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Full text of "The Summer School"

.73 



VOL. 9 APRIL 5, 19S7 NO. 31 



1957-1958 




JNIVERSITY. OF MARYLAND 



summer 
school 



AT COLLEGE PARK 




yMP UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 

S^'^^OOb COLLEGE PARK. MD. 



THE PROVISIONS of this publication are not to be regarded 
as an irrevocable contract between the student and , the 
University of Maryland. The University reserves the right 
to change any provision or requirement at any time within 
the student's term of residence. The University further 
reserves the right at any time, to ask a student to withdraw 
when it considers such action to be in the best interests 
of the University. 



GENERAL INFORMATION 

For information in reference to the University grounds, 
buildings, equipment, library facilities, requirements in 
American Civilization, definition of resident and non-resident, 
regrulation of studies, degrees and certificates, transcripts of 
records, student health and welfare, living arrangements in 
the dormitories, off-campus housing, meals, University Coun- 
seling Service, scholarships and stude:it aid, athletics and 
recreation, student government, honors and awards, religious 
denominational clubs, fraternities, societies and special clubs, 
the University band, student publications, University Post 
Office and Supply Store, write to the Editor of Publications 
for the General Information issue of the Catalog. 



See Outside Back Cover for List of Other Catalogs 
Index on inside back cover. 



Volume 9 April 5, 1957 No. 31 



A University of Maryland Publication Is published four times In January, February, 
March and April ; three times In May ; once In June and July ; twice In August, September, 
October and November ; and three times In December. 

Ee-entered at the Post Office In College Park, Maryland, as second class mail matter 
under the Act of Congress of August 24, 1912. 



BOARD OF REGENTS 
AND 

MARYLAND STATE BOARD OF AGRICULTURE Term 

Expires 
Charles P. McCormick, Sr., Chairman, McCormick and Company, Inc., 

414 Light Street, Baltimore 2 1957 

Edward F. Holter, Vice-Chairman, The National Grange, 744 Jackson 

Place, N.W., Washington 6 1959 

B. Herbert Brown, Secretary, The Baltimore Institute, 12 West 

Madison Street, Baltimore 1 - _ 1960 

Harry H. Nuttle, Treasurer, Denton ....» 1957 

Louis L. ELaplan, Assistant Secretary, 1201 Eutaw Place, Baltimore 17 1961 

Edmund S. Burke, Assistant Treasurer, Kelly-Springfield Tire Com- 
pany, Cumberland 1959 

William P. Cole, Jr., 100 West University Parkway, Baltimore 10 1958 

Thomas W. Pangborn, The Pangborn Corporation, Pangborn Blvd., 

Hagerstown — - 1965 

Enos S. Stockbridge, 10 Light Street, Baltimore 2 _ 1960 

Thomas B. Symons, Suburban Trust Company, 6950 Carroll Avenue, 

Takoma Park 1963 

C. EwiNG Tuttle, 907 Latrobe Building, Charles and Read Streets, 

Baltimore 2 1962 

Members of the Board are appointed by the Governor of the State for 
terms of nine years each, beginning the first Monday in June. 

The President of the University of Maryland is, by law, Executive Officer 
of the Board. 

Thfi State law provides that the Board of Regents of the University of 
Maryland shall constitute the Maryland State Board of Agriculture. 

A regular meeting of the Board is held the last Friday in each month, 
except during the months of July and August. 

LIBRARY 

UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 

COLLEGE PARK, Ma 



OFFICERS OF THE ADMINISTRATION 

Wilson H. Elkins, President, University of Maryland. ' 

B.A., Uniyersify of Texas, 1932; M.A., 19^2; B.Lltt., Oxford Unlverelty, 1986; i 

D.Phll., 1936. ,J[ 

Albin O. Kuhn, Assistant to the President of the University. 

K.S'., University of Maryland, 1938; M.S.. 1939; Ph.D., 1948. 

Alvin E. Cormeny, Assistant to the President, in charge of Endowment and 
Development. 

R.A., Illinois CoIIprp, 1933; LL.B., Cornell University, 1936. 

Harry C. Byrd, President Emeritus, University of Maryland. \ 

B..S., Universitv of Maryland. 1908; LL.D., Washington Collnge, 1936; I.L.D.. 
Dickinson College, 1938 ; D.Sc, Western Maryland College, 1938. J 

Harold F. Cotterman, Dean of the Faculty of the University. 

RS., Ohio state University, 1916 ; M.A. Columbia University, 1917 ; Ph.D., 
American University, 1930. 

Ronald Bamford, Dean of the Graduate School. 

U.S., University of Connecticut, 1924; M.S., University of Vermont, 1926; Ph.D., 
Columbia University, 1931. 

Gordon M. Cairns, Dean of Agriculture. 

U.S., Cornell University, 1936 ; M.S., 1938 ; Ph.D., 1940. 
Paul E. Nystrom, Director, Agricultural Extension Service. 

K.Sr., Universitv of California. 1928: M.S., University of Maryland, 1931; 
M.P.A., Harvard University, 1948 ; D.P.A., 1951. 

Irvin C. Haut, Director, Agricultural Experiment Station and Head, Depart- 
ment of Horticulture. ' 

B.S., University of Idaho. 1928; M.S., State College of Washington, 1930; 
Ph.D., University of Maryland, 1933. 

Leon P. Smith, Dean of the College of Arts and Sciences. I 

B.A., Emory University. 1919; M.A., University of Chicago, 1928; Ph.D., 19.<10 ; ^ 

Diplome le I'lnstitut de Touraine, 1932. 

J. Freeman Pyle, Dean of the College of Business and Public Administration. 

Ph.B., University of Chicago, 1917 ; M.A., 1918 ; Ph.D., 1925. 
Myron S. Aisenberg, Dean of the School of Dentistry. 

D.D.S., University of Maryland, 1922. \ 

Vernon E. Anderson, Dean of the College of Education. f< 

B.S.. University of Minnesota, 1930; M.A., 1936; Ph.D., University of Colorado, 

1942. 

*S. Sidney Steinberg, Dean of the College of Engineering. 

B.E., Cooper Union School of Engineering, 1910 ; C.E., 1913 ; Registered 
Professional Engineer. 

WiLBERT J. Huff, Director, Engineering Experiment Station and Chairman 

of the Division of Physical Sciences. 

B.A., Ohio Northern University, 1911 ; B.A.. Tale College, 1914 ; Ph.D., Tale 
University, 1917; D.Sc. (hon.), Ohio Northern University, 1927. 

Roger Howell, Dean of the School of Law. 

B.A.. .Tohns Hopkins University, 1914; Ph.D., 1917; LL.B., University of 
Maryland, 1917. 

William S. Stone, Dean of the School of Medicine and Director of Medical 

Education and Research. 

U.S.. University of Idaho. 1924 ; M.S.. 1925 ; M.D., University of Louisville, 
l!t29 ; Ph.D., (hon.). University of Louisville, 1946. 

Florence M. Gipe, Dean of the School of Nursing. 

B.S., Catholic University of America, 1937 ; M.S'., University of Pennsylvania 
1940 ; Ed.D., University of Maryland, 1952. 

Clifford G. Blitch, Director of the University Hospital. 
M.D., Vanderbllt University Medical School, 1928. 



'Resigned Janaary 31, 1957. 



Edward Barber, Dean of the College of Military Science. 

B.S"., Massachusetts Institute of Technology, 1935 ; M.A., Georgetown University, 
1956 ; Brigadier General, U.S. Air Force. 

Noel E. Foss, Dean of the School of Pharmacy. 

Ph.C. South Dakota State College, 1929 ; B.S., 1929 ; M.S., University of 
Maryland, 1932 ; Ph.D., 1933. 

Lester M. Fraley, Dean of the College of Physical Education, Recreation, 
and Health. 

B.A.. Randolph-Macon College, 1928 ; M.A., 1937 ; Ph.D., Peabody College, 1939. 

Ray W. Ehrensberger, Dean of the College of Special and Continuation Studies. 

B.A., Wabash College, 1929; M.A.. Butler University, 1930; Ph.D., Syracuse 
University, 1937. 

Geary F. Eppley, Director of Student Welfare and Dean of Men. 

B.S., Maryland State College, 1920 ; M.S., University of Maryland, 1926. 

Adele H. Stamp, Dean of Women. 

B.A., Tulane University, 1921 ; M.A., University of Maryland, 1924. 
G. Watson Algire, Director of Admissions and Registrations. 
B.A., University of Maryland, 1930 ; U.S., 1931. 

Norma J. Azlein, Registrar. 

B.A., University of Chicago, 1940. 

David L. Brigham, Alumni Secretary. 

B.A., University of Maryland, 1938. 

William W. Cobey, Director of Athletics. 

A.B., University of Maryland, 1930. 
George O. Weber, Director and Supervising Engineer, Department of Physical 
Plant. 

B.S., University of Maryland, 1933. 
George W. Morrison, Associate Director and Supervising Engineer Physical 
Plant. (Baltimore). 

B.S., University of Maryland, 1927; E.E., 1931. 
C. Wilbur Cissel, Director of Finance and Business. 

B.A., University of Maryland, 1932 ; M.A., 1934 ; C.P.A., 1939. 

Howard Rovelstad, Director of Libraries. 

B.A., University of Illinois, 1936: M.A., 1937; B.S.L.S., Columbia University, 
1940. 

George W. Fogg, Director of Personnel, 

B.A., University of Maryland, 1926 ; M.A., 1928. 
Robert J. McCartney, Director of University Relations. 

B.A., University of Massachusetts, 1941. 

Harry A. Bishop, Director of the Student Health Service. 

M.D., University of Maryland, 1912. 
Robert E. Kendig, Professor of Air Science and Commandant of Cadets, Air 
Force R.O.T.C. 

A.B., William and Mary College. 1939. 

DIVISION CHAIRMEN 
Charles E. White, Chairman of the Lower Division. 

B.S., University of Maryland, 1923 : M.S., 1924 ; Ph.D., 1926. 

John E. Faber, Jr., Chairman of the Division of Biological Sciences. 

B.S. University of Maryland, 1926 ; M.S., 1927 ; Ph.D., 1937, 

Adolf E. Zucker, Chairman of the Division of Humanities. 

B.A., University of Illinois, 1912; M.A., 1913; Ph.D., University of Pennsyl- 
vania, 1917. 

Harold C. Hofsommer, Chairman of the Division of Social Sciences. 

B.S., Northwestern University, 1921 ; M.A., 1923 ; Ph.D., Cornell Unlver.sity, 1929. 

WiLBERT J. Huff, Chairman of the Division of Physical Sciences. 

B.A., Ohio Northern University, 1911; B.A., Yale College, 1914; Ph.D., Yale Uni- 
versity, 1917; D.S-c. (hon.), Ohio Northern University, 1927. 

8 



UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 




BUILDING CODE LETTERS FOR CLASS SCHCDULES. 

Arlj a Sciences. Fronci» Scoll Key Holl 

Nursery School 

Armory 

Music 

Administrolion 

Chemistry 

Coliseum 

Ooiry. Turner Loborotcry 

Avifllion Psychology Loborolory 

Deon of Women 

Agrcncmy • Botany H J. Polterscn Holl 

Counseling Center 

Horlicullur! - Holjopfel Holl 
Journalism 

Ritchie Gymnosium 
Activities Building 

Home Economics - Morgeret BrenI Holl 

Agricultural Engr. - Shrivar Loborolory 

Engr. Classroom BIdg. 

Zoology - Silvester Hall 

Librory . Shoemaler Building 

Morrill Holl 

Geography 

Agriculture -Symons Holl 

industriol Arts B Educollon • J M. Peltarson Bldf- 

Business a Public Administration ■Tolloferro Holl 

Clossroom Building . Woods Holl 

Engr. Loborotories 

Educotion - Sftinner Building . 

Chem. Engr. 

Wind Tunnel 

Preinhert Field Hous* 

Judging Povlllan 

Mathematics 

Phriice ■ , 

Poultry .Jull Ha|l 

Engines Reseorch Lob. (Molecular Physics) 



Ci«il 

Detente g 
Trolning BItfg.* 



1957 

September 17-20 
September 23 
November 27 
December 2 
December 21 



1957-58 CALENDAR 
First Semester 



Ttiesday-Friday 

Monday 

Wednesday after last class 

Monday, 8 A.M. 

Saturday after last class 



Registration, first semester 
Instruction begins 
Thanlisgiving recess begins 
Thanlvsgiving recess ends 
Cliristmas recess begins 



1958 

January 6 
January 20 
January 21 
January 22-29 



Monday, 8 A.M. 
Monday 
Tuesday 
Wednesday-Wednesday, inc. 



Christmas recess ends 
Charter Day 

Pre-Examinatlon Study Day 
First Semester examinations 



February 4-7 
February 10 
February 22 
March 25 
April 3 
April 8 
May 15 
May 28 
May 29-June 
May 30 
June 1 
June 7 



Second Semester 

Tuesday-Friday 

Monday 

Saturday 

Tuesday 

Thursday after last class 

Tuesday, 8 A.M. 

Thursday 

Wednesday 

Thursday-Friday, inc. 

Friday 

Sunday 

Saturday 



Registration, second semester 
Instruction begins 
Washington's birthday, holiday 
Maryland Day 
Easter recess begins 
Easter recess ends 
Military Day 

Pre-Examinatlon Study Day 
Second Semester examinations 
Memorial Day, holiday 
Baccalaureate exercises 
Commencement exercises 



June 23 
June 24 
August 1 



Summer Session, 1958 



Monday 
Tuesday 
Friday 



Registration, S*ummer Session 
Summer Session begins 
Summer Session ends 



June 16-21 
August 4-9 
September 2-5 



Short Courses 



Monday-Saturday 
Monday-Saturday 
Tuesday-Friday 



Rural Women's Short CoOTfe 
4-H Club Week 
Firemen's Short Course 



SUMMER SESSION, 1957 

JUNE 24— AUGUST 2 

Vernon E. Anderson, Ph.D., Director 

Orval L. Ulry, Ph.D., Assistant Director 

Grace Lucile Adams, Assistant Professor of Education, Institute for Child 
Study. 

B.S., University of Soulhern California, 1940; M.S., University of Southern Call- 
fomia, 1956. 

Arthur M. Ahalt, Professor and Head, Department of Agricultural Educa- 
tion. 

B.S., University of Maryland, 1931 ; M.S., Pennsylvania State College, 1937. 

Franxis J. Alberts, Assistant Professor of Personnel Administration. 

B.A., University of Rochester, 1947; M.S., University of Rochester, 1950; Ph.D., 
New York University, 1953. 

Albert L. Alford, Instructor in Government and Politics. 

B.A., University of Akron, 194S ; M.A., Princeton University, 1951 ; Ph.D., 
Princeton University, 1953. 

Rowannetta S. Allen, Director of Instruction, Board of Education, Prince 
George's County, Maryland. Visiting Lecturer in Education. 

B.A., American University, 1929 ; M.Ed., University of Maryland, 1941. 

Frank G. Anderson, Assistant Professor of Sociology. 

B.A., Cornell University, 1941 ; Ph.D., University of New Mexico, 1951. 

John P. Augelli, Associate Professor of Geography. 

B.A., Clark University, 1943 ; M.A., Harvard University, 1949 ; Ph.D., Harvard 
University, 1951. 

William T. Avery, Professor and Head, Deartment of Classical Languages 

and Literatures. 

B.A., Western Reserve University, 1934 ; M.A., Western Reserve University, 
1935 ; Ph.D., Western Reserve University, 1937. Fellow of the American Academy 
In Rome. 1937-39. 

Edward W. Baker, Entomologist, Bureau of Entomology and Plant Quaran- 
tine, U.S. Department of Agriculture. Visiting Lecturer in Zoology. 

B.S'., University of California, 1936 ; Ph.D., University of California, 1938. 

Jack C. Barnes, Instructor in English. 

B.A., Duke University, 1939 ; M.A., Duke University, 1947 ; Ph.D., University 
of Maryland, 1954. 

Whitney K. Bates, Instructor in History. 

B.A., University of Washington, 1941 ; M.A., University of Wisconsin, 1948 ; 
Ph.D., University of Wisconsin, 1951. 

George F. Batka, Assistant Professor of Speech. 

B.A., Wichita University, 1938 ; M.A., University of Michigan, 1941. 

Richard H. Bauer, Associate Professor of History. 

B.A., University of Chicago ; M.A., University of Chicago, 1928 ; Ph.D., Uni- 
versity of Chicago, 1935. 

7 



8 UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 

Gi£:nn 0. Blough, Associate Professor of Education. 

B.A., University of Micliigan, 1929 ; M.A., University of Micliigan, 1932 ; LL.D., 
Central Micliigan College of Education, 1950. 

Lucille Bowie, Instructor in Education, Institute for Child Study. 

B.S., University of Maryland, 1942 ; M.A., Teachers College, Columbia University, 
1946. 

Richard M. Brandt, Asisstant Professor of Education, Institute for Child 
Study. 

B.M.E., University of Virginia, 1943 ; M.A., University of Michigan, 1949 ; Ed.D., 
University of Maryland, 1954. 

Pela Fay Braucher, Associate Professor of Foods and Nutrition. 

B'.A., Goucher College, 1927 ; M.S., Pennsylvania State University. 

Glen D. Brown, Professor of Industrial Education. 

B.A., Indiana State Teachers College, 1916 ; M.A., Indiana University, 1931. 

Joshua R. C. Brown, Associate Professor of Zoology. 

B.A., Duke University, 1948 ; M.A.. Duke University, 1949 ; Ph.D., Duke Uni- 
versity, 1953. 

Russell G. Brown, Associate Professor of Botany. 

B.S., West Virginia University, 1929 ; M.S., West Virginia University, 1930 ; 
Ph.D., University of Maryland, 1934. 

Marie D. Bryan, Associate Professor of Education. 

B.A., Goucher College, 1923 ; M.A., University of Maryland, 1945. 

Alois J. Burda, Junior Instructor of Mathematics. 
8.S., U. S. Naval Academy, 1940. 

Richard H. Byrne, Associate Professor of Education. 

B.A., Franklin and Marshall College, 1938 ; M.A., Franklin and Marshall College, 
1947 ; Ed. D., Columbia University, 1952. 

Charles E. Calhoun, Professor of Finance. 

B.A., University of Washington, 1925 ; M.B.A., University of Washington, 1930. 

Joseph H. Camin, Visiting Lecturer inZoology. 

B.S., Ohio State University, 1946 ; M.S., Ohio State University, 1947 ; Ph.D., 
Ohio State University, 1949. 

Marjorie H. Campbell, Insti-uctor in Science Education, Teacher's College, 
District of Columbia. Visiting Lecturer in Education. 

B.S., University of Maryland, 1938 ; M.A., University of Maryland, 1940. 

John T. Carruthers, Assistant Professor of Chemistry. 

Clifton Bob Clark, Asistant Professor of Physics, U.S. Naval Academy, 
Annapolis, Maryland. Visiting Lecturer in Physics. 

B.A., University of Arkansas, 1949 ; M.A., University of Arkansas, 1950 ; Ph.D., 

University of Maryland, 1957. 

Gerald F. Combs, Professor of Poultry Husbandry. 

B.S., University of Illinois, 1940 ; Ph.D., Corneli University, 1948. 

Sara E. Conlon, Instructor in Speech and Dramatic Arts. 

B.A., University of Maryland, 1947 ; M.A., State University of Iowa, 1950. 



SUMMER SCHOOL 9 

Franklin D. Cooley, Associate Professor of English. 

B.A., Johns Hopkins University, 1927; M.A., University of Maryland, 1933 1 
Ph.D., Johns Hopkins University, 1940. 

Leslie C. Costello, Instructor in Zoology. 

B.S., University of Maryland, 1952 ; M.S., University of Maryland, 1954. 

Carroll E. Cox, Professor of Bitany. 

B.A., University of Delaware, 1938 ; M.S., Virginia Polytechnic Institute, 1940 ; 
Ph.D., University of Maryland, 1943. 

Dorothy D. Craven, Instructor in Speech. 

B.S., (Education), S'outheast Missouri State Teachers College, 1945; M.A., 
University of Iowa, 1948. 

Frank H. Cronin, Associate Professor of Physical Education; Head Golf 
Coach. 

B.S., University of Maryland, 1946. 

Vienna Curtiss, Professor and Head of Department of Practical Art. 
B.A., Arizona State College, 1933 ; M.A., Columbia University, 1935. 

Madeline E. Dalton, Supervisor, Classes for Children with Retarded Mental 
Development, New York City. Visiting Lecturer in Education. 
B.A., Hunter College, 1935 ; M.A., Hunter College, 1942. 

Richard F. Davis, Associate Professor and Head, Department of Dairy. 

B.S., University of New Hampshire, 1950 ; M.S., University of New Hampshire, 
1952 ; Ph.D., Cornell University, 1953. 

Marie Denecke, Instructor in Education. 

B.A., Columbia University, 1938 ; M.A., University of Maryland, 1942. 

George W. Denemark, Professor of Education and Assistant Dean. 

B.A., University of Chicago, 1943 ; M.A., University of Chicago, 1948 ; M.Ed., 
University of Illinois, 1950 ; Ed.D., University of Illinois, 1956. 

Carolyn C. Dunlap, Director of Practice, State Teachers College, Salisbury, 
Maryland. Visiting Lecturer in Education. 

B.A., Western Maryland College, 1939 ; M.A., University of Maryland, 1950 ; 
Ed.D., University of Maryland, 1954. 

Charles B. Edelson, Instructor in Accounting. 

