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Full text of "The summer school"

SUMMER SEMESTER 

FffiST TERM— June 22-August 12 
SECOND TERM— August 13-October 2 
INTERSESSION— August 13-September 2 



Vol. 39 



April 1942 



No. 6 




COLLEGE PARK, MARYLAND 



THE SUMMER SEMESTER, 1942 



CALENDAR 



June 19-20 — ^Friday, Saturday — Registration for Summer Semester and Summer 
Session. 

June 22 — Monday — Instruction begins. 

June 27 — Saturday — Last day to change registration or to file schedule cards 
without penalty. 

July 4 — Saturday — Holiday. 

August 12 — ^Wednesday — Closing date, Summer Session. 
September 7 — Monday — Labor Day, Holiday. 
October 2 — ^Friday — Closing date. Summer Semester. 

CHANGES IN REGISTRATION 

Changes in registration may be made by obtaining a change in registration 
slip from the Dean's office. This slip must be approved by the Dean and filed 
in the office of the registrar. After June 27th there is a fee of one dollar for every 
change in registration. 

Credit cannot be obtained for courses for which a student is not officially reg- 
istered in the office of the registrar. Failure to attend a course for which a student 
is registered will result in a mark of failure in the course. 

WITHDRAWAL FROM THE UNIVERSITY 

If a student is compelled to leave the University at any time during the session 
he must file a request for withdrawal from classes with the Registrar. If this is 
not done, the student will not be entitled, as a matter of course, to a certificate of 
honorable dismissal, and will forfeit his right to any refund to which he would 
otherwise be entitled. 



Issued semi-monthly by the University of Maryland at College Park, Maryland. 
Entered as second-class matter under Act of Congress of August 24, 1912. 



OFFICIAL PUBLICATION 



> t t 



OF THE 



UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 



Summer Semester and Summer Session 



» I 



1942 



ADMINISTRATIVE OFFICER? 

of the 

SUMMER SESSION 

President 

H. C. Byrd 

.Executive Secretary 
Frank K. Haszard 

Director 

Harold Benjamin 

Secretary to the Director 
Alma Frothingham ^ecicta y 

Dean of Women 

Adele Stamp 

.Acting Dean of Men 
James H. Reid 

EDGAR F. LONG Acting Director of Admissions 

"Registrar 

Alma H. Preinkert 

Comptroller 

Harvey T. Casbarian 

Librarian 

Carl \V. E. Hintz 

T. A. HiiTTON_-_Purchasing Agent and Manager of Students' Supply Store 



THE SUMMER SEMESTER, 1942 



CALENDIB 

June IJWO-Friday. Saturday-Regfatration for Summer Semerter ud Summer 
Session. 

June 22— Monday— Instruction begins. 

June 27-&turday-Last day to change registration or to file schedule cards 
without penalty. 

July 4— Saturday— HoUday. 

August 12— Wednesday-Closing date. Summer Session. 
September 7— Monday— Labor Day, HoKday. 
October 2-Friday-Closing date. Summer Semester. 

CHANGES IN REGISTRATION 

slipS^the ^?offi^ by obtaining a change in registration 

W^L^ffil #Vr . ^- ^^ ^'P ^^* ^ approved by the Dean and filed 

WITHDRAWAL FROM THE UNIVERSITY 

If a student is compeUed to leave the University at any time durimr the session 
tZT ^l *J^"^ '"' withdrawal from dass^ witMh^t^ % S ^ 
not done, tte student will not be entitled, as a matter of coJb^V^^ ot 
honorable dismissal, and will forf«»i> hio tn^\.4. *^ *«ct;, w a ceruncace oi 

otherwise iSentftted '^^^ ^ "^ ~'""*^ *° ^^-^^ •>« *0"'<1 



I-urf^-monthly 1^ the UniT«lty of M.ryl«,d .t CoUege P.,k. Manrtimd. 
Entered u ,econd-cta« matter under Act of Congree. of A»ga., 2i?Tm 



OFFICIAL PUBLICATION 



»i* 



OF THE 



UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 



* • * 



Summer Semester and Summer Session 



<i 



1942 



ADMINISTRATIVE OFFICERS 

of the 

SUMMER SESSION 

H. C. Byrd President 

Frank K. Haszard Executive Secretary 

Harold Benjamin Director 

Alma Frothingham Secretary to the Director 

Adele Stamp Dean of Women 

James H. Reid Acting Dean of Men 

Edgar F. Long Acting Director of Admissions 

Alma H. Preinkert Registrar 

Harvey T. Casbarian Comptroller 

Carl W. E. Hintz Librarian 

T. A. Hutton Purchasing Agent and Manager of Students' Supply Store 



TABLE OF CONTENTS 

Page 

Instructors 4 

General Information 6 

Registration Procedure 8 

• Expenses 9 

Art 12 

Bacteriology 12 

Chemistry 12 

Chesapeake Biological Laboratory 13 

Classical Languages 14 

Commerce 14 

Education 15 

General 

Elementary ,^ 15 

Guidance )- 1 16 

History and Principles 16 

Methods and Curriculum in High School Subjects 18 

Home Economics Education 20 

Industrial Education 20 

Physical Education 20 

Special Education v 21 

English —1, 1 22 

History 23 

Home Economics 24 

Intersession Courses 21 

Mathematics 27 

Modern Languages 27 

Music 28 

Philosophy 28 

Physics 29 

Political Science 29 

Psychology 29 

Sociology 30 

Speech 32 

Zoology 32 

2 



BOARD OF REGENTS 

Term Expires 

^, . 1943 

Henry Holzappfel, Jr., Chairman 

Hagerstown, Washington County 

1948 
Rowland K. Adams, Vice-Chairman 

1808 Fairbank Road, Baltimore 

1947 
Mrs. John L. Whitehurst, Secretary 

4101 Greenway, Baltimore 

1944 
J. Milton Patterson, Treasurer 

1015 Argonne Drive, Baltimore 

1942 
W. Calvin Chesnut 

Roland Park, Baltimore 

1949 
William P. Cole, Jr 

Towson, Baltimore County 

1942 
John E. Semmes 

100 W. University Parkway, Baltimore 

1950 
Philip C. Turner 

Parkton, Baltimore County 



3 



OFFICERS OF INSTRUCTION 

George F. Aldrich, Ph.D., Instructor in Mathe- 

matics Mathematics 

Hayes Baker-Crothers, Ph.D., Professor of His- 

tory jj.g^^^y 

Catherine Barr, A.M., Acting Head, Department of 

Physical Education for Women Physical Education 

Harold Benjamin, Ph.D., Professor and Dean of 

the College of Education Education 

Victor W. Bennett, Ph.D., Associate Professor of 

Marketing Commerce 

Henry Brechbill, Ph.D., Associate Professor of 

Education Education 

Sumner 0. Burhoe, Ph.D., Assistant Professor of 

Zoology Zoology 

Leo F. Cain, Ph.D., Lecturer in Education Education 

Curry N. Caples, A.M., Instructor in Home Man- 

agement Home Economics 

Weston R. Clark, Ph.D., Assistant Professor of 

Psychology Psychology 

Lincoln H. Clark, Ph.D., Assistant Professor of 

Busmess Administration Commerce 

Franklin D. Cooley, Ph.D., Assistant Professor of 

English E^^ligj^ 

Hazel T. Craig, A.M., Instructor in Textiles Home Economics 

Hugh J. Creech, Ph.D., Assistant Professor of 

Chemistry Chemistry 

Vienna Curtiss, M.A., Assistant Professor of Art__Home Economics 
Tobias Dantzig, Ph.D., Professor of Mathematics__ Mathematics 
Linden S. Dodson, Ph.D., Assistant Professor of 

Sociology Sociology 

Florence Edwards, Graduate of Traphagen School 

of Art, Instructor in Art Home Economics 

Ray Ehrensberger, Ph. D., Professor of Speech Speech 

Charles G. Eichlin, M.S., Professor of Physics Physics 

Robert T. Fitzhugh, Ph.D., Assistant Professor of 

English English 

Ralph Gallington, A.M., Assistant Professor of 

Industrial Education Industrial Education 

Merrill C. Gay, Ph.D., Assistant Professor of Eco- 

nomics Commerce 

Wesley M. Gewehr, Ph.D., Professor of History History 

Charles B. Hale, Ph.D., Professor of English English 

Harold C. Hand, Ph.D., Professor of Education Education 

Susan E. Harman, Ph.D., Associate Professor of 

English E^gligjj 

L. INGEMAN HiGHBY, Ph.D., Associate Professor of 

Ancient Languages and Literature Classical Languages 

Bernard J. Holm, Ph.D., Instructor in History History 

John B. Holt, Ph.D., Associate Professor of So- 
ciology Sociology 

Pv'CHARD R. Hutcheson, A.m., Instructor in 

Speech Spg^^j^ 

4 



Carl S. Joslyn, Ph.D., Professor of Sociology Sociology 

Arnold E. Joyal, Ph.D., Professor of Educational 

Administration Education 

George J. Kabat, A.M., Instructor in Education Education 

Mary E. Kirkpatrick, M.S., Assistant Professor of 

Foods and Nutrition Home Economics 

Peter P. Lejins, PhD., Assistant Professor of So- 
ciology Sociology 

Henry M. Littlefield, Ph.D., Assistant Principal, 

Hamden High School, Connecticut Education 

Roberta Mack, B.S., Assistant Professor of Insti- 
tutional Management Home Economics 

John W. Macmillan, Ph.D., Instructor in Psy- 
chology Psychology 

Alpheus R. Marshall, Ph.D., Associate Professor 

of Economics Commerce 

Fritz Marti, Ph.D., Professor of Philosophy Philosophy 

Monroe H. Martin, Ph.D., Associate Professor of 

Mathematics Mathematics 

Frieda W. McFarland, A.M., Professor of Textiles, 

Clothing, and Art Home Economics 

Edna B. McNaughton, A.M., Professor of Home 

Economics Education Education 

John Michaelis, A.M., Instructor in Education Education 

Thyra F. Mitchell, A.M., Instructor in Textiles 

and Clothing Home Economics 

Hazel B. Murray, B.S., Instructor, Home Eco- 
nomics Home Economics 

Edwin N. Nilson, Ph.D., Instructor in Mathe- 
matics Mathematics 

Norman E. Phillips, Ph.D., Associate Professor of 

Zoology Zoology 

Gordon W. Prange, Ph.D., Assistant Professor of 

History History 

Harlan Randall, B. Mus., Assistant Professor of 

Music Music 

Clark D. Shaughnessy, A.B., Professor and Head, 

Department of Physical Education Physical Education 

Martha Sibley, Ph.D., Instructor, English Depart- 
ment, School of Education, New York Uni- 
versity Education 

Arthur Silver, A.M., Assistant Professor of His- 
tory History 

J. Marvin Sipe, Ed.D., Assistant Professor of Busi- 
ness Administration Commerce 

Kathleen M. Smith, Ed.M., Instructor in Educa- 
tion . Education 

Jesse W. Sprowls, Ph.D., Professor of Psychology Psychology 

Reuben G. Steinmeyer, Ph.D., Associate Professor 

of Political Science Political Science 

Harold W. Thatcher, Ph.D., Asistant Professor of 

History , History 

Harry R. Warfel, Ph.D., Professor of English English 

Floyd H. Warner, A.M., Instructor in Physical Ed- 
ucation Physical Education 

Claribel p. Welsh, A.M., Professor of Foods Home Economics 

Gladys A. Wiggin, A.M., Instructor in Education Education 

W. Gordon Zeeveld, Ph.D., Assistant Professor of 

English English 

5 



6 SUMMER SCHOOL 

GENERAL INFORMATION 

In view of the urgent need of the military services and the country generally 
for trained men and women, the University of Maryland has adopted an ac- 
celerated educational program designed to meet this need. Under the new plan, 
the University's academic year, which formerly consisted of two semesters of 
eighteen week? each, running from mid-September to early June, ha? been changed 
to a three-semester, all-year basis. The first semester under the new plan — the 
Summer Semester of 1942 — will begin on June 22, 1942, and run until October 2, 
1942. This 15 weeks semester will be divided into two terms. The first 7J^ weeks' 
term will constitute ^he "Summer Session" and, except that it will be somewhat 
longer, and will permit a normal load of 8 instead of 6 semester hour?, will be 
approximately equivalent in organization and program to past summer sessions. 

Intersession. A three-weeks intersession is being sponsored for the first time 
by the University of Maryland. Opportunity is provided in this session for teachers 
in service and for prospective teachers to work on courses of study or teaching 
units, or to become more thoroughly acquainted with curricula in their respective 
fields of interest. The intersession is organized into several workshops. (See 
Intersession courses, p. 21.) Students may sign up for one workshop only. Each 
carries three semester hours of credit. Advanced students regularly enrolled in 
the Universily may enroll only with the consent of the instructor ir. charge. 

Dates 

Summer Semester June 22 to October 2 

First Term (Summer Session) June 22 to August 12 

Intersession (3 weeks) August 13 to September 2 

^Second Term August 13 to October 2 

LOCATION 

The University is located at College Park, in Prince George's County, eight 
miles from Washington and thirty-two miles from Baltimore. College Park 
is a station on the B. & O. R. R. and on the City and Suburban Electric Railway. 
Local and inter-urban bus lines pass the University. 

This location combines the advantages of a university in a country environment 
with easy access to the cultural facilities to be found only in a great national 
capital. In the fields of music, art, and letters, as well as in the political, economic, 
social, and scientific areas, Washington is one of the world's truly primary cities. 
In the State of Maryland, moreover, may be observed a wide variety of agri- 
cultural, industrial, commercial, mining, fishing, and maritime activities of great 
significance in various departments of university study. 

TERMS OF ADMISSION 

Teachers and special students not seeking degrees are admitted to the courses 
of the Summer Session for which they are qualified. 

The admission requirements for those who desire to become candidates for 
degrees are the same as for other sessions of the University. Before registering, 
a candidate for a degree will be required to consult the Dean of the College in 
which he seeks a degree. 

Graduates of accredited normal schools with satisfactory normal school records 
may be admitted to advanced standing in the College of Education. The objectives 
of the individual student determine the exact amount of credit allowed. The 



UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND '^ 

student is given individual counsel and advice as to the best procedure for fulfilling 
the requirements for a degree. 

COURSE NUMBERS 

Courses are designated by "'^"'bers as follows^ sophomores 

Crnna I numbered 1 to 49— courses primarily lor iresnmen a 
?rouD II numbered 50 to 99-courses for juniors and ^mors 
G oup in numbered 100 to 199-courses for advanced undergraduates 

(well-qualified juniors and seniors) and graduates 
rrouD IV numbered 200 to 299-courses for graduates only 
Toltlrs will be used in connection with ^^^^^S:^^:^^^ 

semester. Courses d-'f'if ^^ ^.fJl^/.^^^^^^^ ,he''s" i S Parts must be . 
,,e unit eour-. and^oth the J (A-^ -^ Jl. ^ J^^^^ ^^^.^^^^^^ ^^ ^^^ 

S "I" ^n^^h^ numSare offered in the Summer Session only. 

SCHEDULE OF COURSES 

am A. M. ACADEMIC CREDIT 

Th. „n,es.« ho., is .h. «n.. o. .redi., .s m ■X-^'-^Zl SmeLt'wSta 
A „™ster credit hour I. o„. loM«,. o, ~'«T ' ""^ « ."k .« counted 

Teachers and other students not seeking degrees mil receive o^cia reports 

ance with the laws and regulations of the states concerned. 

STUDENT SCHEDULES 

The normal academic load is as follows : 

Summer Semester 1^ J^^^^^ 

T^-^U rv^r-ry. ^ hOUrS 

Either Term 

^ ^ . 3 hours 

Intersession 

r.( ^\.^ noan a student with good academic record may 
By special permission of the Uean, a sTuaeni witu & 

be permitted to carry one or two extra credits. 

REGISTRATION 
Friday «d S.tt„d.y, Ju.e »th .nd 20th, "i * "£'S«Su«. «* 

tion Building. 



8 



SUMMER SCHOOL 



Graduate students should report first to the Dean of the Graduate School, 
Room 214, Agricultural Building and receive registration materials. 

Instruction begins Monday, June 22, at 8 00 A. M. Late registration fee on 
June 22 is $3.00; thereafter, $5.00. 

Registration Procedure 

1. Dean's Office. Receive registration materials. 

2. Consult adviser or dean concerning your courses. 

Fill out registration record form in ink. 

Fill out three course cards, one for the dean, one for the registrar, and 

one for yourself. 
Fill out schedule cards and list section numbers on course card. BE 

SURE ALL COURSES CAN BE SCHEDULED. 
Fill out one class admission card for each course listed on the course 

card. 

3. Have all copies of course card approved by adviser and dean. 

4. Sectioning Committee. Arts and Science Building, Room A-16. Secure 
approval of department representatives tor all sectioned courses listed on 
course card, and secure final approval of Sectioning Committee. 

5. Bill Office. Room A-12. Receive bill and have laboratory and other fees 
added. 

6. Cashier. Room A-21. Pay bill. Receive receipt. 

Dining hall cards will be issued to boarding students. 

Post-office box numbers will be assigned to undergraduate students. 

7. Inspector and Collector. Room A-21. Cards will be checked; registration 
record form, registrar's copy ot course card, schedule card class admission 
cards, and yellow copy ot bill will be collected. 

SUMMER GRADUATE WORK 

Graduate work in the Summer Session may be counted as residence toward 
an advanced degree. A full year of residence is required for the Master's degree, 
the summer term counting in proportion to the amount ot credit carried. The 
maximum amount ot graduate credit for the seven and one-half weeks is eight 
hours. Normally three such summer terms will be required for the Master's 
degree although a fourth summer term may be required in order that a satisfactory 
thesis may be completed. 

In addition to the Master of Arts and Master of Science degrees, the degree ol 
Master of Education is offered for students in the field oi Education. Unless work 
is transferred, the latter will require four summer terms of attendance and 30 
semester hours of course work. This will include intensive seminar courses in 
which one or more seminar papers in the student's major field are required. 

Teachers and other graduate students working for a degree on the summer plan 
must matriculate in the Graduate School, meet the same requirements, and 
proceed in the same way as do students enrolled in the other sessions of the 
University. For those seeking the Master's degree as qualification for the State 
High School Principal's Certificate, approximately one-third of the course work 
should be "advanced study related to high school branches." 

