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Full text of "Summer programs / University of Maryland, College Park"

-CHIPIS i. AKCriWU» 




SUMMER PROGRAMS '89 



THE UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 
COLLEGE PARK 



COLLEGE PARK CAMPUS 
ADMINISTRATION 

Acting President 
William E. Kirwan 

A.B., University of Kentucky, I960; 

M.S., Rutgers University, 1962; 

Ph.D , Rutgers University, 1964. 

Acting Vice President for Academic Affairs and Provost 
Irwin L. Goldstein 

B.B.A., City College of New York, 1959; 

M.A., University of Maryland at College Park, 1962; 

Ph.D.. University of Maryland at College Park, 1964. 

Vice President for Administrative Affairs 
Charles F. Sturtz 

B A., Wittenberg University, 1958; 

M.P.A. Wayne State University, 1961. 

Vice President for Student Affairs 
William L. Thomas, Jr. 

B.S., University of Tennessee, 1955; 

M.S., University of Tennessee, 1965; 

Ph.D., Michigan State University, 1970. 

Vice President for Institutional Advancement 

AH. Edwards 

B.S., Northwest Missouri State University, 1957 
M.S., Northwest Missouri State University, 1971 
Ph.D., Clayton University, St. Louis, 1975 

SUMMER PROGRAMS ADMINISTRATION 

Administrative Dean for Summer Programs 
Melvin Bernstein 

B.A., Southwestern at Memphis, 1947; 

B.Mus., Southwestern at Memphis, 1948; 

M.Mus., University of Michigan, 1949; 

M.A., University of North Carolina. 1954; 

Ph.D., University of North Carolina, 1964. 

Director of Cultural Programs 
George A. Moquin 

B.A., University of Maryland, 1971. 

Assistant Director of Cultural Programs 
Donald Reinhold 

B.M. Bucknell University, 1974 

MA. University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, 1980 

Director of Finance 
David N. Catania 

B.S., University of Maryland, 1978. 

Director of Intramural Sports and Recreation 
Nick Kovalakides 

B.S., University of Maryland, 1961; 

M.A., University of Maryland, 1968. 

CENTRAL ADMINISTRATION OF THE 
UNIVERSITY 

Chancellor 
John S. Toll 

B.S., Yale University. 1944; 

M.A.. Princeton University, 1948; 

Ph.D., Princeton University, 1952. 



Deputy Chacellor 
Jean E. Spencer 

B.A., University of Maryland, 1955 

M.A., University of Maryland, 1961 

Ph D., University of Maryland, 1965 

Vice Chancellor for Academic Affairs 
David S. Sparks 

B S., Grinnell College, 1944 

M.A., Univ. of Chicago, 1945 

Ph.D., Univ. of Chicago, 1951 

Vice Chancellor for Agricultural 
Affairs and Dean 
Raymond J. Miller 

B S.. University of Alberta, 1957 

MS., Wash. State University, 1960 

Ph D., Purdue University, 1962 

Vice Chancellor for General Administration 

Donald L. Myers 

B.A., Pennsylvania State Univ.. 1951 

B.S., N.C. State University, 1961 

M B.A.. U. of Southern California, 1966 

Vice Chancellor for Governmental Relations 
Patricia S. Florestano 

B.S., University of Maryland. 1958 

M.A.. University of Maryland, 1970 

Ph.D., University of Maryland, 1974 

Vice Chancellor for Policy & Planning 
Edgar B. Schick 

A.B.. Muhlenberg College. 1955 

M.A., Rutgers University, 1962 

Ph.D., Rutgers University, 1965 

Vice Chancellor for University Relations 
Robert G. Smith 

B S.. State University of New York at Genesee, 1952; 

MA.. Ohio University. 1956. 

BOARD OF REGENTS 



Chairperson 

Peter F. O'Malley 

Chairman. Emeritus 
Louis L. Kaplan 

Chairman. Emeritus 
B. Herbert Brown 

Vice Chairman 

George V. McGowan 

Secretary 

Albert N. Whiting 



Margaret Alton 

Richard O. Bemdt 

Benjamin L. Brown 

The Honorable Wayne A. Cawley. Jr. 

Charles W. Cole. Jr. 

Ann Hull 

Henry R. Lord 

Thomas J. Owen 

Rodney Lydell Tyson 

John W. T. Webb 

George F. Will 



Treasurer 

Ilona M. Hogan 

Assistant Secretary 

Constance M. Unseld 

Assistant Treasurer 
Roger Blunt 



UNIVERSITY POLICY STATEMENTS 

The proviMons of this publication are nol to be regarded as a contract between the student 
and ihc University of Maryland Changes are effected from time to lime in the general 
regulations and in the academic requirements. There arc established procedures for making 
changes, procedures which protect the mstitution's inlegrity and the individual student's interest 
and welfare A curriLulum or graduation requirement, when altered, is not made retroactive 
unless the alteration is to the student's advantage and can be accommodated within the span of 
years normally required for graduation When the actions of a student are judged by competent 
authority to be detrimental to the inieresLs of the university community, that person may be 
required to withdraw from the university. 

The University of Maryland, in all its branches and divisions, subscribes to a policy of equal 
educational and employment opportunity for people of every race, creed, ethnic origin, and 

It is university policy that smoking in classrooms is prohibited. Any student has the nghi to 
remind the instructor of this policy throughout the duration of the class. 



The University of Maryland 
and employment. The Univen 
pertinent federal and state lav. 
religion, age. national ongin. s 



s an equal opportunity institution with respKct to both education 
ity's policies, programs and activities are in conformance with 
5 and regulations on nondiscrimination regarding race, color, 
and handicap, Inquiries regarding compliance with Title VI 



of the Civil Rights Act of 1964. as amended. Title IX of the 1Q72 Education Admendmenis. 
Section 5tM of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973, or related legal requirements should be directed 
to the appropnate individual designated below 

Director of the Office of Human Relations 
1 107 Hombake Library 
University of Maryland, College Park 
College Park, Maryland. 20742 

Campus Coordinator for S504 of the 
Rehabihtauon Act of 1973 
Room 2101, Main Administration Building 
University of Maryland. College Park 
College Park. Maryland 20742 



Cover: "Fourth Flight" 

by W. C. Richardson, Art Department. University of Maryland 

Original Size: 77" x 90" 

Oil on canvas. 1988 



TABLE OF CONTENTS 



USP Courses for Summer 1989 on pages 12 & 13 



1. THE UNIVERSITY 
College Park Campus Administration . . 
Summer Programs Administration .... 

Central Administration 

Board of Regents 

2. ON-CAMPUS HOUSING SCHEDULE ... 2 

3. TUITION AND FEES 3 

Payment of Fees 3 

4. DETERMINATION OF IN-STATE STATUS 

3 

5. DIRECTORY OF INFORMATION 
SERVICES 3 

6. SUMMER REGISTRATION 

Important Dates 4 

Procedure Summary for Registration 4 

Mail-In Registration Procedures 5 

Walk-In Registration Procedures 5 

Late Registration 6 

Non-Standard Date Course Registration ... 6 

Cancellation of Registration 6 

Withdrawal from Summer School 6 

Requesting Refimd of Tuition 6 

Change of Address Procedure 6 

7. ADMISSIONS 
Undergraduates 

UMCP Students 8 

Visiting Students 8 

High School Juniors/Seniors 8 

Fall Admitted Students 8 

University College Students 8 

Graduates 

UM Students 9 

New Degree and AGS Cert 9 

Advanced Special Students 9 

Visiting Graduate Students 9 

Special Summer Institute Participants . . 9 

Foreign Students 9 

8. CHANGE OF COLLEGE/MAJOR 

Graduate Programs 10 

Undergraduate College/Major 10 

9. ACADEMIC INFORMATION 

University Studies Program 12 

General University Requirements 14 

Academic Credit 14 

Marking System 14 

Advanced Placement 15 

Code of Student Conduct 15 

Protection of Privacy 15 

Candidates for Degrees 15 

Definition of Full-Time Status 15 

Golden Identification Program 15 

USP Advanced Studies 13 

USP Distributive Studies 12 

10. GENERAL INFORMATION 

Veterans Benefits 17 

Computer Science Center 17 

Summer Recreation Program 17 

Motor Vehicle Registration 19 

Health Center 19 

On-Campus Housing 19 

Guest Services 19 

Research Facilities 20 

Dining Services 20 

Disabled Student Services 20 

Libraries 21 

University Book Center 21 

Retired Volunteer Corps 21 



1 1 . SPECIAL PROGRAMS 
Workshops. Institutes and Other 

Special Offerings 21 

12. TAWES THEATRE EVENTS 24 

13 AMERICAN VIOLIN CONGRESS .... 26 

INTERNATIONAL PIANO FESTIVAL AND 
WILLIAM KAPELL COMPETITION ... 28 
CONSTITUTIONAL BICENTENNIAL . . 29 

14. MAPS 

Area Resource Map 16 

College Park Campus Map 63 

15. FORM BOOKLET 

The following forms are contained in the 
booklet in the center of this catalog along 
with a return envelope for mail-in 
registration purposes. 

VISITING GRADUATE & ADVANCED 
SPECIAL STUDENT APPLICATION 



UNDERGRADUATE APPLICATION - 

SUMMER ONLY - READMIT ... 5 
SCHEDULE REQUEST FORM - 

SESSION I 7 

ESTIMATED BILL FORM - SESSION I 

9 

SCHEDULE REQUEST FROM - 

SESSION II 11 

ESTIMATED BILL FORM - SESSION U 

13 

HOUSING INFORMATION 15 

SUMMER RESIDENCE HALLS 

AGREEMENT 16 

17. SCHEDULE OF CLASSES 

Agricultural and Extension Education 30 

Agriculture 30 

Agriculture and Resource Economics 32 

Agronomy 30 

American Studies 30 

Animal Sciences 30 

Anthropology 30 

Applied Design 32 

Applied Mathematics 55 

Architecture 32 

Art History 32 

Art, Studio 33 

Astronomy 33 

Biochemistry 33 

Botany 35 

Business Management 33 

Chemical Physics 36 

Chemistry 36 

Chinese 36 

Classics 36 

Comparative Literature 37 

Computer Science 37 

Consumer Economics 37 

Co-operative Education Program 38 

Criminal Justice 36 

Criminology 38 

Dance 38 

Economics 38 

Education 39 

Curriculum & Insuiiction 39 

Counseling and Personnel Services 40 

Human Development 40 



Industrial Tech.. Occ. Ed 41 

Measurement and Statistics 43 

Policy, Planning & Administration 43 

Special Education 43 

Engineering 44 

Aerospace 44 

Agricultural 44 

Chemical 44 

Civil 44 

Co-operative Eiducation 44 

Electrical 45 

Materials 46 

Mechanical 46 

Nuclear 47 

Science 45 

English 46 

Entomology 47 

Family and Community Development 47 

Food Science 48 

Food 47 

French 48 

Geography 48 

Geology 49 

German 49 

Government and Politics 49 

Hebrew 50 

Hearing and Speech Sciences 50 

Health 52 

History 50 

Horticulture 53 

Housing and Applied Design 53 

Italian 53 

Individual Studies 53 

Japanese 53 

Journalism 53 

Latin 54 

Library Science 54 

Linguistics 54 

Marine Estuarine Environmental 

Sciences 56 

Maryland English Institute 62 

Mathematics 55 

Meteorology 56 

Microbiology 56 

Music 56 

Music Education 56 

Nutrition 57 

Nutritional Science 57 

Philosophy 58 

Physical Education 57 

Physics 58 

Psychology 58 

Public Affairs 59 

Public Communication 57 

Radio, Television and Film 60 

Recreation 59 

Russian 60 

Slavic 60 

Sociology 60 

Spanish 61 

Speech 61 

Statistics 61 

Textiles 61 

Textiles and Consumer Economics 62 

Theatre 62 

Urban Studies 62 

Women's Studies 63 

Zoology 63 



The University reserves the right to change, eliminate, or modify course offerings and programs when in the 
judgements of the University authorities, circumstances make such action necessary. 



SUMMER SESSIONS 
UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 
COLLEGE PARK CAMPUS 



ON-CAMPUS HOUSING SCHEDULE 



March 13 Monday 



Two Six Week Sessions 



SESSION I 
SESSION II 



June 5 - July 14 
July 17 - August 25 



Summer Sessions 1989 

The University of Maryland at College Park offers a richly 
varied summer educational program to its continuing degree 
students and to qualified non-degree students for both graduate and 
undergraduate study. Students may select from over 1,000 courses 
representing 75 academic disciplines and a number of workshops 
and institutes designed to meet specific needs within disciplines. 
The summer sessions offer opportunities for degree students to 
accelerate completion of degrees, to make up deficiencies and 
requirements, and to broaden programs with studies which 
otherwise could not be fitted into their academic schedules. 

The Summer Programs provide opportunities for non-degree 
students who may wish to test their abilities to pursue college level 
study or who may wish to indulge special academic interests. The 
professional or post-graduate student will find courses and 
workshops which permit updating of knowledge and techniques in 
specific disciplines within convenient schedules. 

The summer faculty consists of distinguished members of the 
College Park faculty and outstanding visiting lecturers. In addition 
to academic studies the Summer Programs seek to provide a total 
university environment through varied and exciting recreational and 
cultural programs. 



CAMPUS HOLIDAYS 

Offices will be closed and there will be no classes. 

Tuesday July 4 Independence Day 



May 15 Monday 

June 4 Sunday 

June 5 Monday 

June 26 Monday 

July 14 Friday 

July 16 Sunday 

July 17 Monday 

August 25 Friday 




Summer 1989 Residence Halls 
Agreement available at Department of 
Resident Life, 2100 Annapolis Hall 
(also at center of this catalog). 
Submission of housing Agreement by 
lottery deadline of April 28 is 
advised for higher priority for your 
assignment preferences. 
Deadline for release from Summer 
1989 Residence Halls Agreement for 
Session I without financial obligation; 
written cancellation must be received 
by Resident Life, 2100 Annapolis Hall. 
Residence halls open 12 noon for 
Session I only residents and for 
Session I and II residents to claim 
room assignments. 

Room assignments in residence halls 
not claimed by 12 noon are forfeited. 
"No-show" cancellation charge equal to 
three weeks' housing cost ($205.68) is 
assessed. 

Deadline for release from Summer 
1989 Residence Hall Agreement for 
Session II without financial obligation; 
written cancellation must be received 
by Resident Life, 2100 Annapolis Hall. 
Residents not remaining in residence 
halls for Summer Session II must 
vacate by 7pm. 

Residence halls open 12 noon for 
Summer Session II only new students. 
Room assignments in residence halls 
not claimed by 12 noon forfeited. 
"No-show" cancellation charge equal to 
three weeks' housing cost ($205.68) is 
assessed. 

Residence halls close 7pm. All 
residents must vacate their summer 
assignments. No on-campus housing 
available after 7pm, except as Fall 
Semester campus residents have 
secured "interim" housing privileges. 



Campus photographs by Al Dannegan 
Office of University Relations 



@ 



TUITION AND FEES 



ALL STUDENTS 

Registration Fee per Session 5.00 

Recreation Fee per Session 8.00 

Student Health Fee per Session 8.00 

Auxiliary Facilities Fee Per Session 8.00 

Summer Vehicle Registration Fee, per vehicle 
(not charged if vehicle was registered for 

Fall or Spring Semester) Resident Student 17.00 

Commuter Student 9.00 

Each additional vehicle 15.00 

UNDERGRADUATE STUDENTS 

Tuition per Credit Hour 99.00 

Non-resident Fee per Session (must be paid by all 

students who are not residents of Maryland) 20.00 

Application Fee (New Students) 25.00 

GRADUATE STUDENTS 

Application Fee (Every student must be admitted) 25.00 

Tuition per Credit Hour: 

Resident Student 1 17.00 

Non-resident Student 207.00 

Continuous Registration Fee 

(Doctoral Candidate) 10.00 

ON-CAMPUS HOUSING 

Per Six-Week Session 411.36 

OTHER FEES 

Graduation Application Fee for Bachelor's Degree 15.00 

Graduation Application Fee for Master's Degree 25.00 

Graduation Application Fee for Doctor's Degree 25.(X) 

Late Registration Fee 20.00 

Service Charge for Dishonored Check 

(depending on amount of check) up to 50. (H) 

Fees for auditors and courses taken for audit are the same as those 
charged for courses taken for credit at both undergraduate and graduate 
levels. Fees for altering academic programs are discussed in the section on 
Admissions and Registrations. Although changes in fees and charges 
ordinarily will be announced in advance, the University reserves the 
right to make such changes without prior announcement. 



®l 



DETERMINATION OF IN-STATE 
STATUS FOR ADMISSION 
AND TUITION 



The deadline for meeting all requirements for an in-state status and 
for submitting all documents for reclassification is the last day of late 
registration of the semester for which the student wishes to be 
classified as an in-state student. 
DEADLINES 

Summer Session I, 1988 June 9. 1988 

Summer Session II. 1988 July 21, 1988 

For further information; 

Campus Classification Office 
University of Maryland 
College Park, Maryland 20742 
(301)454-3977 



Payment of Fees 

Returning students will not be permitted to complete registration until all financial 
obligations to Uie University including library fines, parking violation assessments and other 
penalty fees and service charges are paid in full. 

Tuition and fees for summer school courses are due and payable in full at the time of 
registration Students who fail to settle their account by 3:00 pm. of the working day after 
they register will have their registration cancelled The University sends bills to students for 
other financial obligations, i.e.. parking tickets, library fines, etc., on a regular basis. A copy 
of the bill may be obtained by coming to Room 1 103. Lee Building, Monday through Friday, 
from 8:30 a.m. to 4:15 p.m. 

All checks or money orders should be made payable to the University of Maryland for the 
exact amount due. The student's social secunty number must be written on the check. In 
cases where the University has awarded a grant, scholarship, or workship. the appropriate 
amount will be deducted on the bill, mailed approximately one month after the start of the 
semester. 

Students will be severed from University services for delinquent indebtedness to the 
University which occurs or is discovered during a semester. In the event that severance occurs, 
the individual may make payment during the semester in which services were severed and all 
these services except housing will be restored. Students removed from housing because of 
delinquent indebtedness will be placed at the bottom of the waiting list after the financial 
obligation is satisfied and after reapplying for housing. Students who are severed from 
University services and who fail to pay the indebtedness during the semester in which 
severance occurs will be ineligible to pre-register or register for subsequent semesters until the 
debt is cleared, In the event of actual registration in a subsequent semester by a severed 
student who had not settled the student account prior to that semester, such registration will be 
cancelled and no credit will be earned for the semester. 

Severance Fee: 2500. Students who fail to pay the balance due on their accounts will have 
their University services severed In order to have the services restored, students will be 
required to pay the total amount due plus the $25,00 Severance Fee. 

In accordance with State law, the accounts of delinquent and severed students are referred to 
the Stale Central Collections Unit in Baltimore for collection and legal follow-up. Costs 
incurred in collecting delinquent accounts are charged to the student. Collection costs are 
normally 15^ plus any attorney and/or coun fees. Changes in Maryland law allow the central 
collection unit to block issuance of Maryland state income tax refunds for individuals with 
delinquent accounts. In addition, the State of Maryland has implemented a system whereby 
unpaid parking tickets issued on state property may result in the withholding of motor vehicle 
lags until such time as the tickets are paid, 

No degree will be conferred, no grade issued, nor any diploma, certificate, or transcript of 
record issued to a student who has not made satisfactory settlement of his or her account. 

©DIRECTORY OF 
INFORMATION SERVICES 

General Information 454-3311 

Summer Programs Office 454-3347 

Admissions 

Office of Undergraduate Admissions 
Mitchell Building 454-5550 

Graduate Admissions 

Lee Building 454-3141 

Graduate Records 454-5428 

Housing 

Off-Campus 454_3645 

On-Campus 454-2711 

Registration 

Nonh Administration Bldg 454-5559 

Undergraduate Studies 454-2530 

College of Agriculture 454-3708 

College of Arts and Humanities 454-2737 

College of Behavioral and Social Sciences 454-2301 

College of Business and Management 454-4314 

College of Computer, Mathematical 

and Physical Sciences 454-4596 

College of Education 454-201 1 

College of Engineering 454-2421 

College of Human Ecology 454-2136 

College of Journalism 454-2228 

College of Library and Information Services 454-3016 

College of Life Sciences 454-5257 

College of Physical Education, 

Recreation and Health 454-5616 

Computer Science Center 454-2002 

Institute of Criminal Justice and Criminology 454—4538 

Institute of Urban Studies 454-5718 

School of Architecture 454-3427 

University College 985-7000 



SUMMER SESSIONS IMPORTANT DATES 



SUMMER SESSION I 

March 27 - May 22 
March 27 - June 2 



June 5 

June 5 - June 9 



Mail-in Registration; Requests processed 

daily 

Walk-in Registration — 9-11:45 am; 1-3 

pm. Room 1130 Mitchell Building 

Classes begin. 

Late Registration (with a $20.00 Late 

Fee). 

Room 1130 Mitchell Building 



SUMMER SESSION II 

March 27 - July 5 
March 27 - July 14 



July 17 

July 17 -July 21 



Mail-in Registration; Requests processed 
daily 

Walk-in Registration — 9-11:45 am; 

l-3pm. 

Room 1130 Mitchell Building 

Classes begin. 

Late Registration (with a $20.00 Late Fee) 
Room 1130 Mitchell Building 



NOTE: The University will be closed May 29 for Memorial Day, July 4 for Independence Day. 



SUMMARY OF DEADLINES FOR SUMMER 1989 



Type of Change 

Add a course 

Apply for August 1989 Graduation 

Cancel Registration with 100% refund 

Change Credit Level 

Drop a course - Undergraduate Student 

without "W" Mark 

with "W" Mark 
Drop a course - Graduate Student 

(Graduate Student does not receive a "W" mark.) 
Drop a course with a $2.00 fee 
Drop a course with (100%) refund 
Drop a course with (70%) refund 
Change Grading Option 
Process a Late Registration 
Change Sections (Department Approval Required) 
Withdraw from all classes with 100% refund 
Withdraw from all classes with 70% refund 
Withdraw from all classes with 50% refund 
Withdraw from all classes with 20% refund 
Withdraw from all classes with 0% refund 



Last Day 


to Process Change 


SSI 


SSII 


June 9 


July 21 


July 21 


July 21 


June 2 


July 14 


June 9 


July 21 


June 9 


July 21 


June 29 


August 10 


June 29 


August 10 


June 29 


August 10 


June 2 


July 14 


June 9 


July 21 


June 9 


July 21 


June 9 


July 21 


July 14 


August 25 


June 2 


July 14 


June 9 


July 21 


June 16 


July 28 


June 23 


August 4 


July 14 


August 25 



NOTE: 

Registration and Schedule Adjustment transactions are complete when payment has been made and the 
Registration Forms have been validated by the Registrations Office. 



SUMMER 1989 
REGISTRATION PROCEDURES 



Note: LOCATION FOR REGISTRATION 

All registration, drop, add, and section change activity will occur in the Registrations Office, Room 1130, Mitchell Building. Payment must be 

made in the Bursar's Office, Lee Building, at the time of registration. 
Instructions are outlined below for both Mail-In and Walk-In registration methods. 
Students are eligible to register if they were enrolled Spring 1989 or have processed admission or readmission forms: 

Students registered at the College Park Campus for the Spring 1989 Semester should follow the registration procedures outlined below. 

Former students who were not registered for the Spring 1989 Semester must follow the readmission/reinstatement information on page 8 of the 

catalog before registering. 
New students must read the admissions information on page 8 and 9 of the catalog before registering. 
Payments must accompany all mail-in registrations. 



A. WALK-IN REGISTRATION 



WHO? WHERE? 

Any student eligible to attend the University of Maryland, Registrations Office 

College Park campus except: Students owing an outstanding Room 1 1 30 

debt to the University. Mitchell Building 
WHEN? 

Summer Session I Summer Session II 

March 27 - June 2; 9:00-11:45 a.m. March 27 - July 14; 9:00-11:45 a.m. 
1:00-3:00 p.m. 1:00-3:00 p.m 

HOW? 

1. Go to Room 1130. Mitchell Building, where you will receive confirmation of course availability. If admission or readmission action is 
necessary, you will be referred to the proper office. 

2. BY 3 PM OF THE NEXT WORKING DAY pay your bill at: 

The Bursar's Office. Room 1 103. Lee Building, between 9 a.m. and 3 p.m. 

Obtain a copy of your current Student Account Receivable (SAR Account) and pay this amount plus your summer school bill at the 
Cashier's Office. 
NOTE: If you have financial aid. go to the Financial Aid Office. Mitchell Building, 2nd floor Counter, prior to going to the Bursar's Office. 

3. Once your bill is paid at the Cashier's Office, you will receive course verification and a validated ID for the sununer. 

STUDENTS WHO DO NOT GO TO THE BURSAR'S OFFICE BY 3 PM OF THE NEXT WORKING DAY AND PAY THEIR BILL WILL HAVE 
COURSE REQUESTS CANCELLED. PAYMENTS MADE ON OR AFTER JUNE 5 FOR SSI AND JULY 17 FOR SSII WILL HAVE A $20 LATE FEE 
ASSESSED. 



B. MAIL-IN REGISTRATION 



WHO? 

Any student eligible to attend the University of Maryland, College Park Campus except: Students owing an outstanding debt to the University. 

WHEN? WHERE? 

Must be postmarked from: All materials should be returned to: 

March 27 - May 22 for Summer Session I. Office of the Bursar, Lee Building 

March 27 - July 5 for Summer Session II. University of Maryland 

College Park, Maryland 20742 
A return envelope is provided in the center of this catalog for your 
convenience. 
HOW? 

1. Complete the Schedule Request and Estimated Bill Form in the center of this catalog for the session you wish to attend. 
USE ONE FORM FOR EACH SESSION. 

2. Return the following in the enclosed envelope: 

a. Schedule Request and Estimated Bill Form{s) 

b. Admission Application, if necessary 

c. Check made payable to the UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND. Write your SOCIAL SECURITY NUMBER on the check. 

3. Confirmation of your requested schedule and a Summer ID card will be sent to you by mail. If confirmation is not received within 2 weeks, 
please call the Office of Registrations. 454-5225. for immediate assistance. 

4. The Office of the Bursar will notify you of any incorrect payments or adjustments to your account, such as additional charges, refunds, and 
credits. 

5. Any outstanding debt to the University will be deducted from payment submitted and the remainder applied to your summer school charges. 

PLEASE NOTE: Registration material received by mail will be returned to the sender if information is incomplete, and your registration will be 
voided. 



LATE REGISTRATION 

SUMMER SESSION I— A late fee of $20.00 is assessed for 

registration on or after the first day of instruction, June 5. Special 

permission of the dean must be obtained prior to registration after June 

9. 

SUMMER SESSION II— A late fee of $20.00 is assessed for 

registration on or after the first day of instruction, July 17. Special 

permission of the dean must be obtained prior to registration after July 

21. 

PROCEDURES: 

1. Go to Room 1130, Mitchell Building, where you will receive 
confirmation of course availability. If admission or readmission 
action is necessary, you will be referred to the proper office. 

2. BY 3 P.M. OF THE NEXT WORKING DAY pay your bill at: 

The Bursar's Office, Room 1103, Lee Building, between 
9 a.m. and 3 p.m. Obtain a copy of your current 
Smdent Account Receivable (SAR Account) and pay this 
amount plus your summer school bill at the Cashier's 
Office. 

NOTE: If you have financial aid, go to the Financial Aid 
Office, Mitchell Building, 2nd floor counter, prior to going to 
the Bursar's Office. 

3. Once your bill is paid at the Cashier's Office, you will receive 
course verification and a validated ID for the summer. 

STUDENTS WHO DO NOT GO TO THE BURSAR'S OFFICE BY 3 
PM OF THE NEXT WORKING DAY AND PAY THEIR BILL WILL 
HAVE COURSE REQUESTS CANCELLED. PAYMENTS MADE 
ON OR AFTER JUNE 5 FOR SUMMER SESSION 1 OR JULY 17 
FOR SUMMER SESSION II WILL HAVE A $20 LATE FEE 
ASSESSED, 

COURSE REGISTRATION IS ONLY COMPLETE AND OFHCIAL 
WHEN ALL FEES ARE PAID. 



NONSTANDARD DATE COURSE REGISTRATION 

Courses which vary in beginning dates from the starting dates for each 
Summer Session will be available for registration at the normal 
registration period for each session. Additionally, registration will be 
available on the first day of each class or an alternate day if requested 
by the department or instructor. Courses which vary in length from the 
regular Summer Session will have late registration, schedule 
adjustment, and other dates adjusted proportionally to the length of the 
course. In these instances students are urged to contact the department 
or instructor for information. Grades for nonstandard date courses 
ending after the regular session in which they begin will be posted after 
the regular session grade reports are mailed. Students desiring official 
notification of grades in these courses should request an unofficial 
transcript approximately two (2) weeks after the course ends. 
Instructors of these courses will receive information on various 
deadlines. Please check with the department in late spring 1989 
concerning specific questions. 



CANCELLATION OF SUMMER SCHOOL 
REGISTRATION 

Students who register and later decide not to attend the University must 
cancel their registration prior to the first day of classes. Failure to 
cancel registration will result in financial obligation to the University 
even though the student does not attend class. Cancellation requests 
must be received in writing prior to the first day of classes. All 
requests should be sent by Registered Mail to: 

OFHCE OF REGISTRATIONS 
Rm 1130, MITCHELL BLDG. 
UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 
COLLEGE PARK, MD. 20742 



WITHDRAWAL FROM SUMMER SCHOOL 

Students who wish to terminate their registration on or after the first 
day of classes must WITHDRAW. This applies to all students 
regardless of the number of courses or credits for which they are 
enrolled. 

1. Students withdrawing from a Summer Session must complete a 
Withdrawal Form which may be obtained at Room 1101, 
Mitchell Building. 

2. Withdrawal becomes effective on the date the form is filed with 
the Records Office. 

3. Registration, Recreation and Health Fees are not refundable. 

The chart below indicates the percentage of tuition which will be 
credited upon withdrawal. 



SUMMER SESSION I 

June 5-June 9 

June 12-16 

June 19-23 

July 14 



70% 
50% 
20% 
00% 



SUMMER SESSION 11 

July 17-21 70% 

July 24-28 50% 

July 3 1 -Aug. 4 20% 

Aug. 25 00% 

Withdrawals from workshops or institutes must be effected prior to the 
first day of the workshop in order to receive a refund. After a 
workshop has begun no refund will be granted. 

WITHDRAWAL FROM SUMMER SESSIONS DOES NOT AFFECT 
REGISTRATIONS FOR FALL SEMESTER 1989 COURSES 

REQUESTING REFUND OF TUITION 

To obtain a refund of a credit balance, a STUDENT must request the 
refund in writing. This can be done by (1) addressing a letter to: 
Office of the Bursar, University of Maryland, College Park, MD 
20742, or (2) completing a request for refund form available at the 
Student counter, 1 103 Lee Building or the Records or Current 
Registrations Office, first floor, Mitchell Building. NO CREDIT 
BALANCE IS AUTOMATICALLY REFUNDED. Approximately 6 to 
8 weeks is required from the time a credit balance appears on the 
account and a refund request is received until a check is mailed from 
the state Treasurer's Office in Annapolis. THE CHECK WILL BE 
MADE PAYABLE TO THE STUDENT and mailed to the address 
requested by the student on the refund form. Refund checks will not 
be mailed to a campus address. 

CHANGE OF ADDRESS PROCEDURE Changes in 

either local mailing address or permanent address can be processed AT 
ANYTIME DURING THE SEMESTER IN WHICH THEY OCCUR. 
Address changes are posted to the computer by the Office of the 
Bursar. Address Change Forms are available at the following places: 

1. Office of the Bursar, Address Unit, Lee Building, Room 1121 
or 1103, 8:30 a.m. to 4:15p.m., Monday-Friday. 

2. Registrations Counter, Mitchell Building, First Floor Lobby, 
8:30 a.m-4:30 p.m., Monday-Friday. 

3. Deans' Offices, 8:30 a.m. -4:30 p.m., Monday-Friday. 

4. STAR CENTER, Student Union, Room 1122, 9:00 a.m.-4:00 
p.m., Monday-Friday. 

Since many University communications to students are handled 
through the mail, it is imperative that accurate, and up-to-date 
addresses be maintained throughout the enrollment period. During the 
academic year the permanent address for currently registered students 
will be used for grade reports, combined registration schedules and 
bills, and other billings. The local address on file for currently 
registered students will be used for all other mailings. The permanent 
address on file for students not currently registered will be used for all 
mailings. Any student wishing his/her address to be kept confidential 
should contact the Registration Counter. 




June 9 -July 1,1989 



An intensive three week training experience in orchestral musicianship 



SEE PAGE 27 FOR DETAILS 



UNDERGRADUATE ADMISSION INFORMATION 



The following is designed to help you, the prospective summer school student, to determine how or whether to use the admission application 
found in this catalog. Registration information is oa pages 4-6. "Summer Only" admission and registration forms are in center section 
form booldet. 



IF YOU ARE NEW TO UMCP... 
AND ARE A: 

1 . VISITOR from another college or university including UMBC and 
UMES: 



2 UNIVERSITY COLLEGE student: 



3. GRADUATE FROM ANOTHER COLLEGE OR UNIVERSITY: 



4. TEACHER SEEKING CERTIFICATION FOR PROFESSIONAL 
ADVANCEMENT including those who have been admitted for a 
previous summer term as "term only" and those who have never been 
enrolled at UMCP: 

5 HIGH SCHOOL GRADUATE: 



6. HIGH SCHOOL STUDENT ENTERING YOUR JUNIOR OR 
SENIOR YEAR: 



7. NEWLY ADMITTED FALL 1989 STUDENT: 



ADMISSION REQUIREMENTS AND PROCEDURES 



Complete enclosed undergraduate application 

Must be in good standing at parent institution 

If you are on an F-1 visa a letter of permission is required 

A non-refundable $25 application fee is required if you have never 

enrolled at any campus of the University of Maryland 

No transcripts required 

It is your responsibility to verify acceptability by parent institution of 

credits earned at UMCP 



Must present letter of permission from UMUC to register 
No application required 
No transcripts required 



Complete enclosed undergraduate application 

A non-refundable $25 application fee is required if you have never 

enrolled at any campus of the University of Maryland 

No transcripts are required 

See Graduate Study if wishing to attempt graduate level (500-above) 



Same as in number 3 above. 



Must have a minimum of a "C" average in academic subjects 

Complete enclosed undergraduate application 

A non-refundable $25 application fee is required if you have never 

enrolled at any campus of the University of Maryland 

No transcripts required 

Full admission is prerequisite for Fall 1989 enrollment. Please visit the 

Office of Undergraduate Admission, Lower Level, Mitchell Building. 

Must have a minimum of a "B" average 

Complete regular admission application obtainable from Office of 

Undergraduate Admissions, Lower Level, Mitchell Building. 

High School transcripts required 

A non-refundable $25 application fee is required if you have never 

enrolled at any campus of the University of Maryland. 



no application required 

must present letter of admission for Fall, 1989 



IF YOU ARE A UMCP STUDENT OR A FORMER 
UMCP STUDENT... 

AND: 

1. Attended UMCP previously as a "Term Only" registrant... 
Must present letter of readmission to register. 

2. You were not enrolled the Spring 1989 semester and you are in good 
academic standing, or on academic probation and did not withdraw your 
last semester... 

Must present letter of readmission to register. 

3. Attended UMCP this past Spring 1989 semester and you were not 
academically dismissed (this includes students who graduated Mav 
1989) 

Must present ID card to register. 

4. Attended UMCP Spring 1989 semester and either withdrew or you were 
academically dismissed at the end of Spring 1989 

Must present ID card to register 

5. Were dismissed or withdrew from UMCP prior to the Spring 1989 
semester (and did not attend Spring 1989) 



ADMISSION REQUIREMENTS AND PROCEDURES 

Complete enclosed undergraduate application 

Complete enclosed undergraduate application 



No application required for Summer Session registration 



No application required for Summer Session registration 
However, reinstatement is a prerequisite for Fall 1989 registration 

Must be reinstated through Reenrollment Office, Office of 

Undergraduate Admissions, Lower Level, Mitchell Building, by below 

deadlines: 

For Summer Session I - April 15, 1989 

For Summer Session II - May 15, 1989 



GRADUATE ADMISSIONS INFORMATION 



Registration information is on pages 4-6. Summer Only forms for admission and registration are in the center section form booUet. 



The "Summer Only" application is designed for first-time, non-degree students in tlie following categories: 



Admission Status 

ADVANCED SPECIAL STUDENTS 

(first enrollment on campus) 

Advanced Special Student Status is not intended as a qualifying 
program for degree programs. If the student is subsequently 
accepted for degree or certificate study, no more than 6 credits 
earned in the Advanced Special Student Status may be applicable 
to the new program with the approval of the departmental faculty. 



ADVANCED SPECIAL STUDENTS 

(Previously enrolled on campus — graduate admission no longer valid) 



Admission Requirements and Procedures 

complete the enclosed application 

submit $25 application fee 

meet one of the following criteria 

a. Hold a baccalaureate degree from a regionally accredited institution 
with an overall "B" (3.0) average (official transcript required). 

b. Hold a master's or doctoral degree from a regionally accredited 
institution (official transcript required). 

c. Hold a baccalaureate degree from a regionally accredited institution 
and have at least four years of successful post-baccalaureate work or 
professional experience (official transcript required). 

d. Achieve a score that places the applicant in the upper 50 percentile 
of appropriate national standardized aptitude examinations such as 
the Graduate Record Examination, The Miller Analogies Test, the 
Graduate Management Admissions Test (Official test transcripts are 
required). 

complete the enclosed application 



SPECIAL SUMMER INSTITUTE PARTICIPANTS 



contact institute director for special procedures 



VISITING GRADUATE STUDENTS 

(Other Colleges and Universities) 



complete the enclosed application 

provide letter of permission from parent institution 

submit $25 application fee 



The "Summer Only" application in this booklet is NOT appropriate for the following students: 



VISITING GRADUATE STUDENTS 

(Other campuses of the University of Maryland) 



CURRENT UMCP GRADUATE STUDENT IN GOOD STANDING 



no application required 

obtain intercampus registration form from your Graduate Dean 

obtain necessary authorizations on the home campus, then proceed to 

UMCP Graduate School for clearance 

no application required 



UMCP GRADUATE STUDENT— TIME LIMITS EXPDIED 



contact academic advisor to discuss possibilities for an extension 



UMCP GRADUATE STUDENT WHO WISHES TO CHANGE 
PROGRAM/DEPARTMENT OR DEGREE REQUIREMENTS 



must file regular Graduate School application 
must meet departmental requirements and deadlines 



APPLICANTS FOR DEGREE PROGRAMS WHO WISH TO BE- 
GIN STUDY IN SUMMER SESSION 



must file regular Graduate School application 
must meet departmental requirements and deadlines 
must submit $25 application fee 



If you do not find a situation listed above that is applicable to you. or if you need additional information, write or call: 

THE GRADUATE SCHOOL 
Lee Building 
University of Maryland 
College Park, Maryland 20742 

(301)454-3141 



FOREIGN STUDENTS ADMISSION INFORMATION 



Students on F-1 (student) visas who wish to attend the 
University of Maryland, College Park, for the Summer Sessions 
only must present a letter from the Dean/Chaiiperson of their 
academic department at the college or university that they are 
currently attending. The letter should state the institution is aware 
that the student is applying to UMCP's Summer Session and will 
return to the same institution in the Fall term. Before applying for 
Summer School only, foreign students must be enrolled in an 
academic program at another degree institution, not in an English 
as a Second Language program. 



Foreign students on F-1 (student) status who wish to apply to 
begin their studies at the University of Maryland, College Park on a 
full-time degree-seeking basis must apply for the fall semester. If 
their admission is completed prior to the beginning of the Summer 
Session, undergraduate foreign students already in the U.S. may 
use their fall letter of admission to enroll in coursework offered 
during the Summer Sessions. Graduate foreign students should 
contact the Graduate School in the Lee Building prior to 
registration. 



10 



COLLEGE/MAJOR (COURSE OF STUDY) 



UNDERGRADUATE STUDENTS ONLY: 

College and Major (Course of Study) changes may be made at any time, the only restrictions being Board of Regents limitations on enrollment. 
If you wish to initiate a change in your College and/or Major (Course of Study): 

1. Go to a College office or the Registrations Office, first floor lobby, Mitchell Building, to obtain the College/Major (Course of Study) 
Change Form. College office locations are listed below. ^luu;., 

2. Complete the information requested on the form. (All necessary information is on the form.) 

3. Take the completed form to your new College if you are changing Colleges. If you are changing Major (Course of Study) only take 
completed form to your present College. o c j v // ...;, loi^s. 



College 

Agriculture 

Allied Health 

Architecture 

Arts & Humanities 

Behavioral & Social Sciences 

Business & Management 

Education 

Engineering 

General Studies/Individual Studies 

Human Ecology 

Journalism 

Library & Information Services 

Life Sciences 

Mathematical & Physical Sciences 

Physical Education, Recreation & Health 

Undergraduate Studies- 
"Undecided" Undergraduates 



Location 

1116 Symons 
2106 Turner 
1204 Architecture 

1 1 1 1 Francis Scott Key 

21 15 Tydings 

2136 Tydings 

1210 Education 

1131 Engr. Classroom Bldg. 

1115 Hombake Library 

1 100 Marie Mount Hall 

2109 Journalism 

4105 Hombake Library 

1110 Symons 

2300 Math 

3310 Physical Education, Recreation 

& Health Building 

1117 Hombake Library 



GRADUATE PROGRAMS 



n,fp5 h.l^» J. .h^ . ^ !f Pr''gr«'"L»» »«>"' 'he master's and doctoral level, as weU as professional certificates in selected fields. 

n™o^=.mJ»^H fh H '='«•«"« graduate departments and programs at College Park. People interested in information about any of these 
programs and the degrees offered should contact the individual department by addressing an inquiry to: Graduate Director, Department 

7 — r~. — TT ' Lin'^^ersity of Maryland, College Park, Maryland 20742. Application forms for reeular decree 

programs may be obtained from the Graduate School or the department. regular aegree 

newfpplicaUons*apJly° "^^"^^ '"°^'^' °' ''^^'^ objectives, you must submit a new application to the Graduate School. Current deadlines for 



Animal Sciences 

Agricultural & Extension Education 

Agronomy 

American Studies 

Anthropology 

Architecture 

Agricultural & Resource Economics 

Art 

Astronomy 

Biochemistry 

Botany 

Business and Management 

Business and Management/Law 

Business and Management/Public 

Management 
Chemistry 
Chemical Physics 
Classics 

Comparative Literature 
Communication, Arts & Theatre 
Computer Science 
Criminal Justice and Criminology 
Dairy Science 
Economics 

Curriculum & Instruction 
Counseling and Personnel Services 
Human Development Education 
Industrial. Technological and 

Occupational Education 
Measurement & Statistics 

(Education) 
Education Policy, Planning, and 

Administration 



Special Education 
Aerospace Engineering 
Agricultural Engineering 
Civil Engineering 
Chemical Engineering 
Electrical Engineering 
Engineering Materials 
Mechanical Engineering 
Nuclear Engineering 
English Language & Literature 
Entomology 
Food Science 
Family & Community 

Development 
Food, Nutrition and Institutional 

Administration 
French Language and Literature 
Geography 
Geography/Library and Information 

Services 
Geology 

German Language & Literanire 
Government & Politics 
Hearing and Speech Science 
History 
History/Library and Information 

Services 
Health Education 
Horticulture 



Journalism 

Library & Information Services 
Linguistics 
Applied Mathematics 
Mathematics 

Marine Estuarine and Environ- 
mental Science 
Meteorology 
Microbiology 
Music 

Nutritional Sciences 
Public Communications 
Physical Education 
Philosophy 
Physics 
Policy Studies 
Poulti7 Science 
Psychology 
Public Management 
Public Management/Law 
Public Policy 
Recreation 
Sociology 

Spanish Language & Literature 
Mathematical Statistics 
Textiles & Consumer Economics 
Urban Studies 
Zoology 



11 




STRING 

QUARTET 

CONGRESS 

June 19-23, 1989 

Three 

of eighteen 

professional 

quartets 

to be 

featured. 




12 



ACADEMIC INFORMATION 



The information given below is taken from Academic Regulations, a 
complete statement of which may be found in the Undergraduate and 
Graduate catalogs. 



THE UNIVERSITY STUDIES 
PROGRAM 



Virtually all American colleges and universities ask that students re- 
ceiving a baccalaureate degree complete a common set of requirements. 
These common requirements are usually referred to by the generic term 
"general education." Genera! education requirements represent a 
faculty's definition of the knowledge, awarenesses and skills that all 
graduates should possess before that faculty will give its consent to the 
awarding of a degree. General education is that portion of the degree 
requirements in which the entire faculty has a concern. 

The University Studies Program is the general education requirement 
at the University of Maryland, College Park. This program must be 
completed by all students who began baccalaureate study after May, 
1980 with eight or fewer credits from this or any other college. It is 
intended to provide students with the intellectual skills and conceptual 
background Dasic to an understanding of the universe, society and 
themselves. The focus is not on any particular bodies of knowledge, 
for almost any subject matter can lead to an awareness of general 
modes of understanding the world. Thus, for example, it does not 
matter whether the student studies physics or botany as long as he or 
she comes away from the course with some understanding of the power 
of the empirical investigation that characterizes science. 

The University Studies Program has three parts. The "Fundamental 
Studies" section of the program is intended to establish the student's 
ability to participate in the discourse of the university through demon- 
strated mastery of written English and mathematics. Those require- 
ments are to be completed early in the student's program in oraer to 
serve as a foundation for subsequent work. 

The "Distributive Studies" requirement is intended, through study in 
particular disciplines, to acquaint students with the different ways of 
analyzing and talking about the world that characterize the three areas 
into which the university's knowledge is traditionally divided: the phy- 
sical and biological sciences, the social and behavioral sciences, and 
the arts and humanities. The fourth category, "History and Culture," 
includes courses that lead to the consideration of historical and cultural 
differences and the relationship of our own society to those of other 
times and places. 

In fiilfulling "Distributive Studies" reauirements, students will have 
gained some experience of the way in wnich scholars in different kinds 
of disciplines make and organize observations about the world and ar- 
rive at general statements. It is the purpose of "Advanced Studies" 
courses to show how these different intellectual approaches compare 
with each other or may be used in complementary ways to analyze and 
solve problems. "Development of Knowledge" courses deal with the 
basis upon which people who use these different approaches claim to 
know something and the different kinds of insights to which these intel- 
lectual strategies lead. "Analysis of Human Problems" courses consid- 
er these matters in terms of specific cultural, social, scientific or aes- 
thetic problems which may be approached from several points of view. 

The University Studies requirements, designed to be spread through- 
out the student's four years, represent a third of the total academic 
work required for graduation. It is the purpose of this program, in 
combination with the extensive work of the major, to help prepare stu- 
dents to become productive, aware and sensitive members of society, 
capable of understanding their world and the many kinds of people in it 
and of taking responsibility for their own decisions and their own lives. 

OUTLINE OF THE PROGRAM 

These requirements are effective for students beginning baccalaureate 
study in May, 1980 or thereafter. 

I. FUNDAMENTAL STUDIES - 9 credits. (Except for ENGL 
391 or 393, this requirement must be attempted by the time the 
student has completed 30 credit hours and passed successfully 
by the time the student has completed 60 credit hours.) 

A. English Composition - 6 credits. 

I. ENGL 101 - 3 credits. 

a. Students with TSWE scores below 33 take ENGL 
104-105-106 (1 credit each) 



b. Students with SAT verbal scores of 600 or above are ex- 
empt. 

c. Students with AP scores of 4 or 5, or an AP of 3 plus 
SAT verbal scores of 600 or above are exempt and earn 
3 credits for ENGL 101 and 3 credits for ENGL 102. 

2. ENGL 391 (Junior Level Expository Writing) or 393 
(Technical Writing) - 3 credits 

a. Must be taken after the student has completed 56 credit 
hours (i.e., has reached junior standing). 

b. Students with SAT verbal scores of 700 or above or a 
grade of A in ENGL 101 or AP scores of 4 or 5 are ex- 
empt. 

B. Mathematics - 3 credits. 

Math 1 10 (or the modular equivalent Math 102-3-4) or 
MATH 115. 

1. Students with the following minimum examination scores 
or higher are exempt: 

a. SAT: 600 

b. College Board Achievement Tests in Mathematics, Level 
I or n: 600 

c. Advanced Placement Examinations, Calculus AB or BC: 
3 

d. Any CLEP Subject Examination in Mathematics: 60 

2. Successful completion of any of the following entry level 
courses higher than 

MATH 110: MATH 111,140,141,150,151, 220,221,240, 
241,246,250,251; STAT 100,250. 

n. DISTRIBUTIVE STUDIES - minimum: 24 credits. 

A. Culture and History (min: 6 credits, 2 courses) 

B. Natural Sciences and Mathematics (min: 6 cr., 2 courses) One 
course must be a laboratory science. 

C. Literature and the Arts (min: 6 credits, 2 courses) Courses 
must be taken in two different departments, except honors 
coiu^es. 

D. Social and Behavioral Sciences (min: 6 credits, 2 courses) 

III. ADVANCED STUDIES - 6 credits. 

This requirement may be fulfilled only after the student has 
completed 56 credit hours. It is intended that, in fulfilling this 
requirement, students choose courses that offer a contrast to the 
major rather than supplementing it. Courses to fulfill these re- 
quirements must be from two different units outside the depart- 
ment of the student's major. 

A. The Development of Knowledge (I course; 3 credits) Courses 
which focus on the creation, discovery, exploration, testing 
and evaluation of knowledge in one or more disciplines. 

B. The Analysis of Human Problems (I course; 3 credits) 
Courses which focus on the application of knowledge from 
one or more disciplines to the study of important human prob- 
lems. 

Courses to meet these requirements may be chosen from the follow- 
ing list. Consult the Schedule of Classes for course descriptions. 
For a complete listing of all US? courses see the Undergraduate 
Catalog and/or the Spring Schedule of Classes. 

Distributive Studies (A) Cultural and Historical — Approved 
Courses 



CHIN 


101 


Elementary Chinese I 


CHIN 


102 


Elementary Spoken Chinese 


CHIN 


103 


Elementary Written Chinese 


CLAS 


170 


Greek and Roman Mythology 


ENGL 


260 


Introduction to Folklore 


FMCD 


330 


Family Patterns 


FREN 


101 


Elementary French I 


FREN 


102 


Elementary French II 


FREN 


103 


Review of Elementary French 


FREN 


203 


Intermediate French 


GEOG 


150 


World Cities 


GECX} 


202 


The World in Cultural Perspective 


GEOG 


324 


Europe 


GEOG 


327 


South Asia 


GERM 


101 


Elementary German I 


GERM 


102 


Elementary German 11 


GERM 


104 


Intermediate German 


GVPT 


240 


Political Ideologies 


HIST 


130 


The Ancient World 


HIST 


133 


Modem Europe 


HIST 


145 


The Humanities II 


HIST 


156 


History of the United States to 1865 


HIST 


211 


Women in America since 1880 



13 



HIST 


235 


ITAL 


101 


JAPN 


101 


JAPN 


102 


LATN 


120 


LATN 


220 


PHED 


293 


PHIL 


100 


PORT 


101 


SPAN 


101 


SPAN 


102 


SPAN 


203 


SPAN 


204 


SPAN 


311 


SPAN 


312 


TEXT 


347 


TEXT 


363 


THET 


310 



History of Britain 1461-1714 
Elementary Italian I 
Elementary Japanese I 
Elementary Japanese II 
Intensive Latin 
Intermediate Intensive Latin 
History of Sport in America 
Introduction to Philosophy 
Elementary Portuguese I 
Elementary Spanish I 
Elementary Spanish II 
Intermediate Spanish 
Review of Oral and Written Spanish 
Advanced Conversation I 
Advanced Conversation II 
History of Costume II 
History of Textiles 
The American Theatre 

Distributive Studies (B) Natural Sciences and Mathematics — 
Approved Courses 
Lab Sciences 

ASTR 100 Introduction to Astronomy 

ASTR 1 10 Astronomy Laboratory 

BIOL 106 Principles of Biology II 

BOTN 100 General Botany for Non-Science Students 

CHEM 103 Genera! Chemistry I 

CHEM 104 Fundamentals of Organic and Biochemistry 

CHEM 113 General Chemistry II 

MICE 200 General Microbiology 

PHED 360 Physiology of Exercise 

PHYS 121 Fundamentals of Physics I 

PHYS 122 Fundamentals of Physics 11 

PHYS 262 General Physics: Vibrations, Waves, Heat, Electricity 

and Magnetism 

ZOOL 210 Animal Diversity 
Non-Lab Sciences and Mathematics 

ANTH 101 Introduction to Anthropology 

ASTR 100 Introduction to Astronomy 

ENES 121 A The Man-Made World 

ENTM 100 Insects 

GEOL 100 Physical Geology 

HESP 305 Anatomy & Physiology of the Speech Mechanism 

MATH 141 Calculus II 

MATH 210 Elements of Mathematics 

MATH 2 1 1 Elements of Geometry 

MATH 221 Elementary Calculus II 

MATH 240 Introduction to Linear Algebra 

MATH 241 Calculus III 

MATH 246 Differential Eiquations for Scientists and Engineers 

NUTR 100 Elements of Nutrition 

PHYS 161 General Physics 

SOCY 201 Introductory Statistics for Sociology 

Distributive Studies (C) Literature and the Arts — Approved 
Courses (must be taken in two different departments) 
ARCH 170 Introduction to the Built Environment 

Introduction to Art 

History of Art I 

History of Art II 

Arts of Asia 

Introduction to Dance 

Introduction to Shakespeare 

American Literature 

The Short Story 

Introduction to the Art of Landscaping 

Survey of Music Literature 

Music Fundamentals I 

Introduction to the Film 

Readings in Spanish 

Survey of Spanish Literature 

Survey of Spanish Literature 18th-20th Century 

Survey of Spanish Literature II 

Introduction to the Theatre 

Introduction to Women's Studies 

Distributive Studies (D) Social and Behavioral Sciences — Approved 

Introduction to Law Inforcement 
Introduction to Consumer Economics 
Criminology 

Principles of Eiconomics I 
Principles of Eiconomics II 
Fundamentals of Economics 
Evolution of M(xiem Capitalism in Western Europe 
and United States 



ARTH 


100 


ARTH 


260 


ARTH 


261 


ARTH 


262 


DANC 


200 


ENGL 


205 


ENGL 


222 


ENGL 


246 


HORT 


160 


MUSC 


130 


MUSC 


140 


RTVF 


314 


SPAN 


221 


SPAN 


321 


SPAN 


322 


SPAN 


324 


THET 


110 


WMST 


250 


Distributive SI 


Courses 




CJUS 


100 


CNEC 


100 


CRIM 


220 


ECON 


201 


ECON 


203 


ECON 


205 


ECON 


310 



ECON 

EDHD 

FMCD 

FOOD 

GEOG 

GEOG 

GVPT 

GVPT 

GVPT 

HIST 

HLTH 

JOUR 

LING 

PHED 

PHED 

PHIL 

PSYC 

PSYC 

PSYC 

PSYC 

PSYC 

PSYC 

RECR 

RTVF 

SOCY 

SOCY 

SOCY 

SOCY 

SOCY 

URBS 

WMST 

Advanced 

AMST 

AMST 

ANTH 
ASTR 
ASTR 
ECON 
EDMS 
ENGL 

ENGL 
ENGL 

ENGL 

GVPT 
HLTH 

MATH 

MATH 

PHED 

PHIL 

PHIL 

PHYS 

THET 

WMST 

Advanced 

AMST 
AMST 

AREC 

CLAS 

CNEC 

CNEC 

CNEC 

CNEC 

CNEC 

ECON 

EDHD 

EDHD 

EDIT 

EDPA 

ENGL 



311 American Economic Development 

306 A Study of Human Behavior 

250 Decision Making in Families and Communities 

1 1 Food for People 

100 Introduction to Geography 

130 Developing Countries 

100 Principles of Government and Politics 

170 American Government 

300 International Political Relations 

157 History of the US Since 1865 

285 Controlling Stress and Tension 

100 Introduction to Mass Communication 

200 Introduction to Linguistics 

350 Psychology of Sport 

385 Motor Learning and Skilled Performance 

140 Contemporary Moral Issues 

100 Introduction to Psychology 

221 Socio-psychology 

235 Psychology of Adjustment 

310 Perception 

353 Adult Pyschopathology 

355 Child Psychology 

130 History and Introduction to Recreation 

124 Mass Communication in 20th Century Society 

100 Introduction to Sociology 

105 Introduction to Contemporary Social Problems 

300 American Society 

327 Introduction to Study of Deviance 

331 Work, Bureaucracy, and Industry 

100 Introduction to Interdisciplinary Urban Studies 

200 Introduction to Women's Studies: Women and 
Society 



FMCD 
FMCD 



Studies Development of Knowledge 

418K Cultural Themes in America: Race in America: 

Theory and Policy 
428A American Cultural Eras: Social Dramas in American 

Cultural History 

401 Cultural Anthropology: Principles and Process 
330 Solar System Astronomy 

380 Life in the Universe 

402 Business Cycles 

451 Introduction to Educational Statistics 

379E Special Topics in Literature: Film Analysis — The 

Rhetoric of Fictional Worlds 
379J Special Topics in Literature: Interpreting the Bible 
432 American Literature, 1865-1914, Realism and 

Naturalism 
489A Special Topics in English Language: The Language 

of Advertising 
442 History of Political Theory — Modem and Recent 
498T Special Topics in Health: Ways of Knowing about 

Human Stress and Tension 
406 Introduction to Number Theory 

430 Euclidean and Non-Euclidean Geometries 
362 Philosophy of Sport 

328B Marxist Philosophy 

447 Philosophy of Law 

420 Principles of Modem Physics 

495 History of Theatrical Theory and Criticism 

400 Theories of Feminism 

Studies Analysis of Human Problems 

330 Critics of American Culture 

American Cultural Eras: American Film Culture in 

the 1960's. 
World Hunger, Population, Food Supplies and Public 

Policy 
Greek Tragedy in Translation 
Consumer Economics and Public Policy 
Consumer Finance 
The Consumer and the Law 
Economics of Consumpton 
Consumer Behavior 

Economic Development of Underdeveloped Areas 
Adolescent Development 
Guidance of Young Children 
Application of Technology to Societal Problems 
The Future of the Human Community 
379Q Special Topics: More's Utopia and Modem Utopian 

Visions 

381 Poverty and Affluence Among Families and 

Communities 

431 Family Crisis and Intervention 
487 Legal Aspects of Family Problems 



428B 

365 

374 
310 
410 
431 
435 
437 
315 
413 
445 
476 
400 



14 



FMCD 497 The Child and the Law 

GEOG 434 Agriculture and Rural Development 

GVPT 457 American Foreign Relations 

HIST 312A Crisis and Change in the United States 

HLTH 476 Death Education 

SOCY 325 Sex Roles 

SOCY 460 Sociology of Work 

GENERAL UNIVERSITY REQUIREMENTS 

Students who began baccalaureate study prior to May, 1980 may 
elect to complete these requirements rather than the University Studies 
[Program requirements (see above). 

In order to provide educational breadth for all students, there have 
been established the General University Requirements. These require- 
ments consist of 30 semester hours of credit distributed among the 
three areas listed below. (For an exception to this regulation, see the 
Bachelor of General Studies Program, General Undergraduate Catalog.) 
At least 6 hours must be taken in each area. At least 9 of the 30 hours 
must be taken at the 300 level or above. None of the 30 hours may be 
counted toward published departmental, college or divisional require- 
ments for a degree. Area A: 6-12 hours elected in the Divisions of 
Agricultural and Life Sciences; Mathematical and Physical Sciences 
and Engineering. Area B: 6-12 hours in the Divisions of Behavioral 
and Social Sciences; and Human and Community Resources. Area C: 
6-12 hours in the Division of Arts and Humanities. 

In meeting these area requirements, smdents may choose from 
among any undergraduate courses for which they are qualified. The 
students may select either the pass-fail or letter grading option for these 
courses as outlined on page 32. Students are urged to consult with 
academic advisors for guidance in determining which courses in each 
area best fit individual needs and interests. 

Demonstration of competency in English composition: unless the stu- 
dent has been exempted from English composition, at least one course 
in the subject will be required. Exemption is granted if the student 
earns an acceptable score on the SAT Verbal test (score announced an- 
nually) or an acceptable score on the English Advanced Placement Test 
(score announced annually), or by satisfactory completion of a similar 
writing course at another institution. 

Students taking a course to satisfy this requirement may apply the 
credits toward the 30-hour General University Requirement but may not 
count these credits toward the satisfaction of the minimum 6-hour re- 
quirement in any of the three designated areas. Credit for such a 
course may be in addition to the 12-hour maximum in any area. 

NOTE: Students who began baccalaureate study after May, 1978 
must complete the English composition requirement specified in the 
Fundamental Studies section of the University Studies Program (see 
above). Only three hours of this six hour requirement may be used to 
satisfy General University Requirements. 

Students who entered the University prior to June, 1973 have the op- 
tion of completing requirements under the former General Education 
Program rather than the new General University Requirements. Each 
student is responsible for making certain that the various provisions of 
either set of requirements have been satisfied prior to certification for 
the degree. Assistance and advice may be obtained from the academic 
advisor or the Office of the Administrative Dean for Undergraduate 
Studies. 

ACADEMIC CREDIT 

The semester hour is the unit of credit. During the Summer Session 
a typical 3 credit hour course meets five times a week for six weeks 
and requires daily preparation. Each class period is 80 minutes in 
length. 

Students who are matriculated as candidates for degrees will be gi- 
ven credit toward the appropriate degree for satisfactory completion of 
summer courses. Each student is responsible for the determination of 
applicability of coiu-ses selected to the degree program and is urged to 
consult a summer academic advisor. 

All students eru-olled for credit will receive an official grade for each 
course. 

MARKING SYSTEM 

1. The following symbols are used on the student's permanent re- 
cord for all courses in which enrollment is continued after the 
initial registration and schedule adjustment period: A. B, C, D, 
F, I, P, S, and W. These marks remain as part of the student's 
permanent record and may only be changed by the original in- 
structor on certification, approved by the department chairman 
and the dean or provost, that an actual mistake was made in de- 
termining or recording the grade. 



2. The mark of A denotes excellent mastery of the subject. It 
denotes outstanding scholarship. In computations of cumulative 
or semester averages, a mark of A will be assigned a value of 4 
quality points per credit hour. 



3. The mark of B denotes good mastery of the subject. It denotes 
good scholarship. In computation of cumulative or semester av- 
erages a mark of B will be assigned 3 quality points per credit 
hour. 

4. The mark of C denotes acceptable mastery. It denotes the 
usual achievement expected. In computation of cumulative or 
semester averages a mark of C will be assigned a value of 2 
quality points per credit hour. 

5. The mark of D denotes borderline understanding of the subject. 
It denotes marginal performance, and it does not represent sa- 
tisfactory progress toward a degree. In computations of cumu- 
lative or semester averages a mark of D will be assigned a value 
of 1 quality point per credit hour. 

6. The mark of F denotes failure to understand the subject. It 
denotes unsatisfactory performance. In computations of cumula- 
tive or semester averages a mark of F will be assigned a value 
of quality points per credit hour. 

7. The mark of P is a student option mark equivalent to A, B, C, 
or D. (See Pass-Fail option below.) The student must inform 
the Office of Registrations of his selection of this option by the 
end of the schedule adjustment period. In computation of cu- 
mulative averages a mark of P will not be included. In compu- 
tation of quality points achieved for a semester, a mark of P 
will be assigned a value of 2 quality points per credit hour. 

8. The mark of S is a department option mark which may be used 
to denote satisfactory participation by a student in progressing 
thesis projects, orientation courses, practice teaching and the 
like. In computation of cumulative averages a mark of S will 
not be included. In computation of quality points achieved for a 
semester, a mark of S will be assigned a value of 2 quality 
points per credit hour. 

9. The mark of I is an exceptional mark which is an instructor op- 
tion. It is given only to a student whose work in a course has 
been qualitatively satisfactory, when, because of illness or other 
circumstances beyond his control, he or she has been unable to 
complete some small portion of the work of the course. In no 
case will the mark I be recorded for a student who has not com- 
pleted the major portion of the work of the course. The student 
will remove the I by completing work assigned by the instruc- 
tor. It is the student's responsibility to request arrangements for 
completion of the work. The work must be completed by the 
end of the next semester in which the course is again offered 
and in which the student is in attendance at the College Park 
Campus; otherwise the I becomes terminal (equivalent to W). 
Exceptions to the time period cited above may be granted by the 
student's dean or provost upon the written request of the student 
if circumstances warrant further delay. If the instructor is 
unavailable, the department chairman will, upon request of the 
student, make appropriate arrangements for the student to com- 
plete the course requirements. It is the responsibility of the in- 
structor or department chairman concerned to return the appro- 
priate supplementary grade report to the Office of Registrations 
promptly upon completion of the work. The I cannot be re- 
moved through re-registration for the course or through the 
method of "credit by examination." In any event this mark shall 
not be used in any computations. 

10. The mark of W is used to denote that the student withdrew 
from a course after the end of the schedule adjustment period. 
This mark shall not be used in any computation, but for infor- 
mation and completeness is placed on the permanent record by 
the Office of Registrations. The Office of Registrations will 
promptly notify the instuctor that the student has withdrawn 
from the course. 

1 1 . Audit. A student may register to audit a course or courses in 
which space is available. The notation AUD will be placed on 
the transcript for each course audited. A notation to the effect 
that this symbol does not imply attendance or any other effort in 
the course will be included on the transcript in the explanation 
of the grading system. 



15 



PASS/FAIL OPTION 

Undergraduate students who have completed 30 or more semester 
hours of College credit with a GPA of at least 2.0 may register on a 
pass/fail basis if the course offers the pass/fail grading option. At least 
15 of these 30 must have been completed at the College Park Campus. 
Courses for which this option applies must be elective in the students' 
program. The courses may not be used to meet course requirements 
stipulated by a college, major, field of concentration, or general educa- 
tion program requirements. Thhe maximum is one course per semester 
or summer session. Students may not choose this option when re- 
registering for a course. A complete statement of regulations con- 
cerning the pass/fail option is available in the Undergraduate Catalog. 



ADVANCED PLACEMENT PROGRAM 

Students entering the University from secondary schools may obtain 
advanced placement and college credit on the basis of their perfor- 
mance in the College Board Advanced Placement examinations. These 
examinations are normally given to eligible high school seniors during 
the May preceding matriculation in college. 

Questions about the program may be addressed to the Administrative 
Dean for Undergraduate Studies. Additional information is presented 
in the consolidated catalog. For detailed information about examina- 
tions and procedures in taking them, write: 

Director of Advanced Placement Program 

College Entrance Examination Board 

475 Riverside Drive 

New York, New York 10027 



CODE OF STUDENT CONDUCT 

All students are expected to adhere to the provisions of the Code of 
Student Conduct, as set forth in the Undergraduate Catalog and in the 
Student Handbook. Copies of the code may also be obtained from the 
office of Judicial Programs in room 2108A North Administration 
Building, telephone 454-2927. 

ACADEMIC DISHONESTY 

Academic Dishonesty is a serious offense at the University and is de- 
fined in the Code of Student Conduct and in the University pamphlet 
entitled Academic Dishonesty. The code also provides that any act of 
academic dishonesty, including a first offense, will place the student in 
jeopardy "of suspension from the University, unless specific and miti- 
gating factors are present." Disciplinary records for any act of academ- 
ic dishonesty are also retained in the Judicial Programs Office for three 
years from the date of final adjudication. These records are available 
to prospective employers and other educational institutions in accor- 
dance with Federal regulations. To report academic dishonesty, or to 
obtain additional information, dial 454-4746 and ask for the "Campus 
Advocate." 



PROTECTION OF PRIVACY 
UNIVERSITY POLICY ON DISCLOSURE 
OF STUDENT RECORDS 



The University of Maryland adheres to a policy of compliance with 
the Family Eiducational Rights and Privacy Act (Buckley Amendment). 
As such, it is the policy of the University (I) to permit students to in- 
spect their education records, (2) to limit disclosure to others of person- 
ally identifiable information from education records without students' 
prior written consent, and (3) to provide students the opportunity to 
seek correction of their education records where appropriate, A com- 
plete statement of the University policy and procedures is contained in 
the Undergraduate Catalog, 1988-89, College Park Campus. 



CANDIDATES FOR DEGREES 



All students who expect to complete requirements for degrees during 
the summer should complete application for graduation during summer 
registration at the Registrations Office, Mitchell Building. Applications 
should be filed no later than July 21 , for degrees to be awarded as of 
August 25, 1989. While there is no graduation ceremony in August, 
August graduates are invited to participate in the ceremony held in 
December. 

DEFINITION OF FULL-TIME STATUS 

For those students seeking University certification of full-time stu- 
dent status, the following definitions will be applied. 

UNDERGRADUATES 

Normally, enrollment in courses totaling six semester hours of aca- 
demic credit will be defined as full-time enrollment for one Summer 
Session. Enrollment for six semester hours of academic credit in each 
of the two Summer Sessions will be defined as full-time enrollment for 
the summer. 

GRADUATES 

Enrollment for academic credits totaling 24 graduate units will be de- 
fined as full-time enrollment for one Summer Session. Enrollment for 
academic credits totaling 24 graduate units in each of the two Summer 
Sessions will be defined as full-time enrollment for the summer. 
Courses in the series: 000-399 

carry 2 units/credit hour 
Courses in the series: 400-499 

carry 4 units/credit hour 
Courses in the series: 500-599 

carry 5 units/credit hour 
Courses in the series: 600-898 

carry 6 units/credit hour 
Research course: 799 carries 

12 units/credit hour 
Research course: 899 carries 
18 units/credit hour 

MAXIMUM LOAD 

Undergraduate students may not enroll for more than eight semester 
hours of academic credit in one Summer Session. Normally, graduate 
students should not enroll for more than six semester hours in one 
Summer Session. Registrations above these maximums must be ap- 
proved by the student's Dean. 

GOLDEN IDENTIFICATION CARD 

Retired residents of Maryland age 60 and older who are not gainfully 
employed for more than 20 hours per week are invited to apply for a 
University of Maryland College Park Golden Identification Card. 

The card entitles the holder to free tuition on a space-available basis 
beginning the first day of classes for all University of Maryland credit 
courses, waiver of most fees and access to all College Park programs 
and activities on the same basis as all other students. Use of the 
libraries and certain non-academic services will be available to regis- 
trants for one or more courses only during the session for which they 
are registered. 

Program participants may simply take courses that interest them or 
work toward a graduate or undergraduate degree. 

A high school diploma is not required for admission to undergradu- 
ate courses on the Golden ID card. 

Eligibility for admission to graduate courses varies considerably from 
one area of study to another. In general, a bachelor's degree and a su- 
perior undergraduate academic record in an appropriate field are re- 
quired. However, under some circumstances, appropriate training and 
experience may make up for deficiencies. The Graduate School 
Admission Office will respond to individual inquiries. 

For information about obtaining a Golden Identification Card, con- 
tact the Office of Undergraduate Admissions at 454-5550. 



16 

AREA RESOURCE MAP 



OTHER AREA RESOURCES 

The College Park Campus is in a region which is 
unusually rich in libraries, research facilities, 
museums, galleries and cultural centers as illustrated 
by the map below. 



\ 



Baltimore 



UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND PROFESSIONAL SCHOOLS if 
DENTISTRY LAW MEDICINE NURSING 
PHARMACY SOCIAL WORK 



UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND i^ 
BALTIMORE COUNTY 



KoY 




UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 
COLLEGE PARK CAMPUS 




1. AMERICAN UNIVERSITY 

2. ARENA STAGE 

3. ARLINGTON NAT. CEMETERY 

4. ATOMIC ENERGY COMMISSION 

5. BALTO./WASH. INTERNATIONAL AIRPORT 

6. BETHESDA NAT NAVAL MEDICAL CTR. 

7. CATHOLIC UNIVERSITY 

8. CENSUS BUREAU 

9. CORCORAN GALLERY 

10. DULLES INTERNATIONAL AIRPORT 

11. DUMBARTON OAKS 

12. FOLGER SHAKESPEARE LIBRARY 

13. FORTMcHENRY 
14 FREER GALLERY 

15. GEORGETOWN UNIVERSITY 



16. GEORGE WASHINGTON UNIVERSITY 
17 GODDARD SPACE FLIGHT CTR. 

18. HIRSHHORN GALLERY 

19. HOWARD UNIVERSITY 

20. JOHNS HOPKINS APPLIED PHYSICS LAB. 

21. JOHNS HOPKINS UNIVERSITY 



22. KENNEDY CTR. FOR THE PERFORMING ARTS 37. 

23. LIBRARY OF CONGRESS 38. 

24. NAT. AGRICULTURE LIBRARY 39. 

25. NAT. AIRPORT 40. 

26. NAT. ARCHIVES 41. 

27. NAT. BUREAU OF STANDARDS 42. 

28. NAT. ENVIRONMENTAL SATELLITE CTR. 43. 

29. NAT. GALLERY OF ART 44. 

30. NAT. INSTITUTES OF HEALTH 



NAT. METEOROLOGICAL CTR. 

NAT. ZOOLOGICAL PARK 

NAVAL MEDICAL CTR. 

NAVAL OBSERVATORY 

NAVAL OCEANOGRAPHIC OFFICE 

NAVAL ORDINANCE LAB. 

NAVAL RESEARCH LAB. 

PENTAGON 

SMITHSONIAN INSTITUTION 

SMITHSONIAN ECOLOGICAL CTR. 

U.S. CAPITAL 

US. NAVAL ACADEMY 

WALTER REED ARMY MEDICAL CTR, 

WHITE HOUSE 



GENERAL INFORMATION 



17 



GENERAL INFORMATION 



*'^* 



I 



VETERANS BENEFITS 



Students attending the University under the Veterans Education 
Assistance Act (Title 38, U.S. Code) who completed registration will 
be certified on the basis of registration course requests. This certifica- 
tion should be verified by the student at the Registrations Office, Room 
1108, Mitchell Building, 9:00 a.m. to 4:00 p.m., Monday through 
Friday. 

ENROLLMENT CERTIFICATION AND VA PAYMENTS 

1 . Computation of enrollment status: Undergraduate student enroll- 
ment status is based on the number of standard class sessions 
for which the student is registered. 

CompuUtion of Standard Class Session 

Lecture Session 
Number of Minutes in Session 

Days/Week 



Class Meets 80 


100 


120 


180 


1 1.6 


2 


2.4 


3.6 


2 3.2 


4 


4.8 


7.2 


3 4.8 


6 


7.2 


10.8 


4 6.4 


8 


9.6 


14.4 


5 8.0 


10.0 


12.0 


18.0 



Example: If class meets M, Tu, W, Th 8:00-9:20; 
then Standard Class Session (SCS) = 6.4 = 1/2 time 

Laboratory Sessions 



Number of 
Days/Week 
Class meets 


80 


100 


Minutes 
120 


in Session 
180 240 


1 

2 
3 
4 

5 


.8 
1.6 
2.4 
3.2 
4.0 


1 
2 
3 
4 
5 


1.2 
2.4 
3.6 
4.8 
6.0 


1.8 2.4 
3.6 4.8 
5.4 7.2 
7.2 9.6 
9.0 12.0 



Example: If lab course meets M, Tu, W, Th, F 12:30-1:50 
Lecture; M, W, F 8:00-11:00 Lab; Tu, Th 9:30-10:50 
Discussion; then SCS = 8 -I- 5.4 + 3.2 = 16.2 = full-time 

Graduate student enrollment status is based on the number of 
units for which the student is registered. Courses taken as 
"AUDIT' cannot be counted toward credit for graduate or un- 
dergraduate students. Charges are the same for audit and for 
credit courses. 

