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Full text of "The Summer School"

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NIVERSITY of MARYLAND 



mil I 




Summer School 



1966 



je provisions oi m 
cable contract between the student and the University of Maryland. The 
University reserves the right to change any provision or i i I ment at 
any time within the student's term of residence. The I i. > further 

reserves the right, at any time, to ask a student to withdraw when it con- 
siders such action to be in the best interests of the University. 



SUMMER 
SCHOOL 

1966 



THE 
UNIVERSITY 

OF 
MARYLAND 



Volume 22 March 25, 1966 No. 20 

UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND BULLETIN is published four times in September; 
three times in January, March and May; and two times in August, October, Novem- 
ber, December, February, April, June and July. Re-entered at the Post Office at 
College Park, Maryland, as second class mail matter under the Act of Congress on 
August 24, 1912. Published twenty-nine times. 



Digitized by the Internet Archive 

in 2010 with funding from 

Lyrasis IVIembers and Sloan Foundation 



http://www.archive.org/details/summerschool1966univ 



Contents 

GENERAL 

Summer School: Admission, Registration, and Calendar v 

University Calendar vi 

Registration Schedule vii 

Board of Regents viii 

Officers of the University ix 

Chairmen, Standing Committees, Faculty Senate xiii 

Adjunct Committees of the General Committee on Student 

Life and Welfare xiii 

The School 1 

Academic Information 2 

Terms of Admission 2 

Undergraduate and Special Students 2 

Graduate Students . 2 

Academic Credit 3 

Marking System 3 

Maximum Loads 3 

Summer Graduate Work 4 

Candidates for Degrees 4 

General Education Program 4 

General Information 5 

Registration 5 

Length of Class Period 6 

Definition of Residence and Non-Residence 6 

Tuition and Fees 7 

Withdrawal and Refund of Fees 8 

Living Accommodations and Food Service 8 

Student Health 10 

Parking of Automobiles 10 

Libraries 11 

University Bookstore 11 

For Additional Information 11 

Special Summer Activities 13 

Summer Lecture Series 13 

Institutes and Workshops 13 

Campus Map Between 21 and 22 

COURSE OFFERINGS 

Agriculture . 22 

Agricultural Economics 22 

Agricultural Engineering 22 

Agricultural and Extension Education 23 

Agronomy 23 

Animal Science 24 

Botany 24 

Entomology 25 

Horticulture 26 

Arts and Sciences 26 

American Studies 26 



III 



Anthropology (see Sociology) 

Art 26 

Astronomy (see Physics and Astronomy) 

Chemistry 27 

Classical Languages and Literature 28 

Computer Science 28 

English 28 

Foreign Languages 31 

History 32 

Mathematics 34 

Microbiology 37 

Music 38 

Philosophy 39 

Physics and Astronomy 39 

Psychology 40 

Sociology 42 

Anthropology 43 

Speech 44 

Zoology 46 

Business and Public Administration 47 

Business Administration 47 

Economics 50 

Geography 51 

Government and Politics 52 

Journalism 54 

Education 55 

Early Childhood — Elementary Education 55 

General Education 57 

Secondary Education 61 

Music Education 62 

Human Development Education 63 

Industrial Education 64 

Library Science Education 65 

Special Education 65 

Engineering 66 

Chemical Engineering 66 

Civil Engineering 66 

Electrical Engineering 67 

Engineering Sciences 68 

Mechanical Engineering 68 

School of Library and Information Services 68 

Home Economics 70 

Family Life and Management 70 

Food Nutrition and Institution Administration 70 

Housing and Applied Design 71 

Textiles and Clothmg 71 

Physical Education, Recreation and Health 72 

Health Education 73 

Recreation 74 

The Facuhy 75 

iv 



ADMISSION: 

1. Students who were registered with the University during the preceding 
semester need only to appear for registration at the time indicated on 
page vii. 

2. All new undergraduate and special students must file an application 
with the Admissions office by June 1, 1966 and must have been 
admitted to the University before registering for classes. 

3. All new graduate students must file an application and all supporting 
records with the office of the Dean of the Graduate School by June 1 , 
1966 and must have been admitted to the University before registering 
for classes. 



REGISTRATION 

1. All students report to the McKeldin Library according to the alpha- 
betical schedule on page vii of this catalog. 

2. After securing registration materials at the McKeldin Library students 
report to adviser and/or dean. Approval of student's program must be 
secured by both the adviser and dean. Graduate students in the College 
of Education must secure the approval of the Dean of the College of 
Education as well as the Dean of the Graduate School. 

3. When programs for students are approved, they report to the Armory 
where registration is completed. 



SUMMER SCHOOL CALENDAR 

June 22 — Wednesday Classes begin 

June 25 — Saturday Classes (Monday Schedule) 

July 4 — Monday Independence Day, Holiday 

July 9 — Saturday Classes (Tuesday Schedule) 

August 12 — Friday Summer Session Ends 



University Calendar, 1966-67 

(TENTATIVE) 

FALL SEMESTER, 1966 
SEPTEMBER 

12-16 Monday-Friday — Fall Semester Registration 
19 Monday — Instruction begins 
NOVEMBER 

23 Wednesday, after last class — Thanksgiving recess begins 
28 Monday, 8:00 A. M. — Thanksgiving recess ends 
DECEMBER 

21 Wednesday, after last class — Christmas recess begins 
JANUARY 

3 Tuesday, 8:00 A. M. — Christmas recess ends 
18 Wednesday — Pre-exam Study Day 
19-25 Thursday-Wednesday — Fall Semester Examinations 

SPRING SEMESTER, 1967 
JANUARY 

31 -Feb. 3 Tuesday-Friday— Spring Semester Registration 
FEBRUARY 

6 Monday — Instruction begins 

Wednesday — Washington's Birthday, holiday 



22 

MARCH 
23 
28 

MAY 

10 
24 

25-June 2 
28 
30 

JUNE 

3 



Thursday, after last class — Easter recess begins 
Tuesday, 8:00 A. M. — Easter recess ends 

Wednesday— AFROTC Day 
Wednesday — Pre-exam Study Day 
Thursday-Friday — Spring Semester Examinations 
Sunday — Baccalaureate Exercises 
Tuesday — Memorial Day, holiday 

Saturday — Commencement Exercises 



SUMMER SESSION, 1967 
JUNE 

19-20 Monday-Tuesday — Registration, Summer Session 

21 Wednesday — Instruction begins 

24 Saturday — Classes (Monday schedule) 
JULY 

4 Tuesday — Independence Day, holiday 

8 Saturday — Classes (Tuesday schedule) 
AUGUST 

1 1 Friday — Summer Session Ends 

SHORT COURSES, SUMMER, 1967 
JUNE 

12-17 Monday-Saturday — Rural Women's Short Course 
AUGUST 

7-11 Monday-Friday— 4-H Club Week 
SEPTEMBER 

5-8 Tuesday-Friday — Firemen's Short Course 



VI 



REGISTRATION SCHEDULE 

SUMMER SCHOOL 1966 

MONDAY and TUESDAY, JUNE 20 and 21, 1966 

To expedite registration, students have been grouped on the basis of the 
first letters of the last name. No student will be permitted into McKeldin 
Library until the appropriate time, as listed below. 

Tuesday 

SA-SGL 

SGM-SS 

ST-TD 

TE-V 

WA-WH 

WI-Y 

Z-BAL 

BAM-BL 

BM-BT 

BU-CH 

CI-CO 

CP-DN 



8:15 


DO-EZ 


8:40 


FA-FZ 


9:05 


GA-GRL 


9:30 


GRM-HD 


9:55 


HE-HR 


10:20 


HS-J 


10:45 


KA-KR 


11:10 


KS-LI 


11:30 


LJ-MA 


1:00 


MB-MN 


1:25 


MO-NI 


1:50 


NJ-PH 


2:15 


PI-RE 


2:40 


RF-RZ 



Library, Packet Distribution — Monday 8:15 to 3:45 Only 

Tuesday 8: 15 to 3:00 Only 

Armory, Registration Processing — 8:30 to 4:45 Only 



vn 



Board of Regents 

and 

Maryland State Board of Agriculture 

CHAIRMAN 

Charles P. McCormick 

McCormick and Company, Inc., 414 Light Street, Baltimore, 21202 

VICE-CHAIRMAN 

Edward F. Holter 

Farmers Home Administration, Room 412 Hartwick Bldg., 

4321 Hartwick Road, College Park, 20740 

SECRETARY 

B. Herbert Brown 

The Baltimore Institute, 10 West Chase Street, Baltimore, 21201 

TREASURER 

Harry H. Nuttle 
Denton, 21629 

ASSISTANT SECRETARY 

Louis L. Kaplan 

The Baltimore Hebrew College, 5800 Park Heights Ave., Baltimore, 21215 

ASSISTANT TREASURER 

Richard W. Case 

Smith, Somerville and Case, 1 Charles Center — 17th Floor, 

Baltimore, 21201 

Dr. William B. Long 
Medical Center, Salisbury, 21801 

Thomas W. Pangborn 

The Pangborn Corporation, Pangborn Blvd., Hagerstown, 21740 

Thomas B. Symons 

7410 Columbia Ave., College Park, 20740 

William C. Walsh 

Liberty Trust Building, Cumberland, 21501 

Mrs. John L. Whitehurst 
4101 Greenway, Baltimore, 21218 

via 



Officers Of The University 

Central Administrative Officers 
PRESIDENT 

Wilson H. Elkins,— B./4., University of Texas. 1932; M.A., 1932; B.Litt.. Oxford Uni- 
versity, 1936; D.Phil., 1936. 

VICE PRESIDENT, BALTIMORE CAMPUSES 

Albin O. Kuhn— fl.5., University of Maryland, 1938; MS., 1939; Ph.D., 1948. 

VICE PRESIDENT FOR ACADEMIC AFFAIRS 

R. Lee Hornbake — B.S., California State College, Pennsylvania, 1934; M.A., Ohio 
State University, 1936; Ph.D., 1942. 

ASSISTANT TO THE PRESIDENT FOR ADMINISTRATIVE AFFAIRS 
Walter B. Waetjen — B.S., Millersville State College, Millersville, Pennsylvania, 1942; 
M.S., University of Pennsylvania, 1947; Ed.D., University of Maryland. 1951. 

ASSISTANT TO THE PRESIDENT 

Frank L. Bentz, Jr.— 5.5., University of Maryland, 1942; Ph.D., 1952. 

ASSISTANT TO THE PRESIDENT FOR RESEARCH 

Justin Williams — A.B., State Teachers College, Conway, Arkansas, 1926; M.A., State 
University of Iowa, 1928; Ph.D., 1933. 

ASSISTANT TO THE PRESIDENT FOR UNIVERSITY RELATIONS 
Robert A. Beach, Jr., A.B., Baldwin-Wallace College, 1950; M.S., Boston Uni- 
versity, 1954. 

ASSISTANT, PRESIDENT'S OFFICE 

Robert E. Kendig — A.B., College of William and Mary, 1939; M.A., George Wash- 
ington University, 1965. 

ASSISTANT TO THE VICE PRESIDENT FOR ACADEMIC AFFAIRS 

Leslie R. Bundgaard— B.5., University of Wisconsin, 1948; M.S., 1949; Ph.D., 
Georgetown University, 1954. 

DIRECTOR OF FINANCE AND BUSINESS 

C. Wilbur Cissel— 5./4., University of Maryland, 1932; M.A., C.P.A., 1939. 

ASSISTANT DIRECTOR OF FINANCE AND BUSINESS 
James T. Frye — B.S., University of Georgia, 1948; M.S., 1952. 

COMPTROLLER AND BUDGET OFFICER 

Harry D. Fisher— fl.5., University of Maryland, 1943; C.P.A., 1948. 

DIRECTOR OF ADMISSIONS AND REGISTRATIONS 

G. Watson A\girc—B.A., University of Maryland, 1930; M.S., 1931. 

ASSOCIATE DIRECTOR AND REGISTRAR 

James P. Hill- B.5., Temple University, 1939; Ed.M., 1947; Ed.D., University of 

Michigan, 1963. 

DIRECTOR OF ALUMNI AFFAIRS 

J. Logan Schutz— 5.5.. University of Maryland, 1938; M.S., 1940. 

ix 



DIRECTOR OF ATHLETICS 

William W. Cobey — A.B., University of Maryland, 1930. 

DIRECTOR OF PERSONNEL 

George W. Fogg— B..4., University of Maryland, 1926; M.A., 1928. 

ASSISTANT DIRECTOR OF PERSONNEL 

James D. Morgan— B.5., University of Maryland, 1949; M.B.A., 1950. 

DIRECTOR AND SUPERVISING ENGINEER, DEPARTMENT OF PHYSICAL 

PLANT 

George O. Weber — B.S., University of Maryland, 1933. 

ASSOCIATE DIRECTOR AND SUPERVISING ENGINEER, PHYSICAL PLANT 

(Baltimore) 

George W. Morrison — B.S., University of Maryland, 1927; E.E., 1931. 



Emeriti 

PRESIDENT EMERITUS 

Harry C. Byrd— 5.5., University of Maryland, 1908; LL.D., Washington College, 
1936; LL.D., Dickinson College, 1938; D.Sc., Western Maryland College, 1938. 

DEAN OF WOMEN EMERITA 

Adele H. Stamp — B.A., Tulane University, 1921; M.A., University of Maryland, 
1924. 

DEAN OF MEN EMERITUS 

Geary F. Eppley— fi.5., University of Maryland, 1920; M.S., 1926. 



Deans of the Schools and Colleges 

DEAN OF AGRICULTURE 

Gordon M. Cairns— B.5., Cornell University, 1936; M.S., 1938; Ph.D. 1940. 

DEAN OF THE COLLEGE OF ARTS AND SCIENCES 

Charles Manning— B.5., Tufts College, 1929; M.A., Harvard University, 1931; Ph.D., 
University of North Carolina, 1950. 

DEAN OF THE COLLEGE OF BUSINESS AND PUBLIC ADMINISTRATION 
Donald W. O'Connell— B./l., Columbia University, 1937; M.A., 1938; Ph.D., 1953. 

DEAN OF THE SCHOOL OF DENTISTRY 

John J. Salley— D.D.5., Medical College of Virginia, 1951; Ph.D., University of 
Rochester School of Medicine and Dentistry, 1954. 

DEAN OF THE COLLEGE OF EDUCATION 

Vernon E. Anderson — B.S., University of Minnesota, 1930; M.A., 1936; Ph.D., Uni- 
versity of Colorado, 1942. 

ACTING DEAN OF THE COLLEGE OF ENGINEERING 

Russell B. Allen — B.S.. Yale University, 1923; Registered Professional Engineer. 



DEAN OF FACULTY— UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND, BALTIMORE COUNTY 

Homer W. Schamp, Jr. — A.B., Miami University, 1944; M.Sc, University of Michi- 
gan, 1947; Ph.D., 1952. 

DEAN OF THE GRADUATE SCHOOL 

Ronald Bamford — B.S., University of Connecticut, 1924; M.S., University of Ver- 
mont, 1926; Ph.D., Columbia University, 1931. 

ACTING DEAN OF THE COLLEGE OF HOME ECONOMICS 
Ema R. Chapman— S.5., University of Maryland, 1934; M.S., 1936. 

DEAN OF THE SCHOOL OF LAW 

William P. Cunningham — A.B., Harvard College, 1944; LL.B., Harvard Law School, 
1948. 

DEAN OF THE SCHOOL OF LIBRARY AND INFORMATION SERVICES 
Paul Wasserman— 5.B./4., College of the City of New York, 1948; M.S. (L.S.), 

Columbia University, 1949; M.S. {Economics) Columbia University, 1950; Ph.D., 

University of Michigan, 1960. 

DEAN OF THE SCHOOL OF MEDICINE AND DIRECTOR OF MEDICAL 

EDUCATION AND RESEARCH 
William S. Stone— 5.5., University of Idaho, 1924; M.S., 1925; M.D., University of 

Louisville, 1929; Ph.D., (Hon.), University of Louisville, 1946. 

DEAN OF THE SCHOOL OF NURSING 

Florence M. Gipe — B.S., Catholic University of America, 1937; M.S., University of 
Pennsylvania, 1940; Ed.D., University of Maryland, 1952. 

DEAN OF THE SCHOOL OF PHARMACY 

Noel E. Foss— P/i.C, South Dakota State College, 1929; B.S.,1929; M.S., Univer- 
sity of Maryland, 1932; Ph.D., 1933. 

DEAN OF THE COLLEGE OF PHYSICAL EDUCATION, RECREATION AND 
HEALTH 

Lester M. Fraley— B./i., Randolph-Macon College, 1928; M.A., 1937; Ph.D., Pea- 
body College, 1939. 

DEAN OF THE SCHOOL OF SOCIAL WORK 

Verl S. Lewis — A.B., Huron College, 1933; M.A., University of Chicago, 1939; 
D.S.W., Western Reserve University, 1954. 

DEAN OF UNIVERSITY COLLEGE 

Ray W. Ehrensberger- B./4., Wabash College, 1929; M.A., Butler University. 1930; 
Ph.D., Syracuse University, 1937. 

Directors of Educational Services and Programs 

ACTING DEAN FOR STUDENT LIFE 

Francis A. Gray— B.5., University of Maryland, 1943. 

DEAN OF WOMEN 

Helen E. Clarke — B.S., University of Michigan, 1943; M.A., University of Illinois, 
1951; Ed.D., Teachers College, Columbia University, 1960. 



XI 



DIRECTOR. AGRICULTURAL EXTENSION SERVICE 

Edward W. Aiton — B.S., University of Minnesota, 1933; M.S., 1940; Ed.D., Uni- 
versity of Maryland, 1956. 

DIRECTOR. AGRICULTURE EXPERIMENT STATION 

Irvin C. Haut — B.S., University of Idaho, 1928; M.S., State College of Washington, 
1930; Ph.D., University of Maryland, 1933. 

ACTING DIRECTOR. COMPUTER SCIENCE CENTER 
John P. Menard— B.A., St. Michael's College, Vt., 1954. 

DIRECTOR, COUNSELING CENTER 

Thomas Magoon — B.A., Dartmouth, 1947; M.A., University of Minnesota, 1951; 
Ph.D., 1954. 

DIRECTOR, GENERAL EDUCATION PROGRAM 

Gayle S. Smith— B.5., Iowa State College, 1948; M. A., Cornell University. 1951; 
Ph.D.. 1958. 

DIRECTOR, INSTITUTIONAL RESEARCH 

Robert E. McClintock — B.S., University of South Carolina, 1951; M.A., George Pea- 
body College, 1952; Ph.D., 1961. 

DIRECTOR OF LIBRARIES 

Howard Rovelstad— S./i., University of Illinois, 1936; M.A., 1937; B.S.L.S., Colum- 
bia University, 1940. 

DIRECTOR OF NATURAL RESOURCES INSTITUTE 

L. Eugeiie Cronin — A.B., Western Maryland College, 1938; M.S., University of Mary- 
land, 1943; Ph.D., 1946. 

DIRECTOR OF PROFESSIONAL AND SUPPORTING SERVICES, UNIVERSITY 

HOSPITAL 
George H. Yeager — B.S., University of West Virginia, 1925; M.D., University of 

Maryland, 1929. 

DIRECTOR OF STUDENT HEALTH SERVICE 

Lester M. Dyke— S.5., University of Iowa, 1936; M.D., 1926. 

DIRECTOR OF THE SUMMER SESSION 

Clodus R. Smith— 5.5., Oklahoma State University, 1950; M.S., 1955; Ed.D., Cornell 
University, 1960. 

HEAD, DEPARTMENT OF AIR SCIENCE 

Vernon H. Reeves — B.A., Arizona State College, 1936; M.A., Columbia University, 
1949. 

Division Chairmen 

CHAIRMAN OF THE DIVISION OF BIOLOGICAL SCIENCES 

John E. Faber— 5.5., University of Maryland, 1926; M.S.. 1927; Ph.D., 1937. 

CHAIRMAN OF THE LOWER DIVISION 

Charles E. White— 5.5., University of Maryland, 1923; M.S., 1924; Ph.D., 1926. 

CHAIRMAN OF THE DIVISION OF SOCIAL SCIENCES 
Harold C. Hoffsommer— 5.5., Northwestern University. 1921; M.A., 1923; Ph.D., 
Cornell University, 1929. 

xii 



STANDING COMMITTEES, FACULTY SENATE 

GENERAL COMMITTEE ON EDUCATIONAL POLICY 

GENERAL COMMITTEE ON STUDENT LIFE AND WELFARE 

COMMITTEE ON ADMISSIONS AND SCHOLASTIC STANDING 

COMMITTEE ON INSTRUCTIONAL PROCEDURES 

COMMITTEE ON SCHEDULING AND REGISTRATION 

COMMITTEE ON PROGRAMS, CURRICULA AND COURSES 

COMMITTEE ON FACULTY RESEARCH 

COMMITTEE ON PUBLIC FUNCTIONS AND COMMENCEMENTS 

COMMITTEE ON LIBRARIES 

COMMITTEE ON UNIVERSITY PUBLICATIONS 

COMMITTEE ON INTERCOLLEGIATE COMPETITION 

COMMITTEE ON PROFESSIONAL ETHICS, ACADEMIC FREEDOM 
AND TENURE 

COMMITTEE ON APPOINTMENTS, PROMOTIONS AND SALARIES 

COMMITTEE ON FACULTY LIFE AND WELFARE 

COMMITTEE ON MEMBERSHIP AND REPRESENTATION 

COMMITTEE ON COUNSELING OF STUDENTS 

COMMITTEE ON THE FUTURE OF THE UNIVERSITY 

Adjunct Committees of the General Committee on Student 
Life and Welfare 

STUDENT ACTIVITIES 

FINANCIAL AIDS AND SELF-HELP 

STUDENT PUBLICATIONS AND COMMUNICATIONS 

RELIGIOUS LIFE 

STUDENT HEALTH AND SAFETY 

STUDENT DISCIPLINE 

BALTIMORE CAMPUS, STUDENT AFFAIRS 



Xlll 



The School 



The summer school of the university of Maryland at college 
PARK provides the opportunity for year-round study and research- For this 
purpose, the University offers an extensive and varied program of under- 
graduate and graduate courses, as well as lectures, special institutes and 
workshops for educators. More than 8,500 students from the 50 states and 
approximately 55 foreign countries are expected to attend the University 
during the eight- week period, June 20 through August 12, within which 
are included eight- week and six- week courses, and workshops and institutes 
of varying length. 

The Summer School provides educational opportunities for teachers and 
school administrators. A variety of enrichment experiences in areas of 
specialization are available and students are encouraged to participate in 
them. 

Through its summer program, the University makes its resources available 
to students desiring a general education as well as to those students inter- 
ested in preparing for professional, scientific and technical areas which 
require graduate level work. 

The courses offered in the summer session are regular University courses, 
with few exceptions. Each college on the College Park campus is repre- 
sented in the School's offerings. Courses offered by the Summer School are 
taught by members of the faculty or visiting lecturers of demonstrated out- 
standing ability. Many departments have increased their course offerings 
for the 1966 summer session to provide students enrolled during the aca- 
demic year an opportunity to continue their studies during the summer. 
Courses offered include those which enable students to accelerate their 
programs of study, and to remove deficiencies. The academic program 
offered in the summer session provides outstanding educational opportun- 
ities to visiting students pursuing degrees at other institutions. 

A Recreation and Social Activities Committee, working with a full-time 
Director of Summer Recreation, has planned a varied program of activities 
of interest to students attending the University during the summer session. 
University swimming pools will be open with scheduled hours each after- 
noon and evening. There will be softball, tennis, and golf tournaments, 
and a summer theatre workshop in which students are invited to partici- 
pate. Additional opportunities will be added if interest is indicated. 

Planned activities v^dll include round and square dancing, movies. Chapel 
vesper services, band concerts, art exhibits, guided tours of Washington, 
and other social functions. The Director of Summer Recreation will be 
available to counsel with groups planning social events. 



Academic Information 



Terms of Admission 

All Summer School students new to the University must be officially ad- 
mitted. This applies to all non-degree as well as degree candidates. 

Undergraduate and Special Students 

A student seeking a bachelor's degree in any undergraduate college, who 
has not been previously admitted to the University, must file application 
with the Director of Admissions not later than June 1, 1966. 

A student who already has a bachelor's degree and who either does not 
wish graduate credit or does not meet requirements for admission to the 
Graduate School may be admitted as a Special Student to the undergradu- 
ate college consistent with his major interests. He should be admitted to 
the University through the Director of Admissions no later than June 1, 
1966. Credit so obtained through the College of Education is ordinarily 
accepted for renewal of teaching certificate. A Special Student may not 
take courses numbered 200 or above. 

Graduate Students 

Application for admission to the Graduate School, and all supporting aca- 
demic records, must be in the office of the Dean of the Graduate School 
by June 1, 1966. 

TRANSFER CREDIT: TO ANOTHER INSTITUTION. The Studcut who wisheS 

to transfer credit to another institution should submit an application on 
which he writes "For Transfer Only." With the application he should 
submit a letter from the graduate dean of the institution in which he is 
enrolled as a degree student, to the Dean of the Graduate School, Univer- 
sity of Maryland, requesting permission to work during the summer at the 
University. 

TRANSFER CREDIT: TO THE UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND. Credit nOt tO 

exceed six semester hours for course work at other recognized institutions 
may be applied towards the master's degree, only when such course work 
has been taken after the student has been admitted to the University of 
Maryland Graduate School. Before taking course work for transfer the 
student must have the approval of his adviser, the head of his major de- 
partment, and the Dean of the Graduate School. Normally, approval may 
be given only for courses which are not offered by the University of Mary- 
land during the period of the student's attendance. The request for transfer 
of credit shall be submitted to the Graduate Council for approval when the 
student applies for admission to candidacy. The candidate is subject to 
final examination by this institution in all work offered for the degree. 

SPECIAL NON-DEGREE CREDIT. The studcut who already has a master's 
degree and does not wish to pursue a doctoral program may submit an 



Academic Information 

application marked "Non-Degree" and with it, an official transcript of all 
previous undergraduate and graduate study. If the student later desires to 
embark on a doctoral program, the credit earned in Special Non-Degree 
status may, at the discretion of the major adviser, be used in a doctoral 
program. 

DEGREE CREDIT. The Student who wishes to pursue either a master's or 
doctoral program must submit, with his application, official transcripts of 
all work taken in institutions of higher education. The applicant is subject 
to admission requirements of the Graduate School and of the department 
in which he hopes to pursue his graduate work. 

Academic Credit 

The semester hour is the unit of credit. During the summer session a 
course meeting five times a week for six weeks or four times a week for 
eight weeks, each requiring the normal amount of outside work, is given 
a weight of three semester hours. Each class period is 80 minutes in length. 

Students who are matriculated as candidates for degrees will be given credit 
toward the appropriate degree for satisfactory completion of courses. All 
courses offered in the Summer School are creditable toward the appropri- 
ate degree provided they are included in the student's program as planned 
with his adviser. 

All students will receive an official grade report specifying the amount and 
quality of work completed. 

Marking System 

The following symbols are used for marks: A, B, C, and D— -passing; 
F — Failure; I — Incomplete. Mark A denotes superior scholarship; mark 
B, good scholarship; mark C, fair scholarship; and D, passing scholarship. 
The mark of "I" (incomplete) is exceptional. Complete regulations gov- 
erning marks are printed in the University's General and Academic Regu- 
lations. 

Maximum Load 

Students may earn credit at the discretion of their respective advisers in 
accordance with the following guide lines: 

UNDERGRADUATES 

Students enrolled only in courses of eight-week duration may earn 
from eight-ten credits. 

Students enrolled only in courses of six-week duration may earn from 
six-eight credits. 

Students enrolled in combinations of six- and eight-week com"ses may 
earn seven-nine credits. 



Academic Information 

graduate 

Students enrolled only in courses of eight-week duration may earn a 
maximum of eight credits. 

Students enrolled in courses of six-week duration may earn a maxi- 
mum of six credits. 

Students enrolled in combinations of six- and eight-week courses may 
earn a maximum of seven credits. 

Summer Graduate Work 

Appropriate courses offered by the Summer School may be counted to- 
ward any graduate degree program. Doctoral degrees offered through the 
Graduate School are as follows: Doctor of Philosophy and Doctor of 
Education. Master's degrees are offered through the Graduate School as 
follows: Master of Arts, Master of Science, Master of Arts in American 
Civilization, Master of Education, Master of Business Administration, and 
Master of Music. A full year of residence or the equivalent is the minimum 
requirement for each degree. The requirement for any of the above 
degrees may be obtained upon request from the Graduate School. 

For the benefit of the graduate students pursuing doctoral work, the Sum- 
mer School will provide preparatory courses, French 0, and German 0, 
in preparation for the Fall examinations. Please contact the Department of 
Foreign Languages for the exact dates for application and examination. 

Special regulations governing graduate work in Education and supplement- 
ing the statements contained in the Graduate School Announcements are 
available in duplicated form and may be obtained from the College of 
Education. Students seeking the master's degree as a qualification for a 
certificate issued by the Maryland State Department of Education or any 
other certifying agency should consult the appropriate bulletin for specific 
requirements. 

All students desiring graduate credit, whether for meeting degree require- 
ments, for transfer to another institution, or for any other purpose, must 
be regularly matriculated and registered in the Graduate School, 

Candidates for Degrees 

All students who expect to complete requirements for degrees during the 
summer session should make application for diplomas at the office of 
the Registrar during the first two weeks of the summer session. 

General Education Program 

The University has instituted a new series of related course requirements 
which together constitute a general education program. 



General Information 

Essentially, this program includes nine semester-hour credits of English 
(three credits of composition, six of literature); six credits in history (three 
credits in U. S. history and three in non-U. S. history); six credits chosen 
from various fields of the social sciences; seven credits in science; three 
credits in mathematics; three credits in fine arts or in philosophy. Two 
semesters of physical education and a course in health education are re- 
quired of all undergraduates. 

Specific courses which may be used to satisfy these general education re- 
quirements are administered by four of the campus colleges; the various 
offerings are coordinated by a Director of the General Education Program 
for the University. Greater detail will be found in the publication, General 
and Academic Regulations. 



General Information 



Registration 

Every student planning to register for one or more courses must be admitted 
to the University, regardless of his desire to become a degree on non-degree 
student. See information on page v on Admissions. 

Day division students currently enrolled in the University as undergraduates 
or graduates who are presently, and at the conclusion of the Spring 1966 
Semester, in good academic standing may register for the summer session 
without further application. All new graduate students must obtain admis- 
sion to the University from the Graduate School before registration. 

Registration for all undergraduate and graduate day division students will 
take place in accordance with Registration Schedule printed on page vii 
of this catalog. No student will be permitted to begin registration before the 
time listed in the Registration Schedule. Registration materials will be dis- 
tributed in McKeldin Library according to the alphabetical schedule on Page 
v/7 of this catalog. All students must secure registration materials at the 
Library before going to deans or advisors. Registration materials are not 
available from offices of deans or advisors. Registration cards must be ap- 
proved by both the student's advisor and dean. Graduate students must 
secure the approval of the Dean of the Graduate School. Graduate students 
in The College of Education must secure the approval of the Dean, College 
of Education, as well as Dean, Graduate School. 