In a number of departments courses are scheduled for a series of years, thus 
enabling students whose major or minor subjects are in these departments, to 
plan their work in orderly sequence. 



UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 9 

Full information in regard to general regulations governing graduate work 
may be had by writing to the Registrar for The Graduate School Announcements. 
The Qualifying written examination described in the Graduate Bulletin will be 
given twice a year: the first Saturday in December and the first Saturday in 
August. 

Those expecting to register as graduate students should bring with them tran- 
scripts of their undergraduate records. Graduate credit towards an advanced 
degree may be obtained only by students regularly matriculated m the Graduate 
School. 

Certain special regulations governing graduate work in Education on the 
Summer plan are made available to students at time of registration. Each grad- 
uate student in Education should have a copy. 

CANDIDATES FOR DEGREES 

Undergraduate students who expect to complete their requirements for bac- 
calaureate degrees during this summer session should make application for diplo- 
mas at the oflace of the Registrar. Diplomas will be issued early m the fall. 

EXPENSES 

Undergraduate Students 

Either Term Intersession Summer Semester 

(7H weeks) (3 weeks) (15 weeks) 

Fixed charges $36.25 $20.00 $72.50 . 

Fees* 9.25 4.00 19.00 

* Includes athletic fee, special fee, student activities, post office box, infirmary 
fee, and advisory and testing fee. 

District of Columbia 
residents $12.50 

Non-residents (other ^o ca 

states) 31.25 62.50 

Dining Hall 67.50 135.00 

All students are required to pay a matriculation fee of $5.00, payable on first 
entrance to the University. 

Graduate Students 

Instead of the fixed charges of $36.25, the expenses for a graduate student are: 

A matriculation fee of $10.00. ThL- fee is paid but once, upon admission to the 
Graduate School. 

For full load of 8 semester hours during one term, $30.00; for the Summer 
Semester, $50.00. 

For less than 5 semester hours, $6.00 per hour. 

A diploma fee ot $10.00. 

The non-resident fee does not apply to graduate students. 



10 SUMMER SCHOOL 

DORMITORY ACCOMMODATIONS 

Students will be accommodated in the University Dormitories up to the capaci- 
ties of the dormitories. The chaige for rooms is: 

„^ Semester Either Term Intersession 

Women 

Single Room $55.00 $30.00 $12.00 

Double Room 45.00 25.00 10.00 

Large Room for 3 38.00 20.00 9.00 

Men 

Single or Double 

Rooms $38.00— $55.00 $20.00— $30.00 

Rooms may be reserved in advance, but will not be held later than noon of 
Tuesday, June 23rd. As the number of rooms is limited, early application for 
reservation i.? advisable. Men should address applications to Mrs. Mary Beau- 
mont, Men's Dormitory Manager; women, to the Dean of Women. Requests 
for room reservations must be accompanied with a deposit of $15.00 for the full 
semester or $5.00 for either term or for the Intersession. (Please do not send cash.) 

Checks should be made payable to UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND. This 
fee will be deducted from charge for room when the student registers; if he fails 
to occupy the room, the fee will be forfeited, unless application for refund is 
received by Wednesday, June 10th. 

MEALS 

All students who live in University dormitories must board at the University 
Dining Hall. 

Students not living in the dormitories may make arrangements to board by 
the semester at the dining hall, or may get their meals in the University cafeteria 
or at eating establishments in College Park. A few "oflf-campus houses" provide 
board as well as room. 

REFUNDS 

In cases of withdrawal for illness or other unavoidable causes, refunds will be 
made as follows: 

For withdrawal within five days after registration full refund of fixed charges 
and fees, with a deduction of $5.00 to cover cost of registration will be made. Re- 
funds for board will be pro-rated. 

After five days, and up to two weeks, refunds on all charges will be pro-rated 
with the deduction of $5.00 for cost of registration. 

After two weeks refund on board only will be granted. 

Applications for refunds must be made to the registrar's office and approved by 
the Dean. No refund will be paid until the application form has been signed 
by the Dean and countersigned by the dormitory representative if the applicant 
rooms in a dormitory. 

STUDENT HEALTH 

The University Infirmary, located on the campus, in charge of the regular 
University physician and nurse, provides medical service of a routine nature for 
the students in the Summer Session. Students who are ill should report promptly 
to the University physician. Dr. Leonard Hays, either in person or by phone 
(Extension 326). 



UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND ^ 

LIBRARY FACILITIES 

The General Library at College Park, completed in 1931, is an f ractive, well 
PoSped Td well lighted structure. The main reading room on the second floor 
Its 236 an^^^^^^ 5,000 reference books and bound periodicals on open 

heSes Th't^^^^^^^ room is equipped with carrels and desks for the use of 

fdvaTcedsJ^dents. About 12,000 of the 100,000 volumes on ^he cam^^^^^^^ 
fn the Chemistry and Entomology departments, the Graduate School, and other 
units Over 900 periodicals are currently received. 

The University Library System is able to supplement its -f^-"- ^^'^^ 
by borrowing material from other libraries through Jf ^/T^^ "^ ^^es/ 
mbliofilm service, or by arranging for personal work m the L^b^'y <>f Congre-^ 
the United States Department of Agriculture Library, and other agencies m 

Washington. UNIVERSITY BOOKSTORE 

For the convenience ol students, the University maintains a students' supply 
store located In the basement of the Administration Building, where students 
may obtSn at reasonable prices textbooks, stationery, classroom materials and 

equipment, confectionery, etc. ^ , , , a o„r^ 

This store k operated on the basis of furnishing ^t^^^^^s needed books and sup- 
plies at as low a cost as practicable, and profits, if any. f « tu ned nto the general 
University treasury to be used for promoting general student welfare. 

Students are advised not to purchase any textbooks until they have been in- 
formed bTtheir instructors of the exact tests to be used in the various courses, as 
texts vary from year to year. 
The bookstore is operated on a cash basis and credit is not extended to students. 

RECREATION AND STUDENT SOCIAL COMMITTEE 

In cooperation with the Student Life Committee of the University, the Student 
SocLl CommUtee administers the special fund derived from the Recreational 
and Entertainment Fee. 

This committee is responsible for the promotion of social -'^d recreationa 
activities. A general reception, several dances and a ^-^*/ ° ,«.1°"P/^^^^^^^^^^^^ 
are planned. The Department of Physical Education and f ^tetics make av^aU 
able gymnasia, play fields, and tennis courts for general student recreation 
Eq^ipmrt for'games and individual activities is provided from the Re-e^^^^^^^ 
and Entertainment Fee. Each student is urged to avail himself of the social and 
recreational advantages offered during the Summer Session. 

SCHEDULE OF CLASSES 

1st period 8=00- ^=50 A. M. 

2nd period 9=00- 9:50 A. M. 

3rd period... 10:00-10:50 A. M. 

4th period 11:00-11:50 A. M. 

Lunch Hour 11=50 A. M.-12:50 P. M. 

5th period 12=50- 1:40 P. M. 

6th period 1=50- 2:40 P. M. 

7th period 2:50- 3:40 P. M. 

8th period 3:50- 5:00 P. M. 



!!^ 



*2 SUMMER SCHOOL 

DESCRIPTIONS OF COURSES 

ART 

tArt 4-Art in Classical Civilization (2). (Fifteen weeks) Two lectures 

•Art H-Medieval Art (3). (Fifteen weeks). Occasional field trips '^ ^^" 
An introduction to the figurative arts, and to the development of style. Euro- 

(Marti) 
BACTERIOLOGY 
Bact. 1— General Bacteriology (3). (Fifteen weeks). 

tw!w\'a^o?arrS. '"'"'"'"'' ^'^- ^'"'' '^ "^^''^^ ^'^ '-^"-^ «- 
A brief history of bacteriology; microscopy; bacteria and their relation to nature- 
morphobgy; class fication; metabolism; bacterial enzymes; applica Z to wat r,' 
milk, food, and soil; relation to the industries and to disease. Preparation of culture 
media; sterilization and disinfection; microscopic and macroscopic eLminaS)^ 
of bacteria; isolation cultivation, and identification of aerobic and anaerobic 
Lrbtt'rf S^l^^'^^' '"^^ ^'^^'"^''^^ ^^-*- microbiological examination's! 



UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 
CHESAPEAKE BIOLOGICAL LABORATORY 



13 



(Staff). 



Laboratory fee, $5.00. 

Bact. 5— Bacteriological Technic (2). (Fifteen weeks). 
Bact. 82— Bacteriological Problems (2). (Fifteen weeks). 
Bact. 92— Journal Club (1). (Fifteen weeks). 
Bact. 101— Milk Bacteriology (4). (Fifteen weeks). 
Bact. 102-Dairy Products Bacteriology (3). (Fifteen weeks). 
Bact. 125— Clinical Methods (2). (Fifteen weeks). 
Bact. 221— Bacterial Metabolism (2). (Fifteen weeks). 
Bact. 233— Seminar (2). (Fifteen weeks). 

CHEMISTRY 

Sat?rdT;.*'^^~^'^"^""'''' ^'^''"'' ^""""'"''^ (')• 'r^° '^•^'"'•^^ daily except 

istS*' AlfttTJ '^^ "^"-'"'f ^ •'"' '"■"^^'^''^"^ requirements in Organic Chem- 
TnZ'fi^ r /.u ""'^^T *=h«™^t^y *'" begin on June 8, 1942. and continue 

shc^^ld nVteThal Z T'^'. '"""" """"• ^'^""^^"^^ ^'^^ ^'-^ -<^h couise^ 
unHl ?hrK ! dormitories are not available to summer school students 

until the beginning of the regular summer session.) (Creech) 

Chem 8BS— Elementary Organic Laboratory (2-4). Two laboratories dailv 
Laboratory fee, $8.00 or $16.00. "or^ttorie. aaiiy. 

SfiTs'^^f ZT 'T 'T^'^ '^'' ' '*"'^"^* ^^"^ ^^ completed either half of course 
8Bfs of the regular academic year may take the course for half credit. The content 
of the course corres ponds exactly to that of Chem. 8Bfs. (Creech) 

^^*jStude„ts may register in this course for the first 7H weeks and receive 1% semester hours of 
t Students may register is this course for the first 7^ weeks and receive 1 semester hour of credit. 



This Laboratory is on Solomons Island, Maryland in the center of the Chesa- 
peake Bay country. Sponsored by the University of Maryland in co-operation 
with Washington College, Johns Hopkins University, Western Maryland College, 
and St. John's College, it affords a center for research and study where fact?" tend- 
ing toward a fuller appreciation of nature may be gathered and disseminated. 
The program projects a comprehensive survey of the biota of the marine, brackish 
and fresh water areas of the Chesapeake region. 

The Laboratory is open the year round. Courses are offered during the summer 
for advanced undergraduates and graduates. They cover a period of six weeks. 
Not more than two courses may be taken by a student. Classes are limited to 
eight matriculants. Students pursuing special research may establish residence for 
the summer or for the entire year. Laboratory facilities, boats of various types 
fully equipped (pumps, nets, dredges, and other apparatus), and water collecting 
devices are available for the work withouc co?t to the student. 

Zoology 

ZooL 102 cbl. Invertebrates (6). — Prerequisite, nine semester hours in biology. 
Dr. Meyer. 

Lectures, laboratory, and collecting trips to illustrate various significant 
modifications of invertebrate types, their structure, physiology, habits and classi- 
fication. A detailed study of the biology of selected types will be made, and as 
far as possible local forms will be used. Special emphasis will be placed on economi- 
cally important forms. 

ZooL 206 cbL Biological Problems. Credit to be arranged. Laboratory Staff. 

Prospective students should consult with their advisers or the dean of the 
graduate school in which they are matriculated for an advanced degree before 
making inquiry about this work. (Graduate) 

Botany 

Bot. 101 cbL Algae (3) — Prerequisite, nine semester hours in biology, including 
six hours in botany. Dr. Higinbotham. 

This course consists of lectures, laboratory, and field work dealing with the 
morphology, cytology, distribution and classification of the marine and fresh water 
algae of the Solomons Island region. The laboratory work will include a some- 
what detailed study of one or more representative types from each of the main 
groups, as well as briefer comparative examination and identification of related 
forms. In addition, an opportunity is offered to students to collect^ classify, and 
determine the ecological relationship of certain higher types of aquatic 
plants. 

Bot. 201 cbL Diatoms (3). — Prerequisite, nine semester hours of botany. Lec- 
tures, laboratory, and field trips. Mr. Conger. 

This course will consist of a comprehensive study of the diatoms, recent and 
fossil, collected in the region. Also, opportunity will be afforded to examine other 
than local forms. Special attention will be given to the hydrobiological and 
oceanographic bearing of diatoms as well as to the methods of their study, their 
morphology, and their economic importance. (Graduate) 

For further information about work at the Chesapeake Biological Laboratory, 
apply to Dr. R. V. Truitt, Director, College Park, Maryland. 



^^ SUMMER SCHOOL 

CLASSICAL LANGUAGES 

Gr'^ltl^^ZteT'"'''''- ^^^^^l^^)- Three lectures. Prerequisite, 

requ^Te ^"^i'ro^'I r'"""""'^'^- (P"*«- -eeks). Three lectures. Pr^ 
requisite, Latm 2fs or 4 entrance units; three units will admit well qualified stut 

*!:''!''".!u'~'^''*' "'■"'"""" Tacitus. Annals and the Germania (3) ^^If^ 
weeks). Three lectures. Prerequisite, 12 credits beyond SrnsT, Seqivder 

(Highby) 
COMMERCE 

Acct. 101-Advanced Accounting (5). (Fifteen weeks). 

Acct. 181-Specialized Accounting (5). (Fifteen weeks). 

Bus 1-Economic Geography (3). (First 7H weeks). Six lectures. 

A study of economic and physical factors which are responsible for the location 

Bus. 4--DeveIopme„t of Commerce and Industry (3). (Fifteen weeks). ^ 

Bus. 137-IndustriaI Management (3). (Fifteen weeks). 

Bus. 141-World Resources and Industries (3). (Fifteen weeks). 

Bus. 161-FundamentaIs of Cooperative Enterprise (3). (Fifteen weeks). 

Bus. 165— Business Law II (3). (Fifteen weeks). 

Econ. 31f-Prindples of Economics (3). (Fifteen weeks). 

Six irtiT^"""'"""'''' "' *^'="""'""' ^'^- (^'^^' ^'^ --''«)• (Also, 15 weeks). 

p^r cT^T^vEt*--- r- T '- "-^'^ ^° ^- - ~ 

Econ. 105-Economics of Consumption (3). (First 7y, weeks). Six lectures. 

consumer'Ll Trrr.'" °"'" ''''"•""" ^^^*^'"- ^" ^^'^^ ^^ demand for 
sumntrn r. . ^ "' consumer-consciousness and a technique of con- 
sumption. Cooperative and governmental agencies for consumers. SpeclafprX 

Econ. 130-Labor Economics (3). (Fifteen weeks). (Marshall) 

Econ. 151-Comparative Economic Systems (3). (Fifteen weeks). 

^^^Studenu may register in this course for the first m weeks and receive 1« semester hours of 



UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 



15 



Fin. 106 — Public Finance (3). (Fifteen weeks). 

Fin. Ill — Corporation Finance (3). (Fifteen weeks). 

Fin. 115 — Investments (3). (Fifteen weeks). 

Mkt. 101 — Marketing Principles (3). (Fifteen w«!eks). 

Mkt. 109 — Advertising Principles (3). (Fifteen weeks). 

Sec. If — Elementary Ofllce Techniques (2). (First 71^ weeks) (Also, 15 weeks). 
Four lectures and six hours laboratory each week. Fee, $7.50. 

Elements of stenography and typewriting for all students who have not passed 
qualifying examinations of Sec. 3fs. (Sipe) 

Sec. Is — Elementary OflSce Techniques (2). (Fifteen weeks). 

Sec. 3f — Intermediate Office Techniques (3). (Fifteen weeks). 

Stat. 15f — Business Statistics (3). (Fifteen weeks). 

EDUCATION 

Elementary Education 

Ed. 35S — Literature for Children in the Elementary School (2). (First 73^ weeks) 

This course makes a comprehensive survey of materials and methods in develop- 
ing appreciation of literature in the six grades of the elementary school. The 
topics which will be considered are: the various types of literature; selecting liter- 
ature on the basis of children's interest' — and maturity — levels; the purposes to 
be achieved through literature, and development ot literary taste. Folk stories 
and songs, classic myths, legends and hero tale?, literatuie from the Bible, in- 
formational material and the realistic story, poetry, and the modern fanciful tale 
form the content of the course. In addition to the instruction offered in the usual 
treatment of poetry, the materials and methods of choral speech will be con- 
sidered. (Sibley) 

Ed. 36S — Oral and Written Composition in the Elementary School (2). (First 
73^ weeks). 

This course deals with the teaching of language in the elementary school. Help 
in planning a series of graded language activities within a grade and within the 
scope of the elementary school is provided. The common language activities de- 
manded by life outside the school and demanded by representative courses of 
study in language will form the basis of the instruction. Special attention will be 
given to sentence building, paragraph construction, and correct usage. (Sibley) 

Ed. 37S— The Three R's in the Modern School (2). (First 7^ weeks). 

The purpose of this course is to make clear the fundamental importance of the 
three R's in the modern elementary school. Reading, writing, spelling, and arith- 
metic are treated as skills that are basic to the enriched curriculum of the typical 
school. Conversely, the enriched curriculum, rationally organized and interpreted, 
supplies the medium in which the three R*s can operate with meaning. The in- 
struction offered in this course provides the teachers with a knowledge of how to 
teach the necessary skills and how to apply these skills in vital situations. To add 
concreteness to the work, demonstration lessons are given by the instructor with 
children on various maturity levels. (Sibley) 

Ed. 140S — Recent Trends in Curriculum and Methods in the Elementary School 

(2). (First 73^ weeks). 

Emphasis in this course will be placed on recent trends in elementary education, 
newer instructional practices and classroom procedures, organization of learn- 



16 



SUMMER SCHOOL 



ing experiences, and modern techniques of evaluation. New methods and mater- 
ials will be critically evaluated. An opportunity for discussion and study of in- 
dividual problems will be given. (Michaelis) 

Ed. 141S — Administration and Supervision in the Elementary School (2). 
(First 73^ weeks). 

