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Full text of "Summer School Bulletins [Bulletin]"

M^m^'^M'^Mi i'^-' 'SWA.'"? 



LOYOLA UNIVERSITY 




SUMMER BULLETIN 



1974 



Loyola University fully supports and complies with Title VI of the Civil 
Rights Act of 1964 and does not discriminate in any way in any of its poli- 
cies on the basis of race, color, or national origin. 



ENQUIRIES 

The University mailing address is: 
Loyola University 
New Orleans, Louisiana 70118 
Telephone (504) 866-5471 

All Undergraduate Admissions; Bulletins & Information: 

Dr. Bernard Loposer, Director of Admissions - Extension 502 

Housing; Campus Life: 

Mrs. Lynn Neitzschmann, Associate Dean of Students - Extension 552 

Financial Aid; Student Employment: 
Mr. E. P. Seybold, Jr. - Extension 364 

Scholarships: 

Mr. E. P. Seybold - Extension 364 

Honors; Advanced Placement: 

Dr. Walter Maestri, Assistant Dean - Extension 317 

Graduate Studies: 

Dr. John Christman, Director of Graduate Studies - Extension 378 

Requests for Transcripts; Registration; Pre-registration: 
Mr. Earl Retif, Extension 502, Registrar 

Director of Summer Sessions: 
Mr. John F. Sears - Extension 255 



The Bulletin of 
LOYOLA UNIVERSITY 

Summer Session Issue 




Ad Majoref?! Dei G/or/am 



1974 



Containing the programs in Arts and Sciences, 

Business, City College, Law, 

and Music 

New Orleans 



LOYOLA UNIVERSITY BULLETIN 
Vol. LVI 1974 No. 3 

Published Quarterly 
Second-Class Postage paid at Neiv Orleatis, Louisiana 

Loyola University, Incorporated April 15, 1912. Authorized to grant degrees by 
The General Assembly of Louisiana for the year 1912. 

The Legal and Corporate Title of the University is "Loyola University, New 
Orleans". 

All donations, endowments, legacies, bequests, etc., should be made under this 
title. 




Table of Contents 



Map 3 

Academic Calendar 4 

The University 6 

General Information: 

Admissions 9 

Expenses 10 

Student Life: 

Housing 12 

Services 13 

Special Facilities and Programs 16 

University Regulations 18 

Courses of Study: 

Accounting 24 

Biological Sciences 25 

Business Administration Graduate 25 

Chemistry 26 

City College (night courses) 26 

Communications 32 

Drama and Speech 33 

Economics 33 

Education 34 

English 37 

Evening Division (see City College) 

Finance 38 

History 38 

Journalism 40 

Languages 40 

Law 41 

Management 41 

Marketing 41 

Mathematics 42 

Medical Technology 43 

Music 43 

Night courses (see City College) 

Philosophy 46 

Physics 47 

Political Science 48 

Psychology 48 

Sociology 49 

Theology and Religion 49 

Visual Arts 49 

Jesuit Colleges & Universities 51 





1974 




S M T W T F S 


S M T W T F S 


S M T W T F S 


S M T W T F S 


JAN 


APR 


JULY 


OCT 


12 3 4 5 
6 7 8 9 10 11 12 
13 14 15 16 17 18 19 
20 21 22 23 24 25 26 
27 28 29 30 31 


12 3 4 5 6 
7 8 9 10 11 12 13 
14 15 16 17 18 19 20 
21 22 23 24 25 26 27 
28 29 30 


12 3 4 5 6 
7 8 9 10 11 12 13 
14 15 16 17 18 19 20 
21 22 23 24 25 26 27 
28 29 30 31 


12 3 4 5 
6 7 8 9 10 11 12 
13 14 15 16 17 18 19 
20 21 22 23 24 25 26 
27 28 29 30 31 


FEB 


MAY 


AUG 


NOV 


1 2 
3 4 5 6 7 8 9 
10 11 12 13 14 15 16 
17 18 19 20 21 22 23 
24 25 26 27 28 


12 3 4 
5 6 7 8 9 10 11 
12 13 14 15 16 17 18 
19 20 21 22 23 24 25 
26 27 28 29 30 31 


1 2 3 
4 5 6 7 8 9 10 
11 12 13 14 15 16 17 
18 19 20 21 22 23 24 
25 26 27 28 29 30 31 


1 2 
3 4 5 6 7 8 9 
10 11 12 13 14 15 16 
17 18 19 20 21 22 23 
24 25 26 27 28 29 30 


MAR 


JUNE 


SEPT 


DEC 


1 2 
3 4 5 6 7 8 9 
10 11 12 13 14 15 16 
17 18 19 20 21 22 23 
24 25 26 27 28 29 30 
31 


1 

2 3 4 5 6 7 8 
9 10 11 12 13 14 15 
16 17 18 19 20 21 22 
23 24 25 26 27 28 29 
30 


12 3 4 5 6 7 
8 9 10 11 12 13 14 
15 16 17 18 19 20 21 
22 23 24 25 26 27 28 
29 30 


12 3 4 5 6 7 
8 9 10 11 12 13 14 
15 16 17 18 19 20 21 
22 23 24 25 26 27 28 
29 30 31 





1975 




S M T W T F S 


S M T W T F S 


S M T W T F S 


S M T W T F S 


JAN 


APR 


JULY 


OCT 


12 3 4 
5 6 7 8 9 10 U 
12 13 14 15 16 17 18 
19 20 21 22 23 24 25 
26 27 28 29 30 31 


12 3 4 5 
6 7 8 9 10 11 12 
13 14 15 16 17 18 19 
20 21 22 23 24 25 26 
27 28 29 30 


12 3 4 5 
6 7 8 9 10 11 12 
13 14 15 16 17 18 19 
20 21 22 23 24 25 26 
27 28 29 30 31 


12 3 4 
5 6 7 8 9 10 11 
12 13 14 15 16 17 18 
19 20 21 22 23 24 25 
26 27 28 29 30 31 


FEB 


MAY 


AUG 


NOV 


1 

2 3 4 5 6 7 8 

9 10 11 12 13 14 15 
16 17 18 19 20 21 22 
23 24 25 26 27 28 


1 2 3 
4 5 6 7 8 9 10 
11 12 13 14 15 16 17 
18 19 20 21 22 23 24 
25 26 27 28 29 30 31 


1 2 
3 4 5 6 7 8 9 
10 11 12 13 14 15 16 
17 18 19 20 21 22 23 
24 25 26 27 28 29 30 
31 


1 

2 3 4 5 6 7 8 
9 10 11 12 13 14 15 
16 17 18 19 20 21 22 
23 24 25 26 27 28 29 
30 


MAR 


JUNE 


SEPT 


DEC 


1 

2 3 4 5 6 7 8 
9 10 11 12 13 14 15 
16 17 18 19 20 21 22 
23 24 25 26 27 28 29 
30 31 


12 3 4 5 6 7 
8 9 10 11 12 13 14 
15 16 17 18 19 20 21 
22 23 24 25 26 27 28 
29 30 


12 3 4 5 6 
7 8 9 10 11 12 13 
14 15 16 17 18 19 20 
21 22 23 24 25 26 27 
28 29 30 


12 3 4 5 6 
7 8 9 10 11 12 13 
14 15 16 17 18 19 20 
21 22 23 24 25 26 27 
28 29 30 31 




FRERET ST. 



LA SALLE PL. 




LOYOLA AVE. 



® 




^ 



® 



® 



H 



® 

1 


1 









ST. 




^^-lARLEs 



1. 


Holy Name Church 


2. 


Burke Memorial 


3. 


Marquette Hall 


4. 


Horseshoe 


5. 


Thomas Hall 


6. 


Education Building 


7. 


Cummings Hall 


8. 


Music Building 


11. 


Science Complex 


13. 


Administrative Practices 


14. 


Science Complex Parking Lot 


15. 


Library 


16. 


Quadrangle 


17. 


Stallings Hall 


18. 


Blenke Utilities Building 


19. 


Bobet Hall 


20. 


Animal House 


21. 


Drama - Speech 


22. 


Health Sciences 


23. 


Purchasing and Receiving 


25. 


Danna Center 


26. 


Physical Plant Building 


27. 


Maintenance Building 


28. 


Biever Hall 


29. 


Field House 


30. 


Carey Hall 


31. 


Martin Hall 


32. 


Holy Name School 


33. 


Buddig Hall 


34. 


Sociology and Languages 


35. 


Art Building 


36. 


Political Science 


37. 


Law School 


38. 


Infirmary 



AVE, 



The sections of this bulletin are marked by the two seals that have his- 
torically been used by the Society since it began education at its present 
location. The smaller of the two was used in the old Loyola College bulletins 
published from 1904 through 1910. The larger seal was used by the newly 
chartered Loyola University from its inception until 1929. Beginning with 
1930 university bulletins have appeared with basically the seal used on the 
title page of this bulletin. 




Academic Calendar 



S M T W T F S 

1 

2 3 4 5 6 7 8 

9 10 11 12 13 14 15 

16 17 18 19 20 21 22 

23 24 25 26 27 28 29 

30 



Summer Session 1974 



1 2 3 4 5 6 

7 8 9 10 11 12 13 

14 15 16 17 18 19 20 

21 22 23 24 25 26 27 

28 29 30 31 



1 2 3 

4 5 6 7 8 9 10 

11 12 13 14 15 16 17 

18 19 20 21 22 23 24 

25 26 27 28 29 30 31 



June 



3 Registration for All Day Colleges for First 
Session — 9:00 a.m. — 1:00 p.m.- — Danna Center. 

3 Registration for City College — 6:00 p.m. — 
8:00 p.m. — Danna Center. 

4 Late Registration in Registrar's Office for Ail 
Colleges. 

4 Classes begin for All Colleges. 

6 Last Day to Register. 

6 Last Day to Add Courses. 
28 Last Day in 1st Session to Apply to Graduate 

in August, 1973. 
28 Last Day to Drop a Course in 1st Session. 

July 

4 University Holiday. 
9 All Final Exams. 

10 Registration for All Colleges — 9:00 a.m. — 1:00 
p.m. in Danna Center. Night Classes 6:00 p.m. 
— 8:00 p.m. 

11 Classes Begin for All Colleges. 

11 Late Registration Begins in Registrar's Office. 
15 Last Day for Registration and For Adding 
Courses. 

August 

2 Last Day in 2nd Session to Apply to Graduate 
in August, 1973. 

3 Last Day to Drop a Course. 
14 AH Final Examinations. 



Summer Class Periods 



Summer classes with a few noted exceptions, meet for five 90 minute 
periods per week. These periods are: 

I 8:20- 9:50 

II 10:00-11:30 

III 11:40- 1:10 

Those classes meeting at night meet four nights a week for 100 minutes a 
period. The two periods are: 

IV 6:00- 7:50 

V 8:00- 9:50 

Classes in the School of Law, Graduate Business Administration, and some 
science courses, meet on slightly different schedules, and these are noted beside 
the course description. 

A timetable corrected to 15 April 1974, and containing a complete list of 
courses, times, rooms, and teachers, will be distributed during May and will be 
available at registration. 



Summer Examination Schedule 



The following is the examination schedule for Arts and Sciences, Business 
Administration, Music and City College. 

First session day and evening examinations on July 9. 
Second session examinations on August 14. 

8:00-10:00 All 8:20 a.m. classes 
10:30-12:30 All 10:00 a.m. classes 

1:00- 3:00 All 11:40 a.m. classes 

3:30- 5:30 All afternoon classes 

6:00- 8:00 All 6:00 p.m. classes 

8:15-10:20 All 8:00 p.m. classes 





THE UNIVERSITY 

Loyola is a Jesuit University, founded by the Society of Jesus and chartered 
in 1912 with ownership vested in the Loyola community of Jesuit fathers. The 
University offers a wide variety of undergraduate programs, graduate degrees 
in business, education, music and the sciences, and a professional degree in law. 

Loyola is composed of five colleges: Arts and Sciences, Business, City College, 
Law, and Music. In addition the University has programs in graduate and sum- 
mer work, and the Institute of Human Relations operates under its auspices. 
Loyola also owns and operates the WWL radio and television complex in New 
Orleans. There are no branch campuses or affiliated schools, and the University 
does not offer correspondence study. 

All divisions of the University are fully coeducational. Admissions to any 
unit of the University is granted without reference to race, residence, religion, 
or sex. 

The University is located in the uptown residential section of New Orleans, 
on Saint Charles Avenue facing Audubon Park, and covers nineteen acres. On 
this site are modern high rise dormitories, and a student center built within the 
last decade. A new multistory science complex containing classroom and office 
space for many university departments complements the traditional academic 
buildings of the main quadrangle. A new building for the School of Law will be 
opened for use in the fall of 1973. Immediately adjacent to the campus is the 
main campus of the Tulane University of Louisiana, while Saint Mary's Domin- 
ican College is three blocks further down Saint Charles Avenue. 




History 



The founder of New Orleans, Bienville, dreamed of establishing a Jesuit 
college here in the early days of the settlement. It was not until the early nine- 
teenth century that the Society of Jesus began the establishment of colleges in 
the South, and in the 1830's colleges were operated by the Society in Mobile and 
the Saint Charles College was established up the river from New Orleans. 

In 1847 the Jesuits took steps to found a college in New Orleans. This college 
was located on the corner of Baronne and Common streets, and the first students 
reported in February of 1849. The college on Baronne was giving the M.A. 
degree as early as 1868. 



By 1904 another Jesuit college was opened in New Orleans on the site that 
Loyola occupies today. In 1911 all of the college level departments were moved 
to this location, and in 1912 the University was officially chartered by the State 
of Louisiana. It rapidly began to add new schools and colleges: Pharmacy in 
1913, Law and Dentistry in 1914, Music in 1932, and Business Administration 
in 1947. 

In 1909 a spark-gap transmitter was started on campus as a part of the Physics 
department. By 1922 it had matured into WWL radio, and in 1935 it became the 
CBS affiliate in New Orleans. Today it is one of the few fifty thousand watt clear 
channel stations in the country. In 1957 the University branched into television 
with WWL-TV. Both radio and television stations are a part of Loyola Univer- 
sity, and besides providing much needed financial assistance they furnish the 
media by which Loyola serves a larger public. They also provide technical assis- 
tance to the Department of Communications. 




