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Full text of "Sub turri = Under the tower : the yearbook of Boston College"

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FEATURE 




SECTIONS 



OPENING 1 



CURRENT EVENTS 14 



ACADEMICS 32 



ORGANIZATIONS 140 



SPORTS 194 



SENIORS 266 



RENEFACTORS & PATRONS 466 



CLOSING 482 




Sub Turri 2007 




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THE QUIET RETREAT that Bapst Art Library, 
one of Boston College's eight libraries, provides has 
become almost a living legend in itself. Home to 
the university's resource in the fine arts, it was 
the original library of the campus and designed 
as a "cathedral to learning" The natural sciences, 
meanwhile, have become a popular field of study 
for many students, especially those enrolled in 
the Premed program. Professor Michael Piatelli, 
Biology director of laboratories, oversees all 
General Biology Lab sections to ensure students 
begin their scientific pursuits on the right course. 

Photos by Bob McGmth 




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IF A PHOTOGRAPH can speak a thousand words, 
the student photographic exhibition in the Bapst 
Student Gallery, 'Injustice & Hope! sent a power- 
ful message that reflected its title. With a com- 
pilation of photos taken from school-sponsored 
and personal service trips, the Art Club-spon- 
sored show integrated the artistic depth of the 
university's students with its belief in service for 
others. The gallery, opened in the spring of 2004 
to meet the demands of the growing art commu- 
nity within Boston College, continues to feature a 
wide range of media including painting, sketches, 
watercolors, photography, and ceramic sculptures. 
Photo by My in Chui 















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THE APPALACHI A VOLUNTEERS program of Boston 
College was founded by Gregg Cassin in 1978 when he 
and eleven other BC students traveled to Vanceburg, 
KY over their Spring break to serve the community 
there. The group offered one of the first reflective, 
immersive service experiences in the country. Today, 
the Appalachia Volunteers of Boston College includes 
over 650 volunteers spread throughout 36 different 
locations within the Appalachia region, making it the 
largest spring break service organization in the United 
States. Despite its rapid growth, the organization has 
remained true to its original goals and continues to ser- 
vice with the same dedication shown by its founders. 
Photo courtesy of Appalachia Volunteers 



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in itself, yet the co-ed Sailing team made it look easy. 
The rankings, determined by Sailing World's coaches 
panel, are published in Sailing World magazine twice 
a semester. Coming off the heels of this prestigious 
award, the team went on to win the Harry Ander- 
son Regatta. Not that third in the ACC is any less 
impressive. The Men's Basketball team was selected 
third in the Atlantic Coast Conference's preseason 
men's basketball media poll, highlighting a month 
in which Senior forward Jared Dudley had already 
gained a spot on the All-ACC preseason first team. 



Photos h\ Boh McCiruth :md l)u\ id Trudo 



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FOR THE CLASS of 2007, it has been a long journey. Four years 
ago we met over 2,200 incoming freshmen from all fifty states and 
over 65 different countries. We waited for the Newton bus in sun 
and in snow and we sat for hours in Stuart through dinner with 
Amy and Una and then triple decker grilled cheese sandwiches with 
Joe at late night. We played basketball on Upper, frisbee outside 
Medeiros and then jumped in the snow in the Dustbowl. Know- 
ing the arduous task of finding true friends, we forged relation- 
ships and hoped that they would last. As we look back four years 
later, the question remains: how much have we changed, how much 
have we stayed the same? This is who we were. Who are we now? 
Photos courtesy ofMyra Chui and Nikki Tyler 





BOSTON COLLEGE 



OFFICE OF THE PRESIDENT 



May, 2007 



TO THE CLASS of 2007: 



As you approach commencement, I suspect that many of you feel that the years 
since you entered Boston College as freshmen have passed so quickly. I hope you look 
back on your time at BC with deep gratitude and that you approach the future with great 
hope and confidence. \bu arrived on campus with many gifts and talents, and I am 
confident that your time here has helped you grow in self-knowledge and in desires to 
help resolve challenges facing our world. 

I am grateful for your many contributions to the Boston College community 
and also for your generous involvement in wider society, whether in the Boston area 
or in the other parts of our nation and the world. So many possibilities await you after 
graduation, and I am confident that you will continue to respond effectively wherever 
you find yourselves. For decades, graduates of Boston College have gone forth from 
"the Heights" to lead fulfilling, productive lives, and that certainly is my hope for you. 

I trust that what you have learned and experienced during your time at Boston 
College will guide and sustain you in the future. May you be nourished by the ideals of 
Boston College, the friendships you made here, and your personal beliefs and values. I 
pray that God will always be near to you, and may you lead lives marked by faith, hope, 



and love. 



Si ncerely, 



William R Leahy, S.J. 



President 




12 Opening 




Clockwise from top: William R Leahy. S.J. addresses a crowd of parents during the annual Parents 
Weekend celebration at BC. The arresting statue of St. Michael triumphing over Satan is a well- 
known sight for an\ student who passes through Gassorj Hall. The newl\ constructed St Ignatius 
statue in front of Higgins Hall provides a comfortable study location during the tall and spring. 

Photon h\ David 1'rihlo und Bob McGnith 



Opening 13 




Edited by: Myra Chai 



IF HISTORY IS important for the lessons it 
offers, what will future generations think of 
the events of 2006 and 2007? What began in 
2003 as a war to combat terrorism and weap- 
ons of mass destruction continued through the 
past year as thousands of Iraqis were killed in 
sectarian reprisal attacks and the U.S. military 
death toll neared 3,000. Former Iraqi dictator 
Saddam Hussein's execution was intended to 
alleviate anxieties of terrorism yet with rising 
concerns of the ramifications of 'An Incon- 
venient Truthr contaminated spinach, air- 
plane bomb plots and nuclear warfare, a sense 
of uncertainty pervaded every sector of the 
globe. Even in the face of a war that began 



under such strong convictions, Defense Secre 
tary Donald Rumsfeld resigned one day after 
U.S. midterm elections gave Democrats control 
of Congress and forced President Bush to admit 
that changes needed to be made. Yet for all the 
worries we found a way to laugh. Lonelygirll5 
and a "Canon Rock" epitomized the explod- 
ing power of YouTube, Wii and PS3 enthusiasts 
waited for hours for the latest in gaming con- 
soles and audiences worldwide learned about 
the comedy of American culture from a fie 
tional Kazakh. If, then, the last twelve months 
have taught us anything, it is that we must look 
closer and understand the intricate and yet small 
worldwide web in which we live. Myra Chui 



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Currcni Events 15 



Focus 2007 



SINCE 1927, TIME editors have awarded a "Person of the \ear" to the 
individual who, "for better or worse^ had the greatest impact on the year's 
events. Ever conscious of the changing world, the magazine named its 
first "Woman of the \ear" to Wallis Simpson on the cover in 1936 and first 
"Persons of the \ear" to Bill and Melinda Gates on its 78th edition in 2005, 
replacing the antiquated title of "Man of the \ear!' In spite of the maga- 
zine's longstanding clout, however, the decision to name 2006 as the year 
of "\bur beating out potential honorees President George W Bush, Condo- 
leeza Rice, Kim Jong II, Nancy Pelosi and The \buTube Guys, seems a radi- 
cal choice. And yet at the same time a logical one. It is about \buTube and 
Yahoo! Mail, Google and Wikipedia, Facebook and MySpace, and the way 
the World Wide Web has changed the world on every level. It is, argues the 
magazine, "about the many wresting power from the few and helping one 
another for nothing and how that will not only change the world, but also 
change the way the world changes!' It is, simply put, about you. Myra Chai 



16 Current I 




Current E\cni-- 17 




' urrenl hvents 










The World 




JUST MONTHS AFTER the devastating tsunami that killed more than 100,000 Indone 
sians in late 2005, a 6.3 magnitude earthquake struck the country in May and killed more 
than 5,800 while displacing as many as 200.000 others. As the world confronted the real- 
ity of global warming, the next month saw the assassination of Iraq's most-wanted insur- 
gent, Abu Musab al-Zarqawi, while July was marred by train explosions in Mumbai. India 
that increased longstanding tensions with Pakistan. Israels bombing of Lebanon heli 
spark a month long war that ended in ceasefire, violence in Darfur spread into Chad 
after a joint UN-African Union force was rejected by Sudan and as the summer cam*, 
a close, a plot to blow up airplanes en route to the U.S. from Britain with liquid explos 
was foiled but heightened airport security worldwide. In Sepl imist 

sin Shinawatra was ousted in a bloodless coup by the Th 
months later of corruption within the new go 
a peak when Iran refused to halt activities, and n» 
edly tested similar technology. This sense o\~ paranoia i 
spy Alexander Litvinenko was poisoned to death by 1 
concerns about the involvement of the Russian government, 
one source of fear reached a dramatic conclusion. 
former Iraqi dictator Saddam Hussein was hung t\\ 
against humanity and sparked hope among m, 



Current Events l l) 




20 Current Events 



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The Nation 

IT IS NO surprise that throughout the last twelve months, the majority of top U.S. new s storie; 
have focused on politics. The November midterm elections were touted by mam as "the most 
important in a generation" for the issues and the stakes that they represented. With such hot 
topics as state constitutional amendments banning same - sex marriage and South Dakota 
voters rejecting a proposed law to ban nearly all abortions, the surprise came when Democrats 
secured control of both houses of Congress, signaling a momentous power shift, and Nane\ 
Pelosi became the first-ever female and first-ever Californian Speaker of the House. In a 
dramatic turn of events, Defense secretary Donald Rumsfeld stepped down in November, that 
questioned the validity of the war in Iraq. The Iraq Study Group called for troop w ithdrawal as 
President Bush admitted the need for change. Closertohome. immigration pi 
fear of new legislation exploded as hundreds of thousands of peopl 
a national protest billed as *A Day Without Immigrants!" 1 
Bush authorized the construction of nearly 700 miles of fencins 
border. And as the New Year began, the race towards the 200S presidential 
began as New York Sen. Hillary Clinton officially opened bid and excitement built around Illi- 
nois Sen. Barack Obama. Yet not was all politics. Kenneth Lay, former I hairm. 
found guilty on 10 counts of fraud and conspiracy earlier in the year, but di 
ing, while the Amish school house massacre in Pennsylvania that ki 
the nation in its aftermath and left the question of the country's future in the air. 




Curreni E\oniN 21 




22 ' ents 




Arts & Entertaining 



YEARS FROM NOW when we try to remember the events of 2006-2007. we ma\ not remem- 
ber the specifics of the Iraq War or Kenneth Lay and the Enron scandal, but will we remember 
the way a scantily clad Kazakh shocked his way into one of the years biggest box office hits b\ 
offending ordinary Americans'? Or maybe the way that Mel Gibsons anti-Semitic remarks and 
later "Seinfeld" star Michael Richards slurs against blacks exposed hidden racism? Maybe it 
was Zinedine Zidanes headbutt during the World Cup that ultimately handed the French ; 
loss to Italy? Whether we remember Emmitt Smith battling "Saved By The Bell" star Mario 
Lopez in "Dancing With The Stars" or Howard K. Stern battling for custod) o\ millionaire 
baby Dannielynn in the wake of Anna Nicole Smiths mysterious death, the past year had its 
fill of scandals, tragedies and triumphs. The fascination with 
divorce from K-Fed, coupled with her shaved head and tin 
overdue reevaluation of runway model anorexia mark 
Bradley and Robert Altman passed away, they were 1 
The similarly titled new NBC hit "Heroes" continued the cur 
did ABCs newcomer, "Ugly Betty" and the still-populai 
made her own mark by becoming the first solo female and 
after eight tries, director Martin Scorsese finally joined the 
most "diverse" awards ceremony in history. For whatever i 
past year in entertainment was certainly important and ultimai 



Current Events 




24 Current h vents 



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Science & Technology 

IT IS HARD to imagine the present world without the cellular and wireless capabilities thai 
we have at our disposal every day. More than any other year in recent history electronics 
and science came to the forefront of headlines worldwide. Internet users entered the world 
of LonelyGirll5 and her teenage confessions and they watched in awe as a South Korean 
boy played a rock version of Pachelbels Canon on his guitar. These and more videos made 
YouTube one of the most popular sites and led to its purchased by Google for an astounding 
$2.2 billion. All of this amidst a gas price rollercoaster in which prices fell from their v 
gallon peak earlier in 2006 to below $2 in the fall only to inch back up in December. The past 
vear has brousht slobal communication to levels never before imauined whether through the 
phenomena of MySpace and Facebook or increasingly intricate electroi 
company in recent years has experienced success as much as Appl 
of the iPod nearly six years ago, the company continued 
anticipated iPhone, to be released in June. And yet all this tech it 
Al Gore's "An Inconvenient Truth" exposed the world to s nth ab< 

ing. Weather patterns worldwide did the unthinkable as snow fell in Southern California 
and record lows throughout the state led to the destruction of countless produce and failed 
to do so in the Northeast until late January. Science and techno becom itial 

aspects of our lives as the past year has shown, but for scienc in the future, 

as a community of the world must come together and ensure the plat r\ ival. \/\ m C 



Current Eunw 25 




2 f > Opening 




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Unity Rall\ 



NOVEMBER 10, 2006. One thousand students, faculty, football players, and musicians 
assembled in O'Neill Plaza Friday afternoon to express the need lor a more unified and 
tolerant campus. With 1.200 red t-shirts intended to be worn during the Duke football 
game and distributed throughout the Dustbowl prior to the Unity Rally, students proudly 
displayed their shirts and its message for the need to "Testify and Unite!' In light of criti- 
cism drawn by faculty and students regarding the actual working definition behind the true 
Superfan, the shirts were intended to inspire discussion and a revaluation o\~ the term. 
"The Superfan culture can both bring us together and tear us apart:' warned President 
of UGBC, Santi Bunce, "and that we must share in our truth and act out as a commur 
We will be a better BC. We are not all at the same stage, and wil 
others' experiences, but we all have the same ends and 
dinated by Nick Noel, A&S '07. was the culmination i 
a plethora of topics and encouraged candid reflection. I 
not only serve as a forum for the discussion of the importai 
actual sense of unit) throughout the student body. The mu 
tion played "Unity" while Seif Ammus. CSOM 'OS, and Britney B 

behind a group of musicians about racism. As Catherine I "icll 

School of Nursing, expressed, the Rally was ultimately 
and we need to ask ourselves where you are. and hem you t 



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Boston College: \\ i 



IN THIS HI-TECH world that we currently find ourselves, it is hard to imagine that just a little 
over ten years ago the internet was still a fairly mysterious and unknown entity and cell phones 
were still large and clunky plastic devices that looked more like walkie-talkies than anything 
else. We used computers to type essays or to magically talk simultaneously with multiple friends 
through AIM, MSN Messenger, or even ICQ and excitedly picked our first screen names. 2SK. 
56K and DSL seem like a lifetime ago. In this rapid-fire growth that our generation has influ- 
enced, Boston College has done its best to keep up with technological evolutions. With inter- 
net, television and telephone ports for each student within a room, and Tl wireless capabilities 
throughout the campus, students can be connected whenever and wherever they choose. BC 
recently eliminated its own student phone plan in an acceptance of the dominai 
phones. Over the last few years, students have been able to tl 
impossible. Through Agora, the site for the Boston Col leg 
register for classes as well as add funds to their ID cards for pure i 
school stores, among other options. UGBC.org. a site run by the u 

dents can find a plethora of information, such as upcomin /aluations and 

the current status of washers and dryers in their buildings. And final »bvi- 

ous dominance of computers, the CTRC (Campus Technology Re nter) underwent a 

major renovation to accommodate the need for more effii id printing usa 

In this spirit, Boston College has shown itself to be trul\ level. \/\ 



Opening 29 




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Meineke Bow I 



AS TIME EXPIRED on the clock, kicker Steve Aponavicius nailed a career-l< 

field goal before a stunned yet enthusiastic croud at Bank of America Stadium in Charlotte. 

NC to lead the Eagles to a 25-24 victory over Navy Midshipmen at the 2006 Meineke Car 

Care Bowl. For Aponavicius and the Boston College Eagles, it was the perfect ending. For 

a former high school soccer player who magically became the walk-on kicker BC nee 

and a team who, in spite of a record 10 season wins for the first time since 19S4 (when 

Doug Flutie won the Heisman Trophy) and the third time in team history, lost its former 

head coach. Tom O'Brien, to Atlantic Coast Conference rival North Carolina State just three 

weeks earlier, no other comeback would have done them justice. They proved their worth 

by extending the teams already NCAA-leading streak of bowl win 

Boston College junior quarterback Matt Ryan injured with ; 

ginia Tech game on October 12th. the Eagles needed 

ever before. For much of the game, however, the absen 

ily on the team, as the Navy, the nations top rushing team. 

and seemed to control the game. With 7:36 left in the game. BC manat 

22 on Ryan's 25-yard touchdown pass to tight end Ryan Purvis and i by 

Tony Gonzalez. Then with BC all out of timeouts and with onl\ two minul 

game, all Navy needed to do was run out the clock, hut a fumble h\ I 

gave the Eagles and Aponavicius one last chance at gloi 



minute 



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i from top: Higgins Hall is home 
to the Physics and Biology departments and 
as a result is a hotbed of scientific discus- 
sion for students. O'Neill Library offers an 
y of studying environments u 
.iry students needs. With programs in over 
32 different countries, including several in 
Spain, and approximately 40% of the student 
udying abroad, the Center for Inter- 
national Partners and Programs is an impor- 
tant resource on campus. The McMullen 
Museum spring exhibit. A New Key: Modern 
Belgian Art from the Simon Collection fea- 
tures artists such as Rene Magritte and James 
Ensor. As part of the Core Requirements of 
the University students must take a semester- 
long course in the Fine Arts, which can be 




Edited by: Anita Isama 



ONE HUNDRED FORTY-FOUR years ago on 
September 5, 1864, twenty-two students and 
three teachers stepped through the doors of a 
small institution on Harrison Avenue in Boston's 
South End. With an emphasis on the Greek and 
Latin classics, English and modern languages, 
and philosophy and religion mixed with an 
exclusively liberal arts education, Boston Col- 
lege has changed throughout the years. With 
its relocation to Chestnut Hill in 1909, the 
acquisition of the Newton Campus in 1974 and 
the newest addition of the Brighton Campus in 
2004, the University has become a new entity 
in itself. From its humble beginnings as a class 
of twenty-two BC has become the second larg- 



est private school applicant pool in the nation 
with a record of nearly 29,000 applicants for the 
class of 2011. With over 1400 different courses 
in nearly 50 majors and concentrations, 23 
interdisciplinary programs, 4 preprofessional 
programs and international study-abroad pro- 
grams in 32 countries, the academic integrity 
present at Boston College is hard to find else 
where. And yet for its great achievements over 
the last near century and a half, the University 
continues to look ahead. The 10 Year Master 
Plan intends to connect the Brighton prop- 
erty to the current campus and to expand arts, 
sports and student life facilities for future gen- 
erations in its tradition ever to excel. Myra Chai 



32 Academics 






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Photos hv Bob McGraih. Myra Chai and Laura Fincher 



Academics ; ; 






OFFERING A BROAD-BASED liberal arts education in 
the Jesuit tradition. BCs College of Arts & Sciences is 
considered one of the premier college programs within the 
United States. Garnering a spot on Newsweek's "25 New 
hies" list earlier this year. Boston College, especially in 
relation to its rigorous and multicultural Arts and Sciences 
curriculum, has much to take pride in. As Boston College's 
oldest and largest undergraduate division, the College of 
Arts & Sciences consists of a required core, intensive 
work in a major field, and elective courses selected from 
personal areas of interest. In addition to completing 38 
BC courses in order to graduate. College of Arts & Sci- 
ences students must maintain high standards of academic 
integrity in their work. Depending upon the nature of 
the students field, graduates earn the academic degree of 
either Bachelor of Arts (A.B) or Bachelor of Science (B.S). 

All A&S students must complete the University core 
requirements in English. Fine Arts, History, Mathemat- 
ics. Natural Sciences, Social Sciences, Philosophy, and 
Theology, as well as the Foreign Language Proficiency 
requirement. Offering a total of 31 major fields, all A&S 
students are required to take a minimum of 10 courses in 
their chosen major. Majors, while not necessarily linked to 
career paths, are meant to develop analytical thinking and 
presentational skills. With a distinguished full-time faculty 
of over 400 professors, the College of Arts & Sciences is 
lull> committed to undergraduate education. With over 22% 

raduates continuing their education within one year of 
receiving their bachelors degree, it is clear that BC produces 
students of a high intellectual caliber. Michael llmtcvski 




34 Acad 



College of Arts and Sciences 




Academics 35 



Dean Joseph Quinn 




Dear Friends in the Class of 2007, 

You are graduating from Boston College at an exciting and challenging 
time. You have witnessed the tragedy and aftermath of the events of September 
11, 2001, a controversial war in Iraq, a hurricane that devastated one of America's 
great cities, and an abuse scandal that has roiled the Catholic Church. Future chal- 
lenges, domestic and international, await us all. 

I hope that your four years at Boston College have prepared you to look 
forward with confidence, well trained to make your contribution to an often 
troubled world. Our broad Core curriculum has taught you to look at issues from 
various perspectives, and the intense focus in your major has shown you what we 
know, and even more importantly, what we do not know in a particular field. You 
have learned to think critically, to write persuasively, and to appreciate the many 
dimensions - legal and ethical, political and historical, economic and scientific 
- of the complex issues we face. 

Education is a gift - an expensive gift - one that I hope you will use not 
only to enjoy the many options you now face, but also to help a society that needs 
the skills you now possess. 

This is my last of eight wonderful years as the Dean of the College of 
Arts and Sciences. I have enjoyed working with our outstanding faculty, admin- 
istrators and staff who are so dedicated to making this university a supportive 
and challenging home for our students. We have chosen careers at Boston Col- 
lege because of the opportunity to interact, year after year, with the best and the 
brightest - and that's you! 

Please stay in touch with your teachers and mentors on campus, who will 
continue to take great pride in your accomplishments. Drop us a line when the 
Muses strike. I hope that you will remain engaged with the university, which was 
built with the enthusiastic support of prior generations of Boston College gradu- 
ates. Go forth, but come back, soon and often. 



Sincerely, 

Joseph F Quinn 
Dean 



kcademici 




"i hope that your four years at 
Boston College have prepared 
you to look forward with con- 
fidence, well trained to make 
your contribution to an often 



troubled world. 
-Dean Quinn 



Academic - 



WITH AN UNDERGRADUATE population of 2,034 repre- 
senting 78 different countries, the Carroll School of Man- 
agement is one of the four schools in Boston College. CSOM, 
like the rest of the schools, offers a wide range of academic 
opportunities. There are six degrees to choose from and 
earn, namely a Bachelor of Science in Management, a 
Master of Business Administration, a Master of Science 
in Finance, a Master of Science in Accounting, a PhD in 
Organization Studies, and a PhD in Finance. Students who 
aim to graduate with any of the degrees undergo a vigorous 
and challenging four-year academic plan during which sev- 
eral requirements have to be met. Fulton Hall is the center 
of CSOM. Equipped with wireless Internet access and top- 
notch class technologies, the building is definitely one of 
the most high-tech on campus. It also offers three com- 
puter laboratories available round the clock, and an Honors 
Library, both excellent study areas and learning centers. 
The Student Lounge provides a relaxing space for students 
to unwind, work on assignments, and chat with professors. 
There are also a variety of organizations and clubs that 
are linked to the School. The CSOM Honors Program is a 
student-managed organization that provides undergraduate 
students with more intensive courses and more opportu- 
nities for leadership and service within the Program. The 
CSOM Student Government provides a medium through 
which students can voice their opinions and a chance to be 
involved in the daily running of the School. Vincent Sill 




-fl JJ 




tcademica 



Carroll School of Management 




Academics : " 



Dean Andrew Boynton 




To the Class of 2007: 

Congratulations on your graduation and on your many accomplish- 
ments here at Boston College. The faculty and staff join me in thanking you 
for your contributions to making our school a better place, and we wish you the 
best in your future endeavors. 

In many ways, you may not feel like the same person you were when 
you first arrived at the Heights. Indeed, for most of us, our college years at 
Boston College were a time for reflecting, redefining, and discovering our- 
selves. \bu have met new friends, learned new ways to think about the world, 
had new experiences, and discovered interests, talents, and aspirations you may 
not have known you had when you arrived at Boston College. Yet, in impor- 
tant ways you are the same individual who first came here. You have perhaps 
matured, grown, and added new layers of experience, but you are still the same 
unique bundle of talents, the same inner self, and we thank you for sharing 
what is uniquely you with us. 

In the years to come, you will all need to keep redefining yourselves 
as your careers and families develop and as business and other daily activities 
change in ways that we can't even imagine now. Learning as a lifelong skill 
will play a fundamental role in your continued development and success. Yet, 
while change is inevitable, you will always be able to manage it by drawing on 
the same talents and values that have served you well here at Boston College. 
Indeed, we hope we have helped you develop those talents and values to enable 
you to deal with future change in thoughtful, constructive, and creative ways. 

Just as you will need to keep redefining yourselves, so too will Boston 
College. While the nature of the educational process will inevitably evolve, Ifri 
confident that Boston College's inner self, the shared values and community spirit 
that you have come to know and love here, will remain unchanged. Despite the 
surface alterations, I believe you will always recognize Boston College when you 
return to visit, and I hope that you will do so often. 

Best wishes, 



Andrew C. Boynton 
Dean 



40 Academics 




"Learning as a lifelong skill 
will play a fundamental role 
in your continued develop- 
MENT AND success!' 

-Dean Boynton 



Academics 41 



THE LYNCH SCHOOL of Education was Boston 
Colleges first coeducational school on the Chestnut 
Hill campus. Founded in 1952, it continues to pursue 
its mission to "enhance the human condition through 
education!* The Lynch School has 60 full-time fac- 
ulty members, 35 part-time faculty members, and 60 
researchers. The undergraduate students of LSOE 
total 800 while there are 1,000 graduate students. The 
School has more than 25 programs in education, psy- 
chology, and human development and remains com- 
mitted to a model of education that serves the goals of 
social justice. The Lynch School is ranked 16th in the 
country as a research institution at the graduate level. 
It is also ranked second in New England and is the only 
at a Catholic university to be ranked in the top 50 in 
the US. News. This hub of research attracts more than 
S 12 million a year in sponsored research. LSOE is also 
partnered with Boston Public Schools and the YMCA 
of Greater Boston through Boston Connects. Through 
this plan, faculty and students are able to deliver stu- 
dent support services to elementary school children 
throughout different neighborhoods. Anita Isnmit 




42 Academics 



Lynch School of Education 




Academics 43 




Dear Members of the Class of 2007, 

On May 21, 2007, you will begin a new and exciting phase of your life, 
as alumni of Boston College. You will join nearly 150,000 living alumni of the 
University; I have no doubt that you will enhance that proud legacy. 

Four years ago you arrived at Boston College with impressive records 
of achievement. During your time on the Heights, you have had a privileged 
opportunity to ponder important questions about the world, about yourself and 
about God. I hope that you have developed a habit of critical inquiry that will last 
a lifetime. I also hope that you have come to a greater appreciation of the gifts 
you have been given and that you are resolved to put those gifts to work for the 
common good. The world needs your intelligence, your compassion, and your 
dedication. 

Members of the Class of 2007, rich in talent and full of potential, I know 
that you will continue the best traditions of alma mater. You make us proud! 



God Bless you all. 




Joseph M. O'Keefe, S.J. 

Dean 



44 At ade trues 




"The world needs your intel- 
ligence, YOUR COMPASSION, AND 

your dedication!' 
-DeanO'Keefe 



Academics 45 



ON JANUARY 27. 1947. THE Connell School of Nurs- 
ing was founded. This followed a request from Car- 
dinal Cushing who desired to see a baccalaureate 
nursing program established in a Catholic institution 
in Boston. Boston College responded, and in 1958 
established a Master's program. In 1988, it became 
the only nursing school in Boston to offer a doc- 
toral program. Yet despite its achievements in the 
post-graduate level, the school continues to focus on 
the development of the undergraduate that is rooted 
in the liberal arts as well. The CSON mission is to 
prepare professional nurses whose practice reflects 
a humanistic ethic and is scientifically based, tech- 
nically competent, and highly compassionate. In the 
medical field and as nurses, students will be life long 
learners, using what they know to serve others. With 
approximately 230 undergrdaute students, it remains 
the smallest of the four majors schools and with an 
increasing overall nursing shortage throughout the 
nation. CSON prepares the experts who will edu- 
cate future generations of nurses. The school offers 
programs in the departments of Adult Health, Com- 
munity Health. Maternal Child Health and Psychi- 
atric-Mental Health that enables nursing students to 
focus on whatever specialty they desire. Anilu Isiumi 




\cadcmics 



Connell School of Nursing 



Academics 4" 



Dean Barbara Hazard 




Dear William E Connell SON Graduating Class of 2007: 

Congratulations to all of you on your graduation, and thank you for the 
many contributions you have made to this school during your time here. Much 
has happened in the world during your four years here, and nurses have played 
major roles in responding to terrorism and natural disaster. We know that you too 
will use your talents and your Boston College education to meet the needs of our 
country and the world. 

You are entering the health care field at a challenging time. Currently, 
there is a national RN vacancy rate of 8.5%. More than 1.2 million new and 
replacement nurses will be needed by 2014. The positions created will account for 
two-fifths of all new jobs in the health care sector. Recent research has demon- 
strated the crucial role that well-educated nurses play in providing safe and effec- 
tive care. Improved patient outcomes and decreased mortality have both been 
shown to be associated with better educated nurses and adequate nurse staffing. 
There is a great need for nurses prepared at the graduate level. We expect most of 
you will go on for graduate degrees to become specialists in providing advanced 
nursing care to your clients, and scholars who will increase the theoretical base 
of the profession. 



As graduates of the William F Connell SON, you have been extremely 
well prepared for the current evolving health care system. Your program, 
grounded in the liberal arts and in the Jesuit tradition of excellence in service 
to others, was designed to produce graduates who apply honed critical thinking 
skills to clinical decision-making. You will certainly rise to the challenges and 
bring the Boston College tradition and spirit to all you do. 

May God continue to bless you, your parents, and loved ones, as you 
leave Boston College to commence the next phase of your life. 

Si ncerely, 

Barbara Hazard, Ph.D.,R.N.,FAAN 
Dean and Professor 



•.cadcrmes 




"\bu WILL CERTAINLY RISE TO 

the challenges and bring the 

Boston College tradition 

and spirit to all you do!' 

-Dean Hazard 



Academics -W 



OFFERING THE ATMOSPHERE of a small college within 
the environment of a large university, the Woods Col- 
lege of Advancing Studies is a dynamic extension school 
at Boston College. Placing a heavy emphasis on unique 
individuality and personalized attention, the Woods Col- 
lege relies largely upon positive classroom discussion and 
interaction between faculty and students. Offering a flex- 
ible, broad-based curriculum, the Woods College allows its 
registrants to begin studying for an undergraduate degree 
or complete a degree initiated at other institutions. In this 
respect, students will more than likely choose courses 
and tracks of study reflecting their individual interests. 
Degree candidates in the Bachelor of Arts Program, 
a highly revered division within the Woods College, must 
complete a minimum of thirty courses with at least a C 
minus cumulative average. All bachelor programs require 
seventeen core courses in the humanities, social sci- 
ences, mathematics and sciences. Such diversity of subject 
matter is crucial, for it allows for venturesome post-gradu- 
ate possibilities in communications, corporate systems, 
criminal and social justice, information technology, the 
humanities and the social sciences. Drawing upon tech- 
nology's pervasive role within society, the Woods College 
offers an even broader experience through the Corporate 
S\ sterns major. By exploring the corporate world of non- 
profits, social agencies, and criminal justice, the major 
helps students develop management and policy analysis 
skills necessary for personal success. Michael Tuntevski 




'\cadcmics 



Woods College of Advancing Studies 




Academics 51 



Dean James A. Woods 




To the Class of 2007: 

Great joy and accomplishment are yours as you celebrate graduation. You have 
achieved what you dared to dream. The talent, commitment, and optimism you 
brought to studies will now be advanced in different directions, shared in new 
ways. 

You face a new world. Unknown challenges now widen your horizons and 
demand a clear sense of mission. This world community invites your vision, 
vitality and vigilant empathy for others. You are prepared to question, to seek 
answers and to respond. You have anchored your knowledge, convictions, and 
attitudes in a commitment to others which is the essence of moral engagements. 
Life's many changes will now always be examined in a defined context. You 
cannot ever leave behind what now enlightens your dreams. 

Your imagination and initiative link you today with distant continents and 
disparate cultures. Your talents and many gifts call you to connect the world's 
communities and carve a future of freedom and peace. 



You own the greatest human freedom: to choose your own attitude in any given 
circumstance. To secure your opinions under extreme conditions when there is 
no chance of changing them is the highest expression of personal autonomy. 

For seventy-eight years, graduate of the Woods College of Advancing Studies 
have gone forth into a world of upheaval to advance the noblest human cause: 
freedom and moral concern for others. Seize every opportunity with wisdom 
and optimism. Make learning a lifelong goal. Respond to the compelling chal- 
lenges with understanding and enthusiasm. 
Prayerful wishes for all the years ahead 

Sincerely yours, 

Icu^q.uw^Xq, 

James A. Woods, S.J. 
Dean 



52 Academics 




"\0U OWN THE GREATEST FREE- 
DOM! TO CHOOSE YOUR OWN 



ATTITUDE IN ANY GIVEN CIR- 



cumstance. 
-Dean Woods 



Academics 33 




54 




Ill lift/ 

.... 




Photos b\ 






Libraries 



TODAY THERE ARE over 10 libraries and centers including O'Neill Library, Bapst Art Library, and Burns Library 
The main research library that is located on main campus is O'Neill Library which contains over 1.3 million volumes 
and many other resources for students and staff. This library was named for Thomas R O'Neill who was of the class 
of 1936 and the former speaker of the U.S. House of Representatives. O'Neill Library also houses other centers and 
facilities such as the Media Center, the Connors Family Learning Center, and the Thomas R O'Neill. Jr. exhibit. Bapst 
Library is one of the special branches of Boston College Libraries and is one of the original buildings on the campus 
sharing in its overall history. The library was named after the first president of Boston College. Father John Bapst. The 
building has distinctive architecture and stained glass. In the mid 1980s the books from Bapst were moved to O'Neill 
after a much-needed restoration, and the north end of the building became a separate library. Burns Library of Rare 
Books and Special Collections. In 1993 the art books in O'Neill Library were moved to Bapst. and then Bapst became 
the art library of the University. There is also an opportunity for students to showcase their artwork in the Bapst Stu- 
dent Gallery, when the Art Club sponsors events. BurnsLibrary houses the University's rare books, special collections, 
and archives. It holds over 150,000 volumes. 15.000.000 manuscripts, and various important collections. Anita Isama 



Academics SS 




Jesuit Tradition 



Article by: Anita Isama. fhotos by: Carol Ogonowsbi, /V\yra Chai, & Dob AActlrath 



ABOUT HALF OF the 111 Jesuits living 
on campus are active in the University's 
faculty and administration, 20 are from 
foreign countries, and 27 are graduate 
students. Jesuits contribute to all aspects 
of University life by teaching, holding 
administrative appointments, offering 
spiritual guidance, Ignatian retreats, extra- 
curricular programs, and more. Boston 
College is one of the largest Jesuit com- 
munities in the world. This community is 
committed to upholding and maintaining 
the University mission and developing the 
students whole person in the Jesuit Ideal. 
Through taking core classes that include 
the arts, cultural diversity, history, litera- 
ture, mathematics, natural science, philos- 
ophy, social science, theology, and writing, 
students fulfill a well-rounded Liberal 
Arts curriculum focused on critical think- 
ing. Students are exposed to subjects that 
influence their intellectual, personal, 
ethical, and religious formation. BC offers 
many courses and programs that address 
Jesuit values including PULSE and Per- 
spectives programs; the Capstone courses; 
the Faith-Peace and Justice undergradu- 




ate minor; the School of Educations focus 
on urban schools; the ethics courses in the 
undergraduate and graduate programs of 
the Carroll School of Management; and 
the efforts of the Law School to integrate 
legal ethics, jurisprudence, and a clini- 
cal program that serves the poor. Aside 
from attending to the academic needs of 
the students, Boston College offers vari- 
ous opportunities to experience Ignatian 
ideals outside of the classroom. Student 
groups such as the Ignatian Society, Salt 
& Light, and faith-sharing group CURA 
enable students to explore what these very 
ideals can mean for them and their spiri 
tual journey. Students are also very active 
in service groups such as 4Boston, Loyola 
Volunteers, and more that take them intj 
neighborhoods near and far from th 
campus. Appalachia Volunteers, Urban 
Immersion trips, and the Arrupe Interna 
tional Program offer students the opportu 
nity to serve and learn about others aroun 
the country and globe. With the Jesuit 
Catholic tradition as its foundation, Bosto 
College unites high academic achievemen 
with being "men and women for others." 






56 Academics 



I 




Clockwise from top: The Gasson clock tower stands 73 feet above the pavement. The largest of the four 
brass bells is enscribed "Ego Sum Ignatiu". meaning "1 am Ignatius" This statue of Ignatius of Loyola 
was a new addition to the campus this year. Bapst Library was the first major library at Boston College 
and is now the art library of the University's library system. 



Academics 57 




I 




Internships & Careers 



THE COLLEGE LIFE does not last forever. Whether through flyers, EagleLink emails or the constant remind- 
ers of career fairs, it is hard to ignore the impending prospect of a job. The Career Center actively guides mem- 
bers of the Boston College community through their four undergraduate years to help them in their preparation 
for the post-college world, whether it is in grad school or in an actual job. Its members provide assistance to 
students, alumni and staff in finding internships and jobs and making career choices as well as holds work- 
shops on how to create the best resume and how to interview properly. The Boston College Shadow Program, 
offered through the Center, pairs students with an alumnus in their professional setting so that he or she may 
better gain an understanding of the typical workday. The Premedical and Pre-Law programs also offer advice 
on course selection, internships and research opportunities that can best help a student create a resume competi- 
tive in professional school admissions. While the Premedical/Predental program provides help with applications. 
MCAT studying and even a special partnership between BC and Tufts Medical School, the Prelegal program spon- 
sors visits by law school admissions officers and a preparatory course for the LSAT. Boston itself holds a pleth- 
ora of opportunities for students to hold jobs as well as internships throughout the year and many students do 
take advantage of all that the city has to offer. It is no wonder, then, that by the time Boston College students 
graduate they will have found supporting hands to help them transition into the post-undergrad life. Myra Chai 



Academics 59 




' \cademics 




Study Abroad 



THE STUDY ABROAD Program provides opportunities for students to integrate curriculum abroad with their 
BC major, gain new perspectives on a variety of subjects, exchange ideas and information with people from dif- 
ferent cultures, live in a challenging atmosphere that inspires both personal and intellectual growth, and increase 
possibilities for future employment. Students can study in over 30 countries. Almost half of the Boston Col- 
lege undergraduate community participates in some type of international experience by the time they gradu- 
ate. An increasing number of graduate students are studying abroad and undergraduates also have the option of 
studying abroad in the summer after their freshmen years. These valuable experiences could be in the form of 
summer, semester, or a year abroad. To apply for any of the various study abroad programs students must meet 
the academic requirements outlined by their academic dean and major department. Final approval comes from 
the Center for International Partnerships & Programs (CIPP), the academic dean, and major department. All 
applicants must have strong academic standing and motivation pertaining to their majors, maturity, and self- 
discipline. The opportunity to study abroad is one that all students are encouraged to consider. -Anita Isama 



Vcademics M 




62 Academics 




Honors Progra 



M 



THE COLLEGE OF Arts and Sciences was founded in 1863 and is the oldest and lamest undergraduate school 
of Boston College. The College also has one of the oldest Honors Programs in the country, which was started in 
1958. It was started for superior students to challenge them to work to their highest potential, to provide a more 
integrated approach to the core, and to further develop a more solid foundation for as they pursue more special- 
ized studies within their majors. There are also Honors Programs in the Carroll School of Management, the Con- 
nell School of Nursing, and the Lynch School of Education, although their requirements differ slightly from those 
of the A&S Honors Program. With an annual incoming class of about 140 freshmen, these students generally 
are in the top 5% of their high-school classes and have combined SATs in the range of 1450, marking them as the 
top of their class. Students who had several years of Greek, founded literary journals, worked at interesting jobs, 
or earned unusual recommendations from their high-school teachers are also considered. First-year students who 
have strong academic performances can also be admitted to the Honors Program as sophomores, but need to be 
recommended by instructors in their first-year courses. At any given time in the university there are approxi- 
mately 600 students in the Honors Program. Each year, about 100 seniors complete their requirements and gradu- 
ate with Honors standing whether through a senior Honors Seminar or through their Honors Thesis. Anita Isama 



Academics 63 




Image courtesy <>t Mar) SaitJone, Director of Capital Planning and Engineering 



64 Academic > 




s 



.tk^ \ 

©Anderson Illustration Associates, Inc. 2006 



NOT SINCE THE late 
1920s, when President 
James Dolan, SJ, commis- 
sioned the building of a 
new Oxford on the Heights, 
has there been any plan 
broader in scope than the 
"Campus Master Plan!' 
Promising in 10 years, 
among other changes, a 
relocation of the Newton 
Campus freshmen to the 
Upper Campus and a Uni- 
versity center, the Heights 
as we know it will be 
changed forever. 



lO Year Plan 



BUILDING FOR THE FUTURE 



Academics 65 




hcademici 







10 Year Pla 



N 



AS BC PLANS to reshape the landscape of Main Campus, students and faculty are curious as to what the con- 
struction will entail. Marking the most ambitious construction project in BCs history, the blueprints to said 
construction have recently been released to the public. According to the plan. Edmonds Hall will be replaced 
by a state-of-the-art recreational complex. Additionally, the Mods are expected to be demolished within eight to 
ten years. In turn, a brand new student center will be constructed on the current site of the Plex and the Mods. 
Furthermore, a new dining facility and humanities center are expected to be built on the current site of the 
McElroy Commons parking lot along College Road, creating a new quadrangle. In addition. BC plans to relo- 
cate the McMullen Museum of Art from its current location in Devlin Hall to a newly constructed building on 
the north side of Commonwealth Avenue. Attached to the museum will be a 1. 000-1. 200-person auditorium. 
Fans of BCs signature gothic architecture need not worry, assures University President Rev. William R Leahy. 
S.J., for construction will shy away from Middle Campus, the heart of B.C. These structural changes also change 
the location of the T stop, making it more accessible to students. As this hefty endeavor is sure to be tremen- 
dously expensive, it will require the largest fundraising in BCs history. The generosity of BC friends and 
alumni will be indispensable in this process. If all goes as planned, these structural changes will supplement 
BCs already eminent appeal, substantiating its place as one of Americas greatest colleges. Mike Thntevski 



Academics b" 




McMullen M 



useum 



Article by: Anita Isama fhotos by: AAyra LJr\a\ 



THE McMULLEN MUSEUM of Art is 
located In Devlin Hall. It is nationally and 
internationally recognized for organizing 
and presenting multidisciplinary exhibi- 
tions. These exhibitions not only attract 
students and Boston area residents, but 
people across the country and beyond. 
McMullen is a center for both academic 
research and distinctive exhibitions. It's 
mission is "is to cultivate learning, cele 
brate artistic excellence, explore the visual 
traditions of diverse cultures, and inspire 
faculty and student research based on the 
visual arts!' The Museum also offers pro- 
grams and performances that relate to the 
current exhibit. The McMullen Museum 
of Art also contains a permanent collec- 
tion of art dating back to the nineteenth 
century that the University community 
has access to. This permanent collection 
is growing through gifts and acquisitions. 
The Cosmophilia exhibit contains 123 
treasured examples of Islamic art from 
the C.L. David Collection in Copenhagen, 
Denmark. Cosmophilia literally means 



y: /V\yra 

"love of ornament" Instead of organiz- 
ing the pieces of the exhibit by chronol- 
ogy, place of origin, function or technique, 
they are organized and presented visu- I 
ally. This was to achieve an illustration of 
how in the Islamic lands, artisans applied 1 
for major themes of decoration. The term I 
"Islamic art" refers to art made for the! 
Islamic faith and for art created in lands I 
where the Islam was the chief religion. In 
this exhibition a full array of Islamic artl 
is presented from its origins to modern I 
times. The Cosmophilia exhibit was! 
curated by Shelia S. Blair and Jonathan M. I 
Bloom. The McMullen Museum of Artl 
organized this exhibit in collaboration I 
with the David Collection , Copenhagen. I 
The Calderwood Charitable Foundation, 
the National Endowmen for the Arts, and 
the Patrons of the McMullen Museum also I 
offered major support. The Cosmophilia I 
exhibit was dedicated to Norma Jean and I 
the late Stanford Calderwood and was sup- 1 
ported by an indemnity from the Federal I 
Council on the Arts and the Humanities.! 



68 Academics 




Clockwise from top: Visitors to the Cosmophilia exhibit at the McMullen Museum view the artifacts 
during the show's opening night. Curators Jonathan M. Bloom and Shelia Blair welcome all the event. 



Academics <-> 1 ' 




Scholarships 



BOSTON COLLEGE OFFERS a wide range of Undergraduate Fellowships and Scholarships. These awards allow 
winners to pursue personal ambitions and passions around the world. Previous recipients include modern-day lead- 
ers in the arts, business, and politics, and many who have made their mark on almost all areas of human accom- 
plishments. Here are three scholarships available to BC AHANA (African-American, Hispanic, Asian, and Native 
American) students. The Asian American Scholarship is a partial tuition scholarship for senior year that recognizes 
a junior annually for his or her academic achievement, promotion of Asian American awareness, and service to both 
the Asian American and wider communities on and off campus. This scholarship was created in 1995 after proposals 
from students, faculty, and administrators. As a tribute to the anti-racism efforts of Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr., the 
Boston College Martin Luther King, Jr. Memorial Committee was founded in 1982, and the Scholarship award that 
equals 75 'a of senior year tuition was started in 1990. This award is given to a student who exemplifies the charae 
teristics and commitment of Dr. King, one who shares his dream of social equality and justice. The Boston College 
Oscar A. Romero Scholarship recognizes each year a junior who has shown academic excellence and possessed an 
outstanding record of community service at Boston College or other off-campus communities. This scholarship was 
created in honor of t lie achievements by El Salvador Archbishop Father Oscar Romero, who symbolized Christian love 
and solidarity and provided a source of strength and hope for the poor and the oppressed in his country. Vincent Si u 



\cadetnics 




Annie Le 



p 


xZ 1 ( 


r 


m 



1 



Alexandria K. Bradshaw 



Asian American Scholarship 

"Teaching is something I've wanted to do 
since middle school. I want to lessen the 
difference of educational opportunities 
for students - end the education gap that 
exists because of resource shortages!' 



Martin Luther King, Jr. 
Scholarship 

"His legacy is not about a holiday or a 
scholarship foundation, but it's a move 
ment - away from disparity and towards 
social justice. Equality should be reflected 
in every aspect of our lives. We are a com- 
munity; we can do this together!' 



Oscar Romero Scholarship 

'Archbishop [Romero] was a man com- 
mitted to justice ... I honestly feel that we 
all can take away so much from his ideals 
and beliefs, because it is the responsibil- 
ity of all of us to ensure that everyone is 
treated with the same amount of respect 

and humanity!' 



NoraFrias 



Academics 71 




72 Academics 




Academic Diversity 



BOSTON COLLEGE IS neither a college nor is it in Boston. Behind its seemingly straightforward name exists 
four colleges and more than 50 majors. With about 9,000 undergraduate students from all 50 states and over 
66 countries and territories, the diversity present on campus is astounding. Not only do interdisciplinary 
majors and minors exist within each school, but students from each college are also encouraged to branch out 
and explore new courses within the four different schools. Recently as well, the school has seen an increase in 
options with the latest addition of the Jewish Studies minor. What ties students together, however, in the face 
of all this diversity is the 15-course core requirement, irregardless of school, that every Boston College gradu- 
ate must complete to ensure a foundation in the arts, socials sciences, natural sciences, philosophy and theology 
among others. Victimology and Forensic Science have proven to be popular courses for non-CSON students with 
leading specialist Prof. Ann Burgess as well as has Principles of Economics/Macroeconomics with Prof. Richard 
Tresch for non-Economics majors. For those interested in a career in the medical field in the future, the univer- 
sity offers the opportunity to be a non-science major within the Premed program. What Boston College offers 
is a place where Studio Art and Chemistry majors, Finance and International Studies majors and students from 
any academic background can mix with ease to create an environment that is hard to find elsewhere. A/\ ra ( Tiai 



Academics 73 




74 Academics 




Presidential Scholars Progra 



M 



'"EACH YEAR SINCE 1991. a select group of young men and women of outstanding talent and character haw come 
to Boston College to embark on an integrated honors educational experience designed to embody the best of the uni- 
versity and its Jesuit heritage of educational excellence in service to society - the Boston College Presidential Scholars 
Program. The Presidential Scholars Program works in tandem with the University's honors curricula, challenging 
Scholars over four years through summer programs focusing on community service, international experience and 
professional internships. During the academic year. Scholars interact with eminent guests through a biweekly Eve 
ning Speakers series, hone their leadership skills through a series of biweekly workshops, and take advantage of a 
variety of other enrichment opportunities, all intended to nurture their development into the nations future leaders. 
Presidential Scholars receive full tuition scholarships and all PSPsponsored summer programs are fully funded!' The 
Class of 2007 Presidential Scholars are: Richard Aberman. Atlas Anagnos. Kerry Brennan. Emily Cersonsky. William 
Clerico. Marisa Cochrane, Patrick Cron in. Emily Gruber. Samantha Koller. Rebecca Kraus. William Markis. Patricia 
Noonan, Allison Ramirez, Kathleen Wakeham, Christopher Wilson-B) inc. & Alexander Yiannopoulos. Anidi Isama 



Academics 75 




Edited bv:VvVy Vo 



WHAT WAS IT in the Boston College life that 
defined us? Was it the first friend we made 
during Orientation or the freshman roommate 
we timidly introduced ourselves to before we 
realized how close we would actually become? 
Was it walking into Conte Forum during Con- 
vocation and formally entering the Boston 
College community? Was it being tossed into 
the air for all thirty-four points during the 
Clemson double overtime victory or tailgat- 
ing at nine oblock in the morning in the Mods 
with your closest friends? Was it market evan- 
gelist Jim Cramer's exuberant television shoot 
in September or the quiet and reflective chats 
we shared with one another in The Choco- 



late Bar or Hillside? Was it the service trip 
that changed the way we saw injustice in the 
world around us and inspired us to do some 
thing more or was it the way we saw injustice 
in our own community and rose to challenge 
it? Boston College has defined us, whether in 
our first or in our four years at the University. 
From the dining hall formally known as the 
"Rat" to our favorite coffee shop in Boston and 
the plethora of intramural teams to the Rally 
Committee, we have all found our niche. We 
continue to strive not only in the academ- 
ics but in the social interactions we value 
as well because it in education of the whole 
person that we truly find ourselves. Myni Chui 



7t Sludcnl Ufc 



Clockwise from top: In another year 
of strong competition during the ALC 
Showdown. SASA took away the top 
prize tor the cultural category when it 
wowed the audience with high flying 
performances. Students gathered at 
the labyrinth on the sixth anniversary 
of the 9/11 attacks to commemorate 
those BC alumni who lost their lives 
with a single red carnation. The BC 
Eagles dominated the Virginia Tech 
Hokies in a 22 - 3 rout during one 
of the seasons few night games. Red 
shirts proudly displaying the slogan 
"Testify and Unite" were distributed 
prior to the UNITY rally to pro- 
mote awareness on campus. As part 
of an ongoing project by UGBC. the 
organization sponsored a ""Pumpkin 
Slaughter" w here students could hand- 
pick and carve their own pumpkins. 



ft t 



MB 



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Photos by Myra Chai 



Student Lite 77 




Above: Posters are for sale annually in the Dustbowl 
during the moving-in weekend so students can sat- 
isfy their decorative desires. Photo by Myra Chai 

Left: Parents, relatives, siblings, and friends alike help to move 
the seemingly endless load of belongings. Photo by Myra Chai 







Left: Boston College students who live sig- 
nificantly far must use moving trucks or ship 
their possessions well in advance. 
Photo by Myra Chai 

Below: The campus is covered in an ocean of 
cardboard boxes, bags, people, luggage, carts, 
trucks and cars during moving-in weekend. 
Photo by Myra Chai 





A : 



S SEPTEMBER ROLLS in, students begin pack- 
ing and shopping for a new year at Boston College. 
From trips to Bed, Bath, & Beyond to Staples, 
here are many essentials to purchase. While many who 
ive in the vicinity of New England pack all their belong- 
ings into cars, others ship off their belongings ahead of 
'ime. There are several days allotted before the first day of 
classes for moving in, which consists of checking in, get- 
ting room codes, signing papers, and meeting their new 
RAs. Freshmen finally meet their new roommates for the 
upcoming year, while many upperclassmen reunite with 



friends they have opted to live with. Once everything has 
been unloaded, its time to finally unpack. Students utilize 
their space wisely by putting all their clothes into dressers, 
under-the-bed containers, and closets, making their beds, 
and setting up their laptops and electronics. Students enjoy 
decorating their room with posters, pictures, calendars. 
etc. Once they are all moved in and settled, it is time for 
parents to say their goodbyes and for students to prepare 
for classes including purchasing textbooks. This marks the 
beginning of an exciting new year at Boston College! 

Jullcc Kim 



II 



Academics 79 




Siiperlu: 



THE DINING HALLS are strangely empty, the side 
walks silent. The only movements on campus are stray 
students in bright yellow scurrying to take care of 
last-minute chores. Empty cars line the streets, andbarbeques 
are left smoking. Where is everyone? It's gameday at Boston 
College, and the Superfans have rallied! The student section 
is packed with gold and maroon. Every student is given a 
Superfans shirt at freshmen orientation to wear at the games, 
and each graduation year has its own theme; this year's is 
"Eagles Take Action!* Many have artistically changed and 
supplemented these shirts to create a wall of school spirit, 
with body paint, beads, hats, anything maroon and gold. 



Football, basketball, hockey: BC shows pride in them all, withl 
students camping out for the best seats for big-time gamesi 
like Virginia Tech and Duke, waiting in line for hours, and 
entering lotteries for tickets. The term "Superfans'' howeveijl 
goes beyond any t-shirt: it shows the spirit and vitality of oufi 
student body. Dedicated Eagles fans pack every game, show* 
ing full-force the power of BC loyalty and one cannot help 
but be swept up in the fervor of the Superfans. Despite th« 
cold, wind, rain, and snow, they're giving their all, and cheefl 
ing the athletes to do the same. For every roar in the crowdji 
you can bet the Superfans are there making the most noisqi 

Jacqueline Smytm 




Above: Students, alumni, and parents alike manifest 

the idea of Superfans - devout Boston College sports 

enthusiasts. Photo submitted by Chatcqiui Campbell 

Right: Many show their pride for BC by wearing the 

golden Super! an 'I : shi rt s, painting thei r laces, and bei ng 

decked out in maroon and gold from head to toe. 

Photo submitted by Frances Marias-Phillips 




Student I 







It 



Above: WE ARE BC! Game day is the perfect op- 
portunity for students to show their support, as evident 
from the large ocean of golden yellow shirts. Photo 
by David Trudo 

Below: Baldwin gets the crowd pumped up and ready 
to cheer for BC. Photo submitted by Tania Freitas 





Above: A few of Boston Colleges large mass of Supei fans smile 
for the camera during halftime, but once the game resumes, 
it's on! Photo submitted by Tania Freitas 



Student Life SI 



Below: The festivities take place on Shea Field, the Mods, and 
even the Commonwealth Avenue parking garage. The students 
seen here are having fun tailgating with their friends and fami- 
lies during Parents' Weekend. Photo by David Trudo 





Above: With good food and good friends, students 
always have a good time tailgating! Photo submitted 
by Frances Macias-Phillips 

Below: Tailgating is part of the BC experience - a 
tradition that has been implemented for generations 
by students and alumni. Photo by David Trudo 




H2 Student I .ilc 




Left: The highlight of the football season has to be tail- 
gating. During Parents' Weekend, the William J. Flynn 
Fund parking lots are packed with people and cars. 
Photo by David Trudo 

Below: Seniors enjoy the excitement and fun from 
tailgating and partying in the Mods to make their last 
year at BC memorable. Photo by Myru Chui 




lllllllill 



C "X THEN THE SMELL of grilled hot dogs, hamburg- 
\/\/ ers, and sausages is in the air, it must be a special 

T T time of the year: tailgating season. Flocking 
rom many different parts of the country, as well as from 
n campus, Boston College Superfans of all ages come in 
nticipation of the home football games. Tailgating, which 
5 allowed in the William J. Flynn Fund parking lots and 
hea Field, is an ongoing tradition shared with family and 
riends. Since being admitted into the ACC, lines to gain 
ccess to all the excitement have resulted in longer waits, but 

is definitely worth it. Generally, campus parking lots and 
hea Field open two to three hours before the game begins 
nd close two hours after the game. To ensure a good turnout 
t kick off, tailgaters are asked to enter the stadium about 



thirty minutes prior to the start of the game. Amongst 
the sea of bright yellow Superfan t-shirts are a sizeable 
amount of alumni who show tremendous support for their 
alma mater. Many familiar faces are seen from game to 
game, decked out in their BC attire. The intermingling of 
current and previous Boston College students is an amaz- 
ing experience since there is an immediate bond created 
because of the similar interest of rooting for our ver\ o\\ n 
Eagles. Pre-game festivities, such as contests, giveaways, 
and lots of eating, allow the crowd to get pumped up for 
the football game. During this time, the contagious energ) 
just exudes from the fans. Smiles, laughter, and all-around 
good times are had. It is a season to eat, drink, and be 
merry. All in all, friends that tailgate together, stav together! 

