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Full text of "The Summer School"

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MA 






ITY of 






Volume 2 APRIL 10, 1949 Number 2 

SUMMER 
SESSION 

NUMBER 
1949 

UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 
College Park, Meryland 




Volume 2 



APRIL 10, 1949 



Number 2 



A UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND PUBLICATION 

ia published three times during April, twice during May, once in August, October, and 
December, and three times in January, February and March. 

Entered at the Post Office in College Park. Maryland, as second class mail matter 
under the Act of Congress of August 24, 1912. ""»>.>." 

Edited by Harvey L. Miller, Director of Publications, University of Maryland. 



BOARD OF REGENTS 

AND 

MARYLAND STATE BOARD OF AGRICULTURE Term 

Expires 
William P. Cole, Jr., Chairman, 100 West University Parkway, 

Baltimore 1949 

Stanford Z. Rothschild, Secretary, 109 East Redwood Street, 

Baltimore 1952 

J. Milton Patterson, Treasurer, 120 West Redwood Street, Balti- 
more 1953 

E. Paul Knotts, Denton, Caroline County 1954 

Peter W. Chichester, 103 West Second Street, Frederick, Md 1951 

Harry H. Nuttle, Denton, Caroline County 1950 

Philip C. Turner, 2 East North Avenue, Baltimore 1950 

Mrs. John L. Whitehurst, 4101 Greenway, Baltimore 1956 

Charles P. McCormick, McCormick & Company, Baltimore 1948 

Millard E, Tydings, Senate Office Building, Washington, D. C 1951 

Edward F. Holter, Middletown, Md. 1952 

Members of the Board are appointed by the Governor of the State for 
terms of nine years each, beginning the first Monday in June. 

The President of the University of Maryland is, by law, Executive Officer 
of the Board. 

The State Law provides that the Board of Regents of the University of 
Maryland shall constitute the Maryland State Board of Agriculture. 

A regular meeting of the Board is held the last Friday in each month, 
except during the months of July and August. 

GENERAL ADMINISTRATIVE BOARD 

President Byrd, Chairman 

Miss Preinkert, Secretary 

Dean Appleman Dean Eppley Miss Preinkert 

DR. Bamford Mr. Fogg Dean Pyle 

Dean Benjamin Col. Griswold Dean Robinson 

Mr. Benton Mr. Haszard Dean Smith 

Mr. Brigham Dean Howell Col. Stadtman 

Mr. Brown Dr. Huff Dean Staivip 

Dr. Brueckner Dr. Hoffsommer Dean Steinberg 

Dr. Bishop Dr. Kabat Dean Symons 

President Byrd Miss Kellar Mr. Weber 

Mr. Cobey Director Kemp Dr White 

Dr. Corbett Dr. Long Dean Wylie 

Dean Cotterman Dean Mount Dr. Zucker 

EDUCATIONAL COUNCIL 

The President. Dean of the Faculty, Chadrman, Deans of Colleges 
Heads of Educational Departments, Director of Admissions, Registrar 

I 



OFFICERS OF ADMINISTRATION 

H. C. Byrd, LL.D., D.Sc, President of the University 

H. F. COTTERMAN, Ph.D., Dean of the Faculty 

T. B. Symons, M.S., D.Agri., Director of Extension Service, Dean of Col- 
lege of Agriculture 

Leon P. Smith, Ph. D., Dean of Arts and Science 

J. Freeman Pyle, Ph.D., Dean of College of Business and Public Admin- 
istration. 

J. Ben Robinson, D.D.S., F.A.C.D., Dean of School of Dentistry 

Harold Benjamin, Ph.D., Dean of College of Education, Director of Sum- 
mer School 

S. S. Steinberg, B.E., C.E., Dean of College of Engineering 

C. O. Appleman, Ph.D., Dean of Graduate School 

M. Marie Mount, M.A., Dean of College of Home Economics 

Roger Howell, LL.B., Ph.D., Dean of School of Law 

H. Boyd Wylie, M.D., Dean of School of Medicine 

Florence M. Gipe, M.S., R.N., Superintendent of Nurses, Director of 
School of Nursing 

, Dean of School of Pharmacy 

G. J. Kabat, Ph.D., Director of College of Special and Continuation Studies 

W. B. Kemp, Ph.D., Director of the Agricultural Experiment Station 

W. J. Huff, Ph.D., D.Sci., Director of the Engineering Experiment Station 

R. B. CORBETT, Ph.D., Associate Dean of College of Agriculture and Associate 
Director of Extension Service 

Geary F. Eppley, M.S., Dean of Men 

Adele H. Stamp, M.A., Dean of Women 

James M. Tatum, B.S., Director of Athletics 

Harlan C. Griswold, Col., Inf., U. S. Army (Ret.), Acting Dean, College 
of Military Science, Physical Education and Recreation 

Claud E. Stadtman, Col., Inf., U. S. Army, Commandant R. O. T. C. 

Alma H. Preinkert, M.A., Registrar 

Edgar F. Long, Ph.D., Director of Admissions 

Charles L. Benton, M.S., C.P.A., Comptroller 

Howard Rovelstad, M.A., B.S.L.S., Acting Director of Libraries 

Harold A. Sayles, A.B., Assistant Superintendent of University Hospital 

Harry A. Bishop, M.D., Medical Director 

George W. Fogg, M.A., Director of Personnel 

George 0. Weber, B.S., Business Manager 

Frank K. Haszard, B.F.S., Director of Procurement and Supply 

FOR OTHER ADMINISTRATIVE OFFICERS, 

Faculty Committees and Library Staff, see back of book, 

pages V, VI, VII, VIII 

II 




m-M 



CALENDAR FOR 1949-50 
COLLEGE PARK 

First Semester 



1949 






Sept. 19-23 


Mon.-Fri. 


Registration, first 
semester 


Sept. 26 


Mon. 


Instruction begins 


Oct. 20 


Thurs. 


General Convocation 
for faculty and 
students 


Nov. 23 


Wed., after 


Thanksgiving recess 




last class 


begins 


Nov. 28 


Mon., 8 A.M. 


Thanksgiving recess 
ends 


Dec. 20 


Tues., after 
last class 


Xmas recess begrin. 



Tues., 8 A.M. Xmas recess ends 
Fri. Charter Day, Alumni 

Banquet 
Wed.-Wed., First semester ex- 
inc. aminations 



1919 



S M T W T F S 



.. ..|..|..|..| 11 2 
31 4| 5 6| 71 8| y 
10,llil2il3il-J 15|16 
17,lS,U">,2n;21|22|23 
2-125|2G,27i28i2a30 
31|..|..|..|..|..|.. 



AUGUST 



S M T W T K S 



■•I 1| 2| 3i 41 51 C 
7| S 9|10;11 I2I13 
1-1,15(16 17,18 ia|2Cl 
2122123 24125 26127 
2S,2t';30 31 . . . . . , 



SEPTEMBER 



S M T W T F S 



4 5 C 7 8 9 10 
11 12 13 14115 10 17 
18'19 20i2l|22l23 24 



S M T W T F S 



2 3 4 5 7 
VlOll 12 13 14 
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23;24i25:2G|27i2S 



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.|..l. 



NOVEMBER 



S M T W T F S 



C,\ 1 
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2i)|21 



11 21 31 41 5 

81 9110 ll|l2 

15 1G!i7 1811!) 

22!23l24252fi 



DECEMBER 



S M T W T P S 



4 5 6 
11 12!l3 
18 19'20 



II 21 3 

8 9il0 

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8|29!30i31 



iy.-)0 



ti M T W T F S 

11 21 3| 41 5| 01 7 
81 i<|10illll2il3|14 
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29 30 31 ....... . 



FEBRUARY 



S M T W T F S 



..|..|..| 11 2| 3| 4 
5 6 7 8 9iU' 11 
12113 14 15 1G1i7i18 
19,20 2122123124 25 
2G|27l28 . .|.. .. .. 



MARCH 



S M T W T F S 



..|..|..| 1 
5 6 7 8 
12131415 
19202122 
2Gl27i28|29 



21 3| 4 

9 10 11 

1G17 IS 

232425 

30]3l|. . 



S M T W T F S 



16 
23124 



11 12 
1819 



13 14115 
20 21|22 



S M T W T F S 



..] 1| 2 
71 8 9 
14 15 IG 
212223 
2S|29|30 



41 51 G 
I1I12I13 
18119120 
25|2G|27 



S M T W T F S 



. .|..|..|. .1 1| 21 3 
4 51 G 7| 81 9il0 

1112 i:;,u 1:. ir,ii7 

18|ly 20 2122 23124 
25 26 27. 2812;', 30!. . 



1950 



S M T W T F S 



1011 1213|l4 
17 1819|2021 



S M T W T F S 



II 21 3| 41 6 
8| 9110 11|12 



6 7 
13 14|15|16il7 
2021222324 
27128I293031 



18|19 
2520 



SEPTEMBER 



19.-. 1 



S M T W T F S 



21 31 4 
9|in]ii 

16 17 18 
23242 
30131 1. 



S M T W T F S 



11 12 
1819 
25^26 



••I ^ ^1 ^ 
7 8| 9 10 
14 15116 17 
212223|24 
28'.. ..1. . 



MARCH 



S M T W T F S ' S M T W T F S 

1| 2\ ..|..1..|..| 1| 21 3 
41 5| Gj 7| 81 9|l0 
ll'12|13114115il6|n 
18|19120121|22I23|24 
25126|27|28 29|30l31 
I I I I I I 

APRIL 



3 4 5| 6| 71 81 9 
10 11 12|l3 14 15 16 
17 18 19)20 21 22 23 
24|25l2C!27l28|29|30 



OCTOBER 



S M T W T F S 



8 9 
1616 



29130 
..I 



51 61 7 
121314 
19 20 21 
2627 28 



I.. I.. I. 



NOVEMBER 



S M T W T F S 



5 6 
1213 
19 20 

26|27, 



7 8 
14 15 
2122 



28|29|30 



31 4 
1011 
17 18 
24 25 



DECEMBER 



S M T W T F S 



..|..|..| 11 2 
5 G 7 8 9 
12)3141516 
19i20i2ll22l23 
25|26 27|28|29|30 



S M T W T F S 

11 21 31 41 51 6 
8 9|l0|n|l2|13 
15 16117 18 19120 

22 23 24 25 26127 



I.. I. 



.|..|..|..|..| 



S M T W T F S 



..|..| 1| -21 3| 4| B 
6| 7| 8| 9|1011111i 
13|14|15|16117|18|lt 
20l21|22|23l24|26|2( 
27l28| 2913l)131|..|.. 

JUNE 

S M T W T F S 



3 4 
10|ll 
17118 
24125 



5 6 
1213 
1920 
2627 



1| 2 
8| < 
15 1( 
222; 
29|3( 



Second Semester 



February 7-10 
February 13 
February 22 
March 25 
April 6 

April 11 
May 18 
May 30 
June 2-9 
June 4 
June 10 



June 24-26 
June 27 
August 4 

June 19-24 
August 7-12 
September 5- 



Registration, second semester 
Instruction begins 
Washington's Birthday, holiday 
Celebration, Maryland Day 
Easter recess begins 

Easter recess ends 
Military Day 
Memorial Day, holiday 
Second semester examinations 
Baccalaureate exercises 
Commencement exercises 



Tuesday-Friday 
Monday 
Wednesday 
Saturday 
Thursday, after 

last class 
Tuesday, 8 A. M. 
Thursday 
Tuesday 

Friday-Friday, inc. 
Sunday 
Saturday 

Summer Session, 1950 
Saturday-Monday Registration, summer session 

Tuesday Summer session begins 

Friday Summer session ends 

Short Courses 
Monday-Saturday Rural Women's Short Course 

Monday-Saturday 4-H Club Week 

Tuesday-Friday Firemen's Short Course 



IV 



[Pages V-VIII back of booh] 




T I O N 



SUMMER SCHOOL 

SESSION 

1949 



The provisions of this publication are not to be regarded as an irrevocable 
contract between the student and the University. The University reserves 
the right to change any provision or requirement at any time within the 
student's term of residence. The University further reserves the right at 
any time, to ask a student to withdraw when it considers such 
action to be in the best interests of the University. 




Education Building— Headquarters of the 
and Graduate School 



Summer Sossion 



UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 3 

SUMMER SESSION, 1949 — CALENDAR 

June 24, 25, Friday, Saturday — Registration, new graduate students. 
July 16, Saturday — Classes as usual. 

June 25, 27, Saturday morning, Monday— Registration, undergraduate stu- 
dents and matriculated graduate students. 
July 9, Saturday — Classes as usual. 
July 4, Monday — Holiday. 
August 5, Friday — Close of Summer Session. 

SUMMER SESSION FACULTY 

Harold Benjamin, Ph.D., Director 

Adams, Francis R., Jr., A.B., 1938, Williams College; M.A., 1947, Uni- 
versity of Maryland. Instructor in English. 

Ahalt, Arthur, M., B.S., 1931, University of Maryland; M.S., 1937, Penn- 
sylvania State College. Professor and Head of Agricultural Education. 

Alexander, Ruth, B.A., 1929, University of Texas; M.A., 1930, Columbia 
University. Assistant Professor of Physical Education. 

Anderson, George L., B.A., 1946, University of Pennsylvania; M.A., 1948, 
University of Pennsylvania. Instructor in English. 

Ash, Willard 0., B.A., 1937, St. John's College (Annapolis) ; M.A., 1941, 
University of Maryland. Instructor in Statistics. 

Bailey, William L., M.A., 1904; Queens College. Visiting Professor of 
Sociology. 

Baker, Oliver E., B.Sc, 1903, M.Sc, 1904, Heidelberg College (Ohio) ; 
M.A., 1905, Columbia University; Ph.D., 1921, University of Wiscon- 
sin; Hon. Ph.D., 1937, Gottengen, Germany; D.Sc, 1937, Heidelberg 
College (Ohio). Prof essor of Geography. 

Bamford, Ronald, B.S., 1924, University of Connecticut; M.S., 1926, Uni- 
versity of Vermont; Ph.D., 1931, Columbia University. Professor and 
Head, Department of Botany, and Acting Dean of Graduate School. 

Bates, James L., B.A., 1941, Wake Forest College; M.A., 1946, University 
of North Carolina. Instructor in History. 

Bauer, Richard H., Ph.B., 1924; M.A., 1928; Ph.D., 1935, University of 
Chicago. Associate Professor of History. 

Baylis, Charles A., A.B., 1923, A.M., 1924, University of Washington; 
Ph.D., 1926, Harvard University. Professor of Philosophy. 

Bender, Edward K., B.S., 1942, Pennsylvania State College. Assistant Pro- 
fessor of Horticulture. 

Benjamin, Harold, A.B., 1921, and A.M., 1924, University of Oregon; 
Ph.D., 1927, Stanford University. Professor of Education, Dean of 
College of Education, Director of Summer Session. 



4 SUMMER SESSION FACULTY 

Berry, Anne Johnson, A.B., 1931, and M.A., 1932, University of Pitts- 
burgh. Visiting Lecturer in Distributive Education. 

Blacklock, Josiaii a., B.S., 1940, M.Ed., 1948, University of Maryland. 
Supervising Principal of North Point Edgemere School, Baltimore 
County. Visiting Lecturer in Education. 

BOYER, Jean M., B.S., 1943, M.A., 1945, University of Maryland. Instructor 
in Mathematics. 

Bradley, Louise A., A.B., 1943, University of South Carolina; M. A., 1944, 
University of Wisconsin. Instructor in English. 

Brechbill, Henry, A.B., 1911, Blue Ridge College; A.M., 1917, University 
of Pittsburgh; Ph.D., 1933, George Washington University. Professor 
of Education and Assistant Dean of College of Education. 

Brigham, Nelson A., B.S., 1937, M.S., 1938, Rutgers University; Ph.D., 
1938, University of Pennsylvania. Assistant Professor of Mathematics, 

Broome, Eleanor, A.B., University of Maryland; Merrill-Palmer School. 
Instructor, Nursery School. 

Brown, Glen D., A.B., 1916, Indiana State Teachers' College; A.M., 1931, 
University of Indiana. Professor and Head of Department of 
Industrial Education. 

Brown, Russell G., B.S., 1930, West Virginia University; Ph.D., 1934, 
University of Maryland. Associate Professor of Botany. 

Bryan, Marie D., B.A., 1923, Goucher College; M.A., 1945, University of 
Maryland. Assistant Professor of Education. 

Burdette, Franklin L., A.B., 1934, Marshall College; A.M., 1935, Uni- 
versity of Nebraska; A.M., 1937, Ph.D., 1938, Princeton University. 
Professor of Government and Politics. 

BURHOE, Sumner 0., B.S., 1925, Massachusetts Agricultural College; M.S., 
1926, Kansas State College; Ph.D., 1937, Harvard University. Pro- 
fessor of Zoology. 

Cairns, Gordon M., B.S., 1936, M.S., 1938, Ph.D., 1940, Cornell University. 
Professor and Head of Dairy. 

Caldwell, Charles G., B.A., Roanoke College; M.A., University of Chi- 
cago. Assistant Professor of Child Study. 

Calhoun, Charles E., B.A., 1925, M.B.A.; 1930, University of Washing- 
ton. Professor of Finance. 

Cardwell, Guy A., A.B., 1926, University of North Carolina; A.M., 1932, 
Harvard University; Ph.D., 1936, University of North Carolina. Pro- 
fessor and Head of English Department. 

Chatelain, Verne E., A.B., 1917, State Teachers' College (Nebraska) ; 
M.A., 1925, University of Chicago; Ph.D., 1943, University of Minne- 
sota. Professor of History. 



SUMMER SESSION FACULTY 5 

Clemens, Eli W., B.S., 1930, Virginia Polytechnic Institute; M.S., 1934, 
University of Illinois; Ph.D., 1940, University of Wisconsin. Pro- 
fessor of Business Administration. 

COFEB, Charles N., A.B., 1936, Southeast Missouri State Teachers' Col- 
lege; M.A., 1937, University of Iowa; Ph.D., 1940, Brown University. 
Associate Professor of Psychology. 

Colletti, Antoinette, B.S., 1935, University of Minnesota; Kindergarten 
Teacher, Oakview School, Silver Spring, Md. Visiting Lecturer in 
Education. 

Cook, J. Allan, B.A., 1928, College of William and Mary; M.B.A., 1936, 
Harvard Business School; Ph.D., 1947, Columbia University. Asso- 
ciate Pi'ofessor of Marketing. 

CoOLEY, Franklin D., A.B., 1927, Johns Hopkins University; M.A., 1933, 
University of Maryland; Ph.D., 1940, Johns Hopkins University. Asso- 
ciate Professor of English. 

Cory, Ernest N., B.S., 1909, M.S., 1914, MaiTland Agricultural College; 
Ph.D., 1926, American University. Professor of Entomology, Head 
of Entomology Department and State Entomologist; Assistant Direc- 
tor of Extension. Professor of Entomolgy. 

Cronin, Charles F., B.S., 1926, University of Pennsylvania; C.P.A., 1930, 
Indiana University. Assistant Professor of Accounting. 

Cronin, Frank H., B.S., 1946, University of Maryland. Assistant Pro- 
fessor of Physical Education. 

Crook, Compton N., B.S., 1932, and M.A., 1933, George Peabody College 
for Teachers. Professor of Biology, State Teachers' College, Towson. 
Visiting Lecturer in Education. 

Crow, Jane H., B.S., 1937, Salem College; M.S., 1938, University of Mary- 
land. Assistant Professor of Home Management. 

Daiker, John A., B.S., 1941, University of Maryland. Instructor in 
Accounting. 

Dantzig, Henry P., B.S., 1939, University of Maryland. Instructor in 
Mathematics. 

Dare, Dorothy S., B.S., 1939, University of Maryland. Instructor in 
Mathematics. 

Davis, Fremont, Photographic Illustrator and Staff Photographer, Science 
Service. Instructor in Art. 

Deach, Dorothy F., B.S., 1931, M.S., 1931, University of Illinois. Pro- 
fessor and Head of Department of Physical Education for Women. 

Deering, Tam, A.B., University of Washington. Planning Consultant for 
Recreation and Parks, Washington, D. C. Visiting Lecturer in Educa- 
tion. 

DeMarne, Henri, Baccalaureat de I'Universite de Paris, 1944. Instructor 
in French. 



6 SUMMER SESSION FACULTY 

Denecke, Marie, B.S., 1938, Teachers' College of Columbia University; 
M.Ed., 1942, University of Maryland. Division of Language and Lit- 
erature, Wilson Teachers' College, Washington, D. C. Visiting Lec- 
turer in Education. 

DeVault, Samuel H.. B.S., 1912, Carson-Newman College; M.S., 1915, 
University of North Carolina; Ph.D., 1931, Massachusetts State Col- 
lege. Professor and Head of Agricultural Economics and Marketing. 

Dice, L. Kathryn, B.S., 1938, Ed.D., 1941, Johns Hopkins University. Chief 
Psychologist, Psychiatric Clinic of the Mental Hygiene Society and the 
University Hospital, Baltimore, Maryland. Visiting Lecturer in Edu- 
cation. 

Dinwiddie, Shirley Wagner, B.A., 1946, Radford College. Instructor in 
English. 

Dixon, Robert G., A.B., 1943, Ph.D., 1947, Syracuse University. Assistant 

Professor of Government and Politics. 
Dobert, Eitel Wolf, M.A., University of Maryland. Instructor in French 

and German. 
Doetsch, Raymond N., B.S., 1942, University of Illinois; A.M., 1943, 

Indiana University; Ph.D., 1948, University of Maryland. Assistant 

Professor of Bacteriology. 

Drazek, Stanley Joseph, B.S., 1941, State Teachers' College, Oswego, New 
York; M.A., 1947, University of Maryland. Instructor-in-charge, Bal- 
timore Center, College of Special and Continuation Studies. 

Ebersole, Luke, A.B., 1940, Elizabethtown College; B.D., 1944, Crozer 
Theological Seminary; M.A., 1945, University of Pennsylvania. In- 
structor in Sociology. 

Faber, John E., Jr., B.S., 1926, M.S., 1927, Ph.D., 1937, University of Mary- 
land. Professor and Head, Department of Bacteriology. 

Featherston, E. Glenn, B.S., 1929, A.M., 1931, Ed.D., 1940, University 
of Missouri. Specialist for Pupil Transpox'tation, U. S. Office of Edu- 
cation. Visiting Lecturer in Education. 

Foster, John E., B.S., 1926, North Carolina State College; M.S., 1927, 
Kansas State College; Ph.D., 1937, Cornell University. Professor and 
head of Animal Industry. 

French, Mary Annette, B.S., 1930, Public School Music; B.S., Secondary 
Education; 1936, Mansfield State Teachers' College; M.S., in Music 
Education, 1940, University of Pennsylvania. Instructor in Music 
Education. 

Garten, Sydney, B.S., Mississippi State College for Women. Instructor 

in Nursery School. 
Gauch, Hugh G., B.S., 1935, University of Miami; M.S., 1937, Kansas State 

College; Ph.D., 1939, University of Chicago. Associate Professor of 

Plant Physiology. 



SUMMER SESSION FACULTY 7 

Gewehr, Wesley M., Ph.B., 1911, M.A., 1912, Ph.D., 1922, University of 
Chicago. Professor of History. 

