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Full text of "Summer sessions / University of Maryland, College Park"

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University Of Maryland 



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At the University Of Maryland... 




his summer can be your biggest ever. 

Big as your imagination. Big as the universe. Big as life! Everything 

you need is here in your hands — in our big, new Summer Guide 2000. 

It's your passport to a whole universe of learning. 

Now, for the first time, all courses, camps and special events of 

summer at the University of Maryland have been gathered together 

in a single, easy -to -reference manual. The information is organized 

by tabs, so you can zero in on your special interests. 

Here's what you'll find in each section: 





Academic Services 

Here are the basics, including admission procedures, registration 
and financial information and services all incorporated into SPOC, 
your Single Point Of Contact for information and service. 



Noncredit Courses and Special Events 

Check out this section for new noncredit courses 
including those leading to computer certifications, 
computer graphics, and language for travel that are 
open to the general public. 
A variety of performances and activities under the 
sponsorship of the Clarice Smith Performing Arts Center; 
the National History Program and the Regional Special 
Olympics are just some of the events that will 
be conducted on campus this summer. 






Campus Services 

The university is a mini-city 
with services from resident 
iving to libraries, health clubs 
to golf clubs, smoothies to 
shuttles. Also included is a 
map and the information you 
need to get around. 




E RS ITY OF 

YLAND 



Kids and Camps 

We're big on kids of all ages, 
with everything from arts 
programs to engineering and 
science, plus all kinds of 
sports camps for boys and 
girls headed by 
^ k"v Maryland's coaches. 





Course Offerings 

More than 1,700 undergraduate and graduate 
with descriptions and schedules. This section 
includes specialized institutes and programs 
for everything from advancing your career to 
archaeological digs in Annapolis. 

International 

Maryland is all over the world this summer. Study 

ecology in the rain forest, politics in Europe, culture 

and performing arts in Asia and more. Visiting international 

students can find the Maryland English Institute in this section. 




Forms 

Applications, registration, and the forms you'll need to get 
in and go. For information about application and registration 
materials for other programs, see specific listings for your 

programs of interest in the Special Events or Kids and 

Camps sections of this guide. 



J 




So make Summer 2000 
your most rewarding ever. 
Just open our guide 
anywhere... and go from there 






ou don't have to be a University of JVIaryiand student to take advantage of 
Summer 2000. Course registration is open to students and graduates from 
other colleges, students or graduates from high school, retired seniors who 
live in Maryland. ..simply put, we're here for you. 
So if you've always wanted to study at the University of Maryland, 
now is the time! 

Undergraduate and graduate classes are taught by University 
of Maryland faculty, and follow the same rigorous standards 
as courses offered during the regular semester. 
That makes this summer the perfect opportunity to 

• Accelerate your graduation 

• Meet eligibility requirements 
for a major 

• Try a course outside your field of study 

• Take a difficult course all by itself 

• Delve into a specialized workshop 
or institute 

• Study abroad 

• Enhance your professional skills and 
boost your career 

• Or simply expand your world 



jp quickly, so if you see a course 
you like, apply and register! Of course, if you're 
already a Maryland student, you simply need 
to register. To find out more, especially about 
eligibility, refer to the 
Academic Services 
section in this guide. 






^ 



Make our campus your home away from home. 



he University of Maryland is a city 
unto itself; more than 1,500 acres 
with some of the most sophisticated, 
state-of-the-art facilities in the nation. As 
a registered student, it's yours to explore 
and enjoy. 

You can take advantage of the recreational 
facilities on campus, outdoor and indoor 
pools, health fitness center and weight 
rooms, the Campus Recreational Center 
and golf course. We also have seven 
libraries including the National Archives II, 
science centers, a theater and performing 
arts building, the Stamp Student Union 
and University Book Center. 
If you're visiting our area for the summer, 
all of Washington, D.C. is right at your 
doorstep. From museums to historic 




monuments to theaters, it's 

all close at hand... 

the Smithsonian 

Institutions, 

the National 

Holocaust Museum, 

the National Gallery of Art, the 

Washington Monument, the Jefferson 

Memorial, The Capitol, the Kennedy 

Center, Ford's Theatre, the National Zoo 

and NASA to name a few. 

The heart of D.C. is about 20 minutes 

away and the Shuttle UM takes you 

to the College Park Metro station and 

back to the campus free of charge. The 

University of Maryland is ideal for summer 

interns visiting the nation's capital; ask 

about our on-campus housing. 






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Your passport to everything. 



The only password you'll 

need to know to enter this 

summer is SPOC. It stands 

for Single Point Of Contact, 

and it's our way of making 

the whole world of 

the University of Maryland 

accessible to you. 

Now, for any information or 

assistance you need on any 

course, call 1.877.989.SP0C 

or 301.314.3572 

or visit our web site at i 

www.umd.edu/summer 




UN I VE RS ITY OF 

^ MARYLAND 



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University of Maryland: 





^ttiiaoDii, 



Your #1 choice for your summer education — 
tlie University of IVIaryland has a big reputation. 

• We're a premier national research institution witin 
more than 3,000 research projects currently 
underway, from crime prevention to food safety, 
from ecological projects with NASA to Internet 2. 
Our engineering and business schools are ranked among the top 25 in the U.S. 
Our graduate programs in education, engineering, library science, computer science, physics 
and mathematics also are ranked in the top 25. 

Maryland has 24 Division I NCAA teams (12 men's, 12 women's). Our women's lacrosse 
team is an eight-time national champion: and national champion for the last five consecutive 
years: men's basketball enjoyed its fourth trip to the NCAA Sweet 16 in six years. Terrapin 
women's field hockey teams have advanced to the NCAA tournament quarterfinals for five 
consecutive years and won the national championship in 1999, and the softball squad 
came within one win of the College World Series last year. Maryland is the only school to 

advance to the second round of the NCAA men's 
soccer tourney for each of the last five years. 
• Maryland arts are in the forefront, too. 
By the end of this year, our Clarice Smith 
Performing Arts Center will create an extended arts 
village. With five theaters in one center, it'll be the 
largest performing arts facility on any college 
campus in the nation. 

Our invitation for you 

to come explore our fascinating world. 

Inside you'll find: 

Academic Services 

Campus Services 

Course Offerings 

International 

Noncredit Courses/Special Events 

VI. Kids and Camps 

VII. Forms 






^; UNIVERSITY OF 

^ MARYLAND 



Digitized by the Internet Archive 

in 2010 with funding from 

Lyrasis Members and Sloan Foundation 



http://www.archive.org/details/summersessionsun2000univ 




HOW 



I G IS 



S U 



M E R ? 



Table Of Contents 

Academic Calendar for Summer Sessions 2000 2 

New Services Introduced in Summer Sessions 2000: 

SPOC (Single Point Of Contact) 4 

Summer Session III: A Three- Week 

Accelerated Session 5 

Important Contact Information 5 

Summer Sessions Attendance Flowchart: 

Flowchart for Admission, Registration, 

Payment, etc 5 

Applying for Summer Sessions 2000: 

SPOC (Single Point Of Contact) 6 

Undergraduate Students: 

Visiting College Students, College Graduates 

and High School Graduates 6 

Current High School Students 7 

Golden ID Students 7 

Former University of Maryland, 

College Park Students 7 

Prospective Degree Students 7 

Graduate Students 8 

University of Maryland 

College Park Graduate Students 8 

Prospective Degree Students 8 

Visiting Graduate Students 8 

Institute Students 9 

Advanced Special Students 

(Non-degree Post-baccalaureate Students) 9 

Golden ID Students 9 

Registering for Summer Sessions 2000: 

SPOC (Single Point Of Contact) 9 

Student Addresses — Keeping Current 9 

Who Can Register Without Submitting 
a Summer Application: 

Current UM, College Park Students 

(Undergraduate and Graduate) 10 

New Admits for Fall 2000 

(Undergraduate and Graduate) 10 

Current University System of Maryland 

Graduate Students 10 

When to Register 10 

How to Register 11 

Other Registration Information: 

Deadlines Chart for Registration and 

Schedule Adjustment 12 

Late Registration 11 

"Non-Standard Course" Registration 11 



Waitlist 12 

Waitlist Check-in 13 

Veterans 13 

Cancellation of Courses by the Uruversity 

of Maryland 13 

Cancellation of Summer Session(s) 

Registration by the Student 13 

Withdrawal from Summer Sessions 13 

Grades 14 

Transcripts, Requests by Students 14 

Paying for Summer Sessions 2000: 

In-state Status for Admission and Tuition 14 

Tuition Rates 14 

Fees: 

Application Processing Fees 14 

Housing (on-campus) Fees 15 

Late Registration Fee 15 

Mandatory Services Fees 15 

Maryland English Institute Fees 15 

Parking Fees 15 

Special Course-Related Fees 15 

Service for Dishonored Check Fee 15 

Audit 15 

Special Workshops and Institutes 15 

Payment: 

When to Pay 15 

How to Pay 15-16 

Other Payment Information: 

Finance Charge 16 

Delinquent Accounts 16 

Summer Financial Aid 16-17 

Refunds 17 

Tuition Refimd Schedule 16 

Academic Credit and Policies: 

Academic Credit 17 

Academic Policies: 

Academic Dishonesty 18 

Audit 18 

Code of Academic Integrity 18 

Degree Candidates 18 

Final Examination 18 

Full-time Status 18 

Maximum Load 18 

Pass-Fail Option 18 

Protection of Privacy 19 

Index 19 



The Summer Guide is an amiual publiiation of the University ot Maryland Summer Sessions and Special Programs. Provisions of this publication are not 

to be regarded as an irrevocable contract between the student and the University of Maryland. While every effort is made to provide the most current and 

accurate information, at times regulations, academic requirements, fees and class scheduling may change without notice. 