\sh\c\ GuIIo 



Student I ife 83 





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CONVOCATION 



oy 



ON MONDAY. SEPTEMBER 18, 2006 the 
Class of 2010 at Boston College came together 
under one focus: Senator John McCain. The 
Annual First Year Academic Convocation 
proceeded with a class barbeque and the First 
Flight Procession, a torchlit walk through 
campus beginning at Boston College's main 
gate and ending at Conte Forum. This annual 
tradition represents St. Ignatius Loyola's 
motto "Go set the world aflame!' The walk 
is done to commemorate the matriculation of 
the incoming class, where students take the 
same walk as they will when they graduate. 
The Arizona Senator John McCain greeted 
enthusiastic students near Conte Forum as 
freshmen from all dormitories were brought 
together into one unifying body. Through- 
out the sea of students in the stadium, all 
eyes were focused on the greatly anticipated 
speaker. McCain suitably addressed the new 
class with a message to "hear the voice in 
your own heart" and to "make history!' The 
former prisoner of war reflected upon his 
past experiences while held captive in the 



Article by: lullee Kim fhotos by: David I 



y : 






Vietnam War. Prisoners were tortured anJ 
obliged to agree with the captors' conJ 
demning views of the United States, bul 
many men resisted to such force. When tola| 
that no one will ever know of their courage 
and restraint, the soldiers simply replied! 
"I will know!' Their loyalty to this countn 
and moral character were proven througK 
their endurance through such unsettling 
treatment. McCain applied this memor 
to his stance on current political affair^ 
According to the senator, Americans "nefl 
not and must not sacrifice our values in tl 
war on terrorism" or the country will nc 
only lose this war, but "our political sol 
The world must know the strength of tfl 
American ideals and principles upon whicl 
the country was built. He further hopl 
students of Boston College will follow thq 
example of the honorable prisoners of wJ 
Focus on becoming a moral leader regard 
less of others' criticism and disapprow 
and hear your heart say, "I will knoj 



S4 Life 




Above: United States Senator John McCain addresses the freshmen class at the annual Convocation. 

Left: Duchesne West lights the torch and begins their journey to "Go set the world aflameT 

Far Left. Above: The Class of 2010 take instruction before they begin their First Flight Procession. 

Far Left. Below: Freshmen lake their First Flight down the extensive Higgins Stair-, to Oonte Forum. 



Student Li! 




ONE DAY A year the Dustbowl is packed with tables, 
students, and signs. Student Activities Day is a mas- 
sive welcome to incoming freshmen and returning 
students, with each club and sport vying for attention. Amid 
shouts offering free candy. BC student swarm the tables, 
asking questions, and signing up for listservs. Throughout 
the day. there is a steady stream of wanderers walking up the 
lanes of posters, and a constant rotation of club representa- 
tives. Perhaps a little overw helming, the hubbub displays the 
great variety of activities on the BC campus, as well as the 
immense participation of its student body. From the rugby 



teams large tent to Stitch's display of beautiful crafts, there is 
a club for nearly every pastime imaginable. Extracurricular 
activities are perfect for exploring opportunities, furthering 
old hobbies, and discovering new passions. Clubs are open 
to all classes, with many seniors beginning a club for the 
first time, and other students staying in the same activities 
for all four of their college years. It is easy to make friends 
through activities as well. Student Activities Day provides 
great access to the campus's sports and clubs, and the op- 
portunity to get involved in the BC community. 

Jacqueline Smyth 




Above Differentdubsappealtoanarra\ <>t in- 
terests, such as cycling, among Boston Col leges 
large student body. Photo b\ Myrtt Chili 

Right: Members of every club are on hand to an- 
swer any questions of prospective members. 
Photo h\ Myra Chui 




Student Life 



Left: With so many organizations to choose from, mam 
feel that the number of clubs available to sign up for 
can be overwhelming. Photo by Myra Chili 




bove: Posters, candy, music, flashy signs, and quarter- 
leets are just a few of the methods that the numerous groups 
se to attract students in passing. Photo by Myra Chai 

ight: Cultural groups often dress in traditional clothing 
nd display customary decorations on their tables during 
tudent Activities Day. Photo by Myra Chai 



Student Lite 87 



Below: The Spirit of Boston holds the ALC Boat Cruise every 

year. The event is a fun opportunity to spend time with friends, 

eat. dance, and enjoy a cruise through the Boston Harbor. 

Photo submitted by Robert Cathcart 





Above: Many students start the night off by heading 
straight for the delicious food or the dance floor. 
Photo by Myra Chai 

Below: The ALC Boat Cruise never fails to sell out each 
year. Students of all cultures and races congregate to 
celebrate diveristy and unity. Photo by Myra Chai 




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Left: Vice President of the AHANA Leadership Council 
(ALC), Seye Akinbulumo, poses with friends for a quick 
picture. The Boat Cruise is one of the most memorable 
and successful events for ALC. Photo by Myru Cluii 

Below: Students dress to impress for this fun-filled 
event. With good food, good music, and good people, 
no wonder the Boat Cruise is a blast for all! 
Photo by Myra Chui 




ALC Nil Criist 



CELEBRATING DIVERSITY, THE AHANA Lead- 
ership Council (ALC) held their annual boat cruise 
on Saturday, September 23 rd , 2006, and it was defi- 
litely a night to remember. Once again, tickets were sold 
)ut this year, which reflects the continuing popularity of 
he event. Students, administrators, and faculty enjoyed the 
ncredible evening aboard the Spirit of Boston, which sailed 
tlong the Charles River after leaving from Boston Harbor. 
Complete with good music and tasty food, the ALC boat 
ruise allowed its attendees to party until the wee hours of 
he morning. Being a semi-formal dress-to-impress event, 
tudents were able to socialize with others from different 
:ultures and races. Guests were greeted by three stylishly 
lecorated floors, two of which were dedicated to dancing. 



The outside view on the decks of the ship was absolutely 
breath-taking, for the gleaming Boston skyline added the 
perfect touch to memory-capturing pictures. The sparkling 
stars, the glow from the water, and the mingling of friends 
created a magical experience that all could share. The 
AHANA Leadership Council prides itself on recognizing 
the importance of diversity at Boston College and strives to 
make improvements toward equality among all students, 
regardless of race or culture. The fun-tilled night certainly 
exceeded everyone's expectations. There is nothing more 
enjoyable than being surrounded by good company which 
the ALC boat cruise once again proved with its success. 

Ashley Gullo 



Student Life 89 




Din Lili 



COLLEGE DORMS ARE certainly a change from 
the rooms students are used to having. However, 
they learn to love their dorms and make them their 
home away from home. The Upper and Newton Campuses 
house mainly freshman in single, double, triple, and quad- 
style rooms. College Road (CoRo) dorms provide living fa- 
cilities for many sophomores in similar style rooms. Some 
sophomores consider CoRo a less viable option, whereas 
others enjoy the isolation from other upperclassmen dorms 
in order to get their work done. Lower Campus accommo- 
dates sophomores, juniors, and seniors in four, six, eight, or 



nine -person suites, which include larger bedrooms, bigger 
closets, private bathrooms, and common areas. The Mods 
are restricted to seniors and offer house style accommoda- 
tions for six people, which include private bathrooms, living 
rooms, dining areas, and kitchens. Many dorms have an 
array of study lounges, laundry facilities, cardio and work- 
out rooms, and game rooms. Many juniors opt to live off- 
campus in apartments or houses close to campus, and other 
juniors go off to study abroad. However, students generally 
enjoy living in dorms, experiencing student life for them- 
selves. In turn, BC becomes its own tight-knit community. 

Jullee Kim 




Above: Dorms reflect a st udent's personal ity and personal 
style based on the colors chosen to dominate the room 
and the posters hung on the walls. Photo by Vy Vy Vo 

R ight : The com mon rooms i n upperclassmen housi ng a re 

useful to have special gatherings or simply for lounging 

purposes. Photo submitted by Michelle Andrude 




'*> Wk-nt Life 



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Above: The Mods are ideal living arrangements for 
tailgating during the football season, but only seniors 
are allowed to party there. Photo by David Trudo 

Below: Many students decorate their doors to give 
off a welcoming air to visitors and neighbors. Photo 
submitted by Tania Freitas 



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Above: Life in the dorms is fun with good friends as roommates 
and better living arrangements as upperclassmen. 
Photo submitted bv Khalilah Da lev 



Student Life l »l 



Right: Students, parents, and grandparents all enjoy 

refreshments at Pops on the Heights. 

Photo by David Trudo 





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Above: The Boston Pops perform a series of enchanting 
tunes to welcome the start of a new and exciting year: 
Boston College. Photo by David Trudo 

Left: Parents and students alike congregate for Mass to 
wrap up Parents' Weekend, an autumn tradition at BC. 
Photo by David Trudo 



92 Student Life 




Left: Since it's the last Parents' Weekend for 
seniors, students and parents make the most 
of the beginning of the new school sear by 
tailgating in the Mods before the big game. 
Photo submitted by France Macias-Fbillips 

Below: Parents come to experience campus life 
with students so cleaning the dorm, suite. Mod, 
or apartment is protocol for leasing a good 
impression of life at Boston College. 
Photo submitted by Tania Frdtas 





FOR SOME, PARENTS' Weekend is a welcome dose of 
home; for others, it is a reminder to be grateful for the 
freedom college allows. Either way, the last weekend 
in September is packed with activities for families and their 
BC students to do. The campus teems with parents, sibl ings, 
and students who assume the role of tour guide as they show 
their visitors around Boston College. From the Pops on the 
Heights Scholarship Gala (featuring the Boston Col lege Un i- 
versity Chorale) on Friday, the football game Saturday after- 
noon. Parents' Weekend Mass on Sunday, and the inevitable 
dinners out in Boston, students and parents are kept busy. 



Shuttles run to and from the Newton campus to allow easier 
parking for parents, and tailgating before the game invokes 
a carnival-like atmosphere. The extensive preparation for 
Parents' Weekend promises a good experience for all. and 
the perfect opportunity to show off BC's beautiful campus. 
awesome football team, and great musical talent. This 
weekend comes when the excitement of school starts to wear 
off, and homesickness begins to set in: there is little doubt, 
however, that once it's over, students are relieved to return 
to regular college life, and parents exhausted!) go home. 

Jacqueline Sim ih 



Student Life 93 




THE AM AZING SOUNDS coming from instruments 
and vocalists alike have the ability to impact the audi- 
ence by allowing them to experience exactly what the 
performers themselves are going through. Although playing 
an instrument or singing takes many years of practice to 
master, the hard work and long hours of practicing are very 
rewarding. Concerts held by the University Chorale and the 
Boston College Symphony Orchestra are great experiences. 
Other popular concerts on campus are given by student per- 
formance groups. Some instrumental and vocal ensembles 
on campus are BC bOp!, The Swingin Eagles Stage Band, 



and Voices of Imani. A Cappella Fest displays the talent 
of the top vocalist groups on campus, which include The 
Acoustics, BC Sharps, The Bostonians, Against The Current, 
The Dynamics, and The Heightsmen. BC also offers much 
smaller, informal concerts where independent musicians can 
show off their talents. UGBC also puts on bigger concerts, 
such as having Kanye West come last Spring. The Black 
Student Forum brings up and coming artists to campus as 
well. BC really embraces the fact that music is universal 
by making it available to everyone. 

Ashley Gullo 




Abo\ e: The Boston College S) mphony Orches- 
tra puts on one ot its tour annual performances in 
-on Hall. Photo h\ Caroline Ogonawski 

Right: The Undergraduate Government of 
Boston College sponsors an event called 
"Battle of the Bands."' in which BC student 
bands compete to win a S400 cash pri/e and 
an opportunity to perform at ModStock. 
PbotO b\ My Ti\ Ch.ii 



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Student Lite 















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Left: BCbOp! is ajazz ensemble which performs concerts 
at the annual Breaking the Barriers Ball and the AIDS 
Benefit Concert. Photo submitted by Mary Madden 




ibove: BC has numerous bands, choirs, orchestras, and 
roups that contribute to its talented and diverse musical 
Lilture. Photo by Caroline Ogonowski 

ight: The Acoustics harmonized their way into the hearts 
f the audience at the annual A Cappella Fest. 
hoto by Myra Chai 




Student Life 95 



Below: Students dress up for this formal event, never failing 

to show off the style and class that BC is renowned for. 

Photo submitted by Mary Madden 






Above: Although Homecoming took place in a campus 
setting for the second year, students had fun dancing 
the night away. Photo by David Trudo 

Below: The Homecoming dance "Keeping the Tradi- 
tion Alive" sold out to about 1,200 students. 
Photo by David Trudo 




Student Lift 




Left: With a cash bar, del icious buffet food, and good mu- 
sic, people had fun partying on campus under the white 
tent in the Mod parking lot. Photo by David Trudo 

Below: The annual eagle ice sculpture made an appear- 
ance at Homecoming, emblematic of the pride that BC 
students have for the school. Homecoming is an annual 
success planned by UGBC. Photo by David Trudo 





HlllCllill 



W^T TANTING TO KEEP the tradition alive, the 

%/%/ Undergraduate Government of Boston Col- 
T T lege (UGBC) held the much anticipated annual 
lomecoming Dance on Saturday, October 14 ,h , 2006. For 
le second year in a row, it was held in the Mod Parking Lot, 
ue to disorderly behavior in downtown locations, such as 
'ark Plaza and Fairmont Copley, in previous years. Three 
vhite tents were set up and consisted of food, drinks, and a 
3t of dancing. Inside, tables were nicely decorated and the 
'iitfet was overflowing with catered foods. Improvements 
rom last year included an effective coat check system and 
lore organization around the bar area. This year, students 
yere made to walk through metal detectors as an added 
ecurity feature. Making sure students enjoyed themselves on 



the dance floor, the DJ supplied good music throughout the 
whole night. With only 1.200 tickets available, the dance was 
sold-out and left many students disappointed. Even though 
the eagle ice sculpture that was present at the dance may ha\ e 
reflected the cold temperature of the night, there was no avoid- 
ing the sometimes blistering weather of Boston. However, 
students made the most of the evening and took part in this 
BC tradition. Many dancegoers looked forward to getting 
dressed up, and experienced a fabulous night of socializing 
and having fun with good friends. The evening seemed to have 
gone quite smoothly, so it was certainly a success. Perhaps 
moving the event on-campus would prove beneficial since, 
after all, the Homecoming dance should be at our "home" BC. 

ishley Gullo 



Studenl Life 97 




Sieikers 



EXPANDING THE HEARTS and minds of students 
is one of Boston Colleges main goals as a Jesuit col- 
legiate institution, and one way of doing so is through 
speakers from a variety of backgrounds. From monthly 
readings of Dante's Divine Comedy to Senator John McCain, 
presenters from all walks of life are invited to share insights 
to any number of students. Among this year's speakers were 
Archbishop J. Michael Miller, on the responsibility of Catholic 
schools in higher education, discussion on books written by 
Mark Singer, Jill Lepore, and many others. Speeches ranged 
from a presentation of "The Case Against Darwinism" 
to Loretta Ross' discussion on "Racial Injustices Against 
Women" showing Boston College's dedication to the diversity 



of speakers. Boston College professors also form discus- 
sion panels to open the floor to students in order to express 
their views in a comfortable environment, delving deep into 
controversial issues like racism and sexuality. With all the 
events occurring on campus, however, it's difficult to make 
many of the presentations. A valuable resource available is 
Front Row, an online archive of videotaped speakers, which 
is often utilized by faculty and students alike. The avail- 
ability of diverse thought and new ideas is evident in Boston 
College's commitment to widening its students' perspective, 
and inviting speakers from a range of backgrounds is one 
way of doing so. 

Jacqueline Smyth 




Above: Senator John McCain gave the keynote address 
this \ear at the annual First Year Convocation, encour- 
aging students to become moral leaders regardless of 
discouragement from others. Photo by David Trudo 

Right: NASA's first female commander, Colonel Eileen 

Collins (Ret), spoke about leadership from Apollo to 

Discovery at The Chambers Lecture for Undergrads. 

Photo by Alex Valdez 




Student Life 




Above: Jim Cramer, tv personality of CNBCs "Mad 
Money]' enthralled BC students with his wit and knowl- 
edge about equity securities. Photo by David Trudo 

Below: Kevin Kallaugher, world renowned political 
cartoonist for The Economist magazine, came to BC 
in October. Photo by Myra Chai 





Above: Students and faculty alike are shown here at the Women's 
Studies event with Susan Shapiro-Barash. who spoke about 
her recent book "Tripping the Prom Queen: The Truth About 
Women and Rivalry' Photo by Megan Koch 



Student 1 ifc 99 




Above: Locker rooms are key for a student's everyday work- 
out routine, where he or she can change accordingly for 
group exercise classes, swimming in the 25-yard lap pool, 
or utilizing other Plex facilities. Photo by Vy Vy Vo 

Left: The popular cardio machines are one example of the 
aerobic equipment used by students to stay fit and in shape, 
upholding BCs third rank in Mens Fitness Magazines Poll 
of Americas Fittest Colleges. Photo by Vy Vy Vo 



100 Student 1. 1 (c 




Left: Health-conscious and dedicated Boston 
College students utilize the many facilities 
offered by the Ple\ on a day-to-day basis. 
Photo by Bob McGrath 

Below: The Plex has courts for a number of 
sports including basketball, tennis, squash, 
and racquetball. Photo b\ \\ \\ \'o 





SOARING FROM NUMBER 11 to Number 3 in Mens 
Fitness Magazines Poll of Americas Fittest Colleges, 
Boston College students are among the nations most 
health-conscious. Obviously, exercise seems to be a priority 
to most students. The William J. Flynn Student Recreation 
Complex, usually referred to as simply "The Plex'' encom- 
passes 293,000 square feet of athletic facilities, which at- 
tracts a large number of the BC population. Including an 
1/8 mile indoor track, basketball courts, volleyball courts, 
racquetball courts, indoor/outdoor tennis courts, and an 
8-lane pool, which students take full advantage of, are just 



some of the recreational options. What is known as The 
Fitness Center, houses a variety of aerobic and resistance 
equipment. Group workouts are offered with about 70 classes 
per week, including pilates. yoga. step, group cycling, sev- 
eral dance classes, and even some water-based workouts. 
For those wanting to continue a sport played in high school 
but not at the varsity level, club and intramural sports are 
available. Clearly, there are numerous workout programs 
and equipment that are accessible to the BC community. 



making sure their fitness needs are met. 



Ashlev Gullo 



Student Life 101 




THE GREATLY ANTICIPATED college life has 
finally arrived for freshmen. Life has just begun 
and there are numerous opportunities waiting for 
these nervous and anxious students. After the grueling 
admissions process of the previous year, freshmen enter 
college after graduating and leaving behind their life at 
home to create a new one here at Boston College. Many 
students participate in the Freshman Welcome series, which 
includes a boat cruise, lobster bake, and hypnotist - an 
entertaining way to meet new people. They quickly settle 



into their designated dorms on Upper or Newton Campus 
and adjust to eating at the dining halls and getting around 
campus using the shuttle buses. Students try to complete 
their core requirements and some take classes oriented 
towards freshmen, such as Perspectives or Cornerstone 
Advisement Seminars. Freshmen learn the importance 
of time management as exams and papers begin to roll 
in. They also discover the various activities and organiza- 
tions that BC offers. Freshmen year serves as a chance to 
discover new passions and a new love for Boston College. 

Jullee Kim 




Above: Both freshmen are all smiles after BC 

wins the Virgina Tech game! GO EAGLES! 

Photo submitted b\ Sukma Sqjar 

Right: The girlsof the 3f floor of Duchesne East 

group together before a night on the town. 

Photo submitted b\ S&kina Sqjai 




102 Student Life 



Left: During freshman year, most people feel they are 
constantly introducing themselves and asking where 
others are from in hopes of finding some common 
ground. Photo submitted by Gerrel Olivier 




?ove: Freshman year is a chance to build new friend- 
ips, and classes serve as a great place to do so. These 
rls smile with relief after finishing the last class of the 
ty. Photo submitted by Sakina Sojar 

ight: Students pose in front of the Shaw House, where 
embers of the Shaw Leadership Program make lasting 
>nds while living under the same roof. 
wto submitted by Gerrel Olivier 



Student 1 ifc KB 




Soilimorcs 



THE PROMISE OF sophomore year marks a dis- 
tinct change in a students approach to university 
life. Each person has begun to find their niche, 
explore new activities, and branch out a little more both 
within and outside of Boston College. Rooming with one's 
friends is a huge advantage, despite the end-of-freshman- 
\ear flutterings of the housing lottery. Not only are living 
arrangements more in a students control sophomore year, 
but so is their academic schedule: many core requirements 
are fulfilled, allowing much more freedom to choose the 
classes they want to take. Majors are also declared dur- 
ing the second year of college, which for many can be 
a difficult decision; "undecided" is a popular major for 
freshman year, but that unfortunately cannot be continued. 
Sophomores also have to begin making other important 
decisions, li ke study abroad programs and housing for junior 



year. Because many BCers don't have four years of housing, 
they choose to live off campus junior year; thus real estate 
in Chestnut Hill and Newton go quickly, and sophomores 
must be on the ball in order to get reasonable arrangements. 
Study abroad also holds a great deal of decision-making, 
from choosing where to go and what programs through 
which to travel, to whether or not credits are transferable. 
Areas of study, location of international programs, and 
housing are just a few aspects of sophomore year. There is 
also the deepening attachment to friends, BC, and Boston 
itself, and the exploring of these three, while working in 
(and out) of school. Freshman year marks a traditional rite 
of passage, but sophomore year adds an entirely new dimen- 
sion to the college experience: comfort and a sense of place. 

Jacqueline Smyth 




Above: Sophomore year gives you the chance to live 

with your close friends and to bui Id on those friendships. 

Photo submitted by Margaret Bingle 

Right: Sophomores enjoy their second year at BC by 

spending time with friends and going out to Boston, 

which is renowned for being a "college town!' 

Photo submitted by Kevin Johnson 




K>4 Student Life 




Above: Shown here are sophomores hanging out and 
enjoying the nice weather before winter hits. 
Photo submitted by Chatequa Campbell 

Below: After learning to adjust to freshman year, 
sophomores are able to balance out school, work, 
friends, and fun. Photo submitted by Mary Madden 







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Above: These students have fun spending time with each other 
in addition to showing their BC pride. With two years left of col- 
lege, sophomores try to make the most of their time at BC. 
Photo submitted by Aaron Cheung 



Student Lite 105 



Below: Juniors enjoy the fact that they're finally upperclassmen, 

and spend time building old and new friendships before the year 

flies by their eyes. Photo submitted by Alyssa Marchman 





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Above: Many juniors look forward to the benefits of 
turning twenty-one, including being able to go to the 
bars in Boston. Photo by Katherine Modzelewski 

Below: From celebrating birthdays to simply hanging 
out, the options for fun are endless for juniors. 
Photo submitted by Rafael Quizon 



£A* 




V*, Student Life 




Left: Students utilize their third year to strengthen the 
bonds they've already made, which in turn helps them 
through the grueling process of focusing on future 
plans. Photo submitted by Michelle Andrade 

Below: While man\ juniors are studying abroad or living 
off campus, others still make the most of their time on 
campus. Photo submitted by Vanessa Christopher 



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A FTER THE INITIAL shock that two years have al- 
/ \ ready passed at Boston College, juniors are eager to 
L X»make their remaining time worthwhile. Although the 
lass is divided, since most students decide to study abroad 
>r have to live off-campus, there are still many opportuni- 
ies to have fun. Some students are having another exciting 
ear living on campus. Others get a taste of the real world 
^hen they start paying rent while living off-campus around 
le BC area, such as on Comm. Ave, South Street, and by 
Cleveland Circle. Finally being recognized as upperclass- 
len, juniors also anticipate finally turning twenty-one, 
^fiich is quite a perk for any college student, since they are 
ow allowed into bars. Whether living off-campus, going 



abroad, or staying on campus, new experiences will ensue. 
Trying to complete major and minor requirements, starting to 
consider graduate school, and preparing for senior year ma\ 
seem like an uphill battle, however somehow it always man- 
ages to work out. Many juniors find themselves struggling 
with the quest to find the meaning of life, but having a good 
time with a great group of friends can help put their minds 
at ease. Another advantage juniors have is good registration 
times, and perhaps even getting a chance to live in the Mods. 
After being thoroughly acquainted with Boston College for 
two years, students should know all the ropes b\ now. Junior 
year is a time to enjoy and to also focus on plans tor the future. 

ishky Gullo 



Student Life in" 




SENIORS 



Article by: Ashley Oullo fhotos by: Trances /VWias-fhillips, 
Amy Oaitner, & AAicnelle Andrade 



AFTER DECIDING TO attend Boston 
College, students are anxious to start 
a new chapter in their life. This means 
being away from home and on their own, 
and being able to adjust to this newly 
found freedom. In September 2003, the 
current seniors arrived on campus for the 
first time, having no idea what to expect. 
It is hard to imagine that four years have 
flown by since then. Moving into their 
first dorm room, meeting their first 
roommate, and having their first meal 
at the dining hall are only a few of the 
new experiences. Being forced to interact 
with others and find new friends even- 
tually led to lasting memories and good 
times. New challenges arose as well as 
adventures, such as venturing to Comm. 
Ave, Cleveland Circle, and even Boston. 
After settling into a new life at BC, stu- 
dents felt more at ease, having made 
friends and places to go. One can never 
forget the football games and the energy 
surrounding them. Wearing their Super- 






fan shirts, the excitement of the students 
during tailgating and in the student section 
of the games, will always be remembered. 
Going to college means growing up, which 
is precisely what students do over the course 
of four years at BC. Whether it means vol- 
unteering or going on service trips, stu- 
dents always make sure to give back to the . 
BC community. Not only learning morel 
about themselves, students also learn who ] 
they aspire to be. With graduation rapidly 
approaching, students are getting more 
a taste of the so-called "real world!' Befoi 
they leave BC to pursue careers or furtl 
their education, however, they reminis 
about all their memories of the four years! 
spent in Chestnut Hill, their home away] 
from home. All of the friendships made, 
the places explored, and the experiences 
had will forever be a part of them. B( 
helped students find themselves, and they 
will carry on the lessons they have learned 
into yet another chapter of their lives. 




KJX Student l_ifc 




Above: The bonds seniors have made for the past tour years will always be a part of them as the) move on to the "real world. " 

Left: During senior year, students spend the valuable time the) have left with their dose friends. 

Far Left. Above: The memories, the people, the places, and the experiences from BC will last a lifetime for the Class ( >t 2007 

Far Left. Below: In the Mods, seniors have tun celebrating football wins and even just because the> are seniors. 



Student Life 1(W 



FOOD IS AN essential part of college life. There are 
four main dining halls at BC. The one that is known 
to have the best food is at Stuart Hall over at the Law 
School on Newton Campus. There a student can choose from 
Nteak or chicken, with two sides, or even venture off to the 
pasta table. The Rat is located in the basement of Lyons, 
and is a popular spot to pick up a quick snack in between 
classes. McElroy has two cafeterias, known as Carney's and 
Eagles Nest. McElroy has the most variety out of all the 
dining halls and is a popular choice for freshmen living 
on Upper Campus; and if you're looking to get a sandwich 



or salad, check out the Eagle's Nest. McElroy and Stuart 
offer a variety of foods served daily. The best sandwiches, 
however, are located at Hillside, at Lower Campus. There 
you can get a warm Panini, with homemade chips and a 
pickle. It's the perfect lunch for a studious BC student. And 
last but not least, there is Corcoran Commons, the dining 
hall located at Lower Campus. This is a popular choice for 
upperclassmen, and has a good variety to meet a BC Eagle's 
appetite. Feeling like dessert? The Chocolate Bar at McElroy 
has a range of exquisite, chocolate -baked goods. 

Sakina Sojar 




.Above: Hillside is the spot tor students to satisfy 

their sandwich cravings in between classes. 

Photo submitted by Michelle A ndrude 

Right: Corcoran Commons, also known as 

Lower, is popular among upperclassmen. 

Photo by David Trudo 




110 Studentl.de 




Left: The Chocolate Bar is a favorite among those who 
want a comfortable place to study or socialize while 
enjoying a chocolate delicacy. Photo by David Trudo 




Jove: Compared to the other dining halls. McElroy is a 
ore popular choice because of the wide assortment of 
od it offers. Photo by David Trudo 

grit: During the peak hours, students flock to the dining 
lis. standing in long lines to obtain one of the many deli- 
ous meals BC offers. Photo by Caroline Ogonowski 



Student Life 111 




DIVERSITY 



A 



rticle 



THERE IS SOMETHING almost tangible 
about the appeal diversity has to students 
researching colleges. Students from about 
97 countries and all 50 states bring a wide 
range of experience to the academic com- 
munity at BC, and enrich the learning 
experience of their peers. By presenting 
knowledge of one's own background and 
sharing that with others, students provide 
BC with a rich cultural diversity that can 
be tapped in any number of ways. One way 
is through organizations celebrating cul- 
tural diversity, such as the AHANA Lead- 
ership Council (ALC). (African-American, 
Hispanic, Asian, and Native American 
students). While maintaining the roots of 
AHANAs racial backgrounds, the group 
invites students from all cultures to join 
in activities year-round, like the ALC Ball 
and the ALC Boat Cruise. Originally for 
the Office of Minority Programs, the 
name of the organization was changed 
in 1979 to a less marginalizing Office of 
AHANA Student Programs (OASP). Other 



sy: Jacqueline Jmyth fhotos by: Dob AAcCIrath, Michelle Andradi 
Caroline OgonowsRi, & Jacqueline Jmytn 

groups reinforce racial and cultural back- 
grounds as well, such as the Asian Caucus, 
Irish Society, Arab Students Association, 
and Japan Club. Instead of creating cliques 
based on race, these groups create an open 
environment to appreciate different back- 
grounds, and often collude to put on events 
including students from a number of cul- 
tures. A vast array of interests also finds 
its place in BCs massive number of student 
organizations. Often seen around campusl 
are advertisements for different events, from 
comedy groups to musical performances,! 
rallies to speakers. Organizations provide! 
a creative outlet for students, such as dance; 
and fine arts groups, athletics, or musical 
performance. The opportunity to experi-J 
ence one's own culture on campus or enjoyj 
the talents and backgrounds of other stin 
dents is readily available to those who seelJ 
it. BCs dedication to diversity is apparent) 
in its willingness to appeal to those frond 
all walks of life, reaching across racial 
cultural, economic, and geographic lines. 



112 Student Life 




Above: The BC student bod) consists of people from a \ariet\ of cultures and backgrounds. 

Left: Students learn from each others experiences and embrace each other's differences. 

Far Left. Above Campus unit) and awareness are an important and constant goal within the university 

Far Left. Below: Main clubs and activities are available to celebrate diversity and to facilitate understanding. 




Student Life 113 



Right: Students, faculty and administrators alike at- 
tend the 20 th Annual Breaking the Barriers Ball, which 
welcomes in the holiday season. Photo bv David Trudo 




Ahove: The semi-formal event offers a wide range of d 
cious hors dbeuvres and buffet style dinner, topped 
with desserts. Photo by Myra Chai 

Left : Live entert a i n ment for the even i ng features the tale 
of the headliner BC bOp!, BCs six acappella groups, ; 
Voices of Imani. Photo by Myra Chai 



114 Student I. ife 




Left: Each purchased ticket for the 
Bal 1 comes with a faculty ticket . which 
students should use to personalis 
invite any BC employee who has 
affected them. Photo by Myra Chai 

Below: All proceeds from ticket 
sales benefit the Carol DiMaiti 
Stuart Foundation, which provides 
scholarship assistance to students 
from the Mission Hill District of 
Boston and works to alleviate racial 
barriers within the greater Boston 
area. Photo by Myra Chui 






















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RS ARE MILES removed from students, by the Ball. After the initial reluctance to converse with the 
*rience, education, and generation. They re Physics professor that gave you a C last year, you learn a 
cted, often published or famous in some great deal about them outside oftheir teaching duties. When 
c society. The Breaking the Barriers Ball is students and professors become comfortable on a personal 
ision to discover the fun side of professors level, the academic relationship seems less important, and 
i too intimidated to approach. With catered an actual bond occurs. The Ball is the perfect opportunity 
from student groups such as the Sharps, for students to realize that beyond the essays, the problem 
the Acoustics, and the Bostonians, with sets, and the exams, are people with interesting lives and 
"adliner, students and faculty mingle for a skills. By "breaking the barriers]' the BC communit) is 
nments or lectures. When students bought opened to a deeper, more committed relationship between 
' were asked to invite faculty members to professors and their students. Jacqueline Sm\ th 





Suuk-ni Lite 115 





OUTRAGEOUS COSTUMES. TURKEY dinners. 
Christmas decorations. These are signs of the stu- 
dents" enthusiasm for celebrating the various holidays 
throughout the year. The first holiday, Columbus Day, gives 
students a break from the beginning of the semester and 
gives freshmen their first threeday weekend. Walk around 
campus and take a ride on the Commonwealth Ave bus on the 
last day of October and you will see the creative and humor- 
ous Halloween costumes students can create. Towards the 
end of November, students get the chance to return home for 
Thanksgiving and see their friends and family. The campus 
becomes empty as students pack buses, trains, and planes to 



commemorate this holiday. The Christmas Tree Lighting ii 
O'Neil Plaza marks the beginning of the holiday season a 
Boston College. Dorm rooms and doors are decorated witl 
wreaths and Christmas lights, while the campus twinkles a 
night with the beautifully lit trees. This also marks the begin 
ning of finals and end of the semester. Students return horrn 
for the month long vacation and celebrate religious holiday 
and New Year's. The spring semester includes Marathoi 
Monday, Valentine's Day, St. Patrick's Day and Easter, whicl 
are celebrated before the school year ends. These holidays an 
certainly well enjoyed by all students and some bring a much 
needed break while others bring fun and exciting festivities 

Jullee Kk 




Above: These seniors show they can still have fun on 

Halloween regardless of the concept of being "too old" 

to be dress up in costume. Photo by Erin Klewin 

Right: When snow finally falls at BC, students feel the 
holiday season is truly here. Photo by Myra Chai 




W> Student Life 







Above: To get into the holiday spirit, students adorn 
their suites with Christmas trees and Christmas lights. 
Photo byVyVyVo 

Below: During different holidays throughout the school 
year, some choose to decorate their doors accordingly. 
Photo byVyVyVo 





\ 

t ilmJ 

■ wk « 1 




Above: Halloween costumes sometimes end up being whatever 
is in the closets of the enthusiastic students who partake in the 
fun evening. Photo by Vy Vy Vo 



Student Lite 117 



Below: Winter Break is valued time away from exams, papers, 
and homework, whether it is spent in or out of the country. 

Photo submitted by Noemi Esparza 





Above: Shown here are seniors having fun at a res- 
taurant and enjoying their last Winter Break together. 
Photo submitted by Rachel Yoffe 

Below: After first semester, students happily spend 
their month-long break with family and friends. 
Photo submitted by Khalilah Daley 




I 




IIS Student Life 




Left: This Winter Break a group of students went on 
a service trip to Mississippi to help the Turkey Creek 
community. Photo submitted by Gerrel Olivier 

Below: Some opt to travel to another country during 
Winter Break in order to experience life outside the 
college scene. Photo submitted by Katherine Houghton 




w iter Irak 



C "X TINTER BREAK IS a much-needed breath of fresh 

\/\/ air for all college students. After studying and 

T T cramming for the stressful first semester finals, 

tudents have a chance to return home or go on vacation and 

ee their friends and families. Regardless of whether or not 

ley work, students get to relax for a month without doing 

omework or studying for exams. Some students take this 

reak as an opportunity to have a unique experience and 

tudy abroad. There are Boston College programs that allow 

udents to visit many different countries and immerse them- 



selves in a foreign culture. For those who are intending to study 
abroad during the spring semester, they utilize this month- 
long break to work, to purchase necessities, to spend time with 
loved ones, and to make preparations for a soon-approach i ng 
experience. Whether going home, st tidying abroad, or prepar- 
ing to study abroad, students take advantage of winter break 
as a chance to get away from the academic pressures of col- 
lege. However, students eagerly return in January to a whole 
new semester packed with the expected homework, tests. 
papers, but ultimately the fun with friends the} have made. 

Jullcc Kim 



Stiuk-ni Life II 1 ' 



Right: Many students dedicate themselves to life-chang- 
ing volunteer opportunities at places such as Nicaragua. 
Photo submitted by Tania Freitas 




Above: Shown here are dedicated volunteers who are paint- 
i ng a church i n Jamaica that was blown down by Hurricane 
Ivan. Photo submitted by Khaliiah Daley 

Left: As part of the Hurricane Katrina Relief Effort, stu- 
dents took time out of their winter break to help out in 
Mississippi. Photo submitted by Itunu Alao 



120 Student Life 




Volunteering is an important aspect 
of BC. and ranges from service and 
immersion trips to local opportuni- 
ties through the PULSE program. 
Photo submitted by Khali lah Daley 

Below: Last summer a large group 
of students from Boston College 
contributed their time to the Ghana 
Service Immersion Trip. 
Photo submitted by Shannon Keating 










k ^"EN AND WOMEN for others isn't just a motto; 

\/ 1 it's a way of life. Students at BC fully embrace 

- ▼ -A^the opportunity to give back to the community 

rough over 20 volunteer programs. Some of these include 

rvice trips like Appalachia, Navajo Nation, and Pedro Ar- 

pe International Solidarity Programs, while other more 

leal outreach programs include 4Boston, BC MACC, and 

laming to Serve. Each of these sends students out into 

lb city of Boston or to other parts of the nation to share 

tiir talents and abilities with the less-fortunate. Still other 

pgrams are much closer to home: Hoops for Hope, Best 



Buddies, and the Dance Marathon all bring community 
service to BC's campus. In its 4 ,h year, the Volunteer and 
Service Learning Center offers information on highly 
accessible programs within Boston College, like the ones 
listed above. It also sponsors a database online through 
which programs around Boston can register and advertise 
for open service positions. Students don't only volunteer 
because it's the right thing to do: they do so to help other 
people, and simultaneously expand their own experiences. 
Boston College is a community of giving: we are truly men 
and women for others. Jacqueline Smyth 



Student Life 121 



Right: Many students dedicate themselves to life-chang- 
ing volunteer opportunities at places such as Nicaragua. 
Photo submitted by Tania Freitas 




Ahove: Shown here are dedicated volunteers who are { 
ing a church in Jamaica that was blown down by Hurr 
van. Photo submitted by Khalilah Daley 

Left: As part of the Hurricane Katrina Relief Effort 
dents took time out of their winter break to help c 
Mississippi. Photo submitted by Itunu Alao 



120 Student I. if 





Uolunteerism 



Volunteering is an important aspect 
of BC. and ranges from service and 
immersion trips to local opportuni- 
ties through the PULSE program. 
Photo submitted by Khalilah Daley 

Below: Last summer a large group 
of students from Boston College 
contributed their time to the Ghana 
Service Immersion Trip. 
Photo submitted bv Shannon Keating 




MEN AND WOMEN for others isn't just a motto; 
it's a way of life. Students at BC fully embrace 
the opportunity to give back to the community 
through over 20 volunteer programs. Some of these include 
service trips like Appalachia, Navajo Nation, and Pedro Ar- 
rupe International Solidarity Programs, while other more 
local outreach programs include 4Boston, BC MACC, and 
Learning to Serve. Each of these sends students out into 
the city of Boston or to other parts of the nation to share 
their talents and abilities with the less-fortunate. Still other 
programs are much closer to home: Hoops for Hope, Best 



Buddies, and the Dance Marathon all bring community 
service to BC's campus. In its 4 ,h year, the Volunteer and 
Service Learning Center offers information on highly 
accessible programs within Boston College, like the ones 
listed above. It also sponsors a database online through 
which programs around Boston can register and advertise 
for open service positions. Students don't onl\ volunteer 
because it's the right thing to do: the) do so to help other 
people, and simultaneous!} expand their own experiences. 
Boston College isacommunin of giving: we are truly men 
ami women lor others. Jacqueline Sun ill 



Student Life 121 



NOTHING MARKS THE end of a semester better 
than the impeding doom of final exams, which 
affects college students even where. During finals 
week, stress levels escalate mainly due to the fact that they 
cover large quantities of material and are weighted more than 
other exams. At this time, students are often seen heaving 
their enormous backpacks stuffed with too many books. 
Usually students end up with aches, pains, and stiffness 
caused by the long hours of sitting in one place studying 
extensively. Just thinking about the wealth of information 
they will have to learn, memorize, and remember come 



that week probably gives students a headache. The general 
consensus is that they cannot wait for this week to be over 
Coffee and other high-energy drinks are quite popular since 
people tend to stay up later than normal. Many places tc 
study are available, such as the ever-popular libraries, stud) 
lounges, and even their own dorms. Some prefer to sit out- 
side, weather permitting of course. Wherever the place ma) 
be, students always find somewhere to dub "their" spot foi 
studying. Although it once seemed like an impossible feat 
students usually manage to get through in one piece. 

Ashley Gulk 





Above: The study lounges within the 

dorms are also considerable options. 

however, the) often tend to be rather 

noisy. Photo by Vy Vy Vo 

Above: Study days are valuable to the 
array of stressed out students, who 
usually trek their way to O'Neill, the 
more popular and central library on 
campus. Photo by David Trudo 




122 Student Life 



Left: If the weather is fitting, some students prefer to 
study outside, finding that they can concentrate easier 
before class or an exam. Photo by Bob McGrath 




bove: Study days are a dreaded time of the year when 
ie stress of finals runs high. Photo by Bob McGrath 

ight: The library is an ideal place to prepare for exams, 
specially Bapst, which has a quiet atmosphere for those 
ho are easily distracted by noise. Photo by Bob McGrath 



Student Life 123 



























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A FTER A MONTH long winter break, students experiencing warm weather, as opposed to the cold Boston 
/ \ return to more homework, papers, and tests. Come winter. Some Spring Break favorite destinations include 
A. -X. March, they are all in need of a vacation, which is Florida, Jamaica, Puerto Rico, and Mexico. Students who 
why Spring Break is one of the most anticipated times of the have friends studying abroad may pay them a visit, whereas 
sear for a college student. For a week, students can forget others may decide to relax and enjoy their week off with 
about the stress and just unwind. Many students will begin friends, whether at home or at other colleges. Alternative 
to prepare for their Spring Break extravaganzas well in ad- plans, such as Appalachia trips and Immersion programs, 
v ance. as to find the best deals and get organized. Spending involve volunteering and service. There are many options 
the week abroad is quite popular amongst students, since it available to suit everyone's desires. Students take advantage 
tiives them an opportunity to change their scenery. Besides of their much-anticipated week away from school, wherever 
a nice week off from school, many students look forward to their destinations may be! Ashley Gullo 




Above: Many students participate in 
service trips during the week-long 
break in March in order to enjoy 
a new atmosphere and experience. 
Photo submitted by Tania Freitas 

Right: The planning for Spring Break 
begins well in advance to ensure 
st udent s receive good deal s for warm 
locations like Florida or Mexico. 
Photo submitted by Estefania Alves 




MA ScudentLife 



Left: Spring Break is always a good time to work on 
one's tan away from the cold, winter weather. Photo 
submitted bv Bridget Mahonev 




.bove: After a few months into the new semester, students 
nticipate Spring Break as a chance to relax with friends. 
'boto submitted by Tania Freitas 

ight: Some choose to go home to spend time with family 
nd friends, whereas others work or volunteer their time 
n service trips like Appalachia. 
'hoto submitted by Katherine Modzelewski 



Student Life 125 




meatier 



BOSTON COLLEGE STUDENTS get to experience 
true New England weather. The climate in this region 
is known to be unpredictable. It can be sunny and 
warm one day. but then rainy and cold the next. While many 
people enjoy the four seasons, the hot summers, breezy au- 
tumns, snowy winters, and warm springs, it may take some 
time adjusting to for students from other parts of the world. 
Checking the weather each morning is always a good idea in 
order to prepare for the oncoming weather for that day. This 
\ear. the weather has been extremely variable. The weather 
was warm during the beginning of the year, mixed in with 
cool, breezy days. However, the fall had extremely windy and 



rainy days. The first major snow did not actually come until 
February, but the temperature continued to change drastically 
from 60 degrees to 30 degrees at night. This makes it hard 
to plan activities with the ever-changing weather. Several 
athletic games have been completely rained out, yet many 
loyal Superfans return from the games soaked. The first 
snow excites many freshmen, while others dread the long, 
cold walks to class every morning. However, this years winter 
was especially unusual for Boston since there was barely 
any snow even in January. Each season allows for a wide 
range of activities that would not be available anywhere else! 

Jullee Kim 




Above: Daring students are willing to bundle up to 

enjoy the winter, however, this year Boston barely had 

any snow Photo submitted by Michelle Andrade 

Right: Regardless ol rain or snow, students are always 

prepared lor whatever weather the day may bring because 

classes are rarely cancelled. Photo by Vy Vy Vo 




126 Student I 











Above: Sunny and generally nice days il- 
luminate BCs landscape, a major part of the 
campus' overall beauty. Photo by Bob McGrath 

Below: In the spring, the nice days provide a 
relief from the unnatural cold of the winter 
season. Photo submitted by Michelle Andrade 



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Above: Although a large portion of the BC student body come 
from different parts of the country and the world, most enjoy 
the four seasons of Boston weather. Photo by Bob McGrath 



Student Life 127 



Below: The ALC Ball is a classy evening, which exhibits ap- 
preciation for the different backgrounds and cultures of the 
Boston College student body. Photo by Vy Vy Vo 





Above: The entire Boston College community is 
encouraged every year to attend this celebration of 
diversity. Photo submitted by Rudi Julius 

Below: The Copley Plaza Hotel catered the event and 
provided an elegant ballroom setting. 
Photo submitted by Michelle Andrade 




128 Student 1 




Left: Glitz and glamour is the prevalent theme for the 
night, in which everyone looks their best and enjoys a 
night of good music, food, and people. 
Photo submitted by Khalilah Daley 

Below: People dress to impress for the ALC Ball; how- 
ever, both the outer and inner beauty of students from 
different racial and cultural backgrounds are visible. 
Photo submitted by Khalilah Daley 



CELEBRATING DIVERSITY WITH glitz, food, mu- 
sic, and dancing is what the ALC Ball is all about. 
Held at the Copley Plaza Hotel, the ball invites 
udents of any background to join in a beautiful evening 
it. Not many students would forgo an opportunity to dress 
? and eat a catered dinner, and the demand for tickets is 
instantly expanding. However, if you are fortunate (and 
itient) enough to have garnered a ticket, dressing up in 
)vvns and tuxes is only a part of the fun: music and danc- 
ig with friends are also strong draws. Run by the AHANA 
eadership Council (ALC), the Ball exhibits a large variety 
cultures, and is elegantly hosted in the hotels ballroom. 



The wide-ranging appeal of the Ball in past years encour- 
aged the Council to increase the number of tickets sold, 
which shows Boston Colleges commitment to appreciat- 
ing racial and cultural differences. Changing the name of 
the event in 2004 from the AHANA ball to the ALC Ball 
was also a move to expand desirability to those outside 
of the AHANA community. BC even offers shuttles to 
and from the Copley Plaza Hotel to encourage students to 
participate, though little encouragement is needed! The 
ALC Ball is highly anticipated every year, and this is a 
testament to the dedication to diversity oi' Boston College. 

Jacqueline Smyth 



Student Life 129 






Right: The first production of the year was 'An Experi- 
ment v. ith an Air Pump" by the Robsham Theater and the 
Theater Department of BC. Photo by Lee Pellegrini 




Above: Macbeth, a classic by Shakespeare, was anoti 
successful production by Robsham and the Theater Dep; 
ment in November. Photo by Lee Pellegrini 

Left: The Shelagh Stephenson play, "Experiment with 
Air PumpJ' featured the talents of many student actors i 
actresses, and also inspired other programs examini 
bioethical issues. Photo by Lee Pellegrini 



130 Slurknt Life 




Left: The talented students who partake in 
the Theater program grow artistically and 
intellectually. Photo by Lee Pellegrini 

Below: Each year Robsham stages four faculty 
directed and two student directed productions. 
Photo by Lee Pellegrini 




Theater Time 



DPENED IN 1981, ROBSHAM Theater houses BC's 
theatrical performances, put on by dynamic, talent- 
ed, and energetic students. These promising actors 
id actresses come from the Theater and Communications 
bpartments and work for weeks to perfect productions to 
fesent to their peers, families, and professors. Some of the 
jays performed this year included A Dancers Christmas, 
le 1994 Pulitzer Prize winner Three Tall Women, and the 
: udent-produced Custody Wars and Circles in the Sand, 
arly in the fall, Robsham also housed the play 'An Experi- 
lent with an Air Pump',' which sparked several discussions 



on the ethics of science. Robsham also offers a side -stage 
for smaller shows and black-box productions, allowing for 
more intimacy between the audience and the performers, 
with a centered stage and surrounding seats. Theater pro- 
ductions present an opportunity for students and faculty to 
leave aside their busy lives for a couple hours and appreciate 
the arts. Students take advantage of the talent on-campus 
by attending plays in Robsham, enjoying the efforts of other 
students. In the tradition of BCs drive to excel, the depart- 
ments and programs promise a continuing success and 
guarantee exciting upcoming events. Jacqueline Smyth 



Student Lite 131 





IT IS A commonly heard expression that fashion is an 
expression of one's individuality. Here at Boston College, 
the trends reflect upon the colleges preppy reputation. 
The Lacoste and Polo Ralph Lauren polo shirts continue to 
be prevalent every year, regardless of whether the collar is 
popped or not. Denim, ranging from American Eagle to Citi- 
zens and Sevens, are commonly seen on campus. However, 
leggings seem to be the rage for women especially this year. 
They are often seen under miniskirts or extra long shirts and 
sweaters, paired with boots or ballet flats. Boots of all sorts 
of colors and patterns were also seen during the dreary, rainy 
days. Many students try to wear flip-flops as far into the year 
as they can. no matter how cold it is. In the winter, students 



dress accordingly to the weather with their North Face ja( 
ets and snow boots, including the infamous Uggs. The Nc 
England seasons allow students to wear a variety of outf 
that range from shorts and tank tops to winter coats, scarv< 
and gloves. North Face backpacks continue to be popul 
while many women are trendier with their handbags. Ci 
accessories include wide headbands, hair ribbons, pear 
and anything that gives a unique touch to their ensemb 
Common places to shop include stores on Newbury Stre* 
where new fashions can easily be found. However, regai 
less of the current trends, Boston College gear maintai 
its popularity, showing school pride throughout the campi 

Jullee Ki 




Above: Each student has a unique sense of style, whether 
it i s to dress up to go out or to dress casual ly whi le loung- 
ing in the dorms. Photo submitted by Khulihih Daley 

Right: Layered clothes and leggings had significant 

popularity this year, helping students to keep warm, yet 

still appear fashionable. Photo by Bob McGiuili 




132 Student Life 







r 



Above: Fashion at BC ranges from preppy to urban to 
simply unique depending on an individual's person- 
ality and preference. Photo by Caroline Ogonowski 

Below: When attending class, many students dress 
down with pajamas, sweatpants, and gear that shows 
off the familiar logo of BC. Photo by Bob McGrath 





Above: Sweaters, fleeces, hoodies, and jackets are a necessity 
to withstand the unpredictable weather. Some choose to pop 
their collars, whereas others do not submit to that fad. 
Photo by Caroline Ogonowski 



Student Life 133 



FROM LOCAL STORES to our very dining halls, many 
students are employed either on or off campus to help 
pay for college, or earn extra cash for take-out, shop- 
ping, or a night out. While sometimes difficult, the skill of 
balancing school, work, and extracurricular activities can 
be rewarding, allowing a student to pursue many avenues of 
interest. Some may find it easier to work on campus due to 
transportation limitations, but there is plenty to do at BC: 
offices, technology programs, dining services, catering, 
and many others. Opportunities are abundant outside of 
BC's campus as well. From surrounding restaurants and 



retail stores, to businesses in the city, jobs are open to thos 
who have time and the inclination to work. Internships arc 
also available in Boston for a number of career choices, an 
potentially offer a more relevant job for those interested i 
their chosen fields. Valuable experience is also gained whil | 
working both on and off campus, including time managu 
ment, interpersonal skills, and improved and expande 
professional abilities. Perhaps the job is only temporar | 
or maybe it's a life -long career; whichever it happens to b« 
students offer their skills to both the community and t 
others here on campus. Jacqueline Smyth 




Above: Although this year the T increased its 

prices, the s\stem is still a reliable means for 

students to travel without a car to work at jobs or 

internships in Boston or surrounding areas. 

Photo by Vy Vy Vo 

Right: V1an> students work on campus in our 

dining halls such as Lower or The Chocolate 

Bar in McElroy. Photo by David Trudo 




134 Student I. if-: 



Left: Some job opportunities are as close as across 
Comm. Ave. at businesses such as Campus Convenience, 
whereas others are in Boston. Photo by Vy Vy Vo 




hove: Boston offers many off-campus job opportunities 
s :h as retail, restaurants, or even areas of interest that ap- 
fal to a students major. Photo by Caroline Ogonowski 

I ght: The convenience of working on campus in offices is 
i al because there is a comfortable atmosphere and more 
c nsideration for class schedules. Photo by Vy Vy Vo 



Student Life 135 



Below: One of Boston's trademarks is the renowned duck tour, in 

which people have a chance to appreciate the beauty of Boston 

along the Charles River. Photo by Caroline Ogonowski 





Above: Apartment-style living arrangements can be 
rather expensive in Boston, one of the best cities in 
the country. Photo by Caroline Ogonowski 

Below: Boston has its own culture with numerous 
historical sites, diverse people, and natural landmarks. 
Photo by Bob McGrath 






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136 Student Life 







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Left: Finding something to do in Boston is never a chal- 
lenge with its abundance of restaurants, stores, museums, 
colleges, historical sites, and sporting events. 
Photo by Bob McGrath 

Below: The city is especially popular as the home to the 
Red Sox Nation, diehard fans of the infamous baseball 
team. Photo by Bob McGrath 





USUI 



GOING TO SCHOOL at Boston College gives stu- 
dents easy access to the popular city of Boston. 
Conveniently located near the city's Green Line on 
le T, students are able to take advantage of everything that 
Boston has to offer. With a plethora of restaurants, museums, 
ars, clubs, and shopping places, finding something to do is 
ot very difficult and usually very fun. Students who are not 
rom around the area enjoy going on the infamous duck tours, 
*hich take them around Boston and on the Charles River, 
llowing quacking to ensue. With the numerous historical 
ites and people with the well-recognized accents, the city 
5 full of culture. For students who want to experience this 
irst-hand, they may visit the Boston Museum of Fine Art, 



the Aquarium, the symphony, or perhaps see a play in the 
Theater District. Since Fenway Park is only a few T-stops 
away, many diehard Red Sox fans can visit thei r favorite sports 
teams baseball field. Various other sporting events can also 
be watched at local bars. No one can live in Boston and not 
go to some places to shop. Whether it is Newbury Street, the 
Prudential Mall, Faneuil Hall, Copley, or Park Street, there is 
a place for everyone. Main students also like to explore the 
vast diversity of food that is available. Bostons North End is 
popular for first dates or even a group of friends wanting to 
dine out. While there, stopping at Mikes Pastries for some 
of the best desserts around is a must. With so many excit- 
ing opportunities, students can never be bored in Boston. 

Ashley Gullo 



Siikk-ni I ife 137 




SPIRITUALITY 



Article by: Jacqueline jmyth fhotos by: Dob AAcOrath & David I rudo 



TRADITIONALLY, JESUIT UNIVERSI- 
TIES are known for their high standard of 
education, both spiritually and intellectu- 
ally. Boston College's "Men and Women 
for Others" is along this vein: the students 
that graduate from BC not only received a 
strong education in the liberal arts, but are 
also encouraged to grow in their spiritual- 
ity. Regardless of faith, the spirit of giving 
nurtured by a Jesuit education applies to 
all students, many of whom fully embrace 
this teaching through community ser- 
vice. Groups like 4Boston meet weekly 
to discuss experiences in volunteering 
and create a self-reflection. PULSE also 
adheres to this idea of self-reflection, 
though in a more academic sense, encour- 
aging students enrolled in the class to vol- 
unteer at least ten hours a week. Campus 
Ministry is a strong force within BC's 
spiritual teachings, as well. Sponsoring 
retreats that focus almost entirely on the 
development of self, Campus Ministry is 
dedicated to a student's spirituality. Pro- 



grams occur at a variety of times, from a 
"Busy Student" retreat, which is broken 
into parts so as not to take up an entire 
weekend, to Kairos, which whisks students 
away for a weekend to an unknown desti- I 
nation but with lifechanging results. Many 
Jesuits are also professors, bringing a level 
of spirituality into the classroom. To create 
a base upon which to strengthen one's faith 
and spirituality, one of the university's core 
requirements is a two-term theology requi- 
site. A student can choose from a variety 
of Western and non-Western philosophies, 
adding to diversity while searching, ques- i 
tioning, and reinventing their own faith. 
Yet another resource to students is the vari- 
ety of Masses offered throughout campus, 
allowing students to attend services when 
their schedules permit them. Resident Min- 
isters and Peer Ministers are also available 
in students' own dorms. The emphasis oi 
spirituality of Boston College students is I 
unique to a Jesuit education, and time at BC j 
imparts lifelong lessons regardless of faith 




138 Stodenl Life 




Above: The Burns Library Memorial Labyrinth is dedicated to 22 Boston College alumni who lost their li\es in the l > II tragedy 

Left: Boston College dedicates itself to the Jesuit tradition, which is exhibited in the structures o\ main buildings on campus. 

Far Left. Above: Students define spirituality lor themselves through personal reflection oi their lives and beliefs. 

Far Left. Below: St. Ignatius Church offers regular Masses for residents ot the Chestnut Hill area as well as BC students 



Student Lite 139 



Clockwise from top: Gre» Fenton '07 of the 
co-ed acappella group. Acoustics, sings his ren- 
dition of Mike Doughtys hit. "Looking At The 
World From The Bottom of a Well*' during the 
popular annual Acappel latest. Student Activi- 
ties Day in the fall offers students a chance to 
learn about the multitude of organizations die 
I nbersit) has to offer. With dozens of ser- 
vice trips, both domestic and international. 
Huston College students are able to carry out 
ial of ser\ice for others. The Arrupe 
"e and Immersion trip brings stu- 
; winter break to aid local commu- 
nities in social projects. The annual * 
Pretty" fashion show, sponsored by G 
known for its upbqit environment. The Inter- 
national Assistants Pioeram aims to accustom 



International students into the BC co 



n 



i, 





Edited by: Catherine Hahm & Lindsey Hampshire 



OVER TWO HUNDRED fifty clubs and orga- 
nizations exist and thrive on Boston College's 
campus. If in our quest to educate the whole 
we have found that academics are not enough 
and that campus life is indispensable as well, 
we realize that it is in our extracurricular activ- 
ities that we reveal and develop another facet of 
ourselves. Boston College is unique in many 
ways, but perhaps none more so than its clear 
emphasis on service towards others. The largest 
groups on campus, the Student Adm issions Pro- 
gram, the Appalachia Volunteers Program and 
the 4Boston Program, are all volunteer-based 
and this fact alone is indicative of the nature of 
BC's student body. Yet by no means are clubs 



restricted to volunteerism; cultural awareness 
clubs pervade the University and offer various 
events throughout the year to exhibit the stu- 
dents' talents. The AHANA Leadership Coun- 
cil has emerged as the largest of these groups 
and is the creator of the widely popular ALC 
Showdown that had students waiting as early 
as four in the morning and in the cold to secure 
tickets to the quickly sold-out event. And still 
yet, with clubs centered around government, 
honors, leadership, music, art and performance, 
political, preprofessional and academic, pro- 
gramming, publications and media, religious, 
service and sports, we find that the path has 
been paved towards self-discovery. My in Chai 



140 Organization* 





H^HH ' 







. 