Problems, basic principles, and recent improvements in elementary school ad- 
ministration and supervision with emphasis on personnel services, classification 
and grouping of pupils, promotion and grading policies, socializing activities, re- 
ports to parents, attendance, community relations, types of school organization 
will be considered. For both prospective and in-service principals. (Michaelis) 

Guidance 

Ed. 114 — Guidance in Secondary Schools (2-3). (First 73^2 weeks). 

This course is primarily designed for the classroom teacher in terms of the 
day-by-day demands made upon him as a teacher in the guidance of the youth 
in his classes and in the extra-class activities which he sponsors. The stress through- 
out will be upon practical common-sense guidance procedures of demonstrated 
workability. A variety of practical use-materials helpful in the guidance of youth 
will be examined. (Hand) 

Ed. 294 — Counseling Techniques (2). (First 73^ weeks). Prerequisite, Ed. 114 
or equivalent. 

This course deals with the various specialized techniques, procedures, and 
materials utilized by guidance specialists in the schools. (Hand) 

Ed. 295— Occupational Information (2). (First l]^ weeks). Not given in 1942. 

This course is designed to give counselors, teachers of social studies, school 
librarians, as well as other workers in the field of guidance and education, a back- 
ground of educational and occupational information which is basic for counseling 
and teaching. The course involves a study of the existing sources of occupational 
information, an evaluation of books and pamphlets presenting occupational in- 
formation. Members of the class will make individual reports of occupations in 
order to learn desirable techniques of gathering and evaluating such information. 
Special emphasis will be placed upon methods of filing and preserving the in- 
formation acquired. 

History and Principles 

Ed. 2 — Introduction to Education (2). (Fifteen weeks). Required of freshmen 
in education and of students in other colleges desiring to elect a curriculum in 
education. Fee, $1.00. (Hand) 

Ed. 3 — Educational Forum (1). (Second 7 J^ weeks). Required of all sophomores 
in the College of Education. (Staff) 

Ed. 102 — History of Modern Education (2). (Second 73^ weeks). 

A survey of the history of education with emphasis upon the modern period in 
Europe. (Wiggin) 

Ed. 103— Theory of the Senior High School (2). (Second 73^2 weeks). 

The secondary school population, its nature and needs; the school as an instru- 
ment of society; relation of the secondary school to other schools; aims of secondary 
education; curriculum and methods in relation to aims; extra-curricular activities; 
guidance and placement; the school's opportunities for service to its community; 
teacher certification and employment in Maryland and the District of Columbia. 



17 

UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 

TM. course is somewhat more general than Ed. UO-Theory of the Junu,r 
"S'^or-Edueationa. Measurements (2). (First 7^ weeUs). Prereauisit.. 
consent of instructor. ^^r.Vi«ck uoon their construction and 

A study o, tea. .»d «»»»?""4!:'iSSr, ."Sic.. ~»"Pf. »" P- 

This course is a continuation of Ed. 107, with empn v (Benjamin) 

cational systems of the Western H™^^'^;- ^,,^). 

... no-Theory of the ^^^^^f^Z^^lL^ I the junior • 
This course is designed to give a ^ffl^^^ functions, and characteristics 

high school. It includes ^^^^^ ^^ ^^^l^^^r o^al^^^^ program of studies. 

of this school unit; a study o ^^^^ P"P"^^''°'^;,e'';tith their implication for pros- 
methods, staff; and other similar topic-., together witn ^^^^^^^ 

Dective teachers. , . 

"^Ed. n2-Educationai Sociology (2) (F rst ^ week )^ ^^ ^^^ 

This course deals with -^^ain consideratm^^^^^^ J -^^^ administrators, 

social sciences which are germane to the --^^'^"^^ ideology as the value 

Prominent among those treated are the « o"°« J^ ^^ j^ ^^a by population 
benchmark for all educationa endeavo ; educatmnaM P ^ .^^ .^ucational 
and technological trends; he d-^^^ut on of we ^^^ ^^^ consequent 

consequences; the we fare status o^ ^^f^^Uve character of the school in welfare 
demands made upon the ^^^^^^^^^'^X,, structuring; the socioeconomic 
terms and the educational imphcatlon oi ^m administrators, and 

composition and attitudes of school b- ^ ^f « S; se^ ^^^ ^^^^ ^, ^^^ 

teachers and the limiting «<?"ditions wh>ch the^ imp P ^^ ^^^ eommunity 
school; the problem of securing academic freedom in ^^.^^^^^ 

literature. , FHncation may offer this course in satis- 

Candidates for the degree of ^^f^f "^ f^jf^^^^ork in statistical methods or 

faction of the specific requirement for that degree oi ^^^.^^ 

tests and measurements. <5„„prvision of Secondary Schools 

Ed. 202-Organization. Administration, and Superyision 

(2). (First 7 H weeks). ^i vA 200— The Organization and 

^ Ths course is designed as a <:»'^\-"f !,°; "^.^tnlepei^^^^^^^^ It includes 
Administration of Public Education but n^ay be tak- - P ^^^^ ^^^.^ ^ 
what is called 'Hhternal" administration the organ schedule making. 

system; the Pe-nti'^'lSnsTntirsupe'^^^^^^ (J<>^^'> 

teacher selection, public relations, and =cnooi V ^^^^^_ 

Ed. 216-School Finance and Business ^d™'-'- ^oTU^^ and taxation; 

This course deals principally wich these topi^ ^tSfand equipment; 
federal and state aid and equalization, purchase of PP^ ^^ ^^^^ 
internal school accounting; and other selectea v ^^^^^j^ 

finance. 



18 

SUMMER SCHOOL 

Of the types of research in education ?». I u*"^'^'" ^^ «^«1 include a stud v 

utilize the student's research in DreDar«H u ^'^ "^"^'"S- The course wM 
especially for students who wXhX ^^^Te^rin'tf ''''''■ " '^' -^--nl 
*Ed. 220-Seminar in Secondary Educa io„ r^f ^^ -. (^ain) 

*Ed. 22e-Semi„ar in Adn,inisLtln ^7 t ^ "" '^ "^^'^^- ^^^-^^ 
*E<i. 228-Seminar in Special Edtr L ^ '' '^ "^^''^^- (Joyal 

*Ed. 234-Se.i„ar in CaTv eII ' T?' ' '" ^^^''^^- (^a' n 

'«<i. 238S-Se™inar in Edltn Id t^n !', w;"" ^^^''^^^ ^"^"^■^'"^"' 
School Administration and Defel " ^'' ^^-/^ weeks) 
The Science Curriculum and r>^ft^ ^'^"^^'^ 

The Eien^entary SchooTand Detr ^^^^*'''»> 

Guidance Problems and Defense ^ (Michaelis) 

Objectives in English in i-h^ ^-a 

i-tion of subject"i^'St';;„t;m::f''moT "' ''^'^ ^^'^'''"«= -'-«- and organ- 
tion of texts and references.SolZ "T''' ""'^ ^°"P needs; eSa- 

lessons; the use of auxiliary m^riK' so '"T''"^' "' P^°'=<«J"^« ^nd t^pe of 
periods of observation. '"' ''''^'°" P'^ns; measuring results. Twenty 

tEd. 122— Curriculum, Instruction nnrf r^u (Smith) 

Prerequisite, Psych. 55. (Fifteen weeks' ^"^^^^''o— Social Studies (3)- 

n;ethtfo?prrce^,~dr; -^ --^es; texts and bibliographies- 

P.an.me.urin,results. T^^L^^^i ZZ^rT"-' '"^^-'^'= ^ 

^^^-^^tS'Tt;.J::xr -' -~eience Jf-r 

a "Er/:S:^r;r^^^^^ of second, 

science classroom situation- se ection.^ ^' "^ Psychology and of teaching toTll 

* A ,e™w pape. ,0, the M Ed . nervation. (Brechbill) 

t Ed. 120, Ed. 122, and Ed 'rpfi ""^.^^ '"'^P*'""' '" "onnecHon with thk 
-va.on ro. 2 se^es^W^o/^VfLT "^ '^''^ '"^ «- 7>, „ee^*t;trtr20 pe.«u „, ^^ 



UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 



19 



Ed. 127S— Refresher Course for Secondary Teachers (2). (First 714 weeks). 

This course is designed as a "refresher" for ex-teachers who are returning to 
serve in the secondary schools during the War emergency. The individual needs 
of those who enroll will determine the major emphases in the course. If and as 
needed, help will be afforded with reference to recent trends in secondary school 
teaching, extra-curricular activities, and guidance; recent studies of the educa- 
tional needs of high school youth; recent developments in the psychology of 
teaching; recent developments in the subject fields of English, social studies, 
science, mathematics, foreign languages, home arts, industrial arts, etc.; modern 
methods of appraising, recording, and reporting pupils* progress in school; etc. 

(Hand) 

Ed. 129S— Geography in the High School (2). (First 7J^ weeks). 

Geography is becoming more and more important not only as a high school 
subject but in relation to all courses in the high school. This course will attempt 
to give students an understanding of geography and an ability to interpret geo- 
graphic current events. Methods of using current maps as teaching aids, map 
making, and map reading will be emphasized throughout. The socio-geographic 
approach will guide all study. (Kabat) 

tEd. 142 — Curriculum, Instruction, and Observation-Physical Education 
(3) — Prerequisite, Psych. 55. 

Materials and procedures in relation to program planning, physical 
examinations, records, grading, directed observation, reports, conferences 
and criticisms. Twenty periods of observation. (Barr) 

Ed. 216S— Student Activities in the High School (2). (First 7^ weeks). 

This course offers a serious consideration of the problems connected with the so- 
called "extra-curricular" activities of the present-day high school. Special con- 
sideration will be given to: (1) philosophical bases, (2) aims, (3) organizations, 
and (4) supervision of student activities such as student council, school publica- 
tions, musical organizations, dramatics, assemblies, and clubs. Present practices 
and current trends will be evaluated. (Littlefield) 

Ed. 218S — Seminar in Consumer Education (2). (First 73^ weeks). 

Consumer education is an answer to the demands for subject matter in the 
social sciences that has definite practical value. The general aim is to help develop 
a more intelligent consumer population. Problems considered are: (1) types of 
subject matter, (2) bibliographies, (3) materials, and (4) methods. Field trips 
to the government bureaus of: (1) Standards, (2) Food and Drug, and (3) Home 
Economics. This course is especially valuable to tieachers of social sciences, busi- 
ness subjects, and home economics, and to principals and administrators in- 
terested in introducing consumer problems into the curriculum as a separate 
course or as units within present subjects. (Littlefield) 

Ed. 237S — Curriculum Development in the Secondary School (2). (Second 
7}/2 weeks). 

This course is designed to assist admmistrators, supei visors, and teachers in 
planning a curriculum pattern appropriate to the needs of their respective com- 
munities. Trends operative in major curriculum development programs over the 
United States will be studied. Curriculum pattierns yielded by various approaches 
will be analyzed. New developments in the various broad field areas will be ex- 
plored. Methods ot initiating and installing a curriculum development program 
will be considered. (Hand) 



fEd. 142 may be taken the first 7}4 weeks without the 20 periods of observation for 2 semester 
hours of credit. 



20 



SUMMER SCHOOL 



Home Economics Education 

*H. E. Ed. 101 — Curriculum, Instruction, and Observation (3). (Fifteen weeks). 
Prerequisite, Psych. 55. 

Philosophy of homemaking education; community survey; analysis of character- 
istics, interests, and needs of the high school girl; constlruction ot a course of study; 
directed observations; use of various technics; selection of illustrative material; 
the home project. (McNaughton) 

*H. E. Ed. 102— Child Study (3). (Fifteen weeks). Prerequisite, Psych. 55. 

The study of child development in relation to the physicial, mental, and emo- 
tional phases of growth; adaptation of material to teaching of child care in high 
school; observation and participation in a nursery school. (McNaughton) 

Industrial Education 
Ind. Ed. 1 — Mechanical Drawing (2). (First 73^ weeks). Four periods. 

Fundamental practices m orthographic projection followed by auxiliary pro- 
jection, the drawing of threads and bolts, working drawings and isometric views. 
Sketching and the use of conventions are emphasized. Laboratory fee, $2.50. 

(Gallington) 

Ind. Ed. 21 — Mechanical Drawing (2). (Second 7J^ weeks). Four periods. 
Prerequisite, Ind. Ed. 1 or equivalent. 

A more advanced course dealing with working drawings, machine design, 
pattern layouts, tracing and blue-printing. Detail drawings followed by assemblies 
are presented. Laboratory fee, $2.50. (Gallington) 

Ind. Ed. 67— Cold Metal Work (2). (Second 7^ weeks). Four periods. 

This course is concerned with the development of knowledge and skills involved 
in the design and construction of projects trom band iron and other forms of mild 
steel. Laboratory fee, $2.50. (Gallington) 

Ind. Ed. 160 — Essentials of Design (2). (First 7]4, weeks). Four periods. 
Prerequisites, Ind. Ed. 1 or equivalent, plus approximately 8 semester hours of 
shop work. 

A study of the basic principles of design and practice in their application to 
the construction of high school shop projects. It presents knowledges and develops 
abilities in the art elements of line, mass, color, and design, and employs labor- 
atory activities in freehand and mechanical drawing, tracing, and blue-printing. 
Laboratory lee, $2.50. (Gallmgton) 

Ind. Ed. 164 — Shop Organization and Management (2). (First 1]/^ weeks). 
Four periods. Not given in 1942. 

This course recapitulates methods of organization and management for teach- 
ing shop subjects. It includes organization and management ol pupils; daily pro- 
grams; projects; pupfls' progress charts; selection, location, and care of tools, 
machines, equipment, and supplies; record? and reports; and good school house- 
keeping. Opportunity is provided for visits to industrial plants as a basis for more 
practical planning of shop instruction and management. 

Physical Education 
P. E. If — Physical Activities (Men) (1). (Fifteen weeks). 
P. E. 3f— Physical Activities (Men) (2). (Fifteen weeks). 



* Students may register in this course for the first 1]^ weeks and receive 2 semester hours of credit. 



UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 
P E ^-Physical ActWUies (Women) (K.)- (FiHeen weeUs). 

P. E. Sr-Athletics (Men) ^^^J^^;.:;''^.,^^ weeU.)- 
P F 8f-Phy8ical Activities (Women) (1). (*•" 

P. E. 11^1 — ATnieii^o V ^Fifteen weeks). 

No special unifoim is required. ^^^^^^^ 

p. E. 146— Teaching Health CI). V^ui^ 

Special Education 

(2^ (First 7H weeks). 
Ed. 180S-Introd«ction to SPecial EducaUonJ ^^ ^p^.i^uy for persor^ 

A survey of the entire field of social ^ducatjon^ / ^^^^^^^^^ principals 

state and commumty ^l^^f^^^,,,, vocational training, and ^J^ Pj^^ 
finding, identification, scnoP children. ^ 

mentally and physically ^^^^^icap^ g^„,,ti„„. p. 18. 
See also, Ed. 228-Seminar in Special «. 

Intersession 

f 1 ^th and end September 2nd. 
The following courses will begin on f «-* ^ * ;^^,:, .^eUs). 
Ed. 12lS-Elementary School Workshop (3)^ (Th ^^^^^ .^^.^.^^^^^^ 

An opportunity for teachers, P^^^^J' f ^iTproble"-- Discussions, Con- 
or! groups, to work on their ^;^^^]^^ l^Z^ ,>.oU.r^ will be planned. 

^^A individual counseling reiaxeu ^^x^-^al will be provided. 

VrrS'tJpi of teaching units and other source materiaWi P^^.^^^^^.^^ 

Ed. 123S-Secondary School '^^'^''''^''?^;,'^^^"^^^^ materials 

Development of courses of study »;, J'^^^'^trscienee. Individual or group 

f or S school classes in English, ^o^^^^*^ J^-,^,^, conferences with specialist^ 

l"rk on specific teaching proWenisgr-P^^^^^^^^ ^^^^^ ^„ ^ tC tttever 

JlTctl^nir LrrU^nTtbi. course should bring with the. 



22 



SUMMER SCHOOL 



text books, courses of study, and prepared units they may have in the field in 
which they wish to work. 

Section A — English (Smith) 

Section B — Social Studies (Kabat) 

Section C — Science (Brechbill) 

ENGLISH 

*Eng. If — Survey and Composition I (3). (Fifteen weeks). Three lectures*. 
Freshman year. Prerequisite, three units of high school English and successful 
passing of the qualifying examination given by the department, or successful 
completion of Eng. Af . Required of all four-year students. 

A study of style, syntax, spelling, and punctuation, combined with an historical 
study of English and American literature of the nineteenth and twentieth cen- 
turies. Written themes, book reviews, and exercises. Each semester of this course 
will be repeated m the following semester. (Staff) 

*Eng. 2 — Survey and Composition II (3). (Fifteen weeks). One general lecture 
given by various members of the department; two quiz sections. Prerequisite, 
Eng. Ifs. Required of all students in the College of Arts and Sciences. 

A continuation of work in composition based on t^e work accomplished in Eng. 
Ifs. An historical study of English Literature from the beginnings through the 
Romantic Age. Themes, book reports, conferences. (Staff) 

*Eng. 3 — Survey and Composition II (3). (Fifteen weeks). One lecture; two 
quiz sections. Prerequisite, Eng. 2. 

Continuation of Eng. 2. * (Staff) 

*Eng. 7 — Survey of American Literature (3). (Fifteen weeks). Three lectures. 
Prerequisite, Eng. Ifs. 

First semester, American thought and expression from 1607 to 1865, with em- 
phasis upon colonial cultural patterns, upon the rise of nationalism, and upon 
sectional conflict. Reports and term paper. (Wariel) 

Eng. 13 — Introduction to Narrative Literature (2). (First 73^ weeks). Four 
lectures. Prerequisite, Eng. Ifs. Not open to freshmen. 

An intensive study of representative stories, with lectures on the history and 
technique of the short story and of other narrative forms. (Harman) 

*Dram. 1 — Amateur Play Production (3). (Fifteen weeks). Admission by the 
permission of the instructor. Not given in 1942. 

A basic course tor lictle theatre workers and secondary school teachers of 
dramatics. Brief survey of the mechanics used in the theatre from early Greek 
tragedy to contemporary times. Plays of each major period studied with atten- 
tion to the method of creating theatrical effectiveness. 