Purpose 



Loyola is committed to the ideal that the Christian gospel presents a world 
view which can be integrated into the thought of any age. The gospel is not 
wedded to any given philosophy, science, art, or politics. The world view rooted 
in the gospel is stable throughout the ages, although its form may vary with the 
times. 

The person is central in a Catholic college. It is the task of a Catholic college 
to equip man to know himself, his world, his potential, and his Creator. To per- 
form this function properly it must strive to be one academic community in quest 
of truth, a community composed of administrators, faculty, and students; both 
laymen and clerics. This community must be composed in a manner fitting to our 
pluralistic society and ecumenical age. It will, therefore, be made up of many 
whose modes of commitment to Christianity and university aims dififer; of those 
religious men and women who have dedicated their lives to the Christian faith 
commitment, of those who live the Christian faith commitment without a special 
calling, of those who live non-Christian faith commitments, and even of some 
who live no faith commitment at all. Religious and non-religious. Christian and 
non-Christian, all will dedicate themselves to the mission of this Catholic 
college — each in his own way. All will cooperate in the search for truth, either 
by exploring the inner dynamism of Christianity and its implications for the 
present, or by provoking this quest in others. All are bound together by a com- 
mon search for knowledge. All are dedicated to the discovery and promulgation 
, of truth. 

P The community in quest of truth has a reverence for creation, not only the 
creations of God and the creations of man, but for life itself as a foundation of 
creativity. Reverence for creation fosters universal concern and dedication. All 
who are concerned for and dedicated to the truth are welcome in the Loyola 



community. Only those who condemn the commitments of others who seek the 
truth will not find a home here. 

The Catholic institution must foster among its students, its faculty, and the 
larger community a critical sense. To think critically, one must have a place to 
stand. Loyola stands on its Catholic commitment. Its commitment is not the end 
of a search, but the beginning of an inquiry into other traditions, other regions, 
other religions. Loyola seeks to hand down a heritage even as it learns and 
teaches methods of thinking which will revivify the heritage and breach new 
frontiers of knowledge. 

Because Loyola is committed to the Christian tradition, it should achieve 
excellence in theological instruction and scholarship. Catholic teaching should 
be present in some structured way, not in order to foster a uniform system of 
thought but to give theology its true place among the disciplines of higher learn- 
ing and to aid the student to form his own world view. 

Loyola is aware of the great need for innovation in undergraduate education 
due to the increased importance of the verbal-visual aspects of our culture, the 
ready availability of information banks, the inability of ordinary courses and 
structures to meet problems of personal growth, and the importance of non- 
cognitive elements in education. Because of her size and private status, Loyola is 
in a unique position to start experimental programs and try new approaches in 
undergraduate and professional education. Loyola should take advantage of this 
situation with the full realization that lack of change often implies more risks 
than change itself. 

Loyola is a university located in New Orleans which looks forward to her 
place in the community of the 1970's. Her impact on the community will be 
in direct proportion to the number of leaders that she produces. Leadership is 
the result of thorough discipline and competent training in theoretical areas. 

Loyola aims at developing and maintaining a distinctive community of 
scholars. The bond of this community is the desire of teachers and students to 
reach academic excellence in their pursuit, not of knowledge alone, but of 
Truth and Christian wisdom. In such a community, faculty are in contact with 
centuries of accumulated wisdom and of the need to shape this wisdom for a 
new day. Loyola graduates, by reason of their formative contact with this com- 
munity, should be conscious of the achievements and failures of all of human 
history, particuarly those of their own culture and time. They should nonethe- 
less be capable of principled judgment in the face of complexity and ambiguity; 
and humanely keen — or divinely moved — to leave behind them a better world 
than they found. 





THE SUMMER SESSION 



The University has offered summer work on a regular basis since June 13, 
1924. The summer session bulletin dates from that year. The first director of 
summer work was Reverend J. C. Kearns, S.J. The first general director of 
summer sessions was the Reverend Alvin Holloway, S.J. The present director 
is Mr. John F. Sears. In 1970 the organizational structure of the summer 
operations was substantially changed to the current system of centralized 
administration. 

Two basic terms of equal length are offered. The School of Law has only one 
ten (10) week session. 

All facilities available during the regular academic year are available to sum- 
mer students, including campus housing, but excluding scholarships. 

All the general regulations of the University govern the summer session. 
However, requirements for admission are different, and there are certain addi- 
tional regulations governing student course loads. Applicants should consult 
the sections on admissions and University regulations below. 





GENERAL INFORMATION 
Admissions 



UNDERGRADUATE STUDENTS 

Students from other universities wishing to take courses at Loyola only for 
the summer session (transient students) must file with the Dean of Admis- 
sions the official form contained in this brochure or an application form 
obtained from his office. 

Freshmen entering Loyola for the first time through the summer session 



should present a copy of their acceptance letter. Additionally, they should 
confer with their undergraduate Dean before registering. 

Regular Loyola students may simply register after conferring with their 
adviser during the regular Spring preregistration period. 

GRADUATE STUDENTS 

Students entering the Graduate School, whether for the summer session only 
or as a continuing part of their graduate work at Loyola, must file credentials 
one month in advance with the Chairman of the Graduate Council, Box 87, 
Loyola University, New Orleans, La. 70118. The application must be accom- 
panied by an official transcript of all work completed through the Spring 
Semester. 

NOTE: GRADUATE STUDENTS DO NOT FILL OUT THE APPLI- 
CATION BLANK CONTAINED IN THIS BULLETIN, BUT WRITE 
DIRECTLY TO BOX 87, ABOVE. 

LAW STUDENTS 

Students seeking admittance to the School of Law must write directly to the 
Office of the Dean, School of Law, Loyola University, New Orleans, Louisiana, 
70118. 




Student Expenses 



Ail students will be mailed a bill for their tuition, fees, and room charges. 
The billing statement will indicate the date by which payment must be received 
by the Finance Office. All charges must be paid by this due date. Any student 
paying after this date will incur a late payment fee. Subsequent failure to pay 
in full will result in the assessment of additional penalty fees at the University's 
discretion. Students who have not satisfied all financial obligations have not 
officially completed registration and are subject to dismissal from the University. 

The University reserves the right to change, with due notice, any of the 
expenses listed and to withhold statements of honorable dismissal, grade reports, 
transcript of records, diploma, etc. until all indebtedness to the University has 
been discharged or until satisfactory arrangements have been made with the 
Senior Vice President — Finance. Also, no students will be allowed admittance 
for subsequent semesters as long as prior financial indebtedness has not been 
satisfied. Exceptions to regulations regarding University charges will be made 
only by the President of the University. 

Students are encouraged to make payments by check, money order, etc. made 
payable to Loyola University. Cash transactions are discouraged. 

10 



Summary of expenses : 

Tuition: 

Undergraduate 

Day — per sem. hr $ 45.00 

City College — per sem. hr 37.50 

Graduate — per sem. hr 60.00 

Law — per course 180.00 

Housing expenses: 

Room Guarantee Deposit (not refundable 

but applicable to Room) 50.00 

Room 

1st Session 

Men (range) $ 85.50-$133.00 

Women (range) % 95.00-$l42.50 

2nd Session 

Men (range) % 78.75-$122.50 

Women (range) $ 87.50-|131.25 

Resident students fees 

Damage and breakage (refundable) 25.00 

Key deposit (refundable ) 2.00 

Contingent fees: 

Late Registration Fee 20.00 

Registration Fee for Degree only 

(per sem.) 25.00 

Subject Change Fee (per course) 5.00 

Additional Transcript fee 2.00 

Fees for seniors: 

Graduation fee 25.00 

The Transcript Fee. For all transcripts sent after the first one there is a $2.00 
fee. However, when a student requests more than five transcripts at one time 
he is charged $2.00 for the first copy and fifty cents for each additional one. 
REFUND POLICY 

1. Tuition. A student who withdraws from the University must return a 
completed withdrawal form to the Registrar's Office. Mere cessation of atten- 
dance does not constitute withdrawal. Students who withdraw from the Univer- 
sity or from a course are entitled to a refund of a percentage of their tuition. The 
date of receipt of the withdrawal notice by the Registrar will determine the 
amount of tuition refund. No refunds are made when a student is suspended 
or dismissed for academic or disciplinary reasons. Only tuition is refundable. 
Refunds are made on the following basis: 

a. If formal notice is received within two days of the beginning of the 
session a refund of 80% of tuition is made. 

b. If formal notice is received within five days of the beginning of the 
session a refund of 60% of tuition is made. 

c. If formal notice is received within ten days of the beginning of the 
session a refund of 40% of tuition is made. 

d. No refunds are allowed after the tenth day of classes. 

11 





STUDENT LIFE 
Housing 



Policy for Out of Town Students: 

Full time freshmen men and women students are required to reside in 
university housing. Requests for information should be directed to the Director 
of Housing. 

Men's Residence Hall: 

Biever Hall is a six story Residence Hall on the north side of the campus. 
This structure is completely air conditioned and centrally heated and houses 
410. Rooms are for double occupancy and are equipped with a phone. Each 
student has a private locker, single bed, chest of drawers, and desk. A laundry 
pick-up station which also dry cleans is housed on the ground level. Mail boxes, 
and washing and drying facilities are also provided. Jesuit priests are available 
for counselling. 

Women's Residence Hall : 

Buddig Hall is a twelve story Residence Hall for women on campus. Capac- 
ity of this hall is 429. Each suite has individual controls for central heat and 
air conditioning. These suites house two rooms sharing bath facilities. Each 
room has its private wash basin and cosmetic stand, 2 single beds, 2 desks, 2 
chests of drawers, a bulletin board, book shelves, and a phone. Laundry facilities 
with washers and dryers are located on the ground floor. A limited number of 
single rooms are available with private bath facilities. Cost will vary with ac- 
commodations received. 

Supervision : 

Resident Students are supervised by the Resident Assistants under the direc- 
tion of the Associate Dean of Student Affairs and a Head Resident in each hall. 

Reservations : 

The step toward a reservation is to return all information requested by the 
Admissions Office. Eligible students are notified by the Dean of Admissions 

12 



and Records that $25 deposit will be required for summer reservations. This 
deposit applies to the student's housing charges and is not refundable if the 
student cancels his housing. The student must have a signed contract along with 
all required housing forms, i.e., a medical form, before his housing reservation 
will be honored. 

Residence Hall Charges: 

Charges for room are due at the beginning of the summer and billed along 
with tuition and other fees. The cost may vary with desired accommodations 
and availability of housing facilities. 

Additional housing costs are the $25 deposit for damages and the $2 key 
deposit. These deposits will be retained by the Finance Office and drawn upon 
by the Housing Office when necessary. The full amount of the deposit or the 
balance will be refunded when the student officially withdraws or graduates. 

The $25 room deposit sent through the Admissions Office is credited to 
the student's room charge. It is not refundable if the student cancels his housing 
request. 

C 071 tract Meals : 

Board is administered for the University by Saga Food Service. Students may 
contract for nineteen meals per week for the period of summer session enroll- 
ment at a daily rate of $3.25. Checks should be made payable to Loyola Univer- 
sity and mailed to Saga Food Service prior to registration or presented at the 
first meal. 

Health Insurance: 

The University sponsored Health Insurance Program is required of all stu- 
dents residing in University residence halls unless proof of coverage is indicated 
on a Waiver Card. Information is sent each summer to all students by the 
Insurance Company. The group plan covers a student for twelve months, com- 
mencing in September, at a yearly premium of $23. Information may also be 
secured from the Office of the Dean of Student Affairs. 




Services 



HEALTH SERVICE 

Loyola University maintains a medical service on the campus for students, 
both resident and non-resident. 

It is operated under the following rules: 

1, Students, both resident and non-resident, entering Loyola for the first 
time or re-entering the University must undergo a physical examination by their 

13 



personal physician, before their registration is officially completed. A signed 
medical release form is absolutely necessary for resident students. Health 
insurance is mandatory for resident students and is optional for nonresident 
students. 

2. The University may also require physical examinations at other designated 
times during the student's stay. 

3. A student may be refused admission to the University on the recommen- 
dation of the medical examiners. This board also may request a student already 
enrolled to withdraw. 

4. A student may see the University Physician during his office hours on the 
campus, Monday through Friday. 

5. Patients confined on the campus will be visited by the University Physician 
or by the physician of the student's choice at his own expense. 

6. Medicines or hospitali2ation are not provided by the University's health 
service. 

7. Full time students are required to participate in the Loyola Student Health 
Insurance Program or waive it by completion of a waiver form. 

COUNSELING CENTER 

The University has a staff of Clinical and Counseling Psychologists who are 
available to the students for professional testing and counseling. The aim of the 
Counseling Center is to aid Loyola students in vocational, personality or social 
adjustment problems. 

ACADEMIC COUNSELING 

Each student at Loyola is assigned an academic adviser, a fulltime faculty 
member who will assist the student in planning his schedule, and who will dis- 
cuss with him the problems he may encounter in his academic career. The stu- 
dent should see his adviser at least twice a semester. 

SPIRITUAL LIFE 

The University appoints a priest together with needed assistants to the post 
of University Chaplain for all the students. He is at their disposal at all times to 
guide, counsel and advise. Students will find him ready to assist them in their 
spiritual, personal and individual problems. He is responsible for all the or- 
ganized spiritual activities on the campus. 

RETREATS 

There are no obligatory retreats at Loyola, but all students are encouraged to 
take part in one of the three types of retreats offered. The traditional closed re- 
treats at one of the near-by retreat houses stress personal meditation and silence. 
A second type, called "An Experience in Christian Community" is offered to 
Loyola students and students of other colleges in the area. This type is made in 
a group of thirty to forty and stresses group discussions and activity. The third 
type is made in a private home with a group of ten to twelve. It stresses both 

14 



personal meditation and group discussion. Besides these retreats, days of recol- 
lection are offered from time to time during the year. 

SPIRITUAL ORGANIZATIONS 

Chi Rho Mu is the primary spiritual organization on the campus. Its aim 
is to help students seek out and find their Christian response in the context 
of college life in the post- Vatican II Church. 

STUDENT PUBLICATIONS 

Maroon — The University newspaper, the Maroon, is published about 25 
times during the year by a student staflf under the direction of the faculty of the 
Department of Journalism. Positions on the editorial and business staffs are 
open to all students of the university. 

University Directory — Alpha Pi Omicron, service fraternity, presents to the 
faculty and students the University Directory. Contained therein is the name, 
address and telephone number of every member of the faculty, student body, 
and staff of the university. This book is presented free of cost and edited en- 
tirely by members of APO. 

