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Full text of "The summer sessions: University of Maryland, College Park campus [catalog]"

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UniVER/ITV OF mflpvLAno 

COLLEGE PARK CflfflPU/ 1978 CATALOG 



COLLEGE PARK CAMPUS 
ADMINISTRATION 

Chancellor 
Robert L. Cluckstern 

B. E. E., City College of New York, 1944; Ph.D. (Physics), 
Massach'jsetts Institute of Technology, 1948. 

Vice Chancellor for Academic Affairs 
Nancie L. Gonzalez 

B.S., University of North Dakota, 1951; 

M.A., University of Michigan, 1955; 

Ph.D.. University of .Michigan, 1959. 

Vice Chancellor for Administrative Affairs 
John A. Blelec (Acting) 

B.A., University of Maryland, 1966; 

M.A., University of Maryland, 1968; 

Ph.D., University of Maryland, 1972. 

Vice Chancellor for Student Affairs 
William L. Thomas, Jr. 

B.S., University of Tennessee, 1955; 

M.S.. University of Tennessee, 1965; 

Ph.D.. Michigan State University, 1970. 

Summer Programs Administration 

Administrative Dean for Summer Programs 
Melvin Bernstein 

B.A., Southwestern at Memphis, 1947; 

B.Mus., Southwestern at Memphis, 1948; 

M.Mus., University of Michigan, 1949; 

M.A.. University of North Carolina, 1954; 

Ph.D., University of North Carolina, 1964. 

Assistant Director for Cultural Programs 
George A. Moquin 
B.A., University of Maryland, 1971. 

Assistant Director for Administration 
Cheryl J. Deblois 

B.A.. University of Kentucky, 1968; 

M.A., University of Arkansas, 1974. 

Coordinator for Summer Recreational Programs 
Vv'illiam W. Davis 

B.S.. Washington University, 1972; 

M.S.. Pennsylvania State University, 1975. 



CENTRAL ADMINISTRATION 
OF THE UNIVERSITY 

President 
Wilson H. Elkins 

B.A.. University of Texas, 1932; 

M.A.. University of Texas, 1932; 

B. Litt, Oxford University, 1936; 

D.Phil.. Oxford University. 1936. 



Vice President for General Administration 
Donald W. O'Connell 

B.A.. Columbia University. 1937; 

M.A., Columbia University, 1938; 

Ph.D., Columbia University, 1953. 

Vice President for Academic Affairs 
R. Lee Hornbake 

B.S., California State College, Pennsylvania, 1934; 

M.A.. Ohio State University, 1936: 

Ph.D., Ohio State University, 1942. 

Vice President for Graduate Studies and Research 
David S. Sparks (Acting) 

B.A., Grinnell College. 1944; 

M.A., University of Chicago, 1945; 

Ph.D., University of Chicago, 1951. 

Vice President for Agricultural Affairs 
and Legislative Relations 
Frank L. Bentz, Jr. 

B.S., University of Maryland, 1942; 

Ph.D., University of Maryland. 1952. 

Vice President for Development 
Robert G. Smith 

B.S.. State University of New York at Geneseo. 1952; 

M.A.. Ohio University, 1956. 

BOARD OF REGENTS 

Chairman 
B. Herbert Brown 

Vice Chairman 
Hugh A. McMullen 

Secretary 
Samuel H. Hoover 

Treasurer 

N. Thomas Whittington. Jr. 

Assistant Secretary 
Mary H. Broadwater 

Assistant Treasurer 
John C. Scarbath 

Percy M. Chaimson 
Robert M. Coultas, Jr. 
Ralph W. Frey 
The Honorable 

Young D. Hance. ex officio 
A. Paul Moss 
James W. Motsay 
Peter F. O'Malley 
The Honorable 

Joseph D. Tydings 
Wilbur G. Valentine 



THE CATALOG COVER 

The 1978 Summer Programs Catalog cover was designed by Ms Cynthia 

Lou Smith of Annapolis, Maryland Ms Smiths work was selected 



from among numerous entries submitted in a state-wide cover-art compe- 
tition Cynthia is a senior at the University ot Maryland, College Park 
Campus, where she is a major in Applied Design 



University Policy Statements 

The provisions of this publication are not to be regarded as an 
irrevocable contract between the student and the University of 
Maryland Changes are effected from time to time in the general 
regulations and in the academic requirements There are established 
procedures for making changes, procedures which protect the institu- 
tion s integrity and the individual student s interest and welfare 
A curriculum or graduation requirement, when altered, is not made 
retroactive unless the alteration is to the student s advantage and 
can be accommodated within the span of years normally required for 
graduation When the actions of a student are judged by competent 
authority, using established procedure, to be detrimental to the 
interests of the university community, that person may be required 
to withdraw from the university 

The University of Maryland, in all its branches and divisions, subscribes 
to a policy of equal educational and employment opportunity tor people 
of every race, creed, ethnic origin, and sex 

It IS university policy that smoking in classrooms is prohibited unless 
all participants agree to the contrary Any student has the right to 
remind the instructor of this policy throughout the duration of the class 
The University of Maryland at College Park does not discriminate on 



the basis of sex in its educational programs and activities The policy 
of non-discrimination extends to employment in the institution and 
academic admission to the institution Such discrimination is prohibited 
by Title IX of the Education Amendments of 1972 (20 U S C 1681. et 
seq ) and 45 C F R 86, and this notification is required under the Federal 
regulations pursuant to 20 U S C 1681 et seq 

Inquiries concerning the application of Title IX and Part 86 of 45 C F R 
to the University of Maryland, College Park, may be directed to the 
Office of Human Relations Programs, Mam Administration Building, 
University of Maryland, College Park, or to the Director of the Office 
of Civil Rights of the Department of Health, Education and Welfare. 
Washington, D C 

The University of Maryland at College Park does not discriminate on 
the basis of handicap in admission or access to its educational programs 
and activities This policy of nondiscrimination extends to employment 
in the institution Such discrimination is prohibited by Section 504 of 
the Rehabilitation Act of 1973 (29 U S C 706) and 45 C F R 84. and 
this notification is required pursuant to 45 C F R 84 8 
Inquiries concerning the application of Section 504 and part 84 of 45 
C F R to the University ot Maryland, College Park, may be directed to 
the Campus Coordinator on the Handicapped, Main Administration 
Building, University of Maryland, College Park, Maryland 20742 



TABLE OF CONTENTS 



Academic Information 15 

Academic Credit 15 

Advanced Placement Programs 17 

Candidates for Degrees 17 

Definition of Full-Time Status 16 

General University Requirements 15 

Marking System 15 

Pass/Fail Option 16 

Policy On Access to Student 
Information 16 

Administrative Officers/Board of 

Regents 

Central University Administration .... 
College Park Campus Administration . 
Summer Programs Administration . . . 

Admission Information 6 

Graduates 7 

Undergraduates 5 

Higfisctiool Juniors/Seniors 6 

Calendar 2 

Codes: Division/College/Major 12 

Directory of Information Sources 6 

Forms 34 

Graduate Admission (Visiting) 34 

Schedule Request/Estimated Bill 34 

Undergraduate Admission/Re- 
admission 34 

General Information 19 

Automobile Registration 21 

Bookstore- UMporium 19 

Dining Hall Services 18 

Disabled Student Services 19 

Golden Identification Card 17 

Key Dates for Summer Residents 18 

Libraries 19 

Living Accommodations 17 

Researcfi Facilities 19 

Retired Volunteer Service Corps 17 

Summer Cultural Activities 31 

Student Health Service 19 

Map, College Park Campus 89 

Area Resources 20 

Registration Changes 12 

Change of Address Procedure 10 

Change of Division/College 

(Undergraduate) 12 

Change in Major 12 

Change in Program (Graduate) 12 

Undecided College/Major 12 

Registration Procedures Summer, 

1978 8 

Adds, Drops, Section Changes 8 

Armory Registration 8 

Cancellation of Registration 10 

Late Registration 10 



Mail-In Preregistration 8 

Mon-Standard Date Courses 10 

Walk-In Preregistration 8 

Withdrawal from Summer School 10 

Registration Schedule 4 

Tuition and Fees 5 

Determination of In-State Status 5 

Payment of Fees 5 

Remission of Fees 21 

Veterans' Benefits 14 

Workshops, Institutes, Special 

Offerings 21 

University Policy Statement i 

COURSE SCHEDULE: 

Afro-American Studies 35 

Agricultural and Extension Education. . . 81 

Agricultural Engineering 35 

Agricultural and Resource Economics . . 35 

Agronomy 35 

American Studies 35 

Animal Sciences 36 

Anthropology 36 

Applied Design 37 

Art Education 37 

Art History 37 

Art, Studio 37 

Astronomy 38 

Biology 39 

Botany 41 

Business Management 39 

Chemistry 42 

Chinese 43 

Comparative Literature 43 

Computer Science 43 

Consumer Economics 44 

Co-operative Education Program 44 

Crafts 44 

Criminology 44 

Dance 45 

Dramatic Art 45 

Economics 46 

Education 46 

Administration, Supervision and 

Curriculum 46 

Counseling and Personnel Services ... 48 
Early Childhood - Elementary 

Education 48 

Human Development 50 

Industrial Education 53 

Measurement and Statistics 54 

Secondary Education 55 

Social Foundations 57 

Special Education 57 

Engineering 58 

Aerospace 58 

] 



Chemical 58 

Civil 58 

Co-operative Education 59 

Electrical 59 

Materials 61 

Mechanical 61 

Nuclear 61 

Science 60 

English 60 

Entomology 61 

Family and Community Development. . . 62 

Food Science 63 

Food 63 

Foreign Language 63 

French 64 

Geography 64 

Geology 65 

German 65 

Government and Politics 65 

Greek 65 

Hearing and Speech Sciences 66 

Health 68 

History 67 

Horticulture 69 

Housing and Applied Design 70 

Human and Community Resources 45 

Information Systems Management 70 

Institution Administration 70 

Journalism 71 

Law Enforcement 72 

Library and Information Services 71 

Mathematics 73 

Meteorology 74 

Microbiology 75 

Music 75 

Music Education 75 

Mutrition 76 

Philosophy 79 

Physical Education 77 

Physical Education, Recreation and; 

Health 77 

Physics 79 

Psychology 80 

Radio, Television and Film 83 

Recreation 82 

Russian 83 

Sociology ■84 

Spanish 85 

Speech 85 

Statistics 86 

Textiles 86 

Textiles and Consumer Economics 86 

Urban Studies 86 

Women's Studies 87 

Zoology 87 



SUMMER SESSIONS 
UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 
COLLEGE PARK CAMPUS 
1978 



SUMMER CALENDAR 
1978 



Two Six Week Sessions 

SESSION I Tuesday, May 23-Friday, June 30 
SESSION 11 Wednesday, July 5-Friday, August 1 1 



PREREGISTRATION 



February 27 Monday 



Summer Sessions 1978 

The University of Maryland at College Park 
offers a ricfily varied summer educational program 
to its continuing degree students and to qualified 
non-degree students for both graduate and under- 
graduate study. Students may select from over 
1,000 courses representing 75 academic disciplines 
and a number of workshops and institutes designed 
to meet specific needs within disciplines. The 
summer sessions offer opportunities for degree 
students to accelerate completion of degrees, to 
make up deficiencies and requirements, and to 
broaden programs with studies which otherwise 
could not be fitted into their academic schedules. 

The Summer Programs provide opportunities for 
non-degree students who may wish to test their 
abilities to pursue college level study or who may 
wish to indulge special academic interests. The 
professional or post-graduate student will find 
courses and workshops which permit updating of 
knowledge and techniques in specific disciplines 
within convenient schedules. 

The summer faculty consists of distinguished 
members of the College Park faculty and out- 
standing visiting lecturers. In addition to academic 
studies the Summer Programs seek to provide a 
total university environment through varied and 
exciting recreational and cultural programs. 



May 5 



June 9 



May 10 



June 16 



Friday 



Friday 



Wednesday 



Friday 



Preregistration begins 
for both Summer 
Sessions. Walk-in 
registrations can oc- 
cur between 9:00 a.m. 
and 3:00 p.m. 
Mail-in requests will 
be processed daily. 
Mail-in preregistra- 
tion ends for Summer 
Session I. Forms 
must be postmarked 
on or before this date. 
Mail-in preregistration 
ends for Summer Ses- 
sion II. Forms must 
be postmarked on 
or before this date. 
Walk-in preregistra- 
tion ends for Summer 
Session I. 

Walk-in preregistra- 
tion ends for Summer 
Session II. 



May 22 



May 23 
May 23-30 



May 29 
May 30 



SUMMER 

Monday 



Tuesday 
Tuesday - 
Tuesday 

Monday 
Tuesday 



May 31 



Wednesday 



June 16 
June 19 

June 30 



Friday 
Monday 

Friday 



SESSION I 

Registration for Sum- 
mer Session I in the 
Armory. (Teacher 
Registration 5:00 - 
7:00 p.m.) 
Classes begin. 
Late Registration 
Period. A late fee of 
$20.00 is assessed. 
Memorial Day Holiday. 
End of Schedule 
Adjustment Period. 
Last day to drop a 
course without the 
course appearing on 
the record. 
Last day to drop a 
course with a refund. 
Last day to change 
grading option and 
credit level. 
In addition to the 
$20.00 late registra- 
tion fee, special 
permission of a 
student's academic 
provost or dean is 
required for regis- 
tration on or after 
this date. 
A $2.00 fee is as- 
sessed on or after 
this date for each 
change in course 
schedule ($2.00 for 
each drop; $2.00 
for each add.) 
Special permission 
of a student's aca- 
demic provost or 
dean is required 
to add on or after 
this date. 

Beginning this date 
through June 16 
a grade of "W" will 
be recorded for any 
course dropped. 
Last day to drop 
courses. 

No course may be 
dropped on or after 
this date. 

Last day of classes. 
Final Examination 
Day for Summer 
Session I. 



SUMMER SESSION II 



June 28 



July 4 

July 5 
July 6- 



July 



11 



Wednesday 



Tuesday 

Wednesday 
Thursday - 
Tuesday 

Tuesday 



July 12 



Wednesday 



Registration for Sum- 
mer Session II in the 
Armory. 

independence Day 
Holiday. 
Classes begin. 
Late Registration 
Period. A late fee of 
$20.00 is assessed. 
End of Schedule 
Adjustment Period. 
Last day to drop a 
course without the 
course appearing 
on the record. 
Last day to drop a 
course with a 
refund. 

Last day to change 
grading option and 
credit level. 
In addition to the 
$20.00 late regis- 
tration fee, special 
permission of a 
student's academic 
provost or dean is 
required for regis- 
tration on or after 
this date. 
A $2.00 fee is as- 
sessed on or after 
this date for each 
change in course 
schedule ($2.00 for 
each drop; $2.00 
for each add). 
Special permission of 
a student's aca- 
demic provost or 
dean is required 
to add on or after 
this date. 

Beginning this date 
through July 28 a 
grade of "W" will 
be recorded for a 
course dropped. 
Last day to submit 
applications for 
diplomas to be 
awarded August 15, 
1978. 

Last day to drop 
courses. 

No course may be 
dropped on or 
after this date. 

Final Examination 
Day for Summer 
Session II. 

NOTE: ARMORY REGISTRATION FOR SESSION 
II WILL BE HELD ON WEDNESDAY, J(JNE 28. 



July 14 

July 28 
July 31 



Friday 

Friday 
Monday 



August 1 1 Friday 



REGISTRATION SCHEDOLE 

SESSION 1 

Monday, May 22 

Reckord Armory Hours 
8:30 a.m.-7:00 p.m. 

8:30 Cale-Coha 

8:45 Cohb-Dave 

9:00 Davf-Dumo 

9:15 Dump-Finn 

9:30 Fino-Gend 

9:45 Gene-Grig 

10:00 Grih-Hend 

10:15 Hene-laca 

10:30 lacb-Kaul 

10:45 Kaum-Kuld 

11:00 Kule-Lint 

11:15 Linu-Mann 

1 1 :30 Mano-McKi 

11:45 McKj-Mitc 

1 2:00 Mitd-Myer 

12:15 Myes-Okee 

12:30 Okef-Pear 

1 2:45 Peas-Powe 

1:00 Powf-Reil 

1:15 Reim-Roma 

1 :30 Romb-Sand 

1 :45 Sane-Sefr 

2:00 Sefs-Simm 

2:15 Simn-Spai 

2:30 Spaj-Stri 

2:45 Strj-Thom 

3:00 Thon-Vand 

3:15 Vane-Wein 

3:30 Weio-Witk 

3:45 Witl-Zz 

4:00 Aa-Aver 

4:15 Aves-Benn 

4:30 Beno-Bous 

4:45 Bout-Cald 

5:00-7:00 Teacher 

Registration 

Session 1 only 

Department Representatives' Hours 
8:30a.m.-7:15 p.m. 



SESSION II 

Wednesday, June 28 

Reckord Armory Hours 
8:30 a.m.-5:00 p.m. 

8:30 Hene-laca 

8:45 lacb-Kaul 

9:00 Kaum-Kuld 

9:15 Kule-Lint 

9:30 Linu-Mann 

9:45 Mano-McKi 

10:00 McKj-Mitc 

10:15 Mitd-Myer 

10:30 Myes-Okee 

1 0:45 Okef-Pear 

1 1 :00 Peas-Powe 

11:15 Powf-Reil 

11:30 Reim-Roma 

1 1 :45 Romb-Sand 

12:00 Sane-Sefr 

12:15 Sefs-Simm 

1 2:30 Simn-Spai 

12:45 Spaj-Stri 

1:00 Strj-Thom 

1:15 Thon-Vand 

1:30 Vane-Wein 

1:45 Weio-Witk 

2:00 Witl-Zz 

2: 1 5 Aa-Aver 

2:30 Aves-Benn 

2:45 Beno-Bous 

3:00 Bout-Cald 

3:15 Cale-Coha 

3:30 Cohb-Dave 

3:45 Davf-Dumo 

4:00 Dump-Finn 

4:15 Fino-Gend 

4:30 Gene-Grig 

4:45 Grih-Hend 



Department Representatives' Hours 
8:30a.m.-5:15 p.m. 



CLASS PERIODS 

Unless otherwise noted, classes during the 1978 
Summer Sessions will meet on the following 
time schedule: 



Day Classes 

8:00 - 9:20 
9:30-10:50 
11:00-12:20 
12:30- 1:50 
2:00- 3:20 
3:30- 4:50 



Evening Classes 

MW 7:00-10:00 p.m. 
TTh 7:00-10:00 p.m. 
MTWTh 7:00-8:30 p.m. 
MTTh 7:00-9:00 p.m. 



Weekly Class Schedule-Six Week Courses 

2 credit courses meet 4 days as indicated in this 
bulletin 

3 credit courses meet daily 

4 credit courses meet daily and include multiple 
periods for laboratory 



^^%^K TUITION AND FEES 

ALL STUDENTS 

Registration Fee per Session 5.00 

Recreation Fee per Session 4.00 

Student Health Fee per Session 3.00 

Summer Vehicle Registration Fee, per vehicle 
(not charged if vehicle was registered for 
Fall or Spring Semester) 3.00 

UNDERGRADUATE STUDENTS 

Tuition per Credit Hour 34.00 

Non-resident Fee per Session (must be paid by 

all students who are not residents of 

Maryland) 15.00 

Application Fee (New Students) 15.00 

GRADUATE STUDENTS 

Application Fee. Every student must 

be admitted 1 5.00 

Tuition per Credit Hour: 

Resident Student 50.00 

Non-resident Student 95.00 

Continuous Registration Fee 

(Doctoral Candidate) 10.00 

OTHER FEES 

Graduate Language Examination 14.00 

Graduation Fee, Bachelors and Master's 

Degrees 1 5.00 

Graduation Fee, Doctoral Degrees 60.00 

Late Registration Fee 20.00 

Service Charge for Dishonored Check 

(depending on amount of check) up to 20.00 

Fees for auditors and courses taken for audit are 
the same as those charged for courses taken for 
credit at both undergraduate and graduate levels. 
Fees for altering academic programs are discussed 
in the section on Admissions and Registrations. 
Although changes in fees and charges ordinarily 
will be announced in advance, the University 
reserves the right to make such changes without 
prior announcement. 

I^M^J I DETERMINATION OF IN-STATE 
^^^^7 STATUS FOR ADMISSION 
^^^^^ AND TUITION 

The deadline for meeting all requirements for an 
in-state status and for submitting all documents 
for reclassification is the last day of late registra- 
tion of the semester for which the student wishes 
to be classified as an in-state student. 

DEADLINES 

Summer Session 1, 1978 May 30. 1978 

Summer Session II, 1978. . . . July 11, 1978 
Fall Semester, 1978 September 6, 1978 



For further information: 
Undergraduate - 

Office of Admissions 

North Administration Building 

University of Maryland 

College Park, Maryland 20742 

(301) 454-4137, 4535, 4536 
Graduate - 

Graduate Records Office 

Room 21 17, South Administration Building 

University of Maryland 

College Park, Maryland 20742 

(301) 454-5428 

Payment of Fees 

Returning students will not be permitted to complete registration until 
all financial obligations to the University including library fines, parking 
violation assessments and other penalty fees and service charges are 
paid in full 

Although the University regularly mails bills to students, it cannot 
assume responsibility for their receipt If any student does not receive 
a bill on or before the start of each semester it is his, her responsibility 
to obtain a copy of the bill by coming to Room 1 103. South Administra- 
tion Building, between the hours of 8 30 a m and 4 15 p m , Ivlonday 
through Friday 

All checks or money orders should be made payable to the University 
of tviaryland for the exact amount due The students social security 
number must be written on the check In cases where the University 
has awarded a grant, scholarship, or workship the appropriate amount 
will be deducted on the bill, mailed approximately one month after the 
start of the semester 

Students will be severed from University services for delinquent in- 
debtedness to the University which occurs or is discovered during a 
semester In the event that severance occurs, the individual may make 
payment during the semester in which services were severed and all 
these services except housing will be restored Students removed from 
housing because of delinquent indebtedness will be placed at the bottom 
of the waiting list after the financial obligation is satisfied and after 
reapplying for housing Students who are severed from University 
services and who fail to pay the indebtedness during the semester in 
which severance occurs will be ineligible to pre-register or register for 
subsequent semesters until the debt is cleared In the event of actual 
registration in a subsequent semester by a severed student who had 
not settled the student account prior to that semester, such registration 
will be cancelled and no credit will be earned for the semester 

In accordance with State law. the accounts of delinquent and severed 
students are referred to the State Central Collections Unit in Baltimore 
for collection and legal follow-up Costs incurred in collecting delinquent 
accounts are charged to the student Collection costs are normally 15% 
plus any attorney and or court fees 

No degree will be conferred, no grade issued, nor any diploma, cer- 
tificate, or transcript of record issued to a student who has not made 
satisfactory settlement of his or her account 

■ I ^H DIRECTORY OF 

^L ^^ INFORMATION SERVICES 

General Information 

Summer Sessions Office 

Turner Laboratory 454-3347 

Admissions 

Office of Admissions & Registrations 

North Administration Building 454-5550 

Registration 454-5559 

Housing 

Off-Campus 454-3645 

On-Campus 454-27 1 1 

Undergraduate Studies 454-2530 

Graduate Studies 454-3141 

Division of Agricultural and Life 

Sciences 454-5257 

Division of Arts and Humanities 454-2740 

Division of Behavioral and Social 

Sciences 454-5272 

Division of Human and Community 

Resources 454-4 1 45 

Division of Mathematical & Physical 

Sciences & Engineering 454-4906 



College of Agriculture 454-3702 

College of Business & Management 454-5236 

College of Education 454-201 1/2 

College of Engineering 454-2421 

College of Human Ecology 454-2136 

College of Journalism 454-2228 

College of Library & Information 

Services 454-3016 

College of Physical Education. 

