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Full text of "The summer school"

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PUBLICATION 

OP THE 

University of Maryland 



VoL 18 



MAY, 1922 



No. 1 




SUMMER SCHOOL 




Beginning JUNE 26tii and Ending AUGUST 4tli 



AT 



COLLEGE PARK 



Entered by the University of Maryland at College Park, Md., ai Second Claia Matter, nndar 
Act of Congreis of July 16, 1891. 



BOARD OF REGENTS, ^^^^ ^^^.^^^ 

1925 
SAMUEL M. SHOEMAKER, Chairman •••• 

Baltimore County, Md. 1924 

ROBERT CRAIN 

Charles County, Md. i923 

JOHN M. DENNIS 

Baltimore County, Md. 1931 

DR FRANK J. GOODNOW 

Baltimore City, Md. 192S 

DR. W. W. SKINNER 

Montgomery County, Md. ^927 

B. JOHN BLACK 

Baltimore County, Md. 1926 

HENRY HOLZAPFEL 

Washington County, Md. 1929 

CHARLES C. GELDER 

Somerset County, Md. 1930 

JOHN E. RAINE 

Baltimore County, Md. 

OFFICERS OF THE SUMMER SCHOOL. 

President 

A. F. WOODS '.Assistant to President 

H. C. BYRD Director 

H F COTTERMAN 

ELIZABETH BOYLE- ^.^^^^^^^ ^^^ Calvert Halls 

Social Secretary and Adviser to ^^ ^.^^^ ^^ Women, Gerneaux Hall 

FRIEDA M. WIEGAND . .Financial Secretary 

MAUDE F. McKINNEY " ' ' ' . .Registrar 

W. M. HILLEGEIST .Executive Secretary 

J. E. PALMER . ••••,-•••••„•;;; ; " ". ; secretary to the Director 

CLAUDIA E. FROTHINGH AM 

COMMITTEES. 

WOMAN'S ADVISORY COMMITTEE- 

Misses Mount, Boyle, Kellar. Houck, and Mrs. Welsh. 
SATURDAY EXCURSIONS COMMITTEE- 

Messrs. Proffitt. Day. Hutton. and Misses Ro.e and W.egand. 



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OFFICERS OF INSTRUCTION. 
ALBERT F. WOODS. M. A.. D. Agr.. President. 

The order of the following is that of seniority of appointment: 

H. B. McDonnell m c: at t>i ^ r 

W. T. L. TALIAFERRO A B £ n J ^/^^"^^^^ ^^'^ Philosophy. 
J. B. S. NORTON MS Prof!:, D Professor of Farm Management. 
C. S. RICHARDSON A MP.' °' Systematic Botany and Mycology, 
sion Education ' °^'"°^ °' ^"'^''^ ^^'''''"^ -^ Exten- 

HARRY GWINNER \r f td^ r . >, 

^ Dean, Coll^ of Enginferiir°' ''"'"'■^^' ^"^'"^^^'"^' ^-- 

T. H. TALIAFERRO C E Ph n r. r 

MYRON CREESE B 9 v I ?' f'"^^''"' "^ Mathematics. 

E. N. CORY MS Prnflc ^•/i°*«=°'- °f Electrical Engineering. 

C O. APPLEMA^f ^1°^!!^°;°^. Entomology, State Entomologist. 

chemistry.ra'n^ot'd JelS::;. " ^'^^ ^^-^°'- ^ ^io- 

c'e.- TEMPLE M S^pSe'sfo ''^ p["''?."* ^"'^ ^'^^^^^ °^ Athletics. 
J. E. METZGER B ^i' p ^f'"*^ °^P'^"t Pathology. 

O C BRT'^rK n c ^' ^'■°f^«^°^ o^ Agronomy. 
U. L. BRLCE, B. S., Professor of Soils 

C. J. PIERSON, A. M Professor .f 7 i 

P. W. ZIMMERJIAN M S p' f ^ ^f^' 

^ ^ Dean of Colltg^J o1 A'^rttr ^ °' "^'^"^ '^'^^^'^'^^^ ^"^ E-'°^>^. 

R.' ?■ reed"- D^^^M ''p ^"''^ °^'^^°'°->' -'l Soils. 

An^ma^'r?durtrv'Gro;°'"^°' °^ -'"™^' ^^*'>°">^3.> Chairman of 
H. F. COTTERAf AN, B S M A Pr.i^. 

-ector Of VocationaV^e^cher^— ^.^^^^^^^^^^^ 

E. M.^ICKENS^D'vrMT? ^'^ "-''-^- 

Pathologist oT't^eBili;,?';" °l ^-*--'°^y and Animal 

DEVOE MEADE PhDPrS ' . V^'.' ^^^'^'^ Sanitary Laboratory. 

E. C. AUCHTER M% pfT '°'' ;'^ -^"'"'^' Husbandry. 

M. MARIE MOUN^' A B P^r "°/'''<^"'*--- 

a.ement. Aclg Dean' of CoT'' ''."S"^ ^"' Institutional Man- 

EDNA B. McNAUgSton B ? P . ''°""' Economics. 

cation. ^^'^TON, B. S., Professor of Home Economics Edu- 

N. K GS?SoN^PhV'p''r/r^°'' 1 ou'"^*"^' ^'^"-*-"- 

Chemist. ' '°''''°' °f P''^^'"' Chemistry and State 

T. B. THOMPSON. Ph. D.. Professor of Economics and Sociology. 



<; S. STEINBERG, B. E., C. E., Professor of Civil Engineering. 

FRIEDA M. WIEGAND, A. B., Professor of Textiles and Clothing. 

FREDERIC E. LEE, Ph. D., Professor of Applied Economics, Dean 
College of Arts and Sciences. 

R. V. TRUITT, B. S., Professor of Aquiculture. 

H. A. JONES, Ph. D., Professor of Vegetable Gardening. 

RAY W. CARPENTER, A. B., Professor of Farm Equipment. 

H. C. HOUSE, Ph. D., Professor of English and English Literature, 
Director of Choral Music. 

A. N. JOHNSON, S. B., Professor of Highway Engineering, Director of 
Engineering Research, Dean College of Engineering. 

R. H. LEAVITT, Major, Infantry, D. O. L., Professor of Military Sci- 
ence and Tactics. 

FRED. JUCHHOFF, L. L. M., Ph.D., Professor of Accountancy and 
Business Administration. 

C. G. EICHLIN, A. B., M. S., Professor of Physics. 

F. W. BESLEY, A. B., M. F., D. Sc, Lecturer on Forestry. 

A. H. PUTNEY, Ph. D., D. C. L., LL. D., Lecturer on Diplomacy and 

International Law 
FRANK COLLIER, Ph. D., Lecturer on Social Psychology. 
GEORGE E, LADD, A. M., Ph. D., Lecturer in Engineering Geology. 
H. W. STINSON, B. S., Associate Professor of Modern Languages. 

G. J. SCHULZ, A. B., Associate Professor of History and Political 

Science. 
C. F. KRAMER, A. M., Associate Professor of IModern Languages. 

E. S. JOHNSTON, Ph. D., Associate Professor of Plant Physiology. 
R. C. WILEY, M. S., Associate Professor of Chemistry. 

L. J. HODGINS, B. S., Assistant Professor of Electrical Engineering. 
J. T. SPANN, B. S., Assistant Professor of Mathematics. 
H. B. HOSHALL, B. S., Assistant Professor of Mechanical Engineering. 
A. S. THURSTON, M. S., Assistant Professor of Floriculture. 
M. F. WELSH, D. V. M., Assistant Professor of Animal Pathology and 
Bacteriology. 

F. M. LEMON, A. M., Assistant Professor of English. 

GEORGE O. SMITH. M.S., Assistant Professor of Animal Husbandry. 

CLARIBEL P. WELSH, B. S., Assistant Professor of Foods, Head of 
the Department of Foods and Cookery. 

S. H. HARVEY, B. S., Assistant Professor of Dairy Husbandry. 

W. A. GRIFFITH, M. D., Instructor in Hygiene, College Physician. 

M. A. PYLE, B. S., Instructor of Civil Engineering. 

M. ROWE (Miss), Instructor in Library Science, Librarian. 

M. D. BOWERS, A. B., Instructor in Journalism. 

L. J. POELMA, D. V. S., Instructor in Dairy Bacteriology. 

SUSAN HARMAN, M. A., Instructor in English. 

BENJAMIN BERMAN, B. S.. Instructor in Civil Engineering. 

J. B. BLANDFORD, Instructor in Horticulture, Horticultural Superin- 
tendent. 



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W. E. LEER, B. S. A., Instructor in Agronomy. 
O. C. LICHTENWALNER, B. S., Instructor in Chemistry. 
E. F. NEW, B. P., L. L. M., Instructor in Commerce. 
W. E. WHITEHOUSE, B. S., Instructor in Pomology. 

E. B. STARKEY, M. S., Instructor in Chemistry. 

A. R. DYMOND (Miss), A. B., Instructor in Public Speaking. 

D. C. HENNICK, Assistant in Mechanical Engineering. 

F. D. DAY, B. S., Assistant in Agricultural Education. 
L. H. VAN WORMER, M. S., Assistant Chemist. 

H. R. WALLS, Assistant Chemist and Inspector. 

E. B. DONALDSON, M. S., Assistant Chemist and Inspector. 

A. L. FLENNER, B. S., Assistant Chemist. 

B. L. GOODYEAR, B. S., B. Music, Teacher of Voice and Piano. 
JESSIE BLAISDELL (Mrs.), Assistant in Music. 

J. S. DOUGHERTY, Captain, Infantry, D. O. L., Assistant in Military 
Science and Tactics. 

J. W. STANLEY, Captain, Infantry, D. O. L,, Assistant in Military Sci- 
ence and Tactics. 

H. LINDEN, Captain, Infantry, D. O. L. (B. S. in Engineering), As- 
sistant in Military Science and Tactics. 

W. H. McMANUS, Warrant Office, U. S. A., Assistant in Military Sci- 
ence and Tactics. 

W. H. SIMMONS, Sergeant, D. E. M. L., Assistant in Military Science 
and Tactics. 

EDWARD FERGUSON, Sergeant, D. E. M. L., Assistant in Military 
Science and Tactics. 



SPECIAL SUMMER SCHOOL INSTRUCTORS. 
,DELE STAMP. A. B.. Southern Division. American Red Cross. At- 
^''^ Unta. Ga., Special Adviser to Worsen ^^^ ^^^ 

High School. New Brunswick, N. J., t.ancB. 

Methods in High fhool Saence^ ^^^^^ ^^^^^^^ g^^. 

