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Full text of "The Summer School"

UNIVERSITY of MARYLAND 



Ltil 



Summer School 



j^ 



>- 




1962 



ADMISSION AND REGISTRATION 
PROCEDURES* 

ADMISSION : All students must be formally admitted to the Uni- 
versity through the Admission's Office, College Park campus. 

Undergraduate-. Must file application with Director of Admis- 
sions by June 8, 1962. 

Graduate: Application for admission and all supporting records 
must be in the office of the Dean of the Graduate School by 
June 1, 1962. 

REGISTRATION: 

College of Education only: 

1. Begin at South-West door of Armory and only according 
to the alphabetical schedule posted on page vii of this 
catalog. 

2. Undergraduate and Special Students must have schedule 
cards signed by adviser and Dean of College of Education. 

3. Graduate students must have schedule cards signed by 
adviser, Dean of the College of Education, and the Dean 
of the Graduate School (all located in the Armory). 

ALL OTHER COLLEGES 

1. Begin at the respective college office. 

2. Schedule cards must be signed by the student's adviser and 
dean. 

3. Graduate students must have signatures of Dean of the Grad- 
uate School (either in Graduate office or in Armory). 

4. Complete registration at the Armory. 

Registration is Neither Complete Nor Official Until All Forms 
Are Submitted and Fees Are Paid 



For details see page 6 and 7. 



Summer School 
1962 




UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 



Volume 17 



February 22, 1962 



No. 17 



UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND BULLETIN is published four times in January; three 
times in February, March, April, May, September and December; two times in June, 
October and November; and once in July and August. 

Re-entered at the Post Office in College Park, Maryland, as second class mail matter 
under the Act of Congress of August 24, 1912. 



Digitized by the Internet Archive 

in 2010 with funding from 

Lyrasis Members and Sloan Foundation 



http://www.archive.org/details/summerschool1962univ 



CONTENTS 



GENERAL 



University Calendar v 

Summer School Registration 

Schedule and Calendar vii 

Board of Regents viii 

Officers of Administration ix 

Chairmen, Standing Committees, 

Faculty Senate xii 

The School 1 

Academic Information 2 

Terms of Admission 2 

Undergraduate and 

Special Students 2 

Graduate Students 2 

Academic Credit 3 

Marking System 3 

Maximum Loads 4 

Summer Graduate Work 4 

Candidates for Degrees 4 

Program in American 

Civilization 5 



General Information 

Registration 6 

Registration for all Colleges 

except Education 6 

Registration: College of 

Education only 7 

Length of Class Period 7 

Definition of Residence 

and Non-Residence 8 

Tuition and Fees 8 

Withdrawal and Refund 

of Fees 9 

Living Accommodation 

and Meals 10 

Student Health 11 

Parking of Automobiles 11 

Library Facilities 12 

University Bookstore 12 

Kindergarten 12 

For Additional Information 13 



CONFERENCES, INSTITUTES, 
WORKSHOPS, SPECIAL COURSES AND LECTURES 



University-wide Lecture Series 13 

Television Workshop 14 

Typewriting Demonstration for 

Business Education Teachers 14 
Notehand Demonstration and 

Study Group 14 

Workshops in Music 15 

Workshop in Choral Music 15 

Workshop in Band Music 15 

Workshop on Teaching Conser- 
vation of Natural Resources 16 
Workshop on Human Relations 
in Educational Administra- 
tion 16 

Education in Family Finance 

Workshop 17 

Workshops in Human Develop- 
ment 17 



Workshop on Use of Community 
Resources 18 

Workshops in Special Education 21 

Administration and Supervision 
of Special Education Pro- 
grams 21 

Institute in Mathematics for Ele- 
mentary School Teachers, 
Principals and Supervisors 21 

Counselor Education I 22 

Workshop for Teachers of Sec- 
ondary School English 22 

Institute for Teachers of Mathe- 
matics in Junior High School 22 

National Science Foundation 
Summer Institute for High 
School Teachers of Science 23 



III 



CONTENTS 



COURSE OFFERINGS 



Agricultural Economics 26 

Agricultural Engineering 26 

Agricultural and Extension 

Education 26 

Agronomy 27 

Animal Husbandry 27 

Art 28 

Botany 28 

Business Organization and 

Administration 29 

Chemistry 30 

Classical Languages and Lit- 
eratures 31 

Dairy 31 

Economics 31 

Education 32 

Engineering 47 

English 48 

Entomology 49 



Foreign Languages 49 

Geography 51 

Government and Politics 52 

History 53 

Home Economics 54 

Horticulture 56 

Mathematics 56 

Microbiology 58 

Music 58 

Philosophy 59 

Physical Education, Recreation 

and Health 60 

Physics 62 

Poultry 63 

Psychology 64 

Sociology 64 

Speech 65 

Zoology 67 



The Faculty 69 



IV 



UNIVERSITY CALENDAR 

FALL SEMESTER 1961 
SEPTEMBER 

18-22 Monday to Friday — Fall Semester Registration 
25 Monday — ^Instruction Begins 

NOVEMBER 

22 Wednesday — Thanksgiving Recess Begins After Last Class 
27 Monday — Thanksgiving Recess Ends 8 a.m. 

DECEMBER 

20 Wednesday — Christmas Recess Begins After Last Class 

JANUARY 1962 

3 Wednesday — Christmas Recess Ends 8 a.m. 

24 Wednesday — Pre-Examination Study Day 

25-31 Thursday to Wednesday, inclusive — Fall Semester Examinations 

SPRING SEMESTER 1962 
FEBRUARY 

5-9 Monday to Friday — Spring Semester Registration 
12 Monday — Instruction Begins 
22 Thursday — Washington's Birthday, Holiday 

MARCH 

25 Sunday — Maryland Day 

APRIL 

19 Thursday — Easter Recess Begins After Last Class 

24 Tuesday — Easter Recess Ends 8 a.m. 

MAY 

16 Wednesday— AFROTC Day 

30 Wednesday — Memorial Day, Holiday 

JUNE 

1 Friday — Pre-Examination Study Day 

2-8 Saturday to Friday, inclusive — Spring Semester Examinations 

3 Sunday — Baccalaureate Exercises 

9 Saturday — Commencement Exercises 

SUMMER SESSION 1962 
JUNE 1962 

25 Monday — Summer Session Registration 

26 Tuesday — Summer Session Begins 

JULY 

4 Wednesday — Independence Day, Holiday 

AUGUST 

3 Friday — Summer Session Ends (6-week Session) 

17 Friday — Summer Session Ends (8-week Session) 

SHORT COURSES 1962 
JUNE 1962 

18-23 Monday to Saturday — Rural Women's Short Course 

AUGUST 

6-11 Monday to Saturday— 4-H Club Week. 

SEPTEMBER 

4-7 Tuesday to Friday — Firemen's Short Course 



UNIVERSITY CALENDAR 

FALL SEMESTER 1Q62 

SEPTEMBER 

17-21 Monday to Friday — Registrarion 

24 Monday — Instruction begins 
NOVEMBER 

21 Wednesday, after last class — Thanksgiving recess begins 
26 Monday, 8:00 a.m. — Thanksgiving recess ends 

DECEMBER 

21 Friday, after last class — Christmas recess begins 

JANUARY 1963 

3 Thursday, 8:00 a.m. — Christmas recess ends 
23 Wednesday — Pre-Examination Study Day 
24-30 Thursday-Wednesday — Fall Semester Examinations 

SPRING SEMESTER 1963 

FEBRUARY 

4-8 Monday to Friday — Registration 
11 Monday — Instruction begins 

22 Friday — Washington's Birthday, Holiday 

MARCH 

25 Monday — Maryland Day (not a holiday) 

APRIL 

11 Thursday, after last class — Easter recess begins 
16 Tuesday, 8:00 a.m. — Easter recess ends 

MAY 

15 Wednesday— AFROTC Day 

30 Thursday — Memorial Day, Holiday 

31 Friday — Pre-Examination Study Day 

JUNE 

1-7 Saturday to Friday — Spring Semester Examinations 
2 Sunday — Baccalaureate Exercises 
8 Saturday — Commencement Exercises 

SUMMER SESSION 1963 

JUNE 

24 Monday — Registration, Simimer Session 

25 Tuesday — Instruction begins 

JULY 

4 Thursday — Independence Day, Holiday 

AUGUST 

16 Friday — Summer Session ends 

SHORT COURSES 1963 

JUNE 

17-22 Monday to Saturday — Rural Women's Short Course 

AUGUST 

5-10 Monday to Saturday-^-H Club Week 

SEPTEMBER 

3-6 Tuesday to Friday — Firemen's Short Course 



VI 



SUMMER SCHOOL REGISTRATION SCHEDULE 

Monday, June 25, 1962* 
8:00 A.M. — 3:00 P.M. 

To expedite registration, students have been grouped on the basis of 
the first letter of the last name. No student will be permitted into the Ar- 
mory until the appropriate time as listed below: 



TIME 


STUDENTS 


TIME 


STUDENTS 


8:00 


N— Q 


12:00 


BL— CE 


8:30 


R— SE 


12:30 


CF— D 


9:00 


SF— SZ 


1:00 


E— GL 


9:30 


T— WH 


1:30 


GM— H 


10:00 


WI— Z 


2:00 


I— K 


10:30 


A— BK 


2:30 


^-ME 






3:00 


MF— MZ 



SUMMER SCHOOL CALENDAR 



June 26 Tuesday 
July 4 Wednesday 
Aug. 17 Friday 



Classes begin 
Holiday (no classes) 
Close of Summer Session 



1962. 



•Dormitories will be open for occupancy on and after 2:00 P.M., Sunday, June 24, 



Vll 



BOARD OF REGENTS 

and 
MARYLAND STATE BOARD OF AGRICULTURE 

Term 
Expires 

Charles P. McCormick 

Chairman 1966 

McCormick and Company, 414 Light Street, Baltimore 2 

Edward F. Holter 

V ice-Chairman 1968 

Farmers Home Administration, 103 South Gay Street, Baltimore 2 

B. Herbert Brown 

Secretary 1967 

The Baltimore Institute, 10 West Chase Street, Baltimore 1 

Harry H. Nuttle 

Treasurer 1966 

Denton 

Louis L. Kaplan 

Assistant Secretary 1964 

5800 Park Heights Avenue, Baltimore 15 

C. E. TUTTLE 

Assistant Treasurer 1962 

907 Latrobe Building, Charles and Read Streets, Baltimore 2 

Richard W. Case 1970 

Commercial Credit Building, Baltimore 

Thomas W. Pangborn 1965 

The Pangborn Corporation, Pangborn Blvd., Hagerstown 

Thomas B. Symons 1963 

Suburban Trust Company, 6950 Carroll Avenue, Takoma Park 

William C. Walsh 1968 

Liberty Trust Building, Cumberland 

Mrs. John L. Whitehurst 1967 

4101 Greenway, Baltimore 18 



Members of the Board are appointed by the Governor of the State for terms of 
seven years each, beginning the first Monday in June. Members may serve only two 
consecutive terms. 

The President of the University of Maryland is, by law, Executive Officer of the 
Board. 

The State law provides that the Board of Regents of the University of Maryland 
shall constitute the Maryland State Board of Agriculture. 



Vlll 



OFFICERS OF ADMINISTRATION 

Principal Administrative Officers 

WILSON H. ELKINS, President 

B.A., University of Texas, 1932; m.a., 1932; b.litt., Oxford University, 1936; D. phil., 
1936. 

ALBiN o. KUHN, Executive Vice President 
B.S., University of Maryland, 1938; M.S., 1939; ph.d., 1948. 

R. LEE HORNBAKE, Vice President for Academic Affairs 

B.S., California State College, Pa., 1934; m.a., Ohio State University, 1936; ph.d., 1942. 

FRANK L. BENTZ, Assistant to the President 

B.S., University of Maryland, 1942; PH.D., 1952. 

ALVIN E. CORMENY, Assistant to the President, in Charge of Endowment and Development 
B.A., Illinois College, 1933; ll.b., Cornell University, 1936. 



Emeriti 

HARRY c. BYRD, President Emeritus 
B.S., University of Maryland, 1908; ll.d., Washington College, 1936; ll.d., Dickinson 
College, 1938; D.sc, Western Maryland College, 1938. 

ADELE H. STAMP, Dean of Women Emerita 
B.A., Tulane University, 1921; M.A., University of Maryland, 1924. 



Administrative Officers of the Schools and Colleges 

MYRON s. AISENBERG, Dean of the School of Dentistry 
D.D.S., University of Maryland, 1922. 

VERNON E. ANDERSON, Dean of the College of Education 

B.S., University of Minnesota, 1930; m.a., 1936; ph.d.. University of Colorado, 1942. 

RONALD bamford, Dean of the Graduate School 

B.S., University of Connecticut, 1924; M.S., University of Vermont, 1926; ph.d., 
Columbia University, 1931. 

GORDON M. CAIRNS, Dean of Agriculture 
B.S., Cornell University, 1936; M.S., 1938; ph.d., 1940. 

RAY VF. ehrensberger. Dean of University College 
B.A., Wabash College, 1929; m.a., Butler University, 1930; ph.d., Syracuse University, 
1937. 

NOEL E. FOSS, Dean of the School of Pharmacy 
PH.C, South Dakota State College, 1929; b.s., 1929; M.S., University of Maryland, 
1932; PH.D., 1933. 

LESTER M. FRALEY, Dean of the College of Physical Education, Recreation and Health 
B.A., Randolph-Macon College, 1928; m.a., 1937; ph.d., Peabody College, 1939. 



IX 



FLORENCE M. GIPE, Dean of the School of Nursing 
B.S., Catholic University of America, 1937; M.S., University of Pennsylvania, 1940; 
ED.D., University of Maryland, 1952. 

LADISLAUS F. GRAPSKi, Director of the University Hospital 

R.N., Mills School of Nursing, BeUevue Hospital, New York, 1938; B.s., University of 
Denver, 1942; m.b.a., in Hospital Administration, University of Chicago, 1943. 

IRVIN c. HAUT, Director, Agriculture Experiment Station and Head, Department of 

Horticulture 

B.S., University of Idaho, 1928; M.S., State College of Washington, 1930; PH.D., Uni- 
versity of Maryland, 1933. 

ROGER HOWELL, Dean of the School of Law 
B.A., Johns Hopkins University, 1914; PH.D., 1917; ll.b.. University of Maryland, 1917. 

VERL s. LEWIS, Dean of the School of Social Work 

A.B., Huron CoUege, 1933; m.a.. University of Chicago, 1939; d.s.w.. Western Reserve 
University, 1954. 

SELMA F. lippeatt. Dean of the College of Home Economics 

B.S., Arkansas State Teachers College, 1938; M.S., University of Tennessee, 1945; ph.d., 
Pennsylvania State University, 1953. 

FREDERIC T. MAVIS, Dean of the College of Engineering 

B.S., University of Illinois, 1922; M.S., 1926; C.E., 1932; PH.D., 1935. 

PAUL E. NYSTROM, Director, Agricultural Extension Service 

B.S., University of California, 1928; M.S., University of Maryland, 1931; m.p.a., Harvard 
University, 1948; D.P.A., 1951. 

DONALD w. o'coNNELL, Dean of the College of Business and Public Administration^ 
B.A., Columbia University, 1937; m.a., 1938; ph.d., 1953. 

JAMES H. reid. Acting Dean of the College of Business and Public Administration 
B.S., University of Iowa, 1932; m.a., American University, 1933. 

LEON p. smith, Dean of the College of Arts and Sciences 

B.A., Emory University, 1919; M.A., Universtiy of Chicago, 1928; PH.D., 1930; Diplome 
de ITnstitute de Touraine, 1932. 

WILLIAM s. STONE, Dean of the School of Medicine and Director of Medical Education 
and Research 

B.S., University of Idaho, 1924; M.S., 1925; M.D., University of Louisville, 1929; 

(HON.), University of Louisville, 1946. 

General Administrative Officers 

c. WATSON ALGIRE, Director of Admissions and Registrations 
B.A., University of Maryland, 1930; M.S., 1931. 

THEODORE R. AYLESWORTH, Professor of Air Science and Head, Department of Air Science 
B.S., Mansfield State Teachers College, 1936; M.S., University of Pennsylvania, 1949. 



' Appointment effective February 1, 1962. 
'Acting Dean, July 1, 1961 — February 1, 1962. 



B. JAMES BORRESON, Executive Dean for Student Life 
B.A., University of Minnesota, 1944. 

DAVID L. BRIGHAM, Director of Alumni Relations 
B.A., University of Maryland, 1938. 

c. WILBUR, cissEL, Director of Finance and Business 
B.A., University of Maryland, 1932; m.a., 1934; c.p.a., 1939. 

HELEN E. CLARK, Deoji of Women 

B.S., University of Michigan, 1943; M.A., University of Illinois, 1951; ed.d., Teachers 
CoUege, Columbia, 1960. 

WILLIAM w. COBEY, Director of Athletics 
A.B., University of Maryland, 1930. 

L. EUGENE CRONIN, Director of Natural Resources Institute 

A.B., Western Maryland College, 1938; M.S., University of Maryland, 1943; PH.D., 1946. 

LESTER M. DYKE, Director of Student Health Service 
B.S., University of Iowa, 1936; m.d., 1926. 

GEARY F. EPPLET, Dean of Men 

B.S., Maryland State College, 1920; M.S., University of Maryland, 1926. 

HARRY D. FISHER, Comptroller and Budget Officer 
B.S., University of Maryland, 1943. 

GEORGE w. FOGG, Director of Personnel 

B.A., University of Maryland, 1926; m.a., 1928. 

ROBERT J. MCCARTNEY, Director of University Relations 
B.A., University of Massachusetts, 1941. 

GEORGE w. MORRISON, Associate Director and Supervising Engineer Physical Plant 
{Baltimore) 
B.S., University of Maryland, 1927; e.e., 1931. 

HOWARD ROVELSTAD, Director of Libraries 

B.A., University of Illinois, 1936; M.A., 1937; B.s.L.S., Columbia University, 1940. 

ORVAL L. ULRY, Director of the Summer Session 

B.S., Ohio State University, 1938; m.a., 1944; PH.D., 1953. 

GEORGE o. WEBER, Director and Supervising Engineer, Department of Physical Plant 
B.S., University of Maryland, 1933. 

Division Chairmen 

JOHN E. farber, JR., Chairman of the Division of Biological Sciences 
B.S., University of Maryland, 1926; M.S., 1927; PH.D., 1937. 

HAROLD c. hoffsommer. Chairman of the Division of Social Sciences 
B.S., Northwestern University, 1921; m.a., 1923; PH.D., Cornell University, 1929. 

CHARLES E. WHITE, Chairman of the Lower Division 

B.S., University of Maryland, 1923; M.S., 1924; PH.D., 1926. 

xi 



CHAIRMEN, STANDING COMMITTEES, FACULTY SENATE 

GENERAL COMMITTEE ON EDUCATIONAL POLICY 

Peter P. Lejins (Arts and Sciences), Chairman 

GENERAL COMMITTEE ON STUDENT LIFE AND WELFARE 

L. Morris McClure (Education), Chairman 

COMMITTEE ON ADMISSIONS AND SCHOLASTIC STANDING 

Kenneth 0. Hovet (Education), Chairman 

COMMITTEE ON INSTRUCTIONAL PROCEDURES 

Charles E. Manning (Arts and Sciences), Chairman 

COMMITTEE ON SCHEDULING AND REGISTRATION 

Benjamin Massey (Physical Education), Chairman 

COMMITTEE ON PROGRAMS, CURRICULA, AND COURSES 

James H. Reid (Business and Public Administration), Chairman 
COMMITTEE ON FACULTY RESEARCH 

Edward J. Herbst (Medicine), Chairman 

COMMITTEE ON PUBLIC FUNCTIONS AND COMMENCEMENTS 

Albin 0. Kuhn (Executive Vice President), Chairman 

COMMITTEES ON LIBRARIES 

Aubrey C. Land (Arts and Sciences) , Chairman 

COMMITTEE ON UNIVERSITY PUBLICATIONS 

Carl Bode (Arts and Sciences), Chairman 

COMMITTEE ON INTERCOLLEGIATE COMPETITION 
John E. Foster (Agriculture), Chairman 

COMMITTEE ON PROFESSIONAL ETHICS, ACADEMIC FREEDOM, AND TENURE 

Peter P. Lejins (Arts and Sciences), Chairman 

COMMITTEE ON APPOINTMENTS, PROMOTIONS, AND SALARIES 

Robert L. Green (Agriculture), Chairman 

COMMITTEE ON FACULTY LIFE AND WELFARE 

Guy B. Hathorn (Business and Public Administration), Chairman 

COMMITTEE ON MEMBERSHIP AND REPRESENTATION 

G. Kenneth Reiblich (Law), Chairman 

COMMITTEE ON COUNSELING OF STUDENTS 

Harold F. Sylvester (Business and Public Administration), Chairman 

COMMITTEE ON THE FUTURE OF THE UNIVERSITY 

Augustus J. Prahl (Graduate School), Chairman 



Xll 



CHAIRMEN, STANDING COMMITTEES, FACULTY SENATE 

ADJUNCT COMMITTEE OF THE GENERAL COMMITTEE ON STUDENT 
LIFE AND WELFARE 

STUDENT ACTIVITIES 

Richard F. Davis (Agriculture), Chairman 

FINANCIAL AIDS AND SELF-HELP 

Paul E. Nystrom (Agriculture), Chairman 

STUDENT PUBLICATIONS AND COMMUNICATIONS 

Warren L. Strausbaugh (Arts and Sciences), Chairman 

RELIGIOUS LIFE 
Redfield Allen (Engineering), Chairman 

5TUDENT HEALTH AND SAFETY 

Theodore R. Aylesworth (AFROTC), Chairman 

STUDENT DISCIPLINE 

J. Allan Cook (Business and Public Administration), Chairman 

BALTIMORE CAMPUS, STUDENT AFFAIRS 

Vernon E. Krahl, (Medicine), Chairman 



xm 



Summer School 



1962 



TO BETTER SERVE THOSE WHO DESIRE SUMMER STUDY, THE 
University of Maryland is offering this Summer an eight-week Simamer 
Session, from June 25 through August 17, 1962. Within this eight-week 
period, a variety of offerings extending over various instructional periods 
ranging from two and three-week workshops to six and eight-week subject 
matter courses will be available. It is believed that the longer instructional 
period will ease considerably the very heavy subject matter concentration and 
rapid pace necessitated by a six-week session and provide then, additional 
time so badly needed for reading, library assignments and research efforts. 
The longer summer session also will provide extended educational opportun- 
ities for students at a time when the University is operating at less than 
peak student load. 

Among the varied offerings, each student will find a combination of 
courses and schedules best suited to his individual needs and desires. 



Academic Information 

Recreational, Social and Cultural Activities 

A Recreation and Social Activities Committee, working with a full-time 
Director of Recreation, has planned a varied program of activities to suit 
Summer ^ession students of all ages. University swimming pools will be 
open scheduled hours each afternoon and evening. SoftbaU, tennis and golf 
tournaments will interest some; others may care to participate in the sum- 
mer theatre workshop or summer chorus. 

Planned activities will include round and square dancing, outdoor 
movies, Chapel vesper services, band concerts, watermelon feasts, guided 
tours of Washington, and other social functions. The Summer Session 
Recreation Director wUl be available to counsel with groups planning 
picnics or other events. ° 

Academic Information 

TERMS OF ADMISSION 

All summer school students must be officially admitted to the Uni- 
versity. This applies to all non-degree as ivell as degree candidates. 

UNDERGRADUATE AND SPECIAL STUDENTS 

A student seeking a bachelor's degree in any undergraduate college, 
who has not been previously admitted to the University, must file application 
with the Director of Admissions not later than the end of the first week in 
June, 1962. Graduates of accredited two and three year normal schools, 
with satisfactory normal school records, may be admitted to advanced stand- 
ing m the College of Education. 

A student who already has a bachelor's degree and who either does not 
wish graduate credit or does not meet requirements for admission to the 
Graduate School may be admitted to the undergraduate college consistent 
with his major mterests, as a Special Student. He should be admitted to 
the University through the Director of Admissions no later than the end of 
the first week m June 1962. Credit so obtained through the College of Edu- 
cation IS ordinarily accepted for renewal of teaching certificate. A Special 
Student may take upper division (100, but not 200 or 300 level) courses. 

GRADUATE STUDENTS 

Application for admission to the Graduate School, and all supporting 
academic records, must be in the office of the Dean of the Graduate School 
by June 1, 1962. 

Transfer Credit: To another institution. The student who wishes to 
transfer credit to another institution should submit an application on which 
he writes For Transfer Only." Along with the application he should sub- 



Academic Information 

mit a letter from the graduate dean of the institution in which he is enrolled 
as a degree student, to the Dean of the Graduate School, University of Mary- 
land, requesting permission to take a limited amount of work. 

Transfer Credit: To the University of Maryland. Credit not to exceed 
six semester hours for course work at other recognized institutions may be 
applied towards the master's degree only when such course work has been 
taken after the student has been admitted to the University of Maryland 
Graduate School. Before taking course work for transfer the student must 
have the approval of his adviser, the head of his major department and the 
Dean of the Graduate School. Normally, approval may be given only for 
courses which are not offered by the University of Maryland during the 
period of the student's attendance. The request for transfer of credit shall 
be submitted to the Graduate Council for approval when the student applies 
for admission to candidacy. The candidate is subject to final examination 
by this institution in all work offered for the degree. 

Special Non-Degree Credit. The student who already has a master's 
degree and does not wish to pursue a doctoral program may submit an 
application marked "Non-Degree" and along with it, an official transcript 
of the master's degree only. If the student later desires to embark on a 
doctoral program, the credit earned in Special Non-Degree status may, at 
the discretion of the major adviser, be used in a doctoral program. 

Degree Credit. The student who wishes to pursue either a master's or 
doctoral program must submit, along with his application, official transcripts 
of all work taken in institutions of higher education. The applicant is sub- 
ject to admission requirements of the Graduate School and of the depart- 
ment in which he hopes to pursue his graduate work. 

ACADEMIC CREDIT 

The semester hour is the unit of credit. During the Summer Session a 
course meeting five times a week for six weeks or four times a week for 
eight weeks each requiring the normal amount of outside work is given a 
weight of three semester hours. Each class period is 80 minutes in length. 

Students who are matriculated as candidates for degrees will be given 
credit toward the appropriate degree for satisfactory completion of courses. 
All courses offered in the Summer School are creditable toward the appro- 
priate degree provided they are included in the student's program as 
planned with his adviser. 

All students will receive an official grade report specifying the amount 
and quality of work completed. 

MARKING SYSTEM 

The following symbols are used for marks: A, B, C, and D — passing; 
F — Failure; I — Incomplete. Mark "A" denotes superior scholarship; mark 

3 



Academic Information 

"B," good scholarship; mark "C," fair scholarship; and "D," passing schol- 
arship. The mark of "I" (incomplete) is exceptional. Complete regulations 
governing marks are printed in University General and Academic Regula- 
tions. 

MAXIMUM LOAD 

Undergraduates may carry up to 9 semester hours of work subject to 
approval of the respective department. A maximima of 8 graduate credits 
may be earned in the 8-week period. 

SUMMER GRADUATE WORK 

Masters' degrees are offered through the Graduate School as follows: 
Master of Arts 
Master of Science 

Master of Arts in American Civilization 
Master of Education 
Master of Business Administration 

Doctors' degrees offered through the Graduate School are as follows: 
Doctor of Philosophy 
Doctor of Education 

Graduate work in the Summer School may be counted as residence 
toward a master's degree or Doctor of Education degree. A full year of 
residence or the equivalent is the minimum requirement for each degree. 

The requirements for each of the seven degrees above may be procured 
from the Graduate School upon request. 

Special regulations governing graduate work in education and supple- 
menting the statements contained in the Graduate School Announcements are 
available in duplicated form and may be obtained from the College of 
Education. Each graduate student in education should have a copy. Students 
seeking the master's degree as a qualification for a certificate issued by the 
Maryland State Department of Education or any other certifying authority 
should consult the appropriate bulletin for specific requirements. Advisers 
will assist students in planning to meet such requirements. 

All students desiring graduate credit, whether for meeting degree 
requirements, for transfer to another institution, or for any other purpose, 
must be regularly matriculated and registered in the Graduate School. 

CANDIDATES FOR DEGREES 

All students who expect to complete requirements for degrees during 
the Summer Session should make applications for diplomas at the office 
of the Registrar during the first two weeks of the Summer Session. 



Academic Information 

THE PROGRAM IN AMERICAN CIVILIZATION 

The University considers that it is important for every student to 
achieve an appreciative understanding of this country, its history and its 
culture. It has therefore established a comprehensive program in American 
civilization. This program is also designed to provide the student with a 
general educational background. 