DANNA CENTER 

Serving as Loyola's community center, Danna Center provides a convenient 
and inviting place to meet friends, relax and recreate. In addition to dining, 
recreation and meeting facilities the Center houses a rathskeller, bookstore, post 
office, barber shop and beauty salon. 

The offices of the Dean & Associate Dean of Students, the Chaplain and 
Counseling Center are located in the Center as well as the office of the Union 
Director, Placement Director, Student Government Assoc, Student Union and 
other student organizations. 

The Communications Complex, located in the lower level of the Center, in- 
cludes the University's closed circuit television station and campus radio station 
WLDC. WLDC is a closed circuit radio station which is student run under the 
sponsorship of the Communications Department. The station serves the campus 
of Loyola University and Dominican College, is a member of the Associated 
Press, the Intercollegiate Broadcast System, and the American Broadcasting 
Company contemporary radio network. All interested students are eligible to 
work on the radio station. 

I.D. CARDS 

Each student must have an I.D. Card on his person at all times and must pre- 
sent it to University officials on demand. Usage by students other than to whom 
issued is subject to fine and/or disciplinary action. Lost I.D Cards must be 
reported to the Student Union Director. Replacements may be obtained from 
his office. The charge for each replacement will be $3. 

15 




Special Facilities and Programs 



THE SPECIAL COLLEGE ORIENTATION FOR PERSONALIZED EDU- 
CATION 

A new and progressive educational project at Loyola is the Special College 
Orientation for Personalized Education. SCOPE is a program of special admis- 
sion and academic support which adds some flexibility to regular admission re- 
quirements. Through SCOPE, students who make low scores on the Scholastic 
Aptitude Test or the American College Test, or those whose academic record 
does not show their full potential, may qualify for college. The SCOPE student 
receives tutoring, counseling, and remedial courses to prepare him for regular 
college studies. Selected students are invited to the campus four weeks before 
the start of the fall semester to participate in this program. The program begins 
on June 11, 1973 and ends on July 6, 1973. 

SSTP— STUDENT SCIENCE TRAINING PROGRAM (Pre-College) 

This is an integrated bidisciplinary lecture-laboratory project intended to 
develop a better understanding by the participants of the mechanics of research 
with particular emphasis on the close interrelationships in the sciences. The 
courses consist of Computer Science and Chemical Kinetics with stress put 
on the experimental model in the sciences. The laboratory phase presents the 
students considerable challenge by directing their laboratory problem into an 
interdisciplinary activity. Each pair of students chooses a particular parameter 
of a chemical reaction to study. The kinetic data obtained are analyzed by 
computer programs written by the students. The pooling of data yields infor- 
mation about the reaction within the range of parameters studied. 

The entire program is designed to develop in the participant an enthusiasm 
for learning which will result in continued self -motivation. We hope to develop 
new habits of learning and the techniques of using learned material in areas 
apart from the learning discipline. 

The program is designed for 11th grade boys and girls who attend high 
schools that do not provide instruction beyond the normal four courses in 
science and mathematics found in most schools. 

For further information please contact Dr. John Christman, Box 47, Loyola 
University, New Orleans, Louisiana 70118. 

SUMMER COMMUNICATIONS INSTITUTE AND NATIONAL INSTI- 
TUTE FOR RELIGIOUS COMMUNICATIONS 

An intensive three week course of instruction and practical application in all 
aspects of mass media and communications will be conducted by the Loyola 
University Department of Communications from June 10 to June 30. Included 
will be classwork, seminar studies, and workshop sessions in television and 

16 



radio news, programming, writing production and performance, film produc- 
tion, public relations. 

Participating in the operation of the Institute will be WWL-TV, WDSU- 
TV, WVUE-TV, and WYES-TV, plus most of the radio stations in New Or- 
leans. Classwork and workshop sessions extend from 9 A.M. to 4:30 P.M. 
daily, Monday thru Friday. Participants who are representatives of media of- 
fices of religious organizations will register for Comm. 300-A, Institute for 
Religious Communications. 

Six hours of undergraduate credit wil be awarded upon successful comple- 
tion of the Institute. For further information write to Mr. Allan Jacobs, Depart- 
ment of Communications, Loyola University, New Orleans, Louisiana 70118. 




17 




UNIVERSITY REGULATIONS 

KNOWLEDGE OF REGULATIONS 

Students are held responsible for compliance with the regulations of the 
University and should familiarize themselves with the provisions of this bulle- 
tin, distributed by the Registrar's Office, the Student Handbook distributed 
by the Dean of Students, posted official notices and official instructions given 
to students. 

At registration, it is understood that both the student and the student's par- 
ents or guardians agree to the student being governed by the University regula- 
tions and will abide by decisions that may be made by the Student Court and 
Official bodies of the University regarding the individual student. 

ATTENDANCE 

Each instructor must announce at the beginning of the semester how atten- 
dance in his class will affect his grading. Specifically, he may judge that 
attendance in class is imperative and demand adherence to the policy that a 
student is liable to receive an F at the discretion of his instructor if he misses 
fifteen percent of his classes. 

Therefore, attendance is required in all undergraduate day courses subject 
to the above paragraph. 

Freshmen and probationary students are liable to receive an F if they miss 
more than fifteen percent of their classes for any one course. 

The policy in the above paragraph constitutes the attendance policy for all 
night undergraduate courses of City College. 

GRADES 

All work is graded by letters, interpreted as follows: 

A Excellent (4 quality points per credit hour) 

B Good ( 3 quality points per credit hour) 

C Average (2 quality points per credit hour) 

D Minimally passing. ( 1 quality point per credit hour) 

F Failure (no quality points per credit hour) 

I Incomplete. This grade is to be assigned only when the instructor has been 
presented with serious and compelling reasons why the student should be al- 
lowed to complete the course at a later date. These reasons are customarily 
medical. The I grade is not an automatic extension. An I grade must be made 
up within six weeks after the end of the term in which it was incurred. After 



six weeks an I grade automatically converts to an F unless the Dean of the Col- 
lege authorizes an extension. 
W Withdrawal. Any student withdrawing from a course will be automatically 
assigned a W grade. The instructors concerned will then assign letter grades of 
I or P if the student is passing, and F if he is failing. 
P Pass. In addition to work graded by letters, the university offers a pass-fail 
provision for university fellows. F grades in pass-fail are counted as valid F 
grades. P grades are not counted toward quality point averages. At the end of 
the semester the student will receive a letter grade and all grades of D or above 
will be recorded as P by the Registrar. In the event that the student wishes 
to major in a iield in which he has previously taken a pass-fail credit, the 
student has two options: a) he may request that the letter grade which he 
received in the course be considered by the department; b) he may, with the 
permission of the department, select another course to fulfill the requirement. 
The use of certain other administrative notations on student grade reports 

are explained in those reports. Averages are computed only on the basis of letter 

grades A through F. 

GRADE REPORTS 

A report of the grades made by a student in his scheduled subjects is sent 
to the student at the middle and end of each semester. Copies of these reports 
are also sent to the student's dean and faculty adviser. The Registrar's Office will 
also send a copy of the grades to the student's parents, guardian, or sponsor upon 
the student's written request. 

REPETITION OF COPIES 

A student who has failed a course will be allowed to repeat that course when 
it is next offered. No more than two repetitions of the same course will be al- 
lowed to any student. 

SCHEDULE, STATUS, AND COLLEGE CHANGES 

A student desiring to drop a scheduled course or to add another course after 
his semester's schedule has been filed in the Registrars Office should consult 
with his Adviser or the Chairman of the Department in which he is registered 
from whom he should obtain written permission to revise his schedule. This 
written permission should be presented by the student to the Dean for approval. 
Permission to add a course or change from one section to another will not be 
granted after the date indicated in the Session Calendar as the last day for 
schedule adjustments. 

Students may change college or major only with the approval of their Dean 
and then only during registration and pre-registration. 

Students remaining in the University who officially drop one or more courses 
prior to the date designated in the Session Calendar as the last day to drop a 
course will not have grades recorded in those courses. 

Those students who withdraw officially from the University prior to the last 
day for dropping courses will not have grades recorded in those courses for 
which they were registered at time of withdrawal. 

All students who withdraw officially from the University after the last day 
for dropping courses will be assigned a grade for each course for which they 

19 



were registered at the time of withdrawal. If the grade is passing at the time of 
withdrawal, a grade of WP will be assigned. If the grade is failing, a grade of 
WF will be assigned which shall indicate failure in the course. 

CLASSIFICATION 

Students who have successfully completed 24 hours of work for college credit 
are classified as sophomores; 56 hours, juniors; and 90 hours, seniors. 

STANDING 

A student's standing is computed on the basis only of work done at Loyola, 
or under the auspices of its special foreign programs, although his entire record 
will be used to compute graduation honors. Standing is computed by the follow- 
ing formula: the total number of quality points accumulated at Loyola divided 
by the number of hours attempted for letter grades A through F. The number 
of quality points obtained for each individual course is computed by multiplying 
the number of credit hours the course is worth by the quality point equivalent 
of the letter grade received in the course. 

1. Good standing: a student whose overall average is 2.0 except for first 
semester freshman, whose average must be 1.7. 

2. Dean's List standing: a student whose Loyola average is 3.5 or better. 



WITHDRAWAL FROM THE UNIVERSITY 

A student who withdraws from the University during a semester before tak- 
ing the final examinations of the semester forfeits all credit for work done in 
that semester. 

To withdraw officially from the University a student must: 

1 ) Obtain withdrawal forms from the Registrar. 

2) Obtain signatures of designated officials on withdrawal forms. (These forms will 
not be signed until the student has cleared all obligations to the University.) 

3) Resident students must officially withdraw by obtaining clearance through the 
housing office. 

Withdratval is not complete or official until all signatures have been obtained 

and forms are returned to the Registrar s Office. 

Those students who withdraw officially from the University prior to mid- 
semester grades, will not have grades recorded in those courses for which they 
were registered at the time of withdrawal. 

All students who withdraw officially from the University after the mid- 
semester grades, will be assigned a grade for each course for which they 
were registered at the time of withdrawal. If the grade is passing at the time 
of wididrawal a grade of WP will be assigned. If the grade is failing, a 
grade of WF will be assigned which shall indicate a failure in the course. 

Students are reminded that they must complete official withdrawal from the 
University before the termination of the semester in which they have registered. 

In the case of a student who is called to active duty in any branch of the armed 

20 



services before the date for final examinations in the semester, the following 
exceptions to the formal regulations have been made : 

1. Should a second semester senior he called to military service within six 
weeks of the date of commencement exercises, he will have the dates of 
his final examinations advanced, and, if he passes successfully, he ivill he 
granted full credit and his degree. 

2. A senior in his first semester, or a junior, sophomore, or freshman in ei- 
ther semester ivho is called into inilitary service within four weeks of the 
end of the semester will have his examination dates advanced, and, if he 
passes successfully, he granted full credit for the semester. 

3. A notation of the action taken hy the University in accordance ivith the 
provisions made ahove ivill he made on the records and transcripts of the 
students who have received full credit under these provisions. 

DISMISSAL 

Although dismissal is usually a function of the student's inability to remove 
himself from academic probation, all decisions regarding dismissal are made on 
an individual basis, and the University, through duly constituted judicial bodies, 
or through the deans, has the authority to dismiss a student whose conduct, atti- 
tude, or performance is in serious opposition to the aim of the University or to 
the spiritual, moral, or intellectual welfare of the University Community. 

INTEGRITY OF SCHOLARSHIP AND GRADES 

The principles of truth and honesty are recognized as fundamental to a com- 
munity of teachers and scholars. The University expects that both faculty and 
students will follow these principles and in so doing, protect the validity of the 
University grades. This means that all academic work will be done by the 
student to whom it is assigned, without unauthorized data of any kind. Instruc- 
tors for their part, will exercise care in the planning and supervision of academic 
work, so that honest effort be positively encouraged. 

The following regulations pertain to all students taking final examinations, 
mid-semester tests, daily quizzes, or writing term papers: 

1. No student is allowed to bring to an examination any textbooks, note- 
books, or any other printed or written matter without the consent and 
knowledge of the instructor. He is allowed to have only the necessary 
number of the examination Bluebooks in which there must not be any 
writing whatever at the beginning of the examination. 

2. The examinations must be written in the official Bluebooks or on paper 
provided by the instructor. 

3. During the entire period of the examination, no student is permitted to 
speak or signal in any way to any other student, to pass or attempt to pass 
anything to any other student, to look in the direction of another student's 
examination paper, or to look at any other paper other than that of his 
own Bluebook. Should two students' papers be found to be so similar that 
it is evident that one of the students copied from the paper of the other, 
both students may be charged with a failure on the examination. 

4. Whenever a student gives a quotation in a termpaper, he must use quota- 

21 



tion marks to indicate the entire quotation and he must give a footnote 
reference to the book or article from which he took the quotation. 
5. In quizzes, whether written or oral, the above rules are to be observed 

wherever they are applicable. 
Penalties. A student violating any of these regulations or found guilty of any 
form of dishonesty in classwork will be penalized as follows : 

1. If the violation occurs in the mid-semester test, he will be given a failing 
grade in the course involved and will be required to withdraw from all 
the courses scheduled in that semester. In a case of the second violation, 
the student will be expelled. 

2. If the violation occurs in the final examination, the student will be given 
a failing grade in the course involved but he will be allowed and required 
to complete all other examinations. He will receive full credit for the 
semester, but will be suspended from the University for the next semester. 
If the violations occur in the Spring semester, the student will not be 
allowed to register in either the following Summer school session or the 
Fall semester. In the case of a second violation, the student will be ex- 
pelled from the University. 

3. If the violation occurs in a quiz or termpaper, the student will be given 
a failing grade in the course but may continue his work in another subject. 
A second violation will be punished by suspension for a semester. A third 
violation will be cause for explusion from the University. 

LEAVE OF ABSENCE 

Students may apply for a leave of absence for a specified period of time. All 
such leaves should be approved by the dean if the student is to retain his place 
in the university without prejudice. This is especially true as regards students 
wishing to study at other universities, even only for the summer. In all cases the 
student must have his courses validated by his major department and formal- 
ized by the dean. 

