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Full text of "The Summer School"

UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 



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The provisions of this 'publication are not to he regarded 
as an irrevocable contract between the student and the 
University of Maryland. The University reserves the 
right to change any provision or requirement at any time 
within the student's term, of residence. The University 
further reserves the right at any time, to ask a student 
to withdraw when it considers such action to be in the 
best interests of the University. 



SEE OUTSIDE BACK COVER FOR LIST OF OTHER CATALOGS 



SUMMER SCHOOL 



Catalog Series 19584959 




UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 



VOLUME 11 



FEBRUARY 14, 1958 



NO. 13 



A University of Maryland publication is published twelve times in January; three 
times in February; once in March and April; three times in May; twice in June; once 
in July and August; twice in September and October; three times in November; and 

once in December. 

Re-entered at the Post 0£Bce in College Park, Maryland, as second class mail matter 
under the Act of Congress of August 24, 1912. 



Digitized by the Internet Archive 

in 2010 with funding from 

Lyrasis IVIembers and Sloan Foundation 



http://www.archive.org/details/summerschool1958univ 



CONTENTS 



GENERAL 



Board ot Regents 1 

Officers of Administration 2 

Chairmen, Standing Committees, 

Faculty Senate 5 

Faculty 6 

The School 19 

Academic Information 19 

Terms of Admission 19 

Academic Credit 19 

Marking System 20 

Normal and Maximum Loads . . 20 

Summer Graduate Work 20 

Candidates for Degrees 21 

Program in American Civilization 2 1 



General Information 22 

Registration 22 

Advanced Registration 23 

Definition of Residence and Non- 
Residence 23 

Tuition and Fees 23 

Withdrawal and Refund of Fees 24 
Living Accommodations and 

Meals 25 

Off -Campus Housing 26 

Student Health 26 

Parking of Automobiles 26 

Library Facilities 26 

University Bookstore 27 

Kindergarten 27 



CONFERENCES, INSTITUTES, WORKSHOPS, SPECIAL COURSES 
AND LECTURES 



Graduate Education for High 
School Teachers of Science and 
Mathematics 28 

Lecture Series on Problems and 
Trends in Contemporary Ameri- 
can Education 28 

TypewTiting Demonstration for 
Business Education Teachers 

Typewriting Demonstration 
Class 

High School Choral Workshop 

Curriculum Workshop for 
Educable and Trainable 
Mentally Retarded Children 

Workshop on Use of 

Community Resources 30 

Six-Week Human Development 
Workshop 31 



29 

29 
29 



30 



Child Study Leaders Workshop. . 31 

Administrators Conference on 

Implications 31 

Application of Human Develop- 
ment Principles in Classrooms 
Workshop 32 

Education in Family Finance 

\'\^orkshop 32 

Aviation Education Curriculum 

Workshop 33 

Workshop on Teaching Conser\-a- 
tion of Natural Resources .... 33 

Parent-Teacher Association 

Summer Conference 34 

Institute of Acarology 34 

National Science Foundation Sum- 
mer Institute for Teachers of 
Science 34 



(^Continued on next page^ 



CONTENTS 



COURSE OFFERINGS 



Agricultural Economics and 

Marketing 36 

Agricultural Education and 

Rural Life 36 

Agronomy 38 

Animal Husbandry 38 

Botany 39 

Business Organization and 

Administration 39 

Chemistry 40 

Classical Languages and 

Literatures 41 

Dairy 42 

Economics 42 

Education 43 

Engineering 55 

English 56 

Entomology 57 

Foreign Languages 57 



Geography 58 

Government and Politics 58 

History 59 

Home Economics 61 

Horticulture 61 

Journalism and Public 

Relations 62 

Library Science 62 

Mathematics 62 

Microbiology 65 

Music 65 

Physical Education, Recreation 

and Health 66 

Physics 68 

Poultry 69 

Psychology 69 

Sociology 70 

Speech and Dramatic Art 71 

Zoology 72 



Photographs of several of the College's activities and a map of the campus 
are located in the center of the catalog. Use running headlines located at 
the top of each page as an additional aid in locating subject information. 



UNIVERSITY CALENDAR 

FALL SEMESTER 1958 
SEPTEMBER 1958 

15-19 Monday to Friday— Fall Semester Registration 

22 Monday— Instruction Begins 
NOVEMBER 

26 Wednesday— Thanksgiving Recess Begins After Last Class 

DECEMBER 

1 Monday— Thanksgiving Recess Ends 8 a.m. 

20 Saturday— Christmas Recess Begins After Last Class 

JANUARY 1959 

5 Monday— Christmas Recess Ends 8 a.m. 

21 Wednesday— Pre-Examination Study Day 

22-28 Thursday to Wednesday— First Semester Examinations 

SPRING SEMESTER 1959 

FEBRUARY 1959 

2-6 Monday to Friday— Spring Semester Registration 
9 Monday— Instruction Begins 

23 Monday— Washington's Birthday Holiday 

MARCH 

25 Wednesday— Maryland Day 

26 Thursday— Easter Recess Begins After Last Class 
31 Tuesday— Easter Recess Ends 8 a.m. 

MAY 

1 4 Thursday— Military Day 

28 Thursday— Pre-Examination Study Day 

T n p 5 f Friday ^o Friday— Second Semester Examinations 

JUNE 

6 Saturday— Commencement Exercises 

SUMMER SESSION 1959 

JUNE 1959 

22 Monday— Summer Session Registration 

23 Tuesday— Summer Session Begins 
JULY 

31 Friday— Summer Session Ends 

SHORT COURSES 1959 
JUNE 1959 

15-20 Monday to Saturday— Rural Women's Short Course 
AUGUST 

3-8 Monday to Saturday— 4-H Club Week 
SEPTEMBER 

8-11 Tuesday to Friday— Firemen's Short Course 



SUMMER SCHOOL REGISTRATION SCHEDULE 
AND CALENDAR 



Advanced Registration Schedule for Students in Education 



(By appointment only) 

May 1 through May 24-9:00 A.M.- 2:30 P.M., Mondays through Fridays 

9:00 A.M.-11:00 A.M., Saturdays 



Registration Schedule for New Graduate Students 



Friday, June 20* 



9:00 A.M. 



S-Z 



10:00 A.M. 



L-R 



11:00 A.M. 



1:00 P.M. 



F-K 



A-E 



Registratio^i Schedule for Undergraduate Students and 
Returning Graduate Students 



Date 



Time 



Students 



Time 



Students 



Monday, June 23 



8:30 A.M. 
9:30 A.M. , 
10:30 A.M. 1 


T- 
P- 
L- 


-Z 

-s 

-O 


12:30 P.M. 
1:30 P.M. 
2:30 P.M. 


G-K 
D-F 
A-C 



To expedite registration, students have heen put into groups on the hasis 

of the first letter of the last name. All students should register according 

to the above schedule. 



June 24, Tuesday Classes begin. 

June 28, Saturday Classes as usual, Monday schedule. 

July 4, Friday Holiday. 

August 1, Friday Close of Summer Session. 



Dormitories will not be open for occupancy until 2:00 P. M. on Sunday, June 22. 



BOARD OF REGENTS 

and 
MARYLAND STATE BOARD OF AGRICULTURE 

Term 
Expires 
Charles P. McCormick 

Chairvtaii 1966 

McCormick and Company, 414 Light Street, Baltimore 2 

Edward F. Holter 

Vice-Chairman 1959 

The National Grange, 744 Jackson Place, N.W., Washington 6 

B. Herbert Brown 

Secretary I960 

The Baltimore Institute, 12 West Madison Street, Baltimore 1 

Harry H. Nuttle 

Treasurer 1966 

Denton 

Louis L. Kaplan 

Assistant Secretary 1961 

1201 Eutaw Place, Baltimore 17 

Edmund S. Burke 

Assistant Treasurer 1959 

Kelly- Springfield Tire Company, Cumberland 

Alvin L. Aubinoe 1958 

8000 Overhill Road, Bethesda 

Thomas W. Pangborn 1965 

The Pangborn Corporation, Pangborn Blvd., Hagerstown 

Ends S. Stockbridge I960 

10 Light Street, Baltimore 2 

Thomas B. Symons 1963 

Suburban Trust Company, 6950 Carroll Avenue, Takoma Park 

C. Ewing Tuttle 1962 

907 Latrobe Building, Charles and Read Streets, Baltimore 2 



Members of the Board are appointed by the Governor of the State for terms of nine 
years each, beginning the first Monday in June. 

The President of the University of Maryland is, by law, Executive Officer of the 
Board. 

The State law provides that the Board of Regents of the University of Maryland 
shall constitute the Maryland State Board of Agriculture. 



OFFICERS OF ADMINISTRATION 

WILSON H. ELKiNS, President 

B.A., University of Texas, 1932; m.a., 1932; b.litt., Oxford University, 1936; 
D.PHIL., 1936. 

ALBiN o. KUHN, Exectitix'e Vice President 

B.S., University of Maryland, 1938; M.S., 1939; ph.d., 1948. 

ALViN E. CORMENY, Assistant to the President, in Charge of Endowment and 
Development 

B.A., Illinois College, 1933; ll.b., Cornell University, 1936. 

R. LEE HORNBAKE, Dean of the Faculty 

B.S., State Teachers College, California, Pa., 1934; m.a., Ohio State University, 1936; 
PH.D., 1942. 

Emeriti 

HARRY c. BYRD, President Emeritus 

B.S., University of Maryland, 1908; ll.d., Washington College, 1936; ll.d., Dickin- 
son College, 1938; d.sc, Western Maryland College, 1938. 

HAROLD P. coTTERMAN, Dea7i of the Eaculty, Emeritus 

B.S., Ohio State University, 1916; m.a., Columbia University, 1917; ph.d., American 
University, 1930. 

Administrative Officers of the Schools and Colleges 

MYRON s. AisENBERG, Dean of the School of Dentistry 
D.D.S., University of Maryland, 1922. 

VERNON E. ANDERSON, Dean of the College of Education 

B.S., University of Minnesota, 1930; m.a., 1936; ph.d.. University of Colorado, 1942. 

RONALD bamford. Dean of the Graduate School 

B.S., University of Connecticut, 1924; m.s.. University of Vermont, 1926; ph.d., 
Columbia University, 1931. 

CLIFFORD G. BLiTCH, Director of the University Hospital 
M.D., Vanderbilt University Medical School, 1928. 

GORDON M. CAIRNS, Dean of Agriculture 

B.S., Cornell University, 1936; m.s., 1938; ph.d., 1940. 

RAY w. ehrensberger. Dean of the College of Special and Continuation Studies 
B.A., Wabash College, 1929; m.a., Butler University, 1930; ph.d., Syracuse Uni- 
versity, 1937. 

NOEL E. Foss, Dean of the School of Pharmacy 

ph.c. South Dakota State College, 1929; b.s., 1929; m.s.. University of Marj'land, 

1932; PH.D., 1933. 
LESTER M. FRALEY, Dean of the College of Physical Education, Recreation, and 

Health 

B.A., Randolph-Macon College, 1928; m.a., 1937; ph.d., Peabody College, 1939. 



FLORENCE M. GiPE, Dean of the School of Nursing 

B.S., Catholic University of America, 1937; m.s.. University of Pennsylvania, 1940; 
ED.D., University of Marj'land, 1952. 

IRVIN c. HAiiT, Director, Agricultural Experiment Station and Head, Defortment 
of Horticulture 

B.S., University of Idaho, 1928; M.S., State College of Washington, 1930; ph.d., 

University of Mar^'land, 1933. 

ROGER HOWELL, Dean of the School of Law 

B.A., Johns Hopkins University, 1914; ph.d., 1917; ll.b.. University of Marj'land, 
1917. 

wiLBERT J. HUFF, Director, Engineering Experiineiit Statio7i and Chairman of 

the Division of Physical Sciences 

B.A., Ohio Northern University, 1911; b.a., Yale College, 1914; ph.d., Yale Uni- 
versity, 1917; D.sc. (hon.)> Ohio Northern University, 1927. 

FLORANCB B. KING, Acting Dean of the College of Home Economics 

B.S., University of Illinois, 1914; m.a.. University of California, 1926; ph.d.. Uni- 
versity of Indiana, 1929. 

FREDERIC T. MAVIS, Dean of the College of Engineering 

B.S., University of Illinois, 1922; M.S., 1926; c.e., 1932; ph.d., 1935. 

PAUL E. NTSTROM, Director, Agricultural Eoctension Service 

B.S., University of California, 1928; M.S., University of Maryland, 1931; m.p.a., 
Har\'ard University, 1948; d.p.a., 1951. 

J. FREEMAN PYLE, Dean of the College of Business and Public Administration 
PH.B., University of Chicago, 1917; m.a., 1918; ph.d., 1925. 

JAA^IES REGAN, JR., Acting Dean of the College of Military Science 
Colonel, United States Army, Retired. 

LEON p. s\UTH, Dean of the College of Arts and Sciences 

B.A., Emory University, 1919; m.a.. University of Chicago, 1928; ph.d., 1930; 
Diplome le I'lnstitut de Touiaine, 1932. 

wiLLLAM s. STONE, Dcan of the School of Medicine and Director of Medical 
Education and Research 

B.S., University of Idaho, 1924; M.S., 1925; m.d.. University of Lx)uisville, 1929; 

PH.D., (hdn.), University of Louisville, 1946. 

General Administrative Officers 

G. WATSON ALGLRE, Director of Admissions and Registrations 
B.A., University of Maryland, 1930; m.s., 1931. 

NORMA J. AZLEEM, Registrar 

B.A., University of Chicago, 1940. 

BALDWIN J. BORRESON, Exccutive Dean of Stiident Life 
B.A., University of Minnesota, 1944. 

3 ► 



DAVID L. BRiGHAM, Ahim7ti Secretary 
B.A., University of Maryland, 1938. 

c. WILBUR cissEL, Director of Finance and Business 

B.A., University of Maryland, 1932; m.a., 1934; c.p.a., 1939. 

WILLIAM w. COBEY, Director of Athletics 
A.B., University of Maryland, 1930. 

LESTER M. DYKE, Director of the Student Health Service 

B.A., University of Iowa, 1936; m.a., (iion.), Oxford University, Oxford, 1945; 
M.D., University of Iowa, 1926. 

GEARY F. EPPLEY, Director of Student Welfare and Dean of Men 
B.S., Maryland State College, 1920; m.s.. University of Maryland, 1926. 

GEORGE w. FOGG, Director of Personnel 

B.A., University of Maryland, 1926; m.a., 1928. 

ROBERT B. KENDiG, Professor of Air Science and Head, Department of Air Science, 
Colonel, United States Air Force 

A.B., William and Mary College, 1939. 

ROBERT J. MCCARTNEY, Director of University Relatio7is 
B.A., University of Massachusetts, 1941. 

GEORGE w. MORRISON, Associate Director and Supervising Engineer Physical 
Plant (Baltimore') 

B.S., University of Maryland, 1927; e.e., 1931. 

HOWARD ROVELSTAD, Director of Libraries 

B.A., University of Illinois, 1936; m.a., 1937; b.s.l.s., Columbia University, 1940. 

ADELE H. STAMP, Dean of Women 

B.A., Tulane University, 1921; m.a. University of Mar)'land, 1924. 

GEORGE o. WEBER, Director and Supervising Engineer, Department of Physical 
Plant 

B.S., University of Maryland, 1933. 

Division Chairmen 

JOHN E. FABER, JR., Chairman of the Divisioyi of Biological Sciences 
B.S., University of Maryland, 1926; m.s., 1927; ph.d., 1937. 

HAROLD c. hofsommer, Chairman of the Division of Social Sciences 

B.S., Northwestern University, 1921; m.a., 1923; ph.d., Cornell University, 1929. 

wiLBERT J. HUFF, Chairman of the Division of Physical Sciences 

B.A., Ohio Northern University, 1911; b.a., Yale College, 1914; ph.d., Yale Uni- 
versit)', 1917; d.sc, (hon.), Ohio Northern University, 1927. 

CHARLES E. WHITE, Chairman of the Lower Division 

B.S., University of Maryland, 1923; M.S., 1924; ph.d., 1926. 

ADOLF E. ZUCKER, Chairman of the Division of Humanities 

B.A., University of Illinois, 1912; m.a., 1913; ph.d.. University of Pennsylvania, 1917. 



CHAIRiMEN, STANDING COMMITTEES, FACULTY SENATE' 

GENERAL COMMITTEE ON EDUCATIONAL POLICY 

Prof. Russell B. Allen (Engineering), Chairman 

COMMITTEE ON ADMISSIONS 

Dr. Charles Manning (Arts and Sciences), Chairman 

COMMITTEE ON INSTRUCTIONAL PROCEDURES 

Dr. R. Lee Ilornbake (Dean of Faculty), Chairman 

COMMITTEE ON SCHEDULING AND REGISTRATION 

Dr. Charles White (Arts and Sciences), Chairman 

COMMITTEE ON PROGRAMS, CURRICULA AND COURSES 

Dr. Peter Lejins (Arts and Sciences), Chairman 

COMMITTEE ON SCHOLARSHIPS AND GRANTS-IN-AID 

Dr. Paul R. Poffenberger (Agriculture), Chairman 

COMMITTEE ON FACULTY RESEARCH 

Dr. John S. Toll (Arts and Sciences), Chairman 

COMMITTEE ON PUBLIC FUNCTIONS AND COMMENCEMENTS 

Dr. Leon P. Smith (Arts and Sciences), Chairman 

COMMITTEE ON LIBRARIES 

Dr. Lucius Garvin (Arts and Sciences), Chairman 

COMMITTEE ON UNIVERSITY PUBLICATIONS 

Dr. Charles D. Murphy (Arts and Sciences), Chairman 

COMMITTEE ON STUDENT LIFE AND ACTIVITIES 

Prof. Russell B. Allen (Engineering), Chairman 

COMMITTEE ON STUDENT PUBLICATIONS AND COMMUNICATIONS 

Dr. John H. Frederick (Business and Public Administration), Chairman 

COMMITTEE ON STUDENT DISCIPLINE 

Prof. Warren L. Strausbaugh (Arts and Sciences), Chairman 

COMMITTEE ON RELIGIOUS LIFE 

Dr. Stanley Jackson (Arts and Sciences), Chairman 

COMMITTEE ON STUDENT HEALTH AND WELFARE 

Dr. William E. Bickley (Agriculture), Chairman 

COMMITTEE ON STUDENT EMPLOYMENT AND SELF-HELP 

Dr. John E. Foster (Agriculture), Chairman 

COMMITTEE ON INTERCOLLEGIATE COMPETITION 

Dr. Irvin C. Haut (Agriculture), Chairman 

COMMITTEE ON PROFESSIONAL ETHICS, ACADEMIC FREEDOM AND TENURE 

Dr. Carroll E. Cox (Agriculture), Chairman 

COMMITTEE ON APPOINTMENTS, PROMOTIONS AND SALARIES 

Dr. Monroe H. Martin (Institute of Fluid Dynamics), Chairman 

COMMITTEE ON FACULTY LIFE AND WELFARE 

Prof. Homer Ulrich (Arts and Sciences), Chairman 

COMMITTEE ON MEMBERSHIP AND REPRESENTATION 

Prof. Russell R. Reno (Law), Chairman 
'EfFective October 29, 1957. 

5 ► 



THE FACULTY 

SUMMER SESSION, 1958 
JUNE 23 - AUGUST 1 

Dr. Vernon E. Anderson, Director 
Dr. Orval L. Ulry, Assistant Director 

GRACE L. ADAMS, Assistant Professor of Education, Institute for Child Study 
B.S., University of Southern California, 1940; M.S., 1956. 

ARTHUR M. AHALT, Profcssor and Head, Department of Agricultural Education 
B.S., University of Maryland, 1931; m.s., Pennsylvania State College, 1937. 

ALBERT L. ALFORD, Assistant Professor of Government and Politics 

B.A., University of Akron, 1948; m.a., Princeton University, 1951; ph.d., 1953. 

GEORGE ANASTOS, Associatc ProfessoT of Zoology 
B.S., University of Akron, 1942; ri.a.. Harvard University, 1947; ph.d., 1949. 

FRANK G. ANDERSON, Assistant Professor of Sociology 
B.A., Cornell University, 1941; ph.d.. University of New Mexico, 1951. 

PHILIP E. ARSENAULT, Instructor of Foreign Languages 

B.A., Clark University, 1936; m.a., Princeton University, 1951. 

WILLIAM T. AVERY, Professor and Head, Department of Classical Languages and 
Literatures 

B.A., Western Reserve University, 1934; m.a., 1935; ph.d., 1937. Fellow of the 

American Academy in Rome, 1937-39. 

THOMAS J. AYLWARD, Instructor of Speech and Dramatic Arts 
B.S., University of Wisconsin, 1947; m.s., 1949. 

EDWARD w. BAKER, Entomologist, Burcau of Entomology and Plant Quarantine, 
U.S. Department of Agriculture. Visiting Lecturer in Zoology 
B.S., University of California, 1936; ph.d., 1938. 

WHITNEY K. BATES, Instructor in History 

B.A., University of Washington, 1941; m.a.. University of Wisconsin, 1948; ph.d., 
1951. 

EARL s. BEARD, Assistant Professor of History 

B.A., Baylor University, 1948; m.a.. State University of Iowa, 1950; ph.d., 1953. 

E. PAUL BENOiT, Chief Psychologist, Governor Bacon Health Center, Delaware 
City, Delaware. Visiting Lecturer in Education 
PH.D., University of Connecticut, 1955. 



GEORGE R. BLAKLEY, Assistatit InstTiictor in Mathematics 
B.A., Georgetown University, 1954. 

GLENN o. BLOUGH, Associote ProfessoT of Education 

B.A., University of Michigan, 1929; m.a., 1932; ll.d., Central Michigan College 
of Education, 1950. 

B. LUCILLE BOWIE, Assistant Professor of Edtication, Institute for Child Study 
B.S., University of Maryland, 1942; m.a.. Teachers College, Columbia University, 
1946; ED.D., University of Maryland, 1957. 

RICHARD M. BRANDT, Associatc ProfcssoT of Edtication, Institute for Child 
Study 

B.M.E., University of Virginia, 1943; m.a.. University of Michigan, 1949; ed.d.. 

University of Maryland, 1954. 

GERALD s. BRiNTON, Chairman, Social Studies Defartmeni, New Cumberland 
Joint School System, New Cumberland, Pennsylvania. Visiting Lecturer in 
Education 

B.S., State Teachers College, Shippenburg, Pennsylvania, 1940; m.a.. University 

of Maryland, 1951. 

ELEANOR A. BROOME, Instructor in Childhood Education 
B.A., University of Maryland, 1943; m.ed., 1957. 

JOSHUA R. c. BROWN, Associate Professor of Zoology 
B.A., Duke University, 1948; m.a., 1949; ph.d., 1953. 

RUSSELL G. BROWN, Associate Professor of Botany 

B.S., West Virginia University, 1929; M.S., 1930; ph.d.. University of Maryland, 1934. 

RAY B. BROWNE, Instructor in English 

B.A., University of Alabama, 1943; m.a., Columbia University, 1947; ph.d.. Uni- 
versity of California at Los Angeles, 1956. 

MARIE D. BRYAN, Associate Professor of Education 

B.A., Goucher College, 1923; m.a.. University of Maryland, 1945. 

EUNICE E. BURDETTE, Sufcrvisor of Elementary Schools, Prince Georges County, 

Maryland. Visiting Lecturer in Education 

B.S., University of Maryland, 1937; m.ed., 1947. 