GiNEGER, Guy W., B.S., 1933, M.S., 1934, University of Maryland. Asso- 
ciate Professor of Agricultural Engineering. 

Gilbert, Leon, A.B., 1942, Johns Hopkins University. Instructor in French 
and Spanish. 

Gloss, George M., B.P.E., 1927, American College of Physical Education; 
B.S., 1930, Northwestern University; M.S., 1935, Ed.D., 1937, Teach- 
ers' College, Columbia University. Professor of Physical Education, 

Good, Richard A., A.B., 1939, Ashland College; M.A., 1940, Ph.D., 1945, 
University of Wisconsin. Assistant Professor of Mathematics. 

GOREIN, V. Gh., Lie, Math., Bucharest, Roumania. Instructor in Mathe- 
matics. 

Gordon, Donald C, B.A., 1934, College of William and Mary; M.A., 1938, 
Ph.D., 1947, Columbia University. Assistant Professor of History. 

Gravely, William H., Jr., B.A., 1925, College of William and Mary; M.A., 
1934, University of Vii-ginia. Assistant Professor of English. 

Grubar, Francis S., A.B., 1948, University of Maryland. Instructor in 
History of Art. 

Gruber, David M., B.S., 1948, University of Maryland. Instructor in 
Accounting. 

Grzeda, Stanley C, Ph.D., 1948, University of Illinois. Instructor in Psy- 
chology. 

Hackman, Ray C, B.A., 1935; M.A., 1936, University of Nebraska; Ph.D., 
1940, University of Minnesota. Associate Professor of Psychology. 

Hall, Dick W., B.S., 1934, M.S., 1935, Ph.D., 1938, University of Virginia. 
Professor of Mathematics. 

Hamilton, Arthur B., B.S., 1929, M.S., 1931, University of Maryland. 
Associate Professor of Agricultural Economics. 

Harman, Susan Emolyn, B.Ed., 1916, Peru State Teachers' College; A.B., 
1917, M.A., 1918, University of Nebraska; Ph.D., 1926, Johns Hop- 
kins University. Professor of English Language and Literature. 

Harwell, Thomas M., Jr., A.B., 1940, Southern Methodist University; 
M.A., 1947, University of Chicago. Instructor in English. 

Haslup, Charles, B.S., 1938, Towson State Teachers' College; M.Ed., 1946, 
University of Maryland. Instructor in Music. 

Haut, Irvin C, B.S., 1928, University of Idaho; M.S., 1930, State College 
of Washington; Ph.D., 1933, University of Maryland. Professor and 
head of Horticulture. 

Haywood, Stuart, B.S., 1942, M.A., 1948, University of Maryland. Grad- 
uate Assistant in Mathematics. 

Heaps, Louis McBride, B.S., 1929, Woman's College, University of Dela- 
ware; M.A., 1946, Western Maryland College. Librarian of Highland 



8 SUMMER SESSION FACULTY 

Junior-Senior High School, Street, Maryland. Visiting Lecturer in 
Library Science. 

Hendricks, Richard, A.B., Franklin College; M.A., Ohio State Univer- 
sity. Insti'uctor in Speech. 

Heylmun, Stanley L., B.S., 1938, University of Maryland. Teacher at 
Forest Park High School. Visiting Lecturer in Education. 

HiGGisON, Edward, B.S., 1942, Gettysburg College. Instructor in Mathe- 
matics. 

Holland, Willis D., B.S., 1942, University of Richmond. Instructor in 
Mathematics. 

HORNBAKE, R. Lee, B.S., 1934, State Teachers' College, California, Pa.; 
A.M., 1936, Ph.D., 1942, Ohio State University. Professor of Indus- 
trial Education. 

Hutchinson, Charles, A.B., 1931, M.A., 1933, Ph.D., 1941, University of 
Southern California. Assistant Professor of Sociology. 

HUTTO, Louis E., B.S., 1913, Kansas State Teachers' College; M.A., 1932, 
Ph.D., 1938, Columbia University. Professor of Health, Physical Edu- 
cation and Recreation. 

Hyde, Robert T., B.S., 1939, Bowdoin College. Instructor in English. 

IMSE, Thomas P., Ph.B., 1941, M.A., 1942, Marquette University. Instruc- 
tor in Sociology. 

Jackson, Stanley B., A.B., 1933, Bates College; A.M., 1934, Ph.D., 1937, 
Harvard University. Professor of Mathematics, Acting Head, Depart- 
ment of Mathematics. 

Jeffers, Walter F., B.S., 1935, M.S., 1937, Ph.D., 1939, University of 
Maryland. Associate Professor of Plant Pathology. 

Johnson, Charles A., B.A., 1940, M.A., 1941, University of Chicago. 
Instructor in History. 

Kabat, George J., B.E., 1936, Winona State Teachers' College; A.M., 1938, 
University of Colorado; Ph.D., 1947, University of Maryland. Director, 
College of Special and Continuation Studies. 

Kehoe, James H., B.S., University of Maryland. Track Coach and Intra- 
mural Director. 

Kern, Alexander C, A.B., 1930, Yale University; M.A., 1933, Ph.D., 1936, 
University of Wisconsin. Associate Professor, University of Iowa. 
Visiting Pz'ofessor of English. 

Kronquist, Emil. 

Laffer, Norman C, B.S., 1929, Allegheny College; M.S., 1932, University 

of Maine; Ph.D., 1937, University of Illinois. Associate Professor of 

Bacteriology. 

LeBert, Neal Gordon, B.A., 1940, M.A., 1948, University of Virginia. 
Instructor in English. 



SUMMER SESSION FACULTY 9 

Leffingwell, Elsie L., A.B., 1935, University of Pittsburgh; B.S., 1937, 
Margaret Morrison Carnegie College, Carnegie Institute of Technolo- 
gy; M.A., 1941, University of Pittsburgh. Assistant Professor of Sec- 
retarial Studies, Margaret Morrison Carnegie College. Visiting Lec- 
turer in Business Education. 

Lejins, Peter, Master of Philosophy, 1930; Master of Law, 1933, Univer- 
sity of Latvia; Ph.D., 1938, University of Chicago, Professor of So- 
ciology. 

Leutert, Werner W., Diploma in Mathematics, 1946; Sc.D., 1948, E.T.H. 
Zurich, Switzerland. Assistant Professor of Mathematics. 

Limburg, Mildred K., B.S., 1935, M.A., 1937, Ohio State University. Kin- 
dergarten Teacher, Somerset, Maryland. Visiting Lecturer in Edu- 
cation. 

Littleford, Robert A., B.S., 1933, M.S., 1934, Ph.D., 1938, University of 
Maryland. Assistant Professor of Zoology. 

Maley, Donald, B.S., 1943, State Teachers' College, California, Pa.; M.A., 
1947, University of Maryland. Instructor in Industrial Education. 

Maril, Herman, Graduate, Maryland Institute of Fine Arts. Instructor 
in Landscape Painting. 

Martin, Charles P., B.A., 1935, Spring Hill College; M.A., 1947, Colum- 
bia University. Instructor in English. 

Mayer, L. V., A.B., University of North Dakota; M.A., Stanford Univer- 
sity. Instructor in Speech. 

McCoLLUM, Ernestine Becker, School of Hygiene and Public Health, Johns 
Hopkins Universitj^ Insrtuctor in Nutrition. 

McKbiver, John W., B.C.S., 1932, Benjamin Franklin University; C.P.A., 
1932. Instructor in Accounting. 

McLarney, William J.. B.A., 1929, B.S., 1930, University of Iowa; M.A., 
1935, Columbia University. Associate Professor of Industrial Man- 
agement. 

McLean, Hugh B., B.S., 1924, U. S. Naval Academy. Instructor in Mathe- 
matics. 

McNaughton, Edna B., B.S., Michigan State College; M.A., Columbia 
University. Professor of Nursery School Education. 

Menneken, Jessie W., A.B.. 1925, Wesleyan College; M.S., 1938, Univer- 
sity of Michigan. Instructor in Mathematics. 

Merrill, Horace S., B.E., 1932, State Teachers' College (River Falls, 
Wisconsin) ; Ph.M., 1933, Ph.D., 1942, University of Wisconsin. Asso- 
ciate Professor of History. 

Mershon, Madelaine, B.S., Drake University; M.A., University of Chi- 
cago. Assistant Professor of Child Study. 

Miller, Frances, A.B., 1912, A.M., 1915, University of Missouri. Instruc- 
tor in English. 



10 SUMMER SESSION FACULTY 

Mitchell, T. Faye, B.S., 1930, State Teachers' College (Springfield, Mis- 
souri) ; M.A., 1939, Teachers' College, Columbia University, Associate 
Professor and Head of Department of Textiles and Clothing. 

Mitchell, Viola, A.B., DePauw University; M.A., State University of 
Iowa. Assistant Professor of Physical Education for Women. 

Mooney, E. Aubert, Jr., A.B., 1930, Furman University; M.A., 1933, Uni- 
versity of Virginia; Ph.D., 1937, Cornell University. Associate Pro- 
fessor of English. 

MOTT, George Fox, A.B., 1929, Stanford University; A.M., 1931, Ph.D., 
1938, University of Minnesota. Visiting Lecturer in Education. 

MOUNCE, Earl W., B.S., 1921, A.B., 1927, M.A., 1922, LL.B., 1929, Univer- 
sity of Missouri; LL.M., 1945, National University. Associate Pro- 
fessor of Business Law. 

Mount, Marie, A.B., 1916, Indiana University; M.A., 1924, Teachers' Col- 
lege, Columbia University. Professor of Home and Institution Manage- 
ment and Dean of College of Home Economics. 

Murphy, Charles D., B.A., 1929, University of Wisconsin; M.A., 1930, 
Harvard University; Ph.D., 1940, Cornell University. Associate Pro- 
fessor of English. 

Negherbon, William 0., B.S., 1935, M.S., 1936, Stanford University; Ph.D., 
1944, Harvard University. Assistant Professor of Zoology. 

Newell, Clarence A., A.B., 1935, Hasting College; A.M., 1939, Ph.D., 
1943, Columbia University. Professor of Educational Administration. 

Nyweide, Garrett, A.B., 1928, Hope College; M.A., 1934, New York Uni- 
versity. Director and Executive Officer, Vocational Education and 
Extension Board of Rockland County, New York. Visiting Lecturer 
in Education. 

Olewine, Laurence E., B.S., 1943, State Teachers' College, Millersville, 
Pa.; M.Ed., 1946, Boston University. Instructor in Industrial Edu- 
cation. 

Owens, Anna Belle, B.S., 1940, University of Maryland. Instructor in 
Botany. 

Palmer, Jeanne Hancock, Graduate, 1946, Maryland Institute of Art. 
Instructor in Art. 

Patrick, Arthur S., B.E., 1931, State Teachers' College, Wisconsin; M.A., 
1940, George Washington University. Associate Professor, Depart- 
ment of Office Techniques and Management, and Business Education. 

Perkins, Hugh V., B.A., Oberlin College; M.A., University of Chicago. 
Assistant Professor in Child Study. 

Phillips, Norman E., B.S., 1916, Allegheny College; Ph.D., 1931, Cornell 
University. Professor and Chairman, Department of Zoology. 

PiCKARD, Hugh B., B.A., 1933, Haverford College; Ph.D., 1938, Northwest- 
ern University. Associate Professor of Physical Chemistry. 



SUMMER SESSION FACULTY 11 

Plischke, Elmer, Ph.B., 1937, Marquette University; A.M., 1938, Ameri- 
can University; Ph.D., 1943, Clark University. Assistant Professor 
of Government and Politics. 

PORTZ, John, A.B., 1937, Duke University; M.A., 1940, Harvard University. 
Instructor in English. 

Pratt, Ernest F., B.A., 1937, University of Redlands; M.S., 1939, Oregon 
State College; M.A., 1941, Ph.D., 1942, University of Michigan. Asso- 
ciate Professor of Organic Chemistry. 

Prescott, Daniel A., B.S., 1920, Tufts College; Ed.M., 1922, Ed.D., 1923, 
Harvard University. Professor and Head of the Institute for Child 
Study. 

Pylb, Thomas W., B.S., 1921, University of Pennsylvania; M.A., 1926, 
Columbia University. Principal, Bethesda-Chevy Chase High School. 
Visiting Lecturer in Education. 

Randall, Harlan, B.Mus., 1938, Washington College of Music. Professor 
of Music. 

Ratzlaff, Carl J., B.S., 1922, M.A., 1924, University of Minnesota; M.A., 

1928, Ph.D., 1930, Harvard University. Professor and Head of Eco- 
nomics Department. 

Reeve, E. Wilkins, B.S., 1936, Drexel Institute; Ph.D., 1940, University 
of Wisconsin. Associate Professor of Organic Chemistry. 

Reid, James H., B.S., 1923, University of Iowa; M.A., 1933, American 
University. Professor of Marketing. 

RiDGWAY, A. Owen, B.S., 1943, University of Maryland. Graduate As- 
sistant in Mathematics, 

Robinson, Edward A., B.A., 1944, St. Mary's Seminary and University; 
M.A., 1947, Catholic University. Instructor in Economics. 

Rock, John Henry, B.A., 1945, University of Massachusetts; M.A., 1947, 
Columbia University. Instructor in English. 

Schaefer, Willis C, B.S., 1936, Ph.D., 1940, University of Chicago. 
Associate Professor of Psychology. 

Schaumann, Herbert, B.A., 1931, Westminster College; Ph.D., 1935, Cor- 
nell University. Assistant Professor of English. 

Schindler, Alvin W., A.B., 1927, Iowa State Teachers' College; A.M., 

1929, Ph.D., 1934, University of Iowa. Professor of Education. 
Scott, Lucy, B.A., 1915, Trinity University; M.A., 1924, Columbia Uni- 
versity; Ph.D., 1942, State University of Iowa. Director of Student 
Teaching, State Teachers' College, Towson. Visiting Lecturer in 
Education. 

Sellew, Gladys, A.B., 1918, B.S., 1921, M.A., 1922, University of Cin- 
cinnati; Ph.D., 1938, Catholic University of America. Associate Pro- 
fessor of Sociology, Rosary College. Visiting Lecturer in Nursing 
Education. 



12 SUMMER SESSION FACULTY 

Sensenig, Crawford, B.S., 1938, Haverford College; M.A., 1941, Univer- 
sity of Pennsylvania. Instructor in History. 

Shankweiler, Paul, Ph.B., 1919, Muhlenberg College; M.A., 1921, Colum- 
bia University; Ph.D., 1934, University of North Carolina. Associate 
Professor of Sociology. 

Shaw, Joseph C, B.S., 1930, Iowa State College; M.S., 1933, Montana 
State College; Ph.D., 1938, University of Minnesota. Professor of 
Dairy. 

Shepherd, Julius C, A.B., 1944, A.M., 1947, East Carolina Teachers' Col- 
lege. Instructor in Mathematics. 

Siegler, Maurice R., B.S., Georgia Academy of Fine Arts. Associate 
Professor of Art. 

SiEVERS, Frank L., A.B., 1928, State Teachers' College (Nebraska) ; M.A., 
1938, University of Nebraska. Associate Professor of Education. 

Smith, Denzel D., A.B., 1936, York College; M.A., 1939, Ph.D., 1941, 
University of Nebraska. Professor of Psychology. 

Sparhawk, Elizabeth, B.A., 1923, University of Colorado; M.A., 1946, 
University of Denver. Dean of Girls, East High School, Denver. 
Visiting Lecturer in Education. 

Sparks, David S., B.A., 1944, Grinnell College; M.A., 1945, University of 
Chicago. Instructor in History. 

Spencer, Mabel S., B.S., 1925, M.S., 1946, West Virginia University. 
Instructor in Foods and Nutrition. 

Sprowls, Jesse W., A.B., 1910, Valparaiso University; B.S., 1914, Uni- 
versity of Pittsburgh; A.M., 1918, Ph.D., 1919, Clark University. 
Professor of Psychology. 

Steinmeyer, Reuben G., A.B., 1928, Ph.D., 1935, American University. 
Professor of Government and Politics. 

Stewart, Charles T., A.B. Visiting Lecturer in Education. 

Story, Enoch F., Jr., B.S., 1935, M.S., 1937, Rhode Island State College; 
Ph.D., 1940, Massachusetts State College. Assistant Professor of 
Inorganic Chemistry. 

Strausbaugh, W. L., A.B., Wooster College; M.A., Stats University of 
Iowa. Assistant Professor of Speech. 

Strauss, Samuel, Ph. B., 1927, M.A., 1931, University of Chicago. Head 
Teachei", Biology Department, McKinley High School, Washington, 
D. C. Visiting Lecturer in Education. 

Stringer, Kenneth T., B.S., 1946, M.S., 1948, University of Maryland. 
Instructor in Zoology. 

Stuntz, Calvin F., B.A., 1939, Ph.D., 1947, University of Buffalo. As- 
sistant Professor of Analytical Chemistry. 

Sweeney, Charles F., B.S., 1921, Cornell University; M.B.A., 1928, Uni- 
versity of Maryland. Associate Professor of Accounting. 



SUMMER SESSION FACULTY 13 

Sykora, Frank, "Free Artist," 1918, Imperial University of Kiev, Rus- 
sia. Assistant Professor of Instrumental Music. 

Sylvester, John K., B.A., 1937, M.A., 1940, Ph.D., 1947, State University 
of Iowa. Assistant Professor of Economics. 

Sylvester, Harold F., Ph.D., Johns Hopkins University. Associate Pro- 
fessor of Personnel Administration. 

Taylor, Corwin H., B.S., 1932, Ed.M., 1936, Ed.D., 1941, University of 
Cincinnati; Mus.B., 1930, Mus.M., 1933, College of Music of Cincinnati. 
In Charge of Instrumental Division, Department of School Music, 
Peabody Conservatory of Music. Visiting Lecturer in Education. 

Thomas, Royale P., B.S., 1919, University of Illinois; M.S., 1925, Iowa 
State College; Ph.D., 1928, University of Wisconsin. Professor of 
Soils. 

TOMBERLiN, IsABELLE I., B.S., 1941, M.S., 1948, University of Maryland. 
Instructor in Foods and Nutrition. 

TORPEY, Dorothy M., A.B., 1940, Adelphi College; M.A., 1943, Ed.D., 1948, 
New York University. Social Studies Teacher, George Washington 
High School, Alexandria, Virginia. Visiting Lecturer in Education. 

Vanderslice, John L., B.S., 1938, A.M., 1930, University of Pennsyl- 
vania; Ph.D., 1934, Princeton University. Associate Professor of 
Mathematics. 

Van Zwoll, James A., A.B., 1933, Calvin College; M.A., 1937, Ph.D., 1942, 
University of Michigan. Professor of Educational Administration. 

Vent, Myron H., A.B., 1937, University of Chicago; M.A., 1941, North- 
western University. Instructor in German. 

Vinal, William G., B.S., 1906, A.M., 1907, Harvard University; Ph.D., 
1922, Brown University. Professor of Nature Education, University 
of Massachusetts. Visiting Lecturer in Education. 

Walker, Sarah, A.B., 1936, Catawba College; M.S., 1945, University of 
North Carolina. Visiting Lecturer in Education. 

Wall, Gustave S., B.S., 1931, M.A., 1937, University of Minnesota. Asso- 
ciate Professor of Industrial Education. 

Ward, Kathryn Painter, A.B., 1935, George Washington University; Cer- 
tificat des Etudes Humaines, 1936, Sorbonne University (Paris, 
France) ; M.A., 1937, Ph.D., 1947, George Washington University. 
Assistant Professor of English. 

Watson, J. Donald, B.A., 1926, Reed College; M.B.A., 1931, University of 
Michigan; C.L.U., 1940, American College of Life; Ph.D., 1941, North- 
western University. Professor of Finance. 

Wedeberg, Sivert M., B.B.A., 1925, University of Washington; A.M., 1936, 
Yale University; C.P.A. Professor of Accounting. 



14 SUMMER SESSION FACULTY 

Wellborn, Fred W., B.A., 1918, Baker University; M.A., 1923, University 
of Kansas; Ph.D., 1926, University of Wisconsin. Professor of His- 
tory. 

West, Joe Young, B.S., 1931, M.A., 1932, George Peabody College for 
Teachers; Ph.D., 1937, Columbia University. Professor of Natural 
Sciences, State Teachers' College, Towson, Maryland. Visiting Lec- 
turer in Education. 

Wharton, James P., A.B., Woflford College, Duke University; Graduate, 
Maryland Institute of Fine Arts. Professor and Head, Department of 
Fine Arts. 

Whitney, Elizabeth, A.B., Mt. Holyoke College. Instructor in Nursery 
School Education. 

WiGGiN, Gladys A., B.S., 1929, A.M., 1939, University of Minnesota; Ph.D., 
1947, University of Maryland. Associate Professor of Education. 

WiGGiN, Richard G., B.S., 1939, A.M., 1947, University of Minnesota. 
Instructor in Art Education, University of Minnesota. Visiting Lec- 
turer in Art Education. 

Wilbur, June C, B.S., 1936, B.S. in Education, 1937, University of Wash- 
ington; M.S., 1940, Syracuse University. Assistant Professor of Tex- 
tiles and Clothing. 

Wiley, Raymond C, B.S., 1905, Oklahoma Agricultural and Mechanical 
College; M.S., 1922, University of Maryland; Ph.D., 1927, American 
University. Associate Professor of Analytical Chemistry. 

Woods, Albert W., B.S., 1933, M.Ed., 1949, University of Maryland. 
Associate Professor of Physical Education. 

WORTHLEY, Jean R., A.B., 1944, Goucher College; M.S., 1948, University 
of Massachusetts. Visiting Lecturer in Education. 

Wright, Howard W., B.S.C, 1937, Temple University; M.A., 1940, State 
University of Iowa. Associate Professor of Accounting. 

Zeeveld, W. Gordon, A.B., 1924, University of Rochester; M.A., 1929, 
Ph.D., 1936, Johns Hopkins University. Associate Professor of Eng- 
lish. 

Zenn, R. Yvonne, B.S., 1931, Ohio University; M.A., 1937, University of 
Pittsburgh. Assistant Professor of Physical Education and Recre- 
ation. 



UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 15 

SUMMER SESSION 

Harold Benjamin, Ph.D., Director 

Alma Frothingham, Secretary 

The 1949 Summer Session of the University of Maryland will open with 
registration on Monday, June 25, and extended for six weeks, ending Friday, 
August 5. 

In order that there may be 30 class periods for each full course, classes 
will be held on Saturday, July 9 and July 16, to make up for time lost 
on registration day and July 4, which is a holiday. 

TERMS OF ADMISSION 

Teachers and special students not seeking degrees are admitted to the 
courses of the Summer Session for which they are qualified. 

The admission requirements for those who desire to become candidates 
for degrees are the same as for other sessions of the University. Before 
registering, a candidate for a degree will be required to be admitted to 
the University. He should see Dr. E. F. Long, Director of Admissions, and 
also should consult the Dean of the College in which he seeks a degree. 

Graduates of accredited normal schools with satisfactory normal school 
records may be admitted to advanced standing in the College of Educa- 
tion. The objectives of the individual student determine the exact amount 
of credit allowed. The student is given individual counsel as to the best 
procedure for fulfilling the requirements for a degree. 