Recreation and Health 454-2755 

School of Architecture 454-3427 

Computer Science Center 454-4255 

Institute of Criminal Justice & 

Criminology 454-4538 

Institute of Urban Studies 454-5718 

University College (Evening Division) .... 454-5735 

ADMISSION INFORMATION 

Undergraduate 

RETURNING STUDENTS TO THE COLLEGE 
PARK CAMPUS 

1. Students who have attended the College Park 
campus as "term only" registrants any previous 
semester. TO BE ADMITTED: Complete the 
application for "Summer Only Undergraduate 
Students" enclosed at the back of this catalog. 
TO REGISTER: See pages 8 and 4. 

2. Degree and non-degree students other than 
"term only" registrants who have attended any 
previous semester at the College Park campus, 
but not the Spring 1978 semester. TO BE 
ADMITTED: Complete the application for under- 
graduate readmission enclosed at the back of 
this catalog. TO REGISTER: See pages 8 

and 4. 

3. Students who were registered during the Spring 
1978 semester, and are eligible to return in 
the Fall, and students who graduated from the 
College Park campus at the end of the Spring 
semester, are eligible to register for the Summer 
Sessions without being readmitted. TO REGIS- 
TER: See page 8 for information on summer 
registration. 

4. Applicants who were dismissed from the College 
Park campus at the end of the Spring 1978 
semester are eligible to attend the 1978 Summer 
Sessions. However, reinstatement is necessary 

in order to continue in the Fall 1978 semester. 
The deadline for reinstatement applications is 
June 15, 1978 for the Fall 1978 semester. Re- 
instatement applications may be obtained from 
the Withdrawal/Re-enrollment Office in Room 
1 130, North Administration Building. TO REGIS- 
TER: See page 8 for procedures on summer 
registration. Applicants who were dismissed 
from the College Park campus prior to the 
Spring 1978 semester must be reinstated in 
order to attend either or both 1978 Summer 
Sessions. Deadline dates are April 15 for Sum- 
mer Session I and May 15 for Summer Session 
II. Reinstatement applications may be obtained 
from the Withdrawal/Re-enrollment Office, 
Room 1 130, North Administration Building. 
TO REGISTER: If an official letter of reinstate- 



ment is received, follow registrations procedures 
on page 8. 
NEW STUDENTS, COLLEGE PARK CAMPUS 

1. Summer Only Students 

(a) Students enrolled at other colleges and 
universities or at other campuses of the 
University of Maryland. TO BE ADMITTED: 
Complete the "summer only" application 
for admission enclosed at the back of this 
catalog. Transcripts need not be sub- 
mitted. The applicant must certify good 
standing and permission of the parent 
institution on the application. Verification 
that credits earned at the College Park 
campus will be accepted by the parent 
institution is the responsibility of the appli- 
cant. TO REGISTER: See pages 8 and 4. 

(b) Applicants who have graduated from other 
colleges and universities. TO BE AD- 
MITTED: Complete the "summer only" 
application for admission. Transcripts need 
not be submitted. TO REGISTER: See 
pages 8 and 4. 

(c) Teachers seeking certification or profes- 
sional advancement through summer study 
who have not attended the College Park 
campus or who have been admitted previ- 
ously for summer only attendance at College 
Park. TO BE ADMITTED: Complete the 
"summer only" application for admission. 
Transcripts need not be submitted. TO 
REGISTER: See pages 8 and 4. 

(d) High school graduates who wish to attend 
the Summer Sessions only. TO BE AD- 
MITTED: Complete the "summer only" 
application at the back of this catalog. 
Eligibility requires a "C" average in aca- 
demic subjects and rank in the upper half 
of the high school class. Applicants who 
do not meet these criteria should contact 
the College Park campus Office of Under- 
graduate Admissions for information re- 
garding alternate criteria for admission. 
High school transcripts are not required 
for "summer only" admission. However, 
the applicant must certify on the applica- 
tion that he/she meets the University's 
freshman admission standards. New fresh- 
man students admitted for the Summer 
Sessions only will not be permitted to 
continue in the Fall unless regular admis- 
sion application has been made and the 
applicant is eligible for regular admission. 
TO REGISTER: See pages 8 and 4. 

(e) High school students entering the junior 
or senior year may enroll at the University 
during the summer if they have a minimum 
3.00 (B) average. TO BE ADMITTED: Ob- 
tain a regular undergraduate application 
for admission and the admissions brochure, 
Looking at Maryland, and follow the pro- 
cedures outlined in this material. TO REGIS- 
TER: If an official letter of admission for 

the Summer Session only is received, follow 



the instructions on page 8. 

(f) University College students. TO BE AD- 
MITTED: Only a letter of permission from 
the University College Dean must be 
presented. TO REGISTER: See page 8. 
2. Summer 1978 and Fall 1978 Students 

(a) New students who have applied for the 
Fall 1978 semester and have been ad- 
mitted may register for Summer Session 
courses. TO REGISTER: See page 8. 

(b) New students who wish to attend the Sum- 
mer Sessions and continue in the Fall 1978 
semester. TO BE ADMITTED: Complete 

a regular undergraduate application for 
admission and follow the procedures out- 
lined in the application booklet. Refer to 
the application booklet for deadline in- 
formation. TO REGISTER: If an official 
letter of admission is received, see page 8. 

(c) New students who have applied for the Fall 
1978 semester, but have not been admitted, 
should contact the Office of Undergraduate 
Admissions. TO REGISTER: If an official 
letter of admission is received, see page 8. 

ADMISSION INFORMATION 

Graduate 

SUMMER GRADUATE STUDY 

The Summer Programs offer a large selection 
of courses at the graduate level. A student desiring 
graduate credit at Maryland should apply and 
register under the most appropriate of the cate- 
gories given below. Students wishing to enroll in 
courses numbered 600 or above must be in a 
graduate admitted status at the University of 
Maryland. Students who receive faculty guidance 
and wish to use the research facilities of the Uni- 
versity during the summer must register for an 
appropriate number of credits. 

Select one of the following categories which 
corresponds to your situation. If you do not find 
a situation listed that is applicable to you, or if 
you need additional information, write or call: 
THE GRADUATE SCHOOL 
UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 
COLLEGE PARK, MARYLAND 20742 
(301) 454-3141 

GRADUATES 

There are five types of graduate students who 
are eligible for enrollment during the 1978 Summer 
Sessions on the College Park Campus. 

( 1 ) CONTINUING STUDENTS - Students whose 
graduate admission is still valid within the 
following time limits: 

Doctoral - Five years from entrance date to 
be advanced to candidacy after which an 
additional four years are permitted for the 
completion of the remaining requirements, 
including the dissertation. 

Master's & Advanced Graduate Specialist 
(AGS) Certificate - Five years from entrance 



date. Admission is valid either until the 
completion of the degree for which admitted 
or until the expiration of the time limits, 
whichever occurs first. A new application 
for admission is then required to change 
program and/or degree or non-degree status. 
The admitted status for both degree and 
certificate seekers is continued only if de- 
partmental and Graduate School academic 
and administrative requirements are main- 
tained. 

Advanced Special Student - Five years 
from entrance date unless a shorter period 
is specified in the offer of admission. The 
admitted status is continued only if Grad- 
uate School academic and administrative 
requirements are maintained. 
Visiting Graduate - One academic year. 
If the student's current graduate admission 
is valid, special Summer Session admission 
is not required. TO REGISTER: Follow 
procedures under REGISTRATION, page 8. 

(2) NEV^/ DEGREE AND A. G. S. CERTIFICATE 
STUDENTS - Students who wish to obtain 

a master's degree or Advanced Graduate 
Specialist (AGS) Certificate must complete 
a regular application for admission to the 
Graduate School. The deadline for submitting 
an application and all supporting documents 
is May 1, 1978 for either Summer Session 
or the fall 1978 semester. For application 
materials and a Graduate Bulletin, please 
write or call: The Graduate School, Uni- 
versity of Maryland, College Park, Mary- 
land 20742, (301) 454-5429. Do NOT use 
the application in this schedule of classes. 
Applicants are not eligible to register until 
an offer of admission letter is received from 
the Graduate School. 

(3) ADVANCED SPECIAL STUDENT - The 
Advanced Special Student status is de- 
signed to provide an opportunity for in- 
dividuals, who do not have an immediate 
degree objective in mind, to take graduate 
level courses. Students admitted in this 
status are subject to the same instructor 
consent regulations as are other graduate 
students. A detailed statement of regulations 
governing the Advanced Special Student 
status, from which the following material 

is condensed, may be found in the Graduate 
Catalog. Applicants for admission to Ad- 
vanced Special Student status must satisfy 
at least one of the following criteria: 

(a) Hold a baccalaureate degree from a 
regionally accredited institution with 
an overall "B" (3.0) average; (official 
transcript required). 

(b) Hold a master's or doctoral degree from 
a regionally accredited institution; (of- 
ficial transcript required). 

(c) Hold a baccalaureate degree from a 
regionally accredited institution and 



have at least four years of successful 
post-baccalaureate work or professional 
experience. An official transcript and 
letter from the employer(s) are required. 

(d) Achieve a score that places the applicant 
in the upper 50 percentile of appropriate 
national standardized aptitude examina- 
tions such as the Graduate Record Ex- 
amination Aptitude Test, the Millers 
Analogies Test, the Graduate Manage- 
ment Admissions Test. Official test 
transcripts are required. 
Admission to Advanced Special Student 
Status will be granted by the Dean for 
Graduate Studies. Admission to Advanced 
Special Student status is not intended to 
be used as a qualifying program for either 
doctoral or master's programs nor for the 
Advanced Graduate Specialist Certificate 
program. Credits earned while in this status 
may be applicable to a degree or certificate 
program at a later time only with the ap- 
proval of the faculty in the program if the 
student is subsequently accepted for degree 
or certificate study. 

Admission to a degree program at a later 
time may be considered by presenting an 
application in the standard format to the 
Graduate School with a new application fee. 
To be admitted, complete the Graduate 
School application at the back of this book- 



let. The appropriate documentation, including 
transcript, test scores and/or letters from 
employer(s), must be submitted with the 
application. The $15.00 application fee must 
also accompany the application. Do NOT 
mail the application after May 5, 1978 for 
Session I; June 9, 1978 for Session 11. Or 
bring it to Campus Registration. TO REGIS- 
TER: follow the Registration Procedures 
in this catalog. 

(4) VISITirSG GRADUATE STUDENT - A gradu- 
ate student matriculated in another graduate 
school may be admitted as a visiting graduate 
student. Complete the Visiting Graduate 
Student "Summer Only" application enclosed 
at the back of this catalog. Transcripts are 
NOT required. A letter of permission from 
the applicant's graduate dean, indicating 

that the applicant is in good standing, must 
be submitted. Certification that credits earned 
at the College Park Campus will be accepted 
by the parent institution is the responsibility 
of the applicant. TO REGISTER: follow the 
Registration Procedures in this catalog. 

(5) NATIONAL SCIENCE FOUNDATION IN- 
STITUTE STATUS - Application for admis- 
sion to an NSF Institute should be addressed 
to the director of the NSF Institute. Students 
already admitted to a regular graduate degree 
or non-degree status may also qualify for 
participation in an NSF institute. 



^y 



SOMMER 1978 
REGISTRATION PROCEDURES 



There will be three methods of 
registration for the 1978 Summer 
Sessions: A. Walk-in preregis- 
tration; B. Mail-in preregistra- 
tlon; C. Armory registration. 
Preregistration is offered for 



Summer Sessions as an added 
convenience for students; how- 
ever, students may choose the 
method of registration best 
suited to their needs. All instruc- 
tions are outlined below. 



WALK-IN PREREGIS- 
TRATION 



MAIL-IN PREREGISTRA- 
TION 



C. ARMORY REGISTRATION 



WHO? 


WHO? 


WHO? 


Any student eligible to attend 


Any student eligible to attend 


Any student eligible to attend 


the University of Maryland, 


the University of Maryland, 


the University of Maryland, 


College Park Campus except: 


College Park Campus except: 


College Park Campus. 


1. Students owing an out- 


1. Students owing an out- 




standing debt to the Uni- 


standing debt to the Uni- 




versity; 


versity; 




2. Students entitled to financial 


2. Students entitled to finan- 




credits such as scholarships, 


cial credits such as scholar- 




contracts, workshops, re- 


ships, contracts, workshops. 




mission of fees, and the 


remission of fees, and the 




like in which case proof 


like in which case proof 




of financial support is 


of financial support is 




required. 


required. 





WHEN? 

February 27 - May 10 for 

Session I 
February 27 - June 16 for 

Session II 
9:00 a.m. to 3:00 p.m. 



WHERE? 

Registrations Counter 

First Floor Lobby 

North Administration Building 



HOW? 

1. Go to the Registrations 
Counter where you will 
receive confirmation of 
course availability and a 
bill. If admission or re- 
admission action is neces- 
sary, you will be referred 
to the proper office. 

2. Take your bill to: 
South Administration 

Building 
Room 1103 
9:00 a.m. to 3:00 p.m. 
Obtain a copy of your 
current Student Account 
Receivable (SAR Account) 
and pay this amount plus 
your summer school bill 
at the Cashier's Office. 

3. Return to the Registrations 
Counter with your bill 
receipt. You will then re- 
ceive your course verifica- 
tion and Summer ID. 



Walk-in preregistrants must 
return to the Registrations 
Counter by 3:00 p.m. of the 
next working day with a bill 
receipt or course registration 
is NOT COMPLETED. Students 
who do not return with a bill 
receipt and the top (Course 
Request) part of the registra- 
tion form will have requests 
cancelled. The lower part of 
the registration form, verified 
by the Registrations Office, is 
the ONLY official proof of 
registration. 



WHEN? 

Must be postmarked from 

February 27 - May 5, 1978 

for Session I. 
Must be postmarked from 

February 27 -June 9, 1978 

for Session II. 



WHERE? 

All materials should be 

returned to: 

Division of Business Services 
South Administration 

Building 
University of Maryland 
College Park, MD. 20742 

A return envelope is provided 

at the back of this catalog 

for your convenience. 
HOW? 

1. Complete the Schedule 
Request and Estimated 
Bill Form at the back of 
this catalog for the session 
you wish to attend. DO 
NOT USE ONE FORM FOR 
BOTH SESSIONS. 

2. Return the following in 
the enclosed envelope: 

a. Schedule Request and 
Estimated Bill Form(s) 

b. Admission Application, 
if necessary 

c. Check made payable to 
the University of Mary- 
land. Write your social 
security number on the 
check. 

3. Confirmation of your re- 
quested schedule and a 
Summer ID card will be 
sent to you by mail. If 
confirmation is not received 
within 3 weeks, please call 
the Office of Registrations, 
454-5225, for immediate 
assistance. 

4. The Department of Business 
Services will notify you of 
any incorrect payments or 
adjustments to your ac- 
count, such as additional 
charges, refunds, and 
credits. 

5. Any outstanding debt to 
the University will be de- 
ducted from payment sub- 
mitted and the remainder 
applied to your summer 
school charges. 

PLEASE NOTE: Preregistration 
material received by mail will 
be returned to the sender if 
information is incomplete, and 
your registration will be voided. 



WHEN? 

Summer Session I 
May 22, 1978, 8:30 a.m. 

to 4:45 p.m. 
Teacher Registration 5:00 p.m. 
to 7:00 p.m. 
Summer Session II 
June 28, 1978, 8:30 a.m. 
to 5:00 p.m. 
WHERE? 
Reckord Armory 



HOW? 

1. Report to Reckord Armory 
according to the alphabetical 
schedule printed in this 
catalog on pg. 4. You will 
receive registration material 
unless your eligibility to 
register is blocked due to 

an outstanding debt to the 
University. 

2. Fill out one Registration 
and Schedule Adjustment 
Form for each transaction 
you wish to make. 

3. To ADD a course: 

a. Go to the department 
table for sectioning. 

b. Take completed add 
forms, Student Data 
Form, and Estimated 
Bill Form to the Busi- 
ness Services Area and 
pay your bill. 

c. Turn in all required 
materials at the Final 
Registration Station and 
pick up your ID card. 

d. Exit Armory. 

4. To DROP a course: 

a. Go to the Drop Approval 
Station for verification 
of registration. 

b. Go to the department 
table to delete your 
name from the class 
roster. 

c. If this was your only 
transaction, you may 
exit the Armory. 

d. If you are dropping 
ALL of your courses, 
please report to North 
Administration Building, 
Room 1 130. You must 
process a complete 
withdrawal and receive 
proper refund credit. 



CANCELLATION OF 

SUMMER SCHOOL REGISTRATION 

Students who register and later decide not to 
attend Sunnmer School at the University must 
CANCEL their registration PRIOR TO THE FIRST 
DAY OF CLASS. Failure to cancel registration 
will result in financial obligation to the University 
even though the student does not attend class. 

LATE REGISTRATION 

SUMMER SESSION I - A late fee of $20.00 is 
assessed for registration on or after the first day 
of instruction, May 23. Special permission of the 
dean or division provost must be obtained prior 
to picking up registration materials in order to 
register on or after May 31, 1978. 
SUMMER SESSION II - A late fee of $20.00 is 
assessed for registration after the first day of 
instruction, July 5. Special permission of the dean 
or division provost must be obtained prior to 
picking up registration materials in order to regis- 
ter on or after July 12, 1978. 
PROCEDURE: 

1. Pick up registration materials at the Registra- 
tion Counter, First Floor Lobby, North Ad- 
ministration Building, 9:00 a.m. to 4:00 p.m. 

2. Obtain approval of the dean or division pro- 
vost for late registration when registering on 
or after May 31 for Summer Session I or 
July 12 for Session II. 

3. Report to each academic department for 
sectioning into approved courses. 

4. For billing report to South Administration 
Building, Room 1 103, 9:00 a.m. to 3:30 p.m. 
If you are paying for on-campus housing, 
have this charge added by the Housing Of- 
fice, North Administration Building, 3rd Floor, 
before you pay the bill. 

5. Return to the Registrations Counter to turn 
in materials and complete registration. 

COURSE REGISTRATION IS ONLY COMPLETE 
AND OFFICIAL WHEN ALL FEES ARE PAID 
AND ALL MATERIALS ARE RECEIVED BY THE 
REGISTRATIONS OFFICE. 

NONSTANDARD 

DATE COURSE REGISTRATION 

Courses which vary in beginning dates from the 
starting dates for each Summer Session will be 
available for registration at the normal registration 
period for each session. Additionally, registration 
will be available on the first day of each class or 
an alternate day if requested by the department 
or instructor. 

Courses which vary in length from the regular 
Summer Session will have late registration, 
schedule adjustment, and other dates adjusted 
proportionally to the length of the course. In 
these instances students are urged to contact the 
department or instructor for information. 

Bills will be prepared for non-standard date courses 
by the Summer Programs Office, Turner Labora- 



tory, Room 2102. Students should obtain this 
bill prior to making payment at the Cashier's 
Office in the South Administration Building. 

Grades for nonstandard date courses ending after 
the regular session in which they begin will be 
posted after the regular session grade reports 
are mailed. Students desiring official notification 
of grades in these courses should request an 
unofficial transcript approximately two (2) weeks 
after the course ends. Instructors of these courses 
will receive information on various deadlines. 
Please check with them in late spring 1978 con- 
cerning specific questions. 

WITHDRAWAL 

FROM SUMMER SCHOOL 

Students who wish to terminate their registration 
on or after the first day of classes must WITH- 
DRAW. This applies to all students regardless of 
the number of courses or credits for which they 
are enrolled. 

1. Students withdrawing from a Summer Session 
must complete a Withdrawal Form which 
may be ot)tained at Room 1 130, North Ad- 
ministration Building. 

2. Withdrawal ONLY becomes effective on the 
date the form is filed with the Registrations 
Office. 

3. Registration, Recreation and Health Fees are 
not refundable. 

4. In computing refunds to students who have 
received benefit of a University granted 
scholarship, the computation will be made 
in such a way as to return the maximum 
amount to the scholarship account. 

The chart below indicates the percentage of tuition 
which will be refunded upon withdrawal. 



SUMMER SESSION 1 




May 23 - May 30 


70% 


May 31 - June 6 


50% 


June 7 - June 13 


20% 


June 14 


00% 


SUMMER SESSION 1! 




July 5- July 11 


70% 


July 12- July 18 


50% 


JulyT9- July 25 


20% 


July 26 


00% 



WITHDRAWAL FROM SUMMER SESSIONS DOES 
NOT AFFECT YOUR PREREGISTRATION FOR 
FALL SEMESTER 1978 COURSES. 

CHANGE OF ADDRESS PROCEDURE 

Changes in either local mailing address or per- 
manent address can be processed AT ANY TIME 
DURING THE SEMESTER IN WHICH THEY OC- 
CUR. Address changes are posted to the computer 
by the Division of Business Services. Address 
Change Forms are available at the following places: 

1. Division of Business Services, Address Unit 
South Administration Building 



10 



Room 1121 or 1103 

8:30 a.m. to 4:15 p.m., Monday - Friday 

2. Registrations Counter 

North Administration Building 

First Floor Lobby 

9:00 a.m. - 4:00 p.m., Monday - Friday 

3. Deans" or Provosts' Offices 

8:30 a.m. - 4:30 p.m., Monday - Friday 

4. STAR CENTER 
Student Union 
Room 1122 

9:00 a.m. - 4:00 p.m.. Monday - Friday 



Since many University communications to students 
are handled through the mail, it is imperative that 
accurate, and up-to-date addresses be maintained 
throughout the enrollment period. During the 
academic year the local address on file for cur- 
rently registered students will be used for all 
mailings other than billings and grade reports. 
Grade reports will be mailed to the local address 
unless the local address is a campus address (Zip 
Code 20742); otherwise, it will be mailed to the 
pcrrrianent address. Bills will be mailed to a stu- 
dent's permanent address. The permanent address 
on file for students not currently registered will 
be used for all mailings. 



PROCEDURE SUMMARY FOR REGISTRATION 



ARMORY REGISTRATION 



TRANSACTION 


DATE 


FEES 


PERMISSION 
REQUIRED 


REFUND 


PERMANENT 
RECORD 


Add 


May 22 
June 28 


tuition per 
credit hour 


department offering 
course 




on record 




Drop 


May 22 
June 28 


no fee 


department offering 
course 


100% 

(no charge) 


no notation 


Section Change 
(Drop and Add) 


May 22 
June 28 


no fee 


department offering 
course 




new section 
on record 





SCHEDULE ADJUSTMENT PERIOD 



TRANSACTION 


DATE 


FEES 


PERMISSION 
REQUIRED 


REFUND 


PERMANENT 
RECORD 


Add 


May 23-30 
July 6-1 1 


tuition per 
credit hour 


department offering 
course 




on record 




Drop 


May 23-30 
July 6-11 


no fee 




70% 
(30% charge) 


no notation 




Section Change 
(Drop and Add) 


May 23-30 
July 6-11 


no fee 


department offering 
course 




new section 
on record 





AFTER SCHEDULE ADJUSTMENT PERIOD 



TRANSACTION 


DATE 


FEES 


PERMISSION 
REQUIRED 


REFUND 


PERMANENT 
RECORD 


Add 


May31 and later 
July 12 and later 


tuition per credit 
hour plus $2.00 
per add 


department offering course 
and provost or dean 




on record 




Drop 


May 31 -June 16 
July 12-28 


$2.00 each 




0% 
(100% charge) 


CJndergraduate- "W" 
Graduate-no notation 




Section Change 
(Section Change 
Form) 


May 31 and later 
July 12 and later 


$4.00 per 
change: 


department offering 
course 




new section 
on record 





NOTE: STUDENTS WHO INTEND TO DROP ALL COURSES FOR WHICH THEY ARE REGIS- 
TERED MUST PROCESS A WITHDRAWAL FORM. DO NOT USE THE DROP FORM. 
WITHDRAWAL MAY BE ACCOMPLISHED IN ROOM 11 30 NORTH ADMINISTRATION 
BUILDING. 

