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Full text of "The summer school"

JISITY of MARYLAND 

OFFTCIAL PUBLICATION 




y^ds 



AfHI, 1939 



N«. 4 






i^ tiie Session of 
Jme 26— August 4 



1939 




COLLEGE PARK. MARYLAND 



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VERSITY of MARYLAND 



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OFFICIAL PUBLICATION 



April, 1939 




umtttj^r S'rljnnl 



For the Session of 
June 26— August 4 

1939 




COLLEGE PARK, MARYLAND 



No. 4 



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LIBRARY- COLLEGE PARK 



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THE 



UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 




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School InsttfiitioB will lW*fa» pntepttF^m JRieBdij^p 



SUMMER SCHOOL 



For the Session of 



1939 



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ADMINISTRATIVE OFFICERS 



H. C. Byrd 



...President 



Frank K. Haszakd 
WiLLARD S. Small . 



...Executive Secretary 
.....Director 



Alma I. Frothingham 

Adble Stamp 

W. M. HiLLEGEISf 



Secretary to the Director 

Dean of Women 

Director of Admissions 



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Alma H. Preinkert Registrar 

Harvey T. Casbarian Comptroller 

Audrey Killiam Acting Manager of the Dining Hall 

H. L. Crisp - Superintendent of Buildings 

T. A. HuTTON Purchasing Agent and Manager of Students* Supply Store 

George F. Pollock _ Alumnus Secretary 



^«Md Ibnthl, by the Uniw^pfty of M«^N«I « qwl^ftfik, l^toi 
Bntowd «. .,coi4^«i, Burtter tn^to* Art^ Con^ 



Advisory Social Committee — Mr. George F. Pollock, Chairman; Miss Alice 
L. Howard, Miss Gwendolyn Drew, Mr. C. L. Mackeit, Mr. Ralph 
Williams. 



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LIBRARY- COLLEGE PARK 



June 3, 1939— Satu 




June 26 — Monday — Registration, Gymnasium. 

June 27 — ^Tuesday — 8.00 a. m., Instruction in the Summer Session begins. 

July 1 — Saturday — Classes meet as usual. 

July 4 — Tuesday — No classes. 

July 8 — Saturday — Classes meet as usual. 

August 4 — Friday — Close of Summer Session. 



THE COLLEGE YEAR, 1939-40 

September 13-16 — Registration for First Semester. 
September 18 — Classes begin. First Semester, 
January 17-25 — First Semester examinations. 
January 29-31 — Registration for Second Semester. 
February 1 — Classes begin. Second Semester. 
May 21-29 — Second Semester examinations. 
June 1 — Commencement Day. 

All Summer School Instruction will begin promptly on Tuesday morning, 
June 27. 



Issued Monthly by the University of Maryland at College Park, Maryland. 
Entered as second-class matter under Act of Congress of August 24, 1912. 



THE 



UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 



SUMMER SCHOOL 

For the Session of 

1939 



ADMINISTRATIVE OFFICERS 

President 

H. C. Byrd - " 

,, ,, Executive Secretary 

Frank K. HASZAiiD - - 

^ Director 

WiLLARD S. Small - " 

Secretary to the Director 

ALMA I. FROTHINGHAM oecreid y 

Dean of Women 

Adelb Stamp - - " 

Director of Admissions 
W. M. Hillegeist 

Registrar 

Alma H. Preinkert - " 

.. .. Comptroller 
Harvey T. Casbarl\n " 

AUDREY K.LUAM Acting Manager of the Dining Hall 

„ Librarian 
Carl W. E. Hintz - - "•* 

Superintendent of Buildings 

T* A. HUTTON Purchasing Agent and Manager of Students^ Supply Store 

Alumnus Secretary 
George F. Pollock - - 

Advisory Social Co.nmittee-Mr. Geov.e F Pollock Chairrnan; Mi.s A^.ice 
L. Howard, Mis. Gwendolyn Drew, Mr. C. L. M^^ckei.. Mi. Kalpn 

Williams. 

i4£780 

1 



CONTENTS Page 

Instructors „ 3 

General Information „ 8 

Descriptions of Courses 14 

Agricultural Economics and Farm Management 14 

Art 15 

Bacteriology 16 

Botany 16 

Chemistry 17 

Chesapeake Biological Laboratory 47 

Dramatics 20 

Economics and Business Administration 20 

Education 

Commercial Education 21 

Educational Psychology (See Psychology) 45 

Elementary Education - - 21 

Elementary — Secondary _ 22 

Guidance 23 

History, Principles, and Administration 23 

Home Ecomonics Education 25 

Industrial Education 26 

Music Education ( See Music ) 42 

Physical Education 28 

Rural Life and Agricultural Education 29 

Secondary Education 29 

Special Education 31 

English 32 

Entomology 33 

General Science 34 

Geography 34 

History 35 

Home Economics 37 

Horticulture 37 

Mathematics 38 

Modern Languages 39 

Music 42 

Philosophy 43 

Physics 43 

Political Science 43 

Poultry Husbandry 45 

Psychology 45 

Sociology 46 

Speech - 47 

Zoology „ 47 

KEY TO BUILDINGS 

L — Morrill Hall P — Mechanical Engineering DD — Chemistry 

N — Home Economics R — Electrical Engineering M — Library (Old) 
T — Agricultural Q — Civil Engineering AS — Arts and Sciences 

FF— Horticultural S — Engineering (New) GFH— Girls* Field 

EE — Library Gym. — Gymnasium House 

Aud. — Auditorium 
2 



INSTRUCTORS 

C Appleman, Ph.D., Professor of Botany and 
' Plant Physiology ; Dean of the Graduate SchooLBotany 

C. R. BALL, A.M., Instructor of English -English 

RONALD Bamford, Ph.D., Associate Professor of 

Botany - " "" 

H M Barzun, Ph.D., Editor of The French Forum, 

' New York City - -^^^"^^ 

R M BELLOWS, Ph.D., Assistant Professor of Edu- 
cational Psychology Psychology 

A. A. Blair, Ph.D., Assistant Fishery Biologist, 

Chesapeake Biological Laboratory ..Zoology 

Marjorie Billows, B. A. E., Supervisor of Art, 

Montgomery County, Maryland -Art 

H R Bird, Ph.D., Associate Professor of Poultry 

• Nutrition -^^^1^^^ Husbandry 

L. E. Blauch, Ph.D., Principal Educational Special- 
ist The Advisory Committee on Education, 

Washington, D. C ...-Education 

H C Bold Ph.D., Instructor of Botany, Vanderbilt 

' University ^^^^^y 

H. A. Bone, Ph.D., Instructor of Political Science Political Science 
H H Brechbill, Ph.D., Associate Professor of Edu- 

* cation Education 

E. W. Broome, A.M., LL.B., Superintendent of 

Schools, Montgomery County, Maryland Education 
L. B. Broughton, Ph.D., Dean, College of Arts and 
Sciences; Professor and Head of the Department 
of Chemistry Chemistry 

G. D. Brown, A.M., Professor of Industrial Edu- 

,. Education 

cation - 

R G Brown, Ph.D., Assistant Professor of Plant 

Physiology ^^^^^y 

Nellie Buckey, A.M., Assistant Teacher Trainer, 

State Teachers College, Buffalo, New York Education 

S. O. BURHOE, Ph.D., Assistant Professor of Zkwlogy -Zoology 

L. R. Burnett, M.D., Director of Health and Physi- 
cal Education, City Department of Education, 
Baltimore, Maryland P^^ysi^al Education 

T C Byerly, Ph.D., Professor of Poultry Hus- 
bandry Poultry Husbandry 

Pv. p. CARROLL, Ph.D., School of Education, Pennsyl- 
vania State College Education 

Mme Pierre de Chauny, Assistant in French House ..French 

Pierre de Chauny, B.S., Assistant in French House .French 

3 



a W. CissEL, A.M., C.P.A., Assistant Professor of 

Accounting ..Accounting 

J. W. CODDINGTON, M.S., Assistant Professor of Ag- 
ricultural Economics Agricultural Economics 

E. N. Cory, Ph.D., Professor of Entomology; State 

Entomologist ^ Entomology 

H. F. COTTERMAN, Ph.D., Professor of Agricultural 

Education — » > Rural Education 

R. F. Cromwell, A.M., Supervisor of Educational 
and Vocational Guidance, Maryland State De- 
partment of Education Guidance 

H. B. Crothers, Ph.D., Professor of History History 

Vienna Curtiss, A.M., Assistant Professor of Art.Home Economics 

E. B. Daniels, Ph.D., Assistant Professor of Eco- 
nomics - Economics 

Tobias Danzig, Ph.D., Professor of Mathematics Mathematics 

G. O. Darby, Ph.D., Assistant Professor of Modern 

Languages Spanish 

S. H. DbVault, Ph.D., Professor of Agricultural 

Economics , -....Agricultural Economics 

I. C. DiEHL, A.M., Head, Department of Geography, 

State Teachers College, Frostburg, Maryland Geography 

E. M. Douglass, A.M., Principal, Montgomery Blair 

High School, Silver Spring, Maryland Education 

Gwendolyn Drew, A.M., Professor of Physical Edu- 
cation for Women - Physical Education 

Herman DuBuy, Ph.D., Assistant Professor of Plant 

Physiology -.... Botany 

C. B. Edgeworth, A.B., LL.B., Supervisor of Com- 
mercial Education, City Department of Educa- 
tion, Baltimore, Maryland Education 

Ray Ehrensberger, Ph.D., Assistant Professor of 

Speech - Speech 

C. G. EiCHLiN, M.S., Professor and Chairman of the 

Department of Physics Physics 

Eleanor Enright, A.M., In Charge of Adult Edu- 
cation in Home Economics, Public Schools, 

Washington, D. C .Home Economics 

W. F. Falls, Ph.D., Professor of Modern Languages ..French 

R. T. FiTZHUGH, Ph.D., Assistant Professor of Eng- 
lish „ English 

4 



X C Foster, A.B., Research Agent, Vocational Re- 
habilitation Service, Office of Education, Wash- 
ington, D. C - Education 

RALPH Gallington, A.M., Assistant Professor, In- 
dustrial Education Education 

E. E. Ghisblli, Ph.D., Instructor of Psychology Psychology 

T M Gwin, B.S., Associate Professor of Poultry 

Husbandry - P^-^^ry Husbandry 

C B Hale Ph.D., Professor and Chairman of the 

Department of English English 

A B HAMILTON, M.S., Assistant Professor of Agri- 
cultural Economics Agricultural Economics 

W. L. Hard, Ph.D., Instructor of Zoology Zoology 

M. M. Haring, Ph.D., Professor of Chemistry Chemistry 

Susan E Harman, Ph.D., Associate Professor of 

English English 

I. C. Haut, Ph.D., Associate Pomologist Horticulture 

Margaret T. Herring, Ph.D., Department of Modern 

Languages, Western Maryland College French 

C. L. Hodge, Ph.D., Instructor of Sociology Sociology 

J R Ives, M.S., Instructor of Agricultural Eco- 

Agricultural Economics 

nomics ^ 

J. E. JACOBI, Ph.D., Instructor of Sociology Sociology 

J G Jenkins, Ph.D., Professor and Chairman of 

the Department of Psychology Psychology 

C S. JosLYN, Ph.D., Associate Professor of 

Sociology Sociology 

M. A. JULL, Ph.D., Professor of Poultry Husbandry. Poultry Husbandry 

Polly B. Kessinger, Ph.D., Assistant Professor of 

Textiles and Clothing Home Economics 

C F Kramer, A.M., Associate Professor of Modern 

Languages - ^^^"^^" 

R. R. Kudo, Ph.D., Associate Professor of Zoology, 

University of Illinois Zoology 

V. A. Lamb, Ph.D., Instructor of Chemistry Chemistry 

0. E. Lancaster, Ph.D., Instructor of Mathematics Mathematics 

A. F. LiOTARD, A.B., Instructor of Modern Lan- 

French 

guages ~ - 

H. W. Littlefield, A.M., Assistant Principal; Chair- 
man of the Social Studies Department, Ham- 
den High School, Hamden, Connecticut Education 

E. L. Longley, B.S., Instructor, Baltimore Poly- 
technic Institute -- - Education 

5 



Edna B. McNaughton, A.M., Professor of Home 

Economics Education Education 

C. H. Mahoney, Ph.D., Professor of Olericulture Horticulture 

L. C. Marshall, A.M., LL.D., Professor of Political 
Economy, The American University; Visiting 
Professor of Education, The Johns Hopkins 
^^^^^^^^ty Education 

Fritz Marti, Ph.D., Professor of Philosophy Philosophy 

M. H. Martin, Ph.D., Associate Professor of Mathe- 

"^^^^^^ Mathematics 

AUCE Mendham, A.B., Director of Green Acres 

School, Silver Spring, Maryland Education 

L. M. Miller, A.M., Director of Guidance, Rockland 

County, New York Education 

Marie Mount, A.M., Dean, College of Home Eco- 
nomics; Professor of Home and Institution 
Management Home Economics 

J. B. S. Norton, D.Sc, Professor of Botany Botany 

M. C. Old, Ph.D., Associate Professor of Biology 

Ursinus College ^Zoology 

H. W. Olson, Ph.D., In Charge of Biology, Wilson 

Teachers College Zoology 

A. G. Packard, M.S., Acting Supervisor, Vocational 
Industrial Education, City Department of Edu- 
cation, Baltimore, Maryland Education 

J Orin Powers, Ph.D., Professor of Education Education 

G. D. QuiGLEY, B.S., Associate Professor of Poultry 

^^^^^'^^^y Poultry Husbandry 

Harlan Randall, Instructor of Music Music 

J. H. Reid, A.m., Instructor of Economics Economics 

W. H. Rice, B.S., Associate Professor of Poultry 

^^'^^^^^y Poultry Husbandry 

A. L. Schrader, Ph.D., Professor and Head of the 

Department of Horticulture Horticulture 

Mark Schweizer, A.M., Instructor of Modern Lan- 

^^^^s German 

Martha Sibley, A.M., Instructor, Division of Gen- 
eral Education, New York University Education 

G. L. SiXBEY, A.M., Instructor of English English 

C. Mabel Smith, A.M., Principal, Parkside School, 

Silver Spring, Maryland Education 

6 



J. W. SpROWLS, Ph.D., Professor of Psychology Psychology 

L. I. Strakhovsky, Ph.D., Professor of History History 

R. G. Steinmeyer, Ph.D., Associate Professor of Po- 
litical Science Political Science 

C. E. Temple, A.M., Professor of Plant Pathology; 

State Plant Pathologist Botany 

H. W. Thatcher, Ph.D., Assistant Professor of His- 
tory - History 

C. J. Velie, A.m., Supervisor of Music, Baltimore 

County, Maryland Music 

W. P. Walker, M.S., Associate Professor of Agricul- 
tural Economics Agricultural Economics 

D. H. Wallace, Assistant Fishery Biologist, Chesa- 

peake Biological Laboratory Zoology 

G. E. Walther, B.S., Instructor of Political Science.Political Science 

Claribel p. Welsh, A.M., Head of the Department 

of Foods and Nutrition; Professor of Foods Home Economics 

J. Y. West, Ph.D., Professor of Science, State 

Teachers College, Towson, Maryland General Science 

C. E. White, Ph.D., Professor of Chemistry Chemistry 

Helen B. Wilcox, A.M., Instructor of Modern 

Languages French 

C. S. Williams, B.S., Instructor of Poultry Hus- 
bandry Poultry Husbandry 

J. W. Williams, Ph.D., Instructor of Chemistry Chemistry 

R. I. Williams, A.B., Assistant Dean of Men; Di- 
rector of Dramatics ^ Dramatics 

R. S. Williamson, M.Ed., Head of Scientific Tech- 
nical Department, Baltimore City College Education 

L. G. Worthington, A.M., Instructor of History and 

Extension Specialist History 

Alice W. Wygant, Acting Assistant Supervisor of 
Special Classes, City Department of Education, 
Baltimore, Maryland Education 

W. G. Zeeveld, Ph.D., Assistant Professor of Eng- 
lish English 



8 



SUMMER SCHOOL 



UNIVERSITY OP MARYLAND 



9 



GENERAL INFORMATION 

MJ^vlnT^"*n"''"^ 'T'T °^ '^^ ^"'"'"^'" S*='^°°l "f the University of 
Maryland will open Monday, June 26th, 1939, and continue for six weeks 
ending Friday, August 4th. . weeKs, 

claies'tni ^tfif'ir ™f,^^ thirty class periods for each full course, 
classes wdl be held on Saturday, July 1st, and Saturday, July 8th to 
make up for time lost on registration day and on July 4th, respectfv'ely 
There will be no classes or other collegiate activities held on July 4th which 
will be observed as a legal holiday. ' 

Sduai t^ei '" ''''''' ^'^ '•e<l-enients for undergraduate and 

LOCATION 

The University is located at College Park in Prince George's County 
eight miles from Washington and thirty-two miles from Baltimore. cTeS 
Park IS a station on the B. & O. B. B. and on the City and Suburban Electric 
St w^lth 1 "'*^'-"'-^f b«« lin«« P^s the University. Washington. 
Sny acresiwe """"" '" "^"^^ ^^"^*^'''^' ^*"^^' ^^' ««-«- - 

TERMS OF ADMISSION 

Teachers and special students not seeking degrees are admitted to the 
courses of the Summer Session for which they are qualified. 

