(navigation image)
Home American Libraries | Canadian Libraries | Universal Library | Community Texts | Project Gutenberg | Children's Library | Biodiversity Heritage Library | Additional Collections
Search: Advanced Search
Anonymous User (login or join us)
Upload
See other formats

Full text of "The Summer School"

THE 



UNIVERSITVffF MARYLAND 



BULLETIN 









n 




Summer School 



THE UNIVERSITY is the rear guard and the 
advance agent of society. It Hves in the 
past, the present and the future. It is the 
storehouse of knowledge; it draws upon 
this depository to throw light upon the 
present; it prepares people to live and make 
a living in the world of today; and it 
should take the lead in expanding the 
intellectual horizons and the scientific 
frontiers, thus helping mankind to go forward 
— always toward the promise of a 
better tomorrow. 



From "The State and the University" 
the inaugural address of 
President Wilson H. Elkins, 
January 20, 1955, 
College Park, Maryland. 



The provisions of this publication are not to be regarded as an irrevocable 
contract between the student and the University of Maryland. The Uni- 
versity reserves the right to change any provision or requirement at any 
time within the student's term of residence. The University further re- 
serves the right at any time, to ask a student to withdraw when it considers 
such action to be in the best interests of the University. 



SUMMER 
SCHOOL 

1964 



THE 
UNIVERSITY 

OF 
MARYLAND 



Volume 19 February 24, 1964 No. 19 

UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND BULLETIN is published four times in Januray, 
February, April and June; three times in November, December and March; two 
times in September, October, May and August; and once in July. Re-entered at the 
Post Office in College Park, Maryland, as second class mail matter under the Act 
of Congress on August 24, 1912. Published thirty-four times. 



ADMISSION AND REGISTRATION 
PROCEDURES 

ADMISSION: All new students must be formally admitted to 
the University through the Admission's Office, College Park 
campus. 

Undergraduate: Must file application with Director of Ad- 
missions by June 5, 1964. 

Graduate: AppUcation for admission and all supporting rec- 
ords must be in the office of the Dean of the Graduate 
School by June 1, 1964. 

REGISTRATION: 

College of Education only: 

1 . Begin at south-west door of Armory and only according 
to the alphabetical schedule posted on page vii of this 
catalog. 

2. In the Armory, undergraduate and special students 
must have schedule cards signed by adviser and Dean 
of College of Education. 

3. Graduate students must have schedule cards signed by 

adviser. Dean of the College of Education, and the 
Dean of the Graduate School. 

All Other Colleges: 

1. Begin at the respective college office. 

2. Here, schedule cards must be signed by the student's 

adviser and dean. 

3. Graduate students must have signature of Dean of the 

Graduate School. 

4. Complete registration at the Armory. 

Registration is Neither Complete Nor Official Until All Forms 
Are Submitted and Fees Are Paid. 



REGISTRATION SCHEDULE 

Monday, June 22, 1964* 
8:00 A.M.— 3:00 P.M. 

To expedite registration, students have been grouped on the basis of the 
first letter of the last name. No student will be permitted into the Armory 
until the appropriate time as listed below: 



TIME 


STUDENTS 


TIME 


STUDENTS 


8:00 


W— Y 


12:30 


KA— LI 


8:30 


Z— BL 


1:00 


LJ—MN 


9:00 


BM— CH 


1:30 


MO PH 


9:30 


CI— DN 


2:00 


PI— R 


10:00 


DO F 


2:30 


SA— SS 


10:30 


GA— HD 


3:00 


ST— V 


11:00 


HE— J 







SUMMER SCHOOL CALENDAR 



June 23 Tuesday 
July 4 Saturday 
Aug. 14 Friday 



Classes begin 

HoUday 

Close of Summer Session 



*Dormitories will be open for occupancy on and after 2:00 P.M. Sunday, 
June 21, 1964. 



Ill 



CONTENTS 



University Calendar 
Summer School Registration 

Schedule and Calendar 
Board of Regents 
Officers of Administration 
Chairmen, Standing Commit- 
tees, Faculty Senate 
The School 

Recreational, Social and 
Cultural Activities 

Academic Information . . 

Terms of Admission ... 

Undergraduate and 
Special Students 

Graduate Students 

Academic Credit 

Marking System 

Maximum Loads 

Summer Graduate Work 

Candidates for Degrees . 



GENERAL 

vi Program in American 

Civilization 5 

vii General Information 

vii; Registration 6 

Registration for all Colleges 
^^ except Education 6 

Registration: College of 
xii Education only 7 

1 Length of Class Period . 7 

Definition of Residence and 

1 Non-Residence 8 

2 Tuition and Fees 8 
2 Withdrawal and Refund of 

Fees 9 

2 Living Accommodations and 

2 Meals 10 

3 Student Health 12 

3 Parking of Automobiles 12 

3 Library Facilities 12 

4 University Bookstore 13 
4 For Additional Information 13 



CONFERENCES, INSTITUTES 
WORKSHOPS, SPECIAL COURSES AND LECTURES 



Summer Lecture Series 14 

Institute for Teachers of Math- 
ematics in Junior High 
School 14 

Institute in Mathematics for 
Elementary School Teach- 
ers, Principals and Super- 
visors 15 

Institute in Counseling and 

Guidance Training 15 

Institute for High School 

Teachers of Biology 16 

Institute in Modern Health 
Education 17 

Workshop on Teaching Con- 
servation of Natural Re- 
sources 17 

Workshop on Economic Edu- 
cation 17 



Education in Family Finance 
Workshop 18 

Workshop in Human Develop- 
ment 19 

Child Study Leaders Work- 
shop 20 

Workshop on Applications of 
Human Development Prin- 
ciples in Classrooms 20 

Workshops on Human Devel- 
opment and Religious Edu- 
cation 20 

Workshop on Action Research 
in Human Development 
Education 20 

Workshop on Human Rela- 
lations in Educational 
Administration 21 



IV 



CONTENTS 



CONFERENCES, INSTITUTES 
WORKSHOPS, SPECIAL COURSES AND LECTURES 

Workshop in Instructional Television Workshop 23 

Materials 21 Workshop in Physical Activity 

Workshop in Music 22 in Recreation Programs for 

Workshop in Physical the Retarded 24 

Education — PE 1 89 22 Typewriting Demonstration for 
Workshop for Teachers of Sec- Business Education 

ondary School English . . 22 Teachers 24 

Workshops in Special 

Education 23 



COURSE OFFERINGS 



Agriculture 25 

Agricultural Economics ... 25 

Agricultural Engineering 25 
Agricultural and Extension 

Education 26 

Agronomy 26 

Animal Science 27 

Botany 27 

Entomology 28 

Horticulture 28 

Arts and Sciences 29 

Art 29 

Chemistry 30 
Classical Languages and 

Literatures 31 

English 31 

Foreign Languages 32 

History 34 

Mathematics 36 



Microbiology 37 

Music 38 

Philosophy 39 

Physics and Astronomy . 39 

Psychology 40 

Sociology 41 

Speech 42 

Zoology 44 

Business Administration ... 45 
Office Management and 

Techniques 47 

Economics 48 

Government and Politics .... 49 

Journalism 51 

Education 51 

Engineering 61 

Home Economics 62 

Physical Education, Recreation 

and Health 63 



The Faculty 66 



UNIVERSITY CALENDAR, 1964 



Spring Semester 

February 3-7 
February 10 
February 22 
March 25 
March 26 

March 31 
May 13 
May 28 
May 29-June 5 
May 30 
May 31 
June 6 



Monday-Friday 

Monday 

Saturday 

Wednesday 

Thursday 

Tuesday 

Wednesday 

Thursday 

Friday-Friday 

Saturday 

Sunday 

Saturday 



Spring Semester Registration 
Instruction Begins 
Washington's Birthday, Holiday 
Maryland Day, not a holiday 
Easter Recess Begins After Last 

Class 
Easter Recess Ends, 8 a.m. 
AFROTC Day 
Pre-Examination Study Day 
Spring Semester Examinations 
Memorial Day, Holiday 
Baccalaureate Exercises 
Commencement Exercises 



Summer Session 
1964 

June 22 
June 23 
July 4 
August 14 



Monday 
Tuesday 
Saturday 
Friday 



Summer Session Registration 
Summer Session Begins 
Independence Day, Holiday 
Summer Session Ends 



Short Courses 
1964 

June 15-19 
August 3-7 
September 8-11 



Monday-Saturday 
Monday-Saturday 
Tuesday-Friday 



Rural Women's Short Course 
4-H Club Week 
Firemen's Short Course 



VI 



UNIVERSITY CALENDAR, 1964-65 



(Tentative) 



Fall Semester 
1964 



September 14-18 Monday-Friday 
September 21 Monday 

November 25 Wednesday 



November 30 


Monday 


December 22 


Tuesday 


1965 




January 4 
January 20 
January 21-27 


Monday 
Wednesday 
Thursday- Wednesday 


Spring Semester 




February 2-5 
February 8 
February 22 
March 25 
April 15 


Tuesday-Friday 

Monday 

Monday 

Thursday 

Thursday 


April 20 
May 12 
May 27 
May 28-June 4 
May 30 
May 31 
June 5 


Tuesday 

Wednesday 

Thursday 

Friday-Friday 

Sunday 

Monday 

Saturday 


Summer Session 




June 21 
June 22 
July 5 
August 13 


Monday 
Tuesday 
Monday 
Friday 


Short Courses 




June 14-18 
August 2-6 
September 7-10 


Monday-Friday 
Monday-Friday 
Tuesday-Friday 



Fall Semester Registration 
Instruction Begins 
Thanksgiving Recess Begins 

After Last Class 
Thanksgiving Recess Ends 

8 a.m. 
Christmas Recess Begins After 

Last Class 



Christmas Recess Ends 8 a.m. 
Pre-Examination Study Day 
Fall Semester Examinations 



Spring Semester Registration 
Instruction Begins 
Washington's Birthday, Holiday 
Maryland Day, not a Holiday 
Easter Recess Begins After Last 

Class 
Easter Recess Ends 8 a.m. 
AFROTC Day 
Pre-Examination Study Day 
Spring Semester Examinations 
Baccalaureate Exercises 
Memorial Day, Holiday 
Commencement Exercises 



Summer Session Registration 
Summer Session Begins 
Independence Day, Holiday 
Summer Session Ends 



Rural Women's Short Course 
4-H Club Week 
Firemen's Short Course 



VII 



Board Of Regents 

and 

Maryland State Board Of Agriculture 

CHAIRMAN 

Charles P. McCormick 

McCormick and Company, Inc., 414 Light Street, Baltimore, 21202 

VICE-CHAIRMAN 

Edward F. Holier 

Farmers Home Administration, 103 South Gay Street, Baltimore, 21202 

SECRETARY 

B. Herbert Brown 

The Baltimore Institute, 10 West Chase Street, Baltimore, 21201 

TREASURER 

Harry H. Nuttle 
Denton, 21629 

ASSISTANT SECRETARY 

Louis L. Kaplan 

The Baltimore Hebrew College, 5800 Park Heights Ave., Baltimore, 21215 

ASSISTANT TREASURER 

Richard W. Case 

Smith, Somerville and Case, 1 Charles Center — 17th Floor, 

Baltimore, 21201 

Dr. William B. Long 

Medical Center, Salisbury, 21801 

Thomas W. Pangborn 

The Pangborn Corporation, Pangborn Blvd., Hagerstown, 21740 

Thomas B. Symons 

Suburban Trust Company, 6950 Carroll Avenue, Takoma Park, 20012 

William C. Walsh 

Liberty Trust Building, Cumberland, 21501 

Mrs. John L. Whitehurst 
4101 Greenway, Baltimore, 21218 

via 



OFFICERS OF ADMINISTRATION 



Principal Administrative Officers 

WILSON H. ELKINS, President 

B.A., University of Texas, 1932; M.A., 1932; B.Litt., Oxford University, 1936; 
D.Phil., 1936. 

ALBIN O. KUHN, Executive Vice President 

B.S., University of Maryland, 1938; M.S., 1939; Ph.D., 1948. 

R. LEE HORNBAKE, Vice President for Academic Affairs 

B.S., California State College, Pa., 1934; M.A., Ohio State University, 1936; 
Ph.D., 1942. 

FRANK L. BENTZ, JR., Assistant to the President 
B.S., University of Maryland, 1942; Ph.D., 1952. 

ALVIN E. CORMENY, Assistant to the President, in Charge of Endowment and 
Development 

B.A., Illinois College, 1933; LL.B., Cornell University, 1936. 

Emeriti 

HARRY C. BYRD, President Emeritus 

B.S., University of Maryland, 1908; LL.D., Washington College, 1936; LL.D., 
Dickinson College, 1938; D.Sc, Western Maryland College, 1938. 

ADELE H. STAMP, Dean of Women Emerita 

B.A., Tulane University, 1921; M.A., University of Maryland, 1924. 

Administrative Officers of the Schools and Colleges 

EDWARD W. AITON, Director, Agricultural Extension Service 

B.S., University of Minnesota, 1933; M.S., 1940; Ed.D., University of Maryland, 
1956. 

VERNON E. ANDERSON, Dean of the College of Education 
B.S., University of Minnesota, 1930; M.A., 1936; Ph.D., University of Colorado, 
1942. 

RONALD BAMFORD, Dean of the Graduate School 
B.S., University of Connecticut, 1924; M.S., University of Vermont, 1926; Ph.D., 
Columbia University, 1931. 

GORDON M. CAIRNS, Dean of Agriculture 

B.S., Cornell University, 1936; M.S., 1938; Ph.D., 1940. 

WILLIAM P. CUNNINGHAM, Dean of the School of Law 
A.B., Harvard College, 1944; LL.B., Harvard Law School, 1948. 

RAY W. EHRENSBERGER, Dean of University College 

B.A., Wabash College, 1929; M.A., Butler University, 1930; Ph.D., Syracuse 
University, 1937. 

NOEL E. FOSS, Dean of the School of Pharmacy 

Ph.C, South Dakota State College, 1929; B.S., 1929; M.S., University of Maryland, 
1932; Ph.D., 1933. 

ix 



LESTER M. FRALEY, Dean of the College of Physical Education, Recreation, 
and Health. 

B.A., Randolph-Macon College, 1928; M.A., 1937; Ph.D., Peabody College, 1939. 

FLORENCE M. GIPE, Dean of the School of Nursing 

B.S., Catholic University of America, 1937; M.S., University of Pennsylvania, 
1940; Ed.D., University of Maryland, 1952. 

LADISLAUS F. GRAPSKL Director of the University Hospital 

R.N., Mills School of Nursing, Bellevue Hospital, New York, 1938; B.S., 
University of Denver, 1942; M.B.A., in Hospital Administration, University of 
Chicago, 1943. 

IRVIN C. HAUT, Director, Agricultural Experiment Station 

B.S., University of Idaho, 1928; M.S., State College of Washington, 1930; Ph.D., 
University of Maryland, 1933. 

VERL S. LEWIS, Dean of the School of Social Work 

A.B., Huron College, 1933; M.A., University of Chicago, 1939; D.S.W., Western 
Reserve University, 1954. 

SELMA F. LIPPEATT, Dean of the College of Home Economics 

B.S., Arkansas State Teachers College, 1938; M.S., University of Tennessee, 1945; 
Ph.D., Pennsylvania State University, 1953. 

CHARLES MANNING, Dean of the College of Arts and Sciences 

B.S., Tufts College, 1929; M.A., Harvard University, 1931; Ph.D., University of 
North Carolina, 1950. 

FREDERIC T. MAVIS, Dean of the College of Engineering 

B.S., University of Illinois, 1922; M.S., 1926; C.E., 1932; Ph.D., 1935. 

DONALD W. O'CONNELL, Dean of the College of Business and Public 
Administration 

B.A., Columbia University, 1937; M.A., 1938; Ph.D., 1953. 

JOHN J. SALLEY, Dean of the School of Dentistry 

D.D.S., Medical College of Virginia, 1947; Ph.D., University of Rochester School 
of Medicine and Dentistry, 1954. 

WILLIAM S. STONE, Dean of the School of Medicine and Director of 
Medical Education and Research 

B.S., University of Idaho, 1924; M.S., 1925; M.D., University of Louisville, 1929; 

Ph.D. (Hon.), University of Louisville, 1946. 

General Administrative Officers 

G. WATSON ALGIRE, Director of Admissions and Registrations 
B.A., University of Maryland, 1930; M.S., 1931. 

B. JAMES BORRESON, Executive Dean for Student Life 
B.A., University of Minnesota, 1944. 

C. WILBUR CISSEL, Director of Finance and Business 

B.A., University of Maryland, 1932; M.A., 1934; C.P.A., 1939. 

HELEN E. CLARKE, Dean of Women 

B.S., University of Michigan, 1943; M.A., University of Illinois, 1951; Ed.D., 
Teachers College, Columbia University, 1960. 



WILLIAM W. COBEY, Director of Athletics 
A.B., University of Maryland, 1930. 

L. EUGENE CRONIN, Director, Natural Resources Institute 

A.B., Western Maryland College, 1938; M.S., University of Maryland, 1943; 
Ph.D., 1946. 

LESTER M. DYKE, Director of Student Health Service 

B.S., University of Iowa, 1936; M.D., University of Iowa, 1926. 

GEARY F. EPPLEY, Dean of Men 

B.S., Maryland State College, 1920; M.S., University of Maryland, 1926. 

HARRY D. FISHER, Comptroller and Budget Officer 
B.S., University of Maryland, 1943; C.P.A., 1948. 

GEORGE W. FOGG, Director of Personnel 
B.A., University of Maryland, 1926; M.A., 1928. 

ROBERT J. McCartney, Director of University Relations 
B.A., University of Massachusetts, 1941. 

GEORGE W. MORRISON, Associate Director and Supervising Engineer, 
Physical Plant {Baltimore) 

B.S., University of Maryland, 1927; E.E., 1931. 

VERNON H. REEVES, Professor of Air Science and Head, Department of Air 
Science 

B.A., Arizona State College, 1936; M.A., Columbia University, 1949. 

WERNER C. RHEINBOLDT, Director, Computer Science Center 

Dipl. Math., University of Heidelberg, 1952; Dr. Rer. Nat., University of Freiburg, 
1955. 

HOWARD ROVELSTAD, Director of Libraries 

B.A., University of Illinois, 1936; M.A., 1937; B.S.L.S., Columbia University, 1940. 

CLODUS R. SMITH, Director of the Summer Session 

B.S., Oklahoma State University, 1950; M.S., 1955; Ed.D., Cornell University, 
1960. 

GEORGE O. WEBER, Director and Supervising Engineer, Department of Physical 
Plant. 

B.S., University of Maryland, 1933. 

Division Chairmen 

JOHN E. FABER, JR., Chairman of the Division of Biological Sciences 
B.S., University of Maryland, 1926; M.S., 1927; Ph.D., 1937. 

HAROLD C. HOFFSOMMER, Chairman of the Division of Social Sciences 

B.S., Northwestern University, 1921; M.A., 1923; Ph.D., Cornell University, 1929. 

CHARLES E. WHITE, Chairman of the Lower Division 

B.S., University of Maryland, 1923; M.S., 1924; Ph.D., 1926. 



Xt 



CHAIRMEN, STANDING COMMITTEES, FACULTY SENATE 

GENERAL COMMITTEE ON EDUCATIONAL POLICY 
Monroe H. Martin (Arts and Sciences), Chairman 

GENERAL COMMITTEE ON STUDENT LIFE AND WELFARE 
Joseph F. Mattick (Agriculture), Chairman 

COMMITTEE ON ADMISSIONS AND SCHOLASTIC STANDING 
Russell B. Allen (Engineering), Chairman 

COMMITTEE ON INSTRUCTIONAL PROCEDURES 

Thomas G. Andrews (Arts and Sciences), Chairman 

COMMITTEE ON SCHEDULING AND REGISTRATION 
Richard H. Byrne (Education), Chairman 

COMMITTEE ON PROGRAMS, CURRICULA, AND COURSES 
V. R. Cardozier (Agriculture), Chairman 

COMMITTEE ON FACULTY RESEARCH 

James A. Hummel (Arts and Sciences), Chairman 

COMMITTEE ON PUBLIC FUNCTIONS AND COMMENCEMENTS 
Donald W. O'Connell (Business and Public Administration), Chairman 

COMMITTEE ON LIBRARIES 

Walter E. Schlaretzki (Arts and Sciences), Chairman 

COMMITTEE ON UNIVERSITY PUBLICATIONS 

Mark Keeny (Agriculture), Chairman 

COMMITTEE ON INTERCOLLEGIATE COMPETITION 
Robert B. Beckmann (Engineering), Chairman 

COMMITTEE ON PROFESSIONAL ETHICS, ACADEMIC FREEDOM 
AND TENURE 

George Anastos (Arts and Sciences), Chairman 

COMMITTEE ON APPOINTMENTS, PROMOTIONS, AND SALARIES 

Stanley B. Jackson (Arts and Sciences), Chairman 

COMMITTEE ON FACULTY LIFE AND WELFARE 
John M. Brumbaugh (Law), Chairman 

COMMITTEE ON MEMBERSHIP AND REPRESENTATION 

Noel E. Foss (Pharmacy), Chairman 

COMMITTEE ON COUNSELING OF STUDENTS 
Mary K. Carl (Nursing), Chairman 

COMMITTEE ON THE FUTURE OF THE UNIVERSITY 
Homer Ulrich (Arts and Sciences), Chairman 



Xll 



Adjunct Committees of the General Committee of Student 
Life and Welfare 

STUDENT ACTIVITIES 

Gayle S. Smith (Arts and Sciences), Chairman 

FINANCIAL AIDS AND SELF-HELP 
A. B. Hamilton (Agriculture), Chairman 

STUDENT PUBLICATIONS AND COMMUNICATIONS 
George F. Batka (Arts and Sciences), Chairman 

RELIGIOUS LIFE 

Thomas Aylward (Arts and Sciences), Chairman 

STUDENT HEALTH AND SAFETY 

Ellen Harvey (Physical Education), Chairman 

STUDENT DISCIPLINE 

J. Allan Cook (Business and Public Administration), Chairman 

BALTIMORE CAMPUS, STUDENT AFFAIRS 
Calvin Gaver (Dentistry), Chairman 



jrii7 



THE SCHOOL 



The Summer School of the University of Maryland at College Park pro- 
vides the opportunity for year-round study and research. For this purpose, 
the University is offering an extensive and varied program of under- 
graduate and graduate courses, as well as lectures, special institutes and 
workshops for educators. More than 6,000 students from the 50 states 
and approximately 55 foreign countries are expected to attend the Uni- 
versity during the eight- week period, June 22 through August 14, within 
which are included eight-week and six-week courses, and workshops and 
institutes of varying length. 

Through its summer program, the University makes its resources available 
to students desiring a general education, and to those students interested 
in preparing for professional, scientific and technical areas for which it 
offers collegiate and graduate level work. 

The courses of the Summer School are the regular courses of the 
University; each college on the College Park campus is represented in the 
School's offerings. All courses are equivalent to those offered in the 
academic year in content, method and credit, and are taught by mem- 
bers of the regular faculty or visiting lecturers of outstanding ability. 
Many departments within the various colleges have increased their course 
offerings for the 1964 Summer School. 

The 1964 Summer School has been planned to: 

1. Provide students enrolled during the academic year an oppor- 
tunity to continue their studies during the summer. 

2. Enable students to accelerate their programs of study. 

3. Enable students to remove deficiencies. 

4. Provide educational opportunities to visiting students pursuing 
degrees at other institutions. 

5. Provide in-service education to teachers and school administrators. 

6. Provide a variety of enrichment experience opportunities in areas 
of specialization. 

RECREATIONAL, SOCIAL AND CULTURAL ACTIVITIES 

A Recreation and Social Activities Committee, working with a full-time 
Summer Director of Recreation, has planned a varied program of activities 
of interest to students attending the University during the summer session. 
University swimming pools will be open with scheduled hours each after- 
noon and evening. There will be Softball, tennis, and golf tournaments, 
a summer theater workshop, and a summer chorus in which students are 
invited to participate. 



Academic Information 

Planned activities will include round and square dancing, outdoor movies, 
Chapel vesper services, band concerts, watermelon feasts, guided tours of 
Washington, and other social functions. The Summer Recreation Director 
will be available to counsel with groups planning picnics or other events. 



ACADEMIC INFORMATION 

TERMS OF ADMISSION 

All Summer School students new to the University must be officially ad- 
mitted. This applies to all non-degree as well as degree candidates. 

UNDERGRADUATE AND SPECIAL STUDENTS 

A student seeking a bachelor's degree in any undergraduate college, who 
has not been previously admitted to the University, must file application 
with the Director of Admissions not later than the end of the first week in 
June, 1964. 

A student who already has a bachelor's degree and who either does not 
wish graduate credit or does not meet requirements for admission to the 
Graduate School may be admitted to the undergraduate college consistent 
with his major interests, as a Special Student. He should be admitted to the 
University through the Director of Admissions no later than the end of 
the first week in June, 1964. Credit so obtained through the College of 
Education is ordinarily accepted for renewal of teaching certificate. A 
Special Student may take upper division (100, but not 200 or 300 level) 
courses. 

GRADUATE STUDENTS 

Application for admission to the Graduate School, and all supporting aca- 
demic records, must be in the office of the Dean of the Graduate School 
by June 1, 1964. 

Transfer Credit: To another institution. The student who wishes to trans- 
fer credit to another institution should submit an application on which he 
writes 'For Transfer Only." Along with the application he should submit 
a letter from the graduate dean of the institution in which he is enrolled 
as a degree student, to the Dean of the Graduate School, University of 
Maryland, requesting permission to take a limited amount of work. 

Transfer Credit: To the University of Maryland. Credit not to exceed six 
semester hours for course work at other recognized institutions may be 
applied towards the master's degree, only when such course work has been 
taken after the student has been admitted to the University of Maryland 
Graduate School. Before taking course work for transfer the student must 
have the approval of his adviser, the head of his major department, and 



Academic Information 

the Dean of the Graduate School. Normally, approval may be given 
only for courses which are not offered by the University of Maryland 
during the period of the student's attendance. The request for transfer 
of credit shall be submitted to the Graduate Council for approval when the 
student applies for admission to candidacy. The candidate is subject to 
final examination by this institution in all work offered for the degree. 

Special Non-Degree Credit. The student who already has a master's 
degree and does not wish to pursue a doctoral program may submit an 
application marked "Non-Degree" and along with it, official transcript of 
all previous undergraduate and graduate study. If the student later desires 
to embark on a doctoral program, the credit earned in Special Non-Degree 
status may, at the discretion of the major adviser, be used in a doctoral 
program. 

Degree Credit. The student who wishes to pursue either a master's or 
doctoral program must submit, along with his application, official tran- 
scripts of all work taken in institutions of higher education. The appli- 
cant is subject to admission requirements of the Graduate School and of 
the department in which he hopes to pursue his graduate work. 