REGISTRATIONS AND SCHEDULE ADJUSTMENT TRANSACTIONS ARE COMPLETE AND 
OFFICIAL WHEN THE APPROPRIATE FORMS HAVE BEEN TURNED IN TO THE REGISTRA- 
TIONS OFFICE. 



11 




DmSION/COLLEGE/ 
MAJOR CHANGES 



Division, College and Major ciianges may be made 
at any time, the only restrictions being Board 
of Regents limitations on enrollment. 

Forms to initiate these changes will be available 
at the division and college offices and at the Regis- 
trations Counter, First Floor Lobby, North Adminis- 
tration Building. 

Refer to the code table on page of this catalog 
to verify that you have processed all the necessary 
changes and are using the correct codes. ALL 
students must have: 1) A division code, 2) A 
college code, 3) A major (course of study) code. 
Please make sure that you have a valid combination 
of all three. If your major (course of study) comes 
directly under the jurisdiction of a division provost, 
your college code should be "99 — Mo College, 
(Jndergraduate". 

CHANGE IN DIVISION (Undergraduate Students 
Only) 

1. To initiate a change of division, go to the 
Provost's office of the division in which you 
wish to enroll. Forms and unofficial academic 
record information are available in the Pro- 
vost's office. 

2. The Provost of the new division will relay the 
transfer information to the Registrations 
office. 

3. The divisions involved will assume responsi- 
bility for the appropriate transfer of complete 
records. 

CHANGE IN COLLEGE (Undergraduate Students 
Only) 

1. To initiate a change of college, go to the 
Dean's office of the college in which you wish 
to enroll. Forms and unofficial academic 
record information are available in the Dean's 
office. 

2. The Dean of the new college will relay the 



transfer information to the Registrations 
office. 
3. The colleges involved will assume responsi- 
bility for the appropriate transfer of complete 
records. 

CHANGE IN MAJOR (Undergraduate Students 
Only) 

1. Forms for this purpose are available at the 
Registrations Counter, North Administration 
Building. 

2. The form indicating the change information 
should be turned in with the registration 
materials at the time of registration or turned 
in to the Registrations Counter at a later 
time during the semester. 

3. Be sure to complete a Division - College 
Change Form also, if appropriate. 



UNDECIDED ABOUT A COLLEGE, DIVISION 
AND/OR MAJOR AND WANT TO BE ADVISED 
BY THE GENERAL UNDERGRADUATE ADVISE- 
MENT OFFICE. 

1. Students who wish to change from their 
current college or division to "undecided" 
should obtain a Change of College Form at 
the Registrations Counter, North Adminis- 
tration Building. 

2. The Change of College Form should be taken 
to Room 3151, Undergraduate Advising 
Center, Undergraduate Library. Unofficial 
academic record information is available at 

at the Undergraduate Advising Office. 

3. The "undecided" student will be unofficially 
registered in the Office of the Dean for Under- 
graduate Studies and receive advisement 
from the Undergraduate Advising Center. 
These offices and the student's former college 
will assume responsibility for the appropriate 
transfer of complete records. 

CHANGE IN PROGRAM (Graduate Students Only) 
1. A graduate student who wishes to change 
programs or degree objectives must submit 
a new application with fee to the Graduate 
School. Current deadlines for new applications 
apply. 



Undergraduate Division/College/Major 
(Course of Study) CODES 



DIVISION 



50 - AGRICULTUHAL & LIFE SCIENCES 
S) ■ MATHEMATICAL & PHYSICAL SCIENCES 
AND ENGlNEERtNG 

52 - BEHAVIORAL & SOCIAL SCIENCES 
53- ARTS AND HUMANITIES 

54 - HUMAN & COMMUNITY RESOURCES 

53 ARTS AND HUMANITIES 

54 = HUMAN * COMMUNITY RESOURCES 

55 UNDERGRADUATE STUDIES 

56 ALLIED HEALTH PROFESSIONS 
56 - NURSING 

56 PHARMACY 

67 UNIVERSITY COLLEGE 

58 GRADUATE SCHOOL 



COLLEGE 

The numbers in parentheses indicate 
the Division for each College. 



ENGINEERING (51) 

GRADUATE SCHOOL 1581 

HUMAN ECOLOGY 1541 

NURSING (561 

PHYSICAL EDUCATION. RECREATlO^ 

UNIVERSITY COLLEGE (57) 

PHARMACY (561 

ARCHITECTURE (53) 

ALLIED HEALTH PROFESSIONS 156) 



'IDUA 



)IES 155) 



20 GENERAL STUDIES PROGRAM (t 

21 -- JOURNALISM (53) 

22 = I.E.O. (INTENSIVE EDUCATlONA 

DEVELOPMENT! (S5) 

23 '- BUSINESS & MANAGEMENT (52) 
99 = NO COLLEGE UNDERGRADUATE 



PRE PROFESSIONAL PROGRAM 

If you wish to be advised in one of 
these pre-professional programs, 
you must select a code for course 
study in addition to indicating a 
pre-professional interest. 



12 



MAJOR (COURSE OF STUDY) 

The numbers in parentheses indicate 
the Division/College for each Course 
of Study. 



Maiot 
Code 

05020 
t302A 
09020 
22110 
0899E 
Oil 10 
0199A 
09030 
01010 
01000 
01020 
01030 
03130 
01040 
22020 
02020 
08310 
10030 
10020 
19110 
04140 
04010 
0401 A 
0401 B 
0401 C 
0401 D 
040IE 

04020 
0&01A 
05016 
08380 
22060 
09060 
19050 
09080 
1305B 
15030 
07010 
01151 



52 = 



01155 

T304A 
1009A 
1009B 
22090 
2206C 
01050 
10080 
08000 
13070 



Courae of Study 

ACCOUNTING (52^23) 

ADVERTISING DESIGN (54^06) 

AEROSPACE ENGINEERING (51'04) 

AFRO-AMERICAN STUDIES i52'99l 

AGRi & EXTENSION EOUC (50^001 

AGRI a RESOURCE ECON ISO-OOI 

AGRICULTURAL CMFM 150 001 

AGRICULTURAL ENGR (50.00) 

AGRICULTURE GENERAL (50/001 

AGRICULTURE UNDECIDED (50/001 

AGRONOMY-CROPS 150 00) 

AGRONOMY-SOILS 150,00) 

AMERICAN STUDIES I53'99) 

ANIMAL SCIENCE 150/00) 

ANTHROPQLOGV 152/99) 

ARCHITECTURE 153/14) 

ART EDUCATION (54/031 

ART HISTORY (53/99) 

ART STUDIO (53 991 

ASTRONOMY (51/99) 

BIOCHEMISTRY (50/99) 

BIOL SCIENCE GENERAL (50/99) 

BIOLOGICAL SCIENCE-BOTANY (50/99) 

BIOLOGICAL SCIENCE -ENTOMOLOGY (50/99) 

BIOLOGICAL SCIENCE -MICROBIOLOGY (50/991 

BIOLOGICAL SCIENCE-ZOOLOGY (50/991 

BIOLOGICAL SCIENCE-CHEMISTRV (50 991 

BIOLOGICAL SCIENCE-ANIMAL SCIENCES (SO 991 

BOTANY (50/991 

BUSINESS & MGMT GENERAL (52/231 

BUStNESS COMMERCE, UC (57/10) 

BUSINESS EDUCATION (54(03) 

CARTOGRAPHY (52/991 

CHEMICAL ENGINEERING (51/041 

CHEMISTRY (50/99) 

CIVIL ENGINEERING (51 04) 

COMMUNITY STUDIES (54/06) 

COMPARATIVE LIT (53'99) 

COMPUTER SCIENCE (51 '991 

CONSERVATION AND RESOURCE DEVELOPMENT 

FISH & WILDLIFE MANAGEMENT (50/00) 

CONSERVATION AND RESOURCE DEVELOPMENT 

PLANT RESOURCE MANAGEMENT (50/00) 

CONSERVATION AND RESOURCE DEVELOPMENT 

PESTMANAGEMENT(50/00) 

CONSERVATION AND RESOURCE DEVELOPMENT 

WATER RESOURCE MANAGEMENT (50/00) 

CONSERVATION AND RESOURCE DEVELOPMENT 

RESOURCE MANAGEMENT (50/00) 

CONSUMER ECONOMICS (54/061 

COSTUME DESIGN (54/06) 

CRAFTS (54/06) 

CRIMINOLOGY (52/99) 

CULTURAL GEOGRAPHY (52/99) 

DAIRY SCIENCE (50/001 

DANCE (53/991 

DANCE EDUCATION (54/03) 

DIETETICS (54/06) 

DISTRIBUTIVE EDUC (54/03) 



00300 

06230 
22040 
08010 
0801 A 

09090 
06020 
15010 
08030 
09250 

09010 
04210 
1306C 
1305 A 
05040 
0999A 
13060 



4901 C 
49018 
22060 
19140 



08370 
12200 
22050 
0eO3G 



13000 
01060 
13020 
00001 

49020 
0639B 
0839A 
07020 
1307 A 
13028 
22100 



1040 



DRAMATIC ART 153/99) 
DIVISION OF AGRICULTURAL AND 
LIFE SCIENCES UNDECIDED (50/991 
DIVISION OF MATHEMATICAL ft 
PHYSICAL SCIENCES a ENGINEER(NG 
UNDECIDED (Sl,'99l 
DIVISION OF BEHAVIORAL AND 
SOCIAL SCIENCES UNDECIDED I52.991 
DIVISION OF ARTS & HUMANITIES 
UNDECIDED 1(53-99) 
DIVISION OF HUMAN & COMMUNITY 
RESOURCES UNDECIDED 154/99) 
EARLY CHILDHOOD EDUC 154/031 
ECONOMICS 152/991 
EDUCATION GENERAL (54/03) 
EDUC UNDESIGNATED 154/031 
ELECTRICAL ENGR (51/04) 
ELEMENTARY EDUC (54/03) 
ENGLISH (53/99) 
ENGLISH EDUCATION (54/03) 
ENGINEERING TECHNOLOGY- 
MECHANICAL (51/04) 
ENGR UNDESIGNATED BS (SI/04) 
ENTOMOLOGY (50/99) 
EXPER(MeNTAL FOODS (54/06) 
FAMILY STUDIES (54/06) 
FINANCE 152/23) 
FIRE PROTECTION ENGR (51/04) 
FOOD. NUTRITION & INSTITUTION 
ADMINISTRATION (54/06) 
= FOOD SCIENCE (50/00) 
= FOREIGN LANGUAGE EDUC 154/03) 
= FRENCH LANGUAGE and LIT (53;99) 
= GENERAL STUDIES PROGRAM (55/201 
= GENERAL STUDIES, UC 157/10) 
= GEOGRAPMV (52 99) 
= GEOLOGY 150'99) 

= GERMAN & SLAVIC LANG ft LIT (53/99) 
= GOVERNMENT & POLITICS (52/991 

- GREEK (S3'99) 

= HEALTH EDUCATION (54/091 

= HEARING & SPEECH SCIENCES (52/99) 

- HISTORY (53/99) 

= HOME ECONOMICS EDUCATION 
IColle9eo( Educ^Lonl (54/031 

- HOME ECONOMICS EDUCATION 
(COLLEGE OF HUMAN ECOLOGY) (54j06) 

- HUMAN ECOLOGY UNDECIDED 154/06) 
= HORTICULTURE (50/00) 

= HOUSING (54,06) 
= IE D.((NTENS(VE EDUCATIONAL 
DEVELOPMENT (55/22) 

- INDIVIDUAL STUDIES (55/19) 

- INDUSTRIAL ARTS EOUC (54,'03) 

- (NDUSTRIAL TECHNOLOGY (54/03) 

= INFORMATION SYSTEMS MGMT (52991 

= INSTITUTIONAL AOMIN (54/06) 

= INTERIOR DES(GN (54 '06) 

= INTERNATIONAL RELATIONS (52/991 

= ITALIAN (53/99) 



06020 = JOURNALISM 153/211 

08351 = KINESlOL(XilCAL SCIENCES (54/09) 

1 1090 ■ LATIN LANGUAGE & LIT I53'991 

21050 - LAWENFORCEMENT I52'99) 

08990- LIBRARY SCIENCE EDUC (54 03) 

13040 MANAGEMENT a CONSUMER STUDIES (54(06) 

05070 - MGMT SCIENCE a STATISTICS 152/231 

05090 MARKETING (52/231 

17010 - MATHEMATICS (51/991 

06330 - MATHEMATICS EDUCATION (54/031 

09100 MECHANICAL ENGINEERING (51/041 

04110 - MlCROBiOLCX^Y (50/99) 

1899A - MILITARY SCIENCE, UC (57/101 

10050 MUSIC (53/991 

08320 - MUSIC EDUCATION 154/03) 

10060 = MUSIC HISTORY a LIT isi^sg) 

1004A MUSIC THEORY ft COMPOSITION (53'991 

13068 -- NUTRITION (54/061 

0515A- PERSONNEL a LABOR RELATIONS (52/23) 

15090 = PHILOSOPHY (53/991 

08350 - PHYSICAL EDUCATION 154/09) 

19010- PHYSICAL SCIENCE GENERAL (51/991 

19020= PHYSIC:S (51 991 

22068= PHYSICALGEOGRAPHY (52/99) 

01060 = POULTRY SCIENCE 150001 

12130 ^ Pre-denial hyg.ene i56 161 

0114A- PRE-FORESTRY (50 001 

12230 = Pre-medtcal technology I56'16) 

12030 = PRE-NURSING (5&07) 

12110 = PREJ>HARMACY (56 11) 

12250 = PRE-RADIOLOG(C TECHNOLOGY (56'16) 

12120 = Pre-ohys-cal iherapy (56 161 

12990= PRE-VETERINARY 150/001 

0599A =PRODUCTION MANAGEMENT (52 231 

20010 = PSYCHOLCXIY (52 99) 

PUBLIC ADMINISTRATION (52/99) 

RECREATION (54 09) 

RUSSIAN (53(99) 

RUSSIAN AREA STUDIES (53/991 

SCIENCE EDUCATION (54-031 

SECRETARIAL EDUCATION i&4 03> 

SOCIAL STUDIES EOUC 154 03) 

SOCIOLOGY 152/99) 
11050 = SPAN* PORT LANG a LIT 15399) 
08080 = SPECIAL EDUCATION (54/031 
0e03L = SPEECH EDUCATION (54/03) 
1506A= SPEECH COMMUNICATION (53/991 
06030 = RADIO TV & FILM (53 99) 
13030- TEXTlLESa APPAREL (54/061 
13038= TEXTILE MARKETING 154/061 
130X= TEXTILE SCIENCE (54/06) 
051(X) = TRANSPORTATION I52'23l 
00400 = UNDECIDED UNDERGRADUATE (55/991 
2206A - URBAN GEOGRAPHY & RE&IONAL 

DEVELOPMENT (52 991 
22140 - URBAN STUDIES (52 99) 
0839c - VOCATIONAL EDUCATION (54/031 
04070 = ZOOLOGY (50/991 



21020 
21030 
11060 
03070 
06340 
0803H 
0e99F 
22060 



PROGRAM -GRADUATE STUDENTS 



AMST 
ARTS 
ASTR 
BOTN 



ECON 
EDAO 
EDCP 



ANIMAL SCIENCES 

AGRICULTURAL ENGINEERING 

AGRONOMY 

AMERICAN STUDIES 

ART 

ASTRONOMY 

BOTANY 

CHEMISTRY 

COMPARATIVE LITERATURE 

COMPUTER SCIENCE 

CRIMINAL JUSTICE AND CRIMINOLOGY 

DAIRY SCIENCE 

ECONOMICS 

ADMINISTRATION. SUPERVISION & CURRICULUM 

COUNSELING AND PERSONNEL SERVICES 

EARLY CHILDHOOD-ELEMENTARY EDUCATION 

HUMAN DEVELOPMENT EDUCATION 

INDUSTRIAL EDUCATION 

MEASUREMENT AND STATISTICS 

SECONDARY EDUCATION 

SOCIAL FCXJNDATlONS OF EDUCATION 

SPECIAL EDUCATION 



ENAE 
ENCE 
ENCH 
ENEE 
ENGL 
ENMA 
ENME 
ENNU 
ENTM 
FDSC 
FMCO 



GERS = 

GRAO 
GVPT = 
HESP = 
HIST = 
HLTH = 



AEROSPACE ENGINEERING 

CIVILENGINEERING 

CHEMICAL ENGINEERING 

ELECTRICAL ENGINEERING 

ENGLISH LANGUAGE AND LITERATURE 

ENGINEERING MATERlAI^ 

MECHANICAL ENGINEERING 

NUCLEAR ENGINEERING 

ENTOMOLOGY 

FOOD SCIENCE 

FAMILY AND COMMUNITY DEVELOPMENT 

FOOD. NUTRITION AND INSTITUTIONAL 

ADMINISTRATION 

FRENCH AND ITALIAN LANGUAGE AND 

LITERATURE 

GEOGRAPHY 

GE RMAN AND SLAVIC LANGUAGE AND 

LITERATURE 

UNSPECIFIED DEPARTMENT 

GOVERNMENT AND POLITICS 

HEARING AND SPEECH SCIENCE 

HISTORY 

HEALTH EDUCATION 



HORT= HO.ITICULTURE 

X)UR = JOURNALISM 

LBSC = LIBRARY AND INFORMATlONSERVICES 

MAPL = APPLIED MATHEMATICS 

MATH= MATHEMATICS 

METO= METEOROLOGY 

Mice = MICROBIOLOGY 

MUSC= MUSIC 

NUSC = NUTRITIONAL SCIENCES 

PHEO = PHYSICAL EDUCATION 

PHIL = PHILOSOPHY 

PHVS = PHYSICS AND ASTRONOMY 

POUL = POULTRY SCIENCE 

PSVC - PSYCHOLOGY 

RECR = RECREATION 

RLED= AGRICULTURAL AND EXTENSION EDUCATION 

SOCY = SOCIOLOGY 

SPAP = SPANISH AND PORTUGUESE 

LANGUAGE AND LITERATURE 

SPCH = SPEECH AND DRAMATIC ART 

TXCE = TEXTILES AND CONSUMER ECONOMICS 

UR8S = URBAN STUDIES 

ZOOL = ZOOLOGY 



13 




I 



VETERANS BENERTS 



Students attending the University under the 
Veteran's Education Assistance Act (Title 38, U.S. 
Code) who completed preregistration will be cer- 
tified on the basis of preregistration course re- 
quests. This certification should be verified by 
the student at the Registrations Office, Room 
1 1 30A, North Administration Building, 9:00 a.m. 
to 4:00 p.m., Monday through Friday. 
ENROLLMENT CERTIFICATION AND 
VA PAYMENTS 

1. How to compute payments based on enrollment 
status: 

Undergraduate student enrollment status is 
based on the number of credits for which the 
student is registered. Graduate student enrollment 
status is based on the number of units for which 
the student is registered. Courses taken as "AUDIT" 
cannot be counted toward credit for graduate or 
undergraduate students. Charges are the same 
for audit and for credit courses. 
TABLE FOR COMPUTIMG GRADUATE UNITS 
000-399 2 Units per credit 

400-499 4 Units per credit 

500-599 5 Units per credit 

600-898 6 Units per credit 

799 12 Units per credit 

899 18 Units per credit 

Graduate students will not be certified for any 



course below the 400 level unless it is required by 
their department and a letter stating this is ap- 
proved by Mr. Seidel in the Graduate School and 
submitted to the Veteran's Affairs Office when 
registering. 

2. Table for payment during each Summer Ses- 
sion.* 

■COURSES WHICH VARY FROM THE REGULAR 
SIX WEEK SESSIONS ARE CALCULATED BY 
V.A. ACCORDING TO LENGTH OF TIME AS 
WELL AS CREDITS OR UNITS. 

3. Graduate Assistants 

Graduate students who are graduate assistants 
will be certified full time if their assistantship is 
confirmed in writing by the Graduate School and 
they are taking 12 units each summer session. 
This must be done for each summer session. 
Please note — the Veterans Administration's defini- 
tion of "full time" for Graduate Assistants differs 
from the University of Maryland definition and 
should be used only for V.A. purposes. 

PROTECTION OF PRIVACY 
INFORMATION SHEET 

Public law 93-579 entitled the Privacy Act of 1974 
requires that all claimants be informed of the 
purposes and uses to be made of the information 
which is solicited. The following is furnished to 
explain the reason why the information is requested 
and the general uses to which that information 
may be put. 

AUTHORITY: The Veterans Administration is 
empowered to solicit the information requested 
in this form under the authority of Title 38, 
United States Code. 



Credits for 

Undergraduates 

4 or more 

3 

2 

1 



Units for 
Graduate 
Students 

24 

18 

12 
6 



Status 
Full time 
3/4 time 
1/2 time 
1/4 time 





Monthly Rates 


Each 
Addn'l 


Single 


1 Dep. 2 Dep. 


Dep 


$311 


$370 $422 


$26 


233 


277 317 


19 


156 


185 211 


13 



Active Duty/less than Half-time — 



TUITION ONLY 
Tuition and fees, not to exceed 
$31 1 for full time; $233 for three- 
quarter time; $1 56 for half time 
or less-than-half but more than 
one-quarter time; $78 for quarter- 
time or less. 



PURPOSE: The information requested by this 

form is considered relevant and necessary to 
determine maximum entitlement to the benefit 
for which you have applied. 

USES: The information will be used in your best 
interests in determining eligibility to the maximum 
benefits allowable by law. The responses which are 
submitted may be disclosed as permitted by law 
outside the Veterans Administration. 

EFFECTS OF NON-DISCLOSURE: Disclosure of 



the requested information is voluntary. No penalty 
will be imposed for failure to respond. However, 
the decision as to entitlement for the benefit you 
are claiming must then be made on the basis of 
available evidence of record. This may result in a 
delay in the processing of the claim, payment of 
less than maximum benefits, or complete dis- 
allowance of your claim. Failure to provide informa- 
tion in connection with the benefit currently being 
sought will have no detrimental effect on any other 
benefit to which you are entitled. (From VA 
Form 20-8739, July 1975). 



14 



VETERANS COUNSELING 

Veterans Administration Counselors, Alexis 
McKissic and David M. Rhoads, now work on 
campus full time to assist veterans, ttieir de- 
pendents, and service personnel with all V.A. related 
questions and problems. These representatives 
can offer you help in getting your monthly educa- 
tional assistance checks as well as other less 
well-known but available benefits. 

The counselors are available on a walk-in basis 
during normal office hours in Room 1 130A, North 
Administration Building (454-5276). 

ACADEMIC INFORMATION 

The information given below is taken from 
Academic Regulations, a complete statement of 
which may be found in the Undergraduate and 
Graduate Catalogs. 

GENERAL UNIVERSITY 
REQUIREMENTS 

In order to provide educational breadth for all 
students, there has been established the General 
University Requirements. These requirements 
consist of 30 semester hours of credit distributed 
among the three areas listed below. (For an excep- 
tion to this regulation, see the Bachelor of General 
Studies Program.) At least 6 hours must be taken 
in each area. At least 9 of the 30 hours must be 
taken at the 300 level or above. None of the 30 
hours may be counted toward published depart- 
mental, college or divisional requirements for a 
degree. 

Area A. 6-12 hours elected in the Division 
of Agricultural and Life Sciences; Mathe- 
matical and Physical Sciences and Engi- 
neering. 

Area B. 6-12 hours in the Divisions of 
Behavioral and Social Sciences; Human 
and Community Resources. 
Area C. 6-12 hours in the Division of Arts 
and Humanities. 

In meeting these area requirements, students 
may choose from among any undergraduate 
courses for which they are qualified. Students 
are urged to consult academic advisors for guidance 
in determining which courses in each area best 
fit individual needs and interests. 

