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Full text of "The summer school"

OFnCIAL PUBLICATION OF TTffi 



UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 



Vol. 19 



APRIL, 1923 



C 

C 



Summer School 

June 25th-August 4th 

1923 




COLLEGE PARK, MARYLAND 



No. I 



Entered by the Univeraity of Maryland at College Park, Md., as Second Class Matter j 

under Act of Congress of July 16, 1891. 



CONTENTS 

Calendar Page 2 of Cover 

Officers of Administration 3 

Instructors 4 

General Information 6 

Daily Schedule of Classes 11 

Description of Courses 12 

Students' Schedule Page 3 of Cover 






CALENDAR 1923-1924. 



June 16, 1923 — Saturday — Commencement day. 



THE SUMMER SESSION 

June 25, Registration, Agricultural Building. 

June 26, 8.15 a.m.. Instruction in the Summer Courses begins. 

July 4, Wednesday — Independence Day. University buildings closed. 

July 6, Thursday — Classes meet as usual. 

August 4, Saturday — Close of Summer Courses. 

THE COLLEGE YEAR 

September 17-18 — Entrance Examinations. Registration for all students. 

January 21-26 — Registration for the second semester. 

January 28-February 2 — First semester examinations. 

February 4 — Classes begin. Second semester. 

June 2-6 — Second semester examinations. 

June 14, 1924 — Commencement Day. 

All Simimer School instruction will begin promptly on Tuesday morning, 
June 26, in conformity with the schedule on page 11. 

Students may register, in advance, by mail prior to Saturday, June 16; 
after this date in person only. (See page 7) 



CONTENTS 

Calendar ^^^^ ^ of Cover 

Officers of Administration '^ 

Instructors 

General Information 

Daily Schedule of Classes "^^ 

Description of Courses ^-' 

Students* Schedule Page 3 of Cover 



SUMMER SCHOOL 



THE UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 



SUMMER SCHOOL 

1923 



OFFICERS OF ADMINISTRATION 

Albert F. Woods President of the University. 

H. C. Byrd Assistant to President. 

WillardS. Small Director. 

Adele Stamp Dean of Women, Calvert Hall. 

Pearl Anderson Adviser to Women, Gerneaux Hall. 

Maude F. McKinney Financial Secretary. 

W. M. Hillegeist Registrar. 

Alma Preinkert Assistant Registrar. 

J. E. Palmer Executive Secretary. 

Claudia E. Frothingham Secretary to the Director. 



COMMITTEES 



Woman's Advisory Committee: 

Misses Stamp, Mount, Boyle, Houck, and Mrs. Welsh. 
Saturday Excursions Committee: 

Messrs. Day, Hutton, and Misses McNaughton and Wiegand, and Mrs. 
McVey. 



4 



UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 



INSTRUCTORS 

Leslie W. Baker, M. C. S., C. P. A., Of the firm of Baker 

& Hendrix, Accountants, Baltimore, Md Education 

L. E. Blauch, Ph. D., Specialist Land Grant Colleges, U. S. 

Bureau of Education Education 

Elizabeth Boyle, Public Athletic League Education 

Edwin C. Broome, Superintendent of Schools, Montgom- 
ery County Education 

Huldah Brust, Rural Helping Teacher, Frederick County, 

Frederick Education 

Maynard A. Clemens, M. A. Director, School of Commerce, 

University of Maryland Education 

H. F. Cotterman, B. S., M. A., Professor of Agricultural 

Education and Rural Sociology Education 

Frank D. Day, B. S., Elementary Agriculture Education 

C. G. Eichlin, A. B., M. S., Professor of Physics Physics 

G. Eppley, B. S., Professor of Agronomy Agriculture 

J. A. Gamble, M. S., Professor of Dairy Husbandry Agriculture 

F. W. Geise, M. S., Professor of Vegetable Gardening Agriculture 

N. E. Gordon, Ph. D., Professor of Physical Chemistry and 

State Chemist Chemistry 

Edith Miller Haring, Assistant Supervisor of Music, 

Washington, D. C Education 

S. H. Harvey, B. S., Asst. Professor of Dairy Husbandry . -Agriculture 

Frank P. Hiner, M. A., School of Commerce, University 

of Maryland Education 

H. B. Hoshall, B. S., Asst. Professor of Mechanical 

Engineering Engineering 

H. C. House, Ph. D., Professor of English and English 

Literature, Director of Choral Music English 

Helen R. Houck, M. A., Instructor, Roosevelt Junior High 

School, New Brunswick, N. J Education 

Tressa B. Johnson, Asst. Professor of English English 

W. B. Kemp, B. S., Associate Professor of Genetics and 

Agronomy Agriculture 

M. Kharasch, Ph. D., Associate Professor of Chemistry Chemistry 

W. K. Klingaman, Principal, Frederick High School, 

Frederick, Md Education 

J. F. Landis, Director of Physical Education, Latimer 

Junior High School, Pittsburg, Pa Education 

Elizabeth Langenfeldt, R. N., County Health Nurse, Prince 

George^s County Education 



SUMMER SCHOOL 5 

Frederick Lee, Ph. D., Professor of Applied Economics Economics 

F. M. Lemon, A. M., Assistant Professor of English English 

Edna B. McNaughton, B. S., Professor of Home Economics 

T^j .. ^ Education 

Education 

Ethel McNutt, Frederick High School, Frederick, Md._ _ .Education 
Devoe Meade, Ph D., Professor of Animal Husbandry _ _ __Agriculture 
Marie Mount, A. B., Professor of Home and Institutional 

AT «„^rv,^r.^- - Home Economics 

Management 

J B S Norton, M. S., Professor of Systematic Botany and 

Mycology Agriculture 

L. J. O'Rourke, Ph. D., Director of Research, U. S. Civil 

Service Commission Education 

C. J. Pierson, A. M., Professor of Zoology Agriculture 

C S Richardson, A. M., Professor of Public Speaking and 

Extension Education * Public Speaking 

Mary Francis Sidwell, A. B. Frederick High School Education 

Eleanor Smith, Rockville, Md Education 

George O. Smith, M. S., Assistant Professor of Animal 

Husbandry Agriculture 

Thos. H. Spence, A. M., Professor of Languages and 

Philosophy Philosophy 

H W Stinson, B. S., Associate Professor of Modern 

Languages Spanish 

T. H. Taliaferro, C. E., Ph. D., Professor of Mathematics ..Mathematics 
W. T. L. Taliaferro, A. B., Sc. D., Professor of Farm 

Management Agriculture 

C. E. Temple, M. S., Professor of Plant Pathology Agriculture 

Martha Temple, A. B., Instructor, Hyattsville High School 

Hyattsville, Md Education 

T B. Thompson, Ph. D., Professor of Economics and 

Sociology Economics 

A. S. Thurston, M. S., Assistant Professor of Floriculture _ .Agriculture 

Claribel Welsh, B. S., Assistant Professor of Foods Home Economics 

Freida Wiegand, A. B., Professor of Textiles and Clothing . . _Home Economics 

Ida Belle Wilson ._... Education 

Carolyn Zeigler, A. B., Instructor in Sparrows Point High 

School, Sparrows Point, Md Education 

P W Zimmerman, Professor of Plant Physiology and 

Ecology Agriculture 

Marguerite Zouck, A. M., Certificat de V Alliance Francaise, 
Paris and student of the Sorbonne, Instructor in the 
Reisterstown High School, Reisterstown, Md. Education 



ii 



UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 



SUMMER SCHOOL 



GENERAL INFORMATION 

The ninth session of the Summer School of the University of Maryland 
will open Monday, June 25th, 1923, and continue for six weeks, ending Friday, 
August 4th. 

In order that there may be thirty class periods for each full course, classes 
will be held on Saturday, June 30th, and on Saturday, July 7th, to make up for 
time lost registration day and the regular holiday July 4th. The regular Mon- 
day schedule will be followed on June 30th and the regular Wednesday schedule 
on July 7th. There will be no classes or other collegiate activities held on 
July 4th. 

The work of the Summer School was designed originally for rural teachers. 
Many persons, however, it has been found, desire to attend the University in 
summer to pursue courses in other lines of work. For this reason additions, 
both academic and professional in character, have been made gradually until 
the present program of studies includes courses for the teachers of the several 
classes of school work — elementary, secondary, and vocational; for special stud- 
ents, as farmers, breeders, dairymen, home makers, chemists, public speakers, 
graduate students; and persons who are candidates for degrees in agriculture, 
arts and science, education, engineering and home economics. 

The instruction in the Summer School is free to all students of Maryland. 

LOCATION 

The University is located in Prince George's County, Maryland, on the 
Washington Division of the B. & O. R. R., eight miles from Washington and 
thirty-two miles from Baltimore; and on the City and Surb urban Electric 
Railway, eight miles from Washington, and twelve miles from Laurel. 

