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Full text of "The summer school"

OFFICIAL PUBLICATION 



OF THE 



Maryland State College 



Vol. 16 



APRIL, X920 



No. 8 



THE 
SUMMER SCHOOL 




Beginning JUNE 21st and Ending JULY 30th 



AT 



COLLEGE PARK 



Entered by the Maryland State College at College Park, Md., as Second QaM Matter, Under 
Act of Congress of July 16, J 894. 



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BOARD OF TRUSTEES 



Term Expires. 
SAMUEL SHOEMAKER, ESQ., Chairman. .1925 

Baltimore County, Md. 
KOBERT CRAIX ESQ 1924 

Charles County, Md. 
JOHN M. DEXXIS, ESQ 1923 

Baltimore County, Md. 
DR. FRAXK J. GOODXOW 1922 

Baltimore City, ild. 
DR. W. W. SKIXXER 1928 

Montgomery County, Md. 
B. JOHX BLACK, ESQ. 1927 

Baltimore County, Md. 
HEXRY HOLZAPFEL, ESQ 1926 

Washington County, ^Id. 
CHARLES C\ GELDER 1929 

Somerset County, ild. 
JOHX E. RAIXE. . .' 1921 

Baltimore County, Md. 



OFFICERS OF THE SUMMER SCHOOL 

A. F. WOODS President 

H. F. COTTERMAX Director 

FRIEDA M. WTEGAXI), 

Adviser to Women, Gerneaux Hall 
ADELE STA^IP, Social Secretary and Adviser 

to Women in Calvert Hall 

MAUDE F. McKEXXEY Financial Secretary 

W. M. HILLEGEIST Registrar 

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OFFICERS OF THE SUMMER SCHOOL 

A. \\ WOODS Pivsi.lcnt 

11. \\ COrrKKMAX Dinvtor 

KKMKDA M. WlKCiAXD, 

Atlvisrr to Womciu (itTiuMiix Hal! 
.VhI\LI\ STAMP, S.H'ial Scrrctai'v and Advi-tT 

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FACULTY OF MARYLAND STATE COLLEGE 
A. F. WOODS, M. A^ D. Agr^ President. 



PROFESSORS: 

H. B. McDonnell, M. S., :\1. D., Professor of Chemistry, State Chemist, 

Dean of School of Chemistry. 
T. H. SPENCE, M. A., Professor of Modern Languages, Dean of School of 

Liberal Arts. 
W. T. L, TALIAFERRO, A. B., Sc. D., Professor of Farm Management. 
J. B. S. NORTON, M. S , Professor of Plant Pathology. 
CHARLES S. RICHARDSON, M. A., Professor of Public Speaking and 

Extension Education. 
HARRY GWINNER, M. E., Professor of ^Mechanical Engineering and 

Drawing, Superintendent of Shops. 
T. H. TALIAFERRO, C. E., Ph. D., Professor of Civil Engineering and 

Mathematics, Dean of School of Engineering. 
MYRON CREESE, B. S. E. E., Professor of Electrical Engineering and 

Physics. 
C. O. APPLEMAN, Ph. D., Professor of Plant Physiology, Dean of Graduate 

School. 
E. N. CORY, M. S., Professor of Zoology, State Entomologist. 
L. B. BROUGHTON, M. S., Professor of General Chemistry. 
J. E. METZGER, B. S., Professor of Agronomy. 

H. C. BYRD, B. S., Professor of Physical Education and Journalism. 
O. C. BRUCE, B. S., Professor of Soils. 
P. W. ZIMMERMAN, M. S., Professor of Plant Physiology and Acology, 

Dean of School of Agriculture. 
J. B. WiENTZ, M. S., Professor of Agronomy. 

P. I. REED, M. A., Ph. D., Professor of the English Language and Lit- 
erature. 
A. C. McCALL, Ph. D., Professor of Geology and Soils. 
R. C. REED, Ph. B., D. V. M., Professor of Animal Pathology, Dean of 

Division of Animal Industry. 
H. F. COTTERMAN, B. S., M. A., Professor of Agricultural Education, 

Dean of School of Education. 
J. A. GAMBLE, M. S., Professor of Dairy Husbandry. 
E. M. PICKENS, D. V. S., M. S., Professor of Bacteriology and Animal 

Pathologist of the Biological and Live Stock Sanitary Laboratory. 
DEVOE MEADE, Ph. D., Professor of Animal Husbandry. 
E. C. AUCHTER, M. S., Professor of Horticulture. 

E. B. McNAUGHTON, B. S., Professor of Home Economics Education. 
M. MARIE MOUNT, B. A., Professor of Home and Institutional Manage- 
ment, Acting Dean of Home Economics. 
M. M. PROFFITT, Ph. B., Professor of Trade and Industrial Education. 
NEIL E. GORDON, Ph. D., Professor of Physical Chemistry. 
T. B. THOMPSON, Ph. D., Professor of Economics. 
CAPT. GEORGE A. MATILE, U. S. A., Professor of Military Science 

and Tactics. 



R. WELLINGTON, M. S., Professor of Vegetable Gardening. 

.MRS. JANET THURSTON, Professor of Textiles and Clothing, and Foods 

and Cookery. 
G. J. SCHULZ, B. A., Assistant Professor of History. 
L, J. HODGINS, B. S., Assistant Professor of Electrical Engineering and 

Physics. 

C. J. PIERSON, M. A., Professor of Vertebrate Morphology. 

(\ F. KRAMER, M. A., Assistant Professor of Modern Languages. 

.J. 1*. SPANN, B. S., Assistant Professor of Mathematics. 

R C. WILEY, B. S., Assistant Professor of Chemistry. 

W. R. BALLARD, B. S., Assistant Professor of Pomology. 

H. W. STINSON, B. S., Assistant Professor of Modern Languages. 

S. S. STEINBERG, B. E., C. E., Assistant Professor of Civil Engineering. 

L. H. VANWORMER, M. S., Assistant Professor of Agricultural Chem- 
istry. 

H. B. HOSHALL, B. S., Assistant Professor of Mechanical Engineering. 

A. S. THURSTON, M. S., Assistant Professor of Vegetable Gardening and 
Floriculture. 

FRIEDA M. WIEGAND, B. A., Assistant Professor of Textiles and 
Clothing. 

M. F. WELCH, D. V. M., Assistant Professor of Animal Pathology and 
Bacteriology. 

H. D. McMURTRAY, B. S., Assistant Professor of Electrical Engineering 
and Physics. 

M. A. PYLE, B. S., Instructor in Engineering. 

MILTANNA ROWE, Instructor in Library Science and Librarian. 