SUMMER SCHOOL 

Students must obtain permission from their Dean to attend summer school 
away from Loyola. No transfer credit will be awarded for summer work unless 
the courses were approved by the major adviser and Dean. Only students in good 
standing are granted permission to attend another institution's summer school. 

GRADUATION HONORS 

Graduation honors are computed according to the quality point system. A 
student's graduation average is determined by dividing the total number of 
quality points earned by the total number of semester hours attempted by the 
student during his entire course. 

Semester hours carried include all hours attempted, excluding authorized 
withdrawals, but including all attempts at a course which has been repeated in 
order to raise the total of quality points. A student who has made an average 
of 3.5 graduates cum laude; one who has made an average of 3.7 magna cum 

22 



laude; one who has made an average of 3-9 summa cum laude. Record of these 
honors is inscribed on the diplomas and noted in the Hst of graduates published 
for the Commencement Exercises. 

SUMMER REGULATIONS 

All the general rules of the University apply, with the following exception-, 
a student may schedule no more than six hours a session (or seven, if one course 
is a laboratory science course) without the written permission of his dean, 
and only then if he has a cumulative average of 3.0 or better. Loyola students 
are reminded that they may only do summer work elsewhere if they are in good 
standing and have the written permission of their adviser and their dean. 

Each course announced in this bulletin will be offered provided the required 
minimum number of ten students registers for the course. The University re- 
serves the right to cancel any course for ivhich there are not sufficient regis- 
trants. 




23 





COURSES OF STUDY 



Accounting 



Dean: Lowell C. Smith, Ph.D. (Stallings Hall 210— Ext. 336) 

Ace. 105-106— Principles of Accounting (105 — 1st session 10:00; 106 — 2nd 
session 10:00) 

A basic course in accounting designed to familiarize all students registered in the 
College of Business Administration with the fundamental accounting principles and 
practices and with a background to business through accounting. Emphasis is placed 
on the modern concepts of "how" accounting is used in the business world plus an 
introduction of cost and managerial accounting. Laboratory drills will be devoted to 
problem solving. Practice sets are optional 3-3 sem. hrs. 

Acc. 203 — Managerial Accounting (2nd session 8:20) 

This is a one semester terminal course designed especially for business administration 
students who have selected a program of study other than accounting. As a further 
preparation for his business career, using the fundamentals of accounting, the stu- 
dent is introduced to the uses of accounting data in the planning and control func- 
tions of management. Coordination of opening and capital budgets are a few of the 
concepts of management that will be covered. Prerequisite: Acc. 105-106 or equiva- 
lent. 3 sem. hrs. 

Acc. 314 — Federal Tax Accounting I (1st session 8:20) 

This course introduces the student to the complexities of the Revenue Code, 
Regulations, Revenue Rulings, and related court decisions as they apply to in- 
dividuals. The mechanics of preparing federal income tax returns for individuals are 
covered. Tax planning is introduced. Prerequisite: Acc. 105-106, 203 or equivalent. 

3 sem. hrs. 



Acc. 340 — Integrated E.D.P. and Information Systems (1st session 10:00) 

The major emphasis is directed toward computer programming (Fortran). Other 
concepts of integrated data processing, accounting, information systems, problems 
inherent in development cf systems, electronic data processing systems are also 
developed. Prerequisite: Acc. 105, 106, 205. 3 sem. hrs. 

24 



Biological Sciences 

Chairman: John H. Mullahy, SJ., Ph.D. (Bobet Hall 113— Ext. 211) 

BioSci. 101 — General Botany (1st session) TBA 

The basic principles of plant morphology and physiology. The evolution, distribu- 
tion, genetics and economic importance of plants are briefly considered. This 
course is designed primarily for education majors, medical technologists and dental 
hygiene students. Two lectures and two laboratory periods. 4 sem. hrs. 

BioSci. 103— Cultural Biology (1st session) TBA 

A lecture demonstration course in the essentials of biology designed specifically as an 
orientation course for those whose interests lie in the sphere of the humanities. May 
not be used as a prerequisite for advanced courses. 4 sem. hrs. 

BioSci. 209 — Mammalian Anatomy (1st session) TBA 

A lecture and laboratory study presented as a basis for the understanding of human 
anatomy. Detailed dissection of the cat and anatomical studies of other vertebrates 
are included. This course is restricted to medical technologists. Prerequisites: 2 se- 
mesters of biology. 4 sem. hrs. 

BioSci. 122 — Microbiology (1st session) TBA 

This course embraces bacteriological techniques, the classification and properties of 
important non-pathogenic and pathogenic bacteria, molds and viruses. The princi- 
ples of immunity and serology are briefly treated. Two lecturers and two laboratory 
periods. 4 sem. hrs. 

Business Administration 
Graduate Courses 



Ace. 512 — Accounting and Information Systems (1st session 6:30 to 9:00 
p.m. ; M and W) 
A study of accounting procedures to provide management with data to make 
decisions; types of data required for planning and control; availability and reli- 
ability of such data in accounting systems; provision of special-purpose data; 
conditions of good internal reporting. Prerequisites: Q.M. 501, MG. 508. 

3 sem. hrs. 

Eco. 500 — ^National Income and Employment Analysis (1st session 6:30 to 

9:00 p.m.; T and Th) 

The course treats systematically the concepts and methods used in national income 
accounting and reviews theories relevant to national product and income stability. 

3 sem. hrs. 

Eco. 515 — Advanced Price Theory (2nd session 6:30 to 9:00 p.m.; M and 
W) 

A rigorous analysis of the various market structures and the pricing process for 
commodities and for productive services as taking place within these market forms. 
A systematic study of the conventional "tools" of the theory of price is included, 

25 



and also some consideration given to possible divergences between practice and 
theory in the pricing process. 3 sem. hrs. 

Fn. 520 — Seminar in Finance (2nd session 6:30 to 9:00 p.m. ; M and W) 

Selected problems and topics in finance are examined. Permission of the graduate 
faculty in finance is a prerequisite. 3 sem. hrs. 

Mg. 520 — Seminar in Management (1st session and 2nd session 6:30 to 
9:00 p.m.; M and W) 
Selected problems and topics in management are examined. Permission of the 
graduate faculty in management is a prerequisite. 3 sem. hrs. 




Chemistry 



Chairman: Anthony DiMaggio, Ph.D. (Science Complex 425 — Ext. 441) 

Ch. 111-112 — General Chemistry (111 — 1st session 8:20; 112 — 2nd session 
8:20) 
A basic course in the fundamental principles of general chemistry. Intended for sci- 
ence majors whose high school background, as shown by the Chemistry Achieve- 
ment Test in the College Entrance Board, indicates the need of a full-year course in 
Freshman Chemistry. 3-3 sem. hrs. 

Ch. 113-114 — General Chemistry Laboratory (113 — 1st session 10:00 to 
12:45; 114— 2nd session 10:00 to 12:45) 
Includes qualitative analysis. Prerequisite: credit or registration in Ch. 111-112. 

1-1 sem. hrs. 

Ch. 331-332 — Organic Chemistry Lecture (331— 1st session 11:40; 332— 

2nd session 11 :40) 

An intensive course in organic chemistry, covering structural theory, organic reaction 

mechanisms, stereochemistry, and type reaction of organic compounds. Prerequisites: 

Ch. 111-114, Ch. 211-213 or approval of Chairman. 3-3 sem. hrs. 

Ch. 333-334 — Organic Chemistry Laboratory (333— 1st session 8:20 to 

11:10; 334— 2nd session 8:20 to 11:10) 

Laboratory course to accompany Ch. 331-332. Introduction to laboratory techniques 

of organic chemistry: simple preparations, separations and identification of organic 

compounds. Prerequisite: Credit or registration in Ch. 331-332. 2-2 sem. hrs. 




City College 



Dean: John J. Burns, S.J. (Marquette Hall 112— Ext. 521) 

Ace. 105-106 — Principles of Accounting (105 — Both sessions 6:00 p.m.; 
106 — Both sessions 6:00 p.m.) 
A basic course in accounting designed to familiarize all students with the funda- 

26 



mental accounting principles and practices and with a background to business 
through accounting. Emphasis is placed on the modern concepts of "how" account- 
ing is used in the business world plus an introduction of cost and managerial ac- 
counting. Laboratory drills will be devoted to problem solving. Practice sets are 
optional. 3-3 sem hrs. 

Acc. 205-206 — Intermediate Accounting (205 — 1st session 6:00 p.m.; 206 — 
2nd session 6:00 p.m.) 
This course is designed to develop an understanding of modern accounting standards 
and concepts, acceptable form and techniques in the preparation of accounting state- 
ments. Detailed accounts are considered in both financial and income-determination 
statements. Special problems in corporate accounting, statement analysis, use of 
funds and cash flow are considered. Prerequisite: Acc. 105-106 or its equivalent. 

3-3 sem. hrs. 

Acc. 323 — Auditing Principles (1st session 8:00 p.m.) 

This course acquaints the student with the procedures of conducting a general audit. 
Emphasis is placed upon the standards, philosophy, ethics and responsibilities of the 
independent Certified Public Accountant in conducting an audit and upon the role 
and importance of internal control. Prerequisite: Acc. 205-206 or equivalent. 

3 sem. hrs. 

Acc. 324 — Auditing Practices (2nd session 8:00 p.m.) 

This course is designed to provide the opportunity for application of the concepts 
developed in Acc. 323. The student is required to prepare auditing programs, to solve 
assigned contemporary problems, and to prepare a complete set of audit working 
papers and the report and statements that normally result from a general audit. 
Prerequisite: Acc. 32 3 or equivalent. 3 sem. hrs. 

Comm. 392 — Current Trends in Television (2nd session 8:00 p.m.) 

The most popular programs of the current TV season will be approached through 
moral, cultural, and social perspectives. The "television mentality" will be synthe- 
sized through program screenings, discussions with TV programmers, and industry 
publications. New programs for the fall will also be examined. 3 sem. hrs. 

CmpSci. 121-122 — Introduction to Computer Science I, II (121 — 1st session 
6:00 p.m. ; 122 — 2nd session 6:00 p.m.) 

The principles of digital computer components including functional units; stored 
programs; flow charting; FORTRAN, ALGOL, COBOL programming languages 
with applications in a wide variety of target areas; algorithms and algorithmic 
procedures. 3-3 sem. hrs. 

Crimjust. 317 — Juvenile Delinquency (2nd session 6:00 p.m.) 

The seriousness of the social problem called Juvenile Delinquency and the tre- 
mendous importance of the peace officer's role in the lives of children are stressed. 

3 sem. hrs. 

Crimjust. 330 — Fundamentals of Criminology (1st session 6:00 p.m.) 

3 sem. hrs. 

Crimjust. 361 — Felony Offenders (1st session 6:00 p.m.) 

Analysis of attitudes and other characteristics of felons. 3 sem. hrs. 

Crimjust. 365 — Correctional Institutions (1st session 8:00 p.m.) 

Institutional management of the offender for individual treatment purposes from 
admission through release. 3 sem. hrs. 

D.S. 101 — Fundamentals of Speech (Both sessions 6:00 p.m.) 

Study of the factors governing good speech content and delivery; an introduction to 
speech behavior in human interaction. 3~3 sem. hrs. 

27 



D.S. 375 — Theatre Experiments (Both sessions 8:00 p.m.) 

Theatrical experiments for people who can't act or direct and have no interest in 
going to plays. A study of what the magic is really all about. 3 sem. hrs. 

Eco. 106 — Introduction to Economics (2nd session 8:00 p.m.) 

This course emphasizes the broad historical aspects in the evolution of our economic 
system, taught from the liberal arts and social sciences viewpoint. It seeks values be- 
yond those of professional training for business. In acquiring familiarity with the 
tools of the economist, the student is introduced in a small way to the microeconomic 
and macroeconomic approaches. Consideration is also given to dissenting economic 
theories, both at home and abroad. Eco. 106 may be used as a terminal course for 
non-business majors. If this group desires more economic study they may schedule 
Eco. 201-Eco. 202 as a follow up. 3 sem. hrs. 

Eco. 201 — Principles of Economics (1st session 8:00 p.m.) 

This course and its companion (Eco. 202) provide the gateway to all advanced 
courses in economics. Macroeconomics: the emphasis is on the level of economic ac- 
tivity. A survey of the roles of business, government, labor and the consumer in the 
economy, the principles of national income accounting, income and employment the- 
ory, monetary institutions and theory, cyclical fluctuations, monetary and fiscal policy. 
Prerequisite: Soph, standing. 3 sem. hrs. 

Eco. 202 — Principles of Economics (2nd session 6:00 p.m.) 

Microeconomics: the emphasis is on the composition of economic activity. Elemen- 
tary theory of pricing and distribution of income under the alternative market situa- 
tions of completion, monopoly, oligopoly, monopolistic competition. Also included 
are a simplil'ied theory of international trade, the problems of national economic de- 
velopment, and a survey of alternative economic systems. Prerequisite: Soph, stand- 
ing. 3 sem. hrs. 

Eco. 210 — Economic Statistics (1st session 6:00 p.m.) 

Collection, analysis and presentation of statistical data; principles of sampling; mea- 
sures of reliability for testing and estimation problems; index numbers; time series 
analysis; business barometers and forecasting; the use of the normal curve. Primary 
emphasis is placed on statistical methods with application to practical business and 
economic problems rather than mathematical derivation. Mathematical knowledge be- 
yond college-level algebra is not required for satisfactory performance in the course. 

3 sem. hrs. 

Engl. 101-102^EngIish Composition (City College credit only) (101 — 1st 
session 6:00 and 8:00 p.m.; 2nd session 6:00 p.m.; 102 — 1st session 8:00 
p.m.; 2nd session 6:00 and 8:00 p.m.) 

Rapid grammar review and introduction to accurate and comprehensive read- 
ing; introduction to research. Course designed to develop further the students 
ability to compose thoughts and express them in written form. 3-3 sem. hrs. 

Engl. 201 — Major Literary Types I (City College credit only) (1st session 
6:00 p.m.; 2nd session 8:00 p.m.) 
A study of the novel and short story will be combined with intensive writings. 

3 sem. hrs. 

Engl. 202 — Major Literary Types II (City College credit only) (Both sessions 
6:00 p.m.) 

A study of poetry and drama will be combined with intensive writing. 3 sem. hrs. 

Engl. 447 — Modern Poetry to 1940 (1st session 8:00 p.m.) 

