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Full text of "The summer sessions: University of Maryland, College Park campus [catalog]"

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COLLEGE PARK CAMPUS 
ADMINISTRATION 

Chancellor 
Robert L. Cluckstern 

B.E.E.,Cit>'CollegeorNewYork,1944; Ph.D. (Physics), 
Massachusetts Instituteof Technology, 1948. 

Vice Chancellor for Academic Affairs 
Nancie L. Gonzalez 

B.S.,Universiryot North Dakota, 1951; 

M.A., University of Michigan, 1955; 

Ph.D., University of Michigan, 1959. 

Vice Chancellor tor Administrative Affairs 
DarrylW. Bierly 

B.S., Pennsylvania State University, 1%1; 

M.S., Pennsylvania State University, 1%9. 

Vice Chancellor for Student Affairs 
William L. Thomas, Jr. 

B.S., University otTennessee, 1955; 

M.S., University of Tennessee, 1965; 

Ph.D., Michigan State University, 1970. 

Summer Programs Administration 

Administrative Dean tor Summer Programs 
Melvin Bernstein 

B.A., Southwestern at Memphis, 1947; 

B.Mus., Southwestern at Memphis, 1948; 

M.Mus., University of Michigan, 1949; 

M.A., Universiryof North Carolina, 1954; 

Ph.D., UniversityofNorth Carolina, 1964. 

Assistant Director for Cultural Programs 
George A. Moquin 

B.A., Universiryof Maryland, 1971. 

Assistant Director for Administration 
Patricia A. Grim 

B.S., University of Pittsburgh, 1972; 

M.S., Universiryof Pittsburgh, 1976; 

Ph.D., University of Pittsburgh, 1979. 

Coordinator for Summer Recreational Programs 
Wallace R. Stephenson 

B.A., University of Maryland, 1978. 



CENTRAL ADMINISTRATION 
OF THE UNIVERSITY 

President 
Johns. Toll 

B.S., Yale University, 1944; 

A.M., Princeton University, 1948; 

Ph.D., Princeton University, 1952. 



Vice President for General Administration 
Donald W.O'Connell 

B.A., Columbia University, 1937; 

M.A., Columbia University, 1938; 

Ph.D., Columbia University, 1953. 

Vice President for Academic Affairs 
R. Lee Hornbake 

B.S., California Slate College, Pennsylvania, 1934; 

M.A., Ohio State University, 1936; 

Ph.D., Ohio State University, 1942. 

Vice President for Graduate Studies and Research 
David S. Sparks (Acting) 

B.A., Grinnell College, 1944; 

M.A., University of Chicago, 1945; 

Ph.D., Universityof Chicago, 1951. 

Vice President for Agricultural Affairs 
and Legislative Relations 
Frank L. Bentz, Jr. 

B.S., Universityof Maryland, 1942; 

Ph.D., University of Maryland, 1952. 

Vice President for Development 
Robert G. Smith 

B.S., State Universityof New York at Geneseo, 1952; 

M.A., Ohio University, 1956. 

BOARD OF REGENTS 

Chairman 

B. Herbert Brown 

Chairman, Emeritus 
Louis L. Kaplan 

Vice Chairman 

Hugh A. McMullen 

Secretary 

Samuel H. Hoover 

Treasurer 

N.Thomas Whittington, Jr. 

Assistant Secretary 
Mary H. Broadwater 

Assistant Treasurer 
John C. Scarbath 

Percy M. Chaimson 

Ralph W.Frey 

The Honorable Young D. Hance, ex officio 

A. Paul Moss 

Peter F.O'Malley 

Jeffrey J. Silver 

The Honorable Joseph D.Tydings 

Wilbur G.Valentine 

Samuel M. Witten 



University Policy Statements 

The provisions of this publication are not to be regarded as an irrevocable contract 
between the student and the university of Maryland Changes are effected from time to 
time in the general regulations and m the academic requirements There are established 
proce<3ures lor making changes procedures v^hich protect the institution s integrity 
and the individual student s interest and welfare A curriculum or graduation 
requirement, when altered, is not made retroactive unless the alteration is to the 
students advantage and can be accommodated within the span of years normally 
required for graduation When the actions of a student are judged by competent 
authority, using established procedure, to be detrimental to the interests ol the 
university community, that person may be required to withdraw from the university 
The University of Maryland, in all its branches and divisions, subscribes to a policy 
of equal educational and employment opportunity lor people of every race, creed, 
ethicorigin and sex 

It IS university policy that smoking in classrooms is prohibited unless all participants 
agree to the contrary. Any student has the right to remind the instructor of this policy 
throughout the duration of the class. 



The University of Maryland is an equal opportunity institution with respect to both 
education and employment The University's policies, programs and activities are in 
conformance with pertinent federal and state taws and regulations on 
non-discnmination regarding race, color, religion, age, national origin, sex, and 
handicap Inquiries regarding compliance with Title VI of the Civil Rights Act of 1964, 
as amended. Title IX of the 1972 Education Amendments, Section 504 ol the 
Rehabilitation Act of 1973, or related legal requirements should be directed to the 
appropriate individual designated below 

DirectoroftheOfficeof Human Relations 

Room 1114, Mam Administration Building 

University of Maryland. College Park 

College Park, Maryland 20742 

Campus Coordinator for §504 of the 
Rehabilitation Act of 1973 

Room 1 109. Mam Administration Building 

Universityof Maryland. College Park 

College Park. Maryland 20742 



TABLE OF CONTENTS 



Academic Information 

Academic Credit 

Advanced Placement Programs 

Candidates for Degrees 

Definition of Full-Time Status 

General University Requirements 

Marking System 

Pass/Fail Option 

Protection of Records Policy 

Administrative Officers/Board of 

Regents 

Central University Administration 

College Park Campus Administration . 

Summer Programs Administration 

Admission Information 

Graduates 

Undergraduates 

High School luniors/Seniors 

Calendar 

Codes: Division/College/Major 

Directory of Information Services 

Forms 

Graduate Admission (Visiting) 

Schedule Request/Estimated Bill 

Undergraduate Admission/Re- 

admission 

General Information 

Automobile Registration 

Bookstore-UMporium 

Dining Hall Services 

Disabled Student Services 

Golden Identification Card 

Key Dates for Summer Residents 

Libraries 

Living Accommodations 

Research Facilities 

Retired Volunteer Service Corps 

Sum mer Cult u ral Activities 

Student Health Service 

Map, College Park Campus 

Area Resources 

Registration Changes 

Change of Address Procedu re 

Change of Division/College/Major 
(Undergraduate) 

Change in Program (Graduate) 

Registration Procedures Summer, 

1979 

Adds, Drops 

Armory Registration 

Cancellation of Registration 

Late Registration 

Mail-in Preregistration 

Non-Standard Date Courses 



Walk-in Preregistration 8 

Withdrawal from Summer School 10 

Registration Schedule 4 

Tuition and Fees 5 

Determination of In-State Status 5 

Payment of Fees 5 

Remission of Fees 21 

Veterans' Benefits 14 

Workshops, Institutes, Special 

Offerings 21 

University Policy Statement i 

COURSE SCHEDULE: 

Afro-American Studies 35 

Agricultural and Extension Education 80 

Agricultural Engineering 57 

Agricultural and Resource Economics 36 

Agronomy 35 

American Studies 35 

Animal Sciences 35 

Anthropology 36 

Applied Design 36 

Art Ed ucation 37 

Art History 37 

Art, Studio 37 

Astronomy 38 

Biochemistry 39 

Biology 39 

Botany 41 

Business Management 39 

Chemistry 41 

Comparative Literature 42 

Computer Science 42 

Consumer Economics 43 

Co-operative Education Program 43 

Crafts 43 

Criminology 44 

Dance 44 

Dramatic Art 44 

Econom ics 45 

Education 46 

Administration, Supervision and 

Curriculum 46 

Counseling and Personnel Services 47 

Early Childhood-Elementary 

Education 48 

Human Development 49 

Industrial Education 51 

Measurement and Statistics 53 

Secondary Education 54 

Social Foundations 55 

Special Education 56 

Engineering 57 

Aerospace 57 

1 



Chemical 57 

Civil 57 

Co-operative Education 58 

Electrical 58 

Materials 60 

Mechanical 60 

Nuclear 61 

Science 59 

English 59 

Entomology 61 

Family and Com munity Development 61 

Food Science 61 

Food 63 

Foreign Language 62 

French 63 

Geography 64 

Geology 64 

German 64 

Government and Politics 65 

Hearing and Speech Sciences 66 

Health 68 

History 67 

Horticulture 69 

Housing and Applied Design 69 

Human and Community Resources 45 

Information Systems Management 69 

Institution Administration 69 

Journalism 69 

Law Enforcement 71 

Library Science 70 

Marine Estuarine Environmental 

Sciences 73 

Mathematics 72 

Meteorology 73 

Microbiology 73 

Music 74 

Music Education 73 

Nutrition 76 

Philosophy 77 

Physical Education 76 

Physics 77 

Psychology 78 

Radio, Television and Film 81 

Recreation 79 

Russian 81 

Sociology 82 

Spanish 82 

Speech 83 

Statistics 83 

Textiles 83 

Textiles and Consumer Economics 84 

Urban Studies 84 

Women's Studies 84 

Zoology 84 



SUMMER SESSIONS 
UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 
COLLEGE PARK CAMPUS 
1979 



Two Six Week Sessions 

SESSION I Tuesday, May 22-Friday, June 29 
SESSION II Tuesday, July 3-Friday, August 10 



Summer Sessions 1979 

The University of Maryland at College Park offers a 
richly varied summer educational program to its 
continuing degree students and to qualified non-degree 
students for both graduate and undergraduate study. 
Students may select from over 1,000 courses representing 
75 academic disciplines and a number of workshops and 
institutes designed to meet specific needs within 
disciplines. The summer sessions offer opportunities for 
degree students to accelerate completion of degrees, to 
make up deficiencies and requirements, and to broaden 
programs with studies which cthel^(vise could not be fitted 
into theiracademic schedules. 

The Summer Programs provide opportunities for 
non-degree students who may wish to test their abilities 
to pursue college level studyorwho may wish to indulge 
special academic interests. The professional or post- 
graduate student will find courses and workshops which 
permit updatingof knowledge and techniques in specific 
disciplines within convenient schedules. 

The summer faculty consists of distinguished members 
of the College Park faculty and outstanding visiting 
lecturers. In addition to academic studies the Summer 
Programs seek to provide a total university environment 
through varied and exciting recreational and cultural 
programs. 



SUMMER CALENDAR 
1979 



PREREGISTRATION 



March 12 



Monday 



May 4 



June8 



May 9 



JunelS 



Friday 



Friday 



Wednesday 



Friday 



Preregistration begins 
for both Summer 
Sessions. Walk-in 
registrations can occur 
between 9:00 a.m. and 
3:00 p.m. Mail-in 
requests will be 
processed daily. 
Mail-in preregistration 
ends for Summer 
Session I. Forms must 
be postmarked on or 
before this date. 
Mail-in preregistration 
ends for Summer 
Session II. Forms must 
be postmarked on or 
before this date. 
Walk-in preregistration 
ends for Summer 
Session I. 

Walk-in preregistration 
ends for Summer 
Session II. 





SUMMER 


May 21 


Monday 


May 22 
May 22-29 


Tuesday 
Tuesday- 
Tuesday 


May 28 
May 29 


Monday 
Tuesday 



May 30 



Wednesday 



JunelS 
June18 



June 29 



Friday 
Monday 

Friday 



SESSION I 

Registration tor Summer 
Session I in the Armory. 
(Teacher Registration 
5:00-7:00 p.m.) 
Classes begin. 
Late Registration Period. 
A late fee of $20.00 is 
assessed. 

Memorial Day Holiday. 
End of Schedule 
Adjustment Period. 
Last day to drop a course 
without the course 
appearing on the record. 
Last day to drop a course 
with a refund. 
Last day to change 
grading option and 
credit level. 

In addition to the $20.00 
late registration fee, 
special permission of a 
student's academic 
provost or dean is 
required for registra- 
tion on or after this date. 
A $2.00 fee is assessed 
on or after this date for 
each change in course 
schedule ($2.00 for each 
drop; $2.00 for each 
add.) 

Special permission of a 
student's academic 
provost or dean is 
required to add on or 
afterthisdate. 
Beginning this date 
through June 15 agrade 
of "W" will be recorded 
for any course 
dropped. 

Last day to drop courses. 
No course may be 
dropped on or after 
this date. 

Last day of classes. 
Final Examination Day 
for Summer Session I. 





SUMMER 


uly2 


Monday 


uly3 
uiy4 


Tuesday 
Wednesday 


uly3-10 


Tuesday- 
Tuesday 


ulylO 


Tuesday 



Julyll 



July13 



July 27 
July 30 



Wednesday 



Friday 



Friday 
Monday 



August 10 Friday 



SESSION 11 

Registration for Summer 
Session II in the Armory. 
Classes begin. 
Independence Day 
Holiday. 

Late Registration Period. 
A late fee of $20.00 is 
assessed. 
End of Schedule 
Adjustment Period. 
Last day to drop a cou rse 
without the course 
appearing on the record. 
Last day to drop a course 
with a refund. 
Last day to change grading 
option and credit level. 
In addition to the $20.00 
late registration fee, 
special permissionof a 
student's academic 
provost or dean is 
required for registration 
onorafterthisdate. 
A $2.00 fee is assessed 
on or after this date for 
each change in course 
schedule ($2.00 foreach 
drop; $2.00 for each 
add). 

Special permission of a 
student's academic 
provost or dean is 
required to add on or after 
this date. 

Beginning this date 
through J uly 27 a grade of 
"W" will be recorded fora 
course dropped. 
Last day to submit 
applications fordiplomas 
to be awarded August 
15,1979. 

Last day to drop courses. 
No course may be 
dropped on or after 
this date. 

Final Examination Day 
for Summer Session II. 



REGISTRATION SCHEDULE 
Session I 

Monday, May 21 

Reckord Armory Hours 
8:30a.m.-5:00p.m. 

8:30 Simn-Spai 

8:45 Spaj-Stri 

9:00 Strj-Thom 

9:15 Thon-Vand 

9:30 Vane-Wein 

9:45 Weio-Witk 

10:00 Witl-Zz 

10:15 Aa-Aver 

10:30 Aves-Benn 

10:45 Beno-Bous 

11:00 Bout-Cald 

11:15 Cale-Coha 

11:30 Cohb-Dave 

11:45 Davf-Dumo 

12:00 Dump-Finn 

12:15 Fino-Gend 

12:30 Gene-Grig 

12:45 Grih-Hend 

1:00 Hene-laca 

1:15 lacb-Kaul 

1:30 Kaum-Kuld 

1:45 Kule-Lint 

2:00 Linu-Mann 

2:15 Mano-McKi 

2:30 McKj-Mitc 

2:45 Mitd-Myer 

3:00 Myes-Okee 

3:15 Okef-Pear 

3 : 30 Peas-Powe 

3:45 Powf-Reil 

4:00 Reim-Roma 

4:15 Romb-Sand 

4:30 Sane-Sefr 

4:45 Sefs-Simm 



Session II 

Monday, July2 

Reckord Armory Hours 
8:30a.m.-5:00p.m. 

8:30 Powf-Reil 

8 :45 Rei m-Roma 

9:00 Romb-Sand 

9:15 Sane-Sefr 

9:30 Sefs-Simm 

9:45 Simn-Spai 

10:00 Spaj-Stri 

10:15 Strj-Thom 

10:30 Thon-Vand 

10:45 Vane-Wein 

11:00 Weio-Witk 

11:15 Witl-Zz 

11:30 Aa-Aver 

11 :45 Aves-Benn 

12:00 Beno-Bous 

12:15 Bout-Cald 

12:30 Cale-Coha 

12:45 Cohb-Dave 

1:00 Davf-Dumo 

1:15 Dump-Finn 

1 : 30 Fino-Gend 

1:45 Gene-Grig 

2:00 Grih-Hend 

2:15 Hene-laca 

2:30 lacb-Kaul 

2:45 Kaum-Kuld 

3:00 Kule-Lint 

3:15 Linu-Mann 

3:30 Mano-McKi 

3:45 McKj-Mitc 

4:00 Mitd-Myer 

4:15 Myes-Okee 

4:30 Okef-Pear 

4:45 Peas-Powe 



Department Representatives' Hours 
8:30a.m. -5:15p.m. 



Department Representatives' Hours 
8:30a.m. -5:15p.m. 



CLASS PERIODS 

Unless otherwise noted, classes during the 1979 Summer 
Sessions will meet on the following time schedule: 



Day Classes 

8:00- 9:20 
9:30-10:50 
11:00-12:20 
12:30- 1:50 
2:00- 3:20 
3:30- 4:50 



Evening Classes 

MW7:00-10:00p.m. 
TFh 7:00-10:00 p.m. 
MTWTh 7:00-8:30 p.m. 
MTTh 7:00-9:00 p.m. 



WeeklyClass Schedule-Six Week Courses 

2 credit courses meet 4 days as indicated in this bulletin. 

3 credit courses meet daily. 

4 credit courses meet daily and include multiple periods 
for laboratory. 







TUITION AND FEES 



ALL STUDENTS 

Registration Fee per Session 5.00 --'^ 

Recreation Fee per Session 4.00 -^ 

Student Health Fee per Session 4.00 i^ 

Summer Vehicle Registration Fee, per vehicle 

(not charged if vehicle was registered tor 

Fall or Spring Semester) 3.00 

UNDERGRADUATE STUDENTS 

Tuition per Credit Hour 38.00 .■ 

Non-resident Fee per Session (must be paid by all 

students who are not residents of Maryland) 15.00 

Application Fee (New Students) 15.00 

GRADUATE STUDENTS 

Application Fee. Every student must be admitted 15.00 

Tuition perCredit Hour: 

Resident Student 55.00 

Non-resident Student 100.00 

Continuous Registration Fee 

(Doctoral Candidate) 10.00 

OTHER FEES 

Graduate Language Examination 14.00 

Graduation Fee, Bachelors and Master's Degrees 15.00 

Graduation Fee, Doctoral Degrees 60.00 

Late Registration Fee 20.00 

Service Charge for Dishonored Check 

(depending on amount of check) up to 20.00 

Fees for auditors and courses taken for audit are the same 
as those charged for courses taken for credit at both 
undergraduate and graduate levels. Fees for altering 
academic programs are discussed in the section on 
Admissions and Registrations. Although changes in fees 
and charges ordinarily will be announced in advance, 
the University reserves the right to make such changes 
without prior announcement. 



^ 



DETERMINATION OF IN-STATE 
STATUS FOR ADMISSION 
ANDTUITION 



The deadline for meeting all requirements for an in-state 
status and for submitting all documents for reclassification 
is the last day of late registration of the semester for which 
the student wishes to be classified as an in-state student. 

DEADLINES 

Summer Session 1,1979 May 29, 1979 

Summer Session 11,1979 July 10, 1979 

Fall Semester, 1979 September 5, 1979 



For further information : 
Undergraduate — 

Office of Undergraduate Admissions 

North Administration Building 

University of Maryland 

College Park, Maryland 20742 

(301)454-4137,4535,4536 
Graduate — 
- Graduate Records Office 

Room 2117, South Administration Building 

University of Maryland 

College Park, Maryland 20742 

(301)454-5428 



Payment of Fees 

Returning students will not be permitted to complete registration until all financial 
obligations to the University including library fines, parking violation assessments and 
other penalty fees and service charges are paid in full- 

Although the University regularly mails bills to students, it cannot assume responsibility 
for their receipt. If any student does not receive a bill on or before the start of each semester, 
it is his/her responsibility to obtain a copy of the bill by coming to Room 1 103. South 
Administration Building, between the hours of 8:30 a.m. and 4:15 p.m.. Monday through 
Friday 

All checks or money orders should be made payable to the University of Maryland 
for the exact amount due. The student's social security number must be written on the 
check In cases where the University has awarded a grant, scholarship, or workship. 
the appropriate amount will be deducted on the bill, mailed approximately one month 
after the start of the semester 

Students will be severed from University services for delinquent indebtedness to the 
University which occurs or is discovered during a semester In the event that severance 
occurs, the individual may make payment during the semester in which services were 
severedandall these services except housing will be restored Students removed from 
housing becauseof delinquent indebtedness will be placed at the bottom of the waiting 
list after the financial obligation is satisfied and after reapplying for housing Students 
who are severed from University services and who fail to pay the indebtedness during the 
semester in which severance occurs will be ineligible to pre-register or register for 
subsequent semesters until the debt is cleared In the event of actual registration m a 
subsequent semester by a severed student who had not settled the student account prior 
to that semester, such registration will be cancelled and no credit will be earned for 
the semester, 

In accordance with State law, the accounts of delinquent and severed students are 
referred to the State Central Collections Unit in Baltimore for collection and legal 
follow-up Costs incurredm collecting delinquent accounts are charged to the student. 
Collection costs are normally 1 5% plus any attorney and/or court fees. 

No degree will be conferred, no grade issued, nor any diploma, certificate, or 
transcript of record issued to a student who has not made satisfactory settlement of his 
or heraccount 



^V INFORMATION SERVICES 

General I nformation 454-331 1 

Summer Sessions Office 

Tu rner Laboratory 454-3347 

Admissions 

Office of Admissions & Registrations 

North Administration Building 454-5550 

Registration 454-5559 

Housing 

Off-Campus 454-3645 

On-Campus 454-2711 

Undergraduate Studies 454-2530 

Graduate Studies 454-3141 

Division of Agricultural and Life Sciences 454-5257 

Division of Arts and Humanities 454-2740 

Division of Behavioral and Social Sciences 454-5272 

Division of Human and Community Resources 454-4145 

Division of Mathematical & Physical 

Sciences & Engineering 454-4906 

College of Agriculture 454-3702 

College of Business & Management 454-5236 

College of Education 454-2011/2 



College of Engi neering 454-2421 

College of H uman Ecology 454-21 36 

College of jou rnali sm 454-2228 

College of Library & I n formation Services 454-5441 

College of Physical Education, 

Recreation and Health 454-2755 

School of Architectu re 454-3427 

Computer Science Center 454-4255 

Institute of Crimi nal Justice & Criminology 454-4538 

Institute of Urban Studies 454-5718 

University College (Evening Division) 454-5735 



ADMISSION INFORMATION 

Undergraduate 

RETURNING STUDENTS TO THE 
COLLEGE PARK CAMPUS 

1. Studentswho have attended the College Park campus 
as "term only" registrants any previous semester. 
TO BE ADMITTED: Complete the application for 
"SummerOniy Undergraduate Students" enclosed 
in the centerof this catalog. TO REGISTER: See 
pages 4 and 8. 

2. Degree and non-degree students other than "term 
only" registrantswho have attended any previous 
semester at the College Park campus, but not the 
Spring1979 semester. TO BE ADMITTED: Complete 
the application for undergraduate readmission 
enclosed in the center of this catalog. TO REGISTER: 
See pages 4 and 8. 

3. Students who were registered during the Spring 1979 
semester, and are eligible to return in the Fall, and 
students who graduated from the College Park campus 
at the end of the Spring semester, are eligible to 
register for the Summer Sessions without being 
readmitted. TO REGISTER: See page 8 for information 
on summer registration. 