The admission requirements for those who desire to become candidates 
for degrees are the same as for any other session of the University. Before 
nf ^ff "p^'n * ^ candidate for a degree will be required to consult the Dean 
of the College m which he seeks a degree. 

Graduates of accredited Normal Schools with satisfactory normal school 
records may be admitted to advanced standing in the College of Education- 
TTie objectives of the individual student determine the exact amount of 
credit allowed The student is given individual counsel and advice as to 
the best procedure for fulfilling the requirements for a degree. 

ACADEMIC CREDIT 

The semester hour is the unit of credit, as in other sessions of the Uni- 
versity. A semester credit hour is one lecture or recitation a week for a 
semester which is approximately seventeen weeks in length. Two or three 
hours of laboratory or field work are counted as equivalent to one lecture 
or recitation. During the summer session a lecture course meeting five times 
a week for six weeks requiring the standard amount of outside work, is 
given a weight of two semester hours. 

In exceptional cases, the credit allowance of a course may be increased on 
account of additional individual work. This must be arranged w?^^^^^^^ 
instructor at time of registration and approved by the Director! 

Students who are matriculated as candidates for degrees will be credited 
towards the appropriate degree for satisfactory completion of courses. 



Teachers and other students not seeking degrees will receive official re- 
ports specifying the amount and quality of work completed. These reports 
will be accepted by the Maryland State Department of Education and by the 
appropriate education authorities in other States for the extension and 
renewal of certificates in accordance with their laws and regulations. 

All courses offered in the Summer Session are creditable towards the 
appropriate degree. 

STUDENT SCHEDULES 

Six semester hours is the standard load for the Summer Session. Special 
permission will be required for a program of more than six semester hours. 
(See also under expenses.) The program of ever>^ elementary school teacher 
should include at least one content course. Teachers should be careful not 
to elect courses that they have had in previous attendance at summer 
schools. 

Regularly registered students who wish to attend a course or a part of 
a course without doing the work connected therewith are permitted to enroll 
as auditors with the consent of the instructor in charge and approval of the 
Director. 

REGISTRATION 

Monday, June 26th, is Registration Day. On this day the entire procedure 
of registration will be conducted in the Gymnasium by advisers, director 
of admissions, registrar, and cashier. The hours are from 9 A. M. to 5 P. M. 
Students should register on or before this date and be ready for class work 
on the morning of Tuesday, June 27th. 

Students living in the vicinity of the University are urged to register 
in person Thursday, Friday, and Saturday preceding the regular registra- 
tion day in the Summer School office. 

It is possible to register in advance by mail and reserve rooms by applying 
to the Director of the Summer School. 

Students may not register after Saturday, July 1st, except by special 
permission of the Director and the payment of a fee of $2.00 for late 
registration. 

All course cards for work in the Summer School must be countersigned 
by the Director or Registration Adviser before they are presented at the 
Registrar's office. 

A student desiring to withdraw from a course for which he has registered 
will apply to the Director for a withdrawal permit. 

Unless otherwise stated, courses listed will be offered in 1939. In gen- 
eral, courses for which less than five students apply will not be given. Such 
courses will be held open until the end of the first week, July 1st, at which 
time it will be determined by the Director whether they will be given. 

SUMMER GRADUATE WORK 

Special arrangements have been made for persons wishing to do graduate 
work in summer. The Master's degree represents full time work for one 
academic year. The minimum credit requirement is 24 semester hours in 



10 



SUMMER SCHOOL 



UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 



U 



courses approved for graduate credits, in addition to a thesis. The mini- 
mum residence requirement is attendance at four Summer Sessions. By 
carrying six semester hours of graduate work for four sessions and upon 
submitting a satisfactory thesis students may be granted the degree of 
Master of Arts or Master of Science. In some instances a fifth summer 
may be required in order that a satisfactory thesis may be completed. 
Teachers and other graduate students working for a degree on the summer 
plan must matriculate in the Graduate School, meet the same requirements, 
and proceed in the same way as do students enrolled in the other sessions 
of the University. Those seeking the Master's degree as qualification for 
the State High School Principars Certificate should include in their twenty- 
four semester hours approximately eight hours of "advanced study related 
to high school branches." 

In a number of departments courses are scheduled for a series of years, 
thus enabling students whose major or minor subjects are in these de- 
partments, to plan their work in orderly sequence. 

Full information in regard to general regulations governing graduate 
work may be had by writing to the Registrar for The Graduate School An- 
nouncements. 

Those expecting to register as graduate students should bring with them 
transcripts of their undergraduate records. Graduate credit towards an 
advanced degree may be obtained only by students regularly matriculated 
in the Graduate School. 

Certain special regulations governing graduate work in Education om 
the Summer plan are made available to students at time of registration. 
Each graduate student in Education should have a copy. 

DORMITORIES 

Students are accommodated in the University dormitories up to the ca- 
pacity of the dormitories. The charge for rooms is as follows: 



Calvert Hall (Men) 

Margaret Brent Hall (Women) 
New Dormitory (Women) 



$ 9.00 
12.00 
12.00 



Rooms may be reserved in advance, but will not be held later than noon of 
Tuesday, June 27th. As the number of rooms is limited, early applica- 
tion for reser\ ations is advisable. Men should address applications to the 
Director of the Summer School; women, to the Dean of Women. Requests 
for room reservations must be accompanied with a deposit of $3.00. Checks 
should be made payable to University of Maryland. This fee of $3.00 will 
be deducted from charge for roam rent when the student registers; if he 
fails to occupy the room, the fee will be forfeited, unless application for re- 
fund is received by Wednesday, June 14th. 

The University dormitories will be open for occupancy the morning of 
June 26th. 

Students attending the Summer School and occupying rooms in the dor- 
mitories will provide themselves with towels, pillows, pillow cases, sheets 
and blankets. 



Trunks should be marked plainly with name and address (dormitory and 
room number) if rooms have been assigned in advance. Trunks are trans- 
ported from the railroad station to dormitories by University trucks at a 
charge of 50 cents each. Trunks sent by express should be prepaid. 

Students who prefer to room off the campus, or who cannot be accommo- 
dated in the dormitory, may find accommodations in fraternity houses and 
boarding houses in College Park and in private homes in College Park 
and the nearby towns of Berwyn, Riverdale, and Hyattsville. 

The University assumes no responsibility for rooms and board offered to 
summer session patrons outside of the University dormitories and din- 
ing room. 

DINING HALL 

Board is furnished at the College Dining Hall exclusively on the Cafe- 
teria plan. Food is chosen and meals are planned with strict regard to 
health, nutrition, and attractiveness. Milk is furnished by the University 
herd. Plenty of fresh fruits, vegetables, and ice cream are found on all 
menus. Self-service is used in order to permit a wide choice of foods at 
minimum cost. The cost of board, therefore, will depend upon the individual. 

EXPENSES 

The special fees ordinarily required in higher institutions, such as reg- 
istration fee, library fee, health service fee, and the like, are covered in the 
"General Fee" which is paid by all undergraduate students. 



General Fee (for all undergraduate students)... 

Room - _ 

Recreation and Entertainment Fee 

Non-resident fee (for students not residents of 
Maryland or the District of Columbia) 



$20.00 

9.00- 12.00 

1.00 

10.00 



The general fee of $20.00 entitles a student to the normal load of six 
semester hours. For each semester hour in excess of six, an additional fee 
of $4.00 will be charged. 

The "General Fee" is not charged to undergraduate students registering 
for three semester hours of credit or less. The charge for such students 
is at the rate of $6.00 per semester hour. 

Audition courses are charged at the same rate as courses taken for credit 
except that no charge is made to students who have paid the general fee for 
six semester hours. Consent of instructor concerned, however, should al- 
ways be obtained. 

A special fee, which is specified in the descriptions of certain courses, is 
charged for the use of laboratory and other materials. 

One-half of the fees, including laboratory fees, must be paid upon reg- 
istration, and the remainder at the beginning of the third week of the term. 

Expenses for Graduate Students — Instead of a "General Fee" of $20.00, 
the expenses for a graduate student are: 



12 



SUMMER SCHOOL 



UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 



13 



A matriculation fee of $10.00. This is paid but once, upon admission 
to the Graduate School. 

A charge of $4.00 per semester hour for course work. 

Recreation and Entertainment Fee, $1.00. 

A diploma fee of $10.00. 

The non-resident fee does not apply to graduate students. 

REFUNDS 

In cases of withdrawal for illness or other unavoidable causes, refunds 
will be made as follows: 

For withdrawal within five days after registration day full refund of 
general fee and laboratory fees, with a deduction of $2.00 to cover cost of 
registration, will be made. Refunds for lodging will be pro-rated. 

After five days, and up to two weeks, refunds on all charges will be pro- 
rated with the deduction of $2.00 for cost of registration. 

After two weeks no refund will be granted. 

Applications for refunds must be made to the financial office and ap- 
proved by the Director. No refund will be paid until the application form 
has been signed by the Director and countersigned by the dormitory repre- 
sentatives if the applicant rooms in a dormitory. 

STUDENT HEALTH 

The University Infirmary, located on the campus, in charge of the regu- 
lar University physician and nurse, provides free medical service of a 
routine nature for the students in the Summer School. Students who are 
ill should report promptly to the University physician. Dr. Leonard Hayes, 
either in person or by phone (Extension 124). 



PRIVATE INSTRUCTION IN MUSIC 

Instruction in piano and voice under private teachers may be had by a 
limited number of students. Details may be secured from Mr. Harlan Ran- 
dall of the Music Department. 

ASSEMBLY AND CONFERENCE PERIODS 

The intermission between the second and third class periods, from 9.50 
to 10.30, is devoted to assembly programs and faculty- student conferences. 

The assembly programs will consist chiefly of talks on .matters of current 
interest. They will begin and end promptly — at 9.55 and 10.25, respectively. 
Advance notice of assembly programs will be posted. 

The period on other days will be reserved for conference purposes. 

RECREATION AND STUDENT SOCIAL COMMITTEE 

In cooperation with the Student Life Committee of the University, 
the Student Social Committee administers the special fund derived from 
the "Recreational and Entertainment Fee" of $1.00. The Student Social 
Committee is appointed by the Director of Summer School at the beginning 
of each Summer Session. 

These committees are responsible for the promotion of social and recrea- 
tional activities. A general reception, several dances, and a variety of 
group social events are planned. The Departments of Physical Education 
and Athletics make available gymnasia, play fields, and tennis courts for 
general student recreation. Equipment for games and individual activities 
is provided from the "Recreational and Entertainment Fee." Supervision 
of the activities is provided by the Director of the Summer Session. Each 
student is urged to avail himself of the social and recreational advantages 
offered during the Summer Session. 



THE LIBRARY 

The Library Building, completed in 1931, is an attractive, well equipped, 
and well lighted structure. The reading room on the second floor seats 236 
and has about 5000 reference books and bound periodicals on open shelves. 
The five-tier stack room is equipped with eighteen carrels for the use of 
advanced students. About 12,000 of the 80,000 volumes on the campus 
are shelved in the Chemistry and Entomology Departments, the Graduate 
School, and other units. Over 600 periodicals are currently received. 

The Library is open from 8.00 a. m. to 10.00 p. m. Monday through 
Friday; from 8.00 a. m. to 12.30 p. m. on Saturday; and from 2.30 p. m. 
to 10.00 p. m. on Sunday. 

The University Library is able to supplement its reference service by 
borrowing material from other libraries through Inter-library Loan and 
Bibliofilm Service, or by arranging for personal work in the Library of 
Congress, the United States Department of Agriculture Library, the United 
States Office of Education Library, and other agencies in Washington. 



THE FRENCH SCHOOL 

A French School, through the medium of the French House (See p. 40 
of this catalogue), offers to those who wish to perfect their spoken French 
the opportunity of living with native French people for six weeks and of 
taking part in a program of dramatic entertainments, games, and outings 
sponsored by the French School. 

For full (description of the French School, send to the Director of the 
Summer Session for the Special Circular of Information. 

THE WORLD TODAY 

Attention is called to the course in Political Science entitled "The World 
Today" (p. 44) which is open under certain conditions to persons other 
than registered students. 

A special circular describing this course in detail may be had from the 
Director of the Summer Session. 



14 



SUMMER SCHOOL 



EVENING ENTERTAINMENTS 

Evening lectures and musical programs will be given at intervals during 
the session. There is no admission charge to registered students. 

C. C. C. EDUCATIONAL ADVISERS' CONFERENCE 

In cooperation with the Division of Educational Work of the Third Corps 
Area a conference is conducted for the Educational Advisers of this Area. 

The program is under the direction of Dr. Thomas G. Bennett, Corps 
Area Educational Adviser. 

DESCRIPTIONS OF COURSES 
Designation of Courses 

Courses with an S before the number, e.g., Ed. S 11, are special Summer 
School courses and are not offered during the regular collegiate year. 

Courses with an S following the number, as Ed. Psych. 103 S are modifi- 
cations to meet Summer School conditions, of courses of the same number 
in the University catalogue. 

Courses without the S, as Bact. 1 and courses followed by "f" or "s" 
are identical with courses of the same symbol and number in the University 
catalogue. 

Courses numbered 1 to 99 are for undergraduate students only. 

Courses numbered 100 to 199 are for advanced undergraduates and gradu- 
ates; courses numbered 200 and above are for graduate students only. 

The symbols Eng., Ed., etc., refer ^,o the departmental grouping under 
which such courses are found in the general catalogue. 

The number of credit hotirs is shown by the Arabic numeral in parenthesis 
following the title of the course. 

AGRICULTURAL ECONOMICS AND FARM MANAGEMENT 

A. E. 103 S. Cooperation in Agriculture (2). — A. First three weeks (1); 
B. second three weeks (1)— 10.30, P-200. Mr. Ives. 

Organizations with some reference to farmer movements; reasons for 
failure and essentials to success; commodity developments; the Federal 
Farm Board; banks for cooperatives; present trends. 

A. E. 106 S. Prices of Farm Products (2).— A. First three weeks (1); 
B. second three weeks (1)— 11.30, P-200. Mr. Ives. 

A general course in prices, price relationships, and price analysis, with 
emphasis on prices of agricultural products. 

A. E. 108 S. Farm Management (2). — A. First three weeks (1); B. 
second three weeks (1) — 9.00, P-200. Mr. Hamilton. 

A study of the organization and operation of Maryland farms from the 
standpoint of efficiency and profits. Students will be expected to make an 
analysis of the actual farm business and practices of different types of farms 
located in various parts of the State, and to make specific recommendations 
as to how these farms may be organized and operated as successful 
businesses. 



UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 



15 



A. E. 109 S. Research Problems (2).— A. First three weeks (1); B. 
second three weeks (1) — To be arranged. Dr. DeVault. 

With the permission of the instructor, students will work on any research 
problems in agricultural economics or farm management which the students 
choose, or a special list of subjects will be made up from which the students 
may select their research problems. There will be occasional class meetings 
for the purpose of reports on progress of work, methods of approach, etc. 

A. E. 203 S. Research (8).— For graduate students only. Dr. DeVault. 

Students will be assigned research work in agricultural economics or farm 
management under the supervision of the instructor. The work will consist 
of original investigation in problems of agricultural economics or farm 
management and the results will be presented in the form of a thesis. 

A. E. 215 S. Land Economics (2).— A. First three weeks (1); B. 
second three weeks ( 1 ) ; 8.00, P-200. Mr. Coddington. 

This course deals with the economics of land welfare. It presents such 
facts about land as: land classification, characteristics, utilization and con- 
servation, insofar as these involve human relationships. Concepts of land 
and land economy are discussed as well as land policies and land planning. 

A. E. 211 S. Taxation in Theory and Practice (2).— A. First three 
weeks (1); B. second three weeks (1); 8.00, S-101. Dr. DeVault, Mr. 
Walker. 

Ideals in taxation; economic effects of taxation upon the welfare 
of society; theory of taxation — the general property tax, business and 
license taxes, the income tax, the sales tax, special commodity taxes, inheri- 
tance and estate taxes; recent shifts in taxing methods and recent tax 
reforms; conflicts and duplication in taxation among governmental units. 
The specific relations of taxation to public education will be emphasized. 

ART 

Art. S 1. Art for the Schools (2).— 8.00-9.50, Q-300. Miss Billows. 

The work required in this course is done in the two assigned hours of 
theory and practice. 