ACADEMIC CREDIT 

The semester hour is the unit of credit. During the summer session a 
course meeting five times a week for six weeks or four times a week for 
eight weeks, each requiring the normal amount of outside work, is given 
a weight of three semester hours. Each class period is 80 minutes in length. 

Students who are matriculated as candidates for degrees will be given credit 
toward the appropriate degree for satisfactory completion of courses. All 
courses offered in the Summer School are creditable toward the appropri- 
ate degree provided they are included in the student's program as planned 
with his adviser. 

All students will receive an official grade report specifying the amount and 
quality of work completed. 

MARKING SYSTEM 

The following symbols are used for marks: A, B, C, and D — passing; 
F — Failure; I — Incomplete. Mark "A" denotes superior scholarship; mark 
"B," good scholarship; mark "C," fair scholarship; and "D," passing 
scholarship. The mark of "I" (incomplete) is exceptional. Complete 
regulations governing marks are printed in University General and Aca- 
demic Regulations. 

MAXIMUM LOAD 

Undergraduates: 

Undergraduate stude ts may earn credit at the discretion of their 
respective advisers ir accordance with the following guide lines: 



Academic Information 

Students enrolled only in courses of 8-week duration may earn from 
8-10 credits. 

Students enrolled only in courses of 6-week duration may earn from 
6-8 credits. 

Students enrolled in combinations of 6 and 8-week courses may earn 
7-9 credits. 

Graduate: 

Students enrolled only in courses of 8-week duration may earn a 
maximum of 8 credits. 

Students enrolled only in courses of 6-week duration may earn a 
maximum of 6 credits. 

Students enrolled in combinations of 6 and 8-week courses may 
earn a maximum of 7 credits. 

SUMMER GRADUATE WORK 

Master's degrees are offered through the Graduate School as follows: 
Master of Arts, Master of Science, Master of Arts in American Civilization, 
Master of Education, Master of Business Administration, and Master of 
Music. 

Doctor's degrees offered through the Graduate School are as follows: 
Doctor of Philosophy and Doctor of Education. 

Graduate work in the Summer School may be counted as residence toward 
a master's degree or Doctor of Education degree. A full year of residence 
or the equivalent is the minimum requirement for each degree. 

The requirements for any of the above degrees may be obtained upon 
request from the Graduate School. 

Special regulations governing graduate work in Education and supplement- 
ing the statements contained in the Graduate School Announcements are 
available in duplicated form and may be obtained from the College of 
Education. Each graduate student in Education should have a copy. 
Students seeking the master's degree as a qualification for a certificate issued 
by the Maryland State Department of Education or any other certifying 
agency should consult the appropriate bulletin for specific requirements. 
Advisers will assist students in planning to meet such requirements. 

All students desiring graduate credit, whether for meeting degree require- 
ments, for transfer to another institution, or for any other purpose, must 
be regularly matriculated and registered in the Graduate School. 

CANDIDATES FOR DEGREES 

All students who expect to complete requirements for degrees during the 

4 



Academic Information 

summer session should make application for diplomas at the office of 
the Registrar during the first two weeks of the summer session. 

THE PROGRAM IN AMERICAN CIVILIZATION 

The University considers that it is important for every student to achieve 
an appreciative understanding of the country, its history and its culture. 
It has therefore established a comprehensive program in American civiliza- 
tion. This program is also designed to provide the student with a general 
educational background. 

All students receiving a baccalaureate degree from the University of Mary- 
land must (except as specific exceptions are noted in printed curricula) 
obtain 24 semester hours of credit in the lower division courses of the 
American Civilization Program. Although the courses in the Program 
are prescribed generally, some choice is permitted, especially for students 
who demonstrate in classification tests good previous preparation in one or 
more of the required subjects. 

The 24 semester hours in American civilization are as follows: 

1. English (12 hours, Eng. 1, 2 and 3, 4), American history (6 hours, H. 
5, 6), and American government (3 hours, G. & P. 1) are required sub- 
jects; however, students who qualify in one, two or all three of these areas 
by means of University administered tests will substitute certain elective 
courses. Through such testing a student may be released from 3 hours 
of English (9 hours would remain an absolute requirement), 3 hours of 
history (3 hours remaining as an absolute requirement), and 3 hours of 
American government. Students released from 3 hours of English will take 
Eng. 21 instead of Eng. 1 and 2. Those released from 3 hours in history 
will take one lower-division history course instead of H. 5 and 6. Students 
who have been exempted from courses in English, American history, or 
American government may not take such courses for credit. 

2. For the 3 additional hours of the 24 hours required the student elects 
one course from the following group (Elective Group I) : 

Econ. 37, Fundamentals of Economics (Not open to freshmen; stu- 
dents who may wish to take additional courses in economics should 
substitute Econ. 31 for Econ. 37) 

Phil. 1, Philosophy for Modern Man 
Psych. 1, Introduction to Psychology 
Soc. 1, Sociology of American Life 

3. Students who, on the basis of tests, have been released from 3, 6 or 9 
hours in otherwise required courses in English, American history or Amer- 
ican government (see 1. above), shall select the replacements for these 
courses from any or all of the following groups: (a) more advanced courses 
in the same department as the required courses in which the student is 
excused, or (b) Elective Group I (see 2. above) provided that the same 



General Information 

course may not be used as both a Group I and a Group II choice, or (c) 
Elective Group II. Group II consists of the following 3-hour courses. 

H. 42, Western Civilization; either H. 51 or 52, The Humanities; 
either Music 20, Survey of Music Literature or Art 22, History of 
American Art; and Soc. 5, Anthropology. 



GENERAL INFORMATION 

REGISTRATION 

All new students must obtain admission to the University from the Direc- 
tor of Admissions or the Dean of the Graduate School before registration. 
Every student planning to register for a course or courses must have been 
admitted to the University regardless of his status as a degree or non-degree 
student. Refer to page 3 for greater detail. 

Registration for undergraduate and graduate students will take place on 
Monday, June 22, from 8:00 a.m. to 3:00 p.m., in accordance with the 
Registration Schedule printed on page vii of this catalog. No student will 
be permitted into the Armory before the time listed in the Registration 
Schedule. 

Students may register in "late registration" at the Registrar's Office on 
June 23. After June 23, exceptional cases may be registered only after 
approval of the appropriate dean. The late registration fee, charged on 
and after June 23, is $10.00. 

REGISTRATION: COLLEGE OF EDUCATION ONLY 

All Education advisers will be located in the south basement wing of the 
Armory. Students will be admitted only through the south-west door of 
the Armory according to the alphabetical schedule posted on page vii 
of this catalog. Students then proceed to the room in which their re- 
spective advisers are located (nearby rooms in the Armory basement). 

Early Registration: Students must request special permission in writing 
from the Dean of the College of Education before Monday, June 22, 1964 
giving the reason for the request. Upon approval, a form will be issued 
to the student allowing him entrance to the Armory out of alphabetical 
order. 

No special permission will be given for reasons of unawareness about the 
schedule or because a student is riding with someone who registers earlier. 
In the latter case, all students riding together should plan to register at 
the latest hours scheduled for anyone in the group. 

Registration cards must be approved by both the student's adviser and 
the Dean of the College of Education. Graduate students must in addi- 



General Information 

tion receive the approval of the Dean of the Graduate School. Graduate 
students carrying the official Graduate School matriculation card may 
obtain the Graduate Dean's approval in the Armory. Graduate students 
not carrying the official graduate school matriculation card must report 
to the Graduate School office, Rooms Q 112-115, Business and Public 
Administration building, before proceeding to the upper floor of the 
Armory to complete registration. After approval, registrations are com- 
pleted on the first floor of the Armory where students secure section 
assignment, receive bills, pay fees, and submit all forms to the Registrar's 
representatives. UNTIL ALL COMPLETED FORMS ARE SUBMIT- 
TED TO THE REGISTRAR'S REPRESENTATIVES, REGISTRA- 
TION IS NEITHER COMPLETE NOR OFFICIAL. 

REGISTRATION FOR ALL COLLEGES 
EXCEPT COLLEGE OF EDUCATION 

Students in all colleges, except the College of Education, will begin reg- 
istration on June 23 by securing registration cards from the respective 
College offices. Registration cards must be approved by both the stu- 
dent's adviser and dean. Graduate students secure the approval of the 
Dean of the Graduate School. After approval, registrations are completed 
at the Armory where students secure section assignment, receive bills, pay 
fees, and submit all forms to the Registrar's representatives. UNTIL ALL 
COMPLETED FORMS ARE SUBMITTED TO THE REGISTRAR'S 
REPRESENTATIVES, REGISTRATION IS NEITHER COMPLETE 
NOR OFFICIAL. 

LENGTH OF CLASS PERIOD 

Classes during the 1964 summer session will meet on the following time 
schedule: 

8:00— 9:20 

9:30—10:50 

11:00—12:20 

12:30— 1:50 

2:00— 3:20 

3:30— 4:50 

Weekly Class Schedule 

6-week classes 

2-credit courses meet 4 days as indicated in the bulletin. 

3-credit courses meet daily. 

4-credit courses meet daily and include multiple periods for laboratory. 

8-week classes 

2-credit courses meet M.W.F. 
3-credit courses meet M.T.Th.F. 



General Information 

4-credit courses meet daily, plus laboratory time. 
5-credit courses meet daily, plus 2 additional periods to be arranged 
each week. 

DEFINITION OF RESIDENCE AND NON-RESIDENCE 

Students who are minors are considered to be resident students if at the 
time of their registration their parents have been domiciled in the State 
of Maryland for at least six months. 

The status of the residence of a student is determined at the time of his 
first registration in the University and may not thereafter be changed by 
him unless, in the case of a minor, his parents move to and become legal 
residents of Maryland by maintaining such residence for at least six months. 
However, the right of the minor student to change from a non-resident 
status to resident status must be established by him prior to the registra- 
tion period set for any semester or session. 

Adult students are considered to be residents if at the time of their regis- 
tration they have been domiciled in Maryland for at least six months, pro- 
vided such residence has not been acquired while attending any school 
or college in Maryland or elsewhere. Time spent on active duty in the 
armed services while stationed in Maryland will not be considered as 
satisfying the six-months period referred to above except in those cases 
in which the adult was domiciled in Maryland for at least six months 
prior to his entrance into the armed service and was not enrolled in any 
school during that period. 

The word "domicile" as used in this regulation shall mean the permanent 
place of abode. For the purpose of this rule only one domicile may be 
maintained. 

TUITION AND FEES 

Undergraduate Students 

General tuition fee, per credit hour $15.00 

Nonresidence fee 15.00 

Must be paid by all students who are not residents of 
Maryland. 
* Application fee (see explanation below) 10.00 



*The application fee for the undergraduate summer session applicant partially de- 
frays the cost of processing applications for admission to this division of the Uni- 
versity. If a new applicant enrolls for the term for which he applied, the fee is 
accepted in lieu of the matriculation fee. Applicants who have been previously 
enrolled with the University of Maryland at College Park or Baltimore, or at one 
of its off-campus centers are not required to pay the application fee since they have 
already paid the matriculation fee. 

8 



General Information 

Matriculation fee 10.00 

Payable only once, upon admission to the University. Every 
student must be matriculated. 

Infirmary fee 1.00 

Recreation fee 1.00 

Graduate Students 

General tuition fee, per credit hour $18.00 

Matriculation fee 10.00 

Payable only once, upon admission to the Graduate School. 
Recreation fee 1.00 

Required of all students registered in the Summer School. 
Infirmary fee (voluntary) 1.00 

The Infirmary services are available to graduate students 

who elect to pay at the time of registration the fee of $1.00 

for the summer session. 

Testing fee (new graduate students in Education only) 5.00 

There is no non-residence fee for graduate students. 

Miscellaneous Information 

Auditors pay the same fees as regular students. 

The graduation fee is $10.00 for bachelor's and master's degrees, and 
$50.00 for doctor's degrees. 

A fee of $5.00 is charged for each change in program after June 26. 
If such change involves entrance to a course, it must be approved by 
the instructor in charge of the course entered. Courses cannot be 
dropped after July 10. All changes must be approved by the appro- 
priate dean and filed in the Office of the Registrar. 

A special laboratory fee is charged for certain courses where such fee 
is noted in the course description. 

Laboratory courses in chemistry carry laboratory fees of $12.00 and 
$20.00; in addition the student is charged for any apparatus which 
cannot be returned to the stock room in perfect condition. Other 
laboratory fees are stated in connection with individual courses. 

Physical education fee charged each student registered for any physical 
activity course, $6.00. 

Late registration fee, $10.00. 

WITHDRAWAL AND REFUND OF FEES 

Any student compelled to leave the University at any time during the 
Summer School must secure the Application for Withdrawal form from the 
office of his dean and file it in the Office of the Registrar, bearing the 



General Information 

proper signatures. If this is not done, the student will not be entitled, as 
a matter of course, to a certificate of honorable dismissal, and will forfeit 
his right to any refunds to which he would otherwise be entitled. The date 
used in computing refunds is the date the Application for Withdrawal is 
tiled in the Office of the Registrar. 

In the case of a minor, official withdrawal will be permitted only with the 
written consent of the student's parent or guardian. 

With the exception of board charges, students withdrawing from the Uni- 
versity will receive a refund of all charges, except the matriculation fee, 
in accordance with the following schedule : 

Percentage 
Period From Date Instruction Begins Refundable 

One week or less 70% 

Between one and two weeks 50% 

Between two and three weeks 20% 

After three weeks 

No refunds of fixed charges, lodging, tuition, laboratory fees, etc., are 
allowed when courses are dropped, unless the student withdraws from the 
University. 

LIVING ACCOMMODATIONS AND MEALS 

Housing accommodations are available at the following cost, on the basis 
indicated: 

Regular Residence Halls Double Occupancy Single Occupancy 

Weekly rate $ 9.00 $ 13.00 

Six weeks session 54.00 78.00 

Eight weeks session 72.00 104.00 

GENERAL INFORMATION 

Since most of the rooms in the residence halls are double rooms, there 
is no guarantee that a request for a single room can be granted. No room 
deposit is required for the summer session; however, the full applicable 
room charge is payable at registration. No refunds of room charges will 
be made after the third week of the summer session. All students are held 
responsible for compliance with University regulations. The University 
reserves the right to inspect residence hall rooms when deemed necessary 
by the staff. 

The typical student room is furnished with a bed, a chest of drawers, a 
desk, and chair. Students should supply themselves with other essential 
items such as a study lamp, wastebasket, and ashtrays. Students must 
provide themselves with linens and a pillow, either from home or from the 
commercial linen service which operates on the University campus. This 

10 



General Information 

company rents sheets, pillow cases, towels, blankets, and pillows for a 
nominal fee. Arrangements for linen service can be made after your 
arrival. 

THE UNIVERSITY RESIDENCE HALLS WILL OPEN FOR OCCU- 
PANCY AT 2:00 P.M. SUNDAY, JUNE 21, AND WILL CLOSE AT 
NOON ON SATURDAY, AUGUST 15. 

Early application for a reservation is advisable, as only those who have 
made reservations can be assured that rooms are available for occupancy 
upon their arrival. Rooms will not be held later than noon on Tuesday, 
June 23. If you desire to make application for campus residence, please 
complete, sign, and return the Room Application Card found in this 
Bulletin. Indicate your precise classification, the exact dates and number 
of weeks of attendance, type of room desired, and whether or not you 
desire board on a prepaid basis. You will be notified by an assignment 
letter after June 1 of the time and place to report to claim your room. 

You will be given your mailing address and telephone number at the time 
you receive your room assignment. Your mail and telephone calls cannot 
be delivered to you without this specific information. 

Campus housing is not available for faculty members during the summer 
session. Listings of off-campus rooms, apartments, and houses are avail- 
able in the University Housing Office, North Administration Building. 
Students occupying off-campus housing will maintain the same standards 
as required of those in the University residence halls and fraternity houses. 
Board is available to all students under the following options: 

(a) Cafeteria style with cash payment for each individual meal. 

(b) On a prepaid basis at the following rates payable at time of regis- 
tration: 

$72.00 for the six weeks session. 
$96.00 for the eight weeks session. 

No refunds will be made on board to those students who elect the prepaid 
basis except in the case of withdrawal from the University or residence 
halls, in which event refund will be made on a pro-rata weekly basis. 

STUDENT HEALTH 

The University Infirmary, located on the campus near the Student Union 
provides medical service for the undergraduate students in the summer 
session, and also for those graduate students who elect to pay the $1.00 
Health Service fee. Students who are ill should report promptly to the 
University Infirmary in person. Serious emergencies may be reported by 
phone to Ext. 7666 or 7667. Doctor's Office hours are: Week days, 9:00 
a.m. to 11:00 a.m.; week ends, 10:00 a.m. to 11:00 a.m. A nurse is on 
duty 24 hours each day. 

// 



General Information 

PARKING OF AUTOMOBILES 

For use of students, staff members, and employees, several parking lots are 
provided. Students may park in lot 1, 3, 6 and 7. All other lots are reserved 
for faculty and staff members. The University rules forbid the parking 
of cars on any campus road. These rules are enforced by campus police. 

LIBRARY FACILITIES 

The new $2.5 million library building located in a prominent position at 
the west end of the main quadrangle was opened for service in January, 
1958. The almost 200,000 square feet of floor space allow for greatly 
improved library service and accommodations for study. Two large read- 
ing rooms are air-conditioned for student convenience. 

The building will ultimately house 1,000,000 volumes; it seats 2,000 
readers. The 200 carrels and individual studies provide excellent facilities 
for graduate students and faculty. 

Library facilities outside the main building include the Engineering and 
Physical Sciences Library located in the Mathematics Building and the 
Chemistry Library. 

The University System of Libraries has in its collection 600,000 volumes, 
in addition to thousands of government publications and uncatalogued 
materials. Over 7,000 periodicals and 200 newspapers are received. The 
libraries are able to supplement their services to graduate students and 
faculty by borrowing material from other Ubraries through interlibrary 
loan. 

UNIVERSITY BOOKSTORE 

For the convenience of students, the University maintains a University 
Bookstore, located in the Student Union Building, where students may 
obtain at reasonable prices textbooks, stationery, classroom materials and 
equipment. The Bookstore operates on a cash basis. 

FOR ADDITIONAL INFORMATION 

Detailed information concerning the American Civilization Program, fees 
and expenses, scholarships and awards, student life, and other material of 
a general nature, may be found in the University publication titled An 
Adventure in Learning. This publication may be obtained on request 
from the Catalog Mailing Room, North Administration Building, Uni- 
versity of Maryland at College Park. A detailed explanation of the regula- 
tion of student and academic life, may be found in the University publica- 
tion titled, University General and Academic Regulations. This is mailed 
in September and February of each year to all new undergraduate students. 
Requests for course catalogs for the individual schools and colleges should 
be directed to the deans of these respective units, addressed to: 

12 



Lectures, Institutes, Workshops 



COLLEGES LOCATED AT COLLEGE PARK: 

Dean 

(College in which you are interested) 
The University of Maryland 
College Park, Maryland 

PROFESSIONAL SCHOOLS LOCATED AT BALTIMORE: 

Dean 

(School in which you are interested) 
The University of Maryland 
Lombard and Greene Streets 
Baltimore 1, Maryland 



LECTURES, INSTITUTES AND WORKSHOPS 

As an integral part of its summer program, the University offers a Sum- 
mer Lecture Series; institutes supported by the National Science Founda- 
tion, National Defense Education Act, and other granting organizations; 
and specialized educational activities through workshops. Opportunities 
for participating and specific information about these events are provided 
below. 



SUMMER LECTURE SERIES 

The 1964 Summer School will sponsor a series of lectures during the 
8-week period from June 22- August 14. These lectures are planned by a 
University-wide committee which selects outstanding lecturers and cur- 
rent topics of interest to all Summer School students regardless of college 
or department. 

All summer school students, faculty members, and other interested persons 
are cordially invited to attend. No admission charge will be made. For 
further information contact the Summer School office on the College 
Park campus. 



INSTITUTE FOR TEACHERS OF MATHEMATICS IN JUNIOR 
HIGH SCHOOL 

The Department of Mathematics of the College of Arts and Sciences with 
the financial support of the National Science Foundation is offering a six- 
week summer institute for junior high school teachers of mathematics 
to assist the teachers in improving the quality of teaching of mathematics. 

13 



N.S.F. AND N.D.E.A. Institutes 

The institute should also give the teachers a better understanding of cur- 
rent curricular developments and make it possible for them to interpret 
these developments for junior high school programs. 

Participants of the institute who are graduate students in the College of 
Education may obtain graduate credit for the six hours of course work 
completed in connection with the Institute. 

Mathematics 182 — Introduction to Algebra, (3) and Mathematics 189 — 
Summer Institute for Teachers of Science and Mathematics are required 
of each participant. For more information on the courses see the listings 
under the Department of Mathematics. In addition there will be a demon- 
stration class in which experimental material for grades seven and/or eight 
will be taught. A seminar will provide for discussion of the materials in 
the demonstration class and associated teaching problems. 

Financial assistance in the form of a National Science Foundation grant 
will be available to about 40 participants at the standard N.S.F. rate of 
$75 per week plus $15 per week for each dependent (to a maximum of 
four). This stipend will be tax free to students enrolled for credit toward 
a degree. A travel allowance of 4 cents per mile for a single round trip 
from the participant's home to the institute (to a maximum of $80) will 
also be paid. All tuition and fee charges will be paid by the N.S.F. grant. 
Participants are expected to have had at least two years' experience teach- 
ing mathematics at the junior high school level and to have been appointed 
to a junior high school position for 1964-65. 

Inquiries should be addressed to: Professor R. A. Good, Director, Summer 
Institute for Mathematics Teachers, Department of Mathematics, Uni- 
versity of Maryland, College Park, Maryland. 



INSTITUTE IN MATHEMATICS FOR ELEMENTARY SCHOOL 
TEACHERS, PRINCIPALS AND SUPERVISORS 

A National Science Foundation grant has made it possible for the Mathe- 
matics Department of the College of Arts and Sciences to offer a six weeks 
summer institute in mathematics for elementary school personnel. This 
institute should provide a participant with the background necessary to 
understand and evaluate the current experimental programs in elementary 
mathematics being used in many communities over the country. 

Two courses in mathematics will be required of each participant: Mathe- 
matics 181 — Introduction to Number Theory (3), and Mathematics 183 — 
Introduction to Geometry (3). Each lecture will be followed by a period 
of supervised study. A demonstration class will be offered, using experi- 
mental materials written for the fourth grade. Visiting lecturers will dis- 
cuss with the participants techniques and procedures for meeting the needs 
of mathematics teaching in the elementary grades. 

14 



N.S.F. AND, N.D.E.A. Institutes 

Financial assistance in the form of a National Science Foundation grant 
will be available to about 35 participants at the standard N.S.F. rate 
of $75.00 per week plus $15 per week for each dependent (to a maximum 
of four). A travel allowance of 4 cents per mile for a single round trip 
from the participant's home to the institute will also be paid. All tuition 
and fee charges will be paid by the N.S.F. grant. Participants who are 
graduate students in the College of Education may obtain graduate credit 
for the six hours of course work completed with the institute. 

Inquiries should be addressed to: Dr. Stanley Jackson, Director, 
Summer Institute in Mathematics for Elementary School Personnel, Col- 
lege of Education, Skinner Building, University of Maryland, College 
Park, Maryland. 

INSTITUTE IN COUNSELING AND GUIDANCE TRAINING 

The National Defense Education Act provides for summer institutes in 
Counseling and Guidance Training. The institute this summer is an ad- 
vanced counseling practicum, with a didactic correlate. Enrollees will 
counsel intellectually able high school students under the supervision of 
counseling psychologists, and the didactic content will be on such topics 
as motivation of able students, testing, developmental psychology and 
counseling theory. Institute activities are for the full day. 

Enrollees will be secondary school counselors from the public and private 
non-profit secondary schools of Maryland and other states.* Tuition and 
other fees are exempted. Enrollees from public schools will receive a $75 
weekly stipend with a $15 allotment for each dependent. Nomination of 
Maryland public school counselors will be through the superintendents' 
offices of the local systems. Secondary school counselors in Maryland 
private, non-profit schools, and in non-Maryland schools should apply to 
Dr. Margaret M. Bott, University CounseUng Center, if interested in more 
information. 

INSTITUTE FOR HIGH SCHOOL TEACHERS OF BIOLOGY 

The Colleges of Agriculture, Arts and Sciences, and Education, and the 
National Science Foundation are cooperating to offer a program of courses 
designed for high school teachers of biology. These courses combine in 
various ways to enable high school teachers to improve their knowledge 
of the biological sciences and related material during an eight-week 
institute. Credit earned in the Summer Institute in Science for High 
School Teachers of Biology and in similar related science courses may 
accumulate up to one-half of the credit hours requirement for the Master 
of Education degree. 



*0nly holders of a master's degree will be eligible for the the 1964 Summer Institute. 

15 



Institute in Modern Health Education 

A National Science Foundation grant makes it possible for the 1964 
summer institute to provide financial assistance for about 40 participants 
at the standard N.S.F. rate of $75 per week plus $15 per week for each 
dependent (to a maximum of four). A travel allowance of 4 cents per mile 
for a single round trip from the participant's home to the institute will also 
be paid (maximum $80). All tuition and fee charges will be paid by the 
N.S.F. grant. 

The summer institute covers the general fields of the biological sciences 
and the physical sciences. Basic to the program will be a required seminar 
covering recent developments in the biological sciences. This two credit 
seminar is Hsted in the Summer School Bulletin as Botany 199 and will 
meet one day a week during the regular eight-week summer session. 

The institute program will include the following courses which are 
described in detail in this Bulletin under the headings of the respective 
departments : 

Biological Sciences: 

Bot. 151-S, Bot. 153, Bot. 199, Ent. S-121, Zool. 102. 

Physical Sciences: 

Chem. Ill, Phys. 130, 131, Phys. 150. 

A maximum of 8 credit hours may be taken. Stipends will be available only 
to those participants scheduling at least 7 hours in the above courses, or in 
other courses specifically approved by the Director of the Institute. 

Inquiries should be sent to: Dr. J. David Lockard, Director of the N.S.F. 
Summer Science Institute, Department of Botany, University of Maryland, 
College Park, Maryland. 

INSTITUTE IN MODERN HEALTH EDUCATION 

In cooperation with the U.S. Public Health Service, the University of 
Maryland will provide an institute to improve school health education 
by helping to bring up to date the knowledge of advancements in health 
sciences. The program will be primarily concerned with the health and 
health problems of children and youth. It will be of special interest to 
school, public health and health agency personnel who are responsible full 
or part time for health education in schools. 

Speakers and discussion leaders will be specialists from the University, 
the National Institutes of Health, and other health centers. Subjects will 
range from recent developments in body maintenance and fitness, mental 
health and mental illness, environmental health hazards, and health 
aspects of population problems and social change. Sessions will be held at 
the College Park Campus and at the National Institutes of Health in 
Bethesda, Maryland. 