JAMES BYRD, Instructor in Speech and Dramatic Arts 
B.A., University of North Carohna, 1948; m.a., 1949. 

RICHARD H. BYRNE, ProfessoT of Education 

B.A., Franklin and Marshall College, 1938; m.a., 1947; ed.d., Columbia University, 
1952. 

CHARLES E. CALHOUN, Profcssor of Finance 

B.A., University of Washington, 1925; m.b.a., 1930. 

JOSEPH H. CAMiN, Visiting Lecturer in Zoology 

B.S., Ohio State University, 1946; m.s., 1947; ph.d., 1949. 

7 ► 



MARjORiE H. CAMPBELL, Instructor in Science Education, Teacher's College, 
District of Columbia. Visiting Lecturer in Education 
B.S., University of Maryland, 1938; m.a., 1940. 

JOHN T. CARRUTHERS, Assistant Professor of Chemistry 

ELISABETH N. COLLINS, Instructor in Institution Management 
B.A., Pembroke College, 1921; m.s., Simmons College, 1947. 

GERALD F. COMBS, Professor of Poultry Husbandry 

B.S., University of Illinois, 1940; ph.d., Cornell University, 1948. 

SARA E. CONLON, Instructor in Speech and Dramatic Arts 

B.A., University of Maryland, 1947; m.a.. State University of Iowa, 1950. 

CHARLES E. COOPER, Director of Guidance Services, State Department of Educa- 
tion, Jefferson City, Missouri. Visiting Lecturer in Education 

B.S., Central Missouri State College, 1942; m.ed., University of Missouri, 1948; 

ED.D., 1953. 

CARROLL E. COX, Ptofessor of Botany 

B.A., University of Delaware, 1938; M.S., Virginia Polytechnic Institute, 1940; 
PH.D., University of Maryland, 1943. 

DOROTHY D. CRAVEN, Instructor in Speech 

B.S., (Education), Southeast Missouri State Teachers College, 1945; m.a.. Uni- 
versity of Iowa, 1948. 

FRANK H. CRONiN, Associute Professor of Physical Education; Head Golf Coach 
B.S., University of Maryland, 1946. 

ALFRED A. CROWELL, Professor and Head, Department of Journalism and Public 
Relations 

A.B., University of Oklahoma, 1929; M.s.j., Northwestern, 1940. 

VIENNA cuRTiss, Profcssor and Head, Department of Practical Art 

B.A., Arizona State College, 1933; m.a., Columbia University, 1935; ed.d., 1957. 

RICHARD F. DAVIS, Associate Professor and Head, Department of Dairy 

B.S., University of New Hampshire, 1950; M.S., 1952; ph.d., Cornell University, 1953. 

TOWNES L. DAWSON, Associate Professor of Business Law 

B.B.A., University of Texas, 1943; b.s., U. S. Merchant Marine Academy, 1946; 
M.B.A., University of Texas, 1947; ph.d., 1950; ll.b., 1954. 

MARIE DENECKE, Instructor in Education 

B.A., Columbia University, 1938; m.a., University of Maryland, 1942. 

GEORGE w. DENEMARK, Profcssor of Education and Assistant Dean 

B.A., University of Chicago, 1943; m.a., 1948; m.ed.. University of Illinois, 1950; 
ED.D., 1956. 

CAROLYN c. DUNLAP, Director of Practice, State Teachers College, Salisbury, 
Maryland. Visiting Lecturer in Education 

B.A., Western Maryland College, 1939; m.a.. University of Maryland, 1950; 

ED.D., 1954. 



THOMAS H. DYER, ItistTiictor in Mathematics 
B.S., U. S. Naval Academy, 1924. 

CHARLES B. EDELSON, Assistant Professor in Accounting 

B.B.A., University of New Mexico, 1949; m.b.a., Indiana University, 1950; c.p.a.. 
University of Maryland, 1951. 

GERTRUDE EHRLiCH, Assistant Professor of Mathematics 

B.S., Georgia State College for Women, 1943; m.a.. University of North Carolina, 
1945; PH.D., University of Tennessee, 1953. 

EMORY G. EVANS, InstructOT in History 

B.A., Randolph-Macon College, 1950; m.a., University of Virginia, 1954; ph.d., 
1957. 

MARVIN H. EYLER, Associate Professor of Physical Education 

B.A., Houghton College, 1942; M.S., University of Illinois, 1948; ph.d., 1956. 

JOHN E. FABER, Profcssor and Head, Microhiology 

B.S., University of Marj'Iand, 1926; m.s., 1927; ph.d., 1937. 

B. JAMES FERGUSON, Assistant Professor of History 

B.A., University of Washington, 1939; m.a., 1941; ph.d.. University of Wisconsin, 
1951. 

BERNARD FUSARO, Instructor in Mathematics 

B.A., Svvarthmore College, 1950; m.a., Columbia University, 1954. 

HUGH G. GAUCH, ProfessoT of Plant Physiology 

B.S., Miami Universitv, 1935; M.S., Kansas State College, 1937; ph.d.. University 
of Chicago, 1939. 

DuacHT L. GENTRY, Associate Professor of Marketing 

B.A., Elon College, 1941; m.b.a., Northwestern University, 1947; ph.d.. University 
of Illinois, 1952. 

GUY w. GiENGER, Associatc Profcssor of Agricidtiiral Engineering 
B.S., University' of Marj'land, 1933; M.S., 1936. 

JACOB D. GOERiNG, Instructor in Edtication, Institute for Child Study 
B.A., Bethel College, 1941; b.d., Bethany Seminary, 1949. 

RICHARD A. GOOD, Associatc Profcssor of Mathematics 

B.A., Ashland College, 1939; m.a.. University of Wisconsin, 1940; ph.d., 1945. 

PvALPh GOODWIN, ProfcssoT and Head of Physics, U. S. Naval Academy, Annap- 
olis, Maryland. Visiting Lecturer in Physics 

B.A., Simpson College, 1935; M.S., Iowa State College, 1937; ph.d., 1939. 

DONALD c. GORDON, Associate Profcssor of History 

B.A., College of William and Mar)', 1925; m.a., Colimibia Teachers College; ph.d., 
Columbia University, 1947. 

9 ► 



JEAN D. GRAMBS, Swpervisor of Adult Education, Prince Georges County, Mary- 
land. Visiting Lecturer in Education 

B.A., Reed College, 1940; m.a., Stanford University, 1941; ed.d., 1948. 

WILLIAM HENRY GRAVELY, JR., Associate Professor of English 

B.A., College of William and Mary, 1925; m.a., University of Virginia, 1934; 
PH.D., 1953. 

SIDNEY GROLLMAN, Assistant Professor of Zoology 

B.S., University of Maryland, 1947; M.S., 1949; ph.d., 1952. 

ALLEN G. GRUCHY, Profcssor of EcoHomics 

B.A., University of British Columbia, 1926; m.a., McGill University, 1928; PH.D., 
University of Virginia, 1931. 

RAYMOND J. HANKS, Instructor in History 
B.A., University of Chicago, 1948; m.a., 1949. 

NORRis G. HARiNG, Lccturcr and Coordinator of Special Education Programs 
B.A., Nebraska State Teachers College, 1948; m.a.. University of Nebraska, 1950; 
ED.D., Syracuse University, 1956. 

PAUL E. HARRISON, JR., Associate Profcssor of Industrial Education 

B.ED., Northern Dlinois State Teachers College, DeKalb, 1942; m.a., Colorado 
State College of Education, Greeley, 1947; ph.d., University of Maryland, 1955. 

GUY B. HATHORN, Assistant Professor of Government and Politics 

B.A., University of Mississippi, 1940; m.a., 1942; ph.d., Duke University, 1950. 

IRVIN c. HAUT, Director of Experiment Station and Professor and Head of 
Horticulture 

B.S., University of Idaho, 1928; M.S., State College of Washington, 1930; ph.d.. 

University of Maryland, 1933. 

ELIZABETH E. HAviLAND, Assistant Professor of Entomology 

B.A., Wilmington (Ohio) College, 1923; m.a., Cornell University, 1926; M.S., 
University of Maryland, 1936; ph.d., 1945. 

HUBERT p. HENDERSON, Assistant Professor of Music and Director of University 
Bands 

B.A., University of North Carolina, 1941; m.a., 1950. 

RICHARD HENDRICKS, Associatc Profcssor of Speech 

B.A., FrankHn College, 1937; m.a., Ohio State University, 1939; PH.D., 1956. 

HAROLD J. HERMAN, Instructor in English 
B.A., University of Maryland, 1952. 



^ 10 



RICHARD HiGHTON, Assistant Professor of Zoology 

B.A., New York University, 1950; M.S., University of Florida, 1953; PH.D., 1956, 

JAMES HILL, Assistant InstriictoT in Mathematics 

B.B.A., University of Miami, 1949; m.a.. University of Maryland, 1955. 

MARGARET HiLLis, Director of the American Choral Foundation and Conductor 
of the American Coyicert Choir, New York City; Choral Director, Chicago 
Symphony Orchestra. Visiting Lecturer in Music. 

B.MUS., Indiana University, 1947; graduate work, Juilliard School of Music, 1947-49. 

ROBERT K. HiRZEL, Instructor in Sociology 
1950; PH.D., Louisiana State University, 1954. 

STANLEY M. HOLBERG, histructor in English 
B.S., University of Buffalo, 1941; m.a., 1951. 

H. PALMER HOPKINS, Assistant Professor of Agricultural Education 

B.S., Oklahoma A. & M. College, 1936; m.ed.. University of Maryland, 1948. 

WILLIAM F. HORNY AK, Associate Professor of Physics 

B.E.E., City College of New York, 1944; m.s., California Institute of Technology, 
1945; PH.D., 1949. 

KENNETH o. HOVET, Professor of Education 

B.A., St. Olaf College, 1926; pu.d.. University of Minnesota, 1950. 

ERRETT HUMMEL, Professor of Education, Assistant to the President, Portland 
QOregoti^ State College. Visiting Lecturer in Education 

B.A., PaciHc University, 1933; m.a.. University of Oregon, 1938; ed.d., 1951. 

JAMES H. HUMPHREY, Professor of Physical Education and Health 

B.A., Denison University, 1933; m.a.. Western Reserve University, 1946; ed.d., 
Boston University, 1951. 

BURRis F. HUSMAN, Associatc Professor of Physical Education 

B.S., University of Illinois, 1941; M.S., 1948; ed.d., University of Maryland, 1954. 

RICHARD w. ISKRAUT, Associatc ProfcssoT of Physics 

B.S., CoUege of the City of New York, 1937; ph.d., Leipzig University, 1941. 

STANLEY B. JACKSON, Professor and Head, Department of Mathematics 
B.A., Bates College, 1933; m.a., Ilanard University, 1934; ph.d., 1937. 

ECKHART A. jACOBSEN, Associate Professor of Industrial Education 

Oswego State Teachers College, New York, 1937; M.S., Cornell University, 1946; 
University of Connecticut, 1957. 
PH.D., Universit)- of Connecticut, 1957. 

RICHARD H. jAQuiTH, Assistant Professor of Chemistry 

B.S., University of Massachusetts, 1940; m.s., 1942; ph.d., Michigan State Uni- 
versity, 1955. 

II ► 



RODERICK H. JELLEMA, InstuictOT in English 
B.A., Cahin College, 1951. 

WILLIAM R. JENKINS, Assistant Professor of Plant Pathology 

B.S., College of William and Mary, 1950; M.S., University of Virginia, 1952; ph.d., 
University of Mar^'land, 1954. 

JOSEPH B. JOHNSON, Administrative Assista^it to the Superintendent, Arlington 
County (Virginia') Public Schools. Visiting Lecturer in Education 

M.A., East Texas State College, 1941; ed.d., George Washington University, 1946. 

WARREN R. JOHNSON, Profcssor of Health Education and Physical Education 
B.A., University of Denver, 1942; m.a., 1947; ed.d., Boston University, 1950. 

H. BRYCB JORDAN, Associate Professor of Music 

B.MUs., University' of Texas, 1948; m.mus., 1949; ph.d.. University of North 
Carolina, 1956. 

MERViN L. KEEDY, Associate Director of the Junior High School Mathematics Stiidy 
B.S., University of Chicago, 1946; m.a., University of Nebraska, 1950; ph.d., 1957. 

ROBERT c. KLINE, JR., Assistant Instructor in Mathematics 
B.S., Moravian College, 1955. 

BENJAMIN Y. c. Koo, Assistant Instructor in Mathematics 

B.A., Princeton University, 1951; m.a.. University of Marj'land, 1954. 

CHARLES F. KRAMER, Associatc Professor of Foreign Languages 
PH.B., Dickinson College, 1911; m.a., 1912. 

ROBERT w. KRAUSS, Associatc Professor of Botany 

B.A., Oberlin College, 1947; m.s.. University of Hawaii, 1949; ph.d., University 
of Maryland, 1951. 

JOHN J. KURTZ, Professor of Education, Institute for Child Study 

B.A., University of Wisconsin, 1935; m.a., Northwestern University, 1940; ph.d., 
University of Chicago, 1947. 

DOROTHEA E. LAADT, Instructor in Childhood Education 
B.E., National College of Education, 1956. 

NORMAN c. LAFFER, Associate Professor of Microbiology 

B.S., Allegheny College, 1929; M.S., University of Maine, 1932; ph.d.. University 
of Illinois, 1937. 

HOWARD J. LASTER, Assistant Professor of Physics 

A.B., Harvard College, 1951; ph.d., Cornell University, 1957. 

LEROY L. LEE, Assistant Professor of Accounting 

C.P.A., University of Maryland, 1949; a.m., George Washington University, 1952. 

JOSEPH LEESE, Professor of Education, New York State College for Teachers, 
Albany; Visiting Lecturer in Education 

B.A., State University of New York, 1939; m.a., Columbia University, 1942; ph.d.. 

Teachers College, Columbia, 1943. 

-< 12 



PETER P. LEjiNS, Pwfessor of Sociology 

Magister PhiJosophiae, University of Latvia, 1930; Magister luris, 1933; ph.d.. 
University of Chicago, 1938. 

LEO R. LEMAiRE, Instructor in Foreign Languages 
B.A., Frankfun, 1926. 

JOHN LEMBACH, Associate Pvofessor of Art and Art Education 

B.A., University of Chicago, 1934; m.a., Northwestern University, 1937; ed.d., 
Columbia University, 1946. 

MARY REA LEWIS, Visiting Lecttirer in Ediication 

B.S., Teachers College, Coliunbia University, 1929; m.a., 1933. 

BERNARD J. LONSDALE, Consultant in Elementary Education, California State 
Depart^neyit of Educatioyi. Visiting Lecturer in Education 

A.B., University of Southern California, 1936; m.a., 1937; ed.d., University of 

California, Berkeley, 1949. 

LEONARD I. LUTWACK, Assistant Professor of English 

B.A., Wesleyan University, 1939; m.a., 1940; PH.D., Ohio State University, 1950. 

THOMAS m. magoon. Assistant Professor of Psychology and Assistant Director, 
University Counseling Center 

B.A., Dartmouth CoUege, 1947; m.a., University of Minnesota, 1951; ph.d., 1954. 

DONALD maley, Professor and Head of Industrial Education 

B.S., State Teachers College, California, Pennsylvania, 1943; m.a., University of 
Maryland, 1947; ph.d., 1950. 

jerry b. MARION, Assistant Professor of Physics 

B.A., Reed College, 1952; m.a.. Rice University, 1953; ph.d., 1955. 

BENJAMIN H. MASSEY, Profcssor of Physical Education 

B.A., Erskine College, 1938; M.S., University of Illinois, 1947; ph.d., 1950. 

WESLEY J. MATSON, Assistant Professor of Education 

B.S., University of Minnesota, 1948; m.a.. University of California, 1954. 

RICHARD L. MATTESON, Instructor in Education, Institute for Child Study 
B.A., Kno.x College, Galesburg, Illinois, 1952; m.a.. University of Maryland, 1956. 

JOHN R. MAYOR, Part-time Professor of Education and Mathematics 

B.S., Knox College, Galesburg, Dlinois, 1928; m.a.. University of Illinois, 1929; 
PH.D., University of Wisconsin, 1933. 

NEIL m. mc ARTHUR, Assistant Professor of Geography 

B.A., University of Western Ontario, 1948; m.a., University of Michigan, 1950; 
PH.D., 1955. 

ANNIE L. MCELHENiE, Assistant Professor of Sociology 

B.A., Franklin College, 1926; b.s., Hillsdale College, 1927; University of Chicago, 
1941; Certificate Third Year, New York School of Social Work, Columbia Uni- 
versit}', 1951. 

13 ► 



WALTER s. MEASDAY, Assistant Professor of Economics 

B.A., College of William and Mary, 1945; ph.d., Massachusetts Institute of Tech- 
nology, 1955. 

HAROLD E. MEHRENS, Chief, Ciirriculuni and Editorial Division, Headquarters, 
Civil Air Patrol. Director, Aviation Education Cnrrictdum Workshop 

B.A., State Teachers College, Silver City, New Mexico, 1927; m.a., Highlands Uni- 
versity, Las Vegas, 1931; M.S., University of Southern California, 1936; ed.d., 1937. 

GEORGE R. MERRILL, Instructor in Industrial Education 
B.S., University of Maryland, 1954; m.ed., 1955. 

MADELAiNE J. MERSHON, Professor of Education, Institute for Child Study 
B.S., Drake University, 1940; m.a., University of Chicago, 1943; ph.d., 1950. 

CHARLTON G. MEYER, Instructor in Music 
B.MUS., Curtis Institute of Music, 1952. 

T. FAYE MITCHELL, Professor and Head, De'partment of Textiles and Clothing 
B.S., State Teachers College, Springfield, Missouri, 1930; m.a., Columbia Uni- 
versity, 1939. 

DELBERT T. MORGAN, Associate Professor of Botany 

B.S., Kent State University, 1940; m.a., Columbia University, 1942; ph.d., 1948. 

H. GERTHON MORGAN, Professor of Education, Institute for Child Sttidy 
B.A., Furman University, 1940; m.a.. University of Chicago, 1943; ph.d., 1946. 

CHARLES D. MURPHY, Professor and Acting Head, Department of English 
B.A., University of Wisconsin, 1929; m.a.. Harvard University, 1930; ph.d., Cornell 
University, 1940. 

BOYD L. NELSON, Assistant Professor of Statistics and Busitiess Administration. 
B.A., University of Wisconsin, 1947; m.a., 1948; ph.d., 1952. 

CLARENCE A. NEWELL, Professor of Ediicational Administration 

B.A., Hastings College, Nebraska, 1935; m.a., Columbia University, 1939; ph.d., 
1943. 

JANE H. o'neill, Instructor in Office Techniques 
E.A., University of Maryland, 1932. 

LEO w. o'neill. Associate Professor of Education 

B.A., University of Chicago, 1938; m.a.. University of Kansas City, 1953; ed.d., 
University of Colorado, 1955. 

ROBERT A. PATERSON, Instructor in Botany 

B.A., University of Nevada, 1949; m.a., Stanford University, 1951; ph.d.. Uni- 
versity of Michigan, 1957. 

ARTHUR s. PATRICK, Professor of Office Management and Business Education 
B.S., Wisconsin State College, 1931; m.a.. University of Iowa, 1940; ph.d., American 
University, 1956. 

-< 14 



BERNARD PECK, Assistant Professor of Education, Institute for Child Study 

B.A., Indiana University, 1939; m.a., Columbia University, 1941; ed.d.. University 

of Maryland, 1957. 

HUGH V. PERKINS, Profcssor of Education, Institute for Child Study 

B.A., Oberlin College, 1941; m.a., University of Chicago, 1946; ph.d., 1949; ed.d.. 
New York University, 1956. 

STANLEY s. PLiSKOFF, Instructor in Psychology 

B.A., New York University, 1951; m.a., 1953; PH.D., 1956. 

DONALD K. PUMROY, Assistant Professor of Psychology 

B.A., University of Iowa, 1949; M.S., University of Wisconsin, 1951; ph.d., Uni- 
versity of Washington, 1954. 

ERNEST F. PRATT, Professor of Chemistry 

B.A., University of Redlands, 1937; m.a., Oregon State University, 1939; m.a.. 
University of Michigan, 1941; ph.d., 1942. 

DANIEL a. prescott, Professor of Education and Director, Institute for Child 
Study 

B.S., Tufts College, 1920; m.ed., Harvard University, 1922; ed.d., 1923. 

MARGUERITE c. RAND, Assistant Professor of Voreign Languages 

B.A., Pomona College, 1919; m.a., Stanford University, 1921; ph.d.. University 
of Chicago, 1951. 

ROBERT D. RAPPLEYE, Associate Profcssor of Botany 

B.S., University of Maryland, 1941; M.S., 1947; ph.d., 1949. 

OLIVER L. RICE, Instructor in English 

B.Mus., Central College, 1943; m.a., Columbia University, 1949. 

MARjoRiE RiCHEY, Assistant Professor of Psychology 
B.A., University of Illinois, 1948; ph.d., 1952. 

PATRICK w. RIDDLEBERGR, Instructor in History 

B.A., Virginia Militarv Institute, 1939; m.a.. University of California, 1949; ph.d., 
1952. 

ROBERT G. RisiNGER, Associate ProfessoT of Education 

B.S., Ball State Teachers College, ?\Iuncie, Indiana, 1940; m.a.. University of 
Chicago, 1947; ed.d.. University of Colorado, 1955. 

HELEN A. RXVLIN, Assistant Professor of History 

B.A., Rochester University, 1949; m.a., Radcliffe College, 1950; ph.d., Lady 
Margaret College (Oxford), 1953. 

WILLIAM G. ROSEN, Assistant Professor of Mathematics 
B.S., University of Illinois, 1943; M.S., 1947; ph.d., 1954. 

ALViN w. SCHINDLER, Profcssor of Education 

B.A., Iowa State College, 1927; m.a.. University of Iowa, 1929; ph.d., 1934. 

15 ► 



JOHN F. SCHMIDT, Instructor in Sociology 

B.A., University of Chicago, 194!; m.a., 1946; ph.d., 1950. 

FERN D. SCHNEIDER, Associate ProfessoT of Education 

B.S., Nebraska Wesleyan University, 1932; m.a., George Washington University, 
1934; ED.D., Columbia University, 1940. 

PAUL w. SHANKWEiLER, Associate PtofessoT of Sociology 

PH.B., Muhlenberg University, 1919; m.a., Columbia University, 1921; ph.d.. 
University of North Carolina, 1934. 

JULIUS c. SHEPHERD, InstTUctoT in Mathematics 
B.A., East Carolina Teachers College, 1944; m.a., 1947. 

HUGH D. siSLER, Assistant Professor of Botany 

B.S., University of Maryland, 1949; M.S., 1951; ph.d., 1953. 

WILLIAM a. smith, InstriictoT in Mathematics 
B.A., Syracuse University, 1941; m.a., 1947. 

MABEL s. spencer. Assistant Professor of Home Economics Education 
B.S., West Virginia University, 1925; M.S., 1946. 

FAGUE K. SPRiNGMANN, Associatc Profcssor of Music 
B.MUS., Westminster Choir College, 1939. 

MARGARET A. STANT, Assistant Professor of Childhood Ed\ication 
B.S., University of Maryland, 1952; m.ed., 1955. 

RUEBEN G. STEiNMEYER, ProfcssoT of Government and Politics 
B.A., American University, 1929; ph.d., 1935. 