The University of Maryland does not discriminate on the basis of race, color, religion, national origin, sex, age, or handicap in admiss 

or access to or treatment or employment in its programs and activities as required by federal and state laws and regulations. 

Photos contributed by: University Publications, academic departments, Department of Intercollegiate Athletics, 
Office of International Education Services and Special dlynipics. 





Academic Calendar 
Summer Sessions 2000 



SESSION 1 
6/5-7/14 


SESSION II 
7/17-8/2 5 


SESSION III* 
6/5-6/23 




Jan. 15 


Jan. 1 5 


Jan. 15 


Summer financial aid applications available in 1 1 35 Lee Building 


Mar. 1 


Mar.1 


Mar.1 


Acceptance of applications for admission to Summer Sessions begins 


Mar. 27 


Mar. 27 


Mar. 27 


Registration for Summer Sessions begins 


Mar. 31 


Mar. 31 


Mar. 31 


Priority deadline for summer financial aid application 


Apr. 14 


Apr. 14 


Apr. 14 


Deadline to submit Residence Halls Agreement for single room lottery & other housing req. 


Mayl 


June 1 


Mayl 


Deadline for applying for reinstatement 


Mays 


June 19 


Mays 


Deadline for release from Residence Halls Agreement 


May 26 


July 7 


May 26 


Deadline to apply for admission by mail or fax; deadline for mailed or faxed registration 


June 2 


July 14 


June 2 


Last day to cancel registration with 1 00% refund 


June 2 


July 14 


June 2 


Last day to drop a course with 1 00% refund 


June 2 


July 14 


June 2 


Deadline to apply for admission by Web or in person; 

Deadline for MARS, Web, or in-person registration without late registration fee 


June 4 


July 16 


June 4 


Residence halls open at 10 a.m. 


Junes 


July 17 


Junes 


Rooms not claimed by noon are forfeited and "no show" cancellation charge is assessed 


Junes 


July 17 


Junes 


Session begins 


Junes 


July 17 


Junes 


Late registration begins ($20 fee) 


June 9 


July 21 


June 7 


Deadline for submitting documentation for classification as Maryland resident 


June 9 


July 21 


June 7 


Schedule adjustment period ends (see p.12) 


June 16 


July 28 


June 9 


Last day to withdraw from all sessions courses with a 50% refund 


n/a 


n/a 


June 23 


Session III residents not enrolled for Session 1 or II must vacate residence halls by 7 p.m. 


June 23 


Aug. 4 


n/a 


Last day to withdraw from all sessions courses with a 20% refund 


July 4 


n/a 


n/a 


University closed for Independence Day 


July 14 


n/a 


n/a 


Session 1 residents not enrolled for Session II must vacate residence halls by 7 p.m. 


July 14 


Aug. 25 


June 23 


Last day to withdraw from all session courses with no refund 


July 14 


Aug. 25 


June 23 


Session ends 


July 21 


July 21 


July 21 


Deadline for summer graduation application 


n/a 


Aug. 25 


n/a 


Residence halls closed at noon 



"New, three-week accelerated session 
FOR OTHER REGISTRATION-RELATED DATES, SEE CHARTS ON PAGE 12 
FOR WITHDRAWAL AND REFUNDS SCHEDULE, SEE CHART ON PAGE 16 



HOW BIG IS SUMMERS 





M^ 



SPOC: Single Point 
Of Contact 

SPOC is a pilot program for Summer Sessions 
2000. It has been created as a one-stop shop 
for students seeking information about or 
wishing to enroll in Summer Sessions 2000. 
SPOC also is a virtual office for those inquiring, 
applying, registering or paying on the Web. 

Contact SPOC 

On the Web: www.umd.edu/summer 
By e-mail: summer@umail.umd.edu 
By phone: 1 -877-989-SPOC; 301-314-3572 
By fax: 301-314-1282 

In person or by mail: 

1101 Mitchell Building 

University of Maryland 

College Park, MD 20742 



C] 



Forms 



Complete the applicable forms: 
Application for admission for 
visiting graduate or undergraduate 
students, new graduate students, 
high school students, new Golden ID 
students, reinstatement form for former 
Maryland students; Permission to Transfer 
Credits Form for visiting UG; course registration 
form; Estimated Billing Form; Summer 2000 
Residence Halls Agreement; parking permit 
application (new and visiting students) (see 
Form H of the "Forms" section of this guide.) 

Applying for 
Summer Sessions 

The application process is quick 
and easy. If you fit into one of the 
categories below, apply to the 
University of Maryland for summer courses. 

Apply if you are: 

Visiting undergraduate college student 
Visiting graduate student 
Former College Park student (if you did 
not attend spring 2000 session) 
College graduate 
High school graduate 
Current high school student 
Prospective College Park student 
Summer Institute student 
New Golden ID student 
Advanced special student (non-degree 
post-baccalaureate students) 





New Services Introduced in 
Summer Sessions 2000 

SPOC: Single Point Of Contact 

First, a word about SPOC: SPOC, the Single Point Of 
Contact, a pilot program for Summer Sessions 2000, has 
been created as a one-stop shop for students seeking 
information about or wishing to enroll in the Summer 
Sessions 2000. Our expectation is (and yours should be) 
that a prospective student can make a phone call to one 
toll-free number and find out anything about the summer 
sessions: courses offered, tuition, fees, classroom 
assignments, instructors, services, extracurricular 
activities, events and camps, as well as the status of 
individual admission, registration, bill payment and 
waitlisted courses. SPOC will have representatives or 
ombudspersons representing all the service sectors of 
campus: admission (graduate and undergraduate), 
registrar, bursar, academic departments, parking, student 
ID and residency. SPOC, centrally located and 
handicapped accessible, is in room 1101 Mitchell Building. 
(See map on page 7 of the "Campus Life" section of this guide.) 

SPOC is open Monday - Friday, 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. There 
will be extended hours during the week preceding the 
start of each summer session and through the first week of 
classes: 8 a.m. to 6 p.m., from May 30 - June 9 for Sessions 
1 and III and from July 11 - July 21 for Session II. 

SPOC is also a virtual office for those inquiring, 
applying, registering or paying on the Web. Each step in 
the admission /registration /payment process will be 
quickly and formally recognized by a corifirmation — either 
by surface mail, fax or e-mail. We encourage you to take 
advantage of electronic communications: The Summer 
Guide 2000 is on the Web, including all the appropriate 
forms for admission, registration, housing, parking and 
bill estimation. Information about textbooks is also 
on the Web. 

Our goal is to be the most student-centered, user-friendly 
organization in higher education. If you have a question or 
concern, SPOC has the answer, a solution or a 
recommendation. Contact SPOC: 

• On the Web: www.umd.edu/summer 

• By e-mail: summer@umail.umd.edu 

• By phone: 1-877-989-SPOC; 301-314-3572 

• By fax: 301-314-1282 

• In person or by mail: 1101 Mitchell Building 

University of Maryland 
College Park, MD 20742 



HOW BIG 



SUMMER? 



Summer Session III: A Three-Week Accelerated Session 

Summer Sessions 2000 introduce a new, three-week accelerated session: Session HI. Session HI course sections begin 
with "03" in the summer schedule of classes. Use the standard registration form to register for them. There is a one course 
(4 credit) limit for Session III. Registration for Session III begins at the same time as registration for Sessions I and 11: 
March 1. Session III begins the same day as Session 1 (June 5) and ends June 23. See the Session III section of the Academic 
Calendar on page 2 for deadlines. Current high school students are not eligible to register for Session III courses. 

Grades for Session III will be available at the same time as grades for Session I, approximately July 28. 