L. E. BLAUCH. M. A;^ ^-jf ^^^ ^S Washington. D. C Public 

Sra'ti^n in th'e"inited States and Hi-ry oj Educat.n. ^^^^^ 
CAROLINE ZEIGLER. A. B-. I-tr«c or m Engl sh Sp^^^^^^^ ^.^^ 

High School, Sparrows Point, Md., Met 

School English and History. Towson High School. 

EDYTH GORSUCH, A. B.. Instructor in Music. 

Towson, Md., Public School Music. Schools, Hissop. 

*™'L^rrii: tST:.u' rL»»u. SCO.. 

R^kvilk. Md., Rural S<''°°' 3",, 5,^0! M..h.n,.Ucs. 
Community R.[.t,o».b,p ""' ^'^r FredTi* County. F,.d«- 
HULDAH BRUST, Rural f '^"jj'**'; ,L k,„ Four Grade, 
id, Md.. El.m.ntary S^ool MMhod. «f lb. ^^ Education. 

*■ '■ Sn^.'^mafs'S: ^^^'^^ =.. Elementary Se.oo, 

E™A»SHi.rs5:» -- -rsetr '-""■ °"''- 

,UztArlVo^rl:L-'^^'"^ .--.. Baltimore. Md.. Reerea- 
tion, Plays and Games. ^ Health Nurse, Prince 

^"^^r™ ^o^'irHy.t-vm;, M^:SeHoo/„y..e.e ^^ - TeaeH- 
ing of Health in Public Schools. 



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GENERAL INFORMATION 

The eighth session of the Summer School of the University of Mary- 
land begins Monday, June 26th, 1922, and continues for six weeks, ending 
Friday, August 4th. 

In order that there may be thirty class periods for each full course^ 
classes will be held on Saturday, July 1st, and Saturday, July 8th, to 
make up for time lost registration day and for the regular holiday July 
4th. The regular Monday schedule will be followed July 1st and the 
regular Tuesday schedule on July 8th. There will be no classes or other 
collegiate activities held on July 4th. 

The work of the Summer School was designed originally for rural 
teachers. Many persons, however, it has been found, desire to attend 
the University in summer to pursue courses in other lines of work. For 
this reason additions, both academic and professional in character, have 
gradually been made until the present program of studies includes 
courses for teachers of the several classes of school work — elementary^ 
secondary, and vocational; for special students, as farmers, breeders, 
dairymen, home makers, chemists, public speakers, graduate students and 
persons who are candidates for degrees in agriculture, arts and science, 
education, engineering and home economics. 

The instruction in the Summer School is free to all students of Mary- 
land. 

LOCATION. 

The University is located in Prince Georges County, Maryland, on the 
Washington Division of the B. & O. R. R., eight miles from Washington 
and thirty-two miles from Baltimore; and on the City and Suburban 
Electric Railway, eight miles from Washington and twelve miles from 
Laurel. 

The grounds front on the Baltimore and Washington Boulevard- 
The site of the University is particularly beautiful. The buildings oc- 
cupy the crest of a commanding hill, which is covered with forest trees^ 
and overlooks a broad valley and several suburban towns. In front, 
extending to the Boulevard, is a broad, rolling campus, the drill ground 
and athletic field of the students. A quarter of a mile to the northeast are 
the buildings of the Experiment Station. 

TERMS OF ADMISSION. 

Teachers and special students not interested in a degree are admitted 
without examination to the courses of the summer session for which they 
are qualified. Before registering for such courses, however, they must 
consult the Director of the Summer School. 

The admission requirements for those who desire to become candidates 
for a degree are the same as for any other session of the University. 
Before registering, a candidate for a degree will be required to consult 
the Dean of the School from which the candidate wishes the degree to be 
recommended. 



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Regularly registered students wishing to attend the lectures or a por- 
tion of the lectures of courses without doing the work connected there- 
with are permitted to enroll in such courses as auditors with the consent 
of the instructor in charge. 

All course cards for work in the Summer School must be countersigned 
by the Director before being presented to the Registrar's office. 

REGISTRATION, 

Monday, June 26th, is Registration Day. Students should register on 
this date and be read}'^ for class work on the morning of Tuesday, June 
27th. It is possible to register in advance and reserve rooms by sending 
a letter of application to the Director of the Summer School. Most 
students find two full courses sufficient work for the summer period. 
Students are urged to make application for no more than nine credit 
hours. In no case will a student be granted credit for more than ten 
term credit hours for work in the Summer School. 

Unless otherwise stated, courses will be offered in 1922. Instructors 
will not be held for courses for which less than five students apply. 
For this reason application should be made at an early date by mail for 
all content courses numbered from 101 to 199. 

DESIGNATION OF COURSES. 

Courses numbered from 1 to 99 with an S before the number, as for 
example, Ed. S. 11, are special Summer School courses and arc not offered 
during the regular collegiate year. 

Courses numbered from 101 to 199 with an S following the number, 
as Eng. 101 S, are modifications of courses of the same number in the 
University catalogue to meet Summer School conditions. 

Courses numbered from 101 to 199 without the S, as Agron. 101, are 
identical in every way with courses of the saTiie symbol and number in 
the University catalogue. 

Courses numbered from 201 and above !ire for graduate students only. 
Many of the courses numbered from 101 to 199 may be used for graduate 
credit by special arrangement. 

The symbols, for examples: Eng., Ed., Agron., refer to the subject 
matter grouping under v/hich such courses are found in the general 
catalogue. 

CREDIT AND CERTIFICATES. 

The term hour is the unit of credit as in other sessions of the Univer- 
sity. A term credit hour is one lecture or recitation a week for a term, 
which is approximately tw^elve weeks in length. Two or three hours 
of laboratory or field work are counted as equivalent to one lecture or 
recitation. During the summer session a lecture course meeting five times 
a week for six weeks requiring the standard amount of outside work, is 
given a weight of three term credit hours, or two semester hours, or one 
year hour. All credit is listed as term credit hours. 

Educational courses satisfactorily completed will be credited by the 
State Superintendent of Schools as follows. 

First, toward meeting the minimum requirements of professional prep- 



aration for teaching in the elementary schools of the State, viz., at least 
six weeks' attendance at a school of pedagogy; a renewal of elementary 
teachers' certificates which requires six weeks' additional professional 
training for those of second and third grade; to meet the requirement 
for advancing the grade of elementary teachers* certificates. 

Second, tov/ard meeting the minimum requirements of professional 
preparation for teaching in high schools of the State and for renewal 
of high school certificates. 

Third, toward meeting the minimum requirements of professional 
preparation for teachers of vocational agriculture and home economics 
and the renewal of vocational teachers' certificates. 

SUMMER GRADUATE WORK. 

Special arrangements have been made for persons wishing to do 
graduate work in summer. By writing for the general University cata- 
logue all of the regulations governing graduate work may be procured. 
The Master's degree represents full time work for one academic year. 
At least 45 term credit hours, including a thesis, must be completed. 
Four Summer Sessions are considered the equivalent of an academic 
year. By carrying approximately ten term credit hours of graduate work 
for four sessions and submitting a satisfactory thesis students may be 
granted the degree of Master of Arts or Master of Science. Teachers" 
and other graduate students working for a degree on the summer plan 
must meet the same requirements and proceed in the same way as do 
students enrolled in the other sessions of the University. 

ACCOMMODATIONS. 

E. Section of Calvert Hall is reserved for m.en students. The remainder 
of this dormitory and Silvester Hall are reserved for women students. In 
addition, Gerneaux Hall and the new practice house used by students 
in certain Home Economics courses will accommodate a limited number. 
Students who room in these dormitories will supply themselves with 
towels, pillows, pillow cases, sheets and blankets. No additional charge 
is made for rooms, but to secure them, early application should be made 
to the Director. Rooms may be reserved in advance, but will not be held 
later than noon of Tuesday, June 27th. 

Students who desire to live in private homes may be accommodated 
in College Park or in the nearby towns of Hyattsville, Riverdale and 
Berwyn. Most students, however, in the past have found it more con- 
venient to room in the dormitories. 

EXPENSES. 

A registration fee of $8.00 will be charged to all applicants. This 
fee will be used to defray the expenses for athletic equipment, certain 
extra-curriculum activities, library, janitor service, and general use of 
University property. A special fee which is named in connection with 
the description of certain courses will be charged for the use of labora- 
tory and other materials. One-half the fees, including board, must be 
paid upon registration, and the remainder at the beginning of the third 
week of the term. The cost of board at the College Dining Hall will be 

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$42.00 for the entire term, or at the rate of $7.00 per week. Day students 
who stay for lunch only may procure the same at the rate of 35 cents 
per meal. 

The total expenses for the term, exclusive of laundry and railroad 
fare, need not exceed $50.00. Students may have a reasonable amount 
of laundry work done at the University laundry at the rate of approxi- 
mately seventy-five cents per week. 

Persons desiring to do graduate work will be charged $1.00 per credit 
hour and $10.00 for matriculation in the graduate school. After a stu- 
dent once matriculates in the graduate school, no further matriculation 
fees for summer graduate work are charged. The total fee for procuring 
a Master's degree on the summer plan, including matriculation fee, cost 
per credit hour and diploma fee need not exceed $65.00. 

LIBRARY. 

The library is housed in a separate two-story building and contains 
10,000 bound books and 5,000 United States Government documents, un- 
bound reports and pamphlets. On the first floor is collected mater^l 
relating to agriculture and related scientific subjects. The general read- 
ing room is on the second floor. All material is on open shelves where 
the students can easily locate it. Through the Inter-Library Loan Sys- 
tem of the Library of Congress and other government-owned libraries 
the University of Maryland library is able to supplement its reference 
material by either borrowing books from these government libraries or 
by personal work in them. 

The library is open from 8 a. m. to 5.30 p. m., Monday to Friday in- 
clusive, and on each jof these evenings from 6.00 p. m. to 10.00 p. m. On 
Saturday from 8 a. m. to 12.30 p. m. 

OBSERVATION SCHOOL. 

In co-operation with the College Park Home and School Association 
and the school officials of Prince George's County, an observation school 
is maintained for demonstrational purposes. The school is essentially 
rural in character and embraces grades one to six, inclusive. 

The school serves as a vacation school to the pupils of the College 
Park School and other communities and affords them an opportunity to 
make up deficiencies due to sickness and other causes and to review and 
round out instruction received during the regular school year. The 
school is free, but only a limited number of pupils may be accepted. 
Application for entrance to the school should be in the hands of the 
Director not later than a week prior to its opening. 

Through the courtesy of its executive committee, students in education 
are given an opportunity to attend one meetmg of the College Park 
Home and School Association. 

CONFERENCE HOURS. 