Demonstration of competency in English compo- 
sition. Unless the student has been exempted 
from English composition, at least one course in 
this subject will be required. Exemption is granted 
if the student earns an acceptable SAT Verbal 
or English Advanced Placement Test score (score 
announced annually), or by satisfactory completion 
of a similar course at another institution. Students 
taking a course to satisfy this requirement may 
apply the credits toward the 30-hour General Uni- 
versity Requirement but may not count these credits 
toward the satisfaction of the minimum 6-hour 
requirement in any of the three designated areas. 
Credit for such a course may be in addition to 
the 12-hour maximum in any area. 



Students who entered the University prior to 
June, 1973, have the option of completing require- 
ments under the former General Education Pro- 
gram rather than the new General University 
Requirements. Each student is responsible for 
making certain that the various categories of either 
set of requirements have been satisfied prior to 
certification for the degree. Assistance and advice 
may be obtained from the academic advisor, the 
Offices of the Dean for Undergraduate Studies, or 
the Administrative Dean for Summer Programs. 

ACADEMIC CREDIT 

The semester hour is the unit of credit. During 
the Summer Session a typical 3 credit hour course 
meets five times a week for six weeks and requires 
daily preparation. Each class period is 80 minutes 
in length. 

Students who are matriculated as candidates for 
degrees will be given credit toward the appropriate 
degree for satisfactory completion of summer 
courses. Each student is responsible for the de- 
termination of applicability of courses selected to 
the degree program and is urged to consult an 
academic advisor. 

All students enrolled for credit will receive an 
official grade for each course. 
Marking System 

1. The following symbols are used on the student's 
permanent record for all courses in which he or 
she is enrolled after the initial registration and 
schedule adjustment period: A, B, C, D, F, I, P, 

S, and V^/. These marks remain as part of the 
student's permanent record and may only be 
changed by the original instructor on certifica- 
tion, approved by the department chairman and 
the dean or provost, that an actual mistake was 
made in determining or recording the grade. 

2. The mark of A denotes excellent mastery of 
the subject. It denotes outstanding scholarship. 
In computations of cumulative or semester aver- 
ages, a mark of A will be assigned a value of 4 
quality points per credit hour. 

3. The mark of B denotes good mastery of the 
subject. It denotes good scholarship. In computa- 
tion of cumulative or semester averages a mark of 
B will be assigned 3 quality points per credit hour. 

4. The mark of C denotes acceptable mastery. 
It denotes the usual achievement expected. In 
computation of cumulative or semester averages 
a mark of C will be assigned a value of 2 quality 
points per credit hour. 

5. The mark of D denotes borderline under- 
standing of the subject. It denotes marginal per- 
formance, and it does not represent satisfactory 
progress toward a degree. In computations of 
cumulative or semester averages a mark of D will 
be assigned a value of 1 quality point per credit 
hour. 

6. The mark of F denotes failure to understand 
the subject. It denotes unsatisfactory performance. 
In computations of cumulative or semester aver- 
ages a mark of F will be assigned a value of 
quality points per credit hour. 



15 



7. The mark of P is a student option mark equiva- 
lent to A, B, C, or D. (See Pass-Fail option below.) 
The student must inform the Office of Registrations 
of his selection of this option by the end of the 
schedule adjustment period. In computation of 
cumulative averages a mark of P will not be in- 
cluded. In computation of quality points achieved 
for a semester, a mark of P will be assigned a 
value of 2 quality points per credit hour. 

8. The mark of S is a department option mark 
which may be used to denote satisfactory participa- 
tion by a student in progressing thesis projects, 
orientation courses, practice teaching and the 

like. In computation of cumulative averages a 
mark of S will not be included. In computation 
of quality points achieved for a semester, a mark 
of S will be assigned a value of 2 quality points 
per credit hour. 

9. The mark of I is an exceptional mark which is 
an instructor option. It is given only to a student 
whose work in a course has been qualitatively 
satisfactory, when, because of illness or other 
circumstances beyond his control, he or she has 
been unable to complete some small portion of 
the work of the course. In no case will the mark 

I be recorded for a student who has not completed 
the major portion of the work of the course. The 
student will remove the I by completing work 
assigned by the instructor; it is the student's 
responsibility to request arrangements for com- 
pletion of the work. The work must be completed 
by the end of the next semester in which the 
course is again offered and in which the student 
is in attendance at the College Park Campus; 
otherwise the I becomes terminal (equivalent 
to W). Exceptions to the time period cited above 
may be granted by the student's dean or provost 
upon the written request of the student if circum- 
stances warrant further delay. If the instructor is 
unavailable, the department chairman will, upon 
request of the student, make appropriate arrange- 
ments for the student to complete the course re- 
quirements. It is the responsibility of the instructor 
or department chairman concerned to return the 
appropriate supplementary grade report to the 
Office of Registrations promptly upon completion 
of the work. The I cannot be removed through 
re-registration for the course or through the tech- 
nique of "credit by examination." In any event 
this mark shall not be used in any computations. 

10. The mark of W is used to denote that the 
student withdrew from a course in which he or 
she was enrolled at the end of the schedule ad- 
justment period. This mark shall not be used in 
any computation, but for information and complete- 
ness is placed on the permanent record by the 
Office of Registrations. The Office of Registrations 
will promptly notify the instructor that the student 
has withdrawn from the course. 

1 1. Audit. A student may register to audit a course 
or courses in which space is available. The notation 
ACID will be placed on the transcript for each 
course audited. A notation to the effect that this 
symbol does not imply attendance or any other 
effort in the course will be included on the tran- 
script in the explanation of the grading system. 



PASS/FAIL OPTION 

CJndergraduate students who have completed 15 
or more credit hours on the College Park Campus 
and have a cumulative average of at least 2.0 
may register on a pass/fail basis if the course 
offers the pass/fail grading option. No more than 
20 percent of the credits offered toward a degree 
may be taken on the pass/fail basis. A complete 
statement of regulations concerning the pass/fail 
option is available in the Undergraduate Catalog. 

Graduate students may not enroll on a Pass/Fail 
basis. 

POLICY ON ACCESS TO AND RELEASE 
OF STUDENT DATA/INFORMATION 

The University of Maryland is responsible for 
supervision of access to and/or release of official 
data/information about its students. A complete 
policy statement on access and release of student 
data is contained in the Fall and Spring Schedule 
of Classes, the Undergraduate Catalog, 1976-77, 
page 35, and in the Graduate Catalog, 1976-77, 
page 17. This policy is in force during the Summer 
Programs. Appropriate forms for access or limita- 
tion of access to student data are available at the 
Registrations Counter. 

DEFINITION OF 
FULL TIME STATUS 

For those students seeking University certification 
of full-time student status, the following definitions 
will be applied. 

UNDERGRADUATES 

Normally, enrollment in courses totaling six 
semester hours of academic credit will be defined 
as full-time enrollment for one Summer Session. 
Enrollment for six semester hours of academic 
credit in each of the two Summer Sessions will 
be defined as full-time enrollment for the summer. 
Four semester hours of academic credit in each 
six week session constitutes full-time enrollment 
for Veterans Administration purposes. 

GRADUATES 

Enrollment in academic credits totaling 24 graduate 
units will be defined as full-time enrollment for 
one Summer Session. Enrollment in academic 
credits totaling 24 graduate units in each of the 
two Summer Sessions will be defined as full-time 
enrollment for the summer. 
Courses in the series: 000-399 

carry 2 units/credit hour. 
Courses in the series: 400-499 

carry 4 units/credit hour. 
Courses in the series: 500-599 

carry 5 units/credit hour. 
Courses in the series: 600-898 

carry 6 units/credit hour. 
Research course: 799 carries 12 

units/credit hour. 
Research course: 899 carries 18 
units/credit hour. 

MAXIMUM LOAD 

Normally, undergraduate students should not 



16 



enroll for more than eight semester hours of 
academic credit in one Summer Session. Normally, 
graduate students should not enroll for more than 
six semester hours in one Summer Session. Varia- 
tions on these normal maximum loads must be 
approved by the student's advisor and/or major 
department. 

ADVANCED PLACEMENT PROGRAM 

Students entering the University from secondary 
schools may obtain advanced placement and 
college credit on the basis of their performance 
in the College Board Advanced Placement examina- 
tions. These examinations are normally given to 
eligible high school seniors during the May pre- 
ceding matriculation in college. 

Questions about the program may be addressed to 
the Director of Admissions and Registrations. Addi- 
tional information is presented in the consolidated 
catalog. For detailed information about examina- 
tions and procedures in taking them, write: 

Director of Advanced Placement Program 
College Entrance Examination Board 
475 Riverside Drive 
New York, New York 10027 

CANDIDATES FOR DEGREES 

All students who expect to complete requirements 
for degrees during the summer should make appli- 
cation for diplomas during summer registration 
at the Registrations Office, North Administration 
Building. Such applications should be filed no 
later than July 12 - degrees to be awarded as of 
August 15, 1978. While there is no graduation 
ceremony in August, August graduates are invited 
to attend the ceremony held in December. Doctoral 
graduates should notify the Candidate Office, 
Room 1 lOlB, North Administration Building, if 
they intend to participate in the December cere- 
monies. 



GOLDEN 
IDENTIFICATION CARD 



Retired residents of Maryland age 60 and older 
are invited to apply for a University of Maryland 
College Park Golden Identification Card. 

The card entitles the holder to free tuition for 
all University of Maryland credit courses, waiver 
of most fees and access to all College Park pro- 
grams and activities on the same basis as all other 
students. 

Program participants may simply take courses 
that interest them or work toward a graduate or 
undergraduate degree. 




A high school diploma is not required for admis- 
sion to undergraduate courses. 

Eligibility for admission to graduate courses 
varies considerably from one area of study to 
another. In general, a bachelor's degree and a 
superior undergraduate academic record in an 
appropriate field are required. However, under 
some circumstances, appropriate training and 
experience may make up for deficiencies in these 
matters. The Graduate School Admission Office wil 
be happy to respond to individual inquiries. 

For information about obtaining a Golden Identi- 
fication Card, contact the Center on Aging at 
454-5856. 



RETIRED 

VOLUNTEER SERVICE CORPS 



People who are retired and have career or life 
experience skills which they would like to continue 
to use can do so through the Retired Volunteer 
Service Corps. By volunteering three hours or 
more a week, talented older people can help per- 
sonalize undergraduate education and provide a 
unique perspective to students at U. M. C. P. 
Volunteer opportunities include career and aca- 
demic advising, tutoring, assisting in a variety 
of technical direct student contact areas - ac- 
counting, mapping and library; new positions can 
be arranged upon request. For further information 
call the Retired Volunteer Service Corps office at 
454-2453. 





LIVING 
ACCOMMODATIONS 



Any student properly registered for Summer 
Sessions is encouraged to apply for accommoda- 
tions in University residence halls. 

Information and application/contract forms may 
be obtained after February 28, 1978 by writing or 
visiting: 

Resident Life Information Desk 

3117 North Administration Building 

University of Maryland 

College Park, Maryland 20742 

Fee listings effective Summer, 1978 are: 

Weekly Six-week Session 
Double Occupancy $27.50 $165.00 

Single Occupancy $31.50 $189.00 

Fees for accommodations are payable in advance 
or on the date of registration for classes, each 
session. Housing charges are not listed on the 
enclosed Schedule Request and Estimated Bill 
form. Information on payment of housing fees is 



17 



available from Resident Life after February 28. 

A complete Residence Halls Application/Contract 
must be on file witfi Resident Life before services 
will be provided any student. Applicants may 
choose to contract for accommodations for Session 
I only, Session II only, or Sessions I and II. Ac- 
commodations are for the Summer Sessions only, 
and in no way affect the probability of any individ- 
ual obtaining assignment to residence halls for 
any subsequent academic year. Accommodations 
for fall and/or spring semester are secured only 
upon renewal of the existing contract at a time 
scheduled and announced by Resident Life, or 
upon completion of separate application and con- 
tract procedures required of students new to the 
residence halls. 

Each resident is responsible for the full term of 
the contract, unless release from obligation is 
secured from Resident Life. 

Students are notified of hall assignment before 
registration for classes. Mo request for specific 
or preferred assignment can be accepted. Assign- 
ments are made on a random, chance-distribution 
basis. Most assignments are made to rooms desig- 
nated for double occupancy. A very limited number 
of single rooms are available. Singles are assigned 
first-come, first-served based on the date an appli- 
cation is received by Resident Life, not the date 
of arrival to claim services. 

Residence hall rooms are typically furnished 
with desks, desk chairs, lounge chair, twin beds, 
mattresses and pads, and chest of drawers. Cur- 
tains, desk lamps, waste baskets and other room 
accessories, as well as decorations and all personal 
effects, are not furnished. A weekly linen rental 
service is available. 



KEY DATES FOR 

SUMMER 

1978 

DORMITORY RESIDENTS 

February 28 Tuesday Applications for sum- 

mer housing available 
from Department of 
Resident Life. 
Early application, es- 
pecially for single 
occupancy, is en- 
couraged. 

May 21 Sunday Residence halls open 

12 noon for Session I 
residents to claim as- 
signments. 

May 22 Monday Registration for Ses- 

sion I courses. 

May 23 Tuesday First day of classes. 

Room assignments not 
claimed by 12 noon 
are forfeited. 

June 28 



June 30 



July 1- 
July 4 



July 2 



Session II registrants 
may be housed in 
Short-term accom- 
modations from 12 
noon June 27 to 12 
noon July 2. Separate 
application/contract in 
advance and after 
February 28 is re- 
quired. 

Friday Last day of classes, 

Session 1. Rooms as- 
signed to residents not 
remaining for Session 
II must be vacated by 
7 p.m. 

Saturday- Summer Sessions 
Tuesday break. 

Residents enrolled for 
both sessions may re- 
main in residence hall 
rooms. 

Sunday 



Residence halls open 
12 noon for residents 
for Session II only to 
claim assignments. 

July 5 Wednesday First day of classes. 

Room assignments not 
claimed by 12 noon 
are forfeited. 

August n Friday Last day of classes, 

Session II. Rooms 
must be vacated by 
7 p.m. 



IMPORTANT 

Summer Residence Halls Application/Contract 
and detailed information including single-room 
allocation procedures, payment of fees, refund 
procedure, and appropriate action dates may be 
obtained from Resident Life after February 28, 
1978. Students desiring summer accommodations 
for either session are urged to contact Resident 
Life on or soon after February 28. 



m 



DINING HALL SERVICES 



Wednesday Registration for Ses- 
sion 11 courses. 



Meals are available to each resident on a cash 
line, cafeteria-style basis through University Dining 
Services. Meals are served seven days each week, 
with three meals each day except Sunday breakfast. 
Facilities are in the Hill Dining Hall, Ellicott Com- 
munity Dining Hall and Student Union. Further 
information may be obtained from the office of 
the Director, University Dining Service, 454-2901. 



18 




STUDENT HEALTH 



The University Health Center, located on the 
Campus near the Student Union, provides medical 
service for students enrolled for Summer Session 
courses on the College Park Campus. Students 
who are ill should report promptly to the University 
Health Center. Serious emergencies may be re- 
ported by phone to X3444 on Campus phones or 
454-3444 on a pay phone. Doctor's office hours 
are: Weekdays, 8:30 a.m. to 5:00 p.m. Nurses are 
on duty 24 hours each day including weekends 
and doctors are on call for serious conditions after 
regular hours. 

X3444 

X4923 

X4925 

X4921 



For information call 
Appointments 
Mental health 
Women's health 



# 



DISABLED STUDENT SERVICES 



Provisions are available on a limited basis for 
special assistance for students with physical dis- 
abilities. Among the services offered are: readers 
for the visually handicapped, interpreters for the 
deaf, special parking permits, etc. Contact the 
Disabled Student Services at: 
Counseling Center 
Room 0126 
454-2931 (voice or TTY) 



GENERAL INFORMATION 



LIBRARIES 



Libraries of the University are the general library, 
Theodore R. McKeldin Library, the Undergraduate 
Library, the Architecture Library, the Engineering 
and Physical Sciences Library, and the Chemistry 
Library. The libraries have a total book collection 
of over 1,400,000 cataloged volumes and currently 
receive more than 15,200 subscriptions to periodi- 
cals and newspapers. In addition, the libraries 
contain over 750,000 microtexts, over 200,000 
U.S. government and United Nations documents, 
and thousands of phonograph records, maps, film 
strips, slides, and technical reports. Bibliographi- 





cal facilities include card catalogs of the British 
Museum, Bibliotheque Nationale, Library of 
Congress, and trade bibliographies of foreign coun- 
tries. Study carrels in the McKeldin Library are 
available to faculty members and graduate students 
whose study and research require these facilities. 
Lockers are available for assignment to graduate 
students. Facilities for reading microtext materials, 
for typing, and for copying are also provided, inter- 
library loan service is available. 



RESEARCH FACILITIES 



The research programs at the University derive 
their existence and vigor from a faculty comprised 
of internationally recognized scholars and scientists. 
It is an advantage for undergraduate students to 
be aware of the University's research facilities as 
they plan their program. 

In addition to fine library resources and the usual 
laboratory facilities for undergraduate studies, the 
University has developed outstanding opportunities 
for research in the biological, physical, and social 
sciences. Among the exceptional facilities are the 
Institute for Child Study; the Natural Resources 
Institute; a Computer Science Center; a laboratory 
for basic behavioral research on animals; Van de 
Graaff accelerators; a training nuclear reactor; a 
full-scale, low-velocity wind tunnel; a psychophar- 
macology laboratory; and laboratory models for 
meteorological phenomena. Collaborative arrange- 
ments with many nearby government agencies 
permit qualified University students and faculty 
to utilize their research facilities. The University 
owns and operates the world's longest radio tele- 
scope, located in California. A 160 MeV cyclotron 
for research in nuclear studies is located on the 
College Park Campus. 

Investigation in agriculture is an important aspect 
of University research. University farms total more 
than 2,000 acres. Breeding, selection in farm crops, 
and soil research are a part of the program. Work 
in these areas is augmented by X-ray equipment 
and an electron microscope. 



UMporium - 

UNIVERSITY BOOKSTORE 



The UMporium, University Bookstore, is located 
in the basement of the Student Union Building. 
Members of the University Community may pur- 
chase at reasonable rates textbooks, classroom 
materials, photographic materials, and many novel 
ties, notions and gifts. 




19 



AREA RESOURCE MAP 

OTHER AREA RESOURCES 

The College Park Campus is in a region which 
is unusually rich in libraries, research facilities, 
museums, galleries and cultural centers as illus- 
trated by the map below. 



Baltimore 



UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND PROFESSION/i. SCHOOLS # 
DENTISTRY LAW MEDICINl NURSING 
PHARMACY SOc\l WORK 



.%^ 



^^ 



UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND^ 
BALTIMORE COUNTY 



20. 



\0 



^^ 



.W^ 



<r 




30, 



33. 



1 34 



38. 



„ 43. 
32. 7. 

11. 19- 

o 9 18. 
15.2- 

■ 16 39 *^-41. 

^j2 14.29. i2j 

26.23 



iNIVER/lTY OF MARYLAND 
J.E«E PARK CAMPUS 



40. 



[university of maryund if 

NATURAL RESOURCES INSTITUTE ^ ^ 



8. /35. 
28. 




1. 


AMERICAN UNIVERSITY 


18. 


GEORGE WASHINGTON UNIVERSITY 


31. 


NAT. METEOROLOGICAL CTR. 


2. 


ARENA STAGE 


17. 


GODDARD SPACE FLIGHT CTR. 


32. 


NAT. ZOOLOGICAL PARK 


3. 


ARLINGTON NAT. CEMETERY 


18. 


HERSHORN GALLERY 


33. 


NAVAL MEDICAL CTR. 


4. 


ATOMIC ENERGY COMMISSION 


19. 


HOWARD UNIVERSITY 


34. 


NAVAL OBSERVATORY 


5. 


BALTO./WASH. INTERNATIONAL AIRPORT 


20. 


JOHNS HOPKINS APPLIED PHYSICS LAB. 


35. 


NAVAL OCEANOGRAPHIC OFFICE 


6. 


BETHESOA NAT. NAVAL MEDICAL CTR. 


21. 


JOHNS HOPKINS UNIVERSITY 


36. 


NAVAL ORDINANCE LAB. 


7. 


CATHOLIC UNIVERSITY 


22. 


KENNEDY CTR. FOR THE PERFORMING ARTS 


37. 


NAVAL RESEARCH LAB. 


8. 


CENSUS BUREAU 


23. 


LIBRARY OF CONGRESS 


38. 


PENTAGON 


9. 


CORCORAN GALLERY 


24. 


NAT AGRICULTURE LIBRARY 


39. 


SMITHSONIAN INSTITUTION 


10 


OULLES INTERNATIONAL AIRPORT 


25. 


NAT. AIRPORT 


40. 


SMITHSONIAN ECOLOGICAL CTR. 


11 


DUMBARTON OAKS 


26. 


NAT. ARCHIVES 


41. 


U.S. CAPITAL 


12 


FOLGER SHAKESPEARE LIBRARY 


27. 


NAT BUREAU OF STANDARDS 


42. 


U.S. NAVAL ACADEMY 


13 


FORT McHENRY 


28. 


NAT. ENVIRONMENTAL SATELLITE CTR. 


43. 


WALTER REED ARMY MEDICAL CTR 


14 


FREER GALLERY 


29. 


NAT. GALLERY OF ART 


44. 


WHITE HOUSE 


15 


GEORGETOWN UNIVERSITY 


30. 


NAT. INSTITUTES OF HEALTH 







( 



20 




SPECIAL PROGRAMS 



MOTOR VEHICLE 
REGISTRATION 



All students are required to register their motor 
vehicles at the time of registration for classes. A 
student must bring his/her state or District of 
Columbia motor vehicle registration card containing 
the motor vehicle tag number. Parking stickers 
for motor vehicles previously registered for the 
1977 - 1978 academic year will be honored for 
the 1978 Summer Sessions. For motor vehicles 
operated by new students or non-registered motor 
vehicles operated by continuing students, there 
will be a registration fee of $3.00 which must be 
paid to the Motor Vehicle Administration Office 
when the vehicle is registered. (See Tuition and 
Fees) Vehicles must be registered by the legal 
operator only. 

For use of students, staff members, and em- 
ployees, several parking lots are provided. Students 
may park registered motor vehicles in lots 1, 2, 3, 
4, 7 and 1 1. All other lots are reserved for faculty 
and staff members. University Regulations forbid 
the parking of motor vehicles on any Campus road 
or fire lane. These regulations are enforced by the 
Campus Office of Public Safety. 

Questions regarding Motor Vehicle Registration 
should be directed to the Motor Vehicle Office 
from 9:00 to 3:00, Monday through Friday, or by 
telephone on X4242 or X4243. 



REMISSION OF FEES 
FOR FACULTY AND STAFF 



Under certain conditions members of the faculty 
and classified staff may register for a specified 
number of credits with remission of fees. Policy 
governing remission of fees during summer is 
contained in Administrative Procedure No. 2 and 
in the Classified Staff Handbook. For each Summer 
Session during which remission of fees is being 
requested by faculty and staff who are to be on 
the Summer Programs payroll an approved Authori- 
zation for Remission of Fees form must be turned 
in to the Summer Programs Office. At the bottom 
of the form, the authorizing department should 
indicate the course to be taken. The faculty/staff 
member should check with the respective depart- 
ment to ascertain that the proper forms have been 
submitted for each Summer Session. Forms should 
be submitted at the same time the payroll entry 
is submitted. If submitted after May 26, 1978, for 
Session 1, or July 7, 1978, for Session II, fee remis- 
sion will be allowed only on a pro rata basis. 