Important Contact Information 



Single Point Of Contact (SPOC) 

Telephone: 301-314-3572 
Toll-free: 1-877-989-SPOC 
Fax: 301-314-1282 
E-mail: summer@umail.umd.edu 
Internet: www.umd.edu/summer 
Mail: 1101 Mitchell Building 
University of Maryland 
College Park, MD 20742 

Admission 
Graduate 

Telephone: 301-405-4198 
Fax: 301-314-9305 
grschool@deans.umd.edu 
w~ww.umd.edu/grad 
2117 Lee Building 
Undergraduate 
Telephone: 301-314-8385 
Toll-free: 1-800-422-5867 
Fax: 301-314-9693 
um-admit@uga.umd.edu 
www.uga.umd.edu 
0103 Mitchell Building 



Bursar's Office 

Telephone: 301-314-9000 
Toll-free: 1-888-313-2404 
Fax: 301-314-9098 
billtalk@accmail.umd.edu 
1135 Lee Building 

Financial Aid 

Telephone: 301-314-9000 
Toll-free: 1-888-313-2404 
Fax: 301-314-9587 
umfinaid@osfa.umd.edu 
1135 Lee Building 

The Maryland Book Exchange 

Telephone: 301-927-2510 
www.marylandbook.com 
4500 College Avenue 
College Park, MD 20740 

Reenrollment 

Telephone: 301-314-8382 
0117 Mitchell Building 

Registrar 

Telephone: 301-314-8240 

Phone regis.: MARS 301-403-0500 

Fax: 301-314-9568 

testudo@accmail.umd.edu 

www.testudo.umd.edu 

1101 Mitchell Building 



Resident Life (Housing) 

Telephone: 301-314-2100 
reslife@accmail.umd.edu 
www.umd.edu/RES 
2101 Annapolis Hall 

Student Financial Services Center 

Telephone: 301-314-9000 

Toll-free: 1-888-313-2404 

1135 Lee Bulding 

University Book Center 

Telephone: 301-314-2665 

Toll-free: 1-800-343-6621 

textbooks@ubcmail.umd.edu 

www.ubc.umd.edu 

Stamp Student Union, Lower Level 

Veterans Affairs 

Telephone: 301-314-8239 
1101 Mitchell Building 



^\, limn tor admission for 
I Complete the '■'PP>'"^^'^;':;""j;ite students, new graduate students, 
visiting graduate or ""'^'^^S"f "f ,Ds,udents. reinstatement form 
high school students, "^^^ golden UJs^^ ^^^ ^^^^^^^^^ Cred.ts Form 
for former Maryland students 1 '•.™'^^ Estimated Billing Form; 
t 'l..mg UU ^--/H^CI^-^nt rarkmg PermU Applicat,.^ 
Summer 2000 R'^«''!^X "f(|^S^Forms section of lh>s gu>de.)^ 
(new and visiting students) (bee tne r ^^ 



APPLY 

Web: wvvw.unid.edu / summer 

Fax: 301-314-1282 

Mail or in person: 
SPOC 

1101 Mitchell Bldg 
Universit\' Of Maryland 
College Park, MD 20742 

(Exception: High school students 

apply to Undergraduate 

Admissions. See p. 7) 



^ apply to unaergraauaie 

j-> r-— ■ .,—._. __^ 1 Admissions. See p. 7) 

i'l']1'"'S''"''"^''>''"^'"-'''<^''"PV'ourIDatSPOC- Ifc^^*— '^ 

1101 Mitchell Bldg. Check the Web to see what books vou 



PARKING PERMIT: 

(If not a-ceivcd by mail): Take a photo ID to 
campus parking in Regents Dr. earaee 
oft Campus Dr 6 f, ■ 




Check the Web lo see what books vou 
need, www.umd.edu/summer, then 
"Schedule of Classes." Click on the 
dept., then course, then "Books' Buy 
your texts at the Univ. Book Ctr. in the 
Union, at the Maryland Book Exchange 
or from any vendor that carries them: 
varsitybooks.com, etc. 



Bills will Ix' mailed. Pay via: 
Web: www.umd.edu/summer 
Phone: 301-403-0500 (MARS) 
301-314-9000, 1-888-313-2404 
Fax: 301-314-9098 (Bursar) 
Mail: use return envelope with bill 
In Person: 1115 Lee Bldg. 




Application for summer courses is not 
necessary for: 

Current University of IVIaryland, College 
Park students (enrolled for the spring 
2000 semester) 

University System of Maryland graduate 
students in good standing 

Newly admitted College Park students 
(admitted for the fall 2000 semester) 

Apply online at www.umd.edu/summer, by fax, 
by mail or drop off in person. 

Deadline for applying: 

By mail or fax May 26 for Sessions I and III; July 

7 for Session II; 

Online or in person June 2 for Sessions I and III; 

July 14 for Session II. 

Once you are admitted: 

An e-mail/mail acknowledgement will be sent. 





Applying for Summer 
Sessions 2000 



SPOC: Single Point Of Contact 

SPOC, the Single Point Of Contact, a pilot program for 
Summer Sessions 2000, has been created as a one-stop 
shop for students seeking information about or wishing 
to enroll in Surrmier Sessions 2000. By contacting SPOC, 
you can find out anything about the summer sessions: 
courses offered, tuition, fees, classroom assignments, 
instructor assignments, textbooks, services and 
extracurricular activities, as well as the status of 
individual admission, registration, bill payment and 
waitlisted courses. SPOC is in Room 1101 Mitchell 
Building. SPOC also is a virtual office for those inquiring, 
applying, registering or paying bills on the Web. 

For more information on SPOC, see page 4. 



Register for courses undergraduate Students 



Register for summer courses 
beginning March 1 using one of the 
five methods below. 



Registration without $20 late fee for Summer I 
and III ends June 2. Registration without $20 
late fee for Summer II ends July 14. 

How to Register: 

There are five ways to register for summer 
courses. Apply first if you are not a current 
University of Maryland student. 

1. Register on the Web at www.testudo.umd.edu 

2. Call MARS, the Maryland Automated 
Registration System, at 301-403-0500 

3. Mail in registration form 

4. Fax registration form 

5. Register in person at the Office of the 
Registrar, 1101 Mitchell Building 

Registration Notes 

Registration is not official until payment is made 
in full. If you register, and later decide not to 
attend the university, you must cancel your 
registration in writing to SPOC prior to the first 
day of classes. Some students may be blocked 
from using Testudo and MARS for registration, 
including those owing an outstanding debt. 



Visiting College Students, College Graduates 
and High School Graduates 

If you are a student from another college or university, 
you must be in good standing at that institution to be 
admitted for the summer sessions. It is your 
responsibility to ensure that the courses you take at 
the University of Maryland College Park may be 
transferred to your degree program at your home 
institution. You may complete the Permission to Transfer 
Credits Form (see the "Forms" section of this guide) prior 
to attending Summer Sessions 2000 and have it signed by 
your advisor or dean as a record for your personal use 
that the credits earned here are acceptable toward your 
degree at that institution. (You will need to request a 
transcript from Maryland in order to have those credits 
transferred to your home institution. See page 14 for 
instructions on requesting transcripts.) 

If you are a college graduate, that is sufficient for taking 
undergraduate courses at the university. 

If you are a high school graduate, you must have earned 
a grade point average of 2.0 or better to be admitted to 
the summer sessions. 

To apply: 

• On the Web: You may apply and pay your 
application processing fee online at 
www.umd.edu/summer. Complete the Visiting 
Undergraduate Summer Student Application 
2000 and pay the non-refundable $45 application 
processing fee ($65 for international students). 



HOW 



SUMMER? 



• By mail, by fax or in person: Complete the 
Visiting Undergraduate Summer Student 
Application 2000 in the "Forms" section of this 
guide. Submit the application and your non- 
refundable $45 application processing fee ($65 
for international students) to SPOC. 

It is recommended that you submit your registration 
form with your application materials. 

Current High School Students 

You must be entering your junior or senior year in fall 
2000 and must have earned a grade point average of 3.0 
or better. High school students are not eligible to 
register for Session III courses. For Summer Sessions 
2000 admissions only, the following are not required: 
counselor recommendation, essay, SAT 1 or ACT scores. 

To apply: 

• On the Web: You may apply and pay your 
application processing fee online at 
www.uga.umd.edu. You will still need to 
submit your high school transcripts by mail to: 

Undergraduate Admissions 
University of Maryland 
0103 Mitchell Building 
CoUege Park, MD 20742 

• By mail, by fax or in person: Complete a 
regular undergraduate application for 
admission (not the Summer 2000 application 
for admission). You may download it from the 
Web at www.uga.umd.edu or request it from 
Undergraduate Admissions, 301-314-8385. 

On question 1, write "summer 2000." On question 15, 
mark "Concurrent — attend part-time while enrolled in 
high school." 

Send the application, along with an official copy of 
your high school transcript and your non-refundable $45 
application processing fee, to the Office of 
Undergraduate Admissions. 

It is recommended that you submit your registration 
form with your application materials. 

Golden ID Students 

The Uni\'ersity of Maryland Golden Identification 
Program makes courses and services available to 
persons who are 60 years of age or older who are legal 
residents of Maryland and who are retired (not 
employed more than 20 hours/week). Apply for 



undergraduate courses by completing a Visiting 
Undergraduate Summer Student Application 2000, 
indicating in the appropriate section that you are 
applying as a Golden ID student. Submit it to SPOC. 
The application is in the "Forms" section of this guide. 
SPOC's address is on page 4. 

You will receive instructions on how to register. You may 
begin registering on the first day of classes, and may 
register for up to two courses per session, when space is 
available. You must meet all of the courses' prerequisites 
and co-requisites. Golden ID students are not eligible for 
Consortium classes. Tuition charges are waived, but you 
must pay the mandatory fees. (See the Estimated Billing 
Form in the "Forms" section of this guide.) 