Six-week participation, 6 hours credit. First or second three week periods 
participation, 3 hours credit. The institute will meet daily from 9-12, 

16 



Workshops 

with optional field trips and consultation periods provided in the afternoon. 
Limited to 60 participants. 



WORKSHOP ON TEACHING CONSERVATION OF NATURAL 
RESOURCES 

The College of Agriculture and the Conservation Education Division of the 
Natural Resources Institute cooperate in offering this workshop devoted 
to the study of the State's basic wealth, its natural resources. Basic source 
information will be available, specimens will be collected, pictures will 
be taken in different resource regions, teaching aids will be evaluated, and 
effective methods of teaching conservation and natural resources will be 
studied. The workshop offers six semester hours of graduate credit. 

State and federal workers in conservation of natural resources will be used 
extensively as consultants in their specialties. Field trips will be taken to 
all the natural regions of the State so that students will be able to observe 
the resources problems and current practices. Adequate opportunity will 
be provided for students to analyze problems as a group and develop 
logical solutions. 

The workshop will be held on the College Park campus of the University 
June 22 to July 31, 1964. Registration is limited to 30 persons. 



WORKSHOP ON ECONOMIC EDUCATION 

The Workshop on Economic Education is sponsored by the Council on 
Economic Education in Maryland and by six colleges and universities in 
Maryland giving graduate study in education — Goucher College, Johns 
Hopkins University, Loyola College, Towson State College, the Uni- 
versity of Maryland, and Western Maryland College. The Maryland State 
Department of Education, the Baltimore Board of School Commissioners 
and the Department of Catholic Education cooperate in the program. 
At the University of Maryland the College of Education will offer the 
Workshop with the cooperation of the Department of Economics. 

Members of the workshop are mostly secondary school teachers in Mary- 
land, but some elementary teachers and some out-of-state participants 
may be admitted. The purpose of the workshop is to give teachers a better 
understanding of the basic principles of economics and of the operation 
of the American economic system. Activities of the workshop are de- 
signed to assist teachers to develop ways of demonstrating to their pupils 
how economic principles are important for citizenship. 

Economists and curriculum experts make up the staff of the workshop. 
Visiting speakers and consultants will also participate. Different points 

17 



Workshops 

of view are presented by representatives of business, agriculture, and labor, 
and there will be open discussion on all problems presented. 

The workshop involves three weeks of intensive study extending from July 
20 to August 7. Sessions will be scheduled for a minimum of six hours 
per day, Monday through Friday. 

Participants in the workshop may receive three semester hours of credit 
in Education. Those desiring credit from the University of Maryland 
should register in Ed. 189-9, Workshops, Clinics and Institutes: Economic 
Education. If graduate credit is desired, application for admission must be 
made to the Graduate School before June 1. Other applications must 
also be in the Admissions Office before June 1. 

A limited number of tuition scholarships will be granted. Interested per- 
sons should make application on a special form which will be available 
upon request. Each applicant must be recommended by his superintendent 
or principal. Early application is encouraged to assure a place in the 
workshop. 

Correspondence concerning application or information about the work- 
shop should be addressed to Dr. Elinor Pancoast, Field Director, Council 
for Economic Education in Maryland, Towson State College, Towson, Md. 

EDUCATION IN FAMILY FINANCE WORKSHOP 

The Colleges of Education, Business and Public Administration, and Home 
Economics, in cooperation with the National Committee for Education in 
Family Finance, offer a four-week, four-credit workshop June 22 through 
July 17. The workshop program includes learning experiences in subject 
matter, curriculum construction, and educational techniques. During the 
six hour day participants will have opportunity to develop broad under- 
standings of concepts and facts relating to family financial security in the 
areas of budgeting and financial planning, savings and investments, bank- 
ing services, insurance, home ownership, taxation, wills and estates, social 
security and pension plans, and consumer credit. The workshop will also 
provide the opportunity to develop teaching materials and curriculum 
guides for use in improving and expanding school programs in family 
finance education. 

Participants will register for credit through course Ed. 189-1, Workshops, 
Clinics, and Institutes: Education in Family Finance. Participants must 
be admitted to either the College of Education or the Graduate School. If 
graduate credit is desired, admission to the Graduate School must be com- 
pleted before June 1. 

Scholarships covering tuition will be granted to qualified applicants. Inter- 
ested persons should make apphcation for scholarship on a special form 
which will be available upon request. Each scholarship recipient must be 
recommended to the workshop by his superintendent or principal. All 

18 



Workshops 

correspondence concerning the workshop should be addressed to C. Ray- 
mond Anderson, Director, Family Finance Workshop, College of Educa- 
tion, University of Maryland, College Park, Maryland. 

WORKSHOP IN HUMAN DEVELOPMENT 

The Institute for Child Study, College of Education, offers a six-week 
human development workshop each summer providing opportunities for 

(1) study and synthesis of scientific knowledge about human behavior; 

(2) experience in the analysis of case records; (3) preparation of study 
group leaders for in-service child and youth study programs; (4) planning 
in-service child and youth study programs for teachers or other human 
relations workers; (5) planning preservice teacher education courses and 
laboratory experiences for prospective teachers; (6) examination of impU- 
cations of scientific knowledge about human development and behavior 
for school organization, curriculum development, guidance services, club 
leadership, and other programs and procedures designed to foster mental 
health and optimal development of children, youth, and adults. 

The workshop is designed for teachers and administrators who have been 
actively engaged in the Child and Youth Study Program sponsored by the 
Institute, for persons who are interested in participating in such a program, 
and for persons in other fields where human relations are a vital factor. 

This workshop will extend from June 22 to July 31. Workshop lectures, 
laboratory groups and seminars will be scheduled between 8:00 a.m. and 
12:00 p.m. Special lectures, interest groups and conferences are scheduled 
from 1:30 to 3:00 p.m. 

Inquiries concerning this and other workshops in human development 
should be addressed to Director of Summer Workshops, Institute for Child 
Study, University of Maryland, College Park, Maryland. 

CHILD STUDY LEADERS WORKSHOP 

For leaders and prospective leaders of child and youth study groups who 
cannot attend the full six weeks workshop, a two-week workshop will be 
held on the University campus from June 22 to July 3. Each day's activi- 
ties will include a lecture-discussion period centering around major sci- 
entific concepts explaining growth, development, and behavior; laboratory 
periods for analyzing case record material at the first, second, or third 
year level of the program; reading and special interest periods. (Participants 
will choose the year level of the group they expect to lead). Two hours' 
credit can be earned for full time participation in one of these workshops. 

WORKSHOP ON APPLICATIONS OF HUMAN DEVELOPMENT 
PRINCIPLES IN CLASSROOMS 

For people who have had three or more years of child study experience 
either in workshops or in groups during the school year, a 2 credit work- 

19 



Workshops 

shop will be held at the University from July 6 to July 17. Classroom 
practices will be examined in the light of human development principles, 
and procedures will be studied for possible beyond-third-year action re- 
search projects during the school year. Opportunities will be offered also 
to superintendents, supervisors, and principals who are interested in ex- 
ploring the implications of human development principles for school op- 
eration. 

WORKSHOPS ON HUMAN DEVELOPMENT AND 
RELIGIOUS EDUCATION 

Two workshops in human development, each for 2 credit hours, for per- 
sons in the field of religious education will be held on the University 
campus from July 20 to July 31. These workshops will be entirely non- 
denominational and any person responsibly concerned with religious edu- 
cation can appropriately enroll regardless of his faith. 

A workshop for persons without prior workshop experience will examide 
scientific knowledge about human development, learning, behavior and 
adjustment, and will consider the implications of this knowledge for re- 
ligious education practice in vacation, weekday, and Sunday schools op- 
erated by church groups. 

Advanced workshops for persons who have had a previous workshop in 
Human Development and Religious Education will provide advanced ex- 
periences with concepts and analyses. 

WORKSHOP ON ACTION RESEARCH IN HUMAN 
DEVELOPMENT EDUCATION 

A workshop for teachers and other school personnel who are interested 
in learning more about action research or in initiating action research 
projects in their own schools. This 2 credit workshop will be held at the 
University from August 3 to August 14. The role of action research in 
the solution of educational problems will be emphasized. Participants will 
have the opportunity to learn about and to develop designs and instru- 
ments for carrying out action research in their own schools and classrooms. 
Preference in enrollment will be given to persons coming as teams for the 
purpose of developing an action research design for implementation in 
their own school or school system. 

The daily schedules of all two weeks workshops will be similar to those 
of the six weeks workshop. Only full time participants can be accepted. 
These two-week workshops may be taken for either graduate or under- 
graduate credit. 

WORKSHOP ON HUMAN RELATIONS IN 
EDUCATIONAL ADMINISTRATION 

This workshop is concerned with the development of leadership teams 
capable of providing in-service programs in human relations in local school 

20 



Workshops 

systems. In addition to basic theory, the workshop will center on the 
practice and acquisition of specific human relations skills. 

Preference in enrollment will be given to teams representing Maryland 
school systems which have participated in the workshop in the past, and 
to teams of four to six persons designated by other Maryland school sys- 
tems. 

Enrollment in the workshop will be limited. Applications for team par- 
ticipation from local school systems will be processed in the order received. 
If more than one application is received at the same time, the director 
of the workshop will make the final decision. 

The workshop will meet daily from 9:00 a.m. to 3:00 p.m., June 22 
through July 3 1 . A student may earn six semester hours of graduate credit. 

WORKSHOP IN INSTRUCTIONAL MATERIALS 

The Workshop in Instructional Materials will be offered for school li- 
brarians at all levels, school administrators, and classroom teachers in 
grades kindergarten to twelve, for three weeks, June 22 to July 10. It 
is designed to give librarians, teachers, and other school personnel an op- 
portunity to work together on problems in the selection, organization and 
utilization of instructional materials in school programs. Consideration 
will be given to materials of all types, including: books, films, filmstrips, 
records, free and inexpensive materials. All grade levels and subject areas 
will be included. A student may earn three hours of graduate or under- 
graduate credit in Education or Library Science. 

Further information may be obtained by writing to: Dale W. Brown, 
456 McKeldin Library, University of Maryland, College Park, Maryland. 

WORKSHOP IN MUSIC 

Through the cooperation of the Department of Music, the College of 
Education, and University College, a workshop in music will be offered 
during the 1964 summer session. The regular procedures for admission 
to the University, listed elsewhere in this bulletin, apply also to the work- 
shop. 

The workshop, with its Band section directed by Clarence Sawhill, is 
offered during the period June 22-July 10. Participants will register for 
Mus. Ed. 155, Organization and Techniques for Instrumental Class In- 
struction, 3 credits, and will meet daily in afternoon sessions. The work- 
shop will include lectures and demonstrations of all phases of instru- 
mental teaching. Daily^ laboratory sessions will be held in connection with 
rehearsals of two bands composed of selected high school students. 

In addition, there will be an opportunity to observe a selected high school 
chorus (in residence June 29-July 3), conducted by a nationally known 

21 



Workshops 

choral director. The rehearsals of the chorus will also be open to all 
students enrolled in other Music or Music Education courses during the 
summer sessions. The chorus and the senior high band will give a joint 
concert on July 3. 

Copies of a brochure containing detailed information about the workshop 
may be obtained by addressing the Department of Music. See page 8 
for the applicable fees including registration, dormitory room, and sup- 
plementary fee. 

WORKSHOP IN PHYSICAL EDUCATION— PE 189 

The workshop offers professional assistance to teachers of physical edu- 
cation. A realistic foundation for physical education will be developed 
and related to modern programs. Individual and group problems will be 
given special consideration. 

This workshop will meet from 8:30 a.m. to 12:00 noon and 1 : 00-3: 00 p.m. 
daily for three weeks, June 22 to July 10. Six (6) credits, either graduate 
or undergraduate, are offered. In either case, the credits are counted 
as "content" for certification in Maryland. 

WORKSHOP FOR TEACHERS OF SECONDARY 
SCHOOL ENGLISH 

The College of Education, in cooperation with the departments of English, 
Journalism, and Speech, the Maryland State Department of Education, 
and the National Council of Teachers of English will sponsor a workshop 
for teachers of secondary school English. 

The emphasis will be upon the concept of integration in the teaching of 
literature, composition, language, journalism, and speech through deeper in- 
sight into the humanities, through better acquaintance with the newer 
media of instruction, and through the development of new techniques and 
materials of instruction. 

The workshop will be held from June 22 to July 10, from 10:00 a.m. to 
3:30 p.m., Monday through Friday. Three (3) hours of credit may be 
earned. All workshop participants must be admitted to the University 
as special students or to the Graduate School as graduate students before 
June 1 . Enrollment will be limited and preference will be given to teach- 
ers with two years or more of secondary school experience. Registration 
will be June 22. 

All correspondence concerning application or information should be ad- 
dressed to Miss Marie D. Bryan, College of Education. 



22 



Workshops 

WORKSHOPS IN SPECIAL EDUCATION 

THE EDUCATION OF CHILDREN WITH LEARNING 
IMPAIRMENTS 

This workshop will consider the theoretical background and the methods, 
curricula and materials employed in the approach to the various learning 
problems of children. 

Opportunities for observation, participation and consultation in program 
planning, curriculum organization, and the use of methods and materials 
will be provided according to the primary learning problems involved: 
Mentally Handicapped (Educable), Mentally Deficient (Trainable), Pre- 
School Mentally Retarded, Perceptual Learning Problems, Disturbances 
in Emotional Development, and Motor Handicapped. Selected consultants 
will be utilized. 

The workshop will meet off-campus daily from 9:00 a.m.-3:00 p.m., 
June 22 to July 17. Four units of undergraduate or graduate credit may 
be earned. 

Students planning to attend the Workshop should request the Special 
Education Summer Session Brochure for program details from Dr. Jean 
Hebeler, Program of Special Education, University of Maryland, Col- 
lege Park, Maryland, 

TELEVISION WORKSHOP 

Each summer the Department of Speech offers a television workshop 
(Speech 149 — 3 hours, see listing under Speech and Dramatic Art) which 
is primarily designed for the classroom teacher. 

The workshop provides an opportunity to ( 1 ) learn the fundamental prin- 
ciples of instructional television, (2) to develop techniques of presentation, 
(3) to further develop professional skill and competence. 

The air-conditioned studios in Woods Hall contain the latest in profes- 
sional broadcast-type equipment. 

Enrollment is limited. Inquiries may be sent to Professor George F. Batka, 
Director, Radio and Television, Department of Speech, University of Mary- 
land, College Park, Maryland. 

WORKSHOP IN PHYSICAL ACTIVITY IN RECREATION 
PROGRAMS FOR THE RETARDED 

This is a cooperative workshop, with Recreation, Special Education, and 
the Joseph P. Kennedy, Jr., Foundation, collaborating. It will feature 
an exploration of the problems involved in programming, staffing, and 
skills instruction in the special recreation program for the mentally re- 
tarded child. Specific emphasis is placed upon training the prospective 

23 



Workshops 

teacher and recreation leader of the mentally retarded in the methods 
and techniques of teaching recreational skills to the retarded. Valuable 
laboratory experiences involving working with the retarded in a Day 
Camp setting will provide students with practical problems in special 
techniques for the retarded child. 

The workshop will meet daily, Monday to Friday, 9:00 a.m. to 3:00 p.m., 
June 8 through July 3. Amount of time spent in laboratory sessions will 
determine credit which can be obtained. Students must attend the com- 
plete morning session; full credit may be received only through comple- 
tion of the entire daily program. 

TYPEWRITING DEMONSTRATION FOR BUSINESS 
EDUCATION TEACHERS 

The College of Education offers the business teacher registered during the 
summer session an opportunity to observe pupils at work in a typewriting 
class. These observations will aid the classroom teacher in: (1) designing 
purposeful classroom activities for developing basic typewriting skills, (2) 
planning with the pupil the organization of an effective set of "work" 
habits, (3) analyzing through case studies the methods of deaUng with 
the various aspects of individual pupil progress, (4) applying the principles 
of the psychology of skills to the teaching of typewriting, and (5) develop- 
ing improved methods for course construction, selection of instructional 
materials, and measuring pupil achievement. 



24 



COURSE OFFERINGS 



An "S" before a course number denotes that the course is offered in Sum- 
mer School only. An "S" after a course number indicates a regular course 
modified for offering during the summer session. A more complete course 
description may be found in the respective College catalogues. 

The University may find it necessary to cancel courses when warranted, 
due to low enrollment. In general, freshman and sophomore courses will 
not be maintained for classes smaller than 20. Minimum enrollments for 
upper level undegraduate courses and graduate courses will be 15 and 
10 respectively. 



AGRICULTURE 

AGRICULTURAL ECONOMICS 
A.E. 198. Special Problems. (1-2) (2 cr. max.) 

Arranged. Concentrated reading and study in some phase or problem in Agri- 
cultural Economics. Not for graduate credit. (Staff.) 

Farm Business Analysis. June 22-25 (Stevens) Agricultural Policy. Aug. 3-7. 

(Marshall.) 

A.E. 301, Special Problems in Agricultural Economics. (1-2) 

(4 cr. max.) 

Arranged. Intensive study and analysis of specific problems in the field of 
Agricultural Economics, which will provide information in depth in areas of 
special interest to the student. (Staff.) 

A.E. 399. Research. (6 cr. M.S., additional 12 cr. Ph.D.) 

Arranged. Advanced research in Agricultural Economics. Credit according 
to work accomplished. (Staff.) 

AGRICULTURAL ENGINEERING 

Agr. Engr. 198. Special Problems in Farm Mechanics. (1-3) 

Arranged. Prerequisite, approval of department. Not acceptable for majors in 
agricultural engineering. Problems assigned in proportion to amount of credit. 

(Gienger.) 

Agr. Engr. 301. Special Problems in Agricultural 
Engineering. (1-6) 

Arranged. Work assigned in proportion to amount of credit. (Staff.) 

Agr. Engr. 399. Research. (1-6) 

Arranged. Credit according to work accomplished. (Staff.) 

25 



Agricultural and Extension Education 

AGRICULTURAL AND EXTENSION EDUCATION 

R.Ed. 170, 171. Conservation of Natural Resources. (3, 3) 

Six weeks, June 22-July 31. Arranged; E-103. Fee, $35.00. Designed primarily 
for teachers. Study of State's natural resources — soil, water, fisheries, wildlife, 
forests and minerals — and natural resource problems and practices. Extensive 
field study. First course concentrates on subject matter, second includes meth- 
ods of teaching conservation. Courses taken concurrently in summer session. 

(Erickson.) 

R.Ed. 180, 181. Critique in Rural Education. (1, 1) 

Arranged. Prerequisite, approval of staff. Current problems and trends in rural 
education. (Staff.) 

R.Ed. 198. Special Problems in Agricultural Education. (1-3) 

Arranged. Prerequisite, approval of staff. Credit in accordance with amount 
of work planned. A course designed for advanced undergraduates for problems 
in teaching vocational agriculture. (Staff.) 

R.Ed. 207, 208. Problems in Rural Education. (2, 2) 

July 6-31. Consideration of current problems and topics in rural education. 

(Addison, Cardozier.) 

R.Ed. 301. Field Problems in Rural Education. (1-3) 

Arranged. Prerequisite, six semester hours of graduate study. Problems accepted 
depend upon the character of the work of the student and the facilities available 
for study. Periodic conferences required. Final report must follow accepted 
pattern for field investigations. (Staff.) 

R.Ed. 399. Research. (1-6) 

Arranged. Credit according to work accomplished. (Staff.) 

AGRONOMY 

Agron. 198. Special Problems in Agronomy. (1) 

For advanced undergraduates only. Prerequisite, Agron. 10, 107, 108 or permis- 
sion of instructor. A detailed study, including a written report of an important 
problem in agronomy. (Staff.) 

Agron. 208. Research Methods. (2) 

Prerequisite, permission of staff. Development of research viewpoint by detailed 
study and report on crop research of the Maryland Experiment Station or 
review of literature on specific phases of a problem. (Staff.) 

Agron. 399. Research in Agronomy. 

Arranged. Credit according to work accomplished. (Staff.) 



26 



Botany 



ANIMAL SCIENCE 



An.Sc. 198. Special Problems IN Animal Science. (1-2) (4 cr. max.) 

Arranged. Prerequisite, approval of staff. A course assigned in proportion to 
amount of credit. A course designed for advanced undergraduates in which 
specific problems relating to animal science will be assigned. Work assigned 
in proportion to amount of credit. (Staff.) 

An.Sc. 301. Special Problems in Animal Science. (1-2) (4 cr. max.) 

Arranged. Prerequisite, approval of staff. Problems will be assigned which 
relate specifically to the character of work the student is pursuing. Work as- 
signed in proportion to amount of credit. (Staflf.) 

An.Sc. 399. Research. (1-8) 

Arranged. Students will be required to pursue original research in some phase 
of animal science, carrying the same to completion, and report the results in 
the form of a thesis. Work assigned in proportion to amount of credit. 

ASTRONOMY 

(See PHYSICS and ASTRONOMY) 

BOTANY 

BoT. 1. General Botany. (4) 

June 22-Aug. 14. Lectures M.T.Th.F., 8-8:50 a.m.; A-1. Laboratory periods. 
Sec. 1— M.T.Th.F., 9-10:50; Sec. 2—11:00-12:50; E. 212. Laboratory fee, $6.00. 
General introduction to botany. Emphasis is on the fundamental biological prin- 
ciples of the higher plants. (Brown, Assistants.) 

BoT. 151-S. Teaching Methods IN Botany. (2) 

June 22-Aug. 14. Lecture-laboratory periods; M.T.Th.F., 1:00 to 2:50, E-212; 
A study of the biological principles of common plants employing the apparatus, 
demonstrations, experiments and visual aids suitable for teaching these prin- 
ciples in high school biology classes. Material from all three versions of the 
B.S.C.S. programs will be used where appropriate. Laboratory fee, $5.00. 

(Lockard.) 

BoT. 153. Field Botany AND Taxonomy. (2) 

June 22-Aug. 14. Prerequisite, Hot. 1 or General Biology. Laboratory periods, 
M.T.Th.F., 1:00-2:50; E-308. Laboratory fee, $5.00. The identification of 
trees, shrubs, and herbs, emphasizing the native plants of Maryland. Numerous 
short field trips will be taken. Each student will make an individual collection. 

(Brown.) 

BoT. 195. Tutorial Readings in Botany (Honors Course). (2 or 3) 

Arranged. Prerequisite, admission to the Department of Botany Honors Pro- 
gram. Literature review on a specific topic. (Galloway, Staflf.) 

BoT. 196. Research Problems in Botany (Honors Course). (2 or 3) 
Arranged. Prerequisite, Bot. 195. Laboratory fee, $10.00. Pursuit of a re- 
search problem under faculty supervision. (Galloway, Staflf.) 

27 



Botany 

BoT. 199-S. National Science Foundation Summer Institute for 
Teachers of Biology Seminar. (2) 

June 22-Aug. 14. Two-hour sessions, morning and afternoon, or all day visita- 
tion on Wednesdays. Includes lectures, discussions, laboratory demonstrations 
and visitations in the fields of the biological sciences, especially designed for 
high school teachers and open only to participants in the National Science 
Foundation Institute. Student participation will be encouraged. Laboratory 
fee, $5.00. (Lockard.) 

Bot. 399. Research. (1-6) 

Arranged. Credit according to work done. (Staff.) 



ENTOMOLOGY 

Ent. S-121. Entomology for Science Teachers. (4) 

June 22-Aug. 14. Lectures M.T.Th.F., 8:00-8:50; 0-120. Laboratory periods, 
M.T.Th.F., 9:00-10:50; 0-200. This course will include the elements of 
morphology, taxonomy and biology of insects using examples commonly avail- 
able to high school teachers. It will include practice in collecting, preserving, 
rearing and experimenting with insects. (Riedel.) 

Ent. 198. Special Problems. (1-3) 

Arranged. Credit and prerequisites determined by the department. Investiga- 
tion of assigned entomological problems. (Staff.) 

Ent. 301. Advanced Entomology. 

Arranged. Credit and prerequisite determined by the department. Independent 
studies of selected entomological problems with appropriate supervision. 

(Staff.) 

Ent. 399. Research. (1-6) 

Arranged. Credit determined by the department. Thesis research. (Staff.) 



HORTICULTURE 

HoRT. 198. Special Problems. (2) 

Arranged. For major students in horticulture or botany. Credit according to 
work accomplished. Four credits maximum. 

HoRT. 399. Advanced Horticultural Research. (2-12) 
Arranged. Credit arranged according to work accomplished. 



28 



Art 

ARTS AND SCIENCES 
ART 

Art 1. Basic Drawing. (3) 

June 22-Aug. 14. M.T.Th.F., 8:00-9:20; A-307. 

Drawing preparatory to life and portrait drawing and painting. Stress is placed 
on fundamental principles, such as the study of relative proportions, values and 
modeling, etc. (O'Connell.) 

Art 5. Basic Design. (3) 

June 22-Aug. 14. M.T.Th.F., 11:00-12:20; A-7. 

A basic course in design for beginners consisting of the theory and practice of 
design. Theory of design deals with design elements such as line, shape, form, 
etc., and design principles such as contrast, balance, rhythm, etc. Design prac- 
tice consists of working with pencil, pen, water color, casein, and other media 
in terms of organization, representation and space. (Freeny.) 

Art 9. History of Art. (3) 

June 22-Aug. 14. M.T.Th.F., 9:30-10:50; A-302. 

A survey of the cultures from prehistoric times to the Renaissance, as expressed 

through painting, sculpture, and architecture. (Grubar.) 

Art 13. Elementary Sculpture. (3) 

June 22-Aug. 14, M.T.Th.F., 8:00-9:20; A-7. 

Study of three-dimensional composition in round and bas-relief. Mediums used: 

clay, plasteline, wood, plaster, stone. (Freeny.) 

Art. 14. Elementary Sculpture. (3) 

June 22-Aug. 14. M.T.Th.F., 8:00-9:20; A-7. 

Study of three-dimensional compositions in round and bas-relief. Mediums 

used: clay, plasteline, plaster, wood, stone. (Freeny.) 

Art 20. Art Appreciation. (2) 

June 22-July 31. M.T.Th.F., 8:00-9:20; A-303. 

An introduction to the technical and aesthetic problems of the artist. The 
student becomes acquainted with the elements that go into a work of the 
visual arts.. He is made aware of the underlying structure that results in the 
"wholeness" of an art work. He will see examples (originals and reproductions) 
of master-pieces of art. (Lembach.) 

Art 108. Modern Art. (3) 

June 22-Aug. 14. M.T.Th.F., 11:00-12:20; A-303. 

A survey of the developments in various schools of modern art. Works of 
art analyzed according to intrinsic values and historical background. Collec- 
tions of Washington and Baltimore are utilized. (Grubar.) 