Eng. 101 — History of the English Language (3). (First 73^ weeks). Six lectures. 

An historical survey of the English Language; ics nature, origin, and develop- 
ment, witji special stress upon structural and phonetic changes in English speech 
and upon the rules which govern modern usage. (Harman) 

*Eng. 107 — Renaissance Poetry and Prose (3). (Fifteen weeks). Three lectures. 
Prerequisites, Eng. 2, 3. 



* A student may register for this course and obtain 2 semester hours of credit during the first 7}-^ 
weeks. 



23 
UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 

. •,-:i tJio new national spirit 

A study of the literary manifestations of hum-- „, ^ore Lyly. 

X: .n-Ute.tu.e o. the Eighteenth Centu. .)■ (F.-n weei.)- Two 
-r se= -i in the period — ed hy Oefoe. Swift. A^- 

Steele, and Pope. ^^^^^^^ ^g, (3). (Fifteen weeks). Three 

*Eng. 113-Prose and Poetry 01 

lootures Prerequisite. Eng. '^, ^- Romantic movement in t.ng- 

*Fnir 127— Contemporary American roet 

^, i\f,irp^ Prerequisites, Eng. 7, ». (Warfel) 

Three lectures. rrer«4u literature since 1920. ^ 

TTmted States. , ^ • a '9 'K^ (Fifteen weeks). Two or 

Jli-r XHi:^-^^^^^^^^^^ '- '''' '''' 

o/e^ui^a Ssatisf actory to the instructor. .^ , 

SpLal studies oi problems or ^^^^^^^^^ of the class. (Hale 

The subject-matter of the course will vary ^^^^^ ^wo or 

ing 2nf-Semmar in the Victorian Penod 2-3^^.^^ ,f ,he instructor. 

^-^-/^^::^7 ^0:^1:11 vLorian Age. The subj^t 

HISTORY 

.. r^^ (Fifteen weeks). Two lectures; 
t w»«tprn CiviliMtion (3). (.rureeu 
H If— Survey of Western ^i»i 

one 'recitacion. ^ v» to the end of the Roman Empire to the 

From the decline of the Roman Empire to the (Prange-Holm) 

end of the Thirty Years' War. 

___-— t.r hours of credit duriag the first 
•^t.r for this course and obtain 2 semester hours 

* A student may register for tms ^ „/ weeks. 

^y, weeks. , .„„^,ter hour of credit tor the first 7^2 w depending upon 

** This course will carry 1 -«">^'f J^,^,^ hours of credit tor the first T.i wee 

t This course will carry one or two semes 
the student's election. 



24 

SUMMER SCHOOL 

"• '"-i— The American Revolution f3) (v.r., t,^ (Baker-Crothers) 

6. or equivalent. ^^^- (f^""! 71^ weeks). Prerequisites H 5 

E»nomlo and p.nae^, „ 

..„ , , o oulWral changes o( th. te, jfty y„„ 

Diplomatic problems from the R-.^.. .• 

^ - ^3,-.„... ,, ,, ,,^._ ^^^^^^^ ^^^ ^^^^^^^^ ^^^^^ ^^^^ 

»H « ' r""i' "'"' ^"-^ ™'*"-' developments 
H. 143— Europe Since 1914 C3) fp,ft„„ ^""enrs. (Holm) 

Political, economic social and f , '''"''^- '^'"•^^ '^'^t"'-^^- 
fim World War. ' ""^' ^"^ -'*"-' developments in the period after the 

•H. 172-History of the British Empire (3) (w;h ^^'^"8^) 

(Baker-Crothers) 
HOME ECONOMICS 

"-""•"^ ^^'*"-'- I"-'"- (I). (Fiiteen weeks). 

«. r.. 17055— Consumer Problems in ri^*k- 

!^!!::!^|^ati^^ teachers onT L'S:?;"^:^!^ ^'^^ ^"'■'^' ^^ -«'^«) 
w4t """"■" "^^ "-^Si'te^ for this course and obtain 9 



UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 



25 



The selection of household textiles and wearing apparel; the care required to 
prolong the lile of fabrics. Planning attractive and satisfactory clothing for the 
family on decreased budgets. (McFarland) 

Clothing 

H. E. IIA— Clothing (3). (Fifteen weeks). 

H. E. IIB— Clothing (3). (Fifteen weeks). 

*H. E. Ill — Advanced Clothing (3). (Filteen weeks). Three laboratories. 
Prerequisites, H. E. 11, 24, or equivalent. Laboratory fee, $3.00. 

Draping of garments in cloth on a dress form; stressing style, design, and 
suitability to the individual. (McFarland) 

H. E. 114 — Tailoring (2). (First 73^2 weeks — Four laboratpries). (Also 15 weeks 
— Two laboratories). Prerequisites, H. E. IIA or IIB, 15, 111, or equivalent. 
Laboratory fee, $2.50. 

Construction of tailored garments requiring professional skill. (Mitchell) 

Practical Art 

H. E. 21— Design (3). (Fifteen weeks). 

H. E. 24 — Costume Design (3). (First 73^ weeks — Six laboratories). (Also 15 
weeks — Three laboratpries). Prerequisites, H. E. 21, or equivalent. Laboratory 
fee, $2.00. 

Clothing selection with relation to personality. Adaption of changing fashions 
to the individual. Designing of costumes in mediums such as Conte and lithograph 
crayon, transparent and opaque water color, soft pencil, colored crayon, India 
ink, and three-dimensional materials. Survey of the fashion industry. (Edwards) 

H. E. 25 — Simple Crafts (2). (First 7^^ weeks). Four laboratories. Labor- 
atory fee, $2.00. 

Creative art expressed in clay modeling, plaster carving, metal working, paper 
mache modeling, wood burning, etc. Emphasis is laid upon inexpensive mater- 
ials and tools and simple techniques, which can be pursued in the home. (Craig) 

H. E. 121— Interior Design (3). (Fifteen weeks). 

H. E. 124 — Advanced Interior Design (2). (Fifteen weeks). 

H. E. 125 — Merchandise Display (2). (Fifteen weeks). 

H. E. 128 — Advanced Costume Design (2). (Fifteen weeks). 

H. E. 129— Radio in Retailing (3). (Fifteen weeks). 

H. E. 130 — Advanced Merchandise Display (2). (FiTteen weeks). 

*H. E. 160 — Individual Problems in Design (3). (Fifteen weeks). Three lec- 
tures. Prerequisites, H. E. 21, 24, 121, 122; H. E. 123, 124, or 127, 128 must 
precede or parallel this course. Laboratory fee, $2.00. (Curtiss) 

Home and Institution Management 

*H. E. 14 If — Management of the Home (3). (Fifteen weeks). Two lectures, 
one laboratory. 

The family and human relations; household organization and management; 
budgeting of time and money. Housing as a social problem; federal and civic 



* students may register in this course for the first 7}^ weeks and by doing required amount of 
extra work receive 2 semester hours of credit. 



26 



SUMMER SCHOOL 



housing projects; housing standards for the family; building and financing a 
home. Selection and care of household equipment and furnishings. (Caples) 

H. E. 143 — Practice in Management of the Home (3). (Fifteen weeks). 

*H. E. 147 — Institution Cookery (3). (Fifteen weeks). One lecture, two labor- 
atories. Prerequisites, H. E. 31ts, 131, 137. Laboratory fee, $7.00. 

Application of principles of food preparation to large quantity cookery; study 
of standard techniques; menu planning and costs; standardization of recipes; use 
of institutional equipment^ practice in cafeteria counter service. (Mack) 

**H. E. 148S— School Lunch (2). (Fifteen weeks). Two lectures, two labor- 
atories. Prerequisites, H. E. 31, 131, or equivalent. Laboratory fee, $3.50. 

Open to regular students. 

The educational and nutritional aspects ot the school lunch and its adminis- 
tration; equipment, finances and accounting; planning and preparation of menus. 

(Caples) 

Foods and Nutrition 

H. E. 30f— Introductory Food Study (3). (Fifteen weeks). 

H. E. 31f— Foods (3). (Fifteen weeks). 

H. E. 32f — Elements of Nutrition (3). (First 7J^ weeks). Six recitations. 

A study of normal nutritional needs; relation of food to health; planning of 
adequate dietaries tor adults. (Welsh) 

*H. E. 131— Nutrition (3). (Fifteen weeks). Prerequisites, H. E. 31fs, Chem. 12fs. 

A scientific study of principles of human nutrition. (Welsh) 

H. E. 133 — Demonstrations (2). (Fifteen weeks). 

H. E. 135 — Experimental Foods (3). (First 1]4 weeks). Three recitations; 
three laboratories. Prerequisites, H. E. 31fs, 137; Chem. 12Af, s. Laboratory 
fee, $7.00. 

A study of food preparation processes from experimental viewpoint. Practice 
in techniques. Open to Home Economics seniors and teachers. (Kirkpatrick) 

H. E. 137 — Food Buying and Meal Service (3). (Fifteen weeks). One recita- 
tion, two laboratories. Prerequisites, H. E. 31f, s. Laboratory fee, $7.00. 

Study of problems in food buying; planning and serving meals for the family 
group in relation to nutritional needs and cost. Includes simple entertaining. 

(Kirkpatrick and Murray) 

H. E. 204 — Reading in Nutrition (1-2). (Three weeks). Six recitation?. 

Reports and discussions of outstanding nutritional research and investigations. 

(Welsh) 
Work Shop in Home Economics — No credit. June 15-19, inclusive. 

A. Food Conservation. This will include a review of the proper preparation 
and reservation of food to insure conservation of our food products, planned 
particularly for those home economic? teachers who are working with the state 
nutrition program and for those who are to carry on the work in food preservation 
in each county as part of the Victory Garden program. 



27 
UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 

. r tion and it^ application to the planning and preparation 
B. Nutrition Information and its appuv. 

of low cost dietaries. workers public health nurses, 

This has been planned ^^^^:^l ^^^^ I^^il in allied fields. 

teachers who are not tramed m home econ ^^^^^^^ ^.j, ^^ ^.,,, 

A and B will be given concurrently. Some oi i 

to both groups at the same time. 



MATHEMATICS 



* students may re^rister in this course for the first IM weeks and by doing required amount of 
extra work receive 2 semester hours of credit. 

** Students may register in this course for the first 7,'^ weeks and by doing required amount of 
extra work receive 1 semester hour of credit. 



,, u • = ('>^ fFlrst 7H weeks). Four lectures. Pre 
Math. 130-Analytical Mechanics (2). (First ,,2 

requisite. Math. 23 fs-Calculus ^ ^^^^^ kinematics. 

Statics, equilibrium of a ^^^"^^l^fj^^t^.^;.. (Martin-Mnch) 

dynamics of a P-^-^^' f^f "^ "^trst^K^ weeks). Four lectures. Prere- 

Math. 141— Higher Algebra (2). (Ursi '/2 
quisite, Math. 23f. s-Calculus, or «^";~ ^ ^^,,^35,. ^mathematical in- 

tions; comples magnitudes. ^^^^^^ ^^^^ lectures. 

Math. 146-Solid Analytic Geometry (2). ^J^^ ./^,,^etry. or equivalent. 
Prerequisite, Math. 145-Advanced ^^'"^'^^l^ ^^, geometry; geometry 

General theory of quadric surfaces; the tv^isted cubic, ^^^^^^.^^ 

on a sphere; cubic and quartic surfaces. 

MODERN LANGUAGES 

• students the Modern Language Depart- 
As a special feature for summer session students the ^^^^^ ^^^^ 

ment o/ers •f^-^^.^:^:^::^^?.'.?^SL^ oUhe two periods of seven 
per week and carrying a full se"ie=ier gu^mer semester. 

Ld a half weeks, or a full year s ^^^^^ J^^JJ^^^^, ,,,1 have to be discontinued 
Owing to the change of Program the French " ^^^^^^ j^^ ^ degree in 

this summer. Teachers of French or o^^^^^^^ ^^ Department regarding 

languages are invited to wnte to tlieMc^derng^ 

rSrSrrirvra^ra hS weeks penod some of the courses l.ted 
in the General Catalogue. ^ ^^^^^^ 

V. it\ fFirst?'^ weeks). Six lectures. 
Fr. If-Elementary French ^^^•/"^'^''^^ Translation. Exerci.es in 

general catalogue. /First 7 H weeks). Six lectures. 

Fr. 3f-Second-Year French (3). ^^^'^ - comprehension. No extensive 

whom special provision will be made. 

B. German 
rq^ f First 71 ^i weeks). Six lectures. 
Ger. If-Elementary German (3). ^^"^^^"... and translation. This 

Elements of grammar -P^^^STthTge^^ll catalogue. (Staff) 
requisite, German Ifs or tha equivalent. 



28 



SUMMER SCHOOL 



Vi 



Span. ir-E,e„e„tar. Spanish (s'' (tsTzl w . . ''"'' 

. f^"«"t« «f grammar. compo,it on ™ '.^.'^^«''«)- Six lectures. 

-c^uisite. Spanish lioTj^S^ tj'''\ ''^ '^^*''«)- «- lectures Pr^ 
mar review; oral and writL pl^Jice "' "' "^"''"^^ ^'^^^^ -d wo^ gr!m: 

(Staff) 

Tu • o. MUSIC 

Music 3f— Chorus H/^ /i?w^ 

A w ^"^i^usc^). (Fifteen weeks). 

A. Women's Chorus 

B- Men's Glee Club 

Ther^cTrZei::;:,?- ^^'"-"-^^>- -ouriectures. 

pS^w Str L'^ gf '«f • Operatic^in^rtnTdiiSro/r "r ^^'^ 
cases the stu^enTZt^fZ'!' TfT "^°^'^"^ -""^^eaMt?^'::^ 
nstructor of the course and other sinLr 'T^' *° ^'^"'^^ ^^e recordings Th. 
the operas. "^"^^^ «'»gers will occasionally perform excerpt's from 

Music 7S-History of American Music (2) f P,>«, „ . (Randall) 

This course is designed to follow the of; ! ^ ''""'^'^- ^''"^ J^<=t"res. 

(Randall) 
Phil I p- ., PHILOSOPHY 

: "' ^-*^«ndamentals of Philosophy (S) (Vif, 
tPhil. llf-The Occidental Tr h! (^'^een weeks), 

consent of instructor. "'"' '^'^'""»" ^'^- (Fifteen weeks). Prerequisite 

to t£~ "-ou:::tr^^^ - — taught.' 

sc^ ^- — -tS an?r;i- r i-i — V- 

-?i S7urr^™'- '" ^^"--^^ (3). ,Pi,.e„ weeks). Prere'quisitrr 
^^^^^^eadi„gi„p,„.,,,^^ (-^^teen weeks). Prerequisite, consent 

we^te l^tS! ""^ ™«'»'«"o' this course and obtain 1 s. . u 

„ t S..en. „a. .e.s.. in .. eo.. .. ,, ^J ^ ^ ""' ^""^ ""^ "^ ^« 

- -en. „ay ..is. i„ .. _ ,„. ,, „„^ ^^ iii^rrrr ^""-^ °' 

receive 1 semester hour of credit. 



UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 



29 



Individual work for especially qualified students, under supervision and with 
tutorial advice. Regular written reports, and an essay. (Marti) 

PHYSICS 

Phys. IS — Introductory Physics (3). Not given in 1942. 

A study of the physical phenomena in mechanics, heat, and sound designed for 
students desiring a general survey of the field of physics. The lectures are sup- 
plemented with numerous experimental demonstrations. 

Phys. 2S — Introductory Physics (3). (First 732 weeks). Six lectures. Fee, 
$3.00. 

A study of the physical phenomena in electricity, magnetism, light, and modern 
physics, designed for students desiring a general survey of the field of physics. 
The lectures are supplemented with numerous experimental demonstrations. 

(Eichlin) 
POLITICAL SCIENCE 

*Pol.-Sci. 1 — American National Government (3). (Fifteen weeks). One lecture 
and two discussions. Open to freshmen. 

A study of tjie organization and functions of the national government of the 
United States. (Staff) 

*Poi. Sci. 4 — State and Local Government (3). (Fifteen weeks). One lecture 
and tXvo discussions. Prerequisite, Pol. Sci. 1. 

A study of the organization and functions of state and local government in 
the United States, with special emphasis upon the government of Maryland. 

(Staff) 

Pol. Sci. 10 — Comparative Government IV (2). (First 7 3^ weeks). Four 
lectures. 

A study of Far Eastern governments with special emphasis on China and Japan. 

(Steinmeyer) 
Pol. Sci. 105 — Recent Far Eastern Politics (3). (First 7}4 weeks). Six lectures. 

The background and mterpretation of recent political event? in the Far East 
and their influence on world pDlitics. (Steinmeyer) 

PSYCHOLOGY 

Psychological Testing Bureau. The staff of the Department of Psychology 
maintains a bureau of vocational and educational guidance on the basis of ade- 
quately standardized psychological tests. The services of the bureau are avail- 
able without charge to students. 

Psych. 1 — Introduction to Psychology (2). (Fifteen weeks). 

Psych. 55 — Educational Psychology (3). (First 73/2 weeks). Six meetings a 
week. Required of students in the College of Education. 

Experimental studies of basic psychological problems encountered in education; 
measurements and significance of individual differences, learning, motivation, trans- 
fer of training, etc. (Sprowls) 

*Psych. 115 — Detection and Treatment of Defects in Reading (3). (Fifteen 
weeks). Prerequisites, Psych. 1 and permission of the instructor. 

A survey of the psychological problems involved in the discovery and treat- 
ment of reading defects at college level. (Macmillan) 



* A student may register for this course during the first 7>^ weeks and obtain 2 semester hours of 
credit. 



30 

SUMMER SCHOOL 

Psych. 121_Soc.al Psychology rS) (V!h 
A psychological study of humL K u '^^^'^- ^'^'^^i^ite. Psych ] 

current social movements 

i'sych. 150— Psychological Tests anH itf (Sprowls) 

Two lectures; one laboratory. Prt uSl ^srcriar '^ ''\- ^^^^^'^ -eks)! 

Cnt,eal survey of psychological tests usJ '''™"''°" °^ •'^*^<=«on- 

industry w,th emphasis on methods by whch '" 7^*'°"^' ""entation and in 

'p ,1 "/ef p"' *'^ ""^'^'^^ If ititV^^'*^ ^^^ ^^"^n^^-- p-ti:: 

niissioroi L"7u!:r "^' ^^^' ^^'^*- -^s). Prere,ui.te. Psycr:*^ 
Psychological problems involved in th. 