W. A. GRIFFITH, M. D., Instructor in Hygiene, Physician. 

F. W. BESLEY, B. A., M. S., Sc. D., Instructor in Forestry, State Forester. 

J. B. BLANDFORD, Instructor in Horticulure, Horticultural and Campus 
Superintendent. 

R. V. TRUITT, B. S., Assistant in Zoology. 

F. D. DAY, B. S., Assistant in Agricultural Education. 

SGT. M. :McMANUS, Assistant in Military Science and Tactics. 



SPECIAL SUMMER SCHOOL IXSTRICTORS: 



EDWARD F. WEBB, Superintendent of Schools, Allegany County. 

Rural School Organization, Management, Community Relationships, 
and Psychology. 
ADELE STAMP, Y. M. C. A. 

Recreation, Plays and Games. 
KATE KELLY. 

Director Observation School. 
ELIZABETH I. :\IURPHY, Supervisor of Schools, St. :Mary's County. 

Geography and Nature Study, History and Arithmetic. 
NETTIE E. BROGDON, Supervisor of Rural Education. Montgomery Co. 

Primary and Grammar Grade Methods. 



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TWO CORXEltS OF THE C^AMPFS. 



GENERAL INFORMATION 

The sixth session of the Summer School of the Maryland State College 
begins Monday, June 21, 1920, and continues for six weeks, ending July 30. 

The work of the Summer School was designed originally for rural teach- 
ers, and the attendance has been largely of that class. Special attention 
is given to the needs of these teachers again this year. It has been found, 
however, that many persons who desire to pursue courses in other lines 
of work can come to the College conveniently during the summer session. 
For this reason courses academic and professional in character are offered 
for teachers of all classes of school work — elementary, secondary, and 
vocational; for special students, as farmers, breeders, dairymen, home 
makers, chemists, public speakers, and persons wishing to meet college 
entrance requirements; and for students who are candidates for degrees 
in agriculture, chemistry, education, engineering, home economics, and 
liberal arts. 

The instruction in the Summer School, which is an integral part of the 
College work, is free to all students of ^Maryland. 



LOC ATIO>. 

The Maryland State College is located in Prince George's County, Mary- 
land, on the Washington Division of the B. & O. R. R., eight miles from 
Washington and thirty-two miles from Baltimore; and on the City and 
Suburban Electric Railway, eight miles from Washington and twelve 
miles from Laurel. 

The College grounds front on the Baltimore and Washington Boulevard. 
The site of the College is particularly beautiful. T'he buildings occupy 
the crest of a commanding hill, which is covered with forest trees, and 
overlooks a broad valley and a number of suburban towns. In front, 
extending to the Boulevard, is a broad, rolling campus, the drill ground 
and athletic field of the students. A quarter of a mile to the northeast 
are the buildings of the Experiment Station. The College farm contains 
about three hundred acres, and is devoted to fields, gardens, orchards, 
vineyards, poultry, etc., used for experimental purposes and demonstra- 
tion work in agriculture. 



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TERMS OF ADMISSION. 

Teachers and special students not interested in a degree are admitted 
without examination to the courses of the summer session for which they 
are qualified. Before registering for such courses, however, they must 
consult the Director of the Summer School. 

The admission requirements for those who desire to become candidates 
for a degree are the same as for any other session of the College, and 
ii'volve graduation from a standard four-year high school. Before regis- 



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GENERAL INFORMATION 

The sixth session of tlu' SunniUT School of tliv Mary hint! State ('ollei^e 
1 'iiin^ Monday. Jiiiu^ iM, TJJo, and continues for six weeks, endinji: July :io. 

The work of the Summer School was desi?:ned originally for rural teach- 
. s, and the att«Midanc(» has been l.irgely of that class. S|>ecial attention 
i: given to the needs of these teachers aiAain this year. 1 1 ha-^ been found. 
1 iwever, that many persons who desirt^ to pursue courses in otlier lines 
( work can come to tlic College conveniently during the summer session. 
I'or this reason courses acad<'mic and professional in character are offered 
lor teachers of all clas es of school work — elementary, secondary, and 
vocational; for special students, as farmi'rs, breeders, dairymen, home 
MKikers, chemists, public sj»eakers, and p(»r>ons wishing to meet college 
entrance retiuirenients; and for students who are candidates for degrees 
ill agriculture, chemistry, education, engineering, home econnmics. and 
liberal arts. 

The instruction in the Summer School, which is an intcgial part of the 
( nllege work, is free to all students of .Maryland. 

LOrVTION. 

The .Maryland State College is located in Prince Cieoige's County, .Mary- 
land, on the Washington Division of the }\. ^ (). K. R., eight miles from 
Washington and thirty-two miles from naltinu)re; and on the City and 
Suburban Klectric Kail way, <'ight miles from Washington and twelve 
iniies from Laurel. 

The College grounds front on the lialtimore and Washington r.oulevard. 
The site of the College is particularly beautiful. Tiie buil(linu,s (u-cupy 
!ln' crest of a commanding hill, which is coverc^d with fore t trees, and 
overlooks a broad valley and a number of suburban towns. In front, 
extending to the Boulevard, is a broad, rolling campus, the drill ground 
and athletic field of th(^ students. A (|uarter of a mile to the northeast 
aic the buildings of the Kxperimcnt Station. The College farm contains 
aliout tliree hundrcHl acres, and is devoted to lields, gardens, orciiards. 
vineyards, poultry, etc., us«'(l for experimental purposes and dcmonstra- 
ti(>n work in agriculture. 



Ti:i{>lS 01 AHMISSION. 

Teachers and special students nt)t interested in a degree are admitted 
^^iHl(^ut (\xamination to the courses of the summer session for which lliey 
n!.' (|ualitled. IJefore registering for such courses. howevtT, they must 
*«nsiilt the Director of the Sunnner School. 

rile admission r«M|uirements foi* those who desire to become candidate^ 
h- a degree are the sauie as for any other session of the College, and 
iiolve gradual ion from a standard foui-year high school. I'efoi'e r<'gis- 



tering, a candidate for a degree rhould consult the Dean of the schoo 
from which he expects the degree to be recommended. 

Regularly registered students wishing to attend the lectures or a por- 
tion of the lectures of courses without doing the work connected therewith I 
are permitted to enroll in such courses as auditors without additional 
charge. Before registering for work of this character a student must 
consult the Director or the instructor in charge of the course in which h^ 
wishes to be an auditor. 

REGISTRATION. 