The grounds front on the Baltimore and Washington Boulevard. The 
site of the University is healthful and attractive. The buildings occupy the 
crest of a commanding hill, covered with forest trees. It overlooks a broad 
valley and several suburban towns. In front, extending to the Boulevard, is 
a broad, rolling campus, the drill ground and athletic field of the students. East 
of the Boulevard is the new athletic field. A quarter of a mile to the northeast 
are the buildings of the Experiment Station. 

TERMS OF ADMISSION 

Teachers and special students not seeking a degree are admitted without 
examination to the courses of the summer session for which they are qualified. 
All such selection of courses, however, must be approved by the Director of the 
Summer School. 

The admission requirements for those who desire to become candidates for 
degrees are the same as for any other session of the University. Before regis- 
tering, a candidate for a degree will be required to consult the Dean of the 
School in which the candidate wishes to secure the degree. 

Regularly registered students who wish to attend the lectures or a portion 
of the lectures of courses without doing the work connected therewith are per- 
mitted to enroll in such courses as auditors with the consent of the instructor 
in charge. 

All course cards for work in the Summer School must be countersigned by 
the Director before being presented to the Registrar's office. 



REGISTRATION 

Monday, June 25th, is Registration Day. Students should register on or 
before this date and be ready for class work on the morning of Tuesday, June 
26th It is possible to register in advance and reserve rooms by applying to 
the Director of the Summer School. Students desiring to ^^SJ^^^^^^y mail 
should apply to the Director's office for a registration card. When filled out 
this should be returned to the registrar's office accompanied by remittance of 
the exact amount of tuition and other dues. 

Most students find two full courses sufficient work for the Summer period. 
Students are urged to make application for no more than nine credit hours. 

In no case will a student be granted credit for more than ten term credit hours 

work in the Summer School. 

Unless otherwise stated, courses listed will be offered in 1923. Instructors 

will not be held for courses for which less than five students apply . For this. 

reason appUcation should be made at an early date by mail for all content 

courses numbered from 101 to 199. 

DESIGNATION OF COURSES 

Courses numbered from 1 to 99 with an S before the number, as for ex- 
ample, Ed. S. 11, are special Summer School courses and are not offered during 
the regular collegiate year. 

Courses numbered from 101 to 199 with an S following the number, as Eng. 
101 S, are modifications to meet Summer School conditions of courses of the 
same number in the University catalogue. 

Courses numbered from 101 to 199 without the S, as Agron. 101, are 
identical in every way with courses of the same symbol and number in the Uni- 
versity catalogue. 

Courses numbered from 201 and above are for graduate students only. 
Many of the courses numbered from 101 to 199 may be used for graduate 
credit by special arrangement. 

The symbols, for examples: Eng., Ed., Agron., refer to the subject matter 
grouping under which such courses are found in the general catalogue. 

CREDITS AND CERTIFICATES 

The term hour is the unit of credit as in other sessions of the University. 
A term credit hour is one lecture or recitation a week for a term, which is ap- 
proximately twelve weeks in length. Two or three hours of laboratory or field 
work are counted as equivalent to one lecture or recitation. During the summer 
session a lecture course meeting five times a week for six weeks requiring the 
standard amount of outside work, is given a weight of three term credit hours, 
or two semester hours, or one year hour. All credit is Usted as term credit hours. 

Educational courses satisfactorily completed will be credited by the State 
Superintendent of Schools toward meeting the minimum requirements of 
professional preparation as follows: 



8 



UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 



(1) For teaching in the elementary schools of the State, viz., at least 
six weeks' attendance at a school of pedagogy; a renewal of elementary teachers* 
certificates which requires six weeks' additional professional training for those 
of second and third grade; to meet the requirement for advancing the grade of 
elementary teachers' certificates. 

(2) For teaching in high schools of the State and for renewal of high school 
certificates. 

(3) For teachers of vocational agriculture and home economics and the 
renewal of vocational teachers' certificates. 

(4) For high school principalships. 

(5) For supervisorships. 

SUMMER GRADUATE WORK 

Special arrangements have been made for persons wishing to do graduate 
work in summer. By writing for the general University catalogue all of the 
regulations governing graduate work may be procured. The Master's degree 
represents full time work for one academic year. At least forty-five term credit 
hours, including a thesis, must be completed. Four Summer Sessions are con- 
sidered the equivalent of an academic year. By carrying approximately ten 
term credit hours of graduate work for four sessions and submitting a satis- 
factory thesis students may be granted the degree of Master of Arts or Master 
of Science. Teachers and other graduate students working for a degree on 
the summer plan must meet the same requirements and proceed in the same 
way as do students enrolled in the other sessions of the University. 

ACCOMMODATIONS 

Students are accommodated in the University up to the capacity of the 
dormitories. 

Students who room in these dormitories will supply themselves with towels, 
pillows, pillow cases, sheets and blankets. No additional charge is made for 
rooms, but to secure them, early application should be made to the Director. 
Rooms may be reserved in advance, but will not be held later than noon of 
Tuesday, June 26th. 

Students who desire to live in private homes may be accommodated in Col- 
lege Park or in the nearby towns of Hyattsville, Riverdale and Berwyn. Most 
students, however, in the past have found it more convenient to room in 
the dormitories. 



EXPENSES 

A registration fee of $10.00 will be charged to all applicants. This fee will 
be used to defray the expenses for the athletic equipment, certain extra-cur- 
riculum activities, library, janitor service, and general use of the University 
property. A special fee which is named in connection with the description of 



SUMMER SCHOOL » 

;?M «*r' D.ylll .'« «°y io. .""* only may pr«u. .he « 

cluiive ol laondiy and railroad lares is »52.00. 

5t.„d.„t. may h.ve a r.asomble amount ot laundry work done at the 
OnlSt Taunto at the r.t.o. approximately seventyJive cent, per w«,k 

drs=rr-s.tr«sc3^-roritrai-j;:^^^^^^^ 

Sl!rn^'p»..-~^^o;^h.,n;a.^^^^^^^^ 

:i::\Z tStn. ZSl^ZX. ...t Ar credit hour ..d dip,o„. 

fee need not exceed $65.00. 

LIBRARY 

The library is housed in a separate two-story building and contains 10000 
The library is n""**" ^ Government documents, unbound re- 

bound books -"d 5,000 United Sat^^^^^^^^^ ^^^^^.^^ ^^^^^.^^ ^„ ^^^,, 

lZrTtS:SSTs.S:tS:XL T.. general reading room is on the 
culture ana reia^e ^ ^ ^^^^^ ^^ie students can easily 

government libraries or by personal work m them. . , • ^ 

goveimu 8, ,„ tn'^^OD m Monday to Friday inclusive, 

and «r ;^7.i;:r.'r.',,l°e.Srn,':tr.0.» . l O. S.tu,day iron. 
8 a. m. to 12.30 p. m. . 

DEMONSTRATION SCHOOLS 

Demonstration schools, both elementary and high are carmd on in con- 
nection with the Summer School. Full information will be found under Des 
crTption of Courses, p 22 (high), and p 25 (elementary)- 

CONFERENCE HOURS 

Conference hours are planned for two special purposes: (1) To give the 
student an opportunity to confer with the instructor on subjects relative to 
c ai work (2) To serve as an hour during which round table discussions may 
be heTd on topics of common interest. Conference hours are arranged by in- 
dividual instructors at the beginning of the session. 

SPECIAL LECTURES 

Arrangements are made with educators of "^«°'»^V'''f t^'stulentsln 
special lectures from time to time in fields of particular ^^^^fJ^j'^^^Z 
the Summer School. Special conference hours are -^'^^^^^-^^for sucM^^^^^^ 
in order that students may have an opportunity to meet leaders m their special 
lines of work. Details are announced in the weekly calendar. 



10 



i 

I 

. -, < 



UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 



STUDENT HEALTH 



SUMMER SCHOOL 



11 



\\ 



The University makes every effort to conserve the health of the students 
and maintains a hospital physician and competent nurse. The hospital is lo- 
cated on the campus. All cases of illness should be promptly reported to the 
University physician, Dr. W. A. Griffith, whose office is located in the Uni- 
sity Infirmary, phone Berwyn 85- M. 

SOCIAL EVENINGS 

On Friday evenings during the session informal gatherings of students 
are held on the campus. The programs are varied. The hours from 8.30 to 1 1 .00 
are given over to various kinds of entertainments directed by student commit- 
tees. These evenings afford agreeable relaxation and enable the students of 
the Summer School to become well acquainted. Friday evening, July 13th, 
will be "Eastern Shore Night' ' and Friday evening, July 20th, "Western Shore 
Night." In the fifth week of the session the class in Recreational Leadership 
will present an open-air pageant. Community sings will be held at various 
times during the session. Students will also be given an opportunity to en- 
gage in an evening play hour under the supervision of the Department of 
Physical Education. 

EXCURSIONS 

The vicinity of College Park holds a wealth of historic and geologic inter- 
ests. Saturday excursions will be arranged to Washington, Mount Vernon, 
Great Falls and other places of interest in the neighborhood of the National 
Capital. All excursions will be in charge of a general committee of which 
Mr. F. D. Day is chairman. 