A survey of the major figures in England and America from Whitman to the begin- 
ning of World War II, with intensive analysis of Yeats, Pound, Eliot, Frost, Stevens, 
Williams, and Auden. 3 sem. hrs. 



Fn. 305 — Money and Banking (1st session 8:00 p.m.) 

An introductory survey of the monetary and banking system of the United States de- 
signed to provide essential background for advanced work in business administration. 
The main topics covered are the elements of money, banking. Federal Reserve 
System monetary and fiscal theory, and international developments in money and 
banking. Prerequisites: Eco. 201-202. 3 sem. hrs. 

Fn. 307 — Corporation Finance (1st session 6:00 p.m.) 

Methods, policy, institutions involved in financing the business corporation, financial 
analysis of corporations. Emphasis is on the formulation and implementation of long- 
term corporate financial policies and the modification of these policies to meet 
changing conditions. Prerequisites: Eco. 201-202, Ace. 203 or its equivalent. 

3 sem. hrs. 

G.B. 105 — Behavioral Sciences (1st session 6:00 p.m. ; 2nd session 8:00 p.m.) 

This course is designed to familiarize the student of business administration with 
the fundamental principles and practices of the behavioral sciences. Emphasis 
is placed on the growth and development in psychology, sociology, and cultural 
anthropology and their increased application to the study of human behavior in 
working environments in business, industrial, military and governmental settings. 
This course is related to advanced courses in advertising psychology, marketing 
research and marketing psychology. 3 sem. hrs. 

Hist. 101— Western Civilization (2000 B.C.-1500 A.D.) (1st session 6:00 
p.m.) 

The purpose of this course is to give an introductory view of history as a whole. In 
this semester, early civilizations are studied in their political, economic, social and 
religious aspects, and their contributions to modern civilization evaluated. 

3 sem. hrs. 

Hist. 102 — Western Civilization (1500 A.D. to Present) (2nd session 6:00 
p.m.) 

In this semester, past movements are coordinated with present civilization by study- 
ing the present in the light of the past. Special emphasis is placed throughout on the 
unity and continuity of history. 3 sem. hrs. 

Hist. 201— Survey of United States History I (1492-1865) (1st session 8:00 
p.m.) 

Discoveries and settlements; French and Indian wars; economic development; inde- 
pendence; the "Articles" and the "Constitution"; era of Jefferson; westward move- 
ments; the "American system" ; the "reign" of Jackson; the Civil War. 3 sem. hrs. 

Hist. 202 — Survey of United States History II (1865 to Present) (2nd session 

8:00p.m.) 

Reconstruction; economic and social developments; imperialism; agriculture vs. in- 
dustry; growth of monopolies and trusts; World War I; the New Deal, American 
interest in world affairs; World War II; toward internationalism; the New Frontier. 

3 sem. hrs. 

Hist. 324 — Modern Europe IV (1945 to the Present) 1st session 6:00 p.m.) 
Cold war; Recovery; Economic and Social Trends; Cultural Scene; Political De- 
velopments. 3 sem. hrs. 

Hist. 341 — Contemporary World History (2nd session 6:00 p.m.) 

The Western nations in the aftermath of World War II; the Communist States 
in the aftermath of the War, the March towards independence in Asia and Africa 
— India, China, Japan, Southeast Asia, the Near and Middle East, Global Re- 
sources. Defense and Social Justice. 3 sem. hrs. 

29 



Hist. 352 — Latin American History (1820-Present) (1st session 8:00 p.m.) 
Foundation and development of Mexico, Venezuela, Columbia, Ecuador, Peru, 
Bolivia, Chile, Argentina, Uruguay, Paraguay, Brazil and the smaller nations of 
Middle America; Latin America and the United States; Inter- American relations. 

3 sem. hrs. 

Journ. 323 — Photography (1st session 6:00 p.m.) 

The use of the camera in Journalism. Darkroom techniques, fundamentals of com. 
position and lighting, editing of photographs, intensive practice in taking photo- 
graphs and darkroom work. Prerequisite: instructor's permission. 3 sem. hrb. 

MFL Sp. 101-102 — First Year College Language; Sp. 101 — 1st session 6:00 
p.m.; Sp. 102 — 2nd session 6:00 p.m.) 
The fundamentals of the language. Primary emphasis on structure, morphology, 
vocabulary. This course aims chiefly at a reading knowledge and is designed for 
non-majors. Language laboratory work is recommended, but is voluntary. Out- 
side readings. 3-3 sem. hrs. 

Mg. 205 — Principles of Management (1st session 6:00 p.m.; 2nd session 
8:00 p.m.) 

Basic principles and concepts of management as they are applied in the functions of 
planning, organizing, directing, and controlling the business enterprise. 

3 sem. hrs. 

Mg. 330 — Organizational Theory (2nd session 6:00 p.m.) 

This is an analytical approach to the definition, measurement, and evaluation of 
the systems and subsystems, functions and disfunctions, which constitute the organi- 
zation. The course is treated as the first step in the implementation of planning. 
Prerequisites: GB 105, MG 205. 3 sem. hrs. 

Mg. 345 — Managerial Policies (1st session 8:00 p.m.) 

This course deals with the principles and problems involved in planning, coordinat- 
ing and controlling the operations of a business. A considerable part of the course 
is devoted to solving typical problems that arise in administering these functions. 
Cases are used to supplement text material. Prerequisites: Mg. 205, Ec. 201-202, Ec. 
202 may be taken concurrently. 3 sem. hrs. 

Mg. 362 — Managerial Behavior (1st session 8:00 p.m.) 

This course relates the efforts of behavioral scientists to the problems of managing 
people in organizations. Major areas considered are: the social, psychological and 
managerial issues involved in setting objectives; the qualifications and requirements 
of a manager in modern business; and some current issues which will affect the atti- 
tudes of management in the future. Prerequisites: Mg. 205 or equivalent. 

3 sem. hrs. 

Mk. 205 — Basic Marketing (1st session 8:00 p.m.; 2nd session 6:00 p.m.) 

This basic course acquaints the student with the nature and scope of modern market- 
ing management. It is a prerequisite for all other marketing courses. It outlines the 
areas in which decisions are made in developing and implementing marketing activi- 
ties at all levels of production and distribution. This is the required terminal course 
in marketing for non-marketing majors. 3 sem. hrs. 

Mk. 307 — Market Simulation (1st session 6:00 p.m.; 2nd session 8:00 p.m.) 

3 sem. hrs. 

Mk. 308 — Advertising (May be taken for credit as Jr. 345) (1st session 8:00 
p.m.) 

Fundamentals of advertising: layouts and writing of copy; advertising agencies and 
media; psychology in advertising; assigned problems and demonstrations. Pre- 
requisite: Mk. 205. 3 sem. hrs. 

30 



Math. 101-102 — Elementary Concepts of Mathematics (City College credit 
only) (101 — 1st session 8:00 p.m.; 102 — 2nd session 8:00 p.m.) 
A course intended for non-math, non-science majors which deals with a selection of 
topics from the areas of computational and modern mathematics. 3-3 sem. hrs. 

Phil. 101 — Introduction to Philosophy (Both sessions 6:00 p.m.) 

The difference between the philosophical approach to reality and that of other disci- 
plines. An introduction to certain fundamental problems of philosophy, especially 
those of metaphysics and epistemology, as seen by various authors. No prerequi- 
site. REQUIRED BY ALL STUDENTS WHO HAVE HAD NO PREVIOUS 
PHILOSOPHY COURSES. Students who have had a previous course cannot take 
this course for credit. 3 sem. hrs. 

Phil. 302 — Ethics (2nd session 8:00 p.m.) 

An attempt to acquaint the student with certain fundamental ethical problems by 
contrasting the solutions proposed by the philosophies most influential on the con- 
temporary American scene: subjectivism, cultural relativism, situationism, hedonism, 
moralsense theory, pragmatism, naturalism, natural-law theory, psychoanalysis, exis- 
tentialism. Prerequisites: PI. 101. 3 sem. hrs. 

Phil. 320 — Existentialism (1st session 8:00 p.m.) 

A treatment of the characteristic existentialistic themes as exemplified in the 
writings of Kierkegard, Heidegger, Jaspers, Marcel and Sartre. Prerequisites: 
PI. 101 3 sem. hrs. 

Phil. 321 — Philosophy of Education (1st session 6:00 p.m.) 

Fundamental educational problems: the nature of the learner, the agencies responsible 
for education, the rights of parents and state regarding education, and the philo- 
sophical aspects of curriculum and methodology. Also Ed. 321. 3 sem. hrs. 

Pol. Sci. 101-102 — Introduction to American Government (101 — 1st session 
8:00 p.m.; 102 — 2nd session 8:00 p.m.) 

Structure, development, powers, and limits of -the federal government; under- 
lying principles and relationships of executive, legislative and judicial departments; 
organization, functions, and powers of various branches and bureaus of government; 
revenues, expenditures, and debts; federal regulation and control. 3-3 sem. hrs. 

Pol. Sci. 306- — City Governments, Large and Small (1st session 6:00 p.m.) 

Analysis of the various types of city governments found in the United States. It 
will include an in depth study of these types: City Manager, Mayor and Council, 
Commissioners, and Mayor and Alderman (for smaller cities and towns). 

3 sem. hrs. 

Psch. 101 — Introductory Psychology (2nd session 8:00 p.m.) 

Survey of the major fields of Psychology. Prerequisite for all other psychology 
courses. 3 sem. hrs. 

Sociol. 101 — Introductory Sociology (1st session 8:00 p.m.; 2nd session 6:00 
p.m.) 

An introduction to the sociological perspective. Consideration of the concepts of 
structure and culture. General survey of relevant theory and research to give the stu- 
dent an understanding of the sociologist's approach to human behavior. 3 sem. hrs. 

Sociol. 201 — Social Problems (2nd session 8:00 p.m.) 

A broad one-semester survey of current social problems in American Society. Topical 
areas include: Alcoholism and addiction, crime and delinquency, race and minorities, 
population. 3 sem. hrs. 

31 



Sociol. 306 — Sociology of Religion (1st session 6:00 p.m.) 

The functions of religion in society; religious and social variation; the inter-relations 
between religion and other social institutions. 3 sem. hrs. 

RelStu. 342- — Ways of Christian Life: Marriage (2nd session 6:00 p.m.) 

3 sem. hrs. 

RelStu. 344 — The Church of the Future (1st session 6:00 p.m.) 

A study of the Catholic Church in a state of change; special emphasis on Vatican 
ll's understanding of the nature and mission of the Church; projections about 
the form of Catholicism in the future; obedience; authority; contemporary moral 
issues; ecumenism; liturgical reform ; layman and priest in the Church. 3 sem. hrs. 

VisArt. 125 — Survey of Worlci Art I (1st session 8:00 p.m.) 

A special course for non-art majors which deals with the significant images, 
structures, and concepts of art from pre-historic times through the Middle Ages. 

3 sem. hrs. 

VisArt. 126 — Survey of World Art 11 (2nd session 8:00 p.m.) 

A special course for non-art majors which traces the development of images, concepts, 
styles and structures from the Renaissance to the present. 3 sem. hrs. 




Classical Studies 



Chairman: Emmett M. Bienvenu, S.J., M.A. 

Cls. 356 — Lyric and Pastoral Poetry (1st session 10:00) 

Besides the Idylls of Theocritus and the Eclogues of Virgil, selected poems from 
both the Greek and Roman lyrical poets are discussed. 3 sem. hrs. 




Communications 



Chairman: James Tungate, Ph.D. (Danna Center Basement — Ext. 471) 

Comm. 300 — Institute for Religious Communications 

A high-intensity three-week session of learning and practice in the basic techniques 
of modern mass communication, including television, radio, film, educational media 
and public relations. Primary emphasis is on religious programming, but student 
interests in all aspects of public affairs programming and educational uses are 
equally served. The institute holds all-day sessions, plus evening meetings, Monday 
through Friday, with additional meetings on week-ends. 

Comm. 382 — Broadcast Law (1st session 10:00) 

Laws and regulations dealing with all aspects of broadcasting will be examined. 
Landmark FCC decisions will be studied and court cases resulting in precedent-setting 
guidelines for purchasing, licensing and operating broadcast properties will be 
studied. 3 sem. hrs. 

Comm. 392 — Current Trends (1st session 10:00) 

Each offering of the course will change, since the content of the course is based 
on current issues and developments within the media. This course may be re- 
peated. 3 sem. hrs. 

32 




Computer Science 



CompSci. 121— FORTRAN Programming (1st session TB A) 

Writing and debugging computer programs in the FORTRAN language in a self- 
paced format. 3 sem. hrs. 

CompSci. 122 — COBOL Programming (2nd session TB A) 

Writing and debugging computer programs in the COBOL language in a self- 
paced format. Prerequisit: 101 or approval of Instructor. 3 sem. hrs. 




Drama and Speech 



Chairman: Ernest Ferlita, S.J., D.F.A. (Drama Speech Building — Ext. 306) 

D.S. 101-102 — Fundamentals of Speech (101 — 1st session 10:00; 102 — 2nd 
session 10:00) 

Study of the factors governmg good speech content and delivery; an introduction to 
speech behavior in human interaction, 3-3 sem. hrs. 

D.S. 375 — Theatre Experiments (1st session 6:00 p.m.) 

This course is designed for those who have absolutely no interest m the theatre. 

3 sem. hrs. 




Economics 



Eco. 201 — Principles of Economics (1st session 11:40) 

This course and its companion (Eco. 202) provide the gateway to all advanced 
courses in economics. Macroeconomics: the emphasis is on the level of economic ac- 
tivity. A survey of the roles of business, government, labor and the consumer in the 
economy, the principles of national income accounting, income and employment 
theory, monetary institutions and theory, cyclical fluctuations, monetary and fiscal 
policy. Prerequisite: Soph, standing. 3 sem. hrs. 

Eco. 202 — Principles of Economics (2nd session 11:40) 

Microeconomics: the emphasis is on the composition of economic activity. Elemen- 
tary theory of pricing and distribution of income under the alternative market situa- 
tions of completion, monopoly, oligopoly, monopolistic competition. Also included 
are a simplified theory of international trade, the problems of national economic 
development, and a survey of alternative economic systems. Prerequisite: Soph, 
standing. 3 sem. hrs. 