Conference hours are planned for two special purposes: (1) To give 
the student an opportunity to confer with the instructor on subjects 
relative to class work. (2) To serve as an hour during which round 
table discussions may be held on topics of common interest. Conference 
hours are arranged by individual instructors at the beginning of the 
session. 

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SPECIAL LECTURES. 

Arrangements are made with educators of national reputation to give 
special lectures from time to time in fields of particular interest to stu- 
dents in the Summer School. Special conference hours are arranged for 
such lectures in order that students may have an opportunity to meet 
leaders in their special lines of work. Details are announced in the 
weekly calendar. 

STUDENT HEALTH. 

The University makes every effort to conserve the health of the stu- 
dents and maintains a hospital physician and competent nurse. The 
hospital is located on the campus. All cases of illness should be promptly 
reported to the University physician. Dr. W, A. Griffith, whose office is 
located in the University Infirmary, phone Berwyn 74-M. 

SOCIAL EVENINGS. 

On Friday evenings during the session informal gatherings of stu- 
dents are held on the campus. The programs are varied. The hours 
from 8.30 to 11.00 are given over to various kinds of entertainments 
directed by student committees. These evenings afford agreeable relaxa- 
tion and enable the students of the Summer School to become well 
acquaintd. Friday evening, July 14th, will be "Eastern Shore Night*' 
and Friday evening, July 21st, "Western Shore Night." In the fifth week 
of the session the class in Recreational Leadership will present an open- 
air pageant. Community sings will be held at various times during the 
session. Students will also be given an opportunity to engage in an 
evening play hour under the supervision of the Department of Physical 
Education. 

EXCURSIONS. 



The vicinity of College Park holds a wealth of historic and geologic 
interests. Saturday excursions will be arranged to Washington, Mount 
Vernon, Great Falls and other places of interest in the neighborhood 
of the National Capital. All excursions will be in charge of a general 
committee of which Professor M. M, Proffitt is chairman. 

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DESCRIPTION OF COURSES 

AGRONOMY. 

Cereal Crops (Agron. 101 S.). — Four credit hours. Five lectures and 
two two-hour laboratory periods per week. Offered in 1922 and 1924. 
8.10, Lab.; 1.30, M. W. T-315. Mr. Leer. 

A study of the history, distribution, culture, and improvement of the 
cereal crops. The laboratory work is devoted to studies of the plant 
and grain of the cereal crops, with detailed descriptive study of the grain. 

Forage Crops (Agron. 102 S.). — Four credit hours. Five lectures and 
two two-hour laboratory periods per week. Offered in 1923 and 1925. 
Mr. Leer. 

History, distribution, adaptation culture and uses of forage, pasture, 
cover and green manure crops. The laboratory periods are largely de- 
voted to the identification and classification of forage plants and seeds 
and to purity and nativity tests of seeds. 

Grading Farm Crops (Agron. 103 S.)- — Three credit hours. Four lec- 
tures and two two-hour laboratory periods per week. Prerequisites, 
Agron. 101 S. or its equivalent. Offered in 1923 and 1925. Mr. Leer. 

This course is planned to satisfy the demand for information on the 
federal grain standards and the current status of market grades of field 
crops in general. A careful study is made of the grade requirements and 
in the laboratory the student gets practice in actually determining the 
market grades. 

Grain Judging (Agron. 104 S.). — One credit hour. Two two-hour lab- 
oratory periods per week. Prerequisites, Agron. 101 S. or its equivalent 
or it may be taken in conjunction with Agron. 101 S. Offered in 1922 and 
1924. Lab., 1.30, T. Th. T.-311. Air. Leer. 

This course gives practice in judging the cereal crops for milling, seed- 
ing and feeding purposes. 

Genetics (Agron. 108 S.). — Four credit hours. Five lectures and two 
three-hour laboratory periods. 9.15, Lab.; 1.30, T. F. T-315. Mr. Kemp. 

This is a study of variation and method of inheritance of characters in 
plants and animals and the effects of heredity upon man. The statistical 
methods used in the course are applicable in the presentation and inter- 
pretation of classroom data of any kind. 

ANIMAL HUSBANDRY. 

Animal Husbandry (A. H. 101 S.). — Four credit hours. Five lectures 
and one laboratory period per week. Offered in 1922 and 1923. 10.20, 
Lab.; 1.30, M. T.-211. Mr. Smith. 

This course is devoted to the study of the types and breeds of the 
various classes of farm stock, especial attention being given to the origin, 
history, characteristics and adaptability of such breeds. 

Feeds and Feeding (A. H. 102 S.-A.). —Three credit hours. Three lec- 
tures and two laboratory periods per week. Offered in 1922. 11.40, M. 
W. F.; Lab., 1.30, M. W. T.-211. Mr. Meade. 

Elements of nutrition, source, characteristics and adaptability of the 
various food stuffs to the several classes of farm livestock. Feeding 
standards and the calculation and compounding of rations. 

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Feeds and Feeding (A. H. 102 S.-B.).— Three credit hours. Three lec- 
tures and two laboratory periods per week. Offered in 1923. Mr. Meade. 

A continuation of A. H. 102 S.-A. 

Principles of Breeding (A. H. 104 S.). Four credit hours. Five lectures 
and one laboratory period per week. Offered in 1923. Mr. Meade. 

The course is designed to cover the practical aspects of animal breed- 
ing, including heredity, variation, selection, growth, development, systems 
of breeding and pedigree study. 

Swine Production (A. H. 105 S.).— Three credit hours. Four lectures 
and one laboratory period per week. Offered in 1922. 9.15, M. T. W. Th.; 
Lab., 1.30 Th. T.-211. Mr. Smith. 

Types and breeds of swine, care, feeding, breeding, management, eco- 
nomics of swine husbandry, and judging. 

Sheep Production (A. H. 108 S.).— Three credit hours. Four lectures 
and one laboratory period per week. Offered in 1923. Mr. Smith. 

Breeds of sheep; their history, characteristics and adaptability; care, 
feeding, breeding, and management; grades of wool, judging, and scoring. 

BOTANY. 

General Botany (Hot. 101 S.).— Three credit hours. Three lectures and 
two laboratory periods per week. 8.10, M. W. F.; Lab., 1.30 T. Th. 
T.-309. Mr. Temple. 

This elementary general course includes a study of structure, hfe 
processes and identification of the seed plants. Special attention will be 
given also methods of presenting the subject to high school strdcr.ts, 
and ample oT-po-tunity will be afforded for collecting and preserving 
material for 1 igb school study. An occasional nature study field trip 
will be taken on laboratory time. 

General Bot-.ny (Bot. 102 S.).— Three credit hours. Three lectures and 
two laboratory periods per week. Offered in 1923 Mr. Temple. 

A continuation of Botany 101 S.; includes a study of the plant groups, 
beginning with the lowest forms of plants and coniinuing through to 
the seed plants; reproduction in its various form; origin of the land habit 
of growth; adjustment of plants to their surrounding; forests of ferns: 
origin of flovrers and seeds. This and the preceding course may be 
substituted for General Botany of the regular college course. 

CHEMISTRY. 

General Chemistry (Inorg Chem. 101 S.).— Four credit hours. Five 
lectures and tv.^o laboratory periods per week. 9.15, Lab.; 1.30, M. W. 

N.-102. Mr. Gordon. 

A study of the non-metals together with the fundamental theories and 
principles of chemistry. One of the main purposes of the course is to 
develop original work, clear thinking and keen observation. This is 
accomplished by the project method of teaching. 

General Chemistry (Inorg. Chem. 102 S.).— Four credit hours. Five 
lectures and two laboratory periods per week. Prerequisites, Inorgan. 
Chem. 101 S. 10.20, Lab.; 1.30, M. W. H., N.-102. Mr. Gordon. 

A continuation of Inorg. Chem. 101 S., in which the theories and meth- 
ods of study are applied to the non-metals and metals. > 

13 • ' 



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I, 

I J. 



! 



I 



M 



i 



Qualitative Analysis (Inorg. hem. 103 S.). — Four credit hours. Two 
lectures and four laboratory periods per week. Prerequisites, Inorg. 
Chem. 101 S. 8.10, Lab.; 1,30, M. W. N.-102. Mr. Wiley. 

Systematic qualitative analysis of the more common bases and acids. 
This course can be taken in parallel with Inorg. Chem. 102 S. 

Analytical Chemistry (Anal. Chem. 101 S.)- — Three credit hours. One 
lecture and four laboratory periods per week. Prerequisites, Inorg. 
Chem. 101 S.-103 S. 11.40, M. Lab.; 1.30, T. W. Th. F. N.-102. Mr. 
Wiley. 

The principal operations of quantitative analysis applied to gravimetric 
and volumetric methods. 

Organic Chemistry (Org. Chem. 101 S.). — Four credit hours. Five 
lectures and two laboratory periods per week. Prerequisites, Inorg. 
Chem. lui S.-103 S. 8.10, Lab.; 1.30, T. Th. N.-102. Mr. Broughton. 

A study of the aliphatic compounds, hydrocarbons, alcohols, aldehydes, 
fatty acids, Ketones, etc. 

Organic Chemistry {Org. Chem. 102 S.). — Four credit hours. Five lec- 
tures and two laboratory periods per Vv'eek. Prerequisites, Org. Chem. 
101 S. 9.15, Lab.; 1.30, T. Th. N.-102. Mr. Broughton. 

A study of the aromatic compounds or benzene and its derivatives. 

DAIRY HUSBANDRY. 

Principles of Dairy Husbandry (D. H. S. 11). — Three credit hours. 
Four lectures and one laboratory period per week. Offered in 1922. 
8.10, M. T. W. Th. Lab.: 1.30, W. T.-211. Mr. Gamble and Mr. Harvey. 

The origin, history, development and characteristics of dairy cattle; 
the relationship of dairying to general agriculture; the composition of 
milk; butter and cheese; methods of testing for butter fat and for total 
solids. 

Dairy Production (D. H. S. 12). — Three credit hours. Four lectures 
and one laboratory period per week. Offered in 1922. 10.00, T. W. Th. 
F.; Lab., 1.30; F. T., 3.15. Mr. Gamble and Mr. Harvey. 

The care, feeding, and management of dairy cattle, including selection 
of feeds, systems of herd ieeding, silage, soiling crops and pasture, selec- 
tion, care and feeding the sires Dairy herd development and manage- 
ment. Methods of keeping and forms for herd records. Dairy cost 
accounts. Barn practices which influence quantity and quality in milk. 

Farm Dairying (D. H. S. 13), — Three credit hours. Four lectures and 
one laboratory period per week. Prerequisites, D. H. S. 11 and D. H. 12. 
Offered in 1923. Mr. Gamble and Mr. Harvey. 