Your Golden ID registration entitles you to use the 
libraries and certain non-academic services. For more 
information, contact the Golden ID Coordinator: 1101 
Mitchell Building, 301-314-8219. 

Former University of Maryland, 
College Park Students If you are a 
former Maryland student who: 

• Attended in a prior term as a visiting student, 
you must re-apply for admission as a visiting 
student and pay the application processing fee. 
Follow the instructions for visiting college 
students on page 6. 

• Attended Maryland in a past fall or spring 
semester but did not attend spring semester 
2000, contact the Office of ReenroUment in 
Room 0117 Mitchell Building, 301-314-8382. 

Prospective Degree Students 

The University of Mapy'land formally admits undergraduate 
students for the fall and spring semesters only. 

• If you have not been formally admitted to a 
degree program at Maryland and wish to take a 
course during the summer sessions, follow the 
instructions for visiting students. 

• If you have been formally accepted into a 
degree program at Maryland for the fall 2000, 
you are eligible to register for summer without 
applying for admission to the summer sessions. 




/^Difk 



After Registration 

• Estimate your tuition and fees (see 
page 14); you will be billed 

• If you want to change your schedule, 
you can add/drop on the Web, MARS or 
in person. 

• ID cards will be mailed with registration 
materials 

• First day of classes information, 
call SPOC 

• Check online for class locations; waitlist 

Summary of Deadlines 

The schedule adjustment period ends June 9 
for Summer Session I, July 21 for Summer 
Session II and June 7 for Summer Session III. 

Cancellation of Summer Session Registration 

Students who register and later decide not to 
attend the university must cancel their 
registration before the first day of classes. 
After the first day of classes this is 
considered a withdrawal, and a percentage of 
tuition is assessed. 

Failure to cancel registration will result in 
financial obligation to the university even 
though the student does not attend class. 
Request for cancellation must be received by 
SPOC in writing before the first day of classes. 




Payment 



Bills will be mailed. 

Pay via: 

Web: www.umd.edu/summer 

Phone: 301-314-9000; 

1-888-313-2404 
MARS#: 301-403-0500 
Fax: 301-314-9098 (Bursar) 
Mall: use return envelope with bill 
In person: 1115 Lee Building 
(If you register and decide not to attend, you 
must cancel in writing before classes or you 
are still required to pay.) 




Graduate Students 

University of Maryland, 
College Park Graduate Students 

If you are currently enrolled as a graduate student in 
good standing, you do not have to apply unless you 
wish to change your major, department, or degree 
requirements, in which case you must file a regular 
Graduate School Application and meet departmental 
requirements and deadlines. The application is available 
from the Office of Graduate Admissions. 

Prospective Degree Students 

If you wish to begin your degree program in Summer 
Sessions 2000, you must file a regular Graduate School 
Application Form, meet departmental requirements and 
deadlines, and pay your $50 application processing fee. 
Apply to the Office of Graduate Admissions. 

Visiting Graduate Students, Institute Students, 
Advanced Special Students (Non-degree Post- 
baccalaureate Students) and Golden ID Students: 

To apply: 

• On the Web: Complete the Visiting Graduate 
Summer Student Application 2000 and pay the 
$50 non-refundable application processing fee 
online at wwvv.umd.edu/summer. For 
additional instructions, see your category, below. 

• By mail, by fax, or in person: Complete the 
Visiting Graduate Summer Student Application 
2000 in the "Forms" section of this guide. 
Submit the application and your non-refundable 
$50 application processing fee to SPOC. It is 
recommended that you submit your 
registration form with your application 
materials. For additional instructions, see 

your category, below. 

Visiting Graduate Students 

If you are a graduate student at a university or college 
outside the Uruversity System of Maryland, you are 
considered a visiting graduate student. Transcripts are 
not required, but a letter stating you are in good 
academic standing and that the courses taken at the 
University of Maryland will be transferred to your home 
institution must be signed by your dean and submitted 
via fax, surface mail or in person. 






HOW B 



SUMMER? 



Institute Students 

Institute students must comply with requirements 
stated in the literature published about the institute in 
which they are enrolling. 

Advanced Special Students 

(Non-degree Post-baccalaureate Students): 

If you wish to earn graduate credit without enrolling in 
a degree program and do not qualify for admission as a 
visiting student, you must apply (checking the 
"Advanced Special Student" box on the application), pay 
the non-refundable $50 application processing fee and 
meet one of the four following criteria (verifiable by an 
official transcript): 

1. Hold a baccalaureate degree from a regionally- 
accredited institution with an o\'eraJl "B" (3.0) average. 

2. Hold a master's or doctoral degree from a 
regionally-accredited institution. 

3. Hold a baccalaureate degree from a regionally- 
accredited institution and have at least four 
years of post-baccalaureate work or professional 
experience. 

4. Hold a baccalaureate degree from a regionally- 
accredited institution and, within the last five 
years, have taken either the Graduate Record 
Examination (GRE) (required minimum score: 1020 
on the combined Verbal and Quantative sections), 
the Graduate Management Admissions Test 
(GMAT) (required minimum score: 500), or the 
Miller's Analogies Test (MAT) (required score: 51). 
Original test scores must be attached to the 
application or sent from the testing agency to the 
Office of Graduate Admissions. 

If you have previously enrolled as an Advanced Special 
Student, your graduate application is valid for five years 
from the semester or summer session for which you 
originally enrolled. Otherwise, you must submit another 
application, although you are not required to pay 
another application processing fee. 

Golden ID Students 

The University of Maryland Golden Identification 
Program makes courses and services available to persons 
who are 60 years of age or older who are legal residents 
of Maryland and who are retired (not employed more 
than 20 hours/week). For more information, see page 7. 



Registering for Summer 
Sessions 2000 



SPOC: Single Point Of Contact 

SPOC, the Single Point Of Contact, a pilot program for 
Summer Sessions 2000, has been created as a one-stop 
shop for students seeking informahon about or wishing 
to enroll in the Summer Sessions 2000. By contacting 
SPOC, you can find out anything about the summer 
sessions: courses offered, tuition, fees, classroom 
assignments, instructor assignments, textbooks, services 
and extracurricular activities, as well as the status of 
individual admission, registration, bill payment and 
waitlisted courses. SPOC is in Room 1101 Mitchell 
Building. SPOC is also a \'irtual office for those inquiring, 
applying, registering or paying bills on the Web. 

For more information on SPOC, see page 4. 



Student Addresses - Keeping Current 

Because many universit)' communications to students 
will be handled through the mail and e-mail, it is 
important that the student provide accurate, up-to-date 
local, permanent and e-mail addresses throughout the 
enrollment period. These communications include 
registration schedules and bills. Address changes can be 
made at any time in the session in which they occur. 
Any student wishing her or his address to be kept 
confidential cjm indicate this in the address change process. 
Contact SPOC at 1-877-989-SPOC or 301-314-3572 if 
you have any questions about address information. 

Address changes can be made in four ways: 

1. On the Web: vvww.testudo.umd.edu 

2. Through SPOC: 1101 Mitchell Building 
Monday - Friday, 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. 

WW w.umd .edu / summer 
summer@umail.umd.edu 
1-877-989-SPOC; 301-314-3572 
Fax: 301-314-1282 

3. At the Cashier's Office: 1115 Lee Building 
Monday - Friday, 8:30 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. 

4. At the Student Financial Service Center 
1135 Lee Building 

Monday - Friday, 8:30 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. 




a^k. 





Textbooks 

Check the Web to see what 
books you need. Click on 
www.umd.edu/summer. Click 
on the department, then the 
course, and then book. You can 
purchase your books at the 
University Book Center in the 
Student Union; at the Maryland 
Book Exchange; an online vendor 
(e.g.,varsitybooks.com), or any 
other textbook vendor. 



Attend 
Class! 




10 




ID Card 

(If not received by mail) 
Pick up your ID at SPOC, 
1101 Mitchell Building. 



Parking 
Permit 4 

(If not received by mail) 
Take a photo ID to Campus 
Parking in Regents Drive 
Garage, off Campus Drive. 
See map on page 7 of the 
"Campus Services" section of 
this guide for exact location. 





Who Can Register Without 
Submitting A Summer Application 

Current University of Maryland, College Park 
Students (Undergraduate and Graduate): 

If you are a current student at the University of 
Maryland, College Park and are or were enrolled Spring 
Semester 2000, you may register for Summer Sessions 
classes without completing a summer application. 

New Admits for Fall 2000 
(Undergraduate and Graduate): 

If you have been admitted to the university for 
Summer Sessions 2000 or for Fall 
Semester 2000, you may register. 

W^^^^lk Current University 
^^^^^V System of Maryland 
.^^^^^ Graduate Students: 

/^^r If you are a graduate student at 

another University System of Maryland 
institution, you do not need to apply, but must 
submit an inter-campus registration form, 
available at your school. 

It must be authorized by both your home campus and, 
through SPOC, by the University of Maryland, College 
Park Office of Inter-campus Enrollment. 