B.B.A., University of New Mexico, 1949 ; M.B.A., Indiana University, 1950 ; C.P.A. 
Maryland, 1951. 

Gertrude Ehrlich, Assistant Professor of Mathematics. 

B.S., Georgia S'tate College for Women, 1943 ; M.A., University of North Caroliaa, 
1945 ; Ph.D., University of Tennessee, 1953. 

Emory G. Evans, Instructor in History. 

B.A.. Randolph-Macon College, 1950 ; M.A., University of Virginia, 1954 ; Ph.D., 
University of Virginia, 1957. 

Marvin H. Eyler, Assistant Professor of Physical Education. 

B.A., Houghton College. 1942 ; M.S., University of Illinois, 1948 ; Ph.D., Uni- 
versity of Illinois, 1956. 



10 UXIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 

John E. Faber, Professor and Head of Bacteriology. 

B.S., Universitj- of Maryland. 1926 ; M.S., 1927 ; Ph.D., 1937. 

Bhaskar S. Fadxis, Instructor in Mathematics. 

B.S., University of Xagpur, 1944 ; M.S.. University of Nagpur, 194S ; Ph.D., 
University of Nagpur, 1955. 

Hugh G. Gauch, Professor of Plant Physiology. 

B.S., Miami University, 1935 ; M.S., Kansas State College, 1937 ; Ph.D., Uni- 
versity of Chicago, 1939. 

DwiGHT L. Gentry, Associate Professor of Marketing. 

B.A., Elon College. 1941 ; M.B.A., Northwestern University, 1947 ; Ph.D., Uni- 
versity of Illinois, 1952. 

Guy W. Gienger, Associate Professor of Agricultural Engineering. 
B.S., University of Maryland, 1933 ; M.S., University of Maryland, 1936. 

Richard A. Good, Associate Professor of Mathematics. 

B.A., Ashland College, 1939 ; M.A., University of Wisconsin, 1940 ; Ph.D., Uni- 
versity of Wisconsin, 1945. 

Ralph Goodwin, Professor and Head of Physics, U. S. Naval Academy, 
Annapolis, Maryland. Visiting Lecturer in Physics. 

B.A., Simpson College, 1935 ; M.S., Iowa State College, 1937 ; Ph.D., Iowa State 

College, 1939. 

William Henry Gravely, Jr., Associate Professor of English. 

B.A., College of William and Mary, 1924 ; M.A., University of Virginia, 19.34 ; 
Ph.D., University of Virginia, 1953. 

Rose Marie Grentzer, Professor of Music. 

B.A.. (Music and Music Education), Carnegie Institute of Technology, 1936; 
M.A., Carnegie Institute of Technology, 1939. 

John W, Gustad, Professor of Psychology and Director, University Counsel- 
ing Center. 

B.A., Macalester College, 1943 ; M.A., University of Minnesota, 1948 ; Ph.D., 

University of Minnesota, 1949. 

Hai-Tsin Hsu, Instructor in Mathematics. 

B.E., National Technical College, 1937 ; M.A., National Cliekiang University, 1945 ; 
Ph.D., Yale University, 1955. 

Helen E. Hale, Supervisor of Senior High Schools, Science and Mathe- 
matics, Baltimore County Public Schools, Maryland. Visiting Lecturer in 
Education. 

B.A., Goucher College, 1935 ; M.A., Johns Hopkins University, 1952. 

Thomas W. Hall, Instructor of Foreign Languages. 

M.A., Middlebury College, 1950. 

Robert C. Hammock, Professor of Secondary Education, University of 
Alabama. Visiting Lecturer in Education. 

B.A., North Texas State College, 1928 ; M.A., University of Texas, 1935 ; Ph.D., 

University of Texas, 1942. 

Horace V. Harrison, Asisstant Professor of Government and Politics. 

B.A.. Trinity University, 1932 ; M.A., University of Texas, 1941 ; Ph.D., Uni- 
versity of Texas, 1951. 



SUMMER SCHOOL 11 

Paul E, Harrison, Jr., Associate Professor of Industrial Education. 

®.Ed., Northern Illinois State Teacliers College, DeKalb, 1942 ; M.A., Colorado 
State College of Education, Greeley, 1947 ; Ph.D., University of Maryland, 1955. 

Ellen E. Harvey, Associate Professor of Physical Education and Recreation. 

B.S., New College, Columbia University, 1935 ; M.E., Teachers' CoUgee, ColumWa 
University, 1941 ; Ed.D., University of Oregon, 1951. 

Elizabeth E. Haviland, Assistant Professor of Entomology. 

B.A., Wilmington (Ohio) College, 1923 ; M.A., Cornell University. 1926 ; M.S., 
Universcity of Maryland, 1936 ; Ph.D., University of Maryland. 1945. 

Guy B. Hathorn, Assistant Professor of Government and Politics. 

B.A., University of Mississippi, 1940 ; M.A., University of Mississippi. 1942 ; 
Ph.D., Duke University, 1950. 

Richard Hendricks, Associate Professor of Speech. 

B.A., Franklin College, 1937 ; M.A., Ohio State University, 1939 ; Ph.D., Ohio 
State University, 1956. 

Richard Highton, Assistant Professor of Zoolo^. 

B.A., New York University, 1950 ; M.S., University of Florida, 1953 ; Ph.D., 
University of Florida, 1956. 

David Wayne Hirst, Instructor in History. 

B.A., University of Connecticut, 1950 ; M.A., Northwestern University, 1952. 

Robert K. Hirzel, Instructor in Sociology. 

19.50 ; Ph.D., Louisiana State University, 1954. 

Harold C. Hoffsommer, Professor and Head, Department of Sociology. 

B.S., Northwestern University, 1921 ; M.A., Northwestern University, 1923 ; 
Ph.D., Cornell University, 1929. 

Harald Holmann, Instructor in Mathematios. 

Staatsexamen (M.A.), University of Munster, 1955; Ph.D., University of Munster, 
1956. 

H. Palmehi Hopkins, Assistant Professor of Agricultural Education. 

B.S., Oklahoma A. & M. College, 1936: M.Ed., University of Maryland. 1948. 

William F. Hornyak, Associate Professor of Physics. 

B.E.E., City College of New York. 1944 ; M.S., California Institute of Technology, 
1945 ; Ph.D., California Institute of Technology, 1949. 

Kenneth 0. Hovet, Professor of Education. 

B.A., St. Olaf College, 1926 ; Ph.D.. University of Minnesota, 1950. 

James H. Humphrey, Professor of Physical Education and Health. 

B.A., Denison University. 1933 ; M.A.. Western Reserve Uniersity, 1946 ; Ed.D., 
Boston University, 1951. 

BURRIS F. HUSMAN, Associate Professor of Physical Education. 

B.S., University of Illinois. 1941 ; M.S., University of Illinois, 1948 ; Ed.D., Uni- 
versity of Maryland, 1954. 

Stanley B. Jackson, Professor and Head, Department of Mathematics. 

B.A., Bates College, 1933 : M.A., Harvard University, 1934 ; Ph.D., Harvard Uni- 
versity, 1937. 



12 UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 

Richard H. Jaquith, Assistant Professor of Chemistry. 

B.S., University of Massachusetts. 1940 ; M.S., Universitj- of Massachusetts, 1942 ; 
Ph.D., Michigan State University, 1955. 

William Robert Jenkins, Assistant Professor of Plant Pathology. 

B.S.. College of William and Mary, 1950 ; M.S., University of Virginia, 1952 ; Ph.D., 
University of Maryland, 1954. 

Warren R. Johnson, Professor of Health Education and Physical Educa- 
tion. 

p.. A.. University of Denver, 1952 ; M.A., University of Denver, 1946 ; Ed.D., Boston 

University, 1950. 

Henry Bryce Jordan, Assistant Professor of Music. 

B.Mus., University of Texas, 1948 ; M.Mus., University of Texas, 1949 ; Ph.D., 
University of North Carolina, 1956. 

Louis "W. Kazienko, Associate Professor of Educational Psychology, Man- 
kato State Teachers College, Minnesota. Visiting Lecturer in Education. 

B.&., University of New Hampshire, 19.3S ; M.A., University of New Hampshire, 

1940 ; Ph.D., University of Nebraska, 1953. , 

Dora E. Kearney, Instructor in Mathematics. 

B.A., University of Minnesota, 1920 ; M.A., University of Minnesota, 1924. 

Mary A. Kemble, Instnictor in Music and Music Education. 

B.S., (Music) State Teachers College. Mansfield, Pennsylvania, 1930; B.S., (Edu- 
cation), State Teachers College, Mansfield, Pennsylvania, 1936; M.S., University 
of Pennsylvania, 1930. 

Florance B. King, Professor and Head, Department of Foods and Nutrition. 

B.S., University of Illinois, 1914 ; M.A., University of California, 1926 ; Ph.D., Uni- 
versity of Indiana, 1929. 

Charles F. Kramer, Associate Professor of Foreign Languages. 

Ph.B., Dickinson College, 1911 ; M.A., Dickinson College, 1912. 

Robert W. Krauss, Assistant Professor of Botany. 

B.A., Oberlin College, 1947 ; M.S., University of Hawaii, 1949 ; Ph.D., University 
of Maryland, 1951. 

Norman C. Laffer, Associate Professor of Bacteriology. 

B.?.. Allegheny College, 1929 ; M.S., University of Maine, 1932 ; Ph.D., University 
of Illinois, 1937. 

Howard J. Laster, Assistant Professor of Physics. 

B.A., Harvard College, 1951 ; Ph.D., Cornell University, 1957. 

Victor B. Lawhead, Associate Professor of Education, Ball State Teachers 
College, Muncie, Indiana. Visiting Lecturer in Education. 

p.. a., De Paw University, 1940 ; M.A., The Ohio State University, 1947 ; Ph.D., 

The Ohio State University, 1950. 

LeRoy L. Lee, Assistant Professor of Accounting. 

C.P.A., Maryland, 1949 ; A.M., George Washington, 1952. 



SUMMER SCHOOL 13 

John Lembach, Associate Professor of Art and Art Education. 

B.A., University of Crlcago, 1034 : M.A., Northwestern University, 1937 ; Ed.D., 
Columbia University, 1946. 

Mary Rea Lewis, Visiting Lecturer in Education. 

B.S., Teachers College, Columbia University, 1929 ; M.A., Teachers College, Colum- 
bia University, 1933. 

R. A. LiTTLEFORD, Associate Professor of Zoology. 

B.S., University of Maryland, 1933 ; M.S., University of Maryland, 1934 ; Ph.D., 
University of Maryland, 1938. 

Robert F. Luce, Instructor in Civil Engineering. 

B.S., Tale University, 1910. Registered Professional Engineer. 

Thomas M. Magoon, Assistant Professor of Psychology and Assistant 

Director, Student Couseling Center. 

B.A., Dartmouth College, 1947 ; M.A., University of Minaesota, 1951 ; Ph.D., Uni- 
versity of Minnesota, 1954. 

Donald Maley, Professor of Industrial Education. 

B.S., State Teachers College, California, Pennsylvania. 1943 ; M.A., University of 
Maryland, 1947 ; Ph.D., University of Maryland, 1950. 

Benjamin H. Massey, Professor of Physical Education. 

B.A., Erskine College. 193S ; M.S., University of Illinois, 1947 ; Ph.D., University 
of Illinois, 1950. 

Wesley J. Matson, Assistant Professor of Education. 

B.S'., University of Minnesota, 1948 ; M.A., University of California, 1954. 

Martha Maxwell, Counselor-Instruction in Psychology. 

B.A., University of Maryland. 1946 ; M.A., University of Maryland. 1948. 

Nancy Jane Mearig, Instructor in Home Management. 

B.S., New York State College for Teachers, Buffalo, New York, 1947 ; M.S., Purdae 
University, 1952. 

Walter S. Measday, Assistant Professor of Economics. 

B.A., College of William and M:.\ry, 1945 ; Ph.D., Massachusetts Institute of Tech- 
nology, 1955. 

Bruce L. Melvin, Associate Professor of Sociology. 

B.S., University of Missouri, 1916 ; M.A., University of Missouri, 1917 ; Ph.D., Uni- 
versity of Missouri. 1921. 

George R. Merrill, Instructor in Industrial Education. 

B.S., University of Maryland, 1954 ; M.Ed., University of Maryland, 1955. 

Horace S. Merrill, Professor of History. 

B.E.. filver Falls State College, Wisconsin, 1932 ; Ph.M., University of Wisconsin, 
1933 ; Ph.D., University of Wisconsin, 1942. 

Madelaine J. Mershon, Professor of Education, Institute for Child Study. 
B.S., Drake University, 1940 ; M.A.. University of Chicago, 1943 ; Ph.D., University 
of Chicago, 1950. 

Charlton G. Meyer, Instructor in Music. 

B.Mus., Curtis Institute of Music, 1952. 



14 UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 

Dorothy R. Mohr, Professor of Physical Education. 

B.S'., University of Chicago, 1932; M.A., University of Chicago, 1933; Ph.D., Uni- 
versity of Iowa, 1944. 

E. AUBERT MoONEY, Jr., Associate Professor of English. 

B.A.. Furman University, 1930 ; M.A., University of Virginia, 1933 ; Ph.D., Cornell 
University, 1937. 

Delbert T. Morgan, Associate Professor of Botany. 

B.S.. Kent State University, 1940 ; M.A., Columbia University, 1942 ; Ph.D., Colum- 
bia University, 1948. 

H. Gerthon Morgan, Professor of Education, Institute for Child Study. 

B.A., Furman University, 1940 ; M.A., University of Chicago, 1943 ; Ph.D., Univer- 
sity of Chicago, 1946. 

Earl W. Mounce, Professor of Law and Labor. 

B.S., University of Missouri, 1921 ; M.A., University of Southern California, 1922 ; 
B.A.. University of Southern California, 1927 ; L.L.M., University of S'outhern Cali- 
fornia, 1945. 

Charles D. Murphy, Professor and Acting Head, Department of English. 

B.A., University of Wisconsin, 1929 ; M.A., Harvard University, 1930 ; Ph.D., 
Cornell University, 1940. 

Boyd L. Nelson, Assistant Professor of Statistics and Business Administra- 
tion. 

B.A., University of Wisconsin, 1947 ; M.A., University of Wisconsin, 1948 ; Ph.D., 
University of Wisconsin, 1952. 

Graciela p. Nemes, Intructor in Foreign Languages. 

B.S., Trinity College, 1942 ; M.A., University of Maryland, 1949 ; Ph.D., University 
of Maryland, 1952. 

Clarence A. Newell, Professor of Educational Administration. 

B.A., Hastings College, Nebraska, 1935 ; M.A., Columbia University, 1939 ; Ph.D., 
Columbia University, 1943. 

Jane H. O'Neill, Instructor in Office Tecniques. 
B.A., University of Maryland, 1932. 

Leo W. O'Neill, Associate Professor of Education. 

B.A., University of Chicago, 1938 ; M.A., University of Kansas City, 1953 ; Ed.D., 
University of Colorado, 1955. 

Jess Norman Parmer, Instructor in History. 

B.A.. Indiana University, 1949 ; M.A., University of Connecticut, 1951 ; Ph.D., 
Cornell University, 1957. 

Robert A. Paterson, Instructor in Botany. 

B.A., University of Nevada, 1949 ; M.A., Stanford University, 1951. 

Arthur S. Patrick, Associate Professor of Office Management and Business 
Education. 

B.S., Wisconsin State College, 1931 ; M.A., University of Iowa, 1940 ; Ph.D., 
American University, 1956. 

Bernard Peck, Instructor in Education, Institute for Child Study. 
B.A., Indiana University, 1939 ; M.A., Columbia University, 1941. 



SUMMER SCHOOL 15 

Hugh B. Pickard, Associate Professor of Chemistry. 

B.A., Haverford College, 1933 ; Ph.D., Northwestern Uui% ersity, 1938. 

Harry W. Piper, Assistant Professor of Civil Engineering. 

B.Arch.E., Catholic University of America, 1940 ; Registered Professional Engineer. 

Gordon W. Prange, Professor of History. 

B.A., University of Iowa. 1932 ; M.A., University of Iowa. 1934 ; Ph.D., University 
of Iowa, 1937. 

Ernest F. Pratt, Professor of Chemistry. 

B.A., University of Redlands. 1937 ; M.A., Oregon State University, 1939 ; M.A., 
University of Michigan, 1941 : Ph.D.. University of Michigan, 1942. 

Daniel A. Prescott, Professor of Education and Director, Institute for 
Child Study. 

B.S., Tufts College, 1920 ; M.Ed., Harvard University, 1922 ; Ed.D., Harvard Uni- 
versity, 1923. 

Philo T. Pritzkau, Associate Professor of Education, University of Con- 
necticut. Visiting Lecturer in Education. 

B.A., Valparaiso University, 1926 ; Ph.B., University of Chicago, 1927 ; M.A., Uni- 
versity of Chicago, 1931 ; Ed.D., Teachers College. Columbia University, 1951. 

Robert D. Rappleye, Associate Professor of Botany. 

B.S'., University of Maryland, 1941 ; M.S., University of Maryland. 1947 ; Ph.D., 
University of Maryland, 1954. 

Robert G. Risinger, Associate Professor of Education. 

B.S., Ball State Teachers College, Muncie, Indiana, 1940 ; M.A., University of 
Chicago, 1947 ; Ed.D., University of Colorado, 1955. 

Alice L. Robinson, Supervisor of Libraries, Montgomery County Board of 
Education, Maryland. Visiting Lecturer in Library Science. 

B.A., Baldwin-Wallace College, 1934 ; B.S. in Library Science, Western Reserve 
University, 1940 ; M.A.. Western Reserve University, 1952. 

William G. Rosen, Assistant Professor of Mathematics. 

B.S.. University of Illinois. 1943 : M.S., University of Illinois, 1947 ; Ph.D., Uni- 
versity of Illinois, 1954. 

William B. Runge, Associate Professor of Secondary Education and State 
Supervisor of Distributive Education, University of New Mexico. Visiting 
Lecturer in Education. 

B.S., Colorado State College of Agriculture and Mechanic Arts, 1935 ; M.Ed., 
Colorado State College of Agriculture and Mechanic Arts, 1944 : Ed.D., University 
of S'outhem California, 1953. 

Alvin W. Schindler, Professor of Education. 

B.A.. Iowa State College, 1927 : M.-A... University of Iowa, 1929 ; Ph.D., University 
of Iowa, 1934. 

Frank J. Schmidt, Instructor in Sociology. 

B.A., University of Chicago, 1941 ; M.A., University of Chicago, 1946 ; Ph.D., Uni- 
versity of Chicago, 1950. 

Jennye Faye Schultz, Visiting Lecturer in Education. 

B.A., Mississippi College, 1951 ; M.A., University of Alabama, 1954. 



16 UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 

Mark Schweizer, Assistant Professor of Foreign Languages. 
M.A., University of Maryland, 1931 ; Ph.D., University of Maryland. 

Paul W. Shankweiler, Associate Professor of Sociology. 

Ph.B., Muhlenberg University, 1919 ; M.A., Columbia University, 1921 ; Ph.D., 
University of North Carolina, 1934. 

George D. Shelby, Assistant Professor of Economics. 

B.A.. University of Cincinnati, 1947 ; Ph.D., University of California, 1955. 

Julius C. Shepherd, Instructor in Mathematics. 

B.A., East Carolina Teachers College, 1944 ; M.A., East Carolina Teachers College, 
1947. 

David E. Simons, Assistant Professor of Electrical Engineering. 

B.S., University of Maryland, 1949 ; M.S., University of Maryland, 1951. 

Hugh D. Sisler, Assistant Professor of Botany. 

B.S., University of Maryland, 1949 ; M.S., University of Maryland, 1951 ; Ph.D., 
University of Maryland, 1953. 

Elkan E. Snyder, Assistant Director, Bureau for Children With Retarded 
Mental Development, Board of Education, New York City. Visiting Lecturer 
in Education. 

B.S"., New York University, 1950; MA., New York University, 1951. 

Allen R. Solem, Associate Professor of Psychology. 

B.A., University of Minnesota, 1938 ; M.A., Wayne University, 1948 ; Ph.D., Uni- 
versity of Michigan, 1953. 

David S. Sparks, Assistant Professor of History. 

B.A., Grinnell College, 1944 ; M.A., University of Chicago, 1945 ; Ph.D., University 
N of Chicago, 1951. 

Mabel S. Spencer, Assistant Professor of Home Economics Education. 
B.S., West Virginia University, 1925 ; M.S., West Virginia University, 1946. 

Fague K. Springmann, Associate Professor of Music. 
B.Mus., Westminster Choir College, 1939. 

Donald Stanger, Assistant Professor of Education, Institute for Child 

Study. 

B.S., State Teachers College, Glassboro, New Jersey, 1948 ; M.A., Columbia Univer- 
sity, 1949 ; Ed.D., University of Maryland, 1955. 

E. Thomas Starcher, Instructor in Speech. 

B.A., University of Southern California, 1940 ; M.S., University of Arkansas, 1948. 

RUEBEN G. Stein MEYER, Professor of Government and Politics. 

B.A., American University, 1929 ; Ph.D., American University, 1935. 

R. W. Strandtmann, Professor of Biology, Texas Technological College. 

Visiting Lecturer in Zoology. 

B.S., S-outhwestem Texas Technology College, 1935 ; M.S., Texas Agricultural and 
Mechanical College, 1937; Ph.D., Ohio State University, 1944. 