Work in American civilization is offered at three distinct academic 
levels. The first level is required of all freshmen and sophomores at the 
University and is described below. The second level is for undergraduate 
students wishing to carry a major in this field (see catalog for the College 
of Arts and Sciences). The third level is for students desiring to do grad- 
uate work in this field (see catalog for the Graduate School). 

All students receiving a baccalaureate degree from the University of 
Maryland must (except as specific exceptions are noted in printed curricula) 
obtain 24 semester hours of credit in the lower division courses of the 
American Civilization Program. Although the courses in the Program are 
prescribed generally, some choice is permitted, especially for students who 
demonstrate in classification tests good previous preparation in one or more 
of the required subjects. 

The 24 semester hours in American civilization are as follows: 

1. English (12 hours, Eng, 1, 2 and 3, 4 or 5, 6), American history 
(6 hours, H. 5, 6), and American government (3 hours, G. & P. 1) are 
required subjects; however, students who qualify in one, two or all three of 
these areas by means of University administered tests will substitute certain 
elective courses. Through such testing a student may be released from 3 
hours of English (9 hours would remain an absolute requirement) , 3 hours 
of American history (3 hours remaining as an absolute requirement) , and 
3 hours of American government. Students released from 3 hours of 
English Avill take Eng. 21 instead of Eng. 1 and 2. Those released from 3 
hours in history will take H. 56 instead of H. 5 and 6. Students who have 
been exempted from courses in English, American history, or American 
government may not take such courses for credit. 

2. For the 3 additional hours of the 24 hours required the student 
elects one course from the following group (Elective Group I) : 

Econ. 37, Fundamentals of Economics (Not open to freshmen; stu- 
dents who may wish to take additional courses in econom- 
ics should substitute Econ. 31 for Econ. 37) 

Phil. 1, Philosophy for Modern Man 
Psych. 1, Introduction to Psychology 
Soc. 1, Sociology of American Life 

3. Students who, on the basis of tests, have been released from 3, 6 
or 9 hours in otherwise required courses in English, American history or 



Academic, General Information 

American government (see 1 above), shall select the replacements for these 
courses from any or all of the following groups: (a) more advanced courses- 
in the same department as the required courses in which the student is 
excused, or (b) Elective Group I (see 2 above) provided that the same 
course may not be used as both a Group I and a Group II choice, or (c) 
Elective Group II. Group II consists of the following 3-hour courses: 

H. 42, Western Civilization; either H. 51 or 52, The Humanities; either 
Music 20, Survey of Music Literature or Art 22, History of American Art; 
and Soc. 5, Anthropology. 



General Information 



REGISTRATION 

All new students must obtain admission to the University from the- 
Director of Admissions or the Dean of the Graduate School before regis- 
tration. Every student planning to register for a course or courses must 
have been admitted to the University regardless of his status as a degree 
or non-degree student. 

Registration for undergraduate and graduate students will take place 
on Monday, June 25, from 8:00 a.m. to 3:00 p.m., in accordance with 
the Registration Schedule printed on page ^' of this catalog. No student 
will he permitted into the Armory before the time listed in the Registration- 
Schedule. 

Students may register in "late registration" at the Registrar's Office 
on June 26. After June 26, exceptional cases may be admitted only after 
approval of the appropriate dean. The late registration fee, charged on and 
after June 26, is $5.00. 



REGISTRATION FOR ALL COLLEGES 

EXCEPT COLLEGE OF EDUCATION 

Students in all colleges except the College of Education, will begin 
registration on June 25 by securing registration cards from the respective 
College offices. Registration cards must be approved (signed) by both the 
student's adviser and Dean. Graduate students secure the approval of the 
graduate Dean. After approval, registrations are completed at the Armory, 
where students secure section assignments for all courses for which more 
than one section is being offered, receive bills, pay fees, and submit all 
forms to the Registrar's representatives. UNTIL THIS IS DONE, REGIS- 
TRATION IS NEITHER COMPLETE NOR OFFICIAL. 



General Information 

REGISTRATION: COLLEGE OF EDUCATION ONLY 

All Education advisers will be located in the south basement iving of 
the Armory. Students will be admitted only through the south-west door 
of the Armory and only according to the adphabetical schedule posted on 
page vii of this catalog. Students then proceed to the room in which 
their respective advisors are located (nearby rooms in the Armory basement) . 

Registration cards must be approved (signed) by both the student's 
adviser and the Dean of the College of Education. Graduate students must 
in addition receive the approval of the Dean of the Graduate School. Grad- 
uate students carrying the official graduate school matriculation card may 
obtain the graduate dean's approval (signature) in the Armory. Graduate 
students not carrying the official graduate school matriculation card must 
report to the Graduate School office, Rooms Q 112-115 Business and Public 
Administration Building, before proceeding to the upper floor of the 
Armory to complete registration. After approval, registrations are com- 
pleted on the first floor of the Armory, where students secure section assign- 
ments for all courses for which more than one section is being offered, 
receive bills, pay fees, and submit all forms to the Registrar's representatives. 
UNTIL THIS IS DONE, REGISTRATION IS NEITHER COMPLETE 
NOR OFFICIAL. 



LENGTH OF CLASS PERIOD 

Classes during the 1962 summer session will meet on the following time 
schedule : 

8:00 — 9:20 

9:30 — 10:50 
11:00 — 12:20 
12:30 — 1:50 

Weekly Class Schedule 

6-week classes 

2-credit courses meet 4 days as indicated in the catalog. 
3-credit courses meet daily 

4-credit courses meet daily and include multiple periods for lab- 
ratory. 

8-week classes 

2-credit courses meet M.W.F. 
3-credit courses meet M.T.Th.F. 
4-credit courses meet daily, plus laboratory time. 
5-credit courses meet daily, plus 2 additional periods to be ar- 
ranged each week. 



General Information 

DEFINITION OF RESIDENCE AND NON-RESIDENCE 

Students who are minors are considered to be resident students if at 
the time of their registration their parents have been domiciled in the State 
of Maryland for at least six months. 

The status of the residence of a student is determined at the time of his 
first registration in the University and may not thereafter be changed by him 
unless, in the case of a minor, his parents move to and become legal residents 
of Maryland by maintaining such residence for at least six months. However, 
the right of the minor student to change from a non-resident status to 
resident status must be established by him prior to the registration period 
set for any semester. 

Adult students are considered to be residents if at the time of their 
registration they have been domiciled in Maryland for at least six months 
provided such residence has not been acquired while attending any school 
or college in Maryland or elsewhere. Time spent on active duty in the 
armed services while stationed in Maryland will not be considered as 
satisfying the six-months period referred to above except in those cases in 
which the adult was domiciled in Maryland for at least six months prior to 
his entrance into the armed service and was not enrolled in any school during 
that period. 

The word "domicile" as used in this regulation shall mean the permanent 
place of abode. For the purpose of this rule only one domicile may be 
maintained. 

TUITION AND FEES 

UNDERGRADUATE STUDENTS 

General tuition fee, per credit hour $15.00 

Nonresidence fee 15.00 

Must be paid by all students who are not residents of Maryland. 

*Application fee (see explanation below) 10.00 

Matriculation fee 10.00 

Payable only once, upon admission to the University. Every 

student must be matriculated. 

Infirmary fee 1-00 

Recreation fee 1-00 

Required of all students registered in the Summer School. 



*The application fee for the undergraduate summer session applicant partially 
defrays the cost of processing applications for admission to this division of the 
University. If a new applicant enrolls for the term for vrhich he applied, the fee 
is accepted in lieu of the matriculation fee. Applicants who have been previously 
enrolled with the University of Maryland at College Park or Baltimore, or at one of 
its off-campus centers are not required to pay the application fee since they have 
already paid the matriculation fee. 

8 



General Information 



GRADUATE STUDENTS 



General tuition fee, per credit hour $15.00 

Matriculation fee 10.00 

Payable only once, upon admission to the Graduate School. 
Recreation fee 1«00 

Required of all students registered in the Summer School. 
Infirmary fee (voluntary) 1.00 

The Infirmary services are available to graduate students who 

elect to pay at the time of registration the fee of $1.00 for the 

Summer Session. 
Testing fee (new graduate students in the College of Education 

only) 5.00 

There is no non-residence fee for graduate students. 

MISCELLANEOUS INFORMATION 

Auditors pay the same fees as regular students. 

The graduation fee is $10.00 for bachelors' and masters' degrees, and 
.00 for doctors' degrees. 



A fee of $3.00 is charged for each change in program after June 30. 
If such change involves entrance to a course, it must be approved by 
the instructor in charge of the course entered. Courses cannot be 
dropped after July 16. All changes must be approved by the appro- 
priate dean and filed in the Office of the Registrar. 

A special laboratory fee may be charged for certain courses where such 
fee is noted in the course description. 

Laboratory courses in chemistry carry laboratory fees of $12.00 and 
$20.00; in addition the student is charged for any apparatus which 
cannot be returned to the stock room in perfect condition. Other 
laboratory fees are stated in connection with individual courses. 

Physical education fee charged each student registered for any physical 

activity course, $6.00. 
Late registration fee, $5.00. 

FEE FOR KINDERGARTEN SCHOOL 

Children 5 years of age $15.00 

WITHDRAWAL AND REFUND OF FEES 

Any student compelled to leave the University at any time during the 
Summer Session must file in the Office of the Registrar an application for 
withdrawal, bearing the proper signatures. If this is not done, the student 
will not be entitled, as a matter of course, to a certificate of honorable dis- 
missal, and will forfeit his right to any refund to which he would otherwise 



General Information 

be entitled. The date used in computing refunds is the date the application 
for withdrawal is filed in the Office of the Registrar. 

In the case of a minor, official withdrawal will be permitted only with 
the written consent of the student's parent or guardian. 

With the exception of board charges, students withdrawing from the 
University will receive a refund of all charges, less the matriculation fee in 
accordance with the following schedule: 

Percentage 
Period from Date Instruction Begins Refundable 

One week or less 60% 

Between one and two weeks 20% 

Over two weeks 

No refunds of fixed charges, lodging, tuition, laboratory fees, etc., are 
allowed when courses are dropped, unless the student withdraws from the 
University. 

LIVING ACCOMMODATIONS AND MEALS 

Housing accommodations are available at the following cost, on the 
basis indicated: 

Double Occupancy Single Occupancy 

Regular Residence Halls Men Women Men Women 

Six weeks session $ 48.00 $ 54.00 $ 72.00 $ 78.00 

Eight weeks session 64.00 72.00 96.00 104.00 

Since most of the rooms in the residence halls are double rooms there 
is no definite guarantee that a request for a single room can be granted. The 
availability of single rooms will be determined by the number of persons 
requesting rooms for the Summer Session. 

The typical student room is furnished with a bed, a chest of drawers, 
a desk and chair. Students should supply themselves with other items essen- 
tial for their needs, such as a study lamp and wastebasket. All students 
must provide themselves with linens and a pillow, either from home or from 
the commercial linen service which operates on the University campus. 
This company rents, for $1.00 per week, two sheets, a pillow case and 
toAvels, and will also have available blankets and pillows for a nominal fee. 

THE UNIVERSITY RESIDENCE HALLS WILL OPEN FOR OCCU- 
PANCY AT 2:00 P.M. SUNDAY, JUNE 24, AND WILL CLOSE AT NOON 
ON SATURDAY, AUGUST 18. 

Early application for a reservation is advisable, as only those who have 
made reservations can be assured that rooms are available for occupancy 

10 



General Information 

upon the arrival. Rooms will not be held later than noon on Tuesday, 
June 26. For reservations write to: Housing Office, North Administration 
Building. 

Campus housing is not available for faculty members during the sum- 
mer session. 

Listings of off-campus rooms, apartments and houses are available in 
the Housing Office, North Administration Building. 

Students occupying off-campus housing will maintain the same standards 
as required of those in the University residence halls and fraternity houses. 

All housing occupied by students, other than those living at home, is 
subject to inspection by representatives of the University in order to de- 
termine its desirability as living accommodations. Students desiring meals 
may obtain them at the University Dining Hall or in the several local restau- 
rants located within walking distance of the campus. 

Board is available to all students under the following options: 

(a) Cafeteria style with cash payment for each individual meal. 

(b) On a contract basis at the following rates payable at time of regis- 
tration: 

$ 72.00 for the six weeks session. 
S 96.00 for the eight weeks session. 

No refunds will be made on board to those students who elect the 
contract basis except in the case of withdrawal from the University in which 
event refund will be made on a pro-rata weekly basis. 

STUDENT HEALTH 

The University Infirmary, located on the campus near the Dining Hall 
(main) provides medical service for the undergraduate students in the 
Summer Session, and also for those graduate students who elect to pay the 
$1.00 Health Service fee. Students who are ill should report promptly to 
the University Infirmary, in person. Serious emergencies may be reported 
by phone to Ext. 326. Doctor's Office hours are: Week days, 9:00 a.m. to 
11:00 a.m.; week ends, 10:00 a.m. to 11:00 a.m. A nurse is on duty 24 
hours per day. 

PARKING OF AUTOMOBILES 

For use of students, staff members, and employees, several parking lots 
are provided. Students may park in lots 1, 2, 3, 4, 6, and 7. All other lots 
are reserved for faculty and staff members. The University rules forbid the 
parking of cars on any of the campus roads. These rules are enforced by 
campus police. 

11 



General Information 

LIBRARY FACILITIES 

The new $2.5 million library building located in a prominent position 
at the west end of the main quadrangle was opened for service in January, 
1958. The almost 200,000 square feet of floor space allow for greatly im- 
proved library service and accommodations for study. Two large reading 
rooms are air-conditioned for student convenience. 

The building will ultimately house 1,000,000 volumes and seat 2,000 
readers. The 200 carrels and individual studies provide excellent facilities 
for graduate students and faculty. 

Library facilities outside the main building include the Engineering 
and Physical Sciences Library located in the Mathematics Building, the 
Chemistry Library, and collections in the various departments of the Col- 
lege of Agriculture. 

The University System of Libraries has in its collection 475,000 vol- 
umes in addition to thousands of government publications and uncatalogued 
materials. Over 5,000 periodicals and 176 newspapers are received. The 
libraries are able to supplement their services to graduate students and fac- 
ulty by borrowing material from other libraries through interlibrary loan. 
Also within a short distance from College Park are located the unexcelled 
library facilities of the Library of Congress, Department of Agriculture, 
Office of Education and other agencies of the Federal Government. 

UNIVERSITY BOOKSTORE 

For the convenience of students, the University maintains a Students' 
Supply Store, located in the Student Union Building, where students may 
obtain at reasonable prices textbooks, stationery, classroom materials and 
equipment. 

The bookstore operates on a cash basis. 

KINDERGARTEN 

A Kindergarten for children 5 years of age operates from 8:00 a.m. to 
10:50 a.m. in Building AA, June 25-Aug.3, as a laboratory for courses in 
early childhood education. This school is open to children of the commu- 
nity and to children whose parents are students or teachers in the Summer 
Session. The enrollment must be limited to a number that can be accommo- 
dated in the room available. Applications may be obtained from the Early 
Childhood Education Department, University of Maryland, College Park, 
Maryland after May 1, 1962. 

The tuition fee for each child is $15.00 for the session. 

12 



Conferences, Institutes, Workshops 

FOR ADDITIONAL INFORMATION 

Detailed information concerning the American Civilization Program, 
fees and expenses, scholarships and awards, student life, and other material 
of a general nature, may be found in the University publication titled An 
Adventure in Learning. This publication may be obtained on request from 
the Office of University Relations, North Administration Building, University 
of Maryland at College Park. A detailed explanation of the regulation of 
student and academic life, may be found in the University publication titled, 
University General and Academic Regulation. This is mailed in September 
and February of each year to all new undergraduate students. 

Requests for course catalogs for the individual schools and colleges 
should be directed to the deans of these respective units, addressed to: 

COLLEGES LOCATED AT COLLEGE PARK: 

Dean 

(College in which you are interested) 
The University of Maryland 
College Park, Maryland 

PROFESSIONAL SCHOOLS LOCATED AT BALTIMORE: 

Dean 

(School in which you are interested) 
The University of Maryland 
Lombard and Greene Streets 
Baltimore 1, Maryland 



CONFERENCES, INSTITUTES, WORKSHOPS, 
SPECIAL COURSES AND LECTURES 

University- Wide Lecture Series 

The 1962 Summer School will sponsor a series of lectures during the 
8-week period from June 25-August 17. These lectures are planned by a 
University-wide committee with the hope of selecting current informative 
topics and obtaining outstanding lecturers that will be of interest to all 
summer school students regardless of college or department. 

All summer school students and faculty members as well as other inter- 
ested persons are cordially invited to attend. No admission charge will be 
made. For further information please contact the Summer School office 
on the College Park campus. 

13 



Conferences, Institutes, Workshops 

Television Workshop 

Each summer the Department of Speech offers a television workshop 
(Speech 149 — 3 hours, see listing under Speech and Dramatic Art) which 
is primarily designed for the classroom teacher. 

The workshop provides an opportunity to (1) learn the fundamental 
principles of instructional television (2) to develop presentational techniques 
(3) to further professional skills and competence. 

The air-conditioned studios are located in Woods Hall, and the latest 
in professional broadcast-type equipment is utilized. 

Enrollment is limited. Inquiries may be sent to Professor George F. 
Batka, Director, Radio and Television, Department of Speech, University of 
Maryland, College Park, Maryland. 

Typewriting Demonstration For Business Education Teachers 

The College of Education offers the business teacher resigstered during 
the Summer Session an opportunity to observe pupils at work in a type- 
writing class. These observations will aid the classroom teacher in: (1) 
designing purposeful classroom activities involving development of the basic 
typewriting skills, (2) planning with the pupil the organization of an effect- 
ive set of "work" habits, (3) analyzing through case studies the methods of 
dealing with the various aspects of individual pupil progress, (4) applying 
the principles of the psychology of skills to the teaching of typewriting, and 
(5) developing improved methods for course construction, selection of in- 
structional materials, and measuring pupil achievement. 

Notehand Demonstration and Study Group 

Those business teachers registered during the summer session will be able 
to observe pupils at work in a Gregg Notehand study group. 

Observing the pupils at work in this study group will assist the business 
teacher to obtain a better understanding of the Notehand system which may 
be described as a brief, easy-to-learn writing method consisting essentially 
of the Gregg alphabet and a few abbreviating devices. There will also be op- 
portunities to note the experimental methods that will be used in integrating a 
Notehand system with more effective techniques in listening, in reading, and 
in note-taking. Time will be scheduled for questions concerning the various 
aspects of initiating and conducting courses in Gregg Notehand at the high 
school level. 

The immediate general education objective in this study group will be 
to give the pupil a personal-use system that will be useful to him in making 
notes in his college work. Gregg Notehand will not be taught as an "office 
skill" nor for verbatim dictation. A pupil must have completed the eleventh 
grade to be eligible to enroll in this non-credit study group. 

14 



Conferences, Institutes, Workshops 

Workshops in Music 

Through the cooperation of the Department of Music, the College of Edu- 
cation, and University College, two workshops in music will be offered during 
the 1962 Summer Session, directed by nationally known leaders in their 
respective fields. Participants registered in one of the courses listed below 
will meet in the afternoon for a minimum of 30 class hours during a two- 
week period, and may receive two semester hours of credit. The workshops 
are so designed that registration for four additional hours in other courses 
during the regular six-week session is possible. 

The regular procedures for admission to the University, listed elsewhere in 
this catalog, apply also for admission to the Workshops. The courses may be 
counted for graduate credit only if prior admission to the Graduate School 
has been obtained; note the deadline of June 1 for admission to that school. 
Rooms may be reserved in the campus dormitories for the period of the 
workshops, and meals will be available in the University at nominal cost. 

Workshop in Choral Music 

The Choral Workshop, directed by Margaret Hillis, is offered during 
the period July 16 to July 27. Participants will register for Mus. Ed. 175, 
Methods and Materials in Vocal Music for the High School. In the first week, 
July 16-20, a series of lectures, conferences, and discussions of choral prob- 
lems and readings of new choral music will be held. In the second week, 
July 23-27, a mixed chorus of selected high-school students will rehearse 
and present a public concert. Adult participants will assist in the rehearsals 
and take part in other professional activities. 

Workshop in Band Music 

The Band Worshop, directed by Clarence Sawhill, is offered during the 
period July 16 to July 27. Participants will register for Mus. Ed. 180, Instru- 
mental Music for the High School. The workshop will consist of lectures and 
demonstrations of all phases of instrumental conducting, including baton 
techniques, score preparation, rehearsal techniques, style, and interpretation. 
Daily laboratory sessions will be held in connection with rehearsals of a 
concert band, composed of selected high school students. The band, which 
will be in residence for a one-week period, will present a public concert 
on July 27. 

Copies of a brochure containing detailed information about the work- 
shops in music may be obtained by addressing the Department of Music. The 
fees applicable to these workshops, including registration, dormitory room, and 
supplementary fee of S5.00, can be calculated by referring to pages 7-8 of 
this catalog. 

15 



Conferences, Institutes, Workshops 

Workshop on Teaching Conservation of Natural Resources 

The College of Agriculture and the Conservation Education Division of 
the Natural Resources Institute cooperate in offering this workshop which is 
devoted to the study of the State's basic wealth, its natural resources. Basic 
source information will be available, specimens will be collected, pictures 
will be taken in different resource regions, teaching aids will be evaluated, 
and effective methods of teaching conservation and natural resources will 
be studied. The workshop will carry six semester hours of graduate credit. 
State and federal workers in conservation of natural resources will be used 
extensively as consultants in their specialties. Field trips will be taken to all 
the natural regions of the State. Students will be able to observe first hand 
the resources problems and current practices. Adequate opportunity will be 
provided for students to analyze problems as a group and develop logical 
solutions. 

The workshop will be held on the College Park campus of the University 
of Maryland June 25 to August 3, 1962. Registration will be limited to 30 
persons. 

Workshop on Human Relations in Educational Administration 

This workshop is concerned with the development of leadership teams 
capable of providing in-service programs in human relations in local school 
systems. In addition to basic theory, the workshop will center on the prac- 
tice and acquisition of specific human relations skills. 

Preference in enrollment will be given to teams representing Maryland 
school systems which have participated in the Workshop in the past, and to 
teams of four to six persons designated by other Maryland school systems 
and including in their membership: (1) a school superintendent, an assistant 
superintendent or someone else with equivalent rank; (2) a full-time super- 
vising secondary school principal; (3) a full-time supervising elementary 
school principal, and (4) full-time supervisor, counselor, psychologist, or 
other professional person who spends full-time in a service position in the 
school system. Prerequisite for all participants: a master's degree. 

Enrollment in the workshop will be limited. Applications for team par- 
ticipation from local school systems will be processed in the order received. 
If more than one application is received at the same time, the Director of 
the Workshop will make the final decision. 

The workshop will meet daily from 9:00 a.m. to 3:00 p.m., June 25 
through August 3. A student may earn six semester hours of graduate 
credit. 

Inquiries should be addressed to Dr. Clarence A. Newell, Professor of 
Educational Administration. 

Education in Family Finance Workshop 

During the Summer Session of 1962 the College of Education, the College 
of Business and Public Administration, and the College of Home Economics 
are cooperating with the National Committee for Education in Family 

16 



Conferences, Institutes, Workshops 

Finance to offer a laboratory course designed to help educators improve 
their classroom instruction in personal and family money management. 

Objectives: The workshop will center about such areas as: budgeting and 
financial planning, savings, investment, banks and banking, insurance, home 
ownership, taxation, wills and estates, social security and pension plans, and 
credit. To explore ways in which educators can help prepare young people to 
deal -with financial problems in these areas, the participants will have an 
opportunity to develop (1) broad understandings of important concepts and 
facts relating to family financial security, (2) leadership skills needed to 
improve and expand programs of education in family finance, and (3) 
materials which may be used in solving their own curricular and instruc- 
tional problems. 

Participation: School systems are encouraged to send teams of partici- 
pants numbering up to three. Persons in the follov/ing positions are especially 
invited to apply for acceptance: junior high, senior high, and college teachers 
in social studies, core, mathematics, homemaking, business education, basic 
business, and family life education; supervisors; guidance counselors; prin- 
cipals; curriculum directors; superintendents of schools; representatives of 
state departments of education; and staff members of teacher education 
institutions. 

Staff: In addition to full-time staff members, a wealth of resource people 
from the University, from business, and from governmental agencies will 
be utilized as they apply to the projects undertaken. 

Schedule: The six- week workshop will extend from June 25 to August 3, 
1962. Sessions will be scheduled for a minimum of six hours per day, Mon- 
day through Friday. 

Credit: Six hours of credit will be earned in the workshop. Participants 
will register through course Ed. 189-1 Workshops, Clinics, and Institutes: 
Education in Family Finance. Tlie credit may be applicable to advanced 
degree requirements. If graduate credit is desired, application for admission 
to the Graduate School must be made before June 1. 

Scholarships : Scholarships covering either board and room in campus 
facilities or tuition and lunch will be granted. Interested persons should make 
application on a special form which will be available upon request. Each 
applicant must be recommended by his superintendent or principal. Early 
application is encouraged so as to be assured a place in the workshop. 

All correspondence concerning application or information concerning the 
workshop should be addressed to: Dr. Robert G. Risinger, College of Educa- 
tion, University of Maryland, College Park, Maryland. 

Workshop on Use of Community Resources 

The Workshop on Use of Community Resources will be offered for per- 
sons who teach in kindergarten or in grades one to twelve, inclusive, for three 
weeks, June 25 to July 13. It is designed to help teachers learn to utilize 
conununity resources to strengthen a sound program of teaching and learning. 

17 



Conferences, Institutes, Workshops 

The workshop is being offered at the request of the Washington Area School 
Study Council, a voluntary association of school systems and administrators 
in the Washington area. The Smithsonian Institution, which has cooperated 
with the Council over a period of years in a project designed to make 
its resources more meaningful to teachers and children, will receive special 
attention as an excellent example of a valuable community resource. The 
workshop will require full-time work of all participants. Meetings will be 
held from 9:30 a.m. to 3:30 p.m. throughout the workshop period. In 
addition to teachers designated by the Council schools, a limited number 
of other persons will be allowed to register. A student may earn three 
semester hours of undergraduate or graduate credit. 

Further information may be seured by writing to: Director of the Sum- 
mer Session, University of Maryland, College Park, Maryland. 

Workshops in Human Development 

SIX-WEEK WORKSHOP 

The Institute for Child Study, College of Education, offers a six-week 
human development workshop each summer providing opportunities for (1) 
study and synthesis of scientific knowledge about human behavior; (2) 
experience in the analysis of case records; (3) preparation of study group 
leaders for in-service child study programs; (4) planning in-service child 
study programs for teachers or other human relations workers; (5) plan- 
ning preservice teacher education courses and laboratory experiences for 
prospective teachers; (6) examination of implications of scientific knowledge 
about human development and behavior for school organization, curriculum 
development, guidance services, club leadership, and other programs and 
procedures designed to foster the mental health and optimal development 
of children, youth, and adults. 

The workshop is designed for teachers and administrators who have been 
actively engaged in the Child Study Program sponsored by the Institute, for 
persons who are interested in participating in such a program, and for 
persons in other fields where human relations are a vital factor. 

This workshop will run from June 25 to August 3. Workshop lectures, 
laboratory groups and seminars will be scheduled between 8:00 a.m. and 
12:00 p.m. Special lectures, interest groups and conferences are scheduled 
from 1:30 to 3:00 p.m. 

Additional details are available in the descriptions of H.D. Ed. 112-117 
and H.D. Ed. 212-217 listed under 'Course Offerings." Inquiries should be 
addressed to Director of Summer Workshops, Institute for Child Study, Uni- 
versity of Maryland, College Park, Maryland. 

FOUR-WEEK WORKSHOP 

The Institute for Child Study will also offer a four-week workshop in 
Human Development and Child Study for teachers and administrators which 

18 



Conferences, Institutes, Workshops 

will emphasize the same purposes and follow a similar program as the 
six-week workshop described above. This workshop will be held on the 
university campus from June 25 to July 20. Participants should register 
for one of the following courses, H.D. Ed. 112, 114, 116, 212, 214, 216, 
or 270 (3 hours credits). In addition they should register for Ed 188 or 
H.D. Ed. 250 (1 hour credit). 

CHILD STUDY LEADERS WORKSHOP 

For leaders and prospective leaders of child study groups who cannot 
attend the full six weeks workshop, a two-week workshop will be held on 
the University campus from June 25 to July 6. This workshop will be re- 
peated July 23 to August 3. Each day's activities will include a lecture- 
discussion period centering around major scientific concepts explaining 
growth, development, and behavior; laboratory periods for analyzing case 
record material at the first, second, or third year level of the program (par- 
ticipants will choose the year level of the group they expect to lead) ; read- 
ing and special interest periods. Two hours credit can be earned for full 
time participation in one of these workshops. A special section of this work- 
shop is being planned for leaders of parent child study groups. 