All other students must complete the appropriate 
application for admission and be admitted to the 
university (see pages 4 - 9). If you have any questions, 
contact SPOC. 

When To Register 

You can register for summer courses beginning March 1, 
2000. Registration for Summer Session I and Summer 
Session III (without a late registration fee) continues 
through June 2. Registration for Summer Session EI 
(without a late registration fee) is available through July 14. 
Check the Academic Calendar on page 2 for schedule 
adjustment deadlines. 



NEED HELP? 

For more information call SPOC 
1-877-989 SPOC or 301-314-3572 



sasK. 



•sm 



HOW BIG IS SUMMER? 



It is your responsibility to notify the university if you 
register and later decide not to attend. Failure to 
cancel registration will result in financial obligation to 
the university even though you do not attend class. 
(See "Late Registration" on this page.) 

How To Register 

There are FOUR ways to register for summer courses: 

1. On the Web by accessing www.testudo.umd.edu. 
Use your student ID number (Social Security 
number) and PIN. Your initial PIN is your six-digit 
birth date (MMDDYY). Once you have accessed the 
system, you will be required to change this to 
another six-digit number. If you are registering for 
audit or pass-fail, choose that option; the default is 
the regular grading method. (See the "Academic 
Credit and Policies" section on pages 17-19 for 
more information about auditing and the pass-fail 
grading option.) A bill with your payment due date 
will be sent to you. 

2. By phone by calling the Maryland Automated 
Registration System (MARS) at 301-403-0500, seven 
days a week from 7:30 a.m. to 10:45 p.m. Use the 
MARS worksheet in the "Forms" section of this guide 
to help you through the process. Use your student ID 
number (Social Security number) and PIN. Your initial 
PIN is your six-digit birth date (MMDDYY). Once you 
have accessed the system, you wUI be required to 
change this to another six-digit number Should you 
have problems with the system, the MARS Helpline is 
available Monday - Friday from 8:30 a.m. to 4:30 p.m.: 
301-314-1600. A bill with your payment due date 
will be sent to you. 

If you are registering for audit or pass-fail, choose 
that option; the default is the regular grading 
method. (See the "Academic Credit and Policies" 
section on pages 17 - 19 for more information about 
auditing and the pass-fail grading option.) 

3. In writing — by mail or fax: A summer course 
registration form appears in the "Forms" section of 
this guide. It may also be printed from the Web 
(www.umd.edu/summer) or picked up at or 
requested from SPOC. It is recommended that you 
submit your admissions materials (if applicable) 
with your registration form. (Action will not be 
taken on your registration until your application 
has been processed and you have been admitted.) 
Submit your materials to SPOC. A bill with your 
payment due date will be sent to you. 



4. In person: Visit SPOC, Monday - Friday, 8 a.m. to 
5 p.m. There will be extended hours for Ln-person 
registration during the week preceding the start of 
each summer session and through the first week of 
classes: SPOC will be open 8 a.m. to 6 p.m. from 
May 30 - June 9 for Sessions I and 111 and from 
July 11 -July 21 for Session II. Note: Schedule 
adjustments for Session III will not be processed 
after June 7. It is recommended that you submit 
your admissions materials (if applicable) with your 
registration form. (Action will not be taken on your 
registration until your application has been 
processed and you have been admitted.) A bill 
with your payment due date will be sent to you. 

Confirmation of registration, along with your summer 
ID (for new and visiting students), will be mailed to you 
within two weeks. If you do not receive confirmation, 
call SPOC at 1-877-989-SPOC or at 301-314-3572 
or send e-mail to summer@umail.umd.edu. 

Other Registration Information 

Deadlines Chart for Registration and 
Schedule Adjustment 

A chart of deadlines tor registration and schedule 
adjustment appears on the next page. 

Late Registration 

A $20 late registration fee will be assessed for 
registrations initiated on or after the first day of classes 
for each summer session. During late registration, all 
tuition, fees and outstanding balances must be paid at 
the time of registration. 

"Non-Standard Course" Registration 

During the normal registration periods for each 
session, you may register for courses which vary In 
beginning dates from the summer sessions' starting 
dates. Additionally, registration is available on the first 
day of each non-standard class or an alternate dav if 
arranged by the department or instructor. Summer 
Sessions 2000 introduces a new, three-week accelerated 
session. Session III, that begins the same day as 
Session I (June 5) and ends June 23. 

Courses varying in length from the regular summer 
session will have late registration, schedule adjustment 
and other dates adjusted proportionately to the length of 
the course. Contact SPOC at 1-877-989-SPOC or 
301-314-3572 for specific dates and terms. 






Courses varying in length from the regular summer sessions will have late registration, schedule adjustment and other 
dates adjusted proportionately to the length of the course. See page 11 for more information on non-standard courses. 



REGISTRATION AND SCHEDULE ADJUSTMENT - UNDERGRADUATE 


TYPE OF CHANGE 


LAST DAY TO PROCESS CHANGE 




SESSION I 


SESSION n 


SESSION m 


Late registration begins with ($20 late fee) First Day of Classes: 


June 5 


Jime 17 


June 5 


Add a Course 


June 9 


July 21 


June 7 


Cancel Registration 


June 2 


July 14 


June 2 


Drop a Course: 








- Without "W" Mark 


June 9 


July 21 


June 7 


- With "W" Mark 


June 30 


Aug. 11 


June 15 


Change Credit Level 


June 9 


July 21 


June 7 


Change Grading Method 


June 9 


July 21 


June 7 


Change Section (without department approval) 


June 9 


July 21 


June 7 


Change Section (with department approval) 


June 30 


Aug 11 


June 15 



REGISTRATION AND SCHEDULE ADJUSTMENT - GRADUATE 


TYPE OF CHANGE 


LAST DAY TO PROCESS CHANGE 




SESSION I 


SESSION II 


SESSION III 


Late registration begins with ($20 late fee) First Day of Classes: 


June 5 


June 17 


June 5 


Add a Course: 








- Without Department Approval 


June 9 


July 21 


June 7 


- With Department Approval 


Jtme 30 


Aug. 11 


June 15 


Cancel Registration 


June 2 


July 14 


June 2 


Drop a Course 


June 30 


Aug 11 


June 15 


Change Credit Level 


June 30 


Aug 11 


June 15 


Change Section (without department approval) 


June 9 


July 21 


June 7 


Change Section (with department approval) 


June 30 


Aug 11 


June 15 



Waitlist 

The waitlist is a roster of students waiting for a seat to 
become available in a closed /filled course. The waitlist 
stores names Ln order of request and allows access to 
seats as drops are processed. If a waitlist is available, it 
will be offered when you attempt to add a closed course. 
If you select the waitlist option, you will be placed on 
the waitlist for a closed section and for up to five 
additional sections if they are available. 

• Not all departments offer waitlists. It is the 
decision of the department whether to offer 
a waitlist. 

• To be eligible for the waitlist, you cannot 
be registered for any other section of the 
desired course. 



It is recommended that you complete your 
schedule with alternate course choices: Being 
placed on a waitlist does not guarantee you will 
be registered in the course. 

You may select to be waitlisted on up to six 
sections of a course. The first section to become 
available will be assigned to you. Since you will 
then be registered for a section, your name will 
be removed from all other waitlisted sections of 
the course. 

Time conflicts and excessive credit load violations 
that might result from receiving a course from 
the waitlist must be resolved. 

Once you are registered in a course for which 
you were waitlisted, it becomes part of your 
schedule and you become responsible for the 
tuition charge. 



12 



HOW B 



IS S U 



M E R ? 



Waitlist Check-in: 

Once on a waitlist, you may check on your status 
regularly; however, you must check in on the mandatory 
check-in day, typically the first day of the summer 
session. If you are still on the waitlist after the first day 
of mandatory check-in, you must then check in daily to 
remain on the waitlist. Waitlist activity ends with the 
last day of the schedule adjustment period. (See 
Academic Calendar on page 2.) 

Students can check in three ways: 

1. On the Web: ww^w.testudo. umd.edu 
Select "Records and Registration" and then 
"Waitlist Check-in." Keep your confirmation 
number for your records. 

2. By phone: Call MARS at 301-403-0500 

Press 1 for "Registration Activities." Press 2 for 
"Waitlist Check-in." Enter your student ID 
number and PIN. Keep your confirmation 
number for your records. 

3. In person: Visit SPOC in 1101 Mitchell Building, 
Monday - Friday, 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. 

Veterans 

Students attending the university under the Veterans 
Education Act (Title 38, U.S. Code) will be certified 
based on their enrollment status after they have 
completed registration. Computation of enrollment 
status is based on the number of credits for which the 
student is registered and the length of the term. Six 
weeks is the standard term of a summer session. 
Courses taken for audit cannot be counted toward credit 
for certification. 