Photos by Mvra Chai & Adam Feenej 



Organizations 141 



UGBC 

Undergraduate Government of Boston College j 

The Undergraduate Government of Boston College (UGBC) has the duty to take an active role in the governance of our 
university. The UGBC is committed to protecting the interests and opinions of the student body at large, as well as 
to serve as the collaborative voice for the students. Each member of UGBC belongs to one of a variety of departments 
or group> within the government. These departments and groups include Student Life, University Issues, Programming. 
Communications. Finance. Social and Cultural Issues, Mentoring Leadership Program, AHANA Leadership Academy, the 
Executive, Senate, and the AHANA Leadership Council. UGBC takes on the mission to be wholeheartedly committed to 
helping Boston College continue to build and strengthen a community that is morally grounded in the principles of justice, 
love, and service, and moreover guided by an overarching concern for the enrichment of student life. An important aspect of 
the UGBC is the programs and events it puts together for students. The Undergraduate Government is dedicated to serving 
the students of Boston College and continuing to improve the everyday life of each and every person on campus. 



ALC 



AHANA Leadership Council 



The AHANA Leadership Council (ALC) was created in the 
Spring of 1995 with the mission of providing leadership and 
service to the AHANA community. In addition, the AHANA 
Leadership Council has sought to be a means of support to all 
AHANA clubs and organizations in a collective effort to uplift the 
community politically, academically, and socially. As part of the 
Undergraduate Government of Boston College (UGBC), the AHANA 
Leadership Council works to insure that the interests and needs of 
AHANA students are voiced and heard. The AHANA Leadership 
Council is truly establishing its presence at Boston College. 
Ihrough increased communication and stronger relationships 
with the Undergraduate Government of Boston College and the 
greater Boston College community, legitimacy is established. With 
increased torums, rallies, and discussions, education is established. 
Through service and leadership, compassion is established. 
Together with other multicultural clubs, the AHANA Leadership 
Council organizes and hosts such events as the AHANA Boat 
Cruise and the AHANA Ball. The AHANA Leadership Academy 
is a party of ALC, providing training, resources, and advice to 
emerging AHANA freshman leaders. 




Photos submitted by Annie Le 



142 Organizal 



Model 

United Nations 

The Model United Nations (Model UN) is a simulation of the United Nations system. Students assume the roles of 
ambassadors to the United Nations, and debate the current issues on the UN's agenda. Through diplomacy and 
negotiation. Model UN students seek ways that the world community can deal with complex global concerns such as 
the environment, economic development, refugees, AIDS, conflict resolution, disarmament and human rights. The Model 
UN travels to conferences throughout the United States and Canada, and has successful represented various countries at 
these events. 



The Heights 



rhe Heights is the University's independent student newspaper and one of its largest student groups with about 150 
students on staff. Last year, the newspaper began printing twice a week. This is the largest initiative the Heights has 
accomplished. Its goal is to provide fair and accurate news of interest to the undergraduate students of BC and the 
jeater Boston community. The newspaper also serves as an independent forum for the opinions of the BC community. The 
leights holds itself to the highest ethical standard in its journalistic and business operations, and its primary responsibility 
1 its readers, particularly the students of Boston College. 



E ntrepreneu r 

Society 

The Boston College Entrepreneur Society (BCES) provides the Boston College community with a forum for exploring 
all aspects of successful entrepreneurship. BCES has a twofold focus. Firstly, to give students the opportunitv to 
learn about the world of entrepreneurship and the processes associated with it. Secondly, BCES strives to inform 
tudents about the dynamics of working in a startup environment. 



Organizations 143 



Floetry 



Floetry's purpose is to provide a dynamic forum for students to express themselves through urban verse and receive 
feedback from their peers, as well as discuss issues pertaining to the urban lifestyle. Furthermore, they wish to foster 
an appreciation and understanding of a musical/cultural movement that is often perceived as negative by opening the 
forum to the general student population. 



J 



T 



Percussion 

Ensemble 



he Boston College Percussion Ensemble is a 14-member group that performs at the annual spring Arts Festival an 
in the combined performances at Gasson Hall, which occur frequently throughout the year. Literature include 
unconventional arrangements of classical pieces in addition to contemporary works by renowned composers. 



-" 



Sex ual Choco late 

Step Group 

The Sexual Chocolate Step Squad of Boston College was formed as another outlet to express one's dance creativity 
While several dance groups are formed and exist on campus, none have been dedicated to the sole focus on dancing 
The group practices, held weekly in McElroy Commons, can be detected from far distances by their upbeat and liveh 
•mcnts on the floor of the building. Sexual Chocolate offers a limited number of performances throughout the year 
usually in collaboration with fellow BC dance and music groups. 



144 Organization* 



SWINGKIDS 



rn the 1920s, Harlem's Savoy Ballroom gave birth to a new style of dance: The Lindy Hop and Swing Dance. Its wild and 
I sexual movements challenged authority and its free spirit defied racial boundaries. Sadly, the times would move past 
L swing dancing. However, the 90s embraced it with a newfound appreciation, and sparked a movement that will keep us 
vinging well throughout this century and into the next. BC Swing Kids was started five years ago by a group of then-sopho- 
ores in a successful effort to reignite the interest of swing dancing in the BC community. The organization offers weekly 
ssons to all levels of experience, and organizes frequent events with other colleges. Above all, Swing Kids aim to have fun. 
iteract with new people, and keep the spirit of swing alive. 



Voices 

of Imam 



'|-^he Voices of Imani was organized in the fall of 1978. Created to celebrate the viability, potency, and beauty of gospel 
I music, the choir has served both as a source of spiritual inspiration and a needed source amongst students of color. 
L "Imani," Swahili for "faith," is indicative of what the choir strives to reflect through its music. The goal of Voices 
llmani is to explore and share the full wealth of black musical culture as members sing, professing their faith through 
litemporary gospel music, as well as traditional Negro spirituals. Their mission is to sing praises unto God and minister to 
I community using the gifts that God blessed them with. In years past, Voices of Imani has successfully completed tours 
bushout the United States. 



Woodwind 

Ensemble 



The Boston College Woodwind Ensemble, the newest performing group of the Bands Program, made its inaugural 
debut in the spring of 2003 at the BC Arts Festival. Membership is still growing, but it is currently comprised of 
25 - 30 woodwind instrumentalists. The ensemble emphasizes smaller group endeavors such as the flute choir and 
■xophone quartet. The ensemble performs with the Percussion Ensemble and the Brass Choir at the Boston College Ails 
Istival and at the annual spring concert given at St. Ignatius Church. 



Organizations 145 



Omicron Delta 



Epsilon 



Omicron Delta Epsilon is the International Honor Society in economics and one of the worlds largest academic honor 
societies. Founded in 1915. its goal is to honor students who have both excelled scholastically in economics and have an 
impressive overall academic record. The Boston College chapter of Omicron Delta Epsilon provides career advising and 
peer advising to its members. The society also helps to facilitate career and academic discussions between members, professors, 
and alumni. 




V * » 




Phi Alpha Th eta 

Phi Alpha Theta, Boston College's chapter of the national history honor society, h\ 
comprised of members that are recognized as outstanding students in the field o 
history. The mission of the society is to promote the study of history through research 
scholarly exchange, and publication. This mission is achieved through history lectures aru 
educational trips organized by the society and the constant pursuit of historical knowledge 
and research by its members. The society also holds an annual induction ceremony a 
which a faculty member of the history department, selected by the members, receives tru 
excellence in teaching award. Phi Alpha Theta continues to grow in numbers and prestig( 
on the Boston College campus as the excellence of the history department grows. 



Golden Ke y 

National Honor Society 



The Boston College chapter of the Golden Key National Honor Society strives to maintain an active presence outsidj 
the classroom through its leadership, service, and academic activities while recognizing outstanding and meritoriou 
achievement of students inside the classroom. Each year, over two hundred of the top students at Boston College ar 
honored with membership of the Society. However, student participation docs not end after induction. Members are encourage 
to participate in many of the activities that the Society plans and coordinates. 



inization . 




Order of the Cross & Crown 2 cor 



Order 

Of the Cross and Crown 

Founded in 1937. the Order of the Cross and Crown is the 
oldest and most prestigious honor society in the College of 
Arts and Societies. It recognizes senior men and women 
who both demonstrate academic excellence by maintaining an 
overall cumulative grade point average of at least A- and establish 
records of unusual service and leadership on the campus over their 
undergraduate careers. The selection committee, made up of the 
deans and faculty of the College of Arts and Sciences, also selects 
particularly distinguished seniors as Marshals and Chief Marshal of 
the Order. 



CSOM Honors 



Program 



r: 



he Carroll School of Management Honors Program is a group of students who are being educated to lead the business and 
communities of tomorrow. The program demonstrates that setting high expectations, giving stduents responsibility, and 
encouraging cooperation among peers leads to levels of achievement and understanding that are rewarding on many levels. 
[(is group of talented and highly motivated students pursue excellence inside and outside the classroom. Scholarship, community 
jrvice. and leadership, the precepts of the Program, create an environment that is charged for growth, learning, and enriched 
meriences. 



LSOE Senate 



rhe Lynch School of Education Senate is an undergraduate student senate that serves as an intermediary between the 
administration and the students in the Lynch School of Education. It consists of about twenty-five active members of all 
years and four student officers who work together to organize activities, to promote spirit, and to aid the student body, 
pie Senate has organized Spirit of Ed Week. Cuisine and Conversations, a political discussion prior to the election, and sent 
ems to support the troops in Iraq. 



Organizations 147 



Investment Club 



The Investment Club was founded in 1983. focusing primarily on value based investments. Through a real life portfolio, the 
Investment Club manages a certain amount of Boston Colleges endowment, members hope to expand students' knowledge 
of finance. Presently, there are approximately 200 members who meet weekly. The primary purpose of these meetings is to 
propose stock pitches which involve either selling stock currently in the portfolio or purchasing new stock. The club also holds 
tutorials which help teach new members various aspects of the stock market. Speakers with a background in finance also come 
to meetings to expand upon topics and share their experiences. Professor Peterson has been the advisor of the club since its i 
inception. 




Ladi es in Busin ess 

Ladies in Business provides a woman's perspective of the business world for female 
Boston College students interested in business careers after college. Through 
panels, dinner discussions, socials, and networking, a connection between current 
students and successful female alumni is forged. Positive female role models provide 
career advice to club members as well as essential tips about work life balance. 



Photos submitted by Jacquelyn Shea 



Economics 

Association 



The purpose of the Economics Association is to promote a better understanding of economics, and to further the 
economics-related knowledge and opportunities available to interested students. These initiatives are achieved through 
the encouragement and facilitation of interactions between students and faculty through regular meetings and ; 
number of social and informational events. The Association strives to provide helpful information for students concerning 
economics-related internships, post-undergraduate study options, and careers. Being able to provide information is one oi 
the most satisfying of the Association's accomplishments. 



148 Organization! 



College Democrats 



The College Democrats of Boston College is both an officially registered student organization and a chartered 
member of the Massachusetts College Democrats, a subsidiary of the Massachusetts Democratic Party. The 
organization seeks to involve and educate the student body with regard to, not only politics, but also public 
service. Its purpose is to show students the benefits of public service both on and off campus. This year saw the 
launching of two major initiatives for the College Democrats. First, the group began the Progressive Speaker Series, 
which features Boston City Councilor Felix Arroyo, Congressman Barney Frank, and former Governor and Presidential 
Candidate Howard Dean. This program was easily the largest in the history of the organization, and helps to represent 
its incredible growth. The club aimed to involve as many people in the Presidential Election as possible, registering 
close to two hundred students and helping nearly six hundred students obtain absentee ballots. The College Democrats 
attempt to voice the progressive message in hopes of carrying out an expansion of the Democratic Party and its beliefs 
and ideals. 



Fulton Debate S ociety 

The Fulton Debate Society is a nationally-competitive intercollegiate debate team with a strong tradition at Boston 
College. Members of the Fulton Debate Society compete in two-person teams in policy debate against students 
from other colleges and universities across the country. Boston College competes in the Novice, Junior Varsity, 
nd Varsity divisions of debate. Novice debaters are those who have no previous experience in policy debate in high 
chool or college (although debaters with only Lincoln-Douglas and/or forensics experience are eligible to compete in 
ovice debate). The Junior Varsity division is open to all students with less than two years of experience in college policy 
ebate. Varsity debaters generally have extensive high school debate experience and/or two to three years of college 
ebate. Boston College students debate the topic selected by the national Cross Examination Debate Association (CEDA) 
nd National Debate Tournament (NDT). The topic is the same for all tournaments in the academic year. Each team will 
ebate both the affirmative and negative sides of the topic several times at each tournament. 



Finance Academy 



The Boston College Finance Academy is a student-run organization whose intent is to inform students of all the 
opportunities available to them in the world of finance. A main objective of the academy is to bring together the 
academic and business worlds through meetings, panels, and career nights. Events are planned to benefit members 
i matters such as general information on current topics in finance, career planning, and possible job placement. The 
inance Academy offers services such as career and academic peer advisement. 



Organizations 14 l > 



AHANA Management 



Academy 



The AHANA Management Academy provides networking and socializing opportunities for AHANA students in the Car- 
roll School of Management. The Academy sets up students with alumni of the school as well as internships throughout 
the year so that the students will gain invaluable work experience and connections that will help them later in their pursuit 
for a career in management. 




Photos submitted by Sean Keck 



Stylus 



As the oldest student magazine on campus, The Stylus (c.188 
remains a powerful showcase for the art and literature 
Boston College undergraduates. The staff meets weekly 
read, discuss, and evaluate submissions from the student body. Copy 
editing, layout, and design responsibilities are undertaken by the stal 
at the end of each term. Administrative tasks (scheduling, advertising 
coordination of publishing, publicity, and distribution) are th) 1 
responsibility of the seven-member Stylus Editorial Board. The Stylu 
is released once per semester and distributed at no charge on campu: 
In recent years, The Stylus staff has hosted events such as poetr 
readings and open mikes. In 2000, The Stylus Anthology was release 
to chronicle the best poetry and fiction written by Boston Colleg 
students from 1950-2000. The staff is committed to continuing t 
present works of high artistic merit in the years to come. 



Naked Singularity 



As the description of this independent magazine of Boston College states: A "naked singularity!' as we all know, is an 
infinitely dense point mass around which no black hole can develop. Several centuries ago, the buzz around the (Dead 
White Male) world was "Nature abhors a vacuum." Now it might aptly be said "Nature abhors a naked singularity!' 
(Stephen Hawking said it, and he had a guest spot on Star Trek The Next Generation, so, in fact, it might be more than aptly 
said,! Therefore, it is the hope of Naked Singularity to invoke some of that abhorrence, and to push the bounds of acceptance 
understanding and commensurability forward a few light years. 



150 Organization* 



STITCH 



Students Taking an Interest Towards Creative Heights (ST.IT.C.H.) is a student-run organization that seeks to enrich 
and enhance the lives of the Boston college community by recognizing the domestic arts and reintroducing 
this lost art form to both men and women. The crafts made in ST.IT.C.H. are sold, and the proceeds are given 
to charity. This will be the organizations second year, but it hopes to have many great memories. ST.IT.C.H. will be 
participating in the Arts festival, and will have a cafe where crafts will be sold for charity. 



WVBC/ WZBC 9 0.3 FM 

"IT TZBC is Boston Colleges student-run radio station. Originally founded as WVBC, the voice of Boston College, the 
4/V/ radio station began in 1960 as a carrier-current AM station. After operating in this capacity for 13 years. BC Radio 

T T took a big step by applying for a license to open and operate WZBC - FM, a nine watt, educationally-oriented 
sition at the frequency 90.3. With the advent of WZBC - FM, the radio station expanded its listenership to begin serving the 
ctside community. A power increase was given to WZBC in 1974, bringing the station up to its current output of 1000 watts 
ajd allowing once again for an expansion in listenership. Since the initial format change, WZBC has grown to become one 
cthe most influential and respected college stations in the country. 



Elements 



Elements, Boston College's first and only undergraduate research journal, was founded in September 2004 by a group 
of twenty undergraduate students. The journal published its first issue in April of 2005. featuring research articles 
written by BC undergraduates along with shorter special features. The goal of the publication is to become a forum 
)r the exchange of original ideas within and across disciplines at the university. Staff members will read and evaluate all 
ubmitted manuscripts and select the best articles on the basis of quality of scholarship as well as readability. Faculty mem- 
ers will be consulted to assist staff members in the evaluation process. 



Organizations 151 



T 



Hellenic Society 



he Hellenic Society of Boston College was created in 1892 by a small group of Greek Americans who wanted to 
establish a Greek presence on campus. Its purpose is to promote Hellenism to all members of the BC community 
who are interested in Greek food, music, dancing, and history. 




ioto submitted by Nora Bourghol 



Armenian Club 



The Armenian Club at Boston College is an organization ol 
students, who are not necessarily of Armenian decent, whc 
are concerned with keeping the Armenian culture alive 
throughout their time at BC. We get together to celebrate Armeniari 
traditions, values, and food, while making sure to commemorate 
and spread recognition of historical events such as the Armeniar 
Genocide. Our organization provides a place for Armenians to get tc 
know other Armenians within Boston College and at other universities 
throughout the Boston area. Through events such as club dinners, 
cooking sessions, speakers, and participation in charity fundraisers, 
we encourage our members to keep active in remembering anc 
extending the Armenian spirit in our surrounding communities. 




Af rican Stud ent 

Organization 

The African Student Organization of Boston College is a premier 
cultural group that strives to introduce the diversity of Africa's 
culture, traditions, customs, and politics to the Boston College 
community. We are not exclusive or limited to students of African 
descent but welcome all who have an interest in promoting the diversity 
ol Africa's richness. We are committed to the recruitment of potential 
African students to Boston College. Our organization also provides 
support lor students of African descent in the form of mentoring with 
academic and social issues. 



Photo submitted by Lorraine Lisk 



152 Organization 







submitted by Jessica Frattaroli 



I I Circolo 

Italiano 

II Circolo Italiano di Boston College aims to bring members of the BC 
community together to recognize and celebrate the uniqueness of the 
Italian Culture. The club runs events from Bocce Tournaments, to dinners 
in the North End to Study Abroad Information Nights. In the past we have 
brought Italian American as well as Italian speakers to campus, one of our 
most memorable ones being Nunzio DiPlacido. an Abruzzesi Artist. As a 
club, we also take group trips to see panelists and speakers of interest around 
Boston. This year we hope to hold cooking demonstrations, wine tasting 
and movie nights. Members of the Italian Club absolutely do not have to 
be Italian, just have a love of the Italian Culture, language and want to talk 
about aspects of their family, traditions and life that has been influenced by 
that culture. 



P hilippine Socie ty 

rhe Philippine Society of Boston College (PSBC) is one of the most diverse organizations on campus. Our mission is to promote 
PhilippinecultureandheritagewithinBostonCollegeandwithinthe Boston Community, strengthenrelationsbetweenFilipinos 
andFilipino Americans, andcreateandfortifyasubstantiallinkbetweentheFilipinosintheUnitedStatesandin the Philippines. 
f>r over a decade, we have tried to reach our goals and encourage an atmosphere of education, awareness, and friendship. 
e have brought powerful speakers to campus whose topics ranged from Philippine politics and history to Filipino art and 
Movies. We volunteer at Iskelahang Pilipino, or IR a Sunday school in Bedford, MA, that teaches children from ages 3-18 about 
Uipino language, culture, art, and music. We perform our modern dance suite annually at Kamayan, an event where Boston- 
rea college Filipino clubs come together to perform traditional and modern dances, the ALC Showdown, and our annual 
jlture show. This year marked our 15th annual Culture Show — the longest running multi-cultural show at Boston College, 
ut what we view as PSBC's greatest achievement is the strong sense of "pamilya" or family that we have been able to provide year 
ter year. Our welcoming environment enables our members to make friends that last throughout their years at Boston College 
id that last a lifetime. 



In donesian Culture Cl ub 

The Indonesian Culture Club began as an organization that would allow Boston College students to gather weekly for 
the purpose of exchanging ideas and thoughts about the growing concern on Indonesia's economy, politics, and social 
life. Furthermore, the members of this cultural club sought to promote their diverse cultures by organizing events 
ind activities that would welcome anyone interested to join in celebrating their heritage. The more notable activities that this 
3rganization is responsible for planning and hosting are the Indonesian Night and the Christian Celebration at St. Ignatius. 
The Indonesian Night takes place once a year and unites all the other Indonesian clubs from other schools in Boston and the 
iurrounding areas. 



Organizations 153 



Ca mpus Scho ol 

The Campus School Volunteers of Boston College (CSVBC) are 
a group of undergraduates established to work with and for the 
Campus School. They have a number of programs and events 
designed to benefit the students of the Campus School as much as 
possible. The\ feel that the Campus School is the "Best Kept Secret 
ot Boston College" and it is our goal to expose this wonderful part of 
our campus. The Campus School Volunteers work both directly with 
the students in the classroom settings as well as outside of the school 
by organizing fundraisers and promoting awareness. Each year, their 
final goal is to meet with the Campus School administration and 
designate areas where the money they raise will be the most useful to 
the school as a whole. 




■ 




Photos submitted bv Deena Khabbaza 



Circle K 



Boston Colleges Circle K makes the community at large accessibh 
to students who too often get wrapped up in events only 01 
campus. It introduces them to the world of service outside o 
the campus walls and facilitates their involvement in numerous servici 
activities. Their main goal is to provide students with the opportunit 
to do service, with such weekly service activities as soup kitchens, fooi; 
pantries, tutoring, and nursing home visits. The list is open to suggestion^ 
for expansion. They also host events throughout the year to support KPT1 
the Kiwanis Pediatric Trauma Institute at the New England Medical Cente; 
To fundraise, they sell candy grams for Valentines Day and host Bosto 
College's on campus Music Fest. Circle K also volunteers during Pumpkii 
Fest. They also participate with group activities amongst other Circle I 
groups in the New England area and are always open to new ideas am 
always looking for something new to do. 



Best Buddies 



The mission of Best Buddies is to enhance the lives of people 
with intellectual disabilities by providing them with one -on- 
one friendships with Boston College students. The program 
began in 1987 at Georgetown University when Anthony K. Shriver, 
founder and Chairman, realized that many people with intellectual 
disabilities lacked the opportunity to socialize with their non-disabled 
peers. College Buddies (BC students) meet with their buddies at least 
twice a month, with activities ranging from having lunch to going to 
a movie. 




'hotos submitted by Stephanie Losi 



154 Organization* 



Bicso 



BICSO was established at Boston College by Jon Lennon four years ago. The organization works with other colleges 
in the city of Boston as an organization based on serving others as a vehicle of personal growth. BICSO conveys 
the idea of "service by choicer welcoming all members, however small or large their level of commitment. As a 
result, it provides an outlet for many students who cannot make a full-time commitment to other organizations. By working 
with other schools, BICSO has multiplied the size, scope, and impact of projects to a greater degree, as well as provided 
assistance in the research and development of projects for other organizations. 



AI DS Awaren ess 

Committee 

rhe AIDS Awareness Committee of Boston College works to 
raise awareness and educate the Boston College community 
about issues related to HIV and AIDS. This is done through 
f'ndraising events, volunteer work, and education initiatives. Their 
rain events throughout the year are Pie in the Sky for Community 
$rvings, the Fall Benefit Concert, and the Annual 5K Run for Relief 
i' the Spring. The executive board would like to thank all those who 
live contributed or volunteered; you made it a great year. 




~ 




Photos submitted by Laura Marke 



American 

Red Cross 



■ ihe American Red Cross (ARC) of Boston College is a humanitarian organization, led by volunteers, that provides 
I relief to victims of disasters, and helps people prevent, prepare for, and respond to emergencies. It does this through 

-A. services that are consistent with its congressional charter and the principles of the International Red Cross Movement. 

n addition, the American Red Cross of Boston College will develop and offer sen ices that address critical human, health. 

nd safety needs of the communities, which it serves, and are consistent with the National Mission of the American Red 

JOSS. 



Organizations 155 



Eng lish Assoc iation j 

The English Association strives to bring together the community of literary lovers and gives them a forum where their 
voices can be heard. With a continually growing membership, the English Association hopes to increase the awareness 
of literary events in the surrounding Boston as well as those hosted by Boston College's own literary scholars. They 
also host a career fair with alumni who have built careers in the English and literary fields to help the English majors here 
at Boston College plan for their features. 



Geology Club 



The Geology Club of Boston College focuses on research and educational activities that are supported by the Geolog) 
and Geophysics programs within the school. The club sponsored a Coyote walk at the beginning of the school yeai 
to investigate the habits of the animals in the forests close to the Newton campus. The group also sponsors guest 
speakers who come to talk about the complex issues facing the world and the ecological problems facing the world in light 
of pollution and environmental degradation. 



Mar keting Aca demy 

The goal of the Marketing Academy is to coordinate events for undergraduates to gain a better understanding of careers 
in the field of marketing. Events include speakers, such as the director of marketing for the Patriots, presentations,] 
including a proper business dress presentation at Bloomingdales, a trip to New York City to visit an ad agency, and 
the Finishing School, a way for students to prepare for interviews and other social events in business. 



156 Organizations 



Political Science As sociation 

The Political Science Association attempts to establish relationships between the faculty of the Political Science 
Department and the undergraduate student body. The organization believes that by organizing events during 
which students and professors can interact, there can be a greater success level toward this goal. The Political 
Science Association is firmly committed to the discussion forum, which is the first step in understanding the science 
of politics. Another goal that this association attempts to accomplish is to spark interest in the field and study of 
politics. 



SCOPE 



rl 
: 



fi| Ihe Student Community Outreach for Pre-Health Experience (SCOPE) is an organization committed to placing Boston 
College students in health-related volunteering positions. SCOPE is predominately affiliated w ith Brigham and Wom- 
en's Hospital. Children's Hospital, and Beth Israel Medical Center. Besides volunteering, the organization holds advi- 
Iry and reflection-based meetings. The clubs goal is to provide upperclassmen with an opportunity to get exposed to the 
lalth field and to learn from the experiences of upperclassmen who have had such experiences. 






German Academy 



rhe German Academy is the organization on campus that promotes the German language and culture in the university 
community, and fosters friendships between German and American students. The group has Stammtisch (regular 
table) every Wednesday at Roggies. Every week, German-speaking foreign exchange students. Boston College students 
udying German, and anyone else who speaks German meet for dinner. Stammtisch provides an informal atmosphere in 
hich everyone can practice German. The club also promotes German culture events. The German Academy also organizes 
)cial functions including a Christmas party. 



Organizations 157 



Sharps 



The Sharps were founded in 1990 as the only all-female a 
cappella group on campus. Since those humble beginnings, the 
Sharps has grown into a polished fifteen-member group that 
transcends the traditional notion of girl groups. Built upon sisterly 
values, the groups goal is to share their joy with others by using their 
on n voices to recreate songs everyone loves to hear. The Sharps has 
toured at colleges and universities up and down the East Coast, and 
performed at many corporate and private functions as well as campus 
events. 




1 


[Ml If 11] Q ej 

1 1 K - j 



Photos submitted b\' Megan Koch 




Boston i ans 



Founded in 1986, the Bostonians is Boston Colleges oldest ; 
cappella group. The group is co-ed, using female and mall 
soloists alike to supply a colorful show for all to enjoy. Fron 
slow to upbeat, pop to classics, the Bostonians not only demonstrate 
talent, but musical diversity in all their performances. In the past 
the Bostonians have toured several states in the U.S. They plan U! 
continue their traveling tradition this spring as well as return to thei 
old pastime: national competitions. With fourteen members ranginr 
from freshmen to seniors, the Bostonians will be putting out a nev. 
CD this spring with which they hope to be selected for the Best oii 
College A Cappella, an honor they have been awarded for the past twe! 
CDs they have produced. 




Dynamics 



The Boston College Dynamics is the youngest of the co-ed a 
cappella groups on campus, but also one of the most active. 
Founded in the fall of 1998, the group has steadily been gaining 
fans and recognition as a household Boston College name. Consisting 
ot about sixteen undergraduate students, the group maintains a varied 
repertoire ranging anywhere from Motown to 80s hits to popular music 
of today. f:ach year, the Dynamics perform at different events both on 
and of I campus, and hold three shows of their own. They aim to please an 
audience with enjoyable music in a way that is exciting to watch through 
hard work, friendship, and lots of fun. They have been known to sing 
all over campus in cafes, benefit concerts, and invitational, as well as up 
and down the Easl Toast touring at other schools and venues. 



inizatiom 




Heightsmen 



The Heightsmen of Boston College is Boston Colleges only 
all-male a cappella group dedicated to musical excellence. 
Celebrating their fifteenth year in 2005. the group has 
established itself as a prominent musical group on and off the 
Boston College campus. Last February, they released their seventh 
album, "False." While maintaining a diverse musical repertoire that 
encompasses everything from 50s do-wops to contemporary hits, 
the Heightsmen entertain thousands of a cappella fans worldwide. 



Photos by Megan Koch 



Against 

the Current 



^ gainst the Current is a non-denominational Christian a cappella 
group that ministers to the campus community through their 
music and testimonies. The performers assembled in the Spring 
iil998 with the intention of starting a group that would worship God 
liough a cappella music. The auditions that followed that year brought 
d enthusiastic freshmen, who helped to form the group for the purpose 
•bringing the Gospel through a cappella music to the Boston College 
immunity. Against the Current has grown to be a music ministry 
rluding members from each class, race, and denomination of the 
J;ston College student population. The musical group aspires to serve 
Jd on the campus of BC in conjunction with the campus fellowships, 
hrches. and other organizations. 




Photos by Megan Koch 




Photos bv Mvra Chai 



Acoustics 

Since 1993, the Acoustics have performed their way into many 
hearts with an uplifting, humorous, and theatrical brand of a 
cappella. In its thirteenth year at Boston College, the group has 
developed a rich history of traditions. The Acoustics have released a 
total of five albums. Outside the studio, the Acoustics venture oi'f on 
wild tours, and compete in the International Championship of Col- 
legiate A Cappella. They have taken their high-energy performances 
everywhere from the Nations capital to the sunny beaches o\~ Florida, 
and received numerous accolades (Regional Champions, Best Arrange- 
ments, Best Soloists). On campus, the Acoustics harmonize at main 
venues, including numerous benefits and charity concerts. At their 
famous Cafe performances, their wack\ skits have confronted bizarre 
topics including infectious Disney medleys, game show violence, and 
talk show trash. 



Organizations 159 



Korean 

Students Association 

The objective of the Boston College Korean Students Association 
(KSA) is to cultivate and promote an interest in Korean and 
Korean-American history, culture, and many other facts of the 
Korean and Korean-American experience by providing opportunities 
for Boston College students to come together on political, cultural, 
and social level. KSA serves as an active academic support network 
for students through events fostering community development and 
stimulating personal development in defining ones identity. The KSA 
thereby embraces the responsibility to educate Boston College as a 
whole, as well as the surrounding community, in accordance to its 
objectives. 




Photos submitted by Dong-Joo Lee 



Cu ban Americ an 

Students Association 



The Cuban-American Student Association (CASA) serves the purpose of educating the Boston College community d 
Cuban culture through social, cultural, and political events. In fostering awareness of and preserving Cuban cultur' 
in the Boston College community through programming, the Cuban-American Student Association serves to unite th! 
student body through cultural appreciation. By socially, culturally and politically enhancing the community at Boston Colleg 
through Cuban culture, the organization takes part in diversifying the Boston College campus. 



Bl ack Student For um 

The Black Student Forums mission is to provide an innovative platform that encourages political, intellectual, and socia 
growth of the student body, and in doing so, to allow the Boston College community to experience the sum of the man; 
elements that combine to make the black experience. The BSF sponsors such forums as The Black Male and His Sexualit; 
as well as the Freshman Mentoring Program and the Joe Clark keynote address during Black History Month. 



Vt) Organizations 



Asian Caucus 



As representatives of the Asian American community here at Boston College, the Asian Caucus (AC) strives to 
foster relationships between its members and the greater Boston College and Boston communities. Through a 
balanced social, educational and political agenda, the organization is committed to creating a unified voice 
that is necessary in order to create awareness of issues that affect the Asian American community and contribute to 
the progress and betterment of society. The Asian Caucus is committed to the seven culture clubs that it comprises, 
recognizing that part of AC's task is to serve the culture clubs by supporting their efforts and serving as a resource. 
Through its efforts, the AC hopes to be truly representative of the community that it represents. Recognizing the 
common struggles that are shared with members of the AHANA community, the AC hopes to work wither AH ANA 
organizations in the efforts taking place to create a better environment at BC. 



FACES 



FACES seeks to foster a greater sense of unity among the different ethnic and racial groups at Boston College by 
creating an environment of patience, respect, honesty, and open-mindedness. Through interactive programs that 
engage students, faculty, and administration, FACES strives to eliminate the ethnic and racial stereotypes that still 
ersist today. 



Suwic Club 



rhe Slavic Club is a joint effort by native Slavs, students, and faculty across various departments to learn from one 
another about Slavic cultures and languages. Throughout the year, the Slavic Club organizes a wide range of social 
and educational activities such as group trips to film festivals and plays, volunteering at conferences, social gather- 
|gs to celebrate Eastern European holidays, and a faculty-student banquet at the end of each semester. 



Organizations IN 



Irish Society 



The Irish Society of Boston College is one of the largest student 
run organizations on BCs campus. It currently serves 900 
members. The purpose of the Society is to not only preserve, 
enjoy, and actively participate in the traditions and cultural activities 
of Irish Ancestry, but it is also our intent to encourage the celebration 
of these traditions with Boston College students, faculty; and staff. In 
order to educate other students about the Irish culture and heritage, the 
Society is an active participant in University wide events and Boston 
area activities such as ceili dances. One of the most important purposes 
of the Society is to serve as a resource and provide opportunities for 
students to become involved. Some of these opportunities include 
Irish tin whistle lessons, attending Gaelic football games, and Irish 
dancing. 




F 



Jamaica Association 



ounded in 2000, the Jamaica Association of Boston College aims to educate the Boston College community about th 
Jamaican culture, history, economics, and people. This goal is accomplished through lectures, culture shows, dinners, an 
performances by the Dance Troop. The Jamaican Association Dance Troop was founded in 2003 by Sannisha Dale. 



Brazilian Club 



The Brazilian Club of Boston College is commited to sharing Brazil and its culture with the Boston College campus, a: 
well as reaching out to the Brazilian Intercollegiate network and surrounding Brazilian communities. The club hold: 
events to exhibit the lively traditions of Brazilian food, folklore, music, and dance, in addition to raising awareness o 
historical, political, and social issues concerning Brazil and its global position. Working with the ever growing Braziliai 
population, specifically at local schools, the club wishes to ease the hardships that Brazilian and Brazilian- Americans face ii 
this country and celebrate their triumphant accomplishments. Anyone with a love for or interest in Brazil is welcome. 



(62 Organ i /.ill ions 



Chinese Students 



Association 



The Chinese Students Association of Boston College is geared towards the development of a community environment and 
the advancement of cultural awareness. The CSAs goal is to not only reach out to Chinese and Asians in general, but the 
great BC and Boston community as well. Through educational and social events such as Dim Sum Outings, a New Year's 
Janquet, and other culture shows, the CSA invites students from all backgrounds to enter the family atmosphere and engage in 
Chinese culture. 



L' ASSOCIATIO N 

Haitienne 

rhe mission of LAssociation Haitienne at Boston College is to 
increase knowledge of the unique history of Haiti and its people, to 
promote discussion on contemporary, political, and social issues, 
il to foster a better understanding of Haitian culture. Throughout the 
e r, they hold events to encourage students to experience Haitian culture 
iDugh food, music, and their annual Culture Show held in the Spring. 
\ have also added a dance group called Danse Kreyol and have been 
b to share their style of dance with the BC community as well. 





Photo submitted by Michelle Cherubin 



Japan Club 



rhe Japan Club of Boston College has achieved greater presence in Asian Caucus and the Boston College community 
through strong core leadership. By electing representatives from the Japan Club to attend main meetings of other clubs, 
the organization builds better awareness and increases visibility, which contributes to the success of upcoming events, 
lembers of the Japan Club of Boston College are invited to join frequent events, gatherings, and discussions to foster the 
ipanese culture. By building strong friendships within the Japan Club community, the club hopes to advance the friendship to 
iteract with other cultural clubs and their events on and off campus, including the Japan Society of Boston. 



Oiganizations 163 



Appalach ia 

The Appalachia Volunteers program is committed to working 
with the people of the United States who are poor. 
Our mission throughout the year is the following: 
-To learn about the structural and societal realities in the United 
States that leaves some people impoverished and marginalized 
-To discuss the injustices that create entrenched poverty 
-To consider a theological and faith perspective on social justice, 
and. 

-To participate in local service opportunities throughout the year. 
This yearlong process culminates in an annual spring break trip to 
struggling regions of the United States. With these goals and our work, 
the Appalachia program seeks to build a better future by entering into 
solidarity with the people who are poor in Boston and beyond. 




Photos Submitted by Paul Chiozzi and 
Shannon Keating 




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Photos Submitted by Kim Lindquist 




Special Olympics 



Special Olympics of Boston College is dedicated to uniting BO 
students and local athletes with intellectual disabilities in a*] 
effort to create a dynamic, and safe space for all involved t 
have fun, to interact socially, and most importantly, to stay health; 
SOBC has two sports in which they compete---soccer (fall) an; 
volleyball (spring). To raise money, they participate in two Specia 
Olympics of Massachusetts fundraisers, a 5k run in Decembe 
called the Jolly Jaunt , and a jump into the Atlantic in Februar 
called the Passion Plunge. Over forty BC students participate i 
one of these several aspects of SOBC. 



Buck Campus 



Ministry 



The mission of Black Campus Ministry is rooted in the African-American experience. Members assume responsibilit 
for the spiritual growth of the Boston College community at large. With God as their focus, they aspire to achiev 
these goals through various activities strengthening community relations. As Christians, the group believes i 
serving the community of Boston College and the greater Boston area. Everything Black Campus Ministry does is in th 
name of the Lord and Savior, Jesus Christ. As a ministry, members are faith-oriented people dedicated to the enhancemen 
oi spiritual growth in both others and themselves. 



164 Organization 



4 Boston 



4 Boston is a volunteer organization that utilizes undergraduate students who are willing to serve in Bos- 
ton's homeless shelters, soup kitchens, inner-city schools, youth center, hospitals and live-in facilities. 
4Boston volunteers do service in and around the city of Boston for four hours each and every week during 
he academic year. The aim of 4Boston is to provide students with a significant extended urban service expe- 
ience, and to provide the agencies of Boston with reliable and consistent assistance from the BC community. 



Chi Alpha 

Christian Fellowship 



rhe Chi Alpha Christian Fellowship (XA) is a committed group of Christians who want to see a difference on Boston 
College campus today. XA are two Greek symbols pronounced "chi alpha" and represent the letters C and A. These 
two letters stand for "Christ's Ambassadors." The group aims to change their school by living out their faith in Jesus 
jrist on a daily basis. XA is more than just a club; it is a community of students from various backgrounds who are able to 
\\n together around the common belief that Christ is their Savior. 



I ntervarsit y 

Christian Fellowship 



[ 



nterVarsity Christian Fellowship is a multi-ethnic. Catholic and Protestant, Christian movement at Boston College. It is 
a close-knit community of active students who seek to discover together how God and faith can impact their daily lives 
at Boston College and beyond. The group meets weekly, and has smaller group meetings. Bible studies, and prayer gath- 
« ings throughout the week as well as retreats and conferences throughout the year. The [nterVarsity Christian Fellowship 
lakes regular trips into Boston to feed the homeless, tutor students in the inner-city, and has spring break trips to serve t ho 
iban poor in Boston. 



Organizations 165 



United in Christ 



United In Christ (UIC) is the umbrella organization over the 
different Christian fellowships on campus. We seek to edify 
the existing Christian constituency on campus by hosting 
events together to promote interfaith dialogue, as well as build and 
foster a unified Christian community. Secondly, we strive to reach out 
to the student body and increase awareness about the Christian faith as 
well as make known the diverse opportunities for student involvement 
in the various Christian groups and fellowships. Thirdly, United In 
Christ seeks to encourase and advance the growth of students. 




Photo submitted by Michael Leen 




Th e Orthod ox 

Christian Fellowship 

The OCF is an official Campus Ministry Club which exists ai 
a resource for the Orthodox Christian students on campus 
We meet once a week to participate in worship, fellowship 
social outreach, and discussion of topics of interest informed by ai 
Orthodox perspective. We are part of the North American OCF fo 
performances at the end of each semester. 



Photo submitted by Elaina Matook 



HlLLEL 



Boston College Hillel serves as the center for Jewish life at Boston College. The Hillel helps to facilitate the social, cultural 
and religious needs of the small but active group of Jewish students who attend Boston College. The organization i 
committed to a pluralistic vision of Judaism that embraces all movements and invites all members of the Boston Colleg 
community to participate in its programs. It serves to educate the Boston College community about Jewish life and culture an> 
offers itself as a resource to those interested in learning more. 



' ' Ol ■' -iMAltlOfl I 



St. Thomas M ore 

Society 

The St. Thomas More Society seeks to promote a rich Catholic culture at Boston College. The group sponsors lectures 
and debates about important religious and cultural issues. The organization also sponsors biweekly Power Hours. These 
are times of quiet, reflective prayer in the form of traditional Eucharistic adoration and benedictions. All students are 
.elcome to participate in any of the activities of the Society regardless of religious affiliation. 



A sian Bapti st 

Student Koinonia 



Coming from the Greek word "Koinonia'' which means fellowship in Greek, Asian Baptist Student Koinonia (ABSK) is 
a student Christian group committed to their fellowship with God and each other. The group's hope is to experience 
God's love concretely, whether by means of Bible studies, prayer, or fellowship (which consists of many forms, mainly 
un indoor and outdoor activities, like sports, hiking, BBQs, and eating a lot of food). Members study together, eat together, 
ind make an effort to understand the meaning of life together. 



Ignatian Society 






rhe Ignatian Society of Boston College is a group of Boston College undergraduate students committed to the promotion 
of Jesuit education and the Ignatian ideal. The group offers all BC students opportunities to actively engage the Mission 
of the University through social, spiritual, and service programs and events, and seeks to maintain a strong link 
etween the Jesuit Community and the student body at Boston College. The Ignatian Society offers spiritual programs such as 
le Kairos retreat and peer ministry. Its social programs seek to strengthen the bond between two great communities here at 
oston College: the undergraduate students and the Jesuits. The group also offers both traditional and innovative community 
'rvice opportunities to its members and the Boston College community based on the ideals of Jesuit educational experience. 



Organizations 167 



BCSA 



Founded in 1983. Boston College Student Agencies (BCSA) provides students the opportunity to launch and operate their owi< 
businesses. As the only financially independent organization at Boston College that is managed exclusively by students 
BCSA lends students from different majors real world experience in many areas of business, including: management 
marketing, human resources, finance, and information technology. Supervised by the Wallace E. Carroll School of Managemen 
and directed by a second year MBA student, BCSA is currently comprised of four agencies and four functional department: 
that are each managed by an undergraduate student. The agencies (BC Ad/Comm, BC Cheers!, BC Storage, and BC Motivatioi 
Delivered) offer a wide range of services for students, parents, and faculty: from promoting area businesses and events 01 
campus to delivering birthday and care packages to BC students. 



A ccountin g 

Academy 



The Boston College Accounting Academy is a student organization established by and run by Accounting students. Tfr 
Academy was established to provide declared and prospective Accounting majors with services pertaining to their futur 
careers. In order to provide opportunities to come in contact with prospective future employers, the Accounting Academ; 
organizes events where students, teachers, and employers can come together in a relaxed environment. 



Careers 

in Management 



The Careers in Management club works to offer opportunities to undergraduate students with an interest in pursuing, 
job in the management field. Each year it sponsors the Career Launch, which is a free full-day event for juniors from al 
majors that gives them the opportunity to get interviewing, internship-searching, and etiquette skills to sharpen then 
for upcoming internship and job searches. The Launch features a panel of seniors who share their internship search stories am 
presentations by employers on behavioral interviewing, etiquette, and networking. Resume critique are also offered on a firs 
come first serve basis. 



inizatiom 



In ternationa l 

Business Academy 



T 



he International Business Academy of Boston College (IBA) strives to bring international economic awareness to students 
at Boston College. Through meetings and global guest speakers the group has addressed issues of the emerging markets 
of a variety of countries around the world in the hopes of broadening the horizons of their future business leaders. 



Math Society 



Boston College Mathematics Society (BCMS) is a student- 
initiated academic group dedicated to serving the needs and 
interests of all students interested in mathematics. The goal of 
fiCMS is to build a strong mathematics community at Boston College, 
in particular, BCMS provides opportunities for students to explore 
reas of mathematics outside of classrooms, enhances inter-student 
ommunication and co-operation, and prepares students for various math 
ompetitions. BCMS provides members with: Mathematics Workshop/ 
>iscussion Forums, Guest Speakers, Research resources, Competition 
>pportunities, Peer Networking/Advising Sessions, Student Tutoring 
nd Recreational Activities. 




Photos submitted by Clare Duan 



CSOM 

Government 



The purpose of the Carroll School of Management Government (CSOM) is to serve as a promoter of better relationships 
between students, faculty, and corporate America. Serving over 2,000 students, the organizations goal is to sponsor 
various activities that are designed to assist students in pursuing their studies and future career paths. The organization 
josts prominent keynote speakers, panelists, and student-faculty integration events throughout the year. In addition, CSOM 
jovernment has been involved with the Ethics core initiative. University Strategic Planning process, and matters concerning 
rofessor promotion and tenure. 



Organizations IrW 



Asi an Christ ian 

Fellowship 



Asian Christian Fellowship (ACF) has large group meetings weekly that include singing praise songs, a talk byij 
a guest speaker, and fellowship with food at the end. Occasionally, ACF has a special event instead of regular 
meetings. Each member is also encouraged to join one of the small groups that meet during the week. These small i 
groups range from doing a book-study to having free discussion and prayer. Asian Christian Fellowship has a general prayer 
meeting once a week for anybody who needs prayer, or wants to pray for the fellowship, the campus, the world, or anything 
else. ACF has one retreat each year in January. 



"I 



Lit urgical A rts 

Group 



The Liturgical Arts Group (LAG) serves the community of Boston College by sharing their special gift of music at i 
the regular weekend liturgies of the campus and at various events at Boston College. With song and instrument andi 
dance, LAG provides a wide repertoire of music to enliven and enrich the experience of worship. Through praise of! 
God in song, the community finds its way to greater depth and joy in its service to others. LAG meets regularly for rehearsal 
and prayer, and especially tries to foster community among freshman members. LAG has released CDs in the past and its 
group number grows considerably each year. Their contributions make masses feel much warmer and bring the students 
closer together through the sharing of their gifts. 



Dance Marathon 



Dance Marathon at Boston College is a yearly event held in February where the student body comes together to enjoy a 1 
night of dancing in celebration of money raised for charity. For the last four years, Dance Marathon has raised money to 
support the Children's Hospital in Boston. Dancers and Moralers participate in this 16-hour event, which is held in the 
Plex, and students are invited to join in the festivities and suppor their friends and classmates. 



F70 Organization! 



Eagle EMS 



Eagle Emergency Medical Services was founded in 1997 when Kevin Eidt collapsed in the Flynn Recreation Complex 
during a pickup basketball game. Friend and Emergency Medical Technician Mark Ritchie attempted to revive him 
while waiting for an ambulance to come and take him to a hospital, but was unable to and Eidt died within an hour 
)f fainting. This motivated Ritchie to create Eagle EMS. The group is made up of trained student Emergency Medical 
Technicians (EMTs), who assist the Boston College Police Department with medical emergencies. Today, students staff major 
Events, such as Boston College football games and "Pops on the Heights." Eagle EMS also conducts CPR and Emergency 
vledical Technician certification classes, and do daily night-time response on both Upper and Lower campus. 



Festival 

of Friendship 



Festival of Friendship is an organization dedicated to establishing a strong relationship with the mentally handicapped 
community in Boston. The organization provides a one day event held on campus for local special needs students. Over 
two hundred Boston College volunteers are involved in making this day possible. Boston College clubs and organizations 
'taff carnival games and activities while entertainment is provided by various Boston College performance groups. Volunteers 
•re buddies for the day to assist special needs guests in enjoying the festivities Through fund-raising and volunteer efforts, 
fecial needs guests are connected with the Boston College community. 



Heights 

Boys & Girls Club 



rhe Heights Boys and Girls Club is composed of about forty Boston College students ranging from freshman to seniors. 
Each BC volunteer is paired up with a "little buddy" from St. Col umbki lies Elementary School located in Brighton. 
Many of the elementary-aged children come from underprivileged home environments. The members of our club bring 
1 fun and exciting activity to these children at least once a month. Some of our events include apple picking, bowling, roller- 
bating, a visit to the children's museum, a trip to the movies, ice skating, or an activity day on BCs campus. The children arc 
ble to receive the opportunity to form a friendship with their "BC buddy" while really enjoying the events. The Boston College 
lembers of the club also have just as much fun participating and attending all of the events. 



Organizations 171 



Emerging Leaders 



Program 



The Emerging Leaders Program (ELP) is a one year leadership 
development program for a select group of fifty freshman 
students. The program is run out of the Office of the Dean for 
Student Development and is designed to help first-year students adjust 
to college life and develop enhanced interpersonal skills. ELP meets 
weekly to discuss leadership and service issues and concerns. Topics 
include intercultural awareness and diversity, group dynamics, leadership 
development, decision making, social justice, and volunteerism. The 
Emerging Leaders Program is designed to instill an attitude of social 
auareness and responsibility. ELP hopes that the students who 
complete the program will be prepared to assume roles of thoughtful 
responsibility in the BC community and throughout their lives. 




Photo submitted by Mer Zovko 



Mentoring 

Leadership Program 



The Mentoring Leadership Program is a leadership program involving over fifty freshman, created to continue the process * 
of fostering leadership skills. This is achieved through leadership workshops, a retreat, a series of community service 
activities and most importantly, a pairing of the members with a cabinet member of UGBC. The goal of the program is j 
to give a better insight into the student government of BC and prepare members to assume leadership roles in UGBC and other 
aspects of campus. 






St udent Judi cial 

Board 

The members of the Boston College Student Judicial Board are 
representatives of the student body. It is their responsibility 
not only to conduct disciplinary hearings, but also to educate 
the student body about their rights and responsibilities. Their role on 
campus is to oiler students the opportunity to be heard in a fair and 
impartial environment by a board of peers. After hearing the cases, 
the Student Judicial Board determines responsibility and recom- 
mends sanctions to the Dean for Student Development. The board's 
objective is lo educate students of both the rights and the accompa- 
nying responsibilities of members of the Boston College community. 
The Board strives to maintain and uphold community standards and, 
in keeping with the Jesuit tradition of the University, they also encour- 
age the development and use ol sound moral judgment. 




Photo submitted 



172 Organization* 



College 

Republicans 



The mission of the College Republicans of Boston College is threefold. The first is to represent the Republican Party 
to the student body, and to promote Republican goals and interests on campus. Their second goal is to act on behalf 
of Republican candidates on and off campus, and to promote these candidates to the student body. Lastly, the 
rganization is to create a strong link with the Republican Party and College Republicans throughout the state and the 
ountry. Each year there have been exciting Republican Speakers on the Heights, including Ben Stein, Dinesh D'Souza, Pat 
•uchanan, and Jay Severin. Members attend events with the Massachusetts Alliance of College Republicans each year, and 
tay in close contact with the National Committee. There are ample opportunities to network and make friends, all the while 
aving a great time. 



Qual ity of Stu dent 

j Life Committee 

rhe Quality of Student Life Committee (QSLC) works with Vice Presidents, Deans, Administrators, and Academic 
Departments, striving to provide students with a means to understand BC and create opportunities to better their 
environment. It was formed in November 2001 by six freshman who wanted to further understand their surrounding 
nd to improve life on and around campus. The QSLC is a registered student organization made up of over 25 active members 
hd over 170 general members. As a non-political group, QSLC's goal is to act as an advocacy group for the students and a vehicle 
»r students to further define and create their own initiatives effectively and constructively. 



Seni or Task F orce 

Tlhe Senior Task Force is responsible for planning individual Senior Consilium programs as well as the fourth annual 

I Campus Crawl. These programs give seniors the space necessary to explore vocational discernment, reducing their 

A. anxiety of deciding what to do next year, and getting them excited for life after graduation. The Senior Consilium 

Tiogram has been very successful and will continue to be hosted by members of the Senior Task Force. The Campus Crawl was 

Kiuge success this year with over 250 seniors participating. 



Organizations 173 



Synergy 



Synergy Hip Hop Dance Company is Boston Colleges premiere 
hip hop dance group, incorporating various styles such as video 
dance, break dance, pop and lock, jazz fusion, etc. One of their 
missions is to promote unity among students of numerous cultural 
backgrounds through hip hop dance. They have performed at several 
on-campus events, as well as off-campus events, including venues such 
as Boston University The Ro\y nightclub, and Bayside Expo Center. 




Photos submitted by Synergy 





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Photo submitted by Liz Bench 



BC Symphon y 

Orchestra I 

The Boston College Symphony Orchestra is an organization of 
players dedicated to music of the symphonic repertoire unde 
the direction of John Finney. The BCSO performs three fre> 
concerts each year, drawing standing-room-only crowds to Gassoi 
Hall's Irish Room. At the end of the fall semester, the orchestra als> 
performs a series of Christmas concerts in collaboration with th- 
University Chorale. In their February concert, the orchestra features 
solo performance by the winner of the annual Concerto Competitor 
open to all senior members of the group. In addition to student soloist* 
the orchestra occasionally performs with faculty soloists. Professo 
Sandra Hebert of the Music Department performed Schumann's Piarn 
Concerto with the orchestra for their first concert of the vear. 




Dance Ensemble 



The Boston College Dance Esemble consists of 35 studnts 
joined together by a passion for dance. Most have received 
intense dance training for years and welcome the opportunity 
to continue developing their love for their art. Members of this 
completely student-run organization train together all year, taking 
classes in ballet and ja// taught by professional dancers and instructors 
in the Boston area. They spend countless hours choreographing and 
rehearsing lor performances at the end of each semester. These 
performances consist of about 20 dances ranging in style from ballet, 
hip-hop. jazz, I lamenco, tap, and musical theater. All proceeds from 
the performances directly benefit the Boston College Campus School's 
music theraov resources. 



'hoto submitted by Sophie Forte 



174 Organization! 



Brass Choir 



rhe Brass Choir is like a chamber ensemble on steroids. The year before David Healey accepted the conducting position 
for the group, the Brass Choir had approximately a dozen members. In 2000, the group grew to thirty members. In 
2001, Brass Choir had forty-five members, and in 2002, the group grew to a membership of sixty. As of right now, 
lere is no membership roster for last year and this year, but the group anticipates that the number will again be high. 



C ommittee fo r 

Creative Enactments 



F l"^he Committee for Creative Enactments (CCE) is a comedic theater troupe dating back to the mid 80's that layers 
I improvised scenes on top of a scripted plot in a murder-mystery format. Made up entirely of BC students, there is no 
M. conventional stage, and the performances, put on in O'Connell House, are not to be passively watched. Actors move 
ftoughout the audience, and converse with audience members directly. Audience members take on the pretense of the set- 
ig of the show. Audience members are guests of the event, and there may be multiple scenes occurring simultaneously in 
ireral rooms. Audience members may follow their favorite characters into a scene or engage them in conversation. All actors 
•tfiain in character throughout the night, making for an unforgettable evening that can't be compared to any other form of 
ifertainment out there. 



Concert Band 



he Boston College Concert Band boasts a diverse membership, comprised of BC undergraduate students, alumni, 
staff, and graduate students. This diversity contributes to an atmosphere of growth as developing musicians mix 
with experienced players. The Concert Band performs a wide variety of both traditional and contemporary literature 
wind band. The mission of the Boston College Concert Band is to enable BC community members who share a passion 
making music an opportunity to perform wind and percussion music in an educational setting. In the past, the Concert 
nd has performed a dynamic and varied concert schedule including holiday concerts. Pops dinner concerts, and seasonal 
ctncerts. The group has also performed a series of exchange concerts with other Jesuit universities, including Georgetown 
liiversity, John Carroll University in Cleveland, Ohio, and Tufts University. The Concert Band continues to seek new and 
d ferent opportunities that will enhance the experiences of its members. 



Organizations 175 



Hawai'i Club 



The Hawai'i Club was established in 1991. making this its fifteen year anniversary. It was established to promate ann 
celebrate the Hawaiian culture and people with the Boston College community, while providing support to culture 
shocked students from the Islands of Hawai'i. The club is a small organization with some events to spread the aloh 
of Hawai'i such as lei making classes and hula lessons. However, food is the main aspect of Hawaiian culture, and the event 
usually include plenty of it. This Hawai'i Club is defined by luau, which through Iokani (unity), Aloha (love), and kokua (help 
is the club's favorite event of the year. 



O'C onnell H ouse I 

Student Union 

O'Connell House was constructed at the turn of the 20th century for approximately $300,000; the mansion resemble* 
a royal palace at the time, filled with lavish furnishings and surrounded by fragrant gardens and beautiful fountain* 
The house was later donated to Boston's Cardinal O'Connell, who used the house as his official residence am 
spiritual haven: the Church donated the house to the growing Boston College. Since the fall of 1972, the O'Connell Hous 
has served the Boston College community as the home of the official student union in addition to providing office space fo 
the Office of First Year Experience and the Alcohol and Drug Education Program. On a social level, O'Connell House seek 
to entertain, educate, and faciliate all Boston College students through events such as the Middlemarch Ball, the Breakin, 
the Barriers Ball, and Harvest Night. It's the home of weekly events including live bands, coffee house concerts, stduen 
talent nights, lectures, and more. 