^election, classification, measure^ of ahilit,, ![ : ^ •=°n-°'deration of personnel 
mg personnel efficiency and morale ^'"^' "''''"^' "' "^-^'^Pin^ and Sain 
Psych. 190-Techniques of Investigation in P .. . ^^lark) 

" 2^»-Part.c.patio„ i„ Testing Clinic (4-6)'\pi,l w:l5" "^'^' 

*^ , SOCIOLOGY 

&0C. 3— Introduction to Socioloffv ri^ ^p^^ 

""r 'jr^^itr ™ --S .ts'ii "^ *"'~ »' 

A study „l o,g.„ia,i„,| jh ™"^°t," : """* "' »M"'Mo,. "'"'■ 

»Soc 7I-S • , o *''^ P''^^^"* ^ar. 

* Students may reeistpr in ^u- (Lejins) 

y register m this course for the first 7y, weeks an^ • 

' """l ^""^ ^"^^^^^ 2 semester hours of credit. 



UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 



31 



*Soc. 103 — Rural Sociology (3). (Fifteen weeks). Two lectures; one discussion. 

The structure and functions of rural communities; the evolution of rural 
culture; rural institutions and their problems; the psychology of rural life; com- 
position and characteristics of the rural population; relation of rural life to the 
major social processes; the social aspects of rural planning. (Holt) 

*Soc. 106 — Regional Sociology (3). (Fifteen weeks). Two lectures; one dis- 
cussion. Prerequisite, consent of instructor. 

The meaning and implications of regionalism; differentiation of regions; types 
of regions in the United States; problems peculiar to these regions; metropolitan, 
cultural, and administrative regions; the impact of regionalism on social institu- 
tions; regional planning with emphasis on post-wai planning. (Dodson) 

*Soc. 107 — Ethnic Minority Groups (3). (Fifteen weeks). Two lectures; one 
discussion. Prerequisite, consent of instructor. 

Basic processes in the relations of ethnic groups. Immigrant groups in the 
United States; their cultural background; the causes of their migration; their 
adjustment to the new situation. The Negro in the United States. Ethnic minori- 
ties in Europ>e and the problems they present. A discussion of proposals for the 
solution of these problems in the light of past experiences and desiderata for the 
future. * (Lejins) 

Soc. 125 — Sociology of War (3). (First 7}^ weeks). Four lectures; two dis- 
cussions. 

The concept and typologies of war. Hypotheses concerning factors operative 
in bringing about wars. The influence of war on society. The military class; its 
role in war and its influence on social structure and processes. Technology and 
war. The modern concept of total war. (Lejins) 

*Soc. 141 — Techniques of Investigation in Sociology (3). (Fifteen weeks). 
Three periods of practice and discussion. Prerequisite, Soc. 3. Required of all 
sociology majors. 

A study of quantitative methods in sociology and actual practice in various 
methods of obtaining, analyzing, and interpreting data. (Holt) 

*Soc. 150 — Field Practice in Social Work (3). (Fifteen weeks). Prerequisite, 
Soc. 81 or consent of instructor. Enrollment restricted to available opportunities. 

Supervised field work of various types undertaken during the summer months 
and suited to the needs of the individual student. (Joslyn) 

*Soc. 201 — Seminar in Systematic Sociology (3). (Fifteen weeks). Three periods 
of discussion. 

A study of the structure of social action systems in relation to the structural 
requirements of the means-end fields, in which these systems operate. (Joslyn) 

*Soc. 216 — Sociology of the Family (3). (Fifteen weeks). Two lectures; one 
discussion. 

A study of selected recent researches in the sociology of the family. (Lejins) 

*Soc. 218 — Sociological Problems of Leadership (3). (Fifteen weeks). Two 
lectures; one discussion. 

An analysis of the leader-follower relationship, leadership defined; factors con- 
ditioning the leadership situation; leadership as a function of the group, the leader 
as an instrument of social control; methods of developing group support; the 
professional and lay leader; functions of the leader; types of leaders; morale as a 
function of leadership. (Dodson) 

*Soc. 222 — Recent Criminological Theories (3). (Fifteen weeks). Two lec- 
tures; one discussion. 



* Students may register in this course for the first 7)^ weeks and receive 2 semester hours of credit. 



32 



SUMMERJJSCHOOL 



Speech If P K.- o SPEECH (Staff) 

Speech 6— Advanced Or„i t L • ^^" (^'^een weeks). 

Speech 7-Adva" el S T^cSr ?"''"" ^'^^ ^^'^^-» --ks) 

^SpelTm^lVoT'r' ^'^- (Fifteen weeks). 

minor speech defects. The course t ^ '"?P'-°f'n^nt of voice and the treatment of 
lems that confront the teachr^h^rfSea^r ' Tr'' ''' « "-^ 

wui be a demonstration and practice clinic 

Zool 1 r„„ . ^ ZOOLOGY (Hutcheson) 

Z.OOI. I— General Zoology (A) rp,v„x -,^ ■^ 

IrVr ''^°''*°""' '"''^- (^'^''' 15 weeks). Pour 

' the "b^^pSctfesTS^^^^ P-etica, in its aim. It deals with 

ties, a knowledge of which L. valuaWe Tn f ' '*^"^*"^1 relationships, and ac«v^ 

cal sciences. Typical inverteSes i J .^"^^'"^'^^ ^" appreciation o the bblori- 

atory fee, $5.00. ''''^*"' ^"^^ ^ mammalian form are studied. lS- 

Zo^l f ~^""*'''»»entals of Zoology (4) rPift^.. , ^ (Burhoe) 

Zool. 4— Comparative Vertebrate mIu T ^° '^^*^^- 

Zoo . 8-,„vertebrate CZZyw'^'^m ^'^^ ^^"*^^" "-•^«)- 

, Zoo,. i^«™ pCoIgrif^r"^^ ^^^- (^'^^-n -eks). 
laboratories. Not open L SfhmS' ^^"^' '^ '^-'^«>- ^our lectures; two 

Zoo,. aoe-Resei' r-CrtditTo b""'"'' ^'^^ ^^'^*^«" --k«)- 
-^^L|>!^^oo,ogica, Se^^^irc?: TiSt wSSr ^^^'^^• 

^^^A student may register for this cou,^ and obtain 1- 

obtam m semester hours of credit for the nrst 7^ 



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^ SUMMERITSCHOOL 

Speech If PI.- o SPEECH (Staff) 

''pi^tcn ••— Public SDeakiiiff fi\ /u- <•. 

Speech Clinic -No credit /..r; ^ ^"'''" ^'^'^«>- 
Speech •» K..„,i . ('"'fteen weeks). 

Pticn _ l-unclamentals of Speech (1^ rl-n 
Speech .-{ Voice and l)ic<i„n A, n^, ' ^*^'"'''^" ^«*«'«)- 
Speech 4f Advanced Phi i^' ''* 'f^^en weeks). 

Speech , <,ra T ;;'„ cal K r:""!"' ^''- (^^'"f^-" --k<^) 
Speech 6 Advanced w t ^L"^ ^^^^ (™<^" ^^eek..). ^ 
«P'-h 7 ..vaiH-ld -lis «"«««; f )• (^^.•^tee„ weeks). 

^^^Zl^'Z^T '''■ ('^'•f'-n weeks). 

peech 107S -Teacher Problems in Sno^.h r-.^ .l- (Ehrensberger) 

be a (lemonstratron ar.d practice clinic 
Zool. 1 - General 7 . . ZOOLOGY (Hutcheson) 

l«-turos- UnrlT f "^^ ^"^^ (*''■•«' 7-.; weeks) Ml i- 
^"'ts, i„ur laboratories. " ^'^^^''s^ (Also, lo weeks). Pour 

7o«l'/ r!'""*'"""'"''''^"'' Zoology (4) fpift^n .^ (Burhoe) 

;«ool. 4-( omparaiive Verlebrafe \i V * " ''■''*'''^)- 

ft f-»"vertebra,e Mo h C> ' ) " ^ff ^'^^ ^""''''^'^ -«"<«)• 
Zool. 12 Animal Histolo^v rn m^I ^^ 'f^ee" ^veeks). 
Zool. I5f Humin in . ^ '■ ('•'f'^en weeks). 

, Zoo.. '6 H-r pS/Zfr^^^^^^^^ (Fifteen weeks). 

't:'^''\''"'"^'^^'>^'^t ^ '"' ''' '^^•"'^'- ^^o- . -tares; two 
An elementary conrs;^ ;,. r.i • . 

Zoo/. 7..r-Jonr:r,:b ,?-7;" :^^- ^^t"-*-.- fe«. ?5.0«. 
Zool. I03f Gener-.! A .' ^ '^'«*<*'' «eeks). 

Zool. ,0, (;;, H c (3)"";' ^^^'"'»«> (••''• (Fifteen weeks) 

Zool. 105 Aquic lltire ;3)^ fpT "''''"^- 
Zool. I-)! iv... . * '• (Fifteen weeks). 

-^"■if^^Zoologiea, Sen^ ar (n "Sr' ^'T'""' "*"'^^>- 

•"" ' ^' '"™«''^- '"•"« "f -«lit for the n„t 7.. 



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A — Arts and Sciences 

B — Music 

C— Calvert Hall 

D — Dairy 

E — Engineering 

F — Horticulture 



KEY TO BUILDINGS 

G — Gymnasium-Armory 
H — Home Economics 
K — Chemistry 
L — ^Library 
M— Morrill Hall 
N — Education 



P— Poultry 

T — Agriculture 

W— Women's Field House 

Z— Sylvester Hall 




MAIIYLAND & RAKE BOOK I 
UNIVXIiSITY OF MARYLAN 
COLLEGE PARK, MD. 




edulewith youwhen you register and keep it for use throughout the semester. 



UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 

College Park 

SCHEDULE OF CLASSES, SUMMER, 1942 



Registration for Undergraduate Students 



Time 



June 19 

freshmen and 

special students 



June 20 
juniors and 
seniors 



't 



r 



X" 



8:30 9:30 A. M 


A E 


A E 


9:30 10:30 A. M 


F K 


F K 


10:30 11:30 A. M 


I^R 


I^-R 


11:30 12:30 P. M 


S Z 


S Z 




SOPHOMORE 




1:30 2:30 P. M 


P z 




2:30 3:30 P. M 


H 




3:30 4:30 P. M 


A G 


• 



Registration for Graduate Students 

Graduate students register on June 19, from 8:30 A.M. until 4:30 P.M. and June 
20, from 8:30 A. M. until 12:00 noon, reporting first to the Dean's Office, Room T-214, 
Agricultural Building. 

Instruction begins Monday, June 22, at 8:00 A. M. 

Late registration fee on June 22, is $3.00; thereafter, $5.00. 

REGISTRATION PROCEDURE 

1. Dean's Office. Receive registration materials. 

2. Consult adviser or dean concerning your courses. 

Fill out registration record form in ink. 

Fill out three course cards, one for dean, one for registrar, and one for yourself. 

Fill out schedule cards and list section numbers on course card. Be sure all 

COURSES CAN BE SCHEDULED. 

Fill out one class admission card for each course listed on the course card. 

3. Have all copies of course card approved by adviser and dean. 

4. Sectioning Committee. Arts and Science Building, Room A-16. Secure approval 
of department representatives for all sectioned courses listed on course card, and 
secure final approval of Sectioning Committee. 







5. 
6. 



Bill OfficeV^Koom A-12. 



7. 



J 3 

Receive bill and have laboratory and other fees 

Cashier. Room A-21. Pay bill. Receive receipt. 

Dining hall cards will be issued to boarding students. 

Post-office box numbers will be assigned to students entering 
summer semester. 

Inspector and Collector. Room A-21. Cards will be checked; registration record 
form, registrar's copy of course card, schedule card, class admission cards, and 
yellow copy of bill will be collected. 




«# 



REGISTRATION HEADQUARTERS 

The offices of the registrar and cashier are located in the Administration Building. 
On June 19 and 20 these offices will function in the Arts and Science Building, Rooms 
A-12 and A-21. Deans will be in their regular offices. 

SCHEDULE CARD 

If a correct schedule card was not filed during registration, this must be done 
within one week after the beginning of instruction. A fee of one dollar is charged for 
failure to file this card in the office of the registrar within one week. 

CHANGES IN REGISTRATION 

Changes in registration may be made by obtaining a change in registration slip 
from your dean's office. This slip must be approved by your dean and filed in the office 
of the registrar. After one week, there is a fee of one dollar for every change in 
registration. If, for any reason, the instructor will not allow you to take a course for 
which you are registered, a change of registration slip must be filed in the office of 
the registrar. 

Students, who for adequate reasons desire to enter classes more than ten days late, 
must secure permission in writing from the instructor in charge. 

Credit cannot be obtained for courses for which you are not officially registered in 
the office of the registrar. Your failure to attend a course for which you are registered 
will result in your receiving a mark of failure in the course. 

Courses dropped after eight weeks (August 15, 1942) carry a grade of failure. 

WITHDRAWAL FROM THE UNIVERSITY 

If a student is compelled to leave the University at any time during the academic 
year, he must file a formal application for withdrawal, bearing the proper signatures, 
in the office of the registrar. If this is not done, the student will not be entitled, as a 
matter of course, to a certificate of honorable dismissal, and will forfeit his right to any 
refund to which he would otherwise be entitled. 



J$^ 



CHANGES IN COLLEGE 



To effect a change in college, secure the necessary form from the office of the 
registrar and have it signed by the deans concerned. The transfer is not official until 
the blank has been filed in the office of the registrar. 



A — Arts and Sciences 
B — Music 
C— Calvert Hall 
D — Dairy 
j)W — ^Dean of Women 
E — Engineering 



BUILDINGS 

F — H ort iculture 

G — Gymnasium- Armory 

H — Home Economics 

K — Chemistry 

L — Library 

M— Morrill Hall 

Trial Schedule 



N — Education 
P — Poultry 
T — Agriculture 
"W — Women's Field House 
Z—Sylvester Hall 



Period 


Time 


Monday 


Tuesday 


Wednesday 


Thursday 


Friday 


Saturday 


1 


8:00- 8:50 














2 


9:00- 9:50 














3 


10:00-10:50 














4 


11:00-11:50 














Lunch 


11:50-12:50 








■ 






5 


12:50- 1:40 














6 


1:50- 2:40 














7 


2:50- 3:40 














8 


3:50- 5:00 


PHYSICAL EDUCATION PROGRAM 





PLEASE PRESERVE THIS SCHEDULE AS YOU WILL NEED IT THROUGHOUT 

THE SEMESTER 



REFUNDS 

Prorated refunds for general fees and for board and lodging are allowed only in 
case of withdawal from the University within certain time limits. Consult the catalog 
for rules governing refunds. After July 27, prorated refunds are granted for board 
only. The date used in computing refunds is the date the application for withdrawal 
is filed in the office of the registrar. No laboratory fee refunds will be issued after 
July 1, 1942. 



CANDIDATES FOR DEGREES 

Every candidate for a degree must make formal application for a degree on a 
special form and file it in the office of the registrar at least three months prior to the 
date the candidate expects to complete his course of study. 



Full Semester Courses, Summer, 1942 



SECTION 



Symbol & 
Number 



Course 



BOTANY (Cont'd) 



Section 



Symbol & 
Number 



Course 



AGRICULTURE 



1 
2 



AE 1 Agr. Industry & Resources . . . 

AE 108 Farm Management 

AE 109 Research Problems 

REd 52 Farm Pract. & Demon 

*REd 91 Practice Teaching 

REd 110 Rural Life & Education 

*REd 112 Depart. Organ. & Admin 

*REd 114 Teach. Farm Mech. in Sec. Sch, 

AEngr 107 Farm Drainage 

Agron 2 Forage Crop Production 

♦Soils 102 Soil Management 

AH 2 Fund, of Animal Husbandry. . 

*DH IL Fund, of Dairying 

*DH 50 Dairy Cattle Management 

*DH 54 Adv. Dairy Cattle Judging. . . 

*DH 70 Dairy Plant Management. . . . 

*DH 72 Dairy Plant Experience 

*DH 114L Analysis of Dairy Prod 

DH 123 Meth. of Dairy Research 

*Ent IL Introductory Entomology. . . . 



*Ent SOL Insect Taxonomy , 

*Ent 103L Insect Pests 

*Ent 110 Special Problems 

*Ent 201 Advanced Entomology 

Ent 202 Research 

*Hort 2 General Horticulture 

Hort 3 Fruit Production 

Hort 9 Garden Flowers 

Hort 56 Landscape Ornamentals & 

Floriculture , 

Hort lllf . . . .Seminar , 

Hort 112 Special Problems , 

Hort 208 Adv. Hort. Research , 

PH 2 Poultry Management , 

PH 105 Egg Marketing Problems. . , 

PH 107 Poultry Ind. & Econ. Prob. 

PH 204 Seminar 

PH 205f Poultry Literature 

PH 206f Research 

*VS 107 Poultry Hygiene 



ART 



Credit 



Art 11 Medieval Art. 

BACTERIOLOGY 



1 

2 

la, b 



*Bact IL General Bacteriology. 



*Bact 5L Bacteriological Technique . . . . 

*Bact 80L Bacteriological Problems 

*Bact 90 Journal Club 

*Bact lOlL Milk Bacteriology 

*Bact 115L Serology 

*Bact 118 Systematic Bacteriology 

FTech 130f . . .Technology Conference 

*Bact 212L Adv. Food Bacteriology 

♦Bact 216 Advanced Serology 



BOTANY 

1 
2 
3 

4 



Bot IL General Botany 



*Bot 50 Plant Taxonomy 



3 
3 
1 
1 
4 
3 
1 
1 
2 
3 
3 
3 
3 
2 
1 
1 
2 
4 
1-3 
3 
3 
3 
3 



3 

2-3 

3 

2 

1 

2 
4-6 

3 

2 

2 

1 
1-4 



3 
3 
2 
2 
1 
4 
4 
2 
1 
3 
2 



4 
4 
4 
4 
3 



Time Scheduled 
Day and Period 



MF 1, M 5-6. . 