TABLE FOR COMPUTING GRADUATE UNITS 

000-399 2 Units per credit 

400-499 4 Units per credit 

500-599 5 Units per credit 

600-898 6 Units per credit 

799 12 Units per credit 

899 18 Units per credit 

Graduate registration will not be certified for any course below 
the 400 level unless the course is required by the major depart- 
ment. A letter verifying the requirement must be approved by 
the Graduate School and submitted to the Veterans Affairs 
Office. Courses below 400-level will not receive Graduate 
Credit. 



Students 


Status 


24 


Full time 


18 


% time 


12 


'/2 time 


6 


'/4 time 



2. Basis for payment during each Summer Session. 

Standard 

Class Session Graduate 

(SCS) Crediu 

12+ 

9-11 

6-8 

less than 5 

"COURSES WHICH VARY FROM THE REGULAR SIX WEEK 
SESSIONS ARE CALCULATED BY THE V.A. ACCORDING TO 
LENGTH OF TIME AS WELL AS CREDITS OR UNITS. 

The Schedule of Benefits is available in the Veterans Office, 
Room 1108, Mitchell Building. 

3. Graduate Assistants: Graduate students who are graduate assis- 
tants will be certified for full time if the assistantship is con- 
fumed in writing by the Graduate School. Enrollment must 
be for 12 units each summer session. 

Please note — the Veterans Administration's definition of "full 
time" for Graduate Assistants differs from the University of 
Maryland definition and should be used only for V.A. pur- 
poses. 

PROTECTION OF PRIVACY INFORMATION 

SHEET: Public law 93-579 entitled the Privacy Act of 1974 re- 
quires that all claimants be informed of the purposes and uses to be 
made of the information which is solicited. The following is furnished 
to explain why the information is requested and the general uses to 
which that information may be put. 

AUTHORITY: The Veterans Administration is empowered to solicit 
the information requested in this form under the authority of Title 38, 
United States Code. 

PURPOSE: The information requested is considered relevant and ne- 
cessary to determine maximum entitlement to the benefit for which the 
student has applied. 

USES: The information will be used in determining eligibility for the 
maximum benefits allowable by law. The responses which are submit- 
ted may be disclosed as permitted by law outside the Veterans 
Administration. 

EFFECTS OF NON-DISCLOSURE: Disclosure of the re 
quested information is voluntary. No penalty will be imposed for fail- 
ure to respond. However, the decision as to entitlement for the benefit 
being claimed must then be made on the basis of available evidence of 
record. This may result in a delay in the processing of the claim, pay- 
ment of less than maximum benefits, or complete disallowance of the 
claim. Failure to provide information in connection with the benefit 
currently being sought will have no detrimental effect on any other 
benefits to which a veteran is entitled. (From VA Form 20-8739, July 
1975). 



COMPUTER SCIENCE CENTER 

Non-Credit Training Courses(Summer 1989) 

The Computer Science Center offers a series oi free workstation train- 
ing classes scheduled during evening and weekend hours. Classes in 
the use of workstations (e.g., the IBM PC, XT, AT, PS/2 and 
Macintosh microcomputers) are designed to be a hands-on experience 
for those who wish to use a computer to do their class assignments and 
work. 

The classes include: Introduction to the IBM PC and MS-DOS, 
WordPerfect on the IBM PC, Introduction to the Macintosh, and 
Mac Write on the Macintosh. Instructors for the classes are computer 
experienced students. Courses will begin in June. Drop by the CSC 
Program Library(room 2337) to register for classes, or call 454-6945 
for scheduling information. 

SUMMER RECREATION PROGRAM 

WATCH FOR THE RECREATION BROCHURE 
GREAT SUMMER SPORTS ACTIVITIES 
CULTURAL EVENTS 

SPORTS TOURNAMENTS AND COMPETITIONS 
For information: Reckord Armory, Room 1104. 454-3124 



18 



GENERAL INFORMATION 




STUDENT PARKING 
REGISTRATION 



All students must register for a parking permit at the time of registra- 
tion for classes. STUDENTS MUST BRING THEIR STUDENT ID. 
CARD. 

Parking permits issued to students for the 1988-89 academic year 
will be honored for the 1989 Summer Sessions. For new students or 
continuing students who did not previously register for a parking per- 
mit, there will be a registration fee of $17.00 for campus resident stu- 
dents and $9.00 for commuter students, which must be paid to the 
Department of Campus Parking at the time of registration (see Tuition 
and Fees). Students who display their parking permit may park in lots 
1, 2, 4, 7, 11, and 1.6. All other lots are reserved for faculty and staff 
members. University Parking Regulations prohibit the parking of mo- 
tor vehicles on any Campus road, fire lane, unpaid meters, or handi- 
capped spaces. These regulations are enforced by the Department of 
Campus Parking and the Police Department. 

BICYCLE AND MOPED PARKING 

Mopeds and bicycles need not be registered, but should be parked in 
bicycle racks provided on campus. Questions should be directed to the 
Department of Campus Parking, Comer of Field House Dr. and 
Regents, Building 202, Parking Garage 2, from 8:30 to 4:15 P.M. 
Monday through Friday, or by telephone on 454-4242 or 4243. 

HANDICAPPED PARKING 

All persons associated with the University (including those display- 
ing a State handicapped permit or tag) must purchase and display a 
UMCP-DCP parking permit for the current year. Upon the issuance of 
the UMCP-DCP permit, an additional UMCP-DCP handicapped permit 
will be issued at no charge. This additional permit must be used in 
conjimction with the State handicapped permit in order to use Campus 
spaces for the handicapped, unpaid parking meters or any ungated 
parking lot on campus. 

Only persons to whom the handicapped privileges are extended are 
authorized to park in these special parking areas. Family members 
driving these vehicles must utilize their assigned parking lot(s). 




HEALTH CENTER 



Check out the Health Center located directly across from the Stamp 
Union on Campus Drive for primary care of illness and injury, health 
promotion and maintenance, consultation or education. Health Center 
services include the dental clinic, men's clinic, women's clinic, skin 
care, sports medicine, physical therapy, nutrition counseling, mental 
health, social services, laboratory and a pharmacy. Individual and 
group health education programs are also available on topics such as 
sexual health, stress management and substance use and abuse. 

The Health Center is open 24 hours, seven days a week. Hours vary 
during semester breaks and holidays. Appointments are recommended. 
Students, however, are also seen on a walk-in basis. 

Currently registered students who have paid the health fee are eligi- 
ble for care. This fee covers most routine costs. There are additional 
charges for special services such as X-ray, laboratory tests, dental treat- 
ment, allergy injections, casts, and pharmacy supplies. 

All information in student medical records is confidential. Medical 
information is released only with the student's written permission or 
court-ordered subpoena. The Health Center does not issue routine ab- 
sence excuses for illness or injury. In cases of prolonged absence or a 




missed exam, with the student's signed permission, the Health Center 
will verify dates of treatment. 

Health Center telephone numbers to remember: information X3444, 
appointments X4923, mental health service X4925, pharmacy X6439, 
health insurance X6750, health education X4922. 



ON-CAMPUS HOUSING 



Every student who registers for suminer sessions coursework is 
encouraged to live on campus in the undergraduate residence halls. 
Early reservation for summer sessions housing is advised. Room 
reservation procedures are discussed in the Summer 1988 Residence 
Halls Agreement, located at the center of this catalog. This 
Agreement and accompanying instructions should be carefully 
read and understood before the Agreement is returned and 
financial obligation is incurred. No provisions are made for fami- 
ly members or spouses. 

For sununer sessions, rooms are available from the period just 
prior to the start of Session I classes until final examinations are 
completed for Session II. Please consult the calendar on page 2 of 
this catalog. Spring semester campus residents who register for 
Session I may be permitted to move directly from spring room as- 
signments to Summer Sessions assignments, possibly involving an 
additional move to a temporary assignment, according to proce- 
dures and a calendar established by the Department of Resident 
Life. Spring semester residents should indicate their current as- 
signment and their desire for temporary "interim housing" privi- 
leges in the appropriate spaces on the Residence Halls Agreement 
(in booklet section in the center of the catalog). 

Rooms in apartment/suite hall types are available for long-term 
stays: 

• Summer assignments are in fully furnished and fully 
equipped apartments. Each apartment has a kitchen, two 
baths, shared dining room and living room and single and 
double bedrooms for four or six students. Apartments are 
air-conditioned and fully carpeted. • 

Bedrooms are furnished with essentials for student study and 
sleep. Curtains, desk lamp, wastebasket, pillow, linens, all other 
personal effects and room accessories are not provided. Coin- 
operated laundry and vending services are available. 

Inquiries regarding summer sessions housing are welcomed at 
Department of Resident Life, 31I7B North Administration BIdg., 
University of Maryland, College Park, MD 20742, Tele: (301) 
454-2711. 

CAMPUS GUEST SERVICES 

Accommodations are also available for visiting faculty and lec- 
turers, researchers and other educators associated with the summer 
sessions or involved in the special programs offered during the 
summer term. Accommodations, rates and reservation process 
vary depending on length of stay and type of program. 

In addition, accommodations may be provided for conference 
and special interest groups who wish to hold their events on cam- 
pus in the summertime. 

For more information about these services contact Campus Guest 
Services, University of Maryland, Room 1 I05C, South Campus 
Dining Hall, College Park, MD 20742, Tele. (301) 454-8723. 



GENERAL INFORMATION 



19 




RESEARCH FACILITIES 



The research programs at the University derive their existence and 
vigor from a faculty comprised of internationally recognized scholars 
and scientists. It is an advantage for undergraduate students to be 
aware of the University's research facilities as they plan their pro- 
grams. 

Active research takes place in every department on the campus. 
Among the exceptional research facilties are: scaiming electron micros- 
copes; subsonic, supersonic, and hypersonic wind tunnels; laboratories 
for radiation research and biochemical reactions; a nuclear training 
reactor; an electron ring accelerator; complete laboratories for the 
dynamic studies of soils and structures; a unique facility utilizing satel- 
lite remote sensing data; a dynamic photomechanics lab; a gravitational 
radiation detection system including a gravimeter on the moon; three 
retroflector arrays on the moon; a psycho-pharmacology laboratory; a 
comfort and perception research laboratory; a historic costume/textile 
research laboratory; a linear accelerator; a high resolution spectroscopy 
facility; small groups behavioral research laboratories; computer simula- 
tion and gaming facilities; remote sensing and cartographies laborato- 
ries; specialized sound chambers for audiology research; a center for 
theoretical physics; a criminal forensics laboratory; an archaeometrics 
laboratory; laboratories for parallel computation, computer graphics, 
computer-aided design, biotechnology scale-up, communication & sig- 
nal processing, compositer research, semiconductor research, very large 
scale integration, software engineering, and machine intelligence and 
pattern analysis; the Center for Automation Research which includes 
the computer vision, robotics and human/computer interaction laborato- 
ries; centers for rotorcraft education and research, architecture and en- 
gineering performance information, transportation studies, the 
Astronomy Observatory, and the Water Resources Center. 

The College Park campus is also part of a consortium of three uni- 
versities with the University of California at Berkeley, and the 
University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign who operate a large milli- 
meter array telescope at Hat Creek in California. 

In addition to these research facilities, the campus supports a number 
of organized research activities, many of which have received national 
and international recognition for the quality of their research work. 
Among the major organized research units on campus are: the Bureaus 
of Business and Economic Research, and Governmental Research; the 
Center on Aging and Center for Family Service; Educational Research 
and Development; National Center for Postsecondary Governance and 
Finance; Family Research Center; Industrial Relations and Labor 
Studies; Information Sciences Research; International Development and 
Conflict Management; Research Center for Arts and Humanities; 
Philosophy and Public Policy; Productivity and Quality of Working 
Life; Renaissance and Baroque Studies; Study and Research in 
Business and Public Policy; the Center for Entrepreneurship; Young 
Children; and the Survey Research Center; the Engineering Research 
Center; the Laboratory for Plasma Research; the Center for 
Superconductivity Research; Laboratory for Coastal Reaearch; and the 
Institutes for Exceptional Children and Youth; Physical Sciences and 
Technology; Research in Higher and Adult Education, the Center for 
Research in Public Communication of the College of Journalism, the 
Center for Architectural Design and Research (CADRE) in the School 
of Architecture, and the Center for Population, Gender and Social 
Inequality. 

Investigation in agriculture is an important aspect of University 
research. The Agricultural Experiment Station, which has its 
headquarters on the College Park campus, uses its personnel and 
laboratories at UMCP and UMES, as well as the off-campus research 
farms (totalling over 3,(X)0 acres) to conduct research in the areas of 
natural resources and forestry, plants and crops, animals and poultry, 
economics and rural life, and general resource technology. 

The College of Physical Education, Recreation and Health maintains 
modem research laboratories including, but not limited to, 
Psychophysiological Research Laboratory, the Biofeedback Leaming 
Lab, The Safety Education Center, Leisure and Recreation Studies 
Laboratory, Cinematographic Analysis, Cardiovascular Measurement, 
Strength and other Motor Fitness Assessments. Body Composition, 
Analysis of Motion, and Motor Leaming Research. 



m 



DINING SERVICES 



The Department of Dining Services has 17 operations to serve the 
University community. Among these are four dining rooms, located in 
the Cambridge, Elicott, and Denton Complexes, and in the South 
Campus. 

A full service restaurant and diverse fast food eateries line the 
underground central hallway of the Adele H. Stamp Union. Each shop 
is open daily Monday through Friday and some shops are open with 
special hours on Saturday. 

For a special occasion or just a change of pace. What's Your Beef 
Restaurant offers flame broiled steaks, BBQ chicken and ribs and an 
extensive salad bar. Fresh dough pizza, made to order, by the slice or 
whole, is available at the Pizza Shop. This N' That offers a variety of 
favorites, including all beef hot dogs, nachos and hot pretzels. 
Popular, Maryland Dairy ice cream, is served any way you likt it, at 
Dory's Sweets. Fresh from the oven breads, doughnuts and assorted 
pastries are prepared daily at the Bakery Stop. Ask about our 
personalized cakes. The Butcher's Block features flame broiled 
quarterpound cheeseburgers and Cajun style fried chicken. Stop by the 
Maryland Sandwich Factory for deli subs, sandwiches, cheeses and 
meats by the platter or the pound. Create your own salad at the 
Farmer's Market with a salad bar featuring over 50 items. Quench 
your thirst at the Oasis which offers an extensive selection of hot and 
cold beverages. 

Elsewhere on campus is the Gazebo Room, open Monday through 
Friday, conveniently located in South Campus Dining Hall. This 
cafeteria features an extensive soup and salad bar, sandwiches, grill 
line, hot entrees and an ever changing a la carte menu. Now open 
Monday through Sunday, is the Leonardtown Convenience Store which 
sells groceries and sundries. The Hi-Rise Snack Bar and Convenience 
Store, located near the Ellicott Dining Hall, is also open for your 
convenience Monday through Sunday, for a quick bite to eat or an 
emergency item. 



% 



DISABLED STUDENT 
SERVICES 



Special assistance is available for students with disabilities. Among 
the services offered are: assistance with registration, reading services, 
interpreter services, accessibility information and orientation. 
Currently, handicapped shuttle service is not available during the 
summer. Students should contact the office at the earliest possible 
opportunity so that services can be arranged by the start of classes. 
454-5028 (voice) 
454-5029 (TDD) 

Contact the Disabled Student Services Office in the Coimseling 
Center, Shoemaker Hall, Room 0126, 8:30 to 4:00 Monday through 
Friday. 



LIBRARIES 



Libraries of the campus are the Theodore R. McKeldin Library (the 
main library), the Architecture Library, the Art Library, the Library of 
the College of Library and Information Services and its Juvenile 
Teaching Materials Collection, the White Memorial Chemistry Library, 
the Engineering and Physical Sciences Library, the R. Lee Hombake 
Library containing the Undergraduate Library, Nonprint Media 
Services, and the Music Library; The Libraries have a total book 
collection of more than 1.8 million volumes and currently receive over 
21, (XK) serials. In addition, the libraries contain 3.5 million 
microforms; 600,000 U.S., state and international government 
documents; over 900,000 technical reports; 64,000 cassettes, records 




20 



GENERAL INFORMATION 



and tapes; and over 93,000 maps. Bibliographical facilities include 
piint catalogs of the Library of Congress and national bibliographies of 
many foreign countries, as well as access to online resources such as 
the OCIC and the UM online catalog. Special Collections include the 
Katherine Anne Porter Room, East Asia collection, Marylandia, 
industrial and craft union files, music education association files, the 
International Piano Archives at Maryland, and numerous sets of 
microieproductions of rare books, early and rare journals, archives and 
manuscripts, and other research materials in many subjects. Study 
carrels and lockers are available to faculty members and graduate 
students in the McKeldin Library. Facilities for microform reading, 
photocopying, ordering online data-base searches, reading reserve 
material and arranging interlibrary loans are available in all libraries. 
Anyone is welcome to use the libraries' resources on site, and UM 
students, faculty and staff may borrow circulating items. 



EXPERIENTIAL LEARNING PROGRAMS 

0119 Hombake Undergraduate Library, 454-4767 



Mandatory Learning Proposals 

Learning Proposals, which can be obtained in the ELP office, are 

mandatory for all students taking 386 Field Experience and 

387 Analysis of field Experience. The Learning Proposal is a learning 
contract that spells out and clarifies the nature of a student intern's 
placement, learning objectives, specific responsibilities, supervision, 
in-service training, method of evaluation, and contact with the faculty 
sponsor. The process for developing a Learning Proposal is intended 
to include the student, faculty sponsor and the on-site supervisor, all of 
whom must sign the finished proposal before it is returned to ELP. 

Students must have Learning Proposals completed and copies to 
ELP, faculty sponsors and on-site supervisors, no later than the 
first week of the session. If the Learning Proposal is not completed, 

the student may have his/her 386/ 387 credit removed. It is, 

however, strongly recommended that the Learning Proposal be 

completed before a student registeres for 386/ 387. Thus, 

the student, faculty sponsor and on-site supervisor can be in agreement 
about the expectations of the internship experience prior to registration. 

VOLUNTEER SERVICE 



Experiential Learning Programs (ELP) offers four of the University's 
most exciting learning opportunities — internships, cooperative 
education, volunteer service, and student exchange. Each is designed 
to give students "hands-on" experience that can help them integrate 
classroom learning with practice, provide valuable on-the-job 
experience, make professional contacts, observe career fields first-hand, 
experience different educational, work or cultural environments and 
clarify personal and professional goals. 

INTERNSHIPS 



Students can learn while being of service to others as a student 
volunteer. The ELP office lists more than 400 different opportunities 
for community and public service in a variety of settings, addressing 
such issues as child welfare, family services, illiteracy, hunger, 
homelessness, and environmental preservation. Students are 
encouraged to incorporate some volunteer service as part of their 
undergraduate experience, the opportunities to be of service are almost 
without limit. 

NATIONAL STUDENT EXCHANGE PROGRAM (NSE) 



An internship is a paid or unpaid work experience with specific 
educational objectives that can be granted academic credit. Students 
can use extensive ELP listings, which include more than 2000 
opportunities in more than 1100 organizations, businesses and agencies 
to identify possible internships. Directories and catalogues are also 
available in the ELP office which describe hundreds of other local and 
national positions. In addition, the ELP staff can show students how to 
investigate and design unique internship opportunities which might not 
be listed in our files. Once students have found a placement, they can 
enlist a full-time faculty member to provide sponsorship for academic 
credit. 

Internship Credit Policies for 386/ 387 

Students can earn academic credit for their internship experience 
through departmental internships or through the campus-wide internship 

courses 386 Field Experience and 387 Analysis of Field 

Experience. The following are Campus Senate Policies regarding 

386/ 387: 

• 386 and 387 may be taken by any student with the 

permission of a full-time faculty member, if it is a departmental 
option and in accordance with departmental requirements and 
internship policies. 

• 386 and 387 must be taken concurrently. 

• 386 and 387 may be taken for a letter grade or 

pass-fail. 

• 386 and 387 are variable credit courses. Each may 

be awarded from 1-3 credits with a maximum of 6 credits for 
the two courses combined, unless otherwise stipulated by 
departmental policy. 

• 386 and 387 may be taken only once in a given 

department. 

• 386 and 387 may be taken in only one department 

per semester. 

• 386 and 387 may be taken for a maximum of 24 

credits in an undergraduate program. 



The National Student Exchange Program offers UMCP students the 
opportunity to study at 75 participating public colleges and universities 
across the country. UMCP students pay Maryland tuition and fees and 
exchange with a student wishing to come to College Park for a 
semester or a year. NSE offers the opportunity to explore new 
geographical settings, experience academic diversity, and study under 
different educational and social circumstances in various parts of the 
continental U.S.. Hawaii, the Virgin Islands, and Puerto Rico. While 
the application deadline is March 1st for the following academic year, 
students who are interested in NSE are encouraged to contact the ELP 
office as soon as possible to plan for their exchange. 



GENERAL INFORMATION 



21 



® 



UNIVERSITY BOOK 
CENTER 



The University Book Center is a retail establishment located in the 
lower level of the Adele H. Stamp Student Union Building. The Book 
Center offers textbooks, popular and professional books, art, school 
and office supplies, imprinted Maryland clothing, groceries and 
assorted sundries. 



RETIRED VOLUNTEER 
SERVICE CORPS 



People who are retired and have career or life experience skills 
which they would like to continue to use can do so through the Retired 
Volunteer Service Corps. By volunteering three hours or more a week, 
talented older people can help personalize undergraduate education and 
provide a unique perspective to students at U.M.C.P. Volunteers 
utilize their unique skills as tutors, career counselors, academic 
advisors, teaching assistants, technical assistants and office assistants, 
as well as having the option of assisting in a volunteer job of their own 
design. For further information contact the Retired Volunteer Service 
Corps office at 454-^767. 




COOPERATIVE EDUCATION 



Full-time students enrolled at The University of Maryland College 
Park have an opportunity to participate in a program which links 
education with practical work experience. The program is called 
COOPERATIVE EDUCATION. 

Two co-op programs exist on UMCP's campus: Cooperative 
Education for Liberal Arts, Business and the Sciences and the 
Engineering Cooperative Education Program. While each program 
carries its own eligibility requirements and procedures, the benefits are 
the same: 



• Apply classroom learning to actual practice 

• Confirm career choice 

• Develop professional level skills 

• Earn money to help finance one's education 

• Gain access to the hidden job market 

• And more 

Smdents who participate in cooperative education, both at UMCP 
and nationwide, have benefitted from the skills and experience gained 
from their co-op experience. In fact, 67% of co-op students receive 
job offers from their co-op employers upon graduation. 

Co-op employers include both private industry and the public sector. 
There are a wealth of co-op files available for co-op applicant perusal. 

For more information. Engineering majors should contact the Co-op 
Director, 1137 Engineering Classroom Building, or call 454-5191. 
Liberal Arts, Business and the Sciences majors should contact the 
Co-op Coordinator, 0119 Hombake Library, or call 454-4767. 



SPECIAL PROGRAMS 



WORKSHOPS, INSTITUTES AND OTHER SPECIAL OFFERINGS 



The summer sessions offer a number of special programs of interest to both students and professional audiences. The programs fre- 
quently differ from traditional courses in instructional format and duration. In many classes scheduling differs from the dates of the stan- 
dard academic sessions. Many of the special programs provide the option of registering either for credit or on a non-credit, non- 
matriculant basis. Some of the special programs are offered on a special fee, non-credit basis only. 

Unless noted otherwise, admission procedures for credit registrations are the same as those for standard courses. Special arrangements 
for registration will be provided for certain workshops, details of which may be obtained from the program directors. The standard tuition 
and fee schedule applies for all credit registrations except that University Health Services are not provided for students registered in 
courses offered away from the College Park Campus, in which case the student health fee is not charged. 

Reference to additional or alternative fees may be found under individual listings. Special non-credit fees apply only where specifically 
quoted. Registrations based upon these fees are available only to non-matriculated applicants and do not provide credit. Because special 
planning based upon the number of registrants is required, and because applicant screening and/or auditioning may be required, most of 
the special fee programs require an extra charge after a specified registration period and only a partial refund for late withdrawal. No re- 
funds will be granted on or after the first day of any program which is less than the standard six-week terms in length. In each case, 
campus housing will be available at additional charge. 

The descriptions following are intended to indicate only general content. For detailed information please contact the program director. 



22 



SPECIAL PROGRAMS 




THE MARYLAND 
SUMMER INSTITUTE FOR 
THE CREATIVE AND 
PERFORMING ARTS 

George Moquin, Executive Director 



In coordination with the Summer Entertaiimient Series described 
elsewhere in the catalog, the Institute (MSICPA) presents the following 
career development training programs. 

THE FIRST AMERICAN STRING QUARTET CONGRESS 
June 19-23, Michael Tree, President 

The Institute, in cooperation with Chamber Music America, the 
Amateur Chamber Music Players, Inc., and the Violin Society of 
America, is organizing and presenting this first public exposition of the 
state of the art of string quartet playing in America. Evening concerts 
to be held in the Baird Auditorium, Museum of Natural History, 
Smithsonian Institution, Washington, DC, are co-sponsored by the 
Smithsonian Resident Associates Program. Leading American artists 
and pedagogues will lead symposia on various aspects of the string 
quartet art and performance practices. Daily sessions will explore 
American Works for String Quartet and leading American composers 
will share their ideas on composing for this musical idiom. Violin and 
bow makers of the Violin Society of America will provide an exhibi- 
tion of the latest examples of their craft, including matched sets of 
quartet instruments. Accessory manufacturers and music publishers 
will complete the exhibition. Daily "play-ins" by Congress registrants 
will be coached informally by participating professional quartet 
members. 

Late Registration Fees 
"(Sfter May 19, 1589) 

Full Congress: $250.00 Full Congress: $300.00 

Daily Rate: $60.00 Daily Rate: $75.00 



Pre-Registration Fees 

(Received by May~I57 1989) 



THE MARYLAND ASTA STRING PEDAGOGY 

CONFERENCE 

June 19-24, Gerald Fischbach, Conference Director 

Concurrent with the String Quartet Congress, this intensive program 
for studio and school teachers will be led by Gerald Fischbach, violin. 
University of Maryland; William Preucil, viola. University of Iowa; 
Phyllis Young, cello. University of Texas; and George Vance, double- 
bass, Washington Susuki Bass Project. Registrants will participate in 
events of the String Quartet Congress and may attend rehearsals and a 
performance of the National Orchestral Institute Philharmonic. 

Registration Fee: Same as String Quartet Congress 

THE NATIONAL ORCHESTRAL INSTITUTE 

June 9 -July 1, 1989 
Resident Conductors 
Catherine Comet 
Keimeth Jean 
Yoel Levi 

A symphony orchestra of America's most talented young musicians 
studies and performs with three internationally acclaimed conductors. 
Selected from regional auditions throughout the United States, members 
of the NCI Philharmonic receive full tuition, room and board scholar- 
ships for this intensive career development opportunity. Musicians 
from America's leading orchestras and UMCP Department of Music fa- 
culty will be in residence to direct sectional rehearsals and present mas- 
terclasses. The orchestra will be presented in three public concerts. 
For information, contact Mr. Donald Reinhold, Administrative 
Director, Office of Summer Programs, University of Maryland, College 
Park, MD. 20742, (301) 454-3347. 

THE UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND INTERNATIONAL 

PIANO FESTIVAL AND WILLIAM KAPELL 

COMPETITION 

Seymour Lipkin, Artistic Director 

July 13-22, 1989 

For the nineteenth consecutive summer, the Festival presents interna- 
tionally acclaimed artists and teachers in masterclasses, lecture-recitals, 



symposia, and recitals. The Competition offers pianists aged 18-23 
more than $42,000 in prize money. The First Prize includes $15,000, 
a New York recital in Lincoln Center's Alice Tully Hall, a compact 
disc recording opportunity, and other engagements. Competition Finals 
will be held at the Kennedy Center, Washington, D.C., with the 
National Symphony Orchestra. All events are open to the general pub- 
lic. 



Pre-Registration Fees 

(Received by JuneTT 1989) 

Full Festival: $250.00 
Daily Rate: $35.00 



Late Registration Fees 

"ISfter June 13, 1989) 

Full Festival $300.00 
Daily Rate: $40.00 



THE 1989 SUMMER LECTURES 

Summer Programs is pleased to present two public lecture series dur- 
ing Summer 1989. 

Series I: Defense Spending and American National Security 

In cooperation with the Department of History, the Department 
of Government and Politics, and the School of Public Affairs. 

Rarely have questions concerning the federal budget been more im- 
portant than in the present case as the nation prepares for the inaugura- 
tion of George Bush. The deficit is of prime concern, yet this problem 
is interwoven with major questions concerning the provision of human 
services, welfare, education, renewal, and defense, among others. Of 
all the budget questions those concerning defense may be the key to the 
solution of other financial problems; but, at the same time, one of the 
most vexing. Hopefully, the nation can look forward to a period of de- 
clining intemational tensions. Yet the armed forces seek more weap- 
ons research and production while the debate rages over systems fail- 
ures, cost overruns, and, central to the issue, what is enough? The dis- 
tinguished speakers who will present these lecture/debates will help us 
to understand one of the most important issues in the history of the na- 
tion. 

Dr. Jon T. Sumida, Director 

1 . Tuesday, June 6, 1989 

American Geopolitical Decline: The Historical Debate 

Dr. Paul Kennedy, J. Richardson Dilworth Professor of 

History, Yale University; Author. 
Dr. Walter Rostow, Professor of Economics and History, 

University of Texas; Member of the Johnson 

Administration. 

2. Tuesday, June 27, 1989 

American GeopoUtical Circumstances, Present and Future 
Dr. Robert G. Gilpin, Eisenhower Professor of International 

Relations, Princeton University; Author. 
Dr. Samuel P. Huntington, Clarence Dillon Professor of 

Intemational Affairs, Harvard University; Author. 

3. Thursday, July 6, 1989 

The Management of Defense Spending 

Dr. Lawrence Korb, formerly Assistant Secretary for 
Manpower Logistics and Reserve Affairs, The 
Pentagon; currently, the Brookings Institution. 

Dr. Eliot Cohen, Secretary of the Navy Senior Research 
Fellow, United States Naval War College. 

4. Thursday, July 27, 1989 

The Politics of Defense Spending 

Dr. Arnold Kanter, formerly U.S. State Department; cur- 
rently. The Rand Corporation. 

Dr. Thomas McNaugher, Senior Fellow, The Brookings 
Institution. 

Series U: Emerging Cultures of Peace 

In cooperation with The Center for Intemational Development 
and Conflict Management. 

While the nation continues an intense debate concerning security, 
there is the suggestion that our concept of security may be changing. 
There has arisen in this century the beginnings, however vague and 
confused, of an intemational subculture which has identified common 
concerns regarding, among other topics, territory, race, religion, 
health, food, and economics. Particularly since the advent of the atom- 
ic bomb, this international community has concluded that war is not a 
viable solution, even of last resort, to intemational problems; that war 
rarely brings permanent solutions; and indeed, that the growing liti- 
giousness both within and among groups and nations, as well as organ- 
ized countermovements to modem problems like terrorism, are, in pre- 
sent form, usually counterproductive, expensive, and threatening to the 



SPECIAL PROGRAMS 



23 



precious freedoms which we now possess. Thus, the need for new ap- 
proaches to mediation with a sense of winning solutions for all parties 
and vigorous searches for those values which we hold in common must 
be emphasized. This emerging culture has found expression around the 
world through people in government , religion, the humanities and the 
aits. It expresses an orientation which seeks to find ways for all par- 
ties to "win" through peaceful means and to avoid the age-old practice 
of the victor excluding the vanquished. Its approach is to create an en- 
richment of the concept of national security; an enhancement of securi- 
ty which goes far beyond the limited possibilities of military hardware. 
Dr. Edward E. Azar, Director 
Dates and Speakers to be announced. 



COLLEGE OF 
ARCHITECTURE 



ARCH 4ggC. Selected Topics In Architectural Presentation: Cape 
May Historic Preservation Workshop. 3 credits. May 29 to June 14, 
1989. A workshop and study experience in the preservation of some of 
the nations important architectural landmarks in the resort of Cape 
May, New Jersey. Professor David P. Fogle. 




COLLEGE OF ARTS 
AND HUMAMTIES 



The Summer Institute for The Advancement of High School 
Teachers of German 

June 19 to July 8, 1989. 6 credits. 9:00-5:00 daily. The University of 
Maryland [)epaitment of Germanic and Slavic Languages and 
Literatures in cooperation with the Goethe House, New York City, pre- 
sents an intensive German program for students who seek greater oral 
and written fluency as well as studies in German culture. Open to qua- 
lified students who wish to improve German skills and to work toward 
a graduate degree. Due to generous support from the Goethe House, 
tuition will be waived for those accepted into the program. However, 
there will be a special seminar fee of $300.00. Students will live in a 
dormitory and speak in German at all times. For details contact Dr. 
Guenther Pfister, Department of Germanic and Slavic Languages, 
University of Maryland, College Park, MD 20742. Telephone: 
301^54-4301. 



1) 



COLLEGE OF BEHAV- 
IORAL AND SOCIAL 
SCIENCES 



Department of Anthropology 

ANTH 499A/699A/389A/SUMM 015. Field Methods In Historical 
Archaeology. 6 credits or non-matriculanl/non-credit registration at a 
special fee of $600.00. June 5 to July 14, 1989. 8:00 a.m. - 4:00 p.m. 
Professor Mark Leone 

An anthropological field school conducted at Annapolis, Maryland in 
cooperation with Historical Annapolis, provides and opportunity for 
students who wish to acquire skills in archaeological research. Open to 
both majors and non-majors. For details contact Dr. Mark Leone, 
Departtnent of Anthropology, University of Maryland, College Park, 
MD. 20742. Telephone: 301^54-4154. 




COLLEGE OF JOURNALISM 



Thirteenth Annual University of Maryland 
School Press Workshops and Yearbook Short 
Course 



School Press Workshop 1: 
Writing and Editing 
June 26 through June 30, 1989 
MTWThF, 9:30-3:30 
Special Fee: $80.00 



School Press Workshop II: 
Design and Production 
June 26 through June 30, 1989 
MTWThF, 9:30-3:30 
Special Fee: $80.00 
Featuring nationally known journalists and educators, the School 
Press Workshops provide special training for high school newspaper 
and newsmagazine publishing. School Press Workshop I focuses on 
newswriting, interviewing, sports reporting, editorial writing, and fea- 
ture writing. School Press Workshop 11 provides experience with de- 
sign techniques, typography, pasteup, and headline writing. Air- 
conditioned dorm/hotel accommodations available at extra charge. For 
futher information and application, write to Mrs. Lois Kay, College of 
Journalism, University of Maryland, College Park, MD 20742 or call 
301-454-6939. 

Yearbook Short Course 

June 21 through June 23, 1989 
WThF, 9:30 a.m.^:00 p.m. 
Special Fee: $60.00 

In the thirteenth annual Yearbook Short Course high school editors, 
reporters, and advisers can plan their 1988-89 school yearbook. 
Lecturers include noted yearbook experts. Lectures and work sessions 
will be held on budget and finance, advertising, theme, content, copy- 
writing, photography, contemporary design, graphics, covers, and staff 
organization. Air-conditioned dorm/hotel accommodations available at 
extra charge. For further information and application, write to Mrs. 
Lois Kay, College of Journalism, University of Maryland, College 
Park, MD 20742 or call 301^54-6939. 



COLLEGE OF LIBRARY 
AND INFORMATION 
SERVICES 



LBSC 499A/SUMM 008A. Archival Automaton. 3 credits or non- 
matriculant/non-credit registration at special fee of 500.00. June 5 to 
July 14. M-W, 10:00 a.m. - 1:00 p.m. 
Professor Frank Burke 

Computer applications for a broad range of records management and 
archival activities, including control of office files through appraisal, 
accessioning, arrangement, description, and use. Special emphasis on 
administering documentary collections with computer assistance. 





COLLEGE OF COMPUTER, 
MATHEMATICAL AND 
PHYSICAL SCIENCES 



Department of Mathematics 

SUMM 003 BuUding Math Self-Confidence: A Review of High 
School Algebra. Non-credit. June 5 to June 23, M-F, 9:00 a.m. - 
12:00 p.m. Building N, Room 2102. Special fee: $250.00. 
Professor Elizabeth Sheam. 

Offered through the Counseling Center, this special course assists 
students in gaining confidence in math through instruction and practice 
in the basics of Algebra, The work prepares students for college level 
math courses. 



THE MARYLAND SUMMER INSTITUTE FOR 
THE CREATIVE AND PERFORMING ARTS 

Presents 

Your Carousel 
of Summer 
Entertainment 







With complimentary ticket admission to tlie following events: 



SESSION I. 



SESSION n. 



Saturday, June 3, 8:15pm. 

OPERA northeast's production of 
Rodgers and Hammerstein's 
CAROUSEL, with orchestra 

Sati4rday,June 10, 8:15p.m. 

CHICAGO PRO MUSICA 
Grammy-Award-Winning ensemble of 
virtuosi from the Chicago Symphony 
Orchestra 

Saturday, June 17, 8:15p.m. 

THE NATIONAL ORCHESTRAL 
INSTITUTE PHILHARMONIC 
Catherine Comet, Conduaor 
Mendelssohn: Symphony No. 5 
Britten: Four Sea Interludes 
from "Peter Grimes" 
Debussy: LaMer 



Saturday, June 24, 8:15p.m. 

THE NATIONAL ORCHESTRAL 
INSTITUTE PHILHARMONIC 
Kenneth Jean, Conduaor 
Paulus: The Postman Always 
Rings Tlvice: 
Orchestral Suite 
Mahler: Symphony No. 5 

Saturday, July 1, 8. -00 p.m. 

THE NATIONAL ORCHESTRAL 
INSTITUTE PHILHARMONIC 
Yoel Levi, Conductor 
Barber: School for Scandal 

Overture 
Haydn: Symphony No. 88 
Stravinslty: Rite of Spring 

Saturday, July 15, 8:30 p.m. 
RUDOLF HRKUSNY, pianist 



Sunday, July 16, 8:30p.m. 
PETER FRANKL, pianist 

Monday, July 17, 8:30p.m. 
CHARLES ROSEN, pianist 

Tuesday, July 18, 8:30p.m. 
TAMAS VASARY, pianist 

Wednesday, July 19, 8:30p.m. 
VLADIMIR VIARDO, pianist 

Friday, July 21, 8:30p.m. 
JORGE BOLET, pianist 

Saturday, July 29, 8:15p.m. 

WOODY HERMAN ORCHESTRA 
Frank Tiberi, Director 



All performances in Tawes Theatre, University of Maryland at College Park, except for July 1 
concert which will be in Meyerhoff Symphony Hall, Baltimore, Maryland 



COMPUMMTARYTICKErS 

Students who register for Summer 
Sessions, and students, faculty staff 
and alumni who purchase a Summer 
Activity Card are eligible for one 
complimentary ticket for each of 
twelve 1988 performing arts events 
listed above. 



HOWTOQUAUFY 

Registered Summer Sessions students 
present their Registration Card at the 
Tawes Theatre Box Office. Faculty 
staff, alumni and students not 
registered for Summer Sessions may 
purchase a Summer Activity Card at 
the Campus Recreation Services 
Window located in the Reckord 
Armory Lobby and then present the 
card at the Tawes Theatre Box Office. 



WHERE AND WHEN 

Tawes Theatre Box Office will be 
open Monday through Friday 12:30- 
5:30 p.m., and at 7:30 p.m. on 
performance evenings. Beginning 
Tuesday May 30, Summer Aaivity 
Card holders will be issued 
complimentary tickets on a weekly, 
first-come, first-served basis. A 
schedule of ticket distribution dates 
will be published and distributed to 
Summer Sessions registrants and 
purchasers of Aaivity Cards. 



For more information, call 454-5910. All programs subject to change. 



26 






Public Exposition 
of the State of the 
Art of String Quartet 
Playing in America 

Professionals, amateurs, 

teachers and students 

are invited to register to 

attend this collegia! 

meeting. 

Concerts by 

American String Quartet 

Angeles Quartet 

Audubon Quartet 

Broadway String Quartet 

Cavani String Quartet 

Chester String Quartet 

Cleveland Quartet 

Colorado Quartet 

Composers String Quartet 

Franciscan String Quartet 

Manchester String Quartet 

Mendelssohn String 
Quartet 

Muir Quartet 

New World String Quartet 

Orford String Quartet 

Really Eclectic String 
Quartet 

Turtle Island String Quartet 

igSg Winner of the Banff 

International String 

Quartet Competition 

Symposia Topics 

Staying Together 

Career Directions 

Repertoire Selection 

Instrument Making 

Rehearsal Techniques 

Inner Voices 

Intonation 

Composing for the 
String Quartet 



Exhibitions by 

Instrument and Bow Makers 

of the Violin Society of 

America 




^^te^^^jl/mierica^ 



STRING 

QUARTET 

CONGRESS 

June 19-23, 1989 




Michael Tree 

President 

UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND AT 
COLLEGE PARK 

and 

SMITHSONIAN INSTITUTION 
WASHINGTON, DC 



Accessory manufacturers 
Music Publishers 

Daily Sessions 

American Works for 
String Quartet 

Registrant "Play-Ins" with 
informal coaching 

Concurrent 
ASTA String 
Pedagogy 
Conference 

]um 19-24 

Gerald Fischbach, violin, 
Confer etKe Director, University 
of Maryland 

William Preucil, viola, 

University of Iowa 

Phyllis Young, cello. 
University of Texas 

George Vance, double- 
bass, Washington Suzuki 
Bass Project 

The Congress is organized 
and sponsored by The 
Maryland Summer Institute 
for the Creative and 
Performing Arts, University 
of Maryland, College Park, 
in cooperation with 
Chamber Music America, 
Amateur Chamber Music 
Players, Inc., and the Violin 
Society of America. Evening 
concerts to be held in the 
Baird Auditorium, Museum 
of Natural History, 
Smithsonian Institution, 
Washington, DC, are co- 
sponsored by the 
Smithsonian Resident 
Associates Program. 

For Registration Brochure and 
information: 

String Quartet Congress 
Summer Programs 
University of Maryland 
College Park, MD 20742 

Telephone 

(301) 454-5910 



II 




• •• 




Ninety talented 
young musicians 
from throughout the na- 
tion will be in residence, 
on full scholarships, to 
study the great orchestral 
literature with internation- 
ally-renowned conductors 
and principal musicians 
from America's leading or- 
chestras. Daily rehearsals 
will culminate in three 
public concerts: 

June 17 &" 24 
Tawes Theatre 

July 1 
Meyerhoff 
Symphony Hall 

Baltimore 



For More 
Information: 

The National Orchestral Institute 
Summer Programs 

University ofMarylaiui 
College Park, MD 20742 
C^O 1)454-5276 




University of Maryland 
College Park 

June 9 -July 1, 1989 



■ Catherine Comet 

Music Director 

Grand Rapids Symphony 

■ Kenneth Jean 

Music Director 

Florida Symphony Orchestra 

Associate Conductor 

Chicago Symphony Orchestra 

■ YoEL Levi 

Music Director 

Adanta Symphony Orchestra 



28 



TT i TTT 




THE UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 

International 
Piano Festival & 
William KapeU 
Competition 



Seymour Lipkin, Artistic Director 
July 13-22, 1989 
College Park, Maryland 



The 
Festival 



Registration Open to 
Pianists of All Ages 

Special Registration Rates 
for Students 



Hear Recitals, Lectures, and Masterclasses by Major Artists 



Saturday, July 15, 8:30 p.m. 
RUDOLF HRKUSNY 

Sunday, July 16, 8:30p.m. 
PETER FRANKL 

Monday, July 17, 8:30 p.m. 
CHARLES ROSEN 



Tuesday, July 18, 8:30p.m. 
TAMAS VASARY 

Wednesday, July 19, 8:30 p.m. 
VLADIMIR VIARDO 

Friday, July 21, 8:30 p.m. 
JORGE BOLET 



All performances in Tawes Theatre, University of Maryland at College Park. 



The Competition 

• Finals at the Kennedy Center with the National 
Symphony Orchestra 

• Over $40,000 in Prizes 

• Winner Receives $15,000 and New York Recital 



FOR INFORMATION 
CALL (301) 454-5276 

Donald Reinhold, Coordinator 
Piano Festival and Competition 

Summer Programs 
University of Maryland 
College Park, MD 20742 



29 



WILLIAM KAPELL (1922-I953) 




INTERNATIONAL 

WILLIAM KAPELL 

PIANO ♦COMPETITION 

July 13-2S, 1989 



30 



COURSE SECTIONS: 01 xy, SESSION I ONLY; 02xx, SESSION II ONLY. 



AEED 

AGRICULTURAL AND EXTENSION EDUCATION 



(AGRICULTURE) 



AEED 325 Directed Expertence )n Extension Education 1-5 credits; Grading Method: REG 
0101 Time Arranged Room Arranged Miller, M 

Prcrequisile: satisfactory academic average and permission of instructor Full-time observation and 
participation in selected aspects of extension education in an approved training county, 
AEED 487 Conservation of Natural Resources 3 credits. Gradtrig Method: REG/P-F 

Concurrent registration with AEED 497 required. Field trips; 6/10; 6/17; 6/28-6/30; 7/5-7/7. 
An $60 transportation fee for field trips will be assessed. 
0101 W7:0apm-10:00pm BIdg. SYM. Room 0115 Gibson Jr.. G 

Time Arranged Room Arranged (DIS) 

Designed primarily for teachers Study of slate's natural resources: soil, water, fishenes, wildlife, 
forests, and minerals: natural resources problems and practices Extensive field study Concentration 
on subject matter. Taken concunrntly with AEED 497 in summer season. 
AEED 489 Field Experience 1-4 credits; Gradina Method: REG 

Permission of department required. Contact department to make arrangements. 
0101 Time Aranged Room Arranged li^iller, M 

0201 Tirrw Arranged Room Arrariged Miller, M 

Planned field experience for both major and non-major students Repcatabic to a maximum of four 

AEED 497 Conservation of Natural Resources 3 credits. Gradirig Method: REG/P-F 
Concurrent registration with AEED 487 required. 
0101 W7:00pm-1 0:00pm Bldg. SYM, Room 0115 Gibson Jr., G 

Ttme Arranged Room Arranged (DIS) 

Designed pnmarily for teachers Study of slate's natural resources soil, water, fishenes. wildHfe. 
forests, and minerals: natural resources problems and practices. Extensive field study Methods of 
teaching conservation uicluded Taken concurrently with AEED 487 ui summer season, 
AEED 499 Special Problems 1-3 credits. Grading Method: REG 

Permission of department required. CJontad department to make an-angements. 
0101 Time Arranged Room Arranged Staff 

0201 Time Arranged Room Arranged Staff 

AEED 699 Special Problems 1-3 credits; Grading Method: REG 

Permission of department required. Contact department to make anangements. 
0101 Time Arranged Room Arranged Staff 

0201 Time Arranged Room Arranged Staff 

AEED 789R Special Topics: Supervised Occupational Experience Programs In Ag Ed 
3 credits; Grading Method: REG 
Permission of department required, This course will meet at the scheduled time for the first 
2 weeks of classes. Other meeting times are an^anged. Contact department to make 
arrangements. 
0201 W 6:00pm-9:00pm Bldg. SYM, Room 01 15 Cooper, E 

Time Arranged Room Arranged (DIS) 

AEED 799 Master's Thesis Research 1-6 credits; Grading Method: REG 

0101 Time Arranged Room Arranged Staff 

0201 Time Arranged Room Arranged Staff 

AEED 899 Doctoral Dissertation Research 1-8 credits; Grading Method: REG 
0101 Ttme Arranged Room Arranged Staff 

0201 Time Arranged Room Arranged Staff 



AGRICULTURE 



AGRI 



(AGRICULTURE) 



AGRI 389 Internship in Natural Resources Msnagement 3 credits; Grading Method: S-F 
Permission of department required. Natural resources management majors only. 
0101 Time Arranged Room Arranged Gibson Jr., G 



AGRO 



AGRONOMY (AGRICULTURE) 

AGRO 386 Field Work 1-3 credits; Grading Method: REG/P-F/AUD 
Permission of department required. 
0101 Time An-anged Room Arranged Staff 

0201 Ttme Arranged Room Arranged Staff 

AGRO 387 Flaw Work Analysis 1-3 credits; Grading Method: REG/P-F/AUD 
Permission of department required. 
0101 Time Arranged Room Arranged Staff 

0201 Time Arranged Room Arranged Staff 

AGRO 499 Special Problems In Agronomy 1-3 credits; Grading Method: REG/P-F/AUD 
0101 Time Arranged Room Arranged Staff 

0201 Time Arranged Room Arranged Staff 

AGRO 608 Research Methods 2 credits; Grading Method: REG/AUD 

0101 Time Arranged Room Arranged Staff 

0201 Time Arranged Room Arranged Staff 

AGRO 608A 

Research Methods: Reld Studies In Pedology 1-4 credits; Grading Method: REG/AUD 
Permission of department required. 
0201 Time Arranged Room Ananged Rabenhorsl. M 

AGRO 799 Master's Thesis Research 1-6 credits; Grading Method: REG 

0101 Time Arranged Room Arranged Staff 

0201 Time Arranged Room Arranged Staff 

AGRO 699 Doctoral Dlssertatton Research 1-8 credits; Grading Method: REG 
0101 Ttme Arranged Room Arranged Staff 

0201 Time Arranged Room Arranged Staff 



AMST 



AMERICAN STUDIES (ARTS AND HUMANITIES) 

AMST 330 Critic* of Anwrican Culture 3 credits: Grading Method: REG/P-F/AUD 
Meets USP Advanced Studies Analysis ol Human Problems requirement. 
0201 TuTti 9:00an>-12:CI0pm Bldg. TLF, Room 2108 Mintz, L 

Philosophies of American social purpose and promise Readings from "classical" Amcncan thinkers, 
contemporary social commentators, and American studies scholars. 
AMST 398 indapendant StudiM 1-3 credits. Grading Method: REG/P-F/AUD 

0101 Time Arranged Room Arranged Staff 

0201 Time Arranged Room Arranged Staff 



AMST cont. 



AMST 418A Cultural Themes In America: Culture and Society In American Humor 

3 credits; Grading Method: REG/P-F/AUD 
0201 TuTh 1 :00pm-4 :00pm Bldg. TLF, Room 2110 Mintz, L 

This course will examine humor as a reflection of, and influence on American values, beliefs, and 
social institutions. It will include theoretical discussions, an hisloncal survey, and a study of 
contemporary humor considered m a variety of sources — literature, journalism, graphic arts, the 
mass media, and oral traditions Aiteniion will t>e given to the consiruciion of stereotypes and to 
the treatment of imponani social concerns (the family, sexuality, class stniciure, political issues), 
AMST 416K Cultural Themes In America: Race In America: Theory and Policy 
3 credits; Grading Method: REG/P-F/AUD 
Meets USP Advanced Studies Development of Knowledge requirement. 

0101 MTuWThF 8;00am-9:20am Bldg. TLF, Room 21 10 Diner, H 

0102 MTuWThF 9:30am-1 0:50am Bldg. UF. Room 2108 Diner, H 

American culture has t)een, since its earliest days, concerned with categorizing and labeling people 
on the basis of distinguishable physical characteristics. The evolution of this tendency to link 
physical differences with mental and temperamental differences historically involved the fields of 
Ihe natural sciences, geography, ethnology, linguistics, theology, and literature. Race theory spilled 
over into American policies — both foreign and domestic — and shaped laws, mores, and the biases 
of racial theorists. Prerequisite: a prior course in American Studies, Amencan History, or 
Sociology 
AMST 426A American Cultural Eras: Social Dramas In American Cuttursi History 
3 credits; Grading Method: REG/P-F/AUD 
Meets USP Advanced Studies Development of Knowledge requirement. 
0101 MW 7:00pm-ia:00pm Bldg. TLF, Room 2126 Lounsbury. M 

Applying the methods of sociology, rhetorical analysis and anthropology, the course will explore 
the dramatic nature of face-to-face relationships, sniall-group behavior, and public media events. 
After placing American social dramas in historical perspective, we will focus on the 1960's, its 
'Ticrocs" (John F. Kennedy. Martin Luther King, filalcolm X>. communal activities (the Merry 
Pranksters, the Esalen Institute) and radical demonsUations (1964 Berkeley, 1968 Chicago). 
Prerequisite' a prior course in Amencan Studies, Amencan History or Sociology, 
AMST 428B American Cultural Eras: American Rim Culture In the 1960's 
3 credits. Grading Method: REG/P-F/AUD 
Meets USP Advanced Studies Analysis of Human Problems requirement. 
0101 MW 1 :00pnf>~4 :00pm Bldg. TLF, Room 2126 Lounsbury, M 

Investigating the interaction between the film medium and an era of significant cultural change, the 
course will emphasize; 1) institutional factors (the Hollywood industry, the avant-garde film critics) 
that influence the production and appreciation of the motion picture, 2) Hollywood genres (the 
horror film, the war movie, the gangster melodrama) undergoing substantial transformations during 
this period, 3) documentaries and experimental narrauve films exploring the medium as an 
intrument for social observation and reform Prerequisite; one of Ihe following: American studies 
course; a film course; a twentieth-century American history course; an art history course; a 
sociology course - 
AMST 696 Directed Readings In American Studies 3 credits; Grading Method: REG/AUD 
0101 Time Arranged Room Arranged Staff 

0201 Time Arranged Room Arranged Staff 

AMST 799 Master's Thesis Research 1-6 credits: Grading Method: REG 

0101 Time An-anged Room Arranged Staff 

0201 Time Arranged Room Arranged Staff 

AMST 899 Doctoral Dissertation Resesrch 1-8 credits; Grading Method: REG 
0101 Time Arranged Room Arranged Staff 

0201 Time Arranged Room Arranged Staff 



ANIMAL SCIENCE 



ANSC 



(AGRICULTURE) 



ANSC 386 Held Work 1-3 credits; Grading Method: REG/P-F/AUD 
Permission of department required, 
0101 Time Arranged Room Arranged Staff 

0201 Time Ananged Room Arranged Staff 

ANSC 387 Reld Work Analysis 1-3 credits; Grading Method: REG/P-F/AUD 
Permission of department required. 
0101 Time Arranged Room An^anged Staff 

0201 Time Arranged Room Arranged Staff 

ANSC 399 Special Problems In Animal Science 1-2 credits; Grading Method: REG/P-F/AUD 
Permission of department required. 
0101 Time Arranged Room An'anged Staff 

0201 Time Ananged Room Arranged Staff 

ANSC 660 Poultry Literature 1^ credits: Grading Method: REG/AUD 
Permission of department required. 
0101 Time Arranged Room Arranged Doen, J 

0201 Time Arranged Room Arranged Doerr. J 

Readings on individual topics are assigned. Written reports required. Methods of analysis and 
presentation of scientific malcnal are discussed. 
ANSC 699 Special Problems In Animsl Science 1-2 credits; Grading Method: REG/AUD 
Permission of department required, 
0101 Time Arranged Room Arranged Staff 

0201 Time Arranged Room Ananged Staff 

ANSC 799 Master's Thesis Research 1-6 credits; Grading Method: REG 
Permission of department required. 
0101 Time Arranged Room Arranged Staff 

0201 Time Arranged Room Arranged Staff 

ANSC 899 Doctoral Dissertation Resesrch 1-8 credits; Grading Method: REG 
Permission of department required, 
0101 Time Arranged Room Ananged Staff 

0201 Time Arranged Room An-anged Staff 



ANTH 

ANTHROPOLOGY (BEHAVIOR AND SOCIAL SCI) 

ANTH 101 Introduction to Anthropology: Arcliaaology and Physical Anthropology 

3 credits. Grading Method REGP-FAUD 
Meets USP Distributive Studies (B)Natural Sciences and Mathematics requirement. 
0101 MTuWThF 9:30am-10:50am Bldg TLF. Room 0124 Stuart, W 

May be taken for credit in the general education program General patterns of the development of 
human culture; die biological and morphological aspects of man viewed in his cultural setting. 
ANTH seOA Research Problems t-6 credits: Grading Method: REG/P-F/AUD 
Permission ol department required. 
0101 Meets JUN 5 to JUL 14 

MTuWThF 8:00ann-4:00pm Room Arranged Leone, M 



COURSE SECTIONS: 01 xx, SESSION I ONLY; 02xx, SESSION II ONLY. 

ARCH cont. 



32 

ANTH cont. 

ANTH 401 Guttural Anthropology: Principles and Procauea 

3 credits: Grading Method: REQIP-F/AUD 
Meets USP Advanced Studies Development ol Knowledge requirement- 
0101 MTuWThF12:30pm-1 :50pm BIdgTYD. Room 1132 Stuart. W 

Prerequisite: ANTH lOI. 102. or 221 An examination of the nature of human cultuit and its 
processes, both historical and functional. The apprxiach will be topical and theoretical rather than 
descriptive. 
ANTH 499A FMd Methods In Archaeology: Summer Field School In Archaeology 
1-6 credits: Gradirtg Method: REG/P-F/AUD 
See special programs ol catalog. 
0101 Meets JUN 5 to JUL 14 

MTuWThF 8:00am-4:00pm Room Arranged Leone. M 

ANTH 689A Special Problems In Anthropology 1-6 credits: Grading Method: REG/AUD 
0101 Meets MAY 30 to JUL 7 

MTuWTtiF 8:00am-4:00pm Room Arranged Leone. M 

0201 Time Arranged Room Arranged Stuart. W 

ANTH 699A Advanced FMd Training In Archaeology: Summer Field School In Archaeology 
1-6 credits: Grading Method: REG/AUD 
See special programs section of catalog. 
0101 Meets JUN 5 to JUL 14 

MTuWTiiF 8:0Gam-4:00pm Room Arranged Leone, M 

ANTM 70S Internship 6- 12 credits: Grading Method: REG/AUD 
Permission of department required. 
0101 Time Arranged Room Arranged (LAB) t/Vhitehead, T 

Prerequisite: ANTH 701 Problem-oriented internship with an appropriate pubhc agency or private 
institution under the direction of a faculty and agency supervisor. 
ANTH 712 Internship Analysis 3 credits: Grading Method: REG/AUD 

0101 Time Arranged Room Arranged Whitehead. T 

Prerequisite: ANTH 705. The preparation and presenlation of internship reports, development of 
skills in report writing and presentation. The completion of a professional quality report based on 
the internship experience. Review of problems in ethics and professional development. 



APPLIED DESIGN 



APDS 



(ARTS AND HUMANITIES) 

APDS 101 Fundamentals of Design 3 credits: Grading Method: REG/P-F/AUD 
0101 Meets JUN 5 to JUL 27 

MWF 9:00am-12:00pm BIdg. MMH, Room 2411 (U^) Roper, J 

Knowledge of basic art elements and principles gained through design problems which employ a 
variety of media. 
APDS 102 Design II 3 credits: Grading Method: REG/P-F/AUD 
0101 Meets JUN 5 to JUL 27 

MWF 8:30am-1 1 :30am BIdg. MMH, Room 2415 (LAB) Sham, F 

Prerequisite: APDS 101. Continued exploration of design as a means of visual expression with 
added emphasis on color and lighting. 
APDS 103 Design III: Tltree-Dlmenslonal Design 3 credits: Grading Method: REG/P-F/AUD 
0101 Meets JUN 5 to JUL 27 

MWF 1 :00pm-4:00pm BWg. MMH. Room 2415 (LAB) Sham, F 

Pre- or co-requisite: APDS 102. Creative efforts directed to discriminating use of form, volume, 
depth, and movement. 
APDS 210 Presentation Tschniques I 3 credits: Grading Method: REG/P-F/AUD 
Design majors only. 
0101 Meets JUN 5 to JUL 27 

TuTh 8:00am-12:30pm BIdg. MMH, Room 2411 (LAB) Davis, S 

Prerequisites: APDS 103 or equivalent. Open only to advertising design majoi^. Emphasis on basic 
drawing including the human figure and illustration techniques used in several altas of graphic 
design. 
APDS 237 Photography 3 credits: Grading Method: REG/P-F/AUD 
Advertisirig design majors only. 
0101 Meets JUN 5 to JUL 27 

TuTh 8:00am-12:30pm BIdg. MMH. Room 0110 (LAB) Elliott. L 

Prerequisites: APDS 101. 102, or equivalent Study of fundamental camera techniques. Exploration 
of the expressive possibilities in relation to the field of design and visual communication. 
APDS 337 Advanced Photography 3 credits: Grading Method: REG/P-F/AUD 
Advertising design majors only. 
0101 Meets JUN 5 to JUL 27 

TuTh 1:00p(T>-5:30pm BIdg. MMH, Room 0110 (LAB) Gips, C 

Prerequisite: APDS 237. Composition, techniques and lighting applicable to illustration, 
documentation, advertising desip. and display. 
APDS 431 Advanced Problems In Advertising Design 3 credits: Grading Method: REG/P-F/AUD 
Advertising design majors only. 
0101 Meets JUN 5 to JUL 27 

TuTh 8:00am-12:30pm BIdg. MMH, Room 1413 Thorpe, J 

Prerequisite: APDS 430 Advanced problems in design and layout planned for developing 
competency in one or more areas of advertising design, 
APDS 499A Individual Problems In Applied Design 3-4 credits: Grading Method: REG/P-F/AUD 
Permission ol department required. 
0101 Time Arranged Room Arranged Staff 

APDS 499S Indhrldual Problems in Applied Design: Advanced problems In Typography: 
Typography as Imagery 3 credits: Grading Method: REG/P-F/AUD 
Prerequisite: APDS 330. 
0101 Meets JUN 5 to JUL 27 

TuTh 1 :00pm-5fl0pm BIdg. MMH. Room 1413 Davis. S 

TuTh l:00pm-5O0pm BIdg. MMH, Room 1413 fMBJ 



ARCH 

ARCHITECTURE (ARCHITECTURE) 

ARCH 170 Intreductlon to the Built Environment 3 credits. Grading Method: REG/P-F/AUD 
Meets USP Distributive Studies (C) Literature and the Arts requirement. 
0101 MTuWThF 9:30am-10:50am BIdg. ARC, Room 1105 Staff 

Intnxhiction to conceptual, perceptual, behavioral and technical aspects of envu-onmenlal design: 
mediods of analysis, problem solving and project implemenlalion 
ABCH 220 History of Archltectura I 3 credrts: Grading Method: REG/P-F/AUD 

0101 MTuWThF 11 ;00am-12:20pm BIdg. ARC. Room 1101 Vann. R 

Survey of Westcm architectural history to the Renaissance. With consideration of parallel 
developments in the Eastern World 
ARCH 221 History of Architecture II 3 credits: Grading Method: REG/P-F/AUD 

0201 MTuWThF 11 :00am-12:20pm BIdg. ARC. Room 1101 Vann. R 

Prerequisite ,\RCH 220 or pennission of the instructor Survey of Western architectural history 
from the Renaissance to the Twentieth Century. With consideration of parallel developments in Ihe 
Eastern World. 



ARCH 242 Drawing I 2 credits: Grading Method: REG/P-F/AUD 

0101 TuTh 7:00pm-10:00pm BIdg. ARC. Room 1105 Staff 

0102 TuTh 7:00pm-10:00pm BIdg. ARC. Room 1123 Staff 

Introduces the student to basic techniques of sketching and use of various media. 
ARCH 312 Archttectural Structures I 3 credits: Grading Method: REG/P-F/AUD 
0101 Meets JUN 5 to AUG 25 

TuTh 7:00pm-^:30pm BIdg. ARC, Room 1101 Staff 

Prerequisites: MATH 220; and PHYS 122, Recommended: ARCH 401 For ARCH majors only. 
Principles of behavior displayed in architectural stniclural systems, elements and materials; 
equilibrium and stability, dislnbution of forces and su^sses, strength and stiffness. Resolutions of 
forces, reactions, movements, shears, delleclion. and buckling of systems and elements. 
ARCH 40«C Selected Topics In Archttecture Studio: College Park Studio 
3 credits: Grading Method: REG/P-F/AUD 
Prerequisite: ARCH 403 ot equivalent. 
0101 MWTh 1 :00pm-5:00pm BIdg. ARC. Room 1105 Staff 

0201 MWTh 1 :00pm-5:00pm Bkjg. ARC, Room 1127 Staff 

Comprehensive building and urban design; studio options in advanced topical problems. 
ARCH 470 Computer Applications In Architecture 3 credits: Grading Method: REG/P-F/AUO 
Pennission ol department required. 
0101 TuTh 7:00pm-l 0:00pm BIdg. ARC, Room 1115 OXonsId, A 

Prerequisite. ARCH 400 or permission of instructor. Inlroduclion to computer programming and 
utilization, with emphasis on architectural applications. 
ARCH 479 independent Studies In Archltectura 1-4 credits: Grading Method: REG/P-F/AUD 
0101 Time Arranged Room Arranged Staff 

0201 Time Arranged Room Arranged Staff 

ARCH 488C Selected Topics In Archttectural Preservation: Selected Topics Cape May Woritstiop 
3 credits: Grading Method: REG/P-F/AUD 
Permission of department required. Course is conducted at Hotel Chalfonte. Cape May, 
New Jersey. 
01 01 Meets MAY 29 to JUN 1 4 

Time Ananged Room Arranged Fogle. D 



AREC 

AGRICULTURE AND RESOURCE ECONOMICS 



(AGRICULTURE) 



AHEC 365 World Hunger, Population, and Food Supplies 3 credits: Grading Method: REG/P-F/AUD 
Meets USP Advanced Studies Analysis o( Human Problems requirement. 
0101 MTuWThF 9;30am-10:50am BIdg. HJP. Room 2242 Russell. J 

An introduction to the problem of world hunger and possible solutions to it. World demand, supply, 
and distribution of food. Alternatives for leveling off world food demand, increasing the supply of 
food, and improving its distribution. Environmental limitations to increasing world food production. 
AREC 399 Special Problems 1-2 credits: Grading Method: REG/P-F/AUD 

0101 Time Arranged Room Arranged Staff 

0201 Time Arranged Room Arranged Staff 

AREC 699 Special Problems in Agricultural and Resource Economics 

1-2 credits: Grading Method: REG/AUD 

0101 Time Arranged Room Arranged Staff 

0201 Time Arranged Room An-anged Staff 

AREC 799 Master's Thesis Researcfi 1-6 credits: Grading Method: REG 

0101 Time Ananged Room Arranged Staff 

0201 Time Arranged Room Arranged Staff 

AREC 899 Doctoral Dissertation Research 1-€ credits: Grading Method: REG 
0101 Time Arranged Room Arranged Staff 

0201 Time Arranged Room Arranged Staff 



ARHU 

ARTS AND HUMANITIES (ARTS AND HUMANITIES) 

ARHU 366 Held Work 1-3 credits; Grading Method: REG/P-F/AUD 

Permission of department required. ARHU 386 and ARHU 387 must be taken 
concunently, 
0101 Time Arranged Room An^anged Staff 

0201 Time Arranged Room Arranged Staff 

ARHU 387 Raid Work Analysis 1-3 credits: Grading Method: REG/P-F/AUD 

Permission of department required. ARHU 367 and ARHU 386 must be taken 
concunently. 
0101 Time Arranged Room Arranged DiPaolo. T 

0201 Time Arranged Room Arranged DiPaolo. T 



ART HISTORY 



ARTH 



(ARTS AND HUMANITIES) 



ARTH 100 Introdutrtlon to Art 3 credits, Grading Method: REG/P-F/AUD 

Meets USP Distributive Studies (C) Literature and the Arts requirement. 
0101 MTuWThF 9;30am-10:50am BIdg. ASY. Room 1213 Waller, D 

0201 MTuWThF 9:30am-10:50am BIdg. ASY, Room 1213 Finnani, D 

Major approches lo understanding the visual arts, and includes analysis of techniques, subject 
matler. and form Painting, sculpture, archilecturc. and the graphic ans, 
ARTH 260 Hlitory of Art 3 credits: Grading Method: REG/P-F/AUD 

Meets USP Distributive Studies (C) Literature and the Arts requirement. 
0101 MTuWThF 12:30pm-l :50pm BIdg. ASY. Room 1213 Spiro, M 

A survey of western an as enpressed through archileclure, sculpture and painting. Prehistonc times 
to Renaissance 
ARTH 261 History ot Art 3 credits: Grading Method: REG/P-F/AUD 

Meets USP Distributive Studies (C) Literature and the Arts requirement. 
0101 MTuWThF 11. 00am-12;20pm BIdg. ASY, Room 1213 Denny, D 

0201 MTuWThF 11 :00am-12;20pm BIdg. ASY. Room 1213 Johnson, L 

A survey of western art as expressed through architecture, sculpture and painting from Renaissance 
to the present 
ARTH 262 Arts of .Asia 3 credits: Grading Method: REG/P-F/AUD 

Meets USP Distributn/e Studies (C) Lilerahjre and the Arts requirement. 
0201 MTuWThF 12:30pm-l;50pm BIdg. ASY. Room 1213 Sandler, M 

The history of South and East Asian an from prehistory through the mid 19th century 
ARTH 320 Masterpieces ol Painting 3 credits. Grading Method: REG/P-F/AUD 

0101 MTuWThf^2:00pm-3:20pm BIdg. ASY. Room 3215 Denny, D 

A study of the contributions of a few major painters, ranging from Giotto to Titian. 




FORM BOOKLET CONTENTS: 

Page 

Visiting Graduate and Advanced Special Student Application 3 

Undergraduate Admission Application 5 

Schedule Request and Estimated Bill Form - Summer Session 1 7-9 

Schedule Request and Estimated Bill Form - Summer Session II 11-13 

Summer Residence Halls Agreement 15-16 



GUIDELINES FOR COURSE SELECTION 



Courses with multiple sections may be offered in both summer sessions. The session for which a specific section is scheduled is 
designated by the first two digits of the section number: 01 for Summer Session I; 02 for Summer Session II. 

If the course or section meeting dates deviate from the regular Summer Session dates, the specific starting and ending dates are 
displayed below the title for the course. The section number indicates the session to which a nonstancjard course or section belongs 
for registration purposes. 

Below are 3 examples of typical course listings in the schedule of classes. In using the registration forms students should take 
care that the form for the proper session is completed: the Session I form is for course sections beginning with 01 : the Session II 
form is for course sections beginning with 02. 

USE OF THE WRONG FORM WILL INVALIDATE THE REGISTRATION 

Additional information on nonstandard date courses may be found on page 6 of the catalog. In many instances registration, 
billing and grading procedures will be different for these courses. 

1 • ECON 205 Fundamentals of Economics 3 credits, grading method: Reg P~F'Aud 

USP Dislributive Studies {D) Soc and Behavioral Sciences Approved Courses 

0101 MTuWThFS BIdg. G. Rm 31 18 Stall 

0102 MTuWThFll BIdg GG. Rm, 31 1 1 Stan 
0201 MTuWThF9:30 BIdg, GG, Rm, 3109 SlatI 

IN THIS EXAMPLE, SECTIONS 0101 AND 0102 MEET DURING SUMMER SESSION I FIVE DAYS PER WEEK AT THE 
TIMES INDICATED. SECTION 0201 MEETS DURING THE SECOND SUMMER SESSION FIVE DAYS PER WEEK AT 
THE TIME INDICATED. SECTION 0101 MEETS IN BUILDING G (JOURNALISM BUILDING) AND SECTIONS 0102 
AND 0201 MEET IN BUILDING GG (COLE STUDENT ACTIVITIES BLDG). BUILDING CODES ARE LISTED WITH THE 
MAP AT THE BACK OF THIS CATALOG. 

£m DANC 100 Modern Dance I tor Non-Majors 2 credits, grading mettiod. RegiP-FiAud 

0102-12 Jun-24 Jun 

0101 MTuWThFSSG BIdg, W. Rm, 2102 Rosen, M 

0102 MTuWThFll BIdg, EE, Rm 11 15 Owens. G 
Basic principles ol modern dance, emphasizing fundamentals of movement, 

IN THIS EXAMPLE, SECTION 0101 MEETS FOR THE ENTIRE SUMMER SESSION I FIVE DAYS PER WEEK AT THE 
TIME INDICATED. SECTION 0102 BEGINS JUN 12 AND ENDS JUN 24 - THIS IS A NON-STANDARD DATE 
COURSE FOR SUMMER SESSION I. 

O. MUSC 448B Special Topics in Music Vocal Production and Repertoire 3 credits: grading 

method: Fieg'Aud 
0201 - 1 1 Jul - 28 Jul 
0201 MTuWThF9-12 BIdg, NN. Rm, 2123 Fleming. L 

IN THIS EXAMPLE, THIS COURSE IS A NON-STANDARD DATE COURSE WHICH IS OFFERED BETWEEN JULY 11 
AND JULY 28. THIS IS A SUMMER SESSION II COURSE AND THE SESSION II REGISTRATION FORM MUST BE 
USED. 



Any course that has the note "BY PERMISSION ONLY" requires a Department Stamp next to your course listing(s) on the 
Schedule Request Form. This stamp must be obtained from the Department offering the course prior to registration for the 
course. 



LIVE ON CAMPUS TfflS SUMMER! 





Enjoy livinf> on campus this summer in aparlmenis with single and double bed- 
rooms accommodating four or six students. Apartments are fully furnished, with 
carpeting and the comfort of air-conditioning. Apartments include full kitchens. 

Take a break from studying with the recreational facilities nearby. Tennis, basket- 
ball and volleyball are available for your enjoyment, or relax in the Community 
Center offering video games, snacks, laundry facilities and telephones. 





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Early reservations are advised, see the Summer Residence Halls Agreement, pages 15-16. 



NON-DEGREE APPLICATION FOR GRADUATE ADMISSION 

A non-refundable fee of U.S. $25.00 must accompany the application. 
Incomplete application will be returned. 

Are you claiming Maryland residency'' Q yes D "O (If yes. complete tine back of tinis application) 

Have you ever applied to our Graduate Scfiool before either as an Advanced Special or Degree Seeking Student? 

Do you qualify for tfie Golden ID. fee waiver? □ yes Q "o 

SOCIAL SECURITY NUIV1BER 



OD 



The Graduate School 
University of Maryland/UIVICP 
College Park, Maryland 20742 

D yes n no Year 









- 






- 












G 


R 


A 


D 




SUMMER TERM 1989 



Name: Last Name 



Present 
Address: 



City 



State or Country 



Zip Code 



MD County 



Phone Numbers 

Home: 

Work: 



Please check one criterion 



-Visiting Graduate 
-Institute 



-Advanced Special Student 
(check one criterion) 

a. Bachelor Degree viiith 3.0 gpa 

b. fvlasters or Doctoral Degree 

c. Bachelor Degree (4 yrs out) 

d Test Scores 



Citizenship U.S. Non-U. 

Non-US. Citizens or Permanent Immigrants 
Country of Citizenship 



City and Country of Birth- 
Type of Visa 



Permanent Alien Registration #_ 
Date of Issue 



The information In this item Is solely for the purpose of determining compliance with Federal civil rights law. Your response will not affect consideration of your 
application 



Sex: Male 

Female- 



-(mmddyy) 



-American Indian/Native Indian Hispanic 

-Black, not of Hispanic origin White 

-Asian/Pacific Islander 



List in chronological order, all colleges, universities or other Institutions of higher learning which you have attended, including the University of Maryland. Attach official 
transcript If required for admission as an Advanced Special Student. Visiting graduate students must submit a letter of permission from the applicant's Dean indicating 
that the applicant Is in good standing. 



INSCODE 


Name of Inst. 