Or ganization of 

Latin American Affairs 

The Organization of Latin American Affairs' purpose is to articulate and promote the needs of the Latinos at Bostoi 
College and to foster and encourage an attitude of academics, religious beliefs, and social awareness. OLAA aids 
supports and assists in the recruitment of prospective Latino/a students. The group raises awareness regardin, 
the state of Latin America, and incorporates the use of bilingual and bi-cultural knowledge in providing exposure of fh< 
college experience to Latino communities. Throughout the year, this organization sponsors many events including a Latin< 
fashion show, the Hermandad Retreat, programs about Latinos in the United States and in Latin American, forums on issue 
pertinent to the Latino community, and participation in protesting the School of the Americas. 



F76 Organization i 



Vietnamese 

Students Association 



rhe Vietnamese Students Association is commited to educating members about the Vietnamese culture by providing 
cultural and traditional enrichment through our events and also developing a deeper sense of pride, identity, and 
leadership. The club's goals are to inform our members and peers about the historical and cultural aspects of Vietnam 
rough art, music, and cuisine. The association further wants to strengthen the VSA internally by fostering a stronger 
nse of unity through better communication with the members and their families. They hope to strenghten their presence 
i campus by showing their support for other AHANA cultural clubs and participating in community service projects 
itside of Boston College. 



Soc iety of Na tive 

American Peoples 

rhe Society of Native American Peoples (SNAP) represents all Native American Boston College students. The 
organization welcomes all BC students who wish to learn about and participate in Native American history, culture 
and current issues. SNAP is dedicated to to providing a helping hand to fellow Native Americans through service 
lojects in communities outside of BC, in particular to Indian reservations in predominantly Native American regions. In 
Idition, SNAP pledges to assist in creating a more diverse BC community by reaching out to prospective Native American 
lidents as well as fostering the success of those on campus. SNAP acts as both the political and cultural voice of the Native 
tnerican community at Boston College. 



-T- 






Residence Hall 



Association 



^our voice in the residence halls. The goal of the Residence Hall Association (RHA) is to be an advocate for residents' 
concerns and provide programming. Comprised of an executive board and representative councils from each hous- 
ing area, the RHA is a student-run organization sponsored by the Office of Residential Life. Past RHA programs 
iiluded Mr. Boston College, Fall Movie Night, Breaking the Barriers Ball, and Spring Fest. 



Organizations 177 



Shaw 

Leadership Program 



Shaw House is the home of the twenty members of the Shaw Leadership Program. They spend the first year in weekl 
leadership sessions, and they use what they have learned to create and complete their own leadership projects. Wit 
the goals of completing community service and pervading the Shaw spirit throughout Boston College, these twenty 
students, along with the sophomore, junior and senior members of the Shaw Leadership Program, embark on a year fille 
with memorable events. The road to leadership is filled with service to others, Shaw members learn, and they are bette 
equipped to walk down that path with the skills they have learned and the friendships they have made in the house. 



Student Admissions 



Program 



The Student Admissions Program (SAP) is the largest volunteer organization on campus at Boston College. In a 
given year there are between 700 and 900 volunteer members in the program. Working directly with the Office ; 
Undergraduate Admission, SAP offers current Boston College students the chance to assist in the recruitment 
prospective students. From serving as tour guides (who lead families around campus and answer their questions) and panelij 
to Day Visit hosts and greeters, Student Admissions Program volunteers often act as the first ambassadors for visitors 
Boston College. The first moment a prospective student enters the admissions office, he or she is greeted by not only a weal 
of on hand admissions officers but current students as well who are only willing to help out with any questions or concerr 
Within the SAP there are nine programs. The SAP Coordinators Council is made up of 11 students who each run a progra 
in SAP The Student Admissions Program culminates each year with the FUN that is April - up to 1000 visitors through t 
office each and every day. Volunteers enjoy what they do as they get to meet many different people from all over the wor 
Every year, it is through the help of the SAP volunteers that accepted high school seniors are able to visit the campus and me 
fellow accepted students, while also having the chance to talk with current students. 



LGBC 



Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual Community 

The Lesbian, Gay. and Bisexual Community at Boston College (LGBC) is a student organization, established in 197- 
I he organization exists to promote those basic rights to friendship, respect, and justice among students, faculty am 
staff of the Boston College community by encouraging an environment of understanding for all members of thi 
community. The aim of LGBC within the BC community is to provide an environment where members of the Universit; 
can address the range of issues which arise around minority sexual orientations in modern society. 



I7S Organization 



UNICEF 

Boston College Chapter 



The Boston College chapter of UNICEF seeks to continue the tradition upheld by the national organization in its quest 
to raise support for the programs implemented and proposed by the United Nations Children's Fund, among others. It 
also increases public awareness of the challenges facing the worlds children. The chapter at BC raises money to add 
3 that raised by at least hundreds of other schools and universities around the country as well as volunteering in campaigns 
) change policies that will greatly benefit the less fortunate. 



Stude nt Organi zation 

Funding Committee 

rhe Student Organization Funding Committee (SOFC) is charged with funding student organizations who meet the 
eligibility requirements set forth in the SOFC constitution. Approximately 130 organizations at Boston College presently 
exist that can receive funding. The money allocated by SOFC comes from 47% of the Student Activities Fee, which 
^collected by the University along with tuition. The Student Organization Funding Committee is a separate and distinct 
)iianization from the Undergraduate Government of Boston College and operated under its own constitution and bylaws. The 
ml of the group is to assist student groups in putting on enriching events for the Boston College community without the 
pup having to be overly concerned with the funding of the event. 



NAACP 



Boston College Chapter 

he Boston College chapter of the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People began in 197°- as a 
student-led vehicle for advocating the civil rights of African-American people. The mission of the Boston College 
chapter is to uplift the minority community of all people as well as support the goals and ideals of the national bod) 
the NAACR They have pledged to uphold the innate civil rights that all people possess and to abhor, abstain from and 
ght against injustice of any kind on Boston Colleges campus or in the community. Membership is open to all members o\~ 
je undergraduate and graduate population of Boston College. NAACP's large events include the DEF Poetry Jam. poetr\ 
fife, speaker series, and an award celebration for a dedicated faculty or staff member of the AHANA community. 



r 

' the I 



Organizations 179 



BC bOp! 



BC bOp! is a 28-piece jazz ensemble dedicated to the highest levels of instrumental and vocal jazz performance. Th< 
standard for musicianship is high, the repertoire is challenging, and the work ethic is rigorous. The group is now ovei 
fifteen years old. and has frequently performed in both national and international arenas. The group's performance:! 
have included Carnegie Hall in New York City, the Walt Disney World Resort in Orlando, Florida, and the Jamaica Grandti 
resort in Ocho Rios. Jamaica. BC bOp! provides Boston College students with numerous performances on campus, including 
their concerts at the Breaking the Barriers Ball, and the AIDS Benefit Ball. 



Pep Band 



The Boston College Pep Band is an acoustic musical ensemble composed of wind instruments, drum set, and auxiliai 
percussion. Under the direction of one professional director and student conductors/coordinators, the Boston Colle; 
Pep Band is one of the most highly visible of the Boston College Band Program Ensembles. With a membership jj 
approximately fifty to sixty students per year, the band is split into Maroon and Gold ensembles to provide a well-balance 
bond at all athletic events. The Pep Band supports the Men's Hockey Team and both Women and Men's Basketball Team, 
creating an ample opportunity for the BC Pep Band member to support Boston College Athletics, travel to fun and excitir 
athletic events, as well as to get air-time on regional and national sports broadcasts. 



My Mother's 



Flea bag 



According to group legend, My Mother's Fleabag was founded in 1980, which makes them the oldest college improv 
troupe in the country. The group consists entirely of Boston College students, yet has in actuality no connectior 
to the school. My Mother's Fleabag performs in and around Boston, in whole or in part, for fun or as a bookec 1 
contract. The comedy organization performs the standard array of improv games, completely unscripted, based on live 
audience suggestions. Each semester, the group does a four-show, two-day run, mixing improv, skits, a group opera, and £ 
live band. 



tnizatkm 



Music Guild 



rhe Music Guild provides a forum for musicians of all levels and styles to interact and perform on campus. Currently, 
the Guild consists of over two hundred members. Their website serves as a tool for musicians by allowing them to 
search a member directory, post messages, upload original mp3s, reserve practice space, and keep informed on 
ossible performance opportunities. The Music Guild provides an opportunity for students who are interested in music 
ioth recreationally and professionally. In practice, the Guild sponsors various types of events each year at Boston College, 
lcluding open mic nights, drum circles, guest lectures, Battle of the Bands, and concerts featuring well-known regional 
cts of various genres. The Music Guild dates back before Boston College had an actual music program, and today has 
volved into a unique organization not to be found at other universities. 



University 

Chorale 



M tarting out as a small, all-male glee club in 1912, the University Chorale is now co-ed and the largest arts organization 
W at Boston College. Entirely student-run, the Chorale currently has 160 singers, including students, Jesuits, and faculty 
%J members. The University Chorale displays its talents at numerous events both on and off campus. In the past, the group 
i|> traveled to Rome to sing at St. Peters Basilica. Domestically, they have traveled to New York City to perform a benefit 
:ncert for the Twin Towers Orphan Fund. 






Marching Band 



X^\ Thether it's on the turf of Alumni Stadium during half-time of a football game, on the streets of New England 
%/%/ for a parade, or in front of hundreds of high school students at an exhibition, wherever the Screaming Eagles 
T T Marching Band performs, you can feel the excitement in the air. This collection of highly spirited, talented, and 
ommitted individuals have provided thrills and excitement to audiences from across the nation - and even as far away as 
eland. Founded in 1919, the Screaming Eagles Marching Band has become the embodiment of New England Division 1 
hletics through excellence in performance both on and off the field. Currently, the Screaming Eagles provide opportunities 
r instrumentalists, color guard, dancers, and managers. 



Organizations IS1 



Dramatics 

Society 



The Dramatics Society of Boston College, founded in 1865, is the oldest student group on campus. The Dramatics Socieh 
provides student actors, designers, directors, playwrights, and producers another outlet to voice their creativity and u 
share their talent with the Boston College community. By choosing works from a well-established canon of dramatic 
literature to student-written works, the group strives to make the arts an important part of university life. 



Hell o. ..Shovel head! 

Hello.. .Shovelhead! is a sketch comedy group comprised of students with a talent for humor. Hello.. .Shovelheads go 
is to entertain the Boston College community with sketch comedy. The club members meet on a weekly basis whe 
they put together their creative ideas and write and act out original work. They end up with roughly forty scenes aft< 
each meeting. Of all the scenes they comprise in their practices, the group chooses nine to act out for any given performanc 
Hello.. .Shovelhead! puts together a genre of comedy that is similar to the sketches on Saturday Night Live and Mad TV Wii 
their innovative skits, they have managed to make Boston College students laugh for over a decade. 



R ole Playe rs 

and Strategy Enthusiasts 



t 



he Role Flayers and Strategy Enthusiasts (RPSE) is an organization founded less than a decade ago by a smal 
group of individuals who were interested in role-playing, board, and strategy games. The club's purpose is to locate 
individuals of Boston College with an interest in engaging in role-playing and strategy games, to introduce them tc 
each other, and to create an environment in which those individuals can find enjoyment and the opportunity for artistic 
expression through those games. In addition, the club maintains organization between the games so that new members car 
be referred to panics matching their areas of interest, as well as for the games to be continued from year to year. Current!) 
the club possesses a large library of challenging and eclectic games for members to borrow and enjoy. 



1X2 Organization! 



Asinine 



A sinine is one of the few comedy groups around that incorporates both sketch and improvisational comedy into 
/\ their shows. Members write, direct, and act in their own original sketches and video segments as well as perform 
L \*an increasing repertoire of improv games. Asinine's purpose at Boston College is first and foremost to entertain, 
ut also to get more people involved in the production of the performing arts of improvisational and sketch comedy. The 
roup prides itself on the fact that it is Boston Colleges only sketch AND improv group; there are also very few other groups 
eyond BC who work with both art forms simultaneously. They offer frequent and affordable shows to their fans, performing 
>r $3 every month or so. The Asinine website receives hundreds of hits each month by loyal fans. Founded in 2001 by a 
ig-tag group of students, Asinine has risen from performing in the Eagle's Nest with about twenty people in the audience 
> performing monthly shows that sell out hundreds of seats. 



Contemporary 



Theater 



ontemporary Theater is a dramatic club on campus in addition to the Dramatics Society. Performing productions 
written by playwrights within the last two decades, they represent the trends in present-day theater and put a modern 
spin on things. 



Hip-Hop 

Culture Club 



rhe Hip-Hop Culture Club of Boston College was founded to help promote and spread the message of hip-hop through 
the student body community. As a largely misunderstood media of music, the group seeks to educate others about the 
history and actual culture that exists beneath the surface. Frequent meetings with dance help to bring further life to 
te group and the club can sometimes be seen performing in events around campus. 



Organizations 183 



Salt and Light 



Salt and Light is a Christian ministry group that serves the Greater Boston area by leading Confirmation retreats fo 
high school students. The group has one training weekend every semester for members who are interested in leadin 
those retreats. These weekends are held at the Mellos Retreat House in peaceful Jacksonville, Vermont. Salt and Ligh 
also meets for fellowship and fun every other week. Meetings usually consist of an icebreaker, witness talks, small grou 
sharing, and snacks. 



Mahjong 

Club 



Mahjong originated in China, and it remains an integral part of that culture as a massively popular form of entertainmei : 
It is played during spare time, and especially during large family gatherings. Both young and old, male and fema 
play this game with the same enthusiasm and fervor (not to mention plenty of noise). It is a game comparable to t 
card game of Rummy, both in rules and excitement. The Mahjong Clubs officers have taken it upon themselves personally 
introduce this game of little tiles to anyone who wants to learn. Our goal is to not only make this game accessible to Chine 
and other Asians in BC who are already familiar with mahjong, but also to the rest of the community who may not even knc 
what it is. 



Wom en's Reso urce 

Center 

The Women's Resource Center, located in McElroy 141 is a safe place on campus that seeks to build a community o 
equality and support for all BC students. Throughout the year the WRC organizes several programs to address th« 
needs of the BC community. These range from stopping in on cookie Mondays for a free snack, to the Love You 
Body campaign, and CARE (Concerned About Rape Education) weeks in the spring. The WRC also provides resources 01 
a variety of gendered issues, from brochures to peer counseling, to a library of great books. 



\M Organizations 



Mendel 

Society 



Ti 
■ 



he Mendel Society is the pre-health professions and biology club of Boston College. Although the majority of members 
are pre-medical students, others include pre-vet, pre-dental, and research oriented students. Club activities include 
inviting alumni physicians, as well as, current medical students to speak, the annual bioethics conference, and 

nedical school admissions night. Our goal is to help expose current students to health related careers and support their 

)ursuit of such ambitions. 



Karate 

Club 



PT^he Boston College Karate Club trains in the Shotokan style under the guidance of several black belt instructors. Shoto- 
I kan was brought to the United States by Sensai Kazumi Tabata. The BC Karate Club welcomes all students regardless 
K. of experience level. Training is divided into basics (kihon), forms (kata), and sparring (kumite), with emphasis placed on 
s!f-defense, meditation and control. Every semester, a tournament is held at one of the local universities. These competitions 
povide practitioners with valuable sparring experience, and give them the chance to demonstrate what they have learned over 
te course of the semester. Boston College is in the New England Collegiate Karate Conference (NECKC) and is consistently 
vll-represented at these tournaments. 



Learning 

to Serve 



Learning to Serve is primarily a second semester service and mentoring program for freshmen led by a council of 
upperclassmen. Small groups of freshmen, each led by one or two council members, spend four to five hours a week 
volunteering in the Boston community. Student involvement at placements ranges from tutoring at local schools to 
articipating in organized activities at Boys and Girls Clubs or assisting in local homeless shelters. Bi-weekly, the small 
roups meet for reflection upon their service experiences, as well as to discuss Boston College freshman issues in general. 
i the remaining weeks, the group meets as a whole to either take part in orientation or community-building acth ities or 
' hear from various speakers like BC Residential Life employees to community leaders and organizers. Learning to Serve 
not only an exciting opportunity for freshmen to get acquainted with each other and the city of Boston, but it is also an 
itroduction to what it really means to be "men and women for others."" 



Organizations 185 



T 



Pro-Life 

Club 



he Pro-Life Club of Boston College is dedicated to addressing all 
lite i>Miev focusing mostly on the topics of abortion, euthanasia, 
and the death penalty. Members take part in weekly educational 
outreach and volunteer projects in Boston to aid pregnant women in 
need, mothers, and children. The organization participates in various 
walks and marches around the country including the Respect Life Walk 
in Boston each October and the March for Life in Washington, DC. in 
January. We have monthly prayer vigils on campus in the Dustbowl and 
at the local Planned Parenthood. Members also have the opportunity to 
meet with other college students at various conferences throughout the 
year. As a group, we try to facilitate dialogue and provide education on 
life issues at BC by providing various speakers and programs. 




Photo submitted by Margaret Keefe 



ECOPLEDGE 



Ecopledge is an environmental activism group that seeks corporate responsibility, demanding that big companu 
adjust their business practices to better protect the environment. Recent victories include Dell, Office Max, Staple 
Office Depot, and Citigroup. Last year, Ecopledge was working on the Dell computer campaign, which strived to g<! 
the company to take their computers back from customers once they became obsolete. After taking the computers bad 
Ecopledge demanded that the computers be recycled safely here in the United States rather than shipped to China, where the 
were deconstructed in unsafe and unhealthy conditions by underpaid workers. Another noteworthy event includes rallying i 
Boston asking Shaws Supermarkets to remove genetically engineered ingredients from their store-brand products. The grou 
on campus participates in days of action for campaigns by tabling in McElroy, educating students on the issues and gettin 
them to sign petitions. 



A nimal Righ ts 

Organization I 

The Animal Rights Organization (ARO) was founded in 2001 by Kaitlin Amalthea '03. The organization works to 
help expose the ways in which animals are mistreated and abused in our society, and to help inspire people to make 
compassionate choices in their everyday lives. In order to make people aware of the benefits of a vegetarian diet anc 
to encourage them to be conscious consumers, the ARC has events including baking and giving away vegan food, videc 
screenings of the award-winning documentary, The Witness, and Peaceable Kingdom, as well as having speakers come talk 
cm a variety of topics like mad cow disease. The group tables in McElroy, and hands out information on vegetarianism, am 
also asks people to sign a pledge to give up meat for one day. Other activities include volunteering at animal shelters in the 
area, attending conferences in Boston, having bands come play, and working on getting better veggie options in the di n i n^ 
halls. 



niAitlOh . 



En vironment al 

Action Coalition 



The mission of the Environmental Action Coalition (EAC) is to preserve and appreciate nature through mutually 
encouraging components of envionmntal action and direction environmental experience. The EAC encourages the 
BC community to appreciate nature with annual hikes, clean-ups, and recycled cereal box notebook making. This 
ear, members are trying to educate themselves and the community more about the environmental issuee in the news, in 
olitics, and at Boston College. 



Dance 

Organization 



rhe goal of the Boston College Dance Organization is to promote dance of all types to the BC student community. In 
addition to this, DOBC provides students with the opportunity to choreograph and experiment with the art of dance. 
It allows more advanced students to utilize and expand their talents while providing beginners an open and fun 
)i ironment to learn about dance. The dancers work hard to dance with a freedom that comes from the love of the art. 




FISTS 



Females Incorporating Sisterhood Through Step (FI.ST.S), 
Boston Colleges official female step team, is designed to build 
strong, talented, and focused young women as well as excellent 
steppers. The number one goal of the group is to construct a sound 
sense of sisterhood amongst members through the activit) of step, so 
that as a team, they will be able to positively impact the community. 



Photos submitted by Khalihih Dale 



Organizations is - 



Eagles 

on the Weekend 



Eagles on the Weekend will provide the B.C. community with eleven social events for the 2006-2007 academic yea< 
Some events include Karaoke, a Red Sox outing, sports tournaments at the Plex, a movie night, talent show, Valentine 
Day dance, and a St. Patrick's Day event. The Red Sox outing will offer subsidized tickets while the rest of the event 
will be completely free. Hope to see you at one of our gatherings! 



Mock Trial 

Program 



Mock Trial is a student activity at Boston College designed to provide a forum for undergraduate Boston Collel 
students interested in learning about our country's legal system. Mock Trial is for students interested in the field 
law. or those that want to put their theatrical or debating talents to the test. Students can participate as attorneys I 
w itnesses (or both), or can take less theatrical roles as timekeepers or alternates. Students are placed on individual teams a • 
work during the year to prepare both the defense and the plaintiff/prosecution arguments, questions, and witnesses based' 
the fact pattern the program receives from the American Mock Trial Association. The BC Mock Trial teams compete at vario 
intercollegiate competitions throughout the year, including the American Mock Trial Associations Regional Competition he 
at other universities in the Northeast. All teams have a chance of competing in the National Tournaments held in St. Pai 
Minnesota and Des Moines, Iowa. For the past several years, the Mock Trial Program has sent teams to Nationals where th 
competed amongst the toughest teams in the country. 



Bellarmine 

Pre-Law Council 



The Bellarmine Pre-Law Council (BPLC) stands as the only student organization providing leadership for those student 
interested in attending law school. The club works with students, the University Dean's Office, outside professiona 
organizations, and academic centers as a means to provide for those needs. Throughout the year, BPLC organize 
mock LSAT administrations, negotiates discounts for BC students on LSAT courses, coordinates speakers and presentation 
regarding law and the legal profession, compiles data from law school applicants, and sponsors field trips and forums. 



nizatiom 



Society of Physics 



Students 



The Society of Physics Students at Boston College is a group of undergraduates majoring and interested in the field 
of physics. In particular, we aim to explore physics outside of the classroom and in its many applications. This 
includes visiting active laboratories of neighboring facilities which are engaged in cutting-edge research, as well as 
ecoming more closely involved with the research done by the faculty at Boston College. The SPS encourages interaction 
nd mentoring between the undergraduate classes as well as with graduate students and faculty, which is a crucial part of 
cientific pursuit. 



ALLIES 



he mission of Allies is to advance the understanding of issues, concerns, and needs regarding sexual orientation among 
undergraduates at Boston College. Allies offers undergraduate courses concerning sexuality and sexual orientation in 
the context of the University's Jesuit. Catholic tradition. Allies recognizes that psychosexual development is a critical 

:mponent of personal identity and that all personal development is a critical component of personal identity. The focus of 

Aiies is education and support, not advocacy. 







Cape Verdea n 

Student Association 



rhe Cape Verdean Student Association (CVSA) aims to promote and preserve the Cape Verdean culture and heritage 
here at Boston College through educational fundamentals, such as discussion panels and lectures, and through social 
proceedings, such as cultural events and festivities. In order to develop awareness within Boston's Cape Verdean 
(immunity, the organization annually hosts a program called Prospective Weekend. This program is directed at high school 
•■udents in the Boston area who are interested in attending college after graduation, mainly Boston College. The emphasis 
(f the program is to convince Cape Verdean students of the importance of going to college. Although the Cape Verdean 
'Udent Association sees it as necessary to reach out to the Boston community, the group also focuses its attention on gi\ ing 
jrvice to their native country. 



Organizations is" 



Caribbean 

Culture Club 



The Caribbean Culture Club was founded in October 1988 by Lisa Morgan of Jamaica. The drive behind such a big mov i 
was made in hopes that the Caribbean Culture Club would become the forum for members to express the commo 
bond that they all share. While building a home of unity, the organization hopes to be successful in providing 
familiar atmosphere for all members. It strives to foster an understanding of the diverse cultures of the Caribbean. In a 
effort to accomplish these goals, the club is structured to educate members and others concerning the social, economica 
and political problems of the Caribbean. The leaders believe that being involved in social outreach programs helps ther 
relate to minority Caribbean groups living in Boston. 



P uerto Rica n 

Association 



The Puerto Rican Association of Boston College wants to communicate to the student body the influence and importan 
of the Puerto Rican community by creating a liaison between island and mainland Puerto Ricans, by maximizi 
intercollegiate relations, and by breaking down stereotypes. The PRA holds forums and seminars to show a full ima 
of Puerto Rican culture, and helps the local Puerto Rican community with aide and community service. The Puerto Ric 
Association of Boston College wants to educate and create a better understanding of what it means to be a Puerto Rican. 



S outh Asia n 

Student Association 



The South Asian Students Association (SASA) founded in 1996 and previously known as the Indian Students Associatioi 
is a student-led organization that represents the countries of Bangladesh, India, Nepal, Pakistan and Sri Lanka. Th 
purpose of the organization is to provide Boston College students and faculty who are of South Asian descent, c 
those interested in South Asia, with an environment where they can meet, learn, and participate in cultural events wit 
others of the same interest. The South Asian Students Association is open to all, and strives for true cultural unity b 
celebrating differences in a fun and exciting atmosphere. Their biggest event of the year is the annual cultural shov 
consisting of many different dances ranging from traditional folk dance to class bhangra, a fashion show, singing, as we 
as performances from other cultural groups and schools. 



I'/) Organization* 



Sou theast A sian 

Student Association 



As a student organization, the Southeast Asian Students Association (SEASA) strives to educate, promote, and uphold 
the beautiful traditions of the Southeast Asian cultures through various campus activities. SEASAs objectives on 
campus are to support fellow Southeast Asian students and to provide a voice for themselves in student government, 
vlong with other Asian student organizations, SEASA brings diversity and creates a sense of community. However, it is 
i its own community that members hope to make the biggest difference by instilling pride and confidence in the younger 
eneration to pursue higher education with its annual Prospective Weekend program. 



MAPS 

Minority Association of Pre-Health Students 

p r^he Boston College Minority Association of Pre-Health Students (MAPS) strives to prepare and support under-represented 
I pre-health students with the knowledge, skills, and experience necessary when pursuing and attempting to enroll in 
L health institutions for future careers as health professionals. With frequent meetings throughout the year led by Dr. 

}vid Krauss, the group offers a wealth of information to the students of Boston College and offer many opportunities to 

:onect with alumni in the medical field. 



Urban 



Project 



I ■ ihe Boston College Urban Project (BCUP) will engage the larger Boston College community in social, political, and 
I economic topics and public policy questions relating to city life and government. Through forums, speakers, historic 
A. tours of the Boston metro-region, and student policy research and initiatives, the BCUP will endeavor to understand 
uban problems and issues through on-campus study and discussion and through off-site \ isits. 



Organizations 1 1 >I 



ACM 



The purpose of this student chapter of the Association for 
Computing Machinery (ACM) is to promote interest in the 
field of Computer Science. By bringing together students 
and faculty the ACM hopes to provide a forum in which people 
can share common interests outside of the classroom. Aside from 
monthly meetings, the Boston College Association for Computing 
Machinery hosts a guest lecture series, attends outside lectures at 
other colleges and universities, and partakes in the annual ACM 
Proiirammins Contest. 




Photos submitted by Michael Schuler 



Information 

Technology Club 



The Information Technology Club is dedicated to bringing Boston College undergraduate students more in tune wil 
technology and technological developments in business. Through a membership in this club, students will have tl 
opportunity to hear speakers from the industry, go to company headquarters in Boston, learn about technology throug 
special tutorials, and more. 



Macintosh 

Users Group 



The purpose of the Boston College Macintosh Users Group (BCMUG) is to provide a community that is informative 
social and supportive for those interested in the Macintosh and related technologies. Macintosh users are not highh 
represented on the BC campus but the group strives to promote its computers as well as products released by Appk 
Computers in the hopes that more will embrace its technology. In the past the group has sponsored video competitions with 
possible prizes such as a 20GB iPod. The group also attends the annual Mac users convention to discuss the latest news ir 
the Macintosh world. 



192 Organization! 



NO T FEATUR ED 

AH ANA Collective Theatre 

Alpha Epsilon Delta 

Alpha Sigma Nu 

Americans for Informed Democracy (AID) 

Amnesty International 

Arab Students Association 

Art Club 

Beta Gamma Sigma 

Biological Research Society 

Black Law Student Association 

b.l.u.e. 

The Boston College Review 

Buddhist Club 

Chess Club 

College Bowl 

Computer Science Academy 

CSOM Academies 

CSON Senate 

Dobro Slovo 

Eagle Volunteer Corps 

Episcopal Campus Ministry 

Free Radicals 

French Club 

Jenks Leadership Program 

LSOE Honors Program 

Martin Luther King, Jr. Student Activism Coalition 

Middle Eastern and Islamic Studies Student Association 

Minority Engineers 

Muslim Students Association 

National Student Nurses Association 

Nights on the Heights 

Operation Smile 

Operations and Strategic Management 

Partnership for Life 

Phi Beta Kappa 

Philosophy Association 

Pi Delta Phi 

Project 2000 

Psi Chi 

Psychology Club 

Rotaract Club 

Sigma Theta Tau 

Society for Neuroscience 

Sociology Club 

University Symphonic Band 

University Wind Ensemble 

Woods College of Advancing Studies Student Senate 



Organizations 193 




Edited by: Catherine Clark 



IF THE JAM-PACKED Superfan section in 
Alumni Stadium sparkling with waves of 
golden shirts during football games or the die 
hard fans who wait in the rain and cold to be 
the first to enter Conti Forum during basket- 
ball games are any indication of the impor- 
tance of sports at Boston College, it is hard 
to deny that in the quest for self-realization, 
sports are utterly essential. Whether it is the 
Co-ed Sailing team that has established itself 
as among the top three teams in the nation 
week after week, the Men's Basketball team 
that was preranked third in the country or 
the Women's Ice Hockey team that cracked the 
top ten, sports have not only become a foun- 



dation of one's experience here at BC but has 
affected the way campus life evolves. Superfan 
shirts are among the most cherished posses- 
sions that students receive from the Univer- 
sity and they wear them proudly as they cheer 
on their teams because in them they find a 
bond among each other that is entirely dif- 
ferent from the academic relationships they 
form with one another. It is Laura Georges 
bravely leading the Women's soccer team into 
the NCAA Tournament, it is the Women's Field 
Hockey team doing their best and ranking 
ninth in the nation and it is each of us pushing 
ourselves faster, harder and stronger than we 
ever thought we were capable of. Myra Chai 






m V"> 








Photos b\ David Trmlo. Boh McGralh & RC" Sk. 



Sports 195 



ATLANTIC COAST CONFERENCE 




PLAYING UP A LEVI 



DURING ITS INAUGURAL season in the Atlantic Coast Conference, Boston College met with 
new competitors and challenges. No longer competing against the Big East rivals that the teams 
had become accustomed to facing, the Eagles headed south to meet their new opponents. In 
sports like football and basketball, the Eagles continued to excel, but the adjustment to the new 
league did not prove easy for all of the teams. However, throughout the course of the seasons, the 
teams all passed the all-important benchmark of achieving their first win in the ACC. While 
many people both within and outside of BC were skeptical of their ability to compete in the 
tougher league, these fears were quickly silenced as BC won games and solidified their position. 
After a strong inaugural season, all of the teams hoped to continue their initial success and also 
to build upon it and affirm their strength. 








.ports 






Sports l l )7 




Hion, ',. David fni'ln 



>ports 




AFTER LOSING STAR 
players Will Blackmon, 
Mathias Kiwanuka, and 
Jeremy Trueblood to grad- 
uation and the NFL, head 
coach Tom O'Brien and 
the 2006 team needed to 
regroup for the coming 
season. Senior quarter- 
back Matt Ryan had his 
work cut out for him in 
the 2006 season to carry 
the team to a Bowl game, 
and to help Coach O'Brien 
secure the BC record for 
career wins. 



FOOTBALL 

DRIVING THROUGH THE COMPETITION 



Sports 199 



FOOTBALL 



TACKLING EVERY OBSTACL 



WHEN TOP SENIORS Mathias 
Kiwanuka, Will Blackmon, and 
Jeremy Trueblood graduated in 
the spring of 2006 and headed to the NFL. 
many wondered about the future of Eagles 
football. Fortunately, captains Josh Beek- 
man. Jolonn Dunbar, and Matt Ryan pos- 
Nessed the leadership qualities necessary 
for a successful season. The Eagles made 
the fall an exciting season at BC with two 
games ending in double overtime victories. 
Taking nothing for granted and learning 
from every game, the football team was able 
to perfect their strategy and defeat teams 
such as Virginia Tech, Florida State, and 
Maryland. Despite tough losses at Wake 
Forest and NC State, the Eagles continued 
to improve throughout the season and saw 
many players, including the three captains 
as well as Mark Herzlich. Jeff Smith, and 
Brian Toal, recognized for their individual 
efforts. During the season. Coach O'Brien 
was also recognized for his achievements 
alter a thrilling victory over Clemson which 
led him to top the list of all-time BC football 
coaching victories. The Eagles finished off 
the year with an exciting victory over Navy 
at the Meineke Car Care Bowl thanks to a 
last minute field goal by Steve Aponavicius. 
The team hopes to futher their success next 
year with new head coach Jeff Jagodzinski. 





iack Andre Callender displays his ability and avoids a tackle from his opponent. Above Left: A BC football player jumps to keep the ball out of the opponej 
hands. Above Right: A group ol players gather in the end/one for a huddle to diseuss a strategy and keep spirits high. Photos by David Trudo. 



200 Sport , 




Sports 201 



FOOTBALL 



f $ 



"When Tm on the field, I just try to hustle no matter 
what happens on the field. If I fall down, I get up and 
run after the ball. No matter what I do, I just keep 
going until the whistle blows and when you do that, 
good things happen." - Kevin Akins (Sophomore) 




Above: Kevin Challenger moves 

past the Clemson defense and 

into the endzone to score a 

touchdown for the Eagles. Top 

Right: Matt Ryan scans the 

field for an open teammate. 

Photos by David Trudo. 






202 Sr, 







J 



/^ir 



V*I 



*r£ 



lb 



kfe. 



Left: Trey Koziol, Brandon Robinson, and Kevin I 
lenger work together to push past the BYU d 
sive line. Above: Brandon Robinson outruns til 
opposing team to move the Eagles closer to victoi| 
Photos by David Trudo. 



Top Right: Alexandra Weishaupt and Keara Eagan are nothing 

but smiles as they perform a difficult stunt in front of the roar- 

ng crowd. Bottom Right: The girls entertain the fans during a 

timeout. Photos Courtes\ of Kutherine Waters. 



Left: Jen Crook. Heaher Jones, and 
Alexandra Weishaupt work together to 
awe the crowd in yet another amazing 
pyramid. Below: The girls show off for 
the Superfans. 
Photos Courtsev of Katherine Uarers. 




CHEERLEADING 



Sports 208 



WOMEN'S SOCCER 



CREATING BUZZ OVER the summer 
with a fifth place ACC preseason rank- 
ing and senior Laura Georges being 
named to the Hermann Trophy watch list, the 
women's soccer team entered this year with 
unstoppable energy and momentum. With 
man) early season victories under their belt, 
the women's team won their first ACC match- 
up of the season at home against Clemson 
with a score of 3-0. Strong performances were 
shown early on by the new freshmen Gina 
Di Marti no. named ACC women's soccer player 
of the week in October. Kelly Henderson, and 
Melissa Gimpel. Seeing tough losses to ACC 
opponents North Carolina and Duke, the team 
responded with victories over NC State, where 
they outshot their opponent 26-6, and Miami, 
where players Kia McNeill, Jenny Maurer, and 
Brianna Wilson-Byrne displayed strong per- 
formances. In a high pressure ACC match-up, 
the women's team upset number twelve ranked 
University of Virginia with a score of 1-0. Not 
only was the team recognized for its accom- 
plishments this year, but it also saw great sue 
cess on the individual level with Laura Georges 
being nominated for the FIFA Women's World 
Player of the Year for 2006, Jenny Maurer and 
Heather Ferron recognized for academic excel- 
lence, and Jenny Maurer, Laura Georges and 
Molly Dane selected to play in the NEWISA 
Senior Bowl. With such strong individual 
performances contributing to the creation of 
a strong team, the women's soccer team saw 
action in the NCAA tournament where they 
defeated Boston University and Rutgers, but 
sadly fell to Penn State in the Sweet Sixteen, 
and hope to continue their success next year. 




SHOOTING FOR THE STAR 




Io|< Kia M' '■ II lakes control of the ball and makes her way past the opponent. Above Left: The BC soccer team works together to make a defensive effort in clearing! 
ball down the field. Abov Right: Jenny Maurer dribbles the ball down the field on a breakaway. Photos by David I'rudo. 



204 S(. 




Spoils 205 



MEN'S SOCCER 




KICKING OFF IN THE RIGHT DIRECTION 



FOLLOWING A DISAPPOINTING 2005 season, the 
mens soccer team looked to rebound and improve on 
their previous season. In preseason polls, the Eagles 
were predicted to finish eighth in the ACC. After losing 
their season-opener, the Eagles rebounded with a sev- 
eral victories, including its first-ever ACC win when they 
defeated Virginia Tech 2-1 in overtime. Senior Sam Brill tied 
the game in the second half and junior Sherron Manswell 
netted the winning goal in sudden death overtime. As the 
season continued, junior Charlie Davies emerged as the 
team leader with many notable plays, including a hat trick 
against North Carolina State. Davies' performance earned 
him the ACC Player of the Week award. In addition to Davies, 
Brill also had several key plays, including the first goal in 
the North Carolina State game and one of the goals scored 
against Wake Forest. Junior goalkeeper Chris Brown played 
strongly in net throughout the season, helping the Eagles in 
their pursuit of victory. The Eagles went on to defeat 2nd- 
ranked Maryland as Davies became the ACC leader in both 
goals and points. In addition to their impressive victories 
on the field, the team also displayed their dedication to the 
game of soccer by participating in Boston's annual celebra- 
tion of Youth Soccer Month. The team finished the 2006 
regular season fifth in the ACC, but lost to Maryland in 
the opening round of the ACC tournament. At the end of 
the regular season, Davies had broken the school record for 
goals scored and was named the ACC Offensive Player of the 
Year, and sophomore Reuben Ayarna was named to the All- 
ACC second team. Although not predicted to excel during 
the 2006 season, the Eagles were able to secure their first 
conference win and prove that they belong in the ACC. 




Top: Issey Maholo 
and Charlie Davies 
embrace in celebra- 
tion of their victory. 
Right: Reuben Ayarna 
controls the ball in 
front of a defender. 
Top Photo Courier, <>t 
Issey Maholo. Bottom 
Photo by Duvnl Trudo 




206 Sf. 




7 * 




Clockwise from lop: Ryan Sherman looks to take a shot on goal. Mike Kontcoff controls 
the ball in between two defenders as he looks to score. Sam Brill passes to a teammate. 
Photos by David Trudo 



L 



Sports 207 



WOMEN'S CROSS COUNTRY 



PACING FOR VICTO 



THE 2006 WOMEN'S Cross Country 
team had a memorable season. The 
team opened their fall running schedule 
in September with a third place finish in 
the Boston College Invitational. They 
won their next meet, the UMASS Invi- 
tational, the following week. The Eagles 
performed well in their meets over 
the ensuing months, which included a 
fourth out of 46 teams in the New Eng- 
land Championships at the beginning of 
October. The women placed seventh in 
the ACC Championships but went on to 
win the NCAA District 1 Qualifiers by 
beating out 40 other schools. They fin- 
ished 30th at the NCAA Championships, 
which were held in Terre Haute, Indi- 
ana on November 20. The runners were 
led by senior captains Kathleen Smyth 
and Jesse Mizzone. They were a young 
squad, since freshmen comprised half of 
the team. Head coach, Randy Thomas, 
brought seasoned leadership to the team 
in his 14th year. He was honored with his 
second consecutive Northeast Regional 
Women's Coach of the Year Award. The 
runners also racked up numerous individ- 
ual honors. Five of their members were 
named to the NCAA Northeast Regional 
Cross Country Team. Sophomore Mal- 
lory Champa earned numerous accolades 
including All-ACC team member, ACC 
Per former of the Week, and All-Ameri- 
can team member. The team is looking 
forward to another great season in 2007. 




lop A {',< runri pa .1 her opponents on the last leg ol a race. Above Left: A HC runner 

roup al II ling ot a rate. All PhOtOS by Xhdnilli Studios. 



ion V r,s 





Sports 209 



MEN'S CROSS COUNTRY 



AAAKING TRACKS TO SUCCESS 



ENTERING INTO THE 2006 season, the mens cross country team had high 
hopes and expectations. With returning veterans Mark Alizzi and Stephen 
Walsh leading the team as co-captains, the Eagles looked to improve upon 
last years performance. After a hard summer of intense work outs, top runner Pat- 
rick Mel lea assessed this years team saying it was "the healthiest and deepest team 
that we've had so far coming off our training, so everyone's looking really good!' 
With ten promising young freshmen joining the group and the experienced leader- 
ship of coaches Randy Thomas and John Mortimer the season looked promising. 
After a fifth place finish in 2005 at the Dartmouth Invitation, third at the Quin- 
nipiac Invitational, third at the New England Championships and ninth at the ACC 
Championships, the Eagles saw room for improvement. This year's hard work paid 
off as they finished second in the BC Invitational, third in the Iona Invitational and 
moved up a place in the New England Championships, finishing second. The Eagles 
ended the season with a seventh place finish at the 2006 ACC Championship in Vir- 
ginia and hoped that this rebuilding year would allow them to continue improving. 














! from t ■'.' runner pulls ahead ol his 

opponent Rnuhing trong a EH runner prepare* to 

cross Ihc finish line. Ih': B( runnei slick ii the 

beginning of the race. A i ruin m a pushes himself 
toward* the finish line as tc ompetition 

Photo* b) Hob WcGrath/McGrath Studio 




{ 



210 Sporti 




Sports :n 



FIELD HOCKEY 



THE BC FIELD hockey team made 
great strides during the regular season of 
2006. The team achieved a 14-6 overall 
record under Head Coach Ainslee Lamb. 
Lamb joined BC in 2005 for its first year 
in the Atlantic Coast Conference. This 
\ear the team achieved a fourth place 
national ranking in October, which was 
the highest in the history of the pro- 
gram. Despite opening with a loss, BC 
rebounded with a win over Boston Uni- 
versity, which would be the start of a five 
game win streak. They dropped a game 
to number one Maryland but went on to 
win their next six games, including vic- 
tories over seventh ranked Virginia and 
fourth ranked Duke. The Eagles split 
their last six games, losing the last two to 
the University of Connecticut and Wake 
Forest. They finished the regular season 
record of 14-5 and 3-2 in the ACC. The 
number seven Eagles earned the fourth 
seed in the ACC Championships held in 
Chapel Hill. The team lost to fifth seeded 
Virginia and did not receive a bid to the 
NCAA Tournament for the first time since 
2002. The team will lose four important 
seniors this year, but great talent will still 
be present in the upcoming seasons. Five 
members of the team were named to the 
National Field Hockey Coach's Associa- 
tion All-Region roster, four of whom were 
underclassmen. Sophomore Bob Dirks 
was also named first team Ail-American 
and ACC Field Hockey Offensive Player 
ol the Year and junior Crystal Frates 
was named a third team All-American. 



SHOOTING TO VICTORY IN THE AC 




lop. Lauren I'arks carries the ball with greal control down the field. Above: The team . 
ers on the sidelines during a time out to regroup. All Photos Courtesy of the Field Hockc} ' 



212 Sports 



. 




Spoil- 213 



WOMEN'S SWIMMING & DIVINC 




AFTER AN EXTREMELY successful 
2005 season that included victories 
over Boston University and other local 
rivals, as well as finishing eleventh place at the 
ACC Championships in College Park, Mary- 
land, the BC Women's Swimming and Diving 
team entered this year with a drive to continue 
bringing in victories. The season opener took 
the Eagles to Atlanta, Georgia for a matchup 
against Emory. The team came away from 
the meet with a win thanks to strong per- 
formances by freshman Ashley Leprine and 
sophomores Caroline Byron and Kelly Leahy. 
After a tough loss in their first ACC matchup 
against Clemson, the team bounced back for a 
victory against Brandeis as junior Maeve Bren- 
nan swept the diving competition. The follow- 
ing meets against teams such as Colgate and 
LeMoyne resulted in more success for the team 
topped off by first place finishes by senior Kim 
Garcia and freshman Anna Smith. With a great 
momentum at the beginning of the season, the 
Eagles looked forward to more successes at 
the New England and ACC Championships. 




' 



A BC diver sets up on the (living 
\ I'/ iwimmer makes strong strokes to pass her 
opponent In midair, a BC diver executes a clean dive. 

Photoi by David lni<i<> 



214 Sports 




Sports 215 



AFTER CONCLUDING LAST year's strong 
season with a winning record, the mens 
swimming and diving team wasted no time in 
continuing their success in the 2006-2007. Defeating 
Brandeis University 141-112 in the season opener, the 
team saw strong performances from two wins by junior 
Bill\ Schw itter in both the fifty and hundred yard free 
style as well as Michael Hogan, Dan Kollar, and Andy 
Faughnan taking the top three places in the thousand 
yard freestyle. Senior Christopher Wilson-Byrne con- 
tributed to the win with a victory in the one meter 
diving event. After a loss to Bucknell, the team bounced 
back with victories over Dartmouth and Providence. 
In November, the mens team took second place at the 
Boston University Terrier Invite where senior Thomas 
Martz and freshman Brian Cogan took first place in 
their respective events and other swimmers took top 
three finishes. Such success in the northeast led the 
men's swimming and diving team to compete in Key 
Largo. Florida at the Orange Bowl Classic in January. 

r 




LIFE IN THE FAST LAN 




" 











I 




ffr 





Tbp : .' miner pulls ahead with a Itrong breast Stroke. Above Left: A HC diver prepares lo jump off the board al a meet. Above Right: A BC swimmer surges 

through the pool with a powerful butterfly. All photos by U.nul Inulo. 



2V> Sports 



. 




Spor^ 217 




fhiitu by David Initio 



-ports 




AFTER BOTH THE 
men's and women's bas- 
ketball teams made it to 
the Sweet Sixteen of the 
NCAA Tournament in 

2006, hopes were high for 
the 2007 season. The loss 
of leaders Craig Smith 
and Louis Hinnant on 
the men's side, as well as 
Aja Parham and Brooke 
Queenan from the wom- 
en's, left a lot of open spots 
to be filled. Both teams 
looked forward to a return 
to the Sweet Sixteen in 

2007, and hopefully even 
further success. 



BASKETBALL 



SHOOTING FOR THE TOP 



Sports 21 l > 



MEN'S BASKETBALL 




LAYING UP THE COMPETITION 



WITH LAST YEAR'S trip to the 
Sweet Sixteen in the NCAA tour- 
nament still fresh in their minds, 
this years men's basketball team was ready 
to achieve last year's success and more by 
showing the nation what they were capable 
of. Thanks to confidence within the team 
and support from the fans behind them, the 
team was ready to prove themselves. Kick- 
ing off the year w ith a victory of 86-47 over 
New Hamsphire. the season started off with 
a bang. Despite early losses to teams such as 
Vermont and Providence, the Eagles defeated 
ACC rival Maryland with a score of 73-62. 
The team continued on from there by going 
6-0 in the conference, only to break the 
streak with a loss to Clemson. Senior Jared 
Dudley also received ACC Player of the Week 
honors, further boosting the teams confi- 
dence. After the sudden dismissal of Sean 
Williams and Akida McClain, the team was 
driven to work extra hard and maintain their 
momentum. In an exciting matchup at home, 
Senior Sean Marshall made things exciting 
w hen he sunk a threepoint shot at the buzzer 
to defeat Florida State by one point. With 
great team chemistry, determination, and 
skill, the Eagles were on the road to further 
success in the ACC and NCAA tournament. 




1* ^W * 





220 Sf> 



ti: G ird T.res< tin ball down the court while his teammates set up a play Above Right: Forward Jared Dudley ignores his opponent while he | 

iboott lor three point . Photos by David Trudo. 










Above: Scan Mar- 
shall reaches high 
to make a lay up. 
Far Lett: John 
Oates plays tough 
defense against 
Miami. Left: Mar- 
que/ Haynes and 
T\relle Blair race 
their opponent 
down the court to 
make a play Photos 
b\ Du\ M TruJo. 



Sports ::i 



WOMEN'S BASKETBALL 



THIS YEAR'S WOMEN'S basketball team 
entered the season with a drive for nothing 
less than victory and they made this clear 
to their opponents at the start. Winning their 
season opener against Sacred Heart at home with 
a powerful 68-46 victory, the women's team made 
it clear they would settle for nothing less than 
success. The team stayed hot through Novem- 
ber until they lost a tough game to sixth ranked 
Ohio in double overtime. Nonetheless, the women 
bounced back with a win over Central Connecti- 
cut and continued their winning pattern over 
teams such as Maine. Colgate, and Massachu- 
setts. The first ACC victory came to the women's 
team at home in a 69-64 victory over Clemson 
where freshman Ayla Brown scored a career high 
eighteen points and Sarah Marshall and Kathrin 
Ress each had twelve. The seniors of the team 
recognized the importance of team unity and 
worked especial ly hard to build and maintain it 
throughout the season. With a great team bond 
and a determination to win, the women's basket- 
ball team hoped to return to the NCAA tourna- 
ment this spring and repeat last year's success. 




DUNKING THEIR OPPONENT 



\ « 



v x 



■* 






> 



■*r- * 



% 




lop: A B( pla;. r ibbles the ball while she waits lor her teammates to move to their positions. Above I. ell: Kathrin Ress moves to take a shot from the three point ranf 
Above Right: 1 1 n intently to advice Irom a coach during a time out. PhotOS by K;ttic Modzelewski. 



222 S| 




1 anil-Mil I 



3 



* 









Above: Guard Sarah Mar- 
shall takes a shot while 
her teammates move for 
the rebound. Far Left: 
Sarah Marshall keeps the 
ball awaj from her Dre\el 
opponent. Left: Forward 
Kathrin Ress stands on the 
free throw line preparing 
to take her shots. Photos 
b\ Katie Modzekwski. 



Sports 223 



MEN'S TENNIS 



COMPETING IN THE fall and spring, 
the men's tennis team saw plenty of 
success this year. The season kicked 
off at the Northeast Intercollegiate Invita- 
tional at Brown University where the team 
encountered victories richt off the bat. Fresh- 
man Thomas Nolan went 4-0 in the singles 
match while sophomore Alex Rastorgouev 
advanced to the finals and overall, the team 
ended 23-11 in singles and 6-7 in doubles. 
Shortly after, the team traveled to Wiscon- 
sin for the Milwaukee Classic where senior 
Soma Kesthely won two out of three singles 
matches. In October, men's tennis faced 
schools from the Ivy League, Big East, and 
AtlantielO conferences at the E.C.A.C. Team 
Championships. Both doubles teams were 
victorious against Princeton on the first 
day of competition and the Eagles saw con- 
tinued success in the next few days against 
Stony Brook and Harvard. The season 
picked up again in January where the team 
dropped a match against Brown, despite 
strong performances all around. Bouncing 
back at the Harvard Invitational, the Eagles 
sent two players to the semi-finals. With a 
promising start in 2007, the men's tennis 
team hoped to finish out the season strong. 




ACING THE COMPETITIC 




l"|< nil player follows through on a forehand from the baseline. Above Led: A tennis player uses the momentum of his body to deliver a strong ser 

i reaches to make a backhand. All PhotOt by Myru Ch;ii. 



224 Sports 




Sports 







226 Spt 




FOR THE SEVENTH 

time in the last nine 
years, the Men's Hockey 
team has been pre- 
dicted to finish first in 
Hockey East. The Wom- 
en's Hockey team came 
in second behind New 
Hampshire in their pre- 
season polls. During 
the 2006 - 2007 season, 
Captains Brian Boyle, 
Michelle Lombardi, and 
Deborah Spillane had 
the task of continuing 
the legacy of excellence 
within the Boston Col- 
lege Hockey Program. 



HOCKEY 

SKATING TO VICTORY 



Sports 227 



MEN'S HOCKEY 



ICING THE OPPOSITIO 



BOUNCING BACK FROM a heart- 
breaking loss at the NCAA champi- 
onship to Wisconsin last spring, the 
hockey team, led by Captain Brian Boyle and 
Assistant Captains Joe Rooney and Mike 
Brennan. entered the season ready to repeat 
their previous success. Favored in preseason 
polls as the number one team in the Hockey 
East, and the hockey team won their season 
opener 5-3 against Northeastern University. 
The team quickly gained momentum with 
early victories and saw redemption in back- 
to-back victories over the national champi- 
ons in Wisconsin, which included at 3-0 shut 
out. The Eagles continued on their path to 
victory with wins against a number of teams 
including Vermont. Merrimack, and Maine. 
After the postponement of the highly antici- 
pated home match up against rivals Boston 
University, the hockey team brought home 
a 1-0 victory the next night at BU's Agga- 
nis Arena. With individual players such as 
Brian Boyle, Joe Rooney, Cory Schneider, 
and Benn Ferriero receiving Hockey East 
Player of the Week Honors and Dan Bertram 
and Nathan Gerbe playing for Team Canada 
and Team USA, respectively, in the World 
Juniors tournament, the hockey team had 
the talent required for a victorious season. 




bp SophoniOl B in I crriero lakes a laceoH. Above I-cft: Assistant Captain Mike Brennan makes a pass through his opponents to elear the puek. Above Right: Ca| 
Brian Boyle t.>> I and scores. Photo* by David TYudo. 



21% Sp 




. 







* 



*►- ' 



\ 





Top: A line gath- 
ers in the middle of 
the ice to celebrate a 
goal. Above Assis- 
tant Captain Joe 
Roonev carries the 
puck past his oppo- 
nent. Above Left 
Goalie Cor) Sch- 
neider and BCdelen- 
semen attempt to 
block a shot on goal 
Lett: Benn bernero 
lakes control of the 
puck as he is sur- 
rounded b\ three 
opponents. Photos 
b\ Dai id Trudo. 



spoils 229 



WOMEN'S HOCKEY 




THE 2005-2006 SEASON was one that the 
women's hockey team would not soon forgot. 
In addition to playing in the Hockey East 
championship game, the Eagles also won their first 
ever Beanpot championship. Following these suc- 
cesses, high expectations were in place for the 2006- 
2007 season, as the team was ranked 10th in the 
nation in preseason polls. The women's hockey team 
skated straight to victory in their season-opener 
against Rensselaer. Freshmen Anna McDonald 
and Allie Thunstrom both scored their first colle- 
giate goals and freshman goalkeeper Molly Schaus 
turned away 18 shots in the 2-1 victory. Following 
this game. Schaus was named the Women's Hockey 
East Defensive Player of the Week award. The tenth- 
ran ked Eagles continued their impressive play 
against Quinnipiac in their first home game of the 
season. Sophomore Meghan Fardelmann recorded 
a hat trick in the 6-0 victory. The victory was made 
possible with assists from Michelle Lombardi, 
Linday Wright. Beck)- Zavisza, and Megan Keever. 
Registering her first shutout of the season, Schaus 
blocked all 23 shots during the victory and earned 
Hockey East ITECH Rookie of the Week honors. 
The team was victorious in their next game against 
the University of Maine with a 5-3 win. McDonald 
and Thunstrom both scored short-handed goals, 
while Fardelmann, Zavisza, and Kelli Stack scored 
power-play goals. After a strong start to the season 
with a 5-1-1 record, the Eagles looked for continued 
success and hoped to defend their Beanpot title. 






From top to bottom: 
Megan Keever fights 
for the puck along the 
boards against another 
BL opponent. Lindsay 
Wright waits for the 
puck to drop during a 
faceoff. 
Photos by David Trudo. 




230 Sf. 






"The chance to put on 
the Boston College jersey 
and represent this school 
and this team is an unbe- 
lievable experience." 
-Cristin Stuart (Junior) 



Clockwise from top: Becky Zavisza takes a faceoff against Boston University Moll) Schaus 
watches the offense across the ice while she waits in the goal. The team celebrates a third period 
insurance goal. 
Photos b\ Din id Trudo. 



Sports 2 ; i 



FENCING 



FOILING OUR COMPETITOI 



THIS YEAR'S FENCING season 
began with an invitational tourna- 
ment at Smith College known as 
"The Big One" where BC placed finalists in 
ti\e of six events. For the mens team, junior 
Andrew Faubel contributed to a day of sue 
cess by medaling with a third place finish 
out of sixty-one fencers. Sophomore Ian 
Griswold also added to the team's success 
earning a bronze medal in the sabre. The 
women performed well at the invitational, 
particularly in the epee event, where fresh- 
man Heather Ciganek earning a bronze. 
Later in the season, the teams competed at 
a meet against Yale, MIT, Vassar, and St. 
John's where freshman sabreur Malcolm 
Conely gave a standout performance. The 
women's team saw a great deal of potential 
in their relatively young team where four 
of nine starters were freshmen. The team 
also competed at the Northeast Fencing 
Conference at Brown University where they 
faced Brown, MIT, and Brandeis. With the 
building momentum from strong victories 
and powerful determination, the fencing 
team hoped to encounter more successes 
and conclude the season on a high note. 






§ 




. ;ii Ins oppone n l dui ing a i ompetition and hopes lor a win. Above: A B( ' fencer faces her competition with determination, strength, and sirat 
Photot Courtesy «/ the Fern ing Team. 



232 V 




Top: A BC fencer duels at 
The Big One. Far Left: Pre 
paring to take his stance, a 
BC fencer anticipates his 
opponent's next move. Lett: 
A BC fencer dodges a touch 
b\ his opponent by being 
quick on his feet. Below: 
Taking control of the 
match, a BC fencer goes lor 
the opponent. Photos Cour- 
tesy of the Faxing Tc:im. 