Candidates for admission to the Graduate School should file an applica- 
tion with the Dean of the Graduate School as long as possible in advance 
of registration and should have transcripts of their undergraduate records 
sent to the Dean of the Graduate School at the time of filing applications 

for admission. „ 

ACADEMIC CREDIT 

The semester hour is the unit of credit. During the Summer Session 
a course meeting five times a week for six weeks requiring the standard 
amount of outside work is given a weight of two semester hours. 

Students who are matriculated as candidates for degrees will be given 
credit towards the appropriate degree for satisfactory completion of courses. 
All courses offered in the Summer Session are creditable towards the ap- 
propriate degree. 

Teachers and other students not seeking degrees will receive official reports 
specifying the amount and quality of work completed. These reports will be 
accepted by the Maryland State Department of Education and by the appro- 
priate education authorities in other states for the extension and renewal 
of certificates in accordance with their laws and regulations. 

NORMAL AND MAXIMUM LOADS 

Six semester hours is the normal load for the Summer Session. Under- 
graduate students in the College of Education and teachers in service may 



16 UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 

take a maximum of eight semester hours if they have above-average grades. 
Extra tuition is charged for loads over six semester hours. For details, see 
"Tuition and Fees." 

REGISTRATION 

Registration for the Summer School will take place on Saturday, June 25, 
from 8:30 A. M. to 1 P. M., and Monday, June 27, from 8:30 A. M. to 
3:30 P. M. Graduate students who are not matriculated should register on 
Friday and Saturday morning, June 24 and 25, and should report to the 
office of the Graduate Dean, 214 Education Building. 

Teachers and other Summer Session students who are not candidates 
for degrees will register in the office of the Director of the Summer School, 
Education Building. Regular undergraduate students will register in the 
offices of their respective deans. After registration materials have been 
completed and approved, bills will be issued and fees paid at the offices of 
the Registrar and Cashier in the Armory. 

Instruction will begin on Tuesday, June 28, at 8:00 A. M.. The late regis- 
tration fee on Tuesday, June 28, will be $3.00; thereafter, it will be $5.00. 

Students who intend to become candidates for degrees and have not previ- 
ously been admitted to and matriculated in the University should report 
before registration to the Director of Admissions, Dr. E. F. Long, in the 
Administration Building. Such students will find it advantageous to make 
arrangements for admission in advance by mail. 

TUITION AND FEES 
l^ndergraduate Students 

General Tuition Fee $40.00 

This fee entitles the student to 6 semester hours of work, 
the general recreational program, and the use of a post 
office box. 

Non-residence Fee 15.00 

Must be paid by all students who are not residents of 
Maryland. 

Matriculation Fee 10.00 

Payable only once, upon admission to the University. 
Every student must be matriculated. 

Special Tuition Fees 

For load of 4 semester hours or less, or for additional 

credits over 6 semester hours, per semester hour 8.00 

Graduate Students 

General Tuition Fee 40.00 

This fee entitles the student ot 6 semester hours of work, 
the general recreational program, and the use of a post 
office box. 



SUMMER SESSION 17 

Matriculation Fee '• 10.00 

Payable only once, upon admission to the Graduate School. 

Special Tuition Fee 

For load of 4 semester hours or less, per semester hour. . . . 8.00 

Miscellaneous Information 

There is no non-residence fee for graduate students. 

Auditors pay the same fees as regular students except that no charge 
is made to students who have paid the general fee. 

The diploma fee is $10.00 for bachelors' and masters' degrees, and 
$25.00 for doctors' degrees. 

A fee of $3.00 is charged for each change in program after July 2nd. 
If such changes involve entrance to a course, they must be ap- 
proved by the istructor in charge of the course entered. Courses 
cannot be dropped after July 16th. 

A special laboratory fee may be charged for certain courses where such 
fee is noted in the course description. 

All laboratory courses in chemistry carry a laboratory fee of $10.00; 
in addition the student is charged for any apparatus which cannot 
be returned to the stock room in perfect condition. Other laboratory 
fees are stated in connection with individual courses. 

Cancellation of Courses 

Courses may be cancelled if the number of students enrolled is below cer- 
tain minima. In general, freshman and sophomore courses will not be main- 
tained for classes smaller than 20. Minimum enrollments for upper level 
undergraduate courses and graduate courses will be 15 and 10 respectively. 

FEES FOR INSTITUTE OF COSMETOLOGY 

Tuition fee for course. . . . ; $50.00 

FEES FOR NURSERY SCHOOL 

Children 21/2 to 5 years $10.00 

Kindergarten (children 5 to 6 years) 12.50 

LIVING ACCOMMODATIONS— MEALS 

Dormitory accommodations are available as follows: 

Regular Dormitories (WOMEN), $30 per term (maid service). 
Regular Dormitories (MEN), $20 per term (no maid service). 
Temporary Dormitories (MEN), $20 per term (no maid service). 
Students living in the Regular Domitories will be required to take their 
meals in the University Dining Hall. Residents of the Temporary Dormi- 
tories may take their meals off-campus. 

A few off-campus rooms are available. Inquiries concerning them should 
be addressed to Mr. Doyle Royal, Office of Director of Student Welfare. He 
will furnish the names of those householders to whom you should write to 
make you own arrangements. 



18 SUMMER SESSION 

Board in the University Dining Hall will be $60 for the term. Cafeteria 
meal service will be available to those summer school students who are 
commuting and those who live in off-campus houses. 

Rooms may be reserved in advance but will not be held later than noon 
of Monday, June 27. Early application for reservations is advisable, as 
only those who have made reservations will be assured that rooms are ready 
for their occupancy. The University dormitories will be open for occupancy 
after 12 o'clock noon, Sunday, June 26. For reservations write to Miss 
Marian Johnson, Assistant Dean of Women, or Mr. Robert C. James, Men's 
Dormitory Manager. 

Students attending the Summer School and occupying rooms in the dormi- 
tories wall provide themselves with towels, pillows, pillow cases, sheets, 
and blankets. Trunks for the men's dormitories should be marked with 
name and addressed to "Men's Dormitories." Trunks for the women's 
dormitories should include name or dormitory and room number if it has 
been assigned in advance. Trunks sent by express should be prepaid. 
Cleanliness and neatness of rooms is the responsibility of the individual. 

The University assumes no responsibility for rooms and board offered 
to Summer Session patrons outside of the University dormitories and 
dining room. Eating establishments in the vicinity are inspected by the 
County Health Service. 

WITHDRAWAL AND REFUND OF FEES 

Any student compelled to leave the University at any time during the 
academic year, should file an application for withdrawal, bearing the proper 
signatures, in the office of the Registrar. If this is not done, the student 
wall not be entitled, as a matter of course, to a certificate of honorable dis- 
missal, and will forfeit his right to any refund to which he would other- 
wise be entitled. The date used in computing refunds is the date the appli- 
cation for withdrawal is filed in the office of the Registrar. 

In the case of a minor, withdrawal will be permitted only with the written 
consent of the student's parent or guardian. 

Students withdrawing from the University will receive a refund of all 
charges, except board and lodging, less the matriculation fee in accordance 
with the following schedule: 

Percentage 
Period from Date Instruction Begins Refundable 

One week or less 40% 

Between one and two weeks 80% 

Over two weeks 

Board and lodging are refunded only in the event the student withdraws 
from the University. Refunds of board and lodging are made on a pro-rata, 
weekly basis. Dining Hall cards issued to boarding students must be sur- 
rendered at the Dining Hall office the day of withdrawal. 



UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 19 

STUDENT HEALTH 

The University Infirmary, located on the campus, in charge of the regular 
University physician and nurse, provides medical service of a routine 
nature for the students in the Summer Session. Students who are ill should 
report promptly to the University Infirmary, either in person or by phone 
(Extension 326). 

PARKING OF AUTOMOBILES 

For the use of students, staff members, and employees, several parking 
lots are provided. The University rules forbid the parking of cars on any 
of the campus roads. These rules are enforced by State police. 

SOCIAL AND RECREATIONAL ACTIVITIES 

There will be a carefully planned program of social and recreational 
events. The recreational fee of one dollar, paid by all registrants in the 
Summer Session, is used to finance the program. 

A representative advisory committee of students will be appointed to plan 
such events as they may wish to provide. Suggestions as to the nature of 
the social program will be welcomed. 

SUMMER GRADUATE WORK 

Masters' degrees are offered through the Graduate School as follows: 
Master of Arts 
Master of Sciences 

Master of Arts in American Civilization 
Master of Education 
Master of Business Administration 
Doctors' degrees offered through the Graduate School are as follows: 
Doctor of Philosophy 
Doctor of Education 
Graduate work in the Summer School may be counted as residence toward 
a Master's degree or Doctor of Education degree. A full year of residence 
or the equivalent is the minimum requirement for each degree. 

The requirements for each of the seven degrees above may be procured 
from the Graduate School upon request. 

Special regulations governing graduate work in Education and supple- 
menting the statements contained in the Graduate School Announcements 
are available in duplicated form and may be obtained at the College of 
Education. Each graduate student in Education should have a copy. Stu- 
dents seeking the Master's degree as a qualification for a certificate issued 
by the Maryland State Department of Education or any other certifying 
authority should consult the appropriate bulletin for specific requirements. 
Advisers will assist students in planning to meet such requirements. 

All students desiring graduate credit, whether for meeting degree re- 
quirements, for transfer to another institution, or for any other purpose, 
must be regularly matriculated and registered in the Graduate School. 



20 SUMMER SESSION 

CANDIDATES FOR DEGREES 

Undergraduate students who expect to complete their requirements for 
baccalaureate degrees during the Summer Session should make application 
for diplomas at the office of the Registrar during the first two weeks of 
the Summer Session. 

LIBRARY FACILITIES 

The General Library at College Park, completed in 1931, is an attrac- 
tive, well equipped and well lighted structure. The main reading room on 
the second floor seats 250, and has about 5,000 reference books and bound 
periodicals on open shelves. The stack room is equipped with carrels and 
desks for the use of advanced students. About 20,000 of the 132,000 volumes 
on the campus are shelved in the Chemistry, Entomology and Mathematics 
departments, the Graduate School, and other units. Over 1,000 periodicals 
are currently received. 

The University Library System is able to supplement its reference service 
by borrowing material from other libraries through inter-library loans or 
bibliofilm service, or by arranging for personal work in the Library of Con- 
gress, the United States Office of Education Library, the United States 
Department of Agriculture Library, and other agencies in Washington. 

UNIVERSITY BOOKSTORE 

For the convenience of students, the University maintains a students' 
supply store, located in the basement of the Administration Building, where 
students may obtain at reasonable prices textbooks, stationery, classroom 
materials and equipment, confectionery, etc. 

The store is operated on the basis of furnishing students needed books 
and supplies at as low a cost as practicable, and profits, if any, are turned 
into the general University treasury to be used for promoting general 
student welfare. 

Students are advised not to purchase any textbooks until they have been 
informed by their instructors of the exact texts to be used in the various 
courses, as texts vary from year to year. 

The bookstore is operated on a cash basis. 

ART SCHOOL AT CAMP RITCHIE 
June 27 — August 5 

Those interested in summer painting classes at Camp Ritchie near Blue 
Ridge Summit, should write the Art Department, College Park, for a detailed 
catalog and application forms. 

NURSING EDUCATION IN BALTIMORE 

Several courses in the field of Nursing Education will be off'ered as a 
part of the Summer School in the School of Nursing in the University of 
Maryland in Baltimore. The instructor will be Miss Gladys Sellew, Ph.D., 



UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 21 

R.N. Registration for these courses will be made through Miss Florence 
Gipe, Head, School of Nursing, University of Maryland, Lombard and 
Greene Streets, Baltimore. 

INSTITUTE FOR CHILD STUDY SUMMER WORKSHOP 

The Institute for Child Study offers a summer workshop designed for 
those persons who have been actively engaged in the Child Study Program 
sponsored by the Institute and for those persons who are interested in 
participating in such a program. 

The summer experiences will provide opportunities for increasing knowl- 
edge of scientific concepts that explain behavior and for applying this 
knowledge to concrete school and community situations. 

For further information write the Institute for Child Study, College of 
Education, College Park. 

NURSERY SCHOOL-KINDERGARTEN 

A nursery school for children from 2^/^ to 5 years of age and a kinder- 
garten for those from 5 to 6 years operates during forenoon in Building 
HH for the duration of the Summer Session. These schools are open to 
children of the community and to children whose parents ai-e students or 
teachers in the Summer Session. The enrollment must be limited to the 
number that can be accommodated in the rooms available. Children will 
be accepted in the order of the filing of applications, which may be 
obtained from Miss Edna B. McNaughton, College of Education, College 
Park, Maryland. 

Children whose applications have been accepted should be brought to 
Building HH the morning of June 27. Tuition fees for each child are |10 
in the nursery school and $12.50 in the kindergarten for the session. 

These schools become the basis for courses for teachers for early child- 
hood schools. See page 33. 

THE PROGRAM IN AMERICAN CIVILIZATION 

Work in American Civilization is required of freshmen and sophomores 
and is offered for election to juniors, seniors, and graduates. Freshmen 
and sophomores study literature, history, sociology, and political science 
(Eng. 1, 2, and 3, 4 or 5, 6; Hist. 5, 6; Soc. 1; G. & P. 1). Upper class 
students may elect a combined major-minor in American Civilization 
stressing literature, history, sociology, or government and politics. Gradu- 
ate students may take master's or doctor's degrees in American Civiliza- 
tion. 

The principal objectives of American studies are broadly cultural rather 
than professional; but the work is an excellent preparation for many 
occupations such as teaching, writing, government service, and the law. 
For additional information, address an inquiry to the Chairman of the 
Committee on American Civilization. 



22 



COURSE OFFERINGS 



COURSES OFFERED IN FIELD OF AMERICAN CIVILIZATION 



History 

Hist. 108 S. 

1900. 
Hist. 115 S. 
Hist. 122 S. 
Hist. 129 S. 
Hist. 133 S. 
Hist. 208 S. 

English 

Eng. 155 S. 
Eng. 225 S. 



SUMMER, 1949 

Social and Economic History of the United States, since 

(Chatelain.) 
The Old South. (Gewehr.) 

History of the American Frontier. (Gewehr.) 

The United States and World Affairs. (Wellborn.) 

The History of American Ideas to 1800. (Johnson.) 

Topics in Recent American History. (Merrill.) 



Major American Writers. 
Seminar in American Literature. 



Government and Politics 

G. & P. 4. State Government and Administration. 
G. & P. 106 S. American Foreign Relations. 
G. & P. 174 S. Political Parties. 

Music 

Music 90. History of American Music. 

Art 

Art 10. History of American Art. 

Sociology 

See. 14 S. Urban Sociology. 

Soc. 64 S. Marriage and the Family. 

See. 115 S. Industrial Sociology. 

Soc. 118 S. Community Organization. 

Education 

Ed. 130. Theory of the Junior High School. 
Ed. 203. Problems in Higher Education. 



(Kern.) 
(Kern.) 

(Dixon.) 
(Plischke.) 
(Burdette.) 

(Haslup.) 

(Grubar.) 

(Bailey.) 

(Shankweiler.) 

(Imse.) 

(Bailey.) 

(Torpey.) 
(Torpey.) 



CONFERENCES, INSTITUTES AND WORKSHOPS 
The Parent-Teacher Association Summer Conference — July 12-14 

The College of Education will cooperate with the Maryland Congress of 
Parents and Teachers in planning their convention to be held this summer 
on the University campus. The theme of the meeting will be: "A.B.C.'s of 
P.T.A." Persons of national reputation will be present as speakers and 
discussion leaders at the conference. 



COURSE OFFERINGS 23 

Office Management Institute — July 12-15 

The University of Maryland in cooperation with the Baltimore and 
Washington Chapters of the National Office Management Association and 
the National Education Committee of NOMA, will conduct a four-day 
institute on the College Park campus of the University of Maryland, July 
12, 13, 14, 15, 1949. The Institute will deal with supervisory training and 
scientific methods and procedures in office management. 

The institute is open to teachers and students who for vocational rea- 
sons are interested in becoming more familiar with the functions of office 
management in private business and government. It will also be of value 
to those teachers and students preparing to teach business subjects on 
both the secondary school and collegiate levels. 

Men of national reputation and wide experience in the field of office 
management have been secured to serve on the faculty of the Institute. 

Workshop — Clothing Construction Methods — June 27-JuIy 9 

(Without credit.) 

Daily, 8:00 to 12:00 and 1:00 to 4:00; H304. Laboratory fee, $10.00. 
Open to home economics teachers and home demonstration agents. Be- 
cause the enrollment is limited to 30, reservations should be made early 
by writing to T. Faye Mitchell, College of Home Economics, College Park. 

This is an in-service training project sponsored by Elisabeth Amery, 
Supervisor of Home Economics Education, for the Maryland State Depart- 
ment of Education, and by the College of Home Economics. Edna Bryte 
Bishop will conduct the workshop. Demonstrations and lectures will be 
used to present adaptations of trade methods of clothing construction. 
Cutting, fitting and finishing of garments for a professional appearance 
will be stressed. Each participant will use the methods demonstrated in 
the making of individual garments. 

Workshop — The School Lunch — June 13-17 

State Department of Education and Colleges of Education and Home 
Economics cooperating. Registration June 13, 10:00 A. M. Enrollment 
limited to 30. For experienced school lunch managers. 

Purchasing, storage and preparation of food in quantity; selection and 
use of equipment. Round-table discussion of problems. Trips: Wholesale 
market, a large scale food production center, and school lunch research 
laboratory of the Bureau of Human Nutrition and Home Economics, U. S. 
D. A. Isabelle Tomberlin, Irma Bradford, Marie Mount (in charge) ; 
Gerti'ude N. Bowie (Consultant). 

Workshop — Executive Housekeepers — July 11-15 

Registration July 11, 10:00-11:00 A. M. Fee, $10.00. Enrollment limited 
to 25. Florence Mooers, Sheppard Pratt Hospital (Consultant) ; Jane Crow 
(in charge). 



24 COURSE OFFERINGS 

Organization and administration of the housekeeping departments in 
hotels, hospitals or other institutions. 

Institute of Cosmetology — July 11-August 5 

A four-week course, Monday through Friday, 9 A. M. to 3:30 P. M., with 
extra laboratory work if desired. Tuition, $50 for course. Director: Mrs. 
Louise M. Valench; staff, Dr. Francis A. Ellis, Compton N. Crook, Madame 
Marguerite Buck, Dr. Stanley Pawelek. 

The course is divided into five parts — 

1. Dermatology — Covering the anatomy, functions, characteristics, dis- 

eases and disorders of skin, hair and nails. 
Dermatology laboratory work. 

2. Sanitation and Sterilization — Covering bacteriology, bacterial 
growth and control. Hygiene. 

Bacteriology laboratory work. 

3. Chemistry — Covering the composition and analysis of materials 

used in cosmetology — such as shampoos, permanent wave solu- 
tions, hair dyes, creams and tonics. 
Chemical laboratory work. 

4. Art of Hair Styling — Covering permanent waving processes, de- 

signing of hair styles, hair cutting, combing, and adapting of 
hair styles. 
Practice work on live models. 

5. Teaching Methods — Covering how to teach cosmetology, the psy- 

chology of selling yourself to others, and instruction in platform 
styling and lecturing. 

Institute of Industrial Arts — July 14 
Morning registration — T-108. 

AGRICULTURAL ECONOMICS AND MARKETING 

A. E. 109. Research Problems (1-2). To be arranged. (DeVault.) 

With the permission of the instructor, students will work on any 
research problems in agricultural economics. There will be occasional con- 
ferences for the purpose of making reports on progress of work. 

A. E. 200. Special Problems in Farm Economics (2). To be arranged. 

(DeVault.) 

An advanced course dealing extensively with some of the economic prob- 
lems affecting the farmer, such as land values, taxation, credit, prices, pro- 
duction adjustments, transportation, marketing and cooperation. 

A. E. S216. Advanced Farm Management (1). First three weeks. 10:00; 
0-236. (Hamilton.) 

An advanced course in farm organization and management, especially 
designed for teachers of vocational agriculture. 



COURSE OFFERINGS 25 

AGRICULTURAL EDUCATION AND RURAL LIFE 

The three-week courses in Agricultural Education and Rural Life which 
follow are offered primarily for teachers of vocational agriculture, county 
agents and others interested in the professional and cultural development 
of rural communities. The normal load in such a program is three courses, 
which gives three units of credit. The courses of this department are offered 
in a cycle. By pursuing such a program successfully for four summers, 
a student will be able to earn 12 semester hours, a minimum major in 
this field, and could then return for two full summer sessions or one 
semester of regular school or for four more summers of three weeks each 
to complete the remaining 12 hours required for the Master's degree. These 
courses are arranged to articulate with the three-week courses in Agri- 
cultural Economics and Marketing, Agronomy, Animal Husbandry, Botany, 
Dairy Husbandry, Entomology, Horticulture and Poultry. 

In 1949 the first three-week period will extend from June 27 to July 15. 
School will be held on Saturdays, July 2 and 9, to make up for registration 
day and July 4. 

R. Ed. 8208 A-B. Problems in Teaching Farm Mechanics (1-1). First 
three weeks. Part A. 1:00 to 3:00. I. (Gienger.) 

This course deals with the latest developments in the teaching of Farm 
Mechanics. Various methods in use will be compared and studied under 
laboratory conditions. 

R. Ed. S209 A-B. Adult Education in Agriculture (1-1). First three 
weeks. Part A. 9:00; 0-138. (Ahalt.) 

Principles of adult education as applied to rural groups, especially young 
and adult farmers. Organizing classes, planning courses and instructional 
methods are stressed. 

R. Ed. S210 A-B. Land Grant College Education (1-1). First three 
weeks. Part A. Arranged; 0-138. (Ahalt.) 

Development of Land Grant Colleges and Experiment Stations and the 
role they have played in improving conditions in rural communities. 

R. Ed. S250 A-B. Seminar in Rural Education (1-1). First three weeks. 
Part B. 11:00; 0-138. (Ahalt.) 

Current problems of teaching agriculture are analyzed and discussed. 
Students are asked to make investigations, prepare papers and make 
reports. 

AGRONOMY 

Soils SlOl. Soil Management (1). First three weeks. 8:00; T-13. 

(Thomas.) 

An advanced course primarily designed for teachers of Vocational Agri- 
culture and County Agents dealing with factors involved in management of 
soils in general and of Maryland soils in particular. Emphasis is placed 



26 COURSE OFFERINGS 

on methods of maintaining and improving chemical, physical, and bio- 
logical characteristics of soils. Illustrations with conservation practices 
receive particular attention. 

ANIMAL HUSBANDRY 

A. H. S206. Beef Cattle (1). First three weeks. To be arranged. 

(Foster.) 

A course designed especially for teachers of vocational agriculture and 
extension workers. Baby beef production and the feeding of beef cattle 
will be stressed. 

BACTERIOLOGY 

Bact. 1. General Bacteriology (4.) Five lectures and five two-hour 
laboratory periods a week. Lecture, 8:00; T-314; laboratory, 9:00, 10:00; 
T-311. Laboratory fee, $10.00. (Laffer.) 

The physiology, culture, and differentiation of bacteria. Fundamental 
principles of microbiology in relation to man and his environment. 

Bact. 5. Advanced General Bacteriology (4). Five lectures and five two- 
hour laboratory periods a week. Lecture, 9:00; T-314; laboratory, 10:00, 
11:00; T-307. Prerequisites, Bact. 1 and Chem. 3. Laboratory fee, $10.00. 