8.15-9.05 
A. H. 101. S 
Cloth. 102S-a 
D. H. S-11 
Dr. 101-(M. W.) 
Ed. S. 11 
Ed. 128S 
Ed. S. 14 
Ed. S. 16 
Ed. 121-122S 
Ed. S. 20 
Ed. S. 21 

Ed. S. 25 

Ed. S. 27 

Eng. S. 11 

Hort. 129 (M. W. F) 

Inorg. Chem. 103S 

Math. 4 

Org. Chem. lOlS 

Phy. S. 11 

Phy. S. 12 

Phy. S. 13 

Span. 1 

Shop. 102. S. (T) 



10.15-11.05 
Agron 103S 
A. H. 104S 
A. H. loss 
Ed. S. 203 
Ed. S. 15 
Ed. 115-116S 
Ed. 119-120S 

Ed. S. 22 
Ed. S. 23 

Ed. S. 30 

Ed. S. 32 

Ed. S. 43 

Eng. 109S 

Eng. 112S 

F. M. 101-102S 

Foods lOlS-a (T. Th) 

Hort. S. 11 (M. W. F) 

Inorg. Chem. 102S 

Math. 2 

Pit. Phy. 101 (M. T. W. Th) 

Soc. 10 IS 

Soc. 107S 



9.15-10.05 
Agron. 102S 
Bot. 102S 
Ed. S. 201 
Ed. lOlS 
Ed. 104S 
Ed. 124S 
Ed. S. 17 
Ed. 107-108S 
Ed. S. 24 

Ed. S. 30 

Ed. S. 33 

Ed. S- 35 

Eng. S. 13 

H. E. Sll 

Hort. S12 (M. W. F) 

Hort. Ill 

Math. 1 

Org. Chem. 102S 

Phil. 101 

Pit. Path. lOlS (M. W. 



11.40-12.30 
A. E. S. 103 
A. H. 102S-b 
Anal. Chem. lOlS 
D. H. S. 13 
Ed. 102S 
Ed. 103S 
Ed. 205S 
Ed. S. 31 
Ed. S. 36 
Ed. S. 39 
Ed. S. 44 
Eng. 108S 
Eng. S. 11 
Hort. 101 
Math. 3 

Pit. Phy. 102 (M. T. W. Th) 
P. S lOlS (M. W. F) 
Zool. 102S (M. W. F) 



1.30-2.20 
A. E. S103 Lab. (T. Th)" 
Anal. Chem. lOlS. Lab. (T. W. Th. F) 
D. H. S. llLab. (W) - - 
D. H. S. 12 Lab. (F) 
D. H. S. 13 Lab. (M) 
Ed. S. 26 
Ed. S. 28 

Ed. S. 34 Lecture (T) 
Ed. S. 34 (Lab. 1.30-3.20 W) 
Ed. S. 40 
F. M. Lab. (M. F.) 

Hort. S. 11 Lab. (M. W.) 

Hort. S. 12 Lab. (F.) 

Hort. 101 Lab. (M. W.) 

Hort. Ill Lab. (T. Th.) 

Hort .129 Lab. (T. Th) 

Inorg. Chem. lOlS. Lab. (M. W.) 

Inorg. Chem. 102S. Lab. (M W.) 

Inorg. Chem. 103S. Lab. (M. W.) 

Org. Chem. lOlS. Lab. (T. Th) 

Org. Chem. 102S. Lab. (T Th.^ 

Phy?. S. 11. Lab. (M. T. ) 

Phys. S. 12 Lab. (W. Th) 

Phys. S. 13. Lab. (Th. F) 
Pit. Phy 101 Lab. (T. Th) 

Pit. Phy. 102 Lab. (M. W) 
PI. Path. lOlS. Lab. (M. F) 
Shop. lOlS (M. T) 
Shop. 102S (W) 
Zool. 102S Lab. (T. Th) 



Time to be arranged. 

Art. 101 S-a 
Cloth lOlS 
Cloth. 103S 
Cloth. 104S 
Cloth. 102S-b 
Ed. S. 12 
Ed. 141S 
Ed. S. 41 
Ed. S. 42 
Foods lOlS 
Pit. Path. 105S 



F.) 



KEY TO BUILDINGS 

• L-MorriU Hall Q-^ivil Engineering 

N — Chemical 
p_Mechanical Engineering 



R— Electrical Engineering 
T — Agricultural 



12 



UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 



DESCRIPTION OF COURSES 

AGRONOMY 

Cereal Crops (Agron. 101 S.). — Four credit hours. Five lectures and 
two two-hour laboratory periods per week. Offered in 1924. 8.15, Lab.; 1.30, 
M.W. T-315. Mr. Eppley. 

A study of history, distribution, culture, and improvement of the cereal 
crops. The laboratory work is devoted to studies of the plant and grain of the 
cereal crops, with detailed descriptive study of the grain. 

Forage Crops (Agron. 102 S.). — Four credit hours. Five lectures and 

two two-hour laboratory periods per week, 9.15 T 211. Mr. Eppley. 

History, distribution, adaptation culture and uses of forage, pasture, cover 
and green manure crops. The laboratory periods are largely devoted to the 
identification and classification of forage plants and seeds and to purity and 
nativity tests of seeds. 

Grading Farm Crops (Agron. 103 S.) — Three credit hours. Four 
lectures and two two-hour laboratory periods per week. Prerequisites, Agron. 
101 S. or its equivalent, 10.15 T.-311. Mr Eppley. 

This course is planned to satisfy the demand for information on the federal 
grain standards and the current status of market grades of field crops in general. 
A careful study is made of the grade requirements and in the laboratory the 
student gets practice in actually determining the market grades. 

Grain Judging (Agron. 104 S.). — One credit hour. Two two-hour lab- 
oratory periods per week. Prerequisites, Agron. 101 S. or its equivalent, or it 
may be taken in conjunction with Agron. 101 S. Offered in 1924. Lab. ,1.30, 
T. Th. T.-311. Mr. Eppley. 

This course gives practice in judging the cereal crops for milling, seeding 
and feeding purposes. 



ANIMAL HUSBANDRY 

Animal Husbandry (A. H. 101 S.). — Four credit hours. Five lectures 
and one laboratory period per week. 8.15 Lab.; 1.30, M. T.-211. Mr. Smith. 

This course is devoted to the study of the types and breeds of the various 
classes of farm stock, especial attention being given to the origin, history, 
characteristics and adaptability of such breeds. 

Feeds and Feeding (A. H. 102 S.-A.). — Three credit hours. Three lec- 
tures and two laboratory periods per week. Offered in 1924. 11.40, M. W. F.; 
1.30, M. W. T.-211. Mr. Meade. 

Elements of nutrition, source, characteristics and adaptability of the va- 
rious food stuffs to the several classes of farm livestock. Feeding standards 
and the calculation and compounding of rations. 



SUMMER SCHOOL 



13 



Feeds and Feeding (A. H. 102 S.-B.).-Three credit hours. Three lec- 
tures and two laboratory periods per week. 11.15, T.-211. Mr. Meade. 
A continuation of A. H. 102 S.-A. 

Principals of Breeding (A. H. 104 S.).-Four credit hours. Five lec- 
tures and one laboratory period per week. 10.15. T.-211. Mr Meade. 

The course is designed to cover the practical aspects of animal breeding 
including heredity, variation, selection, growth, development, systems of 
breeding and pedigree study. 

Swine Production (A. H. 105 S.).-Three credit hour^. Four lectures 
and one laboratory period per week. Offered in 1924. 9.15. M. T. W. Th.. 
Lab.. 1.30 Th. T.-211. Mr. Smith. 

Types and breeds of swine, care, feeding, breeding, management, econom- 
ics of swine husbandry, and judging. 

Sheep Production (A. H.. 108 S.).-Three credit hours. Four lectures 
and one laboratory period per week. 10.15, T.-315. Mr. Smith. 

Breeds of sheep; their history, characteristics and adaptability; care, 
feeding, breeding, and management; grades of wool, judging, and scoring. 



BOTANY 

General Botany (Bot. 101 S.). -Three credit hours. Three lectures and 
two laboratory periods per week. Offered in 1924. Mr. Temple. 

This elementary course includes a study of structure, life processes and 
identification of the seed plants. Special attention will be given a so to methods 
of presenting the subject matter to high school students, and ample opportunity 
win be aflorded for collecting and preserving material for high school study. 
An occasional nature study field trip will be taken on laboratory time. 

General Botany (Bot. 102 S.). -Three credit hours. Three lectures and 
two laboratory periods per week. Botany 101 S. not prerequisite. 9.1o M. 
W F.; Lab., 1.30 T. Th. T.-315. Mr. Temple. 

A continuation of Botany 101 S.; includes a study of the Pl^nt groups, 
beginning with the lowest forms of plants and continuing through to the seed 
plants; reproduction in its various forms; origin of the land habit of growth, 
adjustment of plants to their surroundings; forests of f--^ -Jj" f ^^^^J^^ 
and seeds. This and the preceding course may be substituted tor General 
Botany of the regular college course. 