Monday, June 21s:t, is registration day. Students should register on 
this date and be ready for class work on the morning of Tuesday, June 
22nd. It is possible to register in advance and reserve rooms by sending 
a letter of application to the Director of the Summer School. Students 
are urged to make application for not more than nine credit hours. In- 
Ftructors will not be held for courses for which less than five students 
apply. For this reason application should be made at an early date by 
mail for all content courses numbered from 101 to 199. 

DESIGXATIOX OF COURSES. 

Courses numbered from 1 to 99 with an S before the number, as, for 
example. El. Ed. S. 11, are special Summer School courses and are not 
offered during the regular collegiate year. 

Courses numbered from 101 to 199 with an S following the number, a^ 
Eng. 101 S, are modifications of courses of the same number in the Col- 
lege catalog to meet Summer School conditions. 

Courses numbered from 101 to 199 without the S, as H. E. Ed. 109, are 
identical in every way with courses of the same symbol and number in 
the College catalog. 

The symbols, for examples: Eng., H. E. Ed., Agric. Ed., refer to the 
subject-matter grouping under which such courses are found in the gen- 
eral catalog. 



CREDIT AND CERTIFICATES. 

Since the courses are offered in the Schools of Agriculture, Chemistry. 
Education, Engineering, Home Economics and Liberal Arts, all the regu- 
lar courses and virtually all the special courses carry full academic 
credit toward a degree. Students completing the Summer School work 
in any of the subjects and passing a satisfactory examination are issued 
a certificate showing the amount and grade of the work done. Students 
not registered in the College are issued certificates of attendance. 

Educational courses satisfactorily completed will be credited by the 
State Superintendent of Schools to one of the following objects: first, to 
meet the minimum requirements of professional preparation for teachir? 
in this State, viz: at least six weeks' attendance at a school of pedagogy; 
second, the renewal of teachers' certificates which requires six weeks' 

8 



additional professional training for those of second and third grade; 
third, to meet the requirement for advancing the grade of a teacher's 
certificate according to the by-laws of the State Board of Education, as 
published in 1918; fourth, the renewal of high school teachers' certifi- 
cates. 

The term hour is the unit of credit as in other sessions of the College. 
A term credit hour is one lecture or recitation a week for a term, which 
is approximately twelve weeks in length. Two or three hours of labo- 
ratory or field work are counted as equivalent to one lecture or recita- 
tion. During the summer session a lecture course meeting five times a 
week for six weeks, requiring outside work, is given a weight of three 
term credit hours, or two semester hours, or one year hour. All credit 
is listed as term credit hours. 

ACT03Or0DATI0>S. 

The large dormitory, Calvert Hall, is reserved for women students. In 
addition, Gerneaux Hall, used by the students in home economics as a 
practice house, will accommodate a limited number. The Y. M. C. A. Hut 
will accommodate a limited number of men. Students who room in these 
dormitories will supply themselves with towels, pillows, pillow cases, 
sheets, and blankets. No additional charge is made for these rooms, 
but to secure them, early application should be made to the Director. 
Rooms may be reserved in advance, but will not be held later than noon 
of Tuesday, June 22. 

Students who desire to live in private homes may be accommodated in 
the village or in the nearby towns of Hyattsville, Riverdale and Berwyn. 
A select list of rooming and boarding places will be furnished upon 
request. 



EXPENSES. 

A registration fee of $5.00 will be charged to all applicants. This fee 
will be used to defray the expenses for athletic equipment, certain 
extra-curriculum activities, library, janitor service, and general use of 
College property. A special fee which is named in connection with the 
description of certain courses will be charged for the use of laboratory 
and other materials. One-half of the fees, including board, must be paid 
upon registration, and the remainder at the beginning of the third week 
of the term. The cost of board at the College Dining Hall will be $36.00 
for the entire term, or at the rate of $6.00 per week. Students who do 
not stay at the College over week-ends may procure board at the rate of 
$5.00 per week. Arrangements for this special rate must be made at 
the beginning of the term, at the time of registration. Day students 
who stay for lunch only may procure it at the rate of 35 cents per meal. 

The total expenses for the terms, exclusive of laundry and railroad 
fare, need not exceed $41.00. Students may have a reasonable amount of 
laundry work done at the College laundry at the rate of approximately 
seventy-five cents per week. 



I 



BOOKS. 

The College and Experiment Station Library will be open for use o| 
students. It contains a large number of carefully chosen reference books 
in the sciences, education, history, biography, poetry and the standarcj 
books of fiction. In addition, it contains a number of State and Nationa] 
reports and surveys. 

Teachers pursuing methods courses should bring with them any text-l 
books they may have dealing with the subjects they expect to teach. In 
all courses in which fees are charged text-books are furnished by the 
College. Text-books for all courses may be procured at the College 
Book Store. 

OBSERVATION SCHOOL. 

In co-operation with the College Park Home and School Association 
and the school officials of Prince George's County, an observation school 
is maintained for demonstrational purposes. The school is essentially 
rural in character and embraces grades one to six, inclusive. 

The school serves as a vacation school to the pupils of the College 
Park community and affords them an opportunity to make up deficiencies 
due to sickness and other causes and to review and round out instruction 
received during the regular school year. The school is free and a lim- 
ited number of pupils may be accepted from other communities. Applica- 
tion for entrance to the school should be in the hands of the Director not 
later than a week prior to its opening. 

Through the courtesy of its executive committee, students in education 
are given an opportunity to attend one meeting of the College Park Home 
and School Association. 

CONFERENCE HOURS. 

Conference hours are planned for two special purposes: (1) To give 
the student an opportunity to confer with the instructor on subjects 
relative to class work. (2) To serve as an hour during which round 
table discussions may be held on topics of common interest. Conference 
hours are arranged by individual instructors at the beginning of the 
session. 

SPECIAL LECTURES. 

Arrangements are made with educators of national reputation to give 
special lectures from time to time in fields of particular interest to stu- 
dents in the Summer School. Special conference hours are arranged for 
such lectures in order that students may have an opportunity to meet 
leaders in their special lines of work. Details are announced in the 
weekly calendar. 

STUDENT HEALTH. 

The College makes every effort to conserve the health of the students 
and maintains a hospital physician and competent nurse. The hospital is 
located on the campus. All cases of illness should be promptly reported 
to the College physician. Dr. W. A. Griffith, whose office is located in the 
College Hospital, phone Berwyn 74-M. 

10 



SOCIAL EVENINGS. 

