



The symptoms begin subtly. One day you don't feel like going to class so you just do not. The 
next day, you ignore some reading. Justfied by watching "The OC" or catching a new movie on 
Channel 48, you choose not to study for a quiz that, if you think about it and maybe even take 
the time to do the math, really only counts for about two percent of your overall grade. What you don't 
realize, though, is the real cause of this increasingly relaxed behavior: senioritis. Before you even expect 
to feel its effects, you are already hungover at your Wednesday afternoon class, if you even make it 
there. And it's only October. It inevitably happens to the best of us. The delicate balance of class-going 
and bar-hopping becomes more of a significant difference. Weekend routines creep into daily forms. 
Senioritis is almost hypnotic; after your first few encounters with simply forgetting about school and 
enjoying the freedom of all of your friends' legality, it seems there is no escape from this new lifestyles' 
warm, welcoming arms. Then it hits you as you come across your dusty syllabi crumpled at the back 
of your drawer while searching for your missing shot glass and notice that in one week a long paper is 
due and a midterm worth half your grade will be given. You feel a sudden rush of panic. "Whoops... 
how could I have let that happen?" you ponder with your friends at the bar on a Wednesda) night. In 
your almost two decades of being a student, you would think that you would have the drill down. And 
not only should you be completing these simple academic tasks, but also searching for a job to take you 
down a new road of life. Or maybe even preparing for graduate school exams to enjo\ several more years 
of even more rigorous academic studies. These seem to have all been forgotten by the constant celebra- 
tions of the "last Halloween or hangover in March as a senior!' All in the same situation, you agree 
that you have let some responsibilities slide and it might be tough 
to maneuver. As you throw back your shots and chug your beers 
to forget all the worries that put you in this very position though, 
you know that you will always remember these moments with your 
friends, and not care that you sacrificied a grade to make them. 
College will not be remembered as missing that A- but instead 
experiencing times that you still laugh about years later. 




Sen- 




Ashley Augusta, Molly Trowbridge & Blair Armstrong 



Chris Pizzo, Luke Howe, Brian Keller, Brian Roundy & Ethan Gregor 



288 Seniors 




Chris Marques. Brian Keller & Amish Pale 



Stephanie Manconda ! idre 






Senior Perspectives 

For Those Who Went Above and Beyond 







Tina Corea 

College of Arts & Sciences 

Tina has consistently involved herself in all aspects of the BC 
experience and in doing so has sought to improve the future of 
the university. She has portrayed a genuine passion and concern 
for today's pressing global issues through her International Stud- 
ies major and participating in the Cuernavaca Immersion Trip. 
More than actively involved with campus life, she fully commits 
to whatever she undertakes. Founder of the BC Urban Project, 
she sought to increase the academic dialogue and understanding 
of urban life on campus. She has assisted with the planning of 
BCs future through her involvement with various university and 
UGBC committees impacting campus life and the BC commu- 
nity. "The Boston College faculty and staff and my incredible 
peers have shaped my future plans through their love and intel- 
lectual imaginations, and have molded me into the person I am 
today, continually pushing me to look beyond my own world view 
and to live out the mission of being a servant leader when it will 
be most difficult." 



Brendan Sage 

Carroll School of Management 

Brendan seeks to incorporate who he is into Boston College, 
and in so doing, serves as an embodiment of a true man for 
others. His passion for the school, his fellow students, the com- 
munity around him, and the community abroad is immense. As 
a Campus School Marathon runner, he seeks the full develop- 
ment of the individual. A leader of both Kairos and the Jamaica 
Summer Service Trip and a PULSE volunteer with Project Bread, 
Brendan's passion for service and care of the individual is one of 
commitment and enthusiasm. "Meeting passionate and inspir- 
ing friends and mentors throughout these different experiences 
has been unbelievable, and I have been challenged to reflect on 
what Jesuit ideals really mean, which has helped me grow into a 
complete person." The compassion and attention which Brendan 
exhibits towards others is an inspiring display of one individual 
making a difference. 




290 Seniors 



Class of 2006 



Ever to Excel 




Anthony Nunziata 

Cm i h.i <>i Arts cV S< iences 

\ membei ol the Order ol the I and Grown, tnthoir) has 
applied to excel" in academics and service to others His 

passion and love for others is evident in all he does, including 
ins serving as ■ Kairos leader and officer of the l nrversit) Cli 
rale During his BC tenure, Vnthonj has proudl) represented 
Host. mi College singing .is ■ soloist with Keith I ockhart and the 
Host, mi Pops Symphony Orchesti S motion) H.ill andduri 
Pops on the Heightsr ts director ol Harold Pinter's The Col lei? 
lion, he crafted .1 production that eventual I) lead 10 bis winni 
the Region 1 Kenned) (outer American College Theate al 

Dii \ward Vnthori) h.is performed in sis th il pro 

ductions and was awarded trn Council 

twardfoi his contributions to the trtsoncampt rheadi 

in Vrts Initiative with his brother Will \h 
o\ tin passions and how I can use m> talents nid 

around me." citing the strong liberal arts and Jesuit edu 
that is Boston Colk 



Margaret Nuzzolhse 

Colleg of Arts cV Sciences 

Margaret^ commitment to faith ami ramify and her love of B< 
always led her to excellence \ natural leader with grea - rid 

enthusiasm, Mai tret has pursued .1 course .it H( thai has rcsul; 
in making tangible impacts on campus. She ran the lai rt- 

menl in I GBC Her spirit is evident through her imoKcmenl with 
the Office of First i* penencean * del M 

ret learned about II Salvador over spring break and « 
that she returned to spend .1 summer there \oluntecnng and will 
leadifl rvke trip there this spring break s the embodi- 

ment oJ BC school spirit and a positive OUtl • N n- 

st.intl\ seeks to dn whatever she underta* il and is not afraid 

to otter .1 refreshing perspecti\e B its spirit and commum 
has set m\ heart aflame" Her spirit, love, and ser\ant le :ti- 

tude is win Margaret excels. 




M 



Senior Perspectives 

Men and Women for Others 




Ted Serra 

College of Arts & Sciences 

Ted devotes great care to his academic pursuits and makes 
diligent efforts to place academics as his top priority. He has 
achieved balance, however, by involving himself with a number 
extra-curricular activities which focus on making the BC experi- 
ence better for others. As a member of Appalachia Leadership 
Council, he assists in the placement of hundreds of students in 
spring-break service projects. On Halftime Council, he chal- 
lenged BC students to think about the direction of their own 
studies. He spent a semester studying in Madrid and continues 
his study of piano. "BC has challenged me to incorporate ser- 
vice into my everyday life and presented me with a community 
of motivated people working to make the world better for tomor- 
row!' He brings to each task his sincere desire to have it be the 
best that it possibly can be. 



Rosa Ortiz 

College of Arts & Sciences 

Whatever it is that Rosa undertakes, she does so with genuine 
ness, leadership, dedication and organization. She firmly adheres 
to the Jesuit ideal of seeking social justice in all aspects of life 
and is not afraid to offer a challenge to an accepted norm if it 
defies that idea. This has led her to partake in activities that ben- 
efit others: with the Red Cross, she helps ensure humane treat- 
ment for all, and as a founder of the BC chapter of Americans for 
Informed Democracy, she assists in educating the BC commu- 
nity about international issues of great concern. "My professors 
and friends at BC have helped me to face challenging questions 
and not to be satisfied with easy answers." Rosa never ceases and 
is a woman for others, excelling in all she does. 



292 Seniors 




Class of 2006 

Fly Like an Eagle 




Shen Chen 

Carroll School of Management 

Shcn has always embraced the BC community and those outside 
BC on many levels. Becoming involved early on has allowed her 
to be proactive on campus such as creating a new diversity skit 
for the freshmen orientation and helping to bring an advanced 
Chinese course to the curriculum. She is outgoing and likes to 



be around different cultures, serving as a PULSE volunteer at 
the International Rescue Committee and through her work with 
the Asian Caucus. Additionally, she has had the opportunity to 
be a research assistant to a graduate professor in CSOM. focus- 
ing on Operations and Strategic Management. Shen contributes 
her action as a woman for others in stating. "My amazing friends 
and mentors at BC have been integral in cultivating m\ passions 
and shaping the individual I am today!' 



Will Nunziata 

College of Arts & Sciences 

Will has taken on a number of leadership positions whether that 
be with the goal of transitioning freshmen to collegiate life as 
an Orientation and as a 48 Hours leader. He has sung at the US. 
Open, the Rockefeller Center, and with the Boston Pops Symphoin 
Orchestra. As a National Italian American Foundation Scholar- 
ship winner, he sang at a gala honoring Luciano Pavarotti in 2004. 
A 2005 recipient of the Boston College Arts Council Award. Will 
has appeared in 7 productions at BC and was also was nominated 
by the Kennedy Center Collegiate Awards for his directorship o\ 
Bat Boy: The Musical. Along with his brother Anthony, Will has 
spearheaded an initiative to better the space for the arts at BC. He 
enjoyed his Summer Appalachia trip to Cats Bridge. Virginia so 
much that he organized a return trip over Christmas break. Will 
credits his service to others by stepping outside of his comfort 
zone and "through classes, outside-classroom experience, and the 
overwhelming love and support from family, friends, and facult) 
while at Boston College." 




Senior* 




Where arc you guys going and can we come.' 



Sara Combies, Shannon Fallon & Courtney Combies 



294 Seniors 




Marisa Fusco it T.nlor Goodcll 



Meli^a Donovan & Ashlev Amorello 



Senior^ 




Drev\ Wiecnicki, Alexis Lake. Laurel Burdick, Lora Mead & Ryan Lowry 



Seniors 296 




Stephanie Mariconda. Libb) Merrill & All DiQuollo 



David Nagib. Shannon Jerolmon. Lujuana Milton. Danielle Carroll. Su 

Senior^ 




Lauren Brennan. Alana Mahoney & Amanda Lee 
2"X Seniors 



Michael Murphy 




Nothing compares to being in the company of friend^ 



Senior*. 299 




Leslie Abbott 


Michael Abbott 


Tara Abbott 


George Abdelsayed 


Kristen Abels 


College of Arts & Science 


College of Arts & Science 


College of Arts & Science 


College of Arts & Science 


School of Management 


Theater Arts 


Communications 


Communications 


Biochemistry 


Finance 


Communication 




Theatre 




German 




Ufuoma Abiola 

College of Arts & Science 

Psychology 



Pamela Abraham 

School of Management 

Marketing 



Philip Abraham 

College of Arts & Science 

Biology 



Melissa Abruzzese 

College of Arts & Science 

Communications 



Stephen Acampora 

School of Management 

Accounting 




Benjamin Adams 

College of Arts & Science 

Political Science 



Elizabeth Adams 

College of Arts & Science 

Biology 



Percy Addo-Yobo 

College of Arts & Science 

Biology 



Gintas Adomkaitis 

School of Management 

Accounting 



Sara Agostinho 

School of Education 

Human Development 

Philosophy 




Wajiha Ahmed 

College of Arts & Science 

International Studies 



Brian Ahn 

College of Arts & Science 

History 



Emily Alberghini 

School of Education 

Elementary Education 

Persp Spanish America 



Brian Aldridge 

School of Management 

Finance 

Accounting 



Nicholas Allan 

College of Arts & Science 

Biology 







i 



Beth Allen 

School of Education 

Elementary Education 

Math/Computer Science 



Nick Altman 

College of Arts & Science 

Philosophy 

English 



Elmer Alvarez 

College of Arts & Science 

English 



Jessica Amato 

College of Arts & Science 

English 



Katherine Amber 

School of Management 

Marketing 




Alesha Amendola 

School of Nursing 

Nursing 



Ashley Amorello 

School of Nursing 

\ursing 



Christopher Anastasi 

College of Arts & Science 

Political Science 

Philosophy 



Lisa Andre 

College of Arts & Science 

Political Science 

Sociology 



Collin Andrew 

School of Management 

Finance 




Hector Andrews 


Lisa Angeloni 


Nikoleta Angelo\ a 


Alexandra Angrand 


Meghan Anson 


College of Arts & Science 


School of Nursing 


School of Management 


College ol \rts ,jc Science 


Col '* r t- & Science 


Political Science 


Nursing 


Finance 
Economic- 


Sodotog) 


Sodolog) 

International Stu 




Katherine \ntonellis 

n hool of Education 

Elemental*) Education 

Human Development 



Hollv An/enbei 
College of \rts & Science 
t. ieology 



Mary Kathryn Apholt 
College 

Fnglish 



Vernon Araujo 
Col 

^mmunicahV 



nd 

Col • nee 

Historv 



Sen* 



Blair Armstrong 

School of Nursing 

Nursing 



Kevin Armstrong 

College of Arts & Science 

History 



Eric Arnstein 

College of Arts & Science 

English 



Caroline Arre 

College of Arts & Science 

English 



Ann Arrojo 

College of Arts & Science 

Psychology 




Candace Asiedu 

College of Arts & Science 

Sociology 



Emily Ayre 

College of Arts & Science 

English 

Communications 



Nicholas Auger 

School of Management 

Economics 

Finance 



Ashley Augusta 

School of Education 

Elementary Education 

Human Development 




Valerie Au-Yeung 

School of Management 

Marketing 

Communications 



Patrick Axtmayer 

College of Arts & Science 

Economics 




Mireille Azzi 

School of Management 

Finance 

Theology 



Algenis Baez 

College of Arts & Science 

Communications 

Hispanic Studies 



Bernard Baffoe 

College of Arts & Science 

Biology 



Matthew Bair 

College of Arts & Science 

Communications 





Monica Bajek 


Rehana Bakali 


Alexandra Baker 


George Balagia 


Shahira Balal 


School of Nursing 


School of Management 


School of Education 


School of Management 


College of Arts & Science 


\ursing 


Marketing 


Human Development 
Child In Society 


Finance 
Accounting 


Mathematics 






Sarah Baldwin 

School of Management 

Marketing 

Finance 



K.ntK n Basile 

School of Management 

Marketing 



Brian Ball 

College of Arts & Science 

Biology 



Ali Ballard 

College of Arts & Science 

English 



Amit Bansal 

College of Arts & Science 

Psychology 



Michael Banuchis 

College of Arts & Science 

Political Science 




Francesca Baraggioli 


Therese Baran 


Michael Barbosa 


Jonathan Barger 


Rachel Barnett 


School of Management 


College of Arts & Science 


College of Arts & Science 


College of Arts & Science 


School of Management 


Marketing 


Communications 


Economics 
Communications 


Communications 


Finance 
Marketing 




Walter Baronovvski 


Meghan Barrett 


Courtney Barrows 


foseph Bartell 


Matthew B.m% -, 


College of Arts & Science 


School of Management 


College of Arts & Science 


School of Management 


School of Management 


I conomics 


Marketing 


Biologj 


Information Systems 
Finance 


Accounting 

Finance 





Joseph Batac 

College of Arts & Science 

Biologj 



\ Bayer 

College of Arts & Science 
Historv 
;;ish 



Jonathan Beattie 
College of Vrts >v 

Political Science 



Erica Beck 

Col r 

: ish 



Senn^ 




Caroline Sullivan & Emily Driscoll 



Jen Marsh & James Lajoie 



304 Seniors 




Eli\e Melvin, Shannon Slump. Jean Blosser. Taylor Heyen & Matt Porcelli 



Alexandra Le~ nne 



Seniors 




306 Seniors 




Brian Keller. Rob Wjer^bicki <V Joe Cronin 



Senior^ 





Joseph Beekman 


Matthew Begolan 


Robert Begonja 


Tara Behr 


Teresa Behr 


College of Arts & Science 


School of Education 


School of Management 


School of Nursing 


College of Arts & Science 


History 


History 


Finance 


Nursing 


English 


Hispanic Studies 


Human Development 


Marketing 




German 




Louis Beierle 

School of Management 

Accounting 

Hispanic Studies 



Margaret Beirne 

School of Management 

Accounting 



Theater Arts 



Craig Belcastro 

School of Management 

Finance 

Marketing 



Vincent Belgiovine 

College of Arts & Science 

Communications 



Samantha Belinkie 

School of Management 

Accounting 



i ./?\ 



** 






Emily Bellock 

College of Arts & Science 

Communications 



Leah Ben-Ami 

College of Arts & Science 

Sociology 



Emily Bendana 

College of Arts & Science 

Psychology 

Communications 



Ryan Benson 

School of Management 

Finance 



Christopher Bentson 

College of Arts & Science 

Theology 

Philosophy 




Ariana Berberich 
College of Arts & Science- 
Biology 



Emily Berg 

College of Arts & Science 

Communications 



Jennifer Berg 

College of Arts & Science 

English 



Daniel Berglund 

School of Management 

Finance 



Christopher Bergman 

College of Arts & Science 

History 

Political Science 




Christine Berkery 

College of Arts & Science 

Communications 



Alyson Bernstein 

School of Management 

Accounting 

Information Systems 



Sahadia Berthaud 

College of Arts & Science 

Sociology 



Susan Berube 

College of Arts & Science 

Communications 



Ryan Bethke 

College of Arts & Science 

Theater Art< 




Rachael Biancardi 

School of Nursing 

Nursing 



Anthony Bianchi 

College of Arts & Science 

Classical Studies 



Marissa Bianco 

College of Arts & Science 

Mathematics 

Economics 



Richard Bianco 

School of Management 

Finance 



David Biele 

College oi Art>- & Science 

Historv 




Advva Bin Abdulaziz 

College ot Arts & Science 
Political Science 



Christopher Binder 

College of Arts & Science 

English 

Italian 



Peter Bing 

School of Management 

Accounting 

Finance 



Walshe Bimey 

College of Arts & Science 

History 



Cara Blackabv 

School of Management 

Finance 

Accounting 




Lauren Blake 


Mary Blake 


William Blake 


Mars Block 


Lizette Blohm 


College ol Irts & Science 


School of Nursing 


School oi Management 


Col ts& Science 


Co 


Communications 


Nursing 


Finance 


English 


Bio 


Hispanic Studies 




Histon 




neral Education 



Sen to 




Jamie Blosser 


Jean Blosser 


Peter Boboris 


Peter Bohlin 


Giovanni Bolivar 


College of Arts & Science 


College of Arts & Science 


School of Management 


College of Arts & Science 


School of Management 


Psychology 


English 


Finance 


Environment Geoscience 


Accounting 


Theology 








Finance 




Catharine Bon 

College of Arts & Science 

Biology 



Jean- Victor Bonnaig 

College of Arts & Science 

Sociology 



Jennifer Bordeaux 

College of Arts & Science 

Biochemistry 



Mitchell Borin 

College of Arts & Science 

Chemistry 



Elizabeth Bouchard 

College of Arts & Science 

Theater Arts 




Holly Boucher 

College of Arts & Science 

Communications 



Alyson Boulanger 

College of Arts & Science 

Biology 

French 



Ernest Bourassa Jr. 

School of Management 

Accounting 



Patrick Boyle 

College of Arts & Science 

History 

Music 



Michelle Bradley 

College of Arts & Science 

Biology 




Steven Bradley 


Kevin 15rady 


Loretta Brady 


Michael Brain 


Peter Brannen 


( ollege of Arts & Si ieni e 


School of Management 


School of Education 


College of Arts & Science 


College of Arts & Science 


Political Science 


Finance 


Elementary Education 
American Heritages 


Political Science 


English 



Kelly Brashear 

College of Arts & Science 

Sociology 



Albert Brayson 111 

School of Management 

Finance 



John Bree 

School of Management 

Human Resources Mgmnt 

Operations Management 



Lauren Brennan 

School of Education 

Human Development 

Psychology 



Laura Brenninkmever 

College oi Arts ic Science 

Sociolog) 




Jessica Briody 


Margaret Brogan 


Stephanie Bronner 


John Bron/o 


Matthew Broodie-Stewart 


College of Arts & Science 


School of Management 


School of Education 


College oi Arts t<c Science 


College oi \rts 6c Science 


Economics 


Information Systems 


Human Development 


Classic- 


Computer Science 


Communications 


Finance 


Theology 




Studio Art 




Brittany Brown 

College of Arts & Science 

Histon 



Christopher Brown 

College of Arts & Science 

Economics 



Claire Broun 

College of Arts & Science 

Ps) chologj 



Hannah Brown 

College of Art- >Sc Science 

International Studies 



Kelly Brown 
School of 

\u- 





Ryan Brown 
College ol Vrts & Science 

Political Science 
History 



Timothv Brown 

School of Education 

Human Development 

English 



M^M 



Lisa Bruich 

College ol \rts & Science 

Communications 



Richard Bnitti 
College of Vrts ft ■ 

Italian 
Linguistics 



Col 

Ma then- 



Senior^ 311 




Katrina DAmore, Irene Marinakis & Tina Pham 




Becky Murray, Colleen Crowley. Lisa Scansaroli, Christina Conroy & Valerie Ferrera 
312 Seniors 



Ryan Foster & Jack Mecone 




mm^^Mk 



Nick Narodny A feniq Mmquisl 



Jill Fitzgerald. Liz Adam* A: Suzanne Cha*e 



Senior* 




Lisa Andre, Elizabeth Bouchard, Margaret Chow. Caroline Whelan. Laura Hauck, Libby Merrill & Stephanie Mariconda 



314 Seniors 




Matt Roman & Rebecca Hancock 



Kaitlin Plunkctt. Rebecca Goula & Bctham Knight 



Sen 



Michael Bubolo 

College of Arts & Science 

Theater Arts 



Pathira Bunyasaranand 

College of Arts & Science 

English 



Bridget Burke 

School of Education 

Human Development 



Brian Bum h 

School of Management 

Philosophy 

Finance 



Max Buccini 

College of Arts & Science 

History 

Communications 



Donald Buda 

College of Arts & Science 

English 



Philip Budrose 

School of Management 

Operations Management 



Edward Bumber 

School of Management 

Accounting 

Hispanic Studies 




Laurel Burdick 

School of Education 

Elementary Education 

Math /Computer Science 



Margaret Burdo 

College of Arts & Science 

Psychology 



Matthew Burger 

School of Management 

Finance 



Andrew Burke 

School of Management 

Accounting/Inf Tech 




Dennis Burke 

School of Management 

Finance 

Accounting 



Erin Burke 

College of Arts & Science 

Philosophy 

Communications 



Brooke Burns 

College of Arts & Science 

Psychology 



Jeffrey Burns 

College of Arts & Science 

Communications 




Harry Bush 

College of Arts & Science 

Philosophy 



Megan Bushey 

School of Education 

Secondary Education 

Mathematics 



Brittany Butera 

School of Education 

Human Development 



Mark Butler 

School of Management 

Economics 

Marketing 



Sarah Butler 

College of Arts & Science 

Political Science 



Melissa Buzzi 

College of Arts & Science 

Philosophy 

English 



Felicia Byrne 

College of Arts & Science 

Political Science 

Hispanic Studies 



Thomas Bvrne 

College of Arts & Science 

Economics 



Elizabeth Bvron 

School of Education 

Elementary Education 

Studio Art 




Sarah Byron 

School of Management 

Accounting/Inf Tech 



Oliver Bystricky 

College of Arts & Science 

Psychology 




Lauren Cables 

School of Education 

Elementary Education 

Human Development 



Christopher Cahill 

College of Arts & Science 

Computer Science 

Philosophy 



Mallorv Cain 
College of Arts & Science 
Psychol 




Kellie Cairns 

College of Arts & Science 

Political Science 

Communications 



Esther Cajuste 

College of Arts & Science 

Sociolog\ 



Anthony Calabro 

College of Arts & Science 
Mathematics 



Thomas Caliendo 

College of Arts & Science 

Economics 



i Callahan 
College of Art- & 

Thilosophv 





Elizabeth Callahan 

College of Arts & Science 

Mathematics 

Philosoph) 