Clara G. Stratemeyer, Elementary Supervisor, Montgomery County Schools, 
Maryland. Visiting Lecturer in Education. 
B.S., Teachers College, Columbia University, 1928 ; M.A., Teachers College, Colum- 
bia University, 1929 ; Ph.D., Teachers College, Columbia University, 1936. 



SUMMER SCHOOL 17 

Warren L. Strausbaugh, Associate Professor and Head, Department of 
Speech and Dramatic Arts. 

B.S., Wooster College, 1932 ; M.A., University of Iowa, 1935. 

Roland N. Stromberg, Assistant Professor of History. 

B.A., University of Kansas City, 1939 ; M.A., American University, 1946 ; Ph.D., 
University of Maryland, 1952. 

Calvin F. Stuntz, Associate Professor of Chemistry. 

B.A., University of Buffalo, 1939 ; Ph.D., University of Buffalo, 1947. 

Fred R. Thompson, Associate Professor of Education, Institute for Child 
Study. 

B.A., University of Texas, 1929 ; M.A., University of Texas, 1939 ; Ed.D., University 
of Maryland, 1952. 

William F. Tierney, Assistant Professor of Industrial Education. 

B.S., Teachers College of Connecticut, 1941 ; M.A., Ohio State University, 1949 ; 
Ed.D., University of Maryland, 1952. 

Orval L, Ulry, Associate Professor of Education and Assistant Director 
of Summer Session. 

B.S., Ohio S-tate University, 1938 ; M.A., Ohio State University, 1944 ; Ph.D., Ohio 

State University, 1953. 

James A. Van Zwoll, Professor of School Administration. 

B.A., Calvin College, Grand Rapids, Michigan, 1933 ; M.A., University of Michigan, 
1937 ; Ph.D., University of Michigan, 1942. 

Antoine Visconti, Lecturer in Physics. 

Docteur 6s Sciences, Faculty des Sciences de Paris, 1951. 

Walter B. Waettjen, Associate Professor of Education, Institute for Child 
Study. 

B.S., State Teachers College, Millersville, Pennsylvania, 1942 ; M.S., University of 

Pennsylvania, 1947 ; Ed.D., University of Maryland, 1951. 

Robert E. Wagner, Professor and Head, Department of Agronomy. 

B.S'., Kansas State College, 1942 ; M.S., University of Wisconsin, 1943 ; Ph.D., Uni- 
versity of Wisconsin, 1950. 

Gladys A. Wiggin, Professor of Education. 

B.S., University of Minnesota, 1929 ; M.A., University of Minnesota, 1939 ; Ph.D., 
University of Maryland, 1947. 

Frank H. Wilcox, Jr., Assistant Professor of Poultry. 

B.S., University of Connecticut, 1951 ; M.S., Cornell University, 1953 ; Ph.D., 
Cornell University, 1955. 

G. Forrest Woods, Professor of Chemistry. 

B.A., Northwestern University, 1935 ; M.S., Harvard University, 1937 ; Ph.D., 
Harvard University, 1940. 

Howard Wright, Professor of Accounting. 

B.S., Temple University, 1937 ; M.A., University of Iowa, 1940 ; C.P.A., State of 
Texas, 1940 ; Ph.D., University of Iowa, 1947. 

Leland B. Yeager, Assistant Professor of Economics. 

B.A., Oberlin College, 1948 ; M.A., Columbia University, 1949 ; Ph.D., Columbia 
University, 1952. 

Jacqueline L. Zemel, Instructor in Mathematics. 

B.S'., Queens College, 1949 ; M.A., Syracuse University, 1951. 



18 



UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 



SUMMER SESSION 

Vernon E. Anderson, Ph.D., Director 
Orval L. Ulry, Ph.D., Assistant Director 
Alma Frothingham, Administrative Assistant 

REGISTRATION SCHEDULE AND CALENDAR OF DATES 



Advanced Registration Schedule for Students in Education 
(By appointment only) 
May 1 through May 25—9:00 A.M.- 2:30 P.M., Mondays through Fridays 
9:00 A.M.-11:00 A.M., Saturdays 



Registration Schedule for New Graduate Students 


Friday, June 21 


9:00 A.M. 


A— E 


11:00 A.M. 


I^R 


10:00 A.M. 


F— K 


1:00 P.M. 


S— Z 


Registration Schedule for Undergraduate Students and 
Returning Graduate Students 



Date 


Time 


Students 


Time 


Students 


Monday, June 24 


8:30 A.M. 

9:30 A.M. 

10:30 A.M. 


A— C 
D— F 
G— K 


12:30 P.M. 
1:30 P.M. 
2:30 P.M. 


1^0 
P— S 
T— Z 



To expedite registration, students have been put into groups on the basis 
of the first letter of the last name. All students should register according 
to the above schedule. 

June 25, Tuesday Classes begin. 

June 29, Saturday Classes as usual, Monday schedule. 

July 4, Thursday Holiday. 

August 2, Friday Close of Summer Session, 



REGISTRATION 

Registration for undergraduate and graduate students will take place on 
Monday, June 24, from 8:30 A. M. to 2:30 P. M. New graduate students should 
register on Friday, June 21, from 9:00 A. M. to 1:00 P. M., and should report 
to the office of the department or college concerned with their graduate pro- 
grams, at the time listed in the Registration Schedule. 

All students must obtain admission to the University from the Director of 
Admissions or the Dean of the Graduate School before registration. 

Registration begins in the office of the appropriate dean at the time listed 
in the Registration Schedule. After registration forms have been filled out and 



SUMMER SCHOOL 19 

approved by the dean, students complete registration at the Armory where 
they receive bills, pay fees, and submit all forms to the Registrar. 

Instruction will begin on Tuesday, June 25, at 8:00 A. M. The late regis- 
tration fee, charged on and after Tuesday, June 25, is $5.00. 

Advanced Registration 

Undergraduate and graduate students in Education may register for the 
Summer Session between May 1 and 25 by appointment with the advisers in 
the College of Education. The hours for advanced registration will be 9:00 
A. M. to 2:30 P. M., Mondays through Fridays, and 9:00 A. M. to 11:00 A. M. 
on Saturdays. 

Students who wish to register early should arrange to complete registra- 
tion after conference with the Dean by paying fees at the Cashier's Office and 
submitting all approved registration farms to the Office of the Registrar. 

New students who wish to register in advance must be formally admitted 
to the University prior to registration. New undergraduate students should 
file applications for admission with the Office of Admissions and new graduate 
students should apply to the Dean of the Graduate School. 

TERMS OF ADMISSION 

All summer school students must be admitted to the university. This 
applies to all non-degree as well as degree candidates. Persons not previously- 
admitted should file their applications with Mr. G. W. Algire, Director of Ad- 
missions, not later than June 8, 1957. 

Graduates of accredited two-and three-year normal schools with satis- 
factory normal school records may be admitted to advanced standing in the 
College of Education. The record and objectives of the individual student 
determine the exact amount of credit allowed. The student is given individual 
counsel as to the best procedure for fulfiJling the requirements for a degree. 

Applications for admission to the Graduate School must be in the hands of 
the Dean of the Graduate School by June 8. Applications must include tran- 
scripts of undergraduate records. Students not desiring graduate credit may 
register as "Special Students" and not seek admission to the Graduate School. 
Only students admitted to the Graduate School may register for courses 
numbered 200 or above. 

DEFINITION OF RESIDENCE AND NON-RESIDENCE 

Students who are minors are considered to be resident students if at the 
time of their registration their parents have been domiciled in this State for 
at least one year. 

The status of the residence of a student is determined at the time of his 
first registration in the University, and may not thereafter be changed by him 
unless, in the case of a minor, his parents move to and become legal residents 



20 UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 

of this State by maintaining sucli residence for at least one full yeai*. HoW^ 
ever, the right of the minor student to change from a non-resident to resident 
status must be established by him prior to the registration period set for any 
semester. 

Adult students are considered to be residents if at the time of their regis- 
tration they have been domiciled in this State for at least one year provided 
such residence has not been acquired while attending any school or college in 
Maryland or elsewhere. 

The word domicile as used in this regulation shall mean the permanent 
place of abode. For the purpose of this rule only one domicile may be main- 
tained. 

ACADEMIC CREDIT 

The semester hour is the unit of credit. During the Summer Session a 
course meeting five times a week for six weeks requiring the standard amount 
of outside work is given a weight of two semester hours. 

Students who are matriculated as candidates for degrees will be given 
credit towards the appropriate degree for satisfactory completion of courses. 
All courses offered in the Summer Session are creditable towards the ap- 
propriate degree. 

Teachers and other students will receive official reports specifying the 
amount and quality of work completed. These reports will be accepted by the 
Maryland State Department of Education and by the appropriate education 
authorities in other states for the extension and renewal of certificates in 
accordance with their laws and regulations. 

MARKING SYSTEM 

The following symbols are used for marks: A, B, C, and D — passing; F — 
Failure; I — Incomplete. Mark A denotes superior scholarship; mark B, good 
scholarship; mark C, fair scholarship; and mark D, passing scholarship. The 
mark of I (incomplete) is exceptional. Regulations governing the use of an 
incomplete mark are printed in the Academic Regulations. 

NORMAL AND MAXIMUM LOADS 

Six semester hours is the nomial load for the Summer Session. Under- 
graduate students in the College of Education and teachers in service may 
take a maximum of eight semester hours if they have above-average grades. 
The maximum load for graduate students is six semester hours. For details, 
see "Tuition and Fees." 

TUITION AND FEES 

Undergraduate Students 

General Tuition Fee, Per Credit Hour $10.00 

Non-residence Fee 15.00 

Must be paid by all students who are not residents of 

Maryland. 



SUMMER SCHOOL 21 

Matriculation Fee 10.00 

Payable only once, upon admission to the University. 
Every student must be matriculated. 

Infirmary Fee 1.00 

Recreation Fee 1.00 

Required of all students registered in the Summer School. 

Graduate Students 

General Tuition Fee, Per Credit Hour $10.00 

Matriculation Fee 10.00 

Payable only once, upon admission to the Graduate School. 
Recreation Fee 1.00 

Required of all students registered in the Summer School. 
Infirmary Fee (voluntaiy) 1.00 

The Infirmary services are available to graduate students who 

elect to pay at the time of registration the fee of $1.00 

for the Summer Session. 

There is no non-residence fee for graduate students. 

Miscellaneous Information 

Auditors pay the same fees as regular students. 

The diploma fee is $10.00 for bachelors' and masters' degrees, and $50.00 
for doctors' degrees. 

A fee of $3.00 is charged for each change in program after June 29. If such 
change involves entrance to a course, it must be approved by the instruc- 
tor in charge of the course entered. Courses cannot be dropped after 
July 12. 

A special laboratory fee may be charged for certain courses where such fee 
is noted in the course description. 

All laboratory courses in chemistry carry laboratory fees of $10.00; in 
addition the student is charged for any apparatus which cannot be re- 
turned to the stock room in perfect condition. Other laboratory fees are 
stated in connection with individual courses. 

Physical Education Fee charged each student registered for any physical 
activity course, $3.00. 
Late Registration fee, $5.00. 

LIVING ACCOMMODATIONS— MEALS 

Dormitory accommodations are available at the following cost per term, 
on the basis indicated: 

Regular Dormitories Single Room Double Room 

Women (with maid service) $45 $35 

Men (without maid service) $35 $25 



22 UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 

There is no definite guarantee that a I'equest for a single room can be 
grranted because the availability of space is determined by the number of per- 
sons requesting rooms for the Summer session. 

The Dining Hall will operate entirely on the Cafeteria plan and meals 
will be served at a minimum cost with a choice of foods. 

THE UNIVERSITY DORMITORIES WILL NOT BE OPEN FOR 
OCCUPANCY UNTIL 12 O'CLOCK NOON, SUNDAY, JUNE 23. 

Early application for reservations is advisable, as only those who have 
made reservations will be assured that rooms are ready for their occupancy. 
Rooms will not be held later than noon of Tuesday, June 25. For reservations 
write to Miss M. Margaret Jameson, Associate Dean of Women, or Mr. Robert 
C. James, Men's Dormitory Manager. Do not send a deposit for room. 

Students attending the Summer School and occupying rooms in the dormi- 
tories will provide themselves with towels, pillows, pillow cases, sheets, 
blankets, bureau scarf, desk blotter, and waste basket. Trunks for the men's 
dormitories should be marked with student's name and addressed to "Men's 
Dormitories." Trunks for the women's dormitories should include name of 
dormitory and room number if it has been assigned in advance. Trunks sent 
by express should be prepaid. Cleanliness and neatness of rooms is the 
responsibility of the individual. 

OFF-CAMPUS HOUSING 

Off-campus rooms are available. Inquiries concerning them should be 
addressed to Mr. Doyle Royal, Office of Director of Student Welfare. He 
will furnish the names of those householders to whom students should write 
to make their own arrangements. 

The University assumes no responsibility for rooms and board offered to 
Summer Session patrons outside of the University dormitories and dining 
room. Eating establishments in the vicinity are inspected by the County 
Health Ser\i'ice. 

CANCELLATION OF COURSES 

Courses may be cancelled if the number of students enrolled is below cer- 
tain minima. In general, freshman and sophomore courses will not be main- 
tained for classes smaller than 20. Minimum enrollments for upper level 
under-graduate courses and graduate courses will be 15 and 10 respectively. 

WITHDRAWAL AND REFUND OF FEES 

Any student compelled to leave the University at any time during the 
Summer Session must file in the office of the Registrar an application for with- 
drawal, bearing the proper signatures. If this is not done, the student will 
not be entitled, as a matter of course, to a certificate of honorable dismissal, 
and will forfeit his right to any refund to which he would othe^-^vise be 



SUMMER SCHOOL 23 

entitled. The date used in computing refunds is the date the application for 
withdrawal is filed in the office of the Registrar. 

In the case of a minor, official withdrawal will be permitted only with the 
written consent of the student's parent or guardian. 

Students withdrawing from the University will receive a refund of all 
charges, less the matriculation fee in accordance with the following schedule: 

Percentage 
Period from Date Instruction Begins Refundable 

One week or less 60% 

Between one and two weeks 20 % 

Over two weeks 

No refunds of fixed charges, lodging, tuition, laboratory fees, etc., are 
allowed when courses are dropped, unless the student withdraws from the 
University. 

STUDENT HEALTH 

The University Infirmary, located on the campus, in charge of the regular 
University physician and nurse, provides medical service of a routine nature 
for the undergraduate students in the Summer Session and for those graduate 
students who elect to pay the $1.00 fee. Students who are ill should report 
promptly to the University Infirmary, either in person or by phone (Extension 
326). 

PARKING OF AUTOMOBILES 

For the use of students, staff members, and employees, several parking 
lots are provided. The University rules forbid the parking of cars on any of 
the campus roads. These rules are enforced by State police. 

SUMMER GRADUATE WORK 

Masters' degrees are offered through the Graduate School as follows: 
Master of Arts 
Master of Science 

Master of Arts in American Civilization 
Master of Education 
Master of Business Administration 

Doctors' degrees offered through the Graduate School are as follows: 
Doctor of Philosophy 
Doctor of Education 

Graduate work in the Summer School may be counted as residence toward 
a Master's degree or Doctor of Education degree. A full year of residence or 
the equivalent is the minimum requirement for each degree. 

The requirements for each of the seven degrees above may be procured 
from the Graduate School upon request. 



24 UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 

Special regulations governing graduate work in Education and supple- 
menting the statements contained in the Graduate School Announcements are 
available in duplicated form and may be obtained from the College of Edu- 
cation. Each graduate student in Education should have a copy. Students 
seeking the Master's degree as a qualification for a certificate issued by the 
Maryland State Department of Education or any other certifying authority 
should consult the appropriate bulletin for specific requirements. Advisers 
will assist students in planning to meet such requirements. 

All students desiring graduate credit, whether for meeting degree require- 
ments, for transfer to another institution, or for any other purpose, must be 
regularly matriculated and registered in the Graduate School. 

CANDIDATES FOR DEGREES 

All students who expect to complete requirements for degrees during the 
Summer Session should make applications for diplomas at the office of the 
Registrar during the first two weeks of the Summer Session. 

UNIVERSITY BOOKSTORE 

For the convenience of students, the University maintains a students' 
supply store, located in the Student Union Building, where students may 
obtain at reasonable prices textbooks, stationery, classroom materials and 
equipment. 

The bookstore operates on a cash basis. 

THE PROGRAM IN AMERICAN CIVILIZATION 

The University considers that it is important for every student to achieve 
an appreciative understanding of this country, its history and its culture. 
It has therefore established a comprehensive program in American Civiliza- 
tion. This program is also designed to provide the student with a general 
educational background. 

Work in American Civilization is offered at three distinct academic levels. 
The first level is required of all freshmen and sophomores at the University 
and is described below. The second level is for undergraduate students wish- 
ing to carry a major in this field (see catalog for the College of Arts and 
Sciences). The third level is for students desiring to do graduate work in 
this field (see catalog for the Graduate School). 

All students receiving a baccalaureate degree from the University of 
Maryland must (except as specific exceptions are noted in printed curricula) 
obtain 24 semester hours of credit in the lower division courses of the 
American Civilization Program. Although the courses in the Program are 
prescribed generally, some choice is permitted, especially for students who 
demonstrate in classification tests good pre^•iovls pi'eparation in one or more 
of the required subjects. 



SUMMER SCHOOL 25 

The 24 semester hours in American Civilization are as follows: 

1. English (12 hours, Eng. 1, 2 and 3, 4 or 5, 6), American History (6 
hours Hist. 5, 6), and American Government (3 hours, G. & P. 1) are required 
subjects; however, students who qualify in one, two, or all three of these areas 
by means of University administered tests v/ill substitute certain elective 
coui-ses. Through such testing a student may be released from 3 hours of 
English (9 hours would remain an absolute requirement), 3 hours of Ameri- 
can History (3 hours remaining as an absolute requirement), and 3 hours of 
American Government. Students released from 3 hours of English will take 
Eng. 21 instead of Eng. 1 and 2. Those released from 3 hour's in History 
will take Hist. 56 instead of Hist. 5 and 6. Students who have been exempted 
from courses in English, History, or American Government may not take 
such courses for credit. 

2. For the 3 additional hours of the 24 hours required the student elects 
one course from the following group (Elective Group I): 

Economics 37, Fundamentals of Economics (Not open to Freshmen; 
students who may wish to take additional courses in 
economics should substitute Economics 31 for Econ- 
omics 37) 

Philosophy 1, Philosophy of Modern Man 

Sociology 1, Sociology of American Life 

3. Students who, on the basis of tests, have been released from 3, 6 or 9 
hours in otherwise required courses in English, American History or Ameri- 
can Government (see 1 above), shall select the replacements for these courses 
from any or all of the following groups: (a) more advanced courses in the 
same department as the required courses in which the student is exciised, or 
(b) Elective Group I (see 2 above) provided that the same course may not 
be used as both a Group I and a Group II choice, or (c) Elective Group IL 
Group II consists of the following 3-hour courses: 

History 2, History of Modem Europe; either History 51 or 52, The 
Humanities; either Music 20, Survey of Music Literature or Art 22, History 
of American Art; Psychology 1, Introduction to Psychology; and Sociology 5, 
Anthropology. 

This course is one of a group of three courses within the Elective Group 
I of the American Civilization Program. It may also be taken by students 
who qualify by test to select substitute courses in the Program (provided 
the student has not taken the course as his Group I elective). 

This course may be taken by students who qualify to select courses within 
Elective Group II of the American Civilization Program. 

LECTURE SERIES OX PROBLEMS AND TRENDS IN 
CONTEMPORARY AMERICAN EDUCATION 

All Summer Session students and faculty members are cordially invited 
to attend a series of lectures to be given by educators of national prominence. 



26 UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 

The lecture series has been planned to present a broad overview of some 
of the key issues and trends that relate to the improvement of instruction 
at elementary, secondary, and teacher education levels. A listing of specific 
topics and speakers is included in a separate brochure which will be available 
on request at the time of registration. 

These lectures are scheduled for Mondays and Wednesdays from 1:00 to 
8:00 P.M. in Room 115 of the Physics Building, beginning on Wednesday, 
June 26th, and ending on Wednesday, July 31st. 

Those students wishing to register for this series on a regular class 
basis and earn three hours of undergraduate or graduate credit may do so by 
supplementing attendance at these lectures by participation in a series of 
discussion groups led by regular university staff members. Additional details 
are available in the description of Ed. 190 which appears with the College of 
Education course offerings in this bulletin. 

TYPEWRITING DEMONSTRATION FOR BUSINESS EDUCATION 

TEACHERS 

The College of Education offers the business teacher registered for the 
summer session an opportunity to observe pupils, at work in a typewriting 
laboratory. (See B. Ed. 101, page 38.) These obseiwations will aid the 
classroom teacher in: (1) designing purposeful classroom activities involving 
development of the basic tjrpewriting skills, (2) planning with the pupil the 
organization of an effective set of "work" habits, (3) analyzing through case 
studies the methods of dealing with the various aspects of individual pupil 
progress, (4) applying the principles of the psychology of skills to the teach- 
ing of t3T)ewriting, and (5) developing improved methods for course con- 
struction, selection of instructional materials, and measuring pupil achieve- 
ment. 

Typewriting Laboratory. The typewriting laboratory will meet daily 
from 9 to 11 A. M. in Room Q-143. Any student, from grade 7 up, may 
sign up for this typewriting laboratory. The charge will be $35.00 for the 
six weeks period and no credit will be allowed for the work. No refunds will 
be made. 