Sports 233 



VOLLEYBALL 



SERVING UP THE HEAT 



AFTER HAVING THREE players named to 
the All-ACC academic team and earning the 
2005 ACC sportsmanship award for the pre 
vious season, the women's volleyball team hoped to 
continue their success on and off the court. Armed 
with new coaching staff, including assistant coach 
Kristen Shockley. and a strong group of senior lead- 
ers, the team was well prepared to kick off its second 
ACC season. According to an ACC Preseason Volley- 
ball poll. Duke was the team to beat. Starting off the 
\ear with plenty of hype was senior Allison Anderson, 
one of eighteen players named to the Preseason All- 
ACC team and BCs record holder for digs in a single 
season with 706 in 2004. Despite seventeen kills and 
sixteen digs by Junior Kelsey Johnson, the Eagles fell 
to Belmont University in their season opener. Boune 
ing back, however, the team came together for a win 
in the ACC opener against Miami. The Eagles saw 
key victories against ACC teams such as Virginia 
Tech and Maryland as a result of kills by Tori Thomp- 
son and Dorota Niemczewska and sets from Brit- 
tany Pierpont. Learning from last year's inaugural 
season, the 2006 Eagles had their eyes set on victory. 




from lop! Shardai Davis focuses and awaits the opponent's serve. Brittany Pierpont sets up a play for the hitters. Allison Anderson receives the ball in gltd 
passing form. Photo* courtesy ol Jumic Walsh 



234 S[- 




Sports 23S 



WOMEN'S TRACK 




STRIDES AHEAD OF THE COMPETITIO I 



FINISHING OFF THE last season with a strong 
showing at the ACC Championship in North 
Carolina, which included the school heptathalon 
record being broken by Kasey Hill, the women's track 
team entered this season with high expectations. Last 
spring saw great success at prestigious meets such as 
the Penn Relays in Philadelphia and the New England 
Championship where the) placed ninth. Strong efforts 
from all members allowed the team to excel, with many 
personal and school records being broken. The worn- 
ens track team looked forward to opening their season 
against Harvard and competing in other meets against 
various New England schools. With the momentum of 
last year's success, the team hoped for more victories 
at the ACC Indor Championships, the NCAA Cham- 
pionships, and even a trip to Orlando, Florida at the 
Walt Disney World Invitational. The outdoor season 
concludes with the New England Championship before 
the team travels to California for the NCAA Champi- 
onships in June. The indoor season kicked off with a 
victory over Harvard. This seasons captains, seniors 
Laurel Burdick. Kasey Hill. Julie Regan and Kath- 
leen Smyth, had high hopes for the team and were 
excited to lead their teammates toward more success. 





runner pushes herself to the limit during a race. Above Right: After rounding a bend, a BC runner prepares to hand off the baton. Photos ( 'ourtesj ol th 
Won am. 



236 Sp 




Sports 237 



SWINGING FOR THE FENCI 



WITH RETURNING SENIOR Jenna 
Macchi named to the ASA Women's 
Major Fast Pitch Championship Ail- 
American first team this August, the Eagles were 
off to a great start. Macchis performance in the 
2006 season (Atlantic Coast Conference All-Con- 
ference second team and the ACC All-Tournament 
team) meant the girls would be in good hands 
this year. Highlights of fall season tournaments 
included the 3-1 win against Vermont thanks to 
solid plays by Amanda Klimczak and Savana Lloyd 
and a 3-2 defeat of Harvard. By the Providence fall 
tournament, the girls had improved from their 2-1 
victories and defeated Rhode Island 6-1 with nota- 
ble plays made by Savana Lloyd, Britney Thomp- 
son. Amy Tunstall. Amy Obrest, Taylor Peyton, and 
Renee Ramos. The tournament closed out with a 
5-4 victory against longtime Big East enemy, Provi- 
dence. Amanda Klimczak and Angela Pandolfo 
earned the win with three strikeouts and a three 
run homerun in the fourth, respectively. When the 
score tied. Britney Thompson and Ashley Obrest 
brought the team back by hitting back-to-back 
doubles. The Eagles defense performed flawlessly 
and maintained the victory in the final inning with 
three straight outs. With such a great start the fall 
tournaments, there was no doubt the girls would 
perform well throughout the rest of the season. 



ST 



w^tmmm^ ■*■ ■ ■_ __^_JJ^^^^^1 






W^iiiH 



«"■*-**-• 




lop I hurl the ball to a teammate in order to make an out. Photo Courtesy <>l Ashley Obrest, Above Left: The players gather on the pitched 

to 'liscuss Itrateg) Photo < OUTtesy ol Ashley Obrest. Above Right: A player lakes her stance at the plate awaiting a pitch. Photo Courtesy of Amanda Brooks. 



238 Sport, 




Sports : ; " 



WOMEN'S TENNIS 



QUEENS OF THE COU 



AFTER A TOUGH loss to North Caro- 
lina at the ACC Championships last 
season, the women's tennis team 
was read> to put the past behind them and 
strive for greater success in the 2006-2007 
season. The team opened its season in Sep- 
tember at the fourteenth annual William 
and Mary Invitational against teams such as 
Penn, Richmond, and ACC rivals Maryland, 
Virginia Tech. North Carolina, and Virginia. 
With standout performances from sopho- 
mores Lana Krasnopolsky and doubles part- 
ners Dasha Cherkasov and Lauren Cash, the 
women's tennis team saw many victories at the 
invitational. In October, the team competed 
in the USTA Women's Tennis Invitational 
where sophomore Alina Sullivan defeated the 
number one seed from Harvard in her first 
match and senior Lindsey Nash advanced to 
the quarter finals. Doubles team Brittany Del- 
aney and Gia Nafarrete left the tournament 
with a winning record. At the ITA Regional 
Championships in New Hampshire, the team 
saw more success with Lana Krasnopolsky 
defeating the number two seed. The women's 
tennis spring season kicked off in late Janu- 
ary at home where they defeated Army 6-1. 
The women's tennis team hoped to see contin- 
ued success throughout the rest of the season. 




•A the team travel in a van to the Brown Invitational. Above Left: The tennis players take a break while on the road lor a tournament. Photo Courtes) < 
l.mtl Right I be team crowds in for a picture on their way to the William and Mary Invitational. I'liotos Courtesy of Brittany Delaney: 



2V> Spo r,s 




Above: Three tennis players 
Mick together on the side of the 
court to cheer on their team- 
mates during a match. Photo 
Courier) of Brit tuii\ Ddancy 
Left: Friends on and off the 
court, two members o\ the team 
build team unii\ while traveling. 
Photo Courtesy of Lindses Wash. 



Sports 241 



SKIING 



THE MEN'S AND women's ski teams each 
returned great depth for the 2007 season. 
They benefited from the leadership of 
second-year coach Peter Endres. The men ended 
the 2006 season with a fourth place finish at 
both the USCSA Eastern Regionals and National 
Championships in Sugarloaf. Maine. The women 
took first place in the Eastern Regionals and fin- 
ished third at the National Championships with 
a second place overall finish in the slalom race. 
The ski team opened the 2007 season at the 
L'CONN Carnival in Cranmore, New Hampshire. 
The Women placed first in the giant slalom and 
third in the slalom. The men were first in the 
giant slalom and second in the slalom, placing 
three skiers among the top nine of both events. 
The women's team was second in the Eastern Col- 
legiate Ski Conference after the Carnival, while 
the mens team earned the top rank in the Confer- 
ence. The team expected even more improvement 
and success throughout the 2007 winter season. 




HITTING THE SLOI 



* 






v 






t^zz- 



\^ 




turn down the bill. Above Left: Picking up speed, a skier races down the slope and focuses on technique. Above Right: A skier stays low tOgr< J 
maintain top speed PhotOt Courtesy oi John Tkyloi Risky 



242 Sports 




Top Left: Kicking up snow, a skier keeps their 
eyes on the finish line. Photo Courtesy of John 
Thylot Risky. Top Right: A BC skier takes a look 
at the slope and the other competitors. Photo 
Courtesy of the Ski Team Above: A skier moves 
around a gate on his waj down the slope. PbotD 
Courtes) of the Ski Team Left: Pushing hard 
to the end. a skier approaches the bottom of 
the hill. Photo Courte^\ of John Ta\Ior Ri*le\. 



Sports 243 



WOMEN'S LACROSSE 



STICKS OF FU 



LEADING THE WOMEN'S lacrosse team this 
year, captains Meg Davis, Brennan Joyce, 
Katie Wagoner, and Elizabeth Kadison had 
great plans for hard work and success. After seeing 
an assistant coaching change in the fall, the team 
entered the spring with determination and passion 
for victory. In addition to practicing hard, the team 
also hosted winter clinics for high school and middle 
school lacrosse players in which the BC women 
coached the young players, helping them improve 
their skills. With their season kicking off in a match 
up against University of Maryland in College Park, 
MD in February, the team hoped to continue to 
improve and continue to see success in the ACC. 




lop I, -It \ I.K 

l-cli Running 




- 1 r nit her opponent and moves toward the goal. Top Right: Reaching out her stick, a IK' player intercepts 

I down the field, a player cradles the hall to maintain possession. Above Right: A BC play launches the ball to a t 



tall It 
earn mate. 



(an the oppone 
All Photo- In 



Ml. v 



2*4 Sfiorts 




Spoils 24? 



SAILING 




WINNING ON THE WAT 



ENTERING THE SEASON ranked in the 
top fifteen, both the co-ed and women's 
sailing teams were among the best in the 
country. The co-ed team was ranked number 
one in preseason polls and, after seeing many 
victories in the first few months, was able to 
hold this spot well into the season. Both teams 
qualified early for the Atlantic Coast Champi- 
onships. At the Atlantic Coast Freshman Cham- 
pionship, the freshman squad made up of Evan 
Cooke. Sandy Williams, Avery Brooks, and 
Field Osier took first place for the third con- 
secutive year. The sailing teams also received 
first place trophies at the Michael Horn Trophy 
and Crews Regattas during the same week- 
end. The team saw yet another strong season 
thanks to flawless performances from all 
members, man) - of whom received national 
honors in the off season, such as Adam Roberts 
who qualified for the 2006 US Sailing Team. 





• jh>: A co-' sailing pair orl together to control the boa) during a regatta. Top Left: A group ol Boston College boats gather on the water. Above Left: Two it 
bers ol tfl on their individual responsibilities in the boat. Above Right: Two co-ed sailors lean to turn the boat. All photos by McGruth Studios 



lAb Sports 




Sports 247 



MEN'S TRACK 




RACING THROUGH THE AC 



THIS YEARS BOSTON College 
Mens Track team was led by 
senior captains Mike Alizzi, 
Christopher Caulfield. and Daniel 
LaFave. The team also benefited 
from the knowledgeable guidance of 
head coach Randy Thomas and his 
four assistant coaches. This marked 
Thomas' 14th year as director of the 
track and cross country programs 
and his 19th year with the school. He 
felt that the 2006-2007 squad had a lot 
of strength especially in the middle 
distance events. The teams spring 
season was longer than that of many 
other sports. Their first meet was 
held at the beginning of December 
and had the potential to go through 
January when NCAA Championships 
were held. Boston College had many 
strong performances and members 
of each grade excelled in their first 
meet of the season, the Harvard Invi- 
tational. No team scores were taken. 
The next month, coming off Christ- 
mas vacation, the team finished with 
a 1-2 record in the Boston University 
Quad Meet. They expected to have 
continued improvement through- 
out the remainder of the season. 



lop: Ad oncentiatet as he rounds a bend. Above: Louis 

' 'he bar during the Inj-'li jump. Above Right: Jeremy 

/ Id pi to pass the baton to a teammate. PhotOi Courtesy <>/ tht 

! ■ I .mi. 




24S Sport* 




Sports 20 



BASEBALL 






HOME RUN HITTEF! 



T 



|HE BASEBALL TEAM entered the 2007 
season ready for victory after a previous 
season and summer of successes. During 
the summer. Junior pitcher Terry Doyle was named 
to the Cape Cod All-Star Game while teammates 
Ryne Reynoso and Kevin Boggan were selected in 
the 2006 Major League draft. The team withnessed 
changes when assistant coach of three years Mikio 
Aoki succeeded head coach Peter Hughes's position 
when Hughes accepted a head coaching position at 
Virginia Tech. Due to the teams familiarity with 
Coach Aoki. they were able to transition and move 
ahead smoothly. To conclude its fall season, the base 
ball team participated in the fifth annual Sonny Nie 
takis World Series where the team split into Maroon 
and Gold teams and faced each other. In November, 
the team signed thirteen high school students whom 
they believed would be assets to the team, helping 
them to gain a place at the ACC Championships. With 
a new coaching staff and plenty of individual talent 
in the dugout, the baseball team had great plans of 
success this season and were on the road to victory. 





in winds up for a pitch. Photo < 'ourtesy <>t Nick Asselin, Above Right: A BC player follows through with a swing for additional power. Phoioi S 
tcsy a! fen 



250 Sj, 



*'JV* /* 






ss m n t i B \ ■ J rf 7 - Cy, i " 



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* ~ *-*«,■ * ♦ 




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Top: The team lines up on the field at the beginning of a game. Photo Courtesy afftfer /rates. 
Above: Tvvoplayersrun back tothedugout at theendof the inning.P/iofoC<iurfi'N_\<j/'WA Use/;/). 
Left: A BC player follows through with B s\\ ing at the plate. Photo Courier) of And McGuire. 



Sports 29 



WOMEN'S GOLF 



OPENING THEIR SEASON in New 
Hampshire for the Dartmouth Invi- 
tational, the Boston College women's 
golf team competed against sixteen other 
schools including Harvard. Columbia, and 
Yale where they took seventh place. Fresh- 
man Megan Martinek finished sixteenth 
overall with a score of +21 and posted a team 
best round of 76 for her first tournament at 
the collegiate level. Traveling to University 
Park. Pennsylvania for a three day tourna- 
ment at Penn State, the teams great efforts 
paid off in an eight place finish led by fresh- 
man Sara Gogolak. Strong play was also 
shown by juniors Lara Smilnak and Katie 
Napleton and freshman Hannah Shin. After 
a disappointing cancellation of the ECAC 
golf championship in Williamsburg, Vir- 
ginia, the golf team attended the Spider Invi- 
tational in Richmond where they took fourth 
place with a score of 661 points. The two day 
tournament hosted twelve schools. Gather- 
ing momentum from the successful begin- 
ning of their fall season, the women's team 
captured a first place finish at the Sacred 
Heart Invitational where it edged out Boston 
University who took second. The spring 
schedule kicked off in March in Arizona. 




FAIRWAY TO VICTOI 




golf CI examine! the llaiH ol the green before taking her putt. Above Left: hiking a step awa> from the ball, a golfer prepares lo take a practice SWIH| 

befor ' .it All Photos by McGrath Studios. 



252 Sports 




Sports 253 



MENTS GOLF 



AFTER WITNESSING GREAT success in the 
ACC last season, the BC Mens Golf team saw 
areas where they could improve this year as 
well as where they could continue to succeed. The 
team took eleventh place at the 2006 ACC Champi- 
onship and had great plans to excel this year. Play- 
ing in both the fall and the spring, the Men's Golf 
team dedicates a great deal of time and effort to their 
sport. The team travelled to states such as Maryland. 
Texas, and Virginia to compete in tournaments like 
the Towson, Joe Agee, and Roadrunner Invitation- 
als. This year the team saw many victories and great 
leadership as a result of strong performances put 
in by players such as seniors Ryan Sturma and Kyle 
Kelly, juniors Alex Snickenberger, Bob Reed, and Jim 
Granello. and freshman Jan Prokop. During their fall 
schedule, the team tied for second place at the ECAC 
Championships in Rhode Island, a two round tour- 
nament attended by eleven schools throughout New 
England. In addition to continued success, the team 
hoped to see individual players recognized and hon- 
ored for various awards as has happened in the past. 
The fall schedule ended with a ninth place finish at 
the Seascape Invitational tournament in North Caro- 
lina and the spring schedule kicked off in March. 




GOING FOR THE GREI 




up a pull. ;i W golfel attempts to get the ball to the hole. Above Right: A BC golf team member follows through on a fairway shot and follows 
Allpha I Grath Studiot 



254 S|. 





m 


Top: A BC goll team 
member executes 


\ to ff t 


ureal form in his 


swing Above Left: 


m B M h£ ^\ 


Chipping ihe ball 


BK^_ ■ ^^H ^ ^^ 


back to the fairway 


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Vbove A BC golfer 


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tries to gel the ball out 


^ "J Li_ W I rV 


of ihe sand. Far Lett: 


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Marking his ball on 
the green, this team 


BJ§ ^9^r ^^u )mj 


member prepares to 


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putt. Lett: The golfers 


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earn their clubs while 


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walking up the fair- 


^Ri i 


wax to their balls. All 


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photos bj \LCinith 


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Studios ^^^^^^^^^^^^_ 


^ -^■h^h=»_^{ 





Sports 255 



WOMEN'S ROWING 




STROKING TO SUCCE 



THE WOMEN'S CREW Team 
competes in both the spring and 
fall seasons. Their rowers are 
among the most dedicated athletes at BC. 
Even when they are not getting up for 
5:00 a.m. practices on the water during 
their seasons, they continue to train and 
lift weights throughout the winter. The 
team races in events throughout the 
country in eight and four person boats. 
Boston College finished the 2006 spring 
season with a fifth place overall finish 
in the ACC Championships in Clemson, 
South Carolina. It was the first ACCs for 
the program. The novice eight did partic- 
ularly well with a second place finish. In 
May. the team sent 5 boats to the Grand 
Finals in the ECAC/METRO Champi- 
onships which were held in Worcester. 
The Crew team finished off the season 
with a 13th place finish in the East- 
ern Sprints. They were honored to have 
senior Bridget Regan named to the All- 
ACC team. Four of the rowers won the 
Collegiate Rowing Coaches Association 
National Scholar-Athlete Award. The Fall 
2006 season saw the addition of another 
strong class of rowers - 37 novice women 
joined the team. The rowers competed in 
three events during the fall season. They 
opened with a great start at the Head 
of the Charles in October. The team 
entered boats in the Championship and 
Club eights and fours. The Varsity Eight 
finished within the top ten percent of 
the winning U.S. National Team rowers 
in the Campionship eight event. The 
Crew team competed at the Princeton 
Chases, where the fours' races were can- 
celled due to high winds. Boston College 
finished off the fall season in the Foot 
o! the Charles at the end of November. 
Three of the Eagles' boats finished in 
the lop 10 with the Varsity Eight winning 
their event. I he novice team was strong 
again with a fifth place and another 
top 15 finish. The team expected fur- 
ther improvement throughout the off- 
season and into the 2007 spring season. 





lop: Some <il the rowen pose with their hard earned 
medals. PhotO Courtesy of Angeliqiit Hrycko. 
Above: The Varsity Four boat makes its way 
through a race. PhotO Courtesy of Pulton Hindis. 



25f> S[. 




Sports 257 






THROUGH THICK AND TH 




Ibp l.cii I..', Superfani start a chart to pump up the crowd around them at a football game. Top Right: During a football game several Superfans take time out from 
ring lor a picture. Above: The Superfans attempt to distract an opposing player taking a foul shot. Photos by David Tnulo. 



258 Sp 





^•xW • •• • 




&m 



^&^f?^fe \J 




flroup of tans demonstrate a long held tradition of tossing people in the air every time the football team scores. Above Left: Fans pose « ith crowd favorite Baldwin the Eagle. 
H ight: Choosing body paint as an alternative to the Superfan t-shirt. a group of fans shows their enthusiasm and dedication. Photo-* b\ David Trudo. 



Sports 259 



MEN'S CLUB VOLLEYBAL 



SETTING UP FOR VICTOI 



( 



T 



|HE MEN'S CLUB volleyball team was 
extremely dedicated this year after a 
strong showing at Nationals last spring. 
They had high hopes of repeating their previous 
successes and. with the strength of their team 
units boosting them, were able to achieve their 
goals of continued success this season. Partici- 
pating in a variety of tournaments throughout the 
year and across the country, every player devoted 
a significant amount of time to ensure the teams 
all around success. The team continues to grow 
stronger and more successful and hoped for 
another solid performance at Nationals this year. 





Photo* ( 'ourtcty at Rol 



260 Sj, 



MEN'S CLUB RUBGY 



GETTING PHYSICAL 



THE MEN'S CLUB rugby team 
enjoyed many successes and 
fun times this season. With the 
mild temperatures in the fall, the team 
was able to take advantage of the great 
weather playing outside. Growing pop- 
ularity and great team unity allowed 
the rugby team to achieve their goals 
and see many victories in competi- 
tions across the region. Participating in 
team events both on and off the field, 
the group is a very close one. In the 
future, the men hope to continue their 
success that has resulted from effective 
teamwork and fun, positive attitudes. 




Photos Courtesy oftheRugb) Club. 



Sports 2M 






CLUB MEN'S CREW 






RACING TO DOMINATIC 



THE MEN'S CREW team put in a great deal of 
work this season and their efforts paid off in 
the form of many successes. After losing some 
much loved seniors, the team rebounded thanks to 
the abundance of drive and talent brought to the table 
by new faces from last year's novice team. Members 
of the team this season attended early morning prac- 
tices year round and traveled to Clemson University 
during Spring Break for training. Competing in highly 
regarded races such as the annual Head of the Charles 
in Boston, the mens crew team was pleased with their 
performance this year and looked forward to further 
improvement and success in the future. 





262 Sport 



CLUB FIGURE SKATING 



THE CLUB FIGURE skating team was ready 
for another season of fierce competition this 
year after finishing in seventh place at the 
national championship in Michigan last year. With a 
strong work ethic and great teamwork, the girls were 
hoping to match last year's success this year. Put- 
ting in many hard hours of practice, the team per- 
fected their routine and impressed the crowds at 
the regional competition in Providence in January 
by earning second place and a spot at Nationals in 
Colorado Springs, which took place later in the year. 




IN SYNC ON ICE 




* * -a * 


L 5 . 3 




mgmi 


|CHA| 





Photos Courtesy of Amy Stabile 



Sports 2t>3 



WOMEN'S CLUB LACROSSI 



READY AT THE DRA 



THE WOMEN'S CLUB lacrosse 
team had high hopes for this 
season and as a result of hard 
work and talent, they were very sue 
cessful. After losing seniors last year, 
the team rebounded with a fresh new 
group and needed little adjustment 
time. Competing across the regoin, 
the women had a victorious season 
and enjoyed spending time with 
each other both on and off the field. 




i'h'. 



M.nlil . hi; me. 



264 S| 



MEN'S CLUB LACROSSE 



CHECKING THE COMPETITION 



THE MEN'S LACROSSE team was 
ready for a strong season this year 
and possessed the talent necessary 
for victory. Without a varsiy men's team at 
BC, the club team is very competitive and 
is made up of the best players available as 
a result. Training and practicing through- 
out the school year, the men's team devoted 
a lot of time to developing their skills. 
With matchups against schools across 
the nation, the team was exposed to other 
teams of varying skill levels and strate- 
gies and learned from every game. Their 
hardwork paid off as the team encoun- 
tered many decisive victories through- 
out the season and hoped to maintain 
their momentum up to the end of the year. 




Photos Courtesy of Lucas Martinez 



Sports 265 




Edited by: Andrew Fudge & Erin Klewin 



TAKE IT TO the Heights. There are words 
and phrases that will remain with us for as 
long as we can remember Boston College and 
all that we have learned during our time here. 
Lower. Maddies. The Mods. The Rat. Wednes- 
day Kells, Thursday An Tua Nua, Friday Happy 
Hour. Even if the Lower sign reads "Corcoran 
Commons;' Maddies' reads "Campus Conve 
nience" and The Rat no longer serves the fried 
comfort food we've loved without guilt, their 
names will always conjure the best of memo- 
ries. Did you stay after the Maryland football 
game and sing and dance on the bleachers to 
one last round of "Build Me Up Buttercup" and 
"Sweet Caroline"? Did you schedule your week 



around Wednesday night at the Kells with every 
senior at BC, Thursdays at An Tua Nua and 
make sure to never miss Happy Hour at Rog- 
gies, rain or shine? Did you stay up all night 
with your friends to support each other during 
hard weeks of school work? And finally, did 
you refuse to acknowledge that the end of four 
years at Boston College was fast approaching 
and dance till midnight at Avalon with your 
classmates? For the class of 2007, we have 
become, and will always be, a family. We have 
celebrated victories, we have stood silently in 
vigils and we have marched together in defiance 
of injustice, but more than anything else, we 
have found ourselves in each other. Myra Chui 



266 Seniors 



X ♦ 




^ 



Photos by Myra Chai. Melissa Kasparian. Lindsay Granatcll 



Seniors 267 




faryn ( iervais & Jessica Bennett 



Katie Sarmini, Maia Tekle & Amanda Abel 



26X Senior. 




Kim Macaulcv. Caitlin Kit'. Camille Castro & Amber Clarke 



Seniors 269 



I 






Sr 



■ 



r~ 



\ 



* 



H 



» 



TAKE it to the HEIGHT 



< 



Article by: Kaitlin Vigars 



IN 2003, WHEN we first set foot on this 
campus as BC's most competitive class 
thus far, the war in Iraq had barely begun, 
gas was cheap(er), John Paul II was Pope, 
and the Curse of the Bambino had yet to 
be reversed. In 2003, St. Ignatius Gate was 
just a blue print, there was no fountain 
in O'Neill Plaza, Conte Forum was still 
referred to as Conte Morgue, and there was 
no statue of St. Ignatius in front of Hig- 
gins Hall. Now as graduating seniors in 
2007, we have witnessed democratic elee 
tions in Iraq, Red Sox Nation finally got 
that victory they had been waiting for and 
BC's landscape has totally changed. We 
have left the Big East and joined the ACC, 
packed the stands and cheered the Eagles 
on to victory. We have waited in line over- 
night in Conte Forum to get season hockey 
and basketball tickets. We have seen BC in 
the Frozen Four and witnessed a March 
Madness with BC ranked #4. We have seen 
natural disasters and have done our part 
to help, inviting refugees from Hurricane 



Katrina to study here and traveling to t 
Gulf Coast to rebuild. We have hosted o 
fair share of notable visitors too — Bara 
Obama and Condoleeza Rice, to name a fe 
In the wake of all this, Boston G 
lege has emerged as one of the "new lviej 
People are starting to realize what we ha 
known all along; there is no better pla 
to spend four years. As students we pi 
a large role in BC's favorable reputatk 
Every day, through our words and actioi 
each of us demonstrates to the rest of t 
world that we truly are men and women 
others. As our time on the Heights corrj 
to a close and we prepare to "set the wo 
aflame" it is important to remember tl 
we must always strive to exemplify wl : 
we were taught at BC. After all, Bosti 
College has given us so much over 
years, and the very least that we can 
is carry with us the passion for excellei 
that has been instilled in us. As our cl;5 
slogan states, we will show the world W|t 
it really means to "Take it to the Heigh 



270 Sci 




Left: Erin Klewin and Melissa Pelletier cheer the Eagles on at a football game; Kate Hough- 
ton shows her maroon and gold pride before the first home game ol the year. Above Tann 
Gervais. Caitlin White and Christ] Dunn show what it means to Take it to the Heights' 
Background: Seniors tailgating before a big game. 






Seniors 271 




i Mares <t Julie < n m 



272 




Heather Wynne. Meg Gooseman & Stephanie Lj ndon 



Becca Sham 



Seniors 2 : 




Above: The Modular Apartments, more commonly referred to as "the 
Mod-"! are a senior haven and the site of the most on-campus parties 
Right page: Seniors gather in the Mods to tailgate before and after home football 
games, enjov good food and good friends, and have an all-around good time. 



THE MODS 



Article by: bertha Lee and trin Klewin 




274 




THE MODULAR APARTMENTS, 

most commonly known as 'the Mods' 
were built in 1970 during a dorm short- 
age due to the increasing number of 
students living on campus. They were 
originally intended as temporary hous- 
ing on the Lower Campus but a total of 
forty-three modular apartments were 
later built and placed in between Vander- 
slice and Walsh Hall dormitories because 
of their popularity among students. 
For most seniors, the Mods are the top 
housing choice during room selection 
week. The Mods are a senior tradition, 
providing six students the opportunity to 
live in a townhouse style apartment with 
a backyard and a patio. In describing the 
Mods, Winson Liu '07 says, "The Mods 
are almost like a sacred kingdom. A fence 
surrounds intruders (underclassmen) from 
coining in. We are the only ones on campus 
with the privilege of tailgating during foot- 
ball games. We can barbeque, play wiffle 
ball, or throw a football around in the 



backyard whenever we please. Living 
the Mods is essentially the ultimate 1 
style and fun that all BC students des 
the second they walk into this scho< 
In addition, the Mods are prim 
ily where most on-campus weeke 
parties and hangout socials are he 
Another advantage is that the Mods i 
located in the center of Lower Camp 
where students of all classes c 
gather to take time off from studyii 

Sadly, the Mods will not last \h 
ever. Senior Rosemary Lee conclud 
"Hearsay has told me that the Mods w 
be replaced by another form of hoi 
ing at some point in the future. WJ 
that said, the thought of going down 
BC history as a Mod resident is at i| 
very least a big deal for me. I feel 1 
the Mods in itself is a community — 1| 
only by its appearance, but by the v 
it always fosters a friendly atmosphe 
And so, I love living here because I 
to experience that dynamic every*.! 




Seniors 




Paul Kountz, Not-lit: Troccoli, Brian Zager& Stephanie Lyndon 







Morgan Wilson & Norma Hajrc 



Seniors 277 




Above Seniors vacation in tropical locations over spring break to forget about 
school work. Right page, clockwise: Senioritis takes on many forms, includ- 
ing excessive partying and having as much fun with friends as possible. 



SENIORITIS 



Article by: Andrew Fudge 



SENIOR YEAR HAS come and is rapidly on 
its way out. Whether completing a thesis or 
advanced research project, taking a senior- 
friendly class schedule, or beginning work in 
a chosen career path, the motivation to keep up 
with academics wholeheartedly is not always 
the top priority for a senior. As the year pro- 
gresses, the balance between working on a 
thesis, attending class, beginning a job, and 
going out with your friends is often upset. If you 
do a lot of work from Sunday through Tuesday, 
it makes perfect sense that you should do a lot 
of partying from Wednesday through Saturday. 
Senioritis is not something unique to college 
seniors. It was experienced by many of these 
same students at the end of their high school 
careers, and in the more severe cases, it was 
also experienced during freshman, sophomore, 
and junior years. There are no other points in 
life when it is truly acceptable to tailgate in the 
Mods and then go to a football game with your 
friends or to "pregame" any event in life. Yet 
Senioryear, which is marked by the dichotomy of 
the daytime academic setting and Friday night 



partying, suddenly gives way to the real 
of constant work and paying bills. Little w 
then that a spirit of youthfulness and a nelj 
enjoy every moment affects so many seM 
All of these things taken together have ■ 
to be recognized as a set of symptoms th.il 
the basis of a highly contagious symptom k k 
at Senioritis. Specifically, it is the tenth 
towards decreased motivation in acacn 
studies, procrastination, and a sometimj 
occasional inclination towards nonattendM 
To those experiencing bouts of SenioritifK 
paper is due at noon on Thursday, it is star] I 
midnight on Wednesday, after a successful! ■ 
at The Kells with friends and roommates, [d 
night chats with a best friend seem more i 
tant than a weekly French assignment. Sebi 
tis exists in a BC world where friendships 
relationships take on an importance that c n 
be replaced by school work. It is the tew|n 
to make each moment count after three 
of building lasting memories with those atU 
us and the desire to experience all that w|c 
before taking leave of the Heights one last n 



)( 



278 Seniors 




Seniors 279 




I i' lyn Shea & Anna Lenzczynsk 







Stella Kim& Carl Dulav 



Seniors 2SI 










* 


TTflfc 



LIFE AFTER BC 



Article by: Andrew rudge & trin KJewin 



AS SENIOR YEAR begins, it seems 
that seniors are already insanely busy. 
Resumes pass from hand to hand and 
ties attract the eye as seniors from A&S, 
CSOM, CSON, and LSOE all scramble to 
ensure that they have jobs waiting for them 
when senior year finally draws to a close. 
By September 21st, only a few weeks after 
arriving on campus, these seniors stop in 
at the career fair, in order to pass along 
their resumes, find out important appli- 
cation deadlines, and set up internships 
for the academic year. Many of them 
have already interned over the previous 
summer, and are now looking for some 
thing a little more permanent. Through 
all of this turmoil and fear, the Career 
Center is always there for seniors, offering 
them career advising, alumni network- 
ing, on-campus recruiting, internship 
and career fairs, extensive online career 
databases, and many other opportunities. 
A common position for many seniors 
at the close of four years of study is one 



marked by uncertainty about the future 
or life directly after college. Continuing 
education at the graduate level has become 
an extremely popular choice among recent i 
graduates who pursue an even greater I 
specialization in the topic they majored I 
in at Boston College. The preparation ' 
that the university has offered its students ; 
over its long history enables graduates to ' 
write dissertations and publish journals 
in whichever study they pursue and to 
work towards the prized doctoral degree 
so valued in the current-day work world. 
Still others will choose to take time 
out to travel the world or enter the military. 
Whatever paths these seniors choose, they 
share many of the same hopes and fea 
about graduating and entering the 'reai 
world' for the first time. However, with tf 
education and life lessons learned at Bostoi 
College, the class of 2007 will without 
doubt take on these new challenges as ambi 
tiously as they did four short years ago when 
they began their journey at Boston College. 









Left: Many seniors prepare for a graduate education by taking the GREs. and Boston College offers prep 
classes for the test; The Career Center helps seniors plan for the future through resume critiquing, career 
advice, and interview opportunities. Above: Post-graduation, mam BC alums will enter the '"real world'" 
right away, working at places such as the John Hancock building in downtown Boston. Background: Net- 
working provides seniors the chance to form relationships with possible employers. Photos by Myra Chai. 






Seniors 




Connie < >< onnor, [ngrid Bengl ion < hristine Kochctko & Sascha Rubin 



2H4 




Lauren Crow no & Cam i lie Castro 



Seniors 285 




.Above: Campus Crawl culminated in an MTV-themed dance party. Right page. 
dockwt>e: Members of the Senior Task Force at the final dance; The winning 
team. Team Take it to the Trolley dressed as the different stages of Madonna: 
Another team completes the task of standing in front of another Beanpot school 
in their Superfan shirts; I is for Ignatius in the ABC's of Boston College task. 



CAMP US CRAWL 



Article by: 

WHEN WAS THE last time you sat down 
with a professor and discussed a great 
poem? Or visited the site of the original 
Boston College campus? How about host- 
ing a faculty gathering in your dorm room? 
Boston College seniors got the chance 
to do all of these things and many more 
during BCs Campus Crawl, a week-long 
scavenger hunt designed by seniors for 
seniors during the last week in October. 
For the Crawl, teams made up of 4-6 mem- 
bers were given a list of clues and tasks 
that they had to complete in order to earn 
points. Total points were based on how 
many tasks were completed, with more 
points allotted for more difficult tasks. 
Tasks ranged from meeting with alumni 
to photographing things on campus begin- 
ning with every letter of the alphabet. 
Now in its third year, the Campus Crawl 
not only gives seniors a reason to spend 
time with their friends and attend great 
events, but also affords them an opportu- 
nity to reflect on their experiences at BC 
and engage in conversations about their 



trin Klewin 

next steps beyond the walls of the uni'- 

sity. The hunt allows participants to In 

fun while engaging in conversations attt 

i 
discernment and vocation, and by deg 

so, earning points towards great pri I 

This year, a record number of seni ;, 

over 250, signed up for the Campus Cr; .. 

It is run by the Senior Task Force which a 

part of the Intersections Project, desig i 

to help students understand the conp 

tions that their intellectual and spirii 1 

journeys are creating at Boston Colli!. 

This year's grand prize was a free Cm 

mencement Ball trolley, with second I 

third place winning Commencement I 

tickets and select senior week event t 

ets, respectively. The scavenger hunt < 

minated in an MTV-themed dance pa 

where the winners were announced ; 

teams participated in a dance-off for sc I 

last minute points. Campus Crawl proviiH 

seniors a fun opportunity to explore thi 

both on and off campus they might ti 

never done before, and to reflect upon tl | r 

time at BC as well as life after graduati 



2Hf> 




Seniors 287 




Stephanie l.iakos, Sarah Manganaro, Victoria Devins, Alyson Wattinnc. Kristina Lang & Erica Olsen 







Kellis Garland. Jack Naylor, Megan Godio, Brian Tichenor & Anna Boisture 










^§T~ i 








P m 




IV ii 


o 





Henna Gn. Alexandra Eu & Denis Chans 



Carolyn Smiley & Lisa Velte 




Lora Krsulich. Leslie Appleion. Rachel Yfoffe, k\le DeMeo & K.uic Mcl.arnev 



Seniors 289 



Amanda Abel 


Anna Abrahamian 


Nuha Abujaber 


Annmarie Accomando 


Christopher Agliano j 


College Of Arts & Sciences 


College Of Arts & Sciences 


College Of Arts & Sciences 


Lynch School Of Education 


College Of Arts & Scienc 


Communications 


Biology 


Communications 


Secondary Education 


Theology 


Film Studies 






English (LSOE) 


! 




Elizabeth Aguilo 


Elizabeth Ahearn 


Kathleen Ahearn 


Tad Ahlersmeyer 


Humera Ahmed 


Lynch School Of Education 


College Of Arts & Sciences 


College Of Arts & Sciences 


College Of Arts & Sciences 


College Of Arts & Scienc 


Human Development 


Biology A&S B.A 


Communications 


Computer Science B.S 


English 




Dure Ahn 


Julio Alarcon 


Nicolas Albert 


Eric Alcala 


Ana Aldea 


College Of Arts & Sciences 


Carroll School Of Management 


College Of Arts & Sciences 


College Of Arts & Sciences 


College Of Arts & Scien 


Film Studies 


Econom ics-Csom 


Theology 


Sociology 


Biology 


English 




Philosophy 








n Alesbury 
( ollege Of Arts k 
Politii al 



Paloma Alissc 

Lynch School Of Education 

Secondary Education 

English (LSOl ) 



Mark Ali//i 

Carroll School Of Management 

General Mgmt 



Ashley Allen 

College Of Arts & Sciences 

Political Science 

Communications 



Joseph Alleva 
Carroll School Of Managerr 
Finance 
Marketing 



Jasmina Almeda 


Matthew Alvarez 


Estefania Alves 


Manuel Alves 


Amanda Amato 


oil School Of Management 


Carroll School Of Management 


Lynch School Of Education 


Carroll School Of Management 


College Of Arts & Sciences 


Finance 


Finance 


Human Development 


Finance 


English 


Marketing 






General Mgmt/ Leadership 


Sociology 




Matthew Ambury 
Qllege Of Arts & Sciences 
Chemistry 



Caitlin Ameral 

College Of Arts & Sciences 

Political Science 



Nicole Amon 

College Of Arts & Sciences 

English 

Communications 



Samuel An 

College Of Arts & Sciences 

Theology 



Atlas Anagnos 

College Of Arts & Sciences 

International Studies 

German Studies 




Jason Ander 
C|lege Of Arts & Sciences 
Communications 



Allison Anderson 

College Of Arts & Sciences 

Political Science 



Gregory Anderson 

Carroll School Of Management 

Marketing 



Meaghan Anderson 

Carroll School Of Management 

Economics-Csom 



Thomas Anderson 

College Of Arts & Sciences 

English 




Dalsie Andrade 
ch School Of Education 
luman Development 

Political Science 



Yandei Andrews 

College Of Arts & Sciences 

English 



Michael Audio 

Carroll School Of Management 

Economics-Csom 

Finance 



Tom Ano\ "ki 

t arroll School Oi Management 

Marketing 



I isa Antonellis 
Carroll School Of Management 

Finance 



Seniors 291 




I^Ai^l 



. n Antonsen 
Carroll School Of Management 
General Mgmt 



Leslie Appleton 

Lvnch School Of Education 

Elementary Education 

Romance Lang - French 



John Archibald 

College Of Arts & Sciences 

Mathematics 



John-Paul Arena 

College Of Arts & Sciences 

Psychology 

Theology 



Jennifer Arens 
College Of Arts & Scienc 
English 




Michael Arkin 

College Of Arts & Sciences 

Psychology 

Philosophy 



William Armstrong 

College Of Arts & Sciences 

English 



Jessica Arrigo 

Lynch School Of Education 

Elementary Education 

Human Development 



Brendan Arsenault 

College Of Arts & Sciences 

Chemistry 



Christopher Ashcraft 
College Of Arts & Scienc 
Political Science 




Justin Ashenfelter 

College Of Arts & Sciences 

English 



Kelsey Asher 

Carroll School Of Management 

Marketing 

Operations/Tech Mgmt 



Kaitlyn Aspell 

College Of Arts & Sciences 

Mathematics 



Nicholas Asselin 

Carroll School Of Management 

Marketing 



James Athy 
Carroll School Of Manage nt 
General Mgmt 




Allison Auer 
( ollege Of Arts & Sc i < 
I listory 



Gregory Avallon 
( arroU S< hool ( H Management 

I in.iiK e 
Accounting 



Pooia Awatramani 

( ollege Of Arts & Sciences 

Biology 

Philosophy 



Joseph Ayers 

Carroll School Of Management 

Finance 



Christina Aylward 
Carroll School Of Managem 
Economics-Csom 



Ana Baca 
ill School Of Management 
Marketing 
Operations Mgmt 



Griffin Bach 

College Of Arts & Sciences 

Music 



William Bacic 

College Of Arts & Sciences 

Political Science 



Daniel Bagley 

Carroll School Of Management 

Finance 

Accounting 



Michael Baker 

College Of Arts & Sciences 

History 




Owen Baldwin 
Allege Of Arts & Sciences 
Biology 



Cara Ball 

Lynch School Of Education 

Elementary Education 

Human Development 



Alison Bane 

College Of Arts & Sciences 

Communications 

Theater Arts 



Meaghan Barbour 

College Of Arts & Sciences 

Psychology 



Adam Barelski 

College Of Arts & Sciences 

Political Science 




Ryan Barker 
-kh School Of Education 
Secondary Education 
Mathmetics 



William Barnes 

College Of Arts & Sciences 

Political Science 



Elizabeth Barnet 

College Of Arts & Sciences 

English 

Communications 



Joseph Barrett 

College Of Arts & Sciences 

English 



Lauren Barrett 

School Of Nursing 

Nursing 




Mary Barrett 
C ! ege Of Arts & Sciences 
Mathematics 
Philosophy 



Brittany Barry 

Carroll School Of Management 

Marketing 



Colin Bartolik 

College Of Arts & Sciences 

Communications 

Economics 



Mariana Bartolomei 

Carroll School Of Management 

Finance 

Accounting 



Kathiyn Barwikowski 

School Of Nursing 

Nursing 



Seniors 2". ; 




I " Sclhorn, Liz Rini, Mike Ml (iov.ii 1 1 & Pete Malone 



Alanna Wonji. Denton Conklin, Paul Chiozzi & Julia Chipman-Scherv 



294 




Christine Kochefko. Antl\ Mezsaros & Atlas Aananos 



Son uts 2 V »5 




Annie f !hoi & Ryan Elman 







I 



Christina Gomez. Luis Zepeda & Shirley Cho 









- 


tB 


I; 



Erin Klewin, Katie McLaimhlin & Liss Muethins; 




Stephanie Liakos & Alyson Wattinne 



Miehelle Kim. Annie Wei I u. Henna Gn & Stella Kim 



Seniors 297 




' 



Meredeth Barzen 

College Of Arts & Sciences 

English 



Andrew Bassett 
College Of Arts & Sciences 



English 



Communications 



Mason Bates 

College Of Arts & Sciences 

English 

Philosophy 



Tyler Bates 

Carroll School Of Management 

Accounting 



Bethany Bateson 

School Of Nursing 

Nursing 




Jonathan Bathgate 

College Of Arts & Sciences 

Mathematics 



Charles Beale 

College Of Arts & Sciences 

Biochemistry 



Jennifer Beaudry 

School Of Nursing 

Nursing 



Christina Bechhold 

Carroll School Of Management 

Finance 

Philosophy 



Christine Beckwith 
College Of Arts & Science 
Biology 




L, 




Christopher Bedell 

College Of Arts & Sciences 

Physics 



Jessica Bedney 

Lynch School Of Education 

Human Development 



Dara Beirne 

College Of Arts & Sciences 

History 

Communications 



Todd Belden 

College Of Arts & Sciences 

English 



Elizabeth Bench 
College Of Arts & Scien. 
History 




ler 
College < >'. A 

-mmuni' 
PhilOBO] 



Meghan Benedetto 

( ollege of Arts & s< icik es 

Sociology 



[ngrid Bengtson 

( < il lege Of Arts & Sciences 
Philosophy 



Jessica Bennett 

Carroll School Of Management 

Finance 

Marketing 



Krista Benson 
College Of Arts & Sdena 
History 




Lisa Bernabei 
illege Of Arts & Sciences 

Political Science 
m. Lang.-Hispanic Study 



Kinsey Bernhard 

College Of Arts & Sciences 

Psychology 

Biology 



Nicholas Bernier 

College Of Arts & Sciences 

History 



Lauren Bernstein 

Lynch School Of Education 

Human Development 

Communications 



Allen Best 

College Of Arts & Sciences 

Political Science 

Economics 




Omolara Bewaji 
pllege Of Arts & Sciences 
Political Science 



Darren Bielawski 

Carroll School Of Management 

Economics-Csom 

Corp. Report & Analysis 



Virginia Binford 

College Of Arts & Sciences 

Psychology 



Jessica Biscup 

School Of Nursing 

Nursing 



James Blair 

College Of Arts & Sciences 

History 

Philosophy 




Emily Blake 
pllege Of Arts & Sciences 
Romance Lang - French 



Alysha Blassberg 

Carroll School Of Management 

Marketing 



Lindsay Bloom 

College Of Arts & Sciences 

Psychology 



Kelley Blouin 

School Of Nursing 

Nursing 



Kristian Blum 

Lynch School Of Education 

Elementary Education 

Communications 




Jessica Bocca 
>llege Of Arts & Sciences 
Psychology 



Anna Boisture 

College Of Arts & Sciences 

History 

Art History 



Emily Bolduc 

Lynch School Of Education 

Elementary Education 

Human Development 



Christopher Bone 

College Of Arts & Sciences 

1 nglish 



Peter Boogaaid 

College Of Art-- & Sciences 

Political Science 

Theologj 



Senior- 2"" 



Meghan Boova 

College Of Arts & Sciences 

Art History 



Sasha Bordett 

College Of Arts & Sciences 

Psychology 



Brian Bosworth 

College Of Arts & Sciences 

Political Science 



Meakara Bou 

College Of Arts & Sciences 

Communications 



Elizabeth Bouchard 
College Of Arts & Science 
History 




Sarah Bouchard 

College Of Arts & Sciences 

International Studies 



Kathryn Boudreau 

Lynch School Of Education 

Secondary Education 

History (LSOE) 



Nora Bourghol 

Lynch School Of Education 

Elementary Education 

Math /Computer Science 



Alexandra Bourque 

College Of Arts & Sciences 

Economics 

Philosophy 



Emily C. Bowen 

School Of Nursing 

Nursing 




Emily M. Bowen 
College Of Arts & Sciences 

hnglish 



Ryan Bowen 

College Of Arts & Sciences 

Sociology 

History 



Claire Bowersox 

College Of Arts & Sciences 

Communications 



Brendan Boyce 

College Of Arts & Sciences 

Communications 



Alison Boyle 
Carroll School Of Manage 'nt 
Marketing 




1 5 r ■ 

'IS 



Mi< li.K-l Boyle 

Carroll S< hool Of Management 

Accounting 

Political Science 



David Bradley 

( ollege( )f Arts & Sciences 

History 



Alexandria Bradshaw 

College Of Arts & Sciences 

Communications 

Sociology 



Kathryn Brady 
College Of Arts & Science 
Biology 




Megan Brannigan 
School Of Nursing 



Nursing 



Sarah Braunschvveiger 

School Of Nursing 

Nursing 



Kevin Brazil 

College Of Arts & Sciences 

Communications 



Katherine Brennan 

School Of Nursing 

Nursing 



Kathleen Brennan 

College Of Arts & Sciences 

Biology 




Kern' Brennan 


Rosemary Brewka 


Mark Brezinski 


Megan Bright 


Victor Broccoli 


liege Of Arts & Sciences 


College Of Arts & Sciences 


College Of Arts & Sciences 


College Of Arts & Sciences 


College Of Arts & Sciences 


International Studies 


Biology 


English 


English 


Historv 




Amanda Brooks 


Rand Brothers 


Carson Brown 


Christopher]. Brown 


Christopher M. Brown 


>llege Of Arts & Sciences 


College Of Arts & Sciences 


Lynch School Of Education 


College Of Arts & Sciences 


College Of Arts & Sciences 


English 


Economics 


Human Development 
History (LSOE) 


Biology 


Biology A&S B.A 




Jessica Brown 
Ipch School Of Education 
.Human Development 
elementary Education 



Samuel Browne 


Amy Bruno 


Arthur Bryan 


Matthew Bryson 


College Of Arts & Sciences 


Lynch School Of Education 


College Of Arts & Sciences 


College Of Vrts & Sciences 


English 


Elementary Education 


Communications 


Political Science 


Communications 


Human Development 







Seniors 301 




Dave Slack & .Jessica Malvey 



302 




Jen Schiffner& Denise Ekenstierna 



Seniors 303 




a rmen Buccheri 
L\nch School Of Education 
ndary Education 
Mathmetics 



Nicolle Buckley 

College Of Arts & Sciences 

Economics 



Abby Bullock 

Lynch School Of Education 

Human Development 



Kaitlin Bulman Esen Bulut 

Carroll School Of Management Carroll School Of Manage: 
Finance 
Marketing 



Finance 
Economics-CSOM 




Jennifer Bun 

College Of Arts & Sciences 

Communications 



Santiago Bunce 

College Of Arts & Sciences 

Theology 



Cara Bunyan 

College Of Arts & Sciences 

German 

International Studies 



Katie Burch 

College Of Arts & Sciences 

History 

Economics 



Alexander Burke 
College Of Arts & Scienc I 
Political Science 
Philosophy 




Christopher Burke 
Carroll School Of Management 
Finance- 
Accounting 



Emily Burke 

College Of Arts & Sciences 

Political Science 

Philosophy 



Kerry Burke 

Carroll School Of Management 

Accounting 



Thomas Burke 

College Of Arts & Sciences 

Biology 



Matthew Burns 
College Of Arts & Sciei 
Communications 




t Jin Bur: 

College Of A.- 

•mmuni' 



Catherine Burton 
( ollege of Arts & Si ieru es 

International Studies 



Amanda Bustos 

College Of Arts & Sciences 

History 

I heology 



Andrew Buttaro 

College Of Arts & Sciences 

Political Science 

I listory 



Ashley Bynoe 
Carroll School Of Manager 
Finance 
Operations/Tech Mgrr 




Eric Cabezas 


Liza Cabrera 


Jennifer Cadigan 


Jannelle Cafferky 


Brandon Calenda 


School Of Management 


College Of Arts & Sciences 


Carroll School Of Management 


College Of Arts & Sciences 


College Of Arts & Sciences 


Finance 


Communications 


Accounting 


Sociology 


Biology 


Accounting 




Marketing 








r Michael Callahan 
Jlege Of Arts & Sciences 
\ Communications 



Bethany Callan 

Carroll School Of Management 

Finance 

Operations Mgmt 



Rita Calvo 

College Of Arts & Sciences 

Political Science 



Paul Camacho 

College Of Arts & Sciences 

Philosophy 

Theology 



Rebecca Camacho 

College Of Arts & Sciences 

Theology 




Timothy Cameron 
lege Of Arts & Sciences 
Political Science 
Slavic Studies 



Christopher Camilleri 

College Of Arts & Sciences 

Music 



Matthew Cammarata 

College Of Arts & Sciences 

English 



Kristen Campbell 

Lynch School Of Education 

Human Development 



Meaghan Campbell 

Carroll School Of Management 

Finance 




Nathaniel Campbell 
3ege Of Arts & Sciences 
Classics 
German 



Paul Campbell 

College Of Arts & Sciences 

English 



Cynthia Campobasso 

College Of Arts & Sciences 

Communications 



Louis Canelli 
College Of Arts & Sciences 

English 



Andrew Canto 

Carroll School Of Management 

Finance 



Seniors JOS 




Above: The Kells. a popular \YednesJa\ night hot spot for seniors. Right, 
clockwise: Seniors girls dance the night away; Celebrating the end of a tough 
week together. Celebrating 2Kt birthda\s at Mary Ann's is a right of passage 
tor mam BC seniors: Senior guvs enjoy their ever popular "Reggie's howls!' 



GOING OUT i 



Article by: Kaitlin Vigars 



THE WEEKEND. A time to shirk respon- 
sibility and forget about all that work you 
should probably be doing. In fact, for 
seniors who are finally 21, weekends are 
so great that sometimes they begin a little 
early, like on Wednesday. Luckily, when 
Friday just seems too far away there is The 
Kells, a BC senior staple bar on Wednes- 
day nights. With two floors of uninhib- 
ited dancing and popular music pumping 
from the speakers it is no wonder the 
Kells is so popular among BC students. 
Even though Wednesday is the new Thurs- 
day, Thursday is hardly forgotten. If The 
Kells is the place to be on Wednesday nights, 
An Tua Nua is Thursdays senior hotspot. 
After a long week, what better place 
to unwind than at Roggie's? A Cleveland 
Circle staple, Roggies holds a special place 
in the hearts of the Eagles. During the 
week, Roggies is a great place to grab a 
meal with friends, but when Friday rolls 
a round everyone knows that Roggies means 
happy hour. Friday nights start over pitch- 



, 



si 



ers of mixed drinks, or "Roggie bowls' 
Roggie's. Coincidentally, many nights a 
end at Roggies. Long after the dining ha 
have shut down, Roggie's doors are s 
open, serving up piping hot slices of pi 
On the other side of Cleveland Ci 
is Mary Anns. Mary Ann's, a windc 
less dive bar, manages to draw hi 
crowds almost every night of the wi 
No one goes to Mary Ann's for the at 
sphere; nor is the draw of Mary Ann's 
cheap beer, although that certainly he! 
Mary Ann's is popular because everyc 
is there. That girl you sat next to in 1 
tory freshman year, she's there. The C 
boy you always see at the Plex, he's th 
too, and so are all his friends. And in t? 
end isn't that why seniors revere going I 
on weekends? Because they aren't Jul 
time out from your heavy workload tf 
the stress of classes. Weekends are wh 
you get together with your friends j 1 
do crazy things, creating memories tn 
will last much longer than any night < 







Seniors 307 




Katharine l.iVohi & Myra Chai 







Seniors $09 




SENIOR CONSILIUM 



Article by: trin Me 



ARE YOU A senior who feels lost because 
you do not have a clue as to what you want 
to do after graduation? Are you some 
one who has an idea of what you might 
want to do but are still unsure if it's the 
right decision? These are the questions 
that college seniors have experienced 
for years, but now have the opportunity 
to address, with Boston College's new 
Senior Consilium. Senior Consilium is 
a three-part wine and cheese series for 
seniors where they come together and talk 
about their anxiety and eagerness for life 
after graduation with their friends while 
exploring their talents, interests and pos- 
sible career paths. It also provides seniors 
a chance to commiserate with fellow 
seniors about the anxieties, fears and 
excitement of life after Boston College. 
Each Senior Consilium is run by a 
member of the Senior Task Force, a group 
of fifteen seniors who work together to 
create memorable events and activities 
for the senior class, as well as a faculty 



co-host of their choice. It is sponsored b| 
the Intersections project, whose goal 
to help students understand the connej 
tions that their intellectual and spiritiu 
journeys are creating at Boston College 
Each Consilium hosts from five to te; 
seniors and incorporates the three ke 
questions at the heart of Intersections: Wh; 
gives you joy? Are you good at these thing, 
Does anybody need you to do these thing 
These questions aim to help students di: 
cover who they want to become and hi 
they want to get there. Seniors are given a 
outlet to discuss their fears about the futui | 
and life as a senior with others who sha 
similar feelings, while getting to know 
faculty member's perspective at the san 
time. Overall, Senior Consilium providi] 
seniors the opportunity to go on an intc 
lectual and spiritual retreat without leavir 
campus, and truly reflect upon their pos* 
ble career choices, passions, gifts and jo> 



lil 









Left page: The building of the Intersections project, which sponsors Senior Consilium: This dis- 
cernment grid is used by members of each Consilium to determine the strengths and weak- 
nesses of their academic, social and spiritual lives. Above: Members of Senior Consilium often 
meet in the leader's dorm room. Background: A frame from the Father Himes DVD. played 
during Consilium, where he articulates the three key questions at the core of Intersections. 



Seniors >ll 




Sue Grodcn, Michael Uuddy, Lauren Wojnar & Dan Gujinn 



312 




Rachel Ybffc, Jennifer Mahonej i*c Rachel Orlowski 



Seniors 313 



CORNERSTONE to CAPSTONE 




HIE 
ALCHEMIST 






Article by: Kaitlin Vigars 



IN ARCHITECTURE, THE cornerstone 
is an important component of a building's 
foundation. At Boston College, the Cor- 
nerstone Program, run by the office of 
First Year Experience, is designed as a 
foundation for students to better under- 
stand their college experience. It is a 
chance for students to get to know their 
professors as well as themselves. Cor- 
nerstone is comprised of several different 
classes with a built in advisement seminar 
that allows students to develop meaning- 
ful relationships with faculty members. 
The Cornerstone program allows stu- 
dents to answer questions associated with 
the transition to college. By allowing 
for open discussion, students are able to 
confront many of the issues that they will 
face in their new role as college students. 
By the time senior year rolls around 
you probably have all the aspects of col- 
lege life down pat. You've discovered the 
secret to balancing work, school, friends; 
you've resolved your interests and your 



aspirations into a tentative career path. 
Just when it all seems too easy, you real- 
ize May is rapidly approaching and that 
you are facing another huge transition, life 
after graduation. You are filled with ques- 
tions, just as you were as a freshman, that 
short time ago. Luckily, Boston College 
offers Capstone classes to help the gradu- 
ating class avert their quarter life crisis. 
Similar to the Cornerstone program, 
the Capstone program allows seniors to 
reflect on their time at BC and their plans 
for the future. The goal of each Capstone 
is for seniors to better understand thi 
experiences at Boston College. In these 
classes, offered in over twenty disciplines, 
students are encouraged to think about 
their undergraduate years as a whole and 
to evaluate the impact Boston College hi 
had on their lives. At Boston College, as in 
architecture, the Capstone represents the 
completion and culmination of somethin] 
begun with the Cornerstone, as seniot 
prepare for their leave from the heights. 



i 








Left page: The goal of the Cornerstone/Capstone program is to encapsulate each student'-* expe 
rience at BG The Alchemist is a popular part of the curriculum of several Capstone seminars. 
Above: Students from Professor Boylan's Capstone seminar, "Decisions for Lifer Background 

The Gasson bell tower, signed by students as part of the Capstone "Boston's College: '"tour life'' 



Senior^ $15 




Molls Cofiwa) & Becca LaPIante 





I'^Bk ill fffffl 



f ami lie f astro & Lara Steele 



Mari Kohatsu, Meg Benedetto. Stephanie Lyndon & Anne Marchessaull 







Seniors J17 




FRIENDS FOREVER 



Article by: Natalie Raffol 



SPENDING THE FIRST few weeks of 
freshman year waking up with, eating with, 
and going to class with completely new 
faces can be intimidating. However, the 
initial fears of living in a dorm and being 
able to find a group of friends that you will 
spend virtually all of your time with soon 
pass. The situation transforms from over- 
whelming to as natural as sibling rivalry 
during the four years spent as Boston Col- 
lege. We are no longer in our safety net of 
friends that had been built since we first 
started school so many years ago, and are 
instead immersed in a sea of new people; 
yet somehow from all the chaos we end 
up with true lifelong friendships. Friends 
not only share bathrooms, food, and other 
material possessions, but ideas, memories, 
and future ambitions, making these bonds 
transcend superficial acquaintances. BC 
students engage in all types of new activi- 
ties with their new friends, from tailgating 
before football games to pulling all-night- 
ers during finals. These experiences make 
tor long lasting relationships, which start in 
a single freshman dorm room and end up in 



a two-story mod. The faces that were once 
strangers to us blend into every aspect of 
our lives. As seniors, it is now the thought of 
losing these faces in our daily routines that 
makes our eyes water. The initial fear that 
was felt as you first moved into your dorm 
returns, except now it is the fear that you will 
no longer see those same faces. At the same 
time, however, you know these friendships 
will not end on graduation day, but will be 
cherished for a lifetime. The past four years 
have seen friendships survive academic 
stresses as well as social pressures, all while 
everyone tries to identify themselves as indi- 
viduals. Former strangers morph into life! 
long friends, infinitely enriching our live 
with their own diverse backgrounds and cul-J 
tures. Although this is only the beginnin 
of our adult lives, it is the end of an era, one 
where we were able to make true friends to 
journey through life with and share all that 
Boston College has to offer. Although the 
normality of seeing the same people every 
day may be over, these friendships will last| 
far beyond Boston College, always remind- 
ing us of our four unforgettable years here. 