An exploratory course introducing old and new materials of instruction 
with experience in the different uses and possibilities of many brands of 
crayons, chalks, water colors, easel paints, temperas, charcoal, inks, dyes, 
frescol, rayons, finger paint, papers, adhesives, etc., for illustration, 
mural painting, dictation, object and figure drawing, elementary perspec- 
tive, composition, design, outdoor sketch, lettering for simple posters, 
etc., block printing, stencil, celluloid dry point, batiks, etc. 

Aids for introducing and adapting the above to different age levels of 
children; for building creative thought and expression in elementary and 
secondary schools; for seeing art as another means of expression in the 
present-day course of living; and for seeing artistic possibilities in the 
subject-matter fields and in the interests of the children. 

Craft materials as cork, plaster of paris, woods, metal, beads, leather, 
clay, synthetic ambers, etchall, plastic marble, materials for weaving, etc., 
are available for use as far as time permits. 



16 



SUMMER SCHOOOL 



Emphasis is also placed upon selection, organization, use and care of 
materials and tools; upon evaluation of work and measuring growth; upon 
bulletin board arrangements; upon practical appreciation, etc. 

No prerequisite in Art is required. Students will work according to their 
own ability and need only interest and a willingness to work. 

Art S 2. Advanced Art for the Schools. Prerequisite, Art 1 or equiva- 
lent. Not given in 1939. 

The work required in this course is done in the two assigned hours of 
theory and practice. 

Emphasis is placed upon building more technical knowledge and ability 
in any of the divisions of Art which are listed in the Art 1 exploratory 
course, such as: object or figure drawing, composition — mural painting, 
illustration, outdoor sketch, applied design, lettering and posters and the 
like or upon the processes of block printing, clay modelling, wood carving, 
simple weaving, metal work and the like. 

Art S 3. Marionettes and Stage Craft (2).— 10.30-12.10, Q-300. Miss 
Billows. 

The two assigned hours of theory and practice may be spent on the 
creation and manipulation of hand puppets, shadow puppets, stick puppets, 
and marionettes with the necessary costumes, staging, lighting, and the 
like, or upon quick scenery construction and painting, costumes, make-up, 
lighting properties, etc., for grade or school dramatizations emphasizing 
simple and easily accessible materials and planning for putting to best use 
the adequate or inadequate stages in school buildings. 

BACTERIOLOGY 

Bact. 1. General Bacteriology (4). — Five lectures; five two-hour labora- 
tories. Lecture, 1.30, T-311; laboratory, 8.00, T-301. Laboratory fee, $5.00. 
Staff. 

A brief history of Bacteriology; microscopy; bacteria and their relation 
to nature; morphology; classification; metabolism; bacterial enzymes; appli- 
cation to water, milk, food, and soil; relation to the industries and to 
disease. Preparation of culture media; sterilization and disinfection; micro- 
scopic and macroscopic examination of bacteria; isolation, cultivation, and 
identification of aerobic and anaerobic bacteria; effects of physical and 
chemical agents; microbiological examinations. 



BOTANY 

Bot. 1 S. General Botany (4). — Five lectures and five two-hour labora- 
tory periods per week. Lecture 1.30, T-219; laboratory 8.00, T-208. Lab- 
oratory fee, $5.00. Dr. Bamford. 

The chief aim of this course is to present fundamental biological prin- 
ciples rather than to lay the foundation for professional botany. The 
student is also acquainted with the true nature and aim of botanical science, 
its methods and the value of its results. 



UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 



17 



Bot. 3 S. General Botany (4). — Prerequisite, Bot. 1 S or equivalent. 
Five lectures and five two-hour laboratory periods per week. Lecture, 1.30, 
T-208; laboratory, 8.00, T-209. Laboratory fee, $3.00. Dr. Brown. 

A continuation of Bot. 1 S, but with emphasis upon the evolutionary 
development of the plant kingdom and the morphological changes corre- 
lated with it. A study of the algae, fungi, liverworts, mosses, ferns and 
their relatives, and the seed plants. Several field trips will be arranged. 

Bot. 4 S. Local Flora (2). Not given in 1939. 

Bot. 102 S. Plant Taxonomy (2).— Prerequisite, Bot. 1 S or equivalent. 
Two lectures, one laboratory, and a field trip per week. Lecture, M., W., 
1.30, T-218; laboratory, T., 1.30, T-209; field trip, Th., 1.30. Laboratory 
fee, $3.00. Dr. Norton. 

Classification of the vegetable kingdom and the principles underlying it; 
the use of other sciences and all phases of botany as taxonomic foundations; 
methods of taxonomic research in field, garden, herbarium, and library. 
Each student will work on a special problem during a part of the labora- 
tory time. 

Bot. 204 S. Research in Morphology and Taxonomy (4-6). — To be 

arranged. Dr. Norton, Dr. Bamford. 

Pit. Path. 205 S. Research in Plant Pathology (4-6).— To be arranged. 
Dr. Norton, Professor Temple. 

Pit. Phys. 206 S. Research in Plant Physiology (4-6). — To be arranged. 
Dr. Appleman, Dr. DuBuy. 

For other courses in Botany, see "Chesapeake Biological Laboratory," 
p. 47. 

CHEMISTRY 

Chem. lys. General Chemistry (4). — Five lectures; five laboratories. 
Prerequisite, Inorg. Chem. If. Laboratory fee, $7.00. Lecture, 9.00, DD-307. 
Lab., 1.30-4.20, DD-9. Dr. White. 

A study of the general principles of inorganic chemistry with special 
reference to the metallic elements. 

Chem. 8 As. Elementary Organic Chemistry (4). — Two lectures daily; 
to be arranged. Dr. Broughton. 

Chem. 8As and 8Bs will satisfy the premedical requirements in Organic 
Chemistry. Lectures in this course will begin on June 12, 1939, and con- 
tinue until the close of the regular summer session. (Students who 
elect this course should note that the dormitories are not available to sum- 
mer school students until the beginning of the regular summer session.) 

Chem. 8 Bs. Elementary Organic Laboratory (2). — Two laboratories 
daily. To be arranged. Dr. Broughton and assistant. 

A laboratory course to accompany Chem. 8As. Laboratory work in this 
course will begin on June 12, 1939 (see description under Chem. 8As). 
This course is so arranged that a student who has completed either half of 



18 



SUMMER SCHOOL 



course 8By of the regular academic year may take the course for half 
credit. The content of the course corresponds exactly to that of Chem. 8 By. 

Chem. 12 S. Elements of Organic Chemistry (6).— Two lectures per day. 
Laboratory equivalent to five three-hour periods per week. Lecture and 
laboratory to be arranged. Laboratory fee $8.00. Dr. Broughton and Dr. 
Williams. 

The chemistry of carbon and its compounds in its relation to biology. 
This course is particularly designed for students in Agriculture and Home 
Economics. 

Chem. 15 S. Introduction to General Chemistry (2).— Five lectures a 
week. 8.00, DD-307. Dr. Haring. 

The purpose of this course is to develop an appreciation of the science 
of chemistry, its application in modern life and its possibilities. Lectures 
will be accompanied by demonstrations. The course will be descriptive 
rather than quantitative. The subjects for consideration have been chosen 
because of their general appeal, economic importance and educational value. 
The course does not fulfill the prerequisite requirements for advanced 
courses in chemistry. 

Chem. S 100. Special Topics for Teachers of Elementary Chemistry (2). 

—Prerequisite, Inorg. Chem. ly or equivalent. 11.30, DD-307. Dr. White. 
A study of the method of presentation and the content of a High School 
Chemistry Course. It is designed chiefly to give a more complete under- 
standmg of the subject matter than is usually contained in an elementary 
course. Some of the more recent advances in Inorganic Chemistry will 
be discussed. 

*Chem. 102Af. Physical Chemistry (3).— Eight lectures a week. Hours 
to be arranged. DD-208. Prerequisites, Chem. 6y; Phvs. 2y; Math. 23y 
Dr. Haring. 

For those taking laboratory, graduates will elect Chem. 219f (2) and 
undergraduates, Chem. 102Bf (2). 

This is an advanced course intended for chemistry majors and others 
desiring a thorough background in quantitative chemical theory. Gases, 
liquids, solids solutions, electrolytic conductivity, etc. are discussed. 

*Chem. 102AS. Physical Chemistry (3).— Eight lectures a week. Hours 
to be arranged. DD-208. Prerequisite, Chem. 102Af. Dr. Haring. 

The accompanying laboratory courses are Chem. 219s (2) for graduates 
and Chem. 102Bs (2) for undergraduates. 

A continuation of Chem. 102Af. Subjects considered are elementary 
thermodynamics, equilibrium, kinetics, electromotive force, etc. 

*Chem. 102Bf. Physical Chemistry Laboratory (2).— Five laboratories a 
week. Prerequisites, Chem. 4f or s or Chem. 6y. Laboratory fee, $7 00 
1.30-4.20, DD-208. Dr. Haring. 

The course must accompany or be preceded by Chem.l02Af. 
Eighteen quantitative experiments are performed. These are chosen to 
illustrate the lectures and acquaint the student with precise technique. 



UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 



19 



*Chem. 102Bs. Physical Chemistry Laboratory (2). — Five laboratories 
a week. Prerequisite, Chem. 102Bf. Laboratory fee, $7.00. 1.30-4.20, 
DD-208. Dr. Haring. 

The course must accompany or be preceded by Chem. 102As. 
This is a continuation of Chem. 102Bf. 

Chem. 103 Ay. Elements of Physical Chemistry (4). — Ten lectures a week. 
Prerequisites, Chem. ly, Phys. ly, Math. 10s or 22s. 9.00 and 10.30, DD-208. 
Dr. Haring or Dr. Lamb. 

Undergraduates taking this course must elect Chem. 103By (2). 

The course covers the same general material as Chem. 102Af and Chem. 
102As but the treatment is less detailed. Since it is intended especially 
for premedical students and others not majoring in chemistry, the subjects 
stressed are those of greater interest to this class. 

Chem. 103By. Elements of Physical Chemistry Laboratory (2). — Five 
laboratories a week. Prerequisite, Chem 4f or s. Laboratory fee, $7.00. 
1.30-4.20, DD-208. Dr. Haring or Dr. Lamb. 

This course must accompany or be preceded by Chem. 103Ay. 
The course involves the performance of numerous quantitative experi- 
ments of particular interest to premedical students, etc. 

Chem. 117y. Organic Laboratory (2). — Laboratories equivalent to five 
three-hour periods a week. Laboratory fee, $8.00. To be arranged. Dr. 
Williams. 

This course is devoted to an elementary study of organic qualitative 
analysis. The work includes the identification of unknown organic com- 
pounds, and corresponds to the more extended course, Chem. 207. 

Chem. llSy. Advanced Organic Laboratory (2). — Laboratories equivalent 
to five three-hour periods a week. Laboratory fee, $8.00. To be arranged. 
Dr. Williams. 

A study of organic quantitative analysis and the preparation of organic 
compounds. Quantitative determinations of carbon and hydrogen, nitrogen 
and halogen are carried out, and syntheses more difficult than those of Chem. 
8By are studied. 

Chem. 201f. Introduction to Spectrographic Analysis (1). — Three lab- 
oratory periods a week. Laboratory fee, $7.00. To be arranged. Dr. 

White. 

This course is designed to give the student the fundamental laboratory 
principles of spectrographic analysis. 

Chem. 205s. Organic Preparations (4). — Laboratory equivalent to ten 
three-hour periods a week. Laboratory fee, $8.00. Consent of instructor. 
To be arranged. Dr. Williams. 

A laboratory course devoted to the preparation of typical organic sub- 
stances and designed for those students whose experience in this field is 
deficient. 

Chem. 210S. Advanced Organic Laboratory (4 or 6). — To be arranged. 
Laboratory fee, $8.00. Dr. Williams. 

Students electing this course should elect Chem. 116y. 



20 



SUMMER SCHOOL 



r 



The content of the course is essentially that of Chem. 117y and 118y 
sienf ''"'''" ^'^"^ ""'*' '' ""' ***" "^^^^ «* the individual' 

*Chem. 212Af. Colloid Chemistry (2).-Five lectures a week. Pre- 
requisite, Chem. 102Ay. To be arranged. DD-208. Dr. Haring 

w£, *'%"'"'■'! ^^^'^^^ consideration is given to the phenomena observed 
when surfaces become very great. "uaeiveu 

wee?"?; wlf ?""! Chemistry Laboratory (2).-Five laboratories a 
week. Laboratory fee, $7.00. 1.30-4.20, DD-208. Dr. Haring. 

This course must accompany or be preceded by Chem. 212A'f 
A wide selection of experiments, mostly qualitative, serve to illustrate 
colloid phenomena and techniques. "lustrate 

wee?''"I>;.^r5- r""!.'!' ^''^"''^t'-y Laboratory (2).-Five laboratories a 
S^.2o'^DS8nr'Ha^ing. "' " "' ^'^'"- '^^ ^^^^^^^ ^-' ^'-'■ 

wi^ChrToiL!" '' ''"'^' '^ ^"'"^*^ ^*"^^"*^ ^-'""^ l^^°-tory 

wee?' Prilnni r^^rt' ^''"'""''^ Laboratory (2).-Five laboratories a 
rD-208. DTSSng. ■ '"'^'- ''^'"^^^^^^ ^^^' ^'■''- '■'^-'■'^' 

ChIm.'l02Ts' '' *° *" """^"^ ^^ ^'■^'^"^*" '*"'^""*^ '^^^•'•'"^ laboratory with 
Chem. 229s. Research (6).— The Chemistry Staff. 

DRAMATICS 

Dram. S 2. Amateur Play Production (2).-ll.30. Aud. Mr. Williams. 

Fundamental principles of acting, staging, lighting, and direction of 
amateur productions. Each student will make product on book of one or 
more plays and engage in practical laboratory work 

ECONOMICS AND BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION 

^^nS. life'- //;:£,•" ^■^'"'- <«-«.«o«o, 10.30, „<, 

= ^ j^***^-l "/ theories and underiying production, consumption exchantre 

AS ^^' /m ? . P"n<='Ples «f Accounting (8).-8.00-9.50; 10.30-12.20: 

AS-313. (Not given if less than ten students enroll.) Mr Cissel 

A basic course presenting accounting as a means of control and as intro 
ductory to advanced and specialized accounting. A study Ts made of 

S^ctSLr^^ "^ ^^^°""""^ ^" ''^ -'^ Proprietor^shi; palU! 



UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 



21 



Econ. 53 S. Money and Banking (2). — Prerequisite, Econ. 51f. 8.00, 
AS-131. Mr. Reid. 

An analysis of the basic principles of money, credit, and banking. 

Econ. 130 S. Labor Problems (2). — Prerequisites, Econ. 51f and 52s, 
or consent of instructor. 9.00, AS-131. Mr. Reid. 

The purpose is to present the salient features in the history of American 
labor; labor legislation; trends in the labor movement; safety and health 
measures, social security, and what effect these problems have on place- 
ment and readjustment of youth at work today. 

EDUCATION 

Commercial Education 

Ed. 151 S. Methods and Materials in Teaching Bookkeeping (2). — 9.00, 
T-219. Mr. Edge worth. 

This course develops bookkeeping from its beginning as a commercial 
subject to its present position in the high school curriculum, and deals with 
aims, values, modern methods, and selection of desirable teaching materials. 
An opportunity will be given each member of the class to cover subject 
matter according to individual needs. Some knowledge of bookkeeping is 
a prerequisite. 

*Ed. S 255. Principles and Problems in Commercial Education (2). — 
10.30, T-219. Mr. Edgeworth. 

This course will develop the principles through the history of commercial 
education. It will give consideration to the various problems in this field 
arising in the junior high school, the senior high school, and the voca- 
tional school. Among such problems may be listed the meeting of commer- 
cial education needs of different sized communities, the problem of better 
guidance of commercial pupils, adjusting the program to meet better pupil 
needs and employment standards in this field; and the problem of publicizing 
the program of commercial education. 

*Ed. S 257. The Commercial Curriculum (2).— 10.30, T-219. Mr. Edge- 
worth. 

The course will develop and evaluate the aims in commercial education. 
It will cover the construction of the commercial curriculum from the view- 
points of the aims and the meeting of the training needs of the different 
types of school communities, and the needs of pupils of varying abilities. 

See also Ed. S 218. Consumer Education, p. 25; Geog. S 109. Economic 
Geography for Teachers, p. 35. 

Elementary Education 

Ed. S 35. Literature for Children in the Elementary School (2).— 11.30, 
P-202. Mrs. Sibley. 

A comprehensive survey of materials and methods for literature in the 
six grades of the elementary school. Topics considered are: various types 
of literature; selection of literature on the basis of children's interests and 
levels of maturity; character building; and development of literary taste. 

*The one for which there is the greater demand will be given. 