ADMINISTRATORS' CONFERENCE ON IMPLICATIONS 

For superintendents, supervisors and principals who are interested in 
exploring the implications of human development principles for school oper- 
ation a workshop (2 credit hours) will be held at the University from July 
9 to July 20. This work conference will examine recent scientific research 
findings and theory regarding human growth, learning and behavior and 
will consider the implications of this knowledge for educational practice, 
including such problems as grouping for effective learning, marking, cur- 
riculum control, teaching processes, home-school interaction, the development 
and use of cumulative records, and mental health problems. A special sec- 
tion of this workshop is being planned for coordinators of parent child 
study programs. 

WORKSHOP ON APPLICATIONS OF HUMAN DEVELOPMENT 
PRINCIPLES IN CLASSROOMS 

^ For people who have had three or more years of child study experience 
either in workshops or in groups during the school year, a workshop (2 credit 
hours) will be held at the University from August 6 to August 17. Class- 
room practices will be examined in the light of human development prin- 
ciples, and procedures will be studied for possible beyond-third-year action 
research projects during the school year. 

WORKSHOP: ACTION RESEARCH IN HUMAN DEVELOPMENT 
EDUCATION 

A workshop for teachers and other school personnel who are interested 
m learning more about action research or in initiating action research 
projects m their ovm schools. This workshop will be held at the University, 

19 



Conferences, Institutes, Workshops 

August 6 to 17 (2 credit hours). The role of action research in the solution 
of educational problems will be emphasized. Participants will have the 
opportunity to learn about and to develop designs and instruments for carry- 
ing out action research in their own schools and classrooms. Preference in 
enrollment will be given to persons coming as teams for the purpose of 
developing an action research design for implementation in their own 
school or school system. 

WORKSHOPS ON HUMAN DEVELOPMENT AND RELIGIOUS 
EDUCATION 

Two workshops in human development (each for 2 credit hours) for 
persons in the field of religious education will be held on the University 
campus. A workshop for persons without prior workshop experience will be 
held from July 23 to August 3. This workshop wiU examine scientific 
knowledge about human development, learning, behavior and adjustment 
and will consider the implications of this knowledge for religious educa- 
tional practice in vacation, weekday, and Sunday schools operated by 
church groups. 

An advanced workshop for persons who have had a previous work- 
shop in Human Development and Religious Education will be held from 
August 6 to August 17. 

These workshops will be entirely non-denominational and any person 
responsibly concerned with religious education can appropriately enroll 
regardless of the nature of his faith. 

The daily schedules will be similar to those of the six weeks workshop. 
Only full time participants can he accepted. These two-week workshops 
may be taken for either graduate or undergraduate credit. 

Students desiring graduate credit and not previously enrolled in the 
Graduate School must have their applications for admission and transcripts 
in the office of the Graduate School not later than June 1, 1962. 

Those interested should contact, as soon as possible. Director of Sum- 
mer Workshops, Institute for Child Study, University of Maryland, College 
Park, Maryland. 

Workshops in Special Education 

THE EDUCATION OF CHILDREN WITH LEARNING IMPAIRMENTS 

This workshop will consider the theoretical background and the meth- 
ods, curricula and materials employed in the approach to the various learn- 
ing problems of children. 

Opportunities for observation, participation and consultation in pro- 
gram planning, curriculum organization, and the use of methods and ma- 
terials will be provided according to the primary learning problem involved: 
Mentally Handicapped (Educable), Mentally Deficient (Trainable), Percep- 
tual Learning Problems, Disturbances in Emotional/Social Development, 
Disturbances in Language Development, and Physically Handicapped. 

20 



Conferences, Institutes, Workshops 

This workshop will meet off campus daily from 9:00-3:00, June 25 to 
July 20. Four units of undergraduate or graduate credit may be earned. 

Students planning to attend the workshop should request the Special 
Education summer session brochure for program details. 

Administration and Supervision of Special Education Programs 

This workshop will consider the areas of primary concern to adminis- 
trators and supervisors in determining Special Education needs, and in es- 
tablishing and carrying out educational program modifications. The work- 
shop will utilize a number of resource consultants with experience at 
various levels and the various facets of the overall problem. 

This workshop will meet daily from 9:00-3:00, July 23 to August 10. 
Three units of undergraduate or graduate credit may be earned. 

Students planning to attend the workshop should request the Special 
Education summer session brochure for program details. 

Institute is Mathematics For Elementary School Teachers, 
Principals and Supervisors 

A National Science Foundation grant has made it possible for the Mathe- 
matics Department of the College of Arts and Sciences to offer a six weeks 
summer institute in mathematics for elementary school personnel. The offer- 
ing of the Institute should provide a participant with the background neces- 
sary to understand and evaluate the current experimental programs in ele- 
mentary mathematics being used in many communities over the country. 

Two courses in mathematics will be required of each participant: Mathe- 
matics 181 — Foundations of Number Theory and Mathematics 183 — Funda- 
mentals of Geometry. Each lecture will be followed by a period of super- 
vised study. A demonstration class will be offered, using experimental ma- 
terials written for the fourth grade. Visiting lecturers will discuss with the 
participants techniques and procedures for meeting the needs of mathematics 
teaching in the elementary grades. 

Financial assistance in the form of a National Science Foundation 
grant will be available to about 35 participants at the standard N.S.F. rate 
of $75.00 per week plus $15 per week for each dependent (to a maximum 
of four). A travel allowance of 4 cents per mile for a single round trip 
from the participant's home to the Institute will also be paid. All tuition 
and fee charges will be paid by the N.S.F. grant. Participants who are gradu- 
ate students in the College of Education may obtain graduate credit for 
the six hours of course work completed with the Institute. 

Inquiries should be addressed to: Professor John R. Mayor, Director, 
Summer Institute in Mathematics for Elementary School Personnel, College 
of Education, Skinner Building, University of Maryland, College Park, Md. 

Counselor Education I 

The College of Education in cooperation with Maryland School Super- 
intendents and the State Department of Education will sponsor a special 

21 



Conferences, Institutes^ Workshops 

program for the preparation of secondary school counselors, June 25 to 
August 17. 

Lectures, seminars and discussions will be scheduled between 8:30 a.m. 
and 3 :00 p.m. daily. The content of the program will include the course con- 
tent of Principles of Guidance, Analysis of the Individual, and School Coirn- 
seling: Theoretical Foundations and Practice. Students enrolled in this pro- 
gram will receive eight hours credit. Each applicant must be recommended 
by his superintendent or principal. See page 37 for courses for which to 
register. 

Workshop for Teachers of Secondary School English 

The College of Education in cooperation with the English Department, 
the Maryland State Department of Education, and the National Council of 
Teachers of English will sponsor a workshop for teachers of secondary 
school English. 

The emphasis will be upon the concept of integration in the teaching 
of literature, composition, and grammar, through deeper insight into the 
humanities, through better acquaintance with the newer media of instruc- 
tion, and through the development of new techniques and materials of 
instruction. 

Lectures by national and State authorities will be presented; discus- 
sion groups of all the participants will be held; and working sessions un- 
der University and State leaders will be provided. 

The workshop will be held from July 9 to July 27, from 9:30 a.m. to 
3:30 p.m., Monday through Friday. Three (3) hours of credit will be 
earned. All workshop participants must be admitted to the University as 
special students or to the Graduate School as graduate students before June 
1, 1962. Enrollment will be limited and preference will be given to teach- 
ers with two years or more of secondary school experience. Registration 
will be July 9. 

All correspondence concerning application or information should be 
addressed to Miss Marie D. Bryan, College of Education. 

Institute for Teachers of Mathematics in Junior High School 

The Department of Mathematics of the College of Arts and Sciences 
with the financial support of the National Science Foundation is offering a 
six-week Summer Institute for junior high school teachers of mathematics. 
Its purpose is to assist the teachers in improving the quality of teaching of 
mathematics at the junior high school level. The Institute should also give 
the teachers a better understanding of current curricular developments and 
make it possible for them to interpret these developments for junior high 
school programs. 

Participants of the Institute who are graduate students in the College 
of Education may obtain graduate credit for the six hours of course work 
completed in connection with the Institute. 

22 



Conferences, Institutes, Workshops 

Mathematics 182 — Foundations of Algebra, and Mathematics 199 — 
Summer Institute for Teachers of Science and Mathematics Seminar, are 
required of each participant. For more information on the courses see the 
listings under the Department of Mathematics. In addition there will be a 
demonstration class in Avhich experimental material for grades seven and/ or 
eight will be taught. A seminar will provide for discussion of the mater- 
ials in the demonstration class and associated teaching problems. 

Financial assistance in the form of a National Science Foundation grant 
will be available to about 30 participants at the standard N.S.F. rate of 1^75 
per week plus $15 per week for each dependent (to a maximum of four). 
This stipend will be tax free to students enrolled for credit toAvard a de- 
gree. A travel allowance of 4 cents per mile for a single round trip from 
the participants home to the Institute (to a maximum of $80) will also be 
paid. All tuition and fee charges will be paid by the N.S.F. grant. 

Participants are expected to have had at least two years experience 
teaching mathematics at the junior high school level and to have been ap- 
pointed to a junior high school position for 1962-63. 

Inquiries should be addressed to: Professor James A. Hummel, Direc- 
tor, Summer Institute for Mathematics Teachers, Department of Mathemat- 
ics, University of Maryland, College Park, Maryland. 

National Science Foundation Summer Institute 
For High School Teachers of Science 

The College of Agriculture, the College of Arts and Sciences and the 
College of Education are cooperating to offer a program of courses designed 
for junior and senior high school teachers of science. These courses com- 
bine in various ways to provide curricula for the participants of a seven- 
week institute for teachers of science. This Summer Institute has the sup- 
port of the National Science Foundation. It is designed primarily to enable 
junior and senior high school teachers to improve their knowledge of the 
subjects they teach. Credit earned in this Summer Institute and in similar 
related science courses may accumulate up to one-half of the total credit- 
hour requirement for the Master of Education degree. 

A National Science Foundation grant makes it possible for the 1962 
Summer Institute to provide financial assistance for about 75 participants 
at the standard N.S.F. rate of $75 per week plus $15 per week for each 
dependent (to a maximum of four). This stipend will be tax free to stu- 
dents enrolled for credit toward a degree. A travel allowance of 4 cents 
per mile for a single round trip from the participant's home to the Insti- 
tute will also be paid. All tuition and fee charges will be paid by the 
N.S.F. grant. 

The Summer Institute covers the general fields of the Biological Sci- 
ences and the Physical Sciences. Basic to the program will be two seminars 
covering recent developments in the Biological Sciences and the Physical 

23 



Conferences, Institutes, Workshops 

Sciences. These seminars are listed in the Summer Session catalog as Zoo- 
logy 199 and Physics 199, respectively. Each will meet once a week during 
the regular six-week summer session, and daily during the seventh week, 
and will count as one credit hour. Participants in the Institute will be ex- 
pected to register for both seminars. 

The following courses are included in the program. Courses especially 
prepared for teachers are indiciated by an asterisk ( * ) . 

Biological Sciences Physical Sciences 

*Bot. 113 *Chem. 1 

*Bot. 151S *Phys. 118A 

*Ent. S-121 Phys. 126 

Zool. 1 Phys. 130, 131 

Zool. 104 *Phys. 150 

*Zool. 121 *Phys. 160A 

*Zool. 199 *Phys. 199 
*Zool. 208 

These courses are described in detail in this catalog under the head- 
ings of the respective departments. In addition to the courses specifically 
listed, participants may register in the regular Summer Session offerings in 
Mathematics or other appropriate fields. A maximum of 7 credit hours may 
be taken. Stipends will be available only to those participants scheduling at 
least 6 hours in the above courses, or in other courses specifically approved 
by the Director of the Institute. 

Inquiries should be sent to: Dr. J. R. C. Brown, Director of the N.S.F. 
Summer Institute, Department of Zoology, University of Maryland, College 
Park, Maryland. 

NDEA Summer Language Institute 

A special foreign language institute under the National Defense Educa- 
tion Act of 1958 and under the auspices of the U.S. Office of Education, for 
Secondary School teachers of Spanish or French, limited to 30 participants 
in Spanish and 30 participants in French. Credits, if desired by participants, 
will be graduate or undergraduate depending upon previous scholastic rec- 
ord. Students must remain in residence in campus dormitories. Duration 
of Institute: 7 weeks, from June 25 to August 10, 1962. Participants are 
paid stipends of $75 per week plus $15 per week for each dependent. Formal 
courses include Professional Training and Demonstration (10 hours) ; 
Elementary Russian (2/2 hours) ; Linguistics (3 hours) ; Writing (2 hours) ; 
Culture and Civilization (5 hours) ; Language Practice (12 hours) ; Lab- 
oratory Procedures (1 hour) ; and Library (4 hours) ; per week. 

Students register for Ed. 189-50, NDEA Summer Language Institute, 
(4) credits and Foreign Language 140, (3) credits. 

Application should be requested of, and returned to Dr. Philip Rovner, 
Director, NDEA Summer Language Institute, Department of Foreign Lan- 
guages, College Park, Maryland, before March 1, 1962. 

24 



Course Offerings 



An "S" before a course number denotes that the course is offered in 
Summer School only. An "S" after a course number indicates a regular 
course modified for summer school offering. 



•5- 



Courses may be cancelled if the number of students enrolled is below 
certain minima. In general, freshman and sophomore courses will not be 
maintained for classes smaller than 20. Minimum enrollments for upper 
level undergraduate courses and graduate courses will be 15 and 10 respec- 
tively. 

25 



Agricultural Economics 

AGRICULTURAL ECONOMICS 

A.E. 198. Research Problems. (2 cr. max.) 

To be arranged. "With the permission of the instructor, students will work on any 
research problems in Agricultural Economics. There will be occasional conferences 
for the purpose of making reports on progress of work. (Staff.) 

AJE. 301. Special Problems in Farm Economics. (2) (4 or. max.) 
To be arranged. An advanced course dealing extensively with some of the economic 
problems affecting the farmer, such as land values, taxation, credits, prices, produc- 
tion adjustments, transportation, marketing and cooperation. (Staff) 

A.E. 399. Research. 

Credit according to work accomplished. This course will consist of special reports 

fay students on current economic subjects, and a discussion and criticism of the 

members of the class and instructional staff. (Staff) 

AGRICULTURAL ENGINEERING 

For Advanced Undergraduates and Graduates 

Agr. Engr. 198. Special Problems in Farm Mechanics. (1-3) 

Prerequisite, approval of Department. Not acceptable for majors in agricultural 

engineering. Problems assigned in proportion to credit registered for. (Gienger) 

For Graduates 

Agr. Engr. 301. Special Problems in Agricultural Engineering. (1-6) 

Work assigned in proportion to amount of credit. (Green) 

Agr. Engr. 399. Research. (1-6) 

Credit according to work accomplished. (Green) 

AGRICULTURAL AND EXTENSION EDUCATION 

R. Ed. 170 A-B Workshop Teaching Conservation of Natural Resources. (3, 3) 
Six weeks, June 25 - August 3. Arranged. 

Fee, $35.00. This workshop is devoted to a study of the state's basic wealth, its 
natural resources, natural resource problems and practices pertinent to local, state, 
national and world welfare. (Erickson) 

R. Ed. 198. Special Problems in Agricultural Education. (1-3) 

Arranged. Prerequisite, approval of staff. Credit in accordance with amount of work 

planned. A course designed for advanced undergraduates for problems in teaching 

vocational agriculture. (Staff) 

26 



Agronomy, Animal Husbandry 

R. Ed. 207. Problems in Vocational Agriculture. (2) 

P our weeks, July 9 - August 3. Arranged. 

In this course special emphasis is placed upon the current problems facing teacher* 

of vocational agriculture. It is designed especially for persons who have had several 

years of teaching experience in this field. (Smith) 

R. Ed. S207 A-B. Problems in Teaching Vocational Agriculture. (1, 1) 
Principles of adult education as applied to rural groups, especially young and adult 
farmers, organizing classes, planning courses and instructional methods are stressed. 

(Staff) 

R. Ed. S250 A-B. Critique in Rural Education. (1, 1) 

Four weeks, July 9 - August 3. Arranged. 

Current problems of teaching agriculture are analyzed and discussed. Students are 

required to make investigations, prepare papers and make reports. (Cardozier.) 

R. Ed. 301. Field Problems in Rural Education. (1-3) 

Arranged. Prerequisite, six semester hours of graduate study. Problems accepted 
depend upon the character of the work of the student and the facilities available 
for study. Periodic conferences required. Final report must follow accepted pattern 
for field investigations. (Staff) 

R. Ed. 399. Research. (1-6) 

Arranged. Credit hours according to work done. (Staff) 

AGRONOMY 

Agron. SllO. Soil Management. (1) 

Summer session only. An advanced course prunarily designed for teachers of voca- 
tional agriculture and country agents dealing with factors involved in management of 
soils in general and of Maryland soils in particular. Emphasis is placed on melhoda 
of maintaining and improving chemical, physical, and biological characteristics of soils. 

(S trickling.) 

Agron. 198. Special Problems in Agronomy. (1) 

For advanced undergraduates only. Prerequisite, Agron. 10, 107, 108 or permission 
of instructor. A detailed study, including a written report of an important problem 
in agronomy. Staff.) 

Agron. 208. Research Methods. (2) 

Prerequisite, permission of staff. Development of research viewpoint by detailed study 
and report on crop research of the Maryland Experiment Station or review of literaturc- 
on specific phases of a problem. (Staff.) 

Agron. 399. Research in Agronomy. 

Credit according to work done. (Staff.) 

ANIMAL HUSBANDRY 

A. H. 198. Special Problems in Animal Husbandry. (1-2) (4 cr. max.) 
Work assigned in proportion to amount of credit. Prerequisite, permission of instruc- 
tor. A course designed for advanced undergraduates in which specific problems re- 
lating to animal husbandry will be assigned. (Staff.) 

27 



Animal Husbandry, Art, Botany 

A. H. 301. Special Problems in Animal Husbandry. (1-2) (4 cr. max.) 
Work assigned in proportion to amount of credit. Prerequisite, permission of instruc- 
tor. Problems will be assigned which relate specfically to the character of the work 
the student is pursuing. (Staff.) 

A. H. 399. Research. 

Credit to be determined by amount and character of work done. With the approval 
of the Head of the Department, students will be required to pursue original research 
in some phase of animal husbandry, carrying the same to completion, and report 
the results in the form of a thesis. (Staff.) 



ART 



Art 20 Art Appreciation. (2) 
M.W.F. June 25 -August 17, 8:00. A-302. 

An introduction to the technical and aesthetic problems of the artist. The student 
becomes acquainted with the elements that go into a work of the visual arts. He 
is made aware of the underlying structure that results in the "wholeness" of an art 
work. He will see examples (original and reproductions) of masterpieces of art. 

(Lembach.) 



BOTANY 



Bot. 1. General Botany. (4) 

June 25 -Aug. 17. Lectures M. T. Th. F., 8:00-8:50, A-1. Four laboratory periods, E-212; 
Sec. 1 — M. T. Th. F., 9:00-10:50; Sec. 2— M. T. Th. F., 12:30-2:30. Laboratory 
fee 16.00. General introduction to botany, touching briefly on all phases of the sub- 
ject. Emphasis is on the fundamental biological principles of the higher plants. 

(Brown, Assistants.) 

Bot. 113. Plant Geography. (2) 

June 25 -Aug. 3, daily, 1:00-2:50, E-235. Prerequisite, Bot. 1 or equivalent. Laboratory 
A study of plant distribution throughout the world and the factors generally associ- 
ated with such distribution. (Brown.) 

Bot. 151S. Teaching Methods in Botany. (2) 

June 25 - Aug. 3, daily, 1:00-2:50, E-235. Prerequisite, Bot. 1 or equivalent. Laboratory 
fee, $5.00. A study of the biological principles of common plants, and demonstrations, 
projects, and visual aids suitable for teaching in primary and secondary schools. 

(Lockard.) 

Bot. 399. Research. 

Credit according to work done. A minimum of 6 credit hours is required for the M.S. 
degree and an additional minimum of 12 hours is required for the Ph.D. degree. Stu- 
dents must be qualified to pursue with profit the research to be undertaken. (Staff.) 

28 



Business Organization and Administration 
BUSINESS ORGANIZATION AND ADMINISTRATION 

B.A. 20. Principles of Accounting. (3) 

June 25 -Aug. 17. M. T. Th. Fr., 9:30-10:50; Q-122. Prerequisite, sophomore standing. 
The fundamental principles and problems involved in accounting for proprietorships, 
corporations and partnerships. (Daiker.) 

B.A. 21. Principles of Accounting. (3) 

June 25 - Aug. 17. M. T. Th. F., 8:00-9:20; Q-104. Prerequisite, sophomore standing. 
The fundamental principles and problems involved in accounting for proprietorships, 
corporations and partnerships. (Sweeney.) 

B.A. 111. Intermediate Accounting. (3) 

June 25 - Aug. 17. M. T. Th. F., 8:00-9:20; Q-122. Prerequisite, B.A. 21. A comprehen- 
sive study of the theory and problems of valuation of assets, application of funds, cor- 
poration accounts and statements, and the interpretation of accounting statements. 

(Lee.) 

B.A. 130. Elements of Business Statistics I. (3) 

June 25 - Aug. 17. M. T. Th. F. Prerequisite, Junior standing. Laboratory fee, $3.50 

Section 1—8:00, Q-103. 

Section 11—9:30, Q-103. 

This course is devoted to a study of the fundamentals of statistics. Emphasis is placed 
upon the collection of data; hand and machine tabulation; graphic charting; statisti- 
cal distribution; averages; index numbers; sampling; elementary tests of reliability; 
and simple correlations. 

(Nelson, Anderson.) 

B.A. 140. Business Finance. (3) 

June 25 -Aug. 17. M. T. Th. F., 8:00-9:20; Q-123. Prerequisite, Economics 140. This 
course deals with principles and practices involved in the organization, financing, and 
reconstruction of corporations; the various types of securities, and their use in raising 
funds, apportioning income; risk and control; intercorporate relations; and new devel- 
opments. Emphasis on solution of problems of financial policy faced by management. 

(Calhoun.) 

B.A. 159. Marketing Principles and Organization. (3) 

June 25 -Aug. 17. M.T.Th.F., 9:30-10:50; Q-123. Prerequisite, Economics 32 or 37. 
This is an introductory course in the field of marketing. Its purpose is to give a gen- 
eral understanding and appreciation of the forces operating, institutions employed, and 
methods followed in marketing agricultural products, natural products, services, and 
manufactured goods. 

B.A. 160. Personnel Management. (3) 

June 25 -Aug. 17. M.T.Th.F., 9:30-10:50; Q-104. Prerequisite, Economics 160. This 
course deals essentially with functional and administrative relationships between man- 
agement and the labor force. It comprises a survey of the scientific selection of em- 
ployees, '"in-service" training, job analysis, classification and rating, motivation of employ- 
ees, employee adjustment, wage incentives, employee discipline and techniques of super- 
vision, and eliminaton of employment hazards. (Sylvester.) 

B.A. 163. Industrial Relations. (3) 

June 25 - Aug. 17. M. T. Th. F., 11:00-12:30; Q-132. Prerequisite, B.A. 160 and Senior 

Standing. A study of the development and methods of organized groups in industry 

29 



Business Organization and Administration, Chemistry 

with reference to the settlement of labor disputes. An economic and legal analysis of 
labor union and employer association activities, arbitration, mediation and conciliaton; 
coJlectve bargaining, trade agreements, strikes, boycotts, lockouts, company unions, 
employee representation and injunctions. 

B.A. 181. Business Law. (3) 

June 25 -Aug. 17. M.T.Th.F., 8:00-9:20; Q-28. Prerequisite, Senior Standing. Re- 
quired in all Business Administration curriculums. Legal aspects of business relation- 
ships, contracts, negotiable instruments, agency, partnerships, corporations, real and per- 
sonal property and sales. (Dawson.) 

B.A. 399. Thesis. (Arranged) 



CHEMISTRY 



All laboratory courses in chemistry (except Chem. 214 — $20.00) carry 
a laboratory fee of $12.00; in addition the student is charged for any ap- 
paratus which cannot be returned to the stock room in perfect condition. 

Chem. 1. General Chemistry. (4) 

June 25 - Aug. 3. Five lectures and five three-hour laboratory periods per week. Lecture 
11:00 C-130. Laboratory, 1:00, 2:00, 3:00. Prerequisite, 1 year high school algebra 
or equivalent. (Boyd.) 

Chem. 3. General Chemistry. (4) 

June 25 - Aug. 17, M. T. Th. F. Four lectures and four three-hour laboratory periods 

per week. Lecture, 11:00, C-132. Laboratory, 1:00, 2:00, 3:00. Prerequisite, Chem. 1. 

(Jaquith.) 

Chem. 19. Elements of Quantitative Analysis. (4) 

June 25 - Aug. 17. Four lectures and four laboratory periods per week. Lecture 8:00, 
C-215, M. T. Th. F. and laboratory M. T. Th. F. 9:00, 10:00; W., 8, 9, 10. Prerequisite, 
Chem. 3. (Stuntz.) 

Chem. 37. Elementary Organic Chemistry. (2) 

June 25 - Aug. 17. Four lectures per week. 8:00, C-134. Prerequisite, Chem. 35. 

(Henery-Logan.) 

Chem. 38. Elementary Organic Laboratory. (2) 

June 25- Aug. 17. Four three-hour laboratory periods per week. 9:00, 10:00, 11:00, C-221. 

Perequisite, Chem. 36. (Henery-Logan.) 

Chem. 192, 194. Glassblowing Laboratory. (1, 1) 

June 25 -Aug. 3. Two four-hour laboratory periods a week. M., W., 1:00, 2:00, 3:00, 

4:00, C-B3. (Carruthers.) 

Chem. 399. Research. (Staff.) 



30 



Classical Languages and Literatures, Dairy, Economics 

CLASSICAL LANGUAGES AND LITERATURES 

Latin 102. Tacitus. (3) 

June 25 -Aug. 17. M.T.Th.F., 9:30-10:50, LL-3. Lectures and readings on Greek and 
Roman historiography before Tacitus and on the author as a writer of history. The 
reading of selections from the Annals and Histories. Reports. (Avery.) 

DAIRY 



Dairy SIOl. Advanced Dairy Production. (1) (to be arranged) 

An advanced course primarily designed for teachers of vocational agriculture and county 
agents. It includes a study of the newer discoveries in dairy cattle nutrition, breeding 
and management. (Davis.) 

Dairy 301. Special Problems in Dairying. (1-5) (4 cr. max., M.S.; 8 cr. Max, Ph.D.) 
Prerequisite, permission of professor in charge of work. Credit in accordance with the 
amount and character of work done. Methods of conducting dairy research and the 
presentation of results are stressed. A research problem which relates specifically to 
the work the student is pursuing will be assigned. (Staff.) 

Dairy 399. Reearch. (1-6) 

Credit to be determined by the amount and quality of work done. Original investiga- 
tion by the student of some subject assigned by the major professor, and completion 
of the assignment and the preparation of a thesis in accordance with requirements for 
an advanced degree, (Staff.) 



ECONOMICS 



Econ. 5. Economic Developments. (2) 

June 25- Aug. 17. Three periods a week, M. W. F., 12:30; Q-111. No prerequisite. An 
introduction to modem economic institutions — their origins, development and present 
status. Emphasis on development in England, Western Europe and the United States. 

(Dalton.) 

Econ. 31. Principles of Economics. (3) 

June 25 -Aug. 17. M.T.Th.F., 8:00; Q-111. Prerequisite, sophomore standing. A gen- 
neral analysis of the functioning of the economic system, with special emphasis on na- 
tional income analysis. A considerable portion of the course is devoted to a study of 
basic concepts and explanatory principles. The remainder deals with the major prob- 
lems of the economic system. (Dalton.) 

Econ. 32. Principles of Economics. (3) 

June 25 - Aug. 17. M. T. Th. F., 9:30; Q-111. Prerequisite, Econ. 31. A general analysis 
of the functioning of the economic system, with special emphasis on resource alloca- 
tion. A considerable portion of the course is devoted to a study of basic concepts and 
explanatory principles. The remainder deals with the major problems of the economic 
system. (Barrett.) 

31 



Economics, Education 

Econ. 37. Fundamentals of Economics. (3) 

June 25 -Aug. 17. M.T.Th. F., 8:00; Q-129. Prerequisite, sophomore standing. Not 
open to students who have credit in Econ. 31 and 32. Not open to freshmen or to 
B.P.A. students. A survey of the general principles underlying economic activity. This 
is the basic course in economics for the American Civilzation Program for students 
who are unable to take the more complete course provided in Econ. 31 and 32. (Staff.) 