How bacteria and dirt get into milk; how they may be kept out; equip- 
ping the stable and milk house; surface coolers and pre-cooling; milk- 
cooling tanks; sterilizers for utensils; washing and sterilizing utensils; 
dairy farm score cards; composition of milk, butter and cheese and 
methods of testing. 

Commercial Dairying (D. H. S. 14), — Three credit hours. Two lec- 
tures and two laboratory periods per week. Prerequisites, D. H. S. H 
and D. H, S, 12. Offered in 1923, Mr. Gamble and Mr. Harvey. 

Methods of testing and of manufacturing of dairy products. Dairr 

14 



machinery. Theory and practice of cream separation, pasteurization and 
processing of milk and cream; butter, ice cream and cottage cheese 
making. 

EDUCATION. 

Introductory Course in Educational Psychology (Ed. S. 11).— Three 
credit hours. Five lectures per week. 9.15, P.-207. Mr. Proffitt. 

Psychology of conscious life; the nature of consciousness; conscious- 
ness and behavior; learning a modification of unlearned behavior; atten- 
tion and behavior; behavior and the feelings; instincts and behavior; 
value of human instincts; laws of habit; laws of association; higher 
thought processes; economy of learning. 

Advanced Educational Psychology.-A. (Ed. 102 S.).— Three credit 
hours. Graduate credit by special arrangement. Five lectures per week. 
Prerequisites, Ed. S. 11 or its equivalent. 11.40, T.-301. Miss Houck. 

Characteristics of original tendencies; instincts and capacities; the 
individual's equipment of instincts; forms of behavior; satisfiers and 
annoyers; cerebral connectional physiology of the capacity to learn; 
development of bodily control; theories as to the order and dates for the 
appearance and disappearance of original tendencies and their effect upon 
curricula; value and use of original tendencies; the laws of learning; 
amount, rate, limit, and permanency of improvement; experiments in rate 
of improvement. 

Advanced Educational Psychology.-B. (Ed. S. 201).— Five credit hours. 
Five lectures per week. Open to graduate students on!}'. Offered in 

1923. Miss Ilouck. 

General principles of mental evolution and development; nature and 
different types of learning; the psychology of such racial products as 
languages and arts; individual differences, their causes and nature; types 
of intellect and character; mental variations; mental tests and measure- 
ments; the psychology of school practices; the effect of modern psy- 
chological theories upon methods and subject matter. 

Public Education in the United States (Ed. 101 S.).— Three credit 
hours. Graduate credit by special arrangement. Five lectures per week. 
8.10, Q.-202. Mr. Blauch. 

The evolution of public education in the United States as the expres- 
sion and promoter of democracy, emphasizing particularly rural educa- 
tion and present tendencies in reorganization; recent state and federal 
school laws; proposed legislation. 

History of Education.-A. (Ed. 126 S.).— Three credit hours. Graduate 
credit by special arrangement. Five lectures per week. Offered in 1923. 
Mr. Blauch. 

History of the evolution of educational theory; institutions and prac- 
tices; stressing particularly the contributions of Greece, of Rome, and 
of Europe to approximately 1750. 

History of Education-B. (Ed. 126 S.).— Three credit hours. Graduate 
credit by special arrangement. Five lectures per week. 9.15, Q.-202. 
Mr. Blauch. 

This course embraces a study of the history of the evolution of educa- 
tional theory, institutions, and practices as a survey of the part which 



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'^ZZ.!::VtZilZ^^^^^ -ionanties; the 

The way in which the: 7ysZl ^Lt^S fr^ ^'^ ^"^"* «"'-- 
national developn^ent; the func ion o Xa n Tn '" T '" ^"^'" 
baclcward peoples; the part which ed,^cJT ^^"""^ '° ^^^'°"s 

tion of nations. education may play in the recoustruc- 

Americanization in Education (Ed S 12^ tu 
lectures per week. Offered in 1923 Mr Bl7u!h " °""- ^'^<= 

whole to the school system needed f T'' ^^ *"' ''''''''°'' °^ ^^- 
tions. ^ • ""''^*^ educational adjustments and addi- 

Five'^ditToufs'-'i^rri^L pr^^^^^^^^ t-^^^^ ^^'- ^ -^)- 

only. 8.10, P.-207. Mr Proffitt "' ' ''" '' ^'"'"^'^ ^'"^<="t» 

Vocational education the earliest t^n» * c 
and objectives underlving tra ninl f r™"' ''"'"'"^'- P""^'?'" 

civilization; earlv srsten s of 'r . "^ '^^ ""'"'^ development of 

and Objectives; ^nj^rs^: ^o^nrZ^^lt ^ rhT""": f f ""^'^°^^ 
vocational education- obiect-Ve« nf " "^"'^ "« ^^"^ s°c'al demand lor 

schools: types of vocation eduo don th" ''"''""'' '" ''"^ P"^'- 
of occupations and needs of wo'Ss euid'T "J '""'^"'""^^ ^"^^'^^^ 
vocational co.rses; or.an-.ation of voc ' ^nal schoo'. "*f '=^'"-"' ^^ 
tional interest in vocational f-H,,.-*- -''°"a' schools; state and na- 

of vocational course^ ^^"^''tion; recent legislation; the planning 

cre^:;;; ,':::' i>:j;;';^:4:ftt^t?r ^'"^"^°" ^^^ -^ ^•>-^'- 

-eek. 9.t5,.T.-301. Mr. Cotterm:„ " ^"«"^--'«- Five lectures per 

a.Sru:;;'hirs h:;Ltv:f' °t^ ^-^^^ °^ '^^ -•^'^^ °f -"^--o-^' 

communities; the Present ft Xt rsr^i/llT/"" m"' ''''' °^ "-' 
tendencies in rural develoomenf *.' T "'*'"'' ^^o^th; present 

This course is desi.td tjeJa iy o'r th"*"" 1 ^^-"'^"-1 education, 
rural affairs who expect to be Ta L ' °^ agriculture and 

programs for rural people. "^°" *° "'^'^^ '" ^''^P'""^ educational 

(Secondary Education.) 

ho!frf cJadL^nfed.^ Sf ' -'r^' '"'^'"^^ ^^^- ^«^ S>-T'^-<^ "edit 
n.40. Q-203. Mr. Khngamaf '"■''''''-^^^- F>- ^-tures per week. 

This course treats of the essentialQ r.t .^^^i, j 
of all high school subject^ Such n ohi '"'^"'°^^,<=°;»™on to the teaching 
sidered: The hi^h schonln ^"^\P'°.''^,^™^ ^« the following will be con- 

cedure; selectio:'of"s b crmaite:.?;;"" Tr^"^ ""'■''''' '"''- '''■ 
school subiects- tfiP nrJn 1 "'^""' ^P^s of leamuig involved in high 

the question ai a facto '• '""= *"'"*^''"^ ^""^ "^^uctive methods; 

«.ethL r;tre :ocird";e:-S"°t:;ts'orrt'^^^"'"^'- ^'^^ -°^"' 

of pupils. Special attention wK of achievement, the marking 

evaluation of lesion pins! ^'"" '° ''' preparation and critical 

16 



Principles of Secondary Education (Ed. 124 S.). — Three credit hour*. 
Graduate credit by special arrangement. Five lectures per week. 9.15, 
Q.-203. Mr. Klingaman. 

This course deals mainly with the social foundations of secondary edu- 
cation and the educational values of the several subjects of the curricu- 
lum. Physical and mental traits of high school pupils; individual dif- 
ferences; characteristics of the high school population; comparative 
secondary education; the objectives of secondary education, and reor- 
ganization for attaining main objectives are other topics treated. 

Organization and Administration of High Schools (Ed. S. 202). — Five 
credit hours. Five lectures per week. Open to graduate students only. 
10.20, Q.-203. Mr. Klingaman. 

Organization, legal status, and control of the state school system and 
the relation of the high school to the state and other administrative 
units; standards for the physical plant and equipment; the preparation, 
selection, promotion, and supervision of teachers; text books; significant 
movements such as the junior high school; tests and measurements, co- 
operative agencies, continuation work; standards for judging instruction;, 
school records and statistics; courses of study; the hygiene of the high 
school; the progress of pupils — acceleration, retardation, and elimination. 

Administrative Problems of the High School (Ed. S. 203). — Five credit 
hours. Five lectures per week. Open to graduate students only. Offered 
in 1923. Mr. Klingaman. 

Daily programs; type programs; extra curricular activities; publicity; 
promotions; working S3-stems; classification of pupils; records and re- 
ports; relations with parents and the community; the tone of the school; 
the school library; the internal government of the school and other prac- 
tical problems of high school principals which arise in administrative 
work. 

Psychology of High School Subjects (Ed. S. 13). — Three credit hours. 
Graduate credit by special arrangement. Five lectures per week. 11.40, 
T.-315. Mr. Proffitt. 

A brief survey of the psychological principles which determine the 
scope and character of secondary education; mental characteristics of 
the secondary school student; the necessity for a psjxhological study of 
the aims, values, and methods of subject matter; psychological problems 
involved in mathematics, including the psychology of space and nuaiber; 
psychology of language and its application to some problems in English; 
the psychology of science, arts, history, and manual and vocational train- 
ing; the psychology of generalized experience as applied to high school 
subjects; preparation of paper dealing with some high school subject in 
accordance with modern psychological thought. 

Methods of English Composition in High Schools (Ed. S. 14). — Three 
credit hours. Graduate credit by special arrangement. Five lectures per 
week. 8.10, Q.-203. Miss Ziegler. 

Objectives in the teaching of English in secondary schools; selection 
of subject matter; state requirements and state courses of study; psy- 
chological principles underlying the teaching of English in secondary 
schools; the organization of materials: special methods and type lesson* 
in teaching different forms of composition. 

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Methods of Teaching Literature in High Schools (Ed. S. 15). — Three 
credit hours. Graduate credit by special arrangement. Five lectures per 
week. 9.15, P.-202. Miss Ziegler. 

Objectives in the teaching of literature in secondary schools; selection 
of subject matter; state requirements and state courses of study; the 
psychological principles underlying the teaching of literature in the sec- 
ondary schools; the organization of materials; special methods; type 
lessons. 

Methods in High School History (Ed. 115-116 S.) — Three credit hours. 
Graduate credit by special arrangement. Five lectures per week. 10.20, 
R.-200. Miss Ziegler. 

Objectives of history and civics in secondary schools; selection of sub- 
ject matter; parallel readings; state requirements and state courses of 
study; psychological principles underlying the teaching of history and 
civics; organization of material devices for motivating and socializing 
work; maintenance of the citizenship objective; type lessons; note book 
and other necessary auxiliary work. 