MWF2 

Arranged 

F 3-4 

Arranged 

MTS3 

T 1-2 

W4 

W3, W 5-6-7. . 
TTh 5, M 3-4.. 
MW 3, M 5-6 . . 
ThS 1-2, W 3-4 . 
TTh 4, F 2-3-4 . 

MF 5-6-7 

Arranged 

Arranged 

Arranged 

Arranged 

Arranged 

MW2, F 3-4. . 
MW2, W 5-6.. 

Arranged 

TTh 5, T 3-4. . 

Arranged 

Arranged 

Arranged 

TTh 3, M 5-6-7 
F 3, WF 5-6 .. . 
MW 2, Th 1-2 . 



F 3, F 5-6 

Th4 

Arranged 

Arranged 

TTh 4, F 5-6 . 

TTh 2 

TTh 3 

Arranged 

Arranged 

Arranged 

TTh 4. W 5-6 



MWF 5. 



T 1, TTh 3-4 

T 1, MF 5-6 

MW 3-4 

Arranged 

Arranged 

TTh 1, TTh .3-4... 
TTh 5, M W 5-6 .. . 

MF2 

Arranged 

Arranged 

Arranged 



MW 2, M W 3-4 . 
MW2, MW 5-6. 
MW2, TTh 1-2. 
MW2, TTh 3-4. 
T 5, TTh 3-4 .. . 



Lecture 
Room 



A140 
A140 



T112 



T112 
T112 
T112 
T112 
T219 
T218 



D311 
Barn 



DW106 
DW106 



M107 



F103 
F103 
F103 

F104 
F103 



P120 
P120 
P120 



PlOl 



A14 



A21 
A21 



T219 
PlOl 
T218 



Al 
Al 
Al 
Al 
T218 



Instructor 



1 



*Bot 204 Research 

♦PltPath 101 . . Diseases of Special Crops , 

*PltPath 205 . . Research 

*PltPhys 102 . . Plant Ecology 

*PltPhys 206 . . Research 



CHEMISTRY 



Ahalt 

Hamilton 

DeVault 

Ahalt 

Cotterman, Ahalt 

Cotterman, Ahalt 

Ahalt 

Carpenter 

Carpenter 

Woods 

Thomas 

Outhouse, Leinbach 

Berry, England 

Turk, Berry 

Turk 

Hughes 

England, Hughes 

England 

Staff 

Knight 

Knight 

Knight 

Knight 

Cory, Staff 

Cory 

Cory 

Shoemaker, Thurston 

Haut, Hitz 

Thurston 

Fossum, Amatt 

Haut 

Schrader, Thurston 

Mahoney, Schrader 

Quigley 

Jull 

Staff 

Staff 

Staff 

Staff 

DeVolt 



Marti 



Goldsmith 

Goldsmith 

James, Hansen 

Staff 

Hansen 

Hansen 

Faber 

James 

James 

James 

Faber 



Bamford, 

Assistants 



1 
2 
3 

4 (women) 

1 
2 
3 



Chem lAfL.. 



Chem IBfL, 



*Chem IsL. 



2 (women) 
3 



1 
2 

1 

2 



*Chem 

Chem 

♦Chem 

*Chem 

*Chem 

*Chem 

Chem 

Chem 

*Chem 

*Chem 



2fL 

3f L 

4L 

6fL 

8Af. ... 
8BfL... 
12Af. .. 
12BfL. 
102Af. . 
102BfL 



General Chemistry Lect. . . 

Laboratory 

Laboratory 

Laboratory 

Laboratory 

General Chemistry 

Laboratory 

Laboratory 

Laboratory 

General Chemistry 

Laboratory 

Laboratory 

Laboratory 

Qualitative Analysis 

Introductory Chemistry . . . 

Quantitative Analysis 

Quantitative Analysis 

Elem. Organic Chemistry . 
Organic Laboratory. 

of Organic Chem 

of Organic Lab 

Physical Chemistry 

Physical Chem. Lab 



Elem 
Elem 
Elem 



*Chem 103Af. .Elem. of Physical Chem. . 
*Chem 103BfL.Elem. of Phys. Chem. Lab. 



1 

2 



*Chem 

Chem 

Chem 

Chem 

*Chem 

Chem 

*Chem 

*Chem 

*Chem 

♦Chem 



116f.. 

117fL 

118fL 

205L . 

206L. 

207L. 

210L. 

224L. 

229. . 

231L. 



.Adv. Organic Chemistry. 
. Organic Laboratory 

Adv. Organic Laboratory 
. Organic Preparations . . . . 

Organic Microanalysis. . . 
. Organic Qualitative Anal. 

, Adv. Organic Lab 

. Special Problems 

Research in Chemistry. . . 
. Physical Chem. Lab 



CLASSICAL LANGUAGES 

♦Latin 2f Intermediate Latin 

♦Latin 61 Livy's History of Rome . 



M COMMERCE 



1 

2 



1 
2 



1 

o 



Acct 3 If Principles of Accounting. 



♦Acct 101 Advanced Accounting 

♦Acct 181 Specialized Accounting 

Bus 4 Development of Commerce 

and Industry 

♦Bus 137 Industrial Management 

♦Bus 141 World Resources & Industries 

♦Bus 161 Fund, of Coop. Enterprise. . . . 

♦Bus 165 Business Law 



Credit 



1 ♦Econ 31 . . . 
2 


. . . Principles of Economics 


3 .. 


4 ... 


KEngr) ♦Econ 37..! 

it 


. . . Fundamentals of Econ 



Brown 



♦Econ 130 Labor Economics 

*Econ 151 Comp. Econ. Systems 

Econ 171 Econ. Institutions & War. 

*Econ 190 Adv. Econ. Principles 



3 
3 



3 

3 

4 

4 

2 

2 

2 

1 

3 

2 

2 

2 

1 

1 

2 

2 

1 
2-4 

4 
2-6 
2-3 
2-4 



2 
2 



3 
3 



4 
4 
5 
5 
3 
3 
3 
3 
3 
3 
3 
3 
3 
3 
3 
3 
3 
3 
3 
3 
3 



Time Scheduled 
Day and Period 



Arranged 

MWF 1 

Arranged 

TTh 1,W 5-6-7 
Arranged 



TTh 4 or 5 

MF 2-3-4 

TTh. 1-2-3 

MW 5-6-7 

TTh 5-6-7 

WF 4 

MF 1-2-3 

TTh 1-2-3 

MW 5-6-7 

TTh 2 

MF 2-3-4 

TTh 5-6-7 

MW 5-6-7 

WF2, M 5-6-7..., 
TTh 3, W 5-6-7 . . 
TTh 2, MF 5-6-7 . 
TTh 3, MW 5-6-7. 

TTh 1 

Arranged 

TTh 3 

W 5-6-7 

MWF 1 

TTh 1-2-3 

F 5-6-7, S 2-3-4 . . . 

MW3 

M 5-6-7 

W 5-6-7 

TTh 5 

Arranged 

Arranged 

Arranged 

Arranged 

Arranged 

Arranged 

Arranged 

Arranged 

TTh 1-2-3 

F 5-6-7, S 2-3-4 . . . 



MWF 6. 
MWF 5 



MWF 1, T 1-2. 
MWF 2, Th 3-4 
MTWThF 5... 
MTWThF3... 

TThS 1 

TThS 2 

MWF 2 

MWF 2 

MWF 4 

MWF 1 

MWF 6 

MWF 1 

MWF 2 

TThS 1 

TThS 3 

MWF 1 

MWF 1 

MWF 4 

MWF 3 

MWF 4 

MWF 2 



Lecture 
Room 



T218 
T2i8 



Al 

K9 

K9 

K9 

K9 

Al 

K22 

K22 

K22 

Al 

KIO 

KIO 

KIO 

K307 

K307 

T219 

T219 

Al 



Al 



K307 
K208 
K208 
K307 
K208 
K208 
K307 



K298 
K208 



A244 
A244 



A243 

A243; A246 

A246 

A243 

A143 

A143 

A246 

E312 

A16 

A143 

A143 

A246 

E315 

A140 

A140 

A16 

Al 

A143 

DW106 

A140 

A143 



Instructor 



Bamford 
Woods 
Woods, Jehle 
Brown 
Appleman 



White 



White 



Westgate 



White 

Wiley 

Svirbely 

Svirbely 

Drake 

Drake 

Broughton 

Broughton 

Haring 

Oesper 

Oesper 

Oasper 

Oesper 

Oesper 

Drake 

Drake 

Drake 

Drake 

Drake 

Drake 

Drake 

Creech, Wiley 

Staff 

Oesper 

Oesper 



Banta 
Banta 



Wedeberg, Gottlieb 

Benton, Gottlieb 

Benton 

Wedeberg 

Wyckoff 

Gay 

Reid 

Gay 

Clark 

Shirley 

Shirley 

Gruchy 

Marshall 

Clark 

Clark 

Reid 

Costanzo 

Marshall 

Wyckoff 

Costanzo 

Gruchy 



L — Laboratory Course. 

f — First semester of year course. 

s — Second semester of year course. 



♦Courses Requiring Prerequisites. 
S — Special summer course. 



L — Laboratory Course. 

I First semester of year course. 

s Second semester of year course. 



♦Courses Requiring Prerequisites. 
S — Special summer course. 



6 



Section 



Symbol & 
Number 



Course 



COMMERCE (Cont'd) 



1 

2 



*Fin 106 Public Finance 

♦Fin 111 Corporation Finance. . . . 

♦Fin 115 Investments 

♦Mkt 101 Prin. of Marketing 

♦Mkt 109 Prin. of Advertising 

Sec IfL Elem. Office Techniques. 

Sec IsL Elem. Office Techniques. 

♦Sec 3fL Intermed. Office Tech. . . 

Stat 15f Business Statistics 



Credit 



COMPARATIVE LITERATURE 

CL 105 Romanticism in France 

CI. 107 The Faust Legend in English 

& German Literature .... 

EDUCATION 

Ed 2L Introduction to Education .... 

♦Ed 120 Cur., Instr., & Obser.-English . 

♦Ed 122 Cur., Instr., & Obser.-Soc. St.. 

♦Ed 126 Cur., Instr., & Obser .-Science . 

♦Ed 142 Cur., Instr., & Obser.-Phys. Ed. 

ENGINEERING 



♦ChE 103f Elem. of Chem. Engr. 

ChE 104f Chem. Engr. Seminar. 

♦ChE 105fL. . .Adv. Unit Operations. 



la, b 


2a, b 


3 


4 


la, b 


la, b 


2a, b 


8 


1 


2 


l(ChE) 


2(ME) 



♦ChE 108f Chemical Technology 

♦ChE 109f Chem. Engr. Thermodynamics 

♦ChE llOf Chem. Engr. Calculations 

♦ChE 11 If Explosives & Toxic Gases. . . . 

♦CE 52 Curves & Earthwork 

♦CE 101 Elem. of Highways 

♦CE 102f Concrete Design 

♦CE 103f Structural Design 

♦CE 104f Mimicipal Sanitation 

♦CE 106f Thesis 

Dr 1 Engineering Drawing 



♦Dr 2 Descriptive Geometry , 

♦Dr 3 Adv. Engr. Drawing. . 



Dr 4f Mechanical Drawing . 



♦EE If Direct-Current Theory, 

♦EE 51f Prin. of Elect. Engr 



1(ME) 

2(ME) 

3(CE) 

(EE) 



la, b 



1 
2 
1 



♦EE 52 Direct-Current Machinery . 

♦EE 53 Electricity & Magnetism . . 

♦EE 102f Alternating-Current Mach. 

♦EE 103f Radio Communication .... 

♦EE 105 Electric Railways 

♦EE 106f Thesis 

♦EE 107 Transmission Lines 

Engr 1 Introd. to Engineering. . . . 

♦Mech 50 Strength of Materials 



♦Mech 51 Strength of Materials. . , 

♦Mech 52 Materials of Engineering. 

♦ME 50 Prin. of Mech. Engr 

♦ME 51 Thermodynamics 

♦ME lOOf Thermodynamics , 

♦ME 101 Heating & Ventilation. . . 

♦ME 103f Thesis 

♦ME 104f Prime Movers 



♦ME 105f Mech. Engr. Design 



3 
3 
3 
3 
3 
2 
2 
3 
3 
3 



2 
2 



2 
3 
3 
3 
3 



3 
1 
5 

2 

2 

3 

2 

3 

3 

4 

4 

3 

1 

2 

2 

2 

2 

2 

2 

2 

2 

1 

1 

2 

4 

4 

3 

4 

5 

3 

3 

1 

3 

1 

5 

5 

6 

3 

2 

3 

3 

2 

3 

1 

4 

4 

4 



Time Scheduled 
Day and Period 



MWF4 

M WF 3 

M WF 1 

MWF 5 

TThS 3 

TTh 2, MWF 2 . . 
TTh3, MWF 3. . 
MWF 4, MWF 1 

TThS 2 

TThS4 



Lecture 
Room 



TTh 5 
TTh 3 



WF 7 

TWThF 6, arranged 
MTWTh 3, arranged 
MT WTh 6, arranged 
MTWTh 5, arranged 



MWF 3 

Th5 

MW 4, F 1-2-3-4-5- 

6-7 

TTh 1 

MW2 , 

MWF 3 

TTh 3 

TTh 4, F 5-6-7 ... 
WF 1, Th 2-3-4. . , 
MWF 2, T 1-2-3 . , 
MWF 3, M 5-6-7 . 
TTh 5, W 5-6-7 . . 

S 1-2-3 

TW 1-2-3 

W 2-3-4, Th 1-2-3 

ThS 1-2-3 

F 5-6-7, S 1-2-3 . . 

MW 5-6-7 

MW 5-6-7 

ThS 1-2-3 

MF 5-6-7 

W 5-6-7 

F 2-3-4 

TTh 5 

MWF 2, Th 2-3-4 
MWF 3, F 5-6-7 . 
TTh 5, W 5-6-7 . . 
MWF 3, M 5-6-7. 
MWF 4, TTh 2-3-4 
TTh 1, W 5-6-7 . . 

MWF 2 

S 1-2-3 

MWF 3 

T4 

MTWThF 1 

MTWThF 1 

MTWThF 1 

MWF 2 

T 2, Th 2-3-4 

M W 5, F 2-3-4 .... 

MThF 5 

TTh 5 

TTh 1, W 5-6-7. .. 

S 2-3-4 

MWF 3, Th 2-3-4 
MWF 4, Th 2-3-4 . 
WF 4, MF 5-6-7 . . 



A243 

A143 

E212 

A143 

A18 
A106; A302 
A143; A302 
A246; A302 

A246 

A140 



A207 
A210 



NlOl 
NlOl 
N106 
N106 
N105 



E121 
EllO 

EllO 
EllO 
EllO 
EllO 
E121 
E212 
E121 
E304 
E214 
E121 



Instructor 



E401; E115 
E403; E402 

E401 

E115 

E115; E109 

E402; E102 

E109; E404 

.E403 

E401 

E402 

E212 

E212 

E212 

E213 

E304 

E213 

E212 

E121 



E213 
T26 
E116 
E131 
E214 
E214 
E214 
E212 
E214 
E304; E305 
E121 
E236 
E305 
E212 
E214 



Gruchy 

Costanzo 

Wyckoff 

Bennett 

Bennett 

Sipe, Greenfield 

Sipe, Greenfield 

Sipe, Greenfield 

Shirley 

Shirley 



Wilcox 
Prahl 



Michaelis 

Smith 

Kabat 

BrechbiU 

Barr 



HuflF 
Huflf, Staff 

Machwart 

Mach wart 

Bonney 

Bonney 

HuflF 

Allen, Gohr 

SteinlDerg . 

Allen 

Allen 

Hall 

Steinberg, Staff 

Hogentogler, Dayton 

Hoshall, Hebrank 

Hogentogler 

Dayton 

Dayton, Gohr 

Hebrank, Pyle 

Frayer, Sherwood 

Hoshall 

Hogentogler 

Hebrank 

Corcoran 

Laning 

Creese, Laning 

Hodgins 

Laning 

Creese, Hodgins 

Davies 

Hodgins 

Corcoran, Staff 

Corcoran 

Steinberg 

Barton 

Younger 

Kurzweil 

Kurzweil 

Kurzweil 

Sh reeve 

Green 

Frayer, Sherwood 

Achenbach 

Younger, Staff 

Green 

Shreeve 

Barton 



L — Laboratory Course. 

f — First semester of year course, 

s — Second semester of year course. 



♦Courses Requiring Prerequisites. 
S — Special summer course. 



Section Symbol & 
I Number 


1 Course 


Credit 


Time Schedui-ed 
Day and Period 


Lecture 
Room 


Instructor 


ENGINI 
2 


BERING (Cont'd) 


4 
2 
3 

2 
2 
2 

2 
4 

3 
3 
3 
3 
3 
3 
3 
3 
3 
3 
3 
3 
3 
3 
3 

3 


WF3, MF5-6-7. . 

S 1, T 2-3-4 

MWF 2 


E306 
E121 
E116 
E213 


Sherwood 


♦ME 106f. .. 
♦ME107f. .. 

Shop 1 

♦Shop 2 


. Mechanical Laboratory 

. Airplane Structures 


Younger, Staff 

Younger 

Frayer 




. Forge Practice 


Th4 


1 


. . Machine Shop Practice 


M 5-6 


Hennick, 


2 


T 1-2 




Hebrank 


3 






T 3-4 






4 






W 5-6 






n 






Th 1-2 






6 






F 5-6 






7 






S 1-2 






8 






S 3-4 






1 
2 


♦Shop 3 


. Machine Shop Practice 


T 1 1 Laboratories 1 
T 2 } same as \ 
T 5 J Shop 2 [ 
W5. .. 


E18 
E116 
E214 
E213 
E213 
E213 
E131 
E131 
E131 
E131 

AllO; A133 
A17; A203 

A21 

AllO 

AllO 
A106; AllO 

AllO 
AllO; A133 
E121; A130 

A130 

A133 

A17 

A17 

A17 

A106 

A21 

A12 
A212 

A21 

A21 

A21 
H222 
A130 
A130 
A207 
A130 
A130 

A130 

A130 
A130 

A130 
A130 
A133 


Hoshall 
Hoshall 


3 






Hoshall 


1 


Shop 50 


. Foundry Practice 


Hoshall 


2 






W6 


Hoshall 


3 






W 7 


Hoshall 


1 


♦Surv 1 


. Elem. of Plane Surveying 


F 5-6-7 


Hoeentocrler 


2 


S 1-2-3 


Gohr 




♦Surv 2f 


. Plane Surveying 


F 2, Th 1-2-3 

TTh 5, MW 2-3-4 . 