Art 110. Print Making. (3) 

June 22-Aug. 14. M.T.Th.F., 9:30-10:50; A-7. 

Basic experiences in the various print making media: woodcut, etching, and 
lithography. Emphasis on a demonstrated understanding of the means of mak- 
ing fine prints. (O'Connell.) 

29 



Chemistry 

Art 111. Print Making. (3) 

June 22-Aug. 14. M.T.Th.F., 9:30-10:50; A-7. 

Development in depth of not more than two print making media leading to 
a demonstrated capability with the techniques as means of making fine prints. 

(O'Connell.) 

Art 190, 191. Special Problems in Art. (2 or 3, 2 or 3) 

Arranged. Two three-hour laboratory periods per week, or equivalent work in 
art history and appreciation. Permission of department head. Designed to 
offer the advanced art student special instruction in areas not offered regularly 
by the department. (Staff.) 



CHEMISTRY 

All laboratory courses in chemistry (except Chem. 214 — $20.00) carry a 
laboratory fee of $12.00; in addition the student is charged for any appar- 
atus which cannot be returned to the stock room in perfect condition. 

Chem. 1. General Chemistry. (4) 

June 22-Aug. 14. M.T.Th.F. Four lectures and four three-hour laboratory 
periods per week. Lecture, 11:00; C-132. Laboratory, 1:00, 2:00, 3:00; C-119, 
C-120. Prerequisite, 1 year high school algebra or equivalent. (Boyd.) 

Chem. 3. General Chemistry. (4) 

June 22-Aug. 14. M.T.Th.F. Four lectures and four three-hour laboratory 
periods per week. Lecture, 11:00; C-130. Laboratory, 1:00-2:00, 3:00; C-105, 
C-117, C-118. Prerequisite, Chem. 1. (Staff.) 

Chem. 19. Elements of Quantitative Analysis. (4) 

June 22-Aug. 14. M.T.Th.F. Four lectures and four laboratory periods per 
June 22-Aug. 14. M.T.Th.F. Four lectures per week, 8:00; C-134. Prerequisite, 
Chem. 3. (Stuntz.) 

Chem. 37. Elementary Organic Chemistry. (2) 

June 22-Aug. 14. M.T.Th.F. Four lectures per week, 8:00; C-134. Prerequisite, 
Chem. 35. (Henery-Logan.) 

Chem. 38. Elementary Organic Laboratory. (2) 

June 22-Aug. 14. M.T.Th.F. Four three-hour laboratory periods per week. 
9:00, 10:00. 11:00; C-221. Prerequisite, Chem. 36. (Henery-Logan.) 

Chem. 111. Chemical Principles. (4) 

June 22-Aug. 14. M.T.Th.F. Four lectures and four three hour laboratory 
periods per week. Lecture, 8:00; C-132. Laboratory, 9:00, 10:00, 11:00; C-108. 
Prerequisite, Chem. 1 and 3, or equivalent. A course in the principles of 
chemistry with accompanying laboratory work consisting of simple quantitative 
experiments. Not open to students seeking a major in the physical sciences. 
(Credit applicable only toward degree in College of Education.) (Jaquith.) 

30 



English 
Chem. 192, 194. Glassblowing Laboratory. (1, 1) 

June 22-July 31. Two four-hour laboratory periods a week. M., W., 1:00, 2:00, 
3:00, 4:00; C-B3. (Carruthers.) 



Chem. 399. Research. 



(Staff.) 



CLASSICAL LANGUAGES AND LITERATURES 

Latin 102. Tacitus. (3) 

June 22-Aug. 14. M.T.Th.F., 9:30-10:50; LL-1. Lectures and readings on Greek 
and Roman historiography before Tacitus and on the author as a writer of 
history. The reading of selections from the Annals and Histories. Reports. 

(Avery.) 



ENGLISH 

Eng. 1, 2. Composition and American Literature. (3, 3) 

Eng. 1 is the prerequisite of Eng. 2. June 22-August 14. (Herman, Staff.) 

Eng. 1 — 

Section 1— M.T.Th.F., 8:00- 9:20; A-133 

Section 2— M.T.Th.F., 9:30-10:50; A-133 

Section 3— ^M.T.Th.F., 9:30-10:50; A-49 

Section 4— M.T.Th.F., 11:00-12:20; A-48 

Eng. 2— 

Section 1— M.T.Th.F., 8:00- 9:20; A-159 

Section 2— M.T.Th.F., 9:30-10:50; A-159 

Section 3— M.T.Th.F., 9:30-10:50; A-161 

Section 4— M.T.Th.F., 11:00-12:00; A-159 

Eng. 3, 4. Composition and World Literature. (3, 3) 

Prerequisite, Eng. 2 or 21. June 22-August 14. (Gravely, Staff.) 

Section 1— M.T.Th.F., 8:00- 9:20; A-163 

Section 2— M.T.Th.F., 8:00- 9:20; A-49 

Section 3— M.T.Th.F., 9:30-10:50; A-163 

Section 4— M.T.Th.F., 9:30-10:50; A-164 

Section 5— M.T.Th.F., 11:00-12:20; A-163 

Eng. 4 — 

Section 1— M.T.Th.F., 8:00- 9:20; A-167 

Section 2— M.T.Th.F., 8:00- 9:20; A-174 

Section 3— M.T.Th.F., 9:30-10:50; A-167 

Section 4— M.T.Th.F., 9:30-10:50; A-174 

Section 5— M.T.Th.F., 11:00-12:20; A-167 

Section 6— M.T.Th.F., 11:00-12:20; A-174 

31 



Foreign Languages 

Eng. 101. History of the English Language. (3) 

June 22-August 14. M.T.Th.F., 8:00-9:20; A- 161. Prerequisite, Eng. 4 or 
equivalent. (James.) 

Eng. 115. Shakespeare. (3) 

June 22-August 14. M.T.Th.F., 9:30-10:50; A- 12. Prerequisite, Eng. 4 or 
equivalent. Outstanding plays to Shakespeare's mid-career. (Zeeveld.) 

Eng. 125. Literature of the Eighteenth Century. (3) 

June 22-July 31. Daily, 8:00-9:20; A- 164. Prerequisite, Eng. 4 or equivalent. 
The Age of Pope and Swift. (Myers.) 

Eng. 134. Literature of the Victorian Period. (3) 

June 22-August 14. M.T.Th.F., 11:00-12:20; A-164. Prerequisite, Eng. 4 or 
equivalent. Major Victorian prose writers. (Jerman.) 

Eng. 139. The English Novel. (3) 

June 22— August 14. M.T.Th.F., 11:00-12:20; A-161. Prerequisite, Eng. 4 
or equivalent. Six major eighteenth century writers. (Ward.) 

Eng. 143. Modern Poetry. (3) 

June 22-July 31. Daily, «: 00-9: 20; A- 166. Prerequisite, Eng. 4 or equivalent. 

(Portz.) 

Eng. 150. American Literature. (3) 

June 22-August 14. M.T.Th.F., 9:30-10:50; A-166. Prerequisite, Eng. 4 or 
equivalent. American prose and poetry to 1850. (Bode.) 

Eng. 155. Major American Writers. (3) 

June 22-August 14. M.T.Th.F., 11:00-12:20; A-166. Prerequisite, Eng. 4 or 
equivalent. Melville and Emerson. (Lutwack.) 

Eng. 160. Advanced Expository Writing. (3) 

June 22-July 31. Daily, 9:30 10:20; A-170. Prerequisite, Eng. 4 or equivalent. 

(Myers.) 

Eng. 206. Seminar in Renaissance Literature. (3) 

June 22-August 14. M., Th., 1:30-3:30 p.m.; A-48. (Zeeveld.) 

Eng. 226. Seminar in American Literature. (3) 

June 22-August 14. M., Th., 7:00-9:30 p.m.; A-170. (Bode.) 

Eng. 230. Special Studies in English Literature. (3) 

June 22-August 14. T., F., 1:30-3:30 p.m.; A-48. Directed readings in nine- 
teenth century writers. (Jerman.) 



FOREIGN LANGUAGES 

French 0. Elementary French for Graduate Students. 
(0 OR audit) 

June 22-July 31. Daily, 8:00 to 9:20; LL-2. (Hall.) 

32 



Foreign Languages 
French 1-2. Elementary French. (3, 3) 

June 22-Aug. 14. Daily, 8:00 to 9:20 and 12:30 to 1:20; LL-4. In addition 
each student will have one 50-minute drill daily. Students enrolled in this course 
may not take other courses in the summer session. (Demaitre.) 

French 6. Intermediate French. (3) 

June 22-July 31. Daily, 9:30 to 10:50; LL-106. (Bingham.) 

French 7. Intermediate French. (3) 

June 22-July 31. Daily, 9:30 to 10:50; LL-105. (Hall.) 

French 125. French Literature of the Eighteenth Century, (3) 

June 22-JuIy 31. Daily, 11 to 12:20; LL-220. Conducted in French. Prerequi- 
site, French 75. (Bingham.) 

German 0. Elementary German for Graduate Students. 
(0 or audit) 

June 22-July 31. Sec. 1, Daily, 8:00 to 9:20; LL-13; Sec. 2, Daily, 9:30 to 
10:50; LL-13. CDobert, Hering.) 

German 1-2. Elementary German. (3, 3) 

June 22-Aug. 14. Daily, 8:00 to 9:20 and 12:30 to 1:20; LL-204. In addition 
each student will have one 50-minute drill daily. Students enrolled in this 
course may not take other courses in the summer session. (Kemner.) 

German 6. Intermediate German. (3) 

June 22-July 31. Daily, 11:00 to 12:20; LL-201. (Dobert.) 

German 7. Intermediate German. (3) 

June 22-July 31. Daily, 11:00 to 12:20; LL-203. (Hering.) 

Spanish 1-2. Elementary Spanish. (3, 3) 

June 22-Aug. 14. Daily, 8:00 to 9:20 and 12:30 to 1:20; LL-301. In addition 
each student will have one 50-minute drill daily. Students enrolled in this course 
may not take other courses in the summer session. (Rodriguez.) 

Spanish 6. Intermediate Spanish. (3) 

June 22-July 31. Daily, 9:30 to 10:50; LL-319. (Herdoiza.) 

Spanish 7. Intermediate Spanish. (3) 

June 22-July 31. Daily, 9:30 to 10:50; LL-116. (Moncayo.) 

Spanish 111. Poetry of the Sixteenth and 

Seventeenth Centuries. (3) 

June 22-July 31. Daily, 9:30 to 10:50; LL-2. Conducted in Spanish. Prerequi- 
site, Spanish 75. (Goodwyn.) 

Chinese 1-2. Elementary Chinese. (3, 3) 

June 22-Aug. 14. Daily, 8:00 to 9:20 and 11:00 to 11:50; LL-3. Supplemented 
by required electronic laboratory sessions. Students enrolled in this course may 
not take other courses in the summer session. (Chen.) 

33 



History 

Russian 1-2. Elementary Russian. (3, 3) 

June 22-Aug. 14. Daily, 9:30 to 10:50 and 12:30 to 1:20; LL-104. Students 
enrolled in this course may not take other courses in the summer session. 

(Hitchcock.) 



HISTORY 



H. 



H. 



H. 



5. History of American Civilization. 

June 22-Aug. 14 
Section 1— 8:00- 9:20; A-106 
Section 2— 8:00- 9:20; A-110 
Section 3— 9:30-10:50; A-106 
Section 4— 9:30-10:50; A-110 
Section 5—11:00-12:20; A-106 
Section 6—11:00-12:20; A-110 

6. History of American Civilization. 

June 22-Aug. 14 
Section 1— 8:00- 9:20; A-130 
Section 2— 9:30-10:50; A-207 
Section 3— 9:30-10:50; A-130 
Section 4—11:00-12:20; A-130 



(3) 



H. 



H. 



H. 



(3) 



(Van Ness.) 
(Staff.) 
(Wellborn.) 
(Chatelain.) 
(Wellborn.) 
(Staff.) 



(Isaacs.) 

(Isaacs.) 

(Campbell.) 

(Staff.) 



41. Western Civilization. (3) 

June 22-Aug. 14. This course is designed to give the student an appreciation of 
the civilization in which he lives in its broadest setting. The study begins with 
the collapse of classical civilization and comes to the seventeenth century. 
Section 1—8:00- 9:20; A-207 (Robertson.) 

Section 2—9:30-10:50; A-209 (Robertson.) 

42. Western Civilization. (3) 

June 22-Aug. 14. This course is designed to give the student an appreciation of 
the civilization in which he lives in its broadest setting. The study begins with 
the seventeenth century and comes to the present. 

Section 1— 9:30-10:50; A-228 (Staff.) 

Section 2— 11 :00-12;20; A-209 (Staff.) 

61. Far Eastern Civilization. (3) 

June 22-Aug. 14. 9:30-10:50; A-231. This course seeks to give the student an 
understanding of a great civilization radically different from our own and an 
appreciation of the complex problems of the Far East and of American policy 
there. The approach is interdisciplinary within an historical framework. 

(Farquhar.) 

119. Recent American History. (3) 

June 22-Aug. 14. 11:00-12:20; A-231. Prerequisite, H. 5, 6 or the equivalent. 
Part politics, domestic issues, foreign relations of the United States since World 
War I. (Merrill.) 



34 



History 
H. 124. Reconstruction and the New Nation, 1865-1896. (3) 

June 22-Aug. 14. 9:30-10:50; Q-28. Prerequisite, H. 5, 6 or equivalent. Prob- 
lems of construction in both South and North. Emergence of big business and 
industrial combinations. Problems of the farmer and laborer. (Franklin.) 

H. 133. The History of Ideas in America. (3) 

June 22-Aug. 14. 8:00-9:20; A-231. Prerequisite, H. 5, 6 or equivalent. An in- 
tellectual history of the American people, embracing such topics as liberty, 
democracy and social ideas. (Conkin.) 

H. 142. History of Maryland. (3) 

June 22-Aug. 14. 8:00-9:20; A-209. Prerequisite, H. 5, 6 or equivalent. Mary- 
land's historical development and role as a state in the American Union. 

(Chatelain.) 

H. 160. History of European Ideas, (3) 

June 22-Aug. 14. 11:00-12:20; A-228. Prerequisites, H. 41, 42, or H. 53, 54 or 
the equivalent. The courses will present important currents of thought during 
the nineteenth and twentieth centuries. (Stromberg.) 

H. 170, Europe in the Nineteenth Century, 1815-1919. (3) 

June 22-Aug. 14. 9:30-10:50; A-16. Prerequisites, H. 41, 42 or H. 53, 54 or 
equivalent. A study of the political, economic, social and cultural development 
of Europe from the Franco-Prussian War to the end of World War I. (Bauer.) 

H, 200, Historiography: Techniques of Historical Research 
AND Writing, (3) 

An introduction to the professional study of history, including an examination 
of the sources and nature of historical knowledge, historical criticism, and syn- 
thesis. Required of ail candidates for advanced degrees in history. 
Section 1 — Arranged. (Stromberg.) 

Section 2 — Arranged. (Conkin.) 

H, 208. Seminar in Recent American History, (3) 

Arranged. Emphasis will be placed on the period since 1900. (Merrill.) 

H, 217, Seminar in Reconstruction America. (3) 

Arranged. A seminar on problems resulting from the Civil War: political, 
social, and economic reconstruction. (Franklin.) 

H, 269, Seminar in Nineteenth Century Europe, (3) 

Arranged. A seminar on problems in the history of western Europe during the 
nineteenth century. (Bauer.) 

H. 399. Thesis Reseap-h. (1-6) 
Arranged, 



35 



Mathematics 

MATHEMATICS 
Math. 10. Introduction to Mathematics. (3) 

Prerequisite, 2V2 years of college preparatory mathematics or Math. 1. Open 
to students not majoring in mathematics or the physical and engineering sciences. 
Logic, sets, counting, probability; elementary algebraic and transcendental func- 
tions and their geometric representation; systems of linear equations, vectors, 
matrices. 

Section 1— June 22-Aug. 14; M.T.Th.F., 8:00- 9:20; Y-5 (Staff.) 

Section 2— June 22-Aug. 14; M.T.Th.F., 9:30-10:50; Y-3 (Staff.) 

Section 3— June 22-Aug. 14; M.T.Th.F., 9:30-10:50; Y-15 (Staff.) 

Section 4 — June 22-Aug. 14; M.T.Th.F., 11:00-12:20; Y-16 (Staff.) 

Math. 11. Introduction to Mathematics. (3) 

Prerequisite, Math. 10. Math. 1 1 is a continuation of Math. 10. 

Section 1— June 22-Aug. 14; M.T.Th.F., 8:00- 9:20; Y-2 (Staff.) 

Section 2— June 22-Aug. 14; M.T.Th.F., 9:30-10:50; Y-16 (Staff.) 

Section 3— June 22-Aug. 14; M.T.Th.F., 11:00-12:20; Y-5 (Staff.) 

Math. 18. Introductory Analysis. (3) 

Prerequisite, 2V2 years of college preparatory mathematics or Math. 1. An in- 
troductory course for students not qualified to start Math. 19. Real numbers, 
functions, coordinate systems. Trigonometric functions. Plane analytic geom- 
etry. 

Section 1— June 22-Aug. 14; M.T.Th.F., 8:00- 9:20; Y-4 (Staff.) 

Section 2— June 22-Aug. 14; M.T.Th.F., 11:00-12:20; Y-4 (Staff.) 

Math. 19. Elementary Analysis. (4) 

Prerequisite, 3Vj years of college preparatory mathematics or Math. 18. Vec- 
tors and analytic geometry in three dimensions. Review of real numbers, coor- 
dinate systems, trigonometric functions, determinants. 

Section 1— June 22-Aug. 14; Daily, 9:30-10:50; Y-14 (Staff.) 

Section 2— June 22-Aug. 14; Daily, 9:30-10:50; Y-121 (Staff.) 

Section 3— June 22-Aug. 14; Daily, 9:30-10:50; Y-17 (Staff.) 

Math. 20. Calculus I. (4) 

Prerequisite, Math. 19 or equivalent. 

Section 1— June 22-Aug. 14; Daily, 8:00-9:20; Y-16 (Staff.) 

Section 2— June 22-Aug 14; Daily, 8:00-9:20; Y-15 (Staff.) 

Math. 21. Calculus II. (4) 

Prerequisite, Math. 20 or equivalent. 

Section 1— June 22-Aug. 14; Daily, 9:30-10:50; Y-4 (Staff.) 

Section 2— June 22-Aug. 14; Daily, 9:30-10.50; Y-5 (Staff.) 

Math. 30. Elements of Mathematics. (4) 

Prerequisite, high school elementary algebra. Required course in mathematics 
for elementary education majors and open only to students in this field. Topics 
from algebra and number theory are presented to provide a proper mathematical 
insight into arithmetic for the prospective elementary school teacher. 
Section 1— June 22-Aug. 14; Daily, 8:00- 9:20; Y-18 (Staff.) 

Section 2— June 22-Aug. 14; Daily, 9:30-10:50; Y-18 (Staff.) 

36 



Microbiology 

Math. 31. Elements of Geometry. (4) 

June 22-Aug.l4. Daily, 11:00-12:20; Y-2. (Staff.) 

Prerequisite, Math. 30 or equivalent. Required course in mathematics for ele- 
mentary education majors and open only to students in this field. Topics in- 
cluded are: review of the structure of a mathematical system, a mathematical 
system of sets, non-metric geometry, logic, congruence, measurement, simi- 
larity, graphs on a plane, a miniature geometry, spherical geometry. 

Math. 64. Differential Equations for Engineers. (3) 

June 22-Aug. 14. M.T.Th.F., 9:30-10:50; Y-2. (Staff.) 

Prerequisite, Math. 21 or equivalent. 

Math. 128. Euclidean Geometry. (3) 

June 22-Aug. 14. M.T.Th.F., 9:30-10:50; Y-122. (Staff.) 

Prerequisite, Math. 21 or equivalent. Open only to teachers or undergraduates 
preparing to teach or with emphasis on the teaching of mathematics and science. 

Math. 181. Introduction to Number Theory. (3) 

June 22-July 31. Daily, time to be arranged; U-115. (Staff.) 

Open only to participants in the N.S.F. Institute in Mathematics for Elemen- 
tary School Teachers. 

Math. 182. Introduction to Algebra. (3) 

June 22-July 31. Daily, 8:30-9:50; Y-101. (Good, Staff.) 

Open only to participants in the N.S.F. Institute in Mathematics for Junior 
High School Teachers of Mathematics. 

Math. 183. Introduction to Geometry. (3) 

June 22-July 31. Daily, time to be arranged; U-115. (Staff.) 

Open only to participants in the N.S.F. Institute in Mathematics for Elementary 
School Teachers. 

Math. 185. Selected Topics for Teachers of Mathematics. (3) 

June 22-Aug. 14. M.T.Th.F., 11:00-12:20; Y-122. (Staff.) 

Prerequisite, one year of college mathematics or consent of instructor. Open 
only to students in the graduate program with emphasis on the teaching of 
mathematics and science. 

Math. 189. National Science Foundation Summer Institute for 
Teachers of Science and Mathematics Seminar. (3) 

June 22-July 31. Daily, 10:10-11:30; Y-101. (Good, Staff.) 

Open only to participants in the N.S.F. Institute in Mathematics for Junior 
High School Teachers in Mathematics. 



MICROBIOLOGY 

Microb. 1. General Microbiology. (4) 

June 22-Aug. 14. Four lectures and four two-hour laboratory periods a week. 
Lecture, 8:00; F-101. Laboratory, 9:00, 10:00, M.T.Th.F.; T-210. Laboratory 

37 



Music 

fee, $15.00. The physiology, culture, and differentiation of bacteria. Funda- 
mental principles of microbiology in relation to man and his environment. 

(Whitman.) 

MicROB. 181. Microbiological Problems, (3) 

June 22-Aug. 14. Six two-hour laboratory periods a week. Arranged. Pre- 
requisite. 16 credits in microbiology. Registration only upon consent of the 
instructor. Laboratory fee, $15.00. (Faber.) 

MiCROB. 399. Research. 

Arranged. Credits according to work done. Laboratory fee, $15,00. (Staff.) 



MUSIC 

See Music Education, page 57 

Music 16. Music Fundamentals for the Classroom Teacher. (3) 

June 22-July 31. Daily, 9:30-10:50; B-7. The fundamentals of music theory 
and practice related to the needs of the classroom and kindergarten teacher. 

(de Vermond.) 

Music 20. Survey of Music Literature. (3) 

June 22-July 31. Daily, 11:00-12:20; HH108. A study of musical principles 
and an introduction to musical repertoires. Beginning course. (Heim.) 

Music 167. Symphonic Music. (3) 

June 22-July 31. Daily, 11:00-12:20; B-1. Prerequisite, Mus. 120, 121 or 
equivalents. Orchestral music from the Baroque period to the present. 

(McCorkle.) 

Music 200. Advanced Studies in the History of Music. (3) 

June 22-July 31. Daily, 8:00-9:20; B-9. Prerequisites, Mus. 120, 121 or equiva- 
lents. In the 1964 summer session the Renaissance period will be studied. 

(Bernstein.) 

Music 201. Seminar in Musicology. (3) 

June 22-July 31. Daily, 11:00-12:20; B-1. Prerequisites, Mus. 120, 121 or 
equivalents. In the 1964 summer session the music of Brahms will be studied. 

(McCorkle.) 

APPLIED MUSIC 

June 22-August 14. A student taking applied music for the first time at this 
University should register for Music 999. He will receive the proper classifica- 
tion at the end of the summer session. 

Every student taking an applied music course should, in addition to register- 
ing for the proper course number, indicate the instrument chosen by adding a 
section number as follows: 

Sec. 1, Piano Sec. 7, Flute Sec. 12, Trumpet 

Sec. 2, Voice Sec. 9, Clarinet Sec. 13, Trombone 

Sec. 3, Violin Sec. 11, Horn Sec. 15, Organ 

38 



Physics and Astronomy 

Music 12, 13, 52, 53, 112, 113, 152, 153. Applied Music. 

(2 EACH course) 

Hours to be arranged with instructor on first day of classes; B-4. Prerequisite, 
the next lower course in the same instrument. Two one-hour lessons and a 
minimum of twelve practice hours per week for eight weeks. Supplementary 
fee of $40.00 for each course. (Staff.) 



PHILOSOPHY 

Phil. 1. Introduction to Philosophy. (3) 

June 22-Aug.^ 14. 9:30-10:50; LL-302. (Messenger.) 

Phil. 53. Philosophy of Religion. (3) 

June 22-Aug. 14. 11:00-12:20; LL-302. (Messenger.) 

Phil. 292. Selected Problems in Philosophy. (1-3) 

Arranged. Credit according to work accomplished. (Staff.) 

Phil. 399. Research. (1-3) 

Arranged. Credit according to work accomplished. (Staff.) 



PHYSICS AND ASTRONOMY 

Astronomy 1. Introduction to Astronomy. (3) 

June 22-July 31. Lecture, M.T.W., 7:30-9:00 P.M.; Laboratory, Th., 7:30- 
9:30 P.M.; Z-115. An elementary course in descriptive astronomy. This course 
is self-contained; it is not required that it be followed by Astronomy 2. Lecture 
demonstration fee, $3 per semester. (Upgren.) 

Astronomy 150. Special Problems in Astronomy. 

June 22-Aug. 14. Arranged. Prerequisite, major in physics or astronomy 
and/or consent of advisor. Research or special study. Credit according to 
work accomplished. (Staff.) 

Astronomy 190. Honors Seminar. 

June 22-Aug. 14. Arranged. Enrollment is limited to students admitted to the 
Honors Programs in Astronomy. Credit according to work accomplished. 

(Staff.) 

Astronomy 399. Research. 

June 22-Aug. 14. Arranged. Laboratory fee, $10 per credit hour. Prerequi- 
site, an approved application for admission to candidacy or special permission 
of the Department of Physics and Astronomy. Credit according to work ac- 
complished. (Staff.) 

39 



Psychology 

Physics 106. Theoretical Mechanics, (3) 

June 22-Aug. 14. M.T.Th.F., 9:30-10:50; C-134. Prerequisite, Physics 20, 
21 or consent of instructor. A study of Newtonian mechanics, appropriate for 
those who have some familiarity with calculus. (Undergraduate physics majors 
are normally advised to take the parallel course, Physics 127; those wishing to 
enroll in Physics 106 first should consult their advisor.) (Estabrook.) 

♦Physics 130, 131. Basic Concepts of Physics. (2, 2) 

June 22-Aug. 14. M.T.Th.F., 9:10-10:50; C-130. Prerequisite, junior standing. 
Lecture demonstration fee, $4.00. The concepts of physics, their evolution, and 
their relation to other branches of human endeavor. Intended for teachers. A 
primarily descriptive course that does not satisfy the requirement of professional 
schools or serve as a substitute for other physics courses. This course should 
be taken concurrently with Physics 150. Section 2. (Staff.) 