Methods in High School Sciences (Ed. 121-122 S.). — Three credit hours. 
Graduate credit by special arrangement. Five lectures per week. 8.10, 
P.-202. Miss Houck, 

Objectives of science in secondary schools; selection of subject matter; 
state requirements and state courses of study; phychological principles 
underlying the teaching of science in secondary schools; organization of 
materials for instruction; methods of the class period; lesson plans; 
preparation and organization of laboratory instruction; note books. 

Methods in High School Mathematics (Ed. 119-120 S.).— Three credit 
hours. Graduate credit by special arrangement. Five lectures per week. 
10.10, Q.-202. Miss Houck. 

Objectives of mathematics in secondary schools; selection of subject 
matter; state requirements and state courses of study; proposed reor- 
ganizations; psychological principles underlying the teaching of mathe- 
matics in secondary schools; lesson plans and devices for motivating 
work. 

Methods in Secondary Vocational Agriculture (Ed. 104-105 S.). — Three 
credit hours. Graduate credit by special arrangement, Five lectures 
per week. 8.10, T.-301. Mr. Cotterman. 

The philosophy of education underlying the introduction of vocational 
agriculture in the high school; survey of community needs; vocational 
analysis; types of schools and classes being established: curriculums 
and short courses; the analysis of farm industries for industrial purposes; 
the farm job as the unit in the analysis and the organization of material 
for instruction; preparation of job analysis outlines; the organization 
of farm shop courses; the checking of skills; type lessons and methods 
of the class period; the organization and conduction of project instruc- 
tion — project plans, project study, project work, project records, project 
supervision; the comparison of project records and reports; summer 
work of the agricultural teacher; equipment; school reports an4 records. 

Administration and Supervision of Secondary Vocational Agriculture 
(Ed. S. 205). — Five credit hours. Open to graduate students only. Five 
lectures per week. Offered in 1923. Mr. Cotterman. 

18 



Social significance of the extension of vocational agricultural education 
in scW ! the relation of vocational to general education; ob^ecive 

. determ ned by needs; community and county surveys; types of 

: hoo s beinf ^ 'types of control and administration; state^a^^^^ 

ederal aid; the Smith-Hughes Act; the trainmg of agncultura tea^^^^^ 

he analyss of agricultural vocations; the establishment of schools 

te and county programs; problems of the -P^-^-^ ;;7-jn^^^ 
of teachers in service; the development of community contacts, the 
comparison and measurement of results. mft S ^ — 

Methods in Secondary Vocational Home Economics (Ed. ^J-^J^ S.^ 
Three credit hours. Graduate credit by special arrangement. Five lee 
tures per week. 9.15, L.-202. Miss McNaughton. 

Survey of vocational movement; relation of home economics to other 
subjects of the curriculum; aims and ideals of home economics; deter- 
mtation and organization of subject matter; cl-s-room manage aen, 
types of lesson; lesson plans; equipment; use of illustrative material, 
text and reference books; correlation of school ^nd home work^ 

Practice and Teaching of Home Management m High Schools (Ed. b. 
16) -Five credit hours. Graduate credit by special arrangenicnt ^uni- 
ber periods per week will depend upon type of work under consideration. 

Miss McNaughton. . :n^lnHp«; 

This course is designed for teachers of home economics and inchadj^ 
both the subject matter and methods of home management. The course 
is given by the Department of Home Economics Education m co-opera- 
t on with [he Department of Home Economics. Much of the course w.U - 
be in the nature of research with the definite object.ve of work.ng out a 
course of study in home management for the secondary schoo s. The 
very nature of the work will require that much practice work in home 
managLent be done. The course will be given in the Home Economics 
Practice House, where the students taking the course will hve and con 
duct all of the household duties, including the preparation of two meals 
daily. Admission to the course will be limited to six students. Prefer- 
ence will be given to advanced students now teaching vocational home 
economics. Application for the work should be made before the opening 

of the summer session. . ,. . ^ • ^*:^„ 

Among the topics to be considered are the followmg: Organization 

of the household; budgets; schedule of duties; care of the house samta- 

tion, nature and action of cleansing agents; care of -'f'-.^^'^'^^ZTZn 

hangings, and furniture, labor-saving equipment; P'f "•"^; . f^^P^;;* °"; 

and service of meals; interior decoration; ideals of home life; selection 

of pictures, books, and music; home entertainment. 
Methods in High School Music (Ed. S. 17). -One and one-half credit 

hours Five periods per week. 9.15. Auditorium, Miss Gorsuch. 

This course deals with a study of the aims, content and methods of 
teaching music, and the use of the phonograph in high schools and places 
some emphasis upon community singing and other musical activ ties^ 
Students interested in music and in the development of school orche ras 
should not fail to bring with them the instruments -'^■<=Vu , w^ bel 
play as the development of an orchestra in Summer School will be a 

project of this class. 

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Hill 



Recreation and Athletics in High Schools (Ed. S. 18).-Three croH, 
hours^ F.ve lectures per week. 10.20, L.-202. This course will be ! 

Day Mr. Byrd. Mr. Proffitt. Mr. Cotterman. Miss Boyle and M 
Mackert. The course will be in charge of Mr. Mackert ^' 

_ Recreation and athletics as a training for citizenship and other nK 
jcctives of recreation and athletics in secondary schools- state and rn 
programs; publicity for athletics; the psychology involj d^^ ^e hoT;: 
developmg sk.l; organization of games and other recreational a ' vhie 
the grantmg of letters and other forms of recognition; the coaching.; 
soccor. dodge ball, basket ball, track and baseball; pr'ogrLs fo "J. 
.nd their special problems; reaching the boy; equipment and paraphe™ 

athle c% m""::c"'°" "' ' ^"^^"'°"^' ""'"• '"^l"^"'^ P'^^-o""s, 



'^T* 



(Elementary Education.) 
ihx?TEd't"l3)''T"''"^ ^"' Community Relation- 

«rWl '''"''' "^""^^ "^'^ '"'^ '^P^'^ "^ equipment, records Zl reports- 

school government, school law; preparation for the opening of schoo • 

he daily program; decorating, lighting, ventilating, seating heatin. 

ZmenTotof rT-"r ^"' ^^^^"^^^^^^^ ^' ^^^'^ contfnuous 1': 
tionTnH '^"' ^'r^^"'' Progressional ethics; phases of consolida- 

tion and community relationships 

Fot^oTadf. f^TT7. ^'i^°'' ^'''*°^^ "^^^ ^-Ph-- - the First 

Lctur^'s S L 20. ^f-^^y- -^^^'^ h--- Five lectures per week. 
lecture, 8.10, L.-202; Observation, 9.15. P.-200. Miss Brust 

experLT'" H '."'f "'' '" '"'"^^ "'" ^^"^ ^^^ "^ P-^-- teaching 

materia^^^ t T "." i'" "^'' ^^" ^^^^^^^^^^ ^^-^' -^thods, and 

materials of instruction of the first four grades of the elementary school. 

iT d'anret[ ?^^^^t'^'? ^""^ ^^'^^^^^ '^^^ ^^^'^^ -"e'r is out- 
Sine ' "^ • i^'T'^ '"'"^^"" ^'^ ^^^'^" ^^ -^thods of teaching 

Tnd tones^ '•!; '" '"' ""'''" ^^"^^^^^ ^''"^^"^^^ P^^-^^ P-tures 
teach nTo' H !r ' k'"' '"'^^^ ^"' geography. As the successful 

" '4 firs! Pnd "."^^ ^"'^ '^^"^'^ "P"" ^^^^^^"^' ^h-t subject will 
recme first and greatest attention. Mechanics of reading oral reading 

eadmg for interpretation of thought-silent reading-will be stresd 
tem^^ ic "otr^ T''^^'^ r" ""' ''''''' "^^" proper's tudv habits, st 
^^^:::::Zr '"' '--^^-'-'-^ -^-^^ -iti^ues and lessen 

hott'Tit I'T"'""^ ^'""'^ ""'^^^"^ (^^' S- ^^)-Three credit 
loT P.lr Sr Bru^s^ ^^'''- "^-'--^ '-''' ^•--'- ^^----"• 

P JilVwhrhi' "'^'r '"i ""'"'''"" ^- ''' ^^^^P* *^^* ^'t - designed for 

El^me^ ^ ri f .f ''^'' ^"' ^'^"^ ^^ ^^^^h^'"^ experience. 
(Ed r^o) "th .''':'' "^'' ^"^'^^^^ ^'^ ^^^ I'-t Four Grades 

L 20V o; .•'' ' ^^^^^^ Five lectures per week. Lecture. 8.10, 

1^.-203, Observation, 10.20, P.-200. Miss Shapard. 

20 



Designed for persons who have had no previous teaching experience 
and embraces the study of the problem, aims, methods, and materials of 
instruction of the last four grades of the elementary school, with special 
emphasis upon the needs of the rural school. Systematic observation in 
the demonstration school, critiques, and lesson planning are required. 

Elementary School Organization and Administration (Ed. S. 23). — 
Three credit hours. Five lectures per week. Lecture, 8.10, L.-203; 
Observation, 10.20, P.-200. Miss Shapard. 

Designed for persons who have had no previous teaching experience 
and embraces the study of the problem, aims, methods, and materials of 
instruction of the last four grades of the elementary school, with special 
emphasis upon the needs of the rural school. Systematic observation in 
the demonstration school, crii:ques, and lesson planning are required. 

Elementary School Organization and Administration (Ed. S. 23). — 
Three credit hours. Five lectures per week. 1.30, L.-107. Miss Shapard. 

This course is designed to meet the needs of principals of elementary 
schools. It deals with such topics as selection of teachers; preparation 
for the opening of school; requisition of supplies daily programs and 
other organization problems; school government; the arrangement of 
classrooms as to lighting, seating, equipment; and such other adminis- 
trative problems as the developing of an esprit de corps on the part of 
the staff; the professional growth of teachers in service; professional 
ethics; the promotion of drives; the principal's duty in regard to records 
and reports; the promotion of pupils; school projects and community 
relationships. 

Elementary School Geography (Ed. S. 24). — Three credit hours. Five 
lectures per week. First Section, 9.15; Second Section, 10.20, L.-305. 
Miss Whitney. 

A content course in geography designed primarily for teachers of 
geography in the elementary schools and emphasizes to some extent 
problems, aims, methods and materials of teaching the subject. 

Elementary School History (Ed. S. 253)— Three credit hours. Five lec- 
tures per week. 11.40, L.-305. Miss Whitney. 

A content course dealing with the essentials of American history with 
the consideration of problems, aims, methods and materials of teaching 
the same in the elementary school. 

Elementary School Mathematics (Ed. S. 26). — Three credit hours. Five 
lectures per week 8.10, L.-305. Mr. Broome. 

A content course in arithmetic covering the essential features of the 
subject, and embraces a study of the problems, aims, methods and mate- 
rials of teaching arithmetic in the elementary school. 