Location 


From 


To 


Major 


Degree 


Date Awarded/ 
Expected 


Overall 
Average 











































































If appropriate, please complete the following and have the testing agency send OFFICIAL test results to the Graduate School. If you have not taken the required 
examination, indicate when you plan to do so. Our institutional code is 5814. 



Graduate Record General (Aptitude) 
Miller Analogies Test 
Graduate Management Admissions Test 
Test of English as a Foreign Language 



(GRE) Date- 

(MAT) Date- 

(GMAT) Date- 

(TOEFL) Date- 



Verbal- 
Score— 
Score- 
Score— 



Analytical- 



i(over) 

3 



List any work and military experiences (major categories and time periods only) for the past two years 
TITLE OR PERSON EMPLOYER 



MARYLAND RESIDENTS ONLY 

The following information is used to determine your eligibility for in-state status for admission and tuition purposes. The University reserves the right to request 
additional information if necessary 

YES NO 

□ □ 1. For the most recent 12 months has another person(s) provided half or more than half your support? 

2. Have you been, or will you be claimed as a dependent by another person(s) on federal and/or state Income tax 
returns for any of the following years? 1988? YES D NOD 1989? YES D NO D 

3. If the answer to 1 and/or 2 is yes, indicate name of person who has provided financial support or is claiming you as a dependent. 

Name Relationship to applicant 



If you, the applicant, answered "NO" to questions 1 and 2, please complete the following. 

♦•♦•IN ALL OTHER CASES^^^* 

The person listed in question 3 should complete the following. 



□ □ 4. Are you or your spouse a full-time member of the US Armed Forces'' 

If yes, you may omil questions 5-16. Please attach a photocopy of most recent orders, 
n D 5. Current Residence 



Street Address Apt. # City 



County State 



Zip 



M/D/Y M/D/Y 

(Dates Occupied) 



6. Previous Residence- 



Street Address Apt. # City 
□ □ 7. Do you own any property outside of (Maryland? Date of acquisition. 

If yes, for what purpose do you hold such property? 

n n 8- Are you a citizen of the United States' 

If no, type of visa 

Date visa issued 



County State 



Zip 



Alien Registration Number. 
Expiration date of visa 



n n 9 Are you registered to vote? 

a. If yes. in what state/country? 

□ □ 10. Do you possess a valid driver's license? 

a. If yes. in what state was it issued? 

□ n 11. Do you own a motor vehicle(s)? 

a. If yes. registered in what state 



b. Date of registration- 



b. Date of issue- 



b. Date of registration. 



n D 12. Do you have the use of a motor vehicle registered in another person's name? 
If yes. indicate the name and relationship of person 



□ □ 13. Have you paid (Maryland income tax for the most recent year on all earned income including all taxable income earned outside the State? 

If no, please state reason _^ 

14. List actual years and state in which you have filed a tax return in the last 3 years 



(State/Country Tax Year) (Stale/Country Tax Year] 
□ □ 15. If employed, is Maryland income tax being withheld? 

n D 16 Did you give a Maryland home address on most recent federal and state income tax forms? 
n D 17 Do you receive any type of financial aid (loans, scholarships, grants) from a state other than Maryland? 
YES NO If yes, from which state 



(State/Country Tax Year) 



I certify that the information submitted in this application is complete and accurate to the best of my knowledge. I agree to abide by the rules, policies and regulations of 
the University of Maryland if I am admitted as a student. 



Signature 



University of Maryland 
College Park Campus 

Undergraduate Application for Summer Only 

Do not use this application to apply for reinstatement or 

to apply as a degree seeking student. 

Please confine name and address to the spaces provided, abbreviate w/here necessary and leave a space 
between name and initial (if used)- DO NOT WRITE IN SHADED SPACES. 





































































U.S. 


Social Security N 


jmber 



























































































Last Ivtame 


































F 











































Middle Name 



Number & Street ot Present Mailing Address 



City 



County 



6. Length of time you've occupied the above address 



Country 



Area Code & Telephone Number 



State Zip Code 

5. n Male □ Female 



8. Please check the appropriate box below: 
I I White, not of Hispanic Origin 
I I Black, not of Hispanic Origin 



I I Asian or Pacific Islander 
I I Hispanic 



Former Name 



I I American Indian 
or Alaskan Native 



D 



n D 



CITZ APPFEE 



6 8 9 



9 9 9 9 



9. Are you a United States citizen' Q Yes O No If no. please complete the following: 
Country of birth Country of citizenship 



-Type of visa_ 



Alien registration number_ 



-Date issued- 



-Date of expiration- 



10. Please read instructions on page 8 and check one admission status: 
I I a. high school graduate. 

I I b. visitor from another college/university. 

I I c. coliegeuniversity graduate. 

I I d. former UMCP student who was in good standing or on academic probation at the conclusion of your last semester. 

11. Have you previously applied for admission to the University of Maryland? Q Yes Q] No 
If yes. which campus'' □ UMAB Q UMBC □ UMCP □ UMES □ UMUC 



UG TYPE ENSTAT 



Type of program: 
I I Undergraduate 
I I Graduate 



Term/Year Applied For 



Dates of Attendance: 



12. List the high school from which you graduated or expect to graduate. Also list all colleges and universities previously attended, including U. of MD. 
Failure to list all institutions previously attended may result in cancellation of admission and any registration 



Name of Institution 


Location 
City. State 


Attendance Dates 
Month and Year 




Grad 
Date 








From 


Through 










1 


1 


1 


1 


Secondary School or GED 


Credits 
Earned 




Degree 
Obtained 






1 


1 


1 


1 








College/University 




1 , 


, 1 








College/University 




I , 


, I 









Hiq 


1 School 


















College Board Code 















Previous Institution 
Code 



13. Are you currently attending the last institution mentioned? Q Yes Q No 

14. Are you in good academic standing at all previous institutions? Q Yes Q No If no, please explain_ 



MARYLAND RESIDENTS ONLY 

The following information is used to determine your eligibility for in-state status for admission and tuition purposes- The University reserves the right to request 
additional information if necessary. 

YES NO 

I I I I 15. For the most recent 12 months has another person(s) provided half or more than half your supporf 

16. Have you been, or w/ill you be claimed as a dependent by another person(s) on federal and/or state income tax 
returns for any of the following years? 1987? YES D NOD 1988? YES D NOD 

17. If the answer to 15 and/or 16 is yes, indicate name of person who has provided financial support or is claiming you as a dependent 

Name Relationship to applicant 



If you, the applicant, answered "NO" to questions 15 and 16, piease complete the following. 

**"IN ALL OTHER CASES**** 

The person listed in question 17 should complete the following. 

I I I I 18. Are you or your spouse a full-time employee of the University'' 

If yes. you may omit questions 19-32. Please attach a letter from your personnel office confirming full-time employment. 

(Dates Occupied) 

Current Residence 



19. 
20. 

D Dzi. 

D 22. 

D 23. 

D 24. 

D 25. 

D 26. 

O 27. 



Street Address 



Apt. # City 



County 



State 



Zip 



M / D ; Y M , D , Y 

(Dates Occupied) 



Previous Residence. 



Street Address Apt. # City County 

Do you own any property outside of Maryland'' Date of acquisition 

If yes, for what purpose do you hold such property'' 

Are you a citizen of the United States'' 

If no. type of visa 

Date visa issued 



Zip 



Alien Registration Number_ 
Expiration date of visa 



Are you registered to vote'' 

a. If yes. in what state'country'' 

Do you possess a valid driver's license'' 

a. If yes. in what state was it issued^ 

Do you own a motor vehicle(s)'' 

a. If yes, registered in what state 



b. Date of registration^ 



b. Date of issue_ 



b. Date(s) of registration- 
Do you have the use of a motor vehicle registered in another persons name'' 
If yes. indicate name and relationship of person 



Have you paid Maryland income tax for the most recent year on all earned income including all taxable income earned outside the State'' 
If no. please state reason 



28. List actual years and state in which you have filed a tax return in the last 3 years: , 



O 29. 
O O30. 
O 31. 

O 32. 
YES NO 



(State/Country Tax Year) (Slale/Counlry Tax Year) (Slat&Country Tax Year) 
If employed, is Maryland income tax being withheW 

Did you give a Maryland home address on most recent federal and state income tax forms'' 
Do you receive any type of financial aid (loans, scholarships, grants) from a state other than Maryland'' 

If yes. from which state 

Are you or your spouse a full-time member of the U.S. Armed Forces'' 



Sign 



Sign 



Sign 



By signing below, high school graduates and students currently enrolled in colleges other than the University 
of Maryland College Park Campus certify that they meet requirements for admission for the summer session(s). 
To be eligible for admission for the summer session(s), a high school graduate must have graduated with an 
overall "C" average in academic subjects. Applicants currently attending (or attended in the past) another 
college or university must be in good standing at that institution and have the permission of the parent 
institution to enroll for the summer session. 

I certify that I meet the requirements as listed above and that the information recorded on this form is correct. I 
understand that inaccurate or false information will result in my dismissal from the University. I also understand 
that this form does not place me into consideration for admission to the College Park Campus for the fall or 
spring terms. 



Sign 



Signature of Applicant. 



_Date_ 



DATE LT SENT 



Schedule Request Form 



Summer Session I 
— Only — 1989 



This form should be used tor the First Summer Session only. 

Mail-in registration requests must be postmarked by May 22, 1989. COMPLETE THE ENTIRE FORM. The top part of this form is a course 

request only. 



STUDENT NAME (Print Last Name F 


rst) 



























































































SOCIAL SECURITY NO. 



DAY PHONE NO. TODAY'S DATE 



(9-5) 



Were you registered at the University of Maryland College 

Park day campus: SPRING 1989 YES Q NO n 

IF NO Please read Admission Information in this catalog 



STUDENT S SIGNATURE 



ADVISORS STAMP 
AND SIGNATURE 



COURSE REQUEST: Complete this part with information found in the Schedule of Classes Section of this catalog. See page 1 of this 
booklet for information on determining the session of a course IF MAILING REQUEST, please provide alternate sections. 







COURSE INFORMATION EXAMPLE 


ALTERNATE 
SECTION 0....J 




GRADING METHODS ARE 


M 


A 


T 


H 




T 


1 





1 





1 3 





1 





2] [r_ 


A — Audit S — Satisfactory 

Fall 


COURSE PflEEIX 




COURSE NO SUFFIX SECTION NO CREDIT 










COURSE 1 
COURSE INFORMATION 


ALTERNATE 
SECTION sraa.nj 


DEPARTMENT STAMP 

MANDATORY FOR COURSES NOTED 

BY PERMISSION ONLY 
















r 


1 




^ 


1 




11 1 








COURSE PREFIX 




COURSE NO SUFFIX SECTION NO CREDIT 
















COURSE 2 




GfaOing 

Method 


DEPARTMENT STAMP 

MANDATORY FOR COURSES NOTED 

BY PERMISSION ONLY 



















1 







1 


_ 










COURSE PREFIX 




COURSE NO SUFFIX SECTWNNO CREDIT 
















COURSE 3 




taa 


DEPARTMENT STAMP 
MANDATORY FOR COURSES NOTED 



















1 







1 


















c 


DURSe 


PREf 


IX 




CO 


lURSE 


NO SUFFIX 


5ECTH 


-IN NO 


CREDIT 











ALL STUDENTS COMPLETE THIS SECTION:\n the space below list the cours'Bis) you have requested. The Registrations Office will 
record the action taken for each course in the space on the right marked "For Office Use Only, " and will return this part of the form to you. 
Any course without a Registration Stamp was not received for the reason indicated to the right of the course. The lower part of this form 
must be validated by the Registrations Office after payment is made. It is your proof of registration. 

FOR OFFICE USE ONLY 
SOCIAL SECURITY NO. 



n 



1 



1 



COURSE PREFIX COURSE NO SUFFIX SECTION NO CREDIT 



D^ 



COURSE NO SUFFIX SECTION NO 



][ 



1 



ALTERNATE 



D 



1 






1 




1 



COURSE PREFIX COURSE NO SUFFIX SECTION NO CREniT 



THIS MUST BE COMPLETED BY ALL STUDENTS. 

CHECK IF THIS IS A NEW/ ADDRESS 



SOCIAL SECURITY NUMBER 



ADDRESS 

CITY - STATE - ZIP 



students who register and later decide not to attend 
Summer School at the University must cancel their reg- 
istration prior to the first day ol class. Failure to cancel a 
registration will result in financial obligation even 
though the student does not attend class 



Estimated Billing Form 



1989 

SUMMER SESSION I ONLY 



ESTIMATED BILLING FORM INSTRUCTIONS: 

1. Add the number of credit hours on the Schedule Request Form. Only courses listed on that page should be included in this total. 

2. Locate your status (undergraduate, graduate resident, graduate non-resident) on lines 1-4 above, (Please note; A "Graduate Student" is one who has 
been admitted to the Graduate School either at the University of Maryland or another institution. Students who have graduated from this or another 
institution are not considered graduate students until they have been admitted to the Graduate School. Any student not admitted to the Graduate School 
is classified as an Undergraduate. If you have any questions on this or your residence status, please call the Undergraduate Admissions Office, 454-41 37 
or the Graduate Records Office, 454-5428. The University reserves the right to make the final and official determination of the students residence status.) 

3. On the line next to your status circle the number of credit hours you have requested above. The number below the hours circled is your cost of tuition. 

4. Enter the cost in the amount column on the right. If you are an Undergraduate Non-resident, enter the $20.00 Non-resident Fee (line 2) in the amount 
column. 

5. Line 5 lists mandatory fees charged to every student each summer session. The fees are therefore entered in the amount column for you. 

6. If you are requesting On-Campus Housing, enter the appropriate amount for 6 weeks on line 6 in the amount column. If your course schedule requires 
other than 6 weeks residence, enter the number of weeks, calculate the amount and enter it in the amount column of line 7. Attach the Residence Halls 
Agreement tear-off portion to the Schedule Request and Estimated Bill Form. 

7. If you wish to register a car for the summer, refer to line 8. Parking stickers must be picked up at the Motor Vehicle Administration Office on the campus. 
Note: UM students' stickers assigned the previous Fall semester are valid through August. 

8. If this form is accompanied by an Application, you must also pay an Application Fee. If this pertains to you, enter the appropriate amount on line 9. Note; 
only one Application for Admission and one Application Fee is required for both summer sessions 

9. To determine the amount you owe the University add all charges entered in the amount column Enter this total on line 10. Make a check for the amount 
owed payable to the University of Maryland. Write Student Social Security Number on face of check. You will be notified of any bill adjustments that are 
necessary. Payment must accompany the Estimated Bill Form. 

10. Students entitled to credit on their bills (contract, scholarships, etc.) must attach a purchase order from the agency paying their fees and/or certifying 
documentation for the scholarship credit. 

11. MONIES OWED THE UNIVERSITY WILL BE DEDUCTED FROM CHECKS RECEIVED PRIOR TO APPLICATION OF THE REMAINDER TO SUMMER 
SCHOOL TUITION. CHARGES INCURRED DURING THE SUMMER ARE PAYABLE IMMEDIATELY. 

12. Enclose the Schedule Request and Estimated Bill Form (and if applicable; application and housing request) along with your check in the return envelope 
provided herein, or use the following address; 

Office of the Bursar 
Summer Mail-In Registration 
Room 1108 Lee Building 
University of Maryland 
College Park, Maryland 20742 





ESTIMATED BILL FORM 


AMOUNT 1 


Undergraduate 
Students 


CREDIT HOURS 






1 


2 


3 


4 


5 


6 


7 


8 


9 


10 


Tuition 


99 


198 


297 


396 


495 


594 


693 


792 


891 


990 


$ 




Non-Resident Under 


graduate Fee (flat fee, not per cr. hr.) 


$20.00 


$ 




Graduate 
Students 


CREDIT HOURS 






1 


2 


3 


4 


5 


6 


7 


8 






Resident Tuition 


117 


234 


351 


468 


585 


702 


819 


936 






S 




Non-Resident 
Tuition 


207 


414 


621 


828 


1035 


1242 


1449 


1656 






$ 




Mandatory Fees 
For All Students 


Registration Fee 


$ 5 


$ 


5 


00 


Recreation Fee 


S 8 


$ 


8 


00 


Health Fee 


S 8 


$ 


8 


00 


Auxiliary Facilities Fee 


$ 8 


$ 


8 


00 


On-Campus Housing 
/ attach Residence \ 
I Halls Agreement Form 1 


Six Weeks 


$41 1 .36 


$ 




(must be at lea 


St 6 wk period) 


$ 




Vehicle Registration Fee: Campus Resident $17; Commuter $9 (choose o 


ie) 


$ 




Application Fee for New Students (non-refundable) 


$25 


$ 




Special Fees (consult course listings) 


$ 




TOTAL BILL 


s 





MAKE CHECKS PAYABLE TO UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND. INCLUDE THE STUDENT SOCIAL SECURITY NUMBER ON CHECK. 

One check may be used to pay for both summer sessions. Add the "Total Bill from both estimated bill forms to determine the total amount of your check. 

NOTE: Fees listed are subject to change at any time without advance notice. 



All tuition and fees subject to adjustment 



If you wish t o use your credit card, che ck one and fill in: 

I^S MasterCard n !^^i VISA D 



Customer Account Number 
Effective Date Expiration Date _ 



Your Signature 



10 



Schedule Request Form 



Summer Session 
— Only — 1989 



This form should be used for the Second Summer Session only. 

Mail-in registration requests must be postmarked by July 5, 1989. COfylPLETE THE ENTIRE FORI^. The top part of this form is a course request only. 



STUDENT NAME (Print Last Name First) 














1 

1 











































SOCIAL SECURITY NO 



DAYPHONENO. TODAYS DATE 



79- 5r 



Were you registered at the University of Maryland College 

Park day campus SPRING 1989 YES Q NO □ 

IF NO Please read Admissions Information in this catalog 



STUDENTS SIGNATURE 



ADVISORS STAMP 
AND SIGNATURE 



COURSE REQUEST: Complete this part with information found in the Schedule of Classes Section of this catalog. See page 1 ot this booklet 
for information on determining the session of a course. IF MAILING REQUEST, please provide alternate sections. 









EXAMPLE 
COURSE INFORMATION 




ALTERNATE 
SECTION 


R 


R- 


3RADING METHODS ARE 
- Reaular P — Pass/Fail 






M 


A 


T 


H- 




1 1 





2 





1 







3 







2 





2 


A — Audit S — Satisfactory 
Fail 




COURSE PREFIX 




COURSE NO SUFFIX SECTION MO 




CREDIT 












COL 
COURSE INFORMATION 


JR 


SE 1 




ALTERNATE 
SECTION 


Sol 


DEPARTI^ENT STAMP 

MANDATORY FOR COURSES NOTED 

BY PERMISSION ONLY 
















L [0 


2 











2 




1 








COURSE PREfix 




COURSE NO SUFFIX SECTION NO 


CREDIT 
















COL 


JR 


SE 2 






Gfadinq 


DEPARTMENT STAMP 
MANDATORY FOR COURSES NOTED 





















2 











2 
































l,UU"St-1tM« UUUMSt IMU 3Ur'.. .-,t .^ i .U". ".W LMtU" 
















COL 


JR 


se 3 






SI 


DEPARTMENT STAMP 
MANDATORY FOR COURSES NOTED 





















2 











2 








BY PERMISSION ONLY 














cr 


JURSE 


PREF 


X 




CO 


URSE 


MO SUFFIX 5 


EC 'If 


)NNO 




CREDIT 











ALL STUDENTS COMPLETE THIS SECTION: In the space below list the course(s) you have requested The Registrations Office will record the 
action taken for each course in the space on the right marked "For Office Use Only," and will return this part of the form to you. Any course 
without a Registration Stamp was not received for the reason indicated to the right of the cou rse. The lower part of this form must be validated 
by the Registrations Office after payment is made. It is your proof of registration. 

_ ,— ,— r— .— , . ^^^ OFFICE USE ONLY 

SOCIAL SECURITY NO. 



nn Rim m ei 






2 







COURSE PRtf 



COURSE NO SU' 



in iohi I i m 01 



COuRSf PR! f 



COURSE NO SUFF 



SEC I ION NO 



ALTERNATE 



IDEI 



COURSf PBEF 



COUHSt NO 






2 






^^'e^^'^t^^ 


FE 



THIS MUST BE COMPLETED BY ALL STUDENTS. 

a CHECK IF THIS IS A NEW ADDRESS 



SOCIAL SECURITY NUMBER 



NAME 



ADDRESS 



CITY - STATE - ZIP 



Students who register and later decide not to attend 
Summer School at the University must cancel their reg- 
istration prior to the first day of class Failure to cancel a 
registration will result in financial obligation even 
though the student does not attend class 



S 
s 
II 

11 



12 



Estimated Billing Form 



1989 

SUMMER SESSION II ONLY 



ESTIMATED BILLING FORM INSTRUCTIONS: 

1. Add the number of credit hours on the Schedule Request Form Only courses listed on that page should be included in this total. 

2. Locate your status (undergraduate, graduate resident, graduate non-resident) on lines 1-4 above (Please note: A "Graduate Student" is one who has 
been admitted to the Graduate School either at the University of Maryland or another institution Students who have graduated from this or another 
institution are not considered graduate students until they have been admitted to the Graduate School. Any student not admitted to the Graduate School 
is classified as an Undergraduate. If you have any questions on this or your residence status, please call the Undergraduate Admissions Office, 454-4137 
or the Graduate Records Office, 454-5428. The University reserves the right to make the final and official determination of the student's residence status.) 

3. On the line next to your status circle the number of credit hours you have requested above. The number below the hours circled is your cost of tuition. 

4. Enter the cost in the amount column on the right. If you are an Undergraduate Non-resident, enter the $20.00 Non-resident Fee (line 2) in the amount 
column. 

5. Line 5 lists mandatory fees charged to every student each summer session. The fees are therefore entered in the amount column for you 

6. If you are requesting On-Campus Housing, enter the appropriate amount for 6 weeks on line 6 in the amount column. If your course schedule requires 
other than 6 weeks residence, enter the number of weeks, calculate the amount and enter it in the amount column of line 7 Attach the Residence Halls 
Agreement tear-off portion to the Schedule Request and Estimated Bill Form 

7. If you wish to register a car for the summer, refer to line 8. Parking stickers must be picked up at the Motor Vehicle Administration Office on the campus. 
Note: UM students' stickers assigned the previous Fall semester are valid through August. 

8. If this form is accompanied by an Application, you must also pay an Application Fee. If this pertains to you, enter the appropriate amount on line 9. Note: 
only one Application for Admission and one Application Fee is required for both summer sessions 

9. To determine the amount you owe the University add all charges entered in the amount column. Enter this total on line 1 0. Make a check for the amount 
owed payable to the University of Maryland Write Student Social Security Number on face of check. You will be notified of any bill adjustments that are 
necessary Payment must accompany the Estimated Bill Form. 

10. Students entitled to credit on their bills (contract, scholarships, etc.) must attach a purchase order from the agency paying their fees and/or certifying 
documentation for the scholarship credit. 

11. MONIES OWED THE UNIVERSITY WILL BE DEDUCTED FROM CHECKS RECEIVED PRIOR TO APPLICATION OF THE REMAINDER TO SUMMER 
SCHOOL TUITION. CHARGES INCURRED DURING THE SUMMER ARE PAYABLE IMMEDIATELY. 

12. Enclose the Schedule Request and Estimated Bill Form (and if applicable: application and housing request) along with your check in the return envelope 
provided herein, or use the following address: 

Office of the Bursar 
Summer Mail-In Registration 
Room 1108 Lee Building 
University of Maryland 
College Park, Maryland 20742 





ESTIMATED BILL FORM 


AMOUNT 






Undergraduate 
Students 


CREDIT HOURS 








1 


2 


3 


4 


5 


6 


7 


8 


9 


10 


1. 


Tuition 


99 


198 


297 


396 


495 


594 


693 


792 


891 


990 


$ 




2 


Non-Resident Undergraduate Fee (flat fee, not per cr. hr.) 




$20.00 


S 






Graduate 
Students 


CREDIT HOURS 








1 


2 


3 


4 


5 


6 


7 


8 






3. 


Resident Tuition 


117 


234 


351 


466 


585 


702 


819 


936 






$ 




4. 


Non-Resident 
Tuition 


207 


414 


621 


828 


1035 


1242 


1449 


1656 






$ 




5. 


Mandatory Fees 
For All Students 


Registration Fee 




$ 5 


s 


5 


00 




Recreation Fee 




$ 8 


$ 


8 


00 




Health Fee 




$ 8 


$ 


8 


00 




Auxiliary Facilities Fee 




$ 8 


$ 


8 


00 


6. 


On-Campus Housing 
/ attach Residence \ 
y Halls Agreement Form ) 


Six Weeks 




$41 1 .36 


$ 




/. 


(must be at lea 


W 
St 6 wk p 


ks (a $68.56 wk 
eriod) 


$ 




8 


Vehicle Registration Fee: Campus Resident $17; Commuter $9 (choose one) 


s 




9. 


Application Fee for New Students (non-refundable) 




$25 


$ 




10. 


Special Fees (consult course listings) 


$ 




11. 


TOTAL BILL 


$ 





MAKE CHECKS PAYABLE TO UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND. INCLUDE THE STUDENT SOCIAL SECURITY NUMBER ON CHECK 

One check may be used to pay for both summer sessions. Add the Total Bill " from both estimated bill forms to determine the total amount of your check 

NOTE: Fees listed are subject to change at any time without advance notice. 



All tuition and fees subject to adjustment 



If you wish to use your credit card, check one and fill in: 

IfflfflS MasterCard D ^^S VISA D 

( ^P^r) I — ■! 

Customer Account Number 
Effective Date Expiration Date 



Your Signature 



13 



14 



How To Reserve On-Campus Summer Housing 

STUDY the terms and conditions under which housing is offered. These are in 
the Summer Residence Halls Agreement below and on the reverse. 

COMPLETE the Agreement form on the reverse and sign your name. Use this 
form only if your summer enrollment is at the College Park Campus (not 
University College). 

Do not complete the Agreement form if you will be enrolled and working this 
summer for Resident Life or Residential Facilities departments. Separate 
procedures apply; contact Resident Life at 454-2711 or 2100 Annapolis 
Hall for Instructions. 

DETACH the Agreement form at the dotted line and submit it with the appro- 
priate housing payment to the Office of the Bursar Payment must be 
included. The Agreement may be submitted along with the Schedule 
Request and Estimated Bill Form 

SUBMIT the Agreement by April 28 (recommended) in order to receive priority 
consideration for your assignment preferences. Housing will be pro- 
vided to all interested Summer Sessions students, regardless of the date 
the Agreement is submitted. 

KEEP the Agreement below for your records and information. Notice of your 
actual assignment will be mailed by Resident Life about 1 0-1 4 days before 
the start of classes 




SUMMER RESIDENCE HALLS AGREEMENT 



When the Agreement Form within this booklet is signed by the resident and confirmed by 
the University this Agreement provides the resident with the opportunity to live in a University 
summer residence hall, subject to all terms slated below. The resident is also subject to 
responsibililies and processes set forth in the Code of Student Condm t. Undergraduate! 
Graduate Catalog. Summer Sessions Catalog, and other relevant University documents. 

The residence hall facilities are provided as a service and are unique lo the University 
environment Therefore, the relationship between the University and the resident, as described 
within this document, should not be construed to constitute a landlord/tenant relationship. 
ELIGIBILITY Individuals must be properly registered for Summer Sessions coursework at the 
College Park Campus in order to be assigned and be eligible for the Summer Session housing fee 
of $4 11, 36 for each six-week session. Proof of payment, financial eligibility and proper registra- 
tion may be required before Resident Life will confirm services at the stated fee and/or permit 
occupancy. No provisions are made for spouses or family members. 

At Resident Life's discretion, other individuals may occupy a summer residence hall 
subject to a separate fee structure published annually by Resident Life, when these individuals 
are (a) UMCP students for the preceding spring or coming fall semesters, as demonstrated by a 
current Registration ID or proof of admission, or (b) students from another campus, college or 
university, or individuals of similar age and interests, who are visiting UMCP m pursuit of an 
educational goal and for whom written sponsorship has been provided by a Campus Department 
or faculty member, a faculty member or administrator from another educational institution, or 
an administrator of a government agency sponsoring an educational program. Proof of payment 
of established fees and of eligibility/sponsorship may be required before Resident Life will 
confirm services and/or permit occupancy, 

OCCUPANCY PERIODS Housing may be requested for Session I only. Session I! only, or for 
both Sessions I and II In general, summer occupancy is scheduled from June 4. 1989 to August 
25. 1989 for Session r and II registrants: from June 4. 1989 to July 14, 1989 for Session I only 
registrants and from July 16, 1989 to August 25. 1989 for Session 11 only registrants. 
ASSIGNMENT OF BUILDING AND ROOM Summer accommodations are coeducational. Men 
and women are housed on separate floors or wings of a building or in separate apartment'suite 
units. Daily hours for visitation may extend lo 24 hours. Resident Life does not discriminate in 
assignment on the basis of race, color, religion or national origin. Summer housing does not 
affect an individual's request for housing in any subsequent academic lerm- 

An individual who has this Agreement confirmed by Resident Life will be assigned to and is 
obligated to accept a building and room designated by Resident Life. Available accommoda- 
tions normally are in apartments (include kitchen and dining area) and suites (no kitchens, no 
cooking permitted) Both apartments and suites are fully furnished, and have carpeting, shared 
living room area. 1-2 baths, and single and/or double bedrooms- Individuals assigned lo suites 
must maintain an approved meal program, as determined by the Department of Dining Services, 
for the full period of assignment to a suite. 

Available spaces, especially singles, in each building type are limited. To assure thai these 
spaces are assigned as equitably as possible, all signed and completed Agreements received by 
Resident Life by April 28 will be submitted to a lottery drawing. The lottery will determine 
priority for building and room types. 

Agreements received after April 28 will be considered on a first-come, first-served basis for 
existing vacancies- 
Building assignments normally are confirmed in advance of the first occupancy date. This 
confirmation is mailed to the applicant's local address not sooner than about three weeks before 
the first occupancy date or within 10 days when the Agreement has been submitted less than 
three weeks before the first occupancy date. 

LIABILITY The University cannot and does not assume responsibility for personal accident, 
injury, or illness sustained by residents, guests or visitors, nor for the damage, theft, or loss of 
personal properly. The resident releases the University, its officers, agents and employees from 
any liability on account of any accident, injury, illness, property damage, theft, or loss. The 
University recommends an insurance carrier of the individual's choice to assure protection 
against such harm or loss. 



UNIVERSITY SERVICES: SPACE. UTILITIES. HOUSEKEEPING. FURNISHINGS AND RE- 
PAIRS This Agreement, when confirmed by the University, permits the individual to use 
residence hall facilities and receive services. Although the University will endeavor to provide 
the following services on a continual basis, interruptions may be necessitated by an act of God. 
an order of a University/civil authority, a limited or restricted control or availability of resources 
as determined by the University, maintenance activities, or any condition other than these that 
is reasonably beyond administrative control. Services are provided in accordance with stan- 
dards and levels of service determined by the University. It is the expectation of the University 
that services will be available and uninterrupted and that any disruption of services vital to the 
health and safety of residents will be restored within a reasonable time. 

The University will furnish a space in a residence hall and will grant the resident use of the 
facilities of the hall in accordance with terms and conditions specified within this Agreement. 

The University will provide heat, water, and electricity. The University is responsible for 
cleaning only the designated common areas on a scheduled basis. 

The University will provide to each resident one bed, one mattress and cover, one dresser, 
and one desk and chair set. The University will provide each bed/study room with a mirror, 
window shade, window screen, and smoke detector. 

The University will make all repairs and perform maintenance in the residence hall and the 
resident's room through authorized personnel. Repairs to the room or University furnishings 
will occur upon request or in accordance with routine schedules. Repairs and maintenance 
activities shall be conducted under a system of priority scheduling. 

CARE OF FACILITIES The resident accepts responsibility for self and guest(s); for care of the 
residence hall facility , assigned space, common areas, and University properiy ; and for prompt- 
ly reporting any interruptions of service or needed repair. 

The resident will take reasonable action to protect and prevent the building and property 
from wanton, reckless or negligent damage; will refrain from encouraging or participating in 
activities which cause damage; will report property or facilities damage; and will take reason- 
able action to assist the University in identifying individuals responsible for damage. 

The resident, at the time of checkout, will return the assigned space and its University 
furnishings in the same condition as they were received, with the exception of reasonable wear 
and tear, as determined by Resident Life. 

The resident assumes responsibility for the appropriate use of safely and security hardware 
within the assigned space and building and will immediately report loss of assigned key(s). 
CONDUCT The resident shall behave in a manner which facilitates a quiet, safe and secure 
residence hall environment conducive to the pursuit of academic goals. 

The resident shall insure that the roommate will have access to and equitable use of the 
assigned space. The resident will abide by the rules, regulations, policies and procedures 
established by Resident Life and the University. 

Rules and regulations are intended lo promote the safely and well-being of residents. They 
include, but are not limited to. prohibitions against: (al flammable materials; (b) weapons and 
firecrackers; (c) unauthorized modification of assigned space; (d) pets; (e) duplication and 
transfer of University keys; (0 disruptive/deslruclive behavior; (g) behavior such as intimida- 
tion or harrassment which threatens the properly, safety, security, health and well-being of 
others; (h) improper use of fire safety and building security equipment; (i) threats to and/or 
interference with University staff in the performance of iheir duties. 

Violation of rules and regulations as well as violations of probationary status can constitute 
grounds for termination of the Agreement, When determined by Resident Life that an individual 
has violated state or federal laws and/or University rules and regulations, and when such 
conduct indicates that the individual's residence in University residence halls constitutes a 
threat to the safety, health, or well-being of community members, disciplinary and/or adminis- 
trative action, including the termination of this Agreement, may be pursued. 

The resident shall be responsible for familiarity with all rules and regulations, the behaviors 
which can result in the termination of the Agreement, and the adjudication procedures. Informa- 
tion may be found in the Code of Student Conduct. 

USE OF ASSIGNED SPACE The resident agrees (a) lo live only in the space officially assigned, 
(b) not to sublet or otherwise use or grant use of the assigned space, residence hall common 
areas, or grounds for any unauthorized purpose, and (c) not to sell, solicit or conduct a business 
enterprise therein without the written permission of the Department of Resident Life. 

If a vacancy occurs in the assigned room, the remaining residenl(s) agrees to follow 
established procedures for the reassignment of another student lo ihal space. 

When vacating an assigned space, regardless of reason, the resident agrees to complete 
established checkout procedures. 



15 



LAST NAME, FIRST, Ml 



SUMMER 1989 RESIDENCE HALLS AGREEMENT 

D Male 
□ Female 



Social Security No. Requested 



HOME STREET. NUMBER 



CITY 



HOME PHONE 



ASSIGNMENT PREFERENCES — must be ranked 1, 2, 3 

Garden-style apartment with kitchen (Leonardtown complex) 

Approx. 30% of all available spaces 

Kitchenless suite in South Hill building. Approx. 40% of all spaces. 

No cooking; must purchase meal program (e.g., D.S. Cash mini- 
mum of $30.00 per 6-week session) 

South Hill apartment with kitchen. Approx. 30% of all available 

spaces 



DO YOU OBJECT TO A 
ROOMMATE WHO SMOKES? 



DO YOU n yes 

SMOKE? D no 

DO YOU LIVE IN UMCP CAMPUS HOUSING NOW? 

D no 

n yes 



n yes 
n no 



building & room # 

□ Additional $68.56 enclosed solely by current on-campus resident in 
order to request campus housing from end of finals in May to start of 
Summer Session I, subject to Resident Life approval and according 
to "Interim housing' procedure. 



DATES OF OCCUPANCY/PAYMENT 

n Session I only, June 4-July 14 
$411.36 housing fee enclosed 

□ Session II only. July 16-Aug. 25 
$411.36 housing fee enclosed 

n Sessions I and II 

$822.72 housing fee enclosed 

□ Eight-week course: June 4-July 28 
$548.48 housing fee enclosed 

NOTE: If course lasts fewer than 6 weeks, contact 
Assignments Office at 301 -454-5906 or room 2100 
Annapolis Hall to make special housing arrange- 
ments. 



I understand that I am obligated to accept co- 
educational summer housing upon Resident 
Life's receipt of this Agreement form I have 
read, understand and agree to abide by ail terms 
and conditions of residence halls occupancy 
stated in the Residence Hails Agreement pub- 
lished in the Summer Sessions Catalog 



STUDENT SIGNATURE 


AGE 


DATE 


PARENT SIGNATURE (i( studem 


under 18 yrs) 



FOR OFFICE USE 
DT RECD: 
ASSIGN BY/TO: 



CHANGES OF ASSIGNMENT An individual may move from an assigned space only with 
Resident Life's approval. Requests may be made lo the Community Office. No request which is 
based upon considerations of race, religion or national origin can be honored. 

To meet its responsibilities to student health, safety, and well-being and maintenance of 
property and facilities. Resident Life reserves the right to move a resident from one space to 
another, or. at Resident Life's discretion, to another occupied hall for which the individual is 
eligible. 

GUESTS A guest may stay in the assigned space only with the concurrence of the roommate(s) 
and for no more than three consecutive nights. Resident Life may invoke limitations of the guesi 
privileges. Guesl(s) must abide by established University/Resident Life regulations. 
UNIVERSITY PREROGATIVE The University reserves the right to change fees, to change its 
academic calendar, and to alter existing procedures. Such alteration would be pursued in 
accordance with appropriate University processes. 

ROOM ENTRY. INSPECTION, AND PROPERTY REMOVAL The University reserves the 
right to enter rooms for purposes of (a) improvements, (b) maintenance, (c) recovery of 
University/State owned property which is not authorized for use in the assigned space, (d) fire 
and safely inspection, and (e) actions necessary to insure the safety, health and general welfare 
of the resident or others and/or the protection of University or student property. 

A resident's request for maintenance and repair constitutes consent for room entry. 
Attempts will be made to provide prior notification whenever feasible. 

The University reserves the right to remove and dispose of any personal property remain- 
ing in a room more than 24 hours following termination of the Agreement, the resident's 
separation by/from the University, and/or the date the resident officially checks out of the room, 
A charge for costs incurred for such removal may be assessed to the resident. 

The University respects the resident's right to privacy within the assigned space and will 
give reasonable consideration lo privacy when entry is required. 

REVIEW OF HOUSING STATUS When determined that a resident his violated a term of this 
Agreement or any other Resident Life or University rule, regulation or procedure, the resident 
is subject to disciplinary sanctions, administrative action and/or financial responsibility for any 
damage, theft, or loss. 

When a violation is reported, and the established administrative review process to termin- 
ate this Agreement is initiated, the resident will be provided with the following procedural 
safeguards; (a) notice of the violations charged, (b) opportunity to respond to the charge, and 
(c) opportunity to appeal the decision lo terminate the Agreement. Administrative action by 
Resident Life under the Agreement may range from a verbal or written warning to change of 
assignment to termination of residence hall services. 

When disciplinary action is taken, procedures defined within the Code of Student Conduct 
apply. 

The Director of Resident Life or authorized representative may temporarily suspend a 
resident from residence halls pending initiation and/or implementation of administrative and/or 
disciplinary action when in the judgement of the Director the individual may be a threat to self 
and/or to the safety of other people or property. 

LIABILITY FOR DAMAGES The resident will be assessed charges fordamage. loss, or special 
service due to misuse or abuse of the assigned psace and the State property contained therein. 
When the assigned space is shared, and where the responsible resident(s) fails lo assume 
responsibility, an equal portion of the charges will be assessed to each occupant. 

IndividuaUs) identified as being responsible for damage, theft. loss, or special service 
whether intentional or accidental in common areas of the residential facility will be assessed the 
cost of repair, replacement or restoration. 

When individual responsibility cannot be determined, and where deemed necessary by 
Resident Life, residents will be held collectively responsible for damage, theft, loss, special 
service wilhin/for the common areas or to University property within the residential facility. 
Residents will be notified in advance of the initiation of a collective billing process and of the 
common areas for which they share responsibility. 

TERMINATION OF AGREEMENT Resident Life may automatically terminate this Agreement 
at any time and require the individual to forfeit the assigned space: 

a. When determined that information furnished by the individual or other person for the 
purpose of obtaining residence hall services is substantially incomplete, misleading, or 
false in whole or in part. 

b. When an individual, for whatever reason, is not eligible, or has lost eligibility, to reside in 
the building. In such cases, the individual may be required to check-out of the residence 
hall on the date of notification. 



c. When a convened "Review of Housing Status" determines that the individual has com- 
mitted a breach of residence hall rules and regulations. In such cases, continued access to 
any University residence hall may be denied. 

d. When facilities are found to be inadequate in number or physical condition. 

e. When an individual has failed to properly execute or complete all terms and conditions of a 
Residence Halls Agreement 1988-1989. or had such Agreement terminated for disciplin- 
ary/behavioral reasons. 

f. When an individual (1) fails to properly check-in to the assigned space (i.e.. no-show) or 
(2) fails to notify Resident Life of delayed arrival by 12 noon of the first class day, or within 
72 hours after receipt of the assignment if the assignment is made after classes begin. 

CONFIRMATION OF AGREEMENT The individual and parent or guardian if student is under 
18 must sign and submit the Summer Residence Halls Agreement ioxm without alteration. This 
Agreement shall not be accepted by the University nor does the student have permission to 
reside in a University residence hall until the applicant has been provided with a confirmation of 
residence hall services or other notification that an assignment has been made. 
RELEASE PRIOR TO OCCUPANCY PERIOD Voluntary release from this Agreement will be 
approved by Resident Life, prior to the date services may be claimed and without the individual 
incurring any financial obligation, when written notice signed by the individual is received by 
Resident Life on or before May 15, 1989 for Session I or June 26. 1989 for Session II. If notice is 
received after these dates, but before the first day of classes of the term in question, the 
individual, regardless of University status at the date of release from the Agreement. wilJ be 
charged as follows: 



Notice for Session I by Amount 



Notice for Session It by Amount 



May 15 


$ 0.00 


June 26 


$ 0.00 


May 16-22 


$ 68.56 


June 26-July 3 


$ 68.56 


May 23-29 


$137.12 


July 4-10 


$137.12 


May 30-June 5 


$205.68 


July 11-17 


$205.68 


No-show/No notice 


$205.68 


No-show.'No notice 


$205.68 


to Resident Life 




to Resident Life 




by June 5 




by July 17 





RELEASE DURING OCCUPANCY PERIOD Resident Life will release an individual from this 
Agreement after services are claimed, without the student incurring any financial obligation 
beyond charges associated with occupancy to date . when Resident Life has received proof from 
the student of withdrawal from Summer Sessionsor notice signed by the student that, regardless 
of reason, the assigned space will be vacated three weeks or more after this notice to Resident 
Life. If proof of withdrawal is not received, or if notice that the resident will check out is 
received less than three weeks before the actual departure, the following release charges will be 
incurred: 



CANCELLATION NOTICE 
RECD BY RESIDENT LIFE 

More than three weeks 

before actual departure 
Two to three weeks 

before actual departure 
One to two weeks 

before actual depanure 
Less than one week 

before actual departure 



AMOUNT OF RELEASE 
CHARGE 

$ 0.00 

S 68.56 

$137.12 

$205.68 



CANCELLATION PROCEDURE Requests for release from this Agreement must be made in 
writing and directed specifically to Resident Life. NOTICE TO ANY OTHER UNIVERSITY 
OFFICE WILL NOT INSURE RELEASE 

REFUNDS AND CREDITS Refunds and credits for housing fees will not be approved until 
release from this Agreement has been secured and checkout has been completed. Charges and 
credits are based upon the weekly cost of housing services. Appropriate release charges are 
assessed in addition to charges for housing services from the week during which services must 
be claimed through the week during which checkout is completed. Failure to checkout by the 
date specified by the resident when requesting release from this Agreement will decrease the 
amount of credit. No credit is approved if checkout occurs during the last three weeks of each 
session, or if the occupancy period is three weeks or less. Refund, if due. must be requested in 
writing from the Bursar. 



16 



COURSE SECTIONS: 01 xx, SESSION I ONLY; 02xx, SESSION II ONLY. 



33 



ARTH cont. 



ARTH 386 FWd Work 1-3 credits. Grading Method: REG/P-F/AUD 
Permission of department required. 
0101 Time Arranged Room Arranged Staff 

0201 Time Arranged Room Arranged Staff 

ARTH 387 Held Work Analysis 1-3 credits; Grading Method: REGP-FAUD 
Permission of department required. 
0101 Time Airanged Room Arranged Staff 

0201 Time Arranged Room Arranged Staff 

ARTH 450 20th Cerrtury Art 3 credits; Grading Method: REG/P-F/AUD 

0101 MTuWThF 9:30am- 10 50am BIdg. ASY, Room 3215 Wyss. E 

Painting, sculpture and aa-hilcclure I'rom the late I9lh i.cntury to 1920. 
ARTH 451 20th Century Art 3 credits: Grading Method: REG P-FAUD 

0201 MTuWThF 11 00am-12;20pm BIdg. ASY, Room 3215 Peters-Campbell. J 

Painting, sculpture and architecture from 1920 to the present 

ARTH 476 Hlttofv Of American Art to 1900 5 credits; Grading Method: REGP-F/AUD 
0201 MTuWThF 2:00pm-3:20pm BIdg ASY. Room 3215 Ston-, S 

An styles among the segmeniary. centralised and nomadic people of Africa. The iconography and 
function of theu^ an and its' relationship to their vanous societies, cults and ceremonies 
ARTH 498 Directed Studies In Art History I 2-3 credits; Grading Method: REG/P-F/AUD 
0101 Time Arrar>ged Room Arranged Staff 

0201 Time Arrar>ged Room Arranged Staff 

ARTH 499 Directed Studies In Art History 11 2-3 credits; Grading Method: REaP-F/AUD 
0101 Time Arranged Room Arranged Staff 

0201 Time Arranged Room Arranged S:aff 

ARTH 698 Directed Graduate Studies In Art History 3 credits: Grading Method: REGAUD 
0101 Time Arranged Room Arranged Staff 

0201 Time Arranged Room Arranged Staff 

ARTH 699A Special Topics In Art History: The Art and Archaeology of Mosaics 
3 credits; Grading Method: REGAUD 
Permission of department required. 
0101 MWF 3:30pfTV^:00pm BIdg. ASY. Room 4206 (DIS) Sprro. M 

ARTH 699B Special Topics In Art History: Buddhist iconography 

3 credits. Grading Method: REGAUD 
Pennisston of department required, 
0201 MWF 3:30pm~6:00pm BIdg. ASY. Room 4206 (DIS) Sandler. M 

ARTH 796 Directed Graduate Studies In Art History 3 credits; Grading Method: REGAUD 
0101 Time Arranged Room Arranged Staff 

0201 Time An-anged Room Arranged Staff 

ARTH 799 Master's Thesis Research 1-6 credits; Grading Method: REG 

0101 Time Arranged Room Arranged Staff 

0201 Time Arranged Room Arranged Staff 

ARTH 899 Doctoral Dissertation Research 1-8 credits; Grading Method: REG 

0101 Time Ananged Room Arranged Staff 

0201 Time Arranged Room Arranged Staff 



ART STUDIO 



ARTS 



(ARTS AND HUMANITIES) 



ARTS 100 Elements of Design 3 credits: Grading Method: REG P-FAUD 

0101 MTuWThF 3 OOpm-5 00pm BIdg, ASY, Room 2314 (LAB) Staff 

0201 MTuWThF 9 30am-1 1:30am BIdg ASY, Room 2314 fMB; Craig. P 

Pnnciples and elements of design through manipulation and organization of matenals in t 

three dm 



ABTS 110 Elements of Drawing 3 credits: Gradirtg Method: REG/P-F'AUD 

0101 MTuWThF 8:00am-10:30am BIdg. ASY, Room 231 7 (L4S; NIese, H 

0201 MTuWThF 12;30pn>-3:00pm BIdg. ASY, Room 231 7 ('MS; Craig, P 

An introductory cour^ with a variety of media and related techniques Problems based on still life. 

figure and nature 

ARTS 200 Intermediate Design 3 credits: Grading Method: REG/P-F/AUD 

0101 MTuWThF 3:00pm-5:00pm BIdg. ASY, Room 2318 MS^ Staff 

0201 MTuWThF 9:30an>-1 1 ;30am BIdg. ASY, Room 2318 (LAB) Craig. P 

Prerequisites: ARTS 100. 110 A continuation of Design I with more individually stnictuied 
problems in terms of form, composition and meaning 
ARTS 208C Design: Figure Modeling 3 credits. Grading Method: REG/P-F/AUD 

0201 MTuWThF 12 :30pm-3 00pm BIdg. ASY, Room 1310 CMBj Blotner, P 

ARTS 210 intermediate Draiwlng 3 credits: Grading Method REG P-FAUD 

0101 MTuWThF 8:00am-10 30am BIdg ASY, Room 2321 (lAB) Niese, H 

0201 kJTuWThF 12:30pm-3 00pm BIdg. ASY, Room 2321 (U^B) Craig, P 

Preretjuisiles: ARTS 1(10 and 1 10 Emphasis on understanding organic form, as related to study 

from the human figure and to pictonal composition 

ARTS 320 Elements o) Painting 3 credits: Grading Method: REG/P-FAUD 

0101 MTuWThF 12:30prrv3:00pm BIdg. ASY, Room 3322 (LAB) Klank, R 

Prerequisite ARTS 210 Ba.sic tools and language of painting Oil and/or water-based paints 
ARTS 334 Elements o1 Sculpture: Construction 3 credits: Grading Method: REG/P-F/AUD 
0201 MTuWThF 3:00pnn-5 30pm BIdg, ASY, Room 1310 (LAB) Blotner, P 

Prerequisite ARTS 210 Baiic techniques and processes related to metals, plastics, fiberglass, and 

ARTS 418 Drawing 3 credits: Grading Method. REG/P-EAUD 

0101 MTuWThF eoOam-lOSOam BIdg ASY, Room 232WMfl; Niese, H 

0201 MTuWThF 12 30pm-3 OOpm BIdg ASY, Room 2321 (LAB) Craig, P 

ARTS 428 Painting 3 aedits. Grading Method: REG/P-FAUD 
Repeatable up to 12 credits 
0101 MTuWThF 12:30pnv-3:0Cpm BIdg, ASY, Room 3322 (LAB) Klank, H 

ARTS 498 Directed Studies In Studio Art 2-3 credits: Grading Method: REG/P-F/AUD 
0101 Time Arranged Room Arranged Staff 

0201 Time A/ranged Room Arranged Staff 

ARTS 698 Directed Graduate Studies in Studio Art 3 credits. Grading Method: REGiAUD 
0101 Time Arranged Room Arranged Staff 

0201 Time Arranged Room Arranged Staff 

ARTS 798 Directed Graduate Studies in Studio Art 3 credits. Grading Method: REG/AUD 
0101 Time A/ranged Room Arranged Stall 

0201 Time A/ranged Room Arranged Staff 

ARTS 799 Master's Thesis Research t-6 credits. Grading Method REG 

0101 Time Arranged Room Arranged Staff 

0201 Time Arranged Room Arranged Staff 



ASTRONOMY 



ASTR 



(COMP, MATH, AND PHYS SCI) 



ASTR 100 introduction to Astronomy 3 credits. Grading Method. REG P-FAUD 

Course meets University Studies Program Distributive Studies non-iab science and 
mathematics requirement. II ASTR 1 10 or 111 are taken at tfie same or at a later time, the 
combination may be counted as lab science requirement. 
0101 MTuWThF 9:30am-1 0:50am BIdg, CSS, Room 1113 Harrington, J 

0201 MTuWThF 9:30am-10:50am BIdg CSS, Room 1113 Matthews. T 

An elementary course in descnptivc a.sironomy. especially appropriate for non-science students. 
Sun. mtwn. planets, stars and nebulae, galaxies, evolution. Credit for ASTR 100 cannot tie 
obtained after, or simultaneously with, receiving credit for any astronomy course numl)cred 150 or 
higher 
ASTR 110 Astronomy Laboratory 1 credit; Grading Method: REG/P-F/AUD 

0101 TuTh 1 ;O0prT>-3:00pm BIdg. CSS, Room 1 109 (LAB) Stafi 

0201 TuTh 1 :00pm-3:00pm BIdg CSS. Room 1109 (LAB) Staff 

Prercquisile; previous or concurrent enrollment in ASTR 100 Exercises include use of photographs 
of moon, stars, nebulae and galaxies and spectra; expenments demonstrating scientific concepts 
used in astronomy Daytime and nightime observations if weather permits. Appropriate for 
non-science majors 
ASTR 288 Special Projects in Astronomy 1-3 credits; Grading Method: REG/P-F/AUD 
Permission of department required. 
0101 Time Arranged Room Arranged Staff 

0201 Time Arranged Room Arranged Staff 

ASTH 330 Solar-System Astronomy 3 credits; Grading Method: REG/P-F/AUD 

Meets USP Advanced Studies Development of Knowledge requirement. 
0101 MTuWThF 12:30pm-1 :50pm BIdg. CSS. Room 1113 Harrington. J 

Prerequisite: ASTR 100 and completion of University Studies requirement in the natural science, or 
consent of instructor Designed pnmarily for non-physicaJ -science majors The structure of planets 
and of their atmospheres, the nature of comets, asleriods. and satellites. Companson of vanous 
theories for the origin of the solar system Emphasis on a descnplion of recent data and 
interpretation. 
ASTR 380 Life In the Universe 3 credits; Grading Method: REG/P-F/AUD 

Meets USP Advanced Studies Development ol Knowledge requirement, 
0201 MTuWThF 12:30pm-1 :50pm BIdg, CSS. Room 1113 Matthews. T 

Prerequisite: ASTR 100 and completion of University Studies requirement in the natural science, or 
consent of instructor Designed primarily for non-physical science majors. Study of the astronomical 
perspective on the conitions for the origin and existence of life. Communication with 
extraterrestnal life 
ASTR 498 Special Problems In Astronomy 1-6 credits; Grading Method: REG/P-F/AUD 
Permission of department required. 
0101 Time Arranged Room Arranged Staff 

0201 Time Arranged Room Arranged Staff 

ASTR 699 Special Problems In Advanced Astronomy 1-6 credits; Grading Method: REG/AUD 
0101 Time Arranged Room Arranged Staff 

0201 Time Arranged Room Arranged Staff 

ASTR 799 Master's Thesis Research 1-6 credits; Grading Method: REG 

0101 Time Arranged Room Arranged Staff 

0201 Time Arranged Room Arranged Staff 

ASTR 699 Doctoral Dissertation Research IS credits; Grading Method: REG 
0101 Time Arranged Room Arranged Staff 

0201 Time Arranged Room Arranged Staff 



BCHM 



BIOCHEMISTRY (LIFE SCIENCES) 

BCHM 261 Elements of Biochemistry 3 credits; Grading Method: REG/P-F/AUD 
0101 MTuWThF 9:30am-10:50am BIdg, CHM. Room 1402 Staff 

Prerequisite: CHEM 104 or 233 or 235, For undergraduate students who desire a onc-semesler 
biochemistry course rather than a two-semester sequence Basic chemistry and metabolism of most 
molecules of biological importance Not open to students with credit in BCHM 461 
BCHM 461 Biochemistry I 3 credits; Grading Method: REG/P-F/AUD 

0101 MTuWThF 9:30am-10:50am BIdg CHM, Room 1407 Staff 

Prerequisites. CHEM 243 or 245, or permission of instniclor. A comprehensive introduction to 
general biochemistry. The chemistry and metabolism of carbohydrates, lipids, nucleic acids, and 

BCHM 462 Biochemistry 11 3 credits; Grading Method: REG/P-F/AUD 

0201 MTuWThF 9:30am-10:50am BIdg. CHM. Room 1407 Staff 

Prerequisite BCHM 461 A conlinualion of BCHM 461. 

BCHM 699 Special Problems In Biochemistry 1-6 credits: Grading Method: REG/AUD 

0101 Time Arranged Room Arranged Staff 

0201 Time Arranged Room Arranged Staff 

BCHM 799 Master's Thesis Research 1-6 credits. Grading Method: REG 

0101 Time Arranged Room Arranged Staff 

0201 Time Arranged Room Arranged Staff 

BCHM 899 Doctoral Dissertation Research i-8 credits. Grading Method: REG 

0101 Time Arranged Room Arranged Staff 

0201 Time Arranged Room Arranged Staff 



BIOL 



BIOLOGY (LIFE SCIENCES) 

BIOL 106 Principles of Biology II 4 credits: Grading Method REG. P-FAUD 

Meets USP Distributive Studies (B|Nalural Sciences and Mathematics requirement 

0201 MTuWTIlF Il:00am-12:20pm BIdg ZOP, Room 1238 Kent, B 
TuWTh 8 OOam-1 1 :00am BIdg ZOP. Room 021 3 (LAB) 

0202 MTuWTtiF 11 :00am- 12 :20pm BIdg. ZOP, Room 1238 Kent, B 
TuWTh 1 :00pm-4:00pm BIdg. ZOP. Room 0213 (LAB) 

Basic pnnciples of biology with special emphasis on organismic. ecological and evolutionary 
biology. For science majors 



BMGT 



BUSINESS AND MANAGEMENT (BUSINESS AND MANAGEMENT ) 

BMGT 110 Introduction to Business and Management 3 credits: Grading Method REGP-F/AUD 
0101 MW 7 OOpm- 10 OOpm BIdg LEF, Room 2166 Staff 

0201 MTuWThF 9 30am-10 50am BIdg. TYD, Room 1140 Staff 

A survey of the field of business, including ils environmenl, organization, overall and functional 

management, and current issues and development:^. 



COURSE SECTIONS: 01 xx, SESSION I ONLY; 02xx, SESSION II ONLY. 

BMGT cont. 



34 

BMGT cont. 

BMGT 220 Principles of Accounting I 3 aedils. Gradinq Method: REG 

0101 MTuWThF9 30am-10 50am BIdgTYD, Room 1101 Loeb, M 

0102 MTuWThF 11:00am-12:20pm BIdgTYD. Room 0117 Loeb, M 

0103 MW 7 :00pm- 10 :00pm BIdg. TYD, Room 0101 Sta« 

0104 TuTh 7:00pm-10:00pm BIdg, LEF. Room 1221 Stall 

0201 MTuWThF9:30am-10:50am BIdg, TYD, Room 0117 Staff 

0202 TuTti 7:00pn>-10:00pm BIdg, TYD, Room 0111 Staff 

0203 MW 7 :00pm- 10:00pm BIdg, TYD, Room 1108 Staff 

Sophomore standing Study ot ttie bask pnnciples of accounting for business emcrpnses 
BMGT 221 Principles of Accounting II 3 aedils; Grading Method: REG 

0101 MTuWTtlF 8:00am-9:20am BIdg, TYD, Room 2106 Staff 

0102 MTuWThF 9 30am-10:50am BIdg, TYD, Room 2106 Staff 

0103 TuTti 7 OOpm-lOOOpm BIdg TYD, Room 2108 Staff 

0201 MTuWTtlF 2:00pm-3:20pm BIdg TYD, Room 2106 Staff 

0202 MW 7 00pm- 10 :00pm BIdg, TYD, Room 2106 Staff 

Prcrcquisilc BMGT 220 Conlinualion of BMGT 220 
BMGT 230 Business Statistics 3 credits: Grading Method: REG 

0101 MTuWTtlF 11 00am- 12 20pm BIdg TYD, Room 0102 Widtielm, W 

0102 TuTh 7:00pm-10:00pm BIdg, TYD, Room 1108 Afm, S 

0201 MTuWTtlF 8:00am-9:20am BIdg, TYD. Room 1128 Staff 

0202 MTuWThF 9:30am-10:50am BIdg, TYD, Room 1108 Staff 

0203 TuTh 7:00pm-10:00pm BIdg, TYD, Room 0101 Staff 

Prerequisite: MATH 220, Nol open to students who have completed BMGT 231, ENEE 324, or 
STAT 400. Credit will be granled for only one of the following: AREC 484. BIOM 301, BMGT 
2.30. CNEC 400. ECON 421. EDMS 451. GEOG 305, GVPT 422. PSYC 200. SOCY 201. LIRBS 
350. or TEXT 400, Introductory course in probabilistic and statistical concepts including 
descriptive statistics, set-theoretic development of probability, the properties of discrete and 
continuous random variables, sampling theory, estimation, hypothesis testing, regression, decision 
theory and the application of these concepts to problem solving in business and management This 
course does not meet requirements for management science and statistics majors, 

BMGT 231 Statistical Models For Business 3 credits: Grading Method REG 

0101 TuTh 12 :3apm-3 :30pm BIdg, TYD, Room 1108 Ahn, S 

Prerequisite: MATH 141 or permission of department. For management science and statistics 
majors. Credit will be granled for only one of the following: BMGT 231. ENEE 324. or STAT 
400, An introductory course in stalistical concepts including probability from a naive set theory 
approach, r^dom variables and their properties, and the probability distributions of selected 
discrete and continuous random variables- The concepts of sampling, sampling distnbutions, and 
the application of these concepts to estimation and hypothesis testing are included as are bnef 
surveys of the regression and anova models, 

BMGT 301 Introduction to Data Processing 3 credits. Grading Method: REG 

0101 MTuWThF t1:00am-12:20pm BIdg, TYD, Room 0111 StaH 

0102 TuTh 4:00pm-7:00pm BIdg, TYD, Room 0102 Staff 

0103 TuTh 7 :00pm- 10 :00pm BIdg, TYD, Room 0102 Staff 

0201 MTuWThF 8 00am-9:20am BIdg, TYD, Room 0111 Staff 

0202 MTuWThF 9:30am-10:50am BIdg, TYD, Room 0102 Staff 

0203 MW 7:00pm-10:00pm BIdg, TYD, Room 0111 Staff 

Junior standing. The fundamentals of business data processing Organizauonal. environmental and 
managcnal aspects of computer systems. Heavy emphasis on COBOL language. Limited coverage 
of other business computing languages including the report generator (RPG) language Several 
programming projects assigned 

BMGT 302 Information Systems Implementation Techniques 3 credits; Grading Method: REG 
0201 MW 4:00pnv7:00pm BIdg. TYD, Room 1140 Staff 

Prerequisite BfilGT 301 Advanced concepts and tools neces,sary for the construction of computer 
based information systems Operaung systems, data and storage structures. Hie processing and 
advanced features of the COBOL language. Techniques related to the overall development of 
software projects including project management, software design, engineering and software 
documentation Several programming protects assigned 

BMGT 310 Intermediate Accounting I 3 credits: GradingMethod: REG 

0101 MTuWThF 8:00am-9:20am BIdg TYD. Room 0117 Huss. H 

0102 MTuWThF 9 30arr>-10:50am BIdg, TYD. Room 0102 Huss. H 

0103 TuTh 7:00ptT>-10:00pm BIdg. TYD, Room 1140 Staff 
0201 MTuWThF 8:00am-9:20am BIdg, TYD, Room 0117 Stafl 

Prerequisite BMGT 221 Comprehensive analysis of financial accounting topics related to 
financial slatement preparation and entemal reporting 
BMGT 311 Intermediate Accounting II 3 credits; Grading Method: REG 

0101 MTuWThF 2 00pm-3.20pm BIdg. TYD, Room 1132 Staff 

0102 MW 7:00prT>-10:00pm BIdg, TYD, Room 0111 Staff 
0201 MTuWThF 9:30am-10:50am BIdg TYD. Room 2110 Staff 

Prerequisilc BMGT 310 Continuation of BMGT 310 

BMGT 321 Cost Accounting 3 credits: Grading Method: REG 

0101 MTuWThF 9:30am-10:50am BIdg, TYD, Room 2108 Staff 

0102 TuTh 7:00pm-10:00pm BIdg, TYD, Room 1102 Staff 

Prerequisite BMGT 221 A study of the basic concepts of product costing and cost analysis for 
managemenl planning and control. Emphasis is placed on the role of the accountant in 
organizational management, analysis of cost behavior, standard cost, budgeting, responsibility 
accounting and relevant costs for decision making, 
BMGT 323 Income Tax Accounting 3 credits; Grading Method: REG 

0101 MTuWThF 11 :00art>-12:20pm BIdg TYD, Room 1108 StaH 

0201 MTuWThF 12 :30piT>- 1:50pm BIdg, TYD, Room 0101 Staff 

Prerequisite, BMGT 221 Introduction to federal income taxation of individuals. Examination of 
tax laws by use of illustrative examples and problems 
BMGT 326 Accounting Systems 3 credits; Grading Method: REG 

0101 TuTh 7:00pm- 10 :00pm BIdg, TYD. Room 2106 Staff 

Prerequisites: BMGT 301; and BMGT 321, A smdy of the control aspects of accounting systems 
Topics include, standard setting, admimstrauve, operational, and security conuols. cost effectiveness 
of systems, audit Implications of a computer-based information environment 
BMGT 332 Operations Researcti For Management Decisions 3 credits; Grading Method: REG 
0101 MW 12:30prr)-3:30pm BIdg, TYD, Room 1128 Golden, B 

0201 MTuWThF 9:30am-10,50am BIdg, TYD. Room 01 1 1 Staff 

Prerequisite. BMGT 230, Surveys the philosophy, techniques, and applications of operauons 
research to managcnal decision making. The course is designed pnmarily for students not majonng 
in management science or statistics. Techniques covered include linear programming, transportation 
and assignment models. Markov processes, inventory and qucueing models. Emphasis is placed on 
formulating and solving decision problems in the functional areas of management 
BMGT 340 Business Finance 3 credits; Grading Method: REG 

0101 MTuWThF 9:30am-10 50am BIdg, TYD, Room 0117 Staff 

0102 MTuWThF II :00am-12:20pm BIdg. TYD, Room 1140 Staff 

0103 TuTh 7:00pm-10,00pm BIdg, TYD, Room 2100 Soubra, B 

0201 MTuWThF 9:30am-10:50am BIdg. TYD, Room 1118 Staff 

0202 MW 7 :00pm- 10 :00pm BIdg TYD, Room 1114 Chang, E 

0203 TuTh 7:00pm-10:00pm BIdg, TYD. Room 1114 Chang. E 

Prerequisites: BMGT 221. and BMGT 230; or BMGT 231. Tlie pnnciples and practices involved 
in the organization, fmancing, and rehabilitation of business enterprises; the vanous types of 
securities and their use m raising funds, apportioning income, risk, and control; intercorporate 
relations; and new developments. Emphasis on solution of problems of financial policy faced by 
management. 



BMGT 343 Investments 3 credits; Grading Method: REG 

0101 MTuWThF 11 :00am-12:20pm BIdg, LEF, Room 1208 Chen, S 

0102 TuTh 7:00pm-10:00pm BIdg, TYD, Room 0101 Staff 
0201 MW 7:00pnv10:00pm BIdg, TYD, Room 1132 Eun, C 

Prerequisite: BMGT 340, An introducUon to financial investments Topics include securities and 
secunties markets, investment risks, returns, and constraints, portfolio policies; and institutional 
investment policies 
BMGT 3S0 Matlieting Principles and Organization 3 credits; Grading Method: REG 



0101 MTuWThF 9:30am- 10:50am 

0102 MTuWThF 11 :00am-12:20pm 

0103 MW 6:30pm-9:30pm 

0104 TuTh 7:00pm-10:00pm 

0201 MTuWThF 11 :00am-12:20pm 

0202 MTuWThF 12:30pm-1 :50pm 

0203 MW 6:30pm-9;30pm 



Staff 
Staff 
Stafl 
Staff 
Staff 
Staff 
Staff 
I the field of marketmg. Its 



TYD. Room 1102 
Idg. TYD. Room 1101 

■ TYD, Room 1118 
Idg. TLF. Room 21 10 

■ TYD. Room 1108 
TYD. Room 1108 
SKN. Room 0124 

Prerequisite: ECON 203. or ECON 205 An introductory course 
purpose IS to give a general understanding and appreciation of the forces operating, institutions 
employed, and methods followed in marketing agncultural products, natiiral products, services and 
manufactured goods, 
BMGT 3S4 Promotion Management 3 credits; Grading Method: REG 

0101 MW7:00pii>-l 0:00pm BWg. TYD, Room 2108 Staff 

Prcrcquisile: BMGT 350 Not open to stiidents who have completed BMGT 452. The use of 
advertising, personal selling, sales promouons, and other methods m marketing programs. Case 
studies in the use and coordination of demand stimulation methods, analysis arid planning, 
Researeh, testing and statistical conotil of promotional activities- 
BMGT 360 Personnel Management 3 credits; Grading Method: REG 

0101 MTuWThF 8:00am-9:20am BIdg, TYD, Room 2108 Staff 

0102 TuTh 4:00pm-7:00pm BIdg, TYD, Room 2108 Olian, J 
0201 TuTh 3:0OpiT>-6:O0pm BIdg, TYD, Room 0101 Premack, S 

Junior standing The basic course in personnel management includes manpower plannmg. 
recniiunent, selection, development, compensation, and appraisal of employees. Explores the 
impact of scientific management and unionism on these functions. 
BMGT 362 Labor Retations 3 credits; Grading Method: REG 

0101 MTuWThF 11 :00am-12;20pm BIdg TYD. Room 1102 Uvine, M 

Junior standmg. A study of the development and methods of organized groups in industry with 
reference to the settlement of labor disputes. An economic and legal analysis of labor union and 
employer association activities, arbitration, mediation, and conciliation; collective bargauiing. u^de 
agreements, stnkes. boycotts, lockouts, company unions, employee representiition, and injuiKtions. 
BMGT 364 Management and Organization Theory 3 credrts; Grading Method: REG 



0101 MTuWThF 9:30arr>-1 0:50am 

0102 MTuWThF 11 :00am-12:20pm 

0103 TuTh 7 :00pm- 10 :00pm 

0104 MW 7:00pm-10O0pm 

0201 MTuWThF 9:30am-1 0:50am 

0202 TuTh 7:00p(t>-10:00pm 



BIdg. ASY, Room 5219 
BIdg, ASY, Room 3219 
BWg, TYD. Room 1118 
BIdg, TYD, Room 1128 
BIdg, TYD, Room 1132 
BIdg, LEF, Room 2166 



Levine, M 
Staff 
Banol. K 
Bartol, K 
Staff 
Staff 



Junior standing. The development of management and organization tficory, nature of IlK 
management process and function and its future development. The role of ttie manager as an 
organizer and director, the communication process, goals and responsibilitcs. 
BMGT 370 Principles ot Transportation 3 credits; Grading Method: REG 

0101 TuTfi 7:00pm-10;00pm BIdg, TYD, Room 1132 Staff 

0201 MTuWThF 11 :00am-12:20pm BIdg, TYD, Room 0101 Staff 

Prerequisitt: ECON 203, or ECON 205. A general coune covering tile five fields of 
transportation, their development, service, and reguiation. 
BMGT 372 Traffic and Pliyslcal DistrllMition Management 3 credits; Grading Method: REG 
0101 MTuWThF 11 :00am-1220pm BIdg, KEY, Room 0103 Poist. R 

0201 MW 7:00pn>-10:00pm BIdg, LEF, Room 2208 Grimm, C 

Junior standing. Not open to snjdents who have completed BMGT 371, EAamines the 
management aspects of the business firm in moving their raw materials and finished goods tlUDUgh 
traffic, warehousing, industiial packaging, materials handling, and inventory. A systematic 
examination of the trade-off possibilities and management alternatives to minimize cost of product 
flow and maximizmg customer service is provided 
BMGT 380 Business Law I 3 credits. Grading Method: REG 



0101 MTuWThF 9:30am-10:50am 

0102 MTuWThF 11:00am-12:20pm 

0103 TuTh 7:00pn>-10:00pm 

0201 MTuWThF 8:00am-9:20am 

0202 TuTh 7 OOpm-10 00pm 

Legal aspects of business relationship 



BIdg. TYD. Room 01 1 1 Staff 

BIdg TYD, Room 2108 Staff 

BIdg, TYD, Room 0117 Staff 

BIdg. TYD, Room 2108 Staff 

BIdg. TYD. Room 2109 Staff 

Examinauon of torts and business crimei 
agency The law of personal property and bailment relationships. Survey of public policy issues. 
BMGT 381 Business Law 11 3 credits; Grading Method: REG 

0101 MW7:0Opm-10:0Opm BIdg, HJP. Room 1229 Staff 

Prerequisite BMGT 380 or perrmssion of department The Uniform Commercial Code including 
sates, commereial paper, secured transactions, bulk sales and documents of title. The law of 
partnerships and corporations Reorganization and liquidation under the bankruptcy laws. The law 
of real property, landlord and tenant relauonships and decedents' estates. 
BMGT 386 Field Work 1-3 credits; Grading Method: REG 
Permission of department required. 
0101 Time Arranged Room Arranged Staff 

0201 Time Arranged Room Arranged Staff 

BMGT 387 Field Work Analysis 1-3 aedits; Grading Method: REG 
Permission of department required. 
0101 Time Arranged Room Arranged Staff 

0201 Time Arranged Room Arranged Staff 

BMGT 398 individual Study in Business and Msnagement t-3 credits; Grading Method: REG 
Permission of department required. 
0101 Time Arranged Room Arranged Staff 

0201 Time Arranged Room Arranged Staff 

BMGT 402 Database and Data Communication Systems 3 credits; Grading Method: REG 
0101 TuTh4 00pm-7:00pm BWg. TYD. Room 2110 Staff 

Prerequisite BMGT 302 Introduction to database and data commumcations systems. Modeling 
and database consuiiction using the three data models: networic. relational and hierarchical. 
Implementation project using DMS 1100 database system Data communications protocols and 
communications support software Analysis of distributed systems and computer netwofits. 
Emphasis on new technologies. 
BMGT 404 Seminar in Decision Support Systems 3 credits: Grading Method: REG 
0201 TuTh 4:00pm-7:00pm BIdg, TYD. Room 1108 Staff 

Prerequisite: BMGT 301 Design of computer systems to solve business problems and to support 
decision making Human and organizational factors are considered Emphasis on case studies, 
BMGT 417 Advanced Tax Accounting 3 credits; Grading Method: REG 

0201 MTuWThF 11 :00am- 12 :20pm BIdg, rVD, Room 1101 Staff 

Prerequisites: BMGT 311; and BMGT 323, Feder^ uixation of corporations, partnerships, 
fiducianes. and gratuitous transfers Tools and techniques of tax research for compliance and 
planning. 
BMGT 422 Auditing Theory and Practice 3 credits: Grading Method: REG 

0101 MTuWThF 2:00pm-3:20pm BIdg, TYD. Room 2110 Staff 

Prerequisite: BMGT 311 A stiidy of the independent accounuint's attest function, generally 
accepted auditing standards, compliance and substantive tests, and report forms and opiruons. 



COURSE SECTIONS: 01 xx, SESSION I ONLY; 02xx, SESSION II ONLY. 



35 



BMGT cont. 