After approval, registrations are completed at the Armory where students 
secure section assignments, receive bills, pay fees, and submit all forms to 
the Registrar's representatives. Until all completed forms are submitted to 
the Registrar's representatives and fees paid, registration is neither complete 
nor official. 



General Information 

Students may register in "late registration" at the Registrar's Office on June 
22. After June 22, exceptional cases may be registered only after approval 
of the appropriate dean. The late registration fee, charged on and after 
June 22, is $20.00. 

Length of Class Period 

Classes during the 1966 summer session will meet on the following time 
schedule: 

8:00— 9:20 



9:30 — 


10:50 


11:00 — 


12:20 


12:30 — 


1:50 


2:00 — 


3:20 


3:30 — 


4:50 



Weekly Class Schedule 

6-week classes 

2-credit courses meet 4 days as indicated in the bulletin. 

3-credit courses meet daily. 

4-credit courses meet daily and include multiple periods for laboratory. 
8-week classes 

2-credit courses meet M.W.F. 

3-credit courses meet M.T.Th.F. 

4-credit courses meet daily, plus laboratory time. 

Definition of Residence and Non-residence 

Students who are minors are considered to be resident students if at the 
time of their registration their parents have been domiciled in the State 
of Maryland for at least six months. 

The status of the residence of a student is determined at the time of his 
first registration in the University and may not thereafter be changed by 
him unless, in the case of a minor, his parents move to and become legal 
residents of Maryland by maintaining such residence for at least six months. 
However, the right of the minor student to change from a non-resident 
status to resident status must be established by him prior to the registra- 
tion period set for any semester or session. 

Adult students are considered to be residents if at the time of their regis- 
tration they have been domiciled in Maryland for at least six months, pro- 
vided such residence has not been acquired while attending any school 
or college in Maryland or elsewhere. Time spent on active duty in the 
armed services while stationed in Maryland will not be considered as 
satisfying the six-months period referred to above except in those cases 



General Information 

in which the adult was domiciled in Maryland for at least six months 
prior to his entrance into the armed service and was not enrolled in any 
school during that period. 

The word "domicile" as used in this regulation shall mean the permanent 
place of abode. For the purpose of this rule only one domicile may be 

maintained. 



Tuition and Fees 

ALL STUDENTS 

Auxiliary facilities fee $ 3.00 

Infirmary fee (voluntary for graduate students) 1.00 

Vehicle Registration Fee — Each vehicle 2.00 

Recreation fee 1.00 

UNDERGRADUATE STUDENTS 

General tuition fee, per credit hour $18.00 

Nonresidence fee 15.00 

Per session. Must be paid by all students who are not 

residents of Maryland. 
Application fee 10-00 

GRADUATE STUDENTS 

Application or matriculation fee 10.00 

Payable only once upon admission. Every 

student must be admitted. 

General tuition fee, per credit hour $24.00 

Testing fee (new graduate students in Education only) 5.00 

MISCELLANEOUS INFORMATION 

Auditors pay the same fees as regular students. 

The graduation fee is $10.00 for bachelor's and master's degrees, and 
$50.00 for doctoral degrees. 

A fee of $5.00 is charged for each change in program after June 24. 
If such change involves entrance to a course, it must be approved by 
the instructor in charge of the course entered. Courses cannot be 
dropped after July 8. All changes must be approved by the appro- 
priate dean and filed in the Office of the Registrar. 

A special laboratory fee is charged for certain courses where such fee 
is noted in the course description. 



General Information 

Laboratory courses in chemistry carry laboratory fees of $12.00 and 
$20.00; in addition the student is charged for any apparatus which 
cannot be returned to the stock room in perfect condition. Other 
laboratory fees are stated in connection with individual courses. 

Physical education fee charged each student registered for any physical 
activity course, $6.00. 

Late registration fee, $20.00. 

An additional late application fee of $10.00 will be assessed against 
students who fail to apply for graduation within the first three (3) 
weeks of a summer session (on or before July 8). Students who apply 
after the end of the fourth week (after June 15) of a summer session will 
be required to wait for the next academic semester in order to obtain a 
diploma. 

WITHDRAWAL AND REFUND OF FEES 

Any student compelled to leave the University at any time during the 
summer session must secure the Application for Withdrawal form from 
the ofl&ce of his dean and file it in the Office of the Registrar, bearing the 
proper signatures. If this is not done, the student will not be entitled, as 
a matter of course, to a certificate of honorable dismissal, and will forfeit 
his right to any refunds to which he would otherwise be entitled. The date 
used in computing refunds is the date the Application for Withdrawal is 
filed in the Office of the Registrar. 

In the case of a minor, official withdrawal will be permitted only with the 
written consent of the student's parent or guardian. 

With the exception of board charges, students withdrawing from the Uni- 
versity will receive a refund of all charges, except the matriculation fee, 
in accordance with the following schedule: 

Percentage 
Period From Date Instruction Begins Refundable 

One week or less 70% 

Between one and two weeks 50% 

Between two and three weeks 20% 

After three weeks 

No refunds of fixed charges, lodging, tuition, laboratory fees, etc., are 
allowed when courses are dropped, unless the student withdraws from the 
University. 

Living Accommodations and Food Service 

Residence Hall accommodations are available only to students who are 
attending the University Summer School program or duly recognized work- 
shops and conferences. When a student terminates his academic assocition 
with the University, he also terminates his room contract. Listings of off- 

8 



General Information 

campus rooms, apartments, and houses are available in the University 
Housing Office, North Administration Building. 

The facilities of the residence halls typically include study rooms, lounges, 
recreation centers, laundry equipment, and public telephones. The typical 
student room is for double occupancy and is furnished with beds, chests, 
desks, and chairs. Residents supply other essential items such as study 
lamp, waste basket, laundry bag, pillow, linen, and other accessories. The 
Gordon-Davis Linen Supply Company, 1620 North 11th Street, Philadel- 
phia, Pennsylvania 19122, is authorized to offer all resident students a 
complete weekly linen rental service. Additional information may be ob- 
tained from the company, or arrangements for linen service can be made 
after arrival. 

All students are held responsible for compliance with University regula- 
tions. 

Housing accomodations are available at the following costs, on the basis 
indicated : 

Regular Residence Halls Double Occupancy Single Occupancy 

Six week session $54.00 $ 78.00 

Eight week session 72.00 104.00 

The appropriate multiple of the weekly rates of $9.00 for double occupancy 
and $13.00 for single occupancy will be charged to students enrolled in 
workshops and other special courses of less than six weeks' duration. 
No room deposit is required for the summer session; however, the full 
apphcable room charge is payable at registration. No refunds of room 
charges will be made after the third week of classes. 

Early application for a reservation is advisable. Only those who have made 
reservations can be assured that rooms are available for occupancy upon 
their arrival. If you desire to make application for campus residence, please 
complete, sign and return the Room Application Card found in this bul- 
letin. Indicate (1) exact dates and number of weeks of attendance, (2) 
your classification (e.g., graduate, undergraduate. Human Development 
Workshop, special name of any other workshop, Pre-College Summer 
Session.); (3) type of room desired; (4) and whether or not you desire a 
six or eight weeks' board contract on a pre-paid basis. It is impossible to 
honor all room assignment requests. Since most of the rooms in the resid- 
ence halls are double rooms, there is no guarantee that a request for a 
single room can be granted. Only a limited number of single rooms are 
available and these are assigned on a first come, first served basis. You will 
be notified by mail after June 1 of the time and place to claim your room. 
Room reservations will be cancelled after noon on Wednesday, June 22. 

The University residence halls will open for occupancy at 2:00 p.m., 
Sunday, June 19. Room assignment is for the summer sessions only. Stu- 



General Information 

dents will be expected to move out of the residence halls as soon as pos- 
sible after the last class on Friday, August 12, 1966, but not later than 
7:00 p.m. on that date. Your residence hall assignment for the summer 
in no way affects your housing assignment for the following academic year. 
If you are to be a full-time undergraduate student during the regular aca- 
demic year and if you desire campus residence, you will be required to 
apply for a residence hall space in the regular way by submitting a Housing 
Application form in accordance with instructions outlined in the Residence 
Halls booklet. 

If you need to ship baggage, the following steps are suggested: (1) address 
to: Central Receiving, University of Maryland, College Park, Maryland 
20742, (2) be sure all postage, shipping, and customs duties are prepaid 
(shipments will not be accepted unless all charges are prepaid), and (3) 
when a student who has shipped personal belongings reports to the Uni- 
versity, he must call for his luggage at the Central Receiving Warehouse. 
The University does not make delivery to the residence units. 

Food Service is available to all students under the following options: 

(a) Cafeteria style with cash payment for each individual meal. 

(b) On a prepaid basis for six or eight weeks only at the following 
rates payable in full at registration: 

$72.00 for the Six Weeks Session 
$96.00 for the Eight Weeks Session 

Food services cannot be contracted on a weekly basis. The prepaid or 
contract basis includes twenty meals each week (the Sunday evening meal 
is not included). 

Refund of the prepaid board charees will he ma'^f* oniv in t>>^ rpc^c of 
withdrawal from the University or the residence halls. This refund will be 
made on a pro rata weekly basis. 

Student Health 

The University Infirmary, located on the campus near the Student Union, 
provides medical service for the undergraduate students in the summer 
session, and also for those graduate students who elect to pay the $1.00 
Health Service fee. Students who are ill should report promptly to the 
University Infirmary in person. Serious emergencies may be reported by 
phone to Ext. 7666 or 7667, or if transportation for emergency is needed 
call 333 on campus phone or 864-1122 on a pay phone. Doctor's Office 
hours are: Week days, 9:00 a.m. to 4:00 p.m.; week ends, 10:00 a.m. to 
11 :00 a.m. Nurses are on duty 24 hours each day and doctor's are on call 
for serious conditions after regular office hours. 

Parking of Automobiles 

For use of students, staff members, and employees, several parking lots are 
provided. Students may park in lot 1,3, 7, 10 and 11. All other lots are 

10 



General Information 

reserved for faculty and staff members. The University rules forbid the 
parking of cars on any campus road. These rules are enforced by campus 
police. 

If you do not intend to operate a vehicle on the College Park Campus 
during the 1965-66 academic year or summer session you are required to 
sign a non-driver declaration. 

Libraries 

Libraries of the University are located on the College Park and Baltimore 
campuses. They consist of the general University Library (the McKeldin 
Library), the Engineering and Physical Sciences Library, and the Chem- 
istry Library in College Park; and the Health Sciences Library and the 
Law Library in Baltimore. The libraries have a total book collection of 
over 750,000 cataloged volumes, and more than 8,000 periodicals and 
newspapers are received currently. 

In addition to the total of cataloged volumes cited above, the College 
Park libraries contain over 140,000 U. S. government and United Na- 
tions documents, 340,000 negatives and prints, 2,600 film strips, 5,150 
slides, and thousands of phonorecords, maps, and technical reports. 

Bibliographical facilities of these libraries include, in addition to the card 
catalogs, printed catalogs of other libraries, e.g., British Museum, Bib- 
Uotheque Nationale, and Library of Congress, as well as trade bibliogra- 
phies of foreign countries, special bibliographies of subject fields and simi- 
lar research aids. 

In the McKeldin Library are study carrels available to faculty members 
and graduate students whose study and research require extensive use of 
library materials. Lockers are likewise available for assignment to graduate 
students. Facilities for reading microtext materials and for use of typewriters 
are also provided. Interlibrary loan service from other institutions is pro- 
vided for those engaged in research. 

University Bookstore 

For the convenience of students, the University maintains a University 
Bookstore, located in the Student Union Building, where students may 
obtain at reasonable prices textbooks, stationery, classroom materials and 
equipment. The Bookstore operates on a cash basis. 

For Additional Information 

Detailed information concerning fees and expenses, scholarships and 
awards, student life, and other material of a general nature, may be found 
in the University publication titled An Adventure in Learning. This pub- 
lication may be obtained on request from the Catalog Mailing Room, 



General Information 

North Administration Building, University of Maryland at College Park. 
A detailed explanation of the regulation of student and academic life, 
may be found in the University publication titled. University General and 
Academic Regulations. This is mailed in September and February of 
each year to all new undergraduate students. Requests for course catalogs 
for the individual schools and colleges should be directed to the deans 
of these respective units, addressed to: 

COLLEGES LOCATED AT COLLEGE PARK: 

Dean 

(College in which you are interested) 
The University of Maryland 
College Park, Maryland 20740 

PROFESSIONAL SCHOOLS LOCATED AT BALTIMORE: 

Dean 

(School in which you are interested) 
The University of Maryland 
Lombard and Greene Streets 
Baltimore, Maryland 21201 



12 



Institutes and Workshops 

Special Summer Activities 

As an integral part of its summer program, the University offers a Sum- 
mer Lecture Series; institutes supported by the National Science Founda- 
tion, National Defense Education Act, and other granting organizations; 
and specialized educational activities through workshops. Opportunities 
for participating and specific infonnation about these events are provided 

The Summer Lecture Series 

A series of lectures, open to members of the University community, is 
planned for the 1966 summer session. For the series, distinguished scholars, 
national leaders, and important state and University officials are usually 
invited to speak. 

A committee of the faculty selects the theme for the lectures, and invites 
the speakers. The lectures are a contribution to the social and cultural 
offerings of the summer session. 

Lecturers are scheduled for the convenience of students and faculty in 
air conditioned facilities on the College Park campus. 

Institutes and Workshops 

Descriptive information on the workshops listed below may be found on 
the following pages. Communication regarding these special programs 
should to addressed to the director, as indicated. University of Maryland, 
College Park, Maryland, 20742. 

All workshops and institute students must be admitted to the University 
according to procedures described on page 2. 

Institutes 

NATIONAL DEFENSE EDUCATION ACT 

Institute in Counseling and Guidance 

Dr. Phillip M. Ray, Counseling Center 

Institute for Secondary School Teachers of Composition 
Eh-. John Portz, English Department 

Institute for Secondary School Teachers of Geography 
Prof. Jeremy H. Anderson, Geography Department 

NATIONAL SCIENCE FOUNDATION 

Institute for High School Teachers of Biology 

Dr. J. David Lockard, College of Education and Botany 

Institute for Teachers of Mathematics in Junior High School 

Prof. J. H. Henkelman, College of Education and Mathematics 

13 



Institutes and Workshops 

Workshops 

Advances in Health Science and Health Education 

Dr. Warren R. Johnson, College of Physical Education, Recreation 
and Health 

Education of Children with Learning Impairments 
Dr. Betty Simms, College of Education 

Educators Workshop on Automatic Data Processing 

Dr. Arthur S. Patrick, College of Business and Public 
Administration 

European Travel Seminar 

Dr. Leo W. O'Neill, College of Education 

Family Finance 

Prof. C. Raymond Anderson, College of Business and Public 
Administration 

Human Development — Scientific Concepts and Laboratory 
Dr- H. Gerthon Morgan, College of Education 

Human Development — Two-week workshops 
Child Study Leaders 

Application of Human Development Principles in the Classroom 
Human Development and Religious Education 
Action Research in Human Development Education 
Dr. Fred R. Thompson, College of Education 

Human Relations in Educational Administration 
Dr. Clarence Newell, College of Education 

Instructional Materials 

Prof. Dale W. Brown, Library Science Education 

Modem Physical Education Programs 

Dr. Dale L. Hanson, College of Physical Education, Recreation 
and Health 

Scholastic Journalism 

Prof. William Noall, Department of Journalism 

School Recreation for Exceptional Children 

Prof. Ron Johnson, College of Physical Education, Recreation and 
Health 

Supervision of Student Teachers 

Mr. James Collins, College of Education 

Team Teaching 

Mr. James Kleman, College of Education 

Trade and Industrial Teacher Certification 

Dr. Joseph Luetkemeyer, Department of Industrial Education 

Typewriting Demonstration for Business Education Teachers 

Prof. Jane O'Neill, College of Business and Public Administration 

14 



Institutes and Workshops 

ADVANCEMENTS IN HEALTH SCIENCE AND 
HEALTH EDUCATION (Hea. 189) three or six credits 

An Institute will be provided for the updating of teachers, nurses and others 
concerned with the health and health education of school-aged children and 
youth. Topics covered will include: major health hazards, mental health 
and social adjustment, sex education, consumer education and problems 
and trends in health education. 

Guest speakers and discussion leaders will be specialists from the National 
Institutes of Health and other health centers. 

Six- week participation, six hours credit; three week participation, three 
hours credit, 8:30-11:30 a.m. daily, June 20- July 29. 

EDUCATION OF CHILDREN WITH LEARNING IMPAIRMENTS 

(Ed. 189-29) four credits 

The workshop will consider the theoretical background and the methods, 
curricula and materials employed in the approach to the various learning 
problems of children. 

Opportunities for observation, participation and consultation in program 
planning, curriculum organization, and the use of methods and materials 
will be provided according to the primary learning problems involved: 
Mentally Handicapped (Educable), Mentally Deficient (Trainable), Per- 
ceptual Learning Problems, Disturbances in Emotional Development, and 
Motor Handicapped. Selected consultants will be utilized. 

The workshop will meet off -campus daily from 9:00-12:30 June 20 to 
July 29. Four units of undergraduate or graduate credit may be earned. 

Students planning to attend the Workshop should request the Special Edu- 
cation Summer Session Brochure for program details from Program of 
Special Education, University of Maryland, College Park, Maryland. 

EDUCATOR'S WORKSHOP ON AUTOMATIC 
DATA PROCESSING (Ed. 189-53) six credits 

This workshop should be of particular interest to those persons teaching 
and supervising courses in business and mathematics. No formal mathe- 
matics is required as a prerequisite to this workshop. 

Opportunities will be provided to study ( 1 ) the principles of IBM punch- 
card data systems, (2) the basic concepts of computers, (3) a program- 
ming language and (4) the construction of courses, curriculum design, and 
the qualifications of teachers in ADP. 

Workshop lectures are scheduled from 9:00 a.m. to 12:00, special labora- 
tories and conferences from 1:30 to 3:00 p.m., June 20-July 29. 

15 



Institutes and Workshops 

EUROPEAN TRAVEL SEMINAR (189-72) six credits 

The seminar is an opportunity to travel and study abroad this summer. 
The tour will cover the major continental capitals, London, Rome and 
Paris with visits to historic buildings, leading museums and galleries, as 
well as attendance at concerts, theatre and the ballet. During the six week 
seminar, students will be free to make their own travel arrangements on 
weekends as well as during a designated period at the end of the first month 
of the tour, for special interest activities. 

EDUCATION IN FAMILY FINANCE WORKSHOP (Ed. 189-1) 
four credits 

A four-week, four-credit workshop — June 20-July 15 — providing the op- 
portunity for teachers to develop concepts and understandings relative to 
the role of the individual in the American business economy. Content 
studied includes family financial planning, principles of investing, problems 
of home ownership, agencies and processes for consumer protection, pen- 
sion plans and social security, principles of taxation, and control of con- 
sumer credit. 

Workshop activities include lectures, demonstration teaching, group pro- 
cesses, and the development of curricular and teaching materials. 

This Workshop is offered in conjunction with the National Committee for 
Education in Family Finance. Scholarships covering board and tuition will 
be granted to qualified applicants. Interested persons should apply in 
advance. 

HUMAN DEVELOPMENT— SCIENTIFIC CONCEPTS AND 
LABORATORY (H.D. Ed. 112-115, 212-215) six credits 

The Institute for Child Study, College of Education, offers a six-week 
human development workshop each summer providing opportunities for 

(1) study and synthesis of scientific knowledge about human behavior; 

(2) experience in the analysis of case records; (3) preparation of study 
group leaders for in-service child and youth study programs; (4) planning 
in-service child and youth study programs for teachers or other human 
relations workers; (5) planning preservice teacher education courses and 
laboratory experiences for prospective teachers; (6) examination of impli- 
cations of scientific knowledge about human development and behavior for 
school organization, curriculum development, guidance services, club 
leadership, and other programs and procedures designed to foster mental 
health and optimal development of children, youth, and adults. 

HUMAN DEVELOPMENT— Two-week Workshops 

CHILD STUDY LEADERS WORKSHOP (Ed. 189-33) two credits 

For leaders and prospective leaders of child and youth study groups^ who 
cannot attend the full six weeks workshop, a two-week workshop will be 

16 



Institutes and Worxshops 

held on the University campus from June 20 to July 1 . Each day's activi- 
ties will include a lecture-discussion period centering around major scien- 
tific concepts explaining growth, development, and behavior; laboratory 
periods for analyzing case record material at the first, second, or third 
year level of the program; reading and special interest periods. (Partici- 
pants will choose the year level of the group they expect to lead). Two 
hours' credit can be earned for full time participation in this workshop. 

APPLICATIONS OF HUMAN DEVELOPMENT PRINCIPLES IN 
CLASSROOMS (Ed. 189-35) two credits 

For people who have had three or more years of child study experience 
either in workshops or in groups during the school year, a two credit work- 
shop will be held at the University from July 5 to July 15. Classroom 
practices will be examined in the light of human development principles, 
and procedures will be studied for possible beyond-third-year action re- 
search projects during the school year. Opportunities will be offered also to 
superintendents, supervisors, and principals who are interested in exploring 
the implications of human development principles for school operation. 

HUMAN DEVELOPMENT AND RELIGIOUS EDUCATION 

(ED. 189-36) two credits 

Two workshops in human development, each for two credit hours, for 
persons in the field of religious education will be held on the University 
campus from July 18 to July 29. These workshops will be entirely non- 
denominational and any person responsibly concerned with religious edu- 
cation can appropriately enroll regardless of his faith. 

A workshop for persons without prior workshop experience will examine 
scientific knowledge about human development, learning, behavior and 
adjustment, and will practice in vacation, weekday, and Sunday schools op- 
erated by church groups. 

Advanced workshops for persons who have had a previous workshop in 
Human Development and Religious Education will provide advanced ex- 
periences with concepts and analyses. 

ACTION RESEARCH IN HUMAN DEVELOPMENT EDUCATION 

(Ed. 189-37) two credits 

A workshop for teachers and other school personnel who are interested 
in learning more about action research or in initiating action research 
projects in their own schools. This two credit workshop will be held at the 
University from August 1 to 12. The role of action research in the solution 
of educational problems will be emphasized. Participants will have the 
opportunity to learn about and to develop designs and instruments for 
carrying out action research in their own schools and classrooms. Pref- 
erence in enrollment will be given to persons coming as teams for the 

17 



Institutes and Workshops 

purpose of developing an action research design for implementation in 
their own school or school system. 

HUMAN RELATIONS IN EDUCATIONAL ADMINISTRATION 
(Ed. 189-26) six credits 

This workshop is concerned with the development of leadership teams 
capable of providing in-service programs in human relations in local 
school systems. In addition to basic theory, the workshop will center on 
the practice and acquisition of specific human relations skills. 

Preference in enrollment will be given to teams representing Maryland 
school systems which have participated in the workshop in the past, and 
to teams of four to six persons designated by other Maryland school 
systems. 

Enrollment in the workshop will be limited. Applications for team par- 
ticipation from local school systems will be processed in the order received. 
If more than one application is received at the same time, the director 
of the workshop will make the final decision. 

The workshop will meet daily from 9:00 a.m. to 3:00' p.m., June 20 
through July 29. A student may earn six semester hours of graduate credit. 

INSTRUCTIONAL MATERIALS (Ed. 189-8) three credits 

The Workshop in Instructional Materials will be offered for school libra- 
rians at all levels, school administrators, and classroom teachers in grades 
kindergarten to twelve, July 18 to August 5. It is designed to give libra- 
rians, teachers, and other school personnel an opportunity to work to- 
gether on problems in the selection, organization and utilization of in- 
structional materials in school programs. Consideration will be given 
to materials of all types, including: books, films, filmstrips, records, free 
and inexpensive materials. All grade levels and subject areas will be in- 
cluded. A student may earn three hours of graduate or undergraduate 
credit in Education or Library Science. 

MODERN PHYSICAL EDUCATION PROGRAMS 

(P. E. S.189) three or six credits 

This workshop is directed toward physical education teachers of all grade 
levels. It is offered in two sessions of three weeks each. Either one or 
both sessions may be taken. Session I will be concerned with physical 
education curriculum "dynamics" while Session II will be directed toward 
the study of problems defined by the numbers of the group. 

This workshop will meet from 8:30 a.m. to 12:00 noon daily for each 
three weeks session. Each session will carry 3 credits, either graduate or 
undergraduate. The credits are counted as CONTENT for meeting the 
requirements for the "Advanced Professional Certificate" in Maryland. 

18 



Institutes and Workshops 



SESSION I JUNE 20-JULY 8 



Topics for consideration will include: the impact of society on youth, 
the growth and developmental approach to physical education, principles 
of motor learning, physical fitness principles, and guidance into physical 
education activities. 

SESSION II — JULY 11- JULY 29 

For the second session, the workshop will be divided into two groups: 

Group A — will concern themselves with instruction and participa- 
tion in selected motor skills. The scope of this offering 
will be appropriate for Physical Education teachers in 
Elementary Schools, Junior High Schools and Senior High 
Schools. 

Group A will not be available to graduate students. 

Group B — problems defined by the individual members of the group 
will be studied in a similar manner. Independent study 
projects will be undertaken. 

SCHOLASTIC JOURNALISM WORKSHOP 

(Jour. 189 S) three credits 

The Scholastic Journalism Workshop is sponsored by the Department 
of Journalism in cooperation with the Maryland-Delaware Press Asso- 
ciation and the Maryland Scholastic Press Advisers Association. 

This workshop for school newspaper advisers puts emphasis on the scho- 
lastic press: objectives, editing, reporting, head writing, head schedule, 
layout, production, circultation, advertising, photography and staff. One 
edition of a paper is produced under a supervision by members of the 
workshop. 

This workshop, devoting all of its time to scholastic journalism, will 
meet from 10:00 to 12:00 and 1:00 to 3:30, daily, June 20-July 8, in 
the Journalism Building. Three hours of credit may be earned. 



SCHOOL RECREATION FOR EXCEPTIONAL CHILDREN 
(Rec. 189-B) four credits 

In cooperation with the Special Education Summer Workshop Program, 
the College of Physical Education, Recreation, and Health offers an off- 
campus Recreation Workshop for teachers and prospective professionals. 
The workshop will be centered around an actual recreation program 
conducted for the exceptional children participating in other portions of 
the Special Education Workshop. 

19 



Institutes and Workshops 

Opportunities will be provided for students to gain first-hand information 
regarding the planning, organizing, and administering of school recrea- 
tional activities for children with learning problems. Lectures, seminar 
sessions, and cooperative organization of useful materials will be based 
upon the essentials of the laboratory practicum. 

The workshop will meet daily from 12:30-3:30 p.m., June 20-July 29, 
and will offer the undergraduate and/or special student four semester hours 
credit. 

SUPERVISION OF STUDENT TEACHERS (Ed. 189-7) three credits 

The workshop is planned for qualified and experienced teachers who 
may be assigned a student teacher during the school year. The character- 
istics of good student teaching programs are studied, as well as such 
topics as the role of the cooperating teacher, university supervisor, prin- 
cipal, etc. Research material, consultants, and teacher education litera- 
ture are used. 

The workshop will provide both large and small group activities. These 
activities will include formal presentations by the instructional staff, in- 
cluding visiting consultants. It will also provide opportunities to study 
and discuss problems and materials related to this phase of teacher edu- 
cation. The roles and responsibilities of supervisory personnel will also be 
considered. 

The workshop will meet 9:30 a.m.-3:30 p.m. daily from June 20 to July 8. 

TEAM TEACHING (Ed. 189-57) three credits 

A workshop on team teaching will be offered to classroom teachers and 
school administrators for three weeks from June 20 to July 8. It is de- 
signed to give the teachers and administrators an opportunity to develop 
team teaching projects to be implemented in their local schools. Teams 
of teachers from individual schools are encouraged to make application. 

Team teaching is an organizational concept for instruction in which a 
group of teachers, in a cooperative venture, may undertake an educa- 
tional program that provides more challenging opportunities and enrich- 
ing experiences for students. Team teaching proposes to improve in- 
struction through the reorganization of personnel, resulting in a team of 
two or more teachers with complimentary talents working cooperatively, 
who assume joint responsibility for the planning, administration and 
evaluation of the educational program for a distinct student group. Large 
group instruction, small group instruction, independent study, programmed 
instruction, and other newer media of instruction will be considered. 
Lectures will include some given by school personnel who have been in- 
volved in successful team teaching experiences. The workshop will meet 
daily from 9:30 a.m. to 3:30 p.m. Enrollment will be limited and pref- 
erences win be given to teachers with two or more years of experience. 

20 



Institutes and Workshops 

TRADE AND INDUSTRIAL TEACHER CERTIFICATION 
WORKSHOP (Ed. 189-67) one credit 

The trade and Industrial Teacher Certification Workshop is sponsored 
by the Department of Industrial Education, in cooperation with the 
Division of Vocational Education, Maryland State Department of Edu- 
cation. 

This workshop offers professional assistance to teachers and prospective 
teachers of vocational education. Specific emphasis is placed upon course 
construction, shop organization and management, and methods of teach- 
ing. The trainees will work together in the selection, organization, and 
utilization of course materials. The trainees will also be involved in 
various activities including class demonstrations, field trips, film evalua- 
tions, textbook selection and guest lecturers. 

The workshop will meet daily, Monday through Friday, 8:00 a.m. to 
3:30 p.m. from June 20 to August 12. 

TYPEWRITING DEMONSTRATION FOR BUSINESS EDUCATION 
TEACHERS 

The College of Education offers the business teacher registered during the 
summer session an opportunity to observe pupils at work in a typewriting 
class. These observations will aid the classroom teacher in: (1) designing 
purposeful classroom activities for developing basic typewriting skills, (2) 
planning with the pupil the organization of an effective set of "work" 
habits, (3) analyzing through case studies the methods of dealing with 
the various aspects of individual pupil progress, (4) applying the principles 
of the psychology of skills to the teaching of typewriting, and (5) develop- 
ing improved methods for course construction, selection of instructional 
materials, and measuring pupil achievement. 