CONFERENCES, INSTITUTES AND WORKSHOPS 
Institute of Acarology 

The Institute of Acarology provides a unique opportunity for entomolo- 
gists, parasitologists, zoologists and advanced students in the field of biology 
to study the mites and ticks. The recent important discoveries of the role 
of the Acarina in the fields of public health and agriculture have emphasized 
the need for an understanding of all phases of knowledge concerned with 
mites and ticks. Their part in the epidemiology of the encephalitides, scrub 
tjrphus, "Q" fever, haemoi-rhagic fever, and other diseases, as well as their 
increased destruction of plants that has followed the introduction of the 
newer insecticides have brought them to the attention of an increasing num- 
ber of biologists. Three courses (see page 69) involving lecture, laboratory 
and field work will be offered from July 15 through August 2 in the Depart- 
ment of Zoology, University of Maryland. 



I 



SUMMER SCHOOL 27 

The 1956 lectures were presented by Dr. G. W. Wharton, Department 
of Zoology, University of Maryland; Dr. David H. Johnson, Division of Mam- 
mals, U. S. National Museum, Washington, D. C; Mr. George Goodmn, li- 
brarian, Smithsonian Institution, Washington, D. C.; Dr. Henry S. Fuller, 
Department of Entomology, Army Medical Graduate School, Walter Reed 
Medical Center, Washington, D. C; Dr. Louis Lipovsky, Department of Ento- 
mology, Army Medical Graduate School, Walter Reed Medical Center, Wash- 
ington, D. C. ; Dr. Floyd F. Smith, U. S. Department of Agriculture, Agricul- 
tural Research Center, Beltsville, Maryland; Dr. Dale W. Jenkins, Entomology 
Branch, Chemical Corps Research and Development Command, Fort Detrick, 
Maryland; Dr. Ralph E. Heal, Executive Secretary, National Pest Control As- 
sociation, Nev7 York, New York; Dr. Joseph H. Camin, Chicago Academy of 
Sciences, Chicago, Illinois; Mr. J. Keller, Plant Industry Station, U. S. 
Department of Agriculture, Beltsville, Maryland; and Dr. Russell W. Strandt- 
mann, Department of Biology, Texas Technological College, Lubbock, Texas. 

Special lectures on subjects of acarological interest were also presented 
at the Animal Parasite Laboratory, U. S. Department of Agriculture, Belts- 
ville, Mai-yland, by Dr. Benjamin Schwartz and Dr. A. O. Foster. 

National Science Foundation Summer Institute 

For 

Teachers of Science and Mathematics 

The College of Agriculture, the College of Arts and Sciences and the 
College of Education are cooperating to offer a program of courses designed 
for junior and senior high school teachers of science and mathematics. These 
courses combine in various ways to provide curricula for the participants of a 
6-week Institute for teachers of science and mathematics. The Summer 
Institute has the support of the National Science Foundation. It is designed 
primarily to enable junior and senior high school teachers to improve their 
knowledge of the subjects they teach. Credit earned in this Summer Institute 
and in similar related science courses may accumulate up to one-half of 
the total credit-hour requirement for the Master of Education degree. 

A National Science Foundation grant makes it possible for the 1957 
Summer Institute to provide financial assistance to about 50 participants. A 
stipend will be paid to each participant at the rate of $75 per week plus $15 
per week for each dependent (to a maximum of 4). This stipend will be 
tax free to students enrolled for credit toward a degree. A travel allowance 
equal to a single round trip at the rate of 4 cents per mile from home to the 
Institute (not to exceed $80) will be paid each holder of a stipend. All 
tuition and fee charges will also be paid by the National Science Foundation. 

The Summer Institute covers three general fields: Biological Sciences, 
Mathematics, and Physical Sciences. Basic to the program will be three con- 
secutive two-week seminars covering each of these fields. They will be listed 
in the Summer Session Catalog as Zoology 199, Mathematics 199, and Physics 
199, respectively. Each will meet five times a week during the two weeks and 



28 



UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 



count as one credit hour. Participants in the Institute will be expected to 
register for at least two of the three seminars. 

The following courses are included in the program. Courses especially 
prepared for teachers are indicated by an asterisk (*). In addition, other 
courses of particular interest to teachers will be indicated by a dagger (f). 



Eio'ogical Sciences 

tBact. 1 
tBact. 5 
fBot. 1 
tBot. 102 
*Ent. lis 
fZool. 1 
tZool. 104 
*Zool. 108S 
*Zool. 199 (N.S.F. In- 
stitute Seminar) 



Mathematics 

fMath. 10 
fMath. 11 
fMath. 18 
fMath. 19 
fMath. 20 
fMath. 21 
fMath. 140S 
*Math. 182 
*Math. 199 (Math. 
N.S.F, Inst. Sem.) 



Physical Sciences 

fChem. 3 
fChem. 19 
fChem. 37, 38 
*Chem. Ill 
fPhys. 109 
*Phys. 122A 
f Phys. 130, 131 
*Phys. 160A 
*Phys. 199 (Phys. 

N.S.F. Inst. Sem.) 



These courses are described in detail in this catalog under 
the headings of the respective depai tments. Each participant will be limited 
to a maximum of 6 credit hours for the summer. Stipends will be available 
only for those participants scheduling at least 5 credit hours from among 
the above-listed courses. 

Inquiries should be sent to Dr. G. W. Wharton, Director of the N. S. F. 
Summer Institute, Department of Zoology, University of Maryland, College 
Park, Maryland. 



Institute for Child Study Summer Workshop 

The Institute for Child Study, College of Education, offers a six-week 
human development workshop each summer providing opportunities for (1) 
study and synthesis of scientific knowledge about children and youth; (2) 
experience in the analysis of case records; (3) preparation of study group 
leaders for in-service child study programs; (4) planning in-service child study 
programs for teachers or other human relations workers; (5) planning pre- 
service teacher education courses and laboratory experiences for prospective 
teachers; (6) examination of implications of scientific knowledge about human 
development and behavior for school organization, curriculum development, 
guidance services, club leadership, and other agencies devoted to fostering the 
mental health and optimal development of children, youth, and adults. 

While the workshop is designed mainly for teachers and administrators 
who have been actively engaged in the Child Study Program sponsored by the 
Institute or persons who are interested in participating in such a program, the 
experience has meaning for and has proved valuable for persons in other fields 
where human relations are a vital factor. Inquiries should be addressed to 
Director, Summer Workshop in Human Development. 



SUMMER SCHOOL 29 

The Parent-Teacher Association Summer Conference 
July 15, 16, 17 

The College of Education will cooperate with the Maryland Congress of 
Parents and Teachers in planning their convention to be held this summer on 
the University campus. Persons of national reputation will be present as 
speakers and discussion leaders at the conference. 

Special Education Workshop 

The need to increase the number of well-prepared persons in all agencies 
and professions dealing with the mentally retarded and the brain-injured is 
of countrywide concern. For this reason, the College of Education, in coopera- 
tion with the State Department of Education and the Montgomery County 
Board of Education, is sponsoring a special education workshop of unique 
design for a three-week period, July 1 — 19, 1957. 

While the workshop is designed mainly for teachers vv-ho are actively 
engaged in a program of special education for retarded children, it will be 
of value to all professional workers in the field. Special consultants in 
medicine, psychiatry, psychology, speech, social work, physio-therapy, and 
occupational therapy will demonstrate and elaborate upon recent findings in 
their special disciplines. After lectures and demonsti'ations by the specialists, 
the lafger group will be divided into smaller groups which will be led by 
recognized authorities in the various fields who are expei'ienced in more than 
one discipline. Classes for retarded children will be available for observation 
and demonstration purposes. 

The workshop will be planned to assist its members in the understanding 
of the special services available to teachers and how these services can be 
utilized in the classroom. For those who are not teachers a clearer understand- 
ing of the team approach to the problems of retardation \\i\\ be emphasized. 
Methods of teaching retarded children will be an integral part of the workshop 
for teachers as well as specific training in the analysis and correction of learn- 
ing disabilities. The enrollment will be limited to one hundred twenty-five. 
Additional details are available in the description of Ed. 189 which appears 
with the College of Education course offerings in this bulletin. Further 
information may be secured by writing to the Assistant Director of the 
Summer Session, College Park, Maryland. 

Workshop on the Improvement of Science Teaching 

This workshop is co-sponsored by The Future Scientists of America 
Foundation of the National Science Teachers Association, The West Vir- 
ginia Pulp and Paper Company, and the University of Maryland. It is designed 
for forty junior and senior high school science teachers to be selected by a 
joint committee of the National Science Teachers Association and the Uni- 
versity of Maryland from a list of names of teachers submitted by junior 
and senior high school principals in the immediate plant communities of T\ie 
West Virginia Pulp and Paper Company. ,•»,,- .->;.•?,*■•.■»> 



80 UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 

Design^ed around the theme, "Effective Teaching and Career Counseling 
in the Junior and Senior High School Science Program," the workshop will 
feature a study of the special role of the science teacher in helping young 
people make wise choices relative to careers in science and science-related 
areas as well as to increase personal know-how in the science subjects taught. 

Additional details are available in the description of Ed. 189 which appears 
with the College of Education course offerings in this bulletin. 

The workshop will be held on the College Park campus of the University 
of Maryland from June 23 to July 6, 1957. 

Transportation Institute 

In cooperation with the State Department of Education and the public 
schools of the State, the College of Education and the College of Special and 
Continuation Studies are sponsoring a 4-day non-credit "Transportation In- 
stitute" from June 25 to June 28. This institute is planned to be of service 
to school bus drivers, transportation supervisors, teachers and principals who 
are involved in pupil transportation on a part-time basis, and other interested 
persons. Areas of interest that have been identified include (1) the need for 
the selection and training of school bus drivers, (2) the planning for and 
the organization of in-service training programs for school bus drivers, (3) 
the possibilities of establishing certain state-wide policies with respect to 
school bus operation, and (4) the defining of the job of the transportation 
supervisor. 

The major part of the institute will be open for small-group work 
sessions where participants will be urged to share their experiences and 
know-how in the solving of their common problems. A director will coordin- 
ate the entire institute and consultants on both the state and national levels 
will be available as needed. 

COURSE OFFERINGS AND DESCRIPTIONS 

An "S" before a course number denotes that the course is offered in 
summer school only. An "S" after a course number indicates a regular course 
modified for summer school offering. 

AGRICULTURAL ECONOMICS AND MARKETING 

A. E. 109. Research Problems (1-2). To be arranged. (Staff.) 

With the permission of the Inetructor, students wUl work on any research problems 
in agricultural economics. There will be occasional conferences for the purpose of mak- 
ing reports on progress of work. 

A. E. 200. Special Problems in Farm Economics (2). To be arranged. 

(Staff.) 

An advanced course dealing extensively with some of the economic problems affecting 
the farmer, such as land values, taxation, credit, prices, production adjustments, trans- 
portation, marketing and cooperation. 



SUMMER SCHOOL 31 

A, E. 203. Research. Ci-edit According to work accomplished, (Staff.) 

Students will be assigned research in agricultural economics under the supervision 
of the instructor. The work will consist of original investigation in problems of agri- 
cultural economics. 

AGRICULTURAL EDUCATION AND RURAL LIFE 

Summer courses in Agricultural Education and Rural Life are offered 
primarily for teachers of vocational agricultux-e, extension field agents and 
others interested in the professional and cultui-al development of rural com- 
munities. These courses are arranged to articulate with certain courses in 
Agricultural Economics and Marketing, Agronomy, Animal Husbandry, 
Botany, Dairy Husbandry, Horticulture, and Poultry. Courses in both groups 
are offered in a cycle. 

In 1957, one one-credit course will be offered per week for the last four 
weeks of Summer School. Students can take as many of these courses as 
they can arrange to attend. The schedule for each course will depend upon 
the nature of the material presented, but the total number of meetings per 
credit will be in accordance with graduate course standards. For example, 
in courses that are presented largely through the laboratory method the 
class will meet the greater part of each day. In courses where the lecture 
method is used, there will be a minimum of three hours of class each day, and 
the students will be expected to spend considerable time outside of classes 
in various kinds of assignments. Some courses will be a combination of 
lectures and laboratories in varying degrees. 

By pursuing a program of three properly selected one-week courses 
successfully for eight consecutive summers and submitting a satisfactory 
thesis a student can earn a Master of Science degree with a major in Agri- 
cultural Education. The time required for this degree can be shortened by 
attending some full six-week Summer School Sessions, by attending one or 
more full semesters, by taking University Extension courses offered over the 
State, and by taking courses given in the evening and on Saturday on the 
campus. Minor credit can be taken in either Agricultural or Secondary 
Education courses. 

Teachers should register for these courses on the regular registration 
days or during the week of June 24 while the FFA State Convention and 
Contests are being held. Teachers registering for the field problems or 
research courses may register at the same time, but will work under the 
direction of an assigned member of the staff, rather than on the basis of 
one-week per credit. 

R. Ed. S208 A-B. Problems in Teaching Farm Mechanics (1-1). July 8 
through July 12. Part B. I Arranged. (Gienger.) 

This course deals with the latest developments in the teaching of Farm Mechanics. 
Various methods in use will be compared and studied under laboratory conditions. 

R. Ed. S209 A-B. Adult Education in Agriculture (1-1). July 15 through 
July 19. Part B. Arranged. 0-138. (Ahalt.) 



32 UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 

Principles of adult education as applied to rural groups, especially young and adult 
farmers. Organizing tlasses, planning courses and instructional methods are sti'essed. 

R. Ed. 220. Field Problems in Rural Education (1-3). Prerequisite, six 
semester hours of graduate study. Arranged. 0-138. (Ahalt, Hopkins.) 

Problems accepted depend upon the character of the work of the student and the 
facilities available for study. Periodic conferences required. Final report must follow 
accepted pattern for field investigations. 

R. Ed. S250, A-B. Seminar in Rural Education (1-1). July 29 through 
August 2. Part B. Ai'ranged. 0-138. (Hopkins.) 

Current problems of teaching agriculture are analyzed and discussed. Students are 
asked to make investigations, prepare papers and make reports. 

R. Ed. 251. Research. (1-6). Arranged, 0-138. (Ahalt, Hopkins.) 

Principles of research are studied, problems for thesis are selected, methods of 
developing a thesis are discussed, and a thesis is written. 

Also see, Agron. S210. July 22 through July 26. 

AGRONOMY 

A. Crops 

Agron. 208. Research Methods (2). (Staff.) 

Development of research viewpoint by detailed study and report on crop research of 
the Maryland Agricultural Experiment Station, review of literature, or original work by 
the student on specific phases of a problem. 

Agron. 209. Research in Crops (1-6). Credit according to work accomp- 
lished. (Staff.) 

With approval or suggestion of the head of the department the student will choose 
his own problems for study. 

Agron. S210. Cropping Systems (1). July 22 to July 26. Arranged; 
E-103. (Wagner.) 

An advanced course primarily designed for teachers of vocational agriculture and 
county agents. It deals with outstanding problems and the latest developments in the 
field. 

B. Soils 

Agron. 118. Special Problems in Soils (1). Prerequisite, Agron. 10 and 
permission of instructor. (Staff.) 

A detailed study including a written report of an important soils problem. 

Agron. 256. Soil Research (1-6). (Staff.) 



SUMMER SCHOOL 33 

ANIMAL HUSBANDRY 

A. H. 172. Special Problems in Animal Husbandry (1-2). Work assigned 
in proportion to amount of credit. Prerequisite, permission of instructor. 

(Staff.) 

A course designed for advanced undergraduates in which specific problems relating 
to Animal Husbandry will be assigned. 

A. H. 201. Special Problems in Animal Husbandry (1-2). Work assigned 
in proportion to amount of credit. Prerequisite, permission of instructor. 

(Staff.) 

Problems will be assigned which relate specifically to the character of work the 
student is pursuing. 

A. H. 204. Research (1-6). Credit to be determined by amount and 
character of work done. 

With the approval of the head of the department, students will be required to pursue 
original research in some phase of Animal Husbandry, carrying the same to completion, 
and report the results in the form of a thesis. 



BACTERIOLOGY 

fBact. 1. General Bacteriology (4). Five lectures and five two-hour 
laboratory periods a week. Lecture, 8:00; T-219; laboratory, 9:00, 10:00; 
T-311. Laboratory fee, $10.00. (Laffer.) 

The physiology, culture, and differentiation of bacteria. Fundamental principles of 
microbiology in relation to man and his environment. 

fBact. 5. Advanced General Bacteriology (4). Five lectures and five 
two-hour laboratory periods a week. Lecture, 9:00; T-219; laboratory, 10:00, 
11:00; T-307. Prerequisite, Bact. 1 and Chem. 3. Laboratory fee, $10.00. 

(Laffer.) 

Emphasis will be given to the fundamental procedures and techniques used In 
the field of bacteriology. Lertures will consist of the explanation of various laboratory 
procedures. 

Bact. 181. Bacteriological Problems (3). Eight two-hour laboratory 
periods a week. To be arranged. Prerequisite 16 credits in bacteriology. 
Registration only upon consent of the instructor. Laboratory fee, $10.00. 

(Faber.) 

This course is arranged to provide qualified majors in bacteriology, and majors 
In allied fields an opportunity to pursue specific bacteriological problems under the 
supervision of a member of the Department. 



tRecommended for teachers. 



34 UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 

Bact. 291. Research. Prerequisite, 30 credits in bacteriology. Laboratory 
fee, $10.00. 

Credits according to work done. Tlie investigation is outlined in consultation with 
and pursued under the supervision of a senior staff member of tlie department. 

BOTANY 

fBot. 1. General Botany (4). Lecture 10:00,E-214; Laboratory 1:00, 
2:00; E-238. Laboratory fee, $5.00. (Paterson.) 

General introduction to botany including all phases of the subject. Emphasis 
on the fundamental biological principles of the higher plants. 

tBot. 102. Plant Ecology (3). Lecture 8:00, E-214; laboratory 1:00, 
2:00, 3:00, M., W., F., E-236. Prerequisite, Bot. 1, or equivalent. Laboratory fee, 
$5.00. (Brown.) 

A study of plants In relation to their environments. Plant successions and forma- 
tions of North America are treated briefly and local examples studied. 

The subject matter of this course Is especially useful to science teachers and iB 
offered as a part of their graduate program. 

Bot. 206. Research in Plant Physiology. (Credit according to work done). 

(Gauch, Krauss.) 

Bot. 214. Research in Plant Cytology and Morphology. (Credit accord- 
ing to work done.) (D. T. Morgan, Rappleye.) 

Bot. 225. Research in Plant Pathology. (Credit according to work done). 

(Cox, Sisler, Jenkins.) 

BUSINESS ORGANIZATION AND ADMINISTRATION 

B. A. 20. Principles of Accounting (4). Ten periods a week. Daily 8:00, 
9:00; Q-28. Prerequisite, sophomore standing. (Edelson.) 

The fundamental principles and problems involved in accounting for proprietorships, 
corporations and partnerships. 

B. A. 21. Principles of Accounting (4). Ten periods a week. Daily 8:00, 
9:00; Q-29A. Prerequisite, sophomore standing. (Wright.) 

The fundamental principles and problems Involved in accounting for proprietorships, 
corporations and partnerships. 

B. A. 111. Intermediate Accounting (3). Eight periods a week. Daily 
8:00; M., W., F., 9:00; Q-29. Prerequisite, B. A. 21. (Lee.) 

A comprehensive study of the theory and problems of valuation of assets, appli- 
cation of funds, corporation accounts and statements, and the Interpretation of 
accounting statements. 



tRecommended for teachers. 



SUMMER SCHOOL 35 

B. A. 130. Elements of Business Statistics (3). Eight periods a week. 
Daily 8:00; M., W., F., 9:00; Q-243. Prerequisite, junior standing. Required 
for graduation. Laboratory fee, $3.50. (Nelson.) 

This course is devotefl to a study of the fundamentals of statistics. Emphasis Is 
placed upon the collection of data ; hand and machine tabulation ; graphic charting ; 
statistical distribution ; averages ; index numbers ; sampling ; elementary tests of 
reliability ; and simple correlations. 

B. A. 140. Financial Management (3). Eight periods a week. Daily 
8:00; M., W., F., 9:00; Q-146. Prerequisite, Economics 140. (Calhoun.) 

This course deals with principles and practices involved In the organization, 
financing, and reconstruction of corporations ; the various types of securities, and 
their use in raising funds, apportioning Income ; risk and control ; intercorporate rela- 
tions ; and new developments. Emphasis on solution of problems of financial policy 
faced by management. 

B, A. 150a. Marketing Principles and Organization (3). Eight periods 
a week. Daily 10:00; M., W., F., 11:00; Q-146. Prerequisite, Economics 32 
or 37. (Gentry.) 

This is an introductory course in the field of marketing. Its purpose is to give 
a general understading and appreciation of the forces operating, institutions employed, 
and methods followed In marketing agricultural products, natural products, services, 
and manufactured goods. 

B. A. 160. Personnel Management (3). Eight periods a week. Daily 
10:00; M., W., F., 11:00; Q-148. Prerequisite, Economics 160. (Alberts.) 

This course deals essentially with functional and administrative relationships 
between management and the labor-force. It comprises a survey of the scientific selection 
of employees, "in-service" training, job analysis, classification and rating, motivation 
of employees, employee adjustment, wage incentives, employee discipline and techniques 
of supervision, and elimination of employment hazards. 

B. A. 181. Business Law (4). Ten periods a week. Daily 10:00, 11:00; 
Q-30. Prerequisite, senior standing. Required in all Business Administration 
curriculums. (Mounce.) 