On Friday evenings during the session informal gatherings of students 
are held on the campus. Orchestra and light refreshments are furnished, 
and the hours from 8.30 to 11.00 are given over to various kinds of enter- 
tainments directed by student committees. These evenings afford agree- 
able relaxation and enable the students of the Summer School to become 
well acquainted. In the last week of the session, the Dramatic Club will 
present an open-air play. Students will also be given an opportunity to 
engage in an evening play hour under the supervision of the Department 
of Physical Education. 



EXCURSIONS. 

The vicinity of College Park holds a wealth of historic and geologic 
interests. Saturday excursions will be arranged to Washington, Mount 
Vernon, Great Falls and other places of interest. 



ATHLETICS. 

Students will have use of the athletic field and the tennis and basket- 
ball courts. 



CORRESPONDENCE WITH INSTRUCTORS. 

Prospective students who desire information concerning individual 
courses are urged to correspond directly with the instructors in charge 
of the courses, addressing letters in care of Maryland State College, 
College Park, ^laryland. 



11 



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DESCRIPTION OF COURSES. 

EDUCATIO. 

Essentials of Method (Ed. S. 11)— Three credit hours. Five lectures per 
week. ^Nlr. Webb. 

This course is planned to serve as a basis for the more specific courses 
in educational theory and practice. It embraces a study of the important 
principles of education and emphasizes such topics as attention and 
interest; instincts; tendencies; habit formation; memory; association; 
economy in learning; individual differences. 

Educational Psyeliology (Ed. 102 S) — Three credit hours. Five lectures 
per week. Prerequisite Ed. S 11 or its equivalent. Mr. Webb. 

A study of instincts and their appearance; the psychology of learning; 
individual differences; and the mental development and characteristics 
of children during the successive school ages. 

Public Education in the United Stiites (Ed. 101 S)— Three credit hours. 
Five lectures per week. Miss McNaughton. 

This course is designed to introduce the students to the present day 
problems of education by means of a study of public education of the 
United States, with particular emphasis upon the educational develop- 
ment and reorganization of the past twenty-five years. 

Americanization and Education (Ed. S. 12) — One and one-half credit 
hours. Five lectures per week. Mr. Schulz. 

A study of the development of American ideals, relationships and duties; 
problems of the foreign-born; illiteracy, and the relation of the whole to 
the school system; needed educational adjustments and additions. 

(Elementary Education.) 

Kunil School Organization, Management and Community Belationships 

(El. Ed. S 11) — Three credit hours. Five lectures per week. Mr. Webb. 

This course deals with such topics as equipment, the daily program, 
records and reports, school government, school law and system, phases 
of consolidation, and community relationships, and stresses particularly, 
l)reparation for the opening of school, decorating, lighting, ventilating, 
seating, heating, janitor work, the organization of play, the planning and 
preparation of work, the continuous employment of pupils, discipline, 
professional ethics, and the rural school as a social center. 

Elementiiry School Methods (El. Ed. S 12) — Three credit hours. Five 
lectures per week. Miss Brogdon. 

This course is designed for persons wiio have had no previous teaching 
experience, and deals mainly with the problems, aims, methods, and 
materials of instruction of the first four grades of the elementary school, 
with particular application to rural conditions. The subject-matter of 



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13 



DESCRIPTION OF COURSES- 

KIK ( ATION. 

Kssoiifhils of >I<>tli<Mi {FA. S. 11) — Tliree credit hours. ^""1x0 lectures per 
xveek. Mr. Webl). 

This course is planned to serve as a basis for the more specific cour^t s 
in educational theory and practice. It embraces a study of the important 
itriuciples of education and emphasizes such topics as attention and 
interest; instincts; tendencies; habit formation; memory; association; 
fconomv in learning; individual differences. 

Educational INjclioloiij (Kd. lUL' S) —Three credit hours. Five lecture^ 
per week. Prereiiuisite Kd. S 1 1 or its ei|uivalent. Mr. Webb. 

A study of instincts and their appearance; the i)sychology of learninu: 
individual differences; and the mental development and characteristics 
oi childriMi duriuii the successive school aiies. 

riiblic Kdiicatioii in the I'liited States (Kd. KM S) — Three credit hours. 
Five lectures per week. Miss McNautihton. 

This course is desiiiued to introduce the students to the present day 
problems of education by means of a study of public education of the 
Inited States, with particular emphasis upon the educational develop- 
n)ent and rtH)ri;anization of the past twenty-tive years. 

Ainericaiii/atUai and Kducation ( Kd. S. 12) — One and one-half credit 
hours. Five lectures per week. .Mr. Schulz. 

A study of the development of American ideals, relationships and duties; 
problems of ilie foreiiin-born ; illiteracy, and the relation of the whole to 
rhe school system; needed educational adjustments and additions. 

1 Elementary Kdueatlon.) 

liiiral School th'uanixation, .Management and ( oniinunit\ Helation>hi|» 

» Kl. Ed. S 11) — Three credit hours. Five lectures per wt^ek. Mr. Webb. 

This course deals with such topics a< etiuipment, the daily proiiram. 
records and reports, school government, school law and system, phases 
of consolidation, and community relationships, and stresses particularly, 
preparation for the opening of school, decorating, lighting, ventilating, 
seating, heating, janitor work, the organization of play, the planning and 
preparation ot work, the continuous employment of pupils, discipline, 
professional ethics, and the rural school as a social center. 

Klenientar} School Methods iKl. Kd. S 12) — Three credit hours. Five 
hctures per week. .Miss Hrogdon. 

This course is designed for persons who have had no previous teaching 
« Aperience, and deals mainly with the problems, aims, methods, and 
■materials of instruction of the first four grades of the elementary school. 
'^ ith particular application to rural conditions. The subject-matter ot 



1»» 



each grade is outlined and evaluated. Special attention is given to meth- 
ods of teaching, reading, literature, story telling, and oral language. The 
latter part of the course is devoted to a survey of methods in nature 
study, number, geography, and history. Systematic observation in the 
demonstration school, critiques, and lesson planning are reqiuired. 

Elemeiitiiry School Methods (El. Ed. S 13)— Three credit hours. Five 
lectures per week. Miss Brogdon. 

This course is similar to Elementary Education S 12, except that it is 
designed for persons who have had at least one year of teaching experi- 
ence. 

Eleiueutiiry School Methods (El. Ed. S 14)— Three credit hours. Five 
lectures per week. Miss Brogdon. 

This course embraces a study of the problem, aims, methods, and 
materials of instruction of the last four grades of the elementary school, 
with special emphasis upon the needs of the rural school. Systematic 
observation in the demonstration school, critiques, and lesson planning 
are required. 

School Room Obsenatioii — Systematic observation is required of all 
students taking elementary school methods. The work is divided into 
three sections. :\Iiss Brogdon, Miss Kelley. 