21 




1 



UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 
~~ ^ College Park Campus 





[i 



5 




^: 




^,x\—- 






I s^sv 





jCjtl^ 



i^""-"-" 





r 




BLULDING CODE LETTERS 


FOR CLASS SCHEDULES 


A 


Am and Scitnco— FrancU Scon Key Hall 




—Taliaferro Hall 


AA 


Nunery School 


AR 


Amiory 


B 


Muiic 


SB 


Center of Adull Edncation 


IB 


Adminutntion 


C 


Chcmisti^ 


CC 


Zoology 


Col 


Cohsrum 


D 


Dairy — Turner Laboratory 


DD 


Psychology Research Laboratory 


E 


Agronomy— Botan>-—H. J- Patterson Hall 


EE 


Psychology 


F 


Horticnltnre— Holaapfel Hall 


FF 


Temporary Classroom 


G 


Journalism 


GG 


Cole Snjdent Activities Building 


H 


Home Economics 


HH 


Music Annex 


I 


Agricultural Engineering— Shriver Laboratory 


II 


Poultr^^JuU Hall 


I 


Engirreering Classroom Building 


IF 


Engines Reseatrh Laboratory (Molecular Physics) 


K 


Zoology— SiKrster Hall 


KK 


North Administration Building 


L 


Library— McKeldin H»U 


IX 


Foreign Languages Building 


M 


P^chology— Morrill Hall 


MM 


Computer Science Center 


N 


Shoerruker Building 


NN 


Fine Arts Building 


O 


Agriculture — Symons Hall 


oo 


College of Education and Classroom Building 


p 


Industrial Arts and Education 




—J. M. Patterson Building 


Q 


Business and Public Administration 




and Classroom Building 


R 


Classroom Building— Woods Hall 


S 


Engineering Laboratories 


su 


Student Union 


T 


Education — SWinner Building 


U 


Chemical Engineering 


V 


Wind Tunnel 


w 


Preinkert Field House 


X 


Judging Pavilion 


Y 


Mathematics 


Z 


Physics 


Soronocs INOt snowu rratcmitia Not Shown 




Alpha Xi Delta Tau Epsilon Phi 




Phi Epsilon Pi 




Tau Kappa Epsilon 



£0^ 



'\*"lf=r 



■■-"4 >'" j; «"••' 





Course Offerings 



An "S" before a course number denotes that the course is offered in Sum- 
mer School only. An "S" after a course number indicates a regular course 
modified for offering during the summer session. A more complete course 
description may be found in the respective College catalogues. 

The University may find it necessary to cancel courses when warranted, 
due to low enrollment. In general, freshman and sophomore courses will 
not be maintained for classes smaller than 20. Minimum enrollments for 
upper level undegraduate courses and graduate courses will be 15 and 
10 respectively. 

Unless otherwise specified, all courses will be offered for eight weeks. 
June 20-August 12, 1966. 



AGRICULTURE 

AGRICULTURAL ECONOMICS 

A.E. 112. Agricultural Policy and Programs. (3) 

9:30 Daily. A study of public policies and programs related to the problem 
of Agriculture. Description, analysis and appraisal of current policies and 
programs will be emphasized. (Beal.) 

A.E. 198. Special Problems. (1-2) (2 cr. max.) 

Arranged. Concentrated reading and study in some phase or problem in Agri- 
cultural Economics. Not for graduate credit. (Staff.) 

A.E. 301. Special Problems in Agricultural Economics. (1-2) 
(4 or. max.) 

Arranged. Intensive study and analysis of specific problems in the field of 
Agricultural Economics, which will provide information in depth in areas of 
special interest to the student. (Staff.) 

A.E. 399. Research. (1-6) 

Arranged. Advanced research in Agricultural Economics. Credit according 
to work assigned. (Staff.) 

AGRICULTURAL ENGINEERING 

Agr. Engr. 189. Senior Problem. (2) 

Prerequisite, approval of Department. Students will select individual projects, 
prepare design, conduct experiment or analyze experimental data and present 
both an oral and written report to Departmental faculty. (Staff.) 

Agr. Engr. 198. Special Problems in Farm Mechanics. (1-3) 

Arranged. Prerequisite, approval of department. Not acceptable for majors in 
agricultural engineering. Problems assigned in proportion to amount of credit. 

(Gienger.) 
22 



Agricultural and Extension Education 

Agr. Engr. 301. Special Problems in Agricultural 
Engineering. (1-6) 

Arranged. Credit according to work assigned. (Staff.) 

Agr. Engr. 399. Research. (1-6) 

Arranged. Credit according to work assigned. (Staff.) 

AGRICULTURAL AND EXTENSION EDUCATION 

R.Ed. 170, 171. Conservation of Natural Resources. (3, 3) 

June 20-July 29. Arranged; E-103. Fee, $35.00. Designed primarily for teach- 
ers. Study of State's natural resources — soil, water fisheries, wildlife, forests and 
minerals — and natural resource problems and practices. Extensive field study. 
First course concentrates on subject matter, second includes methods of teaching 
conservation. Courses taken concurrently in summer session. (Norden.) 

R.Ed. 180, 181. Critique in Rural Education. (1, 1) 

Arranged. Prerequisite, approval of staff. Current problems and trends in rural 
education. (Staff.) 

R.Ed. 198. Special Problems in Agricultural Education. (1-3) 

Arranged. Prerequisite, approval of staff. (Staff.) 

R.Ed. 207, 208. Problems in Rural Education. (2, 2) 

Arranged. Consideration of current problems and topics in rural education. 

(Cardozier.) 

R.Ed. 301. Field Problems in Rural Education. (1-3) 

Arranged. Prerequisite, approval of staff. (Staff.) 

R.Ed. 302. Seminar in Rural Education. (1) 

Arranged. Prerequisite, approval of staff. Problems in the organization, ad- 
ministration and supervision of the several agencies of rural education. In- 
vestigations, papers and reports. (Staff.) 

R.Ed. 399. Research. (1-6) 

Arranged. Credit according to work assigned. (Staff.) 

AGRONOMY 

Agron. 198. Special Problems in Agronomy. (1) 

Arranged. Prerequisites, Agron. 10, 107, 108 or permission of instructor. 
A detailed study, including a written report of an important problem in 
agronomy. (Staff.) 

Agron. 208. Research Methods. (2) 

Arranged. Prerequisite, permission of staff. Development of research viewpoint 
by detailed study and report on crop research of the Maryland Experiment 
Station or review of literature on specific phases of problem. (Staff.) 

23 



Agronomy 

Agron. 399. Research. (1-6) 

Arranged. Credit according to work assigned. (Staff.) 

ANIMAL SCIENCE 

An.Sc. 198. Special Problems in Animal Science. (1-2) (4 cr. max.) 

Arranged. Prerequisite, approval of staff. A course designed for advanced under- 
graduates in which specific problems relating to animal science will be assigned. 
Credit according to work, assigned. (Staflf.) 

An.Sc. 263. Poultry Nutrition Laboratory. (2) 

One lecture and one laboratory period per week. To acquaint graduate students 
with common basic nutrition research techniques useful in conducting experi- 
ments with poultry. Actual feeding trials with chicks as well as bacteriological 
and chemical assays will be performed. (Creek.) 

An.Sc. 301. Special Problems in Animal Science. (1-2) (4 cr. max.) 

Arranged. Prerequisite, approval of staff. Work assigned in proportion to amount 
of credit. Problems will be assigned which relate specifically to the character 
of work the student is pursuing. (Staff.) 

An.Sc. 399. Research. (1-12) 

Arranged. Students will be required to pursue original research in some phase 
of animal science, carrying the same to completion, and report the results in 
the form of a thesis. Credit according to work assigned. (Staff.) 

BOTANY 

BoT. 1. General Botany. (4) 

Lecture: M.T.Th.F.. 8:00, A-1; Laboratory periods. Sec. 1 M.T.Th.F., 9:00, 
E-212. Sec. 2 M.T.Th.F., 11:00, E-212. Sec. 3 M.T.Th.F., 12:30, E-238, 
Laboratory fee. $6.00. General introduction to Botany. Emphasis on the 
fundamental biological principles of higher plants. (Harrison, Assistants.) 

Bot. 101. Plant Physiology. (4) 

Lecture: NLT.Th.F., 8:00, E-116. Laboratory: M.T.Th.F., 9:00, E-314. Pre- 
requisites. Bot. 1 and General Chemistry or their equivalents. Laboratory 
fee. S6.00. A survey of the general physiological activities of plants. (Open 
only to participants in the N.S.F. Institute.) (Lockard.) 

Bot. 113. Plant Geography. (2) 

M.T.Th.F.. 9:00. E-116. Prerequisite, Bot. 1 or equivalent. A study of 
plant distribution throughout the world and the factors generally associated 
with such distribution. (Useful to teachers of general cultural interest.) 

(Brown.) 

Bot. 151-S. Teaching Methods in Botany. (2) 

Lecture-Laboratory: M.T.Th.F.. 1:00-2:50. E-212. Prerequisite. Bot. 1 or equiv- 
alent. Laboratory fee, $5.00. A study of the biological principles of common 
plants, and demonstrations, projects, and visual aids suitable for teaching in 
primary and secondary schools. (Open only to participants in the N.S.F. 
Institute.) (Rappleye.) 

24 



Botany 
BoT. 153. Field Botany and Taxonomy. (2) 

M.T.Th.F., 1:00-2:50, E-308. Prerequisite, Bot. 1 or equivalent. Laboratory 
fee, $5.00. The identification of trees, shrubs, and herbs, emphasizing the 
native plants of Maryland. Manuals, keys, and other techniques will be used. 
Short field trips will be taken. Each student will make an individual collection. 
(Open only to participants in the N.S.F. Institute.) (Brown.) 

BoT. 195. Tutorial Readings in Botany (Honors course) (2 or 3) 
Time and place arranged. Prerequisite, admission to the Department of Botany 
Honors Program. A review of the literature dealing with a specific research 
problem in preparation for original research to be accomplished in Bot. 196. 
Papers will be assigned and discussed in frequent sessions with the instructor. 

BoT. 1%. Research Problems in Botany (Honors Course) (2 or 3) 

Prerequisite, Bot. 195. Laboratory fee, $10.00. The candidate for Honors 
will pursue a research problem under the direction and close supervision of 
a member of the faculty. 

BoT. 199-S. Seminar for National Science Foundation Summer 
Institute for Biology Teachers. (2) 

June 20- Aug. 12. Two or three hour sessions, W 9 and 2, or all day visitations. 
Laboratory fee, $5.00. Includes lectures, discussions, laboratory demonstrations, 
and visitations in the fields of the biological sciences, especially designed for 
high school. (Open only to participants in the N.S.F. Institute for Biology 
Teachers.) (Rappleye.) 

Bot. 399. Research. (1-6) 

Arranged. Credit according to work assigned. (Staff.i 



ENTOMOLOGY 

Ent. S-121. Entomology for Science Teachers. (4) 

Lectures M.T.Th.F., 8:00, O-lOl. Laboratory periods, M.T.Th.F., 9:00-11:50, 
0-200. This course will include the elements of morphology, taxonomy and 
biology of insects using examples commonly available to high school teachers. 
It will include practice in collecting, preserving, rearing and experimenting 
with insects. Laboratory fee, $3.00. Open only to participants in the N.S.F. 
Institute. (Messersmith.) 

Ent. 198. Special Problems. (1-3) 

Arranged. Credit and prerequisites determined by the department. Investiga- 
tion of assigned entomological problems. (Staff.) 

Ent. 301. Advanced Entomology. 

Arranged. Credit and prerequisite determined by the department. Independent 
studies of selected entomological problems with appropriate supervision. 

(Staff.) 

Ent. 399. Research. (1-6) 

Thesis research. Arranged. Credit according to work assigned. (Staff.) 

25 



Art 

HORTICULTURE 

HoRT. 20. Introduction to the Art of Landscaping. (3) 

June 20-July 29. Daily, 1:00-2:20, F-103. The theory and general principles 
of landscape design with their application to public and private areas. 

(Soergel.) 

HoRT. 198. Special Problems. (2-4) 

Arranged. For major students in horticulture or botany. Credit according to 
work assigned. Four credits maximum. 

HoRT. 399. Advanced Horticultural Research. (2-12) 

Arranged. Credit according to work assigned. (Staff.) 

ARTS AND SCIENCES 

AMERICAN STUDIES 

Amer, Stud. 137. Conference Course in American Studies. (3) 

M.Th., 9:30, A-164. Prerequisite, Eng. 4 or equivalent. A consideration of 
some major works in American Studies. (Beall.) 

Amer. Stud. 201 Seminar in American Studies. (3) 

M.Th., 7:00-9:00 P.M., A-164. (BeaU.) 

ART 

Art. 16. Drawing I. (3) 

M.T.Th.F., 8:00, NN-332. An introductory course with a variety of media 
and related techniques. Problems based on still life, figure, and nature. 

(Forbes.) 

Art. 17. Painting I. (3) 

M.T.Th.F., 8:00, NN 230. Basic tools and language of painting. Oil and 
watercolor. (Freeny.) 

Art. 40. Fundamentals of Art Education. (3) 

Sec. 1, M.T.Th.F., 9:30, NN-328. Sec. 2, M.T.Th.F., 11:00, NN-328. Funda- 
mental principles of the visual arts for teaching on the elementary level. Ele- 
ments and principles of design and theory of color. Studio practice in different 
media. (Lembach.) 

Art 60. History of Art. (3) 

June 20-July 29. Daily, 12:30, NN-214. A survey of western art as ex- 
pressed through architecture, sculpture and painting. First half. (Denny.) 

Art. 61. History of Art (3) 

June 20-July 29. Daily, 8:00-9:20, NN-214. A survey of western art as 
expressed through architecture, sculpture and painting. Second half. (Lynch.) 



26 



Art 

Art 118. Sculpture. (3) 

M.T.Th.F., 9:30-11:00, NN-139. Volume, masses and planes, based on the 
use of plastic earth. Simple armature construction and methods of casting. 

(Freeny.) 
Art 119. Printmaking I. (3) 

M.T.Th.F., 9:30, 11:00, NN-137. Basic printmaking technique in relief, intaglio, 
and planographic media. (O'Connell.) 

Art 129. Printmaking II. (3) 

M.T.Th.F., 12:30-2:00, NN-137. One print medium including extensive 
study of color processes. Individually structured problems. (O'Connell.) 

Art 166. Medieval Art. (3) 

June 20-July 29. Daily, 9:30, NN-214. Architecture, sculpture and painting 
in (he Middle Ages. (Denny.) 

Art 292. Directed Graduate Studies in Studio Art. (1-3) 

Arranged. (Staff.) 

Art 294. Directed Graduate Studies in Art History. (1-3) 

Arranged. (Staff.) 

Art 399. Research Thesis 

Arranged. Credit according to work assigned. (Staff.) 

ASTRONOMY — see Physics and Astronomy 

CHEMISTRY 

All laboratory courses in chemistry (except Chem. 270 — $20.00) carry a 
laboratory fee of $12.00; in addition the student is charged for any appar- 
atus which cannot be returned to the stock room in perfect condition. 

Chem. 1. General Chemistry. (4) 

M.T.Th.F. Four lectures and four three-hour laboratory periods per week. 
Lecture, 11:00, C-132. Laboratory, 1:00, 2:00, 3:00, C-119, C-120. Pre- 
requisite, 1 year high school algebra or equivalent. (Staff.) 

Chem. 3. General Chemistry. (4) 

M.T.Th.F. Four lectures and four three-hour laboratory periods per week. 
Lecture, 11:00, C-130. Laboratory, 1:00, 2:00, 3:00, C-105, C-117, C-118. 
Prerequisite, Chem. 1 (Staff.) 

Chem. 19. Elements of Quantitative Analysis. (4) 

M.T.Th.F. Lecture, 12:30-1:20, C-132. Laboratory, 8:00, 9:00, 10:00, 
C-306. Prerequisite, Chem. 3. Four lectures and four three-hour laboratory 
periods per week. (Stuntz.) 

Chem. 37. Elementary Organic Chemistry. (2) 

M.T.Th.F. Four lectures per week, 12:30, C-130. Prerequisite, Chem. 35. 
Chem. 35. (Henery-Logan.) 

Chem. 38. Elementary Organic Laboratory. (2) 

M.T.Th.F. Four three-hour laboratory periods per week. C-225. Prerequisite, 
Chem. 36, 8:00, 9:00, 10:00, C-202, C-204. (Henery-Logan.) 

27 



Chemistry 

Chem. 192, 194. Glassblowing Laboratory. (1, 1) 

June 20-July 29. Two four-hour laboratory periods a week. MW l-OO 2-00 
3:00, 4:00; C-B3. (Carru'thers.)' 

Chem. 399. Research. 

Arranged. Credit according to work assigned. (StaflF.) 

CLASSICAL LANGUAGES AND LITERATURES 
Latin 102. Tacitus. (3) 

M.T.Th.F., 9:30, T-102. Lectures and readings on Greek and Roman his- 
tiography before Tacitus and on the author as a writer of history. The reading 
of selections from the Annals and Histories. Reports. (Avery.) 

COMPUTER SCIENCE 

C. S. 12. Introductory Algorithmic Methods. (3) 

Daily, 8:00, lectures M.W.F, Lab. T.Th. 8:00. Prerequisite, Math. 11 or 
equivalent. Laboratory fee, $10.00. 

Designed for students not majoring in mathematics, the physical sciences, or 
engineering. Study of the algorithmic approach in the analysis of problems and 
their computational solution. Definition and use of a particular algorithmic 
language. Computer projects based on elementary algebra and probability; 
linear equations and matrices; and the ordering, searching sorting, and manipu- 
lating of data. (Lindamood.) 

C. S. 20. Elementary Algorithmic Analysis. (3) 

Daily, 9:30, lectures M.W.F. Lab. T.Th., 9:30. Prerequisite, Math. 20, or con- 
current registration therein, or equivalent. Laboratory fee, $10.00. 
Concept and properties of an algorithm, language and notation for describing 
algorithms, analysis of computational problems and development of algorithms 
for their solution, use of specific algorithmic languages in solving problems from 
numerical mathematics, completion of several projects using a computer. 

C. S. 100. Language and Structure of Computers. (3) 

Daily, 9:30, lectures M.W.F. Lab. T.Th., 9:30. Prerequisite, C. S. 12 or C S 20 
or equivalent. Laboratory fee, $10.00. 

Logical basis of computer structure, machine representation of numbers and 
characters, flow of control, instruction codes, arithmetic and logical operations, 
indexing and indirect addressing, input-output, push-down stacks, symboUc 
representation of programs and assembly systems, subroutine linkage, macros, 
interpretative systems, and recent advances in computer organization. Several 
computer projects to illustrate basic concepts. (Parnas.) 

ENGLISH 

Eng. 1. Composition. (3) 

^ . (Barnes, Staff.) 

Section 1— M.T.Th.F., 8:00; A-18 

Section 2— M.T.Th.F., 8:00; F-103 

Section 3— M.T.Th.F., 9:30; A-17 

Section A — M.T.Th.F., 9:30; A-300 

Section 5— M.T.Th.F., 9:30; A-18 

Section 6 — M.T.Th.F., 11:00; F-103 

Section 7— M.T.Th.F., 11:00; F-104 

28 



Eng. 3, 4. World Literature. (3, 3) 

Prerequisite, Eng. 1 or 21. 

Eng. 3 — 



English 

(Cooley, Staff.) 
(Staff.) 



Eng 



Section 


1- 


-M.T.Th.F., 


8:00; 


A-48 


Section 


2- 


-M.T.Th.F., 


8:00; 


A-49 


Section 


3- 


-M.T.Th.F.; 


9:30; 


A-48 


Section 


4— M.T.Th.F., 


9:30; 


A-49 


Section 


5- 


-M.T.Th.F., 


9:30; 


A-167 


Section 


6- 


-M.T.Th.F., 


11:00; 


A-48 


Section 


7- 


-M.T.Th.F., 


11:00; 


A-49 


. 4— 










Section 


1- 


-M.T.Th.F., 


8:00; 


A-228 


Section 


2- 


-M.T.Th.F., 


8:00; 


A-14 


Section 


3- 


-M.T.Th.F., 


8:00; 


A- 104 


Section 


4— M.T.Th.F., 


9:30; 


A-14 


Section 


5- 


-M.T.Th.F., 


9:30; 


A- 104 


Section 


6- 


-M.T.Th.F., 


9:30; 


A-106 


Section 


7- 


-M.T.Th.F., 


9:30; 


A-110 


Section 


8- 


-M.T.Th.F., 


11:00; 


A-14 


Section 


9- 


-M.T.Th.F., 


11:00; 


A- 104 



(Staff.) 



Eng. 8. Introduction to English Grammar. (3) 

M.T.Th.F., 9:30; A-16. Prerequisite, Eng. 1 or 21. A brief review of tradi- 
tional of English grammar and an expanded introduction to structural grammar, 
including phonology, morphology, and syntax. (Birdsall.) 

Eng. 101. History of the English Language. 



(3) 

M.T.Th.F., 8:00; A-17. Prerequisite, Eng. 4 or equivalent. 
(3) 



(Birdsall.) 



Eng. 115. Shakespeare. 

M.T.Th.F., 8:00; A-167. Prerequisite, Eng. 4 or equivalent. Outstanding plays 
to Shakespeare's mid-career. (D. Smith.) 

Eng. 116. Shakespeare. (3) 

M.T.Th.F., 11:00; A-167. Prerequisite, Eng. 4 or equivalent. The Roman his- 
tory plays, the great tragedies, and the dramatic romances. (Zeeveld.) 

Eng. 120. English Drama from 1660 to 1800. (3) 

M.T.Th.F., 9:30; A-130. Prerequisite, Eng. 4 or equivalent. (Ward.) 

Eng. 122. Literature of the Seventeenth Century, 1600-1660. (3) 

M.T.Th.F., 9:30; A-174. Prerequisite, Eng. 4 or equivalent. The major non- 
dramatic writers (exclusive of Milton). (Wilson.) 

Eng. 126. Literature of the Eighteenth Century. (3) 

M.T.Th.F., 9:30; A-159. Prerequisite, Eng. 4 or equivalent. (Myers.) 

Eng. 130. Literature of the Romantic Period. (3) 

M.T.Th.F., 11:00; A-130. Prerequisite, Eng. 4 or equivalent. (Howard.) 



29 



English 

Eng. 135. Literature of the Victorian Period. (3) 

M.T.Th.F., 9:30; A-161 Prerequisite Eng. 4 or equivalent. (Cooley.) 

Eng. 144. Modern Drama. (3) 

M.T.Th.F., 11:00; A-174. Prerequisite, Eng. 4 or equivalent. (Bryer.) 

Eng. 150. American Literature. (3) 

M.T.Th.F., 11:00; A-18. Prerequisite, Eng. 4 or equivalent. American prose 
and poetry in 1850. (Gravely.) 

Eng. 151. American Literature. (3) 

M.T.Th.F., 9:30; A-258. Prerequisite, Eng. 4 or equivalent. American prose 
and poetry since 1850. (Bryer.) 

Eng. 155. Major American Writers. (3) 

M.T.Th.F., 8:00; A-258. Prerequisite, Eng. 4 or equivalent. Poe and Hawthorne. 

(Gravely.) 

Eng. 156. Major American Writers. (3) 

M.T.Th.F., 11:00; A-258. Prerequisite, Eng. 4 or equivalent. Two modern 
writers. (Lutwack.) 

Eng. 157. Introduction to Folklore. (3) 

M.T.Th.F., 11:00; A-17. Prerequisite, Eng. 4 or equivalent. (Birdsall.) 



Eng. 160. Advanced Expository Writing. (3) 

Prerequisite, Eng. 4 or equivalent. 
M.T.Th.F., 8:00; A-174. 

Eng. 201. Bibliography and Methods. (3) 

Section 1— M.Th. 1:30-3:30; A-163 
Section 2— M.Th., 7:00-9:00; A-163 

Eng. 204. Seminar in Medieval Literature. (3) 

M.Th., 1:30-3:30; A-7 

Eng. 206. Seminar in Renaissance Literature. (3) 

M.Th., 1:30-3:30; A-8. 



(Myers.) 



(Pitts.) 
(Mish.) 



(Cooley.) 



(Zeeveld.) 
Eng. 215. Seminar in Nineteenth-Century Literature. (3) 



T.F., l:30-3;30; A-163. 

Eng. 225. Seminar in American Literature. (3) 

M.Th., 7:00-9:00; A-7. 



(Pitts.) 



(Bode.) 



Eng. 237. Special Studies in American Literature. (3) 

M.Th., 7:00-9:00; A-8. (Lutwack.) 



30 



Foreign Languages 

Eng. 399. Thesis Research. (1-6) 

(Staff.) 

FOREIGN LANGUAGES 

French 0. Elementary French for Graduate Students. 
(Audit) 

June 20-July 29. Daily, 8:00; LL-12. (Demaitre.) 

French 1-2. Elementary French. (3, 3) 

French 1, June 20-July 15, French 2, July 18-Aug. 12. Registration for both 
French 1 and French 2 on June 21. Register for French 1 and French 2 on 
separate class cards. This course meets three times daily, 8:00 and 12:30. 
LL-13 with an additional 50 minute drill daily. Students enrolled in French 1 
and /or French 2 may not take other courses in the summer session. 

(Gray.) 

French 6. Intermediate French. (3) 

June 20-July 29. Daily, 9:30, LL-1. (Cap.) 

French 7. Intermediate French. (3) 

June 20-JuIy 29. Daily, 9-30, LL-2. (Alter.) 

French 142. French Literature of the Twentieth Century. (3) 

June 20-July 29. Daily, 11:00, LL-201. (Alter.) 

German 0. Elementary German for Graduate Students. 

(Audit) 

June 20-July 29, Section 1, Daily 9:30, LL-12. (Hering.) 

German 1-2. Elementary German. (3, 3) 

German 1, June 20-July 15, German 2, July 18-Aug. 12. Registration for both 
German 1 and German 2 on June 21. Register for German 1 and German 2 on 
separate class cards. This course meets three times daily, 8:00 and 12:30, 
LL-229. with an additional 50 minute drill daily to be scheduled at first class 
meeting. Students enrolled in German 1 and/or German 2 may not take other 
courses in the summer session. (Miller.) 

Germ.an 6. Intermediate Literary German. (3) 

June 20-July 29. Daily, 11:00-LL-13. (Hering.) 

German 7. Intermediate Literary German. (3) 

June 20-July 29. Daily.l 1 :00-LL-l. (Kemner.) 

German 9. Conversation and Composition. (3) 

June 20-July 29. Daily, 8:00, LL-1. (Kemner.) 

Spanish 1-2. Elementary Spanish. (3, 3) 

Spanish 1. June 20-July 15, Spanish 2, July 18-Aug. 12. Registration for both 
Spanish 1 and Spanish 2 on June 21. Register for Spanish 1 and Spanish 2 on 
separate class cards. This course meets three times daily, 8:00 and 12:30, 

31 



Foreign Languages 

LL-301. with an additional 50 minutes drill daily to be scheduled at first class 
meeting. Students enrolled in Spanish 1 and/or Spanish 2 may not take other 
courses in the summer session. (Herdoiza.) 



Spanish 6. Intermediate Spanish. (3) 

June 20-July 29. Daily, 9:30-LL-3. 

Spanish 7. Intermediate Spanish. (3) 

June 20-July 29. Daily, 9:30, LL-4. 



(Moncayo.) 



(Salgado.) 



Spanish 112. Prose of the 16th and 17th Centuries. (3) 

June 20-July 29. Daily 1:00-2:45, LL-204. (Goodwyn.) 

Chinese 1-2. Elementary Chinese. (3, 3) 

Chinese 1, June 20-July 15, Chinese 2, July 18-Aug. 12. Registration for both 
Chinese 1 and Chinese 2 on June 20. Register for Chinese 1 and Chinese 2 
on separate class cards. This course meets three times daily, 8:00 and 12:30- 
LL-106 with an additional 50 minute drill daily to be scheduled at first class 
meeting. Students enrolled in Chinese 1 and/or Chinese 2 may not take 
other courses in the summer session. (Chen.) 

Russian 1-2. Elementary Russian. (3, 3) 

Russian 1, June 20-July 15, Russian 2, July 18-Aug. 12. Registration for both 
Russian 1 and Russian 2 on June 21. Register for both Russian 1 and Russian 
2 on separate class cards. This course meets three times daily, 8:00 and 12:30, 
11-105, with an additional 50 minutes daily, to be scheduled at first class meet- 
ing. Students enrolled in Russian 1 and Russian 2 may not take other courses 
in the summer session. (Hitchcock.) 

HISTORY 

H. 21. History of the United States to 1865. (3) 

A survey of the history of the United States from colonial times to the end 
of the Civil War. Emphasis on the establishment and development of American 
Institutions. 

8:00; A- 110 (Farrell.) 

(Farrell.) 

(Staff.) 

A- 110 (Staff.) 



Section 1- 

Section 2— 9:30; A-163 

Section 3— 9:30; A- 166 

Section 4 — 11:00; 



Section 5—11:00; A-159 



(Staff.) 



H. 22. History of the United States since 1865. (3) 

A survey of economic, social, intellectual, and political developments since 
the Civil War. Emphasis on the rise of industry and the emergence of the 
United States as a world power. 



Section 1 — 8 
Section 2 — 8 
Section 3 — 9 
Section 4 — 11 



00; A-159 
00; A-163 
30; A-12 
00; A-I61 



(Fitch.) 
(Staff.) 

(Fitch.) 
(Staff.) 



H. 23. Social and Cultural History of Early America. (3) 

9:30; A-133 — A study of the social and cultural history of the United States 
as a predominantly agricultural society. Examination of how the social milieu 
shapes the cultural development of the nation and its institutions. (Staff.) 



32 



History 

H. 24, Social and Cultural History of Modern America. (3) 

11:00; A-163 — A study of the social and cultural history of the United States 
as a society in transition. Examination of the social and cultural changes that 
accompanied industrial and scientific development. (Staff.) 

H. 41. Western Civilization. (3) 

This course is designed to give the student an appreciation of the civilization 

in which he lives in its broadest setting. The study begins with the collapse 
of classical civilization and comes to the seventeenth century. 

Section 1— 8:00; A- 164 (Staff.) 

Section 2— 9:30; A-207 (Staff.) 

Section 3—11:00; A-164 (Staff.) 

H. 42. Western Civilization. (3) 

This course is designed to give the student an appreciation of the civilization 
in which he lives in its broadest setting. The study begins with the seventeenth 
century and comes to the present. 

Section 1— 8:00; A-12 (Staff.) 

Section 2— 9:30; A-228 (Staff.) 

Section 3—11:00; A-12 (Staff.) 

H. 62. Far Eastern Civilization. (3) 

8:00; A-133. This course seeks to give the student an understanding of a 
great civilization radically different from our own and an appreciation of the 
complex problem of the Far East and of American policy there. The approach 
is interdisciplinary with an historical framework. (Folsom.) 

H. 101. American Colonial History. (3) 

9:30; A-209. The settlement and development of colonial America to the 
middle of the eighteenth century. (Staff.) 

H. 119. Recent American History. (3) 

8:00; A- 166. Party politics, domestic issues, foreign relations of the United 
States since 1929. (Staff.) 

H. i24. Reconstruction and the New Nation, 1865-1896. (3) 

9:30; A-231. Prerequisite, H. 21, 22, or the equivalent. Problems of con- 
struction in both South and North. Emergence of big business and industrial 
combinations. Problems of the farmer and laborer. (Staff.) 

H.127. Diplomatic History of the United States. (3) 

11:00. A-133. A historical study of the diplomatic negotiations and foreign 
relations of the United States, from the Revolution to the present. (Staff.) 

H. 158. The Old Regime AND THE French Revolution, 1748-1815. (3) 

9:30; A-8. Europe in the era of the French Revolution. (Staff.) 

H.166. Tudor-Stuart England. (3) 

11:00; A-166. An examination of the political, religious and social forces in 
English life from 1485-1714 with special emphasis on Tudor goverimient, 
the English Reformation, the Elizabethan era, Puritanism, and the English 
revolution. (Staff.) 