CHEMISTRY 

General Chemistry (Inorg. Chem. 101 S-).-Four credit hours^ Five 
lectures and two laboratory periods per week. 9.15, Lab.; 1.30, M. W. N.-102. 

Mr. Gordon. , ^, • j 

A study of the non-metals together with the fundamental theory and 
principles of chemistry. One of the main purposes of the course is to develop 
orS work clear thinking and keen observation. This is accomplished by 
the project method of teaching. 



14 



UNIVERSITY OP MARYLAND 



101 s. 10.20. Llir^rriToTS: G^r ""^' ^"°^-"- ^'>-- 

Of stu^drraS S "Z^^^^^ - -ones and .e.ods 
S. 8.15. Lab.; 1.30. M. W N^lot^MT^Iey '"''*''• '°"^- ^'^"- ^''^ 

TH.tr::;: b-ss -si^^^^^^^^^ - a... 

lee Je"aS^\Sor,?;^^pei^^^ ^^ '^-- One 

S.-103 S. 11.40 M. Lab.7l'30.TrTTF. kTor^L^ '^'^"^- '''^ 

and Jol^rS mlthor"" °' '"^"*"^"^^ analysis applied to gravimetric 

S.-103 S. 8.1, Lab.; 1.3??. Th'^Kl^f.Tbirr^JStTr- ''' 
f^tty ;S£! Kitonkit''' '=°™^°""'^' •^^''^--bons. alcohols, aldehydes. 

S. 9.15 Lab.; 1.30^?"^ St. "^rKtl-er"^^^*^^- "^^^ ^^^'"- ''' 
A study of aromatic compounds or benzene and its derivatives. 

DAIRY HUSBANDRY 

.«<, o^"'rC'SSr w„k'- '/.'i7"t' W ?n ':"• /»" '-"- 

Mr. Gamble and Mr. Harvey ' ^^* ^-^ ^^^^ ^'^^^ F.L.-303. 

feeds^'^sLTof^^^^^^^^ -tje, including selection of 

and feeding the sires Dairv S ;i i ^ ^^' ^"^ ^^^^'"^ selection, care 
of keepingLd foZ-fo?S re^^^^^^^^ T' management. Methods 

which influence quantity and quality in ^^ '"' "'^"^'" ^^^^ ^^^^^-^ 

11.15, T.-315. Mr. Gamble and Mr Harvey ' '"^ ""• ''• ^^ '^ 



SUMMER SCHOOL 



15 



How bacteria and dirt get into milk; how they may be kept out; equipping 
the stable and milk house; surface coolers and pre-cooling; milk-cooling tanks; 
sterilizers for utensils; washing and sterilizing utensils; dairy farm score cards; 
composition of milk, butter and cheese and methods of testing. 



ENGLISH 

Composition and Rhetoric (Eng. S. 11). — Three credit hours. Five 
lectures per week Accepted as the equivalent of Eng. 101 — the first term of 
"Freshman English." 8.15, L.-300. Miss Johnson. 

Parts, principles, and conventions of effective writing, particularly as re- 
lating to exposition. Short themes. 

Descriptive and Narrative Composition (Eng. S. 13). — Three credit 
hours. Five lectures per week. Accepted as the equivalent of Eng. 103 — the 
third term of " Freshman English." 9.15, L.-300. Mr. Lemon. 

English words; imagery; character delineation; short stories, themes and 
plots; study of classic models; class exercises. 

The Poems of Robert Browning (Eng. 109 S.). — Three credit hours. 
Five lectures per week A continuation of the courses in Modern Poets, 10.15, 
L.-300. Dr. House. 

The shorter poems of Browning read and discussed. 

/^ Modern Poets (Eng. 108 S.). — Three credit hours. Five lectures per 
week. Continuation of Eng. 107 S. 11.40, L.-300. Dr. House. 

The poets studied will be^^hitman, Emerson, Edwin Arnold, Fitzgerald, 
^Neihardt,^agore,'^evenson, and others. 

The Short Story (Eng. 112 S.). — Three credit hours. Five lectures per 
week. 10.15, L.-303. Mr. Lemon. 

^ Study of the principles of the short story, with citations from the work of 

• ^ the chief American and British writers. Emphasis on phases of the short 
story technique. 

Business Writing (Eng. S. 11). — Three credit hours. Five lectures per 
week. 11.40, L.-303. Miss Johnson. 

A course in the psychology of effective writing for the public; designed 
especially for the presenting of methods of teaching the subject as well as for 
the application of the principles studied. The field covers correspondence, the 
principles of salesmanship as applied to sales letters, the English and art of 
advertising. 



EDUCATION 

Introductory Course in Educational Psychology (Ed. S. 11). — Three 
credit hours. Five lectures per week. 8.15, P. -207. Dr. O'Rourke. 

The psychological principles underlying teaching, including study of mental 
development, of the learning process, of interest, and of teaching methods. 

Advanced Educational Psychology .-A. (Ed. 102 S.). — Three credit 
hours. Graduate credit by special arrangement. Five lectures per week. 
Prerequisites, Ed. S. 11 or its equivalent. 11.40, T.-301. Miss Houck. 



16 



UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 



Characteristics of original tendencies; instincts and capacities; the in- 
dividual's equipment of instincts; forms of behavior; satisfiers and annoyers; 
cerebral connectional physiology of the capacity to learn; development of 
bodily control; theories as to the order and dates for the appearance and dis- 
appearance of original tendencies and their effect upon curricula; value and 
use of original tendencies; the laws of learning; amount, rate, limit, and per- 
manency of improvement; experiments in rate of improvement. 

Advanced Educational Psychology .-B. (Ed. S. 201). — Five credit hours. 
Five lectures per week. Open to graduate students only; 9.15, P.-207. Dr. 
O'Rourke. 

This course is concerned chiefly with educational tests and measurements. 
It includes consideration of the construction, use, standardization, application, 
and limitations of educational measurements. Intelligence tests, tests for 
special aptitude, and industrial tests. 

O Heredity (Ed. S. 12). — Three credit hours. Five periods a week. Grad- 
i *uate credit by special arrangement. Time to be arranged. Mr. Kemp. 

This course includes consideration of the early views of inheritance of 
characters; the Mendelian principle and the mechanism underlying it; simple 
application in plants, in animals and in men; variability and individual dif- 
ferences; eugenics; educational implications. 

Public Education in the United States (Ed. 101 S. ). — Three 
credit hours. Graduate credit by special arrangement. Five lectures per week. 
9.15, Q.-202. Dr. Blauch. 

A course in the development of the theory and practice of public education 
in the United States. The emphasis will be on elementary education though 
other phases of American education will be briefly mentioned. An elementary 
knowledge of the economic and social development of the United States will be 
of assistance to the student in the course. The following books contain much of 
the material which will form the basis of the discussion: 

"Public Education in the United States" by Ellwood P. Cubberly. 

"Public Education in the South" by Edgar W. Knight. 

Americanization in Education (Ed. S. 13). — Three credit hours. Five 
lectures per week. Offered in 1924. Dr. Blauch. 

A study of the development of American ideals, relationships and duties; 
problems of the foreign-born, illiteracy, and the relation of the whole to the 
school system; needed educational adjustments and additions. 

Theory and Development of Vocational Education (Ed. S. 204). — 

Five credit hours. Five lectures per week. Open to graduate students only. 
Offered in 1924. Mr. Proffitt. 

Vocational education the earliest type of formal training; principles and 
objectives underlying training during the early development of civilization; 
early systems of organized vocational training, their methods and objectives; 
analysis of conditions underlying the social demand for vocational education; 
objectives of vocational education in the public schools; types of vocational 




SUMMER SCHOOL 

education, their aims and functions; surveys of occupations 

ers a guide for the establishment of vocational courses; oi 

tional schools; state and national interest in vocational education 

islation; the planning of vocational courses. 

Rural Sociology and Educational Leadership (Ed. 128 S), 

credit hours. Five lectures per week. Graduate credit by special arrange- 
ment. 8.15, T.-309. Mr. Cotterman. 

The rural community-nature, history, structure, types; the community 
survey; present tendencies, needs, the problems of rural life; the vil^ge and 
ts pla^e'in American social organization; special functions of the -^^^^^^^^^ 
other institutions in relation to the needs of the rural group. This course is 
Sned e^^^^^ for persons who expect to be called upon to assist m shapmg 

educational and other community programs for rural people. 

Practicum in Rural Sociology (Ed. 141 S.)- Three to five credit hours. 
Open to graduate students only. Prerequisite, Ed. 128 S. Time to be arranged. 

Mr. Cotterman. , . ^, - 4. • t-i,^ 

Essentially a field course. The work may be done durmg the wmter m the 
community t which the student may be teaching. Students electing this 
courTe will arrange to meet the instructor one hour each week during the sum- 
mer session preparatory to taking the field. 

Educational Sociology (Ed. 140 S).-Three credit hours^ Five ^c- 
tures per week. Graduate credit by special arrangement. 9.1o, T.-309. Mr. 