(Doetsch.) 

Emphasis will be given to the fundamental procedures and techniques 
used in the field of bacteriology with drill in the performance of these 
techniques. Lectures will consist of the explanation of various laboratory 
procedures. 

Bact. 181. Bacteriological Problems (3). Eight two-hour laboratory 
periods a week. To be arranged. Prerequisites, 16 credits in bacteriology. 
Registration only upon consent of the instructor. Laboratory fee, $10.00. 

(Faber.) 

This course is arranged to provide qualified undergraduate majors in 
bacteriology and majors in allied fields an opportunity to pursue specific 
bacteriological problems under the supervision of a member of the de- 
partment. 

Bact. 290. Research. Prerequisites, 30 credits in bacteriology. Labora- 
tory fee, $10.00. (Staff.) 

Credits according to work done. The investigation is outlined in consul- 
tation with and pursued under the supervision of a senior staff member 
of the department. 

BOTANY 

Bot. 1. General Botany (4). Five lectures and five two-hour laboratory 
periods per week. Lecture, 11:00; T-119; laboratory, 8.00:T-208. Labora- 
tory fee, $5.00. (Owens.) 



COURSE OFFERINGS 27 

General introduction to botany, touching briefly on all phases of the sub- 
ject. The chief aim in this course is to present fundamental biological prin- 
ciples rather than to lay the foundation for professional botany. The stu- 
dent is also acquainted with the true nature and aim of botanical science, 
its methods and the value of its results. 

Bot. 11. Plant Taxonomy (3). Three lectures and five two-hour labora- 
tory periods per week. Prerequisite, Bot. 1. Lecture, M., W., F., 1:00; 
T-218; laboratory, 2:00; T-208. Laboratory fee, $5.00. (Brown.) 

A study of the principles of plant classification, based on the collection 
and identification of local plants. 

Bot. 206. Research, Physiology. (Credit according to work done.) Stu- 
dents must be qualified to pursue with profit the research to be undertaken. 

(Gauch.) 

Bot. 214. Research, Morphology. (Credit according to work done.) 

(Bamford.) 

Bot. 225. Research, Pathology. (Credit according to work done.) 

(Jeffers.) 
BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION 

B. A. 10. Organization and Control (2). Daily, 12:00; A-21. (Clemens.) 
A survey course treating the internal and functional organization of a 
business enterprise. 

B. A. 11. Organization and Control (2). Daily, 8:00; A-21. (McLarney.) 
Includes industrial management, organization and control. 

B. A. 20. Principles of Accounting (4). Daily, 10:00 and 11:00; Q-243. 
Ten periods a week. (Wedeberg.) 

B. A. 21. Principles of Accounting (4). Prerequisite, B. A. 20. Ten 
periods a week. 

Section 1— Daily, 8:00 and 9:00; Q-147. (Wright.) 

Section 2— Daily, 12:00 and 1:00; Q-147. (Daiker.) 

The fundamental principles and problems involved in the accounting sys- 
tem; capital and surplus; bonds; and manufacturing and cost accounting. 

B. A. 110. Intermediate Accounting (3). Prerequisite, B. A. 21. Eight 
periods a week. Daily, 8:00; M., W., F., 9:00; Q-146. (Woodbury.) 

A comprehensive- study of the theory and problems of valuation of 
assets, corporation accounts and statements, consignment and installments, 
and the interpretation of accounting statements. 

B. A. 111. Intermediate Accounting (3). Daily, 12:00; M., W., F., 1:00; 
Q-146. (Woodbury.) 

B. A. 121. Cost Accounting (4). Prerequisite, B. A. 21. Ten periods a 
week. Daily, 10:00 and 11:00; Q-147. (Sweeney.) 



28 COURSE OFFERINGS 

A study of fundamental principles of cost accounting, including job order, 
process and standard cost accounting. 

B. A. 122. Auditing Theory and Practice (3). Prerequisite, B. A. 110. 
Eight periods a week. Daily, 12:00; M., W., F., 1:00; Q-243. (Cronin.) 

A study of the principles and problems of auditing and the application 
of accounting principles to the preparation of audit working papers and 
reports. 

B. A. 123. Income Tax Accounting (4). Prerequisite, B. A. 21. Ten 
periods a week. Daily, 8:00 and 9:00; Q-243. (McKiever.) 

A study of the important provisions of the Federal Tax Law, using 
illustrative examples, selected questions and problems, the preparation of 
returns. 

B. A. 124. Advanced Accounting (3). Prerequisite, B. A. 111. Ten 
periods a week. Daily, 10:00; M., W., F., 11:00; Q-146. (Cronin.) 

Advanced accounting theory applied to specialized problems in partner- 
ships, estates and trusts, banks, mergers and consolidations, receiverships 
and liquidations. 

B. A. 130. Elements of Statistics (3). Prerequisite, junior standing. 
Eight periods a week. Daily, 8:00; M., W., F., 9:00; A-133. (Ash.) 

This course is devoted to a study of the fundamentals of statistics. 
Emphasis is placed upon the collection of data; hand and machine tabula- 
tion; graphic charting; statistical dsitribution; averages; index numbers; 
sampling; elementary tests and reliability and simple correlations. 

B. A. 140. Financial Management (3). Prerequisite, Econ. 140. Eight 
periods a week. Daily, 1:00; M., W., F., 2:00; A-106. (Calhaun.) 

This course deals with principles and practices involved in the organiza- 
tion, financing, and reconstruction of corporations, the various types of 
securities and their use in raising funds, apportioning income, risk, and 
control; intercorporate relations; and new developments. Emphasis on 
solution of problems of financial policy faced by management. 

B. A. 150. Marketing Management (3). Prerequisite, Econ. 150. Eight 
periods a week. Daily, 8:00; M., W., F., 9:00; R-113. (Reid.) 

A study of the work of the marketing division in a going organization. 
The work of developing organizations and procedures for the control of 
marketing activities are surveyed. The emphasis throughout the course 
is placed on the determination of policies, methods, and practices for the 
effective marketing of various forms of manufactured products. 

B. A. 160. Personnel Management (3). Prerequisite, Econ. 160. Eight 
periods a week. 

Section 1— Daily, 10:00; M., W., F., 11:00; A-110. (H.Sylvester.) 

Section 2— Daily, 1:00; M., W., F., 2:00; A-110. (H. Sylvester.) 



COURSE OFFERINGS 29 

This course deals essentially with functions and administrative relation- 
ships between management and the labor force. It comprises a survey of 
the scientific selection of employees, "service" training, job analysis, classifi- 
cation and rating motivation of employees, employer adjustment, wage in- 
centive, employee discipline and techniques of supervision, elimination of 
employment hazards, etc. 

B. A. 166. Business Communication (3). Prerequisite, junior standing. 
Eight periods a week. Daily, 10:00 M., W., F., 11:00; A-21. 

The systems of communications used in modern business; techniques of 
communication forms, administrative memorandums, order, bulletin, digest, 
reports; communication problems in production, marketing, personnel ad- 
ministration, and public relations. 

B. A. 169. Industrial Management (3). Prerequisite, B. A. 11 and 160. 
Eight periods a week. Daily, 10:00; M., W., F., 11:00; A-203. (McLarney.) 

Studies the operation of a manufacturing enterprise. Among the topics 
covered are product development, plant location, plant layout, production 
planning and control, methods analysis, time study, job analysis, budgetary 
control, standard costs, and problems of supervision. An inspection trip 
to large manufacturing plant is made at the latter part of the semester. 

B. A. 181. Business Law (4). Prerequisite, senior standing and B. A. 
180. Ten periods a week. Daily, 8:00 and 9:00; A-209. (Mounce.) 

Legal aspects of business relationships, contracts, negotiable instruments, 
agency, partnerships, corporations, real and personal property, and sales. 

Econ. 5. Economic Development (2). Daily, 9:00; A-21. (Robinson.) 

An introduction to modern economic institutions — their origins, develop- 
ment, and present status. Commercial revolution, industrial revolution, and 
age mass production. Emphasis on the United States. 

Econ. 31. Principles of Economics (3). Prerequisite, sophomore stand- 
ing. Eight periods a week. 

Section 1— Daily, 8:00; M., W., F., 9:00; A-130. 

Section 2— Daily, 10:00; M., W., F., 11:00; A-130. (Clemens.) 

A general analysis of the functioning of the economic system. A con- 
siderable portion of the course is devoted to a study of basic concepts and 
explanatory principles. The remainder deals with the major problems of the 
economic system. 

Econ. 32. Principles of Economics (3). Prerequisite, Econ. 31. Eight 
periods a week. 

Section 1— Daily, 8:00; M., W,. F., 9:00; A-110. (J. Sylvester.) 

Section 2— Daily, 10:00; M., W., F., 11:00; R-112. (Robinson.) 

Same as Econ. 31. 



30 COURSE OFFERINGS 

Econ. 140. Money and Banking (3). Prerequisite, Econ, 32 or 37. Eight 
periods a week. 

Section 1— Daily, 8:00; M., W., P., 9:00; A-204. (Watson.) 

Section 2— Daily, 10:00; M., W., F., 11:00; A-204. (Calhaun.) 

A study of the nature, functions, and operations of our financial organiza- 
tion, money and credit, commercial banking, domestic and foreign exchange, 
federal reser\'e system, non-commercial banking institutions, and recent 
financial developments. 

Econ. 150. Marketing Principles and Organization (3). Prerequisite, 
Econ. 32 or 37. Eight periods a week. Daily, 12:00; M., W., F., 1:00; 
A-130. (Cook.) 

This is an introductory course in the field of marketing. Its purpose is 
to give a general understanding and appreciation of the forces operating, 
institutions employed, and methods followed in marketing agricultural 
products, natural products, services, and manufactured goods. 

Econ. 160. Labor Economics (3). Prerequisite, Econ. 32 or 37. Eight 
periods a week. 

Section 1— Daily, 10:00; M., W., F., 11:00; A-106. (Ratzlaff.) 

Section 2— Daily, 1:00; M., W., F., 2:00; A-204. (J. Sylvester.) 

The historical development and chief characteristics of the American 

labor movement are first surveyed. Present-day problems are then examined 

in detail: wage theories, unemployment, social security, labor organization, 

collective bargaining. 

Geog. 2. Economic Resources (2). 

Section 1— Daily, 10:00; N-106. (Baker.) 

Section 2— Daily, 1:00; N-106. (Baker.) 

General comparative study of the geographic factors underlying produc- 
tion economics. Emphasis upon climate, soils, land forms, agricultural 
products, power resources, and major minerals, concluding with brief sur- 
vey of geography of commerce and manufacturing. 

S. T. 1. Principles of Typewriting (2). Laboratory fee, $7.50. Ten 
periods a week. Daily, 8:00 and 9:00; Q-143. 

The goal of this course is the attainment of the ability to operate the 
typewriter continuously with reasonable speed and accuracy by the use of 
the "touch" system. 

CHEMISTRY 

All laboratory courses in chemistry carry a laboratory fee of $10.00; 
in addition the student is charged for any apparatus which cannot be re- 
turned to the stock room in perfect condition. 

Chem. 3. General Chemistry (4). Five lectures and five three-hour labora- 
tory periods per week. Prerequisite, Chem. 1. Lecture, 11:00; BB-5; labora- 
tory, 1, 2, 3, or 8, 9, 10; BB-5, AA-6. (Story.) 



COURSE OFFERINGS 31 

Chem. 19. Quantitative Analysis (4). Five lectures and five three-hour 
laboratory periods per week. Prerequisite, Chem. 1 and 3. Lecture, 9:00; 
E-116; laboratory, 10, 11, 12; K-231. (Stuntz.) 

Chem. 37. Elementary Organic Chemistry (2). Five lectures per week. 
Prerequisite, Chem. 35. 8:00; BB-5. (Reeve.) 

Chem. 38. Elementary Organic Laboratory (2). Five three-hour labora- 
tory periods per week. 9, 10, 11. (Reeve.) 

Chem. 142. Advanced Organic Laboratory (2). Five three-hour labora- 
tory periods per week. Prerqeuisites, Chem. 19 or 23 and Chem. 37 and 38. 
Laboratory periods arranged. K-310. (Pratt.) 

Chem. 146. Identification of Organic Compounds (2). Five three-hour 
laboratory periods per week. Prerequisites, Chem. 141 and 142. Labora- 
tory periods arranged; K-310. (Pratt.) 

Chem. 166 and 167. Food Analysis (3). Three lectures and five three- 
hour laboratory periods per week. Prerequisites, Chem. 19, 31, 32, 33, 34. 
Lecture, M., W., F., 10:00; BB-5. Laboratory periods arranged. (Wiley.) 

Chem. 254. Advanced Organic Preparations (2 to 4). Five to ten three- 
hour laboratory periods per week. Laboratory periods arranged; K-310. 

(Pratt.) 

Chem. 258. The Identification of Organic Compounds, an advanced course 

(2 to 4). Five to ten three-hour laboratory periods per week. Laboratory 
periods arranged; K-310. Two recitations per week. Arranged. (Pratt.) 

Chem. 285. Colloid Chemistry (2). Five lectures per week, 11:00; R-103. 

(Pickard.) 

Chem. 360. Research. (Staff.) 

DAIRY 

Dairy 124. Special Problems in Dairying (2-4). Arranged. Prerequi- 
sites, students majoring in dairy husbandry. Dairy 1 and 101; students 
majoring in dairy products technology, Dairy 1, 108 and 109. Credit in 
accordance with the amount and character of work done. (Staff.) 

Special problems which relate specifically to the work the student is 
pursuing will be assigned. 

Dairy 204. Methods of Dairy Research (1-3). Arranged. Prerequisite, 
permission of professor in charge of work. Credit in accordance with the 
amount and character of work done. (Cairns and Shaw.) 

Special problems which relate specifically to the work the student is 
pursuing will be assigned. 

Dairy 208. Research (1-3). Arranged. Credit to be determined by the 
amount and quality of work done. (Cairns and Shaw.) 

The student will be required to pursue, with the approval of the Head 
of the Department, an original investigation in some phase of dairy hus- 



32 COURSE OFFERINGS 

bandry, carrying the same to completion and report results in the form 
of a thesis. 

EDUCATION 
BUSINESS EDUCATION 

B. Ed. 101. Methods and Materials in Teaching Office Skills (2). 11:00; 
Q-140. (Leffingwell.) 

Problems in development of occupational competency, achievement tests, 
standards of achievement, instructional materials, transcription and the 
integration of skills. 

B. Ed. 102. Methods and Materials in Teaching Bookkeeping and Related 
Subjects (2). 8:00; Q-140. (Patrick.) 

Important problems and procedures in the mastery of bookkeeping and 
related office knowledges and skills including a consideration of materials 
and teaching procedures. 

B. Ed. 162. Methods of Teaching in the Part-Time Cooperative (Dis- 
tributive Education) Program (2). 10:00; Q-140. (Berry.) 

Work study programs require an approach in teaching techniques some- 
what different from that of the regular classroom. This course will in- 
clude a study of the methods to be used in teaching the part-time cooper- 
ative student, e. g., discussion, committee, conference, individualized study. 
Emphasis will be placed on the development and use of visual aids, films, 
sound slides, field trips, and laboratory work in the classroom and on the 
job. Opportunity will be given for demonstration and practice. 

B. Ed. 16.5. Organization and Operation of the Part-Time Cooperative 
(Distributive Education) Program (2). 11:00; Q-148. (Berry.) 

A basic course essential for all those who teach or supervise part-time 
high school cooperative programs. Includes study of such topics as, setting 
and maintaining standards of performance for students, school, and train- 
ing agencies; integrating the program in the high school; selection, place- 
ment, and follow-up of students; building good training agencies; promoting 
the program; and development of efficient forms and records. 

B. Ed. 180. Merchandise Information for the Distributive Education Co- 
ordinator (2). 1:00; Q-148. (Berry.) 

A technical course designed to provide the information necessary for 
teaching the manufacture, selling and care of merchandise. Opportunity 
is given to study specific items of merchandise and also to develop general 
techniques for learning about and keeping up-to-date on all items. Source 
files, bibliographies and visual aids will be considered. 

B. Ed. 255. Principles and Problems of Business Education (2). 9:00; 
Q-140. (Patrick.) 

Principles and practices in business education; growth and present status; 
vocational business education; general business education; relation to con- 
sumer education and to education in general. 



COURSE OFFERINGS 33 

O. T. 150. Theory of New Gregg Shorthand System (3). 1:00-2:30; 
Q-140. (Leffingwell.) 

Open to experienced teachers. 

The purpose of this course is to present the basic changes in the new 
Revised System of Gregg Shorthand, and to develop the mastery of teach- 
ing this revision. The course includes a study of the advanced principles 
and phrasing, and the development of maximum dictation skills. 

CHILDHOOD EDUCATION 

C. Ed. 102. Child Development, III: The Child from Five to Ten Years 

(2). Daily, 10:00; T-119. (McNaughton.) 

Development, characteristics, and interests of the middle-age child; inter- 
personal relations as affected by home, school, and community; observation 
and study of one child. 

C. Ed. 110. Child Development, IV: The Preschool Years (3). Eight 
periods a week. Daily, 11:00; T., W., Th., 8:00; R-204. (McNaughton.) 

Growth and development of the preschool child as a basis for understand- 
ing child behavior and the type of guidance needed; observation in nursery 
school; study of one child of preschool age. 

C. Ed. 140. Curriculum, Instruction and Observation — Nursery School 
(3). Five lectures. Daily, 8:00; DD-12. Three hours a week observation 
in university nursery school (9-12). (Whitney.) 

Setting up of nursery school, selection of equipment, planning of pro- 
gram, methods of working with each age level; parents' conferences. 

C. Ed. 149. Teaching Nursery School (4). Daily 9-12. Conference 
hours arranged. Advance registration advised for those wishing to do 
student teaching. (Whitney.) 

Nursery school open to children of community and to those of parents 
attending Summer Session; for age groups 2i/^-5. Enrollment of children 
limited. Advance registration required by May 15th. Tuition for Summer 
Session (for child), $10.00. 

C. Ed. 150. Curriculum, Instruction and Observation — Kindergarten (3). 

Five lectures. Daily, 8:00; N-105. Three hours observation in university 
kindergarten each week (9-12). (Limburg.) 

A study of the many activities of the kindergarten program with em- 
pliasis on maturity levels and various aspects of child development. 

C. Ed. 159. Teaching Kindergarten (4). Daily, 9-12. Conference hours 
arranged. (Colletti.) 

Emphasis will be placed upon creative activities, music, rhythms, art. 
Class in student teaching limited to twelve. Advance registration for those 
planning to do student teaching required by May 15th. 



34 COURSE OFFERINGS 

The kindergarten will be open not only to children (5-6 years) of com- 
munity but also to those of parents attending the Summer Session. Enroll- 
ment limited to twenty. Tuition for child, $12.50. Advance registration 
for children by May 15th. 

EDUCATION 

Ed. 52. Children's Literature (2). 8:00; T-119. (Bryan.) 

A study of literary values in prose and verse for children. 

Ed. 101. History of Education (2). 1:00; T-102. (Mott.) 

Emphasis is placed on the post-Renaissance periods. 

Ed. 105. Comparative Education— Europe (2). 11:00; T-314. (Mott.) 

A study of national systems of education with the primary purpose of 

discovering their characteristic differences and formulating criteria for 

judging their worth. 

Ed. 106. Comparative Education— Latin American (2). 8:00; T-102. 

(Benjamin and Stewart.) 
This course is a continuation of Ed. 105, with emphasis upon the national 
educational systems of the Western Hemisphere. 

Ed. 121. The Language Arts in the Elementary School (2). 12 noon; 
F-103. (Scott.) 

This course is concerned with present trends in the teaching of reading, 
spelling, handwriting, written and oral language, and creative expression. 
Special emphasis is given to the use of the skills in meaningful situations 
having real significance to the pupils. 

Ed. 122. The Social Studies in the Elementary School (2). 9:00; F-112. 

(Scott.) 

The emphasis in this course is on pupil growth through social experi- 
ences. Consideration is given to the utilization of environmental resources, 
curriculum, organization and methods of teaching, and evaluation of newer 
methods and materials in the field. 

Ed. 123. The Child and the Curriculum (2). 9:00; P-101. (Denecke.) 

This course will emphasize the relation of the elementary school curricu- 
lum to child growth and development. Recent trends in curriculum organi- 
zation; the effect of school environment on learning; readiness to learn; and 
adapting curriculum content and methods to the maturity levels of children 
will be emphasized. 

Ed. 124. Creative Expression in the Elementary School, I (2). 10:00; 
F-112. (Scott.) 

This course should prove practical to classroom teachers and supervisors, 
since it will attempt to consider the so-called special subjects in their rela- 
tion to children and the course of study. It is based on the point of view 



COURSE OFFERINGS 35 

that the classroom teacher is the best teacher of her children and as such 
is responsible for the day by day development of special areas as an 
integrated part of the total program. Creativity as the natural expression 
of ideas and as a means of communication will be stressed in both language 
and manual arts. The relation of creativity to the integration of personality 
will be emphasized. 

Ed. 125. Creative Expression in the Elementary School, II (2). Pre- 
requisite, Ed. 124 or taking concurrently. 

Following on Ed. 124, this course allows for specialization in selected 
phases of the creative arts. Separate sections will be scheduled in such 
fields as art, dramatics, and music. 

Section 1— Art, 1.00; H-135. (R. Wiggin.) 

Section 2— Music, 1:00; B-4. (Taylor.) 

Ed. 130. Theory of the Junior High School (2). 9:00; T-102. (Torpey.) 

This course gives a general overview of the junior high school. In includes 

consideration of the purposes, functions, and characteristics of this school 

unit; a study of its population, organization, program of studies, methods, 

and staff; and other similar topics, together with their implication for 

prospective teachers. 

Ed. 134. Materials and Procedure for the Senior High School Core Cur- 
riculum (2). 11:00; 0-236. (Sparhawk.) 

This course is designed to bring practical suggestions to teachers who are 
in charge of core classes in senior high schools. Materials and teaching 
procedures for specific units of work are stressed. 

Ed. 137. Science in the Junior High School (2). 8:00; EE-16. (Crook.) 
A study of the place, function and content of science in junior high school 

programs. Applications to core curriculum organization. Laboratory fee, 

$2.00. 

Ed. 144. Materials and Procedure for the Junior High School Core Cur- 
riculum (2). 9:00; 0-236. (Sparhawk.) 

This course is designed to bring practical suggestions to teachers who are 
in charge of core classes in junior high schools. Materials and teaching 
procedures for specific units of work are stressed. 

Ed. 147. Audio-Visual Education (2). Section 1, 2:00; Section 2, 3.00; 
T-108. Laboratory fee, $1.00. (Brechbill.) 

Sensory impressions in their relation to learning; projection apparatus, its 
cost and operation; slides, film-strips, and films; physical principles under- 
lying projection; auditory aids to instruction; fields trips; pictures, models, 
and graphic materials; integration of sensory aids with organized instruc- 
tion. 

Ed. 150. Educational Measurement (2). Section 1, 2:00; Section 2, 3:00; 
T-102. (Taylor.) 



36 COURSE OFFERINGS 

A study of tests and examinations with emphasis upon their construction 
and use. Types of tests; purposes of testing; elementary statistical con- 
cepts, and processes used in summarizing and analyzing test results; school 
marks. 