K ^ 


r: 













Above: Friends share many experiences together at Boston College, including tailgaling before football 
games together; Left page: Although seniors will no longer sec the same familiar faces everydaj after 
graduation in the spring, main of these friendships will last far beyond the gates of Boston College. 



Seniors 319 




Emilj Lyons & fewit ;i Biscup 



320 




Nuha Abujabcr & Mariette don/ale/ 



Seniors 321 



Maiissa Capineri 

L\Tich School Of Education 

Human Development 



Nicole Capobianco 

College Of Arts & Sciences 

Economics 



Schuanne Cappel 

College Of Arts & Sciences 

Economics 



Amanda Carhart 

College Of Arts & Sciences 

Psychology 

Philosophy 



Julia Carlin 
College Of Arts & Sciena 
English 




Brian Carne\ 

College Of Arts & Sciences 

Historv 



Leighlin Carnival 

College Of Arts & Sciences 

Sociology 

Communications 



Danielle Carpentieri 

College Of Arts & Sciences 

Mathematics 



Kathryn Carr 

College Of Arts & Sciences 

Psychology 



Jennel Carreras 

College Of Arts & Science I 

Sociology 




Christopher Carroll 

Lynch School Of Education 

Secondary Education 

Historv (LSOE) 



Christina Caruso 

College Of Arts & Sciences 

Biology 



Shelby Casassa 

Lynch School Of Education 

Early Childhood 

Human Development 



Krishna Casey 

Carroll School Of Management 

Marketing 



Stefanie Casillas 
College Of Arts & Scienc 
German 




Kathh ly 

ment 
ng 



Alexandra Cassis 
( ollege Of Arte & Sciences 

Communications 



Laura Castelli 

( i illege ( )f Arts & Sciences 

Romance Lang - French 



Mandy Castle 

( ollege Of Arts & Sciences 

Political Science 



Camille Castro 
College Of Arts & Science 
Economics 
History 



Melissa Catarra 
>ge Of Arts & Sciences 
History 



Dana Cates 

Carroll School Of Management 

Marketing 

Communications 



Christopher Caulfield 

College Of Arts & Sciences 

English 

Theology 



Marc Cavallero 

College Of Arts & Sciences 

Economics 



Jeffrey Cegan 

College Of Arts & Sciences 

Economics 




Anna Cembrola 
tege Of Arts & Sciences 
Political Science 



Ashley Ceplikas 

Lynch School Of Education 

Elementary Education 

Human Development 



Stefano Ceroni 

College Of Arts & Sciences 

Sociology 



Emily Cersonsky 

College Of Arts & Sciences 

English 

Philosophy 



Myra Chai 
College Of Arts & Sciences 
Rom. Lang.-Hispanic Study 

Studio Art 




'■. Matthew Chancey 
y:h School Of Education 
econdary Education 
History (LSOE) 



Denis Chang 

College Of Arts & Sciences 

Biology 



Lauren Chang 

College Of Arts & Sciences 

International Studies 



Philip Chang 

Carroll School Of Management 

Finance 

Accounting 



Frederic Chapados 

Carroll School Of Management 

Chemistry 

Finance 




Laura Chaput 

School Of Nursing 

Nursing 



Amanda Chase 

College Of Arts & Sciences 

Biology 



Justin Chen 

Carroll School Of Management 

Finance 

Marketing 



Li Chen 

College Of Arts & Sciences 

Psychology 



1 ing lie Chen 

Carroll School Of Management 

Finance 

Accounting 



Seniors ; 2 ; 




Mary Chen 

College Of Arts & Sciences 

Economics 



David Chepauskas 

Carroll School Of Management 

Finance 

Accounting 



Kara Cherniga 

College Of Arts & Sciences 

Theology 

Political Science 



Michelle Cherubin 

College Of Arts & Sciences 

Communications 



Keith Cheung 
Carroll School Of Managen 
Accounting 
Information Systems 




Philippe Chevalier 

College Of Arts & Sciences 

Political Science 

Communications 



Amy Chew 

Lynch School Of Education 

Elementary Education 

Studio Art 



Paul Chiozzi 

College Of Arts & Sciences 

Communications 



Julia Chipman-Schervish 

College Of Arts & Sciences 

Psychology 



Adrienne Chitayat 
College Of Arts & Science 
Art History 



no. 




Duri Chitayat 

College Of Arts & Sciences 

Political Science 

Economics 



Christian Cho 

College Of Arts & Sciences 

Sociology 



Shirley Cho 

Lynch School Of Education 

Human Development 

Psychology 



Hyun-Ji Choi 

College Of Arts & Sciences 

International Studies 



Annie Chor 
Carroll School Of Managei it 
Finance 




College Of Arts &Sciei 



J.imcxis ( hristian 
( ollcgc Of Arts & Sciences 
>mmunications 

Politic al Si ten* e 



Jennifer Christian 

( ollcge ( )f Arts & Sciences 

English 



Alexander Chu 

College Of Arts & Sciences 

English 

Philosophy 



Sarah Church 
Carroll School Of Managemi 
Finance 
Marketing 




Kathrvn Cianfrocca 
lege Of Arts & Sciences 

English 
Communications 



Michael Ciauri 

Carroll School Of Management 

Accounting 

Finance 



Michael Cintolo 

Carroll School Of Management 

Finance 

Operations /Tech Mgmt 



Christian Cintron 

College Of Arts & Sciences 

Theology 



Courtney Clabbv 

College Of Arts & Sciences 

Sociology 




Jennifer Clair 

School Of Nursing 

Nursing 



Michael Clancy 

College Of Arts & Sciences 

History 



Amber Clarke 

Carroll School Of Management 

Marketing 



Andrew Clement 

College Of Arts & Sciences 

Economics 

Political Science 



William Clerico 
College Of Arts & Sciences 



Computer Science B.S 




hristopher Coakley 
tege Of Arts & Sciences 
imputer Science B.A 



Kimberly Coblyn 

Carroll School Of Management 

Economics-Csom 



Marisa Cochrane 

College Of Arts & Sciences 

International Studies 



Christopher Cody 

College Of Arts & Sciences 

History 



Rov Cohen 

Carroll School Of Management 

Finance 

Marketing 




oseph Colasuonno 
?ge Of Arts & Sciences 
Mathematics 



Jessica Colavita 

College Of Arts & Sciences 

English 



Daniel Coleman 

Carroll School Of Management 

Finance 



Mikaela Coletti 
Carroll School Of Management 

Accounting 



Jeffrey Collins 

Carroll School Ot Management 

Accounting 



I 



Seniors 325 




Danny Jameson. Sarah Manganaro. Emily Labriola & AJ Silver 



Mary Conway & Alison Boyle 









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Lisa Anlonielis, Angela Thompson, Amanda Abel, Mike Wilhclm & Maia Tekle 



326 




Can Bunyan. Chris Ybung, Bill Przylucki, Christine Kbchefko & 
Lauren Kestd 



Seniors ; -~ 



Kateh/n Collins 

College Of Arts & Sciences 

Political Science 



Michael Collins 

College Of Arts & Sciences 

Psychology 



Diana Colon 

Lynch School Of Education 

Elementary Education 

Persp. Spanish America 



James Colucci Kyle Concannon 

Carroll School Of Management Carroll School Of Manager) i 
Finance Finance 

Information Systems l 




Courtnev Condaxis 

College Of Arts & Sciences 

International Studies 



Maura Condon 

Lynch School Of Education 

Elementary Education 

American Heritages 



Denton Conklin 

Lynch School Of Education 

Secondary Education 

History (LSOE) 



Richard Conklin 

College Of Arts & Sciences 

International Studies 



Megan Connelly 
College Of Arts & Scienct 
Communications 




Jeffrey Connolly Meghan Connolly 

College Of Arts & Sciences College Of Arts & Sciences 



History 
Economics 



Biology 



Stephen Connolly 

College Of Arts & Sciences 

Communications 



Susan Connolly 

College Of Arts & Sciences 

Psychology 



Timothy Connolly 
College Of Arts & Scien 
Chemistry 




/ roy James ( onti 

»U School Of M <it College Of Arts & Sciences 

Mgmt. Communications 



Molly Conway 

( ollege ( )f Arts & Sciences 

Psychology 



John Cooney 

Carroll School Of Management 

Finance 



Kate Cooper 
College Of Arts & Scienct 
Communications 



Stephen Cordo 
School Of Management 
Finance 
Marketing 



Lawrence Corio 

College Of Arts & Sciences 

Communications 



Catherine Corkum 

Lynch School Of Education 

Human Development 

Elementary Education 



Elizabeth Correa 

College Of Arts & Sciences 

History 



Caitlin Corrieri 

Lynch School Of Education 

Secondary Education 

English (LSOE) 




Dean Corsi 


Anthony Costanzo 


Daniel Costigan 


Christopher Cote 


Michael Cotter 


allege Of Arts & Sciences 


College Of Arts & Sciences 


College Of Arts & Sciences 


Carroll School Of Management 


College Of Arts & Sciences 


Communications 


Communications 
English 


Psychology 
Communications 


Finance 


Political Science 




I Katharine Courtney 


Christopher Coutin 


Lindsay Cowan 


Amanda Cowie 


Jennifer Cowperthwait 


allege Of Arts & Sciences 


College Of Arts & Sciences 


College Of Arts & Sciences 


College Of Arts & Sciences 


College Oi Arts & Sciences 


Political Science 


Psychology 


English 


Communications 


Communications 


Communications 












Katherine Coyne 
doll School Of Management 
Marketing 
Finance 



Ryan Coyne 

College Of Arts & Sciences 
Political Science 



Elizabeth Cramer 

College Of Arts & Sciences 

Psychology 



Michael Craparo 

College Of Arts & Sciences 

History 



Kristen Critelli 

College CM Arts ,«^ Sciences 

Biolog) 



Seniors 329 



Mary Cronin 
College Of Arts & Sciences 
Rom. Lang-Hispanic Stdv 



Damien Croteau-Chonka 

College Of Arts & Sciences 

Biochemistry 



Amy Crotty 

College Of Arts & Sciences 

English 



Lauren Crowne 

College Of Arts & Sciences 

English 

Communications 



David Cubeta 
Carroll School Of Managenv 
Finance 
Accounting 




Rebecca Cudmore 

College Of Arts & Sciences 

Psychology 



Keith Cullar 

College Of Arts & Sciences 

Economics 



Michael Cullen 

Carroll School Of Management 

Finance 



Matthew Cullinan 

College Of Arts & Sciences 

Theater Arts 

English 



Jennifer Cundall 

School Of Nursing 

Nursing 




Kara Cunnane 

Carroll School Of Management 

Accounting 

Finance 



Catherine Cunningham 

College Of Arts & Sciences 

Psychology 



Matthew Curley 

College Of Arts & Sciences 

Chemistry 



Matthew Cushing 

College Of Arts & Sciences 

International Studies 



Casey Cwynar 
College Of Arts & Science 
Political Science 




Matthi < zemy Parthiv Daftary 

Carroll Sch(, nagement Carroll School Of Management 

I i nance 
I < ononiK s-CSOM 



Anne Dalebroux 

( ollege Of Arts & Sciences 

Psychology 



Richard Daley 

Carroll School Of Management 

Accounting 



Justin Dalrymple 

College Of Arts & Sciences 

Biology A&S BA 



Ashley Dalton 

School Of Nursing 

Nursing 



Katie Daly 

School Of Nursing 

Nursing 



Megan Daly 

Carroll School Of Management 

Marketing 



David D'Ambrosio 

College Of Arts & Sciences 

Political Science 



Colin D' Amour 

College Of Arts & Sciences 

Economics 




Marygene Dane 
ipll School Of Management 
Accounting 



Christopher Daniello 

Carroll School Of Management 

Finance 

Accounting 



Mariel Dator 

College Of Arts & Sciences 

English 

Psychology 



Hillary D'Atri 

Carroll School Of Management 

Marketing 

Finance 



Noelle Dauenhaver 

Lynch School Of Education 

Early Childhood Ed 




Russell Dauterman 
allege Of Arts & Sciences 
Communications 
Studio Art 



Maura Davenport 

College Of Arts & Sciences 

Communications 



Elizabeth Davis 

School Of Nursing 

Nursing 



Meghan Davis 

College Of Arts & Sciences 

Psychology 



Shardai Davis 

College Of Arts & Sciences 

Sociology 




Alison Davitt 
'liege Of Arts & Sciences 
Biology 



Lindsey Day 

College Of Arts & Sciences 

Communications 



Genevieve Dean 
Carroll School Of Management 

Marketing 



Steven Debartolo 

College Of Arts & Sciences 

Economics 



Nicole Deblieux 

Lynch School Of Education 

Human Development 

Sociology 



Seniors ;; i 



Rachael De Chacon 

College Of Arts & Sciences 

Philosophy 



Jessica Decosta 

Carroll School Of Management 

Finance 

Economics-CSOM 



Marlon Dee 

Carroll School Of Management 

Finance 



Corp. Report & Analysis 



Emily Deemer 

College Of Arts & Sciences 

Psychology 



Mary Defilippo 
College Of Arts & Scienc 
Communications 




Andrew Degiorgio 

College Of Arts & Sciences 

Psychology 



Matthew Deibel 

Carroll School Of Management 

Finance 



Niurka De Jesus 

College Of Arts & Sciences 

English 

Human Development 



Minochy Delanois 

School Of Nursing 

Nursing 



Peter Del Cioppo 
College Of Arts & Science 
Physics 




Kristen De D20 

Carroll School Of Management 

Finance 



Susanna Dello Russo 

College Of Arts & Sciences 

History 



Anthony DeMarco Kyle De Meo 

Carroll School Of Management Lynch School Of Education 

Human Resources Mgmnt. Human Development 
Philosophy 



Nicholas Deming 
College Of Arts & Scienc 
English 







An tones Kinnary Desai 

College Of Arts & Carroll School Of Management 

<mmunir -itions I inance 



Kunal Desai 

( ollege Of Arts & Sciences 

Biology 



Nisha Desai 

College Of Arts & Sciences 

Communications 



Joseph DeSanctis 
Carroll School Of Managemt 
Accounting 




Clara De Soto 
je Of Arts & Sciences 



English 



Daniel Destefano 

College Of Arts & Sciences 

Theater Arts 



Rene Destefano 

College Of Arts & Sciences 

Communications 



Victoria Devins Ashvvinder Dhillon 

Carroll School Of Management Carroll School Of Management 
Finance Marketing Finance Accounting 




Victoria Diaz 
C liege Of Arts & Sciences 
Political Science 



Jessica Dickinson 

College Of Arts & Sciences 

Economics 



Christina Diiorio 

Lynch School Of Education 

Human Development 

Elementary Education 



Ekaterina Dikansky 

College Of Arts & Sciences 

English 



Vincent Di Maggio 

College Of Arts & Sciences 

Mathematics 





Daniel Diorio 
liege Of Arts & Sciences 
History 



Kelsey Dippold 

College Of Arts & Sciences 

Communica tions 

History 



Christopher Dirolf 

College Of Arts & Sciences 

Political Science 



Anne Di Salvo Peter Dischinger 

College Of Arts & Sciences Carroll School Of \ [anagement 



English 
Philosophy 



Finance 




-hristopher DiSchino 
■lege Of Arts & Sciences 
Political Science 


Michael Distefano 

College Of Arts & Sciences 

Political Science 


Alexandra Dizard 

College Of Arts & Sciences 

Communications 


Anabel Djaja 

Carrol] School Oi Management 

Accounting 

I inance 


Caroline Dobrowski 
College Of Art- *.<: Sciences 

Studio Art 

Seniors B3 




I li! » 



I II II 11 11 II f 

^T_ •-■---••:••-•-: *f*mtf*< i?::::?::-:::- ™ ............ ^1 

■■r * *.^ 



Kevin D/.iubek. Leigh Tinmouth, Mike Anello & Brian White 






Karina Duran & Alder DeBrito 



l.iixJsa) (Jranalcll & Lauren Barrel! 



VA Scnion 




Mail Leidl 



Zack c\>nro\ & Mike McGowan 



Seniors ;; ^ 




Susie Connelly, Kalie Hrennan & Emily Bowcn 







Sarah Manganaro & Julia Chipman-Schervish 



Seniors 337 







Kathleen Dodd 

College Of Arts & Sciences 

Communications 

English 



Nicholas Doherty 

College Of Arts & Sciences 

History 



Joseph Dolginow 

College Of Arts & Sciences 

Economics 

History 



Irene Domenico 
College Of Arts & Sciences 

Economics 
Rom. Lang.-Hispanic Study 



Caitlin Domke 
College Of Arts & Sciena j 
Communications 
Philosophy 




Adam Donahue 

College Of Arts & Sciences 

Communications 



Andrew Donahue 

Carroll School Of Management 

Finance 



Monica Donahue 

School Of Nursing 

Nursing 



Maura Donnantuono 

College Of Arts & Sciences 

History 

Psychology 



Kelly Donohue 
Carroll School Of Managem I 
Finance 




Megan Donohue 

College Of Arts & Sciences 

Political Science 



Stephen Dool 

College Of Arts & Sciences 

Communications 



John Dooley 

College Of Arts & Sciences 

History 

Philosophy 



William Dorsey 

College Of Arts & Sciences 

Biology 



Matthew Doukas 
Carroll School Of Managei it 
Marketing 




' )i Arts & S< i. 
f.nglish 



Julia Downall 

( ollcgc Of Arts & Sciences 

Bioc hemistry 



Brendan Dowries 

Lynch School ( )l Education 
I lum. m Development 



John Doyle 

College Of Arts & Sciences 

I listory 

Communications 



William A. Doyle 
Carroll School Of Managers 
Accounting 
Finance 



William J. Doyle 
lege Of Arts & Sciences 

English 
Communications 



Elizabeth Driscoll 

College Of Arts & Sciences 

Chemistry 



Kathryn Driscoll 

College Of Arts & Sciences 

English 



David D'Silva 

College Of Arts & Sciences 

Political Science 

Economics 



Clare Duan 

Carroll School Of Management 

Mathematics 

Finance- 




Carl Dulay 
i>l\ School Of Management 
Finance 



Carolyn Dumser 

Carroll School Of Management 

Finance 

Accounting 



Thomas Duncan 

College Of Arts & Sciences 

Mathematics 



Kristen Dunkel 

Carroll School Of Management 

Accounting 



Christina Dunn 

College Of Arts & Sciences 

English 




Karina Duran 
Cjlege Of Arts & Sciences 
Communications 



Erin Durkin 

College Of Arts & Sciences 

English 

Communications 



Michael Dwyer 

College Of Arts & Sciences 

Philosophy 



Nicole Dziamba 

College Of Arts & Sciences 

Communications 



Kevin Dziubek 

Carroll School Of Management 

Finance 

Accounting 




Susan Earle 
Cjlege Of Arts & Sciences 
Political Science 






Bradley Easterbrooks 

College Of Arts & Sciences 

Political Science 

History 



Dennis Eaton 

College Of Arts & Sciences 

Economics 



Julia Ebel 

College Of Arts & Sciences 

German 



Charles 1 bj 

College Of Arts & Sciences 

Psychology 



Senior- 09 



Sekavi Edwards 

College Or Art> & Sciences 

Musk 



Juan Egui 

Carroll School Of Management 

Economics-Csom 

Finance 



Matthew Egyud 

College Of Arts & Sciences 

Biology 



Eugene Ehmann Jr 

College Of Arts & Sciences 

History 



Emily Ehrgood 
Carroll School Of Managerr , 
Economics 




Deborah Ehrlich 


Gregory Eisenhart 


Denise Ekenstierna 


Caitlyn Elf 


Anthony Elia 


College Of Arts & Sciences 


Carroll School Of Management 


College Of Arts & Sciences 


College Of Arts & Sciences 


Carroll School Of Managem 


Art History 


Finance 
Management. & Leadership 


English 


Communications 


Finance 
Marketing 




Jessica Elliott 

College Of Arts & Sciences 

Theater Arts 



Laura Ellis 

Carroll School Of Management 

Marketing 



Ryan Elman 

Carroll School Of Management 

Econom ics-Csom 

Political Science 



Benjamin Eng 

Carroll School Of Management 

Finance 



Steven Englehardt 
College Of Arts & Scienc 
Economics 







'ii<-nt 



Stephen I nostrum 

( ollege of Arts & S( icik es 
Biology 



Matthew Epps 

College ( )f Arts & Sciences 

Economics 

Political Science 



Christine Ettman 

Lynch School Of Education 

Secondary Education 

History (LSOE) 



Andrea Evans 
College Of Arts & Science; 
History 
Sociology 



Asia Evans 
[illege Of Arts & Sciences 
English 



Catherine Evans 

College Of Arts & Sciences 

English 

Communications 



Katherine Evans 

College Of Arts & Sciences 

English 



Michael Ewert 

College Of Arts & Sciences 

Theology 



Salvatore M. Fabbri 

College Of Arts & Sciences 

Biochemistry 




Schuyler Fabian 
)11 School Of Management 
Finance 



Elizabeth Fabiani 

College Of Arts & Sciences 

English 

Communications 



James Fagan 

College Of Arts & Sciences 

Theater Arts 

Film 



Lauren Faherty 

College Of Arts & Sciences 

Communications 



Alison Fahey 

College Of Arts & Sciences 

International Studies 




Anne Fahrenbach 

School Of Nursing 

Nursing 



Irene Farnham 

College Of Arts & Sciences 

Communications 



Glenn Farrell 

Lynch School Of Education 

Elementary Education 

Math/Computer Science 



Kathleen Farrell 

College Of Arts & Sciences 

Biology 

Philosophy 



Sophie Farrell 

College Of Arts & Sciences 

Communications 




Andrew Faxon 
(liege Of Arts & Sciences 
ivironment Geoscience 



Kaitlin Fazio 

Carroll School Of Management 

Marketing 



Melissa Fazio 

College Of Arts & Sciences 

Communications 



John Feighery 

College Of Arts & Sciences 

Film Studies 



Emihe Feiten 

College Of Arts & Sciences 

International Studies 



Seniors ; 4I 




V(l 




Seniors 343 




M B nedetto <t Justin N^ 







^mmm^mm 



Hillary DAtri & Erin Klewin 



Qristina Lopez i*v Julie Chipman-Shervish 



Seniors 345 



Kaitlin Felonev 

College Of Arts & Sciences 

History 



James Ferguson 

College Of Arts & Sciences 

Biology 



Teresa Ferguson 

College Of Arts & Sciences 

Communications 



Ana Fernandes Tara Fernandes 

College Of Arts & Sciences Carroll School Of Managen 
Sociology Accounting 




Nicolas Fernandez Aramburu 

Carroll School Of Management 

Marketing 



Kathleen Ferris 

College Of Arts & Sciences 

Communications 

Marketing 



Lara Figueroa 

College Of Arts & Sciences 

English 



Alexandra Filimonov 

College Of Arts & Sciences 

Political Science 



Laura Fincher 
Lynch School Of Educatk 
Elementary Education 
English (LSOE) 




Mary Beth Findlay 

College Of Arts & Sciences 

Communications 



John Finnegan 

College Of Arts & Sciences 

International Studies 



Patrick Fisher 

College Of Arts & Sciences 

Economics 



Caitlin Fitzgerald 

College Of Arts & Sciences 

English 



Jaclyn Fitzgerald 
Carroll School Of Manage nt 
Accounting 
Human Resources Mgrr 




I it/^ibbons Valerie Flambert 

College Of Arts & S< iences (■ arroll St hool Of Management 
lology ( >|>crations/Tech Mngmt. 

I i nance 



Laura Fleming 
School Of Nursing 

Nursing 



Taylor Fleming 

Carroll School Of Management 

Marketing 

Philosophy 



Jessica Flinn 
College Of Arts & Scieno 
History 




Alexandra Flores 
Inch School Of Education 

Early Childhood 
Human Development 



William Flynn 

Carroll School Of Management 

Marketing 

Economics-CSOM 



Natalie Fogiel 

Carroll School Of Management 

Accounting 

Philosophy 



Morgan Foley 

College Of Arts & Sciences 

Communications 



Siobhan Forbes 

School Of Nursing 

Nursing 




Margaret Ford 
)llege Of Arts & Sciences 
English 
Sociology 



Kelleen Forlizzi 

College Of Arts & Sciences 

Communications 

English 



Sophie Forte 

College Of Arts & Sciences 

Biology 



Kimberly Fortier 

College Of Arts & Sciences 

English 



Christopher Fournier 

College Of Arts & Sciences 

Economics 




Shannon Fox 
allege Of Arts & Sciences 
Political Science 



Michael Frank 

College Of Arts & Sciences 

International Studies 



Thomas Fraser 

College Of Arts & Sciences 

Political Science 

Music 



Peter Frates 

College Of Arts & Sciences 

Communications 



Katherine Freund 

Carroll School Of Management 

Finance 




Cynthia Frezzo 
Uege Of Arts & Sciences 
History 



Nora Frias 

College Of Arts & Sciences 

Psychology 



Kristen Fruauff 

College Of Arts & Sciences 

Biology 



Lindsay Fryer 

Lynch School Of Education 

Secondary Education 

English (LSOE) 



Matthew Fumuso 

Carroll School Of Management 

Finance 



Seniors 347 




Antonio Fusco 


Mari Gahbert 


Corinne Gabelli 


Lindsay Gabriel 


Megan Gaffney 


College Of Arts & Sciences 


College Of Arts & Sciences 


College Of Arts & Sciences 


Lynch School Of Education 


Lynch School Of Educati 


Philosophy 


Psychology 


Theology 


Elementary Education 


Human Development 


Economics 




Communications 


Math/Computer Science 


Theater Arts 





Amy Gaither 

College Of Arts & Sciences 

Communications 

English 



Catherine Galeota 

Carroll School Of Management 

Marketing 

Human Resources Mgmnt 



Erin Galgay 

College Of Arts & Sciences 

Classics 

Theology 



Elizabeth Gallaher 

College Of Arts & Sciences 

Biology A&S B.A 



Margaret Galligan 
College Of Arts & Scieno 
Communications 
Philosophy 




James Galvin 

College Of Arts & Sciences 

International Studies 



Richard Gambale 

College Of Arts & Sciences 

Economics 



Melissa Gambatese 

College Of Arts & Sciences 

Biology 



Sarah Gant 

Lynch School Of Education 

Elementary Education 

English (LSOE) 



Lindsay Ganz 

Lynch School Of Educat 

Human Developmen 




BreW ' ,-trbcr Jeffrey Gardner 

.11 School Oi ment College Of Arts & Sciences 

History 



Kellis Garland 

School Of Nursing 

Nursing 



Justin Caskill 

College Of Arts & Sciences 

History 



Frank Gatto 
Carroll School Of Managem | 
Marketing 
Communications 



Lindsey Gatto 
School Of Management 
Corporate Systems 



Priti Gautam 

College Of Arts & Sciences 

Economics 



Caitlin Geddes 

College Of Arts & Sciences 

English 



Elizabeth Genovese 

College Of Arts & Sciences 

Biology 



Meghan George 

College Of Arts & Sciences 

History 

Communications 




Melissa Gerdung 
mil School Of Management 
Finance 
Accounting 



Taryn Gervais 

College Of Arts & Sciences 

Biology 



Silvia Gesheva 

College Of Arts & Sciences 

Biology 



Ashley Gestrich 

College Of Arts & Sciences 

International Studies 



Genna Ghaul 

College Of Arts & Sciences 

Economics 




Elizabeth Ghazi 
Qlege Of Arts & Sciences 
Psychology 



Katherine Giblin 

Lynch School Of Education 

Human Development 

Communications 



Timothy Gilchrist 

College Of Arts & Sciences 

Mathematics 



Caitlin Gillen 

School Of Nursing 

Nursing 



Lauren Gionfriddo 

Carroll School Of Management 

Finance 

Accounting 




Patrick Gipson 
({lege Of Arts & Sciences 
Political Science 



James Girvin 

College Of Arts & Sciences 

Political Science 



Kelly Glennon 

Lynch School Of Education 

Communications 

Human Development 



Christine Go 

Carroll School Of Management 

Marketing 



Megan Godio 

School Oi Nursing 

Nursing 



Seniors 349 




350 




Trinh Tang. Minochy Ddanois & Chariene Yietorino 



Kate Goggins & Kelleen rorlizzi 



Seniors 351 




Pumpkin I •■ tival at the Boston Commons 



Meghan Fredette, Jcnna Sakolsky, Amy Smith & Ali Fahej 



352 




Nuha Ahujaber & Steve Dool 



Seniors 



Andrew Goff 

Carroll School Of Management 

Accounting 

Information Systems 



Kate Goggins 

College Oi Arts & Sciences 

Communications 



Leigh Going 

Carroll School Of Management 

Marketing 

Human Resources Mgmnt 



Django Gold 

College Of Arts & Sciences 

English 



Leah Goldenthal 
Carroll School Of Manager ,t 
Marketing 




Sean Goldthwaite 

College Of Arts & Sciences 

Psychology 



Peter Goljan 

College Of Arts & Sciences 

English 



Brian Gonzales 

College Of Arts & Sciences 

Psychology 



Alexandra Gonzalez 

College Of Arts & Sciences 

Communications 



Julianna Gonzalez 
College Of Arts & Science 
Sociology 




Mariette Gonzalez Nicole Gonzalez 

College Of Arts & Sciences Lynch School Of Education 

Political Science Human Development 



Paula Gonzalez 

College Of Arts & Sciences 

Philosophy 



Kristen Goodby 

College Of Arts & Sciences 

History 



Brent Goodin 
College Of Arts & Scierv 

Economics 
Rom. Lang.-Hispanic Sti 




man 
Lyncl lui .ition 

v< ond ition 

Korn. Lang -I I itudy 



Cara Gorham 

( ollege Of Arts & Sc iero es 

Biology 



Nicole Gorospe 

( arroll S< hool Of Management 
Accounting 



Dennis Cioulet 

College Of Arts & Sciences 

Philosophy 



Caitlin Graboski 
Lynch School Of Educatio 
Human Development 




Megan Grace 
*e Of Arts & Sciences 
Psychology 



Lindsay Granatell 

College Of Arts & Sciences 

Mathematics 



Kaelin Grant 

College Of Arts & Sciences 

Romance Lang - French 

Philosophy 



Victoria Grasso 

College Of Arts & Sciences 

English 



Christopher Gray 

College Of Arts & Sciences 

Theology 




Michele Greco 

I 

jlege Of Arts & Sciences 
English 



Megan Green 

School Of Nursing 

Nursing 



Lauren Greenberg 

Lynch School Of Education 

Elementary Education 

Human Development 



Alana Greer 

College Of Arts & Sciences 

Philosophy 



Bridget Griffin 

Carroll School Of Management 

Finance 




Meghan Griffin 
H lege Of Arts & Sciences 
Biochemistry 



Julie Grimes 

College Of Arts & Sciences 

Psychology 



Susan Groden 

College Of Arts & Sciences 

English 



Jennifer Gropp 

School Of Nursing 

Nursing 



Alexander Grosart 

College Of Arts & Sciences 

Biochemistn 




Emily Gruber 
*e Of Arts & Sciences 
English 



Janet Guarino 

College Of Arts & Sciences 

History 

English 



Joseph Guenzer 

College Of Arts & Sciences 

Biolog) 

English 



Joseph Gugliotta 
Carroll School Oi Management 

Finance 
Marketing 



Christine Cuida 

College OJ \rt> & Sciences 

English 

Philosophy 



Senior- 355 




lames Gullage 

Carroll School Of Management 

Accounting 



Graham Gullans 

Carroll School Of Management 

Finance 

Information Systems 



Colin Gunn-Graffy 

College Of Arts & Sciences 

Communications 



YiGuo 

College Of Arts & Sciences 

Economics 

Biology 



Daniel Guyton 
Carroll School Of Managen 
Accounting/Inf Tech 
Finance 




Jimmy Guzman Brendan Haag 

Carroll School Of Management Carroll School Of Management 
Marketing Accounting 

Communications 



Stephanie Hackett 

College Of Arts & Sciences 

Art History 



Christopher Hadfield 

College Of Arts & Sciences 

Sociology 



Timothy Hagan 
College Of Arts & Sciena 
Psychology 




f*\ 




Norma Hage 

Lynch School Of Education 

Human Development 

English (LSOE) 



Ashley Hall 

Carroll School Of Management 

Accounting 



Ty Hall 

Carroll School Of Management 

Marketing 



Mohamed Hallaba 

Carroll School Of Management 

Finance 

Corp. Report & Analysis 



Patrick Halloun 
Carroll School Of Managei 
Information Systems 
Accounting 




■ tnel 

Colli . 

iish 



I heodore I l.mno 

Carroll Si hool < >i Management 

Accounting 



Jill I lansen 
Lynch School Of Education 

Elementary Education 
Communications 



Rebekah hlanson 

School Of Nursing 

Nursing 



Nasira Haque 
College Of Arts & Science- 
History 
English 




Jonathan Harding 
(Jllege Of Arts & Sciences 
Political Science 



Julia Harding 

College Of Arts & Sciences 

English 



Melissa Hargleroad 

College Of Arts & Sciences 

International Studies 



Gail Harmon 

College Of Arts & Sciences 

Political Science 



Gregory Harr 

Carroll School Of Management 

Finance 

Accounting 




Megan Harriman 
Cllege Of Arts & Sciences 
History 



Kent Harrington 

College Of Arts & Sciences 

English 



Molly Harrington 

Lynch School Of Education 

Elementary Education 

Math/Computer Science 



Shannon Harrington 

College Of Arts & Sciences 

Biology A&S B.A 



Andrew Harris 

Carroll School Of Management 

Finance 




Cathleen Harris 
College Of Arts & Sciences 
Political Science 



Balynnda Harrison 

Carroll School Of Management 

Human Resources Mgmnt. 

Marketing 



Mark Harrison 

College Of Arts & Sciences 

Biology 



Stephanie Hartzband 

College Of Arts & Sciences 

Communications 

English 



Mehdi Hashambhov 

Carroll School Of Management 

Finance 




Alison Hayden 
Allege Of Arts & Sciences 
Biology 



Preston Hayes 

Carroll School Of Management 

Economics-Csom 

Finance 



Juliana 1 layman 

School Of Nursing 

Nursing 



Daniel 1 lazelwood 

i allege Of Arts & Sciences 
Political Science 

I nglisli 



Sean 1 leal) 

College Of Arts & Sciences 

Sociologj 



Seniors ; ^~ 




Kale Goggins, Lindsay Fryer, Megan Grace, Carey St. Onge & frio 



fin mouth 







■^^■^■■■■^^H 



Rete Goljan & Joe Walsh 



Emit) Blake & Meaghan Krupa 



Seniors 3S9 




Fen Pdktier, Katie Farmini, Krislina Nazareth, Maia Tekle, Kathryn Barwikowski & Amanda Abel 



. 




Brian Zager, Stephanie Lyndon. Nasira Hat|ue. Paul Kountz & Noelle Troccol 



Sean Hand & Julia Chipman-Schen ish 



Seniors 361 




Erin Hearn 

College Of Arts & Sciences 

Communications 

Psvcholog\ 



Monica Hebert 

College Of Arts & Sciences 

Mathematics 



Peter Heinlein 

College Of Arts & Sciences 

Economics 

German 



Kathryn Held 

College Of Arts & Sciences 

Sociology 



Rachel Held 
College Of Arts & Scienc 
Theology 




Kathryn Henault 

College Of Arts & Sciences 

Biology 



Mark Henderson 

College Of Arts & Sciences 

History 

Sociology 



Miguel Hendrickson 

Carroll School Of Management 

Finance 

Economics-CSOM 



Evan Henrich 

College Of Arts & Sciences 

International Studies 



David Henry 
Carroll School Of Manageir j 
Finance 




Kaitlin Henry 

Lynch School Of Education 

Elementary Education 



Laura Henry 

College Of Arts & Sciences 

Mathematics 



Alyssa Henske 

Lynch School Of Education 

Human Development 

Child in Society 



Peter Herbst 

College Of Arts & Sciences 

Economics 

English 



Whitney Herge 
College Of Arts & Scieni 
English 
Psychology 




I n< Hewitt 

>1 Of Management 
Economic ft-Csom 



Maria Hidalgo 

( ollegc ( >f Arts & Si icn< cs 

Biology 



Kelly I liggins 

College Of Arts & Sciences 

History 



Petra Hiigel 

College Of Arts & Sciences 

History 

Communications 



Karen Hill 
College Of Arts & Science 
Psychology 








Kasey Hill 
ilill School Of Management 

Marketing 
i Operations Mgmnt 



Lauren Hill 

Carroll School Of Management 

Accounting 

Finance 



Clarence Hill Jr 

College Of Arts & Sciences 

Education 

English 



Court Hillman 

Carroll School Of Management 

Information Systems 



Arielle Himy 

College Of Arts & Sciences 

Art History 




Hayley Hindinger 
Cllege Of Arts & Sciences 
Communications 



Amanda H inkle 

College Of Arts & Sciences 

Political Science 



Alexandra Hinojosa 

College Of Arts & Sciences 

Economics 

English 



Kimberly Hirsch 

College Of Arts & Sciences 

International Studies 



Crystal Ho 

Carroll School Of Management 

Finance 




Sheau-Yan Ho 
Cllege Of Arts & Sciences 
Psychology 



Jake Holbrook 

Carroll School Of Management 

Marketing 



Philip Holden 

College Of Arts & Sciences 

Communications 



Timothy Holden 

College Of Arts & Sciences 

Communications 



Daniel Holland 

Carroll School Of Management 

Finance 




James Holland 
9»11 School Of Management 
Finance 
Economics 



Courtney Hollis 

Carroll School Of Management 

Finance 



Kathryn Hollis 

College Of Arts & Sciences 

Communications 



Megan Holmberg 
College Of Arts & Sciences 

English 



Stephanie 1 lolmes 

College Of Arts v^ Sciences 

Historj 



Son lots $63 



Senior Perspectives 



Class of 2007 



Ten exceptional seniors were 
chosen by their peers as those 
who exemplify Boston College's 
motto "Ever to Excel" and are 
truly men and women for others. 



Claire Lerchen 



Claire Lerchen has been able to involve her- 
self in many activities during her time at 
Boston College. She has given a great amount 
of time to Intersections, through her involve- 
ment as a council member in the Senior Task 
Force for vocational discernment. She also 
was on the Halftime Council and led a retreat. 
Appalachia has also been a part of Claire's 
BC experience. She went on a summer trip 
to Mississippi and plans to go on another 
this March. Claire served as the committee 
chair for research and development in the 
Campus School as well as a reading buddy. 
For her academic strength Claire is a member 
of Golden Key, an international honor soci- 
ety, and Cross and Crown, an honor society 
for BC's College of Arts and Sciences. All 
of Claire's involvement demonstrates how 
her actions live up to her personal motto by 
John F. Kennedy, "A man may die, nations 
may rise and fall, but an idea lives on". 




364 Scr 



Alison Fahey 




N ke Normant has always known he wanted 
be a teacher. During the four years he has 
>;n at Boston College he has actively pur- 
»i;d this goal. As a history and secondary 
Mcation double major, Mike has proudly 
Hved as the president of the Lynch School 
) Education Senate. However, Mike's com- 
iirtent to children does not end with his 
i< demic pursuits. As a volunteer coach of 
Mh baseball and basketball teams, Mike 
Bible to combine his love of sports with 
passion for working with children. In 
ti spare time Mike has also participated in 
J's intramural softball league assuming 
i role of both player and manager. Above 
i though, friends say Mike is committed to 
a rig a full life; "Everyday he has a goal to 
H ve for excellence and seek God in all things 
|r all of his activities. " Friends also note 
*ke's enthusiasm and positive attitudes as 
sinificant factors in Mike's achievement. 



Alison Fahey has not let her time at Boston 
College go to waste. Whether it is participat- 
ing in the Undergraduate Student Govern- 
ment or volunteering off campus through 
4Boston, Alison has greatly contributed to her 
community. Alison's most cherished accom- 
plishment lies within her 4Boston experience 
where she currently volunteers at the Suffolk 
County House of Corrections. She has been 
involved since freshman year helping the 
residents acquire educational skills and even 
earn their GEDs. In UGBC she serves as the 
Assistant Director of Student Life allowing her 
to branch out into all of her interests concern- 
ing volunteer issues and student relations. 
For her service and academic accomplish- 
ments Alison is a member of the Cross and 
Crown, an honor society in the School of Arts 
and Sciences. All of these accomplishments 
embody the epitome of what Boston College 
hopes to instill in its students. Alison hopes to 
take these qualities with her as she ventures 
into the field of international relations and 
development where her altruism and per- 
severance will definitely allow her to shine. 



Mike Normant 




Seniors 



Clare Murphy 




Becoming immersed in the many facets Bo^ 
College has to offer comes naturally to C 
Murphy. She has deeply been involved in the ! 
dent Admissions Program as well as the Bo^ 
College Irish Society throughout her four year 
BC. Clare has been able to hold leadership pi 
tions in both areas, being on the council for 
Student Admissions Program and as the Pr 1 
dent of the Irish Society. However, these are c 
parts of Clare's involvement at Boston Colli 
Clare is currently a Freshman RA, after be 
nominated for Sophomore RA of the year in 2(1 
Clare's greatest accomplishment lies in her ir 
est in health sciences. She is vice presidem 
the Mendel Society and was a participant in 
Bioethics Conference in 2006 and 2007 fori 
papers on Ethics in Stem Cell Research and M> 
cal Tourism. This year Clare was also invite< 
the National Undergraduate Bioethics Confere 
at Michigan State University where she will c 
presentation on HIV/AIDS in South Africa. C 
plans to take all of her experiences throughout 
time at BC to go to Medical School and evei 
ally pursue international healthcare, bringing 
hard work and determination out into the wc 



Annie Le 



Between student teaching at Boston's Urban Sci- 
ence Academy and completing a double major in 
Education and Math, it is hard to imagine Annie 
Le has much time left over to devote to the various 
organizations she is involved with. As one friend 
puts it. "Sometimes she gives herself 25 hours 
v%orth of things to do in a day, but she handles 
it all!" In her time at Boston College, Annie has 
won several prestigious scholarships and been an 
active member of both the AHANA Leadership 
Council and the Vietnamese Student Associa- 
tion, where she served as Co-President during her 
junior year. But Annie isn't all business; friends 
know her best as someone who is friendly, out- 
going and who loves giving people nicknames, 
"its just something fun I do when I get bored," 
she says. As if she has much time to be bored. 







Tad Ahlersmeyer 




Tad Ahlersmeyer is the kind of guy who likes to 
help people. In only four years at Boston College, 
Tad has gone on six different service trips; once 
to Guatemala and five times with the Appalachia 
volunteers. Tad has been involved with the Appa- 
lachia Volunteers at many levels, first as a partici- 
pant, then twice as a leader and most recently as 
a member of Appalachia council. He is also the 
go-to guy for students experiencing technical dif- 
ficulties. As the ResNet coordinator, Tad helps the 
most stressed out students on campus, the ones 
who's computer "like won't turn on, it like has a 
virus or something!' As the head coordinator for 
this program, Tad has also had the opportunity to 
star in a short film used at orientation to inform 
students about virus protection before it's too late. 
After graduation, Tad plans to do service for a year 
or two to continue in his spirit of helping others. 



.Landa Denes has proven herself to be a valuable 
5 1 to Boston College. She displays a passion for 
Sing others, especially those in the minority, 
iim may otherwise be overlooked. Amanda 
it; her most cherished activity as her position 
Oirector of Programming for GLC. She finds 
fework planning events for this group especially 
turding since she can sense the appreciation 
hn by those involved. However, Amanda is also 
hived in the UGBC programming department, 
l:h plans other events on campus for students, 
aanda is also working as director for The Vagina 
liologues, a production that supports women's 
fets, another passion of hers. One student exem- 
l.es Amanda spirit by saying, "She has come 
pe the value of offering education outside of 
|:lassroom, which is a cornerstone of the Jesuit 
:ation!' Amanda's spirit to raise awareness and 
line interest in others is a unique characteris- 
hat has lead her to be invited to the Scholar of 
[(College program, which is designed to recog- 
|| students who have performed outstandingly 
I oston College. This will greatly help her as she 
Ills on to grad school after completing her double 
W)r in communication and women's studies. 



Amanda Denes 




Seniors 367 



Alanna Wong 




Alanna Wong has boundless school spirit, "J 
is that girl that paints her entire body for foott 
games'' says her friend Jim Conti. Being a de 
cated Superfan is not the only way Alanna she 
her love for Boston College; Alanna exemplil 
the precise excellence in which BC has staked 
reputation. As an executive board member of 
Residence Hall Association, a Halftime lead i 
Cross and Crown marshal, she has spent the p i 
four years striving to leave Boston College a bet 
place than she found it. However, Alanna's 1< 
for her community extends far beyond the ga 
of Boston College. She spent two summers do 
volunteer work in Jamaica on a Pedro Arrupe 
vice trip, an experience that still stays with 1 
After graduation Alanna plans to attend gra> 
ate school where she will study internatio 
affairs and complete more volunteer work abro . 



Adrienne Andry 



Volunteering has always been a prominent part 
of Adrienne Andrys life, especially throughout 
her duration at Boston College. Adrienne volun- 
teered with 4Boston for all four years at the Com- 
monwealth Tenant's Association, a children's after 
school program. The CTA program, located in 
Brighton, is where Adrienne travels 2-3 times a 
week to help improve the city of Boston. This ser- 
vice is especially important to Adrienne because 
of her background, "I grew up in the neighborhood 
and I was directly influenced by BC students who 
came to volunteer at the CTA and I want to do the 
same for the kids who are growing up in the com- 
munity now!' Adrienne also devoted two spring 
breaks to Appalachia Volunteers, traveling to 
ipe Charles. Virginia on community trips. For 
her service. .Adrienne was awarded the W Seavey 
ce, SJ, Community Service Award. Next year 
Adrienne plans to join Teach For America to teach 
chemistry to middle school or high school students. 
However, she h< o end up back in Boston for 

graduate school so she can give back to the com- 
munity that has given tier so much in return. 







Caitlin Corrieri 




Caitlin Corrieri loves Boston College. Not only 
is she an avid football fan, but Caitlin exempli- 
fies the Jesuit ideals of excellence in all she does. 
For the past four years Caitlin has been involved 
with the Appalachia Volunteers, lending a hand 
to impoverished communities throughout the 
Appalachia region. Additionally, she has served 
on Appalachia Council for the past two years. On 
campus, Caitlin has volunteered with many orga- 
nizations, including Best Buddies, the Student 
Admissions Program and the Quality of Student 
Life Committee. Caitlins friends call her a true 
"woman for others" as well as a mentor to her 
peers. Through her work at Boston College, she 
has shown a unique commitment to volunteerism 
and scholarship. After graduation, Caitlin, an 
English and Secondary Education major, plans to 
pursue volunteer work with a Jesuit organization. 



Congratulations to the senior 
perspective winners of the 

Class of 2007! 



Take it to the Heights! 
"Go set the world aflame" 

- St. Ignatius of Loyola 



Seniors 369 



Stephen Holodak 

College Of Arts & Sciences 

Geology 



Paul Holowczyk 

College Of Arts & Sciences 

Mathematics 

Music 



Jennifer Holt 

Carroll School Of Management 

General Mgmt 



Jacob Holtz 

College Of Arts & Sciences 

Sociology 

History 



Arthur Hong 
Carroll School Of Manager ( 
Finance 




Kristin Hopper 

Carroll School Of Management 

Accounting 



Laura Hopps 

College Of Arts & Sciences 

English 



Rebecca Horan 

Carroll School Of Management 

Marketing 

Communications 



Blaire Horner 

Carroll School Of Management 

Finance 



Katherine Houghton 
Lynch School Of Educatic 
Secondary Education 
Mathematics 




John Houston 

College Of Arts & Sciences 

Political Science 



Christopher Huang 

College Of Arts & Sciences 

Psychology 



Jaclyn Hubbard 

College Of Arts & Sciences 

Mathematics 



Michael Huddy 

Carroll School Of Management 

Accounting 



Jeffrey Huelskamp 
College Of Arts & Scierv 
History 




Hughes 
c ollege Of Arts & Scu 
Hisl 



Matthew Hughes 

( ollege ( )f Arts & Sciences 

English 

Philosophy 



Richard I lughes 

( ollege < )f Arts & Sciences 
Chemistry 



Brian Hugo 

Carroll School Of Management 

Finance 



Mary Hunter 
College Of Arts & Scienc i 
Economics 




Andrea Hurley 
d lege Of Arts & Sciences 
Political Science 



Lauren Hurring 

College Of Arts & Sciences 

Economics 



Lindsay Huse 

College Of Arts & Sciences Art 

History 

English 



Allison Hynes 

College Of Arts & Sciences 

History 

Communications 



Eliza Hynes 

Lynch School Of Education 

Human Development 




i Kvung-A Im Son 



iwll School Of Management 
Finance 
Accounting 



Sean Indra 

College Of Arts & Sciences 

English 



\athan Ingham 

College Of Arts & Sciences 

Communications 



Bryan Innis 

College Of Arts & Sciences 

Philosophy 

Biology 



Patricia Inzeo 

Lynch School Of Education 

Math/Computer Science 

Elementary Education 




Colette Irving 
Qlege Of Arts & Sciences 
Mathematics 



William Issa 

College Of Arts & Sciences 

Biochemistry 



Roberto Iturralde 

College Of Arts & Sciences 

Psychology 



Megan Jackson 

College Of Arts & Sciences 

English 



Mia Jackson 

College Of Arts & Sciences 

Historj 




Kristin Jacques 

School Of Nursing 

Nursing 



Sheila Jafarzadeh 

College Of Arts & Sciences 

Rom. Lang. - Hispanic Stud\ 

Rom. Lang. Italian 



Daniel Jamieson 

College Of Arts & Sciences 

Biologj 



Katie Km is 
College Ot Art- & Sciences 

Histor\ 



Alex (aunsen 

Carroll School Ot Management 
Accounting 



Seniors ; "l 



Robert Javnes 


Kristina Jeanconte 


Kerline Jean-Louis 


Allison Jeannette 


Laurel Johannesson 


Carroll School Of Management 


College Of Arts & Sciences 


College Of Arts & Sciences 


Lynch School Of Education 


Carroll School Of Managen 


Finance 


English 


Sociology 


Early Childhood 


Finance 




Communications 


Philosophy 


Childhood in Society 






Jennifer Johnson 

College Of Arts & Sciences 

Political Science 

Philosophy 



Laura Johnson 

College Of Arts & Sciences 

Sociology 

History 



Lindsey Johnson 

Lynch School Of Education 

Secondary Education 

History 



Jonathan John 

College Of Arts & Sciences 

Biochemistry 



Christopher Jonas 
Carroll School Of Manageir I 
Finance 




Joseph Jones 

Carroll School Of Management 

Accounting 

Information Systems 



Katherine Jones 

Lynch School Of Education 

Human Development 



Michael Jones 

Carroll School Of Management 

Accounting 



Jonathan Jordan 

College Of Arts & Sciences 

English 



Charles Joseph 
College Of Arts & Scienc ; 
Theology 
Philosophy 




Kom Lang-I i »udy 



( ristina Joy 
( ollege Of Arts & Sciences 

English 



Kathleen Joyce 

Carroll Si hool Of Managemnet 

Corporate Systems 



James Judge 

Carroll School Of Management 

Accounting 



Stacy Kaczmarek 
Lynch School Of Educatioi 
Elementary Education 
Human Development 



w^ 



i* 



R^T^ 





Naveen Kailas 
lege Of Arts & Sciences 
Psychology 
Biology A&S B.A 



Peter Kaizer 

Carroll School Of Management 

Finance 

Economics-CSOM 



Andrew Kalafarski 

Carroll School Of Management 

Finance 

Information Systems 



Alexandra Kamin 

College Of Arts & Sciences 

Biology A&S B.A 



Rebecca Kane 

College Of Arts & Sciences 

History 




Jeffrey Kang 
dege Of Arts & Sciences 
History 



Julianne Kanner 

College Of Arts & Sciences 

Psychology 



Benjamin Kaplan 

Carroll School Of Management 

Economics-Csom 

Finance 



Lara Kapura 

Lynch School Of Education 

Mathematics 

Secondary Education 



Tracy Karachi 

College Of Arts & Sciences 

English 




1 Catherine Kardong 
lege Of Arts & Sciences 
Sociology 



Melissa Kasparian 

Carroll School Of Management 

Accounting 



Bonnie Kaufman 

College Of Arts & Sciences 

English 



Melanie Kay 

Lynch School Of Education 

Human Development 

Elementary Eduction 



Jennifer Kaye 

College Of Arts & Sciences 

Communications 




Stephanie Kazane 
C lege Of Arts & Sciences 
Chemistry 



Kathryn Keane 

College Of Arts & Sciences 

Human Development 

Communications 



Shannon Keating 

Lynch School Of Education 

Secondary Education 

History (LSOE) 



Sean Keck 
College Of Arts & Sciences 

English 



Jane Keefe 
School Of Nursing 

Nursing 



Seniors 373 



I 




Benedetto, ( »reg Schaefer & Emily Bowen 



Sasha Di/.anl. .lean King. Mike McGowan & Joe Mackev 



374 




Juliana Hayman, Bckah Hanson & Court nc\ I'ladsen 






Seniors 




hi I <opez & Jess Dickinson 



I'll; 




Stephanie Lyndon & Mike Craparo 



Anna Leszczynski, Phil Chang & Jacqudyn Shea 



Seniors 377 




Jessica Biscup. Nina Fahrenback & Siobha 


n Forbes 






^». 


1/WMIES 1 


aags^mca^^^t 




w2frpuY\m 


i 




Courtney Cull inane & Sue Groden 



Myra Chai & Chris Laws 




Brenna Konrse. Vanessa Krumbein. Ashley Ceplikas, Lauren Cireenberg, Alyson Wallinne &. Christine Guida 



37>i 




Chris Honnon. John Rick lot's A: Soon Williams 



Seniors 



Ryan Keefe 

College Of Arts & Sciences 

English 



Andrea Keeffe 

Carroll School Of Management 

Economics -CSOM 



Michelle Keenan 

College Of Arts & Sciences 

History 



John Keene 

College Of Arts & Sciences 

Theology 



Philosophy 



Philip Keffer 
College Of Arts & Scieno 
Economics 




Colleen Kehoe 


Frazier Keitt 


John Kelley 


Julie Kelley 


Ryan Kelley 


School Of Nursing 


College Of Arts & Sciences 


College Of Arts & Sciences 


College Of Arts & Sciences 


College Of Arts & Science 


Nursing 


Communications 


Psychology 


Communications 
Rom. Lang. - Hispanic Study 


History 
Philosophy 




Amanda Kelly 


Christopher Kelly 


Elizabeth Kelly 


Travis Keltner 


Kevin Kemper 


College Of Arts & Sciences 


College Of Arts & Sciences 


College Of Arts & Sciences 


College Of Arts & Sciences 


College Of Arts & Scieni 


Psychology 


Biology A&s B.A. 
Psychology 


Sociology 


Economics 


English 




Jennifer Kendall 
College of Arts & v i. 
osophy 
gy 



Joseph Kenned) 

( ollege < )i Arts & s< K-f k es 

Chemistry 



Margaret Kennedy 

( ollege ( )i Arts & S( iem es 

film Studies 



Sara Kennedy 

Lynch School Of Education 

I luman Development 

Theology 



Christopher Kenyon 
College Of Arts & Scieno 
History 



Alison Keogh 
lege Of Arts & Sciences 
History 



Paola Keough 

Carroll School Of Management 

Marketing 

Communications 



Thomas Kessler 

College Of Arts & Sciences 

History 

Psychology 



Lauren Kestel 

College Of Arts & Sciences 

German 



Deena Khabbaza 

College Of Arts & Sciences 

Biology 




Halima Khan 
pllege Of Arts & Sciences 
History 



Rima Khani 

Carroll School Of Management 

Marketing 



Sokhom Khoeun 

Carroll School Of Management 

Finance 

Human Resources Mgmnt 



Abraham Kim 

College Of Arts & Sciences 

Psychology 



Angela Kim 

College Of Arts & Sciences 

English 




Connie Kim 
soil School Of Management 



Marketing 



Isaac Kim 

College Of Arts & Sciences 

Biology 



Jennifer Kim 

College Of Arts & Sciences 

Political Science 

History 



Samuel Kim 

College Of Arts & Sciences 

Economics 



Sunkum Kim 

College Of Arts & Sciences 

History 

Communication^ 




Yujin Kim 
P 8 oil School Of Management 
Finance 
Accounting 



Matthew Kimmel 

Carroll School Of Management 

Operations /Tech Mngmt. 