Christi Anne Cambfl 

College oi Vrts & Science 

Biologj 



Charles Campanv 

School of Management 

Finance 

Hinting 



lohn Campbell 

School of Management 

Marketing 



Matthew Canali 

School of Management 
Finance 
Mai • 



Senior^ 317 




Matthew Canapari 

College of Arts & Science 

Economics 



Joseph Cancelliere 

School of Management 

Accounting 



Robert Canham 

College of Arts & Science 

Political Science 



Joseph Capuano 

College of Arts & Science 

History 



t 



\\ 



Steven Caradimos 

College of Arts & Science 

Communications 




Nicole Caragian 

College of Arts & Science 

History 

Communications 



Mark Cardarelli 

College of Arts & Science 

Political Science 



Jacob Carlson 

College of Arts & Science 

Film Studies 



Sarah Carmody 

College of Arts & Science 

History 

French 



Alice Carney 

College of Arts & Science 

Communications 




Vivian Carrasco 

College of Arts & Science 

International Studies 

Art History 



Erin Carreiro 

College of Arts & Science 

English 

Mathematics 



Michael Carreras 

School of Management 

Finance 



Danielle Carroll 

College of Arts & Science 

Theater Arts 

Mathematics 



Jared Carroll 

College of Arts & Science 

History 




(Catherine Carroll 
College of Arts & S ( u 
Mathematics 



Kelly Carroll 

College of Arts & Science 

English 



Daniel Carrow 

College of Arts & Science 

Communications 

Economics 



Caroline Carter 

School of Education 

Elementary Education 

Math /Computer Science 



Christopher Carter 

College of Arts & Science 

History 



I -7* 




Christopher Carry 

College of Arts & Science 

Communications 




Natalie Caruso 

College of Arts & Science 

History 



Anna Casey 

College of Arts & Science 

Communications 



Bridget Casey 

School of Management 

Marketing 




James Case] 

College of Arts & Science 
Bio 




Lauren Cataldo 

College of Arts & Science 

Biology 



Rosario Catizone 

College of Arts & Science 

Economics 



Joseph Cauda 

College of Arts & Science 

Psychology 



English 



Crystal Chambers 

School of Management 

Finance 

Marketing 



Chun Chan 
College oi Arts & Science 
Econor 




Doris Chan 

School of Management 

Marketing 


Christine Chandler 

College of Arts & Science 

Biolog) 


Caitlin Chandonnet 

School of Education 

Human Development 

11 

Suzanne Ch 

School of Education 

. ish 
Secondary Education 


Feng Chang 

College oi Arts .Sc Science 

Biolog] 

mi 

Brian Chaszar 

School of Management 

Finance 


Kevin Cha 
College of A 

Communicahr 


f] 

Stephanie Charamnac 

College of \rt- & Science 

Communications 


IP 


Brett Chase 

School of Management 

Communications 


1 vdia C 
Colli nee 
Theolo 
Bio 

Sen 




Gary Chen 

School of Management 
Finance 
History 



Linda Chen 

School of Management 

Accounting 

Human Resources Mgmnt 



Priscilla Chen 

School of Education 

Human Development 



Shen Chen 

School of Management 

Finance 



Michael Cherkezian 

College of Arts & Science 

Communications 




Kathleen Chiarantona 

College of Arts & Science 

Political Science 



English 



John Chin 

College of Arts & Science 

Mathematics 



Kenneth Chin 

School of Management 

Marketing 



Kathleen Chines 

School of Management 

Accounting 



Soottee Cho 

School of Management 

Marketing 




Jennifer Choi 

School of Management 

Finance 



Jessie Chou 

College of Arts & Science 

Communications 

History 



Margaret Chow 

School of Management 

Finance 

Marketing 



William Christian 

College of Arts & Science 

Biology 



Michael Cianchette 

College of Arts & Science 

Political Science 

Economics 




Brian Ciccone 

College of Arts & Science 

English 

Political Science 



Mark Ciccone 

School of Management 

Finance 

Accounting 



Katie Cisto 

College of Arts & Science 

Communications 

English 



Owen Clancey 

College of Arts & Science 

Physics 



James Clancy 

College of Arts & Science 

Political Science 

English 





Ann Clark 


Kendra Clark 


Anita Clarke 


Dana Clasby 


Kathrvn Coffman 


College of Arts & Science 


College of Arts & Science 


School of Education 


School of Education 


College of Arts & Science 


Biology 


Communications 


Elementary Education 
Communications 


Elementary Education 
Human Development 


English 




Gillian Cohen 

College of Arts & Science 

Psychology 



Thomas Cokeley 

College of Arts & Science 

Political Science 



Andrew Cole 

School of Management 

Finance 



Ashley Cole 

School of Education 

Elementarv Education 

Human Development 



Amv Coleman 
School of Management 

Marketing 




Matthew Collier 

College of Arts & Science 

Philosophj 

Histon 



Brendan Collins 

College of Arts & Science 

Historj 



Matthew Collura 

College of Arts & Science 

Biolog) 



Manuel Colon 

School of Management 

Finance 



Courtney Comb 

School of Management 
Marketing 




Sarah Combies 

School of Management 
Accounting 



Susan Cornea u\ 
School of Education 

Human Development 



Bennett Comerford 

College ol Arts & Science 

Philosophy 



Christian Commelin 
Col 

Political Science 
Economics 



Crishna Conciaton 

School of Education 

Elementary Education 



Sen* 




Pete Grieco, Karen (ialvin & Jason Contegni 



Liz Wevman 



322 Seniors 




Mike Crunmmgv lustin Galacki, Jason Contegni. S.un Fleischer, Hank Spring. Mike Welch & Christ Stanley 



Sen>or*. 



Cornelia Condon 

College of Arts & Science 

English 



Christina Conroy 

College of Arts & Science 

History 



Patrick Condon 

College of Arts & Science 

English 



Meaghan Connerty 

College of Arts & Science 

Psychology 



Marion Considine 
School of Education 
Secondary Education 



Jason Contegni 

School of Management 

Finance 



Jack Connolly 

College of Arts & Science 

Communications 



Anne Connors 

School of Education 

Elementary Education 

Studio Art 




Leah Contrino 

College of Arts & Science 

Biochemistry 



Jeffrey Cook 

School of Management 

Finance 




Maureen Cooke 

College of Arts & Science 

English 



Michael Corcoran 

College of Arts & Science 

English 



Travis Cooke 

School of Management 

General Mgmnt 

Finance 



Patrick Cooney 

College of Arts & Science 

History 

Economics 



Anthony Coppola 

College of Arts & Science 

Political Science 



Michael Corazzini 

College of Arts & Science 

History 

Sociology 




Carolyn Cordeiro 

School of Education 

Elementary Education 

English 



Christina Corea 

College of Arts & Science 

Political Science 

International Studies 



Frank Corrado 

School of Management 

Finance 



Melissa Cortina 

College of Arts & Science 

Economics 



Megan Cosgrove 

College of Arts & Science 

English 

Communications 



Brian Cotroneo 

College of Arts & Science 

Political Science 

Economics 



Kelly Coughlin 

School of Management 

Accounting 



Sarah Courtney 

College of Arts & Science 

Psychology 



Maurva Couvare- 

College of Arts & Science 

Philosophy 




Laura Covington 

School of Education 

Human Development 



Melissa Cox 

College of Arts & Science 

Sociology 



Jennifer Coyle 

School of Education 

Elementary Education 

Human Development 



Meagan Covle 

College of Arts & Science 

English 

Film Studies 



Alexandra Crabtree 
School of Management 

Marketing 




Winfield Craig 

College of Arts L <c Scirni e 

History 



Andrew Crane 

College of Arts & Science 

Historj 

Philosoph] 



Robert Crane 

College of Arts & Science 

Communications 



Kellen Creedon 

College of Arts & Science 
Economics 



Paul Creedon 
School of Management 

Finance 




Thamarah Crevecoeur 


Michael Crimmings 


Caroline Cromwell 


lo-oph Cronin 


Matthew CfOtty 


School of Nursing 


College of \rN k Science 


College oi Vrts *i Science 


Col nee 


Co ence 


Nursing 


Economics 


Psycho 


Communications 


History 



Seme 




Jameson Crowley 

College of Arts & Science 

Biology 



Paige Crowther 

College of Arts & Science 

Psychology 



Chadwick Crutchfield 

School of Management 

Economics 



Daniel Cuddy 

College of Arts & Science 

Political Science 



Joan Cullinan 

School of Management 

Corporate Systems 




Patricia Curley 

College of Arts & Science 

Political Science 

International Studies 



Patrick Curley 

College of Arts & Science 

Mathematics 



Christopher Curtis 

School of Education 

Human Development 



Danielle Curtis 

College of Arts & Science 

Political Science 



Paul Czachorowski 

College of Arts & Science 

English 

Sociology 




Kevin Czerniak 

College of Arts & Science 

Political Science 

Economics 



Timothy Czerwienski 

College of Arts & Science 

English 



Leigh D'Ambra 

School of Management 

Finance 



Katrina D'Amore 

College of Arts & Science 

Biology 



Joseph D'Ascoli 

School of Management 

Finance 

Economics 




Julia Dashuta 

School of Management 

Accounting 



Michael Daszkiewicz 

School of Management 

Accounting 



Elizabeth Davis 

College of Arts & Science 

Communications 



Sally Davis 

School of Education 

Elementary Education 

Persp On Spanish America 



Micah Davis-Johnson 

School of Management 

Finance 

Accounting 



Sarah Dawson 

College of Arts & Science 

History 



Peter Deangelis 

College of Arts & Science 

Philosophy 



David De Barros 

College of Arts & Science 

Political Science 




Diana DeCario 

School of Management 

Accounting 

Finance 



Katherine Decellc- 

School of Management 

Accounting 



" 



i 



Mark Decost 

School of Management 

Accounting 

Finance 




Zachary Deese-Laurent 

College of Arts & Science 
Economics 
Philosophy 



Mark Defeo 

College of Arts & Science 

Economics 

Psychology 



Timothy DeHaut 

College of Arts 6c Science 

Biochemistry 

Philosophy 



Fany De La Cruz 

School of Management 

Accounting 




4 



41 







Daniel Delaporta 

College of Arts & Science 

Theater Arts 

English 



Nora Delay 

College of Arts & Science 

Histor) 

Communications 



Kimberley DeLeire 

School of Management 

Corporate Systems 



Alexandra Delphia 

School of Education 

Elementary Education 

Human Development 



Frank Deluc 
School of Management 
Finance 
Accounting 




Christopher De Matteo 

College ol Arts & Science 

Histor) 
Economics 



Frank DemmerK 

School of Management 

Marketing 



Man Denihan 

School of Education 

Human Di'v elopment 



Otha Dennard 
Col 

Soriok . 



dn? DeOliveira 
Col^ 

Econorr 



Sen* 




Alison Rypkema. Valerie AuYeung. Carolyn Hassel. Lauren DuRocher & Victoria O'Kane 



Crystal Rimoczy & Sarah Healey 







■ 


^^ MtSm IL — 


60OZARAMA ' 






3*5--^ 


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PI 



Chris Carter. Christian Sobrino, Brendan Sage ik Rafael Rovira 

328 Seniors 



/ 


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7 VI 


HJT 


>-N (TV 


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Erin Hutton. Danielle Curtis & Katie Chiarantona 




Sem 




Will Nunziata, Shcn Chen & Anthony Nun/.iata 



Jamie Blosser & James Crowley 



330 Seniors 




Kiera Rynn, Allison Watras, Kaitlin Plunkett. Kaitlin 0*Malky Brendan Sage, Kathryn Short. Kaitlin Dohcrt\. Kristin Disipio & Patrick Condon 






Julie Depontbriand 

College of Arts & Science 

Communications 



Esme Deprez 

College of Arts & Science 

English 



Antoin Deschrijver 

College of Arts & Science 

Psychology 



Andrea DeStaffany 

School of Education 

Human Development 



Cara Devins 

College of Arts & Science 

Communications 




Robert Devita 

College of Arts & Science 

Computer Science 



Frank Di Cocco 

College of Arts & Science 

Communications 



Jerry Dicolo 

College of Arts & Science 

English 



Jeffrey Dieterle 

College of Arts & Science 

Communications 



Patrick Dietz 

College of Arts & Science 

Psychology 




Jillian Difazio 

College of Arts & Science 

Biology 



Lyndsey DiGiorgio 

College of Arts & Science 

Psychology 



Mark Di Iulio 

College of Arts & Science 

History 



Philip Diliegro 

School of Management 

Finance 



Elena Dimattia 

College of Arts & Science 

Sociology 




Anthony Dimeo 
School of Management 

finance 



Melissa DiPietro 

School of Management 

Accounting 



Alison Diquollo 

School of Education 

Elementary Education 

Human Development 



Michael DiSiena 

College of Arts & Science 

Biology 



Kristin Disipio 

School of Education 

Elementary Education 

Human Development 






Michael Dixon 


Noel Dixon 


Jennifer Djaferis 


Kaitlin Doherry 


Amv Doiron 


School of Management 


School of Management 


School of Management 


School of Education 


School of Education 


Finance 


Finance 


Finance 


Elementary Education 


Elementary Education 


Accounting 






Human Development 


Communications 




Chrystina Dolan 

College of Arts & Science 

Psychology 



Michael Dolan 

School of Management 

Marketing 

Finance 



Patrick Dolan 

School of Management 

Accounting 



Andria Dolce 

College of Arts & Science 

English 



Suzanne Dominick 

School of Management 

Finance 

Economics 




Deirdre Donahue 

College of Arts & Science 

Historj 

Sociology 



Teresa Donahue 

School of Nursing 

Nursing 



Thomas Donahue 

School of Management 

Finance 

Human Resources Mgmnt 



Brian Donnelly 

School of Management 

Accounting 



lesska Donoghue 
School oi Education 

Human Dc\ clopment 
Philosophy 




Denis Donov an 

College ol \iK & Science 

Economics 



Gregory Donovan 
Collect- ot \rts & Science 

Political Science 



Kathleen Donovan 
College ot Kits & Science 

History 
French 



L-aura Donovan 
College of \rt- ,v - 
Political Science 
Hispanic Studies 



nan 
School o - ' 



Sen ic 




Allison D'Orazio 

College of Arts & Science 

Political Science 



Carolyn Dorazio 

College of Arts & Science 

Communications 

Sociology 



William Dorney 

College of Arts & Science 

Communications 

English 



Matthew D'Orsi 

College of Arts & Science 

International Studies 



Bruce Dos Santos 

College of Arts & Science 

Psychology 




Nora Doty 

College of Arts & Science 

Biology 



William Dowd 

College of Arts & Science 

English 



Matthew Dowling 

School of Management 

Marketing 



Molly Dowling 

College of Arts & Science 

Communications 



Niels Dragsbaek 

College of Arts & Science 

Economics 




Jenna Drevins 

School of Nursing 

Nursing 



Lauren Dreyer 

School of Management 

Human Resources Mgmnt 



Katie Driscoll 

College of Arts & Science 

Political Science 



Megan Dubas 

College of Arts & Science 

Communications 



Laura Ducie 

College of Arts & Science 

Communications 




Meredith Dumais 
College of Arts & Sciem e 

Psychology 



Ryan Duncan 

College of Arts & Science 

Political Science 

Communications 



Edward Dunlap 

College of Arts & Science 

English 



Casey Dunn 

School of Management 

Finance 

Accounting 



Colleen Dunn 

College of Arts & Science 

Biology 





Michael Dunn 


Robin Dunn 


Edward Dunnigan 


Caroline Dunwoody 


Suzanne Dupre 


College of Arts & Science 


School of Management 


College of Arts & Science 


College of Arts & Science 


College o\ Arts & Science 


English 


Accounting 


Philosophy 


Political Science 


English 



Spanish 




Lauren Durocher 


Kathleen Dyer 


Andrew Dylag 


Jennifer Eagan 


Allison Earlv 


College of Arts & Science 


College of Arts & Science 


College of Arts & Science 


College of Arts & Science 


School of Management 


Art History 


Political Science 
History 


History 


English 
Communications 


Finance 




Uexandra Eastman 

College of Arts & Science 
English 



Matthew Echave 

College of Arts & Science 

Economic^ 

History 



Joy Eckstein 

School of Management 

Accounting 

Human Resources Mgmnt 



Jonathan Edwards 

College oi Arts ft Science 

History 

Philosophy 



Michael Egbert 
Col 

Mnmunkatki 

Political Science 




Victoria Ekstrom 

College ol \i ts & Science 
Communications 



Emily Elisor 

Collece ol \rts & Science 
Communications 



Andrea ElizaiTCZ 

College of Arts ft Science 

English 



Richard Elliott 
Col 

English 



Elizabeth Elv 

School of Education 

Elementary Education 

Human Development 



Sen* 




Tiana Estrada. Lrin Hojzan. Andrea Eli/.arrez. Jackie LeGrand &. Lindsay Martclli 
336 Seniors 



Rebecca Goula, Amanda Lee, Thercse Baran & Faye Shan ley 





Samantha Fontellio & Grace Faturoti 



Manin Morel I i. Vanessa \bltolina. Sue Berube & Jan Wolfe 





Meaghan Mitchell. Keele\ Mathews & Alice Carney 





Nick 


Ibdisco. Margaret Nuzzolese & Get 


asin d 








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illmari 







Senior^ 




Will Dorney. Sylvia Hechema & Matt OBrien 



Shane Stryzinski, Pauline Khamo & Kaytlin Lapsa 




Lisa Bruich, Valerie Au-Yeung. Alison Rypkema. Carolyn Hassel. Alyson Bernstein & Lauren DuRoehes 



338 Seniors 



Tx* 



k 










Patrick Dietz & .left Stablie 



Good friends lo\e good food! 




Manuel Colon & Alhe Loring 



■ Chou. Katie Ri" in Bushe? 



Seniors 3*3 



SG W^. 




Jared Emolo 

College of Arts & Science 

Biology 



Teresa Eng 
School of Management 

Finance 
Operations/Tech Mgmt 



Danny Engelman 

College of Arts & Science 

Biology 



Kathryn Erickson 

College of Arts & Science 

Biology 



Michael Escaler 

College of Arts & Science 

Economics 

Philosophy 




Megan Esteves 

College of Arts & Science 

Communications 



Tiana Estrada 

College of Arts & Science 

Psychology 



Peter Evangelista 

College of Arts & Science 

Psychology 

Chemistry 



Lindsay Ewick 

School of Education 

Elementary Education 

Child In Society 



Daniel Fabbri 

College of Arts & Science 

Communications 




Marinna Fador 

School of Education 

Elementary Education 

Human Development 



Mark Faga 

College of Arts & Science 

Computer Science 



Nicole Falcey 

School of Management 

Marketing 



Christine Faller 

College of Arts & Science 

Political Science 



Kelley Fallon 

College of Arts & Science 

Psychology 




Shannon Fallon 

School of Management 

Finance 

Marketing 



Kaitlyn Farley 

College of Arts & Science 

Communications 



Ryan Fa man 

School of Management 

Marketing 



Kimberly Fass 

College of Arts & Science 

Communications 



Grace Faturoti 

School of Management 

Accounting 






Jessica Fazekas 

College of Arts & Science 

Communications 



r 

Michele Fernandes 

College of Arts & Science 

Psychology 



Jessica Feldman 

College of Arts & Science 

English 

Hispanic Studies 



Emily Felix 

College of Arts & Science 

Communications 



Christopher Fell 

College of Arts & Science 

History 



Nicole Femminella 

College of Arts & Science 

History 




Stephanie Fernandez 

College of Arts & Science 

Political Science 

Communications 



Lauren Ferrara 

College of Arts & Science 

Biology 



Valerie Ferrara 

School of Management 

Finance 



lennifer Fischl 

School oi Education 

Elementary Education 

I lum.in Development 



Galen Fisher 

School oi Education 

Human Development 



lulianne Fishman 

Collect' oi Vrts & Science 

Psychology 



Trevor T 
Colt 

History 



Lindsav Ferraro 

College of Art< & Science 

Biochemistry 




School of M -nent 

Fin- 



Sen* 




Jillian Fitzgerald 

College of Arts & Science 

Economics 



Megan Fitzpatrick 

School of Management 

Accounting 



Jennifer Fitz-Roy 

School of Education 

Human Development 



Katherine Flaherty 

College of Arts & Science 

Psychology 

Sociology 



Joseph B. Flaherty III 

College of Arts & Science 

Biochemistry 




Samuel Fleischer 


Kara Fleming 


Anthony Fleurival 


Richard Floor 


Michael Flynn 


College of Arts & Science 


School of Management 


School of Management 


College of Arts & Science 


School of Management 


History 


Marketing 


General Mgmnt 


Political Science 


Finance 
Economics 




Michael Flynn 


Kristen Fogaren 


Meredith Foley 


Jane Follansbee 


Gregory Follin 


College of Arts & Science 


College of Arts & Science 


School of Nursing 


College of Arts & Science 


School of Management 


History 


Geology 


Nursing 


Communications 


Accounting 




Sofia Fontecill.i 

College of Arts & Science 

Economics 



Samantha Fontellio 

College of Arts & Science 

Sociology 

Communications 



Patrick Forcelli 

College of Arts & Science 

Biology 

Psychology 



i mm 

Nicholas Ford 

School of Education 

Secondary Education 

English 



William Ford III 

College of Arts & Science 

History 






Carl Forsberg 


Nicholas Forti 


Allyson Fortier 


Melissa Fortunato 


Amelia Foumier 


School of Management 


College of Arts & Science 


College of Arts & Science 


College of Arts & Science 


School oi Nursing 


Marketing 


Psychology 


History 


Communications 


Nursing 




Alexander Fowler 


Kevin Fox 


Kevin Fox 


Tv Frankel 


Marianne Frapw ell 


College of Arts & Science 


College of Arts & Science 


College of Arts & Science 


College o\ Arts & Science 


College oi Arts iSc Science 


History 


History 


Mathematics 


Communications 


English 


Political Science 






Political Science 


Theater Art- 




Daruella Frattaroli 

School of Education 

Elementary Education 

I [uman De\ elopmenl 



Leah Freeman 

College of Arts & Science 

English 



Jennifer Friedenberg 

School of Education 

Elementary Education 

Persp Spanish America 



Tara Friedlander 

College of Arts it Science 

English 



Elizabeth Frid 

School of Management 

Finance 




lre\ or Frierson 

College of Kits & Science 

Psychology 



Kara Pucd 
School of Education 

Elementary Education 
Human Development 



Robert Fullerton 

College of KrtS & Science 

P-\ cholog] 