Ed. 152. The Adolescent: Characteristics and Problems (2). 9:00; N-106. 

(Dice.) 

This course deals with the intellectual, emotional, social, and vocational 
problems which arise in the transitional period between childhood and 
adulthood, the secondary school period. 

Ed. 153. The Improvement of Reading (2). 11:00; T-103. (Schindler.) 
This course is intended for teachers working at the intermediate and 
secondary school levels. Attention is given to the teaching of reading in 
different school subjects, the selection of reading materials, the study of 
individuals with reference to causes of reading deficiencies, types of reading 
lessons, and certain elements of psychology essential to intelligent con- 
sideration of problems in this field. 

Ed. 160. Educational Sociology— Introductory (2). 1:00; 0-236. 

(Sparhawk.) 

This course deals with data of the social sciences which are germane to 
the work of teachers. Consideration is given to implications of democratic 
ideology for educational endeavor, educational tasks imposed by changes in 
population and technological trends, the welfare status of pupils, the socio- 
economic attitudes of individuals who control the schools, and other ele- 
ments of community background which has significance in relation to 
schools. 

Ed. 161. Guidance in Secondary Schools (2). 8:00; T-103. 

This course is primarily designed for the classroom teacher in terms of 
the day-by-day demands made upon him as a teacher in the guidance of 
youth in his classes and in the extra-class activities which he sponsors. The 
stress is upon usable materials and upon practical common-sense guidance 
procedures of demonstrated workability. 

Ed. 162. Mental Hygiene in the Classroom (2). Section 1, 11:00; Sec- 
tion 2, 1:00; N-105. (Dice.) 

The practical application of the principles of mental hygiene to classroom 
problems. 

Ed. 184. Outdoor Education (6). All day; W-15. 

(Deering, Vinal, and Staff.) 

A full-time program for teachers, administrators, recreation leaders, and 
social workers in functionalized child development through utilization of 
the surrounding natural environment and resources. Guided group work im- 
plements the acquired techniques for use with children in developing educa- 
tion in democratic living, worthy use of leisure, certain character traits 



COURSE OFFERINGS 37 

and also for vitalizing such subject-matter areas as mathematics, language, 
arts, social and natural sciences, music, health and physical education, 
graphic and plastic arts. 

Ed. 191. Principles of Adult Education (2). 8:00; T-218. (Wiggin.) 

The course includes a study of adult educational agencies, both formal and 
informal, with special reference to the development of adult education in the 
United States, the interests and abilities of adults, and the techniques of 
adult learning. Emphasis is laid on practical aids for teachers of various 
types of adult groups. 

Ed, 195. Teaching Traffic Safety and Automobile Operation (2). Pre- 
requisite, two years driving experience. 9:00; 10:00, M., W., F.; Ar-26. 
Laboratory fee, $3.00. (Heylmun.) 

Practical and theoretical study of the driver, driver and pedestrian re- 
sponsibilities, the automobile and its operation, traffic problems and regu- 
lations, and the organization and administration of the course in secondary 
schools. Dual control cars are used. 

Ed. 202. The Junior College (2). 8:00; A-207. (Kabat.) 

The philosophy and development of the junior college in the United States 
with emphasis on curriculum and administrative controls. 

Ed. 203. Problems in Higher Education (2). 11:00; T-102. (Torpey.) 

A study of present problems in higher education. 
Ed. 205. Seminar in Comparative Education (2). 10:00; T-102. (Mott.) 

Ed. 209. Seminar in History of Education (2). 12:00 noon; T-102. 

(Wiggin.) 

Ed. 210. The Organization and Administration of Public Education (2). 

Section 1, 9:00; Section 2, 10:00; T-103. (Newell.) 

This course deals with so-called "external" phases of school administra- 
tion. It includes study of the present status of public school administration, 
organization of local, state and federal educational authorities; and the ad- 
ministrative relationships involved therein. 

Ed. 211. The Organization, Administration, and Supervision of Secondary 
Schools (2). 10:00; N-101. (Pyle.) 

This course is designed as a continuation of Ed. 210, but may be taken 
independently. It includes what is called "internal" administration; the 
organization of units within a school system; the personnel problems in- 
volved; and such topics as schedule making, teacher selection, public rela- 
tions, and school supervision. 

Ed. 214. School Buildings and Equipment (2). 11:00; R-6. (Van Zwoll.) 
This course emphasizes the planning and construction of school build- 
ings, the development of building programs, and the selection of equipment. 
The care and upkeep of school buildings also receive attention. 



38 COURSE OFFERINGS 

Ed. 216. High School Supervision (2). 9:00; N-101. (Pyle.) 

This course deals with the nature and function of supei-vision; recent 
trends in supervisory theory and practice; teacher participation in the de- 
termination of policies; planning of supervisory programs; appraisal of 
teaching methods; curriculum reorganization, and other means for the 
improvement of instruction. 

Ed. 217. Administration and Supervision in Elementary Schools (2). 

11:00; O-240. (Blacklock.) 

A study of the problems connected with organizing and operating ele- 
mentary schools and directing instruction. 

Ed. 219. Seminar in School Administration (2). 9:00; T-119. 

(Van Zwoll.) 

Ed. 220. Pupil Transportation (2). 8:00; F-101. (Feather stone.) 

This course includes consideration of the organization and administration 
of state, county, and district pupil transportation service with emphasis 
on safety and economy. The planning of bus routes; the selection and train- 
ing of bus drivers, and maintenance mechanics; the specification of school 
buses; and procurement procedures are included in this course. 

Ed. 225. School Public Relations (2). 10:00; R-4. (Van Zwoll.) 

A study of the relationships between the public school as a social insti- 
tution and the community of which it is a part. This course deals with the 
agents who participate in the interpretative process, with propaganda and 
the schools, with parent-teacher associations and other lay advisory groups, 
and with such means of publicity as the newspaper, radio, and school 
publications. 

Ed. 229. Seminar in Elementary Education (2). 1:00; P-101. 

(Denecke.) 

Ed. 236. Curriculum Development in the Secondary School (2). 10:00; 
P-120. (Hornbake.) 

Curriculum planning; philosophical bases, objectives, learning experiences, 
organization of appropriate content, and means of evaluation. 

Ed. 242. Coordination in Work-Experience Programs (2). 9:00; R-6. 

(Brown.) 

This course surveys and evaluates the qualities and duties of a teacher- 
coordinator in a work-experience program. It deals particularly -with evolving 
patterns in city and county schools in Maryland, and is designed to help 
teacher-coordinators, guidance counselors, and other supervisory and ad- 
ministrative personnel concerned with functioning relationships of part- 
time, cooperative education in a comprehensive educational program. 

Ed. 244. Applications of Theory and Research to the Language Arts in 
Elementary Schools (2). 8:00; R-6. (Schindler.) 



COURSE OFFERINGS 39 

Implications of experimental practices, the proposals of eminent writers, 
and the results of research for the language arts in elementary schools. 

Ed. 245. Applications of Theory and Research to High School Teaching 
—English (2). 10:00; T-314. (Bryan.) 

Implications of experimental practices, the proposals of eminent writers 
and the results of research for the improvement of teaching on the secondary 
level. Emphasis on English. 

Ed. 247. Seminar in Science Education (2). 12:00; T-128. (Straus.) 

Ed. 250. Analysis of the Individual (2). 

Section 1—9:00; 0-336. (Nyweide.) 

Section 2—10:00; 0-336. (Nyweide.) 

This course is concerned with the selection and administration of tests and 
inventories. Interpretation and use of data are stressed. 

Ed. 261. Counseling Technique (2). Section 1, 9:00; Section 2, 10:00; 
T-218. (Sievers.) 

This course deals with the various specialized techniques, procedures, and 
materials utilized by guidance specialists in the schools. 

Ed. 262. Occupational Information (2). 11:00; 0-336. (Nyweide.) 

This course is designed to give counsellors, teachers of social studies, 

school librarians, and other workers in the field of guidance and education 

a background of educational and occupational information which is basic 

for counseling and teaching. 

Ed. 269. Seminar in Guidance (2). 2:00; T-103. (Sievers.) 

Ed. 289. Research (1-6). 

Ed. 290. Administrative Direction of Health, Physical Education and 
Recreation (2). 8:00; G-203. (Hutto.) 

HUMAN DEVELOPMENT EDUCATION 

H. D. 112. Scientific Concepts in Human Development (3). 

NOTE. H. D. Ed. 112 must be taken concurrently with H. D. Ed. 113. 

H. D. 113. Laboratory in Behavior Analysis (3). 

NOTE: H. D. Ed. 113 must be taken concurrently with H. D. Ed. 112. 

H. D. 212. Advanced Scientific Concepts in Human Development (3). 

NOTE: H. D. Ed. 212 must be taken concurrently with H. D. Ed. 213. 

H. D. 213. Advanced Laboratory in Behavior Analysis (3). 

NOTE: H. D. Ed. 213 must be taken concurrently with H. D. Ed. 212. 

INDUSTRIAL EDUCATION 
Technical Courses 

The following courses are offered to persons who are preparing to teach 
industrial arts at the secondary school level or to teachers already engaged 



40 COURSE OFFERINGS 

in industrial arts teaching. The courses are comparable in content and 
presentation to those offered during the regular school term in the indus- 
trial arts curriculum. The primary purpose of each course is to have the 
student develop sufficient skill and technique to instruct secondary school 
pupils. 

Ind. Ed. 2. Elementary Woodworking (2). 1:00, 2:00; Ind. Ed. Bldg. 
Laboratory fee, $3.00. (Wall.) 

This is a wookworking course which involves the use of hand tools almost 
exclusively. The course is developed so that the student uses practically 
every common woodworking hand tool in one or more situations. There is 
also included elementary wood finishing, the specifying and storing of lum- 
ber, and the care and conditioning of tools used. 

Ind. Ed. 9. Art Crafts, I (2). 1:00, 2:00; Ind. Ed. Bldg. Laboratory 
fee, $3.00. (Olewine.) 

The materials used in Art Crafts I are woods, leathers and plastics. Silk 
screen and block printing procedures are taught. Each student is provided 
with the opportunity of doing a variety of types of work in the various media. 

Ind. Ed. 106. Art Metal Work (2). Section 1, 8:00, 9:00; Section 2, 
10:00, 11:00; Ind. Ed. Bldg. Laboratory fee, $3.00. (Kronquist.) 

Simple operations in the art of making jewelry including ring making, 
stone setting, and the like. 

Ind. Ed. 21. Mechanical Drawing II (2). 3:00, 4:00; Ind. Ed. Bldg. 
Laboratory fee, $3.00. Prerequisite, Ind. Ed. I, or equivalent. (Olewine.) 

This course deals with working drawings, machine design, pattern layouts, 
tracing and reproduction. Details and assembly drawings are produced. 

Ind. Ed. 22. Machine Woodworking I (2). 1:00, 2:00; Ind. Ed. Bldg. 
Laboratory fee $3.00. Prerequisite, Ind. Ed. 2, or equivalent. (Wall.) 

Machine Woodworking I offers initial instruction in the proper operation 
of the jointer, band saw, variety saw, jig saw, mortiser, shaper, and lathe. 
The types of jobs which may be performed on each machine and their safe 
operation are of primary concern. The medium of instruction is school-shop 
equipment, hobby items, and useful home projects. 

Ind. Ed. 23. Arc and Gas Welding (1). 9:00; Ind. Ed. Bldg. Labora- 
tory fee, $3.00. (Maley.) 

A course designed to give the student a functional knowledge of the 
principles and use of electric and acetylene welding. Practical work is 
carried on in the construction of various projects using welded joints. In- 
struction is given in the use and care of equipment, type of welded joints, 
methods of welding, importance of welding processes in industry, safety 
considerations, etc. 

Ind. Ed. 24. Sheet Metal Work (2). 1:00, 2:00; Ind. Ed. Bldg. Labora- 
tory fee, $3.00. (Maley.) 



COURSE OFFERINGS 41 

Articles are made from metal in its sheet form and involve the opera- 
tions of cutting, shaping, soldering, riveting, wiring, folding, seaming, bead- 
ing, burring, etc. The student is required to develop his own patterns in- 
clusive of parallel line development, radial line development, and triangu- 
lation. Common sheet metal tools and machines are used in this course. 

Ind. Ed. 28. Electricity I (2). 10:00, 11:00; Ind. Ed. Bldg. Laboratory 
fee, $3.00. (Drazek.) 

An introductory course in electricity. It deals with basic electrical phe- 
nomena and includes such radio and electronic instruction as may be helpful 
in industrial arts programs at the junior high school level. 

Ind. Ed. 41. Architectural Drawing (2). 3:00, 4:00; Ind. Ed. Bldg. 
Laboratory fee, $3.00. Prerequisite, Ind. Ed. 1, or equivalent. (Olewine.) 

Practical experience is provided in the design and planning of homes and 
other buildings. Working drawings, specifications and blue prints are 
featured. 

Ind. Ed. 110. Foundry (1). 8:00; Ind. Ed. Bldg. Laboratory fee, $3.00. 

(Maley.) 

The course includes bench and floor molding and elementary core making. 
Theory and principles of foundry materials, tools, and appliances are 
covered. 

Professional Courses 

The following courses are intended for industrial arts teachers and 
supervisors, for vocational-industrial teachers and supervisors, and for 
school administrators and others who desire to acquaint themselves with 
underlying principles, practices and educational contributions of industrial 
arts and vocational education. 

Ind. Ed. 150. Training Aids Development (2). 8:00; P-101. (Wall.) 

Study of the aids in common use as to their source and application. Special 
emphasis is placed on principles to be observed in making aids useful to 
shop teachers. Actual making and application of such aids will be required. 

Ind. Ed. 157. Evaluation Related to Vocational and Occupational Subjects 

(2). 10:00; P-101. (Wall.) 

This course is devoted to the construction of objective tests for voca- 
tional and occupational subjects and to other means of evaluation. The 
statistical treatment of such data is also covered. 

Ind. Ed. 165. Modern Industry (2). 11:00; P-120. (Hornbake.) 

This course provides an overview of factory organization and manage- 
ment. Representative basic industries are studied from the viewpoints of 
personnel and management organization, industrial relations, production 
procedures, distribution of product, and the like. 



42 COURSE OFFERINGS 

Ind. Ed. 240. Research in Industrial Arts and Vocational Education (2). 

8:00; P-120. (Hornbake.) 

This is a course olTered for persons who are conducting research in the 

areas of Industrial Arts and Vocational Education. 

Ind. Ed. 248. Seminar in Industrial Arts and Vocational Education (2). 

11:00; P-101. (Brown.) 

This seminar deals with the issues and functions of Industrial Arts and 

Vocational Education, particularly with respect to the emerging changes 

in educational planning on the secondary school level. Opportunity is given 

to students majoring in Industrial Education to write one of the seminar 

reports required for the degree of Master of Education. 

PHYSICAL EDUCATION 
P. E. 10s. Tennis (1). 

Section 1— Daily, 2:00; Col. (Woods.) 

Section 2— Daily, 4:00; W. (Alexander.) 

Instruction and practice in basic strokes, rules of the game; care and 
selection of equipment. 

P. E. 20s. Badminton (1). 

Section 1— Daily, 3:00; Col. (Woods.) 

Section 2— Daily, 5:00; W. (Alexander.) 

Instruction and practice in basic strokes, rules of the game; care and 

selection of equipment. 

P. E. 30s. Archery (1). Daily, 2:00; W. (Alexander.) 

Instruction and practice; scoring; competition in varying types of 

shooting. 

P. E. 40s. Golf (1). Wednesday, 1:00, 2:00, 3:00, 4:00; Ar. (Cronin.) 

Selection of equipment; rules of golf. Techniques of drive, approach and 
putt. Instruction in golf as a competitive game; intramural and inter- 
scholastic. 

P. E. 100. Kinesiology (3). Daily, 3:00; M., W., F., 4:00; G-I. 

(Mitchell.) 
A study of human motion conforming to the laws of mechanics and 
principles of physiology and anatomy. 

P. E. 114. Methods and Materials for Secondary Schools (Women) (2). 

Daily, 11:00; T., Th., 10:00; W. (Alexander.) 

Theory and practice: Class organization, analysis, and teaching tech- 
niques of sports, gymnastics, self-testing activities, and rhythms for junior 
and senior high school programs. 

P. E. 125s. Coaching Athletics (2). Daily, 3:00; Ar. (Kehoe.) 

Methods of coaching track and field in high school and college. 



COURSE OFFERINGS 43 

P. E. 140. Therapeutics (3). Daily, 1:00, 2:00; G-I. (Mitchell.) 

A study of common structural abnormalities, corrective (adaptive) exer- 
cises, and massage. Causes, prevention and correction of postural defects. 
Testing methods. Theory and practice. 

P. E. 180. Tests and Measurements in Physical Education (3). Daily, 
9:00, 10:00; W. (Hutto.) 

The theory and use of achievement standards and tests of physical fitness, 
motor ability, sports skills, etc., with emphasis on the analysis and interpre- 
tation of results and their application to school programs of physical 
education. 

P. E. 200. Departmental Seminar (1-2). 12:00; G-201. (Staff.) 

Each candidate for the Master's Degree will present to the group, includ- 
ing faculty and invited authorities, a mimeographed outline of his thesis, 
a verbally delivered digest of the main thesis problem, sub-problems and 
the tentative solutions. This must be presented, and defended in a manner 
satisfactory to the fellow students, faculty and/or authorities present. 

P. E. 201s. Foundations in Health, Physical Education, and Recreation 
(2). Daily, 1:00; G-202. (Deach, Hutto.) 

An overall view of the total fields with their inter-relations and places in 
education. 

P. E. 230s. Contemporary Physical Education (2). Daily, 11:00; G-201. 

(Gloss.) 
The present-day status and possible future developments of community, 
state, federal (including military), physical education programs. 

P. E. 250. Survey in Area of Health, Physical Education, and Recreation 
(6). Arranged; G-101. (Gloss.) 

A library survey course, covering the total areas of physical education, 
health, and recreation, plus intensive research on one specific limited 
problem of which a digest, including a bibliography, is to be submitted. 

P. E. 260. Research (1-6). Arranged; G-101. (Gloss, Burnett.) 

This course is for advanced students who are capable of doing individual 

research on some topic other than the thesis or the one chosen in P. E. 250. 

Approval of the instructor is required. 

RECREATION 

Rec. 100. Co- Recreational Games and Programs (2). Daily, 9:00; G-202. 

(Zenn.) 
Activities for social recreation in playgrounds, industries, camps, churches, 
and gymnasiums. 

Rec. 130. Principles and Practice of Recreation (3). Daily, 10:00, 11:00; 
G-202. (Zenn.) 



44 COURSE OFFERINGS 

Theories of recreation and methods of conducting individual and group 
recreation put into practice with college students. 

HEALTH EDUCATION 

Hea. 160. Problems in School Health Education (4-6). Arranged; Ar,-32. 

(Walker, Deach, Hutto.) 

A workshop type course for experienced teachers, administrators, nurses, 
and other active health service personnel dealing with the practical prob- 
lems of educating children in healthful living. 

SCIENCE EDUCATION 

Sci. Ed. SI. General Science for the Elementary School. (West.) 

Section A-1: For Primary Grades (2). 9:00; GG-11. Laboratory fee, 
$1.00. 

Section B-1.: For Upper Elementary Grades (2). 11:00; GG-11. Labora- 
tory fee, $1.00. 

These courses are planned to meet the needs of the elementary school 
teacher. A point of view consistent with current philosophy in elementary 
education will be developed. The course will provide background material 
in selected phases of those sciences which contribute to elementary school 
work. An interpretation of materials of the local environment with refer- 
ence to enrichment of the science program will receive attention. As much 
of the work as is possible will be illustrated with simple materials and 
apparatus and the material will be professionalized as much as possible. 

There are two additional sections of this course, A-2 and B-2, which are 
given in alternate summers. None of the sections is prerequisite to other 
sections. Students may receive credit for both Sections A-1 and A-2 or 
B-1 and B-2. Students should not enroll for both A and B Sections. 

Sci. Ed. S2. Activity Materials for Science in the Elementary School (2). 

T., Th., 1:00-3:30; GG-11. Group and individual conferences to be arranged. 
Class limited to thirty students. Laboratory fee, $2.00. (West.) 

A laboratory course planned to provide grade teachers with the oppor- 
tunity for becoming acquainted with experiments and preparing materials 
which are of practical value in their science teaching. 

ENGLISH 

Eng. 1, 2. Composition and American Literature (3, 3). Eight periods a 
week. 



Eng. 1— 

Section 1— Daily, 9:00; M., W., F., 8 

Section 2— Daily, 9:00; M., W., F., 8 

Section 3— Daily, 1 :00; M., W., F., 2 

Section 4— Daily, 1 :00; M., W., F., 2 



00; A-18. (LeBert.) 

00; A-17. (Dinwiddle.) 

00; A-17. (Roch.) 
00; A-18. 



COURSE OFFERINGS 



45 



Eng. 2— 

Section 1— Daily, 9:00; M., W., F., 8:00; A-203. 
Section 2— Daily, 9:00; M., W., F., 8:00; A-12. 
Section 3— Daily, 11 :00; M., W., F., 1 :00; A-209. 
Section 4— Daily, 11 :00; M., W., F., 1:00; A-12. 
Section 5— Daily, 11:00; M., W., F., 1:00; A-230. 

Eng. 3, 4. Composition and World Literature (3, 3). 

week. 



Eng. 3— 

Section 1— Daily, 9:00; M., W., F., 8 
Section 2— Daily, 9:00; M., W., F., 8 
Section 3— Daily, 9:00; M., W., F., 8 
Section 4— Daily, 10:00; M., W., F., 11 
Section 5— Daily, 10:00; M., W., F., 11 
Section 6— Daily, 10:00; M., W., F., 11 

Eng. 4 — 



00; A-203. 
00; R-101. 
00; A-228. 
00; A-228. 
00; A-302. 
00; H-309. 



Section 1— Daily, 9:00; M., W., F., 8:00; A-302. 
Section 2— Daily, 10:00; M., W., F., 11:00; A-18. 
Section 3— Daily, 1:00; M., W., F., 2:00; A-133. 
Section 4— Daily, 1:00; M., W., F., 2:00; A-203. 



(Harwell.) 

(Martin.) 

(Anderson.) 

(Portz.) 

Eight periods a 



(Mooney.) 
(Adams.) 

(Cooley.) 
(Schaumann.) 



(Gravely.) 
(Hyde.) 



Eng. 5, 6. Composition and English Literature (3, 3). Eight periods a 
week. 



Eng. 5— 

Section 1— Daily, 10:00; M., W., F., 11:00; A-17. 
Section 2— Daily, 10:00; M., W., F., 11:00; H-222. 
Section 3— Daily, 1:00; M., W., F., 2:00; A-228. 



(Murphy.) 
(Miller.) 
(Ward.) 



Eng. 6 — 

Section 1— Daily, 10:00; M., W., F., 11:00; R-109. (Zeeveld.) 

Section 2— Daily, 10:00; M., W., F., 11:00; R-110. (Bradley.) 

Section 3— Daily, 1:00; M., W., F., 2:00; A-207. 

Eng. 88. College Grammar (2). 11:00; A-207. Prerequisites, Eng. 1, 2. 

(Harman.) 