HELEN M. STEPHENS, Instructor in Home Management 
E.S., University of Kentucky, 1954. 

R. w. STRANDTMANN, Profcssor of Biology, Texas Technological College, 

Visiting Lecturer in Zoology 

B.S., Southwestern Texas Technology College, 1935; M.S., Texas Agricultural and 
Mechanical College, 1937; ph.d., Ohio State University, 1944. 

CLARA G. STRATEMEYER, Elementary Supervisor, Montgomery County Schools, 
Maryland. Visiting hecturer in Education 

B.S., Teachers College, Columbia University, 1928; m.a., 1929; ph.d., 1936. 

WARREN L. STRAUSBAUGH, Assodute PtofessoT and Head, Department of Speech 

and Dramatic Arts 

B.S., Wooster College, 1932; m.a.. University of Iowa, 1935. 

CALVIN F. STUNTZ, Associatc PfofessoT of Chemistry 
B.A., University of Buffalo, 1939; ph.d., 1947. 

HAROLD SYLVESTER, ProfessoT of Business Administration 
PH.D., The Johns Hopkins University, 1938. 

M 16 



ARTHUR H. THOMPSON, Profcssor of Potnology 

B.S., University of Minnesota, 1941; pii.d.. University of Maryland, 1945. 

DAVID G. THOMPSON, Itistnictor in Electrical Engineering 
B.S., University of Maryland, 1949. 

FRED R. THOMPSON, Associate Professor of Education, Institute for Child Study 
B.A., University of Texas, 1929; m.a., 1939; ed.d.. University of Maryland, 1952. 

WILLIAM F. TiERNEY, Associate Professor of Industrial Education 

B.S., Teachers College of Connecticut, 1941; m.a., Ohio State University, 1949; 
ED.D., University of Maryland, 1952. 

JOHN s. TOLL, Professor and Head of Physics 

B.S., Yale University, 1944; m.a., Princeton University, 1948; PH.D., 1952. 

THERON A. TOMPKINS, Associatc Professor of Physical Education 

B.S., Eastern Michigan College of Education, 1926; m.a.. University of Michigan, 
1939. 

ORVAL L. ULRY, Associate Professor of Education and Assistant Director of 
Summer Session 

B.S., Ohio State University, 1938; m.a., 1944; ph.d., 1953. 

JAMES A. VAN zwoLL, Professor of School Administration 

B.A., Calvin College, Grand Uapids, Michigan, 1933; m.a., University of Michigan^ 
1937; PH.D., 1942. 

WALTER B. WAETjEN, Profcssor of Education, Institute for Child Study 

B.S., State Teachers College, Millersville, Pennsylvania, 1942; M.S., University of 
Pennsylvania, 1947; ed.d.. University of Maryland, 1951. 

ROBERT E. WAGNER, Profcssor and Head, Department of Agronomy 

B.S., Kansas State College, 1942; M.S., University of Wisconsin, 1943; ph.d., 1950. 

JAMES A. WALKER, Instructor in English 

B.A., Amherst College, 1939; m.a.. Harvard University, 1941; ph.d., 1948. 

KATHRYN P. WARD, Associatc ProfessoT of English 

B.A., George Washington University, 1935; m.a., 1936; ph.d., 1947. 

GEORGE w. WHARTON, Profcssor and Head of Zoology 
B.S., Duke University, 1935; ph.d., 1939. 

GLADYS A. wiGGiN, Profcssor of Education 

B.S., University of Minnesota, 1929; m.a., 1939; ph.d.. University of Maryland, 1947. 

FRANK h. WILCOX, JR., Assistant Professor of Poultry 

B.S., University of Connecticut, 1951; M.S., Cornell University, 1953; ph.d., 
1955. 

HOWARD E. wnsTN, Asststant Professor of Zoology 

B.A., Bowdoin College, 1948; m.s.. University of Michigan, 1950; ph.d., 1955. 

17 ► 



G. FORREST WOODS, PwfessoT of Chemistry 

B.A., Northwestern University, 1935; m.s., Harvard University, 1937; ph.d., 1940. 

HOWARD WRIGHT, Professor of Accoujiting 

B.S., Temple University, 1937; m.a., University of Iowa, 1940; c.p.a.. State of 
Texas, 1940; ph.d.. University of Iowa, 1947. 

w. GORDON 2EEVELD, ProfessoT of English 

B.A., University of Rochester, 1924; m.a.. The Johns Hopkins University, 1929; 
PH.D., 1936. 



18 



THE SCHOOL 

To SERVE BETTER THOSE WHO DESIRE SUMMER STUDY, THE UNIVERSITY OF 
Maryland Summer Session afTords opportunities to two major groups: to 
the professional men and women for additional work in their chosen fields; and, 
to college students for meeting requirements toward graduation. This summer 
of 1958, special emphasis has been placed upon broadening both the variety 
and the extent of offerings especially at the graduate level throughout the 
various colleges and departments on the campus. Summer offerings include 
institutes, workshops, conferences, short courses, and a lecture series in addition 
to a large number and variety of regularly scheduled offerings. These offerings 
are conducted on the same high plane that prevails during the regular fall and 
spring semesters. 

Academic Information 

TERMS OF ADMISSION 

All summer school stndeyjts must he admitted to the University. This af^plies 
to all non-degree as \vell as degree candidates. All undergraduate students not 
previously admitted should fde their applications with Mr. G. W. Algire, Director 
of Admissions, not later than June 7, 1958. 

Graduates of accredited txvo-arid three-year normal schools with satisfactory 
normal school records may be admitted to advanced standing in the College of 
Education. The record and objectives of the individual student determine the 
exact amount of credit allowed. The student is given individual counsel as 
to the best procedure for fulfilling the requirements for a degree. 

Applications for admissioyt to the Graduate School must he in the hands of 
the Dean of the Graduate School hy June 6. Applications must include tran- 
scripts of undergraduate records. Students not desiring graduate credit may 
register as "Special Students" and not seek admission to the Graduate School. 
Only students admitted to the Graduate School may register for courses 
numbered 200 or above. 

ACADEMIC CREDIT 

The semester hour is the unit of credit. During the Summer Session a 
course meeting five times a week for six weeks requiring the standard amount 
of outside work is given a weight of two semester hours. 

Students who are matriculated as candidates for degrees will be given credit 
towards the appropriate degree for satisfactory completion of courses. All courses 
offered in the Summer Session are creditable towards the appropriate degree 
provided they are included in the student's program as planned with his adviser. 

19 ► 



Academic Information 

Teachers and other students will receive official grade reports specifying the 
amount and quality of work completed. These reports will be accepted by the 
Maryland State Department of Education and by the appropriate education 
authorities in other states for the extension and renewal of certificates in 
accordance with their laws and regulations. 

MARKING SYSTEM 

The following symbols are used for marks: A, B, C, and D— passing; F— 
Failure; I— Incomplete. Mark A denotes superior scholarship; mark B, good 
scholarship; mark C, fair scholarship; and mark D, passing scholarship. The 
mark of I (incomplete) is exceptional. Complete regulations governing marks 
are printed in Unii^ersity Regulations and General Information. 

NORMAL AND MAXIMUM LOADS 

Six semester hours is the normal load for the Summer Session. Under- 
graduate students in the College of Education and teachers in ser\'ice may take 
a maximum of eight semester hours if they have above-average grades. The 
maximum load for graduate students is six semester hours. For details, see 
"Tuition and Fees." 

SUMMER GRADUATE WORK 

Masters' degrees are offered through the Graduate School as follows: 
Master of Arts 
Master of Science 

Master of Arts in American Civilization 
Master of Education 
Master of Business Administration 

Doctors' degrees offered through the Graduate School are as follows: 
Doctor of Philosophy 
Doctor of Education 

Graduate work in the Summer School may be counted as residence toward 
a Master's degree or Doctor of Education degree. A full year of residence or 
the equivalent is the minimum requirement for each degree. 

The requirements for each of the seven degrees above may be procured from 
the Graduate School upon request. 

Special regulations governing graduate work in Education and supplementing 
the statements contained in the Graduate School Announcements are available 
in duplicated form and may be obtained from the College of Education. Each 
graduate student in Education should have a copy. Students seeking the 
Master's degree as a qualification for a certificate issued by the Maryland State 
Department of Education or any other certifying authority should consult the 

-^ 20 



Academic Infoniiation 

appropriate bulletin for specific requirements. Advisers will assist students in 
planning to meet such requirements. 

All students desiring graduate credit, whether for meeting degree require- 
ments, for transfer to another institution, or for any other purpose, must be 
regularly matriculated and registered in the Graduate School. 

CANDIDATES FOR DEGREES 

All students who expect to complete requirements for degrees during the 
Summer Session should make applications for diplomas at the ofi&ce of the 
Registrar during the first two weeks of the Summer Session. 

THE PROGRAM IN AMERICAN CIVILIZATION 

The University considers that it is important for every student to achieve 
an appreciative understanding of this country, its history and its culture. It has 
therefore established a comprehensive program in American Civilization. This 
program is also designed to provide the student with a general educational back- 
ground. 

Work in American Civilization is offered at three distinct academic levels. 
The first level is required of all freshmen and sophomores at the University and 
is described below. The second level is for undergraduate students wishing to 
carry a major in this field (see catalog for the College of Arts and Sciences). 
The third level is for students desiring to do graduate work in this field (see 
catalog for the Graduate School). 

All students receiving a baccalaureate degree from the University of Mary- 
land must (except as specific exceptions are noted in printed curricula) obtain 
24 semester hours of credit in the lower division courses of the American Civiliza- 
rion Program. Although the courses in the Program are prescribed generally, 
some choice is permitted, especially for students who demonstrate in classification 
tests good previous preparation in one or more of the required subjects. 

The 24 semester hours in American Civilization are as follows: 

I. English (12 hours, Eng. 1, 2 and 3, 4 or 5, 6), American History (6 
hours, H. 5, 6), and American Government (3 hours, G & P. 1) are required 
subjects; however, students w^ho qualify in one, two, or all three of these areas 
by means of University administered tests will substitute certain elective courses. 
Through such testing a student may be released from 3 hours of English (9 
hours would remain an absolute requirement), 3 hours of American History 
(3 hours remaining as an absolute requirement), and 3 hours of American 
Government. Students released from 3 hours of English will take Eng. 21 
instead of Eng. 1 and 2. Those released from 3 hours in History will take H. 
56 instead of H. 5 and 6. Students who have been exempted from courses 
in English, History, or American Government may not take such courses for 
credit. 

21 ► 



General Information 

2. For the 3 additional hours of the 24 hours required the student elects 
one course from the following group (Elective Group I): 

Economics 37, Fundamentals of Economics (Not open to freshmen; 
students who may wish to take additional courses in 
economics should substitute Economics 3 1 for Econ- 
omics 37) 

Philosophy 1, Philosophy for Modern Man 

Sociology 1, Sociology of American Life 

3. Students who, on the basis of tests, have been released from 3, 6 or 9 
hours in otherwise required courses in English, American History or Ameri- 
can Government (see 1 above), shall select the replacements for these courses 
from any or all of the following groups: (a) more advanced courses in the same 
department as the required courses in which the student is excused, or (b) 
Elective Group I (see 2 above) provided that the same course may not be used 
as both a Group I and a Group II choice, or (c) Elective Group II. Group II 
consists of the following 3-hour courses: 

History 2, History of Modern Europe; either History 51 or 52, The Human- 
ities; either Music 20, Survey of Music Literature or Art 22, Histor)' of Ameri- 
can Art; Psychology 1, Introduction to Psychology; and Sociology 5, Anthropology. 

General Information 

REGISTRATION 

Registration for undergraduate and graduate students will take place on 
Monday, June 23, from 8:30 A.M. to 2:30 P. M. New graduate students should 
register on Friday, June 20, from 9:00 A. M. to 1:00 P. M., and should report 
to the office of the department or college concerned with their graduate pro- 
grams, at the time listed in the Registration Schedule. 

All new students must obtain admission to the University from the Director of 
Admissions or the Dean of the Graduate School before registration. 

Registration begins in the office of the appropriate dean at the time Hsted 
in the Registration Schedule. After registration forms have been filled out and 
approved by the dean, students complete registration at the Armory. Students 
must secure section assignments from the departmental representatives at the 
Armory for all courses listed on their course cards for which more than one 
section is being offered. After receiving section assignments, students receive 
bills, pay fees, and submit all forms to the Registrar. Until this is done, registra- 
tion is not complete or official. 

Instruction will begin on Tuesday, June 24, at 8:00 A. M. The late regis- 
tration fee, charged on and after Tuesday, June 24, is $5.00. 



^ 22 



General Information 



ADVANCED REGISTRATION 



Undergraduate and graduate students in Education may register for the 
Summer Session between May 1 and 24 hy appointment with the advisers in 
the College of Education. The hours for advanced registration will be 9:00 A. M. 
to 2:30 P. M., Mondays through Fridays, and 9:00 A. M. to 11:00 A. M. 
on Saturdays. 

Students who wish to register early should arrange to complete registration 
after conference with the Dean by paying fees at the Cashier's Office and sub- 
mitting all approved registration forms to the Office of the Registrar. 

New students who wish to register in advance must be formally admitted 
to the University prior to registration. New undergraduate students should 
file applications for admission with the Office of Admissions and new graduate 
students should apply to the Dean of the Graduate School. 

DEFINITION OF RESIDENCE AND NON-RESIDENCE 

Students who are minors are considered to be resident students if at the 
time of their registration their parents have been domiciled in this State for at 
least one year. 

The status of the residence of a student is determined at the time of his 
first registration in the University, and may not thereafter be changed by him 
unless, in the case of a minor, his parents move to and become legal residents 
of this State by maintaining such residence for at least one full year. How- 
ever, the right of the minor student to change from a non-resident to resident 
status must be established by him prior to the registration period set for any 
semester. 

Adult students are considered to be residents if at the time of their registration 
they have been domiciled in this State for at least one year provided such resi- 
dence has not been acquired while attending any school or college in Maryland 
or elsewhere. 

The word domicile as used in this regulation shall mean the permanent place 
of abode. For the purpose of this rule only one domicile may be maintained. 

TUITION AND FEES 
UNDERGRADUATE STUDENTS 

General Tuition Fee, Per Credit Hour $10.00 

Non-residence Fee 1 5.00 

Must be paid by all students who are not residents of Maryland. 
Matriculation Fee 10.00 

Payable only once, upon admission to the University. Every 

student must be matriculated. 

Infirmary Fee 1.00 

Recreation Fee 1 .00 

Required of all students registered in the Summer School. 

23 ► 



General Inforvtation 

GRADUATE STUDENTS 

General Tuition Fee, Per Credit Hour $10.00 

Matriculation Fee 10.00 

Payable only once, upon admission to the Graduate School. 
Recreation Fee 1 .00 

Required of all students registered in the Summer School. 
Infirmary Fee (voluntary) 1 .00 

The Infirmary services are available to graduate students who 

elect to pay at the time of registration the fee of $1.00 for the 

Summer Session. 
There is no non-residence fee for graduate students. 

MISCELLANEOUS INFORMATION 

Auditors pay the same fees as regular students. 

The diploma fee is $10.00 for bachelors' and masters' degrees, and $50.00 
for doctors' degrees. 

A fee of $3.00 is charged for each change in program after June 27. If such 
change involves entrance to a course, it must be approved by the instructor 
in charge of the course entered. Courses cannot be dropped after July 1 1 . 
All changes must be approved by the appropriate dean and filed in the 
Oflfice of the Registrar. 

A special laboratory fee may be charged for certain courses where such fee 
is noted in the course description. 

All laboratory courses in chemistry carry laboratory fees of $10.00; in addition 
the student is charged for any apparatus which cannot be returned to the 
stock room in perfect condition. Other laboratory fees are stated in con- 
nection with individual courses. 

Physical Education Fee charged each student registered for any physical 

activity course, $6.00. 
Late Registration fee, $5.00. 

FEE FOR KINDERGARTEN 

Children 5 years of age $ 1 5.00 

WITHDRAWAL AND REFUND OF FEES 

Any student compelled to leave the University at any time during the Sum- 
mer Session must file in the Office of the Registrar an application for withdrawal, 
bearing the proper signatures. If this is not done, the student will not be en- 
titled, as a matter of course, to a certificate of honorable dismissal, and will forfeit 
his right to any refund to which he would otherwise be entitled. The date 
used in computing refunds is the date the application for vidthdrawal is filed 
in the Office of the Registrar. 

^ 24 



General Information 

In the case of a minor, official withdrawal will be permitted only with the 
written consent of the student's parent or guardian. 

Students withdrawing from the University will receive a refund of all 
charges, less the matriculation fee in accordance with the following schedule: 

Percentage 
Period from Date Instruction Begins Refundable 

One week or less 60% 

Between one and two weeks 20% 

Over two weeks 

No refunds of fixed charges, lodging, tuition, laboratory fees, etc., are allowed 
when courses are dropped, unless the student withdraws from the University. 

LIVING ACCOMMODATIONS AND MEALS 

Dormitory accommodations are available at the following cost per term, on 
the basis indicated: 



Regular Dormitories 


Single Room 


Double Room 


Women 


$45 


$35 


Men 


$35 


$25 



Since most of the rooms in the dormitories are double rooms there is no 
definite guarantee that a request for a single room can be granted. The availa- 
bility of single rooms will be determined by the number of persons requesting 
rooms for the Summer Session. 

The Dining Room will operate entirely on the cafeteria plan and meals vidll 
be served at a minimum cost with a choice of foods. 

THE UNIVERSITY DORMITORIES WILL NOT BE OPEN FOR 
OCCUPANCY UNTIL 2:00 P. M. SUNDAY, JUNE 22, AND THEY WILL 
CLOSE AT 5:00 P. M. ON THE LAST DAY OF REGULAR SCHEDULED 
CLASSES, FRIDAY, AUGUST 1. 

Early application for a reservation is advisable, as only those who have made 
reservations will be assured that rooms are ready for occupancy upon the arrival 
of the student. Rooms will not be held later than noon on Tuesday, June 24. 
For reservations write to Miss M. Margaret Jameson, Associate Dean of Women 
or Mr. Robert C. James, Associate Dean of Men. Do not send a deposit for a 
rootn. 

Students attending the Summer School and occupying rooms in the dormitory 
will provide themselves with towels, pillows, pillow cases, sheets, blankets, 
bureau scarf, desk blotter, and waste basket. Trunks for the men's dormitories 
should be marked with student's name and addressed to Men's Dormitories. 
Trunks for women's dormitories should include the name of the dormitory to 
which the student has been assigned. Trunks sent by express must be prepaid. 
Cleanliness and neatness of rooms is the responsibility of the individual. 

25 ► 



General Information 

OFF-CAMPUS HOUSING 

OfF-campus rooms are available. Inquiries concerning them should be 
addressed to Mr. Doyle Royal, Office of Director of Student Welfare. He will 
furnish the names of those householders to whom students may write to make 
their own arrangements. 

The University assumes no responsibility for room and board off^ered to 
Summer Session students outside of the University dormitory and Dining Hall. 
Eating establishments in the vicinity are inspected by the County Health Service. 

STUDE^r^ health 

The University Infirmary, located on the campus, in charge of the regular 
University physician and nurse, provides medical service of a routine nature 
for the undergraduate students in the Summer Session and for those graduate 
students who elect to pay the $1.00 fee. Students who are ill should report 
promptly to the University Infirmary, either in person or by phone (Extension 
326). 



PARKING OF AUTOMOBILES 

For the use of students, staff members, and employees, several parking lots 
are provided. Students may park in lots A, B, and D. All other lots are reserved 
for faculty and staff members. The University rules forbid the parking of cars 
on any of the campus roads. These rules are enforced by State police. 

LIBRARY FACILITIES 

The new $2.5 million library building located in a prominent position at the 
west end of the main quadrangle was opened for service in January of this year. 
The almost 200,000 square feet of floor space allow for greatly improved library 
service and accommodations for study. 

The building will ultimately house 1,000,000 volumes and seat 2,000 readers. 
The 200 carrels and individual studies provide excellent facilities for graduate 
students and faculty. 

Library facilities outside the main building include the Engineering and 
Physical Sciences Library located in the Mathematics Building, the Chemistry 
Library, and collections in the various departments of the College of Agriculture. 

The University System of Libraries has in its collections 350,000 volumes 
in addition to thousands of government publications and books that have been 
in storage. Over 4,500 periodicals and 162 newspapers are received. The libraries 
are able to supplement their services to graduate students and faculty by borrow- 
ing material from other libraries through interlibrar)' loan. Also within a short 
distance from College Park are located the unexcelled library facilities of the 

-^ 26 



General Information 

Library of Congress, Department of Agriculture, Office of Education and other 
agencies of the Federal Government. 

UNIVERSITY BOOKSTORE 

For the convenience of students, the University maintains a students' supply 
store, located in the Student Union Building, where students may obtain at 
reasonable prices textbooks, stationery, classroom materials and equipment. 

The bookstore operates on a cash basis. 

KINDERGARTEN 

A kindergarten for children 5 years of age operates during the forenoon in 
Building AA for the duration of the Summer Session as a laboratory for courses in 
Childhood Education. This school is open to children of the community and to 
children whose parents are students or teachers in the Summer Session. The 
enrollment must be limited to a number that can be accommodated in the room 
available. Children will be accepted in the order of the filing of applications, 
which may be obtained from the Childhood Education Department, University of 
Maryland, College Park, Maryland. Applications should be filed before May 
16, 1958. 

The tuition fee for each child is $15.00 for the session. 



27 



CONFERENCES, INSTITUTES, WORKSHOPS, 
SPECIAL COURSES AND LECTURES 

Graduate Education For Hish School Teachers of 
Science and Mathematics 

The College of Agriculture, the College of Arts and Sciences, and the College 
of Education of the University of Maryland will continue, again this summer, 
a program of courses specially designed for the high school teachers of science 
and mathematics. Through these courses high school teachers will have opportuni- 
ties first, to refresh subject matter, methods, and procedures and second, to 
delve into the ever enlarging areas of advancements in scientific and technological 
developments. 

T}^ical of these courses are those listed below. These courses may be 
counted toward fulfillment of requirements for the degree of Master of 
Education. 

Botany 113— Plant Geography (2). 

Botany 153S-Field Botany (2). 

Chemistry 192, 194— Glassblovdng Laboratory (1), (1). 

Education 137— Methods of Teaching Mathematics and Science in Secondary 

Schools (2). 
Mathematics 1 06S— Introduction to the Theory of Numbers (2). 
Mathematics 1 29S— Higher Geometry (2). 
Mathematics 184— Foundations of Analysis (3). 
Physics 118A— Atoms, Nuclei, and Stars (2). 
Physics 130, 131— Basic Concepts of Physics (4). 
Physics 160A— Physics Problems (1, 2, or 3). 
Zoology 104— Genetics (3). 
Zoology 12 IS— Principles of Animal Ecology (3). 

Lecture Series On Problems And Trends In 
Contemporary American Education 

All Summer Session students and faculty members are cordially invited to 
attend a series of lectures to be given by educators of national prominence. The 
lecture series has been planned to present a broad over\'iew of some of the key 
issues and trends that relate to the improvement of instruction at elementary, 
secondary, and teacher education levels. A listing of specific topics and speakers 
is included in a separate brochure which will be available on request at the time 
of registration. 

These lectures are scheduled for Mondays and Wednesdays from 1 : 00 to 
3:00 P.M. in the Central Auditorium of Skinner Building, beginning on Monday, 
June 30 and ending on Wednesday, July 30. 