4. Applicants who were dismissed from the College Park 
campus at the end of the Spring 1979 semester are 
eligible to attend the 1979 Summer Sessions. However, 
reinstatement is necessary in orderto continue in the 
Fall 1979 semester. The deadline for reinstatement 
applications is June 15, 1979 for the Fall 1979 semester. 
Reinstatement applications may be obtained from the 
Withdrawal/Re-enroliment Office in Room 1130, 
North Administration Building. TO REGISTER: See 
page 8 for procedures on summer registration. 
Applicants who were dismissed from the College Park 
campus prior to the Spring 1979 semester must be 
reinstated in order to attend either or both 1979 
Summer Sessions. Deadline dates are April 15 for 
Summer Session I and May 15 for Summer Session II. 
Reinstatement applications may be obtained from the 
Withdrawal/Re-enrollment Office, Room 1130, North 
Administration Building. TO REGISTER: If an official 
letter of reinstatement is received, follow registrations 
procedures on page 8. 



NEW STUDENTS, COLLEGE PARK CAMPUS 

1. Summer Only Students 

(a) Students enrolled at other colleges and universities 
or at other campuses of the University of Maryland. 
TO BE ADMITTED: Complete the "summeronly" 
application for admission enclosed in the centerof 
this catalog. Transcripts need not be submitted. 
Theapplicant must certify good standing and 
permission of the parent institution on the 
application. Verification that credits earned at the 
College Park campus will be accepted by the parent 
institution isthe responsibility of the applicant. 
TO REGISTER; See pages 4 and 8. 

(b) Applicants who have graduated from other colleges 
and universities. TO BE ADMITTED: Complete the 
"summeronly" application for admission. 
Transcripts need not be submitted. TO REGISTER: 
See pages 4 and 8. 

(c) Teachers seeking certification or professional 
advancement through summer study who have not 
attended the College Park campus or who have 
been admitted previously for summer only 
attendance at College Park. TO BE ADMITTED: 
Completethe "summeronly" application for 
admission. Transcripts need not be submitted. 
TO REGISTER: See pages 4 and 8. 

(d) High school graduates who wish to attend the 
Summer Sessions only. TO BE ADMITTED: 
Complete the "summer only" application in the 
center of this catalog. Eligibility requires a "C" 
average in academic subjects and rank in the upper 
half of the high school class. Applicants who do 
not meet these criteria should contact the College 
Park campus Office of Undergraduate Admissions 
for information regarding alternate criteria for 
admission. High school transcripts are not 
required for "summer only" admission. However, 
the applicant must certify on the application that 
he/she meets the University's freshman admission 
standards. New freshman students admitted forthe 
Summer Sessions only will not be permitted to 
continue in the Fall unless regular admission 
application has been made and the applicant is 
eligibleforregularadmission. TO REGISTER: 

See pages 4 and 8. 

(e) High school students enteringthe junior or senior 
year may enroll at the University during the summer 
if they have a minimum 3.00 (8) average. TO BE 
ADMITTED: Obtain a regular undergraduate 
application for admission and the admissions 
brochure. Looking at Maryland, and follow the 
procedures outlined in this material. TO REGISTER: 
If anofficial letter of admission forthe Summer 
Session only is received, follow the instructions 

on page 8. 

(f) University College students. TO BE ADMITTED: 
Only a letter of permission from the University 
College Dean must be presented. TO REGISTER: 
See page 8. 

2. Summer1979and Fall 1979 Students 

(a) New students who have applied for the Fall 1979 
semester and have been admitted may register for 



SummerSession courses. TO REGISTER: See 
page 8. 

(b) New students who wish to attend the Summer 
Sessions and continue in the Fall 1979 semester. 
TO BEADMITTED: Complete a regular under- 
graduate application for admission and follow the 
procedures outlined in the application booklet. 
Refer to the application booklet for deadline 
information. TO REGISTER: If an official letter of 
admission is received, see page 8. 

(c) New students who have applied for the Fall 1979 
semester, but have not been admitted, should 
contact the Office of Undergraduate Admission. 
TO REGISTER: If an official letter of admission is 
received, see page 8. 



ADMISSION INFORMATION 

Graduate 

SUMMER GRADUATE STUDY 

The Summer Programs offer a large selection of courses 
at the graduate level. A student desiring graduate credit 
at Maryland should apply and register under the most 
appropriate of the categories given below. Students 
wishing to enroll in courses numbered 600 or above must 
be in a graduate admitted status at the University of 
Maryland. Students who receive faculty guidance and 
wish to use the'research facilities of the University during 
the summer must register for an appropriate number 
of credits. 

Select one of the following categories which 
corresponds to your situation. If you do not find a 
situation listed that is applicable to you, or if you need 
additional information, writeorcall: 

THE GRADUATE SCHOOL 
UNIVERSITY OFMARYLAND 
COLLEGE PARK, MARYLAND 20742 
(301)454-3141 

GRADUATES 

There are five types of graduate students who are 
eligible for enrollment during the 1979 Summer Sessions 
on the College Park Campus. 

(1) CONTINUING STUDENTS — Students whose 
graduate admission is still valid within the following 
time limits: 

Doctoral — Five years from entrance date to be 
advanced to candidacy after which an additional 
four years are permitted for the completion of the 
remaining requirements, including the dissertation. 

Master's & Advanced Graduate Specialist (AGS) 
Certificate — Five years from entrance date. 
Admission is valid either until the completion of the 
degree for which admitted or until the expiration 
of the time limits, whichever occurs first. Anew 
application foradmission isthen required tochange 
program and/or degree or non-degree status. 
The admitted status for both degree and certificate 



seekers is continued only if departmental and 
Graduate School academic and administrative 
requirements are maintained. 

Advanced Special Student — Five years from 
entrance date unless a shorter period is specified 
in the offer of admission. The admitted status is 
continued only if Graduate School academic and 
administrative requirementsare maintained. 

Visiting Graduate — One academic year. If the 
student's current graduate admission is valid, 
special Summer Session admission is not required. 
TO REGISTER: Follow procedures under 
REGISTRATION, pages. 

(2) NEW DECREE AND A.C.S. CERTIFICATE STUDENTS 
— Students who wish to obtain a master's degree 
or Advanced Graduate Specialist (A.C.S.) Certificate 
must complete a regularapplication foradmission 
to the Graduate School. The deadline for submitting 
an application and all supporting documents is 
May 1 , 1979 for either Summer Session or the fall 
1979 semester. For application materials and a 
Graduate Bulletin, please writeorcall: TheGraduate 
School, University of Maryland, College Park, 
Maryland 20742, (301 ) 454-4006. Do NOT use the 
application in this schedule of classes. Applicants 
are not eligible to register until an offer of admission 
letter is received from the Graduate School. 

(3) ADVANCED SPECIAL STUDENT — The Advanced 
Special Student status is designed to provide an 
opportunity for individuals, who do not have an 
immediate degree objective in mind, to take 
graduate level courses. Students admitted in this 
status are subject to the same instructor consent 
regulations as are other graduate students. A 
detailed statement of regulations governing the 
Advanced Special Student status, from which the 
following material is condensed, may be found in 
The Graduate Catalog. Applicants for admission 
to Advanced Special Student status must satisfy 
at least one of the following criteria : 

(a) Hold a baccalaureate degree from a regionally 
accredited institution with an overall "B" (3.0) 
average; (official transcript required). 

(b) Hold a master's or doctoral degree from a 
regionally accredited institution; (official 
transcript required). 

-(c) Hold a baccalaureate degree from a regionally 
accredited institution and have at least four 
years of successful post-baccalaureate work or 
professional experience. An official transcript 
and letter from the employer(s) are required. 

(d) Achieve a score that places the applicant in the 
upperSO percentile of appropriate national 
standardized aptitude examinations such as the 
Graduate Record Examination AptitudeTest, 
TheMillers Analogies Test, the Graduate 
Management Admissions Test. Official test 
transcripts are required. 

Admission to Advanced Special Student Status will 
be granted by the Dean for Graduate Studies. 



Admission to Advanced Special Student status is not 
intended to be used as a qualifying program tor 
either doctoral or master's programs nor for the 
Advanced Graduate Specialist Certificate program. 
Credits earned while in this status may be applicable 
to a degree or certificate program at a later time only 
with the approval of the faculty in the program if 
the student is subsequently accepted for degree 
or certificate study. 

Admission to a degree program at a later time 
may be considered by presenting an application 
in the standard format to the Graduate School 
with a new application fee. 

To be admitted, complete the Graduate School 
application at the back of this booklet. The 
appropriate documentation, including transcript, 
test scores and/or letters from employer(s), 
must be submitted with the application. The $15.00 
application fee must also accompany the 
application. Do NOT mail the application after 
May4,1979forSessionl;June8,1979forSessionll. 



Or bring it to Campus Registration. TO REGISTER: 

follow the Registration Procedures in this catalog. 

(4) VISITING GRADUATE STUDENT — A graduate 
student matriculated in another graduate school 
may be admitted as a visiting graduate student. 
Complete the Visiting Graduate Student "Summer 
Only" application enclosed at the back of this 
catalog. Transcripts are NOT required. A letter of 
permission from the applicant's graduate dean, 
indicating that the applicant is in good standing, 
must be submitted. Certification that credits earned 
at the College Park Campus will be accepted by the 
parent institution isthe responsibility of the 
applicant. TO REGISTER: follow the Registration 
Procedures in this catalog. 

(5) NATIONAL SCIENCE FOUNDATION INSTITUTE 
STATUS — Application foradmission to an NSF 
Institute should be addressed to the director of the 
NSF Institute. Students already admitted to a regular 
graduate degree or non-degree status may also 
qualify for participation in an NSF Institute. 



^y 



SUMMER 1979 

REGISTRATION PROCEDURES 



There will be three methods of registration for the 
1979 Summer Sessions : A. Walk-in preregistration; 
B. Mail-in preregistration; C. Armory registration. 

Preregistration is offered for Summer Sessions as an 
added convenience for students; however, students may 
choose the method of registration best suited to their 
needs. All instructions are outlined below. 

Students registered at the College Park Campus for the 
Spring 1979 Semester should follow the registration 
procedures outlined below. 



Students who have attended the College Park Campus 
in the past but who were not registered for the Spring 
1979 Semester must read the readmission/reinstatement 
information on page 6 before registering. 

Students who have never attended at the College Park 
Campus must read the admissions information on page 6 
before registering. 

If you are mailing in admissions and registration 
materials, they must be sent with your payment in the 
same envelope. 



A. WALK-IN PREREGISTRATION 



B. MAIL-IN PREREGISTRATION 



C. ARMORY REGISTRATION 



WHO? 


WHO? 


WHO? 


Any student eligible to attend the 


Any student eligible to attend the 


Any student eligible to attend the 


University of Maryland, College 


University of Maryland, College 


University of Maryland, College 


Park Campus except: 


Park Campus except: 


Park Campus. 


1. Students owing an outstand- 


1. Students owing an outstand- 




ing debt to the University; 


ing debt to the University; 




2. Students entitled to financial 


2. Students entitled to financial 




credits such as scholarships, 


credits such as scholarships. 




contracts, workshops. 


contracts, workshops. 




remission of fees, and the 


remission of fees, and the 




like in which case proof of 


like in which case proof of 




financial support is required. 


financial support is required. 





WHEN? 

March 12-May 9 for Session I 
March 12-June 15 for Session 1 1 
9:00a.m. to3:00 p.m. 



WHERE? 

Registrations Counter 

First Floor Lobby 

North Administration Building 



HOW? 

1. Go to the Registrations 
Counter where you will 
receive confirmation of course 
availabilit\'andabill. If 
admission or readmission 
action is necessary, you will 
be referred to the proper 
office. 

2. Takeyourbillto: 

South Administration Building 
Room 1103 

9:00 a.m. to3:00p.m. 
Obtain a copy of your current 
Student Account Receivable 
(SAR Account) and pay this 
amount plus your summer 
school bill at the Cashier's 
Office. 

3. Return to the Registrations 
Counterwith your bill receipt. 
You will then receive your 
course verification and 
SummerlD. 



Walk-in preregistrants must return 
to the Registrations Counter by 
3:00 p.m. of the next working day 
with a bill receipt or course 
registration is NOT COMPLETED. 
Students who do not return with a 
bill receipt and the top (Course 
Request) part of the registration 
form will have requests cancelled. 
The lower part of the registration 
form, verified by the Registrations 
Office, istheONLYofficial prootot 
registration. 



WHEN? 

Must be postmarked from 

March 12-May 4, 1979 

for Session I. 
Must be postmarked from 

March 12-June 8, 1979 

for Session II. 



WHERE? 

All materials should be 

returned to: 

Division of Business Services 
South Administration Building 
University of Maryland 
College Park, MD. 20742 

A return envelope is provided in 

the center of this catalog for your 

convenience. 



HOW? 

1. Complete the Schedule 
Request and Estimated Bill 
Form in the center of this 
catalog for the session you 
wish to attend. DO NOT USE 
ONE FORM FOR BOTH 
SESSIONS. 

2. Return the following in the 
enclosed envelope: 

a. Schedule Request and 
Estimated Bill Form(s) 

b. Admission Application, 
if necessary 

c. Check made payable to 
the University of Maryland. 
Write your social security 
numberon the check. 

3. Confirmation of your 
requested schedule and a 
Summer ID card will be sent 
toyouby mail. If confirmation 
is not received within 2 weeks, 
please call the Office of 
Registrations, 454-5225, for 
immediate assistance. 

4. The Department of Business 
Services will notify you of any 
incorrect payments or 
adjustments to your account, 
such as additional charges, 
refunds, and credits. 

5. Any outstanding debt to the 
University will be deducted 
from payment submitted 
and the remainder applied to 
yoursummerschool charges. 



PLEASE NOTE: Preregistration 
material received by mail will be 
retu rned to the sender if 
information is incomplete, and 
your registration will be voided. 



WHEN? 

Summer Session I 

May21, 1979, 8:30 a.m. 
to5:00p.m. 
Summer Session II 
July 2,1979,8:30 a.m. 
to5:00p.m. 



WHERE? 

Reckord Armory 



HOW? 

1. Report to Reckord Armory 
according to the alphabetical 
schedule printed in this 
catalog on page 4. You will 
receive registration material 
unless your eligibility to 
register is blocked due to an 
outstanding debt to the 
University. 

2. Fill out one Registration 
and Schedule Adjustment 
Form for each transaction 
you wish to make. 

3. To ADD a course: 

a. Go to the department 
table for sectioning. 

b. Take completed add forms, 
Student Data Form, 

and Estimated Bill Form to 
the Business Services Area 
and pay your bill. 

c. Turn in all required 
materials at the Final 
Registration Station and 
pick upyour IDcard. 

d. ExitArmory. 

4. To DROP a course: 

a. Goto the Drop Approval 
Station for verification 
of registration. 

b. Go to the department table 
to delete your name from 
the class roster. 

c. If thiswasyouronly 
transaction, you may exit 
the Armory. 

d. ifyou are dropping ALL 
of your courses, please 
report to North Adminis- 
tration Building, Room 
1130. You must process a 
complete withdrawal and 
receive proper refund 
credit. 



LATE REGISTRATION 

SUMMER SESSION I —A late tee of $20.00 is assessed for 
registration on or after the first day of instruction, May 22. 
Special permission of the dean or division provost 
must be obtained prior to picking up registration materials 
in order to register on or after May 30, 1979. 

SUMMER SESSION II —A late fee of $20.00 is assessed for 
registration after the first day of instruction, July 3. 
Special permission of the dean ordivision provost must 
be obtained priorto picking up registration materials 
in order to register on or after July 11, 1979. 

PROCEDURE: 

1 . Pick up registration materials at the Registration 
Counter, First Floor Lobby, North Administration 
Building, 9:00 a.m. to 4:00 p.m. 

2. Obtain approval of the dean ordivision provost for 
late registration when registering on or after 

May 30 for Summer Session I or July 11 for Session II. 

3. Report to each academic department for sectioning 
into approved courses. 

4. For billing report to South Administration Building, 
Room 1103, 9:00 a.m. to3:30 p.m. If you are paying 
foron-campus housing, have this charge added by 
the Housing Office, North Administration Building, 
3rd Floor, before you pay the bill. 

5. Return to the Registrations Counterto turn in 
materials and complete registration. 

COURSE REGISTRATION IS ONLY COMPLETE AND 
OFFICIALWHENALL FEES ARE PAID ANDALL MATERIALS 
ARE RECEIVED BYTHE REGISTRATIONS OFFICE. 



CANCELLATION OF 

SUMMER SCHOOL REGISTRATION 

Students who register and later decide not to attend the 
University must cancel their registration prior to the first 
day of classes. Failure to cancel registration will result in 
financial obligation to the University even though the 
student does not attend class. Cancellation requests 
must be received in writing. All requests should be sent 
by Registered Mail to: 

OFFICE OF REGISTRATIONS 
WITHDRAWAL OFFICE 
UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 
COLLEGE PARK, MD. 20742 



WITHDRAWAL FROM SUMMER SCHOOL 

Students who wish to terminate their registration on or 
after the first day of classes m ust WITHDRAW. This applies 
to all students regardless of the number of cou rses or 
credits for which they are enrolled. 

1 . Students withdrawaing from a Summer Session must 
complete a Withdrawal Form which may be obtained 
at Room 1130, North Administration Building. 

2. Withdrawal becomes effective on the date the form 
is filed with the Registrations Office. 

3. Registration, Recreation and Health Fees are not 
refundable. 

The chart below indicates the percentage of tuition which 
will be refunded upon withdrawal. 



NONSTANDARD 

DATE COURSE REGISTRATION 

Courses which vary in beginning dates from the starting 
dates for each Summer Session will be available for 
registration at the normal registration period for each 
session. Additionally, registration will be available on the 
first day of each class or an alternate day if requested by 
the department or instructor. 

Courses which vary in length from the regular Summer 
Session will have late registration, schedule adjustment, 
and other dates adjusted proportionally to the length of 
the course. In these instances students are urged to 
contact the department or instructor for information. 

Bills will be prepared for non-standard date courses by the 
Summer Programs Office, Turner Laboratory, Room 2102. 
Students should obtain this bill prior to making payment 
at the Cashier's Office in the South Administration 
Building. 

Grades fornonstandard date courses ending after the 
regular session in which they begin will be posted after 
the regular session grade reports are mailed. Students 
desiring official notification of grades in these courses 
should request an unofficial transcript approximately 
two (2) weeks after the course ends. Instructors of these 
courses will receive information on various deadlines. 
Please check with them in late spring 1979 concerning 
specific questions. 



SUMMER SESSION! 




May22-May29 


70% 


May30-June5 


507o 


June6-June12 


20% 


June13 


00% 


SUMMER SESSION II 




July3-July10_ 


.7a% 


July11-July17 


50% 


July18-July24 


20% 


July 25 


00% 



WITHDRAWAL FROM SUMMER SESSIONS DOES NOT 
AFFECTYOURPREREGISTRATION FOR FALL SEMESTER 
1979 COURSES. 



CHANGE OF ADDRESS PROCEDURE 

Changes in either local mailing address or permanent 
address can be processed AT ANYTIME DURING THE 
SEMESTER IN WHICH THEY OCCUR. Address changes 
are posted to the computer by the Division of Business 
Services. Address Change Forms are available at the 
following places: 

1 . Division of Business Services, Address Unit 
South Administration Building 



10 



Room 1121 or1103 

8:30a.m. to4:15 p.m., Monday-Friday 

2. Registrations Counter 
North Administration Building 
First Floor Lobby 

9:00a.m. -4:00 p.m., Monday-Friday 

3. Deans' or Provosts' Offices 
8:30a.m.-4:30 p.m., Monday-Friday 

4. STAR CENTER 
Student Union 
Room 1122 

9:00 a.m.-4:00 p.m., Monday-Friday 



Since many University communications to students are 
handled through the mail, it is imperative that accurate, 
and up-to-date addresses be maintained throughout the 
enrollment period. During the academic year the local 
addresson file forcurrently registered students will be 
used for all mailings otherthan billings and grade reports. 
Grade reports and bills will be mailed to a student's 
permanent address. The permanent addresson file for 
studentsnotcurrently registered will be used for all 
mailings. 



e,/3 /. 



PROCEDURE SUMMARY FOR REGISTRATION 



ARMORY REGISTRATION 



TRANSACTION 


DATE 


FEES 


PERMISSION 
REQUIRED 


REFUND 


PERMANENT 
RECORD 


Add SSI 
SSII 


May 21 
Iuly2 


tuition per 
credit hour 


department offering 
course 




on record 


Drop SSI 
SSII 


May 21 
Iuly2 


no fee 


department offering 
course 


100% 

(no charge) 


no notatton 


Section Change SSI 
(DropandAdd) SSII 


May 21 
)uly2 


no fee 


department offering 
course 




new section 
on record 



SCHEDULE ADJUSTMENT PERIOD 



TRANSACTION 


DATE 


FEES 


PERMISSION 
REQUIRED 


REFUND 


PERMANENT 
RECORD 


Add SSI 
SSII 


May 22-29 
July 3-10 


tuition per 
credit hour 


department offermg 
course 




on record 


Drop SSI 
SSII 


May 22-29 
July 3-10 


no fee 




70% 

(30% charge) 


no notation 


Section Change SSI 
(DropandAdd) SSII 


May 22-29 
July 3-10 


no fee 


department offering 
course 




new section 
on record 



AFTER SCHEDULE ADJUSTMENT PERIOD 



TRANSACTION 


DATE 


FEES 


PERMISSION 
REQUIRED 


REFUND 


PERMANENT 
RECORD 


Add SSI 
SSII 


May 30 and later 
)uly11 and later 


tuition per credit 
hour plus $2.00 
per add 


department offering course 
and provost or dean 




on record 


Drop SSI 
SSII 


May30-|une15 
|uly11-27 


$2.00 each 




0% 

(100% charge) 


Undergrad. — "W" 
Crad. — no notation 


Section Change SSI 
(Section Change SSII 
Form) 


May 30 and later 
July 11 and later 


$4.00 per 
change 


department offering 
course 




new section 
on record 



NOTE: STUDENTS WHO INTEND TO DROP ALL COURSES FOR WHICH THEY ARE REGISTERED MUST 
PROCESS A WITHDRAWAL FORM. DO NOT USE THE DROP FORM. WITHDRAWAL MAY BE 
ACCOMPLISHED IN ROOM 1130 NORTH ADMINISTRATION BUILDING. 

REGISTRATIONS AND SCHEDULE ADJUSTMENTTRANSACTIONS ARE COMPLETE AND OFFICIAL 
WHEN THE APPROPRIATE FORMS HAVE BEEN TURNED IN TO THE REGISTRATIONS OFFICE. 



11 



DIVISION/COLLEGE/MAjOR 
(COURSE OF STUDY) CHANGES 

UNDERGRADUATE STUDENTS ONLY: 

Division, College, and Major (Course of Study) changes may be made at any time, 
the only restrictions being Board of Regents limitations on enrollment. 