Section I, for students taking Elementary Education S 12; section II, 
for students taking Elementary Education S 13; section III for students 
registered in Elementary Education S 14. 

Children's Literature (El. Ed. S 15) — Three credit hours. Five lectures 
per week. Miss ^Murphy. 

A content course dealing with types of literature for children, as: 
story telling, fairy tales, fables, myths, legends, historical tales, nature 
stories, poetry, methods, dramatization and seatwork ; sources of materials. 

(Jeogrraphy and Nature Study (El. Ed. S 16) — Three credit hours. Five 
lectures per week. Miss Murphy. 

The first of this course deals with geography as taught in the elemen- 
tary schools, and stresses problems, aims, methods, and materials of 
teaching the subject. 

The second part of the course deals with content, aims, type lessons, 
and materials in nature study, and the relation of nature study to the 
other school subjects. 

History and Arithmetic (El. Ed. S 17) — Three credit hours. Five lec- 
tures per week. Miss ^lurphy. 

Tlie fore part of this course will deal with a review of the essentials 
of American history, with a consideration of problems, aims, methods 
and materials of teaching the subject in the elementary school. 

The latter part of the course will embrace a study of the problems, 
aims, methods, and materials of teaching arithmetic in the elementary 
school. 

Elementary School Agriculture and Club Work (El. Ed. S 18)— One 
and one-half hours' credit. Five periods per week. Mr. Cotterman, Mr. 
Day. 



14 



This is essentially a content course in elementary agriculture dealing 
to some extent with the purposes, problems, methods and materials of 
teaching agriculture in elementary schools; the organization of club 
project activities; project supervision; reports based on the Boys' and 
Girls' Club work of the Extension Service; school exhibits. 

School Hygiene and First Aid (El. Ed. S 19) — One and one-half credit 
liours. Five periods per week. Miss McXaughton, Dr. Griffith. 

This course includes a general survey of school hygiene; instruction 
in emergencies and first aid; and the care and welfare of children. 

Recreation Plays and Games (El. Ed. S 20) — One and one-half credit 
hours. Five periods per week, ;Miss Stamp. 

This course deals with the study of theories of play; practice in play- 
ing games; practice in the instruction of games for children in primary 
and grammar grades. 

Recreational Leadership and Physical Education in Rural Schools (El. 
Ed. S 21) — One and one-half credit hours. Five periods per week. Miss 
Stamp. 

A continuation of Elementary Education S 20, stressing more particu- 
larly the theory of recreation, purpose of organized play, pageants, and 
community recreational activities. 

Elementiiry School Music (El. Ed. S 22) — One and one-half credit hours. 
Five periods per week. Miss 

This course deals with a study of the aims, content, and methods of 
teaching music, and the use of the phonograph in elementary schools, and 
places some emphasis upon community singing and other musical activi- 
ties. 

(Secondary Education.) 

Principles of Secondary Education (Ed. 107) — Three credit hours. Five 
lectures per week. ]Mr. Proffitt. 

A study of the evolution of secondary education; the articulation of 
the secondary school with the elementary school, colleges, technical 
schools, the community, and the home; the junior high school; programs 
of study and the reconstruction of curriculums; the teaching staff and 
student activities. 

Survey of High School 3Iethods (Ed. 103 S)— Three credit hours. Five 
lectures per week. Mr. Cotterman. 

A course dealing with the teaching process; the nature of objectives; 
the lesson plan; observation; critiques; teaching methods; type lessons, 
and motivation. 

Metliods in High School EngHsh and History (Ed 104 S)— Three credit 
hours. Five lectures per week. ;Mr. Proffitt. 

This course deals with the aims; content; sources of materials; analy- 
sis and arrangement of subject-matter; psychology of the subjects; 
special methods; note book, and other necessary auxiliary work. 

Methods in High School Sciences (Ag. Ed. 105S) — Three credit hours. 
Five lectures per week. ^Mr. Zimmerman. 

This course deals with the aims; content; sources of material; analy- 
sis and arrangement of subject-matter; psychology of the subjects; spe- 

15 



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cial methods; equipment and its proper use; note books, and other neces- 
sary auxiliary work. 

Methods in Secondary Vocational Agriculture (Ag. Ed. 101 S)— Three 
credit hours. Five lectures per week. Mr. Cotterman. 

This course embraces a study of the purposes of secondary vocational 
agriculture; vocational analysis; the arrangement of vocational informa- 
tion for instructional purposes; types of schools offering such instruc- 
tion; curriculums; daily programs; the farm job as the unit of instruc- 
tion; the place of auxiliary knowledge; the analysis, classification and 
arrangement of farm jobs, and auxiliary knowledge for instructional pur- 
l)Oses; lesson plans; observation; critiques; methods of the class period; 
the home project method, and its administration methods in other super- 
vised practical work; plant and equipment; the relation of the agricult- 
ural teacher to the school system. 

Methods in Secondary Vocational Home Economics (H. E. Ed. 101 S) — 

Three credit hours. Five lectures per week. Miss McNaughton. 

The purposes of Secondary Vocational Home Economics; a study of 
types of classroom work and management as observed in high schools; 
discussion of the methods of teaching; the relation of home economics 
to the school and home; the planning of lessons and courses of study 
suitable to the methods and purpose of vocational home economics; analy- 
sis of the various home activities in preparation for the home project; 
organization of the project; supervision and project reports. 

Vocational Education in High Schools (Ed. 108 S)— One and one-half 
credit hours. Five periods per week. ;Mr. Profhtt. 

A study of the development of vocational education; educational and 
social forces behind the movement; terminology; types of industrial 
schools; technical high schools; vocational education for girls; voca- 
tional education in rural communities; recent legislation. 

Recreational Leadership and Athletics in High Schools (Ed. 109 S) — 
One and one-half credit hours. Five periods per week. Mr. Byrd. 

This course is designed for athletic directors in high schools, and 
deals with systems of organized play for secondary schools; the direction 
of boys and girls engaged in such play, both in and out of the games, 
jind stresses in particular the kinds of games best suited to the various 

individuals and personalities. 

Secondary School Music (Sec. Ed. S 11) — Onfe and one-half credit hours. 
Five peri()ds per week. Miss 

TTiis course deals with a study of the aims, content and methods of 
teaching music, and the use of the phonograph in high schools, and 
places some emphasis upon community singing and other musical activi- 
ties. 

COMPOSITIOX, LITERATURE, AND PUBLIC SPEAKING. 

Composition and Rhetoric (Eng. 101 S) — Three credit hours. Five 
lectures per week. Mr. Richardson. 