22 



SUMMER SCHOOL 



11 TnJ . ^' •"^'''' "'^^^'' '^^^"'^^ ^"d hero tales, literature 
trom the Bible, informational material and the realistic story, poetrv and 
modern fanciful material form the content of this course. 

loS: 1-202. "^Mrs'slblly""'" '^"'"'"'""•' '" '"^ ^"'■"^"'"^ ^"'^^ ''>- 

iJi'lfl """'•f /"^.'« ^"h ^^^ tea<=hing of language in the elementary school. 
Jrom thr"1 r ^''^ P'-f t^l help in teaching oral and written composition 
from the vitalized point of view. The common language activities outside 
the school are made the basis for curriculum and instruction Vocabularv 
and sentence building, enunciation and spelling, and correct usage receive 
special attention. ^ lei-eive 

Note This course should not be taken by students who had the Lan- 
guage Arts course in 1938. 

Siwfy ^ ^^' ^""^ ^'"^*'* ^^ *" '''* ^**'*'™ ^''°*'' (2).-9.00, P-202. Mrs. 

The purpose of this course is to make clear the fundamental importance 
of he three R's in the modern elementary school. Reading, wrSng 
spelhng, and arithmetic are treated as skills that are basic to the enricS 
curriculum of the typical elementary school. Conversely the enr!ch^ cur 
riculum rationally organized and interpreted, supplies the medium in wWch 
furnT.h° \ * v''' ""! r '"'''''' ""h meaning. This unit of w S 
them t wo'rk ^^^'■''""' ''' ''^'"'""^ '''' ^'^'"^ ^"^ « --»« «« Pitting 

See also especially Ind. Ed. S 65. Hand Craft, p. 26; Phvs Ed Sim 

S''sTi9"'Th''^"s\^' '; ''; ''i'\^'- ' "^- ^-- -<• «*-i p. 28; 

Ed S 119. The School and the Social Studies, p. 22; Ed S 111 Th^ 
School and Character Education, p. 24; Psych. 115 S. Psychological Diag! 
nos.s of Reading Difficulties, p. 45; Art courses, p. 15; Genefal ScienL 
courses, p. 34; Geography courses, p. 34; Music' cours;s, p 42 IpecTa 
Education courses, p. 31. y t^ * ^yti^i<n 

Elementary-Secondary 

Ma^shall/^^' ^^"^ ^'''''''' '''''* '^^ ^""''^^ ^'"^^^' (2).~8.00, AS-18. Dr. 

.J^i' TT"' • P":r^f ^' ^^ ^^^ t« '"ore effective instruction in the 
social studies m the elementary and secondary schools, is organized in 
terms of the basic processes of human living. These fundameSsocia" 
processes have persisted in all cultures of all peoples of all times; and each 
of them IS today present in every group, large or small, personal or im 
personal, to which it is appropriate. They may be thought of as patterns 
underlying the complex details of our living-patterns which are n^matelv 
m the experiential background of even young children, and yet rea^h ott 
to all social living. They are, accordingly, significant foci of thinking an] 
planning in the social studies. They are here examined, one after another 

- Opportunity will be open to supervising teachers and to graduate stu 
dents to participate in discussions which will be arranged for ouSp thi 
regular schedule of meetings. outside the 



UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 



23 



It is suggested that members of the class provide themselves with the 
Maryland School Bulletin, Vol. 20, No. 1, Curriculum Materials in the Social 
Studies for the Intermediate Grades, 

Guidance 

Ed. S 194. Introductory Course in Educational and Vocational Guidance 
(2).— 8.00, T-311. Mr. Miller. 

This is a basic introductory course in the Principles of Guidance and a 
study of their application to the problems of the educational and vocational 
adjustment of the school child. It deals with the procedures and tech- 
niques of guidance in the elementary and secondary schools. This course 
is a prerequisite for anyone who wishes to specialize in vocational guidance 
and become a certified or qualified counselor. Those who select this course 
should be those who will be administrating a guidance program or who 
have some assurance that they will have some specific guidance jobs 
assigned to them. 

Ed. S197. Teaching Occupations (2).— 11.30, T-311. Mr. Cromwell. 

This course is designed to give the prospective counselor training in 
the procedure of acquiring and imparting educational and occupational 
information. It involves a study of existing sources of information in 
books and pamphlets, through field trips, written reports, and the organi- 
zation of a file for arranging and preserving information acquired. 

Ed. S 198. Guidance in Class Room and Home Room (2).— 9.00, T-311. 
Mr. Cromwell. 

This course is designed to help the class room teacher realize how he 
can help in the adjustment of the individual. This will show how the 
entire educative process must be closely integrated toward one main objec- 
tive, that of helping the individual to make his own way in life. The 
guidance functions of the class room and home room teacher are mainly 
those of educational, social, and citizenship guidance. It is most impera- 
tive, however, that every subject teacher and home room teacher understand 
the job of the specialists in guidance and know how and when to utilize 
their assistance. 

Ed. S 294. Counseling Techniques (2). — Prerequisite, Ed. S 194 or equiv- 
alent. 10.30, T-311. Mr. Miller. 

In special cases Ed. S 194 and this course may be taken concurrently. 
This course defines the job of the counselor. It deals with the tech- 
niques involved in the analysis of the individual and available aids. 

History, Principles, and Administration 

Ed. S 104. Philosophy of Education (2).— 11.30, M-104. Dr. Marti. 

Philosophical problems touch upon the essentials of life. To many, such 
problems seem insoluble. They are insoluble as long as they appear in the 
form of unanswerable questions, of questions whose very terms keep off 
an answer. It is the task of philosophy to do away with such terms, to 
ask each question properly, and thus to lead to the answer. 

Education is to lead forth into fuller life. The fundamental problems 



24 



SUMMER SCHOOL 



of education are philosophical. This course puts within reach of teacher 
and parent the main pedagogical results of philosophy. Students will 
receive systematic help in developing a proper technique of dealing with 
their own basic problems, as learners and teachers. 

Ed. S 111. The School and Character Education (2).— 10.30, S-201. Dr. 
Carroll. 

This course will consider the psychological basis of conduct; the out- 
standing physical, mental, social, and emotional factors that influence 
personality and character; the typical home, school, and life discipline 
situations and the place of punishment; the underlying principles of an 
effective program of personality development and character education; and 
a critical examination and evaluation of outstanding school plans of charac- 
ter education that have been tried. Some time will be given to the measure- 
ment of character. 

Ed. S 113. The Principles of Supervision (2).— 9.00, R-100. Mr. Broome. 

This course deals with the problems, functions, and more recent methods 
in supervision. Consideration is given to such matters as teaching proce- 
dures, growth of pupils, content areas in present living, activities in the 
school as a whole, and relating the school to local conditions. 

The course is designed for principals and prospective principals. Especial 
attention is given the problems of teaching principals. 

Ed. S 114. Educational Foundations (2).— 10.30, R-100. Mr. Broome. 

This course is devoted to the examination of education and of the school 
with its tasks in the light of the more recent psychology and a social 
outlook in a democracy. This course is open only to normal school gradu- 
ates and to students who have the equivalent, in experience and summer 
school study, of normal school graduation or the equivalent in college work. 

Ed. S 115. Seminar in Course of Study Construction (2). — 11.30, AS-109. 
Miss Smith. 

The course will be adjusted to individual needs, with class periods for 
construction or in the revision of curriculums. Each student will pursue 
some problem in the field of curriculum making which has been approved 
as part of the curriculum program of the school system in which he works; 
for example, the making of units for science, the social studies, or English. 

This course will be adjusted to individual needs, with class periods for 
the discussion of general principles and procedures, and separate laboratory 
periods arranged by the instructor. Enrichment of the curriculum work 
may be further facilitated through access to the libraries and other sources 
of Washington, D. C. An extensive collection of recent courses of study 
from progressive school systems of the United States will thus be available. 

Ed. 193 S. Visual Education (2).— 8.00, S-1. Dr. Brechbill. 

Visual impressions in their relation to learning; investigations into the 
effectiveness of instruction by visual means; projection apparatus, its cost 
and operation; slides, film strips, and films; physical principles underlying 
projection; the integration of visual materials with organized courses of 
study; means of utilizing commercial moving pictures as an aid in realizing 
the aims of the school. 



UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 



25 



Ed. 200 S. Organization and Administration of Public Education (2). — 

9.00, S-201. Dr. Blauch. 

This course deals with the principal features of public education in the 
United States. The scope, organization, administration, and financial sup- 
port of public schools, the school plant and equipment, school attendance, 
and private and parochial schools are among the topics to be considered. 
Special attention will be given to public education in Maryland and the 
District of Columbia and in nearby States. The course is designed for 
teachers who are interested in some of the educational problems now con- 
fronting the public and the educational profession, as well as for prin- 
cipals, supervisors, and superintendents. 

(Recommended for students in second summer of graduate work.) 

Ed. 205 S. Utilization of Tests and Measurements in Education (2). — 

8.00, Q-203. Mr. Packard. 

This course deals with the selection, interpretation, evaluation, and classi- 
fication of tests from the viewpoint of the classroom teacher, the principal, 
the supervisor, the administrator, and the guidance personnel. New de- 
velopments in the field will receive special attention. Tests in the various 
fields of academic achievement, attitudes, interests, aptitude, and personality 
will be considered. Emphasis will be placed on how to select tests, collect 
and interpret data, and utilize the findings. 

Ed. S 213. Federal Relations to Education (2).— 8.00, S-201. Dr. Blauch. 

The national interest in education, the educational problem confronting 
the nation in recent years, federal emergency agencies and education, fed- 
eral aid now provided far various types of educational service in the states, 
curriculum and other educational materials published by the federal gov- 
ernment, recent proposals for the extension of federal aid to education, 
and services to teachers and schools by the federal government are among 
the topics of the course. The course is given primarily from the point of 
view of teachers, principals, and superintendents in local school systems. 
It will consist of lectures and appropriate readings. 

Ed. S 218. Consumer Education (2).— 8.00, S-204. Mr. Littlefield. 

Consumer education is an answer to the demands for subject matter in 
the social sciences that has definite practical value. The general aim is 
to help develop a more intelligent consumer population. Special considera- 
tion is given to (1) types of subject matter, (2) bibliographies, (3) ma- 
terials, and (4) methods. An opportunity for field trips to the government 
bureaus of (1) Standards, (2) Food and Drug, and (3) Home Economics 
will be provided. This course is especially valuable to teachers of social 
sciences, business subjects, and home economics, and to principals and 
administrators interested in introducing consumer problems into the cur- 
riculum as a separate course or as units within present subjects. 

Home Economics Education 

H. E. Ed. 102 S. Child Study (2).— 10.30, N-201. Miss McNaughton. 

Study of the physical, mental, social, and emotional development of 
children; observation of children in the nursery school; adaptation of 
material to teaching child care in the high school. 



26 



SUMMER SCHOOL 



H. E. Ed. 102 S-A. Nursery School Practice (1).— (First three weeks)— 
1.30, N-101. Miss Mendham. 

Observation and participation in the University Nursery School. Open 
to students who are taking or who have taken Child Study in former years. 
Student must be able to schedule in nursery school one hour daily between 
9 A. M. and 12 M. Group limited to ten. 

H. E. Ed. 202 S. Special Methods in Home Economics Education (1). — 

(First three weeks.)— 10.30, N-101. Miss Buckey. 

Newer methods for presenting vocational home economics in the regular 
day school program; the selection and organization of classes in adult 
education; the formulating of a homemaking program in Maryland for 
out-of-school youth. 

H. E. Ed. 205 S. Methods of Evaluating Home Economics Teaching (1). — 

(Second three weeks)— 10.30, N-101. Miss Buckey. 

Newer methods of measuring pupil growth and development; construc- 
tion of various means for checking pupil progress; study of existing 
objective tests. 

H. E. Ed. S 206. Methods of Teaching Home Management (2). 

A. First three weeks (1). 11.30, N-101. Miss McNaughton. 

Methods of teaching family management by determining what constitutes 
good family relations and good inter-relations of the family and com- 
munity, through the analysis of family case studies. The place of finan- 
cial management, recreation and education in family life. 

B. Second three weeks (1). 11.30, N-101. Miss Enright. 

Methods of teaching management of the house through the analysis of 
family case studies of housekeeping procedures; and the use of household 
equipment in relation to the conservation of human energy. 



Industrial Education 

Summer School courses in Industrial Education are primarily for advanced 
undergraduates and graduates. 

Ind. Ed. S 65. Hand Craft (2).— 1.30-3.20, Q-102. Laboratory fee, $2.50. 
Mr. Williamson. 

Projects are made in elementary woodwork, weaving, bookbinding, ele- 
mentary sheet metal work, electrical work as used in the making of an 
extension cord and the repairing of household electrical appliances, leather 
work, linoleum block printing, and any additional similar activities to meet 
the needs of the individual members of the class in their teaching situations. 

Emphasis is given to the application of water colors, shellac, paint and 
enamel; cleaning, sharpening and storing tools; courses, equipment, sup- 
plies, and methods of organizing and teaching these activities. 

Teachers of academic subjects as well as thoe^ engaged in boy scout, 
girl scout, camp fire girls, play ground, recreation, and hobby club activities; 
teachers of art, of special education, of physical education, and of subjects 
related to occupational shop work will find this course especially adapted 
to their needs. 



UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 



27 



Note. Beginning and advanced groups will be organized to work con- 
currently. 

Ind. Ed. S 106. Art Metal (2).— 8.00-9.50, P-103. Shop practicum. Lab- 
oratory fee, $5.00. Mr. Longley. 

Elementary courses in drawing and metal shopwork should precede this 
course. Equivalent abilities and experience are acceptable. 

Creative work in brass, copper, silversmithing, and jewelry. Typical 
projects, suitable for high school shop instruction, are designed, constructed 
and finished. This course emphasizes special methods in organizing and 
teaching Art Metal Work. 

Ind. Ed. S 160. Essentials of Design (2).— 1.30-3.20, S-203. Mr. Gal- 
lington. 

Each student will furnish his own instruments and supplies. Prerequi- 
sites — four semester hours drawing and eight semester hours shop practice, 
or equivalent in training or experience. 

A study of the basic principles of design and practice in their application 
to the construction of high school shop projects. It presents knowledge 
and develops abilities in the art elements of line, mass, and color, and 
employs such activities as freehand and mechanical drawing, tracing and 
blue-printing. Short cuts in the development of new projects with better 
design are presented. 

Ind. Ed. S 161. Testing in Shop and Related Subjects (2).— 9.00, Q-203. 
Mr. Packard. 

This course is for teachers in the shop and related subjects. Such aspects 
as analysis of courses, construction of preliminary tests, scoring of tests, 
statistical characteristics, and factors in validation and standardization 
of tests are considered. The purpose of this course is to give the teacher 
a scientific basis for test construction which he may apply to his own 
subject matter. 

Ind. Ed. S 162. Industrial Education in the High School (2).— 11.30, 
Q-203. Mr. Williamson. 

A course in methods and materials of instruction. Major functions and 
specific aims of industrial education, their relation to the general objec- 
tives of the junior and senior high schools; selection and organization of 
subject matter in terms of modem methods of instruction; expected out- 
comes; measuring results; professional standards. 

Ind. Ed. S 167. General Shop (2).— 10.30-12.20, Q-102-104. Shop prac- 
ticum. Laboratory fee, $5.00. Mr. Gallington. 

Prerequisites — ten semester hours of drawing and shop practice, or 
equivalent in training or experience. 

A general survey course designed to meet the needs of teachers in service 
as well as those in training. Methods in the organization and administra- 
tion of several shop subjects in one room are presented as the students are 
rotated through skill and knowledge developing activities in mechanical 
drawing, electricity, woodworking and general metalwork. 

Special forms for shop respords are employed, and the conservation of 
teacher-time is emphasized. 



28 



SUMMER SCHOOL 



UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 



29 



Graduate Student Conferences in Industrial Education.— 9.50-10.20, Q-203. 

Group conferences, Tuesday and Thursday. Individual and group con- 
ferences on other days to be arranged. Mr. Brown and Staff. 

All graduate students in Industrial Education courses numbered in the 
100 series are required to attend these conferences, in which the w^ork of 
these courses is critically analyzed with reference to values, place in the 
curriculum, and functional relationships to each other and to other educa- 
tion areas in a program of vocational adjustment. 

Voc. Ed. S 220. Organization and Administration of Vocational Educa- 
tion (2).— 10.30, Q-203. Mr. Brown. 

This course surveys objectively the organization, administration, cur- 
ricular spread and viewpoint, and the present status of vocational education. 
Its realistic values are weighed, and its functional relationships in public 
education are considered in terms of national, state, and local effects. 

The course is intended for graduate students in all the education areas 
who are interested in current interpretations and functions of vocational 
education. 

Physical Eklucation 

Phys. Ed. S 110. Rhythms and Dances (2).— 8.00, G. F. H. Miss Drew. 

A course devoted to the practice of rhythms and dances. This course 
presents material primarily for use in the elementary grades (1-8), but 
is suitable for any person interested in rhythms and dances in school 
situations. Emphasis is placed on methods and teaching technics rather 
than a high degree of skill in performance. 