Econ. 140. Money and Banking. (3) 

June 25 -Aug. 17. M. T. Th. F., 8:00; Q-228. Prerequisite, Econ. 32 or 37. A study of 
the organization, functions, and operation of our monetary, credit, and banking sys- 
tem; the relation of commercial banking to the Federal Reserve System; the relation 
of money and credit to prices; domestic and foreign exchange and the impact of public 
policy upon banking and credit. (Barrett.) 

Econ. 160. Labor Economics. (3) 

June 25 - Aug. 17. M, T, Th, F, 11:00; Q-111. Prerequisite, Econ. 32 or 37. The histor- 
ical development and chief characteristics of the American Labor movement are first 
surveyed. Present day problems are then examined in detail; wage theories, unemploy- 
ment, social security, labor organization, collective bargaining. (Staff.) 

Econ. 399. Thesis. 

EDUCATION 

BUSINESS EDUCATION 

B.Ed. 102. Methods and Materials in Teaching Bookkeeping and Related Subjects. (2) 
M. T. Th. F., 8:00; Q-27. June 25 -Aug. 3. Important problems and procedures in the 
mastery of bookkeeping and related office knowledges and the skiUs including a con- 
sideration of materials and teaching procedures. (Lomax.) 

B.Ed. 205. Seminar in Business Education. (2) 

June 25 -Aug. 3, M. T. W. F., 9:30; Q-27. An evaluation of the literature and research 

in business education. (Lomax.) 

B.Ed. 256. Curriculum Development in Business Education. (2) 

June 25 -Aug. 3, M. W. Th. F., 11:00; Q-27. Emphasis will be placed on the philoso- 
phy and objectives of the business education program, and on curriculum research and 
organization of appropriate course content. (Lomax.) 

Education in Family Finance Workshop. (6) 
June 25 - August 3. See Ed. 189-1 in this catalog. 

EARLY CHILDHOOD EDUCATION ' 

Ed. 105. Science in the Elementary School, Section 3. (3) 

June 25 -Aug. 3, Daily; AA-9. See page 33 for detailed description. (Slant.) 

C. Ed. 110 Child Development III. (3) 

June 25 -Aug. 17, M. T. Th. F., 8:00; AA-8. Development growth of the child from the 
prenatal period through the early childhood years with implications for home and school 
practice. Open to students in other colleges of the University. (Hymes.) 



^The early childhood education curriculum has as its primary goal the preparation of 
nursery school, kindergarten, and primary teachers. 

32 



Education 

C. Ed. 115. Children's Activities and Activities Materials. (3) 

June 25 -Aug. 3, Daily, 9:30; AA-9. Prerequisites, C.Ed. 50, 51 or 110. Laboratory 
fee, $5.00. Storytelling, selection of books; the use, preparation and presentation of 
such raw materials as clay, paints (easel and finger), blocks, wood, and scrap mater- 
ials. (Stant.) 

C. Ed. 145. Guidance of Young Children. (3) 

June 25 -Aug. 17, M. T. Th. F., 9:30; AA-8. Development of an appreciation and 
understanding of young children from different home and community backgrounds; 
study of individual and group problems. (Hymes.) 

C. Ed. 159. Teaching Kindergarten. (4) (To Be Arranged) 

June 25 - Aug. 3. Admission to student teaching depends upon approval of the teaching 
staff of the department. An academic average of 2.3 is required. Teaching experience 
in the University Kindergarten. Fee, $30.00. (Broome.) 

ELEMENTARY-SECONDARY EDUCATION 

Ed. 52. Children's Literature (3) 

A study of literary values in prose and verse for children. 

Section 1—9:30, Daily, June 25 - August 3; A-17. (Chesney.) 

Section 2—11:00, Daily, June 25 - August 3; A-17. (Chesney.) 

Ed. 102. History of Education in the United States. (3) 

June 25 - Aug. 3, Daily, 11:00; T-129. A study of the origins and deveolpment of the 

chief features of the present system of education in the United States. (Wiggin.) 

Ed. 105. Science in the Elementary School. (3) 

Section 1—8:00, Daily, June 25 - August 3; T-119. (Blough.) 

Section 2— Daily, 11:00, June 25 - August 3; T-119. (F. Brown.) 

Section 3— Daily, 8:00, June 25 - August 3; AA-9. (Stant.) 

Ed. 121. The Language Arts in the Elementary School. (3) 

Section 1—8:00, Daily, June 25 to Aug. 3; LL-104. (Kinn.) 

Section 2—9:30, M. T. Th. F., June 25 to Aug. 17; A-18. (Evans.) 

Section S— 11:00, M. T. Th. F., June 25 to Aug. 17; A-18. (Evans.) 

Concerned with the teaching of spelling, handwriting, oral and written expression, and 
creative expression. Special emphasis given to skills havng real significance to pupils. 

Ed. 122. The Social Studies in the Elementary School. (3) 

Section 1— 8:00 Daily, June 25 to Aug. 3; T-20. (Bennett.) 

Section 2—9:30 M. T. Th. F., June 25 to Aug. 17; T-10. (L. O'NeiU.) 

Section 3—11:00 Daily, June 25 to Aug. 3; A-140. (Bennett.) 

Consideration given to curriculum, organization, methods of teaching, evaluation of 
newer materials, and utilization of environmental resources. 

Ed. 124. Arithmetic in the Elementary School. (3) 

Section 1— 8:00 Daily, June 25 to Aug. 3; A-16. ("Walters.) 

Section 2— 9:30 Daily, June 25 to Aug. 3; T-20. (Flournoy.) 

Section 3—11:00 Daily, June 25 to Aug. 3; T-20. (Flournoy.) 

33 



Education 

Emphasis on materials and procedures which help pupils sense arithmetical meanings 
and relationships. Helps teachers gain <t better understanding of the number system 
and arithmetical processes. 

Ed. 125. Art in Elementary Schools. (2) 

Section 1— 8:00 M.W.F., June 25 to Aug. 17; H-102. (Longley.) 

Section 2— 9:30 M. W. F., June 25 to Aug. 17; A-302. (Lembach.) 

Section 3—11:00 M.W.F., June 25 to Aug. 17; A-302. (Lembach.) 

Concerned with art methods and materials lor elementary schools. Includes laboratory 
experiences with materials appropriate for elementary schools. Enrollment limited to 
25 per section. 

Note: Teachers who need an art fundamentals course to meet certification requirements, 
may fulfill that requirement with Pr. Arts 1 or Art 20. Pr. Arts 1 is listed under Home 
Economics. See page 55 for the course description. 

Ed. 130. The Junior High School. (3) 

June 25 - Aug. 3, Daily, 9:30; A-14. A general overview of the junior high school. Pur- 
poses, functions, and characteristics of this school unit; a study of its population, or- 
ganization, program of studies, methods, staff, and other similar topics, together with 
their implications for prospective teachers. (McClure.) 

Ed. 133. Methods of Teaching Social Studies in Secondary School. (3) 
June 25 - Aug. 17, M. T. Th. F., 9:30; A-16. Designed to give practical training in the 
everyday teaching situations. Use of various lesson techniques, audio and visual aids, 
reference materials, and testing programs and the adaption of teaching methods in indi- 
vidual and group differences. Present tendencies and aims of instruction in the social 
studies. (Crambs.) 

Ed. 134. Materials and Procedures for the Secondary School Core Curriculum. (3) 
June 25 - Aug. 3, Daily, 11:00; Q-129. Fee, $1.00. This course is designed to bring prac- 
tical suggestion to teachers who are in charge of core classes in junior and senior high 
schools. Materials and teaching procedures for specific units of work are stressed. 

(Bossing.) 

Ed. 137. Methods of Teaching Mathematics and Science in Secondary Schools. (3) 
Section 1— Science; M. T. Tb. F., 9:30, June 25 - Aug. 17; E-308. (Lockard.) 

Section 2— Math; M. T. Th. F., 9:30, June 25 - Aug. 17; A-210. (Cole.) 

Laboratory fee, $2.00. Considers such topics as objectives, selection, organization, and 
presentation of subject matter, appropriate classroom methods and procedures, instruc- 
tional materials and evaluation of learning experiences in the areas of mathematics, 
the physical sciences, and the biological sciences. 

Ed. 141. Methods of Teaching English in Secondary Schools (3) 

June 25 - Aug. 17, M. T. Th. F., 9:30; A-130. Content and method in teaching the 

English language arts. (Kibler.) 

Ed. 142. Oral-aural Method in Teaching Foreign Languages. (3) 

June 25 - Aug. 17, M. T. Th. F., 9:30; LL-220. Prerequisite, 20 academic hours in a par- 
ticular language and approval of adviser. Graduate credit allowed by special arrangement 
and adviser's approval. Designed for high school teachers. Methods in making and using 
tape recordings, using electronic laboratories, developing oral-aural skills and direct 
approach to language teaching are emphasised. (Staff.) 

34 



Education 

Ed. 145. Principles and Methods of Secondary Education. (3) 

June 25 - Aug. 17, M. T. Th. F., 8:00; A-130. This course is concerned with the princi- 
ples and methods of teaching in junior and senior high schools. (Kibler.) 

Ed. 147. Audio-Visual Education. (3) 

Section 1— 8:00, M. T. Th. F., June 25 - Aug. 17; P-306. (Maley.) 

Section 2—11:00, M. T. Th. F., June 25 - Aug. 17; P-306. (Schramm.) 

Laboratory fee, $1.00. Sensory impression in their relation to learning, projection ap- 
paratus, its cost and operation; slides, film-strips, and films; physical principles under- 
lying projection; auditory aids to instruction; field trips; pictures, models, and graphic 
materials, integration of sesnsory aids with organized instruction. Recommended for all 
education students. 

Ed. 150. Educational Measurement. (3) 

June 25 - Aug. 3, Daily, 11:00; A-16. Constructing and interacting measures of 

achievements. (Ciblette.) 

Ed. 151. Statistical Methods in Education. (3) 

Section 1— 8:00 M. T. Th. F., June 25 - Aug. 17; T-10. (Dayton.) 

Section 2—11:00, M. T. Th. F., June 25 - Aug. 17; A-12. (Joos.) 

Designed as a first course in statistics for students in education. Emphasis is upon 
educational applications of descriptive statistics, including measures of central tendency, 
variability and association. 

Ed. 153. The Teaching of Reading. (3) 

Section 1 — 8:00, Daily, June 25 to Aug. 3; LL-104. (Fitzmaurice.) 

Section 2—9:30, Daily, June 25 to Aug. 3; LL-104. (Kinn.) 

Section 3—11:00, M. T. Th. F., June 25 to Aug. 17; LL-201. (R. O'Neill.) 

Concerned with fundamentals of development reading instruction, including reading 
readiness, uses of experience records, procedures in using basal readers, the improve- 
ment of comprehension, teaching reading in all areas of the curriculum, uses of 
children's literature, the program in word analysis, and procedures for determining 
individual needs. 

Ed. 154. Remedial Reading Instruction. (3) 

June 25 to Aug. 17, M. T. Th. F., 8:00; Ed. Annex. For supervisors and teachers who 
wish to help retarded readers. Concerned with causes of reading difficulties, the 
identification and diagnosis of retarded pupils, instructional materials, and teaching 
procedures. Prerequisite, Ed. 153 or the equivalent. (Massey.) 

Ed. 155. Laboratory Practice in Reading for Elementary and Secondary Schools. (3) 
June 25 to Aug. 17, M. T. Th. F., 9:30 and arr.; Ed. Annex. Prerequisite, Ed. 154. 
A laboratory course in which each student has one or more pupils for analysis and 
instruction. At least one class meeting per week to diagnose individual cases and to plan 
instruction. (Massey.) 

Application for enrollment should be mailed to Dr. Will J. Massey, College of 
Education, before June 1, 1962. 

Ed. 160. Educational Sociology. (3) 

June 25 to Aug. 3, Daily, 8:00; A-147. This course deals with data of the social 

sciences which are germane to the work of teachers. Consideration is given to im- 

35 



Education 

plications of democratic ideology for educational endeavor, educational tasks imposed 
by changes in population and technological trends, the welfare status of pupils, the 
socio-economic attitudes of individuals who control the schools, and other elements 
of community background which have significance in relation to schools. (Rugg.) 

Ed. 161. Principles of Guidance. (3) 

Overview of principles and practices of guidance-oriented education. 

June 25 to Aug. 17, 8:00, M. T. Th. F.; LL-2. (Staff.) 

Ed. 162. Mental Hygiene in the Classroom. (3) 

Section 1— Daily, 8:00, June 25 to Aug. 3; T-102. (Denecke.) 

Section 2— Daily, 9:30, June 25 to Aug. 3; T-102. (Denecke.) 

The practical application of the principles of mental hygiene to classroom problems. 
Limit enroUment to 30 per section. 

Ed. 188, Special Problems in Education. (1-3) 

Prerequisite, consent of instructor. Available only to mature students who have 
definite plans for individual study of approved problems. Course cards must have the 
title of the problem and the name of the faculty member who has approved it. (Staff.) 

Ed. 189. Workshops, Clinics, and Institutes. 

Ed. 189-1. Education in Family Finance. (6) 

Daily, 8.00-3:00; Q-107, 108. June 25 to August 3, 1962. The course is especially 
designed for junior, senior high school, and college teachers and other educators 
interested in developing and improving classroom instruction in personal and family 
money management. Activities of the total workshop will include lectures by staff 
and consultants, small group work, study of individual problems, field trips and 
evaluation of available materials. For a detailed description of the workshop see 
page 17. Early application is recommended. (Risinger.) 

Ed. 189-11. Use of Community Resources. (3) 

June 25 to July 13, 1962, Daily, 9:30-3:30; AR-29. This workshop is offered for 
persons who teach in kindergarten or in grades one to twelve, inclusive. It is designed 
to help teachers learn to utilize community resources to strengthen a sound program 
of teaching and learning. The Smithsonian Institution will receive special attention 
as an excellent example of a valuable community resource. (Brinton.) 

Ed. 189-26. Human Relations in Educational Administration. (6) 

June 25 to August 3, Daily, 9:00-3:00. Prerequisite, a master's degree. Enrollment 
limited. This workshop is concerned with the development of leadership teams 
capable of providing in-service programs in human relations in local school systems. 
Preference in enroUment will be given to teams designated by Maryland school systems. 

(NeweU.) 

Ed. 189-28. The Administration and Supervision of Special Education Programs. (3) 
July 23 to August 10, Daily, 9:00 to 3:00; AR-29. This workshop will consider the 
areas of primary concern to administrators and supervisors in determining Special 
Education needs, and in establishing and carrying out educational program modification. 

(Gates.) 

36 



Education 

Ed. 189-29. The Education of Children with Learning Impairments. (4) 
June 25 to July 20, Daily, 9:00-3:00. To be arranged off-campus. This workshop will 
consider the basis for and demonstrate techniques and materials in teaching children 
with learning disabilities. (Hebeler and consultants.) 

Ed. 189-33. Child Study Leaders. (2) 

June 25 to July 6., Daily, 8:00-3:00; J-8A. This workshop is designed primarily 
for leaders or prospective leaders to acquaint them with principles and procedures of 
the child study program. All three year levels of the program will be covered. See 
also page 16. (Morgan, Thompson.) 

July 23 to August 3, Daily, 8:00-3:00; J-8A. (Morgan, Thompson.) 

Ed. 189-34. Administrators' Conference on Implication of Human Development 
Principles. (2) 

July 9 to July 20, Daily, 8:00-3:00; J-8A. This Administrators' Conference is 
open to superintendents of schools, supervisors and principals. It will examine recent 
scientific research findings and theory regarding human growth, learning and behavior 
and will consider the implications of this knowledge for educational practice, includ- 
ing such problems as grouping for effective learning, marking, curriculum control, 
teaching purposes, home-school interaction, the development and use of cumulative 
records, and mental health problems. See also page 16. (Morgan.) 

Ed. 189-35, I and II. Application of Human Development Principles in Classrooms. 
(2) (2) 

August 6 to 17, Daily, 8:00-3:00; J-11. This workshop is open to persons who have 
been in the child study program for three years or more. Its purpose is to consider 
classroom practices in the light of human development principles. See also page 16. 

(Matteson, Orr.) 

Ed. 189-36, I and II. Human Development and Religious Education. (2) (2) 

I. (Beginning Section) July 23 to August 3. Daily 8:00 to 3:00. J-12. This Work- 
shop is open to persons who are responsible for planning and organizing programs 
of religious education. The workshop will be entirely non-denominational and will 
focus on examining scientific knowledge about human development, learning behavior, 
and adjustment and considering the implications of this knowledge for religious educa- 
tional practice and church school programs. (Morgan, Goering.) 

II. (Advanced Section) August 6 to 17. Daily 8:00 to 3:00. J-12. Open to those 
who have had a previous workshop in Human Development and Religious Education 
or a Child Study Workshop. (Morgan, Goering.) 

Ed. 18Q-37. Action Research in Human Development Education. (2) 
August 6 to 17, Daily, 8:00-3:00; J-114. Survey of action research methods and 
exploration of design requirements and materials suitable for use in studying class- 
room problems. When teams enroll, preliminary plans may be developed. (Staff.) 

Ed. 189-42. Counselor Education I. (2) 

June 25 - Aug. 17, Daily, 8:30-3:00; A-231. Enrollment limited to representatives of 
sponsoring counties. First of a two-summer sequence designed to prepare school coun- 
selors. Students register concurrently for Ed. 250, Analysis of the Individual, Section 
2 (3) and Ed. 260: School Counseling: Theoretical Foundations and Practice, Sec- 
tion 2 (3). (Hall.) 

Ed. 189-47. Workshop for Teachers of Secondary School English. (3) 

July 9 to July 27, Daily, 9:30 to 3:30; G-109A, 109B. The purpose of this workshop 

is to encourage experienced teachers of secondary school English to study the new 

37 



Education 

trends in the teaching of English, to increase their knowledge and understanding 
of the subject matter of English, and to prepare materials for use in their own. 
classes. (Bryan, Cooley.) 

Ed. 189-50. NDEA Summer Language Institute. (4) 

June 25 to August 10, Daily, 8:00-5:00; LL-12. Purpose is to upgrade foreign language 
secondary school teachers' speaking ability in French or Spanish, improve their class- 
room and laboratory procedures, and augment their knowledge of the Spanish and 
French speaking peoples. Students register concurrently for Foreign Language 140, 
3 credits. (Rovner.) 

Ed. 210. The Organization and Administration of Public Education. (3) 
June 25 to Augst 3, Daily, 8:00; A-146. The basic course in school administration. 
The course deals with the organization and administration of school systems — at the 
local, state, and federal levels, and with the administrative relationships involved. 

(Roesch.) 

Ed. 211. The Organization, Administration, and Supervision of Secondary Schools. (3) 
June 25 to August 17, M. T. Th. F., 8:00; A-140. The work of the secondary school 
principal. The course includes topics such as personnel problems, supervision, school- 
community relationships, student activities, schedule making, and internal financial 
accounting. (J. P. Anderson.) 

Ed. 216. Public School Supervision. (3) 

June 25 to August 17, M. T. Th. F., 11:00; Q-110. Deals with recent trends in ele- 
mentary and high school supervision; the nature and function of supervision; planning 
supervisory programs; evaluation and rating; participation of teachers and other groups 
in policy development; school workshops; and other means for the improvement of 
instruction. (J. P. Anderson.) 

Ed. 217. Administration and Supervision in Elementary Schools. (3) 
June 25 to August 17, M. T. Th. F., 11:00; LL-202. Problems in organizing and ad- 
ministering elementary schools and improving instruction. (Davis.) 

Ed. 219. Seminar in Educational Administration and Supervision. (2) 

Prerequisite, at least four hours in educational administration and supervision or 

consent of instructor. A student may register for two hours and take the seminar a 

second time for an additional two hours. 

Section 1— June 25 to August 3, M. T. Th. F., 9:30; A-149. (Roesch.) 

Section 2— August 6 to August 17, Daily, 9:30 to 12:30; A-149. (NeweU.) 

Ed. 226. Child Accounting. (2) 

June 25 to August 3, M. T. Th. F., 9:30; Q-132. An inquiry into the record keeping 

activities of the school system, including an examination of the marking system. 

(VanZwoU.) 

Ed. 227. Public School Personnel Administration. (3) 

June 25 to August 3, Daily, 8:00; A-45. A comparison of practices with principles 
governing the satisfaction of school personnel needs, including a study of tenure, 
salary schedules, supervision, rewards, and other benefits. (VanZwoE.) 

Ed. 229. Seminar in Elementary Education. (2) 

June 25 to August 17, M. W. F., 11:00; T-10. Primarily for individuals who wish to 
write seminar papers. Enrollment should be preceded by at least 12 hours of 
graduate work in education. (L- O'Neill.) 

38 



Education 

Ed. 234. The School Curriculum. (2) 

June 25 to August 3, M. T. Th. F., 9:30; A-147. A foundations course embracing the 
curriculum as a whole from early childhood through adolescence, including a review 
of historical developments, an analysis of conditions affecting curriculum change, an 
examination of issues in curriculum making, and a consideration of current trends 
in curriculum design. (Hovet.) 

Ed. 235. Principles of Curriculum Development. (3) 

June 25 to August 3, Daily, 9:30; Q-129. Curriculum planning, improvement, and 
evaluation in the schools; principles for the selection and organization of the con- 
tent and learning experiences; ways of working in classroom and school on curriculum 
improvement, (Bossing.) 

Ed. 239. Seminar in Secondary Education. (2) 

August 6 to August 17, Daily, 9:30 to 12:30; Q-107. (Ulry.) 

Ed. 241 Problems in the Teaching of Reading. (3) 

June 25 to August 3. Elementary School — 9:30, Daily; T-219. Implications of cur- 
rent theory and results of research for the teaching of reading. Attention is given 
to all areas of developmental reading instruction, with special emphasis on presistent 
problems. Prerequisite, Ed. 153 or equivalent. (Walters.) 

Ed. 243. Problems of Teaching Arithmetic in Elementary Schools. (2) 

June 25 to August 3, M. T. Th. F., 8:00; A-149. Implications of current theoiy and 

results of research for the teaching of arithmetic in elementary schools. (F. Brown.) 

Ed. 244. Problems of Teaching Language Arts in Elementary Schools. (2) 
June 25 to August 7, M. W. F., 9:30; LL-202. Implications of current theory and re- 
sults of research for the language arts in the elementary schools. (Davis.) 

Ed. 245. Introduction to Research. (2) 

Section 1— M.T.W.F., 11:00; June 25 to August 3. Q-104. (Hovet.) 

Section 2— M.T.Th.F, 12:30; June 25 to August 3. Q-104 (Rugg.) 

Intensive reading, analysis, and interpretation of research; applications to teaching 
fields; the writing of abstracts, research reports, and seminar papers. 

Ed. 247. Seminar in Science Education. (2) (Elementary School) 
June 25 to August 3, M. T. Th. F., 9:30; T-119. An opportunity to pursue problems 
in curriculimi making, course of study development, or other science teaching problems. 
Class members may work on problems related directly to their own school situations. 

(Blough.) 
Ed. 250. Analysis of the Individual. (3) 

Section 1— Daily, 9:30; June 25 to August 3; O-lOl. (Staff.) 

Section 2— Daily, 11:00; June 25 to August 17; Q-28. (See Ed. 18942) (HaU.) 

Collecting and interpreting non-standardized pupil appraisal data; synthesis of all 
types of data through case study procedures. Prerequisites, Ed. 161, Ed. 151, Ed. 263, 
or permission of instructor. 

Ed. 251. Intermediate Statistics in Education. (3) 

June 25 to August 17, M. T. Th. F., 9:30; T-5. Prerequisite, Education 151 or equivalent. 
A study of the basic statistical techniques used for graduate research in education, 
including tests of significance and sampling techniques. Necessary arithmetic skills are 
developed as part of the course. (Johnson.) 

39 



Education 

Ed. 253. Occupational Choice: Theory and Information. (2) 

June 25 to August 3, M. T. Th. F., 9:30; LL-2. Research and theory related to oc- 
cupational and educatinal decisions; school programs of related information and other 
activities in occupational decisions. (StafF.) 

Ed. 255. Advanced Laboratory Experiences in Reading Instruction. (3) 
June 25 to August 17, M. T. Th. F., 9:30 and arranged; Ed. Annex. Prerequisites, 21 
crs. applicable to master's program in Corrective and Remedial Reading, including Ed. 
154, Ed. 150, and Ed. 141 or Ed. 244. Each participant wiU assist in diagnosing pupils 
with reading disabilities and in recommending instructional procedures for them. Ap- 
plications for enrollment must be mailed to Dr. Massey, College of Education, before 
June 1. (Massey.) 

Ed. 256. Advanced Laboratory Experiences in Reading Instruction. (3) 
June 25 to August 17, M. T. Th. F., 9:30 and arranged; Ed. Annex. Prerequisite: at 
least 21 credits which are applicable to the master's program in Corrective and Reme- 
dial Reading Instruction, including Ed. 154, Ed. 150, and Ed. 141 or Ed. 244. Each 
participant will assist in instructing pupils with reading disabilities. Applications for 
enrollment must be mailed to Dr. Massey before June 1. (Massey.) 

Ed. 259. Elementary School Counseling. (3) 

June 25 to August 3, Daily, 11:00; A-133. For elementary school counselors or ad- 
vanced students preparing for elementary school counseling. The functions of a coun- 
selor in elementary schools studied covering both general guidance and interview func- 
tions. Admission with instructor's consent only. (Metcalf.) 

Ed. 260. School Counsteling: Theoretical Foundations and Practice. (3) 
Section 1—11:00, M.T.Th.F., June 25 -Aug. 17; O-lOl (Tarwater.) 

Section 2—12:30, Daily, June 25 - Aug. 17. (See Ed. 189-42) ; O-lOl (HaU.) 

Exploration of counseling theories and the practices which stem from them. Ed. 161, 
Ed. 250, Ed. 253 are prerequisite. 

Ed. 261. Practicum in Counseling. (2) 

June 25 to August 3, M. T. Th. F., 8:00; O-lOl. Sequence of supervised counseling ex- 
periences of increasing complexity. Limited to 8 applicants in advance. Two hour class 
plus laboratory. Prerequisites, Ed. 260 and permission of instructor. (Marx.) 

Ed. 262. Measurement in Pupil Appraisal. (3) 

June 25 -Aug. 17. M.T.Th.F., 9:30; LL-319. Study of group tests typically employed 
in school testing programs; discussion of evidence relating to the measurement of abil- 
ities. Prerequisite, Ed. 150. (Joos.) 

Ed. 268. Seminar in Educational Sociology. (2) 

Aug. 6 to Aug. 17, 9:30-12:30; Q-108. (Risinger.) 

Ed. 269. Seminar in Guidance. (2) 

June 25 -Aug. 17, M. W. F., 9:30; O-120. Registration only by approval of instructor. 

Final guidance course. Students study and conduct research. (Tarwater.) 

Ed. 281. Source Materials in Education. (2) 

June 25 -Aug. 3, M.T.Th.F., 8:00; T-219. Bibliography development through a study 
of source materials in education, special fields of education, and for seminar papers 
and theses. (Wiggin.) 

40 



Education 

Ed. 288. Special Problems in Education. (1-6) 

Arranged. Master of education or doctoral candidates who desire to pursue special 
research problems under the direction of their advisers may register for credit under 
this number. Course card must have the title of the problem and the name of the fac- 
ulty member under whom the work will be done. (Staff.) 

Ed. 290. Doctoral Seminar. (1) 

Arranged. Prerequisite, passing the preliminary examination for a doctor's degree in 
Education, or recommendation of a doctoral adviser. Analysis of doctoral projects and 
thesis, and of other on-going research projects. A doctoral candidate may participate 
in the Seminar during as many University sessions as he desires, but may earn no more 
than three semester hours of credit in the Seminar. An Ed.D. candidate may earn in 
total no more than nine semester hours, and a Ph.D. candidate, no more than eighteen 
semester hours, in the Seminar and in Ed. 399. (Johnson.) 

Ed. 302. Curriculum in Higher Education. (3) 

June 25 - Aug. 17, M. T. Th. F., 8:00; A-240. An analysis of research in curriculum and 
of conditions affecting curriculum change, with examination of issues in curriculum 
making based upon the history of higher education curriculum development. (Kelsey.) 

Ed. 305. College Teaching. (3) 

June 25 - Aug. 17, M. T. Th. F., 9:30; A-240. Various methods of college instruction 
analyzed in relation to the curriculum and psychological basis. These would include 
the case study method, the recitation method, teaching readiness, teaching by televi- 
sion, and other teaching aids. (Kelsey.) 

Ed. 399. Research-Thesis. (1-6) 

First and second semesters; summer session. Students who desire credit for a master's 

thesis, a doctoral dissertation, or a doctoral project should use this number. (Staff.) 