Elizabeth Fulton 

Col nee 

Communications 



Maris** Fu- 
Col noe 

Politica 



Sen* 



Rea Gacad 

College of Arts & Science 

Sociology 



Tyler Gaffney 

College of Arts & Science 

Economics 



Justin Galacki 

School of Management 

Finance 



Hugh Gallagher 

School of Management 

Finance 

Economics 



Kara Gallagher 

College of Arts & Science 

Biology 




Patrick Gallagher 

School of Management 

Finance 

Accounting 



Shawna Gallagher Vega 

College of Arts & Science 

History 



Kevin Galligan 

School of Management 

Marketing 



Ryan Galligan 

College of Arts & Science 

English 



Timothy Galligan 

College of Arts & Science 

Economics 




Peter Galop 

College of Arts & Science 

Economics 



Karen Galvin 

College of Arts & Science 

English 

Communications 



Kelly Galvin 

School of Nursing 

Nursing 



Michael Galvin 

School of Management 

Finance 

Economics 



Michael Galvin Jr 

College of Arts & Science 

English 

Communications 




Nora Ganey 

College of Arts & Scieni e 

History 



Thomas Ganjamie 

College of Arts & Science 

Communications 



Gregory Garra 

School of Management 

Accounting 

Finance 



Blake Garrett 

School of Management 

Accounting 

Information Systems 



Jennifer Garron 

College of Arts & Science 

Psychology 






Michael Garvey 

College of Arts & Science 

History 



Nicole Gaudelli 

College of Arts & Science 

Biochemistry 



David Gavin 

School of Management 

Finance 

Marketing 



Steven Gay 

College of Arts & Science 

Biology 



Kathleen Geary 

School of Education 

Human Development 



Caroline Gelmi 

College of Arts & Science 

English 



John Genest 

College of Arts & Science 

English 



Jennifer Gens 

College of Arts & Science 
Communications 



Caroline German 

College of Arts & Science 

History 

Hispanic Studies 



Katharine Germanskv 

College of Arts & Science 

Biolo^\ 

Chemistrv 



Jhaleh Ghassemi 

School of Management 

Accounting 

Finance 



Robert Giacchetti 

College of Arts & Science 

History 

Sociology 



Danielle Gifford 
College o\ Vrts & Science 

Communications 



Elizabeth Gilliam 

College of Vrts & Science 

Economics 

English 



Nancy Gillis 
School oi Education 

Human Development 
Child In Society 



Emilv Gilman 

School of Management 

Marketing 



Jennifer Ga/e 

College oi Arts &: Science 

Communications 




Scott Gentile 

College of \rts & Science 

Mathematics 

Philosophy 




Matthew Giamalva 
Coli 

Economics 
Psycho 




Lauren Ginsburg 
Col' nee 

Communicant 



Sen*- 




Dave Rod, Pam Peterson & Matt Mifsud 











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Lora Mead, Alexis Lake, Erin Sweatt. Kate Guenette, Katie Killinger 












■MHL | 







Jayshree Mahtani & Evelyn Kelty 




Christine (ioclbout & Lauren Cables 



Marisa Fusco & Taylor Goodell 



34ft Seniors 




Caitlin McCue. Demlre Kellehcr. Karon \LCourt. Susan Preston. KnMen Gorham. Karen Maciolek & Monica Santi* 



Senior* 



Stephen Gionta 

College of Arts & Science 

Communications 



Jessica Giordano 

College of Arts & Science 

Biology A & S B.A 



Stefanie Giuliano 

College of Arts & Science 

History 



Frederick Glasgow 

College of Arts & Science 

Economics 



Erin Gleason 

School of Management 

Marketing 




Charles Glover 

College of Arts & Science 

Philosophy 



Mark Goehausen 

School of Management 

Accounting 



Patrick Glynn 

School of Management 

Corporate Systems 



Andrew Gniadek 

College of Arts & Science 

English 



Christine Godbout 

College of Arts & Science 

History 

Romance Languages 



Christopher Godfrey 

College of Arts & Science 

Studio Art 




Megan Goetchius 

School of Management 

Accounting 



Craig Goldberg 

School of Management 

Corporate Systems 



Thomas Good 

College of Arts & Science 

Psychology 



Taylor Goodell 

College of Arts & Science 

Communications 




Alexander Goodman 


Richard Gordon 


Tricia Gordon 


Kristen Gorham 


Christine Gottshall 


( ollege of Arts & Science 


College of Arts & Science 


School of Nursing 


College of Arts & Science 


School of Education 


Economics 


Economics 


Nursing 


Biochemistry 


Human Development 
Elementary Education 






Rebecca Goula 

College of Arts & Science 

Psychology 



Anwar Graves 

School of Management 

Finance 

Political Science 



Ethan Gregor 

School of Education 

History 

Secondary Education 



Timothy Goulter 

School of Management 

Business 



Dennis Gouthro 

School of Management 

General Mgmnt 



Man- Grabenstatter 

College of Arts & Science 

French 

Film Sciences 



Alexander Gray 

College of Arts & Science 

English 

Communications 



Elizabeth Greco 

School of Education 

Human Development 



Laura Greenfield 

College of Arts & Science 

Psycholog) 



Andrea Graham 

College of Art"- 6c Science 

English 




Sarah Greenwood 

School of Education 
Human Development 
Psychol 




Amanda Grey 

College of \rts ^ Science 

Communications 



Peter Grieco 

College of Arts & Science 

Biology 



Megan Griffith 

School of Education 
Human Development 



Alexandra Gnmlev 
Col 

; ish 




Michael Grosso 

College of \rts & Science 

Historj 

I conomics 



\licheleGr\ 
Collect' ol \TtS & Science 
Environment Geoscience 
German 



Kaidin Guenette 
Collecc of VrtsA Science 

Communications 



Patrick Guiton 

School of Management 
Finance 



itierre? 
Col nee 

^mmuni. 
Hispan: 



Senieri 3» 



Jessica Gutteridge 

College of Arts & Science 

History 



Caitlin Hamlin 

School of Education 

Elementary Education 



Elizabeth Gyves 

College of Arts & Science 

Sociology 

Communications 



Charles Habegger 

College of Arts & Science 

Psychology 



Chelsea Halbmaier 

College of Arts & Science 

Psychology 



Rebecca Hancock 

College of Arts & Science 

Psychology 



Shirley Handoko 

College of Arts & Science 

Computer Science 



Ryan Hanlon 

School of Education 

Secondary Education 

History 



Nicholas Hanneman 

College of Arts & Science 

Art History 



Christopher Hansen 

College of Arts & Science 

Biology 



William Harding 

College of Arts & Science 

Psychology 



Jill Hark 

School of Nursing 

Nursing 



Jonathan Hall 

School of Management 

Finance 




Sean Hanlon 

School of Management 

Accounting 

Theology 




Margaret Harkness 

College of Arts & Science 

History 




Thomas Harlukowicz 

School of Management 

Finance 

Marketing 



Sean Harper 

College of Arts & Science 

Political Science 

I listory 



Justin Harrington 

College of Arts & Science 

Communications 

History 



Brett Harris 

School of Management 

Finance 

Accounting 



Mark Hartzler 

College of Arts & Science 

Biology 



Steven Harvey 

School of Management 

Finance 

Economics 



Carolyn Hassel 

School of Management 

Accounting 



Robert Hatch 

College of Arts & Science 

Historv 



Laura Hauck 
School of Education 

Mathematics 
Secondary Education 



Ashley Hawkins 

School of Management 

Marketing 




Brian Havvko 

School of Management 

Finance 

Mathematics 



Katherine Hayes 

College of Arts & Science 

English 



Rvan Hayes 

College of Arts & Science 

Communications 



Sarah Healev 

School of Education 

Elementary Education 

Human Development 



Sylvia Hechema 

School of Education 

Human Development 

English 




|,i\ Hedstroni 

College of Arts & Science 

Histon 



Ryan Heffeman 

College of Arts & Science 

Communications 

Histon 



Nicholas Helfenstein 

College of Arts & Science 

History 



Lauren Helman 

College of \ltS & Science 

Communications 



Nathan Helming 
College of \rt- \ - 
International Studies 




foanna Melon 

College ol VrtS & Science 

I conomics 



lack Hempling 

School oi Management 

Information Systems 

Finance 



Andrew Henderson 
College o( \rts cfe Science 
. ish 



Timothv Henderson 
Colli 

Histon 
Philosophy 



'ine Hennebem 
Col nee 

His' 



Sen*- 




Joe Bartell, Chris McCann, John Montana, Ryan Yackel & Andrew Schulte 



Melissa Abruzzese, Nicole Caraigan & Melissa Buzzi 




Carolyn Dorazio, Maura Silverstein & Maureen Kelly 
352 Seniors 



Jacki Vilaca. Nina Clarke. Simone Solsers & Ayana Miller 




Angela Shannon. v 



Senior. 




Sara Dart, Vanessa Voliolina, Kelly Cairns & Mat! Porcellj 
354 Seniors 



David Nagib & Chris Pavlow 




en Marsh. Nick Toilisco. Will Nun/iata oi Faith Kirkpatriek 



Grace Faturoii & Ifuoma Abiola 




Enjoying the coast ot Hal) while studying abroad' 



Seniors 



Krista Henneman 

School of Management 

Marketing 



Lee Hennessey 

School of Education 

Elementary Education 

Human Development 



Shannon Hennessy 

College of Arts & Science 

Communications 



Robert Henry 

College of Arts & Science 

History 



Sasha Hernandez 

College of Arts & Science 

Psychology 




Brett Herr 

School of Management 

Accounting 

Economics 



Erin Herro 

College of Arts & Science 

International Studies 



Anne Hessberg 

College of Arts & Science 

Communications 



Taylor Heyen 

College of Arts & Science 

History 



Elizabeth Higgins 

College of Arts & Science 

Biology 




Brian Hilley 

College of Arts & Science 

Mathematics 



William Hillmann 

College of Arts & Science 

Biochemistry 



Kevin Hines 

School of Management 

Finance 

Accounting 



Kathryn Hodgdon 

College of Arts & Science 

Hispanic Studies 



Erin Hogan 

School of Education 

Elementary Education 

American Heritages 




Eric Holder 

College of Arts & Science 

Sociology 



Sarah Holland 

School of Education 

Elementary Education 

Human Development 



Mike Hollis 

School of Management 

Marketing 



Kimberly Hopkin 

College of Arts & Science 

Sociology 



Courtney Hopkins 

College of Arts & Science 

English 




Roisin Hopkins 

School of Nursing 

Nursing 



Ryan Horan 

School of Management 

Economics 



Geraldine Hough 

School of Management 

Finance 

Accounting 



Megan House 

School of Management 

Accounting 



Finance 



Rebeca Howard 
College of Art<- dsc Science 
Hispanic Stu 




Timothy Howe 


Margaret Howell 


Matthew Howell 


Nicole Hovniak 


lason Hsu 


School of Management 


School of Management 


School of Management 


School of Management 


School of Management 


Economics 


General Mgmnt 


Finance 


General Mgmnt 


Marketing 


Finance 


Finance 




Psj cholog] 


Finance 





Lin Hu 

School of Management 

Accounting 



Edward Hubbard 

College of Arts & Science 

History 



Kyle Hudson 

College of Arts c<c Science 
Communications 



Tim Hughes 

School of Nursing 

Nursing 



lulia Hui 

School of Management 

Finance 

Marketing 




Kathrvn Humora 

College ot \rt- & Science 

1 nglish 



Fancj 1 lung 

School of Management 

Finance 

Marketing 



Courtney Hunt 
College nee 

Communications 



lHunt 

Col ' -rs & SCM 

Mathemat 

] 



Cristina Hunter 
' ucation 
Elementary Educ 



Human De> 



KTlt 



Sen* 



Danielle Huntley 

College of Arts & Science 

Philosophy 



Michael Huntowski 

College of Arts & Science 

Communications 

English 



Erin Hutton 

College of Arts & Science 

Political Science 



Benjamin Hux 

College of Arts & Science 

Sociology 



Margaret Hurley 

School of Education 

Elementary Education 

American Heritages 



William Hurley 

College of Arts & Science 

English 



Nicole Iannuzzi 

College of Arts & Science 

Political Science 



Chikaelo Ibeabuchi 

College of Arts & Science 

Communications 



Noelle Huskins 

School of Education 

Human Development 

English 




Joseph Igoe 

School of Management 

Finance 




Vladimir Ilic 

School of Management 

Economics 

Finance 



Miguel Ipince 

School of Management 

Finance 

Marketing 



Danielle Incropera 

College of Arts & Science 

Communications 



Christopher Inkpen 

College of Arts & Science 

Political Science 



Michael Invernale 

College of Arts & Science 

Chemistry 



Joseph Iole 

College of Arts & Science 

Biology 

Philosophy 





Modupe Irerua 

College of Arts & Science 

Psychology 



Ryan Irwin 

College of Arts & Science 

History 



Daniel Jachym 

College of Arts & Science 

Film Studies 

English 



Joann Jaen 

School of Education 

Human Development 

Sociology 





Katejalkut 

College of Arts & Science 

Communications 



Alisha James 

College of Arts & Science 

Sociology 



Edgar James 

School of Management 

Finance 



Matthew Jaques 

College of Arts & Science 

History 

Economics 



George Jasinski 

College oi Arts & Science 

Economics 




Raymond Jeandron 


Emily Jendzejec 


Carrie Jenkins 


Margaret lennings 


Cassie Teremie 


School of Management 


School of Education 


School of Nursing 


College of Arts & Science 


College of Arts <Sc Science 


Accounting 


History 


Nursing 


Political Science 


History 


Theology 


Human Development 






Political Science 




\ 




Shannon Jerolmon 

School of Education 

Human Development 

I nglish 



Darvl Johnson 

School of Management 

General Mgmnt 



Alexander Johnston 

School of Management 
Marketing 



Chelsea Jones 
Colli rts <Sc Science 

Psychol 



Bridget Jordan 

School oi Management 

Marketing 




Sharista Joseph 


i\ an |oye 


Dana Kvefc/vk 


Betsy Juarez 


11 Julien 


College ot Arts & Science 


School of Management 


College of Vrts -x i 


Col 


Co enoe 


1 nglish 


Finance 


Bio 







Senior^ .W 




Carolyn Hassel, Valerie AuYeunj;. Alison Rypkema, Alyson Bernstein, Victoria O'Kane 

360 Seniors 



Shannon McNamee & Caroline Whelan 




Katie Unser & Jamie Blosser 



The Halloween spirit is alive and well amongst friends! 



^r 










ala^ka^^^. t- 

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pa 

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Ir 1 
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JaV Jv 

aa^a^aw # 


aaa*" ^^May 




■ ^^Bejl^ ' ^^^^K 


LB 






A 






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auE£'' A 


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^k 










Rea Mae Gacad & Shane 


' Str\ /inski 








Tav|or Hcven & Me red n 



Senior^ ViJ 




Eric Todd, Lisa Bruich. Danielle Curtis & Tim Howe 



Jess Palumbo, Brittany Butera. Michelle Bradley & Jen Marsh 




R>an Grieco, Dan Smith, Pal O'Donncll. Mike Dunn, Alex Goodman. Colin Ryan & Chris Kratz 



362 Seniors 




Christine Falter, Kate Gallaghei «v Eliza Moulton 



The Cldv. knows how to keep a par- 



Sen tors 363 




Jan Jurek 

College of Arts & Science 

Political Science 



Elizabeth Kadison 

School of Education 

Human Development 

History 



John Kanca 

College of Arts & Science 

Political Science 



Jonathan Kantor 

School of Management 

Marketing 



Kelly-Jo Karneeb 

College of Arts & Science 

Communications 

Hispanic Studies 




Matthew Karp 

College of Arts & Science 

Political Science 



David Karpuk 

College of Arts & Science 

Mathematics 



Jennifer Kasyan 

College of Arts & Science 

English 



Brian Kaufman 

College of Arts & Science 

Theology 

International Studies 



Amanda Kavanaugh 

College of Arts & Science 

Economics 




Simone Kearney 

College of Arts & Science 

English 

Philosophy 



Amanda Kearns 

College of Arts & Science 

History 

Communications 



Rosemarie Keefe 

College of Arts & Science 

Biochemistry 

Psychology 



Courtney Keegan 

College of Arts & Science 

Political Science 



Jenna Keegan 

College of Arts & Science 

Economics 

Communications 




Larry Keitt 


Abigail Kell 


Deirdre Kelleher 


Brian Keller 


Kevin Keller 


College of Arts & Science 


School of Nursing 


College of Arts & Science 


School of Management 


College of Arts & Science 


Political Science 


Nursing 


Mathematics 


Finance 


Economics 
History 




Katharine Kelliher 

College of Arts & Science 

English 

Psychology 



Pauline Khamo 

College of Arts & Science 

Political Science 



u 



Brian Kelly 

College of Arts & Science 

Economics 

Communications 



Brian Kelly 

College of Arts & Science 

History 



Eamonn Kelly 

College of Arts & Science 

History 



Elizabeth Kelly 

School of Management 
Finance 




Christina Kenefick 


\ahley Kenney 


Matthew Kephart 


Andrew Kern 


Robert Kessler 


College of Arts & Science 
Psychology 


College of Arts & Science 
English 


College of Arts & Science 

Political Science 

Philosophy 


School of Management 
Finance 


School oi M ■ 

Finance 




(Catherine Kiefner 

School of Management 

Marketing 

Human Recourses Mgmnt 



Margaret Kilcoyne 

Collect' of \rts & Science 
History 



Kathenne killir 
jol of Education 
Elementary Educat 
Math Compute- 



Brian Killoy 
Col 



Senir- 



Along Kim 

School of Education 

Human Development 

Theology 



Wan Kim 

School of Education 

Human Development 

Child In Society 



Christine Kim 

School of Education 

Elementary Education 

Human Development 



Christopher Kim 

School of Management 

Finance 

Marketing 



Edward Kim 

College of Arts & Science 

Economics 



Rebecca Kim 

College of Arts & Science 

Communications 




Patrick Kirk 

College of Arts & Science 

Computer Science 



Faith Kirkpatrick 

College of Arts & Science 

Sociology 



Courtney Kirouac 

College of Arts & Science 

Biology 



Christine Kistner 

College of Arts & Science 

Communications 




Meaghan Kitley 

College of Arts & Science 

English 



Emily Kives 

College of Arts & Science 

Psychology 



Katherine Klein 

School of Education 

Secondary Education 

English 



Bethany Knight 

School of Management 

Accounting 



William Knotek 
School of Education 

History 
Secondary Education 




Ryan Knox 

College of Arts & Scieru e 

Computer Science 



John Koehler 

School of Management 

Finance 



Julie Koehler 

College of Arts & Science 

Biology 

Political Science 



Kristofer Koller 

College of Arts & Science 

Theology 

Philosophy 



Katharine Koster 

College of Arts & Science 

Theater Arts 

Mathematics 



William Kozaites 

College of Arts & Science 

English 



Christopher Kratz 

College of Arts & Science 

Biology 



Ross Krentzman 

School of Management 

Marketing 



Abigail Kritzler 

School of Education 

Human Development 

Sociology 



David Krueger 

College of Arts & Science 

English 

Communications 



Kenneth Kruszeski 

School of Management 

Finance 

Political Science 



Allison Kuder 

College of Arts & Science 

History 



Danise Kuhn 

College of Arts & Science 

Communications 



I indse) 1 aboe 

College of Arts &: Science 

Communications 

French 



Jenna La Cava 

School of Management 

Accounting 



Megan I acerte 

College of Arts & Science 

History 



John Lacroix 

School of Management 
Finance 



Carolyn Kron 
College oi Arts & Science 
Theolog 




Allison Kulig 

College oi Arts 6c Science 

Communications 




Micaela Lade 
College of \its & 

French 




Elise 1 a Douceur 

College ol \n» k Science 

Biology 



Erin I aet/ 

School of Management 

Economics 



Mail inh Fai 

School of Management 

Marketing 

Finance 



lames Lajoie 
School of Education 
vlan Education 

Mathematics 



Col • 

Fhiloso; 



Sen* 



Hung Lam 

School of Management 

Economics 

Marketing 



Nicholas Lannon 

School of Management 

Accounting 



James La Marca 

College of Arts & Science 

Political Science 



Stephen Lane 

College of Arts & Science 

Biology 



Melissa Langone 

School of Management 

Accounting 

Marketing 



Kaytlin Lapsa 

College of Arts & Science 

Biology 



Jaime Lareau 

College of Arts & Science 

Psychology 



Conor Larkin 

College of Arts & Science 

Economics 



Brian Langs 

College of Arts & Science 

English 




Alyssa Lau 

School of Management 

Marketing 




Christopher Lauderdale 

College of Arts & Science 

Economics 

German 



Kiernan Laughlin 

College of Arts & Science 

History 

Psychology 



Martine Laurent-Russell 

College of Arts & Science 

Communications 



Matthew Lauring 

College of Arts & Science 

Philosophy 

History 



Katherine LaValle 

College of Arts & Science 

French 




Christopher I., nailer 

( <il lege of Arte & Science 
I listory 



Jamie Lavin 

School of Management 

Finance 

History 



Pia Layon 

College of Arts & Science 

Economics 



Sabrina Lazzari 

College of Arts & Science 

Human Development 



Amanda Lee 

School of Management 

Finance 




Chiwon Lee 

College of Arts & Science 

Psychology 

Bioloev 



Christopher Lee 

College of Arts & Science 

History 



Elizabeth Lee 

College of Arts & Science 

Biology 



Genevieve Lee 

School of Management 

Finance 

Marketing 



Jamie 1 
College oi Arts 6; Science 
Historv 
Economic- 




Jong Lee 


Justin Lee 


Kevin Lee 


Meredith Lee 


Michael Lee 


School of Management 


College of Arts & Science 


School of Management 


College of Arts & Science 


College of Arts & Science 


Finance 


Communications 


Accounting 


English 


Bioi 


Accounting 




Finance 








Sora Lee 

College of Arts & Science 

Political Science 

Histon 



Sunny Lee 

School of Management 

Accounting 

Marketing 



Vnne Leese 

School of Education 
Human Development 



Matthew I eger 

College of Arts & Science 
Historv 



Jacqueline Legrand 

Col 

Miimunicatic 




Robert I emein 
School of Management 

Accounting 

Finance 



Emil) 1 ennox 

College of \rts & Science 

Economics 



Andrew Leone 

Collect' ol Arts A- Science 

Biolog) 



William Leone 
Col 

His' 
Theolo 



Kathrvn Le*-affre 
x>l of Education 
Human '< ~ient 



Senir 



Looking Back 




'May God bless and keep you always 

May your wishes all come true 

May you always do for others 

And let others do for you. 

May you build a ladder to the stars 

And climb on every rung 

May you stay forever young 

Forever young, forever young 

May you stay forever young. 

May you grow up to be righteous 

May you grow up to be true 

May you always know the truth 

And see the lights surrounding you. 

May you always be courageous 

Stand upright and be strong 

May you stay forever young 

Forever young, forever young 

May you stay forever young^' 

Bob Dylan 



370 Seniors 




"There are places I remember 
all my life, though some have 
changed, some forever, not for 
better, some have cone and some 
remain. All these places had 
their moments, with lovers and 
friends I still can recall, some 
are dead and some are living. 
In my life, I've loved them all. 
Though I know I'll never lose 
affection for people and things 
that went before, I know I'll 
often stop and think about 

them!' The Beatles 




Do you remember? Getting accepted. Nervously 
going to freshman orientation. Meeting your room- 
mate, "tour first football game. Getting lost taking 
the T. Getting lost in the quad. Seeing Vanilla Ice. 
Waiting on lines at the Plex. Discovering late night 
food. Only being able to enjoy Christmas lights for 
two months. Freshman year's freezing winter. Tray I can t remember al 1 
sledding. Getting shafted in the housing lottery, the times I tried to tell 
Marathon Mondays and St. Patricks Days. Laugh- .,« A ir *^ u^a ~ * +~ *u^~ 

^ _ . . _ r J B t1 myself to hold on to these 

ing at Dane Cook in Conte. Waiting forever to sell J 

books back only to be told they're not taking yours moments as they pass. 

anymore. Not being able to fit all your stuff in Counting Crows 

the car. The excitement of returning from breaks. 