Legal aspects of business relationships, contracts, negotiable instruments, agency, 
partnerships, corporations, real and personal property and sales. 

CHEMISTRY 

All laboratory courses in Chemistry carry a laboratory fee of $10.00; ini 
addition the student is charged for any apparatus which cannot be returned 
to the stock room in perfect condition. 

tChem. 3. General Chemistry (4). Second Semester. Five lectures and 
five three-hour laboratory periods per week. Prerequisite, Chem. 1. Lecture, 
11:00, U-16. Laboratory, 1:00, 2:00, 3:00, C-120. (Rollinson.) 



tRecommended for teachers. 



36 UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 

fChem, 19. Elements of Quantitative Analysis (4). Five lectures and 
five three-hour laboratory periods per week. Prerequisite, Chem. 1 and 3. 
Lecture 9:00, C-215; laboratory, 10:00, 11:00, 12:00; C-306. (Stuntz.) 

fChem. 37. Elementary Organic Chemistry (2). Second semester. Five 
lectures per week. Prerequisites, Chem. 35. 8:00, C-215. (Woods.) 

fChem. 38. Elementary Organic Laboratory (2). Second semester. Five 
three-hour laboratory periods per v;eek. 9:00, 10:00, 11:00; C-221. (Woods.) 

*Chem. 111. Chemical Principles (4). Five lectures and five three-hour 
laboratory periods per week. Prerequisite, Chem. 1 and 3, or equivalent. Not 
open to students seeking a major in the physical sciences, since the course 
content is covered elsewhere in their curriculum. Lecture, 11:00; C-215; labor- 
atory, 8:00, 9:00, 10:00; C-107. (Jaquith.) 

A course in the principles of chemistry with accompanying: laboratory worli consisting 
•of s mple quantitative experiments. (Credit app.icable only toward degree in College of 
E^au'ation.) 

Chem. 144. Advanced Organic Laboratory (2 or 4). Five or ten three- 
hour laboratory periods per week. Prerequisites, Chem. 37 and 38. Laboi'atory 
poriods arranged. C-206. (Pratt.) 

Chem. 146, 148. The Identification or Organic Compounds (2, 2). Five 

three-hour laboratory periods per week. Prerequisites, Chem. 37 and 38. 
Laboratory periods arranged, C-208. Two recitations per week. Arranged. 

(Pratt.) 

Chem, 192, 194. Glassblowing Laboratory (1, 1). Three three-hour lab- 
oratory periods per week. M., W., 7:00, 8:00, 9:00; S, 9:00, 10:00, 11:00; C-B3. 

(Carruthers.) 

Chem. 254. Advanced Organic Preparations (2 or 4). Five or ten three- 
hour laboratory periods per week. Laboratory periods arranged. C-206. 

(Pratt.) 

Chem. 258. The Identification of Organic Compounds, an advanced course 

(2 or 4). Five or ten three-hour laboratoi-y periods per week. Laboratory 
periods arranged. C-208. Two recitations per week. Arranged. (Pratt.) 

Chem. 311. Physicochemical Calculations (2). Five lectures per week. 
9:00; Y-18. (Pickard.) 

Chem. 360. Research. (StaflF.) 



tRecommended for teachers. 
♦Intended for teachers. 



SUMMER SCHOOL 37 

CLASSICAL LANGUAGES AND LITERATURES 
Lat. 103S. Roman Satire (2). Daily 9:00; A-8. (Avery.) 

Lectures and readings on the origins and development of Roman satire. The 
reading of selections from the satires of Horace. Petronius' Cena Trimalchionis, and 
the satires of Juvenal. Reports. 

Lat. 210. Vulgar Latin Readings (3), Arranged. (Avery.) 

An intensive review of the phonology, morphology, and syntax of Classical Latin, 
followed by the study of the deviations of Vulgar Latin from the classical norma, 
with the reading of illustrative texts. The reading of selections from the Peregrinatlo 
ad loca sancta and the study of divergences from classical usage therein, with special 
emphasis on those which anticipate subsequent developments in the Romance Languages. 
Reports. 

NOTE :-^This course is especially recommended for students doing graduate work 
in the Roman Languages as well as for those interested in the development of Latin. 

DAIRY 

Dairy S201. Advanced Dairy Production (1). 8:00: D-308, July 2 to 
July 20. (Davis.) 

An advanced course primarily designed for teachers of vocational agriculture and 
county agents. It includes a study of the newer discoveries in dairy cattle nutrition, 
breeding and management. 

Dairy 204. Special Problems in Dairying (1-5). Prerequisite permission 
of Professor in charge of work. Credit in accordance with the amount and 
character of work done. (Statf.) 

Methods of conducting dairy research and the presentation of results are stressed. 
A research problem which relates specifically to the work the student is pursuing will 
be assigned. 

Dairy 20S. Research (1-6). Credit to be determined by the amount and 
quality of work done. (Staff.) 

Original investigation by the student of some subject assigned by the Major 
Professor, the completion of the assignment and the preparation of a thesis in accord- 
ance with requirements for an advanced degree. 



ECONOMICS 

Econ. 5. Economic Developments (2). 10:00; Q-147. Prerequisite, 
none. (Measday.) 

An introduction to modern economic institutions — their origins, development and 
present status. Commercial revolution, industrial revolution, and age of mass produc- 
tion. Emphasis on developments in England, Western Europe and the United States. 

Econ. 31. Principles of Economics (3). Eight periods a week. D.-xily 
S:00; M., W., F., 9:00; Q-147. Prerequisite, sophomore standing. 



88 UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 

A general analysis of the functioning of the economic system. A considerable 
portion of the course Is devoted to a study of basic concepts and explanatory principles. 
The remainder deals with the major problems of the economic system. 

Econ. 32. Principles of Economics (3). Eight periods a week. Daily 
12;00; M., W., F., 1:00; Q-30. Prerequisite, Economics 31. (Yeager.) 

A general analysis of the functioning of the economic system. A considerable 
portion of the course is devoted to a study of basic concepts and explanatory principles. 
The remainder deals with the major problems of the economic system. 

Econ. 140. Money and Banking (3). Eight periods a week. Daily 8:00; 
M., W., F., 9:00; Q-148. Prerequisite,, Economics 32 or 37. (Shelby.) 

A study of the organization, functions, and operation of our monetary, credit, 
and banking system ; the relation of commercial banking to the Federal Reserve System ; 
the relation of money and credit to prices ; domestic and foreign exchange and the 
Impact of public policy upon banking and credit. 

Econ. 160. Labor Economics (3). Eight periods a week. Daily 12:00; 
M., W., F., 1:00; Q-31. Prerequisite, Economics 32 or 37. (Measday.) 

The historical development and chief characteristics of the American Labor move- 
ment are first surveyed. Present day problems are then examined in detail ; wage 
theories, unemployment, social security, labor organization, collective bargaining. 

EDUCATION 
Business Education 

B. Ed. 101. Methods and Materials in Teaching Office Skills (2). Daily, 
11:00; Q-246. (Patrick, O'Neill). 

Problems in development of occupational competency, achievement tests, standards 
of achievement, instructional materials, transcription, and the integration of office 
Bkills. For experienced teachers. Observation period for methods of teaching typewriting, 
at 10 :00, see page 26 for details. 

B. Ed. 103. Basic Business Subjects in the Junior High School (2). 
Daily, 9:00; Q-246. (Patrick). 

Deals with the exploratory aspects of basic business subjects and fundamentals of 
consumer business education, available instructional materials, and teaching procedures. 

B. Ed. 200. Administration and Supervision of Business Education (2). 
Daily, 8:00; Q-246. (Patrick.) 

Major emphasis on departmental organization, curriculum, equipment, budget 
making, guidance, placement and follow-up, visual aids and the in-service training of 
teachers. For administrators, supervisors, and teachers of business subjects. 

Elementary — Secondary 

Ed. 52. Children's Literature (2). 8:00; T-4. (Bryan.) 

A study of literary values In prose and verse for children. 



f 



SUMMER SCHOOL 39 

Ed. 107. Philosophy of Education (2). 8:00; T-218. (Wiggin.) 

A study of the great educational pMlosopliers and systems of thought aflfecting the 
development of modem education. 

Ed. 121. The Language Arts in the Elementary School (2). 

Section 1 — 9 :00 ; R-202. (Stratemeyer.) 

Section 2 — 10:00; T-219. (Lewis.) 

Section 3 — 11:00; T-219. (Lewis.) 

Concerned with the teaching of spelling, handwriting, oral and written expression, 
and creative expression. Special emphasis given to skills having real significance to 
pupils. 

Ed. 122. The Social Studies in the Elementary School (2). 

Section 1 — 9 :00 ; T-5. (O'Neill.) 

Section 2 — 10 :00 ; T-5. (O'Neill.) 

Section 3 — 11:00; R-202. (Stratemeyer.) 

Consideration given to curriculum, organization, methods of teaching, evaluation 
of newer materials, and utilization of environmental resources. 



Ed. 124. Arithmetic in the Elementary School (2). 

Section 1 — 8 :00 ; A-14. (Schindler.) 

Section 2 — 10 :00 ; A-14. (Schultz.) 

Emphasis on materials and procedures which help pupils sense arithmetical meanings 
and relationships. Helps teachers gain a better understanding of the number system 
aod arithmetical processes. 

Ed. 125. Art in Elementary Schools (2). 

Section 1 — M., W., 10 :00-12 :30 ; A-302. (Lembaeh.) 

Section 2 — T., Th., 10 :00-12 :30 ; A-302. (Lembaeh.) 

Concerned with art methods and materials for elementary schools. Includes lab- 
oratory experiences with materials appropriate for elementary schools. 

Applications for enrollment must be mailed to the Director of the Summer Session 
before June 15, 1957. Enrollment will be limited to 25 persons per section. 

Ed. 127. Teaching in Elementary Schools (6). Daily, 9:00, 10:00, 11:00; 
T-18. (Allen.) 

An overview of elementary school teaching designed for individuals without specific 
preparation for elementary school teaching or for individuals without recent teaching 
experience. 

Aplications for enrollment must be mailed to the Director of Summer Session before 
June 15, 1957. Enrollment will be limited to 25 persons. 



40 UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 

*Ed. 130. Theory of the Junior High School (2). 8:00; R-112. 

(Lawhead.) 

This course gives a general overview of tlie junior high school. It includes con- 
sideration of the purposes, functions, and characteristics of this school unit ; a study 
of its population, organization, program of studies, methods., staff, and other similar 
topics together with their implications for prospective teachers. 

*Ed. 131. Theory of the Senior High School (2). 8:00; R-112. 

(Lawhead.) 

The secondary school population ; the school as an instrument of society ; relation 
of the secondary school to other schools ; aims of secondary education ; curriculum and 
methods ; extra-curricular activities ; guidance and placement ; teacher certification and 
employment in Maryland and the District of Columbia. 

Ed. 133. Methods of Teaching the Social Studies (2). 8:00; T-10. 

(Risinger.) 

Designed to give practical training in the everyday teaching situations. Emphasis; 
is placed on the use of various lesson techniques, audio and visual aids, reference 
materials, and testing programs. Attention is given to the adaption of teaching methods 
to individual and group differences. Consideration is given to present tendencies and, 
aims of instruction in the social studies. 

Ed. 134. IMaterials and Procedure for the High School Core CurriculuiTfc 
(2). 9:00; R-112. Fee, $1.00. (Lawhead.) 

This course is designed to bring practical suggestions to teachers who are in 
charge of core classes in junior and senior high schools. Materials and teaching pro- 
cedures for specific units of work are stressed. 

Ed. 137. Science in the Junior High School (2). 9:00; T-102. 

(Blough and Ulry.) 

A study of the place, function and content of science in junior high school pro- 
grams. Application to core curriculum organization. Laboratory fee, $2.00. 

Ed. 141. High School Course of Study— English (2). 10:00; T-4. 

(Bryan.) 

Methods and techniques used in teaching the language arts in secondary schools. 

Ed. 142. High School Course of Study— Literature (2). 11:00; T-4. 

(Bryan.) 

Representative selections of the literature studied in sei-ondary schools and methods 
of presentation. 

Ed. 145. Principles of High School Teaching (3). Daily, 11:00; M., W., 
F., 12:00; R-112. (Risinger.) 

This course is concerned with the principles and methods of teaching in junior and 
senior high schools. 



♦Credit is accepted for Ed. 130 or Ed. 131, but not for both courses. 



SUMMER SCHOOL 41 

Ed. 147. Audio-Visual Education (2). Fee, $1.00. (Maley.) 

Section 1 — S :00 ; P-306. 
Section 2—9 :00 ; P-306. 

Sensory impressions in their relation to learning ; projection apparatus, its cost 
and operation ; slides, film-strips, and films ; physical principles underlying projection ; 
auditory aids to instruction ; field trips ; pictures, models, and graphic materials ; inte- 
gration of sensory aids with organized instruction. 

Ed. 150. Educational Measurement (2). 9:00; T-10. (Risinger.) 

Constructing and interpreting measures of achievement. 

Ed. 153. The Teaching of Reading (2). (Matson.) 

Section 1 — Primary and intermediate grades — 8 :00 ; T-12. 
Section 2 — Intermediate and secondary grades — 9 :00 ; T-12. 
Section 3 — Primary and intermediate grades — 11 :00 ; T-12. 

Concerned with fundamentals of developmental reading instruction, including read- 
ing readiness, uses of experience records, procedures in using basal readers, the improve- 
ment of comprehension, teaching reading in all areas of the curriculum, uses of children's 
literature, the program in word analysis, and procedures for determining individual 
seeds. 

Ed. 154. Remedial Reading Instruction (2). 8:00; T-102. (Dunlap.) 

For supervisors and teachers who wish to help retarded readers. Concerned with 
causes of reading difficulties, the identification and diagnosis of retarded pupils, instruc- 
tional materials, and teaching procedures. Prerequisite, Ed. 153 or the equivalent. 

Applications for enrollment must be mailed to the Director of Summer Session before 
June 15, 1957. Enrollment will be limited to 30 persons. 

Ed. 160. Educational Sociology (2). 10:00; R-112. (Lawhead.) 

This course deals with data of the social sciences which are germane to the work 
of teachers. Consideration is given to implications of democratic ideology for educa- 
tional endeavor, educational tasks imposed by changes in population and technological 
trends, the welfare status of pupils, the socio-economic attitudes of individuals who 
control the schools, and other elements of community background which have significance 
in relation to schools. 

Ed. 161. Principles of Guidance (2). 11:00; T-20. (Byrne.) 

Overview of principles and practices of guidance-oriented education. 

Ed. 162. Mental Hygiene in the Classroom (2). (Denecke.) 

Section 1— 8 :00 ; T-103. 
Section 2— 9 :00 ; T-103. 
Section 3—11 :00 ; T-103. 

The practical application of the principles of mental hygiene to classroom problems. 



42 UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 

Ed. 170. Introduction to Special Education (2). 8:00; R-7. (Dal ton.) 

Designed to give an understanding of the needs of all types of exceptional children 
stressing preventive and remedial measures. 

Ed. 188. Special Problems in Education (1-3). Arranged. Prerequisite, 
consent of instructor. Available only to mature students who have definite 
plans for individual study of approved problems. (Staff.) 

NOTE : Course cards must have the title of the problem and the name of the faculty 
member who has approved It. 

Ed. 189. Workshops, Clinics, and Institutes: Special Education (3). 

Daily, 8:30-12:30, with afternoons for special conferences, committee work, 
study, and use of special library facilities. Three weeks, July 1-19. Place 
to be arranged. (Snyder.) 

The Special Education Workshop will be centered on the understanding of special 
services available to teachers and the utilization of these services In the classroom. 
The team approach to the problem of retardation v?lll be emphasized. Lectures by 
staff and consultants ; small group work ; study of individual problems ; and observation 
of demonstration classes will be Included. Enrollment limited to 125. 

Ed. 189. Workshops, Clinics, and Institutes: Methods of Teaching Re- 
tarded Children (3). Daily, 8:30-12:30, with afternoons for special confer- 
ences, committee work, study, and use of special library facilities. Three 
weeks, July 1-19. (Held in conjunction with the Special Education Workshop.) 
Place to be arranged. (Dalton.) 

A section of the worshop in Special Education, especially planned for teachers 
who wish to work on methods of teaching retarded children. Demonstration claesei 
for observation purposes are included in the workshop. Opportunity to pursue Individual 
problems. Activities of the total workshop will be a part of the program, including 
lectures by staff and consultants, small group work, and observation. 

Ed. 189. Workshops, Clinics, and Institutes: The Improvement of Sci- 
ence Teaching (2). Time and place to be arranged. June 23- July 6, 1957. 

(Hale, Ulry.) 

Open only to forty junior and senior high school science teach&ra selected from 
plant communities of the West Yi/rainia P>ulv and Paper Company. 

This worshop is designed around the theme, "Effective Teaching and Career 
Counseling in the Junior and Senior High S'chool Science Program," and features 
lectures by scientists, seminars on science instruction, field trips, and scientists inter- 
views in university, industrial, and government research centers. 

Ed. 190. Problems and Trends in Contemporary American Education (3). 
Lectures, M., W., 1:00, 2:00; Z-115. Discussions, M., T., W., Th., 11:00; T-102, 
T-108. (Denemark, Blough.) 

Designed to present a broad overview of some key issues and trends that relate 
to the improvement of instruction at elementary, secondary, and teacher education levels. 
Lectures by visiting educators of national prominence will be reviewed and analyzed In 
discussion groups led by regular University staff members. 



SUMMER SCHOOL 43 

Ed. 207. Seminar in History and Philosophy of Education (2). 10:00; 
T-218. (Wiggin.) 

Ed. 210. The Organization and Administration of Public Education (2). 

Section 1 — 9 :00 ; T-20. (Newell.) 

Section 2—10:00; A-7. (Runge.) 

The basic course in school administration. The course deals with the organization 
and administration of school systems — at the local, state, and federal levels ; and with 
the administrative relationships involved. 

Ed. 211. The Organization, Administration, and Supervision of Sec- 
ondary Schools (2). 11:00; R-102. (Hammock.) 

The work of the secondary school principal. The course includes topics such as 
I>ersonnel problems, supervision, school-community relationships, student activities, 
schedule making, and internal financial accounting. 

Ed. 212. School Finance and Business Administration (2). 10:00; T-20. 

(Van Zwoll.) 

An Introduction to principles and practices in the administration of the public 
school finance activity. Sources of tax revenue, the budget, and the function of 
finance in the educational program are considered. 

Ed. 216. High School Supervision (2). 8:00; R-102. (Hammock.) 

Deals with recent trends In supervision ; the nature and function of supervision ; 
planning supervisory programs ; evaluation and rating ; participation of teachers and 
other groups in policy development ; school workshops ; and other means for the improve- 
ment of instruction. 

Ed. 217. Administration and Supervision in Elementary Schools (2). 
8:00; T-211. (Pritzkau.) 

Problems in organizing and administering elementary schools and Improving In- 
Btrnctlon. 

Ed. 219. Seminar in School Administration (2). 11:00; TIO. (Newell.) 

Ed. 225. School Public Relations (2). 8:00; T-5. (Van Zwoll.) 

A study of the Interrelationships between the community and the school. Public 
opinion, propaganda, and the ways In which various specified agents and agencies within 
the school have a part in the school public relations program are explored. 

Ed. 227. Public School Personnel Administration (2). 9:00; T-4. 

(Van Zwoll.) 

A comparison of practices with principles governing the satisfaction of school 
personnel needs, including a study of tenure, salary schedules, supervision, rewards, 
and other benefits. 



44 UXIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 

Ed. 229. Seminar in Elementary Education (2), (Du:.l..p.) 

Section 1 — 10 :00 ; T-102. 
Section 2—11 :00 ; T-218. 

Primarilj- for individuals who wish to write seminar papers. Enrollment should 
be preceded by at least 12 hours of graduate work in education. 

Ed. 230. Elementary School Supervision (2). 11:00; T-211. (Pritzkau.) 

Concerned with the nature and function of supervision, various supervisory tech- 
niques and procedures, human relationship factors, and personal qualities for eflfective 
supervision. 

Ed. 234. The School Curriculum (2). 8:00; R-110. (Hovet.l 

A foundations course embracing the curriculum as a whole from early childhood 
through adolescence, including a review of historical developments, an anlysis of con- 
ditions affecting curriculum change, an examination of issues in curriculum making, 
and a consideration of current trends in curriculum design. 

Ed. 235. Curriculum Development in Elementary Schools (2). 9:00; 
T-211. (Pritzkau.) 

Concerned with problems encountered in curriculum evaluation and revision. Socio- 
logical and philosophical factors, principles for the selection and organization of 
content aud learning activities, patterns of curriculum organization and the utilization 
of personnel for curriculum development. 

Ed. 236. Curriculum Development in the Secondary School (2). 11:00; 
A-7. (Runge.) 

Curriculum planning ; philosophical bases, objectives, learning experiences, organi- 
zation of appropriate content, aud means of evaluation. 

Ed. 237. Curriculum Theory and Research (2). 9:00; R-110. (Hovet.) 

The school curriculum considered within the totality of factors affecting pupil 
behavior patterns, an anlysis of research contributing to the development of curriculum 
theory, a study of curriculum theory as basic to improved curriculum design, the func- 
tion of theory in guiding research, and the construction of theory through the utilization 
of concepts from the behavioral research disciplines. 

Ed. 243. Problems of Teaching Arithmetic in Elementary Schoo's (2). 
9:00; A-14. (Schindler.) 