Finance 



lean King 

Carroll School Of Management 

Accounting 



Rachel King 

College Of Arts & Sciences 

Art History 



Micaela Kinneen 

School Of Nursing 

\ur-ing 



Seniors 381 



Brian Kinsella 


Adam Kinson 


Kate Kirby 


William Kirsch 


John Kladakis 


Carroll School Of Management 


Carroll School Of Management 


Lynch School Of Education 


College Of Arts & Sciences 


Carroll School Of Managem 


Marketing 


Operations/Tech Mngmt 


Elementary Education 


Communications 


Marketing 


Finance 




Communications 




Finance 




Erin Klewin 

College Of Arts & Sciences 

Communications 



Terrence Knapp 

College Of Arts & Sciences 

Political Science 



Robert Kneeland 

College Of Arts & Sciences 

English 



Kristin Knopf 

School Of Nursing 

Nursing 

Theology 



Peter Knowles 
College Of Arts & Science; 
Economics 




Ashlev Koch 


Kristin Koch 


Christine Kochefko 


Marisella Kohatsu 


Nicholas Kolentse 


Carroll School Of Management 


Lynch School Of Education 


College Of Arts & Sciences 


College Of Arts & Sciences 


College Of Arts & Scienc 


Management & Leadership 


Elementary Education 


German 


English 


History 


Marketing 


1 luman Development 


Rom. Lang. - Hispanic Study 








College Of Arts & Sck 
-rsophy 
["heology 



Brenna Koorse 
( ollegeOf Arts & s< K< 
Communications 



Michael Korb 

( ill lege Of Arts & Sciences 

Philosophy 

Theology 



Melissa Koski 

College Of Arts & Sciences 

Communications 



Matthew Kosko 
College Of Arts & Science- 
Computer Science B.S 




Aakash Kothari 
School Of Management 
Finance 



Paul Kountz 

College Of Arts & Sciences 

Economics 



Ekaterina Kouznetsova 

College Of Arts & Sciences 

Economics 



Steven Kozusko 

College Of Arts & Sciences 

Philosophy 



Katheryne Kramer 

College Of Arts & Sciences 

International Studies 




Rebecca Kraus 
Iilege Of Arts & Sciences 
English 



Lia Krautmanis 

College Of Arts & Sciences 

Communications 

International Studies 



Rory Kretzmer 

College Of Arts & Sciences 

Biology 



Alexandra Kritchevsky 

College Of Arts & Sciences 

History 



Kelly Kross 

Carroll School Of Management 

Finance 

Marketing 




iimberley Krowchun 
'jlege Of Arts & Sciences 
History 



Marek Krowka 

Carroll School Of Management 

Finance 



Lora Krsulich 

College Of Arts & Sciences 

Political Science 



Vanessa Krumbein 

College Of Arts & Sciences 

Political Science 



Meaghan Krupa 

College Of Arts & Sciences 

International Studies 




Robert Krusz 
ch School Of Education 
luman Development 



Nelliana Kuh 

College Of Arts & Sciences 

Film Studies 



Katherine Kurgansky 

College Of Arts & Sciences 

Biology A&S B.A 



Dinesh Kurian 

College Of Arfs & Silences 

Biology 



Benedicte 1 aborde 
Carroll School Of Management 

Finance 



Seniors 383 




Leigh Tinmouth & Mike Anello 





Kate Houghton, Carolyn Smiley & Seema Paid 





*Jri 



' una Sakolsky Ali lahey & Amy Smith 



Jessie Nixon. Rosie Ixe. Stephanie Lyndon & Noelle Troccoli 












Trin h Tan" & Tonv Sunk 




Kristin Roonev & Liz Rini 



Eric Selhorn 



Senior- 



Emily Labriola 

School Of Nursing 

Nursing 



Aleksandra Lada 

College Of Arts & Sciences 
International Studies 



Daniel LaFave 

College Of Arts & Sciences 

International Studies 



Tanya Lafuente 

College Of Arts & Sciences 

Communications 



Andrea LaGala 

Lynch School Of Educatio 

Secondary Education 

Mathematics 




Ching Lam 

College Of Arts & Sciences 

Sociology 



Quang Lam 

College Of Arts & Sciences 

Computer Science B.S. 

Mathematics 



Michael Lamb 

College Of Arts & Sciences 

Communications 



Callie Lambert 

School Of Nursing 

Nursing 



Jennifer Lambert 
College Of Arts & Science 
Communications 




Carolyn LaMonica 

School Of Nursing 

Nursing 



Nicole La Montagne 

College Of Arts & Sciences 

History 

Economics 



Nicole Landi 

College Of Arts & Sciences 

Mathematics 

Economics 



Alexander Landraitis 

College Of Arts & Sciences 

Mathematics 



Krishna Lang 
College Of Arts & Scienc 
Communications 
English 




han Lanigan 
College Of Arts & s< n 

English 



John Lansdowne 
( ollege ( )i Arts & Sc icik es 

■sirs 
I listory 



'latiana Lapchuk 
( ollege Of Arts & Sciences 

Communications 



Rebecca La Plante 

College Of Arts & Sciences 

Philosophy 



Vanessa Lara 

School Of Nursing 

Nursing 



Daniel Lasher 


Alison Lastowski 


Dana Latson 


Chit Lau 


Clare Launder 


School Of Management 


College Of Arts & Sciences 


College Of Arts & Sciences 


Carroll School Of Management 


College Of Arts & Sciences 


Finance 


Communications 


Communications 


Finance 


Economics 


Marketing 












Joseph Lawler 
i .ill School Of Management 
Economics-Csom 
Finance 



Matthew Lawlor 

College Of Arts & Sciences 

Biology 



Kathleen Lawrence 

College Of Arts & Sciences 

Communications 



Christopher Laws 

College Of Arts & Sciences 

Philosophy 

Sociology 



Annie Le 

Lynch School Of Education 

Mathematics 

Secondary Education 




Brenna Leahy 


Derek Leak 


Kristen Leclaire 


Adrian Lee 


Amy Lee 


Cllege Of Arts & Sciences 


College Of Arts & Sciences 


School Of Nursing 


College Of Arts & Sciences 


Carroll School Of Management 


1 Communications 


Psychology 


Nursing 


Political Science 


Accounting 
History 




Andrew Lee 
'•liege Of Arts & Science 
English 
Communications 



Diane Lee 

College Of Arts & Sciences 

Theology 

Sociology 



Dong-Joo Lee 

College Of Arts & Sciences 

Political Science 

Communications 



Mairin Lee 

College Of Arts& Sciences 

Theater Arts 

Communications 



Rosario 1 ee 

College Ot \rt-~ ,<: Sciences 

Philosoph) 



Seniors ; n~ 



i 



Matthew Leidl 
College Ot Arte os: Sciences 

English 



Ariane Lenis 

College Of Arts & Sciences 

Communications 

English 



Daniel Lennon 

College Of Arts & Sciences 

Communications 



Kevin Leonard 

College Of Arts & Sciences 

Communications 



Michael Leonard 
College Of Arts & Scieno 
History 







Stephanie Leonard 

College Of Arts & Sciences 

International Studies 



Elizabeth Lerchen 

College Of Arts & Sciences 

Political Science 



Tomasz Lesiczka 

Carroll School Of Management 

Finance 



Anna Leszczynski 

College Of Arts & Sciences 

Biology 



Christopher Leuchten j 
College Of Arts & Science I 
Political Science 
Philosophy 




Jacqueline Leung 

Carroll School Of Management 

Finance 

Information Systems 



Andrew Lewis 

College Of Arts & Sciences 

Economics 

History 



Frances Lewis 

College Of Arts & Sciences 

Rom Lang-Hispanic Study 

Communications 



May Li 

College Of Arts & Sciences 

Communications 



Stephanie Liakos 
College Of Arts & Scienc 
Economics 




Anthony l.iberti John Mess 

ol Of Management ( arroll School Of Management 
< Operations Management 



Evan Light 
( ollege < >l Arts & Sciences 

I < enemies 
Biology 



Keith Liguori 

College Of Arts & Sciences 

Theater Arts 

Philosophy 



Hoyoung Lim 
Carroll School Of Managenu 
Finance 
Management & Leadership 



Ting Lin 
nil School Of Management 
Accounting 



Taylor Lincoln 

College Of Arts & Sciences 

Biology 

Philosophy 



Kimberly Lindquist 

College Of Arts & Sciences 

English 

Communications 



Phillip Lipari 

College Of Arts & Sciences 

Philosophy 

Communications 



Benjamin Litchfield 

College Of Arts & Sciences 

Philosophy 




Brady Littlefield 
C liege Of Arts & Sciences 
Communications 



Lilian Liu 

Carroll School Of Management 

Marketing 

Operations Management 



Lloyd Liu 

College Of Arts & Sciences 

Economics 

English 



Winson Liu 

College Of Arts & Sciences 

Computer Science B.A. 

Economics 



Katharine LiVolsi 

College Of Arts & Sciences 

Political Science 

Philosophy 




! Alexandra Lloyd 
iMl School Of Management 
Marketing 



Ryan Lo 

Carroll School Of Management 

Finance 

Marketing 



Alexandra Lobodocky 

Carroll School Of Management 

Marketing 

Finance 



Jessica Loboen 

College Of Arts & Sciences 

Economics 

History 



Cynthia Loesch 

Lynch School Of Education 

Human Development 

Sociology 




I Alexandra Lofredo 
I ich School Of Education 
'ilementary Education 
Studio Art 



Brittany Lonero 

College Of Arts & Sciences 

English 



Jason Long 

College Of Arts & Sciences 

Theology 

Philosophy 



Gary I ongi 

Carroll School Of Management 

Finance 

Marketing 



Cristina Lopez 

College Of Art- & Sciences 

Geolog) 



Seniors $89 




I.i/ Rini, Krislin Marlines & Jacquelyn Shea 







Lindsay Purnell & Laura Fincher 



KimberK Macaulev Camille Castro & Amber Clarke 



Seniors 391 




Ashley Dallon. Larissa Mueihing & Christine Zcn-Ruffinen 







Maiihcw Deilvl & Andrew Kalafarski 



Seniors J93 



Zazzi Lopez Allison Lord 

Woods College Of Advancing Studies College Of Arts & Sciences 
Criminal Justice Biology 



Meghan Lortie 

School Of Nursing 

Nursing 



Stephanie Losi Lauren Lou 

Carroll School Of Management Carroll School Of Managem 
Finance Accounting 

Management & Leadership 




Runeko Lo\ ell 

College Of Arts & Sciences 

Philosophy 



Karla Loya 

College Of Arts & Sciences 

Political Science 



Alex Lozano 

Carroll School Of Management 

Finance 

Marketing 



WeiLu 

College Of Arts & Sciences 

Political Science 



Mary Lucas 
Carroll School Of Managerru 
General Mgmt 




Jeffrey Lucia Vanessa Lum 

Carroll School Of Management Carroll School Of Management 
Finance Economics-Csom 



Lawrence Lundy 

College Of Arts & Sciences 

History 



Laura Lupinetti 

Carroll School Of Management 

Accounting 



Kathrine Lupo 
College Of Arts & Sciena 
Economics 




An: 
( ollcgc Of Art . fc Sciences 
Philosophy 



Stephanie Lyndon 
( ollegeOf Arts fcSciei 

Psychology 



William Lyon 

( ollcge Of Arts & Sciences 

Communications 



Emily Lyons 

College Of Arts & Sciences 
Communications 



Joseph Maberry 

College Of Arts & Sciences 

Theology 

Philosophy 




Kimberly Macauley 


Jenna Macchi 


Bridget MacDonald 


Frances Macias-Phillips 


Christopher Macios 


illege Of Arts & Sciences 


Carroll School Of Management 


Carroll School Of Management 


College Of Arts & Sciences 


College Of Arts & Sciences 


Biology 


General Mgmt 


Finance 


Political Science 


English 






Marketing 


History 


Economics 




Patricia Mack 
)llege Of Arts & Sciences 
Political Science 
Rom. Lang. - French 



Paul Madden Kerri Maddock 

Carroll School Of Management Carroll School Of Management 
Accounting Marketing 

Philosophy 



Kate Magee 

College Of Arts & Sciences 

History 



Anthony Maglio 

College Of Arts & Sciences 

Biology 




Lindsey Magness 
allege Of Arts & Sciences 
Computer Science B.A 



James Maher 

College Of Arts & Sciences 

History 




Bridget Mahoney 

Lynch School Of Education 

Human Development 

Sociology 



Jennifer Mahoney 

College Of Arts & Sciences 

Political Science 



Sandra Maier 

Lynch School Of Education 

Elementary Education 

Human Development 




Esha Malhotra 
School Of Management 

Finance 
General Mgmnt 



Rohit Malhotra Peter Malone 

Carroll School Of Management Carroll School Of Management 
Management & Leadership Marketing 

Biology A&S B.A Finance 



lesMC.i Mah e\ 

I ynch School Of Education 

Secondary Education 

English (l.SOE) 



Anton Mandrov 

College Ot Arts & Sciences 

Biochemistrv 



Seniors $95 



Daniel Mantra 

College Of .Arts & Sciences 

English 



Sarah Manganaro 

College Of Arts & Sciences 

Psychology 



Erica Mannherz 

Carroll School Of Management 

Marketing 



Brian Maples 

College Of Arts & Sciences 

Biochemistry 



Michael Marc 
College Of Arts & Science 
Economics 




John Marcel 

College Of Arts & Sciences 

History 



Emily Marchese 

College Of Arts & Sciences 

English 



Anne Marchessault 

College Of Arts & Sciences 

English 



Caroline Marcotte 

College Of Arts & Sciences 

History 

Music 



Justin Marcoux 

College Of Arts & Science; 

Economics 

Mathematics 




Erica Marcus 

College Of Arts & Sciences 

Philosophy 

German 



Sarah Mares 

Lynch School Of Education 

Elementary Education 

Child in Society 



Michael Mariani 

College Of Arts & Sciences 

Philosophy 



Alexis Mark 

College Of Arts & Sciences 

Communications 



Brighid Marquess 
Lynch School Of Educarii 
Secondary Education 
English (LSOE) 




rone 

>f Arts k 

Political 
Kom. l-ang - French 



Dana Mars 
( ollege < )f Arts & Sciences 
Mathema 



Jake Marsello 

I ..i inll School Of Management 

I luman Resources Mgmnl 



Francisco Martin 

( 'arroll School Of Management 

Finance 

Corp. Reports & Analysis 



Jeffrey Martin 

College Of Arts & Sciences 

Biochemistry 



Joseph Martin 
all School Of Management 
Marketing 
Finance 



Allison Martinelli 

College Of Arts & Sciences 

Communications 



Kristin Martines 

Carroll School Of Management 

Accounting 



Thomas Mart/ 

College Of Arts & Sciences 

Biochemistrv 



Maria Masaveu 

College Of Arts & Sciences 

Political Science 




Stephen Masterson 
liege Of Arts & Sciences 
Communications 



Elaina Matook 

College Of Arts & Sciences 

Theology 



Joseph Mattaini 

College Of Arts & Sciences 

Economics 



Brian Matthews 

Carroll School Of Management 

General Mgmt 



Carolyn Mattus 
College Of Arts & Sciences 

English 




John Mattus 
ill School Of Management 
Economics-Csom 
Finance 



Ashley Mattys 

College Of Arts & Sciences 

Communications 



Veronica Maunz 

School Of Nursing 

Nursing 



Kira Maye 

College Of Arts & Sciences 

Art History 



Jessica Maynard 
School Of Nursing 

Nursing 




Megan McBoumie 
1'lege Of Arts & Sciences 
lm Lang-Hispanic Stdy 



Kelly McCabe 

School Of Nursing 

Nursing 



Kristen McCann 

Carroll School Of Management 

Marketing 



Catherine McCarthj 

College ot Arts ,<; Sciences 
Communications 



Elizabeth McCarth) 

Carroll School Ot Management 

Finance 

Marketing 



Seniors 397 







Stephanie Liakos. Alyson Wattinne. Sarah Manganaro & Victoria Devins 



Seniors ; "" 




Christina Gomez, Amanda Wairal & Shirley Cho 







Eric Selhorn & Zack ConrO) 



anging out on the IK" bus 



Seniors 401 



Megan C. McCarthy 

College Oi Arts &; Sciences 

Communications 



Megan E. McCarthy 

College Of Arts & Sciences 

English 

Romance Lang. - French 



Molly McCary 

College Of Arts & Sciences 

Sociology 



Haley McCole 

College Of Arts & Sciences 

English 

History 



Marjorie McCormick 
College Of Arts & Science 
Communications 
English 




Jacqueline McCoy 

Lynch School Of Education 

Theater Arts 

Elementary Education 



David McCredo 

College Of Arts & Sciences 

Philosophy 

Art History 



Sarah McDermott 

College Of Arts & Sciences 

English 

Art History 



Kathryn McDevitt 

College Of Arts & Sciences 

Philosophy 



Frederick McDonald 

College Of Arts & Sciences I 

Political Science 




Allison McDonough 

College Of Arts & Sciem es 

Communications 

History 



Anne McDonough 

College Of Arts & Sciences 

Biology 



Kristen McEvitt 

College Of Arts & Sciences 

Psychology 



Timothy McFeely 

College Of Arts & Sciences 

Sociology 



Sean McGann 
Carroll School Of Manager! t 
Accounting 




Micuddy 
'Of Management 



Michael McGowan 

( ollegeOf Arts & '« him es 

Psychology 

' ommunications 



J a red McCuire 
' ollegeOf Arts & Sciences 

Sociology 



Thomas McCuirk 

College Of Arts & Sciences 

Communications 



Meghan McKenzie 

College Of Arts & Sciences 

Communications 



Margaret McKinney 

School Of Nursing 

Nursing 



Kathryn McLarney 

Lynch School Of Education 

Human Development 



Kathryn McLaughlin 
School Of Nursing 

Nursing 



Michael McLaughlin 

College Of Arts & Sciences 

Political Science 

History 



Susan McMann 

College Of Arts & Sciences 

History 

Communications 




Francis McManus 
liege Of Arts & Sciences 
History 
Communications 



Patrick McMenamin 

Carroll School Of Management 

Economics-Csom 



Maren McMullan 

Lynch School Of Education 

Human Development 



Lauren McNamara 

College Of Arts & Sciences 

Communications 

Sociology 



John McWilliams 

Carroll School Of Management 

Finance 




Stacey Meader 
Ml School Of Management 
Marketing 
Finance 



Maria Means 

College Of Arts & Sciences 

Communications 



Michael Medeiros 

Carroll School Of Management 

Finance 

Accounting 



Emily Medina 

Carroll School Of Management 

Marketing 



Conor Meehan 

Lynch School Of Education 

Secondary Education 

English (LSOE) 




Ryan Meehan 
(liege Of Arts & Sciences 
History 
Philosophy 






Jennifer Mejia 

Carroll School Of Management 

Finance 

Marketing 



Stephen Melchionne 

College Of Arts & Sciences 

Political Science 

Philosophy 



Christopher Melnic 

College Of Arts & Sciences 

Biology 



Lauren Mendoza 

I \ nch School Oi Education 

Early Childhood 

Communications 



Seniors 403 



Lauren Meola 

Lynch School Of Education 

Human Development 

Communications 



Samantha Mercado 

College Of Arts & Sciences 
Communications 



Maureen Meredith 

College Of Arts & Sciences 

History 



Rebecca Mergenthaler 

School Of Nursing 

Nursing 



Donald Meurer 
College Of Arts & Science 
Biology A&S BA 




Samara Meyers 

College Of Arts & Sciences 

Classics 



Adam Micheletti 

Carroll School Of Management 

Management & Leadership 



Gabriela Mier 

College Of Arts & Sciences 

History 



Robert Miksenas 

Carroll School Of Management 

Corporate Systems 



Sara Milliken 

School Of Nursing 

Nursing 




Lvnsay Mills 


Megan Minogue 


Melodie Miranda 


Christopher Mitchell 


Olivia Mitchell 


College Of Arts & Sciences 


College Of Arts & Sciences 


Lynch School Of Education 


College Of Arts & Sciences 


College Of Arts & Scienc 


English 


History 


Secondary Education 


Psychology 


History 




English 


History (LSOE) 


Philosophy 






' 



hell 


1 rland Modesto 


Kathryn Moeller 


Dorice Moise 


Brian Mok 




liege Of Arts & S< icik es 


College ( )f Arts & Sciences 


Lynch School Of Education 


College Of Arts & Sciences 


ish 


Political Science 


Theater Arts 


1 lu man Development 


Economics 






English 







Jonathan Molinaro 


Janine Molino 


Nicole Monnin 


Margaret Monroe 


Trent Montgomery 


allege Of Arts & Sciences 


College Of Arts & Sciences 


Carroll School Of Management 


College Of Arts & Sciences 


College Of Arts & Sciences 


English 


Mathematics 


Marketing 


International Studies 


Historv 


Philosophy 


Economics 


Management & Leadership 








Robin Moody 
allege Of Arts & Sciences 
Communications 



Dustin Moore 

College Of Arts & Sciences 

Communications 



Michelle Moore 

College Of Arts & Sciences 

Economics 



Peter Moore 

Carroll School Of Management 

Finance 



Marketing 



Ransom Moore 

Carroll School Of Management 

Finance 

Marketing 




.izeth Mora-Hernandez 
)llege Of Arts & Sciences 
English 



Leigh Moran 

College Of Arts & Sciences 

Economics 



Matthew Moran 

College Of Arts & Sciences 

Communications 



Michael Moran 

College Of Arts & Sciences 

History 



Karvn Morelli 

School Of Nursing 

Nursing 




Daniella Morello 
•liege Of Arts & Sciences 
Communications 



Thomas Morgan 

Carroll School Of Management 

Finance 

Accounting 



Erin Morlev 

College Of Arts & Sciences 

Communications 



Thomas Moronev 
Carroll School Of Management 

Finance 



Elizabeth Morris 

College Ot Art- & Sciences 

Political Science 



Seniors 40? 




Nitolc Dziamba, Denisc Kkensiierna, Jen Schifi'ner& Laura Caslelli 







Katie Brady Ania LeszczynskJ & Michael Boyle 



Seniors 40~ 




Melissa Ko \ i. Melissa Joyce <t Caitlin Graboski 



Rima Khani. Laura Ellis & Genua Cihaul 







Lauren Wojnar & Kelleen Forli//i 



Senior- 4(W 




Tajiddin Morris 

Carroll School Oi Management 

\ larketing 



Ryan Morrissey 

Carroll School Of Management 

Finance 

Marketing 



Brian Moy 

College Of Arts & Sciences 

Chemistry 



Geomele Moya 

College Of Arts & Sciences 

Mathematics 



Christine Moynihan 

College Of Arts & Science* i 

Communications 




N'amrita Mozumdar 

College Of Arts & Sciences 

English 



Ndaalu Mpi Carroll 

School Of Management 

Accounting 



Laura Mueller 

College Of Arts & Sciences 

English 



Paul Mueller 

Lynch School Of Education 

Secondary Education 

History (LSOE) 



Nicole Muhlbauer 

College Of Arts & Sciences 

Theology 

Biology 




Brian Mulcahy 

College Of Arts & Sciences 

Communications 

Economics 



Erin Mulhall 

College Of Arts & Sciences 

Political Science 

Communications 



Kerry Mullin 

College Of Arts & Sciences 

English 



Kristen Mullin 

College Of Arts & Sciences 

English 



Patrick Mulrenan 
Carroll School Of Managem :: 
Finance 
Accounting 




Murphy 
I >f Arts & Sci< 
Political S< ]< 



Daniel Murphy 
Carroll S< hool < M Management 

Accounting 



Emily Murphy 

( ( illege ( )f Arts & Sciences 

I nglish 



John Murphy 

Carroll School Of Management 

Accounting 



Kathleen Murphy 

School Of Nursing 

Nursing 




Lauren Murphy 
ollege Of Arts & Sciences 
Art History 



Regan Murphy 

College Of Arts & Sciences 

Art History 



Rory Murphy 

Carroll School Of Management 

Finance 

Accounting 



Sean Murphy 
Carroll School Of Management 

Accounting 



Caitlin Murphy-Kennelly 

College Of Arts & Sciences 

Linguistics 




Olexander Mykyta 
ollege Of Arts & Sciences 
Economics 



Allison Nackel 

College Of Arts & Sciences 

Sociology 



Vineet Naik 

Carroll School Of Management 

Finance 



Ashley Naranjo 

Lynch School Of Education 

Human Development 



Aiste Narkeviciute 

College Of Arts & Sciences 

Biology 




Elisabeth Narkin 
ollege Of Arts & Sciences 
Art History 
Rom. Lang. - French 



Thomas Nash 

College Of Arts & Sciences 

History 



Timothy Nast 

College Of Arts & Sciences 

Classics 

Philosophy 



Kunal Nath Andres Navia 

Carroll School Of Management Carroll School Of Management 
Accounting Marketing 

Finance 




Kristina Nazareth 
illege Of Arts & Sciences 
Biology 



Ruben Nazario 

Carroll School Of Management 

Finance 

Marketing 



Thomas Nececkas 

College Of Arts & Sciences 

Biology 



Alexander Neckles 

College Of Arts & Sciences 

Political Science 



Kevin Nee 
Carroll School 01 Management 

finance 



Seniors 411 




Dominick Negrotto 


Andrew Nelson 


Jessica Newburger 


Ali Newcomb 


Patrick Newcomb 


College Of Arts & Sciences 


Carroll School Of Management 


College Of Arts & Sciences 


College Of Arts & Sciences 


Carroll School Of Managem 


History 


Accounting 


Biology 


International Studies 


Marketing 
Finance 




Emilv Newkirk 

College Of Arts & Sciences 

History 



Justin Ng 

Carroll School Of Management 

Finance 

Marketing 



Nicolas Ng 

College Of Arts & Sciences 

Psychology 



Serena Ng 

Carroll School Of Management 

Finance 

Accounting 



Siu Man Ng 

College Of Arts & Sciences 

Computer Science BA 




Stephanie Ng 


Lisa Ngo 


Nguyet Nguyen 


Dorota Niemczewska 


Tiffany Nilsson 


College Of Arts & Sciences 


School Of Nursing 


School Of Nursing 


Carroll School Of Management 


Lynch School Of Educarit 


Economics 


Nursing 


Nursing 


Finance 


Early Childhood 
Music 




.It/ 
i Of Management 



Ji-ssh <i Nixon 

( ollege ( )f Arts & Si icim es 

Communications 

English 



Nick Noel 

( ollege ( )f Arts & Sciences 

History 



Patricia Noonan 

( ollege Of Arts & Sciences 

Theater Arts 

English 



Michael Normant 

Lynch School Of Education 

Secondary Education 

History (LSOE) 



Matthew Northrup 
ollege Of Arts & Sciences 
Communications 



Kyle Norton 

Carroll School Of Management 

Finance 



Justin Nunez 

Carroll School Of Management 

Marketing 



Sarah Nunn 

College Of Arts & Sciences 

Philosophy 



Catherine Nunziata 

College Of Arts & Sciences 

Communications 




Caitlin Oates 
ollege Of Arts & Sciences 
Psychology 



Erika O'Bannon 

College Of Arts & Sciences 

History 



Ashley Obrest 

College Of Arts & Sciences 

Sociology 



Caitlin O'Brien 

Lynch School Of Education 

Human Development 

History (LSOE) 



Caroline O'Brien 

College Of Arts & Sciences 

Communications 




Conor O'Brien 
roll School Of Management 
Accounting 
Marketing 



Gregory O'Brien 

Carroll School Of Management 

Finance 

Marketing 



John O'Brien 

College Of Arts & Sciences 

History 



Kathryn O'Brien 

College Of Arts & Sciences 

Philosophy 



Victoria Ochoa 

Lynch School Of Education 

Human Development 

English (LSOE) 




Catherine O'Connell 
rich School Of Education 
'Elementary Education 
Communications 



Carol O'Connor 

College Of Arts & Sciences 

Political Science 



Elizabeth O'Connor 

School Of Nursing 

Nursing 



John O'Connor 

I \ rich School Ot I duration 

Human Development 



Kit O'Connor 
Carroll School Ot Management 

Finance I cononucs ■ C SO\1 



Seniors 413 




rating Tom 9weeney's 20* Birthday in classy fashion. 



414 




Alexis Mark & Laurey Lou 



Nina Fahrenbach, Juliana Haymar iV Sarah I'.irker 



Seniors 415 




Kelly Dunn. S;ir;ih Parker, Amy Grotty, Annie Scott & Bekah Han 







St;ic\ Kaczmarek, Kristin Martines, Liz Rim & Mand) RiuUkk 



Seniors 41" 




Mark O'Connor 

Carroll School Of Management 

Accounting 



Matthew O'Connor 

College Of Arts & Sciences 

Studio Art 



Michael O'Connor 

Carroll School Of Management 

Marketing 



Ryan O'Connor 

Carroll School Of Management 

Marketing 



Maureen O'Dea 

College Of Arts & Science:* 

English History 




Charles Odence 

College Of Arts & Sciences 

Communications 



Caroline O'Donnell 

Carroll School Of Management 

Accounting 



James O'Donnell 

College Of Arts & Sciences 

History 

Political Science 



John O'Donnell 

Carroll School Of Management 

Accounting 

Finance 



Lindsay Officer 

College Of Arts & Sciences 

Psychology 




Amanda O'Flaherty 

College Of Arts & Sciences 

Theology 

History 



Erin O'Grady 

College Of Arts & Sciences 

Communications 



Brendan O'Kane 

Carroll School Of Management 

Economics-Csom 

Operations Management 



Courtney O'Leary 

Lynch School Of Education 

Elementary Education 

Human Development 



Kathryn O'Leary 
College Of Arts & Scienct 
Sociology 
History 




r\ 


Ryan Oliver 


Erica Olson 


Allison O'Mdlley 


Eve O'Neil 


.ing 


Carroll s< hool Of Management 


College ( >f Arts & Sciences 


Carroll School Of Management 


College Of Arts & Sciences 


.ing 


Finance 


International Studies 


Marketing 


German 
Biology 



Edward O'Neill 
rroll School Of Management 
Finance 
Economics - CSOM 



Gwyneth O'Neill 

College Of Arts & Sciences 

English 



Lauren Onis 

College Of Arts & Sciences 

Communications 

History 



Brendan O'Reilly 

College Of Arts & Sciences 

Psychology 



Rachel Orlowski 

College Of Arts & Sciences 

Biology 




Elizabeth Orofino 
vnch School Of Education 
Human Development 



Cassandra Osei 

College Of Arts & Sciences 

English 

Communications 



Edward Osswalt 

Carroll School Of Management 

Finance 

Operations Management 



Matthew Otto 
College Of Arts & Sciences 

Philosophy 
Environment Geoscience 



Seren Ozcan 

College Of Arts & Sciences 

Communications 




Jacob Pacific 
ollege Of Arts & Sciences 
Philosophy 



Alex Packer 

Carroll School Of Management 

Finance 



Evan Padilla 

College Of Arts & Sciences 

Historv 



Adam Paggi 

College Of Arts & Sciences 

Theology 



Katelyn Paglia 

Lynch School Of Education 

Human Development 

Child in Society 




Stephanie Pally 
. nch School Of Education 
Secondary Education 
History (LSOE) 



Anne Palmer 

School Of Nursing 

Nursing 



Jessica Palmer 

College Of Arts & Sciences 

Biology 



Rvan Paitaro 
Carroll School CM Management 

Accounting 
Operations Management 



Pia Panday 
Carroll School Of Management 

Marketing 
Human Resources Management 



Seniors 4l l > 




*tp* 'V* 






v 



Rochelle Panichelle Anthony Paolucci 

College Of Arts >S; Sciences College Of Arts & Sciences 



Psychology 



Biology 



Kathleen Papa 
College Of Arts & Sciences 



English 



Alyson Papalia 
College Of Arts & Sciences 



Communications 



Julianne Papetsas 
College Of Arts & Science > 



English 




Jamie Pardee 


Ah in Park 


Chanmi Park 


Jane Park 


Sarah Parker 


Carroll School Of Management 


Carroll School Of Management 


College Of Arts & Sciences 


Carroll School Of Management 


School Of Nursing 


Accounting 


Finance 


Communications 


Marketing 


Nursing 


Finance 


Accounting 




Finance 






Kellyanne Parry 


Jennifer Pascual 


Marina Pasetti DeSouza 


Courtney Pasquariello 


Seema Patel 


College Of Arts & Sciences 


College Of Arts & Sciences 


Carroll School Of Management 


Carroll School Of Management 


Lynch School Of Educatic 


History 


Philosophy 
Biology 


Marketing 


Marketing 


Secondary Education 
Mathematics 






John-Peter Patrizia 


Breana Patterson 


Meghan Paul] 


Elizabeth Pawelc/yk 




( ollege ( H Arts & Sc iem ee 


School Of Nursing 


Carroll School Of Management 


College Of Arts & Sciences 




Political Scieix e 


Nursing 


Accounting 


Communications 
English 



Nicholas Payton 
ollege Of Arts & Sciences 
Political Science 



Melanie Pearson 

College Of Arts & Sciences 

Biology 



Joelle Pedersen 

College Of Arts & Sciences 

English 



Lauren Peiffer 

School Of Nursing 

Nursing 



Jennifer Pelletier 

Lynch School Of Education 

Elementary Education 

Math/Computer Science 




Melissa Pelletier 
t'nch School Of Education 
Elementary Education 
Human Development 



Gabriel Pena 

College Of Arts & Sciences 

English 

Philosophy 



Sarah Pennington 

Lynch School Of Education 

Secondary Education 

History (LSOE) 



Elizabeth Perez 

College Of Arts & Sciences 

Communications 



Vito Petrozzino 

College Of Arts & Sciences 

Biology 




Steffan Peyer 
roll School Of Management 
Finance 
Accounting 



Alexandra Peyton 

Carroll School Of Management 

Finance 

Marketing 



Jennifer Phelan 

Lynch School Of Education 

Human Development 

Math/Computer Science 



Jonathan Phelps 

College Of Arts & Sciences 

Communications 



Lara Philipps 

College Of Arts & Sciences 

Communications 




Sean Phillips 
oil School Of Management 
Information Systems 
Finance 



Ian Phipps 

College Of Arts & Sciences 

Philosophy 



Anthony Picarazzi 

College Of Arts & Sciences 

English 



Tyler Pidgeon 

College Of Arts & Sciences 

Biology 



Cristina Piechocki 

College i M \i-t-. & Sciences 

Psychology 



Seniors 421 




Adam Shulman, Julie ( jrirncs, Ryan Coyne & Jena Wirih 



422 




Nasira Haquc. Stephanie Lyndon & Noelle Troccoli 



Ali Fahe\ & Laura Castelli 






Seniors 423 




Eric Pierce 

College Of Arts & Sciences 

Mathematics 

Bio^ 



Kathrvn Pierce 

College Of Arts & Sciences 

Biochemistry 



Jay Piretti 

Lynch School Of Education 

Human Development 



Allison Pistone 

Carroll School Of Management 

Finance 




Courtney Pladsen 

School Of Nursing 

Nursing 




Gabriel Pleasants 

College Of Arts & Sciences 

International Studies 



Aleksandra Plocha 

College Of Arts & Sciences 

Psychology 



Alison Pochebit 

College Of Arts & Sciences 

Political Science 



Cristin Pohlig 

College Of Arts & Sciences 

Political Science 



Michael Pohlman 

College Of Arts & Sciences 

Communications 




John Pol it is 

College Of Arts & Sciences 

Philosophy 



Nicole Polizzi 

College Of Arts & Sciences 

International Studies 



Lauren Pollock 

College of Arts & Sciences 

Art History 



Kathryn Poltack 

School Of Nursing 

Nursing 



David Porter 

College Of Arts & Science i 

Psychology 




".in 



I . .in Powell 

( ollege of Arts & S( ieru es 

I heater Arts 



Spencer Powers 

< ollege Of Arts & Sciences 

Economics 



Zakiya Powers 

College Of Arts & Sciences 

Communications 



Kimberly Prater 

Lynch School Of Education 

Human Development 




imfc 



Andrew Press 
College Of Arts & Sciences 
Rom Lang-Hispanic Stdy 



Daniel Prior 

Carroll School Of Management 

Accounting 

Information Systems 



Laura Przybylowski 

College Of Arts & Sciences 

Theater Arts 



William Przylucki 

College Of Arts & Sciences 

Film Studies 

History 



Elizabeth Pullum 
Carroll School Of Management 

Marketing 
Human Resources Management 




Timothy Pultorak 
rroll School Of Management 
Finance 
Accounting 



Kyle Quilici 

Lynch School Of Education 

Human Development 



Kaitlin Quinn 

College Of Arts & Sciences 

Biology 



Thomas Quinn 

College Of Arts & Sciences 

Film Studies 



Allison Rabik 

College Of Arts & Sciences 

Theology 

Philosophy 




Kyle Ramachandran 
irroll School Of Management 
Finance 
Accounting 



Jina Rameau 

School Of Nursing 

Nursing 



Allison Ramirez 

College Of Arts & Sciences 

International Studies 



Marisa Ramirez 

College Of Arts & Sciences 

Sociology 



Nicholas Ramirez 

Carroll School Of Management 

Finance 




Ximena Ramirez 

.ollege Of Arts & Sciences 

Communications 



Joseph Ransom 

Carroll School Of Management 

Marketing 

Leadership & Management 



Nina Rao 

College Of Arts & Sciences 

Sociology 



Joshua Rapoport 

College Ol Arts& Sciences 

I Ustory 



Mar\ Anno Rattta) 

Carrol] School ot Management 

1 inance 

Marketing 



Seniors 425 




Diana Ravass 

College Of Arts & Sciences 

Theater Arts 



Katelyn Reabe 

Carroll School Of Management 

Marketing 



Ian Read 

College Of Arts & Sciences 

Philosophy 

Communications 



Dennis Reardon 

Carroll School Of Management 

Marketing 



Allison Rebello 

Lynch School Of Education 

Human Development 

Sociology 




Joseph Recomendes 

College Of Arts & Sciences 

Communications 



Jessica Reeves 

College Of Arts & Sciences 

Psychologv 

Communications 



Bridget Regan 

College Of Arts & Sciences 

History 

Communications 



Julie Regan 

Carroll School Of Management 

Marketing 



Ashley Reid 

College Of Arts & Sciences 

Communications 




Jean Reidy 

School Of Nursing 

Nursing 



Alison Rf ill y 

College Of Arts & Sciences 

Psychology 



Alexandra Reimelt 

College Of Arts & Sciences 

History 



Paul Reiss 

College Of Arts & Sciences 

Mathematics 



Nadine Resha 
Carroll School Of Manageme 
Finance 




I 



Rafael Reyneri 
( ollege of Arts &Sciei 
I'olitii ,il S( iera e 
Philosophy 



Edward Reynolds 

( lollege C )f Arts & Sciences 

English 



Michael Reynolds 

College Of Arts & Sciences 

Mathematics 

Economics 



Richard Reynolds 

College Of Arts & Sciences 

English 



Theresa Reynolds Lupo 

Lynch School Of Education 

Human Development 



Michael Reznick 

College Of Arts & Sciences 

Communications 

History 



Katherine Rice 

College Of Arts & Sciences 

Studio Art 



Melissa Richards 

Lynch School Of Education 

Elementary Education 

Human Development 



Sarah Richardt 

College Of Arts & Sciences 

Psychology 




Erin Richling 
College Of Arts & Sciences 
History 



Elizabeth Rielly 

Carroll School Of Management 

Accounting 

Finance 



Meaghan Riemer 

Lynch School Of Education 

Early Childhood 

English (LSOE) 



Alexis Rife 

College Of Arts & Sciences 

Biology 



John Ring 

College Of Arts & Sciences 

Economics 




#** 





Elizabeth Rini 

ynch School Of Education 

Secondary Education 

Mathematics 



John Riordan 

Carroll School Of Management 

Finance 

Economics - CSOM 



Alexander Rios 

Lynch School Of Education 

Communications 

Human Development 



Caroline Ritter 

Lynch School Of Education 

Elementary Education 

English (LSOE) 



Onalee Rivera 

College Of Arts & Sciences 

Studio Art 




Thomas Roberts 

Zollege Of Arts & Sciences 

Economics 



Tyrone Roberts 

Carroll School Of Management 

Operations Mngmt. 

Computer Science CSOM 



Gabriela Rocha 

College Of Arts & Sciences 

Psychology 



Brian Roche 

Carroll School Of Management 

Finance 

Economics - CSOM 



Diana Rodgers 
College Of Art- & Sciences 

Historv 



Seniors 42~ 




Phil Chang, K.jik- Brady, Ania Lcszczynski, John Weiss, Jacquie Shea, Kristcn Fruauff, Katie Johanson & Marlon Dee 







Mary Beth Findlay. Megan McCarthy. Jessica Biscup & Clare Murphy 



Julie Dow nail. Jen in Kasyan, Melissa Gambatese & Erin K lew in 



Seniors 429 




Rotk Lee & Stephanie Lyndon 







Kimberlv Macaulev 



Seniors 431 




/ 






Adriana Rodriguez 

Lvnch School Of Education 

Earlv Childhood 

Childhood in Society 



Josefina Rodriguez 

College Of Arts & Sciences 

Communications 



John Roe 

Carroll School Of Management 

Marketing 



Paul Roessner 

College Of Arts & Sciences 

History 



Sarah Roffman 
College Of Arts & Science 

Economics 
Rom. Lang. - Hispanic Stu< 




Maria Rogers 

College Of Arts & Sciences 

Sociology 



Peter Rogers 

College Of Arts & Sciences 

History 



Catherine Rollings 

Lynch School Of Education 

Elementary Education 

English (LSOE) 



Kristi Romero 

College Of Arts & Sciences 

Psychology 



Kristin Rooney 
College Of Arts & Science 
Communications 




Kaitlyn Rose 

College Of Arts & Sciences 

Psychology 



Michael Rosebrook 

Carroll School Of Management 

Finance 



John Rosellini 

Carroll School Of Management 

finance 

Marketing 



Raimi Ross 

College Of Arts & Sciences 

Psychology 



Ryan Ross 
College Of Arts & Scienc 
Biochemistry 




Sara Rossi 

Mt ( .irroll S( Ih.oI ( )f Management 
Marketing 



Michael Roth 

< <illi-ge()f Arts & Sciences 
Economics 



Sascha Rubin 

( 'ollege Of Arts & Sciences 

( lerman 

Philosophy 



Kevin Rubottom 

College Of Arts & Sciences 

Theology 

Political Science 



Warren Ruchie 
roll School Of Management 
General Management 



Amanda Ruddick 

Lynch School Of Education 

Elementary Education 

Human Development 



Chase Ruddy 

College Of Arts & Sciences 

English 



Melissa Ruhry 

College Of Arts & Sciences 

History 

German 



Jason Ruiz 

Carroll School Of Management 

Finance 

Management & Leadership 




Christine Ruppert 
v'nch School Of Education 
Human Development 



Anne Rush 

Carroll School Of Management 

Corporate Systems 



Katherine Rush 

College Of Arts & Sciences 

Communications 



Brandon Russell 

College Of Arts & Sciences 

Biology 



Ethiopia Russell 

School Of Nursing 

Nursing 




Allison Ryan 
allege Of Arts & Sciences 
Art History 



Patricia Ryan 

Carroll School Of Management 

Marketing 



Faraz Sabet 

College Of Arts & Sciences 

Psychology 



Rocco Sainato 

College Of Arts & Sciences 

Economics 



Jenrta Sakolskj 

Lynch School Of Education 
Human Development 

American Heritages 




Carina Salazar 
"oil School Of Management 
Finance 



Pedro Salcedo Uribe 

College Of Arts & Sciences 

Romance Lang - French 

Political Science 



Jonathan Salibra 

College Of Arts & Sciences 

1 listory 



Douglas Salmon 

College Of Arts & Sciences 

Communications 



I ara Salna 

Carroll School Ol Management 
Accounting 



Seniors 433 




Jennifer Salpietro 

Carroll School Of Management 

Marketing 



Nicholas Salter 

College Of Arts & Sciences 

Economics 



George Samiotes 

College Of Arts & Sciences 

History 



Ryan Sanborn 

College Of Arts & Sciences 

Economics 



William Sandman 

College Of Arts & Science:* 

Physics 




Sarah Saniuk 

Carroll School Of Management 

Marketing 

Information Svstems 



Kenneth Sanocki 

College Of Arts & Sciences 

English 

History 



Daysa Santana 

College Of Arts & Sciences 

Rom Lang-Hispanic Stdy 



Andrew Santosuosso 

Carroll School Of Management 

Finance 

Marketing 



Brendan Sapien 

College Of Arts & Sciences 

Philosophy 




Matthew Saporito 

Carroll School Of Management 

Accounting 



Katherine Sarmini 

College Of Arts & Sciences 

International Studies 



Martha Sarno 

College Of Arts & Sciences 

Art History 



Ayana Saunders 

College Of Arts & Sciences 

History 



Michael Savage 
College Of Arts & Science 
Economics 




. lor 
-mmum<ations 



Allison Sea I pa to 

Lynch S< hool Of Education 

Elementary Education 

I [uman Development 



( aitlin Schechter 

( ollege ( )i Arts & Sc ieru es 
Biology 



Avery Schellens 

College Of Arts & Sciences 

Communications 



Doris Schierembergg 

College Of Arts & Sciences 

Chemistry 



Berit Schiess 

College Of Arts & Sciences 

Communications 



Jennifer Schiffner 

College Of Arts & Sciences 

Philosophy 

Communications 



Lisa Schmidt 

College Of Arts & Sciences 

Communications 



Jessica Schmierer 

College Of Arts & Sciences 

Biology A&S B.A 



Mary Schneck 
Carroll School Of Management 

Marketing 
Human Resource Management 




Margaret Schneider 

College Of Arts & Sciences 

International Studies 



Elizabeth Schnorr 

College Of Arts & Sciences 

Political Science 



Jeffrey Schomaker 

College Of Arts & Sciences 

Environment Geoscience 



Sara Schoonover 

College Of Arts & Sciences 

Psychology 

English 



Gregory Schrank 

College Of Arts & Sciences 

Biology 




Michael Schuler 
ollege Of Arts & Sciences 
Computer Science B.S 



Elizabeth Schuville 

Carroll School Of Management 

Marketing 



Daniel Schwartz 

College Of Arts & Sciences 

Communications 



Samantha Schwartz 

Carroll School Of Management 

Marketing 



Jonathan Schwar/ 

College Of Arts & Sciences 

History 




Erica Schweitzer 
ollege Of Arts & Sciences 
English 
Communications 



Meredith Sciarrio 

College Of Arts & Sciences 

History 



Gregory Sclama 

College Of Arts & Sciences 

Philosoph) 

Economics 



Stefan Scoon 

College Of Arts & Sciences 
Psychology 



Anne Scott 

College Of Arts & Sciences 

English 



Seniors 435 




Shirley Cho& Morgan Wilson 







Denise Ekenstierna, Michael Aube &. Jake Holhrook 



K.ulileen Bremi.m & Jennifer Pascual 



Seniors 




I.i in Klewin, Will Back A: Janine Molino 



Nicole Dziamba, Meghan Fredette, Ali Fahey & Ann Smith 







Steve Kozusko, Annie Chor & Tom Sweeney 



Seniors 439 




Ian Scott Patrick Scranton 


Sean Scuderi 


Nicole Seagriff 


Matthew Seeman 


Carroll School Of Management Carroll School Of Management 


College Of Arts & Sciences 


School Of Nursing 


Carroll School Of Managerm 


Finance Marketing 


Communications 


Nursing 


Finance 


Accounting 










Lauren Seghezzi 

Carroll School Of Management 

Marketing 



Jennifer Seleman 

College Of Arts & Sciences 

Psychology 

Philosophy 



Eric Selhorn 

Carroll School Of Management 

Finance 

Accounting 



Alice Semerjian 

College Of Arts & Sciences 

Biology 



Audrey Seynhaeve 

College Of Arts & Sciences 

International Studies 




Jonathan Sgro 
College Of Arts & Sciences 

English 



John Shadrick 

( ollege Of Arts & Sciences 

History 



Patrick Sharkey 

College Of Arts & Sciences 

English 



Kerry Shaughnessy 

School Of Nursing 

Nursing 



Rebecca Shaw 
Carroll School Of Managem. 
Marketing 




Inna Shaykevich Jacquelyn Shea William Shea 

cs ( .irroll S( hool ( )f Management Carroll School ( )f Management Carroll School Of Management 
I i <.ik. mi< s-CSOM Accounting Finance 

I in. iik c Accounting 



Evan Shearer 

College Of Arts & Sciences 

History 

English 



Matthew Sheehan 

College Of Arts & Sciences 

Political Science 



Michael Sheehan 

College Of Arts & Sciences 

Communications 

English 



Karl Shehu 

College Of Arts & Sciences 

Political Science 

History 



Vincent Shen 

Carroll School Of Management 

Finance 

Accounting 



Alison Shepp 

Carroll School Of Management 

Marketing 




Jessica Sherry 


Edward Shim 


Eunjev Shin 


Amanda Short 


Karen Shortt 


College Of Arts & Sciences 


Carroll School Of Management 


Carroll School Of Management 


Carroll School Of Management 


Carroll School Of Management 


Economics 


Finance 


Finance 


Operations/Tech Mngmt. 


Marketing 


Sociology 


Philosophy 


Marketing 


Accounting 


Economics - CSOM 




Adam Shulman 

; College Of Arts & Sciences 

Music 



James Silva 

College Of Arts & Sciences 

Communications 



Andrew Silver 

Carroll School Of Management 

Finance 



Accounting 



Peter Sima-Eichler 

College Of Arts & Sciences 

Political Science 

Philosophy 



Sandra Simich 

College Of Arts & Sciences 

Political Science 

Histon 




David Simmons 

College Of Arts & Sciences 

Communications 



Mark Simms 

College Of Arts & Sciences 

Economics 

Philosophy 



Julia Simon 

College Of Arts & Sciences 

Psychology 



Samita Singh 

College Of Arts & Sciences 

Biolog) 

Philosophy 



Christian Sison 
College Of Arts & Sciences 

Communications 



Seniors 441 




Fan Siu \ ianni Skourtis 

Carroll School Of Management Carroll School Of Management 
Finance Finance 

Accounting 



Michael Skrzyniarz 

College Of Arts & Sciences 

Political Science 



Lauren Slack Kevin Slemp 

College Of Arts & Sciences Carroll School Of Manageme ; 



Biology A&S B.A. 
Communications 



Finance 




Matthew Slomienski 


Elisabeth Smee 


Martina Smielewska 


Carolyn Smiley 


Amy Smith 


Carroll School Of Management 


College Of Arts & Sciences 


College Of Arts & Sciences 


Lynch School Of Education 


College Of Arts & Sciences 


Finance 


History 


Psychology 
Rom. Lang. - French 


Secondary Education 
English (LSOE) 


Biology 




Brendan Smith 


Ryan Smith 


Sarah Smith 


Kathleen Smyth 


Christine Sodergren 


College Of Arts & Sciences 


College Of Arts & Sciences 


Lynch School Of Education 


College Of Arts & Sciences 


Lynch School Of Educatior 


Philosophy 


History 


Elementary Education 


English 


Secondary Education 




Philosophy 


Communications 




Rom. Lang. - Hispanic Stud 




ten Sohn 


Brandon Solarana 


Brian Solinger 


Adoria Sommer 


Andrew Song 


Lynch iucation 


lege( H Arts & Sciences 


Carroll School Of Management 


College Of Arts & Sciences 


Carroll School Of Managemenl 


Hon 


Political Scieni e 


Finance 


Communications 


Marketing 




1 listory 


Accounting 










» : 




Juliette Song 

Lynch School Of Education 

Human Development 

Child in Society 



Amy Soohoo 

College Of Arts & Sciences 

Psychology 



Moutaz Soudani 

College Of Arts & Sciences 

Film Studies 

Economics 



Mariella Soussou 

College Of Arts & Sciences 

International Studies 



Katherine Souza 

College Of Arts & Sciences 

Communications 

Economics 




Kristin Spang 

College Of Arts & Sciences 

English 



Eric Speed 

College Of Arts & Sciences 

History 



Katherine Spencer 

College Of Arts & Sciences 

Art History 



Timothy Speros 

College Of Arts & Sciences 

Communications 



Michael Spicer 

Carroll School Of Management 

Finance 




Lindsey Spiegel 

^College Of Arts & Sciences 

Communications 



Kaitlyn Sprague 

College Of Arts & Sciences 

Communications 

Political Science 



Catherine Staff ier 

College Of Arts & Sciences 

English 



Caitlin Stainken 

College Of Arts & Sciences 

English 



Philip Stango 

College Of Arts & Sciences 

English 




V ' * ' 





k A 



I 



t Michael Starr 
ollege Of Arts & Sciences 
Philosophy 



Samantha Staub 

College Of Arts & Sciences 

Psychology 



Greg Stecker 

College Of Arts & Sciences 

Biology 

Theology 



Lara Steele 

College Of Arts & Sciences 

Political Science 



William Steinkrau-s 

Carroll School Of Management 

Accounting 

I inance 



Seniors 44.^ 




Katie Brennan 



Seniors 44> 




Shirle) Cho. Norma Hage & Christina Gomez 



Allie Marti nelli & Kristin Spang 




********** ■* 

• • • • ♦ v 




K ;it it- McLaughln <t Larwsa Mucthing 



Caitlin White & Christy Dunn 







Rain won't stop these tailgaters! 



0um 







Evan Shearer & Phil Chevaliei 



Angela Kim & Steve Dool 




Chris Ashcrafl & Ana Maria Senior 




Me« McBournie. Adoria Sommer & Erin Klewin 







Sen u'rs 447 



a Stella 


Elizabeth Stender 


Emma Stephens 


Carroll School Of Management 


College Ot Arts & Sciences 


College Of Arts & Sciences 


Accounting 


Political Science 


Biochemistry 



Marketing 



Yamicha Stephenson Jason Stevenson 

Carroll School Of Management Carroll School Of Managenru | 
Finance Economics-Csom 

Marketing 




Kate Stewart 

College Of Arts & Sciences 

Psychology 



Stephanie St Martin 

College Of Arts & Sciences 

Philosophy 

Communications 



Ian Stoker-Long 

College Of Arts & Sciences 

Theater Arts 

English 



Caroline St Onge 

College Of Arts & Sciences 

Psychology 



Mary Strockbine 

College Of Arts & Sciences I 

Communications 

Economics 




John Stuart Ryan Sturma 

Carroll School Of Management Carroll School Of Management 
Finance Accounting 



Angela Suh 

Carroll School Of Management 

Marketing 

Accounting 



Devin Sullivan 

Carroll School Of Management 

Finance 



Mari Sullivan 
College Of Arts & Science 
Communications 









Owen Sullivan 


Stephen Sullivan 


Timothy Sullivan 


Soohee Sun 


• fit 


lege ' 'i Arts & Sciences 


College ( )l Arts & Sciences 


College Of Arts & Sciences 


College Of Arts & Sciences 




Communications 


Political Sc icn< c 


Political Science 


English 






1 listory 








V 



Yekaterina Susloparova 
irroll School Of Management 
Marketing 



Novelia Sutanto 

Carroll School Of Management 

Marketing 



Brianne Sutton 

College Of Arts & Sciences 

English 



Kari Sveum 

College Of Arts & Sciences 

Sociology 



Clare Swanson 

College Of Arts & Sciences 

English 




Suzanne Sweeney 
rroll School Of Management 
Economics-CSOM 
Finance 



Thomas Sweeney 

College Of Arts & Sciences 

Philosophy 



Jason Swergold 

College Of Arts & Sciences 

Political Science 



Stephanie Sylvia 

School Of Nursing 

Nursing 



Stephanie Talutis 

College Of Arts & Sciences 

Biochemistry 




Jessica Tamuleviz 

College Of Arts & Sciences 

Art History 



Chia Lin Tan 

Carroll School Of Management 

Operations Management 

Marketing 



Wei-Ko Tan 

College Of Arts & Sciences 

History 



Trinh Tang 

School Of Nursing 

Nursing 



Jessica Tanse\ 

Lynch School Of Education 

Human Development 

English (LSOE) 




Matthew Tasca 
roll School Of Management 
Finance 



Alberto Tawachi 

College Of Arts & Sciences 

Communications 

History 



Maia Tekle 

College Of Arts & Sciences 

Communications 



Patricia ter Horst 

Carroll School Of Management 

Economics 

Finance 



Khanh-Phuong Thai 

College 01 \rN & Sciences 

Psycholog) 



Seniors 44 l > 



Jennifer Thayer 

College Oi Arts &: Sciences 

Communications 



Alexander Theissen 

Carroll School Of Management 

Finance 



Sarah Thibadeau 

College Of Arts & Sciences 

Physics 



Jennifer Thibault 

College Of Arts & Sciences 

English 

German 



Kate Thibault 

Lynch School Of Educatior 

Human Development 

Sociology 




Sophie Thibodeau 

College Of Arts & Sciences 

Political Science 



Dominique Thomas 

College Of Arts & Sciences 

Communications 



Angela Thompson 

Carroll School Of Management 

Finance 

Philosophy 



Ashley Thompson 

College Of Arts & Sciences 

Sociology 



Britney Thompson 

College Of Arts & Sciences 

English 




Catherine Thompson 

College Of Arts & Sciences 

Biology A&S B.A 



Jennifer Thompson 

Carroll School Of Management 

Accounting 



Patrick Thompson 

Carroll School Of Management 

Finance 



Leslie Thorup 

Lynch School Of Education 

Elementary Education 

Film Studies 



Brian Tichenor 
Carroll School Of Managerru 
Finance 
Computer Science - CSOIv 




1 1 1 1 e r 



h Schrtol Of I dm ation 

.on 
Hum«i: <nt 



I eigh linmouth 

( ( (liege Of Arts & Sciences 

I listory 



Phillip Titolo 

( .irroll St hool Of Management 

Marketing 

I in.ii I- e 



Takeru Tochisako 

College Of Arts & Sciences 
Economics 



Meghan Toland 

College Of Arts & Sciences 

Biology 



Kathryn Tompson 

College Of Arts & Sciences 

Mathematics 



Marta Topran 

College Of Arts & Sciences 

Philosophy 



Gabriela Torres 

College Of Arts & Sciences 

Rom Lang-Hispanic Stdy 



Meghan Tozzi 

College Of Arts & Sciences 

Mathematics 



Jonathan Trainor 

College Of Arts & Sciences 

Psychology 




Lauren Tran 


Myhanh Tran 


Michael Trapanese 


Melissa Trejo 


Noelle Troccoli 


arroll School Of Management 


Lynch School Of Education 


College Of Arts & Sciences 


School Of Nursing 


Carroll School Of Management 


Finance 


Human Development 


Economics 


Nursing 


Marketing 


German 




Philosophy 








Hanh Truong 
tLynch School Of Education 

Elementary Education 
) Math/Computer Science 



Ellen Tsay 

Carroll School Of Management 

Marketing 

English 



Meghan Tubridy 

College Of Arts & Sciences 

Biology A&S B.A 



Nikki Tyler 

College Of Arts & Sciences 

Economics 



Alicia Tynan 

Lynch School Of Education 

Human Development 




Ogbutor Uchenna 

'College Of Arts & Sciences 

Economics 

Finance 



Giovannipaolo Urbanucci 

Carroll School Of Management 

Finance 

Accounting 



Scott Utterson 

Carroll School Of Management 

Finance 



Andrea Valdes 

Carroll School Of Management 

Marketing 



Ariadna Van Der Plas 
College Of Arts & Sciences 

English 






Seniors 451 




hmicrcr, Kristen Goodby Erin Morley, Heather Reid & ( !aitlin Geddes 



452 




Matthew Diebel & Paul Mueller 



Erin K lew in & Caitlin \\ hue 



Seniors 453 



Laura Van Der Vynckt Cara Van Heest 

College Oi Arts & Sciences Carroll School Of Management 



History 



Marketing 



Heather Van Orman 

College Of Arts & Sciences 

Psychology 



Erik Van Versendaal 

College Of Arts & Sciences 

English 

Philosophy 



Andrew Varani 
Carroll School Of Manageme 
Economics-CSOM 
Finance 




Gary Varnavides 

College Of Arts & Sciences 

Political Science 



Lindsay Varquez 

College Of Arts & Sciences 

Communications 

English 



Danielle Vartigian 

Lynch School Of Education 

Human Development 

Elementary Eduction 



Megan Vassallo 

Lynch School Of Education 

Elementary Education 

Human Development 



Laura Vaughn 

College Of Arts & Sciences 

English 




Dana Va lighters 

College Of Arts & Sciem <s 

Communications 



Catherine Veillette 

College Of Arts & Sciences 

Communications 

English 



Kathryn Velluti 

Lynch School Of Education 

Elementary Education 

Math/Computer Science 



Lisa Velte 

Carroll School Of Management 

Marketing 

Accounting 



Daniel Viafore 

Lynch School Of Education 

Secondary Education 

History (LSOE) 




■in 
h/Conrtj 



( harlene Victorino 

S< hool Of Nursing 

Nursing 



Diana Villagomez 

( oUege( )l Arts & S( iences 
Communications 



Rhea Villamin 
Sc hool ( )f Nursing 

Nursing 



I 'rank Virga 

College Of Arts & Sciences 

Economics 



Cristina Vitiello 
larroll School Of Management 
Marketing 



Geoffrey Vogel 

College Of Arts & Sciences 

History 



Elizabeth Vollman 

Carroll School Of Management 

Marketing 



Danielle Volpe 

College Of Arts & Sciences 

Biology 



Jesse Volturo 

College Of Arts & Sciences 

Philosophy 




Caroline Vuilleumier 

Lynch School Of Education 

Secondary Education 

Mathematics 



Emilie Wachtel 

College Of Arts & Sciences 

Environment Geoscience 



Darcy Wade 

College Of Arts & Sciences 

Communications 



Matthew Wagar 

College Of Arts & Sciences 

Physics 



Katherine Wagoner 

College Of Arts & Sciences 

Rom Lang-Hispanic Stdy 




Melissa Waite 

College Of Arts & Sciences 

Sociology 



Lindsay Wakefield 

Carroll School Of Management 

Human Resources Mgmnt. 