® 



WORKSHOPS, INSTITUTES 

AND OTHER SPECIAL OFFERINGS 



During the summer months the Summer 
Sessions offer a number of special educational 
programs of interest to both select audiences 
and general student community residents. These 
programs sometimes differ from traditional courses 
in instructional format and frequently in duration. 
Unless noted otherwise, admission procedures are 
the same as those for standard courses. Special 
registration arrangements will be made for certain 
workshops. Details regarding registration may be 
obtained from program directors. The standard 
fee schedule applies except that University Health 
services are not provided for students registered 
in courses offered away from the College Park 
Campus, in which case the Student Health Fee is 
not charged. Reference to additional or alternative 
fees may be found under individual listings. Special 
non-credit fees apply only where specifically quoted. 
Registrations based upon these fees are available 
only to non-matriculated students and provide 
neither credit nor transcripts of attendance. The 
descriptions below are intended to indicate the 
general content only, it is advisable to contact the 
program director for more detailed information. 



THE MARYLAND SUMMER 
INSTITUTE FOR THE CREATIVE 
AND PERFORMING ARTS 



in connection with the Summer Entertainment 
Series and in cooperation with the Departments 
of Music, Dance and Drama, the Institute will 
sponsor visiting artists in an exciting series of 
master classes open to students, professionals 
and the general public. Events are as follows: 

MAY 31 Open rehearsal with the phenom- 

enal, conductorless ORPHEUS 
CHAMBER ENSEMBLE; partici- 
pants will rehearse with the 
orchestra. 

JUNE 5 & 7 Master classes with the world- 
renowned flamenco dancer and 
authority on the history and folklore 
of Spanish dance, TEODORO 
MORCA. 

JUNE 13 Vocal jazz clinic workshop with 

the internationally-acclaimed star, 
SARAH VAUGHAN. 

JUNE 21 Master classes with members of 

the magnificent CANADIAN BRASS. 




21 



JUNE 26 Master class on 20th century art 

song with mezzo soprano JAN 
DEGAETANI, world-renowned 
artist. 

JUNE 28 Master class on 20th century art 

song with Metropolitan Opera 
bass baritone DONALD GRAMM. 

JULY 12 Master class with the inter- 

nationally-celebrated virtuosi of 
THE FRIEDMAN, VARDI, SILBER- 
STEIN STRING TRIO. 

JULY 19 Master class with one of the 

world's greatest flautists, JAMES 
GALWAY. 

JULY 31 & Master classes with members of 

AUGUST 2 the sensational, gymnastic PILO- 
BOLUS DANCE THEATRE. 

These classes are offered on a non-credit basis. 
Persons who wish to perform should contact Mr. 
George Moquin, Department of Music (454-2501, 
454-5910). Admission fee for any student, faculty 
or college-level institution staff member in the 
Washington-Baltimore area is $2.00 per session 
with proper identification. All others, $3.50 per 
session. Tickets may be purchased in advance 
through Mr. Moquin. The remainder of the limited 
seating will be sold on a first come, first served 
basis. 

In addition, the Institute is pleased to announce 
The National Opera Orchestra Workshop, June 
19 - July 15. Designed to provide outstanding, 
young professional musicians with a unique op- 
portunity for practical experience in opera orches- 
tra, the month-long, concentrated study of some 
of the most difficult standard operatic literature 
will be directed and coached by distinguished 
artists from leading opera and symphony orches- 
tras in the nation. Eve Queler, Music Director, 
The Opera Orchestra of New York, has graciously 
accepted the University of Maryland's invitation 
to serve as Music Director. 

Assisting Eve Queler will be distinguished mem- 
bers of the Metropolitan Opera Orchestra, the 
Philadelphia Orchestra and other nationally famous 
instrumental artists. Operas to be studied include 
Rigoletto, Don Giovanni, I Pagiiacci, Tosca, La 
Boheme, Cavalleria rusticana, and Tristan und 
Isolde. Two three-hour sessions per day will be 
held six days per week. Sectional rehearsals and 
clinics will be held regularly. Master classes with 
members of the Canadian Brass and the Friedman, 
Vardi, Silberstein String Trio will be held on June 
21 and July 12, respectively. Friday evening ses- 
sions on June 23, 30 and July 7, will be open to 
the general public and will consist of read-through 
reviews of the week's work. On Saturday, July 15, 
the Workshop will close with a concert performance 
of Tristan und Isolde with Roberta Knie and Jess 
Thomas in the lead roles. 

All applicants selected for participation in the 
opera orchestra will receive scholarship awards 
consisting of full tuition, room and board on the 
College Park Campus. Participants will be expected 
to provide their own transportation and sufficient 




funds to defray personal expenses. 

Auditions will be conducted by Eve Queler in 
regional centers throughout the United States. 
All auditions must be in person and appointments 
will be arranged upon receipt of applications. 
Transportation to the audition must be provided 
by the applicant. The deadline for receipt of appli- 
cation is April 1, 1978. Application is subject to 
screening which may determine admission to an 
audition. The audition will consist of performance 
of a short selection of the applicant's choice and 
sight-reading of excerpts (solos in the case of 
winds) from the repertoire listed above. 

For further information, contact Mr. George 
Moquin, Department of Music, (454-2501, 
454-5910). 



UNIVERSITY CHORUS 
1978 SUMMER SEASON 



Paul Traver 

Join the Chorus and sing some of the world's 
great choral literature. Music Director, Paul Traver, 
has planned an exciting season, with rehearsals 
scheduled through both summer sessions. For 
further information contact the Department of 
Music, 454-2501. 

FLUTE MASTERCLASS, NON-CREDIT, JULY 17- 
20/24-27, MTWTH, 7:00 - 10:00 P.M. 
William Montgomery 

Conducted by one of the outstanding flautists in 
the country, this masterclass will be devoted to 
problems of technique, literature and interpretation 
of the major flute solo and ensemble repertoire. 
One evening session will be held at the Dayton C. 
Miller flute collection at the Library of Congress. 
In addition, the nightly classes will be compli- 
mented by a performance by the internationally 
acclaimed flautist, James Galway, on Tuesday 
evening, July 18. Mr. Galway will provide a master- 
class for the group on Wednesday, July 19, 10:00 - 
12:00 noon. A maximum of twenty performers will 
be accepted by audition to play at the master- 
classes. Registrants may be of college, high school, 
professional affiliation, or general public. Special 
workshop fee, including Galway performance 
and masterclass: $50 for performers; $25 for 
auditors. For further information, contact Dr. 
William Montgomery, Department of Music 
(454-2501). 



@ 



DIVISION OF AGRICULTURE 
AND LIFE SCIENCES 



RLED 487, 497, CONSERVATION OF NATURAL 
RESOURCES, 6 CREDITS, SESSION II, 



22 



SCHEDULE TO BE ARRANGED. 
Staff 

Tfiis worksfiop, designed primarily for elementary 
teachers, is devoted to tfie study of Maryland's 
b.isic wealth, its natural resources. The course is 
field based, with several two and three day trips 
involving overnight visits to study the natural 
regions of the state. Resource problems, practices 
and programs are emphasized. Registration is 
required for both RLED 487 and 497 and is limited 
to 25 students. Special travel fee of $35.00 in 
addition to tuition. 




DIVISION OF ARTS 
AND HUMANITIES 



COLLEGE OF JOURNALISM 

THIRD ANNUAL UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 
SCHOOL PRESS WORKSHOP, JUNE 26-JULY 14. 
MTWTHF, 9:30-12:00/1:30-3:30. 
Barbara Hines 

For the third year the College will provide a three- 
week intensive program in publishing a high school 
newspaper-newsmagazine. The program, featuring 
nationally known journalists and educators, focuses 
on newswriting, interviewing, sports reporting, 
editorials, features, censorship and libel, headlines, 
copy editing, layout and typography, advertising, 
and much more. Educational field trips to Vv'ash- 
ington area media organizations are arranged. 
Special fee: $100. Room and board may be ar- 
ranged at extra charge. 

For further information and application write to 
Mrs. Barbara Hines, Assistant Dean, College of 
Journalism, University of Maryland, College Park, 
Maryland 20742. 

THIRD ANNUAL YEARBOOK SHORT COURSE. 
JUNE 26-29. MTWTH, 10:00-4:00. 
Barbara Hines 

High school yearbook editors and reporters have 
the opportunity to plan their 1978-79 school year- 
book at the annual four-day yearbook workshop. 
Lecturers include such nationally known yearbook 
experts as Dr. Regis L. Boyle, Col. Charles Savedge. 
and Mr. William Lawbaugh. Lectures and work ses- 
sions are held on budget and finance, advertising, 
theme, content, copywriting, photography, con- 
temporary design, graphics, covers, and staff 
organization. Special fee: $25 for the four-day 
session. Room and board may be arranged at 
extra charge. 

For further information and application write to 
Mrs. Barbara Hines, Assistant Dean, College of 
Journalism, University of Maryland, College Park, 
Maryland 20742. 



@ 



INSTITUTE FOR 

ADVANCED FRENCH STUDIES 




FREN 498/499/699. SESSION II, MTWTH, 
9:00-12:30. 

Andrew Campagna, Micheline Barrabini, Visiting 
Professor Germaine Bree and Staff 
For both undergraduate and graduate students 
of French, the institute is designed to provide an 
intensive program in French studies, including 
language, literature, civilization and culture. Stu- 
dents may earn a maximum of six (6) credits. For 
further information contact the department 
(454-4303). 



THE SELF-INSTRUCTION 
LANGUAGE PROGRAM 



FOLA 158A, ELEMENTARY HUNGARIAN, 3-6 
CREDITS; FOLA 158B, ELEMENTARY ROMA- 
NIAN, 3-6 CREDITS; FOLA 158C, ELEMENTARY 
MODERN GREEK, 3-6 CREDITS; FOLA 158D, 
ELEMENTARY HAUSA, 3-6 CREDITS; FOLA 
158E, ELEMENTARY ITALIAN, 3-6 CREDITS. 
MAY 22-JULY 14. ARRANGED. REGISTRATION 
ONLY BY PERMISSION OF THE DIRECTOR. 

William MacBain, Director 

Assisted by a grant from the National Endowment 
for the Humanities, Summer Programs is pleased 
to announce an exciting new self-instruction pro- 
gram in languages. This program permits the 
student to proceed on a self-paced basis assisted 
by the availability of excellent materials which will 
be at the student's disposal in the Language Media 
Center. Coaching assistance will be available and, 
in each case, the accomplishment will be evaluated 
by outside examiners. A broad selection of 
languages has been provided for this first term 
of the program, including Hausa, one of the most 
important languages of West Africa. Enrollment 
for each language will necessarily be limited. There- 
fore, students are urged to obtain permission of 
the Director to preregister as early as possible. 
Applicants wishing more detail or interested in 
the study of other languages through the Self- 
Instruction Program should contact Dr. William 
MacBain, Department of French (454-4303). 

GERM 438A, THE OLD NORSE SAGA, 3 CRED- 
ITS, SESSION I. MW, 7:00-10:00 P.M. 
Jere Fleck 

The Old Norse saga is the unrivaled highpoint of 
medieval European prose. Its striking modern 



23 



style, devastating understatement and fast moving 
plot bring to life the violent world of the Viking, 
the Morw/egian court and the settlement of Ice- 
land—rich in action and unforgettable characters. 
No prerequisites. All readings in English. 

GERM 439A, PRO SEMIMAR IN GERMAN LIT- 
ERATURE: MODERN SHORT STORIES, A 
CULTURAL APPROACH TO THE THIRD YEAR 
LITERATURE COURSE, 3 CREDITS, SESSION I. 
TTH, 4:15-7:00 P.M. 

Guenter Pfister 

The pro seminar seeks to define the surface and 
deep cultural aspects of German life in German 
literature in anthropological terms. These cultural 
identifications then will be applied to the collection 
of short stories which are to be read in order to 
underline the cultural message. Finally, cultural 
contrasts will be identified by comparisons with 
American culture. 

GERM 439B, MODERN GERMAN FILMS: A 
CULTURAL APPROACH TO GERMAN LITERA- 
TURE, 3 CREDITS, SESSION 11. 
TTH, 9:30-12:15. 
Peter Beicken 

Film has become an important tool of communica- 
tion in the classroom. This course, designed for 
students and high school teachers, will focus on 
the media advantage of film in teaching German 
literature and culture. Films will be placed in their 
historical context for a discussion of their cultural 
significance and literary value. Discussions will 
center on the usefulness of films as elements of 
teaching. Reading knowledge of German required. 

DART 120A/125A/429A/499A, MUSICAL THEA- 
TER WORKSHOP, 3-6 CREDITS OPTIONAL, 
JUNE 26 - JULY 29, MTWTHF, 9:00-12:00, 
1:00-4:00. ADMISSION BY AUDITION ONLY. 
Ronald O'Leary, Director 

The Department of Drama and University Theater 
are presenting a major workshop in the popular 
American musical theater genre. Open by audition 
to both qualified high school and college students, 
the workshop will provide classes taught by mem- 
bers of the theater and music faculties in voice, 
dance and acting. In addition, all students will 
participate in a five night run of a full-scale produc- 
tion in which a professional guest artist will play 
the leading role. Special fee for non-credit, non- 
(Jniversity registrants: $145. Room and board 
may be arranged at extra charge. For additional 
information, contact Dr. Ronald O'Leary 
(454-2541). 

MUSC 448/699, VISUAL AND PERFORMING 
ARTS FOR CHILDREN, 2 CREDITS, JUNE 19-30. 
MTV^THF, 9:30-12:30. 
Shirley Shelley and staff 

With the wealth of materials available to render the 
visual and performing arts an increasingly valuable 
educational experience for children, this course 
provides a special learning opportunity in review, 
coordination and planning new activities. Guest 



presentations by specialists in art, dance, poetry 
and dramatics, together with the faculty in music, 
will present a composite view of the material. 

MUSC 448A/699A, THE ART SONG IN THE 
TWENTIETH CENTURY, 2 CREDITS (OPTIONAL), 
JUNE 25-30. SUNDAY, 7:00-10:00 P.M.; M-TH, 
9:00-4:00; F, 9:00-12:00. 
Kenneth Pennington and staff 
In cooperation with a meeting of the National 
Association of Teachers of Singing, the course 
will present a concentrated study of the twentieth 
century repertoire of the art song genre. The 
meetings and the course will include presentations 
by distinguished composers, performers and music 
critics. In addition to panels and master classes, 
the course will be complimented by several con- 
certs by distinguished artists including Donald 
Gramm and Jan DeGaetani. Special fee for non- 
credit, non-University registrants: $100 for entire 
session or $25 daily. For further information con- 
tact Dr. Kenneth Pennington (454-2501). 

MUED, OFFERED JOINTLY WITH THE DIVISION 
OF HUMAN AND COMMUNITY RESOURCES. 
MUED 499A, WORKSHOP IN TOMETICS, 

I, 2 CREDITS (OPTIONAL), JULY 10-14. 
MTWTHF, 9:30-12:30/1:30-4:30. 

Roger Folstrom and staff 
This workshop will explore the relatively new 
philosophy and methodology of teaching and 
learning skills of reading music. The workshop 
will consist of lectures and demonstrations by the 
faculty and visiting specialists, intensive skills 
development for specialists in various areas and 
individualized projects. Special fee for non-credit, 
non-CJniversity registrants: $100. 

MUED 4998, WORKSHOP IN TOMETICS, 

II, 2 CREDITS (OPTIONAL), JULY 17-21. 
MTWTHF, 9:30-12:30/1:30-4:30. 

Roger Folstrom and staff 

This workshop will provide advanced preparation 
in the methodology of Tometics and will explore 
developmental learning implications of the system. 
Special fee for non-credit, non-University regis- 
trants: $100. 

MUED 499D, THE SILVER BURDETT WORKSHOP 
IN MUSIC TEACHING MATERIALS, 2 CREDITS 
(OPTIONAL), JULY 24-28, MTWTHF, 9:30- 
12:30/1:30-4:30. 
Roger Folstrom, Coordinator 
The Silver Burdett Company has a distinguished 
history of providing workshops across the nation, 
assisting teachers in music education to acquire 
new skills and knowledge of new materials. These 
workshops date prior to the early teacher "normal" 
schools in the history of American education and 
served in some instances to certify teachers. The 
workshop will present a distinguished group of 
composers and authors who will lead the class in 
intensive drills with the new materials and tech- 
niques. Special fee for non-credit, non-University 
registrants: $100. 



24 



MUED 499E/698E, MUSIC IM SPECIAL EDUCA- 
TION: ITS ROLE, ACTIVITIES. MATERIALS. 
2 CREDITS. JULY 31 - AUGUST 11. MTWTHF, 
9:30-12:30. 
Sharon Lenz and staff 

With the increasing interest in all aspects of special 
education, this course focuses on a generally 
neglected area of the vitally important special 
education field. With the aid of visiting specialists 
the course will explore the various roles of con- 
tributing to the education of special students, 
drill in applications and materials. 

RUSS 461. SOVIET LITERATURE OF PROTEST: 
CENSORED AND SAMIZDAT. 3 CREDITS. 
SESSION I, MW. 9:30-11:30. 
Grigorii Svirsky 

Post World War II Russian Soviet literature. A 
study of authors and works which served as a 
source of moral support for today's generation of 
dissidents. The sociology and psychology of con- 
temporary Russia. Taught in Russian. 

RUSS 468. THE OCCULT IN RUSSIAN AND 
WESTERN LITERATURES, 3 CREDITS. SES- 
SION II. MW, 9:30-11:30. 
Thomas Berry 

Spiritualism, demonism and the occult sciences 
in Russian literature through the nineteenth century 
with counterparts in Western literature. Read short 
stories of Tolstoy, Dostoevsky, Poe, Radcliffe, etc. 
No prerequisites. Instruction and readings in 
English. 



o 



WOMEN'S STUDIES 
SUMMER PROGRAM 



During Summer 1978. the University of Maryland 
will be a center for the study of women. Jointly 
sponsored by the Division of Arts and Humanities 
and the Division of Behavioral and Social Sciences, 
this program will present a group of faculty and 
guest lecturers who will share information, theories 
and concepts concerning "Theories of Feminism," 
"Female Systems and Cultural Change," and "Amer- 
ican Women and Ethnic Diversity." For specific 
registration information on these and other courses 
in Women's Studies, contact Dr. Carol Pearson 
(434-3841). 



(D 



DIVISION OF BEHAVIORAL AND 
SOCIAL SCIENCES 



ANTH 389C/689C, EARLY MAN AND HUMAN 
EVOLUTION. 6 CREDITS. MAY 23 - JUNE 9, 
MTV^TTHF, 9:30-3:30. 
Stephen Rosen 



The subject of human evolution has become an 
increasingly fascinating study for people of many 
disciplines. This workshop offers an intensive 
examination of the evidence of human evolution 
and the core theories dealing with the most im- 
portant and controversial questions concerning 
fossil man. Prerequisite: an introductory course 
in physical anthropology. 

CRIM 220, CRIMINOLOGY. 3 CREDITS, SES- 
SION I. MTWTHF. 9:30. 
Walter Minor 

The problem of crime, which is of increasing con- 
cern in American society, is explored in this course. 
Topically, the course considers the "creation" of 
crime by the state, the nature and extent of crime 
in our society, and the way the criminal justice 
system responds to crime (both ideally and ac- 
tually). More specific topics include police brutality, 
"hidden" criminality, women's liberation and female 
crime, organized crime, whose interests the criminal 
law really serves, con games, plea bargaining, 
and the future of American crime. The course is 
open to both majors and non-majors. 

GEOG 498C, LINE SYMBOLIZATION IN COM- 
PUTER CARTOGRAPHY, 3 CREDITS, SESSION II, 
TTH, 4:30-7:00. 
George Jenks 

in relation to the meeting of the International 
Cartographic Association at College Park, this 
course offers a unique opportunity to study with 
visiting Professor George Jenks, an expert in this 
discipline from the University of Kansas. Topics 
will cover basic developments to coordinate 
geometry depending upon the level of participation 
and map design for automated cartography. The 
class will make several trips to the U.S. Bureau 
of the Census to use their computer facilities. 
Special fee for non-credit, non University regis- 
trants: $100. Room and board may be arranged 
at extra charge. 

GEOG 498D, CARTOGRAPHIC DESIGN, 3 
CREDITS, SESSION II, MW, 4:30-7:00. 
George McCleary 

Also coordinated with the meeting of the Inter- 
national Cartographic Association, Professor 
McCleary, University of Kansas, will cover the 
development of map structure and design in 
modern thematic cartography, a combination of 
cartography, psychology and graphic arts, and 
consideration of their influence on map design 
aimed at communicating ideas. This course is of 
interest to anyone working with visual perception, 
design and graphic communication. Special fee 
for non-credit, non-University registrants: $100. 
Room and board may be arranged at extra charge. 
GEOG 498U, URBAN FIELD STUDY, 3 CREDITS, 
MAY 23-JUNE 6, MTWTHF, 8:30-5:00. 
Harold Brodsky 

The Urban Field Study course is designed to 
provide students with direct field experiences in 
downtown business districts, suburban shopping 
centers, industrial districts, strip commercial 



25 



developments, residential neigiiborhoods and 
apartment complexes. In addition, study includes 
assigned readings and briefing sessions dealing 
with economic and social forces. 
LENF 330, CONTEMPORARY LEGAL POLICY 
ISSUES: EXPERIMENtATIOM WITH HUMAN 
SUBJECTS -LEGAL ASPECTS, 3 CREDITS, 
SESSION I, MTWTHF, 11:00. 
Barton Ingraham 

Two topics of current interest will be explored in 
depth: 1) legal and ethical problems involved in 
doing social science research with human subjects, 
including but not restricted to convicted offenders; 
2) legal and ethical problems involved in the use of 
new forms of therapy with convicted offenders and 
other involuntarily confined people, such as the 
mentally ill. Examples include the use of new drug 
therapies, behavior modification, and aversive 
conditioning psychosurgery. 
FISCAL/BUDGET WORKSHOP FOR LOCAL 
GOVERNMENTS, NON-CREDIT, JULY 19-20. 
M. Henry Eppes 

Jointly sponsored by the Maryland Technical 
Advisory Service and the Institute for Urban 
Studies, the workshop is designed to help Mary- 
land local government officials improve their 
familiarity with the fiscal/budgetary process. The 
two days of concentrated instruction, discussion 
and practical work relating to the annual fiscal 
cycle will emphasize budgets and revenue sources. 
Experts in fiscal management and budgeting from 
all levels of government will serve as instructors. 
Special fee: $50. Housing and meal accommoda- 
tions will be available for additional charge. 
For further information, contact Dr. M. Henry 
Eppes (454-2507). 



DIVISION OF HUMAN AND 
COMMUNITY RESOURCES 



EDAD 798S, INSTITUTE FOR COLLEGE/UNI- 
VERSITY DEVELOPMENT, 3 CREDITS, SESSION 
1, ARRANGED. 
Robert Carbone 

Fund raising, alumni administration, publications 
and public information, governmental relations, 
grant and contract administration. These are the 
elements of "institutional advancement" to be 
covered in this institute. The schedule provides 
for two weeks of independent study, an intensive 
one-week conference, and three weeks devoted to 
designing an advancement project for your own 
campus. For college/university personnel and for 
those who aspire to these positions. 

EDCP 498G, DESIGN OF CAREER COUNSELING 
SERVICES FOR HIGH SCHOOL STUDENTS, 3 
CREDITS, JUNE 26-30, MTWTHF, 9:30-4:30. 
Loretta Wertheimer 
High school counselors and others involved with 




the provision of career planning and decision- 
making services to students will find this workshop 
very valuable. Recent developments are covered 
in the field of career counseling as they relate 
both to the assessment of current career concerns 
and to the delivery of career development and 
decision-making services. Opportunities will be 
provided for students to develop programs applying 
to cognitive developmental concepts. 

EDEL 417, THE SOCIAL STUDIES AND MULTI- 
ETHNIC EDUCATION, 3 CREDITS, SESSION I, 
TTH, 7:00-9:45 P.M. 
V. Phillips Weaver 

The general principles from the social sciences 
that are applicable to multi-cultural education as 
a component of social studies instruction are 
the main focus of the class. Cultural experiences 
utilizing the resources of the Washington, D.C. 
metropolitan area will be arranged on an independ- 
ent basis for each student. 