BMGT 424 Advanced Accounting 3 credits; Grading Method: HEG 

0101 MTuWThF 8:00am-9:20am Brdg TYD, Room 1108 Staff 

Prercquisiie BMGT 311 Advanced accounting theory applied to specialized topics and current 
problems Emphasis on consolidated statements and paiinership accounting 
BMGT 435 Introduction to Applied Probability Models 3 credits; Grading Method: REG 
0101 MW 4:00pm-7:00pfn ffldg, TYD. Room 0102 Bodin, L 

Prcrcquisiie; BMGT 231 or permission of departmenl. Slatislical models m management Review 
of probability theory. Monte Carlo methods, discrete event simulation, Markov chains, queueing 
analysis, other topics depending upon time Guass, a higher-level computer language, will be 
introduced in the class and the students will cany out vanous exercises using this language. 
BMGT 440 Rnandal Management 3 credits; Grading Method; REG 

0101 MW 7:00pm-10:00pm BIdg, TYD, Room 1108 Soubra, B 

0201 MW 7:00pm-10 00pm Btdg. TYD, Room 1118 Staff 

Prerequisite BMGT 340, Analysis and discussion of cases and readmgs relating to financial 
decisions of the firm The application of finance concepts to the solution of financial problems is 
emphasized 

BMGT 445 Commerctal Bank Management 3 credits; Grading Method REG 

0101 MW 7:00pm-1 0:00pm BIdg. TYD, Room 2102 Edmister. R 

0201 TuTh 7:00pm-10:00pm BIdg. TYD, Room 1108 Edmister, R 

Prerequisites. BMGT 340; and ECON 430 Analysis and discussion of cases and readings in 
commercial bank management The loan function is emphasized; also the management of liquidity 
reserves, investments for income, and source of funds Bank objectives, ftinclions. policies, 
organization, structure, services, and regulation are considered 

BMGT 450 Marketing Research Methods 3 credits, Grading Method REG 

0101 MTuWThF 9:30am-l0 50am BIdg TYD, Room 1132 Staff 

0201 MTuWThF 11 00am-12:20pm BIdg TYD, Room 2108 Stephens, D 

Prerequisites. BMGT 230; and BMGT 350. Recommended BMGT 430 Development of skill in 
the use of scientific methods in the acquisition, analysis and mterpretalion of marketing data 
Specialized fields of marleting research, the planning of survey projects, sample design, tabulation 
procedure and report preparation are covered 
BMGT 451 Consumer Analysis 3 credits; Grading Method: REG 

0101 MTuWThF 9:30arT>-10:50am BIdg. TYD, Room 1108 Durand, R 

Prerequisite BMGT 350 Recommended PSYC 100, and PSYC 221 The growing importance of 
Amencan consumers in the marketing system and the need to understand them Topics include the 
foundation considerations underlying consumer behavior such as economic, social, psychological 
and cultural factors Analysis of consumers in marketing situations ■ as buyers and users of products 
and services - and in relation to the various individual social and marketing factors affecting iheu' 
behavior The influence of marketing communications is also considered 
BMGT 454 International Marketing 3 credits: Grading Method: REG 

0101 MTuWThF 11 :00am- 12 20pm BIdg TYD, Room 2106 Greer, T 

Prerequisites BMGT 350 plus one other maiieting courw Marketing functions from the 
international executive's viewpomt, including coverage of international marketing policies relating 
to product adaptation, data collection and analysis, channels of distribution, pricing, 
communications, and cost analysis Consideration is given to the cultural, legal, financial, and 
organizational aspects of international marketing 
BMGT 457 Marketing Policies and Strategies 3 credits. Grading Method: REG 

0101 MTuWThF 12:30pm-1;50pm BIdg, TYD. Room 2108 Biehal, G 

0201 MTuWThF 9;30arT>-10:50am BIdg. TYD, Room 2106 Stephens. D 

Prcrtquisite: three courws in marketing Integrative decision making in marketing Emphasis on 
consumer and market analysis and the appropnate decision models Case studies are included 
BMGT 482 Business and Government 3 credits; Grading Method: REG 

0201 MTuWThF 12:30pm-l:50pm BIdg. TYD, Room 2108 Staff 

Prerequisite ECON 203. or ECON 205 A study of the role of government in modem economic 
life SoLiaJ control of business as a remedy for the abuses of business enterprise ansing from the 
decline of competition Cntena of limitations on govemmenl regulation of pnvale enterprise, 
BMGT 495 Business Policies 3 credits. Grading Method: REG 

BMGT majors only All others must have authorization. 

0101 MTuWThF 9 30am-10:50am BIdg. TYD, Room 1118 Haslem, J 

0102 MTuWThF 11 00am-1220pm BIdg. TYD, Room 1132 Haslem. J 

0103 TuTh 4:00pm-7:00pm BIdg. TYD, Room 1 128 Gannon. M 

0104 TuTh 7:0qpm-10:00pm BIdg TYD. Room 2111 Gannon, M 

0201 MTuWThF 9:30am-10:50am BIdg. TYD, Room 2108 Staff 

0202 TuTh 4:00pm-7:00pm BIdg. TYD, Room 1118 Staff 

0203 TuTh 7:00pm-10:Xpm BIdg. TYD, Room 2102 Staff 

Prerequisites BMGT 340; and BMGT 350; and BMGT 364 Semor siandmg A case study 

course where students apply what they have learned of general management principles and their 

speciali/xd functional applications to the overall management function in the enterprise. 
BMGT 501 BusJr>ess Functions 4 credits; Grading Method: REG 

Permission of department required 
0101 MW 6:00pm^ 10:00pm BIdg. TYD, Room 1136 Staff 

Intensive review of marketing and finance functions in the business enterprise Credit not applicable 

to graduate degrees 
BMGT 505 Organizational Behavior and Strategic Management 3 credits; Grading Method; REG 

Permission of department required. 
0201 MW 7:00pm~10:00pm BIdg, TYD, Room 2108 Power, D 

Intensive review of organizational behavior theory, and administrative processes and policy in the 

business enterprise Credit not applicable to graduate degrees 
BMGT 630 Mana9er1al Statistics I 3 credits; Grading Method: REG 

Permission of department required. 

0101 MW 7:OOprTvlO:OOpm BIdg, TYD, Room 1140 Alt, F 

0102 TuTh 7:OOpm~10;Xpm BIclg. TYD, Room 1101 Alt, F 

0201 MW 7:00prTKl0:00pm BIdg, TYD. Room 1128 Staff 

0202 TuTh 7:00pm-10:00pm BIdg. TYD, Room 1140 Staff 

Application of statistical concepts to solution of business problems, laboratory use of computer 



BMGT 661 Human Resources Management 3 credits; Grading Method: REG 

Permission of department required 
0101 TuTh 7:00pm-10:00pm BIdg, TYD. Room 2102 Olian, J 

0201 TuTh 7:00pn>- 10:00pm BIdg, TYD, Room 1102 Premack, S 

The human resource function in organizations Human resource planning, procurement and 

selection, training and development, performance appraisal, wage and salary administration, and 

equal employment opportunity 

BMGT 670 Economic Environment 3 credits: Grading Method: REG 
Permission of department required- 

0101 MW 7:00pm-10:00pm BIdg, TYD. Room 0117 Staff 

0102 TuTh 7:00pm-10:00pm BIdg. TYD. Room 2109 Staff 
0201 TuTh 7:00pm-10:00pm BIdg, TYD. Room 0102 Staff 

The macroeconomic cnvuonment and iLs impact on the business enterprise Nature of economic 
fluctuations, analysis of consumer spending, theory and analysis of mveslment spending, supply and 
demand for money and capital, modem macroeconomic theory, international problems, forecasting 



and an analysis of economic conditions 
BMGT 672 Physical Distribution Management 3 credits: Grading Method: REG 
Pefmission of department required 
0101 MW 7 :00pm- 10 :00pm BIdg, TYD, Room 2140 Poist, R 

Managerial practices required to fulfil the physical movement needs of extractive, manufacturing, 
and merchandising rirms The total cost approach to physical distribution. Interrelations among 
purchased transport services, pnvately-supplied transport services, warehousing, inventory control, 
materials handling, packaging, and plant location The communications network to support physical 
distribution The problems of coordination between the physical movement management function 
aiuj other functional areas within the business firm, such as accounting, finance, marketing, and 
production 



BMGT cont. 



BMGT 690 Strategic Management 3 credits: Grading Method: REG 
Permission of department required 
0101 MW 7:00pm-1 0:00pm BIdg, TYD, Room 1102 Staff 

0201 TuTh 7:00pm-10:00pm BIdg TYD, Room 1101 Power, D 

Prerequisites, permission of department; and completion of all other MBA core courses before 
regisienng for this course Case studies and research in the identification of management problems. 
the evaluation ol alternative solutions, and the recommendation for management implci 

BMGT 710 Advanced Accounting Theory 3 credits; Grading Method: REG 
Permission of department required 
0201 MW 7:00pm-10a0pm BIdg, TYD. Room 1136 Staff 

Prerequisite. BMGT 610 Contemporary issues in financial accounting. The n 
relationship between asset valuation and income determination, and var 
accounting for inflation. The accounting standards setting process The measurement and valuation 
of assets (eg. foreign investments) and liabilities (e g . leases and pensions) 
BMGT 713 The Impact of Taxation On Business Decisions 3 credits; Grading Method: REG 
Permission of department required. 
0101 MW 7 0apm-10:00pm BIdg, HBK. Room 0117 Staff 

Prerequisite BMGT 611 The impact of tax law and regulations on alternative strategies with 
particular emphasis on the large, mullidivisional firm Problems of acquisitions, mergers, spinoffs, 
and other divestitures from the viewpoint of profit planning, cash How, and tax deferment 
BMGT 741 Advanced Financial Management 3 credits: Grading Method: REG 
Permission of department required. 
0101 MW 7:00pm-10:00pm BIdg. TYD, Room 2110 Chen. S 

[Prerequisite : BMGT 640 Concepts underlying financial decision making in the firm. Case studies, 
model building and applications m financial theory and management. 
BMGT 743 Investment Management 3 aedits; Grading Method REG 
Permission of department required. 
0201 TuTh 7:00pm-10 00pm BIdg. ARC, Room 1123 Eun, C 

Prerequisite BMGT 640 Methods of secunty selection and portfolio management in the debt and 
equity markets Investment altcmaiives. securities markets. t»ond and common stock valuation, 
options, portfolio theory, and behavior of slock prices. 
BMGT 753 International Marhetlng 3 credits; Grading Method: REG 
Permission of department required, 
0101 TuTh 7.00pm-10:00pm BIdg. TYD, Room 0111 Greer. T 

Prerequisite; BMGT 650 Environmental, organizational, and financial asp)ects of international 
marketing as well as problems of mariieting research, pncing, channels of distribution, product 
policy, and communications which face U S firms trading with foreign firms or which face foreign 
firms in ihcir operations 

BMGT 791 MBA Field Pro|ect 3 credits; Grading Method: REG 

Permission of department required. Total Enterprise Strategy - Management Practicum. 
0101 Time Ananged Room Arranged Staff 

0201 Time Arranged Room Arranged Staff 

Prerequisite: permission of department, Experiental research project in the identification of 
management problems, the evaluation of alternative sotufions, and the recommendation for 
management. 
BMGT 795 Manacjement of the Multinational Firm 3 credits; Grading Method: REGAUD 
Permission of departmenl required 
0101 MW 7 OOpm-10 00pm BIdg TYD, Room 1101 Scheraga, C 

The problems and policies of intcmaiional business enierpnse at the management level. 
Management of a mulunalional enterprise as well as management within foreign units. The 
multinational firm as a socio-econometric institution Cases in comparative management, 
BMGT 798A Special Topics In Business and Management: Expert Systems 
3 credits; Grading Method: REG 
Permission of departmenl required. 
0101 TuTh 7:00pnn-10:00pm BIdg. TYD, Room 2110 Basu, A 

BMGT 798B Special Topics In Business and Management: Strategic Marketing 
3 credits: Grading Method: REG 
Permission of department required, 
0101 MW 6:30pm-9:30pm BIdg. TYD. Room 21 1 1 Biehal, G 

BMGT 796C Special Topics In Business and Management: Advanced Topics In Linear 
Programming 3 credits; Grading Method. REG 
Permission of department required 
0101 MW 700pm-10:00pm BIdg. TYD, Room 2100 Gass. S 

BMGT 798G 

Special Topics In Business and Management: Executive Power and Negotiation 

3 credits: Grading Method: REG 
Permission of department required. 
0201 MW 7:00pm~10:00pm BIdg. TYD, Room 2140 Taylor, M 

BMGT 799 Master's Thesis Research 1~€ credits: Grading Method: REG 
Permission of department required. 
0101 Time Arranged Room Arranged Staff 

0201 Time Arranged Room Arranged Staff 

BMGT 826 Independent Study In Business and Management 1-9 credits: Grading Method: REG 

Permission of department required. Contact Graduate Program Director to make 
arrangements 
0101 Time Arranged Room Arranged Staff 

0201 Time Arranged Room Arranged Staff 

BMGT 899 Doctoral Dissertation Research IS credits. Grading Method: REG 

Permission of department required Contact Graduate Program Director to make 
arrangements. 
0101 Time Arranged Room Arranged Staff 

0201 Time Arranged Room Arranged Staff 



BOTN 



BOTANY (LIFE SCIENCES) 

BOTN 100 Gerwral Botany For Non-Science Studentt 4 credits: Grading Method: REGP-F'AUD 
Meets USP Distributive Studies (B}Natural Sciences and Mathematics requirement. 

0101 MTuWThF 9,00am-9:60am BIdg HJP, Room 1229 Higgins, E 
MTuWThF 10:00am-12 00pm BIdg, HJP, Room 2103 (IJ>.B) 

0102 MTuWThF 9:00anv9:50am BIdg HJP, Room 1229 Higgins, E 
MTuWThF 10:00anD-12:00pm BIdg, HJP, Room 2104 (lAB) 

0201 MTuWThF 9:00am-9:50am BIdg HJP. Room 2242 Koines. P 
MTuWThF 10:00am-12:00pm BIdg HJP. Room 2103 (LAB) 

0202 MTuWThF 9:00am-9:50am BIdg HJP. Room 2242 Koines. P 
MTuWThF 10:00am-12:00pm BIdg, HJP. Room 2104 (LAB) 

A basic course in plant biology specifically designed 10 meet the educational needs of the general or 
non-science srudeni Emphasis is placed on an ecological approach to studying fundamental 
concepts and processes of plants, and stressing the importance of plant life to human welfare 
Credit not allowed for both BOTN 100 and 101 , 
BOTN 399 Research Problems In Botany: Research Problems In Botany 
1-3 credits: Grading Method REG/P-F/AUD 
Permission of department required, 
0101 Time Arranged Room Arranged Staff 

0201 Time Arranged Room Arranged Staff 



COURSE SECTIONS: 01 xx, SESSION I ONLY; 02xx, SESSION II ONLY. 



36 

BOTN cont. 

BOTN 403 Medicinal and Poisonous Plants 2 credits: Grading Method: REG/P-F/AUD 
0101 MW 4:15pm-7:00pm BIdg. HJP, Room 1229 Lockard. J 

Prerequisites, BOTN 101 and CHEM 104 A study of plants important lo man thai have medicinal 
or poisonous properties Emphasis on plant source, plant descnplion. the active agent and its 
beneficial or detrimental physiological action and effects. 
BOTN 799 Master's Thesis Research 1-€ credits: Gradirig Method: REG 

0101 Time Arranged Room Arranged Staff 

0201 Time Arranged Room Arranged Staff 

BOTN 899 Doctoral Dissertation Research 1-8 credits. Grading Method: REG 
0101 Ttme Arranged Room Arranged Staff 

0201 Time Arranged Room Arranged Staff 



BSOS 

BEHAVIORAL AND SOCIAL 

SCIENCES (BEHAVIOR AND SOCIAL SCI) 

BSOS 386 Reld Work 3 credits: Grading Method: REG/P-F/AUD 

0101 Time An-anged Room Arranged Beardsley. K 

0102 Time Arranged Room Arranged Sorenson, G 
0201 Time Arranged Room Ananged Sorenson, G 

BSOS 387 Field Wortc Analysis 3 credits: Grading Method: REG/P-F/AUD 

0101 Time Ananged Room An-anged Beardsley. K 

0102 Time Arranged Room Arranged Sorenson, G 
0201 Time Arranged Room Arranged Sorenson, G 



CHEM 



CHEMISTRY (LIFE SCIENCES) 

CHEM 103 General Chemistry I 4 credits: Grading Method: REG/P-F/AUD 

Meets USP Distribulive Studies (BjNatural Sciences and Mathematics requirement. 



0131 MTuWThF t1:00am-12;20pm 
MWF 8:00am-10:50am 
TuTh 9:30am-10:50am 

0132 MTuWThF 11 :00am-12:20pm 
MWF8:OOam-10:50am 
TuTh 9:30am-10:50am 

0133 MTuWThF 11 :00am-12:20pm 
MWF 8:00am-1 0:50am 
TuTh 9:30am-10:50am 

0134 MTuWThF 11 :00am-1250pm 
MWF8:0Oam-10:5Oam 
TuTh 9:30am-10:50am 

0231 MTuWThF 11 :00am-12;20pm 
MWF8:OOam-10:50am 
TuTh 9:30am-10:50am 

0232 MTuWThF 11 :00am-12:20pm 
MWF B:00am-10:50am 
TuTh 9;30am-10:60am 

Prerequisite; a satisfactory math SAT s 



BIdg. CHE, Room 21 10 Staff 

BIdg. CHM, Room 1105 MB) 
BIdg. CHM, Room 0119 ('D/Sj 
BIdg. CHE. Room 21 10 Staff 

Bkjg. CHM, Room 1106 (MB; 
BIdg. CHM, Room 0122 (D/S) 
BIdg. CHE, Room 21 10 Staff 

BIdg. CHM, Room 1 109 ILAB) 
BIdg. CHM. Room 2201 (DIS) 
BIdg. CHE, Room 21 10 Staff 

BIdg. CHM, Room 1110 fMS; 
BIdg. CHM, Room 0127 (DIS) 
BIdg. CHM, Room 1402 Staff 

BIdg. CHM, Room 1 106 (UiBI 
BIdg. EGR, Room 3114 fD/S; 
BIdg. CHM, Room 1402 Staff 

BIdg. CHM, Room 1105 CMS; 
BIdg. EGR, Room 1110 ('D/S; 

I adequate knowledge of high school chemistry c 



satisfactory perfonnancc in CHEM 101 The fint semesler of a chemistry sequence intended for 
studenis whose curricula require a year or more of chemistry The nature and composition of 
matter, chemical calculauons, elements and inorganic compounds Credit may be received for only 
one course of the following: CHEM 102, 103, 105, 107. Ill 
CHEM 104 Fundamentals of Organic and Biochemistry 4 credits. Grading Method: REG/P-F/AUD 
Meets USP Distributive Studies (B)Natural Sciences and Mathematics requirement. 

0261 MTuWThF 11 :00am-12:15pm BIdg. CHE, Room 2110 Staff 
MWF 8:00am-10:50am BIdg. CHM, Room 1208 (LAB) 
TuTh 9:30am-10:50am BIdg. CHE, Room 21 10 (DIS) 

0262 MTuWThF 11 :00am-12:15pm BIdg. CHE, Room 2110 Staff 
MWF 8:00am-10:50am Room Arranged (U^B) 

TuTh 9:30am-10:50am BIdg. CHE, Room 2145 (DIS) 

Prerequisite: CHEM 103 or CHEM 105. Intended for studenis whose curricula require one year of 
chemistry Students requiring two or more year^ of chemistry should register for CHEM 233 or 
235. Students may not receive credit for both CHEM 104 and CHEM 233 (or 235). The cheimstry 
of carbon: aliphatic compounds, aromatic coAU9M stereochemistry, halidcs, amines, and amides, 
acids, esters, carbohydrates, and naniral products 
CHEM 113 General Chemistry II 4 credits: Grading Method: REGP-F'AUD 

Meets USP Distributive Studies (B)Natural Sciences and Mathematics requirement. 



0141 MTuWTliF 11:00am-12:20pm 
MWFBOOam-tOSOam 
TuTh 9:30am-10:50am 

0142 MTuWThF 11 :00am- 12 :20pm 
MWF 8:00am-10:50am 
TuTh 9:30am-10:50am 

0241 MTuWThF 11 :00arrv.l2.20pm 
MWF 8:00am-10:50am 
TuTh 9:30aiTl-10:50am 

0242 MTutflmtF ll:00am-12:20pm 
MWF 8:00an>-10:50am 
TuTh 9:30am-10:50am 

0243 MTuWThF 11 :00am-12:20pm 
MWF8:OOam-10:50am 
TuTh 9:30am-10:50am 

Prerequisite: CHEM 103 or 



Staff 



g CHM, Room 1402 
g, CHM, Room 1122 flABj 
g, EGR, Room 3108 (■0/S; 
g. CHM, Room 1402 
g. CHM, Room 1112^8^ 
g. EGR, Room 3114(0/5; 
g. PHY, Room 1412 
g. CHM, Room 1122 (MB) 
g. CHM, Room 0127 (•OS) 
g, PHY, Room 1412 
g. CHM, Room 1112 (LAB) 
g. CHM, Room 0126 (DIS) 
g. PHY, Room 1412 
g. CHM, Room 1119 (MS; 
g. ANS, Room 1109 (DIS) 
Kinetics; homogeneous, hetrogeneous. and 



BIdg. 
BIdg. I 
BIdg. 



BIdg. 



Staff 



Staff 



Staff 



Staff 



CHEM 233 Organic Chemistry I 4 credits: Grading Method: REG/P-F/AUD 

0171 MTuWThF 11 :00am-12:20pm BIdg CHM, Room 1407 Staff 
MWF 8:00am-10:50am BIdg. CHM, Room 1216 (LAB) 
TuTh 9:30am-10:50am BIdg. CHM, Room 0124 (DIS) 

0172 MTuWThF 11:00am-12:20pm BIdg. CHM, Room 1407 Slalf 
MWF 8:00am-10:50am BIdg, CHM, Room 1221 (LAB) 
TuTh 9:30am-10:50am BIdg. EGR, Room 1110 (DIS) 

0173 MTuWThF 11 :00am-12:20pm BIdg. CHM, Room 1407 Staff 
MWF 8:00am-10:50am BIdg. CHM, Room 1224 (LAB) 
TuTh 9:30an>-10:50am BIdg. CHM, Room 0128 (DIS) 

0174 MTuWThF 11 :00anv- 12 :20pm BIdg. CHM, Room 1407 Staff 
MWF 8:00am-10:50am BIdg. CHM, Room 1227 (/LAB; 
TuTh 9:30am-10:50am BIdg. CHE, Room 2118 (DIS) 

Prerequisite: CHEM 113 or 115. This course is the fir^t of a two-scmcster sequence in organic 
chemistry and is intended lo be followed by CHEM 243 or 245, The chemistry of carbon: aliphatic 
compounds, aromatic compounds, stereochemistry, arenes, halides, alcohols, esters, and 
spectroscopy Credit may be received for only one course of: CHEM 104. 233. 235. 



CHEM cont. 



CHEM 243 Organic Chemistry II 4 credits: Grading Method: REG/P-F/AUD 



0281 



0282 



carbonium 



Idg, CHM. Room 1407 Staff 

Idg. CHM. Room 1224 (LAB) 
■ EGR, Room 0135 (O/S; 

CHM, Room 1407 Staff 

Idg. CHM, Room 1221 (LAB) 
Idg. CHM, Room 0122 (D/S; 
Idg. CHM, Room 1407 Staff 

Idg. CHM, Room 1227 (LAB) 
Idg, MTH, Room B0425 (DIS) 
Idg CHM, Room 1407 Staff 

Idg, CHM, Room 1216 (L4B; 
Idg, MTH, Room 0401 (DIS) 
Idg. CHM. Room 1407 Staff 

Idg. CHM, Room 1233 (LAB) 
Idg. CLB, Room 0109 (DIS) 

CHEM 233 with emphasis on molecular 
aromaticity. synthetic processes; macro-molecules. 



MTuWThF 1 1 :00am-12;20pm 

MWF 8 :00am- 10 :50am 

TuTh 9:30am-10:50am 

MTul/VThF 1 1 :00am-l 2:20pm 

MWF8:00am-10:50am 

TuTh 9:30am-10:50am 

0283 MTuWThF 1 1 OOairv- 1 2 :20pm 
MWFe:00am-10:50am 
TuTh9:30am-10:50am 

0284 MTuWThF 11 :00am-12:20pm 
MWF e:00am-1 0:50am 
TuTh 9 :30am- 10 :50am 

0285 l^uWThF ll:00am-12:20pm 
MWF 8:00am-10.50am 
TuTh 9:30am-10:50am 

Prerequisite: CHEM 243 or 
slrucnire; substitution reactions 
Credit may be received for only one of: CHEM 243 c 
CHEM 398 Special Projects 2 credits: Grading Method: REG/P-F/AUD 

0101 Time Arranged Room Arranged Staff 

CHEM 399 Introduction to Chemical Research t-2 credits: Grading Method: REG/P-F/AUD 

Permission of department required. Research plans must be approved by Dr. Boyd or Dr. 
Durso before registration. 
0101 Time Arranged Room Arranged Staff 

0201 Time Arranged Room Arranged Staff 

CHEM 481 Physical Chemistry I 3 credits: Grading Method: REG/P-F/AUD 
0101 Meets JUN 5 to JUL 27 

MTuT1iF8:00am-9:15am BIdg. CHM, Room 1402 Staff 

Preitquisiu^. CHEM 1 13 or 1 15; CHEM 243 or 245. MATH 14I,PHYS 142 or PHYS 263 (PHYS 
263 may be taken concurrently); or consent of instructor. A course primarily for chemists and 
chemical engineers 
CHEM 482 Physical Chemistry II 3 credits: Grading Method: REG/P-F/AUD 
0101 Meets JUN 5 to JUL 27 

MTuThF 12:30pm-l :45pm BIdg. CHM, Room 1402 Staff 

Prerequisite: CHEM 481, or consent of instructor. A cour^ primarily for chemists and chemical 
engineers, 
CHEM 699 Special Problems In Chemistry 1-6 credits: Grading Method: REG/AUD 
0101 Time Arranged Room Arranged Staff 

0201 Time Arranged Room Arranged Staff 

CHEM 799 Master's Thesis Resesrch 1-e credits: Grading Method: REG 

0101 Time Arranged Room Arranged Staff 

0201 Time Arranged Room Arranged Staff 

CHEM 899 Doctoral Dissertation Research 1-8 credits: Grading Method: REG 
0101 Time Arranged Room Arranged Staff 

0201 Time Arranged Room Arranged Staff 



CHINESE 



CHIN 



(ARTS AND HUMANITIES) 



CHIN 101 IntenalvB Elementary Chinese I 6 credits: Grading Method: REG/P-F/AUD 
Meets USP Distributive Studies (A) Cultural and Mislorical requirement. 

0101 MTuWThF 9:30am-12:20pm BIdg. JMZ, Room 1123 Hu. J 

0102 MTuWThF 9:30arT>-t2:20pm BIdg. JMZ, Room 2207 Brown. W 

Introduction lo speaking, reading . and writing Chinese with an emphasis oo mastering the 
essentials of pronunciation, basic characters and stnictural paitems 
CHIN 102 Elementary Spoken Chinese 3 credits: Grading Method: REG/P-F/AUD 
Meets USP Distributive Studies (A) Guttural and Historical requirement. 
0201 MTuWThF 9:30am-10:50am BIdg. JMZ, Room 1123 Wu, D 

Prerequisite: CHIN 102 or equivalent, Continued study of grammatical patterns and vocabulary 
buildup with particular emphasis on conversation May be taken in conjunction with CHIN 103. 
CHIN 103 Elementary Written Chinese 3 credits. Grading Method: REG/P-F/AUD 
Meets USP Distribulive Studies (A) Guttural and Historical requirement. 
0201 MTuWThF 11 :00am-1 2:20pm BIdg. JMZ, Room 1123 Sargent. S 

Prerequisite: CHIN 101 or equivalent Continued study of grammaiical pattems and buildup of 
vocabulary with particular emphasis on reading and writing. May be taken in conjunction with 
CHIN 102 



CHPH 

(COMP, MATH, AND PHYS SCI) 



CHEMICAL PHYSICS 

CHPH 799 IMaster's Thesis Research 1-6 credits: Grading Method: REG 

0101 Time Arranged Room An-anged Staff 

CHPH 899 Doctoral DIssertatJon Research 1-8 credits: Grading Method: REG 
0101 Time Ananged Room Arranged Staff 

0201 Time Arranged Room Arranged Staff 



CJUS 

INSTITUTE OF CRIMINAL JUSTICE AND 

CRIMINOLOGY (BEHAVIOR AND SOCIAL SCI) 

CJUS 100 introduction to ijw Enfofcement 3 credits: Grading Method: REGP-FAUD 

Meets USP Distributive Studies (D) Social and Behavioral Sciences requirement, 
0101 MTuWThF 9:30am-10:50am BIdg. LEF, Room 1220 Brooks. L 

0201 MTuWThF 11 :00am-12;20pm BIdg. LEF, Room 1222 Miller, S 

Introduction lo the administration of criminal justice in a democratic society with emphasis upon the 
theoretical and historical development of law enforcement The principles of organization and 
administration for law enforcement; functions and specific activities; planning and research; public 
relations; personnel and training, inspection and control, direction, policy fonnulalion. 
CJUS 320 Introduction to Criminalistics 3 credits: Grading Method: REG/P-F/AUD 

0101 MW 6:00pm-9:00pm BIdg. LEF. Room 0208 Maurielto, T 

0201 MW 6:00pm-9:00pm BkJg. LEF. Room 0208 Maurielto, T 

Prerequisites: CJUS 220 and consent of instructor. An introduction to modem methods used in the 
detection, investigation and solution of crimes Practical analysis of evidence in a criminal 
investigation latxtratory. including photography, fingerpnnts and other impressions, ballistics, glass, 
hair, handwriting and document examination, drug analysis, and lie detection. 



COURSE SECTIONS: 01 xx, SESSION I ONLY; 02xx, SESSION II ONLY. 



37 



CJUS cont. 



CJUS 386 ReW Wortc 1-3 credits: Grading Method: REG 
Permisston ol department required. 

0101 Time Arranged Room Arranged Staff 

0201 Time Arranged Room Arranged Staff 

CJUS 3«7 FWd Work Analysis 1-3 credits; Grading Method REG 
Permission of department required. 

0101 Time Arranged Room Arranged Staff 

0201 Time Arranged Room Arranged Staff 

CJUS 398 Law Enforcement Field Training 1-3 credits: Grading Method REG^P-F/AUD 

0101 Ttme Arranged Room Arranged Staff 

0201 Ttme Arranged Room Arranged Staff 

CJUS 399 Directed Independent Research 1-3 credrts: Grading Method: REG/P-F/AUD 

0101 Time Arranged Room Arranged Staff 

0201 Time Arranged Room Arranged Staff 

CJUS 699 Special Problems in Criminal Justice 1-3 credits. Grading Method: REG/AUD 

0101 Time Arranged Room An^anged Staff 

0201 Time Arranged Room Arranged Staff 

CJUS 799 Master's Thesis Research 1-6 credits: Grading Method: REG 

0101 Time Arranged Room An'anged Staff 

0201 Time Arranged Room Arranged Staff 



CLAS 



CLASSICS (ARTS AND HUMANITIES) 

CLAS 170 Greek and Roman Mythology 3 credits: Grading Method: REG/P-FAUD 
Meets USP Distributive Studies (A) Cultural and Historical requirement. 
0101 MTuWTTiF 9,30am-10:50am BIdg. HBK. Room 1112 Staff 

0201 MTuWThF 11:00am-12;20pm BIdg, JMZ, Room 2206 Sfienwin. W 

Taught in English, no prercquisiie cannoi be taken for language credit This course is particularly 
recommended for students planning lo major in foreign languages, English, history, the fine arts, or 
journalism 
CLAS 374 Greek Tragedy In Translation 3 credits; Grading Method REG/P-FAUD 
Meets USP Advanced Studies Analysis of Human Problems requirement. 
0101 MTuWTtiF 11;00arT>- 12 :20pm BIdg. HBK. Room 1112 Clawsey, M 

Study and analysis of the tragedies of Aeschylus, Sophocles and Eunpidcs with special altcnuon lo 
the concepts of character and of thought as conceived by .'^nstotle in The Poetics 



CMLT 



COMPARATIVE LITERATURE (ARTS AND HUMANITIES) 

CMLT 799 Master's Thesis Research 1-6 credits: Grading Method: REG 

0101 Time Arranged Room Ananged Staff 

0201 Time Arranged Room Arranged Staff 

CMLT 899 Doctoral Dissertation Research 1-6 credits; Grading Method: REG 

0101 Time Arranged Room Aranged Staff 

0201 Time An'anged Room An'anged Staff 



CMSC 



COMPUTER SCIENCE (COMP, MATH, AND PHYS SCI) 

CMSC 110 Introduction to Fortran Programming 4 credits: Grading Method: REG/P-F/AUD 
CMSC majors must take CMSC 112 as a first course 
0101 Meets JUN 5 to JUL 28 

MTuWThF 12,30pm-1 :50pm BIdg. CSS, Room 2330 Williams, J 

Tu 1 1 :00am-12;20pm BIdg. CSS. Room 2352 (DIS) 

Pre- or corcquisile MATH 140 or MATH 220 Conslniclion of algonlhms and the cfficiem solulion 
of compulalional problems Conducted in FORTRAN Intended for scientists, engineers, and 
business majors Not applicable to the major requirements in computer science, 
CMSC 1 1 2 Computer Sdence I 4 credits: Grading Mettiod: REG/P-F/AUD 
0101 Meets JUN 5 to JUL 28 

MTuWThF 2:00pm-3;20pm BIdg. CLB, Room 0109 Jou, E 

W 12;30pm-l :50pm BIdg. CLB, Room 0102 (DIS) 

Pre- or corcquisite: MATH 140 Design and analysis of programs using structured programming and 
daU) abstraction Formal syntax and semantics, and program verification Conducted in Pascal. 
Intended for computer science majors 
CMSC 1 1 3 Computer Sclanca II 4 credits: Grading Method: REG/PFAUD 
0101 Meets JUN 5 to JUL 28 

MTuWThF 2:00pm-3:20pm BIdg. CLB, Room 0104 Eastman, R 

W 1230pm-l 50pm BIdg CLB, Room 0104 fMBJ 

Prerequisite: CMSC 112 Pre- or corequisite MATH 141 A continuation of CMSC 1 12 Intended 
for computer science majors Credit will be given for only one course CMSC 113, 120 or 122 
CMSC 120 Introduction to Pucal Programming 4 credits: Grading Method: REG/P-F/AUD 
0101 MTuWThF 11 :00am- 12 :20pm BIdg. CSS, Room 2330 Williams, J 

Tu 9:30arT>-10:50am BIdg. CSS, Room 2330 ^D/S; 

Prerequisite MATH 110 Design and analysis of programs in Pascal An introduction to 
computing, using stnicturcd programming concepts Not applicable to the major requirements in 
compuu:r science Credit will be given for only one course: CMSC 1 13, 120 or 122 
CMSC 250 Introduction to Discrete Structures 3 credits: Grading Method: REG/P-F/AUD 
0101 TuTh 5:00pn>-e:00pm BIdg CLB, Room 0104 Fonlecilla, R 

Prerequisite CMSC 110 or CMSC 112. MATH 1 1 1 or equivalcm Fundamental mathematical 
concepts and algebraic stnjctures, such as sets, relations, functions, semigroups, monoids, and 
Boolean algebms Introduction to the theory of graphs and trees and their realization as computer 
programs Emphasis on examples and applications rather than mathematical rigor 
CMSC 31 1 Computer Organization 3 aedits: Grading Method: REG/P-F 
Permission ofdepariment required. 
0201 MTuWThF a:00am-9:20am BIdg. CLB, Room 0102 Park, C 

Prerequisite CMSC 122 Introduction to assembly language Design of digital logic circuits 
Oganizauon of central processors, including instruction sets, register transfer operations, control 
microprogramming, data representation, and anthmctic algorithms Memory and input/output 
organization 
CMSC 38« FWd Wor1< 1 credit: Grading Method: REG/P-F/AUD 

Permission of department required. Written permission ol Instructor must be obtained in 
advance on department form 
0101 Time Arranged Room Arranged SlafI 

CMSC 387 Field Work Analysis 2 credits: Grading Method: REG/P-F/AUD 

Permission ol department required. Writlen permission of instruc^lor must be obtained in 
advance on department form, 
0101 Ttme Arranged Room Arranged Staff 



CMSC cont. 



CMSC 411 Computer System Architecture 3 aedits. Grading Method- REG/P-F 
Permission of department required 
0201 MTuWThF 9:30am-10:50am BIdg CLB, Room 0104 Park. C 

Prerequisite CMSC 311 or cquivaleni Input/ouipul processors and techniques Inlra-syslcm 
communication, buses, caches Addressing and memory hierarchies Microprogramnung, 
parallelism, and pipeling 
CMSC 420 Data Structures 3 credits: Grading Method: REG/P-F 
Permission o( department required, 

0201 MW 5:00pnv^;00pm BIdg CLB, Room Dili Eastman, R 

Prerequisiie CMSC 22U or equivalent Dcscnption, properties, and storage allocauon of data 
structures including lists and trees Algonthms for manipulatmg structures Applications from areas 
such as data processing, information retrieval, symbol manipulation, and operating systems. 
CMSC 450 Elementary Logic and Algorithms 3 credits; Grading Method: REG/P-F/AUD 
Permission of department required. 

0102 MTuWThF 9:30am-10;50am BIdg MTH. Room 1313 Staff 

0103 MTuWThF 11:00am-12;20pm BIdg, MTH, Room 1313 Staff 

0202 MTuWThF 9:30am-10:50am BIdg MTH, Room 0407 Staff 

Prerequisite: MATH 240 or consent of instnictor This is the same course as MATH 444. An 
elementary development of propositional logic, predicate logic, set algebra, and Boolean algebra, 
with a discussion of Markov algorithms, tunng machines and recursive functions. Topics include 
post productions, word problems, and formal languages 
CMSC 460 Computational Methods 3 credits: Grading Method: REG/P-F 
Permission of department required. 
0201 MTuWThF 8:00am-9:20am BIdg CLB. Room 0111 Staff 

PrerequiMlcs MATH 240: and MATH 241, and CMSC MO or CMSC 113 Also offered as MAPL 
460 Basic computational methods for interpolauon. least squares, approximation, numerical 
quadrature, numerical solution of polynomial and transcendental equations, systems of linear 
equations and initial value problems for ordinary differential equations Emphasis is on methods and 
their computational properties rather than their analytic aspects Intended primarily for students in 
the physical and engineering sciences, Credit will not be granted for both CMSC/MAPL 460 and 
CMSC/MAPL 466 

CMSC 498A Special Problems In Computer Science 1-3 credits: Grading Method: REG/P-F 
Permission of department required. 
0101 Time Arranged Room Arranged Staff 

0201 Time Arranged Room Arranged Staff 

CMSC 798A Graduate Seminar In Computer Science 1-3 credits: Grading Method: REG/AUD 
Permission of department required 
0101 Time Arranged Room Arranged Staff 

0201 Time Arranged Room Arranged Staff 

CMSC 799 Master's Thesis Research 1-6 credits: Grading Method: REG 
Permission of department required. 
0101 Time Arranged Room Arranged Staff 

0201 Time Arranged Room Arranged Staff 

CMSC 61BA Advanced Topics In Computer Systems 1-3 credits: Grading Method: REG/AUD 
Permission or department required 
0101 Time Arranged Room Arranged Staff 

0201 Time Arranged Room Arranged Staff 

CMSC 828A Advanced Topics In Information Processing 1-3 credits: Grading Method: REG/AUD 
Permission of department required, 
0101 Time Arranged Room Arranged Staff 

0201 Time Arranged Room Arranged Staff 

CMSC e38A Advanced Topics In Programming Languages 1-3 credits: Grading Method: REG/AUD 
Permission of department required. 
0101 Time Arranged Room Arranged Staff 

0201 Time Arranged Room An-anged Staff 

CMSC eSBA Advanced Topics In Theory of Computing 1-3 credits. Grading Method: REG/AUD 
Permission of department required. 
0101 Time Arranged Room Arranged Staff 

0201 Time Arranged Room Arranged Staff 

CMSC 878A Advanced Topics In Numerical Methods: Advanced Topics In Numerical Methods 
1-3 credits: Grading Method: REG/AUD 
Permission of department required, 
0101 Time Arranged Room A^anged Staff 

0201 Time An^anged Room Aranged Staff 

CMSC 899 Doctoral Dissertation Research 1-8 credits: Grading Method: REG 
Permission of department required. 
0101 Time Arranged Room Arranged Staff 

0201 Time Arranged Room Arranged Staff 



CNEC 



CONSUMER ECONOMICS 



(HUMAN ECOLOGY) 



CNEC 100 Introduction to Consumer Economics 3 credits: Grading Method: REG/P-F/AUD 
Meets USP Dislnbutive Studies (D) Social and Betiavioral Sciences requirement. 
0101 TuTti 7:00pm-10:00pm BIdg. MMH. Room 0108 Turner. P 

0201 TuTfi 7:00pm-10:00pm BIdg I^MH. Room 0108 Eckman. M 

The role of the consumer in modem society Topics include the consumer in the market, the impact 
of market failures on the quality of life and the impact of government and business decisions on 

CNEC 310 Consumer Economics snd Public Policy 3 credits: Grading Method: REG/P-F/AUD 
Meets USP Advanced Studies Analysis ol Human Problems requirement. 
0201 MW7:O0pm-l 0:00pm BIdg. MMH, Room 1304 Soberon-Ferrer, H 

Prerequisites: ECON 201: and ECON 20.1, The application of economic theory, including 
benefit-cost analysis, to an evaluation of policy decisions in the private and public sectoni which 
affect the consumer. The economic, social, and political framework within which policy decisions 

CNEC 396 Field Wortt and Analysis In Consumer Economics 3-6 aedits: Grading Method: S-F 

Permission o( department required Limited lo majors in consumer economics. Permisston 
of inslructof required 
0101 Time Arranged Room Ananged Staff 

0201 Time Arranged Room Arranged Staff 

Supervised, professional field work e^penence in business, industry, government or education. A 
seminar and a written critique of the field work enpenence will be required to relate formal 
academic study to student work eupcriences Students must apply a semester in advance and 
enrollment is by permission of the depanment and is limited to majom 
CNEC 410 Consumer Rnance 3 credits: Grading Method: REG/P-F/AUD 

Meets USP Advanced Studies Analysis ol Human Problems requirement. 
0101 TuTh 7:00pm-10:00pni BIdg. MMH, Room 3418 Soberon-Fen-er. H 

0201 TuTh 7:00pnv-10:00pm BIdg. MMH. Room 3418 Vemia, 3 

Prerequisites: ECON 201; and ECON 20.1 Not open to students who have completed FMCD 441. 
An economic approach to the problems of income allocation and consumer financial plarmmg, 
including income maAimization, principles of asset choice, financial management and risk 
management. The effects of fiscal and monetary policies on lifclime economic planning 



COURSE SECTIONS: 01xx, SESSION I ONLY; 02xx, SESSION II ONLY. 



38 

CNEC cont. 

CNEC 431 The Consumer and the Law 3 credits: Grading Method. REG/P-FAUD 
Meets USP Advanced Studies Analysis of Human Problems requirement. 

0101 MW 7,00pfn-10:00pm BIdg, MMH, Room 1400 Ensor, B 

0102 TuTh 7:00pm-10:00pm BIdg. MMH, Room 1304 Brannigan, V 
0201 MW 7:00pm-10:00pm BIdg, MMH, Room 1400 Jakitsch, R 

A study of legislation affecting consumer goods and services Topics covered include product 
safety and liability, packaging and labeling, deceptive advertising, and consumer credit. The 
implications of such legislation for consumer welfare with particular emphasis on the disadvantaged 
groups in our society will be examined. 
CNEC 435 Economics of Consumption 3 credits; Grading Method: HEG/P-F/AUD 

Meets USP Advanced Studies Analysis of Human Problems requirement. In regular 
academic year, this course will be offered in the spring semester only, 
0101 MW7:00pnr>-10:00pm BIdg. MMH, Room 3418 Verma, S 

Prerequisites ECON 201. and ECON 203; or ECON 205 for non-majors The application of 
economic theory to a study of consumer decision-making and its role in a market economy al both 
the individual and aggregate levels. Topics covered include empirical studies of consumer spcndmg 
and saving, the consumer in the market and collective consumption 
CNEC 437 Consumer Behavtor 3 credits; Grading Method: FtBG/P-F'AUD 

Meets USP Advanced Studies Analysis of Human Problems requirement. 
0101 TuTh 7:00pm-10:00pm BIdg LEF, Room 1222 Ettenson. R 

0201 TuTh 7:00pm-10:00pm BIdg. IVIMH, Room 1304 Ettenson. R 

Prerequisites: PSYC 100; and SOCY 100 An application ol the behavioral sciences to a study of 
consumer behavior. Current theones. models and empincal research findings are explored. 
CNEC 498 Special Studies 2^ credits; Grading Method: REG/P-F/AUD 

0101 Time Arranged Room Arranged Staff 

0201 Time Arranged Room Arranged Staff 



COOP 

COOPERATIVE EDUCATION 

PROGRAM (UNDERGRADUATE STUDIES) 

COOP 098 Co-op Work Experience I No credit: Grading Method: S-F 

Permission of Co-op Coordinator required. Obtain signature and more information at 
Experiential Learning Programs, 0119 Hornbake Library. For special fees, see the financial 
information section of the Schedule of Classes. 
0101 Time Arranged Room Arranged Mintz. S 



CRIM 

(BEHAVIOR AND SOCIAL SCI) 

CRIM 220 Criminology 3 credits; Grading Method: REG/P-F/AUD 

Meets USP Distributive Studies (D) Social and Behavioral Sciences requirement, 
0101 MTuWThF 2:00pm-3:20pm BIdg. LEF. Room 1208 Siman. B 

0201 MTuWThF 2;00pm-3:20pm BIdg. LEF. Room 1208 Katzenelson. S 

Prerequisites: SOCY 100 and sophomore standing. Criminal behavior and the methods of its study; 
causation; typologies of criminal acts and offenders; punishment, con'cction and incapacitation, 
prevention of crime 
CRIM 359 Field Training In Criminology and Corrections 

1-3 credits: Grading Method: REG/P-F/AUD 
0101 Time Arrar^ed Room Arranged Staff 

0201 Time Arranged Room Arranged Staff 

CRIM 386 Held Worit 1-3 credits; Grading Method: REG/P-F/AUD 

0101 Time Arranged Room Arranged Staff 

0201 Time Arrar>ged Room Arranged Staff 

CRIM 387 Held Worit Analysis 1-3 credits: Grading Method: REG/P-F/AUD 

0101 Time Arranged Room Arranged Staff 

0201 Time Arranged Room Arranged Staff 

CRIM 399 Independent Study In Criminology 1-3 credits: Grading Method: REG/P-F/AUD 
0101 Time Arranged Room Arranged Staff 

0201 Time Arranged Room Arranged Staff 

CRIM 450 Juvenile Delinquency 3 credits; Grading Method: REGP-FAUD 

0101 MTuWThF 12:30pm-1 :50pm BIdg. LEF, Room 1208 Brooks, L 

0201 MTuWThF 3:30pm-4:50pm BIdg, LEF, Room 1208 Katzenelson. S 

Prerequisite SOCY 100 Juvenile dc!inqucnc> in relation lo the general problem of crime; analysis 
of factors underlying juvenile delinquency; treatment and prevention 
CRIM 498 Selected Topics In Criminology: Legal Issues In the Death Penalty 
3 credits: Grading Method: REG 
0101 MW 4:00pm-7:00pm BIdg LEF, Room 1208 Paternoster, R 

CRIM 699 Special Criminological Problems 1-3 credits; Gradina Method: REG/AUD 
0101 Time Arranged Room Arranged Staff 

0201 Time Arranged Room Arranged Staff 

CRIM 799 Master's Thesis Research 1-6 credits; Grading Method: REG 

0101 Time Arranged Room An-anged Staff 

0201 Time Arranged Room A/ranged Staff 

CRIM 899 Doctoral Dtssertatlon Research 1-6 credits. Grading Method: REG 
0101 Time Arranged Room Arranged Staff 

0201 Time Arranged Room Arranged Staff 



CRIMINOLOGY 



DANC 

DANCE (ARTS AND HUMANITIES) 

DANC 100 Mo<i«m Dane* I For Non-Ma|or* 2 credits: Grading Method: REG/P-FAUD 
0101 MTuWThF 1t:00am-12;20pm BIdg, PKT, Room 2102 (MS; Mayes, A 

Basic pnnciples of modem dance, emphasizing fundamentals of movement 

DANC 124 BalM I Fof Non-Major* 2 credits: Grading Method: REG/P-FAUD 

0101 MTuWThF 9:30atn-10:50ain BWg. PKT, Room 2102 Haigler de Robles, 



M 



oA for alignment, strength, flexibtlity and coordination Introduction to ballet 



Barre and c( 
terminology, 
DANC 200 Intreductlon to Danes 3 credits: Grading Method: REG/P-F/AUD 

Meets USP Disthbtjtive Studies (C) Literature and the Arts requirement. 
0101 MTuWThF 12:30pm-1:50pm BIdg. PHY, Room 4208 Haigler de Robles, 



M 



1 form, a survey of the theories and 



DANC cont. 



DANC 398 Directed Studies In Dance 1-6 credits; Grading Method: REG/P-F/AUD 
0101 Time Arranged Room Arranged (LAB) Wiltz, A 



ECON 

ECONOMICS (BEHAVIOR AND SOCIAL SCI) 

ECON 201 Principles o) Economics I 3 credits: Grading Method: REG/P-F/AUD 

Meets USP Distributive Studies (D) Social and Behavioral Sciences requirement. Not open 
to students who have credit for ECON 205- 

0101 MTuWThF e:00am-9:20am BIdg. TYD, Room 0101 Staff 

0102 MTuWThF 9:30am-10:50am BIdg TYD. Room 0101 Staff 

0103 MTuWThF 11 00am-12:20pm BIdg TYD, Room 0101 StafI 

0104 MW 7 00pm- 10 :00pm BIdg TYD, Room 1 114 StafI 

0105 TuTh 7:00pm- 10:00pm BIdg. TYD, Room 1114 Staff 

0201 MTuWThF 8:00am-9:20am BIdg TYD, Room 0101 Staff 

0202 MTuWThF 9.30atT>-10:50am BIdg. TYD, Room 0101 Staff 

An introduction to the problems of unemployment, inflation, and economic growth. Emphasis is 
placed on the roles of mot^etaiy and fiscal policy in the conduct of macroeconomic policy. The 
efficacy of wage and pnce controls is analyzed 
ECON 203 Principles o( Economics II 3 credits: Grading Method: REG/P-F/AUD 

Meets USP Disthbutive Studies (D) Social and Behavioral Sciences requirement. 

0101 TuTh 7 :00pm- 10 :00pm BIdg TYD, Room 1128 Staff 

0102 MTuWThF 9:30am-10:50am BIdg. TYD. Room 1128 Wallis, J 

0103 MTuWThF 11 :00am-1 2:20pm BIdg, TYD, Room 1118 Staff 

0104 MTuWThF 8:00am-9:20am BIdg TYD, Room 1116 Wallis, J 

0201 MTuWThF 8:00am-9:20am BIdg, TYD, Room 1101 Staff 

0202 MTuWThF 9:30am-10:50am BIdg, TYD, Room 1128 Panagatiya. A 

This course emphasizes the behavior of individual consumers and business firms, problems of 
interaationa! trade and finance, the dislnbution of income, policies for eliminating poverty and 
discrimination, the problems of environmental pollution, and the impact of different marict 
stnicturcs upon economic activity (Students an; advised to take ECON 201 before ECON 203.) 

ECON 205 Fundamentals of Economics 3 credits: Grading Method: REG/P-F/AUD 

Meets USP Distributive Studies (D) Social and Behavioral Sciences requirement. 
0102 MTuWThF 8:00am-9:20am BIdg, TYD, Room 1114 Adams, J 

0201 MTuWThF 9;30am-1 0.50am BIdg. TYD, Room 1114 SlaH 

(Not open lo students who have credit in ECON 201. Credit will be given for either 201 or 205, 
but not for boUl. Students in the College of Business and Management are required lo lake ECON 
201 and should not take 205.1 A one-semester introduction, for non-majors, to the principles of 
economics and their applications to die leading economic problems of society, including inflation, 
unemployment, population, poverty, urban renewal, inequality, monopoly, environmental 
protection, international trade, impenalism, economic planning, and comparative economic systems. 

ECON 301 Current Issues in American Economic Policy 3 aedils: Grading Method: REG/P-F/AUD 
0101 MW7:00pn>-10:00pm BIdg. TYD, Room 2109 Stratmann, T 

[Prerequisite. ECON 201 and 203, or 205 Analysis of current economic problems and public 
policies Inflation, umemployment, market power, government regulation, poverty and distribution 
of income, federal budget and tax policy, environment. 

ECON 305 intermediate Macroeconomic Theory and Policy 

3 credits. Grading Method: REG/P-F/AUD 
Previously ECON 401. 

0101 MTuWThF 9:30am-10:50am BIdg. TYD, Room 1140 Staff 

0102 MTuWThF 8:00am-9:20am BIdg. TYD, Room 1101 Staff 

0201 TuTh 7:00pm-10:00pm BIdg. TYD, Room 2106 Brechling, F 

Prerequisites: ECON 201, 203 and MATH 220 Analysis of die determination of national income, 
employment, and pnce levels Discussion of consumption, investment, inflation, and government 
fiscal and monetary policy Credit will be given for only one courie ECON 305 or ECON 405. 
ECON 306 intermediate Mlcroeconomlc Tlieory 3 credits: Grading Method: REG/P-F/AUD 

Credit will be given lor only one course: ECON 306 or ECON 406. Previously ECON 403. 

0101 MTuWThF 11 :00am-12:20pm BIdg ARC, Room 1105 Kelejian, H 

0201 MW 7:00pm-10:00pm BIdg TYD, Room 21 1 1 Brechling, F 

0202 MTuWThF 1 1 :00am-1 2;20pm BIdg. TYD, Room 1114 Kendix, M 

Prerequisites: ECON 201. 203 and MATH 220 Analysis of die dieories of consumer behavior and 
of the firm, market systems dislnbution theory and die roles of externalities 
ECON 310 Evolution ol Modem Capitalism In Western Europe and tlw Unltad States 
3 credits: Grading Method: REG/P-F/AUD 
Meets USP Distributive Studies (D) Social and Behavioral Sciences requirement. 
0101 MTuWThF 9:30am-10:50am BIdg LEF, Room 2208 Adams, J 

The evolution of the capitalist system from its medieval ongins to the present Emphasis on 
dynamic forces of cumulative change in capitalism, including capital accumulation, technology, 
expansion of markets, die corporate form of pnvale properly in the means of production, and the 
relation of capitalism to war and revolution. 
ECON 311 American Economic Development 3 credits: Grading Method: REG/P-F/AUD 
Meets USP Disthbutive Studies (D) Social and Behavioral Sciences requirement. 
0101 MTuWThF 11 :00am-12:20pm BIdg. TYD, Room 1128 Wallis, J 

Pierequisile: ECON 201 AND 203; OR 205. An analysis of the major issues in the growth and 
development of die American economy Basic economic theory related to such topics as 
agriculnirc, banking, industnalization, slavery, transponadon, and the Depression of die I930's 
ECON 315 Economic Development of Underdeveloped Areas 
3 credits: Grading Method: REG/P-FAUD 
Meets USP Advanced Studies Analysis of Human Problems requirement. Previously 
ECON 415, 
0101 MTuWThF 11 :00am-12:20pm BIdg. TYD, Room 2110 Clague, C 

[*retequisites: ECON 201 and 203, or 205, Analysis of the economic and social chamcterislics of 
underdeveloped areas Recent dieories of economic development, obstacles to development, policies 
and planning for development. Credit will be given for only one course; ECON 315 or 416, 
ECON 321 Economic Statistics 3 credits: Grading Method: REG/P-F/AUD 
Previously ECON 421 
0101 MTuWThF 8:00am-9:20am BIdg, TYD, Room 1128 Staff 

Prerequisite; MATH 220 or equivalent Introduction to die use of statistics in economics. Topics 
include; Probability, random variables and dieir distributions, sampling dicory, (^dmadon, 
hypothesis testing, analysis of variance, regression analysis and correlation. Not open to students 
who have taken BMOT 230 or BMOT 231. 
ECON 361 Economics of American industries 3 credits: Grading Method: REG/P-F/AUD 
0101 MTuWThF 9 :30am- 10 50am BIdg. TYD, Room 2110 Burgess, J 

Prerequisite ECON 201 AND 203, OR 205 A survey of industrial organization dieory. Analysis of 
die structure, conduct, pertbmiance. and public policies in selected American industries. 
ECON 370 l.abor Markets, Human Resources, and Trade Unions 
3 credits. Grading Method: REG/P-F/AUD 
0101 MTuWThF 11 ;00am- 12 :20pm BIdg. LEF, Room 2208 Knight, R 

Prerequisite; ECON 201 and ECON 203, or ECON 205. A survey of labor markets and die 
American labor movement Analysis of labor force growth and composition, problems of 
unemployment and labor market operations, dieories of wage detemiinauon, the wage-price spiral, 
collective bargaining, and governmental regulation of employment and labor relations. Credit will 
be given for only one course; ECON 370 or ECON 470. 



COURSE SECTIONS: 01 xx, SESSION I ONLY; 02xx, SESSION II ONLY. 



39 



ECON cont. 



ECON 399 Individual Reading and Research For Undergraduates 

3 credits; Grading Method: REGP-FAUD 
Permission of department required. Prerequisite 6 hours of upper-division economics 
courses 
0101 Time Arranged Room Arranged Staff 

0201 Ttme Arranged Room Arranged Staff 

ECON 402 Macroeconomic Models and Forecasting 3 credits; Grading Method: REG/P-F/AUD 
Meets USP Advanced Studies Development of Knowledge requirement. 
0101 MTuWThF 8:00am-9:20am BIdg TYO. Room 2110 Staff 

PrEfequisite. ECON 305 or 405 Analysis of ihe lluctualions in econonuc activity and Ihe 
formulation and use of forecasting models of the economy Illuslraiions of computer macro models 
and forecasting problems 
ECON 430 Money and Banking 3 credits; Grading Method: REG/P-FAUD 

0101 MTuWThF 11 :00am- 12 :20pm BIdg. TYD, Room 1114 Staff 

0102 MTuWThF 9:Xam-10:50am BIdg. TYD, Room 1114 Meyer. P 
0201 MTuWThF 9:Xam-1 0:50am BIdg. TYD. Room 1 102 Fahim-Nader, M 

Prerequisite: ECON 201 and ECON 203 The structure of financial msiituuons and their role in ihc 
provision of money and near money Analysis of the Federal Reserve System, the techniques of 
central banks, and the control of supply of Financial assets in stabilization policy. Relationship of 
money and credit to economic activity and the price level Credit will be given for only one courw: 
ECON 430 or ECON 431 
ECON 440 IntomatJonal Economics 3 credits; Grading Method: REG/P-F/AUD 

0101 MTuWThF 8:00am-9:20am BIdg. TYD. Room 1102 Claque, C 

0201 MTuWThF 11 :00am- 12 :20pm BIdg, TYD, Room 1140 Fahim-Nader, U 

Prerequisite ECON 201 and ECON 203 A descnption of international trade and [he analysis of 
international transactions, exchange rates, and balance of payments. Analysis of policies of 
protection, devaluation, and exchange rate slabilizauon and their consequences Credit will be 
given for only one course ECON 440 or ECON 441 

ECON ras Selected Topics In Economics 3 credits; Grading Method: REG 
Permission of department required 
0101 Time An-anged Room Arranged Staff 

0201 Time Arranged Room Arranged Staff 

ECON 799 Master's Tliesis Research 1-6 credits; Grading Method: REG 

0101 Time Arranged Room Arranged Staff 

0201 Time Arranged Room Arranged Staff 

ECON S99 Doctoral Dissertation Research 1-8 credits: Grading Method: REG 
0101 Time Arranged Room Arranged Staff 

0201 Time Arranged Room Arranged Staff 



EDCI 

CURRICULUM AND INSTRUCTION 



(EDUCATION) 



EDO 301 Teaching Art In the Elementary School 3 aedils: Grading Method: REG/P-F/AUD 
0101 TuTh 4:00prT>-7:00pni BIdg. EDU, Room 1315 Cfaig, R 

0201 Meets JUL 17 to AUG 4 

MTuWThF 9:00am-12:00piii BIdg. EDU, Room 1315 McWhinnie. H 

Limited to non-an education majors Art methods and malenals lor elementary schools Includes 
laboratory expenences with malenals appropnate for elementary schools Emphasis on emerging 
areas of an education for the elementary classroom teacher 
EOa 313 Craathre Activities and Materials lor the Young Child 
3 aeaits. Grading Method: REG/P-F/AUD 
0101 Meets JUN 19 to JUL 7 

MTuWThF 9:00am-12:00()m BIdg, EDU. Room 2102 Amershek. K 

Prerequisite, EDCI 280 Corequisiles EDHD 300, and MUED 450; and EDCI 318; and EDCI 
314 Techniques and resources for an, music, play and creative dramatics, 
EOCI 390 Principles and Methods of Secondary Education 

3 credits. Grading Method: REG/P-F/AUD 
0101 MW 4:00pm-7:00pm BIdg EDU. Room 1107 Brigham, 8 

0201 TuTh liOOpm-tOOpm BIdg. EDU, Room 1107 Markham, P 

Pie- or corequisitc EDHD 300; or permission of departmenl Pnnciples and methods of leaching 
in Junior and semor high schools. Instructional problems common to all of Ihe subject fields, 
considered in relation to the needs and interests of youth, social problems and the central values of 

EOa 397 Introduction to Teaching 3 credits: Grading Method REG/P-F/AUD 
0101 Meets JUN 19 to JUL 7 

MTuWThF 9:00am-12:00pm BIdg EDU. Room 01 14 Janlz. R 

Prerequisite: EDCI 280 Corequisile: EDHD 300 Teaching strategies, classroom interactive 
techniques, and procedures for planning and evaluating instruction in elementary schools Emphasis 
on principles of effecuve instruction, classroom management, and adaptation of instruction for 
various student populauons 
EOa 426 Methods of Teaching Social Studies In Secondare Schools 
3 credits: Grading Method: REG/P-F/AUD 
0101 MW 4:00pm-7:00pm BIdg, LEF. Room 1222 Cimncione. J 

Prei«|uisiles: EDHD 300; and EDCI 390 tjbjeclives. selecuon and organization of subject malter. 
appropnate methods, lesson plans, lexlboolcs and other inslrticlional materials, measurement and 
topics pertinent lo social studies education Includes emphasis on multicultural educauon For 

EDO 434 Methods of Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages 

3 credits: Grading Method. REG/P-F/AUD 
0201 MW 4:00pm-7;00pm BIdg. EDU. Room 0202 Markham. P 

Methods for teaching listening, speaking, reading and wnling icchniques and a review of research 
findings 
EOCI 443 Literature tor Children and Youth 3 credits, Grading Method: REG/P-F/AUD 
0101 MW 4:00pm-7 :00pm BIdg EDU. Room 2212 Oreher, J 

0201 MW l:00pm-4 :00pm BIdg, EDU, Room 0114 Slafi 

For education and pre-cducabon majors only Analysis of literary malenals for children and youth 
Timeless and ageless books, and outstanding examples of contemporary publishing Evaluation of 
the conlnbuEions of individual authors, illustrators and children's book awards 
EOCI 444 Language Arts In Earfy Childhood Education 3 credits: Grading Method: REG.'P-F/AUD 
0101 TuTh 4:00pnv7:00pm BIdg EDU, Room 2101 O'Rahaven, J 

Teaching of spelling, handwnling. oral and wnllcn cspression and creative expression Pnmanly 
for in-service Icachcrs. nursery school through grade 3 
EOa 445 Language ArU In the Elementary School 3 credits, Grading Method: REG/P-F/AUD 
0101 TuTh 4:0Opm-7:00pm BIdg EDU. Room 2101 ORahaven. J 

Teaching of spelling, handwnling, oral and written expression and creative expression Primarily 
for in-service teachers, grades I -6 
EOCI 446 Methods of Teaching English, Speech, Drama In Secondary Schools 
3 credits: Grading Method: REG/P-F/AUD 
0101 MW 7:00pm-t0:00p(n BIdg EDU. Room 1107 Horstman. F 

Prerequisites EDHD 300. and EfXTI 390; or permission of depanmenl Objectives, selection and 
organization ol subject mailer, appropriate methods, lesson plans. Icxlbooks and other instructional 
materials, measurement and topics pcninent to English, speech, and drama education. For in-service 



EDCI cont. 



EOCI 455 
0101 



Mathematics In the Elementary School 3 credits: Grading Method: REG/P-F/AUD 
MW4:00pm-7:00pm BIdg EDU, Room 2121 SlafI 

Prerequisile: MATH 210 or equivalent Emphasis on malenals and procedures which help pupils 

sense anlhmclic meanings and relationships Primarily for in-service leacheis. grades 1-6 

Methods of Teaching Mathematics In Secondary Schools 
3 credits. Grading Method: REG/P-F/AUD 
TuTh 4:00pm-7;00pm BIdg, EDU. Room 2121 Stall 

Prerequisites: EDHD 300; and EDCI 390; and 2 semesters of calculus. Objectives, selection and 

organization of subject mailer, appropnate methods, lesson plans, textbooks and other instructional 

malenals. measurement, and topics peninenl to mathematics education. 

Reading In Early Childhood Education 3 credits: Grading Method: REG/P-F/AUD 
Meets JUL 17 to AUG 4 
MTuWThF l:00pm-4:00pm BIdg EDU, Room 2119 Sanacho. O 

Fundamentals of developmental reading instruction, including reading readiness, use of expenence 

slones. procedures in using basal readers, ihe improvcmenl of comprehension, word analysis, and 

procedures tor determining individual needs Pnmanly for in-service teachers, nursery school 

through grade 3 

Reading In the Elementary School 3 credits. Grading Method: REG/P-F/AUD 
Meets JUL 17 10 AUG 4 
MTuWThF 1:C0pm-^ :00pm BIdg, EDU, Room 2119 Sarracho. 

Fundamentals of developmental reading instruction, including reading readiness, use of experience 

stones, procedures in using basal readers, ihe improvement of comprehension, word analysis, and 

prtKedures for dclerminmg individual needs Pnmanly lor in-service leacheis, grades I 8, 

The Teaching of Reading In the Secondary School 
3 ciedits. Giading Method REGP-FAUD 
MW 4:00pm-7:00pm BIdg, EDU, Room 0114 Davey, H 

The fundamentals of secondary reading inslniclion. including emphasis on content reading 



Eley Jr, G 
the elementary school. 



Lockard. J 



EDCI 463 
0101 



EDCI 464 Clinical Practices In Reading Diagnosis and Instruction 

3 credits: Grading Method: REG/P-F/AUD 
0201 Meets JUL 17 to AUG 4 

MTuWThF 9:00am-12;00pm BIdg. EDU, Room 2101 Sarracho. 

Prerequisite. EDCI 362 or EDCI 463. A laboratory course in which each student has one or more 
pupils for analysis and inslniclion. Al least one class meeting per week to diagnose individual cases 
and 10 plan instruction 
EOCI 467 Teaching WrHIng 3 credits: Giading Method: REG/P-F/AUD 

0201 MW 4:00piTV-7;00pm BIdg, EDU, Room 2102 Slater, W 

Sources and procedures for developing cuiriculum objectives and malenals for teaching wnllen 
composition, prewriting. composing, and revision procedures, conlempotary directions m rhetorical 
theory, survey of research on composition instruction 
EOCI 472 Methods of Teaching Science In Secondary Schools 
3 credits: Grading Method. REG/P-F/AUD 
0201 Meets JUL 17 to AUG 4 

MTuWThF 9:00anv-l 2:00pm BIdg EDU. Room 2212 Staff 

Prerequisites: EDHD 300; and EDCI 390; and permission of depanmenl. Methods for classroom 
and labonilory inslniclion. determining appropriate teaching methods, selecting instructional 
malenals. evaluating shident achievement Includes lab and field expenence. For in-service 
teachers 
EDCI 473 Environmental Education 3 credits: Grading Method: REG/P-F/AUD 

0201 MWl:00pm-4 :00pm BIdg EDU. Room 0202 Messersmilh. D 

An interdisciplinary course covenng Ihe literature, techniques and strategies of environmental 
educauon 
EDCI 474 Science In Eariy Childhood Education 3 credits: Grading Method: REG/P-F/AUD 
0101 Meets JUN 19 to JUL 7 

MTuWThF 9 OOant-12 00pm BIdg. EDU. Room 2212 Eley Jr. G 

Objccuvcs. methods, materials and activities for teaching science in the elemenuuy school. 
Pnmanly lor in-service teachers, nursery school through grade 3 
EOCI 475 Science In the Elementary School 3 credits: Grading Method: REG/P-F./AUD 
0101 Meets JUN 19 lo JUL 7 

MTuWThF 9:00am-12:00pm BIdg, EDU, Room 2212 

Objectives, methods, malenals. and activities lor leaching scienc 
Primarily for m-service teachers, grades 1-6. 
EOCI 487 Introduction to Computers In Instructional Settings 
3 aedits: Grading Method: REG/P-F.AUD 
0101 TuTh 4:00pm-7:00pm BIdg. EDU. Room 01 14 

Prerequisite six hours of education or permission of departmenl A firsl-level survey of 
inslrucuonal uses of compuleni. software, and related technology especially for in-service teachers. 
EDCI 4881 Selected Topics In Teacher Education: Wrtting/ Composing Oifflcuttles and their 
Remediation 3 credits. Grading Method: REGP-F/AUD 

0101 TuTh 7:00prrv10:00pm BIdg EDU, Room 0114 Slater, W 

EDCI 488N Selected Topics In Teacher Education: Study of Cross Cultural, Interdlsclplinaiy 
Science, Arts, and Humanities: Implications for Teaching 3 credits: Grading Method: REG/P-F/AUD 
0101 Meets JUN 1910 JUL 7 

MTuWThF 9 :00am- 12 :00pm BIdg. EDU, Room 2101 Weaver, V 

EOCI 488V Selected Topics In Teacher Education: Teaching Visual Literacy 
3 credits: Grading Method: REG/P-F/AUD 
0101 MW 4:00pm-7:00pm BIdg. EDU. Room 1315 Craig. R 

Examines physiological, psychological, cultural, environmental, and aesthetic bases for visual 
preference and perceplual attitudes Consideration will be given lo perceptual theones that are 
concerned with Ihe development of visual lileracy and ihal have influenced ihe leaching of art 
EOCI 489 Field Experiences In Education 1-4 credits. Grading Method: REG P-FAUD 
0101 Time Arranged Room Arranged Slalf 

0201 Time Arranged Room Arranged Stall 

EOCI 498 Special Problems In Teacher Education 1-6 ciedits: Grading Method: REG/P-F/AUD 
0101 Time Arranged Room Arranged Stall 

0201 Time Arranged Room Arranged Slalf 

EOCI 499C Woriishops. Clinics, and Institutes: Advanced MBL-Curriculum, Applications and 
Research 2 credits: Grading Method: REG 

Permission of department required, 
0101 Meets JUN 26 10 JUL 18 

MTuWThF 9:00am-3:00pm BIdg EDU, Room 1121 Layman, J 

EOC1499S Workshops, Clinics, and Institutes: Woriishop: Computers In the Middle School 
Science LatMratory 3 credits: Grading Method: REG 
Permission ol department required. 
0101 Meets JUL 10 10 JUL 28 

MTuWThF 9:00am-3:00pm BIdg. EDU. Room 1121 Layman. J 

EDCI 653 Diagnosis and Treatment of Learning Olsabllltles In Mathematics I 
3 credits: Grading Method: REG/AUD 
0101 Meets JUN 19 to JUL 7 

MTuVI/ThF 9:00am-12:00pm Bklg. EDU, Room 2121 Bamberger, H 

Prerequisite EtXT! 352 or pemussion of departmenl. Diagnosis and irealmenl of disabilities in 
mathematics Tbeoretical models, specific diagnostic and instructional techniques and materials for 
working wiih children in both clinical and classroom sellings Clinic hours lo be arranged 
EDCI 661 Teaching Reading In the Content Areas 3 credits. Grading Method: REGAUD 
0101 TuTh 4:00pnv7:00pm BIdg, EDU, Room 2212 Davey, H 

Prerequisile EDCI 362 or EDCI 463 Focus on improving sludenl achievcmeni in conleni 
disciplines where reading malenals are used as inslrucuonal r 



COURSE SECTIONS: 01 xx, SESSION I ONLY; 02xx, SESSION II ONLY. 



40 

EDCI cont. 

EDCI 687 Appltcatk>ns of Computers In Instructional Settings 

3 credits: Grading Method: REG/AUD 
0201 MW 9:00arTv-1 2:00pm BIdg. EDU. Room 0206 Gillingham. M 

Prerequisite: EDCI 487 or pennission of depanment. Review and analysis of instnictional software 
and computer-based learning environments from the standpomi of (caching, learning, and design 
theoncs. Integration of instructional and tool software into classroom settings 
EDCI 700 Tlteory and Research In Art Education 3 credits: Gradirig Method: REG/AUD 
0201 MW 1:00pm-4:00pm BIdg EDU. Room 1315 McWhinnte, H 

A survey of the research lUeraiure. evaluation of research techniques. consideraUon of relevant 
instructional cumculum theory; evaluation of modem teaching methods and techniques 

EDCI 761 Advanced Clinical Practices In Reading Otagnosis 3 credits: Grading Method: REG/AUD 
0201 MTuWThF 9:O0arT>-12:O0pm Room Arranged Gambrell, L 

Prerequisite: EDCI 665. Corcquisiie: EDCI 762. Diagnostic work with children in clinic and 
school situations Case report writing and conferences 

EDCI 762 Advanced Clinical Practices In Reading Instruction 

3 credits: Grading Method: REG/AUD 
0201 MTuWTtiF 1:00pm-4:00pm Room Arranged Gambrell. L 

Prerequisite: BDCl 665 Corequisite: EDCI 761 Remedial insiiucuon with children in clinic and 
school situations Remedial techniques, diagnostic leaching and evaluation 
EDCI 786 Selected Topics In Teacher Education 1~3 credits: Grading Method: REG/AUD 

0201 Time Arranged Room Arrar>ged Staff 

EDCI 786E Selected Topics In Teacher Education: Program Design, Assessment and Evaluation 
3 credits: Grading Method: REG'^UD 
Permission of department required. 
0101 TuTTi 1 :00pm-4;00pm BIdg. EDU. Room 21 19 Roderick. J 

Provides a context for study and appreciation of the complexities and values of designmg and 
evaluating programs in curriculum specialties In the process of exaimning extant courts of study 
and in designing original ones, students will have opportunities to witness and expenence how 
values, assumptions, and knowledge influence curriculum decisions. Broader societal factors that 
influence program decisions are also examined Although a tentative calendar has been proposed, it 
is expect»l that restructunng will occur around student needs and mterests. Limited (o students in 
the DepaiTment of Masters Certification Program. 
EDCI 788G Selected Topics In Teacher Education: Proseminar: Perspectives on Teaching 
3 credits: Grading Method: REG/AUD 
Permission of department required 
0101 Time Arranged Room Arranged Borko, H 

This course provides an opportunity for students to synthesize and integrate knowledge and skills 
learned in all components of the Maryland Masters Certification Program Particular emphasis is 
placed on the integration of theoretical, empirical and practical knowledge of teaching and learning 
EDCI 786U Selected Topics In Teacher Education: Learning Principles for Teachers 
3 credits: Grading Method: REG 
Permission of department required, 
0201 MW 9:00am-1 2:00pm BWg. EDU. Room 2102 Gamer, R 

Designed as a foundational course for students in the Masters Certirication Program. Il is intended 
to acquaint students with the psychological and educational research literature on learning in 
classrooms. Learner and teacher strategies will be particularly emphasized. Students will be 
expected to do the followmg; (a) complete the Cognitive Psychology of School Learning; (b) write 
a synthesis paper (to be submitted one week into the Fall term as the first seminar paper); (c) 
participate in class discussions of text and library reading, participate in piloting and norming for a 
school-learning research study. Limited to students in the Masters Certification Program, 
EDCI 788V Selected Topics In Teacher Education: Models and Processes of Teaching 
5 credits: Grading Method: REG 
Permission of department required. 
0201 TuTh9:O0am-12:0Opm BIdg. EDU, Room 2102 McCaleb, J 

Course reflects three basic goals of Masters Certification Program: developing repertoire of 
teachinggractices. developing effective habits of reflection upon those practices, and using theory 
and research on leaching and learning as a basis for the reflective practices The teacher scholars 
who complete this course should develop a repertoire of at least three methods of teaching. These 
represent infomiation processing models, behavioral models and social models. Scholar teacher will 
critique teaching according to standards of the specific models The refiection about teaching 
practices should include consideration of philosophical issues conccmmg models of teaching as well 
as theory and research studied Limited to students in the Masters Certification Program 
EDCI 788Y Selected Topics In Teacher Education: Social Context of Education 
2 credits: Grading Method: REG 
Permission of department required. 
0201 F 8:00am-12:00pm BWg. EDU. Room 2102 Arer>ds. R 

Introduction to the profession of leaching and to contextual features of the school that impact 
teaching and learning; includes direct observation, reflective reading and focused discussion based 
on field tnps. help labs and group activities and class presentations will emphasize salient issues 
about schools and the environment in which they function. Students will be encouraged lo learn 
from expenence coupled with critical review and reflection. Limited to students in the Masters 
Certification Program 
EDCI 788Z Selected Topics In Teacher Education: Proseminar and Social Context of Education 
/ credit: Grading Method: REG 
Permission of department required, 
0201 F 1 :00pm-4:00pm BWg, EDU, Room 2102 Henkelman. J 

EDCI 798 Special Problems In Teacher Education 1-6 credits: Grading Method: REG/AUD 
0101 Time Arranged Room Arranged Staff 

0201 Time Arranged Room Arranged Staff 

EDCI 799 Master's Thesis Research 1-6 credits: Grading Method: REG 

0101 Time Arranged Room Arranged Staff 

0201 Time Arranged Room Arranged Staff 

EDCI 888 Apprenticeship In Education 1-8 credits: Grading Method: REG/AUD 
0101 Time Arranged Room Arranged Staff 

0201 Time Arranged Room Arranged Staff 

EDCI 899 Doctoral Dissertstlon Research 1-8 credits: Grading Method: REG 
0101 Time Arranged Room Arranged Staff 

0201 Time Arranged Room An-anged Staff 



EDCP 

EDUCATION COUNSELING AND PERSONNEL 
SERVICES 



EDCP 386 Field Wo* t-3 credits: Grading Method: REG/P-F/AUD 

Permission of department required. 