Phys. Ed. S 112. Games and Stunts (2).— 9.00, G. F. H. Miss Drew. 

A practical course devoted to individual and group games and stunts for 
schoolroom, playground, and gymnasium. The material in this course is 
presented on the elementary level (1-8), but is useful in the administration 
of intramural play programs on any level. 

Phys. Ed. S 115. Class Programs in Physical Education (2).— 11.30, Gym. 
Dr. Burnett. 

This course gives practical demonstrations of methods used in conduct- 
ing classes on the field, in the gymnasium, or in a classroom. The material 
of the course is suited to the junior and senior high school levels, but is of 
value in any school situation. Fifty practical games are presented in 
which students are taught to act as players, leaders, and teachers. Activi- 
ties on apparatus, achievement contests of skill, accuracy and endurance 
tests, rhythmic steps, marching tactics, and free exercises are included in 
the squad activities presented. 

Phys. Ed. S 239. School and Community Recreation (2). — 10.30, Gym. 
Dr. Burnett. 

This course considers the organization and administration of recreational 
programs designed for use in communities and educational institutions. 
The proper use of leisure time and the possible contributions that co- 
recreational activities of boys and girls may make towards character de- 
velopment are emphasized by the seminar discussion method. 



Rural Life and Agricultural Education 

The three-week courses in Rural Life and Education which follow are 
offered primarily for teachers of vocational agriculture and home eco- 
nomics, principals, and others interested in the professional and cultural 
development of rural communities. The normal load in such a program is 
three courses, which will give 3 units of credit. By pursuing such a program 
successfully for four summers, a student will be able to earn 12 semester 
hours, a minimum major in this field, and could then return either for two 
full summer schools or one semester of regular school to complete the 
remaining 12 hours required for the master's degree. These courses may 
be articulated with the three-week courses in Agricultural Economics, Home 
Economics, Poultry, and in other fields. 

R. Ed. 201 S. Principles of Rural and Adult Education I (1).— (First 
three weeks)— 11.30, T-219. Dr. Cotterman. 

Consideration is given those principles and trends upon which the 
present program in rural education is predicated. Application is made to 
the several fields — elementary, secondary, and adult. The objective is a 
comprehensive intergrated outlook. 

R. Ed. 205S. Problems in Vocational Agriculture, Related Science, and 
Shop (1).— (First three weeks)— 10.30, T-112. Dr. Cotterman. 

Current programs in vocational agriculture are critically reviewed and 
evaluated. The emphasis is upon recent developments in all-day programs. 
The course is designed especially for persons who have had several years 
of teaching experience. ' 

The following courses are not available in 1939, but will be offered for 
election in subsequent years: 



R. Ed. 202. 
R. Ed. 203. 
R. Ed. 204. 
R. Ed. 206. 
R. Ed. 207. 
R. Ed. 208. 



Principles of Rural and Adult Education II (1). 

Social Trends in Rural Education I (1). 

Social Trends in Rural Education II (1). 

Curriculum Construction in Vocational Agriculture (1). 

Continuation Education in Rural Communities (1). 

Adult Education in Rural Communities (1). 



See also courses in Agricultural Economics, p. 14; Home Economics, p. 37; 
and Poultry Husbandry, p. 45. 

Secondary Education 

Ed. 110 S. The Junior High School (2).— 1.30, S-101. Dr. Powers. 

Definition and history of the junior high school; physical, mental, and 
social traits of the junior high school pupil; purposes, functions, and limi- 
tations; types of reorganized schools; articulation with lower and higher 
schools; duties and responsibilities of the administrative and teaching staff; 
the program of studies; exploratory courses; departmentalization; pro- 
visions for individual differences; the guidance program; significant prob- 
lems and challenges implied in present trends. 



30 



SUMMER SCHOOL 



Ed. S 203. Supervisory Problems of the High School Principal (2).— 11.30, 
S-101. Mr. Douglass. 

This course deals with the function, problems, and technique of the super- 
vision of instruction in the high school. The following major topics are 
considered: the aims and standards of the high school; the purpose of super- 
vision; supervisory visits and conferences; evaluation of types of class 
room procedure and of instructional methods and devices; selection and 
organization of subject matter; the psychology of learning; marks and 
marking systems; economy in the class room; rating teachers; evaluating 
the efficiency of instruction; achievement tests as an aid to supervision. 

Ed. S 211. The Adolescent: Characteristics and Problems (2).— 11.30, 
S-201. Dr. Carroll. 

This course will concern itself with the problems which often arise in 
the transitional period between childhood and adulthood — roughly, the 
"teen-age" or high school period. The discussion will include the intel- 
lectual, emotional, social, and vocational problems of youth. Practical ex- 
perience and concrete cases will be considered wherever possible. 

Ed. S 216. Student Activities in the High School (2).— 10.30, S-204. 
Mr. Littlefield. 

This course offers a serious consideration of the problems connected with 
the so-called "extra-curricular" activities of the present-day high school. 
Special consideration will be given to: (1) philosophical bases, (2) aims, 
(3) organization, and (4) supervision of student activities such as student 
council, school publications, musical organizations, dramatics, assemblies, 
and clubs. Present practices and current trends will be evaluated. 

Ed. S 219. The Federal Government at Work (2).— 10.30, S-101. Dr. 
Powers. 

A course interpreting for school administrators and high school teachers 
of the social studies a selected number of functions of the Federal Gov- 
ernment. Themes developed will illustrate the services of the Federal 
Government in relation to conservation of resources, social welfare, regula- 
tion of business and industry, labor relations, agriculture, public health, 
cultural relations with foreign countries, research, personnel, and public 
relations. The procedure will include lectures by appropriate government 
officials, visits to government agencies for observation and explanations 
by officials, group discussions, and assigned readings. Supplementary 
features will be the showing of documentary films illustrating a number 
of government activities and a series of exhibits of government aids avail- 
able to teachers. 

Note. Students who register for the course should select appropriate 
related courses in political science, sociology, and education as advised by 
the instructor. Registrations will be limited to approximately thirty 
students. 

Ed. S 222. High School Social Studies: Materials and Methods (2).— 
9.00, S-204. Mr. Littlefield. 

Prerequisite, at least one year of experience in teaching the social 
studies in junior or senior high school. 



UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 



31 



This is an advanced course in which a critical evaluation is made of 
the materials and methods in current use. Consideration will be given 
to (1) organization of subject matter, (2) classroom procedure, (3) the 
testing program, and (4) professional aids. The course is organized on a 
practical basis for teachers-in-service. 

Ed. S 226. Trends in High School Science (2).— 9.00, M-106. Dr. Brech- 
bill. 

Prerequisite, one year of experience in teaching science. 

A study of recent investigations and developments in the field of science 
teaching on junior and senior high school levels. Selection and organiza- 
tion of curricular materials. Science as an instrument of general educa- 
tion. Textbooks; measurements. 

Ed. 250 S. Seminar in Education (2).— 9.00, S-101. Dr. Powers. 

A survey of the techniques employed in the solution of educational 
problems that involve research. It will include an exposition of methods 
for locating educational information, defining problems, organizing pro- 
cedures, interpreting data, and reporting the findings of research. Each 
member of the class will be expected to outline an acceptable problem 
and to carry some phase of it to completion. 

Note. Required of all candidates for the Master's degree, preferably in 
the second or third summer of attendance. Students who are ready to be- 
gin work on a thesis or who have a research study in progress may be 
admitted to the course. 

See also Ed. 193 S. Visual Education, p. 24; Ed. S 119. The School and 
the Social Studies, p. 22; Phys. Ed. S 110. Rhythms and Dances, p. 28; 
Phys. Ed. S 112. Games and Stunts, p. 28; Chem. S 100. Special Topics 
for Teachers of Elementary Chemistry, p. 18; Ed. S 115. Seminar in 
Course of Study Construction, p. 24; Dram. S 2. Amateur Play Production, 
p. 20; Voc. Ed. S 220. Organization and Administration of Vocational 
Education, p. 28; Math. Ill S. Elementary Mathematics from an Advanced 
Standpoint, p. 38; Geog. S 103. Geography of Latin America, p. 35; Geog. 
S 109. Economic Geography for Teachers, p. 35; Mus. Ed. S 114. The 
Teaching of Music in the High School, p. 43; Phil. S 101. History of Art, 
p. 43. 

Special Education 

Ed. S 180. Introduction to Special Education (2).— 10.30, FF-103. Mrs. 
Wygant. 

A survey of the entire field of special education. Planned especially 
for persons who have done no work in this field and designed to give 
teachers, principals, attendance workers, and supervisors an understanding 
of the needs of all types of exceptional children and information con- 
cerning the sources available in the State and community for helping each 
type. The course deals with methods of finding, identification, school place- 
ment, vocational training, and follow-up of mentally and physically handi- 
capped children. 



32 



SUMMER SCHOOL 



Ed. S 181. The Study of Handicapped Children (2).— Not given in 1939. 

Ed. S 182. Methods of Teaching Handicapped Children (2).— 11.30, 
FF-103. Mrs. Wygant. 

Development of language and reading materials suitable for handicapped 
children and the proper techniques for applying these materials will con- 
stitute the basic essentials of this course. 

It is designed especially for teachers of retarded children and for regular 
grade teachers who are interested in the problem child. 

Ed. S 187. Case Method Techniques in School Attendance and Special 
Education (2). — (Two hours daily, last three weeks of the session, July 17 — 
August 4, inclusive.) 8.00-9.50, FF-103. Mr. Foster. 

For attendance workers, elementary supervisors, principals, and both 
special and regular classroom teachers. 

An intensive study of the mental, physical, and emotional factors that 
affect school attendance, and that handicap school children. Methods of 
diagnosing behavior problems, including the use of standardized procedures 
will be discussed, and an attempt will be made to arrive at methods of 
providing satisfactory educational treatment of maladjusted children. In- 
dividual case records will be used as a basis for classroom discussion. 

Text: "Diagnosis and Treatment of Behavior Problem Children," by 
Baker and Traphagen. 

ENGLISH 

Eng. lys. Survey and Composition I (3). — Eight periods a week. Two 
sections. 9.00, daily; 8.00, M., W., F., AS-214; AS-215. Dr. Fitzhugh, Dr. 
Zeeveld. 

The second semester of the freshman Survey and Composition course. 

A study of the mechanics and conventions of effective prose composition 
combined with an historical study of the literature of the Victorian Age. 
Themes, reports, and conferences. 

Note. The Survey portion of this course (given daily at 9.00) may be 
elected separately for two hours of credit. 

Eng. 3 s. Survey and Composition II (3). — Eight periods a week. 10.30, 
daily; 11.30, M., W., F., AS-214. Mr. Ball. 

An equivalent of the second semester of sophomore Survey and Composi- 
tion. 

An historical survey of English literature from the beginnings to the 
17th Century. Drill in the fundamentals of good English expression. Themes, 
reports. 

Note. The Survey portion of this course (given daily at 10.30) may be 
elected separately for two hours of credit. 

Eng. 8-B S. Survey of American Literature (2).— 9.00, AS-305. Mr. 
Sixbey. 

American thought and expression from 1829 to 1865, with emphasis on 



UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 



33 



the rise of humanitarianism, transcendentalism, sectionalism, and indus- 
trialism, and their effect upon the major writers from Longfellow to 
Whitman. 

Eng. 11 f. Shakespeare (2).— 11.30, AS-104. Dr. Zeeveld. 

Six significant plays, illustrating the drama as a distinct form of art. 
Dramatic criticisms. 

Eng. 14 f. College Grammar (2).— 8.00, AS-104. Dr. Harman. 

Studies in the descriptive grammar of Modern English, with some account 
of the history of forms. 

Eng. 104 S. The Old Testament as Literature (2).— 11.30, AS-234. Dr. 
Hale. 

A study of the sources, development, and literary types. 

Eng. 105 S. Types of Literature (2).— 9.00, AS-104. Dr. Harman. 

A study of the principal types of world literature, with special attention 
to the influence of the Greek and Roman myth and legend and of the 
classical literary ideals upon modern writers. 

Eng. 114 S. Poetry of the Romantic Age (2).— 9.00, AS-212. Dr. Hale. 
A study of the works of Byron, Shelley, and Keats. 

Eng. 124 S. Contemporary Drama (2).— 10.30, AS-215. Dr. Fitzhugh. 

A survey of European and American dramatic literature and dramatic 
theory from 1880 to the present. Ibsen, Strindberg, Hauptmann, Schnitzler, 
Checkhov, Gorki, Rostand, Brieux, Maeterlinck, Molnar, Benevente, Piran- 
delle, Wildem Galsworthy, Shaw, Pinere, Maugham, Synge, O'Casey, Noel 
Coward, Sidney Howard, Paul Green, Phillip Barry, Maxwell Anderson, 
Behrman, O'Neill, Odetts. 

Eng. 125 S. Emerson and Whitman (2).— 10.30, AS-305. Mr. Sixbey. 

A study of the major writings of Emerson and Whitman, with especial 
reference to their place in the development of American life and ideals 
in the nineteenth century. 

Eng. 202 S. Middle English Language (2).— 10.30, AS-212. Dr. Harman. 
A study of readings of the Middle English period, with reference to 
etymology and syntax. 

ENTOMOLOGY 

Ent. 201. Advanced Entomology (2).— Hours to be arranged. Dr. Cory. 
Studies of minor problems in morphology, taxonomy and applied entomol- 
ogy, with particular reference to preparation for individual research. 

Ent. 202. Research in Entomology (Credit commensurate with work.) — 

Hours to be arranged. Dr. Cory. 

Advanced students having sufficient preparation, with the approval of the 
head of the department, may undertake supervised research in morphology, 
taxonomy or biology and control of insects. Frequently the student may be 



34 



SUMMER SCHOOL 



allowed to work on Station or State Horticultural Department projects. The 
student's work may form a part of the final report on the project and be 
published in bulletin form. A dissertation, suitable for publication, must be 
submitted at the close of the studies as a part of the requirements for an 
advanced degree. 

Note: Only students qualified by previous training will be accepted in 
the above courses. Consult instructor before registering. 

GENERAL SCIENCE 

Gen. Sci. S 1. General Science for the Elementary School (2). — Dr. West. 

Section A-1: For Primary Grades. Not given in 1939. 

Section A-2: For Primary Grades. 11.30, AS-18. 

Section B-1 : For Upper Elementary Grades. Not given in 1939. 

Section B-2: For Upper Elementary Grades. 10.30, AS-18. 

These courses are planned to meet the needs of the elementary school 
teacher. A point of view consistent with current philosophy in elementary 
education will be developed. The course will provide background material 
in selected phases of those sciences which contribute to elementary school 
work. An interpretation of materials of the local environment with refer- 
ence to enrichment of the science program will receive attention. As much 
of the work as is possible will be illustrated with simple materials and 
apparatus and the material will be professionalized as much as possible. 

Sections A-2 and B-2 are continuations of Sections A-1 and B-1 and are 
given in alternate summers. None of the sections are prerequisites to other 
sections. Students may receive credit for both Sections A-1 and A-2 or 
B-1 and B-2. Students should not enroll for both A and B Sections. 

Gen. Sci. S 2. Activity Materials for Science in the Elementary School 
(2). — T., Th., 1.30-4.00, AS-21. Group and individual conferences to be 
arranged. Class limited to thirty students. Dr. West. 

A laboratory course planned to provide grade teachers with the oppor- 
tunity for becoming acquainted with experiments and preparing materials 
which are of practical value in their science teaching. 



GEOGRAPHY 

Geog. S 1. Elements of Geography (4).— Mr. Diehl. 

The chief purpose of the course is to acquaint the student with the basic 
subject matter of geography. The elements of the physical environment 
and their influence on human activities are studied. 

The course is given in two sections in alternate years. 

Section I: (2).— Not given in 1939. 

The major topics are: the historical development of geography; the 
nature, scope, and functions of modern geography; theories as to the origin 
of the earth; a study of the earth's form, size, and motions; the earth's 
relations to other bodies of the universe; latitude and longitude; standard 



UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 



time; international date line; tides; terrestial magnetism; seasons; zones; 
calendars; the atmosphere; moisture; temperature; and pressure and the 
planetary winds. 

Section II: (2).— 8.00, FF-104. Mr. Diehl. 

The major topics are: a review of the development of the planetary wind 
system; the major climatic regions of the world based on the Trewartha 
classification; land forms; bodies of water; soil; minerals; transportation 
and land trade routes; and world trade. 

Geog. S 103. Geography of Latin America (2).— 10.30, FF-104. Mr. 
Diehl. 

This course is an interpretive geographic study of the countries of Latin 
America with major emphasis on the ABC countries. A regional as well 
as political treatment is used emphasizing the geographic personalities of 
the various regions. The chief purpose of this study is to evaluate the 
natural environment as a factor in (1) the major human activities carried 
on in each region, and (2) the current national and international economic, 
political, and social problems which confront these people. 