Cotterman. , , 

The sociological foundations of education; group needs; educational ob- 
jectives; educational institutions; the program of studies; need for specia or- 
ganizations; possibilities of the special group leaders in adult education, 
educational programs. ' 

Principles of Commercial Education (Ed. S 41) -Three credit hours. 
Five periods per week. Time and place to be arranged. Mr. Clemens. 

The rapid development of interest in commercial education m this country 
during the past twenty years has led to the establishment of courses in secon- 
dai schools and colleges. This in turn has led to a demand fo^ qualified teache^ 
of commercial education. This course aims to give the teacher of commercial 
branc^rs the broad vocational outlook upon his subject and to acquamt him 
S the pedagogical principles underlying it. Consideration w.U be given to 
the following topics: the essentials and value of busmess education, the cur 
rtu lum in a secondary school; a survey of subject matter -^-"^ ^^^^^^^^^ 
riculum, such as arithmetic, bookkeeping, English, stenography and typewriting, 
and special problems in commercial education. 

Vocational Guidance (Ed. S 42).-Three credit hours. Five periods 
ner week Time and place to be arranged. Mr. Hiner. , , ■ • u 

^ Tht'course is designed for teachers, especially junior high school, high 
school, and vocational teachers; but may be taken by other P™- f YstoTv 
in the vocational guidance of youth. It includes: a brief ^";::^«y ^-^ ^'^*°^^: 
the literature, and the economic and social significance of ^^f *'°«^lj"'f„\"^^; 
a study of the conditions under which children leave school; the ^o^^n for 
employment supervision, vocational analysis, vocational surveys and other 



18 



UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 



sources of vocational information; special attention to vocational guidance 
values in the regular school curriculm, life career classes, self analysis, tests and 
the treatment of results, counselling, try-out courses, the relation of vocational 
to moral and educational guidance, the organization and administration of 
guidance and placement work, the cooperation of the school with other agen- 
cies. Instruction will include lectures, text, assigned reading, discussion and 
projects. 

SECONDARY EDUCATION 

Secondary Education in the United States (Ed. S 14). — Three credit 
hours. Five lectures per week. Graduate credit by special arrangement. 
8.15, Q.-202. Dr. Blauch. 

A course in the development and present status of secondary education 
in the United States. The following and similar topics will be considered: 
outline of development from colonial days to the present time; evolution of the 
legal status of public secondary education; typical state systems of secondary 
education compared with secondary education in Maryland; the relation of 
secondary education to higher education; recent tendences, the junior high 
school, the junior college; evolution of the curriculum of secondary education; 
private secondary education. 

The purpose of the course is to acquaint the student with a body of knowl- 
edge which is fundamental to a thorough understanding of secondary education 
as it is organized and administered in the United States. The development of 
secondary education in Maryland will be given attention. The relation be- 
tween secondary education and American social and economic movements will 
be emphasized. 

Methods of Teaching High School Subjects (Ed. 103 S.).— Three 
credit hours. Graduate credit by special arrangement. Five lectures per week. 
11.40, R.-IOO. Mr. Klingaman. 

This course treats of the essentials of methods common to the teaching of 
all high school subjects. Such problems as the following will be xionsidered : 
The high school pupil; discipline; economy of class room procedure; selection of 
subject matter; types of learning involved in high school subjects; the principles 
of drill; inductive and deductive methods; the question as a factor of instruction; 
directed learning; the project method and the socialized recitation; tests of 
achievement, the marking of pupils. Special attention will be given to the 
preparation and critical evaluation of lesson plans. 

Principles of Secondary Education (Ed. 124 S.). — Three credit hours. 
Graduate credit by special arrangement. Five lectures per week. Offered in 
1924. 

This course deals mainly with the social foundations of secondary education 
and the educational values of the several subjects of the curriculum. Physical 
and mental traits of high school pupils; individual differences; characteristics 
of the high school population; comparative secondary education; the objec- 
tives of secondary education; and reorganization for attaining main objectives 
are other topics treated. 



SUMMER SCHOOL 



19 



• Organization and Administration of High Schools (Ed. S. 202).- 
Five credit hours. Five lectures per week. Open to graduate students only. 

^^''oTg^M^^ legal status, and control of the state school system and the 
relation of the high school to the state and other administrative units; standards 
or the physical plant and equipment; the preparation, selection. Promotion 
and supervision of teachers; text books; significant movements such as the 
Lior high school; tests and measurements, cooperative agencies continuation 
work standards f;r judging instruction; school records and statistics; courses 
of study; the hygiene of the high school; the progress of pupils-acceleration, 

retardation, and elimination. , .^.^ <z 9^Q^ PiVa 

Administrative Problems of the High School (Ed. S 203). -Five 

credit hours. Five lectures per week. Open to graduate students only. 10.15, 

T -309. Dr. Small. , , , vt .. 

■ Daily programs; type programs; extra curricular activities; publicity; pro- 
motions; working systems; classification of pupils; records and reports; relations 
w?h pa ent« ani the community; the tone of the school; the school hbra|j; 
The internal government of the school and other practical problems of high 
school principles which arise in administrative work. 

Psychology of High School Subjects (Ed. S. 15).-Three credit hours. 
Graduate credit by special arrangement. Five lectures per week. 10.15, T.-301. 

^"^Altiei'suTVBy of the psychological principles which determine the scope 
and Character of secondary education; mental characteristics o the secondary 
school sSdent; the necessity for a psychological study of the aims values and 

3"rraranT^e^&JS;^^^^^^^^^ 

as ap^Ued to high school subjects; preparation of paper deahng with some high 

school subject in accordance with modern psychological thought. 

Methods of English Composition in High Schools (Ed. S lb). 
Three credit hours. Graduate credit by special arrangement. Five lectures 
oer week. 8.15, L.-302. Miss Ziegler. 

OWectives in the teaching of English in secondary schools; selection 
of subject matter; state requirements and state courses of study; Psycholog- 
ical principles underlying the teaching of English in «««°''f^^^.^<^*^«f„^' Jj" 
organization of materials; special methods and type lessons in teaching different 

forms of composition. . „ , , r-cj o i7\ 

Methods of Teaching Literature in High Schools (Ed. S. 17 . 
Three credit hours. Graduate credit by special arrangement. Five lectures 
oer week. 9.15, L.-302. Miss Ziegler. 

Objectives in the teaching of literature in the secondary schook; selection 
of subject matter; state requirements and state courses of study; the psycho- 
logical principles underlying the teaching of literature m the secondary schools, 
the organization of materials; special methods; tyP« l^^"^- ^^ 

Methods in High School History (Ed. 115-116 S.).-Three credit 
hours. Graduate credit by special arrangement Five lectures per week. 
10.15, L.-302. Miss Ziegler. 



20 



UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 



Objectives of history and civics in secondary schools; selection of subiect 
ma ter; parallel readings; state requirements and state c;urses^ study S 
chological principles underlying the teaching of history and civics orlan^aWon 
of material devices for motivating and socializing work; maTntJance of he 
«t.ensh.p objective; type lemons; note book and othe^ ne^etary auxlil'; 

Methods in High School Sciences (Ed 121-122 9 ^ TV..^^ ^v. 

sTt ?orr r\*'^ r^^^ arrangeLent.''pil?iec -uVer;: ^^ 
«.1J), 1.-301. Miss Houck and Mr. Day. 

.f.,.^^^^''^^^ °^ ^"^"''^ '" secondary schools; selection of subject matter- 

y ng t'heTaT ' 'f ''''' ^•"""" "' ^^"''^^ psychological prindples u„d I 
lying the teaching of science m secondary schools; organization of materiak 

lanlzT" m\"'*'°'' °' '''' "'^ P^""'^-- lesson plans; preTaratL and ot 
ganization of laboratory instruction; note books. 

Note: This course in 1923 will be concerned chiefly with General Science. 

.r.H,!^h^'^°''V'". "'^^^ ^"^"^^ Mathematics (Ed. 119-120 S ) -Three 
S; 'k?;00. "^KCr^ '^''^' --—• -- lecturesierlS 

tPr- SJj"'"''^' "^ ™at''^'»^«<^ in secondary schools; selection of subject mat- 

schools; lesson plans and devices for motivating work secondary 

Problems in Secondary Vocational Agriculture (Ed 205 S ^ Th.^ 

credit hours. Five periods per week. Graduate stuZt^ only P^ ;;;S " 

exper^ience as a teacher of vocational agriculture. 11.40. T.-309 Mr' c"2 

Sociological foundations of vocational education- need., of tho =,,. - i 
groups of the farming population; evolution of agncXVaTedLation develon 

tTeteTf th't'r 1 *'^ ''' ^•=''°'''-*'^^ P-'-t- triettTon of c« 
nrohTm f "^'' f '' P""°^' ^^"iP'nent.- Problems of the part-time schoob 
problems of evening classes; directed and supervised practical work; measuring 

S^ ^tpr'^' !,",!^''°"''^'y Vocational Home Economics (Ed. 107-108 
andorganization of subject matter; class-room managemen ^ynS J le..r 



SUMMER SCHOOL 



21 



This course is designed for teachers of home economics and includes both 
the subject matter and methods of home management. The course is given by 
the Department of Home Economics Education in cooperation with the De- 
partment of Home Economics. Much of the course will be in the nature of 
research with the definite objective of working out a course of study in home 
management for the secondary schools. The very nature of the work will re- 
quire that much practice work in home management be done. The course will 
be given in the Home Economics Practice House, where the students taking 
the course will live and conduct all of the household duties, including the 
preparation of two meals daily. Admission to the course will be limited to six 
students. Preference will be given to advanced students now teaching vocational 
home economics. Application for the work should be made before the opening 
of the summer session. 