Living on Lower for the first time. The Red Sox 

finally winning the World Series. The rise of OC 

and wine parties. Traveling to Notre Dame to see 

BC win again. Not having a Notre Dame game 

senior year. Registering your first party. Moving 

to the ACC. The newer, stricter tailgating rules. 

Watching BC almost beat Duke, wherever you 

were. Only being let in to MAs if you're from MA. 

Set 





Amanda Lee. Roseanne Palatucci, Todd Seekircher & Jan Wolfe 



Kaytlin Lapsa & Elise Melvin 






Mike Nuttall & Marianne Tierney 




Y 



Jell Sou & Lisa Andre 




Ana Morales, Kathleen Moise. Utuoma Abiola, Alexandra Angrand & Nedean Wilson 



372 Seniors 




Alana Vi\olo. Brooke Wilson. Shannon Fallon. Marin na Fadon <fc Jenny AlmquiM 



Senior* 



Alexandra Lescop 

College of Arts & Science 

Biology 



Lauren Leshik 

College of Arts & Science 

English 

Philosophy 



Joseph Lesniak 

College of Arts & Science 

History 



Anthony LeVoci 

College of Arts & Science 

Economics 

Classical Languages 



David Levy 

College of Arts & Science 

Political Science 

Communications 




Derrick Lewis 


Malik Lewis 


Whitney Lewis 


Stephanie Li 


Jason Lilly 


School of Management 


College of Arts & Science 


College of Arts & Science 


School of Management 


College of Arts & Science 


Information Systems 


Chemistry 


Political Science 


Accounting 
Finance 


English 




Xin Lin 


Benjamin Lindeman 


Matthew Lindgren 


Timothy Linehan 


Kimberly Linkletter 


School of Nursing 


School of Management 


School of Management 


School of Education 


College of Arts & Science 


Nursing 


Finance 


Finance 


Secondary Education 


Communications 




Accounting 




History 


Sociology 




Daniel Littauer 


Laura Little 


Edward Liu 


Stephanie Locatelli 


Jessica Locke 


( ollegeof Arts & Science 


College of Arts & Science 


College of Arts & Science 


College of Arts & Science 


College of Arts & Science 


Theology 


Biology 


Mathematics 


Political Science 


History 


Philosophy 




Computer Science 


International Studies 





Caitlin Loftus 


Katherine Loftus 


Nicole Lombard i 


Geoffrey Longstaff 


Janice Lopez 


College of Arts & Science 


College of Arts & Science 


School of Management 


School of Management 


School of Nursing 


Political Science 


Biochemistry 


Finance 
Communications 


Finance 
French 


Nursing 




Joseph Lopresti 


Allison Loring 


Caroline Lorusso 


Da\ id Lucia 


Jaime L. 


College of Arts & Science 


School of Management 


College of Arts & Science 


School of Education 


College of Arts & Science 


Communications 


Finance 


History 


Secondary Education 


History 


Philosophy 






Mathematics 


Sociol. 




Christina Luke 

School of Education 

S© ondary Education 

English 



Kellv Luken 

School of Education 

Secondary Education 

History 



Erdeta Lula 

School of Management 

Marketing 

Italian 



Peter 1 undb 
College oi Art< & Science 
Psychologj 
Biolojn 



Lauren Lundy 
School of Education 
Human Development 
^mmunicahons 




Jennifer I noma 

College ol Vrts & Science 

Mathematics 



Brian Lusignan 

College oi Alts & Science 

English 



Courtney Luther 

School of Management 

Marketing 



Allison Luvera 

School of Management 

General Mgmnt 



Taylor L\Tin 
School of Management 
Fin ■ 



Sen* 



Kathleen Lysakowski 

College of Arts & Science 

Art History 



Caitlin Mackie 

School of Education 

Elementary Education 

Human Development 



Claire Magee 

College of Arts & Science 

English 



Chi Ma 

School of Management 

Finance 



Eric MacDonald 

College of Arts & Science 

Political Science 



Erin MacDonald 

School of Management 

Accounting 

Economics 



Karen Maciolek 

School of Management 

Marketing 




Jennifer MacLellan 

College of Arts & Science 

Communications 



Patrick Madaus 

School of Management 

Finance 

Marketing 



Kristen Madden 

School of Management 

Accounting 



Rebecca Madson 
School of Education 

History 
Human Development 




Laura Magno 

School of Education 

Secondary Education 

History 



Amanda Maguire 

College of Arts & Science 

Psychology 



Frank Maguire 

School of Management 

Marketing 



Alana Mahoney 

College of Arts & Science 

Communications 




Andrew Mahoney 

College of Arts & Scieni e 

Film Studies 



Ryan Mahoney 

( o I lege of Arts & Science 

Psychology 

Philosophy 



Jayshree Mahtani 

College of Arts & Science 
Economics 



Ashley Mai 

School of Management 

Human Resources 



Richard Maichle 

College of Arts & Science 

Biology 



Brian Maier 

School of Management 

Accounting 



Andre Major 

College of Arts & Science 

History 



Chrisanthi Makkas 

College of Arts & Science 

English 



Frances Malcolm 

College of Arts & Science 

English 



Aditya Malhotra 

School of Management 

Finance 




Elyse Mallouk 

College of Arts & Science 

Studio Art 

English 



Ksenia Mankowska 

College of Arts & Science 

Political Science 



Stephanie Mariconda 

College ot Kits & Science 

Political Science 

Philosophj 



Scott Mallozzi 

College of Arts & Science 

Biology 



Timothy Malone 

College of Arts & Science 

History 

Communications 



Jason Mangone 

College of Arts <Sc Science 

Political Science 



Jessica Manni\ 

College of Arts & Science 

Communications 



Jessica Mantas 

College oi Arts & Science 
Communications 



Jennifer Manzo 

School of Nursing 

Nursing 



Joseph \larik 

College of \i t- >.<; Science 

1 listory 

Economics 



Irene Ntarinakis 

Colli nee 

Histon 



Brett Marks 
Col' nee 

Theater 



Christopher Manion 

School of Management 

Finance 




Jonathan Mariano 
School of Management 
Finance 
Computer S 




Julianne Marlev 

Col' -nee 

International Studies 



Sen* 




1 i inline Whelan. Jean Blosser <t Meredith DuMais 
378 Seniors 




Brooke N\iKon & Alana \'nolo 



Pauline Khat- 



yn »or<- 




Katie Killingcr & Erin Sweat t 



3X0 Seniors 




Joseph Lopresti, Tim Linehan. Tim Quealy Nick Narodny, Matthew Morici. Bruce Teichman &: R\an 



Sen 




Christopher Marques 

College of Arts & Science 

Political Science 



Nicholas Marsh 

College of Arts & Science 

English 



Lindsey Martelli 

School of Nursing 

Nursing 



Katherine Martin 

College of Arts & Science 

Communications 



BK8M 

Robert Martin 

School of Management 

Accounting 




Domenico Martinez 

College of Arts & Science 

Computer Science 

Music 



Robert Martinez-Dawson 

College of Arts & Science 

Economics 



Maggie Martyn 

School of Nursing 

Nursing 



Raymond Mascia 

College of Arts & Science 

Communications 



Jennifer Maser 

College of Arts & Science 

Computer Science 




Shabnam Mashmasarmi 

College of Arts & Science 

Sociology 



Ashley Massaro 

School of Management 

Marketing 

Theology 



Kathleen Masterson 

School of Education 

Elementary Education 

Human Development 



Lauren Mastrocola 

School of Management 

Accounting 



Michael Mastroianni 

School of Management 

Accounting 

General Mgmt 





Keeley Mathews 

School of Management 
Marketing 



Bryan Mattel 

School of Management 

Finani e 



Megan Mattern 

School of Nursing 

Nursing 



Jonathan Matthews 

College of Arts & Science 

Biology 



Emily Mauro 

College of Arts & Science 

English 







Douglas Mayne 

School of Management 

Finance 

Information Systems 



Christopher McCann 

School of Management 

Finance 

Marketing 




Andrew Mazgelis 

School of Management 

Finance 

Accounting 



Elizabeth McAlpine 

College of Arts & Science 

English 

Communications 



Elayne McCahe 

College of Arts & Science 

Historv 



Bonnie McCall 

College of Arts & Science 

English 




Lauren McCarthy 

School of Management 

Accounting 

Finance 



Lauren McCormick 

School of Management 

Accounting 

History 



Karen McCourt 

School of Education 

Elementary Education 

Human Development 



David McCracken 
College oi Arts & Science 
Psycho 




Caitlin McCue 


Emilv McCue 


(Catherine McDaniel 


Bridget McDevitt 


Erin McDevitt 


School of Nursing 


School of Nursing 


College of Alls & Science 


College of Arts .Si Science 


School oi Education 


Nursing 


Nursing 


Historv 


Political Science 


Human Development 



Mate McDonnell 

School of Management 

Finance 

\l i minting 



Robert McDonough 

College of Kits & Science 

English 



Ahson McElene) 
College of Art-- & Science 
irnnuinica turns 



* 





Meghan McGUI 
Col urts&Scn 

Philosophy 



Matthew McGinn 
Col 

His' 



SenK- 



Scott McGoohan 

College of Arts & Science 

Biology 



Katelyn McGovern 

College of Arts & Science 

Biology 



Katelyn McGowan 

School of Nursing 

Nursing 



Kelli McGrail 

School of Education 

Elementary Education 

Math/Computer Science 



Katherine McGregor 

College of Arts & Science 

Communications 




Patrick McGroarty 

College of Arts & Science 

Philosophy 



Priscilla McGuire 

School of Education 

Human Development 



Brighid McHugh-Mullane 

College of Arts & Science 

English 

Philosophy 



Jill Mclnnis 

College of Arts & Science 

Economics 




Lindsey McKenna 

School of Education 

Elementary Education 

Math /Computer Science 



Tara McKennett 

School of Management 

Marketing 



Kristen McKeon 

College of Arts & Science 

English 

Psychology 



Laura McKinney 
School of Nursing 



Nursing 



Leland McManus 

College of Arts & Scieiu e 

Communications 



Melanie McNally 

College of Arts & Science 

Biology 



Clare McNamara 

College of Arts & Science 

Physics 



Shannon McNamee 

College of Arts & Science 

Biology 



Lynn Mclntyre 

School of Nursing 

Nursing 




Scott McLean 

College of Arts & Science 

Biology 




John McNaught 

College of Arts & Science 

Sociology 



+rr t^ 




Margaret McQuade 


Lora Mead 


Diane Meade 


Kathleen Meagher 


Brian Medlin 


College of Arts & Science 


School of Nursing 


College of Arts & Science 


College of Arts & Science 


School of Education 


Communications 


Nursing 


Communications 


Sociology 


Human Development 



Studio Art 




Kevin Meenan 

College of Arts & Science 

English 

Philosophy 



Michelle Megna 

College of Arts & Science 

Economics 



Marissa Mehall 

School of Management 

Finance 

Philosophy 



Kyle Meingast 

College of Arts & Science 

Political Science 

History 



Antonia Melas 

College of Arts & Science 

Chemistrv 




Elise Melvin 
School of Management 

Accounting 
Latin american Studies 



Todd Menk 

School of Management 

Finance 



Yaribel Mercedes 

College of \rts & Science 

English 

Communications 



Elizabeth Merrill 

College of Alls & Science 

Historv 

Communications 



Christopher Messina 

College oi \t\< Sc Science 

Chemistry 




Daniel Mezzartcello 

College ol Vrts & Science 

Philosophy 

Communications 



Kimberly Miazga 

School ot Management 
Accounting 



Rachel Mkhakzyk 

College of Arts & Science 

Psychologj 



Brian Mickelson 
Collecc > >; Vrts & • 
English 



Matthew Mifsud 

Col I • 

Bio 



Serin- 




I 'rsula Rodriguez & Patricia Rodriguez 



Tim Pitta. Elise Mclvin & Mike Nuttall 



3X6 Seniors 




Susan Preston, Ret»\ Da\iv A Cm \I\irph\ 



Adam Shtple> \; Addie N 



Seniors 




Michelle 'Iebsherany. Emily Kives, Melanie Nesse, Kate Patten & Carolyn Kron 



Craig Dorsett & Stephanie Locatelli 




Who says we are too old to celebrate halloween?! 



388 Seniors 







Jen Marsh & Fames Lajoie 



Baldwin makes a hou^e visit! 



Senior*. 




James Milkosky 
School of Management 



Accounting 



April Millado 

College of Arts & Science 

Sociology 



Elizabeth Millar 

College of Arts & Science 

English 

Sociology 



Ayana Miller 

College of Arts & Science 

Communications 



Brian Miller 

College of Arts & Science 

Communications 




Daniel Milligan 

College of Arts & Science 

Economics 



Kerri Milligan 

School of Education 

Human Development 



Abigail Millman 

College of Arts & Science 

Economics 



Lujuana Milton 

College of Arts & Science 

Sociology 



Meaghan Mitchell 

College of Arts & Science 

Economics 





Stephanie Mitrione 

School of Management 

Marketing 

Human Resources Mgmnt 



Matthew Modafferi 

College of Arts & Science 

English 



Michael Mohan 

School of Management 

Finance 



Kathleen Moise 

School of Education 

Elementary Education 

Human Development 



F. Paul Monaco 

College of Arts & Science 

Biology 




Christina Montalvo 

College of Arts & Science 

Theology 



John Montana 

School of Management 

Finance 

Marketing 



Amanda Montesano 

School of Education 

Human Development 

English 



Jina Moon 

College of Arts & Science 

Political Science 

Communications 



Stephen Moon 

School of Management 

Finance 



4C9^ 



^jr* 












Colleen Mooney 


Michael Moore 


Steven Moore 


Ana Morales 


Ermanno Morelli 


School of Nursing 


College of Arts & Science 


College of Arts & Science 


College of Arts & Science 


College of Arts & Science 


Nursing 


Biology 


Political Science 


Sociology 


History 




Matthew Morici 


Jenniffer Morillo 


Erin Morin 


Nicholas Morteo 


Lindsav Morton 


School of Management 


College of Arts & Science 


College of Arts & Science 


School of Management 


tool oi Management 


Finance 


Philosophy 
Hispanic Studies 


English 


Finance 
Corp Report & Anal) sis 


Marketing 




Victoria Mosshrook 

College of Arts & Science 

Biolog] 



Eli/a Moulton 

School of Education 

Secondary Education 

History 



Sarah Mower 

School of Management 

Accounting 



Elizabeth Mover 

College of Arts & Science 

Psychology 



Sean Mulderrig 

College of Arts & Science 

Philosophy 

Communications 



Patrick Mulheam 

College oi \rts & Science 

Mathematics 

I conomics 



Pieman Mulroonej 

College of \rts <k Science 

Biolog] 



Ann Mulvey 
School of Nursing 
Nir 



Christina Mucci 
College of Arts & Science 

Communications 




Morgaux Munnellv 
Col 



SenK>rs *>! 




Patricia Munoz 


Anne Murphy- 


Caitlin Murphy 


James Murphy 


Lindsay Murphy 


College of Arts & Science 


College of Arts & Science 


School of Nursing 


College of Arts & Science 


School of Management 


Communications 


Economics 
Philosophy 


Nursing 


Political Science 


Marketing 
Finance 






Matthew Murphy 

College of Arts & Science 

English 



Michael Murphy 

College of Arts & Science 

Communications 



Padraic Murphy 

College of Arts & Science 

History 



Patrick Murphy 

College of Arts & Science 

Mathematics 

Art History 



Robinson Murphy 

College of Arts & Science 

English 




Rebecca Murray 

School of Management 

Marketing 



Cham Mutdhastira 

School of Management 

Finance 

Marketing 



Gregory Myers 

School of Management 

Information Systems 

Finance 



Thomas Myers 

School of Education 

Human Development 

Elementary Education 



David Nagib 

College of Arts & Science 

Chemistry 




Danielle Najarian 


Roger Nani 


Craig Napolitano 


Christina Nardone 


Nicholas Narodny 


School of Management 


College of Arts & Science 


College of Arts & Science 


College of Arts & Science 


School of Management 


Operations 


Biochemistry 


Biochemistry 


English 


Finance 


Marketing 











Ellianne Nasser 

College of Arts & Science 

Biology 



Theologv 



Jessica Nelson 

College of Arts & Science 

Political Science 

Economics 



Finance 



Matthew Nichols 

School of Management 

( ieneral Mgmnt 



Bryan Natale 
College of Arts & Science 
Environment Geoscience 



Jessica Natale 

College of Arts & Science 

Psychology 



Danielle Naugler 
School of Education 

Theater Arts 
Human Development 



Kanchan Nayar 

School of Management 

Finance 

Accounting 




Robert Nelson 

School of Management 

Finance 

Philosophy 



Melanie Nesse 

School of Management 

Accounting 

Finance 



Kevin Newman 

College of Arts & Science 

History 

Political Science 



{Catherine Nicolai 

College of \rN & Science 

Fnglish 



Anthony Nicosia 

College of Vita & Science 

Computer Science 



\ Kiia Nikotk 

Col 

History 
Slavic Stuc 



Lindsav Newton 

School oi Education 

Elementary Education 

Human Envelopment 




Patrick New ton 


[ennifer Nguyen 


Mariana Nguyen 


Mario Nicholas 


Paul Nicholas 


School of Management 


School of Management 


College of Arts & Science 


College ot Arts & Science 


Co ence 


1 l|s|,M\ 


Marketing 


Psvcholog\ 


Economics 


Hilton 




aka 

Coli 



Seniors 393 




William Nunziata 

College of Arts & Science 

Theater Arts 

English 



Andrew O'Brien 

College of Arts & Science 

English 




Christopher Noonan 


Varina Nouza 


Sarah Nowalk 


Kathern Nowell 


Anthony Nunziata 


College of Arts & Science 


School of Nursing 


College of Arts & Science 


College of Arts & Science 


College of Arts & Science 


English 


Nursing 


French 
Theater Arts 


Biology 


Communications 
Theater Arts 




Michael Nuttall 

College of Arts & Science 

History 



Margaret Nuzzolese 

College of Arts & Science 

Political Science 



Margaret Obermeier 

School of Management 

Accounting 



Peter Obersheimer 

College of Arts & Science 

Economics 




Colin O'Brien 

College of Arts & Science 

Sociology 



Matthew O'Brien 

College of Arts & Science 

Psychology 



Claire O'Connell 

College of Arts & Science 

Sociology 



Flannery O'Connor 

College of Arts & Science 

Theology 





Mikaela O'Connor 

College of Arts & Science 

I listory 



Elizabeth O'Day 

College of Arts & Science 

Biochemistry 



Jarrod O'Donnell 

School of Management 

Accounting 

Human Resources 



Patrick O'Donnell 

School of Management 

Finance 



William O'Dwyer 

School of Education 

Elementary Education 

Mathematics 



Lesley O'Garro 


Brian O'Hara 


Meghan O'Hare 


College of Arts & Science 


College of Arts & Science 


School of Nursing 


English 


History 


Nursing 



Katy O'Leary 

College of Arts & Science 

History 

Communications 



John O'Kane 

School of Management 

Finance 



Victoria O'Kane 

College of Arts & Science 

International Studies 



Communications 




Kristen O'Leary 

School of Management 

Finance 



Steven Oliveira 

College of Arts & Science 

Political Science 

Communications 



Feyisara Oloru 

College of Arts & Science 

Sociology 



Kaitlin O Malley 

School ot Management 

Marketing 




Meaghan O'Mallev 

College of Arts & Science 

Chemistry 



Thomas O'Mullane 

School of Management 

Computer Science 



lohnO '\eill 

College of Arts & Science 

Political Science 



Stephanie O'Neill 

College oi Arts & Science 

Economics 

Tinea ter 



Timothy Orazem 
College ot \rts & Science 

His - 
Finance 




I auren Orefice 

College of Vrts & Science 

Biolog) 

Psycholog) 



Seamus Oftourke 
College of \rts & Science 

International Studies 



lennifer Orthman 
College of Arts it Science 
Cla- 



Rosa Ortiz 
College of \rts & 
Soriok 



Kristen Ostfc 

ucation 
Earlv Childhood 
Psychol a 



Seniors 395 




Brady Smith. Melissa Abruzzese & Manny More 
396 Seniors 



Shane Stryzinski & Barbara Sternal 




Chris Carter, Courtne) Hopkins. Rafael Ro\ira. Greg Gagnon & Micah Davis-Johnson 



Sen 




Justin Ostrowski 

School of Management 

Finance 

Accounting 



Ryan O'Sullivan 

School of Management 

Finance 



Edward Otis 

School of Management 

Operations & Information Systems 



Brook Ott 

College of Arts & Science 

Philosophy 



Mark Owens 

College of Arts & Science 

Political Science 




Nicholas Padavano 

College of Arts & Science 

Psychology 



Heather Page 

School of Education 

Elementary Education 

Psychology 



Oscar Palacio 
School of Management 
Business Management 



Rosanne Palatucci 

College of Arts & Science 

Economics 

French 



Marguerite Palisoul 

College of Arts & Science 

Psychology 




Jessica Palumbo 

College of Arts & Science 

Political Science 



Antim Panesar 


Reena Parikh 


Damian Park 


allege of Arts & Science 


College of Arts & Science 


School of Management 


International Studies 


English 


Marketing 
Finance 



Howard Park 

School of Management 

Finance 





Michael Parker 


Kris Parks 


Lauren Parks 


Sheetal Parvani 


Roland Pasquariello 


College of Arts & Science 


School of Management 


College of Arts & Science 


School of Management 


School of Management 


Political Science 


Finance 


Communications 


Finance 


Finance 


1 i onomics 


Accounting 




Communications 


Accounting 




Amish Patel 

College of Arts & Science 

Biochemistry 



Jonah Patel 

College of Arts & Science 

Hispanic Studies 



Rahul Patel 

College of Arts & Science 

Biology 



Tara Paternoster 

College of Arts & Science 

English 



r* *-- 




(Catherine Patten 

College of Arts >fc Science 

English 




Paul Pavia 

School of Management 

Accounting 

Marketing 




John Pavletic 

School of Management 

Finance 



Christopher Pavlow 

College of Arts & Science 

Chemistry 



Brianne Pearce 

School of Nursing 

Nursing 



Paula Pereira 

School of Management 

Accounting 



Daniel Perez 

School of Management 

General Mgmnt 

Finance 



Rebecca Perreault 
School of Nursing 

Nursing 



Louis Perrotta 

College of Arts & Science 

Psychologj 



Marissa Peterson 

School ol Management 

I inance 



Pamela Peterson 

School of Management 

Marketing 

Finance 



locelvn Petitto 

College i" f \rts <Nc Science 

Mathematics 

Philosophy 



John Petrozzino 

School of Management 
Finance 
hunting 



Roberto Peraza 

College oi Arts & Science 

Chemistry 

Philosophy 




Lindsay Pesacreta 

School of Nursing 
Nursing 




Leah Pettinari 
Col nee 

mmunicatic 
; ish 



Senior*. **9 



Tien Pham 
School of Management 

Finance 
Corp Report & Analysis 



Christina Pherson 

School of Nursing 

Nursing 



Emily Phillips 

College of Arts & Science 

Music 

English 



Jeffrey Picard 

College of Arts & Science 

History 

Philosophy 



Justin Pine 

College of Arts & Science 

Chemistry 

Philosophy 




Dwan Pineros 


Courtney Piper 


Nicole Pirello 


Tara Pisani 


Timothy Pitta 


College of Arts & Science 


School of Nursing 


College of Arts & Science 


School of Education 


School of Nursin 


Economics 


Nursing 


History 


Communications 


Nursing 


Philosophy 






Elementary Education 







Gabrielle Pittman 

College of Arts & Science 

Political Science 



Laura Pizzimenti 

School of Management 

Accounting 

Finance 



Christopher Pizzo 

College of Arts & Science 

Political Science 



Rebecca Plate 

College of Arts & Science 

Studio Art 




Robert Plunkert 

( ollege of Arts & Sck'iK <■ 

Psychology 

I listory 



Kaitlin Plunkett 

College of Arts & Science 

History 



Kevin Plunkett 

College of Arts & Science 

Political Science 

Philosophy 



Max Podell 

College of Arts & Science 

Economics 



Matthew Pluimer 

College of Arts & Science 

Mathematics 




Travis Podesta 

College of Arts & Science 

Communications 

Political Science 



Katherine Poff 


Bridget Pollock 


Elizabeth Pomerantz 


Samuel Pond 


Matthew Pontes 


School of Nursing 


School of Education 


School of Management 


College of Arts & Science 


College of Arts & Science 


Nursing 


Human Development 


Finance 


Economics 


Communications 




Child In Society 


Economics 


History 


English 




Matthew Porcelli 


Sara Porter 


Katherine Potter 


John Powell 


Jaime Towers 


College of Arts & Science 


College of Arts & Science 


School of Nursing 


College of Arts & Science 


School of Management 


Economics 


Political Science 


Nursing 


Political Science 


Finance 


English 


Hispanic Studies 




Philosophy 






Joseph Prang 

School of Management 

Marketing 



Susan Preston 

School of Education 

Human Development 

Early Childhood 



Christie Pride 

College of Arts & Science 

English 

Art Historv 



Abbey Prior 
College of Arts & Science 
iolog} 



Matthew Putorti 
College ol Arts ^ Science 

Political Science 



Margaret P\ ne 

School of Education 

Human Development 



Daniel Tvster 

College of \lta & Science 

History 

Political Science 



Alison Quandt 
Collect' ol VrtS & Sci 
Economics 



Ama Pritchaid 

College oi XrN <Sc Science 
Film Studies 




David Quarello 
Col 

Econom 



Sen* 




Student 



Advice 



"I have never let schooling interfere with my education!' Mark Twain 



"Live on Newton! %ah, it gets 
cold in the winter, but there's 
nothing like going home to 
your own campus with all 
other freshmen around!' 
"Upper is the best, "fou never 
have to wait for the bus, walk- 
ing to classes takes no time, 
and you can go home between 
classes. The only downside 
are all the stairs on the way up 
to campus! 