Elementary School Agriculture and Project Work (Ed. S. 27). — Three 
credit hours. Five lectures per week. First Section, 9.15, L.-300; Sec- 
ond Section, 10.20, P.-207. Mr. Day. 

This is essentially a content course dealing with the underlying prin- 
ciples of agriculture, with special consideration of the purposes, problems, 
motivation, management, methods and materials of teaching agriculture 
in elementary schools; the organization of project activities and project 
supervision; school exhibits and special class room projects. 



21 



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(/• School Hygiene, First Aid, and the Teaching of Health in the Ele- 
mentary School (Ed. S. 28). — Three credit hours. Five lectures per week. 
8.10, N.-102. Miss Langenfeldt. 

Principles of school hygiene; examination of children; communicable 
diseases and the relation of public health laws of Maryland to communica- 
ble diseases; the use of the emergency kit and first-aid treatment in 
schools; objectives in health teaching in elementary schools; health les- 
sons; and class projects in health instruction. 

Recreation, Plays and Games for the Elementary School (Ed. S. 29) -^ 
One and one-half credit hours. Five periods per week. 11.40, L.-202. 
Miss Boyle. v^ 

The course deals with the study of theories of play; practice in playing 
games; practice in the instruction of games for children in primary 
grades. 

Recreational Leadership and Physical Education in Rural Schools 
(Ed. S. 30). — Three credit hours. Five lectures per week. Prerequisites, 
Ed. S. 29. 2.30, L.-202. Miss Boyle. 

Origin of the play movement; evolution of the play movement in the 
United States; play at schools — urban and rural; stressing particularly 
theory of recreation; purpose of organized play, pageants, and com- 
munity recreational activities. 

Elementary School Music (Ed. S. 31). — One and one-half credit hours. 
Five lectures per week. 11.40, Auditorium. Miss Gorsuch. 

This course deals with a stud}' of the aims, content, and methods of 
teaching music, the use of the phonograph in elementary schools, and 
places some emphasis upon community singing and other musical activi- 
ties. Students interested in music and in the development of school 
orchestras should not fail to bring with them the instruments which they 
themselves play, as the development of an orchestra in Summer School 
will be a project of this class. 

ENGLISH. 

Composition and Rhetoric (Eng. S. 11). — Three credit hours. Five lec- 
tures per week. Accepted as the equivalent of Eng. 101 — the first term 
of "Freshman English." 8.10, L.-300. Miss Harman. 

Parts, principles, and conventions of effective writing, particularly as 
relating to exposition. Short themes. 

Descriptive Grammar (Eng. S. 12). — Three credit hours. Five lectures 
per week. The equivalent of Eng. 102 — the second term of "Freshman 
English." 10.20, L.-300. Miss Harman. 

Careful examination of the modifications and functions of the various 
parts of speech. Classification and analysis of clauses and connectives. 
Study of various types of sentences. Daily exercises in oral and written 
analysis. 

Descriptive and Narrative Composition (Eng. S. 13). — Three credit 
hours. Five lectures per week. Accepted as the equivalent of Eng. 103— 
the third term of "Freshman English." Oflfered in 1923. Miss Harman. 

English words; imagery; character delineation; short stories, themes 
and plots; study of classic models; class exercises. 

22 



.T7 107 S^ -Three credit hours. Five lectures per 
Modern Poets (Eng. 107 S.).— mree 
^eek. 11.40, L.-300. Mr. House. ^^^^ ^^g^sh 

Lectures on the -ture an^^^^^^^^^^ ^ L^^Soody, Noyes, Masefield, 

,erald Neihardt, Ta.ore, S^even^^^^^^^^^^^^ ^^^^ ^^^^^^^^ ^^^ _,. 

The Novel (Eng. 113 b.).— inrcc ^ 
10.80, L.-107. Mr. House „^„ative style and structure. Class 

S,;." .o»n. o< -h. ■■-•»■■"'»• «'|:f,''J'tr-Thr., edit h.„.. 

ENTOMOLOGY. 

/T- . lAi Q^ Three credit hours. Three lee- 
General Entomology ^^n ,101 S). -Three c ^^^^ ^^^ ^ 

tures. Two laboratory periods per weeK. 

Not offered in 1922. ^'■^°'J- ^j^^ ^eral economic importance 

Classification ^^--f^/^J^^'X^i'^rof insects to plants and other 

of insects; the habits and the relation collection of repre- 

animals are the points that will ''f^^^/^*; J^material will be required. 

sentative insects and the P-P/^^'^^J^/^t ; ^o" for his collection and 
Each student will be -^l--^ /o have a net a ^^^^^^^ ^^^^ ^^^ ^^^^ 

miscellaneous materials, all of which may o v 

dents' Supply Store. c > -Three credit hours. Three lec- 

AppUed Entomology (En^.^^^ ^;>- ^^^ ^^,,,4 ;„ 1922. Mr. Cory. 
^tisrrsfwTSSrtU; and practice of insect control. 

FARM EQUIPMENT. 

.TT T7 101^ Three credit hours. Three lectures and 
Farm Machinery (F. E. 101).-ihree crea Carpenter. 

drawn machinery. TT„,,r Icrtures and two 

r,= Trnaines (F E 102).— Four credit hours. Four lectures a 
Gas Engines (t. n.. i" ; Offered in 1923. Mr. Carpenter. 

laboratory periods per week, Offered in ly^ 

A study of automobile, tractor, and "«<=k "lotors 

Farm Buildings (F. K 10^^-Two c.d. h urs. ^X^.n... 

'Z ItroTairtTpt; rf^rm'structures; also of farm lighting, water 

supply, and ^^-^J^-^^^^ee credit hours. Three lectures and two 
Dramage (F. E. 108). [""^^ j^^ Carpenter. 

laboratory periods per week^ .^,l"dr'ainage Maryland drainage laws. 
The theory and practice of farm dramage. nd j 

23 i 



\ 



FARM MANAGEMENT AND FARM ACCOUNTING. 

Farm Management (F. M. 101-102 S.)- — Four credit hours. Five lec- 
tures and two laboratory periods per week. 10.20, Lab.; 1.30, M. P., 
T.-212. Mr. Taliaferro. 

A study of the business of farming from the standpoint of the indi- 
vidual farmer. This course aims to connect the principles and practice 
which the student has acquired in technical courses and to apply them to 
the development of a successful farm business. 

Farm Accounting (A. E. S. 103). — Four credit hours. Four lectures 
and two laboratory periods per week. 11.40, T. W. Th. F.; Lab., 1.30, T. 
Th., T.-212. Mr. Taliaferro. 

An introduction to the principles involved in the keeping of farm 
records and accounts with special reference to cost accounting and the 
analysis of the farm business. 

FRENCH. 

Elementary French (Fren. 1). — Three credit hours. Five lectures per 
week. 8.10, L.-303. Mr. Kramer. 

Drill upon pronunciation; elements of grammar; composition; conver- 
sation. 

Elementary French continued (Fren. 2). — Three credit hours. Five 
lectures per week. 9.1.5, L.-303. Mr. Kramer. 

Continued drill in grammar; and composition, reading and translation. 

Elementary French continued (Fren. 3). — Three credit hours. Five 
lectures per week. 10.20, L.-303. Mr. Kramer. 

Grammar; prose composition; reproduction; dictation; reading; trans- 
lation; memorizing. 

Note. — Not more than two of the above courses will be offered simul- 
taneously. Students will make choice at the opening of the session. The 
will of the majority will rule. 

HISTORY. 

American Colonial History (His. 102). — Three credit hours. Five 
lectures per week. 11.40, L.-303. Mr. Schulz. 

Reports. A study of the political, economic and social conditions of 
the American Colonies from the Settlement at Jamestown to the Adop- 
tion of the Constitution. 

Note. — In 1923 and succeeding years a wide range of offerings in His- 
tory will be made which will enable students to procure over a series of 
years the necessary ratio of credits to fulfill requirements for the A. B. 
or B. S. degree. 

HOME ECONOMICS. 

Essentials of Home Economics (H. E. S. ll). — Three credit hours. 
Credit cannot be used toward a degree by students majoring in Home 
Economics or Home Economics Education. Five lecture periods per 
week. 10.10, T.-315. This course will be handled by a number of special- 
ists. The course as a whole will be in charge of Miss Mount. 

This course is designed for those who wish a general knowledge of 

24 



course will consist of the following units: 

(a) Accounts and Budget Makmg. 

(b) Nutrition and Health. 

(c) Principles of Correct Dress. 

(d) Millinery. ^f:^n- hqp of sewing machine 
e Fundamentals of Garment Constract>on use of se ^ ^^^^.^^ 

attachments; making ot paper dress torms, use or 

furnishings, pictures and wall finishes. 
Elementary Foods (Foods 101 S--a).-T>-e credu hours^ Tv^o le^^^^ 

,.es and two ^^^^'^^l l^rnlTil^^^^^^^^ 
Chem. 101-103. Offered m 1922. ii.4U, i. i- , 

Mrs. Welsh and assistants. p.^^uction and composition of 

Principles and processes ot cooKer) . 

^^^^^' ^ ^ /T7 ^ ini c: M_Three credit hours. Two lec- 

Elcmentmry Foods (Foods 101 S-b).-i^ree c prerequisite, 

tures and two three-hour laboratory periods per week, rre q 

Foods 101 S.-a. Offered in 1923. 
Continuation of Foods 101 S.-a. ^^^u.r^. ond 

Advanced Foods (Foods 10. S.).-Four -^^t hours. Four lec^r^an^ 

two th"-^-;; ^^^-7°;i,''|"r\^,rif T.'^v"!?: ir. 1.30, t.-^o. 

thereafter with Foods 101 b.-D. li.^^S 
Mrs Welsh and assistants. 

Nutrition (Foods loa S.). -Five credit hour. One ectn. and n^ 
laboratory P^-d ciai!>^^ Prereau.s.te, ^^f ^r^.^^^^ "1U,,,3. 
Chemistry of Foods. Offered in 11>23. Mrs. v\ eib 

Food requirements and metabolism. Diets for the normal and ab- 
normal person Invalid cookery and feeding of ch.ldr.n. 
normal person^ ^^^^^ ^.^^ ,^^^^,^^^ ^„, ft,. 

Nutrition (Foods 104 ^.). ^^^^ ^,^j^j^ ^„j ^,. 

laboratory periods per week. Otterea 

sistants. . , _ j, in-i c 

Continuation of and alternating with Foods 103 S. 

. /TT ■»» 101 s")— Three credit houis. fivt 
Household Management (H. M. lOi b i i ^„. .^j, 

1 in -A T-s>.iq Mrs Welsh and assistants. 

ing, furniture, and equipment. 