Graduate students will not be certified for any course 
below the 400 level unless the course is required by the 
major department. A letter verifying the requirement 
must be submitted to the Office of Veterans Affairs. 
Courses below the 400 level do not receive graduate 
credit. Courses that vary from the regular six-week 
summer session are calculated by Veterans Affairs 
according to the length of the term as well as by the 
number of credits or units. You can obtain certification 
Monday - Friday, 8:30 a.m. to 5 p.m. at: 

University of Maryland 
1101 Mitchell Building 
College Park, MD 20742 
301-314-8239 




Cancellation of Courses by the 
University of Maryland 

The university reserves the right to cancel courses 
due to insufficient enrollment or for other reasons that 
it deems valid. Appropriate refunds will be made. 
Because cancellation of a course may occur so close to 
the beginning of class, there is not always time to 
send notification. 

Cancellation of Summer Session(s) 
Registration by the Student 

Students who register and later decide not to attend 
the university must cancel their registration. 
Cancellation must be received bv SPOC in writing 
(mail, fax or in person) prior to the first dav of classes. 
Failure to cancel registration will result in financial 
obligation to the university even though the student 
does not attend class. 

Withdrawal from Summer Sessions 

Students who wish to terminate their registration 
(withdraw from all summer courses) either on or after 
the first day of classes must formally withdraw. This 
applies to all students regardless of the number of 
courses or credits for which they are registered. 
Withdrawals will be recorded on the student's transcript. 

To withdraw from a summer session(s), complete a 
Withdrawal Form, available at SPOC, or fax a letter of 
withdrawal to 301-314-1282. Withdrawal is effective 
on the date the form is filed with SPOC. See the 
Academic Calendar on page 2 for deadlines and 
refund amounts. See page 17 for complete information 
on refunds. Note that withdrawals from workshops or 
institutes must be made prior to the first meeting in 
order to receive a refund. 




/A^oani 




Grades 

Grades for Session I and Session II will be available 
approximately two weeks after the end of each session. 
Session III grades will be available at the same time as 
Session I grades. Grades for non-standard courses 
ending after the regular session in which they begin will 
be posted after the regular session grade reports are 
posted. Students desiring official notification of grades 
in these courses should request an official transcript 
approximately two weeks after the course ends or one 
week after the session ends. Instructors of these courses 
will receive information on various deadlines. Please 
check with the department in late spring 2000 for 
specific details. 

You can get your grades via the Web 
(www.testudo.umd.edu) or MARS (301-403-0500). 
Grades are not automatically mailed. A grade report 
can be requested via the Web or MARS or by 
contacting SPOC. 

Transcripts, Requests by Students 

Transcripts will not be sent to your home institution or 
elsewhere unless you submit a transcript request. There 
is no fee for transcripts. TTiere are three ways to request 
a transcript: 

1. On the Web: You can request a transcript prior 
to completing a course using the "hold for 
grades" option or you can request it after you 
complete the course. Access 
www.testudo.umd.edu. Select "Records and 
Registration/' then "Transcript Request." You 
will need to enter your student ID number and 
your PIN. 

2. In writing — by mail or fax: Be sure to include 
your full name, student ID number (Social 
Security niomber), session in which you 
attended, your daytime telephone number and 
your signature. Send the request to the Office of 
the Registrar, 301-314-9568 (fax) or: 

Uruversity of Maryland 
1101 Mitchell Building 
College Park, MD 20742 

3. In person: Visit the Registrar's Office in room 
1101 Mitchell Building and complete a transcript 
request form. 



Paying For 

Summer Sessions 2000 

Although changes in fees and charges ordinarily 
will be announced in advance, the university 
reserves the right to make such changes without 
prior announcement. 

To determine the amount you owe, complete the 
Estimated Billing Form in the "Forms" section of this 
guide. The Office of the Bursar will mail a bill to all 
registrants. Payment is due by the date on the bill. 

It is your responsibility to notify the university in 
writing via SPOC if you register and later decide not 
to attend. Failure to cancel registration will result in 
financial obligation to the university even though you 
do not attend class. (See page 17 for more information.) 

In-State Status for 
Admission and Tuition 

For the university to determine your eligibility to pay 
tuition at the in-state rate, you must complete the "In- 
state Tuition Status" section of the undergraduate 
application for admission or the "Maryland Residents 
Only" section of the graduate application for 
admission, whichever form is applicable. The deadline 
for meeting all requirements for in-state status and for 
submitting all documents for classification for Summer 
Sessions 2000 is the last day of late registration for the 
appropriate session: June 9 for Session I, July 21 for 
Session II, Jime 7 for Session 111. 

For more information on residency requirements, 
contact the Office of Residency Classification: 1118 
Mitchell Building; 301-405-2030. 

Tuition Rates 

Undergraduate, Maryland resident.. $174 per credit hour 

Undergraduate, out-of-state 280 per credit hour 

Graduate, Maryland resident 278 per credit hour 

Graduate, out-of-state 380 per credit hour 

Fees 

Application Processing Fees: 

Undergraduate, U.S. citizen $45.00 

Undergraduate, international student 65.00 

Graduate, U.S. citizen 50.00 

Graduate, international student 50.00 



14 



HOW BIG IS SUMMER? 



Housing (on-campus) Fees: 

For three-week Session III: $ 346.14 

Per six-week session: 692.28 

Per eight-week session: 923.04 

Sessions I and II jointly 1384.56 

Late Registration Fee: $ 20.00 

IVIandatory Services Fee*: $126 per session 

Mandatory fees for academic services, recreation 
services and student services will be assessed for each 
summer session in which you enroll. 

•Students who enroll in Session 1 and Session III will only pay the fee 
once for that time period. 

Maryland English Institute Fees: 

(fees listed on previous page do not apply; see parking fees below) 

Activities fee $ 25.00 

Application fee 40.00 

Housing 923.04 

Tuition: 

UMEl 001 (Beginning) $2352.00 

UMEI 002 (Intermediate I) 2352.00 

UMEI 003 (Intermediate II) 2352.00 

UMEI 004 (Intermediate III) 2352.00 

Parking Fees: 

Commuter student $ 19.00 

Resident student 35.00 

Special Course-Related Fees: 

AGRO 308 Field Soil Morphology $ 297.00 

ANTH 220 Intro, to Biological Anthro 30.00 

ENCO 098 Sununer Co-op Work Experience 30.00 

Lab fee - Life Sciences 40.00 

MATH 001 Review of High School Algebra 200.00 

MATH 002 Adv. Rev. of High School Algebra 200.00 



Service for Dishonored Check Fee: up to $50 
depending on amount of check: 

$10 charge for checks up to $100 

$25 charge for checks $100.01 - $500 

$50 charge for checks greater than $500 



m 
J 



Audit 

Tuition and fees for undergraduate and graduate 
courses taken for audit are the same as those for courses 
taken for credit. 

Special Workshops and Institutes 

The standard tuition and fee schedule applies for all 
credit registrations unless otherwise noted in this guide 
or other, official literature pro\'ided to the prospective 
student. Additional or alternative fees are sometimes 
charged for special workshops and institutes due to 
needs for special planning based upon number of 
registrants, applicant screening or auditioning. These 
fees can be charged after the registration period, and 
only a partial refund for late withdrawal will be made. 
No refunds will be granted on or after the first day of a 
program if it is shorter than the standard six-week 
summer session. Campus housing will be available at an 
additional charge. The university reserves the right to 
cancel programs due to insufficient enrollment. 

Payment 

When To Pay 

Upon registering, you incur a financial obligation and 
will be billed. Bills will be mailed to each student's 
permanent address. Each bill will include a pa\Tnent 
due date. Failure to make payment by the due date wUi 
result in a finance charge of 1 .5 percent. Please note tliat 
the assessment of a finance charge is a cimnge from previous 
years. You may viezv your current account balance online at 
any time at wzciv.testudo.umd.edu. 

How To Pay 

Pay your bill by credit card (Visa, MasterCard, or 
Discover Card) or by check or money order (payable to 
the University of Maryland for the exact amount due; 
write your student ID number on it) using one of the 
FIVE methods below: 

1. On the Web: You may pay by credit card by 

accessing www.umd.edu/summer. 

2. By phone: Through MARS, you can pay by 
credit card beginning the day after you receive 
confirmation of registration. Registration 
charges are posted to the system nightly. 

Dial 301-403-0500. You may also call the 
Student Financial Ser\'ice Center at 301-314-9000 
or 1-888-313-2404 to make pa>'ment. 




/»^ik 




3. By fax: When paying by credit card, you n\ay fax 
your payment to the Bursar's Office at 301-314-9098. 

4. By mail: Pay by check or money order or provide 
the requested credit card information on the 
remittance stub. Using the return envelope 
enclosed with your bill, send your payment to: 

Office of the Bursar 

Lee Building 
University of Maryland 
College Park, MD 20742-5151 

5. In peison: Pay in the Bursar's Office, Room 1115 Lee 
Building. Payment may be made by cash, check, 
money order or credit card. The Bursar's Office is 
open Monday - Friday, 8:30 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. It will 
be open for extended hours — 8:30 a.m. to 6 p.m.- 
from May 30 - June 9 and from July 11-21. 

Other Payment Information 

Finance Charge: 

A finance charge of 1.5 percent will be added to any 
account that has not been paid by the payment due date 
displayed on the bill. 