Marketing 



Kathleen Wakeham 

College Of Arts & Sciences 

Biology 



Brendan Walsh 

Lynch School Of Education 

Human Development 

Communications 



Colleen Walsh 

College Of Arts & Sciences 

Political Science 




Emily Walsh 

College Of Arts & Sciences 

Music 



John Walsh Joseph Walsh Stephen Walsh 

Carroll School Of Management Carroll School Of Management College Of Arts & Sciences 

Finance General Management Philosophy 



lorn Walsh 

College Ot Arts & Sciences 

Political Science 



Seniors 455 




Justin Walter 

College Oi Arts & Sciences 

Political Science 



Carolyn Ward 

College Of Arts & Sciences 

Psychology 



Lindsey Warren 

Carroll School Of Management 

Corporate Systems 



Caitlin Watras 

Lynch School Of Education 

Communications 

Human Development 



Adam Watson 
Carroll School Of Managemei 
Marketing 
Finance 




James Watson 

Carroll School Of Management 

Finance 

General Management 



William Watson 

Carroll School Of Management 

Finance 

Accounting/ Inf. Tech 



Ian Watt 

College Of Arts & Sciences 

Economics 



Alyson Wattinne 

Lynch School Of Education 

Elementary Education 

Math/Computer Science 



Ashley Watts 

College Of Arts & Sciences 

Biology 




Venecia Webster 

College Of Arts & Sciences 

Sociology 

Philosophy 



Thomas Wehr 

Carroll School Of Management 

Finance 



Emily Weiss 

School Of Nursing 

Nursing 



John Weiss 

Carroll School Of Management 

Finance 



Elizabeth Wellington 

College Of Arts & Sciences 

Political Science 




I Wells 
>fArts&S<i. 
try 



Megan Wiesp 

Lynch S< hool ( M Education 

Elemental . I ducation 

I luman Development 



Aimer Wrsscl 

( olle^e Of Arts & Sciences 

Biology 



Ryan Westerfield 

College Of Arts & Sciences 
Political Science 



Meghan Wetherbee 

Lynch School Of Education 

Elementary Education 

Human Development 



Matthew Whalen 
Carroll School Of Management 
Finance 



Meaghan Whalen 

College Of Arts & Sciences 

Psychology 



Alexander Whelan 

Carroll School Of Management 

Finance 



Brian White 

Carroll School Of Management 

Accounting 

Operations Management 



Caitlin White 

College Of Arts & Sciences 

English 

Communications 




Thomas White 

College Of Arts & Sciences 

History 



Alyson Whitehead 

Lynch School Of Education 

Human Development 



Brian Wilby 

College Of Arts & Sciences 

Economics 



Michael Wilhelm 

Carroll School Of Management 

Finance 

History 



Audrey Williams 

College Of Arts & Sciences 

Communications 




Christopher Williams 
i College Of Arts & Sciences 
Economics 



Erica Williams 

College Of Arts & Sciences 

English 



Jeffrey Williams 

Lynch School Of Education 

Secondary Education 

English (LSOE) 



Raymond Williams 

Carroll School Of Management 

Finance 



Scott Williams 

College Of Arts & Sciences 

Economics 




Christopher Wilson 


Dania Wilson 


Jessica Wilson 


Morgan Wilson 


Elizabeth Winn 


College Of Arts & Sciences 


School Of Nursing 


College Of Arts & Sciences 


College Of Arts & Sciences 


School Of Nursing 


Psychology 


Nursing 


Biology 


1 listory 


Nursing 



Seniors 457 




Jena Wirth 
College Oi Arts & Sciences 
Bio 



Marysia VVlazlo 

College Of Arts & Sciences 

Communications 



Lauren Wojnar 
Carroll School Of Management 

Finance 
Accounting Information Systems 



Jonathan Wolff 

College Of Arts & Sciences 

Economics 



Alanna Wong 

College Of Arts & Sciences 

Romance Lang - French 

Philosophy 




Allison Wong 

Carroll School Of Management 

Accounting 

Marketing 



Anne Woodbury 

School Of Nursing 

Nursing 



Marcus Woods 

College Of Arts & Sciences 

Communications 

Psychology 



Michael Wright 

College Of Arts & Sciences 

Computer Science B.A 



Tanesha Wright 

College Of Arts & Sciences 

English 




Heather Wynne 

Lynch School Of Education 

Elementary Education 

Human Development 



Tian Xu Carroll 

School Of Management 

Accounting 

Finance 



Agnes Yao 

College Of Arts & Sciences 

English 



Rachel Yoffe 

Lynch School Of Education 

Elementary Education 

Math/Computer Science 



Catherine Yoo 

College Of Arts & Sciences 

Communications 




ipher Young 

Coll. -ts&Sci' 



Kathei ine Zai hara 

( oilege of Arts & S( ieru a 

Political Science 



Brian Zager 

( oilege Of Arts & Sciences 

Communications 



Theresa Zaleski 

( ollciM' Of Arts & S, iem es 
Psychology 



Anthony Zancanaro 

College Of Arts & Sciences 

Mathematics 




■I 





Michaela Zanello 

Lynch School Of Education 

Human Development 



Kristen Zapata 

Lynch School Of Education 

Elementary Education 

Human Development 



Michael Zavaski 

College Of Arts & Sciences 

Biology 



Xiu Zhao 

Carroll School Of Management 

Accounting 



James Zhen 

College Of Arts & Sciences 

Film Studies 

Historv 




Sara Zhu 

College Of Arts & Sciences 

International Studies 



Monica Zielinski 

Lynch School Of Education 

Human Development 

Child in Society 



Nicholas Zimick 

College Of Arts & Sciences 

Biochemistry 



Dotsy Zirkle 

College Of Arts & Sciences 

Political Science 



Gerard Zopfi 

Carroll School Of Management 

Finance 




Brett Gallagher 

1 College of Arts & Sciences 

Political Science 

Historv, Film Studies 



Seniors 



Camera 



Muna Abdalla 

Michael Abene 

Richard Aberman 

Miren Aboitiz 

Rebecca Abramson 

{Catherine Adam 

Meaghan Adamyk 

Francis Adduci 

Andrew Agzarian 

Akinseye Akinbulumo 

Hamad Al Sabah 

Paul Alexandrov 

Marco Alfieri 

Jennifer Allen 

Nehia Al-Shanniek 

Jamen Amato 

Bonnie Anderson 

Erik Anderson 

Adrienne Andry 

Yaw Any i nam 

Patricia Anzalone 

Claire Arpin 

Michael Aube 

Brenna Ayers 

Eric Babaev 

Monica Bajek 

Nicholas Balk 

Adebowale Bamiduro 

Frank Baptiste 

Carlos Baralt-Suarez 

Wilber Barillas 

Lisa Barnes 

Jonathan Barry 

Ciiovanna Beauchamp 

Michael Beirnard 

Justin Bell 
Kimberly Bernard 



Jake Bertanza 
Andrea Bidegaray 
Philopater Bishay 

Tyrelle Blair 

Matthew Bland 

Laine Blumenkopf 

Kevin Boggan 

Niamh Bohan 

Christopher Boldig 

Lindsay Bolles 

Jonathan Bowen 

Carolyn Bowman 

Brian Boyle 

Christopher Brablc 

Alexander Brady 

Michael Bresnahan 

Samuel Brill 

Nicole Bucheri 

Meghan Buckley 

Ryan Burke 

Kathryn Cahill 

Michael Cahill 

Andre Callender 

Cailen Campbell 

Eric Campion 

Matthew Caouette 

Victoria Capdevielle 

Lenny Caraballo 

Lauren Cardinale 

Nicole Cardoso 

Lauren Carey 

Alfredo Carranza 

Michael Cartwright 

Thomas Cartwright 

Gian-Karlo Casimiro 

Natalie Castillo 

Peter Cavanaugh 



Victoria Cavanaugh 

Kate Ceredona 

Heather Cerulli 

Jorge Chacon 

Kevin Challenger 

Wesley Chaney 

Sung Chang 

Colby Chattman 

Courtney Cheetham 

Yu Chen 

Philip Cheng 

Gosder Cherilus 

Jacob Chin 

Sydney Chiu 

Abraham Cho 

Sarah Choi 

Barom Chon 

Rose Chou 

Ashley Christie 

Kevin Christina 

Roger Chu 

Gihee Chung 

Zachary Churchich 

Alex Churchill 

Alexander Clark 

Joshua Coefer 

Marie Connelly 

Adrienne Connolly 

Sarah Connolly 

Kevin Connor 

Daniel Connors 

Patrick Conte 

Mary Conway 

Kathleen Corcoran 

Leo Corcoran 
Morgan Corcoran 
Carolyn Cordeiro 







Shelley Coulombe 

Rebecca Cousineau 

Brian Cramer 

Rebecca Croke 

Nicholas Cronan 

Patrick Cronin 

Jennifer Crook 

Frank Crowley 

Courtney Culnane 

Denis Cummings 

Nijah Cunningham 

Jasmine Cutting 

Monica Da Silva 

Colleen Daley 

James Daley 

Andrea DAmato 

Nikia Darden 

Noelle Dauenhauer 

Jaclyn Davison 

Molly Davison 

Andrew Daya 

Dana De Filippo 

Michael Dean 

Alder Debrito 

Andrew Defeo 

Julie Defossez 

Amanda Dellevigne 

Julianna Dessau 

Eleanore Deutsch 

Meghan Dillon 

Tina DiMonda 

Robert Dittrich 

Michael Dolan 

Jacqueline Dolson 

Maria Domestico 

Danielle Donahue 

Theodore Donovan 



Brandon Dorey 

Wilfred Dorlus 

Kathleen Dorman 

Gardy Dorneval 

Kindyll Dorsey 

Mykal Dortch 

Desiree Douglas 

Kimberly Drayton 

John Driscoll 

Brian Drislane 

Michael Dubinsky 

Janelle Ducott 

Jared Dudley 

Anne Dudley-Marling 

Bernard Dufresne 

Nicholas Dumais 

Jo-Lonn Dunbar 

Kelly Dunn 

Jason Duran 

Michael Echemendia 

Alexandra Eu 

Yanick Evora 

John Ezzard 

Mark Fahey 

Quinton Farrar 

Andrew Faugh nan 

Nicholas Feeley 

Peter Fehn 

Sammy Feliciano 

Gregory Fenton 

Heather Ferron 

Kathryn Fin ley 

Liam Fitts 

Jennifer Fitz-Roy 

Keith Fleischer 

Jason Fleming 

Nolvia Flores-Herrera 



Ryan Flynn 

Terrance Ford 

Casey Foster 

Ryan Foster 

Matthew Francis 

Meghan Fredette 

Cameron Froude 

Andrew Galdes 

Daniel la Gal lego 

Isabel Garcia 

Jennifer Garcia 

Kimberly Garcia 

Rodrigo Garcia 

Sharon Garwood 

Dashan Gaskin 

John Gately 

Richard Gavilanes 

Amanda Gedge 

Eric Gehrke 

Christopher Gelnaw 

Philip George 

Laura Georges 

Linh Giang 

Ryan Glasper 

Henna Gn 

Christopher Gotfredson 

Sarah Graner 

Matthew Grasmick 

Amanda Grazioli 

Noelle Green 

Justin Greene 

Thomas Greene 

Daniel Grejdus 

Gregory Gressel 

Alexandra Griffin 

Christopher Griffin 

Tyler Griggs 



Seniors 461 



Camera 



Robert Grygiel 

Michael Guanci 

Noelani Guerrero 

Lisa Gurski 

Jeffrey Gu shard 

Jessica Gustafson 

Joana Gutierrez 

Kojo Gyasi 

William Hagan 

Jessica Hallman 

David Ham 

Tara Hanna 

Ryan Harms 

Christopher Harris 

Emily Hassett 

Carolyn Hayek 

Erik Hayman 

Darryl Hazelwood 

Patrick Healey 

James Healy 

Virginia Heatter 

Shea Heffernan 

John Hell man 

Christopher Hennen 

Nicholas Herbold 

Sean Herman 

Anita Hertell 

Catherine Hickel 

Kara Hoisington 

David Horn 

Seongsin Hong 

Christopher Horwood 

Cameron Hosmer 

Valerie Hsia 

Joey Hsu 

Linda Hu 

Kyle Huffstetler 



Timothy Hultzman 

Christopher Hunker 

Martin Hunter 

Arnold Hur 

Megan Hurd 

Walter Hyde 

Amanda lies 

Soo-Bin Im 

Jar ret Izzo 

Outi Jaaskelainen 

Colin Jackson 

Jacqueline Jacobs 

Todd Janus 

Andrew Jarvis 

Vanessa Jenkins 

Lindsay Jennison 

Katherine Johanson 

Sean Jones 

Felicia Jordan 

Max Joseph 

Shel ley Joseph 

Natalie Joubert 

Melissa Joyce 

Henry Kahn 

Sean Kane 

Hyun-Woo Kang 

Jeremy Kaplan 

Christopher Karle 

Katherine Kavanagh 

Lindsey Keefner 

Michael Keegan 

David Kelly 

Jessica Kelly 

Kristin Kenney 

Samantha Keough 

Deborah Kern 

Jennifer Kero 



Patrick Kerwin 

Kyle Kessler 

Soma Kesthely 

Christine Kim 

Daniel Kim 

Eddy Kim 

Gina Kim 

June Kim 

Naehoon Kim 

Sang Kim 

Stella Kim 

\bon Kim 

\bungho Kim 

Curtis King 

Katrina King 

Christopher Kirkland 

Matthew Kluge 

Blake Kobashigawa 

Tobias Koha 

Pharawee Koletschka 

Daniel Kollar 

Samantha Koller 

Yelizaveta Konoplyova 

Caitlin Koscuiszka 

Trey Koziol 

Richard Kurdi 

Christina Kwan 

Martha Kwasnik 

Daniel Kweon 

Prince Kyereme 

Sarah La Motte 

Genevieve Labahn 

Danielle Labonia 

Allison Laffer 

James Lahens 

Donald Lai 
Nicholas Lake 







Joseph Lampkin 

Andrew Lane 

Ray Lankford 

Nicholas Larkin 

Hieu Le 

Jiyeun Lee 

Joanne Lee 

Julia Lee 

Mi Lee 

\bon-Joo Lee 

James Leonard 

Daniel Li 

Chen Lim 

David Lin 

Lei Lin 

Jason Littman-Quinn 

Stacey Livingstone 

Grand Lo 

Nancy Lohmiller 

Michelle Lombardi 

Jennifer Lord 

Whitnie Low 

Hannah Lynch 

Colin Mac Donald 

Lisa Macchia 

Neil Macisaac 

Joseph Mackey 

Alexandria Macmaster-Ho 

Beth Maguire 

Issey Maholo 

Jennifer Mahoney 

Michael Makinde 

Juan Maldonado 

Marina Malvagna 

Christopher Manion 

Melissa Marchionna 

Claire Markham 



William Markis 

Sarah Marshall 

Sean Marshall 

Brian Martell 

Brian Martin 

Laura Martin 

Selina Martinez 

Jennifer Maurer 

Mark Mayeda 

Kendall Mayhew 

Elizabeth Maynard 

Lyndsey Mc Donnough 

Claire Mcanulty 

Kaitlin Mccann 

Maureen Mcdonnell 

Matthew Mcgarry 

John McGinness 

Ryan Mcginty 

Daniel McGovern 

Shawn Meg rath 

Ryan Mchaffie 

Kathleen Mckenzie 

Stewart McKinney 

Abigail Mckoy 

Kati Mcleod 

Patrick Mcmanus 

John Mcnamara 

Julie McNamara 

Peter Mcnulty 

Jeffrey McPheeters 

Carolina Mederos 

Sangeeta Mehta 

Kenneth Melillo 

Luiz Menezes 

Ryan Merrill 

Thatcher Merrill 

Andrew Meszaros 



Tiffany Metts 

Brian Meyer 

Artem Mikhlyukov 

Maja Milicevic 

Emily Miller 

Brigitte Mills 

Erin Mindell 

Lisa Miragliuolo 

Tara Mirto 

Sean Mitchell 

Aurpon Mitra 

Satoshi Mitsuda 

Jesse Mizzone 

Kaite Mo 

Edward Monan 

William Monigan 

Carlos Monteiro 

Glenn Moody 

Veronica Mora 

Elizabeth Moran 

Theresa Morse 

Gabriela Moscoso 

Bradley Mueller 

Larissa Muething 

Rohan Mulgaonkar 

Robert Muller 

Caroline Mull in 

Nicolas Mulroney 

Keith Murphy 

Michael Murphy 

Ryan Murphy 

Justin Muto 

Evans Muzere 

Dawn Myers 

Jonathan Myers 

Sarah Naegele 

Bhairavi Narayanan 



Seniors 463 



Camera 



Lindsey Nash 

Ryan Naumes 

Mad aw i Nawaf 

Mashael Nawaf 

Jack Naylor 
Rory Neubauer 
Mark Neumann 
Anthony Nguyen 
Gaelle Nguyen 
Phuong Nguyen 
Quang Nguyen 
Nicholas Nigro 

Donald No 

Philip Norris 

Brent Noyes 

Katie O'Brien 

Matthew O'Connor 

Rory O'Connor 

Joshua O'Dor 

Jennifer Oh 

Meghan O'Halleran 

Caitlin O'Hara 

Kevin O'Leary 

Caitlin Olsen 

Daniel O'Rourke 

Emlen Page 

Kyle Pa ice 

Anne Palmer 

Mark Palmer 

Christina Pan 

Ryan Panaro 

Chris Pang 

Daniel Park 

Hyunyoung Park 

Richard Park 

Seong Park 

Crystal Parker 



William Parry 

Joshua Paterno 

John-Peter Patrizia 

Richard Paul 

Jason Paulino 

Joseph Pearce 

Jeffrey Peloquin 

Vanessa Perrin 

Shane Peterson 

Stephen Petteruti 

Ritchy Philoctete 

Sebastian Pinto-Thomaz 

Elizabeth Pippert 

Ryan Poles 

Michael Pope 

Christopher Popper 

Fernando Portilla 

Alicia Powers 

Antonio Prado 

Sean Pramov 

Kevin Prendergast 

Joseph Prikazsky 

Christopher Prottas 

Tyronne Pruitt 

Lindsay Purnell 

Obair Qudsi 

Kerry Quealy 

Tyler Rancourt 

Rohit Rao 

Theodore Rati iff 

Paige Rawlins 

Brian Reagor 

Courtney Reggo 

Heather Reid 

James Reisman 

Lauren Reliford 

Kathrin Ress 



Ryne Reynoso 

Meghan Rice 

Michelle Rice 

John Ricklefs 

Katharina Riehle 

Ali Rizvi 

Clare Robbins 

Sarah Roberto 

David Rocco 

Nelson Rodrigues 

Matthew Rogan 

Brian Rogers 

Eric Romeo 

Joseph Rooney 

Nicole Rosich 

Rudolf Roux-Bruno 

Anna Rupani 

Amanda Russo 

Matthew Ryan 

Saheba Sahni 

William Salmon 

Andrew Sande 

Sulaiman Sanni 

David Saunders 

Candace Savino 

Michael Scerra 

Gregory Schaefer 

Erin Scheu 

Jessica Schillinger 

Mark Schruender 

Matthew Schweitzer 

Yosef Seddiq 

Edi Selita 

Anamaria Senior 

Paul Seo 

Sanghoon Seo 

Fanta Sesay 



464 




Jill Shadek 

Heather Shaw 

Neil Shea 

Catherine Sheehan 

Kevin Sheridan 

Mark Shim 

Stephanie Shin 

Justin Simmons 

Thomas Simmons 

Daniel Simoncini 

Alvin Siu 

Chase Smith 

Megan Smith 

Tristan Smith 

William Smith 

Benedict Song 

Janet Song 

Seunghan Song 

Julie Spatola 

Ajay Srikanth 

David Stack 

Monica Stallings 

Michael Stallone 

Lindsey Steffen 

Luke Stone 

Mitchell Storace 

Krystal Strassman 

Diego Suarez 

Joshua Sudbey 

Katey Sullivan 

Michael Sullivan 

Patrick Sullivan 

Steven Sunderland 

Michael Sutcliffe 

Timothy Sweeney 

Corey Sylvester 

Lindsay Talley 



Christopher Teehan 

Preston Thakral 

Ryan Thompson 

Tyler Thompson 

Justin Thornton 

Douglas Til ley 

Matthew Tobyne 

Andrew Tourville 

Christopher Tracy 

Dejuan Tribble 

Elizabeth Tuominen 

Christopher Turnure 

Iquo Ukpong 

Jairo Valverde 

Dana Van Hise 

Lauren Vanderland 

Priscilla Vasconcelos 

Alexander Vasquez 

Kathryn Vassar 

Tatiana Vicente 

Stephanie Vo 

Michael Wallace 

Brianna Walling 

Helen Wang 

Xing Wang 

Ying Wang 

Leszek Ward 

Frank Warren 

Brendan Waters 

Amanda Watral 

Bryan Watts 

Allison Weiss 

Bryan Werth 

Kathryn West 

Paul White 

Adam Whitfield 

Lennox Whitworth 



Dosh Whye 

Matt Wiggins 

Lindsay Wilcox 

Courtney Williams 

Alexander Wilson 

Christopher Wilson-Byrne 

Daniel Woods 

Taylor Workman 

Edwin Xiao 

Elizabeth Yan 

Fan Yang 

Alexander Yiannopoulos 

Albert \bon 

Heewon \bon 

Jeffrey \bon 

Glodean Y)rrick 

Justin Yxin 

Brian Y)ung 

Christian Zakelj 

Christine Zen-Ruffinen 

Luis Zepeda 

Daniel Zepp 

Nathan Zyla 



Seniors 465 









Clockwise from top: St. Ignatius of Loyola, 
founder of the Society of Jesus, and on whose 
ideals Boston College was founded, watches 
over students on an early fall day. BC par- 
aphernalia is a large < 
bookstore, whi< 



ars. The 
runveTIecl in 2005, features the 
most modern in sports medicine facilities as 
well as a BC Football Hall of Fame that pays 
tribute to important figures such as Doug 
Floutie. A welcome sight in the fall is the 



flower-decorated BC sign behind McGuinn 
Hall. Renovation outside Hillside Cafe has 
been popularly received by students, who find 
the cafe's environment extremely relaxing 



and conducive to get-togethers with friends. 



Edited by: Matthew Deibel & Natalie Fogiel 



WHAT DOES IT take to make a yearbook? 
While there is no one formula for creating the 
perfect publication, there are certain qualities 
that help determine its quality as a book. Have 
the events of the 2006-2007 school year been 
documented as accurately as possible? Has the 
book been presented in an aesthetically pleas- 
ing manner? For seniors, has it done justice to 
your last four years at Boston College? And 
for alumni, has it brought back memories of 
your time on the Heights? It is easy to focus 
on the ultimate product of a year of late nights 
in the yearbook office and stressful deadlines 
without remembering the importance of fund- 
ing. As a 504-page student-run publication, 



Sub Turri receives no funding from the Uni- 
versity, but instead exists on the basis of book 
sales and the generous support of its benefac 
tors and patrons. Without such caring dona- 
tions the Sub Turri staff would never be able 
to afford advanced equipment to create the 
national prizewinning publication that it is 
renowned for. Your enthusiasm for our book 
encouraged us to persevere through dead- 
lines and to do the best that we could in the 
hopes that you are now as proud of this book 
as we are. This book, then, is dedicated to 
all those who have supported us through the 
year and especially to those whose names 
appear on the following pages. Myra Chai 



Benefactors & Patron* 























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Photos by Myra Chai & Bob McGrath 



Benefactors & Patrons 467 



Benefactors 



Jana & David Agliano 

Michael & Penny Augustine 

The Family of Mason Bates 

Bob & Maureen Bingle 

Jaclyn Calcagno 

Vince & Robyn Caponi 

Dauld & Maureen Christmas 

The Collins Family 

Robert & Trudy Cushing 

Charles & Elizabeth DAmour 



r,<] Patrons 



Renee Deming 

Glorianne Demoulas 

Richard & Helen Donohue 

Ron & Bernadette Ervin 

Joan N. Gionfriddo 




Benefactors and Patrons 46v> 



James Girven 

Dr. & Mrs. Pedro J. Greer Jr. 

Mr. & Mrs. Robert E Harper 

Mr. & Mrs. David B. Henry 

The Hillman Family 

Paul & Judy Holowczyk 

Jeffery Kang 

Brian & Patty Keck 

Dennis & Susan Kelley 

Moira & Brian Kelly 

Karen Kennedy 
Frank & Derval Kenny 



Benefactors and Patron* 



Peter Knowles 

The Kushiyama Family 

Meghan Lanigan 

Michael Phillips, Kathy & 

Frances Macias-Phillips 

John & Nina Marcel 

Todd & Tricia Mills 

John L. McWilliams 

Gerard & Barbara Muldoon 

Mr. & Mrs. Ed Napleton 

Michael & Kim O'Brien 

Parents of Eve J. O'Neil 



Benefactors and Patrons 471 



= 



Mr. & Mrs. Joseph S. Pawelczyk 

Milton & Aida Perez 

Steven & Kathy Pidgeon 

Ian Abelardo Read 
Mr. & Mrs. Francis Roche 
Mr. & Mrs. Frank J. Roney 

James A. Rubin 
Andrew Schirling & Family 

Gregory Schrank 
Dr. & Mrs. Giles R. Scuderi 

Rishesh Singh 
Raymond Williams 



:':lr<)fl . 



The Sasso Family 

Edward Shim 

The Vitiello Family 

Alexander M. Whelan 

The "ibungworth-Wright Family 

Mimi C. Yu 




Benefactors and Patrons 473 



!i 



Patrons 



William & Patricia Ahearn 

Andrew & Sandra Arena 

Nicholas (Nyck) D. Bernier 

Bertucio Family 

Lindsay Bloom 

The Bourghol Family 

Brendan Boyce 

Mary D. Bradley 

Michael & Debra Brison 

Dr. & Mrs. Michael Camilleri 

Kathryn Carr 

Stefanie Casillas 

Jane & Dennis Cates 



factor* and Patrons 



Janet & Tony Cheetham I 

Michael Ciauri 

The Ciganek Family 

Lorraine, Tom MSW48, 

Shelly NC'72 & Meg '07 Connolly 

Noreen Connolly NC'67 




Benefactors .nnl Patrons 475 



Ms. Lisa Conticelli 

Lisa Corvese 

Mr. & Mrs. Kevin Coughlin 

MaryDale & Rafael Coutin 

Sally & Tom Curtin 

Joseph & Dolores Dauenhauer 

Marianne & Jerry Dean 

Frank & Deirdre Donnantuono 

Patricia & James W Evans, Jr. 

Elizabeth C. Fabiani 

Katherine C. Fabiani 

Melissa Fazio 

Dr. & Mrs. Gary T. Fernando 

Mr. & Mrs. John Finnegan 

Michael & Karen Fiorile 



Benefactor! and Patrons 



Dr. & Mrs. Mark D. Forte 

Mr. & Mrs. John Gabelli 

Chris Gelnaw 

Girard Gibbons 

Patrick Gipson 

Phillip B. Grant 

The Grosart Family 

Mr. & Mrs. John M. Harrington, III 

Chris & Erie Hartwig 

Dr. Michael & Marina Hayman 

Bob & Nancy Holland 

Mr. & Mrs. Stephen Holodak 

Jungman Hong 

Lander & Bill Hynes 

Mr. & Mrs. Richard E. Kaplan 



Benefactors .uul I'.itroiiN 477 



= s 



Pamela Kaye 

Thomas & Bernadette Keitt 

Dr. & Mrs. Richard Lambert 

Anthony Liberti 

Sal & Donna Lipari 

Mr. & Mrs. Thomas LiVolsi 

Ruthanne & Jorge Lopez 

Catherine McCarthy 

Wagar Terry & Sharon McGuirk 

Ryan McHaffie 
Angelo & Pat Messina 

Erland Modesto 

Sue & Chuck Moran 

Julian Nguyen 

Scott Nitz 



!:iciors and Patrons 



Mr. & Mrs. Jerome E O'Brien 

Brian, Maura & Sarah O'Connor 

Mr. & Mrs. John O'Dor 

Ann & Jerry O'Leary 

Michael & Carol Oliver 

Mr. & Mrs. Kenneth O'Neill-Arredondo 

Mr. & Mrs. Richard A. Otto 

Mr. & Mrs. Lawrence Paggi 

Alison Parks 

Laura & Gerald Peyton 

Cristina Piechocki 

Brittany Pierpont 

Cassandra Pond 

Nicki & Ed Richards 

Andrew Rigoglioso 



Benefactors .uul fatrons 479 



James & Frances Roth 

Edward & Deborah Sanocki 

Mr. & Mrs. Frank Santora 

Andrew Santosuosso 

Jonathan Schwarz 

Tom & Rose Shadek 

Matthew Sheehan 

Michael Sheehan 

Peter Si ma 

Mr. & Mrs. William B. Simmons, Jr. 

Wayne & Sherry Smith 

Mark & Julie Steinhafel 

Robert & Louise Steinkrauss 

Matthew Tasca 
Susan Tasca 



ml Patrons 






Chris Tonn 

Ariadna C. Van Der Plas 

The Viafore Family 

Dr. & Mrs. Dennis Vollman 

Anthony V Zancanaro 

Margaret A. Zimick 




Benefactors uiul fatrons 




Kdilrd bv: Mvra Chai & Katie Mfodzelowski 



IN FIVE HUNDRED four pages we have 
attempted to encapsulate the Boston Col- 
lege experience for the last year. In doing so 
we acknowledge that many events were not 
included yet believe that those featured are rep- 
resentative of what it meant to be a student at 
BC We began the book with the world at large 
then focused on our community and the events 
that changed us for better or worse. Irregard- 
less of opinions regarding the Iraq war it was 
voted by the Associated Press to be the most 
influential story of 2006. Al Gores 'An Incon- 
venient Truth" affected us as deeply as did the E. 
coli spinach scare, sending a chilling message 
that we as a world community must care for 



the environment or else suffer life-threaten ins 
consequences. The McMullen "Cosmophilia" 
exhibit brought visitors worldwide to Boston 
Colleges campus to marvel at Islamic orna- 
mentation from the David Collection in Copen- 
hagen. The UNITY rally brought us together 
against injustice in the hopes of creating an 
environment conducive for self-discovery and 
acceptance. And in the wake of Tom O'Briens 
departure, Jeff Jagodzinski, offensive coordi- 
nator for the Green Bay Packers and previously 
for two seasons at BC, became the 33rd Head 
Football Coach. In five hundred four pages, 
then, we hope you have learned something more 
about BC and maybe about yourself. Myru Chai 






482 Closing 



■:■•"■-■• 



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Photos h\ Boh McGrath & Associated Press 



Closing 4X3 




• J w 




For Boston 



For Boston, For Boston 
We sing our proud refrain! 

For Boston, For Boston, 
'Tis Widsom's earthly fane. 

For here all are one 

And their hearts are true 

And the towers on The Heights 

Reach to Heav'n's own blue. 

For Boston, For Boston, 
Till the echoes ring again! 

For Boston, For Boston, 

Thy glory is our own! 

For Boston, For Boston, 

'Tis here that Truth is known! 

And every with the right 

Shall thy heirs be found 
'Tis time shall be no more 

And thy work is crownd. 

For Boston, For Boston, 
For Thee and Thine alone! 






Hail! Alma Mater! 



Hail! Alma Mater! 

Thy praise we sing. 

Fondly thy mem'ries 

'Round our hearts still cling. 

Guide of our youth, 

Through thee we shall prevail! 

Hail! Alma Mater! 

Hail! Alma Mater! 

Lo! on the Heights, 

Proudly thy tow'rs raised for the Right 

God is thy master, 

His law thy sole avail! 

Hail! Alma Mater! 
Hail! Alma Mater! 




Closing 485 




AFTER ALL THE work, the classes and the hours 
spent in the studio, Studio Art majors finally real- 
ize their gallery aspirations. In the major manda- 
tory Senior Art Project, department head Professor 
Andrew Tavarelli monitors the progress of his stu- 
dents during "crits" on works appearing in each stu- 
dent's final project, the culmination of which leads to 
the student gallery in Devlin Hall in the spring. For 
all the good times of Boston College, however, stu- 
dents must eventually leave the Heights. The Career 
Center continuously schedules fairs and workshops, 
such as the Networking Bingo Night, to help stu- 
dents transition into the post-college working world. 
Photo by Myru Chui and David Trudo 




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WE BEGAN WITH a question. Who are we now? Four years later, we hope that we have 
come closer to answering it. We have discovered that genuine friendships throughout 
our college career truly are possible. We have discovered just how far we could push 
ourselves academically, physically and emotionally. The memories we have stored from 
freshman year until now will remain with us forever. The way we tailgated in the Mods, 
the way we built houses together on Appalachia, the way we immersed ourselves into 
an entirely new culture while studying abroad, the way we played in two and a half feet 
of snow one weekend in December our sophomore year, and finally, the way we walked 
together for one last time as the class of 2007. Boston College has left an indelible 
impression on each of us and for that we will always remember our years here on the 
Heights. So we ask again. Who are we now? Maybe we still don't know. And maybe 
that's okay. In the end, if we have learned anything of who we are, then it is because of 
this: that we have cared for one another and have let ourselves be cared for in return. 
Photos courtesy oi'Myru Clvii and Nikki Tyler 



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Sub Turri 2007 



Editors-in-Chief: Myra Chai & Katie Modzelewski 

Business Managers: Matthew Deibel & Natalie Fogiel 



Academics 

Anita Isama, Editor 

Vincent Siu 

Mike Tuntevski 

Student Life 

Vy Vy Vo, Editor 

Ashley Gullo 

Jullee Kim 

Jacquie Smith 

Sports 

Catherine Clark, Editor 
Kyle Green leaf 
Aubrey Timm 

Organizations 

Catherine Hahm, Editor 
Lindsey Hampshire, Editor 

Seniors 

Andrew Fudge, Editor 

Erin Klewin, Editor 

Bertha Lee 

Natalie Raffol 

Kaitlin Vigars 



Photo 

David Trudo, Editor 

Christina Capela 

Colleen Cote 

Anna Fish 

Angela Kim 

Megan Koch 

Ashley Mattys 

Caroline Ogonowski 

Alex Valdez 

Business 

Steve Marconi, Ass. Manager 

Victoria Mayer, Ass. Manager 

Kimberly Beatley 

Lindsey Hampshire 

Samantha Lipscomb 

Vincent Siu 

Christina Yang 

Marketing 

Briana Cronin, Manager 



494 Closing 




Above: The 2007 staff of Sub Turri. Left: Editors-in-Chief Mvra Chai and 
Katie Modzelewski reunite at the last football game. Photo* h\ \l\r.i Chui 



dosing -W5 



Academics - 
Anita Is am a 



I AM GRATEFUL for this opportunity to say thanks to everyone who continues to make this experi- 
ence at BC one of a lifetime. Mom and Dad, thank you for supporting me with all that I get involved 
with and for making it possible for me to be at BC. I have greatly benefited from the communities 
that have developed in my life during the past year. They encourage me to not only take a more 
active approach in meeting others, but to take an active role in knowing who I am too. I am so 
grateful to the upperclassmen, especially the seniors, that have given advice and been there for 
me. I was blessed to go to Guatemala with 15 wonderful people who I will never forget. While the 
experience gave me a lot to process, I am more than ready to move forward in action because of 
the strong community we formed. And to my room mates who continue to support me, thank you! 



- Student Life - 



VyVyVo 



THIS YEAR WAS one of trials. Not only did I go into a new living situation first semester, but I took on 
the Student Life section by myself. Although at times I was frustrated with the demands that came with 
being a sole editor, I enjoyed designing and managing the spreads nonetheless. Once again I am so happy 
with the finished product. Thank you to all my friends who submitted photos. I couldn't have done it 
without you. I also want to thank my 305 girls for welcoming a stranger with open arms. Yall are a "hott 
mess'' but you all helped me in more ways than you'll ever know. To my ex-roomie, Vanessa, thank you for 
checking up on me with voicemails when Id be hibernating in the office, listening to my rants, staying 
up late, watching Heroes, and just being the sister I needed. Myra, yearbook's not going to be the same 
without you! You finally made it though, and I just want to express my appreciation for all your help for 
the past 3 years with your talents, photos, advice, I Ms, and emails. Katie, our senior yearbook is going 
to be awesome, especially with you as an EIC. Thanks for helping me out this year with photos. To my 
sisters in 90511. even though yall try to play me and say you want to get rid of me again, I still love you 
girls (on certain days when you pay me hahajust kidding). Chandi, my rooms and Diva #2, 1 can't believe 
were almost seniors! Next year's going to be so much fun so get amped for hamster noises, quotables, 
and lots of PINK. On a final note, I hope everyone enjoys the Student Life section as much as I do. 



■ 



- Organizations - 
Catherine Hahni 



FIRST OFF; I want to thank Myra and Katie for being such patient, talented, and wonderful edi- 
tors. \buVe taught me so many things this year and I really appreciate your kindness always. You 
guys are awesome and the book is amazing! Myra, I wish you the best of luck in the future as you 
graduate from BC and move on to the next chapter of your life. \bu and your talents will be missed 
dearly by the whole staff. Katie, I'm looking forward to working with you more in the years to come! 
And of course, I need to thank my co-editor for clubs and organizations, Lindsey. \bu've saved our 
butts so many times, coming to the rescue by putting in those extra hours. Couldn't have done any of 
this without you! Sending out those emails to the clubs and hounding them for pictures was no easy 
task... It was a lot of work but it was all worth it and now we're finally done! Our section looks awesome. 
To everyone else on the staff, it was great working with you on this book. See you all next year! 



- Organizations - 
Lindsey Hampshire 



IT'S HARD TO believe that another year has gone by so quickly! Myra and Katie, thank you for 
giving me the opportunity to be an editor on this year's staff. I couldn't have asked for a better first 
year or better people to chat with about pretty much every TV show under the sun. Catherine, you 
were an amazing co-editor and I had a great time working with you on Orgs. When we first started. 
I didn't realize how difficult putting together this section would be, especially with such a fantas- 
tic computer. So thank you for the endless e-mails trying to hunt down club photos and descrip- 
tions (and for putting up with my sometimes frantic e-mails when deadlines seemed to pop up out 
of nowhere..). Many thanks to Natalie, Matt, and the Business Staff. It was so nice to be able to 
come into the office and not have to look at spreads. I hope everyone enjoys this book as much as 
we have enjoyed putting it together. Also, to Liz and the wonderful girls of 305. My life wouldn't be 
complete without living under Liz's bed, the sudden thuds against the wall, and the never-ending 
laughter. My Ohio loves, to the brick wall at the end of the universe and back (and don't tell me 
there's no such thing). B.B.Q., you are simply the best. And last, but not least, to my amazing family. 
Mom and Dad, for everything. Words can't express how grateful I am for everything you've given me. 



Closing 4 l >- 



- Sports - 
Catherine Clark 



WHILE I WAS nervous at first, my first year on the Sub Turri staff was such a fun experience. However, 
my job as an editor would not have been as great without certain people and I owe many people my 
thanks. First, I want to thank Myra and Katie for welcoming me into the staff, going above and beyond 
to help me. and listening to me complain about whatever annoyance I was dealing with in my life that 
day. You guys were fantastic editors in chief and are basically the coolest people ever. A huge thank you 
also goes out to all of the athletes who sent me pictures of their respective sports. The section could not 
have been finished without their help and I really appreciate all of their efforts. Despite being abroad 
first semester, the fabulous Aubrey Timm really saved the day when she lightened my load when I 
needed it most and I am extremely gracious for her flexibility and extra help. Finally, thanks to my family 
and roommates whose love and support has helped me through so much and means the world to me. 



- Seniors - 
Andrew Fudge 



FIRST OF ALL I would like to thank the editors, Myra and Katie, for accepting me into the editorial 
staff for this year. It was a lot of fun working with everybody, and definitely well worth the effort. I 
would also like to thank my parents for preparing me for success. They made sure that I was ready 
to face any and all difficulties in college, and they encouraged me to take advantage of all the oppor- 
tunities that would come my way. Really, if I've accomplished anything, I owe it to them. My sister 
deserves some credit as well. Because were so close in age, she is always around to talk to when I 
need to get things off my chest, and she was there for me over winter break when all my friends had 
gone back to state college, leaving me quite alone for the final two weeks. She's been not just a good 
sister but a great friend. Last of all, I pass along my thanks to my very good friends Kevin Kwan and 
William Yee, who pretty much taught me everything about yearbook production. We had great times 
back in high school on the yearbook staff, and a lot of fun, lasting memories came out of that time. 
And of course, Irn looking forward to next year's production of Sub Turri. With another three years 
ahead of me, I think I have plenty of time to figure out what makes a good yearbook here at BC. 






- Seniors - 
Erin Klewin 



WHEN I JOINED the Sub Turri staff four years ago, I couldn't imagine how it would feel to be a senior 
- and here I am. It has truly been a fantastic experience being a part of Sub Turri all these years, and 
truly a stable force throughout my four years at BC. I've made some great friends, expanded my social 
network, and learned so much about publishing and design, and of course the importance of deadlines! 
This has been my second year working on the Senior Section, and it was great being able to create and 
design a section dedicated to my own class. I would really like to thank everyone on the yearbook staff 
who worked so hard to make this years book fantastic. First and foremost, man) thanks to Myra and 
Katie for putting up with all of our questions, problems, and emails, and for staying upbeat and patient 
the whole time. Many thanks also to my co-editor Andrew, who stuck with the Senior Section as a 
freshman even after several other editors dropped out, and to our two amazing staff members. Kaitlin 
and Natalie, who helped us out tremendously this year. The Senior Section is the biggest section of the 
book, and I was lucky to work with such dedicated individuals. I also want to thank all of my friends 
at school, including my lovely roommates of Ignacio B33 who have made this year so much fun. To 
my friend Jenny, who was with me through high school and BC up until last May, thanks for being 
a great friend to me and BC isn't the same without you this year! Most importantly, I need to thank 
my amazing family, who have supported and encouraged me in all that I've ever done, and especial ly 
my mom, who has been there for me through the best times and the worst - I love you all so much! 



- Photo - 
David Trndo 



FIRST OFF THANKS to the photo staff for all their hard work and covering everything they could. 
Without them I would have had to run across campus many more times than I already did. Secondly, 
thanks to all the section editors for being patient with us. Even though it usually took awhile, Im pretty 
sure we got photos of everything. Myra, thanks for giving me the chance to be Photo Editor this year. 
It really made the semester fly by and I enjoyed every minute of it. To my family, thanks for all the 
support. Dad, thanks for driving back and forth between Delmarva and Boston. Mom, thanks for bug- 
ging me on the phone and instant messenger. Megan, good luck next year, wherever you go. Aunt Meg. 
thanks for the ticket to the Penguins game. There was no better way to start off 2007. To my friends, 
especially everyone in Vandy 603, thanks for everything this year. You guys keep my life interesting. 






dosing 4w 



- Editor-in-Chief - 
Myra Chai 

TO BEGIN. IT'S been eight years since I first started working on yearbooks. Eight years of late 
night designing, photography and endless meetings. But also eight years of lasting memories, per- 
sonal growth and creating fulfilling works that have been entirely worth it. This book is dedicated 
to those listed below for everything they have given me. To Katie. Can we be more awkward? It's 
been amazing working and laughing with you. I'll never listen to the Scissor Sisters, think of scrap 
booking, or watch Buffy the same without you. While the Project was disastrous I know this book 
will be fabulous and that North Carolina will be amazing. The best of luck with the book next year, 
please cc me on all happenings. To the staff, you guys made this book possible and for that I am 
entirely grateful for all your hard work. To Katharine, Cara, Beth, Megan and Asia. \bu guys have 
become and will always be my family. For supporting me when I never left the yearbook office and 
for never leaving my side through all the ups and the downs, I can never thank you enough. I will 
always remember our first snow storm, singing to Celine Dion on Marathon Monday, the sophomore 
Miss's and the senior Trolls. Amor para siempre. To every BCer I've met and known these last four 
years, from Duchesne to Ecuador, Sub Turri to Ghana, Appa and everything else, thank you for 
having made my years at the Heights something I will cherish throughout the remainder of my life. 
To my LAers, I know that you most of all are glad that this chapter of yearbook has ended and that 
just maybe, I can pull myself away from it to gain some semblance of a life. It's been ten years since 
the beginning of H-W and I can safely say that you have become a part of my family. To my family. 
While it seems as if I haven't been in Santa Monica in ages and I know that the travel bug will take 
me far in the future, you will always be my home. And to Matt. What more is there to say? 'Vbu have 
simply meant everything to me since we've been together. \bu can watch nine straight hours of 
VH1 and infomercials with me past sunrise, you can make me smile until even my own jaws hurt 
and you can make me feel like the most important person in the world. I can't wait to spend forever 
with you. Je taime toujours. To end. I hope this book, now and in the future, helps you to look back 
and remember fondly the life you lived at BC. While it aspires to capture the overarching experi- 
ence, it is also highly personal and has afforded me the privileged opportunity of creating the 
book I have always dreamed of making and of serving as the narrative force behind these pages. 









■ 



- Editor-in-Chief - 
Katie Modzelewski 



MAKING THE JUMP from section editor to editor-in-chief was really a daunting task at first, 
since I knew yearbook already dominated my life and didn't know how much more it would take 
over. However, this year's Sub Turri has been a delight to work on and I am very proud of the fin- 
ished product. My biggest thanks must, of course, go to my dear co-editor, Myra. This year has 
been quite the adventure (especially our Project), but we managed to pull it all off. Our ridiculously 
many hours spent in the office were all worth it, and I don't know what Ihi going to do without 
you next year, hopefully I will have some kind of divine creative intervention. I don't think it is 
possible to find two more insane people to put together as co-editors, from our common love of 
bizarre tv shows to our random taste in music. To all of the section editors, thank you so much for 
a terrific job. I know it got pretty stressful whenever deadlines and proofs arrived, but you were 
always there to get everything done on time and make life easier for Myra and me. \bu should all 
be very proud of the finished product, as it is your hard work that makes it so impressive. The 
next few thanks are on behalf of both Myra and myself. To Mer, thank you so much for your guid- 
ance and patience with everything. I know we made you crazy, but we would be lost without your 
help. To Pete, thanks for all of your great suggestions about duotone and endless support. Sandy, 
we are so grateful for your patience and all of your help this year. And Rick, thanks for all of the 
laughs and your amazing artistic insight. Apart from yearbook, but just as important is a huge 
thank you to my family, ^u are always there to listen no matter how often or what time I call, 
and are always able to calm me down and help me get myself reorganized. I really look forward 
to knowing that I can call you every Sunday after our meetings and just let everything go. To my 
actual roommates, Brittany, Kristina, and Michelle, you girls are amazing. I seriously don't know 
what I would do without you. Especially after long days in the yearbook office, nothing is better 
to come home to than one of our traditional family dinners. To all of my extra roommates, it is 
really nice to know that whenever I come home, there will be somebody there to talk to about 
anything and everything, and to all of my other wonderful BC friends, nothing compares to our 
inside jokes and general absurdity. It has been an absolute pleasure working on the 2007 edi- 
tion of Sub Turri, and I cannot wait to come back next year and make another terrific yearbook! 






dosing 501 




II 



Focus 2007 



Article and Photos by: Myra Chai 



IN A YEAR that began with students 
nationwide, including those at Boston 
College, gasping in horror at the newly 
implemented changes to Facebook and 
the danger they posed to the privacy of its 
students, we have learned over the last ten 
months especially that privacy is impor- 
tant, but that it is important not to harbor 
closed-minded sentiments about others. 
Racial incidents marred the beginning 
of the school year and sparked the first- 
ever Unity Rally on campus in an effort to 
address growing concerns about the defi- 
nition of a true Super fan. Yet in spite of 
this, Boston College's McMullen Museum 
hosted "Cosmophiliar which exhibited 123 
of the finest examples of Islamic art from 
the C. L. David Collection in Copenhagen, 
Denmark, as well as 'A New KeyT which 
explored Belgian art, not generally consid- 
ered a center of such works, and revealed 
how the history of modern art looks dif- 
ferent when viewed from the vantage 
point of this "marginal" center. With fifty- 



three works from the Simon collection that 
have never displayed in North America, the 
exhibition included important paintings 
by Rene Magritte, James Ensor, and Theo 
van Rysselberghe, among others. We as a 
Boston College community found other 
ways to come together as one. We cheered 
on our Eagles in Alumni and in Conte, and 
screamed in joy as we beat the Navy in a 
thriller ending. We traveled to Ghana to 
teach kids how to use computers, to various 
sites along the Appalachian region during 
Spring Break to build houses, and supported 
our own Campus School week after week. 
We got through our first week of college 
together, struggled through endless weeks 
of midterms that seemed to crop up period- 
ically throughout the semester, sacrificed 
everything for the thesis, until it paid off 
at the "Strip Mod" during Finals. We have 
opened our minds, but most importantly 
we have opened our hearts, and we have 
allowed this new family of Boston College 
to help us become better human beings. 








Clockwise from top: Seif Animus and Britney Brevard rap during the L ; MTY Rally in November. Reno- 
vations to the CTRC enabled students easier access to email and the internet on the \va\ to class as we] I as 
a more organized printing system through students' ID cards. While Gasson Tower was under construc- 
tion, its bells were notorious for being 3 minutes earlier and throwing students off on their \va\ to class 
The first big winter storm hit Boston College in February and casl a beautiful scene on middle campus. 



Closing 503 




\\ K \I\K 9,000 strong. We are individuals wlio seek knowledge and 
ever to excel. We are thousands of Superfans donning bright yellow 
shirts who pack Alumni Stadium on fall days irregardless of weather 
to cheer on the Kagles. We arc hundreds of clubs educating and 
expanding tin 4 horizons of all those who wish to learn. We are an 
undeniable athletic force within the ACC that will grow stronger in 



years to com(\ We are eagles taking action and talons of fury. We soar 
to glor\ and finally we take 4 it to the Heights. We are 0,000 individu- 
als, hut more than anything else, we are one community. We are BC. 



COLOPHON 



THE 2007 SUB Turn. Volume 95, was printed by Jostens Printing and Publishing in Winston-Salem, NC. The publishing 
consultant was Peter Greer and the Creative Accounts Manager was Rick Brooks. The book, "Focus',' was a 504-page Spring 
publication with a press run of 1400 copies. The publishing cost of the book was approximately $140,000. Each book sold 
for $97 online until February and $125 by check or money order, shipping and handling included. The office of Sub Turri 
is located at 103 McElroy Commons. Chestnut Hill, MA, 02467. The office phone number is (617) 552-3493 and the email 
address is subturri@bc.edu. The website can be found at http://www.bc.edu/subturri. All clubs and organizations were allowed 
to submit descriptions and photos. Each group was allotted equal space with the exception of the largest groups on campus. 
All Current Events photos were reprinted with permission from the Associated Press. The staff would like to extend its deepest 
gratitude to the follow ing individuals for their help and support during the production of the 2007 book: Peter Greer for his 
tireless enthusiasm and patience during this process. Sandy Moses for understanding throughout deadlines, proofs and flats. 
Bob McGrath for another year of wonderful portraits. Rick Brooks for his wealth of knowledge and his beautiful artwork, and 
Mer Zovko for her moral support and guidance in every aspect. Additionally, this book would not have been possible without 
the generous donations of its Benefactors and Patrons. Thank you. 



DESIGN 

The cover and endsheets were designed by Myra Chai. All 
other designs were created by the Sub Turri staff using Adobe 
In Design 2.0.2 and Adobe Photoshop CS. The cover uses High 
Gloss Litho478 base material. Pantone 8420C metalic and black 
in were used. Grained with "Linen" with an overall UV over the 
image. The photo was taken by Bob McGrath and treated in 
Photoshop CS by Myra Chai. Theme and date appear in Didot, 
embossed to register with Silver Foil #381. Spine is AYTLynn, 
embossed to register in Silver Foil #381. Opening, Divider and 
Closing were designed by Myra Chai. The dominant photo on 
all dividers were treated to opacity and Gaussian Blur effects 
in Photoshop CS2 by Myra Chai. The opening signature of 
the book was printed on 100# Signature True Gloss paper with 
UV coating on photos. The second signature was printed on 
100 # Signature True Gloss stock paper, duotone using Pantone 
8420C and black to create a silver gelatin-like feel to the photos. 
The remainder of the book was printed on 80# dull stock paper 
and sewn using sixteen page signatures rounded, backed, and 
bounded with black on black headbands. Endsheets were 
printed in black on Cottonwood. 

COLOR & SPOT COLOR 

There are 19 color multiples and 2 duotone multiples in the 
book. Spot colors vary by section. Cover: Pantone 8420C and 
black. Divider: Three layers ol various sections at 50%, 65% 
and 100% opacity laid upon one another, with 8.0 Gaussian 
blur. Maroon: 41% Cyan, 100'/ Magenta, 92% Yellow, 51% 
Black: Gold: 0% Cyan, 18% Magenta, 83% Yellow, 0% Black. 



PHOTOGRAPHY 

The Sub Turri photography staff took all photographs unless 
otherwise indicated. McGrath Studios, Inc. 8 Elm St., Suite 
2, Braintree, MA, 02184, took all senior portraits. McGrath 
Studios was contracted by Boston College to be the official 
photographer for the 2007 Sub Turri. 

Photos were taken using a variety of digital cameras and lenses 
manufactured by Nikon, Inc. These include Nikon D70, Nikon 
L5 and Nikon D200. 

Bob McGrath, Myra Chai and David Trudo took all Opening, 
Closing and Divider photos unless otherwise noted. All 
images are the exclusive property of Sub Turri and may not be 
reproduced without prior written consent. 



TYPOGRAPHY & GRAPHICS 

The first three words of all body copy, with the exception of 

the Organizations section, were capitalized to emphasize the 

"Focus" theme. All body copy is 12pt. AYTLynn. Captions are 

8pt. AYTLynn and photo and copy credits are 8pt. AYTLynn. 

Headlines vary by section: 

Opening: AYTLynn 

Dividers: AYTLynn 

Academics: AYTTurnOil 

Organizations: AYTDavid 

Student Life: AYTMiles 

Sports: AYTMaximo 

Seniors: AYTCornell 

Benefactors: AYTLynn 



COPYRIGHT INFORMATION 

I he 2007 Sub lurri is copyrighted to Myra Chai and Katie Mod/elewski. No portion of this publication may be reproduced without 

the prior written consent of .Sub Turri. 



Every reader finds himself. The writer's 
work is merely a kind of optical instru- 
ment that makes it possible for the reader 
to discern what, without this book, he 
would perhaps never have seen in himself. 

Marcel Proust