EDEL 488A, CREATIVE SCIENCE ACTIVITIES 
FOR EARLY CHILDHOOD AND ELEMENTARY 
EDUCATION, 3 CREDITS, SESSION I, TTH, 
4:15-7:00. 
George Eley 

Creative use of activities and materials to teach 
science in open-ended ways is stressed. A variety 
of formats for science learning activities are in- 
corporated in the course as well as the use of 
school and community resources in science. 

EDEL 4880, CREATIVE CRAFTS FOR EARLY 
CHILDHOOD AND ELEMENTARY TEACHERS, 
3 CREDITS, SESSION I, TTH, 7:00-9:45 P.M. 
David Williams 

An exciting DO IT experience for teachers with 
an emphasis on folk crafts of 18th and 19th 
Century America. Participants will learn some of 
the stories behind the crafts as well as construct 
their own replicas. 

EDEL 499P, MATHEMATICS WORKSHOP FOR 
ELEMENTARY SCHOOL TEACHERS, 3 CREDITS, 
JULY 5-25, MTWTHF, 9:30-3:30. 
Martin Johnson 

The three-week workshop is ideally suited for 
elementary school teachers wishing to review 
and update knowledge and skills needed to teach 
mathematics in the elementary school. Major focus 
is on developing teaching strategies, sequencing 
mathematics content, and constructing and trying 
out teaching materials, including games, with 
children. 

EDEL 788U, INSTRUCTION IN MATHEMATICS 
FOR THE GIFTED, 3 CREDITS, JULY 24- 
AUGUST 11, MTWTHF, 1:00-4:00. 
Martin Johnson 

Developing mathematics activities and programs 
for gifted elementary children in a laboratory setting 
provides valuable training for teaching this in- 
creasingly important group of students. Participants 
will have experiences working with gifted children 
during the course. 



26 



THE YOONG CHILD IN 
CONTEMPORARY SOCIETY 

A summer series of special offerings: colloquium, 
seminar, and courses designed to provide short- 
term, intensive study of the young child in con- 
temporary sodety. Planned to t>e useful to advanced 
graduate students in all divisions of the University 
as well as leadership people in community agendes 
assodated with young children, these courses are 
offered in three and six-week sessions. For addi- 
tional information, contact Dr. Kathleen Amershek, 
Department of Early Childhood-Elementary Educa- 
tion. 

EDEL 488K/788K, THE YOUNG CHILD AND 
TESTING. 3 CREDITS. SESSION I. TTH 7:00- 
9:45 P.M.. Marilyn Church. 
EDEL 4881/7881. THE EARLY CHILDHOOD 
EDUCATOR IN CONTEMPORARY SOCIETY. 
3 CREDITS. SESSION I. MW 7:00-9:45 P.M., 



Ruth Heidelbach. 

EDEL 650. SEMINAR IN EARLY CHILDHOOD 
EDUCATION. 3 CREDITS, SESSION I. MW, 
4:15-7:00. Marilyn Church. 

EDEL 726. RESEARCH IN EARLY CHILDHOOD 
EDUCATION. 3 CREDITS, SESSION I, TTH, 
4:15-7:00. Ruth Heidelbach. 

EDEL 488Z/788Z. MAINSTREAMING AND THE 
CURRICULUM FOR EARLY CHILDHOOD. 3 
CREDITS. JUNE 26-JULY 14. MT\An"HF. 9:00- 
1 2:00. Staff. 

EDEL 488L/788L. COLLOQUIUM IN EARLY 
CHILDHOOD EDUCATION. 3 CREDITS. JULY 
10-28. MTWTHF. 7:00-9:45 P.M.. Kathleen 
Annershek. 

EDEL 488J/788J. EARLY CHILDHOOD PRO- 
GRAM ADMINISTRATION. 3 CREDITS. SESSION 
II, MW. 4:15-7:00. Kathleen Amershek. 
EDEL 652. EDUCATION AND GROUP CARE OF 
THE INFANT AND YOUNG CHILD. 3 CREDITS, 
SESSION II. TTH. 4:15-7:00. Staff. 



® 



INSTITUTE FOR CHILD STUDY 
SEMINARS AND WORKSHOPS 



'6i9A. COGNITIVE PROCESSES 
N. 3 CREDITS. SESSION I, TTH. 



Stephen Wolk 

r- --- - - 

e 



speci or me neia in aeptn. 



ANT. 



r?t •" rp^^arch and 



provide full care. 



Dects of 
of under- 
go- 2.r.z iCc.escence. 

: practices in the contem- 

De considered. 



_ _ 319F/619F. CHANGING ROLES OF MEN 



AND WOMEN 3 CREDITS SESSION I MW 
4:15-7:0C 

Bonnie Ty;er 

This seminar will examine the origin of sex roles. 

determine the exte-*^ ' ■" ■" sex roles are 
changing, define ir riers encountered 

inc^' "^- - -^-^-.- of appropriate roles. 

anc which changing one's life 

sty.= - _- -:ed. 

EDHD 319H/619H. PARENTING IN A CHANGING 

SOCIETY. 3 CREDITS. SESSION II, MW. 7:00- 

10:00 P.M. 

Robert Marcus 

Explores styles and methods of childrearing as 

they have changed over time and as they relate 

to children's cognitive and social-oersonality 

de\ ~ ' 

beh 

anc - - 

als: 

pare. ;. - - ^ z.-\- -- >- . . m 

parent-child relationships. 

EDHD 3191/6191. CONTEMPORARY YOUTH. 
3 CREDITS. SESSION I. TTH, 4:15-7:00. 
Albert Gardner 

A study of the post-adolescent age group and the 
challenges they face in meeting the complexities 
of modern sodety. 

EDHD 319K/619K. COMMUNICATION SKILLS 

IN THE HELPING PROFESSIONS. 3 CREDITS. 

JULY 5-21. MTWTHF. 12:30-3:00. 

Harry Green 

Focuses upon the development of skills in relating, 

r,-i-T-n- jnicating, and problem-solving with others. 



27 



Includes an examination of psychological theories 
relevant to the helping relationship and provides 
laboratory experiences in developing communica- 
tion skills. 

EDHD 319L/619L, TEACHER SURVIVAL, 3 
CREDITS, SESSION I, MV^, 7:00-10:00 P.M. 
Albert Gardner 

We seem to give little attention to the difficulties 
faced by public school teachers in the day-to-day 
pressures of their profession. This seminar will 
study these pressures in an attempt to help teachers 
cope with the demands placed upon them. The 
focus will be on the teacher's optimal development 
in the setting of the public school. 

EDHD 319M/619M, DEVELOPMENT OF FORMAL 
OPERATIONAL THINKING, 3 CREDITS, SESSION 
I, MW, 7:00-10:00 P.M. 
Cyril Svoboda 

This seminar will have a twofold emphasis: develop- 
ment of knowledge of the various formal operations 
and improvement in the exercise of these opera- 
tions. By means of class activities, students will 
practice defining, generalizing, discriminating, 
forming concepts, reasoning and critiquing. 

EDHD 319N/619N, PARENT-CHILD INTERAC- 
TION: THE ELDERLY PARENT AND THE 
"MIDDLE AGED" CHILD, 3 CREDITS, SESSION I, 
TTH, 7:00-10:00 P.M. 
Elizabeth Anne Robertson-Tchabo 
This seminar will consider the effects of social 
networks on the quality of life of elderly family 
members. Particular emphasis will be put on social 
exchange and linkage theory, ethnic differences in 
family structure, and family supportive services 
as alternatives to institutionalization. 

EDHD 319P/619P, LEARNING AND THE CREA- 



TIVE MIND, 3 CREDITS, JULY 5-21, MTV^/THF, 
12:30-3:00. 
Robert Hardy 

A critical examination of the role of individual 
factors and the optimal learning environment 
necessary to stimulate creative thinking in children 
and adults. Deals with contemporary theories and 
research related to the study of creativity and an 
in-depth evaluation of various measures of crea- 
tivity. 

EDHD 319Q/619Q, ADVANCED SEMINAR IN 
COMMUNICATION SKILLS, 3 CREDITS, JULY 25- 
AUGUST 11, MTWTHF, 12:30-3:00. 
Joan Hunt 

This seminar is an in-depth experience in the 
development of interpersonal communication. 
Skill development will focus on problem solving, 
conflict resolution, and constructive confrontation. 
There will be extensive laboratory experiences 
both in and out of class. Prerequisite: EDHD 
319K/619K or EDHD 499N or EDHD 499Y or 
previous experience in communication skills. 

EDHD 319R/619R, CULTURAL MYTHS AND 
MODERN MOVIES, 3 CREDITS, JULY 25- 
AUGUST n, MTVi/THF, 12:30-3:00. 
Jacob Goering 

Every society appears to have a number of myths 
which are largely unconscious, but which never- 
theless are widely subscribed to by the populace, 
and which, therefore, exercise an enormous in- 
fluence on the masses. Some of these myths are 
very durable, lasting for generations and even 
centuries, but others seem to change and thus 
may contribute to profound social upheaval. This 
seminar will focus on a number of movies — classic, 
current, and perhaps even avant garde — in at- 
tempting to identify some of these emerging myths 
and to ascertain their present status in our time. 



EDIN 499J, V^ORKSHOP ON SPECIAL NEEDS 
OF STUDENTS IN VOCATIONAL EDUCATION, 
3 CREDITS, JULY 10-28, MTWTHF, 1:00-4:00. 
Kendall Starkweather 

This workshop is intended to meet the needs of 
vocational teachers in the secondary and post- 
secondary schools for the training of handicapped 
and disadvantaged individuals. The workshop will 
focus on the identification and understanding of 
the "special needs" student. It is designed to enable 
the vocational teacher to plan and execute instruc- 
tional programs especially suited to the "special 
needs" student in vocational education. 

EDSE/EDEL 499U, EFFECTIVE CLASSROOM 
MANAGEMENT AND DISCIPLINE, 3 CREDITS, 
SESSION II, MTWTHF, 11:00. 
David Lauridsen 

Teachers and prospective teachers at the elemen- 
tary and secondary levels will find this course to 
be an excellent opportunity to study major ap- 
proaches to behavioristic and humanistic discipline. 
Participants will be assisted in developing a per- 



sonal philosophy and a plan of action appropriate 
to individual needs. Topics will include uses and 
abuses of punishment, reward systems, communica- 
tion techniques, classroom procedures, rules and 
rule-making. 

EDSE 441 B, PRACTICUM IN ART EDUCATION: 
THREE DIMENSIONAL, 3 CREDITS, SESSION II, 
MW, 4:15-7:00. 
Randall Craig 

This course provides three dimensional experiences 
that focus on materials, processes and techniques 
that are suitable for the secondary school art 
curriculum. Studio activities exploring a variety 
of media and concepts will be sources to which 
teachers may turn for ideas and procedures in 
meeting the needs of their prospective students. 
Some background in content, especially design, 
is desirable. 

EDSE 488E, FOREIGN LANGUAGE CURRICULUM 
MATERIALS, 3 CREDITS, SESSION II, MW, 
4:15-7:00. 
William DeLorenzo 



28 



The need to construct and become more familiar 
with curriculum materials in the foreign language 
classroom make this course a must for foreign 
language teachers. The course deals with the ex- 
amination of texts, and supplementary materials 
as well as the construction and utilization of visuals 
and instructional games for today's foreign lan- 
guage classroom. 

EDSE 488H/788H, COMPETENCY-BASED IN- 
STRUCTION IN BUSINESS EDUCATION, 3 
CREDITS, SESSION I, MW, 4:15-7:00. 
Robert Peters 

The current emphasis for public education in 
Maryland addresses the utilization of competency- 
based systems for development of curriculum, 
learning materials, instructional techniques and 
evaluation. The theory, technique and development 
of materials for use in competency-based programs 
in Business Education will be addressed in this 
course. Let's prepare to lead the way in the de- 
velopment of systems to further refine our instruc- 
tional programs in business. 

EDSE 488K, WORKSHOP IN INDIVIDUALIZING 
INSTRUCTION IN HOME ECONOMICS THROUGH 
COMPETENCY-BASED EDUCATION, 3 CREDITS, 
JULY 5-25, MTWTHF, 8:00 A.M. - 12:00 NOON. 
Joan Baird 

Students will become familiar with available pre- 
pared materials for independent learning and their 
utilization through instruction by consultants and 
the faculty. The participants will develop compe- 
tencies necessary for adaptation and preparation 
of competency-based materials, and they will 
prepare teaching materials and/or activities for 
individualizing instruction based on each teacher's 
specific classroom needs. 

EDSE 488T, COMMUNICATION SKILLS FOR 
TEACHERS, 3 CREDITS, SESSION II, MTWTHF. 
9:30- ILOO. 
Joseph McCaleb 

Students will study the distinctive characteristics 
of instructional communication, demonstrate their 
proficiency in the varied areas of instructional 
communication, and analyze strategies for im- 
proving their pupils' communications. Units in the 
course are: 1) improving interpersonal communica- 
tion in educational environments, including the 
development of listening skills; 2) organizing and 
managing small groups; 3) lecturing; 4) directing 
class discussions, and 5) developing effective 
questioning strategies. 

EDSE 788M, TEACHING FOREIGN LANGUAGES 
IN COMMUNITY COLLEGES, 3 CREDITS, SES- 
SION I, MW, 4:15-7:00. 
Guenter Pfister 

A close look at teaching methods and techniques 
which will allow the teacher to concentrate not 
only on the four language skills (understanding, 
speaking, reading and writing) but also to develop 
a cultural awareness by means of cultural contrasts. 
By doing so, the teacher is able to help his or her 



students to create a cultural sensitivity to his or 
her own culture. 

EDSF 430, EDUCATIONAL SOCIOLOGY, 3 
CREDITS, SESSION I, MW, 4:15-7:00. 
Daniel Huden 

For the summer session, EDSF 430 will have a 
special focus on sociological study of learners 
with higher level cognitive aptitudes, their teachers, 
the institutional settings they thrive in, and social 
issues related to their nurture. The nexus of 
problems related to meritocracy will be considered. 

EDSF 499C, FREEDOM AND EDUCATION: THE 

PHILOSOPHY OF SUMMERHILL, 3 CREDITS, 

SESSION I, TTH, 7:00-10:00 P.M. 

Richard Hopkins 

A case study of the meaning of freedom espoused 

by A. S. Neill and exemplified by his Summerhill 

school. 

EDSF 601, CONTEMPORARY SOCIAL ISSUES 
IN EDUCATION, 3 CREDITS, SESSION I, TTH, 
7:00-10:00 P.M. 
Rao Lindsay 

A new graduate course which examines social, 
historical and philosophical bases of current ed- 
ucational issues, such as rights and responsibilities, 
development of values, professional accountability, 
and cultural pluralism. 

EDSP 499B, WORKSHOP IN THE EDUCATION 
OF EXCEPTIONAL CHILDREN-GIFTED, 3 
CREDITS, JULY 5-25, MTWTHF, 8:00-3:00. 
Jean Hebeler 

The workshop will provide the opportunity to be 
involved in a demonstration practicum in instruc- 
tional strategies with identified gifted students 
from Harford County, Maryland. There will be 
opportunities for independent pursuit of relevant 
topics of individual interest. The program will 
encompass two components: a) for teachers with 
no formal background in the education of the 
gifted; b) advanced concepts for teachers with 
background in the education of the gifted. 

EDSP 499J, DEVELOPING INDIVIDUALIZED 
EDUCATION PLANS FOR EXCEPTIONAL CHIL- 
DREN, 3 CREDITS, JULY 2-26, MTWTHF, 9:00- 
3:00. 

Nancy Spekman 

This workshop will focus on the familiarization 
with the concepts and actual experience in the 
development of individualized educational plans 
for exceptional children as mandated under the 
provisions of P.L. 94-142 and State By-law. The 
workshop is open to special education teachers 
and regular education teachers and related per- 
sonnel who have responsibility in the development 
of instructional programs for the range of excep- 
tional children. 

EDSP 499K, INTERDISCIPLINARY APPROACHES 
IN THE IDENTIFICATION, PLACEMENT AND 
EDUCATIONAL PLANNING FOR EXCEPTIONAL 



29 



CHILDREN, 2 CREDITS, JULY 5-19, MTWTHF, 
9:00-4:00. 
Charlotte Shroyer 

The focus of the workshop will be upon the infor- 
mation and processes used by Admission, Review, 
Dismissal Committees in their role in developing 
an appropriate education program for exceptional 
children as mandated by P.L. 94-142 and State 
By-law. Attention will focus on the interdisciplinary 
teams' interpretation and use of the various assess- 
ments and other relevant information. Processes 
for the integration of the information for the most 
appropriate programs and placement decisions 
will be dealt with. 



DIVISION OF MATHEMATICAL 
AND PHYSICAL SCIENCES 
AND ENGINEERING 



ASTR 498A, ASTRONOMY FOR TEACHERS, 
3 CREDITS, SESSION I, MTTH, 3:30-5:30. 
Bruce Levine 

This will be a course mainly oriented toward school 
teachers. It will deal with introductory astronomy 
and ways of presenting this in elementary and 
secondary schools. The course will be essentially 
in a self-paced format with a few lectures scheduled. 
There will be a certain degree of emphasis on 




"lab" aspects of astronomy, e.g., telescopes and 
their uses. 

MATH 310, INTRODUCTION TO MATHEMA- 
TICAL REASONING, 3 CREDITS, SESSION I, 
MTWTHF, 8:00. 
Staff 

This course is recommended for all students who 
intend eventually to take MATH 410. Proofs and 
limits are stressed. 

PHYS 499A, LECTURE DEMONSTRATION IN 

PHYSICS, 1 CREDIT, JUNE 19-23, MTWTHF, 

9:00-4:00. 

John Layman and Richard Berg 

To make available to local high school and college 

physics teachers one of the world's best lecture 

demonstration facilities and to prepare them to 

present effective lecture demonstrations in their 

own classrooms. Lectures and student participation. 

PHYS 499B, SPECIAL PROBLEMS IN PHYSICS: 
ELECTRONIC INSTRUMENTATION AND INTRO- 
DUCTION TO SOLID STATE DEVICES, FOR 
TEACHERS, 3 CREDITS, SESSION II, MTTHF, 
11:00-12:30, W, 1:00-5:00. 
John Layman 

Graduate level, electronic instrumentation and 
introduction to integrated circuits, multimeters 
(analog, digital), oscilloscopes function generators, 
oscillators, single and multichannel analyzer, opera- 
tional amplifiers, differential amplifiers, timers, 
wave form generators, digital integrated circuits. 



The University reserves the right to change, eliminate, 
or modify course offerings and programs when in the 
judgements of the University authorities, circum- 
stances make such action necessary. 



30 




UNIVERSITY of MARYLAND 
College Park Campus 

Summer Programs and 
Department of Speech and Dramatic Art 



MUSICAL THEATRE WORKSHOP 

Workshop Classes and a Major Musical 

Production 
Singers Dancers Actors 
June 26 -July 29, 1978 
Participation is open by audition to per- 
formers including college and advanced 
high school students. Credit or Hon-Credit 
Workshop Classes 

Weekday morning classes will be taught 
by qualified and experienced professionals 
from the University's Theatre and Music 
faculties. 

Major Musical Production 
Weekday afternoons, all participants will 
be involved in rehearsals for the Work- 
shop's full-scale musical production. 
Meredith Willson's The Music Man has 



been tentatively selected for five per- 
formances, July 25-29, in the Tawes 
Theatre. Megotiations are currently under- 
way to secure a guest artist to participate 
in the Workshop and to play the role of 
Professor Harold Hill. 
Auditions 

Auditions for all Workshop applicants will 
be held in April. 

Students interested in participating in the 
Musical Theatre Workshop should com- 
plete and mail the Audition Application 
by March 15. 
For Further Information 
Musical Theatre Workshop, Department 
of Speech and Dramatic Art, University 
of Maryland, College Park, MD 20742 
(301)454-2541. 



31 




The Friedman. Vardi. 
Silberstein String Tno 



32 



M^OUNCING 



Natbnal 



'era 



Orchestra^rkshoD 
June 19- July 15 



\ 



Jess Thomas 



Eve Queler, 
Music Director 

Tawes Fine Arts Center 
University of Maryland 
College Park. Maryland 

All selected applicants 
will be awarded full 
scholarships consisting 
of tuition, room and 
board at the Univer- 
sity of Maryland 
College Park Campus 
Coaching by leading 
members of the Met- 
ropolitan Opera and 
Philadelphia Sym- 
phony Orchestras 

For complete information and application call or write: 

George Moquin, Summer Programs 

University of Maryland 

College Park. Maryland 20742 

(301) 454-2501 or 454-5910 



Roberta Knie 



33 




Adele Marcus 



Ei^h JLnnud Intematkmd 
Piano Festival &^Competion 

August 6, 1978 - August 12, 1978 
University of Maryland, College Park 




Guest A i-tists will include: 

August 6, 1978 - Alicia DeLairocha 
August 7, 1978 - Jean Philippe Collar J 
August 8, 1978 - Jeanne Marie Darre 
August 9, 1978 - Charles Rosen 
A ugusf 10, 1978 - Joerg Demus 
August 11, 1978 - Lili Kraus 
August 12, 1978 - Final Competition 



Performances will be nightly 
at Tawes Fine Arts Theatre 
at 8:30 P.M. 

A Master Class series will 
be held everyday featuring 
A dele Marcus. Other day- 
time Master Classes and 
lecture recitals will he held 
everyday with guest artists. 
Dates and times will be 
announced. 

Competition Semi-Finals will 
be held August 7. 1978. at 
3:30 P.M. in Tawes Recital 
Hall. 

Competition Finals will be 
held at 8:00 P.M.. August 
12. 1978. Tawes Fine Arts 



Theatre. The Baltimore 
Symphony Orchestra will 
be performing. Sergiu Com- 
missiona. Conducting. 
The International Piano 
Competition is open to 
pianists between the ages 
of 16 and 30. The final date 
for enrollment is Mav 1. 
1978. 

For further information con- 
cerning the Competition and 
Performances contact: 
Dr. Stewart Gordon 
Music Department 
University of Maryland 
College Park. MD. 20742 
(301) 454-2501 





34 



Instructions 

Applications 

Forms 



1978 Summer Sessions 

University of Maryland 

College Park Campus 



ation 

ation Building 



PLACE 




STAMP 




HERE 






PAGE 




lication Instructions 




ing Graduate Students 




3 Summer Sessions 2 




lication for Admission 




Juate School 3-4 




lication for Admission 




Summer Only Undergraduate Students 




J Summer Sessions 5-6 




idule Request and 




nated Bill Form 




mer Session 1 9-10 




dule Request and 




Estimated Bill Form 




Summer Session II 11-12 




Adele Marcus 



Ei^h Anmd Intemationd 
Piano Festival &^Competion 

August 6, 1978 - August 12, 1978 
University of Maryland, College Park 




Guest A rtists will include: 

August 6, 1978 - Alicia DeLanocha 

August 7, 19. 

August 8, 19: 

August 9, 19: 

August 10, 1 

August 11, I' 

August 12, H 



Performances will he nig 
a I Tawes Fine Arts Thee 
at 8:30 P.M. 

A Master Class series wi 
be held everyday featurii 
Adele Marcus. Other da 
time Master Classes and 
lecture recitals will he hi 
everyday with guest artis 
Dates and times will he 
announced. 

Competition Semi-Finals 
he held August 7. 1978. c 
.1:30 P.M. in Tawes Red 
Hall. 

Competition Finals will I 
held at 8:00 P.M.. Augu. 
12. 1978. Tawes Fine A r 




34 



Instructions 

Applications 

Forms 



1978 Summer Sessions 

University of Maryland 

College Park Campus 



PAGE 

Application Instructions 

Visiting Graduate Students 

1 978 Summer Sessions 2 

Application for Admission 

Graduate School 3-4 

Application for Admission 

For Summer Only Undergraduate Students 

1 978 Summer Sessions 5-6 

Schedule Request and 

Estimated Bill Form 

Summer Session I 9-10 

Schedule Request and 

Estimated Bill Form 

Summer Session 11 11-12 



Application Instructions 

Advanced Special Students 

and 

Visiting Graduate Students 

1978 Summer Sessions 



University of Maryland The Graduate School 

College Park, Md. 20742 



The graduate Application for Admission form included in this booklet is to be used only by applicants seeking 
admission as Advanced Special Graduate Students or Visiting Graduate Students. 