HOME ECONOMICS EDUCATION 

H. E. Ed. 102 Problems in Teaching Home Economics. (3) 

June 25 - July 20, daily, 8:00-11:00; A-53. Prerequisite, consent of instructor. A study of 
the managerial aspects of teaching and administering a home making program; the 
physical environment, organization, and sequence of instructional units, resource ma- 
terials, evaluation, home projects. Special emphasis will be given to the construction of 
units in the area of teaching Family Life and Family Relationships. (Spencer.) 

H. E. Ed. 202. Trends in the Teaching and Supervision of Home Economics. (3) 
July 23 - Aug. 17, daily, 8:00-11:00; A-53. Study of home economics programs and 
practices in light of current educational trends. Interpretation and analysis of demo- 
cratic teaching procedures, outcomes of instruction, and supervisory practices. 

(Spencer.) 

HUMAN DEVELOPMENT EDUCATION 

(In addition to the courses listed below, see Ed. 189-33, -34, -35, -36, -37) 

H. D. Ed. 100. Principles of Human Development I. (3) 

June 25 -Aug. 17, M. T. Th. F., 8:00; J-124. This course gives a general overview of 
the scientific principles that describe human development, learning and behavior and 
relate these principles to the task of the school. Intensive laboratory work with case 
records is an integral part of this course. Ordinarily, H. D. Ed. 100 and H. D. Ed. 101 
are not taken concurrently. (Goering.) 

41 



Education 

H. D. Ed. 101. Principles of Human Development II. (3) 

June 25 -Aug. 17, M.T.Th.F., 9:30; J-125. Continuation of H. D. Ed. 100, which is 
a prerequisite. These two courses, H D. 100 and H. D. 101, are designed to meet the 
usual certificate requirements in educational psychology. (Perkins.) 

H. D. Ed. 112, 114, 116. Scientific Concepts in Human Development I, II, III. (3, 3, 3) 

(Staff.) 
Summer workshop courses for undergraduates. In any one summer, concept and labor- 
atory courses must be taken concurrently. For further description, see Six-Week Hu- 
man Development Workshop, page 15. 

H. D. Ed. 200. Introduction to Human Development and Child Study. (3) 

Section 1—8:00, M. T. Th. F.; J-207. (Perkins.) 

Section 2—9:30-12:20, M.T.Th.F., June 26 -July 20; J-127. (Staff.) 

This course offers a general overview of the scientific principles which describe human 
development and behavior and makes use of these principles in the study of individual 
children. When this course is offered during the academic year, each student will 
observe and record the behavior of an individual child through the semester and must 
have one half-day a week free for this purpose. The course is basic to further work in 
child study and serves as a prerequisite for advanced courses where the student has 
not had field work or at least six weeks of workshop experience in child study. When 
this course is offered during the summer intensive laboratory work with case records 
wiU be substituted for the study of an individual child. 

H. D. Ed. 201. Biological Bases of Behavior. (3) 

June 25 - Aug. 17, M. T. Th. F., 9:30; J-124. H. D. Ed. 200 or its equivalent must be 
taken before H. D. Ed. 201 or concurrently. Emphasizes that understanding himian life, 
growth and behavior depends on understanding the ways in which the body is able to 
capture, control and expand energy. Application throughout is made to human body 
processes and implications for understanding and working with people. (Goering.) 

H. D. Ed. 202. Social Bases of Behavior. (3) 

June 25 - Aug. 17, M. T. Th., F., 8:00; J-125. H. D. Ed. 200 or its equivalent must be 
taken before H. D. Ed. 202 or concurrently. Analyzes the socially inherited and trans- 
mitted patterns of pressures, expectations and limitations learned by an individual as 
he grows up. These are considered in relation to the patterns of feeling and behaving 
which emerge as the result of growing up in one's social group. (Brandt.) 

H. D. Ed. 203. Integrative Bases of Behavior. (3) 

June 25 - Aug. 17, M. T. Th. F., 9:30; J-104. H. D. Ed. 200 or its equivalent, H. D. 
Ed. 201, and H. D. 202, are prerequisite. Analyzes the organized and integrated patterns 
of feeling, thinking, learning and behavior which emerge from the interaction of basic 
biological drives and potentials with one's unique experience growing up in a social 
group. (Peck.) 

H. D. Ed. 206. Socialization Processes in Human Development I. (3) 

June 26 - July 20, M. T. Th. F., 8:00-10:50; J-114. (Kurtz.) 

H. D. Ed. 207. Socialization Processes in Human Development II. (3) 
July 23 - Aug. 17, M. T. Th. F., 8:00-10:50; J-127. (Kurtz.) 

H. D. Ed. 250 may be taken concurrently with this course. Analyzes the processes by 
which human beings internalize the culture of the society in which they live. The 
major sub-cultures in the United States, their training procedures, and their character- 
istic human expressions in folk-knowledge, habits, attitudes, values, life-goals, and ad- 
justments patterns are analyzed. Other cultures are examined to highlight the Ameri- 
can way of life and to reveal its strengths and weaknesses. 

42 



Education 

H. D. Ed. 210. Affectional Relationships and Processes in Human Development. (3) 
M. T. Th. F., 8:00; J-104. H. D. Ed. 200 or its equivalent must be taken before or con- 
currently. Describes the normal development, expression and influence of love in in- 
fancy, childhood, adolescence and adulthood. It deals with the influence of parent-child 
relationships involving normal acceptance, neglect, rejection, inconsistency, and over- 
protection upon health, learning, emotional behavior and personality adjustment and 
development. (Peck.) 

H. D. Ed. 212, 214, 216. Advanced Scientific Concepts in Human Development, I, II, 
III, (3, 3, 3) (Matteson and Staff.) 

H. D. Ed. 213, 215, 217. Advanced Laboratory in Behavior Analysis, I, II, III. (3, 
3, 3) (Matteson and Staff.) 

Summer workshop courses for graduates providing credit for as many as three work- 
shops. In any one summer, concept and laboratory courses must be taken concurrently. 
For further description, see Six-Week Human Development Workshop, page 18. 

H. D. Ed. 221. Learning Theory and the Educative Process. (3) 
June 25 - Aug. 17, M. T. Th. F., 9:30; J-126. Prerequisites, H. D. Ed. 100 and 101 or 
equivalent. Provides a systematic review of the major theories of learning and their 
impact on education. Considers factors that influence learning. (Brandt.) 

H. D. Ed. 250. Direct Study of Children. (!) 

Arranged. May not be taken concurrently with H. D. Ed. 102, 103, 104, 200. Provides 
the opportunity to observe and record the behavior of an individual child in a nearby 
school. These records will be used in conjunction with advanced courses in human 
development and this course will be taken concurrently with such courses. When offered 
in the summer intensive analysis of case materials will be substituted for the direct 
study experiences. 

H. D. Ed. 270. Seminars in Special Topics in Human Development. (2-6) 
Arranged. Prerequisites, consent of instructor. An opportunity for advanced students 
to focus in depth on topics of special interest growing out of their basic courses in 
human development. (Staff.) 

INDUSTRIAL EDUCATION 

The technical courses which are offered are intended for industrial arts 
teachers, arts and crafts teachers, education for industry majors, and adult 
education leaders. 

The professional courses are open to industrial arts teachers and super- 
visors, to vocational-industrial teachers and supervisors, to school adminis- 
trators and to other graduate students whose planned programs include 
work in this area. 

Ind. Ed. 1. Mechanical Drawing. (2) 

June 25 -Aug. 17, Daily, 8:00; P-208. Laboratory fee, $5.00. This course constitutes 
an introduction to orthographic multiview and isometric projection. Emphasis is placed 
upon the visualization of an object when it is represented by a multi-view drawing and 
upon the making of multi-view drawings. The course carries through auxiliary views, 
sectional views, demonstrating conventional representation and single stroke letters. 

(Luetkemeyer.) 

43 



Education 

Ind. Ed. 2. Elementary Woodworking. (2) 

June 25 - Aug. 17, Daily, 12:30; P-218. Laboratory fee, $5.00. This is a woodworking 

course which involves primarily the use of hand tools. (Schranrun.) 

Ind. Ed. 21. Mechanical Drawing. (2) 

June 25 -Aug. 17. Daily, 8:00; P-208. Prerequisite, Ind. Ed. 1. Laboratory fee, $5.00. 
A course dealing with working drawings, machine design, pattern layouts, tracing and 
reproduction. Detail drawings followed by assemblies are presented. (Leutkemeyer.) 

Ind. Ed. 22. Machine Woodworking I. (2) 

June 25 -Aug. 17. Daily, 12:30; P-218. Prerequisite, Ind. Ed. 2. Laboratory fee, $5.00. 
Machine Woodworking I offers initial instruction in the proper operation of the jointer, 
band saw, variety saw, jig saw, mortiser, shaper, and lathe. The types of jobs which 
may be performed on each machine and thier safe operation are of primary concern. 

(Schramm.) 
Ind. Ed. 24. Sheet Metal Work. (2) 

June 25 - Aug. 17. Daily, 9:30; P-116. Laboratory fee, $5.00. Articles are made from 
metal in its sheet form and involve the operations of cutting, shaping, soldering, rivet- 
ing, wiring, folding, seaming, beading, burring, etc. The student is required to develop 
his own patterns inclusive of parallel line development, radial line development, and 
triangulation. (Crosby.) 

Ind. Ed. 26. General Metal Work. (3) 

June 25- Aug. 17. Daily, 9:30; P-116. Laboratory fee, $7.50. This course provides exper- 
iences in constructing items from aluminum, brass, copper, pewter, and steel. The proc- 
esses included are designing, lay out, heat treating, forming, surface decorating, fas- 
tening, and assembling. The course also includes a study of the aluminum, copper, and 
steel industries in terms of their basic manufacturing processes. (Crosby.) 

Ind. Ed. 84, 124. Organized and Supervised Work Experience. 

(3 credits for each internship period, total: 6 credits.) This is a work experience 
sequence planned for students enrolled in the curriculum, "Education for Industry." The 
purpose is to provide the students with opportunities for first-hand experiences with 
business and industry. The student is responsible for obtaining his own employment 
with the coordinator advising him in regard to the job opportimities which have opti- 
mum learning value. The nature of the work experience desired is outlined at the out- 
set of employment and the evaluations made by the student and the coordinator are 
based upon the planned experiences. The minimum time basis for each internship 
period is 240 work hours. Any one period of internship must be served through contin- 
uous employment in a single establishment. Two internships are required. The two 
internships may be served with the same business or industry. The completion for 
credit of any period of internship requires the employer's recommendation in terms of 
satisfactory work and work attitudes. More complete details are found in the hand- 
book prepared for the student of this curriculiun. 

Ind. Ed. 150. Training Aids Development. (3) 

June 25 -Aug. 17, M.T.Th. F., 8:00; P-306. Study of the aids in common use as to 
their source and application. Special emphasis is placed on principles to be observed 
in making aids useful to shop teachers. Actual construction and application of such 
devices will be required. (Maley.) 

Ind. Ed. 164. Shop Organization and Management. (2) 

June 25 -Aug. 17, M. W. F., 12:30; P-221. This course covers the basic elements of or- 
ganizing and managing an Industrial Education program including the selection of 
equipment and the arrangement of the shop. (Tierney.) 

44 



Education 

Ind. Ed. 168. Trade or Occupational Analysis. (2) 

June 25 -Aug. 17, M.W. F., 9:30; P-221. This course should precede Ind. Ed. 169. Pro- 
vides a working knowledge of occupational and job analysis, which is basic in organ- 
izing vocational-industrial courses of study. (Luetkemeyer.) 

Ind. Ed. 171. History of Vocational Education. (2) 

June 25 -Aug. 17, M. W. F., 11:00; P-205. An overview of the development of voca- 
tional education from primitive times to the present. (Tiemey.) 

Ind. Ed. 175. Recent Technological Developments in Products and Processes. (3) 
June 25 -Aug. 17. Daily, 8:00; P-306. This course is designed to give the student an 
understanding of recent technological developments as they pertain to the products 
and processes of industry. The nature of the newer products and processes is studied 
as well as their effect upon modern industry and/or society. (Crosby.) 

Ind. Ed. 207. Philosophy of Industrial Arts Education. (3) 

June 25 -Aug. 17, M. T. Th. F., 9:30; P-205. This course is intended to assist the stu- 
dent in his development of a point of view in regard to Industrial Arts and its rela- 
tionship with the total educational program. He should, thereby, have a "yardstick" for 
appraising current procedures and proposals and an articulateness for his own profes- 
sional area. (Harrison.) 

Ind. Ed. 216. Supervision of Industrial Arts. (2) 

June 25 -Aug. 17, M.W.F., 8:00; P-221. (Tiemey.) 

Ind. Ed. 240. Research in Industrial Arts and Vocational Education. (2) 

Arranged. This is a course offered by arrangement for persons who are conducting 

research in the areas of industrial arts and vocational education. (Staff.) 

Ind. Ed. 248. Seminar in Industrial Arts and Vocational Education. (2) 

Arranged. (Staff.) 

Ind. Ed. 250. Teacher Education in Industrial Arts. (3) 

June 25 -Aug. 17, M.T.Th. F., 11:00; P-221. This course is intended for the Industrial 
Arts teacher educator at the College level. It deals with the function and historical 
development of Industrial Arts Teacher education. Other areas of content include ad- 
ministration, program and program development, physical facilities and requirements, 
staff organization and relationships, college-secondary school relationships, philosophy 
and evaluation. (Harrison.) 

Ed. 147. Audio-Visual Education. (3) 

June 25 - Aug. 17. See details under Ed. listing. 

Section 1— M. T. Th. F., 8:00; P-306. (Maley.) 

Section 2— M. T. Th. F., 11:00; P-306. (Schramm.) 

LIBRARY SCIENCE EDUCATION 

L. S. Ed. 120. Introduction to Librarianship. (3) 

June 25 -Aug. 17, M. T. Th. F., 8 to 9:20; Library 100. An overview of the library- pro- 
fession. Development of public, academic, special and school library services. History 
of books and libraries. The library as a social institution. The impact of communica- 
tion media on society. Philosophy of librarianship. Professional standards, organizations, 
and publications. (D. Brown.) 

45 



Education 

L. S. Ed. 124. Book Selection and Evaluation for Children and Youth. (3) 
June 25 -Aug. 17, M.T.Th. F., 9:30 to 10:50; Library 100. Principles of book selec- 
tion for school libraries and children's collections. Book selection aids and reviewing 
media. Influence of the community and curriculum on selection. Evaluation of publish- 
ers, editions, translations, series. (D. Brown.) 

L. S. Ed. 128. School Library Administration and Service. (3) 

June 25 -Aug. 17, M.T.Th. F., 11:00-12:20; Library 100. Acquisition, circulation, util- 
ization and maintenance of library materials. Organization of effective school library 
programs. School library quarters and equipment. Publicity and exihibits. Evaluation 
of library services. (Staff.) 

L. S. Ed. 132. Library Materials for Youth. (3) 

June 25 -Aug. 17, 1:00-2:30, M.T. Th. F.; Library 100. Reading interests of young 
people. Literature for adolescents. Informational materials in subject fields including: 
books, periodicals, films, fihnstrips, records, pictures, pamphlet materials. (Staff.) 



MUSIC EDUCATION 

Mus. Ed. 132. Music in the Secondary School. (3) 

Daily, 8:00-9:20; B-7. A study of the vocal and instrumental programs in the secon- 
dary school. A survey of the needs in general music, and the relationship of music 
to the core curriculum. (deVermond.) 

Mus. Ed. 175-1. Methods and Materials in Vocal Music for the High School. (2) 
Daily, 2:00-5:00, July 16-27 only; Lib. 405. Offered as part of a Workshop in Choral 
Music for a two-week period. Supplementary fee, $5.00. Lectures, conferences, and dis- 
cussions of problems of repertoire, diction, tone production, interpretation, and reading 
of new music. A chorus composed of selected high-school students wiU be available for 
demonstrations in the second week of the workshop. The course may be repeated for 
credit, since different repertoires are covered each time the course is offered. (HiUis.) 

Mus. Ed. 180-1. Instrumental Music for the High School. (2) 
July 16-27 only, Daily, 2:00-5:00; Armory 21. Offered as part of a Workshop in Band 
Music for a two-week period. Supplementary fee, $5.00. A survey of the repertoires 
for high school orchestra, band, and small ensemble. Problems of interpretation, inton- 
ation, tone quality, and rehearsal techniques. The course may be repeated for credit, 
since different repertoires are covered each time the course is offered. (SawhiU.) 

Mus. Ed. 201. Administration and Supervision of Music in the Public Schools. (3) 
Daily, 9:30-10:50; B-9. The study of basic principles and practices of supervision and 
administration with emphasis on curriculum construction, scheduling, budgets, directing 
of in-service teaching, personnel problems, and school-community relationships. (Staff.) 

Mus. Ed. 209. Seminar in Instrumental Music. (2) 

Daily, 11:00-12:20; B-9. A consideration of acoustical properties and basic techniques 
of the instruments. Problems of ensemble and balance, intonation, precision, and inter- 
pretation are studied. Materials and musical literature for orchestras, bands, and small 
ensembles are evaluated. (Staff.) 

46 



Education, Engineering 
SPECIAL EDUCATION 

Sp. Ed. 170. Introduction to Special Education. (3) 

June 25 -Aug. 3. Daily, 8:00; R-202. Designed to give an understanding of the needa 

of all types of exceptional children, stressing preventive and remedial measures. 

(Pappanikau.) 

Sp. Ed. 171-A. Characteristics of Exceptional Children. A. Mentally Retarded. 
June 25 to Aug. 3. Daily, 9:30; R-202. A study of psychological characteristics of re- 
tarded children, including discovery, analysis of causes, testing techniques, case studies, 
and remedial educational measures. (Pappanikau.) 

Ed. 189-28. Workshop: The Administration and Supervision of Special Education 

Programs. (3) 
July 23 to Aug. 10. See workshops in Special Education, pages 21 and 36-37. 

(Hebeler, Gates.) 

Ed. 189-29. Workshop: The Education of Children with Learning Impairments. (4) 
June 25 to July 20. Se>e workshops in Special Education, pages 21 and 36-37 

(Hebeler and Consultants.) 

Sp. Ed. 172-B. Education of Exceptional Children. B. Gifted (3) 
June 25 to Aug. 17. Daily, 9:30; R-205. Offers practical and specific methods of teach- 
ing gifted children based upon a study of characteristics and the learning process. 

(Staff.) 

Sp. Ed. 173-A. Curriculum for Exceptional Children. A. Mentally Retarded. (3) 
July 23 to Aug. 17, 9:00-12:00; AR-33. Prerequisite, Sp. Ed. 171 or equivalent. 
Examines the principles and objectives guiding curriculum for exceptional children: 
gives experience in developing curriculum for these children; studies various curricula 
currently in use. (Hebeler.) 

ENGINEERING 

€. E. 110. Surveying I. (3) 

June 11 to June 23, 1962, inclusive. Daily, all day; J-103, J-104. Prerequisite: Junior 
standing or consent of Department. Principles and methods of making plane and topo- 
graphic surveys. Use, care, and adjustment of instruments. Consistent accuracy and 
systematic procedures in field work, computations, and mapping are emphasized for 
obtaining desired objectives. Open only to students who were enrolled in the College 
•of Engineering during the academic year, 1961-62. (Garber.) 

E. E. 1. Basic Electrical Engineering. (4) 

June 25 -Aug. 17, M.T.Th.F., 8:00-9:20, J-10; Sat. 8:00-10:50, S-107A. Prerequisites, 
Math. 21, Phys. 21 or concurrent registration. Required of sophomores in electrical 
engineering. Laboratory fee, $4.00. Basic concepts of electrical potential, current, pow- 
er, and energy; d-c circuit analysis by mesh-current and nodal methods; network theor- 
ems, magnetic field concepts; ferro-magnetic circuits. (Rumbaugh.) 

E. S. 10. Introductory Mechanics (3) 

June 25 -Aug. 17, M.W.F., 9:30-10:50, J-323; T.Th., 1:00-3:00, J-323. 
Prerequisites: Math. 19 (or concurrent registration in Math. 19) and E. S. 1 Free-body 
Diagrams. Numerical, graphical and vectorial computation applied to elementary prob- 
lems in statics. Areas, volumes, statical moment, moments of inertia, centroids, radii 
or gyration. (Yang.) 

47 



Engineering, English 

E. S. 21. Dynamics. (3) 

June 25 -Aug. 17, M. T. Th. F, 11:00-12:20; J-323. Prerequisites: Math. 21, Phys. 21 
(or concurrent registration in Math. 21 and Phys. 21) and E. S. 10. Dynamics of par- 
ticles and rigid bodies. Principle of work and energy; impulse and momentimi. Appli- 
cations to elementary engineering problems. (Yang.) 



ENGLISH 

Eng. 1, 2. Composition and American Literature. (3, 3) 

Eng. 1 is the prerequisite of Eng. 2. June 25 - Aug. 17. (Barnes, Staff.)' 

Eng. 1— 

Section 1— M.T.Th. F., 8:00- 9:20; A-40. 

Section 2— M. T. Th. F., 9:30-10:50; A-40. 

Section 3— M.T.Th. F., 11:00-12:20; A-40. 

Eng. 2— 

Section 1— M.T.Th. F., 8:00- 9:20; A-55. 
Section 2— M. T. Th. F., 9:30-10:50; A-55. 
Section 3— M. T. Th. F., 9:30-10:50; A-142. 
Section 4— M.T.Th. F., 11:00-12:20; A-55. 

Eng. 3, 4. Composition and World Literature. (3, 3) 

Prerequisite Eng. 2 or 21. June 25 - Aug. 17. (Cooley, Staff.)- 

Eng. 3— 

Section 1— M.T.Th. F., 9:30-10:50; A-45. 

Section 2— M. T. Th. F., 9 :30-10 :50 ; A-140. 

Section 3— M.T.Th. F., 11:00-12:20; A-45. 

Eng. 4— 

Section 1— M.T.Th. F., 8:00- 9:20; A-144. 
Section 2— M. T. Th. F., 9 :30-10 :50 ; A-144. 
Section 3— M. T. Th. F. 9 :30-10 :50 ; A-146. 
Section 4^M. T. Th. F., 11:00-12:20; A-144. 

Eng. 107. American English. (3) 

June 25 - Aug. 3. Daily, 8:00; A-142. Prerequisite, Eng. 4 or 6. The English language 
as developed in the United States. Dialects, vocabulary, past and present problems of 
usage. (Ball.) 

Eng. 115. Shakespeare. (3) 

June 25 -Aug. 17, M.T.Th.F., 9:30; A-154. Prerequisite, Eng. 4 or 6. Outstanding 

plays to Shakespeare's mid-career. (Zeeveld.) 

Eng. 134. Literature of the Victorian Period. (3) 

June 25 -Aug. 3. Daily, 11:00; A-146. Prerequisite, Eng. 4 or 6. A study of major 

Victorian prose writers. (Jerman.) 

Eng. 139. The English Novel. (3) 

June 25 -Aug. 17, M.T.Th.F., 9:30; A-151. Prerequisite, English 4 or 6. A study of 

the eigthteenth-century novel with emphasis on six major writers. (Ward.) 

48 



English, Entomology, Foreign Languages 

Eng. 150. American Literature. (3) 

June 25 -Aug. 17, M.T.Th.F., 11:00; A-142. Prerequisite, English 4 or 6. American 

poetry and prose to 1850. (Gravely.) 

Eng. 214. Seminar in Nineteenth-Century Literature. (3) 

June 25 - Aug. 3. Arranged. ( Jerman.) 

Eng. 241. Studies in Twentieth-Century Literature. (3) 

June 25 - Aug. 17. Arranged. (Lutwack.) 

Eng. 399. Thesis Research. (1-6) (Murphy, Staff.) 

Arranged. (Murphy, Staff.) 

ENTOMOLOGY 

*Ent. S121. Entomology for Science Teachers. (4) 

June 25 - Aug. 3. Five lectures and five two-hour laboratory periods a week. Lecture, 
8:00; O-120. Laboratory, 9:00, 10:00; O-200. This course will include the elements of 
morphology, taxonomy and biology of insects using examples commonly available to 
high school teachers. It wiU include practice in collecting, preserving, rearing and ex- 
perimenting with insects insofar as time will permit. (Haviland.) 

Ent. 198. Special Problems. (1-3) 

Credit and prerequisites to be determined by the Department. Investigation of assigned 

entomological problems. (Staff.) 

Ent. 301. Advanced Entomology. 

Credit and prerequisite to be determined by the Department. To be arranged. Studies 
of minor problems in morphology, taxonomy and applied entomology, with particular 
reference to the preparation of the student for individual research. (Staff.) 

Ent. 399. Research. 

Credit depends upon the amount of work done. To be arranged. Required of graduate 
students majoring in entomology. This course involves research on an approved project. 
A dissertation suitable for publication must be submitted at the conclusion of the 
studies as a part of the requirements for an advanced degree. (Staff.) 



FOREIGN LANGUAGES 

French 0. Elementary French for Graduates. (0) 

June 25 - Aug. 17, M. T. Th. F., 11:00; LL-220. Intensive elementary course in the 
French language designed particularly for graduate students who wish to acquire a 
reading knowledge. (Hall.) 

French 1-2. Elementary French. (3, 3) 

June 25 -Aug. 17. Daily, 8:00 and 11:00 to 11:50; LL-106. Elements of grammar and 
exercises in pronounciation and conversation. An intensive course. May be taken only 
by students who have not previously studied French, except that a student who has 
received credit for French 1 may enter the course at the end of the first four weeks. 
Students enrolled in this course may not take other courses in the summer session. 

(Demaitre.) 



* Intended for teachers. 

49 



Foreign Languages 

French 4, 5. Intermediate Literary French. (3, 3) 

June 25 - Aug. 17. Reading of texts designed to give some knoAvledge of French life, 

thought, and culture. Prerequisite, French 2 or equivalent. Students who have taken 
French 6 and 7 cannot receive credit for French 4 and 5. Note. French 4 and 5 can- 
not be taken concurrently. 

French 4^M.T.Th.F., 9:30; LL-106. (Staff.) 

French 5— M.T.Th.F., 9:30; LL-105. (Staff.) 

German 0. Elementary German for Graduates. (0) 

June 25 - Aug. 17. Intensive elementary course in the German language designed par- 
ticularly for graduate students who wish to acquire a reading knowledge. 
Section 1— M.T.Th.F., 8:00; LL-4. (Hering, Staff.) 

Section 2— M.T.Th.F., 8:00; LL-3. 

German 1-2. Elementary German. (3, 3) 

June 25 -Aug. 17. Daily, 8:00 and 11:00 to 11:50; LL-204. Elements of grammar and 
exercises in pronunciation and conversation. An intensive course. May be taken only 
by students who have not previously studied German, except that a student who has- 
received credit for German 1 may enter the course at the end of the first four weeks. 
Students enrolled in this course may not take other courses in the summer session. 

(Anderson.) 

German 4, 5. Intermediate Literary German. (3, 3) 

June 25 - Aug. 17. Reading of texts designed to give some knowledge of German Ufe,. 
thought, and culture. Prerequisite, German 2 or equivalent. Students who have taken 
German 6 and 7 cannot receive credit for German 4 and 5. Note. German 4 and 5 can- 
not be taken concurrently, 

German 4^M. T. Th. F., 9:30; LL-204. (Roswell.) 

German 5— M.T.Th.F., 11:00; LL-4. (Hering.) 

Spanish 1-2. Elementary Spanish. (3, 3) 

June 25 - Aug. 17. Daily, 8:00 and 11:00 to 11:50; LL 203. Elements of grammar and 
exercises in pronunciation and conversation. An intensive course. May be taken only 
by students who have not previously studied Spanish, except that a student who ha& 
received credit for Spanish 1 may enter the course at the end of the first four weeks. 
Students enrolled in this course may not take other courses in the summer session. 

(Panico.) 

Spanish 4, 5. Intermediate Spanish. (3, 3) 

June 25 - Aug. 17. Reading of texts designed to give some knowledge of Spanish life,, 
thought, and culture. Prerequisite, Spanish 2 or equivalent. Note. Spanish 4 and 5 can- 
not be taken concurrently. 

Spanish 4— M.T.Th.F., 9:30; LL-203. (Herdoiza.) 

Spanish 5— M.T.Th.F., 9:30; LL-4. (Parsons.) 

Chinese I. Elementary Chinese. (3) 

June 25 -Aug. 17, M.T.Th.F., 9:30; LL-201. Conversation, pronunciation, drill in sim- 
ple characters. (Chen.) 

Chinese 161. Chinese Civilization. (3) 

June 25 -Aug. 17, M.T.Th.F., 11:00; LL-3. This course deals with Chinese literature, 

art, folklore, history, government, and great men. (Clien.) 