33 



History 

H. 172. Europe in the World Setting of the Twentieth Century. 
(3) 

9:30; A-301. Prerequisites, H. 41, 42, or H. 53, 54. A study of political, eco- 
nomic, and cultural developments in twentieth century Europe with special 
emphasis on the factors involved in the two World Wars and their global 
impacts and significance. (Staff.) 

H. 189. History of Japan. (3) 

9:30; A-302. A history of Japan from earliest to modem times. Emphasis 
is placed on the evolution of institutions and thought. (Folsom.) 

H. 300. Historiography: Techniques of Historical Research and 
Writing. (3) 

Section 1 — Arranged (Staff.) 

Section 2 — Arranged (Staff.) 

Section 3 — ^Arranged (Staff.) 

H. 301. Readings in Colonial American History. (3) 

Arranged (Staff.) 

H. 318. Seminar in Reconstruction America. (3) 

Arranged (Staff.) 

H. 327. Readings in the History of American Foreign Policy. (3) 

Arranged (Staff.) 

H. 366. Seminar in Tudor and Stuart England. (3) 

Arranged (Staff.) 

H. 372. Seminar in the History of World War II. (3) 

Arranged (Staff.) 

H. 399. Thesis Research. (1-6) 

Arranged. Credit according to work assigned. (Staff.) 

MATHEMATICS 

Math. 3. Fundamentals of Mathematics. (4) 

This course, open to all students, is designed to provide an introduction to 

mathematical thinking and to develop an appreciation of the role of mathe- 
matics in human culture. 

Section 1— Daily, 8;00; Y-26 (Staff.) 

Section 2— Daily, 9:30; J-18 (Staff.) 

Section 3— Daily, 9:30; M04 (Staff.) 

Math. 10. Introduction to Mathematics. (3) 

Prerequisite, 2^2 years of college preparatory mathematics or Math. 1. Open 
to students not majoring in mathematics or the physical and engineering sciences. 
Logic, sets, counting, probability; elementary algebraic and transcendental func- 
tions and their geometric representation; systems of linear equations, vectors, 
matrices. 
Section 1— M.T.Th.F., 8:00; J-6 (Staff.) 

34 



Math. U. 


Introduction 


TO 


Mathematics. 


(3) 


Prerequisite, Math. 10. 


Math 


11 is a 


continuatior 


I of Math 


Section 


1— M.T.Th.F., 


8 


00; 


M34 






Section 


2— M.T.Th.F., 


8 


00; 


M8 






Section 


3— M.T.Th.F., 


9 


30; 


J-131 






Section 


4— M.T.Th.F., 


11 


:00, 


M31 






Section 


5— M.T.Th.F., 


11 


00; 


M4 







Mathematics 

Section 2— M.T.Th.F., 9:30; J-6 (Staff.) 

Section 3— M.T.Th.F., 9:30; J-134 (Staff.) 

Section 4— M.T.Th.F., 11:00; Y-2 (Staff.) 

Section 5— M.T.Th.F., 11:00; J-6 (Staff.) 

10. 

(Staff.) 

(Staff.) 
(Staff.) 
(Staff.) 
(Staff.) 

Math. 18. Introductory Analysis. (3) 

Prerequisite, 2Vi years of college preparatory mathematics or Math. 1. An in- 
troductory course for students not qualified to start Math. 19. Real numbers, 
functions, coordinate systems. Trigonometric functions. Plane analytic geom- 
etry. 

Section 1— M.T.Th.F., 8:00; Y-19 (Staff.) 

Section 2— M.T.Th.F., 11:00; Y-5 (Staff.) 

Math. 19. Elementary Analysis. (4) 

Prerequisite, 3V2 years of college preparatory mathematics or Math. 18. Vec- 
tors and analytic geometry in three dimensions. Review of real numbers, coor- 
dinate systems, trigonometric functions, determinants. 

Section 1— Daily, 8:00: J-14 (Staff.) 

Section 2— Daily, 8:00; Y-14 (Staff.) 

Section 3— Daily, 8:00; Y-18 (Staff.) 

Math. 20. Calculus I. (4) 

Prerequisite, Math. 19 or equivalent. 

Section 1— Daily, 9:30, Y-27 (Staff.) 

Section 2— Daily, 9:30; Y-26 (Staff.) 

Section 3— Daily, 9:30; Y-19 (Staff.) 

Math. 21. Calculus II. (4) 

Prerequisite, Math. 20 or equivalent. 

Section 1— Daily, 11:00; Y-14 (Staff.) 

Section 2— Daily, 11:00; Y-17 (Staff.) 

Section 3— Daily, 11:00; Y-18 (Staff.) 

Math. 22. Calculus III. (4) 

Prerequisite, Math. 21 or equivalent. Basic concepts of linear algebra, matrices, 
and determinants. Calculus of functions of vectors. Implicit function theorem. 
Surface integrals. Classical theorems of Green, Gauss, and Stokes. 
Section 1— Daily, 9:30; Y-18 (Staff.) 

Section 2— Daily, 9:30; Y-17 (Staff.) 

Math. 30. Elements of Mathematics. (4) 

Prerequisite, high school elementary algebra. Required course in mathematics 
for elementary education majors and open only to students in this field. Topics 
from algebra and number theory are presented to provide a proper mathematical 
insight into arithmetic for the prospective elementary school teacher. 
Section 1— Daily, 8:00; Y-5 (Staff.) 

Section 2— Daily, 9:30; Y-14 (Staff.) 

35 



Mathematics 

Math. 31. Elements of Geometry. (4) 

Prerequisite, Math. 30 or equivalent. Required course in mathematics for ele- 
mentary education majors and open only to students in this field. Topics in- 
cluded are: review of the structure of a mathematical system, algebra of sets, 
non-metric geometry, logic, congruence, measurement, similarity, graphs on a 
plane, a miniature geometry, spherical geometry. Daily, 11:00; Y-19. (Staff.) 

Math. 66. (64). Differential Equations for Scientists and 
Engineers. (3) 

Prerequisite, Math. 21. M.T.Th. F., 9:30; Y-5 (Staff.) 

Math. 100. Vectors and Matrices. (3) 

Prerequisite, Math. 21 or Math. 15. 

M.T.Th.F., 8:00; Y-2 (Staff.) 

Math. 103. Introduction to Abstract Algebra. (3) 

Prerequisite, Math. 22 or equivalent. Integers, groups, rings, integral domains, 
fields. M.T.Th.F., 8:00; Y-27 (Staff.) 

Math. 128. Euclidean Geometry. (3) 

Prerequisite, Math. 22 or equivalent. Recommended for students in the 
College of Education. Axiomatic method, models, properties of axioms: 
proofs of some basic theorems from the axioms: modern geometry of the 
triangle, circle, and sphere. M.T.Th.F., 11:00; Y-16. (Staff.) 

Math. 130. Introduction to Probability Theory I. (3) 

Prerequisite, Math. 110, or equivalent. Sample space, events, probability and 
its basic properties. Independence and conditioning, random variables, dis- 
tribution functions (continuous and discrete): typical distributions, expec- 
tations, moments, generating functions: transformations of random variables, 
limit theorems. M.T.Th.F., 11:00; Y-28. 

Math. 146. Fundamental Concepts of Mathematics. (3) 

Prerequisite, Math. 22 or consent of instructor. Sets, relations, mappings. 
Construction of the real number system starting with Peano postulates: 
algebraic structures associated with the construction: Archimedean order, 
sequential completeness and equivalent properties of ordered fields. Finite and 
infinite sets, denumerable and non-denumerable sets. M.T.Th.F., 9:30; Y-2. 

(Staff.) 

Math. 163. Analysis for Scientists and Engineers II. (3) 

Prerequisites, Math. 162 or 22 or consent of instructor. Not open to students 
with credit for Math. 116 or Math. 113. The complex field. Infinite processes 
for real and complex numbers. Calculus of complex functions. Analytic 
functions and analytic continuation. Theory of residues and application to 
evaluation of integrals. Conformal mapping. (This course cannot be counted 
toward a major in mathematics.) M.T.Th.F., 8:00; Y-4. (Staff.) 

Math. 181. Introduction to Number Theory. (3) 

Prerequisite, high school elementary algebra. Topics from algebra and num- 
ber theory are presented to provide mathematical insight into arithmetic 
for the elementary school teacher. M.T.Th. F., 9:30; Y-4. (Staff.) 

36 



Mathematics 
Math. 182, Introduction to Algebra. (3) 

Open only to participants in the N.S.F. Institute in Mathematics for Junior 

High School Teachers in Mathematics. 

June 20-July 29, Daily; 8:00-C-134. (Kirwan.) 

Math. 183. Introduction to Geometry. (3) 

Prerequisite, one year high school mathematics. Topics from geometry and 
logic are presented to provide mathematical insight into arithmetic for the 
elementary school teacher. M.T.Th.F., 11:00; Y-27. (Staff.) 

Math. 189. National Science Foundation Summer Institute for 
Teachers of Science and Mathematics Seminar. (3) 

Open only to participants in the N.S.F. Institute in Mathematics for Junior 

High School Teachers in Mathematics. 

June 20-July 29, Daily; 1:00; C-134. (Henkelman.) 

Math. 190. Honors Seminars. (2) 

Prerequisite permission of Departmental Honors Committee. (Staff.) 

Math. 191. Selected Topics in Mathematics. 

Prerequisite, Consent of instructor. Arranged. Credit according to work as- 
signed. (Staff.) 

Math. 271. Selected Topics in Algebra. (3) 

Arranged. Prerequisite, consent of instructor. (Staff.) 

Math. 272. Selected Topics in Analysis. (3) 

Arranged. Prerequisite, consent of instructor. (Staff.) 

Math. 273. Selected Topics in Geometry and Topology. (3) 

Arranged. Prerequisite, consent of instructor. (Staff.) 

Math. 274. Selected Topics in Applied Mathematics. (3) 

Arranged. Prerequisite, consent of instructor. (Staff.) 

Math. 399. Research. 

Arranged. Credits according to work assigned. (Staff.) 

MICROBIOLOGY 

MiCROB. 1. General Microbiology. (4) 

Four lectures and four two-hour laboratory periods a week. Lecture, 8:00; 
T-5. Laboratory, 9:00, 10:00. M.T.Th.F.; T-210. Laboratory fee, $15.00. The 
physiology, culture, and differentiation of bacteria. Fundamental principles of 
Microbiology in relation to man and his environment. (Staff.) 

Micros, 181. Microbiological Problems. (3) 

Arranged. Six two-hour laboratory periods a week. Prerequisite, 16 credits 
in Microbiology. Registration only upon consent of the instructor. Laboratory 
fee, $15.00. (Faber.) 

Micros, 399. Research, 

Arranged. Credits according to work assigned. Laboratory fee, $15.00. 

(Staff.) 

37 



Music 

MUSIC * 

Music 8. Theory of Music. (3) 

June 20-July 29. M.W.F., 8:00 and Daily, 9:30; NN-301. Prerequisite, Music 
7. A fundamental course in the elements of music. Study of rhythms, scales, 
chordal structures, and tonalities through ear training, sight singing, and key- 
board drill. (Payerele.) 

Music 16. Fundamentals for the Classroom Teacher, (3) 

June 20-July 29. Daily, 8:00; NN-359. The fundamentals of music theory 
and practice, related to the needs of the classroom and kindergarten teacher, 
and organized in accord with the six-area concept of music learning. 

(Cosentino.) 

Music 20. Survey of Music Literature. (3) 

June 20-July 29. Daily, 11:00; NN-301. Open to all students except music 
and music-education majors, and may be taken to satisfy the fine arts option 
in the general education program. A study of musical principles and an intro- 
duction to musical repertoires. (Payerle.) 

Music 165. Keyboard Music. (3) 

June 20-July 29. Daily, 9:30; NN-210. Prerequisites, Music 120, 121, or 
the equivalent. The history and literature of keyboard music. In the 1966 
Summer Session the piano sonata in the nineteenth century will be studied. 

(Bernstein.) 

Music 167. Symphonic Music. (3) 

June 20-July 29. Daily, 12:30; NN-208. Prerequisites, Music 120, 121, or 
the equivalents. The study of orchestral music from the Baroque period to 
the present. The concerto, symphony, overture, and other forms are examined. 

(Heim.) 

Music 200. Advanced Studies in the History of Music. (3) 

June 20— July 29. Daily, 8:00; NN-210. Prerequisites, Music 120, 121, and 
graduate standing. A critical study of one style period will be undertaken. In 
the 1966 Summer Session, vocal music of the fifteenth and sixteenth centuries 
will be studied. (Bernstein.) 

Music 201. Seminar in Musicology: Beethoven. (3) 

June 20-July 29. Daily, 12:30; NN-210. Prerequisites, Music 120, 121, and 
graduate standing. The subject of music criticism will be studied. (McCorkle.) 

Music 211. Special Studies in Music. (3) 

June 20-July 29. Daily, 9:30; NN-359. Prerequisites, Music 120, 121, and 
graduate standing. The subject of music criticism will be studied. (McCorkle.) 

Applied Music. 

Arranged. A student taking applied music for the first time at this University 
should register for Music 999. He will receive the proper classification at the 
end of the summer session. 



*(for Music, Education, see page 62.) 

38 



Music 

Every student taking an applied music course should, in addition to registering 
for the proper course number, indicate the instrument chosen by adding a 
section number as follows: 

Sec. 1, Piano Sec. 9, Clarinet Sec. 12, Trumpet 

Sec. 2, Voice Sec. 11, Horn Sec. 13, Trombone 

Sec. 7, Rute Sec. 16, Organ 

Music 12, 13, 52, 53, 112, 113, 152, 153, 212, 213. Applied Music. 

(2 each course) 

Hours to be arranged with instructor on first day of classes, NN-201. Pre- 
requisite, the next lower course in the same instrument. Two one-hour lessons 
and a minimum of twelve practice hours per week for eight weeks. Supple- 
mentary fee of $40.00 for each course. (Staflf.) 

PHILOSOPHY 

Phil. 1. Introduction to PfflLosopHY. (3) 

M.T.Th.F., 9:30; T-10. An introduction to some of the main problems of 
philosophy, and to some of the main ways of dealing with these problems. 

(Kress.) 

PfflL. 41. Elementary Logic and Semantics. (3) 

M.T.Th.F., 8:00; T-10. An introductory study of logic and language, intended 
to help the student increase his ability to employ language with understanding 
and to reason correctly. Topics treated include: the uses and abuses of language, 
techniques for making sound inferences, and the logic of science. (Varnedoe.) 

Phil. 45. Ethics. (3) 

M.T.Th.F., 11:00; T-10. An introduction to moral philosophy, including a 
critical examination of some important classic and contemporary systems of 
ethics, such as those of Aristotle, Kant, Mill, and Dewey. (Roelofs.) 

Phil. 102. Modern Philosophy. (3) 

M.T.Th.F., 9:30; T-103. Prerequisites, Phil. 1 and either one additional course 
in philosophy or senior standing. A history of philosophical thought in the 
West during the 16th, 17th, and 18th centuries. The chief figures discussed: 
Bacon, Galileo, Descartes, Spinoza, Leibniz, Locke, Berkeley, Hume, and 
Kant. (Celarier.) 

PfflL. 292. Selected Problems in PmLosoPHY. (1-3) 

Arranged. Prerequisite, consent of the instructor. Credit according to work 
assigned. (Staflf.) 

Phil. 399. Research in Philosophy. (1-3) 

Arranged. Credit according to work assigned. (Staflf.) 

PHYSICS AND ASTRONOMY 

Astr. 1. Introduction to Astronomy. (3) 

June 20-July 29. Lecture, M.T.W.. 7:30-9:00 P.M.; Laboratory, Th. 7:30-9:30 
P.M.; Z-140. An elementary course in descriptive astronomy. This course 
is self-contained; it is not required that it be followed by Astronomy 2. Lecture 
demonstration fee, $3 per semester. (Upgren.) 

39 



Physics and Astronomy 

AsTR. 150. Special Problems in Astronomy. 

Arranged. Prerequisite, major in physics or astronomy and/or consent of 
advisor. Research or special study. Credit according to work accomplished. 

(Staff.) 

AsTR. 190. Honors Seminar. 

Arranged. Enrollment is limited to students admitted to the Honors Pro- 
grams in Astronomy. Credit according to work assigned. (Staff.) 

Astr. 399. Research. (1-6) 

Arranged. Laboratory fee, $10 per credit hour. Prerequisite, an approved 
application for admission to candidacy or special permission of the Department 
of Physics and Astronomy. Credit according to work assigned. (Staff.) 

Phys. 10. Fundamentals of Physics. (4) 

Daily, 8:00; C-132. Lab. Sections T.Th. 10-12 or MW 2-4, Z-362, six lecture ses- 
sions and two recitation sessions plus 4 hours of laboratory per week. Prerequi- 
site, entrance credit in Trigonometry or Math. 11 or concurrent enrollment in 
Math. 18, or equivalent preparation. Demonstration and laboratory fee, $10. A 
course to general physics treating the fields of mechanics, heat and sound. 

(Staff.) 

Phys. 150. Special Problems in Physics. Section 1. 

Arranged. Research or special study. Laboratory fee, $10.00 per credit hour" 
when appropriate. Prerequisite, major in physics and consent of Department 
Head. Credit according to work assigned. (Staff.) 

Phys. 190. Honors Seminar. 

Arranged. Credit according to work assigned. (Staff.) 

Phys. 230. Seminar. (1) 

Arranged. One two-hour class per week. (Staff.) 

Phys. 248. Special Topics in Modern Physics. (2) 

Arranged. Two two-hour lectures per week. (Staff.) 

Phys. 399. Research. (1-6) 

Credit according to work accomplished. Laboratory fee, $10.00 per credit hour. 
Prerequisite, approved application for admission to candidacy or special per- 
mission of the Department Chairman. Thesis research conducted under ap- 
proved supervision. (Staff.) 

PSYCHOLOGY 

Psych. 1. Introduction to Psychology. (3) 

M.T.Th.F. Section 1—8:00; A-52. Section 2—9:30; A-52. A basic introductory 
course intended to bring the student into contact with the major problems 
confronting psychology and the more important attempts at their solution. 

(Waldrop, Johnson.) 

40 



Psychology 
Psych. 5. Personality and Adjustment. (3) 

M.T.Th.F. 9:30; M-105. Prerequisite, Psych. 1 — Introduction to the psychol- 
ogy of human personality and adjustment, with a view toward increasing self- 
understanding and developing an appreciation for the mental health movement 
and each individual's stake in it. (Golann.) 

Psych. 90. Statistical Methods in Psychology. (3) 

M.T.Th.F. 8:00; A-130. Prerequisite, Psych. 1 and Math. 1, or 5 or 10 or 
equivalent. A basic introduction to quantitative methods used in psychological 
research. (Higgs.) 

Psych. 110. Educational Psychology. (3) 

M.T.Th.F. Section 1—9:30; T-108. Section 2—11:00; T-202. Prerequisite, 
Psych. 1. Researches on fundamental psychological problems encountered in 
education. Measurement and significance of individual differences; learning, 
motivation, transfer of training, and the educational implications of theories 
of intelligence. (Higgs, Johnson.) 

Psych. 131. Abnormal Psychology. (3) 

M.T.Th.F. 8:00; M-105. Prerequisite, two courses in Psychology. The nature, 
diagnosis, etiology and treatment of mental disorders. (Daston.) 

Psych. 150. Tests and Measurements. (3) 

M.T.Th.F. 11:00; M-105; with additional laboratory sessions. M.Th., 1:30- 
3:30. Prerequisite, Psych. 90. Laboratory fee, $4.00. Critical survey of meas- 
uring devices used in counseling, educational and industrial practice, with an 
emphasis on the theory, development and standardization. Laboratory work 
will incorporate training in methodology of test development together with 
appropriate practice in he use of selected tests. (Waldrop.) 

Psych. 194. Independent Study in Psychology. (1-3) 

Times arranged. Prerequisites, advanced standing and written consent of indi- 
vidual faculty supervisor. Integrated reading matter under direction leading to 
the preparation of an adequately documented report on a special topic. (Staff.) 

Psych. 195. Minor Problems in Psychology. (1-3) 

Times arranged. Prerequisites, advanced standing and written consent of indi- 
vidual faculty supervisor. An individualized course designed to allow the stu- 
dent to pursue a specialized research project under supervision. (Staff.) 

Psych. 225. Measurement and Evaluation. (4) 

M.T.Th.F. 11:00; EE-8; with additional laboratory sessions T.F., 1:30-3:30. 
Prerequisite, Psych 150 and graduate standing. Laboratory fee, $6.00. Theory 
and logic of the methodology of evaluation. Laboratory practice in methods 
of individual intelligence testing. Survey of available testing instruments and 
techniques. (Golann.) 

Psych. 261. Modification of Human Behaviors Research Methods 

and Practice. (3) 

M.W. 7:00-9:30 P.M. and other hours arranged; M-105. Prerequisite, consent 
of instructor. The experimental and applied methods available for the induc- 
tion of behavior change. (Daston.) 

41 



Sociology 

Psych. 288. Special Research Problems. (1-4) 

Times arranged. Requires graduate standing and consent of individual faculty 
supervisor. Supervised research on problems selected from the areas of ex- 
perimental, industrial, social, quantitative, or mental health psychology. 

(Staff.) 

Psych. 399. Research for Thesis. (1-6) 

Times arranged. Requires consent of individual faculty supervisor. Credit 
according work assigned. (Staff.) 



SOCIOLOGY 

Soc. 1. Introduction to Sociology. (3) 

Introduction to the Study of Sociology. 

Sec. 1—M.T.Th.F. 8:00; A324. (Staff.) 

Sec. 2— M.T.Th.F., 9:30; A321. (Staff.) 

Sec. 3— M.T.Th.F., 11:00; A324. (Staff.) 

Soc. 2. Principles of Sociology. (3) 

M.T.Th.F., 9:30; A320. Prerequisite, Soc. 1. The basic forms of human associa- 
tion and interaction. (Staff.) 

Soc. 51. Social Pathology. (3) 

Prerequisite, sophomore standing. Personal-social disorganization and malad- 
justment; physical and mental handicaps; economic indequacies; programs of 
treatment and control. (Staff.) 

Soc. 52. Criminology. (3) 

M.T.Th.F. 8:00; A321. Prerequisite, Soc. 1. Criminal behavior and the methods 
of its study. (Staff.) 

Soc. 95. Introductory Statistics for Sociology. (3) 

M.T.Th.F., 11:00; A-209. Prerequisite, Math 3 or 10. Measures of central tend- 
ency and dispersion, use of statistical inference in simple testing of null hypoth- 
eses, chi square, and labor saving computional devices for correlation. Majors in 
sociology should take this course in their junior year. (Staff.) 

Soc. 112. Rural-Urban Relations. (3) 

M.T.Th.F. 11:00; A320. Prerequisite Soc. 1. The ecology of population and the 
forces making for change in rural and urban life; migration, decentralization and 
the regionalism as methods of studying individual and national issues. Applied 
field problems. (Staff.) 

Soc. 114. The City. (3) 

1:00; A228. The rise of urban civilization and metropolitan regions; ecological 
process and structure; the city as a center of dominance; social problems, con- 
trol and planning. (Staff.) 



42 



Sociology, Anthropology 

Soc. 131. Introduction to Social Service. (3) 

M.T.Th.F., 11;00; A321. Prerequisite, Soc. 1. General survey of the field of 
social-welfare activities. (Di Bella.) 

Soc. 153. Juvenile Delinquency. (3) 

M.T.Th.F., 9:30; A-324. Prerequisite, Soc. 1. Juvenile delinquency in relation to 
the general problem of crime. (Staflf.) 

Soc. 154. Crime and Delinquency Prevention. (3) 

M.T.Th.F., 11:00; A207. Prerequisite, Soc. 52 or Soc. 153 or consent of instruc- 
tor. Methods and programs in prevention of crime and delinquency. (Staff.) 

Soc. 164. The Family and Society. (3) 

M.T.Th.F., 12:30; A 159. Prerequisite, Soc. 1. The family as asocial institution. 

(Staff.) 
Soc. 171. Family and Child Welfare. (3) 

M.T.Th.F., 12:30; A-159. Programs of family and child welfare agencies; social 
services to families and children; child placement; foster families. (DiBella.) 

Soc. 186. Sociological Theory. (3) 

M.T.Th.F., 9:30; A7. Prerequisite, Soc. 1. Development of the science of 
sociology. (Staff.) 

Soc. 291. Special Social Problems. 

Arranged. Credit according to work assigned. (Staff.) 

Soc 399. Thesis Research. 

Arranged. Credit according to work assigned. (Staff.) 

ANTHROPOLOGY 

Anthropology 1 or its Anthropology equivalent is prerequisite to all other 
courses in Aiithropology. 

Anth. 1. Introduction to Anthropology: Archeology and Physical 
Anthropology. (3) 

M.T.Th.F., 9:30; T206. May be taken for credit in the General Studies Program. 
General patterns of the development of human culture; the biological and mor- 
phological aspects of man viewed in his cultural setting. (Staff.) 

Anth. 2. Introduction to Anthropology: Cultural Anthropology 
and Linquistics. (3) 

M.T.Th.F., 8:00; A209. Social and cultural principles as exemplified in ethno- 
graphic descriptions. The study of language within the context of Anthropology. 

(Staff.) 

Anth. 105. Cultural Anthropology (3) 

M.T.Th.F., 12:30; A106. A survey of the simpler cultures of the world, with 
attention to historical processes and the application of anthropological theory to 
the modem situation. (Staff.) 

Anth. 125. Cultural History of the Negro. (3) 

M.T.Th.F., 11:00; A106. The cultures of Africa south of the Sahara and the 
cultural adjustments of the Negro in North and South America. (Staff.) 

43 



Speech 

SPEECH 

Speech 1. Public Speaking. (3) 

Prerequisite for advanced speech courses. The preparation and delivery of short 
original speeches; Outside readings; reports; etc. It is recommended that this 
course be taken during the freshman year. Laboratory fee $1.00. 
Section 1— June 20-July 29, Daily, 8:00; NN-9A (McCain.) 

Section 2— M.T.Th.F., 8:00; NN-9B (Frank.) 

Section 3— June 20-July 29, Daily, 9:30; NN-102 (Starcher.) 

Section 4— M.T.Th.F., 9:30; NN-22A (Wolfe.) 

Section 5— M.T.Th.F., 11:00; NN-9A (Linkow.) 

Section 6— M.T.Th.F., 11:00; NN-9B (Schwartz.) 

Section 7— M.T.Th.F., 12:30; NN-13 (Kirkley.) 

Speech 3. Fundamentals of General American Speech. (3) 

Training in auditory discrimination of speech sounds, rhythms and inflections of 
general American Speech. Analysis of the physiological bases of speech produc- 
tion and the phonetic elements of speech reception. 

Section 1— M.T.Th.F., 9:30; NN-22B (Waghelstein) 

Section 2— M.T.Th.F., 11:00; NN-22B (Waghelstein) 

Speech 13. Oral Interpretation. (3) 

M.T.Th.F., 11:00; NN-102. The oral interpretation of literature and the prac- 
tical training of students in the art of reading. (Provensen.) 

Speech 16. Introduction to the Theatre. (3) 

June 20-July 29, Daily, 9:30; NN-22 B. A. general survey of the fields of the 
theatre. (Pugliese.) 

Speech 105. Speech Handicapped School Children. (3) 

M.T.Th.F., 11:00; NN-13. Prerequisite, Speech 3 for undergraduates. The oc- 
currence, identification and treatment of speech handicaps in the classroom. An 
introduction to Speech Pathology. (Baratz.) 

Speech 106. Clinical Practice. (1-3) 

T.F., 12:30 and arranged, NN-9. Prerequisite, Speech 105. A laboratory course 
dealing with the various methods of correction plus actual work in the clinic. 
Fee $1.00 per semester hour. (Kanstoroom.) 

Speech 108. Educational Phonetics. (3) 

M.T.Th.F., 9:30; NN-4. This course is designed to relate phonetic science to the 
classroom. An extensive coverage of broad transcription of General American 
Speech. Students having credit for Speech 3 or any previous phonetics course 
are not eligible for this course. (Hendricks.) 

Speech 111. Seminar. (3) 

Arranged. Prerequisities, senior standing and consent of instructor. Speech re- 
search. (Strausbaugh.) 



44 



Speech 
Speech 127. Children's Dramatics. (3) 

M.T.Th.F., 9:30; NN-55. Principles and methods necessary for staging children's 
productions on the elementary school level. Major emphasis on creative dra- 
matics; the application of creative dramatics in the school room, and the values 
gained by the child in this activity. Students will conduct classes in formal and 
creative dramatics which will culminate in children's programs. (Meersman.) 

Speech 136, Principles of Speech Therapy. (3) 

M.T.Th.F., 9:30 NN-B. Prerequisite, Speech 120. Differential diagnosis of speech 
and language handicaps and the application of psychological principles of learn- 
ing, motivation and adjustment in the treatment of speech disorders. Laboratory 
fee, $3.00. (Carter.) 

Speech 142. Speech Reading and Auditory Training. (2) 

M.W.F., 9:30; NN-9A. Prerequisite, Speech 3. Required for students whose 
concentration is in speech and hearing therapy. Methods of training individuals 
with hearing loss to recognize, interpret and understand spoken language. Lab- 
oratory fee, $2.00. (Baker.) 

Speech 201C. Special Problems Seminar: Delayed Speech. (3) 

M.T.Th.F., 11:00; NN-4. Prerequisite, graduate standing in speech and hearing 
science. (Carter.) 

Speech 201K. Special Problems Seminar: Minor Research Prob- 
lems. (3) 

MT.Th.F., 12:30; NN-9B. Prerequistites, Speech 202 and Speech 203. 

(Baker.) 

Speech 206. Diagnostic Procedures in Speech Pathology. (3) 

M.T.Th.F., 9:30; NN-13. Prerequisite, 6 hours of speech pathology. A study of 
diagnostic tools and methods in the analysis of various types of speech dis- 
orders. (Baratz.) 

Speech 211. Advanced Clinical Practice. (1-3) 

Arranged. Prerequisites, 12 hours of speech pathology and audiology. Supervised 
training in the application of clinical methods in the diagnisis and treatment of 
speech and hearing disorders. Laboratory fee, $1.00 per semester hour. 

(Kanstoroom) 

Speech 214. Clinical Audiometry. (3) 

M.T.Th.F., 12:30; NN-22A. Prerequisites, 3 hours in audiology and consent of 
instructor. Testing of auditory acuity with pure tones and speech. Laboratory 
fee, $3.00. (Doudna.) 

Speech 262. Special Problems in General Speech. (3) 

M.T.Th.F., 8:00; NN-22A. (Weaver) 

Speech 273. Theories of the Drama. (3) 

M.T.Th.F., 11:00; NN-55. Advanced study of the identification and development 
of dramatic form from the early Greek drama to contemporary forms; the 
esthetics of theatre arts; and dramatic criticism. (Meersman.) 

45 



Speech, Zoology 

Speech 290. Independent Study. (1-3) 

Arranged. Prerequisite, consent of instructor. An individual course designed for 
intensive study or research of problems in any one of the three areas of: drama, 
general speech, or radio/TV. (Staff.) 