If you wish to initiate a change in your Division, College, and/or Major (Course 
of Study): 

1 . Co to a Division/College office or the Registrations Office, first floor lobby. 
North Administration Building, toobtain the Division/College/Major (Course 
of Study) Change Form. Division/College office locations are listed below. 

2. Complete the information requested on the form. (All necessary information 
ison the form.) 

3. Take the completed form to your new Division if you are changing Divisions 
or to your new College if you are changing Col leges. If you are changing 
Major (Course of Study) only, take completed form to your present Division 
or College. 

GRADUATE STUDENTS ONLY: 

If you wish to change programs or degree objectives, you must submit a new 
application with fee to the Graduate School. Current deadlines for new applications 
apply. 



DIVISION/COLLEGE LOCATIONS 



Division/College 

Agriculture 

Agricultural & Life Sciences 

Allied Health 

Architecture 

Arts& Humanities 

Behavioral & Social Sciences 

Business & Management 

Education 

Engineering 

Human & Community Resources 

Human Ecology 

Journalism 

Library & Information Services 

Mathematical & Physical Sciences 

& Engineering 
Physical Education & Recreation 

& Health 
Undergraduate Studies 



Location 

1122Symons 

mOSymons 

2106 Turner 

1204 Architecture 

1111 Francis Scott Key 

2141 Tydings 

3136Tydings 

1210Education 

1107Engineering 

1120E Francis Scott Key 

4M109McKeldin Library 

4102 Journalism 

1117 Undergraduate Library 

mOMath 

3110 Physical Education, Recreation, 

Health Building 

1115,3151 Undergraduate Library 



Undergraduate Division/College/Major 
(Course of Study) CODES 



DIVISION 



50 - AGRICULTURAL* LIFE SCIENCES 

51 - MATHEMATICAL & PHYSICAL SCIENCES 

ANDENGINEERING 

52 • BEHAVIORAL & SOCIAL SCIENCES 

53 • ARTS AND HUMANITIES 

54 - HUMAN & COMMUNITY RESOURCES 

55 - UNDERGRADUATE STUDIES 

56 - ALLIED HEALTH PROFESSIONS 
56 - NURSING 

56 • PHARMACY 

57 - UNIVERSITY COLLEGE 

58 - GRADUATE SCHOOL 



COLLEGE 

The numbers in parenthese indicate 
the Division for each College. 

00- AGRICULTURE (50| 
03- EDUCATION (54| 
04-ENGINEERING(51) 

05 - GRADUATE SCHOOL (58) 

06 - HUMAN ECOLOGY (54) 
07 -NURSING (56) 

09 • PHYSICAL EDUCATION, RECREATION 

& HEALTH (54) 
10- UNIVERSITY COLLEGE (57) 
11 -PHARMACY (56) 
14 -ARCHITECTURE (53) 
16 - ALLIED HEALTH PROFESSIONS (56) 

19 - INDIVIDUAL STUDIES (55) 

20 - GENERAL STUDIES PROGRAM (55) 

21 -JOURNALISM (53) 

22 - LED (INTENSIVE EDUCATIONAL DEVELOPMENT) (55) 

23 - BUSINESS & MANAGEMENT (52) 

99- NO COLLEGE UNDERGRADUATE (50. 51. 52, 53, 55) 



PRE PROFESSIONAL PROGRAM 

If you wish to be advised in one of these 
pre-professional programs, you must select 
a code for course study in addition to 
indicatinga pre-professional interest. 

001 - Pre-Medicine 

003 - Pre-Law 

004 - Pre-Dent(Slry 

005 - Pre-Theology 



12 



MAJOR (COURSE OF STUDY) 

The numbers in parentheses indicate the 
Division/College for each Course of Study. 

Major 
Code 

05020 
1302A 
09020 
22110 
0899 E 
01110 
01 99 A 
09030 
01010 
01000 
01020 
01030 
03130 
01040 
22020 
02020 
08310 
10030 
10020 
19110 
04140 
04010 
0401 A 
0401 B 
0401 C 
0401 D 
0401 F 
04020 
0501 A 
0501 B 
08380 
2206D 
09060 
19050 
09080 
13058 
15030 
07010 
01151 



Course of Study 

ACCOUNTING (52/23) 

ADVERTISING DESIGN (54/06) 

AEROSPACE ENGINEERING (51/04) 

AFRO-AMERICAN STUDIES (52/99) 

AGRI & EXTENSION EDUC (50/00) 

AGRI & RESOURCE ECON (50/00) 

AGRICULTURAL CHFM (50/00) 

AGRICULTURAL ENGR (50/00) 

AGRICULTURE GENERAL (50/00) 

AGRICULTURE UNDECIDED (50/00) 

AGRONOMY-CROPS (50/00) 

AGRONOMY-SOILS (50/00) 

AMERICAN STUDIES (53/99) 

ANIMAL SCIENCE (50/00) 

ANTHROPOLOGY (52/99) 

ARCHITECTURE (53/14) 

ART EDUCATION (54/03) 

ART HISTORY (53/99) 

ART STUDIO (53/99) 

ASTRONOMY (51/991 

BIOCHEMISTRY (50/99) 

BIOL SCIENCE GENERAL (50/99) 

BIOL SCIENCE-BOTANY (50/99) 

ENTOMOLOGY (50/99) 
MICROBIOLOGY (50/99) 
ZOOLOGY (50/99) 
ANIMAL SCIENCES (50/99) 



01152 



01155 

1304A 
1009A 
1009B 
22090 
2206C 
01050 
10080 
13070 
0803C 
10070 



= BIOLSCIENCE 

= BIOLSCIENCE 

= BIOLSCIENCE 

= BIOLSCIENCE 

= BOTANY (50/99 

= BUSINESS &MGMT GENERAL (52/23) 

= BUSINESS COMMERCE. UC (57/10) 

= BUSINESS EDUCATION (54/03) 

= CARTOGRAPHY (52/99) 

= CHEMICAL ENGINEERING (51/04) 

= CHEMISTRY(50/99) 

= CIVIL ENGINEERING (51/04) 

= COMMUNITY STUDIES (54/06) 

= COMPARATIVE LIT (53/99) 

= COMPUTER SCIENCE (51/99) 

= CONSERVATION & RESOURCE DEV, 

FISH & WILDLIFE MGMT (50/00) 
= CONSERVATION & RESOURCE DEV 

PLANTRESOURCE MGMT (50/00) 
= CONSERVATION & RESOURCE DEV 

PEST MANAGEMENT (50/00) 
= CONSERVATION & RESOURCE DEV 

WATER RESOURCE MGMT (50/00) 
= CONSERVATION & RESOURCE DEV 

RESOURCE MANAGEMENT (50/00) 
= CONSUMER ECONOMICS (54/06) 
= COSTUME DESIGN (54/06) 
= CRAFTS (54/06) 
= CRIMINOLOGY (52/99) 
= CULTURAL GEOGRAPHY (52/99) 
= DAIRY SCIENCE (50/00) 
= DANCE (53/99) 
= DIETETICS (54/06) 
= DISTRIBUTIVE EDUC (54/03) 
= DRAMATIC ART (53/99) 



00100 = DIVISIONOFAGRI&LIFE 

SCIENCES UNDECIDEO(50/99) 
00200 = DIVISION OF MATHEMATICAL & PHYSICAL 

SCIENCES* ENGINEERING 

UNDECIDED (51/99) 
05000 = DIVISION OF BEHAVIORAL 8, SOCIAL 

SCIENCES UNDECIDED (52/99) 
49000 = DIVISIONOFARTS&HUMANITIES 

UNDECIDED (53/99) 
00300 = DIVISION OF HUMAN & COMMUNITY 

RESOURCES UNDECIDED (54/99) 
08230 = EARLY CHILDHOOD EDUC (54/03) 
22040 = ECONOMICS (52/99) 
08010 = EDUCATION GENERAL (54/03) 
0801 A = EDUC UNDESIGNATED (54/03) 
09090 = ELECTRICAL ENGR (51/04) 
08020 = ELEMENTARY EDUC (54/03) 
15010 = ENGLISH (53/99) 
0803D = ENGLISH EDUCATION (54/03) 
09250 = ENGINEERING TECHNOLOGY- 
MECHANICAL (51/04) 
09010 = ENGR UNDESIGNATED BS (51/04) 
04210 = ENTOMOLOGY (50/99) 
1306C = EXPERIMENTAL FOODS (54/06) 
1305A = FAMILY STUDIES (54/06) 
05040 = FINANCE (52/23) 
0999A = FIRE PROTECTION ENGR (51/04) 
1 3060 = FOOD, NUTRITION & INSTITUTION 

ADMINISTRATION (54/06) 
01130 = FOOD SCIENCE (50/00) 
0899B = FOREIGN LANGUAGE EDUC (54/03) 
11020 = FRENCH LANGUAGE SLIT (53/99) 
4901C = GENERAL STUDIES PROGRAM (55/20) 
4901 B = GENERAL STUDIES. UC (57/10) 
22060 = GEOGRAPHY (52/99) 
19140 = GEOLOGY (50/99) 
11030 = GERMANS SLAVIC LANG & LIT (53/99) 
22070 = GOVERNMENT & POLITICS (52/99) 
08370 = HEALTH EDUCATION (54/09) 
12200 = HEARINGS SPEECH SCIENCES (52/99) 
22050 = HISTORY (53/99) 
0803G = HOME ECONOMICS EDUCATION 

(College of Education) (54/03) 
1 3000 = HUMAN ECOLOGY UNDECIDED (54/06) 
01080 = HORTICULTURE (50/00) 
13020 = HOUSING (54/06) 
00001 = I. ED, (INTENSIVE EDUCATIONAL 

DEVELOPMENT) (55/22) 
49020 = INDIVIDUAL STUDIES (55/1 9) 
08398 = INDUSTRIAL ARTS EDUC (54/03) 
0839A = INDUSTRIAL TECHNOLOGY (54/03) 
07020 = INFORMATION SYSTEMS MGMT (52/99) 
1302B = INTERIOR DESIGN (54/06) 
22100 = INTERNATIONAL RELATIONS (52/99) 
06020 = JOURNALISM (53/21) 
08351 = KINESIOLOGICALSCIENCES(54/09) 



11090 
21050 
0899D 
13040 



05090 
17010 
08330 
09100 
04110 
1899A 
10050 
08320 
10060 
1004A 
1306B 
0515A 
15090 
08350 
19010 
19020 
2206B 
01060 
12130 
0114A 
12230 
12030 
12110 
12250 
12120 
1299C 
0599A 
20010 
21030 
11060 
03070 
08340 
0803H 
0899F 
22080 
11050 
08080 
0803 L 
1506A 
06030 
13030 
1303B 
1303C 
05100 
00400 
2206A 

22140 
0839C 
04070 



= LATIN LANGUAGES LIT (53/99) 
= LAWENFORCEMENT(52/99) 
= LIBRARY SCIENCE EDUC (54/03) 
= MANAGEMENT* CONSUMER 

STUDIES (54/06) 
= MANAGEMENT SCIENCE* 

STATISTICS (52/23) 
= MARKETING (52/23) 
= MATHEMATICS (51/99) 
= MATHEMATICS EDUCATION (54/03) 
= MECHANICAL ENGINEERING (51/04) 
= MICROBIOLOGY (50/99) 
= MILITARY SCIENCE, UC (57/10) 
= MUSIC (53/99) 
= MUSIC EDUCATION (54/03) 
= MUSIC HISTORY & LIT (53/99) 
= MUSIC THEORY* COMPOSITION (53/99) 
= NUTRITION (54/06) 

= PERSONNEL* LABOR RELATIONS (52/23) 
= PHILOSOPHY (53/99) 
= PHYSICAL EDUCATION (54/09) 
= PHYSICAL SCIENCE GENERAL (51/99) 
= PHYSICS (51/99) 
= PHYSICAL GEOGRAPHY (52/99) 
= POULTRY SCIENCE (50/00) 
= PRE-DENTAL HYGIENE (56/16) 
= PRE-FORESTRY (50/00) 
= PRE-MEDICALTECHN6lOGY(56/16) 
= PRE-NURSING (56/07) 
= PRE-PHARMACY (56/11) 
= PRE-RADIOLOGIC TECHNOLOGY (56/16) 
= PRE-PHYSICALTHERAPY (56/16) 
= PRE-VETERINAHY (50/00) 
= PRODUCTION MANAGEMENT (52/23) 
= PSYCHOLOGY (52/99) 
= RECREATION (54/09) 
= RUSSIAN (53/99) 
= RUSSIAN AREASTUOIES(53/99) 
= SCIENCE EDUCATION (54/03) 
= SECRETARIAL EDUCATION (54/03) 
= SOCIAL STUDIES EDUC (54/03) 
= SOCIOLOGY (52/99) 
= SPAN & PORT LANG * LIT (53/99) 
= SPECIAL EDUCATION (54/03) 
= SPEECH EDUCATION (54/03) 
= SPEECH COMMUNICATION (53/99) 
= RADIO TV* FILM (53/99) 
= TEXTILES & APPAREL (54/06) 
= TEXTILE MARKETING (54/06) 
= TEXTILE SCIENCE (54/06) 
= TRANSPORTATION (52/23) 
= UNDECIDED UNDERGRADUATE (55/99) 
= URBAN GEOGRAPHY & REGIONAL 

DEVELOPMENT (52/99) 
= URBAN STUDIES (52/99) 
= VOCATIONAL EDUCATION (54/03) 
= ZOOLOGY (50/99) 



GRADUATE PROGRAM CODES 



ADVP = ANIMAL SCIENCES 

AGRO = AGRONOMY 

AMST = AMERICAN STUDIES 

ANSC = ANIMAL SCIENCE 

AREC = AGRICULTURALANDRESOURCEECONOMICS 

ARTS = ART 

ASTR = ASTRONOMY 

BCHM = BIOCHEMISTRY 

BOTN = BOTANY 

BMGT = BUSINESS AND MANAGEMENT 

CHEM = CHEMISTRY 

CMLT = COMPARATIVE LITERATURE 

CMSC = COMPUTER SCIENCE 

CRIM = CRIMINALJUSTICE AND CRIMINOLOGY 

DAIR = DAIRY SCIENCE 

ECON = ECONOMICS 

EDAD = ADMINISTRATION. SUPERVISION AND 

CURRICULUM 

EDCP = COUNSELING AND PERSONNEL SERVICES 

EDEL = EARLY CHILDHOOD-ELEMENTARY EDUCATION 

EDHD = HUMAN DEVELOPMENT EDUCATION 

EDIN = INDUSTRIAL EDUCATION 

EDMS = MEASUREMENT ANDSTATISTICS 

EDSE = SECONDARY EDUCATION 

EDSF = SOCIALFOUNOATIONSOFEDUCATION 

EDSP = SPECIAL EDUCATION 

ENAE = AEROSPACE ENGINEERING 

ENAG = AGRICULTURAL ENGINEERING 

ENCE = CIVIL ENGINEERING 

ENCH = CHEMICAL ENGINEERING 

ENEE = ELECTRICAL ENGINEERING 

ENGL = ENGLISH LANGUAGE AND LITERATURE 

ENMA = ENGINEERING MATERIALS 

ENME = MECHANICAL ENGINEERING 

ENNU = NUCLEAR ENGINEERING 

ENTM = ENTOLOMOGY 

FDSC =FOODSClENCE 

FMCD = FAMILY AND COMMUNITY DEVELOPMENT 



FNIA 


= FOOD. NUTRITION AND INSTITUTIONAL 




ADMINISTRATION 


FRIT 


= FRENCH AND ITALIAN LANGUAGE AND 




LITERATURE 


GEOG 


= GEOGRAPHY 


GERS 


= GERMAN AND SLAVIC LANGUAGE AND 




LITERATURE 


GRAD 


= UNSPECIFIED DEPARTMENT 


GVPT 


= GOVERNMENT AND POLITICS 


HESP 


= HEARING AND SPEECH SCIENCE 


HILS 


= HISTORY/LIBRARY SCIENCE 


HIST 


= HISTORY 


HLTH 


= HEALTH EDUCATION 


HORT 


= HORTICULTURE 


JOUR 


= JOURNALISM 


LBSC 


= LIBRARY ANDINFORMATION SERVICES 


MAPL 


= APPLIED MATHEMATICS 


MATH 


= MATHEMATICS 


METO 


= METEOROLOGY 


MICB 


= MICROBIOLOGY 


MUSC 


= MUSIC 


NUSC 


= NUTRITIONAL SCIENCES 


PHED 


= PHYSICAL EDUCATION 


PHIL 


= PHILOSOPHY 


PHYS 


= PHYSICS 


POUL 


= POULTRY SCIENCE 


PSYC 


= PSYCHOLOGY 


RECR 


= RECREATION 


RLED 


= AGRICULTURAL AND EXTENSION EDUCATION 


SOCY 


= SOCIOLOGY 


SPAP 


= SPANISH AND PORTUGUESE 




LANGUAGE AND LITERATURE 


SPCH 


= COMMUNICATION ARTS AND THEATRE 


STAT 


= STATISTICS 


TXCE 


= TEXTILES AND CONSUMER ECONOMICS 


URBS 


= URBAN STUDIES 


ZOOL 


= ZOOLOGY 



13 




I 



VETERANS BENEFITS 



Students attendingthe University underthe Veteran's 
Education Assistance Act (Title 38, U.S. Code) who 
completed preregistration will be certified on the basis 
of preregistration course requests. This certification 
should be verified by the student at the Registrations 
Office, Room 1130A, North Administration Building, 
9:00 a.m. to4:00 p.m., Monday through Friday. 

ENROLLMENT CERTIFICATION AND VA PAYMENTS 

1. How to compute payments based on enrollment status: 

Undergraduate student enrollment status is based on 
the number of credits for which the student is registered. 
Graduate student enrollment status is based on the 
number of units for which the student is registered. 
Courses taken as "AUDIT" cannot be counted toward 
credit for graduate or undergraduate students. Charges 
are the same for audit and for credit courses. 
TABLE FOR COMPUTING GRADUATE UNITS 

000-399 2 Units per credit 

400-499 4 Units per credit 

500-599 SUnitspercredit 

600-898 6 Units per credit 

799 12 Units per credit 

899 18 Units per credit 



Graduate students will not be certified for any course 
below the 400 level unless it is required by their 
department and a letter stating this is approved by 
Mr. Seidel in the Graduate School and submitted to the 
Veteran's Affairs Office when registering. 

2. Table for payment during each Summer Session.* 

*COURSES WHICH VARY FROM THE REGULAR SIX WEEK 
SESSIONS ARE CALCULATED BY V. A. ACCORDING TO 
LENGTH OF TIME AS WELL AS CREDITS OR UNITS. 

3. Graduate Assistants 

Graduate students who are graduate assistants will be 
certified full time if their assistantship is confirmed in 
writing by the Graduate School and they are taking 12 units 
each summer session. This must be done foreach summer 
session. Please note — the Veterans Administration's 
definition of "full time" for Graduate Assistants differs 
from the University of Maryland definition and should be 
used only for V. A. purposes. 

PROTECTION OF PRIVACY INFORMATION SHEET 

Public law 93-579 entitled the Privacy Act of 1974 requires 
that all claimants be informed of the purposes and uses 
to be made of the information which is solicited. The 
following is furnished to explain the reason why the 
information is requested and the general uses to which 
that information may be put. 

AUTHORITY: The Veterans Administration is empowered 
to solicit the information requested in this form underthe 
authority of Title 38, United States Code. 









Monthly Rates 




Units for 








Each 


Credits for Graduate 








Addn'l 


Undergraduates Students 


Status Single 


1 Dep. 


2 Dep. 


Dep. 


4 or more 24 


Fulltime $311 


$370 


$422 


$26 


3 18 


3/4 time 233 


277 


317 


19 


2 12 


1/2 time 156 


185 


211 


13 


1 6/ 


1/4 time 
TUITION ONLY 








Active Duty/less than Half-time —Tuition and fees, not to exceed $311 for full 








time; 


$233forthree-quartertime; $156 for half 








time or less-than-half but more than one-quarter 








time; 


$78 for quarter-time or less. 









PURPOSE: The information requested by this form is 
considered relevant and necessary to determine maximum 
entitlement to the benefit for which you have applied. 

USES: The information will be used in your best interests 
in determiningeligibilitytothe maximum benefits 
allowable by law. The responses which are submitted may 
be disclosed as permitted by law outside the Veterans 
Administration. 

EFFECTS OF NON-DISCLOSURE: Disclosure of the 



requested information is voluntary. No penalty will be 
imposed for failure to respond. However, the decision 
as to entitlement for the benefit you are claiming must 
then be made on the basis of available evidence of record. 
This may result in adelay in the processingof theclaim, 
payment of less than maximum benefits, orcomplete 
disallowance of your claim. Failure to provide information 
in connection with the benefit currently being sought will 
have no detrimental effect on any other benefit to which 
you are entitled. (From VA Form 20-8739, July 1975). 



14 



VETERANS REPRESENTATIVES 

The Veterans Administration Representative is available 
on campus on a part-time basis to assist veterans, their 
dependants and service personnel with V.A. -related 
questions and problems. You can receive assistance if 
problems occur with vour monthlv educational assistance 
checks as well as other less well-known but available 
benefits. 

The representative is available on a walk-in basis during 
normal office hours in Room 1130A, North Administration 
Building (454-5276). 



ACADEMIC INFORMATION 

The information given below is taken from Academic 
Regulations, a complete statement of which mav be 
found in the Undergraduate and Graduate Catalogs. 



GENERAL UNIVERSITY REQUIREMENTS 

In order to provide educational breadth for ail students, 
there has been established the General University 
Requirements. These requirementsconsist of 30 semester 
hours of credit distributed among the three areas listed 
below. (For an exception to this regulation, see the 
Bachelor of General Studies Program . ) At least 6 hours 
must be taken in each area. At least 9 of the 30 hours 
must be taken at the 300 level or above. None of the 
30 hours may be counted toward published departmental, 
college or divisional requirements for a degree. 

Area A. 6-12 hours elected in the Division of 
Agricultural and Life Sciences; Mathematical and 
Physical Sciencesand Engineering. 

Area B. 6-12 hours in the Divisions of Behavioral and 
Social Sciences; Human and Community Resources. 

Area C. 6-12 hours in the Division of Arts and 
Humanities. 

In meetingthese area requirements, students may 
choose from among an\ undergraduate courses for which 
thev are qualified. Students are urged to consult academic 
advisors for guidance in determining which courses in 
each area best fit individual needs and interests. 

Demonstration of competency in English composition. 
Unless the student has been exempted from English 
composition, at least one course in this subject will be 
required. Exemption is granted if the student earns an 
acceptable SAT \'erbal or English Ad\ anced Placement 
Test score (score announced annuallv), or bv satisfactory 
completion of a similar course at another institution. 
Students taking a course to satisf\ this requirement 
mav apply the credits toward the 30-hour Genera! 
University Requirement but mav not count these credits 
toward the satisfaction of the minimum 6-hour 
requirement in any of the three designated areas. 
Credit for such a course mav be in addition to the 
12-hour maximum in any area. 