Among the topics to be considered are the following: Organization of the 
household; budgets; schedule of duties; care of the house, sanitation, nature and 
action of cleansing agents; care of walls, floors, windows, hangings, and furniture 
labor-saving equipment; planning, preparation, and service of meals; interior 
decoration; ideals of home life; selection of pictures, books, and music; home 
entertainment. 

Methods in High School French (Ed. S. 20). — Three credit hours. 
Five periods per week. 8.15, L.-202. Miss Zouck. 

Objectives of French in secondary schools; content of course of study in 
French, including the state requirements and state course of study; study of 
texts; methods of procedure; lesson plans; observation. 

Methods in High School Latin (Ed. S. 21). — Three credit hours. Five 
periods per week. 8.15, T.-315. Miss Sidwell. 

Objectives of Latin in the secondary school; content of the course of 
study in Latin, including the state requirements and state course of study; 
study of texts; methods of procedure; lesson plans; observation. 

Methods in High School Music (Ed. S. 22). — Three credit hours. Five 
periods per week. 10.15 Auditorium. Miss McNutt. 

Objectives of music in the high school; content of high school music in- 
cluding the state requirements and program; organization and management of 
classes in chorus singing, appreciation theory and orchestra, lesson plans; ob- 
servation. 

Students interested in the development of school orchestras should not 
fail to bring with them the instruments which they themselves play as the de- 
velopment of an orchestra in Summer School will be a project of this class. 

Physical Education and Athletics in High Schools (Ed. S. 23).— 
Three credit hours. Five lectures per week. 10.15, L. 202. Mr. Landis. 

The social recreational and physical objectives of Physical Education in 
secondary schools; state and county programs; publicity for athletics; the 
psychology involved; methods in developing skill; organization of games and 



22 



UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 



SUMMER SCHOOL 



23 



\ 



S'„-Thr.!!°T' ^"'^''^'' '^' ^'""""^ °f 1^"^^^ ^"d other forms of recog- 
mtion the coaching of soccer, dodge ball, basket ball, track and baseball nro 

Stic fii'etc. '"■^^"^^*'°'^ °^ ^ — «o-l -nter. including playgrounds. 

DEMONSTRATION HIGH SCHOOL 

Mrs. Temple, Miss Zouck, Miss Sidwell, Mr. Klingaman and Mr. Day 
,>;.« ^" '="°P^'"^«°n ^th the HyattsviUe High School and the school author 
ties of Prmce George's County a demonstration high school will be maintained 

slmTlSf r Tr r " r "^^'°" ^"•^ *^' S-— SchoorForthe 
summer 1923 it will be limited to the beginning pupils in hieh school and 

Tm r LT witf ""t" "r ^'- ^'^ "^^"^ P^'^^- -" extdelTrom 9 
a. m. to 12 m. with optional sports and games in the afternoon T af-in 

French and Mathematics will be offered for credit. Each pupHwill hav^ 

SitS'^f thl^' ">. ' ^\'r" ""^'^ ^" °"^ ^'^ ^'^^^ subiec'te which liS be 
credited m the high school he enters in the fall. 

couri^itEn2h°fl^" one intensive course fo^ credit, a review and practice 
course m l^nglish for which no credit is eiven will hp rpmnVo^ r.f oii i 

Music and physical training will also be a JarTof tt dairpTgram. '" '"''^- 

ELEMENTARY EDUCATION 

schoo?^=i^:thS^^^^^^^^^^^ 

coZw= '"T"""' "^'^""^' --«'-ting, seating.'heat^g, janitor work tS 
completion and organization of work; continuous employment of pS dfs 
cgne; progressional ethics; phases of consolidation a'ndTmLLty rStiot 

Beginning Elementary School Methods with Emohasis on th. 

8 iTl 107 ^ot' ^^.'- 'o''*- '''''^ ^^^-^'^ •^^-^ FiveTecturpeTweek 
».15,L.-107. Observation, 9.15, P.-200. Miss Brust 

tory and geography. As the successful teaching of all o her Secte ^"^1 
upon reading, that subject will receive first and greatest attentSMechanS 

5llte':L:"d"t"^rt"^/°^ '"^^^^^^^^ 

will be stressed. In all subjects emphasis will be placed upon nrooer .^tndv 



Advanced Elementary School Methods (Ed. S. 26). — Three credit 
hours. Five lectures per week. Lectures 1.30; L. 305, Observation, 1L20, 
P.-200. Miss Brust. 

This course is similar to Education S. 20, except that it is designed for 
persons who have had at least one year of teaching experience. 

Theory and Practice of Teaching in Elementary Schools with 
Empbasis on the Last Four Grades (Ed. S. 27). — Three credit hours. Five 
periods per week. Lecture 8.15, L.-203; Observation 10.20. Miss Marshall. 

This course is designed for persons who have had no or little teaching ex- 
pereince and embraces the study of the problems, aims, methods, and materials 
of instruction of the last four grades of the elementary school, with emphasis 
upon the needs of the rural school. Lectures, required readings, observation of 
lessons in demonstration school, critiques and lesson planning are required. 

School and Class Management in Elementary Schools (Ed. S. 28). — 
Three credit hours. Five lectures per week. 1.30, L.-107. Miss Marshall. 

This course is designed to meet the needs of principals of elementary 
schools. It deals with such topics as selection of teachers; preparation for the 
opening of school; requisition of supplies, daily programs and other organization 
problems; school government; the arrangement of classrooms to lighting, seat- 
ing, equipment; and such other administrative problems as the developing of 
an esprit de corps on the part of the staff; the professional growth of teachers 
in service; professional ethics; the promotion of drives; the principal's duty in 
regard to records and reports; the promotion of pupils; school projects and com- 
munity relationships. 

Elementary School Geography (Ed. S. 30). — Three credit hours. Five 
lectures per week. First section, 9.15; Second Section, 10.15, L.-305. Miss 
Wilson. 

A content course in geography designed primarily for teachers of geography 
in the elementary schools and emphasizing to some extent problems, aims, 
methods and materials of teaching the subject. 

Elementary School History (Ed. S. 31). — Three credit hours. Five 
lectures per week. 11.40, L.-305. Miss Wilson. 

A content course dealing with the essentials of American history with the 
consideration of problems, aims, methods and materials of teaching the same 
in the elementary school. 

Elementary School Mathematics (Ed. S. 32). — Three credit hours. 
Five lectures per week. 10.15, L.-107 Mr Broome. 

A content course in arithmetic covering the essential features of the sub- 
ject, and embracing a study of the problems, aims, methods and materials of 
teaching arithmetic in the elementary school. 

Elementary School Agriculture and Project Work (Ed. S. 33). — 
Three credit hours. Five lectures per week. 9.15, T.-301. Mr. Day. 



24 



UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 



This IS essentially a content course dealing with the underlying principles 
• of agnculture, with special consideration of the purposes, problems, motivation 
management, methods and materials of teaching agriculture in elementary 
schools; the organization of project activities and project supervision; school 
exhibits and special class room projects. 

Nature Study: Plant Life (Ed. S. 34). -One and one-half credit hours 

?on T Tq^Tw ^^^l^^^'^^^'y P^"«ds per week. Lecture L30 Tues. Lab.* 
^.tiU, 1., 1.30 W. T.-315. Mr. Norton. 

V,- .f ""T^^J" '^'"''''^ designed primarily for elementary teachers, consisting 
chiefly of field study of trees, flowers, weeds and other forms of land and water 
plant life and inanimate nature; their relations to the conditions under which 
they live; the use of such studies to inspire an interest in the natural human en- 
vironment and in more advanced work in science. 

Elementary School Music-A. (Ed. S. 35).-One and one-half credit 
hours. Five periods a week. 9.15 Auditorium. Mrs. Haring. 

This course is designed for those who have had no special preparation for 
teaching elementary school music. It is based upon the "Tentative Course in 
Elementary Music for the Maryland Schools - and is devoted chiefly to the 
work of the first three grades: aims, material, procedure and expected outcome 
Observation in the demonstration school. 

Elementary School Music-B (Ed. S. 36).- Three credit hours. 
Five periods per week. 11.40 Auditorium. Mrs. Haring. 