Eco. 322 — Intermediate Macroeconomic Analysis (1st session 10:00) 

An intensive and comprehensive study of aggregative economic analysis which 
covers the measurement of aggregative economic activity and the theory of income 
and employment. Special attention is given to the role of aggregate consumption, 

33 




savings, investment, and government in determining the level of income and em- 
ployment. Other topics considered are foreign trade and finance, money and interest, 
the price level, and growth and stability in economic activity. Emphasis is placed 
upon the application of principles to current economic problems. Prerequisite: 
Eco. 201-202, M.B.E. 210. 3 sem. hrs. 



Education, Physical Education 
and Library Science 



Chairman: Mary C. Fitzgerald, M.Ed. (Cummings Hall 206 — Ext. 225) 
UNDERGRADUATE EDUCATION 

Educ. 152 — General Geography (2nd session 10:00) 

This course deals with the basic concepts of general geography as an area of the 
social studies, (also Geo 152A). 3 sem. hrs. 

Educ. 155- — Art for Elementary School Teachers (2nd session 11 :40) 

Practical experience in art at the elementary level. 3 sem. hrs. 

Educ. 230 — Child Psychology (1st session 10:00) 

A study of the growth and development of the child from birth to adolescence with 
emphasis on motor functioning, language, intelligence, social and emotional adjust- 
ment, moral formation. 3 sem. hrs. 

Educ. 254 — Children's Literature (1st session 8:20) 

A study of children's literature, its uses in the elementary school, and the theory of 
story telling. K-6. Also LS 312. 3 sem. hrs. 

Educ. 301 — The Modern High School (1st session 8:20) 

The development, objectives, curriculum, administration, and supervision of the 
high school; guidance and extracurricular activities and evaluation at the high 
school level. 3 sem. hrs. 

Educ. 321 — Philosophy of Education (2nd session 8:20) 

Fundamental educational problems; the nature of the learner, the agencies respon- 
sible for education, the rights of parents and state regarding education, and the 
phil sophical aspects of curriculum and methodology. 3 sem. hrs. 

Educ. 333 — Educational Psychology (1st session 11 :40) 

A study of psychological principles as they may apply to field of education including 
nature of man, nature of mental abilities, motivation, the learning process, in- 
dividual differences, and principles of mental hygiene. 3 sem. hrs. 

Educ. 351 — Secondary School Methods (1st session 10:00) 

This course includes the psychology of specific high school subjects and the 
methods of teaching these subjects. 3 sem. hrs. 

Educ. 352 — The Teaching of Reading in the Elementary School (1st session 
10:00) 

The methods and materials used in reading instruction in most types of elementary 
schools will be studied. 3 sem. hrs. 

34 



Educ. 361 — Reading Practicum (1st session 8:20) 

A course in which undergraduates assist graduate students; work in critical settings 
at the elementary school level, aiding children who have reading problems. 3 sem. hrs. 

Educ. 31 — Tests and Measurements (1st session 10:00) 

The principles and practices utilized in the construction and improvement of teacher- 
made tests and an appraisal of the various types of standardized tests available to 
school systems. 3 sem. hrs. 

Educ. 399 — Independent Research Project in Education (1st session TBA ; 2nnd 
session TBA) 

Individual Research Project, under close supervision of a faculty member, to enrich 
the teacher preparation of the student. 1-3 sem. hrs. 

PHYSICAL EDUCATION 

PhysEd. 107— Tennis (2nd session 10:00 MW; 11:40 M\V) 



PhysEd. 125 — First Aid and Safety (1st session 8:25) 



1 sem. hr. 



2 sem. hrs. 



PhysEd. 389 — Techniques in Health Education in the Elementary School (1st 
session 10:00 TTh) 

Methods, materials, and trends in the elementary school health program. 

2 sem. hrs. 

PhysEd. 390 — Techniques in Physical Education in the Elementary School (1st 
session 11 :40 TTh) 

The study of the techniques, curriculum and trends of the physical education pro- 
gram in the elementary school. 2 sem. hrs. 

LIBRARY SCIENCE 

Ls. 312 — Selection of Books for the Young Adult (1st session 10:00) 

Criteria for selection of books and audio-visual aids for the young adult based on the 
educational program of the school. Skillful use of tools in the various areas of 
knowledge; reading guidance, reading and evaluating current trends in present day 
books and the choice of some adult books for the young adult. Examination of 
printed and audio-visual tools. 3 sem. hrs. 

Ls. 351 — Selection of Library Materials (1st session 11:40) 

Instruction in the use of reference materials ; their content, evaluation, organization 
and use. Examination of the textual features of books. General characteristics of 
reference material in their relations to the school curriculum. Methods of selecting 
reference material and instruction in their use. 3 sem. hrs. 

GRADUATE EDUCATION 

Educ. 401 — Philosophy of Education (2nd session 8 :20) 

A brief study of the major philosophies, including contemporary movements, which 
affect educational thought. 3 sem. hrs. 

Educ. 420 — School Administration: Elementary (1st session 10:00) 

Principles, policies, practices and problems of elementary school administration; 
the role and functions of the elementary principal ; the improvement of pupil 
discipline and school-community relations. 3 sem. hrs. 

35 



Educ. 422 — School Administration: Secondary (1st session 10:00) 

Principles, policies, practices and problems of secondary school administration; the 
role and functions of the secondary principal ; the improvement of pupil motivation 
and teacher morale; administering the comprehensive secondary school. 

3 sem. hrs. 

Educ. 425 — School Administration: Legal Foundations and Problems (2nd 
session 10:00) 
Principles of law as found in Constitutional provisions, typical statutes and de- 
cisions of cases as they affect education, public and private, are examined in this 
course from the viewpoint of governing bodies, administrators, educators, students 
and those responsible for them 3 sem. hrs. 

Educ. 455-456 — -Supervision and Curriculum in Reading for the Secondary 
School Teacher (1st session 8:20—1 :10) 
Principal emphasis is placed on supervision and curriculum to determine the 
achievement of the objectives of developmental reading with practical experiences 
with the materials and supplementary equipment. Experience will be provided 
with students in large groups, grade 7-12. Summer only. 6 sem. hrs. 

Educ. 457 — Reading Foundations (1st session 11:40) 

A foundation course designed to explore, in depth, the skills to be developed in a 
reading program, the grade-placement of these skills, and methods for developing 
efficiency in the application and usage of these skills. 3 sem. hrs. 

Educ. 460-A61 — Supervision and Curriculum in Reading for the Elementary 
School Teacher (1st session 8:20-1 : 10) 
A class-practicum course stressing diagnosis and correction of reading problems at 
the elementary level and the supervision of developmental programs and individu- 
alized instruction in reading. Emphasis will be placed on analysis and implementa- 
tion of current curriculum materials as well as standardized and teacher-made tests. 
The clinic provides an opportunity to work under supervision with children pos- 
sessing reading difficulties. 6 sem. hrs. 

Educ. 470 — Principles and Administration of Guidance: Secondary (2nd 
session 11 :40) 
A survey of the history, nature, purposes, functions, principles and practices of or- 
ganized guidance in our educational system. Required for Counselors in secondary 
schools. 3 sem. hrs. 

Educ. 471 — Analysis of the Individual: Educational Tests and Measurements 
(1st session 10:00) 
A survey of the educational measurement movement ; the principles and techniques 
of constructing and improving teacher-made tests; an appraisal of intelligence, apti- 
tude, achievement, and interest tests relative to their validity, reliability, administra- 
tion and interpretation. 3 sem. hrs. 

Educ. 475 — Counseling Theory and Practice (1st session 8:20) 

Theories and techniques of counseling with consideration given to the principles, 
practices, tools, problems, and evaluation of counseling. Required for counselors 
in secondary and elementary schools. 3 sem. hrs. 

Educ. 481 — Analysis of the Elementary School Pupil (1st session 10:00) 

Required for counselors in the elementary school. 3 sem. hrs. 

Educ. 490 — Methodology of Educational Research (1st session 8:20) 

An extensive study of the methods and tools of educational research with emphasis 
reading program, the grade-placement of these skills, and methods for developing 
efficiency in the application and usage of these skills. 3 sem. hrs. 

36 



Educ. 491 — Statistics in Education (1st session 11:40) 

The computation, use and understanding of frequency distributions, measures of 
central tendency, measures of variability, normal curve, correlation, and statistical 
inference as applied to education and found in educational literature. Prerequisite: 
Ed. 490. 3 sem. hrs. 

Educ. 499 — Research Problem in Education (1st session TBA; 2nd session 
TBA) 

An individual research project, under close supervision of a faculty member, when 
particular needs of a student cannot be satisfied by the regularly scheduled courses. 
Prerequisite: Ed. 490. 1-3 sem. hrs. 




English 



Chairman: James E. Swearingen, Ph.D. (Science Complex 537D — Ext. 432) 

Engl. 110-111 — Literature and Life (110 — 1st session 10:00; 11:40; 111 — 
2nd session 11:40) 
A series of thematically oriented courses, providing subject matter for composition 
and presenting a systematic introduction to writing. Titles of sections and book- 
lists will be published prior to each term. 3 sem. hrs. 

Engl. 201 — Major Literary Types I (City College credit only) (1st and 2nd 
session TBA) 
A study of the novel and short story will be combined with intensive writing. 

3 sem. hrs. 

Engl. 202 — Major Literary Types II (City College credit only (1st and 2nd 
session TBA) 

A study of poetry and drama will be combined with intensive writing. 3 sem. hrs. 

Engl. 212 — Introduction to Fiction (1st session 11:40) 
Engl. 214 — Introduction to Poetry (2nd session 8:20) 



Engl. 215 — Introduction to Shakespeare (2nd session 8:20) 



3 sem. hrs. 



3 sem. hrs. 



Engl. 405 — The Epic (2nd session 10:00) 

A course illustrating the development of the epic, beginning with intensive study 
of Homer and Vergil. Some attention will be given to the minor classical epics 
and to selected medieval writings. 3 sem. hrs. 

Engl. 453 — 19th Century British Fiction (1st session 10:00) 

A continuation of Engl. 452, this course examines the development of the novel in 
the 19th century with the study of works of Austen, the Brentes, Thackeray, 
Dickens, George Eliot, Hardy, and the minor novelists. 3 sem. hrs. 

Engl. 469 — Shakespeare: Histories (1st session 8:20) 

3 sem. hrs. 

37 




Finance 



Fn. 305 — Money and Banking (1st session 8:20) 

An introductory survey of the monetary and banking system of the United States de- 
signed to provide essential background for advanced work in business administration. 
The main topics covered are the elements of money, banking. Federal Reserve 
System monetary and fiscal theory, and international developments in money and 
banking. Prerequisites: Eco. 201-202. 3 sem. hrs. 

Fn. 307 — Corporation Finance (1st session 10:00) 

Methods, policy, institutions involved in financing the business corporation, financial 
analysis of corporations. Emphasis is on the formulation and implementation of long- 
term corporate financial policies and the modification of these policies to meet 
changing conditions. Prerequisites: Eco. 201-202, Ace. 203 or its equivalent. 

3 sem. hrs. 

Fn. 310 — Financial Institutions (2nd session 10:00) 

A study of the operations, sources, and uses of funds of saving and loan institu- 
tions, insurance companies, pension funds, trusts, and other financial intermediaries 
and the impact of this rapidly growing area of finance on the economy. Prerequi- 
site: Fn. 305- 3 sem. hrs. 

Fn. 316 — Investments (1st session 8:20) 

Principles of sound investment securities, markets for security issues, sources of finan- 
cial information; interpretation of financial news and corporation data and reports, 
investment programs for individuals and institutional investors, estate planning, regu- 
lation of investment markets; the Securities and Exchange Commission. Prerequisite: 
Fn. 305, Ace. 106 or its equivalent. 3 sem. hrs. 



General Business 




G.B. 105 — Behavioral Sciences (2nd session 10:00) 

This course is designed to familiarize the student of business administration with 
the fundam.ental principles and practices of the behavioral sciences. Emphasis 
is placed on the growth and development in psychology, sociology, and cultural 
anthropology and their increased application to the study of human behavior in 
working environments in business, industrial, military and governmental settings. 
This course is related to advanced courses in advertising psychology, marketing 
research and marketing psychology. 3 sem. hrs. 




History 



Chairman: C Joseph Pusateri, Ph.D. (Science Complex 537C — Ext. 367) 

Hs. 101— Western Civilization (2000 B.C.-1500 A.D.) (1st session 11:40) 
The purpose of this course is to give an introductory view of history as a whole. 

38 



In this semester, early civilizations are studied in their political, economic, social, 
and religious aspects, and their contributions to modern civilization evaluated. 

3 sem. hrs. 

Hs. 102 — Western Civilization (1500 A.D. to Present) (1st session 10:00) 
In this semester, past movements are coordinated with present civilization by study- 
ing the present in the light of the past. Special emphasis is placed throughout on the 
unity and continuity of history. 3 sem. hrs. 

Hs. 201 — Survey of United States History I (1492-1865) (1st session 8:20) 
Discoveries and settlements; French and Indian wars; economic development; in- 
dependence; the "Articles" and the "Constitution"; era of Jefferson; westward move- 
ments ; the "American system"; and "reign" of Jackson ; the Civil War. 3 sem. hrs. 

Hs. 202 — Survey of United States History II (1865 to Present) (2nd session 

11:40) 

Reconstruction; economic and social developments; imperialism; agriculture vs. 

industry; growth of monopolies and trusts; World War I; the New Deal, American 

interest in world affairs; World War II; toward internationalism; the New Frontier. 

3 sem. hrs. 

Hs. 320 — The Reformation: The Protestant and Cathohc Phases (1st session 
10:00) 

The Origins of the Reformation; Luther; Calvin; the English scene; the Scandi- 
navian scene; the Wars of Religion; the effects of the Reformation; the Pre- 
Reformation attempts at reform; reactions to the Protestant Reforms; the Council 
of Trent; the Reformed Papacy; Revival among the Regulars; Education and 
Scholarship; Missions. 3 sem. hrs. 

Hs. 378— The United States Since World War I (1918-to the Present) (2nd 
session 10:00) 

A studied analysis of the responses of the United States to the exigencies of the 
twentieth century. The course commences with an examination of Wilsonian diplo- 
macy and then attempts extensive reevaluation of both the foreign and domestic 
events of the Twenties. The rise and fall of the New Deal is studied at length, as 
is the American response to the turmoils of European and Asian developments. 
The unsolved problems emanating from the Second World War provide a backdrop 
for an analysis of the origins of the Cold War. An attempt is also made to relate 
the problems of the 1960's to the contours of American History. 3 sem. hrs. 