Household Management (H. M. 102 S.^-Three credit hours, 
lectures per week. Offered in 1923. M-.ss Mount. 

Continuation of and given alternate summers with H M b. 

Garment Construction (Cloth. 101 S-) --Three cr^ed.thou- 
three-hour laboratory periods per week. Time to be arranged. 

^;:;dte„tal stitches, darning and patching;, P-^ceJ^ ^^ 

machine sewing, including practical use of machme attachments. 

25 



Five 



Four 

Mis3 



Ill' 



i 



li!-^ 



'lit 

I' 



Composition and Design (Art 101 S.-a). — Two credit hours. Three 
three-hour laboratory periods per week. 1.30, T. Th. F., T.-S19. Miss 
Wiegand. 

Space division and space relation; color schemes and exercises; original 
designs in which lines, values, and colors are put together to produce 
fine harmony. 

Composition and Design (Art 101 S.-b). — Two credit hours. Four 
laboratory periods per week. Offered in 1923, and thereafter alternating 
with Art 101 S.-a. Miss Wiegand. 

Continuation of Art. 101 S.-a. 

Millinery (Cloth. 103 S.).— Two credit hours. Three three-hour labor- 
atory periods per week. 1.30, M. W. F., T.-219. Mrs. Welsh. 

Millinery stitches and simple trimmings; drafting of patterns for hats; 
making and covering of buckram frames; making hats in velvet, silk, 
straw, and transparent materials; renovation of materials. 

MUlinery (Cloth. 104 S.).~Two credit hours. Four laboratory pe- 
riods per week. Offered in 1923. Mrs. Welsh. 

Continuation of Cloth. 103 S. Given every other year, alternating 
with Cloth. 103 S. 

History of Costume (Art 102 S.-a).— Two credit hours. Four lectures 
per week. 9.15, M. T. Th. F., T.-219. Miss Wiegand. 

History of Ancient, Medieval, and Modern Dress. Offered in 1922, 
alternating thereafter with Art 102 S.-b. 

Costume Design (Art 102 S.-b).— Three credit hours. Five laboratory 
periods per week. Offered in 1923. Miss Wiegand. 

Appropriate dress; application of color; harmony and proportion of 
parts to costumes designed in ink and water color. Given every other 
year, alternating with History of Costume. 

Textiles (Cloth. 102 S.-a).— Two credit hours. Four lectures per week. 
8.10, T. W. Th. F., T.-219. Miss Wiegand. 

History of textile industry; recognition of fibers. 

Dressmaking (Cloth. 102 S.-b).— Three credit hours. Five laboratory 
periods per week. Offered in 1023. Miss Wiegand. 

Use of commercial pattern, drafting, cutting, fitting and designing of 
patterns, construction of a cotton dress. 

Textiles (Textiles 101 S.).— Three credit hours. Two lectures and 
three laboratory periods per week. Prerequisite, Cloth. 102 S.-a. Offered 
in 1923. Miss Wiegand. 
^ Qualitative and quantitative analysis of fibers and materials; renova- 
tion of materials; dying and laundering. 

Practice and Teaching of Home Management in High Schools (Ed. S. 
16).— Five credit hours. Graduate credit by special arrangement. Num- 
ber periods per week will depend upon type of work under consideration. 
Time to be arranged. Miss McNaughton, 

This course is designed for teachers of home economics and includes 
both the subject matter and methods of home management. The course 
is given by the Department of Home Economics Education in co-opera- 
tion with the Department of Home Economics. Much of the course 
will be in the nature of research with the definite objective of working 

26 



out a course of study in home management for the secondary schools. 
The very nature of the course will require that much practice work in 
l^ome management be done. The course will be given in the Home 
Economics Practice House, where the students taking the course will 
live and conduct all of the household duties, including the preparation 
of two meals daily. Admission to the course will be limited to six stu- 
dents. Preference will be given to advanced students now teaching 
vocational home economics. Application for the work should be made 
before the opening of the summer session. 

Among the topics to be considered are the following: Organization 
of the household; budgets; schedule of duties; care of the house, sanita- 
tion, nature and action of cleansing agents; care of walls, floors, win- 
dows, hanging, and furniture, labor-saving equipment; planning, prepara- 
tion and service of meals; interior decoration; ideals of home life; 
selection of pictures, books, and music; home entertainment. 

HORTICULTURE. 

General Horticulture (Hort. S. 11). — Three credit hours. Credit can- 
not be used toward a degree by students majoring in Agriculture or 
Agricultural Education. Three lectures and two laboratory periods per 
week. 10.20, M. W. F.; Lab., 1.30 M. W., T.-309. Mr. Jones, Mr. Thurs- 
ton, and Mr. Whitehouse. 

In this course special topics in fruit growing, vegetable gardening, 
landscape and floriculture are discussed. Its aim is to present the gen- 
eral field of horticulture to one who has not studied any branch of the 
subject before. 

Landscape and Floriculture (Hort. S. 12). — Three credit hours. Credit 
cannot be used toward a degree b}' students majoring in Agriculture or 
Agricultural Education. Three lectures and one laboratory period. 
9.15, M. W. F.; Lab., 1.30, F, Greenhouse. Mr. Thursday. 

The principles of landscape gardening and their application to the 
improvement of home grounds. The propagation and cultivation of 
greenhouse plants. 

Elementary Pomology (Hort. 101). — Four credit hours. Five lectures 
and two laboratorj^ periods per week. 11.40, Lab.; 1.30, M. W., T.-309. 
Mr. Whitehouse. 

This course discusses the general problems incident to the planting, 
management, and marketing of such fruit crops as apples, peaches, pears, 
plums, cherries, quinces and small fruits. The principles of plant propa- 
gation as applied to fruit growing are discussed. 

Commercial Fruit Growing (Hort. 102). — Three credit hours. Three 
lectures and two laboratory periods per week. Offered in 1923. Mr. 
Whitehouse. 

The proper management of commercial orchards in Maryland. Special 
attention is given to orchard economics. 

Commercial Fruit Growing (Hort. 103). — Three credit hours. Three 
lectures and two laboratory periods per week. Offered in 1924. Mr. 
Whitehouse. 

A continuation of Hort. 102. 

27 






1 1 



i 



ill 



1 1. 



■IV' 



Elementary Vegetable Gardening (Hort. 111). —Four credit hours. 
Five lectures and two laboratory periods per week. 9.15, Lab.; 1.30, T. 
Th. Greenhouse. Mr. Thurston. 

This course includes a study of the different types of vegetable garden- 
ing; methods of propagation; construction and management of hot 
beds and cold frames; growing early vegetable plants under glass, and 
the growing and managing of individual gardens. 

Commercial Vegetable Gardening (Hort. 113).— Three credit hours. 
Three lectures and two laboratory periods per week. Offered in 1923. 
Mr. Jones. 

A study of methods used in commercial vegetable production. Trips 
are made to commercial gardens and various other places of interest. 

Commercial Vegetable Gardening (Hort. 114). — Three credit hours. 
Three lectures and two laboratory periods per week. Offered in 1924. 
Mr. Jones. 

This is a continuation of Commercial Vegetable Gardening. Hort. 113. 

INDUSTRIAL ARTS. 

Mechanical Drawing (Dr. 101).— One credit hour. Two laboratory 
periods per week. 8.10, M. W., Q.-300. Mr. Hoshall. 

Practice in plain lettering; use of the instruments; projection and sim- 
ple working drawings; the plates upon completion being enclosed in 
covers properly titled by the students. 

Woodworking (Shop 101 S.).— One credit hour. Two laboratory pe- 
riods per week. 1.30, M. T., P.-107. Mr. Hoshall. 

Use and care of wood-working tools; exercises in planing, mortising, 
and tenoning, and laying out work from blue prints. 

Forging (Shop (102 S.).— One credit hour. Two laboratory periods 
per week. 8.20, T., and 1.20, W. P.-107. Mr. Hoshall. 

Forging, iron and steel; welding; the making of steel tools. 

MATHEMATICS. 

Algebra (Math. 106-A).— Three credit hours. Five lectures per week. 
9.15, R.-200. Mr. Taliaferro and assistants. 

Quadratic equations, simultaneous quadratic equations, progressions, 
graphs, logarithms, etc. 

Algebra (Math. 106-B).— Three credit hours. Five lectures a week. 
10.20, P.-202. Designed for students who have had the equivalent of 
Math 106-A. Mr. Taliaferro and assistants. 

A course similar to Math. 104 of the general catalogue. 

Plane Trigonometry (Math. 107).— Three credit hours. Five lectures 
a week. Prerequisites, Math. 106-A or 106-B. 11.40, R.-200. Mr. Talia- 
ferro and assistants. 

Trigonometric functions. Development of formulas and their applica- 
tion to the solution of trigonometric equations and triangles. 

Plane Analytic Geometry (Math. 108).— Three credit hours. Five 
lectures per week. Prerequisites, Math. 106 and Math. 107. 8.10, R.-200. 
Mr. Taliaferro and assistants. 

A discussion of the straight line, conic sections and higher plane curves. 



MUSIC. 

Voice. — Hours to be arranged in consultation with the instructor at 
the opening of the session. One lesson per week; fee, $15. Two lessons 
per week, for term of six weeks; fee, $24. Mr. Goodyear. 

The courses in voice culture cover a thorough and comprehensive 
study of music based on the Italian method of singing. The work 
required to develop a singer is begun with the most fundamental princi- 
ples of correct breathing. Scale and arpeggio exercises, and all intervals^ 
the portamento, legato, and staccato, the trill, and all embellishments 
to develop the technique of singing, are studied through the medium of 
vocalizes arranged by the recognized authorities on the voice, under the 
careful supervision of the instructor. The study of songs and ballads 
is adapted to the ability and requirements of each singer, a thorough 
training being given in diction and phrasing, through the medium of 
sacred and secular ballads, leading to the oratorio and opera. Oppor- 
tunities are offered all voice pupils who are capable, to make public 
appearance in the regular pupils' recitals, as well as in the churches of 
the community. 

NATURE STUDY. 

Plant Life (N. S. 11). — One and one-half credit hours. One lecture 
and two laboratory periods per week. 2.30, M.; Lab., 3.30, T. W. T.-315. 
Mr. Norton. 

A content course designed primarily for elementary teachers, consist- 
ing chiefly of field study of trees, flowers, weeds and other forms of 
land and water plant life and inanimate nature; their behavior, their 
most significant characteristics; their relations to the conditions under 
which they live; the use of such studies to inspire an interest in the 
natural human environment and in more advanced work in science. 

Animal Life (N. S. S. 12). — One and one-half credit hours. Two lec- 
tures and one laboratory period per week. 2.30 W. Lab.; 2.30, Th. F., 
L-107. Mr. Truitt and Mr. Cory. 