Speech 301. Independent Study in Speech and Hearing Science. 

(1-6) 

Arranged. Student-selected topic of investigation. A proposed topic must be 
approved prior to registration. In addition to a formal report, an oral presenta- 
tion of the results will be required. May be repeated. Prerequisite 30 hours of 
graduate study in speech and hearing science. (Staff.) 

Speech 399. Research. 

Arranged. Credit according to work assigned. (Staff.) 



ZOOLOGY 

ZooL. 1. General Zoology. (4) 

Four 80-minute lectures and two two-hour laboratories a week. Lectures 
M.T.Th.F., 8:00-9:20, laboratory T.Th., 9:30, 10:30. Zool. 1 and 2 satisfy the 
freshman pre-medical requirement in general biology. An introduction to the 
modern concepts of biological principles and animal life. Emphasis will be 
placed upon the functional aspects of living systems with a survey of the phys- 
ical and chemical bases of all life processes. Laboratory fee, $12.00. 

(Kaufman.) 

ZooL. 55S. Development of the Human Body. (2) 

Four one-hour lectures a week, M.T.Th.F., 11:00. A study of the main factors 
aflfecting the growth and development of the child with special emphasis on 
normal development. (Mozden) 

ZooL. 120. Vertebrate Embryology. (4) 

Four one-hour lectures and four three-hour laboratory periods a week. Lectures, 
M.T.Th.F., 11:00; laboratory M.T.Th.F. 8,9,10, R-200. Prerequisite, one year 
of zoology. Principles of developmental dynamics including organization, dif- 
ferentiation, morphogenesis and developmental physitlogy. Laboratory fee, 
$12.00. (Ramm.) 

ZooL. 128. Zoogeography. (3) 

Lectures M.T.Th.F., 8:00-9:20. Prerequisites, Zool. 1, 2, and 5 or equivalent. 
Principles governing the geographical distribution of animals with particular 
emphasis on vertebrates. ( Potter.) 

ZooL. 150. Special Problems in Zoology. (1 or 2) 

Arranged. Prerequisite, major in zoology or biological sciences, a minimum of 
3.0 cumulative average in the biological sciences, and consent of instructor. Re- 
search or integrated reading in zoology. A student may register several times 
and receive up to 8 semester hours of credit. Laboratory fee, $12.00. (Staff.) 



46 



Business Administration 
ZooL. 152H. Honors Independent Study. (1-4) 

Arranged. Prerequisites, participation in honors program. Study of classical 
material by way of guided independent study and laboratory experiments. Re- 
peatable to a total of 12 hours credit. Laboratory fee, $12.00. (Staff.) 

ZooL. 153H. Honors Research. (1-2) 

Arranged. Prerequisite, participation in honors program. A laboratory research 
problem; required each semester during honors participation and culminating in 
an honors thesis. Repeatable to a total of 8 hours credit. Laboratory fee, $12.00. 

(Staff.) 
ZooL. 208. Special Problems in Zoology. 

Credit hours, and topics to be arranged. Laboratory fee, $12.00. (Staflf.J 

ZooL. 399. Research. 

Research on thesis project only. Laboratory fee, $12.00. Credit according to 
work assigned. (Staff.) 

BUSINESS AND PUBLIC ADMINISTRATION 

BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION 

B.A. 10. Business Enterprise. (3) 

M.T.Th.F., 11:00; Section L Q-132. Section U, Q-131. A survey course treating 
the internal and functional organization of business enterprise, its organization 
and control. (Staff.) 

B.A. 20. Principles of Accounting. (3) 

M.T.Th.F. Prerequisite, sophomore standing. The fundamental principles and 
problems involved in accounting for proprietorship corporations and partnerships. 
Section I— 9:30, Q- 122. (Sweeney.) 

Section 11—9:30, Q-108. (Staff.) 

B.A. 21. Principles of Accounting. (3) 

M.T.Th.F. Prerequisite, sophomore standing. The fundamental principles and 
problems involved in accounting for proprietorships, corporations and partner- 
ships. 

Section 1—8:00, Q-104. (Sweeney.) 

Section 11—8:00, Q-133. (Staff.) 

B.A. 110. Intermediate Accounting. (3) 

M.T.Th.F., 8:00; Q-110. Prerequisite, B.A. 21. A comprehensive study of the 
theory and problems of evaluation of assets, application of funds, corporation 
accounts and statements, and the interpretation of accounting statements. 

(Staff.) 

B.A. 111. Intermediate Accounting. (3) 

M.T.Th.F., 8:00; Q-122. Prerequisite, B.A. 21. A comprehensive study of the 
theory and problems of valuation of assets, application of funds, corporation ac- 
counts and statements, and the interpretation of accounting statements. 

(Edelson.) 
B.A. 119. Budgeting and Control. (3) 

M.T.Th.F., 9:30, T-119. Prerequisite, B.A. 21. The use of financial data in con- 
trolling an enterprise. Budgetary formulation, execution and appraisal. The use 
of accounting in managerial decision making. (Staff.) 

47 



Business Administration 

B.A. 120. Accounting Systems. (3) 

M.T.Th.F. How to make a survey of the business, select the methods to be 

used, design the system or procedure, and prepare the systems report or 

manual. 

Section 1—8:00, Q-123. (Hines.) 

Section 11—8:00; A-207. (Suelflow.) 

B.A. 124. Advanced Accounting. (3) 

M.T.Th.F., Prerequisite, B.A. Ill or consent of instructor. Advanced account- 
ing theory applied to specialized problems in partnerships, ventures, consign- 
ments, installment sales, insurance, statement of affairs, receiver's accounts, 
realization and liquidation reports, governmental accounting and applications 
of mathematics to accounting problems. 

Section I— 1 1 :00, Q-122. (Hermanson.) 

Section II— 1 1 :00, Q-123. (Edelson.) 

B.A. 130. Business Statistics I. (3) 

M.T.Th.F. Prerequisite, junior standing. Laboratory fee, $10.00. 
An introductory course. Topics covered include statistical observation, fre- 
quency distribution, averages, measures of variability, elementary probability, 
sampling, distribution, problems of estimation, simple tests of hypotheses, index 
numbers, time series, graphical and tabular presentation. 

Section 1—8:00, Q-103. (Staff.) 

Section 11—9:30, Q-103 (Calhoun.) 

Section 111—11:00, Q-103 (Anderson.) 

Section IV— 12:30, Q-103 (Calhoun.) 

B.A. 140. Business Finance. (3) 

M.T.Th.F., 8:00; Section I, F-104. Deals with principles and practices in- 
volved in the organization, financing, and reconstruction of corporations; the 
various types of securities, and their use in raising funds, apportioning income; 
risk and control; intercorporate relations; and new developments. 

(Spychalski.) 

B.A. 149. Marketing Principles and Organization. (3) 

M.T.Th.F., 9:30; Q-123 .An introductory course to give a general under- 
standing and appreciation of the forces operating, institutions employed, and 
methods followed in marketing agricultural products, natural products, serv- 
ices, and manufactured goods. (Ashman.) 

B.A. 151. Advertising. (3) 

M.T.Th.F., 12:30; Q-123. Prerequisite, B.A. 149 or consent of instructor. A 
study of the role of advertising in the American economy; the impact of adver- 
tising on our economic and social life, the methods and techniques currently 
applied by advertising practitioners and modern research methods to improve 
the effectiveness of advertising, and the organization of the advertising bus- 
iness. (Ryans.) 

B.A. 160. Personnel Management I. (3) 

M.T.Th.F.. 12:30; Q-104. Deals with functional and administrative relation- 
ships between management and the labor force. It comprises a survey of the 
scientific selection of employees, "in-service" training, job analysis, classifica- 
tion and rating, motivation of employees, employee adjustment, wage incentives, 
employee discipline and techniques of supervision, and elimination of employ- 
ment hazards. (Carroll.) 

48 



Business Administration 
B.A. 163. Labor Relations. (3) 

M.T.Th.F.. 9:30: Q-133. A study of the development and methods of organized 
groups in industry with reference to the settlement of labor disputes. An 
economic and legal analysis of labor union and employer association activities, 
arbitration, mediation and conciliation, collective bargaining, trade agreements, 
strikes, boycotts, lockouts, company unions, employee representation and in- 
junctions. (Staff.) 

B.A. 168. Management and Organization Theory. (3) 

M.T.Th.F., 11:00; Section I; Q-28. Section II, T-119. The development of man- 
agement and organization theory, nature of the management process and func- 
tion and its future development. The role of the manager as an organizer and 
director, the communication process, goals and responsibilities. (Staff.) 

B.A. 171. Traffic and Physical Distribution Management. (3) 

M.TTh.F., 8:00: G-109B. Prerequisite, junior standing. Examines the man- 
agement aspects of the business firm in moving their raw materials and finished 
goods, through traffic, warehousing, industrial packaging, material handling, and 
inventory. A systematic examination of the trade-off possibilities and manage- 
ment alternatives to minimize cost of product flow and maximizing customer 
service is provided. (Hille.) 

B.A. 180. Business Law. (3) 

M.T.Th.F., 8:00, Q-28. Legal aspects of business relationships, contracts, nego- 
tiable instruments, agency, partnerships, corporations, real and personal prop- 
erty and sales. (Dawson.) 

B.A. 182. Advanced Business Law. (3) 

M.T.Th.F.. 9:30; G-109B. Designed primarily for CPA candidates. Legal 
aspects of wills, insurance, torts and bankruptcy. (Dawson.) 

B.A. 189. Business and Government. (3) 

M.T.Th.F., 11:00: Q-104. A study of the role of government in modern eco- 
nomic life. Social control of business as a remedy for the abuses of business 
enterprise arising from the decline of competition. Criteria of limitations on 
government regulation of private enterprise. (Staff.) 

B.A. 199. Business Policies. (3) 

M.T.Th.F., 9:30; Section I, Q-28. Section II, G-109A. Prerequisite, senior 
standing. A case study course in which the aim is to have the student apply both 
what he has learned of general management principles and their specialized 
functional applications of the overall management function in the enterprise. 

(Staff.) 

B.A. 269. Application of Behavioral Science to Business. (3) 

Evening meeting hours arranged. Designed to enable the student to go into 
greater depth in the design and implementation of behavioral science research in 
management. (Staff.) 

B.A. 281. Private Enterprise and Public Policy. (3) 

Evening meeting hours arranged. Examines the executives social and ethical 
responsibilities to his employees, customers, and to the general public. Con- 

49 



Economics 

sideration is given to the conflicts occasioned by competitive relationships in 
the private sector of business and the effect of institutional restraints. The 
trends in public policy and their future effect upon management are examined. 
For comparative purposes, several examples of planned societies are consid- 
ered. (Culbertson.) 

B.A. 283. Management Policy Formulation. (3) 

Evening meeting hours arranged. Affords an insight into the problems con- 
fronting top management. A complex management game supplemented by 
the case method; provides a simulated environment required for dynamic de- 
cision-making policy formulation. (Tosi.) 

B.A. 399. Thesis. (1-6) 

Arranged. Credit according tt work assigned. (Staff.) 

ECONOMICS 

EcoN. 4. Economic Developments. (3) 

M.T.Th.F., 11:00; Q-107; no prerequisite, introduction to modern economic in- 
stitutions with emphasis on development in England, Western Europe and the 
United States. (Staff.) 

EcoN. 31. PiaNciPLEs OF Economics. (3) 

Sec. 1, M.T.Th.F., 8:00; Q-107. Sec. 2, M.T.Th.F., 9:30; Q.-28, Prerequisite, 
sophomore standing. A general analysis of the functioning of the economic 
system, with sjpecial «nif4iasis cm national income analysis A considerable por- 
tion of the course is devoted to a study of basic concepts and explanatory prin- 
ciples. The remaiadar <ie»ls with th« major problems of the economic system. 

(Staff.) 
EcoN. 32. PwNapLM of Economics. (3) 

Sec. 1, M.T.Th.F., 8:00; Q-129. S«c. 2, M.T.Th.F., 9:30; Q-107, Prerequisite, 
Econ. 31. A general analysis of the functioning of the economic system, with 
special emi^asis on Mtaurc* allocation. A considerable portion of the course 
is devoted to a study of b«isie concepts and explanatory principles. The re- 
mainder deals with the major problems of the economic system. (Staff.) 

Econ. 37. Funbamkntals of Economics. (3) 

M.T.Th.F., 1:00; Q-130. Prerequisite, sophomore standing. Not open to 
students wko have ^«lit in Eco«. 3 1 and 32. Not open to B.P.A. students. A 
siHTey of the ftneral prmciplcs underlying economic activity. This is the basic 
course in economics for the American Civilization Program for students who 
are unable to take the more complete course provided in Econ. 31 and 32. 

(Staff.) 

Econ. 102. National Income Analysis. (3) 

M.T.Th.F., 11:00, Q-123. Prerequisite, Econ. 32. Required for Econ. majors. 
An analysis of national vacom/t accounts and the level of national income and 
employment. (Staff) 

Econ. 131. Comparative Economic Systems. (3) 

M.T.Th.F., 9:30; Q-UO, Frerequisite, Econ. 32 or 37. An investigation of the 
theory and practice vf various typee of economic systems. The course begins 
with an examinatioB a«d evaluation of the capitalistic system and is followed 
by an analysis of alternative types of economic systems such as fascism, social- 
isai, and communism. (Staff.) 

50 



Geography 
EcoN. 132. Intermediate Price Theory. (3) 

M.T.Th.F., 9:30; Q-104. Prerequisite, Econ. 32. Required for economics ma- 
jors. This course is an analysis of price and distribution theory with special 
attention to recent developments in the theory of imperfect competition. 

(Staff.) 

EcoN. 140. Money and Banking. (3) 

M.T.Th.F., 8:00; Q-108. Prerequisite, Econ. 32 or 37. A study of the organiza- 
tion, functions, and operation of our monetary, credit, and banking system; 
♦he relation of commercial banking to the Federal Reserve System; the relation 
of money and credit to prices; domestic and foreign exchange and the impact 
of public policy upon banking and credit. (Staff.) 

EcoN. 148. International Economics. (3) 

M.T.Th.F., 9:30; Q-129. Prerequisite, Econ. 32 or 37. A descriptive and theo- 
retical analysis of international trade; balance of payments accounts; the mech- 
anism of international economic adjustment; comparative costs; economics of 
customs unions. (Staff.) 

EcoN. 160. Labor Economics. (3) 

M.T.Th.F., 11:00; Q-129. Prerequisite, Econ. 32 or 37. The historical develop- 
ment and chief characteristics of the American labor movement are first sur- 
veyed. Present day problems are then examined in detail: wage theories, un- 
employment, social security, labor organization, collective bargaining. (Staff.) 

EcoN. 202. Macro-Economic Analysis. (3) 

Evening meeting hours arranged. Prerequisite, Econ. 132. National income 
accounting; determination of national income and employment especially as 
related to the modern theory of effective demand; consumption function; mul- 
tiplier and acceleration principles; the role of money as it affects output and 
employment as a whole. (Staff.) 

EcoN. 237. Selected Topics in Economics. (3) 

Arranged. 

EcoN. 399. Thesis. (1-6) 

Arranged. Credit according to work assigned. (Staff.) 



GEOGRAPHY 

Geog. 10. General Geography I. (3) 

M.T.Th.F., 9:30; Q-210. Introduction to geography as a field of study. A study 
of the content, philosophy, techniques, and application of geography and its 
significance for the understanding of world problems. (Dando.) 

Geog. 30. Principles of Morphology. (3) 

M.T.Th.F., 12:30; O-210. A study of the physical features of the earth's sur- 
face and their geographic distribution, including subordinate land forms. Major 
morphological processes, the development of land forms, and the relationships 
between various types of land forms and land use problems. (Dando.) 

31 



Government and Politics 

Geog. 41 Introductory Climatology. (3) 

M.T.Th.F., 8:00; Q-210. Prerequisite, Geog. 40, or permission of the in- 
structor. Climatic elements and their controls, the classification and distribu- 
tion of world climates and relevance of climatic differences to human activi- 
ties. (Chaves.) 

Geog. 100 — Regional Geography of Eastern Anglo America. (3) 

M.T.Th.F., 11:00, Q-210. Prerequisite, Geog. 10 or Geog. 15, or permission 
of the instructor. A study of the cultural and economic geography and the 
geographic regions of eastern United States and Canada, including an analysis 
of the significance of the physical basis for present-day diversification of de- 
velopment, and the historical geographic background. (Mika.) 

Geog. 110. Economic and Cultural Geography of Caribbean 
America. (3) 

M.T.Th.F., 11:00; Q-232. An analysis of the physical framework, broad 
economic and historical trends, cultural patterns, and regional diversification of 
Mexico, Central America, the West Indies, and parts of Colombia and Venez- 
uela. (Chaves.) 

Geog. 120. Geography of Europe. (3) 

M.T.Th.F., 9:30; Q-209. Agricultural and industrial development of Europe 
and present-day problems in relation to the physical and cultural setting of 
the continent and its natural resources. (Van Royen.) 

Geog. 161. Mineral Resources. (3) 

Arranged. Q-209. (Van Royen.) 

Geog. 197. Urban Geography. (3) 

M.T.Th.F., 8:00; Q-209. Origins of cities followed by a study of elements 
of site and location with reference to cities. The patterns and functions of 
some major world cities will be analyzed. Theories of land use differentiation 
within cities will be appraised. (Mika.) 

GOVERNMENT AND POLITICS 

G. & P. 1. American Government. (3) 

This course is designed as the basic course in government, and it or its equiva- 
lent is a prerequisite to all other courses in the Department. It is a compre- 
hensive study of governments in the United States — national, state, and local 
Section 1— M.T.Th.F. 8:00, Q-213. (Hathorn.) 
Section 2— M.T.Th.F. 9:30; Q-213. (Cox.) 
Section 3— M.T.Th.F. 11:00; Q-213. (Hathorn.) 
Section A — M.T.Th.F. 12:30; Q-213. (Frederickson.) 

G. & P. 3. Principles of Government and Politics. (3) 

M.T.Th.F., 9:30; Q-132. A study of the basic principles and concepts of po- 
litical science. (Soles.) 

G. & P. 40. Political Ideologies. (3) 

M.T.Th.F., 8:00; Q-211. Prerequisite, G. & P. 1. A survey and analysis of 
the leading ideologies of the modern world, including anarchism, communism, 
socialism, fascism, nationalism, and democracy. (Grote.) 

52 



Government and Politics 
G. & P. 97. Governments and Politics of Europe. (3) 

M.T.Th.F., 11:00; Q-110. Prerequisite, G. & P. 1. A comparative study of the 
political systems of the United Kingdom, France, Germany, Italy, and other 
selected European countries. (Onyewu.) 

G. & P. 101. International Political Relations. (3) 

M.T.Th.F., 8:00; Q-132. Prerequisite, G. & P. 1. A study of the major factors 
underlying international relations, the methods of conducting foreign relations, 
the foreign policies of the major powers, and the means of avoiding or 
alleviating international conflicts. (Piper.) 

G. & P. 106. American Foreign Relations. (3) 

M.T.Th.F., 9:30; Q-211. Prerequisite, G. & P. 1. The principles and ma- 
chinery of the conduct of American foreign relations, with emphasis on the 
Dejpartment of State and the Foreign Service, and an analysis of the major 
foreign policies of the United States. (Staff.) 

G. & P. 110. Principles of Public Administration. (3) 

M.T.Th.F., 8:00; Q-131. Prerequisite, G. & P. 1. A survey of public adminis- 
tration in the United States, giving special attention to the principles of or- 
ganization and management and to fiscal, personnel, planning, and public 
relations practices. (Frederickson.) 

G. & P. 124. Legislatures and Legislation. (3) 

M.T.Th.F., 11:00; Q-130. Prerequisite, G. & P. 1. A comprehensive study of 
legislative organization, procedure, and problems. The course includes oppor- 
tunities for student contact with Congress and with the Legislature of Mary- 
land. (Zimring.) 

G. & P. 141. History of Political Theory. (3) 

M.T.Th.F., 9:30; Q-131. Prerequisite, G. & P. 1. A survey of the principal 
political theories set forth in the works of writers from Plato to Bentham. 

(Schick.) 
G. & P. 142. Recent Political Theory. (3) 

M.T.Th.F., 11:00; Q-211. Prerequisite, G. & P. 1. A study of 19th and 20th 
century political thought, with special emphasis on recent theories of socialism, 
communism, and fascism. (Byrd.) 

G. & P. 154. Problems of World Politics. (3) 

M.T.Th.F., 8:00; G-109-A. Prerequisite, G. & P. 1. A study of governmental 
problems of international scope, such as causes of war, problems of neutrality, 
and propaganda. Students are required to report on readings from current lit- 
erature. (Koury.) 

G. & P. 174. Political Parties. (3) 

M.T.Th.F., 9:30; Q-130. Prerequisite, G. & P. 1. A descriptive and analytical 
examination of American political parties, nominations, elections, and political 
leadership. (Zimring.) 

G & P. 197. Comparative Political Systems. (3) 

M.T.Th.F., 11:00; Q-108. Prerequisites, G. & P. 97 and at least one other 
course in comparative government. A study, along functional lines, of major 
political institutions, such as legislatures, executives, courts, bureaucracies, 
public organizations, and political parties. (Podelco.) 

53 



Journalism 

G. & P. 203. Functional Problems in International 

Relations. (3) 

M.Th., 12:30; Q-369. An examination of the major substantive issues in 
contemporary international relations, involving reports on selected topics based 
on individual research. (Piper.) 

G. & P. 207. Seminar in Comparative Governmental 
Institutions. (3) 

M.Th., 3:00; Q-169. Reports on selected topics for individual study and 
reading in governmental and political institutions in governments throughout 
the world. (Koury.) 

G. & P. 208. Seminar in the Government and Politics of Emerging 

Nations. (3) 

M.W., 7:00 p. M.; Q-369. An examination of the programs of political de- 
velopment in the emerging nations with special reference to the newly inde- 
pendent nations of Asia and Africa and the less developed countries of Latin 
America. Individual reporting as assigned. (Onyewu.) 

G. & P. 213. Problems of Public Administration. (3) 

T.F., 12:30; Q-369. Reports on topics assigned for individual study and reading 
in the field of public administration. (Cox.) 

G. & P. 225. Man and the State. (3) 

T.F., 3;00; Q-369. Prerequisite, G. & P. 142. Individual reading and reports 
on such recurring concepts in political theory as liberty, equality, justice, nat- 
ural law and natural rights, private property, sovereignty, nationalism and the 
organic state. (Byrd.) 

G. & P. 261. Problems IN American Government AND Politics. (3) 

T.Th., 7:00 P. M., Q-369. An examination of contemporary problems in var- 
ious fields of government and politics in the United States with reports on 
topics assigned for individual study. (Soles.) 

G. & P. 399. Thesis Research. (1-6) 

Arranged. Credit according to work assigned. (Staff.) 

JOURNALISM 

JouRN. 10. Introduction to Journalism. (3) 

June 20-July 29. Daily, 11:00; G304. Survey of journalism, professional 
careers in writing and communications; news writing in laboratory. Prequi- 
sites: At least average grade of C in English; ability to type at least 30 words 
a minute. Laboratory fee, $3.00. (Newsom.) 

JouRN. 100. News Reporting. (3) 

Daily, 9:30, G304. News writing and reporting, campus news beat in pro- 
ducing supervised weekly school newspaper in laboratory. Prerequisite: Type 
30 words per minute. Laboratory fee, $3.00. (Noall.) 

54 



Journalism 
JouRN. 152. Advertising Copy and Layout. (3) 

June 20-July 29. Daily, 8:00; G307. Theory and practice in advertising copy 
and layout, with emphasis on newspaper advertising, for letterpress and photo- 
offset printing. Use of illustrations, type selection, copy-fitting, media selec- 
tion. Sell advertising for supervised weekly school newspaper in laboratory. 

(Newsom.) 

JouRN. 160. News Editing. (3) 

Daily, 11:00; G305. News editing, head writing, newspaper layout, on super- 
vised weekly school newspaper in laboratory. Laboratory fee, $3.00. 

(Crowell.) 

JouRN. 166. Public Relations. (3) 

June 20-July 29. Daily, 11 :00; G309. Principles of public relations. (Kobre) 

JouRN. 173. Scholastic Journalism. (3) 

June 20-July 29. Daily, 8:00; G304. Introduction to theory and practice of 
highschool publications, for scholastic publications advisers. (Crowell.) 

JouRN. 189S. Scholastic Journalism Workshop. (3) 

June 20-July 8. Daily, 10:00-3:30; G310; G305. Workshop in the school 
newspaper, for advisers. One paper produced in laboratory. (Noall.) 

JouRN. 192. History of American Journalism. (3) 

June 20-July 29. Daily, 12:30; G-309. Influences on political, social and cul- 
tural institutions. (Kobre.) 

JouRN. 196. Problems in Journalism. (1 or 2) 

Daily, arr.; G-202. (Staff.) 

EDUCATION 

EARLY CHILDHOOD— ELEMENTARY EDUCATION * 
ECEEd 105-B. Science in the Elementary School. (2-3) 

Section 1-B. (3) June 20-July 29, Daily, 8:00; 00-210. (Blough) 

Section 2-B. (3) June 20-July 29, Daily, 9:30; 00-210. (Williams.) 

Section 3-B. (2) June 20-July 29, M.T.Th.F., 11:00; 00-210. (Williams.) 

Open only to pre-service undergraduate students. Laboratory fee, $2.00. 

ECEEd 115. Activities and Materials in Early Childhood 
Education. (3) 

June 20-July 29. Daily, 8:00; 00-105. Prerequisite, ECEEd 50, 51, or 110. 
Laboratory fee, $5.00. (Stant.) 

ECEEd 116. Music in Early Childhood Education. (3) 

June 20-July 29. Daily, 9:30; 00-105. Prerequisite: Music 16 or equivalent. 

(L. Brown.) 

ECEEd 121. Language Arts in the Elementary School. B. (3) 

Section 1 June 20-July 29. Daily, 1.00; 00-127. (Zachary.) 

Section 2 June 20-July 29. Daily, 9:30; T-202. (Edgemon.) 



♦Throughout this section, A refers to Early Childhood level, B refers to 
Elementary level, C refers to Secondary level. 

55 



Education 

ECEEd 122. Social Studies in the Elementary School. B. (3) 

June 20-July 29. Daily, 11:00; 00-225. (Weaver.) 

ECEEd 123B.. The Child and the Curriculum. (3) 

June 20-JuIy 29. Daily, 11:00; T-103. (Edgemon.) 

ECEEd 124. Mathematics in the Elementary School. B. (2-3) 

Section I M.T.Th.F., 8:00; 00-222 (3) (Schindler.) 

Section 2 M.T.Th.F., 9:30; 00-222 (3) (Schindler.) 

Section 3 June 20-July 29; M.T.Th.F., 8:00; T-201. Open only to pre-service 

undergraduate students. (2) (Ashlock.) 

ECEEd 125. Art in the Elementary School. (3) 

June 21 -July 30. Daily, 11:00; NN-330. (Sullivan.) 

Enrollment limited to 25 students. 

ECEEd 140A. Curriculum and Instruction: A — Cooperative 
Nursery School. (3) 

June 20-July 29. Daily, 11:00; OO-l 18. (Stant.) 

ECEEd 1408. Curriculum and Instruction: B. — Early Childhood. 
(3) 

June 20-July 29. Daily, 1 1 :00; 00-1 12. (Pfau.) 

ECEEd 152. Literature for Children and Young People, 
Advanced. (3) 

June 20-JuIy 29. Daily, 8:00; T-102. Prerequisite, ECEEd 52 or approval of 
the professor. (Pfau.) 

ECEEd 153-B. The Teaching of Reading. (3) 

Section 1-B. June 20-July 29. Daily, 8:00; 00-127. (Herman.) 

Section 2-B. June 20-July 29. Daily, 11:00; T-102. (Herman.) 

ECEEd 205. Problems in Teaching Science in Elementary 
Schools. (2) 

June 20-July 29, M.T.Th.F., 9:30; 00-220. Enrollment limited to 15. 

(Blough) 

ECEEd 210. Curriculum Planning in Nursery and Kindergarten 
Education. (3) 

June 20-July 29. Daily, 9:30; T-203. (Hymes.) 

ECEEd 212. The Young Child in School. (3) 

June 20-JuIy 29. Daily, 11:00; T-203 (Hymes.) 

ECEEd 221. Problems of Teaching Language Arts in Elementary 
Schools. (2) 

June 20-July 29. Daily, 11:00; T-201. Enrollment limited to 15. (Zachary.) 



56 



Education 

ECEEd 222. Problems of Teaching Social Studies in Elementary 
Schools. (2) 

June 20-July 29. M.T.Th.F., 1:00; 00-220. Enrollment limited to 15. 

(Weaver.) 

GENERAL EDUCATION 

Ed. 100. History of Education in Western Civilization. (3) 

M.T.Th.F., 9:30; 0-236. (Lindsay.) 

Ed. 102. History of Education in the United States. (3) 



June 20-JuIy 29. Daily, 11:00; 00-227. 

Ed. 107. Philosophy of Education. (3) 

June 20-July 29. Daily, 11:00; 00-126. 

Ed. 110. Human Development and Learning. (6) 

June 20-July 29. Daily, 9:30-12:20; 00-312. 

Ed. 111. Foundations of Education. (3) 

Sect. 1, M.T.Th.F., 8:00, O-240. 

Sect. 2. June 20-July 29. Daily, 9:30; 00-301. 

Sect. 3. M.T.Th.F., 11:00; 00-303. 

Ed. 147. Audio-visual Education. (3) 

Sect. 1, June 20-July 29. Daily, 8:00; P-300. 
Sect. 2, June 20-July 29. Daily, 9:30; P-300. 
Sect. 3, M.T.Th.F., 11:00; P-300. 

Ed. 150. Educational Measurement. (3) 

Sect. 1, June 20-July 29. Daily, 11:00; OO-lOl. 
Sect. 2, M.T.Th.F., 8:00; 00-118. 
Sect. 3, M.T.Th.F., 9:30; 00-126. 

Ed. 151. Statistical Methods in Education. (3) 

Sect. 1, M.T.Th.F., 8:00; 0-236. 
Sect. 2. M.T.Th.F., 9:30; 00-225. 



(Finkelstein) 

(Noll.) 

(Larson.) 



(Lindsay.) 
(Noll.) 
(Agre.) 



(Maley.) 
(Schramm.) 
(Schramm.) 



(Giblette.) 
(Staflf.) 
(Staflf.) 



(Stunkard.) 
(Staff.) 



Ed. 157. Corrective-Remedial Reading Instruction. (3) 

June 20-July 29. Daily, 9:30; 00-303. Prerequisite, ECEEd 153 or equivalent 

(Sullivan) 

Ed. 161. Introduction to Counseling and Pupil Services. (3) 

Sect. 1, M.T.Th.F., 8:00; 00-303. (Rhoads.) 

Sect. 2 M.T.Th.F., 8:00; 00-112. (SchmuUer.) 

Ed. 162. Mental Hygiene in the Classroom. (3) 

M.T.Th.F., 9:30; 00-227. (Chenault.) 