Physics 150. Special Problems in Physics. Section 1. 

June 22-Aug. 14. Arranged. Research or special study. Laboratory fee, $10.00 
per credit hour when appropriate. Prerequisite, major in physics and consent 
of Department Head. Credit according to work accomplished. (Staff.) 

♦Physics 150. Special Problems in Physics. Section 2. 
Basic Experiments. (2) 

June 22-Aug. 14. Two 4-hour laboratories a week. T.F. 2-6. Z-315. The 
course should be taken concurrently with Physics 130, 131. It will consist of 
fundamental laboratory experiments in physics. (Staff.) 

Physics 190. Independent Studies Seminar. 

June 22-Aug. 14. Arranged. (Staff.) 

Physics 230. Seminar. (1) 

June 22-Aug. 14. Arranged. One two-hour class per week. (Faculty.) 

Physics 248. Special Topics in Modern Physics. (2) 

June 22-Aug. 14. Arranged. Two two-hour lectures per week. (Faculty.) 

Physics 399. Research. 

June 22-Aug. 14. Credit according to work accomplished. Laboratory fee, 
$10.00 per credit hour. Prerequisite, approved application for admission to 
candidacy or special permission of the Department Chairman. Thesis research 
conducted under approved supervision. (Faculty.) 



PSYCHOLOGY 

Psych. 1. Introduction to Psychology. (3) 

June 22-Aug. 14. Two sections: Section 1—8:00-9:20; M-105. Section 2—9:30- 
10:50; A-52. A basic introductory course intended to bring the student into 
contact with the major problems confronting psychology and the more impor- 
tant attempts at their solution. (Heermann, Waldrop.) 



* Intended for teachers. 

40 



Sociology 

Psych. 90. Statistical Methods in Psychology. (3) 

June 22-Aug. 14. 8:00-9:20; A-52. Prerequisite, Psych. 1 and Math. 1, 5, or 
10 equivalent. A basic introduction to quantitative methods used in psycholog- 
ical research. (Heermann.) 

Psych. 110. Educational Psychology. (3) 

June 22-Aug. 14. 11:00-12:20; A-52. Prerequisite, Psych. 1 or equivalent. 
Researches on fundamental psychological problems encountered in education. 
Measurement and significance of individual differences; learning, motivation, 
transfer of training, and the educational implications of theories of intelligence. 

(WaJdrop.) 

Psych. 131. Abnormal Psychology. (3) 

June 22-Aug. 14. 9:30-10:50; M-105. Prerequisite, two courses in psychology. 
The nature, diagnosis, etiology, and treatment of mental disorders. 

(Das ton.) 

Psych. 194. Independent Study in Psychology. (1-3) 

Arranged. Prerequisite, written consent of individual faculty supervisor. 

(Staff.) 
Psych. 195 Minor Problems in Psychology. (1-3) 

Arranged. Prerequisite, written consent of individual faculty supervisor. 

(Staff.) 

Psych. 225. Practicum in Counseling and Clinical Procedures. 
(1-3) 

Arranged. Requires consent of faculty supervisor. (Staff.) 

Psych. 260 Individual Tests. (3) 

June 22-Aug. 14. 11:00-12:20, M-105. Prerequisite, Psych. 150 or equivalent. 
Lab. fee, $4.00. (Daston.) 

Psych. 288. Special Research Problems. (1-3) 

Arranged. Requires consent of faculty supervisor. (Staff.) 

Psych. 399. Research for Thesis. (1-6) 

Arranged. Requires consent of faculty supervisor. (Staff.) 



SOCIOLOGY 

Soc. 1. Introduction to Sociology. (3) 

June 22-Aug. 14. M.T.Th.F., 8:00-9:20; A-324. An introduction to the study 
of sociology. (Hirzel, Staff.) 

Soc. 2. Principles of Sociology. (3) 

June 22-Aug. 14. M.T.Th.F., 8:00-9:20; A-321. Prerequisite, Soc. 1. The basic 
forms of human association and interaction. (Staff.) 

Soc. 51. Social Pathology. (3) 

June 22-Aug. 14. M.T.Th.F., 9:30-10:50; A-258. Prerequisite, Soc. 1. Per- 
sonal-social disorganization and maladjustment. (Wellford.) 

41 



Speech 

Soc. 52. Criminology. (3) 

June 22-Aug. 14. M.T.Th.F., 8:00-9:20; A-320. Prerequisite, Soc. 1. Criminal 
behavior and the methods of its study. (Toland.) 

Soc. 105. Cultural Anthropology. (3) 

June 22-Aug. 14. M.T.Th.F., 11:00-12:20; A-258. A study of the simpler 
cultures of the world, with attention to historical processes. (Anderson.) 

Soc. 121. Population. (3) 

June 22-Aug. 14. M.T.Th.F., 11:00-12:20; A-324. Prerequisite, Soc. 1. Popula- 
tion distribution and growth in the United States and the world. (Hirzel.) 

Soc. 125. Cultural History of the Negro. (3) 

June 22-Aug. 14. M.T.Th.F., 8:00-9:20; A-258. Cultures of Africa and 
cultural adjustments of the Negro in North and South America. (Anderson.) 

Soc. 131. Introduction to Social Service. (3) 

June 22-Aug. 14. M.T.Th.F., 9:30-10:50; A-324. Prerequisite, Soc. 1. General 
survey of the field of social-welfare activities. (Di Bella.) 

Soc. 153. Juvenile Delinquency. (3) 

June 22-Aug. 14. M.T.Th.F., 11:00-12:20; A-321. Prerequisite, Soc. 1. Juve- 
nile delinquency in relation to the general problem of crime. (Courtless.) 

Soc. 164. The Family and Society. (3) 

June 22-Aug. 14. M.T.Th.F., 12:30-1:50; A-258. Prerequisite, Soc. 1. The 
family as a social institution. (Bourdeau.) 

Soc. 166. Interviewing and Problem Solving in Social Work. (3) 

June 22-Aug. 14. M.T.Th.F., 11:00-12:20; A-320. Prerequisite, Soc. 1. Inter- 
viewing and other diagnostic techniques with particular reference to family and 
child behavior. (Di Bella.) 

Soc. 186. Sociological Theory. (3) 

June 22-Aug. 14. M.T.Th.F., 9:30-10:50; A-321. Prerequisite, Soc. 1. De- 
velopment of the science of sociology. (Staff.) 

Soc. 291. Special Social Problems. 

June 22-Aug. 14. Arranged. Credit according to work accomplished. (Staff.) 

Soc. 399. Thesis Research. 

June 22-Aug. 14. Arranged. Credit according to work accomplished. (Staff.) 



SPEECH 

Speech 1. Public Speaking. (3) 

First and second semesters. Prerequisite for advanced speech courses. Labora- 
tory fee, $1.00. The preparation and delivery of short original speeches; outside 
readings; reports, etc. It is recommended that this course be taken during the 
freshman year. 

42 



Speech 

Section 1— June 22-July 31. Daily, 8:00-9:20; R-103. (Starcher.) 

Section 2— June 22-Aug. 14. M.T.Th.F., 9:30-10:50; R-102. (Downs.) 

Section 3— June 22-July 31. Daily, 11:00-12:20; R-102. (Batka.) 

Section 4 — June 22-Aug. 14. M.T.Th.F., 11:00-12:20; R-103. (Downs.) 

Speech 3. Fundamentals of General Speech. (3) 

June 22-July 31. Daily, 8:00-9:20; R-102. Training in auditory discrimination 
of speech sounds, rhythms and inflections of general American speech. Analy- 
sis of the physiological bases of speech production and the phonetic elements 
of speech reception. This course is required of speech majors and recommended 
for foreign students and majors in nursery and elementary education. 

(Virden.) 

Speech 105. Speech Handicapped School Children. (3) 

June 22-July 31. Daily, 9:30-10:50; R-109. Prerequisite, Speech 3 for under- 
graduates. The occurrence, identification and treatment of speech handicaps in 
the classroom. An introduction to speech pathology. (Hendricks.) 

Speech 106. Clinical Practice. (1-3) 

June 22-July 31. T.F., 12:30-1:50, and arranged; R-109. Prerequisite, Speech 
105. A laboratory course dealing with the various methods of correction plus 
actual work in the clinic. Fee, $1.00 per credit hour. (Shaftel.) 

Speech 111. Seminar. (3) 

June 22-July 31. Prerequisites, senior standing and consent of instructor. Pres- 
ent-day speech research. Arranged. (Strausbaugh.) 

Speech 112. Phonetics. (3) 

June 22-Juiy 31. Daily, 11:00-12:30; R-109. Prerequisite, Speech 3 or consent 
of instructor. Training in the recognition and production of the sounds of 
spoken English, with an analysis of their formation. Practice transcription. 
Mastery of the international phonetic alphabet. Laboratory fee, $3.00. (Staff.) 

Speech 127. Children's Dramatics. (3) 

June 22-July 31. Daily, 9:30-10:50; R-103. Principles and methods necessary 
for staging children's productions on the elementary school level. Major empha- 
sis on creative dramatics; the application of creative dramatics in the school 
room, and the values gained by the child in this activity. Students will conduct 
classes in formal and creative dramatics which will culminate in children's pro- 
grams. (Meersman.) 

Speech 139. Theatre Workshop. (3) 

June 22-July 31. Daily, 9:30-10:50; Radio Studio. Consent of instructor. A 
laboratory course designed to provide the student with practical experience in 
all phases of theatre production. (Pugliese.) 

Speech 141. Introduction to Audiometry. (2) 

June 22-July 31. M.T.Th.F., 9:30-10:50; R-101. Laboratory fee, $2.00. Analy- 
sis of various methods and procedures in evaluating hearing losses. Required 
for students whose concentration is in speech and hearing therapy. (Staff.) 

43 



Zoology 

Speech 149. Television Workshop. (3) 

June 22-JuIy 31. Daily, 11:00-12:20; R-9. Prerequisites, Speech 22, Speech 140, 
and Speech 148, or consent of instructor. Two hour lecture, four hour labora- 
tory. Laboratory fee, $10.00. (Aylward.) 

Speech 164. Persuasion in Speech. (3) 

June 22-JuIy 31. Daily, 8:00-9:20; R-101 (6 week). A study of the bases of 
persuasion with emphasis on recent experimental developments in persuasion. 

(Weaver.) 

Speech 201K. Seminar, Minor Research Problems. (1-3) 

June 22-31. Arranged. Prerequisites, 6 hours in speech pathology and consent 
of instructor. 

Speech 211. Advanced Clinical Practice. (1-3) 

June 22-July 31. T.F., 12:30-1:50; R-109 and arranged. Prerequisites, 12 hours 
in speech pathology and audiology. Supervised training in the application of 
clinical methods in the diagnosis and treatment of speech and hearing disorders. 
Laboratory fee, $1.00 per hour. (Shaftel.) 

Speech 214. Clinical Audiometry. (3) 

June 22-July 31. Hours and room arranged. Prerequisites, 3 hours in audiology 
and consent of instructor. Testing of auditory acuity with pure tones and speech. 
Laboratory fee, $3.00. (Causey.) 

Speech 399. Thesis. (1-6 credits) 

Arranged. (Staff.) 



ZOOLOGY 

ZooL. 1. General Zoology. (4) 

June 22-Aug. 14. Four 80-minute lectures and two two-hour laboratories a 
week. Lectures M.T.Th.F., 8:00 to 9:20; F-112; laboratory T.Th., 9:30-10:30; 
R-203. Zool. 1 and 2 satisfy the freshman pre-medical requirement in general 
biology. An introduction to the modem concepts of biological principles and 
animal life. Emphasis will be placed upon the functional aspects of living 
systems with a survey of the physical and chemical bases of all life processes. 

(Potter.) 

ZooL. 55S. Development of the Human Body. (2) 

June 22-Aug. 14. Four one-hour lectures a week, M.T.Th.F., 11:00; A-12. A 
study of the main factors affecting the growth and development of the child 
with special emphasis on normal development. (Staff.) 

Zool. 102. General Animal Physiology. (4) 

June 22-Aug. 14. Four one-hour lectures and four three-hour laboratory periods 
a week. Lectures M.T.Th.F., 8:00-A-12. Laboratory M.T.Th.F., 9, 10, 11; R- 
112. Prerequisites, one year of zoology and chemistry 31 or 25. The general 
principles of physiological function as shown in mammals and lower animals. 

(Grollman.) 

44 



Business Administration 

ZooL. 110. General Parasitology. (4) 

June 22-Aug. 14. Four one-hour lectures and four three-hour laboratory periods 
a week. Lectures M.T.Th.F., 8:00; A-14. Laboratory M.T.Th.F., 9, 10, 11; 
R-113. Prerequisites, Zool. 1 and 2 or permission of the instructor. A consider- 
ation of the phenomenon of parasitism through a study of the structure, func- 
tion and host relationships of parasitic organisms. (Rothman.) 

ZooL. 150. Special Problems in Zoology. (1 or 2) 

Arranged. Prerequisite, major in zoology or biological sciences a minimum of 
3.0 cumulative average in the biological sciences, and consent of instructor. 
Research or integrated reading in zoology. A student may register several times 
and receive up to 8 semester hours of credit. (Staff.) 

ZooL. 208. Special Problems in Zoology. 
(Credit to be arranged) 
Credit hours, and topics to be arranged. Laboratory fee, $8.00. (Staff.) 

ZooL. 399. Research. 
(Credit to be arranged) 
Research on thesis project only. Laboratory fee, $8.00. (Staff.) 



BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION 

B.A. 10. Introduction to Business. (3) 

June 22-Aug. 14. M.T.Th. F., 11:00-12:20; Q-132. A survey course treating 
the internal and functional organization of business enterprise, its organization 
and control. (Spivey.) 

B.A. 20. Principles of Accounting. (3) 

June 22-Aug. 14. M.T.Th.F., 9:30-10:50; Q-122. Prerequisite, sophomore stand- 
ing. The fundamental principles and problems involved in accounting for 
proprietorship, corporations and partnerships. (Sweeney.) 

B.A. 21. Principles of Accounting. (3) 

June 22-Aug. 14. M.T.Th.F., 8:00-9:20; Q-104. Prerequisite, sophomore 
standing. The fundamental principles and problems involved in accounting for 
proprietorships, corporations and partnerships. (Sweeney.) 

B.A. 22. Accounting Methodology. (3) 

June 22-Aug. 14. M.T.Th.F., 9:30-10:50; Q-132. Prerequisite, B.A. 20. Re- 
quired of majors in accounting. Specialized problems of accounting; cash and 
accrual basis, single entry and complex adjustments and corrections of prior 
years' data. (Edelson.) 

B.A. 111. Intermediate Accounting. (3) 

June 22-Aug. 14. M.T.Th.F., 8:00-9:20; Q-122. Prerequisite, B.A. 21. A com- 
prehensive study of the theory and problems of valuation of assets, application 
of funds, corporation accounts and statements, and the interpretation of account- 
ing statements. (Edelson.) 

45 



Business Administration 

B.A. 120. Accounting Systems. (3) 

June 22-Aug. 14. M.T.Th.F., 8:00-9:20; Q-123. How to make a survey of the 
business, select the methods to be used, design the system or procedure, and 
prepare the systems report or manual. (Daiker.) 

B.A. 124. Advanced Accounting. (3) 

June 22-Aug. 14. M.T.Th.F., 11:00-12:20; Q-122. Prerequisite, B.A. Ill or 
consent of instructor. Advanced accounting theory applied to specialized 
problems in partnerships, ventures, consignments, installment sales, insurance, 
statement of affairs, receiver's accounts, realization and liquidation reports, 
governmental accounting, and applications of mathematics to accounting 
problems. (Hermanson.) 

B.A. 130. Business Statistics I. (3) 

June 22-Aug. 14. M.T.Th.F. Prerequisite, junior standing. Laboratory fee, $6.00. 
Section 1—8:00-9:20; Q-103; Section 11—9:30-10:50; Q-103; Section Hi- 
ll :00-12:20; Q-103. An introductory course. Topics covered include statis- 
tical observation, frequency distribution, averages, measures of variability, ele- 
mentary probability, sampling, distribution, problems of estimation, simple 
tests of hypotheses, index numbers, time series, graphical and tabular presenta- 
tion. Selected applications of the techniques are drawn from economics and 
business. (Nelson, Anderson, Calhoun.) 

B.A. 140. Business Finance. (3) 

June 22-Aug. 14. M.T.Th.F., 8:00-9:20; Q-111. Deals with principles and 
practices involved in the organization, financing, and reconstruction of corpora- 
tions; the various types of securities, and their use in raising funds, apportioning 
income; risk and control; intercorporate relations; and new developments. 

(Calhoun.) 

B.A. 159. Marketing Principles and Organization. (3) 

June 22-Aug. 14. M.T.Th.F., 9:30-10:50; Q-123. An introductory course to give 
a general understanding and appreciation of the forces operating, institutions 
employed, and methods followed in marketing agricultural products, natural 
products, services, and manufactured goods. (Cook.) 

B.A. 160. Personnel Management. (3) 

June 22-Aug. 14. M.T.Th.F., 12:30-1:50; Q-104. Deals with functional and 
administrative relationships between management and the labor force. It com- 
prises a survey of the scientific selection of employees, "in-service" training, 
job analysis, classification and rating, motivation of employees, employee adjust- 
ment, wage incentives, employee discipline and techniques of supervision, and 
elimination of employment hazards. (Nash.) 

B.A. 163. Industrial Relations. (3) 

June 22-Aug. 14. M.T.Th.F.. 9:30-10:50; Q-111. A study of the development 
and methods of organized groups in industry with reference to the settlement 
of labor disputes. An economic and legal analysis of labor union and employer 
association activities, arbitration, mediation and conciliation; collective bargain- 
ing, trade agreements, strikes, boycotts, lockouts, company unions, employee 
representation and injunctions. (Spivey.) 

46 



Business Administration 
B.A. 168. Management and Organization Theory. (3) 

June 22-Aug. 14. M.T.Th.F., 11:00-12:20; Q-111. The development of man- 
agement and organization theory, nature of the management process and 
function and its future development. The role of the manager as an organizer 
and director, the communication process, goals and responsibilities. (Paine.) 

B.A. 180. Business Law. (3) 

June 22-Aug. 14. M.T.Th.F., 8:00-9:20; Q-28. Legal aspects of business rela- 
tionships, contracts, negotiable instruments, agency, partnerships, corporations, 
real and personal property and sales. (Dawson.) 

B.A. 182. Advanced Business Law. (3) 

June 22-Aug. 14. M.T.Th.F., 9:30-10:50; Q-213. Designed primarily for CPA 
candidates. Legal aspects of wills, insurance, torts and bankruptcy. (Dawson.) 

B.A. 189. Business and Government. (3) 

June 22-Aug. 14. M.T.Th.F., 11-12:20; Q-28. A study of the role of govern- 
ment in modern economic life. Social control of business as a remedy for 
the abuses of business enterprise arising from the decline of competition. 
Criteria of limitations on government regulation of private enterprise. (Smerk.) 

B.A. 199. Business Policies. (3) 

June 22-Aug. 14. M.T.Th.F. 9:30-10:50; Q-130. Prerequisite, senior standing. 
A case study course in which the aim is to have the student apply both what 
he has learned of general management principles and their specialized func- 
tional applications of the overall management function in the enterprise. 

(Staff.) 

B.A. 237. Management Simulation L (3) 

June 22-Aug. 14. (Evening meeting hours arranged) Lab fee, $6.00. Open only 
to graduate students. Application of management principles to the solution of 
complex business problems. Game Theory and computer application where 
feasible are applied. (Raia.) 

B.A. 281. Private Enterprise and Public Policy. (3) 

June 22- Aug. 14. (Evening meeting hours arranged) Open only to graduate 
students. Examines the executive's social and ethical responsibilities to his em- 
ployees, customers, and to the general public. The trends in public policy and 
their future effect upon management are examined. (Smerk.) 

B.A. 399. Thesis. (1-6) 

Arranged. 



OFFICE MANAGEMENT AND TECHNIQUES 
B.A. 101. Electronic Data Processing. (3) 

June 22-July 31. Daily, 8:00; Q-6. Prerequisite, junior standing. Laboratory fee, 
$10.00. The electronic digital computer and its use as a tool in processing data. 

(Patrick.) 

47 



ECONC^IICS 

ECONOMICS 

EcoN. 4. Economic Developments. (3) 

June 22-Aug. 14. 11:00-12:20; M.T.Th.F.; Q-28; no prerequisite. Introduction 
to modern economic institutions with emphasis on development in England, 
Western Europe and the United States. (Staff.) 

EcoN. 5. Economic Developments. (2) 

June 22-Aug. 14. M.W.F., 12:30; Q-111. Modern economic institutions, their 
origins, development and present status. Emphasis on development in England, 
Western Europe and the United States. (Staff.) 

EcoN. 31. Principles OF Economics. (3) 

June 22-Aug. 14. M.T.Th.F., 8:00; Q-107. Prerequisite, sophomore standing. 
A general analysis of the functioning of the economic system, with special 
emphasis on national income analysis. A considerable portion of the course is 
devoted to a study of basic concepts and explanatory principles. The remainder 
deals with the major problems of the economic system. (Staff.) 

EcoN. 32. Principles of Economics. (3) 

June 22-Aug. 14. M.T.Th.F., 9:30; Q-107. Prerequisite, Econ. 31. A general 
analysis of the functioning of the economic system, with special emphasis on 
resource allocation. A considerable portion of the course is devoted to a study 
of basic concepts and explanatory principles. The remainder deals with the 
major problems of the economic system. (Staff.) 

EcoN. 37. Fundamentals of Economics. (3) 

June 22-Aug. 14. M.T.Th.F., 8:00; Q-129. Prerequisite, sophomore standing. 
Not open to students who have credit in Econ. 31 and 32. Not open to B.P.A. 
students. A survey of the general principles underlying economic activity. 
This is the basic course in economics for the American Civilization Program for 
students who are unable to take the more complete course provided in Econ. 
31 and 32. (Staff.) 

Econ. 102. National Income Analysis. (3) 

June 22-Aug. 14. 11:00-12:20; M.T.Th.F.; Q-123. Prerequisite, Econ. 32. Re- 
quired for Econ. majors. An analysis of national income accounts and the level 
of national income and employment. (Staff.) 

Econ. 132. Advanced Economic Principles. (3) 

June 22-Aug. 14. M.T.Th.F., 9:30; Q-104. Prerequisite, Econ. 32. Required for 
economics majors. This course is an analysis of price and distribution theory 
with special attention to recent developments in the theory of imperfect 
competition. 

Econ. 140. Money and Banking. (3) 

June 22-Aug. 14. M.T.Th.F., 8:00; Q-108. Prerequisite, Econ. 32 or 37. A 
study of the organization, functions, and operation of our monetary, credit, 
and banking system; the relation of commercial banking to the Federal Reserve 
System; the relation of money and credit to prices; domestic and foreign 
exchange and the impact of public policy upon banking and credit. (Bennett.) 

48 



Government and Politics 
EcoN. 160. Labor Economics. (3) 

June 22-Aug. 14. M.T.Th.F., 11:00; Q-107. Prerequisite, Econ. 32 or 37. The 
historical development and chief characteristics of the American labor move- 
ment are first surveyed. Present day problems are then examined in detail; wage 
theories, unemployment, social security, labor organization, collective bargaining. 

(Staff.) 

Econ. 399. Thesis. (1-6) 

Arranged. (Staff.) 



GEOGRAPHY 

Geog. 10. General Geography. (3) 

June 22-Aug. 14. Sec. 1, M.T.Th.F., 8:00; Q-210. Sec. 2, 11:00; Q-228. Intro- 
duction to geography as a field of study. A survey of the content, philosophy, 
techniques, and application of geography and its significance for the under- 
standing of world problems. (Mika, Schmieder.) 

Geog. 40. Principles of Meteorology. (3) 

June 22-Aug. 14. M.T.Th.F., 9:30; Q-210. Properties and conditions of the 
atmosphere. The atmopsheric circulation and conditions responsible for various 
types of weather and their geographic distribution patterns. (Chaves.) 

Geog. 100. Regional Geography of Eastern Anglo- America. (3) 

June 22-Aug. 14. M.T.Th.F., 11:00; Q-210. A study of the cultural and eco- 
nomic geography and the geographic regions of Eastern United States and 
Canada, including an analysis of the significance of the physical basis. (Mika.) 

Geog. 105. Geography of Maryland and Adjacent Areas. (3) 

June 22-Aug. 14. M.T.Th.F., 8:00; Q-228. An analysis of the physical environ- 
ment, natural resources, and population in relation to agriculture, industry, and 
trade, in Maryland and adjacent areas. (Schmieder.) 

Geog. 111. Economic and Cultural Geography of 
South America. (3) 

June 22-Aug. 14. M.T.Th.F. 12:30; Q-210. Natural environment and resources, 
economic development and cultural diversity of the South American republics, 
with emphasis upon problems and prospects. (Chaves.) 



GOVERNMENT AND POLITICS 

& P. 1. American Government. (3) 

June 22-Aug. 14. This course is designed as the basic course in government for 
the American Civilization Program, and it or its equivalent is a prerequisite to 
all other courses in the department. It is a comprehensive study of governments 
in the United States — national, state, and local. 

Section 1— M.T.Th.F. 8:00; Q-110. (Staff.) 

Section 2— M.T.Th.F. 9:30; Q-211. (Staff.) 

Section 3— M.T.Th.F. 11:00; Q-108. (Staff.) 

49 



Government and Politics 

G. & P. 60. State and Local Government. (3) 

June 22-Aug. 14. M.T.Th.F., 9:30; Q-110. Prerequisite, G. & P. 1. Study of the 
functioning and problems of state and local government in the United States 
with illustrations from Maryland jurisdictions. (Conway.) 

G. & P. 101. International Political Relations. (3) 

June 22-Aug. 14. M.T.Th.F., 8:00; Q-211. Prerequisite, G. & P. 1. A study of 
the major factors underlying international relations, the influence of geography, 
climate, nationalism, and imperialism, and the development of foreign policies 
of the major powers. (Jacobs.) 

G. & P. 110. Principles of Public Administration. (3) 

June 22-Aug. 14. M.T.Th.F., 11:00; Q-213. Prerequisite, G. & P. 1. A study of 
public administration in the United States, giving special attention to the 
principles of organization and management and to fiscal, personnel, planning, 
and public relations practices. (Dillon.) 

G. P. 142. Recent Political Theory. (3) 

June 22-Aug. 14. M.T.Th.F., 11:00; Q-110. Prerequisite, G. & P. 1. A study 
of 19th and 20th century political thought with special emphasis on recent 
theories of socialism, communism, and fascism. (Byrd.) 

G. & p. 154. Problems of World Politics. (3) 

June 22-Aug. 14. M.T.Th.F., 9:30; Q-108. Prerequisite, G. & P. 1. A study of 
governmental problems of international scope, such as causes of war, problems 
of neutrality, and propaganda. Students are required to report on readings from 
current literature. (Steinmeyer.) 