Delinquent Accounts: 

You will not be able to register until any outstanding 
bills to the university, including library fines, parking 
violation assessments, and other penalty fees and service 
charges, are paid in full. 



Upon registering, you incur a financial obligation. 
Failure to make payment by the due date will result in a 
finance charge and may jeopardize your continued 
enrollment. In accordance with state law, the university 
must refer delinquent accounts to the State Central 
Collections Unit in Baltimore for collection and legal 
follow-up. Collection charges will be billed to the 
student. Collection costs are 17 percent of the bill, plus 
any attorney and/or court fees. Maryland law allows 
the Central Collections Unit to block issuance of 
Maryland state income tax refunds to individuals with 
delinquent accounts. In addition. State of Maryland 
policy stipulates that unpaid parking tickets issued on 
state property could result in the withholding of motor 
vehicle tags until tickets are paid. 

The university wUl not confer any diplomas or 
certificates or issue a transcript of record to a student who 
has not made sahsfactory settlement on her or his account. 

Summer Financial Aid: 

Tuition and fees for summer sessions are due in full 
before summer classes start. Summer financial aid 
usually cannot be released until after summer tuidon 
and fees are due, so summer aid usually serves as a 
reimbursement to you. In general, summer financial aid 
is very limited. The university does not receive separate 
allocations of grant, work-study, or loan funds from the 
Federal or state governments for summer financial aid. 
If there are any funds available from these programs, 
preference will be given to students who are graduating 
in August 2000. To be eligible for any summer financial 
aid, you must register for at least 6 credits or 24 
graduate units. 



TUITION REFUND 

The university will refund tuition paid based on the date the course was dropped. 


REFUND 


SESSION 1 


SESSION II 


SESSION III 


Cancel registration with 100% refund 


June 2 


July 14 


June 2 


Drop a course with a 100% refund 


June 2 


July 14 


June 2 


Drop a course with 70% refund 


Tune 9 


July 21 


June 7 


Withdraw From All Courses: 








with a 70% refund 


June 9 


July 21 


June 7 


with a 50% refund 


June 16 


July 28 


June 9 


with a 20% refund 


June 23 


August 4 


n/a 


with no refund 


July 14 


August 25 


June 23 





16 



HOW B 



IS SUMMER? 



If you have not used all of your Pell Grant or Stafford 
Loan eligibility from the 1999-2000 school year, you may 
be eligible to receive your remaining eligibility during 
the summer. 

To request summer financial aid, you must have 
submitted a 1999-2000 Free Application for Federal 
Student Aid (FAFSA) and all other requested documents 
to the Office of Student Financial Aid (OSFA). You must 
also submit a Summer Financial Aid Application to the 
OSFA. For priority consideration, applications are due 
by Friday, March 31, 2000. Applications are available 
from the Student Financial Service Center (1135 Lee 
Building) and from the OSFA Web site 
(www.umd.edu/fin). If you have ever attended any 
other post-secondary institutions, you must ask them to 
send a Financial Aid Transcript (FAT) to the OSFA, even 
if the other institution(s) never awarded you any 
financial aid. Once your eligibility has been determined, 
the OSFA will mail a Summer Financial Aid Notification 
to your summer address. 

If you have any questions about summer billing or 
financial aid, please contact the Student Financial 
Service Center at 301-314-9000 or 1-888-313-2404. 

Refunds 

The university will not automatically refund a credit 
balance. A refund must be requested. Payments made by 
cash or check will be refunded by check. Payments 
made by credit card will be refunded by crediting the 
credit card account. Refunds wiU usually be received by 
the student within two to three weeks from receipt of 
the refund request. Checks will be made payable to the 
student and sent to the address designated in the refund 
request. They will not be mailed to a campus address. 

The Academic Services fee is not refundable. All other 
mandatory fees will be refunded at the same percentage 
as tuition refunds. The refund schedule on page 16 
indicates, by date, the percentage of tuition that will be 
credited upon withdrawal from courses or dropping a 
course or courses. Withdrawals from workshops or 
institutes must be made prior to the first meeting in 
order to receive a refund. After the first meeting, there 
can be no refund . 



To request a refund: 

1. By phone: Call MARS at 301-403-0500 and 
choose option 3 from the main menu. 

2. In writing — by mail, fax or e-mail: Send a 
letter requesting a refund to: 

Office of the Bursar 

Lee Building 
University of Maryland 
College Park, MD 20742-5151 
Fax: 301-314-9098 
billtalk@accmail.umd.edu 

3. In person: Complete a Request for Refund 
Form in the Student Financial Service Center 
or in SPOC. 

Academic Credit and Policies 

Academic Credit 

The semester hour is the unit of credit. During the 
Summer Sessions, a three-credit course may meet five 
times a week for six weeks, with each class period 
meeting for 80 minutes. Courses that meet two or three 
times a week will have longer class sessions. 

University of Maryland, College Park students who are 
pursuing a degree will be given credit toward the 
appropriate degree for satisfactory completion of 
summer courses. Each student is responsible for 
determining the applicability of courses selected to the 
degree program and is urged to consult with her or his 
academic advisor 

All students enrolled for credit will receive an official 
grade for each course. 

Academic Policies 

Academic Dishonesty: 

Academic dishonesty is a serious offense which may 
result in suspension or expulsion from the university. 
The normal sanction for academic dishonesty is a grade 
of XF, denoting "failure due to academic dishonesty," 
recorded on the student's transcript. 




/^te 




Audit: 

A student may register to audit a course or courses in 
which space is available. Tuition and fees are the same 
as when taken for credit. The notation "AUD" is placed 
on the transcript for each course audited. Courses taken 
for audit are not included in the calculation of full- 
time /part-time status. 

Code of Academic Integrity: 

All students are expected to adhere to the provisions of 
the Code of Academic Integrity, as set forth in the 
undergraduate and graduate catalogs. Copies of the 
Code may be obtained from the Student Honor Council 
in Room 2118 Mitchell Building; 301-314-8450. 

Degree Candidates: 

All students who expect to complete requirements for 
degrees during the summer should complete an 
application for graduation. Applications should be filed 
with the Registrar's Office no later than Friday July 21 
for degrees to be awarded as of August 25, 2000. 
Students may apply on the Web at 
www.testudo.umd.edu or in person in Room 1101 
Mitchell Building. 

August graduates are invited to participate in the 
Commencement ceremonies in December, and will be 
included in that Commencement program. 

Final Examination: 

All final examinations must be held on the last day of 
classes of each summer session. No final examination 
shall be given at a time other than the last day of classes 
without the permission of the department chair. 

A final examination will be given in every 
undergraduate course. Exceptions may be made with 
the written approval of the chair of the department and 
the dean. 

Full-time Status: 

Courses taken for audit are not included in the 
calculation of full-time status. 

For undergraduate students, enrollment in courses 
totalling six semester hours of academic credit will be 
defined as full-time status for one summer session. 
Enrollment in six semester hours of academic credit in 
each of the two summer sessions will be defined as full- 
time enrollment for the summer. 

Students enrolled in UMEI 001-004 are considered 
full time. 



For graduate students, enrollment in academic credit 
totalling 24 graduate units will be defined as full- 
time enrollment for one summer session. Academic 
credit totalling 24 graduate units in each of the two 
summer sessions will be defined as full-time 
enrollment for the summer: 



Course Number 


Graduate Unit 


00-399 


2 units per credit hour 


400-499 


4 units per credit hour 


500-599 ; m 


jK; 5 units per credit hour 


600-898 


6 units per credit hour 


799 :flHHHI 


K 12 units per credit hour 


899 


18 units per credit hour 




6 units per credit hour 


UMEI 006 


2 units per credit hour 


UMEI 007 


4 units per credit hour 


UMEI 008 


2 units per credit hour 



Maximum Load: 

Undergraduate students may not enroll for more than 
eight hours of academic credit in Summer Sessions 1 and 
III combined, or Session II. Students may only register 
for one course (4 credits) for Summer Session HI. Normally, 
graduate students should not enroll for more than six 
semester hours in one summer session. Course loads 
above these maximums require approval of the college 
dean. Visiting undergraduate students who wish to 
request exceptions should contact the Registrar's Office. 

Pass-Fail Option: 

Undergraduate students who have completed 30 or 
more semester hours with a GPA of at least 2.0 (15 of 
which must have been completed at the University of 
Maryland, College Park with a GPA of at least 2.0) 
may register on a pass-fail basis if the course offers a 
pass-fail option. 

The course must be elective to the student's program 
and not used to meet general education requirements, 
major requirements, or gateway requirements for 
admission to limited enrollment programs or when re- 
registering for a course. Only one course per semester or 
summer session may be taken pass-fail. (No more than 
12 semester hours of credit may be taken during a 
student's college career.) For further information on the 
pass-fail option, see the undergraduate catalog. 

Visiting students who are interested in taking a course 
pass-fail should contact the Registrar's Office. Many 
institutions will not accept transfer courses from another 
institution if they were completed on a pass-fail basis. 