.?? 



"For those of you who love BC, 
get involved with everything 
you love on campus. \bu can't 
go wrong with following your 
passion, plus everybody loves 
new friends and more of a 
social life. If you get claustro- 
phobic on campus, take advan- 
tage of Boston and getting 
off campus because then you 
won't mind it so much when 

you're back!' 




402 Seniors 




"I would tell 
people to go 
abroad. It mieht 
be your only 
chance to experi- 
ence another cul- 
ture to such a full 
extent. It's really 
more of a social 
experience than 
academic, which 
is awesome. And 
who wouldn't want 
to enjoy the good 
food and cheap 
wine in places like 
Italy and France?" 



'Don't worry about every little grade 
hat you get if some are bad. %u only 
have four years to live in a place with 
people all about your age and who 
don't have to work forty or more hours 
a week. Take advantage of the relax- 
ing times and it will help you not to 

stress outT 





"Pick your courses, choose your 
friends, spend your time, and basi- 
cally live your entire life in a way 
that you will be proud of in any w a\ 
at the end of every day... 
Everything else will fall into place! 9 



Sen- 




Erin Swealt, Brittany Staples, Katie Killinger & Kate Guenette 



Ryan Walters & Brooke Wilson 




Nicole Stowell-Alonso, Patricia Rodriguez & Patricia Munoz 
404 Seniors 



Kristen Gorham, Karen Maciolek, Mui-Linh Lai & Monica Santis 



r. 



a-- 








A*. 



wrm 




t 



t 



tttfelSBF 




Ted Serra. Pauline Khamo. Jess Palumbo. Kaytlin Lapsa & Dave Nagib 



A 




U|uo Ukpong, Ufuoma Abtola .v Alexandra Angrand 



Dustin Hatefi. John Pavletic & Brian Busch 



Senior* 



Timothy Quealy 

College of Arts & Science 

English 



Alexander Quebec 

School of Management 

Finance 



Matthew Quigg 

College of Arts & Science 

Philosophy 

History 



Meaghan Quinlan 

College of Arts & Science 

Sociology 



Lisa Quinn 

School of Nursing 

Nursing 





Kelly Quish 

School of Management 

Finance 



Sarah Quish 

College of Arts & Science 

Political Science 



Christina Racek 

College of Arts & Science 

Biology 



David Racki 

College of Arts & Science 

Economics 

Philosophy 



James Ranieri 

School of Management 

Finance 

Marketing 



Kathryn Rankin 

College of Arts & Science 

Biology 



David Ranta 

College of Arts & Science 

Economics 



Elisabeth Ready 

College of Arts & Science 

Mathematics 



Matthew Raher 

School of Management 

Finance 

History 




Meighann Recile 

School of Nursing 

Nursing 




Shannon Ken e 


Margaret Reed 


Joseph Regan 


Erica Reid 


Kevin Reidy 


College of Arts & Science 


College ol Arts & Science 


College of Arts & Science 


College of Arts & Science 


College of Arts & Science 


International Studies 


Political Science 
Communications 


Psychology 


Political Science 


History 






I 





Samuel Reidy 

College of Arts & Science 

Communications 



Christopher Reilly 

College of Arts & Science 

English 



Kathleen Reilly 

College of Arts & Science 

History 

Political Science 



Kevin Reilly 

College of Arts & Science 

English 

Philosophy 



Alexa Reisler 

College oi Arts <S: Science 
Communications 



ft r 





April Rezendes 


Alicia Reznick 


Jennifer Rhines 


Andrew Rice 


Christopher Rich 


School of Nursing 


College of Arts & Science 


School of Management 


College of Arts & Science 


College of Arts & Science 


Nursing 


English 


Marketing 


History 


Economics 
Sodolofi 




Alyssa Richman 


Katelyn Rideout 


Daniel Riehs 


Crystal Rimoc/\ 


Pn an Rizzardi 


School of Education 


School of Education 


College of Arts ft Science 


School of Education 


School of Management 


Human Development 


Secondary Education 


Computer Science 


Elementary Education 


Finance 


Child In Society 


Histon 




Philosophy 


Econooi 




Peter Robbins 

College ol Vrts >Sc Science 

1 conomics 



Ian Roberts 

College of tots iSc Science 

Communications 



Gregory Robinson 
College of \rts ft Science 

Economics 



Ma reel a Robles 
Col nee 

Art Histoid 
TheoK 



Julia Roboff 
School of Nursing 



Sen*' 



Amanda Roche 

School of Education 

Human Development 



Oddalys Rodriguez 

College of Arts & Science 

Communications 



Stephanie Roche 

School of Management 

Accounting 



Bridget Rochester 

School of Education 

Early Childhood 

History 



Alexis Rodriguez 

School of Management 

Marketing 





Patricia Rodriguez 

College of Arts & Science 

Communications 



Rosa Rodriguez 

College of Arts & Science 

Marketing 



Ursula Rodriguez 

School of Management 

Marketing 

Human Recources Mgmnt 



Cameron Rogers 

College of Arts & Science 

Psychology 




Emily Roh 

College of Arts & Science 

Philosophy 



Christian Roman 

College of Arts & Science 

Economics 



Matthew Roman 

College of Arts & Science 

Communications 

Mathematics 



Karen Romans 

School of Education 

Human Development 

Child In Society 



April Rondeau 

College of Arts & Science 

History 

Film Studies 





■fj 




Francis Roney 

School of Management 

Finance 

Accounting 



Ashley Roraback 

College of Arts & Science 

Psychology 



Geoffrey Rose 

School of Education 

Elementary Education 

Human Development 



Rachel Rosen 

College of Arts & Science 

Communications 



Tabitha Rosien 

College of Arts & Science 

Psychology 



s% 




Kaitlyn Ross 

School of Education 

Elementary Education 

Communications 



Jessica Rouge 

College of Arts & Science 

Biochemistry 



Austin Rubel 

College of Arts & Science 

Political Science 



Michael Russell 

College of Arts & Science 

Economics 

Mathematics 



Richard Rossi 

College of Arts & Science 

Economics 

Communications 



Thomas Rossmeissl 

College of Arts & Science 

Political Science 



Verena Rost 

School of Education 

Elementary Education 

Human Development 



Brian Roundy 

College of Arts & Science 

Communications 

Sociology 



Steven Rountos 

School of Management 

Finance 

Marketing 



Brett Rozhon 

School of Nursing 

Nursing 



Brendan Ruddv 

College of Arts & Science 

Philosophy 

Theology 



John Ruggieri 

School of Management 

Marketing 



Megan Rulison 

College of Art-- ft Science 

Theater Arts 

Biologj 



John Rotundo 
School of Management 

Finance 
Corp Report & Ana! 




Megan Ruane 

School of Nursing 

Nursing 




Emily Russell 
School oi Management 

Marketing 
Human Resources Mgmnt 




Robert Russo 

College of Art-- ft Science 

Computer Science 



Stephanie Rutkowski 

College of Vrts ft Science 

English 

Film Studies 



Carol vn Rvan 
Coli rts & Science 

Bio 



Colin Rvan 
Coli; 

Econorr 



Sentr 




Jenny Almquist & Brooke Wilson 



Ashley A morel lo, Laura McKinncy & Melissa Donovan 



410 Seniors 




i.mn.i Walling, Margaret Chow. Caroline Whelan & Lisa Anilr 



i M.nKon. \shlc\ Mai. I : \ Kclt\ & Ja\ Maliiam 




N i tonites bonilhng in K 



Seniors -ill 



mm Wa 





Jen Marsh. Michelle Bradley & Marianne Tierney 



Valerie AuYeung, Victoria O'Kane, Carolyn Hassel & Alison Rypkema 



412 Seniors 




Tara Paternoster, Matthew Putorti & Margaret Hepp 



Rahul Patcl & Irene Manr 



Senior^ 



Kathleen Ryan 
School of Management 

I conomics 



Erika Rvback 

School of Management 

Accounting 

Finance 



Alison Rypkema 

College of Arts & Science 

Communications 



Wesley Saavedra 

College of Arts & Science 

Philosophy 



Linda Sabatello 

College of Arts & Science 

Political Science 

Communications 




Joseph Sabia 

College of Arts & Science 

Economics 

Political Science 



Daniel Sacchetti 

College of Arts & Science 

Psychology 



Emily Sacknoff 

College of Arts & Science 

Psychology 



Brendan Sage 

School of Management 

Marketing 



Yuri Samsonov 

School of Management 

Finance 

Accounting 









Keri Sanborn 
College ot Arts & Science 
Biol 



Jean-Paul Sanday 

School of Management 

Marketing 

Operations/Tech Mgmnt 



Curran Sands 

College of Arts & Science 

Communications 

English 



M-Isabel Santos 

College of Arts & Science 

Economics 



Nicholas Sarno 

College of Arts & Science 

Art History 




I milv Sarokhan 

( ollege <>f Arts & s. i< 

Politii .il & inn i- 



Anthonj Sartorio 
( ollege "i Aits (S.- Si iciu c 
lish 
Philoso] 



lolin Sauter 
( ollege oi Arts & Science 

Political Si inn v 



Kevin Sawyer 

College of Arts & Science 

Communications 



Daniel Scali 

College of Arts & Science 

Computer Science 

Political Science 




/"* T 



Lisa Scansaroli 

College of Arts & Science 

Communications 

English 



Jonathan Schaffrath 

School of Management 

Finance/ Marketing 

English 



William Schatz 

College of Arts & Science 

Psychology 



Brooke Schepman 

School of Management 

Finance 

Economics 



Lindsev Schiller 

School of Education 

Human Oe\ elopment 




Anna Schindelar 


Jaclyn Schlichting 


Alexis Schmid 


Ann Schneider 


Anne Schoellerman 


School of Education 


College of Arts & Science 


School of Nursing 


School of Education 


College of Arts & Science 


4uman Development 


Economics 


Nursing 


Communications 


English 


Studio Art 






Elementary Education 






Kevin Schohl 


Jennifer Schretter 


Andrew Schulte 


(Catherine Schulte 


Nellie Schult/ 


School of Management 


College of tots & Science 


College of Arts & Science 


College of \rt- & Science 


College oi Art^ *c Science 


Finance Operations 


Sociology 


English 


Sociology 


Soaok) | 


Accounting 






English 






Sarah Schultz 


Allison Schwarz 


Stephanie Scibilia 


m Sdafani 


A tt 


College of Arts >.<.- Science 


College of Art-- & Science 


Collect' ol \rts ft Science 


Colli 


Co enee 


Biolog) 


Philosophy 


Bio 


Computer S 


Psycho 



Senior. 415 



Michael Scott 

College of Arts & Science 

Sociology 



Jarred Scumaci 

School of Management 

Finance 



Michael Scott 

School of Management 

Accounting 



Regina Scott 

College of Arts & Science 

Psychology 



Ryan Scudellari 

College of Arts & Science 

Computer Science 



Christopher Scully 

School of Management 

Finance 

Marketing 




Eileen Searle 

School of Nursing 

Nursing 



Todd Seekircher 

College of Arts & Science 

History 



Alexandra Selby 

School of Management 

Finance 

Theater Arts 



Jaclyn Senner 

College of Arts & Science 

History 

Art History 



G. Theodore Serra 

College of Arts & Science 

Economics 

Music 



Brynn Shaffer 

College of Arts & Science 

Theology 



Ankit Shah 

College of Arts & Science 

Economics 



David Shane 

College of Arts & Science 

Biology 



Faye Shanley 

College of Arts & Science 

English 



Angela Shannon 

College of Arts & Science 

Communications 

Psychology 



Kevin Shannon 

School of Management 

Finance 

Economics 



Catherine Semenoff 

School of Nursing 

Nursing 




Melissa Shakro 

College of Arts & Science 

Mathematics 




Alexandra Sharp 

College of Arts & Science 

English 




Melissa Shaughnessy 

College of Arts & Science 

English 



Benjamin Shaw 

College of Arts & Science 

Physics 



Kaitlin Shea 

College of Arts & Science 

Communications 



Joseph Sheehan 

School of Management 

Accounting 



1 



Bridget Sheehy 

School of Education 

Human Development 




Margaret Sheldon 

School of Education 

Human Development 

Psychology 



Wesley Sheldon 

School of Management 

Finance 

Marketing 



Sarah Shepard 

College of Arts & Science 

Communications 

English 



Lesley Shermeta 

College of Arts & Science 
English 



Joanna Shihadeh 

College oi Arts ic Science 
Music 




Matthew Shineman 

College of Arts & Science 

Music 



Matthew Stunners 

College of Arts & Science 

Biochemistry 



Adam Shiplej 

College of Arts & Science 

Ps) chology 



Matthew Shoemaker 

School of Management 
Marketing 



kathrvn Short 
College oi Arts & Sc 
English 
Communications 





\iu hael Sieglen 


Stacej Sienko 


Alejandro Sierra 


Maura Silverstein 


M ^n 


School of Management 


School o\ Nursing 


School oi Management 


School of Education 


Co rts St Science 


Finance 


Nursing 


Marketing 


Elementary Education 
Math Computer Science 


Theater 
French 



Seniors 41" 




Rafael Rouira, Michael Cherke/ian. Chrislian Sobrino <!<: Joe Sabia 



4IK Sen iors 




Chris Cam. Kcmti Schohl. Emil\ Bere .v Matt Kcl)\ 



>r«. 4JQ 








Margaret Nu//olese & Tim Malone 



420 Seniors 




Kaytlin Lapsa, Katie Unger, Pauline Kl 



phanie Locate! I i 



THE BEATLES .. "- * 
ABBEY ROAD . 


W 


. 


!a7^ 


/0mm "iafi 


| 


. 


t 

ml 


s 

■ 


r ™ m W 



All dressed up for an e\enint: on the town' 




Nicole Pirello. Rlair Armstrong. Ashle\ Augusta & Holh Boucher 




Jonathan Maier. P' Wacner. Tim Pitta A Mike N'uttal 






I 



t\ 




Prabhdeep Singh 

College of Arts & Science 

Political Science 

Philosophy 



Stacey Small 

College of Arts & Science 

English 



Meghan Smith 

School of Education 

Human Development 



David Sipala 

College of Arts & Science 

Biology 



Kristen Skarupa 

School of Education 

Elementary Education 

English 



Christine Skurka 

School of Management 

Accounting 

Finance 



Kathryn Slattery 

School of Nursing 

Nursing 




Andrew Smith 

College of Arts & Science 

Biochemistry 



Christine Smith 

College of Arts & Science 

Communications 

History 



Daniel Smith 

College of Arts & Science 

Political Science 



Jessica Smith 

School of Nursing 

Nursing 




Erin Snow 

School of Education 

Elementary Education 

Human Development 



Jonathan Snow 

College of Arts & Science 

Computer Science 



Simone Sobers 

College of Arts & Science 

Communications 

Psychology 



Christian Sobrino 

College of Arts & Science 

English 




Carl Sohn 


Bora Song 


Sara Soni 


Christine Soran 


Christine Soriano 


School of Management 


College of Arts & Science 


School of Nursing 


College of Arts & Science 


College of Arts & Science 


1 in, iin e 


English 


Nursing 


Political Science 


Finance 


Info Systems 


Economics 




Philosophy 


Marketing 



Jessica Soule 

College of Arts & Science 

Biology 



Christie Spadafora 

College of Arts & Science 

Biology 



Julie Spatola 
School of Management 

Marketing 
Organizational Studies 



Henry Spring 

School of Management 

Finance 

Accounting 



Cassandra Springer 

School of Management 
Corporate Systems 




Kathryn Staab 

School of Nursing 

Nursing 



Jeffrey Stabile 

College of Arts & Science 

Political Science 

History 



Jacob Stahl 

College of Arts & Science 

International Studies 



Leonard Stalling- 

School of Management 

General Mgmnt 

Philosophy 



Monica Stallings 

School of Management 

Communications 




Christopher Stanley 

College of Arts & Science 

Communications 



Emma Stanton 

College of Arts & Science 

Theater Arts 

Philosoph) 



Margo Staruch 

College of Arts & Science 

Physics 



foseph Steele 

College of Art- & Science 

History 



Keith StefaneUi 

Col nee 

History 




John Stefanopoulos 

College of Arts & Science 

Ph\ sics 



Emily Stegner 

School of Management 

Finance 

Marketing 



Erin Steinhart 
College of \rts & Science 
Psychol 



Robert Steinkrauss 

School of Management 

Finance 



Barbara Sternal 
Col 

History 



Sen* 




Shelley Stewart 

College of Arts & Science 

Economics 



Matthew St Hilaire 

College of Arts & Science 

Mathematics 



Matthew Stiles 

College of Arts & Science 

Theology 

English 



Marie St Jean 

School of Management 

Marketing 

Finance 



Danielle Stockwell 

School of Management 

Marketing 




Meredith Stoffel 

College of Arts & Science 

Communications 

History 



Natalie Stokes 

College of Arts & Science 

Theology 

History 



Kelly Stone 

College of Arts & Science 

Sociology 

Philosophy 



Nicole Stone 

College of Arts & Science 

History 




Nicole Stowell-Alonso 

College of Arts & Science 

Communications 




Michael St Pierre Patrick Streeter 

Woods College of Advanced Studies College of Arts & Science 
Business Administration Biology 



Shane Stryzinski 

College of Arts & Science 

Political Science 



Daniel Stulck 

College of Arts & Science 

Biology 



Shannon Stump 

College of Arts & Science 

Political Science 

English 










k i 1' 




) dm 


' 


^v^l 





Jennifer Suh 

I ollege of Arts & Science 

Communications 



Amy Sullivan 

< o I lege of Arts & Science 
Biology 



Caroline Sullivan 

School of Management 

Finance 



Catherine Sullivan 

College of Arts & Science 

Biology 



Christian Sullivan 

College of Arts & Science 

Economics 

Philosophy 



Daniel Sullivan 


Jeffrey Sullivan 


Meaghan Sullivan 


Meghan Sullivan 


Michael Sullivan 


College of Arts & Science 


College of Arts & Science 


College of Arts & Science 


School of Nursing 


School of Management 


Chemistry 


Political Science 


Communications 


Nursing 


Accounting 


Economics 












Shavvna Sullivan 

College of Arts & Science 

Political Science 



Megan Summers 

School of Education 

Human Development 

Latin American Studies 



Tony Sunly 

School of Management 

Accounting 

Finance 



Leigh Sutcliffe 

School of Education 

Human Development 

Child In Society 



Erin Sweatt 

College of Arts & Science 

Biology 



[essica Swensen 

College of Arts & Science 

Sociology 



Kathrvn Sw 'iderski 

College of Arts i!c Science 

Economics 

Philosophy 



Knstina Sy 

School of Management 

Marketing 

General Mgmt 



Szilvia Szegedi 

College ol \rts & Science 

Communications 



Michael Szklarski 

School oi Management 

finance 

Philosophy 



Lai la Tai 
College of Vrts& Science 

Communications 



Matthew lakvorian 
Colli 

Biochemistry 



Cassandra Svenson 

School oi Management 

Finance 

Marketing 




Suzanne Szalai 
College ol \rts & Scm 

En\ ironment Ge 




holas Taravella 
School of -nent 

Finance 



Sen* 







Leigh Tartaglia 

College of Arts & Science 

Communications 



Chantal Tate 

College of Arts & Science 

Communications 



Brian Taylor 

College of Arts & Science 

Computer Science 



Shawn Taylor 

School of Management 

Finance 



Michelle Tebsherany 

College of Arts & Science 

Psychology 




Bruce Teichman 

College of Arts & Science 

Psychology 



Margaret Tejani 

College of Arts & Science 

Biology 



Karen Tellekamp 

School of Education 

Human Development 

Child In Society 



Paul Tellier 

College of Arts & Science 

Political Science 

Philosophy 



Tara Termine 

School of Nursing 

Nursing 




Elizabeth Tesoro 

College of Arts & Science 

Communications 



Michelle Tetrault 

School of Education 

Human Development 

Child In Society 



Tu-Lin Tham 

College of Arts & Science 

English 



Jennifer Theiss 

School of Management 

Finance 




Benjamin Thompson 

College of Arts & Science 

Biochemistry 



Sarah Thompson 

School of Education 

Elementary Education 

Human Development 



Marianne Tierney 

College of Arts & Science 

English 



Alejandro Timiraos 

College of Arts & Science 

Communications 




Suzanne Timmons 

School of Education 

Elementary Education 

Human Development 




Sarah Titus 


Christopher Tocco 


Joanna Todaro 


Nicholas Todisco 


Lisa Tomasi 


2 of Arts & Science 


College of Arts & Science 


College of Arts & Science 


College of Arts & Science 


School of Management 


Biology 


Theater Arts 
Theology 


English 


Historv 


Marketing 
Finance 




Sherwood Tondorf 

College of Arts & Science 

Political Science 



Ali Torabi 

College of Arts & Science 

Philosophy 



Benjamin Torbert 

College of Arts & Science 

English 



Nicholas Townley 

College of Arts & Science 

Historv 



Emilv Townsend 

College of Arts <k Science 

English 




Kara Travinski 


Andrew Tremble 


Ann Triche 


Christopher Tnngale 


Crystal Tnnh 


School of Nursing 


School of Management 


College of Alts & Science 


College of Art-- fli Science 


School of Management 


Nursing 


Accounting 


Psycholog) 


Political Science 
History 


Finance 
Marketing 




Daniel lYovato 


Molly Trowbridj 


Alexandra Trov 


Christina Tsichlis 


Evan Turner 


College oi \rs & Science 


School oi Nursing 


Colli nee 


School of Education 


School of M 


lnternation.il Studies 


Nursing 


Biolog] 


OOndary Education 


Finance 


Political Science 






English 





Sen* 




Faculty 



Advice 



t< 



Good advice is always certain to be ignored, but that's no reason not to give it!' 