Parts, principles, and conventions of effective thought communication. 
Daily short themes and periodical essays. 

16 



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Literature in America (Eng. ill S— 112 S)— Three credit hours. Five 
periods per week. Regi?tration subject to the approval of the instructor 
in charge. :\Jr. Richardson. 

Critical study of principal American authors. Consideration of national 
life in American letters and America's contribution to world literature. 
Lectures, discussions, reports. 

Oral Reading (P. S. 113 S— 115 S)— One and one-half credit hours. 
Three periods per week. :Mr. Richardson. 

Primarily for students intending to be teachers. Study of the tech- 
nique of vocal expression. The oral interpretation of literary master- 
pieces. Study of methods of teaching oral English in the schools. 



HISTORY A>D SOCIAL SCIENCE. 

History of tlie United States (H. 114 S— 115 S)— Three credit hours. 
Five lectures per week. Mr. Schulz. 

A rapid survey of the principal events in the life of the American 
people. The colonial period; the Revolution; growth of population; 
nationalism; rise to leadership. 

Social Psychology (Soc. 104 S) — ^TTiree credit hours. Five lectures per 
week. Mr. Thompson. 

This course deals with such psychological matters as underlie the 
work in the fields of sociology and other social sciences. The develop- 
ment, organization, and control of the fundamental instincts will receive 
considerable attention. 

Elements of Economies (Soc. 101 S) — Three credit hours. Five lectures 
per week. Mr. Thompson. 

Production, exchange, distribution, and consumption of wealth; the 
monetary system; public finance; land and labor problems; monopolies; 
taxation; other similar topics. 



MATHEMATICS. 

Algebra to Quadratics (Math. S. 11) — Partial entrance credit. Five 
periods per week. Mr. Spann. 

A review of the fundamental operations; factoring, highest common 
factor, and least common multiple; fractions, powers and roots; the solu- 
tion of linear equations, radicals, and the theory of exponents; the solu- 
tion of second degree equations in one unknown quantity of factoring. 

Algebra from Quadratics (Math. S. 12) — Partial entrance credit. Five 
periods per week. Mr. Spann. 

A course in elementary algebra, involving the solution of equations 
by the methods of linear and quadratic equations; ratio, proportion, and 
variation; properties of series, including the binominal theorem of 
integral exponents and the formulas for the nth term; the sum of the 
terms of arithmetical and geometrical progressions; logarithms. 

Plane Geometry (Math. S 13) — Partial entrance credit. Five periods 
per week. ;Mr. Spann. 

A course involving the study of the important theorems of Books I 
and II. Applications of the theorems to original exercises will be made. 

17 



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Plane Geometry (Math. S 14)— Partial entrance credit. Five periods perl 
week. Mr. Spann. 

Enrollment in the course implies that the student has completed satis- 
factorily the subject of plane geometry in a high school, or has com- 
pleted Math. S 13. Students in this course may complete the subjects. 
The course involves many original exercises and practical problems in 
which the theorems studied are applied. 

Solid Geometry (Math. S 15)— Three credit hours. Five periods per 
week. Mr. T. H. Taliaferro. 

Books VI to VIII, inclusive, with selected practical problems. 

Trigonometry (Math. S 16)— Three credit hours. Five periods per 
week. Mr. T. H. Taliaferro. 

Deduction of formulas and practical application of same in the solu- 
tion of right and oblique triangles, etc. 

Analytical Geometry CNIath. S 17)— Three credit hours. Five periods 
per week. :Mr. T. H. Taliaferro. 

Geometry of two and three dimensions; loci of general equations of 
second order; higher plane curves, etc. 

BIOLOGY. 

General Bacteriologry (Bact. S 11)— Tliree credit hours. Two lectures 
and three laboratory periods per week; laboratory fee, $2.50. Mr. Welch. 

The work covered in this course will include a study of the morphology 
and classification of representative types of the more common bacteria. 
Exercises will also be devoted to milk, water, soil, and certain disease- 
producing bacteria. 

General Botany (Bot. 101) — Four credit hours. Four lectures and three 
laboratory periods per week; laboratory fee, $2.50. Mr. Zimmerman. 

A survey of the entire field of botanical study. The most important 
phases will be studied somewhat in detail, an effort being made to give 
the student an understanding of how plants take up water and nutrient 
elements from the soil; how they manufacture food, and the structure 
of organs involved in carrying on these processes. 

General Zoology (Zool. 101) — Three credit hours. Three lectures and 
two laboratory periods per week; fee, $2.50. Mr. Pierson. 

A study is made of the general form-characteristics, habits, and classi- 
fication of animals, from the lowest to the highest forms. This course is 
designed to give the student a thorough knowledge of the principles 
underlying animal life, and the environmental conditions necessary to 
wholesome growth. 

Nature Study (Zool. S 11) — One and one-half credit hours. One lecture 
and two laboratory periods per week; fee, $1.00. Mr. Pierson. 

This courre embraces a field study of the life history, habits, and rela- 
tionships of a few selected local wild animals and insects. 

CHEfflSTRY. 

General Cliemistry and Qualitative Analysis (Chem. 101 or 102 or 103) — 
Four credit hours each summer term. Five lectures and two laboratory 
periods per week, each term; fee, $2.50. Mr. Broughton. 

IS 



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A study of the non-metals and metals. The non-metals are first con- 
; idered. Special attention is given those elements and compounds which 
.;re of industrial importance. The laboratory work accompanying this 
ourse in the first term consists, chiefly, of experiments illustrative of 
,he work in the class. During the last two terms systematic qualitative 
analysis of the more common bases and acids is the laboratory work pur- 
sued. 

Quantftsitiye Analysis (Chem. 105) — Three credit hours. One lecture 
and four laboratory periods per week. Prerequisite Chem. 101-103. Fee, 
$5.00. Mr. Broughton. 

The principal operations of quantitative analysis. Standardization of 
chemical balance. Standardization of gravimetric and volumetric meth- 
ods. 

Organic liiemistry (Chem. 112) — Four credit hours. Five lectures and 
two laboratory periods per week. Registration subject to the approval 
of the instructor in charge. Fee, $3.00. Mr. Broughton. 

The study of alphatic compounds; hydro-carbons, alcohols, aldehydes, 
fatty acids, ketones, etc. The laboratory work is purely synthetical. 

GEOLOGY. 

General Geology (Geol. 101) — Three credit hours. Three lectures and 
two laboratory periods per week; fee, $2.00. Mr. Bruce. 