StudentswhoenteredtheUniversity prior to June, 1973, 
have the option of completing requirements under the 
former General Education Program rather than the new 
General University Requirements. Each student is 
responsible for making certain that the various categories 
of either set of requirements have been satisfied prior to 
certification for the degree. Assistance and advice may be 
obtained from the academic advisor, the Offices of the 
Dean for Undergraduate Studies, or the Administrative 
Dean for Summer Programs. 



ACADEMIC CREDIT 

The semester hour is the unit of credit. During the 
Summer Session a typical 3 credit hour course meets five 
times a week for six weeks and requires daily preparation. 
Each class period is 80 minutes in length. 

Students who are matriculated as candidates for degrees 
will be given credit toward the appropriate degree for 
satisfactory completion of summer courses. Each student 
is responsible for the determination of applicability of 
courses selected to the degree program and is urged to 
consult an academic advisor. 

All students enrolled for credit will receive an official 
grade for each course. 

Marking System 

1 . The following symbols are used on the student's 
permanent record for all courses in which he or she is 
enrolled after the initial registration and schedule 
adjustment period: A, B, C, D, F, 1, P, S,andW. These 
marks remain as part of the students permanent record 
and may onlv bechanged bvthe original instructor on 
certification, approved bvthe department chairman and 
the dean or provost, that an actual mistakewasmadein 
determiningorrecordingthe grade. 

2. The mark of A denotes excellent mastery of the subject. 
It denotes outstanding scholarship. In computations of 
cumulative or semester averages, a mark of A will be 
assigned a value of 4 qualit\' points per credit hour. 

3. The mark of B denotes good masten,' of the subject. 

It denotes good scholarship. In computation of cumulative 
or semester averages a mark of B w ill be assigned 3 quality 
points per credit hour. 

4. The mark of C denotes acceptable mastery. It denotes 
the usual achievement expected. In computation of 
cumulative or semester averages a mark of C will be 
assigned a value of 2 qualitv points per credit hour. 

5. The markofD denotes borderline understandingof 
the subject. It denotes marginal performance, and it does 
not represent satisfactory progress toward a degree. 

In computations of cumulative or semester averages 
a markofD will be assigned a value of 1 qualitv point 
per credit hour. 

6. The mark of F denotes failure to understand the 
subject. It denotes unsatisfactorv performance. In 
computations of cumulative or semester averages a mark 
of F will be assigned a value of quality points per 
credit hour. 

7. The mark of Pis a student option markequi\alent 

to A, B, C, or D. (See Pass-Fail option below, i The student 
must inform the Office of Registrations of his selection 
of this option bvthe end of the schedule adjustment 



15 



period. In computation of cumulative averages a mark of P 
will not be included. In computation of quality points 
achieved for a semester, a mark of Pwill be assigned 
a value of 2 quality points per credit hour. 

8. The mark of Sis a department option mark which 
may be used to denote satisfactory participation by a 
student in progressing thesis projects, orientation 
courses, practice teaching and the like. In computation 
of cumulative averages a mark of S will not be included. 
In computation of quality points achieved for a semester, 

ji mark of S will be assigned a value of 2 quality points 
per credit hour. 

9. The mark of I is an exceptional mark which is an 
instructor option. It is given only to a student whose work 
in acourse has been qualitatively satisfactory, when, 
because of illness or other circumstances beyond his 
control, he or she has been unable to complete some 
small portionofthe work of the course. In no case will 
the mark I be recorded for a student who has not 
completed the major portion of the work of the course. 
The student will removethel by completing work 
assigned by the instructor; it is the student's responsibility 
to request arrangements for completion of the work. 
The work must be completed by the end of the next 
semester in which the course is again offered and in which 
the student is in attendance atthe College Park Campus; 
otherwise the I becomes terminal (equivalent to W). 
Exceptions to the time period cited above may be granted 
by the student's dean or provost upon the written request 
of the student if circumstances warrant further delay. 

If the instructor is unavailable, the department chairman 
will, upon requestof the student, make appropriate 
arrangements for the student to complete the course 
requirements. It islhe responsibility of the instructor 
or department chairman concerned to return the 
appropriate supplementary grade report to the Office 
of Registrations promptly upon completion of the work. 
The I cannot be removed through re-registration forthe 
course or through the technique of "credit by 
examination." Inanyeventthis mark shall not be used 
in any computations. 

10. The mark of W is used to denote that the student 
withdrew from a course in which he or she was enrolled 
at the end of the schedule adjustment period. This mark 
shall not be used in any computation, but for information 
and completeness is placed on the permanent record by 
the Office of Registrations. The Office of Registrations 
will promptly notify the instructor that the student has 
withdrawn from the course. 

11 . Audit. A student may register to audit a course or 
courses in which space is available. The notation ADD 
will be placed on the transcript for each course audited. 
A notation to the effect that this symbol does not imply 
attendanceoranyothereffort in the course will be 
included on the transcript in the explanation of the 
grading system. 

PASS/FAIL OPTION 

Undergraduate students who have completed 15 or 
more credit hours on the College Park Campus and have 
a cumulative average of at least 2.0 may register on a 
pass/fail basis if the course offers the pass/fail grading 
option. No more than 20 percent of the credits offiered 
toward a degree may be taken on the pass/fail basis. A 



complete statement of regulations concerning the 
pass/fail option is available in the Undergraduate 
Catalog. 

Graduate students may not enroll on a pass/fail basis. 

PROTECTION OF PRIVACY 
UNIVERSITY POLICY ON DISCLOSURE 
OF STUDENT RECORDS 

The University of Maryland ad heres to a policy of 
compliance with the Family Educational Rights and Privacy 
Act (Buckley Amendment). As such, it is the policy of 
the University (1 ) to permit students to inspect their 
education records, (2) to limit disclosure to others of 
personally identifiable information from education 
records without students' prior written consent, and 
(3) to provide students the opportunity to seek correction 
of their education records where appropriate. A complete 
statement of the University policy and procedures is 
contained in the Undergraduate Catalog, 1978-79, 
College Park Campus. 



DEFINITION OF FULL-TIME STATUS 

For those students seeking University certification of 
full-time student status, the following definitions will 
be applied. 

UNDERGRADUATES 

Normally, enrollment in courses totaling six semester 
hours of academic credit will be defined as full-time 
enrollment for one Summer Session. Enrollment for 
six semester hours of academic credit in each of the two 
Summer Sessions will be defined as full-time enrollment 
for the summer. Four semester hours of academic credit 
in each six week session constitutes full-time enrollment 
for Veterans Administration purposes. 

GRADUATES 

Enrollment in academic credits totaling 24 graduate 
units will be defined as full-time enrollment for one 
Summer Session. Enrollment in academic credits totaling 
24 graduate units in each of the two Summer Sessions 
will be defined as full-time enrollment forthe summer. 
Courses in the series: 000-399 

carry 2 units/credit hour 
Courses in the series: 400-499 

carry 4 units/credit hour 
Courses in the series: 500-599 

carry 5 units/credit hour 
Courses in the series: 600-898 

carry 6 units/credit hour 
Research course: 799 carries 

12 units/credit hour 
Research course: 899 carries 
18 units/credit hour 

MAXIMUM LOAD 

Normally, undergraduate students should not enroll for 
more than eight semester hours of academic credit in one 
Summer Session. Normally, graduate students should 
not enroll for more than six semester hours in one Summer 
Session. Variations on these normal maximum loads must 
be approved by the student's advisor and/or major 
department. 



16 



ADVANCED PLACEMENT PROGRAM 

Students entering the University from secondary schools 
nnay obtain advanced placement and college credit on the 
basis of their performance in the College Board Advanced 
Placement examinations. These examinations are normally 
given to eligible high school seniors during the May 
preceding matriculation in college. 

Questions about the program may be addressed to the 
Administrative Dean for Undergraduate Studies. 
Additional information is presented in the consolidated 
catalog. For detailed information about examinations 
and procedures in takingthem, write: 

Director of Advanced Placement Program 
College Entrance Examination Board 
475 Riverside Drive 
New York, New York 10027 

CANDIDATES FOR DECREES 

All students who expect to complete requirements for 
degrees during the summer should make application for 
diplomas during summer registration at the Registrations 
Office, North Administration Building. Such applications 
should be fi led no later than J u ly 1 3 — degrees to be 
awardedasofAugustIS, 1979. While there is no graduation 
ceremony in August, August graduates are invited to 
attend the ceremony held in December. Doctoral 
graduates should notifythe Candidate Office, Room 
1101 B, North Administration Building, if they intend to 
participate in the December ceremonies. 




GOLDEN 
IDENTIFICATION CARD 



Retired residents of Maryland age 60 and older are 
invited to apply for a University of Maryland College 
Park Golden Identification Card. 

The card entitles the holder to free tuition for all University 
of Maryland credit courses, waiver of most fees and access 
to all College Park programs and activities on the same 
basis as all other students. 

Program participants may simply take courses that interest 
them orwork toward agraduate or undergraduate degree. 

A high school diploma is not required for admission to 
undergraduate courses. 

Eligibility for admission to graduate courses varies 
considerably from one area of study to another. In general, 
a bachelor's degree and a superior undergraduate 
academic record in an appropriate field are required. 
However, under some circumstances, appropriate 
training and experience may make up for deficiencies in 
these matters. The Graduate School Admission Office 
will be happy to respond to individual inquiries. 

For information about obtaining a Golden Identification 
Card, contact the Center on Aging at 454-5856. 




RETIRED VOLUNTEER 
SERVICE CORPS 



People who are retired and have career or life experience 
skills which they would like to continue to use can do so 
through the Retired Volunteer Service Corps. By 
volunteering three hours or more a week, talented older 
people can help personalize undergraduate education and 
provide a unique perspective to students at U.M.C. P. 
Volunteer opportunities include career and academic 
advising, tutoring, assisting in a variety of technical 
direct student contact areas — accounting, mapping 
and library; new positions can be arranged upon request. 
For further information call the Retired Volunteer Service 
Corps office at 454-2453. 




LIVING 
ACCOMMODATIONS 



Any student properly registered for Summer Sessions 
is encouraged to consider accommodations in residence 
halls on the College Park Campus. 

Residence halls provide clean, comfortable living 
quarters from the period just before Session I 
registration begins until after final examinations are 
completed for Session II. Residence hallsofferthe 
Summer Sessions student proximity to classes, libraries 
and other academic services on the campus, proximity 
to recreational, social and cultural activities on the 
campus, and independence from daily commuting. 
A full meal service is available at extra cost. 

Residence halls accommodations are sufficient to 
house all Summer Sessions students who apply. 
Application and contract is required. Information and 
required forms may be obtained NOSOONERTHAN 
FEBRUARY 28, 1979 by writing or visiting: 

Information Services 
Department of Resident Life 
3117 North Administration Building 
University of Maryland 
College Park, Maryland 20742 

Accommodations are available for Session I only, for 
Session II only, or for Sessions I and II. A completed 
"Summer Sessions Residence Halls Contract" for 1979 
must be on file with Resident Life before services can be 
provided. The resident is financially responsible for the 
full contracted period, unless release from the obligation 
has been secured. Conditions for such release are 
specified in information made available with the contract. 
Fees for Summer Sessions housing services are: 

Weekly Six Week Session 

Single Occupancy $36.00 $216.00 

Double Occupancy 32.00 192.00 



17 



Although changes in charges ordinarily will be announced 
in advance, the University reserves the right to make such 
changes without prior announcement. 

Fees are payable when the contract is signed and any 
date thereafter through the time services are claimed. 
Fees must be paid in full by the date of registration for 
classes, each session. Housing charges are not indicated 
on the Schedule Request and Estimated Bill Form. Further 
information about fees payment is made available when 
thecontract is signed. 

Summer Sessions accommodations are coeducational 
with men and women housed on separate floors or wings 
of the same building. Most rooms are designed for double 
occupancy. Some single rooms are available and are 
assigned first-come, first-served, based on the date the 
contract is received by Resident Life, not the date of arrival 
to claim services. Students are notified of specific hall 
assignment before registration for classes. Assignments 
are made on a random, chance-distribution basis. 
Residence hail rooms typically are furnished with desks, 
desk chairs, lounge chair, twin beds, mattresses and pads, 
and chest of drawers. Curtains, desk lamps, waste 
baskets and other room accessories, as well as decorations 
and all personal effects, are not furnished. A weekly linen 
rental service is available. 



Julyl 



Sunday 



July2 
July3 



Monday 
Tuesday 



Residents enrolled for both 
sessions may remain in 
residence hall rooms. 
Residence halls open 
Sunday 12 noon for 
residents for Session II 
only toclaim assignments. 

Registration for Session II 
courses. 

First day of classes. 
Room assignments not 
claimed by 12 noon are 
forfeited. 



August 10 Friday 



Last day of classes, 
Session II. Rooms must 
be vacated by 7 p. m . 

NOTE: Accommodations are for the Summer Sessions 
only, and in no way affect eligibility for or 
assignment to residence halls for any academic 
year. Accommodations for fall and spring 
semesters are secured only by recontracting 
at a time each spring semester which is announced 
by Resident Life, or by completing separate 
application and contract procedures required of 
students newtothe residence halls. 



KEY DATES AND ACTIVITIES 

February 28 Wednesday 



May 20 

May 21 
May 22 



Sunday 

Monday 
Tuesday 



June 29 Friday 



June 30- Saturday, 



Contracts forsummer 
housing available from 
Department of Resident 
Life. Early contracting, 
especially for single 
occupancy, is encouraged. 

Residence halls open 
12 noon for Session I 
residents to claim 
assignments. 

Registration for Session I 
courses. 

First dayof classes. Room 
assignments notclaimed 
by 12 noon are forfeited, 
and cancellation charge 
is applied to student's 
account. 

Last day of classes. 
Session I. Residents not 
remainingfor Session II 
must vacate assignments 
byZp.m. 

Session II registrants who 
desire on-campus housing 
before the start of Session 1 1 
classes may be 
accommodated. Separate 
short-term contract in 
advance and after February 
28 is required. 

Summer Sessions break. 



# 



DINING HALL SERVICES 



Meals are available to each resident on a cash line, 
cafeteria-style basis through University Dining Services. 
Meals are served seven days each week, with three meals 
each day except Sunday breakfast. Facilities are in the 
Hill Dining Hall, Ellicott Community Dining Hall and 
Student Union. Further information may be obtained 
from the office of the Director, University Dining 
Service, 454-2901. 




STUDENT HEALTH 



The University Health Center, located on the Campus near 
the Student Union, provides medical service for students 
enrolled for Summer Session courses on the College Park 
Campus. The Health Center is open for routine services 
8:30a.m. -5:30p.m., Monday thru Friday with limited 
services available 24 hours a day. 

For information call X3444 

Appointments X4923 

Mental health service X4925 



18 



® 



DISABLED STUDENT 
SERVICES 



Provisions are available on a limited basis for special 
assistance tor students with physical disabilities. Among the 
services offered are: readers forthe visually handicapped, 
interpreters forthe deaf, special parking permits, etc. 
Advance arrangements are recommended. Contact the 
Disabled Student Services Office in the Counseling Center, 
Room 0126. 

454-5028 (Voice) 

454-5029 (TTY) 



GENERAL INFORMATION 




LIBRARIES 



Libraries of the University are the general library, Theodore 
R. McKeldin Library, the Undergraduate Library, the 
Architecture Library, the Engineering and Physical Sciences 
Library, and the Chemistry Library. The libraries have a 
total book collection of over 1 ,400,000 cataloged volumes 
and currently receive more than 15,200 subscriptions to 
periodicals and newspapers. In addition, the libraries 
contain over 750,000 microtexts, over 200,000 U.S. 
government and United Nations documents, and 
thousands of phonograph records, maps, film strips, 
slides, and technical reports. Bibliographical facilities 
include card catalogs of the British Museum, Bibliotheque 
Nationale, Library of Congress, and trade bibliographies 
of foreign countries. Study carrels in the McKeldin Library 
are available to faculty members and graduate students 
whose study and research require these facilities. Lockers 
are available for assignment to graduate students. Facilities 
for reading microtext materials, for typing, and for 
copying are also provided. Inter-library loan service is 
available. 



RESEARCH FACILITIES 



The research programs at the University derive their 
existence and vigor from a faculty comprised of 
internationally recognized scholars and scientists. It isan 
advantage for undergraduate students to be aware of 




the University's research facilitiesasthey plan their 
program. 

In addition to fine library resources and the usual 
laboratory facilities for undergraduate studies, the 
University has developed outstanding opportunities for 
research in the biological, physical, and social sciences. 
Among the exceptional facilities are the Institute for Child 
Study; the Natural Resources Institute; a Computer 
Science Center; a laboratory for basic behavioral research 
on animals; Van deCraaff accelerators; a training nuclear 
reactor; a full-scale, low-velocity wind tunnel; a psycho- 
pharmacology laboratory; and laboratory models for 
meteorological phenomena. Collaborative arrangements 
with many nearby government agencies permit qualified 
University students and faculty to utilize their research 
facilities. The University owns and operates the world's 
longest radio telescope, located in California. A 160 MeV 
cyclotron for research in nuclear studies is located on the 
College Park Campus. 

Investigation in agriculture is an important aspect of 
University research. University farms total more than 
2,000 acres. Breeding, selection in farm crops, and soil 
research are a part of the program. Work in these areas is 
augmented by X-ray equipment and an electron 
microscope. 



^ UMporium — 

UNIVERSITY BOOKSTORE 



The UMporium, University Bookstore, is located in the 
basement of the Student Union Building. Members of the 
University Community may purchase at reasonable rates 
textbooks, classroom materials, photographic materials, 
and many novelties, notions and gifts. 





MOTOR VEHICLE 
REGISTRATION 



All studentsare required to registertheir motor vehicles 
at the time of registration for classes. A student must bring 
his/her state or District of Columbia motor vehicle 
registration card containing the motor vehicle tag 
number. Parkingstickers for motor vehicles previously 
registered for the 1978-1979 academic year will be honored 
for the 1979 Summer Sessions. For motor vehicles 
operated by new students or non-registered motor 
vehicles operated by continuing students, there will be a 
registration fee of $3.00 which must be paid to the Motor 
Vehicle Administration Office when the vehicle is 
registered. (See Tuition and Fees) Vehicles must be 
registered by the legal operator only. 

For use of students, staff members, and employees, 
several parking lots are provided. Students may park 



19 



AREA RESOURCE MAP 

OTHER AREA RESOURCES 

The College Park Campus is in a region which is 
unusually rich in libraries, research facilities, 
museums, galleries and cultural centers as illustrated 
by the map below. 



Baltimore 



UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND PROFESSIONAL SCHOOLS ^ 
DENTISTRY LAW MEDICINE NURSING 
PHARMACY SOckL WORK 



ao 



^^^^ 



v^^ 



UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND) 
BALTIMORE COUNTY 



^K^:i 



20. 



24. 



«; 



1 34 



38. 



'■ 30. 33. 


— n \irrr"f"" of Maryland 
■TSi^rfE park campus 


1 


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11. 19. 


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40. 



'uNivERsrrv of Maryland . if, 

KATURAl RESOURCES IHSTITUTE ^-^ 




AMERICAN UNIVERSITY 

ARENA STAGE 

ARLINGTON NAT. CEMETERY 

ATOMIC ENERGY COMMISSION 

BALTO./WASH. INTERNATIONAL AIRPORT 

BETHESOA NAT. NAVAL MEDICAL CTR. 

CATHOLIC UNIVERSITY 

CENSUS BUREAU 

CORCORAN GALLERY 

DULLES INTERNATIONAL AIRPORT 

DUMBARTON OAKS 

12. FOLGER SHAKESPEARE LIBRARY 

13. FORTMcHENRY 

14. FREER GALLERY 

15. GEORGETOWN UNIVERSITY 



28. 



16. GEORGE WASHINGTON UNIVERSITY 31. 

17. GOODARD SPACE FLIGHT CTR. 32. 

18. HIRSHHORN GALLERY 33. 

19. HOWARD UNIVERSITY 34. 

20. JOHNS HOPKINS APPLIED PHYSICS LAB. 35. 

21. JOHNS HOPKINS UNIVERSITY 36. 

22. KENNEDY CTR. FOR THE PERFORMING ARTS 37. 

23. LIBRARY OF CONGRESS 38. 

24. NAT. AGRICULTURE LIBRARY 39. 

25. NAT. AIRPORT 40. 

26. NAT. ARCHIVES 41. 

27. NAT. BUREAU OF STANDARDS 42. 

28. NAT. ENVIRONMENTAL SATELLITE CTR. 43. 

29. NAT. GALLERY OF ART 44. 

30. NAT. INSTITUTES OF HEALTH 



NAT. METEOROLOGICAL CTR. 

NAT. ZOOLOGICAL PARK 

NAVAL MEDICAL CTR. 

NAVAL OBSERVATORY 

NAVAL OCEANOGRAPHIC OFFICE 

NAVAL ORDINANCE LAB. 

NAVAL RESEARCH LAB. 

PENTAGON 

SMITHSONIAN INSTITUTION 

SMITHSONIAN ECOLOGICAL CTR. 

U.S. CAPITAL 

U.S. NAVAL ACADEMY 

WALTER REED ARMY MEDICAL CTR. 

WHITE HOUSE 




registered motor vehicles in lots 1 , 2, 3, 4, 7, 8, 9 and 11 . All 
other lots are reserved for faculty and staff members. 
University Regulations forbid the parking of motor 
vehicleson any Campus road orfire lane. These 
regulations are enforced by the University Police. 

Questions regarding Motor Vehicle Registration should 
be directed to the Motor Vehicle Office from 9:00 to 3:30, 
Monday through Friday, or by telephone on X4242or 
X4243. 



REMISSION OF FEES 
FOR FACULTY AND STAFF 



Under certain conditions members of the faculty and 
classifiedstaff may register for a specified number of 
credits vi'ith remission of fees. Policy governing remission 
of fees during summer is contained in Administrative 
Procedure No. 2 and in the Classified Staff Handbook. 
Foreach Summer Session during which remission of fees 
is being requested by faculty and staff who are to be on 
the Summer Programs payroll an approved Authorization 
for Remission of Fees form must be turned in to the 
Summer Programs Office. At the bottom of the form, the 
authorizing department should indicate the course to be 
taken. The faculty/staff member should check with the 
respective department to ascertain that the proper forms 
have been submitted for each Summer Session. Forms 
should be submitted at the same time the payroll entry is 
submitted. If submitted after May 25, 1979, for Session I, or 
July6, 1979, for Session 1 1, fee remission will be allowed 
only on a pro rata basis. 



SPECIAL PROGRAMS 




WORKSHOPS, INSTITUTES 

AND 

OTHER SPECIAL OFFERINGS 



During the summer months the Summer Sessions offer 
a numberof special programs of interest to both students 
and professional audiences. These programs sometimes 
differ from traditional courses in instructional format and 
frequently induration. In manycases scheduling is 
different from the dates of the standard academic 
sessions. Many of the special courses and workshops 
provide the option of registering either for credit or on a 
non-credit, non-matriculated basis. Unless noted other- 
wise, admission procedures for credit registrations are 
the same as those for standard courses. Special arrange- 
ments for registration will be provided for certain 
workshops, detailsof which may be obtained from 
program directors. The standard tuition and fee schedule 




applies for all credit registrations except that University 
Health Services are not provided for students registered 
in courses offered away from the College Park Campus, 
in which case the Student Health Fee is not charged. 
Reference to additional or alternative fees may be found 
under individual listings. Special non-credit fees apply 
only where specifically quoted. Registrations based upon 
these fees are available only to non-matriculated students 
and provideneithercredit nor transcripts of attendance. 
The descriptions below are intended to indicate the 
general content only. For more detailed information, 
please contact the program director. 