Note. This course should be of special interest to those students who 
plan to take "The World Today," a symposium on Latin America. Insofar 
as possible, these courses will parallel each other. 

The following materials will be used: R. H. Whitbeck, "Economic Geog- 
raphy of South America"; J. Paul Goode, "School Atlas, Revised and En- 
larged"; Guy-Harold Smith, "Physiographic Diagram of South America." 

Geog. S 109. Economic Geography for Teachers (2).— 9.00, FF-104. 
Mr. Diehl. 

This course is chiefly concerned with a study of the relationships of 
physiographic, climatic, and economic conditions involved in the production, 
trade, transportation, and consumption of the chief commercial raw mate- 
rials and natural resources of the world. The fundamentals of manufactur- 
ing, the principles of commerce, and current national and international 
economic, political, and social problems are discussed. Special emphasis is 
placed upon the regional aspects of the commodities. 

Although this is distinctly a content course, attention in selection and 
treatment of material is given to the needs of teachers of commercial and 
industrial geography in the senior high school as well as to teachers of 
geography in the junior high school and the elementary school. 

HISTORY 

H. 1 S. General European History. 

A survey of General European History from the time of the disintegra- 
tion of the Roman Empire to the French Revolution. The course emphasizes 
the social and cultural movements in the background of political events. 

A. From the Decline of the Roman Empire to the Renaissance (2). — 
10.30, AS-213. Dr. Strakhovsky. 

B. From the Renaissance to the Opening of the French Revolution (2). — 
Not given in 1939. 



36 



SUMMER SCHOOL 



H. 2 S. American History. 

An introductory course in American History from 1492 to the present 
time. 

A. The Colonial Period 1492-1790 (2).— Not given in 1939. 

B. American History 1790-1860 (2).— 9.00, AS-132. Dr. Crothers. 

C. American History 1860 to the Present (2). — Not given in 1939. 

H. 6 S. Greek Civilization (2).— 9.00, AS-213. Dr. Strakhovsky. 

This course describes the political, cultural, and social development of 
Greece from its beginnings to the Roman conquest. 

H. 102 S. The United States from the Civil War to 1900 (2).— 11.30, 
AS-312. Dr. Thatcher. 

Selected topics intended to provide an historical basis for an understand- 
ing of problems of the present century. 

H. 107 S. Diplomatic History of the United States from the Revolution 
to the Civil War (2).— 10.30, AS-312. Dr. Thatcher. 

A study of American foreign policy. 

H. 128 S. Social and Political History of Europe Since 1814. — Prerequi- 
site, H. 1 S. 

This course emphasizes the social, political, and cultural changes as well 
as the great intellectual movements in that period. 

A. The Period 1814 to 1871 (2).— 11.30, AS-305. Dr. Strakhovsky. 

B. The Period 1871 to Present (2).— Not given in 1939. 

H. S 140. The American Revolution (2).— Prerequisite, H. 2 S. 10.30, 
AS-104. Dr. Crothers. 

An intensive study of the development of the American nation from 
1763 through the adoption of the Federal Constitution. 

H. S 141. Rural Life in Maryland from 1634 (2).— 8.00, AS-212. Mr. 

Worthington. 

The purpose of this course is to study the correlation between agricul- 
tural development in the Colony and State and the changing social order. 
Emphasis will be placed upon agriculture as the determining factor in the 
form of rural life, internal improvements, education, and the growth of 
commerce and cities. 

The course is designed to give background not only to rural teachers but 
also to students of agriculture, education, and others interested in the early 
trends of Maryland rural life. It will consist of lectures, reports, and field 
trips to early Maryland homes and other places of interest in the develop- 
ment of rural life. 

H. 201 S. Seminar in American History (2). — Four periods a week. 
Time to be arranged. Dr. Crothers. 

Limited to ten students. 

H. 202 S. Historical Criticism and American Bibliography (2). — Four 
periods a week. Time to be arranged. Dr. Thatcher. 

This course is intended for graduate students in American history. 



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97 



HOME ECONOMICS 

*H. E. S 113. Clothes in Relation to Personality (2).— Laboratory course. 

A. First three weeks (1).— 10.30-12.20, N-202. Miss Curtiss. 

A study of clothing, accessories and grooming in relation to personality. 

B. Second three weeks (1).— 10.30-12.20, N-201. Miss Kessinger. 
Clothing construction. Study of new patterns, new sewing techniques 

and new materials for the fall. 

H. E. 134 S. Advanced Foods (1).— 8.00, N-101. Fee, $2.00. Miss En- 
right. 

New foods, methods of preparing them; newest developments in food 
preparation. Planning food for public functions. The instructor and 
specialists will conduct this course by the demonstration method. 

*H. E. S 161. Housing (2). 

A. First three weeks (1).— 9.00, N-101. Miss Mount, Miss Curtiss. 

Housing as a Social Problem. Civic and national low-cost housing proj- 
ects. Lectures by specialists in housing from the Alley Dwelling Authority, 
Washington, D. C. and from the Government housing agencies. 

B. Second three weeks (1).— 9.00, N-101. Miss Curtiss. 

Housing the Family. Choosing a home site; study of house plans; 
construction materials for both urban and rural homes; rural electrification 
in relation to the rural home; financing the home. Emphasis is placed on 
the medium and low-cost house. Lectures by specialists in architecture, 
building materials and. home financing. 

H. E. S 173. Buying of Textiles (1).— 1.30, N-201. Miss Kessinger. 

The selection of textiles for the house and family. A comparison of 
old and new textile fibers and fabrics as to their source, characteristics and 
uses. 

H. E. 204 S. Readings in Nutrition (1).— 8.00, N-102. (First three 
weeks). Mrs. Welsh. 

Reports and discussions of outstanding nutritional research and in- 
vestigations. 



HORTICULTURE 

Graduate students may arrange to take and receive credit for one or 
more of the following courses provided a sufficient number of students 
enroll. 

Hort. 104 S. Systematic Pomology (3). — Two lectures; one laboratory. 
To be arranged. Dr. Haut. 

A study of the origin, history, taxonomic relationships, description, 
pomological classification and identification of tree and small fruits. 
(Given in alternate years.) 



* Students may register in either A or B of these courses. 



38 



SUMMER SCHOOL 



I 



ii 



Hort. 105 S. Systematic Olericulture (3). — Two lectures; one labora- 
tory. Not given in 1939. 

A study of the classification and nomenclature of vegetable crops and 
the description and identification of varieties. The adaptation of varieties 
to different environmental conditions and their special uses in vegetable 
production. 

(Given in alternate years.) 

Hort. 201y. Experimental Pomology (3). — ^Three lectures. To be ar- 
ranged. Dr. Schrader. 

A systematic study of the sources of knowledge and opinion as to prac- 
tices in pomology; methods and difficulties in experimental work in pomol- 
ogy, and results of experiments that have been or are being conducted in 
all experiment stations in this and other countries. 

Hort. 202y. Experimental Olericulture (3). — ^Three lectures. To be ar- 
ranged. Dr. Mahoney. 

A systematic study of the sources of knowledge and opinion as to practices 
in vegetable growing; methods and difficulties in experimental work in vege- 
table production, and results of experiments that have been or are being 
conducted in all experiment stations in this and other countries. 

Hort. 205y> Advanced Horticultural Research and Thesis (4, 6, or 8). — 

To be arrariged. Hort. Staff. 

Graduate students will be required to select problems for original research 
in pomology, vegetable gardening, or floriculture. These problems will be 
continued until completed and final results are to be published in the form 
of a thesis. 

MATHEMATICS 

Math. 22 S. Analytic Geometry (4).— Three hours daily. 8.00-9.50, 10.30, 
AS-306. Dr. Lancaster. 

Principles of trigonometry; coordinates; metrical relations; the straight 
line, circle, parabola, ellipse, hyperbola; empirical equations; graphing of 
periodic functions; applications to the solution of equations. 

Math. 23 S. Calculus (4).— Three hours daily. 8.00-9.50, 10.30, AS-234. 
Dr. Martin, Dr. Dantzig. 

This course deals with the integral calculus and its applications to 
geometry and mechanics; much emphasis will be laid on the technique of 
integration, the calculation of curvilinear areas, arcs, volumes, moments 
of inertia, pressure, and work. In addition, the course will deal with 
elementary differential equations and their applications to physics and 
chemistry. 

Math. Ill S. Elementary Mathematics From an Advanced Standpoint 

(2) .—8.00, AS-110. Dr. Dantzig. 

A survey course in high school mathematics intended for teachers of 
mathematics and physics and for workers in biological and social sciences. 

Math. 116 S. Advanced Trigonometry (2).— 11.30, AS-110. Dr. Dantzig. 

Complex numbers; de Moivre's identity; trigonometric series and pro- 
ducts; periodic functions; hyperbolic functions; spherial trigonometry. 



UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 



39 



Math. 143 S. Advanced Calculus (2).— 10.30, AS-110. Dr. Martin. 
Advanced methods of integration; multiple integrals; partial derivatives; 
Jacobians; envelopes. 

MODERN LANGUAGES 

The semester courses in elementary French, German, and Spanish are 
arranged as consecutive courses covering the work of a year. The classes 
meet 14 hours a week. Students desiring credit for first or second semester 
only should consult the instructor for hours of attendance and credit. 

A. French 

Fr. ly. Elementary French (6).— M., T., W., Th., 9.00, 11.30, 1.30; 
F., 9.00, 11.30, AS-311. Miss Wilcox. 

Elements of grammar. Phonetics and dictation. Translation. Exer- 
cises in vocabulary building. This course is the equivalent of the French 
ly listed in the general catalogue. 

Fr. 3y. Second Year French (6).— M., T., W., Th., 8.00, 10.30, 1.30; 
F., 8.00, 10.30, AS-311. (1.30 period. Room AS-312). Miss Herring. 

Reading of narrative works and plays. Grammar review. Phonetics and 
dictation. Exercises in vocabulary building for rapid reading and conver- 
sation. This course is the equivalent of the French 3y listed in the general 
catalogue. 

Fr. 9 S. Phonetics (2).— 8.00, AS-315. M. Liotard. 

Practical course in French pronunciation. Rapid review of scientific 
phonetics. Study of isolated sounds and of sounds in combination. Oral 
drill and writing in phonetics. Correction of individual errors. Conducted 
in French. 

Fr. 10 S. Intermediate Grammar and Composition (2). — 10.30, AS-315. 
Dr. Falls. 

Review of French grammar and syntax. Translation exercises. Free 
composition. Conducted in French. 

Fr. S 15. Diction (2).— 9.00, AS-315. M. Liotard. 

Study of inflection, intonation, and accentuation in the pronunciation of 
French. Exercises in reading aloud. Study of appropriate texts to show 
the proper diction for the different types of discourse. Conducted in French. 

Fr. S 100. Conversation (2).— To be arranged. Staff. 

Dictation, "explications de textes," practical exercises in speaking French. 
There are graded levels in this course. Students are placed where their 
previous training properly equips them to study. Each one receives special 
attention. 

Fr. 110 S. Advanced French Composition and Stylistics (2). — 11.30, 
AS-314. Dr. Barzun. 

A course in the study of literary styles (lyric, dramatic, etc.) and cur- 
rent types of expression (conversation, fiction, etc.) from the point of 
view of structure, technique, syntax, and vocabulary. Reading of texts. 
Composition work embodying styles and types. Conducted in French. 



49760 



40 



SUMMER SCHOOL 



Fr. S 116. The Nineteenth-Century French Novel (2).— 11.30, AS-215. 
M. Liotard. 

A survey course on the most important novelists of the nineteenth 
century. Reading and discussion of masterpieces of Chateaubriand, Hugo, 
Stendhal, Balzac, Flaubert, Zola, Loti, and Anatole France. Conducted in 
French. 

Fr. S 125. Moliere and His Time (2).— 10.30, AS-314. Dr. Barzun. 

A study of Moliere's comedies exemplifying: (1) literary achievement; 

(2) evolution of seventeenth-century society; (3) expression of French 
Classicism; (4) tradition of his dramas on the stage of the National 
French Theater. Conducted in French. 

Fr. 205 S. Georges Duhamel, Poet, Dramatist, and Novelist (2). — 9.00, 
AS-307. Dr. Falls. 

Reading and discussion of DuhamePs most important works. Selected 
texts for analysis in class (explication de textes). Reports. Conducted in 
French. 

Fr. S 215. The Evolution of Contemporary French Literature (2). — 8.00, 
AS-314. Dr. Barzun. 

A survey course on the movement of French literature from Symbolism 
to the present day; (1) Symbolism and Naturalism; (2) Abbat/e Group; 

(3) post-symbolist schools before and since the war (Purism, Populism, 
Surrealism, etc.); (4) orphic literature. Conducted in French. 

Fr. 220 S. Reading Course (1-2).— To be arranged. Dr. Falls. 

Designed to give graduate students the background of a survey of 
French literature. Extensive outside reading with reports and conferences. 
This course prepares candidates for the Master's degree to take the 
comprehensive examination on French literature. 

The Summer French School 

The purpose of the French School is to create a center where at a 
minimum expense students of French, largely isolated for six weeks from 
contact with English, can effectively devote their efforts to perfecting 
their knowledge of the written and spoken language, of French literature, 
history, and civilization. 

French House. The French House is the center of the French School. 
It includes the Men's Hall (Home Economics House) and the Women's 
Hall (Gerneaux Hall), two large comfortable dwellings situated on the 
campus within a few steps of the classrooms in the Arts and Sciences 
building. It provides excellent accommodations, both room and board, 
for 15 w^omen and 10 men. Men and w^omen students do not room in 
the same hall but take their meals together in Gerneaux Hall. 

The French House is virtually apart from the other units of the Uni- 
versity. Students living in it hear only French spoken and are allowed 
to speak only French themselves. The staff, composed chiefly of native- 
bom French men and women, resides in the French House in order that 
all students may have the advantage of constant contact with their in- 
structors. Opportunities for speaking French are not confined, however, 
to conversing with faculty and students. Many members of the large 



UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 



41 



French colony of Washington, D. C, take an active interest in the French 
House and frequently attend its teas and dinners. 

A spirit of informality and camaraderie prevails in the French House and 
in all the activities which it sponsors. The meal hours and the social 
hour after dinner, with its lively "sings" and games, have been for the 
past three summers among the most pleasant features of the School. 
Tennis, swimming, and picnics provide recreation and exercise, as well 
as further opportunities for informal conversation in French. 

Nature of Work. No diploma is required for registration. The School is 
open to all persons desirous of perfecting their knowledge of French. 
The courses of instruction have been arranged with the purpose of meet- 
ing the needs of teachers and students who show a wide degree of variance 
in their preparation and interests. An individual program will be made 
for the work of each student according to his abilities and the objects 
he has in view. This program may be adapted to all degrees of pro- 
ficiency. Enough graduate work is offered to permit students to earn 
credits towards the Master's degree. 

There are elementary courses for beginners (Fr. 1 y, 3y), practical 
courses of intermediate level for those who have some knowledge of French 
(Fr. 9 S, 10 S, S 15, SlOO), fourteen hours in courses for advanced under- 
graduates and graduates (Fr. S 100, 110 S, S 116, S 125, 205 S, S 215, 
220 S). 

Expenses. The fee for registration in the French School is $100.00. 
It includes tuition for the normal load of six semester hours, room and 
board in the French House for six weeks, maid service, and the privilege 
of taking part in all activities conducted by the French School. Students 
who do not live in Maryland or the District of Columbia must pay a non- 
resident fee of $10.00. These fees do not include laundry expenses, and 
students expecting to occupy rooms in the French House should note that 
they will furnish their own towels, pillows, pillow cases, sheets and blankets. 

Reservations. Room reservation should be made early. A deposit of 
$10.00, payable on or before June 1, is necessary to reserve room and board 
in the French House. Checks should be made payable to the University of 
Maryland. Failure to occupy the room will result in forfeiture of the 
deposit fee, unless application for a refund is received by June 15. An 
exception to this regulation will be made only in cases of illness. Applica- 
tion for such exception must be accompanied by a physician's certificate. 

Visiting Professor. The French School welcomes Dr. Henri Martin Bar- 
zun, visiting Professor of French, for the summer of 1939. Dr. Barzun is 
well known in America as a writer, educator, and scholar. At the close of 
the World War he came to the United States to lecture on French literature 
and civilization. He was already known in France and in this country 
as one of the founders of the Abbaye Group with Georges Duhamel, Charles 
Vildrac, Jules Romains, and others. He has taught at Lehigh, Fordham, 
Pennsylvania State College, New York University, Columbia, and City 
College of New York. At present he is editor of the French Foruniy a quar- 
terly review of French civilization published in New York. 

A special printed announcement of the French School, containing a full 
description of the courses, additional comments and information will be 
sent upon request. 



42 



SUMMER SCHOOL 



UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 



43 



B. German 

Ger. ly. Elementary German (6).— M., T., W., Th., 8.00, 10.30, 1.30; 
F., 8.00, 10.30, M-106. Mr. Schweizer. 