G. & P. 174. Political Parties. (3) 

June 22-Aug. 14. M.T.Th.F., 8:00; Q-213. Prerequisite, G. & P. 1. A descriptive 
and analytical examination of American political parties, nominations, elections, 
and political leadership. (Conway.) 

G. & P. 197. Comparative Governmental Institutions. (3) 

June 22-Aug. 14. M.T.Th.F., 11:00; Q-211. Prerequisite, G. & P. 1. A study 
of major political institutions such as legislatures, executives, courts, admin- 
istrative systems, and political parties, in selected foreign governments. (Jacobs.) 

G. & P. 225. Man and the State. (3) 

Arranged. Q-369. (Byrd.) 

G. & P. 261. Problems of Government and Politics 
(National). (3) 

Arranged. Q-369. (Hathorn.) 

G. & P. 261. Problems of Government and Politics 
(International). (3) 

Arranged. Q-369. (Steinmeyer.) 

G. & P. 399. Thesis. (1-6) 

Arranged. (Staff.) 

50 



Education 
JOURNALISM 

JouRN. 173. Scholastic Journalism. (3) 

June 22-July 31. Daily, 8:00; G-304. Introduction to theory and practice in 
production of high school and junior high publications. Outline for teaching 
high school course in journalism. (Crowell.) 



EDUCATION 

EARLY CHILDHOOD-ELEMENTARY EDUCATION * 
ECEEd 52. Introduction to Children's Literature. A, B. (3) 

June 22-July 31. Daily, 11:00; A-16. Prerequisite: English 1 and 2. (Staff.) 

ECEEd 105. Science in the Elementary School. A, B. (3) 

Section 1— June 22-July 31. Daily, 8:00; T-119. (Blough.) 

Section 2— June22-July 31. Daily, 9:30; A-14. (F. Brown.) 

Laboratory fee, $2.00. 

ECEEd 115. Activities and Materials in Early Childhood 
Education. (3) 

June 22-July 31. Daily, 8:00; AA-9. Prerequisite: ECEEd. 50, 51, or 110. Lab- 
oratory fee, $5.00. (Coonce.) 

ECEEd. 116. Music in Early Childhood Education. (3) 

June 22-July 31. Daily, 9:30; AA-9. Prerequisite: Music 16 or equivalent. 

(L. Brown.) 

ECEEd 121. Language Arts in the Elementary School. A, B. (3) 

June 22-Aug. 14. M.T.Th.F., 9:30; A-17. (Seidman.) 

ECEEd 122. Social Studies in the Elementary School. A, B. (3) 

Section 1— June 22-Aug. 14. M.T.Th.F., 8:00; A- 18. (Duffey.) 

Section 2— June 22-Aug. 14. M.T.Th.F., 9:30; A-18. (Weaver.) 

ECEEd 123. The Child and The Curriculum. A, B. (3) 

June 22-July 31. Daily, 9:30; A- 104. (Bennett.) 

ECEEd 124. Mathematics in the Elementary School. A, B. (3) 

Section 1— June 22-Aug. 14. M.T.Th.F., 8:00; A-48. (Schindler.) 

Section 2— June 22-Aug 14. M.T.Th.F., 9:30; A-48. (Schindler.) 

ECEEd 125. Art in the Elementary School. (3) 

Section 1— June 22-Aug. 14. M.T.Th.F., 9:30; A-259. (Longley.) 

Section 2— June 22-Aug. 14. M.T.Th.F., 11:00; A-104. (Longley.) 

Enrollment limited to 25 per section. 



* Throughout this section, A. refers to Early Childhood level, B. refers to Elementary 
level, C. refers to Secondary level. 

51 



Education 

ECEEd 152. Literature for Children and Young People, 

Advanced. (3) 

June 22-July 31. Daily, 8:00; A-259. Prerequisite, ECEEd. 52 or consent of 
instructor. (Bennett.) 

ECEEd 153. The Teaching of Reading. A, B, C. (3) 

Section 1— (A. B) June 22-July 31. Daily, 8:00; F-103. (Hall.) 

Section 2— (A. B) June 22-Aug. 14. M.T.Th.F., 11:00; A-259. (Seidman.) 
Section 3— (C) June 22-Aug. 14. M.T.Th.F., 8:00; F-104. (Lonsdale.) 

ECEEd 200. Seminar in Elementary Education. (2) 

June 22-Aug. 14. M.W.F., 9:30; F-103. Prerequisite, 12 s. h. graduate work. 

(Lonsdale.) 

ECEEd 205. Problems of Teaching Science in Elementary 
Schools. (2) 

June 22-July 31. M.T.Th.F., 9:30; T-119. (Blough.) 

ECEEd 221. Problems of Teaching Language Arts in 
Elementary Schools. (2) 

June 22-Aug. 14. M.W.F., 8:00; O-lOl. (Collins.) 

ECEEd 222. Problems of Teaching Social Studies in 
Elementary Schools. (2) 

June 22-Aug. 14. M.W.F., 11:00; F-103. (Weaver.) 

ECEEd 224. Problems of Teaching Mathematics in 
Elementary Schools. (2) 

June 22-July 31. M.T.Th.F., 11:00; F-104. (F. Brown.) 



(3) 



GENERAL EDUCATION 
Ed. 102. History of Education in the United States. 

June 22-July 31. Daily, 9:30; F-101. (deBeruff.) 

Ed. 107. Philosophy of Education. (3) 

June 22-Aug. 14. M.T.Th.F. 11:00; F-101. (Agre.) 

Ed. no. Human Development and Learning. (6)* 

Section 1— June 22-Aug. 14. 8:00-10:50, M.T.Th.F.; J-149. (Lawson.) 

Section 2— June 22-Aug. 14. 9:30-12:20, M.T.Th.F.; J.135. (Peck.) 

Ed. 147. Audio-visual Education. (3) 

Section 1— June 22-July 31. 8.00 Daily; P-300. (Maley.) 

Section 2— June 22-July 31. 9:30 Daily; P-300. (Schramm.) 

Section 3— June 22-Aug. 14. 11:00 M.T.Th.F.; P-300. (Schramm.) 

Ed. 150. Educational Measurement. (3) 

Section 1— June 22-July 31. Daily, 11:00; G-205. Limited to 50. (Giblette.) 
Section 2— June 22-Aug. 14. M.T.Th.F., 8:00; G-109B. Limited to 50. 

(Klevan.) 



*Students in Ed. 110 must reserve Wednesday mornings for observation-participation 
in a public school off-Campus. 



52 



Education 

Ed. 151. Statistical Methods in Education. (3) 

Section 1— June 22-Aug. 14. M.T.Th.F., 8:00; G-109A. Limited to 50. 

(Dayton.) 
Section 2— June 22-Aug. 14. M.T.Th.F., 9:30; G-205. Limited to 50. 

(Stunkard.) 

Ed. 154. Introduction to Corrective and Remedial Reading. (3) 
June 22-Aug. 14. M.T.Th.F., 8:00. Ed. Annex. (Staff.) 

Ed. 155. Laboratory Practices in Reading. A, B. C. (3) 

June 22-Aug. 14. Daily, Arranged. Ed. Annex. Prerequisite: Ed. 154 or equiv- 
alent. (Fanning.) 

Ed. 161. Introduction to Counseling and Pupil Services. (3) 

June 22-Aug. 14. M.T.Th.F., 8:00; G-205. (Staff.) 

Ed. 162. Mental Hygiene in the Classroom. (3) 

June 22-Aug. 14. M.T.Th.F., 9:30; A-8. (Greenberg.) 

Ed. 188. Special Problems in Education. (1-3) 

Prerequisite, consent of instructor. Available only to mature students who have 
definite plans for individual study of approved problems. Course cards must 
have the title of the problem and the name of the faculty member who has 
approved it. Arranged. (Staff.) 

Ed. 189. Workshops, Clinics, and Institutes. 

Ed. 189-1. Education in Family Finance. (4) 

June 22-July 17. 8:30-3:30; Q-20 and 27. See page 18. (C. Anderson.) 

Ed. 189-8. Workshop in Instructional Materials. (3) 

June 22-July 10. 11:00-12:20 and 1:30-2:50. L-100. See page 21. 

(Hatfield.) 

Ed. 189-9. Workshop on Economic Education. (3) 

July 20-Aug. 7. 9:00-3:00. See page 18; Q-129. 

Ed. 189-26. Human Relations in Educational Administration (6) 
June 22-July 31. Daily, 9:00-3:00; J-18. Prerequisite, a master's degree. Enroll- 
ment limited. Preference in enrollment will be given to teams designated by 
Maryland school systems. See page 21. (Newell, Bowie.) 

Ed. 189-29. Workshop in the Education of Children with Learn- 
ing Disabilities. (4) 

June 22-July 17. Daily, 9-3. To be held off -campus. See page 23. 

(Fouracre, Hebeler.) 

Ed. 189-33. Child Study Leaders. (2) 

June 22-July 3. Daily, 8:00-3:00; J-36. See page 20. (Morgan, Prescott.) 

Ed. 189-35. Application of Human Development Principles in 
Classrooms. (2) 

July 6-July 17. Daily, 8:00-3:00; J-36. See page 20. (Prescott.) 

53 



General Education 

Ed. 189-36. Human Development and Religious Education. (2) 

July 20-July 31. Daily, 8:00-3:00, J- 10. See page 20. (Morgan, Prescott.) 

Ed, 189-37, Action Research in Human Development Education. 
(2) 

Aug. 3-Aug. 14. Daily, 8:00-3:00, J-10. See page 20. (Morgan.) 

Ed, 189-41. N.D.E.A. Counseling and Guidance Training Insti- 
tute, (7) 

June 29-Aug. 7. Daily, 8-5:00. Terrapin Room. See page 15 for description. 

(Bott.) 

Ed. 189-47. Workshop for Teachers of Secondary School Eng- 
lish. (3) 

June 22-July 10. 10:00-3:30; G-109A and G-109B. See page 22. (Bryan.) 

Typewriting Demonstration Laroratory. (0) 

June 22-July 31. 8:30-10:15. (O'Neill.) 

Ed, 206. Seminar in Comparative Education. (2) 

June 22-July 31. M.T.Th.F.; 8:00; A-8. (Wiggin.) 

Ed. 210. The Organization and Administration of Public Educa- 
tion, (3) 

Section 1— June 22-July 31. Daily, 8:00; A-16. (Blaha.) 

Section 2— June 22-July 31. Daily, 11:00; A-14. (Blaha.) 

Ed. 211. The Organization and Administration of Secondary 
Schools. (3) 

June 22-July 31. Daily, 11:00; A-17. (Staff.) 

Ed. 214. School Plant Planning. (2) 

June 22-July 31. M.T.Th.F., 9:30; A-103. (van Zwoll.) 

Ed. 216. Public School Supervision. (3) 

June 22-Aug. 14. M.T.Th.F., 8:00; A-103. (J. P. Anderson.) 

Ed. 217. Administration and Supervision in Elementary Schools. 
(3) 

June 22-July 31. Daily 9:30; A-320. (Johnson.) 

Ed, 219, Seminar in Educational Administration and Supervision. 

(2) 

June 22-July 31. M.T.Th.F., 11:00; A-323. Prerequisite, at least four hours in 
educational administration and supervision or consent of instructor. A student 
may register for two hours and take the seminar a second time for an additional 
two hours. (Johnson.) 

Ed. 227. Public School Personnel Administration. (3) 

June 22-July 31. Daily, 8:00; A-323. (van Zwoll.) 

Ed. 234. The School Curriculum. (2) 

June 22-July 31. M.T.Th.F., 9:30; F-104. (Hovet.) 

54 



Education 
Ed. 235. Principles of Curriculum Development. (3) 

June 22-July 31. Daily, 11:00; A-18. (Harrison.) 

Ed. 241. Problems in the Teaching of Reading. (3) 

June 22-Aug. 14. M.T.Th.F., 9:30; O-lOl. Prerequisite, Ed. 153 or equivalent. 

(Collins.) 

Ed. 245. Introduction to Research. (2) 

Section 1— June 22-July 31. M.T.Th.F., 8:00. Limited to 25; FF-16. (Nelson.) 
Section 2— June 22-July 31. M.T.Th.F., 9:30. Limited to 25; FF-16. (Raths.) 
Section 3— June 22-July 31. M.T.Th.F., 11:00. Limited to 25; A-49. (Hovet.) 

Ed. 250. Cases in Pupil Appraisal. (3) 

June 22-Aug. 14. M.T.Th.F., 11:00; A-50. (Chenault.) 

Ed. 251. Intermediate Statistics in Education. (3) 

June 22-August 14, M.T.Th.F., 9:30; T-5. 

Prerequisite, Ed. 151 or equivalent. (Dayton.) 

Ed. 255. Advanced Laboratory Experiences in Reading Instruc- 
tion. (3) 

June 22-August 14. Daily. Arranged. Ed. Annex. Prerequisites, 21 credits 
applicable to master's program in Corrective-Remedial Reading, including Ed. 
154, Ed. 150, and Ed. 141 or ECEE 221; and a written application before 
June 1. (Fanning.) 

Ed. 256. Advanced Laboratory Experiences in Reading Instruc- 
tion. (3) 

June 22-August 14. Daily. Arranged. Ed. Annex. Prerequisite, same as those 
for Ed 255. (Fanning.) 

Ed. 259. Counseling in Elementary Schools. (3) 

June 22-August 14. M.T.Th.F., 8:00; O-240. (Greenberg.) 

Ed. 260. School Counseling: Theoretical Foundations and 
Practice. (3) 

June 22-July 31, Daily 8:00; O-120. 

Prerequisites, Ed. 161, Ed. 250, and Ed. 253. (Marx.) 

Ed. 261. Practicum in Counseling. (2) 

June 22-August 14, M.W.F., 9:30, 0-236. 

Prerequisite, Ed. 260 and permission of instructor. (Chenault.) 

Ed. 280. Research Methods and Materials. (2) 

June 22-August 14. Arranged. 

Primarily for advanced students and doctoral candidates. Limited to 15. 

(Stunkard.) 

Ed. 281. Source Materials in Education. (2) 

June 22-July 31. M.T.Th.F., 8:00; 0-236. (Luetkemeyer.) 

55 



General and Academic Education 

Ed. 288. Special Problems in Education. (1-6) 

Arranged. Master of Education or doctoral candidates who desire to pursue 
special research problems under the direction of their advisers may register 
for credit under this number. Course cards must have the title of the problem 
and the name of the faculty member under whom the work will be done. 

(Staff.) 

Ed. 290. Doctoral Seminar. ( 1 ) 

June 22-August 14. Arranged. Prerequisite, passing the preliminary examination 
for a doctor's degree in Education, or recommendation of a doctoral adviser. 
A doctoral candidate may participate in the Seminar during as many University 
sessions as he desires, but may earn no more than three semester hours of 
credit in the Seminar. An Ed.D. candidate may earn in total no more than 
nine semester hours, and a Ph.D. candidate, no more than eighteen semester 
hours, in the Seminar and in Ed. 399. Limited to 15. (Stunkard.) 

Ed. 302. Curriculum in Higher Education. (3) 

July 31-August 14. M.T.Th.F., 9:30; A-10. (Kelsey.) 

Ed. 305. College Teaching. (3) 

July 31-August 14. M.T.Th.F., 8:00; A-10. (Kelsey.) 

Ed. 399. Research-Thesis. (1-6) 

Arranged. (Staff.) 

SECONDARY EDUCATION 

GENERAL AND ACADEMIC EDUCATION 
Sec. Ed. 130. The Junior High School. (3) 

June 22-JuIy 31. Daily, 8:00; A-104. (Crosby.) 

Sec. Ed. 133. Methods of Teaching Social Studies in Secondary 
Schools. (3) 

June 22-August 14. M.T.Th.F., 9:30; FF-7. (Campbell.) 

Sec. Ed. 137. Methods of Teaching Mathematics in Secondary 
Schools. (3) 

June 22-August 14. M.T.Th.F., 9:30-10:50. (Cole.) 

Sec. Ed. 138. Methods of Teaching Science in Secondary Schools. 
(3) 

June 22-August 14. M.T.Th.F., 9:30; T-10. (Pancella.) 

Sec. Ed. 141. Methods of Teaching English in Secondary Schools. 
(3) 

June 22-August 14. M.T.Th.F., 8:00; R-109. (Staff.) 

Sec. Ed. 145. Principles and Methods of Secondary Education. (3) 

June 22-August 14. M.T.Th.F., 8:00; A-228. (Van Ness.) 

Ed. 189-47, page 22, Workshop for Teachers of Secondary English. (3) 

56 



Business Education 
Sec. Ed. 160. Educational Sociology. (3) 

June 22-August 14. M.T.Th.F., 1 1 :00; O-120. (Pickett.) 

Sec. Ed. 239. Seminar in Secondary Education. (2) 

August 3-14. 9:30-12:30; A-170. (Grambs.) 

BUSINESS EDUCATION 

B. Ed. 102. Methods and Materials in Teaching Bookkeeping and 
Related Subjects. (2) 

June 22-JuIy 31. M.T.Th.F., 9:30-10:50; Q-6. (Fries.) 

B. Ed. 205. Seminar in Business Education. (2) 

June 22-July 31. M.T.Th.F., 11:00-12:20; Q-6. (Patrick.) 

B. Ed, 256. Curriculum Development in Business Education. (3) 
June 22-July 31. Daily, 12:30-1:50; Q-6. (Fries.) 

HOME ECONOMICS EDUCATION 

H. Ec. Ed. 102. Problems in Teaching Home Economics. (3) 

June 22-July 17. 8:00-10:50. A-50. (Spencer.) 

H. Ec. 202. Trends in the Teaching and Supervision of 
Home Economics. (3) 

July 20-August 14. 8:00-10:50. A-50. (Spencer.) 

MUSIC EDUCATION 

Mus. Ed. 128. Music for the Elementary Classroom Teacher. (3) 

June 22-July 31. Daily, 8:00-9:20; B-1. Prerequisite, Music 16 or equivalent, 
or consent of instructor. A study of group activities and materials through 
which the child experiences music. (Fanos.) 

Mus. Ed. 132. Music in Secondary Schools. (3) 

June 22-July 31. Daily, 8:00-9:20; B-7. A study of the vocal and instrumental 
programs in the secondary school. (Eisenstadt.) 

Mus. Ed. 139. Music for the Elementary School Specialist. (3) 

June 22-July 31. Daily, 11:00-12:20; B-7. A survey of instructional materials 
and objectives. (Eisenstadt.) 

Mus. Ed. 155. Organization and Technique of Instrumental Class 
Instruction. (3) 

June 22-July 10. Daily, 2:00-5:00 for three weeks; Arm. 300. Offered as part 
of High School Band Workshop. A survey of materials and methods for class 
instruction. Supplementary fee, $5.00. (Sawhill.) 

Mus. Ed. 171. String Teaching in the Public Schools. (2) 

June 22-July 31. M.T.Th.F., 9:30-10:50; HH-108. A study of the organization 
and development of public school string programs. Study of teaching techniques 
and appropriate music. (Berman.) 

51 



Human Development Education 

Mus. Ed. 204. Current Trends in Music Education. (3) 

June 22-JuIy 31. Daily, 9:30-10:50; B-9. A survey of current philosophies 
and practices in the public schools. (Grentzer.) 

Mus. Ed. 250. History and Aesthetics of Music Education. (3) 

June 22-July 31. Daily, 11:00-12:20; B.9. Prerequisite, consent of instructor. 
The development of pedagogical practices in music education, their aesthetic 
implications, and their educational values. (Grentzer.) 



HUMAN DEVELOPMENT EDUCATION 

(In addition to the courses listed below, see Ed. 110, Ed. 189-33,-35,-36,-37) 

H. D. Ed. 101. Principles of Human Development II. (3) 

June 22-July 31. Daily, 9:30; J-143. (Kyle.) 

H. D. Ed. 110. Child Development III. (3) 

June 22-July 31. Daily, 8:00; AA-8. (Broome.) 

H. D. Ed. 112, 114. Scientific Concepts in Human Development 
I, II. (3) (3) 

June 22-July 31. Daily, J-154, J-150. See page 19. (Mershon, Matteson.) 

H. D. Ed. 113, 115. Laboratory in Behavior Analysis I, II. (3) (3) 

June 22-July 31. Daily, J-14, J-153, J-128. See page 19. (Mershon, Matteson.) 

H. D. Ed. 145. Guidance of Young Children. (3) 

June 22-July 31. Daily, 9:30; AA-8. (Broome.) 

H. D. Ed. 200. Introduction to Human Development and Child 
Study. (3) 

June 22-July 31. 

Section 1—8:00, Daily; J-207. (Kurtz.) 

Section 2—9:30, Daily; J-207. (Perkins.) 

H. D. Ed. 201. Biological Bases of Behavior. (3) 

June 22— July 31. Daily, 9:30; J-124. (Kurtz.) 

H. D. Ed. 202. Social Bases of Behavior. (3) 

June 22-July 31. Daily, 8:00; J-9. (Brandt.) 

H. D. Ed. 203. Integrative Bases of Behavior. (3) 

June 22-July 31. Daily, 9:30; J-341. (Staff.) 

H. D. Ed. 210. Affectional Relationships and Processes in 
Human Development. (3) 

June 22-July 31. Daily, 8:00; J-126. (Kyle.) 

H. D. Ed. 212, 214. Advanced Scientific Concepts in Human De- 
velopment, I, II. (3) (3) 

June 22-July 31. Daily, J-347, J-355, J-320. See page 19 (Mershon, Matteson.) 

58 



Industrial Education 

H. D. Ed. 213, 215. Advanced Laroratory in Behavior Analysis, 
I, II. (3) (3) 

June 11-July 31. Daily; J-361, J-369. See page 19. (Mershon, Matteson.) 

H. D. Ed. 221. Learning Theory and the Educative Process. (3) 

June 22-July 31. Daily, 8:00; J-128. (Perkins.) 



INDUSTRIAL EDUCATION 

I. Ed. 34. Graphic Arts I (3) 

June 22-July 31. Daily, 11:00; P-201. Laboratory fee, $7.50. 



(Tierney.) 



L Ed. 44. Graphic Arts II. (3) 

June 22-July 31. Daily, 11:00; P-201. Laboratory fee, $7.50. (Tierney.) 

I. Ed. 69. Machine Shop I (3) 

June 22-July 31. Daily, 9:30; P-126. Laboratory fee, $7.50. (Herrick.) 

I. Ed. 84. Organized and Supervised Work Experience. (3) 
June 22-August 14. 

Arranged for students enrolled in the curriculum Education for Industry. 

(Guy, Herrick.) 

L Ed. 89. Machine Shop II. (3) 

June 22-July 31. Daily, 9:30; P-126. Laboratory fee, $5.00. (Herrick.) 

I. Ed. 115. Research and Experimentation in Industrial Arts. (3) 

June 22-July 31. Daily, 11:00; P-128. (Maley.) 

I. Ed. 121. Industrial Arts in Special Education. (3) 

June 22-July 31. Daily, 9:30-12:00; P-214. Laboratory fee, $5.00. 

(Luetkemeyer.) 

I. Ed. 124. Organized and Supervised Work Experience (3) 

June 22-August 14. (Merrill.) 

Arranged for students enrolled in the curriculum Education for Industry. 

L Ed. 125. Industrial Training in Industry. (3) 

June 22-August 14. M.T.Th.F., 8:00; P-221. (Merrill.) 

I. Ed. 150. Training Aids Development. (3) 

June 22-July 31. Daily, 8:00; P-300. (Maley.) 

I. Ed. 164. Shop Organization and Management. (2) 

June 22-July 31. M.T.Th.F., 9:30; P-221. (Snyder.) 

I. Ed. 168. Trade or Occupational Analysis. (2) 

June 22-July 31, M.T.Th.F., 11:00, P-220. (Snyder.) 

I. Ed. 175. Recent Technological Developments in Products and 
Processes. (3) 

June 22-JuIy 31. Daily, 9:30; P-306. (Crosby.) 



59 



Library Science Education 

I. Ed. 207. Philosophy of Industrial Arts Education. (3) 

June 22-August 14. M.T.Th.F. (Harrison.) 

I. Ed. 216. Supervision of Industrial Arts. (2) 

June 22-JuIy 31. M.T.Th.F., 8:00; P-220. (Tierney.) 



LIBRARY SCIENCE EDUCATION 

L. S. Ed. 120. Introduction to Librarianship. (3) 

June 22-July 10. 11:00-12:20 and 1:30-2:50 Introduction; A-8-N. (Staff.) 

L. S. Ed. 124. Book Selection and Evaluation for Children and 
Youth. (3) 

June 22-July 17. 8:00-9:20 and 9:30-10:50; L-100. (D.Brown.) 

L. S. Ed. 128. School Library Administration and Service. (3) 

July 20-August 14. 8:00-9:20 and 9:30-10:50; L-100. (D.Brown.) 

L, S. Ed. 132. Library Materials for Youth. (3) 

July 13-July 31. 11:00-12:20 and 1:30-2:50; L-100. Library materials for 
junior high and senior high school students, including book and non-book ma- 
terials. (A. Smith.) 



Ed. 189-8, page 21, Workshop in Instructional Materials. (3) 



SPECIAL EDUCATION 

Sp. Ed. 170. Introduction to Special Education. (3) 

June 22-July 31. Daily, 8:00-9:20; AR-23. (Simms.) 

Sp. Ed. 171-A. Characteristics of Exceptional Children. (3) 

June 22-Juiy 31. Daily, 9:30-10:50; AR-23. 

A. Mentally Retarded. Prerequisite, Sp. Ed. 170. (Renz.) 

Sp. Ed. 200. Exceptional Children and Youth. (3) 

June 22-July 31. Daily, 8:00-9:20; AR-20. Prerequisite, consent of instructor. 

Sp. Ed. 210. Administration and Supervision of Special Education 
Programs. (2) 

June 22-July 3. Daily, 8:00-12:00; A- 10. Prerequisite, consent of instructor. 

(Wirtz.) 

Sp. Ed. 215. Evaluation and Measurement of Exceptional Chil- 
dren AND Youth. (3) 

June 22-July 31. Daily, 9:30-10:50. Prerequisite, Ed. 150, 151, Sp. Ed. 200; 
AR-21. (Simms, Hebeler.) 

Sp. Ed. 220. Educational Diagnosis and Planning for Exceptional 
Children and Youth. (3) 

July 6-Aug. 14. Daily, 11:00-12:20. Prerequisite, Sp. Ed. 215; AR-20. 

(Hebeler.) 

60 



Engineering 
Sp. Ed. 278. Seminar in Special Education. (2) 

June 22-July 31, M.T.Th.F., 8:00-9:20. Prerequisite, 9 hours in Sp. Ed. or 
consent of instructor; AR-21. (Hebeler.) 