50 



Foreign Languages, Geography 

LANGUAGE COURSES FOR TEACHERS (Six Weeks, June 25-Aug. 3) 

The Summer School program for language teachers consists of refresh- 
er courses in language and in pedagogical methods. The language labora- 
tory will be used in this connection. 

Foreign Language 140. Oral Practice in Modern Foreign Languages. (3) 
Daily, 11:00; LL-105. Development of fluency in modern foreign languages, stress on 
correct sentence structure and idiomatic expression. Especially designed for teachers, 
offering practice in speaking the language. Note. Because of inadequate enrollments, 
usually the only language offered is French. If enrollment is sufficient, there will be 
offerings in the other languages. (HaU.) 

French 171. Practical French Phonetics. (3) 

Daily, 8:00; LL-105. Pronuniciation of modem French. The sounds and their produc- 
tion, the stress group, intonation. (Falls.) 



GEOGRAPHY 

Geog. 10. General Geography. (3) 

June 25-Aug. 17., M.T. Th. F., 9:30 a.m.; Q-228. Required of aU majors in geography; 
recommended for all minors; Geog. 10 is suggested for students of Arts and Sciences, 
Education and others who may desire a background in geography and its application 
to problems of their respective fields. Introduction to geography as a field of study. A 
survey of the content, philosophy, techniques, and application of geography and its 
significance for the understanding of world problems. (Schmieder.) 

Geog. 40. Principles of Meteorology. (3) 

June 25-Aug. 17, M.T.Th. F., 8:00 a.m.; Q-210. An introductory study of the wea- 
ther. Properties and conditions of the atmosphere, and methods of measurement. The 
atmospheric circulation and conditions responsible for various types of weather and 
their geographic distribution patterns. Practical applications. (Chaves.) 

Geog. 100. Regional Geography of Eastern Anglo-America. (3) 

June 25 - Aug. 17, M. T. Th. F., 12:30; Q-210. Prerequisite, Geog. 1, 2 or Geog. 10, or 
permission of the instructor. A study of the cultural and economic geography and the 
geographic regions of Eastern United States and Canada, including an analysis of the 
significance of the physical basis for present-day diversification of development, and the 
historical geographic background. (Schmieder.) 

Geog. 104. Geography of Major World Regions. (3) 

June 25-Aug. 17, M. T.Th. F., 11:00 a.m.; Q-210. A geographic analysis of the patterns, 
problems, and prospects of the world's principal human-geographic regions, including 
Europe, Anglo-America, the Soviet Union, the Far East, and Latin America. Emphasis 
upon the casual factors of differentiation and the role geographic differences play in 
the interpretation of the current v/orld scene. This course is designed especially for 
teachers. (Chaves.) 

51 



Government and Politics 

GOVERNMENT AND POLITICS 



G. & P. 1. American Government. (3) 

June 25 - Aug. 17. Four periods a week. This course is designed as the basic course 

in government for the American Civilization Program, and it or its equivalent is a pre- 
requisite to all other courses in the Department. It is a comprehensive study of gov- 
ernment in the United States — national, state, and local. 

Section 1— M.T.Th.F., 8:00; 0-213. (Alperin.) 

Section 2— M.T.Th.F., 11:00; Q-213. (Alperin.) 

G. &■ P. 3. Principles of Government and Politics. (3) 

June 25 -Aug. 17. Four periods a week. M.T.Th.F., 9:30;Q-110. A study of the basic 

principles and concepts of political science. (Byrd.) 

G. & P. 101. International Political Relations. (3) 

June 25 -Aug. 17. Four periods a week. M.T.Th.F., 11:00;Q-211. Prerequisite, G. & P. 
1. A study of the major factors underlying international relations, the influence of 
geography, climate, nationalism, and imperialism, and the development of foreign poli- 
cies of the major powers. (Lee.) 

G. &■ P. 154. Problems of World Politics. (3) 

June 25 -Aug. 17. Four periods a week. M.T.Th.F., 8:00; Q-211. Prerequisite, G. & P. 
1. A study of governmental problems of international scope, such as causes of war, prob- 
lems of neutrality, and propaganda. Students are required to report on reading from 
current literature. (Steinmeyer.) 

G. & P. 174. Political Parties. (3) 

June 25 -Aug. 17. Four periods a week. M.T.Th.F., 9:30; 0-213. Prerequisite, G. & 
P. 1. A descriptive and analytical examination of American political parties, nomina- 
tions, elections, and political leadership. (Hathorn.) 

G. & P. 191. The Government and Administration of the Soviet Union. (3) 
June 25 -Aug. 17. Four periods a week. M.T.Th.F., 9:30; Q-211. Prerequisite, G. & 
P. 1. A study of the adoption of the communist philosophy by the Soviet Union, of its 
governmental structure, and the administration of government policy in the Soviet 
Union. (Steinmeyer.) 



For Graduates 

G. & P. 261. Problems of Government and Politics. (3) 

To be arranged. Q-369. (Dillon.) 

G. & P. 399. Thesis. (1-6) 

To be arranged. (Staff.) 

52 



History 



HISTORY 



H. 5. History of American Civilization. (3) June 25 - August 17. 

Section 1— M.T.Th.F., 8:00; A-49. (Staff.) 

Section 2— M. T. Th. F., 9:30; A-49. (Staff.) 

Section 3— M. T. Th. P., 11:00; A-49. (Staff.) 

H. 6. History of American Civilization. (3) June 25 - August 17. 

Section 1— M. T. Th. F., 8:00; A-110. (Staff.) 

Section 2— M. T. Th. F., 9:30; A-110. (Staff.) 

Section 3— M.T.Th.F., 11:00; A-110. (Staff.) 

H. 41. Western Civilization. (3) 

June 25 -Aug. 17, M.T.Th.F., 8:00; A-207. This course is designed to give the stu- 
dent an appreciation of the civilization in which he lives in its broadest setting. The 
study begins with the collapse of classical cvilization and comes to the present. 

(Bergmann.) 

H. 42. Western Civilization. (3) 

June 25 -Aug. 17. M.T.Th.F., 9:30; A-228. This course is designed to give the student 
an appreciation of the civilization in which he lives in its broadest setting. The study 
begins with the collapse of classical civilization and comes to the present. (Staff.) 

H. 62. Far Eastern Civilization. (3) 

June 25 -Aug. 17. M.T.Th.F., 9:30; A-207. This course seeks to give the student an un- 
derstanding of a great civilization radically different from our own and an apprecia- 
tion of the complex problems of the Far East and of American policy there. The 
approach is interdisciplinary within an historical framework. (Farquhar.) 

H. 111. The Middle Period of American History. (3) 

June 25 -Aug. 17. M.T.Th.F., 8:00; A-209. Prerequisite, H. 5, 6 or the equivalent 
An examination of the political history of the U. S. from Jefferson to Lincoln with 
particular emphasis on the factors producing Jacksonian Democracy, Manifest Destiny, 
the Whig Party, the anti-slavery movement. The Republican Party, and secession. 

(Nash.) 

H. 119. Recent American History. (3) 

June 25 -Aug. 17. M.T.Th.F., 8:00; A-228. Prerequisite, H. 5, 6 or the equivalent. 
Party Politics, domestic issues, foreign relations of the United States since 1890. First 
semester, through World War I. Second semester, since World War I. (Merrill.) 

H. 153. History of Rome. (3) 

June 25 -Aug. 17. M.T.Th.F., 11:00; A-207. A study of Roman civilization from the 
earliest beginning through the Republic and down to the last centuries of the Empire. 

(Bergmann.) 

H. 172. Europe in the World Setting of the Twentieth Century. (3) 
June 25 -Aug. 17. M.T.ThF., 9:30; A-209. Prerequisites, H. 41, 42, or H. 53, 54. A 
study of political, economic, and cultural developments in twentieth century Europe 
with special emphasis on the factors involved in the two World Wars and their global 
impact and significance. (Staff.) 

H. 202. Historical Literature: American. (1-6) 

Arranged. Readings in the standard works and monographic studies to meet the re- 
quirements of qualified graduate students who need intensive concentration in Amer- 
ican history. (Staff.) 

53 



History, Home Economics 

H. 205. Seminar in American Economic History. (3) 

Arranged. A seminar on problems of American Economic History of selected periods. 

(Nash.) 

H. 260. Historical Literature: European. (1-6) 

Arranged. Readings in the standard works and monographic studies to meet the re- 
quirements of qualified graduate students who need intensive concentration in Eur- 
opean history. (Staff.) 

H. 281. Problems in the History of World War I. (3) 

Arranged. Investigation of various aspects of the First World War, including military 
operations, diplomatic phases, and political and economic problems of the War and 
its aftermath. (Staff.) 

H. 290. Historical Literature: Asian. (1-6) 

Arranged. Readings in the standard works and monographic studies to meet the re- 
quirements of qualified graduate students who need intensive concentration in Asian 
history. (Farquhar.) 

H. 399. Thesis Research. (1-6) 

Arranged. (Staff.) 

HOME ECONOMICS 

Family Life and Management 

F.L. 132. The Child in the Family. (3) 

July 9-27. 9:00-12:00. Prerequisites, Psych. 1, H.M. 50, H.E. 5, or equivalent. Study 
of the child from prenatal stage through adolescence, with emphasis on responsibility 
for guidance in the home. Biological and psychological needs as they they affect the 
child's relationship with his family and peers. Enrollment limited to 30. (Dales.) 

H.M. 140. Fundamentals of Housing. (3) (arranged) 

June 25 - July 13, arranged. Prerequisite, H.M. 50. Laboratory fee, S3.00. Sociological, 
psychological and economic aspects of housing. Relationship of the house and the family 
living within. (Sutton.) 

H.M. 161 Resident Experience in Home Management. (3) 

June 25 - Aug. 3. Prerequisites, H.M. 50, 160; Food 150; or equivalent. Laboratory 
fee, $10.00. Experience in planning, coordinating and participating in the activities of 
a household, composed of a faculty member, a group of students, and possibly an infant 
on a part-time basis. A charge of $40.00 for food and supplies and S5.00 a week for a 
room in the Home Management House is assessed each student. (Sutton.) 

Food, Nutrition, and Institution Management 

FQrN 130. Special Problems in Food and/ or Nutrition. (1-3) 

June 25 - Aug. 17, arranged. Consent of instructor. Problem may be in any one of sev- 
eral areas of food and nutrition and will carry the name of the basic area; e.g., child 
nutrition, adolescent nutrition. (Brown.) 

LM. 152. Institution Food. (3) 

June 25 -July 13, 1:00-3:30. Prerequisites, Food 52, 53; Nutr. 20 or 121; or consent 
of instructor. Laboratory fee, $10.00. Application of basic principles and procedures 
of food preparation to quantity food preparation. Standardizing recipes; menu plan- 
ning for various types of food services; determination of food costs. (Brown.) 

54 



Home Economics 
Home Economics — General 

H.E. 201. Methods of Research in Home Economics. (3) 

July 23 -Aug. 17, 1:00-4:00. Prerequisite, Statistics or Tests and Measurements. Appli- 
cation of scientific methods to problems in the field of home economics with emphasis 
on needed research of an inter-disciplinary nature. (Wilson.) 

H.E. 290. Special Topics. (1-6) 

June 25 - August 17, arranged. Concentrated study in areas of home economics, such 
as consumer problems; housing, interior design and home furnishings; institution ad- 
ministration, and food service. (Lippeatt.) 

H.E. 399. Research. (1-6) 

Credit according to work accomplished. (Staff.) 

Practical Art 

Pr. Art 1. Design. (3) 

June 25 -Aug. 17, M.T. Th.F., 9:30-10:50; H-101. Art expression through materials 
such as opaque water color, wet clay, colored chalk, and lithograph rayon which are 
conducive to freeing techniques. Elementary lettering, action figures, abstract design, 
three-dimensional design and general composition study. Consideration of art as applied 
to daily living. (Longley.) 

Textiles and Clothing 

Clo. 120. Draping. (3) 

June 25 -Aug. 17, M.W. F., 1:00-3:30. Prerequisite, Clo. 10. Laboratory fee, 13.00. 

Demonstrations and practice in creating costumes in fabrics and on individual dress 
forms; modeling of garments for class criticism. (Wilbur.) 

Clo. 127. Apparel Design. (3) 

June 25 -Aug. 17, M.W.F., 1:00-3:30. Prerequisite, Clo. 120. Laboratory fee, $3.00. 
The art of costuming; trade and custom methods of clothing design and construction; 
advanced work in draping, pattern design and/or tailoring, with study of the interre- 
lationship of these techniques. (Wilbur.) 

Tex. 200. Special Studies in Textiles. (2-4) or 

H.E. 190. Special Problems in Home Economics. (1-3). Maximum credit 3 hours. 
July 9-27, arranged. Laboratory fee $3.00 for Tex. 200; $3.00 a semester hour for H.E. 
190. Enrollment limited to 30. Prerequisite, background in textiles and consent of in- 
structor. Advanced inquiry into uses, care, types and performance of textile materials, 
either contemporary or historic, depending on interest of students; compilation of data 
through testing, surveys, museum visits and/or field trips; writing of technical reports. 
(To be offered in cooperation with National Institute of Dry Qeaning.) (Mitchell.) 

Tex. 200. Special Studies in Textiles. (2) or 

H.E. 190. Special Problems in Home Economics. (2). Maximum credit 2 hours. 
July 30 -Aug. 10, arranged. Laboratory fee $3.00 for Tex. 200; $3.00 a semester hour 
for H.E. 190. Enrollment limited to 30. Prerequisite, background in textiles and con- 
sent of instructor. Advanced inquiry into uses, care, types and/or performance of tex- 
tile materials, either contemporary or historic, through museum visits and field trips. 

(Mitchell.) 

55 



Horticulture, Mathematics 

HORTICULTURE 



Hon. S125. Ornamental Horticulture. (1) 

To be arranged. A course designed for teachers of agriculture, home demonstration 
agents and county agents. Special emphasis will be given to the development of lawns, 
flowers and shrubbery to beautify homes. 

Hort. 198. Special Problems. (2) 

Credit arranged according to work done. For major students in horticulture or botany. 

Four credits maximum per student. 

Hort. 399. Advanced Horticultural Research. (2-12) 
Credit granted according to work done. 



MATHEMATICS 



Math. 5. Business Algebra. (3) 

Section 1— June 25 -Aug. 17; M. T. Th. F., 11:00-12:20; Y-2. (Shepherd.) 

Section 2— June 25 -Aug. 17; M. T. Th. F., 11:00-12:20; Y-5. (Steely.) 

Prerequisite, one unit of algebra. Open only to students in the College of Business 
and Public Administration, the College of Agriculture, the Department of Military 
Science and the College of Education. Fundamental operations, fractions, ratio and 
proportion, linear equations, exponents, logarithms, percentage, trade discount, simple 
interest, bank discount, true discount, and promissory notes. 

Math. 6 Mathematics of Finance. (3) 

Section 1— June 25 - Aug. 17; M. T. Th. F., 9:30-10:50; Y-2. (Shepherd.) 

Section 2— June 25 -Aug. 17; M.T.Th.F., 9:30-10:50; Y-5. (Steely.) 

Prerequisite, Math. 5 or equivalent. Required of students in the College of Business 
and Public Administration and open to students in the College of Arts and Sciences 
for elective credit only. Line diagrams, compound interest, simple interest, ordinary 
annuities, general annuities, deferred annuities, annuities due, perpetuities, evaluation 
of bonds, amortization, and sinking funds. 

Math. 10. Algebra. (3) 

Section 1— June 25 - Aug. 17; M.T.Th.F., 9:30-10:50; Y-26. (Dyer.) 

Section 2— June 25 - Aug. 17; M.T.Th.F., 9:30-10:50; Y-27. (Lepson.) 

Prerequisite, one unit each of algebra and plane geometry. Fundamental operations, fac- 
toring, fractions, linear equations, exponents and radicals, logarithms, quadratic equa- 
tions, progressions, permutations and combinations, probability. 

Math. 11. Trigonometry and Analytic Geometry. (3) 

Section 1— June 25 -Aug. 17; M.T.Th.F., 8:00-9:20; Y-26. (Dyer.) 

Section 2— June 25 - Aug. 17; M.T.Th.F., 8:00-9:20; Y-27. (Lepson.) 

Prerequisite, Math. 10 or equivalent. This course is not recommended for students plan- 
ning to enroll in Math. 20. Trigonometric functions, identities, addition formulas, solu- 
tion of triangles, coordinates, locus problems, the straight line and circle, conic sections, 
graphs. 

56 



Mathematics 

Math. 18. Elementary Mathematical Analysis. (5) 

June 25 -Aug. 17. Daily, 8:00-9:20 and M. W., 12:30-1:50; Y-122. Prerequisite, high 
school algebra completed and plane geometry. Open to students in the physical sci- 
ences, engineering, and education. The elementary mathematical functions, especially 
algebraic, logarithmic, and exponential are studied by means of their properties, their 
graphical representations, the identities connecting them, and the solution of equations 
involving them. The beginning techniques of calculus, sequences, permutations and 
combinations and probability are introduced. (Staff.) 

Math. 19. Elementary Mathematical Analysis. (5) 

Section 1— June 25 - Aug. 17; Daily, 8:00-9:20 & M. W., 12:30-1:50; Y-17. (Bari.) 

Section 2— June 25 - Aug. 17; Daily, 8:00-9:20 & M. W., 12:30-1:50; Y-18. (Lehner) 
Section 3— June 25 - Aug. 17; Daily, 8:00-9:20 & M. W., 12:30-1:50; Y-19. (Richeson.) 
Prerequisite, Math. 18 or equivalent. Open to students in the physical sciences, engi- 
neering, and education. A continuation of the content of Math. 18 including a study 
of the trigonometric and inverse trigonometric functions, determinants, the conic sec- 
tions, solid analytic geometry, and an introduction to finding areas by integration. 

Math. 20. Calculus. (4) 

June 25 -Aug. 17. Daily, 8:00-9:20; Y-16. Prerequisite, Math. 19 or equivalent. Open 
to students in the engineering, education, and the physical sciences. Limits, derivatives, 
differentials, maxima and minima, curve sketching, curvatures, kinematics, integration. 

(Zemel.) 

Math. 21. Calculus. (4) 

Section 1— June 25 -Aug. 17; Daily, 9:30-10:50; Y-14. (Henney.) 

Section 2— June 25 - Aug. 17; Daily, 9:30-10:50; Y-15. (Ehrlich.) 

Prerequisite, Math. 20 or equivalent. Open to students in engineering, education and 
the physical sciences. Integration with geometric and physical applications, partial de- 
rivatives, space geometry, multiple integrals, infinite series. 

Math. 30. Elements of Mathematics. (4) 

June 25 -Aug. 17. Daily, 8:00-9:20; Y-15. Prerequisite, high school elementary algebra 
highly desirable. Preferred course in mathematics for elementary education majors. 
Topics from algebra and number theory are presented to provide a proper mathemati- 
cal insight into arithmetic for the prospective elementary school teacher. Topics in- 
cluded are: inductive proof, the system of natural numbers based on the peano axioms; 
mathematical systems, groups, fields, the systems of integers, the system of rational 
numbers, congruences, divisibility, systems of enumeration. (Staff.) 

Math. 64. Differential Equations for Engineers. (3) 

June 25 -Aug. 17. M. T. Th. F., 8:00-9:20; Y-121. Prerequisite, Math. 21 or equivalent. 
Required of students in most of the engineering curriculums. Differential equations of 
the first and second order with emphasis on their engineering applications. (Singh.) 

Math. 106S. Introduction to the Theory of Numbers. (2) 

June 25 -Aug. 17. M.W.F., 9:30-10:50; Y-121. Prerequisite, Math. 21 or equivalent. 
Integers, divisibility, Euclid's algorithm, Diophantine equations, prime numbers, Moe- 
bius function, congruences, residues. (Singh.) 

Math. 114. Differential Equations. (3) 

June 25 -Aug. 17: M. T. Th. F., 8:00-9:20; Y-4. Prerequisite, Math. 110 or equivalent. 
Ordinary differential equations, symbolic methods, successive approximations, solutions 
in series, orthogonal functions, Bessel functions, Sturmian theory. (Staff.) 

57 



Mathematics, Microbiology, Music 

Math. 182. Foundations of Algebra. (3) 

June 25 -Aug. 3. Daily, 9:30-10:50; Y-101. Prerequisite, participation in the N.S.F. 
Institute in Mathematics for Junior High School Teachers of Mathematics. Material 
background for experimental units for grades 7 and 8, from the Maryland Project and 
the School Mathematics Study Group, including such topics as: algebra, number theory, 
algebraic structures. (Correl.) 

Math. 183S. Foundations of Geometry. (2) 

June 25 -Aug. 17. M. W. F., 11;00-12:20; Y-4. Prerequisite, one year of college mathe- 
matics or consent of instructor. Designed primarily for those enrolled in programs with 
emphasis in the teaching of mathematics and science. Not open to students seeking a 
major directly in the physical sciences, since the course content is usually covered 
elsewhere in their curriculum. A study of the axioms for Euclidean and non-Euclidean 
geometry. (Staff.) 

Math. 199. National Science Foundation Summer Institute for Teachers of Science 

and Mathematics Seminar. (3) 
June 25 -Aug. 3. Daily, 8:00-9:20; Y-101. Prerequisite, participation in the N.S.F. In- 
stitute in Mathematics for Junior High School Teachers of Mathematics. Material back- 
ground for work in experimental units for grades 7 and 8 from Maryland Project and 
from School Mathematics Study Group. (Hummel.) 



MICROBIOLOGY 

*Microb. 1. General Microbiology. (4) 

June 25 - Aug. 17. Four lectures and four two-hour laboratory periods a week. Lecture, 
8:00; F-101. Laboratory, 9:00, 10:00, M. T. Th. F.; T-210. Laboratory fee, $11.00. The 
physiology, culture, and differentiation of bacteria. Fundamental principles of micro- 
biology in relation to man and his environment. (Hetrick.) 

Microb. 181. Microbiological Problems. (3) 

June 25 - Aug. 17. Six two-hour laboratory periods a week. To be arranged. Prerequis- 
ite, 16 credits in microbiology. Registration only upon consent of the instructor. Lab- 
oratory fee, $11.00. This course is arranged to provide qualified majors in microbology, 
and majors in allied fields, an opportunity to pursue specific microbiological problems 
under the supervision of a senior staff member of the Department. (Faber.) 

Microb. 399. Research. 

To be arranged. Credits according to work done. Laboratory fee, $11.00. The investi- 
gation is outlined in consultation with and pursued under the supervision of a senior 
staff member of the Department. (Staff.) 



MUSIC 

Music 16. Music Fundamentals for the Classroom Teacher. (3) 

June 25 -Aug. 17. M.T.Th. F., 9:30-10:50; B-7. Open to students in elementary edu- 
cation or childhood education; other students take Music 7. (In the Summer Session, 
also open to classroom teachers.) Music 7 and 16 may not both be counted for credit. 
The fundamentals of music theory and practice, related to the needs of the classroom 
and kindergarten teacher, and organized in accord with the six area concept of musi- 
cal learning. (Traver.) 

58 



Music, Philosophy 

Music 20. Survey of Music Literature. (3) 

June 25 -Aug. 17. M.T.Th.F., 11:00-12:20; B-7. Open to all students except music 
and music education majors, and may be taken by students who qualify to select 
courses within Group II of the American Civilization Program. Music 1 and 20 may 
not both be taken for credit. A study of the principles upon which music is based, 
and an introduction to the musical repertoires performed in America today. (Traver.) 

Music 147. Orchestration. (2) 

June 25 -Aug. 3. M.T.Th.F., 8:00-9:20; B-9. Prerequisite, Music 70 and 71 or the 
equivalent. A study of the ranges, musical functions, and technical characteristics of 
the instruments, and their color possibilities in various combinations. Practical exper- 
ience in orchestrating for small and large ensembles. (Henderson.) 

Music 166. Survey of the Opera. (3) 

June 25 -Aug. 3. Daily, 8:00-9:20; B-1. Prerequisite, Music 120 and 121 or the equiva- 
lent. A study of the music, librettos, and composers of representative operas. (Jordon.) 

Music 201. Seminar in Music. (3) 

June 25 -Aug. 3. Daily, 11:00-12:20; B-1. Prerequisites, Music 120 and 121 and con- 
sent of instructor. The work of one major composer will be studied, with emphasis on 
musicological method. In the 1962 Summer Session, the course wiU deal with Brahms. 
The course may be repeated for credit, since a different composer will be chosen each 
time it is offered. (Jordan.) 

Applied Music 

June 25- Aug. 17. A new student or one taking applied music for the 
first time at this University should register for Music X. He will receive 
the proper classification at the end of the Summer Session. 

Every student taking an applied music course should, in addition to 
registering for the proper course number, indicate the instrument chosen by 
adding a section number as follows: 

Sec. 1, Piano Sec. 5, Cello 

Sec. 3, Violin Sec. 6, Bass 

Sec. 4, Viola 

Music X, 12, 13, 52, 53, 112, 113, 152, 153. Applied Music. (2) 

Hours to be arranged with instructors; B-4. Prerequisite, the next lower course in the 
same instrument. Three half-hour lessons and a minimum of ten practice hours per week 
for eight weeks. Special fee of $40 for each course. (Meyer, Berman.) 

PHILOSOPHY 

Phil. 1. Philosophy for Modern Man. (3) 

June 25 - Aug. 17, M. T. Th. F., 11:00; LL-301. Modern man's quest for understanding 
of himself and his world, with particular reference to American ideas and ideals. This 
course is one of a group of four courses within Elective Group I of the American Civ- 
ilization Program. It may also be taken by students who qualify by tests to select sub- 
stitute courses in the Program (provided the student has not taken the course as his 
Group I elective). (Staff.) 

59 



Philosophy, Physical Education, Recreation and Health 

Phil. 145. Ethics. (3) 

June 25 - Aug. 17, M. T. Th. F., 9:30; LL-301. A critical study of the problems and 
theories of human conduct, aimed at developing such principles of ethical criticism as 
may be applied to contemporary personal and social problems and to the formulation 
of anethical philosophy of life. (Staff.) 

Phil. 292. Selected Problems in Philosophy. (1-3) 

Hours arranged. Intensive study of selected problems in philosophy under individual 

supen'ision. (Staff.) 

Phil. 399. Research. (1-3) 

Hours arranged. ■ (Staff.) 



PHYSICAL EDUCATION, RECREATION AND HEALTH 

p. E. SIO. Physical Education Activities. (1-6) 

Section 1— Swimming (1); June 25 - Aug. 17; M. T. Th. F., 3:10-4:00; Pool. (Husman.) 
Section 2— Golf (1), June 25 - Aug. 17; M.T.Th.F., 2:00-2:50; Driving Range. (Cronin.) 
Section 3— Tennis (1), June 25 - Aug. 17; M.T.Th.F, 2:00-2:50; Courts. (Husman.) 
Fee, $6.00. Instruction and practice in selected sports: tennis, badminton, golf, archery, 
swimming and square dance. 

Note 1. Not available for credit by physical education majors. 

Note 2. Non-majors in physical education may use this credit to fulfill graduation 
requirements in physical education. 

P. E. 100. Kinesiology. (4) 

June 25 - Aug. 17. Daily, 8:00-9:20; GG-160. The study of human movement and the 
physical and physiological principles upon which it depends. Body mechanics, posture, 
motor efficiency, sports, the performance of atypical individfuals, and the influence of 
gro^vth and development upon motor performance are studied. (Nelson.) 

P. E. 120. Physical Education for the Elementary School. (3) 

June 25 -Aug. 17. M.T.Th.F., 9:30-10:50; GG-Gym. This course is designed to orient 
the general elementary teacher to physical education. Principles and practices in ele- 
mentary physical education will be presented and discussed and a variety of appropri- 
ate activities will be considered from the standpoint of their use at the various grade 
levels. (Humphrey.) 

P. E. 155. Physical Fitness of the Individual. (3) 

June 25 -Aug. 17. M.T.Th.F., 9:30-10:50; GG-205. A study of the major physical fit- 
ness problems confronting the adult in modern society. Consideration is given to the 
scientific appraisal, development and maintenance of fitness at all age levels. Such 
problems as obesity, weight reduction, chronic fatigue, posture, and special exercise 
programs are explored. This course is open to persons outside the field of Physical 
Education and Health. (Massey.) 

P. E. 180. Measurement in Physical Education and Health. (3) 

June 25 -Aug. 17. M.T.Th.F., 11:00-12:20; GG-160. The application of the principles 
and techniques of educational measurement to the teaching of health and physical edu- 
cation; study of the functions and techniques of measurement in the evaluation of stu- 
dent progress toward the objectives of health and physical education, and in the eval- 
uation of the effectiveness of teaching. (Nelson.) 

60 



Physical Education, Recreation and Health 

*P. E. 189. Field Laboratory Projects and Workshop. (1-6) 

A course designed to meet the needs of persons in the field with respect to workshops 
and research projects in special areas of knowledge not covered by regularly structured 
courses. (Staff.) 