THE MARYLAND SUMMER 
INSTITUTE FORTHE CREATIVE 
AND PERFORMING ARTS 



George Moquin, Executive Director 

In connection with the Summer Entertainment Seriesand 
in cooperation with the Departments of Art, Dance, 
Drama and Music, the Institutewill sponsor visiting artists 
in an exciting series of seminars and master classes open to 
students, professionals and the general public. 

May 23- JENNIFER MULLERANDTHE WORKS. 

June 5 See below. 

May 30 A master class with the renowned violinist, 

RUGCIERORICCI, who is celebrating his 
fifty-first year on the international concert 
stage. 

June 6- LARLUBOVITCH DANCE COMPANY. 

June 19 See below. 

June 13 A masterclass under the celebrated mime, 

ZWI KANAR. Born in Poland and now 
residing in Belgium, Mr. Kanar studied 
under Decroux and Marcel Marceau. He 
has achieved an international reputation 
as a foremost artist of mime. 

June 27 A unique opportunity to haveawork 

session with the outstanding and articulate 
jazz pianist, BILLYTAYLOR. 

July 11 A master class with one of the greatest 

cello soloistsof ourtime. NATHANIEL 
ROSEN, Cold Medal winner of the 1978 
Tchaikovsky Competition. 

July 18 The distinguished Leading Bass of the 

Metropolitan Opera Company, PAUL 
PLISHKA, will discuss important aspects of 
operatic performance and offer coaching 
to several performers. 

July 25 An exciting master class by the team of 

HERBERT COOPERand BILL CROFUT, 
who have combined to produce an 
outstanding presentation of Folk and 
Baroque music. Mr. Cooper will discuss 
and demonstrate various aspects of 
Baroque accompaniment performance 
practices. Mr. Crofutwill offer guidance 
and performance in folk music. 



21 



August 1 A master class on Baroque vocal 

performance practices by the renowned 
tenor, CHARLES BRESSLER, who isa 
specialist in Baroque music. 

These classes are offered on a non-credit basis. Persons 
who wish to perform should contact Mr. George Moquin, 
Office of Summer Programs (454-5910). Admission fee for 
any student, faculty or staff member from an educational 
institution is $5.00 with proper identification. All others, 
$10.00 per session. Tickets may be purchased in advance 
through the Tawes Theatre Box Office (454-2201 ). The 
remainder of the limited seating will be sold on a first 
come, first served basis. All classes will be held in the Tawes 
Building at 10:00 A.M. Each session will be at least two 
hours in length. 

In addition, the Institute is pleased to announce a show 
of the paintingsof the distinguished artist, GRACE 
HARTIGAN, who will be Artist In Residence in the 
Department of Art, July 3 through August 10, 1979, 
University of Maryland Art Gallery, Art-Sociology 
Building, hours to be announced. Admission is free and 
open to the public. In addition, Ms. Hartigan will present 
two public slide lectures in the Lecture Hall, Room 2203, 
Art-Sociology Building. On Thursday, July 12 at 8:00 P.M. 
hertopicwill be "Abstract Expressionism"; on Thursday, 
July26at8:00P.M. Ms. Hartigan will lecture on herown 
works. Admission is by free ticket, obtainable at the Tawes 
Theatre Box Office (454-2201 ). 



UNIVERSITV CHORUS 
1979 SUMMER SEASON 



Paul Traver, Director 

Join the Chorus and sing some of the world's great choral 
literature. Music Director, Paul Traver, has planned an 
exciting season, with rehearsals and performances 
scheduled through both summer sessions, focusing 
special emphasis on music of the Baroque period. 
Membersof the Chorus will take part in the International 
Handel Festival in Halle, East Germany, June 8-12. The 
entire group will constitute the Chorus In Residence for 
the Institute for Baroque Performance Practices, featuring 
faculty, distinguished guest artists, and scholars on 
Campus, July 16 to August 3. In addition, the Chorus is 
planning performances to be presented at the Wolf Trap 
Performing Arts Center. 




@ 



DIVISION OF AGRICULTURE 
AND LIFE SCIENCES 



BIOL 386, 387, PRE-MEDICAL INTERNSHIP, 6 CREDITS, 
SESSIONS I AND II. ARRANGED. BY PERMISSION ONLY. 

Staff 

The pre-medical student often lacks a clear conception of 



the real nature of clinical and professional laboratory 
work. The internship, which includes summer placement 
in supervised hospital work, provides an exciting 
opportunity to gain this valuable experience during early 
training and affords an excellent opportunity for the 
student to evaluate both aptitude and emotional response 
to the experience. 

CEOL 490, GEOLOGY FIELD CAMP, 6 CREDITS, SESSION 
I. ARRANGED. REGISTRATION ONLY BY PERMISSION 
OF DEPARTMENTCHAIRMAN. PREREQUISITES: GEOL 
422, 431 AND 441 OR CONSENT OFTHE INSTRUCTOR. 

Charles Onasch 

The summer Geology Field Camp is based at Frostburg, 
Maryland, and provides six weeks of summer field training 
prior to the senior year. The work involves procedures of 
sampling, measuring, mappingand reporting of geologic 
data. There will be numerous field trips into different areas 
ofWestern Maryland which provides a wide variety of 
fascinatingterrains. Special living expense and service fee 
in addition to tuition: $300.00. 

RLED 487, 497, CONSERVATION OF NATURAL 
RESOURCES, 6CREDITS, SESSION II. ARRANGED. 

John Wheatley 

This workshop, designed primarily for elementary 
teachers, is devoted to the study of Maryland's basic 
wealth, its natural resources. The course is field based, 
with several two and three day trips involving overnight 
visits to study the natural regions of the state. Resource 
problems, practices and programs are emphasized. 
Registration is required for both RLED 487 and 497 and is 
limited to 25 students. Special travel fee in addition to 
tuition: $40.00. 



DIVISION OF ARTS 
AND HUMANITIES 



COLLEGE OF JOURNALISM 

FOURTH ANNUAL UNIVERSITY OFMARYLAND 
SCHOOL PRESS WORKSHOP, JUNE25-JULY 13. 
MTWTHF, 9:30-12:00/1:30-3:00 

Barbara Hines 

Forthe fourth year the College will provide a three-week 
intensive program in publishing a high school newspaper- 
news magazine. The program, featuring nationally known 
journalists and educators, focusesonnewswriting, inter- 
viewing, sports reporting, editorials, features, censorship 
and libel, headlines, copy editing, layout and typography, 
advertising, and much more. Educational field trips to 
Washington area media organizations are arranged. 
Special fee: $110.00. Room and board may be arranged at 
extra charge. For further information and application, 
write to Mrs. Barbara Hines, Assistant Dean, College of 
Journalism, Universityof Maryland, College Park, 
Maryland 20742. 




22 



FOURTH ANNUAL YEARBOOK SHORT COURSE, 
JUNE25-28. M, 1 :00-4:00; TW, 10:00-4:00: TH, 10:00-1 :00. 

Barbara Nines 

High School yearbook editors and reporters have the 
opportunity to plan their 1979-80 school yearbook at the 
annual four-day yearbook workshop. Lecturers include 
such nationally known yearbook experts as Dr. Regis L. 
Boyle, Col. Charles Savedge, and Mr. William Lawbaugh. 
Lectures and work sessions will be held on budget and 
finance, ad\ertising, theme, content, copv-writing, 
photography, contemporary design, graphics, co\ ers, 
and staff organization. Special fee: S30.00. Room and 
board may be arranged at extra charge. For further 
information and application, write to Mrs. Barbara Nines, 
Assistant Dean, College of journalism. University of 
Maryland, College Park, Maryland 20742. 



ARTIST IN RESIDENCE 

Summer Programs, in cooperationwith the Department 
of Art, is pleased to announce that the distinguished artist, 
GRACE HARTIGAN, has graciously accepted an invitation 
to join the summer faculty as Artist In Residence, )uly 3 
through August 10. Ms. Hartigan will offer a generous and 
exciting program including a continuous double studio 
environment combining painting and drawing: one for 
students requiring super\'ision and the other for advanced 
students capable of working on independent projects and 
special problems in painting; aweekly seminar for all 
students in both groups on aesthetic problems of the 
Twentieth Centurv, featuring such topics as poetrv and 
painting, color theorv, feminism in painting and in an 
artistic career, and a student-de\ ised session ; individual 
professional counseling, advice on dealer relationships, 
museum shows, and other professional problems. GRACE 
HARTIGAN is a leading abstract expressionist painter. A 
prominent member of the New York School since the 
1950's, she has been a major painter in her exploration 
of the potential for color, in her synthesis of figurative 
and abstract elements, and in her use of historic and 
prehistoric techniques and conceptions of painting. Of 
international status as a painter, GRACE HARTIGAN is 
renowned, also, as a teacher with an impressive record of 
importantworkshops and seminars. Special fee: S300.00. 
Academic credit and campus accommodations available 
at extra charge. For details contact Patricia Grim, Office of 
Summer Programs, Universityof Maryland, College Park, 
Maryland 20742, telephone : (301 ) 454-3347. 



THE SUMMER DANCE 
WORKSHOP 

Summer Programs, in cooperation with the Department 
of Dance, and with assistance from the National 
Endowment for the Arts, is pleased to announce a special 
Summer Dance Workshop featuring two internationally 
acclaimed dance companies in residence. JENNIFER 
MULLER AND THE WORKS, May 23 through June 5; and 
the LAR LUBOVITCH DANCE COMPANY, June 6 through 
June 19. These residencies will be the only combined 
performance-teaching appearances of these artists and 
their fine companies this year. Ms. Muller will stress 
performance, interpretation of material, phrasing. 




moti\ation and projection. Mr. Lubovitch will tocus upon 
choreography, form, structure and dramatic intent. Both 
residencies will culminate in student concerts including 
the results of repertory classes and new works by both 
faculty and students. In addition, each company will be 
presented in full concert in TawesTheatre. Enrollment for 
each residency is limited to 25 students pei class. 
Application may be for either or both two-week periods. 
Special fee for each two-week period : $200.00. Academic 
credit and campus living accommodations are available at 
extra charge. For details, contact Patricia Grim, Office of 
Summer Programs, Universityof Maryland, College Park, 
Maryland 20742, telephone: (301 ) 454-3347. 



THE SELF-INSTRUCTION 
LANGUAGE PROGRAM 



FOLA 158G159C, MODERN GREEK; 158E, ITALIAN; 
158F/159F, POLISH; 158G'159G, RUSSIAN; 1581/1591, 
SWEDISH. 3-6CREDITS.MAY21-JULY13. ARRANGED. 
RECISTR^-^TION ONLY BY PERMISSION OFTHE 
DIRECTOR. 

William MacBain 

Assisted by a grant from the National Endowment for the 
Humanities, Summer Programs is pleased to announce an 
exciting self-instruction program in languages. This 
program permits the student to proceed on a self-paced 
basis assisted bv the availability ot excellent materials 
which will be at the student's disposal in the Language 
Media Center. Coachingassistancewill be available and, 
in each case, the accomplishment will be evaluated by 
outside examiners. Enrollment foreach language will 
necessarily be limited. Therefore, students are urged to 
obtain permission of the Director to preregister as early 
as possible. Applicants wishing more detail or interested 
in the study of other languages through the Self- 
Instruction Program should contact Dr. William MacBain, 
Department of French (454-4303). 

HIST 319, SPECIALTOPICS IN HISTORY: FROM BALLADS 
TO BIG TIME, A HISTORY OF COUNTRY MUSIC, 3 
CREDITS, SESSION I. TTH, 1 :00-4:00. 

James Cobb 

This unique course presents a history of country music 
in its social context; traces the tolk origins to the widely 
accepted commercialized art form or today, with 
emphasison the impact ot modern technological 
innovations and the effect of dramatic events such as the 
great Depression and the world wars, urbanization, 
industrialization, and social movements like women's 
liberation. Attention is required not only to the 
interaction of southern provencialism with the shifting 
preferences ot mass society, but also to phenomena like 
the simultaneous popularitv' or traditional mountain and 
bluegrass music with both the middle class and counter- 
culture : and, to the question of how a music that once 
exoked a \ ision of unsavor\' characters as in the writing 
of Erskine Caldwell came instead to inspire a portrait of 



23 



Jefferson's "salt of the earth" agrarian hero. The class will 
enjoy recorded and live performances and the 
contributionsofanumberofcountry music specialists 
in the Washington area. 

MUSC.346,JAZZTHEORYAND IMPROVISATION I, 
3 CREDITS, SESSION II. MTW, 7:00-10:00 P.M. 

George Ross 

Part of an expanding new curriculum, this course offers 
qualified music students an exciting opportunity to 
explore development of a jazz improvisatory style with an 
outstandingjazz musician and composer. For details, 
contact Dr. George Ross, Department of Music, 
(301)454-2501. 

MUSC 448, FLUTE MASTERCLASS, JUNE 17-29. 
7:00-10:00 P.M. AND ARRANGED. 

William Montgomery 

Conducted by one of the outstanding flutists in the 
country, this master class will be devoted to technique, 
literature and interpretation of the major flute solo and 
ensemble repertoire. Classes will meet each weekday 
evening and each week will conclude with a recital by the 
participants. A maximum of 20 flutists will be selected 
through either personal ortaped audition to participate. 
Each will perform in two masterclass sessions and one 
recital, participate in the requisite rehearsals with the 
accompanist, and have the opportunity to work in several 
flute ensembles. Auditors are invited to register and may 
attend all master classes, ensemble and coaching sessions, 
and class performances. Available on a non-credit basis. 
Special workshop fee: Performers, $50.00; Auditors, 
$40.00. Two credits available at additional tuition charge. 
For details, contact Professor William Montgomery, 
Department of Music, (301 ) 45^-2501 . 

MUSC 448 A/699A, VOCAL ARTS OFTHE BAROQUE, 
3CREDITS,JULY16-AUGUST3.MTWTHF, 1:00-4:00 AND 
ARRANGED. 

James McDonald 

The Department of Music is pleased to present a special 
workshop program on the vocal arts of the Baroque. The 
program will offer a concentrated study of major 
segments of Baroque vocal music. The first week will be 
devoted to a study of selected works by Monteverdi and 
othercomposersof the early Italian Baroque; the second 
to compositions of Schutz and Teleman; and the third to 
Bach and Handel. An outstanding staff of Maryland faculty 
will be joined byadistinguished group of visiting 
specialists on the Baroque including both performing 
artists and musicologists. The University Chorus and 
Chamber Singers, underthe direction of Dr. Paul Traver, 
will be in residence for the workshop, and a numberof 
special performances will be featured. These will include a 
performance of Handel's "Acis and Galatea" by the New 
York Chamber Players, a performance of a new edition of 
Handel's "Esther", which will be performed by the 
University Chorus and members of the faculty as soloists 
at the Handel Festival at Halle, and recitals by a number 
of faculty and visiting artists. Special non-matriculant fee: 
$100.00. Individual coaching will be available at a special 
fee of $40.00. Arrangements must be completed in 



advance. Academic credit and campus accommodations 
are available at extra charge. For details, contact Patricia 
Grim, Office of Summer Programs, (301) 454-3347. 

MUED499A, DEVELOPING MUSICIANSHIPAND 
LITERACY THROUGH PERFORMANCE: BEGINNING 
TOMETICS, 2 CREDITS, JULY 9-13. MTWTHF, 9:30-12:30/ 
1:30-4:30. 

Roger Folstrom 

This workshop presents the relatively new philosophy and 
methodologyof teaching and learning skills of reading 
music. The workshop will consist of lectures and 
demonstrations by the faculty and visiting specialists, 
intensive skill development for specialists in various areas, 
and individualized projects. Special fee for non-credit, 
non-University registrants: $100.00. 

MUED499B, STRATEGIES AND MATERIALS FOR 
DEVELOPING MUSICIANSHIP: ADVANCEDTOMETICS, 
2 CREDITS, JULY16-20. MTWTHF, 9:30-12:30/1:30-4:30. 

Roger Folstrom 

This workshop will provide advanced preparation in the 
methodology of Tometics and will explore developmental 
learning implications of the system. Special fee for non- 
credit, non-University registrants: $100.00. 

PHIL209, SCIENCE AND SOCIETY, 3 CREDITS, SESSION II. 
MTWTHF, 9:30 A.M. 

Stephen Stich 

The Department of Philosophy is pleased to announce the 
appointment of Professor Stich to the faculty. Professor 
Stich, who will introduce this course, has been a Fulbright 
Scholar at the University of Bristol, England, during the 
1978-79 year. He is an authority and co-editor of a forth- 
coming book concerning the current debate about DNA 
research. 

This course has no prerequisite and is intended for a 
general audience. It will examine issues concerning the 
place of science in the larger society: the possibility of 
democratic decision-making when there is a need for 
technical expertise; the appropriate roles for the scientific 
community, the public, and elected officials in disputes 
about scientific research — aboutwhat should be pursued, 
who should pay for it, and where the control should be; 
the protection of human subjects in biomedical research; 
and how to assess the social impact of technical develop- 
ments such as nuclear power and supersonic trans- 
portation. Particular attention will be devoted to the 
public debate surrounding research in recombinatory 
genetics. 



(D 



DIVISION OF BEHAVIORAL AND 
SOCIAL SCIENCES 



AASP 298M, THE BLACK STUDENT MOVEMENT IN 
AMERICA, 3 CREDITS, SESSION I. MTWTHF, 9:30. 

Roosevelt Williams 

A study of the origins and development of the black 
student movement in America. An examination of the 



24 



problems of the black student, especially the college 
student, and responses to these problems. Of special 
concern will be the history of black student activism and 
protest and linkages between various black student 
movements. 

ANTH 298, SPECIALTOPiCS IN ANTHROPOLOGY: 
ETHNOGRAPHYOF AMERICAN SOCIETY, 3CREDITS, 
SESSION I. MTWTHF, 11 :00-12:20. 

Aubrey Williams 

This course will explore the intellectual heritage of the 
U.S.A. including the first settlements, colonial period and 
development as an industrial nation. The contemporary 
period will include analysisof the cultural mainsprings 
and the cultural behavior in such social groups as the 
family, church, temple, cults, V.F.W., American Legion, 
police, sororities, fraternities, and behavior attached to 
courtship, dating, and bi-sexual and uni-sexual group 
living and inter-ethnic social interaction. Each studentwill 
locate, study and report on a small segment of the U.S.A. 
society as part of the course. 

ANTH 298A, ARCHAEOASTRONOMY, 3 CREDITS, 
SESSION II, MTWTHF, 12:30-1 :50. 

John Carlson 

"Archaeoastronomy" is a new and rapidly growing field 
of interdisciplinary research into the astronomical 
practices, celestial lore, and world views of ancient and 
vanishing peoples largely from the examination of the 
"unwritten" archaeological record. The methodologies 
and results from Astronomy, Anthropology, Archaeology 
and other disciplines are combined to explore the 
astronomical implications of such ancient ruins as 
Stonehenge, Maya temples, Angkorian cities, and the 
Pyramids of Egypt. Particular attention will be paid to the 
civilizationsof the New World, Megalithic Europe and the 
Far East with some discussion of several of the so-called 
"pseudosciences" such as astrology, ancient astronauts 
and Velikovsky's "Worlds in Collision." Perspectives from 
the past are sought for the better understanding of the 
interaction of modern man with his rapidly-expanding 
environment. This unique course is designed for general 
undergraduate studies and requires no specialized 
background or prerequisites. 

ANTH 499, SUMMER FIELD SCHOOL IN HISTORIC 
ARCHEOLOGY, 6 CREDITS, JUNE 4-29. MTWTHF, 9:00- 
5:00. REGISTRATION BY PERMISSION OF INSTRUCTOR 
ONLY. 

Ann Palkovich 

In cooperation with the Archeological Program of the City 
of Alexandria, Virginia, students will have the opportunity 
to work with an on-going archeological research 
program. The lifestyles and social dynamics of various 
neighborhood communitieswill be examined through 
excavations of discarded materials from 19th century 
Alexandria. Each studentwill actively participate in 
learning excavation techniques, recording of field 
observations, use of surveying equipment, mapping 
techniques, and the like. In addition, students will be 
, introduced to the use of historic documents as 
complementary information to historic archeological 
remains. Students will thus be actively contributing to 



anthropological research reconstructing past cultural 
behavior. 



WORLD ORDER STUDIES ABROAD, ASIA — 1979. 

REGISTRATION ONLY BY PERMISSION OFTHE 
INSTRUCTOR. STUDENTS MUST REGISTER 
SIMULTANEOUSLY FOR: 



GVPT388C/858, SELECTED TOPICS IN AREA PROBLEMS IN 
INTERNATIONAL RELATIONS, 3 CREDITS. SEE 
DESCRIPTION BELOW FOR DATES. 



GVPT 399C/887, SEMINAR IN THE POLITICS OF 
DEVELOPING NATIONS, 3 CREDITS. SEE DESCRIPTION 
BELOW FOR DATES. 

Dennis Pirages 

This special summer program will consist of one week of 
intensive preparation on the College Park campus and 
threeweeksof field study in five Asian countries, 
tentatively the People's Republic of China, Indonesia, 
Malaysia, Singapore and Thailand. Topics include the 
economic, social and political problems of the countries 
to be visited related to the international politics of 
technology and resources. Programs will be offered in 
selected Asian countries. A total of six credits may be 
earned for participation in the pre-departure orientation 
seminars, the study tour itself, and for completion of an 
approved project. The program, which is open to both 
undergraduate and graduate students, will be limited to 
30 students. Pendingcompletion of travel and study 
arrangements, tentative dates of the program are June 20 
through July 28. Additional information on curriculum, 
specific dates and costs can be obtained by contacting 
Professor Dennis Pirages, Department of Government 
and Politics, (301)454-4211 or 454-6753. 



GVPT 828, SELECTED PROBLEMS IN POLITICAL 
BEHAVIOR: INTRODUCTION TO DATA MANAGEMENT, 
3 CREDITS, SESSION I. TTH, 7:00-10:00 P.M. 

Warren Phillips 

A summer workshop in data collection and preparation 
for analysis is being offered by the Department of 
Government and Politics and the Divisional 
Computational Laboratory. Students will learn how to 
collect data tor their own research, how to utilize 
existing data sets and how to prepare data for analysis. 
Emphasis will be placed on the preparation of data for 
statistical analysis using SPSS. 



HESP639, SPECIALTOPICS IN HEARING AND SPEECH 
SCIENCES: IMPEDANCE, 3CREDITS, SESSION I. 
SCHEDULETO BE ARRANGED. 

Staff 

A state of the art/science consideration of middle ear 
fimction under normal and pathological states with focus 
on the use of impedance measurements for the assess- 
ment of middle ear function. Research pertinent to the 
clinical application of impedance measurement in the 
professional practiceotaudiology will be highlighted. 