This course is designed for those who have had previous training or ex- 
perience m teaching elementary school music, equivalent at leapt to Ed S 31 
school^''''^^'^ especially to the work of the last four grades of the elementary 

Notes: (1) Those intending to pursue either of these courses should pro- 
vide themselves in advance with the "Tentative Course in Elementary School 
^^^Ir ^^'^^^""^ Schools- and become familiar with its more important 

(2) Students interested in music and in the development of school or- 
chestras should not fail to bring with them the instruments which they them- 
selves play, as the development of an orchestra in Summer School will be a 
project of this class. 

Elements of School Hygiene (Ed. S. 43).-Three credit hours. Five 
periods per week. 10.15. P. 207. Miss Langenfeldt. 

This course covers the elements of health and disease necessary for the 
teacher. It includes the principles of hygiene, hygiene of the school plant 
andTst^afd'"''''^'''^ ""^ communicable diseases, health inspection, emergencies 

Methods in Health Teaching (Ed. S. 44) Three credit hours. Five 
periods per week. 11.40. P. 207. Miss Langenfeldt. 

The objectives of health teaching in the elementary school; content for 
the several grades; methods, lesson plans; observation in demonstration school. 



SUMMER SCHOOL 



25 



Physical Education for the Elementary School (Ed. S. 39). — One 
and one-half credit hours. Five periods per week. 11.40 L.-202. Miss Boyle. 

This course deals with the principles and practice of Physical Education 
in the Elementary Schools and includes nature and meaning of play; practice 
in playing games; and practice in the instruction of games for children in the 
primary games. 

Physical Education and Recreational Leadership in Rural Schools. 
(Ed. S. 40) — Three credit hours. Five lectures per week. Prerequisites, Ed. 
S. 39 or equivalent. 1.30 L- 202. Miss Boyle. 

Origin of the play movement; evolution of the play movement in the United 
States; play at Schools — urban and rural; stressing particularly theory of 
recreation; purposes of organized play, pageants, and community recreational 
activities. 

DEMONSTRATION SCHOOL FOR ELEMENTARY GRADES 

Miss Smith. 

In cooperation with the College Park Home and School Association and 
the school officials of Prince George's County an elementary school, essentially 
rural in character, is maintained for demonstration purposes. It includes grades 
one to six inclusive. 

The. school serves as a vacation school to the pupils of the College Park 
School and other communities and affords them an opportunity to make up 
deficiencies due to sickness and other causes and to review and supplement in- 
struction received during the regular school year. The school is free, but only 
a limited number of pupils may be accepted. Application lor entrance to tne 
school should be in the hands of the Director not later than a week prior to its 
opening. 

Through the courtesy of its executive committee, students in education are 
given an opportunity to attend one meeting of the College Park Home and 
School Association. 

FARM MANAGEMENT AND FARM ACCOUNTING 

Farm Management (F. M. 101-102 S.). — Four credit hours. Five lec- 
tures and two laboratory periods per week. 10.15, Lab.; 1.30, M. F., T.-212. 
Mr. Taliaferro. 

A study of the business of farming from the standpoint of the individual 
farmer. This course aims to connect the principles and practice which the 
student has acquired in technical courses and to apply them to the development 
of a successful farm business. 

Farm Accounting (A. E. S. 103). — Four credit hours. Four lectures 
and two laboratory periods per week 11.40, T. W. Th. F.; Lab., 1.30, T. Th., 
T.-212. Mr. Taliaferro. 

An introduction to the principles involved in the keeping of farm records 
and accounts with special reference to cost accounting and the analysis of the 
farm business. 

HOME ECONOMICS 

Essentials of Home Economics (H. E. S. 11). — Three credit hours. Credit 
cannot be used toward a degree by students majoring in Home Economics or 
Home Economics Education. Five lecture periods per week. 9.15, T.-210. 
This course will be handled by a number of specialists. The course as a whole 
will be in charge of Miss Mount. 



26 



UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 



(a) Child Care and Welfare. 

(b) Accounts and Budget Making. 

(c) Nutrition and Health. 

(d) Principles of Correct Dress. 

(e) Millinery. 

^'^ "^"ttrachmin*^' ""T"' ^^''^^^''-^-^ -« of sewing machine 
patterr ^ ^°^ ^^^'' **'^'' ^''™'= "^^ °^ commercia, 

(g) The Art of Making the Home Attractive; curtains and hangings- 
refimshmg of furniture; and arrangements of furniture K 
furnishmgs, pictures and wall finishes. 

Elementary Foods (Foods 101 S.— a).— Three credit hoiir« Tw„ i 

assistants Laboratory to be arranged. Mrs. Welsh and 

Prindples and processes of cookery. Production and composition of foods 
Oarment Construction (Cloth 101 SI Th,-^^ J-4. """ "' ^"°as. 

.h Jh;"SX"iSS^vti'°'Tt7.'T'^° ™'i' "'"'"■ ^'"' 

Wiegand. perioas per week. Time to be arranged; T.-219. Miss 

Space division and space relation; color schemes and exercises- original 
designs m which hnes. values, and colors are put together to produce 'finellar 

torySsTe/week- 'TL'e^r^'' "'''?°"'^- '''^^ ^'^^-h"- ^^bora- 
Penoas per week. Time to be arranged. Mrs. Welsh. 

Milhnery stitches and simple trimmings; drafting of patterns for hats- 
mak „g and covering of buckram frames; making hats in velvet silk straw ' 
and transparent materials; renovation of materials ' 

per ^e^^TiJ''!"'!!- '"' ^'V^" ^^^'^^ ''°"'^- ^"^ '-^oratory periods 
per week. Time to be arranged Mrs Welsh p^^i^u^ 

cioth'^iS' r"" °' ""'"''• '"' '• ""'"" ^'"^ "^'^^^ ^^^^' ^'^^™^*-« -th 

8.1 jT.S'r Swie^aifdr^'-^^" ^^^"^^ '^""■^- ^"^ '-*"- ^^ ^k. 
History of textile industry; recognition of fibers 

periodsTe^wti^'S't* l'' ^-^^'-Three credit hours. J^ve laboratory 
periods per week. Time to be arranged. T.-219. Miss Wiegand 

Use of commercial pattern, drafting, cutting, fitting and desigiiins of oat 
terns, construction of a cotton dress. resigning ot pat- 



SUMMER SCHOOL 



27 



HORTICULTURE 

General Horticulture (Hort. S. 11). — Three credit hours. Credit can- 
not be used toward a degree by students majoring in Agriculture or Agricultural 
Education. Three lectures and two laboratory periods per week. 10.15, M W., 
F.; Lab., 1.30 M. W., Greenhouse. Mr. Geise, Mr. Thurston, and Mr. White- 
house. 

In this course special topics in fruit growing, vegetable gardening, land- 
scape and floriculture are discussed. Its aim is to present the general field of 
horticulture to one who has not studied any branch of the subject before. 

Landscape and Floriculture (Hort. S. 12). — Three credit hours. Credit 
cannot be used toward a degree by students majoring in Agriculture or Agri- 
cultural education. Three lectures and one laboratory period. 9.15, M. W. F.; 
Lab., 1.30, F. Greenhouse. Mr. Thurston. 

The principles of landscape gardening and their application to the im- 
provement of home grounds. The propagation and cultivation of greenhouse 
plants. 

Elementary Pomology (Hort. 101). — Four credit hours. Five lectures 
and two laboratory periods per week. 11.40, Lab.; 1.30 M. W., Greenhouse. 
Mr. Whitehouse. 

This course discusses the general problems incident to the planting, man- 
agement, and marketing of such fruit crops as apples, peaches, pears, plums, 
cherries, quinces and small fruits. The principles of plant propagation as ap- 
plied to fruit growing are discussed. 

Commercial Fruit Growing (Hort. 102). — Three credit hours. Three 
lectures and two laboratory periods per week. Offered in 1924. Mr. White- 
house. 

The proper management of commercial orchards in Maryland. Special 
attention is given to orchard economics. 

Elementary Vegetable Gardening (Hort. 111). — Four credit hours- 
Five lectures and two laboratory periods per week 9.15, Lab.; 1.30, T. Th. 
Greenhouse. Mr. Geise. 

This course includes a study of the different types of vegetable gardening; 
methods of propagation; construction and management of hot beds and cold 
frames; growing early vegetable plants under glass, and the growing and man- 
agement of individual gardens. 

Commercial Vegetable Gardening (Hort. 113). — Three credit hours. 
Three lectures and two laboratory periods per week. Offered in 1924. Mr. 
Geise. 

A study of the methods used in commercial vegetable production. Trips 
are made to commercial gardens and various other places of interest. 

Garden Flowers (Hort. 129). — Three credit hours. Three lectures and 
two laboratory periods per week. M. W. F. 8.15, Lab. T. Th. 1.30, Green- 
house. Mr. Thurston. 

Plants for garden use; the various species of annuals, herbacious peren- 
nial bulbs; bedding plants and roses, and their cultural requirements. 