0101 Time An-anged Room Arranged Stall 

0201 Time Arranged Room Ananged Stall 

EDCP 387 Flew Wofk Analysis 1-3 credits: Grading Method: REG/P-F/AUD 

Permission ol dejsarlment required. 

0101 Time Arranged Room Ananged Stall 

0201 Time Ananged Room Arranged Stall 



(EDUCATION) 



EDCP cont. 



EDCP 410 Introduction to Counsaling and Psrsoniwl Servlcas 

3 credits: Gradirtg Method: REG/P-F/AUD 
0101 MW 4:00pm-7:00pm BWg. EDU, Room 2102 Power, P 

Overview of counselor functions and skills that lead to effective helping. 
EDCP 411 PrindplM of MsnttI HeaW) 3 credits: Grading Method: REG/P-F/AUD 

0201 MW 4:00pm-7:00pm BIdg. EDU, Room 2203 Lawrence, R 

The practical application of the principles of mental hygiene to classnxjm problems. 
EOCP 416 TTieorles of Counseling 3 credits: Grading Method: REG/P-F/AUD 

0101 TuTh 4;00pm-7:00pm Bk^. EDU, Room 2203 Spokane, A 

An overview and comparison of the major theories of counseling, including an appraisal of their 
ulitity and empirical suppon. 
EDCP 489 FMd Experiences In Counseling and Personnel Servlcee 
r-4 credits: Grading Method: REG/P-F/AUD 
Pennission ol depanment required. 
0101 Time Ananged Room Arranged Staff 

0201 Time Ananged Room Ananged Staff 

EDCP 498 Special Problems In Counseling snd Personnel Services 
1-3 credits: Grading Method: REG 
0101 Time Arranged Room Arranged Staff 

0201 Time Ananged Room Ananged Staff 

EDCP 611 Career Devslopineiit Theory and Programs 3 credits: GrarSng Method: REG/AUD 
0101 MW 4fl0pm-7:00pm BIdg. EDU, Room 3236 Spokane, A 

Research and theory related to career and educational decisions: programs of related iofontution 
and other activities m career decision. 
EOCP 614 Personality TTieorlee In Counseling snd Psraonnel Services 
3 credits: Grading Method: REG/AUD 
0201 MW 4:D0pm-7mpm BIdg. EDU, Room 3233 Strain, W 

Examinauon of constructs and research relating to major personality theories with emphasis on their 
signiflcaiKe for working with the t>ehaviors of individuals. 
EDCP 617 Group Counseling 3 credits: Grading Method: REG/AUD 

0201 TuTh 4:0Opm-7DOpm BWg EDU, Room 3233 Lawrence, R 

Preiequisiu:: EDCP 616. A survey of theory, research and practice of group counseling and 
psychotherapy with an introduction to growth groups and the laboratory approach, therapeutic 
factors in groups, composition of therapeutic groups, problem chents. therapeutic techniques, 
research methods, theones. ethics and traimng of group counselors and therapists. 
EDCP 798 Special Problems In Counseling snd Personnel Services 
t-6 credits: Grading Method: REG/AUD 
0101 Time Ananged Room Ananged Staff 

0201 Time Ananged Room Ananged Staff 

EDCP 799 Master's Thesis Rseearcli 1-6 credits: Grading Method: REG 

0101 Time Arranged Room Arranged Staff 

0201 Time Ananged Room Ananged Staff 

EDCP 888 Apprentlcaship In Counseling and Personnel Servlcas 
I-fl credits: Grading Method: REG/AUD 
0101 Time Arranged Room Arranged Staff 

0201 Time Ananged Room Arranged Staff 

EDCP 889 IntemsMp In Counseling snd Personnel Services 
3-8 credits: Grading Method: REG/AUD 
0101 Time Arranged Room Arranged Staff 

0201 Time Arranged Room Arranged Staff 

EDCP 899 Doctoral Dissertation Research IS credits: Grading Method: REG 
0101 Time Arranged Room Arranged Staff 

0201 Time Arranged Room Arranged Staff 



EDHD 

EDUCATION, HUMAN DEVELOPMENT (EDUCATION) 

EDHD 300 Human Development and Learning 6 credits; Grading Method: REG/P-F/AUD 
0101 MTuV\miF9.30am-12;20pm BWg, EDU, Room 3315 Bennett. S 

0201 MTuWThF 9:30am-12;20pm BWg. EDU, Room 3315 Green, H 

Opea only to students admitted to teacher education pmgrams. Major concepts aitd theories of 
human development and learning and their implications for the educational process. One half day a 
week in school to observe student befuvior. panicipatc in classroom activities, and attend seminars 
on school topics (Separate sections for early childhood, elementary, and secondary teacher 
candidates.) 
EDHD 306 Study of Human Behavior 3 credits; Grading Method: REG/P-F/AUD 

Meets USP Distributive Studies (D) Social and Behavioral Sdenoes requirement. 
0101 MW 4:00pm-7:00pm BIdg. EDU. Room 3315 Staff 

The scientific principles of human behavior, development, and adjustirtenl. Field work: observation, 
recording, and analysis of the behavior of an individual- Does not satisl^ requirements of 
professional teacher education program. 
EDHD 320 Human Development Through the Ufespan 3 credits; Grading Method: REG/P-F/AUD 
0101 MW4:00pf!>-7:00pm BWg. EDU. Room 2101 Gardner, A 

Central concepts related to parameters of human development, individual and social, which arise 
throughout the various stages of the lifespan. Continuity and change witJiin the developing 
individual 

EDHD 350 Human Development Factors In Personal Devetooment 

3 credits; Grading Method: REG/P-F/AUD 
0201 TuTh 4:00pm-7:00pm BIdg. EDU. Room 2102 Tyler, B 

Personality dynamics including self-study and group experiences which contribute to individual 
development and insight Emphasis on factors which enhance optimal personal grovi/th 
EDHD 411 Child Growth and Development 3 credits: Grading Method: REG/P-F/AUD 
0101 TuTTi 4:00pm-7i)0pm BWg. EDU. Room 2102 Staff 

0201 TuTh 4:00pm-7:00pm BWg. EDU. Room 3315 Taylor, A 

Theoretical approaches to and empirical studies of physical, psychological and social development 
from conception to puberty. Implications for home, school and community, 
EDHD 413 Adolescent Development 3 credits; Gradina Method: REG/P-F/AUD 

Meets USP Advanced Studies Analysts of Human Problems requirement, 
0101 MW7:00pm-10:Mpm BWg, EDU, Room 3315 Gardner, A 

0201 TuTh 7:00pm-10:00pm BWg. EDU, Room 3315 Staff 

Adolescent devetc^ment. including special problems encountered in contemporary culture. 
Observational component and individual case study. Does not satisfy requirement for professional 
teacher education program. 
EDHD 445 Guidance of Young Children 3 credits: Grading Method: REG/P-F/AUD 
Meets USP Advanced Shjdies Analysis of Human Problems requirement. 

0101 MW 1:0Opm-4 :00pm BIdg. EDU, Room 1107 Staff 

0102 TuTh 4:00pm-7.0Cpm BWg. EDU, Room 1121 Staff 

0201 MW 7:00pnvl 0:00pm BWg. EDU, Room 2101 Marcus. R 

0202 TuTh 7-Wpm-1 0:00pm BWg. EDU, Room 2101 Marcus. R 

Prerequisite: PSYC 100 or EDHD 306 or pennission of department. Practical aspects for helping 
and working with children, drawing on research, clinical studies, and observation. Implications for 
day care and other public issues. 



COURSE SECTIONS: 01 xx, SESSION I ONLY; 02xx, SESSION II ONLY. 



41 



EDHD cont. 



EDHD 4«0 Educ3tlonal Ptychotogy 3 credits: Grading Method: REG/P-F/AUD 
0101 TuTli 7:00pm-10:00p(n BkJg- EDU, Room 2101 Staff 

0201 MW 7:00pm-10fl0pni BIdg. EDU. Room 0114 Staff 

Prcrcquisilc: PSYC 100 or EDHD 306 or permission of depanment Applicalion of psycliology lo 
leamiDg pnxesscs and theories. Individual differences, measurement, motivation, emotions, 
intelligence, aninidcs. problem solving, thinking and communicatmg in educational settings (May 
no< be substituted for EDHD 300 by snidents m professional teacher education programs ) 
EOHO 49* SpacM ProMtm* In EducttkMi 1-3 credits: Grading Method: REG/P-F/AUD 
0101 Time AirangetJ Room Arranged Staff 

0201 Time Anwiged Room Arranged Staff 

EOHO 499T Wofkahopt, Clinic*, and Inttltutu; The Study of ttw Older Woman 
3 credits: Grading Method: REG 
0201 MW 1<X)pm-3:4Spm BIdg, EDU. Room 1107 Staff 

EOHO 600 Inlioducllon to Human Development and CMId Study 
3 credits: Grading Method: REG/AUD 
0101 MW 7«)pm-10a)pm BWg EDU, Room 1121 Ratter. C 

An overview of the multidisciplinary . scientific principles which describe human development and 
behavior and an application of these prmciples in an analysis of a behavioral recotd. Techniques of 
otKcrvation. recording, and analysis of human behavior. Emphasis on critiquing and applying 
research findings, 
EDH0 619T Advanced Sclantlflc Concapt* In Human Develapment: The Study of the Older 
Woman 3 credits: Gracing Method: REG 

0201 MW 1:00pm-3;45pm BIdg, EDU. Room 1107 Staff 

EOHO 840 The Adult Learner 3 creOts: Grading Method: REG 

0101 TuTh 4:00pm-7«)pm BWg, EDU, Room 1203 Roti«rtson-Tt*atx). 

E 

Changes in adult learning/cognitive processes and factors that may affect an individual's selection 
and perfomumce of learning tasks; includes discussion of both theoretical issues and pioposed 
applicalitms of research on adult leaming, 
EOHD 701 Training the Parent Educator 3 credits: Grading Method: REG 

0101 MW 40Dpm-7«)pm BIdg, EDU. Room 1203 natter, C 

Recommended: course in child development. History, philosophy, and ethics of partm cducabon, 
and examination of issues cribcal to the design, implementation, and evaluauon of parent education 
prDgiams, Training in communication and leadership skills 
EDHO 721 Laaming Tlwory and tti* Educative Procaas I 3 credits: Grading Method: REG/AUD 
0101 TuTti7,00pri>-1 0:00pm BIdg, EDU, fk»m 1121 Eliot. J 

0201 TuTh 7:00pm-10:00pm BIdg, EDU, Room 1107 Staff 

Major theories, issues and research in learmng and cognitive development Emphasis on the 
apphcation of these theories to education and the helping professions 
EDHD TM tntamahlp In Human Development 3-8 credits: Grading Method: REG/AUD 
0101 Time Arranged Room Arranged Staff 

0201 Time Arranged Room Arranged Staff 

EOHO 7W Special ProMama ki Education 1-6 credits: Grading Method: REG/AUD 
0101 Time Ananged Room Arranged Staff 

OS01 Time Arranged Room Ananged Staff 

EOHO 7S9 Maatar"* Ttiaal* Reaearch 1-6 credits: Grading Method: REG 

0101 Time Ananged Room Ananged Staff 

0201 Time Arranged Room Arranged Staff 

EOHO M8 ApprantlcaaMp In Education IS credits: Grading Method: REG/AUD 
0101 Time A/ranged Room Arranged Staff 

0201 Tune An-anged Room Arranged Staff 

EOHO tn IntainaMp hi Education 3-6 credits: Grading Method: REG/AUD 

0101 Time Arranged Room Ananged Staff 

0201 Time Arranged Room Ananged Staff 

EDHO W9 Doctoral Olaaailatlon Raaearch 1-8 credits: Grading Method: REG 
0101 Tune Arranged Room Arranged Staff 

0201 Tune Arranged Room Arranged Staff 



EDIT 

INDUSTRIAL, TECHNOLOGICAL AND OCCUPATIONAL 
EDUCATION (EDUCATION) 

EOrr 101 MKhaniccI Drawing I 2 credits; Grading Method: REG/AUD 

0101 MW 5:00pav-10«)pm ffldg, JMP, Room 2108 Staff 

An introduction to orthographic multi-view and isometric projection. The visualization and making 
of a multi-view drawing. Auxiliary views, sectional views, dimensionmg, conventional 
representation and single stroke letters. 
EOrr 102 FurxterTMntils of Woodworking 3 credits: Grading Method: REG/P-F/AUD 
0201 MTuVmi 8:30am-12:00pm BIdg. JMP, Room 1210 Smrth, J 

MTuWTh 8:30am-12:00pm BWg. JMP, Room 1210 (LAB) 

An orientation into the woodworking industry, materials, products and processes; provides skill 
development in the care and use of hand and power tools. 
EDTT 114 PrindplM of Typ«wrtth>g 2 credits: Grading Method: REG 

0101 MTuWThF9:30am-10:50am BIdg. JMP. Room 2115 Peters, R 

The altainmcnl of the ability to operate the typewriter and keyboard continuously with reasonable 
speed and accuracy by the '^ouch". 
EOTT 121 Itochwttcal Drawing II 2 credits; Grading Method: REG/AUD 

0101 MW 5t)0pm-10O0pm BWg. JMP. Room 2108 Staff 

Prerequisite: EDIT 10! Working drawmgs. machine design, pattern layouts, tracing and 
reproduction, dctailmgs and assemblies 
EOrr 160 DMlgn IHustratlng I 3 credits: Grading Method: REG/P-F/AUD 

0101 MW 4:00pm- 10:00pm BWg. JMP. Room 2229 Staff 

0201 MW4.O0pn>-10:00pm BWg. JMP, Room 2108 Staff 

Intended for advertismg, mlerior. landscape design and horticulture majors The use of instruments, 
equipment, and maienals. Ictlcnng, line technique; geometric construction, and projection theory, 
PictonaJ representation, particularly isomctnc. oblique, and one and two point pCRpeclive 
EDIT 202 Itochlnft Woodworking 3 credits: Grading Method: REG/P-F/AUD 

0201 MTuWTh 8 :30am- 12 :00pm BWg. JMP. Room 1210 Smrth. J 

MTuWTh 8:30am-12:00pm BWg. JMP. Room 1210 (LAB) 

Prerequisiie EDIT 102 or equivalent. The dcvelopmem of comprehensive knowledge of machine 
woodworking with emphasis on mass production practices, speciality cuts, laminating, maintenajice , 
and consumer understanding 

EOrr 224 Orgartlxtd and SupwvlMd Work ExptriwKM I 3 credits: Grading Method: REG/P-F/AUD 
Students must nwet with insmKlor during first week. 

0101 Time Arranged Room Arranged Sullivan. D 

0102 Ttme Arranged Room Arranged Sutlh^an, D 
0201 Tvne Arranged Room Ananged Elklns, R 

A work experience for students enrolled m the industrial technology pogram. Opportunities for 
Hrst-hand expeneiKes with business and industry Students are responsible for obtaining their own 
en^loymcnl. with the coordinator advising them about job opportunities with optimum learning 
value The nature of the worit experience desired is outlined ai the outset of employment and then 
evaluations nude by the student and the coordinator are based upon the planned cxperKuces The 
minimum time is 240 worit hours The work experience must be served through 
employment in a single establishment 



EDIT cont. 



EDIT 232 Fundamentals ol Automotive Technology 3 credits. Grading Method: REG/P-F/AUD 
0101 MW4O0pm-ia:0Opm BIdg. JMP, Room 2123 Jones, B 

MW 4;D0pm-10:00pm BIdg. JMP. Room 1229 (MB; 

Designed for non-industnal educalion majors inleresled in learning ttie theory and practical 
operation of the automobile MecfianicaJ, lubrication, cooling, fuel and electrical systcm-s 
EOrr 234 Graphic Communlcetlone 3 credits: Grading Method: REG/P-F/AUD 

0101 MTuWThF 9;00am-12;00pm BIdg. JMP, Room 2202 McLaughlin Jr , C 

MTuWThF 9 :00am- 12 :00pm BIdg. JMP, Room 2222 (l^B) 

Graphic reproduction processes and related areas used to communicate Offset, letterpress, screen, 
gravure. engraving flexographic, and electrostatic duplication, and relevant history, safety, layout 
and design, composition, photo conversion, image carriers, image trxmsfer. finishing, binding, paper 
and ink. 
EDIT 324 Organized and Supervised Work Experiences II 

3 credits: Grading Method: REG/P-F/AUD 
0201 Time Arranged Room Arranged Elkins, R 

A work experience for students enrolled in the industrial technology program Continuation of EDIT 
224 
EDIT 350 Methods of Teaching: Trades end Industrlsl Education 
3 credits: Grading Method: REG/P-F/AUD 
0201 MTuWThF 8:00am-9:20am BIdg. JMP, Room 3225 Schuma. J 

Intended for vocational and occupational teachers The identification and analysis of factors 
essential to helping others learn; types of teaching situations and techniques; measuring results and 
gradmg student progress in laboratory and related technical subjects 
EDIT 406 Word Processing 3 credits: Grading Method: REG/AUD 

0101 MW 40Qpm-7«)pm BIdg JMP, Room 3106 Marschall, S 

An introduction lo the word processing field with emphasis on word processing theory and concepts 
uicluding hands-on equipment training. Management of office personnel, procedures, and 
equipmenl; tlie incorporation of word processing into the school curriculum, the automated office of 
tlK future and career opportunities 
EDfT 412 Managenwnt of Phyalcal Facilities In Industrial Arts and Vocational Education 
3 credits: Grading Method REG/P-F/AUD 
0101 TuTtl 4:0OpiT>-7:OOpm BIdg JMP, Room 3201 Stough. K 

Principles, practices, and theory related to the role of the departmental chairperson charged with lire 
management of tlie physical facilities in vocational, technical, and industrial arts laboratories. 
EDIT 434 Color Reproduction In Graphic Communications 

3 credits: Grading Method: REG/P-F/AUD 
0101 MTuWThF 9:00am-12:00pm BIdg. JMP, Room 2202 McLaughlin Jr., C 

MTuWThF 9:00air>-12;00pm BIdg. JMP, Room 2222 MS; 

Prcrequisilcs: lEDfT 234; and EDfT 334, and EDIT 335] or equivalent. An advanced course in 
the theory and processes of color graphic reproduction Continuous tone color photography, fiat 
color preparation, process color separations and the reproduction of a multiK:olor product on a 
semi-automatic or automatic printing press. 
EOrr 457 Tssts and Measurements 3 credits: Grading Method: REG/P-F/AUD 

0101 TuTh 7:00pin-10:00pm BIdg. JMP, Room 3201 Stough. K 

The construcuon of objective tests for occupational and vocational subjects. Use of measures in 
domains of learning and examination of test analysis techniques. 
EOrr 460 Design Illustrating II 2 aedits: Grading Method: REG/P-F/AUD 

0101 l*A/5:0Opm-10:0Opm BIdg. JMP, Room 2229 Stafl 

MW5flOpm-10:0Opm BIdg. JMP, Room 2229 CL4B; 

0201 MW 5:00pm-10:00pm BIdg. JMP, Room 2229 Staff 

KWV 5:a0pin-10:00pm BIdg JMP. Room 2229 {LAB) 

Prerequisite. fiDfT 160 Advanced drawing, rendering, shadow construction, lettering techniques 
and advanced pictorial representation techniques 
EDfT 461 Principles of Vocational Guidance 3 credits: Grading Method: REG/P-F/AUD 
0101 TuTh 4:00pir>-7:00pm BIdg. JMP, Room 3104 Mietus, W 

The untierlying principles of guidance and their application to the problems of educational and 
occupational adjustment of students of all ages 
EDIT 462 Occupational Analysis snd Course Construction 

3 credits: Grading Mettiod: REG/P-F/AUD 

0201 MTuWThF 9:30am-10:50am BIdg. JMP, Room 1202 Herschbach, D 

0202 MTuWThF 12:30pm-2:00pm BIdg. JMP, Room 1202 Herschbach, D 

Application of the techmques of occupational and job analysis concepts to instructional development 
and the design of occupational programs 
EDIT 464 Latwratory Organization and Management 3 credits: Grading Method: REG/P-F/AUD 
0201 MTuWThF 11. 00am-12;20pm BIdg. JMP, Room 2202 Beatty, C 

The basic elements of organizing and managing an industnal educauon program, the selection of 
equipment, facility development, legal responsibilities of laboratory mstructois, inventory, storage 
control and safety. 
EDIT 471 HIatory and Principles of Vocational Education 

3 credits: Grading Method: REG/P-F/AUD 
0101 MW 4:00pm-7:00pm BIdg. JMP, Room 1202 Luetkemeyet, J 

The development of vocauonal education from pnmitive times to the present with special emphasis 
given to the vocational educauon movement with the Amencan program of public education. 
EDIT 474 Organization and Adtnlnlstrstlon of Youth Groups 
3 credits: Grading Method: REG/P-F/AUD 
0101 Meets JUN 26 to JUL 14 

Time Arranged Room Arranged Mietus, W 

Principles, practices, and theoretical considerations related to youth organizations as a co-cumcular 
function of the subject areas of industrial arts, business and marlceting education, home economics, 
health occupauons and trades and industry 
EDfT 476 Application of Technology to Societal Problems 

3 credits. Grading Method: REG.'P-F/AUD 
Meets USP Advanced Shjdies Analysis of Human Problems requirement. 

0101 MW7:00p(T>-1 0:00pm BIdg. JMP, Room 3201 Staff 

0102 TuTh 7:00pm-10:00pm BIdg. JMP, Room 3104 Staff 

A study of alternative solutions of a technological nature with respect to such areas as housing, 
transportation, energy, communications, production, trash and waste disposal, water development, 
and pollution conm^l 
EDIT 486 FMd Experiences In Martieting and DIstributhre Education 
3 credits: Grading Method: REG/P-F/AUD 
0101 Time Arranged Room Arranged Peters. R 

EDIT 4a8A Selected Topics In Education: Office Technology and Automation 
3 credits: Grading Method: REG/P-F/AUD 
0101 MW 7:COpm-10:OOpm BIdg JMP. Room 1202 Boyce, J 

EDIT 488M Selected Topics In Educstlon: Ethical Actions and the Family 
3 credits: Grading Method: REGP-FAUD 
0101 Meets JUN 5 10 JUN 23 

Time Arranged Room Arranged Huhgren, F 

EDTT 468R Selected Topics In Education: Robots In Industry 
3 credits: Grading Method: REG/P-FAUD 
0101 MW7:0Opm-10:OOpm BIdg. JMP, Room 2201 Milligan, D 

Programming and simulauon m production and manufactunng usmg robouc and automatic theory 
and practice 
EDtr 496 Special Problems In Education 1-6 credits: Grading Method: REG/P-F/AUD 
0101 Time Arranged Room Arranged Staff 

0201 Time Ananged Room Arranged Staff 



42 




COURSE SECTIONS: Olxx, SESSION I ONLY; 02xx, SESSION II ONLY. 



43 



EDIT cont. 



EDIT 4990 Workshops, Clinics, and Institutes: Professional Transition for Vocational Teachers 

1-3 credits: Grading Method REG P-FAUD 
0201 Time Arranged Room Arranged Beatty, C 

EOrr 499n workshops. Clinics, and Institutes: Work Experience. Trade Advancement 
1-6 credits: Grading Method: REG P-FAUD 
0101 Time Arranged Room Arranged Luelkemeyer, J 

0201 Time Arranged Room Arranged Luelkemeyer, J 

Studeni must make pnor arrangements with an adviser lo participate in worishops that are formally 
arranged by corporations, businesses, others., and document their partjcipation. One week 140 
bour^) participation along with a written implementation plan is needed per credit 
EOrr 600 Administration and Supervision of Business Education 
3 credits: Grading Method: REGAUD 
0101 MW 4:00pnt-7:00pm Bidg. JMP, Room 2202 Peters, R 

Major emphasis on departmental organization and its role in the school program, curriculum, 
equipment, budget-making, supervision, guidance, placement and follow-up, school-community 
relationships, qualifications and selection of leaching staff, visual aids, and in-service pnagrams for 
teacher development For administralot^. supervisors, and teachers 
EOrr 788A Selected Topics In Education: Office Technology and Automation 
3 aedits: Grading Method: REG/AUD 
0101 MW7«)pm-10:0Opm BIdg. JMP, Room 1202 Boyce. J 

EDIT 788M Setocted Topics In Education: Ethical Actions and the Family 
3 aedits: Grading Method: REG'AUD 
0101 Meets JUN 5 to JUN 23 

Time Arranged Room Arranged Hultgren, F 

EDIT 798 Special Prolilems In Education 1-6 aedits. Grading Method: REG/AUD 
0101 Time Arranged Room Arranged Staff 

0201 Time Arranged Room Arranged Staff 

EDIT 799 Master's Thesis Research 1-6 aedits. Grading Method. REG 

0101 Time An-anged Room Arranged Staff 

0201 Time Arranged Room Arranged Staff 

EDIT S88 Apprenticeship In Education 1-8 aedits: Grading Method: REG/AUD 
0101 Time Arranged Room Arranged Staff 

0201 Tinne Arranged Room Arranged Staff 

EDIT 889 Internship In Education 3-8 credits: Grading Method: REG/AUD 

0101 Time Arranged Room Arranged Staff 

0201 Time Arranged Room Arranged Slaff 

EDfT 899 Doctoral Dissertation Research 1-8 credits: Grading Method: REG 
0101 Time An-anged Room Arranged Staff 

0201 Time Arranged Room Arranged Staff 



EDMS 

MEASUREMENT, STATISTICS, AND EVALUATION (EDUCATION) 

EDMS 451 Introduction to Educational Statistics 3 credits. Grading Method REG AUD 

Meets USP Advanced Studies Development o( Knowledge requirement BMGT, PSYC, 
and ECON majors and possibly otfiers a student whose program requires a different 
introductoiv applied statistirs course may not use EDMS 451 to satisfy the USP Advanced 
Studies requirement 

0101 MTuWThF 8:00am-9:20am BIdg. EOU, Room 4233 Macready G 

0102 MTuWThF 9:30am-10:50am BIdg, EDU. Room 4233 Macready G 

0201 MTuWThF 9:30am-10:50am BIdg. EDU, Room 4233 DeAyala R 

0202 MTuWThF 11 :00an>-12:20pm BIdg. EDU, Room 0114 Staff 

Designed as a first course in staustics for students in education Emphasis is upon educational 
applications of dcscnpuve sutislics, mcludmg measures of central tendency, vanability and 
association Also included are inferential statistics dirough one-way ANOVA 
EDMS 645 Quantitative Research Methods i 3 aedits: Grading Method REG/AUD 

0101 MTuWTh4:30pm-6:10pm BIdg EDU, (feom 0212 Dayton C 

0201 MTuWThF 11 :00am-12:20pm BIdg, EDU, Room 4233 DeAyala, R 

Introducuon to research design pnnciplcs and the scienunc method as applied to behavioral 
phenomena Instrumentation procedures including the planning and construction of simple data 
collection instnimenls and their analysis, and assessment of the reliability and validity of such 
instnimcnts Sutislical procedures appropnatc to the analysis of data from simple research designs. 
Laboratory expenences in instrumentation and research design are emphasized 
EDMS 646 Quantitative Research Methods II 3 credits: Grading Method REG/AUD 
0101 MTuWTti 7:00pm-8:40pm BIdg. EDU, Room 0212 Dayton C 

0201 l^uWThF9 30am-10:50am BIdg EDU, Room 1107 Schaler, W 

Prerequisite EDfvIS 645 Special problems ansing in the implementation of educational research 
designs Instnimentation to measure attitudes and collection of questionnaire data Additional 
statistical procedures appropnatc to the analysis of education research designs laboratory 
espenences in instnimentation and research design are emphasized 
EDMS 651 intermediate Statistics In Education 3 aedits: Grading Method: REG/AUD 
Prerequisite: EDMS 646. 
0201 MTuWThF 11 :00am-12:20pm BIdg. EDU, Room 1107 Schafer, W 

Distributional theory. Chi-square analysis of contingency tables, analysis of vanance; inu-oduction to 
multiple correlation and regression 
EDMS 798 Special Problems In Education 1-6 aedits: Grading Method: REG/AUD 
0101 Time Arranged Room Arranged Staff 

0201 Time Arranged Room Arranged Slaff 

EDMS 799 Master's Thesis Research 1-6 aedits: Grading Method REG 

0101 Time Arranged Room Arranged Staff 

0201 Time Arranged Room Ananged Staff 

EDMS 899 Doctoral Dissertation Research 1-8 credits: Grading Method REG 
0101 Time Arranged Room Arranged Staff 

0201 Time Arranged Room Arranged Slaff 



EDPA 

EDUCATION POLICY, PLANNING AND 

ADMINISTRATION (EDUCATION) 

EDPA 301 Foundations o« Education 3 aedits. Grading Method: REG/P-F/AUD 

0101 MW 7 0Op(Ti-i0OOpm BIdg, EDU, Room 01 14 Lindsay R 

0102 TuTfi 7:00pm-10:00pffl BIdg, EDU, Room 21 19 Noll, J 

0201 TuTh 7:00pm-10:00pm BIdg. EDU, Room 2102 Male, G 

Histoncal social, cullural, and philosophical foundations of Amencan education Considers 

cducauon as a profession, and the organizational struchire, operation and funcuon of modem school 

systems Comparative education and contemporary issues are included 
EDPA 400 The Future ol the Human Community 3 credits: Grading Method: REG/P-F.'AUD 

Meets USP Advanced Studies Analysis of Human Problems requirement 
0101 TuTh 7 :00pm- 10 00pm BIdg EOU, Room 2102 Slaff 

Vm MW 7:00prT)-10:00pm BIdg, EDU, Room 1107 Splaine, J 

0202 TuTh 7:00pm-10:00pm BIdg, EDU, Room 0114 Splaine, J 

Examination of the fulure of our social and cullural institutions for education and child reanng, 
social and family relationships, health and leisure, informauon exchange, and the provision of food. 



EDPA cont. 

clothing, and shelter 
EDPA 498 Special Problems in Education f-3 aedits: Grading Method: REG/P-F/AUD 
Permission of department required, 
0101 Time Ananged Room Arranged Staff 

0201 Time Arranged Room Arranged Slaff 

EDPA 610 History of Western Education 3 credits: Grading Method: REG/AUD 

0101 MW 4:00pm-7:00pm BIdg EDU, Room 2203 Undsay, R 

Educational institutions through the ancient, medieval and early modem pcnods in western 
civilization, as seen against a background of socio-economic development 
EDPA 620 Education Policy Analysis 3 credits: Grading Method: REG/AUD 

0201 TuTh 7:00pm-10:00pm BIdg, EDU, Room 1203 Agre, G 

Policy making in education from planning to evaluation with emphasis on the identification of 
policy problems and the resources available to analysts through multi-disciplinary approaches. An 
introductory experience with education policy analysis. 
EDPA 622 Education Policy, Values, and Social Change 3 aedits: Grading Method: REG/AUD 

0101 TuTh 4:00pm-7:00pm BIdg EDU, Room 3233 Hopkins, R 

0102 TuTh 4:00pn>-7:00pm BIdg, EDU, Room 3236 Staff 

Prerequisite. EDPA 620 Examination of relationships among educational policy, values, and 
social change. Roles of educational organizations and institutional change in such social issues as 
equity and cultural diversity 
EDPA 634 The School Curriculum 3 credits: Grading Method: REG/AUD 

0201 TuTh 4:00pm-7:00pm BIdg. EDU, Room 3236 Selden, S 

A foundations course embracing the curriculum as a whole from early childhood through 
adolescence, including a review of histoncal developments, an analysis of conditions affecting 
cumculum change, an exammalion of issues in cumculum making, and a consideration of current 
trends in cumculum design 
EDPA 635 Principles o( Curriculum t)evelopnient 3 aedits: Grading Method: REG/AUD 
0101 MW 4:00pm-7:00pm BIdg. EDU, Room 1121 Berman, L 

Cumculum planmng, improvement, and evaluation in the schools, principles for the selection and 
organization of the content and learning experiences, ways of working in classroom and school on 
cumculum improvement 
EDPA 660 Administrative Foundations 3 aedits: Grading Method REG/AUD 

0101 MW 4:00pm-7:00pm BIdg, EDU, Room 3233 Heid, C 

Develops a theorebcal and research based structure for the smdy and practice of administration m 
the field of education 
EDPA 661 Administrative Behavior and Organizational Management 
3 credits: Grading Method: REG/AUD 
0201 MW 4:00pm-7:00pm BIdg, EDU, Room 0206 Goldman, H 

Critical analysis of organizational management governance and management (mformal and fomial 
dimensions), and of contnbutions from other fields (traditional and emerging! to the study of 
adnunistrative behavior, 
EDPA 662 Administrative Processes 3 credits: Grading Method: REG/AUD 

0101 TuTh 4:00pm-7:00pm BIdg, EDU, Room 0202 Leak, L 

Develops competence with respect to selected administrative process areas, 
EDPA 663 Policy Formulation In Education 3 aedits: Grading Method: REG/AUD 
0101 MW7:00pm-10:00pm BIdg, EDU, Room 3233 Heid, C 

Various levels of school governance Analysis of policy formation, admuiistration and evaluation 

EDPA 690 Research In Education Policy, Planning and Admlnistra 

3 credits: Grading Method: REG/AUD 
0201 MW 4:00pm-7:00pm BIdg. EDU, Room 1203 Agre, G 

Intixxluction to research methods and designs used in studies of education policy, planning, and 
administration. 
EDPA 700 Qualitative Research Methods in Education 3 credits: Grading Method: REG/AUD 

0101 TuTh 7:00pm-10:00pm BIdg. EDU, Room 2203 Huden D 

0102 TuTh 7 :00pm- 10 :00pm BIdg EDU, Room 3236 Hopkins, R 

Qualilauve mediods in educaUon research, emphasizing the paradigms of philosophy, history. 
sociology, anthropology, and comparative studies as they rely on narrative rather than quantitative 
ordenng of data 
EDPA 772 Practlcum in Leadership Behaviors 3 credits: Grading Method: REG/AUD 
0201 Meets JUL 17 to AUG 3 

MTuWTh 9 30an>-12:40pm BIdg, EDU, Room 3233 GokJman, H 

Prerequisites: EDPA 660 and EDPA 661, or permission of department. Practicum in the use of 
social exchange behaviors m administrativc/lcadersh ip situations Emphasis on development and 
refinement of exchange behaviors enhancing employee commitment and productivity in human 



EDPA788F Special Topics in Education Policy and Administration: Comparing Education In 

Japan and the United States 3 aedits. Grading Method: REG/AUD 

0101 MW 7 00pm-10 00pm BIdg. EDU, Room 1203 Finkelstein, B 

EDPA 798 Special Problems in Education 1-6 credits: Grading Method: REG/AUD 
Permission of department required. 

0101 Time Arranged Room Arranged Staff 

0201 Time Arranged Room Arranged Staff 

EDPA 799 Master's Thesis Research 1-6 credits. Grading Method: REG 

0101 Time Arranged Room Arranged Staff 

0201 Time Arranged Room Arranged Slaff 

EDPA 899 Doctoral Dissertation Research 1-8 credits: Grading Method: REG 

0101 Time Arranged Room Arranged Slaff 

0201 Time Arranged Room Arranged Staff 



EDSP 

EDUCATION. SPECIAL (EDUCATION) 

EDSP 210 introduction to Special Education 3 aedits. Grading Method: REG/AUD 
0201 MW 4:00pm-7:00pm BIdg. EDU, Room 1121 Maag, J 

Charactenstics and needs of children with handicaps Current issues in special education 
EDSP 402 Field Placement: Severely Handicapped I 2-5 credits: Grading Method: REG 

Permission ol department required Students without the required co- or prerequisites can 
register lor this course with departmental approval Open lo special education graduate 
students only (or this term 
0101 Time Arranged Room Arranged Staff 

0201 Time Arranged Room Arranged Staff 

Pre- or corcquisiles: [EDSP 400: and EDSP 404| or peniiission of depanmenl Practicum 
expenence in settings serving severely handicapped individuals Enrollment limited to those 
admitted to severely handicapped specialty area Field placement tor two to five half-days per 



Permission o( department required. Students without the required pre- or corequisites can 
register lor this course with departmental approval Open to special education graduate 
students only lor this term 
0101 Time Arranged Room Ananged Staff 

0201 Time Arranged Room Arranged Staff 

Pre- or corequisite; [EDSP 410 and EDSP 420| or pennission of department Practicum experience 
in settings serving preschool handicapped children Opportunities for studying the pattems of 
development and learning among nonhandicapped and handicapped infants and older preschoolers. 
Enrollment limited to students admitted to early childhood specialty Field placement for two or 



COURSE SECTIONS: 01 xx, SESSION I ONLY; 02xx, SESSION II ONLY. 

ENAE cont. 



44 

EDSP cont. 

three half-<lays per week 
EDSP 442 Field Placement: Educationally Handicapped I 2-3 credits; Grading Method: HEG 

Permission of department required, Students without the required co- or prerequisites can 
register for this course with departmental approval. Open to special education graduate 
students only for this term. 
0101 Time Arranged Room Arranged Staff 

0201 Time Arranged Room Arranged Staff 

Pk- or corequisite: [EDSP 441 and EDCI 456) or permission of departmeni. Practicum expenence 
in settings serving educationally tiandicapped individuals. Demonstration of the content of EDSP 
441. Enroilmeni limited to students admitted to educationally handicapped specialty Field 
placement for two or three half-days per week. 
EDSP 461 Field Placement: Career/Vocational I 2-3 credits; Grading Method: REG 

Permission of department required. Students witfiout the required pre- or corequisites can 
register for the course with departmental approval. Open to special education graduate 
students only for this term, 
0101 Time Arranged Room Arranged Staff 

0201 Time Arranged Room Arranged Staff 

Pre- or corequisiie: [EDSP 460. and EDSP 456: and EDIT 421] or permission of department. For 
EDSP majors only. Practicum experience in career vocational education for the handicapped. Field 
placement for two or three half-days per week. 
EDSP 470 Introduction to Special Education 3 credits; Grading Method REG/AUD 
Open to all students except undergraduate special education majors. 
0101 TuTh 4:00pm-7:00pm BIdg, EDU, Room 2119 Cooper. D 

Designed to give an understanding of the needs of all types of exceptional children. 
EDSP 475 Education of the Slow Learner 3 credits; Grading Method: REG/AUD 

0101 MW 7:00pnn-1 0:00pm BIdg. EDU. Room 2101 Simms. B 

Studies the characteristics of the slow learner and those educational practices which are appropriate 
for the child who is functjoning as a slow learner 
EDSP 491 Characteristics of Learning Disabled Students 3 credits; Grading Method: REG/AUD 
0201 TuTTi 4:00pm-7:00pm BIdg. EDU. Room 1107 Harris, K 

This course is plarmed for elementary education majors to study possibilibes for the teaching of 
science and social studies wiihm an environniental context, and to apply this mformation by 
demonstration of selected procedures, construction of materials, and class participation. The goals 
of this course are to provide the student with (a) background and understandmg about science and 
social studies cumcula to enable the student to thmk and act intelligently and creatively in a 
classroom situation, (b) ability to plan and teach lessons to children in an elementary school setting, 
(c) ability to develop and evaluate material for science and social studies mstruction, and Id) 
understanding of content, values and skills and process goals in elementary science and social 
studies Open to all students but special population of teachers from Howard County. Diagnosis, 
ebology. physical, social, and emotional characteristics of learning disabled students. 
EDSP 498 Special Problems In Special Education 1~6 credits; Grading Method: REG 
0101 Time Arranged Room Arranged Staff 

0201 Time Arranged Room Arranged Staff 

EDSP 498R Special Problems In Special Education: The Handicapped Child In the Regular 
Classroom 3 credits; Grading Method: REG/AUD 

0101 MW 4:00prTV-7:00pm BIdg. EDU, Room 21 19 Hebeter. J 

Course designed for Maryland slate certification. To assist regular educators in working with 
handicapped students in their school settings. Deals with the philosophy, legal provisions, relevant 
characienstics of handicapped students, modification in educational programs and relevant resources 
for the regular educator, 
EDSP 600 Exceptional Children and Youth 3 credits; Grading Method: REG/AUD 

0101 TuTh 4:00pm-7:00pm BIdg. EDU. Room 3315 Speeca. D 

Prerequisite: 9 hours in special education and permission of department. Examines research 
relevant to the education of exceptional children and youth 
EDSP 798 Special Problems In Special Education 1-6 credits; Grading Method: REG 
0101 Time Arranged Room Arranged Staff 

0201 Time Arranged Room Arranged Staff 

EDSP 79eR Special Problems In Special Education: The Handicapped Child In the Regular 
Classroom 3 credits; Grading Method: REG/AUD 

0101 MW 4:00pm-7:00pm BIdg. EDU, Room 2119 Hebeler, J 

Course designed for Maryland state certification To assist regular educators in working with 
handicapped students in their school settings. Deals with the philosophy, legal provisions, relevant 
characteristics of handicapped students, modification in educational programs and relevant 
for the regular educator 
EDSP 799 Master's Thesis Research 1-6 credits; Grading Method: REG 

0101 Time Arranged Room Arranged Staff 

0201 Time Arranged Room An-anged Staff 

EDSP 868 Apprenticeship In Special Education 1-8 credits; Grading Method: REG 

0101 Time Arranged Room Arranged Staff 

0201 Time Arranged Room Arranged Staff 

EDSP 889 Internship In Special Education 3-8 credits: Grading Method: REG 

0101 Time Arranged Room Arranged Staff 

0201 Time Arranged Room Arranged Staff 

EDSP 899 Doctoral Dissertation Research 1-8 credits; Grading Method: REG 

0101 Time Arranged Room Arranged Staff 

0201 Time Arranged Room Arranged Staff 



ENAE 



ENGINEERING, AEROSPACE 



(ENGINEERING) 

ENAE 201 Introduction to Aerospace Engineering I 2 credits; Grading Method: REG/P-F/AUD 
0101 MTuWTh 8:00am-9:20am BIdg, EGR, Room 2154 Winblade, R 

Prerequisite, ENES 1 10 History of aeronautical engineering, technical fundamentals, the standard 
atmosphere, basic aerodynamics, and the aerodynamics of airfoils, wtngs and other aerodynamic 

ENAE 202 Introduction to Aerospace Engineering II 2 credits; Grading Method: REG'P-F/AUD 
0201 MTuWTh 8:00am-9:20am BIdg. EGR, Room 0108 Winblade, R 

Prerequisite: ENAE 201 Elements of airplane performance. Principles of airplane stability and 
control Basic astronautics, including orbital and escape trajecioncs. flight propulsion fundamentals, 
propellers. IC engines, jet and rocket engines, 
ENAE 345 Right Dynamics 3 credits; Grading Method: REG/P-F/AUD 

0101 MTuWThF 8:00am-9:20am BIdg EGR, Room 0108 Regan, F 

Prerequisites ENES 221, and MATH 246 Kinematics and concept of system state. Dynamic 
principles applied to panicles, discrete mass and continuously distributed mass systems. LaGrangian 
dynamics, dynamic stability of systems, applications to dynamics of aerospace vehicles and vehicle 
components 
ENAE 371 Aerodynamics I 3 credits; Grading Method: REG/P-F/AUD 

0101 MTuWThF 9:30am-10:50am BIdg. EGR. Room 0110 Jones. E 

Prerequisites: ENAE 202. and PHYS 262. and MATH 241 Corequisiie: MATH 246 Basic fluid 
mechanics and aerodynamic theory. 
ENAE 475 Viscous Flow and Aerodynamic Heating 3 credits; Grading Method: REG 
OlOt MTuWThF 8;00am-9:20am BIdg. EGR. Room 1 120 Jones. E 

Prerequisites; ENAE 371; and ENAE 471, and ENME 217 Fundamental aspects of viscous flow, 
Navier-Stokes equations, similarity, boundary layer equations, laminar, transitional and turbulent 
incompressible flows on airfoils, thermal boundary layers and convective heal transfer; conduction 
through solids, iatroduciion to radiative heat transfer. 



ENAE 499 Elective Research 1-3 credits; Grading Method: REG/P-F/AUD 

0101 Time Arranged Room Arranged Staff 

0201 Time Arranged Room An-anged Staff 

ENAE 799 Master's Thesis Research 1-6 credits: Grading Method: REG 

0101 Time Arranged Room Arranged Staff 

0201 Time Arranged Room Arranged Staff 

ENAE 899 Doctoral Dissertation Research 1-8 credits; Grading Method: REG 

0101 Time Arranged Room Arranged Staff 

0201 Time Arranged Room Ananged Staff 



ENAG 

ENGINEERING AGRICULTURAL (AGRICULTURE) 

ENAG 489 Special Problems In Agricultural Engineering 

1-3 credits, Grading Method: REG'P-F/AUD 
0101 Time An^anged Room Arranged Staff 

0201 Time Ananged Room Arranged Staff 

ENAG 499 Special Problems In Agricultural Engineering Technology 
1-3 credits; Grading Memod: REG/P-F/AUD 
0101 Time An^anged Room Arranged Staff 

0201 Time Arranged Room Arranged Staff 

ENAG 699 Special Problems In Agricultural and Aquacultural Engineering 
1-6 credits; Grading Method: REG/AUD 
0101 Time Ananged Room Arranged Staff 

0201 Time Arranged Room Arranged Staff 

ENAG 799 Master's Thesis Research 1-6 credits: Grading Method: REG 

0101 Time Arranged Room Arranged Staff 

0201 Time Arranged Room Arranged Staff 

ENAG 899 Doctoral Dissertation Research 1-8 credits: Grading Method: REG 
0101 Time Arranged Room Arranged Staff 

0201 Time Arranged Room Arranged Staff 



ENCE 



(ENGINEERING) 



ENGINEERING, CIVIL 

ENCE 489 Special Problems 3 credits; Grading Method: REG/P-F/AUD 

0101 Time Arranged Room Arranged Staff 

0201 Time Arranged Room Arranged Staff 

ENCE 688 Advanced Topics In Civil Engineering 1-3 credits: Grading Method: REG/AUD 

0101 Time Arranged Room Arranged Staff 

0201 Time Arranged Room Arranged Staff 

ENCE 799 Master's Thesis Research 1-6 credits: Grading Method: REG 

0101 Time Arranged Room Arranged Staff 

0201 Time Arranged Room Anar>ged Staff 

ENCE 899 Doctoral Dissertation Research 1-3 credits; Grading Method: REG 

0101 Time Arranged Room /^ranged Staff 

0201 Time Arranged Room Arranged Staff 



ENCH 



ENGINEERING, CHEMICAL (ENGINEERING) 

ENCH 215 Chemical Engineering Analysis 3 credits: Grading Method: REG 

0101 MTuWThF 9:30am-10;50am BIdg. CHE, Room 2145 Staff 

Prerequisite: CHEM 104 Pre- or corequisite. MATH 141 Introduction to methods of chemical 
engineering calculations and analysis Stoichiometric relations, material and energy balances, and 
behavior of gases, vapors, liquids and solids. Analytical and computer methods, 
ENCH 280 Transport Processes I: Fluid Mechanics 2 credits: Grading Method: REG 
0201 MTuWTh 2:00pm-3:2Cpm BIdg. CHE, Room 2140 Staff 

Pre- or corequisite. MATH 246, Fluid properties, fluid statics, flow concepts and basic equations. 
viscous effects. Applications in measurement of flow, closed conduit flow, packed bed and other 
chemical engineenng systems 
ENCH 427 Transport Processes III: Mass Transfer 3 credits: Grading Method: REG 
0201 MTuWThF 1 1 :00am-12:20pm BIdg. CHE. Room 2140 Staff 

Prerequisite; ENCH 425 Steady and unsteady state molecular diffusion, inier-phasc transfer, 
simultaneous heal and mass transfer, boundary layer theory, mass transfer and chemical reaction. 
Design applications in humidification. gas absorption, distillation, extraction, adsorption and ion 
exchange. 
ENCH 437 Chemical Engineering Laboratory 3 credits; Grading Method: REG/P-F/AUD 
0101 TuTh 11:00am-5:00pm BkJg, CHE, Room 1145 Staff 

Prerequisites: ENCH 427; and ENCH 440. and ENCH 442 Application of chemical engineering 
process and unit operauon principles in small scale semi -commercial equipment. Data from 
experimental observations arc used to evaluate performance and efficiency of operations. Emphasis 
on correct presentation of results in report form. 

i3c 
Permission of departrnent required. 
0101 MTuWThF 11;00arT>-1 2:20pm BIdg. CHE, Room 2136 Staff 

Prerequisites: ENCH 300; and ENCH 425. and CHEM 481 Fundamentals of chemical reaction 
kinetics and theu" application to the design and operation of chemical reactors. Reaction rate theory, 
homogeneous reactions and catalysis electrochemical reactions Catalytic reactor design. 
Chemical Engineering Systems Ar 
Permission of department required. 
0201 MTuWThF 9:30am-1 0:50am BIdg. CHE, Room 2140 Staff 

Prerequisites: ENCH 300, and ENCH 425 Dynamic response applied to process systems. Goals 
and modes of control. Laplace U^nsformations. analysis and synthesis of simple control systems, 
closed loop response, dynamic testing 
ENCH 468 Research r-3 credits: Grading Method: REG 

0101 Time Arranged Room Arranged Staff 

0201 Time Arranged Room Arranged Staff 

ENCH 648 Special Problems In Chemical Engineering 1-6 credits: Grading Method: REG 
0101 Time Arranged Room Arranged Staff 

0201 Time Arranged Room Arranged Staff 

ENCH 799 Master's Thesis Research 1-6 credits. Grading Method: REG 

0101 Time Arranged Room Arranged Staff 

0201 Time Arranged Room An'anged Staff 

ENCH 899 Doctoral Dissertation Research 1-8 credits; Grading Method: REG 
0101 Time Arranged Room Arranged Staff 

0201 Time Arranged Room Arranged Staff 



COURSE SECTIONS: 01 xx, SESSION I ONLY; 02xx, SESSION II ONLY. 



45 



ENCO 



(ENGINEERING) 



ENGINEERING, COOPERATIVE EDUCATION 

ENCO 098 Co-op Work Experlenc« No credit: Grading Method: S-F 

Permission of department required. Completion of freshman and sophmore engineering 
requirements. 
0101 Time Arranged Room An^anged Sauber, H 

0201 Time Arranged Room Arranged Sauber, H 



N 



ENGINEERING, ELECTRICAL (ENGINEERING) 

ENEE 204 Systems snd Circuits I 3 credits: Grading Method: REG 

Permission of department required Engineering College only (04). 
0101 Meets JUN 5 to JUL 26 

MTuWTh 11:00arT>-12:20pm BIdg. EGR. Room 3108 Staff 

Prerequisite: MATH 141, Required of sophomores in electrical engineenng, Kirchhoffs laws, 
linear, nonlinear, and time-varying elements of systems and circuits. Solution of circuit differential 
equations, zero input, zero state, and complete response. Coupled elements, ideal transformers, 
controlled sources Node and mesh analysis in the time domain 

ENEE 250 Computer Structures 3 credits. Grading Method: REG 

Pemiission of department required. Engineering College only (04), 

0101 Meets JUN 5 to JUL 26 

MTuWTh 9:30am~10:50am Btdg. EGR, Room 1106 Staff 

0102 Meets JUN 5 to JUL 26 

MTuWTh 11:00am-12:20pm BIdg. EGR, Room 1108 Staff 

Prerequisites: ENEE 240 or equivalent Basic structure and organization of digital computers, 
number systems and data representation: assembly language (some simple assembly language 
programs will be run), intnxluction to system software; gates and memory elements; logic design of 
simple digital systems; reliability, hardware/software tradeoffs, 
ENEE 300 PrindplM of Electrical Engineering 3 credits: Grading Method: REG 
Permission of department required. Engineering College only (04). 

0101 Meets JUN 5 to JUL 26 

MTuWTh 9:30am- 10:50am BIdg. EGR. Room 3106 Staff 

0102 Meets JUN 5 to JUL 26 

MTuWTh 11 :00am-12:20pm BIdg. EGR, Room 3106 Staff 

Prerequisites: MATH 241. PHYS 263 Corequisile: ENEE 301 Required of aerospace, mechanical 
and chemical engineers Not applicable in the electncal engineering major program Acceptable as 
prerequisite for some advanced ENEE courses. Analysis of linear systems, introduction to Laplace 
transforms, steady-slate A-C transforms, mtroduction to the concepts of electromagnetic fields and 
electric machiiKs. 
ENEE 301 Electrical Erwlneerlng Laboratory ; credit; Grading Method: REG 
Permission of departn>ent required. Engineering College only (04). 

0101 Meets JUN 5 to JUL 26 

MW 12:30pm-3:30pm BIdg. EGL. Room 0122 Staff 

0102 Meets JUN 5 to JUL 26 

TuTh 12:30pm-3:30pm Btdg. EGL, Room 0122 Staff 

Corcquisite: ENEE 300, Expcnmenls on the transient and steady-sUte response of linear circuits, 
electric machines, electron tubes and semi conductor devices !C All lower-di vision CHEM. 
MATH. PHYS and engineering courses that are required courts for the BS degree in Electrical 
Engineenng must be completed before enrolling in any 300- or 400-ENEE course (encepl EfJEE 
300 and ENEE 3011 Transfer students will be allowed one semester to complete all such courses 
after startmg to take upper-level ENEE courses 

ENEE 304 Systems and Circuhs fl 3 credits. Grading Method: REG 

Permission of department required. ENEE majors only (09090). 
0101 Meets JUN 5 to JUL 26 

MTuWTh 9:30am-10;50am BIdg. EGR, Room 1126 Staff 

Pre- or corcquisite MATH 246. Prerequisite: ENEE 204 and completion of all lower-division 
technical courses in the EE curriculum See above note Sinusoidal analysis. General mesh and 
node analysis Analysis by laplace transforms, network functions, network theorems. Two-port 
theory, controlled sources, small signal analysis of semiconductor devices Fourier scries. 

ENEE 305 Fundamental Laboratory 2 credits. Grading Method REG 

Permisston of department required. ENEE majors only (09090), 

0101 Meets JUN 5 to JUL 26 
MW 12:30pm-1 :30pm 
MW 1:30pm-4 :30pm 

0102 Meets JUN 5 to JUL 26 
TuTh 12:30pm-1 ,30pm BIdg. EGR. Room 3114 Staff 
TuTh 1:30pm-^:30pm BIdg. EGL, Room 0132 (LAB) 

Prerequisite: ENEE 204 and completion of all lower-di vision technical courses in the EE 
curriculum. See above note Concepts and techniques of physical measurements using standard 
electrical measuring devices: generators, oscilloscopes, voltmeters, ete. Measurements of linear and 
non-linear circuits, steady state and step response; integrated circuits. Handling and use of data. 
This course is prerequisite to all EF4EE 400-level laboratory courses 

ENEE 314 Electronic Circuits 3 credits: Grading Method: REG 

Pennission of department required, ENEE majors (09090) only. 
0101 Meets JUN 5 to JUL 26 

MTuWTh 8 00am-9:20am BIdg. EGR. Room 1104 Staff 

Prerequisite: ENEE 304 and completion of all lower-division technical courses in the EE 
curriculum See above note Characteristics of semi- conductor devices Diodes; biasing and 
stabilization of bipolar and field effect transistors; power amplifier characteristics Feedback 
amplifiers, integrated operational amplifiers, transistor switches, gates, and integrated logic circuits, 
bistable mi Iti vibrators and applications in counters, registers and selected digital networks 

ENEE 324 Engineering Probability 3 credits: Grading Method: REG 

Permission of department required, ENEE majors (09090) only 
0101 Meets JUN 5 to JUL 26 

MTuWTh 9:30am-10:50am BIdg, EGR. Room 3140 Staff 

Prerequisite ENEE 322 and compleuon of all lower-division technical courses in the EE 
curriculum See above note Axioms of probability, conditional probability and Bayes' rules, 
random variables, probability distribution and densities: functions of random vanables weak law of 
large numbers and central limit theorem Introduction to random processes, correlation functions, 
spectral densities, and linear systems Applicauons to noise in electrical systems, filtenng of signals 









ENEE 380 Electromagnetic Theory 3 credits; Grading Method: REG 

Permission of department required. ENEE majors only (09090), 
0101 Meets JUN 5 to JUL 26 

MTuWTh 8:00anv9:20am BIdg, EGR, Room 3108 Staff 

Prerequisites MATH 241 and PHYS 263 and completion of all lower-division technical courses in 
the EE curriculum See above note, Introducuon to electromagnetic fields Coulomb's law, Gauss's 
law, electncal potential, dielectric nuttenals capacitance, boundary value problems, Biot-Savart law. 
Ampere's law. bjrcntz force equation. n:iagnetic matenals. magnetic circuits, induclaoce, time 
varying fields and Maxwell's equations 
ENEE 381 Electromagnetic Wave Propagation 3 credits; Grading Me^wd: REG 
Permission of department required ENEE majors (09090) only. 
0101 Meets JUN 5 to JUL 26 

MTuWTh 11 00am-12:20pm BIdg, EGR. Room 3140 Staff 

Prerequisite ENEE 3R0 and completion of all lower-division technical courses in the EE 
curriculum. Sec above note Review of Maxwell's equations, the wave equation, potentials. 



ENEE cont. 



Poynting's theorem. Transmission, lossy medium, skin effect Parallel-plate and 
waveguides, Radiation, retarded potenuals. radiation from dipolc. 






ENEE 413 Electronics Laboratory £» credrfs. Grading Method: REG 

Pennission of department required, ENEE majors only (09090) 

0101 Meets JUN 5 to JUL 26 

MW 12:30pnv1 :30pm BIdg, EGR, Room 1110 Staff 

MW 1:30pm-^ :30pm BIdg, , Room (LAB) 

0102 Meets JUN 5 to JUL 26 

TuTh 12:30pm-l :30pm BIdg, EGR, Room 1110 StaH 

TuTh 1:30pm-4:30pm BIdg. . Room (LAB) 

Prerequisites: ENEE 305 and ENEE 314 and completion of all lower- division technical courses in 
the EE curriculum. See above note The specification, design and testing of basic electronic 
circuits and practical interconnections Emphasis on design with discrete solid slate and integrated 
circuit components for both analog and digital circuits 

ENEE 418 Prelects In Electrical Engineering 1-3 credits; Grading Method. REG 
Permission of department requirecT 

0101 Time Arranged Room Arranged Staff 

0201 Time Arranged Room Arranged Staff 

ENEE 444 Logic Design of Digital Systems J credits. Grading Method: REG 
Permission of department required, ENEE majors only (09090). 
0101 Meets JUN 5 to JUL 26 

MTuWTh 8:00am-9:20am BIdg. EGR, Room 1126 Staff 

Prerequisite: ENEE 250 and completion of all lower-division technical courses in the EE 
curriculum Sec above note Review of switching algebra, gates and logic modules, map 
simplification techniques, multiple-output systems, memory elements and sequential systems; large 
switching systems, iterative networks, sample designs, computer onented simplification algorithms; 
state assignment, partition techniques; sequential system decompositions. 

ENEE 609A Projects In Electrical Engineering: Projects In Electrical Engineering: Independent 

Study 1-3 credits; Grading Method REG/AUD 
Permission of department required 
0101 Time Arranged Room Arranged Staff 

0201 Time Arranged Room Arranged Staff 

ENEE 799 Master's TYwsIs Research 1-6 credits; Grading Method: REG 
Permission of department required. 
0101 Time Arranged Room Arranged Staff 

0201 Time An-anged Room Arranged Fuja, T 

ENEE 699 Doctoral Dissertation Research 1-8 credits. Grading Method: REG 
Permission of department required. 
0101 Time Arranged Room Arranged Staff 

0201 Time Arranged Room Arranged Staff 



ENGINEERING SCIENCE 



N 



(ENGINEERING) 



ENES 101 Introductory Engineering Science J credits: Grading Method: FIEG/P-F/AUD 

0101 MTuWThF 9,30am-10;50am BIdg. CHE. Room 2136 Stafl 

0102 MTuWThF 8:00am-9:20am BIdg. CHE, Room 2136 StaH 

0201 MTuWThF 9;30am-10:50am BIdg. CHE, Room 2136 StaH 

0202 MTuWThF 11 :00am-12;20pm BIdg. CHE, Room 2136 Staff 

Basic languages of the engineer Elements of grapfiic communication and analysis, Orthrographic 
projeclion, convenlions, graphs and curve-fitling Imroduclion lo Fortran computer language. 
Engineering orientation, selection of a major and career goals 

ENES 101A Introductory Engineering Science 3 credits: Gradina Method: REG/P-F/AUD 

Permission of department required. Permission of dean required. High school students 
only 
0201 MWF9:00an>-11;25am BIdg. EGR, Room 0135 Staff 

ENES 101S Introductory Engineering Science 3 credits: Grading Method: REG 

Pemiission of department required Pemiission of ENME required. High school students 
only 
0201 MWF 8:30am-10:50am BIdg, CHE, Room 2120 Staff 

ENES 1 1 Statics 3 credits: Grading Method: REG/P-F/AUD 

0101 MTuWThF 9;30am-10:50am BIdg, EGR, Room 2154 Staff 

0102 MTuWThF 11 :aOam-l 2:20pm BIdg, EGR, Room 1106 StaH 

Corcquisite: MATH 141 The equilibrium of stationary bodies under the uifluence of vaiious kinds 
offerees Forces, moments, couples, equilibnum. trusses, frames and machines, centipids. momenl 
of inertia, beams, and friction Vector and scalar methods are used to solve problems, 

ENES 121A The Min-Msde World 3 credits: Grading Method: REG/P-FAUD 

Meets USP Distribultve Studies {B)Natural Sciences and Mathematit^ requirement. 
Permission of department required Pemiission of dean required. High school students 
only 
0201 TuTh9:a0am"12:00pm BIdg. EGR, Room 1120 Staff 

ENES 220 Mechanic* of Materials 3 credits. Grading Method: REG/P-F/AUD 

0101 MTuWThF 8:00anv-9:20am BIdg. EGR, Room 0135 StaH 

0102 MTuWThF 11 :00am- 12 :20pm BIdg EGR. Room 0135 StaH 

Preitiiuisites: MATH 141. and PHYS 161, and ENES 110, Distoriion of engineenng materials in 
relation to changes in stress or temperature Geomeliy of internal strain and external displacement. 
Application lo beams, columns, shafts, tanks, and odier stnictural, machine and vehicle members, 

ENES 221 Dynamics 3 credits: Grading Method: REGP-F/AUD 

0101 MTuWThF 9:30am-10:50am BIdg. EGR, Room 0135 StaH 

0102 MTuWThF 11:00am-12:20pm BIdg EGR, Room 0110 StaH 

Prerequisites ENES 110, and MATH 141, and PHYS 161. Systems of heavy panicles and rigid 
bodies at rest and in mouon Force- acceleration, wort-energy and impulse-momentum 
relationships. Motion of one body relative to another in a plane and in space. 

ENES 240 Engineering Computation 3 credits: Grading Method: REG/P-F/AUD 

Pemiission of department required. Open only to students in the College of Engineering 
(04), 
0101 Meets JUN 5 to JUL 26 

MTuWTh 9:30am-10:50am BIdg. EGR, Room 1108 StaH 

Prertquisilc MATH 141 Introduction to ttie design and implementation of algorithms to solve 
engineenng problems using digital computers. Analysis of problems fundamental to engineering 
design, construction and diagrammauc description of effective procedures for solving Itiem and 
implementing and testing of these solutions m a common high-level engineering oriented language 
such as FORTRAN Techniques for data input and storage, selection of relevant numencal and 
non-numerical methods for problem solutions, and the elTicient ordenng of data for meanmgtiil 
output piesentation 



46 



COURSE SECTIONS: 01 xx, SESSION I ONLY; 02xx, SESSION II ONLY. 



ENGL 



(ARTS AND HUMANITIES) 



ENGLISH 

ENGL 101 Introduction to Writing 3 credits: Grading Method: REG 

0101 MW 7:00pm-10 :00pm BIdg, TYD, Room 1132 StaN 

0102 MTuWThF 9:30am-10;50am BIdg. KEY, Room 0117 Staff 

0103 MTuWTtiF t1:00am-12:20pm BIdg TLF, Room 0110 StaH 

0104 MTuWThF 11 :00am-12;20pm BIdg. KEY, Room 0119 Staff 

0202 MTuWThF 9:30am'10:50am BIdg. KEY, Room 0119 Staff 

0203 MTuWThF 11 :00am-12:20pm BIdg. TYD, Room 2140 Staff 

0204 MTuWThF 9:30am-10:50am BIdg. LEF, Room 1220 Staff 

An introductory couree in expository writing. 
ENGL 101X Introduction to Writing 3 credits: Grading Method: REG 

Permission of department required. Limited to students for whom English is a second 
language. To register lor ENGL 101X, a student must first demonstrate competence in 
English. Prool of one of the following should be brought to TLF 0139 (X 4160) or PKT 1 104 
(X 6545) 1. A TOEFL score of 550 with no score below 50 2. A CELT score of 220 with no 
subtest score 50 and a rating of 5 or better on the writing sample 3. Successful completion 
of UMEI 005: Advanced English as a Foreign Language, Semi-Intensive. 
0101 MeelsJUN5lo AUG 12 

MWF 1 1 :00am- 12 :30pm BIdg. TLF. Room 2137 Staff 

ENGL 205 introduction to Shaiiespeare 3 credits: Grading Method: REG/P-F/AUD 

Meets USP Distributive Studies (C) Literature and the Arts requirement. 

0101 MTuWThF 9:30am-10:60am BIdg. TLF. Room 2126 Cooper Jr., S 

0201 TuTh 6:00pm-9:00pm BIdg. TYD. Room 1132 Leinwand. T 

Reading of selected representative plays including the major tragedies Recommended for 
non-ma]or^. 

ENGL 222 American Literature: 1865 to Present 3 credits, Grading Method: REG/P-F/AUD 
Meets USP Distributive Studies (C) Uterature and the Arts requirement. 
0101 MTuWThF 11 :00am-12:20pm BIdg TLF. Room 2126 Joyce, J 

0201 MTuWThF 1 1 :00am-12:20pm BIdg. TLF, Room 21 10 Van Egmond, P 

ENGL 246 Tbe Stiort Story 3 credits: Grading Method: REG/P-F/AUD 

Meets USP Distributive Studies (C) Literature and the Arts requirement. 
0101 MTuWThF 11 :00am-12:20pm BIdg. KEY, Room 0125 Cross, R 

0201 MTuWThF 11 :00am-12:20pm BIdg, TLF, Room 0110 Salamanca. J 

ENGL 260 Introduction to Foiidoie 3 credits: Grading Method: REG/P-F/AUD 

Meets USP Distributive Studies (A) Cultural and Historical requirement. 
0101 MTuWThF 9:30am-10;50am BIdg. KEY, Room 0125 Pearson. B 

0201 MTuWThF 8:a0am-9:20am BIdg. TLF, Room 2126 Fry. G 

History, theory, and genres of folklore. Not open to snjdents who have credit in ENGL 360 
ENGL 296 Beginning Fiction Woricshop 3 credits: Grading Method: REG/P-F/AUD 

0101 TuTh 6:00pm-9:00pm BIdg. TLF, Room 0110 Leonard!, S 

Introduction to different aspects of the craft of fiction, such as narration, description, and dramatic 
development Models taken from the entire range of the geme Selected readings 
ENGL 310 Medievsi and Renaissancs Britisli Literature 3 credits: Grading Method: REG 

0201 MTuWThF I1:00am-12:20pm BIdg. TYD. Room 01 1 1 Coletti. T 

0202 MTuWThF n:00am-12:20pm BIdg. KEY. Room 0120 Birdsall. E 

For English and English education majors only. Not open to students who have completed ENGL 
21 1 or ENGL 212 A perspective on the cultural attinides and values drat separate the Middle Ages 
from the Renaissance, highlighting the changing role and purpose of the writer. Major works and 
authors include Beowulf. Chaucer. Spenser, and Sidney 
ENGL 311 Baroque and Augustan British Literature 3 credits: Grading Method: REG 
0101 MTuWThF 8:00am-9:20am BIdg. TLF. Room 0110 Hamilton, G 

For English and English education majors only. An intensive study of major works of seventeenth 
and eighteenth century English literature exploring the variety of artistic ideas and techniques of the 

ENGL 312 Romantic to iUodem British LHeraturs 3 credits: Grading Method: REG 
0101 MW 7:00pm-10:00pm BIdg TLF, Room 0110 Cate, G 

0201 MTuWThF 11 :00am-12;20pm BIdg, LEF, Room 1220 Kleine, D 

For English and English education majors only An intensive study of major works of nineteenth 
and twentieth century English literature. 
ENGL 313 American Literature 3 credits: Grading Method: REG 

0101 MTuWThF 11:00am-12:20pm BIdg KEY, Room 0120 Lawson, L 

0201 MTuWThF 9:30am-10:50am BIdg. LEF, Room 1222 Levine. R 

For English and English education majors only. Not open to students who have completed ENGL 
221 or ENGL 222. A detailed shjdy of selected major texts of Amencan literature from the 1 7th to 
the 20th century, including women's literature, black literature, and literature from vanous legions 
of the century. 
ENGL 378 Independent Research In English 1-6 credits: Grading Method: REG/P-F/AUD 
Permission of department required. 
0101 Time Arranged Room Arranged Staff 

0201 Time Arranged Room Arranged Staff 

ENGL 379E Special Topics In LHeratura: Film Analysis - The Rhetoric ol Fictional Worlds 
3 credits: Grading Method: REG 
Meets USP Advanced Studies Development of Knowledge requirement. 
0101 TuTh 6:30pm-10:00pm BIdg. KEY, Room 0106 Miller, J 

0201 TuTh 6:30pm-10:00pm BIdg. KEY, Room 0106 Miller, J 

ENGL 379J Special Topics In Literature: interpreting the Bible 3 credits: Grading Method: REG 
Meets USP Advanced Studies Development of Knowledge requirement. 
0101 MW 6:00pm-9:00pm BIdg KEY, Room 0125 Handelman, S 

ENGL 3790 Special Topics in LHereture: Mores Utopia and Modern Utopian Visions 
3 credits. Grading Method: REG 
Meets USP Advanced Studies Analysis of Human Problems requirement 
0201 MW 6:00pm-9:00pm BIdg, TLF, Room 2110 Coogan, R 

ENGL 380 Inlemship 3-6 credits: Grading Method: REG/P-F/AUD 
Permission of department required 
0201 Time Arranged Room Arranged Terchek, M 

Pre-or corequisite. ENGL 381 or 382. and consent of department. The English Department's 
internship program, Preprofessional expenence in writing and editing in a variety of fields 
ENGL 391 Advanced Composition 3 credits: Grading Method: REG 

0101 MW 7:00pm-10:00pm Bldg. KEY, Room 0124 Staff 

0102 MTuWThF 8:00ain-9:20am BIdg. TLF, Room 2126 StaH 

0103 MTuWThF 9:30am-10:50am BIdg. TLF, Room 2137 Staff 

0104 MTuWThF 9:30am-10:50am BIdg TLF, Room 0135 Stall 

0105 MTuWfThF 11:00anv12:20pm BIdg, KEY, Room 0123 Stall 

0106 MTuWThF 11 :00an>-12:20pm BIdg. ASY, Room 3215 Stall 

0107 MTuWThF 9:30am-10:50am BIdg. KEY, Room 0126 Stall 

0108 MTuWThF 11 :00am-12:20pm BIdg KEY, Room 0126 Stall 

0201 MTuViTThF 8:00am-9 20am BIdg, KEY, Room 0120 Stall 

0202 MTuWn-hF9 30am-10:50am BIdg, ASY, Room 3219 StaH 

0203 MTuWThF 9:30am-10:50am BIdg. KEY, Room 0117 Staff 

0204 MTuWThF 11 :00an)-12:20pm BIdg. TLF, Room 2126 Stall 

0205 MTuVrrhF 11:00am-12:20pm BIdg. KEY, Room 0117 StaH 

Prerequisite. 56 hour^ of college credit An advanced composition course with emphasis on clarity 
and logic of construction in the wnting and revision of short papers on topics related to die 
student's major, written in a style for the non-specialized reader, A research exercise coordinated 
with the student's discipline is required. 



ENGL cont. 