M 28 



Conferences, Institutes 

Those students wishing to register for this series on a regular class basis 
and earn three hours of undergraduate or graduate credit may do so by supple- 
menting attendance at these lectures by participation in a series of discussion 
groups led by regular LIniversity staff members. Additional details are available in 
the description of Ed. 190 which appears with the College of Education course 
offerinas in this bulletin. 



Typewriting Demonstration For Business Education Teachers 

The College of Education offers the business teacher registered for B.Ed. 101 
(See page 43) during the summer session an opportunity to observe pupils at 
work in a typewriting class. These observations will aid the classroom teacher in: 
(1) designing purposeful classroom activities involving development of the basic 
typewriting skills, (2) planning with the pupil the organization of an effective 
set of "work" habits, (3) analyzing through case studies the methods of dealing 
with the various aspects of individual pupil progress, (4) applying the principles 
of the psychology of skills to the teaching of typewriting, and (5) developing 
improved methods for course construction, selection of instructional materials, 
and measuring pupil achievement. 

Typewriting Demonstration Class 

This is a non-credit typewriting class for those who have had no previous 
training or for those who wish to further their typewriting skills. Any person from 
grade seven up may enroll for the class. The charge will be $35.00 for the six 
weeks period and no credit will be allowed for the work. No refunds will be made. 

High School Choral Workshop 

A High School Choral Workshop, held during the period from July 7 to 11, 
inclusive, is offered through the cooperation of the College of Education, the 
Department of Music, and the College of Special and Continuation Studies. The 
Workshop is the newest of the University's services to music teachers. A chorus 
of one hundred selected high-school students will rehearse daily under the 
direction of Visiting Lecturer Margaret Hillis and will present a concert on 
Friday, July 1 1 . Persons registered in the Workshop will observe and participate 
in the rehearsals, attend afternoon sessions at which a variety of choral problems 
will be discussed, and take part in other professional and social events. 

The Workshop will be open without fee to all students registered for three 
or more semester hours in music or music education courses. Other interested 
persons may participate in the Workshop upon payment of a registration fee of 
$15.00. Rooms are available in campus dormitories at $2.50 per night for the 
inclusive dates of the Workshop. IVleals will be available in the University 
Cafeteria at nominal cost. 



29 ► 



Conferences, Institutes 

Registration forms and further information about the Workshop may be ob- 
tained from the Director of Institutes, College of Special and Continuation Studies, 
University of Maryland, College Park, Maryland. 

Curriculum Workshop for Educable and Trainable 
Mentally Retarded Children 

This Workshop, to be offered during the three-week period July 1 4 — August 1 
for three credits, is designed to provide educators with a greater understanding of 
the curriculum for educable mentally retarded and severely retarded children. 
The Workshop will meet daily in a general session for lectures by leaders in the 
major areas of curriculum development for retarded children. Following the lec- 
tures the major group will divide into four study groups, two groups for individuals 
interested in the curriculum for the educable and two groups for trainable 
mentally retarded children. In these sub-groups the needs of retarded children 
will be studied and interpreted in terms of the curriculum necessary to most ade- 
quately educate or train these children. Special consultants will be invited to 
offer assistance in teaching the academic tool subjects, general vocational educa- 
tional sciences, fine and gross motor coordination, and creative arts. This is one 
of the first workshops of this nature to be offered in the metropolitan area. 

Further information may be secured by writing to the Assistant Director of the 
Summer Session, College of Education, University of Maryland, College Park, 
Maryland. 

Workshop on Use of Community Resources 

The Workshop on Use of Community Resources will be offered for persons 
who teach in kindergarten or in grades one to twelve, inclusive, for three weeks, 
June 23 through July 11. It is designed to help teachers learn to utilize 
community resources to strengthen a sound program of teaching and learning. 
The workshop is being offered at the request of the Washington Area School 
Study Council, a voluntary association of school systems and administrators 
in the Washington Area. The Smithsonian Institution, which has cooperated 
with the Council over a period of years in a project designed to make its re- 
sources more meaningful to teachers and children, will receive special attention 
as an excellent example of a valuable community resource. The workshop will 
require full-time work of all participants. Meetings will be held from 9:30 A.M. 
to 3:30 P.M. throughout the workshop period. In addition to teachers designated 
by the Council schools, a limited number of other persons will be allowed to 
register. A student may earn three semester hours of undergraduate or graduate 
credit. 

Further information may be secured by writing to the Assistant Director of 
the Summer Session, College of Education, University of Maryland, College 
Park, Maryland. 

^ 30 



Conferences, Institutes 

Six-Week Human Development Workshop 

TTie Institute for Child Study, College of Education, offers a six-week human 
development workshop each summer providing opportunities for (1) study and 
synthesis of scientific knowledge about children and youth; (2) experience in the 
analysis of case records; (3) preparation of study group leaders for in-ser\'ice 
child study programs; (4) planning in-service child study programs for teachers 
or other human relations workers; (5) planning preservice teacher education 
courses and laboratory experiences for prospective teachers; (6) examination of 
implications of scientific knowledge about human development and behavior for 
school organization, curriculum development, guidance services, club leadership, 
and other agencies devoted to fostering the mental health and optimal develop- 
ment of children, youth, and adults. 

While the workshop is designed mainly for teachers and administrators who 
have been actively engaged in the Child Study Program sponsored by the Institute 
or persons who are interested in participating in such a program, the experience 
has meaning for and has proved valuable for persons in other fields where human 
relations are a vital factor. Inquiries should be addressed to Director, Summer 
Workshop in Human Development. 

Child Study Leaders Workshop 

For leaders and prospective leaders of child study groups who cannot attend 
the full six-weeks workshop, two two-week workshops will be held on the Uni- 
versit}' campus. One will run from June 23 through July 3; the other from July 
21 through August 1. Ordinarily participants would attend only one of these 
two workshops because they will be organized similarly. 

Each day's activities will include a lecture-discussion feriod centering around 
major scientific concepts ex-plaining growth, development, and behavior; laboratory 
periods for analyzing case record material at the first, second, or third year level 
of the program (participants will choose the year level of the group they expect 
to lead); reading and special interest periods. Two hours credit can be earned 
for participation in one of these workshops. 

Administrators' Conference on Implications 

For superintendents, supervisors and principals who are interested in explor- 
ing the implications of human development principles for school operation, a 
workshop (2 credit hours) will be held at the Universit}' from July 7 to July 18. 
This work conference will examine recent scientific research findings and theory 
regarding human growth, learning and behavior and will consider the implications 
of this knowledge for educational practice, including such problems as grouping 
for efiFective learning, marking, curriculum control, teaching processes, home-school 
interaction, the development and use of cumulative records, and mental health 
problems. 

31 ► 



Conferences, Institutes 

Application of Human Development Principles 
in Classrooms Workshop 

For people who have had three or more years of child study experience either 
in workshops or in groups during the school year, a workshop (2 credit hours) will 
be held at the University from July 2 1 through August 1 . Classroom practices will 
be examined in the light of human development principles, and procedures will 
be studied for possible beyond-third-year action research projects during the 
school year. 

Enrollment in the short workshops and conferences will be limited. Those 
interested should contact, as soon as possible, Director of Summer Workshops, 
Institute for Child Study, University of Maryland, College Park, Maryland. 

Education in Family Finance Workshop 

During the Summer Session of 1958, the College of Education, the College 
of Business and Public Administration, and the College of Home Economics 
are cooperating with the National Committee for Education in Family Finance 
to offer a laboratory course designed to help educators improve their classroom 
instruction in personal and family money management. 

Objectives: The workshop will center about such areas as: budgeting and 
financial planning, savings, investment, banks and banking, insurance, home 
ownership, taxation, wills and estates, social security and pension plans, and 
credit. To explore ways in which educators can help prepare young people to 
deal with financial problems in these areas, the participants will have an oppor- 
tunity to develop (1) broad understandings of important concepts and facts re- 
lating to family financial security, (2) leadership skills needed to improve and 
expand programs of education in family finance, and (3) materials which may 
be used in solving their ovinfi curricular and instructional problems. 

Partici'pation: School systems are encouraged to send teams of participants 
numbering up to three. Persons in the following positions are especially invited 
to apply for acceptance: junior high, senior high, and college teachers in: social 
studies, core, mathematics, homemaking, business education, basic business, and 
family life education; supervisors; guidance counselors; principals; curriculum 
directors; superintendents of schools; representatives of state departments of edu- 
cation; and staff members of teacher education institutions. 

Staff: In addition to full-time staff members a wealth of resource people from 
the University, from business, and from governmental agencies will be utilized 
as they apply to the projects undertaken. 

Schedule: The six-week workshop will extend from June 23 to August 1, 
1958. Sessions will be scheduled for a minimum of six hours per day, Monday 
through Friday. 



32 



Conferences, Institutes 

Credit: Six hours of credit will be earned in the workshop. Participants 
will register through course Ed. 189. Workshops, Clinics, and Institutes: Edu- 
cation in Family Finance. 1 he credit may be applicable to advanced degree re- 
quirements. If graduate credit is desired, application for admission to the Gradu- 
ate School should be made before June 6. 

Scholarships: Forty scholarships covering board and room in campus facilities 
will be granted. Interested persons should make application on a special form 
which will be available upon request. Each applicant must be recommended by 
his superintendent or principal. Early application is encouraged so as to be 
assured a place in the workshop. 

All correspondence concerning application or information concerning the work- 
shop should be addressed to: Dr. Arthur S. Patrick, College of Business and Public 
Administration, University of Maryland, College Park, Maryland. 

Aviation Education Curriculum Workshop 

The College of Education, the College of Special and Continuation Studies, 
and the Civil Air Patrol are cooperating to provide a workshop specifically de- 
signed to encourage research and writing in the field of aviation education 
especially as it relates to the areas of science and social studies. Curriculum 
materials produced during this workshop will enjoy national distribution by the 
Civil Air Patrol. Participants will be chosen jointly by the cooperating organi- 
zations. Enrollment will be limited to 35 persons. 

The workshop will be in session daily, Monday through Friday, from 9:00 
A.M. to 3:00 P.M., June 23 to July 11. Three hours of undergraduate or gradu- 
ate credit may be earned. 

Registration will be conducted at the Boiling Air Force Base. 

Workshop on Teaching Conservation of National Resources 

The College of Agriculture will cooperate with the Conservation Education 
Division of the Maryland Department Research and Education in developing 
this workshop devoted to the study of the State's basic wealth, its natural re- 
sources. Basic source information will be available, specimens will be collected, 
pictures will be taken in different resource regions, teaching aids will be evalu- 
ated, and effective methods of teaching conservation and national resources will 
be studied. The workshop will carry six semester hours of graduate credit. 

State and federal workers in conservation and national resources will be used 
extensively as consultants in their specialities. Field trips will be taken to all the 
natural regions of the State. Students will be able to observe first hand the re- 
sources problems and current practices. Adequate opportunity will be provided 
for students to analyze problems as a group and develop logical solutions. 

The workshop will be held on the College Park campus of the University of 
Maryland June 23 to August 1, 1958. 

33 ► 



Conferences, Institutes 

I'he Parent-Teacher Association Summer Conference, July 14, 15, 16 

The College of Education will cooperate with the Maryland Congress of 
Parents and Teachers in planning their convention to be held this summer on 
the University campus. Persons of national reputation will be present as speakers 
and discussion leaders at the conference. 

Institute of Acarology 

The Institute of Acarology provides a unique opportunity for entomologists, 
parasitologists, zoologists and advanced students in the field of biology to study 
the mites and ticks. The recent important discoveries of the role of the Acarina 
in the fields of public health and agriculture have emphasized the need for an 
understanding of all phases of knowledge concerned with mites and ticks. Their 
part in the epidemiology of scrub typhus, "Q" fever, haemorrhagic fever, and 
other diseases, as well as their increased destruction of plants that has followed 
the introduction of the newer insecticides have brought them to the attention 
of an increasing number of biologists. Three courses (see page 72) involving 
lecture, laboratory and field work will be offered in the Department of Zoology, 
University of Maryland. 

National Science Foundation Summer Institute for 
Teachers of Science 

The College of Agriculture, the College of Arts and Sciences and the College 
of Education are cooperating to offer a program of courses designed for junior 
and senior high school teachers of science. These courses combine in various 
ways to provide curricula for the participants of a six-week Institute for teachers 
of science. This Summer Institute has the support of the National Science 
Foundation. It is designed primarily to enable junior and senior high school 
teachers to improve their knowledge of the subjects they teach. Credit earned in 
this Summer Institute and in similar related science courses may accumulate 
up to one-half of the total credit-hour requirement for the Master of Education 
degree. 

A National Science Foundation grant makes it possible for the 1958 Summer 
Institute to provide financial assistance for about 45 participants at the standard 
N. S. F. rate of $75 per week plus $15 per week for each dependent (to a 
maximum of four). This stipend will be tax free to students enrolled for credit 
toward a degree. A travel allowance of 4<f' per mile for a single round trip from 
the participant's home to the Institute will also be paid. All tuition and fee 
charges will be paid by the N.S.F. grant. 

The Summer Institute covers the general fields of the Biological Sciences 
and the Physical Sciences. Basic to the program will be two consecutive three- 
week seminars covering recent developments in the Biological Sciences and the 
Physical Sciences. These seminars are listed in the Summer Session Catalog 

M 34 



X 






Above: Prepariiii^ to teach Physical Education. 

left: University Me»inrial C'hapel. 

Behnv: WurksJiop in Science for Elementary Schools. 



UNIVERSITY OF] 
College Park Camp! 




lARYLAND 

' 1958- 1959 





BUILDISC COUF I.FrrtRS FOR ( LASS S'.HEUl LES 




A 


Arti li Scicncn- Frincn S<all Kc< Hall 




A A 


Niin«rjr School 




AR 


Armory 




B 


Music 




IB 


Admmiuralwn 




C 


Chcmiirry 




Col 


ColuiMin 




D 


Diirt — TumcT l^boworr 




DD 


Aviation Pitchologv Laboratorr 




DW 


Dean of Women 




E 


AgronomT — Botany — H.J. Pattenon Hall 




EE 


Counseling Center 




F 


Horticulture- Holzapfel Hall 




FF 


Temporary Dormitory 




C 


Journalism 




CC 


Actirilio Building— Cole Building 




H 
1 

J 


Home Economics — Margaret Brent Hall 
Agricultural Engr.- SSn»er Laboratory 
bngr. Classroom BIdg. 




K 


Zoology- Sil>ester Hall 




L 


Librarv- Shoemalter Building 




M 


Morrill Hall 




N 


Geography 




O 


Agriculture- Simons Hall 




P 


Industrul Am ic Education— J. VI. Patterson BUg. 




Q. 


Business St Public Administratson-Talu/erro Hall 




R 


Classroom Building— Woods Hall 




S 


F.ngr, Laboratones 




T 


Education- Skinner Building 




V 


Chem. Engr. 
Wind Tunnel 




w 


Prcinlterr Field House 




X 


Judging Pasilion 




V 


Mathematics 




z 
II 


Phssia 
Po'ultr>-Jull Hall 




JJ 


Engines Research Ub. (Molecular Ph,sici) 




So 


onnes Not Sbo.n 
Phi Sigma Sigma 
Alpha Chi Omega 
Alpha Xi Delta 




Fratcmmei Not Sho»n | 






Alpha bpolon Pi 






Zeti Beta Tau 






Phi Kappa Gamma 






Tau Epsilon Phi 









C-4 
Odirx ■ 

r«Oi^'BU| 




SjH'c'uil Eilticalioii W^orksJiop. 



Workshop in Science for 
Elementary Schools. 





I Ciiniiiio h\ i/o;(;<{, Work 
sliop ill Science. 



Conferences, Institutes 

as Zoology 199 and Physics 199, respectively. Each will meet five times a week 
for the three weeks and will count as one credit hour. Participants in the 
Institute will be expected to register for both seminars. 

The following courses are included in the program. Courses especially pre- 
pared for teachers are indicated by an asterisk (*); other courses of particular 
interest to teachers are indicated by a dagger (t). 

Biological Sciences Physical Sciences 

tBot. 1 tChem. 3 

tBot. 113 tChem. 19 

*Bot. 155 tChem. 37 

*Ent. lis tChem. 38 

tMicrob. 1 tPhys. 109 

tZool. 1 »Phys. 11 8A 

tZool. 104 tPhys. 130, 131 

*Zool. 121S *Phvs. 160A 

*Zool. 199 *Phys. 199 

These courses are described in detail in this catalog under the headings of 
the respective departments. In addition to the courses specifically listed, par- 
ticipants may register in the regular Summer Session offerings in Mathematics 
or other appropriate fields. A maximum of 6 credit hours may be taken. Stipends 
will be a\ailable only to those participants scheduling at least 5 credit hours 
in the above courses, or in other courses specifically approved by the Director 
of the Institute. 

Inquiries should be sent to Dr. J. R. C. Brown, Director of the N. S. F. 
Summer Institute, Department of Zoology, University of Marjdand, College 
Park, Maryland. 



35 



COURSE OFFERINGS 

An "S" before a course number denotes that the course is offered in summer 
school only. An "S" after a course number indicates a regular course modified 
for summer school offering. 

Courses may be cancelled if the number of students enrolled is below cer- 
tain minima. In general, freshman and sophomore courses will not be main- 
tained for classes smaller than 20. Minimum enrollments for upper level 
undergraduate courses and graduate courses will be 15 and 10 respectively. 

AGRICULTURAL ECONOMICS AND MARKETING 

A. E. 109. Research Problems. (1-2) 

To be arranged. With the permission of the instructor, students will work on any 
research problems in agricultural economics. There will be occasional conferences 
for the purpose of making reports on progress of work. (Staff.) 

A. E. 200. Special Prohlents in Farm Economics. (2) 

To be arranged. An advanced course dealing extensively with some of the economic 
problems affecting the farmer, such as land values, taxation, credit, prices, produc- 
tion adjustments, transportation, marketing and cooperation. (Staff.) 

A. E. 203. Research. 

Credit according to work accomplished. Students will be assigned research in agri- 
cultural economics under the supervision of the instructor. The work will consist of 
original investigation in problems of agricultural economics. (Staff.) 

A. E. S216A. Advanced Farm Management, (i) 

July 14 to July 18. Arranged. Summer Session only. An advanced course in farm 
organization and management, especially designed for teachers of vocational agri- 
culture. 

AGRICULTURAL EDUCATION AND RURAL LIFE 

Summer courses in Agricultural Education and Rural Life are offered 
primarily for teachers of vocational agriculture, extension field agents and others 
interested in the professional and cultural development of rural communities. 
These courses are arranged to articulate with certain courses in Agricultural 
Economics and Marketing, Agronomy, Animal Husbandr)', Botany, Dairy 
Husbandry, Horticulture, and Poultry. Courses in both groups are offered in 
a cycle. 

In 1957, one one-credit course will be offered per week for the last four 
weeks of Summer School. Students can take as many of these courses as 
they can arrange to attend. The schedule for each course will depend upon 
the nature of the material presented, but the total number of meetings per 
credit will be in accordance with graduate course standards. For example, 
in courses that are presented largely through the laboratory method the class 

M 36 



Agricultural Education and Rural Life 

will meet the greater part of each day. In courses where the lecture method 
is used, there will be a minimum of three hours of class each day, and the 
students will be expected to spend considerable time outside of classes in 
various kinds of assignments. Some courses will be a combination of lectures 
and laboratories in varying degrees. 

By pursuing a program of three properly selected one-week courses success- 
fully for eight consecutive summers and submitting a satisfactory thesis a 
student can earn a Master of Science degree with a major in Agricultural 
Education. The time required for this degree can be shortened by attending 
some full six-week Summer School Sessions, by attending one or more full 
semesters, by taking University Extension courses offered over the State, and 
by taking courses given in the evening and on Saturday on the campus. Minor 
credit can be taken in either Agricultural or Secondary Education courses. 

Teachers should register for these courses on the regular registration days 
or during the week of June 23 while the FFA State Convention and Contests 
are being held. Teachers registering for the field problems or research courses 
may register at the same time, but will work under the direction of an assigned 
member of the staff, rather than on the basis of one-week per credit. 

R. Ed. 120. Special Problems in Agricultural Education. (2-3) 
Arranged 0-138. Prerequisite, approval of staff. Credit in accordance with amount 
of work planned. A course designed for advanced undergraduates for problems in 
teaching vocational agriculture. (Staff.) 

R. Ed. SI 30 A-B. Seminar in Agrictdtural Education. (]) 

July 28 through August 1. Part A. Arranged. 0-138. Investigations, reports and 
papers on the organization and administration of agricultural education. (Ahalt.) 

R. Ed. S207 A-B. Problems in Teaching Vocational Agricidture. (I) 
July 28 through August 1. Part A. Arranged. 0-138. A critical analysis of current 
problems in the teaching of vocational agriculture with special emphasis upon recent 
developments in all-day programs. (Ahalt.) 

R. Ed. S170. Workshop Teaching Conservation of Natural Resources. (6) 
Daily 9:30 A.M.-12:00 Noon and 1:00 P.M.-3:00 P.M. This workshop is devoted 
to a study of the State's basic wealth, its natural resources, natural resource problems 
and practices pertinent to local, state, national and world welfare. Laboratory fee $25.00. 

R. Ed. S213 A-B. Supervision and Administration of Vocational Agricidture. (i) 
July 21 through JiJy 25. Arranged. 0-138. Administrative and supervisory prob- 
lems in Vocational Agriculture including scheduling, local administrative programs, 
supervisor-teacher relationships and the responsibilities of superintendents and prin- 
cipals in the program. (Hopkins.) 

R. Ed. 220. Field Problems in Rural Education. (_l-3^ 

Prerequisite, six semester hours of graduate study. Arranged. 0-138. Problems 
accepted depend upon the character of the work of the student and the facilities 
available for study. Periodic conferences required. Final report must follow accepted 
pattern for field investigations. (Ahalt, Hopkins.) 

37 ► 



Agronomy, Animal HusbandTy 

K. Ed. 251. Research. 0-6^ 

Arranged. 0-138. Principles of research are studied, problems for thesis are selected, 

methods of developing a thesis are discussed, and a thesis is written. 

(Ahalt, Hopkins.) 

Also see Hort. S124, July 7 through Julv 11 and A. E. S216, July 14 through 
July 18. 



AGRONOMY 

A. CROPS 

Agron. 208. Research Methods. (2) 

Development of research viewpoint by detailed study and report on crop research of 
the Maryland Agricultural Experiment Station, review of literature, or original work 
by the student on specific phases of a problem. (Staff.) 

Agron. 209. Research in Crops. Ci-6~) 

Credit according to work accomplished. With approval or suggestion of the head of 

the department the student will choose his own problems for study. (Staff.) 

B. SOILS 

Agron. 118. Special Prohlems in Soils. (I) 

Prerequisite, Agron. 10 and permission of instructor. A detailed study including a 

written report of an important soils problem. (Staff.) 

Agron. 256. Soil Research. Cl-^^ 

(Staff.) 

ANIMAL HUSBANDRY 

A. H. 172. Special Prohlems in Animal Husbandry . (1-2) 
Work assigned in proportion to amount of credit. Prerequisite, permission of instruc- 
tor. A course designed for advanced undergraduates in which specific problems 
relating to Animal Husbandry will be assigned. (Staff.) 