Honors and Privileged 
Studies 

Director: Walter S. Maestri, III (Marquette Hall— Ext. 317) 

HPS 391-392— Advanced Independent Study (391— 1st session TBA; 392— 
2nd session TBA) 

Individual readings and discussion for the special student with junior standing. Ad- 
mission by permission of the Director. 3-3 sem. hrs. 

HPS 401-402 — Special Projects (401 — 1st session TBA; 402 — 2nd session 
TBA) 

Comprehensive research projects for selected undergraduates working under the su- 
pervision of a faculty research adviser. Admission by permission of the Director. 

3-3 sem. hrs. 

39 





Journalism 




Chamnan: Ralph T. Bell, B.A. (Danna Center 211 — Ext. 265) 

Journ. 103 — Basic Reporting and News Writing (1st session 8:20) 

The basics of news coverage. Intensive practice in reporting news, handling inter- 
views, covering speeches, etc. The style and structure of news stories. Lectures and 
special reading. Required of Journalism majors. 3 sem. hrs. 

Journ. 323 — Photography (1st session 10:00; 11:40) 

The use of the camera in Journalism. Darkroom techniques, fundamentals of com- 
position and lighting, editing of photographs, intensive practice in taking photo- 
graphs and darkroom work. Prerequisite: instructor's permission. 3 sem. hrs. 

Journ. 349 — Pubhc Relations and Publications for School Personnel (1st ses- 
sion 10:00) 

A special interest course designed to provide a theoretical and practical background 
for individuals involved in internal and external public relations and publications 
for schools. Lectures and readings on theoretical aspects; practical application 
projects. 3 sem. hrs. 



Languages — Modern Foreign 



Chairman: Richard Frank, Ph.D. (Health Research Bldg.— Ext. 229) 

Fr. 101-102 — First Year College Language (101 — 1st session 8:20; 102— 
2nd session 8:20) 
The fundamentals of the language. Primary emphasis on structure, morphology, 
vocabulary. This course aims chiefly at a reading knowledge and is designed for 
non-majors. Language laboratory work is recommended, but is voluntary. Outside 
readings. 3-3 sem. hrs. 

Fr. 201-202— Second Year College Language (201— 1st session 10:00; 202 

— 2nd session 10:00) 

Review of structure, morphology and vocabulary. Readings in the general cultural 

monuments of the language community. For non-majors; work in the language 

laboratory is voluntary. Outside readings. 3-3 sem. hrs. 

Ger. 101-102 — First Year College Language (101— 1st session 8:20; 102— 
2nd session 8:20) 
The fundamentals of the language. Primary emphasis on structure, morphology, 
vocabulary. This course aims chiefly at a reading knowledge and is designed for 
non-majors. Language laboratory work is recommended, but is voluntary. Outside 
readings. 3-3 sem. hrs. 

Ger. 201-202 — Second Year College Language (201 — 1st session 10:00; 
202 — 2nd session 10:00) 
Review of structure, morphology and vocabulary. Readings in the general cultural 

40 



monuments of the language community. For non-majors; work in the language 
laboratory is voluntary. Outside readings. 3-3 sem. hrs. 

Rus. 101-102— First Year College Language (101— 1st session 8:20; 201— 
2nd session 8:20) 
The fundamentals of the language. Primary emphasis on structure, morphology, 
vocabulary. This course aims chiefly at a reading knowledge and is designed for 
non-majors. Language laboratory work is recommended, but is voluntary Outside 
^^^^'"g^- .S-3 sem. hrs. 




Law 



Dean: Marcel Garsaud LL.M. (School of Law — Ext. 8472) 
Contact the Dean's Office for Schedule of summer offerings. 




Management 



Mg. 205 — Principles of Management (2nd session 8:20) 

Basic principles and concepts of management as they are applied in the func- 
tions of planning, organizing, directing, and controlling the business enterprise. 
The course also focuses on communications in business. 3 sem. hrs. 

Mg. 338 — Production Management (1st session 8:20) 

The purpose of this course is to acquaint the student with the principles, practices 
and problems of management in the business enterprise. The technical, economic, 
political, social, and personal relationships, v/hich constitute the total structure of 
the iirm, are analyzed. Particular attention is given to the human problems arising 
from the growth of the giant, "assembly-line" enterprise. Prerequisite: Eco.201-202. 

3 sem. hrs. 




Marketing 



Mk. 205 — Basic Marketing (1st session 8:20) 

This basic course acquaints the student with the nature and scope of modern market- 
ing management. It is a prerequisite for all other marketing courses. It outlines the 
areas in which decisions are made in developing and implementing marketing activ- 
ities at ail levels of production and distribution. This is the required course 
in marketing for non-marketing majors. 3 sem. hrs. 

Mk. 308 — Advertising (1st session 10:00) 

Fundamentals of advertising: layouts and writing of copy; advertising agencies 
and media; psychology in advertising; assigned problems and demonstrations. 
Prerequisite: Mk. 205. 3 sem. hrs. 

41 



Mk. 310 — Marketing Research (2nd session 10:00) 

Analyze marketing problems and basic research designs. Included in the topics are: 
basic data collection methods; formulation of problems; sources of information; 
composition of data collection forms; design of samples; tabulation of data; analysis 
of data; and preparation of reports. Actual problems and cases are utilized. Ap- 
plication of marketing research is related to motivation, product, advertising, 
sales control, and other areas of marketing. Prerequisite: Mk. 205, Eco. 201, 202, 
210, 211. Eco. 202 and/or Eco. 211 may be taken concurrently with this course. 
This is a required course for all marketing majors. 3 sem. hrs. 




Mathematics 



Chahman: Bernard A. Tonnar, S.J. (Science Complex 540 — Ext. 511) 

Math. 113-114 — The Number Systems and Informal Geometry (113 — 1st 
session 8:20-11:30 for 1st 3 weeks; 114 — 1st session 8:20-11:30 for 
2nd 3 weeks. 
A course specifically designed according to CUPM recommendations for the ele- 
mentary school teacher. OPEN ONLY TO ELEMENTARY EDUCATION 
MAJORS. 3-3 sem. hrs. 

Math. 115-116 — Mathematics for Social Studies (115 — 1st session 8:20; 
116 — 2nd session 8:20) 
This course offers a wide variety of topics which will serve the social science major 
as analytical and quantitative tools and broaden his appreciation for mathematical 
patterns and procedures. Included are introductions to the concepts of probability and 
statistics, mathematical sequences with applications, flow charting and computer 
programming, matrices and linear programming, trigonometric functions, and some 
fundamental concepts in calculus. 3-3 sem. hrs. 

Math. 121 — Mathematics for Humanities (1st session 11:40) 

This is a course for humanities majors, designed to develop intellectual curiosity 
about mathematics, its nature and spirit. The approach is that of a search for patterns, 
the forming of conjectures, and the study and application of these. An outstanding 
result of the approach is a sharpening of general analytical thinking. This is more 
meaningful than in earlier courses taken in high school because of the greater matur- 
ity and more sophisticated academic environment of the student, the course covers a 
variety of topics from number theory, set theory, logic, probability, number systems, 
simple topological properties, finite math and an introduction to computer program- 
ming. 3-3 sem. hrs. 

Math. 150A — Algebra and Trigonometry (2nd session 10:00) 

This course is a preparation for those who are deficient in Algebra and Trigo- 
nometry and also for those who plan to take Calculus. Fundamental applications 
in Algebra, Factoring, Exponents, Quadratic Equations, and Trigonometric 
Functions. 3 sem. hrs. 

Math. 201 — Introductory Linear Algebra (2nd session 10:00) 

Linear spaces, linear transformations and matrices, multilinear forms, inner product, 
characteristic values. 3 sem. hrs. 

Math. 241 — Introductory Probability and Statistics (1st session 10:00) 

This course is designed as an introduction for applications in the fields of business 

42 



administration, social sciences and education. Emphasis is placed on technical skills 
and interpretation of results with enough basic theory for good understanding. 

3 sem. hrs. 

Math. 257-258 — Basic Analysis (257 — 1st session 11:40; 258 — 2nd session 
11:40) 
This beginning college analysis course introduces the science and math majors to 
the concepts of two and three dimensional geometric analysis and calculus of func- 
tions of one variable. 3-3 sem. hrs. 

Math. 407 — Functions (2nd session 10:00) 

3 sem. hrs. 




Medical Technology 



Chairman: Anna A. Persich, M.S. (Health Sciences Building — Ext. 355) 

MedTch. 205 — Human Physiology (2nd session 8:30-12:00) 

An intensive lecture laboratory plus demonstration course relating the mechanisms 
of homeostasis and basic human physiology to the detection of disease in the 
clinical laboratory. Prerequisite: BioSci 101-102. 4 sem. hrs. 




Music 



D^^;?: Joe B.Buttram, Ph.D. (Collegeof Music 103— Ext. 217) 

Mu. Oil — Theory Fundamentals (1st session 10:00-11:00) 

Pitch and rhythmic notation, clefs, key and metric signatures, intervals, rhythmic 
and melodic sight reading. This course or a satisfactory score on the Loyola Theory 
Test is required of all students entering Mu. 111. 

Mu. 120 — Ballet (1st session 1:00-1:50) 
Basic ballet techniques. 

Mu. 123-A— Guitar Class (1st session TB A) 

Functional and elementary reading skills in guitar for non-majors. 

Mu. 123-B — Class Piano (1st session TBA) 

Functional and elementary reading skills for piano for non-majors. 

Mu. 130 — Ballet (1st session 2:00-2:50) 
Basic ballet techniques. 

Mu. 238 — Introduction to Music Literature (1st session 8:30-9:45) 

Emphasis on listening techniques, melody, harmony, rhythm, and textures; form 
types: imitative, variation, improvisatory, sectional; timbre. For majors only. 

2 sem. hrs. 

Mu. 251 — Pre-Clinical Experience (1st session TBA) 

Students are expected to work as volunteers in a psychiatric or rehabilitation institu- 
tion of instructor required. 1 sem. hr. 



sem. hrs. 



1 sem. hr. 



1 sem. hr. 



1 sem. hr, 



1 sem. hr. 



43 



Mu. 258 — Music Essentials and Methods for Elementary Teachers (1st session 

8:30-9:45) 

A course for the elementary teacher in the fundamentals of music; elementary 

piano accompaniments; rhythm band activities; sociological and psychological uses 

of music. 3 sem. hrs. 

Mu. 315 — Orchestration I (1st session 11:30-12:20) 

A study of the capabilities and the limitations of orchestral string instruments: 
band, woodwind, brass, and percussion instruments; the human voice. Scoring 
for choirs of these instrumental families. Prerequisite: Mu. 212. 2 sem. hrs. 

Mu. 320 — Ballet Repertory (1st session 3:00-3:50) 

Students study repertory of ballet companies and opera which comprises every type 
of dance. 1 sem. hr. 

Mu. 338— History II (1st session 11:30-12:45) 

Music of the classical-romantic era. 3 sem. hrs. 

Educ. 364 — Teaching Music in the Secondary Schools (1st session 8:30-9:45) 
Introduction to acoustics; the psychology of learning and teaching music; the 
nature and testing of musical aptitude and ability; philosophy of music education. 

3 sem. hrs. 

Mu. 365 — Essentials of Conducting (1st session 8:30—9:45) 

Vocal or instrumental; applied conducting and management; basic conducting tech- 
niques; use of the baton; professional ethics; techniques for rehearsal and per- 
formance. 2 sem. hrs. 

Mu. 415 — Orchestration (1st session 11:35) 

Scoring for chamber and full orchestra. 2 sem. hrs. 

Mu. 437 — Pre-Baroque History (1st session 8:30-9:45) 

Music history and literature from antiquity through the Renaissance. Prerequisite: 
Mu. 238. 2 sem. hrs. 

Mu. 452 — Psychology of Music I (1st session 8:30-9:45) 

Acoustics of music: sound waves and their characteristics; vibratory sources of 
sounds; anatomy of the hearing process; theories on hearing, neural auditory con- 
nections to the cortex; the psychology of tone; nature of the aesthetic experience; 
tests of musicality and talent. 3 sem. hrs. 

Mu. 515 — Choral Pedagogy (1st session 10:00-11:15) 

Choral organization problems, blend, balance, intonation and vocal production ; in- 
terpretation of literature; program building; rehearsal psychology. 3 sem. hrs. 

Mu. 521 — Special Problems in Music Education (1st session TBA) 

Individual study in an area of interest and significance under the supervision of a 
faculty member. 2 sem. hrs. 

Mu 525 — Brass Pedagogy (1st session 11:30-12:45) 

Problems and procedures in the teaching of brass instruments ; historical develop- 
ment; acoustical considerations; methods and instructional materials; literature. 

3 sem. hrs. 

Mu. 527 — Applied Music (1st session TBA) 

Private study. The student must display a minimum level of performing ability on 
his designated major instrument (including voice). 2 sem. hrs. and/or a 

qualifying examination 

Mu. 537 — Orchestral Literature (1st session 8:30-9:45) 

Survey of orchestral literature from the Baroque to the present including stylistic 
analysis of selected works. 3 sem. hrs. 

44 



Mu. 554 — Psychology of Music II (1st session TBA) 

Techniques and instrumentation for research in the psychology of music. Lecture 
and laboratory. 2 sem. hrs. 

Mu. 563 — Influence of Music on Behavior II (1st session TBA) 

Man and Music; Processes in Music Therapy; The Community Concept in Music 
Therapy. 3 sem. hrs. 

Mu. 572 — Research in Music Education (1st session TBA) 

Original investigations in the field of music education. 3 sem. hrs. 

Mu. 573 — Research in Music Therapy (1st session TBA) 

Original investigations in the field of music therapy. Seminar. 3 sem. hrs. 

Mu. 585 — Advanced Scoring (1st session TBA) 

The study of scoring for various media such as concert band, chorus, string orcnes- 
tra, and full orchestra; course structured to individual student's need and interest. 

3 sem. hrs. 

Mu. 590 — Seminar in Research (1st session 10:00-10:50) 

Required of all Master's candidates, enrollment must be concurrent with the stu- 
dent's first semester in the graduate program ; techniques in research and writing 
crucial to the completion of the thesis. 1 sem. hr. 