A text-book, lecture and laboratory course, dealing with the principles 
of geology. It is designed principally for agricultural students in pre- 
paring for technical courses, but may be taken as a part of a liberal 
education. 

LANGUAGES. 

Elementary Latin (A. L. S. 11) — Partial entrance credit. Five periods 
per week. Mr. Spence. 

Drill and practice on the fundamentals of Latin Grammar and the 
acquisition of a vocabulary. 

Advanced Latin (A. L. S 121) — Three credit hours. Five periods per 
week. Mr. Spence. 

Selections from Virgil; prosody and mythology. 

Elenientiirj French (M. L. 101) — Three credit hours. Five periods per 
week. Mr. Kramer. 

Grammar; composition; conversation; easy reading. 

Advanced French (M. L. 104) — Three credit hours. Five periods per 
week. Mr. Spence. 

Translation of standard authors; sight reading; conversation. 

Elementary German (M. L. 121) — Three credit hours. Five periods per 
week. Mr. Kramer. 

Grammar; composition; conversation; easy reading. 

Advanced German (M. L. 124) — Three credit hours. Five periods per 
week. Mr. Kramer. 

Translation of standard authors; sight reading; conversation. 

Elementary Spanish (M. L. 141) — Tliree credit hours. Five periods per 
^veek. Mr. Stinson. 

Grammar; composition, and conversation. 

19 



Advanced Spanish (M. L. 143)— Three credit hours. Five periods pe] 
week. Mr. Stinson. 

Emphasis is laid on the verb; reading of easy text; conversation. 

PHYSICS. 

Mechanics and Sounds (Phys. S. 11)— Entrance credit. Five period 
per week. Fee, $2.00. Mr. Creese. 

This course consists of lectures, recitations, and experimental demon 
strations on mechanics of solids, fluids, and sound. 

Electricity and Magnetism (Phys. S. 12)— Entrance credit. Fivel 
periods per week. Fee, $2.00. Mr. Creese. 

A course involving the fundamental laws and principles governing the] 
subject of electricity and magnetism. 

Heat and Light (Phys. S. 13) — Entrance credit. Five periods per week 
Fee, $2.00. Mr. Creese. 

A study of the nature of heat, expansion, change of state, transmission, 
and radiation. The propagation of light; laws of reflection and refrac- 
tion, dispersion, etc. 

HOME ECONOMICS. 

Preparation and Service of Food (Foods 101 S) — Three credit hours. 
Three lectures and two laboratory periods per week. Fee, $3.00. Mrs. 
Thurston. 

A course designed for those who have had no previous work in Food?. 

Advanced Cookery (Foods 102 S) — Three credit hours. Three lectures 
and two laboratory periods per week. Prerequisite Foods 101 S or its 
equivalent. Fee, $3.00. Miss Mount. 

A course designed for those who have had elementary work in Foods. 

Household Management (H. M. 101 S) — Three credit hours. Five lec- 
tures per week. Mrs. Thurston, Miss Mount. 

Problems in the management of the home, including sanitation, plumb- 
ing, equipment, and labor-saving devices, the budget and household 
accounts. 

Costume Design (Art. 103 S) — T*wo credit hours. Three laboratory 
periods per week. Miss Wiegand. 

Appropriate dress; proportion of parts; application of color, harmony, 
art, to design costumes in pencil and water color. 

Practical Pattern Designing (Cloth. 102 S)— Two credit hours. Three 
laboratory periods per week. Miss Wiegand. 

Practice in drafting, cutting, designing of patterns. Emphasis is laid 
upon the development of one pattern from another. Designs are worked 
cut upon paper patterns which may be used in the construction of a 
dres^. 

INDUSTRIAL ARTS. 

Mechanical Drawing (Dr. 101) — One credit hour. Two laboratory 
periods per week; fee, $1.00. :Mr. Gwinner. 



20 



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Practice in plain lettering; use of the instruments; projection and 
simple working drawings; the plates upon completion being enclosed in 
covers properly titled by the students. 

Domestic Engriiieering (M. E. S 11) — Three credit hours. Three lectures 
and two laboratory periods per week; fee, $2.00. Mr. G winner. 

A course dealing with the mechanics of home equipment; water sup- 
ply; plumbing; sanitation; gas engines; heat and lighting. 

Woodwork and Farm Shop (Shop S 11) — One laboratory period per 
week. Registration subject to the approval of the instructor in charge; 
fee, $2.00. Mr. Crisp. 

This course is designed especially for teachers of vocational agricul- 
ture, and deals with the practical phases of farm carpentry; harness 
making and repairing; paints, their composition and mixing; cement 
work and form making. 

AGRICULTURE. 

Cereal Crops (Agron. 101) — Four credit hours. Five lectures and two 
laboratory periods per week. Registration subject to the approval of the 
instructor in charge; fee, $2.00. Mr. Wentz. 

A study of the history, distribution, culture, uses and improvement of 
cereal crops. The laboratory work is devoted to studies of the plant and 
grain of the cereal crops, with detailed descriptive study of the grain. 

Grain Judging (Agron. 102) — One credit hour. Two laboratory periods 
per week; fee, $2.00. Mr. W-entz. 

This course gives practice in judging the cereal crops for milling, 
seeding and feeding purposes. 

Introductory Study of Soils (Soils 101) — Three credit hours. Three 
lectures and two laboratory periods per w^eek. Prerequisite Geol. 101 or 
its equivalent. Registration subject to approval of instructor in charge; 
fee, $2.00. Mr. Bruce. 

The physical and chemical properties of soils in their relation to tillage 
operations, preparation of seed beds, and the maintenance of soil fertility. 
Field excursions are made to study soil formation and their physical 
properties. The practical work consists chiefly of experiments and 
demonstrations in soil physics. 

Fertilizers (Soils 104) — Four credit hours. Five lectures and two 
laboratory periods per week. Prerequisite Soils 101 or equivalent. Reg- 
istration subject to approval of instructor in charge; fee, $2.00. Mr. 
Bruce. 

The subject of fertilizers is developed logically from the needs of the 
plant and the condition of the soil to the selection of proper plant food 
for each crop under varying conditions of soils and climate. Some atten- 
tion is given to the home mixing of fertilizers. 

Elementary Vegetable Gardening (Hort. ill) — Four credit hours. Five 
lectures and two laboratory periods; fee, $2.00. Mr. Wellington and Mr. 
Thurston. 

This course includes a study of the different types of vegetable garden- 
ing; methods of propagation; construction and management of hot beds 
and cold frames; growing early vegetable plants under glass; and plant- 

21 



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I 



ing, cultivating and harvesting under irrigation and in a large fann 
garden. 