ENGINEERING 

C. E. 110. Surveying I. (3) 

June 8-June 20. Daily, 8:00-3:30; J-103. J-104. Prerequisite: junior stand- 
ing or consent of department head. Open only to students who have been en- 
rolled in the College of Engineering. (Garber.) 

E. E. 1. Basic Electrical Engineering. (4) 

June 22-August 14, 1964. M.T.Th.F., 8:00-9:20; J-104. S. 8:00-10:50, S-107. 
Prerequisites, Math. 21, Phys. 21, or concurrent registration. Required of sopho- 
mores in electrical engineering. Laboratory fee, $5.00. Basic concepts of elec- 
trical circuits and methods of analysis. (Rumbaugh.) 

E. E. 101. Engineering Electronics. (4) 

June 22-August 14, 1964. M.T.Th.F., 8:00-9:20, J-131. S. 8:00-10:50, J-208. 
Prerequisite, E. E. 100. Required of juniors in electrical engineering. Labora- 
tory fee, $5.00. Theory and application of transistors and electron tubes; 
electronic circuits and methods of circuit analysis. (Jones.) 

E. E. 104. Long Line Theory. (3) 

June 22-August 14, 1964. M.T.Th.F., 9:30-10:50; J-9. Prerequisite, E. E. 107. 
Required of juniors in electrical engineering. Engineering application of Max- 
well's equations; waves in space; wave guides; transmission lines; matching. 

(Hahn.) 

E. S. 10. Mechanics. (4) 

June 22-August 14, 1964. Section 1— M.T.W.Th.F., 8:00-9:20, J-304. Section 
2— M.T.W.Th.F., 11:00-12:20, J-304. Prerequisites, E. S. 1; Math. 19 (or con- 
current). Numerical, graphical and vectorial computation applied to elemen- 
tary problems in mechanics. (Elkins.) 

E. S. 20. Mechanics of Materials. (3) 

June 22-August 14, 1964. M.T.Th.F., 11:00-12:20; J-371. Prerequisite, Math. 
20, Phys. 20 and E. S. 10. Distortion of engineering materials with application 
to beams, columns, shafts, tanks, trusses, and connections. (Jackson.) 

E. S. 21. Dynamics. (3) 

June 22-August 14, 1964. M.T.Th.F., 12:30-1:50; J-371. Prerequisites, Math. 20. 
Phys. 20 (or concurrent registration) and E. S. 10. Dynamics of particles and 
rigid bodies with applications to engineering problems. (Yang.) 

M. E. 1. Thermodynamics I. (3) 

June 22-August 14, 1964. M.T.W.Th.F., 8:00-9:20; J-201. Prerequisites, Phys. 
20; Math. 21 concurrently. Required of sophomores in mechanical and aero- 
nautical engineering. (M. E. 1 is an acceptable substitute for M. E. 100 in 
other engineering curricula.) (Eyler.) 

61 



Home Economics 

HOME ECONOMICS 
FAMILY LIFE AND MANAGEMENT 

H. M. 50. Decision Making in Family Living. (3) 

July 20-August 14. 9:30-11:45. Decision making in relation to family values, 
philosophies, goals, and resources. (Staflf.) 

H. M. 16L Resident Experience in Home Management. (3) 

First group, June 22-July 18; second group, July 20-August 15. Laboratory fee, 
SI 0.00. A charge of $40.00 for food and supplies is assessed each student. 
Students not living in dormitories are billed at the rate of $5.00 a week for a 
room in the Home Management House. (Staff.) 

F. L. 135. Directed Experience with Children and Families. (3) 

July 20-August 7. 9:00-12:00. Laboratory fee, $3.00. Prerequisite, Psych. 1 
and consent of instructor. Observation and study of selected home situations 
placing emphasis on contemporary family living. (Morgan.) 

FOOD AND NUTRITION 

F. & N. 5. Food and Nutrition of Individuals and Families. (3) 

July 20-Aug. 14. 9:00-12:00. Consent of instructor. Laboratory fee, $3.00. 
A study of the food and nutrition of contemporary peoples. The economic, 
social, esthetic, and nutritional implications of food. (Lanz.) 

Food 150. Food Economics and Meal Management. (3) 

June 22-Juiy 17. 9:00-12:00. Consent of department. Lecture and laboratory. 
Laboratory fee. SI 0.00. Management of family meals through study of the 
distribution and marketing of food, and the management of time, energy, money, 
and other resources. (Lanz.) 

GENERAL HOME ECONOMICS 

H. E. 190. Special Problems in Home Economics. (1-3) 

Arranged. Laboratory fee, $3.00 a semester hour. Problems in the following 
areas of home economics: (a) Applied Art; (b) Clothing; (c) General Home 
Economics: (d) Family Life; (e) Food and Institutional Food; (f) Manage- 
ment: (g) Nutrition: (h) Textiles. (Staff.) 

H. E. 290. Special Topics. (1-6) 

Topics in same fields as H. E. 190 but for graduate credit only. (Staff.) 

H. E. 201. Methods of Research in Home Economics. (3) 

June 22-July 17. 9:30-11:45. Consent of instructor. Application of scientific 
methods to problems in the field of home economics. (Loftis.) 

H. E. 399; F. & N. 399; T. & C. 399. Thesis Research. (1-6) 

Credit according to work accomplished. (Staff.) 

H. E. 190 c or 290 c. Special Problems or Topics — Colloquium in 
Home Economics. (1) 

July 20-24. 9:00-12:00. Overview of trends and developments in the several 
areas. (Visiting Lecturers.) 

62 



Home Economics 
H. E. 290 c. Special Topics. (1) 

July 27-July 31. 9:00-12:00. Special emphasis given to Home Economics col- 
lege teachers directing research activities. (Special Coordinator.) 

HOUSING AND APPLIED DESIGN 
A. D. 1. Design. (3) 

June 22-July 31. 8:00-9:15, daily. Fee, $3.00. Art expression through various 
media. (Roper.) 

A. D. 142. Advanced Interior Design. (2) 

August 3-August 14. 9:00-12:15. Prerequisites, A. D. 1, 2, and 41. Fee, $3.00. 
Designing of rooms rendered in perspective; coordination with fabrics, floor, 
and wall finishes. (Staff.) 

TEXTILES AND CLOTHING 
Tex. 50. Consumer Textiles. (3) 

July 27-Aug. 14. 9:00-12:15. Prerequisite, T. & C. 5 or consent of instructor. 
Laboratory fee, $3.00. Problems of consumers in textile selection, purchase, 
and care. (Mitchell.) 

T. & C. 126. Fundamentals of Fashion. (3) 

July 27-August 14. 9:00-12:00. Prerequisite, Clo. 120. Laboratory fee, $3.00. 
Fashion history; interpretation and evaluation of current fashions; promotion. 

(Visiting Lecturer.) 

T. & C. 128. Fundamentals of Home Furnishings. (3) 

June 29-July 17. 9:00-12:15. Prerequisites, T. & C. 5, Clo. 10, and/or consent 
of instructor. Laboratory fee, $3.00. Selection of fabrics for home and insti- 
tutional furnishings; custom construction of slipcovers, etc.; upholstering fur- 
niture. (Wilbur.) 



PHYSICAL EDUCATION, RECREATION AND HEALTH 

P. E. SIO. Physical Education Activities. (1-2) 

June 22-July 31. Not available for credit by physical education majors. Non- 
majors in physical education may use this credit to fulfill graduation require- 
ments in physical education. Fee, $6.00. 
Section 1— Swimming, (1) Daily, 3:10-4:00. Cole Pool. 
Section 2— Tennis, (1) Daily, 2:00:2:50. Cole Tennis Courts. (Steel.) 

P. E. 100. Kinesiology. (4) 

June 22-July 31. Daily, 9:30-10:50, and arranged; GG-205. The study of hu- 
man movement and the physical, mechanical and physiological principles upon 
which it depends. (Nelson.) 

63 



Physical Education, Recreation and Health 

P. E. 120. Physical Education for the Elementary School. (3) 

June 22-July 31. Daily, 11:00-12:20; GG-310. Principles and practices will be 
presented and discussed, along with appropriate activities for the various grade 
levels. (Humphrey.) 

P. E. 189. Physical Education Workshop (PROGRAM DEVELOP- 
MENT). (1-6) 

The workshop will concern itself with the development of a modern physical 
education program allowing additional guidance for individual problems. This 
is a content workshop. (See page 22) 
June 22-July 10. Daily, Section 1, 8:30-12:00 & 1:00-3:30; GG-160. 

(Hanson.) 
Daily, Section 2, 8:30-12:00 & 1:00-3:30; GG-37. 

(Nessler.) 

P. E. 189. Field Laboratory Projects and Workshop. (1-6) 

Arranged. Credit according to work accomplished. (Staff.) 

P. E. 189A. Workshop in Physical Activity in Recreation 
Programs for the Retarded. (See page 24) 
June 8-July 3. Daily, 9:00-3:00. 

P. E. 195. Organization and Administration of Elementary School 
Physical Education. (3) 

June 22-July 31. Daily, 9:30-10:50; GG-128. Organizational administrative 
factors necessary for the successful operation of the program in various types 
of elementary schools. (Humphrey.) 

P. E. 200, Seminar in Physical Education, Recreation and Health. 
(1) 

Arranged; GG-205. (Staff.) 

P. E. 230. Source Material Survey. (3) 

June 22-July 31. Daily, 9:30-10:50; GG-202. A study of the research literature 
involving the use of various reference tools. (Eyler.) 

P. E. 287. Advanced Seminar. (2) 

June 22-July 31. Daily, 8:00-9:20; Room GG-128. 

\ study of current problems and trends in the selected fields of Physical Edu- 
cation, Recreation and Health. (Staff.) 

P. E. 288. Special Problems in Physical Education, Recreation, 
AND Health. (1-6) 

Arranged. Credit according to work accomplished. (Staff.) 

P. E. 291. Curriculum Construction in Physical Education and 
Health. (3) 

June 22-July 31. Daily, 11:00-12:20; GG-202. A study of valid bases for cur- 
riculum design with practical applications to curriculum construction. (Eyler.) 

P. E. 399. Research— Thesis. (1-5) 

Arranged. Credits according to work accomplished. (Staff.) 

64 



Physical Education, Recreation and Health 

HEALTH EDUCATION 

Hea. 105. Basic Driver Education. (3) 

June 22-July 31. Daily, 8:00-9:20; GG-201. The place of the automobile in 
modern life, including classroom and behind the wheel methods of instruction. 

(Tompkins.) 

Hea. 145. Advanced Driver Education. (3) 

June 22-JuIy 31. Daily, 9:30-10:50; GG-201. Comprehensive programming 
for traffic safety, including training of young drivers and evaluating results. 

(Tompkins.) 

Hea. 189. Health Education Workshop. (1-6) 

Section 1 — June 22-July 10. (Johnson.) 

Section 2 — July 13-31. (Johnson.) 

June 22-July 31. Daily, 8:30-12:00 & 1:00-3:30; W-131. Enrollment by per- 
mission of the instructor. Development of the various fields associated with 
health will be described and discussed by specialists of the University, National 
Institute of Health and others associated with health agencies. See page 17. 



65 



THE FACULTY 



SUMMER SESSION, 1964 
JUNE 22 - AUGUST 14 

ADDISON, Howard P., Assistant Professor of Agricultural and Extension Education 
B.S., Purdue University, 1953; M.S., 1958. 

ADKINS, Arthur, Visiting Professor in Education 

A.B., St. Cloud Teachers College, 1942; M.A., University of Minnesota, 1947; 
Ph.D., 1953. 

ACRE, Gene P., Assistant Professor of Education 

B.A., Macalester College 1951; B.S., University of Minnesota, 1953; M.A., 1956. 

ANDERSON, Charles R., Instructor in Office Management and Techniques 
B.A., University of Maryland, 1957; M.Ed., 1959. 

ANDERSON, Frank G., Associate Professor of Sociology 

A.B., Cornell University, 1941; Ph.D., University of New Mexico, 1951. 

ANDERSON, Henry, Assistant Professor of Statistics 

B.A., University of London, 1939; M.B.A., Columbia University, 1948; Ph.D., 
1959. 

AVERY, William T., Professor and Head, Department of Classical Languages and 
Literatures 

B.A., Western Reserve University, 1934; M.A., 1935; Ph.D., 1937. Fellow of the 
American Academy in Rome, 1937-39. 

AYLWARD, Thomas J., Associate Professor of Speech and Dramatic Art 
B.S., University of Wisconsin, 1947; M.S., 1949; Ph.D., 1960. 

BAUER, Richard H., Professor of History 

B.A., University of Chicago, 1924; M.A., 1928; Ph.D., 1935. 

BARI, Ruth, Instructor of Mathematics 

B.A., Brooklyn College, 1939; M.A., Johns Hopkins University, 1943. 

BATKA, George F., Associate Professor of Speech and Dramatic Art 
B.A., Wichita University, 1938; M.A., University of Michigan, 1941. 

BENNETT, Robert L., Assistant Professor of Economics 
B.A., University of Texas, 1951; M.A., 1955; Ph.D., 1963. 

BENNETT, William E., Instructor in Education 

B.S., Georgia Teachers College, 1939; M.A., Teachers College, Columbia Uni- 
versity, 1947. 

BERMAN, JOEL H., Assistant Professor of Music 

B.S., Juilliard School of Music, 1951; M.A., Columbia University, 1953; D.M.A., 
University of Michigan, 1961. 

66 



Faculty 

BERNSTEIN, Melvin, Assistant Professor of Music 
A.B., Southwestern At Memphis, 1947; B.Mus., 1948; M.Mus., University of 
Michigan, 1949; M.A., University of North Carolina, 1954. 

BICKLEY, William E., Professor and Head of Entomology 

B.S., University of Tennessee, 1934; M.S., 1936; Ph.D., University of Maryland, 
1940. 

BINGHAM, Alfred J., Associate Professor of Foreign Languages 
B.A., Yale University, 1933; Ph.D., Columbia University, 1939. 

BLAHA, M. Jay, Visiting Lecturer in Education 

B.E., St. Cloud State College, Minnesota, 1930; M.A., University of Washington, 
Seattle, 1939; Ph.D., University of Washington, Seattle, 1941. 

BLOUGH, Glenn O., Professor of Education 

B.A., University of Michigan, 1929; M.A., 1932; LL.D., Central Michigan College 
of Education, 1950. 

BODE, Carl, Professor of English 

Ph.B., University of Chicago, 1933; M.A., Northwestern University, 1938; 
Ph.D., 1941; Fellow of the Royal Society of Literature of the United King- 
dom. 

BOTT, Margaret, Assistant Professor of Education and Counselor in Counseling 

Center. 

B.A., St. John's University, 1952; M.S., Hunter College, 1959; Ph.D., Michi- 
gan State University, 1962. 

BOWIE, B. Lucile, Associate Professor of Education, Institute for Child Study 
B.S., University of Maryland, 1942; M.A., Teachers College, Columbia Uni- 
versity, 1946; Ed.D., University of Maryland, 1957. 

BOURDEAU, Hugo A., Instructor of Sociology 

A.B., Tufts University, 1951; M.A., Boston University, 1952. 

BOYD, Alfred C, Assistant Professor of Chemistry 

B.S., Canisius College, 1951; Ph.D., Purdue University, 1957. 

BRANDT, Richard M., Associate Professor of Education, Institute for Child Study 
B.M.E., University of Virginia, 1943; M.A., University of Michigan, 1949; 
Ed.D., University of Maryland, 1954. 

BROOME, Eleanor A., Instructor in Early Childhood Education, Institute for Child 
Study 

B.A., University of Maryland, 1943; M.Ed., 1957. 

BROWN, Dale W., Assistant Professor of Education 
B.A., David Liscomb College, 1953; M.A., George Peabody College for 
Teachers, 1955; A.M.L.S., University of Michigan, 1963. 

BROWN, Frederick A., Assistant Professor in Education 

B.S., Lock Haven State College, 1942; M.A., Teachers College, Columbia, 
1947; Ed.D., The Pennsylvania State University, 1960. 

67 



Faculty 

BROWN, Helen I., Associate Professor and Head, Department of Food, Nutrition, 
and Institution Administration 

B.S., University of Vermont, 1938; M.A., Columbia University, 1948; Ph.D., 

Michigan State University, 1960. 

BROWN, Lillian W., Instructor in Early Childhood Education (part-time) 
B.A., Lake Erie College, 1930. 

BROWN, Marjorie, Visiting Lecturer of Home Economics 

BRYAN, Marie D., Associate Professor of Education 

B.A., Goucher College, 1923; M.A., University of Maryland, 1945. 

BROWN, Russell G., Associate Professor of Botany 

B.S., West Virginia University, 1929: M.S., 1930; Ph.D., University of Mary- 
land, 1934. 

BYRD, Albert M., Assistant Professor of Government and Politics 
B.S., American University, 1953; M.A., 1954; Ph.D., 1959. 

BYRNE, Richard H., Professor of Education and Project Director, Interprofessional 

Research Commission on Pupil Personnel Services 

B.A., Franklin and Marshall College, 1938; M.A., Columbia University, 1947; 
Ed.D., 1952. 

CAIRNS, Gordon M., Dean of Agriculture and Professor of Dairy Husbandry 
B.S., Cornell University, 1936; M.S., 1938; Ph.D., 1940. 

CALHOUN, Charles E.. Professor of Finance 

A.B., University of Washington, 1925; M.B.A., 1930. 

CAMPBELL, Elwood G., Assistant Professor of History and Education 

B.S., Northeast Missouri State Teachers College, 1949; M.A., Northwestern 
University, 1952; Ph.D., 1963. 

CARDOZIER, Virgus R., Professor and Head of Agricultural and Extension Educa- 
tion 

B.S., Louisiana State University, 1947; M.S., 1950; Ph.D., Ohio State Univer- 
sity, 1952. 

CARRUTHERS, John, Assistant Professor of Chemistry 

CAUSEY, G. Donald, Associate Research Professor of Speech and Dramatic Art 

M.A., University of Maryland, 1950; M.A., 1951; Ph.D., Purdue University, 

1954. 

CHAMPLIN, James R., Instructor of Recreation 

A.B., Earlham College, 1953; M.S., Indiana University, 1956, Re-Dir., 1956. 

CHATELAIN, Verne E., Professor of History 

B.A., Nebraska State Teachers College, 1917; M.A., University of Chicago, 
1925; Ph.D., University of Minnesota, 1943. 

CHAVES, Antonio F., Associate Professor of Geography 

M.A., Northwestern University, 1948; D.Litt., University of Habana, 1941; 
Ph.D., University of Habana, 1946. 

68 



Faculty 

CHEN, Chunjen C, Assistant Professor of Foreign Languages 

B.S., Cornell University, 1919; M.S., University of Maryland, 1920. 

COLE, Mildred, Lecturer in Education and Mathematics 

B.S., University of Illinois, 1943; M.S., University of Wisconsin, 1951. 

COLLINS, James P., Assistant Professor in Education 

B.Ed., University State College, New York, 1949; M.S., University State Col- 
lege, New York, 1953. 

CONKIN, Paul K., Associate Professor of History 

B.A., Milligan College, 1951; M.A., Vanderbilt University, 1953; Ph.D., 1957. 

CONWAY, Mary Margaret, Lecturer in Government and Politics 

B.S., Purdue, 1957; M.A., University of California (Berkeley), 1960. 

COOK, J. Allan, Professor of Marketing 

B.A., College of William and Mary, 1928; M.B.A., Harvard University, 1936; 
Ph.D., Columbia University, 1947. 

COONCE, Charlotte, Instructor in Early Childhood Education 
B.S., Iowa State University, 1960. 

CORREL, Ellen, Associate Professor of Mathematics 

B.S., Douglas College (Rutgers University), 1951; M.S., Purdue University, 
1953; Ph.D., 1957. 

COURTLESS, Thomas F., Jr., Instructor of Sociology 

B.A., Pennsylvania State University, 1955; M.A., University of Maryland, 
1960. 

CROSBY, Edmund D., Assistant Professor of Industrial Education 

B.A., Western Michigan University, 1934; M.A., Colorado A. & M. College, 
1941. 

CROWELL, Alfred A., Professor and Head of the Department of Journalism 
and Public Relations 

A.B., University of Oklahoma, 1929; M.A., 1934; M.S.J., Northwestern University, 

1940. 

CURTIS, John M., Professor and Head, Agricultural Economics 

B.S., North Carolina State University, 1947; M.S., 1950; Ph.D., University 
of Maryland, 1961. 

DAIKER, John A., Assistant Professor of Accounting 
C.P.A., District of Columbia, 1949; B.S., University of Maryland, 1941; 
M.B.A., 1951. 

DAVIS, Richard E., Professor and Head of Dairy Science 

B.S., University of New Hampshire, 1950; M.S., Cornell University, 1952; 
Ph.D., 1953. 

DAWSON, Townes L., Associate Professor of Business Law 

B.B.A., University of Texas, 1943; B.A., U. S. Merchant Marine Academy, 
1946; M.B.A., University of Texas, 1947; Ph.D., 1950; LL.B., 1954. 

69 



Faculty 

DAYTON, Chauncey M., Instructor in Education 

A.B., University of Chicago, 1955; M.A., University of Maryland, 1963. 

DEMAITRE, Ann, Instructor of Foreign Languages 

B.A., Columbia University. 1950; M.A., University of California, 1951; M.S., 
Columbia University, 1952. 

De VERMOND. Mary F., Assistant Professor of Music 

B.Mus., Howard University, 1942; M.A.. Columbia University, 1948; Ed.D., 
University of Maryland, 1959. 

DeBERUFF, Ellen, Instructor in Education 
B.A., University of Maryland, 1961. 

DETENBECK, Robert L.. Assistant Professor of Physics 

B.S., University of Rochester. 1954; Ph.D., Princeton, 1963. 

DIBELLA, Edward, Assistant Professor of Sociology 

B.S., Washington University, 1936; M.A., 1938; Ph.D., Catholic University, 1936. 

DILLON, Conley H., Professor of Government and Politics 

B.A., Marshall College, 1928; M.A.. Duke University, 1933; Ph.D., 1936. 

DOBERT, Eitel W., Associate Professor of Foreign Languages 

B.A., University of Geneva, 1932; M.A.. University of Maryland, 1949; 
Ph.D., 1954. 

DOWNS, Calvin W.. Assistant Professor of Speech and Dramatic Art 

B.A., Harding College. 1958; M.A., Michigan State University, 1959; Ph.D., 
1963. 

DUFFEY, Robert V.. Professor and Head, Early Childhood-Elementary Education 

B.S., Millersville State College. 1938; M.Ed.. Temple University, 1948; Ed.D., 
Temple University, 1954. 

EDELSON, Charles B., Assistant Professor of Accounting 

B.B.A.. University of New Mexico, 1949; M.B.A., Indiana University, 1950; 

C.P.A., Maryland, 1951. 
EHRLICH, Gertrude, Associate Professor of Mathematics 

B.S., Georgia State College for Women, 1943; M.A., University of North 

Carolina, 1945; Ph.D., University of Tennessee, 1953. 

EISENSTADT, Beula, Assistant Professor of Music and Music Education 
B.A., Queens College, 1949; M.A., Columbia University, 1954. 

ELKINS, Richard Lonsdale, Assistant Professor of Mechanical Engineering 
B.S.. University of Maryland, 1953; M.A., 1958. 

ERICKSON, Howard R., Visiting Lecturer 

B.S., Indiana State Teachers College, 1952; M.S., Pennsylvania State Uni- 
versity, 1956; Ph.D., Cornell University, 1959. 

ESTABROOK, Gaylord B., Professor of Physics 

B.Sc, Purdue University, 1921; M.Sc, Ohio State University, 1922; Ph.D., 
University of Pittsburgh, 1932. 

70 



Faculty 

EVERHARD, Kenneth E., Assistant Professor 

B.A., New York State College for Teachers, Albany, New York; M.S., 1955; 
Ed.D., Indiana University, Bloomington, Indiana, 1962. 

EYLER, Addison Bernard, Associate Professor of Mechanical Engineering 
B.S., University of Maryland, 1947; M.S., 1950. 

EYLER, Marvin H., Associate Professor of Physical Education 

B.A., Houghton College, 1942; M.S., University of Illinois, 1948; Ph.D., 
1956. 

FABER, John E., Professor and Head of the Department of Microbiology 
B.S., University of Maryland, 1926; M.S., 1927; Ph.D., 1937. 

FANNING, JohnR., Instructor in Education 

B.S., Towson State College, 1958; M.Ed., University of Delaware, 1960. 

FANOS, Stavroula, Instructor in Music 

B.Mus.Ed., Oberlin College, 1957; Ed.M., University of Maryland, 1963. 

FARQUHAR, David M., Assistant Professor of History 

B.A., University of Washington, 1952; M.A., 1955; Ph.D., Harvard Univer- 
sity, 1960. 

FOSTER, John E., Professor and Head of Animal Science 

B.S., North Carolina State College, 1926; M.S., Kansas State College, 1927; 
Ph.D., Cornell University, 1937. 

FOURACRE, Maurice H., Lecturer in Special Education 

B.A., University of Michigan, 1935; M.A., 1940; Ph.D., 1942. 

FRALEY, Lester M., Dean of College of Physical Education, Recreation and 
Health 

A.B., Randolph-Macon College, 1928; M.A., Peabody College, 1937; Ph.D., 

1939. 

FRANKLIN, John Hope, Professor of History, University of Chicago. Visiting 
Professor of History 

B.A., Fisk University, 1935; M.A., Harvard University, 1936; Ph.D., 1941. 

FREENY, Ralph D., Instructor of Art 
B.A., University of Maryland, 1960. 

FRIES, Albert C, Visiting Professor of Business Education 
B.S., Illinois, 1931; M.S., 1932; D.Ed., N. Y. U., 1945. 

GALLOWAY, Raymond A., Assistant Professor of Plant Physiology 
B.S., University of Maryland, 1951; M.S., 1956; Ph.D., 1958. 

GARBER, Daniel Leady, Jr., Instructor in Civil Engineering 
B.S., University of Maryland, 1952; M.S., 1959. 

GATES, Jean Key, Visiting Lecturer in Education 

A.B., Hendrix College, 1930; M.S. in L. S., Catholic University of America, 1951. 

71 



Faculty 

GATES, Robert, Visiting Lecturer in Education 

B.S., Syracuse University, 1946; M.S., 1947; Ed.D., 1956. 

GIBLETTE, John, Assistant Professor of Education and Assistant Director — 
Testing and Research, University Counseling Center 

B.A., George Washington University, 1947; M.A., University of Minnesota, 

1952; Ph.D., University of Pennsylvania, 1960. 

GOOD, Richard G., Professor of Mathematics 

B.A., Ashland College, 1939; M.A., University of Wisconsin, 1940; Ph.D., 
University of Wisconsin, 1945. 

GOODWYN, Frank, Professor of Foreign Languages 

B.A., Texas College of Arts and Industries, 1939; M.A., 1940; Ph.D., Uni- 
versity of Texas, 1946. 