A. H. 201. Special Prohlems in Animal Husbandry, (i-2) 

Work assigned in proportion to amount of credit. Prerequisite, permission of in- 
structor. Problems will be assigned which relate specifically to the character of 
work the student is pursuing. (Staff.) 

A. H. 204. Research. 0-6^ 

Credit to be determined by amount and character of work done. With the approval 
of the Head of the Department, students -will be required to pursue original research 
in some phase of Animal Husbandry, carrying the same to completion, and report 
the results in the form of a thesis. 

M 38 



Botany, Business Organization and Administration 

BOTANY 

tCof. /. General Botatty. (4) 

Lecture 10:00, E-214; Laboratory 1:00, 2:00; E-238. Laboratory fee, $5.00. General 
introduction to botany including all phases of the subject. Emphasis on the funda- 
mental biological principles of the higher plants. Q^atetson.j 

tBot. 113. Plant Geography. (2) 

Daily 8:00, E-214. Prerequisite, Bot. I or equivalent. A study oF plant distribution 

throughout the world and the factors generally associated with such distribution. 

(Brown.) 

''Bot. 153S. Field Botany. (2) 

Daily, 1:00, 2:00, E-401. Prerequisite, Bot. 1 or General Biology. Laboratory fee, 
$5.00. The identification of trees, shrubs, and herbs, emphasizing the native plants 
of Maryland. Manuals, keys, and other techniques will be used. Numerous short 
held trips will be made. Each student will make an individual collection. This 
course is especially designed for science teachers, and is offered as a part of their 
graduate program. (Brown.) 

Bot. 206. Research in Plant Physiology. 

(Credit according to work done). (Gauch, Krauss.) 

Bot. 214. Research in Plant Cytology and Mor'phology. 

(Credit according to work done.) (D. T. Morgan, Rappleye.) 

Bot. 225. Research in Plant Pathology. 

(Credit according to work done). (Cox, Sisler, Jenkins.) 

BUSINESS ORGANIZATION AND ADMINISTRATION 

jB. a. 20. Principles of Accounting. (4) 

Ten periods a week. Daily 8:00, 9:00; Q-28. Prerequisite, sophomore standing. The 
fundamental principles and problems involved in accounting for proprietorships, 
corporations and partnerships. (Wright.) 

B. A. 21. Principles of Accounting. (4) 

Ten periods a week. Daily 8:00, 9:00; Q-29A. Prerequisite, sophomore standing. 
The fundamental principles and problems involved in accounting for proprietorships, 
corporations and partnerships. (Edelson.) 

B. A. 111. Intermediate Accounting. (3) 

Eight periods a week. Daily 8:00; M., W., P., 9:00; Q-29. Prerequisite, B. A. 21. 
A comprehensive study of the theory and problems of valuation of assets, application 
of funds, corporation accounts and statements, and the interpretation of accounting 
statements. (Lee.) 



* Intended for teachers. 

t Recommended for teachers. 



39 ► 



Business Organization and Administration, Chemistry 

B. A. 130. Elements of Business Statistics. (3) 

Eight periods a week. Daily 8:00; M., W., F., 9:00; Q-243. Prerequisite, junior 
standing. Required tor graduation. Laboratory fee, $3.50. This course is devoted 
to a study of the fundamentals of statistics. Emphasis is placed upon the collection 
of data; hand and machine tabulation; graphic charting; statistical distribution; averages; 
index numbers; sampling; elementary tests of reliability; and simple correlations. 

(Nelson.) 
JB. A. 140. Financial Management. (3) 

Eight periods a week. Daily 8:00; M., W., F., 9:00; Q-146. Prerequisite, Econ. 
140. This course deals with principles and practices involved in the organization, 
financing, and reconstruction of corporations; the various types of securities, and their 
use in raising funds, apportioning income; risk and control; intercorporate relations; 
and new developments. Emphasis on solution of problems of financial policy faced by 
management. (Calhoun.) 

B. A. 150a. Marketing Principles and Organization. (3) 

Eight periods a week. Daily 10:00; M. W., F., 11:00; Q-146. Prerequisite, Econ. 
32 or 37. This is an introductory course in the field of marketing. Its purpose 
is to give a general understanding and appreciation of the forces operating, institu- 
tions employed, and methods followed in marketing agricultural products, natural 
products, services, and manufactured goods. (Gentry.) 

B. A. 160. Personnel Management. (3) 

Eight periods a week. Daily 10:00; M., W., F., 11:00; Q-148. Prerequisite, Econ. 
160. This course deals essentially with functional and administrative relation- 
ships between management and the labor-force. It comprises a survey of the scientific 
selection of employees, "in-service" training, job analysis, classification and rating, 
motivation of employees, employee adjustment, wage incentives, employee discipline 
and techniques of supervision, and elimination of employment hazards. (Sylvester.) 

B. A. 181. Business Law. (4) 

Ten periods a week. Daily 10:00, 11:00; Q-30. Prerequisite, senior standing. Re- 
quired in all Business Administration curriculums. Legal aspects of business relation- 
ships, contracts, negotiable instruments, agency, partnerships, corporations, real and 
personal property and sales. (Dawson.) 

B. A. 269. Studies in Special Problems in Employer-Employee Relationships. 

C3) 
Arranged. (Sylvester.) 

CHEMISTRY 

All laboratory courses in Chemistry carry a laboratory fee of $10.00; in 
addition the student is charged for any apparatus which cannot be returned 
to the stock room in perfect condition. 

yChem. 3. General Chemistry. (4) 

Five lectures and five three-hour laboratory periods per week. Prerequisite, Chem. 1. 

Lecture, 11:00, U-16. Laboratory, 1:00, 2:00, 3:00, C-120. (Jaquith.) 



fRecommended for teachers. 
40 



Classical Languages and Literattires 

tC/icm. 19. Elevients of Quatititative Analysis. (4) 

Five lectures and five three-hour laboratory periods per week. Prerequisite, Chem. 1 and 

3. Lecture 9:00, C-215. Laboratory, 10:00, 11:00, 12:00, C-306. (Stuntz.) 

iChem. 37. Elementary Organic Chemistry. (2) 

Five lectures per week. Prerequisite, Chem. 35. 8:00, C-215. (Woods.) 

iChem. 3S. Elemerttary Organic Laboratory. (2) 

Five three-hour laboratory periods per week. Prerequisite, Chem. 36. 9:00, 10:00, 

11:00, C-221. (Woods.) 

Chem. 144. Advanced Organic Laboratory. (2 or 4) 

Five or ten three-hour laboratory periods per week. Prerequisites, Chem. 37 and 38. 

Laboratory periods arranged. C-206. (Pratt.) 

Chem. 146, 148. The Identification of Organic Compounds. (2, 2) 
Five three-hour laboratory periods per week. Prerequisites, Chem. 37 and 38. Labora- 
tory periods arranged. C-208. Two recitations per week. Arranged. (Pratt.) 

IfChem. 192, 194. Glassblowing Laboratory. (I, I) 

Three three-hour laboratory periods per week. M., W., 7:00, 8:00, 9:00; S, 9:00, 

10:00, 11:00; C-B3. (Carruthers.) 

Chem. 254. Advanced Organic Pre'parations. (2 or 4) 

Five or ten three-hour laboratory periods per week. Laboratory periods arranged. C-206. 

(Pratt.) 

Chem. 258. The Identification of Organic Com'pounds, an advanced course. 

(2 or 4) 
Five or ten three-hour laboratory periods per week. Laboratory periods arranged. 
C-208. Two recitations per week. Arranged. (Pratt.) 

Chem. 360. Research. 

(Staff.) 



CLASSICAL LANGUAGES AND LITERATURES 

Latin 111. Advanced Latin Grammar. (3 ) 

Eight periods a week. Daily, 10:00; M., W., F., 11:00; A-8. Prerequisite, three years 

of college Latin or equivalent. (Aver)\) 

An intensive study of the morphology and syntax of the Latin language supple- 
mented by rapid reading. 



fRecommended for teachers, undergraduate credit. 

41 



Dairy, Economics 

DAIRY 

Dairy S201. Advanced Dairy Production. CO 

Daily 8:00, D-308, July 1 to July 19. An advanced course primarily designed for 
teachers of vocational agriculture and county agents. It includes a study of the newer 
discoveries in dairy cattle nutrition, breeding and management. (Davis.) 

Dairy 204. Sfecial Problems in Dairying. (1-5) 

Prerequisite permission of Professor in charge of work. Credit in accordance with the 
amount and character of work done. Methods of conducting dairy research and 
the presentation of results are stressed. A research problem which relates specifically 
to the work the student is pursuing wall be assigned. (Staff.) 

Dairy 208. Research. 0-6^ 

Credit to be determined by the amount and quality of work done. Original investi- 
gation by the student of some subject assigned by the major professor, the completion 
of the assignment and the preparation of a thesis in accordance wath requirements for 
an advanced degree. (Staff.) 

ECONOMICS 

Econ. 5. Economic Develofments. (2) 

Daily 10:00, Q-147. Prerequisite, none. An introduction to modern economic institu- 
tions—their origins, development and present status. Commercial revolution, indus- 
trial revolution, and age of mass production. Emphasis on development in England, 
Western Europe and the United States. (Measday.) 

Econ. 31. Principles of Economics. (3) 

Eight periods a week. Daily 8:00; M., W., F., 9:00; Q-147. Prerequisite, sophomore 
standing. A general analysis of the functioning of the economic system. A considera- 
ble portion of the course is devoted to a study of basic concepts and explanatory 
principles. The remainder deals with the major problems of the economic system. 

(Gruchy.) 
Econ. 32. Principles of Economics. (3) 

Eight periods a week. Daily 12:00; M., W., F., 1:00; Q-30. Prerequisite, Econ. 
31. A general analysis of the functioning of the economic system. A considerable 
portion of the course is devoted to a study of basic concepts and explanatory principles. 
The remainder deals with the major problems of the economic system. (Staff.) 

Econ. 37. Fundamentals of Economics. (3) 

Daily 8:00, M., W., F., 9:00, Q-30. Prerequisite, sophomore standing. Not open to 
students who have credit in Econ. 31 and 32. Not open to freshmen or to B.P.A. 
students. A survey of the general principles underlying economic activity. This is 
the basic course in economics for the American Civilization program for students who 
are unable to take the more complete course provided in Econ. 31 and 32. (Staff.) 

Econ. 140. Money and Banking. (3) 

Eight periods a week. Daily 8:00; M., W., F., 9:00; Q-148. Prerequisite, Econ. 
32 or 37. A study of the organization, functions, and operation of our monetary, credit, 
and banking system; the relation of commercial banking to the Federal Reserve 

^ 42 



Education 

System; the relation of money and credit to prices; domestic and foreign exchange and 
the impact of pubHc policy upon banking and credit. (Staff.) 

Econ. 160. Labor Economics. (3) 

Eight periods a week. Daily 12:00; M., W., F., 1:00, Q-31. Prerequisite, Econ. 
32 or 37. The historical development and chief characteristics of the American Labor 
movement are first surveyed. Present day problems are then examined in detail; wage 
theories, unemployment, social security, labor organization, collective bargaining. 

(Measday.) 

EDUCATIOiN 

BUSINESS EDUCATION 

B. Ed. 101. Problems in Teaching Office Skills. (2) 

Daily, 11:00; Q-246. Problems in development of occupational competency, achieve- 
ment tests, standards of achievement, instructional materials, transcription, and the 
integration of office skills. Observation period for methods of teaching typewriting, 
at 10:00, see page 29 for details. (O'Neill.) 

CHILDHOOD EDUCATION 

C. Ed. no. Child Developneyit 111. (3) 

iM., T., W., Th., 10:00, 11:00; AA-7. Developmental growth of the child from birth 
to five years; observation in the University Kindergarten. For students in other 
colleges of the University'. Laboratorv' fee, Si. 00. (Broome.) 

C. Ed. 115. Children's Activities and Activities Materials. (3) 
Daily 10:00, 11:00; AA-9. Prerequisites, C. Ed. 100, 101, or 110. Laboratory fee, 
$5.00. Stor}telling, selection of books for pre-school children; the use, preparation 
and presentation of such raw materials as clay, paints (easel and finger), blocks, 
wood, and scrap materials for nursery school and kindergarten. (Stant.) 

C. Ed. 140. Curriculum, Instruction, and Observation— Early Childhood Edu- 
cation (^Nursery School and Kindergarten'). (3) 
M., T., W., Th., 8:00, 9:00; AA-8. Prerequisites, C. Ed. 100, 101, or 110. PhUosophy 
of early childhood education; obser\'ation of the developmental needs at various age 
levels, with emphasis upon the acti\ities, materials, and methods by which educational 
objectives are attained. (Stant.) 

C. Ed. 145. Guidance in Behavior Problems. (3) 

M., T., W., Th., 8:00, 9:00; AA-7. Development of an appreciation and under- 
standing of young children from different home and community backgrounds; study 
of indi\1dual and group problems. (Broome.) 

C. Ed. 159. Teaching Kindergarten. (4) 

Daily 8:00, 9:00, 10:00, 11:00; AA-16. Laboratory fee, $30.00. Admission to 
student teaching depends upon approval of the teaching staff of the department. An 
academic average of 2.275 is required. Teaching experience in the University 
Kindergarten. (Laadt.) 

43 ► 



Education 

ELEMENTARY — SECONDARY 

Ed. 52. Children's Literature. (2) 

8:00; T-4. A study of literary values in prose and verse for children. (Bryan.) 

Ed. 102. History of Education in the United States. (3) 

Eight periods a week. Daily, 8:00; M., W., F., 9:00; T-108. A study of the origins 
and development of the chief features of the present system of education in the United 
States. (Wiggin.) 

Ed. 121. The Language Arts in the Elementary School. (2) 

Section 1- 9:00; T-219. (Stratemeyer.) 

Section 2-10:00; T-108. (Lewis.) 

Section 3-11:00; T-20. (Lewis.) 

Concerned with the teaching of spelling, handwriting, oral and written expression, 
and creative expression. Special emphasis given to skills having real signifiance to 
pupils. 

Ed. 122. The Social Studies in the Elementary School. (2) 

Section 1- 9:00; T-5. (O'Neill.) 

Section 2-10:00; T-5. (O'Neill.) 

Section 3-11:00; R-112. (Stratemeyer.) 

Consideration given to curriculum, organization, methods of teaching, evaluation 
of newer materials, and utilization of environmental resources. 

Ed. 124. Arithmetic in the Elementary School. (2) 

Section 1- 8:00; A-14. (Schindler.) 

Section 2-10:00; A-14. (Schindler.) 

Emphasis on materials and procedures which help pupils sense arithmetical 
meanings and relationships. Helps teachers gain a better understanding of the number 
system and arithmetical processes. 

Ed. 125. Art in Elementary Schools. (2) 

Section 1-M., W., 10:00-12:30; A-302. (Lembach.) 

Section 2-T., Th., 10:00-12:30; A-302. (Lembach.) 

Concerned with art methods and materials for elementary schools. Includes labora- 
tory experiences with materials appropriate for elementary schools. 

Applications for enrollment must be mailed to the Director of the Summer Session 
before June 14, 1958. Enrollment will be limited to 25 persons per section. 

Ed. 127. Teaching in Elementary Schools. (6) 

Daily, 9:00, 10:00, 11:00; AR-30. An overview of elementary school teaching de- 
signed for individuals without specific preparation for elementary school teaching or for 
individuals without recent teaching experience. (Burdette.) 

Applications for enrollment must be mailed to the Director of Simimer Session 
before June 14, 1958. Enrollment will be Hmited to 25 persons. 



44 



Education 

Ed. 130. The Junior High School. (3) 

Eight pericxis a week. Daily 8:00; M., VV., F., 9:00; A- 130. A general oven-iew of 
the junior high school. Purposes, functions, and characteristics of this school unit; a 
study of its population, organization, program of studies, methods, staff, and other 
similar topics, together with their implications for prospective teachers. (Leese.) 

Ed. 134. Materials ayid Pwcediires for the Secondary School Core Curriculum. 

(3) 
Fee, $1.00. Eight periods a week. Daily, 10:00; M., \V., F., 11:00; T-102. This 
course is designed to bring practical suggestions to teachers who are in charge of core 
classes in junior and senior high schools. Materials and teaching procedures for specific 
units of work are stressed. (Schneider.) 

Ed. 137. Methods of Teaching Mathematics and Science in Secondary 

Schools. (2) 
Laboratory fee, $2.00. Daily 9:00; T-102. Considers such topics as objectives, selection, 
organization, and presentation of subject matter, appropriate classroom methods and 
procedures, instructional materials and evaluation of learning experiences in the areas 
of mathematics, the physical sciences, and the biological sciences. (Ulrw) 

Ed. 141. Methods of Teaching English in Secondary Schools. (3) 

Eight periods a week. Daily, 10:00; M., \V., F., 11:00; T-4. Content and method 

in teaching the English language arts. (Brvan.) 

Ed. 145. Princi-ples and Methods of Secondary Education. (3) 

Daily, 11:00; M., \V., F., 12:00; R-102. This course is concerned with the principles 

and methods of teaching in junior and senior high schools. (Grambs.) 

Ed. 147. Audio-Visual Education. (3) 
Eight periods a week. 

Section 1-Dailv, 8:00; M., T., W., 9:00; P-306. 
Section 2-Daily, 8:00; W., Th., F., 9:00; P-306. 

Fee, $1.00. Sensory impressions in their relation to learning, projection appa- 
ratus, its cost and operation; slides, film-strips, and films, physical principles under- 
lying projection; auditory aids to instruction; field trips; pictures, models, and graphic 
materials; integration of sensory aids with organized instruction. (Maley.) 

Ed. 150. Educational Measurement. (2) 

Daily 11:00; N-106. Constructing and interpreting measures of achievement. 

(Cooper.) 

Ed. 153. The Teaching of Reading. (2) 

Section 1— Primary and intermediate grades 8:00; T-211. 

Section 2— Intermediate and secondarj' grades— 9:00; T-211. 
Section 3— Primary and intermediate grades— 11:00; T-211. 

Concerned with fundamentals of development reading instruction, including read- 
ing readiness, uses of experience records, procedures in using basal readers, the im- 
provement of comprehension, teaching reading in all areas of the curriculum, uses of 
children's Literature, the program in word analysis, and procedures for determining 
indi\idual needs. (Matson.) 

45 ► 



Education 

Ed. 154. Remedial Reading Instruction. (2) 

Daily 8:00; A-7. For supervisors and teachers who wish to help retarded readers. Con- 
cerned with causes of reading difficulties, the identification and diagnosis of retarded 
pupils, instructional materials, and teaching procedures. Prerequisite, Ed. 153 or the 
equivalent. Applications for enrollment must be mailed to the Director of Summer 
Session before June 14, 1958. Enrollment will be limited to 30 persons. (Dunlap.) 

Ed. 160. Educational Sociology. (2) 

Daily 10:00; T-219. This course deals vAth data of the social sciences which are 
germane to the work of teachers. Consideration is given to implications of democratic 
ideology for educational endeavor, educational tasks imposed by changes in popula- 
tion and technological trends, the welfare status of pupils, the socio-economic attitudes 
of indi\ iduals who control the schools, and other elements of commimity background 
which have significance in relation to schools. (Grambs.) 

Ed. 161. Principles of Guidance. (3) 

Eight periods a week. Daily, 10:00; M., W., F., 11:00; M-104. Overview of principles 

and practices of guidance-oriented education. (Byrne.) 

Ed. 162. Mental Hygiene in the Classroom. (2) 
Section 1- 8:00; T-103. 
Section 2- 9:00; T-103. 
Section 3-10:00; T-103. 

The practical application of the principles of mental hygiene to classroom problems. 

(Denecke.) 
Ed. 170. Introduction to Special Education. (2) 

Daily 8:00; R-112. Designed to give an understanding of the needs of all types of 
exceptional children, stressing preventive and remedial measures. (Benoit.) 

Ed. 171. Education of Retarded and Slow-Learning Children. (2) 
Daily 9:00; R-112. A study of retarded and slow-learning children, including dis- 
covery, analysis of causes, testing techniques, case studies, and remedial educational 
measures. (Benoit.) 

Ed. 188. Special Problems in Education. (2-3) 

Arranged. Prerequisite, consent of instructor. Available only to mature students who 
have definite plans for individual study of approved problems. (Staff.) 

NOTE: Course cards must have the title of the problem and the name of the 
faculty member who has approved it. 

Ed. 189. Workshops, Clinics, and Institutes: Education in Vamily Finance. 

(6) 
lime and place to be arranged. June 23 - August 1, 1958. The program is especially 
designed for junior, senior high school, and college teachers and other educators 
interested in developing and improving classroom instruction in personal and family 
money management. Activities of the total workshop will include lectures by staff 
and consultants, small group work, study of individual problems, field trips and 
evaluation of available materials. For a detailed description of this workshop, see 
page 32 of this catalog. Early application is suggested so as to he considered for a 
place in the program. (Patrick, Risinger.) 

M 46 



Education 

Ed. 189. Workshops, Clinics, and Institutes: Curriculum Workshop for Edu- 

cable and Trainable Mentally Retarded Children. (3) 
July 14 - August 1, 1958. Daily, 8:30-12:30, with attcrnoons for special conferences, 
committee work, study, and use of special library facilities. This workshop is designed 
to provide educators with greater understanding of the curriculum for educable mentally 
retarded and severely retarded children. For further information, see page 30. 

(Haring.) 

Ed. 189. Workshops, Clinics, and Institutes: Use of Community Resources. 

(3) 
June 23-July 11, 1958. Daily, 9:30-3:30; AR-29-30. This workshop is offered for 
persons who teach in kindergarten or in grades one to twelve, inclusive. It is designed 
to help teachers learn to utilize community resources to strengthen a sound program of 
teaching and learning. The Smithsonian Institution will receive special attention as an 
excellent example of a valuable community resource. (Johnson, Brinton.) 

Ed. 189. Workshops, Clinics, and Institutes: Child Study Leaders. (2) 
June 23 - July 3. Daily, full day. This workshop is designed primarily for leaders 
or prospective leaders to acquaint them with principles and procedures of the child 
study program. All three year levels of the program will be covered. (Staff.) 

Ed. 189. Workshops, Climes, and Institutes: Child Study Leaders. (2) 
July 21 - Aug. 1. Daily, full day. Similar to the above mentioned workshop, except 
for dates. Persons can participate in either one but not in both of these workshops 
for child study leaders. (Staff.) 

Ed. 189. Workshops, Clinics, and Institutes: Administrators' Conference on 

Itnplications of Human Development Principles. (2) 
July 7 - July 18. Daily, full day. This Administrators' Conference is open to super- 
intendents of schools, supervisors and principals. It will examine recent scientific re- 
search findings and theory regarding human growth, learning and behavior and will 
consider the implications of this knowledge for educational practice, including such 
problems as grouping for eflfective learning, marking, curriculum control, teaching 
processes, home-school interaction, the development and use of cumulative records, 
and mental health problems. (Staff.) 

Ed. 189. Workshops, Clinics, and Institutes: Application of Human De- 
velopment Principles in Classrooms. (2) 

July 21 -Aug. 1. Daily, full day. This workshop is open only to persons who have 
been in the child study program for three years or more. Its purpose is to consider 
classroom practices in the light of human development principles. (StaflF.) 

Ed. 189. Workshops, Clinics, and Institutes: Aviation Education Curriculum 

Workshop. (3) 
June 23 to July 11. Daily, 9:00-3:00. Boiling Air Force Base. (Mehrens.) 