25 



HESP878, SEMINAR IN LANGUAGE DISORDERS, 
3 CREDITS/NON-CREDIT (OPTIONAL), SESSION I. 
SCHEDULETO BE ARRANGED. 

Staff 

This seminar will consider language disorders in severely 
handicapped communicatively disordered children. 
The seminar will present a state of the art/science 
perspective and will feature a distinguished group of guest 
lecturers. The clinical management of the severely 
handicapped language disordered child will be 
highlighted. 

LENF220, INVESTIGATION IN LAW ENFORCEMENT, 
3 CREDITS, SESSIONS I AND II. MW, 4:00-7:00. 

Staff 

This course will deal with traditional and innovative 
techniques in criminal investigation. Special attention will 
be given to the investigation of major felony offenses, 
such as homicide, rape, robbery, and burglary. 
Demonstrations and practical exercises in the new 
Criminal Investigation Laboratory of the Institute of 
Criminal Justice and Criminology will supplement the 
classroom presentations. 

LENF498B,SELECTEDTOPICSINCRIMINALJUSTICE: 
PSYCHOLOGICALASPECTSOFCRIME CONTROL, 
3 CREDITS, SESSION II. MTWTHF, 11 :00. 

Douglas McKenzie 

This course will focus on the role of psychology in : 
(1 ) law enforcement agencies, such as training police in 
family crisis intervention and diversion from the juvenile 
justice system; (2) judicial and legal agencies, such as bail 
reform and the public defender agency; (3) treatment and 
rehabilitation, such as the social climate in prison and 
behavioral intervention strategies; (4) legal and ethical 
issues, such as psychosurgery, behavior modification, 
and the role of mental health in criminal behavior. 



DIVISION OF HUMAN AND 
COMMUNITY RESOURCES 



COLLOQUIA ON PLANS FOR HIGHER EDUCATION 

In connection with the following two courses, the College 
of Education is pleased to announce a series of colloquia 
devoted to study of the Maryland State Plan for Higher 
Education which has implications for all institutions of 
higher education in the state. Guest speakers, drawn from 
government agencies and a broad spectrum of institutions 
of higher education, will address topics of concern to 
both courses. Time to be announced. 

EDAD 602, THE JUNIORCOLLEGE, 3 CREDITS, SESSION 
I.MW,4:00. 

Roger Kelsey 

EDAD 803, ORGANIZATION AND ADMINISTRATION OF 
HIGHER EDUCATION, 3 CREDITS, SESSION I. TUTH, 
4:00. 

Roger Kelsey 




EDCP499L, FAMILY IN THE REHABILITATION PROCESS. 

2 SEGMENTS: FIRST, JUNE11-15; SECOND, JUNE18-22. 
1 CREDIT, EACH SESSION. MONDAYTHROUGH 
FRIDAY,4:00-7:00. SECOND SEGMENT OF THIS 
WORKSHOPWILL BE HELD ATTHE MARYLAND 
REHABILITATION CENTER, BALTIMORE, MARYLAND. 

Paul Power 

This workshop will provide the counselor and related 
allied health/helping professionals with boththe 
knowledge and skills to utilize effectively the family in the 
rehabilitation of their disabled child or adult. Critical 
issues will beexamined and students will be given an 
opportunity to develop a timely family intervention 
model for appropriate use in their work situation. Guest 
lecturers will address the group on various aspects of the 
subject. 

EDCP771 , THE COLLEGE STUDENT, 3 CREDITS, SESSION 
I. TUTH, 3:30-6:15. CONCURRENT REGISTRATION IN 
EDCP789K IS REQUIRED. 

Lee Knefelkamp 

EDCP789K, UNIVERSITY ENVIRONMENT ASSESSMENT, 

3 CREDITS, SESSION I. TUTH, 7:00-9:45. CONCURRENT 
REGISTRATION IN EDCP771 IS REQUIRED. 

Lee Knefelkamp 

This unique course combination has been developed to 
provide highereducation faculty, administrators, and 
student personnel specialists with an overview of college 
student development theories and their use in assessing 
university environments and individual students. The 
course offerings will focus on the pragmatic use of student 
development theories in needs assessment, program 
design and evaluation, and accountability. 

EDEL488A, CREATIVE SCIENCE ACTIVITIES FOR EARLY 
CHILDHOODAND ELEMENTARY EDUCATION, 
3 CREDITS, SESSION I. MW, 4:15-7:00. 

George Eley 

This course stresses creative use of activities and materials 
to teach science. A variety of new formats for science 
learning activities are incorporated in the course as well as 
the use of school and community resources. 

EDEL488l7788L,COLLOQUIUM IN EARLY CHILDHOOD 
EDUCATION: EARLY CHILDHOOD EDUCATION IN 
OTHERCOUNTRIES, 3 CREDITS, SESSION II. MW, 7:00- 
10:00 P.M. 

Marilyn Church 

A focus on the philosophies and practices regarding the 
educationof young children inothercountries. Speakers 
from the countries being studied, including England, 
Russia, China, Japan and Sweden, will make 
presentations. 

EDEL488Y/788Y, INTRODUCTION TO THE WRITING 
OF CHILDREN'S BOOKS, 3 CREDITS, SESSION I. MW, 
7:00-10:00 P.M. 

John Madison 

Areyou interested in writing forchildren? If you have had 
no experience, or only a little, this course is designed to 
get you started. Using a wide variety of pre-planned and/or 



26 



self-designed activities, you can discover and develop 
yourtalentsinan informal, supportive and stimulating 
atmosphere. Information regarding manuscript 
preparation and publishing v^^ill be available. 

EDEL 499A, THE SECOND ANNUAL MATHEMATICS 
WORKSHOP FOR ELEMENTARY SCHOOL TEACHERS, 
3 CREDITS, JULY 3-24. MTWTHF, 9:00-3:00. 

Martin Johnson 

An excellent opportunity to upgrade and refine your 
mathematics teachingtechniques! Highlights of this 
workshop include: a review of elementary school 
mathematics content, an awareness of new and exciting 
teaching strategies and procedures, development of skill 
in teachingwithmanipulatives, construction of 
mathematical games and materials, and try-out of games 
and ideaswith elementary school children. 

EDEL788U, INSTRUCTION IN MATHEMATICS FORTHE 
GIFTED, 3 CREDITS, SESSION I. TTH, 7:00-10:00 P.M. 

Martin Johnson 

What mathematics is appropriate for an elementary child 
identified as "gifted?" Forclassroom teachers and super- 
visors faced with this question, this is your course. Students 
will explore possible answers to this question while 
interacting with and developing sample programs for 
"gifted" elementary children. 



® 



INSTITUTE FOR CHILD STUDY 
SEMINARS AND WORKSHOPS 



EDHD 319U/619U, SCIENTIFIC CONCEPTS IN HUMAN 
DEVELOPMENT: LIFE REVIEWTHROUGH 
AUTOBIOGRAPHY, 3 CREDITS, SESSION II. MW, 7:00- 
10:00 P.M. 

Hugh Perkins 

This seminar will provide a basic foundation experience 
for those students interested in the aging process. It will 
feature a combination of theoretical explorations and will 
consider implications in live settings. A fundamental 
task of the educated mature adult is to integrate the 
experiences of one's life in a meaningful and acceptable 
way. By writingtwo or three pages per day on personal 
autobiographies, detailing lite experiences from different 
perspectives, students will gain insight into their psycho- 
logical development across the life span. The seminar will 
present a theoretical and practical approach to the study 
and useof autobiography. Special note: Thisclasswill 
meet at Montrose House, 6111 Montrose Road, Rockville, 
Maryland. 



EDHD319V/619V,SCIENTIFICCONCEPTS IN HUMAN 
DEVELOPMENT: SOCIAL POLICY ANDCHILDREN, 
3 CREDITS, SESSION II. MW, 7:00-10:00 P.M. 

Agnes Hatfield 

This seminar will focus on issues relating to the way in 
which public policy, as reflected in laws, regulations, 
institutions, and various support systems, affect the quality 
of contemporary family life. It will identify the social needs 
of families for optimum functioning and raise questions 
concerning rights of children. It will address the question: 
Where does the ultimate responsibility and power in these 
matters lie? The University's convenient location to all 
levels ot government will be utilized in the development 
of thisseminar. 



EDHD 319K/619K, SCIENTIFIC CONCEPTS IN HUMAN 
DEVELOPMENT: COMMUNICATION SKILLS IN THE 
HELPING PROFESSIONS, 3CREDITS, SESSION I. TTH, 
4:15-7:00. 

Joan Hunt 

Thisseminar, designed for any person involved in or 
interested in human services, will focus on the 
development of skills in relating, communicating, and 
problem-solving with others. It will include an 
examination of psychological theories relevant to the 
helping relationship and provide laboratory experiences 
in developingcommunication skills. 

EDHD319P/619P,SCIENTIFICCONCEPTS IN HUMAN 
DEVELOPMENT: LEARNING ANDTHE CREATIVE MIND, 
3 CREDITS, SESSION I. MW, 7:00-10:00 P.M. 

Robert Hardy 

Forthose persons interested in higher level learning 
processes and, in particular, to serve those persons 
working with talented and gifted children, this study will 
offer critical examination ot the role of individual factors 
and the optimal learning environment necessary to 
stimulate creative thinking in children and adults. The 
class will review contemporary theories and research 
related to the study of creativity and evaluate various 
measures of creativity. 



EDIN 232, FUNDAMENTALS OF AUTOMOTIVE 
TECHNOLOGY, 3 CREDITS, SESSIONS I AND II. 
MW, 4:00-10:00 P.M. 

Michael Giblin 

An opportunity to learn the basic operating principles of 
the automobile supplemented with hands-on experience. 
Learn to diagnose common automotive problems and 
perform routine maintenance. The combination of 
laboratory and lecture makes this an ideal course for the 
beginner and those with backyard experience. 

EDIN 499J,WORKSHOPON SPECIAL NEEDS STUDENTS 
IN VOCATIONAL EDUCATION, 3 CREDITS, SESSION II. 
ARRANGED. 

Kendall Starkweather 

This workshop is designed for individuals who are 
currently working with or preparing to work with 
disadvantaged and/or handicapped students. Major 
emphasis will be placed on assistingclass participants in 
recognizing: (1 ) who the disadvantaged and handicapped 
students are, (2) how to determine their special needs, 
interests, and abilities, and (3) what can be done to better 
meet the individual needs ot these students through 
vocational programs while they are still in school. 



27 



EDSF 409B/709B, EFFECTS OF SEXISM IN THE 
EDUCATIONAL PROCESS, 3 CREDITS, SESSION I. 
TTH, 4:15-7:00 P.M. 

GeneAgre 

Title IX "enforcement," Women's Educational Equity Act 
Program activiti^s, various women's commissions school 
reform efforts, NOW Legal and Education Fund activities, 
and various individual feminist school reformers' efforts 
will be researched and evaluated against various feminist 
definitions of a school program totally devoid of sex 
discrimination and sex bias. Individually designed 
research projects will involve personal contact with many 
active Washington-area reformers. 

EDSF409F/709F, FOREIGN STUDY AS A CROSS- 
CULTURAL EXPERIENCE, 3 CREDITS, SESSION II. 
MTWTHF, 11 :00 A.M. 

George Male 

This course offers opportunities for both American and 
foreign students to examine each other's cultures and the 
interrelationshipof education and culture. 

EDSF409K/709K, RESEARCH METHODS l^l SOCIAL 
FOUNDATIONS OF MULTI-CULTURAL EDUCATION, 
3 CREDITS, SESSION I. TTH, 7:00-9:45 P.M. 

Daniel Huden 

To understand the problems of cultural heterogeniety 
and homogeniety in a democratic society which is based 
upon achievement, egalitarianism and meritocratic goals, 
multi-cultural education must utilize insights from a wide 
range of disciplines. This course explores the sources of 
knowledge and skills requisite to such a complex task. 

EDSF409L'709L, RESEARCH METHODS IN SOCIAL 
RESEARCH EOR EDUCATION POLICY PLANNING, 
3CREDITS, SESSION I. MW, 7:00-9:45 P.M. 

Daniel Huden 

A study of the dynamics of educational systems and the 
educational, social and political factors influencingthem. 
How fundamental choices are made in the development 
of educational policy so that specific social, economic 
and cultural goals may be obtained. 

EDSP499L, MAINSTREAMING FORTHE REGULAR 
SECONDARY TEACHER, 3 CREDITS, JULY 23-AUGUST 10. 
MTWTHF, 9:00-3:00. 

Staff 

The modification of teaching strategies, instructional 
materials, and classroom environment necessary for the 
mainstreaming of handicapped students at the secondary 



level. Extensive practical activities supplementing small 
group discussion will be provided for workshop 
participants. 

EDSP499M, MAINSTREAMING FORTHE REGULAR 
ELEMENTARYTEACHER, 3 CREDITS, JULY 3-24. 
MTWTHF, 9:00-3:00. 

Staff 

A study of the modification of teaching strategies, 
instructional materials, and classroom environment 
necessary for the mainstreamingof handicapped students 
at the elementary level. Extensive practical activities 
supplementing small group discussion will be provided for 
workshop participants. 

EDSP499N, CAREER/VOCATIONAL EDUCATION FOR 
THE HANDICAPPED,6CREDITS, SESSION II. LECTURE: 
MTWTHF, 8:00-9:30 A.M.; FIELD EXPERIENCE: MTWTHF, 
3 HOURS DAILY, ARRANGED. 

David Malouf 

Intended for special educators interested in career and 
vocational development of handicapped persons. 
Exemplary careereducation curricula and materials for 
the handicapped : evaluation, career education and the 
lEP, innovative methods of management and 
instruction, and collaboration with related disciplines. 
Field placements of three hours per day provide direct 
experience with handicapped persons in career/ 
vocational programs. 

EDSP4990,EARLYCHILDHOOD EDUCATION FORTHE 
HANDICAPPED,6CREDITS, SESSION II. MTWTHF, 
9:00-3:00. 

Nancy Spekman 

Designed for special education teachers, this workshop 
presents methods and materials appropriate to the 
assessment, management and curriculum design for 
young moderately to severely handicapped children, 
ages 3 to 8. Supervised practicum experiences will provide 
the participants with opportunities to apply their skills 
in the classroom, 

EDSP499P, EDUCATION OF SEVERELY HANDICAPPED 
STUDENTS,6CREDITS, SESSION II. MTWTHF,9:00-3:30. 

Nancy Blair 

This course is designed to introduce special education 
teachers to the special teaching methods and materials 
necessary in the education of the severely handicapped. 
The course will address assessment, management and 
curricular topics and will give students an opportunity to 
apply their skills in a classroom setting. 



The University reserves the right to change, eliminate, or 
modifycourse offerings and programs when in the 
judgements of the University authorities, circumstances 
make such action necessary. 



28 



P UNIQUE 
DPNCE EXPERIENCE 

TECHNIQUE • CHOREOGRAPHY • REPERTORY 
PERSONALIZED INSTRUCTION 

JENNIFER mULLER LflR LUBOVITCH 



AND THE WORKS 

May 23- June 5, 1979 



DANCE COmPANY 

June 6-19, 1979 




The University of Maryland at College Park, with the assistance of the National Endowment for the Arts, 
is pleased to announce a special Summer Dance Workshop, May 23rd through June 19th, 1979, with 
JENNIFER MULLER AND THE WORKS and the LAR LUBOVITCH DANCE COMPANY. Each com- 
pany will be in residence for two weeks. This Workshop provides the only opportunity to enroll in an 
instructional program presenting these outstanding companies in the United States in 1979. 

The emphasis of Ms. Muller's residency is on performance; the interpretation of material, phrasing, ex- 
pression and projection. Mr. Lubovitch's residency offers an ecclectic blend of dance techniques, with a 
focus on repertory and choreography. Both residencies culminate in an Informal Student Concert 
which includes selections from repertory classes and jiew works by both faculty and students. Both 
JENNIFER MULLER AND THE WORKS and the LAR LUBOVITCH DANCE COMPANY will be pre- 
sented in full concerts open to the general public. 

In order to maximize benefits from personalized instruction, enrollment is limited to 25 students for 
technique and most other classes. Students are expected to enroll for one or both complete residencies 
and must participate in the entire day's activities. Enrollment on an individual class basis is not permit- 
ted. For specific information concerning course work, the daily and weekly schedules, as well as the 
curriculum, entrance requirements and placement auditions, write: 

Elizabeth Ince, Director 
Summer Dance Workshop 
University of Maryland 
College Park, Maryland 20742 



6ELEBRATE TUESDAYS 

"We Maryland §ammer institute Vor 




MAY 22 



Tell Tale Poe 

Chamber Repertory Theatre 

A chilling, full-length play based upon several of 
Edgar Allan Poe's short stories, personal letters, 
and events in the last days of his life. This fully- 
costumed, fully-staged production is set in a 
small tavern in Baltimore in October of 1848. 
With terrifying theatricality, a company of four 
professional players mirror the grotesque fears 
and fantasies of Poe's bizarre imagination. 




MAY 29 

Ruggierb Ricci vionn 

and 

Orchestra Piccola 

Saul Schechtman, Musical Director 

The world-renowned, sensational violin virtuoso 
celebrates his 51st year of captivating concert 
performances. Hear him in a stunning program 
of selections by Paganini and concert! by Bach 
and Mozart, supported by the magnificent Or- 
chestra Piccola of Baltimore under the authori- 
tative direction of Saul Schechtman, internation- 
ally acclaimed conductor and composer. 




JUNE 5 

Jennifer MuUer 
^ The Works 

Thisdynamic American modern dance company 
recently reaped exhalted accolades from the 
European press: Paris: "Dance at its purest"; 
Berlin: "Explodes into joyfulness ... a fire- 
cracker"; Nice: "a triumph"; Amsterdam: "total 
theater"; Brussels: "Irrepressible vitality". This 
performance celebrates life and dance with un- 
bridled Imagination, poetic genius and natural 
humor. 




JUNE 12 

Zwi Kanar in 
Christ and Me 

A unique theatrical event: a full-length mime 
drama (with narrator); a moving spectacle of 
meanings, paradoxes, humor, and emotion 
drawn from Mr. Kanar's childhood experiences 
in prewar and Nazi-occupied Poland. A sur- 
vivor of Buchenwald and the Israeli War for 
Independence, Mr. Kanar trained in Paris with 
Decroux and Marceau, and makes his Washing- 
ton-area debut in this profound, personal and 
philosophical statement. 




JUNE 19 

Lar Luhovitch 
Dance Company 

This exuberant modern dance company, de- 
scribed by Clive Barnes, NY Times, as "Exul- 
tation in Dance" brings to the Tawes Theatre 
stage premiere performances of exciting new 
works by Lar Lubovitch, genius choreographer. 
"Lubovitch makes dances like Bellini wrote 
operas: seamless, flowing and musical." NY 
Daily News. 




JUNE 26 

The Billy Taylor 
Trio 

The fabulous Dr. William E. Taylor, jazz piano 
virtuoso, composer, recording artist, arranger, 
conductor, teacher, lecturer, actor, author, 
radio/TV star, will delight you with his inventive 
renditions. John Wilson, NY Times, says: 
"Taylor has that happiest of combinations; 
technique, taste and imagination. Few modern 
jazz pianists play the instrument as engagingly 
as he does." 



IN TAWES THEATRE 

TT^e Creative ^nd Reforming ^rts 




JULY 3 

The United States 
Marine Band 

Admission by Free Ticket 

This FREE concert is a splendid way to begin 
your Independence Day celebration, with the 
stirring music of America's most famous band. 
Founded by an act of Congress on July II, 1798. 
"The President's Own" since 1801, the Marine 
Band's nation-wide tours began in 1891 under 
"The March King", )ohn Philip Sousa. Make 
your holiday celebration a proud occasion. 



JULY 10 

Nathaniel Rosen ceiio 

The first American cellist to win the coveted 
Gold Medal at the Tchaikovsky Competition in 
Moscow on )uly 4, 1 978, and the first American 
to win the Gold Medal since Van Cliburn in 
1958! Mr. Rosen began his study of the cello 
at the tender age of six and at thirteen became 
a protege of the legendary Piatigorsky. Winner 
of numerous awards, Mr. Rosen's concert ca- 
reer has exploded into stardom with demands 
for his superb artistry. You can be the first 
to hear him on this concert series. 



cAU Performances cAt 8- 15pm 




JULY 24 

Bill Crofut ^ 
Kenneth Coopef 
Folk &^ Baroque 

A charming, intriguing concert of wide diversity, 
featuring Bill Crofut, folk singer on banjo and 
guitar, and the extraordinary harpsichordist 
Kenneth Cooper. From Handel and Scarlatti to 
Woodie Guthrie and Scott joplin, this is an in- 
spired combination of top-drawer entertain- 
ment. This is serious music making for the fun 
of it! 




JULY 17 

Paul Plishka 

Leading Bass, the Metropolitan Opera 

The distinguished bass of The Metropolitan 
Opera and the great opera houses of the world 
is presented in a recital of favorite selections. 
Acclaimed for his resonant eloquence and strong 
dramatic projection, this celebrated American 
artist will transport you with his luscious de- 
livery and vivid portrayals. This is a unique 
opportunity to enjoy a superb voice of sonorous 
tone and stunning dramatic impact. 




JULY 31 

The New York 
Chamber Soloists 
Handel s Acls ^ Galatea 

With winning skill and stylish polish, thirteen 
extraordinary artists (five singers and eight in- 
strumentalists) will render one of Handel's most 
sparklingoperas, brimming with the lighthearted 
joy of shepherds and shepherdesses in an idyllic 
world. The plot unfolds with merry humor and 
dramatic force. It is a work of the mature 
Handel, with moments of absolute happiness, 
total sorrow, and a profound reawakening of joy. 



Subscribe 'P^w • Save a Smashing 80% ! 

ENJOY THRILLING, MEMORABLE ENTERTAINMENT EVENTS WITH THE GREATEST SUMMER BARGAIN IN THE AREA. 
SECURE YOUR SEAT AND GAIN VALUABLE SUBSCRIBER BENEFITS: 

Free insurance against ticket loss. 



SPECIAL DISCOUNTS! University of Maryland students with Summer 
Session ID, University of Maryland Faculty/Staff with Summer Activity 
Card and Senior Citizens with ID are eligible for an 80% discount on the 
Tuesday series of 10 events for a discounted subscription price of $1 7.00. 
This special discount is available through May 22 when purchased in per- 
son with identification at the Tawes Theatre Box Office. The Box Of- 
fice will be open Monday through Friday, 10:30 am to 4:30 pm, 
April 16—17 and May 1 4 — August 1 0. 



• Seating priority when you renew next season. 

• REMEMBER: There may not be any single tickets left for sale just 
before the event. 

• For further information call 454-4241 or write Summer Programs, Uni- 
versity of Maryland, College Park, MD 20742. 



J\lmtfijlmml Jntefnational 
!PUim^estml & CompetUicti 



August 4 - August 11, 1979 




Aleksander Slobodyanik 



Jorge Bolet 



Louis Kentner 



Louis Kentner 

The New Dave Brubeck Quartet 

Gold and Fizdale 



: Rosalyn Tureck 

Aleksander Slobodyanik 
Jorge Bolet 

Fleisher, Tureck, Slobodyanik, Bolet, Kentner, List, Gold and Fizdale. 