GRAMBS, Jean D., Associate Professor of Education 

B.A., Reed College, 1940; M.A., Stanford University, 1941; Ed.D., 1948. 

GRAVELY, William H., Jr., Associate Professor of English 

B.A., College of William and Mary, 1925; M.A., University of Virginia, 1934; 
Ph.D., 1953. 

GREEN, Robert L., Professor and Head of Agricultural Engineering 

B.S.A.E., University of Georgia, 1934; M.S., Iowa State College, 1939; Ph.D., 
Michigan State University, 1953. Registered Professional Engineer. 

GREENBERG, Kenneth R., Assistant Professor of Education 

B.S., Ohio State University, 1951; M.A.. 1952; Ph.D., Western Reserve Uni- 
versity, 1960. 

GRENTZER, Rose Marie, Professor of Music 

B.A., Mus.Ed., Carnegie Institute of Technology. 1935; B.A., Music. 1936; 
M.A., 1939. 

GROLLMAN, Sigmund, Associate Professor of Zoology 
B.S., University of Maryland, 1947; M.S., 1949; Ph.D., 1952. 

GRUBAR, Francis S., Assistant Professor of Art 

B.A., University of Maryland, 1948: M.A., 1949; M.A., Johns Hopkins Uni- 
versity, 1952. 

GUY, Kenneth H., Instructor of Industrial Education 

B.S., State University of New York, Buffalo, 1959; M.S., 1962. 

HAHN, William Robert, Jr., Instructor in Electrical Engineering 
B.S.E.E., George Washington University, 1958. 

HALL, Mary Anne, Instructor in Education 

B.A., Marshall University, 1955; M.Ed., University of Maryland, 1959. 

HALL, Thomas W., Assistant Professor of Foreign Languages 

B.A., University of Maryland, 1938; M.A., Middlebury College, 1950; Ph.D., 
University of Maryland, 1958. 

72 



Faculty 

HANSON, Dale L., Assistant Professor of Physical Education 

B.A., St. Olaf College, 1952; M.S., Mankato State College, 1956; Ph.D., 
Michigan State University, 1962. 

HARRISON, Horace V., Professor of Government and Politics 

B.A., Trinity University, Texas, 1932; M.A., University of Texas, 1941; 
Ph.D., 1951. 

HARRISON, Paul E., Jr., Professor of Industrial Education 

B.Ed., Northern Illinois State College, 1942; M.A.. Colorado State College, 
1947; Ph.D., University of Maryland, 1955. 

HATFIELD, Frances, Visiting Lecturer in Education 

B.S., Florida State University, 1943; M.A. in L. S., Florida State University, 1949. 

HATHORN, Guy B., Associate Professor of Government and Politics 

B.A., University of Mississippi, 1940; M.A., 1942; Ph.D., Duke University, 
1950. 

HAUT, Irvin C, Director of Experiment Station and Professor of Horticulture 
B.S., University of Idaho, 1928; M.S., State College of Washington, 1930; 
Ph.D., University of Maryland, 1933. 

HEBELER, Jean R., Associate Professor of Education and Coordinator of Special 
Education Program. 

B.S., State University of New York, College for Teachers, 1953; M.S., University of 

Illinois, 1956; Ed. D., Syracuse University, 1960. 

HEIM, Norman, Assistant Professor of Music 

B.Mus.Ed., Evansville College, 1951; M.Mus., Eastman School of Music, 1952; 
D.M.A., 1962. 

HENDRICKS, Richard, Professor of Speech and Dramatic Art 

B.A., Franklin College, 1937; M.A., Ohio State University, 1939; Ph.D., 1956. 

HENERY-LOGAN, Kenneth R., Assistant Professor of Chemistry 
B.S., McGill University, 1942; Ph.D., McGill University, 1946. 

HENNEY, Dagmar R., Instructor of Mathematics 
B.S., University of Miami, 1954; M.S., 1956. 

HERDOIZA, Eulalia, Instructor of Foreign Languages 

B.A., Collegio Normal Manuela Canizares, 1945; M.A., University of Maryland, 
1960. 

HERING, Christoph A., Associate Professor of Foreign Languages 
Ph.D., University of Bonn, 1950. 

HERMANSON, Roger H., Assistant Professor of Accounting 
B.A., Michigan State University, 1955; M.A., 1955; Ph.D., 1963. 

HERRICK, Irving Weymouth, Jr., Instructor in Industrial Education 

B.S., Gorham State Teachers College, Gorham, Maine, 1954; University of Mary- 
land, M.Ed., 1960. 

73 



Faculty 

HETRICK, Frank M., Assistant Professor of Microbiology 

B.S., Michigan State University, 1954; M.S., University &( Maryland, 1960; Ph.D.. 
1962. 

HIRZEL, Robert K., Assistant Professor of Sociology 

B.A., Pennsylvania State College, 1944; M.A., 1950; Ph.D., Louisiana State Uni- 
versity, 1954. 

HITCHCOCK. Donald. Assistant Professor of Foreign Languages 

B.A., University of Maryland, 1952; M.A., Harvard University, 1954. 

HOVET. Kenneth O., Professor of Education 

B.A., St. Olaf College, 1926; Ph.D., University of Minnesota, 1950. 

HOVEY. Richard B., Associate Professor of English 

B.A., University of Cincinnati, 1942; M.A., Harvard University, 1943; Ph.D., 1950. 

HUMPHREY, James H., Professor of Physical Education 

A.B., Denison College, 1953; A.M., Western Reserve University, 1946; Ed.D., 
Boston University, 1951. 

ISAACS, Ernest J., Visiting Lecturer of History 

B.A., University of Colorado, 1951; M.S., University of Wisconsin, 1957. 

JACOBS. Walter D.. Assistant Professor of Government and Politics 

B.S., Columbia University, 1955: M.A.. and Certificates of Russian Institute, 1956; 
Ph.D., 1961. 

JACKSON, John Warren, Professor of Mechanical Engineering 

B.S., University of Cincinnati, 1934; M.E.. 1937; M.S.. California Institute of 
Technology, 1940; Registered Professional Engineer. 

JAMES. Edward F., Instructor of English 

B.A., University of Maryland, 1954; M.A., 1955. 

JAQUITH, Richard H., Associate Professor of Chemistry 

B.S., University of Massachusetts. 1940: M.S., 1942; Ph.D.. Michigan State Uni- 
versity, 1955. 

JERMAN, Bernard R., Associate Professor of English 

B.A., The Ohio State University, 1946; M.A., 1948; Ph.D., 1951. 

JOHNSON. Warren R., Professor of Physical Education and Health 

A.B., University of Denver, 1942; M.A., 1947; Ed.D., Boston University, 1950. 

JONES, Harold Chester, Instructor in Electrical Engineering 

B.S., Illinois Institute of Technology, 1949; M.S., University of Maryland, 1961. 

KELSEY, Roger R.. Lecturer in Education 

B.A., St. Olaf College, 1934; M.A., University of Minnesota, 1940; Ed.D., George 
Peabody College for Teachers, 1954. 

KEMNER, Margarethe M., Instructor of Foreign Languages 

M.A., University of Detroit, 1954; M.A., University of Oklahoma, 1962. 

74 



Faculty 

KLEVAN, Albert, Assistant Professor of Education 

B.S., Temple University, 1948; M.Ed., 1950; Ed.D., New York University, 1957. 

KURTZ, John J., Professor of Education, Institute for Child Study 

B.A., University of Wisconsin, 1935; M.A., Northwestern University, 1940; Ph.D., 
University of Chicago, 1947. 

KYLE, David G., Assistant Professor of Education, Institute for Child Study 
B.A., University of Denver, 1952; M.A., 1953; Ed.D., University of Maryland, 
1961. 

LANZ, Sally J., Instructor of Foods and Nutrition 

B.S., Albright College, 1956; M.S., Pennsylvania State University, 1960. 

LAWSON, John R., Assistant Professor of Education, Institute for Child Study 
B.A., Long Beach State College, 1958; M.A., 1959; Ed.D., University of Nebraska, 
1962. 

LEHNER, Guydo R., Associate Professor of Mathematics 

B.S., Loyola of Chicago, 1951; M.S., University of Wisconsin, 1951; Ph.D., 1957. 

LEMBACH, John, Acting Head and Professor of Art 

B.A., University of Chicago, 1934; M.A., Northwestern University, 1937; Ed.D., 
Columbia University, 1946. 

LEPSON, Inda, Instructor of Mathematics 

B.A., New York University, 1941; M.A., Columbia University, 1945. 

LIPPEATT, Selma F., Professor of Home Economics and Dean of the College 
B.S., Arkansas State Teachers College, 1938; M.S., University of Tennessee, 1945; 
Ph.D., Pennsylvania State University, 1953. 

LOCKARD, J. David, Assistant Professor of Botany and Education 

B.S., Pennsylvania State College, 1951; M.Ed., Pennsylvania State College, 1955; 
Ph.D., 1962. 

LOFTIS, Helen, Visiting Lecturer of Home Economics Education 

LONGLEY, E. L., Jr., Assistant Professor of Art and Education 

B.A., University of Maryland, 1950; M.A., Columbia University, 1953. 

LONSDALE, Bernard J., Visiting Professor in Education 

B.A., University of Southern California, 1936; M.S., University of Southern Cali- 
fornia, 1937; Ed.D., University of California at Berkeley, 1949. 

LUETKEMEYER, Joseph, Assistant Professor of Industrial Education 

B.S., Stout State College, 1953; M.S., 1954; Ed.D., University of Illinois, 1961. 

LUTWACK, Leonard I., Associate Professor of English 

B.A., Wesleyan University, 1939; M.A., 1940; Ph.D., Ohio State University, 1950. 

MALEY, Donald, Professor and Head, Industrial Education 

B.S., State Teachers College, California, Pennsylvania, 1943; M.A., University of 
Maryland, 1947; Ph.D., 1950. 

75 



Faculty 

MARX, George L., Assistant Professor of Education 

B.A., Yankton College, South Dakota, 1953; M.A., State University of Iowa, 1956; 
Ph.D,. 1959. 

MASSEY, William J., Assistant Professor of Education 
A.B., Louisiana State Normal College, 1936; M.Ed., University of Missouri, 1951; 
Ed.D., 1955. 

MATTESON, Richard L., Assistant Professor of Education, Institute for Child Study 
B.A., Knox College, 1952; M.A., University of Maryland, 1956; Ed.D., 1962. 

McCORKLE, Donald M., Visiting Lecturer in Music 

B.Mus., Bradley University, 1951; M.A., Indiana University, 1953; Ph.D., 1958. 

MEERSMAN, Roger L., Instructor of Speech and Dramatic Art 

B.A., St. Ambrose College, 1952; M.A., University of Illinois, 1959; Ph.D., 1962. 

MERRILL, George R., Instructor of Industrial Education 
B.S., University of Maryland, 1954; M.E., 1955. 

MERRILL, Horace S., Professor of History 

B.E., Wisconsin State Teachers College, 1932; Ph.M., University of Wisconsin, 
1933; Ph.D., 1942. 

MERSHON, Madelaine J., Professor of Education, Institute for Child Study 

B.S., Drake University, 1940; M.A., University of Chicago, 1943; Ph.D., 1950. 

MESSENGER, TTieodore Ives, Jr., Instructor of Philosophy 

B.A., Yale University. 1950; M.A., Johns Hopkins University, 1956; Ph.D., Johns 
Hopkins University, 1962. 

MEYER, Charlton, Assistant Professor of Music 
B.Mus., Curtis Institute of Music, 1952. 

MIKA, Paul, Assistant Professor of Geography 

A.B., University of Pittsburgh, 1954; M.A., George Washington University, 1958. 

MILLER, James R., Professor of Soils 

B.S., University of Maryland, 1951; M.S., 1953; Ph.D., 1956. 

MITCHELL, T. Faye, Professor and Head of Department of Textiles and Clothing 
B.S., State Teachers College, Springfield, Missouri, 1930; M.A., Columbia Univer- 
sity, 1939. 

MONCAYO, Abelardo, Instructor of Foreign Languages 
Licenciado, Central University of Ecuador, 1961. 

MORGAN, H. Gerthon, Professor of Education and Director, Institute for Child 
Study 

B.A., Furman University, 1940; M.A., University of Chicago, 1943; Ph.D., 1946. 

MORGAN, Mildred, Visiting Lecturer, Family Life 

MURPHY, Charles D., Professor and Head of English 

B.A., University of Wisconsin, 1929; M.A., Harvard University, 1930; Ph.D., 
Cornell University, 1940. 

76 



Faculty 

MYERS, Robert Manson, Associate Professor of English 

B.A., Vanderbilt University, 1941; M.A., Columbia University, 1942; M.A., Har- 
vard University, 1944; Ph.D., Columbia University, 1948. 

NASH, Allan N., Assistant Professor of Personnel Administration 
B.A., University of Minnesota, 1957; M.A., 1959; Ph.D., 1963. 

NELSON, Boyd L., Professor of Statistics 

B.A., University of Wisconsin, 1947; M.A., 1948; Ph.D., 1952. 

NELSON, Richard C, Assistant Professor of Physical Education 

B.A., St. Olaf College, 1954; M.Ed., University of Houston, 1957; Ph.D., Michigan 
State University, 1960. 

NESSLER, Joan, Assistant Professor of Physical Education 

B.A., Wellesley College, 1951; M.A., State University of Iowa, 1952; Ph.D., Penn. 
State University, 1961. 

NEWELL, Clarence A., Professor of Educational Administration 

B.A., Hastings College, Nebraska, 1935; M.A., Columbia University, 1939; Ph.D., 
1943. 

NOBLE, Weston H., Visiting Lecturer in Music 

B.A., Luther College, 1943; M.Mus., University of Michigan, 1951. 

O'CONNELL, George, Assistant Professor of Art 
B.S., University of Wisconsin, 1950; M.S., 1951. 

PAINE, Frank T., Assistant Professor of Business Administration 

B.S., Syracuse University, 1951; M.B.A., 1956; Ph.D., Stanford University 1963. 

PANCELLA, John, Instructor in Secondary Education. 

B.S,. State Teachers College, Indiana, Pennsylvania, 1953; M.S., University of 
Maryland. 

PATRICK, Arthur S., Professor of Office Management and Business Education 
B.S., Wisconsin State College, 1931; M.A., University of Iowa, 1940; Ph.D., 
American University, 1956. 

PECK, Bernard, Associate Professor of Education, Institute for Child Study 
B.A., Indiana University, 1939; M.A., Columbia University, 1941; Ed.D., Univer- 
sity of Maryland, 1957. 

PENNINGTON, Kenneth, Assistant Professor of Music 

B.A., Friends University, 1949; B.Mus., 1950; New York University, 1953; Mus. 
Doc, Indiana University, 1961. 

PERKINS, Hugh V., Professor of Education, Institute for Child Study 

B.A., Oberlin College, 1941; M.A., University of Chicago, 1946; Ph.D., 1949; 
Ed.D., New York University, 1956. 

PICKETT, Wilda, Associate Professor in Education 

B.S., Missouri State College, 1932; M.S., Teachers College, Columbia, 1934; 
Ed.D., 1955. 

17 



Faculty 

PLISCHKE, Elmer, Professor and Head of the Department of Government and 
Politics 

Ph.B., Marquette University, 1937; M.A., American University, 1938; Ph.D., 
Clark University, 1943. 

POFFENBERGER, Paul R., Assistant Dean-Instruction and Professor of Agricultural 
Economics 

B.S., University of Maryland, 1935; M.S., 1937; Ph.D., American University, 

1953. 

PORTZ, John, Assistant Professor of English 

B.S., Duke University, 1937; M.A.. Harvard University, 1941; Ph.D., 1958. 

POTTER, Jane H., Instructor of Zoology 

B.S., University of Chicago. 1942; M.S.. University of Chicago, 1948; Ph.D., Uni- 
versity of Chicago, 1949. 

PRESCOTT, Daniel A.. Professor of Education and Director Emeritus, Institute for 
Child Study 

B.S., Tufts College. 1920: M.Ed., Harvard University, 1922; Ed.D., 1923. 

PUGLIESE, Rudolph E., Assistant Professor of Speech and Dramatic Art 

B.A., Miami University. 1947; M.A., Catholic University, 1949; Ph.D., Ohio State 
University, 1961. 

RAIA, Anthony P., Assistant Professor of Business Administration 

B.S., Columbia University, 1956: M.B.A.. University of California, Los Angeles, 
1960; Ph.D., 1963. 

RATHS, James D., Associate Professor and Assistant Director, Bureau of Educa- 
tional Research and Field Services 

B.S.. Yale College. 1954: M.A.. 1955; Ph.D.. New York University, 1960. 

RAY, Philip B., Assistant Professor of Education and Counselor 

B.A.. Antioch Colle£e, 1950; M.S., University of Pennsylvania, 1955; Ph.D., 
University of Minnesota, 1962. 

RENZ, Paul, Assistant Professor in Education 

B.S., Syracuse University, 1951; M.S., 1952; Ph.D., University of Illinois, 1962. 

RISINGER. Robert G., Professor and Head, Department of Secondary Education 
B.S., Ball State Teachers College, 1940; M.A., University of Chicago, 1947, 
Ed.D., University of Colorado, 1955. 

RICHESON, Allie W.. Professor of Mathematics 

B.S., University of Richmond, 1918; M.A., Johns Hopkins University, 1925; 
Ph.D., 1928. 

ROBERTSON, J. Righton, Jr., Assistant Professor of History 

B.A., University of the South, 1954; M.A., Emory University, 1960; Ph.D., 1962. 

ROPER, James B., Assistant Professor of Applied Design 
B.S., East Carolina College, 1961; M-A., 1963. 

78 



Faculty 

ROTHMAN, Alvin H., Assistant Professor of Zoology 
A. A., East Los Angeles Junior College, 1949; B.A., University of California, 
1952; M.A., University of California, 1954; Sc.D., Johns Hopkins University, 
1958. 

RUMBAUGH, Jeffrey Hamilton, Instructor in Electrical Engineering 
B.S., University of Maryland, 1957. 

SAWHILL, Clarence, Visiting Lecturer in Music 

B.Mus., Bethany College, 1929; M.Mus., University of Illinois, 1942. 

SEIDMAN, Eric, Assistant Professor of Education 

B.S., New York University, 1947; M.A., New York University, 1948. 

SCHINDLER, Alvin W., Professor of Education 

B.A., Iowa State Teachers College, 1927; M.A., University of Iowa, 1929; Ph.D.. 
1934. 

SCHLARETZKI, W. E.. Associate Professor and Head of Philosophy 

B.A., Monmouth College, 1941; M.A., University of Illinois, 1942; Ph.D., Cornell 
University, 1948. 

SCHMIEDER, Allen A., Assistant Professor in Geography 

B.S., Edinboro State College, 1955; M.A., Ohio State University, 1956; Ph.D., 
Ohio State University, 1963. 

SCHRAMM, Carl, Instructor in Industrial Education 
B.S., University of Maryland, 1956. 

SHAFTEL, Emily S., Instructor of Speech and Dramatic Art 
B.A., University of Maryland, 1960; M.A., 1962. 

SHAFFNER, Clyne S., Professor and Head of Poultry Science 

B.S., Michigan State College, 1938; M.S., 1940; Ph.D., Purdue University, 1947. 

SHEPHERD, Julius C, Assistant Professor of Mathematics 
B.A., East Carolina College, 1944; M.A., 1947. 

SIMMS, Betty Howald, Assistant Professor of Education 

B.A., Harris Teachers College, 1947; M.A., University of Michigan, 1955; Ed.D., 
University of Maryland, 1962. 

SMERK, George M., Assistant Professor of Transportation 

B.S.. Bradley University, 1955; M.B.A., 1957; D.B.A., Indiana University, 1963. 

SMITH, Alice G., Visiting Lecturer in Education 

B.A., Wayne State University, 1939; M.Ed., Wayne State University, 1961. 

SMITHSON, John R., Visiting Lecturer in Physics 

B.S., Washington College, 1934; M.S., Indiana University, 1940; Ph.D., Catholic 
University, 1955. 

SNYDER, William H., Industrial Teacher Trainer 

B.S., 1949; M.A., Pennsylvania State University, 1951. 

79 



Faculty 

SPENCER, Mabel S.. Associate Professor of Home Economics Education 

B.S., West Virginia University, 1925; M.S., 1946; Ed.D., American University, 
1959. 

SPIVEY, C. Clinton, Associate Professor of Industrial Management 
B.S., University of Illinois, 1946; M.S., 1947; Ph.D., 1957. 

STARCHER, E. Thomas, Assistant Professor of Speech and Dramatic Art 

B.A., University of Southern California, 1940; M.A., University of Arkansas, 1948. 

STEELY, Lewis R., Assistant Instructor of Mathematics 

B.S., Wilson Teachers College, 1937; M.A., Catholic University, 1945. 

STEEL, Ronald H., Assistant Professor of Physical Education 

B.S., Trenton State Teachers College, 1955; M.A., University of Maryland, 1957. 

STEINMEYER, Reuben G., Professor of Government and Politics 
B.A., American University, 1929; Ph.D., 1935. 

STRAUSBAUGH, Warren L., Professor and Head of Speech and Dramatic Art 
B.S., Wooster College, 1932; M.A., State University of Iowa, 1935. 

STROMBERG, Roland N., Associate Professpr of History 

B.A., University of Kansas City, 1939; M.A., American University, 1945; Ph.D., 
University of Maryland, 1952. 

STUNKARD, Clayton L., Associate Professor of Education 
B.S., University of Minnesota, 1948; M.S., 1951; Ph.D., 1959. 

STUNTZ, Calvin P., Associate Professor of Chemistry 
B.A., University of Buffalo, 1939; Ph.D., 1947. 

SWEENEY, Charles T., Professor of Accounting 

B.S., Cornell University, 1921; M.B.A., University of Michigan, 1928; C.P.A.. 
Iowa, 1934; Ohio, 1936. 

TAPE, Charles A., Professor and Head of Department of Business Administration 
B.S.C., State University of Iowa, 1937; M.A., 1941; Ph.D., University of Maryland, 
1952. 

TIERNEY, William P.. Associate Professor of Industrial Education 

B.S., Teachers College of Connecticut, 1941; M.A., Ohio State University, 1949; 
Ed.D., University of Maryland, 1952. 

TOLAND, John I., Instructor of Sociology 

B.A., University of Tulsa, 1956; M.A., University of Maryland, 1958. 

TOMPKINS, Theron A., Associate Professor of Physical Education 

B.S., Eastern Michigan College of Education, 1926; M.A., University of Michigan, 
1939. 

UPGREN, Arthur R., Visiting Lecturer in Physics and Astronomy 

B.A., University of Minnesota, 1955; M.S., University of Michigan, 1958; Ph.D., 
Case Institute of Technology, 1961. 

80 



Faculty 

VALDIVIESO, Paulino Rodriguez, Instructor of Foreign Languages 
Maestro de Primera Ensenanza, Escuela Normal de Melilla, 1941, 

VAN NESS, James S., Instructor in History 

B.A., University of Maryland, 1954; M.A., 1962. 

VAN WIJK, Uco, Assistant Professor of Astronomy 
B.S., Harvard, 1948; Ph.D., Harvard, 1952. 

VIRDEN, Virginia D., Instructor of Speech and Dramatic Art 
B.S., University of Maryland, 1959; M.A., 1963. 

VAN ZWOLL, James A., Professor of School Administration 

B.A., Calvin College, Grand Rapids, Michigan, 1933; M.A., University of Mich- 
igan, 1937; Ph.D., 1942. 

WALDROP, Robert S., Professor of Psychology 

B.A., University of Oklahoma, 1934; Ph.D., University of Michigan, 1948. 

WARD, Kathryn M. Painter, Associate Professor of English 

B.A., The George Washington University, 1935; M.A., 1936; Ph.D., 1947. 

WEAVER, Carl H., Associate Professor of Speech and Dramatic Art 

B.A., Bluffton College, 1936; M.A., Ohio State University, 1950; Ph.D., 1957. 

WEAVER, V. Phillips, Assistant Professor of Education 

A.B., William & Mary, 1951; M.Ed., Pennsylvania State University, 1956; Ed.D., 
1962. 

WELLBORN, Fred W., Professor of History 

B.A., Baker University, 1918; M.A., University of Kansas, 1923; Ph.D., University 
of Wisconsin, 1926. 

WELLFORD, Charles F., Instructor of Sociology 

B.A., University of Maryland, 1961; M.A., University of Maryland, 1963. 
WIGGIN, Gladys A., Professor and Director of Graduate Studies in Education 

B.S., University of Minnesota, 1929; M.A., 1939; Ph.D., University of Maryland, 

1947. 

WILBUR, June C, Assistant Professor of Textiles and Clothing 

B.S., University of Washington, 1936; M.S., Syracuse University, 1940. 

WIRTZ, Marvin, Lecturer in Special Education 

B.S., Milwaukee State Teachers College, 1942; M.Ed., 1951; Ed.D., University 
of Illinois, 1954. 

YANG, Jackson, Assistant Professor in Mechanical Engineering 
B.S., University of Maryland, 1958; M.S., 1962; Ph.D., 1963. 

ZEEVELD, W. Gordon, Professor of English 

B.A., University of Rochester, 1924; M.A., The Johns Hopkins University, 1929; 
Ph.D., 1936. 

ZEMEL, Jacqueline L., Instructor of Mathematics 

B.S., Queens College, 1949; M.A., Syracuse University, 1951. 

81 



If you wish to apply for admission to the 
University of Maryland Summer School, 1964, 
please complete the forms following. 



(CUT ALONG THIS LINE) 





BUSINESS REPLY CARD 

First Class Permit No. 93 College Park, Md. 



University Housing 
University of Maryland 
College Park, Maryland 20742 

(cut along this line) 





BUSINESS REPLY CARD 

First Class Permit No. 94 College Park, Md. 



Admissions Office 
University of Maryland 
College Park, Maryland 20742 



UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND SUMMER SCHOOL 

Application for Room in Residence Halls 
(PLEASE TYPE OR PRINT) 



Date Student No. 

Name 



Age. 



Sex 



Home Phone. 



LAST 



FIRST 



MIDDLE 



Address 



Number 



Street 



Town 



County 



State 



Zip 
Code 



Attendance Dates from to . 



Number of Weeks Attending: (Circle one) 
12 3 4 5 6 7 8 

Classification 

Undergrail.. Grad., Special Xanie of Work- 
shop or Institute, Pre-College Summer 
Session, etc. 

Roommate 

Preference, If Any 

Type Room: D Single D Double 
Prepaid Board: D 6 wks D 8 wks 



FOR OFFICE USE ONLY 

Assignment 

Changes 

Withdrawn D Date 

Reason 

Key 

Yes or No 



SUMMER 1964 

Please send me an application for admission to the 
1964 Summer School. 



Name 



Street Address 



Please print 



City 



State 



Zip