Implications of current theory and results of research for the teaching of arithmetic 
in elementary schools. 

Ed. 244. Problems in Teaching Language Arts in Elementary Schools (2). 

10:00; R-202. (Stratemeyer.) 

Implications of current theory and the results of research for the language arts 
in the elementary schools. 



SUMMER SCHOOL 45 

Ed. 245. Applications of Theory and Research to High School Teaching 

(2). 9:00; T-218. (Hammock.) 

Implications of experimental practices, the proposals of eminent writers, and the 
results of research for the improvement of teaching on the secondai-y level. 

Ed. 246. Problems of Teaching Social Studies in Elementary Schools (2). 

11:00; T-5. (O'Neill.) 

Application to the social studies program of selected theory and research in the 
social sciences, emphasizing patterns of behavior, environmental influences, and criti.cal 
thinking. 

Applications for enrollment must he mailed to the Director of the Snimmer Session 
before June 1.5, 1957. Enrollment will be limited to 25 persons. 

Ed. 247. Seminar in Science Education (2). 8:00; T-119. (Blough.) 

This course is concerned with science education in the elementary school. Pre- 
requisite, a science education course. 

Applications for enrollment must be mailed to the Director of the Snimmer Session 
before June 15, 1957. Enrollment will be limited to 25 persons. 

Ed. 250. Analysis of the Individual (2). 11:00; A-133. (Kazienko.) 

Knowing students through use of numerous techniques. Ed. 161 desirable as prior 
course. 

Ed. 253. Guidance Information (2). 9:00; A-7. (Runge.) 

How to find, file, and use information needed by students for making choices, plans, 
and adaptations in schools, occupations, and in inter-personal relations. Ed. 161 desirable 
as prior course. 

Ed 254. Organization and Administration of Guidance Programs (2). 
8:00; A-21. (Kazienko.) 

How to instill the guidance point of view, and to implement guidance practices. 
All guidance courses except Seminar are prerequisite. 

Ed. 260. Principles of School Counseling (2). 10:00; A-130. 

(Kazienko.) 

Exploration of counseling theories and the practices which stem from them. 
Ed. 161, Ed. 250, Ed. 253 are prerequisite. 

Ed. 269. Seminar in Guidance (2). 9:00; M-104. (Byrne.) 

Registration only by approval of instructor. Final guidance course. Students study 
research and conduct one. 

Ed. 288. Special Problems in Education (1-6). Arranged. (Staff.) 

Master of education or doctoral candidates who desire to pursue special research 
problems under the direction of their advisers may register for credit under this number. 



46 UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 

NOTE : Course card must have the title of the problem and the name of the 
faculty member under whom the work will be done. 

Ed. 289. Research— Thesis (1-6). Arranged. (Staff. 

Students who desire credit for a master's thesis, a doctoral dissertation, or a 
doctoral project should use this number. 



Home Economics Education 

H, E. Ed. 102. Problems in Teaching Home Economics (3). Daily, 8:00; 
T-108; other meetings arranged. Required of seniors in Home Economics 
Education. Prerequisite, consent of instructor. (Spencer.) 

A study of the managerial aspects of teaching and administering a homemaklng 
program ; the physical environment, organization, and sequence of instructional units, 
resource materials, evaluation, home projects. 

Note : This course is also open to elementary teachers who, in their instructional 
and administrative responsibilities, are concerned with health and nutrition. Special 
emphasis on methods and instructional materials. 

H. E. Ed. 120. Evaluation of Home Economics (2). 9:00; T-108. 

(Spencer.) 

The meaning and function of evaluation in education ; the deveolpment of a plaa 
for evaluating a homecoming program with emphasis upon types of evaluation devices, 
their construction, and use. First three weeks. 



Human Development Education 

H. D. Ed. 112, 114, 116. Scientific Concepts in Human Development I, 
II, in (3, 3, 3). 

H. D. Ed. 113, 115, 117. Laboratory in Behavior Analysis I, II, III, (3, 
3, 3). 

Summer worshop courses for undergraduates. In any one summer, concept and 
laboratory courses must be taken concurrently. 

H. D. Ed. 200S. Introduction to Human Development and Child Study 
(2). 8:00; A-8. 

This course offers a general overview of the scientific principles which describe 
human development and behavior and makes use of these principles in the study of 
individual children. When this course is offered during the academic year, each student 
will observe and record the behavior of an individual child through the semester and 
must have one half-day a week free for this purpose. The course is basic to further 
work in child study and serves as a prerequisite for advanced courses where the student 
has not had field work or at least six weeks of workshop experience in child study. 
When this course is offered during the summer it will be H. D. 200S and intensive 
laboratory work with case records may be substituted for the study of an individual 
child. 



SUMMER SCHOOL 47 

H. D. Ed. 212, 214, 216. Advanced Scientific Concepts in Human De- 
velopment, I, II, III (3, 3, 3). 

H. D. Ed. 213, 215, 217. Advanced Laboratory in Behavior Analysis, I, 
II, III (3, 3, 3). 

Summer workshop courses for graduates providing credit for as many as three 
workshops. In any one summer, concept and laboratory courses must be taken con- 
currently. 

H. D. Ed. 218. Workshop in Human Development (6). Prerequisites, 
H. D. 212, 213, 214, 215, 216, 217. 

Summer workshop In human development for graduate students who have had 
three worshops and wish additional workshop experience. This course can be taken 
any number of times, but cannot be used as credit toward a degree. 

H. D. Ed. 270. Seminars in Special Topics in Human Development (2-6). 
Arranged. 

An opportunity for advanced students to focus in depth on topics of special interest 
growing out of their basic courses in human development. Prerequisites, consent of 
instructor. 



Industrial Education 

The technical courses which are offered are intended for industrial arts 
teachers, for arts and crafts teachers, education for industry majors, and adult 
education leaders. 

The professional courses are open to industrial arts teachers and super- 
visors, to vocational-industrial teachers and supervisors, to school administra- 
tors and to other graduate students whose planned programs include work 
in this area. 

Ind. Ed. 2. Elementary Woodworking (2). 8:00-9:00; P-218. (Tierney.) 

This is a woodworking course which involves primarily the use of hand tools. 
The course is developed so that the student uses practically every common wood- 
working hand tool in one or more situations. There is also included elementary wood 
flnlehing, the specifying and storing of lumber, and the care and conditioning of tools 
need. Laboratory fee, $5.00. 

Ind. Ed. 22. Machine Wookworking I (2). 8:00-9:00; P-218. (Tierney.) 
Prerequisite, Ind. Ed. 2. 

Machine Woodworking I offers initial instruction in the proper operation of the 
Jointer, band saw, variety saw, jig saw, mortiser, shaper, and lathe. The types of 
Jobs which may be performed on each machine and their safe operation are of primary 
concern. The mediums of Instruction are school-shop equipment, hobby items, and 
useful home projects. Laboratory fee, $5.00. 

Ind. Ed. 24. Sheet Metal Work (2). 11:00-12:00; P-116. (Maley.) 



48 UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 

Articles are made from metal in its sheet form and involve the operations ot 
cutting, shaping soldering, riveting, wiring, folding, seaming, beading, burning, etc. 
The student is required to develop his own patterns inclusive of parallel line develop- 
ment, and triangulation. Laboratory fee, ?5.00 

Ind. Ed. 28. Electricity I (2). 2:00-3:00; P-212. (Harrison.) 

An introductory course to electricity in general. It deals with the electrical circuit, 
elementary wiring problems, the measurement of electrical energy, and a brief treatment 
of radio. Laboratory fee, $5.00. 

Ind. Ed. 48. Electricity II (2). 2:00-3:00; P-2112. (Harrison.) 

Principles involved in AC and D-C electrical equipment, including heating measure- 
ments, motors and controls, electro-chemistry, the electric arc, inductance, condensera, 
radio, and electronics. Laboratory fee, $5.00. 

Ind. Ed. 66. Art Metal Work (2). 11:00-12:00; P-116. (Maley.) 

Prerequisite, Ind. Ed. 26, or equivalent. Advanced practicum. It includes methods 
of bowl raising and bowl ornamenting. Laboratory fee, $5.00. 

Ind. Ed. 105. General Shop (2). 10:00; P-300. (Tierney.) 

Designed to meet needs in organizing and administering a secondary school general 
shop. Students are rotated through skill and knowledge developing activities in a 
variety of shop areas. Laboratory fee, $5.00. 

Ind. Ed. 124 a, b. Organized and Supervised Work Experience. Ar- 
ranged. (Merrill.) 

(Three credits for each internship period, total : 6 credits). This is a work experience 
sequence planned for students enrolled in the curriculum, "Education for Industry." 
The purpose is to provide the students with opportunities for first-hand experiences with 
business and industry. The student is responsible for obtaining his own employment 
with the coordinator advising him as regards the job opportunities which have optimum 
learning value. The nature of the work experience desired is outlined at the outset of 
employment and the evaluations made by the student and the coordinator are based upon 
the planned experiences. The time basis for each internship period is 6 forty-hour weeks 
or 240 work hours. Any one perio<l of internship must be served through continuous 
employment in a single establishment. Two internship periods are required. The two 
internships may be served with the same business or industry. The completion for credit 
of any period of internship requires the employer's recommendation in terms of satis- 
factory work and work attitudes. More complete details are found in the handbook 
prepared for the student of this curriculum. 

Ind. Ed. 150. Training Aids Development (2). 8:00; P-306. (Maley.) 

Study of the aids in common use as to their source and application. Special em- 
phasis is placed on principles to be observed in making aids useful to shop teachers. 
Actual construction and application of such devices will be required. 

Ind. Ed. 165. Modern Industry (2). 8:00; P-300. (Harrison.) 

This course provides an overview of manufacturing industry in the American social, 
economic, and culture pattern. Representative basic industries are studied from the 



SUMMER SCHOOL 49 

viewpoints of personnel and management organization, industrial relations, production 
procedures, distribution of products, and the likte. 

Ind. Ed. 168. Trade or Occupational Analysis (2). 10:00; P-221. 

(Brown.) 

Provides a working knowledge of occupational and job analysis which is basic in 
organizing vocational-industrial courses of study. This course should precede Ind. Ed. 169. 

Ind. Ed. 169. Course Construction (2). 10:00; P-221. (Brown.) 

S'urveys and applies techniques of building and reorganizing courses of study for 
effective use in vocational and occupational schools. 

Ind. Ed. 170. Principles of Vocational Education (2). 11:00; P-221. 

(Brown.) 

The course develops the Vocational Education movement as an integral phase of the 
American program of public education. 

Ind. Ed. 171. History of Vocational Education (2). 11:00; P-221. 

(Brown.) 

An overview of the development of Vocational Education from primitive times to 
the present. 

Ind. Ed. 214. School Shop Planning and Equipment Selection (2). 11:00; 
P-300. (Tiemey.) 

This course deals with principles involved in planning a school shop and provides 
opportunities for applying these principles. Facilities required in the operation of a 
satisfactory shop program are catalogued and appraised. 

Ind. Ed. 216. Supervision of Industrial Arts (2). 9:00; P-221. (Brown.) 

Ind. Ed. 240. Research in Industrial Arts and Vocational Education (2). 

Arranged. 

This is a course offered by arrangement for persons who are conducting research in 
the areas of Industrial Arts and Vocational Education. 

Ind. Ed. 241. Content and Method of Industrial Arts (2). 10:00; P-306. 

(Maley.) 

Various methods and procedures used in curriculum development are examined and 
those suited to the field of Industrial Arts education are applied. Methods of and 
devices for Industrial Arts instruction are studied and practiced. 

Music Education 

Mus. Ed. 128. Workshop in Music for the Elementary School (2). Pre- 
requisite, Mas. 16 or consent of instructor. 

Section 1 — 9 :00 ; B-1. (Kemble.) 

Section 2 — 10:00; B-1. (Kemble.) 



50 UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 

A study of the group activities and materials through -which the child experiences 
music. The course is designed to aid both music specialists and classroom teachers. 
It includes an outline of objectives and a survey of instructional methods. 

Mus. Ed. 132. Workshop in Music for the Secondary School (2). 8:00; 
B-1. Prerequisite, consent of instructor. (Kemble.) 

A study of the vocal and Instrumental programs in the secondary school. A 
survey of the needs in general music, and the relationship of music to the core 
cnrriculum. 

Mus. Ed. 200. Research Methods in Music and 3Iusic Education (2). 
11:00; B-8. (Grentzer.) 

The application of methods of research to problems in the fields of music and 
music education. The preparation of bibliographies and the written exposition of re- 
Beareh projects in the area of the student's major interest. 

Mus. Ed. 201. Administration and Supervision of Music in the Public 
Schools (2). 10:00; B-8. (Grentzer.) 

The study of basic principles and practices of supervision and administration with 
emphasis on curriculum construction, scheduling, budgets, directing of in-service teaching, 
personnel problems, and school-community relationships. 

Mus. Ed. 205. Seminar in Vocal Music in the Elementary Schools (2). 
9:00; B-8. (Grentzer.) 

A comparative analysis of current methods and materials used in the elementary 
Bchools. A study of the music curriculum as a part of the total school program, and 
of the roles of the classroom teacher and the music speoiallst. 

Mus. Ed. 209. Seminar in Instrumental Music (2). 9:00; B-7. (Jordan.) 

A consideration of acoustical properties and basic techniques of the instruments. 
Problems of ensemble and balance, intonation, precision and interpretation are studied. 
Materials and musical literature for orchestras, bands, and small ensembles are evaluated. 

Science Education 

*Sci. Ed. 6. The Natural Sciences in the Elementary School (2). Labor- 
atory fee, $2.00. 9:00; T-119. (Campbell.) 

Selecting, organizing, and teaching plant and animal materials. For teachers who 
need help in identifying and making effective use of living materials brought to the 
classroom, assisting pupils to find answers to their questions, and planning other worth- 
while science experiences. 

*Sci. Ed. 7. The Physical Sciences in the Elementary School (2). Labora- 
tory fee, $2.00. 10:00; T-119. (Campbell.) 

Similar to the previous course except that problems for study are selected from the 



•Students who have received four credits in Sci. Ed. 1, 2, 3, and 4 should not register 
for these courses. 



SUMMER SCHOOL 51 

various fields of the physical sciences such as electricity and magnetism, weather, beat, 
light, sound, etc. 

Sci. Ed. 105. Workshop in Science for Elementary Schools (2). Labora- 
tory fee, $2.00. 

Section 1—11:00; T-119. (Campbell.) 

Section 2 — 12 :00 ; T-119. (Blough.) 

General science content and teaching materials for practical use in classrooms. In- 
Qiudes experiments, demonstrations, constructions, obserTations, field trips, and use of 
audio-visual materials. Emphasis is on content and method related to science units In 
common use. 

Enrollment in each of the above courses will be limited to 35 persons. AppUcatlona 
for enrollment must be mailed to the Director of the Sumn>er Session before June 15, 1957. 



ENGINEERING 

C. E. 100. Theory of Structures (4). Eight lectures and two three-hour 
laboratories and one two-hour laboratory per week. Lecture, 8:00, M., T., 
W., Th., F., and 9:00, M., W., F.; J-6; Laboratoiy, M., 10:00, 11:00 and T., 
Th., 9:00, 10:00 ,11:00; J-202. Prerequisite, Mech. 50 or equivalent. Required 
of juniors in civil engineering. (Piper.) 

Analytic and graphical determination of dead and live load stresses in beams and 
framed structures ; influence lines ; lateral bracing and portals ; elements of slope and 
deflection. 

E. E. 1. Basic Electrical Engineering (4). Eight lectures and one four- 
hour laboratory a week. Lecture, 8:00, M., T., W., Th., F., S., and 9:00, M., 
W.; J-114; laboratory, S., 9:00, 10:00, 11:00, 12:00; S-107-A. Prerequisites, 
Math. 21, Phys. 21 or concurrent registration. Required of sophomores in 
electrical engineering. Laboratory fee, $4.00. (Simons.) 

Basic concepts of electrical potential, current, power, and energy ; d-c circuit analysis 
by the mesh-current and nodal methods ; network theorems ; electric and magnetic fleldi. 

Surv. 100. Curves and Earthwork (3). Two and one half hours of lec- 
tures and fifteen hours of laboratories per week. Lecture, 8:30-9:30, M., and 
8:00-9:30, W.; J-103; laboratory, 9:30-12:30, M., T„ W., Th., F.; J-203. Pre- 
requisite, Surv, 50 or equivalent. Required of juniors in civil engineering. 

(Luce.) 

Computation and field work for simple, compound and reversed circular curves and 
spirals ; parabolic curves ; earthwork computations ; complete survey and map, including 
mass diagram of a short route. 



ENGLISH 

Eng. 1, 2. Composition and American Literature (3, 3). Eight periods 
a week. Eng. 1 is the prerequisite of Eng. 2. (Gravely and Staff.) 



52 UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 

Eng. 1— 

Section 1— Daily, 8:00; M., W., F., 9:00; A-209. 
Section 2— Daily, 10 :00 ; M., W., F., 11 :00 ; A-209. 

Eng. 2— 

Section 1 — Daily, S :00 ; M., W., F., 9 :00 ; A-17. 
Section 2 — Daily, 8 :00 ; M., W., F., 9 :00 ; Q-30. 
Section 3 — Daily, 10 :00 ; M., W., F., 11 :00 ; A-17. 

Eng. 3, 4. Composition and World Literature (3, 3). Eight periods a 
week. Prerequisite Eng. 1, 2. (Cooley and Staff.) 

Eng. 3— 

Section 1— Daily, 8 :00 ; M., W., F., 9 :00 ; A-18. 
Section 2 — Daily, 10 :00 ; M., W., F., 11 :00 ; A-18. 
Section 3— Daily, 10 :00 ; M., W., F., 11 :00 ; A-16. 

Eng. 4— 

Section 1 — Daily. 8 :00 ; M., W., F., 9 :00 ; 0-32. 

Section 2— Daily, 10 :00 ; M., W., F., 11 :00 ; Q-31. 

Section 3 — Daily, 10 :00 ; M., W., F., 11 :00 ; A-8. 

Eng. lOlS. History of the English Language (2). 8:00; A-133. Pre- 
requisite, Eng. 1, 2 and 3, 4 or 5, 6. (Barnes.) 

Eng. 135S. Literature of the Victorian Period (2). 12:00; A-17. Pre- 
requisite, Eng. 1, 2 and 3, 4 or 5, 6. (Mooney.) 

A study of the later Victorian writers. 

Eng. 143S. Modern Poetry (2). 9:00; A-133. Prerequisite, Eng. 1, 2 and 
3, 4 or 5, 6. (Murphy.) 

A study of some British and American poets of the twentieth century. 

Eng. 151S. American Literature (2). 10:00; A-133. Prerequisite, Eng. 
1, 2 and 3, 4 or 5, 6. (Gravely.) 

American poetry and prose after 1850. 

Eng. 200. Research (1-6). Arranged. (Murphy and Staff.) 

ENTOMOLOGY 

tEnt. lis. Entomology in Nature Study (3). Daily, 1:00; M., W., F., 
2:00; O-200. (Haviland.) 

This course is designed to help teachers utilize insects in their teaching. The 
general availability of insects makes them especially desirable for use in nature study 



tRecommended for teachers. 



SUMMER SCHOOL 53 

courses. Teachers should be acquainted, therefore, with the simpliest and easiest way 
to collect, rear, preserve, and identify the common insects about which students ar« 
constantly asking questions. 

Ent. 110, 111. Special Problems (1, 1). Prerequisites to be determined 
by instructor. Arranged. (Staff.) 

An intensive investigation of some entomological problem, preferably of the student's 
choice. Required of majors in entomology. 

Ent. 201. Advanced Entomology. Credit and prerequisites to be deter- 
mined by the department. To be arranged. (Staff.) 

Studies of minor problems in morphology, taxonomy and applied entomology, with 
particular reference to the preparation of the student for individual research. 

Ent. 202. Research. Credit depends upon the amount of work done. To 
B3t arranged. (Staff.) 

Required of graduate students majoring in Entomology. This course involves re- 
search on an approved project. A dissertation suitable for publication must be submitted 
at the conclusion of the studies as a part of the requirements for an advanced degree. 



FOREIGN LANGUAGES 

French 0. Intensive Elementary French (0). Eight periods a week. M., 
T., W., Th., 11:00, 12:00; T-12. (Kramer.) 

Intensive elementary course In the French language designed particularly for gradu- 
ate students who wish to acquire a reading knowledge. 

French 2. Elementary French (3). Eight periods a week. Daily, 11:00; 
M., W., F., 12:00; A-231. Second semester of first-year French. (Hall.) 

Elements of grammar ; pronunciation and conversation ; exercises la composition 
and translation. 

French 4 or 5. Intermediate Literary French (3) or Fr. 6 or 7. Inter- 
mediate Scientific French (3). Eight periods a week. Daily, 9:00; M., W., F., 
8:00; A-231. Prerequisite, French 1 and 2, or equivalent, (Hall.) 

Students interested In second year French should consult with Foreign Language 
Department at time of registration. Arrangements will be made to meet needs of stu- 
dents Interested in either the first or second semester of literary or scientific French. 

German 0. Intensive Elementary German (0). Eight periods a week. 
M., T., W., Th., 8:00, 9:00; M-101. (Kramer.) 

Intensive elementary course In the German language designed particularly for 
graduate students who wish to acquire a reading knowledge. 

German 2. Elementary German (3). Eight periods a week. Daily, 11:00; 
M., W., F., 12:00; A-228. Second semester of first-year German. 

(Schweizer.) 