Competition Finals With 
Baltimore Symphony Orchestra 
Sergiu Comissiona, conducting 



i\elita True, Alan Walker, Valerie Tryon, Thomas Schumacher, Joseph Bloch, Maurice Hinson, Hilde Somer. 



EVENING CONCERTS 

Tawes Theatre 

MASTERCLASSES: 

Center of Adult 
Education Auditorium 

LECTURE-RECITALS: 

Center of Adult 
Education Auditorium 

COMPETITION: Deadline ■ May 1st; Commissioned work by Lawrence Moss, Prizes: $4,000, $2,500, $1,500. Special Prizes: 
Tawes Theatre Organization of American States, Baldwin Piano and Organ Company, Gisriel Piano and Organ Company, 

Irwin Freundlich Prize. 

Preliminary Rounds on August 4 and 5; Semi-Final Rounds on August 5 through 10; Final Round on August 11. 

JURY: Leon Fleisher (USA), Roy H. Johnson (USA), Robin Harrison (Canada), Louis Kentner (Enghnd), Tihkon Khrennikov 
(USSR), Eugene List (USA), A-F Marescotti (Switzerland), Ladislav Mokry (Czechoslovakia), L, Moura-Castro (Brazil), 
Wiktor Weinbaum (Poland), Jascha Zayde (USA). 

TEACHER CONSULTATION SESSIONS auai/afo/e to teachers in full-time attendance. 




FOR INFORMATION WRITE: 

Fernando Laires, 
Festival Director 
Summer Programs 
University of Maryland 
College Park, Md. 20742 
Telephone: (301) 454-3347 



The New Dave Brubeck Quartet 



Gold and Fizdale 



^ouT^Ctipice Of Subscnptiori Options! 

Tickets for individual events are not available at this time and may not be available following subscription sales. 



SPECIAL DISCOUNTS: University of Maryland students with Summer Sessions ID, University of Maryland Faculty/ 
Staff with Summer Activity Card and Senior Citizens with ID are eligible for an 80% discount on OPTION A only for 
a discounted subscription price of SI 7.00. This special discount is available through May 22 when purchased in person 
with identification for each subscription at the Tawes Theatre Box Office. The Box Office will be open Monday 
through Friday, 10:30 am to 4:30 pm, April 16-17, and May 14-August 10. 



A 



ALL 10 TUESDAYS 

Preferred seating 
can only be offered 
to those who 
select OPTION A. 
Does not include 
Piano Festival. 



50% 

Off 

Not available after May 22. 



4 Music Recitals @ $ 7.50 each = $30.00 
2 Popular Concerts @ 7.50 each = 15.00 
2 Theatre Events @ 7.50 each = 15.00 
2 Dance Events @ 1 2.50 each = 25.00 

REGULAR BOX OFFICE PRICE; S85.00 
(You save $42.50) SUBSCRIPTION PRICE: 



MUSIC 
RECITALS 



Off 

Not available after May 29. 



4 Music Recitals 

May 29 - Ruggiero Ricci 

July 10 - Nathaniel Rosen 

)ulY 17 - Paul Plishka 

July 31 - NY Chamber Soloists - 

REGULAR BOX OFFICE PRICE: 

(You save $9.00) SUBSCRIPTION PRICE: 



POPULAR 
CONCERTS 



Off 

Not available after June 26. 



2 Popular Concerts 

June 26 ■ Billy Taylor 
July 24 - Folk & Baroque 
REGULAR BOX OFFICE PRICE 

(You save S4.50 



7.50 
7.50 



$15.00 
SUBSCRIPTION PRICE: 



D 



THEATRE 
PERFORMANCES 



30% 



Off 

Not available after June 12. 



2 Theatre Performances 

May 22 - Tell Tale Poe ■ $ 7.50 

June 1 2 - Christ and Me - 7.50 

REGULAR BOX OFFICE PRICE: $15.00 
(You save $4.50) SUBSCRIPTION PRICE: 



E 



DANCE 
CONCERTS 



Off 

Not available after June 12. 



2 Dance Concerts 

June 5 - Jennifer Muller - $12.50 

June 19 - Lar Lubovitch - 12.50 

REGULAR BOX OFFICE PRICE: $25.00 
(You save $7.50) SUBSCRIPTION PRICE: 



SAMPLER OF 

4 EVENTS 



Off 

Not available after June 5. 



4 Sampler Events 

one from B, Music Recital - S 7.50 

one from C, Popular Concert - 7.50 

one from D, Theatre Performance - 7.50 

one from E, Dance Concert - 1 2.50 

REGULAR BOX OFFICE PRICE: $35.00 
(You save $10.50) SUBSCRIPTION PRICE: 



NINTH ANNUAL 
INTERNATIONAL 
PIANO FESTIVAL & 
COMPETITION 



Subscri 
Orders 



ption O/) 0/ 
Only OU/O 



ALL 

SEVEN 
EVENTS 



Off 

Not Available After August 5. 



August 



Keyboard Non-Keyboard 



Rosalyn Tureck 

Aleksander Slobodyanik 

Jorge Bolet 

Louis Kentner 

The New Dave Brubeck Quartet 

Gold <& Fizdale 

Competition Finals with 

The Baltimore Symphony Orchestra 

(You save $15.50 or $13.50) 

SUBSCRIPTION PRICE: 



Side 


Side 


$ 7.50 


$ 6.50 


7.50 


6.50 


7.50 


6.50 


7.50 


6.50 


7.50 


6.50 


7.50 


6.50 


7.50 


6.50 


$52.50 


$45.50 


$37.00 


$32.00 



Theatre Graphh 



Uni\ersity of Maryland 



Order* ^lank^ 

Subscriptions for Tuesday events, Piano Festival sub- 
scriptions, and Master Class individual tickets may be 
ordered on this form. NO TICKETS FOR INDIVID- 
UAL EVENINGS MAY BE ORDERED AT THIS 
TIME, except for Free Events. There can be no re- 
funds or exchanges on any subscription option. 



A 

B 
C 
D 
E 
F 



All Ten Tuesday Events 

(no.) subscriptions @ $42.50 ea. = li_ 

Four Music Recitals 

(no.)subscription5@$21.00ea. = U- 

Ricci Rosen Plishka N Y Chamber 

Two Popular Concerts 

(no.)subscriptions@$10.50ea. = LL 

Taylor Folk & Baroque 

Two Theatre Performances 



I 



I 



I 



I 



(no.) subscriptions @$10.50ea. 

Poe Kanar 



Two Dance Concerts 



I 



(no.) subscriptions @$1 7. 50ea. = li_^ I 



Muller Lubovitch 

Sampler Subscriptions 

Circle one in each colunnn: 

-B- -C- -D- ■£- 

Ricci Taylor Poe Muller 

Rosen Folk & Kanar Lubovitch 

Plishka Baroque 

NY Chamber 



(no.)subscriptions@S24.50ea. = Ll. 



Free Events 



I 



U.S. Marine Band Independence Day Concert 
July 3 no. of tickets 

Art Lectures by Grace Hartigan 

July 12 no. of tickets 

July 26 no. of tickets 



Master Classes 



O Q. 



10 am Wednesdays. Enter no. of 
tickets in columns at left. 

* You will be notified of selection 
procedures. 

May 30 Ruggiero Ricci, violin 
June 1 3 Zwi Kanar, mime 
June 27 Billy Taylor, ;ozzp/o/70 
July 11 Nathaniel Rosen, ce//o 
July 18 Paul Plishka, opera 
July 25 Herbert Cooper, liarpsiciiord 
July 25 Bill Crofut, fc//? mws/c 
Aug. 1 Charles Bressler, 
Baroque singing 
TOTAL tickets @ $1 0.00 each 



Piano Festival 

Seven evening piano recitals 

(no.) keyboard subscriptions 

@ $37.00 each 
(no.) non-keyboard subscriptions 

@ $32.00 each 



I 



Seating - Cfieck One In Each Row 


For 
Box Office 
Use Only 


Main Floor Balcony 


Left Center Right 


Front Middle Rear 







Name 

Address 

City 

State _ 



Phone (day) 



MAIL TO: 



Zip — 

(night) 



Tawes Theatre Box Office 
University of Maryland 
College Park, MD 20742 

Please enclose a STAMPED, SELF-AD- 
DRESSED ENVELOPE to return tickets. 
Use a 4x9 envelope with 2 stamps for or- 
ders of 20 or more tickets. Example: 
2 Option A subscriptions. 

Enclosed is a single check made payable 
to the UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 
for the total amount of 



35 



36 




37 



38 






39 



40 



41 



I i 



42 



w 



43 



44 



Instructions 

Applications 

Forms 



1979 Summer Sessions 

University of Maryland 

College Park Campus 



PAGE 

Application Instructions 

Visiting Graduate Students 

1979 Summer Sessions 2 

Application for Admission 

Graduate School 3-4 

Application for Admission 

For Summer Only Undergraduate Students 

1979 Summer Sessions 5-6 

Schedule Request and 

Estimated Bill Form 

Summer Session 1 9-10 

Schedule Request and 

Estimated Bill Form 

Summer Session II 11-12 



Application Instructions 

Advanced Special Students 

and 

Visiting Graduate Students 

1979 Summer Sessions 



University of Maryland "T^® Graduate School 

College Park, Md. 20742 



The graduate Application for Admission form included in this booklet is to be used only by applicants seeking admission as 
Advanced Special Graduate Students or Visiting Graduate Students. 

To qualify for Advanced Special Student status, one of the following criteria must be satisfied: a) hold baccalaureate with B 
(3.0) average overall, b) hold masters or doctorate, c) hold baccalaureate and submit letter from employer certifying to at least 
four years of professional employment, d) submit official test scores in the upper 50 percentile from either the GRE-Graduate 
Record Exam, or the MAT-Miller Analogies Test, or GMAT-Graduate Management Admissions Test. Official transcripts are re- 
quired. Letters of recommendation are not required. 

To enroll as a visitor, the student must be officially admitted to another recognized graduate school and currently be in good 
standing. Full transcripts of credit need not be submitted, but an application for admission (visiting graduate student status) to 
the Graduate School of the University of Maryland must be submitted along with the $1 5.00 application fee. A letter of permission 
from the applicant's graduate dean must also be presented indicating that the applicant is in good standing and that the credits 
will be accepted toward his or her degree. 

DO NOT use this form if: 

(1 ) You are already in graduate admitted status with the University of Maryland at College Park. 

or 

(2) You desire to be admitted to The Graduate School as a regular student either in a degree or advanced specialist certifi- 
cate (AGS) program. 

Regular application materials and further information regarding our graduate programs may be obtained from: 

THE GRADUATE SCHOOL 

UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 

COLLEGE PARK, MARYLAND 20742 

(301)454-4006 



The Golden Identification Card Program for Senior Citizens of Maryland: The purpose of this status is to make 
available without charge, courses and services of the University's campuses to citizens who are 60 years of age or 
older, who are residents of the State of Maryland and who are retired. Such persons may apply for graduate admis- 
sion, either as degree or nondegree students, and must meet the same admissions criteria pertaining to either cate- 
gory as do all applicants. Once admitted and having been issued the Golden Identification Card, such persons may 
register for courses in any session, subject to the same restrictions as any other student. Tuition fees will be waived. 
Additionally, holders of the Golden Identification Card will be entitled to certain academic services, including library 
services during the time that they are actually enrolled for courses. The classification of an applicants resident sta- 
tus will be determined by the University from data on the application form. A retired person will be considered one 
who affirms that he or she is not engaged in gainful employment for more than 20 hours per week. 



Graduate School 
University of Maryland 
College Park, Md. 20742 



FOR SUMMER 1979 

VISITING GRADUATE STUDENTS AND 

ADVANCED SPECIAL STUDENTS ONLY 



Application for Admission 



PLEASE TYPE OR PRINT PLAINLY IN INK 



1 SOCIAL SECURITY 

NUMBER 
Ms 
2, Mr. 



This Will Be Your 
Student Number. 



Last name 
3 PRESENT HOME 

ADDRESS 



Middle name 



Other last names 



State or Country 



Give county if you reside m Maryland 



5 Citizenship _ 

6 Date of Birtti _ 
7. Place of Birtti 



8. Sex □ Male □ Female 

9 Enrollment Status: Q Full-time D Part-time 



10 Proposed Graduate 
Program (Dept ) 



G R A D 



NON US CITIZENS OR 
PERMANENT IMMIGRANTS 



TYPE OF VISA IF YOU HAVE ONE 
Sponsored By 



Permanent Immigrants give 
Alien Registration Number_ 
and Date of Issue: _ 



12 Term in Which You Request Entrance: 
Year □ Summer Term «1 (May-Jun) □ Summer Term #2 {Jul-Aug 

1 3 If you have ever applied to our Graduate School before, please indicate year 

14 Overall Baccalaureate G PA 



11. Non-degree Program Desired 
n Visiting Graduate Student "'' 
n Advanced Special Student °' abed 

Circle letter indicating under which 
criterion you are applying See also 
section on Advanced Special Student under 
Admission Information - Graduates 



.(all institutions attended) 



1 5 National Standardized Aptitude Test Scores and Data Test Taken 
Attach copy of test score If required for admission 



Graduate Record (Aptitude): 
Miller Analogies 



Date 
Date 



Graduate Management Admissions Test: Date 



Verbal Score 

Score 

Score 



Quant Score. 



1 6. List below the official name of each Institution attended beyond high school. 

Attach copy of transcript If required for admission as an Advanced Special Student Visiting graduate students must sub- 
mit a letter of permission from the applicants graduate dean indicating that the applicant Is In good standing. 



Full Name of Institution 
Bachelor s Degree 


State 


Dates attended 
From 


To 






Tyoeol Degree 


Major 


Date Deg awarded 


Full Name of Institution 
Master s Degree 


Slate 


Dales attended 

From 


To 






Type of Degree 


Maior 


Date De; divaroea 


Other Institution Attended 


Stat.? 


Dales attendee 
From 


Tc 






Type of Degree 


Maior 


Da'p Deg awarded 





An application fee of $15.00 is required. NO ACTION will tie taken on this application without the required documentation (i e., transcript(s). letter from em- 
ployer(s). test scores or letter from visiting students graduate dean). 3 



1 7. Present Home Address 



City 



Length of time at this address_ 
Phone at office 



Mo Day Year 

_ Home 



Mo Day Year 



1 8. Last previous address. 



Length of time at this address. 



Zip Code 



Mo Day Year 

1 9. Permanent Address where mail will always reach you 



Mo Day Year 



20 List any work and military experiences (major categories and time periods only) for the past five years. 
Attach statement from employer(s) if required for admission. 



TITLE OR POSITION 



EMPLOYER 



STATE FROM TO 



21. Military Veteran □ Active Military Duty □ 

22 Applicants Claiming Maryland Residency Complete the Following Questions: 
The University reserves the right to request additional information if necessary. 

Are all. or substantially all, your possessions in the State of Maryland? Yes_ 

Are you registered to vote in the State of Maryland? Yes_ 

Do you possess a valid Maryland drivers license? Yes_ 

Do you own motor vehicles? Yes . 

Are all owned motor vehicles registered in Maryland? Yes_ 

Do you have the use of a motor vehicle registered in another persons name? Yes_ 

a. If yes, indicate name and relationship of person: 

Have you paid Maryland income tax for most recent year on all earned income including 

all taxable income earned outside the State? Yes_ 

a. List actual years you paid Maryland income tax since 1975: 

b. List actual years you paid income tax to another state since 1975: 

c. If you did not pay in Maryland in the past 12 months, please state reason(s). 



No_ 
No_ 
No_ 
No. 
No_ 
No_ 



No_ 



Yes_ 



No_ 



Do you receive any type of financial aid (loan, scholarship, grant) from a state other 

than Maryland? 

If yes. from which state? 

For the most recent 12 months has another person{s) 

a Provided one-halt or more of your financial supporf 

b Claimed you as a dependent on a federal and/or state income tax return'' Yes No_ 



Yes No 

I federal and/or state income tax return'' Yes 
II the answer to a and/or b is yes, give person(s) name, relationship and permanent address 

Name and Relationship 

Address City Stale 



Length of time at this address Yean 



.Months. 



23 Do you wish to apply for the Golden Identification Card Program? D Yes Q No 

Restricted to persons residing in the State of Maryland who are 60 years of age or older, who are retired and not gainfully 
employed over 20 hours weekly. 

24. I certify that the information submitted in this application is complete and accurate to the best of my knowledge I agree to abide 
by the rules, policies, and regulations of the University of Maryland if I am admitted as a student. 



Social Security Number 



Signature of Applicant 



enrollment in- 
University 



The Department of Health Education and Welfare and other Federal regulatory agencies require that the University supply admissions and ( 

formation for U S citizens and permanent immigrants (with alien Registration Card issued) by racial, ethnic, and sex categories In order that t 
may comply you are requested to check the appropriate box below: 

□ AMERICAN INDIAN/ALASKAN NATIVE U S Citizens and permanent □ HISPANIC U S Citizens and permanent residents of Mexican. Puerto 

residents having origins in any of the original peoples of North America Rican, Cuban Central or South American or other Spanish culture or 

and maintaining cultural identification through tribal affiliation or com- origin, regardless of race 

munily recognition 

Q BLACK, not Hispanic Origin US Citizens and permanent residents LJ WHITE, not of Hispanic Origin: U S Citizens and permanent residents 

having origins in any ot the black racial groups in Africa having origins in any of the original people of Europe, North Africa or 

n ASIAN/PACIFIC ISLANDER US Citizens and permanent residents Ihe Middle East 

having origin in any of the original people of the Far East, Southeast 

Asia, the Indian Subcontinent, or the Pacific Islands This area includes, CJ NON-U S CITIZENS studying or intending to study under a student or 

for example China Japan, Korea the Philiipme Islands and Samoa other temporary visa 



Application for Summer Only 

Undergraduate Students 

(Reviewed by Office of 

Undergraduate Admissions) 



University of Maryland 
College Park Campus 



Application for Undergraduate 

Readmission 

(Reviewed by Office of 

Wittidrawal/ Re-enrollment) 



Please read the instructions below and the admissions information on pages 6,7 before coinoleting this torn 

Please indicate below your admission status 

SUMMER 
ONLY 




READMIT □ Degree and non-degree undergraduate students who attended a Fall or Spring semester prior to Spring 

1979 semester at the College Park campus and who were in good standing or on academic probation at the conclu- 
sion of that semester No application lee is required 

NOTE New students who have applied for Fall 1979. or have been admitted for Fall 1979, or wish to continue for the Fall 1979 semes- 
ter, do not complete this application Please refer to pages 6^7 concerning admission 
All other students please refer to pages 6,7 concerning admissions 



Enter your Social Security Number Below 



Do Not Write in the Shadeij Boxes 

Print your legal name in the boxes below 



Middle 



Suffix Print any other last name under which 

(Example, Jr., Sr,, III) you may have been enrolled 

Check the space corresponding to your sex and write the numtjer in the box to the r ight: 

1 Male ^ I I Month Day 

2 Female '—' I [ I I | I y 

Write your date of birth in the boxes to the right ► I L_J I 1 1 

Are you a United States Citizen' Yes □ No □ If not, print the country of which you are a citizen 

Please complete the following (if applicable) Print type of visa Alien Registration No. _ 

Date visa issued 



Are you currently a Maryland resident? Yes Q No □ County 

(If yes, complete the section on Domicile on the back of this application) 
(If not, print the state of which you are a resident) 

Your present home address 



CITZ RES 



n n 

Length of lime lived at this address I 1 * ' 



Name of parent to whom information should be sent (minors only) 



II TT1 CD I I M M 



Zip Code (Required) 

Your home telephone number 



Last Name 

Your last previous address 



City 

Father's (or 
Spouse's) Name _ 

Father's Address, 
(or Spouse's) 
Mother's Name _ 



- Father s (or spouse s) 
Occupation 



Length of time lived at last address; 

CD CD 



D 



.Mother's 
Occupation . 



Mother's Address 

(if different from father's) 

I certify that the information recorded on this form is correct and I understand that inaccurate or false information will result in my dismissal from the 
University. I also understand that this form does not place me into consideration for admission to the College Park Campus for the fall or spring terms. 

Signature of Applicant Date 



Enter yotir Social Sectutty Ntunber: 
Print your legal name below: 



LAST NAME 



HRSTNAME 



SUFFIX (Example: Jr, Sr , ID) 

The Department of Health, Education and Welfare and other federal regulatory agencies require that the University supply adittisstons and eiuollment 
iitfomution by racial, ethruc, and sex categories. In order that the Uiuversity may comply you are requested to check the appropriate box below: 
O WluM. nor of HispAnic Ongin. A panon having ongmj m tny of tha ongma] p«opl«« of Europe. 

Nonh Africa, or tlig Middle Eaa. 
D Blaclcn 

ZD American Indian or Aiaakan Native. A pereon having ongina in any of the ongmaj peoplea of 
Nortta Amenca. and who mamlAin cujlmi idenQficatlOQ through tubal afihaoon or communiTy 



M of Hjspanx: Ongm: A penon having ongina m any of the black racial groupe in Africa. 
a Ki^Mjuc: A penon of Mexican. PoeitD Rican. Cuban. Cenml oi South American, or other 
Spanish cultun or origin. legaidtaM of reoe. 



MIDDLE NAME 



" Ajun or Paafic lalander A penon having onguis in any of the original people* ot the Far Eaat. 
Southeaal Kbm. the Indian Subconuneni. or the Paofic lalanda. This area mcludea. for example. 
Chjn^ lapan. Eorea. the Philippine lilanHi. or Samoa. 



HSCODE 



List educational institutions attended (secondary school and current collage or university). 



(Full name and location of high school) 



(No. of years and dates of attendance) 



(Date of graduation) 



(Full name and location of college or university) (No. of years and dates of attendance) (Date of graduation) (Degree) IPICDE 

Are you currently attending the last institution mentioned? ^— ' ' "~ '"' 



Yes a 



Are you presently in a dismissed or probationary status tor either Yes □ 
academic or disciplinary reasons from the last academic institution 



No D 
No □ 



attended' 



UGTERM Div COL COUST 

|6|7|9|[nT][TII]h|9|9|C3I 



By signing below, high school graduates and students currently enrolled in colleges other than the University of Maryland College Parl< Campus certify that they meet require- 
ments for admission for the summer session(s) To be eligible for admission for the summer session(s). a high school graduate must have graduated with an overall "C" aver- 
age in academic subiects and rank in the lop half of the graduating class. Applicants currently attending (or attended in the past) another college or university must be in good 
standing at that institution and have the permission of the parent institution to enn 

I certify that I meet the r .quirements as listed above 



I for the summer session. 



If you have attended the University of Maryland, when were you first enrolled (any branch) _ 



Signature of applicant 
last enrolled . 



Date 



Semester/Year 



Semester/Year 



(College Park Campus, Baltimore County, University College, Atlantic, Baltimore, College Park, Overseas) 



Did you graduate from the University of Maryland? 