An analytical study of Modern English grammar, with lectures on the 
origin and history of inflectional and derivational forms. 

Eng. 1048. Chaucer (2). 9:00; A-207. Prerequisites, Eng. 1, 2 and 3, 4 
or 5, 6. (Cooley.) 



46 COURSE OFFERINGS 

A literary and language study of the Canterbury Tales, Troilus and 
Criseyde, and the principal minor poems. 

Eng. 115S. Shakespeare (2). 9:00; A-212. Prerequisites, Eng. 1, 2 and 
3, 4 or 5, 6. (Zeeveld.) 

Important plays. 

Eng. 121S. Milton (2). 12:00; A-212. Prerequisites, Eng. 1, 2 and 3, 4 
or 5, 6. (Murphy.) 

The poetry and the chief prose works. 

Eng. 135S. Literature of the Victorian Period (2). 10:00; A-212. Pre- 
requisites, Eng. 1, 2 and 3, 4 or 5, 6. (Mooney.) 
Chief writers of prose and verse. 

Eng. 155S. Major American Writers (2). 11:00; A-212. Prerequisites, 
Eng. 1, 2 and 3, 4 or 5, 6. (Kern.) 

Two writers studied intensively. 

Eng. 202S. Middle English (2). 9:00; A-106. Prerequisites, Eng. 101 
or 104. (Harman.) 

A study of selected readings of the Middle English period with reference 
to etymology, morphology, and syntax. 

Eng. 225S. Seminar in American Literature (2). 10:00; A-207. (Kern.) 

ENTOMOLOGY 

Ent. 1. Introductory Entomology (3). (Not offered 1949.) 

Ent. 110, 11. Special Probelms (1, 1). Prerequisites to be determined by 
instructor. Arranged. (Cory.) 

An intensive investigation of some entomological problem, preferably of 
the student's choice. Required of majors in entomology. 

Ent. 201. Advanced Entomology. Credit and prerequisites to be deter- 
mined by the department. To be arranged. (Cory and Staff.) 

Studies of minor problems in morphology, taxonomy and applied ento- 
mology, with particular reference to the preparation of the students for 
individual research. 

Ent. 202. Research. Credit depends upon the amount of work done. To 
be arranged. (Cory and Staff.) 

Required of graduate students majoring in Entomology. This course 
involves research on an approved project. A dissertation suitable for pub- 
lication must be submitted at the conclusion of the studies as a part of 
the requirements for an advanced degree. 

FINE ARTS 

Art 1. Charcoal Drawing (3). M., W., Th., F., 9:00, 10:00, 11:00; A-308. 

(Siegler.) 



COURSE OFFERINGS 47 

Drawings from casts, preparatory to life and portrait drawing and paint- 
ing. Stress is placed on fundamental principles, such as study of relative 
proportions, values, modeling, etc. 

Art 5. Still-Life (3). M., W., Th., F., 9:00, 10:00, 11:00; A-308. 

(Siegler, Maril.) 

Elementary theory and practice of drawing. Methods of linear and tonal 
description with emphasis on perspective and light-and-shade. Theory and 
practice of painting in oil color. Theory and practice of composition in- 
troduced and utilized. 

Art 7. Landscape Painting (3). T., W., Th., F.; A-310. (Maril.) 

Outdoor studies with subsequent utilization in studio where organization 
of landscape material is studied. 

Art 9. Historical Survey of Painting, Sculpture and Architecture (3). 
M., W., F., 1-2; A-300. (Grubar, Siegler.) 

An understanding of the epochs of the advance of civilization as ex- 
pressed through painting, sculpture and architecture. A background to more 
detailed study. 

Art 10. History of American Art (1). M., W., 3:00; A-300. 

(Grubar, Siegler.) 

A resume of the development of painting, sculpture and architecture in 
this country, and how American art was influenced by social, political, and 
economic forces here and abroad. 

Art 100. Art Appreciation (2). T., Th., 1-2; A-300. (Maril.) 

A course designed to help the student to a fuller appreciation and greater 
enjoyment of art. Lectures, discussions, slides and occasional visits to 
museums. 

Art 104. Life Class (Drawing and Painting) (3). M., W., F., 9:00, 
10:00, 11:00; A-308. . (Siegler.) 

Careful observation and study of the human figure for construction, 
action, form, and color. 

Art 106. Portrait Class (Drawing and Painting) (3). M., W., Th., F., 
9:00, 10:00, 11:00; A-308. (Siegler.) 

Thorough draftsmanship and study of characterization and composition 
stressed. 

FOREIGN LANGUAGES AND LITERATURE 

The first semester of beginning languages will not be offered. Second- 
year language (French 4 and 5, German 4 and 5, German 6 and 7, and 
Spanish 4 and 5) will be offered in a reading course granting credit for 
either first or second semester, depending on the student's preparation. 



48 COURSE OFFERINGS 

FRENCH 

Fr. 2. Elementary French (3). Eight periods a week. Daily, 11:00; 
M., W., F., 1:00; A-14. Second semester of first-year French. (deMarne.) 

Elements of grammar; pronunciation and conversation; exercises in com- 
position and translation. 

Fr. 4 or 5. Intermediate Literary French (3). Eight periods a week. 
Daily, 10:00; M., W., F., 2:00; A-14. Prerequisite, French 1 and 2, or 
equivalent. (deMarne.) 

Translation; conversation; exercises in pronunciation. Reading of texts 
designed to give some knowledge of French life, thought, and culture. 

GERMAN 

Ger. 2. Elementary German (3). Eight periods a week. Daily, 11:00; 
M., W., F., 1:00; R-204. Second semester of first-year German. (Dobert.) 

Elements of grammar; pronunciation and conversation; exercises in 
composition and translation. 

Ger. 4 or 5. Intermediate Literary German (3). Eight periods a week. 
Daily, 10:00; M., W., F., 2:00; A-209. Prerequisite, German 1 and 2, or 
equivalent. (Dobert.) 

Reading of narrative prose, grammar review, and oral and written prac- 
tice. 

Ger. 6 or 7. Intermediate Scientific German (3). Eight periods a week. 
Daily, 12:00; M., W., F., 3:00; A-110. Prerequisite, German 1 and 2, or 
equivalent. (Vent.) 

SPANISH 

Sp. 2. Elementary Spanish (3). Eight periods a week. Daily, 12:00; 
M., W., F., 3:00; A-203. Second semester of first-year Spanish. (Gilbert.) 

Elements of grammar; pronunciation and conversation; exercises in 
composition and translation. 

Sp. 4 or 5. Intermediate Literary Spanish (3). Eight periods a week. 
Daily, 1:00; M., W., F., 2:00; A-21. Prerequisite, Spanish 1 and 2, or 
equivalent. (Gilbert.) 

Translation, conversation, exercises in pronunciation. Reading of texts 
designed to give some knowledge of Spanish and Latin-American life, 
thought, and culture. 

GOVERNMENT AND POLITICS 

G. & P. 1. American Government (3). Eight periods a week. 

Section 1— Daily, 9:00; M., W., F., 8:00; A-14. (Dixon.) 

Section 2— Daily, 10:00; T., W., F., 9:00; R-7. (Burdette.) 

Section 3— Daily, 11:00; T., Th., F., 12:00; R-7. (Plischke.) 



COURSE OFFERINGS 49 

This course is designed as the basic course in government for the Amer- 
ican Civilization program. It comprises a comprehensive study of govern- 
ments in the United States and their adjustment to changing social and 
economic conditions. 

G. & P. 4s. State Government and Administration (2). Prerequisite, 
G. & P. 1. Daily, 11:00; R-113. (Dixon.) 

A study of the organization and functions of state government in the 
United States, with special emphasis upon the government of Maryland. 

G. & P. 7. The Government of the British Empire (2). Prerequisite, 
G. & P. 1. Five periods a week. Daily, 10:00; A-16. (Steinmeyer.) 

A study of the governments of the United Kingdom and the British 
Dominions. 

G. & P. 106s. American Foreign Relations (2). Prerequisite, G. & P. 1. 
Five periods a week. Daily, 10:00; A-12. (Plischke.) 

The principles and machinery of the conduct of American Foreign 
Relations, with emphasis on the Department of State and the Foreign 
Service, and an analysis of the major foreign policies of the United States. 

G. & P. 154. Problems of World Politics (3). Prerequisite, G. & P. 1. 
Eight periods a week. Daily, 9:00; M., W., F., 8:00; A-16. (Steinmeyer.) 

A study of governmental problems of international scope, such as causes 
of war, problems of neutrality, and propaganda. Students are required to 
report on readings from current literature. 

G. & P. 174s. Political Parties (2). Prerequisite, G. & P. 1. Five 
periods a week. Daily, 12:00; Q-140. (Burdette.) 

A descriptive and analytical examination of American political parties, 
nominations, elections, and political leadership. 

HISTORY 

H. 4. History of England and Great Britain Since 1603 (3). Daily, 1:00; 
M., W., F., 2:00; A-212. (Gordon.) 

H. 5. History of American Civilization (3). Eight periods a week. 
Section 1— Daily, 9:00; M., W., F., 10:00; R-103. (Chatelain.) 

Section 2— Daily, 11:00; M., W., F., 12:00; A-16. (Wellborn.) 

Section 3— Daily, 8:00; M., W., F., 9:00; R-1. (Johnson.) 

From the colonial period through the American Civil War. Required of 
all students for graduation. 

H. 6. History of American Civilization (3). Eight periods a week. 

Section 1— Daily, 8:00; M., W., F., 9:00; R-205. (Bates.) 

Section 2— Daily, 10:00; M., W., F., 11:00; R-205. (Merrill.) 

Section 3— Daily, 1:00; M., W., F., 2:00; A-302. (Sensenig.) 



50 COURSE OFFERINGS 

From the American Civil War to the present. Required of all students 
for graduation. 

H. 108. Social and Economic History of the United States Since 1900 
(2). Daily, 1:00; R-103. (Chatelain.) 

A study of the outstanding social and economic problems and of the cul- 
tural changes of Twentieth Century America, 

H. 115S. The Old South (2). Daily, 10:00; A-230. (Gewehr.) 

A study of the institutional and cultural life of the ante-bellum South, 
with particular reference to the background of the Civil War. 

H. 122S. History of the American Frontier: The Trans-Mississippi West 
(2). Daily, 2:00; A-230. (Gewehr.) 

Processes and factors which influenced the settlement and development of 
the western half of the United States. 

H. 129S. The United States and World Affairs (2). Daily, 9:00; F-103. 

(Wellborn.) 

A consideration of the changed position of the United States with refer- 
ence to the rest of the world since 1917. 

H. 133S. History of American Ideas to 1800 (2). Daily, 12:00; A-204. 

(Johnson.) 

An intellectual history of the American people, einbracing such topics 
as religious liberty, democracy, and social ideas. 

H. 166S. Revolutionary and Napoleonic Europe (2). Daily, 10:00; 
A-133. (Bauer.) 

The Old Regime in France and Europe; the changes effected by the 
French Revolution; the Napoleonic regime and the balance of power, 1789- 
1815. 

H. 176S. Europe in the World Setting of the Twentieth Century (2). 
Daily, 11:00; N-101. (Gordon.) 

A study of political, economic, and cultural developments in Twentieth 
Century Europe with special emphasis on the factors involved in the two 
World Wars and their global impacts and significance. 

H. 191S. History of Russia (2). Daily, 12:00; A-12. (Bauer.) 

A history of Russia from the earliest times to the present day. 
H. 208S. Topics in Recent American History (2). Arranged. (Merrill.) 
Selected readings, research and conferences on important topics in United 
States history from 1900 to the present. 

H. 250S. Seminar in European History (2). Arranged. (Bauer.) 

H. 287. Historiography (3). Daily, 8:00, plus special conferences; A-106. 

(Sparks.) 



COURSE OFFERINGS 51 

Required of all candidates for advanced degrees in history. Readings 
and occasional lectures on the historical writing, the evolution of critical 
standards, the rise of auxiliary sciences, and the works of selected masters. 

HOME ECONOMICS 

Clo. 20 A and B.* Clothing Construction (3). 8:00, 9:00, 10:00; H-132. 
Laboratory fee, $3.00. (Mitchell.) 

Each student is required to complete a minimum of two garments. The 
course is planned to develop technical skill in garment construction and to 
give experience in the selection of fabrics and fashions suited to indi- 
vidual needs. 

Clo. 22. Clothing Construction (2). 9:00, 10:00; H-132. Laboratory 
fee, $3.00. (Mitchell.) 

Continuation of Clo. 20 with emphasis on figure analysis, fitting problems 
and workmanship. 

Clo. 128. Home Furnishings (3). 1:00, 2:00, 3:00; H-132. Laboratory 
fee, $3.00. Prerequisites, Tex. 1, Clo. 20 A or B, or consent of the in- 
structor. Enrollment limited. (Wilbur.) 

Selection of fabrics for home and institutional furnishings; care and 
repair of such furnishings; custom construction of slip covers, draperies, 
bedspreads, etc. — or 

Tex. 108. Decorative Fabrics (2). 1:00; M., W., 2:00; H-132. Labora- 
tory fee, $3.00. Prerequisites, Tex. 1 or consent of instructor. (Wilbur.) 

Study of historic and contemporary textiles including tapestries, rugs 
and laces. Various decorating techniques will be developed. 

Tex. and Clo. 200. Seminar (1). Time arranged; H-123. (Mitchell.) 

Readings and discussions of recent developments in the field of textiles 
and clothing. 

Pr. Art 1. Design (2). 11:00; H-105. Laboratory fee, $3.00. (Palmer.) 
Art expression through the use of materials, such as opaque water color, 
wet clay, colored chalk, and lithograph crayon, which are conducive to 
free techniques. Elementary lettering, action figures, abstract design and 
general composition study. Methods are emphasized for teaching be- 
ginners of any age level. 

Pr. Art 38. Photography (2). 8:00, 9:00; H-307. Laboratory fee, 
$3.00. (Davis.) 

Beginning photography adapted to the needs of teachers and school 
administrators. Emphasis is placed upon good composition and upon pro- 
priety in the use of this medium for public relations, visual education, and 
recreational and occupational activity. Advanced photography may be 
taken at this same time, with the approval of the instructor. 



* Clo. 20B elective for students in other colleges. 



52 COURSE OFFERINGS 

Cr. 2. Simple Crafts (2). 1:00, 2:00; H-5. Laboratory fee, $3.00. 

(Palmer.) 

Creative art expressed in clay modeling, plaster carving, wood burning, 
thin metal working, paper mache modeling, etc. Emphasis is laid upon 
inexpensive materials and tools and simple techniques, which can be pur- 
sued in the home. Excellent for teachers and directors of recreation 
centers. Consideration will be given to simple recreation centers in the 
home and at camp. 

Home Mgt .152. Experience in Management of a Home (3). Laboratory 
fee, $7.00. Prerequisite, Home Mgt. 150-151. (Crow.) 

Residence for the equivalent of one-third of a semester in the Home 
Management House. Experience in planning, guiding, directing, coordi- 
nating, and participating in the activities of a household composed of a 
faculty member and a small group of students. 

Inst. Mgt. 165S. The School Lunch (2). 9:00; H-222. Prerequsites, 
Foods 2, 3; Nut. 110, or consent of the instructor. (Spencer.) 

Problems that relate to planning, organizing and serving lunch to 
school children of all ages; also to the supervision of a school lunch 
program. 

Nut. 10. Elements of Nutrition (3). 10:00; M., W., F., 11:00; H-204. 

(Spencer.) 

The principles of human nutrition. Methods of applying these principles 
through health education in the school room and through the school lunch 
program. 

Nut. 210. Readings in Nutrition (3). 10:00, 11:00; W., 3:00, July 11 

through August 5, 1949; H-222. (McCollom.) 

Reports and discussion of outstanding nutritional research and investi- 

^^**°"' HORTICULTURE 

Hort. SI 15. Truck Crop Management (1). First three weeks. 8:00; 
F-103. (Haut and Bender.) 

Primarily designed for teachers of vocational agriculture and extension 
agents. Special emphasis will be placed upon new and improved methods 
of proudction of the leading truck crops. Current problems and their 
solution will receive special attention. 

LIBRARY SCIENCE 

L. S. 102S. Cataloging and Classification (3). Eight periods a week. 
Daily, 1:00; M., W., F., 2:00; Library Annex. (Heaps.) 

Study and practice in classifying books and making dictionary catalog 
for school libraries. Simplified forms as used in the Children's Catalog, 
Standard Catalog for High School Libraries, and Wilson printed cards are 
studied. 



COURSE OFFERINGS 53 

L. S. 104S. Reference and Bibliography for School Libraries (4). Ten 
periods a week. Daily, 10:00, 11:00; Library Annex. (Heaps.) 

Evaluation, selection and use of standard reference tools, such as en- 
cyclopedias, dictionaries, periodical indexes, atlases and yearbooks, for 
school libraries. Study of bibliographical procedures and forms. 

MATHEMATICS 

Math. 1. Introductory Algebra (0). Eight lectures a week. Daily, 8:00; 
M., W., F., 9:00; FF-18. Prerequisite, one unit of algebra. Open to students 
of engineering and required of students who fail in the qualifying examina- 
tion in Math. 15. 

A review of topics covered in a second course in algebra. 

Math. 2. Solid Geometry (0). 11:00; FF-17. Prerequisite, Plane Geome- 
try. Open to students who enter deficient in solid geometry. 

Lines, planes, cylinders, cones, the sphere and polyhedra, primary empha- 
sis on mensuration. Intended for engineers and science students. 

Math. 6. Mathematics of Finance (3). Three sections. Eight lectures 
a week. 

Section 1—8:00; M., W., F., 9:00; GG-1. 
Section 2—8:00; M., W., F., 9:00; E-312. 
Section 3—10:00; M., W., F., 11:00; GG-1. 
Prerequisite, Math. 5, or equivalent. Open to students in the College of 
Business and Public Administration. 

Simple and compound interest, discount, amortization, sinking funds, 
valuation of bonds, depreciation, annuities. 

Math. 10. Algebra (3). Eight lectures a week. Daily, 10:00; M., W., F., 
11:00; GG-5. Prerequisite, one unit each of algebra and plane geometry. 
Open to biological, pre-medical, pre-dental, and general Arts and Science 
students. 

Fundamental operations, factoring, fractions, linear equations, exponents 
and radicals, logarithms, quadratic equations, variation, binominal theorem, 
theory of equations. 

Math. 11. Trigonometry and Analytic Geometry (3). Two sections. 
Eight lectures a week. 

Section 1— Daily, 8:00; M., W., F., 9:00; GG-7. 
Section 2— Daily, 10:00; M., W., F., 11:00; GG-7. 

Prerequisite, Math. 10, or equivalent. Open to biological, pre-medical, 
pre-dental, and general Arts and Science students. This course is not 
recommended for students planning to enroll in Math. 20. 

Trigonometric functions, identities, addition formulas, solution of tri- 
angles, coordinates, locus problems, the straight line and circle, conic 
sections, graphs. 



54 COURSE OFFERINGS 

Math. 14. Plane Trigonometry (2). Two sections. 
Section 1—10:00; FF-17. 
Section 2—10:00; FF-18. 
Prerequisite, Math. 15 or concurrent enrollment in Math. 15. Open to 
students in engineering, education, and the physical sciences. 

Trigonometric functions, identities, the radian, graphs, addition formulas, 
solution of triangles, trigonometric equations. 

Math. 15. College Algebra (3). Eight lectures a week. Daily, 8:00; 
M., W., F., 9:00; FF-17. Prerequisite, high school algebra completed. Open 
to students in engineering, education, and the physical sciences. 

Fundamental operations, variations, functions and graphs, quadratic 
equations, theory of equations, binominal theorem, complex numbers, loga- 
rithms, determinants, progressions. 

Math. 17. Analytic Geometry (4). Three sections. Eight lectures, four 
drill periods a week. 

Section 1— M., T., W., Th., F., S., 8:00, 9:00; FF-19. 
Section 2— M., T., W., Th., F., S., 8:00, 9:00; FF-20. 
Section 3— M,, T., W., Th., F., S., 10:00, 11:00; FF-25. 

Prerequisite, Math. 14, 15, or equivalent. Open to students in engineer- 
ing, education, and the physical sciences. 

Coordinates, locus problems, the straight line and circle, graphs, trans- 
formation of coordinates, conic sections, parametric equations, transcen- 
dental equations, solid analytic geometry. 

Math. 20. Calculus (4). Eight lectures, four drill periods a week. 
M., T., W., Th., F., S., 8:00, 9:00; GG-5. 

Prerequisite, Math. 17, or equivalent. Open to students in engineering, 
education, and physical sciences. 

Limits, derivatives, differentials, maxima and minima, curve sketching, 
rates, curvature, kinematics. 

Math. 21. Calculus (4). Five sections. Eight lectures, four drill periods 
a week. 

Section 1— M., T., W., Th., F., S., 8:00, 9:00; FF-24. 

Section 2— M., T., W., Th., F., S., 8:00, 9:00; FF-25. 

Section 3— M., T., W., Th., F., S., 10:00, 11:00; FF-20. 

Section 4— M., T., W., Th., F., S., 10:00, 11:00; FF-24. 

Section 5— M., T., W., Th., F., S., 10:00, 11:00; F-104. 

Prerequisite, Math. 20, or equivalent. Open to students in engineering, 
education, and the physical sciences. 

Integration with geometric and physical applications, partial deriva- 
tives, space geometry, multiple integrals, infinite series. 



COURSE OFFERINGS 55 

Math. 64. Differential Equations for Engineers (3). Eight lectures a 
week. Daily, 10:00; M., W., F., 11:00; FF-19. Prerequisite, Math. 21, or 
equivalent. Required of students in mechanical and electrical engineering. 

Ordinary and partial differential equations of the first and second order 
with emphasis on their engineering applications. 

Math. 102S, Theory of Equations (2). 9:00; FF-7. Prerequisite, Math. 

20, 21, or equivalent. (Good.) 
Solution of algebraic equations; symmetric functions. 

Math. 128S. Higher Geometry (2). Daily, 8:00; FF-7. (Jackson.) 

This course is designed for students preparing to teach geometry in 

high school and is devoted to the modern geometry of the triangle, circle, 

and sphere. 

Math. 106S. Number Theory (2). 10:00; FF-7. Prerequisite, Math. 20, 

21, or equivalent. (Brigham.) 
Integers, divisibility, Euclid's algorithm, Diophantine equations, prime 

numbers, Moebius function, congruences, residues. 

MUSIC 

Mus. 1. Music Appreciation (3). Daily, 8:00; M., W., F., 9:00; B-1. 

(Randall.) 

A study of all types of classical music (not including opera) from the 
time of Haydn, with a view to developing the ability to listen and enjoy. 

Mus. S4. Summer School Chorus (1). 12:00; B-1. (Randall.) 

Open to all students attending the Summer Session. Work will be directed 

toward the presentation of a Summer School Concert one evening during 

the fifth or sixth week of the Summer Session. 

Mus. 6. Orchestra (1). 12:00; Ar.-300. (Sykora.) 

An opportunity for students attending the Summer Session to enjoy par- 
ticipation in an instrumental ensemble and present a program in connection 
with the Chorus. 

Mus. 7. Fundamentals of Music (2). 10:00; B-1. (Haslup.) 

This course is a prerequisite to Harmony and includes a study of major 

and minor scales, intervals, basic piano technique, sight singing, simple 

musical form and theory. 