Elements of grammar, composition, pronunciation, and translation. This 
course is the equivalent of the German ly listed in the general catalogue. 

Ger. 3y. Second Year German (6).— M., T., W., Th., 8.00, 10.30, 1.30; 
F., 8.00, 10.30, M-104. Mr. Kramer. 

Prerequisite, Ger. ly or equivalent. 

After a grammar review the course is devoted to the attainment of pro- 
ficiency in the reading of German. 

C. Spanish 

Span. ly. Elementary Spanish (6).— M., T., W., Th., 8.00, 10.30, 1.30; 
F., 8.00, 10.30, AS-3'07. Dr. Darby. 

Elements of grammar, composition, pronunciation, and translation. This 
course is the equivalent of Spanish ly listed in the general catalogue. 

MUSIC 

Mus. S 2. History of Modern Music (2).— 9.00, Aud. Mr. Randall. 

A survey of the history of Modern Music. The development of musical 
instruments and the rise of instrumental music; Bach and Handel, clas- 
sicism and romanticism; the early symphonists; the advent of the music 
drama and nationalism; the modern composers. 

Mus. S 3. History of American Music (2). — 8.00, Aud. Mr. Randall. 

This course is designed to follow the progress of music in America from 
the settlement of Plymouth down to the present time. This period is divided 
as follows: from 1620 to the Revolution and the establishment of our 
government; 1800 to the Civil War; 1865 to the present. This brings us 
down to our own day when our musical life is comparable with that of 
any other country in the world; and when records, radio, and the talking 
screen are exerting such an influence on music. 

Mus. Ed. S 8. Survey of Music Literature (2).— 11.30, FF-112. Mr. 
Velie. 

A general course in music appreciation dealing with both vocal and instru- 
mental music. It includes a study of folk song, art song, opera and ora- 
torio; idealized dance forms, instrumental suite, sonata, symphony and 
symphonic poem. This course will provide an excellent background for 
teachers who are teaching their own music and who have had few addi- 
tional courses in musical content. Included in the course will be a survey 
of music for special occasions, operettas, etc. 

Mus. Ed. S 10. The Teaching of Music in the Elementary School (2). — 
9.00, FF-112. Mr. Velie. 

Prerequisite, the required normal school music course or equivalent. 

This course deals with the study and demonstration of material and 
methods suitable for the first six grades. The various song series will be 
surveyed. 

The work of each year will be taken up in detail and the problems which 
confront the grade teacher will be carefully considered. 



Each teacher is requested to bring the course of study she uses and a 
chromatic pitch pipe. 

Mus. Ed. S 114. The Teaching of Music in the High School (2).— 10.30, 
FF-112. Mr. Velie. 

Prerequisite, eligibility for teaching music in the high school. 

An advanced course devoted to the methods of organizing and conducting 
a high school department of music. The various problems of junior and 
senior high school music will be given careful study. 

The work will be suited to the needs of the individual student. 

PHILOSOPHY 

Phil. S 101. History of Art (2).— 9.00, AS-18. Dr. Marti. 

A survey of architecture, sculpture, and painting in Europe, from 300 
A. D. to the present. 

The main purpose of the course is to enhance and train the student's 
ability to see, and to think in visual terms. The lectures will be profusely 
illustrated with slides. 

Students should bring to the course An Illustrated Handbook of Art 
History, edited by Frank J. Roos, Macmillan Company, New York, 1938. 

PHYSICS 

Phys. S 1. General Physics (3).— 1.30-3.20, AS-18. Fee, $3.00. Mr. 
Eichlin. 

A study of the physical phenomena in mechanics, heat, and sound, 
designed for students diesiring a general survey of the field of physics. 
The lectures are supplemented with numerous experimental demonstrations. 

Phys. S 2. General Physics (3).— Not given in 1939. 

A study of the physical phenomena in electricity, magnetism, light, and 
modern physics, designed for students desiring a general survey of the 
field of physics. The lectures are supplemented with numerous experi- 
mental demonstrations. 

POLITICAL SCIENCE 

Pol. Sci. Is. American National Government (3).— 8.00, AS-304. Mr. 
Walther. 

This course is a survey of the organization, structure, and functioning of 
the American National Government with particular attention to citizenship, 
political parties, the Presidency, the Congress, the Supreme Court and the 
more recent regulatory and social legislation. 

Pol. Sci. 108 S. Contemporary Dictatorships (2).— 10.30, AS-132. Dr. 
Steinmeyer. 

A comparative study of the dictatorial governments of Europe, with 
special emphasis upon Italy, Germany, and the U. S. S. R. 

Pol. Sci. S 148. American Civil Liberties (2).— 9.00, AS-304. Mr. Walther. 

This course is a study of the more important civil liberties guaranteed by 

the Bill of Rights of the Constitution, an interpretation of their meaning 



44 



SUMMER SCHOOL 



UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 



45 



and importance in a democracy, and an examination of their practical appli- 
cation. Emphasis will be placed upon freedom of speech, of press, of teach- 
ing, and of religion and upon protections against searches and seizures, self- 
incrimination, unfair trials, excessive fines, and cruel and unusual punish- 
ments. 

Pol. Sci. S 152. The World Today (2).— 1.30, S-1. 

This course, directed by Dr. Steinmeyer, is devoted to a special study of 
Latin-America. 

Latin-America looms prominently on the horizon of International affairs 
today. As Americans we should endeavor to become better acquainted with 
these nations to the South. 

The lectures and discussions will be conducted by leading authorities in 
each of the fields to be covered. The examination for credit at the end of 
the course will be based upon leading questions submitted by the lecturers 
at the beginning of each of the series of lectures. Students not wishing to 
register for credit are invited to register as auditors. 

The subjects covered, and the lecturers are as follows: 

June 27-29. Elements of Latin-American Culture. Mr. Philip Leonard 
Green. 

July 3-7. Political and Social Institutions and Problems in Latin-America. 
Dr. Jorge Roa. 

July 10-13. Economic Problems of Latin-America. Dr. George Wythe. 

July 17-20. Latin-America in World Politics. Dr. Samuel Guy Inman. 

July 24-27. The United States in the Caribbean. Dr. John Patterson. 

Supplementing this series of lectures, representatives from various Latin- 
American embassies and legations will appear on the program to discuss 
conditions in their respective countries. 

Note. The course will be open to the general public as well as to summer 
school students. A special circular giving detailed schedule of lectures, in- 
formation about the lecturers, and fees for attendance may be obtained by 
applying to the Director of the Summer Session. 

Pol. Sci. S 161. Contemporary American Political Problems (2-3). — 

11.30, AS-304. Dr. Bone. 

A study of some of the more important problems with which the national 
and state governments have had to deal in recent years. Special emphasis 
this summer is placed on government in business, the cooperative move- 
ment, health insurance, executive reorganization, national defense, and 
problems facing the 1939 Congress. 

Pol. Sci. S171. Contemporary Political Leadership (2-3).— 10.30, AS-304. 
Dr. Bone. 

A study of the personality traits and techniques of present day European 
and American political leaders. Attention is given to the methods employed 
by leaders in their rise to power, and the effect of different types of gov- 
ernment in conditioning political leadership and executive responsibility. 



POULTRY HUSBANDRY 

P. H. S5. Poultry Selection and Breeding (1). — One lecture per day. 
(First three weeks) — To be arranged. Dr. Jull, Mr. Quigley, Mr. Rice, Mr. 

Williams. 

Designed to acquaint the student with modern methods of poultry hus- 
bandry, with emphasis on selecting fowls for egg and meat production and 
standardbred qualities and breeding methods that should be practiced to in- 
crease the labor income from the flock, including the progeny-test method 
of selection. 

P. H. S208. Advanced Poultry Husbandry (1). — One lecture per day. 
(First three weeks)— To be arranged. Dr. Jull, Dr. Byerly, Dr. Bird, Mr. 
Gwin. 

The genetic basis of poultry improvements; the physiology of reproduc- 
tion; the fundamental principles of poultry nutrition with special emphasis 
on broiler production, egg production, and turkey growing; factors affecting 
the quality of poultry products and marketing methods. 

PSYCHOLOGY 

Psych. 101 S. Introduction to Psychology for Mature Students (2).— 9.00, 
AS-115. Dr. Jenkins. 

Intended to provide graduate credit for those who are candidates for 
graduate degrees, but who have never had a general course in psychology. 
A review of the more basic findings regarding human behavior. 

Psych. 110 S. Educational Psychology (3). — Seven periods a week. Daily, 
10.30; in addition, Th. and F., 11.30, AS-121. Dr. Bellows. 

Application of psychological methods and results to problems encountered 
in education; measurement of individual differences and their significance; 
learning, motivation, transfer of training, and related problems. 

Psych. 115 S. Psychological Diagnosis of Reading Difficulties (2-3). — 

9.00, AS-109. Dr. Ghiselli. 

After a review of psychological investigations of the reading process, at- 
tention will be given to the causes of reading defects and their treatment. 
Topics considered will include: faulty mechanics of reading, role of sensory 
defects, difficulties at the perceptual level, deficiency in comprehension, 
and the relationship of reading to vocabulary and to intelligence. In each 
case, a psychological analysis of remedial proposals will be discussed. 

Psych. 120 S. Psychology of Individual Differences (2-3).— 10.30, AS-109. 
Dr. Ghiselli. 

Nature and occurrences of psychological differences between individuals 
as found by experimental and statistical methods. Special attention will be 
paid to the significance of these differences in school and daily life. 

Psych. 121 S. Experimental Social Psychology (2).— 11.30, AS-115. Dr. 
Jenkins. 

Studies of human behavior in social situations; effects of place in the 



46 



SUMMER SCHOOL 



family, of competition, and of various social groups as studied by methods of 
controlled observation. Special attention will be given to social forces at 
work in the educational situation. 

Psych. 130 S. Mental Hygiene (2-3). — Four lectures and one clinic. 
8.00, AS-115. Dr. Sprowls. 

The more common deviations of personality and behavior; conditions of 
psychological maladjustment and methods of treatment. The weekly clinics 
are arranged to give an opportunity to observ^e the more common types at 
first hand. 

Psych. 135 S. Problems of Mental Hygiene in School and Home (2-3). — 

10.30, AS-115. Dr. Sprowls. 

A review of the modern literature of mental hygiene with special refer- 
ence to maladjustments of the types most frequently encountered in domestic 
and educational circles. 

Psych. 150 S. Psychological Tests and Measurements (2).— 9.00, AS-121. 
Dr. Bellows. 

Critical survey of psychological techniques used in educational and 
vocational orientation and in personnel selection with emphasis on methods 
by which such tests are validated; practice in the use of tests and the 
interpretation of test data. 

SOCIOLOGY 

Soc. 1 S. Elements of Sociology (2). — Prerequisite, sophomore standing. 
Two sections. 11.30, AS-212, AS-213. Dr. Jacobi; Dr. Hodge. 

An analysis of society and the social processes; the relation of the in- 
dividual to the group; social products; social change. 

Soc. 2 S. Cultural Anthropology (2). — Prerequisite, sophomore standing. 
8.00, AS-213. Dr. Hodge. 

An analysis of the cultures of several primitive and modem societies, 
the purpose of which is to ascertain the nature of culture and the processes 
related to it. Museum exhibits will be utilized. 

Soc. 102 S. Urban Sociology (2). — Prerequisite, Soc. 1 S or consent of 
instructor. 8.00, AS-312. Dr. Jacobi. 

The origin and growth of cities; composition and characteristics of city 
populations; the nature and significance of urbanization; the social struc- 
ture and functions of the city; urban personalities and groups; cultural 
conflicts arising out of the impact of urban environment. 

Soc. 107 S. Criminology and Penology (2). — Prerequisite, Soc. 1 S. 
10.30, AS-131. Dr. Jacobi. 

The nature and extent and cost of crime; causative factors; historical 
methods of dealing with criminals; apprehension of alleged criminals; the 
machinery of justice; penal institutions; other means of caring for con- 
victed persons; the prevention of crime. 

Soc. 117 S. The Sociology of Leisure (2).— Prerequisite, Soc. IS. 9.00, 
AS-312. Dr. Hodge. 

This course deals with the sociological implications of leisure time and 



UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 



47 



its uses, particularly in contemporary American life. The group aspects 
of recreation, including both commercialized and voluntary forms, com- 
munity organization and planning for leisure-time activities, and related 
subjects are included. 

Soc. 150 S. Field Practice in Social Work (1-3). — Open only to sociology 
majors upon consent of instructor. Dr. Joslyn. 

SPEECH 

Speech 101 S. Radio Speech (2).— 10.30, AS-302. Laboratory fee, $2.00. 
Admission by audition or consent of instructor. Dr. Ehrensberger. 

A laboratory course dealing with the various aspects of modem broad- 
casting. Practice in program planning, production, continuity writing, an- 
noimcing, etc. This course is under the direction of the Speech Department 
with the cooperation of the Columbia Broadcasting System. 

ZOOLOGY 

Zool. 1 s. (General Zoology (4). — Five lectures; five two-hour laboratories. 
Lecture, 1.30, L-107; laboratory, 8.00, L-203. Laboratory fee, $5.00. Dr. 
Burhoe. 

An introductory course which is cultural and practical in its aim. It deals 
with the principles of the development, structure, relationships, and activi- 
ties of animals, a knowledge of which is valuable in developing an appre- 
ciation of the biological sciences. Typical invertebrates and a mammalian 
form are studied. 

Zool. 4 s. Comparative Vertebrate Morphology (4). — Five lectures; five 
three-hour laboratories. Lecture, 11.30, L-107; laboratory, 1.30, L-203. 
Laboratory fee, $5.00. Dr. Hard. 

A comparative study of selected organ systems in certain vertebrate 
groups. This course is designed for pre-medical students. 

Zool. 206 s. Research (3-6). — Hours to be arranged. Staff. 

CHESAPEAKE BIOLOGICAL LABORATORY 

This Laboratory is on Solomons Island, Maryland, in the center of the 
Chesapeake Bay country. Sponsored by the University of Maryland in 
co-operation with Goucher College, Washington College, Johns Hopkins 
University, Western Maryland College, the Carnegie Institution of Wash- 
ington, and the Maryland Conservation Department, it affords a center 
for research and study where facts tending toward a fuller appreciation 
of nature may be gathered and disseminated. The program projects a 
comprehensive survey of the biota of the marine, brackish and fresh water 
areas of the Chesapeake region. 

The Laboratory is open the year round. Courses are offered during the 
summer for advanced undergraduates and graduates. They cover a period 
of six weeks. Not more than two courses may be taken by a student. Classes 
are limited to eight matriculants. Students pursuing special research may 
establish residence for the summer or for the entire year. Laboratory facili- 
ties, boats of various types fully equipped (pumps, nets, dredges, and 
other apparatus), and water collecting devices are available for the work 
without cost to the student. 



48 



SUMMER SCHOOL 



I 



I 



i 



i 



Zoology 

Zool. 101 cbl. Economic Zoology (3). — Prerequisite, nine semester hours 
in biology, six of which must be in zoological subjects. Dr. Old. 

Lectures, laboratory, and field trips. Emphasis will be placed on the 
biology of local marine life of commercial importance. Problems of preser- 
vation, control, conservation and development of wild formsi will be studied. 
Week-end cruises will be made on the Chesapeake Bay from the Laboratory 
to the main fishing grounds for oysters, crabs, terrapin, and fin fishes. 
Observation will be made of the holding, preserving, packing, and shipping 
of comjm^rcial forms of seafoods at Crisfield, Cajnbridge, Solomons, and 
elsewhere, as weather conditions permit. 

Zool. 102 cbl. Invertebrates (6). — Prerequisite, eight semester hours in 
Biology. Dr. Olson. 

Lectures, laboratory, and collecting trips to illustrate various significant 
modifications of the invertebrate types, their structure, habits, and classi- 
fication. A detailed study of selected types will be made, and as far as 
possible local forms will be used. 

Zool. 201 cbl. Ichthyology (6). — Prerequisite, nine semester hours of 
zoology. Dr. Blair and Mr. Wallace. 

Field, laboratory, and experimental study of the biology of fishes, in- 
cluding taxonomy and methods for determining age and growth, collecting, 
preserving, and statistical analysis. Except for purposes of classification, 
Chesapeake fishes will be used exclusively. 

Zool. 203 cbl. Protozoology (3). — Prerequisite, nine semester hours of 
zoology. Dr. Kudo. 

Morphology, physiology, and taxonomy of representative genera of Proto- 
zoa, both free-living and those parasitic in the lower vertebrates and the 
invertebrates of the region. Lectures, laboratory, and field work. 

Zool. 206 cbl. Biological Problems (Credit to be arranged) — Laboratory 
Staff. 

A prospective student should consult with the Dean of the Graduate 
School in which he is matriculated for an advanced degree before making 
inquiry about this work. 