Are you planning to work toward a bachelor's degree at the University? Yes - 



.No_ 



Degree 



In-State stutdents MUST complete this section. Out-of-State students DO NOT complete this section. 

The following questions assist the University in determining yotir eligibility (or in-state status. The University reserves the right to request additional 
information if necessary. 

1. Have you been or will you be claimed as a dependent by another person(s) on federal and/or state income tax returns for any of the following years? 
Yes D No D If yes, please check the appropriate year(s): D 1977 D 1978 D 1979 

2. For the most recent 12 months has another person(s) provided half or more than half of yotir support? Yes D No D 

3. If the answer to \ and/or 2 is yes, give person(s) name, relationship, and permanent address: 

a. Name Relationship 

Street Address 

City State 



-^ip- 



. Months 



b. Length of time lived at this address' Years „ 

c. Amoimt of support provided by the person listed in question 3a $ . 



TVie following questions are to be answered by the person(s) listed in item 3a . Uitem 3a is blank, the 
following questions are to be answered by the applicant. 

4. Are all, or substantially all, of your personal possessions in the State of Maryland? 

5. Are you registered to vote? 

a. If yes, what state? b. Date of registration: Month Year 



Yes D 
Yes D 



No D 
No D 



6. Have you paid Maryland income tax for the most recent year on all earned income including all taxable inconte earned outside of the State? 

a. List actual years you paid Maryland income tax since 1975: Yes D No D 

b. Ust actual years you paid income tax to another state since 197S: 

c. If you did not pay taxes m Maryland in the past 12 months, please state reasoi\(s): 

7. If employed, is Maryland income tax being withheld? 



8. Did you give a Maryland home address on most recent federal and state income tax forms? 

9. Do you own motor vehicles? Yes D No D 10. Are all owned motor vehicles registered in Maryland? 
Date(s) of vehicle(s) registration(sJ_ 



Yes □ No D 
Yes D No D 
Yes D No D 



11. Do you have the use ofa motor vehicle registered in another person's name? Yes n No D 
a. If yes, indicate name and relationship of person: 

12. Do you possess a valid driver's Ucense? Yes G No D 13. Do you possess a valid Maryland driver's license? Yes D No D 
14. Are you a citizen of the United States? Yes D No D 

a. If no, type of visa b. Expiration date of visa 



c. Alien registration number 



d. Dale visa issued. 



15. Do you receive any type of financial aid Qoan, scholarship, grant) from a state other than Maryland? 

a. If yes, from which lUte? 

DO NOT WKITE BELOW THE LDC 



Yes a No D 



UGType ENSTAT UGMAT 



PC 



AF 



UGAPPDATE 



RES. DEC. CODE EVAL DATE LT.SENT 



H DC 



D D 



COURSE SELECTION INFORMATION 

Courses with multiple sections may be offered in both summer sessions. The session for which a specific section is sched- 
uled is designated by the first two digits of the section number: 01 for Summer Session I; 02 for Summer Session II. 

If the course or section meeting dates deviate from the regular Summer Session dates, the specific starting and ending 
dates are displayed below the title for the course. The section number indicates the session to which a nonstandard course or 
section belongs for registration purposes. 

EXAMPLES: 

A. ECON205 3CREDITS GRADING METHODS — REG/AUD/P-F 

PRINCIPLES OF ECONOMICS I 

0101 MTUWTHF8 Q 0101 SMITH 

0102 MTUWTHF9:30 0101 JONES 
0201 MTUWTHF9:30 O 1102 GREEN 

In this example, sections 0101 and 0102 meet during Summer Session I five (5) days per week at the times indicated in 
Tydings Hall (Building Q) room 01 01 . Section 0201 meets during the second Summer session. 

B. DANC100 2CREDITS GRADING METHODS — REG/AUD/P-F 

DANCE TECHNIQUES 
0102 12JUN-24JUN 

0101 MTUWTHF8-10:30 W 2102 BROWN 

0102 MTUWTHF8-12 W 2101 BLACK 

In this example, section 01 01 meets for the entire Summer Session I but section 01 02 begins 1 2 June and ends 24 June. 
Section 01 02 is a non-standard date course for Summer Session I. 

C. MUED438 2-3CREDITS GRADING METHODS — REG/AUD/P-F 

SPECIAL PROBLEMS IN THE TEACHING OF INSTRUMENTAL MUSIC-WOODWINDS 
0201 01AUG-10AUG 

0201 MTUWTHF1 2:30-4:30 NN 1123 WHITE 

In this example, the course is a non-standard date course which is offered between 1 August and 10 August. This is a 
Summer Session II course for the purpose of registration. 

In using the registration forms enclosed in this packet students should take care that the form for the proper session is com- 
pleted : the Summer Session I form for course sections beginning 01 and Summer Session II form for course sections beginning 
02. 

Any attempt to register for a course in the wrong session will invalidate the registration. 

NOTE: Please read the additional information on nonstandard date courses elsewhere in this Schedule of Classes. In many in- 
stances registration, billing and grading procedures will be different for these courses. 



Schedule Request and 
Estimated Bill Form 



Summer Session 
—Only — 1979 



T"is form should be used for the First Summer Session only 

Mail-in preregistration requests must be postmarked by May4, 1979. COMPLETE THE ENTIRE FORM EXCEPT 
FOR THE SPACE MARKED "FOR OFFICE USE ONLY ' The top part of this form is a course request only. Students 
must have the lower part (Course Verification) validated by the Registrations Office tor a registration to be official. 
Only the validated lower part may be used as proof. 



STUDENT NAIME (P 


int 


.ast Name First) 



























































































SOCIAL SECURITY NO. 



DAY PHONE NO. TODAY'S DATE 



9-5: 



Were you registered at the University of Maryland College Park day campus: 

SPRING 1979 YES NO 

IF NO: Please read Admission Information on pages 6 and 7 



STUDENT'S SIGNATURE 



COURSE REQUEST: Complete this part with information found in the Schedule of Classes. See page 7 for directions 
on determining the session of a course. 

EXAMPLE 



COURSE INFORMATION 



E D C P 



UDEo 



10 3 



COORSEPHEFIX COURSE NO SUFRX SECTION NO 



GRADING INFORMATION 

(CIRCLE ONE NUMBER ONLY) 



1 ® 3 



REGULAR PASS FAIL AUWT SATISFACTORY FAIL 



COURSE INFORMATION 

IDE 



COURSE 1 



COURSE PREFIX COURSE NO SUFRX SECTKX NO CREDIT 

COURSE 2 
COURSE INFORMATION 



GRADING INFORMATION 

(CIRCLE ONE NUMBER ONLY) 

12 3 4 

REGULAR PASS FAIL AUDIT SATISFACTORY FAIL 



SUFFIX 

ORW 



COURSE PREFIX COURSE NO SUFFIX SECTION NO CREDIT 

COURSE INFORMATION COURSE 3 



COURSE PREFIX COURSE NO SUFFIX SECTION NO 



GRADING INFORMATION 

(CIRCLE ONE NUMBER ONLY) 

12 3 4 

REGULAR PASS FAIL AUDIT SATISFACTORY FAIL 



GRADING INFORMATION 

(CIRCLE ONE NUMBER ONLYI 

12 3 4 

REGULAR PASS FAIL AUDIT SATISFACTORY FAIL 



COURSE VERIFICATION: In the space below list the course(s) you have requested above. The Registrations Office will record 
the action taken for each course in the space on the right marked •For Office Use Only." and will return this part of the form 
to you. Any course without a Registration Stamp was not received for the reason indicated to the right of the course. The lower 
part of this form must be validated by the Registrations Office after payment is made. It is your proof of registration. 



SOCIAL SECURITY NO. 





















FOR OFFICE USE ONLY. 




















1 










COURSE PREFIX 




CCXIRSE NO 


SUFFIX SECTION NO 




CREDIT 










































nnr^ 


1 












COURSE PREFIX 




COURSE NO 


SUFFIX SECTION NO 




CREDIT 







































1 








COURSE PREFIX 




COURSE NO 


SUFFIX SECTION NC 




CREDIT 


This must be co 


mpleled by all students For n-.aii-m prere 
THIS WILL BE USED AS A MAILING L 


gistran 
ABEl 


ts 






Students who register and later decide not 
to attend Summer School at the University 
must cancel their registration prior to (he lirsl 
asy ot class Failure to cancel a registration 
will result in financial obligation even thougn 
the student does not attend class 
















Summer Session 1 ID cards will be mailed to 
you Oo you have 

U of l^d Photo ID Card'' 






NAME 




ADDRESS 


Previously issued Summer Session card 
Yes No 




CITY STATE ZIP 





INSTRUCTIONS for completion of the ESTIMATED BILLING FORM are given at the bottom of this page 



STANDARD FEFS | 


CHARGES 


AMOUNT 


1. Undergraduate 


1 

38 


.^ 


3 - 


4 
152 


5 
190 


6 

228 


7 
266 


8 
304 


9 
342 


10 
380 






Cred'I Hours 
Cojt 


114 > 




2. Urtdergraduate Nonresiden 


~^' — 


$15 






3. Graduate Rejident 
Credit Houri 
Cost 


1 

55 


2 
110 


3 
165 


4 
220 


5 
27(5 


6 
330 


7 
385 


8 
440 








4. Graduate Non resident 
Credit Ho jr$ 
Cost 


1 
100 


2 
200 


3 
300 


4 
400 


5 
500 


6 
600 


7 
700 


8 
800 








5. Registration Fee 




$ 5 


5 


00 


6 Health Fee 




$ 4 


4 


00 


7. Becieai.on Fee 




$ 4 


4 


00 


8 Application Fee (non refun 


dablel 


$15 


. 




9 Vehicle Registration Fee 




$ 3 






10 Total Chdi^es 


S 





Make checks payable to University of Maryland. Include the student Social Security number on check. 

One check may be used to pay for both summer sessions. 

Add the "Total Charges" from both pages to determine the amount of your check. 

NOTE : Fees listed are subject to change at any time v\/ithout advance notice. 

ESTIMATED BILLING FORM INSTRUCTIONS: 

1 . Add the number of credit hours requested for Summer Session I. Only courses listed in this page should be included in this total. 

2. Locate your status (undergraduate, graduate resident, graduate non-resident) on lines 1-4 above (Please note: A "Graduate Student" is one who has been 
admitted to the Graduate School either at the University of Maryland or another institution. Students who have graduated from this or another institution 
are not considered graduate students until they have been admitted to the Graduate School. Any student not admitted to the Graduate School is classified 
as an Undergraduate. If you have any questions on this or your residence status, please call the Undergraduate Admissions Office, 454-41 37 or the Grad- 
uate Records Office. 454-5428. The University reserves the right to make the final and official determination of the student's residence status.) 

3. On the line next to your status circle the number of credit hours you have requested above. The number below the hours circled is your cost of tuition. 

4 Enter the cost in the Amount column on the right. If you are an Undergraduate Non-resident, enter the $1 5.00 Non-resident Fee (line 2) in the Amount col- 
umn. 

5. Lines 5-7 are mandatory fees charged to every student each summer session. The fees are therefore entered in the Amount column for you. 

6. If this form is accompanied by an Application for Admission, you must also pay a $15.00 Application Fee. If this pertains to you, enter the $15.00 on line 8. 
Note: only one Application for Admission and one $1 5.00 Application Fee is required for both summer sessions. 

7. If you wish to register a car for the summer, enter $3 on line 9. Parking stickers must be picked upat the Motor Vehicle Administration Office on the cam- 
pus. Note : Stickers assigned in Fall 1 978 are valid until August 1 979. 

8. To determine the amount you owe the University for Summer Session I. add all charges entered in the Amount Column. Enter this total on line 10. This is 
the total amount owed for the First Summer Session. 

9. Make a check for the amount owed payable to the University of Maryland. Write Student Social Security Number on face of check. You will be notified of 
any bill adjustments that are necessary. Payment must accompany the estimated bill form. 

10. Students entitled to credit on their bills (contract, scholarships, etc.) must attach a purchase order from the agency paying their fees and/or certifying 
documentation for the scholarship credit. 

11. MONIES OWED THE UNIVERSITY WILL BE DEDUCTED FROM CHECKS RECEIVED PRIOR TO APPLICATION OF THE REMAINDER TO SUMMER 
SCHOOL TUITION. 



EXAMPLES 



10 



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ALPHABETICAL 
DIRECTORY OF BUILDINGS 

024 Allegany Hall (Dorm). G-17 
106 Animal Barn, P-10 
108-112 Animal Barns. O-10 

104 Animal Sciences Annex. P-9 

142 Animal Sciences BIdg . O-10 
008 Annapolis Hall. H'18 

060 Anne Arundel Hall (Dorm), G-1D 

156 Apiary, J-4 

145 Architecture BIdg . D-1 1 

146 Art-Sociology BIdg , E-10 
092 Asphalt Institute. P-12 

221 Astronomy Observatory, M-1 

016 Baltimore Hall (DormI, G-16 
110 Beel Barn, P-9 

099 Bel Air Hall (Dorm). 0-7 

091 Biochemistry/Chemistry BIdg . N-11 

231 Bureau of Mines. Main BIdg . K-11 

160 Byrd Stadium, J-6 

161 Byrd Stadium, Field House, J-7 
015 Calvert Hall (Dorm), G-15 

096 Cambridge Hall (Dorm). N-8 

298 Campus Drive Security Booth. E-10 

070 Caroline Hall. E-13 

065 Carroll Hall (Dorm), F-l£ 

017 Cecil Hall (Dorm), H-16 

250 Center ol Adult Education, A-6 

206 Central Receiving Warehouse, P-22 

098 Centreville Hall (Dorm). 0-7 

025 Charles Hall (Dorm), G-18 

090 Chemical Engineering. P-11 

091 Chemistry/Biochemistry BIdg . N-11 

121 Chestertown Hall (Dorm), N-6 

162 Cole Student Activities BIdg , H-8 
224 Computer Science Center, N-9 

250 Conlerences and Institutes (Center of 

Adult Ed ), A-6 

122 Cumberland Hall (Dorm), M-6 

105 Dairy Research Labs. Q-10 

252 Denton Hall (Dorm). 1-2 

097 Dining Hall (Cambridge). N-7 

251 Dining Hall (Denton). J-2 

026 Dining Hall (Hill). G-14 
257 Dining Hall (Ellicott). L-4 
064 Dorchester Hall (Dorm). H-10 

229 East Poultry Laboratory BIdg . M-S 

253 Easton Hall (Dorm). 1-2 

117 Education Annex. East (Health). H-18 

066 Education Annex West. F-1 4 

143 Education BIdg . G-9 



107 Electron Ring Accelerator (Physics). 0-9 

254 Elkton Hall (Dorm), J-3 
256 Ellicott Hall (Dorm). K-5 

007 Fire & Rescue Institute (Md), K-19 

237 Fish & Wildlife Service, M-12 

034 Foreign Languages BIdg , 1-11 
048 Francis Scott Key Hall, H-13 
126-139 Fraternity & Sorority Houses. M-19 
029 Frederick Hall (Dorm). H-17 

031 Garrett Hall (Dorm). G-15 
299 Gatehouse. P-15 

166 Golf Course Club House, E-1 

258 Hagerstown Hall (Dorm), K-4 
014 Harford Hall (Dorm), H-17 

002 Harrison Lab. 0-16 
140 Health Center, 1-10 

074 Holzapfel Hall (Horticulture). K-13 

027 Home Management House. G-18 

108 Horse Barn. 0-9 

028 Howard Hall (Dorm). G-17 

158 Intercollegiate Athletic Facility. K-7 

059 Journalism BIdg . H-12 

227 Jull Hall. L-8 

022 Kent Hall (Dorm), H-15 

259 LaPlata Hall (Dorm), L-5 

201 Leonardtown Community BIdg (Employment 
Office), 0-21 

238 Leonardtown Housing, N-22 

260 Lord Calvert Apts , E-19 

077 Main Administration BIdg , K-14 

046 Mane Mount Hall (Human Ecology). J-14 

088 Martin Engineering Classroom BIdg.. 0-13 

089 Martin Engineering Labs. 0-13 

084 Mathematics BIdg . N-13 

035 McKeldin Library. Theodore R,, H-11 
009 Memorial Chapel. 1-15 

085 Molecular Physics. N-9 

032 Montgomery Hall (Dorm). 1-18 
040 Mornll Hall. G-13 

01 1 Motor Transportation Facility. P-18 

052 North Administration BIdg.. L-14 

295 North Gate Security Booth, P-15 

087 Nuclear Reactor, O-IO 

056 Nyumburu Community Center, 

Temporary CC, F-15 

179 Parking Garage #1. 1-9 

073 H J Patterson Hall (Agronomy, Botany). 1-11 

083 J M Patterson Hall (Industrial Education). 0-10 

008 Photographic Services (Annapolis Hall), H-18 

255 Physical Education BIdg . 0-6 
082 Physics BIdg . M-12 

003 Police & Service BIdg . N-1 7 



093 Post Office & Custodial BIdg . 0-12 

054 Preinkert Field House (Women's Gymnasium 

& Swimming Pool). E-11 

164 President s Home, D-4 

021 Prince George s Hall (Dorm). G-16 

061 Oueen Annes Hall (Dorm). F-ll 

078 Reckord Armory. L-1 5 

004 Ritchie Coliseum. M-17 

080 Rossborough Inn (Faculty-Alumni Club). M-16 
109 Sheep Barn. 0-9 

159 Shipley Field (Baseball). K-e 

037 Shoemaker BIdg (Counseling CIr ), H-14 

075 Shriver Lab (Ag Engineering), K-12 
044 Skinner BIdg (Microbiology), 1-14 

038 Social Sciences BIdg , G-14 
063 Somerset Hall (Dorm), F-11 

071 South Administration BIdg and Graduate 

School, K-15 

224 Space Sciences BIdg., N-9 

062 St Mary s Hall (Dorm), H-10 
163 Student Union (Maryland), J-10 

094 Surplus Properly (Md State Agency for), 0-12 

076 Symons Hall (Agriculture. Entomology). L-13 
030 Talbot Hall. H-15 

043 Taliaferro Hall (English). H-13 

141 Tawes Fine Arts BIdg , E-9 

053 Temporary Classroom BIdg AA. F-16 

056 Temporary BIdg CC (Nyumburu Community 

Center). F-15 

058 Temporary Classroom BIdg EE (Dance). F-16 

049 Temporary Classroom BIdg FF (Art Annex). E-13 

050 Temporary Classroom BIdg HH (An Annex). E-13 

067 Temporary Classroom BIdg, UU (Speech and 

Drama). F-14 

068 Temporary Classroom BIdg. TT (Art Annex). E-14 

039 Terrapin Hall. F-13 

079 Turner Lab (Darry) (Summer Programs). M-16 
042 Tydings Hall. Millard E., H-13 

147 Undergraduate Library, L-1 1 

250 University College (Center of Adult Ed ). A-6 

286 University Hills Apts (on Univ Blvd ). A-5 

005 University Press. 0-18 

023 Washington Hall (Dorm). G-17 

297 West Gate Security Booth. 1-3 

069 Wicomico Hall (Dorm). E-12 

081 Wind Tunnel. P-13 
047 Woods Hall. 1-14 

051 Worcester Hall (Dorm). G-12 
144 Zoology-Psychology BIdg. L-1 

207 Human Ecology Temp. (HEA). F-15 

208 Human Ecology Temp (HEB). F-15 

209 Human Ecology Temp. (NEC). F-13 



API 

AR 

ARC 

ARR 

AS 

BEB 

C 

CC 

COL 

D 

E 

EE 

F 

FF 

Q 

GQ 

GOi. 

H 

HAR 

HEA 

HEB 

HEC 

HMC 

I 

II 



SCHEDULE OF CLASSES 
DIRECTORY OF BUILDINQ CODES 

BUILDING LOG. NUM. 

Taliaferro Hall H-13 043 

Temporary Classroom BIdg. — AA....F-16 053 

Apiary J-4 156 

Reckord Armory L-15 078 

Architecture Building D-11 145 

Meeting place to be arranged 000 

Arl-Sociology Building E-10 146 

Beef Barn P-9 110 

Chemistry-Biochemistry BIdg N-11 091 

Temporary Classroom BIdg. — CC ...F-15 056 

Ritchie Coliseum M-17 004 

Turner Laboratory (Dairy) M-16 079 

H. J. Patterson Hall 1-11 073 

Temporary Classroom BIdg. — EE ....F-16 058 

Holzaptel Hall K-13 074 

Temporary Classroom BIdg. — FF ....E-13 049 

Journalism BIdg H-12 059 

Cole Student Activities BIdg H-8 162 

Golf Range Classroom D-1 165 

Marie Mount Hall J-14 046 

Harrison Laboratory 0-16 002 

Temporary Classroom BIdg F-15 207 

Temporary Classroom BIdg F-15 208 

Temporary Classroom BIdg E-13 209 

Home Management House G-18 027 

Shriver Laboratory K-12 075 

Jull Hall L-8 227 

Martin Engineering Classroom BIdg. 0-13 088 

Molecular Physics Building N-9 085 

McKeldin Library H-11 035 

Laboratory Animal Management 

Classroom CRF 783 

Foreign Languages BIdg 1-11 034 



MM 

N 

NN 

O 

00 



Q 

00 

R 

RR 

S 

SHB 

SS 

SSB 

STA 

SU 

T 

TT 

U 

ULB 

UU 



YY 

Z 

ZP 

zz 



Morrill Hall G-13 040 

Computer Science Center N-9 224 

Shoemaker BIdg H-14 037 

Tawes Fine Arts BIdg E-9 141 

Symons Hall L-13 076 

Education Building G-9 143 

J. M. Patterson Hall O-IO 083 

Physical Education, Recreation, 

& Health BIdg 0-6 255 

Tydings Hall H-13 042 

Horse Barn 0-9 108 

Woods Hall 1-14 047 

Francis Scott Key Hall H-13 048 

Martin Engineering Laboratory BIdg. 0-13 089 

Sheep Barn 0-9 109 

Space Sciences BIdg N-9 224 

Social Sciences Building G-14 038 

Byrd Stadium J-6 160 

Maryland Student Union J-10 163 

Skinner Building 1-14 044 

Temporary Classroom BIdg. — TT ....E-14 068 

Chemical Engineering BIdg P-11 090 

Undergraduate Library L-11 147 

Temporary Classroom BIdg. — UU....F-14 067 

Wind Tunnel P-13 081 

Preinkert Field House E-11 054 

Animal Sciences Building O-IO 142 

Dairy Barn and Large Animal 

Classroom P-IO 106 

East Poultry Laboratory BIdg M-8 229 

Mathematics BIdg N-13 084 

West Education Annex F-14 066 

Physics BIdg M-12 082 

Zoology-Psychology BIdg L-10 144 

Animal Sciences Annex P-9 104 



Note: Location "CRF " denotes Calvert Road facilities. 



86 



L; 



'% ^.. 



University of Maryland 
College Park Carnpus 




C E 



UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 

SUMMER SESSIONS 
TURNER LABORATORY 
COLLEGE PARK, MD. 20742 



NON-PROFIT ORG. 
U.S. POSTAGE 

PAID 
COLLEGE PARK, MD. 
PERMIT NO. 10