Bldg 


TLF. Room 2126 


Staff 


BIdg 


KEY, Room 0124 


Staff 


Bldg 


KEY, Room 0120 


Staff 


Bldg 


KEY, Room 0121 


StaK 


Bldg 


KEY, Room 0124 


Staff 


Bldg 


TLF, Room 0135 


Staff 


Bldg 


TLF, Room 2110 


Staff 


Bldg 


KEY, Room 0124 


Stall 


Bldg 


KEY, Room 0123 


Staff 


Bldg 


KEY, Room 01 19 


Staff 


Bldg 


TLF, Room 2126 


Stall 


Bldg 


ARC. Room 1127 


Staff 


Bldg 


TLF, Room 0110 


Staff 


Bldg 


LEF, Room 1208 


Staff 


Bldg 


ASY, Room 3219 


Staff 


Bldg 


KEY, Room 01 19 


Staff 


of 56 credits, which must include ENGL 101 



ENGL 393 Technical Writing 3 credits: Grading Method: REG 

0101 TuTh 7:00pnvl0:00pm "' ' 

0102 MTuWThF e:00anv9:20am 

0103 MTuWThF 9:30am-10:50am 

0104 MTuWThF 9:30am-10:50am 

0105 MTuWThF 9:30am-10:50am 

0106 MTuWThF 11 :00am-12:20pm 

0107 MTuWThF 1 1 :00am-12:20pm 

0108 MTuWThF 11:00am-12:20pm 

0109 MTuWThF 9;30am-10:50am 
0201 MTuWThF e:00am-9:20am 

0203 MTuWThF 9:30am-10:50am 

0204 MTuWThF 9;30am-10.50am 

0205 MTuWThF 9:30am-10:50am 

0206 MTuWThF 11 :00am-12:20pm 

0207 MTuWThF 1 1 :00am-12:20pm 

0208 MTuWThF 1 1 :00am-12:20pm 

Prerequisite: satisfactory completion of 56 credits, which must include ENGL 101 or equivalent. 
The writing of scientific papers and reports. This course or ENGL 391 is required of students who 
entered Uie University in Summer 1978 or thereafter, unless exempt by University regulations. Not 
open to students who have credit for ENGL 293 
ENGL 393X Technical Writing 3 credits: Grading Method: REG 
For students lor whom English is a second language. 

0101 Meets JUN 5 to AUG 12 

MWF 1 1 :00anv-12:30pm Bldg. LEF, Room 2123 Staff 

0102 Meets JUN 5 to AUG 12 

MWF 1 1 OOanvl 2:30pm Bldg, TLF, Room 2108 Staff 

ENGL 394 Business Writing 3 credits: Grading Method: REG 

This course satisfies the Junior English requirement. Prerequisite: ENGL 101 or equivalent 
and 56 credits (Junior standing). 
0101 MTuWThF 9:30am-1 0:50am Bldg. KEY, Room 0119 Stall 

0201 MW7:00pm-1 0:00pm Bldg. KEY, Room 0120 Staff 

Intensive practice in the forms of written communication common ui the business world — letters, 
memos, shon reports, and proposals Principles of rhelonc and effective style 
ENGL 412 Lltsrsture of the Seventeenth Century, 1600-1660 3 credits: Grading Method: REG 
Meets USP Advanced Shjdies Development ot Knowledge requirement. 
0101 MTuWThF 9:30am-10:50am Bldg. KEY, Room 0116 Wilson, G 

ENGL 432 American Uterature, 1865 to 1914, Realism and Naturalism 
3 credits: Grading Method: REG 
Meets USP Advanced Studies Development of Knowledge requirement. 
0101 MTuWThF 11 :00anvl2:20pm Bldg. LEF, Room 1220 Smith, M 

0201 MTuWThF 9:30am-1 0:50am Bldg. TLF, Room 2110 Auerbach, J 

Prerequisite: two college-level literature courses. 
ENGL 454 Modern Drama 3 credits: Grading Method: REG/P-F/AUD 

0101 MTuWThF 9:30am-10:50am Bldg. TLF, Room 2110 Freedman. M 

ENGL 466 Arthurian Legend 3 credits: Grading Method: REG/P-F'AUD 

0101 MTuWThF 9:30am-10:50am Bldg. TLF, Room 0110 Hernian, H 

Development of the Anhunan legend of heroism and love in English literahire from medieval to 
modem times. 
ENGL 489A Special Topics in English Language: The Language of Advertising 
3 credits: Grading Method: REG 
Meets USP Advanced Studies Development of Knowledge requirement. 
0101 MTuVifThF 11:00am-12:20pm Bldg, KEY. Room 0116 Coleman, L 

0201 MTuVifThF 9:30am-10:50am Bldg. LEF. Room 1208 James. E 

ENGL 611 Approaches to College Composition 3 credits: Grading Method: REG/AUD 
0201 MW 6:00pm-9:00pm Bldg. TLF, Room 0110 Shapiro. N 

A seminar emphasizing rhetoncal and linguistic foundations for the handling of a course in 
freshman composition For graduate assistants (optional to other graduate students). 
ENGL 626 Readings in American Literature Before 1865 3 credits: Grading Method: REG/AUD 

0101 MW 6:00pm-9:00pm Bldg UF, Room 2110 Bennett, M 

ENGL 630 Readings In 20th Century English Literature 3 credits: Grading Method: REG/AUD 

0101 TuTh 6:00pm-9:00pm Bldg. TLF, Room 2108 Russell, J 

ENGL 688 Poetry Workshop: Poetry Woriishop. 3 credits: Grading Method: REG/AUD 
Permission of department required. 
0101 MW 6:00pm-9:00pm Bldg. TLF. Room 2108 Plumly. S 

ENGL 699 independent Study 1-3 credits. Grading Method: REG/AUD 
Permission of department required, 
0101 Time Arranged Room Arranged StaH 

0201 Time Arranged Room Arranged Stall 

ENGL 748 Seminar In American Literature: Seminar in American Uterature 
3 credits: Grading Method: REG/AUD 
Permission of department required. 
0101 TuTh 6:00pnrH9:00pm Bldg. KEY, Room 0119 Robinson, J 

ENGL 799 Master's Tltssls Research t-6 credits: Grading Method: REG 

0101 Time Arranged Room Arranged StaH 

0201 Time Arranged Room Arranged Staff 

ENGL 899 Doctoral Dissertation Research t-8 credits: Grading Method: REG 
0101 Time Arranged Room Arranged Staff 

0201 Time Arranged Room Arranged Staff 



NMA 



ENGINEERING, MATERIALS (ENGINEERING) 

ENMA 698 Special Problems In Engineering Materials 1-16 credits; Grading Method: REG/AUD 
0101 Time Arranged Room Arranged Staff 

0201 Time Arranged Room Arranged Staff 

ENMA 799 Master's Thesis Research 1-€ credits: Gradmg Method: REG 
Permission of department required 
0101 Time Arranged Room Arranged Staff 

0201 Time Arranged Room Arranged Staff 

ENMA 899 Doctoral Dissertation Research 1-8 credits; Gradir^g Method: REG 
Permission of department required, 
0101 Time Arranged Room Arranged Staff 

0201 Time Arranged Room Arranged Staff 



NME 



(ENGINEERING) 



ENGINEERING, MECHANICAL 

ENME 205 Engineering Analysis and Computer Programming 

3 credits; Gradir^g Method: REG/P-F/AUD 
0101 MTuWTbF 11:00am-12:20pm Bldg, EGR. Room 1126 Staff 

Pre- or corequisite: MATH 241 Conlinuaiion of computer programming techniques: flowcharts, 
algorithms, and computer languages. Introduction to numencal techniques and error analysis in 
solving for roots of equations, simultaneous equations, interpolalion, numerical dilTerentiation and 



COURSE SECTIONS: 01 xx, SESSION I ONLY; 02xx, SESSION II ONLY. 



47 



ENME cont. 



intcgranon. numcnca) solution of differenlia) equations Applications to engineering problems, 
ENME 217 TbwTWXtynamlc* 3 credits: Grading Method: REG/P-F/AUD 

0101 MTuWThF 8:00am-9:20am BIdg, EGR, Room 1106 Staff 

0102 MTuWThF 11 :00am- 12 20pm BIdg. EGR, Room 1120 Staff 

Prerequisites: PHYS 262, and MATH 141. Properties, characteristics and fundamental equations 
of gases and vapors. Work transfer and heal transfer, first and second laws of themnxlynamics, 
entropy, irreversibility, availability, and the thermodynamics of mixtures 
ENME 310 Mechanics of Deformabto Solids 3 credits; Grading Method: REG/P-F/AUD 
0101 MTuWThF 8:00am-9:20am BIdg EGR. Room 1108 Staff 

Prerequisite: ENES 220 Introduction to the mechanics of engineenng malenals m Ihree 
dimensions Concepts of stress, strain, generalized Hooke's law. and equilibrium of solids Modes 
of failure including plasticity, stability, faugue. and fracture will be tiealcd 
ENME 311 Mschinlcs of DefonnaMe Solids Laboratory 1 credit; Grading Method: REG/P-FAUD 
0101 MTu 12;30pm-3:30pm BIdg. EGR, Room 1106 /MS; Staff 

Corequisite, ENME 310 A laboratory course ui the mechanics of engineenng materials 
CoDcqjts of stress, strain, generalized Hooke's taw, and equilibnum of solids. Modes of failure 
including plasbcily. stability, fatigue, and fracture will be treated 
ENME 315 Intermediate Thermodynamics 3 credits; Grading Method: REG/P-F/AUD 
0101 MTuWThF 9:30am-10:50am BIdg. EGR, Room 1104 Staff 

Prerequisite: ENME 217 Application of the first and second laws of thermodynamics in the 
analysis of basic heal engines, air compression and vapor cycles, Heal sources in fossil fuels and 
nuclear fuels. The thermodynamics of fluid flow, 
ENME 321 Transfer Processes 3 credits: Grading Method: REG/P-F/AUD 

0101 MTuWThF 11 :00am-12:20pm BIdg. EGR. Room 1104 Staff 

Prerequisite: ENME 342 Conduction by steady state and transient heat flow, laminar and 
turbulent flow, free and forced convection, radiation, evaporation and condensation vapors Transfer 
of mass, heat and momentum 
ENME 342 Ruid Mechanics I 3 credits; Grading Method: REGP-FAUD 

0101 MTuWThF 11:00anv1220pm BIdg. EGR, Room 2154 Staff 

Prcrtquisiie: ENME 217 Fluid flow concepts and basic equations, effects of viscosity and 
compressibility Dimensional analysis and laws of simulaniy Flow through pipes and over 
immersed bodies Pnnciples of flow measurement 
ENME 343 Ruld Mechanics Laboratory / credit; Grading Method: REG/P-F/AUD 
0101 WTh 12:30pm-3:30pm BIdg, EGR, Room 3106 (LAB) Staff 

Laboratory to be taken concurrently with ENME 342 Measurement of fluid properties, 
determination of pressure drops in pipes and fittings, obscrvaiion of fluid phenomena, Expcrimenl 
and demonstration of flow measurement techniques 
ENME 360 Dynamics of Machinery 3 credits; Grading Method: REG/P-F/AUD 

0101 MTuWTtiF 8:00am-9:20am BIdg. EGR, Room 3106 Staff 

Prerequisites: ENES 220; and ENES 221. and MATH 246. Dynamic charactenslics of machinery 
with emphasis on systems with single and muluple degrees of freedom 
ENME 381 Meesurementa Laboratory 3 credits. Grading Method: REG/P-F/AUD 
0101 TuWTh 12:30pm-1 :50pm BIdg. EGR. Room 1120 StaH 

TuWTh 2:00pm-5:30pm BIdg, EGR, Room 1120 (LAB) 

Prerequisites ENME 360. and ENEE 300- Required of juniors in mechanical engineenng 
Measurements and measurement systems, application of selected instruments with emphasis on 
interpretation of results 
ENME 400 Machine Design 3 credits; Grading Method: REG/P-F/AUD 

0101 MTuWTTiF 11:00am"1220pm BIdg, CHE, Room 2140 Staff 

Prerequisites: ENME 310. and ENME 360 Corequisite: ENME 401 Worlung stresses, stress 
concentration, stress analysis and repeated loadmgs Design of machine elements Kinematics ol 
mechanisms. 
ENME 401 The Structure and Properties of Engineering Materlala 3 credits; Grading Method: REG 
0101 MTuWThF 9:30am-10:50am BIdg. EGR. Room 0108 Staff 

Corequisite: ENME 310 The nature and properties of engineenng materials as related to their use 
in all [biases of mechanical engineenng will be studied. Malenals covered mclude metals, ceramics 
and glasses, polymer and composites 
ENME 403 Automatic Controls 3 credits; Grading Method: REG/P-F/AUD 

0101 MTuWniF 8:00an>-9:20am Btdg. CHM, Room 2201 Staft 

Prerequisites. ENEE 300, and ENME 360 Senior standing. Hydraulic, electrical, mechanical and 
pneumatic automatic control systems Open and closed loops Steady slate and transient operation, 
stability cntcna, Imear and non-lincar systems I^place uansforms 
ENME 405 Energy Conversion Design 3 credits: Grading Method REG/P-F/AUD 
0101 MTuWThF 9:30am-10:50am BIdg EGR, Room 1120 Staff 

Prerequisite senior standing in mechanical engineenng ApplicaDon of thermodynamics, fluid 
mechanics and heat transfer to energy conversion processes Design of engines, compressors, heal 
exchangers Energy storage and fuel handling equipment 
ENME 414 Computer-Alded Design 3 credits: Grading Method: REG/P-F/AUD 
Permission of department required 
0101 MTuWThF 5:30pm-6:50pm BIdg. EGL, Room 1101 Staff 

Prerequisites: ENME 205; and MATH 241 or equivalent Introduction to computer graphics 
Plotting and drawing with computer software Principles of wntmg interactive software The 
applic^ions of computer graphics in computer-aided design Computer-aided design project, 
ENME 488 Special Problems 3 credits; Grading Method: REG/P-F/AUD 
Permisston of department required- 
0101 Time Arrar>ged Room Arranged Staff 

0201 Time Arranged Room Arranged Staff 

ENME 799 Maater'a Thesis Research 1-6 credits, Grading Method: REG 

0101 Time Arranged Room Arranged Staff 

0201 Time Arranged Room Arranged Staff 

ENME 808 Advanced Topics In Mechanical Engineering 3 credits; Grading Method: REG/AUD 
0101 Time Arranged Room Ananged Staff 

0201 Time Arranged Room Arranged Staff 

ENME 809 Doctoral Dissertation Research 1-8 credits; Grading Method REG 
0101 Tirrw Arranged Room Arranged Staff 

0201 Time Arranged Room An-anged Staff 



NNU 



ENGINEERING, NUCLEAR (ENGINEERING) 

ENNU 215 Introduction to Nuclear Technology 3 credits; Grading Method: REG/P-F/AUD 
0101 MTuWThF 9 30am-10,50am BIdg. CHE, Room 2140 Staff 

Prerequisites MATH 141; and PHYS 161 Engineering problems of the nuclear energy complex, 
mcluding basic theory, use of computers, nuclear reactor design and isotopic and chemical 
separauons 

ENNU 488 Research 2-3 credits; Grading Method: REG 

0101 Ttme Arranged Room Arranged Staff 

0201 TirT>e Arranged Room Arranged Staff 

ENNU 848 Special Problems In Nuclesr Engineering 1-6 credits; Grading Method: REG 

0101 Time Arrar^ged Room Arranged Staff 

0201 Time Arranged Room Arranged Staff 

ENNU 799 Master's Thesis Research 1-6 credits; Grading Method REG 

0101 TtfTw Arranged Room Ananged Staff 

0201 Time Arranged Room Arranged Staff 



ENNU cont. 



ENNU B99 Doctoral Dissertation Research 1-8 credits: Grading Method: REG 
0101 Time Arranged Room Arranged Staff 

0201 Time Arranged Room Arranged Staff 



ENTOMOLOGY 



ENTM 



(LIFE SCIENCES) 



ENTM 100 Insects 3 credits; Grading Method: REGP-FAUD 

Meets USP Distributive Studies (B)Natural Sciences and Mathematics requirement 

0101 MTuWThF 9:30am-10:50am BIdg SYM, Room 1308 Messersmith, D 

0201 MTuWThF 9 30am-10:50am BIdg SYM. Room 1308 Messersmith, D 

A survey of ihe major groups of insects. Ihcir natural historv. and their relationships with man and 

ENTM 399 Special Problems 1-2 credits; Grading Method: REG/P-F/AUD 

0101 Time Arranged Room Arranged Staff 

0201 Time Arranged Room Arranged Staff 

ENTM 699 Advanced Entomology 1-€ credits; Grading Method: REG/AUD 

0101 Time Arranged Room Ananged Staff 

0201 Time Arranged Room Arranged Staff 

ENTM 789 Field Experience In Pest Management 1-6 credits. Grading Method: REG/AUD 

0101 Time Arranged Room Arranged Staff 

0201 Time Arranged Room Arranged Staff 

ENTM 799 Master's Thesis Research 1-6 credits. Grading Method: REG 

0101 Time Arranged Room Arranged Staff 

0201 Time Arranged Room Arranged Staff 

ENTM 899 Doctoral Dissertation Research 1-8 credits; Grading Method: REG 

0101 Time Arranged Room Arranged Staff 

0201 Time Arranged Room Arranged Staff 



FOOD SCIENCE 



FDSC 



(AGRICULTURE) 



FDSC 399 Special Problems In Food Science 1-3 credits. Grading Method: REGP-FAUD 
0101 Time Arranged Room Arranged Staff 

0201 Time Arranged Room Arranged Staff 

FDSC 699 Special Problems In Food Science 1-4 credits; Grading Method: REG/AUD 
0101 Time Arranged Room Arranged Staff 

0201 Time Arranged Room Arranged Staff 

FDSC 799 Master's TTwsIs Research 1-6 credits; Grading Method: REG 

0101 Time Arranged Room Arranged Staff 

0201 Time Arranged Room Arranged Staff 

FDSC 899 Doctoral Dissertation Research 1-8 credits; Grading Method: REG 
0101 Time Arranged Room Ananged Staff 

0201 Time Arranged Room Arranged Staff 



FMCD 

FAMILY AND COMMUNITY DEVELOPMENT 



(HUMAN ECOLOGY) 



FMCD 260 Interpersonal Lite Styles 3 credits: Grading Method: REG/P-F/AUD 

0101 TuTh9:30am-12:50pm BIdg. MMH, Room 1304 Rubin, R 

Prerequisile. FMCD 105 or equivaleni Couple relationships in contemporary dating, counship and 
mamage. and their alternatives 
FMCD 330 Family Patterns 3 credits: Gradina Method: REG/AUD 

Meets USP Distributive Studies (A) Cultural and Historical requirement. Must tiave junior 
standing. 

0101 TuTTi 6:00pm-9:20pm BIdg. LEF, Room 2166 Leslie. L 

0102 MW9:30am-12:50pm BIdg HBK. Room 1t 16 Millstein, F 
0201 TuTti9:30am-12:50pm BIdg MI^H. Room 1304 Zeiger, R 

Theory and research on the family, including a cross-culiural anahsis of family patterns 
FMCD 332 The Child In the Family 3 credits: Grading Method REGP-FAUD 

0101 TuTh t:00pm-4;20pm BItfg MMH, Room 0108 Koblinsky, S 

Prerequisite: FMCD 105 or PSYC lOO A family life education approach to die study of children 
and families. Emphasis on die interaction of children wiUi parents, siblings, extended kin and the 
community. 
FMCD 348 Practicum In Family and Community Development 

4-12 credits: Grading Method REG'P-F/AUD 
Permission of department required 
0101 Meets JUN 5 to AUG 25 

Time Arranged Room Arranged Millslein. F 

FMCD 349 Analysis o( Practicum 1 credit, Grading Method: REG/P-F/AUD 
Permission of department required. 
0101 Meets JUN 5 to AUG 25 

Tu 10:00anv-12:00pm BIdg. MMH, Room 1206 Millstein, F 

FMCD 381 Poverty and Affluence Among Families and Communities 
3 credits: Grading Method: REGAUD 
Meets USP Advanced Studies Analysis of Human Problems requirement 
0101 TuTti9 00an»-12;20pm BIdg SYM, Room 2109 Koblinsky, S 

Prerequisite FMCD 201 or SOCY IllO oi SOCY 105 Social, political, economic inlcnelationships 
among families and communities with respect to varying resources 
FMCD 386 Field Woi* 1-3 credits. Grading Method: REGP-FAUD 

0201 Time Arranged Room Arranged Rubin, R 

FMCD 387 Field Woi* Analysis 1-3 credits: Grading Method: REG/P-F'AUD 

0201 Time Arranged Room Arranged Rubin, R 

FMCD 399 Independent Study 1-6 credits: Grading Method: REG/P-F/AUD 

Permission of department required. 

0101 Time Arranged Room Arranged Rubin. R 

0201 Time Arranged Room Arranged Rubin. R 

Individualized family and community studies projects of interest to student and faculty. 

FMCD 431 Family Crises and Intervention 3 credits, Grading Method: REGP-F AUD 
Meets USP Advanced Studies Analysis ol Human Problems requirement. 
0101 TuTtl 2:00prt>-5:20pm BIdg. MII^H, Room 1304 Epstein, N 

0201 TuTh 2;30pm-5:50pm BIdg MMH, Room 1304 Zeiger, R 

Prerequisite. PSYC 100 Family cnses such as divorce, disability, substance abuse, financial 
problems, intrafamilial abuse, and death Theories and techniques for intervention and enhancement 
of family coping strategies 



COURSE SECTIONS: 01 xx, SESSION I ONLY; 02xx, SESSION II ONLY. 

FREN cont. 



48 

FMCD cont. 

FMCD 441 Personal and Family Finance 3 credits: Grading Mettmd: REG/P-F/AUD 

0101 MWF9:00am-l 1:20am BIdg, MMH, Room 1304 Churaman, C 

Prerequisile: ECON 201 or 205, or conseni of inslnictor Study of individual and family financial 
strategies with particular emphasis upon financial planning, savings, insurance, investments, income 
taxes, housing, and use of credit 
FMCD 487 Legal Aspects of Family Problems 3 credits: Grading Mettmd: REG/P-F/AUD 
Meets USP Advant»d Studies Analysis of Human Problems requirement, 
0101 MW9:30am-12:50pm BIdg. MMH, Room 3418 Myricks. N 

Prerequisite: FMCD 105 or SOCY 105. Laws and legal procedures, with emphasis on adoption, 
mamage. divorce, annulment, and property rights, and how they affect family hfe. 
FMCD 497 The Child and the Lanv 3 credits: Grading Method: REG/P-F/AUD 

Meets USP Advanced Studies Analysis of Human Problems requiremejil 
0101 MW l:00pm-4 :20pm BIdg. MMH, Room 1304 Myricks, N 

Legislation and case law regarding children's legal rights with emphasis on the rights of children in 
the juvenile justice system, and rights to medical, educational, and othei social services. 
FMCD 689 Internship In Family and Community Development 
3-6 credits: Grading Method: REG/AUD 
Permission of department required. 
0101 Time Arranged Room Arranged Rubin, R 

0201 Time Arranged Room Arranged Rubin, R 

Internship related to student's chosen specialization. 
FMCD 698 Advanced Topics In Family and Community Development 
1-3 credits: Grading Method: REG/AUD 
Permission of department required. 
0101 Time Arranged Room Arranged Rubin, R 

0201 Time Arranged Room Arranged Rubin, R 

FMCD 698G Advanced Topics In Family and Community Development: Gender and Ethnicity 
Issues In Family Therapy 3 credits: Grading Method: REG/AUD 
Prerequisile: FMCD 485. 
0101 TuTh 2:00pm-5:20pm BIdg. MMH, Room 1206 Leslie, L 

FMCD 799 Master's Thesis Research 1-6 credits: Grading Method: REG 

0101 Time Arranged Room Arranged Rubin, R 

0201 Time Arranged Room Arranged Rubin, R 



FOOD 



FOOD 



(HUMAN ECOLOGY) 



FOOD 110 Food for People 3 credits: Grading Method: REG/P-F/AUD 

Meets USP Distributive Studies (D) Social and Behavioral Sciences requirement. 
0101 MTuWThF 11;00an>-12:20pm BIdg. MMH, Room 0108 Staff 

A study of food in coniemporary living. Economic, social, cultural and aesltielit implica 
food. Selection and use of food in relation to eating habits and well-being of the individual. 
FOOD 789 Non-Thesis Research 1-3 credits: Gradirjg Method: S-F 

0101 Time Arranged Room Arranged Staff 

0201 Time Arranged Room An-anged Staff 

FOOD 799 Master's Thesis Research 1-6 credits: Grading Method: REG 

0101 Time Arranged Room Arranged Staff 

0201 Time Arranged Room Arranged Staff 

FOOD 899 Doctorai Dissertation Research 1-8 credits: Grading Method: REG 
0101 Ttme Arranged Room Arranged Staff 

0201 Ttme Arranged Room Arranged Staff 



FREN 473 Contemporary French Society 3 credits: Grading Method: REG/P-F/AUD 
0101 Meets JUN 26 to JUL 14 

MTuWTbF 9:00am-12:00pm BIdg, JMZ. Room 3118 Verdaguer, P 

Ttiis course is designed lo trace the evolution of French society since World War R, Historical, 
social, economic and cultural factors which have shaped the country and its people over the past 
forty years will be examined A variety of documents and sources will be used as a basis for 
classroom discussion, but special emphasis will be placed on the analysis of numerous audio-visual 
supports which provide unique insights into the culture, such as slides and docunKniaries. feature 
nims, cartoons. TV programs and commercials, popular songs, etc. The forces shaping 
contemporary France. Analysis of social groups, economic development, institutions, political 
structures. Lectures, discussions and most readings in French. 
FREN 798 Master's independent Study 1-3 credits: Grading Method: REG/AUD 
0101 Time Arranged Room Arranged Staff 

0201 Time Arranged Room Arranged Staff 

FREN 799 Master's Thesis Research 1-6 credits: Grading Method: REG 

0101 Time Arranged Room Arranged Staff 

0201 Time An-anged Room Arranged Staff 

FREN 898 Doctorai Independent Study 3 credits: Grading Method: REG/AUD 
0101 Time Arranged Room Arranged Staff 

0201 Time Arranged Room Arranged Staff 

FREN 899 Doctorai Dissertation Research 1-3 credits: Grading Method: REG 
0101 Time An-anged Room Arranged Staff 

0201 Time Arranged Room Arranged Staff 



FSAD 



FOODSERVICE ADMINISTRATION (HUMAN ECOLOGY) 

FSAD 789 Non-Thesis Research 1-3 credits: Grading Method: S-F 

0101 Time Arranged Room Arranged Staff 

0201 Time Arranged Room Arranged Staff 

FSAD 799 Master's Thesis Research 1-6 credits; Grading Method: REG 

0101 Time Arranged Room Arranged Staff 

0201 Time Arranged Room Arranged Staff 

FSAD 899 Doctorai Dissertation Research 1-8 credits; Grading Method: REG 

0101 Time Arranged Room Arranged Staff 

0201 Time Arranged Room Arranged Staff 



GEOGRAPHY 



GEOG 



FRENCH 



FREN 



(ARTS AND HUMANITIES) 



FREN 101 Elementary French 4 credits; Grading Method: REG^P-F/AUD 

Meets USP Distnbutive Studies (A) Cultural and Historical requirement. Limited to students 
with less than 2 years high school French 

0101 MTuWThF 8:a0am-10:00am BIdg. JMZ, Room 1224 Black. C 

0102 MTuWThF 7;00pm-9;00pm BIdg JMZ, Room 3118 Staff 

0201 MWF9;30am-12:50pm BIdg. JMZ, Room 3118 Demartre. A 

Introduction to basic structures and pronunciation with emphasis on the four sidlls: listening, 
speaking, reading and writiDg. Not open to students with two or more years of high-school level 

FREN 102 Elementary French 4 credits: Grading Method: REG/P-F/AUD 

Meets USP Distnbutive Studies (A) Cultural and Historical reauirement. Open only to 
students who have completed FREN 101 on this campus or by permission of course 
chairperson, 
0101 MTuWThF 10;00am"12;aapm BIdg, JMZ. Room 1224 Mossman. C 

0201 MTuWThF 8:00am-10:00am BIdg, JMZ. Room 3120 Staff 

Prerequisile: FREN 101 ai UMCP or permission of department Further work on basic structures 
and pronunciation with emphasis on the four skills: listening, speaking, reading and writing. 
FREN 103 Review of Elementary French 4 credits; Grading Method: REG/P-F/AUD 
Meets USP Distributive Studies (A) Cultural and Historical requirement. 
0101 MWTfiF 1 1 :00am-1 :00pm BIdg JMZ, Room 3120 Staff 

0201 MTuWThF 10 :00am- 12 :00pm BIdg. JMZ, Room 3120 Staff 

Limited to students who have had at least two years of high school French (or equivalent) or who 
do not qualify for FREN 104. Students may not receive credit for both FREN 101/102 and 103. 
FREN 203 Intermediate French 4 credits: Grading Method: REG/P-F/AUD 

Meets USP Distributive Studies (A) Cultural and Historical requirement. Limited to students 
who have had no more than 3 years of high school French. 

0101 MTuWThF 8:00am-10:00am BIdg. JMZ, Room 2125 Barrabini, M 

0102 MTuWThF 8:00am-10:00am BIdg JMZ, Room 1103 Staff 

0201 MTuWThF 8:00am-10:00am BIdg. JMZ, Room 2206 Staff 

0202 MTuWThF B:00am-10:00am BIdg, JMZ, Room 2125 Staff 

Grammar review with extended reading, discussion, and composition. Fulfils the arts and 
humanities language requirement 
FREN 386 Field Woric 1-3 credits: Grading Method: REGP-F/AUD 
Pennission of department required, 
0101 Time Arranged Room Arranged Staff 

0201 Time Arranged Room Arranged Staff 

FREN 387 Field Work Analysis 1-3 credits; Grading Method: REG/P-F/AUD 

Permission of department required. Taken concurrently with FREN 386. 
0101 Time Arranged Room Arranged Staff 

0201 Time Arranged Room Arranged Staff 

FREN 399 Directed Study In French 1-3 credits: Grading Method: S-F 
Permission of department required. 
0101 Ttme Arranged Room Arranged Staff 

0201 Time Arranged Room Arranged Staff 



(BEHAVIOR AND SOCIAL SCI) 

GEOG 100 Introduction to Geography 3 credits: Grading Method: REG 

Meets USP Distributive Studies (D) Social and Behavioral Sciences requirement. 
0101 MW7;00pm"1 0:00pm BIdg, LEF, Room 1201 Cirrincione, J 

An introduction lo the broad field of geography as it is applicable to the general education student. 
The course presents the basic rationale of variations in human occupancy of the earth and stresses 
geographic concepts relevant to understanding world, regional and local issues. 

GEOG 130 Developing Countries 3 credits; Grading Method: REG/P-F/AUD 

Meets USP Distributive Studies (0) Social and Behavioral Sciences requirement. 
0101 MW9:30am-12:30pm BIdg. LEF. Room 1201 Panditharatne. B 

An introduction to the geographic characlerisucs, development problems and prospects of less 
developed countries The distribution of poverty, emerging livelihood patlems, migration and urban 
growth, agricultural productivity, rural development and international trade. Portraits of selected 
developmg countries, 

GEOG 150 World Cities 3 credits; Grading Method: REG 

Meets USP Distributive Studies (A) Cultural and Historical requirement, 
0201 MW9:30am-1 2:30pm BIdg, LEF. Room 1221 Samarasinghe. V 

An introduction to the forces that affect the growth of cities m different parts of the world. 
Regional variations in city design and examples of great world cities The impact of changing 
technologies, economic and social change on the evolution of the city. Current and emerging 

GEOG 202 The World In Cultural Perspective 3 credits: Grading Method: REG/P-F/AUD 
Meets USP Distributive Studies (A) Cultural and Historical requirement. 
0101 TuTh 9:30am-l 2:30pm BIdg. LEF, Room 1201 Mitchell, R 

The imprint of cultural traits, such as religion, language and livelihood systems, on the earth's 
landscape The transformation of the earth's surface as a result of cultural diversity, selllemcnl 
patterns, political organization, cultural evolution, and population growth 

GEOG 305 Quantitative Methods in Geography 3 credits; Grading Method: REG/P-F/AUD 
0101 TuTh 2:00pm-5:00pm BIdg. LEF. Room 2166 Yu. F 

A practical introduction to data sources and measurement, basic descriptive statistics, data 
collection, sampling and questiormaire design, field techniques, map use. introduction to computer 
use and data presentation 

GEOG 324 Europe 3 credits; Grading Method: REG/P-FAUD 

Meets USP Distributive Studies (A) Cultural and Historical requirement, 
0101 MW 4:00pm-7:00pm BIdg, LEF, Room 1221 Cebrian, J 

The geographical diversity of modem Europe from landscape and regional perspectives. TTie diverse 
features of Europe's physical environment and resource base, and their integration into the 
demographic, economic, social and political patlems of the continent's major geographic regions, 

GEOG 327 South Asia 3 credits; Grading Method: REG/P-F/AUD 

Meets USP Distributive Studies (A) Cultural and Historical requirement. 
0201 TuTh 9:30anv1 2:30pm BIdg, LEF, Room 1210 Silva, P 

Methods of regional analysis and area studies applied to the Indian Subcontinent, including India. 
Pakistan. Bangladesh. Sri Lanka and adjacent naUons. Locational significance of the natural 
cnvironmeni. historical and cross-cultural processes, languages and religion, the economy and 
government, population, archaeology, urbanization and development. 

GEOG 384 Internship In Geography 3 credits: Grading Method: REG/P-F/AUD 
Permission o( department required. 
0101 Time Arranged Room Arranged Staff 

0201 Time Arranged Room Arranged Staff 

Prerequisites: GEOG 305. 310, and permission of depanmcnt. Corequisite: GEOG 385. Supervised 
field training to provide career experience Introduction lo professional level activities, demands, 
opportunities Placement at a public agency, non-profit organization, or pnvaie fimi. Participation 
requuts application to the internship advisor in preceding semester 
GEOG 385 Internship Research Paper 3 credits: Grading Method: REG/P-FAUD 
Permission of department required, 
0101 Time Arranged Room Arranged Staff 

0201 Time Arranged Room Arranged Staff 

Prerequisite: GEOG 305. 310. and permission of department Corequisite: GEOG 384, Seminar 
conducted on campus, Research paper related to the student's internship. 
GEOG 434 Aoriculturai and Rural Development 3 credits; Grading Method: REG/P-F/AUD 
Meets USP Advanced Studies Analysis of Human Problems requirement, 
0201 TuTh 7:00pm-10:00pm BIdg. LEF, Room 1222 Silva, P 

The nature of agncultural resources, the major types of agnculiural exploitation in the world and 
the geographic conditions. Main problems of conservation. 



COURSE SECTIONS: 01 xx, SESSION I ONLY; 02xx, SESSION II ONLY. 



49 



GEOG cont. 



GEOG 4S0 The Contemporary City 3 credits; Grading Method: FfEG/P-F/AUD 

0101 TuTh 7:00pn>-10;00pm BIdg. LEF, Room 12t0 Panditharatne, B 

The contemporary urt)an system, towns, cities and metropolitan areas and their role as 
concentrations of sociaJ and economic activity. Panems of land-use residential, commercial 
activity, manuf actunng . and transportation Explanatory and descnptive models International 
comparisons 
GEOG 454 Washington: Past and Present 3 credits: Grading Method: REG/P-F.AUD 
0101 TuTh 4:00pm-7:00pm BIdg. LEF. Room 1208 Groves, P 

The development of the Washington area from its ongin as the Federal Capital to its role as a major 
metropolitan area The geographic setting, the L'Enfant Plan and its modification, the federal 
government role, residential and commercial structure The growth of Washington's suburbs 
GEOG 482 Geographic Information Systems 3 credits; Grading Method: REGP-F/AUD 
Starting Fall 1987. this course is a prerequisite for GEOG 696. 
0101 MW 4:00pm-7;30pm BIdg. LEF. Room 1124 Thompson, D 

Prerequisite, GEOG 373 or consent of instructor The conslniclion and use of computer-based 
information systems The collection, manipulation and automated display of geographical data 
Applications in areas such as resource management, political boundiines. terrain analysis and 
community planning 
GEOG 496 Topical Investloatlons 1-3 credits; Grading Method: REG/P-F/AUD 
Permission of department required. 
0101 Time Arranged Room Arranged Staff 

0201 Ttme Arranged Room Arranged Staff 

GEOG679C 

Seminar In Urban Geooraphy: The Contemporary City 
3 credits; Grading Method REGAUD 
0101 TuTh 7:00prTv-10 OOpm BIdg. LEF. Room 1210 Panditharatne. B 

GEOG 786 Selected Topics In Geography 1-3 credits; Grading Method: REG/AUD 
Permission of department required 
0101 Time Arranged Room Arranged Staff 

0201 Time Arranged Room Arranged Staff 

GEOG 789 Independent Readings 1-3 credits: Grading Method: REG/AUD 

Permission of department required Contact department to make anangements. 
0101 Time Arranged Room Arranged Staff 

0201 Time Arranged Room Arranged Staff 

GEOG 790 Internship in Geography 3 credits; Grading Method: REG/AUD 

Permission of department required. Contact department to make anangemenls. 
0101 Time Arranged Room Arranged Staff 

0201 Time Arranged Room Arranged Staff 

Field expcnence in the student's specialty m a federal, state, or local agency or private business A 
research paper required 
GEOG 799 Master's Thesis Research 1-6 credits; Grading Method: REG 
Permission ol department required. 
0101 Time Arranged Room Arranged Staff 

0201 Time Arranged Room Arranged Staff 

GEOG 899 Doctoral Dissertation Research IS credits; Grading Method: REG 
Permission ol department required. 
0101 Time Arranged Room Arranged Staff 

0201 Time Arranged Room Arranged Staff 



GEOL 



GEOLOGY (COMP, MATH, AND PHYS SCI) 

GEOL iro Physical Geology 3 credits; Grading Method: REG/P-F/AUD 

Course meets University Studies Program Distributive Studies non- lab science and 
mathematics requirement If taken with GEOL 110, course may be counted as lab science 
requirement 
0101 MTuWThF 9;30arTV-10:50am BIdg. GEO, Room 1120 Statt 

A general survey of the rocks and minerals composing the earth, its surface features and the agents 
that form them, and the dynamic forces of plale tectonics. Credit will not be given for both GEOL 
100 and GEOL 101 
GEOL 499 Special Problems In Geology 1-3 credits: Grading Method: REG/P-F/AUD 
Pennission of department required 
0101 Ttme Arranged Room Arranged Staff 

GEOL 799 RAaster's Thesis Research 1-4 credits. Grading Method: REG 

0101 Ttme Arranged Room Arranged Staff 

0201 Time Arranged Room Arranged Staff 

GEOL 899 Doctoral Dissertation Research 1-8 credits. Grading Method: REG/S-F 
0101 Time Arranged Room Arranged Staff 



GERM 



GERMAN (ARTS AND HUMANITIES) 

GERM 101 Elementary German I 4 credits. Grading Method: REG/P-F/AUD 

Meets USP Distributive Studies (A} Cultural and Histoncal requirement. 
0101 MTuWTh 9 :30am- 12 :20pm BIdg. JMZ, Room 3203 Strauch, G 

0201 MTuWTh 9 :30am- 12 :20pm BIdg, JMZ, Room 3203 Staff 

[ntroduclion to basic structures and pronunciation by emphasis on the four skills: listening, 
speaking, reading and wnling Readings concern the current life-style and civilization of the 
German-spcakmg world 

GERM 102 Elementary German II 4 credits. Grading Method REG/P-FAUD 

Meets USP Distributive Studies (A) Cultural and Histoncal requirement. 
0201 MTuWTh 9:30am-12:20pm BIdg, JMZ. Room 3205 Staff 

Prerequisite. GERM 101 or equivalent. A continuation of GERM 101, compleling the introduction 
of basic suuctures and continuing the involvement with the civilization of the German' speaking 

GERM 104 Intennedlate German 4 credits; Grading Method: REG/P-F/AUD 

Meets USP Distributive Studies (A) Cultural and Historical requirement, 
0101 MTuWTh 9:30arTv-12,20pm BIdg JMZ, Room 2206 Pfister, G 

Prcrcquibile (iERM 102 or 103 or equivalent. Grammar review and greater mastery of vocabulary, 
idiiim.s. conversational fluency and compositional skills. Readings stress the current life-style and 
civilization of the German -speaking world 
GERM 301 Conversation and Composition I 3 credits; Grading Method: REG/P-F/AUD 
0101 Time Arranged Room Arranged Staff 

Prerequisite GERM 115 or equivalent Practice in contemporary spoken and written Gemian 
Systematic review of grammar, and exercise in composition Emphasis on cultural contrasts 

GERM 302 Conversation and Composition tl 3 credits; Grading Method: REG/P-F/AUD 

0101 Time Arranged Room Arranged Staff 

Prerequisite GERM 301 or equivalent Continuation of GERM 301 

GERM 415 German/English Translation I 3 credits; Grading Method: REG/P-F/AUD 
0101 MTuTh 4:00pfn-6:00pm BIdg, JMZ, Room 0204 Staff 

An intensive presentation of German grammar limited exclusively to reading skill: graded readings 
in the arts and sciences Instruction in English; can not be used to satisfy the arts and humaniUcs 
foreign language rcquirerrKnl May not be taken for credit by students who have completed GERM 
1 11-115 and/or GERM 301/302. 



GERM cont 



GERM 416 German/English Translation 11 3 credits. Grading Method: REG/P-F/AUD 
0201 MTuTh 4:00pm-6:00pm BIdg, JM^ Room 3205 Fagan. S 

Prerequisites, GERM 302. GERM 415 or equivalent Wntlen translation of materials from the 
student's field of study Discussion of basic problems of German -to- English traiulation. with 
examples from students' projects Instruction in English Cannot be used to satisfy the arts and 
humanities foreign language requirement 
GERM 499 Directed Study: Directed Study tn German 1-3 credits; Grading Method: REG/AUD 
0101 Time Arranged Room Arranged Pfister. G 

0201 Time Arranged Room Arranged Pfister, G 

GERM 611 College Teaching of German 3 credits; Grading Method: REG/AUD 
0101 Meets JUN 19 to JUL 8 

Time Arranged Room Arranged Staff 

Instruction, demonstration and classroom practice under supervision of modem procedures in the 
presentation of elementary German courses to college age students 
GERM 798 Master's independent Study 1-3 credits; Grading Method: REG/AUD 

0101 Time Arranged Room Aranged Pfister. G 

0201 Time Arranged Room Arranged Pfister. G 

GERM 798A 

Master's Independent Study: Landeskunde 1-3 credits: Grading Method: REG/AUD 
0101 Time Arranged Room Arranged Staff 

GERM 799 Master's Thesis Research 1-6 credits; Grading Method: REG 

0101 Time Arranged Room Arranged Staff 

0201 Time Arranged Room Arranged Staff 

GERM 896 Doctoral independent Study 1-3 credits. Grading Method: REG/AUD 

0101 Time Arranged Room Arranged Pfister, G 

0201 Time Arranged Room Arranged Pfister, G 

GERM 899 Doctoral Dissertation Research IS credits; Grading Method: REG 
0101 Time Arranged Room An'anged Staff 

0201 Time Arranged Room Arranged Staff 



GVPT 

GOVERNMENT AND POLITICS (BEHAVIOR AND SOCIAL SCI) 

GVPT 100 Principles of Government and Politics 3 credits. Grading Method: REG/P-F/AUD 
Meets USP Distributive Studies (D) Social and Behavioral Sciences requirement. 
0101 MW 9:30am-1 2:30pm BIdg, LEF. Room 2166 Staff 

0201 TuTh 9:30am-1 2:30pm BIdg, LEF. Room 2166 Staff 

A study of the basic principles and concepts of political science This course may be used to 
satisfy, in part, the social science requirement in the general education program, 
GVPT 170 American Government 3 credits. Grading Method: REG/P-F/AUD 

Meets USP Distnbutive Studies (D) Social and Behavioral Sciences requirement, 
0101 TuTh 9:30am- 12:30pm BIdg, LEF, Room 1221 Staff 

0201 MW 12:30pm-3:30pm BIdg, LEF, Room 1201 Staff 

This course is designed as the basic course in government and it or its equivalent is a prerequisite to 
other courses in the department as specified in the catalog. It is a comprehensive study of 
government in the United Stales-national, state and local. 
GVPT 231 Uw and Society 3 credits: Grading Method: REG/P-F/AUD 

0101 TuTh 12:30pm-3:30pm BIdg. LEF. Room 1201 Mcintosh. W 

Prerequisite: GVPT 170, A study of the basis of law and its relationship with various contemporary 
institutions such as the courts, police, the legal profession, and society at large, 
GVPT 240 Political ideologies 3 credits. Grading Method: REG/P-F/AUD 

Meets USP Distributive Studies (A) Cultural and Historical requirement. 
0201 MW 9:30am-12:30pm BIdg, LEF. Room 2208 Staff 

Prerequisite. GVPT 170 A survey and analysis of the leading ideologies of the modem world, 
including anarchism, communism, socialism, fascism, nationalism, and democracy 
GVPT 300 international Political Relations 3 credits: Grading Method; REG/P-F/AUD 

Meets USP Distributive Studies (D) Social and Behavioral Sciences requirement, 
0101 MW 12:30pm-3:30pm BIdg. LEF. Room 1201 Hsueh. C 

0201 TuTh 12:30pm-3:30pm BIdg. LEF. Room 1201 Kaminski. B 

A study of the major factors underlying international relations, the methods of conducting foreign 
relations, the foreign policies of the major powers, and the means of avoiding or alleviating 
international conflicts This course may be used to satisfy, in part, the social science requirement in 
general education program, 
GVPT 306 Global Ecopolittcs 3 credits: Grading Method: REG/P-F/AUD 

0201 MW9:30am-12:30pm BIdg, LEF, Room 1201 Pirages, D 

Prerequisite: GVPT 170 Consideration of global problems such as the growth controversy, 
agricultural productivity, pollution, resource depletion, the energy crisis, and the general impact of 
science and teehnology on the world ecological, socio-economic, and political system, with 
particular emphasis on such matters as objects of public policy, 
GVPT 376 Applied Field Research in Government and Politics 
6 credits: Grading Method: REG/P-F/AUD 
Course requires concurrent registration in GVPT 377 for a combined total of 9 credits, 
0101 Time Arranged Room Arranged Lanning, E 

Students in this course participate as interns m an agency of government or in some other 
appropnale political organization, Assignments are arranged to provide students with insights into 
both theoretical and practical aspects of pohiics. Under the tutelage of the host agency and an 
academic adviser, students conduct a major research project of mutual interest to the student and his 
host agency in the field of government and politics The course is open only to GVPT majors and 
must be taken concurrently with GVPT 377 
GVPT 377 Seminar For Academic Interns 3 credits; Grading Method: REG/P-F/AUD 

Course requires concurrent registration in GVPT 376 for a combined total of 9 credits. See 
course description under GVPT 376. 
0101 W 3:30pfTv-6:30pm BIdg. LEF, Room 2138H Lanning. E 

Time Arranged Room Arranged 

This seminar stresses the application of major concepts of polibca) science as they apply to the 
realities of the political process. Readings and discussion attempt to relate the experiences of the 
academic interns to appropnate literature on the subject of poHtical decision-making. This course is 
open only to GVPT majors and is intended for students concuiiently enrolled in GVPT 376 and/ or 
375. 
GVPT 386 Field Work 1-3 credits; Grading Method: REG/P-F/AUD 

0101 Time Arranged Room Arranged Staff 

0201 Time Arranged Room Arranged Staff 

GVPT 387 Field Work Analysis 1-3 credits: Grading Method: REG/P-F/AUD 

0101 Time Arranged Room Arranged Staff 

0201 Time Arranged Room Arranged Staff 

GVPT 388 Topical Investigations 3 credits; Grading Method: REG/P-F/AUD 

0101 Time Arranged Room Arranged Staff 

0201 Time Arranged Room Arranged Staff 

GVPT 3B8A Topical Investigations: Analysis ot Concepts and Filmic Images 
3 credits; Grading Method REGP-FAUD 
Requires concurrent registration in GVPT 399A tor a combined total ol 6 credits. See 
course description under GVPT 399A 
0101 Meets JUN 5 to JUN 21 

MTuWThF 1 :30pm-4:30pm BIdg. JMZ, Room 0220 Glass. J 



50 



COURSE SECTIONS: 01 xx, SESSION I ONLY; 02xx, SESSION 11 ONLY. 



GVPT cont. 



CVPT 396 Introduction to Political Research 3 credits. Grading Method: REGP-FAUD 
0101 Time Arranged Room Arranged Staff 

0201 Time Arranged Room Arranged Staff 

A required course for aJI honors students designed to emphasize library, research, methodology, and 
wriling skills in political science and poliiical philosophy. A wntlen proposal, bibliography and 
research design tor an honors paper required ot ail students as a final project. GVPT 396 should 
normally be taken in the junior year. 
GVPT 397 Honors Research 3 credits: Grading Method: REG P-FAUD 

0101 Time Arranged Room Arranged Staff 

0201 Time Arranged Room Arranged Staff 

Prerequisile: admission to GVPT honors program and GVPT 3% Individual reading and research. 
Preparation of an original paper, 
GVPT 399A Seminar In Government and PolKlcs: Films and the Politics of the Family 
3 credits: Grading Method: REG P-FAUD 
Requires concurrent registration in GVPT 388A tor a total of 6 credits. 
0101 fleets JUN 5lo JUN 21 

Ttme An'anged Room Arranged Glass, J 

Survey of films to understand nature and structure of politics of the family. Emphasis on families 
and anti-families, the structure of loneliness, despair, potentiality and the politics implicit in these 
emotional realities. 
GVPT 429 Problems in Political Behavior 3 credits; Grading Method: REGP-F/AUD 

0201 TuTfi 9:30am-12:30pm BIdg LEF. Room 1201 f^anukian, E 

GVPT 442 History of Political Theory— Medieval to Recent 

3 credits: Grading Method: REG'P-FAUD 
Meets USP Advanced Studies Development ot Knowledge requirement. 
0101 fglW 12 :30pn>-3 :30pm BIdg. LEF, Room 2166 Terchek, R 

Prerequisite GVPT 100 A survey of Ihe pnncipal theorists set forth in the works of writers from 
Mithiavelh to J S Mill 
GVPT 457 American Foreign Relations 3 credits: Grading Method: REGP-FAUD 
Meets USP Advanced Studies Analysis of Human Problems requiremenl 
0201 TuTh 9:30am-12:30pm BIdg. LEF, Room 2208 McNelly, T 

Prerequisite GVPT 170 The pnnciples and machinery of the conduct of American foreign 
relations, with emphasis on the depaitmcni of state and the foreign service, and an analysis of the 
major foreign policies of the United States. 
GVPT 479 Problems of American Public Policy: Politics of the Vietnam War 
3 credits: Grading Method: REGP-FAUD 
0101 MW9:30am-1 2:30pm BIdg HBK, Room 4210R Vietri, L 

GVPT 741 Political Theory 3 credits: Grading Method: REG AUD 

0201 MW 6 :30pn>-9:30pm BIdg LEF, Room 2123 Aiford, C 

A graduate level inlaiduction to the hisior> of political philosophy and political theory 
GVPT 799 {Master's Thesis Research 1-6 credits: Grading Method: REG 

0101 Ttme Arranged Room Arranged Staff 

0201 Time Arranged Room Arranged Staff 

GVPT 800 Selected Topics in Functional Problems in International Relations 
3 credits. Grading Method: REG AUD 
0101 TuTfi 6:30pm-9:30pm BIdg LEF, Room 2123 Phillips, W 

GVPT 846 Theories of Democracy 3 credits: Grading Method: REG AUD 

0101 MW 6:30pm-9:30pm BIdg. LEF, Room 2123 Tercfiek. R 

Prerequisite: GVPT 442 A survey and analysis of the leading theones of democratic government, 
with attention to such topics as freedom, equality, representation, dissent, and critics of democracy 
GVPT 862 Seminar On Intergovernmental Relations 3 credits: Grading Method: RE&AUD 
0201 MW 3:00pm-6:00pm BIdg, LEF, Room 2138H Reeves, M 

Reports on topics assigned for individual study and reading in the field of recent iniergovemmentaJ 
relations. 
GVPT 873 Seminar In Legislatures and Legislation 3 credits: Grading Method: REG'AUD 
0101 TuTh 6:30pm-9:30pm BIdg. LEF, Room 2138H Usianer. E 

Reports on topics assigned for individual study and reading aN^iul the composition and organization 
of legislatures and about the legislative priKCSs 
GVPT 898 Readings In Government and Politics 3 credits: Grading Method: REG AUD 
0101 Time Arranged Room Arranged Staff 

0201 Time Arranged Room Arranged Staff 

GVPT 899 Doctoral Dissertation Research 1-8 credits: Grading Method: REG 
0101 Time Arranged Room Arranged Staff 

0201 Time Arranged Room Arranged Staff 



H 



HEBREW (ARTS AND HUMANITIES) 

HEBR 333 Hebrew Civilization (In English) 3 credits; Grading Method: REGP-FAUD 
Meets USP Distributive Studies (A) Cultural and Histoncal requiremenl, 
0201 MTuWThF 9:30am-10:50am BIdg. HBK, Room 1112 Oded, B 

Trends in the culturaJ. social and litcrar)' history of the Jews from their earliest experiences as a 
people until Maccabean times Readings and instruction in English 



HESP 



HEARING AND SPEECH SCIENCES (BEHAVIOR AND SOCIAL SCI) 

HESP 120 Introduction to Linguistics 3 credits. Grading Method REG P-FAUD 

Meets USP Distributive Studies (D) Social and Betiavioral Sciences requirement, 
0101 MTuWThF 9:30an>-10;50am BIdg, LEF. Room 1222 Staff 

An introduction to the scientific study of natural language with focus on the basic concepts of 
phonology, syntax, semantics and pragmatics, with subsequent attention to the applied aspects of 
linguistic pnnciples. 
HESP 202 Introduction to Hearing and Speech Sciences 3 credits: Grading Method: REGP-FAUD 
0101 MTuWThF 9:30am-10:50am BIdg. LEF. Room 1210 Staff 

Introduction lo phonetics, the physiological bases of speech production and reception, and the 
physics of sound 
HESP 31 1 Anatomy, Pathology and Physiology of the Auditory System 
3 credits. Grading Method REG P-F AUD 
0101 MTuWThF 9:30am-10:50am BIdg. LEF, Room 1208 Gordon-Salant. S 

Prerequisile HESP 202 Gross anatomy of the ear and pathways for transmission of sound energy 
through die peripheral and central auditory system Causes, development and effects of pathological 
conditions contnbuting to temporary or chronic hearing impairments. 
HESP 400 Speech and Language Development In Children 

3 credits: Grading Method: REG'P-F'AUD 
0101 MTuWThF 11;00am-12;20pm BIdg. LEF, Room 0135 Roth, F 

Prerequisite HESP 300 Analysis of Ihe normal processes of speech and language development in 
children. 
HESP 498 Seminar: Dysfluency In the School Age Child 3 credits: Grading Method: REGP-FAUD 
0201 Meets JUL 31 lo AUG 1 1 

Time Arranged BIdg. LEF. Room 0135 Ratner. N 



HESP cont. 



HESP 499 Independent Study: Topics In Hearing and Speech Sciences 

1-3 credits: Grading Method: REGP-FAUD 
0101 Time Arranged Room Arranged Staff 

0201 Time Arranged Room Arranged Staff 

HESP 610 Aphasia 3 credits: Grading Method: REG AUD 

0101 TuTh 12:30pm-3:30pm BIdg, LEF. Room 0135 Rao, P 

Language problems of adults associated with brain injury, 
HESP 638 Research Practlcum 1-3 credits. Grading Method: REGAUD 

0101 Time Arranged Room Arranged Roth, F 

0201 Time Arranged Room Arranged Staff 

HESP 639A Special Topics In Hearing and Speech Sciences: Dysphagia 
2 credits; Grading Method REG AUD 
0201 MeelsJUL 17 to JUL 28 

Time Arranged BIdg LEF, Room 0135 Staff 

HESP 639B Special Topics In Hearing and Speech Sciences: Dysfluency In the School Age Child 
2 credits; Grading Method: REGAUD 
0201 Meets JUL 31 lo AUG 11 

Time Arranged BIdg, LEF, Room 0135 Ratner, N 

HESP 648 Clinical Practice In Speech 2 credits; Grading Method: REG/AUD 
Permission ol department required, 
0101 Time Arranged Room Arranged Patrick, S 

HESP 649 Clinical Practice in Audiology 1-3 credits; Grading Method: REG/AUD 
Permission of department required. 
0101 Time Arranged Room Arranged McCabe. M 

HESP 708 Independent Study 1-6 credits; Grading Method: REGAUD 

0101 Time Arranged Room Arranged Staff 

0201 Time Arranged Room Arranged Staff 

HESP 706A Independent Study: Nature and Clinical Management of Dysphagia 
2 credits; Grading Method: REGAUD 
0201 Meets JUL 17 to JUL 28 

Time Arranged BIdg LEF, Room 0135 Staff 

HESP 710 Industrial and Environmental Noise Problems 3 credits; Grading Method: REG/AUD 
0101 Time Ananged Room Arranged Staff 

Prerequisite: permission of instnictor. Evaluation and control of noise hazards. Effects of noise on 
man Medico-legal aspects of noise-induced hearing impauTnenl 

HESP 729 Advanced Clinical Practice In Audlotogy: Advanced Clinical Practlcum 

1-8 credits; Grading Method: REG/AUD 
Permission of department required 
0101 Time Arranged Room Arranged McCabo, M 

HESP 799 Master's Thesis Research 1-6 credits; Grading Method: REG 

0101 Time Arranged Room Arranged Staff 

0201 Time Arranged Room Arranged Staff 

HESP 899 Doctoral Dissertation Research 1-8 credits; Grading Method: REG 
0101 Time Arranged Room Arranged Staff 

0201 Time Arranged Room Arranged Staff 



HISTORY 



HIST 



(ARTS AND HUMANITIES) 



HIST 130 The Anctent World 3 credits: Grading Method: REGP-FAUD 

Meets USP Distributive Studies (A) Cultural and Historical requirement. 
0101 MTuVVThF 11:00am-12:20pm BIdg- KEY. Room 1117 Holum. K 

Interpretation of select lileraiure and art of the ancient Mediterranean world with a view to 
illuminating the antecedents of modem culture; religion and myth in the ancient near East; Greek 
philosophical, scientific, and literary invention, and the Roman tradition in politics and 
administration 
HIST 133 Modern Europe: 1789 - Present 3 credits: Grading Method: REG/P-F/AUD 
Meets USP Distributive Studies (A) Cultural and Historical requirement. 
0101 MTuWThF 9:30am-1 0:50am BIdg, KEY. Room 0103 Matossian. M 

0201 MTuWThF 9:30am-10;50am BIdg. KEY. Room 0103 Harris, J 

Nation-states in Europe since the outbreak of the French revolution Rapid changes in 
industrial -economic stnjcture and in demography related to national growths Emergence of a 
distinctly modem secular society including "Europeanism" throughout the world. Emphasis on 
continental, western european countries and peoples. Eastern Europe and Insular Great Britain. 
HIST 145 The Humanities II 3 credits; Grading Method: REG/P-F/AUD 

Meets USP Distributive Studies (A) Guttural and Historical requirement, 
0201 MTuWThF 12:30pm-1:50pm BIdg. KEY. Room 1 1 1 7 Majeska, G 

A survey of man's cultural development from the Renaissance to the present Particular emphasis is 
given to the ans, philosophy, religion, and social conditions which have influenced the common 
cultural heniage of western civilization. Aspects of the culture of the non-western world included 
when appropnate. Students previously enrolled in HIST 252 not admitted, 
HIST 156 History of Ihe United States to 1865 3 credits; Grading Method: REGP-F/AUD 
Meets USP Distributive Studies (A) Cultural and Histoncal requirement. 
0101 MTuWThF 12:30pm-1 :50pm BIdg, KEY, Room 1117 Bradbury, M 

0201 MTuWThF 8:00am-9:20am BIdg. KEY. Room 1117 Smith, E 

A survey of the history of the United Stales from colonial times to the end of the Civil War 
Emphasis on the establishment and development of American institutions 
HIST 157 History of the United States Since 1865 3 credits: Grading Method: REG/P-FAUD 
Meets USP Distributive Studies (D) Social and Befiavioral Sciences requirement. 
0101 MTuWThF 8:00am-9.20am BIdg, KEY, Room 1117 Staff 

0201 MTuWThF 11:00am-12;20pm BIdg, KEY, Room 1117 Moss Jr.. A 

A survey of economic, social, intellectual, and ptihlical developments since the Civil War. 
Emphasis on the nse of ioLlustry and the emergence of the United States as a world power. 

HIST 211 Women In America Since 1880 3 credits. Grading Method: REG/P-F/AUD 
Meets USP Distributive Studies (A) Cultural and Historical requirement. 
0101 MTuWThF 1 1 :00am-1 2:20pm BIdg. KEY. Room 01 1 7 Gullickson. G 

An examination of women's changing roles in woriing class and middle class families, the effects 
of industrialization on women's econmic activities and status, and women's involvement in political 
and social struggles including those for women's rights, birth control, and civil rights. 
HIST 235 History of Britain 1461 to 1714 3 credits; Grading Method: REG/P-F/AUD 
Meets USP Distributive Studies (A) Cultural and Historical requirement, 
0201 MTuWThF 11:00an>-1 2:20pm BIdg. KEY, Room 0116 Breslow. M 

British history from the War of the Roses to the Hanoverian succession; Yorkist and Tudor society 
and politics; the Renaissance and Reformations in England. Henry VIII through Elizabeth; 17th 
century crises and revolutions; intellectual and cultural changes; the beginnings of empire; the 
achievement of political and intellectual order, 
HIST 312A Crisis and Change In the United States: The Changing Urban Scene 
3 credits: Grading Method: REG P-FAUD 
Meets USP Advanced Studies Analysis of Human Problems requirement. 
0201 MTuWThF 11 :00am- 12 :20pm BIdg, KEY, Room 0103 Flacl^, J 

This course explores the changing urban scene in the U S. with emphasis on the effects of 
urbanization on values, family patterns, intergroup relations and social structure, TTieories about 
urbanization will be considered in relation lo the historical evidence regarding cities at different 
stages of the national development. 



51 



52 



COURSE SECTIONS: 01 xx, SESSION I ONLY; 02xx, SESSION II ONLY. 



HIST cont. 



HIST 313 Crisis and Change in European Society: Freedom and Authority 

3 credits: Grading Method: REG/P-F'AUD 
0201 MTuWThF 9:30am-10:50am BIdg, KEY. Room 1117 Eckstein, A 

HIST 337 Europe In the World Setting of the 20th Century 

3 credits: Grading Method: REG/P-F/AUD 
0101 MTuWThF 1 1 :00am-12:20pm BIdg. KEY. Room 0121 Kent, G 

Political, economic and cullural developments in 20lh ccnlur)' Europe with special emphasis on the 
factors involved in the two world wars and iheir global impacts and significance 
HIST 347 History of Crime and Punishment 3 credits; Grading Method: REG/P-F/AUD 
0201 MTuWThF 9:30am-1 0:50am BIdg. KEY. Room 0120 Cockbum, J 

Emphasis on the histoncal development of law enforcement agencies, cnminal junsdiclions and tnal 
procedure. 1500-ISOO Nature of pnnciple felonies and major trends in cnme; penal theory and 
practice in histoncal perspective 

HIST 360 American Colonial History 3 credits: Grading Method: REG/P-F/AUD 

0101 MTuWThF 12:30pm-1 :50pm BIdg, KEY. Room 0103 McCusker. J 

Colonial Amenca from Jamestown to 1763. The establishment of the various colonics with 
emphasis on the reasons for the instability of colonial society to 1689; the emergence of stable 
societies after 1689; the development of colonial regionalism, political institutions, social divsions. 
education, urban and frontier problems in the eighteenth century, 
HIST 363 The Middle Period of American History, 1824-1860 
3 credits: Grading Method: REG/P-F/AUD 
0201 MTuWThF 9:30am-10:50am BIdg. KEY, Room 01 16 Ridgway, W 

An examination of the political history of the United Slates from Jackson to Lincoln with particular 
emphasis on the factors producing Jacksonian Democracy. Manifest Destiny, the Whig Party, the 
anti-slaver>' movement, the Republican Party, and Secession 
HIST 367 The United States Since Worid War II 3 credits: Grading Method: REG/P-F/AUD 
0201 MTuWThF 12:30pm-1 :50pm BIdg. KEY. Room 0103 Staff 

Amencan history from the inauguration of Harry S. Tmman to the present with emphasis upon 
politics and foreign relations, but with consideration of special topics such as radicalism, 
conservation, and labor 
HIST 398 Honors Thesis 3 credits: Grading Method: REG/P-F/AUD 
Permission of department required. 
0101 Time Arranged Room Arranged StaH 

0201 Time Arranged Room Arranged Staff 

HIST 410 Introduction to Archives I 3 credits: Grading Method: REG/P-F/AUD 
Concurrent registration in HIST 411 required 
0101 Tu 7:00pm-10:00pm BIdg. KEY, Room 2119 Grimsted, D 

Time Arranged Room Arranged 

Prerequisite: Consent of department. Corequisite: HIST 411 History of the basic intellectual 
problems relating to archives and manuscript repositories; emphasis on problems of selection, 
access, preservation, inventorying and editing as well as the variety of institutions housing 
documents 
HIST 411 Introduction to Archives II 3 credits: Grading Method: REG/P-F/AUD 
Concurrent registration in HIST 410 required. 
0101 Time Arranged Room Arranged Grimsted. D 

Time Arranged Room Arranged 

Prerequisite: Consent of department. Corequisite. HIST 410, Practical expenence through placement 
m cooperating archives or manuscript repositories in the Baltimore/ Annapolis/ Washington, D.C, 
areas. Assignments to specific projects based on intellectual interest of students. 
HIST 419A Special Topics In History: Field Work In Archaeology and History 
3 credits. Grading Method: REG/P-F/AUD 
Permission of department required Undergraduate students desiring 6 hours credit should 
register concurrently in HIST 499, SECTION 0101 ; graduate students desiring 6 hours aedil 
should enroll in HIST 6i9B. section 0101 
0101 Time Arranged Room Arranged Holum, K 

Course will be offered in Caesarca Mantima and Rehorot-ba-Ncgev. Israel May 28 - June 23 
(Caesarea). July 2 - August 4 (Rehovot) 

HIST 499 Independent Study 1~3 credits: Grading Method: REG/P-F/AUD 
Permission of department required. 
0101 Time Arranged Room Arranged Staff 

0201 Time Arranged Room Arranged Staff 

HIST 619B Special Topics in History: Independent Study 1-3 credits: Grading Method: REG/AUD 
Permission of department required. 
0101 Time Arranged Room Arranged Staff 

0201 Time Arranged Room Arranged Staff 

HIST 619T Special Topics In History: Seminar In American History 
1-3 credits: Grading Method: REG/AUD 
Course designed lor secondary teachers of American history. 
0101 Meets JUL 10 to JUL 28 

Th 9:00am-12:00pm BIdg, KEY. Room 2119 Fanell, R 

M 9 00am-12:00pm BIdg KEY, Room 2119 

Th 1:00pm-3:00pm BIdg, KEY. Room 2119 (DIS) 

M 1 :00pm-3:00pm BIdg. KEY. Room 21 19 (DiS) 

HIST 799 Master's TTiesis Research /-6 credits: Grading Method: REG 

0101 Time Arranged Room Arranged Staff 

0201 Time Arranged Room Arranged Staff 

HIST 899 Doctoral Dissertation Research 1-8 credits: Grading Method: REG 
0101 Time Arranged Room Arranged Staff 

0201 Time Arranged Room Arranged Staff 



HLTH 



HEALTH (PHYS ED, RECR, AND HEALTH ) 

HLTH 106 Drug Use and Abuse 3 credits: Grading Method: REGP-F'AUD 

0101 MTuWThF 11 :00am- 12 :20pm BIdg PRH, Room 0302 Beck, K 

0201 MTuWThF 11:00am-12:20pm BIdg. PRH, Room 0302 StaH 

An interdisciplinary analysis of conlemporaiy dnig issues and problems. The course will eiiamine 
physiological, psychological, social, philosophical, historical, legal and health aspects of drug use 
and abuse. Special attention will be focused on those general motivations for drug use that allend 
life on the college campus 
HLTH 140 Personal and Community Health 3 credits: Grading Method: REG/P-FiMD 

0101 MTuWThF 11 :00am-12:20pm BIdg PRH, Room 0305 Mann, P 

0102 MTuWThF 9:30am-10:50am BIdg. PRH, Room 0303 Miller, C 
0201 MTuWThF 11 :00am-12:20pm BIdg. PRH, Room 1301 Hyde, D 

Meaning and significance of physical, menial and social health as related to the individual and to 
society; imponanl phases of national health problems; constnjctive methods of promoting health of 
the individual and ihc community. 
HLTH 150 First Aid and Emergency ililedical Services 2 credits: Grading Method: REG/P-F/AUD 

0101 MTuWTh e:OCacrv-9:20am BIdg PRH, Room 0302 Stalf 

0102 MTuWTh 9;30am-10:50am BIdg. PRH, Room 0302 Slad 
0201 MTuWTh e:00am-9:20am BIdg. PRH, Room 0302 Stalf 

Ixciure, demonstration and training in emergency care, including cardiopulmonary resuscitation, 
hemorrhage control, shock, poisons and bone injury treatment and childbiiTh. American Red Cross 
and Heart Association of Maryland Cenification awarded 



HLTH cont. 



HLTH 285 Controlling Stress and Tension 3 credits. Grading Method REGP-F'AUD 

Meets USP Distributive Studies (D) Social and Behavioral Sciences requirement. 

0101 MTuWThF 9:30am- 10:50am BIdg. PRH. Room 1301 Greenberg. J 

0102 TuTh 4:00pm-7:00pm BIdg. PRH, Room 1302 Allen, R 
0201 MTuWThF 9:30an>-10:5Qam BIdg. PRH. Room 1301 Hyde. D 

flealth problems related to stress and tension. Analysis of causative psycho-social stressors and 
intervening physiological mechanisms. Emphasis on prevention and control of stress through 
techniques such as biofeedback, meditation and neuromuscular relaxation. 
HLTH 377 Human Sexuality 3 credits: Grading Method: REG'P-F/AUD 
Students who have received credit for HLTH 477 not eligible, 
0101 MTuWThF 11 :a0am-12:20pm BIdg PRH, Room 1301 Greenberg. J 

0201 MTuWThF 8:00am~9:20am BIdg. PRH, Room 1301 Sawyer, f^ 

The biological and developmentaJ aspKcls of human sexuality; the psychological and emotional 
aspects of sexual behavior; sexual identity, the histoncal. cultural, social, linguistic, legal and moral 
forces affecting sexual issues; the importance of communication, disclosure and intimacy in 
interpersonal relationships; and n:search trends in the area of human sexuality 
HLTH 386 Field Work 1-3 credits: Grading Method: REG/P-F/AUD 
Permission of department required 
0101 Time Arranged Room Arranged Staff 

0201 Time Arranged Room Arranged Staff 

HLTH 387 Field Work Analysis 1-3 credits: Grading Method: REGP-FAUD 
Permission of department required, 
0101 Time Arranged Room Arranged Staff 

0201 Time Arranged Room Arranged Staff 

HLTH 430 Health Education in the Workplace 3 credits: Grading Method: REG/AUD 
0101 MTuWThF 1 1 :00am-12:20pm BIdg. PRH, Room 0303 Feldman, R 

A survey of the role of health education m work settings Examination of occupational stress, the 
health effects of shift work, women's health in the workplace, health education approaches to 
informing workers and management, and health promotion programs in the workplace. 
HLTH 450 Health of Children and Youth 3 credits: Grading Method: REG/P-F/AUD 
0101 MTuWThF 12:30pm-1 :50pm BIdg. PRH, Room 1301 Miller. C 

A study of the health of 5 lo 18 year olds Physical, mental, social, and emotional health. 
Psychosexual development, diet, exercise, recreation, and the roles of parents and teachers 

HLTH 455 Physical Fitness of the Individual 3 credits; Grading Method: REG/P-F/AUD 
Students with credit in HLTH 4988 are not elgible. 
0101 MTuWThF 9;30am-10:50am BIdg. PRH. Room 0305 Mann, P 

Study of major physical fitness problems confronting the adult in modem stxriely. Consideration 
given to the scientific appraisal, development and maintenance of fitness at all age levels. Obesity, 
weight reduction, chronic fatigue, posture, and special exercise programs are explored. Open to 
persons outside the physical education and health fields. 
HLTH 456 Health of the Aging and Aged 3 credits. Grading Method: REG/P-F/AUD 
0201 MW 7:00pm-10:00pm BIdg. PRH, Room 1301 Staff 

Psychological, physiological and socio-economic aspects of aging; nutrition; sexuality, death, dying, 
and t>ereavemenl; self- actualization and creativity, health needs and cnses of the aged. 
HLTH 471 Wonwn's Health 3 credits: Grading Method: REGP-FAUD 

0101 MTuWThF 12:30pm-1 :50pm BIdg. PRH, Room 0302 Staff 

The women's health movement from the perspective of consumerism and feminism. The 
physician-patient relationship in the gynecological and other medical settings. The gynecological 
exam, gynecological problems, contraception, abortion, pregnancy, breast and cervical cancer and 
surgical procedures. Psychological aspects of gynecological concerns. 
HLTH 476 Death Education 3 credits; Grading Method: REG/P-F'AUD 

Meets USP Advanced Studies Analysis ol Human Problems requirement. 
0101 MW 7:00pm-10:00pm BIdg, PRH, Room 1303 Staff 

Examination of the genesis and development of present day death attitudes and behavior by use of a 
mullidisciphnary life cycle approach 

HLTH 489 Field Laboratory Projects and Workshop 1-6 credits; Grading Method: REG/P-F/AUD 
Contact department to make arrangements 
0101 Time Arranged Room Arranged Staff 

0201 Time Arranged Room Arranged Stafi 

HLTH 498T Special Topics In Health: Ways of Knowing About Human Stress and Tension 
3 credits: Grading Method: REGP-FAUD 
Meets USP Advanced Studies Development o( Knowledge requirement. Prerequisite: 
HLTH 285. 

0101 MW 4:a0pm-7:00pm BIdg, PRH, Room 1301 Allen, R 

0102 TuTh 4:00pm-7:00pm BIdg PRH, Room 1301 Schiraldi. G 
HLTH 498V Special Topics In Health: Substance Abuse Programming 

3 credits: Grading Method REGP-FAUD 
0101 MW 4:00pm-7:00pm BIdg. PRH, Room 0302 Beck, K 

HLTH 498X Special Topics In Health: Aids Education and Prevention 
3 credits: Grading Method, REGP-F/AUD 
0201 TuTh 7 00pm-10:00pm BIdg PRH. Room 1301 Thomas, S 

HLTH 665 Health Behavior I 3 credits; Grading Method REG AUD 

0101 TuTh 4:00pm-7:00pm BIdg. PRH, Room 0303 Feldman, R 

The psychological, social psychological, and sociological theoncs of health behavior. The relation 
of health knowledge, beliefs, attitudes, intentions, and behavior to preventive, illness, sick-role, and 
health utilization behaviors, 
HLTH 688 Special Problems In Health Education 1-6 credits; Grading Method: REG/AUD 
Contact department to make arrangements. 
0101 Time Arranged Room Ananged Staff 

0201 Time Arranged Room Arranged Staff 

HLTH 688X Special Problems in Health Education: Writing for Publication 
3 credits; Grading Method: REG/AUD 
0101 MW 4:00pm-7:00pm BIdg. PRH. Room 0303 Gold, R 

HLTH 785 Internship in Hearth Education 3 credits; Grading Method: REG/AUD 
0101 Time Arranged BIdg PRH. Room 2387 Staff 

Prerequisites: [HLTH 665; HLTH 675; and HLTH 680]; or pcmiission of department. The 
application of previously acquired skills and knowledge to the planning, conduct, and evaluation of 
health education Emphasis on education designed to affect and use psychosocial influences of 
health behavior. The setting of the miemship will depend upon the student's background and career 
goals 
HLTH 799 (Master's Thesis Research 1-6 credits; Grading Method: REG 
Permission of department required. 
0101 TimeAnanged Room Arranged Staff 

0201 Time Arranged Room Arranged Staff 

HLTH 899 Doctoral Dissertation Research 1-8 credits: Grading Method: REG 
0101 Time Arranged Room Arranged Staff 

0201 Time Arranged Room Arranged Staff 



HONORS 



HONR 



HONR 379 Honors Independent Study IS credits: Grading Method: S-F 
0201 Time Arranged Room Arranged 



(UNDERGRADUATE STUDIES) 



COURSE SECTIONS: 0^xx, SESSION I ONLY; 02xx, SESSION II ONLY. 