Special emphasis will be placed upon the writing of curriculum materials in aviation 
education. Three hours of undergraduate or graduate credit may be earned. 
Registration will be conducted at the Boiling Air Force Base. 



47 



Education 

Ed. 190. Problems and Trends in Contemporary American Education. (3) 
Lectures, iM., W., 1:00, 2:00; Central Auditorium. Discussions, M., T., W., Th., 
11:00; T-108, T-10. Designed to present a broad overview of some key issues and 
trends that relate to the improvement of instruction at elementary, secondary, and 
teacher education levels. Lectures by visiting educators of national prominence will 
be reviewed and analyzed in discussion groups led by regular University staff members. 

(Denemark, Blough.) 

Ed. 210. The OrganiT^tion and Administration of Public Education. (3) 
Section 1-Daily, 8:00; M., W., F., 9:00; T-10. (Newell.) 

Section 2-Daily, 11:00; M. W., F., 12:00; A-7. (Hummel.) 

Eight periods a week. The basic course in school administration. The course deals 
with the organization and administration of school systems— at the local, state, and 
federal levels; and wdth the administrative relationships involved. 

Ed. 211. The Organization, Administration, and Supervision of Secondary 

Schools. (2) 
Daily 10:00; A-7. The work of the secondary school principal. The course includes 
topics such as personnel problems, supervision, school-community relationships, student 
activities, schedule making, and internal financial accounting. (Hummel.) 

Ed. 216. High School Supervision. (2) 

Daily 8:00; T-102. Deals wth recent trends in supervision; the nature and function 
of supervision; planning supervasory programs; evaluation and rating; participation of 
teachers and other groups in policy development; school workshops; and other means 
for the improvement of instruction. (Schneider.) 

Ed. 217. Administration and Supervision in Elementary Schools. (2) 

Daily 8:00; A-21. Problems in organizing and administering elementary schools and 

improving instruction. (Lonsdale.) 

Ed. 219. Seminar in Educational Administration and Supervision. (2) 
Daily 10:00; T-211. (NeweU.) 

Ed. 225. School Public Relations. (3) 

Eight periods a week. Daily, 8:00; M., W., F., 9:00; T-20. A study of the interrela- 
tionships between the community and the school. Public opinion, propaganda, and 
the ways in which various specified agents and agencies within the school have a part 
in the school public relations program are explored. (Van Zwoll.) 

Ed. 226. Child Accounting. (2) 

Daily 10:00; T-20. An inquir\' into the record keeping activities of the school 

system, including an examination of the marking system. (Van Zwoll.) 

Ed. 229. Semi^jar in Elementary Education. (2) 

Section 1-10:00; A-21. (Lonsdale.) 

Section 2-11:00; A-14. (Dunlap.) 

Primarily for individuals who wish to write seminar papers. Enrollment should 
be preceded by at least 12 hours of graduate work in education. 

M 48 



Education 

Ed. 230. Elementary School Su-pervision. (2) 

Daily 11:00; A-21. Concerned with the nature and function of supervision, various 

supervisory techniques and procedures, human relationship factors, and personal 
qualities for effective supervision. (Lonsdale. ) 

Ed. 234. The School Currictdum. (2) 

Daily 8:00; T-5. A foundations course embracing the curriculum as a whole from 
early childhood through adolescence, including a review of historical developments, an 
analysis of conditions affecting curriculum change, an examination of issues in curricu- 
liun making, and a consideration of current trends in curriculum design. (Hovet.) 

Ed. 235. Principles of Curriculum Development. (3) 

Eight periods a week. Daily, 10:00; M., W., F., 11:00; R-202. Curriculum planning, 
improvement, and evaluation in the schools; principles for the selection and organiza- 
tion of the content and learning experiences; ways of working in classroom and school 
on curriculum improvement. (Leese.) 

Ed. 242. Coordination in Work Experience Programs. (2) 
See page 54. 

Ed. 243. Prohlems of Teaching Arithmetic in Elementary Schools. (2') 
Daily 9:00, A-7. Implications of current theory and results of research for the teach- 
ing of arithmetic in elementary schools. (Dunlap.) 

Ed. 244. Prohlems of Teaching Language Arts in Elementary Schools. (2) 

Daily 10:00; T-10. Implications of current theory and the results of research for the 
language arts in the elementary schools. (Stratemeyer.) 

Ed. 245. Introduction to Research. (2) 

Daily 9:00; T-4. Implications of experimental practices, the proposals of eminent 

writers and the results of research for the improvement of teaching on the secondary 

level. (HovetO 

Ed. 246. Prohlems of Teaching Social Studies in Elementary Schools. (2) 
Daily 11:00; T-5. Application to the social studies program of selected theory and 
research in the social sciences, emphasizing patterns of behavior, environmental influ- 
ences, and critical thinking. Application for enrollment must be mailed to the 
Director of the Summer Session before June 14, 1958. Enrollment will be limited to 
25 persons. (O'Neill.) 

Ed. 247. Seminar in Science Education. (2) 

Daily 8:00, T-119. This course is concerned with science education in the elemen- 
tary school. Prerequisite, a science education course. Applications for enrollment must 
be mailed to the Director of the Summer Session before June 14, 1958. Enrollment 
will be limited to 25 persons. (Blough.) 

Ed. 250. Analysis of the Individual. (3) 

Eight periods a week. Daily, 8:00; M., W., P., 9:00; M-102. Knowing students 

through use of numerous techniques. Ed. 161 desirable as prior course. (Staff.) 

49 ► 



Education 

Ed. 253. Guidance Information. (2) 

Daily 9:00; N-106. How to find, file, and use information needed by students for 
making choices, plans, and adaptations in schools, occupations, and in inter-personal 
relations. Ed. 161 desirable as prior course. (Cooper.) 

Ed. 254. Organization and Administration of Guidance Programs. (2) 

Daily 8:00; N-106. How to instill the guidance point of view, and to implement 
guidance practices. All guidance courses except Seminar are prerequisites. (Cooper.) 

Ed. 260. School Counseling: Theoretical Voundations and Practice. (3) 
Eight periods a week. Daily, 10:00; M., W., P., 11:00; M-102. Exploration of 
counseling theories and the practices which stem from them. Ed. 161, Ed. 250, Ed. 253 
are prerequisite. (Staff.) 

Ed. 269. Seminar in Guidance. (2) 

Daily 9:00; M-104. Registration only by approval of instructor. Final guidance course. 

Students study research and conduct one. (Byrne.) 

Ed. 278. Seminar in Special Education. (2) 

First three weeks. 10:00, 11:00; 0-32. (Haring.) 

Ed. 281. Source Materials in Education. (2) 

Daily 11:00; T-219. Bibliography development through a study of source materials in 

education, special fields in education, and for seminar papers and theses. (Wiggin.) 

Ed. 288. Special Problems in Education. Cl-6^ 

Arranged. Master of education or doctoral candidates who desire to pursue special 
research problems under the direction of their advisers may register for credit under 
this number. (Staff.) 

NOTE: Course card must have the title of the problem and the name of the 
faculty member under whom the work will be done. 

Ed. 289. Research— Thesis. CT6^ 

Arranged. Students who desire credit for a master's thesis, a doctoral dissertation, or a 

doctoral project should use this number. (Staff.) 

HOME ECONOMICS EDUCATION 

H. E. Ed. 102. Problems in Teaching Home Economics. (3) 

Eight periods a week. Daily, 8:00; M., W., F., 9:00; H-222. Required of seniors 
in Home Economics Education. Prerequisite, consent of instructor. A study of the 
managerial aspects of teaching and administering a homemaking program; the physical 
environment, organization, and sequence of instructional units, resource materials, 
evaluation, home projects. (Spencer.) 

H. E. Ed. 202. Trends in the Teaching and Supervision of Home Economics. 

Eight periods a week. Daily, 10:00; M., W., F., 11:00; H-222. Study of home 
economics programs and practices in light of current educational trends. Interpretation 
and analysis of democratic teaching procedures, outcomes of instruction, and super- 
visory practices. (Spencer.) 

■< 50 



Education 

HUMAN DEVELOPMENT EDUCATION 

(In addition to the courses listed below, see Ed. 189, page 47.) 

H. D. Ed. 100. Principles of Human Development I. (3) 
Daily, 8:00; iM., W., F., 9:00; A-8. This course gives a general overview of the 
scientific principles that describe human development, learning and behavior and relate 
these principles to the task of the school. Intensive laboratory work with case records 
is an integral part of this course. It is designed to meet the usual certification require- 
meyits in Editcatiotial Psychology. Ordinarily, H. D. Ed. 100 and H. D. Ed. 101 
are not taken concurrently. (Staff.} 

H. D. Ed. 101. Principles of Human Development U. (3) 

Daily, 10:00; M., VV., F., 11:00; A-17. Continuation of H. D. Ed. 100, which is a 

prerequisite. (Staff.) 

H. D. Ed. 112, 114, 116. Scientific Concepts in Human Development 1, 
11, III. (3, 3, 3) 

H. D. Ed. 113, 115, 117. Laboratory in Behavior Analysis I, II, 111. (3, 
3, 3) 

Summer workshop courses for undergraduates. In any one sunmier, concept and 
laboratorj' courses must be taken concurrently. 

H. D. Ed. 200. Introduction to Human Development and Child Study. (3) 
Daily, 8:00; AI., W., F., 9:00; TT2. This course offers a general overview of the 
scientific principles which describe human development and behavior and makes use of 
these principles in the study of individual children. When this course is offered 
during the academic year, each student will observe and record the behavior of an 
individual child through the semester and must have one half-day a week free for this 
purpose. The course is basic to fiuther work in child study and serves as a prerequisite 
for advanced courses where the student has not had field work or at least six weeks 
or workshop experience in child study. When this course is offered during the summer 
intensive laboratory work with case records will be substituted for the study of an 
individual child. (Staff.) 

H. D. Ed. 201. Biological Bases of Behavior. (3) 

Daily, 10:00; M., W., P., 11:00; Q-31. Emphasizes that understanding human life, 
growth and behavior depends on understanding the ways in which the body is able to 
capture, control and expend energy. Application throughout is made to human body 
processes and implications for understanding and working with people. H. D. Ed. 200 
or its equivalent must be taken before H. D. Ed. 201 or concurrently. (Staff.) 

H. D. Ed. 202. Social Bases of Behavior. (3) 

Daily, 8:00; M., W., F., 9:00; E-116. Analyzes the socially inherited and transmitted 
patterns of pressures, expectations and limitations learned by an individual as he grows 
up. These are considered in relation to the patterns of feeling and beha\'ing which 
emerge as the result of growing up in one's social group. H. D. Ed. 200 or its 
equivalent must be taken before H. D. Ed. 202 or concurrently. (Staff.) 

H. D. Ed. 203. Integrative Bases of Behavior. (3) 

Daily, 10:00; M., W., F., 11:00; O-30. Analyzes the organized and integrated 

51 ► 



Education 

patterns of feeling, thinking and behaving which emerge from the interaction of basic 
biological dri\'es and potentials with one's unique experience growing up in a social 
group. H. D. Ed. 200 or its equivalent, H. D. Ed. 201 and H. D. Ed. 202, are 
prerequisite. (Staff.) 

H. D. Ed. 210. Affectional Rehtionshi'ps and Processes in Human Develop- 
ment. (3) 

Daily, 8:00; M., VV., F., 9:00; O-30. Describes the normal development, expression 
and influence of love in infancy, childhood, adolescence and adulthood. It deals with 
the influence of parent-child relationships involving normal acceptance, neglect, re- 
jection, inconsistency, and over-protection upon health, learning, emotional behavior 
and personality adjustment and development. H. D. Ed. 200 or its equivalent must be 
taken before or concurrently. (Staff.) 

H. D. Ed. 211. Peer-Culture and Group Processes in Human Develcpment. (3) 

Daily, 10:00; M., W., F., 11:00; M-101. Analyzes the processes of group formation, 
role-taking and status-winning. It describes the emergence of the "peer-culture" during 
childhood and the e\olution of the child societv at different maturity' levels to adult- 
hood. It analyzes the developmental tasks and adjustment problems associated with 
winning, belonging and plapng roles in the peer group. H. D. Ed. 200 or its 
equi\-alent must be taken before or concurrently. (Staff.) 

H. D. Ed. 212, 214, 216. Advanced Scientific Concepts in Human Develof- 
ment, 1, II, III. (3, 3, 3) 

H. D. Ed. 213, 215, 217. Advanced Lahoratory in Behavior Analysis, I, U, 

in. (3, 3, 3) 
Simimer workshop courses for graduates pronding credit for as many as three work- 
shops. In any one summer, concept and laboratory courses must be taken concurrently. 

H. D. Ed. 218. Workshop in Human Development. (6) 

Prerequisites, H. D. 212, 213, 214, 215, 216, 217. Summer workshop in human 
development for graduate students who have had three workshops and wish additional 
workshop experience. This course can be taken any number of times, but cannot be 
used as credit toward a degree. 

H. D. Ed. 270. Seminars in Special Topics in Human Development. (2-6) 

Arranged. An opportunity for advanced students to focus in depth on topics of special 
interest growing out of their basic courses in human development. Prerequisites, con- 
sent of instructor. 

INDUSTRIAL EDUCATION 

The technical courses which are offered are intended for industrial arts 
teachers, arts and crafts teachers, education for industr)' majors, and adult 
education leaders. Ind. Ed. 9, "Industrial Arts in the Elementary School", is 
intended for elementary school teachers. 

The professional courses are open to industrial arts teachers and supervisors, 
to vocational-industrial teachers and supervisors, to school administrators and 
to other graduate students whose planned programs include work in this area. 

^ 52 



Education 

Itid. Ed. 1. MecJiauical Drawing. (2) 

8:00, 9:00; P-208. l\vo laboratory periods a week. This course constitutes an in- 
troduction to orthographic muhi-\'iew and isometric projection. Emphasis is placed 
upon the visualization of an object when it is represented by a multi-view drawing 
and upon the making of multi-view drawings. The course carries through auxiliary 
views, sectional views, demonstrating conventional representation and single stroke 
letters. Laboratory fee, $5.00. (Jacobsen.) 

hid. Ed. 2. Elementary Woodworking. (2) 

Daily, 10:00, 11:00; P-2I8. This is a woodworking course which involves primarily the 
use of hand tools. The course is developed so that the student uses practically every 
common woodworking h;ind tool in one or more situations. There is also included 
elementary wood finishing, the specifying and storing of lumber, and the care and 
conditioning of tools used. Laboratory fee, $5.00. (Tiemey.) 

Ind. Ed. 9. Industrial Arts in the Elementary School I. (2) 

Daily, 10:00, 11:00; P-214. A course for pre-service and in-service elementary school 
teachers covering construction activities in a variety of media suitable for classroom use. 
The work is organized on the unit basis so that the construction aspect is supplemented 
by reading and other investigative procedures. Laboratory fee, $5.00. (Jacobsen.) 

Ind. Ed. 21. Mechanical Drawing. (2) 

Daily, 8:00, 9:00; P-208. Two laboratory periods a week. Prerequisite, Ind. Ed. 1. A 
course deahng with working drawings, machine design, pattern layouts, tracing and 
reproduction. Detail dravdngs followed by assemblies are presented. Laboratory fee, 
$5.00. (Jacobsen.) 

Ind. Ed. 22. Machine Woodworking I. (2) 

Daily, 10:00, 11:00; P-218. Two laboratory periods a week. Prerequisite, Ind. Ed. 2. 
Machine Woodworking I offers initial instruction in the proper operation of the jointer, 
band saw, variety saw, jig saw, mortiser, shaper, and lathe. The types of jobs which 
may be performed on each machine and their safe operation are of primary concern. 
Laboratory fee, $5.00. (Tiemey.) 

Ind. Ed. 124 a, h. Organized and Swpervised Work Experience. 
Arranged. (Three credits for each internship period, total: 6 credits). This is a work 
experience sequence planned for students enrolled in the curriculum, "Education for 
Industry." The purpose is to provide the students with opportunities for first-hand 
experiences with business and industry. The student is responsible for obtaining his 
own employment with the coordinator advising him as regards the job opportunities 
which have optimum learning value. The nature of the work experience desired is out- 
lined at the outset of employment and the evaluations made by the student and the 
coordinator are based upon the planned experiences. The time basis for each intern- 
ship period is 6 forty-hour weeks or 240 work hours. Any one period of internship must 
be served through continuous emplojTnent in a single establishment. Two internship 
periods are required. The two internships may be served wdth the same business or 
industry. The completion for credit of any period of internship requires the employer's 
recommendation in terms of satisfactory work and work attitudes. More complete de- 
tails are found in the handbook prepared for the student of this curriculum. 

(Merrill, Harrison, Jacobsen.) 

53 ► 



Education 

Ind. Ed. 150. Training Aids Development, (3) 

M., T., W., 8:00, 9:00; Th., F., 8:00, P-306. Study of the aids in common use as to 
their source and appHcation. Special emphasis is placed on principles to be observed 
in making aids useful to shop teachers. Actual construction and application of such 
devices will be required. (Maley.) 

Ind. Ed. 164. Sho-p Organization and Management. (2) 

Daily, 9:00; P-221. This course covers the basic elements of organizing and manag- 
ing an Industrial Education program including the selection of equipment and the 
arrangement of the shop. (Tiemey.) 

Ind. Ed. 165. Modern Industry. (2) 

Daily, 9:00; P-300. This course provides an overview of manufacturing industry in the 
American social, economic, and culture pattern. Representative basic industries are 
studied from the view'points of personnel and management organization, industrial re- 
lations, production procedures, distribution of products, and the like. (Harrison.) 

Ind. Ed. 168. Trade or Occupational Analysis. (2) 

Daily, 10:00; P-221. Pro\ddes a working knowledge of occupational and job analysis 
which is basic in organizing vocational-industrial courses of study. This course should 
precede Ind. Ed. 169. (Staff.) 

Ind. Ed. 171. History of Vocational Education. (2) 

Daily, 11:00; P-221. An overview of the development of Vocational Education from 
primitive times to the present. (Staff.) 

Ind. Ed. 207. Philosophy of Industrial Arts Education. (3) 
M., T., 11:00; W., Th., F., 10:00, 11:00; P. 205. This course is intended to assist the 
student in his development of a point of view as regards Industrial Arts and its relation- 
ship with the total educational program. He should, thereby, have a "yardstick" for 
appraising current procedures and proposals and an articulateness for his own profes- 
sional area. (Maley.) 

Ind. Ed. 216. Supervision of Industrial Arts. (2) 

Daily, 8:00; P-221. (Tiemey.) 

Ed. 242. Coordination in Work-Experience Programs. (2) 

Daily, 8:00; P-205. This course surveys and evaluates the qualifications and duties of a 
teacher-coordinator in a work-experience program. It deals particularly with evolving 
patterns in city and county schools in ^laryland, and is designed to help teacher- 
coordinators, guidance counselors, and others in the super\'isory and administrative 
personnel concerned with functioning relationships of part-time cooperative education 
in a comprehensive educational program. (Staff.) 

MUSIC EDUCATION 

Mus. Ed. 128. Music for the Elementary Classroom Teacher. (2) 
Section 1- 9:00; B-1. (Staff.) 

Section 2-10:00; B-1. (Staff.) 

Prerequisite, Mus. 16 or consent of instructor. A study of the group activities and 
materials through which the child experiences music. The course is designed to aid 

^ 54 



Engineering 

music specialists and classroom teachers. It includes an outline of objectives and a 
sur\ey of instructional methods. 

Mus. Ed. 132. Music in the Secondary School. (2) 

Daily, 8:00; B-1. Prerequisite, consent of instructor. A study of the vocal and instru- 
mental programs in the secondary school. A sur\'ey of the needs in general music, and 
the relationship of music to the core curriculum. (Staff.) 

Mus. Ed. 163. Band Techniques and Administration. (2) 

Daily, 9:00; B-9. Prerequisites, Mus. 80 and 81 or equivalent. Intensive study of a sec- 
ondary wind instrument and of rehearsal techniques. A survey of instructional material, 
administrative procedures, and band pageantry will be included. (Henderson.) 

Mus. Ed. 206. Choral Conducting and Repertoire. (2) 

Daily 10:00; Lib. Lect. Room. The study and reading of choral literature of all periods, 
including the contemporan,', suitable for use in school and community choruses. Style, 
interpretation, tone quality, diction, rehearsal, and conducting techniques are analyzed. 

(Hillis.) 

SCIENCE EDUCATION 

*Sci. Ed. 6. The Natural Sciences in the Elementary School. (2) 

Laboratory fee, $2.00. Daily, 9:00; T-119. Selecting, organizing, and teaching plant and 
animal materials. For teachers who need help in identif}ang and making effective use 
of living materials brought to the classroom, assisting pupils to find answers to their 
quesrions, and planning other worthwhile science experiences. (Campbell.) 

*Sci. Ed. 7. The Physical Sciences in the Elementary School. (2) 
Laboratory' fee, $2.00. Daily, 10:00; T-119. Similar to the previous course except that 
problems for study are selected from the various fields of the physical sciences such as 
electricity' and magnetism, weather, heat, light, sound, etc. (Campbell.) 

Sci. Ed. 105. Workshop in Science for Elementary Schools. (2) 

Section 1-11:00; T-119. (Campbell.) 

Section 2-12:00; T-119. (Blough.) 

Laborator\' fee, $2.00. General science content and teaching materials for practical 
use in classrooms. Includes experiments, demonstrations, constructions, obser\-ation, 
field trips, and use of audio-visual materials. Emphasis is on content and method re- 
lated to science units in common use. 

Enrollment in each of the above courses will be limited to 35 persons. Apphcations 
for enrollment must be mailed to the Director of the Summer Session before June 
14, 1958. 

ENGINEERING 

E. E. 1. Basic Electrical Engineering. (4) 

Eight lectures and one four-hour laboraton,' a week. Lecture, 8:00, M., T., W., Th., 
F., S., and 9:00, M., W.; J-114; laboratory, S., 9:00, 10:00, 11:00, 12:00; S-107-A. 
Prerequisites, Math. 21, Phys. 21 or concurrent registration. Required of sophomores in 

*Students who have received four credits in Sci. Ed. 1, 2, 3, and 4 should not 
register for these courses. 

55 ► 



English 

electrical engineering. Laboratory fee, $4.00 Basic concepts of electrical potential, cur- 
rent, power, and energy; d-c circuit analysis by the mesh-current and nodal methods; 
network theorems; electric and magnetic fields. (Thompson.) 

ENGLISH 

Ef7g. 1,2. Composition and American Literature. (3, 3) 

Eight periods a week. Eng. 1 is the prerequisite of Eng. 2. (Staff.) 

Eng. 1- 

Section 1 -Daily, 8:00; M., W., F., 9:00; A-209. 

Section 2-Daily, 8:00; M., W., F., 9:00; A-16. 

Section 3-Daily, 10:00; M., W., F., 11:00; A-209. 

Eng. 2- 

Section 1-Daily, 8:00; M., W., F., 9:00; A-17. 

Section 2-Daily, 8:00; M., W., F., 9:00; Q-30. 

Section 3-Daily, 10:00; M., W., F., 11:00; A-17. 

Eng. 3, 4. Covifosition and. World Literature. (3, 3) 

Eight periods a week. Prerequisite Eng. 2 or 21. (Gravely and Staff.) 

Eng. 3- 

Section 1-Daily, 8:00; M., W., F., 9:00; A-18. 
Section 2-Daily, 10:00; M., W., F., 11:00; A-18. 