54 UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 

Elements of grammar ; pronunciation and conversation ; exercises in composition 
and translation. 

German 4 or 5. Intermediate Literary German (3) or Ger. 6 or 7^ 
Intermediate Scientific German (3). Eight periods a week. Daily, 9:00; M.^ 
W., F., 8:00; A-228. Prerequisite, German 1 and 2, or equivalent. 

( Schweizer.) 

Students Interested in second year German should consult with Foreign Language- 
Department at time of registration. Arrangements will be made to meet needs ot 
Btudents interested in either the first or second semester of literary or scientific German^ 

Spanish 2. Elementary Spanish (3). Eight periods a week. Daily, 10:00; 
M., W., F., 9:00; A-212. Second semester of first-year Spanish. (Nemes.> 

Elements of grammar, pronunciation and conversation ; exercises in composition, 
and translation. 

Spanish 4 or 5. Intermediate Spanish (3). Eight periods a week. Daily, 
12:00; M., W., F., 1:00; A-212. Prerequisite Spanish 1 and 2, or equivalent. 

(Nemes.) 

Translation, conversation, exercises in pronunciation. Reading of texts designed ta 
give some knowledge of Spanish and Latin-American life, thought, and culture. 



GEOGRAPHY 

Geog. 103. Geographic Concepts and Source Materials (2). 8:00; N-101. 

(Augelli.) 

A comprehensive and systematic survey of geographic concepts designed exclusively 
for teachers. Stress will be placed upon the philosophy of geography in relation to 
the social and physical sciences, the use of the ordinary tools of geography, source 
materials, and the problems of presenting geographic principles. 

Geog. 190. Political Geography (3). Eight periods a week. Daily, 9:00; 
M., W., F., 10:00; N-101. (Augelli.) 

Geographical factors in national power and international relations ; an analysis- 
of the role of "Geopolitics" and "Geostrategy", with special reference to the current 
■world scene. 



GOVERNMENT AND POLITICS 

G. & P. 1. American Government (3). Eight periods a week. 

S-ection 1— Daily. 9:00; M., W., F., 8:00; O-30. (StaCf.)- 

Section 2— Daily, 9:00; M., W., F., 8:00; Q-31. (Staff.) 

Section 3— Daily, 11 :00 ; M., W., F., 12 :00 ; A-21. (Staff.)- 

This course is designed as the basic course in government for the American Civiliza- 
tion program, and it or its equivalent is a prerequisite to all other courses in the; 
Department. It is a comprehensive study of government in the United States — national,, 
state, and local. 



SUMMER SCHOOL 55 

G. &P. 4. State Government and Administration (3). Eight periods a 
■week. Daily 11:00; M., W., F., 12:00; Q-29A. Prerequisite, G. & P. 1. 

(Alford.) 

A study of the organization and functions of state government In the United Statea, 
■with special emphasis upon the government of Maryland. 

G. & P. 101. International Political Relations (3). Eight periods a week. 
Daily 11:00; M., W., F., 12:00; A-12. Prerequisite G. & P. 1. (Harrison.) 

A study of the major factors underlying international relations, the influence of 
geography, climate, nationalism, and imperialism, and the development of foreign policies 
■of the major powers. 

G. & P. 154. Problems of World Politics (3). Eight periods a week. 

Daily 9:00; M., W., F., 8:00; A-16. Prerequisite G. & P. 1. (Steinmeyer.) 

A study of governmental problems of international scope, such as causes of war, 
problems of neutrality, and propaganda. Students are required to report on readings 
from current literature. 

G. & P. 174. Political Parties (3). Eight periods a week. Daily, 9:00; 
M., W., F., 8:00; A-12. Prerequisite G. & P. 1. (Hathorn.) 

A descriptive and analytical examination of American political parties, nominations, 
flections, and political leadership. 

G. & P. 207. Seminar in Comparative Governmental Institutions (3). To 
be arranged. (Steinmeyer.) 

Reports on selected topics assigned for individual study and reading In governmental 
■«nd political institutions in governments throughout the world. 

G. & P. 299. Thesis Course (3, 6). To be arranged (Staff.) 

HISTORY 
H. 5. History of American Civilization (3). Eight periods a week. 

Section 1 — Daily, 8 :00 ; M., W., F., 9 :00 ; A-207. (Sparks.) 

Section 2— Daily, 9 :00 ; M., W., F., 8 :00 ; A-110. (Bates.) 

Section 3— Daily, 10:00; M., W., F., 11:00; A-110. (Stromberg.) 

H. 6. History of American Civilization (3). Eight periods a week. 

Section 1 — Daily, 9 :00 ; M., W., F., 8 :00 ; A-106. (Hirst.) 

Section 2— Daily. 10 :00 ; M. W., F., 11 :00 : A-106. (Evans.) 

Section 3— Daily, 11:00; M., W., F., 12:00; A-130. (Staff.) 

H. 115S. The Old South (2). 8:00; A-130. Prerequisites, H. 5, 6 or the 
equivalent. (Evans.) 

A study of the institutional and cultural life of the ante-bellum South with particular 
reference to the background of the Civil War. 



56 UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 

H. 116S. The Civil War (2). 10:00; A-207. Prerequisites, H. 5, 6, or 
the equivalent. (Sparks.) 

Military aspects ; problems of the Confederacy ; political, social, and economic 
effects of the war upon American society. 

H. 119. Recent American History (2). Eight periods a week. Daily 9:00; 
M., W., F., 11:00; A-21. Prerequisites, H. 5, 6, or the equivalent. (Merroll.) 

Party politics, domestic issues, foreign relations of the United States since TVorld 
War I. 

H. 129S. The United States and World Aflfairs (2). 1:00; A-207. Pre- 
requisites, H. 5, 6, or the equivalent. (Stromberg.) 

A consideration of the changed position of the United States with reference to the 
rest of the world since 1917. 

H. 161S. The Renaissance and Reformation (2). 12:00. A-207; Prerequi- 
sites, H. 1, 2, or 53, 54 or permission of the instructor. (Bauer.) 

The culture of the Renaissance, the Protestant revolt and Catholic reaction through 
the Thirty Years War. 

H. 176. Europe in the World Setting of the Twentieth Century. (2). 
Eight periods a week. Daily 8:00; M., W., F., 9:00; A-203. Prerequisites, H. 1, 
2 or H. 53, 54. (Staff.) 

A study of World War II and its global impacts. 

H. 191. History of Russia (3). Daily, 10:00; M., W., F., 11:00; A-203. 
Prerequisites, H. 1, 2, or the equivalent, or the permission of the instructor. 

(Bauer.) 

A History of Russia from the earliest times to the present day. 

H. 195S. The Far East. (2). 8:00; A-212. (Parmer.) 

A survey of the history of China and Japan with special emphasis upon their 
distinctive cultures and the impact of the West. 

H. 196S. Southeast Asia (2). 9:00; A-130. (Parmer.) 

The political, economic and cultural history of the new nations of Southeast Asia 
with emphasis on the colonial period and a view to understanding contemporary develop- 
ments. 

H. 200. Research (1-6). Credit proportioned to amount of work. Ar- 
ranged. (Staff.) 

H. 201 S. Seminar in American History (2). 1:00; A-203. (Stromberg.) 

H. 250S. Seminar in European History (2). 1:00; A-203. (Stromberg.> 



SUMMER SCHOOL 57 



HOME ECONOMICS 

Foods 104. Advanced Foods (2). Daily, 11:00; H-222. Consent of In- 
structor required. (King.) 

Advanced study of the scientific principles underlying food preparation and pro- 
cessing ; their incorporation into the procedures for preparing satisfactory food products ; 
trends in the development of foods ; some familiarity with the literature of food research- 
Laboratory Fee, $7.00. 

Home Mgt. 152. Experience in Management of the Home (3). Pre- 
requisites, Home Mgt, 150, 151. Laboratory fee, $7.00. (Mearig.) 

Residence for five weeks in the Home Management House. Experience in planning, 
coordinating and participating in the activities of a household, composed of a faculty 
member and a group of students. 

Nut. 112. Dietetics (3). Daily, 9:00; M., W., F., 10:00; H-222. Labor- 
atory fee, $7.00. Consent of instructor required. (Baucher.) 

A study of food selection for health ; food values and nutrition demonstrations ; 
food, its cost and relative nutritive value; nutritional value of new food products; 
effect of methods of preservation on nutritive values ; planning and circulating dietaries 
for children, adults, family units. 

Pr, Art 100. Mural Design (2). Daily, 2:00, 3:00, 4:00; June 24-July 13; 
H-105. Laboratory fee, $3.00. Consent of the instructor required. (Curtiss.) 

Group expression developed In colored chalk or opaque water color on wrapping 
paper. Techniques appropriate to beginners and to teachers of beginners in the public 
schools. 

Pr. Art 144. Individual Problems in Interior (2). Daily, 10:00, 11:00, 
12:00; June 24-July 13; H-105. Laboratory fee, $3.00. Consent of the in- 
structor required. (Curtiss.) 

Course content and activities will be determined by individual needs. 



HORTICULTURE 

Hort. 122. Special Problems (2). Credit arranged according to work 
done. (Staff.) 

For major students in Horticulture or Botany. 

Hort. 208. Advanced Horticultural Research (2 to 6). (Staff.) 

Credit granted according to work done. 

LIBRARY SCIENCE 

L. S. 102. Cataloging and Classification (3). Eight periods a week. 
Daily, 1:00; M., W., F., 2:00; M-101. (Robinson.) 



58 UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 

Study and practice in classifying boolvs and making dictionary catalog for school 
libraries. Simplified form as used in the Children's Catalog. Standard Catalog for 
High School Libraries and Wilson printed cards are studied. 

L. S. 104. Reference and Bibliography for School Libraries (4). Ten 

periods a week. Daily, 10:00, 11:00, M-101. (Robinson.) 

Evaluation, selection and use of standard reference tools, such as encyclopediaa, 
dictionaries, periodical indexes, atlases and yearbooks, for school libraries. Study of 
bibliographical procedures and forms. 



MATHEMATICS 

Math. 5. General Mathematics (3). Eight periods a week. Prerequisite, 
one unit of algebra. Open only to students in the College of Business and 
Public Administration, the College of Agriculture, the College of Military- 
Science, and the Department of Industrial Education. 

fe'ection la — Daily, 10 :00 : M., W., F.. 11 :00 ; Y-123. 

Section lb — Daily,10 :00 ; M., W.. F., 11:00; Y-3. (Good and Staff.) 

Fundamental operations, fractions, ratio and proportion, linear equations ; exponents, 
logarithms, percentage, trade discount, simple interest, bank discount, true discount, 
and promissory notes. 

Math. 6. Mathematics of Finance (3). Eight periods a week. Daily, 
10:00; M., W., F., 11:00; Y-101. Prerequisite, Math. 5, or equivalent. Required 
of students in the College of Business and Public Administration and open to 
students in the College of Arts and Sciences for elective credit only. 

(Shepherd.) 

Line diagrams, compound interest, simple interest, ordinary annuities, general 
annuities, deferred annuities, annuities due, perpetuities, evaluation of bonds, amortiza- 
tion, and sinking funds. 

tMath. 10. Algebra (3). Eight periods a week. Daily, 10:00; M., W., F., 
11:00; Y-28. Prerequisite, one unit each of algebra and plane geometry. 

(Staff.) 

Fundamental operations, factoring, fractions, linear equations, exponents and radicals, 
logarithms, quadratic equations, progressions, permutations and combinations, proba- 
ability. 

fMath. 11. Trigonometry and Analytic Geometry (3). Eight periods a 
week. Daily, 8:00; M., W., F., 9:00; Y-101. Prerequisite, Math. 10, or equiva- 
lent. This course is not recommended for students planning to enroll in Math. 
20. (Ehrlich, Shepherd.) 

Trigonometric functions, identities, addition formulas, solution of triangles, coordi- 
nates, locus problems, the straight line and circle, conic sections, graphs. 



tRecommended for teachers. 



SUMMER SCHOOL 59 

tMath. 18. Elementary Mathematical Analysis (5). Twelve periods a 
week. Prerequisite, high school algebra completed and plane geometry. Open 
to students in the physical sciences, engineering, and education. 

Section la — M., T., W.. Th., F., S., 10 :00, 11 :00 ; Y-4. (Jackson.) 

Section lb — M., T., W., Th., F., S., 10 :00, 11 :00 ; Y-5. (Kearney.) 

The elementary mathematical functions, especially algebraic, logarithmic, and ex- 
ponential are studied by means of their properties, their graphical representations, the 
Identities connecting them, and the solution of equations involving them. The beginning 
techniques of calculus, sequences, permutations and combinations and probability are 
Introduced. 

tMath. 19. Elementary Mathematical Analysis (5). Twelve periods a 
week. Prerequisite, Math. 18 or equivalent. Open to students in the physical 
sciences, engineering and education. 

S'ection la — M., T., W., Th., F., S., 8 :00, 9 :00 ; T-26. (Holmann.) 

Section lb — M., T., W., Th., F., S., 8 :00, 9 :00 ; Y-27. (Zemel.) 

Section Ic — M., T., W., Th., F., S., 8 :00, 9 :00 ; T-28. (Hsu.) 

Section Id— M., T., W., Th., F., S., 8 :00, 9 :00 ; T-4. (Burda.) 

A continuation of the content of Math 18 including a study of the trigonometric and 
Inverse trigonometric functions, determinants, the conic sections, solid analytic geometry, 
and an introduction to finding areas by integration. 

tMath. 20. Calculus (4). Twelve periods a week. M., T., W., Th., F., S., 
10:C0, 11:00; Y-27. Prerequisite, Math. 19 or equivalent. Open to students in 
engineering, education, and physical sciences. (Staff.) 

Limits, derivatives, diflferetials, maxima and minima, curve sketching, curvature, 
kinematics, integration. 

tMath. 21. Calculus (4). Twelve periods a week. M., T., W., Th., F., S., 
8:00, 9:00; Y-2. Prerequisite Math. 20, or equivalent. Open to students in 
engineering, education, and physical sciences. (Rosen.) 

Integration with geometric and physical applications, partial derivatives, space 
geometry, multiple integrals, infinite series. 

Math. 64. Differential Equations for Engineers (3). Eight periods a 
week. Daily, 10:00; M., W., F., 11:00; Y-122. Prerequisite, Math. 21, or equiv- 
alent. Required of students in mechanical and electrical engineering. 

(Fadnis.) 

Differential equations of the first and second order with emphasis on their engi- 
neering applications. 

tMath. 140S. History of Mathematics (2). 9:00; Y-123. Prerequisite, 
Math. 21 or consent of instructor. (Good.) 



tRecommended for teachers. 



60 UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 

A survey of the historical development of mathematics and of the mathematlclaa« 
who have contributed to that development. 

Math. 152S. Vector Analysis (2). 8:00; Y-122. Prerequisite Math. 21 or 
equivalent. (Fadnis.) 

Algebra and calculus of vectors, with applications. 

*Math. 182. Foundations of Algebra (3). Eight periods a week. Daily, 
10:00; M., W., F., 11:00; Y-121. Designed primarily for those enrolled in 
programs with emphasis in teaching mathematics and science. Not open to 
students seeking a major directly in the physical sciences, since the course 
content is usually covered elsewhere in their curricula. (Ehrlich.) 

Modern ideas in algebra and topics in the theory of equations. 

*Math. 199. National Science Foundation Summer Institute for Teachers 
of Science and Mathematics. Seminar (1). Five 2-hour seminars each week, 
July 8, July 19. M., T., W., Th., F., 3:00, 4:00. Y-101. Laboratory fee $.5.00. 

(Ehrlich and Staff.) 

A series of lectures and discussions designed to broaden the student's appreciation 
of the nature of mathematics as a logical discipline, as an adventure of the imagination, 
and as a field of human endeavor. 



MUSIC 

Music 15. Chapel Choir (1). 12:00; B-7. (Springmann.) 

Open to all students. A program will be prepared and will be presented in the 
Chapel late in the summer session. 

Music 169. Choral Music (3). Daily, 11:00; M., W., F., 8:00; B-7. Pre- 
requisite, Music 120 and 121 or the equivalent. (Jordan.) 

The history and literature of choral music from the Renaissance to the present, 
with discussion of related topics such as Gregorian chant, vocal chamber music, etc. 

Applied Music 

A new student or one taking music for the first time at this University 
should register for Music X (Piano) or Music X (Voice), etc. He will receive 
the proper classification at the end of the Summer Session. 

Music 12, 13, 52, 53, 112, 113, 152, 153. Applied Music (2). Hours to be 

arranged with insti-uctor; B-4. Prerequisite, the next lower course in the 
same instrument. Three half-hour lessons and a minimum of ten practice 
hours per week. (Staff.) 

The student will register for Music 12 (Piano) or Music 12 (Voice), etc. Special 
fee of $40.00 for each course. 



♦Intended for teachers. 



SUMMER SCHOOL 61 

SUMMER SCHOOL— 1957 
PHYSICAL EDUCATION, RECREATION AND HEALTH 

Physical Education Fee per semester (to be charged any student registered 
for any physical activity course), $3.00, 

P. E. SIC. Physical Education Activities (1-6). Fee, $3.00. Instruction 
and practice in selected sports; golf, and s-\vimming. 

Note : 1. Not available for credit by physical education majors. 

Note : 2. Non-majors in physical education may use this credit to fulfill graduation 
reqquirements in physical education. 

Section 1 — Swimming (1), 2:00; GG-Pool. (Husman.) 

Section 2— Golf (1), Wednesdays, 1:00-5:00; GG-310. (Cronin.) 

P. E. 120. Physical Education for the Elementary School (3). 

M.. T.. W'., Th., 8 :00. 9 :00 ; G-100. (Humphrey.) 

This course is designed to orient the general elementary teacher to physical educa- 
tion. Principles and practices in elementary physical education will be presented and 
discussed and a variety of appropriate activities will be considered from a standpoint 
of their use at the various grade levels. 

P. E. 160. Theory of Exercise (3). M., T., W., Th., 8:00, 9:00; GG-128. 

(Staff.) 

A Btudy of exercise and its physiological and kinesiological basis. Special emphasis 
le placed upon the application of exercise to the development and maintenance of 
physical eflBciency. Corrective therapy, conditioning for athletics, the effects of exercise 
and training on the human organism, fatigue, staleness, relaxation, and the nature of 
athletic injuries are investigated. 

P. E, 180. Measurement in Physical Education and Health (3). M., T., 
W., Th., 1:00, 2:00; GG-205. (Staff.) 

The application of the principles and techniques of educational measurement to 
the teaching of health and physical education ; study of the functions and techniques 
of measurement in the evaluation of student progress toward the objectives of health 
and physical education, and in the evaluation of the effectiveness of teaching. 

P. E. 200. Seminar in Physical Education, Recreation, and Health (1). 

T., 12:00; arranged. GG-114. (Staff.) 

P. E. 201. Foundations of Physical Education, Recreation and Health (3). 

M., T., W., Th., 8:00, 9:00; GG-205. (Eyler.) 

A study of history, philosophy and principles of physical education, recreation and 
health as applied to current problems in each area and as related to general education. 



62 UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 

P. E. 205. Analysis of Contemporary Athletics (3). M., T., W., Th., 10:00, 
11:00; GG-205. (Eyler.) 

A study of current problems, practices, and national issues of paramount importance 
to the conduct of athletic competition in a democracy. 

P. E. 210, Methods and Techniques of Research (3). M., T., W., Th., 
10:00, 11:00; W-131. (Mohr.) 

A study of methods and techniques of research used in physical education, recrea- 
tion, and health education ; an analysis of examples of their use ; and practice in their 
application to problems of interest to the student. 

P. E. 280. Scientific Bases of Exercise (3). Prerequisites: Anatomy, 
Physiology, P. E. 100, 160, or equivalent. M., T., W., Th., 8:00, 9:00; GG-128. 

(Massey.) 

A critical analysis of the role of physical exercise in modem society with attention 
given to such topics as : the need for physical exercise, its chronic effects, the role 
of exercise in attaining good physical condition and fitness, factors determining champion- 
ship performances, and physical fatigue. 

P. E. 288. Special Problems in Physical Education, Recreation and Health 
(1-6). (Ai-ranged.) 

Master or Doctoral candidates who desire to pursue special research problems under 
the direction of their advisers may register for 1-6 hours of credit under this number. 

P. E. 289. Research— Thesis (1-5). (Arranged). 

Students who desire credits for a Master's thesis, a Doctoral dissertation, or a 
Doctoral project should use this number. 

Hea. 105. Basic Driver Education (3). M., T., W., Th., 8:00, 9:00; 
GG-201. (Tompkins.) 

This course is the study of the place of the automobile in modern life and deals 
with the theory and practice of the following : traffic accidents and other traffic prob- 
lems ; objectives and scope of driver-education ; motor vehicle laws and regulation ; 
basic classroom instruction ; aids to learning and practice driving instruction. 

Hea. 145. Advanced Driver Education (3). M., T., W., Th., 10:00, 11:00 
GG-201. (Tompkins.) 

Progressive techniques and practice of advanced driver education ; comprehensive 
programming for traffic safety : psychology in traffic safety ; improving the attitudes 
of younger drivers : teaching to meet driving emergencies ; program planning in driver 
education ; resources and agencies ; the teacher and driver education ; consumer educa- 
tion ; measuring and evaluating results ; driver education for adults ; research and needed 
research ; new developments in driver education ; insurance and liability ; the future of 
driver education. 

Prerequisites : Hea. 50, Hea. 70. Hea. 80, and Hea. 175. 