Ed. 188. Special Problems in Education. (1-3) 

Prerequisite, consent of instructor. Available only to mature students who have 
definite plans for individual study of approved problems. Course cards must have 
the title of the problem and the name of the faculty member who has approved 
it. Arranged. Credit according to work assigned. (Staff.) 



57 



Education 

Ed. 189. Workshops, Clinics, and Institutes. (See pages 13-21) 
Ed. 189-1. Education in Family Finance. (4) 

June 20-July 15, 8:30-3:30; Q-27. See page 16. (C. Anderson.) 

Ed. 189-7. Workshop in Supervision of Student Teachers. (3) 

June 20-July 8. Daily, 9:30-3:30; T-5. See page 20. (Collins.) 

Ed. 189-8. Workshop in Instructional Materials. (3) 

July 18-Aug. 5. 8:00-10:40. Daily; L-493. See page 18. (Staff.) 

Ed. 189-26. Human Relations in Educational Administration (6) 

June 20-July 29. Daily, 9:00-3:00. (Off Campus.) 

Prerequisite, a master's degree. Enrollment limited. Preference in enrollment 
will be given to teams designated by Maryland school systems. (Newell.) 

See page 18 

Ed. 189-29. Workshop in the Education of Children with Learn- 
ing Disabilities. (4) 

June 20-July 29. Daily, 9:00-12:30. To be held off-campus. (Simms.) 

See page 15 

Ed. 189-33. Child Study Leaders. (2) 

June 20-July 1. Daily, 8:00-3:00; J-302. (Kurtz, Thompson.) 

See page 16 

Ed. 189-35. Application of Human Development Principles in 
Classrooms. (2) 

July 4-July 15. Daily, 8:00-3:00; J-302. (Thompson.) 

See page 17 

Ed. 189-36. Human Development and Religious Education. (2) 

July 18-July 29. Daily, 8:00-3:00; J-302. (Kurtz, Thompson.) 

See page 17 

Ed. 189-37. Action Research in Human Development Education. 
(2) 

Aug. 1-Aug. 12. Daily, 8:00-3:00; J-302. (Kurtz.) 

See page 17 

Ed. 189-41. N.D.E.A. Counseling and Guidance Training Insti- 
tute. (1) 

June 20-Aug. 5. Daily, 8:30-5:00; J-314. 

Concurrent registration in Ed. 261, section 2, and Ed. 249, section 2 is required. 

(Ray.) 

Ed. 189-47. NDEA Institute for Teachers of Secondary School 
English. (6) Open only to Institute registrants. 

June 20-July 29. Daily, 9:00-3:00; G-205. (Portz.) 

Ed. 189-53. Educator's Workshop on Automatic Data 
Processing. (6) 

June 20-JuIy 29. Daily, 9:00-12:00; Q-19. Daily, Labs, and conferences, p.m. 
A prerequisite of mathematics is not required. (See page 16) (Patrick.) 

58 



Education 
Ed. 189-57. Workshop in Team Teaching. (3) 

June 20-July 8. Daily, 9:30-3:30; J-332. See page 20. (Kleman.) 

Ed. 189-64. NDEA Institute for Teachers of Geography. (6) 

June 20-July 29. Daily, 9:00-3:30; Q-209. (Staflf.) 

Ed. 189-67. Workshop in Vocational Education. (1) 

W., 8:00; P-306. See page 21. (Schact.) 

Ed. 189-72. European Travel Seminar (6) 

June 20-Aug. 11. See page 16. (O'Neill.) 

Typewriting Demonstration Laboratory. (0) 

July 20-July 29. 8:30-10:15. (O'Neill.) 

Ed. 202. Junior College. (3) 

June 20-July 29. Daily, 9:30; A-50. (Kelsey.) 

Ed. 203. Problems in Higher Education. (3) 

June 20-July 29. Daily, 8:00; A-50. (Kelsey.) 

Ed. 208. Analysis of Educational Concepts. (3) 

M.T.Th.F., 9:30; O-240. (Agre.) 

Ed. 210. The Organization and Administration of Public Educa- 
tion. (3) 

M.T.Th.F., 8:30; 00-225. (Dudley.) 

Ed. 211. The Organization and Administration of Secondary 
Schools. (3) 

June 20-JuIy 29. Daily, 8:00; LL-2 



Ed. 214. School Plant Planning. (3) 

June 20-July 29. Daily, 9:30; 00-125. 

Ed. 216. Public School Supervision. (3) 

Sect. 1, June 20-July 29. Daily, 9:30. NN-320. 
Sect. 2, June 20-July 29. Daily, 9:30; OO- 11 8. 



(J. P. Anderson.) 
(Van ZwoU.) 



(Neville.) 
(J. P. Anderson.) 



Ed. 217. Administration and Supervision in Elementary Schools. 

(3) 

M.T.Th.F., 11:00. 00-1052. (Dudley.) 

Ed. 227, Public School Personnel Administration. (3) 

June 20~July 29. Daily, 8:00; T-103. (Van ZwoU.) 



59 



Education 

Ed. 234. The School Curriculum. (2) 

June 20-July 29. M.T.Th.F., 9:30; OO-lOl. (Hovet.) 

Ed. 235. Principles of Curriculum Development. (3) 

June 20-July 29. Daily, 8:00; OO-lOl. (Staff.) 

Ed. 245. Introduction to Research. (2) 

Sect. 1, June 20-July 29. M.T.Th.F., 9:30; F-103. (Raths.) 

Sect. 2, June 20-July 29. M.T.Th.F., 11:00; 00-312. (Hovet.) 

Sect. 3, M.W.F., 8:00; F-101. (Dayton.) 

Sect. 4, M.W.F., 9:30; F-101. (Klevan.) 

Sect. 5, M.W.F., 11:00; F-101. (Staff.) 

Ed. 249. Personality Theories in Education. (3) 

Sect. 1, M.T.Th.F., 9:30; LL-201. (Schmuller.) 

Sect. 2, June 20-Aug.-5, Arranged. Restricted to those enrollees registered 
for Ed. 189-41. 

Ed. 250. Cases in Pupil Appraisal. (3) 

Daily, 9:30; F-104. June 20-July 29. (Marx.) 

Ed. 251, Intermedute Statistics in Education. (3) 

M.T.Th.F., 9:30; G-309. Limited to 35. (Dayton.) 

Ed. 253. Occupational Choice Theory and Information. (3) 

Daily, 11:00; A-7. June 20-July 29. (Ehrle.) 

Ed. 255, 256. Advanced Laboratory Experiences in Reading 
Instruction. (3, 3) 

June 20-July 29. Daily. Arranged; 00-125. Prerequisites: 21 credits applicable to 
master's degree program in Corrective-Remedial Reading, including Ed. 157, Ed. 
150, either Ed. 241 or ECEEd 221, and a written application by June 1, 1966. 

(Wilson.) 

Ed. 257. Diagnosis and Remediation of Reading Disabilities. (3) 

June 20-July 29. Daily, 8:00; 00-125. Prerequisites, ECEEd 153, Ed. 157. 

Ed. 259. Counseling in Elementary Schools. (3) 

Daily, 8:00; 00-227. June 20-July 29. (Staff.) 

Ed. 260. School Counseling: Theoretical Foundations and 
Practice. (3) 

M.T.Th.F., 11:00; A-8. (Chenault.) 

Ed. 261. Practicum in Counseling. (2) 

Enrollment limited; apply to Dr. George Marx, College of Education. 
Sect. 1, M.W.F., 9:30; 00-320. (Rhoads.) 

Sect. 2, June 20-Aug. 5. Arranged. (3). Restricted to those NDEA enrollees 
registered for Ed. 189-41. (Staff.) 

60 



Education 

Ed. 262. Measurement in Pupil Appraisal. (3) 

June 20-July 29. Daily, 1 1 :00; 00-127. (Giblette.) 

Ed, 280. Research Methods and Materials. (2) 

M.W.F., 9:30;LL-105. (Stunkard.) 

Ed. 281. Source Materials in Education. (2) 

June 20-JuIy 29. M.T.Th.F., 8:00; A-8. (Staff.) 

Ed. 288. Special Problems in Education. (1-6) 

Arranged. Master of Education or doctoral candidates who desire to pursue 
special research problems under the direction of their advisers may register 
for credit under this number. Course cards must have the title of the problem 
and the name of the faculty member under whom the work will be done. Credit 
according to work assigned. (Staflf.) 

Ed. 290. Doctoral Seminar. ( 1 ) 

Thursday, 1:00-3:00. Prerequisite, consent of instructor. (Dayton.) 

Ed. 399. Research-Thesis. 1-6) 

Arranged. Credit according to work assigned. (Staff.) 



SECONDARY EDUCATION 

Sec. Ed. 141. Methods of Teaching English in Secondary Schools. 
(3) 

June 20-July 29. Daily, 9:30; 00-307. (Bryan.) 

Sec. Ed. 142. Teaching the Audio-Lingual Skills in Foreign 
Languages. (3) 

June 20-July 29. Daily, 9:30; LL-116. (Staff.) 

Sec. Ed. 145. Principles and Methods of Secondary Education. (3) 

June 20-July 29. Daily, 8:00; 00-126. (Bryan.) 

H.E.Ed. 102. Problems in Teaching Home Economics. (3) 

June 20-July 15. M.T.Th.F., 8:00-10:30; 00-102. (Spencer.) 

H.E.Ed. 200. Seminar in Home Economics Education. 

July 20-Aug. 12. M.T.Th.F., 8:00-9:50; 00-312. (Spencer.) 

B.Ed. 101. Problems in Teaching Office Skills. (2) 

June 20-July 29. M.T.Th.F., 11:00; Q-6. (O'NeUl.) 

B.Ed. 102. Methods and Materials in Teaching. (2) 

Bookkeeping and Related Subjects. June 20-July 29. M.T.Th.F., 9:30; Q-6. 

(Staff.) 

61 



Education 

B.Ed. 205. Seminar in Business Education. (2) 

June 20-July29. M.T.Th.F., 9:30; Q-27. (Fries.) 

B.Ed. 256. Curriculum Development in Business Education. (3) 
June 20-July 29. Daily, 12:30; Q-6. (Fries.) 

MUSIC EDUCATION* 

Mus. Ed. 125. Creative Activities in the Elementary School. (3) 

Three weeks, June 20-July 8. Daily, 8:00-10:50; NN-208. Prerequisite, Music 
16 or consent of instructor. A study of the creative approach to singing, listen- 
ing, playing, rhythmic activity, and composition. Special emphasis on contem- 
porary music and creativity. In the 1966 Summer Session, groups of children 
will be available for demonstrations. (Shelley.) 

Mus. Ed. 132. Music in Secondary Schools. (3) 

Three weeks, July 11-29. NN-208. Prerequisite, consent of the instructor. 
A study of the music program in the secondary school, with an emphasis on 
methods and materials for general music. The needs in general music are 
surveyed, and the relationship of music to the general education program is 
investigated. In the 1966 Summer Session, groups of children will be avail- 
able for demonstrations. (Shelley.) 

Mus. Ed. 155. Organization and Technique of Instrumental Class 

Instruction. (3) 

June 20-July 29. Daily, 11:00; NN-208. Practical instruction in the methods 
of tone production, tuning, fingering, and in the care of woodwind and bass 
instruments. A survey of the materials and published methods for class 
instruction. (Dunham.) 

Mus. Ed. 200. Research Methods in Music and Music Education. 

(3) 

June 20-July 29. Daily, 11:00; NN-202. The application of methods of re- 
search to problems in the fields of music and music education. The preparation 
of bibliographies and the written exposition of research projects in the area of 
the student's major interest. (Grentzer.) 

Mus. Ed. 205. Seminar in Vocal Music in the Elementary Schools. 

(3) 

June 20-July 29. Daily, 9:00-10:20; NN-202. A comparative analysis of cur- 
rent methods and materials used in the elementary schools. A study of the 
music curriculum as a part of the total school program. Special emphasis on 
contemporary music and creative activities. In the 1966 Summer Session, 
groups of children will be available for demonstrations. (Grentzer.) 



* For Music, see page 38. 
62 



Education 

HUMAN DEVELOPMENT EDUCATION 

H. D. Ed. 105. Adolescent Development. (3) 

June 20-July 29. Daily, 11:00; 00-125. (Mershoa.) 

H. D. Ed. 107. Growth and Development in Early Childhood (3) 
June 20-July 29. Daily, 8:00; J-244. (Broome.) 

H. D. Ed. 112, 114. Scientific Concepts in Human Development 
(3) 

June 20.July 29. Daily, 8:00-3:00; J-226. (Kyle.) 

H. D. Ed. 113, 115. Laboratory in Behavior Analysis (3) 

June 20-July 29. Daily, 8:00-3:00; J-236. (Kyle.) 

H. D. Ed. 145. Guidance of Young Children. (3) 

June 20-July 29. Daily, 9:30; J-244. (Broome.) 

H. D. Ed. 200. Introduction to Human Development and Child 

Study. (3) 

Section 1— June 20-July 29. Daily, 8:00; 00-301. (Mershon.) 

Section 2— June 20-July 29. Daily, 9:30; 00-112. (Morgan.) 

H. D. Ed. 201. Biological Bases of Behavior. (3) 

Section 1— June 20-July 29. Daily, 8:00; 00-223. (Morgan.) 

Section 2— June 20-July 29. Daily, 9:30; J-140. (Goering.) 

H. D. Ed. 202. Social Bases of Behavior. (3) 

Section 1— June 20-July 29. Daily, 8:00; 00-307. (Goering.) 

Section 2^June 20-July 29. Daily, 11:00; J-336. (Bowie.) 

H. D. Ed. 203. Integrative Bases of Behavior. (3) 

June 20-July 29. Daily, 9:30; J-153. (Bowie.) 

H. D. Ed. 210. Affectional Relationships and Processes in Hu- 
man Development. (3) 

June 20-July 29. Daily, 9:30; J-170. (Hatfield.) 

H. D. Ed. 211. Pier-Culture and Group Processes in 
Human Development. (3) 

June 20-July 29. Daily, 11:00; 00-223. (Hatfield.) 

H. D. Ed. 212, 214. Advanced Scientific CtoNCEPTS in Human De- 
velopment, I, II. (3) (3) 

June 20-July 29. Daily, 8:00-3:00; J-270. (Prescott.) 

H. D. Ed. 213, 215. Advanced Laroratory in Behavior Analysis, 
I, II. (3) (3) 

June 20-July 29. Daily, 8:00-3:00; J-272. (Prescott.) 

H. D. Ed. 221. Learning Theory and the Educative Process. (3) 

Section 1— June 20-July 29. Daily, 8:00; J-282. (Milhollan.) 

Section 2— June 20-July 29. Daily, 11:00; J.282. (Milhollan.) 

63 



Education 

INDUSTRIAL EDUCATION 

I. Ed. 9. Industrial Arts in the Elementary School I. (2) 



June 20-July 29. Daily, 9:30; P-214. Laboratory fee $5.00. 

I. Ed. 28. Electricity-Electronics I (3) 
Daily, 8:00; P-212. Laboratory fee, $7.50. 

I. Ed. 33. Automotives I (3) 

Daily, 9:30; P-120. Laboratory fee $7.50. 

I. Ed. 43 Automotives II (3) 

I. Ed. 48. Electricity-Electronics II 

Daily, 8:00; P-212. Laboratory fee $7.50. 

I. Ed. 50. Methods of Teaching (3) 

M.T.Th.F., 11:00; P-306. 



(Gettle.) 



(Guy.) 



(Merrill.) 



(Merrill.) 



(Guy.) 



(Luetkemeyer.) 



I. Ed. 84. Organized AND Supervised Work Experiences. (3) 

Arranged for students enrolled in the Education for Industry curriculum. 

(Guy, Crosby.) 

I. Ed. 115. Research and Experimentation in Industrial Arts (3) 

June 20-July 29. Daily 11:00; P-108. (Maley.) 

I. Ed. 121. Industrial Arts in Special Education (3) 

June 20-July 29. 12:30-3:00. Four hours laboratory per week, one hour 
lecture. Prerequisite, Sp. Ed. 170 and 171 or consent of instructor. Labora- 
tory fee, $5.00. This course provides experiences of a technical and theoretical 
nature in industrial processes applicable for class-room use. Emphasis is 
placed on individaul research in the specific area of one major interest in 
special education. (Staff.) 

I. Ed. 124, Organized and Supervised Work Experiences. (3) 

Arranged for students enrolled in the Education for Industry curriculum. 

(Gettle, Merrill.) 

I. Ed. 150. Training Aids Development. (3) 

June 20-July 29. Daily, 8:00; P-300. 



I. Ed. 164. Shop Organization and Management (3) 

Sect. 1, M.T.Th.F., 9:30; P-208. 

Sect. 2, June 20-July 29. Daily, 11:00; P-205. 

I. Ed. 165. Modern Industry. (3) 

M.T.Th.F., 11:00; P-306. 



(Maley.) 



(Schacht.) 
(Mertens.) 



(Harrison.) 



I. Ed. 169. Occupational Analysis AND Course Construction. (3) 

Sect. 1, June 20-July 29. Daily, 8:00; P-205. (Mertens.) 

Sect. 2, M.T.Th.F., 8:00; P-208. (Luetkemeyer.) 



64 



Education 
I. Ed. 171. History and Principles of Vocational Education (3) 

June 20-JuIy 29. Daily, 9:30; P-306. (Crosby.) 

I. Ed. 175. Recent Technological Developments in Products and 
Processes. (3) 

June 20-July 29. Daily, 9:30; P-305. (Crosby.) 

I. Ed. 207. Philosophy of Industrial Arts Education (3) 

M.T.Th.F., 8:00; P-221. (Harrison.) 

I. Ed. 214. Shop Planning and Equipment Selection. (3) 

June 20-July 29. Daily, 11:00; P-221. (Tiemey.) 

LIBRARY SCIENCE EDUCATION 

L. S. Ed. 120. Introduction to Librarianship. (3) 



June 20-July 15— Sec. 1—8:00-10:40; M.T.Th.F.; L-303. 
Sec. 2—12:20-3 M.T.Th.F.; L-303. 



(Staff.) 
(Staff.) 



L. S. Ed. 128. School Library Administration and Service. (3) 

July 18-Aug. 12— Sec. 1—8-10-10:40; M.T.Th.F.; L-303. (Staff.) 

Sec. 2—12:20-3; M.T.Th.F?; L-303. (E. Anderson.) 

L. S. Ed. 132. Library Materials for Youth. (3) 

June 20-July 15—12:20-3; M.T.Th.F.; L-452. (E. Anderson.) 

Ed. 189-8. Workshop in Instructional Materials. (3) 

July 18-Aug. 5—8:00-10:40; Daily; L-301. (Staff.) 

See Listing on page 18 



SPECIAL EDUCATION 

Sp. Ed. 170. Introduction to Special Education. (3) 

June 20-July 29. Daily, 8:00; LL-4. 

Sp. Ed. 171. Characteristics of Exceptional Children. 

A. Mentally Retarded. 

June 2U-juiy z9— 9:30; LL-13. 

C. Perceptual Learning Problems. 

June 20-July 29. Daily, 9:30; 00-127. 

Prerequisite, Sp. Ed. 170. 

Sp. Ed. 173. Curriculum for Exceptional Children. 

A. Mentally Retarded. 

June 20-July 29— Daily, 11:00; 00-301. 

Prerequisite, Sp. Ed., 171 A. 



Sp 



(3) 



Ed. 175. Education of the Slow Learner. 

June 20-July 29— Daily, 8:00; LL-104. 

Sp. Ed. 200. Exceptional Children and Youth. (3) 

June 20-July 29— Daily, 8:00; LL-104. 



(Staflf.) 
(3) 

(Renz.) 
(Campbell.) 



(3) 



(Hebeler.) 



(Renz.) 



(Huber.) 



65 



Engineering 

Sp. Ed. 215. Evaluation and Measurement of Exceptional Child- 
ren AND Youth. (3) 

June 20-July 29— Daily, 9:30; LL-202. Prerequisites, Ed. 150, Ed. 151, Sp. Ed. 
200. (Staff.) 

Sp. Ed. 220- Educational Diagnosis and Planning of Exceptional 
Children and Youth. (3) 

June 20-July 29— Daily; 11:00; 00-220. Prerequisite, Sp.Ed. 215. (Campbell.) 

Sp. Ed. 235. Problems in the Education of Children with 
Emotional Disturbances. (3) 

June 20-July 29— Daily, 11:00; LL-116. (Huber.) 

ENGINEERING 
CHEMICAL ENGINEERING 
Ch. E. 15. Chemical Engineering Analysis. (2)* 

June 20-July 15. Daily, 9:30; U-112. Introduction to the methods of chemical 
engineering analysis. Prerequisite, consent of the department. (Staff.) 

Ch. E. 50. Engineering Thermodynamics. (2)* 

July 18-Aug. 12. Daily, 9:30; U-112. Fundamental principles of thermody- 
namics and their application to engineering problems. Prerequisite, consent 
of the department. (Staff.) 

Ch. E. 247. Special Problems in Chemical Engineering. (3) 

Arranged. (Staff) 

Ch. E. 314. Special Problems in Nuclear Engineering. (2 or 3) 

Arranged. Laboratory fee, $10.00. 

Ch. E. 399. Research in Chemical Engineering. (1-6) 

Arranged. Credit according to work assigned. Laboratory fee, $8.00. (Staff.) 

Ch. E. 399. Research in Nuclear Engineering. (1-6) 

Arranged. Credit according to work assigned. Laboratory fee, $10.00. 

(Staff.) 

CIVIL ENGINEERING 

ENCE. 90. Engineering Survey Measurements (3) 

June 6-18 Daily, 8:00-5:00; J-154, J-156 Corequisite, Math 20 with consent of 
instructor. Open only to students enrolled in the College of Engineering. 
Standards, units, calibration; measurement of distance, elevation, angles; sys- 
tematic and random error analysis in measurements; fundamentals of mapping; 
instrumentation. (Garber.) 



*These two courses will be taught sequentially during the eight weeks session and 
students must enroll in both courses. Principally for transfer students and those 
with deficiencies to enable them to follow the regular Ch.E. Junior sequence in 
the fall. 

66 



Engineering 



ELECTRICAL ENGINEERING 



ENEE. 80. Algorithmic Analysis and Computer Programming. (2) 

M.W., 12:30; J-326; Lab, two Sections, F. 9:30-12:00, 12:30-3:00; J-326. 
Corequisite, Math. 21. Laboratory fee, $5.00. Required of sophomores in 
Electrical Engineering. Concepts and properties of algorithms (fully defined 
procedures for solving problems); problems from numerical mathematics; 
use of a specific algorithmic language, MAD; completion of several projects 
using a digital computer. (Miller.) 

ENEE. 90. Circuit Analysis I. (4) 

Daily, 8:00; J-104. See ENEE 91 for related laboratory course. Corequisites, 
Math. 22, Phys. 21, ENEE 91. Required of sophomores in Electrical Engi- 
neering. Introduction to circuit theory; Ohm's law; Kirchhoff's laws; basic 
circuit analysis techniques; energy storage; power; elementary transients by 
classical and transform methods; sinusoidal analysis; introduction to complex 
frequency. ENEE 120 continues where ENEE 90 ends. (Rumbaugh.) 

ENEE 91. Circuits Laboratory I. (1) 

Two Sections, arranged; S-5. First Meeting of all students Wed., June 22, 
9:20 A.M., Rm. S-5. Laboratory fee, $5.00. Coresquisite, ENEE 90. Required 
of sophomores in Electrical Engineering. Laboratory to be taken in association 
with ENEE 90. Electrical components and basic test equipment, principles of 
measurement and data handling; circuit behavior with variation in component 
values. 

ENEE. 122. Electronic Circuits I. (4) 

Daily, 8:00; J- 10. See ENEE 123 for related laboratory course. Prerequisite, 
ENEE 120. Corequisites, ENEE 121, ENEE 123, and ENEE 130. Required 
of juniors in Electrical Engineering. Transistors and electron tubes in dc, 
pulse, and small-signal situations; analysis of basic amplifiers; biasing; basic 
electronic switches; tuned and wide-band amplifiers, feedback. ENEE 124 
continues where ENEE 122 ends. (Glock.) 

ENEE. 123. Electronics Laboratory L (1) 

Two sections. Arranged; S-5. First meeting of all students. Wed., June 22, 
9:20 A.M. S-8. Laboratory fee, $5.00. Corequisite, ENEE 122. Re- 
quired of juniors in Electrical Engineering. Laboratory to be taken in asso- 
ciation with ENEE 122. Transistor and vacuum-tube characteristics; basic 
electronic switches; amplifiers; design practice. To the extent possible, work 
will be individual or in two-man squads. 

ENEE. 140. Transducers and Electrical Machinery. (3) 

M.T.Th.F., 11:00; J-10. See ENEE 141 for related laboratory course. Pre- 
requisites, ENEE 120, ENEE 132. Corequisite, ENEE 141. Required of seniors 
in Electrical Engineering. Electromechanical transducers; theory of electro- 
mechanical systems; power and wide-band transformers, ritatisg electrical 
machinery from the theoretical and performance points of view. (Guha.) 

ENEE. 141. Transducers and Electrical Machinery Laboratory. 
(1) 

Two sections, arranged; S-2. First meeting for all students Wed., June 22, 
12:30 P. M., S-2. Laboratory fee, $5.00. Corequisite, ENEE 140. Required 

67 



Engineering 

of seniors in Electrical Engineering. Laboratory to be taken in association with 
ENEE. 140. Experiments on transformers; synchronous machines; induction 
motors; synchros; loudspeakers; other transducers. (Guha.) 

ENEE. 180. Topics in Electrical Engineering (3) 

M.T.Th.F., 9:30; J- 10. Prerequisite, Senior standing. Study of selected topics 
from the literature of modern Electrical Engineering. (Ferris.) 

ENGINEERING SCIENCES 

E. S. 1. Introductory Engineering Science (4) 

Daily, 11:00, Two 2 hour labs, to be arranged. 

E. S. 10. Mechanics. (4) 

Section 1— Daily 8.00, J-352. Section 2— Daily, 11:00; J-304. Prerequisites, 
E. S. 1; Math. 19 (or concurrent). Numerical, graphical and vectorial com- 
putation applied to elementary problems in mechanics. (Elkins.) 

E. S. 20. Mechanics of Materials. (3) 

M.T.Th.F., 11:00; J-140. Prerequisite, Math. 20, Phys. 20 and E. S. 10. 
Distortion of engineering materials with application to beams, columns, shafts, 
tanks, trusses, and connections. (Schelling.) 

E. S. 21. Dynamics. (3) 

M.T.Th.F., 12:30; J-371. Prerequisites, E. S. 10, Math. 20, and Phys. 20 
(or concurrent registration). Dynamics of particles and rigid bodies with applica- 
tions to engineering problems. (Glass.) 

MECHANICAL ENGINEERING 

M. E. 1. Thermodynamics I. (3) 

M.T.W.Th.F., 8:00; J-201. Prerequisites, Phys. 20; Math. 21 concurrently. 

SCHOOL OF LIBRARY AND INFORMATION SERVICES 

L. 204. Communication and Libraries (3) 

Daily, 10:00; L-100. Communication processes are treated and the library's 
role as part of the larger social content is explored. (Bergen.) 

L. 206. Organization of Knowledge in Libraries L (3) 

M.T.Th.F., 11:00-12:20; L-100. Introduction to basic principles of subject cata- 
loging, alphabetical and systematic. (Perreault.) 

L. 209. History of Libraries and their Materials. (3) 

M.T.Th.F., 12:30-1:50; L-100. The development of pubJication forms and 
institutions set against the historical framework and the cultural forces within 
which such advances were made. (Colson.) 

L. 215. Literature and Research in the Social Sciences. (3) 

Daily, 9:00; L-453. Bibliographic organization, information structure and trends 
in the direction of research in the principal fields of the social sciences. 

(Land.) 

68 



Library 

L. 222. Children's Literature and Materials. (3) 

Daily, 9:00; L-100. A survey of literature and other media of communication 
and the criteria in evaluating such materials as they relate to the needs, in- 
terests and capability of the child. (Gross.) 

L. 228. Analytical Bibliography and Descriptive Cataloging. (3) 

M.T.Th.F., 2:00-3:20; L-453. Concentrates on the techniques and theories appro- 
priate to the study of bibliographic morphology and bibliographical descrip- 
tion. (Perreault.) 

L. 23 L Research Methods in Library and Information Activity. 
(3) 

M.T.Th.F., 11:00-12:20; L-453. The techniques and strategies of research and 
implications for the definition, investigation and evaluation of library prob- 
lems. (Bundy.) 

L. 244. Medical Literature. (3) 

Daily, 8:00; arranged. Survey and evaluation of information sources in medi- 
cine, with emphasis upon the bibliographical organization of the field. 

(Brandon.) 

L. 245. Legal Literature. (3) 

Daily, 8:00; arranged. Survey and evaluation of information sources in 
law, with emphasis upon the bibliographic organization of the field. 

(Bougas.) 

L. 249. Seminar in Technical Services. (3) 

Daily, 8:00; L-452-M. Treatment of special administrative problems related 
to acquisition, cataloging and classification, circulation, and managerial controls. 

(Applebaum.) 

L. 25 L Introduction to Reprography. (3) 

Daily, 9:00; L-452-M. A survey of the processes and technology through which 
materials are made available in furthering library and information services, 
ranging from photography to microforms. (Diaz.) 

L. 255. Seminar on Manuscript Collections. (3) 

Daily, 8:00; L-453. Analysis of the methods and philosophy of handling special 
papers and documentary material in a research library. (Land.) 

L. 261. Seminar in the Special Library and Information Center. 
(3) 

M.T.Th.F., 12:30-1:50; L-453. A seminar on the development, the uses, the 
objectives, the philosophy and the particular systems employed in special library 
service. (Condon.) 

L. 265. Information Systems Design. (3) 

Daily, 4:00; L-453. A workshop oriented seminar designed to cover problems of 
implementation and management of various types of conventional and advanced 
information handling systems. (Doudnikoff.) 

L. 290. Independent Study. (1-3) 

Arranged. Credit according to work assigned. Prereqiusite, consent of instructor. 
Designed to permit intensive individual study, reading or research in an area 
of specialized interest under faculty supervision. (Staff.) 

69 



Home Economics 

HOME ECONOMICS 
FAMILY LIFE AND MANAGEMENT 
F. L. 130, Home Management and Family Life. (3) 

June 27-JuIy 15. 9:00-11:30; H-5. Study of factors influencing establishment and 
maintenance of satisfying interpersonal relations throughout the family life 
cycle as affected by management in the home. (Reiber.) 

H. M. 161. Resident Experience in Home Management. (3) 

First group June 20-July 15; second group July 18-August 12. Laboratory fee, 
$10.00. A charge of $40.00 is assessed each student for food and supplies. 
Students not living in dormitories are billed at the rate of $5.00 a week for a 
room in the Home Management House. (Staff.) 