Note: The maximum total number of credits that may be earned toward any degree 
in Physical Education, Recreation, or Health Education under P. E., Rec, Hea., or 
Ed. 189 is six. 

P. E. 200. Seminar in Physical Education, Recreation and Health. (1) 

Tuesday, 12:30 p.m.; GG-205. (Staff.) 

P. E. 201. Foundations in Physical Education, Recreation and Health. (3) 
June 25 -Aug. 17. M. T. Th. F, 8:00-9:20; GG-128. A study of history, philosophy and 
principles of physical education, recreation and health as applied to current problems 
in each area and as related to general education. (Eyler.) 

P. E. 204. Physical Education and the Development of the Child. (3) 
June 25 -Aug. 17. M.T.Th.F., 11:00-12:20, GG-128. An analysis of the place of phys- 
ical education in meeting the growth and development needs of children of elementary 
school age. (Humphrey.) 

P. E. 210. Methods and Techniques of Research. (3) 

June 25 - Aug. 17. M. T. Th. F., 8:00-9:20; GG-205. A study of methods and techniques 
of research used in Physical Education, Recreation, and Health Education; an analysis 
of examples of their use; and practice in their application to problems of interest to 
the student. (Massey.) 

P. E. 230. Source Material Survey. (3) 

June 25 -Aug. 17. M.T.Th.F., 11:00-12:20; GG-205. A library course, covering the 
total areas of physical education, recreation and health, plus research in one specific 
limited problem of which a digest, including a bibliography, is to be submitted. 

(Eyler.) 

P. E. 288. Special Problems in Physical Education, Recreation and Health. (1-6) 
Arranged. Master or Doctoral candidates who desire to pursue special research prob- 
lems under the direction of their advisers may register for 1-6 hours of credit under 
this niunber. (Staff.) 

P. E. 399. Research Thesis. (1-5) 

Arranged. Students who desire credits for a Master's thesis, a Doctoral dissertation, 

or a Doctoral project should use this number. (Staff.) 

Hea. 105. Basic Driver Education. (3) 

June 25 -Aug. 17. M.T.Th.F., 8:00-9:20; GG-201. Prerequisites, Hea. 50, 70, 80. This 
course is a study of the place of the automobile in modem life and deals with the 
theory and practice of the following: traffic accidents and other traffic problems; ob- 
jectives and scope of driver-education; motor vehicle laAvs and regulations, basic auto- 
mobile construction and maintenance from the standpoint of safety; methods in class- 
room instruction; aids to learning and practice driving instruction. (Tompkins.) 



* Intended for teachers. 

61 



Physics 

Hea. 145. Advanced Driver Education. (3) 

June 25 -Aug. 17. M.T.Th.F., 9:30-10:50; GG-201. Prerequisites, Hea. 50, 70, 80, 105. 
Progressive techniques, supervision, and practice of advanced driver-education; com- 
prehensive programming for traffic safety; psychology of traffic safety; improving the 
attitudes of young drivers; teaching to meet driving emergencies; program planning in 
driver-education; consumer education; resources and agencies; the teacher and driver- 
education; mastering and evaluating results; driver-education for adults; new develop- 
ments in driver-education; insurance and liability, and the future of driver-education. 

(Tompkins.) 

Hea. 178. Fundamentals of Sex Education. (3) 

June 25 -Aug. 17. M.T.Th.F., 12:30-1:50; GG-202. This course is concerned with basic 
information regarding the physical, psychological, historical, semantic and comparative 
cultural aspects of sex. The adjustments and problems of children and adults during 
the course of maturing and aging are studied; and special consideration is given to the 
sex education program in schools. (Johnson.) 

Hea. 220. Scientific Foundations of Health Education. (3) 

June 25 -Aug. 17. M.T.Th.F., 9:30-10:50; GG-202. A course dealing with an anlysia 
of hereditary, physical, mental, and social factors which influence the total health status 
during the developmental process. The role of education in fostering physical and men- 
tal health is studied. (Johnson.) 



PHYSICS 

*Phys. 118A. Atoms, Nuclei, and Stars. (3) 

June 25 -Aug. 3. Five one and one-half hour lectures per week. Daily, 9:30-11:00; Z-115. 
Prerequisite, a previous course in physics. This course is intended primarily for high 
school science teachers and contains a thorough introduction to basic ideas of the con- 
stitution and properties of atomic and subatomic systems, and the over-all structure of 
the universe. The development of present ideas will be outlined, and their shortcomings 
indicated. Subjects treated include the electron, the Bohr theory of the atom, the un- 
certainty principle and quantum mechanics, nuclear reaction, fission, fusion, cosmic 
radiation, the solar system, the life cycle of a star, systems of galaxies, and scientific 
theories about the past and future of the universe. (Gutsche.) 

Phys. 126. Kinetic Theory of Gases. (3) 

June 25 -Aug. 3. Five l^/^-hour lectures per week. Daily, 9:30-11:00; C-134. Prerequi- 
sites, Phys. 107 and Math. 21. Dynamics of gas particles, Maxwell-Boltzman distribu- 
tion, diffusion, Brownian motion, etc. (Estabrook.) 

*Phys. 130, 131. Basic Concepts of Physics. (2, 2) 

June 25 - Aug. 3. Five two-hour lectures per week. Daily 9:00-11:00; C-130. Prerequi- 
site, junior standing. Lecture demonstration fee, $4.00. A primarily descriptive course 
intended mainly for students in the liberal arts and high school science teachers. This 
course does not satisfy the requirement of professional schools or serve as a substitute 
for other physics courses. The main emphasis in the course will be on the concepts 
of physics, their evolution, and their relation to other branches of human endeavor. 
This course is specially recommended for high school science teachers. It should be 
taken concurrently with Phys. 150, Section 2. (Fasnacht, Staff.) 



* Intended for teachers. 

62 



Physics, Poultry 

Phys. 150. Special Problems in Physics. Section 1. (Arranged) 

June 25 - Aug. 17. Credit according to work done. Hours and location arranged. Re- 
search or special study. Laboratory fee, $10.00 per credit hour when appropriate. Pre- 
requisite, major in physics and consent of Department Head. (Stafi.) 

*Phys. 150. Special Problems in Physics. Section 2. Basic Experiments. (1) 
June 25 -Aug. 3. Two 2y2-hour laboratories a week. M. W., 3:00-5:15; Z-315. The 
course should be taken concurrently with Physics 130, 131. It will consist of funda- 
mental laboratory experiments in physics. (Fasnacht, Staff.) 

*Phys. 160 A. Physics Problems. (1, 2, or 3) 

June 25 - Aug. 3. Credit according to work done. T. Th. 1, 2 ; C-130, 134. This course 
intended primarily for high school science teachers, introduces the student to the pro- 
per methods of presenting and solving basic problems in physics. The course consists 
of lectures and discussion sessions. Those problems which illustrate best the fundamen- 
tal principle of physics are treated fully. The necessary mathematical methods are 
developed as needed. (Gutsche, Staff.) 

Phys. 190. Independent Studies Seminar, (Arranged) 

June 25 - Aug. 17. Credit according to work done, each semester. Hours and location 
arranged. Enrollment is limited to students admitted to the Independent Studies Pro- 
gram in Physics. (Faculty.) 

*Phys. 199. National Science Foundation Summer Institute for Teachers of Science 

Seminar. ( 1 ) 
June 25 to August 3. One two-hour seminar each week, T., 3:00-4:50. In addition, 
daily three-hour seminar August 6 to August 10. Daily, 1:30-4:30, C-130. Laboratory 
fee, $5.00. Especially designed for high school teachers of science. Includes the fields 
of chemistry and physics. Experts in these fields will give lectures with emphasis upon 
contemporary research. Time will be available for discussion, and student participation 
will be encouraged. Research and laboratory techniques will be demonstrated. Open 
oi^y 'o participants in the National Science Foundation Institute. (Detenbeck, Staff.) 

Phys. 230. ^-iiinars Arranged. (1) 

June 25 -Aug. IV. o^e two-hour class per week. T., 4:30-6:30; Z-115. Arranged. 

(Facidty.) 

Phys. 248. Special Topics in Modern Physics: Nuclear Cluster Model. (2) 

June 25 - Aug. 17, M. W., 4:15-o.iS: C-134 Two iwo-uoui i^.x.,^p5. pgj. ^g^j^ p^.^. 

requisites. Physics 120 and Physics 213, Oi or^nsent of instructor. (Staff ) 

Phys. 399. Research. 

Credit according to work done. Hours and location arranged. Laboratory fee, 110.00 
per credit hour. Prerequisite, approved application for admission to candidacy or 
special permission of the Department Head. Theses research conducted under approved 
supervision. (Faculty.) 

POULTRY 

p. H. Sill. Poultry Breeding and Feeding. (1) 

To be arranged. This course is designed primarily for teachers of vocational agricul- 
ture and extension service workers. The first half wiU be devoted to problems con- 
cerning breeding and the development of breeding stock. The second half will be de- 
voted to nutrition. (Staff.) 

63 



Psychology, Sociology 

P. H. 205 Poultry Literature. (1-4) 

Readings on individual topics are assigned. Written reports required. Methods of anal- 
ysis and presentation of scientfic material are discussed. (Staff.) 

P. H. 399. Poultry Research. 

Credit in accordance with work done. Practical and fundamental research with poul- 
try may be conducted under the supervision of staff members toward the requirements 
for the degrees of M.S. and Ph.D. (Staff.) 

PSYCHOLOGY 

Psych. 1 Introduction to Psychology. (3) 

June 25 - Aug. 17. Eight weeks, four periods per week. 11-12:20, M. T. Th. F.; M-104. 
A basic introductory course intended to bring the student into contact with the major 
problems confronting psychology and the more important attempts at their solution. 

(Waldrop) 

Psych. 110. Educational Psychology. (3) 

June 25 -Aug. 17. Eight weeks, four periods per week. 9:30-10:50; M.T.Th. F.; M-105. 
Prerequisite, Psych. 1 or equivalent. Researches on fundamental psychological prob- 
lems encountered in education. Measurement and significance of individual differences; 
learning, motivation, transfer of training and the educational implications of theories 
of intelligence. (Waldrop.) 

Psych. 131. Abnormal Psychology. (3) 

Eight weeks, four periods per week. 9:30-10:50; M. T. Th. F.; M-104. Prerequisite, 

Psych. 1. The nature, diagnosis, etiology and treatment of mental disorders. (Daston.) 

Psych. 260. Individual Tests. (3) 

June 25 -Aug. 17. Eight weeks, four periods per week. 11:00-12:20; M.T.Th.F.; M-105. 
Prerequisites, graduate student status and Psych. 150 or equivalent. Laboratory fee 
$4.00. Analysis of the various theories of intelligence and current research in the -'i^^! 
practical experience in the administration, scoring, and interpretaton of cur'-"*'^^)' used 
intelligence tests. (Daston.) 

Psych. 225. Practicum in Counseling and Clinical Procedure" ^'■''^' 

Hours arranged. Prerequisite, consent of instructor. (.Magoon.) 

Psych. 288. Special /?"'- — •'- ^'--blcms. (3) 

Hours arraP"'^- ^Prerequisite, consent -»^ mstructor. (Staff.) 

p^.^.i. 399. Research for Thesis. (1-6) 

Hours arranged. Prerequisite, consent of individual faculty supervisor. (Staff.) 

SOCIOLOGY 

Sociology 1 or its sociology equivalent is prerequisite to all other courses in Sociology 
excepting Soc. 5. 

Soc. 1. Sociology of American Life. (3) 

June 25 - August 17 — 

M.T.Th.F., 8:00-9:20; R-205. (Levinson.) 

Sociological analysis of the American social structure, metropolitan, small town, and 
rural communities; population distribution, composition and change; socal organization. 

64 



Sociology, Speech 

Soc. 5. Anthropology. (3) 

June 25 -Aug. 17. M.T.Th. F., 11:00-12:20; R-103. This course may be taken by stu- 
dents who qualify to select courses within Elective Group II of the American Civiliza- 
tion Program. Introduction to anthropolgy; origins of man; development and trans- 
mission of culture; backgrounds of human institutions. (Anderson.) 

Soc. 51. Social Pathology. (3) 

June 25 -Aug. 17. M. T. Th. F., 9:30-10:50; R-110. Prerequisite, sophomore standing. 
Personal-social disorganization and maladjustment; physical and mental handicaps; 
economic inadequacies; programs of treatment and control. (Shankweiler.) 

Soc. 52. Criminology. (3) 

June 25 -Aug. 17. M. T. Th. F., 8:00-9:20; R-112. Prerequisite, sophomore standing. 
Criminal behavior and the methods of its study; causation; typologies of criminal acts 
and offenders; punishment, correction and incapacitation; prevention of crime. (Lejins.) 

Soc. 121. Population. (3) 

June 25 -Aug. 17. M.T. Th. F., 11:00-12:20; R-110. Population distribution and growth 

in the United States and the world; population problems and policies. (Hirzel.) 

Soc. 125. Cultural History of the Negro. (3) 

June 25 -Aug. 17. M.T.Th. F., 8:00-9:20; R-110. The cultures of Africa south of the 

Sahara and the cultural adjustments of the Negro in North and South America. 

(Anderson) 

Soc. 131. Introduction to Social Service. (3) 

June 25 -Aug. 3. Daily, 9:30-10:50; R-112. General survey of the field of social-welfare 
activities; historical development; growth, functions and specialization of agencies and 
services, private and public. (McElhenie.) 

Soc. 153. Juvenile Delinquency. (3) 

June 25 -Aug. 17. M.T.Th. F., 11:00-12:20; R-205. Juvenile delinquency in relation 
to the general problem of crime; analysis of factors underlying juvenile delinquency; 
treatment and prevention. (Lejins.) 

Soc. 164. The Family and Society. (3) 

June 25 -Aug. 17. M.T.Th. F., 12:30-1:50; R-110. Prerequisite, Soc. 1 and Soc. 64 or 
equivalent. Study of the family as a social institution; its biological and cultural foun- 
dations, historic development, changing structure and functon; the interactions of mar- 
riage and parenthood, disorganizing and reorganizing factors in present day trends. 

(Shankweiler.) 
Soc. 166. Interviewing and Problem Solving in Social Work. (3) 

June 25 - Aug. 3. Daily, 11:00-12:30; R-112. The principles of interviewing and other 
diagnostic techniques as applies to social problems with particular reference to family 
and child behavior. (McElhenie.) 

SPEECH 

Prerequisite for advanced speech courses. The preparation and delivery of short orig- 
inal speeches; outside readings; reports; etc. It is recommended that this course 
be taken during the freshman year. Laboratory fee $1.00. 
Speech 1. Public Speaking. (3) 

Section 1— June 25 - Aug. 3, Daily, 8:00-9:20; R-102. (Starcher.) 

Section 2— June 25 - Aug. 17, M. T. Th. F., 9:30-10:50; R-102 (Aylward.) 

Section 3— June 25 - Aug. 3, Daily, 9:30-10:50; R-101. (Menser.) 

Section 4— June 25 - Aug. 17, M.T.Th.F., 11:00-12:20; R-102. (Alyward.) 

65 



Speech 

Speech 105. Speech-Handicapped School Children. (3) 

June 25 - Aug. 3, Daily, 9:30-10:50; R-109. Prerequisite, Speech 3 for undergraduates. 
The occurence, identification and treatment of speech handicaps in the classroom. An 
introduction to Speech pathology. (StafiE.) 

Speech 106. Clinical Practice. (1-3) 

June 25 - Aug. 3, T. F., 12:30-1:50, and arranged; R-109. Prerequisite, Speech 105. A 
laboratory course dealing with the various methods of correction plus actual work in the 
clinic. Fee $1.00 per credit hour. (Staff.) 

Speech 111. Seminar. (3) 

June 25 - Aug. 3. Prerequisites, senior standing and consent of instructor. Required of 
speech majors. Present day speech research. Hours arranged. (Strausbaugh.) 

Speech 120. Speech Pathology. (3) 

June 25 -Aug. 3. Daily 11:00-12:20; R-109. Prerequisite, Speech 105, A continuation 
of Speech 105, with emphasis on the causes and treatment of organic speech disorders. 
A laboratory fee of 83.00. (Hendricks.) 

Speech 139. Theatre Workshop. (3) 

June 25 -Aug. 3. Daily, 9:30-10:50; Radio Studio. Consent of instructor. A laboratory 
course designed to provide the student with practical experience in all phases of thea- 
tre production. (Pugliese.) 

Speech 149. Television Workshop. (3) 

June 25 -Aug. 3. Daily, 11:00-12:20; R-9. Prerequisites, Speech 22, Speech 140, and 
Speech 148, or consent of instructor. Two hour lecture, four hour laboratory. Labora- 
tory fee, $10.00. (Batka.) 

Speech 164. Persuasion in Speech. (3) 

June 25- Aug. 17. M.T.Th. F., 8:00-9:20; R-101. A study of the bases of persuasion 
with emphasis on recent experimental developments in persuasion. (Weaver.) 

Speech 201K. Seminar, Minor Research Problems. (1-3) 

Prerequisites, 6 hours in speech pathology and consent of instructor. Hours and room 
arranged. (Staff.) 

Speech 211. Advanced Clinical Practice. (1-3) 

T. F., 12:30-1:50; R-109 and arranged. Prerequisites, 12 hours in Speech Pathology 
and Audiology. Supervised training in the application of clinical methods in diagno- 
sis and treatment of speech and hearing disorders. Laboratory fee, $1.00 per hour. (Staff.) 

Speech 214. Clinical Audiometry. (3) 

Hours and room arranged. Prerequisites, 3 hours in audiology and consent of instructor. 
Testing of auditory acuity with pure tones and speech. Laboratory fee, $3.00. (Causey.) 

Speech 399. Thesis. (1-6 credits) 

Arranged. (Staff.) 

66 



Zoology 
ZOOLOGY 

fZool. 1. General Zoology. (4) 

June 25 -Aug. 3. Five lectures and five two-hour laboratory periods a week. Lectures, 
8:00; N-201; laboratory, 9:00, 10:00; CC Bldg. Laboratory fee, $8.00. This course, 
which is cultural and practical in its aim, deals with the basic principles of animal 
life. Special emphasis is placed on human physiology. (Grollman.) 

Zool. 55S. Development of the Human Body. (2) 

June 25 -Aug. 3. Four lecture periods a week. M. T. Th. F., 11:00-12:20; F-112. A study 
of the main factors affecting pre-natal and post-natal growth and development of the 
child with special emphasis on normal development. (Staff.) 

•fZool. 104. Genetics. (3) 

June 25 -Aug. 3. Five lecture periods a week. Daily, 9:30-10:50; F-112. Prerequisite, 
one course in zoology or botany. A consideration of the basic principles of heredity. 

(Staff.) 

*Zool. 121. Principles of Animal Ecology. (3) 

June 25 - Aug. 3. Five lectures and three three-hour laboratory periods a week. Labora- 
tory fee 18.00. T. W. Th., 8:00-11:50; F., 8:00-9:00; K-9. Prerequisite, one year of 
zoology and one year of chemistry Animals are studied in relation to their natural 
surroundings. Biological, physical and chemical factors of the environment which affect 
the growth, behavior, habits, and distribution of animals are stressed. (Stress.) 

Zool. 150. Special Problems in Zoology. (1 or 2) 

To be arranged. Prerequisite, major in zoology or biological sciences, a minimum of 
3.0 Cumulative average in the biological sciences, and consent of instructor. Research 
or integrated reading in zoology. A student may register several times and receive up 
to 8 semester hours of credit. (Staff.) 

*Zool. 199. National Science Foundation Summer Institue for Teachers of Science 

and Mathematics. Seminar. (1) 
June 25 to August 3, and daily seminar, 8:30, 9:30, 10:30, August 6 to August 10; C-132. 
One two-hour seminar each week. Th., 3:00, 4:00; C-130. Laboratory fee, S5.00. 
An integrated discussion of recent advances and basic principles of biology. The pro- 
gram will include lectures by recognized authorities in various fields of biology, labora- 
tory demonstrations, and discussion groups. Student participation will be encouraged. 
Open only to participants in the National Science Foundation Institute. (Brown.) 

*Zool. 208. Special Problems in Zoology. 

Credit hours, and topics to be arranged. Laboratory fee, $8.00. (Staff.) 

Zool. 399. Research. 

Credit to be arranged. Research on thesis project only. Laboratory fee, $8.00. (Staff.) 



fRecommended for teachers. 
•Intended for teachers. 



67 



The Faculty 

SUMMER SESSION, 1962 
JUNE 25-AUGUST 17 

Dr. Orval L. Ulry, Director 

ROBERT J. ALPERIN, Instructor in Government and Politics 

B.A., University of Chicago, 1950; m.a., 1952; PH.D., Northwestern University, 1959. 

FRANK G. ANDERSON, Assistant Professor of Sociology 
B.A., Cornell University, 1941; PH.D., University of New Mexico, 1951. 

HENRY ANDERSON, Assistant Professor of Statistics 
B.A., University of London, 1939; m.b.a., Columbia University, 1948; PH.D., 1959. 

J. PAUL ANDERSON, Assistant Professor of Education 

B.S., University of Minnesota, 1942; m.a., 1947; p.h.d., 1960. 

ROBERT R. ANDERSON, Assistant Professor of Foreign Languages 

B.A., University of Missouri, 1947; m.a., University of Illinois, 1949; PH.D., Ohio State 
University, 1958. 

VERNON E. ANDERSON, Dean of the College of Education 

B.S., University of Minnesota, 1930; M.A., 1936; PH.D., University of Colorado, 1942. 

THOMAS c. ANDREWS, Professor of Psychology and Head of the Department 

B.A., Univ. of So. Calif., 1937; m.a., Univ. of Nebraska, 1939; ph.d., Univ. of Nebraska, 
1941. 

WILLIAM T. AVERY, Professor and Head, Department of Classical Languages and Literatures 
B.A., Western Reserve University, 1934; m.a., 1935; ph.d. 1937. Fellow of the Amer- 
ican Academy in Ronie, T5.37-39. 

THOMAS J. AYLWARD, Assistant Professor of Speech and Dramatic Art 
B.S., University of Wisconsin, 1947; M.S., 1949; ph.d., 1960. 

CECIL R. BALL, Associate Professor of English 

B.A., College of William and Mary, 1923; m.a.. University of Maryland, 1934; ph.d.. 
The Johns Hopkins University, 1955. 

RONALD bamford. Dean of Graduate School, Professor and Head, Botany 

B.S., University of Connecticut, 1924; M.S., University of Vermont, 1926; ph.d., Col- 
umbia University, 1931. 

ruth bari. Instructor of Mathematics 

B.A., Brooklyn College, 1939; m.a., Johns Hopkins University, 1943. 
JACK c. BARNES, Associate Professor of English 

B.A., Duke University, 1939; m.a., 1947; ph.d.. University of Marj'land, 1954. 

CHARLES BARRETT, Assistant Professor of Economics 

A.B., Lyola CoUege, 1942; m.a., Maryland University, 1950; ph.d., 1961. 

69 



Faculty 

GEORGE F. BATKA, Associate Professor of Speech and Dramatic Art 
B.A., University of Wichita, 1938; m.a., University of Michigan, 1941. 

WILLIAM E. BENNETT, Instructor in Education 
B.S., Georgia Teachers College, 1939; m.a.. Teachers College, Columbia University, 
1947. 

JOYCE M. BERGMANN, Instructor of History 
B.A., University of Melbourne, 1942; m.a., Oxford, 1958. 

JOEL H. BERMAN, Assistant Professor of Music 

B.S., Juilliard School of Music, 1951; m.a., Columbia University, 1953; D.M.A., Uni- 
versity of Michigan, 1961. 

WILLIAM E. BICKLEY, Professor and Head of Entomology 
B.S., University of Tennessee, 1934; M.S., 1936; ph.d.. University of Maryland, 1940. 

JOSEPH c. BLAIR, Instructor in Foreign Languages 
A.B., University of Maryland, 1951; m.a., 1960. 

GLENN o. BLOUCH, Professor of Education 

B.A., University of Michigan, 1929; m.a., 1932; ll.d., Central Michigan College of 
Education, 1950. 

NELSON BOSSING, Visiting Lecturer in Education 
A.B., Kansas Wesleyan, 1917; b.d., Garrett Biblical Institute, 1921; a.m., Northwestern, 
1922; PH.D., Chicago, 1925. 

E. LUCILLE BOWIE, Associate Professor of Education, Institute for Child Study 

B.S., University of Maryland, 1942; m.a.. Teachers College, Columbia University, 1946; 
ED.D., University of Maryland, 1957. 

ALFRED c. BOYD, Assistant Professor of Chemistry 

B.S., Canisius College, 1951; ph.d., Purdue University, 1957. 

RICHARD M. BRANDT, Associate Professor of Education, Institute for Child Study 

B.M.E., University of Virginia, 1943; M.A., University of Michigan, 1949; ed.d.. Uni- 
versity of Maryland, 1954. 

GERALD s. BRiNTON, Chairman, Social Studies Department, Cedar Cliff High School, 
Camp Hill, Pennsylvania. Visiting Lecture in Education 

B.S., State Teachers College, Shippenburg, Pennsylvania, 1940; M.A., University of 

Maryland, 1951. 

ELEANOR A. BROOME, Instructor in Early Childhood Education 
B.A., University of Maryland, 1943; m.ed., 1957. 

DALE w. BROWN Assistant Professor of Library Science Education 

A.B., David Lipscomb College, 1953; a.m., George Peabody College for Teachers, 1955. 

FREDERICK A. BROWN, Assistant Professor of Education 

B.S., Lock Haven State College; M.S., Teachers College, Columbia University; ed.d., 
Pennsylvania State University. 

70 



Faculty 

HELEN I. BROWN, Associate Professor of Food, Nutrition, and Institution Management 
B.S., University of Vermont, 1938; m.a., Columbia University, 1948; PH.D., Michigan 
State University, 1960. 

JOSHUA R. c. BROWN, Associate Professor of Zoology 
B.A., Duke University, 194«; M.A., 1949; PH.D., 1953. 

RUSSELL G BROWN, Associate Professor of Botany 
B.S., West Virginia University, 1929; M.S., 1930; ph.d.. University of Maryland, 1934. 

MARIE D. BRYAN, Associate Professor of Education 

B.A., Goucher College, 1923; m.a.. University of Maryland, 1945. 

ELBERT M. BYRD, Assistant Professor of Government and Politics 
B.S., American University, 1953; M.A., 1954; PH.D., 1959. 

GORDON M. CAIRNS, Dean of Agriculture and Professor of Dairy Husbandry 
B.S., Cornell University, 1936; M.S., 1938; ph.d., 1940. 

CHARLES CALHOUN, Professor of Finance 

A.B., University of Washington, 1925; m.b.a., 1930. 

viRGUS R. CARDOziER, Professor and Head of Agricultural and Extension Education 
B.S., Louisiana State University, 1947; M.S., 1950; ph.d., Ohio State University, 1952. 

JOHN CARRUTHERS, Assistant Professor of Chemistry 

GEORGE D. CAUSEY, Associate Research Professor of Speech and Dramatic Art 
M.A., University of Maryland, 1950; M.A., 1951; ph.d., Purdue University, 1954. 

ANTONIO F. CHAVES, Assistant Professor of Geography 

M.A., Northwestern University, 1948; d.litt. University of Habana, 1941; PH.D., Uni- 
versity of Habana, 1946. 

CHUNJEN c. CHEN, Instructor in Foreign Languages 
B.S., Cornell, 1919; M.S., University of Maryland, 1920. 

DOROTHY CHESNEY, Instructor in Education 

B.S., Pennsylvania State University, 1954; m.ed., Pennsylvania State University, 1956. 

MILDRED COLE, Lecturer in Education and Mathematics 

B.S., University of Illinois, 1943; M.S., University of Wisconsin, 1951. 

PAUL K. CONKIN, Associate Professor of History 

B.A., Milligan College, 1951; m.a., Vanderbilt University, 1953; ph.d., 1957. 

FRANKLIN D. COOLEY, Professor of English 

B.A., The Johns Hopkins University, 1927; m.a.. University of Maryland, 1933; PH.D., 
The Johns Hopkins University, 1940. 

sherod m. COOPER, Instructor of English 
B.S., Temple University, 1951; m.a., 1953. 

ELLEN CORREL, Assistant frofessor of Mathemuilcs 

B.S., Douglas College (Rutgers University), 1951; M.S., Purdue Univorsitv, 1953; 
PH.D., 1957. 

71 



Faculty 

FRANK H. CRONiN, Associate Professor of Physical Education, Head Golf Coach 
B.S., University of Maryland, 1946. 

EDMUND D. CROSBY, Assistant Professor of Industrial Education 

B.A., Western Michigan University, 1934; M.A., Colorado A, & M. College, 1941. 