28 



UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 



INDUSTRIAL ARTS 

Mechanical Drawing (Dr. 101). — One credit hour. Two laboratory 
periods per week. 8.15, M. W., Q.-300. Mr. HoshalL 

Practice in plain lettering; use of the instruments; projection and simple 
working drawings; the plates upon completion being inclosed in covers properly 
titled by the students. 

Woodworking (Shop 101 S.). — One credit hour. Two laboratory periods 
per week. 1.30, M. T. P.-107. Mr. Hoshall. 

Use and care of wood-working tools; exercises in planing, mortising, and 
tennoning, and laying out work from blue prints. 

Forging (Shop 102 S.). — One credit hour. Two laboratory periods per 
week. 8.15 T., and 1.20, W. P.-107. Mr. Hoshall. 

Forging, iron and steel; welding; the making of steel tools. 



MATHEMATICS 

Algebra (Math. 1). — Three credit hours. Five lectures per week. 9.15 
R.-200. Dr. Taliaferro or assistants. 

Quadratic equations, simultaneous equations, progressions, graphs log- 
arithms, etc 

Advanced Algebra (Math. 2). — Three credit hours. Five lectures per 
week. 10.15, R.-200. Dr. Taliaferro or assistants. 

Elementary theory of equations. Permutations and combinations, bi- 
nomial theorem, etc. 

Plane Trigonometry (Math. 3). — Three credit hours. Five lectures per 
week. 11.40, R.-200. Prerequisite Math. 1. Dr. Taliaferro or assistants. 

Trigonometric functions. Development of formulas and their application 
to the solution of trigonometric equations and right and oblique triangles. 

Plane Analytic Geometry (Math. 4). — Three credit hours. Five lec- 
tures per week. Prerequisite Math. 1 and 3. 8.15, R.-200. Dr. Taliaferro or 
assistants. 

A discussion of the loci of equations in two variables, the straight line, the 
circle and the parabola. 

MODERN LANGUAGES 
Spanish 

Beginners' Spanish (Span. 1 ). — Offered if as many as five students ap- 
ply. — Three credit hours. Five lectures per week. 8.15, L.-303. Mr. Stinson. 

A study of the elements of grammar with emphasis on the verb, compo- 
sition and conversation. 

MUSIC 

Voice. — Hours to be arranged in consultation with the instructor at the 
opening of the session. One lesson per week; fee, $15. Two lessons per week, 
for term of six weeks; fee, $24. Mr. Goodyear. 

The courses in voice culture cover a thorough and comprehensive study of 
music based on the Italian method of singing. The work required to develop 
a singer is begun with the most fundamental principles of correct breathing. 
Scale and arpeggio exercises, and all intervals, the portamento, legato, and 



SUMMER SCHOOL 



29 



PHILOSOPHY 

^ Philosophy of the Ancient World (Phil. lOD.-Three credit hours>: 

''^rZZ'^f ZM^i- of ciraUon fro. the Gree. and e^^ 
Christirphysoph; to the Lddle Ages. .Lectures and reports on outs^de^ 

reading. 

PHYSICS 

Mechanics (Physics S. ll).-Four credit ^-^ ^j^^i^^m 'S 
laboratory periods per week. Accepted ^ ^e^jvalent of Physic^ OL 
requisite. Plane Trigonometry. 8.15, Lab.; 1.30, M. T., K lOU. 

A discussion in the class room and application in the laboratory of the 
laws of physical phenomena m mechanics. 

Magnetism and Electricity (Physu^S. ^l'^^:^ ^t: e::^^^e!^:i 
lectures and two laboratory periods per week Acceptea as t ^ 
Physics 102. Prerequisite. Plane Trigonometry. 8.15, Lab., 1.30. W. in. 
R.-100. Mr. Eichlin. 

A discussion in the class room and application in the laboratory of the laws 
of physical phenomena in magnetism and electricity. 

Heat LiBht and Sound (Physics S. 13). -Four credit hours. Five lec- 
tures and 'tto'^boratory periods per week. Accepted - the ^^^--^^ .^^ 
Physics 103. Prerequisite, Plane Geometry. 8.15, Lab.; 1.30, Th. F., K. 

' "*" f dSfussion in the class room and application in the laboratory of the laws 

of physical phenomena in heat, light and sound. o.„Hpnts 

Note -Not all the above courses will be offered simultaneously. Students 

will ml chot ithe opening of the session. The will of the majority will rule. 

PLANT PATHOLOGY 

General Plant Pathology (Pit. Path. ^^^ ^^--Three cre<«t hou.^ 
Three lectures and two laboratory periods per week. 9.15. M. W. F. Lab., l.du 
M. F.. T.-209. Mr. Temple. . , „f tv,p His- 

This course gives training in the i^entification^"'^^^^,:"^^^^^^^^ L'^ven 
eases of fruits, field crops, and truck crops. It is the same course that is given 

during the College year. 



30 



UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 



Advanced Plant Pathology (Pit. Path. 105 S. ). — Credit according to 
the time devoted to the subject. Lectures, conferences and laboratory work. 
Undergraduate and graduate. Time to be arranged. T.-209. Mr. Temple. 

Opportunity to specialize in plant pathology in general or in the pathology 
of particular groups of plants; a study of the reports of original investigations; 
famiharity with and practice in pathological technique; special problems. 

PLANT PHYSIOLOGY 

Plant Physiology (Pit. Phy. 101 ). — Four credit hours. Four lectures 
and two laboratory periods per week. Prerequisite, Botany 101-102. 10.15, 
M. T. W. Th. Lab.; 1.30, T. Th., T.-209. Mr. Zimmerman. 

The first course in Plant Physiology deals with the water requirements, 
principles of absorption, transpiration and mineral nutrient requirements. 

Plant Physiology (Pit. Phy. 102). — Four credit hours. Four lectures and 
two laboratory periods per week. Prerequisite, Botany 101-102. 11.40, 
T.-209. Mr. Zimmerman. 

The following subjects are studied: compounds manufactured by plants; 
metabohc processes; the growth of plants and tropic movements. 

Advanced Plant Physiology (Pit. Phys. 103 ). — Three credit hours. 
Graduate credit by special arrangement. Two lectures and three laboratory 
periods per week. Prerequisite, General Botany and Plant Physiology 101-102. 
Offered in 1924. Mr. Zimmerman. 

A detailed study of all life processes of plants. The laboratory work gen- 
erally consists of special work on one or more problems that may continue 
through the year. Students who write theses for their undergraduate degrees 
get their data from special problems assigned for the laboratory work. 

PUBLIC SPEAKING 

Oral Reading (P.S. 101 S.). — One and one-half credit hours. Three 
periods per week. 11.40 M. W. F., L.-203. Mr. Richardson. 

Study of the technic of vocal expression. The oral interpretation of lit- 
erary masterpieces. Study of methods of teaching oral English in the schools. 

Note. — As in former years, special courses in Public Speaking will be ar- 
ranged at the opening of the session to meet the needs of the students who enroll. 

THE SOCIAL SCIENCES 
History 

American Colonial History (His. 102 ). — One and one-half credit hours 
three lectures ver week. Given 1924. Mr. Schulz. 

A study t: the political, economic and social conditions of the American 
colonies from the settlement at Jamestown to the adoption of the Constitution. 

Sociology. 

Elements Of Social Science (Soc. 101 S.). — Three credit hours. Five 
lectures per week. Accepted as the equivalent of Soc. 101. 10.20, L.-203. 
Dr. Lee. 

This course deals with the basis and nature of society; the process of so- 
cial evolution; the economic organization of society; the rise of government and 
the state as an institution; and the nature and extent of social control of man's 
activities. It forms the foundation upon which the principles of economics, 
the principles of sociology, and the science of government are based. 



SUMMER SCHOOL 



31 



Social Psychology (Soc. 107 S ).-Three credit hours. Five lect^^^^^^^^ 

week. Accepted as the equivalent of Soc. 104. 10.15, Q..202. Dr. Ihompson. 

This course deals with such psychological matters as underlie the work in 

Socil^ and other social sciences. An effort will be made to ana^y- 1^^^^^^^^^^^ 

f patures of human nature, which find expression m social life. The fundamental 

SSt dy^^^^^^ for;es in the individual and in society, their origm, de- 

velopm^^^ organization and control. Analysis of the value problem. 

ZOOLOGY 
General Zoology (Zool. 101 S. ).-Three credit hours. Three lectures 
and t^o thrlhour ifboratory periods per week. This course covers the wo^k 
o^ZodlOl and Zool. 101-a as outlined in the University catalogue. 8.10, M. 
W. F. Lab.; 1.30, T. Th., L.-107. Mr. Pierson. 

The basic principles of animal biology are emphasized rather than the 
morphology of selected types. Not offered in 1923. 

General Zoology (Zool. 102 S. ). -Three credit hours. Three lectures 
and ^wothreeThour laboratory periods per week. Prerequisite, General Zo- 
Igy 101 S. or its equivalent. This course covers the work as outlined ^n the 
Sersity catalogue under General Zoology 102 and 102-b. 11.40. L.-107. 
Mr. Pierson. 

A continuation of General Zoology 101 S.