Botany 

Bot. 101 cbl. Algae (3). — Prerequisite, nine semester hours in biology, 
including a minimum of six hours in botany. Dr. Bold. 

This course, consisting of field and laboratory work as well as lectures, 
will deal with the distribution, morphology, cytology, and classification of 
the marine and fresh water algae of the Solomons Island region. The 
laboratory work will include a detailed study of the development of one 
or more representative types from each of the main groups with briefer 
comparative examination and identification of related forms. 

For further information about work at the Chesapeake Biological Lab- 
oratory, apply to Dr. R. V. Truitt, Director, College Park, Maryland. 



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SUMMER SCHOOL 



Zoology 

Zool. 101 cbl. Econamic Zoology (3). — Prerequisite, nine semester hours 
in biology, six of which must be in zoological subjects. Dr. Old. 

Lectures, laboratory, and field trips. Emphasis will be placed on the 
biology of local marine life of commercial importance. Problems of preser- 
vation, control, conservation and development of wild forms will be studied. 
Week-end cruises will be made on the Chesapeake Bay from the Laboratory 
to the main fishing grounds for oysters, crabs, terrapin, and fin fishes. 
Observ^ation will be made of the holding, preserving, packing, and shipping 
of conmiercial forms of seafoods at Crisfield, Cambridge, Solomons, and 
elsewhere, as weather conditions permit. 

Zool. 102 cbl. Invertebrates (6). — Prerequisite, eight semester hours in 
Biology. Dr. Olson. 

Lectures, laboratory, and collecting trips to illustrate various significant 
modifications of the invertebrate types, their structure, habits, and classi- 
fication. A detailed study of selected types w^ill be made, and as far as 
possible local forms will be used. 

Zool. 201 cbl. Ichthyology (B). — Prerequisite, nine semester hours of 
zoology. Dr. Blair and Mr. Wallace. 

Field, laboratory, and experimental study of the biology of fishes, in- 
cluding taxonomy and methods for determining age and growth, collecting, 
preserving, and statistical analysis. Except for purposes of classification, 
Chesapeake fishes will be used exclusively. 

Zool. 203 cbl. Protozoology (3). — Prerequisite, nine semester hours of 
zoology. Dr. Kudo. 

Morphology, physiology, and taxonomy of representative genera of Proto- 
zoa, both free-living and those parasitic in the lower vertebrates and the 
invertebrates of the region. Lectures, laboratory, and field work. 

Zool. 206 cbl. Biological Problems (Credit to be arranged) — Laboratory 
Staff. 

A prospective student should consult with the Dean of the Graduate 
School in which he is matriculated for an advanced degree before making 
inquiry about this work. 

Botany 

Hot. 101 cbl. Algae (3). — Prerequisite, nine semester hours in biology, 
including a minimum of six hours in botany. Dr. Bold. 

This course, consisting of field and laboratory work as well as lectures, 
will deal with the distiibution, morphology, cytology, and classification of 
the marine and fresh water algae of the Solomons Island region. The 
laboratory work will include a detailed study of the development of one 
or more representative types from each of the main groups with briefer 
comparative examination and identification of related forms. 

For further information about work at the Chesapeake Biological Lab- 
orator>', apply to Dr. R. V. Truitt, Director, College Park, Marj^land. 



STUDENTS SCHEDULE 



PERIOD 


MONDAY 


TITESDAT 


WEDNESDAY THURSDAY 


PBTDAY 


SATURDAY 


8.00 














9.00 














10.30 














11.30 














1.30 














2.30 














3.30 






























CHANGES IN THE PRINTED SCHEDULE 

Any variation from the printed schedule must 
be authorized by the registrar, who requires the 
approval of the director and head of the depart- 
ment concerned* 



CHANGES IN REGISTRATION 

Any change of courses is made only on the written permission 
from the director and is subject to a fee of one dollar ($1.00) 
after the first five days. After securing such written permission 
from the director the student must present the same to the reg- 
istrar, who in turn issues a class card for the course the student 
is entering and a withdrawal card to the instructor in charge 
of ttie course from which the student withdraws. Unless this is 
done, no credit will be given for the new course and a failure 
will be recorded for the course dropped. 

Office of the Registrar. 



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June 26— August 4, 1939 



H. C. BYRD, LL. D. 

President of the University 

W. S. SMALL, Ph. D. 
Director of the Summer Session 



The University of Maryland is located in College 
Park, Maryland, eight miles from Washington. This 
location combines the advantages of living in the country 
and of nearness to a large city which is also the Capital of 
the Nation. 






m i?OT CIRCULiTI 




EXTRAXCE TO CAMPl'S 



OPPORTUNITIES FOR STUDY 

The Summer Session in cooperation with various divisions 
of the University offers courses essentially equivalent in 
method, character, and credit value to those of the regular 
year. The faculty consists of members of the regular teach- 
ing staff, supplemented by specialists from other institutions. 

Students who are matriculated as candidates for degrees 
are credited towards the appropriate degree upon satisfactory 
completion of courses. 

Teachers and others not seeking degrees receive official 
reports specifying the amount and quality of work completed. 
These reports are accepted by the Maryland State Depart- 
ment of Education and by the appropriate education authori- 
ties of other states for extension and renewal of certificates in 
accordance with their respective laws and regulations. 

Six or more semester hours of credit may be earned in the 
Summer Session. (See ''Costs.'*) 






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College Papjc Md. 



June 26— August 4, 1939 



H. C. BYRD, LL. D. 

Presidertt of the University 

VV. S. SMALL, Ph. D. 

Director of the Summer Session 



The UxivERSTrv of ALarvlaxd is located in Com.ege 
Park, Marvlaxd, eight miles from Washington. This 
location combines the advantages of living in the country 
and of nearness to a large city which is also the Capital of 
the Nation. 



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OPPOR'l'l Xn IKS l-OR S'I'l I)Y 

The Simmer Session in cooperation with \arious divisions 
of the I'nixersity offers courses essentialK ecpiixalent in 
method, character, and credit \alue to those ot the regular 
vcar. The faculty consists of members of the regular teach- 
ing staff, supj^lemcntL'd b\ specialists from other institutions. 

Students who are matriculated as candidates tor degrees 
arc credited towards the apj^ropriate degree upon satistactor\ 
com]>iction ot courses. 

Teachers and others not seeking degrees receive official 
reports specifying the amount and cjualitx ot work comj^leted. 
These reports are accepted b\ the Maryland Sf.ite Depart- 
ment of Kducation and by the aj^i^'opriate education authori- 
ties of other states for extension and renewal ot certiticates in 
accordance with their respective laws and regulations. 

Six or more semester hours ot credit may be earned in the 
Summer Session. (See "Costs.*') 



The program offers more than 150 individual courses and 
includes offerings in the physical and biological sciences, 
mathematics, English, foreign languages, history, economics, 
political science, sociology, music, psychology, agriculture, 
home economics, physical education, industrial arts, and in 
the various levels and phases of Education. 

Special intensive courses in elementary French^ German^ and 
Spanish enable students to cover a years course in the Summer 
Session. 

In a number of departments courses are scheduled for a 
series of years so that students whose major or minor subjects 
are in these fields may plan their work in orderly sequence. 

Some Special Features 

The French School, through the medium of the French 
House, offers an opportunity to live with native French peo- 
ple for six weeks and to take part in a program of dramatic 
entertainments, games, and outings sponsored by the French 
School. Limited to 15 women; 9 men. (A special descrip- 
tive circular for this feature is issued.) 

The World Today, a symposium course open to the gen- 
eral public as well as Summer School students, presents a 
view of major political problems in the chief geographical 
areas of the world. It is conducted by lectures and discus- 
sions under the leadership of recognized authorities. In the 
summer of 1939 the course will be concerned with Latin 
America. 



Educational and Vocational Guidance. A compre- 
hensive program for a series of years. The 1939 offerings in- 
clude an Introductory Course and courses in Counselling 
Techniques, Teaching Occupations, Guidance in Classroom 
and Homeroom, and the Function of Tests in Guidance. 
These will be supplemented by appropriate courses in eco- 
nomics, sociology, and vocational education. 

Mr. Leonard Miller, Director of Guidance in Rockland 
County, New York, is a member of the staff. 

The Teaching of the Social Studies. This course for 
teachers will be given by Dr. Leon Marshall, Professor of 
Political Economy, American University. Dr. Marshall's 
leadership in this field needs no comment. 



The Federal Government at Work. A course inter- 
preting for high school teachers of the social sciences a 
selected number of functions of the Federal Government. 
The procedure will include lectures by appropriate govern- 
ment officials, visits to government agencies for observation 
and explanations by officials, and discussions conducted by 
the professor in charge. A supplementary feature will be the 
showing of a series of documentary films illustrating a num- 
ber of government activities. 

This course will be supported by appropriate courses in 
political science, sociology, and education. 

Registration will be limited to approximately thirty stu- 
dents. 



State Parent-Teacher Conference, meeting for one 
week during the Summer Session, offers opportunity for 
teachers attending the Summer Session to become acquainted 
with the objectives, activities, and procedures of this im- 
portant auxiliary to public education. 

Chesapeake Biological Laboratory, at Solomons Is- 
land, in the center of the Chesapeake Bay region, offers op- 
portunity for advanced study to a limited number of ad- 
vanced undergraduates and graduates. This feature is 
described in the Summer Session catalogue and in more de- 
tail in a special circular. Interested students should apply 
to Dr. R. V. Truitt, Director, Chesapeake Biological Labora- 
tory, College Park, Maryland. 

These and other timely special features will be fully des- 
cribed in the Summer Session catalogue issued in April. 



are provided out of the receipts from the Recreation and 
Entertainment Fee. (See ''Expenses.*') 

A Student Social Committee, cooperating with the Uni- 
versity Student Life Committee, arranges and manages the 
program of activities and events. 

Provision is made for free use of the University tennis 
courts. 

Nearness to Washington makes it easy for Summer School 
students to avail themselves of the extensive dramatic and 
musical opportunities offered there during the summer. 

In and near Washington is a multitude of "things to see" — 
as varied as the Children's Art Gallery (only one of its kind). 
National Museum, Lincoln Memorial, the Greenbelt Com- 
munity, Library of Congress, Mount Vernon, the Great Falls 
of the Potomac. 



Graduate Work 



Graduate work in the Summer Session may be counted as 
residence toward an advanced degree. By carrying approxi- 
mately six semester hours of graduate work for four summer 
sessions and upon submitting a satisfactory thesis, a student 
may be granted the degree of Master of Arts or Master of 
Science. In some instances a fifth summer may be required 
in order that a satisfactory thesis may be completed. 

LEISURE TIME OPPORTUNITIES 

Facilities on the campus for recreation and social inter- 
course, sufficiently varied to meet varying individual tastes. 



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State Pa rem -Teacher Conference, meeting tor one 
week clunng the Summer Session, offers opportunity tor 
teachers attending the Sumfiier Session to become accjuainted 
with the objectives, activities, and i^rocedures ot this im- 
portant auxiliary to ]Hiblic education. 

Chesapeake BiohociicAL Lahoratorv, at Solomons Is- 
land, in the center ot the Chesapeake Hay region, offers op- 
l^ortunitx for advanced studx to a limited number of ad- 
vanced undergraduates anil graduates. 'I'his feature is 
described in the Summer Session catalo^ue and in more de- 
tail in a special circular. Interested students should apj>l\ 
to Dr. K. \'. Truitt, Director, Chesapeake Biological l.abora- 
torv , College Park, Maryland. 

1 hese and other timelv special features will be fully des- 
cribed in the Summer Session catalogue issued in April. 

Graduate Work 



are ]irovided out ot the receipts from the Recreation and 
I .ntertainment l^'ee. (See "KxjK-nses.*' ) 

A Student Social Committee, cooperating with the I ni- 
versity Student Lite Committee, arranges and manages the 
]>rogram ot activ ities and events. 

Provision is made tor tree use ot the I niversitv tennis 
courts. 

Nearness to Washington makes it easy tcjr Summer School 
students to avail themselves of the extensive dramatic and 
musical opportunities offered there during the summer. 

In and near Washington is a multitude of "things to see** — 
as varied as the ChiKlren's Art (lallery (onl\ one ot its kintl). 
National Museum, Lincoln Memorial, the (ireenbelt Com- 
munitv , Library of Congress, Mount \ ernon, the (ireat l^'alls 
of the Potomac. 



(Graduate work in the Summer Session ma\ be counted as 
residence towartl an advanced degree. By carrv ing approxi- 
matelv six semester hours of tijraduate work for tour summer 
sessions and upon submitting a satistactorv thesis, a student 
may be granted the degree of Master of Arts or Master of 
Science. In some instances a hfth summer ma\ be retiuired 
in ortler that a satisfactory thesis may be completed. 

LLISLRK riML OPPOR 1 I Nil IKS 

Facilities on the cam]His for recreation and social inter- 
course, sufficienth varieti to meet varying individual tastes, 



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There is no golf course on the campus but there are three 
or four excellent country club courses within a radius of 
eight miles. 

LIVING CONDITIONS AND EXPENSES 

Students are accommodated in the University dormitories, 
two for women and one for men, up to the capacity of the 
dormitories. The charge for rooms is: 

Calvert Hall (Men) $ 9.00 

Margaret Brent Hall and Dormitory B (Women) 12.00 

Rooms may be reserved in advance, but will not be held 
later than noon of Tuesday, June 27th. As the number of 
rooms is limited, early application for reservations is advisa- 
ble. Men should address applications to the Director 
OF the Summer School; women, to the Dean of Women. 
Requests for room reservations must be accompanied with a 
deposit of $3.00. Checks should be made payable to Uni- 
versity OF Maryland. This fee of $3.00 will be deducted 
from charge for room rent when the student registers; // he 
Jails to occupy the room^ the fee will be forjeited^ unless applica- 
tion J or refund is received by Wednesday^ June 21st, 

Board is furnished at the University Dining Hall on the 
Cafeteria plan. 






SUMMARY OF EXPENSES 

General Fee (for all undergraduate 

students) $20.00 

Room % 9.00—12.00 

Recreation and Entertainment Fee 1.00 

The General Fee of ?20.00 entitles a student to the normal 
load of six semester hours. For each semester hour in excess 
of six, an additional fee of $4.00 is charged. 

A fee of JIO.OO is charged to non-resident undergraduate 
students. 

Laboratory fees for certain courses are specified in the 
descriptions of courses in the Summer School catalogue. 



MARGARET BRENT HALL 





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There is no golf course on the campus hut there are three 
or tour excellent countr\ clul) courses within a radius ot 
eight miles. 

Ll\ IN(i CONDI riONS AND lAPKNSKS 

Students are accommodated in the I niversity elormitories, 
two for women and one (ov men, up to the capacity ot the 
dormitories. I'he charge for rooms is: 

Calvert Hull (Men) $ *A0() 

Marsjjaret Brent Hall and Dormitory B (Women) 12.00 

Rooms may be reserved in advance, hut will not he held 
hiter than noon of Tuesday, June 27th. As the numher ot 
rooms is limited, earl\ application tor reservations is advisa- 
ble. MkX SHOl LD AOOKESS applications to IHF: DlRECIOR 

oi THE Simmer School; womex, to the Deax oi Women. 
Requests for room reservations must he accompanied with a 
deposit of f3.(X). Checks should he made payable to I'ni- 
VERSirv OF Maryland. This fee of $3.00 will he deducted 
from charge for room rent when the student registers; // he 
fails to occupy the room, the fee ivill he forfeited , iDiless applica- 
tioii for refinid is received hy IVednesday^ JiDie 2 1st. 

Hoard is furnished at the I'niversity Dining Hall on the 
CAifeteriii phui. 



SIM MARY OF KXPKNSKS 

General Fee (for all underLrrachiate 

students) ;^2n.00 

Room % 9.00—12.00 

Recreation and Entertainment Fee 1.00 

The fieneral l^ee ot ;f 20.00 entitles a student to the normal 
load ot SIX semester hours. 1m )r each semester hour in excess 
ot six, an additional tee ot ;f4.00 is charged. 

A tee ot ;flO.(X) is charged to non-resident under^raduate 
students. 

Lal)()rat()ry fees for certain courses are specified in the 
descriptions ot courses in the Summer School catalogue. 



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Expenses for Graduate Students 

Instead of a General Fee of $20.00, the expenses for a 
graduate student are: 

A matriculation fee of $10.00. This is paid but 
once, upon admission to the Graduate School. 

A charge of $4.00 per semester hour for course 
work. 

A diploma fee of $10.00. 

The non-resident fee does not apply to graduate students. 



OFF-CAMPUS ROOMS AND BOARD 

Students so desiring may find rooms and board in fraternity 
houses and in private homes, but the University does not 
assume responsibility for rooms and board outside of the 
University dormitories and dining hall. 






For further information, including requests for catalogues, 
address the Director of the Summer Session, University 
OF Maryland, College Park, Maryland. 



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