53 



HORT 



HORTICULTURE (AGRICULTURE) 

HORT 160 Introduction to Landscape Architecture 3 credits: Grading Method: REG/P-FAUD 

Meets USP Distributive Studies (C) Literature and the Arts requirement. 

0101 MTuWThF 3:30pm-4;50pm BIdg. ASY, Room 2309 Hamed. S 

Theory and general principles of landscape archileclure with Iheir application to public and private 

HORT 386 FWd Work 1-3 credits: Grading Method: REG'P-FAUD 
Permission of department required. 
0101 Time Arranged Room Arranged Staff 

0201 Time Arranged Room Arranged Staff 

HORT 387 FWd Work Analysis 1-3 credfts: Gradirig Method: REaP-F/AUD 
Pemiission of department required. 
0101 Time Arrar>ged Room Arranged Staff 

0201 Time Arranged Room Arranged Staff 

HORT 399 Special Problems 2 credits: Gradiryg Method: REG'P-F/AUD 

0101 Time Arranged Room Arranged Staff 

0201 Time Arranged Room Arranged Staff 

HORT 699 Special Problems In Horticulture 1-3 credits: Grading Method: REG/AUD 
0101 Time Arranged Room Arranged Staff 

0201 Time Arranged Room Arranged Staff 

HORT 799 Master's Thesis Research 1-6 credits. Grading Method: REG 

0101 Time Arranged Room Arranged Staff 

0201 Time Arranged Room Arranged Staff 

HORT 899 Doctoral Dissertation Research 1-8 credits: Grading Method: REG 
0101 Time Arranged Room Arranged Staff 

0201 Time Arranged Room Arranged Staff 



HSAD 



HOUSING AND DESIGN (ARTS AND HUMANITIES) 

HSAD 210 Presentation Teclinlques I 3 credits: Grading Method: REG/P-F/AUD 
0101 Meets JUN 5 to JUL 27 

TuTh 8:00am-12:30pm BIdg- MMH. Room 1 108 Hoover, B 

Prercquiiite APDS 103 or equivalem For intenor design majoR only, Basic techniques for 
making two dimensionaj presentations of existing space utilizing technical skills 10 convey design 
solutions. 
HSAD 386 FWd Work 1-3 credits, Grading Method: REG 
Permission of department required, 
0101 Meets JUN 5 to JUL 27 

Time Arranged Room Arranged Hoover, B 

HSAD 3«7 FMd Work Analysis 1-3 credits: Grading Method: REG 
Permission of department required, 
0101 Meets JUN 5 to JUL 27 

Time Arranged Room Arranged Hoover, B 

HSAD 4S8A Selected Topics In Housing and Interior Design: Computer Application In Space 
Design 3 credits: Grading Method. REGP-F/AUD 
0101 Meets JUN 5 to JUL 27 

MW 1:OOp(7V-6 :00pm BIdg MMH, Room 1413A Eckersley, M 

Time Arranged Room Arranged {LAB} 

HSAD 488G Selected Topics In Housing and Interior Design: Computer Imaging 
3 credits: Grading Method: REG'P-F/AUD 
Permission of department required 
0101 Meets JUN 5 to JUL 27 

TuTtl 5:30pm-9:30pm BIdg. MMH, Room 1413A Gips, C 

Time Arrariged Room Ananged (LAB) 

HSAD 4881 Selected Topics In Housing and Interior Design: Lighting Design 
3 credits: Grading Method: RE&'P-FAuS 
0101 Meets JUN 5 to JUL 27 

TuTIi 1 ;00pm-5:30pm BIdg. MMH, Room 1 108 Hoover, B 

HSAD 499 Individual Study In Housing and/or Interior Design 3 credits: Grading Method: REG 
0201 Time Arranged Room Arranged Staff 



ITAL 



ITALIAN (ARTS AND HUMANITIES) 

rTAL 101 Elementary Italian I 4 credits: Grading Method: REG/P-F/AUD 

Meets USP Distributive Studies (A) Cufturat and Historical requirement 
0101 MTuWThF 8 :30am- 10:30am BIdg. JMZ. Room 3120 Russell. C 

Introduction lo basic grammar and vocabulary; wntien and oral work Credit will not be given for 
both ITAL 101 and ITAL 121 
n"AL 475 Kalian Cinema; A Cultural Approach 3 credits: Grading Method: REG/P-F/AUD 
0201 MWTh 11 :00am~1 :30pm BIdg JMZ, Room 0205 Falvo. G 

A study of Italian society and culture through the medium of liieraiure and film Emphasis on 
neorcalism (Rosscllini. Dc Sica. Visconti). and posl-neorealism (Fellini. Antonioni) with reference 
to some major Italian wnicrs (Boccaccio. Vcrga. Moravia and Levi) In English The culture of 
Italy through Ihc medium of film from the silent days up to the present In English 



IVSP 



INDIVIDUAL STUDIES PROGRAM (UNDERGRADUATE STUDIES) 

(VSP318 Individual Studies t- IS aedrfs. Grading Me?tot/fl£G 
Permission of department required IVSP majors only 
0101 Time Arranged Room Arranged Staff 

0201 Time Arranged Room Arranged Staff 

IVSP 319 Tutorial Report 1 credit: Grading Method: S-F 

Permission of department required. IVSP majors only. 
0101 Time Arranged Room Arranged Staff 

0201 Time Arranged Room Arranged Staff 

IVSP 320 Bachelor's Report 3 credits: Grading Method REG 
Permission of department required IVSP majors only 
0101 Time Arranged Room Arranged Staff 

0201 Time Arranged Room Arranged Staff 

Ra^ui^:d of all sIudenLs in the Individual Studies Prograin whose program includes 40% or more of 
informal educational cxpenence (independeni study, special problems, work intemship, etc, I And is 
strongly recommended for all students in Ihe program This paper is to be completed in the 
siudent's Tinal semester and approved by the tutor and committee pnor 10 ccrtificalion for the 
degree 



JAPANESE 



JAPN 



(ARTS AND HUMANITIES) 



JAPN 101 Elementary Japanese I 6 credits: Grading Method: REG/P-F 

Meets USP Distributive Studies (A) Cultural and Histoncal requirement, 
0101 MTuWThF 9:30an>-12:20pm BIdg JMZ. Room 0120 Miura. E 

Introduction lo basic patterns of contemporary spoken Japanese and to the two phonetic syllabaries 
(Katakana and Hiragana) 
JAPN 102 Elementary Japanese II 6 credits: Grading Method: REG 

Meets USP Distributive Studies (A) Cultural and Historical requirement. 
0201 MTuWThF 9:30am-12:20pm BIdg TWS, Room 1202 Yaginuma, K 

Prerequisiie JAPN 101 or equivalent Continued introduction lo the basic spoken and wntten 
patterns of contemporary Japanese 
JAPN 201 Intermediate Spoken Japanese I 3 credits; Grading Method: REG 

Meets USP Distributive Studies (A) Cultural and Historical requirement, 
0101 MTuWThF 9:30am-10:50am BIdg, ARC. Room 1101 Sano. T 

Prerequisite JAPN 102 or equivaleni, Further study of grammar with emphasis on the spoken 
language, 
JAPN 202 Intermediate Written Japanese I 3 credits: Grading Method: REG 

Meets USP Distributive Studies (A) Cultural and Historical requirement- 
0101 MTuWThF 11 :00am-12:20pm BIdg, LEF, Room 1210 Sano, T 

Prerequisite; JAPN 103 or equivalent Continued study of the written Japanese language llirough 
reading and composition. 
JAPN 203 Intermediate Spoken Japanese II 3 credits: Grading Method: REG 

Meets USP Distributive Studies (A) Cultural and Histoncal requirement. 

0201 MTuWThF 9:30am-10:50am BIdg ASY, Room 3215 Staff 

Prerequisite JAPN 201 or equivalent Continuation of JAPN 201 

JAPN 204 Intermediate Written Japanese II 3 credits: Grading Method: REG 

Meets USP Distributive Studies (A) Cultural and Histoncal requirement. 

0202 MTuWThF 11 :00am- 12 :20pm BIdg, TYD. Room 1132 Staff 

Prerequisite: JAPN 202 or equivalem. A conlinuaUon of JAPN 202 



JOUR 



JOURNALISM (JOURNALISM) 

JOUR 100 Introduction to Mass Communication 3 credits: Grading Method: REG 

Meets USP Distributive Studies (D) Social and Behavioral Sciences requirement. 
0101 MTuWThF 11 :00am- 12 :20pm BIdg. JRN, Room 1104 Hieberl, R 

Survey of the functions and effects of the mass media in the United States A consunier's 
introduction lo newspapers, television, radio, film, sound recording, books, magazines, and new 
media technology. Introduction to public relations, advertising, and news analysis. 

JOUR 201 Writing For Mass Media 3 credits; Grading Method: REG 

A 5-minute typing test is required. Must have at least 28 credits earned. During Summer 
Sessions I and II only, JOUR 201 is open to non-majors- 

0101 MTuWThF 3:30pm-4:50pm BIdg, JRN. Room 3102 Roche, J 

0102 MTuWThF 9:30am-1 0:50am BIdg JRN, Room 3102 Barton, S 

Prerequisite. 30 words per minute typing ability, provisional or direct admission to journalism 
major Introduction lo news, feature and publicity wnting for ihe printed and electronic media, 
development of news concepts; laboratory in news gathenng tools and wnltng skills. 
JOUR 202 Editing For the Mass Media 3 credits: Grading Method: REG 
Provisional and majors only 
0101 MTuWThF 11:00am-12:20pm BIdg. JRN, Room 3111 Barttin. S 

0201 MTuWTTiF 9:30am-10:50am BIdg, JRN, Room 3111 Stepp Jr , A 

Prerequisite grade of C or belter m JOUR 201 Basic editing skills applicable to all mass media: 
copy editing, graphic pnnciplcs and processes, new media technology 

JOUR 320 News Reporting 3 credits; Grading Method: REG 
Majors only 
0201 MTuWThF 11 :00am-12:20pm BIdg, JRN, Room 3102 SteppJf.,A 

Prerequisiie: grade of C or better in JOUR 202 Principles and practices of news reporting with 
special emphasis on news gathenng for all the media, covering news beats and other news sources, 
including researching a news story for accuracy, comprehensiveness and interpretation. 
JOUR 330 Public Relations Theory 3 credits: Grading Method: REG 
Majors only and BMGT 051 5A and BMGT 05090. 
0101 MTuWThF 9:30am-10:50am BIdg JRN. Room 1104 Hiebert. R 

Prerequisite: grade of C or belter in JOUR 201 The historical development and contemporary 
status of public relations in business, govemmcnl. associations and other organizations Application 
of communication theory and social science methods lo the research, planning, communication and 
evaluation aspects of the public relations process 
JOUR 331 Public Relations Techniques 3 credits; Grading Method: REG 
Majors only, 
0101 MTuWTh 1:00pm-3:00pm BIdg. JRN, Room 3102 Zerbinos, E 

Prerequisites: JOUR 330. and grade of C or better in JOUR 202 The techniques of public 
relations including news releases, publications and printed materials, audio-visual lechmques. 
speeches and special events Application of these techniques in laboratory and field projects. 
JOUR 340 Advertising Communication 3 credits; Grading Method: REG/P-F/AUD 
0101 MTuWThF 11 :00am- 12 :20pm BIdg, JRN. Room 1105 Zanol. E 

Prerequisite: grade of C or belter m JGLTl 201 Advertising as a mass communication profession 
and Its role in the public mformauon system of the United States, Application of communication 
iheory and research methods to the research, planning, communication, and evaluation aspects of 
advertising 

JOUR 341 Advertising Techniques 3 credits: Grading Method: REG 
Majors only, 
0101 MTuWThF 9:30am-10:50am BIdg. JRN, Room 31 1 1 Zanot. E 

Prerequisites: JOUR 340. and grade of C or belter in JOUR 202 Wntmg and production of print 
and broadcast advenisements; application of these techniques in laboratory and field projects. 
JOUR 342 Advertising Media Planning 3 credits: Grading Method: REG 
Majors only 
0201 MTuWThF 9 30am-10:50am BIdg JRN, Room 3102 Keenan, K 

Prerequisite JOUR 340 Principles of planning, placing and evaluating advertismg media in U S. 
media markets Application of theory and methods to specific advertising situations 
JOUR 352 Special Topics In Photo)ournallsm 3 credits: Grading Method: REG 

Estimated supply costs: $125. Concentration in shooting and processing of color and use 
of color in print. 
0101 Th 6:00pm-9:00pm BIdg JRN, Room 2116 Roche. J 

Tu 6:00pm-9:00pm BIdg JRN, Room 2116 (LAB) 

Prerequisites: JOUR 351 and permission of instructor An analysis of the theory and application of 
advanced photographic processes to the communicauon of ideas, including direct audience 
'tstic and nonrealistic visual materials and media. 



JOUR 373 Graphics 3 credits: Grading Method: REG 
Majors only. 
0201 MTuWThF 8.00am-9:20am BIdg. JRN. Room 3111 Smith, M 

Prerequisite: grade of C or better in JOUR 202 Intensive analysis of the components of 
publication content and design Type and typography, printing processes, illustration and production 
with emphasis on contemporary technology, 



COURSE SECTIONS: 0^xx, SESSION I ONLY; 02xx, SESSION II ONLY. 

LBSC cont. 



54 

JOUR cont. 

JOUR 396 Supervised Internship 3 credits: Grading Method: REG 

For majors only, Contact Lois Kay, 1118 Journalism Building. Proof ol registration required 
when seeking approval of internship in 1118 Journalism No retroactive adds. 
0101 Meets JUN 5 to AUG 25 

Time Arranged BIdg. JRN, Room 1118 Kay, L 

Prerequisites: grade of C or bcdcr in JOUR 202, and firsi course of journalism sequence related to 
techniques [i.e JOUR 320; or JOUR 331. or JOUR 341; or JOUR 350; or JOUR 360; or JOUR 
380] and perTniss:on of department Lntemship experience with commumcalion professionals in 
newspapers, news broadcasting, public relations, advertising, magazines, photojournalism, and 
science communication Relation of academic training to professional experience. 
JOUR 396 Independent Study 1-3 credits; Grading Method: REG 
Contact department to make arrangements Majors only, 
0101 Time Arranged Room Arranged Staff 

0201 Time Arranged Room Arranged Staff 

JOUR 400 Law of Mass Communication 3 credits; Grading Method: REG 

0101 TuTh 6:00pnv-9:00pm BIdg. JRN, Room 1104 Zerbinos, E 

Legal rights and constraints of mass media, libel, pnvacy. copyright, monopoly, contempt, and 
other aspects of the law applied to mass communication Previous study of the law not required, 
JOUR 450 Mass Media In Soctoty 3 credits; Grading Method: REG 

0201 MTuWThF 3:30pnv-4;5apm BIdg. JRN, Room 1105 Levy. M 

Ethical, moral, political, economic, and social consideration of mass communication, 
JOUR 477 Mass Communication Researcti 3 credits: Grading Method: REG 

0201 MTuWThF 8:00am-9:20am BIdg. JRN, Room 1105 Keenan, K 

Prerequisite: MATH 110 or equivalent, students are encouraged to have completed the theory and 
technique courses in their major sequence Communication research methods used in measuring 
public opinion and evaluating public relations, advertising, and mass media programs and materials. 
JOUR 490 Advising Student Publications 3 credits; Grading Method: REG 
0101 Meets JUN 26 to JUL 14 

MTuWThF 2:00pm-5:00pm BIdg. JRN. Room 1104 McAdams. K 

Journalistic writing and editing in student newspapers, yeartwoks. and magazines, libel and policy, 
curriculum and teaching procedures; role ot student publications 
JOUR 492 Typography and Layout For Student Publications 3 credits: Grading Method: REG 
0101 Meets JUN 26 to JUL 14 

MTuWThF 9;30am-12:30pm BIdg. JRN, Room 3103 Smith. M 

Type design, type families, graphics, art. photography, and editorial and advertisement layout of 
school newspapers, yearbooks, and magazines 
JOUR 601 Theories of Mass Communication 3 credits. Grading Method: REG 

0201 TuTh 6:00pm-9;00pm BIdg, JRN, Room 1116 fDIS) Levy, M 

JOUR 698 Special Problems In Communication 3 credits: Grading Method: REGAUD 
0101 Time Arranged Room An-anged Staff 

0201 Time Arranged Room Arranged Staff 

JOUR 798 Masters Professional Fleldwork 3 credits: Grading Method: REG/AUD 
0101 Time Arranged Room Arranged Staff 

0201 Time Arranged Room Arranged Staff 

JOUR 799 Master's Thesis Research 1-6 credits; Grading Method: REG 

0101 Time Arranged Room Arranged Staff 

0201 Time Arranged Room Arranged Staff 



LATN 



LATIN (ARTS AND HUMANITIES) 

LATN 120 Intensive Utin 4 credits; Grading Method: REG/P-FAUD 

Meets USP Distributive Studies (A) Cultural and Historical requirement. 
0201 MTuWThF 11 :00am-12:40pm BIdg. JM2. Room 1104 Levine, M 

Prerequisite: permission of instructor Not open for credit to students with credit for LATN 102, 
Elements of Latin grammar and vocabulary: elementary reading The first years study of Latin 
compressed into a single semester, 
LATN 220 Intermediate Intensive Latin 4 credits; Grading Method REG'P-F/AUD 
Meets USP Distributive Studies (A) Guttural and Historical requirement, 
0201 MTuWThF 1 1 :00am-12:40pm BIdg JM2, Room 0204 Mejer, J 

Prerequisites, LATN 102 or LATN 120. or equivalent Not open to students with credit for LATN 
204 Review of Latin grammar; reading in prose and poetry from selected authors 
LATN 499 Independent Study In Latin Language and Literature 
3 credits; Grading Method: REG/P-F/AUD 
Permission of department required, 
0101 Time Arranged Room Arranged Rowland. R 

0201 Time Arranged Room Arranged Rowland, R 

LATN 601 Latin Pedagogy 3 credits: Grading Method: REG/AUD 

0101 Time Arranged Room Arranged O'Donnell, M 

Practical problems and theoretical issues such as the nature method approach to language 
instruclion, self-paced and intensive approaches to Latin and Greeit. computer-assisted 
and leaching of culture through languages 
LATN 688 Special Topics In Latin Literature: Ovid 3 credits; Grading Method: REG/AUD 
0101 Time An-anged Room Arranged Levine, M 



LBSC 



LIBRARY SCIENCE (LIBRARY AND INFO SERVICES ) 

LBSC 499A Workshops, Clinics, and Institutes: Workshop In Archival Automation 

3 credits; Grading Method: S-F 
For infomiation on non-credit workshop, (fee $500) contact Jean Oiepenbrock in the 
College of Library and Information Services. 454-3016 Additional project and lab required. 
0101 MW 10 :00am- 1:00pm BIdg. HBK, Room 0105 Burke, F 

Explores computer applications in a broad range of records management and archival activiues, 
including control of office files through appraisal, accessioning, anangemcni. descnption, and use 
Special emphasis will be placed on adminisienng documentary collections with computer assistance 
LBSC 600 Prosemlnar: the Development and Operation of Libraries and Information Services 
3 credits; Grading Method: REG/AUD 
Permission ol department required. Meets Monday, Tuesday and Wednesday; June 26 
through August 16. 
0101 Meets JUN 26 to AUG 16 

MTuW 12:00pm-2:00pm BIdg, HBK, Room 0109 Kidd, J 

Background and oncnlation for advanced study in library and mformation services, including such 
areas as conimunication: the use and economics of mformation; libraries as social institutions and as 
organizations; and pnjfessionalism Required of all MLS students, 
LBSC 651 Introduction to Reference and Information Services 
3 credits; Grading Method: REG/AUD 
Permission of department required. Meets Monday. Tuesday and Wednesday; June 26 
through August 16, 
0101 Meets JUN 26 to AUG 16 

MTuW 9:00am-1 1 :00am BIdg HBK, Room 0109 Cunningham. W 

Information and reference systems, services, and tools provided in libranes and information centers 
Problems and concepts of communication, question negotiation, bibliographic control, and search 
processes arc considered. Major types of information sources and modes of information delivery are 



introduced Required of all MLS students 
LBSC 690 Introduction to Data Processing For Libraries and Information Services 
3 credits; Grading Method: REGAUD 
Permission of department required Plus additional lab and project. 
0101 MW 5:30pm-e:30pm BIdg. HBK, Room 0103 Abels. E 

General introduction to computers and theu* use m libraries and other information systems. Includes 
systems analysis, data base management systems, file structure, suiicturcd programming, and data 
processing applications and their management 
LBSC 691 Microcomputers In Information Processing 3 credits. Grading Method: REG/AUD 
Permission of department required Plus additional lab and project. 
0201 MTuThF10:O0am-12:00pm BIdg HBK, Room 0115 Bartow. D 

lnU"oduction to micrLKomputers via practical expencncc with programming, database management 
and information processing, word processing, instructional packages, and other applications, Tlie 
use of personal computers in homes, schools, offices, libraries, and information centers. 
LBSC 707 Field Study in Library Service 3 credits; Grading Method: REG/AUD 

Permission of department required. Permission must be approved prior to May 15, 1989. 
0201 Time Arranged Room An^anged Cunningham. W 

Prerequisites: LBSC 600; and LBSC 651; and LBSC 671. and [LBSC 690 or LBSC 691) and 
permission of both department and instructor. Familiarization of students with library operations 
through unpaid, supervised expenence and'or the opportunity to perform a study to solve a specific 
problem in a suitable library or other information agency 
LBSC 706C Special Topics In Library and information Service: Management of On-Une Services 
in Schools 3 credits: Grading Method: REG/AUD 

Permission ol department required. Meets Monday. Tuesday, Thursday and Friday; June 
26 - July 14, plus Saturday, July 8, 9am-3pm, 
0101 Meets JUN 26 to JUL 14 

MTuThF 8:30am-1 1:30am BIdg, HBK, Room 0115 Aversa. E 

MTuThF 8:30am-1 1:30am BIdg. HBK, Room 0113 

Planning, implementation, management and evaluation of on-line services in the school 
environment Includes hands-on introduction to search techniques, 
LBSC 7060 Special Topics In Library and Information Service: Database Management 
3 credits: Grading Method: REG/AUD 
Permission of department required. Plus additional lab and project, 
0201 TuTh 9:00am-12:00pm BIdg, HBK, Room 4113 Green, R 

Development of a reasonably large application (such as an information system for music recordings 
or a senals control system! using a relational database management system (DBMS) (such as 
Knowledgeman. dBASE[n+. or RBASE 5000). implemented on a microcomputer, 
LBSC 708U Special Topics In Library and Information Service: Classification Theory 
3 credits: Grading Method: REG/AUD 
Permission of department required. Prerequisite: LBSC 671. 
0201 MTuThF 1:00pm-3:00pm BIdg. HBK. Room 4113 Green. R 

Survey of classificaiorv principles applied to bibliographic, philosophical, biological, cognitive and 
linguistic phenomena Special emphasis on cognitive sciences challenges to traditional principles of 
classification 
LBSC 709 Independent Study 1-3 credits; Grading Method: REG/AUD 

Permission of department required. Permission of CLIS Admissions Committee required. 
0101 Time Arranged Room Arranged Staff 

0201 Time Arranged Room An-anged Staff 

LBSC 727 Science Information and the Organization of Science 
3 credits; Grading Method: REG/AUD 
Permission of department required. Plus additional project. 
0201 Tu 6:00pn>-9:00pm BIdg, HBK, Room 0103 Kidd, J 

Sa 9:30anv12:30pm BIdg HBK, Room 0103 

Institutional environments in which science information is produced, evaluated and disseminated. 
The evolution of organizational relationships and the development of new forms such as ihink-tanks 
and contract research firms The influence of science policy on science communication . 
LBSC 746 Analysis of Client Groups: Young Adults 3 credits: Grading Method: REG/AUD 

Permission of department required Meets Tuesday and Thursday evenings; plus 
Saturday, July 15, 9:30am-4:30pm. 
0101 TuTh 5:30pm-8:30pm BIdg. HBK, Room 4113 Liesener. J 

Special characlenstics of youth and resultant implications for the interpretation of information, 
materials and services in all types of libraries and information settings 
LBSC 751 Literature and Research In the Humanities 3 credits: Grading Method: REG/AUD 
Permission of department required. 
0101 MTuTh 2:00pm-4:30pm BIdg, HBK. Room 0105 Aversa, E 

Prerequisite: LBSC 651 or permission of both department and instructor, Analysis of information 
structure, research methods, bibliographic organization and reference services in the humanities, 
including religion, philosophy, performing arts, visual arts, and language and literature, 
LBSC 753 Literature and Research In the Social Sciences 3 credits; Grading Method: REG/AUD 
Permission ol department required. 
0101 MTuThF 8:30am~10:30am BIdg. HBK, Room 0103 White, M 

Prerequisite: LBSC 651 or permission of both department and instructor. Factors affecting tfie 
genei:ation and use of social science information including the characteristics of the social sciences 
and their methodology, the structure of literature, and control of diverse forms of social science 
information 
LBSC 766 Business Information Services 3 credits: Grading Method: REG/AUD 

Permission of department required. Meets daily; Monday June 5 through Friday June 9, 
and Monday June 19 through Friday June 30, plus special exercise. 
0101 Meets JUN 5 to JUN 30 

MTuWThF 10:00am-1 :00pm BIdg. HBK, Room 4113 Wasserman, P 

Survey and analysis of information sources m business, finance, and economics with emphasis upon 
their use in problem solving, 
LBSC 781 Problems of Nonbook Materials 3 credits; Grading Method: REG/AUD 

Permission of department required. Will meet at 11:30am-2pm; June 26-July 14. 
0101 MTuTh 1 1 :00am-1 :30pm BIdg. HBK. Room 0103 White. M 

Examination of nonbook materials such as audiorecords. motion pictures, maps, videorcconls. 
machine -readable data files, and realia. Technical services applicable to nonbook materials, 
LBSC 899 Doctoral Dissertation Research 1-8 credits; Grading Method: REG 
Permission of department required. 
0101 Time Arranged Room Arranged Staff 

0201 Time Arranged Room Arranged Staff 



LINGUISTICS 



LING 



(ARTS AND HUMANITIES) 



LING 200 Introduclory Linguistics 3 credils: Grading Method: REG/P-F/AUD 

Meets USP Distributive Studies (D) Social and Betiaviorai Sciences requirement. Basis (or 
future worl^ in Linguistics. 
0101 MTuWTTiF 9:30am-10:50am BIdg, ZOP. Room 1234 Munn, A 

Ways of studying human language, basic concepts of modem linguistic analysis (sound systems, 
word formation, syntax, meaning). The nature of human language; the social aspects of language; 
language change; dialects; writing systems; language universals. etc. Credit will nol be given for 
both LING 100 and LING 200 Not open for ciedil to students who have credit in ENOL 280. 
ANTH37l.orHESP 120, 



COURSE SECTIONS: 01 xx, SESSION I ONLY; 02xx, SESSION II ONLY. 



55 



LING cont. 



UNG 440 Grammars and Cognition 3 credits: Grading Method: REG'P-FAUD 

Meets USP Advan^ Studies Development of Knowledge requirement. 
0101 MTuWThF lOOOam-11 20am BIdg HBK, Room 1108 Gorrell. P 

Prerequisile LENG 240 Relationship between the slruciure, developmenl and functioning i 
grammars and the stnicturc. development and functioning of other mental systems. Inlerprelalioi 
of expcnmental and observational work on children's language, aphasia, speech production ar 
comprefiension 

UNG 499 Directed Studtes In Unguistics 3 credits; Grading Method: REGP-FAUD 
Permission of department required 
0201 Time Arranged Room Arranged Homslein, N 

UNG 698 Directed Study 3 credits. Grading Method: REG 
Permission of department required. 
0201 Time Arranged Room Arranged Staff 

UNG 799 Master's Thesis Research: Master's Thesis l-€ credits, Grading Method. REG 
Permission of department required- 
0201 Time Arranged Room Arranged Staff 

UNG 889 Directed Research 1-8 credits; Grading Method: REG 
Permission of department required, 
0101 Time Arranged Room Arranged Staff 

0201 Time An-anged Room Arranged Staff 

UNG 895 Doctorai Research Paper 1-6 credits; Grading Method: REG 
Permission of department required. 
0101 Time Arranged Room Arranged Staff 

0201 Time Arranged Room Arranged Staff 

UNG 899 Doctorai Dissertation Research 1-8 credits; Grading Method: REG 
Permission of depanmeni required. 
0101 Time Arranged Room Arranged Staff 

0201 Time Arranged Room Arranged Staff 



MAPL 



APPLIED MATHEMATICS 



(COMP, MATH, AND PHYS SCI) 

MAPL 460 ComputatJonai Methods 3 credits; Grading Method: REGP-F^AUD 

0201 MTuWThF 8:0aam-9 20am BIdg. CLB, Room 0111 Staff 

Prerequisites MATH 240; and MATH 241. and CMSC 1 10 or CMSC 1 13 Also offered as CMSC 
460. Basic computational methods for interpolation, least squares, approximation, numerical 
quadranire. numencaj soiuuon of polynomial and transcendental equations, systems of linear 
equations and initial value problems for ordmary differential equations. Emphasis is on methods and 
their computational properties rather than their analytic aspects Intended pnmarily for students in 
the physical and engineering sciences Credit will not be granted for both CMSC/MAPL 460 and 
CMSC/MAPL 466 

MAPL 799 Master's Thesis Research 1-6 credits: Grading Method: REG 

0101 Tinw Arranged Room Arranged Staff 

0201 Time Arranged Room Arranged Staff 

MAPL 899 Doctoral Dissertation Research 1-8 credits; Grading Method: REG 

0101 Time Arranged Room Arranged Staff 

0201 Time Arranged Room Arranged Staff 



MATH 



0101 
0102 
0103 
0201 
0202 
0203 



Slatt 
Slaff 
Slaft 
StaH 
StaH 
Staff 
Ihe maUiematics placement 



MATHEMATICS (COMP, MATH, AND PHYS SCI) 

For ttwse students experiencing math anxtety or who feei def(c(ent In matn study sidiis, refer to 

the special programs section. SUMM 003. 

MATM 110 Elementary Mathematical Models 3 credits; Grading Method: REGP-FAUD 

Permission of department required MATH 1 10 is not open to students in ttie Engineering 
and Computer, Matfiematical, and Pfiysical Sciences Colleges 
MTuWTfiF 8 00am- 9 20am BIdg. MTH, Room B0421 

MTuWThF 9:30am-10 50am BIdg MTH, Room B0421 

MTuWThF 11 :00am- 12. 20pm BIdg. MTH, Room B0421 

MTuWThF 8:00am-9;20am BIdg. MTH, Room B0421 

MTuWThF 9:30anr)-10:50am BIdg. MTH, Room BC421 

MTuWThF 11 00am- 12 :20pm BIdg. MTH, Room B0421 

Prerequisite permission of depanmeni based on satisfactory score o 

exam, or MATH 001 Elementary introduction to models useful in the biological, management, and 
social sciences Matrices, systems of linear equations, and linear inequalities in two or three 
variables are used to solve simple but representative problems in linear programming, stochastic 
processes, game theory, and the mathematics of mortgages and annuities 
MATH 111 irrtroductlon to Probability 3 credits, Grading Method: REG/P-PAUD 

Meets USP Distributive Studies {B)Natural Sciences and Mathematics requirement, MATH 
111 is not open to students in the Engineenng and Computer, Mathematical, and Physical 
Saences Colleges. 

0102 MTuWThF 9:30arTHlO:50am BIdg, MTH, Room 0307 Staff 
0202 WTuWThF 9 30am-10:50am Btdg, MTH, Room 0307 Staff 

Prerequisite permission of department based on satisfactory score on ihc mathematics placement 

exam, or MATH 110. or MATH 115 Logic. Boolean algebra, counting, probabilty. random 

variables, expectation applications of the normal probability distnbution Credit will not be granted 

for both MATH 1 1 1 and STAT 100 (Not open to students majonng in mathematics, engineenng or 

the physical sciences) 
MATH 115 Precalculus 3 credits. Grading Method: REG/P-F/AUD 
Permission of department required 
MTuWThF 8 OOam-9 20am BIdg MTH. Room 0103 

MTuWThF 11 00an>-12 20pm BIdg MTH. Room 0103 

MTuWThF 8:00am-9:20am BIdg MTH, Room 0103 

WTuWThF 9 30am-10:50am BIdg, MTH, Room 0103 

Prerequisite permission of depanmeni based on saiisfacalory score 

exam or MATH 002 Preparation for MATH 220 or MATH 140 Elementary functions aiid graph; 

polynomials, rational functions, exponential and logarithmic functions, tngonomelnc functions 

Algebraic techniques preparatory for calculus 
MATH 140 Calculus I 4 credits; Grading Method REG/P-F/AUD 

Meets USP Distributive Studies (B)Natural Sciences and Mathematics requirement 

Permission of department required 
Meets JUN 5 to JUL 27 

MTuWThF 8:00anv-9:20am BIdg, MTH, Room 0306 

Meets JUN 5 to JUL 27 
MTuWThF 9:30am-10:50am Btdg, MTH, Room 0306 

0103 Meets JUN 5 to JUL 27 
MTuWThF 1 1 :00am-12:20pm BIdg, MTH, Room 0306 

Prerequisite permission of department based on 3 1/2 years of college preparatory mathematics 

fincluding trigonometry) and satisfactory score on Ihc mathematics placement exam or MATH 115, 

>t Introduction to calculus, including functions, limits, continuity, dcnvatives and applications of the 

I derivative, sketching of graphs of furK:tior>s, definite and indcrinite integrals, and calculation of 

area. The course is especially recommended for science and mathematics majors Credit will not be 
gnnled for both MATH 140 and MATH 220 



0101 
0103 
0201 
0202 



0101 
0102 



Staff 
Slaff 
Staff 
Slaff 
I the mathematics plac 



Staff 



Slaff 
Staff 



MATH cont. 



MATH 141 Calculus II 4 credits. Grading Method: REG'P-FAUD 

Meets USP Distributive Studies (B}Natural Sciences and Mathematics requirement, 

0101 Meets JUN 5 to JUL 27 

MTuWThF 8:00am-9:20am BIdg MTH, Room 0303 Staff 

0102 Meets JUN 5 to JUL 27 

MTuWThF 9 30am-10:50am BIdg, MTH. Room 0303 Staff 

0103 Meets JUN 5 to JUL 27 

MTuWThF 1 1 :a0am-12:20pm BIdg. MTH. Room 0303 Staff 

Prerequisite: MATH 140 or equivalent Continuation of MATH 140, including techniques of 
integration, improper integrals, applications of integration (such as volumes, work, arc length, 
moments), inverse functions, exponential and logarithmic functions, sequences and series. Credit 
will be given for only one course. MATH 141 or MATH 221 , 
MATH 210 Elements of Mathematics 4 credits: Grading Method: REG/P-F/AUD 

Meets USP Distributive Studies (B)Natural Sciences and Mathematics requirement, Open 
only to elementary education majors 
0101 Meets JUN 5 to JUL 27 

MTuWThF 8;00am-9:20am BIdg. MTH, Room 0407 Staff 

Prerequisite, one year of college preparatory algebra. Required for majors in elementary education, 
and open only to students in this field Topics from algebra and number theory, designed to provide 
insight into arithmetic: inductive proof, the natural number system based on the Peano axioms; 
mathematical systems, groups, fields; the system of integers, the system of rational numbers; 
congruence, divisibility; systems of numeration. 
MATH 211 Elements of Geometry 4 credits; Grading Method: REG/P-F/AUD 

Meets USP Distributive Studies (6)Natural Sciences and Mathematics requirement. Open 
only to elementary education majors. 
0101 Meets JUN 5 to JUL 27 

MTuWThF 9 30am-l 0:50am BIdg. MTH, Room 0405 Staff 

Prerequisite: MATH 210 or equivalent Structure of mathematics systems, algebra of sets, 
geometncal structures, logic. mea.surement. congruence, similarity, graphs in the plane, geometry 
on the sphere 
MATH 220 Elementary Calculus I 3 credits; Grading Method: REGP-F/AUD 

Meets USP Distributive Studies (B)Natural Sciences and Mathematics requirement 

0101 MTuWThF 8:00am-9:20am BIdg MTH. Room 0409 StaH 

0102 MTuWThF 9 30am-10:50am BIdg. MTH, Room 0409 Staff 

0103 MTuWThF 11:00am- 12. 20pm BIdg MTH, Room 0409 Staff 

0201 MTuWThF 8 00am-9:20am Btdg. MTH, Room 0409 Staff 

0202 MTuWThF 9 30am-10:50am BIdg, MTH, Room 0409 Staff 

0203 MTuWThF I1:00am-12:20pm BIdg MTH, Room 0409 Staff 

Prerequisite pemiission of department based on 3 1/2 years of college preparatory mathematics 
(including trigonometry) and satisfactory perfomiance on the mathematics placement exam, or 
MATH 115. Basic ideas of differential and integral calculus, with emphasis on elementary 
techniques of differentiation and applications. Credit will not be granted for both MATH 140 and 
MATH 220 (Not open to students majoring in mathematics, engineering or the physical sciences). 
MATH 221 Elementary Calculus It 3 credits; Grading Method: REG/P-F/AUD 

Meets USP Distributive Studies (B}Natural Sciences and Mathematics requirement. 

0102 MTuWThF 9:30am-10:50am BIdg MTH, Room 0304 Staff 
0201 MTuWThF 8:00anv-9;20am BIdg. MTH, Room 0106 Staff 

Prerequisite, MATH 220, or MATH 14U, or equivalent. Differential and integral calculus, with 
emphasis on elementary techniques of mtegralion and applications. Not open to students majoring in 
mathematics, engineering or the physical sciences. Credit will be given for only one course, MATH 
141 or MATH 221. 
MATH 240 Introduction to Linear Algebra 4 credits; Grading Method: REGP-FAUD 

Meets USP Distributive Studies (B)Natural Sciences and Mathematics requirement. 

0103 Meets JUN 5 to JUL 27 

MTuWThF 1 1 :a0am-12:20pm BIdg, MTH, Room 0403 Staff 

Prerequisite: MATH 141 or equivalent Basic concepts of linear algebra: vector spaces, applications 
to line and plane geometry, linear equations and matrices, similar matrices, linear transformations, 
eigenvalues, determinants and quadratic forms. Credit will be given for only one course, MATH 
240 or MATH 400 or MATH 461 
MATH 241 Calculus III 4 credits: Grading Method: REGP-FAUD 

Meets USP Distributive Studies (B)Natural Sciences and Mathematics requirement 

0102 Meets JUN 5 to JUL 27 

MTuWThF 9 30am-10:50am BIdg MTH, Room 0403 Staff 

0103 Meets JUN 5 to JUL 27 

MTuWThF ll:00am-l 2:20pm BIdg. MTH, Room 0307 StaH 

Prerequisite. MATH 141 and any one of the following MATH 240. or ENES 110. or PHYS 191 
InUoduction to mullivanable calculus, including vectors and vector-valued functions, partial 
derivatives and applications of partial denvatives (such as tangent planes and LaGrange multipliers), 
multiple integrals, volume, surface area, and the classical theorems of Green. Stokes and Gauss, 
MATH 246 Differential Equations For Scientists and Engineers 
3 credits; Grading Method: REG/P-F/AUD 
Meets USP Distributive Studies (B)Natural Sciences and Mathematics requirement. 

0102 MTuWThF 9:30am-10:50am BIdg, MTH, Room 0106 Staff 

0201 MTuWThF 8:00anv9;20am BIdg MTH, Room 0304 Staff 

0202 MTuWThF 9:30am-10:50am BIdg. MTH. Room 0304 Staff 

Prerequisite: MATH 141 or equivalent An introduction to the basic methods of solving ordinary 
differential equations Equations of first and second order, linear differential equations, Laplace 
transforms, numerical methods, and Ihe qualitative theory of differential equations. 
MATH 401 Applications of Linear Algebra 3 credits; Grading Method: REG/P-F/AUD 

0103 MTuWThF 1 1 :a0am-12:20pm BIdg. MTH. Room 0407 Staff 

Prerequisite: MATH 400. or MATH 240. or consent of instructor. Various applications of linear 
algebra: theory of finite games, linear programming, matnx methods as applied to finite Markov 
chains, random walk, incidence matnces. graphs and directed graphs, networks, transportation 

MATH 402 Algebraic Structures 3 credits: Grading Method: REGP-FAUD 

0101 MTuWThF 8:00am-9:20am BIdg. MTH, Room 0106 StaH 

Prerequisite: MATH 240 or equivalent. For students having only limited experience with ngorous 
mathematical proofs, and parallels MATH 403. Students planning graduate work in mathematics 
should take MATH 403 Groups, nngs, integral domains and fields, detailed study of several 
groups, properties of integers and polynomials. Emphasis is on the origin of the mathematical ideas 
studied and the logical structure of the subject (Not open to mathematics graduate students. Credit 
will be given for only one of the courses. MATH 402 or MATH 403,) 
MATH 406 Introduction to Number Theory 3 credits; Grading Method: REGP-FAUD 
Meets USP Advanced Studies Development of Knov^fledge requirement, 

0102 MTuWThF 9:30am-ia:50am BIdg. MTH, Room 0302 Staff 
0201 MTuWThF 8:00am-9:20am BIdg MTH. Room 1313 StaH 

Prerequisite MATH 141. or MATH 221 or consent of instructor Rational integers, divisibility. 
pnme numbers, modules and linear forms, unique factorization theorem. Euler's function. Mobius' 
function, cyclotomic polynomial, congruences and quadratic residues, Legendrc's and Jacobi's 
symbol, reciprocity law of quadratic residues, introductory explanation of the method of algebraic 
number theory 
MATH 410 Advanced Calculus I 3 credits; Grading Method: REG/P-F/AUD 
Meets 6 weeks 4 days per week, 
0102 Meets JUN 5 to JUL 27 

MTuThF 9 SOam-lO 50am BIdg, MTH. Room 0201 Staff 

Prerequisites MATH 240 and MATH 241 First semester of a year course. Subjects covered during 
the year are sequences and senes of numbers, continuity and differentiability of real valued 
functions of one vanable. the Rieman integral, sequences of functions, and power senes Functions 
of several variables including partial denvatives. multiple integrals, line and surface integrals. The 
implicit function theorem 



COURSE SECTIONS: 01 xx, SESSION I ONLY; 02xx, SESSION II ONLY. 

MICB cont. 



56 

MATH cont. 

MATH 430 Euclidean and Non-Euclidean Geometries 3 credits: Grading Method: REG/P-F.'AUD 
Meets USP Advanced Studies Development of Knowledge requirement. 
0202 MTuWTiiF9:30am-10:50am BIdg, MTH, Room 1313 Staff 

Prereijuisilcs: MATH 140, MATH 141 or equivalent Hiltien's axioms lor Euclidean geometry. 
Neutral geometry: the consistency of the hyperbolic parallel postulate and the inconsistency of the 
elliptic parallel postulate with neutral geometry. Models of hyerbolic geometry. Existence and 
propenies of isometnes 

MATH 444 Elementary Logic and Algorithms 3 credits: Grading Method: REG/P-F'AUD 

0102 MTuWThF 9;30atTi-10:50am BIdg. MTH, Room 1313 SlaH 

0103 MTuWThF 11 :00am-12:20pm BIdg, MTH, Room 1313 Staff 
0202 MTuWThF 9:30atT>-10:50am BIdg. MTH, Room 0407 Sla« 

Prercquisilc. MATH 240 or consent of instnictor An elementary development of proposilional 
logic, predicate logic, set algebra, and Boolean algebra, with a discussion of Markov algonthms. 
Turing machines and rtcur^ive fiincuons. Topics include post productions, word problems, and 
formal languages. (Also listed as CMSC 450V 
MATH 461 Unear Algebra For Scientists and Engineers 3 credits: Grading Method: REG/P-F/AUD 
0103 MTuWThF 11:00am-12:20pm BIdg, MTH, Room 0405 Staff 

0201 MTuWThF 8:00am-9:20am BIdg. MTH, Room 0101 Staff 

Prerequisites: MATH 141 and one MATH/STAT course for which MATH 141 is a prerequisite. 
Basic concepts of linear algebra. This course is similar to MATH 240, but with more extensive 
coverage of the topics needed in applied imear algebra: change of basis, complex eigenvalues, 
diagonalization. the Jordan canonical form. Credit will be given for only one of MATH 240, 
MATH 400 or MATH 461 
MATH 462 Partial Differential Equations For Scientists and Engineers 
3 credits: Grading Method: REGP-FAUD 
0103 MTuWThF 11 :00am-12;20pm BIdg MTH, Room 0201 Staff 

0201 MTuWThF 8:00am-9:20am BIdg, MTH, Room 0405 Staff 

Prerequisites: MATH 241 and MATH 246 Linear spaces and operators, orthogonality, 
Sturm-Liouviile problems and eigenfunction expansions for ordinary differential equations, 
introduction to partial differential equations, including the heat equation, wave equation and 
I-aplace's equation, boundary value problems, initial value problems, and initial-boundary value 
problems (Credit will be given for only one of the courses MATH 462 or MATH 415 ) 
MATH 463 Complex Variables For Scientists and Engineers 

3 credits: Grading Method: REG/P-FAUD 
0102 MTuWThF 9:30am-10:50am BIdg. MTH, Room 0105 Staff 

0202 MTuWThF 9:30am-10:50am BIdg, MTH, Room 0101 Staff 

0203 MTuWThF 11 :00am-12;20pm BIdg. MTH, Room 0407 Staff 

Prerequisite: MATH 241 or equivalent. The algebra of complex numbers, analytic functions, 

mapping propenies of the elementary functions. Cauchy integral formula Theory of residues and 
application to evaluation of integrals Conformal mapping 
MATH 799 Master's TTiesIs Research 1-6 credits: Grading Method: REG 

0101 Time Airanged Room Arranged Staff 

0201 Time Arranged Room Arranged Staff 

MATH 899 Doctoral Dissertation Research l-fl credits: Grading Method: REG 

0101 Time Arranged Room Arranged Staff 

0201 Time Arranged Room Arranged Staff 



M 



MARINE-ESTUARINE-ENVIRONMENTAL 
SCIENCES 



(LIFE SCIENCES) 



MEES 498M Topics In Marlne-Estuarlne-Envlron mental Sciences: Reld and Laboratory Techniques 

In Marine Science Education 1 credit: Grading Method: REG/AUD 
Course given at Chesapeake Biological Laboratory. 
0201 Meets JUL 31 to AUG 4 

MTuWThF 8:XafTV-4:30pm Room Arranged Staff 

MEES 699 Special Problems In Marlne-Estuarlne-Envlronmental Sciences 
1-3 credits; Grading Method: REG/AUD 
0101 Time Arranged Room Arranged Staff 

0201 Time Arranged Room Arranged Staff 

MEES 799 Masters Thesis Research 1-6 credits; Grading Method: REG 

0101 Time Arranged Room Arranged Staff 

0201 Time Arranged Room Arranged Staff 

MEES 699 Doctoral Dissertation Research 1-^ credits: Grading Method: REG 
0101 Time Arranged Room Arranged Staff 

0201 Time Arranged Room Arranged Staff 



METO 



METEOROLOGY (COMP, MATH, AND PHYS SCI) 

METO 499 Special Problems In Atmospheric Science 1-3 credits: Grading Method: REG/P-F/AUD 

0101 Time Arranged Room Arranged Staff 

0201 Time Arranged Room An^anged Staff 

METO 799 Master's Thesis Research IS credits; Grading Method: REG 

0101 Time Arranged Room Arranged Staff 

0201 Time Arranged Room Arranged Staff 

METO 899 Doctoral Dissertation Research 1-8 credits. Grading Method: REG 

0101 Time Arranged Room Arranged Staff 

0201 Time Arranged Room Arranged Staff 



MICROBIOLOGY 



MICB 



(LIFE SCIENCES) 



MICB 200 General Microbiology 4 credits: Grading Method: REG/P-F/AUD 

Meets USP Distributive Studies (B)Natural Sciences and Mathematics requirement. 

0101 MTuWThF 8:00am-9:00am BIdg. MCB, Room 1207 Hetrick, F 
MTuWThF 9:00am-11:00am BIdg. MCB, Room 1201 (LAB) 

0102 MTuWThF 8:00arT>-9:00am BIdg. MCB, Room 1207 Hetrick, F 
MTuWThF 9:00am-1 1:00am BIdg, MCB, Room 1205 (LAB) 

0103 MTuWThF 8:00am-9:00am BIdg MCB. Room 1207 Hetrick, F 
MTuWThF 9:00am-n :00am BIdg. MCB, Room 1206 (LAB) 

0104 MTuWThF 8:00am-9:00am BIdg. MCB. Room 1207 Hetrick, F 
MTuWThF 9:00am-l 1 :00am BIdg. MCB. Room 1 103A (LAB) 

Prerequisite: two semesters of chemistry. The biology of microorganisms, with special reference to 
the bacteria. Fundamental principles of microbiology as revealed tfirough an examination of the 
structure, physiology, genetics, and ecology of microorganisms. 



MICB 379 Honors Research 2-3 credits: Grading Method: REG/P-F/AUD 

0101 Time Arranged Room Arranged Staff 

0201 Time Arranged Room Arranged Staff 

MICB 388 Special Topics In Microbiology 1-4 credits; Grading Method: REG/P-F/AUD 
0101 Time Arranged Room Arranged Staff 

0201 Time Arranged Room Arranged Staff 

MICB 388R Special Topics In Microbiology: Research Projects 

1^ credits; Grading Method: REG/P-F/AUD 
0101 Time Arranged Room Arranged MacQuillan, A 

0201 Time Arranged Room Arranged Staff 

MICB 399 Microbiological Problems 3 credits: Grading Method: REG/P-F/AUD 
0101 Time Arranged Room Arranged Staff 

0201 Time Arranged Room Arranged Staff 

MICB 450 Immunology 4 credits: Grading Method: REG 

0101 MTuWThF 9:30am-10:30am BIdg. MCB, Room 1207 Roberson, B 

MTuWThF 10:30am-12:30pm BIdg MCB, Room 1135 (LAB) 

Prercquisile: MICB 440 Principles of immunity, hypersensiliveness. Fundamental techniques of 
immunology Credit not given for both ZOOL 455 and MICB 450. 

MICB 688 Special Topics 1^ credits: Grading Method: REGAUD 

0101 Time Arranged Room Arranged Staff 

0201 Time Arranged Room Arranged Staff 

MICB 799 Master's Thesis Research 1-6 credits; Grading Method: REG 

0101 Time Arranged Room Arranged Staff 

0201 Time Arranged Room Arranged Staff 

MICB 899 Doctoral Dissertation Research 1-3 credits; Grading Method: REG 
0101 Time Arranged Room Arranged Staff 

0201 Time Arranged Room Arranged Staff 



MUED 



MUSIC EDUCATION (EDUCATION) 

MUED 499A Workshops, Clinics, Institutes: Creative Use of Recorders in Elementary and Middle 
Scliool 2 credits: Grading Method: REG 

Permission of department required. 
0201 fleets JUL 17 to JUL 28 

MTuWThF 9:00am-12:00pm BIdg, TWS, Room 3238 Gratto. S 

MUED 499B tWorkstiops, Clinics, Institutes: Teacliing Strategies (or Secondsry Performance and 
Humanity Classes 2 credits: Grading Method: REG 
Permission of department required 
0201 Meets JUL 17 to JUL 28 

MTuWTtiF 1:00prTw»:00pm BIdg, TWS. Room 3238 Folstrom, R 

MUED 499C Worksliops, Clinics, Institutes: Innovation In Music Education: Techniques, Methods 
and Technolcwy 2 credits. Grading Method: REG 
Permission of department required, 
0101 MeetsJUL3lo JUL 14 

MTuWThF 1 :00pm-4:00pm BIdg. TWS, Room 3132 Saunders, C 

MUED 698A Current Trends In Music Education: Creative Use of Recorders in Elementary and 
Middle School 2 credits: Grading Method REG 
Permission of department required, 
0201 Meets JUL 17 to JUL 28 

MTuWThF 9:00am-12:00pm BIdg, TWS, Room 3238 Gratto. S 

MUED 698B Current Trends In Music Education: Teaching Strategies for Secondary Performance 
and Humanity Classes 2 credits: Grading Method: REG 
Permission of department required, 
0201 Meets JUL 17 to JUL 28 

MTuWThF 1:00pm-4:00pm BIdg, TWS, Room 3238 Folstrom, R 

MUED 698C Current Trends In Music Education: innovation In Music Ed: Techniques, Methods 
and Technology 2 credits: Grading Method: REG 
Permission of department required, 
0101 Meets JUL 3 to JUL 14 

MTuWThF 1 :00piTi-4:00pm BIdg. TWS, Room 3132 Saunders, C 



MUSC 



MUSIC (ARTS AND HUMANITIES) 

MUSC 100A Beginning Class Voice 2 credits. Grading Method: REG/AUD 
Open to non-music majors, 
0101 MTuWTh9,30arrt- 10:50am BIdg, TWS, Room 3228 Reming, L 

0201 I^TuWTh9;30am-10;50am BIdg, TWS, Room 3228 Reming, L 

MUSC 102B Beginning Class Piano I 2 credits: Grading Method: REG 

0101 MTuWTh 12:30pm-1:50pm BIdg TWS, Room 3218 Statf 

0201 MTuWTh 12:30pm-1:50pm BIdg, TWS, Room 3218 StaH 

MUSC 130 Survey of Music Uterature 3 credits: Grading Method: REG/P-F/AUD 
Meets USP Distributive Studies (C) Literature and the Arts requirement, 
0101 MTuWThF 11 :00am- 12 :20pm BIdg, TWS, Room 2102 Troth, E 

Open 10 alt students except music and music eiducation majors MUSC 130 and 131 may not tjoth 
t)e talten for credit, A study of [he pnnciples upon wfiicfi music is based, and at) introduction to the 
musical repertouts performed in America today, 
MUSC 140 Music Fundamentals I 3 credits: Grading Method: REG/P-F/AUD 

Meets USP Distributive Studies (C) Literature and the Arts requirement. 
0101 MTuWThF 2 :00pm-3:20pm BIdg, TWS, Room 2123 Staff 

0201 MTuWThF 11:00am-12:20pm BIdg. TWS, Room 2123 StaH 

An introductory theory course lor the non-music major Notation, scales, intervals, triads, rtiythm. 
form, and basic aural skills. 
MUSC 155 Fundamentals For the Classroom Teacher 3 credits: Grading Method: REG/P-F/AUD 
Open to pre-early childhood and pre-elementary students. 
0101 MTuWThF 9:30atT>-1 0:50am - BIdg. TWS, Room 2135 Saunders, C 

Open to students majonng in elementary education or childhood education: other students talte 
MUSC 150. MUSC 150 and 155 may not both be counted for credit. The fundamentals of music 
theory and practice, related to the needs of the classroom and kindergarten teacher, and organized 
in accord with the six-area concept of musical learning. 
MUSC 329Z Ensemble: University Chorus ) credit: Grading Method: REG/AUD 
Permission of department required. 
0101 Tu 7:00pm-10:00pm BIdg. TWS. Room 2102 Traver, P 

MUSC 448 Special Topics In Music 2-6 credits: Grading Method: REG/P-F/AUD 
Permission of department required. 
0101 Time Arranged Room Arranged Staff 

0201 Time Arranged Room Arranged Staff 

MUSC 448C Special Topics In Music: Flute Masterclass 1988 2 credits: Grading Method: REG/AUD 
0201 Meets JUL 7 to JUL 16 

MTuWThFSaSu 1 1 OOam-IOOOp BIdg. TWS, Room 1 125 Montgomery, W 



COURSE SECTIONS: 01 xx, SESSION I ONLY; 02xx, SESSION II ONLY. 



57 



MUSC cont. 



MUSC 499 Independent Studies 2-3 credits: Grading Method: REG P-FAUD 
Permission of department required. 
0101 TirT>e Arranged Room Arranged Staff 

0201 Time Arrartged Room Arranged Staff 

MUSC 699 Special Topics In Music 2-e credits: Grading Method REG/AUD 

0101 Time Arranged Room Arranged Staff 

0201 Time Arranged Room Arranged Staff 

MUSC 699C Special Topics In Music: Flute Masterclass 1988 2 credits: Grading Method: RE&AUD 
0201 Meets JUL 7 to JUL 16 

MTuWThFSaSu 11 0OarT>-10:00p BIdg TWS, Room 1125 Montgomery, W 

MUSC 799 Master's Thesis Research 1-6 credits: Grading Method: REG 

0101 Time Arranged Room Arranged Staff 

0201 Time Arranged Room Arranged Staff 

MUSC 899 Doctoral DIsseitaMon Research 1-8 credits. Grading Method: REG 
0101 Time Arranged Room Arranged Staff 

0201 Time Arranged Room Arranged Staff 



NUTRITIONAL SCIENCE 



NUSC 



(AGRICULTURE) 



NUSC 670 Intermediary Metabolism In Nutrition 3 credits; Grading Method. REGAUD 
0101 MTuWThF 9:30am-10 50am BIdg, MMH. Room 1316 Ahrens, H 

Prerequisites NL'SC 4J): or MUTR 300. CHEM 461 or 462 The major routes of carbohydraie. fal 
and protein metabolism with particular emphasis on metabolic shifts and their detection and 
significance in nutntion 

NUSC 699 Problems In Nutrition /-4 credits; Grading Method: REGAUD 
Contact department for instructions. 
0101 Ttme An-anged Room Arranged Staff 

0201 Time An^anged Room Arranged Staff 

NUSC 799 Master's Thesis Research 1-6 credits; Grading Method: REG 

0101 Time Arranged Room Arranged Staff 

0201 Time Arranged Room Arranged Staff 

NUSC 899 Doctoral Dissertation Research 1-8 credits. Grading Method: REG 
0101 Time Arranged Room Arranged Staff 

0201 Time Arranged Room Arranged Staff 



NUTRITION 



NUTR 



(HUMAN ECOLOGY) 

NUTH 10O Elements of Nutrition 3 credits. Grading Method REGiP-FAUD 

Meets USP Distributive Studies (B}Naturai Sciences and Matfiematics requirement, 
0101 MTuWThF 9:30am-10;50am BIdg MMH, Room 1400 Staff 

Crcdil *iJl be granted for only one of Ihe fo]lo*lng NUTR 100 or t^TR 200 Fundamentals of 
fiuman nutnuon Numenl requiiemenls related to cfianging individual and family needs 
NUm 200 Nutrition for Health Services 3 credits: Grading Method: REGP-F,AUD 
0101 MWF a:00am-9:20am BIdg, MMH. Room 3418 Staff 

TuTh8:00am-l 1:00am BWg, MMH, Room 3418 MB; 

Pre- or corcquisile: CHEM 104. and ZOOL 201 or ZOOL 202, Crcdil will tx granted for only one 
of the following NUTR 100 or ^^JTR 200 Nutnuon related to maintenance of nonnal tieallh and 
prevention of disease; nutritional requirements for individuals in different stages of development: 
current concerns in nutntion for the professional in fiealth services, 
NUTR 670 Intemedlary Metabolism In Nutrition 3 credits: Grading Method: REG/AUD 
0101 MTuWThF 9:30am-10;50am BIdg, MMH, Room 1316 Ahrens. R 

Prerequisites BCHM 461. and BCHM 462. or equivalent The major routes of carbohydrate, fat, 
and protein metabolism with particular emphasis on metabolic shifts and their detection and 
significance in nutrition 
NUm 678A Speclsl Topics In Nutrition: Independent Study t-€ credits: Grading Method: REG/AUD 
Permission of instructor required. 
0101 Time Arranged Room Arranged Staff 

NUTR 789 Non-Thesis Research 1-3 credits: Grading Method: S-F 

0101 Time Arranged Room Arranged Staff 

0201 Time Arranged Room Arranged Staff 

NUTR 799 Master's Thesis Research 1-6 credits: Grading Method: REG 

0101 Time Arranged Room Arranged Staff 

0201 Time Arranged Room Arranged Staff 

NUTR 899 Doctoral Dissertation Research t-8 credits, Grading Method: REG 
0101 Time Arranged Room Arranged Staff 

0201 Time Arranged Room Arranged Staff 



PCOM 

PUBLIC COMMUNICATION (ARTS AND HUMANITIES) 

PCOM 888 Doctoral Practlcum In Public Communication 3-9 credits. Grading Method: REG/AUD 
0101 Time Arranged Room Arranged Staff 

0201 Time Arranged Room Arranged Staff 

PCOM 889 Doctoral Tutoriil In Public Communication 3-8 credits: Grading Method: REG/AUD 
0101 Time Ananged Room Arranged Staff 

0201 Time Arranged Room Arranged Staff 

PCOM 899 Doctoral Dissertation Research IS credits. Grading Method: REG 
0101 Time Arranged Room Arranged Staff 

0201 Time Arranged Room Arranged Staff 



PHED 

PHYSICAL EDUCATION (PHYS ED, RECR, AND HEALTH ) 

PHED 137N Physical Education AdlvWes: Coed: Golf (Beginning) 

1 credit: Grading Method REG/P-F 

0101 MTuWTfi9:30anD- 10:50am BIdg, GLF, Room 1102 Staff 

0201 MTuWTtl9:30am-10 50am BIdg, PRH, Room 0305 Tyler, R 

PHED 148N Physical Education Activities: Coed: Racquet Ball ) credit. Grading Method: REG/P-F 

"'"• MTuWTtl 1 00prr>-2 20pm BIdg PRH, Room 0222 Staff 

■ ■■ ■" BIdg, PRH, Room 0222 Staff 



PHED cont. 

PHED 1S4N Physical Education Activities: Coed: 

/ credit: Grading Method: 
0101 MTuWTtl l:00pm-2 :20pm 
0201 MTuWTtl 1:00pm-2 :20pm 

PHED 1S5N Physical Education Activities: Coed: 

/ credit: Grading Method: 

0101 MTuWTtl B:00am-9:20am 

0102 MTuWTh 9:30am-10:50am 

0103 MTuWTh 11 :00am-l 2:20pm 

0201 MTuWTtl 8;00am-9:20am 

0202 MTuWTh 11 :00am-l 2:20pm 

PHED 1550 Physical Education Activities: Coed: 

t credit: Grading Method: 

0101 MTuWTh 8:00am-9:20am 

0102 MTuWTh 9:30am-1 0:50am 

0103 MTuWTh 11 :00am- 12 :20pm 

0201 MTuWTh 8 :00am-9:20am 

0202 MTuWTh 1l:00arrv12:20pm 

PHED 157N Physical Education Activities: Coed: 

1 credit: Grading Method: 
0101 MTuWTh 9:30am-10:50am 
0201 MTuWTh 8:00am-9:20am 



Beginning Stwlmmlng 

REG/P-F 

BIdg, COL, Room 1206 

BIdg COL, Room 1206 



BIdg PRH, Room 2240 
BIdg, PRH. Room 2240 
BIdg, PRH. Room 2240 
BIdg, PRH, Room 2240 
BIdg, PRH. Room 2240 

Tennis (Intermediate) 

REG/P-F 

BIdg, PRH, Room 2101 
BIdg, PRH, Room 2101 
BIdg, PRH, Room 2101 
BIdg, PRH, Room 2101 
BIdg, PRH, Room 2101 



BIdg PRH, Room 0103 
BIdg, PRH, Room 0103 



Slaff 
Staff 
Staff 
Staff 
Staff 



Vander Vetden, L 
Vander Velden, L 
Vander Velden, L 
Staff 
Staff 



PHED 1570 Physical Education Actlvttles: Coed: Weight Training (Intermediate) 

t credit: Grading Method. REG/P-F 
0101 MTuWTh 9:30am-10 50am BIdg, PRH, Room 0103 Staff 

0201 MTuWTh 8:00am-9:20am BIdg. PRH, Room 0103 Staff 

PHED 289 Topical Investigations 1-3 credits: Grading Method: REG 
Permission of (Teparlment required, 
0101 Time Arranged Room Arranged Staff 

0201 Time Arranged Room Arranged Staff 

PHED 293 History ot Sport In America 3 credits: Grading Method: REG/P-F/AUD 
Meets USP Distributive Studies (A) Cultural and Historical requirement. 
0101 TuThl:00pm-4 :00pm BIdg, PRH, Room 1302 Struna, N 

The growth and development of sport in America The transformation of spon within the 
perspective of American history, including class spon, professionalizalion, amateunsm. and 
international involvement 

PHED 300 Kinesiology 4 credits: Grading Method: REG/P-F/AUD 

0201 MTuWThF 1 1 :00att>-l :00pm BIdg, PRH, Room 2132 Kelley, D 

Prerequisites: ZOOL 201: and ZOOL 202 The snidy of human movement and the physical and 
physiological principles upon which it depends. Body mechanics, posture, motor efficiency, spons. 
the performance of a typical individual and the influence of growth and development upon motor 
performance 

PHED 340 Theory of Coaching Athletics 2 credits: Grading Method: REG/P-F/AUD 
0101 MW 7:00pm-9:00pm BIdg PRH, Room 1301 Drum, B 

General theory and practice of coaching selected competitive sports found in secondary schools and 
community recreation programs 

PHED 350 The Psychology o( Sports 3 credits: Grading Method: REG/P-F/AUD 

Meets USP Distributive Studies (D) Social and Behavioral Sciences requirement, 
0101 TuTh 4:00pm-7:00pm BIdg PRH, Room 1303 Steel, D 

0201 TuTh 4:00pm-7:00pm BIdg, PRH, Room 1301 Hatfield, B 

An exploration of the personality factors, including, but not limited to motivation, agression and 
emotion, as they affect sports participation and motor skill performance, 

PHED 360 Physiology ol Exercise 3 credits: Grading Method: REG/P-F/AUD 

Meets USP Distributive Studies (B)Natural Sciences and Mathematics requirement, 
0101 MTuWThF 9:30am-10:50am BIdg, PRH, Room 2132 Vaccaro, P 

Prerequisites ZOOL 201, and ZOOL 202: and permission of dcpanmeni A study of the 
physiology of exercise, mcluding concepts of wori, muscular contraction, energy transformation, 
metabolism, oxygen debt, and nutrition and athletic periormance. Emphasis on cardiovascular and 
respiratory function in relation to physical activity and training, 

PHED 361 Weight Control Through Diet and Exercise 3 credits: Grading Method: REG/P-F/AUD 
0201 MTuWThF 11, 00airv-12:20pm BIdg, PRH, Room 1303 Staff 

l-ecture and laboratory. The basic principles of weight contttti are given and the students participate 
in diet and exercise programs 

PHED 362 Philosophy of Sport 3 credits. Grading Method: REG/P-F/AUD 

Meets USP Advanced Studies Development of Knowfedge requirement. 
0101 MTuWThF 8:00am-9:20am BIdg. PRH, Room 1303 Hull, J 

Form and content of the philosophy of sport. The basis of knowledge in and about spon. the 
stnicture and theories of the discipline, the ontological and moral implications and dilemmas 
involving sport, and the interactions between philosophy and the scientific and humanistic aspects 
of sport 

PHED 385 Motor Learning and Skilled Pertormance 3 credits: Grading Method: REG/P-F/AUD 
Meets USP Distributive Studies (D) Social and Behavioral Sciences requirement, 
0201 MW 4:00pm-7:00pm BIdg, PRH, Room 1301 Tyler, R 

A study of the research dealing with motor learning and motor performance. Scientific 
methodology, individual differences, specificity, propnoceptive control of movement, motivation. 
timing, transfer, and retention 

PHED 389 Topical Investigations 1-3 credits: Grading Method: REG 
Permission ol (Teparlment required 
0101 Time Arranged Room Arranged Staff 

0201 Time Arranged Room Arranged Staff 

PHED 497 Independent Studies Seminar 3 credits: Grading Method: REG 

0101 TuTh 4:00pm-7:00pm BIdg, PRH, Room 0307 Staff 

Discussions of contemporary issues vital to the discipline, critiques of research in the student's 
area/areas of special interest, completion of a major project where the student will be asked to 
I problem solving and critical writing 

PHED 498A Special Topics In Physical Education: Stress Testing and Adult Fitness 

3 credits: Grading Method: REG/P-F 
0101 MWl:00pm-4 :00pm BIdg, PRH, Room 2132 Vaccaro. P 

PHED 689 Special Problems In Physical Education 1-3 credits: Grading Method: REG 
Permission of department required 
0101 Time Arranged Room Arranged Staff 

0201 Time Arranged Room Arranged Staff 

PHED 799 Master's Thesis Research 1-e credits: Grading Method: REG 
Permission of department required, 
0101 Time Arranged Room Arranged Staff 

PHED 899 Doctoral Dissertation Research 1S credits: Grading Method: REG 
Permission ol department required, 
0101 Time Arranged Room Arranged Staff 



I 



58 



COURSE SECTIONS: 01 xx, SESSION I ONLY; 02xx, SESSION II ONLY. 



PHIL 



PHILOSOPHY (ARTS AND HUMANITIES) 

PHIL 100 Introduction to Philosophy 3 credits: Grading Method: REG/P-F/AUD 
Meets USP Distributive Studies (A) Cultural and Historical requirement. 
0101 MTuWThF 1l:00ani-l2:20pm BIdg. SKN. Room 1113 Odell, S 

0201 MTuWThF 12;30pm-1, 50pm BIdg SKN, Room 1113 Umbaugh, B 

An inlroduclion lo the literature, problems. aiKl methods of philosophy either through a study ol 
some of the main figures in philosophic thought or through an eiamuiation of some of the central 
and recurring problems of philosophy 
PHIL 140 Contemporaiy Moral Issues 3 credits: Grading Method: REG/P-F/AUD 

Meets USP Distributive Studies (D) Social and Behavioral Sciences requirement, 
0101 MTuWThF 12:30pnrv-1 :50pm BIdg, SKN, Room 1113 Odell. S 

The uses of philosophical analysis in thinking clearly about such widely debated moral issues as 
abortion, euthanasia, homosexuality, pornography, reverse discnminauon, the death penalty, 
business ediics. sexual equality, and economic jusuce 
PHIL 170 Introduction to Logic 3 credits: Grading Method: REG/P-F/AUD 
0201 MTuWThF 12:30pm-1 :50pm BIdg. SKN. Room 0124 

A general introduction lo the discipli ' ' " ' 

informal fallacies. 

PHIL 209A Philosophical Issues: What Is Cognitive Science? 
3 credits: Grading Method: REGP-FAUD 
0101 MTuWThF 2:00pn>-3:20pm BIdg. SKN, Room 1113 Edwards, D 

A critical examination of the mind's new science, integrating psychology, philosophy, linguistics, 
neuroscience. and computer science. What are the connecting links; can each use results obUiined in 
the odier^: is there a single, common subject matter 
PHIL 209D Philosophical Issues: Indian Philosophy and Religion 
3 credits: Grading Method: REG/P-F/AUD 
0201 MTuWThF 2:00prtv3:20pm BIdg. SKN. Room 1113 Sengupta. P 

The cenual lexl of Hindu religious faith: the Bhagavadgila. a major source for philosophical 
speculation in the Indian tradition. A comparison of these religious systems widi contemporary 
Indian humanism. 
PHIL 236 Philosophy of Religion 3 credits: Grading Method: REG/P-F/AUD 

0101 MW 3:30priv-6:50pm BIdg. SKN, Room 1113 Martin, R 

A philosophical study of some of the mam problems of religious thought: the nature of religious 
experience, the justification of religious belief, the conflicting claims of religion and science, and 
the relauon between religion and morality 
PHIL 328B Studies In the History of Philosophy: Marxist Philosophy 
3 credits: Grading Method: REG/P-F/AUD 
Meets USP Advanced Studies Development ol Knowledge requirement, 
0101 TuTh 3 30pm-6:50pm BIdg. SKN, Room 1113 Manukian. E 

Marx and Engels. the intellectual context out of which their thought grew, and the 2tXh century 
modifications of their theones by their successors responding to unforeseen developments in 
capiulist and communist societies. 
PHIL 386 Field Work 1-3 credits: Grading Method: REG/P-F/AUD 

0101 Time Arranged Room Arranged Stall 

0201 Time Arranged Room Arranged Stall 

PHIL 387 Field Work Analysis 1-3 credits: Grading Method: REG/P-F/AUD 

0101 Time Arranged Room Arranged Stall 

0201 Time Arranged Room Arranged Stall 

PHIL 447 Philosophy ol Law 3 credits: Grading Method: REG/P-F/AUD 

Meets USP Advanced Studies Development ol Knowledge requirement. 
0101 MTuWThF 9:30am-10:50am BIdg. JRN. Room 1105 Johnson, C 

0201 MTuWThF 9:30am-10:50am BIdg, ASY, Room 321 1 Jackson. K 

Prerequisite: one course in philosophy. Examination of fundamental concepts related to law. e g,. 
Legal system, law and morality, justice, legal reasoning, responsibility. 
PHIL 498C Topical Investigations 1-3 credits: Grading Method: REG/P-F/AUD 

0101 Time Arranged Room Arranged Stan 

PHIL 498D Topical Investigations 1-3 credits: Grading Method: REG/P-F/AUD 

0201 Time Arranged Room Arranged Staff 

PHIL 688C Selected Problems In Philosophy 1-3 credits: Grading Method: REG/AUD 
0101 Time Arranged Room Arranged Staff 

PHIL 6880 Selected Problems In Philosophy t-3 credits: Grading Method: REG/AUD 
0201 Time Arranged Room Arranged Stall 

PHIL 799 Master's Thesis Research 1-6 credits: Grading Method: REG 
Contact department to make arrangements. 
0101 Time Arranged Room Arranged Staff 

0201 Time Arranged Room Arranged Stan 

PHIL 899 Doctoral Dissertation Research 1-8 credits: Grading Method: REG 
Contact department to make arrangements 
0101 Time Arranged Room Arranged Staff 

0201 Time Arranged Room Arranged Staff 



PHYS 



PHYSICS (COMP, MATH, AND PHYS SCI) 

PHYS 121 Fundamentals of Physics I 4 credits: Grading Method: REG/P-F;AUD 

Meets USP Distributive Studies (B)Natural Sciences and Mathematics requirement. This 
course meets entire Summer Session I plus the first two weeks ol Summer Session 11. 

0101 Meets JUN 5 to JUL 28 „ ^ ^ 
MTuWTh 9:30aiT>-10:50am BIdg. PHY, Room 1410 Restortf. K 
MW 2 O0pm-«:00pm BIdg. PHY. Room 3306 (LABI 

MW 1 OOpnvl :50pm BIdg. PHY, Room 4220 (DIS) 

0102 Meets JUN 5 to JUL 28 ^ , 
MTuWTh 9 30am-10:50am BIdg. PHY. Room 1410 RestortI, K 
TuTh 2:00pm-^:00pm BIdg. PHY, Room 3306 ILABI 

TuTh 1 OOpm-1 :50pm BIdg. PHY. Room 4220 (DtS) 

Prerequisite: previous course work in tngonomeU7 or MATH 1 10 or MATH 1 15. The first part of a 
two-semester course in general physics treating the fields of mechanics, heal, sound, electricity. 
magneUsm. optics, and modem physics. Together with PHYS 122. this generally satisfies Ihe 
minimum requirement of medical and dental schools. 
PHYS 122 Fundamentals o( Physics II 4 credits: Grading Method: REG/P-F/AUD 

Meets USP Distributive Studies (B)Nalufal Sciences and Mathematics requirement. This 
course meets entire Summer Session 1 plus the first 2 weeks ol Summer Session II. 