JOHN M. CURTIS, Professor and Head, Agricultural Economics 

B.S., North Carolina State University, 1947; M.S., 1950; PH.D., University of Maryland, 
1961. 

JOHN A. DAIKER, Assistant Professor of Accounting 

B.S., University of Maryland, 1941; m.b.a., 1951; C.P.A., District of Columbia, 1949. 

BUTH J. DALES, Visiting Lecturer 

B.S., Elmira College, 1933; M.S., Kansas State University, 1939; PH.D., Cornell Uni- 
sity, 1953. 

JOHN H. DALTON, Assistant Professor of Economics 
A.B., University of California, 1943; PH.D., 1955. 

PAUL G. DASTON, Associate Professor of Psychology 

B.A., Northeastern Univ., 1948; m.a., Michigan State Univ., 1950; PH.D., Michigan 
State Univ., 1952. 

RICHARD E. DAVIS, Professor and Head of Dairy 

B.S., University of New Hampshire, 1950; M.S., Cornell University, 1952; PH.D., 1953. 

TOWNES L. DAWSON, Associate Professor of Business Law 

B.B.A., University of Texas, 1943; b.a., U. S. Merchant Marine Academy, 1946; 
M.B.A., University of Texas, 1947; PH.D., 1950; ll.b., 1954. 

CHAUNCEY M. DAYTON, Instructor in Education 
A.B., University of Chicago, 1955. 

ANN DEMAiTRE, Instructor in Foreign Languages 

B.S., Columbia University, 1950; m.a.. University of California, 1951. 

MARIE DENECKE, Instructor in Education 

B.A., Columbia University, 1938; m.a., University of Maryland, 1942. 

ROBERT L. DETENBECK, Assistant Research Professor of Physics 
B.S., University of Rochester, 1954; PH.D., Princeton, 1960. 

MARY F. DE VERMOND, Instructor of Music 

B.MUS., Howard University, 1942; M.A., Columbia University, 1948; ed.d.. University 
of Maryland, 1959. 

conley h. DILLON, Professor of Government and Politics 

B.A., Marshall College, 1928; m.a., Duke University, 1933; PH.D., 1936. 

THOMAS H. DYER, Instructor of Mathematics 
B.S., U. S. Naval Academy, 1924. 

GERTRUDE EHRLICH, Assistant Professor of Muihematics 

B.S. Georgia State College for Women, 1943; M.A., University of North Carolina, 
1945; PH.D., University of Tennessee, 1953. 

72 



Faculty 

HOWARD R. ERICKSON, Visiting Lecturer 

B.S., Indiana State Teachers College, 1952; M.S., Pennsylvania State University, 1956; 
PH.D., Cornell University, 1959. 

CAYLORD B. ESTABROOK, Professor of Physics 

B.sc, Purdue University, 1921 ; m.sc, Ohio State University, 1922 ; ph.d.. University 
of Pittsburgh, 1932. 

MARVIN H. EYLER, Associate Professor of Physical Education 

B.A., Houghton College, 1942; M.S., University of Illinois, 1948; PH.D., 1956. 

LAURA KATHERINE EVANS, Instructor in Education 

B.S., Eastern Kentucky State College, 1940; m.a., George Peabody College for 
Teachers, 1946. 

WILLIAM F. FALLS, Professor of Foreign Languages 

B.A., University of North Carolina, 1922; m.a., Vanderbilt University, 1928; PH.D., 
University of Pennsylvania, 1932. 

DAVID M. FARQUHAR, Assistant Professor of History 

B.A., University of Washington, 1952; m.a., 1955; ph.d.. Harvard, 1960. 

WILLIAM E. FASNACHT, Visiting Lecturer in Physics 

Instructor, U.S. Naval Academy; b.s., Oregon State CoUege, 1952. 

wiLLARD o. fitzmaurice. Instructor in Education 

B.S., Bridgewater State Teachers College, 1953; m.ed., Boston State Teachers College, 
1959. 

FRANCES flournoy. Visiting Lecturer in Education 

B.A., Northwestern State College of Louisiana, 1942; m.a., George Peabody, 1946; 
PH.D., State University of Iowa, 1953. 

JOHN E. FOSTER, Professor and Head of Animal Husbandry 

B.S., North Carolina State College, 1926; M.S., Kansas State College, 1927; ph.d., 
Cornell University, 1937. 

LESTER M. fraley. Dean of College of Physical Education, Recreation and Health 
A.B., Randolph-Macon CoUege, 1928; m.a., Peabody College, 1937; ph.d., 1938. 

DANIEL LEADY CAREER, JR., Instructor in Civil Engineering 
B.S., University of Maryland, 1952; M.S., 1959. 

ROBERT GATES, Visiting Lecturer in Education 

B.S., Syracuse University, 1946; M.S., 1947; ed.d., 1956. 

DWIGHT GENTRY, Professor of Marketing 

A.B., Elon College, 1941; m.b.a.. Northwestern University, 1947; PH.D., University of 
Illinois, 1952. 

JOHN GiBLETTE, Assistant Professor in Education 

B.A., George Washington University, 1947; m.a.. University of Minnesota, 1952; PH.D., 
University of Pennsylvania, 1960. 

GUY w. GIENGER, Associate Professor of Agricultural Engineering 
B.S., University of Maryland, 1933; M.S., 1936. 

73 



Faculty 

JACOB D. GOERING, Assistant Professor of Education 

B.A., Bethel College, 1941; b.d., Bethany Seminary, 1949; PH.D., University of Mary- 
land, 1959. 

WILLIAM H. GRAVELY, JR., Associate Professor of English 

B.A., College of William and Mary, 1925; m.a.. University of Virginia, 1934; ph.d., 
1953. 

ROBERT L. GREEN, Professor and Head of Agricultural Engineering 

B.S.A.E., University of Georgia, 1934; M.S., lo-wa State College, 1939; ph.d., Michigan 
State University, 1953. Registered Professional Engineer. 

SIDNEY GROLLMAN, Associate Professor of Zoology 
B.S., University of Maryland, 1947; M.S., 1949; ph.d., 1952. 

JEAN D. GRAMBS, Associate Professor of Education 

B.A., Reed College, 1940; m.a., Stanford University, 1941; ed.d., 1948. 

GRAHAM d. gutsche. Visiting Lecturer in Physics 
Associate Professor of Physics, U.S. Naval Academy; B.s., Colorado University, 1950; 
M.S., Minnesota, 1952; ph.d.. Catholic University, 1959. 

ROBERT c. HALL, Visiting Lecturer in Education 

A.B., Nebraska Wesleyan University, 1934; m.a., University of Nebraska, 1935; ph.d.. 
University of Connecticut, 1954. 

THOMAS w. hall. Assistant Professor of Foreign Languages 
B.A., University of Maryland, 1938; m.a., Middlebury College, 1950; ph.d.. University 
of Maryland, 1958. 

HORACE V. HARRISON, Associate Professor of Government and Politics 
B.A., Trinity University, Texas, 1932; m.a.. University of Texas, 1941; ph.d., 1951. 

PAUL E. HARRISON, JR., Profcssor of Industrial Education 

B.ED., Northern Illinois State Teachers College, DeKalb, 1942; m.a., Colorado State 
CoUege of Education, Greeley, 1947; ph.d.. University of Maryland, 1955. 

ELLEN E. HARVEY, Associate Professor of Physical Education and Recreation 
B.S., New College, Columbia University, 1935; m.a.. Teachers College, Columbia Uni- 
sity, 1941; edj).. University of Oregon, 1951. 

GUY B. hathorn. Associate Professor of Government and Politics 

B.A., University of Mississippi, 1940; M.A., 1942; ph.d., Duke University, 1950. 

irvin c. haut. Director of Experiment Station and Professor and Head of Horticulture 
B.S., University of Idaho, 1928; M.S., State College of Washington, 1930; ph.d.. Uni- 
versity of Maryland, 1933. 

ELIZABETH E. HAVILAND, Assistant Professor of Entomolgy 
A.B., Wilmington (Ohio) College, 1923; m.a., Cornell University, 1926; M.S., Univer- 
sity of Maryland, 1936; ph.d., 1945. 

JEAN HEBELER, Assistant Professor of Education and Coordinator of Special Education 
B.S., State University of New York, College for Teachers, 1953; M.S., University of 
Illinois, 1956; ed.d., Syracuse University, 1960. 

74 



Faculty 

KENNETH R. HENERY-LOGAN, Assistant ProfessoT of Chemistry 
B.S., McGill University, 1942; PH.D., 1946. 

HUBERT P. HENDERSON, Assistant Professor of Music and Director of University Bands 
B.A., University of North Carolina, 1941; m.a., 1950. 

RICHARD HENDRICKS, Associate Professor of Speech and Dramatic Art 
B.A., Franklin College, 1937; m.a., Ohio State University, 1939; PH.D., 1956. 

HERBERT H. HENKE, Assistant Professor of Music 
B.MUS.ED., Oberlin College, 1953; b.mus., 1954; m.a., mus.ed., 1954. 

DACMAR R. HENNEY, Instructor of Mathematics 
B.S., University of Miami, 1954; M.S., 1956. 

EULALIA HERDOIZA, Instructor in Foreign Languages 
M.A., University of Maryland, 1960. 

CHRISTOPH A. HERINC, Associate Professor of Foreign Languages 
PH.D., University of Bonn, 1950. 

HAROLD J. HERMAN, Instructor of English 
B.A., University of Maryland, 1952; ph.d.. University of Pennsylvania, 1960. 

mviNG WEYMOUTH HERRiCK, JR., Instructor in Industrial Education 
B.S., Gorham State Teachers CoUege, Gorham, Maine, 1954; m.ed., University of Mary- 
land, 1960. 

FRANK M. HETRICK, Instructor of Microbiology 
B.S., Michigan State, 1954; M.S., University of Maryland, 1960. 

MARGARET HiLLis, Visiting Lecturer in Music 
B.MUS., Indiana University, 1947. 

ROBERT K. HIRZEL, Assistant Professor of Sociology 

B.A., Pennsylvania State College, 1946; m.a., 1950; PH.D., Louisiana State University, 
1954. 

KENNETH o. HO VET, Professor of Education 
B.A., St. Olaf College, 1926; PH.D., University of Minnesota, 1950. 

JAMES HUMMEL, Associate Professor of Mathematics 
B.S., The California Institute of Technology, 1949; m.a.. The Rice Institute, 1953; 
PH.D., 1955. 

JAMES H. HUMPHREY, Professor of Physical Education and Health 
A.B., Denison University, 1933; a.m.. Western Reserve University, 1946; e.d., Boston 
University, 1951. 

BURRis F. husman. Associate Professor of Physical Education 

B.S., University of Illinois, 1941; M.S., 1948; ed.d., University of Marlyand, 1954. 

JAMES L. hymes, Professor of Education 
B.A., Harvard College, 1934; m.a., Teachers CoUege, Columbia University, 1936; 

ED.D., 1947. 

75 



Faculty 

RICHARD JAQUITH, Associate Professor of Chemistry 

B.S., University of Massachusetts, 1940; M.S., 1942; ph.d., Michigan State University, 
1955. 

BERNARD R. JERMAN, Associate Professor of English 

B.A., The Ohio State University, 1946; m.a., 1948; PH.D., 1951. 

M. CLEMENS JOHNSON, Associate Professor of Education 

B.S., University of Minnesota, 1943; m.a., 1950; PH.D., 1954. 

warren r. JOHNSON, Professor of Physical Education and Health 

B.A., University of Denver, 1942; m.a., 1947; ed.d., Boston University, 1950. 

LOYAL joos, Visiting Lecturer in Education 

B.S., University of Wisconsin, 1941; M.S., University of Minnesota, 1957; PH.D., 1959. 

H. BRYCE JORDAN, Associate Professor of Music 

B.MUS., University of Texas, 1948; m.mus., 1949; PH.D., University of North Carolina, 
1956. 

ROGER R. KELSEY, Lecturer in Education, and NDEA Fellowship Program 

B.A., St. Olaf College, 1934; m.a.. University of Minnesota, 1940; ed.d., George Pea- 
body College for Teachers, 1954. 

KATHARINE KIBLER, Visiting Lecturer in Education 

B.S., Washington College, 1927; m.a., Columbia Teachers College, 1949. 

WINIFRED KINN, Visiting Lecturer in Education 

B.S., Towson State Teachers College, 1945; M.S., University of Maryland, 1950. 

JOHN J. KURTZ, Professor of Education 

B.A., University of Wisconsin, 1935; M.A., Northwestern University, 1940; PH.D., Uni- 
versity of Chicago, 1947. 

HAROLD LARSON, Lecturer in Government and Politics 

B.A., Momingside College, 1927; m.a., Columbia University, 1928; PH.D., 1943. 

THELMA z. LAVINE, Associate Professor and Acting Head of Philosophy 
A.B., Radcliffe, 1936; a.m., 1937; ph.d., 1939. 

LEROY L. LEE, Assistant Professor of Accounting 

AB., George Washington University, 1948; a.m., George Washington University, 1952; 
C.P.A., Maryland, 1949. 

OLIVER LEE, Instructor in Government and Politics 

B.A., Harvard University, 1951; m.a., University of Chicago, 1955. 

GUYDO R. LEHNER, Assistant Professor of Mathematics 

B.S., Loyola of Chicago, 1951; M.S., University of Wisconsin, 1951; PH.D., 1957. 

PETER P. LEjiNS, Professor of Sociology 

MAGISTER PHILOSOPHIAE, University of Latvia, 1930; magister iuris, 1933; ph.d.. Uni- 
versity of Chicago, 1938. 

76 



Faculty 

JOHN LEMBACH, Associate Professor of Art and Education 

B.A., University of Chicago, 1934; m.a.. Northwestern University, 1937; ed.d., Colum- 
bia University, 1946. 

INDA LEPSON, Instructor of Mathematics 

B.A., New York University, 1941; m.a., Columbia University, 1945. 

PERRY LEViNSON, Instructor of Sociology 

B.A., Western Maryland College, 1951 ; m.a., University of Pennsylvania, 1953. 

selma f. lippeatt, Professor of Home Economics and Dean of the College 

B.S., Arkansas State Teachers College, 1938; M.S., University of Tennessee, 1945; 
PH.D., Pennsylvania State University, 1953. 

J. DAVID lockard, Assistant Professor of Botany and Education 

B.S., Pennsylvania State College, 1951; m.ed., Pennsylvania State College, 1955. 

PAUL s. lomax. Visiting Lecturer in Business Education 

B.S., University of Missouri, 1917; m.a.. Harvard University, 1923; PH.D., New York 
University, 1927; professor emeritus. New York University. 

EDWARD L. LONGLEY, Assistant Professor of Education and Practical Art 
B.A., University of Maryland, 1950; m.a., Columbia University, 1953. 

JOSEPH F. LUETKEMEYER, Assistant Professor of Industrial Education 

B.S., Stout State College, 1953; M.S., 1954.; ed.d., University of Illinois, 1961. 

LEONARD I. LUTWACK, Assistant Professor of English 
B.A., Wesleyan University, 1939; m.a., 1940; PH.D., The Ohio State University, 1951. 

THOMAS M. MAGOON, Associate Professor of Psychology and Director, University Coun- 
seling Center 
B.A., Dartmouth College, 1947; m.a., University of Minnesota, 1951; ph.d.. University 
of Minnesota, 1954. 

DONALD MALEY, Professor and Head of Industrial Education 
B.s. State Teachers College, California, Pennsylvania, 1943; m.a., University of Mary- 
land, 1947; PH.D., 1950. 

GEORGE L. MARX, Assistant Professor of Education 

B.A., Yankton College, South Dakota, 1953; m.a.. State University of Iowa, 1956; 
PH.D., 1959. 

BENJAMIN H. MASSEY, Profcssor of Physical Education 

A.B., Erskin College, 1938; M.S., University of Elinois, 1947; PH.D., 1950. 

WILLIAM J. MASSEY, Assistant Professor of Education 

A.B., Louisiana State Normal College, 1936; m.ed., University of Missouri, 1951; ed.d., 
1955. 

RICHARD L. MATTESON, Instructor in Education 

B.A., Knox College, 1952; m.a.. University of Maryland, 1956. 

L. MORRIS mc clure, Professor of Education and Assistant Dean of the College ofi 
of Education 
B.A., Western Michigan University, 1940; m.a.. University of Michigan, 1946; ed.d., 
Michigan State University, 1953. 

77 



Faculty 

ANNIE L. MC ELHENIE, Assistant Professor of Sociology 
B.A., Franklin College, 1926; b.s., Hillsdale College, 1927; University of Chicago, 
1941; CERTIFICATE THIRD YEAR, New York School of Social Work, Columbia Univer- 
sity, 1951. 

HENRY MENDELOFF, Assistant Professor of Education and Foreign Languages 
B.S., College of the City of New York, 1936; M.S., 1939; ph.d.. Catholic University of 
America, 1960. 

BETTY c. MENSER, Instructor of Speech and Dramatic Art 
B.A., Allegheny CoUege, 1955; M.A., University of Pittsburgh, 1958. 

ELIZABETH METCALF, Lecturer in Psychology 

A.B., Swarthmore CoUege, 1942; m.a., Yale University, 1943; ph.d.. University of 
Iowa, 1950. 

CEORCE R. MERRILL, Instructor in Industrial Education 
B.S., University of Maryland, 1954; m.ed., 1955. 

HORACE s. MERRILL, Professor of History 

B.E., River Falls State College, 1932; ph.m.. University of Wisconsin, 1933; PH.D., 
1942. 

CHARLTON G. MEYER, Assistant Professor of Music 
B.MUS., Curtis Institute of Music, 1952. 

T. FAYE MITCHELL, Profcssor and Head, Department of Textiles and Clothing 
B.S., State Teachers College, Springfield, Missouri, 1930; m.a., Columbia University, 
1939. 

H. GERTHON MORGAN, Professor of Education and Director of the Institute for Child 
Study 
B.A., Furman University, 1940; m.a.. University of Chicago, 1943; ph.d., 1946. 

CHARLES D. MURPHY, Professor and Head of English 
B.A., University of Wisconsin, 1929; m.a.. Harvard University, 1930; ph.d., Cornell 
University, 1940. 

BOYD L. NELSON, Associate Professor of Statistics 
B.A., University of Wisconsin, 1947; m.a., 1948; ph.d., 1952. 

RICHARD c. NELSON, Assistant Professor of Physical Education 

B.A., St. Olaf College, 1954; m.ed., University of Houston, 1957; ph.d., Michigan State 
University, 1960. 

CLARENCE A. NEWELL, Professor of Educational Administration 

B.A., Hastings CoUege, Nebraska, 1935; m.a., Columbia University, 1939; ph.d., 1943. 

JANE H. o'neill, Instructor in Office Techniques 
B.A., University of Maryland, 1932. 

LEO w. o'neill, Associate Professor of Education 

B.A., University of Chicago, 1938; m.a.. University of Kansas City, 1953; ed.d.. Uni- 
versity of Colorado, 1955. 

78 



Faculty 

RAYMOND A. o'neill, Instructor in Education 

B.A., Loras College, 1950; m.a., University of Maryland, 1956. 

BETTY ORR, Assistant Professor of Education 
B.A., Beloit College, 1943; m.a.. University of Chicago, 1945; ed.d., 1958. 

MARIE PANico, Instructor in Foreign Languages 

A.B., Queens College, 1958; M.A., University of Maryland, 1960. 

ACisLOAS PAPPANIKAU, Visiting Lecturer in Special Education 
B.S., Boudoin, M.S., Syracuse University, 1958; ed.d., 1961. 

ARTHUR c. PARSONS, Associate Professor of Foreign Languages 
B.A., University of Maryland, 1926; M.A., 1928. 

ARTHUR s. PATRICK, Professor of Office Management and Business Education 

B.S., Wisconsin State College, 1931; m.a.. University of Iowa, 1940; PH.D., American 
University, 1956. 

BERNARD PECK, Assistant Professor of Education 

B.A., Indiana University, 1939; M.A., Columbia University, 1941; ed.d., University of 
Maryland, 1957. 

HUGH V. PERKINS, Professor of Education 
B.A., Oberlin College, 1941; m.a.. University of Chicago, 1946; ph.d., 1949; ed.d., New 
York University, 1956. 

ELMER PLISCHKE, Profcssor and Head of the Department of Government and Politics 
PH.B., Marquette University, 1937; m.a., American University, 1938; ph.d., Clark Uni- 
versity, 1943. 

MILTON ploghoft. Visiting Lecturer in Education 

B.S., Northwestern Missouri State College, 1949; M.S., Drake University, 1951; ed.d., 
University of Nebraska, 1957. 

PAUL R. POFFENBERGER, Assistant Dean-Instruction, and Professor of Agricultural 
Economics 
B.S., University of Maryland, 1935; M.S., 1937; ph.d., American University, 1953. 

JOHN PORTZ, Assistant Professor of English 

B.S., Duke University, 1937; M.A., Harvard University, 1941; ph.d., 1958. 

RUDOLPH E. PUGLiESE, Assistant Professor of Speech and Dramatic Art 

B.A., Miami University, 1947; m.a., Catholic University, 1949; PH.D., Ohio State Uni- 
versity, 1961. 

ALLIE w. RiCHESON, Profcssor of Mathematics 
B.S., University of Richmond, 1918; m.a., Johns Hopkins University, 1925; ph.d., 1928 

ROBERT G. RisiNGER, Associate Professor of Education 

B.S., Ball State Teachers College, Muncie, Indiana, 1940; M.A., University of Chi- 
cago, 1947; ED.D., University of Colorado, 1955. 

WINSTON ROESCH, Visiting Lecturer in Education, U.S. Office of Education 
B.S., University of Idaho, 1934; M.S., 1935; ph.d., University of Michigan, 1948. 

79 



Faculty 

MAY ROSWELL, Instructor in Foreign Languages 

B.A., University of Dublin, 1936; m.a., University of Maryland, 1957; PH.D., 1961. 

RUSSELL G. ROTHGEB, Research Professor in Agronomy 

B.S., University of Maryland, 1924; M.S., Iowa State College, 1925; PH.D., University 
of Maryland, 1928. 

EARLE u. RUGG, Visiting Lecturer in Education 

A.B., University of Illinois, 1915; a.m., 1917; PH.D., Teachers College, Columbia Uni- 
versity, 1923. 

JEFFREY HAMILTON RUMBAUGH, Instructor in Electrical Engineering 
B.S., University of Maryland, 1957. 

CLARENCE E. SAWHILL, Visiting Lecturer in Music 

B.MUS., Bethany College, 1929; m.mus.. University of Illinois, 1942. 

ALVIN w. SCHINDLER, Professor of Education 
B.A., Iowa State Teachers College, 1927; m.a., University of Iowa, 1929; PH.D., 1934. 

ALLAN A. schmieder. Assistant Professor of Geography 

B.S., Edinboro State College, 1955; M.A., The Ohio State University, 1956. 

carl SCHRAMM, Instructor in Industrial Education 
B.S., University of Maryland, 1956. 

clyne s. shaffner. Professor and Head of Poultry Husbandry 
B.S., Michigan State College, 1938; M.S., 1940; ph.d., Purdue University, 1947. 

PAUL w. shankweiler, Associate Professor of Sociology 

PH.B., Muhlenberg University, 1919; m.a., Columbia University, 1921; ph.d., University 
of North Carolina, 1934. 

JULIUS c. shepherd, Assistant Professor of Mathematics 
B.A., East Carolina College, 1944; m.a., 1947. 

CLODUS R. smith, Assistant Professor of Agricultural Education 

B.S., Oklahoma State University, 1950; M.S., 1955; ed.d., Cornell University, 1960. 

MABEL s. spencer. Associate Professor of Home Economics Education 

B.S., West Virginia University, 1925; M.S., 1946; ed.d., American University, 1959. 

mahendra p. SINGH, Instructor of Mathematics 

B.S., Agra College, 1951; M.S., Lucknow University, 1953. 

MARGARET A. STANT, Assistant Professor of Early Childhood Education 

B.S., University of Maryland, 1952; m.ed., 1955; a.p.c, George Washington Univer- 
sity, 1959. 

E. THOMAS STARCHER, Assistant Professor of Speech and Dramatic Art 

B.S., University of Southern California, 1940; M.A., University of Arkansas, 1948. 

LEWIS R. STEELEY, Assistant Instructor of Mathematics 

B.S., Wilson Teachers College, 1937; m.a.. Catholic University, 1945. 

80 



Faculty 



REUBEN G. STEINMEYER, Professor of Government and Politics 
B.A., American University, 1929; PH.D., 1935. 

WARREN L. STRAUSBAUGH, Projessor and Head of Speech and Dramatic Art 
B.S., Wooster College, 1932; m.a.. State University of Iowa, 1935. 

RAYMOND G. STROSS, Assistant Professor of Zoology 

B.S., University of Missouri, 1952; M.S., University of Idaho, 1954; PH.D., University 
of Wisconsin, 1958. 

CALVIN F. STUNTZ, Associate Professor of Chemistry 
B.A., University of Buffalo, 1939; PH.D., 1947. 

PAULA L. SUTTON, Instructor in Family Life and Management 

B.S., Womans' College, University of North Carolina, 1953; M.S., 1959. 

CHARLES T. SWEENEY, Professor of Accounting 
B.S., Cornell University, 1921; m.b.a.. University of Michigan, 1928; c.p.a., Iowa, 
1934; Ohio, 1936. 

JESSE wn^soN tarwater, Dean of Students, Whittier College, Visiting Lecturer in Edu- 
cation 
A.B., University of Southern California, 1939; M.S., 1948; ed.d., Stanford University, 
1951. 

HAROLD F. SYLVESTER, Professor of Personnel Administration 
PH.D., The Johns Hopkins University, 1938. 

WILLIAM F. TIERNEY, Associatc Profcssor of Industrial Education 

B.S., Teachers College of Connecticut, 1941; m.a., Ohio State University, 1949; ed.d., 
University of Maryland, 1952. 

FRED R. THOMPSON, Professor of Education 

B.A., University of Texas, 1929; M.A., 1939; ed.d.. University of Maryland, 1952. 

THERON A. TOMPKINS, Associate Professor of Physical Education 

B.S., Eastern Michigan College of Education, 1926; m.a., University of Michigan, 1939. 

PAUL TRAVER, Instructor of Music 

B.MUS., Catholic University of America, 1955; M.MUS., 1957. 

ORVAL L. ULRY, Professor of Education and Director of the Summer School 
B.S., Ohio State University, 1938; m.a., 1944; PH.D., 1953. 

JAMES A. VAN ZwoLL, Professor of School Administration 

B.A., Calvin College, Grand Rapids, Michigan, 1933; M.A., University of Michigan, 
1937; PH.D., 1942. 

ROBERT s. WALDROP, Professor of Psychology 

B.A., University of Oklahoma, 1934; PH.D., University of Michigan, 1948. 

L. HELEN WALTERS, Visiting Lecturer in Education 
B.S., Teachers CoUege, Columbia University, 1937; M.A., University of Minnesota, 
1941; ED.D., Colorado State College, 1958. 

81 



Faculty 

KATHYRN M. PAINTER WARD, Associate Professor of English 
B.A., The George Washington University, 1935; M.A., 1936; PH.D., 1947. 

CARL H. WEAVER, Associate Professor of Speech and Dramatic Art 

B.A., Bluffton College, 1936; m.a., Ohio State University, 1950; PH.D., Ohio State 
University, 1957. 

GLADYS A. WIGGIN, Professor of Education 

B.S., University of Minnesota, 1929; M.A., 1939; PH.D., University of Maryland, 1947. 

JUNE c. WILBUR, Assistant Professor of Textiles and Clothing 
B.S., University of Washington, 1936; M.S., Syracuse University, 1940. 

LEDA A. WILSON, Associate Professor of Home Economics 

B.S., Lander College, 1943; M.S., University of Tennessee, 1950; ed.d., 1954. 

JACKSON YANG, Instructor in Mechanical Engineering 
B.S., University of Maryland, 1958. 

W. GORDON ZEEVELD, Professor of English 

B.A., University of Rochester, 1924; m.a.. The Johns Hopkins University, 1929; ph.d., 
1936. 

JACQUELINE L. Zemel, Instructor of Mathematics 

B.S., Queens College, 1949; m.a., Syracuse University, 1951. 



82 



THE UNIVERSITY is the rear guard and the 
advance agent of society. It lives in the 
past, the present and the future. It is the 
storehouse of knowledge ; it draws upon 
this depository to throw light upon the 
present ; it prepares people to live and make 
a living in the world of today; and it 
should take the lead in expanding the 
intellectual horizons and the scientific 
frontiers, thus helping mankind to go forward 
— always toward the promise of a 
better tomorrow. 



From "The State and the University" 
the inaugural address of 
President Wilson H. Elkins, 
January 20, 1955, 
College Park, Maryland.