Eng. 4- 

Section 1-Daily, 8:00; M., W., F., 9:00; 0-32. 

Section 2-Daily, 10:00; M., W., F., 11:00; Q-31. 

Section 3-Daily, 10:00; M., W., F., 11:00; A-8. 

Eng. 116S. Shakespeare. (2) 

Daily, 9:00; A-133. Prerequisites, Eng. 4 or 6 and junior standing. The Roman history 
plays, the great tragedies, and the dramatic romances. (Zeeveld.) 

Eng. 120S. English Drama from 1660 to 1800. (2) 

Daily, 10:00; A-133. Prerequisites, Eng. 4 or 6 and junior standing. The important dra- 
matists from Wycherley to Sheridan, with emphasis on the comedy of manners. (Ward.) 

Eng. 150S. American Literature. (2) 

Daily, 11:00; A-133. Prerequisites, Eng. 4 or 6 and junior standing. American poetry 

and prose to 1850. (Gravely.) 

Eng. 156S. Major American Writers. (2) 

Daily, 12:00; A-17. Prerequisites, Eng. 4 or 6 and junior standing. Selected works of 

James and Faulkner. (Lutwack.) 

Eng. 200. Research. (J-6) 

Arranged. (Murphy and Staff.) 

M 56 



Entomology, Foreign Languages 

ENTOMOLOGY 

lEwt. lis. Entomology for Science Teachers. (3) 

Daily 1:00; M., VV., F., 2:00; O-200. This course is designed to help teachers 
utilize insects in their teaching. The general availability of insects makes them especial- 
ly desirable for use in nature study courses. Teachers should be acquainted, therefore, 
with the simplest and easiest way to collect, rear, preserve, and identity the common in- 
sects about which students are constantly asking questions. (Haviland.) 

Ent. 110, III. Special Problems. 0,0 

Prerequisites to be determined by instructor. Arranged. An intensive investigation of 
some entomological problem, preferably of the student's choice. Required of majors 
in entomology. (Staff.) 

Ent. 201. Advanced Entomology. 

Credit and prerequisites to be determined by the department. To be arranged. Studies 
of minor problems in morphology, taxonomy and applied entomology, with particular 
reference to the preparation of the student for individual research. (Staff.) 

Ent. 202. Research. 

Credit depends upon the amount of work done. To be arranged. Required of gradu- 
ate students majoring in Entomology. This course involves research on an approved 
project. A dissertation suitable for publication must be submitted at the conclusion of 
the studies as a part of the requirements for an advanced degree. (Staff.) 

FOREIGN LANGUAGES 

French 0. Intensive Elementary French. (0) 

Eight periods a week. M., T., W., Th., 11:00, 12:00; T-12. Intensive elementary 
course in the French language designed particularly for graduate students who wish to 
acquire a reading knowledge. (Kramer.) 

French 2. Elementary French. (3) 

Eight periods a week. Daily, 11:00; M., W., F., 12:00; A-231. Second semester of 
first-year French. Elements of grammar; pronunciation and conversation; exercises in 
composition and translation. (Arsenault.) 

French 4 or 5. Intermediate Literary French (3) or French 6 or 7. Intertnedi- 

ate Scientific French. (3) 
Eight periods a week. Daily, 9:00; M., W., F., 8:00; A-231. Prerequisite, French 1 
and 2, or equivalent. Students interested in second year French should consult with 
Foreign Language Department at time of registration. Arrangements wall be made to 
meet needs of students interested in either the first or second semester of literary or 
scientific French. (Arsenault.) 



fRecommended for teachers. 

57 



Foreign Languages, Geography, Government and Politics 

Gertnan 0. Intensive Elementary German. (0) 

Eight periods a week. M., T., W., Th., 8:00, 9:00; M-101. Intensive elementary 
course in the German language designed particularly for graduate students who wish 
to acquire a reading knowledge. (Kramer.) 

German 2. Elementary German. (3) 

Eight periods a week. Daily, 11:00; M., W., F., 12:00; A-228. Second semester of 
first-year German. Elements of grammar; pronunciation and conversation; exercises in 
composition and translation. (Lemaire.) 

German 4 or 5. Intermediate Literary German (3) or German 6 or 7. Inter- 
mediate Scientific German. (3) 
Eight periods a week. Daily, 9:00; M., W., F., 8:00; A-228. Prerequisite, German 
1 and 2, or equivalent. Students interested in second year German should consult wdth 
Foreign Language Department at time of registration. Arrangements will be made to 
meet needs of students interested in either the first or second semester of literary or 
scientific German. (Lemaire.) 

Spanish 2. Elementary Spanish. (3) 

Eight periods a week. Daily, 10:00; M., W., F., 9:00; A-212. Second semester of 
first-year Spanish. Elements of grammar, pronunciation and conversation; exercises in 
composition and translation. (Rand.) 

Spanish 4 or 5. Intermediate Spanish. (3) 

Eight periods a week. Daily, 12:00; M., W., F., 1:00; A-212. Prerequisite, Spanish 
1 and 2, or equivalent. Translation, conversation, exercises in pronunciation. Reading of 
texts designed to give some knowledge of Spanish and Latin-American life, thought, 
and culture. (Rand.) 



GEOGRAPHY 

Geog. 30. Principles of Morphology. (3) 

Daily, 8:00; M., W., F., 9:00; N-101. A study of the physical features of the earth's 
surface and their geographic distribution, including subordinate land forms. Major 
morphological processes, the development of land forms, and the relationships between 
various types of land forms and land use problems. (McArthur.) 

Geog. 100. Regional Geography of Eastern Anglo- America. (3) 

Daily 10:00, M., W., F., 11:00; N-101. A study of the cultural and economic geography 
and the geographic regions of eastern United States and Canada, including an 
analysis of the significance of the physical basis for present-day diversification of 
development, and the historical geographic background. (McArthur.) 

GOVERNMENT AND POLITICS 

G. & P. I. American Government. (3) 

Eight periods a week. This course is designed as the basic course in government for 

the American Civilization program, and it or its equivalent is a prerequisite to all other 

M 58 



Government and Politics, History 



courses in the Department. It is a comprehensive study of government in the United 
States— national, state, and local. 

Section 1 -Daily, 9:00; M., W., F., 8:00; 0-28A. (Staff.) 

Section 2-Dailv, 9:00; M., W., F., 8:00; Q-31. (Staff.) 

Section 3-Daily, 11:00; M., W., F., 12:00; Q-29A. (Staff.) 

G. & P. 4. State Government and Administration. (3) 

Eight periods a week. Daily, 11:00; M., W., F., 12:00; E-116. Prerequisite, G. & P. 1. 
A study of the organization and functions of state government in the United States, 
with special emphasis upon the government of Maryland. (Staff.) 

G. & P. 11. The Government and Administration of the Soviet Union. (3) 

Eight periods a week. Daily, 9:00; M., VV., F., 8:00; A-17. Prerequisite, G. & P. 1. 
A study of the adoption of the Communist philosophy by the Soviet Union, of its 
governmental structure, and of the administration of government policy in the Soviet 
Union. (Steinmeyer.) 

G. & P. 101. International Political Relations. (3) 

Eight periods a week. Daily, 9:00; M., W., F., 8:00; A-12. Prerequisite, G. & P. 1. 
A study of the major factors underlying international relations, the influence of geogra- 
phy, climate, nationalism, and imperialism, and the development of foreign pohcies 
of the maior powers. (Hathom.) 

G. &• P. 105. Recent Far Eastern Politics. (3) 

Eight periods a week. Daily, 11:00; M., W., F., 12:00; A-16. Prerequisite, G. & P. 1. 
The background and interpretation of recent political events in the Far East and their 
influence on world politics. (Steinmeyer.) 

G. & P. 261. Problems of Government and Politics. (3) 
To be arranged. 

G. & P. 299. Thesis Course. (3, 6) 
To be arranged. 



(Alford.) 



(Staff.) 





HISTORY 


H. 5. History of American C 


Civilization. (3) 


Eight periods a week. 




Section 1 -Daily, 9:00; iM., W., 


F., 8:00; A-12. 


Section 2-Daily, 9:00; M., W., 


F., 10:00; A-203, 


Section 3-Daily; 10:00; M., W., 


F., 11:00; A-106, 


Section 4-Daily, 11:00; M., W., 


F., 12:00; A-110. 


H. 6. History of American C 


ivilization. (3) 


Eight periods a week. 




Section I -Daily, 9:00; M., W., 


F., 8:00; A-106. 


Section 2-Daily, 9:00; M, W., 


F., 10:00; A-110. 


Section 3-Daily, 10:00; M., W., 


F., 11:00; A-12. 


Section 4-Daily, 10:00; M., W., 


F., 11:00; A-130, 



(Ferguson.) 
(Bates.) 
(Beard.) 
(Evans.) 



(Hanks.) 

(Gordon.) 

(Riddleberger.) 

(Staff.) 



59 



History 

H. 102S. The American Revolution. (2) 

Daily, 1 1 :C0; A-203. Prerequisites, H. 5, 6 or equivalent. The background and course of 
the American Revolution through the formation of the Constitution. (Ferguson.) 

H. 115S. The Old South. (2) 

Daily 8:00; A-207. Prerequisites, H. 5, 6 or the equivalent. A study of the institu- 
tional and cultural life of the ante-bellum South with particular reference to the back- 
ground of the Civil War. (Riddleberger or Evans.) 

H. 129S. The United States and World Affairs. (2) 

Daily 10:00; A-207. Prerequisites, H. 5, 6 or the equivalent. A consideration of the 
changed position of the United States with reference to the rest of the world since 1917. 

(Hanks.) 

H. ]33S. The History of Ideas in America. (2) 

Prerequisites, H. 5, 6 or the equivalent. An intellectual history of the American 

people, embracing such topics as liberty, democracy, and social ideas. (Beard.) 

H. 164. The Middle East. (3) 

Eight periods a week. Daily, 10:00; M., W., F., 11:00; A-209. Prerequisites, six 
hours from the following groups of courses: H. 1, 2, H. 51, 52, or H. 53, 54 or per- 
mission of the instructor. Survey of the history and the institutions of Middle Eastern 
nations in the 19th and 20th centuries v\'ith special emphasis upon the impact of the 
West, the rise of nationalisms, and present day problems. (Rivlin.) 

H. 166S. The French Revolution. (2) 

Daily 12:00; A-207. The Enlightenment and the Old Regime in France; the revolution- 
ary uprisings from 1789 to 1799. (Gordon.) 

H. 172S. Europe in the Nineteenth Century, 1815-1919. (2) 

Daily 9:00; A-207. Prerequisites, H. 1, 2 or H. 53, 54. A study of the pohtical, 
economic, social and cultural development of Europe from 1870 to 1914. (Rivlin.) 

H. 200. Research, (i-6) 

Credit apportioned to amount of research. Arranged (Staff.) 

H. 201 S. Seminar in American History. (2) 

Arranged. (Ferguson.) 

H. 202S. Historical Literature. (2) 

Arranged. Assigimients in various selected fields of historical literature and bibliography 
to meet the reqviirements of quahfied graduate students who need more intensive con- 
centration. (Beard.) 

H. 2J2S. Period of the American Revolution. (2) 

Arranged. Readings and conferences designed to familiarize the student with some of 
the critical hterature and sources of the period of the American Revolution. (Ferguson.) 



60 



Home Economics, Horticulture 

H. 21 5S. The Old South. (2) 

Arranged. Readings and conferences designed to familiarize the student with some 

of the standard sources and the classical literature of the ante-bellum South. 

(Riddleberger.) 
H. 2 SOS. Seminar in European History. (2) 

Arranged. (Gordon.) 

HOME ECONOiMICS 

H. Mgt. 152. Experience in Management of the Home. (3) 
Prerequisites, Home Mgt. 150, 151. Laboratory fee, $7.00. Residence in the Home 
Management House. Experience in planning, coordinating, and participating in the 
activities of a household, composed of a faculty member and a group of students. 

(Stephens.) 

Inst. Mgt. 164. Food Service Adyninistration and Personnel Management. (3) 
Daily, June 23- July 11, 8:00, 9:00, 10:00, 11:00. Consent of instructor required. 
Administrative policies; problems in job analysis, job description, work scheduling; per- 
sonnel management, including motivation and on the job training. Field trips re- 
quired. (Collins.) 

Inst. Mgt. 167S. Institution Equipment and Food Service Layout. (3) 
Daily, July 14-August 1, 8:00, 9:00, 10:00, 11:00. Consent of instructor required. 
Selection and arrangement of food service equipment with emphasis on size needed, 
performance, maintenance, relative costs, specifications and functional layout. (Collins.) 

Pr. Art 136. Display. (2) 

M., W., F., 9:00, 10:00, 11:00; H-105. Laborator)' fee, $3.00.; Prerequisites, Pr. Art 1 
or equivalent. Practice in effective display for teaching and for merchandising, using 
display windows and bulletin boards. (Curtiss.) 

Tex. 105. Consumer Problems in Textiles. (3) 

Daily, 10:00; T., W., Th., 9:00; H-132, H-215; time will be needed for field trips. 
Prerequisite, Tex. 1 or equivalent. Laborator)' fee, $3.00. Study of textiles from the 
consumer point of view for personal, household, and institutional use. Evaluation of 
such textiles through analysis of comparative shopping, laboratory tests, sur\'ey of litera- 
ture and field trips. Emphasis \\'ill be upon recent developments. Many guest speakers. 

(MitcheU.) 
Clo. 220. Special Studies in Clothing. (2-4) 

July 7-25; Daily 11:00, 12:00; H-132, H-215; other times arranged in relation to 
credit. Laboratory fee, $3.00. Analysis of clothing construction methods; selection of 
wearing apparel to make or buy; sewing machine clinic, "Using the Automatics"; other 
problems to meet student needs and in relation to credit. (Mitchell.) 

HORTICULTURE 

Hort. 122. Special Prohlems. (2) 

Credit arranged according to work done. For major students in Horticulture or Botany. 

(Staff.) 

61 ► 



Journalism and Pxihlic Relations, Library Science, Mathematics 

Hort. S124. Tree and Sm^ill Fruit Management. CO 

July 7 through July 11. Arranged. F-104. Primarily designed for vocational agricul- 
ture teachers and county agents. Special emphasis will be placed upon new and im- 
proved commercial methods of production of the leading tree and small fruit crops. 
Current problems and their solution will receive special attention. 

(Thompson and Haut.) 

Hort. 208. Advanced Hortictdtural Research. (2-6) 

Credit granted according to work done. (Staff.) 

JOURNALISM AND PUBLIC RELATIONS 

Joum. 173. Scholastic Journalism. (2) 

Daily, 9:00; G-309. Introduction to theory and practice in production of high school 

publications. For education majors who may adidse a student publication. (Crowell.) 

LIBRARY SCIENCE 

L. S. WIS. School Library Administration. (3) 

Eight periods a week. Daily, 10:00; M., W., F., 11:00; New Library. The organiza- 
tion and maintenance of effective library service in the modern school. Planning and 
equipping library quarters, purpose of the library in the school, standards, instruction 
in the use of books and libraries, training student assistants, acquisition of materials, 
repair of books, publicity, exhibits, and other practical problems. (Staff.) 

L. S. 103S. Book Selection for School Libraries. (3) 

Eight periods a week. Daily, 1:00; M., VV., F., 2:00; New Library. Principles of book 
selection as applied to school libraries. Practice in the effective use of book selection 
aids and in the preparation of book lists. Evaluation of publishers, editions, transla- 
tions, format, etc. (Staff.) 

MATHEMATICS 

Math. 0. Basic Mathematics. (0) 

Eight periods a week. Daily 10:00; M., W., F., 11:00; Y-5. Recommended for students 
whose curriculum calls for Math 5 or Math 10 and who fail the qualifying examina- 
tion for these courses. 

The fundamental principles of Algebra. Charge made for equivalent of a three-credit 
course. (Staff.) 

Math. L Introdtictory Algebra. (0) 

Eight periods a week. Daily 10:00; M., W., F., 11:00; Y-17. Reconmiended for 

students whose curriculum calls for Math 5 or Math 10 and who fail the qualifjdng 

examination for these coiu'ses. 

A review of topics covered in a second course in Algebra. Charge made for equivalent 

of a three-credit course. (Staff) 



< 62 



Mathematics 

Math. 5. Business Algebra. (3) 

Eight periods a week. 

Section la-Daily, 10:00; M., W., F., 11:00; Y-27 

Section lb-Daily, 10:00; M., W., F., 11:00; Y-28 (Koo and StafiF.) 

Prerequisite, one unit of algebra. Open only to students in the College of Business 

and Public Administration, the College of Agriculture, the College of Military Science, 

and the Department of Industrial Education. 

Fundamental operations, fractions, ratio and proportion, linear equations; exponents, 

logarithms, percentage, trade discount, simple interest, bank discount, true discount, and 

promissory notes. 

Math. 6. Mathematics of Finance. (3) 

Eight periods a week. 

Section la-Daily, 8:00; M., W., F., 9:00; Y-2 (Dyer.) 

Section lb-Daily, 8:00; M., W., F., 9:00; Y-5 (Smith.) 

Prerequisite, Math. 5, or equivalent. Required of students in the College of Business 
and Public Administration and open to students in the College of Arts and Sciences 
for elective credit only. Line diagrams, compound interest, simple interest, ordinary 
annuities, general annuities, deferred annuities, annuities due, perpetuities, evaluation 
of bonds, amortization, and sinking funds. 

Math. 10. Algebra. (3) 

Eight periods a week. Daily, 8:00, M., W., F., 9:00; Y-16. Prerequisite, one unit each 
of algebra and plane geometry. Fundamental operations, factoring, fractions, linear 
equations, exponents and radicals, logarithms, quadratic equations, progressions, per- 
mutations and combinations, probability. (Staff.) 

Math. 11. Trigonometry and Analytic Geometry. (3) 

Eight periods a week. Daily, 10:00; M., W., F., 11:00; Y-2. Prerequisite, Math. 10, 
or equivalent. This course is not recommended for students planning to enroll in 
Math. 20. Trigonometric functions, identities, addition formulas, solution of triangles, 
coordinates, locus problems, the straight line and circle, conic sections, graphs. 

(Dyer, Good.) 

Math. 18. Elementary Mathematical Analysis. (5) 

Thirteen periods a week. 

Section la-Daily, 8:00, 9:00; M., W., F., 1:00; Y-28 (Ehrlich.) 

Section lb-Daily 8:00, 9:00; M., W., F., 1:00; Y-27 (Kline.) 

Prerequisite, high school algebra completed and plane geometry. Open to students 
in the physical sciences, engineering, and education. The elementary mathematical 
functions, especially algebraic, logarithmic, and exponential are studied by means 
of their properties, their graphical representations, the identities connecting them, 
and the solution of equations involving them. The beginning techniques of calculus, 
sequences, permutations and combinations and probability are introduced. 

Math. 19. Elementary Mathematical Analysis. (5) 

Thirteen periods a week. 

Section la-Daily, 8:00, 9:00, M., W., F., 1:00; Y-19 (Shepherd.) 

Section lb-Daily, 8:00, 9:00; M., W., F., 1:00; Y-18 (Staff.) 

Section Ic-Daily, 8:00, 9:00; M., W., F., 1:00; Y-17 (Staff.) 

Prerequisite, Math. 18 or equivalent. Open to students in the physical sciences, engi- 

63 ► 



Mathematics 

neering and education. A continuation of the content of Math. 18 including a study 
of the trigonometric and inverse trigonometric functions, determinants, the conic sec- 
tions, solid analytic geometry, and an introduction to finding areas by integration. 

Math. 20. Calculus. (4) 

Ten periods a week. Daily, 10:00, 11:00; Y-26. Prerequisite, Math. 19 or equivalent. 
Open to students in engineering, education, and the physical sciences. Limits, derivatives, 
differentials, ma.xima and minima, curve sketching, curvature, kinematics, integration. 

(Fusaro.) 
Math. 21. Calcuhis. (4) 
Ten periods a week. 

Section la-Daily, 8:00, 9:00; Y-26 (Blakley.) 

Section lb-Daily, 8:00, 9:00; Y-4 (Hill.) 

Prerequisite, Math. 20, or equivalent. Open to students in engineering, education, 
and the physical sciences. Intergration with geometric and physical applications, 
partial derivatives, space geometry, multiple integrals, infinite series. 

Math. 64. Differential Equations for Engineers. (3) 

Eight periods a week. Daily, 8:00, M., W., F., 9:00, Y-121. Prerequisite, Math. 21, 
or equivalent. Required of students in mechanical and electrical engineering. Differ- 
ential equations of the first and second order with emphasis on their engineering applica- 
tions. CJadcson.) 

"'Math. 106S. Introduction to the Theory of Numbers. (2) 

Daily, 10:00, Y-122. Prerequisite a year of college mathematics or consent of instructor. 
Integers, divisibility, Euclid's algorithm, Diophantine equation, congruences. (Rosen.) 

Math. 116. Introduction to Coni'plex Variable Theory. (3) 
Eight periods a week. Daily, 8:00; M., W., F., 9:00; Y-122. Prerequisite, Math. 21 
or equivalent. Open to students in engineering and the physical sciences. Graduate 
stvidents in Mathematics should enroll in Math. 286. Fundamental operations in com- 
plex numbers, differentiation and integration, power series, analytic functions, con- 
formal mapping, residue theory. (Rosen.) 

*Math. 129S. Higher Geometry QN on-Euclidean Geometry'). (2) 
Daily, 11:00, Y-121. Prerequisite a year of college mathematics or consent of instructor. 
Development of Non-Euclidean geometry from axioms using the same techniques as in 
Euclidean geometry and showing the basic importance of the axiom system. (Jackson.) 

*Math. 184. Foundations of Analysis. (3) 

Eight periods a week. Daily, 8:00; M., W., F., 9:00; Y-101. Prerequisite a year of 
college mathematics or consent of instructor. Designed primarily for those enrolled in 
programs with emphasis in the teaching of mathematics and science. Not open to stu- 
dents seeking a major directly in the physical sciences, since the course content is 
usually covered elsewhere in their curriculum. A study of sets, relations, functions, 
graphs and the limit concept as it is used in the calculus. (Previous knowledge of 
calculus is not required.) (Good.) 



*Intended for teachers. 
•< 64 



Microbiology, Music 

MICROBIOLOGY 

iMicroh. 1. General Microbiology. (4) 

Five lectures and five two-hour laboratory periods a week. Lecture, 8:00; T-219. 
Laboratory, 9:00, 10:00; T-311. Laboratory fee, $10.00. The physiology, culture, and 
differentiation of bacteria. Fundamental principles of Microbiology in relation to man 
and his environment. (Laffer.) 

Microb. 181. Microbiological Problems. (3) 

Eight two-hour laboratory periods a week. To be arranged. Prerequisite, 16 credits 
in Microbiology. Registration only upon consent of the instructor. Laboratory fee, 
$10.00. This course is arranged to provide qualified majors in Microbiology, and 
majors in allied fields an opportunity to pursue specific microbiological problems under 
the supervision of a member of the Department. (Faber.) 

Microb. 291. Research. 

Prerequisite, 30 credits in Microbiology. Laboratory fee, $10.00. Credits according to 
work done. The investigation is outlined in consultation with, and pursued under, the 
supervision of a senior staff member of the Department. 

MUSIC 

Music 15. Chapel Choir. (J) 

Daily, 12:00; Lib. Lect. Room. Open to all students. A program will be prepared and will 
be presented late in the Simimer Session. (HiUis.) 