This course is designed primarily for persons interested in a stu<?y 
of the various forms of animal life. A special effort will be made to 
collect, determine, and present representative forms which may serve as 
a reference collection for persons planning to conduct field work in 
nature study in schools. The materials for collecting and preserving 
collections may be purchased from the Students* Supply Store. 

PHILOSOPHY. 

Philosophy of the Ancient World (Phil. 101).— Three credit hours. 
Five lectures per week. Not offered in 1922. Mr. Spenee. 

A study of the development of civilization from the Greek and early 
Christian philosophy to the Middle Ages. Lectures and reports on out- 
side reading. 

29 



.*/- 



Ill 



I 

i; ■ 1 



I 



\. I 



i: 1 
M 



PHYSICS. 

Mechanics (Physics S. 11). — Four credit hours. Five lectures and two 
laboratory periods per week. Accepted as the equivalent of Physics 
104. Prerequisite, Plane Trigonometry. 8.10, Lab.; 1.30, M. T., R.-IOO. 
Mr. Eichlin. 

A discussion in the class room and application in the laboratory of 
the laws of the physical phenomena in mechanics. 

Magnetism and Electricity (Physics S. 12). — Four credit hours. Five 
lectures and two laboratory periods per week. Accepted as the equivalent 
of Physics 105. Prerequisite, Plane Trigonometry. 9.20, Lab; 1.30, W. 
Th., R.-IOO. Mr. Eichlin. 

A discussion in the class room and application in the laboratory of 
the laws of physical phenomena in magnetism and electricity. 

Heat, Light and Sound (Physics S. 13). — Four credit hours. Five lec- 
tures and two laboratory' periods per week. Accepted as the equivalent 
of Physics 106. Prerequisite, Plane Geometry. 10.20, Lab.; 1.30, Th. F., 
R.-100. Mr. Eichlin, 

A discussion in the class room and application in the laboratory of 
the laws of physical phenomena in heat, light and sound. 

Note. — Not all of the above courses w^ill be offered simultaneously. 
Students wmII make choice at the opening of the session. The will of the 
majority will rule. 

PLANT PAHHOLOGY. 

I 

General Plant Pathology (Pit. Path. 101 S.).— Three credit hours. 
Three lectures and two laboratory' periods per week. 9.15, M. W. F. 
Lab.; 1.30, M. F., T.-309. Mr. Temple. 

This course gives training in the identification and the control of the 
diseases of fruits, field crops, and truck crops. It is the same course that 
is given during the first term of the Junior 3'ear. 

Advanced Plant Pathology (Pit. Path. 105 S.). — Credit according to the 
time devoted to the subject. Lectures, conferences and laboratory work. 
Undergraduate and graduate. Time to be arranged. T.-309. Mr. Tem- 
ple. 

Opportunity to specialize in plant pathology in general or in the 
pathology of particular groups of plants; a study of the reports of origi- 
nal investigations; familiarit}' wn'th and practice in pathological technique; 
special problems. 

PLANT PHYSIOLOGY. 



Plant Physiological (Pit. Phy. 101). 
and two laboratory periods per week. 
Th. Lab.; 1.30, T. Th., T.-301. Mr. Zi 

The first course in Plant Physiology 
principles of absorption, transpiration 

Plant Physiology (Pit Phy. 102).— 
and two laboratory periods per week. 

The following subjects are studied: 

30 



— Four credit hours. Four lectures 
Offered in 1922. 10.20, M. T. W. 

mmerman. 
deals with the water requirements, 

and mineral nutrient requirements. 

-Four credit hours. Four lectures 

Offered in 1923. Mr. Zimmerman. 

Compounds produced by plants; 



synthesis of plants; metabolic processes; the growth of plants and tropic 

piovements. 

Advanced Plant Physiology (Pit. Phys. 103). —Three credit hours. 
Graduate credit by special arrangement. Two lectures and three labora- 
tory periods per week. Prerequisite, General Botany and Plant Phy- 
siology. Offered in 1924. Mr. Zimmerman. 

The study of plants in relation to their environments. Plant forma- 
tions and successions in various parts of the country are briefly treated. 
Huch of the work, especially the practical, must be carried on in the field, 
and for this purpose type regions adjacent to the University are selected. 
It is generally necessary to take three or four trips at some distance 
from the University, in which case Saturdays are used for that purpose^ 

PUBLIC SPEAKING. 

Oral Reading (P. S. 101 S.).— One and one-half credit hours. Three 
periods per week. 11.40, M. W. F., T.-203. Mr. Richardson. 

Primarily for students intending to be teachers. Study of the technic 
of vocal expression. The oral interpretation of literary masterpieces. 
Study of methods of teaching oral English in the schools. 

j^ote. — As in former years, special courses in Public Speaking will be 
arranged at the opening of the session to meet the needs of the students 
who enroll 

SOCIOLOGY. 

Elementary Sociology. — Three credit hours. Five lectures per week. 
Accepted as the equivalent of Soc. 101. 9.15, L.-203. Mr. Thompson. 

The origin, development, present conditions, and social functioning 
of social units such as the family, the school, the church, clubs, parties 
and associations. Interpretation of the causes of the strength and weak- 
ness of modern social institutions, showing their influence upon the gen- 
eral welfare of society and the progress tow^ard greater efficiency. 
Analysis of social causes and effects of ignorance, crime and poverty. 
Discussion of problems arising from city life, immigration and growth of 
population. 

Social Psychology (Soc. S. 12). — Three credit hours. Five lectures per 
week. Accepted as the equivalent of Soc. 104. Offered in 1923. Mr. 
Thompson. 

This course deals wnth such psychological matters as underlie the 
work in Sociology and other social sciences. An effort will be made to 
anah^ze the salient features of human nature, which find expression in 
social life. The fundamental instincts as dynamic forces in the indi- 
vidual and in society, their origin, development, organization and con- 
trol. Analysis of the value problem. 

31 



STUDENTS SCHEDULE 



ZOOLOGY. 

General Zoology (Zool. 101 S.). — Three credit hours. Three lectures 
and two three-hour laboratory periods per week. This course covers 
the work of Zool. 101 and Zool. 101-a as outlined in the University cata- 
logue. 8.10, M. W. F. Lab.; 1.30, T. Th., L.-107. Mr. Pierson. 

The basic principles of animal biology are emphasized rather than the 
morphology of selected types. 

General Zoology (Zool. 102 S.).— Three credit hours. Three lectures 
and two three-hour laboratory periods per week. Prerequisite, General 
Zoology 101 S. or its equivalent. This course covers the w^ork as out- 
lined in the University catalogue under General Zoology 102 and 102-b. 
Not offered in 1922. Mr. Pierson. 

A continuation of General Zoology 101 S. 



L.. 
2... 
3... 

4 . • • 



l» 5. . • 



6.. 



7.. 



TIME 



8.10. 

9.16. 
10.20. 
11.40. 

1.30. 

2.30. 

3.30. 



MONDAY 



TUESDAY 



WEDNESDAY 



THURSDAY 



FRIDAY 



SATURDAY 



CHANGES IN THE PRINTED SCHEDULE 

Amy vaH«tl«B ttom tkm RHatctf sclietf «lc mmmt W Millittr- 
Ised Uy Uie rcfUitrar, wlM rc%«lrcs tkm approval of tUc 
€troctor mmit flic licad ol the tf epartmeBt concenctf • 



CHANGES IN REGISTRATION 



Aay ekaage af caaraaa is Hiada oaly aa tta wHtfca par- 
aitsalOB irani tMa dircciar aad la aaMect ta a laa ^ aaa 
daUar ($!••#) after tHa ffrat ffvc daya. After aeeariag 
aaeli ivrfttea pemlaalaa fraia the dfreetar tke atadeat 
maat preaeat tlie aaaie to the regtatrar wIm la tara laaaea 
the atadeat a elaaa eard far the eaarae he la eaterlafl 
aad wlthdraival eard ta the prafeaaor la eharge af the 
eaarae fraai whleh the atadeat wlthdrawa. Ualeaa thfa la 
doae aa eredlt will he glvea far the aew eaarae. 

OFFICE OF THE EEGISTEAE. 



MEY TO EinUMNOS 



i^iiorrlU SaU. 
M—Clieiiiical. 

F-^Mechtnlctl Engineering. 
O— Civil Ingineering. 
E.-4UecCrical Kngineeriag. 
T— Agiicnltaral. 



STUDENrS SCHEDULE 



ZOOLOGY. 

General Zoology (Zool. 101 S.)- — Three credit hours. Three lectures 
and two three-hour laboratory periods per week. This course covers 
the work of Zool. 101 and Zool. 101-a as outlined in the University cata- 
logue. 8.10, M. W. F. Lab.; 1.30, T. Th., L.-107. Mr. Pierson. 

The basic principles of animal biology are emphasized rather than the 
morphology of selected types. 

General Zoology (Zool. 102 S.). — Three credit hours. Three lectures 
and two three-liour laboratory periods per week. Prerequisite, General 
Zoology 101 S. or its equivalent. This course covers the work as out- 
lined in the University catalogue under General Zoology 102 and 102-b. 
Not offered in 1922. Mr. Pierson. 

A continuation of General Zoology 101 S. 



BRIOD 

i> I* • • 
2... 

4... 

6... 
7... 



TIME 



8.10. 



9.15, 



10.20. 
11. iO. 



MONDAY 



TUESDAY 



1.30. 



2.30. 



3 30. 



WEDNESDAY! THURSDAY 



FRIDAY I SATURDAY 

I 



CHANGES IN THE PRINTED SCHEDULE 

Aay varlafloii froai tlic printed sebedmlc mvat lie •■tlior- 
Ised hy file registrar* wlio reqnlree tke approval ol tlie 
aireetor and tlie kead ol the department eoncemed. 

CHANGES IN REGISTRATION 

Any elianae of eoaraes la made only on tlie ivrltten per- 
mission Irom tlie director and Is snblect to a tee ol one 
dollar ($i*OS) alter tlie llrst live days. Alter secnrlno 
saeli ivrltten permission Irom tbe director the stndent 
mast present the same to the registrar ivho In tnm Issues 
the student a class card lor the course he Is entering 
and MTlthdraival card to the prolessor In charge ol the 
course Irom ivhlch the student %vlthdrai^s. Unless this Is 
done no credit ivlll be given lor tbe neiv course. 

OFFICE OF THE REGISTRAR. 



MEY TO BULDINGS 



l~.MorriU Hall. 
N->Clieiiilcal. 

P-~Mechanlcal Engineering. 
Q~Givil Engineering. 
R^SIectrical Engineering. 
T— Agricultural.