Agatha Christie 



"Don't plan your college 
career out. Throw yourself 
into whatever you're doing 
and have faith that you'll 
have the credentials to get 
you what you want!' 
On knowing what you want 
to do in college and life: 
"Don't know your song? \bu 
have four years to write it. 
Start with the melody and 
fill in the words later!'* 




"Every day seek out and 

snatch just a little bit of 

happiness for yourself. 

I've been searching for the 

meaning of life for the past 

sixty years. I used to think 

it was the Hokey Pokey: 

that's what it's all about... 

(Thank you) No, it's just 

finding, each day, 

a little bit of happiness!' 

* Professor Michael Moore 

42S Seniors 





'And will you succeed? 

^fes, you will, indeed! 

(98 and 3/4 percent guaranteed.) 

Kid, you'll move mountains! 

So.. .be your name Buxbaum 

or Bixby or Bray, or Mordecai Ali 

Van Allen 0'Shea..r 



"Congratulations! 
Today is your day. 
You're off to 
Great Places! 
Y>u're off and away! 
You have brains in 
your head. You have 
feet in your shoes. 
You can steer your- 
self any direction 
you choose. You re 
on your own. And 
Y)u know what you 
know. And YOU 
are the guy who'll 
decide where to 



so... 



99 





"\bure off to Great Places! 
Today is your day! 
Youx mountain is waiting. 
So.. .get on your way!" 

Dr. Seuss 

Oh. the Places You'll Go! 



Sen 




Becky Perrault. Kait Shea, Emily Bellock. Alyson McEleney, Sue Berube & Nora Doty 



Brian Kelly & Craig Dorsett 




Tina Corea. Joe Iolc. Melanie McNally & Dave Levy 
430 Seniors 



Vernon Araujo, Jack Campbell. Brelt Chase. Peter Robbins & Mark Defeo 



V 



The time we spend with the people we care about leave an impression on the friendships we ha\e formed 




Kristen O'Learj & Diane Meade 



Jaime Lugas. Jenn\ Berc. Marianne Tierney. Danielle Cur s & Suz) Dupre 

K>Ts 4?1 




c.W. 




Nicholas Tuths 


Nicolas Twaalfhoven 


Katherine Twardak 


Iquo Ukpong 


Aykut Unsal 


College of Arts & Science 


College of Arts & Science 


College of Arts & Science 


College of Arts & Science 


College of Arts & Science 


English 


Philosophy 
Theology 


Theology 


Film Studies 


Biology 




Edward Urgola 

College of Arts & Science 

Communications 

Music 



Michael Usinger 

School of Management 

Finance 



Blake Uyeno 

College of Arts & Science 

Sociology 



Cara Valeri 

School of Education 

Elementary Education 

Human Development 



Ryan Valle 

College of Arts & Science 

Biochemistry 




Leigh Van Ostrand 

College of Arts & Science 

English 



Andrew Vasile 

College of Arts & Science 

Political Science 

Philosophy 



Meghan Vaughan 

College of Arts & Science 

Biology 



Ralph Veenema 

College of Arts & Science 

Film Studies 

Economics 



Maureen Velez 

College of Arts & Science 

Psychology 




Cristina Velm i 

College of Arts & Scieru e 

I nglish 

Communications 



Matthew Venables 

S ( hool of Management 

Computer Science 

Finance 



Benjamin Verla 

College of Arts & Science 

I li story 



Zachary Vernon 

School of Management 

Finance 



Christina Vetre 

School of Education 

Secondary Education 

English 



Jaclyn Vilaca 

School of Management 

Finance 

Accounting 



Boris Vilidnitsky 

College of Arts & Science 

Computer Science 

Mathematics 



Alana Visconti 

College of Arts & Science 

Economics 



Michael V'ito 

School of Management 

Finance 

Psychology 



Alana Yivolo 
College oi Arts &; Science 
Psychol 




Elizabeth Volney 

College of Arts & Science 

Communications 



Vanessa Voltolina 

College of Arts & Science 

Communications 

English 



Peter Wagner 

College of Arts & Science 

Biology 

Hispanic Studies 



Trevor Wahlbrink 

School of Management 

Accounting 

Finance 



layme Waldron 

School of Education 

Elementary Education 

Child In Society 




Brianna Walling 

College of Arts & Science 

Hispanic Studies 



Patrick Walling 

College of Arts & Science 

English 

Political Science 



\ndrew Wallman 

College of Art- & Science 

Philosophy 

Economic- 



Andrew Walsh 

College oi Art- & Science 

Histon 



Meaghan Walsh 

School ci Education 

Human Development 




Meghan Walsh 

College of Arts & Science 

English 

Psj cholog) 



Timothv Walsh 

College ol VrtS & Silence 

English 



Rvan Walters 

School of Management 

Finance 

Marketing 



•lev Walther 
Col 

Bio 



in Wan 
School of Management 
Finance 



Sen* 



Megan Ward 

College of Arts & Science 

Communications 



Nicole Warner 

College of Arts & Science 

Economics 



Ross Warren 

College of Arts & Science 

Communications 



Gregory Waryasz 

College of Arts & Science 

Biology 



Jaime Waters 

College of Arts & Science 

Theology 

Philosophy 




Allison Watras 

College of Arts & Science 

Mathematics 



Eugene Watt 

College of Arts & Science 

Economics 



Timothy Weaton 

School of Management 

Finance 

Accounting 



Ben Weinberger 

College of Arts & Science 

Economics 



Justin Weiss 

College of Arts & Science 

Psychology 




Michael Welch 

College of Arts & Science 

Political Science 



Jonathan Wellemeyer 

College of Arts & Science 

History 



Kali Wellington 

School of Education 

Human Development 



Thomas Wells 

School of Management 

Finance 

Marketing 



Kathryn Werner 

College of Arts & Science 

History 




Matthew Werner 

School of Mana ge m en t 

Finance 



Katie Werl 
School of Management 

Finance 
C orp Report & Analysis 



Mary Wert/ 

College of Arts & Science 

Biology 



Jonas Westbrook 

College of Arts & Science 

Mathematics 



Kate Westerman 

College of Arts & Science 

Biology 



Sasha Westerman 

College of Arts & Science 

Hispanic Studies 



Prescott White 

School of Management 

Human Resources Mgmnt 

Marketing 



Charles Wiles 

College of Arts & Science 

History 



Timothy Westfield 

College of Arts & Science 

Theater Arts 

Mathematics 



Elizabeth Weyman 

College of Arts & Science 

Art History 



Brenton Wheatley 

College of Arts & Science 

Mathematics 



Brett Wickman 
College of Arts & Science 
Information Technology 



William Wicks 

College of Arts & Science 

Political Science 



Robert Wierzbicki 

College of Arts & Science 

Communications 



Caroline Whelan 

College oi Art-^ .k Science 

Sociology 




Brian Wildermuth 
College oi Arts & Science 
Theolo_ 




Ellen Willett 

College of Arts & Science 

English 



Kindra Williams 

College of Arts .Sc Science 

Film Studies 



\.i|i Williams 

College of Arts & Science 

English 



Shannon Williams 

College of Art-- & Science 

Communications 




Brooke Wilson 


Nedean Wilson 


Brett Wilzbach 


Elizabeth Wiiuarski 


Ehana Win 


School of Management 


College oi Vrts & Science 


School oi Management 


Col nee 


Co ience 


I inance 


Communications 


Marketing 


: ish 


Communicator 


Marketing 




Finance 


International Studies 





Sen* 




Ryan Hellernan, Margaret Nu//olese & Luke Howe 



One perk of being 21: Waiting in line! 



436 Seniors 




There'-, nothing like hanging out with good Friends! 



Toil Serra. Tina Corea. Joe Out'rcda & fin.. Macdonj 




Dan Tro\ato. Rafiq Salmi. Marci Ronlc>. Scott Mallozzi & Jack Rot undo 



Senior^ 




Kelly Winn 

School of Education 

Early Childhood 

Communications 



Maura Winston 

School of Management 

Marketing 

Philosophy 



M. Sage Withrow 

College of Arts & Science 

Economics 

Political Science 



Sarah Wojtusik 

College of Arts & Science 

Psychology 

History 



Andrew Wolf 

College of Arts & Science 

History 

Philosophy 







Jan Wolfe 


Jessica Wolfe 


Joanna Wong 


Serena Wong 


Amanda Wood 


College of Arts & Science 


College of Arts & Science 


School of Management 


College of Arts & Science 


College of Arts & Science 


English 


Biology 


Marketing 


Biology 


Biology 


History 




Human Resources Mgmnt 








Meghan Wood 

School of Education 

Human Development 

Child In Society 



Morgan Woodcock 
College of Arts & Science 
Environment Geoscience 



Joseph Woodfield 

College of Arts & Science 

History 



Danielle Woods 

College of Arts & Science 

Sociology 



Warren Woods 

School of Management 

Finance 

Marketing 




Jessica Woodward 

College of Arts & Sciriu e 

1 [istor) 

English 



Shauna Worrell-Waldron 

College of Arts & Science 

Sociology 



Kay Wu 

School of Management 

Information Systems 

Accounting 



Jacqueline Wyka 

College of Arts & Science 

Psychology 



Alexander Xenopoulos 

College of Arts & Science 

History 

Economics 




> 



Ryan Yackel 

School of Management 

Finance 



Mariel Yarbrough 

College of Arts & Science 

Theology 



Brad Yaylaian 

College of Arts & Science 

English 

Studio Art 



Richter Yeske 
School of Management 

Finance 
Corp Report & Analysis 



Kristin Yette 

School of Education 

Secondary Education 

English 




Kimberly Yip 

School of Management 

Finance 

Marketing 



Romeo Ymalay 

College of Arts & Science 

Political Science 



Jessica Yoon 

College of Arts & Science 

Biology 



Min Yoon 

School of Management 

Finance 



Christopher Yu 

School of Management 

Marketing 




Rebecca Yu 

School of Management 

Finance 

Marketing 



Mark Yuen 

College of Arts & Science 

English 



Clara Yum 

College oi Arts & Science 

Communications 



Regina Yung 
School of Management 
Finance 
.uniting 



Michael Zanazzi 

College i Science 

Economics 




l )anielle Zanoni 


Emily Zarookian 


Julie Zelman 


Elizabeth Zembruski 


Elizabeth Zephir 


School of Education 


College ol \rt>- i<c Science 


School of Nursing 


CoH -nee 


Co ence 


Elementarj Education 


Biolog) 


Nursing 


;iish 


Political Science 


Persp Spanish America 











Seniors 4?9 



Anna Zervou 

College of Arts & Science 

Economics 



Mary Zider 

School of Education 

Human Development 




Caroline Zwick 

College of Arts & Science 

International Studies 



Stephanie Palladino 

School of Management 

Accounting 



Zachary Zinsli 

College of Arts & Science 

Biology 



Margaret Zulkey 

College of Arts & Science 

Mathematics 



Kurt Zwald 

College of Arts & Science 

Communications 

English 



Now, some of you may have your futures mapped 
out. Whether it's continuing your education, 
conquering Wall Street, starting a Fortune 
500 company, getting into politics, maybe becoming 
an entertainer. Then there are some of you who may 
not have a plan yet. That's ok. Don't be embarrassed 
by indecision. Remember: this life is a marathon. 
Whatever road life leads you down, you can change 
direction at any time. And that's what makes life excit- 
ing. So map out your future — but do it in pencil. 
Remember, 'Not all who wander are lost! Jon Bon Jovi 



In Memory 




Greg Monack 
January 22, 1984- June 11, 2003 

"No one 's death comes to pass 
without making some impres- 
sion, and those close to the 
deceased inherit part of the lib- 
erated soul and become richer 
in their humaneness " 

Robert Oxton Bolt 



Scott Laio 
March 1, 1984-May 15,2005 

God, grant me the serenity 
to accept the things I cannot 

change, 

Courage to change the things 

I can, 

And wisdom to know the 
difference 






Sen i> 




Shane Stryzinski & Stephanie Charamnac 



Meredith DuMais & Jean Blosser 



442 Seniors 





^V 1 


^g^^^ ^^ 


cUa. 1 


<v^ 


■>t *; & 




T^ 1 


a 4 




»4! 






*^^fl H 


ML1 M*J 


■ fc, 


i 
1 






■*tJ 








J 




Javshree Mahtani & Li/ \Ve\man 



Beth Mover. Erdeta Lula. Anna Clarke & Michelle Tetrault 




Courtnej Hopkins, Jake Carlson & Micah Davis-Johnson 



raza 



Senior* 




Manuel Colon & Christian Sobrino 



: 

Patrick Cooney & Jessica Swensen 



444 Sen K us 




Jaclyn Schlichtim:. Emil\ \\re. KrMen O'Lean & Di.inc Mc.uk 



Senior* 




Melissa Shaughnessy, Diana Winings, Sarah Estock & Ben Mux 

446 Seniors 



Jessica Manias. Krisien O'Leary & Rebecca Finck 




Laura McKmnev Melix^.i Donovan. KateKn Rkleout & Carohn Dora 710 



Senior*. 




Victoria Robhen. Brittany Staples, Alexis Lake. Katie Killinger, Lora Mead. Erin Swealt & Kaye Guenette 



44S Seniors 



i 




Kaitlyn Parley Matthew Putorti & Julie Spatola 



Ashle% Amorello. Laura McKinncv. Catherine Semenoff. Jaime \ K.itehn Rnieout 



Semorv -U° 




Scotl Milagro lotre &. Dave Nagib 



Kristin Blundo. Emily Driscoll & Caroline Curtis 



450 Seniors 



v. 



m 

f 



Katie Killinger. Brittam Staple^ . Ei - . . 




Jjitik I\mers. Annie Connors & kjtehn RnJeou 



Mane' 



- 




Courtne) Hopkins & Greg Gagnon 






Chris [aquinto, Jamie Lee, Kenny Lin & Paul Camacho 



452 Seniors 




Priscilla Chen & Jennifer Morillo 



ndre St Tina 



Senior 




Priscilla (hen & Jennifer M i r i 1 1 < 



Emily Driscoll. Sarah Roonev & Kristin Blundo 



454 Seniors 







Celebrating a new member of legality' 






In Search of New Heights 




'"fou are educated. 

\bur certification is in 

your degree. %u may 

think of it as a ticket to 

the good life. Let me 

ask you to think of an 

alternative. Think of it 

as your ticket to change 

the world!' 

Tom Brokaw 




456 Seniors 






This year, graduates of the class of 2006 will soar 
to various places around the world and build new 
nests with the knowledge and training Boston Col- 
lege has provided them. Many students choose to 
remain in the Boston area after their positive expe- 
riences, while others venture to different countries 
on volunteer programs. Whatever one's new path 
requires, though, he or she can feel confident in 
the faith and values that Boston College instills in 
its students. Eagles can be proud of their educa- 
tion in future endeavors and know they can always 
fly home to visit classmates and teachers or to con- 
tinue supporting the athletic teams in their new 
vintage Superfan t-shirts. It can be exciting and 
it can be scary, but commencement is just a step 
towards becoming part of, and hopefully impact- 
ing, a new community, much bigger than that of 
the school in Chestnut Hill. As we move on in our 
lives, Confucius advises that "Wherever you so, so 
with all your heart!' 




"^bu cannot help but 
learn more as you take 
the world into your 
hands. Take it up 
reverently for it is an old 
piece of clay with 
millions of thumbprints 
on it!' 

John Updike 




"It takes courase to 
grow up and become 
who you really are!' 

E.E. Cummings 




Sentor^ 



Camera 



Danat Badrakhmanov 

Joseph Abely 

Diane Addison 

Femi Ademuwagun 

Ana Affonso 

Seongjin Ahn 

Kristin Allain 

Brian Allen 

Kevin Allocca 

Jennifer Almquist 

Ian Alpha 

Christina Amara 

Olanrewaju Anam 

Jeffrey Anand 

Andrea Anderson 

Katherine Anderson 

Patricia Anzalone 

Emalee Arroyo 

Matthew Auger 

Elizabeth Babyatzky 

Stalin Baez 

Karlantoine Balan 

Frank Baptiste 

Jolcesar Barros 

Taylor Bartczak 

Daniel Baslock 

Katie Baynes 

Ryan Beagan 

Mark Beaudette 

David Beaudreau 

Joshua Beekman 

Caitlin Beloiny 

Catherine Bennett 



Meagan Bennett 

Chelsea Benson 

Christopher Bergendorff 

Sara Berger 

Elizabeth Berns 

Margaret Beste 

Keith Binder 

Sean Birbal 

William Blackmon 

Kate Blair 

Nicole Bluefort 

Kristin Blundo 

Christopher Bolman 

Nicholas Boniakowski 

Vanessa Boone 

Sabrina Boutin 

Matthew Bowers 

Nicolas Boyd 

Christian Brenning 

Todd Brezinski 

Thomas Broderick 

David Brown 

Kristin Brown 

Richard Brown 

Andrea Bruckner 

Stephanie Burgos 

Brendan Burke 

Ryan Burke 

Sarah Burns 

Stephani Burton 

Conor Byrne 
Amanda Cadin 
Daniel Cagney 



Muriel Cagney 

Eoin Cahill 

Daniel Caja 

Paul Camacho 

Phillip Caputo 

Edward Carney 

Karen Carpi 

Paul Carty 

Todd Carver 

Thomas Case 

Michael Caslin 

Ana Castaneda 

Raymond Cavanaugh 

Alexander Chang 

Ian Chang 

Brian Chappell 

Shernelle Charles 

Jeremy Chasen 

Lieu Chau 

Kenny Chen 

Clyde Choi 

Hyoung-Zi Choi 

TaeJoon Chun 

Michael Ciauri 

Bryan Ciccarelli 

Jonathan Ciuffreda 

Jordy Clements 

Canyon Cody 

Christian Coleman 

Charles Coleta 

Christopher Collins 

Jenna Commito 

Sean Conaty 



458 Seniors 




Michael Conrad 

Stephen Coppola 

Katherine Cordtz 

Angela Cortes 

Kenneth Craig 

Slater Cram 

Christine Crawford 

Matthew Crow 

Colleen Crowley 

Caroline Curtis 

Kim Cushny 

Katie Cycan 

Andrew Czachorowski 

Martin Czuj 

Derek Dacunha 

Katelyn DAlessandro 

Jennifer Dalia 

Ryan Dal ley 

Jessica Danforth 

Carissa Daniels 

Sara Dart 

Meghan Davey 

Jennifer Davies 

Classie Davis 

Scott Davis 

Tamara Dawli 

Ryan Dawson 

Elizabete De Moura 

Jaime De Rensis 

Eskedar Dejene 

Mike Dellamano 

William Deluca 

Meredith Demaina 



Allison Demirjian 

Christopher Devor 

Frances Di Pema 

Melissa Diaz-Infante 

Lauren Dickerson 

Casey Diederich 

Anthony Dinizio 

Derick Dimaier 

Marcel la Dixon 

Bridget Doherty 

Ross Donovan 

Theodore Donovan 

Craig Dorsett 

Jason Doshi 

Daniel Doyle 

Emily Driscoll 

Brian Drislane 

Am}- Drobish 

John Dussel 

Patrick Eaves 

Karim El Nokali 

Kyle Elligers 

Christopher Emper 

Robert Espinosa 

Sarah Estock 
Gregory Evan off 

Andrew Fa hex 

Brooke Fnltemnier 

Lauren Faric\ 

Elizabeth Fayad 

Nicole Fentin Thompson 

Tasha Ferguson 

Brendon Ferullo 



Jason Filopei 

Kara Fitzpatrick 

Coleman Flaherty 

Julie Flaherty 

Patrick Flavin 

Kiera Flynn 

Michael Flynn 

Vanessa Focazio 

Cara Foley 

Laura Foley 

Ugonma Fontaine 

Michael Fox 

Greg Francis 

Philip Fry 

Caitlin Ententes 

Nicholas Fuller-Googins 

Nicholas Fusaro 

Grec Gaenon 

Charles Gale 

Median Gallagher 

Lauren Galvani 

Alexandra Garcia 

Rafael Garcia 

John Gamse) 

Nina Ga ion ski 

Sarah Gateh 

Samir Gautam 
Richard Gear) 
Maria Gendron 

Stephen Gonna 

Guillemo Gonzales 

Antonio Gonzalez 

( )mar Gonzalez 



Senior*. 



Camera 



Mark Gracia 

Michael Grant 

Stacey Greci 

Ryan Grieco 

Brian Grieve 

Bradley Groff 

Matthew Gryntysz 

Michael Guanci 

Rosemary Gulick 

Debra Gnning 

Rong Guo 

Kathryn Hagen 

Dorsey Hairston 

Thomas Halpenny 

Brigitte Hamadey 

Donghyun Han 

Saepyol Han 

Sungyeon Han 

Avery Hancock 

Avery Hanger 

Daniel Hanify 

Stephanie Harcrow 

Jessica Harkiewicz 

Julia Harris 

Peter Harrold 

Pamela Harvey 

Megan Hatch 

Dustin Hatefi 

William Haydock 

Wesley Hazard 

Sarah Hebl 

Robert Heins 



Alicia Henson 

Margaret Hepp 

Christine Herbas 

Alicia Heredia 

Louis Hinnant 

Patrick Hinterberger 

William Hobson, Jr. 