Music 16. Music Fundamentals for the Classroom Teacher. (3) 
Daily, 9:00; M., T., W., 8:00; B-7. Open to students in Elementary Education or 
Childhood Education; other students take Music 7. Music 7 and 16 may not both be 
counted for credit. The fundamentals of music theory and practice, related to the 
needs of the classroom and kindergarten teacher, and organized in accord with the 
six-area concept of musical learning. (Jordan.) 

Music 141. Musical Form. (2) 

Daily, 11 :00; B-7. Prerequisite, Music 71 or an equivalent course in harmony. The study 
of the organizing principles of musical composition, their interaction in musical forms, 
and their functions in different styles. (Jordan.) 

Music 160. Conducting. (2) 

Daily, 9:00; Lib. Lect. Room. A laboratory course in conducting vocal groups. Baton 
technique, score reading, rehearsal techniques, tone production, st)'le, and interpreta- 
tion. Music of all periods will be introduced. (Hillis.) 

APPLIED MUSIC 

A new student or one taking music for the first time at this University 
should register for Music X (Piano) or Music X (Voice), etc. He will receive 
the proper classification at the end of the Summer Session. 

fRecommended for teachers. 

65 ► 



Physical Education, Recreation and Health 

Music 12, 13, 52, 53, 112, 113, 152, 153. Applied Music. (2) 

Hours to be arranged with instructor; B-4. Prerequisite, the next lower course in the 
same instrument. Three half-hour lessons and a minimum of ten practice hours per 
week. The student will register for Music 12 (Piano) or Music 12 (Voice), etc. 
Special fee of $40.00 for each course. (Staff.) 

PHYSICAL EDUCATION, RECREATION AND HEALTH 

Physical Education Fee per semester (to be charged any student registered 
for any physical activity course), $6.00. 

P. E. SIO. Physical Education Activities, els') 

Section 1. Swimming (1), 2:00; Pool. (Husman.) 

Section 2. Golf (1), Wednesdays, 1 : 00-5: 00; Golf Course Driving Range (Cronin.) 
Section 3. Tennis (1), 1:00; Courts. (Husman.) 

Fee, $6.00. Instruction and practice in selected sports; tennis, badminton, golf, arch- 
ery, swimming and square dance. 

Note: 1. Not available for credit by physical education majors. 

Note: 2. Non-majors in physical education may use this credit to fulfill graduation 
requirements in physical education. 

P. E. 100. Kinesiology. (4) 

Daily, 10:00, 11:00; GG-160. A course designed to study kinesiological and 
physiological principles of exercise and the solution of problems concerned with 
increasing efficiency of movement in motor activities and work, as well as those of 
physical conditioning and training. In addition, their relationships to growth and de- 
velopment will be emphasized. (Massey.) 

P. E. 120. Physical Education for the Elementary School. (3) 
M., T., W., Th., 8:00, 9:00; GG-37. Theory and practice of elementary school physical 
education planned particularly for the general elementary teacher. The course content 
wall include curriculum participation, utilization of restricted play areas, class organiza- 
tion, instruction techniques, and introduction to a variety of appropriate activities. 

(Humphrey.) 
P. E. 155. Physical Eitness of the Individual. (3) 

M., T., W., Th., 8:00, 9:00; GG-128. A study of the major physical fitness problems 
confronting the adult in modern society. Consideration is given to the scientific ap- 
praisal and development in maintenance of fitness. At all levels, such problems as 
obesity, weight reduction, chronic fatigue, posture, and special exercise programs are 
explored. This course is open to majors in all areas of education. (Massey.) 

*P. E. 191. The Curriculum in Elementary School Physical Education. (3) 
M., T., W., Th., 10:00, 11:00; GG-37. Curriculum planning and construction is con- 
sidered from a standpoint of valid criteria for the selection of content in elementary 
school physical education. Desirable features of cooperative curriculum planning in 
providing for learning experiences will be presented and discussed. (Humphrey.) 



^Intended for teachers. 
66 



Physical Education, Recreation and Health 

P. E. 200. Scmitnn in Physical Education, Recreation, and Health, (i) 

T., 12:00. Arranged. GG-114. (Staff.) 

P. E. 201. Foundations in Physical Edtication, Recreation and Health. (3) 
M., T., W., Th., 8:00, 9:00; GG-205. A study of history, philosophy and principles 
of physical education, recreation and health as applied to current problems in each area 
as related to general education. (Eyler.) 

P. E. 230. So2irce Material Survey. (3) 

M., T., W., Th., 10:00, 11:00; GG-205. A library survey course, covering the total 
areas of physical education, recreation, and health, plus research in one specific limited 
problem of which a digest, including a bibliography, is to be submitted. (Eyler.) 

P. E. 288. Special Problems in Physical Education, Recreation and Health. 

0-6:, 

Arranged. Master or Doctoral candidates who desire to pursue special research problems 
under the direction of their advisers may register for 1-6 hours of credit under this 
number. 

P. E. 289. Research-Thesis. OS^} 

Arranged. Students who desire credits for a Master's thesis, a Doctoral dissertation, or 
a Doctoral project should use this number. 

Hea. 105 Basic Driver Education. (3) 

M., T., W., Th., 8:00, 9:00; GG-201. This course is the study of the place of the 
automobile in modern life and deals with the theory and practice of the following: 
traffic accidents and other traffic problems; objectives and scope of driver-education; 
motor vehicle laws and regulations; basic automobile construction and maintenance from 
the standpoint of safety; methods in classroom instruction; aids to learning and prac- 
tice driving instruction. (Tompkins.) 

Hea. 145. Advanced Driver Education. (3) 

M., T., W., Th., 10:00, 11:00; GG-201. Progressive techniques and practice of ad- 
vanced driver education; comprehensive programming for traffic safety; psychology in 
traffic safety; improving the attitudes of younger drivers; teaching to meet driving 
emergencies; program planning in driver education; resources and agencies; the teacher 
and driver education; consumer education; measuring and evaluating results; driver 
education for adults; research and needed research; new developments in driver educa- 
tion; insurance and liability; the future of driver education. Prerequisites, Hea. 50, 
Hea. 70, Hea. 80, and Hea. 175. (Tompkins.) 

Hea. 160. Problems in School Health Education in Elementary and Secondary 

Schools. (3) 
M., T., W., Th., 10:00, 11:00; GG-202. This is a workshop type course designed 
particularly for in-service teachers to acquaint them vdth the best methods of provid- 
ing good health services, healthful environment and health instruction. (Johnson.) 

Hea. 220. Scientific Foundations of Health Education. (3) 
M., T., W., Th., 1:00-3:00; GG-202. A course dealing with an analysis of physical, 
mental, and social factors which influence the total health status during the develop- 
mental process. The role of education in fostering physical and mental health is 
studied. (Johnson.) 

67 ► 



Physics 

PHYSICS 

Physics 100. Advanced Experiments, (i, 2, or 3) 

Eight hours laboratory work per week each credit hour. One, two, or three credits 
may be taken concurrently. Hours arranged, Z-306. Prerequisites, Phys. 52 or 54 and 
four credits in Phys. 60. Limited to Physics majors. Laboratory fee, $10.00 per credit 
hour. Selected fundamental experiments in electricity and magnetism, elementary 
electronics, atomic physics, and optics. (Marion and Staff.) 

iPhysics 109. Electronic Circuits. (4) 

Five two-hour lectures per week. Daily, 1:00, 2:00; Z-115. Prerequisite, Physics 
105 must be taken previously or concurrently. This course is intended for stu- 
dents preparing for research in experimental physics. It is also recommended for high 
school science teachers. It will examine the theory of physics detectors and pulse cir- 
cuits, and its applications in circuit design. There will be lecture demonstrations. 

(Hornyak and Staff.) 
""Phys. USA. Atoms, Nuclei, and Stars. (3) 

Four two-hour lectures per week. M., T., W., Th., 5:30-7:20; Y-101. This course is 
intended primarily for high school science teachers and contains a thorough introduc- 
tion to basic ideas of the constitution and properties of atomic and subatomic systems, 
and the overall structure of the universe. The development of present ideas will be 
outlined, and their shortcomings indicated. Subjects treated include the electron, the 
Bohr theory of the atom, the uncertainty principle and quantum mechanics, nuclear re- 
actions, fission, fusion, cosmic radiation, the solar system, the life cycle of a star, sys- 
tems of galaxies, and scientific theories about the past and future of the universe. 

^ (Staff.) 

1[Physics J 30, 131. Basic Concepts of Physics. (4) 

Five two-hour lectures per week. Daily, 10:00, 11:00; Z-115. Prerequisite, junior 
standing. Lecture demonstration fee $4.00. A primarily descriptive course intended 
mainly for students in the liberal arts and high school science teachers. This 
course does not satisfy the requirements of professional schools or serve as a 
substitute for other physics courses. The main emphasis in the course will be on the 
concepts of physics, their evolution, and their relation to other branches of human en- 
deavor. This course is specially recommended for high school science teachers to serve 
as the basic course in physics for this group. (Goodwin and Staff.) 

Physics 150. Special Prohlems in Physics. 

Credit according to work done. Hours and location arranged. Research or special study. 
Laboratory fee $10.00 per credit hour when appropriate. Prerequisite, major in physics 
and consent of Department Head. (Staff.) 

^Physics 160A. Physics Prohlems. (i, 2, or 3) 

Lectures and discussion sessions arranged. Credit according to work done. This course, 
intended primarily for high school science teachers, introduces the student to the proper 
methods of presenting and solving basic problems in physics. The course consists of 
lectures and discussion sessions. Those problems which illustrate best the fundamental 
principles of physics are treated fully. The necessary mathematical methods are de- 
veloped as needed. (Staff.) 

^Intended for teachers. 
fRecommended for teachers. 

M 68 



Physics, Poultry, Psychology 

*Phys. 199. National Science Foundation Summer Institute for Teachers of 

Science and Mathematics. 
Seminar (1). Five 2-hour seminars each week. July 14, August 1. Daily, 3:00, 
4;00; Z-115. Laboratory fee $5.00. Especially designed for high school teach- 
ers of science. Includes the fields of chemistry and physics. Experts in these fields will 
give lectures with emphasis upon contemporary research. Time will be available for 
discussion, and student participation will be encouraged. Research and laboratory 
techniques will be demonstrated. Open only to participants in the National Science 
Foundation Institute. (Laster and Staff.) 

Physics 230. Seminar: Theoretical Physics, (i) 

One seminar hour per week. Prerequisite, Physics 237. Arranged. (Toll.) 

Physics 248. Special Topics in Modern Physics: Mathematical Physics. (2) 
Two two and one-half hour lectures per week. T., Th., 7:00-9:20 P.M.; Z-115. Pre- 
requisite, Phys. 201. During the summer of 1958 this course will stress the solution 
of differential and integral equations, approximation procedures in mathematical physics 
such as perturbation methods and variational techniques, solutions of wave equations, 
and diffusion problems. (Iskraut.) 

Physics 250. Research. 

Credit according to work done. Hours and location arranged. Laboratory fee $10.00 
per credit hour. Prerequisite, approved application for admission to candidacy or special 
permission of the Department Head. Thesis research conducted under approved super- 
\'ision. (Staff.) 

POULTRY 

P. H. Sill. Po-idtry Breeding and Feeding, (i) 

Daily 9:00. This course is designed primarily for teachers of vocational agriculture and 
extension service workers. The first half will be de%'oted to problems concerning breed- 
ing and the development of breeding stock. The second half will be devoted to nutri- 
tion. (Wilcox and Combs.) 

P. H. 205. Poidtry Literature, (i-4) 

Readings on individual topics are assigned. Written reports required. Methods of 

analysis and presentation of scientific material are discussed. (Staff.) 

P. H. 206. Poidtry Research. 

Credit in accordance with work done. Practical and fundamental research with poultry 
mav be conducted under the supervision of staff members toward the requirements for 
the degrees of xM.S. and Ph.D. (Staff.) 

PSYCHOLOGY 

Psych. 1. hitrodziction to Psychology. (3) 

Eight periods a week. Daily, 9:00; M., W., F., 8:00; M-105. A basic introductory 
course, intended to bring the student into contact with the major problems confronting 
psychology and the more important attempts at their solution. (Pliskoff.) 

*Intended for teachers. 

69 ► 



Psychology, Sociology 

Psych. 110. Educational Psychology. (3) 

Eight periods a week. Daily, 10:00; M., W., F., 11:00; M-105. Prerequisite, Psych. 1. 
Researches on fundamental psychological problems encountered in education. Measure- 
ment and signihcance of individual differences, learning, motivation, transfer of train- 
ing, and the educational implications of theories of intelligence. (Piichey.) 

Psych. 225. Practicum in Counseling and Clinical Procedures. Cl-3^ 
Hours arranged. Prerequisite, Psych. 220 and consent of instructor. (Magoon, Pumroy.) 

Psych. 288. S-pecial Research Prohlems. (1-3) 

Hours arranged. Prerequisite, consent of individual faculty supervisor. (Staff.) 

Psych. 290. Research for Thesis. (1-6) 

Hours arranged. (Staff.) 

SOCIOLOGY 

Soc. 1. Sociology of American Life. (3) 

Eight periods a week. Daily, 8:00; M., W., F., 9:00; R-205. Sociological analysis of 
the American social structure; metropolitan, small town, and rural communities; popu- 
lation distribution, composition and change; social organization. (Hirzel.) 

Soc. 2. Principles of Sociology. (3) 

Prerequisite, Soc. 1 or sophomore standing. Eight periods a week. Daily, 10:00; M., 
W., F., 11:00; R-103. The basic forms of human association and interaction; social 
processes; institutions; culture; human nature and personality. (Hirzel.) 

Soc. 5 IS. Social Pathology. (2) 

Daily, 10:00; R-7. Prerequisite, Soc. 1 and sophomore standing. Personal-social dis- 
organization and maladjustment; physical and mental handicaps; economic inadequacies; 
programs of treatment and control. (Shankweiler.) 

Soc. 105S. Cultural Anthropology. (2) 

Daily, 11:00; R205. A survey of the simpler cultures of the world, with attention to his- 
torical processes and the application of anthropological theory to the modern situa- 
tion. (Anderson, Staff.) 

Soc. 118S. Community Organization. (2) 

Daily, 11:00; R-110. Community organization and its relation to social welfare; analysis 
of community needs and resources; health, housing, recreation; commionity centers; 
neighborhood projects. (Staff.) 

Soc. 123S. Ethnic Minorities. (2) 

Daily, 10:00; R-205. Basic social processes in the relations of ethnic groups within the 
state; immigration groups and the Negro in the United States; ethnic minorities in 
Europe. (Lejins.) 

Soc. 136S. Sociology of Religion. (2) 

Daily, 9:00; R-110. Varieties and sources of religious experience; religious, institutions 

and the role of religion in social life. (Anderson.) 

-< 70 



Sociology, S'peech and Dramatic Art 

Soc. 14 IS. Sociology of Personality. (2) 

Daily, 9:00; R-103. Development of human nature and personality in contemporary 
social life; processes of socialization; attitudes, individual differences, and social be- 
havior. (Schmidt.) 

Soc. 153S. Juvenile Delinquency. (2) 

Daily, 11:00; R-7. Juvenile delinquency in relation to the general problem of crime; 
analysis of factors underlying juvenile delinquency; treatment and prevention. (Lejins.) 

Soc. 164S. The Family and Society. (2) 

Daily, 9:00; R-6. Prerequisite, Soc. 1 and Soc. 64 or equivalent. Study of the family 
as a social institution; its biological and cultural foundations, historic development, 
changing structure and function: the interactions of marriage and parenthood, disor- 
ganizing and reorganizing factors in present day trends. (Shankweiler.) 

Soc. 191. Social Field Training. (3) 

Time to be arranged. Prerequisites: For social work field training, Soc. 131; for crime 
control field training, Soc. 52 and 153. Enrollment restricted to available placements. 
Supervised field training in public and private social agencies. The student will select 
his particular area of interest and be responsible to an agency for a definite program of 
in-service training. Group meetings, individual conferences, and written progress re- 
ports will be required as part of the course. (Staff.) 

Soc. 290. Research in Sociology. (,^-6^ 

Credit to be determined. Time to be arranged. (Staff.) 

Soc. 291. Special Social Problems. (3) 

Credit to be determined. Time to be arranged. (Staff.) 

SPEECH AND DRAMATIC ART 

Speech 4. Voice and Diction. (3) 

Eights periods a week. Daily 9:00; M., W., P., 10:00; Studio. Emphasis upon the im- 
provement of voice, articulation, and phonation. May be taken concurrently with 
Speech 1, 2. (Aylward.) 

Speech 7. Puhlic Speaking. (2) 

Daily, 8:00; R-101. Fee $1.00. The preparation and delivery of speeches on technical 
and general subjects. (Aylward.) 

Speech 105. Speech Handicapped School Children, (3) 

Eight periods a week. Daily, 11:00; M., W., F., 12:00; R-109. The occurrence, identi- 
fication, and treatment of speech handicaps in the classroom. An introduction to speech 
pathology. (Craven.) 

Speech 106. Clinical Practice. Cl-6^ 

Hours arranged. A laboratory course dealing with the various methods of correction 

plus actual work in the clinic. Fee $1.00 per credit hour. (Conlon.) 

71 ► 



Speech and Dramatic Art, Zoology 

Speech 111. Seminar. (3) 

Hours arranged. Required of speech majors. Present-day speech research. 

(Strausbaugh.) 
Speech 112. Phonetics. (3) 

Eight periods a week. Daily, 9:00; M., W., F., 10:00; R-109. Fee $3.00. Training in 
the recognition and production of the sounds of spoken EngHsh, with an analysis of 
their formation. Practice in transcription. Mastery of the international phonetic alpha- 
bet. (Hendricks.) 

Speech 129. Play Directing. (3) 

Eight periods a week. Daily, 11:00; M., W., F., 12:00; R-101. A lecture laboratory 

course dealing with the fundamentals of script cutting, pacing, movement, blocking, 

and rehearsal routine, as applied to the directing of plays. (Byrd.) 

Speech 138. Methods and Materials in Speech Correction. (3) 
Eight periods a week. Daily, 9:00; M., W., F., 10:00; R-102. Prerequisite, Speech 
120 or the equivalent. The design and use of methods and materials for diagnosis, 
measurement, and retraining of the speech-handicapped. Fee $3.00. (GDnlon.) 

Speech 200. Thesis. (,3-6^ 

Hours arranged. Credit in proportion to work done and results accomplished. 

(Hendricks.) 
Speech 21 11 A. Advanced Clinical Practice. Cl-3^ 

Arranged. Fee $1.00 per hour. Supervised training in the application of clinical 
methods in the diagnosis and treatment of speech and hearing disorders. (Craven.) 

ZOOLOGY 

fZooI. 1. General Zoology. (4) 

Five lectures and five two-hour laboratory periods a week. Lecture, 8:00; K-307; lab- 
oratory, 9:00, 10:00; K-306. Laboratory fee, $8.00. This course, which is cultural 
and practical in its aim, deals with the basic principles of animal life. (GroUman.) 

Zool. 55S. Development of the Human Body. (2) 

Five lecture periods a week. Daily, 11 :00; K-106. A study of the main factors affecting 
pre-natal and post-natal growth and development of the child with special emphasis on 
normal development. (Highton.) 

fZool. 104. Genetics. (3) 

Eight lecture periods a week. Daily, 9:00; M., W., F., 8:00; K-106. Prerequisite, one 

course in zoology or botany. A consideration of the basic principles of heredity. 

(Highton.) 
*Zool. 121S. Principles of Animal Ecology. (4) 

Five lectures and five three-hour laboratory periods a week. Lecture, 8:00; K-9; lab- 
oratory, 9:00, 10:00, 11:00; K-9. Laboratory fee, $8.00. Animals are studied in rela- 
tion to their natural surroundings. Biological, physical and chemical factors of the 



^Intended for teachers. 
fRecommended for teachers. 

72 



Zoology 

environment which affect the growth, behavior, habits, and distribution of animals are 
stressed. (Strandtmann and Winn.) 

*ZooI. 199. National Science Foundation Summer Institute for Teachers of 
Science and Mathematics. Seminar, (i) 

Five two-hour seminars each week. June 24, July 11. Daily, 3:00, 4:00; K-307. 
Laboratory fee, $5.00. An integrated discussion of recent advances and basic 
principles of biology. The program will include lectures by recognized authorities in 
various fields of biology, laboratory demonstrations, and organized discussion groups. 
Student participation will be encouraged. Open only to participants in the National 
Science Foundation Institute. (Brown and Staff.) 

Zool. 206. Research. 

Credit to be arranged. Research on thesis project only. Laboratory fee, $8.00. (Staff.) 

Zool. 208. Special Problems on Zoology. 

Credit, hours, and topics to be arranged. Laboratory fee, $8.00. (Staff.) 

Zool. 23 IS. Acarology. (3) 

June 24 through July 11. Lectures, recitations, and laboratory daily, 9:00-12:00, 2:00- 
4:00; K-307 and K-109. Laboratory fee, $8.00. An introductory study of the Acarina, 
or mites and ticks, with special emphasis on classification and biology. (Camin.) 

Zool. 232S. Medical and Veterinary Acarology. (3) 

July 14 through August 1. Lectures, recitations, and laboratory daily, 9:00-12:00, 
2:00-4:00; K-307 and K-109. Laboratory fee, $8.00. The recognition, collection, cul- 
ture, and control of Acarina important to public health and animal husbandr)"^ with 
special emphasis on the transmission of diseases. (Strandtmann.) 

Zool. 233S. Agricultural Acarology. (3) 

July 14 through August 1. Lectures, recitations, and laboratory daily, 9:00-12:00, 2:00- 
4:00; K-307 and K-6. Laboratory fee, $8.00. The recognition, collection, culture, and 
control of acarine pests of crops and ornamentals. (Baker.) 



fRecommended for teachers. 



73 



—The University is the rear guard and the 
advance agent of society. It lives in the 
'past, the present and the future. It is the 
storehouse of knowledge; it draws upon 
this depository to throw light upon the 
present; it prepares people to live and make 
a living in the world of today; and it 
should take the lead in expanding the 
intellectual horizons and the scientific 
frontiers, thus helping mankind to go forward 
— always toward the promise of a 
better tomorrow. 

— From "The State and the University, 
the inaugural address of 
President Wilson H. Elkins, 
January 20, 1955, 
College Park, Maryland. 



SEPARATE CATALOGS AVAILABLE 



AT COLUGe PARK 

Individual catalogs of colleges and schools of the University of Mary- 
land at College Park may be obtained by addressing the Office of Uni- 
versity Relations, University of Maryland, College Park, Md. 

1. General Information 

2. College of Agriculture 

3. College of Arts and Sciences 

4. College of Business and Public Administration 

5. College of Education 

6. College of Engineering 

7. College of Home Economics 

8. Department of Air Science 

9. College of Physical Education, Recreation and Health 

10. College of Special and Continuation Studies 

The catalog of the European Program may be obtained by 
addressing the Dean, College of Special and Continuation 
Studies, College Park, Maryland. 

11. Simimer School 

12. Graduate School Announcements 

AT BALTIMORE 

Individual catalogs for the professional schools of the University of 
Maryland may be obtained by addressing the Deans of the respective 
schools at the University of Maryland, Lombard and Greene Streets, 
Baltimore 1, Maryland. 

13. School of Dentistry 

14. School of Law 

15. School of Medicine 

16. School of Pharmacy 

17. School of Nursing