Mus. 50. Elementary Conducting (2). 11:00; Ar.-300. (Sykora.) 

The student develops a technique of the baton based on the fundamental 
meter designs. Choral and simple orchestra numbers are conducted. Com- 
munity and recreational singing is given special emphasis. 

Mus. 70. Harmony I (3). Daily, 8:00; M., W., F., 9:00; B-4. (French.) 

This course requires Mus. 7 as a prerequisite. Music theory is reviewed 

and a study is made of harmonic progressions, triads, dominant seventh and 



56 COURSE OFFERINGS 

ninth chords in root position and inversions. The course continues through 
altered and mixed chords to modulation. 

Mus. 71. Harmony II (3). Daily, 11:00; M., W., F., 12:00; B-4. (French.) 
This course is a continuation of Harmony I. It includes the study of 

modulation and the inharmonic intervals. Analysis, simple harmonizations, 

and original compositions are a part of this course. 

Mus. 80 or 81. Instruments of the Orchestra (2). 9:00; Ar.-300. 

(Sykora.) 

A study is made of the techniques of the string instruments (Mus. 80) or 

the brass, woodwinds, and percussion groups (Mus. 81) through practical 

experience. 

Mus. 90. History of American Music (2). 11:00; B-1. (Haslup.) 

This course, designed to be an integral part of the American Civilization 

program, reviews the development of music in the United States from 

Colonial days to the present time. 

Mus. 127. Methods and Materials in Music (2). 10:00; B-1. (French.) 
Designed especially for those interested in presenting musical assemblies, 

concerts and programs of all types. Methods of presentation and materials 

suitable for various occasions will be discussed. 

Mus. 12, 52, 112, 152. Piano (1). Fifteen private lessons in Applied 
Music. 

The instructor and place will be assigned by the Music Department, 
Bldg. B. There will be a laboratory fee for all private lessons. 

Mus. 13, 53, 113, 153. Voice (1). All Applied Music courses have the 
same requirements. 

Mus. 14, 54, 114, 154. Instruments (1). Applied Music 

PHILOSOPHY 
Phil. 54S. Political and Social Philosophy (2). 8:00. (Baylis.) 

Classical and contemporary theories of the nature and function of the 
state. The bearing of ethical principles on problems of government, inter- 
national relations, economics, the family, and other social institutions. 
Human rights, social control and individual freedom. 

Phil. 102S. iModern Philosophy (2). 9:00. (Baylis.) 

A survey of occidental philosophy from the Renaissance to the time of 

Schopenhauer. Special attention to Bacon, Hobbes, Descartes, Spinoza, 

Leibnitz, Locke, Berkeley, Hume, Kant and Hegel. 

PHYSICS 
Phys. 21. General Physics: Sound, Optics, Magnetism, and Electricity (5). 

Five lectures, five recitations, and two and one-half three-hour laboratory 
periods weekly. Prerequisites, Phys. 20. Laboratory fee, $6.00. 



COURSE OFFERINGS 57 

The second half of a course in general physics. Required of all students 
in the engineering curricula. (Swartz.) 

Daily— 9:00 and 11:00; GG-6. 
T, Th— 1:00, 2:00, 3:00; Q-301. 
F— 1:00, 2:00, 3:00 in 2nd, 4th and 6th weeks; Q-301. 

PSYCHOLOGY 

University Counseling Center. The Department of Physchology main- 
tains a counseling service, provided with a well-trained technical staff and 
equipped with an excellent stock of standardized tests of aptitude, ability 
and interest. The services of this center are available to Summer Session 
students. 

Psych. 1. Introduction to Psychology (3). Daily, 8:00; M., W., F., 9:00; 
DD-10. (Schaefer.) 

A basic introductory course, intended to bring the student into contact 
with the major problems confronting psychology and the more important 
attempts at their solution. 

Psych. 2S. Applied Psychology (2). 9:00; DD-9. (Hackman.) 

Application of research methods to basic human problems in business 
and industry, in the professions, and in other practical problems of every- 
day life. 

Psych. 106. Statistical Methods in Psychology (3). Daily, 10:00; M., W., 
F., 11:00; DD-8. Prerequisite, Psych. 1. (Hackman.) 

A basic introduction to quantitative methods used in psychological research; 
measures of central tendency, of spread, and of correlation. Majors in 
Psychology must take this course in the junior j^ear. 

Psych. 110. Educational Psychology (3). Eight periods a week. Daily, 
8:00; M., W., F., 9:00; BB-1. Prerequisite Psych. 1. (Grzeda.) 

Researches on fundamental problems in education; measurement and sig- 
nificance of individual differences, learning, motivation, transfer of training. 

Psych. 121S. Social Psychology (2). 10:00; DD-9. Prerequisite, Psych. 1. 

(Grzeda.) 

Psychological study of human behavior in social situations; influence of 
others on indivudual behavior; social conflict and social adjustment, communi- 
cation and its influence on normal social activity. 

Psych. 125S. Child Psychology (2). 11:00; DD-9. Prerequisite, Psych 1. 

(Schaefer.) 
Behavior analysis of normal development and normal socialization of the 
growing child. 

Psych. 128S. Human Motivation (2). 9:00; DD-12. Prerequisite, 
Psych. 1. (Cofer.) 



58 COURSE OFFERINGS 

Eeview of research literature dealing with determinants of human per- 
formance, together with consideration of the major theoretical contribu- 
tions in this area. 

Psych. 131S. Abnormal Psychology (2). 11:00; DD-10. Prerequisite, 
teaching expreience or Psych 5. Four lectures, one clinic at St. Elizabeth's 
Hospital. (Sprowls.) 

The nature, occurrence, and causes of marked psychological abnormalities, 
with emphasis on clinical rather than theoretical aspects. 

Psych. 278S. Seminar in Clinical Psychology for Teachers (2). Arranged. 
Prerequisite, consent of instructor. (Sprowls.) 

A systematic consideration of clinical procedures in treating psychological 
problems of pupils. 

Psych. 225S. Participation in Counseling Clinic (2). Prerequisite, con- 
sent of instructor. (Smith.) 

Participation under direct supervision in the counseling of current cases 
in the University's Student Clinic. Cases will be followed through the inter- 
view, testing, counseling, recommendations and follow-up. 

Psych. 290S. Graduate Research in Psychotechnology (2-4). Arranged. 
Prerequisite, consent of instructor. Credit will be according to work ac- 
complished. (Staff.) 

SOCIOLOGY 
Soc. IS. Sociology of American Life (3). Eight periods a week. 

Section 1— Daily, 8:00; M., W., F., 9:00; R-112. (Imse.) 

Section 2— Daily, 8:00; M., W., F., 9:00; R-109. (Hutchinson.) 

Section 3— Daily, 11:00; M. W., F., 12:00; F-112. (Lejins.) 

Sociological analysis of the American social structure; metropolitan, small 

town, and rural communities; population distribution, composition and 

change; social organization. 

Soc. 2S. Principles of Sociology (3). Eight periods a week. Daily, 10:00; 
M., W., F., 11:00; R-1. (Shankweiler.) 

The basic forms of human association and interaction; social processes; 
institutions; culture, human nature and personality. 

Soc. 5S. Anthropology (2). 11:00; N-106. (Hutchinson.) 

Introduction to anthropology; origins of man; development and transmis- 
sion of culture; backgrounds of human institutions. 

Soc. 14S. Urban Sociology (2). 10:00; R-113. (Bailey.) 

Urban growth and expansion; characteristics of city population; urban 
institutional and personality patterns; relations of city and country. 

Soc. 64S. Marriage and the Family (2). 8:00; R-7. (Shankweiler.) 

Functions of the family; marriage and family adjustments; factors affect- 
ing mate selection, marital relations, and family stability in contemporary 
social life. 



COURSE OFFERINGS 59 

Soc. 115S. Industrial Sociology (2). 12:00; R-103. (Imse.) 

Social organization of American industry; functions of members of indus- 
trial organization; status, social structure, patterns of interaction and 
relations of industry and society. 

Soc. 118S. Community Organization (2). 8:00; R-103. (Bailey.) 

Community organization and its relation to social welfare; analysis of 

community needs and resources; health, housing, recreation; community 

centers; neighborhood projects. 

Soc. 141S. Sociology of Personality (2). 10:00; R-6. (Ebersole.) 

Development of human nature and personality in contemporary social 

life; processes of socialization; attitudes, individual differences, and social 

behavior. 

Soc. 144S. Collective Behavior (2). 12:00; R-1. (Ebersole.) 

Social interaction in mass behavior; communication processes; structure 

and functioning of crowds, strikes, audiences, mass movements, and the 

public. 

Soc. 153S. Juvenile Delinquency (2). 9:00; R-204. (Lejins.) 

Juvenile delinquency in relation to the general problem of crime; analysis 
of factors underlying juvenile delinquency; treatment and prevention. 

Soc. 291S. Special Social Problems. (Credit to be determined.) (Staff.) 
Individual research on selected problems. 

SPEECH AND DRAMATIC ART 
Speech 1. Public Speaking (2). 8:00; R-102. Fee $1.00. (Strausbaugh.) 
The preparation and delivery of short original speeches. Outside read- 
ings; reports, etc. 

Speech 2. Public Speaking (2). 9:00; R-102. Prerequisite, Speech 1. 

(Strausbaugh.) 

Speech 4. Voice and Diction (3). M., W., F., 8:00, 9:00; T., Th., 9:00; 

R-110. (Mayer.) 

Emphasis upon the improvement of voice, articulation, and phonation. 

Speech 7. Public Speaking (2). 10:00; R-102. Fee, $1.00. (Strausbaugh.) 
Limited to freshman engineers. The preparation and delivery of speeches 
and reports dealing with technical subjects. 

Speech 10. Group Discussion (2). 10:00; R-101. (Hendricks.) 

A study of the principles, methods, and types of discussion, and their 
application in the discussion of contemporary problems. 

Speech 110. Teacher Problems in Speech (2). 11:00; R-101. (Hendricks.) 
Everyday speech problems that confront the teacher. 



60 COURSE OFFERINGS 

ZOOLOGY 

Zool. SI. General Zoology (4). Five lectures and five two-hour labora- 
tory periods a week. Lecture, daily, 8:00; EE-15; laboratory, 10:00, 11:00; 
EE-20. Laboratory fee, $6.00. (Burhoe.) 

This course, which is cultural and practical in its aim, deals with the 
basic principles of animal life. Typical invertebrates and a mammalian 
form are studied. 

Zool. S3. Fundamentals of Zoology (4). Five lectures and five two-hour 
laboratory periods a week. Lecture, 10:00; M-107 laboratory, 8:00, 9:00; 
M-302. Laboratory fee, $6.00. (Littleford.) 

This course satisfies the freshmen pre-medical requirements in general 
biology. Freshmen who intend to choose zoology as a major should register 
for this course. 

A thorough study of the anatomy, classifications, and life histories of 
representative animals. Emphasis is placed on vertebrate forms. 

Zool. S5. Comparative Vertebrate Morphology (4). Five lectures and 
five three-hour laboratory periods a week. Prerequisite, one course in 
zoology. Lecture, 9:00; M-107; laboratory, 1:00, 2:00, 3:00; M-303. Labora- 
tory fee, $6.00. (Stringer.) 

A comparative study of selected organ systems in certain vertebrate 
groups. 

Zool. S20. Vertebrate Embryology (4). Five lectures and five three-hour 
laboratory periods a week. Prerequisite, one course in zoology. Lecture, 
11:00; M-107; laboratory, 1:00; EE-16. Laboratory fee, $6.00. (Negherbon.) 

The development of the chick to the end of the fourth day and early 
mammalian embryology. 

Zool. S53. Physiology of Exercise (2). Five lectures a week. Prerequi- 
site, Zool. 15. Lecture arranged, M-107. (Phillips.) 

A detailed consideration of the mechanism of muscular contraction; the 
metabolic, circulatory, and the respiratory responses in exercise; and the 
integration by means of the nervous system. 

Zool. S104. Genetics (3). Eight lecture periods a week. Prerequisite, 
one course in zoology or botany. Recommended for pre-medical students. 
Lecture, daily, 9:00; M., W., F., 10:00; EE-15. (Burhoe.) 

A consideration of the basic principles of heredity. 

Zool. 206. Research. (Credit to be arranged.) (Staff.) 

Zool. 208. Special Problems in Physiology. Credits and hours arranged. 
Laboratory fee, $6.00. (Phillips.) 



SUMMER SESSION 



61 



Symbol 

Soils 101 



SCHEDULE BY HOURS 

8:00 A. M. 

June 27th to July 15th 

Days Symbol 

Daily Hort. 115 



Days 

Daily 



June 27th to August 5th 



Bot. 1 (also at 9, 11) Daily 

Bact. 1 (also at 9, 10) Daily 

B. A. 11 Daily 

B. A. 21 (also at 9), Sec. 1 Daily 

B. A. 110 (also at 9) Daily 

B. A. 123 (also at 9) Daily 

B. A. 130 (also at 9) Daily 

B. A. 150 (also at 9) Daily 

B. A. 181 (also at 9) Daily 

Econ. 31 (also at 9), Sec. 1.... Daily 
Econ. 32 (also at 9), Sec. l....Daily 
Econ. 140 (also at 9), Sec. 1.. Daily 

S. T. 1 (also at 9) Daily 

C?iem. 3 (alternate lab. 8, 9, 

10 or 1, 2, 3; lecture 11) Daily 

Chem. 37 Daily 

Clo. 20 A & B (also at 9, 10). .Daily 

Pr. Art 38 (also at 9) Daily 

Eng. 1, 2 (also at 9), 

Sees. 1, 2 MWF 

Eng. 3 (also at 9), 

Sees. 1, 2, 3 „ MWF 

Eng. 4 (also at 9), Sec. 4 MWF 

G. & P. 154 (also at 9) MWF 

G. & P. 1 (also at 9), Sec. 1....MWF 

Hist. 5 (also at 9), Sec. 3 Daily 

Hist. 6 (also at 9), Sec. 1 Daily 

Hist. 287 (plus special con- 
ferences) Daily 

Math. 1 (also at 9) Daily 

Math. 6 (also at 9), Sees. 1, 2.. Daily 
Math. 11 (also at 9), Sec. l....Daily 

Math. 15 (also at 9) „ Daily 

Math. 17 (also at 9), 

Sees. 1, 2 MTWThFS 



Math. 20 (also at 9) MTWThFS 

Math. 21 (also at 9), 

Sees. 1, 2 MTWThFS 

Math. 128S Daily 

Mus. 1 (also at 9) Daily 

Mus. 70 (also at 9) Daily 

Phil. 54S Daily 

Psych. 1 (also at 9) Daily 

Psych. 110 (also at 9) Daily 

Soc. IS (also at 9), Sees. 1, 2..Daily 

Soc. 64S Daily 

Soc. 118S Daily 

Speech 1 Daily 

Speech 4 (also at 9) MWF 

Zool, SI (also at 10, 11) Daily 

Zool. S3 (also at 9, 10) Daily 

B. Ed. 102 Daily 

C. Ed. 110 (also at 11) TWTh 

C. Ed. 140 Daily 

C. Ed. 150 Daily 

Ed. 52 Daily 

Ed. 106 Daily 

Ed. 137 Daily 

Ed. 161 Daily 

Ed. 191 Daily 

Ed. 202 Daily 

Ed. 220 Daily 

Ed. 244 Daily 

Ed. 290 Daily 

Ind. Ed. 106 (also at 9), 

Sec. 1 Daily 

Ind. Ed. 110 Daily 

Ind. Ed. 150 Daily 

Ind. Ed. 240 Daily 



62 



SUMMER SESSION 



Symbol 

R. Ed. 209 A-B. 



9:00 A. M. 

June 27th to July 15th 

Days Symbol 

.Daily 



Days 



June 27th to August 5th 



Bot. 1 (also at 8, 11) Daily 

Art 1 (also at 10, 11) MWF 

Art 5 (also at 10, 11) MWF 

Art 7 (also at 10, 11) TWTh 

Art 104 (also at 10, 11) MWF 

Art 106 (also at 10, 11) MWF 

Bact. 1 (also at 8, 10) Daily 

Bact. 5 (also at 10, 11) Daily 

B. A. 21 (also at 8), Sec. 1 Daily 

B. A. 110 (also at 8) MWF 

B. A. 123 (also at 8) Daily 

B. A. 130 (also at 8) MWF 

B. A. 150 (also at 8) MWF 

B. A. 181 (also at 8) Daily 

Econ. 5 Daily 

Econ. 31 (also at 8), Sec. 1 MWF 

Econ. 32 (also at 8), Sec. 1 MWF 

Econ. 140 (also at 8), Sec. 1....MWF 

S. T. 1 (also at 8) Daily 

Chem. 3 (alternate lab., 8, 9, 

10 or 1, 2, 3; lecture 11) Daily 

Chem. 19 (also at 10, 11, 12)..Daily 

Chem. 38 (also at 10, 11) Daily 

Clo. 20 A & B (also at 8, 10)..Daily 

Clo. 22 (also at 10) Daily 

Pr. Art 38 (also at 8) Daily 

Inst. Mgt. 165 Daily 

Eng. 104S Daily 

Eng. 115S Daily 

Eng. 1, 2 (also at 8), 

Sees. 1, 2 _ Daily 

Eng. 3 (also at 8), Sec. 1, 2, 3.. Daily 

Eng. 4 (also at 8), Sec. 1 Daily 

Eng. 202S Daily 

G. & P. 154 (also at 8) Daily 

G. & P. 1 (also at 8), Sec. l....Daily 
G. & P. 1 (also at 10), Sec. 2..TWF 
Hist. 5 (also at 10), Sec. 1 Daily 



Hist. 5 (also at 8), Sec. 3 MWF 

Hist. 6 (also at 8), Sec. 1 MWF 

Hist. 129S Daily 

Math. 1 (also at 8) MWF 

Math. 6 (also at 8), Sees. 1, 2.. MWF 
Math. 11 (also at 8), Sec. 1....MWF 

Math. 15 (also at 8) MWF 

Math. 17 (also at 8), 

Sec. 1, 2 MTWThFS 

Math. 20 (also at 8) MTWThFS 

Math. 21 (also at 8), 

Sees. 1, 2 MTWThFS 

Math. 102S Daily 

Mus. 1 (also at 8) MWF 

Mus. 70 (also at 8) MWF 

Mus. 80, 81 Daily 

Phil. 102S Daily 

Psych. 1 (also at 8) MWF 

Psych. 2S Daily 

Psych. 110 (also at 8) MWF 

Psych. 128S Daily 

Soc. IS (also at 8), Sees. 1, 2.. MWF 

Soc. 153S Daily 

Speech 2 Daily 

Speech 4 (also at 8) Daily 

Zool. S3 (also at 8, 10) Daily 

Zool. S5 (also at 1, 2, 3) Daily 

Zool. S104 (also at 10) Daily 

B. Ed. 255 Daily 

Ed. 122 Daily 

Ed. 123 Daily 

Ed. 130 Daily 

Ed. 144 Daily 

Ed. 152 Daily 

Ed. 195 (also at 10) MWF 

Ed. 210, Sec. 1 Daily 

Ed. 216 Daily 

Ed. 219 Daily 



SUMMER SESSION 



63 



Symbol 



Days Symbol 



Days 



Ed. 242 Daily 

Ed. 250, Sec. 1 Daily 

Ed. 261, Sec. 1 Daily 

Ind. Ed. 23 Daily 

Ind. Ed. 106 (also at 8), 



Sec. 1 Daily 

P. E. 180 (also at 10) Daily 

Rec. 100 Daily 

Sci. Ed. 1 Daily 



A. E. 216. 



10:00 A. M. 
June 27th to July 15th 

.Daily 



June 27th to August 5th 



Art 1 (also at 9, 11) MWF 

Art 5 (also at 9, 11) MWF 

Art 7 (also at 9, 11) TWTh 

Art 104 (also at 9, 11) MWF 

Art 106 (also at 9, 11) MWF 

Bact. 1 (also at 8, 9) Daily 

Bact. 5 (also at 9, 11) Daily 

B. A. 20 (also at 11) Daily 

B. A. 121 (also at 11) Daily 

B. A. 124 (also at 11) Daily 

B. A. 160 (also at 11), Sec. L.Daily 

B. A. 166 (also at 11) Daily 

B. A. 169 (also at 11) Daily 

Econ. 31 (also at 11), Sec. 2.. Daily 
Econ. 32 (also at 11), Sec. 2..Daily 



Daily 



Econ. 140 (also at 11), 

Sec. 2 

Econ. 160 (also at 11), 

Sec. 1 Daily 

Geog. 2, Sec. 1 Daily 

Chem. 3 (alternate lab., 8, 9, 

10 or 1, 2, 3; lecture 11) Daily 

Chem. 19 (also at 9, 11, 12).... Daily 

Chem. 38 (also at 9, 11) Daily 

Chem. 166, 167 (lab. ar- 
ranged) MWF 
Clo. 20 A & B (also at 8, 9)....Daily 

Clo. 22 (also at 9) Daily 

Nut. 10 (also at 11) Daily 



July 11th to August 5th 
Nut. 210 (also at 11, 3) Daily 

June 27th to August 5th 



Eng. 135S Daily 

Eng. 225S Daily 

Eng. 3 (also at 11), 

Sees. 4, 5, 6) Daily 

Eng. 4 (also at 11), Sec. 2....Daily 
Eng. 5, 6 (also at 11), 

Sees. 1, 2 Daily 

Fr. 4 or 5 (also at 2) Daily 

Ger. 4 or 5 (also at 2) Daily 

G. & P. 7 Daily 

G. & P. 106S Daily 

G. & P. 1 (also at 9) Daily 

Hist. 5 (also at 9), Sec. 1 MWF 



Hist. 6 (also at 11), Sec. 2 Daily 

Hist. 115S Daily 

Hist. 166S Daily 

L. S. 104S (also at 11) Daily 

Math. 6 (also at 11), Sec. 3.... Daily 

Math. 10 (also at 11) Daily 

Math. 11 (also at 11), Sec. 2.. Daily 

Math. 14, Sees. 1, 2 Daily 

Math. 17 (also at 11), Sec. 3....MTWThFS 
Math. 21 (also at 11), 

Sees. 3, 4, 5 MTWThFS 

Math. 64 (also at 11) Daily 

Math. 106S Daily 



64 



SUMMER SESSION 



Symbol Days 

Mus. 7 Daily 

Mus. 127 Daily 

Psych. 106 (also at 11) Daily 

Psych. 121S Daily 

See. 2S (also at 11) Daily 

Soc. 14S Daily 

Soc. 141S Daily 

Speech 7 Daily 

Speech 10 Daily 

Zool. SI (also at 8, 11) Daily 

Zool. S3 (also at 8, 9) Daily 

Zool. S104 (also at 9) MWF 

B. Ed. 162 Daily 

C. Ed. 102 Daily 

Ed. 124 Daily 

Ed. 195 (also at 9) MWF 



Symbol Days 

Ed. 205 Daily 

Ed. 210, Sec. 2 Daily 

Ed. 211 Daily 

Ed. 225 Daily 

Ed. 236 Daily 

Ed. 245 Daily 

Ed. 250, Sec. 2 Daily 

Ed. 261, Sec. 2 Daily 

Ind. Ed. 28 (also at 11) Daily 

Ind. Ed. 106 (also at 11), 

Sec. 2 Daily 

Ind. Ed. 157 _ Daily 

P. E. 114 (also at 11) TTh 

P. E. 180 (also at 9) Daily 

Rec. 130 (also at 11) Daily 



Pv. Ed. 250 A-B. 