0101 Meets JUN 5 to JUL 28 

MTuWTh 9:30anv10:50am BIdg, PHY, Room 0405 Rapport. M 

MW 2 00pm-4:00pm BIdg. PHY, Room 3316 (LAB) 

MW 1 OOpm-l :50pm BIdg, PHY, Room 0405 (DIS) 

0102 Meets JUN 5 to JUL 28 

MTuWTh 9:30am-10:50am BIdg PHY, Room 0405 Rapport, M 

TuTh 2:00pm-4:00pm BIdg. PHY, Room 3316 (LAB) 

TuTh 1 :00pm- 1 :50pm BIdg PHY, Room 0405 (DIS) 

Prerequisile: PHYS 121 or equivalent A conlinualion of PHYS 121 Which together with it. 

generally satisfies the minimum requiremenl of medical and denial schools. 



PHYS cont. 



PHYS 161 General Physics: Mechanics and Particle Dynamics 

3 credits: Grading Method: REG/P-F/AUD 

Meets USP Distributive Studies (BlNatural Sciences and Mathematics requirement. 

0101 MTuWThF 9:30anv10:50am BIdg, PHY, Room 1412 Fivel, D 
MW 11:00am-l2:00pm BIdg PHY, Room 0405 (DIS) 

0102 MTuWThF 9 30am- 10 :50am BIdg PHY, Room 1412 Fivel, D 
TuTh 1 1 :00am-12:00pm BIdg. PHY, Room 0405 (DIS) 

0103 MTuWThF 9:30am-10:50am BIdg. PHY, Room 1412 Fivel. D 
MW 11:00am-12:00pm BIdg. PHY, Room 4220 (DtS) 

First semester of a diiee-scmester calculus-based general physics course Pre- or corequisite: MATH 
141 Laws of motion, force, and energy: pnnciples of mechanics. coUisions. linear momentum, 
rotation, and gravitation Credit will not be granted for PHYS 171 and PHYS 161 or PHYS 141 or 
fonnerPHYS Wl 
PHYS 262 General Physics; Vibrations, Waves, Heat, Electricity and Magnetism 

4 credits: Grading Method: REG/P-F/AUD 

Meets USP Distributive Studies (B)Nalural Sciences and Mathematics requirement, PHYS 
262A must be taken concunently, 

0201 MTuWThF 9:30arTv-10:50am BIdg. PHY, Room 1412 SlaH 
MW 11:00am-12:00pm BIdg. PHY, Room 4220 (DIS) 

0202 MTuWThF 9:30am-10:50am BIdg. PHY. Room 1412 SlaH 
TuTh 11:00am-12:00pm BIdg. PHY, Room 4220 (DIS) 

0203 MTuWThF 9:30am-10:50am BIdg, PHY, Room 1412 Staff 
MW 11 :00am- 12 :00pm BIdg. PHY. Room 1219 fD/S; 

Second semester of a three-semester calculus-based general physics course. Prertquisite: PHYS IbL 
Vibrations waves, fluids; heat, kineuc theory, and thermodynamics: electrosUlics. circuits, and 
magnetism'. PHYS 262A is the lab for this course, and must be registered for at the same time. 
Credit will not he granted for PHYS 272 and PHYS 142 or former PHYS 192 or PHYS 262. 
PHYS 262A General Physics; Vibrations, Waves, Heat, Electricity and Magnetism (LalXHatory) 
No credit: Grading Method: NGt 
PHYS 262 must be taken concunently. 

0201 MW 1 00pm-3:00pm BIdg. PHY. Room 3312 (LAB) Stall 

0202 TuTh 1 00pm-3:00pm Bk)g. PHY, Room 3312 MB; Staff 

0203 MW 3:00pm-5:00pm BIdg, PHY, Room 3312 MS^ Staff 
PHYS 299 Special Problems In Physics 1-6 credits: Grading Method: REG/P-F/AUD 

Pemiission ol department required. 
0101 Time Arranged Room Ananged Stafl 

0201 Time Ananged Room Ananged Stall 

PHYS 399 Special Problems In Physics 1-3 credits: Grading Method: REG/P-F/AUD 
Permission ol deparlment required. 
0101 Time Arranged Room Arranged Slatf 

0201 Time Arranged Room Arranged Staff 

PHYS 420 Principles ol Modem Physics 3 credits: Grading Method: REG/P-F/AUD 
Meets USP Advanced Studies Development of Knowledge requiremenl. 
0101 MTuWThF 1 :00pm-2:20pm BIdg. PHY, Room 1412 Fivel. D 

Prerequisites: |PHYS 263 or PHYS 273 or PHYS 301]. and MATH 241. A survey of atomic and 
nuclear phenomena and the main trends in modem physics Appropriate for students in engineering 
and other physical sciences Credit will not be granted for both PHYS 420 and PHYS 421 
PHYS 429 Atomic and Nuclear Physics Uboratory 3 credits: Grading Method: REG/P-F/AUD 

Permission ol department required. This course meets entire Summer Session I plus the 
first two weeks of Summer Session II. 

0101 Meets JUN 5 to JUL 28 .„, „ _. „ 

MTul:00pm-6 :00pm BIdg. PHY, Room 3333 MB; Matthews, D 

PHYS 499 Special Problems In Physics (-16 credits: Grading Method: REG/P-F/AUD 
Permission of department required. 
0101 Time Arranged Room Arranged SlaH 

0201 Time Arranged Room Arranged Stan 

PHYS 602 Statistical Physics 3 credits: Grading Method: REG/AUD 

0101 MTuWThF 10:00am-l 1:20am BIdg. PHY, Room 1221 Kim, Y 

Prerequisite PHYS 410 or equivalent Statistical mechanics, ihemiodynamics. kinetic Uieory. Credit 
will not be given for bodi PHYS 602 and PHYS 603 
PHYS 621 Graduate Laboratory 3 credits: Gradirtg Method: REG/AUD ^ , , .u 

Permission of department required. The course meets entire Summer Session 1 plus the 
first lour weeks ol Summer Session II. 

0101 Meets JUN 5 to AUG 1 1 „ ,„, .. _^ 

MTu1:00pm-6:00pm BIdg. PHY, Room 3333 fMS; Matthews. D 

Design and performance of advanced experiments in modem and classical physics. 
PHYS 624 Advanced Quantum Mechanics 3 credits: Grading Method: REG/AUD 

0201 MTuWThF 9:30am-10:50am BIdg. PHY, Room 4220 Oneda, S 

Prerequisile. PHYS 623 Relativistic wave equations, second quantization m many body problems 
and relativistic wave equations. Feynman-Dyson penurbauon dicory. applications to many body 
problems, application lo quannim electrodynamics, elements of renomialization. 
PHYS 798 Special Problems In Advanced Physics 1-3 credits: Grading Method: REG/AUD 
Permission ol department required Contact department to make anangements. 
0101 Time Arranged Room Arranged StaH 

0201 Time Arranged Room Arranged btan 

PHYS 799 Master's Thesis Research 1-6 credits. Grading Method: REG 

0101 Time Arranged Room Arranged Stan 

0201 Time Arranged Room Arranged Stan 

PHYS 899 Doctoral Dissertation Research 1-8 credits: Grading Method: REG 
0101 TimeAnanged Room Arranged Staff 

0201 Time Arranged Room Arranged btan 



PORT 



PORTUGUESE 



(ARTS AND HUMANITIES) 



PORT 101 Elementary Portuguese 4 credits. Grading Method: REG/P-F/AUD 

Meets USP Distributive Studies (A) Cultural and Historical requiremenl. 

0101 Meets JUN 5 to JUL 14 ^ ., ,, 

MTuWTh 9:30am-1 1 :45am BIdg. JMZ. Room 01 03 Gordo. M 

Introduction lo basic stniclures. with emphasis upon audio-lmgual skills. Leads to 102. 



PSYC 



PSYCHOLOGY (BEHAVIOR AND SOCIAL SCI) 

PSYC too Introduction to Psychology 3 credits: Grading Method: REG'P-F/AUD 

Meets USP Distributive Studies (0) Social and Behavioral Sciences requirement. 
0101 MTuWThF 9:30an>-10:50am BIdg. ZOP, Room 1243 Stemheim, C 

0201 MTuWThF 9:30am-10:50am BIdg. ZOP. Room 1243 Johnson, J 

A basic introductory courw. intended lo bnng die student into contact with the major problems 
confronting psychology and die more important attempts at their solution. 



COURSE SECTIONS: 01 xx, SESSION I ONLY; 02xx, SESSION II ONLY. 



59 



PSYC cont. 



PSYC 200 Statistical Metlioda In Psychology 3 aedits: Grading Method: REGj'P-F/AUD 
0101 MTuWTbF 11 00am-12:20pm BIdg, ZOP, Room 1236 Larkin W 

0201 MTuWThF 9 30am-l 0:50am BIdg ZOP, Room 1238 Daubman. K 

Prercijuisilc PSYC 100 and MATH III or 140 or 220 A basic inlroduclion lo quanlilalive 
methods used in psychojogtcal research 
PSYC 221 Social Psychology 3 credits: Grading Method: REG'P-F.AUD 

Meets USP Distnbutwe Studies (D) Social and Behavioral Sciences requirement, 
0101 MW 2:00pm-5:00pm BIdg. ZOP, Room 1243 Stangor, C 

Prerequisite: PSYC 100 The influence of social factors on the individual and interpersonal 
behavior Includes topics such as conformity, attinide change, person perception, interpersonal 
attraction and group behavior, 
PSYC 235 Psycholoay of Adjustnient 3 credits: Grading Method: REG P-F/AUD 

Meets USP Distributive Studies (D) Social and Behavioral Sciences requirement. Students 
who have taken PSYC 335 may not get credit for this course 
0101 MTuWThF 11:00an>-12:20pm BIdg, ZOP, Room 1234 Coursey, R 

Prerequisite PSYC 100 Theory and research on the psychology of personal adjustment in everyday 
life, with an emphasis on self-concept, emotions, self-control, interpersonal relations, and stress 
PSYC 310 Perception 3 credits: Grading Method: REG/P-F/AUD 

Meets USP Distributive Studies (D) Social and Behavioral Sciences requirement. 
0101 MTuWThF 1 1 :00am-122apm BIdg, ZOP, Room 2283 Stemheim. C 

Prerequisite: PSYC 100 or consent of the instructor A survey of phenomena and theones of 
perception including psychological, anatomical, physiological, and environmental factors imponant 
m determining how we perceive the world Histoncal background will be examined as well as 
contemporary research No credit for students who have completed PSYC 410, 
PSYC 332 Psychology of Human Saiuallty 3 credits: Grading Method: REG/P-F'AUD 
0201 MTuWThF 11 :00am-12:20pm BIdg, ZOP. Room 1243 Brov»n. R 

Prerequisite: PSYC 100, A survey of histoncal and contemporary psychological views on a wide 
variety of sexual behaviors, theory and research beanng on the relationship between life span 
psychological development, psychological functioning, interpersonal processes and sexual behaviors, 
political and social issues involved in cunent sexual nonns and practices 
PSYC 334 Psychology of Interpersonal Relationships 3 credits: Grading Method: REG/P-F/AUD 
0201 MTuWThF 9:30am-10:50am BIdg, ZOP, Room 1236 Brown, H 

Prerequisite: PSYC 100 Research, iheoiy and their practical applications pertaining to the 
developmcnl, maintenance and dissolution of human relationships Processes critical to successful 
relatmg (eg communication, bargaining, conflict relations), and issues associated with troubled 
dyadic relations with equal panners ic g jealousy, spouse abuse, divorce) 
PSYC 336 Psychology of Women 3 credits. Grading Method: REG/P-F/AUD 

0101 MTuWThF 8:00am-9:20am BIdg, ZOP, Room 1243 Dies, K 

Prercquisiu; PSYC 100 A survey of die biological, life-span development, socialization, 
personality, mental health factors, and special problems of women 
PSYC 337 Introduction to Community Psychology 3 credits, Grading Method REG/P-F/AUD 
0201 MW 2:00pm-5:00pm BIdg, ZOP, Room 2283 Steele, R 

Prerequisites: PSYC 100 Survey and cntical examination of environmental factors associated with 
variations in individual functioning Effects of social process and social stnjcture in community life 
on uidividual mental healUi, theoreucal models in community psychology Additional topics within 
commuiuly psychology 
PSYC 353 Adult Psychopathology 3 credits: Grading Method REGP-FAUD 

Meets USP Distributive Studies (D) SoaaT and Behavioral Sciences requirement. Students 
may receive credit for only one of the lollowing: PSYC 331 353 or 431 
0101 MTuWThF 9:30am-10:50am BIdg ZOP, Room 1236 Coursey, R 

Prerequisite, PSYC lOO The nature, diagnosis, euology and Ireaunent of mental disorders among 
adults, 
PSYC 355 Child Psychology 3 credits: Grading Method: REG/P-F/AUD 

Meets USP Distributive Studies (D) Social and Behavioral Sciences requirement 
0201 TuTh 2:00pm-5:00pm BIdg, ZOP, Room 1243 Johnson, J 

Prerequisite: PSCY l(X), Survey of research and theory of psychological development from 
conception dirough childhood, stressing physiological, conceptual and behavioral changes and the 
social and biological context in which individuals develop Not open for credit to students who have 
ah-cady completed PSYC .133 or 433 
PSYC 356 Psychology of Adolmcsnce 3 credits: Grading Method: REG/P-F/AUD 
0101 TuTh 2 OOpm-SOOpm BIdg, ZOP, Room 1243 Hall, W 

Prerequisite: PSYC 100, 355, or pennission of the instnictor A description of adolescent 
development based on research and theory intenelaung psychological, intellectual, and social 
changes dunng the teen years and the systems dealuig wiUi those changes 
PSYC 361 Survsy of Industrial and Organizational Psychology 
3 aedits: Grading Method REG/PF/AUD 
0101 TuTh 6:00pm-9:00pm BIdg ZOP, Room 1236 Kidder, P 

Prerequisite: PSYC 100 A general survey of the field of industrial organizational psychology 
including such topics as organizational entry (recniitment, selection, training, socialization), 
organizational psychology (motivation, leadership, job attitudesi, and productivity in the work place 
(performance appraisal, absenteeism, tumover) The role that die larger environment plays in 
influencing wort bchaviois and work attitudes, 
PSYC 400 Expsrlmenlal Psychology: Learning and Motivation 
4 credits. Grading Method REGP-FAUD 
Permission of depanment required 

0201 MTuWThF 11 :00am- 12 :20pm BIdg ZOP, Room 1236 Gollub L 
MTuW 12:3apm-1 50pm BIdg ZOP, Room 4102 (■L48) 

0202 MTuWThF 11 00am- 12 20pm BIdg, ZOP Room 1236 Gollub L 
WThF 9:30am-10:50am BIdg. ZOP, Room 4102 fMS; 

Prerequisites PSYC 2(Xt or a course in statistics from an approved dcpanmental list; completion of 
the depanmentally required English, madi and science supponing course sequence: consent of the 
departmcnl The expcnmental analysis of behavior, with emphasis on conditioning, learning and 
motivational processes Expenments on the behavior of animals 
PSYC 420 Experimental Psychology: Social Processes I 4 credits: Grading Method: REG/P-F/AUD 
Permission of instructor required 

0101 MTuWThF 9:30am-10:50am BIdg ZOP, Room 0147 Sigall H 
TuTh e:00am-9:20am BIdg, ZOP, Room 0147 (LAB) 

0102 MTuWThF 9:30am-10:50am BIdg, ZOP, Room 0147 Sigall H 
TuTh 11 :00am-1 2:20pm BIdg, ZOP, Room 0147 ^B; 

Prerequisites, PSYC 200 or a sutistics couree from an approved depanmental list, PSYC 221, 
completion of the English, math and science supponing course sequence, consent of the department 
A lab«}ratory cour^ to provide a basic undersUinding of expenmcntal method ui social psychology 
and cxpenence in conducting research on social processes 

PSYC 432 Introduction to Counseling Psychology 3 credits: Grading Method: REG/P-F/AUD 
0101 MW2 0Opm-5:0Opm BIdg, ZOP, Room 2?83 Dies, R 

Prerequisite nine hours in psychology A survey and cntical analysis of research and intervention 
strategies developed and used by counseling psychologists Examination of both histoncal and 
cunent uends in content and methodology 

WYC 435 Personality Theories 3 credits, Grading Method REG/P-F,AUD 

0201 TuTh 2:00pm-5:00pm Bidg ZOP, Room 2283 Steele R 

Prercquisitts PSYC 100, PSYC 200 or its equivalent Major theones of personality and research 
methods and findings relevant to diose diconcs 

PSYC 436 Introduction lo Clinical Psychology 3 credits: Grading Method: REG/P-F/AUD 
0201 MTuWThF 8:00am-9:20am BIdg ZOP Room 1238 Dies, R 

Prerequisites, PSYC l(K) A survey and tntical analysis of clinical psychology, with paniculal 
emphasis on cunent developments and trends Students will he expected lo conduct individual 
projects with a substantial amount of direct supervision 



PSYC cont. 



PSYC 478 Independent Study In Psychology 1-3 credits. Grading Method: REG/P-F'AUD 
0101 Time Arranged Room Arranged Staff 

0201 Time Arranged Room Arranged Stan 

PSYC 479 Special Research Problems In Psychology 1-3 credits: Grading Method: REG/P-F/AUD 
0101 Time Arranged Room Arranged Staff 

0201 Time Arranged Room Arranged Staff 

PSYC 499H Honors Thesis Research 3 credits: Grading Method: REG/P-F/AUD 
0101 Time Arranged Room Arranged Staff 

0201 Time Arranged Room Ananged Staff 

PSYC 788 Special Research Problems 1-4 credits. Grading Method: REG/AUD 
0101 Time Arranged Room Arranged Staff 

0201 Time Arranged Room Arranged Staff 

PSYC 799 Master's Thesis Research 1-6 credits: Grading Method: REG 

0101 Time Ananged Room Ananged Staff 

0201 Time Arranged Room Arranged Staff 

PSYC 899 Doctoral Dissertation Research IS credits: Grading Method: REG 
0101 Time Arranged Room Arranged Staff 

0201 Time Arranged Room Arranged Staff 



PUAF 



(PUBLIC AFFAIRS) 



PUBLIC AFFAIRS 

PUAF 798B Readings In Public Policy 1-3 credits, Grading Method: REG 
Pemiission ol department required 
0101 Time Ananged Room Arranged 

0201 Time Ananged Room Ananged 



RECR 

RECREATION (PHYS ED, RECR, AND HEALTH ) 

RECR 130 Recreation and Leisure 3 credits: Grading Method: REG/P-F/AUD 

Meets USP Distributive Studies (D) Sociaf and Behavioral Sciences requirement 
0101 MTuWThF 9,30am-10:50am BIdg. PRH, Room 1302 Iso-Ahola S 

0201 MW 7:00pm-10:00pm BIdg. PRH, Room 1302 Chartoneau, B 

The study of recreation and leisure behavior, including concepts, theones and tenninology. 
Psychological, social psychological and sociological factors that affect recreation and leisure 
behavior throughout the lifespan. Analysis of recreation and leisure behavior in our changing 
society, 

RECR 325 General Fundamentals of Recreation 3 credits: Grading Method: REG/P-F/AUD 
0101 TuTh 7:0Cpm~10:00pm BIdg PRH, Room 1302 Churchill, J 

0201 MW 4:00pnv-7:00pm BIdg, PRH, Room 1302 Churchill, J 

This course is designed for and limited to students not majoring in recreation who wish to develop 
some understanding of the place, importance and potentialities of recreation in modem life. 
Included will be limited study of the areas of philosophy, program planning, leadership techniques, 
organization and administration, and interrelationships with other fields, 
RECR 340 Field Work I 6 credits: Grading Method: REG 

Permission of department required. Sophomore field experience. Students may enroll for 
either Section 0101 or 0201 but must attend all class meetings during both summer 
sessions 
0101 Tu 7:00pm-8:00pm BIdg, PRH, Room 0305 Harper, S 

Time Arranged Room Arranged 

0201 Tu 7:00pm-8:00pm BIdg, PRH, Room 0305 Iso-Ahola, S 

Time Ananged Room Arranged 

Prerequisites: RECR 200; and permission of department. Practical field expenence in developing 
recreation activity leaden;hip skills at an organized recreation department or agency Students will 
be expected to make a commitment for a minimum of eight weeks or equivalent, 
RECR 341 Field Work II 8 credits. Grading Method: REG 

Permission of department required Recreation majors only. Students may enroll lor either 
Sections 0101 or 0201 but must attend all class meetings during both summer sessions, 
0101 Tu 6:00pm-7:00pm BIdg PRH, Room 0305 Annand, V 

Time Ananged Room Arranged 

0201 Tu 6:00pm-7:00pm BIdg PRH, Room 0305 Annand. V 

Time Arranged Room Arranged 

Prerequisites RECR 300; and permission of department Observation and field woric placement 
selected and assigned on the basis of the student's interest and future employment plans. 
Leadership activity and participation in staff acuviues and responsibdities. 
RECR 386 Field Work r-3 credits: Grading Method REG 

Permission ol department required. Advisor approval required before registration, 
0101 Time Arranged Room Arranged Staff 

0201 Time Arranged Room Arranged Staff 

RECR 387 Field Work Analysis 1-3 credits: Grading Method: REG 

Permission of department required. Advisor approval required before registration, 
0101 Time Ananged Room Arranged Staff 

0201 Time Ananged Room Arranged Staff 

RECR 389A Topical Investigations: Recreation Leadership Laboratory 
3 credits: Grading Method: REG/P-F/AUD 
Prerequisite: RECR 130 or RECR 325 
0101 MW 7 00pm- 10 :00pm BIdg, PRH, Room 0102 Slrobell, A 

RECR 489 Field Laboratory Projecta and Workshop 1-6 credits. Grading Method: REG/P-F/AUD 
Permission ol department required Advisor approval required before registration, 
0101 Time Arranged Room Arranged Staff 

0201 Time Arranged Room Arranged Staff 

RECR 498Y Special Topics In Recreation: Computer Applications In Leisure Services 
3 credits: Grading Method REG P-FAUD 
0101 TuTh 7:00pm-10:00pm BIdg PRH, Room 1304 Drecchio, B 

RECR 688 Special Problems In Recreation 1-6 credits. Grading Method: REG 

Permission of department required. Graduate students only Advisor approval required 
before registration, 
0101 Time Arranged Room Arranged Staff 

0201 Time Arranged Room Arranged Staff 

RECR 799 Master's Thesis Research 1-6 credits. Grading Method: REG 

0101 Time Arranged Room Arranged Staff 

0201 Time Arranged Room Arranged Staff 

RECR 899 Doctoral Dissertation Research r-fl credits: Grading Method: REG 
0101 Time Arranged Room Arranged Staff 

0201 Time Arranged Room Ananged Staff 



60 



COURSE SECTIONS: 01 xx, SESSION I ONLY; 02xx, SESSION II ONLY. 



1 the relationship 



Lancaster, D 
i with special emphasis ( 
lagemeni. facility utilization and cost analyst 



Daso. 
Theory, methods techniques and problems of 
J and lenses, lighting theory and practices, audio, graphic 
1 television studios. 



RTVF 

RADIO TELEVISION AND FILM (ARTS AND HUMANITIES) 

RTVF 124 Mass Communication In 20th Century Society 3 credits: Grading Method: REaP-F/AUD 
Meets USP Distributive Studies (D) Social and Betiavioral Sciences requiremenl- 
0101 MTuWThF12;30pnn-l :50pm BIdgTWS, Room 0147 Pecora, N 

Ttie evolulion of mass commonicalions and Itie mpad of the media on contemporary society 
Emptiasis on broadcasting and film treatments of social, economic, or political issues. 
RTVF 222 Introduction to Radio, Tetovlslon, and Film 3 aedits: Grading Method: REG/P-F/AUD 
0101 MTuVmiF9:30am-10:50am BIdg, TWS. Room 0147 Pecora, N 

0201 MTuWThF 2:00pin-3:20pm BIdg. TWS, Room 0147 Shyles, L 

The development, scope and influence of radio, television, and film; emphl 
of the industries to audiences, advertisers, and government 
RTVF 223 Ttw Television Program: Planning and Management 
3 aedits. Grading Method: REG/P-F;AUD 
0201 MTuWThF 9:30am-10;50am BIdg. TWS, Room 0147 

Prerequisite; RTVF 222. Study of basic program formats and 
pre-production planning, production organizat: 
RTVF 302 Beginning Sound Production 3 credits: Grading Method: REG/AUD 
Permission of department required. 
0201 MTuWThF 12;30pm-1;50pm BIdg. TWS, Room 0131 Lancaster, D 

PitiMuisite; RTVF 223 Practical experience m sound production, includmg scripting, 
planning, recording, editing, and coordination of personnel. Application principally toward radio, 
RTVF 314 Introduction to the Film 3 credits: Grading Method: REG/P-F/AUD 

Meets USP Distributive Studies (C) Literature and the Arts refluiremenl. 
0101 TuWTh9;0Oam-1 1:30am BIdg. TWS, Room 2154 Weiss, G 

An elementary survey of the film as an an form. Included are; the medium of the cinema, a bnet 
survey of its development, film genres, esthetics, criticism, and the current international scene A 
series of significant American and foreign films are viewed 
BTVF 317 Radio and Television Continuity Writing 3 credits. Grading Method: REG 
0101 MTuWThF 9:30am-10;50am BIdg. TWS, Room 0138 Robinson, E 

Prerequisiuis RTVF 223 and ENGL 391 or exemption from the latter. Principles, methods and 
limitations of writings for radio and television Application toward wnting of general types of 
continuities and commercials. 
RTVF 333 Tolovlalon and Children 3 credits: Grading Method: REG/AUD 
Pennission ol department required. 
0101 TuWTh 7:00pm-9:00pm BIdg. TWS. Room 0147 Parlts, S 

Pretequisiles; RTVF 223 or consent of the instructor A study of programming designed lor 
children. Investigation of current research and the analysis of specific programs. Field studies with 
local children 
RTVF 340 Principles ol Television Production Techniques 

3 aedits: Grading Method: REG/P-F/AUD 
0201 MTuWTh 12;30pm-3;00pm BIdg. TWS,_Room 0117 

Prerequisite; RTVF 223 and consent of the 
television production; television came 
arts and special effects. Practical appli 
RTVF 351 Television Programming 3 aedits: Grading Method: REG/P-F/AUD 

0101 MTuWThF 2:00pm-3;20pm BIdg. TWS, Room 0138 Blum, R 

Prerequisite; RTVF 223 Intrtiducuon to the history, types, theones, regulations, and conventions of 
television programmmg Exploration of the roles of programmers, advertisers, ratings services, 
producers, and regulatory bodies through a programming simulation. 
RTVF 356 Film Production I, Introduction 3 credits: Grading Method: REG/P-F/AUD 
0101 TuWTh 12;30pm-3:00pm BIdg. TWS, Room 2218 

Prerequisites; for majors. RTVF 222 and consent of instructor; f 
mstnictor Introduction to film technology and techniques 
RTVF 384 Field WorV Experience 1-3 aedils: Grading Method: S-F 
Permission ol depanmenl required, RTVF majors only. 
0101 Time Arranged Room Arranged Stalt 

0201 Time Arranged Room Arranged Staff 

Supervised, professional field work expenence m busmess. industry, government or educauon. 
Enrollment is by permission of the depanment and is limited to majors. 
RTVF 385 Field Work Analysis r-3 aedits: Grading Method: REG/AUD 
Permission ol department required. 
0101 Time Arranged Room Arranged Statt 

0201 Time Arranged Room Arranged ^"^ „ 

A seminar and/or a wnttcn cntique of the field work expenence is required. Enrollment is by 
permission of the depanment and is limited to majors. 
RTVF 417 Dramatic Writing For Broadcasting and Film 3 credits: Grading Method: REG/AUD 
Permission of department required. 
0101 MTuWThF 9:30am-10;50am BIdg. TWS. Room 0135 Blum, R 

Prerequisite; RTVF 317 or consent of mstnictor. An introduction to the pnnciples. methods and 
limitations of writing comedy, drtima. and the documentary for radio, television, and film. 
RTVF 449 Television Wortishop t-3 credits: Grading Method: REG/P-F/AUD 
Permission of departmenl required. 
0201 Time Arranged Room Arranged Daso. D 

RTVF 456 Structure and Criticism of TV Advertising 3 credits: Grading Method: REG 
0101 MTuWThF 11 :00am-12:20pm BIdg. TWS. Room 0147 Robinson, E 

Prerequisites; RTVF 222, RTVF 223 and RTVF 317 An examination of the pcisuasive power "' 
television advertising. Analysis of fonn, strucmre and c( 
techniques used to infiuence altitudes and behavior 
RTVF 498 Seminar 3 credits: Grading Method: REG/P-F/AUD 
Permission ol departmenl required 
0101 Time Arranged Room Arranged SlaN 

0201 Time Arranged Room Arranged Staff 

RTVF 498G Seminar: Gender Roles In the Media 3 credits: Grading Method: REG/P-F/AUD 
Permission of departmenl required. 
0101 TuWTh 4:00prt>-6;00pm BIdg. TWS, Room 0154 Pat1(S, S 

RTVF 498V Seminar: Intro to Visual Communication 3 aedits. Grading Method: RE&AUD 
Pennission of department required. 
0201 MTuWThF 11 ;00am-12;20pm BIdg. TWS Room 0138 Aylward, T 

RTVF 648G Seminar In Broadcaatlng: Seminar: Gender Roles In the Media 
3 credits. Grading Method: REG/AUD 
Permission ol departmenl required 
0101 TuWTh 4;00pm-6:00pm BIdg. TWS. Room 0154 Parks, S 

RTVF 699 Independent Study 1-3 aedils: Grading Method REG'AUD 
Permission ol departmenl required. 
0101 TimeAnanged Room Arranged Sla« 

0201 Time Ananged Room Arranged Stan 

RTVF 799 Maater's Thesis Resaarch t-6 credits: Grading Method: REG 

0101 Time Arranged Room Arranged SlaN 

0201 Time Arranged Room Arranged Staff 



RUSS 



(ARTS AND HUMANITIES) 



RUSSIAN 

RUSS 101 Elementary Russian I 5 aedits: Grading Method: REG/P-F/AUD 

Meets USP Distnbulive Studies (A) CuNural and Historical requirement. 
0101 MTuWThF 9;30am-12;20pm BIdg. JMZ, Room 3205 Staff 

Not open to native speakers of Russian Elements of grammar, pronunciation, convcrsauon and 
reading; exercises in translation 
RUSS 102 Elementary Ruaalan II 5 aedils: Grading Method: REG/P-F/AUD 

Meets USP Distributive Studies (A) Cultural and Historical requirement. 
0201 MTuWThF 9;30am-12;20pm BIdg. JMZ. Room 0202 Hitchcock, D 

Prerequisite; RUSS 101. Not open to native speakers of Russian. Continuation of RUSS 101. 
Elements of grammar, pronunciation, and conversation, exercises in translation 
RUSS 201 Intemwdlate Ruaalan I 4 credits; Grading Method: REG/P-F/AUD 

0101 MTuWTh 9;30am-12;20pm BIdg. JMZ, Room 0204 Schallert W 

Preiequisitc; RUSS 102 Not open to native speakers of Russian. Continuation of RUSS 102, l-or 
studenu planmng to continue the study of Russian. Review and expansion of grammar knowledge, 
conversation and reading skills; exercises in translation Note; this new RUSS 201 has no relauon to 
the old SLAV 201. which is to be eliminated 
RUSS 202 Intemiedlate Russian II 4 credits: Grading Method: REG/P-F/AUD 

0201 MTuWTh 9;30am-12;20pm BIdg. JMZ, Room 3207 Staff ^ „,,^^ ,„, 

Prerequisite; RUSS 201 Not open to native speakers of Russian. ConunuaUon of RUSS 201. 
Review and expansion of grammar knowledge, conversation and reading skills. Exercises in 
translation 



SLAV 



SLAVIC 

SLAV 499 Directed Study t-3 aedits: Grading Method: REG/P-F/AUD 
0101 Time Arranged Room Ananged 



(ARTS AND HUMANITIES) 



Hunt, L 
ilogy; historical backgrounds; 



I commercial and 



SOCY 

SOCIOLOGY (BEHAVIOR AND SOCIAL SCI) 

SOCY 100 Introduction to Sociology 3 aedils: Grading Method: REG/P-F/AUD 

Meets USP Distributive Studies (D) Social and Behavioral Sciences requirement. 
0101 MTuWThF 9:30am-10;50am BIdg. ASY. Room 3207 t)™'' "„ 

0201 MTuWThF 2;00pm-3;20pm BIdg. ASY, Room 3203 Canjar, R 

The fundamenul concepts and pnnciples of sociology Includes consideration of culture, patterns ot 
social interacuon. nonns. values, social institutions, stratification, and social change. 
SOCY 105 Introduction to Contemporary Social Problems 

3 credits: Grading Method: REG/P-FAUD 
Meets USP Distributive Studies (D) Social and Behavioral Sciences reijuirement, 
0201 MTuWThF 11:00am-1 2:20pm BIdg. ASY, Room 3207 Finsterbusch. K 

An examination of contemporary social problems through sociological pcrspecuves; ways in which 
social problems are part of the organizauon of society; a detailed study of selected social problems 
mcluding social connict and social inequality Not open to students who already have credit for 
SOCY 210 
SOCY 201 Introductory Statlatlcs For Sociology 4 aedils: Grading Method: REG/P-F/AUD 
Meets USP Distributive Studies (B)Natural Sciences and Mathematics requirement. 
0101 MTuWThF 12:30pm-1;50pm BIdg. ASY, Room 3203 Harper, G 

TuTh 8 00am-10;30am BWg. ASY. Room 2309 ft^; 

Prerequisites SOCY 100 or 105 and MATH 110 or equivalent. Elementary descnpuve and 
mferential slatisitics Constniction and percentaging of bivanate contingency tables; frequency 
distnbutions and graphic presentations: measures of central tendency and dispersion; patametnc and 
nonparametnc measures of association and conelalion; regression; ptxibability; hypothesis testmg; 
the nonnal. bmomial and chi-squarc distributions, point and mterval 
SOCY 203 Sociological Theory 3 aedits: Grading Method: REG/P-F/AUD 
0101 MTuWThF 9;30am-10:50am BIdg. ASY, Room 3203 

Prerequisite; SOCY 100 or lO.S Development of the science of soci 
recent theories of society Required of all sociology majors 
SOCY 300 American Society 3 aedils: Grading Method: REG/P-FAUD 

Meets USP Distributive Studies (D) Soaal and Behavioral Sciences requirement. 
0201 MTuV/rhF12;30pm-1;50pm BIdg. ASY, Room 3207 Vanneman. R 

The social stnicture and organization of Amencan society with special reference to recent social 
change A sociological perspccuve on urban and other population trends, the character stnicmre. 
values and ideology of Amencans social movements and changes in work, family life and 

SOCY 325 SoK Rolea 3 aedils: Grading Method: REG/P-F/AUD 

Meets USP Advanced Studies Analysis ol Human Problems requirement. 
0101 MTuWThF 11 ;00am-12:20pm BIdg. ASY. Room 3203 Mcltityre. J 

0201 MTuWThF 9;30am-10:50am BIdg. ASY, Room 3203 Hunt. J 

Sex-role differentiation and sex inequality from a sociological pcispecuve Insutuuonal bases of sex 
inequality, cultural views of the sexes, sex-role socialization and sex-role change. Emphasis on 
contemporary Amencan society. 
SOCY 327 Introduction to the Study ot Deviance 3 aedils: Grading Method: REG/P-F/AUD 
Meets USP Distributive Studies (D) Social and Behavioral Saences requirement. 
0101 MTuWThF 12:30pm-1;50pm BIdg. ASY, Room 3207 Pease, J 

Prerequism SOCY 100 or 105 An introduction to the sociological study of deviant behavior, 
covering such topics as mental illness, sexual deviance, and the use of dnigs. Snidents may not 
receive credit for SOCY 327 if they have completed SOCY 427. 
SOCY 331 Wort(, Bureaucracy, and Industry 3 aedils: Grading Method: REG/P-F/AUD 

Meets USP Distributive Studies (D) Social and Behavioral Sciences requirement. 
0101 MTuWThF 11 ;00am-1250pm BIdg. ASY, Room 3207 Lerigemiann. J 

A sociologial approach to the world of woik, occupational careeis, and personal expenences in the 
bureaucratic organizations of modem industrial society. 
SOCY 343 Sociology of Marriage and Family 3 aedits: Grading Method: REG/P-F/AUD 
W01 MTuVin-hF2 00pm-3;20pm BIdg. ASY, Room 3207 Kammeyer, K 

Prerequisite SOCY 100 or 105 The sociological study of mamage and family life, including a 
consideration of demographic trends in maniage, childbcanng, divorce; sociological theones ol 
male selection marital interaction, and marital dissolution. The course includes discussion of some 
contemporary controversial issues, such as the relauonship of unmamcd couples. altenuUve 
mamage fonns. abortion, and violence in the family 
SOCY 386 Field Worii 1-3 aedits: Grading Method: REGP-F/AUD 
Permission of department required 
0101 TimeAnanged Room Arranged Stan 

0201 Time Arranged Room Arranged btan 

SOCY 387 Field Worti Analysis 1-3 credits: Grading Method. REG.'P-F'AUD 
Permission ol departmenl required, 
0101 Time Arranged Room Arranged Stan 

0201 Time Arranged Room Ananged Statt 



COURSE SECTIONS: 01 xx, SESSION I ONLY; 02xx, SESSION II ONLY. 



61 



SOCY cont. 



SOCY 399 Independent Study In Sociology 1-6 credits; Grading Method REGP-FAUD 
Permission of department required 

0101 Time Arrar>ged Room Arranged Staff 

0201 Time Arranged Room Arranged Staff 

SOCY S99 Special Social Problems 1-16 credits. Grading Method: REGAUD 

0101 Time Arranged Room Ananged Staff 

0201 Time Ananged Room Arranged Staff 

SOCY 799 Master's Thesis Research 1-6 credits. Gradmg Method: REG 

0101 Time Arranged Room Arranged Staff 

0201 Time Arranged Room Arranged Staff 

SOCY 899 Ooctofal Dissertation Research 1-8 credits: Grading Method: REG 

0101 Time Arranged Room Arranged Staff 

0201 Time Arranged Room Arranged Staff 



SPANISH 



SPAN 



(ARTS AND HUMANITIES) 



SPAN 101 Etementaiy Spanish 4 aedils: Grading Method: REG P-FAUD 

Meets USP Distributive Studies (A) Cultural and Historical requirement 

0101 Meets JUN 5 to JUL 14 

MTuWTH 9:30am-l 1:45am BIdg. JM2, Room 1215 Puente-Guerra, A 

0102 Meets JUN 5 to JUL 14 

MTuWTti 9 :30atT>-1 1,45am BIdg. JMZ, Room 0208 Salvador. J 

0201 Meets JUL 1 7 to AUG 25 

MTuWTh 9;30arT>-11:45am BkJg. JMZ, Room 0208 Ding. Z 

Inlroduction (o ba^ic stniclures. with emphasis upon understanding and speaking Normally leads to 
102. but gifted students ma> be recominended for I02H 
SPAN 102 Elementary Spanish 4 credits; Grading Method: REG P-FAUD 

Meets USP Distributive Studies (A) Cultural and Htstoncal requirement 
0101 Meets JUN 510 JUL 14 

MTuWTh 9:30arTv-l 1 :45am BIdg JMZ, Room 1 120 Little, K 

0201 Meets JUL 17 to AUG 25 

MTuWTh 9:30am-l 1 :45am BIdg. JMZ, Room 1224 Mora. P 

Continuauon of SPAN 101, with increasing emphasis upon reading skill, reinforced by discussion 
and composition 
SPAN 203 Intermediate Spanish 4 credits: Grading Method REG/P-F/AUD 

Meets USP Distributive Studies (A) Cultural and Htstoncal requirement. Formerly SPAN 
104. 
0101 Meets JUN 5 to JUL 14 

MTuWTh 9 30am-1 1 .45am BIdg. JMZ, Room 1226 Traverso-Rueda, S 

0201 Meets JUL 1 7 to AUG 25 

MTuWTh 9:30anv1 1 :45am BIdg. JMZ, Room 2207 Prielo, M 

Conlmued developmeni of the skills of understanding and speaking with supplemenlaiy allention to 
reading and wnling Ennched course of study, with broad oral base and related developmeni of 
reading and wnting 
SPAN 204 Review ol Oral and Written Spanish 3 credits: Grading Method: REG P-FAUD 

Meets USP Distributive Studies (A) Cultural and Historical requirement. Formerly SPAN 
201 
0101 Meets JUN 5 to JUL 14 

MTuWTh 9:30am-11:15am BIdg. JMZ, Room 1117 Gnnstein, J 

0201 Meets JUL 1 7 to AUG 25 

MTuWTh 9:30am-l1:15am BIdg. JMZ. Room 2122 Downey-Vanover, J 

Prerequisite SPAN 203 A practical language cour^ recommended for all students continuing in 
Spanish May be taken concurrenUy wiih SPAN 221 or SPAN 205 
SPAN 221 Readings In Spanish 3 credits. Grading Method REG P-FAUD 

Meets USP Distnbutive Studies (C) Literature and the Arts requirement 
0201 Meets JUL 1 7 to AUG 25 

MTuWTh 9:30am-11 15am BIdg JMZ. Room 1211 Martins, L 

{*rercquisilL- SPAN 2IW Selected readings from vanous genres in Spanish and Spanish Amcncan 
literature DiscusMon and bnef wnlten repons in Spanish 
SPAN 31 1 Advanced Conversation I 3 credits; Grading Method REG P-F/AUD 
Meets USP Distributive Studies (A) Cultural and Htstoncal requirement. 
0101 Meets JUN 5 to JUL 14 

MTuWTh 9:30am-l 1:15am BIdg. JMZ, Room 1 104 Patino, R 

Prerequisite SPAN 204 or 205 or consent of instnictor Designed to develop fluency and accuracy 
in speaking Spanish 
SPAN 312 Advanced Conversation II 3 credits. Grading Method RE&'P-F/AUD 
Meets USP Distributive Studies (A) Cultural and Historical requirement 
0201 Meets JUL 17 to AUG 25 

MTuWTh 9:30am-1 1:1 5am BIdg. JMZ, Room 1215 Cordero-Roman, A 

Prerequisite SPAN 205 or .1 1 1 or consent of inslniclor 

SPAN 321 Survey of Spanish Literature: 12tl>-17th Century 

3 credits. Grading Method: REG P-FAUD 
Meets USP Distributive Studies (C) Literature and the Arts requirement 
0101 Meets JUN 5 to JUL 14 

MW 9 :30am- 12 :20pm BIdg. JMZ, Room 1122 Benito-Vessels, C 

SPAN 322 Survey of Spanish LHerature: 18th-20th Century 

3 credits. Grading Method: REG'P-F.AUD 
Meets USP Distributive Studies (C) Literature and the Arts requirement 
0201 Meets JUL 17 to AUG 25 

TuTh 9:30an>-12:20pm BIdg JMZ, Room 1226 Naharro-Calderon, J 

SPAN 324 Survey of Spanlsh-Ainerlcan Literature 3 credits. Grading Method REGiP-FiAUD 
Meets USP Distnbutwe Studies (C) Literature and the Arts requirement 
0201 Meets JUL 1 7 to AUG 25 

MW 9 30am- 12 20pm BIdg JMZ, Room 1226 Bracho, C 

Basic survcv o[ ihe history of Spanish-Amencan literaiure 
SPAN 399 Independent Study In Spanish t~3 credits. Grading Method: REG'P-FAUD 
0101 Time Arranged Room Arranged Staff 

0201 Time Arranged Room Arranged Staff 

SPAN 408 Great Themes of tt>e Hispanic Literatures: Espana: Los camblos en el siglo XX 
3 credits. Grading Method: REG.'P-F'AUD 
0201 Meets JUL 1 7 to AUG 25 

MW9:30anvl2:20pm BIdg JMZ, Room 1103 Nahano-Calderon, J 

SPAN 410 Uterature of the Middle Ages 3 credits: Grading Method. REG/P-F/AUD 
0101 Meets JUN 5 to JUL 14 

TuTh 9 30anv 12 20pm BIdg JMZ, Room 1 122 Benito-Vessels, C 

Spanish literary history from the eleventh through the fifteenth century Reading of represcnlativc 



fhis 



III 1350 



SPAN 699 Independent Study In Spanish r-3 credits: Grading Method. REG/AUD 
0101 Time Arranged Room Arranged Staff 

0201 Time Arranged Room Arranged Staff 

SPAN 799 Master's Thesis Research t-6 credits: Grading Method. REG 

0101 Time Arranged Room Arranged Staff 

0201 Time Arranged Room Arranged Staff 



SPAN cont. 



SPAN 699 Doctoral Dissertation Research 1-8 credits; Grading Method: REG 
0101 Time Arranged Room Arranged Stall 

0201 Time Arranged Room Arranged Staff 



SPEECH 



SPCH 



(ARTS AND HUMANITIES) 



SPCH too Basic Principles of Speech Communication 3 credits: Grading Method: REG/P-FAUD 



lldg TWS, Room 1202 Staff 

ildg TWS, Room 1202 Staff 

ildg TWS, Room 2212 Staff 

ildg TWS, Room 1202 Staff 

ildg TWS, Room 2212 Staff 

ildg TWS, Room 2212 Staff 

ildg TWS, Room 2212 Stall 

ildg TWS, Room 2230 Staff 

ildg. TWS, Room 2228 Staff 

A study of oral communication principles, including 
verbal and nonverbal language, listening, group dynamics, and public speaking. Emphasis in this 
course IS upon the application of these principles to contemporary problems and upon tJic 
preparalion of different types of oral discourse SPCH 100 and 107 may noi Kith be used for credit. 
SPCH 107 Technical Speech Communication 3 credits: Grading Method REG P-FAUD 



0101 MTuWThF e:00am-9:20am 

0102 MTuWThF 9:30am-10:50am 

0103 MTuWThF 9:30am-10 50am 

0104 MTuWThF 1 1 :00am-12:20pm 

0105 MTuWThF 11 :00am-12:20pm 

0201 MTuWThF 8:00am-9:20am 

0202 MTuWThF 9 :30am- 10 50am 

0203 MTuWThF 9:30am-10:50am 

0204 MTul/VThF ll:O0am-12:20pm 

Prerequisite for advanced speech 



0101 MTuWThF 8:0Oam-9 20am 

0102 MTuWThF 9 30am-l 50am 

0103 MTuWThF 11 :00am-12:20pm 

0201 MTut/\miF 8 00am-9:20am 

0202 MTuWThF 9:30am-t0:50am 

0203 MTuWThF 1 1 00am- 1 2 :20pm 

A sludv ( ' 



BIdg TWS, Room 0131 
BIdg TWS, Room 0131 
BIdg TWS, Room 2228 
BIdg. TWS, Room 2228 
BIdg. TWS, Room 0135 
BIdg. TWS, Room 1204 
1 IS part of technical fields. Emphas 



Staff 
Wolvin. A 
Staff 
Staff 
Staff 
Staff 
in this touts 



1 the 



:iplcs and techniques of interviewing, group discussion, listening, and informative and 
persuasive bnefings and speeches Sf*CH ItX) and 107 may not twth be used for credit. 
SPCH 125 Introduction to Interpersonal Communication 3 aedits: Grading Method: REG/P-F/AUD 

0101 MTuWThF 9 :30am- 10 :50am BIdg. TWS, Room 2230 Edgar. T 

0102 MTuWThF ll:00am-l 2:20pm BIdg. TWS, Room 1204 Edgar, T 

Concepts of interpersonal communication including perception, language and meaning. 

communication, listening and feedback 
SPCH 200 Advanced Public Speaking 3 credits: Grading Method: REG.P-FAUD 

0101 MTuWThF 11 00am- 12 20pm "' ' 

0201 MTuWThF 1 :00pm-2 20pm 

Prercquisiles SPCH IK), SPCH 107 

of speech composition in con(unclK 

public speaking 

SPCH 230 Argumentation and Debate 3 credits: Grading Method REGP-F.AUD 

0101 MTuWThF 8:00am-9:20am BIdg. tWS, Room 2228 Staff 

0102 MTuWThF 9:30am-10:50am BIdg. TWS, Room 2228 Staff 

A study of Ihe fundamental principles of reasoning, analysis, and evidence prcparalii 
bnefs and presentation of standard academic debate 
SPCH 400 Research Methods In Speech Communication 3 credits: Grading Method: RE&AUD 
to be taken during junior year 
0101 TuTh 2:30pm-5:30pm BIdg. TWS, Room 2212 

Prerequisite: introductory course in statisucs or permission of departmen 
Philosophy of science, role of theory, research ethics, empirical resea 
sampling, design analysis) 
SPCH 401 Foundations of Rhetoric 3 credits: Grading Method: REaAUD 
0101 MTuWThF 12:30pm-2 00pm BIdg TWS, Room 2154 

Prerequisite SPCH 200 Pnnciples and approaches to the theory 
unnderstanding of rhetoncal discourse 
SPCH 402 Communication Theory and Process 3 credits. Grading Method: REGAUD 
0101 MTuWThF 11 :00am- 12 :20pm BIdg. TWS, Room 0138 Gaines, R 

SPCH .150 recommended Philosophical and conceplual analysis of speech communication theories. 
SPCH 468 Speech Communication Internship (-3 credits; Grading Method: REG P-FAUD 
0101 Time Arranged Room Arranged Staff 

0201 Time Arranged Room Arranged Stall 

SPCH 775 Seminar In Persuasion and Attitude Change 3 credits. Grading Method: REG/AUD 
0101 TuTh 7:00pm-10:00pm BIdg. TWS, Room 2212 Rnk, E 

This seminar will concentrate on the problem of makmg message strategy decisions. Course contei 
will consist of study of both theoretical and empirical research on altitude and attitude change i 
persuasive communication. 
SPCH 798 Independent Study f-3 credits. Grading Method: REGAUD 

0101 Time Arranged Room Arranged Staff 

0201 Time Arranged Room Arranged Staff 

SPCH 799 Master's Thesis Research 1-6 credits: Grading Method REG 

0101 Time Arranged Room Arranged Staff 

0201 Time Arranged Room Arranged Staff 






BIdg ™/S, Room 0135 Wolvin, A 

BIdg TWS, Room 1204 McCaleb, J 

emiission of department. Rhcloncal pnnciples and models 
ith the preparation and presentauon of specific forms of 



1 of debate 



Fink, E 
SPCH 350 recommended. 
h methods tmeasurcment. 



STAT 



STATISTICS AND PROBABILITY (COMP, MATH, AND PHYS SCI) 

STAT 400 Applied Probability and Statistics I 3 credits. Grading Method: REG P-FAUD 
0101 MTuWThF 8 OOam-9 20am BIdg MTH. Room 0405 Staff 

0202 MTuWThF 9:30am-10:50am BIdg. MTH, Room 0106 Staff 

Prerequisile MATH Ml Random vanables, standard disuibutions, moments, law of large numbci^ 
and central limit theorem Sampling methods, estimation of parameters, testing of hypotheses. 

STAT 799 Master's Thesis Research 1-6 credits; Grading Method: REG 

0101 Time Ananged Room Arranged Staff 

0201 Time Arranged Room Arranged Staff 

STAT 899 Doctoral Dissertation Research 1-8 credits. Grading Method. REG 
0101 Time Arranged Room Arranged Staff 

0201 Time Arranged Room Arranged Staff 



TEXT 



TEXTILES (HUMAN ECOLOGY) 

TEXT 205 Textile Materials and Performance 3 credits; Grading Method: REG/P-FAUD 
Formerly TEXT 150 
0101 TuWThF9:30anvlO:50am BIdg MMH, Room 2401 Block, I 

TuTh 11 :00am-l 2:50pm BIdg MMH, Room 2401 (LAB) 

Prerequisile: TEXT 105 Prior or eoncunenl registration in CHEM 103 recommended. Analysis of 
the structural components of consumer lemile materials with emphasis on yams, fibers, dyes and 
finishes as they relate to textile performanr 



62 



COURSE SECTIONS: 01xx, SESSION I ONLY; 02xx, SESSION II ONLY. 



TEXT cont. 



TEXT 305 Textile Materials: Evaluation and Characterization 

3 credits. Grading Method: REG/P-FAUD 
Formerly TEXT 250, 
0201 MTuWTh 9:30am-10:50am BIdg, MMH, Room 2201 Sharma, D 

TuTh 11:00am-1 :50pm BIdg. MMH, Room 2201 (LAB) 

Prerequisite: TEXT 205, An invesligaiion of the behavior of textile materials in relnlion to 
environmental factors and conditions of service influencing performance, comfort and aesthetics. 
Laboratory experience provides an opporlunity to explore a variety of textile materiaJs and methods 
of evaluation 

TEXT 347 History of Costume II 3 credits; Grading Method: REGP-FAUD 

Meets USP Distributive Studies (A) Cultural and Historical requirement. 
0101 MW7:00pm-10:C0pm BIdg. MMH, Room 0108 Jung, K 

The development of European and Amencan dress from the Renaissance to the present, relating the 
history of costume to changing technology, social altitudes and trends in the popular and fine arts 

TEXT 363 History of Textiles 3 credits; Gradina Method: REGP-FAUD 

Meets USP Distributive Studies (A) Cultural and Historical requirement. 
0201 MTuV\n"hF9:30am-10;50am BIdg MMH, Room 0108 Anderson, C 

A study of histonc and contemporary fibers and fabncs The analysis of designs and techniques of 
decorating fabrics and the relationship of textiles to the aesthetic and developmental cultures of 
society. 

TEXT 388 Held Work and Analysis In Textiles 3-6 credits; Grading Method: S-F 
Limited to majors in textiles and consumer economics 
0101 Time An^anged Room Arranged Wagner, J 

0201 Time Arranged Room Arranged Wagner, J 



TEXT 498 Special Studies 2~~4 credits: Grading Method: REG P-FAUD 
0101 Time Arranged Room Arranged 

0201 Time Arranged Room Arranged 



THEATRE 



THET 



(ARTS AND HUMANITIES) 



THET 110 Introduction to ttie Theatre 3 credits: Grading Method: REG/P-F/AUD 
Meets USP Distributive Studies (C) Literature and the Arts requirement 

0101 MTuWThF 9:30am-10:50am BIdg TWS, Room 0241 Meersman, R 

0102 MTuWThF 11:a0am-12;20pm BIdg. TWS, Room 0241 Patrick, M 

0201 MTuWThF 1 1 :00am-12;20pm BIdg, TWS, Room 0241 Oleary. R 

0202 MTuWThF 9:30am-10:50am BIdg. TWS. Room 0241 Elam, H 

Introduction to the people of the theater, actors, directors, designers and backstage personnel The 
core and characteristics of a play script; theatrical forms and styles; and theater history 

THET 120 Acting I 3 credits; Grading Method: REGP-F/AUD 

0101 MTuWThF 9:30am-10:50am BIdg. TWS, Room 1228 Patrick, M 

0201 MTuWThF 1 1 :00am-12:20pm BIdg TWS, Room 1228 Elam, H 

Prerequisites: THET 1 10 and THET III, Basic principles of acting techniques. Exercises structured 
to develop the student's concentration, imagination, sense and emotional memory Textual analysis, 
character analysis and scene study; and the application of these techniques to character portrayal 
through performance of short scenes. 

THET 310 The American Theatre 5 credits: Grading Method: REG'P-F/AUD 

Meets USP Distributive Studies (A) Cultural and Historical requirement, 
0201 MTuWThF 9:30am-10:50am BIdg. TWS, Room 1204 Oleary. R 

An analysis of the theatre people, plays, events, and social forces which shaped an evolution from 
the colonial beginnings of artistic dependence on England to the uniquely Amencan theatre of 

THET 386 FWd Worii 1-3 credits; Grading Method: REG/P-FAUD 

0101 Time Ananged Room Arranged Staff 

0201 Time Arranged Room Arranged Staff 

THET 387 Field Wort( Analysis 1-3 credits; Grading Method: REG'P-F/AUD 

0101 Time Arranged Room Arranged Staff 

0201 Time Arranged Room Arranged Staff 

THET 479 Theater Workshop 1-3 credits: Grading Method: REG/P-FAUD 
Permission of department required. 
0101 Time Arranged Room Arranged 



Kriebs. D 



THET 495 History of Theatrical Theory and Crttlcism 3 credits. Grading Method: REG/P-FAUD 

Meets USP Advanced Studies Development of Knowledge requirement. 

0101 MTuWThF 11 :00am-12:20pm BIdg, TWS, Room 0131 Meersman. R 

The development of theatrical theory and criticism from the Greeks to the modem theonst The 
philosophical basis of theatre as an art form. Important theonsts and the practical application of 
their theories in either play scripts or thcatncal productions Required attendance at selected live 
theatre productions, 

THET 499 Independent Study 3 credits; Grading Method: REG 
Permission o( department required, 
0101 Time Arranged Room Arranged Staff 

0201 Time Arranged Room Arranged Staff 

THET 669F Independent Study 1-3 credits; Gradina Method: REGAUD 

0101 Time Arranged Room Arranged Staff 

THET 799 Master's Thesis Research 1-6 credits; Grading Method: REG 
Permission of department required. 
0101 Time Arranged Room Arranged Staff 

0201 Time Arranged Room Arranged Staff 



(HUMAN ECOLOGY) 



TXCE 

TEXTILES AND CONSUMER ECONOMICS 

TXCE 608 Special Problems 1-3 credils: Grading Method REG AUD 

0101 Time Arranged Room Arranged Staff 

0201 Time Arranged Room Arranged Staff 

TXCE 799 Master's Thesis Research 1-6 credits: Grading Meltiod. REG 

0101 Time Arranged Room Arranged Staff 

0201 Time Arranged Room Arranged Staff 

TXCE 899 Doctoral Dissertation Research 1-6 credits: Grading Method: REG 
0101 Time Arranged Room Arranged Staff 

0201 Time Arrangerl Room Arranged Staff 



UMEI 

MARYLAND ENGLISH INSTITUTE (ARTS AND HUMANITIES) 

UMEI 001 English as a Foreign Language: Beginning No credit: Grading Method: S-F 

Permission of department required. An additional fee is charged lor this course. 

0101 Meets JUN 19 to AUG 11 

Time Arranged Room Arranged Staff 

0102 Meets JUN 19 to AUG 11 

Time Arranged Room Arranged Staff 

Intensive course for the non-nalive speaker of English who has little or no previous knowledge of 
English Focus on the rapid acquisition of the basic features of English grammar and pronunciation 
and on speaking and understanding American English, reading and writing appropriate to the level 
will be included. Special fee required for this course This course does not carry credit towards any 
degree at the University and does not count in the retention plan, 
UMEI 002 English as a Foreign Language: Intermediate I No credit: Grading Method: S-F 
Pemiission of department required. An additional fee is charged for this course. 

0101 Meets JUN 19 to AUG 11 

Time Arranged Room Arranged Staff 

0102 Meets JUN 19 to AUG 11 

Time Arranged Room Arranged Staff 

Intensive course for the non-native speaker of English who has had some previous instniclion in 
English Emphasis on improving listening and speaking skills, on mastering intermediate 
grammatical structures, and on expanding vocabulary Includes practice in Oeading and writing 
appropriate to the level. Special fee required for this course This course docs not carry credit 
towards any degree at the University and does not count in the retention plan. 

UMEI 003 English as a Foreign Language: Intermediate II No credit: Grading Method: S-F 
Permission of department required. An additional fee is charged lor this course. 

0101 Meets JUN 19 to AUG 11 

Time Ananged Room Arranged Staff 

0102 Meets JUN 19 to AUG 11 

Time Arranged Room Arranged Staff 

Intensive course for the non-native speaker of English who has mastered the essential siniclures of 
English grammar. Emphasis on improving communicative skills for a wide range of linguistic 
situations, on rapid expansion of vocabulary, and on improving reading comprehension and basic 
writing skills Special fee required for this course. This course does not carry credit towards any 
degree at the University and does noi count in the retention plan 
UMEI 004 English as a Foreign Language: Intermediate III No credit: Grading Method: S-F 
Permission of department required An additional fee is charged for this course. 

0101 Meets JUN 19 to AUG 11 

Time Pranged Room Arranged Staff 

0102 Meets JUN 19 to AUG 11 

Time Arranged Room Arranged Staff 

Intensive course for the non-native speaker of English who has a good command of the basic 
features of spoken and wntten English. Emphasis on refining speaking and listening skills, on 
improving reading speed and comprehension of academic texts, and on developing writing skills for 
academic courses Special fee required for this course. This course does not carry credit towards 
any degree at the University and does not count in the retention plan 

UMEI 005 Advanced English as a Foreign Language 6 credits: Grading Method: S-F 

Permission of depadment required. An additional tee is charged for this course. 

0201 MTuWThF 9:00am-1 1:00am BIdg, ARC, Room 1125 Staff 
MTuWThF 1:00pm-3:00pm BIdg. ARC. Room 1125 

0202 MTuWThF 1 :00pm-3:00pm BIdg. JMZ. Room 0204 Staff 
MTuWThF 9:00am-1 1 :00am BIdg. JMZ, Room 0204 

Semi-intensive course for the nearly proficient non-native speaker of English needing additional 
language instruction poor to undertaking full-time academic study. Speaking and listening skills; 
improvement of reading speed and comprehension; and development of writing skills with special 
emphasis on researeh papers and use of the University library Special fee required for this course. 
This course does not carry credit towards any degree at the University and does not count in the 
retcnuon plan 



URBS 

INSTITUTE FOR URBAN STUDIES (BEHAVIOR AND SOCIAL SCI) 

URBS 100 Introduction to Urban Studies 3 credits: Grading Method: REG/P-F/AUD 

Meets USP Distributive Studies (D) Social and Behavioral Sciences requirement. There Is 
a special fee of $50,00 to cover the cost of field trips tor this course. 
0101 Tu 10:00am-l :00pm BIdg. LEF, Room 2123 Uidlaw, C 

Th 10:00am-3:00pm BIdg. LEF, Room 2123 

Contemporary urban pattems, trends and problems. Major urban issues, such as: population, the 
economy, land use, housing, neighborhood development, fiscal and unemployment crises, and 
social, envu'onmental. and political controversies of metropolitan ^eas. Urbanization pattems and 
policies internationally 
URBS 386 Field Work 1-3 credits. Grading Method: REG/P-F/AUD 

Permission of depadment required. Learning contract must be obtained from 0119 
Hornbake. 
0101 Time Arranged Room Arranged Williams, B 

0201 Time Arranged Room Arranged Williams. B 

URBS 387 Field Work Analysis 1-3 credits; Gradina Method: REG/P-F/AUD 

Permission of department required, teaming contract must be obtained from 0119 
Hornbake. 
0101 Time Arranged Room Arranged Williams. B 

0201 Time Arranged Room Arranged Williams, B 

URBS 399A Independent Study In Urban Topics: independent Study for interns 
3 credits. Grading Method REG P-FAUD 
Permission of department required, May be taken concurrently with URBS 438. Urban 
Inlernstitp 
0101 Time Arranged Room Arranged Williams. B 

0201 Time Arranged Room Aranged Williams. B 

URBS 3991 Independent Study in Urban Topics 3 credits. Grading Method: REG/P-F/AUD 
Permission of department required, 
0101 Time Arranged Room Arranged Williams. B 

0201 Time Ananged Room Arranged Williams, B 

URBS 438 Urban internship 1-6 credits; Gradina Method: REGP-FAUD 

Permission of department required Concurrent registration with URBS 399A is possible. 
0101 Time Arranged Room Arranged Williams. B 

0201 Time Arranged Room Arranged Williams. B 

URBS 470 Management and Administration of Metropolitan Areas 
3 credits; Grading Method: REGP-FAUD 
0101 MW 5:00pm-8:00pm BIdg LEF. Room 1220 Levin, M 

Management and administration of local governments in metropolitan areas with emphasis on cities, 
counties and special distncls in urban areas Urtan governmental organizations, management styles 
and service delivers Contemporary problems confronting urban local governments 
URBS 488D Selected Topics In Urban Studies: Microcomputer Applications In Planning 
3 credits. Gradina Method REG P-FAUD 
0201 TuTh 6 OOpfTv 9 00cm ' BIdg LEF Room 1220 Chang. W 



COURSE SECTIONS: 01 xx, SESSION I ONLY; 02xx, SESSION II ONLY. 



URBS cont. 



URBS 4881 Selected Topics In Urban Studies: Geographic Information Systems 

3 credits: Grading Method REG PFAUD 
Prerequisite: GEOG 373 or consent ot instructor Starting Fall 1987, this course is a 
prerequisite for GEOG 696 
0101 MW 4:00pm-7:30pm BIdg LEF, Room 1124 ■Riompson. D 

URBS 488Q Selected Topics In Urban Studies: Quantitative Methods In Urtun Studies 
3 credits: Grading Mettiod REG PFAUD 
0101 TuTtl 6:00pn)-9:00pm BIdg LEF, Room 1220 Laidlaw, C 

URBS48SW 

Selected Topics In Urban Studies: Workshop In Urban and Community Development 
3 credits: Grading Method REG PFAUD 
0101 MW 9:00am-12:00pm BIdg LEF, Room 1221 Hula, R 

URBS 601 Urban Research Methods: Multivariate Statistics 3 credits: Grading Method: REG/AUD 
0101 TuTti 6:00pm-9:00pm BIdg, LEF, Room 1220 Laidlaw, C 

Prerequisile. URBS 350 or eijuivalcnl, MullTvanale slalislical analysis for urban problem solving 
and research Linear and non-linear correlation and regression, factor analysis. clu.ster analysis 
Social science research methodology Applications, computer software 
URBS 689 Internship Seminar: Graduate Internship 3-S credits: Grading Method: REG/AUD 
Permission of department required 
0101 Time Arranged Room Arranged Williams, B 

0201 Time Arranged Room Arranged Williams, B 

URBS 698 Independent Study In Urban Topics 3 credits: Grading Method: REG/AUD 

Permission of department required Contact department to make arrangements. 
0101 Time Arranged Room Arranged Williams. B 

0201 Time Arranged Room Arranged Williams. B 

URBS 698A Independent Study In Urban Topics: Independent Study tor Interns 
3 credits: Grading Method: REGAUD 
Cofitact department to make arrangements Concurrent registration with URBS 689 is 



0101 Time Arranged Room Arranged Willian 

0201 Time Arranged Room Arranged Willian 

URBS 6981 Independent Study In Urban Topics 3 credits. Grading Method: REGAUD 
Contact department to make arrangements 
0101 Time Arranged Room Arranged Willian 

0201 Time Arranged Room Arranged Willian 

URBS 698R Independent Study In Urban Topics: Independent Readings 
3 credits. Grading Method. REG AUD 
Permission of department required, 
0101 Time Arranged Room Arranged Staff 

0201 Time Arranged Room Arranged Stall 

URBS 799 Master's Thesis Research 1-6 credits: Grading Method REG 
Permission of department required. 
0101 Time Arranged Room Arranged Staff 

0201 Time Arranged Room Arranged Staff 



WOMEN'S STUDIES 



WMST 

(ARTS AND HUMANITIES) 

WMST 200 Introduction to Women's Studies: Women and Society 

3 credits: Grading Method REG PFAUD 
Meets USP Distrbutive Studies (D) Social and Behavioral Sciences requirement 
0201 MW 10:00am- 1:00pm BIdg HBK. Room 1108 Staff 

An inlerdisciplinary study of the status, roles, and eipenences of women in society. Sources from a 
vanely of fields such as literature, psychology, history, and anthropology, focusing on the writings 

WMST 250 Introduction to Women's Studies: Women, Art and Culture 

3 credits: Grading Method REG PFAUD 

Meets USP Distributive Studies (C) Literature and the Arts requirement. 
0101 TuTh 9:00am~12:00pm BIdg HBK, Room 0117 Pratt, M 

An exploration of women s creativuy Traditional and allemauve women's cultures, art. myth. 

hteralurc. and theology by women, women's heroic journeys, and emerging feminisl art and culture 
WMST 350 Femlnlat Education Practlcum 3 credits: Grading Method: REG/AUD 

Permission of department required. 
0101 Time Arranged Room Arranged Staff 

0201 Time Arranged Room Arranged Staff 

Corequisue WMST 351, Teaching praclicum. providing espcnence in the facilitation of small 

sections of lower division introductory survey courses 
WMST 351 Feminist Education Analysis 3 credits: Grading Method. REGAUD 

Permission of department required 
0101 Time Arranged Room Arranged Slafl 

0201 Time Arranged Room Arranged Staff 

Corequisue WMST 150 General application of feminisl methodology to teaching and 

commumcalion skills, leaching strategics, motivation, classroom dynamics and knowledge of 

sludcnts' development and learning styles. 
WMST 400 Theories 01 Feminism 3 credits: Grading Method REG.'P-F/AUD 

Meets USP Advanced Studies Development of Knowledge requirement. 
0101 TuTh 2:00pm-5:00pm BIdg HBK, Room 01 17 Pratt, M 

0201 TuTh 10:00am-1 :00pm BIdg HBK, Room 1116 Staff 

FYcrequisilc WMST :uO or 250. or con.senl of insiruclor A sludy of lemimsl iheones from an 

mtcrdisciplmary perspective, including politics, sociology, psychology, anthropology, and 

philosophy. 

WMST 498A 

Special Topics In Women's Studies: Women In International Development 

3 credits. Grading Method REG PFAUD 
0101 MW 11 00am~2:D0pm BIdg LEF. Room 1222 Hoque, N 

WMST49eB 

Special Topics In Women's Studies: Asian and Asian-American Women 
3 credits. Grading Method REGP-F.AUD 
0201 TuTh 4:00pm-7:00pm BIdg HBK. Room 1116 Ho, C 

WMST 499 Independent Study: Individual Study In Women's Studies 
f-3 credits. Grading Method REG PF AUD 
Permission of department required Individual instruction course Prerequisite 3 hours of 
WMST, upper division standing 
0101 Time Arranged Room Arranged Staff 

0201 Time Arranged Room Arranged Staff 

WMST 699 Independent Study t-3 credits: Grading Method REGAUD 
By permission of instructor only 
0101 Time Arranged Room Arranged Staff 

0201 Time Ananged Room Arranged Staff 



ZOOLOGY 



ZOOL 



63 



(LIFE SCIENCES) 



ZOOL 201 Human Anatomy and Physiology I 4 aedits: Grading Method: REG/P-F/AUD 

0101 MTuWThF 11:00am-12:20pm BIdg, ZOP, Room 1243 Digiovanna, A 
TuWTh eooam-l 1 00am BIdg ZOP, Room 0207 MS; 

0102 MTuWThF 11 00am-i2:20pm BIdg. ZOP. Room 1243 Digiovanna, A 
TuWTh 8 OOanvl 1 00am BIdg ZOP. Room 0205 (LAB) 

0103 MTuWThF 11 :00anv12:20pm BIdg ZOP. Room 1243 Digiovanna. A 
TuWTh 1 :00prr>-4:00pm BIdg ZOP. Room 0205 (Ui,B) 

Preiequisile. BIOL 105 or equivalent Anatomy and physiology of the skeletal, muscular, neural, 
endocrine, and sensory systems Not accepted as credit toward the ideology major. 



ZOOL 202 Human Anatomy and Physiology II 4 credits: Grading Method REG/P-FAUD 



MTuWThF 8 00am-9,20am 
TuWTh 9:30am-12:30pm 
MTuWThF 8:00am-9:20am 
TuWTh 9:30am- 12 :30pm 
Prerequisites: ZOOL 201 or 
cardiovascular, respiratory, inur 
credit toward the zoology major 



BIdg ZOP. Room 1243 Ades. I 

BIdg ZOP, Room 0207 (U\B} 

BIdg ZOP, Room 1243 Ades, I 

BIdg. ZOP. Room 0205 (LAB) 
permission of department Anatomy and physiology of the 
une. digestive, urinary and neproduclive systems. Not accepted as 



0101 



ZOOL 210 Animal Diversity 4 credits: Grading Method: REG/P-F/AUD 

Meets USP Distributive Studies (B)Natural Sciences and Mathematics requirement. 
MTuWThF 8 00am-9:20am BIdg. ZOP. Room 1236 Under, H 

TuWTh 9:30am-12:30pm BIdg. ZOP, Room 0257 (LAB) 

A comparative study of the diversity of animal fomi and function, including analysis of structures 
and mechanisms which different organisms utilize to cope with similar requirements of life Not 
open for credit to students who have credit in ZOOL 293. 



ZOOL 213 Genetics 4 credits: Grading Method: REGP-FAUD 



MTuWThF 11:00atrv-12 20pm 
TuWTh 8 00am-11 00am 
MTuWThF 11 00am-12:20pm 
TuWTh lOOpm-^OOpm 

Prerequisiles one semester f 
Composition, transmission, var 



BIdg. ZOP. Room 1238 Imberski, R 

BIdg, ZOP, Room 0201 (LAB) 
BIdg ZOP, Room 1238 Imberski, R 

BIdg ZOP. Room 0201 (LAB) 
chemistry and one semester of a biological s 
ction. and regulated expression of genetic material. 



ZOOL 309H Honors Independent Study r^ credits. Grading Method: REG/P-F'AUD 

Permission of department required Conlacl department lo make ananqements, 
0101 Time Arranged Room Arranged Staff 

0201 Time Arranged Room Arranged Staff 



ZOOL 316H Honors Research 1-2 credits: Grading Method: REGP-F.AUD 

Permission of department required. Contact department to make artangements, 
0101 Time Arranged Room Arranged Staff 

0201 Time Arranged Room Arranged Staff 



ZOOL 319 Special Problems In Zoology 1-2 credits: Grading Method: REG/P-FAUD 

Permission of department required. Contact department to make arrangements 
0101 Time Arranged Room Arranged Staff 

0201 Time Arranged Room Arranged Staff 



ZOOL 328G Selected Topics In Zoology: Biology ot Aging 3 credits: Grading Method: REG/P-F/AUD 
Prerequisites: BIOL 105 or 101, or Zi30L 101 ZOOL 211 or equivalent strongly 
recommended 
0101 MTuWThF 9:30am-1 0:50am BIdg. ZOP. Room 1238 Olek. A 



ZOOL 32ez Selected Topics In Zoology: Field Research 1-3 credits: Grading Method: REG/P-F/AUD 
Permission of department required, 
0101 Time Arranged Room Arranged Staff 

0201 Time Arranged Room Arranged Staff 



ZOOL 609 Special Problems In Zoology 1-e credits: Grading Method: REG/AUD 

Permission of department required Contact department to make anangemenls. 
ne Arranged Room Arranged Staff 



0101 Time Arranged 
0201 Time Arranged 



Room Arranged 



ZOOL 799 Master's Thesis Research 1-6 credits: Grading Method: REG 
Permission of department required. 
0101 Time Arranged Room Arranged 

0201 Time Arranged Room Arranged 



ZOOL 899 Doctoral Dissertation Research t-8 credits. Grading Method REG 
Permission of department required 
0101 Time Arranged Room Arranged Staff 

0201 Time Arranged Room Arranged Staff 



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SUMMER PROGRAMS 
UNIVERSITY OF MD. 
COLLEGE PARK, MD 20742 



NON-PROFIT ORG. 

U.S. POSTAGE 

PAID 

COLLEGE PARK, MD 

PERMIT NO. 10