Brian na Hoffner 

Kathleen Holman 

Laura Honsberger 

Marc Horton 

Corrie Houle 

Luke Howe 

Joey Hsu 

Meredith Hudson 

Christina Huff 

Natalie Hummel 

Khoi Huynh 

Lucas Iacono 

Christopher Iaquinto 

Mark Irvine 

Simeon Ivanov 

Nathan Jeanes 

Lindsay Jennison 

Christopher Jerome 

Stephanie Johnson 

Amanda Jones 

Ryan Jones 

Eric Joo 

Samuel Joseph 

Shelley Joseph 

Jared Justice 

Salomon Kafati 



Masanori Kamiyama 

Patrick Kane 

John Karam 

Elena Karlgut 

Patrick Kavanagh 

Jonathan Kavanaugh 

Mary Kayyal 

Keith Keaveny 

Robert Keely 

Ian Kemper 

Cristina Kennedy 

Robert Keogh 

Jennifer Kero 

Miles Kerr-Jarrett 

Sahar Khalaj 

Salim Khanachet 

Stephen Kidder 

David Kim 

Eleanor Kim 

Elizabeth Kim 

H.Kim 

June Kim 

Sue Kim 

Tommy Kim 

Michael Kincade 

Ahla Ko 
Whitney Kopech 
Michael Korzyk 

Rita Kostiuk 

Lindsay Kurasz 

James Kwak 

Karen Kwok 

Jeffrey Labroad 



460 Seniors 




James Ladd 

Nicole Lady 

Allison Laffer 

Donald Lai 

Paul Lam 

Takyu Lam 

John Lancor 

Meghan Lane 

Albery Lardizabal 

Kelly Lavery 

Peggy Law 

Jeffrey Lazar 

Daniel Lecours 

Daniel Lee 

Jooyoung Lee 

Milton Lee 

Peter Lee 

Tania Lee 

Stephen Legawiec 

Joseph Lemelin 

Diana Lemire 

Kin Leovv 

Szechun Leung 

Patrick Lewis 

Matthew Lindner 

W Linsley 

Hsing Liu 

Alexandra Liveze\ 

Guillermo Lizano 

Michael Lodsin 

Ashley Loeb 

Ryan Lowry 



Lucas Lucero 

Patrick Lynch 

Bradley MacDonald 

Kevin MacDonald 

Lisa Macchia 

Michael Macfarlane 

Rose Machen 

Kelly Madigan 

John Madonia 

Blane Magee 

Uri Magen-David 

Beth Maguire 

Carolyn Mahler 

Jonatahan Maier 

Christopher Maimone 

John Maloney 

Jihan Mandilawi 

Bridget Manning 

Alexander Mansfield 

Jennifer Marsh 

Nicholas Marshall 

James Marten 

Christopher Mather 

Viena Mbagaya 

Lindsey McArdle 

Kelly McClure 

Brendan McDonald 

Elizabeth McDonnell 

Shawn McGill 

John McGinness 

James McGregor 

Jonathan McKenna 

Rachael McKenne\ 



Ian McKeown 

John Me cone 

Carlos Medina 

Mara Medina 

Zanibel Melo 

Jair Mendes 

Lorigiana Meneide 

Matthew Meyer 
Scott Milagro-Forte 
Daniel Milano 
Andrew Miller 
Dorothy Miller 

Ryan Miller 

Ryan Millikan 

Malia Milstein 

Stephanie Miranda 

Jennifer Mirski 

Stephen Monro) 

Maura Moone\ 

Rebecca Moore 

Shadu Moore 

Michael Mulcah) 

Ryan Muklowne) 

Mollie MullancN 

John Murra\ 
Michael Murra\ 

Joshua Myles 

Meghan Nadolski 

Benjamin Nauman 

Madawi Nawaf 

Mash a el Nawaf 

William Nazarde laucourl 

Oliver Nelson 



Scntor^ Mi 



Camera 



G. Neville 

Andrew Newkirk 

Jeffrey Newton 

Kitwa Ng 

Annie Nguyen 

Nguyen Nguyen 

Nhung Nguyen 

Sara Nicita 

Karen Noble 

Elizabeth Norris 

Joshua Nowak 

James Nugent 

Daniel O'Brien 

Erin O'Brien 

Alexis Ocana 

Jennifer Oh 

Daniel O'Keefe 

Shawn O'Neal 

Brendan O'Neill 

Meghan O'Neill 

Kathryn Onka 

Nchetaka Onyema 

Jake Ottolini 

Monsurat Ottun 

Jeanine Oury 

John Owens 

Megha Pai 

Kyle Paice 

Stefan ia Palladino 

Michael Pal ma 

Kirk Panneton 

Michael Parella 

Aja Parham 



Robert Paul 

Nydjie Payas 

Cristina Pejoves 

Stephen Perazzelli 

Megan Perry 

Phillip Perry 

Nicholas Peruzzi 

Denise Petriello 

Colin Phelps 

Carla Pherson 

Mark Powers 

Stephen Pride 

Jimmy Quach 

Brooke Queenan 

Jennifer Quicuti 

Daniel Raile 

Bernard Raphael 

William Ratkus 

Anna Reyes 

Adrienne Reynolds 

Brian Rice 

Mairead Ridge 

Daniel Ro 

Christopher Robinson 

Carly Rockstroh 

David Rod 

Oriana Rodrigues 

Hector Rodriguez 

Lianne Rodriguez 

Esther Rodriguez-Miranda 

Ashley Rome 

Henry Rooney 

Sarah Rooney 



Jonathan Rose 

J. Ross 

Adrian Rossello-Comier 

Nigel Rossello-Comier 

Rafael Rovira 

Jeffrey Ryan 

Steven Ryder 

Elias Saba Rodriguez 

Hasan Sadigli 

Rafiq Salim 

Jeremy Salupo 

Garrett Sandberg 

William Sandlass 

Monica Santis 

Ann Sarno 

Nicholas Savino 

Moises Savinon 

Stephen Scalzi 

Roger Scarselletta 

Kyra Schaeffer 

Kelly Schmidt 

Steve Schmidt 

Zoe Schmitter 

Robert Schneider 

Austin Scott 

Derek Scott 

Duncan Scott 

Megan Scully 

Taylor Sele 

Rami Selim 

Leigh Shapiro 

Robert Shaw 

Tyler Shenk-Boright 



462 Seniors 




Paul Shih 

Irina Shteyn 

Marco Sideri 

Victor Silva 

Chandler Simpson 

Jeremy Simpson 

Amanda Sindel-Keswick 

Johanna Skrzypczyk 

Alexander Slater 

Christopher Slevin 

Ian Sloss 

Carolyn Smallcomb 

Adrian Smith 

Brady Smith 

Christine Smith 

Craig Smith 

Michael Somers 

Sung Song 

Hanna Sonneborn 

Jeffrey Soo 

Joseph Spece 

Robert Spence 

Scott Spencer 

Akim St. Omer 

Brittany Staples 

Stephen Staysniak 

Matthew Steenrod 

Michael Stefan ilo 

Ryan Stillwell 

Paul Stuebe 

Gabriela Suau 

Michael Sullivan 

Mar the Supreme 



Linda Swank 

Bjorgolfur Takefusa 

Kevin Tanglis 

Cristina Tantoco 

Kathleen Taylor 

Kelvin Tejada 

Pierre Thelusma 

Alexander Thompson 

Alexis Tirella 

Eric Todd 

Sarad Tomlinson 

Trevor Tompane 

Eduardo Torres 

Jennifer Tran 

Jessy Trejo 

Nicholas Tresp 

William Troost 

Matthew Tully 

Ronald Tutalo 

Christopher Tynski 

Daniel Tynski 

Juliana Ucros 

Katherine Uhger 

James Unis 

Lacey Upton 

Rebecca Urban 

Catalina Valdes 

Margarita Vallecillo 

Ana Vallejo 

Zina Varelas 

Paulina Vargas 

Shaye Vfercollone 

James Verdegaal 



David Villarreal 
Michael Vitale 

Calvin \ y 

Martha Wakim 

Andrew Walsh 

Ryan Walsh 

Alvin Washington 

Jonathan Weinberger 

Sersev Wei n stein 

Michael Welch 

Curtis Wells 

William Went worth 

Joseph West 

Janet Whang 

Courtney White 

Rachael White 

Drew Wiechnicki 

Gregory Wiles 

Corina Wilshire 

Andrew Winogradow 

Ryan Winton 

Alexia Witcombe 

Jenna Woodall 

John Work 
Darren Yeung 

John Yi 

Patricia Ybhn 

Tracer Young 

Jason Yu 

Scot! Yurcheshen 

Suzanne Yusuni 

Robert Zi nun ski 



Senior^ 




To Do List 




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Attend orientation 

Be part of a celebratory toss up at a football game 

Party on Newton 

Enjoy the Arts Festival 

Drink green at St. Patrick's Day Parade 

Go to a Culture Show 

Marathon Monday... 

Spend a weekend on a retreat 

Take a Duck Tour 

Sing "For Boston" at sporting events 

Savor a cannoli from Mike's Pastry 

Cheer at a Celtics game at the Garden 

Nap in a Devlin 008 class 

Go out to dinner on BC's tab 

Party in a Mod 

Become legal 

Happy Hour at Roggie's 

End the night at Mary Ann's 



464 Seniors 



^omplete your major and minor requirements 
Confirm diploma name 




Watch the sun rise May 22, 2006 
March down Linden JUane w— — <■ 



[J Toss your ca 



Graduate from 



ollege 



Senior^ 



t****^ & ^ 



Natalie Fogiel & Marisa Fusco 



As students at Boston College, we are all blessed to have support systems. 
That may mean different things for each of us but whether it be our family, 
friends, the administration or some combination of the three, when things 
look as though they are at their worst, we can turn to our support system and it will 
remind us to stay the course, that things will get better. Likewise, Sub Turri is very 
fortunate to have the support of its Benefactors and Patrons. The generosity of these 
donors allows us to buy much needed equipment and supplies. This year, we were able 
to purchase a brand new computer, on which much of this book was created as well as 
several new digitial cameras which captured many of the images featured throughout 
the book. Also, it was with the patience and support of our donors that we were able 
to successfully implement a new online ordering system. Still, the support of our 
Benefactors and Patrons is about much more than equipment and ordering systems. 
Each time an order comes in with a donation, it helps to remind all of us on staff that 
someone cares about what we are doing and thinks it is a worthy investment. In the 
depths of McElroy on cold nights, this type of encouragement goes a long way. With 
the backing of so many thoughtful people, we find the strength to baby-step our way 
to deadlines and someone manage to have everything fall into its proper place. To 
our Benefactors and Patrons, thank you for your support and for believing in us. Your 
encouragement has meant a lot to us this year and we truly appreciate it. We hope 
that the book you are now reading has been enjoyable and that we have made you 
proud in our depiction of the 2005-2006 school year. It is our sincere wish that many 
years from now you will look back on these pages and determine that you did, in 
fact, make a good investment. Though your names 
appear on the pages that follow, please know that 
your generosity is responsible for all 504 pages of 
this book. Your kindness has left a lasting impres- 
sion on us all and will never be forgotten. Thank 
you. We couldn't have done it with you! Marisa 
Fusco 




466 Benefactors & 1'atrons 




Benefactor* A 



^EFACTOi? 



David & Jana Angliano 
Michael & Penny Augustine 

Carol & Louis J. Beierle 

Mr. & Mrs. Richard Bianco 

Bob & Maureen Bingle 

The Blosser Family 

Jim & Janice Brown and Family 

Dr. Yasmin Caballero 

Vince & Robyn Caponi 

John & Linda Carter 

Mr. & Mrs. Creighton Condon 

Alison & Jefferson Crowther 

Maria and John Curtis 

Margaret Connery Dietz 




46X Benefactors & Patrons 



Mary Denihan 

Charlene K. Fiore 

John & Bunny Gallagher 

Michael J. and Lorna Z. Gallagher 

Dan, Louise, Meg and Haynes Gallagher 

Marc & Millie Galligan I 

Dr. & Mrs. Richard C. Gillis 

Mr. & Mrs. David T. Griffith 

Reverend and Mrs. William C. Harding 

Mr. & Mrs. Chris J. Hartwig 

Brian and Denise Hickey 

Bob & Judy Jamieson 

Mr. & Mrs. Robert E Johnston 

Bonnie & Stewart Krentzman 




Benefactor* & Patron- 



Dr. & Mrs. Tom E Lapsa 
Mr. And Mrs. John A. Larkin 

Dr. & Mrs. Alan Leahey 

Kathleen & Robert Mahoney 

Don and Joann Maier 

Donald & Joan Marsh 

Marianne & Kevin Meenan 

The Moran Family 

Mr. & Mrs. Alessandro Morteo 

Gerard & Barbara Muldoon 

Joan & Brian Munnelly 

The O'Brien Family 

Mr. & Mrs. Arthur & Joan O'Neill 

Mr. and Mrs. Frank Pavletic 




470 Benefactors & Patrons 



*i 



Steve & Anne Reed 

Ginny & Chris Rich 

Craig & Mary Frances Richards 

Carol and Richard Roberts 

Mr. & Mrs. Frank J. Roney 

Sarah Rooney 

Jim and Maggie Rountos 

The Sasso Family 

William & Kathi Schlichting 

John & Pat Sheehy 

Dr. and Mrs. Mahadevan S. Shetty 

Nerguizian Varouj 

Wright S. Walling 

John A. & Ellen Walsh 

Donald and Lori ^feske 

MiMi C. Yu 

Mr. & Mrs. Muhammad Zahid 



£ 



v Paimn<. 



?AT RONS 

Jay and Sue Abraham 

Anonymous 

Anonymous 

Charles and Sarah Asiedu 

Robert & Mary Barrows 

Dennis & Marsha Belcastro 

Mauro & Diane Belgiovine 

Elizabeth & Ted Beresford 

Richard and Bonnie Berg 

Nicholas D. Bernier 

Robert Bertucio 

Allen and Laura Binder 

Frank & Betty Birney 

Jennie Weiss Block 

Richard & Cody Brady 

Charles & Maureen Brain 

Anthony & Lillian Brienza 

Mr. & Mrs. Charles D.L. Brown 



-a 



472 Benefactors & Patrons 



Connie & Tim Brown I 

Linda & Joseph Burger 

Thomas and Cynthia Burns 

Kirsten Larson Butler 

John W Byron 

Mr. & Mrs. K. Scott, Mr. John Capezzuto 

Christopher Carty 

James H. Chandler, M.D. 

David & Maureen Christmas 

Susan and James Clancy 

Owen Clancey '06 

David & Julie Clarke 

Coach 
Parents of Scott Gentile II, Peter & Anna Marie 

Coady 

Richard & Linda Cole 

Janet & Richard Collier 



kumwm 




Benefactor* & Patron* 



Anthony and Florence Coppola 

Mr. & Mrs. A. Corea 

Sally & Tom Curtin 

Dr. & Mrs. Richard DAscoli 

Mr.& Mrs. Thomas DeFelice Jr. 

James A. Delay 
Joan Boczar Delphia LSOE '73 & Larry Delphia 

The DiFazio Family 

Kathy & John DiGiorgio 

Mr. & Mrs. Richard S. Donley 

Tom & Gerry Donnelly 

Joan & Alson Drevins 

Lawrence and Karen Dunn 

Mr. & Mrs. Edward Dunnigan 

Dennis & Mary Dyer, '73 

David and Christine Early 

Frank & Debra Emolo 




v 



474 Benefactors & Patrons 



f 



Ron & Bernadette Ervin 
Bruce and Ellen Fador, Classes of '78 and '79 

Dr. & Mrs. Gary Fernando 

John and Elizabeth Ferrara 

John Ferullo, M.D. 

The Fetky Family 

Michael & Karen Fiorile 

Kevin Gipson & Maureen Flynn 

Sharon Frapwell 

WA. Fry 

The Friedenberg Family 

Mr. John & Carol Gabelli 

Mr. & Mrs. Joseph Garra 

Andrew W German 

Girard Gibbons 

Ana Maria Goicoechea 

The Grosart Family 

Barbara & John Halbmaier 

Barbara & Tom Han Ion 

John, Mary & Sean (2006) Han Ion 

Mr. & Mrs. James P Harlukowicz 



Benefactor* & Patron* 



*? 



Dr. & Mrs. Joseph Hedstrom 

George & Anne Hillman 

The Hoi lis Family 

Mr. & Mrs. Stephen Holodak 

Bill & Peggy Howell 

William & Lander Hynes 

Michael A. Invernale 

Brian & Patty Keck 

Peggy Kelleher 

Barbara M. Kelly 

Alicia Kinton 

Robert and Karen Koehler 

Stewart and Bonnie Krentzman 

Bernie & Jeannie Lahde 

Mr. & Mrs. Daniel Lajoie 

Irene Larsen 

Bradley & Barbara Lauderdale 

Ann & James Lauring 

K. Eshelman / R. Lavallee, Jr. 

Thomas & Yin Lee 

Gregg and Carolyn Lemein 



476 Benclactors & Patrons 



Greer Lerchen 

Richard & Lora Lipman 

Ruthanne & Jorge Lopez 

Mr. & Mrs. Kevin LoPresti 

Patrick Lynch 

Edward & Margaret Madaus 

Maureen Mahon 

The Mai Family 

Stuart and Casey Malcolm 

Mr. & Mrs. Ronald Manion 

John & Jennie Mastroianni 

Mary Ann McCue 

Meghan T McGill 

Richard and Debbie McGrail 

Terry and Mary McNeil is 

McPheeters Family 
Peggy & Gene McQuade 




Benefactor*. A: Patrom 



Kevin & Janice Meade 

David & Patti Milligan 

Frank and Christine Monaco 

Barbara & Michael Morici 

Bill & Patt. Morrison 

Ed & Sue Mulvey 

Dan & Jane Murphy 

John & Monica Murphy 

Ed & Kathy Napleton 
Charles & Donna Natale 
Mr. & Mrs. Brian Nelson 

Justin Ng 2008 

Louis & Rhoda Obermeier 

Mr. & Mrs. Jerome E O'Brien 

Dr. & Mrs. John B. O'Connell 

Brian, Maura & Sarah '08 O'Connor 



Mr. & Mrs. John O'Dor & Family 







47S Benefactors & Patrons 



The O'Grady Family 

Mr. & Mrs. Hugh O'Kane, Jr. 

Jerry & Ann O'Leary 

Michael & Carol Oliver 

Larry and Charlotte Oliveira 

Abe & Mo Ortega 
Mr. & Mrs. Lawrence Paggi 

John and Gail Palumbo 
Kenneth & Kristina Parks 

The Pen ni man Family I 

Dr. & Mrs. Milton A. Perez 

John & Marianne Petrozzino 

Steven & Kathy Pidgeon 

Patrick & Jean Pizzimenti 

Family of Matt Pluimer 

Stacey and Jeffrey Podell 

Harry, Patty and Jeffrey Poulos 

Barbara and Alan Quebec 

Joseph and Linda Reidy 

Kate Reilly 
Lori and Jerry Rordback 



Bene Pairom 



Don & Marilyn Russo I 

Tom '80 & Cheryl Bellissimo '82 Russo, P '08 

Claire & Rick St. Hilaire 
Mr. & Mrs. Frank Santora I 

Alan & Carol Sarokhan I 

Robert and Rovena Schirling | 

Jennifer Schretter 
Tony & Patricia Sendik 
Matthew M. Shoemaker 



Martin & Catherine Slark 

Monique & Terrence Sloane 

Mr. & Mrs. Michael & Phyllis Smilnak 

Mark & Julie Steinhafel 

Robert & Louise Steinkrauss 

Sally Sullivan Streeter 

Gerald & Maura Sullivan 

Eric & Cynthia Svenson 

The Tellekamp Family 

John '74 & Nancy '74 Tesoro 

Mr. & Mrs. Stephen Tom 

Troost Family 






4X0 Benefactors & I'aimns 



Doug Virtue 

Mr. & Mrs. Christian E. Volney 

Mr. & Mrs. Theodore M. Volz 

David and Maureen Walsh 

Joe & Peg Westfield 

Cynthia Graves Wilder 

Dr. & Mrs. Charles E. Wiles III 

Steve & Nancy Winings 

Joseph L. Winn 

Buddy & Penny Wolf 

Mark & Cheryl Wolfe 

Mrs. Jane Wood 

Gary and Alexandra Woodfield 

Sharon and Peter Amato and Alex Yeske 

Mr. & Mrs. Romeo T. Ymalay Jr. 

Weider & Jean Yu 

Mr. & Mrs. Gary Zanazzi 

Tony & Debbie Zancanaro 

Susan Chalifoux & Edward Zephir 

Dotsy and Kent Zirkle 

Duff Zwald 



Benefactor^ & Patrons ~ - 



CIjOSING 

Edited by: 
Myra Chai & Marisa Fusco 



Condense a year in the life of Boston College and all of its undergraduate 
students into five hundred and four pages. That is the daunting task 
that faces the Sub Turri staff each year. Nonetheless, we have tried our 
best this year to demonstrate the Impressions that 2005-2006 left on us and that 
we left on it. We witnessed catastrophic natural disasters, improbable sports 
victories and triumphant world events. Still, our lives centered around Boston 
College and Chestnut Hill. We hope that the preceding pages have done justice 
to all that that means. As we have learned from our time on the Heights, it is 
impossible to fully encapsulate all that it means to be a member of the Boston 
College community. For every member of the community, it means something 
unique. We are very proud of that diversity. Therefore, this book does not 
attempt to capture every single student's memories for that would be impossible. 
Instead, we have tried to highlight some of the most memorable moments from 
academics, student life, organizations, sports and seniors so that when we look 
back on this book many years from now, our own memories will be sparked and 
we will remember 2005-2006 in our way. To the Boston College community, 
there could be no greater gift than to allow each of its members to take away 
from the experience what they will. St. Ignatius would be proud of that. And 
so, we began this book with advice from Henry David Thoreau and we end 
with similar advice from K. Rafferty. To the Boston College community, take 
this advice and allow it to help you make your 
own Impressions, not only on the Heights but 
also on the world. "Go, set the world aflame." 
Congratulations on another successful year. 
Marisu Fusco 








482 Closing 




Closing 



?OR BOSTOjy 

For Boston, For Boston, 
We sing our proud refrain! 

For Boston, For Boston, 
Tis Wisdom's earthly fane. 



For here all are one 

And their hearts are true 

And the towers on The Heights 

Reach to Heav'n's own blue. 

For Boston, For Boston, 
Till the echoes ring again! 






For Boston, For Boston, 

Thy glory is our own! 

For Boston, For Boston, 

Tis here that Truth is known! 



And every with the right 

Shall thy heirs be found 
Tis time shall be no more 

And thy work is crown'd. 

For Boston, For Boston, 
For Thee and Thine alone! 





484 Closing 



#M U 



ALMA 



MAT$ 



*/ 



Hail! Alma Mater! 

Thy praise we sing. 

Fondly thy mem'ries 

'Round our hearts still cling. 

Guide of our youth, 

Through thee we shall prevail! 

Hail! Alma Mater! 

Hail! All Hail! 

Lo! on the Heights, 

Proudly thy tow'rs raised for the Right. 

God is thy master, 

His law thy sole avail! 

Hail! Alma Mater! 
Hail! All Hail! 




Closing 







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"It is said that we do not remember days, we 
remember moments. Though we may not have 
captured every moment from 2006, some of 
the best are immortalized in the preceeding 
pages. It is our sincere hope that in the years 
to come, this book will help you to fondly 
recall many happy moments at Boston College. 