To enroll as an Advanced Special Student you must satisfy at least one of the entrance criteria listed on page 7. 
Appropriate documentation (transcript, test scores or letter from employer) and the $15.00 application fee must 
accompany the application. Non-U. S. citizens on F and J visas are not eligible for Advanced Special Student Status. 

To enroll as a visitor, the student must be officially admitted to another recognized graduate school and currently 
be in good standing. Full transcripts of credit need not be submitted, but an application for admission (visiting grad- 
uate student status) to the Graduate School of the University of Maryland must be submitted along with the $15.00 
application fee. A letter of permission from the applicant's graduate dean must also be presented indicating that the 
applicant is in good standing and that the credits will be accepted toward his or her degree. 

DO NOT use this form if: 

(1) You are already in graduate admitted status with the University of Maryland at College Park. 

or 

(2) You desire to be admitted to The Graduate School as a regular student either in a degree or advanced spe- 
cialist certificate (AGS) program. 

Regular application materials and further information regarding our graduate programs may be obtained from: 

THE GRADUATE SCHOOL 

UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 

COLLEGE PARK, MARYLAND 20742 

(301) 454-5429 



The Golden Identification Card Program for Senior Citizens of Maryland: The purpose of this status is to make 
available without charge, courses and services of the University's campuses to citizens who are 60 years of age or 
order, who are residents of the State of Maryland and who are retired. Such persons may apply for graduate admis- 
sion, either as degree or nondegree students, and must meet the same admissions criteria pertaining to either cate- 
gory as do all applicants. Once admitted and having been issued the Golden Identification Card, such persons may 
register for courses in any session, subject to the same restrictions as any other student. Tuition fees will be waived. 
Additionally, holders of the Golden Identification Card will be entitled to certain academic services, including library 
services during the time that they are actually enrolled for courses. The classification of an applicant's resident sta- 
tus will be determined by the University from data on the application form. A retired person will be considered one 
who affirms that he or she is not engaged in gainful employment for more than 20 hours per week. 



Graduate School 
University of IVIaryland 
College Park, Md. 20742 



1 SOCIAL SECURITY 

NUMBER 

Ms. 
2. Mr. 



Last name 
3. PRESENT HOME 

ADDRESS 



FOR SUMMER 1978 

VISITING GRADUATE STUDENTS AND 

ADVANCED SPECIAL STUDENTS ONLY 



Application for Admission 



PLEASE TYPE OR PRINT PLAINLY IN INK 



First name 



Middle name 



This Will Be Your 
Student Number. 



Maiden or other names 



State or Country 



Give county if you reside in Maryland 



5. Citizenship _ 
6 Date ot Birth- 
7. Place of Birth 



8. Sex n Male Q Female 

9. Enrollment Status: D Fulltime D Part-time 



10. Proposed Graduate 
Program (Dept.) 



G R A D 



NON US, CITIZENS OR 
PERMANENT IMMIGRANTS 

TYPE OF VISA IF YOU HAVE ONE 

Sponsored By 



Permanent Immigrants give 
Alien Registration Number_ 
and Date of issue: _ 



12. Term in Which You Request Entrance: 

Year Q Summer Term #1 (May-Jun) Q Summer Term #2 (Jul-Aug) 

1 3 If you have ever applied to our Graduate School before, please indicate year 

14. Overall Baccalaureate G. P. A. . . 



11. Non-degree Program Desired 
n Visiting Graduate Student" 
n Advanced Special Student °' abed 

circle letter indicating under wtiicti 
criterion you are applying See also 
section on Advanced Special Student under 
Admission Information - Graduates. 



_(all institutions attended) 



1 5. National Standardized Aptitude Test Scores and Data Test Taken. 
Attach copy of test score if required for admission. 



Graduate Record (Aptitude): 
Miller Analogies: 



Date 
Date 



Graduate Management Admissions Test: Date 



Verbal Score 

Score 

Score 



Quant Score. 



1 6. List belovi( the official name of each institution attended beyond high school. 

Attach copy of transcript if required for admission as an Advanced Special Student. Visiting graduate students must sub- 
mit a letter of permission from the applicant's graduate dean indicating that the applicant is in good standing. 



Full Name of Institution 
Bacfielors Degree 



Full Name ot Institution 
Master's Degree 



Other Institution Attended 



Type of Degree 



Dates attended 
From: 



Datv^ Deg awarded 



Dates attended 
From 



Oate Den awarded 



Dates attended 

From 



Date Deg awarded 



An application fee of $1 5 00 is required. Please do not mail cash. Checks should be made payable to the University of Maryland This lee is included on your 
estimated bill form if you mail in your pre-registration. Please complete reverse side. 



17. Present Home Address 



Length of time at ttiis address. 
Phone at office 



City 



State Zip Code 



Mo Day Year 

_ Home 



Mo Day Year 



1 8. Last previous address. 



Length of time at this address. 



City 



Mo. Day Year 

1 9 Permanent Address where mail will always reach you 



Mo Day Year 



20. List any work and military experiences (major categories and time periods only) for the past five years. 

Attach statement from employer(s) if required for admission. 



TITLE OR POSITION 



EIVIPLOYER 



STATE 



FROM 



TO 



21. Military Veteran □ Active Military Duty □ 

22 Applicants Claiming Maryland Residency Complete the Following Questions: 
The University reserves the right to request additional information if necessary. 

Are all, or substantially ail. your possessions in the State of Maryland? Yes_ 

Are you registered to vote in the State of Maryland? Yes_ 

Do you possess a valid Maryland driver's license? Yes_ 

Do you own motor vehicles? Yes . 

Are all owned motor vehicles registered in Maryland? Yes_ 

Do you have the use of a motor vehicle registered in another person's name? Yes_ 

a If yes, indicate name and relationship of person: 

Have you paid Maryland income tax for most recent year on all earned income including 

all taxable income earned outside the State? Yes_ 

a. List actual years you paid Maryland income tax since 1974: 

b. List actual years you paid income tax to another state since 1974: 

c. If you did not pay in Maryland in the past 12 months, please state reason(s} 



No_ 
No_ 
No_ 
No- 
No_ 
No_ 



No_ 



Do you receive any type of financial aid (loan, scholarship, grant) from a state other 

than Maryland? 

If yes, from which state? 

For the most recent 1 2 monthis hias another person{s) 



Yes_ 



No_ 



Provided one-halt or more ot your financial supporf^ YeS No_ 

Claimed you as a dependent on a federal and/or state income tax return? 
If the answer to a and/or b is yes, give personis) name, relationship and per 

Name and Relationship 

Address City 



Yes. 



-No. 



lanent address 



Length of time at this address: Years. 



.Months 



23 Do you wish to apply for the Golden Identification Card Program? D Yes D No 

Restricted to persons residing in the State of Maryland who are 60 years of age or older, who are retired and not gainfully 
employed over 20 hours weekly. 

24. I certify that the information submitted in this application is complete and accurate to the best of my knowledge. I agree to abide 
by the rules, policies, and regulations of the University of Maryland if I am admitted as a student. 



m 



Social Security Number 



Signature of Applicant 



The Department of Health. Education and Welfare and other Federal regulatory agencies require that the University supply admissions and enrollment in- 
formation for U S citizens and permanent immigrants (with alien Registration Card issued) by racial, ethnic, and sex categories In order that the University 
may comply you are requested to check the appropriate box below: 

n AMERICAN INDIAN/ALASKAN NATIVE: US Citizens and permanent D HISPANIC: US Citizens and permanent immigrants of Mexican. Puerto 

residents having origins in any of the original peoples of North America Rican, Cuban, Central or South American or other Spanish culture or 

and maintaining cultural identification through tribal affiliation or com- origin regardless of race. 
munity recognition 

□ BLACK, not Hispanic Origin: U S Citizens and permanent residents D WHITE, not of Hispanic Origin U S Citizens and permanent residents 



having origins in any of the black racial groups in Africa 
Q ASIAN/PACIFIC ISLANDER US Citizens and permanent residents 
having origin in any of the original people of the Far East. Southeast 
Asia, the Indian Subcontinent or the Pacific Islands This area inclurf^s, 
for example, China. Japan, Korea, the Phillipine Islands or Samoa 



having origins in any of the original people of Europe. North Africa or 
the Middle East 

□ NON-U S CITIZENS studying or intending to study under a student or 
other temporary visa. 



Application for Summer Only 

Undergraduate Students 

(Reviewed by Office of 

Undergraduate Admissions) 



Summer Sessions 1978 
University of Maryland 
College Park Campus 



Application for Undergraduate 

Readmlssion 

(Reviewed by Office of 

WIthidrawal/ Re-enrollment) 



Please read the Instructions below and the admissions information on pages 6,7 before completing this form 

Please Indicate below your admission status: 

SUMMER 
ONLY 



D 



Undergraduate students who wish to attend the College Park campus for Summer Sessions only A 
non-retundable application fee of $15 00 is required This fee should be included with the check or money order 
submitted in payment of the Summer School bill if the student registers via mail or the walk-in options If the student 
registers via the armory option, a separate check or money order for $15 00 must be presented with the application 
for admission Students who have been admitted as a term only any previous semester and attended classes, need 
not pay the application fee 

READMIT □ Degree and non-degree undergraduate students who attended a Fall or Spring semester prior to Spring 

1978 semester at the College Park campus and who were in good standing or on academic probation at the conclu- 
sion of that semester No application fee is required 

NOTE: New students who have applied for Fall 1978. or have been admitted for Fall 1978. or wish tocontinue for the Fall 1978 semes- 
ter, do not complete this application Please refer to pages 9 ,7 concerning admission 
All other students please refer to pages 6,7 concerning admissions 



Enter your Social Security Number Below 



Do Not Write In the Shaded Boxes 

Print your legal nan^ie In the boxes below 































Last Name 




MM 











" 


n 




" 




n 
















First Name 


MM M 



Middle 



Suffix 
(Example, Jr., Sr., Mil 
Check the space corresponding to your sex and write the number in the box to the r ight: 

1 Male ^ I I 

2 Female ' ' 

Write your date of birth in the boxes to the right: ►" 

Are you a United States Citizen? Yes [_J No □ If not, print the country of which you are a citizen 



Print any other last name under which 
you may have been enrolled 



Month 



Day 



Please complete the following (if applicable): Print type of visa 

Date visa issued 

Are you currently a Maryland resident? Yes □ No □ County, 



.Alien Registration No. 



(If yes, complete the section on Domicile on the back of this application) 

(If not. print the state of which you are a resident) 

Your present home address: 



Length of time lived at this address: 



CITZ RES 
GEOGCD 



Number 










Street 















































City 



Name of parent to whom information should be sent (minors only): 



Zip Code (Required) 

Your home telephone number 



Last Name 

Your last previous address: 



Number 



Area Code 
.Length of time lived at last address: 



City 

Father's (or 
Spouse's) Name . 



Father's Address, 
(or Spouse's) 

Mother's Name 



Zip Code 



.Living?_ 



. Father's (or spouse s) 
Occupation 

. Living? 



Years 
REL 



Months 



Mother's Address 

(if different from father's) 



.Mother's 
Occupation . 



Enter your Social Security Number 



1 



The Department of Health. Education and Welfare and other Federal regulatory agencies require that the University supply admissions and enroll- 
ment information by racial, ethnic, and sex categories. In order that the University may comply you are requested to check the appropriate box 
below. 

n White not of Hispanic Origin A person having origins in any of the D '^sian or Pacific Is'ander A person having origin in any of the original 
original peoples of Europe. North Africa, or the Middle East people of the Far East. Southeast Asia, the l^"*3"_,Subconhnenr^or 

□ Black, not of Hispanic Origin: A person having origins in any of 
black racial groups in Africa 



Q Hispanic: A person of Mexican. Puerto Rican. Cuban. Central or South 
American or other Spanish culture or origin, regardless of race 



the Pacific Islands This area includes, for example. China. Japan. 
Korea, the Philippine Islands, or Samoa 

I I American Indian or Alaskan Native: A person having origins in any of 

the original peoples of North America, and who maintain cultural 5 
identification through tribal affiliation or community recognition 



HSCODE 



List educational Institutions attended (secondary school and current college or university). 



(Full name and location of high school) 



(No. of years and dates of attendance) 



(Date of graduation) 



(Full name and location of college or university) (No. of years and dates of attendance) (Date of graduation) 
Are you currently attending the last institution mentioned? Yes □ No I I 

No □ 



(Degree) 



LPICDE 



Are you presently in a dismissed or probationary status for either yes □ 
academic or disciplinary reasons from the last academic institution 
attended? 



UGTERM 



DIV 

















COL 




COUST 




H 


.'.] 


; = 


9 9 


9 


9 



By signing below, high school graduates and students currently enrolled in colleges other than the University of Maryland College Park Campus certify 
that they meet requirements for admission for the summer session(s). To be eligible for admission for the summer session(s), a high school graduate must 
have graduated with an overall "C" average in academic subjects and rank in the top half of the graduating class. Applicants currently attending (or at- 
tended m the past) another college or university must be in good standing at that institution and have the permission of the parent institution to enroll for 
the summer session. 
I certify that I meet the requirements as listed above: 



Signature of applicant 
If you have attended the University of Maryland, when were you first enrolled (any branch). 



Date 



Semester/Year 



. last enrolled. 



Semester/Year 



Where were you last enrolled?. 



(College Park Campus, Baltimore County, University College: Atlantic, Baltimore, College Park, Overseas) 

Did you graduate from the University of Maryland? 

Degree 

Are you planning to work toward a Bachelor's degree at the University? 

Yes No 



In-State students MUST complete this section. DOMICILE INFORMATION Out-of-state students DO NOT complete this section. 

The University reserves the right to request additional information if necessary. 

1. Have you been or will you be claimed as a dependent by another person(s) on federal and/or state income tax returns for 

any of the following years' Yes I I No I I 

a. If yes, please check the appropriate year(s): D 1976 n 1977 a 1978 

b. For the most recent 12 months has another person(s) provided half or more than half of your support? Yes □ No □ 

2. If the answer to Question 1 is yes, give person(s) name, relationship and permanent address; 

a.NAME AND RELATIONSHIP 



STREET ADDRESS. 



CITY. 



STATE. 



.ZIP 



-Months- 



b. Length of time at this address; Years 
The following questions are to be answered by person(s) listed in item 2. If item 2 is blank, the following questions are to be answered by the applicant. 

3. Are all, or substantially all, your personal possessions in the State of Maryland? Yes I I No I I 

4. Are you registered to vote' Yes I — I No I — I 

5. Are you registered to vote in Maryland' Yes I — I No I — I 

6. Have you paid Maryland income tax for most recent year on all earned income including all taxable income earned 
outside the State? 
a. List actual years you paid Maryland income tax since 1975: 



Yes □ No □ 



b. List actual years you paid income to another state since 1975; 



c. If you did not pay in Maryland in the past 12 months, please state reason(s). 

7. Did you give a Maryland home address on most recent federal and state income tax forms? 

8. Do you own motor vehicles? 

9. Are all owned motor vehicles registered in Maryland? 

10. Do you have the use of a motor vehicle registered in another person's name' 

1 1. Do you possess a valid driver's license? 

12. Do you possess a valid Maryland driver's license? 

13. Are you a citizen of the United States? 
a. If no, type of visa 



b. Alien registration number. 



c. Date visa issued . 



14. Do you receive any type of financial aid (loan, scholarship, grant) from a state other than Maryland? 
a. If yes, from which state? 



Yes □ No □ 

Yes □ No □ 

Yes □ No □ 

Yes □ No □ 

Yes □ No □ 

Yes □ No □ 

Yes □ No □ 

Yes □ No □ 



I certify that the information recorded on this form is correct and I understand that inaccurate or false information will result in my dismissal from the 
University. I also understand that this form does not place me into consideration for admission to the College Park Campus for the fall or spring terms. 
Signature of Applicant 



— Date. 



Do Not Write Below This Line 



UG Type ENSTAT UGMAT 



UGAPPDATE 



RES. DEC. CODE EVAL DATE LT. SENT 



B D 



D D 



COURSE SELECTION INFORMATION 

Courses with multiple sections may be offered in both summer sessions. The session for which a 

specific section is scheduled is designated by the first two digits of the section number: 01 is Session 

I only, 02 is Session II only. Sections scheduled for non-standard dates show the starting and ending 

dates of the particular section immediately following the course title and grading methods. Section 

meeting times are shown under section listings. Non-standard date courses/sections are assigned to 

Session I or Session II for the purpose of registration based on the initial meeting date. 

EXAMPLE: 

ECON 201 PRINCIPLES OF ECONOMICS 

3 credits Grading Methods-REG/AUD/P-F 

0202 - 15 Jul- 11 Aug 

Section Meeting Times 

0101 MTuWThF 8 

0201 MTuWThF 9:30 

0202 MTuWThF 9:30 
In this example, section 0101 meets during Session I. section 0201 meets during Session II. and 
section 0202 meets during Session II. non-standard date. Be certain you enter your course requests 
on the appropriate session request form. 



Room 


Instructor 


Q0101 


Chawdry 


Q0101 


Smith 


Q0101 


Jones 



Summer Session I 
-Only -1978 



Schedule Request and 
Estimated Bill Form 

This form should be used for the First Summer Session only. 

Mail-in preregistration requests must be postmarked by (Vlay 5, 1978. COIVIPLETE THE ENTIRE FORM EXCEPT 
FOR THE SPACE MARKED "FOR OFFICE USE ONLY." The top part of this form is a course request only. Students 
must have the lower part (Course Verification) validated by the Registrations Office for a registration to be official. 

Only the validated lower part may be used as proof. 

STUDENT NAME (Print Last Name First) 



SOCIAL SECURITY NO. 



LOCAL PHONE TODAY'S DATE 



■(9-5)- 



Were you registered at the University of Maryland. College Park day campus: 

SPRING 1978 YES NO 

IF NO: Please read Admissions information on pages 



STUDENT'S SIGNATURE 



COURSE REQUEST: Complete this part with Information found in the Schedule of Classes. See page 7 for directions 
on determining the session of a course. 

EXAMPLE 



E D C P 



COURSE INFORMATION 



L1E3 



COURSE PREFIX 



COURSE NO SUFFIX 



GRADING INFORMATION 

(CIRCLE ONE NUMBER ONLY) 



® 



^ {2J 3 4 

REGULAR PASS/FAIL AUOrf SATISFACTORY FAIL 











COURSE PREFIX 










COURSE PREFIX 











COURSE INFORMATION 



COURSE 1 



inn 



COURSE NO SUFFIX SECTION NO CREDIT 

COURSE 2 
COURSE INFORMATION 



GRADING INFORMATION 

(CIRCLE ONE NUMBER ONLYI 

12 3 4 

REGULAR PASS 'FAIL AUDIT SATISFACTORY FAIL 



n[i 



COURSE NO SUFFIX SECTION NO CREDIT 

COURSE 3 



COURSE INFORMATION 



COURSE PREFIX COURSE NO SUFFIX 



SECTION NO 



GRADING INFORMATION 

(CIRCLE ONE NUMBER ONLY) 

12 3 4 

REGULAR PASS/FAIL AUDIT SATISFACTORY FAIL 



GRADING INFORMATION 

(CIRCLE ONE NUMBER ONLY) 

12 3 4 

REGULAR PASS/FAIL AUDIT SATISFACTORY FAIL 



COURSE VERIFICATION: In the space below list the course(s) you have requested above. The Registrations Office 
will record the action taken for each course in the space on the right marked "For Office Use Only," and will return 
this part of the form to you. Any course without a Registration Stamp was not received for the reason indicated to 
the right of the course. The lower part of this form must be validated by the Registrations Office after payment is 
made. It is your proof of registration. 



SOCIAL SECURITY NO. 



DO NOT COMPLETE. FOR OFFICE USE ONLY. 



■" 




































1 








COURSE PREFIX 




COURSE NO 


SUFFIX SECTION NO 


CREDIT 





































1 








COURSE PREFIX 




COURSE NO 


SUFFIX SECTION NO 


CREDIT 











































1 










COURSE PREFIX 




COURSE NO 


SUFFIX SECTION NC 


CREDIT 








Students who register and later decide not 
to attend Summer School at the University 
must cance/ their registration prior to the first 
day of class. Failure to cancel a registration 
will result in financial obligation even though 
the student does not attend class 














NAME 








Summer Session 1 ID cards will be mailed to 






ADDRESS 


you. uo you nave: 

U of Md. Photo ID Card? 
yp<i Nn 




CITY • STATE • ZIP 


Previously issued Summer Session card 






Thi 


mus 


tbe 


cc 


mple 

T 


tedb 
HISW 


/ all students. For ma 
ILL BE USED AS A N 


il-in 
/lAILI 


srere 
NGL 


gistrants 
ABEL. 






Yos No 

No cards Yes No 





INSTRUCTIONS for completion of the ESTIMATED BILLING FORM are given at the bottom of this page. 



STANDARD FEFS 


CHARGES 


AMOUNT 


1. Undergraduate 
Credit Hours 


1 


2 


3 


4 


5 


6 


7 


8 


9 


10 






Cost 


34 


68 


02 


36 


70 


204 238 1 


?72 


306 


340 




2. Undergraduate Non resident 


$15 






3. Graduate Resident 
Credit Hours 


1 


2 


3 


4 


5 


6 


7 


8 








Cost 


50 


100 


150 


200 


250 


300 


350 


400 




4. Graduate Non-resident 
Credit Hojrs 


1 


. 




3 4 5 6 


1 8 








Cost 


95 


190 


285|380j 475|570|665| 760 




5. Registration Fee 


$ 5 


5 


00 


6. Health Fee 


$ 3 


3 


00 


7. Recreation Fee 


$ 4 


4 


00 


8. Application Fee (non-refundable) 


$15 






9. Vehicle Registration Fee 


$ 3 






10. Total Charges 


$ 





Make checks payable to: University of Maryland 

One check may be used to pay for both summer sessions. 

Add the Total Charges' from both pages to determine the amount of your check. 

NOTE: Fees listed are subject to change at any time without advance notice. 

ESTIMATED BILLING FORM INSTRUCTIONS: 

1 Add the number of credit hours requested for Summer Session I. Only courses listed in this page should be included in this total. 

2 Locate your status (undergraduate, graduate resident. Graduate non-resident) on lines 1-4 above (Please note A "Graduate Student" 
is one who has been admitted to the Graduate School either at the University of Maryland or another institution. Students who have 
graduated from this or another institution are not considered graduate students until they have been admitted to the Graduate School 
Any student not admitted to the Graduate School is classified as an Undergraduate If you have any questions on this or your residence 
status, please call the Undergraduate Admissions Office, 454-41 37 or the Graduate Records Office. 454-5428 The University reserves 
the right to make the final and official determination of the student s residence status ) 

3, On the line next to your status circle the number of credit hours you have requested above.The number below the hours circled is your 
cost of tuition 

4 Enter the cost in the Amount column on the right If you are an Undergraduate Non-resident, enter the $15 00 Non-resident Fee (line 
2) in the Amount column, 

5 Lines 5-7 are mandatory fees charged to every student each summer session. The fees are therefore entered in the Amount column 
for you 

6 If this form is accompanied by an Application for Admission, you must also pay a $1 5 00 Application Fee, If this pertains to you, enter 
the $1 5 00 on line 8 Note only one Application for Admission and one $15 00 Application Fee is required for both summer sessions 

7 If you wish to register a car for the summer, enter $3 on line 9, Parking stickers must be picked up at the Motor Vehicle Administration 
Office on the campus. Note, .Stickers assigned in Fall 1977 are valid until August 1 978 

8, To determine the amount you owe the University for Summer Session I, add all charges entered in the Amount Column Enter this 
total on line 1 0, This is the total amount owed for the First Summer Session 

9, Make a check for the amount owed payable to the University of Maryland Write Student Social Security Number on face of check 
You will be notified of any bill adjustments that are necessary Payment must accompany the estimated bill form 

1 Students entitled to credits on their bills (contract, scholarships, etc ) cannot process a Mail-in Preregistration, They must process a 
Walk-in Pre-registration to assure the accuracy of their bill, 

11 MONIES OWED THE UNIVERSITY WILL BE DEDUCTED FROM CHECKS RECEIVED PRIOR TO APPLICATION OF THE REMAIN- 
DER TO SUMMER SCHOOL TUITION 



EXAMPLES 



10 



1. You are a Graduate and a Maryland Resident 

2. You are registering for 5 hours 

3. You have no scholarship, grant, etc. 



Your bill should look like this: 



STANDARD FEES 


CHARGES 


AMOUNT 




1 Underj'xJuaie 


, 


2 


3 


4 


5 




8 


9 10 






Coil 


3« 


m 


102 


136 


170 20 


4 238 


t1 M. 