FOOD, NUTRITION, AND INSTITUTION ADMINISTRATION 
F. & N. 5. Food and Nutrition of Individuals and Families. (3) 

July 18-August 12. 9:00-12:00; H-223. Consent of instructor. Laboratory fee, 
$3.00. A study of the food and nutrition of contemporary peoples. The economic, 
social, esthetic, and nutritional implications of food. (Staff.) 

Food 150. Food Economics and Meal Management. (3) 

June 20-JuIy 16. 9:00-12:00; H-203. Consent of department. Lecture and labora- 
tory. Laboratory fee, $10.00. Management of family meals through study of the 
distribution and marketing of food, and the management of time, energy, money, 
and other resources. (Staff.) 

H. E. SI 90. Special Topics: Consumer Decisions. (3) 

July 11-July 29. Arranged. Consumer problems; consumer policies, and con- 
sumer practices. (Staff.) 

Food 399. Thesis Research. (1-6) 
Nutrition 399. Thesis Research. (1-6) 



(Staff.) 
(Staff.) 



GENERAL HOME ECONOMICS 

H. E. 190-290a. Special Problems in Applied Design. (1-3) 

Arranged. (Shearer.) 

H. E. 190-290b. Special Problems in Clothing. (1-3) 

Arranged. (Mitchell.) 

H. E. 190-290C. Special Problems in General Home Economics. 
(1-3) 

Arranged. (Wilson.) 

H. E. 190-290g. Special Problems in Food and Institutional Food. 
(1-3) 

Arranged. (Staff.) 

70 



Home Economics 
H. E. 201. Methods of Research in Home Economics. (3) 

July 4-July 22. 9:00-12:00; H-9. Application of scientific methods to problems 
in the field of home economics. (Staff.) 

H. E. 202. Integrative Aspects of Home Economics. (2) 

June 20-July 1. 9:00-12:00; H-135. Scope and focus of total professional field 
with emphasis on purpose and functions as related to family and other group 
living. (Staff.) 

H. E. 290d. Special Problems in Family Life. (2) 

July 25-August 5. 9:00-12:00; H-5. (Reiber.) 

H. E. S290. Special Topics: Consumer Decisions. (3) 

July 11-July 29. Arranged. Consumer problems; consumer policies, and con- 
sumer practices. (Staff.) 

HOUSING AND APPLIED DESIGN 

A. D. 1. Design. (3) 

June 20-July 29, Daily, 8:00; H-101. Fee, $3.00. Art expression through various 
media. (Roper.) 

H. A. D. 110. Exterior-Interiop. Housing Design. (3) 

July 25-August 12. 9:00-12:00. Prerequisite, H.A.D. 41 or equivalent. Labora- 
tory fee, $6.00. An analysis of the works of contemporary zirchitects and an 
overview of the field of architecture, relating the elements and principles to 
interiors. (Shearer.) 

Crafts 2, 102. Simple Crafts; Creative Crafts. (2, 2) 

June 20-July 15. 9:30-12:30; H-102. Consent of department. Laboratory fee, 
$3.00 each course. Interests and needs of persons enrolled will determine the 
crafts to be pursued. (Roper.) 

TEXTILES AND CLOTHING 

Clo. 120. Draping. (3) 

June 20-July 15. 9:00-12:00; H-215. Prerequisite Clo. 10 or equivalent. Lab- 
oratory fee, $3.00. Demonstrations and practice in creating costumes in fabrics 
and on individual dress forms; modeling of garments for class criticism. (Staff.) 

T. & C. 110. Field Experience in Textiles and Clothing. (3) 

June 20-July 15; H-132. Hours arranged. Consent of department. Supervised and 
coordinated training-work program in cooperation with agencies and organi- 
zations. (Mitchell.) 

T. & C. 126. Fundamentals of Fashion. (3) 

July 18-August 5. H-132. Prerequisite, Clo. 120 or equivalent. Laboratory fee, 
$3.00. Fashion history; current fashions — how to interpret and evaluate them. 
Fashion show techniques; fashion promotion. (Wilbur.) 

71 



Physical Education 

Tex. 200. Special Studies in Textiles. (2-3) 

July 5-July 22. Arranged. H-123. Advanced inquiry into uses, care, types and 
performance of textiles; compilation of data through testing, surveys, and field 
trips; writing of technical reports. Laboratory fee, $3.00. (Lyle.) 

T. & C. 399. Thesis Research. (1-6) 

Arranged. Credit according to work assigned. (Staff.) 

PHYSICAL EDUCATION, RECREATION AND HEALTH 

P. E. SIO. Physical Education Activities. (1-4) 

June 20-July 29. Not available for credit by physical education majors. Non- 
majors in physical education may use this credit to fulfill graduation require- 
ments in physical education. Fee, $6.00. 
Section 1— Tennis (1) Daily, 12:30. Cole Courts. 
Section 2 — Swimming (1) Daily, 11:00. Cole Pool. (Husman.) 

P. E. 100. Kinesiology. (4) 

June 20 — July 29. Daily, 9:30, arranged; GG-304. The study of human move- 
ment and the physical, mechanical and physiological principles upon which 
it depends. (Kelley.) 

P. E. 120. Physical Education for the Elementary School. (3) 
June 20-July 29. 9:30; GG-310. Principles and practices will be presented 
and discussed along with appropriate activities for the various grade levels. 

(Humphrey.) 

P. E. 160. Theory of Exercise. (3) 

June 20-July 29. Daily, 8:00; GG-205. A study of exercise and its physiological 
and kinesiological bases. (Clarke.) 

P. E. 180. Measurement IN Physical Education AND Health. (3) 
June 21-July 29. Daily, 8:00; GG-202. The application of the principles 
of techniques of educational measurement to teaching health and physical 
education. ( Kelley. ) 

p. E. 189. Field Laboratory Projects and Workshop. (1-6) 

This course can be used for individual research projects under the guidance 
of an advisor. Arranged. Credit according to work accomplished. (Staff.) 

P. E. S189. Field Laboratory Projects and Workshop — 
"Modern Physical Education Program." (3-6) 

June 20-July 29. Daily 8:30-12:00; GG160. A "content" workshop concerned 
with physical education curriculum dynamics. Ste page 18. (Hanson.) 

P. E. 200. Seminar in Physical Education, Recreation and Health. 

(1) 

Arranged. GG-205. (Fraley.) 

P. E. 204. Physical Education and the Development of the Child. 

(3) 

June 20-July 29. Daily, 11:00; GG-128. An analysis of the place of physical 
education in meeting the growth and developmental needs of children of ele- 
mentary school age. (Humphrey.) 

72 



Physical Education 
P. E. 210. Methods and Techniques of Research. (3) 

June 20-July 29. Daily, 11:00; GG-128. Study of methods and techniques 
of research as applied to the special areas of physical education, recreation 
and health. (Clarke.) 

P. E. 230. Source Material Survey. (3) 

June 20-July 29. Daily, 9:30; GG-202. A library survey course covering the 
total areas of Physical Education, Recreation and Health plus research in one 
specific problem of which a digest, including a bibliography is to be submitted. 

(Eyler.) 

P. E. 250. Mental and Emotional Aspects of Sports and Recre- 
ation. (3) 

June 20-July 29, Daily, 11:00; GG-128. An exploration of psychological aspects 
of physical education, sports and recreation, including personality dynamics in 
relation to exercise and sports, psychological factors in athletic performance and 
coaching, and application of principles of motor learning. (Husman.) 

P. E. 288. Special Problems in Physical Education, Recreation, 
and Health. (1-6) 

Arranged. Credit according to work assigned. (Staff.) 

P. E. 399. Research— Thesis. (1-5) 

Arranged. Credits according to work assigned. (Staff.) 

HEALTH EDUCATION 

Hea. 5. Science and Theory of Health. (2) 

June 20-July 29. M.T.Th.F., 8:00; W-131. A study of the Science and theory of 
health and its importance to the health status of the individual. (Jones.) 

Hea. 40. Personal and Community Health. (3) 

June 20-July 29. Daily 9:30; W-131. Meaning and significance of physical, 
mental, and social health as related to the individual and to society. (Jones.) 

Hea. 165, Organization, Administration and Supervision of School 
Safety Education. (3) 

June 20-July 29. Daily, 8:00-9:20, GG201. Prerequisite, Hea. 70. Designed 
for teachers, school administrators, college instructors and others responsible 
for directing or supervising safety programs in the schools. Deals with the 
problems, policies, practices and procedures involved in the organization, ad- 
ministration and the supervision of a comprehensive accident prevention and 
safety education program for the schools. Considers integration factors of 
the school safety programs with the special emphasis on traffic problems. 

(Tompkins.) 

Hea. 175. Problems in Driver and Traffic Safety Education. (3) 

June 20-July 29. Daily, 9:30-10:50, GG201. Prerequisite, Hea. 145. An ad- 
vanced course which gives consideration to the individual problems encoun- 
tered in teaching driver and safety education. The psychology of teaching and 
learning are emphasized; and consideration is given to the implications of 
emotion and attitude factors in driver and traffic education. The course in- 

73 



Physical Education 

eludes an examination of existing courses of study, research and supervisory 
and evaluated practices. (Tompkins.) 

Hea. 189. Workshop — Advancements in Health Science and Edu- 
cation. (3-6) 

June 20-July 29. Daily, 8:30-11:30. Lectures by health scientists, health 
education experts, and discussions by participants on subjects presented by 
specialists. See page 15 (Johnson.) 

Hea. 288. Special Problems in Physical Education, Recreation 
AND Health. (1-6) 

Arranged. Credit according to work assigned. (Staff.) 

Hea. 399. Research — Thesis. (1-5) 

Arranged. Credit according to work assigned. (Staff.) 

RECREATION 

Rec. 189B. Workshop in School Recreation for Exceptional 
Children. (4) 

June 20-July 29. Daily, 12:30-3:30. (See page 19) (Johnson.) 

Rec. 204. Modern Trends in Recreation. (3) 

June 20-July 29. Daily, 9:30; GG-128. A study of emphasis and recent develop- 
ments in the recreational field as a whole and within the various specialized 
areas, making particular reference to the current and new literature. (Harvey.) 



74 



The Faculty 



SUMMER SESSION, 1966 
June 20 - August 12 

Administrative Officers 

CLODUS R. SMITH, Director of the Summer School and Associate Professor 
of Agricultural and Extension Education 

B.S., Oklahoma State University, 1950; M.S., 1955; Ed.D., Cornell University, 

1960. 

THOMAS J. AYLWARD, Assistant Director of the Summer School and Asso- 
ciate Professor of Speech and Dramatic Art 

B.S., University of Wisconsin, 1947; M.S., 1949; Ph.D., 1960. 

Faculty 

ADKINS, ARTHUR, Associatc Professor in Education 

A.B., St. Cloud Teachers College, 1942; M.A., University of Minnesota, 1947; 
Ph.D., 1953. 

ACRE, GENE P., Assistant Professor of Education 

B.A., Macalester College, 1951; B.S., University of Minnesota, 1953; M.A., 1956; 
Ph.D., University of Illinois, 1964. 

ALLEN, REDFIELD wiLMARTON, Professor of Mechanical Engineering 

B.S., University of Maryland, 1943, M.S., 1949, Ph.D., University of Minnesota, 
1959. 

ALTER, JEAN V., Associate Professor of Foreign Languages 

Licence, Universite' de Brunelles, 1948; Docteur de I'Universite', Universite' de 
Paris, 1951; Ph.D., University of Chicago, 1958. 

ANDERSON, CHARLES R., Instructor in Office Management and Techniques 
B.A., University of Maryland, 1957; M.Ed., 1959. 

ANDERSON, EVELYN J., Assistant Professor of Library Science Education 
B.A., Bethany College, Lindsborg, Kansas, 1935; M. A., University of Chicago, 
1957. 

ANDERSON, FRANK G., Associate Professor of Sociology 

A.B., Cornell University, 1941; Ph.D., University of New Mexico, 1951. 

ANDERSON, HENRY, Associate Professor of Statistics 

B.A., University of London, 1939; M.B.A., Columbia University, 1948; Ph.D., 
1959. 

ANDERSON, J. PAUL, Professor of Education 

B.S., University of Minnesota, 1942; M.A., 1947; Ph.D., 1960 

75 



Faculty 

ANDERSON, VERNON E., Professor of Education and Dean of the College of 
Education 

B.S., University of Minnesota, 1930; M.A., 1936; Ph.D., University of Colorado, 

1942. 

APPLEBAUM, EDMOND L., Visiting Lecturer in Library Science 

A.B., Harvard University, 1949; M.S., Columbia University, 1950; M.P.A., Harvard 
University, 1955. 

ASHLOCK, ROBERT B., Assistant Professor of Education, Department of 

Early Childhood-Elementary Education 

B.S., Butler University, 1957; M.S., 1959; Ed.D., Indiana University, 1965. 

ASHMEN, ROY, Associate Professor of Marketing 

B.S., Drexel Institute of Technology, 1935; M.S., Columbia University, 1936; 
Ph.D., Northwestern University, 1950. 

AVERY, WILLIAM T., Professor and Head, Department of Classical 
Languages and Literatures 

B.A., Western Reserve University, 1934; M.A., 1935; Ph.D., 1937; Fellow of the 

American Academy in Rome, 1937-39. 

BAKER, DONALD J., Assistant Professor of Speech and Dramatic Art 
B.S., Ohio State University, 1954; M.A., 1956; Ph.D. 1962. 

BARATZ, JOAN c. Assistant Professor of Speech and Dramatic Art 

B.A., Queens College, 1961; M.S., 1962; Ph.D., University of Kansas, 1964. 

BARi, RUTH, Instructor of Mathematics 

B.A., Brooklyn College, 1939; M.A., Johns Hopkins University, 1943. 

BEAL, GEORGE M., Professor of Agricultural Economics 

B.S., Utah State College, 1934; M.S., University of Wisconsin, 1938; Ph.D., 1942. 

BEALL, OTHO T., JR., Associatc Profcssor of English 

B.A., Williams College, 1930; M.A., University of Minnesota, 1933; Ph.D., Uni- 
versity of Pennsylvania, 1952. 

BEARDON, ALAN, Visiting Assistant Professor 

B.S., University of London, 1961; Ph.D., University of London, 1964. 

BERGEN, DANIEL P., Assistant Professor of Library Science 

A.B., University of Notre Dame, 1957; A.M., University of Chicago, 1961; M.A., 
University of Notre Dame, 1962. 

BERNSTEIN, MELViN, Assistant Professor of Music 

A.B., Southwestern at Memphis, 1947; B.Mus., 1948; M.Mus., University of Michi- 
gan, 1949; M.A., University of North Carolina, 1954; Ph.D., 1964. 

BiRDALL, ESTHER K., Assistant Professor of English 

B.S., Central Michigan College, 1947; M.A., University of Arizona, 1950; Ph.D., 
University of Maryland, 1958. 

76 



Faculty 

BLOUGH, GLENN o., Professor of Education 

B.A., University of Michigan, 1929; M.A., 1932; LL.D., Central Michigan College 
of Education, 1950. 

BODE, CARL, Professor of English 

Ph.B., University of Chicago, 1933; M.A., Northwestern University, 1938; Ph.D., 
1941; Fellow of the Royal Society of Literature of the United Kingdom. 

BOTT, MARGARET, Assistant Professor of Education and Counselor in Coun- 
seling Center 

B.A., St. John's University, 1952; M.S., Hunter College, 1959; Ph.D., Michi- 
gan State University, 1962. 

BOUGAS, STANLEY J., Visiting Lecturer in Library Science 

A.B., New York University, 1950; MSLS., Columbia University, 1952; LL.B., 
Emory University, 1962. 

BOWIE, B. LUCILE, Associate Professor of Education, Institute for Child 

Study 

B.S., University of Maryland, 1942; M.A., Teachers College, Columbia Uni- 
versity, 1946; Ed.D., University of Maryland, 1957. 

BRANDON, ALFRED N., Visiting Lecturer in Library Science 

Th.B., Atlantic Union College, 1945; B.S., Syracuse University, 1948; M.S., Uni- 
versity of Illinois, 1951; M.A., University of Michigan, 1956. 

BROOME, ELEANOR A., Instructor in Education, Institute for Child Study 
B.A., University of Maryland, 1943; M.Ed., 1957 

BROWN, DALE w.. Assistant Professor of Education 
BA., David Liscomb College, 1953; M.A., George Peabody College for 
Teachers, 1955. 

BROWN, LILLIAN w.. Instructor in Early Childhood Education {part-time) 
B.A., Lake Erie College, 1930. 

BROWN, RUSSELL G., Associate Professor of Botany 

B.S., West Virginia University, 1929; M.S., 1930; Ph.D., University of Maryland, 
1934. 

BRYAN, MARIE D., Associate Professor of Education 

B.A., Goucher College, 1923; M.A., University of Maryland, 1945. 

BRYER, JACKSON R., Assistant Professor of English 

B.A., Amherst College, 1959; M.A., Columbia University, 1960; Ph.D., University 
of Wisconsin, 1965. 

BUCKLEY, FRANK TIMOTHY, JR., Instructor in Mechanical Engineering 
B.S. in Aeronautical Engineering, 1959. 

BUNDY, MARY LEE, Associate Professor of Library Science 

B.E., State University of New York in Potsdam; M.A., University of Denver, 1951; 
Ph.D., University of Illinois, 1960. 

77 



Faculty 

BURDETTE, FRANKLIN L., Projessor of Government and Politics, and Direc- 
tor of Bureau of Governmental Research 

A.B., Marshall College, 1934; M.A., University of Nebraska, 1935; M.A., Prince- 
ton University, 1937; Ph.D., 1918; LL.D., Marshall College, 1959. 

BYRD, ELBERT M., JR., Associate Professor of Government and Politics 
B.S., American University, 1953; M.A., 1954; Ph.D., 1959. 

BYRNE, RICHARD H., Professor of Education and Project Director, Inter- 
professional Research Commission on Pupil Personnel Services 

B.A., Franklin and Marshall College, 1938; M.A., Columbia University, 1947; 

Ed.D., 1952. 

CALHOUN, CHARLES E., Professor of Finance 
A.B., University of Washington, 1925; M.B.A., 1930. 

CAMPBELL, DOROTHY, Lecturer in Special Education 

B.A., College of Idaho, 1952; M.A., George Peabody College, Nashville, Tenn., 
1962. 

CAP, JEAN-PIERRE, Instructor of Foreign Languages 

B.A., Temple University, 1957; M.A., 1960 (History); M.A., University of Penn- 
sylvania, 1960 (French). 

CARDOZIER, viRGUS R., Professor and Head of Agricultural and Extension 

Education 

B.S., Louisiana State University, 1947; M.S., 1950; Ph.D., Ohio State Univer- 
sity, 1952. 

CARTER, JOHN F., Instructor of Speech and Dramatic Art 
B.S., Maryland State Teachers College, 1953; M.A., University of Maryland, 1958. 

CARROLL, STEPHEN J., Assistant Professor 

B.S., University of California, Los Angeles, 1957; M.A., University of Minnesota, 
1959; Ph.D., 1964. 

CARRUTHERSj JOHN T., Assistant Professor of Chemistry 

CATE, G. ALLEN, Instructor of English 

B.A., Rutgers University, 1960; M.A., Duke University, 1962. 

CELARIER, J. L., Assistant Professor of Philosophy 

B.A., University of Illinois, 1956; M.A., University of Illinois, 1958; Ph.D., 
University of Pennsylvania, 1960. 

CHAVES, ANTONIO, Associate Professor 

M.A., Northwestern University, 1948; D.Litt., University of Habana, 1941; Ph.D., 
University of Habana, 1946. 

CHEN, CHUNJEN c. Assistant Professor of Foreign Languages 
B.S., Cornell University, 1919; M.S., University of Maryland, 1920. 

78 



Faculty 

CHURCHILL, JOHN w., Assistant Professor of Recreation 

B.S., State University of New York Cortland; 1958; M.S., University of Illinois, 
1959. 

CLARKE, DAVID H., Associate Professor of Physical Education 

B.S., Springfield College, 1952; M.S., 1953; Ph.D. University of Oregon, 1959. 

COLLINS, JAMES F., Assistant Professor in Education 
B.Ed., University State College, New York, 1949; M.S., University State College, 
New York, 1953. 

COLSON, JOHN c. Assistant Professor of Library Science 

B.A., Ohio University, 1950; M.S.L.S., Western Reserve University, 1951. 

CONDON, WILLIAM, Visiting Lecturer in Library Science 

A.B., Union College, 1952; M.S., Western Reserve University, 1954. 

COOLEY, FRANKLIN D., Professor of English 

B.A., The Johns Hopkins University, 1927; M.A., University of Maryland, 1933; 
Ph.D., The John Hopkins University, 1940. 

COSENTINO, GLORIA, Instructor of Music 

B.S., Duquesne University, 1952; Masters in Music Education, Duquesne Uni- 
versity, 1962. 

COX, JAMES L., Assistant Professor of Government and Politics 
B.A., University of Colorado, 1962; M.P.A., 1965; Ph.D., 1965. 

CROSBY, EDMUND D., Assistant Professor of Industrial Education 

B.A., Western Michigan University, 1934; M.A., Colorado A. & M. College, 
1941. 

CROWELL, ALFRED A., Professor and Head of Journalism 

A.B., University of Oklahoma, 1929; M.A., 1934; M.S.J., Northwestern Univer- 
sity, 1940. 

CULBERTSON, JOHN, Assistant Professor 

B.S., University of Wisconsin, 1959; M.B.A., University of Maryland, 1961; D.B.A., 
Harvard University, 1965. 

DANDO, WILLIAM A., Instructor in Geography 

B.S., California State Teachers College, 1959; M.A., University of Minnesota, 
1962. 

DASTON, PAUL G., Professor of Psychology 

A.B., Northeastern University, 1948; M.A., Northeastern, 1950; Ph.D., Michigan 
State University, 1952. 

DAWSON, TOWNES L., Associate Professor of Business Law 

B.B.A., University of Texas, 1943; B.A., U. S. Merchant Marine Academy, 
1946; M.B.A., University of Texas, 1947; Ph.D., 1950; LL.B., 1954. 

79 



Faculty 

DAYTON, CHAUNCEY M., Assistant Professor of Education 
A.B., University of Chicago, 1955; M.A., University of Maryland, 1963; Ph.D., 
1964. 

DEMAITRE, ANN, Assistant Professor of Foreign Languages 

B.A., Columbia University, 1950; M.A., University of California, 1951; M.S., 
Columbia University, 1952; Ph.D., University of Maryland, 1965. 

DENNY, DON, Assistant Professor 

B.A., University of Florida, 1959; M.A., New York University, 1961; Ph.D., 1965. 

DETENBECK, ROBERT L., Associate Professor of Physics 
B.S., University of Rochester, 1954; Ph.D., Princeton, 1963. 

DIAZ, ALBERT J., Visiting Lecturer in Library Science 

B.A., Swarthmore College, 1952; M.S.L.S., University of North Carolina, 1956. 

DIBELLA, EDWARD, Assistant Professor of Sociology 

B.S., Washington University, 1936; M.A., 1938; Ph.D., Catholic University, 1963. 

DILLON, CONLEY H., Professor of Government and Politics 

B.A., Marshall College, 1928; M.A., Duke University, 1933; Ph.D., 1936. 

DOUDNA, MARK E., Assistant Professor of Speech and Dramatic Art 
B.S., Ohio State University, 1948; M.A., 1956; Ph.D., 1962. 

DOUDNIKOFF, BASIL, Visiting Lecturer in Library Science 

B.S., University of Florida, 1959; M.E.A., The George Washington University, 
1964. 

DUDLEY, JAMES, Assistant Professor of Elementary School Administration 
and Supervision 

B.A., University of Illinois, 1951; M.S., 1957; Ed.D., 1964. 

DUFFY, JOHN J., Asisstant Professor of English 

B.S.S., Georgetown University, 1957; M.A., University of Vermont, 1958; Ph.D., 
Syracuse University, 1964. 

DUNHAM, RICHARD L., Association Professor of Music 

B.M., Ohio Wesleyan University, 1947; M.M., University of Michigan, 1949; Ph.D., 
University of Michigan, 1961. 

EDELSON, CHARLES B., Assistant Professor of Accounting 

B.B.A., University of New Mexico, 1949; M.B.A., Indiana University, 1950; 
C.P.A., Maryland, 1951. 

EDGEMON, ALBERT w., Assistant Professor of Early Childhood-Elementary 

Education 

A.B.. University of Florida, 1950; M.A., Columbia University, 1954; Ed.D., Col- 
umbia University, 1964. 

80 



Faculty 

EHRLE, RAYMOND A., Rehabilitation Counselor Training Coordinator and 
Lecturer in Education 

A.B., Syracuse University, 1951; M.A., George Washington University, 1956; 

Ed.D., University of Missouri, 1961. 

ELKINS, RICHARD LONSDALE, Assistant Professor of Mechanical Engineering 
B.S., University of Maryland, 1953; M.A., 1958. 

EYLER, MARVIN H., Professor Physical Education 

B.A., Houghton College, 1942; M.S., University of Illinois, 1948; Ph.D., 
1956. 

FABER, JOHN E., Professor and Head of the Department of Microbiology 
B.S., University of Maryland, 1926; M.S., 1927; Ph.D., 1937. 

FARRELL, RICHARD T., Lecturer in History 

A.B., Wabash College, 1954; M.S., Indiana University, 1958. 

FERRIS, CLIFFORD DURAS, Associate Professor of Electrical Engineering 
B.S., University of Pennsylvania, 1957; M.S., 1958; D.Sc, The George Wash- 
ington University, 1962. 

FiNKELSTEiN, BARBARA J. E., Assistant Professor of Education 

B.A., 1959, Barnard College, M.A., 1960; Ed.D., 1965; Teachers College, Colum- 
bia University. 

FITCH, ROBERT M., Assistant Professor of Education 

B.A., University of Florida, 1958; M.A., University of Florida, 1961; Ph.D., State 
University of Iowa, 1965. 

FOLSOM, KENNETH E., Assistant Professor of History 

A.B., Princeton University, 1943; A.B., University of California, 1955; M.A., 1957; 
Ph.D., 1964. 

FORBES, JAMES, Instructor of Psychology 
B.A., University of Maryland, 1963; M.A., 1965. 

FRANK, ALLAN D., Assistant Professor of Education and Speech 

B.S., University of Wisconsin, 1953; M.A., University of Wisconsin, 1954. 

FREDRICKSON, H. GEORGE, Lecturer in Government and Politics 

B.S.. Bripham Young University, 1959; M.P.A., University of California at Los 
Angeles, 1961. 

FREENY, RALPH D., Instructor of Art 
B.A., University of Maryland, 1960. 

FRIES, ALBERT c, Visiting Professor of Business Education 
B.S.. Illinois. 1931: M.S., 1932; D.Ed., N.Y.U., 1945. 

GARBER, DANIEL LEEDY, JR., Assistant Professor of Civil Engineering 
B.S., University of Maryland, 1952; M.S., 1959; Ph.D., 1964. 

81 



Faculty 

GETTLE, KARL E., Instructor of Industrial Education 

B.S., Millersville State College, Millersville, Pennsylvania, 1959. 

GIBLETT, JOHN, Assistant Professor in Education and Assistant Director, 
Testing and Research, Counseling Center 

B.A., George Washington University, 1947; M.A., University of Minnesota, 1952; 

Ph.D., University of Pennsylvania, 1960. 

GLOCK, RUSSELL, JR., Instructor in Electrical Engineering 
B.S., University of Maryland, 1959. 

GOERING, JACOB D., Associate Professor of Education, Institute for Child 
Study 

B.A., Bethel College, 1941; B.D., Bethany Seminary, 1949; Ph.D., University of 
Maryland, 1959. 

GOLANN, STUART, Assistant Professor of Psychology 

B.A., Queens College, 1957; M.A., University of North Carolina, 1959; Ph.D., Uni- 
versity of North Carolina, 1961. 

GOODWYN, FRANK, Professor of Foreign Languages 

B.A., Texas College of Arts and Industries, 1939; M.A., 1940; Ph.D., University of 
Texas, 1946. 

GORDON, STEWART, Assistant Professor of Music 

B.A., University of Kansas, 1954; M.A., University of Kansas, 1955. 

GRAVELY, WILLIAM H., JR., Associate Professor of English 

B.A., College of William and Mary, 1925; M.A., University of Virginia, 1934; 
Ph.D., 1953. 

GRAY, WILLIAM L., Instructor of Foreign Languages 
A.B., Middlebury College, 1955; A.M., 1956. 

GREENBERG, KENNETH R., Assistant Professor of Education 

B.S., Ohio State University, 1951; M.A., 1952; Ph.D., Western Reserve Uni- 
versity, 1960. 

GRENTZER, ROSE MARIE, ProfesSOr of Music 

B.A., Mus.Ed., Carnegie Institute of Technology, 1935; B.A., Music, 1936; M.A., 
1939. 

GROSS, ELIZABETH H., Visiting Lecturer in Library Science 

B.A., College of Notre Dame, 1935; B.LS., Columbia University, 1936. 

GROTE, MANFRED, H. w.. Lecturer in Government and Politics 
B.S., University of Kansas, 1960; M.A., 1962. 

GUHA, ARUN KANTi, Instructor in Electrical Engineering 

B.S., Presidency College, Calcutta, India, 1953; M.S., University College of Tech- 
nology, Calcutta, India, 1956; M.S., in Electrical Engineering, University of Wis- 
consin, 1959. 

82 



Faculty 

GUTSCHE, GRAHAM D., Visiting Lecturer in Physics 

B.S., University of Colorado, 1950; M.S., University of Minnesota, 1952; Ph.D., 
Catholic University, 1960. 

GUY, KENNETH H., Instructor of Industrial Education 
B.S., State University of New York, Buffalo, 1959; M.S., 1962. 

HANSON, DALE L., Associate Professor of Physical Education 

B.A., St. Olaf College, 1952; M.S., Mankato State College, 1956; Ph.D., 
Michigan State University, 1962. 

HARRISON, GEORGE K., Assistant Professor of Botany 

B.A., Western Maryland College, 1935; M.S., University of Maryland, 1956; Ph.D., 
1958. 

HARRISON, HORACE V., Professor of Government and Politics 

B.A., Trinity University, 1932; M.A., University of Texas, 1941; Ph.D., 1951. 

HARRISON, PAUL E., Professor of Industrial Education 

B.Ed., Northern Illinois State College, 1942; M.A., Colorado State College, 
1947; Ph.D., University of Maryland, 1955. 

HARVEY, ELLEN E., Professor of Recreation 

B.S., New College, Columbia University, 1935; M.A., Teachers College, Columbia 
University, 1941; Ed.D., University of Oregon, 1951. 

HATFIELD, AGNES BERQUiST, Assistant Professor of Education, Institute for 
Child Study 

Ph.D., University of Denver, 1959; M.A., 1954; B.A., 1948. 

HATHORN, GUY B., Associate Professor of Government and Politics 

B.A., University of Mississippi, 1940; M.A., 1942; Ph.D., Duke University, 1950. 

HEBELER, JEAN R., Associate Professor of Education and Coordinator of 
Special Education Program. 

B.S., State University of New York, College for Teachers, 1953; M.S., University of 

Illinois, 1956; Ed.D., Syracuse University, 1960. 