MWF 1 


Pyle, Gohr 
Pyle, Gohr 

Staff 




♦Surv 100 

H 
♦Eng If 


. Advanced Surveying 


ENGLIS 

la, b 


. Survey and Composition 


2a, b 


MWF 2 




3 






MWF 3 . 




4 






MWF 4 . . 




5 






MWF 5 . 




6a, b 






MWF 6 




7 






MWF 7 




Sa, b 






TThS 1 




9a, b 






TThS 2 ... 




10 






TThS 3 




11 






TThS 4 . . 




1 


♦Engls 


. Survey and Composition 


TThS 1 


Staff 


2 


TThS 2 ... 




3 






TThS 3 




4 






MWF 5 






♦Eng 2 


.Survey and Composition 

Lecture 


T 5 


Staff 


1 




TTh 1 




2 








MF 2 




3 








TTh 2 




4 








MW 1 ... 






♦Eng 3 

♦Eng 4 


. Survey and Composition 

. Expository W^riting 


3 
2 
2 
2 
3 
3 
2 

3 

3 
3 

3 

2 

3 

1-3 
2-4 

2-3 
2 

3 


TThS 3 


Staff 


1 


MW 2 


Staff 


2 




TTh 4 .... 




3 






TTh 5 






♦Eng 7 

♦Eng 107 

♦Eng 111 

♦Eng 113 

♦Eng 118 

♦Eng 123 

♦Eng 127 

♦Eng 135 

♦Eng 141 

Eng 200 


. Survey of American Lit 

. Renaissance Poetry & Prose . . 
.Literature of 18th Century. . . 
. Prose & Poetry of the Roman- 
tic Age 


MWF 2 


Warfel 




MWF 1 


Zeeveld 




MW 3 


Fitzhugh 




MWF 2 


Hale 




.Modern & Contemporary 

British Poets 


MWF 5 


Murphy 
Fitzhueh 




. Modern Drama 


MWF 4 




.Contemporary American 

Poetry and Prose 

. Introd. to Creative Writing . . . 
.Major Amer. Prose Writers. . . 
. Seminar in Spec. Studies 


MWF 6 


Warfel 




TTh 1 


Bryan 




MWF 5 


Warfel 




Arranged 


Staff 




Eng 201 

♦Eng 210 

GY 

♦Geol 2 

lY 

Hlf 


. Research 


Arraneed 




Staff 




.Seminar in the Romantic 

Period 


Arranged 




Hale 


GEOLO( 


. Engineering Geology 


MW 2 


E131 
A21; A16 


Hess 


HISTOE 


.A Survey of Western Civili- 
zation Lecture 


MF 2 or TTh 1 . . . 


Prange, Holm 







6 



L — Laboratory Course. 

f — First semester of year course. 

s — Second semester of year course. 



♦Courses Requiring Prerequisites 
S — Special summer course. 



-1' 



Section 



Symbol & 
Number 



Course 



HISTORY (Cont'd) 



1 

2 
8 

4 



1 

2 



H3f. 
H5. 



History of England and Great 

Britain 

, American History 



Credit 



*H 108. 
*H 119. 
*H 139 

*H 143 
*H 172 
*H 181 



The U. S. in the 20th Century 
. Diplomatic Hist, of the U. S. 
.Europe in the 19th Century, 

1815-1914 • 

.Europe since 1914 

.Hist, of the British Empire. . 
.The Far East 



HOME ECONOMICS 



1 
2 



HE If Home Economics Lectures . 

HE 15L Textiles 

HE 21L Design 

*HE 24L Costume Design 

HE 30fL Introd. Foods Study 

*HE 31fL Foods 



*HE lllL Advanced Clothing 

*HE 114 Tailoring 

*HE 121L Interior Design 

♦HE 123 Adv. Interior Design 

*HE 125L Merchandise Display 

*HE 128L Adv. Costume Design 

*HE 129L Radio in Retailing 

*HE 130L Adv. Merchandise Display. . . 

*HE 131 Nutrition 

*HE 133L Demonstrations 

*HE 135L Experimental Foods 

*HE 137L Food Buying & Meal Service 

*HE 141 Management of the Home. . . . 

*HE 143L Practice in Management of the 

Home 

*HE 147 Institution Cookery 

*HE 160L Individual Problems in Design . 

*HE 161L IndividualProblems in Design 

HOME ECONOMICS EDUCATION 



*HEEd 101 
*HEEd 102 



Cur., Instr., & Obser. 
Child Study 



1 

2 



LIBRARY SCIENCE 

LS 1 Library Methods 

LS 2 Sources of Business Information 

MATHEMATICS 

♦Math 1 Introductory Algebra 

♦Math 2 Solid Geometry 



1 
2 
1 
2 



♦Math 3 Plane & Spherical Trig 

♦Math 4 Spherical Trig. & Navigation . 

♦Math 5 General Mathematics 



1 
2 

8 

la, b 

2 

♦Math 9 Elem. of College Math. 

la, b, c ♦Math 21 College Alg. & PI. Trig. 



♦Math 8 Elem. of College Math. 



2a, b 

la, b ♦Math 22 Analytic Geometry 

la, b, c ♦Math 23f Calculus 



3 
3 
3 
3 
2 

3 
3 
3 
3 



1 
3 
3 
3 
3 
3 
3 
3 
2 
3 
2 
2 
2 
3 
2 
3 
2 
4 
3 
3 

3 
3 
3 
3 



3 
3 



1 
1 
1 







0-2 


1-2-3 
3 
3 
3 
3 
3 
3 
3 
4 

4 
4 
4 



Time Scheduled 
Day and Period 



Lecture 
Room 



W2 
W3 

S 1. 
S2. 



MWF 4 
MWF2 
TThS2. 
MWF 3 
TTh4. . 



TThS 3 . 
MWF 1. 
MWF 2 
MWF 4 



T2 

MW3, F3-4. 

MWF 3-4 

TTh 5-6-7 

M 2, WF 1-2 . 
M 5, TTh 3-4 
M 5, MF 6-7 . 

MWF 3-4 

MW 1-2 

MW 7, F 6»7 . 

TTh 3-4 

TTh 1-2 

TTh 1-2 

MWF 4 

TTh 1-2 

TThS 3 

MW 3-4 
TWTh 5- 
F3, MW3-4 
TTh 1, F 5-6 



-6-7 



Arranged 

F 4, arranged 

Arranged 

Arranged 



TTh 4, arranged 
MWF 1 

T4 

M 4 

M 3 

MWF 1 

MWF 5 

TTh 1 

TTh 4 

MWF 2 

MWF 2 

MWF 5 

MWF 6 

TThS 2 

MWF 2 

MWF 7 

TThS 2 

MWF 1, T 1-2. 

MWF 5, Th 3-4 
TThS 1, T 3-4 . 
MWF 3, T 3-4 . 



A106 
A18 
A18 
A18 

A12 
A18 
A12 
A12 
A12 

A12 
A12 
A12 

A18 



H19 

H222 

H135 

H135 

H203 

H5 

H5 
H135 
H132 
H105 
H105 
H105 
H135 
A306 
H105 
H222 
H204 
H223 
H203 

H5 



H222 
H105 
H105 



H222 
H19 



A17 

A17 

A203 



E304 

E304 

E315 

E214 

E311 

E307 

E121 

E212 

E213 
E305; E306 

E214 

E212 
E305; E306; 

E307 
E305; E306 
E311; E312 
E314; E315; 

E307 



Instructor 



section 



Symbol & 
Number 



Course 



Credit 



Prange 
Prange 
Holm 
Holm 

Silver 

Gewehr 

Thatcher 

Gewehr 

Thatcher 

Holm 
Prange 
Silver 
Gewehr 



Mount 

Mitchell 

Edwards 

Edwards 

Murray 

Kirkpatrick 

Murray 

McFarland 

Mitchell 

Curtiss 

Curtiss 

Curtiss 

Edwards 

Curtiss 

Curtiss 

Welsh 

Welsh 

Kirkpatrick 

Kirkpatrick 

Caples 

Caples 
Mack 
Curtiss 
Curtiss 



McNaughton 
McNaughton 



Hintz 

Rovelstad 

Rovelstad 



MATHEMATICS (Cont'd) 
2a, b 



la, b 



♦Math 23s Calculus 

♦Math 64 DiflF. Equa. for Engineers. 

♦Math 140 .... Seminar 

Stat 14 Elements of Statistics . . . . 



MILITARY 



Ml If Basic R.O.T.C.— DrUl 



1 
2 
8 

4 
5 
6 

7 

8 

9 

10 

11 

12 

13 

14 

15 

16 

17 

18 

19 

20 

1 

2 

3 

4 

5 

6 

7- 

8 

9 

10 

11 

12 



MI 2f Basic R.O.T.C— Drill 



♦MI 50f Advanced R.O.T.C. 

♦MI 51f Advanced R.O.T.C. 



MODERN LANGUAGES 
French 



1 
2 



1 
2 



♦French If Elementary French, 



♦French Is 
♦French 2 . 
♦French 3f . 



. Elementary French , 

Elementary Conversation 

Intermediate Literary French, 



♦French 3s . . 
♦French 4 . . . 
♦French 5f . . . 
♦French Ss . . 
♦French 6 . . . 
French 53 . . 

♦French 59f . . 
♦French 60f . . 
*French 76 . . 
♦French 110. 
♦French 115. 
♦French 120f 



. Intermediate Literary French , 
. Intermediate Conversation . . . 
.Intermed. Scientific French. . , 

Intermed. Scientific French . . , 

. Grammar Review 

. The Development of the 

French Drama 

.French Phonetics 

.Intermed. Grammar & Comp. 

. Introd. to French Lit , 

, French Poetry in 19th Cent. . . 

French Thought in 20th Cent. 

Advanced Composition 



Germ 



an 



1 ♦German If Elementary German 

3 '.'.'.'.'.'.'.'.'.'.'.'.'.'..'.'.'..'.'.'.'.'.'.'.'.'..'.v. 
*German Is Elementary German. 



4 
4 
3 
2 
3 



3 
3 



3 
3 
3 
1 
3 
3 
3 
2 
3 
3 
3 

3 
1 
3 
3 
2 
2 
3 



3 
3 
3 
3 



Time ScheduleO 
Day and Period 



MWF 4, Th 1-2 
MWF 4, T 1-2.. 

MWF 4 

TTh 5 

MWF 2 



TTh 6-7 

Ml 

T 1 

Wl 

Th 1 

Fl 

M2 

T2 

W2 

Th2 

F2 

M3 

T 3 

W3 

Th 3 

F3 

M4 

W4 

F4 

T 5 

Th 5 

TTh 6-7 

T 1 

W 1 

Th 1 

Fl 

T2 

T3 

W3 

Th 3 

W4 

Th4 

F4 

T5 

Arranged, TTh 6-7 
Arranged, TTh 6-7. 



MWF 2 
MWF 3 
TThS 3 
M 6 . . 
MWF 5 
TThS 1 
TThS 2 
TTh 5. 
MWF 4 
TThS 4 
MWF 1 

MWF 3 

T4 .... 
MWF 2 
MWF 4 
TTh 2. 
TTh 1 . 
MWF 1 

MWF 2 
MWF 3 
TThS 1 
TThS 2 



Lecture 
Room 



E305; E306 

E304 
E307; E311 

E237 

E213 



Gym 
Gym 
Gym 
Gym 
Gym 
Gym 
Gym 
Gym 
Gym 
Gym 
Gym 
Gym 
Gym 
Gym 
Gym 
Gym 
Gym 
Gym 
Gym 
Gym 



Z13 
Z13 
Z13 
Z13 
Z13 
Z13 
Z13 
Z13 
Z13 
Z13 
Z13 
Z13 
C105E 
C-Basement 



A204 
A204 
A209 
A209 
A212 
A210 
A207 
A210 
A228 
A228 
A204 

A210 
A209 
A209 
A210 
A209 
A209 
A212 



A231 
A212 

A204 
A210 



Instructor 



Williams 



Ellis, Jones 



Quinn, Kelly 



Judd 
Griswold 



StaflF 

Staff 
Staff 
Staff 

Staff 
Staff 
Staff 
Staff 
Staff 

Kramer 

Wilcox 

Wilcox 

Falls 

Wilcox 

Liotard 

Falls 



Staff 



Staff 



L — Laboratory Course. 

f — First semester of year course. 

s — Second semester of year course. 



♦Courses Requiring Prerequisites. 
S — Special summer course. 



L — Laboratory Course. 

I— First semester of year course. 

s Second semester of year course. 



♦Courses Requiring Prerequisites. 
S — Special summer course. 



8 



Section 



Symbol & i 
Number I 



Course 



Credit 



MODERN LANGUAGES (Cont'd) 
German (Cont'd) 
1 *German 3f In termed. Literary German 



1 
2 



♦German 3s Intermed. Literary German . . . 

♦German 5f Intermed. Scientitic German . . 



♦German 5s Intermed. Scientific German. 

♦German 7 . . . . Military German 

♦German 51 . . . Advanced German 

♦German 59 . . . German Phonetics 

♦German 113. .Contemporary German Lit... 



Spanish 



1 
2 

8 
4 
1 
2 
1 
2 
S 



♦Span If Elementary Spanish 



♦Span Is. 
♦Span 3f . 



Elementary Spanish. 
.Second-Year Spanish. 



♦Span 3s . . 
♦Span 6 . . , 

Span 75 . . 

Span 102 . 

Span 125. 



Second-Year Spanish , 
, Grammar Review . . . 
Introd. to Span. Lit. . 

, Epic and Ballad 

. Lope de Vega 



MUSIC 



Mus 3a Women's Chorus 

Mus 3b Men's Glee Club . 

Mus 5 Harmony 

Mus 6 Survey of Opera . 



PHILOSOPHY 



♦Phil 1 Fundamentals of Philosophy , 

♦Phil llf The Occidental Tradition 

♦Phil 181 Proseminar in Philosophy . . . 

♦Phil 191 Reading in Philosophy 



PHYSICAL EDUCATION (MEN) 



1 
2 



PE If Physical Activities 



*PE 3f Physical Activities. 

PE 5f Athletics 

♦PE 15f Gymnastics 

♦PE 67f Gymnastics 

♦PE 113f Athletics 



PHYSICAL EDUCATION (WOMEN) 



1 
2 
8 

4 



PE 4f Physical Activities . 



♦PE 8f Physical Activities . 

PE 12f Athletics 

♦PE 114f Athletics 

♦PE 146 Teaching Health . . 



PHYSICS 



1 
2 
1 
2 



♦Phys IfL General Physics. 

♦Phys 2fL General Physics. 



Phys 3fL Introductory Physics. . 

♦Phys 105L .... Heat 

♦Phys 201 Atomic Structure \ or 

♦Phys 206 Nuclear Structure / 



L — Laboratory Course. 

f — First semester of year course. 

s — Second semester of year course. 



3 
3 
3 
3 
3 
3 
3 
3 
1 
3 



3 
3 
3 
3 
3 
3 
3 
3 
3 
3 
2 
3 
3 
3 



2 
2 



3 
3 
3 
2 



1 
1 
2 
2 
2 
2 
1 



1 
2 
1 
2 



4 
4 
5 
5 
3 
3 
3 
3 



Time Scheduled 
Dar and Period 



MWF3. 
MWF 6. 
MWF5. 
MWF 2 
MWF 4 
TThS 3 . 
MWF 6 
MWF 1 
Th 4... 
MWFl 

MWF 2 
MWF 3 
TThS 1 . 
TThS 2 , 
TThS 3 
MWF 4 
MWF 1 
MWF 4 
MWF 6 
MWF 1 
TTh 5. 
MWF 2 
MWF 3 
MWF 4 



Th 5, arranged . 
T 5, arranged . . 

TTh 4 

TTh 3 



Lecture 
Room 



MWF 3 . . 
MWF 4.. 
MWF 1 . . 
Arranged . 



TThS 3 . 
TThS 4 . 
MWF 2. 
TTh 2 . . 
MWF 3. 
MWF 5. 
M4 



M 2-3 (golf) 

S 1-2 (golf) 

TTh 1 (tennis) 

WF 2 (badminton, 

archery) 

Same as PE 4f . . . . 

MWF 1 

TTh 2 

WF7 



MWF 1, M 5-6 . . 
MWF 1, T3-4.... 
M WThF 4, W 5-6-7 
MWThF 4, F 5-6-7 

MWF 2 

TTh 2, arranged . . 

MWF 4 

MWF 4 



A231 
A212 
A207 
N106 
A106 
A14 
A204 
A209 
A209 
A210 



T219 
A140 
A228 
A231 
A231 
A231 
A17 
A133 
A228 
A228 
A212 
A210 
A209 
A209 



B 
B 
B 
B 



A17 

A247 

A247 



Gym 
Gym 
Gym 
Gym 
Gym 
Gym 
Gym 



W 
W 

w 



Instructor 



Section 



Symbol & 
Number 



Course 



Staff 

Staff 
Staff 

Staff 

Staff 

Kramer 

Banta 

Prahl 



Staff 

Staff 
Staff 



Staff 

Staff 

Darby 

Darby 

Darby 



Randall 
Randall 
Randall 
Randall 



Marti 
Marti 
Marti 
Marti 



Warner 
Warner 
Warner 
Warner 
Warner 
Warner 
Warner 



Staff 



POLITICAL SCIENCE 



PolSci 1 



.American National Govern- 
ment — Lecture 



1 
2 

3 
4 
5 



♦PolSci 4 . . . 
♦PolSci 51 . . 
♦PolSci 64 . . 
♦PolSci 124 
♦PolSci 131 



PSYCHOLOGY 

♦Psych 1 . . , 
♦Psych 115 . 

♦Psych 121 . 
♦Psych 150 . 
♦Psych 161 . 
♦Psych 190 . 

♦Psych 195 . 

Psych 250 

SOCIOLOGY 



, State & Local Government . 

. International Relations 

. Municipal Govt. & Admin. . 
. Legislatures & Legislation . . 
. Constitutional Law 



Credit 



. Introduction to Psychology . . . 

. Detection & Treatment of De- 
fects in Reading 

, Social Psychology 

. Psy. Tests & Measurements . . 