11:00 A. M. 
June 27th to July 15th 
.Daily 



June 27th 

Bot. 1 (also at 8, 9) Daily 

Art 1 (also at 9, 10) MWF 

Art 5 (also at 9, 10) MWF 

Art 7 (also at 9, 10) TWTh 

Art 104 (also at 9, 10) MWF 

Art 106 (also at 9, 10) MWF 

Bact. 5 (also at 9, 10) Daily 

B. A. 20 (also at 10) Daily 

B. A. 121 (also at 10) Daily 

B. A. 124 (also at 10) MWF 

B. A. 160 (also at 10) MWF 

B. A. 166 (also at 10) MWF 

B. A. 169 (also at 10) MWF 



to August 5th 

Econ. 31 (also at 10), Sec. 2....MWF 
Econ. 32 (also at 10), Sec. 2....MWF 
Econ. 140 (also at 10), 

Sec. 2 MWF 

Econ. 160 (also at 10), 

Sec. 1 Daily 

Chem. 3 (alternate lab., 8, 9, 

10 or 1, 2, 3; lecture 11).... Daily 
Chem. 19 (also at 9, 10, 12)....Daily 

Chem. 38 (also at 9, 10) Daily 

Chem. 285 Daily 

Pr. Art 1 Daily 

Nut. 10 (also at 10) MWF 



July 11th to August 5th 
Nut. 210 (also at 10, 3) Daily 

June 27th to August 5th 
Eng. 8S Daily Eng. 2 (also at 1), 



Eng. 155S Daily 



Sees. 3, 4, 5 Daily 



SUMMER SESSION 



65 



Symbol Days 

Eng. 3 (also at 10), 

Sees. 4, 5, 6 MWF 

Eng. 4 (also at 10), Sec. 2 MWF 

Eng. 5, 6 (also at 10), 

Sec. 1, 2 MWF 

Fr. 2 (also at 1) Daily 

Ger. 2 (also at 1) Daily 

G. & P. 4 (also at 12) Daily 

G. & P. 1 (also at 12), Sec. 3..Daily 

Hist. 5 (also at 12), Sec. 2 Daily 

Hist. 6 (also at 10), Sec. 2 MWF 

Hist. 176S ...; Daily 

L. S. 104S (also at 10) Daily 

Math. 2 Daily 

Math. 6 (also at 10), Sec. 3....MWF 

Math. 10 (also at 10) MWF 

Math. 11 (also at 10) MWF 

Math. 17 (also at 10), Sec. 3..MTWThFS 
Math. 21 (also at 10), 

Sees. 3, 4, 5 MTWThFS 

Math. 64 (also at 10) MWF 

Mus. 50 Daily 

Mus. 71 (also at 12) Daily 

Mus. 90 Daily 

Psych. 106 (also at 10) MWF 

Psych. 125S Daily 

Psych. 131S Daily 



Symbol Days 

Soc. IS (also at 12), Sec. 3....Daily 

Soc. 2S (also at 10) MWF 

Soc. 5S Daily 

Speech 110 Daily 

Zool. SI (also at 8, 10) Daily 

Zool. S20 (also at 1, 2, 3) Daily 

B. Ed. 101 Daily 

B. Ed. 165 Daily 

C. Ed. 110 (also at 8) Daily 

Ed. 105 Daily 

Ed. 134 Daily 

Ed. 153 Daily 

Ed. 162, Sec. 1 Daily 

Ed. 203 Daily 

Ed. 214 Daily 

Ed. 217 Daily 

Ed. 262 Daily 

Ind. Ed. 28 (also at 10) Daily 

Ind. Ed. 106 (also at 10), Daily 

Sec. 2 

Ind. Ed. 165 Daily 

Ind. Ed. 248 Daily 

P. E. 114 (also at 10) Daily 

P. E. 230S Daily 

Rec. 130 (also at 10) Daily 

Sci. Ed. SI Daily 



12:00 Noon 

June 27th to August 5th 



B. A. 10 Daily 

B. A. 21 (also at 1), Sec. 2 Daily 

B. A. Ill (also at 1) Daily 

B. A. 122 (also 1) Daily 

Econ. 150 (also at 1) Daily 

Eng. 121S Daily 

Ger. 6 or 7 (also at 3) Daily 

Sp. 2 (also at 3) Daily 

Chem. 19 (also at 9, 10, 11) Daily 

G. & P. 4 (also at 11) TThF 

G. & P. 1 (also at 11), Sec. 3..TThF 

G. & P. 174S Daily 

Hist. 5 (also at 11), Sec. 2 MWF 



Hist. 133S Daily 

Hist. 191S Daily 

Mus. S4 Daily 

Mus. 6 Daily 

Mus. 71 (also at 11) MWF 

Soc. IS (also at 11), Sec. 3....MWF 

Soc. 115S Daily 

Soc. 144S Daily 

Ed. 121 Daily 

Ed. 209 Daily 

Ed. 247 Daily 

P. E. 200 Daily 



66 



SUMMER SESSION 



Symbol Days Symbol 

1:00 P. M. 
June 27th to July 15th 
R. Ed. 208 A-B (also at 2) Daily 

June 27th to August 5th 



Days 



Bot. 11 (also at 2, 3) MWF 

Art 9 (also at 2) MWF 

Art 100 (also at 2) TTh 

B. A. 21 (also at 12), Sec. 2....Daily 

B. A. Ill (also at 12) MWF 

B. A. 122 (also at 12) MWF 

B. A. 140 (also at 2) Daily 

B. A. 160 (also at 2), Sec. 2....Daily 

Econ. 150 (also at 12) MWF 

Econ. 160 (also at 2), Sec. 2....Daily 

Geog. 2, Sec. 2 Daily 

Chem. 3 (alternate lab., 8, 9, 

10 or 1, 2, 3; lecture 11) Daily 

Clo. 128 (also at 2, 3) Daily 

Tex. 108 (also at 2) Daily 

Cr. 2 (also at 2) Daily 

Eng. 1 (also at 2), Sees. 3, 4..Daily 
Eng. 2 (also at 11), 

Sees. 3, 4, 5 MWF 

Eng. 4 (also at 2), Sees. 3, 4....Daily 
Eng. 5, 6 (also at 2), Sec. 3....Daily 

Fr. 2 (also at 11) MWF 

Ger. 2 (also at 11) MWF 



Sp. 4 or 5 (also at 2) Daily 

Hist. 4 (also at 2) Daily 

Hist. 6 (also at 2) Daily 

Hist. 108S Daily 

L. S. 102S (also at 2) Daily 

Zool. S5 (also at 9, 2, 3) Daily 

Zool. S20 (also at 11, 2, 3) Daily 

B. Ed. 180 Daily 

Ed. 101 Daily 

Ed. 125— 

Sec. 1, Art Daily 

Sec. 2, Music Daily 

Ed. 160 Daily 

Ed. 162, Sec. 2 Daily 

Ed. 229 Daily 

Ind. Ed. 2 (also at 2) Daily 

Ind. Ed. 9 (also at 2) Daily 

Ind. Ed. 22 (also at 2) Daily 

Ind. Ed. 24 (also at 2) Daily 

Ind. Ed. 67 (also at 2) Daily 

0. T. 150 (also at 2) Daily 

P. E. 140 (also at 2) Daily 

P. E. 201S Daily 



2:00 P. M. 
June 27th to July 15th 

R. Ed. 208 A-B (also at 1) Daily 



Bot. 11 (also at 1, 3) Daily 

Art 9 (also at 1) MWF 

Art 100 (also at 1) TTh 

B. A. 140 (also at 1) MWF 

B. A. 160 (also at 1) MWF 

Econ. 160 (also at 1), Sec. 2. MWF 
Chem. 3 (alternate lab., 8, 9, 

10 or 1, 2, 3; lecture 11) Daily 



June 27th to August 5th 

Clo. 128 (also at 1, 3) Daily 

Tex. 108 (also at 1) MW 

Cr. 2 (also at 1) Daily 

Eng. 1 (also at 1) MWF 

Eng. 4 (also at 1) MWF 

Eng. 5, 6 (also at 1), Sec. 3... MWF 

Fr. 4 and 5 (also at 10).; MWF 

Ger. 4 or 5 (also at 10) MWF 



SUMMER SESSION 



67 



Symbol Days 

Sp. 4 or 5 (also at 10) MWF 

Hist. 4 (also at 1) MWF 

Hist. 6 (also at 1), Sec. 3 MWF 

Hist. 122S Daily 

L. S. 102S (also at 1) MWF 

Zool. S5 (also at 9, 1, 3) Daily 

Zool. S20 (also at 11, 1, 3) Daily 

Ed. 147, Sec. 1 Daily 

Ed. 150, Sec. 2 Daily 

Ed. 269 Daily 



Symbol Days 

Ind. Ed. 2 (also at 1) Daily 

Ind. Ed. 9 (also at 1) Daily 

Ind. Ed. 22 (also at 1) Daily 

Ind. Ed. 24 (also at 1) Daily 

Ind. Ed. 67 (also at 1) Daily 

O. T. 150 (also at 1) Daily 

(to 2:30) 

P. E. lOS, Sec. 1 Daily 

P. E. SOS Daily 

P. E. 140 (also at 1) Daily 



3:00 P. M. 

June 27th to August 5th 



Art 10 MW 

Bot. 11 (also at 1, 2) Daily 

Chem. 3 (alternate lab., 8, 9, 

10 or 1, 2, 3; lecture 11) Daily 

Clo. 128 (also at 1, 2) Daily 

Nut. 210 (also at 10, 11) W 

Ger. 6 or 7 (also at 12) MWF 

Sp. 2 (also at 12) MWF 

Zool. S5 (also at 9, 1, 2) Daily 



Zool. S20 (also at 11, 1, 2,)....Daily 

Ed. 147, Sec. 2 Daily 

Ed. 150, Sec. 2 Daily 

Ind. Ed. 21 (also at 4) Daily 

Ind. Ed. 41 (also at 4) Daily 

P. E. 20S, Sec. 1 Daily 

P. E. 100 (also at 4) Daily 

P. E. 125S Daily 



4:00 P. M. 

June 27th to August 5th 

Ind. Ed. 21 (also at 3) Daily P. E. lOS, Sec. 2 

Ind. Ed. 41 (also at 3) Daily P. E. 100 (also at 3). 

5:00 P. M. 
June 27th to August 5th 

P. E. 20S, Sec. 2 Daily 

Arranged and Unusual Hours 

June 27th to July 15th 

A. E. 109 R. Ed. 210 A-B 

A. E. 200 A. H. 206 



Daily 
MWF 



Bot. 206. 
Bot. 214. 
Bot. 225. 



June 27th to August 5th 

Dairy 124 

Dairy 204 

Dairy 208 



68 



SUMMER SESSION 



Symbol 

Ent. 110, 111 

Ent. 201 

Ent. 202 

Bact. 181 

Bact. 290 

Chem. 142 

Chem. 146 

Chem. 254 

Chem. 258 

Chem. 360 

Tex. and Clo. 200 

Home Mgt. 152 

Hist. 208S 

Hist. 250S 

Mus. 12, 52, 112, 152, 13, 
53, 113, 153, 14, 54, 114, 
154 



Days Symbol Days 

Psych. 278S 

Psych. 2258 

Psych. 290S 

Soc. 291S 

Zool. S53 

Zool. 206 

Zool. 208 

C. Ed. 149 (9-12 and arr.) Daily 

C. Ed. 159 (9-12 and arr.) Daily 

Ed. 184 (all day) Daily 

Ed. 289 

Hea. 160 (all day; 4 weeks). ...Daily 

P. E. 40S (1, 2, 3, 4) W 

P. E. 250 

P. E. 260 

Sci. Ed. S2 (1-3:30) TTh 




Campus in Summer, College Park 



OTHER ADMINISTRATIVE OFFICERS 
OfiBce of the President 

Virginia G. Wilkinson Secretary to the President 

Office of the Director of Admissions 

Mary Burke Assistant, Baltimore Division Office 

Office of the Registrar 

Mary Anna Walker, M.A Assistant Registrar 

LiSETTE Thompson Assistant, Records 

Florence Stafford Assistant, Baltimore Division Office 

Dean of Women's Office 

Rosalie Leslie, M.A Assistant Dean of Women 

Marian Johnson, M.A Assistant Dean of Women 

Jane Caton, M.S Assistant Counselor 

Office of Financial Administration and Control 

C. L. Benton, M.S., C.P.A. Comptroller 

W. A. Burslem. B.S Cashier 

Robert Morris Chief, Statistical Services 

Edith M. Frothingham Administrative Assistant 

W. V. Macon ACHY Assistant Comptroller (Baltimore) 

Charles W. Spicer Chief Accountant (Baltimore) 

J. H. Tucker Chief Clerk (Baltimore) 

Frank K. Haszard, B.F.S Director of Procurement and Supply 

McKinley L. Fuller Military Property Custodian 

C. Wilbur Cissel, M.A., C.P.A Assistant to the Comptroller 

Ernest A. Berger Chief Accountant (Baltimore) 

If 

Office of Business Management 

George 0. Weber, B.S : Business Manager 

Harry Gallogly, B.S Maintenance Engineer 

William Wood Service Supervisor 

Grace Hale, B.A Administrative Assistant II 

C. A. Speakb Superintendent of New Construction 

Nelson 0. Rima Superintendent of Veterans Housing 

Robert E. Blair Manager, Students' Supply Store 

Dining Hall 

Robinson Lappin General Manager 

Student Health Service 

Harry A. Bishop, M.D .Medical Director 

W. Allen Griffith, M.D Physician Consultant 

Estella C, Baldwin, R.N Supervisor of Nurses 

V 



Publications and Publicity 

Harvey L. Miller, Col. U.S.M.C. (Ret.) . .Dir. of Publications and Publicity 

Alumni Office 

David L. Brigham General Secretary 

FACULTY COMMITTEES 
Admission, Guidance, and Adjustment 

Professor Bamford, Chairman; Deans Eppley, Robinson, Smith, Stamp; 
Miss Preinkert; Professors Curtiss, Hodgins, Long, Quigley, Reid, 
ScHiNDLER, D. D. Smith. White. 

Coordination of Agricultural Activities 

Director Symons, Chairman; Director Kemp; Dean Corbett; Assist- 
ant Directors Cory, Magruder; State Chemist Bopst; Professors Ahalt, 
Bamford, Brueckner, Cairns, Carpenter, DeVault, Foster, Haut, 
Holmes, Jull. 

Council on Intercollegiate Athletics 

Dean Eppley, Chairman; Acting Dean Griswold; Directors Kemp, 
Tatum; Assistant Director Cory; Professor Supplee, the President of 
the Student Government Association, and the Chairman of the Alumni 
Council, ex-officio. 

Educational Standards, Policies and Coordination 

Dr. Charles White, Chairman; Professors Bamford, Drake, Cairns, 
DeVault, Hofpsommer, Martin, H. B. McCarthy, Shreeve, Strahorn, 
WiGGiN, H. Boyd, Wylie. 

Extension and Adult Education 

Director Kabat, Chairman; Associate Dean Corbett; Assistant Dean 
Brechbill; Assistant Director Kellar; Professors Baker, G. D. Brown, 
Corcoran, DeVault, Ehrensberger, Martin, Phillips, Steinmeyer. 

Libraries 

Professor Cardwell, Chairman; Professors Aisenberg, Russell 
Brown, Corcoran, Dillard, Foster, Hackman, Hall, Harman, Inver- 
NEZZi, Parsons, Reeve, Ida M. Robinson, Rovelstad, Spencer, Wiggin. 

Publications and Catalog 

Dean Cotterman, Chairman; Deans Benjamin, Howell, Mount, Pylb, 
Robinson, Smith, H. Boyd Wylie; Director Kemp; Professors Baker, 
Ball, Bryan, Reid, Zucker; Mr. Brigham; Mr. Durfee; Mr. Fogg; Miss 
E. Prothingham; Colonel Miller; Miss Preinkert. 

VI 



Public Functions and Public Relations 

Director Symons, Chairman; Deans Eppley, Howell, Mount, Robinson, 
Stamp, H. Boyd Wylie; Mr. Fogg; Colonel Stadtman; Mr. Brigham; 
Colonel Miller; Miss Preinkert; Professors Bopst, Cory, Gewehr, 
Randall, Reid, Shreeve, Snyder, Steinmeyer, Weber, Miss Leslie. 

Religious Life Committee 

Assistant Dean Rosalie Leslie, Chairman; Professors Marie Bryan, 
Gewehr, Hamilton, McNaughton, Randall, Reid, Scott, Shreeve, White. 

Scholarships and Student Aid 

Dean Cotterman, Chairman; Deans Eppley, Mount, Stamp; Director 
Long; Professors Reid, Steinmeyer. 

Student Life 

Professor James H. Reid, Chairman; Deans Eppley, Stamp; Colonel 
Stadtman; Miss Preinkert; Professors Russell Allen, Bishop, Bur- 
nett, Deach, Ehrensberger, Harman, Kramer, Lejins, Mitchell, Out- 
house, Phillips, Charles White, Wiggin ; Miss Leslie. 

THE UNIVERSITY LIBRARIES 

Howard Rovelstad, M.A., B.S.L.S Acting Director of Libraries 

College Park 

Betty B. Baehr, A.B., B.S.L.S Loan Librarian 

Barbara H. Baker Assistant Reference Librarian 

Frances M. Bezanson, A.B Assistant Loan Librarian 

Agatha Brown, A.B., B.S.L.S Assistant Catalog Librarian 

Velma L. Charlesworth, B.S.E. in L.S Assistant Catalog Librarian 

Ruth S. Haun Assistant Loan Librarian 

Lois Holladay, A.B., B.L.S Catalog Librarian 

E. Louise Leyh, A.B Assistant Reference Librarian 

Stella S. Moyer, A.B., B.S.L.S Assistant Catalog Librarian 

Virginia Phillips, A.B., B.A.L.S Assistant Reference Librarian 

Merilyn Potter, A.B Assistant Loan Librarian 

H. David Turner, A.B., B.S.L.S Order Librarian 

Anna Mary Urban, A.B., B.A.L.S Reference Librarian 

Theresa Veverka Assistant Catalog Librarian 

Kate White Periodicals Librarian 

Baltimore: Dental, Medical, Pharmacy and School of Nursing Libraries 

Ida M. Robinson, A.B., B.S.L.S Librarian 

Elizabeth Anna Crouse Assistant Librarian (Dentistry) 

Rebecca Elam, B.A., B.S.L.S Catalog Librarian (Dentistry) 

Mary E. Hicks, A.B., B.L.S Assistant Librarian (Medicine) 

Simone C. Hurst Librarian in Charge (School of Nursing) 

VII 



Edith R. McIntosh. A.M., A.B.L.S Catalog Librarian (Medicine) 

Beatrice Marriott, B.S Assistant Librarian (Dentistry) 

Hilda E. Moore, A.B., A.B.L.S Assistant Librarian (Pharmacy) 

Florence R. Kirk Assistant Librarian (Medicine) 

Law Library 

Anne C. Bagby, A.B.. B.L.S Librarian 

A Section of University oj Maryland Professional ScTiool Buildings in Baltimore 




INDEX— SUMMER SESSION 



Page 

Academic Credit ^^ 

Accommodations 1 ' 

Admission, Terms of 15 

Administration, Officers of II. front ; V, back 

Administrative Board I. front 

Agricultural Economics 24 

Agricultural Education 25 

Agricultural Marketing 24 

Agronomy 26 

American Civilization 21 

Animal Husbandry 26 

Arranged Hours ^'^ 

Art School, Camp Ritchie 20 

Arts, Dramatic ^9 

Arts. Fine 26 

Automobiles I'^ 

Bacteriology 26 

Baltimore Nursing Education 20 

Board of Regents I. front 

Bookstore 20 

Botany 26 

Business Administration 27 

Business Education 32 

Calendar IV, front 

Calendar, Summer Session 3 

Camp Ritchie, Art School 20 

Campus Map Inside front cover 

Campus Picture III. front 

Cancellation 17 

Candidates for Degrees 20 

Catalogs Offered Outside back cover 

Chemistry 30 

Childhood Education 33 

Child Study, Summer Workshop 21 

Civilization, American 21 

Committees, Faculty VI, back 

Conferences 22 

Council, Educational I, front 

Courses Offered, American Civilization 22 

Credit, Academic 15 

Dairy 31 

Degrees, Candidates for 19 

Dramatic Arts 59 

Economics, Agricultural 24 

Education 32 

Education, Agricultural 25 

Education Building 2 

Education, Business 32 

Education, Childhood 33 

Education, Health 44 

Education, Human Development 39 

Education, Industrial 39 

Education, Physical 42 

Education, Recreation 43 

Education, Science 44 

Educational Council I, front 



Page 

English 44 

Entomology 46 

Faculty Committees VI, back 

Faculty, Summer Session 3 

Fees 16 

Fine Arts 46 

Foreign Languages and Literature 47 

French 48 

German 48 

Government and Politics 48 

Graduate Work 19 

Health Education 44 

Health, Student 17 

History 49 

Home Economics 61 

Horticulture 62 

Human Development Education 39 

Industrial Education 89 

Institutes 22 

Kindergarten 21 

Libraries VII, back 

Library Facilities 20 

Library Science 62 

Literature, Foreign Languages and 47 

Loads, Normal and Maximum 15 

Map, Campus Inside front cover 

Marketing, Agricultural 24 

Mathematics 63 

Meals 17 

Music 66 

Nursery School 21 

Nursing Education, Baltimore 20 

Officers, Administration II, front; V, back 

Parking 19 

Philosophy 66 

Physical Education 42 

Physics 66 

Politics, Government and 48 

Psychology 67 

Recreation Education 43 

Recreational Activities 19 

Refunds 18 

Regents, Board of I, front 

Registration 16 

Rural Life 25 

Schedule by Hours 61 

Science Education 44 

Social Activities 19 

Sociology 58 

Spanish 48 

Speech and Dramatic Arts 59 

Tuition 16 

Unusual Hours 67 

Workshops 22 

Zoology 60 



UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND'S CATALOGS 

At College Park 

Individual catalogs of colleges and schools of the University of Mary- 
land at College Park may be obtained by addressing the Director of Admis- 
sions, University of Maryland, College Park, Maryland. These colleges 
and schools are: 

1. College of Agriculture 

2. College of Arts and Sciences 

3. College of Business and Public Administration 

4. College of Education 

5. College of Engineering 

6. College of Home Economics 

7. College of Military Science, Physical Education and 
Recreation 

8. College of Special and Continuation Studies 

9. Summer School 

10. Graduate School 

11. The Combined Catalog (a charge of 50 cents is made for 
this publication) 

At Baltimore 

Individual catalogs for the professional schools of the University of 
Maryland may be obtained by addressing the Deans of the respective schools 
at the University of Maryland, Lombard and Greene Streets, Baltimore 1, 
Maryland. These professional schools are: 

(1) School of Dentistry 

(2) School of Law 

(3) School of Medicine 

(4) School of Pharmacy 

(5) School of Nursing 



u 



Do ^^ 



.M