HEIM, NORMAN, Assistant Professor of Music 

B.Mus.Ed., Evansville College, 1951; M.Mus., Eastman School of Music, 1952; 
D.M.A., 1962. 

HENDRICKS, RICHARD, Professor of Speech and Dramatic Art 

B.A., Franklin College, 1937; M.A., Ohio State University, 1939; Ph.D., 1956. 

HENERY-LOGAN, KENNETH R., Associate Professor of Chemistry 
B.S.. McGill University, 1942; Ph.D., McGill University, 1946. 

HENKELMAN, JAMES H., Assistant Professor, Department of Secondary 

Education and Department of Mathematics 

B.S.. Miami University, Oxford, Ohio, 1954; M.Ed., 1955. 

83 



Faculty 

HERDOIZA, EULALIA J., Instructor of Foreign Languages 

B.A., Manuela Canizares, 1954; M.A., University of Maryland, 1960. 

HERING, CHRiSTOPH A., Associate Professor of Foreign Languages 
Ph.D., University of Bonn, 1950. 

HERMAN, WAYNE L., Assistant Professor of Education, Department of Early 
Childhood-Elementary Education 

B.A., Ursinus College, 1955; M.Ed., Temple University, 1960; Ed.D., 1965. 

HERMANSON, ROGER H., Assistant Professor of Accounting 
B.A., Michigan State University, 1954; M.A., 1955; Ph.D., 1963. 

fflOGS, WILLIAM J., Assistant Professor of Psychology 

A.B., University of Nebraska, 1960; M.A., University of Illinois, 1964; Ph.D., Uni- 
versity of Illinois, 1965. 

HILLE, STANLEY J., Assistant Professor 

B.B.A., University of Minnesota, 1959; M.B.A., 1961; Ph.D., 1965. 

HiMES, ROBERT s., Assistant Professor of Accounting 

B.C.S., Benjamin Franklin University, 1939; M.C.S. 1940; B.S., American Uni- 
versity; Ph.D., 1962. 

HiRZEL, ROBERT K,, Assoclate Professor of Sociology 

B.A., Pennsylvania State College, 1944; M.A., 1930; Ph.D., Louisiana State Uni- 
versity, 1954. 

HITCHCOCK, DONALD, Assistant Professor of Foreign Languages 
B.A., University of Maryland, 1962; M.A., Harvard University, 1954. 

HOVET, KENNETH o., Professor of Education 

B.A., St. Olaf College, 1926; Ph.D., University of Minnesota, 1950. 

HOWARD, JOHN D., Instructor of English 

B.A., Washington College, 1956; M.A., University of Maryland, 1962. 

HUBER, FRANZ E., Assistant Professor of Education in Special Education 
B.A., 1951; M.A., 1953; Ph.D. 1964. University of Michigan. 

HUMPHREY, JAMES H., Professor of Physical Education 

A.B., Denison College, 1953; A.M., Western Reserve University, 1946; Ed.D., 
Boston University, 1951. 

HUSMAN, BURRis F., Associttte Professor of Physical Education 

B.S., University of Illinois, 1941; M.S., 1948; Ph.D., University of Maryland, 1954. 

HYMES, JAMES L., JR., Professor of Education 

B.A., Harvard College, 1934; M.A., Teachers College, Columbia University, 1936; 
Ed.D., 1947. 

JACOBS, WALTER D., Associate Professor of Government and Politics 

B.A., Columbia University, 1955; M.A. and Certificate of Russian Institute, 1956; 
Ph.D., 1961. 

84 



Faculty 

JAMES, M. LUCIA, Associate Professor of Education 

B.S., North Carolina College, 1945; M.S., 1949; University of Illinois, Ph.D., 
Ph.D., 1963; University of Connecticut. 

JANES, ROBERT w., Professor of Sociology 

B.A., University of Chicago, 1938; M.A., 1939; Ph.D., University of Illinois, 1942. 

JOHNSON, JANET w.. Assistant Professor of Psychology 

B.A., University of Cincinnati, 1952; M.A., Ohio State University, 1957; Ph.D., 
Ohio State University, 1959. 

JOHNSON, RONALD c. Instructor of Physical Education 
B.S., Baylor University, 1957; M.S., 1958. 

JOHNSON, ROY H., Associate Professor of Music 

B.Mus., Eastman School of Music, 1949; M.Mus., Eastman School of Music, 1951; 
D.M.A., Eastman School of Music, 1960. 

JOHNSON, WARREN R., Professor of Health Education 

A.B., University of Denver, 1942; M.A., 1947; Ed.D., Boston University, 1950. 

JONES, ARTHUR R., JR., Assistant Professor of Sociology 

B.A., Baylor University, 1959; Ph.D., Louisiana State University, 1964. 

JONES, HERBERT L., Assistant Professor of Health Education 

B.S., Wisconsin State College, 1954; M.S., University of Wisconsin, 1957; H.S.D., 
Indiana University, 1964. 

KANSTOROOM, EMILY s.. Instructor of Speech and Dramatic Art 
B.A., University of Maryland, 1960; M.A., 1962. 

KAUFMAN, THOMAS P., Instructor of Zoology 

B.S., University of Akron, 1961; M.S., University of Maryland, 1965. 

KELLEY, DAVID L., Assistant Professor of Physical Education 
B.S., San Diego State College, 1957; M.S., University of Southern California, 
1958; Ph.D , 1962. 

KENNER, FRANCES CHOATE, Adjunct Lecturer in Library Science 
A.B.. Washington Nniversity, 1939; MSLS., Columbia University, 1952. 

KELSEY, ROGER R., Associate Professor in Education 

B.A., St. Olaf College, 1934; M.A., University of Minnesota, 1940; Ed.D., George 
Peabody College for Teachers, 1954. 

KEMNER, MARGARETHE M., Instructor of Foreign Languages 

Abitur, Annette-v.-Droste Hulshoff Munster, 1944; M.A., University of Detroit, 
1954; M.A., University of Oklahoma, 1962. 

KiNERNEY. EUGENE, Instructor 
M.A., University of Missouri, 1961; B.S., University of Kansas, 1959. 

KiRKLEY, DONALD H., JR., Instructor of Speech and Dramatic Art 
B.A„ University of Maryland, 1960; M.A., 1962. 

85 



Faculty 

KLEVAN, ALBERT, Assistant Professor of Education 

B.S., Temple University, 1948; M.Ed., 1950; Ed.D., New York University, 1957. 

KOBRE, SIDNEY, Visiting Professor in Journalism 

A.B., Johns Hopkins University, 1927; M.A., Columbia University, 1932; Ph.D., 
1944. 

KOURY, ENVER M-, Assistant Professor of Government and Politics 
B.A., George Washington University, 1953; Ph.D., American University, 1958. 

KRESS, JERRY R., Lecturer in Philosophy 

B.A., Pacific Lutheran University, 1961; M.A., University of Michigan, 1962. 

KURTZ, JOHN J., Professor of Education, Institute for Child Study 

B.A., University of Wisconsin, 1935; M.A., Northwestern University, 1940; Ph.D., 
University of Chicago, 1947. 

KYLE, DAVID G., Assistant Professor of Education, Institute for Child Study 
B.A., University of Denver, 1952; M.A., 1953; Ed.D., University of Maryland, 
1961. 

LAND, ROBERT H., Visiting Lecturer in Library Science 

A.B., William and Mary College, 1934; M.A., University of Virginia, 1936; B.S., 
Columbia University, 1940. 

LARSON, GERALD L., Assistant Professor of Education, Institute for Child 
Study 

B.S., 1956; M.S., 1957; Indiana University; Ph.D., 1963; University of Illinois. 

LAWRENCE, RICHARD, Assistant Professor of Education, Vocational Re- 
habilitation Counselor Education. 

B.S., 1955, M.A., 1957 and Ph.D., Michigan State University. 

LEJINS, PETER P., Professor of Sociology 

Magister Philosophiae, University of Latvia, 1910; Magister luris, 1933; Ph.D., 
University of Chicago, 1938. 

LEMBACH, JOHN, Professor of Art 

B.A., University of Chicago, 1934; M.A., Northwestern University, 1937; Ed.D., 
Columbia University, 1946. 

LIDDLE, GORDON P., Lecturer in Education, Associate Director, Interpro- 
fessional Research Commission on Pupil Personnel Services 
A.B., Oberlin College, 1947; Ph.D., University of Chicago, 1959. 

LiNDAMOOD, GEORGE E,, Instructor in Computer Science 

B.S., Wittenberg University, 1960; M.A., University of Maryland, 1964. 

LINDSAY, RAO HUMPHREYS, Assistant Professor of Education 
Ph.D., University of Michigan, 1964; M.A., 1958; B.A., 1954. 

LINKOW, IRVING, Associate Professor of Speech and Dramatic Art 
B.A., University of Denver, 1937; M.A., 1938. 

86 



Faculty 

LOCKARD, J. DAVID, Associate Professor of Botany and Education 
B.S., Pennsylvania State College, 1951; M.Ed., Pennsylvania State University, 
1955; Ph.D., 1962. 

LOGAN, TERENCE P., Assistant Professor of English 

B.A., Boston College, 1959; M.A., University of Wisconsin, 1961. 

LUETKEMEYER, JOSEPH, Assistant Professor of Industrial Education 
B.S., Stout State College, 1953; M.S., 1954; Ed.D., University of Illinois, 1961. 

LUTWACK, LEONARD I., Associate Professor of English 

B.A., Wesleyan University, 1939; M.A., 1940; Ph.D., Ohio State University, 1950. 

LYNCH, JAMES, Associate Professor of Art 

A.B., Harvard University, 1941; A.M., Harvard University, 1947; Ph.D., Harvard 
University, 1960. 

MALEY, DONALD, Professor and Head, Industrial Education 

B.S., State Teachers College, California, Pennsylvania, 1943; M.A., University of 
Maryland, 1947; Ph.D., 1950. 

MARX, GEORGE L., Associate Professor of Education 

B.A., Yankton College, South Dakota, 1953; M.A., State University of Iowa, 1958; 
Ph.D,. 1959. 

MATTESON, RICHARD L., Assistant Professor of Education, Institute for 
Child Study 

B.A., Knox College, 1952; M.A., University of Maryland, 1956; Ed.D., 1962. 

MC CAIN, RAYMOND R., Instructor of Speech and Dramatic Art 
B.A., Louisiana State University, 1961; M.A., 1962. 

MC CORKLE, DONALD M., Professor of Music 

B.Mus., Bradley College, 1961; M.A., Indiana University, 1953; Ph.D., Indiana 
University, 1958. 

MEERSMAN, ROGER L., Assistant Professor of Speech and Dramatic Art 
B.A., St. Ambrose College, 1952; M.A., University of Illinois, 1959; Ph.D., 1962. 

MERRILL, GEORGE R., Assistant Professor of Industrial Education 
B.S., University of Maryland, 1954; M.E., 1955; Ed.D., 1964. 

MERSHON, MADELAINE J., Professor of Education, Institute for Child Study 
B.S., Drake University, 1940; M.A., University of Chicago, 1943; Ph.D., 1950. 

MERTENS, ROBERT P., Assistant Professor in Industrial Education 
B.S., State University Buffalo, New York, 1958; M.S., 1963. 

MESSERSMITH, DONALD H., Associate Professor of Entomology 

B.Ed., University of Toledo, 1951; M.S., University of Michigan, 1953; Ph.D., 
Virginia Polytechnic Institute, 1962. 

MEYER, CHARLTON, Assistant Professor of Music 
B.Mus., Curtis Institute of Music, 1952. 

87 



Faculty 

MiKA, PAUL, Assistant Professor of Geography 

B.A., University of Pittsburgh, 1954; George Washington University,, M.A., 1958; 
Clark University, Ph.D., 1965. 

MILLER, EDWARD F., Intructor in Electrical Engineering 

B.S., in Electrical Engineering, Iowa State University, 1962; M.S., in Applied Math- 
ematics, University of Colorado, 1964. 

MILLER, ROBERT L., Assistant Professor of Foreign Languages 

B.A., Wayne University, 1952; M.A., University of Michigan, 1954; Ph.D., 1963. 

MILLHOLLAN, FRANK E., Assistant Professor of Education, Institute for 
Child Study 

B.A., 1949; Colorado College, M.P.S., 1951, University of Colorado, Ph.D., 1965, 

University of Nebraska. 

MISH, CHARLES c, Associate Professor of English 

B.A., University of Pennsylvania, 1936; M.A., 1946; Ph.D., 1951. 

MITCHELL, T. FAYE, Professor and Head, Department of Textiles and 

Clothing 

B.S., State Teachers College, Springfield, Missouri, 1930; M.A., Columbia Uni- 
versity, 1939. 

MONCAYO, ABELARDO, Instructor of Foreign Languages 

B.A., Colegio Americano de Quito, 1954; Licenciado, Central University of 
Ecuador, 1961. 

MONTGOMERY, WILLIAM, Instructor in Music 

B.Mus.Ed., Cornell College, 1953; M.Mus., Catholic University, 1957. 

MORGAN, H. GERTHON, Professor of Education and Director, Institute for 
Child Study 

B.A., Furman University, 1940; M.A., University of Chicago, 1943; Ph.D., 1946. 

MOZDZEN, BiRGiT, Instructor of Zoology 

B.S., University of Illinois, 1961; M.S., University of Maryland, 1964. 

MURPHY, CHARLES D., Profcssor and Head of English 

B.A., University of Wisconsin, 1924; M.A., Harvard University, 1930; Ph.D., 
Cornell University, 1940. 

MYERS, ROBERT MANSON, Associate Professor of English 

B.A., Vanderbilt University, 1941; M.A., Columbia University, 1942; M.A., Har- 
vard University, 1943; Ph.D., Columbia University, 1948. 

NEVILLE, RICHARD P., Associate Professor of Education and Assistant to 

the Dean 

B.S., Central Connecticut, 1953; M.A., Columbia University, 1957; Ph.D., Uni- 
versity of Connecticut, 1963. 

NEWELL, CLARENCE A., Professor of Educational Administration 

B.A., Hastings College, Nebraska, 1935; M.A., Columbia University, 1939; Ph.D., 
1943. 

88 



Faculty 

NEWSON, D. EARL, Professor of Journalism and Sequence Director 

B.S., Oklahoma State University, 1948; M.S.J., Northwestern University, 1940; 
Ed.D., Oklahoma State University, 1957. 

NOALL, WILLIAM F., Assistant Professor of Journalism 
B.S., Kent State University, 1957; M.S., Ohio University, 1960. 

NOLL, JAMES w.. Assistant Professor of Education 

Ph.D., University of Chicago, 1964; M.S., 1961; B.A., 1954. 

NORDEN, ROGER L., Associate Professor, Natural Resources Institute 

B.S., Northern Michigan University, 1947; M.S., Michigan State University, 1948; 
Ph.D., 1960. 

NORTH, RICHARD T., Graduate Assistant in Mechanical Engineering 

B.S., in Mechanical Engineering, Pratt Institute, 1958; M.S., in Computers, Applied 
Mathematics, Stevens Institute of Technology, 1963. 

NOSSMAN, AUDREY, Assistant Professor of Music 

B.M., Westminster Choir College, 1947; Indiana University, JuUiard. 

o'coNNELL, GEORGE, Assistant Professor of Art 
B.S., University of Wisconsin, 1950; M.S., 1951. 

OLSON, ORRIN o.. Instructor of Music 

B.A., Sacramento State College, 1960; M.Mus., Indiana University, 1961. 

O'NEILL, JANE H., Instructor in Office Techniques 
B.A., University of Maryland, 1932. 

O'NEILL, LEO w., Professor of Education 

B.A., University of Chicago, 1938, M.A., University of Kansas City, 1953; Ed.D., 
University of Colorado, 1955. 

ONYEWU, NICHOLAS D. u., Lecturer in Government and Politics 
B.A., Howard University, 1958; M.A., 1962. 

PARNAS, DAVID L., Assistant Professor of Computer Science 

B.S., Carnegie Institute of Technology, 1961; M.S., 1964; Ph.D., 1965. 

PATRICK, ARTHUR s., Profcssor of Office Management and Business Edu- 
cation 

B.E., Wisconsin State University, Whitewater, Wisconsin, 1931; M.A., University 

of Iowa, 1950; Ph.D., American University, 1956. 

PAYERLE, LAZLO, Instructor of Music 

B.Mus., University of Maryland, 1960; M.Mus., University of Texas, 1962. 

PENNINGTON, KENNETH D., Assistant Professor of Music 
B.A., Friends University, 1949; B.Mus., 1950; M.A., New York University, 1953; 
D.Mus., Indiana University, 1961. 

89 



Faculty 

PERREAULT, JEAN M., Lecturer in Library Science 

B.S., Rockhurst College, 1952; M.A., Marquette University, 1957; M.A., University 
of Wisconsin, 1959. 

PFAU, DONALD w., Assistant Professor of Education, Department of Early 
Childhood-Elementary Education 

B.A., Grove City College, 1958; M.S., Buffalo State Teachers College, 1961; Ed.D., 

State University of New York at Buffalo, 1965. 

PIERSON, DR. ROBERT, Lecturer in Special Education 

B.A., DePauw University; M.A., Duke University, 1948; Ph.D., Duke University, 
1950; M.S., in L.S., Catholic University, 1955. 

PIPER, DON c. Assistant Professor of Government and Politics 

B.A., University of Maryland, 1954; M.A., 1958; Ph.D., Duke University, 1961, 

PITTS, GORDON M., Associate Professor of English 

B.A., McGill University, 1943; M.A., New York University, 1948; Ph.D., Uni- 
versity of Pennsylvania, 1956. 

PLiscHKE, ELMER, Professor and Head of the Department of Government 
and Politics 

Ph.B., Marquette University, 1937; M.A., American University, 1938; Ph.D., 

Clark University, 1943. 

PODELCo, GEORGE V., Lecturer in Government and Politics 
B.A., West Virginia University, 1959; M.A., 1963. 

POTTER, JANE H., Assistant Professor of Zoology 

B.S., University of Chicago, 1942; M.S., 1948; Ph.D., 1949. 

PRESCOTT, DANIEL A., Professor of Education and Director Emeritus, 
Institute for Child Study 

B.S., Tufts College, 1920; M.Ed., Harvard University, 1922; Ed.D., 1923. 

PROVENSEN, HESTER BEALL, Assistant Professor of Speech and Dramatic 
Art 

LL.B., George Washington University, 1926; M.A., Emerson College, 1948. 

PUGLIESE, RUDOLPH E., Associate Professor of Speech and Dramatic Art 
B.A., Miami University, 1947; M.A., Catholic University, 1949; Ph.D., Ohio 
State University, 1961. 

RAMM, GORDON M., Associate Professor of Zoology 

B.A., University of Buffalo, 1949; M.A., 1950; Ph.D., New Yofk University, 1954. 

RAPPLEYE, ROBERT D., Associate Professor of Botany 
B.S., University of Maryland, 1941; M.S., 1947; Ph.D., 1949. 

RATHS, JAMES D., Associate Professor and Director, Bureau of Educational 
Research and Field Services 

B.S., Yale College, 1954; M.A., 1955; Ph.D., New York University, 1960. 

90 



Faculty 

RAY, PHILLIP B., Assistant Professor of Education and Counselor 

B.A.. Antioch Collefie, 1950; M.S., University of Pennsylvania, 1955; Ph.D., 
University of Minnesota, 1962. 

REIBER, STANLEY R., Associate Professor of Family Life and Management 
A.B., Grove City College, 1942; B.D., Yale University Divinity School, 1945; 
M.Sc, Florida State University, 1962; Ph.D., 1965. 

RENZ, PAUL, Assistant Professor of Education in Special Education 
B.S., Syracuse University, 1951; M.S., 1952; Ph.D., University of Illinois, 1962. 

RHOADS, DAVID J., Assistant Professor of Education 

B.S., Temple University, 1954; M.A., 1958; Ed.D., University of Maryland, 1963. 

ROELOFS, CHARLES R., JR., Lecturer in Philosophy 

B.A., Ohio Wesleyan University, 1953; B.D., Yale University Divinity School, 
1956; M.A., Harvard University, 1965. 

ROPER, JAMES B., Assistant Professor of Applied Design 
B.S., East Carolina College, 1961; M.A., 1963. 

RUMBAUGH, JEFFREY HAMILTON, Instructor in Electrical Engineering 
B.S., University of Maryland, 1957. 

RYANS, JOHN K., JR., Assistant Professor of Marketing 

A.B., University of Kentucky, 1954; M.S., University of Tennessee, 1958; D.B.A., 
Indiana University, 1965. 

SALGADO, MARIA A., Instructor of Foreign Languages 

B.A., Florida State University, 1958; M.A., University of North Carolina, 1960. 

SCHACHT, ROBERT c. Instructor in Industrial Education 

B.S. Ed., 1960; University of Florida; M.Ed., University of Florida, 1961. 

SCHAUMANN, HERBERT, Assistant Professor of English 

B.A., Westminster College, 1931; Ph.D., Cornell University, 1935. 

SCHELLING, DAVID R., Instructor in Civil Engineering 

B.S., in Civil Engineering, Lehigh University, 1961; M.S., in Mechanical Engineer- 
ing, Drexel Institute of Technology, 1964. 

SCHICK, RICHARD P., Lecturer in Government and Politics 

B.A., Wayne State University, 1961; M.A., Johns Hopkins University, 1964. 

SCHINDLER, ALVIN w., Professor of Education 

B.A., Iowa State Teachers College, 1927; M.A., University of Iowa, 1929; Ph.D., 
1934. 

SCHLARETZKI, WALTER E., Professor and Head of Philosophy 

B.A., Monmouth College, 1941; M.A., University of Illinois, 1942; Ph.D., Cornell 
University, 1948. 

SCHRAMM, CARL, Instructor in Industrial Education 

B.S., University of Maryland, 1956; M.Ed., University of Maryland, 1965. 

91 



Faculty 

SCHWARTZ, HOWARD, Assistant Professor of Speech and Dramatic Art 
B.S., Emerson College, 1960; M.A., 1961; Ph.D., Purdue University, 1965. 

SCHWEPPE, EARL J., Associate Professor of Computer Science 

B.S., Missouri Valley College, 1948; M.S., University of Illinois, 1951; Ph.D., 1955. 

SHELLEY, SHIRLEY J,, Assistant Professor of Music 

B.Mus., University of Michigan, 1944; M.Mus., University of Michigan, 1947. 

SIMMS, BETTY HOWALD, Assistant Professor of Education in Special 
Education 

B.A., Harris Teachers College, 1947; M.A., University of Michigan, 1955; Ed.D., 

University of Maryland, 1962. 

SLATE, THEODORE, Visiting Lecturer in Library Science 

B.A., Rutgers University, 1957; M.A., University of Michigan, 1960; M.A., Library 
Science, University of Michigan, 1960. 

SMITH, DENZELL, Assistant Professor of English 

B.A., University of Minnesota, 1950; M.A., 1954, 1958; Ph.D., 1965. 

SOERGEL, KENNETH P., Assistant Professor of Landscape Gardening 
B.S., Pennsylvania State University, 1961; M.L.A., Harvard University, 1963. 

SOLES, JAMES R., Lecturer in Government and Politics 
B.S. Florida State University, 1957; M.S., 1961. 

SPENCER, MABEL s., Associate Professor of Home Economics Education 
B.S., West Virginia University, 1925; M.S., 1946; Ed.D., American University, 
1959. 

SPYCHALSKi, JOHN c. Assistant Professor 

B.S., St. Josephs College, 1961; M.B.A., Indiana University, 1962; D.B.A:, 1965: 

STANT, MAGRARET A., Assistant Professor of Education 

B.S., University of Maryland, 1952; Ed.M., 1955; A.P.C., George Washington 
University, 1959. 

ST ARCHER, E. THOMAS, Assistant Professor of Speech and Dramatic Art 
B.A., University of Southern California, 1940; M.S. University of Arkansas, 1948. 

STARK, FRANCIS C-, Profcssor and Head of Horticulture 

b.o., Oklahoma A. and M. College, 1940; M.S., University of Maryland, 1941; 
Ph.D., 1948. 

STRAUSBAUGH, WARREN L., Professor and Head of Speech and Dramatic 
Art 

B.S., Wooster College, 1932; M.A., State University of Iowa, 1935. 

STUNKARD, CLAYTON L., Associate Professor of Education 
B.S., University of Minnesota, 1948; M.S., 1951; Ph.D., 1959. 

92 



Faculty 

STUNTZ, CALVIN F., Associate Professor of Chemistry 
B.A., University of Buffalo, 1939; Ph.D., 1947. 

SUELFLOW, JAMES E., Assistant Professor 

B.B.A., University of Wisconsin, 1960, M.B.A., 1961; Ph.D., 1965: 

SULLIVAN, DOROTHY D., Assistant Professor of Education 
A.B., University of Maryland, 1945; Ed.M., 1960; Ed.D., 1965. 

SWEENEY, CHARLES T., Professor of Accounting 

B.S., Cornell University, 1921; M.B.A., University of Michigan, 1928; C.P.A., 
Iowa, 1934; Ohio, 1936. 

TAFF, CHARLES A., Professor and Head of Department of Business 

Administration 

B.S.C., State University of Iowa, 1937; M.A., 1941; Ph.D., University of Mary- 
land, 1952. 

TiERNEY, WILLIAM F., Associate Professor of Industrial Education 

B.S., Teachers College of Connecticut, 1941; M.A., Ohio State University, 1949; 
Ed.D., University of Maryland, 1952. 

THOMPSON, FRED R., Professor of Education, Institute for Child Study 
B.S., University of Texas, 1928, M.A., 1939; Ed.D., University of Maryland, 1952. 

THOMPKINS, HOWARD E., Professor and Head of Electrical Engineering 
B.A., Swarthmore College, 1942; M.S., University of Pennsylvania, 1947; Ph.D., 
1957. 

TOMPKINS, THERON A., Associate Professor of Physical Education 

B.S., Eastern Michigan College of Education, 1926; M.A., University of Michigan, 
1939. 

TOSI, HENRY L., JR., Assistant Professor 

B.S.C., Ohio State University, 1958; M.B.A., 1962; Ph.D., 1964. 

UPGREN, ARTHUR R., Visiting Lecturer in Physics and Astronomy 

B.A., University of Minnesota, 1955; M.S., University of Michigan, 1958; Ph.D., 
Case Institute of Technology, 1961. 

VAN ROYEN, WILLIAM, ProfesSOr 

M.A., Rijksuniversiteit Utrecht, 1925; Ph.D., Clark University, 1928. 

VAN zwoLL, JAMES A., Professor of School Administration 

B.A., Calvin College, Grand Rapids, Michigan, 1933; M.A., University of Mich- 
igan, 1937; Ph.D., 1942. 

VARNEDOE, SAMUEL L., JR., Lecturer in Philosophy 

B.A., University of North Carolina, 1959; M.A., New School for Social Research, 
1962. 

WAGHELSTEIN, CAROL s.. Instructor of Speech and Dramatic Arts 
B.A., University of Maryland, 1961; M.A., 1964. 

93 



Faculty 

WALDROP, ROBERT s., Professor of Psychology 

B.A., University of Oklahoma, 1934; Ph.D., University of Michigan, 1948. 

WARD, KATHRYN M. PAINTER, Associate Professor of English 

B.A., The George Washington University, 1935; M.A., 1936; Ph.D., 1947. 

WEAVER, CARL H., Associate Professor of Speech and Dramatic Art 
B.A., Bluffton College, 1936; M.A., Ohio State University, 1950; Ph.D., 1957. 

WEAVER, V. PHILLIPS, Assistant Professor of Education 

A.B., William & Mary, 1951; M.Ed., Pennsylvania State University, 1956; Ed.D., 
1962. 

wiGGiN, GLADYS A., Profcssor and Director of Graduate Studies in Edu- 
cation 

B.S., University of Minnesota, 1929; M.A., 1939; Ph.D., University of Maryland, 

1947. 

WILBUR, JUNE c, Assistant Professor of Textiles and Clothing 
B.S., University of Washington, 1936; M.S., Syracuse University, 1940. 

WILLIAMS, DAVID L., Assistant Professor of Education 

B.S., Bradley University, 1952; Ed.M., University of lUinois, 1956; Ed.D., 1965. 
be awarded in 1965. 

WILSON, GAYLE E., Assistant Professor of English 

B.A., Wayne State University, 1960; M.A., University of Rochester, 1963; Ph.D., 
1965. 

WILSON, LEDA A., Associate Professor of Home Economics 

B.S., Lander College, 1943; M.S., University of Tennessee, 1950; Ed.D., 1954. 

WILSON, ROBERT M., Associatc Professor of Education, Department of 
Early Childhood-Elementary Education 

B.S., California State Teachers College, Pennsylvania, 1950; M.S., University of 

Pittsburgh, 1956; Ed.D., 1960. 

WOLFE, G. JOSEPH, Assistant Professor of Speech and Dramatic Art 

B.S., Eastern Illinois University, 1955; M.A. State University of Iowa, 1959; 
Ph.D., 1964. 

ZACHARY, LILLIAN B., Assistant Professor of Education, Department of 

Early Childhood-Elementary Education 

A.B., University of North Carolina at Greensboro, 1943; M.A., Florida State Uni- 
versity, 1955; Ed.D., 1960. 

ZEEVELD, w. GORDON, Profcssor of English 

B.A., University of Rochester, 1924; M.A., The Johns Hopkins University, 1929; 
Ph.D., 1936. 

ZIMRING, BOB, Lecturer in Government and Politics 

A.B., University of Illinois, 1960; M.S., University of Wisconsin, 1963. 

94 



If you wish to apply for admission to the 
University of Maryland Summer School, 1966, 
please complete the following forms. 





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University of Maryland 
College Park, Maryland 20742 





BUSINESS REPLY CARD 

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Admissions Office 
University of Maryland 
College Park, Maryland 20742 



UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND SUMMER SCHOOL 

Application for Room in Residence Halls — 1966 
(PLEASE TYPE OR PRINT) 



Date 
Name 



Address 



Student No Age 



Sex 



Home Phone 



LAST 



FIRST 



MIDDLE 



Number Street Town County State 

Attendance Dates from to 

Number of Weeks Attending: (Circle one) 
12 3 4 5 6 7 8 

Classification 



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Code 



Roommate 

Type Room: D Single D Double 
Prepaid Board: D 6 wks D 8 wks 



FOR OFFICE USE ONLY 

Assignment 

Changes 

Withdrawn Q Date 

Reason 

Key 

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SUMMER 1966 

Please send me an application for undergraduate admission to the 
1966 Summer School. 

Students enrolled on the College Park campus during the Spring Semester 
1966 need not apply for admission to the Summer School, but may 
register on assigned registration day. 



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THE UNIVERSITY is the rear guard and thi 
advance agent of society. It lives in the 
past, the present and the future 
storehouse of knowledge; it draws upon 
this depository to throw light upon the 
present; it prepares people to live and make 
a living in the world of today; and it 
should take the lead in expanding the 
intellectual horizons and the scientific 
frontiers, thus helping mankind to go forward 
— ah ward the promise of a 

better tomorrow. 



hroni 1 

the inaui^ 

President Wilson H. HIkins, 

I 20, 1955, 

V Hark. Maryland.