Aniiiteiir Floriculture (Hort. 128) — Three credit hour?. Three lecture 
and two laboratory periods per week; fee, $2.00. Mr. Tliurston. 

Plants and flowers for windows and home gardens. Soils, fertilizer.^ I 
containers, and potting and shifting of plants. The course should be ot| 
e pecial interest to students in home economics, but is open to anyon- 
desiring information regarding simple methods of plant culture. 

Elenieiitiiry Laudsenpe (TrJirdeniiig (Hort. 131) — Four credit hours. Fivo 
lectures and two laboratory periods per week; fee, $2.00. Mr. Thurston. 
A study of types, methods and principles underlying landscape garden- 
ing. The work is given with special application for farmsteads, cottage 
ground, and small suburban properties. Students who desire an intelli- 
gent point of view in landscape work, but who do not intend to take the 
more technical courses, should take this course. 

(weiieral Animal Husbandry (A. H. S 11) — Three credit hours. Four 
lectures and one laboratory period per week; fee, $2,00. Mr. Meade. 

This course is designed especially for teachers of vocational agricul 
ture, and deals with the general care, feeding and management of swine, 
sheep, horses and beef cattle. 

Farm Poultry (A. H. S 12) — Three credit hours. Four lectures and one 
laboratory period i)er week; fee, $2.00. Registration subject to approval 
of instructor in charge. Mr. Meade. 

Care of poultry on the general farm; breeds of poultry; breeding, 
feeding and selection of stock; incubation, brooding, fattening, killing, 
marketing and construction. 

Dairy Production aud Barn Practice (D. H. 102 S) — Three credit hours. 
Two lectures and one laboratory period per week. ;Mr. Gamble. 

The care, feeding and management of dairy cattle, including feeding 
standards, the balancing of rations, selection of feeds, systems of herd 
feeding, silage and silos, soiling systems and pa'^tures, the selection, 
care and feeding the sire, dairy herd development and management, 
methods of keeping and forms for herd records, dairy barn construction, 
arrangement and equipment; requirements for advanced registry and 
management of tests; dairy cost accounts and barn practices which influ- 
ence quantity and quality of milk. 

Farm Dairying: (D. H. 104 S) — Three credit hours. Two lectures and 
one laboratory period per week. Mr. Gamble. 

Composition of milk, butter and cheese; methods of testing for butterfat 
and for total solid«; equipping the stable and milk house; how bacteria 
and dirt get into milk; how they may be kept out; surface coolers and 
l)recooling; milk cooling tanks; washing and sterilization of utensils. 

Farm Management (F. :M. 101 S — 102 S) — Four credit hours. Five 
lectures and two laboratory periods per week. Registration subject to 
approval of instructor in charge. Mr. W. T. L. Taliaferro. 

A study of the business of farming from the standpoint of the indi- 
vidual farmer. This course aims to connect the principles and practice 
which the student has acquired in technical courses and to apply them to 
the development of a successful farm business. 



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iii.:^. tiilt'valiiii; and li.irvo.sliii^ under in'igati:jii and in a lar^e laii: 
iiard«>n. 

>iii.i(<'iir riori<'iiltiii'4' (llort. 12S) — Three credit hour \ Three lecture 
and two hihoratory periods per week; Uh\ $2.nn. Air. T'iiurston. 

IMants and Uoweis foi' \vin(h)\vs and home .gardens. Soils, fertilizer.- 
'oiitaincrs. and potting and shifting ol" plants. The course shuuld be o 
e pj'cial interest to students in hoiin' tM-ononiics, hut is open to anyon 
desiring information ie.i;ai-din.i; simple methods of i)lant culture. 

i:i( iiieiitiU'} I'iiiKlsciijK* <iiinleiiiii^ (llort. i:il) — Four credit linurs. F\\ 
1« riures and two laboratory periods per week; fee, $2.00. .Mr. Tliurstoi. 

.A study of lyix's. methods and principles underlyinj^: landscape garden 
inu. The work i tiiven with special ap|)lication for farmsteads, cottas^o 
uround. and small sul)urhan in-opei'ties. Students who desire an intidli 
iit'Ut point of \iew in landscape work, but who do not intend to take tlic 
morr teciinical courses, should take this course. 

<*eiienil Animal lliisl»aiMir> (A. H. S 11) — Three credit hours. Four 
lecture and on«' laboiatory i)eriod per week; fee, $-.00. .Mr. .Meade. 

This course is designed es|)ecially for teachers ot vocational agricul 
ture, and deals with the general care, feeding and management of swine. 
s!it»ep, horses and beef cattle. 

Farm roiiltr) (A. II. S liM Three credit hours. Four lectures and one 
lalKiiatory peiiod per w<'ek; fee, $2.00. Kegi tration subject to approval 
(tf instructoi' in charge. M!-. .Meade. 

Care of poultry on the general farm; breeds of |>oultry; breeiing. 
feeding and select iim of stock; incubation, brooding, fattening, killing, 
m iiketing and construction. 

I>:iir> IM'odiH'tioii and Hani Practu**' (D. 11. 102 S) Tliree credit hours. 
Two lectuiM's and one laboiatory period per week. .\lr. Gamble. 

The care, feeding and management of dairy cattle, including feedinu 
standi rds. the balancing of rations, selection of feeds, systems of herd 
feeding, silage and silos, soiling syst(»ms and pa tures, the selection, 
cart' and feeding the siie. dairy herd development and management, 
methods of keeping and forms for herd records, dairy barn construction, 
ariangement and eiiuipment; reijuirements for advanced registry an*! 
management of tests; dairy cost accounts and barn practices which influ- 
ence (luantity and (juality of milk. 

Farm nair}iiiir (IV M. \o\ S) Three credit hours. Two lectures and 
<me laboraii)ry iKM'iod per week. .Mr. (lamble. 

Composition of milk, butter and cheese; methods of testing for butterfat 
and for total solid-; e(|uii)ping the stable and milk house; how bacteria 
a.nd iliri gtM into milk; how they may be kept out; surface coolers and 
precooling; milk cooling tanks; washing and sterilization of utensils. 

Farm .Maiiatr<'meii( ( F. .\l. KM S— 102 S) — Four credit hours. Five 
h'ctures and two laboratory periods per week. Registration subject t( 
approval of in^trtictor in charge. .Mr. \V. T. L. Taliaferro. 

.\ study of the business of farming from tlu^ standpoint of the indi 
\itlual farmer. Tliis course aims to connect the principles and practic« 
which the student has aciiuired in technical courses and to apply them t- 
the developnu nt of a successful farm business. 



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