- THE STAFF OF SUB TURRI '06 





4 l M (losing 






Co-Editors In Chief: Myra Chai and Marisa Fusco 

Business Editor: Natalie Fogiel 



Academics 


Photo 




Nhu Huynh, Editor 


Priscilla Chen 




Erin Klewin, Editor 


Angela Kim 




Susie Kelly 


Bertha Lee 




Jessica Lee 


Jessica Lee 
Annie Lu 




Student Life 

Anita Isama, Editor 


Caroline Oeonovvski 
David Trudo 




Vy Vy Vo, Editor 
Adele Beekman 


Business 




Julie Oh 


Matt Diebel. Manager 
Ted Allister 




Sports 

Katherine Modzelewski, Editor 
Aubrey Timm. Editor 


Brittany Amendola 
Katie Cordtz 
Matt Fumuso 
Eric Selhorii 




Organizations 






Sarah Alsamarai. Editor 
Jessica Lee. Editor 












Madeleine Rodriguez. Editor 








Seniors 








Kathleen Ahearn. Editor 








Carolyn Dorazio. Editor 








Shane Stryzinski. Editor 














Closing 495 



Academics 



Nhu Huynh 



Erin Klewin 



I would like to personally thank Erin for being a great 
editor as well as the Academic section staffers, Jessica ai 
Susie, the photographers, and Jostens, Inc. Much appreci- 
ation is sent out to Myra and Marisa for being excellent 
editors in chief. Sub Turri would not be what it is without 
you two. Yearbook is a great production, not because of the 
hundreds of pages that are labored over, but because of the 
individuals that put forth the effort. For the seniors that are 
departing, you will be missed. 




Wow, it's hard to believe another year has passed! This has 
been my third year working on Sub Turri, and it's been greati 
working on the Academics section. Id just like to thank 
everyone who made this year's book so fantastic! Thanks 
to Myra and Marisa for putting the whole book together,i 
being great editors-in-chief to the rest of us, and always; 
being there to help us out when we needed it! Thanks also 
to all of the other editors for being great company in the 
office, and special thanks to Nhu for being such a great co- 
editor! From emailing deans to taking pictures of classes 
early in the morning to staying late in the office to finish 
deadlines, you were so much fun to work with and helped 
keep me sane during proofs! Academics may be a short sec- 
tion, but we both worked really hard to make it the best itj 
could be, and I think we definitely succeeded. I'd also like 
to say hi to my wonderful friends, my lovely roommates 
in SIG 418, and of course to my amazing family, who have 
always supported me in everything I've ever done - I love 
you 



Student Life 



Anita Isama 




\ 



VyVyVo 






I just want to thank Myra and Marisa for giving me the 
opportunity to work on Student Life. I really enjoyed being 
co-editor with Vy Vy. Vy Vy thanks so much for everything! 
Nhu you are the best, and you helped me a lot this semester 
with yearbook and more. Thanks to everyone who submit- 
ted pictures and to our wonderful staffers who wrote great 
copies. 




Time flies. I can't believe that this year has gone by already. 
I have fully enjoyed the opportunity of being a Student Life 
Editor and a part of Sub Turri for my sophomore year. The 
section looks beautiful, and I want to thank my co-editor 
Anita for all of her hard work and understanding. I couldn't 
have done it without you. The late hours, the dedication, and 
the stress were all worth it in the end. To Marisa and Myraj' 
you two are the best EIC's ever! I appreciate everything you 
have done, and best of luck to both of you in the future. 1} 
want my friends from BC and Randolph (Dirrty) to know 
that all of you make me who I am today, and I wouldn't be 
able to survive without each of you in my life. To the ladies 
of 90-417, I will treasure our laughs and memories forever 
Save my spot in senior year. I love you, girls! I particularly 
want to thank Chandi, my roomie and fellow diva, who put 
up with my daily 'Top 10 Quotables" and who always sup- 
ported me. Only one more year to go and I'll be working on 
MY senior yearbook. Time flies. 



'And in the end, its not the years in your life that count. It's 
the life in your years." - Abraham Lincoln 

— -M 



Organizations 



i 



Sarah Alsamarai 

Working on the Sub Turri staff this 
year has been a great experience. 
With deadlines that always seemed 
to come too quickly, computers we 
could never fully figure out, and 
emailing clubs repeatedly for pic- 
tures, we have finally completed the 
Organizations section. Although 
I worked on my high school's year- 
book, I was not quite sure what to 
expect. The nature of work was cer- 
tainly different from high school. 
With the help of our editors-in-chief, 
M&M, and my amazing co-editors, 
Jess and Maddie, we have been able 
to pull everything together in what 
we hope to be an innovative way. I 
thank them all immensely for their 
support! I wish the best of luck to 
next years Organizations editors, 
for they are sure to have a great 
experience and become friends in 
the process. 



Jessica Lee 

The year of 2006 has come to an 
end, and everyone on the staff sur- 
vived, thank the Lord. Thank you 
Marisa and Myra for staying normal 
and not bitins all of our heads off 
during deadlines. And thanks to 
my co-eds, Maddie and Sarah for 
everything. Next, what can I say 
but Edmonds 828 baby! I love you 
girls for keeping me grounded and 
sticking by through thick and thin. 
912 girls too. especially for not put- 
ting up with all of our stuff. Push 
on '08 boys, we're supposed to have 
two more amazing years together! 
Finally, thank you to the Gate boys 
for acting as my second home, liter- 
ally. And thank you for keeping me 
sane this year, it's been more than I 
ever expected. And. that's it! To an 
amazing last year and to a new and 
even better year. 

Sports 



Madeline Rodriguez 

First of all. I need to thank Marisa 
and Myra for not only being great 
ElC's. but knowing someone in 
almost every organization and 
making my life much easier. I alsd 
can't forget to thank Mom and Dad. 
for not having a seizure when I asked 
you to pa> S40.000 a year so I could 
live in a room half the size of my 
own, eat cafeteria food, procrastinate 
and see snow. I promise I will never 
let you regret your decision. I have to 
mention those who helped me form 
my own "impressions"' at BC. To the 
Clava 407 Crew — between the LOST 
marathon, hip-hop classes. Dane 
Cook, and random nights of talking 
until 4am. we kind of got stuck with 
each other. Sandy you are the best 
roommate anybody could have asked 
for and we're so lucky '"the other one" 
never showed up. It's been "525.600 
minutes"" well spent and I love you 
all! 



Katherine Modzelewski 

Working on the yearbook has been a great experience that 1 
truly enjoy being a part of. Many thanks to Aubrey for once 
again being a great co-editor. No matter how prepared we 
thought we would be this year after learning how difficult 
sports was last year, it was still always an adventure, but 
somehow still always managed to get done. Thanks also to 
Myra and Marisa for keeping everything under control and 
creating such a great yearbook. And of course, thank you 
to my amazing famib for supporting me. and to m\ friends 
for always giving me something to laugh about. 



Aubrey Timm 

My second year on Sub Turri has been a great experience. 
1 owe the biggest thank-\ou to m\ co-editor. Katie. Thanks 
for always stepping up to the plate and doing more than 
your fair share. Thank you to Marisa and Myra for once 
again putting together an amazing book. You not onl\ put 
together a wonderful yearbook but make sure that every- 
thing runs smoothb along the way I cannot imagine doing 
the sports section without all of your help and guidance. 
I would like to thank and congratulate all the athletes, 
coaches, and people involved with Boston College athletics. 
It has been so much fun creating pages to honor the won- 
derful accomplishments vou ha\e achieved. BC is lucky to 
have such amazing \arsit\ and club sports teams Thanks 
for all your contributions to these pages Thank you to m\ 
friends at RC. You are what makes this .'. special place for 
me. I appreciate your help and support with my yearbook- 
work and beyond. Also. Id like to thank my parents tor 
then continual support and foi giving me the opportunity 
to go to Boston College. This is a great place, and I think 
the 2005-2006 Sub Turn yearbook wil reflection of 

thai + 




Seniors 

Kathleen Ahearn 



7 



I can't take much credit for this year's senior section, during many of the deadlines I found myself too bogged down with work 
to spend more than just a few hours in the office, leaving Carolyn and Shane to do the majority of the work. They were really 
good sports about it, letting me help when I could, and not giving me grief when I couldn't. I wish that I could have done more, 
but at least it allowed them to put their heart into their yearbook. I can't believe you two are graduating, it doesn't seem like; 
enough time has gone by for you to be leaving. Although I've only known you for two years Carolyn, I can't remember you not 
being a part of my college career. We've had some pretty funny times be it in the office, making fun of ourselves for whatever 
work we had failed to do, or that we had somehow done wrong, or at the big yellow house for one of countless parties and end- 
less hours of beruit. How random was it that the one night that you partied with me my sophomore year, you met Johnny, who 
coincidental ly was friends with so many of my own friends, what a small world. If it wasn't for you, our section would never 
have been completed. You had my back when it came to so many of those deadlines, I owe you big time. Shane, I only had thei 
pleasure of working with you for one year, but you are by far the most dedicated worker ever, you put in endless hours on thosei 
pages and your effort is evident. I wish I had had the opportunity to get to know you better. I want to wish both of you the best 
of luck, and I'll definitely miss you as part of the Sub Turri staff next year... Good luck in your search for new heights. 




Carolyn Dorazio 



As I sit here and write this (the perfect procrastination from studying for yet another batch of finals), I cannot believe that I am 
facing only one semester more of college. Creating the senior section as a senior didn't hit me with a sad realization until we 
finished our last few pages as I found myself also starting to wrap up my own college life. Happily and sadly I am enjoying myi 
best year at BC. I want to give a big hug and a thank you to my co-editors Kat and Shane. Thanks especially for putting up wit! 

[my steadily increasing insanity. I love you guys! Once again, Marisa and Myra have been the best support group as the heac 
honchos. I will definitely miss working with such cool bosses. Unfortunately, this blurb doesn't give me nearly enough space tc 
thank my parents for their never ending love and encouragement, especially since I've been here in Boston. That goes for mj 
big brother, too. And Johnny English. You're the bestest. Which is another reason I love Kat. I will always love and miss the Bij 
Yellow House, and the hundreds of Beirut games we played (and won with Johnny)! Mo and Maura: we made it! After four years 
of ridiculous times (in every sense) I can't imagine not having you girls as my best friends. It's hard to put it all down for you 
two, but I know you know. Finally, congratulations and good luck to my fellow classmates graduating in 2006! "For a moment 
this good time would never end. ..I shall miss this thing when it all rolls by!' (DMB) 

*.*; ^ ■■■■'■ 

Shane Stryzinski |j 

Marisa, thank you for being patient and understanding with everything, but most of all, thanks for being such a great friend./l 
Thanks for the memories of the good times we had working on sports and seniors. Myra, thanks for your humor, stories, and 
friendship. Carolyn and Kat, from the good times in the office to the countless emails to the overnight hours working on dead 
lines, thank you for everything. Mom, these four years have come and gone, and although they have been difficult, thanks f< 
all that you have sacrificed so that I might have. I love you more than you know. K45, your support and challenges have allowe 
me to understand more about myself and have changed me forever. K48, thank you for teaching me so much about myself and 
for your love.. you are always in my thoughts and prayers... I love you. A46/45, thanks for all of your support with all that I have 
done and for the memories these past four years. To all of the people I have met this year that I have come so close to, I thank 
God everyday for you being a part of my life! As our time on the Heights has come to an end, the world lies at our feet. It is 
now our opportunity to excel in all we do, serving as men and women for others, and making a path for ourselves in the world 
upon which we are about to enter. I love you all and pray lor the best for all of you. Know that I am here for you always... much 
love BC! 



z 







■H 



Business 

Natalie Fogiel 




Mer Zovko, thank you for your moral support in such a chaotic year. There were timesJ^hen it appeared as though this book 
simply was not going lo happen: thank you for not giving up during those times. Thank you for always hearing our side of the 
argument and for helping us through when we were not sure where we were headed. We hope \ou arc as proud of this book as 
we are. We appreciate your advice, your kindness and. most importantly, your friendship. Piano. Piano. 
Peter Greer, thank you for never being more than a phone call or e-mail away. In this year of transition, we often talked about 
business more than design: thank you for never forgetting to remind us to maketfoc book look its best. We coujd not have 
done this without your support and your words of encouragement. Thank you for always makiug us feel like your favorite 



customer. 



« 



Bob McGrath. thank you for once again making our book absolute!) beautiful. The senior portraits are siinph the beginning. 

Your photography is. in our humble opinion, the best in the world. Thank you for all \our treats throughout the difficult times 

first semester and thank you for turning our vision into actual images. ^^ ^^^^^^^^ f^w / 

Sandy Moses, thank you for your patience throughout submissions and proofs VVe fell behind more than we should have; 

thank you for never getting upset with us. We appreciate your dedication and your thorough double-checking of all our work. 

An\ mistakes that still remain are entireh our fault. ^k^ \£ 

Rick Brooks, thank you for another wonderful cover. We came into the meeting with an idea and you turned it into a simply 

magnificent work of art. 1 w B^^^ ^^k 

Erin and Isabel of McGrath Studios, thank you for being wonderful compam in the office. Your smiles and kind words were 

inspiration to keep going when things got incredibly hectic. We appreciate \oui support. 

Benefactors & Patrons, this book would not have been possible without your support. Thank you. We hope you enjoy it. 








ptTOR-IN- Ctf /^ 



Myra Chai 




y thank you's do not do justice to my gratitude for the help and support I experi- 
enced during this year's book but I hope they convey in some sense what I feel. 
Marisa, there really aren't enough words to express how much I've loved work- 
ing with you over the last few years. Two books later I have no regrets over what we've 
accomplished and will always cherish all the time we spent together. I still can't believe the 
progress we've made not only on the actual appearance of the office, but on the actual aspect 
of the work. It's kind of funny the way our progress has reflected our themes. We built our 
Foundations and here are our Impressions. I hope that you are as proud of this year's book 
as I am. You've been an amazing friend and I'm so glad you'll be around another year so I 
can force you back into the office. Thank you so much for finishing off this years book, I 
can't wait to see when I get back! To the staff, plain and simple, this book would not have 
been what it is without your help. More than any other year we avoided the late night rushes 
and the panic attacks and I think that speaks volumes about the type of staff this book had. 
You've made my job that much easier and I'm entirely indebted to all of you. To Mer, for 
all of your wise words, you advice and your support through the year during my transition 
to a newly defined art life, thank you. To Peter, Marisa and I are indebted to all of your 
kindness, your patience and your help, especially through crunch times. To Bob, Erin and 
Isabelle, thank you for all the photography work, the snack supply, the tabouli and the end- 
less supply of smiles. To Rick, after a delicious Vinny T's dinner and many laughs later 
the cover looks absolutely spectacular. To Sandy, your meticulous inspection of everything 
Sub Turri related has been entirely invaluable. You all have been entirely patient through- 
out this whole process and I hope you are as proud to be a part of this book as I am.To my 
BCers, I finally gained a life and I have no regrets over the amazing times I had fall semester 
and what I've experienced in Ecuador. For all the lunch dates, the late night deep reflec- 
tions, and the parties, thank you. To Brian, what is there to say? You can make me smile 
even when I'm having an awful day and over the last few months you've defined a huge part 
of my life and for that there are not enough thank you's. To my LAers, M A 2 and the 5 live 



on, so thanks for the never failing insults and lovi 
o n me when I fail to and for all the support. 



family, hank you for checking up 






19 








\ 



^ptroR-iN-cjtte/;. 




Marisa Fusco 

Four years have come and gone and I am forever changed because of it. Being a 
part of Sub Turri has left a deep impression on me. It has helped me to decide on a 
career, it has given me lasting friendships and it has taught me one of life's greatest 
lessons: no matter how much you plan, you have to be ready to deal with anything. And 
thankfully, the end result is often even better than your original plan. To the 2006 staff of 
Sub Turri, thank you for your dedication and for helping me to realize my vision. To Myra. 
I appreciate everything you have done these last two years. You have taught me that even 
I have a creative side and I am forever indebted to you for that. Best of luck next year. To 
Jared, this book might be better than yours but that is only because of you. Thank you for 
pushing me into this: you deserve all of the credit. To my Ruby gems, thank you for all the 
fun times on the couch and in front of the big screen. You girls have been the most wonder- 
ful distraction of my life. Though we may not have gotten much work done, we did do an 
awful lot of living. I appreciate your support more than you may ever know. To my three 
favorites, the best things in life are unexplainable. I love you all and have no doubt that 
these four years were only the beginning. To all the friends I have made at Boston College, 
thank you for making my college experience better than I had ever dreamed it could be. 
Though we may be going on our separate ways, I hope our paths continue to intersect for 
the rest of our lives. To my Belfast beauties, thoughts of our Poetry Streets have kept me 
sane. I long to reunite with you and enjoy pints and dancing. To my family, you allowed 
me to follow my dreams and that has been the greatest gift you could have ever given m< 
hope that as my dreams become realities, you are proud of the outcome. And to Matt, you 
are my Prince Charming. m\ best friend and my soul mate. Thank you for supporting my 
ever) move, even when those moves keep us apart. Your encouragement to just keep bab) 
stepping has been and always will be m> strength. I could not have accomplished all that 
I have without you. Thank you for loving me for all the things 1 couldn't change though 
I've tried. I look forward to pictures on the baseball field. I love you more than I ha 
found a way to sa) to you 




"Boston College endeavors to educate a new 
generation of leaders for the new millen- 
nium — men and women who will be capa- 
ble of shaping a new century with vision, 
justice, and charity — with a sense of call- 
ing, with concern for all of the human family 

- WILLIAM P LEAHY, SJ. 





502 Closing 



^G IMPRESS 

\j>^ 2006 at Boston College ~0 



Every graduating class believes that their four years at Boston College were the best the 
school has ever seen. Though that question may be part of an ongoing debate for many 
years to come, one thing is certain: every year at Boston College is memorable. This past 
school year is no exception. When we read the revised edition of The History of Boston College 
many years from now; 2005-2006 will be remembered for a number of different reasons. For some, 
it may best be recalled as the year Boston College athletics joined the Atlantic Coast Conference. 
With pride and dedication, the Eagles soared south and showed the ACC that the little college from 
Boston belonged among the powerhouses of sport. This year also saw a record number of applica- 
tions come through the Admissions Office of Boston College. Perhaps it was the sports or perhaps it 
was the Jesuit ideals or maybe our world-class academics that attracted so many potential students. 
More so than the "Flutie Factor." 2006 may be remembered as the year that started the trend of 
placing Boston College among the nation's top-ranked universities. The nation's attention was also 
turned towards Boston College as we became just one of main institutions to welcome students 
from universities affeted by the devastation of Hurrican Katrina. And still, to Boston College stu- 
dents, the 2005-2006 school year will be remembered for the smaller moments that were somehow 
more important. We will remember Barack Obama beginning the school year at Convocation. We 
will remember ESPN Game Day on the Dustbowl and MaryAnne's only accepting passports. We 
will remember the debacle of basketball and hockey ticket sales. We will remember new academic 
programs such as the Jewish Studies minor and countless numbers of extra-curricular activities. 
We will remember the impact of "The BC." We will remember Homecoming in the ram and the 
electricity of Conte when the Blue Devils came to town. We will remember watching as Doug 
Flutie came home to play for the Patriots. We will remember 
the first time we saw the new St. Ignatius statue and the da\ 
we saw the Plex parking lot flood. We will remember watch- 
ing some of our fellow Eagles compete at the Olympics in Italy 
We will remember life in the Mods and nights out in Cleveland 
Circle. Most importantly, we will remember that our hearts 
w ill forever be true, 'til the echoes ring again. This year, like 
all others, will be remembered "For Boston!" Marisa Fu^<<' 




Oov 




? ^OUD REF#4 



What are you dreaming soldier 
What is it you see? 



A tall gray Gothic tower, 
And a linden tree. 



m ■- ... ... 

\bu speak so sadly, soldier, 
Sad and wistfully . . 





I cannot hear the tower bell 
In the swirling sea. 




What meaning has it, soldier, 
A tower, bell and tree? 

Nothing, nothing -- only once 
It meant my life to me. 

— Thomas Heath '43 




k 








iifiuEn 



Colophon 



The 2006 Sub Turri, Volume 94, was printed by Jostens Printing and Publishing in Winston-Salem, NC. The representative was 
Peter Greer and the Creative Accounts Manager was Rick Brooks. The book, "Impressions," was a 504-page Spring publication 
with a press run of 1560 copies. The publishing cost of the book was approximately $140,000. The book sold for $90, shipping 
and handling included. 

The office of Sub Turri is located at 103 McElroy Commons, Chestnut Hill, MA, 02467. The office phone number is (617) 
552-3493 and the e-mail address is subturri@bc.edu. The website can be found at http://www.bc.edu/subturri. 

All clubs and organizations were allowed to submit descriptions and photos. Each group was allocated equal space with the 
exception of the largest groups on campus. 



Design 



Photography 



The cover and endsheets were designed by Rick Brooks of 
Jostens' Creative Accounts with assistance from the Editors-in- 
Chief and Peter Greer. All other designs were created by the 
Sub Turri staff using Adobe InDesign CS and Adobe Photoshop 
CS. 

The cover is a Jostens Craftline Embossed Cover with #535 
Black Material with linen grain. The seal is applied with 
Maroon #373, Yellow Gold Ink #371, and White Ink #325. All 
embossed to register. Theme is bevel debossed, Princeton with 
Gold Brush Foil #461. The date is embossed Minister Book with 
Maroon #373. Spine is Minister Book, embossed and screened 
in Pale Gold #328. Photos in the Duotone section were treated 
by Marisa Fusco using Photoshop CS under the guidance of 
Peter Greer. Signatures 1, 2, and 31 are printed on 100 lb. 
Signature True gloss stock, with spot UV coating on signatures 1 
and 31. The remainder of the book is printed on 80 lb. dull 
paper and sewn in sixteen page signatures, rounded, backed, and 
bound with black on black headbands. Endsheets are printed on 
Cottonwood using the seal from the cover, and embossed with 
whispertone foil. 

Typography and Graphics 

All body copy is llpt. AYT Lynn. Copy credits are llpt. AYT 
Lynn Italic. Captions are 8pt. AYT Lynn and photo and credits 
are 8pt. AYT Lynn Italic. The folio section names and number 
are 8pt. AYT Lynn. Headlines vary by section: Dividers: AYT 
Lynn ; Academics: Turnoil; Student Life: First Home; Organi- 
zations: Ebony; Sports: AYT Lynn; Seniors: First Home; 
Benefactors: Bria. 



The Sub Turri photography staff took all photographs unless 
otherwise indicated. McGrath Studios, Inc. 8 Elm St., Suite 2, 
Braintree, MA 02184 took all senior portraits. McGrath Studio 
was contracted by Boston College to be the official photograpru 
for the 2006 Sub Turri. 
Photos were taken using a variety of cameras and lenses manufa 
tured by Nikon, Canon, Quantum, Sony and Mamiya. These 
include but were not limited to Nikon Dl, Nikon N75, Nikon 
N90S, and Sony CD Mavica. 

Bob McGrath took opening, closing and divider page photos. 
All photographs are the exclusive property of Sub Turri and ma 
not be reproduced without prior written consent. 

Color & Spot Color 

There are 19 color multiples in the book. Spot colors vary by 

section. 

Duotone: Desaturate and Saturation, Hue: 30%, Saturation 

25%; Maroon: 41% Cyan, 100% Magenta, 92% Yellow, 51% 

Black; Gold: 0% Cyan, 18% Magenta, 83% Yellow; 0% Black 



Copyright Information 



The 2006 Sub Turri is copyrighted to Myra Chai and Marisa 
Fusco. No portion of this publication may be reproduced 
without the prior written consent of Sub Turri.