Hea. 160. Problems in School Health Education in Elementary and Sec- 
ondary Schools (3). M., T., W., Th., 10:00, 11:30; GG-202. (Johnson.) 



SUMMER SCHOOL 63 

This is a workshop type course designed particularly for in-service teachers to 
acquaint them with the best methods of providing good health services, healthful 
environment and health instruction. 

Hea. 189. Field Laboratory and Workshops: Fundamentals of Sex Edu- 
cation for Teachers (3). M., T., W., Th., 8:00, 9:00; GG-128. (Johnson.) 

This course presents basic information concerning the physical, psychological, and 
social aspects of sex. Special consideration is given to the adjustment needs and 
problems of children and youth throughout the school years ; and emphasis is placed 
upon the role that the teacher may play in helping to meet those needs. 



PHYSICS 

Physics 100. Advanced Experiments (1, 2, or 3). Eight hours laboratory 
work per week each credit hour. One, two, or three credits may be taken con- 
currently. Hours arranged, Z-306. Prerequisites, Phys. 52 or 54 and four 
credits in Phys. 60. Limited to Physics majors. Laboratory fee $10.00 per 
credit ?iour. (Hornyak and Staff.) 

.S'elected fundamental experiments in electricity and magnetism, elementary elec- 
tronics, atomic physics, and optics. 

fPhysics 109. Electronic Circuits (4). Five two-hour lectures per week. 
M., T., W., Th., F., 1:00, 2:00; Z-115. Prerequisite, Physics 105 must be 
taken previously or concurrently. (Hornyak and Staff.) 

This course is intended for students preparing for research in experimental physics. 
It is also recommended for high school science teachers. It will examine the theory 
of physics detectors and pulse circuits, and its applications in circuit design. There 
will be lecture demonstrations. 

Physics 122. Properties of Matter (4). Five two-hour lectures per week. 
M., T., W., Th., F., 5:00, 6:00; Z-115. Prerequisite, Phys. 118 or equivalent. 

(Clark.) 

This course is limited to Physics majors and includes the work of Physics 122A 
plus additional lectures and problems. 

*Physics 122A. Properties of Materials (3). Four two-hour lectures per 
week. M., T., W., Th., 5:00, 6:00; Z-115. (Clark.) 

This course is intended for high school science teachers and will be taught in 
conjunction with Phys. 122. The macroscopic behavior of the various states of matter 
will be explained in terms of molecular models. Thermodynamic, electrical and magnetic 
properties of materials are discussed. The electronic, atomic and molecular structure 
of various types of solids such as metals, semi-conductors, polymers, glass, and dielec- 
trics are correlated with their bulk properties. The experimental techniques used in 
molecular structure determinations are described and the theory of molecular binding 
reviewed. Hydrodynamic and thermodynamic properties of various types of liquids are 
presented. S'ome emphasis is given to a discussion of the way in which various types 
of materials are used in modern technology. 



rRecommended for teachers. 
•Intended for teachers. 



64 UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 

fPhysics 130, 131. Basic Concepts of Physics (4). Five two-hour lectures 
per week. M., T., W., Th., F., 10:00, 11:00; Z-115. Prerequisite, junior stand- 
ing. Lecture demonstration fee $4.00. (Goodwin and Staff.) 

A primarily descriptive course Intended mainly for students In the liberal arta 
and high school science teachers. This course does not satisfy the requirements of 
professional schools or serve as a substitute for other physics courses. The main 
emphasis in the course will be on the concepts of physics, their evolution, and their 
relation to other branches of human endeavor. This course is specially recommended 
for high school science teachers to serve as the basic course in physics for this group. 

Physics 150. Special Problems in Physics. Credit according to work done. 
Hours and location arranged. Research or special study. Laboratory fee 
$10.00 per credit hour when appropriate. Prerequisite, major in physics and 
consent of Department Head. (Staff.) 

*Physics 160A. Physics Problems. (1, 2, or 3). Lectures and discussion 
sessions arranged. Credit according to work done. (Goodwin and Staff.) 

This course, intended primarily for high school science teachers, introduces the 
student to the proper methods of presenting and solving basic problems in physios. The 
course consists of lectures and discussion sessions. Those problems which Illustrate 
best the fundamental principles of physics are treated fully. The necessary mathematical 
methods are developed as needed. 

*Phys. 199. National Science Foundation Summer Institute for Teachers 
of Science and Mathematics. Seminar (1). Five 2-hour seminars each week. 
July 22, August 2. M., T., W., Th., F., 3:00, 4":00. Z-115. Laboratory fee 
$5.00. (Laster and Staff:) 

Especially designed for high school teachers In science and mathematics. Includes 
the fields of chemistry and physics. Experts in these fields will give lectures with 
emphasis upon contemporary research. Time will be available for discussion, and stu- 
dent participation will be encouraged. Research and laboratory techniques will be 
demonstrated. 

Physics 248. Special Topics in Modern Physics: Mathematical Physics 
(2). Two two and one-half hour lectures per week. T., Th., 7-9:20 P.M.; 
Z-115. Prerequisite Phys. 201. (Visconti.) 

During the summer of 1957, this course will stress the solution of differential and 
Integral equations, approximation procedures In mathematical physics such as perturbation 
methods and variational techniques, solutions of wave equations, and diffusion problems. 

Physics 250. Research. Credit according to work done. Hours and lo- 
cation arranged. Laboratory fee $10.00 per credit hour. Prerequisite, ap- 
proved application for admission to candidacy or special permission of the 
Department Head. (Staff.) 

Thesis research conducted under approved supervision. 



fRecommended for teachers. 
♦Intended for teachers. 



SUMMER SCHOOL 65 



POULTRY 

P. H. Sill. Poultry Breeding and Feeding (1). Daily 9:00. 

(Wilcox and Combs.) 

This course is designed primarily for teachers of vocational agriculture and extension 
service workers. The first half will be devoted to problems concerning breeding and 
the development of breeding stock. The second half will be devoted to nutrition. 

P. H. 205. Poultry Literature (1-4). (Staff.) 

Readings on Individual topics are assigned. Written reports required. Methods of 
analysis and presentation of scientific material are discussed. 

P. H. 206. Poultry Research. Credit in accordance with work done. 

(Staff.) 

Practical and fundamental research with poultry may be conducted under the 
supervision of staflE members toward the requirements for the degrees of M.S. and Ph.D. 



PSYCHOLOGY 

Psych. 1. Introduction to Psychology (3). Eight periods a week. Daily, 
9:00; M., W., F., 8:00; M-105. (Solem.) 

A basic introductory course, intended to bring the student into contact with the 
major problems confronting psychology and the more important attempts at their solution. 

Psych. 2S. Applied Psychology (2). Daily 10:00; M-104. Prerequisite, 
Psych. 1. (Solem.) 

Applications of research methods to basic human problems in business and industry, 
In the professions, and in other practical concerns of everyday life. 

Psych. 106. Statistical Methods in Psychology (3). Daily, 11:00; M., W., 
F., 12:00; M-104. Prerequisites, Psych. 1 and Math. 1, 5, or 10. Herrnstein. 

A basic introduction to quantitative methods used in psychological research ; meas- 
ures of central tendency, of spread, and of correlation. Majors in Psychology should take 
this course In the junior year. 

Psych. 110. Educational Psychology (3). Eight periods a week. Daily, 
9:00; M., W., F., 10:00; M-102. Prerequisite, Psych. 1. (Maxwell.) 

Researches on fundamental psychological problems encountered in education. Meas- 
urement and significance of individual differences, learning, motivation, transfer of train- 
ing, and the educational implications of theories of intelligence. 

Psych. 225. Practicum in Counseling and Clinical Procedures (1-3). Hours 
arranged. Prerequisite, Psych. 220 and consent of instructor. 

(Gustad, Magoon.) 

Psych. 288. Special Research Problems (1-3). Hours arranged. Prei^equi- 
slte, consent of individual faculty supervisor. (Staff.) 



66 UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 

Psych. 290. Research for Thesis (1-6). Hours arranged. (Staff.) 

SOCIOLOGY 

Soc. 1. Sociology of American Life (3). Eight periods a week. Daily^ 
8:00; M., W., F., 9:00; R-205. (Hirzel.) 

Sociological analysis of the American social structure ; metropolitan, small town,, 
and rural communities ; population distribution, composition and change ; social organi- 
zation. 

Soc. 5. Anthropology (3). Eight periods a week. Daily, 10:00; M., W.,. 
F., 11:00; R-103. (Anderson.) 

Introduction to anthropology ; origins of man ; development and transmission ot 
culture ; backgrounds of human institutions. 

Soc. 51S. Social Pathology (2). Daily, 10:00; R-7. Prerequisite, Soc.l 
and sophomore standing. (Shankweiler.) 

Personal-social disorganization and maladjustment; physical and mental handicaps;, 
economic inadequacies ; programs of treatment and control. 

Soc. 114S. The City (2). Daily 11:00; R-205. (Schmidt.) 

The rise of urban civilization and metropolitan regions ; ecoloquical processes and 
structure ; the city as a center of dominance ; social problems, control and planning. 

Soc. 121S. Population (2). Daily, 11:00; R-7. (Hirzel.) 

Population distribution, composition, and growth in North America and Eurasia ^ 
trends in fertility and mortality ; migrations ; population prospects and policies. 

Soc. 123S. Ethnic Minorities (2). Daily, 10:00; R-205. (Staff.) 

Basic social processes in the relations of ethnic groups within the state ; immigratioik 
groups and the Negro in the United States ; ethnic minorities in Europe. 

Soc. 125S. Cultural History of the Negro (2). Daily, 8:00; R-103. 

(Anderson.) 

The cultures of Africa south of the Sahara and the cultural adjustments of the 
Negro in North and South America. 

Soc. 131S. Introduction to Social Service (2). 9:00; R-7. (Staff.) 

General survey of the field of social welfare activities ; historical development ;. 
growth, functions, and specialization of agencies and services, private and public. 

Soc. 141S. Sociology of Personality (2). Daily, 9:00; R-103. (Schmidt.) 

Development of human nature and personality in contemporary social life ; processes 
of socialization ; attitudes, individual differences, and social behavior. 



SUMMER SCHOOL 67 

Soc. 164S The Family and Society (2). Daily, 9:00; R-6. Prerequisite, 
■Soc. 1 and Soc. 64 or equivalent. (Shankweiler.) 

Study of the family as a social institution : its biological and cultural foundations, 
historic development, changing structure and function : the interactions of marriage 
•and parenthood, disorganizing and reorganizing factors in present day trends. 

Soc. 191. Social Field Training (3). Time to be arranged. (Staff.) 

Prerequisites : For social work field training, Soc. 131 ; for crime control field 
"training, S'oc. 52 and 153. Enrollment restricted to available placements. 

Supervised field training in public and private social agencies. The student •will 
select his particular area of interest and be responsible to an agency for a definite 
■program of in-service training. Group meetings, individual conferences, and written 
.progress reports will be required part of the course. 

Soc. 290. Research in Sociology (3-6). (Credit to be determined). Time 
"to be arranged. (Hoffsommer.) 

Soc. 291. Special Social Problems (3). (Credit to be determined). Time 
to be arranged. (Staff.) 



SPEECH AND DRAMATIC ART 

Speech 1. Public Speaking (2). 8:00; R-101. Fee $1.00 (Batka.) 

The preparation and delivery of short original speeches. Outside readings ; reports, 
«tc. 

Speech 2. Public Speaking (2). 9:00; R-101. Fee $1.00, Prerequisite, 
Speech 1. • (Batka.) 

Speech 4. Voice and Diction (3). Eight periods a week. Daily 9:00; 
M., W., F., 10:00; Studio. (Starcher.) 

Emphasis upon the improvement of voice, articulation, and phonation. May be 
taken concurrently with Speech 1, 2. 

Speech 7. Public Speaking (2). 11:00; R-101. Fee $1.00 (Batka.) 

The preparation and delivery of speeches on technical and general subjects. 

Speech 106. Clinical Practice (1 to 6 credits). Hours arranged. (Conlon.) 

A laboratory course dealing with the various methods of correction plus actual 
■work in the clinic. Fee $1.00 per credit hour. 



68 UXIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 

Speech 111. Seminar (3). Hours arranged. (Strausbaugh.) 

Required of speech majors. Present-day speech research. 

Speech 126. Semantic Aspects of Speech in Human Relations (3). Eight 
periods a week. Daily 9:00; M., W., F., 10:00; R-109. (Hendricks.) 

An analysis of speech and language habits from the standpoint of General Semantics. 

Speech 138. Methods and Materials in Speech Correction (3). Eight 
periods a week. Daily 9:00; M., W., F., 10:00; R-102. Prerequisite, Speech 120 
or the equivalent. (Conlon.) 

The design and use of methods and materials for diagnosis, measurement, and 
retraining of the speech-handicapped. Fee $3.00. 

Speech 200. Thesis (3-6). Hours arranged. (Hendricks.) 

Credit in proportion to work done and results accomplished. 

Speech 201. Special Problems Seminar (3). Eight periods a week. Daily 
11:00; M., W., F., 12:00 R-109. (Craven.) 

Review of current theories and investigations pertaining to stuttering problems. 



ZOOLOGY 

fZool. 1. General Zoology (4). Five lectures and five two-hour laboratory- 
periods a week. Lecture, 8:00; K-307; laboratory, 9:00, 10:00; K-306. Labor- 
atoi-y fee, $8.00. (Costello.) 

This course, which is cultural and practical in its aim, deals with the basic prin- 
ciples of animal life. 

Zool, 55S. Development of the Human Body (2). Five lecture periods a 
week. 11:00; K-106. (Highton.) 

A study of the main factors affecting pre-natal and post-natal growth and develop- 
ment of the child with special emphasis on normal development. 

tZool. 104. Genetics (3). Eight lecture periods a week. Daily, 9:00; M., 
W., F., 8:00; K-106. Prerequisite, one course in zoology or botany. 

(Highton.) 

A consideration of the basic principles of heredity. 

*Zool. loss. Animal Histology (4). Five lectures and five three-hour 
laboratory periods a week. Lecture, 11:00; K-216; laboratoiy, 8:00, 9:00, 10:00; 
K-216. Prerequisite, one year of zoology. Laboratory fee, $8.00. (Brown.) 



tRecommended for teachers. 
•Intended for teachers. 



SUMMER SCHOOL 69 

A study of the microscopic structure of tissues and organs of animals with special 
emphasis on mammals. The laboratory will include practice iu the preparation of 
material for gross and microscopic study and for classroom demonstration. 

*Zool. 199. National Science Foundation Summer Institute for Teachers 
of Science and Mathematics. Seminar (1). Five 2-hour seminars each week, 
June 25, July 5. M., T., W., Th., F., 3:00, 4:00. K-307. Laboratory fee $5.00. 

(Brown and Staff.) 

An integrated discussion of recent advances and basic principles of biology. The 
program will include lectures by recognized authorities in various fields of biology, 
laboratory demonstrations, and organized discussion groups, i^tudent participation will 
be encouraged. 

Zool. 206. Research. Credit to be arranged. Research on thesis project 
only. Laboratory fee, $8.00. (Staff.) 

Zool. 208. Special Problems in Zoology. Credit, hours, and topics to be 
arranged. Laboratory fee, $8.00. (Staff.) 

Zool. 215S. Fisheries Technology (4). Five lectures and five three-hour 
laboratory periods a week. Hours to be arranged. Given at Sea Food Pro- 
cessing Laboratory, Crisfield, Maryland. Laboratory fee, $8.00. (Littleford.) 

The technological aspects of netting and collection of fish and other fishery resources, 
methods of handling the catch, marketing of fishery products, and recent advances in 
the utilization of fishery products. 

Zool. 231S. Acarology (3). July 15 through August 2. Lectures recita- 
tions, and laboratory daily, 9:00-12:00, 2:00-4:00; K-307 and K-9, Laboratory 
fee, $8.00. (Camin.) 

An introductory study of the Acarina, or mites and ticks, with special emphasis 
on classification and biology. 

Zool. 232S. Medical and Veterinary Acarology (3). July 15 through 
August 2. Lectures, recitations, and laboratory daily, 9:00-12:00, 2:00-4:00; 
K-307 and K-109. Laboratory fee, $8.00. (Strandtmann.) 

The recognition, collection, culture, and control of Acarina Important to public 
health and animal husbandry with special emphasis on the transmission of diseases. 

Zool. 233S. Agricultural Acarology (3). July 15 through August 2. 
Lectures, recitations, and laboratory daily, 9:00-12:00, 2:00-4:00; K-307 and 
K-6. Laboratory fee, $8.00. (Baker.) 

The recognition, collection, culture, and control of acarlne pests of crops and 
ornamentals. 



•Intended for teachers. 




ivINNER BUILDING 
Headquarters of the Summer School 



72 



tiubject pugc 

Acarleniir Calendar 6 

Academic Credit 2(» 

Adiiiiasioii I<j 

Agricultural Ecouoniics and Marketing.... 30 

Agricultural Education and Kural Life.... 31 

Agronomy ;j2 

American Civilization Program 24 

Animal Husbandry 33 

l>actei'i(dogy 33 

I'oard of Kegcnts 1 

Uotany 34 

r-usiness Management and 

Administration 34 

Campus Maps 4 5 

Cancellation of Courses 22 

Candidates for Degrees 24 

Cheniistr.v •<- 

Classical Languages and Literatui-e 37 

Coiiferences, Institutes and 

Workshops 26-30 

Course Offerings 30 

Dairy 37 

Division Chairmen 3 

Economics 37 

Education 3,^ 

Elementary-Secondary Education 38 

Home Economics Education 38 

Human Development Education 4(5 

Industrial Education 4<j 

Music Education 40 

Science Education 50 

English 5 J 

Entomology 5.> 



tiubjcct Page 

Engineering 5^ 

Faculty, Summer Session 7-17 

Foreign Languages 53 

Geography 54 

Government and I'olitics 54 

History ^g 

Home Economics 57 

Horticulture 57 

Lecture Series, American Education 25 

Lil)rary Science 57 

Living Accommodations and Meals 21 

Marking System 2^) 

Mathematics 53 

^1"S''' 60 

Normal and Ma.vimum Loads 20 

Oft-( ainpus Housing 22 

Officers of the Administration 2 

Talking of Automobiles 23 

Thysical Education (jj 

l'h:*«ii'a 63 

I'oultry gr, 

Psychology grj 

Kegistration 1^ 

Kesidence and Non-Kesidence, 

Definition of jy 

'■'"'■'"'"W 66 

Speech and Dramatic Art (j7 

Student Health 23 

Summer Graduate Work 23 

Tuition and Fees 20 21 

I'niversity Bookstore 24 

Withdrawal and Refund of Fees 22 

Zoology gg 



EDUCATION — — 



4417\DUCATION does not mean teaching people what they do not know. It 
JLJ means teaching them to behave as they do not behave. It is not teach- 
ing the youth the shapes of the letters and the trijcks of numbers, and then 
leaving them to turn their arithmetic to roguery and their literature to lust. 
It means, on the contrary, training them into the perfect exercise and kingly 
continence of their bodies and souls. It is painful, continual and difficult work 
to be done by kindness, by watching, by warning, by precedent, and by praise, 
but above all — by example." — ^John Ruskin. 



Ci 



"In our country no man is worthy the honored name of statesman, who 
does not include the highest practicable education of the people in all his 
plans of administration." — Horace Mann. 



"Promote, then, as an object of primary importance institutions for the 
general diffusion of knowledge. In proportion as the structure of a government 
gives force to public opinion, it is essential that public opinion should be 
enlightened." — George Washington. 



"The good education of youth has been esteemed by wise men in all ages 
as the surest foundation of the happiness both of private families and of com- 
monwealths." — Benjamin Franklin. 



"The whole people must take upon themselves the education of the whole 
people and be willing to bear the expense of it." — John Adams. 



"If a nation expects to be ignorant and free in a state of civilization, it 
expects what never was and never will be." — Thomas Jefferson. 



"A popular government without popular information or the means of ac- 
quiring it, is but the prologue to a farce or a tragedy, or perhaps both." 

James Madison 



"An educated man is never poor and no gift is more precious than 
education." — Abraham Lincoln. 



"Without popular education no government which rests on popular action 
can long endure; the people must be schooled in the knowledge and in the 
virtues upon which the maintenance and success of free institutions depend." 

— Woodrow Wilson 



"We have faith in education as the foundation of democratic government." 

— Franklin D. Roosevelt 



u. ui- imu^HAHr 




SEPARATE CATALOGS 

At College Park 

Individual catalogs of colleges and schools of the University of 
Maryland at College Park may be obtained by addressing the Office 
of University Relations, University of Maryland, College Park, Md. 

These catalogs and schools are: 

1. General Information 

2. College of Agriculture 

3. College of Arts and Sciences 

4. College of Business and Public Administration 

5. College of Education 

6. College of Engineering 

7. College of Home Economics 

8. College of Military Science 

9. College of Physical Education, Recreation and Health 

10. College of Special and Continuation Studies 

11. Summer School 

12. Graduate School 

At Baltimore 

Individual catalogs for the professional schools of the University 
of Maryland may be obtained by addressing the Deans of the respec- 
tive schools at the University of Maryland, Lombard and Greene 
Streets, Baltimore 1, Maryland. The professional schools are: 

13. School of Dentistry 

14. School of Law 

15. School of Medicine 

16. School of Pharmacy 

17. School of Nursing 

At Heidelberg 

The catalog of the European Program may be obtained by address- 
ing the Dean, College of Special and Continuation Studies, College 
Park, Maryland.