Mu. 591 — Thesis (1st session TBA) 

Mu. 593 A— Recital (1st session TBA) 

Mu. 593 B — Recital Document (1st session TBA) 

Mu. 598 A — Ensemble (1st session TBA) 



1 to 3 sem. hrs. 



3 sem. hrs. 



3 sem. hrs. 
1 sem. hr. 




Secondary School 
Music Institute 



The College of Music ofl^ers each summer to talented High School and Junior 
High School students the opportunity for concentrated music study on a non- 
credit basis. Students perform in a variety of ensembles, study basic theory, ar- 
ranging and composition, music literature and history and receive private and 
class applied instruction. Offerings are available for students interested in the 
study of string and wind instruments, piano and vocal music. Ballet on the ele- 
mentary, intermediate and advanced levels is also available. 

001 AB— Band (1st session 9:00-9:50) 

002 A— Theory (1st session 9:00-9:50) 

003 A — String Orchestra (1st session 9:00-9:50 TTh) 

45 



003 B— Orchestra (1st session 10:00-10:50 MWF) 

004 A — Allied Arts (1st session 10:00-10:50 TTh) 
004 B— Theory (1st session 10:00-10:50 MWF) 
004 C— Theory ( 1 st session 1 : 00-1 0:50 MWF) 
004 D— Theory (1st session 10:00-10:50 MWF) 
004 E — Theory (College Prep) (1st session 10:00-10:50 MWF) 

004 F — Theory (Adv) (1st session 10:00-10:50 MWF) 

005 A— Stage Band (1st session 11 :00-ll :50 MWF) 

006 A — Chorus (1st session 11:00-11:50) 

007 A— Middle/Junior Stage Band (1st session 11:00-11:50 MWF) 

007 B— String Ensemble (1st session 11 :00-ll :50 TTh) 

008 A — Class Piano (1st session 11 :00-ll : 50 TTh) 
008 B— Class Piano (1st session TBA) 
008 C— Class Guitar (1st session TBA) 

008 D— Class Voice (1st session TBA) 

009 A — Private Lessons (1st session TBA) 

010 A— Ballet (1st session 1 :00-l :50) 
010 B — Ballet (1st session 2:00-2:50) 
010 C— Ballet (1st session 3:00-3:50) 

Philosophy 

Chairman: Alvin J. Holloway, S.J., Ph.D. (Stallings Hall 118— Ext. 348) 

Phil. 114 — DC — Freedom and Oppression (2nd session 10:00) 

An attempt to define and evaluate moral, political, and social freedom. The course 
includes analysis of movements, structures, institutions, processes, and rhetoric of 
oppression, participation, and liberation. No prerequisites. 3 sem. hrs. 

Phil. 141 — DC — Existentialism (1st session 10:00) 

3 sem. hrs. 

Phil. 204 — Philosophy of Man (1st session 11:40) 

A consideration of four of the basic problems of human nature ; knowledge, freedom, 
soul, and person. Readings from classical and contemporary sources. Prerequisite: 
Phil. 101, or mode of thought course. 

Phil. 33 1 — Introduction to Logic (2nd session 1 1 :40) 

An introduction to the structure of arguments, critical thinking in general, and phil- 
osophical argument in particular; including a study of the propositional calculus and 
Aristotelian logic. 3 sem. hrs. 

46 




Physics 



Chairman: Carl Brans, Ph.D. (Science Complex 451— Ext. 596) 

Ph. 103 — Introductory Physics (1st session 10:00-12:00) 

A lecture-demonstration course designed specifically as an orientation course for 
those whose interests lie in the sphere of the humanities and to aid in their interpreta- 
tion of their immediate physical environment. From time to time rigorous laboratory 
exercises are assigned. A knowledge of algebra is required. 4 sem. hrs. 

Ph. 201-203— General Physics (201— 1st session 10:00 to 12:45; 203— 
2nd session 10:00 to 12:45) 
The principles of mechanics, heat, sound, light, magnetism, electricity, and funda- 
mentals of atomic physics. In presenting these topics the special interests of the bio- 
logical sciences and the general education groups are kept in view. A knowledge of 
algebra and trigonometry is required. 4-4 sem. hrs. 

Special advanced offerings designed specifically for High School Teachers 
of Physics will he presented as demand and resources permit. These of- 
ferings will generally carry graduate credit and will he applicahle toward 
the M.S. (Physics Teaching) degree. Credit for these courses ivill he explained 
in the Institute hrochure availahle from the Department of Physics. 

Ph. 470 — Introductory Physical Science 

A unified laboratory-lecture course designed for teachers of students at the junior 
high level. This laboratory-oriented course, which had its genesis in the Physical 
Science Study Committee physics program, is expected to equip students to meet 
the challenge of the various new senior high school courses in science. The study 
of matter is the central theme; differences between substances and the idea of 
quantity are the avenues of approach. Participants have a very active role in the 
program, observations and experiments being integrated directly and immediately 
with the lectures and problems. 

Ph. 471— Physical Science II 

This is a second-year course in physical science intended for those teachers who 
have had Introductory Physical Science teaching experience. Two broad topics 
are presented in PS 11: the relationship between atoms and electrical charge, and 
the various forms and changes in energy culminating in the principle of the 
conservation of energy. The course continues and preserves the spirit of the IPS 
course. The course is offered in connection with Physics 470 for those teachers 
who wish to teach Physical Science II as a follow-up to Introductory Physical 
Science, and for other teachers who feel that the IPS course itself can be 
strengthened at least for particular students by incorporating some of the topics 
treated in PS II. 

Ph. 472 — Harvard Project Physics 

A fresh approach to the teaching of physics primarily from the humanistic point of 
view. Materials comprising Project Physics include six basic Units, forming the 
main line course, plus a choice of selections from a number of supplemental Units. 
The course essentially is designed to be good physics in the widest, most humanistic 
way possible, and presented at a culturally scientific level to challenge the interests 
and ability of the majority of all senior high school students. 
In addition to texts for the above Units other materials in Project Physics include a 

47 



number of visual aids, special readers, and ingenious laboratory devices. Flexibility 
of presentation is built into the Project Physics so that high school students and 
teachers alike have considerable freedom in structuring their individual programs. 

Ph. 488 — Advanced Projects 

Independent study and activity by participants in generating materials considered by 
them to be especially needed and useful in science classes and demonstrations. The 
facilities of the entire department will be available for use. This includes the dark 
rooms and other photographic facilities, machine and carpentry shops, and in- 
structional lab equipment in all fields of general physics. Enrollment is strictly 
limited to participants who present evidence of special competence in either audio- 
visuals or in demonstration apparatus construction. 

^\ 

Political Science 

Chairman: F. Conrad Raabe, Ph.D. (PoHtical Science 203 — Ext. 553) 

Pol. Sci. 101 — American Government I (Both sessions 10:00) 

Structure, development, powers, and limits of the federal government; under- 
lying principles and relationships of executive, legislative and judicial departments; 
organization, functions, and powers of various branches and bureaus of government, 
revenues, expenditures, and debts; federal regulation and control. 3 sem. hrs. 

Pol. Sci. 201 — European and Comparative Government I (1st session 8:20) 
Comparative politics theory: democracy vs. dictatorship; constitutions; separation 
of powers; legislatures and political parties. GREAT BRITAIN: the origin of the 
British Constitution; the Crown, Parliament; the Legal System; local government; 
FRANCE: The heritage of the Revolution and subsequent political structures; 
special emphasis on the politics of the Fourth and Fifth Republics; British and 
French Systems compared. 3 sem. hrs. 





Psychology 



Chairman: Harold Vetter, Ph.D. (Science Complex 431 — Ext. 591) 

Psych. 101 — Introductory Psychology (1st session 11:40; 2nd session 10:00) 
Survey of the major fields of Psychology. Prerequisite for all other psychology 
courses. 3 sem. hrs. 

Psych. 308 — Psychology of Learning (2nd session 11 :40) 

Contemporary theories and problems of learning. Prerequisite: Psych. 201. (3-hrs. 
lecture and 2-hrs. Lab. 3 sem. hrs. 

Psych. 312 — Social Psychology (1st session 8:20) 

Psychological nature of society and social interaction; individual and group re- 
lationships; factors influencing group behavior. 3 sem. hrs. 

Psych. 350 — Psychological Problems of the Mentally Retarded (1st session 
11:40) 

3 sem. hrs. 



Psych. 370 — Propaganda and Mass Communication (1st session 10:00) 
An interdepartmental course, consisting of an evaluation of propaganda and the 
theories and techniques of mass communication. Credit also given for DS 370, and 
J^- ^^^- 3 sem.' hrs. 



I Religious Studies 



Chairman: Stephen Duffy, S.T.D. (Stallings Hall 111— Ext. 298) 
RelStu. 223 — Fundamental Catholic Beliefs (1st session 1 1 :40) 




3 sem. hrs. 



RelStu. 234 — St. John — His Writings and His Theology (2nd session 1 1 :40) 
A study of the Joannine writings and theology in their original context and in 
the context of Christianity in the 20th century. 3 sem. hrs. 

RelStu. 332 — The Christian Ethic (1st session 10:00) 

A study of the goal of the Christian ; his acts as human ; the divinization of these 
acts; the Spirit as directive; the meaning of law. 3 sem. hrs. 




Sociology 



Chairman: Pedro Hernandez, Ph.D. (Sociol/Lang Bldg.— Ext. 353) 

Sociol. 101 — Introductory Sociology (Both sessions 10:00) 

An introduction to the sociological perspective. Consideration of the concepts of 
society and culture. General survey of relevant theory and research to give the 
student an understanding of the sociologist's approach to human behavior. 

3 sem. hrs. 

Sociol. 301 — Sociology of the Family (1st session 11:40) 

A review of theory and research concerned with the family as an institution. Special 
emphasis on cross cultural analysis. 3 sem. hrs. 

Sociol. 306 — Sociology of Religion (1st session 10:00) 

The functions of religion in society; religious and social variation; the inter-relations 
between religion and other social institutions. 3 sem. hrs. 

Sociol. 310 — Demography (2nd session 11:40) 

An analysis of population trends and survey of recent literature on population 
problems and population distribution. 3 sem. hrs. 




Visual Arts 



Chairman: Gebhard Frohlich, S.J., M.A. (Art Bldg. — Ext. 242) 

Vis Art 216 — Painting and Drawing (1st session 10:00) 

A course in painting and drawing designed for the student not majoring in art. 
No prerequisite. 3 sem. hrs. 

49 



VisArt 217— Art Appreciation (1st session 10:00) 

A special course for non-art majors which attempts to elucidate ways of looking at 
art, styles, images and concepts, and to introduce the student to a wide selection 
of art of various cultures. (A summer course.) 3 sem. hrs. 

VisArt 222 — Excursion into the Arts of New Orleans (1st session 11:40) 

3 sem. hrs. 
Students interested should contact Mr. D'Aquila for further details concerning 
registration and transference of credit. 




50 



ASSOCIATION OF JESUIT COLLEGES AND UNIVERSITIES 

A. William Crandell, S.J., Acting President 

1717 Massachusetts Avenue, N.W., Suite #402 

Washington, D.C., 20036 

Telephone: (202) 667-3888 

ALABAMA 

Spring Hill College, Mobile 

CALIFORNIA 

Loyola University, Los Angeles 

Santa Clara University, Santa Clara 

University of San Francisco, San Francisco 

COLORADO 

Regis College, Denver 

CONNECTICUT 

Fairfield University, Fairfield 

DISTRICT OF COLUMBIA 

Georgetown University, Washington 

ILLINOIS 

Loyola University, Chicago 

LOUISIANA 

Loyola University, New Orleans 

MARYLAND 

Loyola Colletje, Baltimore 

MASSACHUSETTS 

Boston College, Boston 

Holv Cross College, Worcester 

MICHIGAN 

University of Detroit, Detroit 

MISSOURI 

Rockhurst College, Kansas City 
St. Louis University, St. Louis 

NEBRASKA 

The Creighton University, Omaha 

NEW JERSEY 

Saint Peter's College, Jersey City 

NEW YORK 

Canisius College, Buffalo 

Fordham University, New York 

Lemoyne College, Syracuse 

OHIO 

John Carroll University, Cleveland 
The Xavier University, Cincinnati 

PENNSYLVANIA 

Saint Joseph's College, Philadelphia 
University of Scranton, Scranton 

WASHINGTON 

Gonzaga University, Spokane 
Seattle University, Seattle 

WEST VIRGINIA 

Wheeling College, Wheeling 

WISCONSIN 

Marquette University, Milwaukee 



51 



ADMISSION 



Students may attend the summer sessions on one of three bases : 

(1) as former or continuing students in good standing who have com- 
pleted courses at Loyola University ; 

(2) as students M^ho are attending Loyola University for the first time; 

(3) as visiting students from other colleges and universities for the summer 
only. It is the visiting student's responsibility to acquire assurances 
from his own institution that Loyola work during summer sessions 
will be acceptable at his home institution. 



(Please Cut Along Dotted Line) 



This form to be used only by UNDERGRADUATE students seeking admission to Loyola as summer transients 
(Summer School Only). Graduate Students and undergraduates seeking regular admission may not use this application. 



plication is for: 



I I First Summer Session I I Second Summer Session 

DATA PROCESSING CENTER CODE SHEET 

Applicant Please Check All Items Carefully 



SECURITY 

JMBER 



IMPORTANT: Your social security number will be used as your permanent stude 
identification number. If you do not have a social security number you may obtam o 
by applying at your nearest social security office which is listed in your local telepho 
directory under U.S. GOVERNMENT HEALTH EDUCATION AND WELFARE. 



t 








First 








Initial 


SEX/MARITAL 
STATUS 




1 SINGLE 
MALE 




2MARRIED 
MALE 




3SINGLE 
FEMALE 




4MARRIED 
FEMALE 



1 ROMAN CATHOLIC 



2 PROTESTANT 



STREET AND 
NUMBER 



OFFICE ENTER STATE 
USE OR 

ONLY COUNTRY CODE 



PERMANENT 
TELEPHONE 



ED 


DMr. & Mrs. DMiss 
DMr. DMrs. 










Street 


City 


State 


Zip Code 


Telephone 


OR UNIVERSITY WHERE 

T IS CURRENTLY ENROLLED 


Name 


State 



BENEATH THIS LINE FOR OFFICE USE ONLY 



PARISH 
CODE 







COLLEGE 
CODE 





CLASS 
(NO.) 






DEGREE 
CODE 


5