. Personnel 

. Techniques of Investigation in 
Psychology 

.Minor Problems in Psycho- 
technology 

. Participation in Testing Clinic . 



♦Soc 3 Introduction to Sociology 

♦Soc 51 Post- War Problems of Social 

Organization 

♦Soc 71 Social Pathology 

Soc 103 Rural Sociology 

♦Soc 106 Regional Sociology . 

♦Soc 141 Techniques of Investigation in 

Sociology 

♦Soc 150 Field Pract. in Soc. Work . . . . 

Soc 201 Seminar in Systematic Soc. . . . 

Soc 218 Soc. Prob. of Leadership 

Soc 250 Research in Sociology 



SPEECH 



w 




w 


Staff 


w 


Barr 


w 


Barr 


Gym 


English 


E18 


Smith 


E18 


Smith 


E18 


Eichlin, Smith 


E18 


Eichlin, Smith 


E18 


Eichlin, Myers 


E18 


Myers 


E23 


Myers 


E23 


Myers 



1 
2 


Speech If . . 


. . . Public Speaking 


3 






4 






5 






6 






7 






8 






9a, b, c 






10 






11a, b 






12 






13a, b 






14 






15a, b 






16 






17 






18 






19 






20 






1 


♦Speech Is . . 


Public SneakinGT 


2 




3 








♦Speech 3 . . . 
♦Speech 4f . ., 


. Voice and Diction 


la, b 
2 


. . .Adv. Public Speaking 


la, b 
2a. b 


♦Speech 5 . . . 


. . Oral Technical English 


a. b, c. 


d 





♦Speech 7f Adv. Oral Tech. English, 



3 
3 
3 
3 
3 



3 
3 
3 
3 



2-3 
4-6 



3 
3 
3 
3 

3 
3 
3 
3 



3 
2 
2 
2 
2 
2 



Time Scheduled 
Day and Period 



M 3 


WF 3 


TTh 1 


TTh 2 


TTh 3 


TTh 4 


MWF 4 


TThS 2 


MWF 4 


TThS 3 


MWF 1 


MWF 3 


MWF 1 


MWF 1 


MWF 4 


MWF 2 


MWF 3 



Arranged . 
Arranged . 



MWF 4. 



MWF 6.. 
MWF 5.. 
Arranged , 
MWF 4.. 



MWF 1 . . 
Arranged . 
Arranged . 
Arranged . 
Arranged . 



Ml... 

T 1 

W 1 

Th 1 . . . 

Fl 

M 2. . . 

W2 

F2 

M3... 

T3 

W3. . . 
Th 3... 

F3 

M 4 

W4. . . 
F4.... 

M 5 

W5... 
T 5... 
Th5... 

S2 

S3 

T 5... 
TThS 4 
TTh 2 . 
TTh 3. 
TTh 1 . 
TTh 2 . 
TTh 5 . 



M 1 



Lecture 
Room 



Al 


Staff 


A203 




A203 




A204 




A204 




A203 




A203 


Leath 


A203 


Kitchin 


A204 


Howard 


A203 


Bone 


A203 


Leath 



A14 

A103 
A14 
A103 
A14 

A103 



A14 

A210 
A210 



A212 
A242 



Instructor 



A3 10 

A14 

A140 

A14 

A21 

A300 

A300 

A300 
A16;A18;A300 

A212 
A246; A300 

A212 
A300; A130 

A300 
A300; A17 

A300 

A300 

A300 

A204 

A204 

A300 

A300 

A203 

A231 
A212; A14 

A300 

A300; A212 

A300; A18 

A300; A228; 

A231; A133 

A231 



Clark 

Macmillan 
Clark 
Thurston 
Clark 

Macmillian 



Macmillan 



Holt 

Joslyn 
Joslyn 
Holt 
Dodson 

Holt 

Joslyn 
Joslyn 
Dodson 
Staff 



Staff 



Staff 



Hutcheson 
Staff 

Steff 



Strausbau^h 



♦Courses Requiring Prerequisites. 
S — Special summer course. 



L — Laboratory Course. 

f — First semester of year course. 

s — Second semester of year course. 



♦Courses Requiring Prerequisites. 
S — Special summer course. 



10 



11 



Section 



Symbol & 
Number 



Course 



SPEECH (Cont'd) 



2 
3 



Speech 10 . . . .Oral Reading 

♦Speech lOlL .Introduction to Radio. 



ZOOLOGY 



1 
2 
3 
1 
2 
1 
2 



Zool IL General Zoology — Lecture. . . 



Zool2fL 



♦Zool 4L , 



, Fundamentals of Zoology 

, Comparative Vert. Morphology 



♦Zool 

♦Zool 

Zool 

♦Zool 

♦Zool 

♦Zool 

♦Zool 

Zool 

Zool 



8L. . . 

15fL.. 

75f... 

103fL. 

104... 

105L. 

121L. 

206L. 

207f.. 



.Invertebrate Morphology . . . . , 
.Human Anat. & Physiology. . 

. Journal Club 

.General Animal Physiology.. 

. Genetics 

. Aquiculture 

. Prin. of Animal Ecology 

. Research 

. Zoological Seminar 



Credit 



1 
1 
3 
3 



4 
4 
3 
3 
4 
4 
1 
3 
3 
3 
3 



Time Scheduled 
Day and Period 



M 3 

M 4 

TThS 4 . 
MWF3 



WF 2 

WF 3-4 

TTh 1-2 

TTh3-4 

MW 1, MW 5-6... 
MW 1, TTh 3-4... 
W 2, TTh 2-3-4 . . . 
W2, WF 5-6-7.... 

Arranged 

TTh 2, W 1-2, F 5-6 

Arranged 

MF2, W 5-6-7.... 

MWF4 

Arranged 

Arranged 

Arranged 

Arranged 



Lecture 
Room 



A246 

A21 

A300 

A306; A308 



M107 

M203 

M203 

M203 

M107; M302 

M107; M302 

A21; M202 

A21; M202 



M107; M105 



A106 
M107 



Instructor 



Half Semester Courses 

Offered First Half of Summer Semester Unless Otherwise Designated 



Strausbaugh 
Strausbaugh 
Provensen 

Ehrensberger 



Burhoe 



Tressler 

Tressler 

Hard 

Hard 

Truitt 

Phillips 

Staff 

Phillips 

Burhoe 

Truitt 

Tressler 

Staff 

Staflf 



Symbol & 
Number 



Course 



Credit 



L — Laboratory Course. 

f — First semester of year course. 

s — Second semester of year course. 



12 



*C lurses Requiring Prerequisites. 
S — Special summer course. 



. 



*K 



O 



Art 11 Medieval Art 

Bact IL General Bacteriology. 



Acct 3 If Accounting Principles . . 

Bus 1 Economic Geography . . 

Econ 37 Fundamentals of Econ. . 

Econ 105 Consumer Economics. . 

Sec IfL Elem. Office Technique. 



Chem 8AS Elem. Organic Chemistry 

Chem 8BSL . . Elem. Organic Lab 

Ed 35S Lit. for Children in Elem. School 

Ed 36S Oral & Written Composition in Elem. 

School 

Ed37S The Three R's in Mod. Sch 

Ed 105 Ed. Measurements 

Ed 110 Theory of Jr. High Sch 

Ed 112 Ed. Sociology, Introd 

Ed 114 Guidance in Secondary Schs 

Ed 118 Statistical Method 

Ed 120 Curr. Instr. & Observ. Eng 

Ed 122 Curr. Instr. & Observ. Soc. Stud 

Ed 126 Curr. Instr. & Observ. Science 

Ed 127S Refresher Course for Secondary Teachers 

Ed 129S Geography in High School 

Ed 138L Visual Education 

Ed 140S Recent Trends in Curr. & Method in 

Elem. Sch 

Ed 141S Admin. & Superv. in Elem. Sch 

Ed 142 Curr. Instr. & Observ. Phys. Ed 

Ed 180S Introd. to Spec. Ed 

Ed 202 Organ. Admin. & Superv. of Secondary 

Schools 

Ed 216S Student Act. in Hi. Sch 

Ed 217 Research Methods 

Ed 218S Seminar in Cons. Ed.. 

Ed 226 Seminar in Admin 

Ed 228 Seminar in Spec. Ed 

Ed 234 Seminar in Comp. Ed 

Ed 238S Seminar in Ed. & Defense 

Ed 294 Counseling Techniques 

Ed 295 Occupational Information 

Ed 299S Research Problems 

Ed 121S Elem. School Workshop 

Ed 123S Secondary Sch. Workshop 

°Ed 3 Educational Forum 

'Ed 102 History of Modern Ed 

'Ed 103 Theory of Sr. Hi. Sch 

"^Ed 108 Comparative Education 

'Ed 216 Sch. Fin. and Bus. Admin 

°Ed 220 Seminar in Secondary Ed 

°Ed 299 Research Problems 

*Eng 13 Introd. to Narrative Lit 

*Eng 101 Hist, of Eng. Language 

^H 6 American History 

*H 102 The American Revolution 

H 201 Seminar in American Hist 

*HE HAL Clothing 

*HE llBL Clothing 

HE 24L Costume Design 

HE 25L Simple Crafts 

HE 32 Elements of Nutrition 

*HE lUL Advanced Clothing 

*gg 114 Tailoring 

*HE 131 Nutrition 

HE 135L Experimental Foods 

*HE 137L Food Buying & Meal Serv 

HE 141 Management of the Home 



4 

4 
3 
3 
3 
2 

4 
4 
2 



2 
2 
2 
2 
2 
2-3 
2 
2 
2 
2 
2 
2 
2 

2 
2 
2 
2 

2 

2 

2 

2 

2 

2 

2 

2 

2 

2 
1-6 

2 
1-6 

1 
2 
2 
2 
2 
2 

1-6 
3 
3 
3 
3 
2 
3 
3 
3 
2 
3 
2 
2 
2 
3 
2 
2 



Time Scheduled 
Day and Period 



Lecture 
Room 



MWF 5 

MTWTh 4, MTW 

Th 1-2 

MTWThF 5-6 

MTWThFS 3 

MTW^ThFS 1 

MTWThFS 1 

TThS 4, Th 5, MW 

F 5-6 

Eight weeks' course 

8. Arranged . . 
MTWTh 2 



MTWTh 3. 
MTWTh 5. 
MTWTh 5. 
MTWTh 4. 
MTWTh 1 . 
MTWTh 2 . 
TWThF 5. 
TWThF6. 
MTWTh 3 . 
MTWTh 6 
MTWTh 1 . 
MTWTh 1 . 
MTWTh 7. 

TWThF 1 . 
TWThF 3 . 
MTWTh 5. 
TWThF 6. 



7. 
4. 
4 



6 
1 



TWThF 

TWThF 

TWThF 

TWThF 8 

TWThF 8 

TWThF 

TWThF 

MTWTh 9 

MTWTh 3 

MTWTh 2 

To be arranged .... 

Aug. 13-Sept. 2 All 

day 

TTh 1 

MTWTh 2 

TWThF 7 

MTWTh 6 

TWThF 8 

TTh7:30to9:10PM 

Arranged 

MTWThFS 2 

MTWThFS 3 

MTWThFS 2 

MTWThFS 3 

Arranged 

TThS 1-2-3-4 

TThS 1-2-3-4 

MTThF 5-6-7 

TTh 5-6-7 

MTWThFS 1 

MWF 3-4 

MWF 2-3-4 

TThS 3 

TWTh 5-6-7 

F 3, MW 3-4 

TTh 1, F5-6 



A14 

T219 
A243 
A106 
AL8 
A106 

A143; A302 
beginning June 

H5 

H5 
A16 
NlOl 
N106 
NlOl 
NlOl 
N106 
NlOl 
N106 
N106 
E213 
F103 
N106 

A231 
NlOl 
N105 
N105 

N105 
NlOl 
N105 
N105 
N106 
DW106 
N106 
N105 
N105 
F104 



N9 
N105 

NlOl 
NlOl 
NlOl 
NlOl 
N106 
N105 



A133 
A133 
Alio 
Alio 



H132 

H9 
H135 

H9 
H222 
HI 35 
H132 
H222 
H223 
H203 
H5 



Instructor 



Marti 

Faber 

Greenfield 

Gay 

Bennett 

Marshall 

Sipe 
Creech 
Creech 
Sibley 

Sibley 

Sibley 

Brechbill 

Kabat 

Hand 

Hand 

Cain 

Smith 

Kabat 

Brechbill 

Carley 

Kabat 

Brechbill 

Michaelis 
Michaelis 
Barr 

Littlefield 

• 

Joyal 

Littlefield 

Cain 

Littlefield 

Joyal 

Cain 

Benjamin 

Staff 

Hand 

Brown 

Staff 

Michaelis 

Smith, Kabat, 

Brechbill 
Hand 
W^iggin 
Joyal 
Benjamin 
Joyal 
Hand 
Staff 
Harman 
Harman 
Cr others 
Crothers 
Crothers 
Mitchell 
McFarland 
Edwards 
Craig 
Welsh 
McFarland 
Mitchell 
Welsh 
Kirkpatrick 
Kirkpatrick 
Caples 



*Courses Requiring Prerequisites. 

"Offered Second Half of Summer Semester. 

L — Laboratory Course. 



f — First semester of year course. 

S — Special summer course. 

s — Second semester of year course. 



13 



Symbol & 
Number 



Course 



*HE 147 Institution Cookery 

*HE 148 The School Lunch 

♦HE 160L Individual Prob. in Design. 

*HE 161L Individual Prob. in Design. 

*HE 170L Consumer Prob. in Textiles, 

♦HE 204 Readings in Nutrition 



HEEd 101. 

HEEd 102. 

Ind Ed IL. 

♦Ind Ed 160L 

Ind Ed 164.. 

*°Ind Ed 21L . 

°Ind Ed 67L. 



. . Curr. Instr. & Observ 

. . Child Study 

. Mechanical Drawing 

. Essentials of Design 

. Shop Organ. & Managemt. 

. Mechanical Drawing 

.Cold Metal Work 



LS 1 Library Methods. 



♦Math 130 
♦Math 141 . 
♦Math 146. 

*°Math 131 . 

♦°Math 142. 

♦°Math 156. 



Analytical Mechanics 

. Higher Algebra 

. Solid Analytic Geometry . . . 

. Analytical Mechanics 

. Higher Algebra 

. Introd. to Different. Geom. , 

Fren Is Elementary French 

♦Fren 3s Second Year French 

Ger Is Elementary German 

♦Ger 3s Second Year German 

Span Is Elementary Spanish 

*Span 3s Second Year Spanish 

♦Span 4 Intermed. Conversation . . . , 

Music 7s History of American Music. 

♦Phil llf The Occidental Tradition. . 

♦Phil 191 Readings in Philosophy. . . . 

PE 66 First Aid 

PE 11 OS Fundamentals in Dance. . . , 

♦PE 125s Recreational Dance , 



Phys SIL Introd. Physics 

♦Pol Sci 10 ... . Comparative Government . . 
♦Pol Sci ids. . .Recent Far Eastern Politics. 

♦Psych 55 Educational Psychology .... 

♦Psych 130 .... Mental Hygiene 



♦Soc 72 Criminology 

♦Soc 107 Ethnic Minority Groups 

Soc 125 Sociology of War 

Soc 216 Sociology of the Family 

Soc 222 Recent Criminolog. Theories. 

Speech 107S . . Teacher Prob. in Speech 

Zool IL General Zoology 



Zool 16L Human Physiology 



Credit 



2 
2 
2 
2 
3 
1 



3 

3 

2 

2 

2 

2 

2 

1 

2 

2 

2 

2 

2 

2 

3 

3 

3 

3 

3 

3 

2 

2 

IH 
1 
1 
2 
2 

3 
2 
3 
3 
3 

3 
3 
3 
3 
3 
3 
4 



Time Scheduled 
Day and Period 



F 4, arranged 

TTh 4-5, M W 1 . . . 

Arranged 

Arranged 

MTWTh6 

MTWThF2(Three 
weeks' course) 
June22-Jul. 11.. 

MTWTh 5 

MTWThF6 

MTThF 1-2 

MTThF 1-2 

MTWTh 3 

MTThF 1-2 

MTThF 3-4 

TTh 5 

MTWF 1 

MTWF 3 

MWF 2. Th3 

MTWFl 

MTWF 3 

MWF 2, Th3 



Lecture 
Room 



H222 
H203; H204 



1. 
2. 
3. 

4. 

5 

6 



MTWThFS 
MTWThFS 
MTWThFS 
MTWThFS 
MTWThFS 
MTWThFS 

MTWTh 1 

MTThF 6 

MWF 4 

Arranged 

TWThF4 

TWThF4 

TWThF 3 (Men & 

Women) 

MTWThF 5-6 

TWThF 3 

MTWThFS 2 

MTWThFS 4 

MTWThF 3 (Clinic 

W PM) 

MTWThFS 2 

Arranged 

MTWThFS 3 

Arranged 

Arranged 

MTWThFS 3 

MWThF 1, MWTh 

MTWTh 3, TTh 5^ 



H19 



H204 
H222 
H222 

N6 

N6 
F104 

N6 
A248 

A17 

E237 

E237 

E237 

E237 

E237 

E237 

E314 

E314 

E116 

E116 

A209 

A207 

A207 

B 

A247 

A247 

Gym 

W 

W 

E18 

A16 

A16 

A207 

A207 
A228 



A228 



Instructor 



A310 

DW106; M203 
M107; M105 



Mack 

Caples 

Curtiss 

Curtiss 

McFarland, Mitchell 



Welsh 

McNaughton 

McNaughton 

Gallington 

Gallington 

Brown 

Gallington 

Gallington 

Hintz 

Alrich 

Nilson 

Dantzig 

Martin 

Newell 

Jackson 

Staff 

Staff 

Staff 

Staff 

Staff 

Staff 

Darby 

Randall 

Marti 

Marti 

Warner 

Barr 

Barr 

Eichlin 

Steinmeyer 

Steinmeyer 

Sprowls 

Sprowls 

Lejins 

Lejins 

Lejins 

Lejins 

Lejins 

Hutcheson 

Burhoe 
Phillips 



♦Courses Requiring Prerequisites. 

* Offered Second Half of Summer Semester. 

L — Laboratory Course. 



f — First semester of year course, 
s — Second semester of year course. 
S — Special summer course. 



14