>6 340 




2 U«<Jt'fl»»dw*te Non •M.<irni 


».6 






3 G'«Ju«ie R«.deni 




3 






'~^\ 


6 ; 


B 




^50 


00 




W> 


IM 


IW 


1 20( 


250^ 


OO 350 


400 


4 G'adu«» Non-.et.<»eni 






. 


3 


. , 


. , 


. 








Cmi 


95 


9C 


265 


so 475 


570 0« 


% 760 




5 n.9..i'«ion F« 


s s 


s 


00 


6 M«lth Fe« S 3 


3 


00 


7 RKfMl.on Fe« $4 


< 


00 


8 AopticAt'Ort Fm Inon-fcluivtobic) SIS 






9 v•^.c»« Rt9fir«i.o» Fm $3 






10 To«' Ch«<^» 


» Mi^;^ 


00 



1. You are an Undergraduate and are not a Maryland resident 

2. You are registering for 6 hours 

3. You are including with this form an Application for Admission 

4. You have no scholarship, grant, etc. 

Your bill should look like this: 



STANDARD FEES CHARGES 


AMOUNT 




1 Undergtadwaie 


2 3 


4 


i 


T 


\ ' 


8 


9 


10 


3i.O^ 


00 




6S 10 


136 


A 


04 


»38 


272 


K)6 




2 UndeFflfjduBie Non r«.dent "^ "^ S15 


15 


00 


3 Gfadwait Reiidem 


1 


3 4 


5 




^ e 








Com W 


100 1 = 


?00 


250 


300 


350 400 




4 Graduale Non-rnideni 
Oed.t Hour* 


. 2 




s 


e 


7 


8 


- 






Coti 


9S 190 


265 38 




57 


ee 


760 




S Re9.»t'»lion Fm $ 5 


5 


00 


6 Health Fm S 3 


3 


00 


7 R«fMi.on Fee $ 4 


4 


OO 


8 Appl.cation Fee Inon refundable) Sl5 


Z*!- 


oa 


9 Vehicle Heg-itrjtion Fee $ 3 






10 Totei Ch»fflB* 


• ^-96 


no 



Schedule Request and 
Estimated Bill Form 



Summer Session II 
-Only -1978 



This form should be used for the Second Summer Session only. The preceding form must be used for the First Summer Session. 
Mail-in preregistration requests must be postmarked by June 9, 1978. COMPLETE THE ENTIRE FORM EXCEPT 
FOR THE SPACE MARKED 'FOR OFFICE USE ONLY." The top part of this form is a course request only. Students 
must have the lower part (Course Verification) validated by the Registrations Office for a registration to be official. 
Only the validated lower part may be used as proof. 



STUDENT NAME (P 


int 


-ast Name First) 



































































































SOCIAL SECURITY NO. 



were you registered at the University of Maryland, College Park day campus: 

SPRING 1978 YES NO 

IP NO: Please read Admissions information on pages 



LOCAL PHONE TODAY'S DATE 



■(9-5)- 



STUDENT'S SIGNATURE 



COURSE REQUEST: Complete this part with information found in the Schedule of Classes. See page? tor directions 
on determining the session of a course. 

EXAMPLE 



COURSE INFORMATION 



E 


D 


C 


P 



4 





1 



DE 



3 



COURSE PREFI) 



COURSE NO SUFFIX 



SECTION NO 



GRADING INFORMATION 

(CIRCLE ONE NUMBER ONLY) 

1 (2) 3 4 

REGULAR PAS5:^AIL AUDIT SATISFACTORY FAIL 



COURSE 1 



COURSE INFORMATION 











COURSE PREFIX 










COURSE PREFIX 


1 










2 







COURSE NO SUFFIX 

COURSE INFORMATION 



SECTION NO CREDIT 

COURSE 2 



nn 



COURSE NO SUFFIX SECTION NO CREDIT 

COURSE 3 



COURSE INFORMATION 



COURSE PREFI) 



COURSE NO SUFFI) 



GRADING INFORMATION 

(CIRCLE ONE NUMBER ONLY) 

12 3 4 

REGULAR PASS FAIL AUDIT SATISFACTORV FAIL 



GRADING INFORMATION 

(CIRCLE ONE NUMBER ONLY) 

12 3 4 

REGULAR PASS FAIL AUDIT SATISFACTORV FAIL 



GRADING INFORMATION 

(CIRCLE ONE NUMBER ONLYI 

12 3 4 

REGULAR PASS FAIL AUDIT SATISFACTORY FAIL 



COURSE VERIFICATION: In the space below list the course(s) you have requested above. The Registrations Office 
will record the action taken for each course in the space on the right marked "For Office Use Only," and will return 
this part of the form to you. Any course without a Registration Stamp was not received for the reason indicated to 
the right of the course. The lower part of this form must be validated by the Registrations Office after payment is 
made. It is your proof of registration. 





SOCIAL SECURITY NO. 












DO NOT COMPLETE. FOR OFFICE USE 


NLY 






























2 








1 
1 






COURSE PREFIX 




COURSE NO SUFFIX SECTION NO 


CREDIT 







































2 












COURSE PREFIX 




COURSE NO SUFFIX SECTION NO 


CREDIT 







































2 
















COURSE PREFIX 




COURSE NO SUFFIX SECTION NO 


CREDIT 


sK 








Students who register and later decide not 
to attend Summer School at the University 
must cancel their registration prior (o the first 
day of class. Failure to cancel a registration 
will result in financial obligation even though 
the student does not attend class 












NAIVIE 








Q mrviar Qaoci^n 11 in ^arHc uyilt K«a m^ilt^M 






ADDRESS 


to you Do you have: 

U of Md Photo ID Card? 




CITY STATE ZIP 


Yfts No 






Thi 


s mu 


St b 


3 c 


ompi 


3ted t 
HISVV 


y all students For m 
ILL BE USED AS A N 


ail-in 
1AILI 


prer 
NGL 


egist 
ABE 


ran 

L. 


ts 




Previously issued Summer Session card 
Yps Nn ,| 

WnrarrKt Ybs Nn 



11 



INSTRUCTIONS for completion of the ESTIMATED BILLING FORM are given at the bottom of this page. 



STANDARD FEFS 


CHARGES 


AMOUNT 


1. Undergraduate 
Credit Hours 


1 


2 


3 


4 


5 


6 


7 


8 


9 


10 






Cost 


34 


68 


02 


36 


70 


204 238|272 


306 


340 




2. Undergraduate Nonresident 


$15 






3. Graduate Resident 
Credit Hours 


1 


2 


3 


4 


5 


6 


7 


8 








Cost 


50 


100 


150 


200 


250 


300 


350 


400 




4. Graduate Non-resident 
Credit Hojrs 


1 


2 




3 4 5 6 


1 8 








Cost 


95 


190 |Za5J38dj 475|570|66£ 


760 




5. Registration Fee 


$ 5 


5 


00 


6. Health Fee 


$ 3 


3 


00 


7. Recreation Fee 


$ 4 


4 


00 


8. Application Fee (non-refundable) 


$15 






9. Vehicle Registration Fee 


$ 3 






10. Total Charges 


$ 





Make checks payable to: University of Maryland 

One check may be used to pay for both summer sessions. 

Add the Total Charges" from both pages to determine the amount of your check. 

NOTE; Fees listed are subject to change at any time without advance notice. 

ESTIMATED BILLING FORM INSTRUCTIONS: 



1 Add the number of credit hours requested for Summer Session II Only courses listed in this page should be included in this total 

2 Locate your status (undergraduate, graduate resident, Graduate non-resident) on lines 1-4 above (Please note A Graduate Student ' 
is one who has been admitted to the Graduate School either at the University of Maryland or another institution Students who have 
graduated from this or another institution are not considered graduate students until they have been admitted to the Graduate School 
Any student not admitted to the Graduate School is classified as an Undergraduate If you have any questions on this or your residence 
status, please call the Undergraduate Admissions Office. 454-4137 or the Graduate Records Office. 454-5428 The University reserves 
the right to make the final and official determination of the student s residence status ) 

3 On the line next to your status circle the number of credit hours you have requested aboveThe number below the hours circled is your 
cost of tuition 

4 Enter the cost in the Amount column on the right If you are an Undergraduate Non-resident, enter the $15 00 Non-resident Fee (line 
2) in the Amount column 

5 Lines 5-7 are mandatory tees charged to every student each summer session The fees are therefore entered in the Amount column 
for you 

6. If this form is accompanied by an Application for Admission, you must also pay a $1 5.00 Application Fee. If this pertains to you, enter 
the $15 00 on line 8 Note only one Application for Admission and one $15 00 Application Fee is required for both summer sessions. 

7 If you wish to register a car for the summer, enter $3 on line 9 Parking stickers must be picked up at the Motor Vehicle Administration 
Office on the campus Note Stickers assigned in Fall 1977 are valid until August 1978 

8 To determine the amount you owe the University for Summer Session I. add all charges entered in the Amount Column Enter this 
total on line 1 This is the total amount owed for the First Summer Session 

9 Make a check for the amount owed payable to the University of Maryland Write Student Social Security Number on face of check. 
You will be notified of any bill adjustments that are necessary Payment must accompany the estimated bill form 

10. Students entitled to credits on their bills (contract, scholarships, etc ) cannot process a Mail-in Preregistration. They must process a 
Walk-in Pre-registration to assure the accuracy of their bill 

1 1 . MONIES OWED THE UNIVERSITY WILL BE DEDUCTED FROM CHECKS RECEIVED PRIOR TO APPLICATION OF THE REMAIN- 
DER TO SUMMER SCHOOL TUITION 



EXAMPLES 



12 



1. You are a Graduate and a Maryland Resident 

2. You are registering for 5 hours 

3. You have no scholarship, grant, etc. 



Your bill should look like this: 



STANDARD FEES 


CHARGES 


AMOUNT 


1 UndeigrMJuaiF 


, 


2 3 


4 


S 


6 


, 


8 


9 


10 






Cm 


34 


j8 102 


136 


1?0 


04 


JB 


72 


06 


MO 




2 Undtrgrsouaif Non lenijent 


.,S 






3 Cxduxiflnxleni 




J 


\ 20( 


s 


\ * 


, 


a 




Z5^ 


00 


Coil 


50 


00 15 


250 


boo 


350 


400 


* OM."",;!'"" '""""' 




2 


3 




. 


7 


. 


- 






Coi. 


05 


190 


es 3 


47 


ST 


ee 






6 ncai.u.Kor, f « S 5 


5 


00 


6 Health F«e $ 3 


3 


oo 


7 Rec.ul.on Fn S 4 


4 


00 


8 Appl>c«lion ft* (non-r«fur>(toblel SIS 






9 Vih.cl. R>g,.i>t<.or< Fta S 3 






10 Total Chatgat 


« «j?i>^ 


ao 



1. You are an Undergraduate and are not a Maryland resident 

2. You are registering for 6 hours 

3. You are including with this form an Application for Admission 

4. You have no scholarship, grant, etc. 

Your bill should look like this: 



STANDARD FEES 


CHARGES 


AMOUNT 


CfediiHoufi 


3 


1 2 3 


4 


5| 


-7 




8 


9 


10 


7^5 


oo 


Cott 


4 68 10 


136 


wd 


?04 


38 


772 


06 


140 


? Unde.Qfadualt Non f«.den| ^^^-^ $i& 


oo 


Credil Hou'i 


- 


J 


sl 4 5 


6 


, 


B 








Coit 


100 1 


o] 200 ?50 


300 


350 


400 




' oSrHo^r'"""" 




, , 


3 a 


, 


6 


7 


B 








Coil 


05 ISO 


285 360 


47 


57 


SO 


Teo 




5 Rag.ii.at.on Fa. S 5 


s 


w 


6 H.aiih Faa $ 3 


3 


00 


7 R«:.eat.on Faa S 4 


4 


00 


8 Appitcat-on Fee Inon- 


alundablal SIS 


15 


00 


9 Vehicle Re9.>i..i.on Fee $ 3 






10 Tola! Chatgei 


« ^"^h 


OCL 



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Summer Sessions 
Turner Lab 

University of Maryland 
College Park, Maryland 20742 



Division of Busir 
Summer Session 
Room 1108, Sol 
University of Ma 
College Park, M< 






;S55 



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024 Allegany Hall (Dorm ) 

106 Animal Barn 
108-112 Animal Barns 

104 Animal Sciences Annex 

142 Animal Sciences BIdg 
008 Annapolis Hall 

060 Anne Arundel Hall (Dorm ) 

1 56 Apiary 

145 Architecture BIdg 

146 Art-Sociology BIdg 
092 Asphalt Institute 

221 Astronomy Observatory 

016 Baltimore Hall (Dorm ) 
099 Bel Air Hall (Dorrri ) 

091 Biochemistry/Chemistry BIdg 

231 Bureau of Mines. Main BIdg 

160 Byrd Stadium 

161 Byrd Stadium. Field House 
015 Calvert Hall (Dorm ) 

096 Cambridge Hall (Dorm ) 

298 Campus Drive Security Booth 

070 Caroline Hall 

065 Carroll Hall (Dorm ) 

017 Cecil Hall (Dorm ) 

250 Center of Adult Education 

206 Central Receiving Warehouse 

098 Centreville Hall (Dorm ) 

025 Charles Hall (Dorm 1 

090 Chemical Engineering 

091 Chemistry Biochemistry BIdg 

121 ChestertovKn Hall (Dorm) 

162 Cole Student Activities BIdg 
224 Computer Science Center 

250 Conferences and Institutes 

(Center of Adult Ed I 

122 Cumberland Hall (Dorm ) 

105 Dairy Research Labs 

252 Denton Hall (Dorm ) 

097 Dining Hall (Cambridge) 

251 Dining Hall (Denton) 

026 Dining Hall (Hill) 
257 Dining Hall (Ellicott) 
064 Dorchester Hall (Dorm ) 

253 Easton Hall (Dorm ) 

117 Education Annex. East (Health) 

066 Education Annex. West 

143 Education BIdg 

107 Electron Ring Accelerator 

(Physics) 

254 Elkton Hall (Dorm ) 
256 Ellicott Hall (Dorm.) 

007 Fire & Rescue Institute (Md j 

237 Fish & Wildlife Service 

034 Foreign Languages BIdg 

048 Francis Scott Key Hall 
126-139 Fraternity & Sorority Houses 

029 Frederick Hall (Dorm ) 



G-17 


031 


P-8 


299 


Q-10 


166 


P-9 


258 


O-IO 


014 


H-18 


002 


G-IO 


140 


J-4 


074 


D-11 


027 


E-10 


028 


P-12 


207 


M-1 


208 


G-16 


209 


0-7 


158 


N-1 1 


059 


K-11 


227 


J -6 


022 


J-7 


259 


G-15 


201 


N-8 




E-10 


238 


E-13 


260 


F-12 


077 


H-16 


046 


A-6 




P-22 


088 


0-7 




G-18 


089 


P-11 


084 


N-11 


035 


N-6 


009 


H-8 


085 


N-9 


032 


A-6 


040 




Oil 


M-6 


052 


O-IO 


295 


1-2 


255 


N-7 


087 


J-2 


056 


G-14 




L-4 

H-10 

1-2 


179 
073 


H-18 
F-14 


083 


G-9 
0-9 


008 


J-3 


255 


K-5 


082 


K-19 


003 


M-12 


093 


1-11 


054 


H-13 




M-19 




H-17 


164 



Directory of Buildings 

Garrett Hall (Dorm ) G-15 

Gatehouse P-'S 

Golf Course Club House E-1 

Hagerstown Hall (Dorm ) K-4 

Harford Hall (Dorm ) H-17 

Harrison Lab 0-16 

Health Center 1-10 

Holzapfel Hall (Horticulture) K-13 

Home Management House G-18 

Howard Hall (Dorm ) G-17 

Human Ecology Temp E-1 4 

Human Ecology Temp E-14 

Human Ecology Temp D-13 

Intercollegiate Athletic Facility K-7 

Journalism BIdg H-1 2 

Jull Hall L-8 

Kent Hall (Dorm ) H-1 5 

LaPlata Hall (Dorm ) L-5 

Leonardlown Community BIdg 0-21 
(Employment Office) 

Leonardlown Housing N-22 

Lord Calvert Apts E-1 9 

Main Administration BIdg K-14 

Marie Mount Hall (Human J-14 

Ecology) 

Martin Engineering Classroom 0-13 

BIdg 

Martin Engineering Labs 0-13 

Mathematics BIdg N-1 3 

McKeldin Library, Theodore R H-1 1 

Memorial Chapel 1-15 

Molecular Physics N-9 

Montgomery Hall (Dorm ) 1-18 

Morrill Hall G-13 

Motor Transportation Facility P-18 

North Administration BIdg L-14 

North Gate Security Booth P-1 S 

North Physical Education BIdg 0-6 

Nuclear Reactor O-IO 

Nyumburu Community Center. F-15 

Temporary CC 

Parking Garage 1«1 1-9 

H J Patterson Hall (Agronomy. 1-1 1 

Botany) 

J M Patterson Hall (Industrial O-IO 

Education) 

Photographic Services H-18 

(Annapolis Hall) 

Physical Education BIdg 0-6 

Physics BIdg M-12 

Police & Service BIdg N-1 7 

Post Office & Custodial BIdg Q-12 

Preinkert Field House E-1 1 

(Women s Gymnasium 

& Swimming Pool) 

President s Home D-4 



021 


Prince Georges Hall (Dorm I 


G-16 


061 


Queen Annes Hall (Dorm ) 


F-11 


078 


Reckord Armory 


L-15 


004 


Ritchie Coliseum 


M.-17 


080 


Rossborough Inn fFacully- 
Alumni Club) 


M-16 


159 


Shipley Field (Baseball) 


K-8 


037 


Shoemaker BIdg (Counseling 
Ctr) 


H-14 


075 


Shriver Lab (Ag Engineering) 


K-12 


044 


Skinner BIdg (Microbiology) 


1-14 


038 


Social Sciences BIdg 


G-14 


063 


Somerset Hall (Dorm ) 


F-11 


071 


South Administration BIdg and 
Graduate School 


K-15 


224 


Space Sciences BIdg 


N-9 


062 


S' Marys Hall (Drrm ) 


H-10 


163 


Student Union (Maryland) 


J-10 


094 


Surplus Property (Md State 
Agency for) 


Q-12 


076 


Symons Hall (Agriculture. 
Entomology) 


L-13 


030 


Talbot Hall 


H-1 5 


043 


Taliaferro Hall (English) 


H-13 


141 


Tawes Fine Arts BIdg 


E-9 


053 


Temporary Classroom BIdg AA 


F-16 


056 


Temporary BIdg CC 
(Nyumburu Community 
Center) 


F-15 


058 


Temporary Classroom BIdg 
EE (Dance) 


F-16 


049 


Temporary Classroom BIdg 
FF (Art Annex) 


E-13 


050 


Temporary Classroom BIdg 
HH (Art Annex) 


E-13 


067 


Temporary Classroom BIdg 
UU (Speech and Drama) 


F-14 


068 


Temporary Classroom BIdg 
TT (Art Annex) 


E-14 


039 


Terrapin Hall 


F-13 


079 


Turner Lab IDairy) 
(Summer Programs) 


M-16 


042 


Tydings Hall, Millard E 


H-13 


147 


Undergraduate Library 


L-1 1 


250 


University College 
(Center of Adult Ed ) 


A-6 


286 


University Hills Apts (on Univ 
Blvd ) 


A -5 


005 


University Press 


0-18 


023 


Washington Hall (Dorm ) 


G-17 


297 


West Gate Security Booth 


1-3 


069 


Wicomico Hall (Dorm ) 


E-1 2 


081 


Wind Tunnel 


P-1 3 


047 


Woods Hall 


1-14 


051 


Worcester Hall (Dorm ) 


G-12 


144 


Zoology-Psychology BIdg 


L-10 



SCHEDULE OF CLASSES BUILDING CODES 



CODE 


BUILDING 


A 


Taliaferro Hall 


AA 


Temporary Classroonns 


API 


Apiary 


AR 


Armory 


ARC 


Architecture 


ARR 


Meeting Place to be Arranged 


AS 


Art Sociology 


C 


Chemistry 


CAM 


Cambridge Hall 


CC 


Temporary Building 


COL 


Ritchie Coliseum 


D 


Turner Lab (Dairy) 


DD 


Temporary Classrooms 


DMT 


Dining Hall Temporary 




(Old Dining Hall#1) 


E 


H.J. Patterson Hall 


EE 


Temporary Classrooms 


ELL 


Ellicott Hall 


F 


Holzapfel Hall 


FF 


Temporary Classrooms 


FS 


Fire Service 


G 


Journalism 


GG 


Cole Student Activities 


H 


Marie Mount Hall 


HAG 


Hagerstown Hall 



HAR 
HEA 
HEB 
HEC 
HEL 

HH 

HMC 

I 

II 

J 

JJ 

KK 

L 

LAP 

LL 

M 

MM 

N 

NN 

NUC 

O 

GO 

P 

RE 

PRH 



Harrison Laboratory 
Human Ecology Temp 
Human Ecology Temp 
Human Ecology Temp 
Health Education Lab 

(located on Lehigh Rd.) 
Temporary Classrooms 
Home Management Center 
Shriver Laboratory 
Jull Hall 

Engineering Classrooms 
Molecular Physics 
North Administration 
McKeldin Library 
La Plata Hall 
Foreign Languages 
Morrill Hall 

Computer Science Center 
Shoemaker Hall 
Tawes Fine Arts 
Nuclear Reactor 
Symons Hall 
Education 
J.M. Patterson 
Physical Education 
North Physical Education 



Q 

GO 

R 

RR 

S 

SS 

STA 

SU 

T 

TH 

TT 

U 

ULB 

UU 

V 

VV 

W 

WW 



YY 

z 

ZP 

zz 



Tydings Hall (BPA) 

Dairy Barn 

Woods Hall 

Francis Scott Key (A&S) 

Engineering Labs 

Space Science Center 

Byrd Stadium 

Student Union 

Skinner 

Terrapin Hall 

Temporary Classrooms 

Chemical Engineering 

Undergraduate Library 

Temporary Classrooms 

Wind Tunnel 

Graduate School - South Adm. 

Preinkert Fieldhouse 

Animal Science Center 

Judging Pavilion 

Temporary Building 

Mathematics 

West Education Annex 

Physics 

Zoology-Psychology 

Dairy Science Annex 



88 



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University of Maryland 
College Park Campus 



M^iavlWalung Ibix 



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UniVER/ITV OF mRRVLRno 
/ummer /e//ion/ 
Turner Loboratory 
College Pork. fttd. 20742 




non-PftOFIT ORG. 
U. /. PO/TRGE 

PAID 
Colleqe Pork, Rid. 
Permit Ho. lO 




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