HOW B 



IS SUM 



E R '' 



The pass-fail grading system is a grading option for 
undergraduates only. However, a graduate program 
may, in certain cases, allow a graduate student to use the 
pass-fail option for any 100-300 level courses that a 
student takes. Graduate credit may not be earned for 
these courses. For further information on the pass-fail 
option, see the graduate catalog. 

Protection of Privacy: 

The Uni\ersity of Maryland adheres to a policy of 
compliance with the Family Educational Rights and 
Privacy Act (Buckley Amendment). As such, it is the 
policy of the university: 



(1) to permit students to inspect their education 
records; (2) to limit disclosure to others of personally 
identifiable information from education records without 
students' prior written consent; (3) to provide students 
the opportunity to seek correction of their education 
records, where appropriate. A complete statement of the 
university policy and procedures is contained in the 
undergraduate and graduate catalogs. 



INDEX 

Academic Calendar for Summer Sessions 2000 2 

Academic Credit and Policies 17 

Academic Dishonesty 17 

Add/Drop Schedule (See "Deadlines Chart for 

Registration and Schedule Adjustment") 12 

Advanced Special Students (Non-degree Post- 
baccalaureate Students) 9 

Applying for Summer Sessions 2000 6-9 

Audit 15 

Calendar 2 

Cancellation of Courses by the 

University of Maryland 13 

Cancellation of Summer Session(s) Registration by 

Students 13 

Code of Academic Integrity 18 

Contact Information 5 

Deadlines Chart for Registration and Schedule 

Adjustment 12 

Degree Candidates 18 

Delinquent Accounts 16 

Fees 14, 15 

Final Examination 18 

Finance Charge 16 

Financial Aid for Summer 2000 16 

Flowchart for Admission, Registration, Payment, Etc 5 

Former University of Maryland College Park Students. ...7 

Full-time Status 18 

Golden ID Students 7, 9 



Grades 14 

Graduation — August (see "Degree Candidates") 18 

High School Students 7 

ID Cards 11 

In-state Status for Admission and Tuition 14 

Institute Students 9 

Late Registration 11 

Maximum Load 18 

"Non-Standard Course" Registration 11 

Pass-Fail Option 18 

Paying for Summer Sessions 2000 14 -16 

Prospective Degree Students 7-8 

Protection of Privacy 19 

Refimds 17 

Registering for Summer Sessions 2000 11 

ReenroUment 7 

SPOC (Single Point Of Contact) 4 

Student Addresses — Keeping Current 9 

Transcripts, Requests by Students 14 

Tuition Rates 14 

Undergraduate Students 6 

University System of Maryland Graduate Students 10 

Veterans 13 

Visiting Students — Graduate 8 

Visiting Students — Undergraduate 6 

Waitlist 12 

Withdrawal from Summer Sessions 13 




a 



ly 




HOW 



B I G 



IS S U 



E R '^ 



Table of Contents 

Bookstores 1 

Career Center 1 

Computer Services 2 

Counseling Center 2 

Dining Services 2 

Disability Support Services 2 

Golf Course 3 

Health Services 3 

Housing 4 

Libraries 4 

Getting to and Around Campus 5 

Map of the Campus 7 

Parking 5 

Police 6 

Postal Services 6 

Recreation Services 6 

Religious Services 9 

Student Union 10 

The Terrapin Express Prepaid Debit Card 10 

Transportation 11 



1 ^ 




mM^> 


■ i^r- ' ,->' 




^i 



Bookstores 

In addition to selling textbooks, school supplies 
and University of Maryland insignia sportswear, the 
University Book Center, now run by Barnes & Noble 
College Book Stores, sells general non-fiction and 
fiction books, greeting cards, gifts, class rings and more. 
A book list is maintained for all courses, and soon it will 
be possible to reserve textbooks online. Computers, 
peripherals, software and computer supplies are also 



available. The Terp Shop, which offers its own catalog, 
provides a wide variety of Maryland clothing, gifts, and 
novelties. The University Book Center is located Ln the 
basement of the Stamp Student Union on Campus Dri\'e. 
During the summer it is open Monday- Friday, 8:30 a.m. 
to 6 p.m., and Saturday 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. It will be open 
on the Memorial Day holiday (obser\'ed May 29), from 11 
a.m. to 5 p.m., but will be closed on Independence Day 
Guly 4). 

For more information: 

University Book Center 

Lower level. Stamp Student Union 

University of Maryland College Park, MD 20742 

301-314-BOOK, wv^rw.ubc.umd.edu 

The Maryland Book Exchange carries all textbooks for 
courses at the University of Maryland, College Park. 
It is conveniently located on Route 1, across from the 
south entrance. The exchange also has an extensive 
selection of books for general reading, professional and 
technical books, school supplies and Terpwear. Summer 
hours are Monday - Saturday 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. Call for 
extended hours at the beginning of each sumnier term. 
Fall textbooks are available for sale mid-August. 

For more information: 

The Maryland Book Exchange 

4500 College Avenue College Park, MD 20740 

301-927-2510, www.marylandbook.com 



Career Center 



The Career Center, located at 3100 Hombake Library 
South Wing, offers extensive career resources on 
its Web site, career counseling, workshops, courses, 
special programs, and a Career and Employment 
resource room in which students can identify interests, 
explore careers and initiate the job and 
graduate/professional school research process. 
Appointments are not required for assistance in the 
resource room, but proof of enrollment in the form 
of an ID card is. The center also offers employment 
assistance through job and career fairs, on-campus 
interviewing, resume referral and job listings for 
part-time, internship, graduate assistantship and full- 
time positions, all of which are available on the center's 
Web site under "TERP Online." Summer hours are 
8:30 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. Monday through Friday. 

For more information: 
Visit the office or the Web site 
(www.CareerCenter.umd.edu) or call 301-314-7225. 




Ofl 




Computer Services 

The campus computer workstations and their summer 
hours of operation are as follows: 

A.V. Williams Building 

Room 1120 (in the Computer 

and Space Sciences area) 

open Monday - Friday 7 a.m. to 11 p.m. 

card key access to the building 11 p.m. 

to 7 a.m. and on weekends 

Computer and Space Sciences Building 

open Monday - Friday 7 a.m. to midnight 

(check each week's schedule posted on each door 

for class reservations); closed Saturday and Sunday: 

Mac Lab - Room 3332 

PC Lab - Room 3330 

Sun /Unix /Web Lab - Room 4352 

Engineering and Physical Sciences Library 

WAM Lab - Room 2403: (see library 
hours on p. 5) 

Hombake Library 

Room 0300 (see library hours on p. 5) 

Parking Garage 2 

Room 0504 — open 24 hours (located at 

the comer of Regents Dr. and Stadium Dr.) 

Centreville and Worcester 

Closed during Summer Sessions I, II and III 

To hear a recording of the hours of operation, call 
301-405-2980. More information can also be found 
on the Web at wks-next.umd.edu. 

Counseling Center 

Free, confidential support groups, disability support, 
family consultation and counseling on personal and 
social issues, careers, academic skills and returning 
students' issues are provided by appointment by the 
Counseling Center, Monday - Friday from 8:30 a.m. 
to 4:30 p.m. located in 1101 A Shoemaker Building. 

For more information: Call 301-314-7651 
or visit the Center's Web site at: 
wTvw.infonn.umd.edu/Campus 
info/Departments/Counseling 



Dining Services 




At South Campus Dining Hall and at the Diner (on the 
north side of campus), Monday - Friday, you will find a 
variety of deli sandwiches, a soup-and- salad bar, fresh- 
dough pizza, flame-broiled hamburgers and hot entrees 
with vegetables. You may also 
choose to visit the food court in 
the Stamp Student Union for 
Adele's restaurant, Starbucks 
Coffee in the Coffee Bar, Taco Bell 
or McDonald's. The Dairy, 
located adjacent to the Visitor 
Center on Route 1 in the Turner 
Lab Building, is home to the 
award-winning University of 
Maryland ice cream. Other 
convenient food locations on 
campus are in Van Munching 
Hall, the Math Building and the 
Engineering Building. For hours of operation and 
additional information, visit the Dining Services' Web 
site at w^ww.dining.umd.edu 
or call 301-314-FOOD (301-314-3663). 
There is no meal plan during the summer; 

however, all dining services facilities accept cash and 
the Terrapin Express card (see p. 10). 

Disability Support Services 

The Disability Support Service (DSS) is a division of 
the Counseling Center. It provides services for more than 
700 members of the university community with 
disabilities. Its mission is to coordinate services which 
will ensure individuals with disabilities equal access to 
university programs. DSS also provides consultation to 
the campus community regarding disability issues. 

Individuals must register with DSS to receive services. 
This registration involves an intake interview with the 
appropriate staff member: director, interpreting service 
coordinator or learning disability coordinator. 
Documentation of need must be provided at the time of 
the intake in order to discuss accommodations. DSS 
services include adapted housing, an adaptive 
technology room, classroom accommodation, 
counseling and advising, interpreting, note-taking, 
paratransit (accessible transit service), priority 
registration, reading and testing (administration of class 
exams to students who have special needs). DSS is 
located in 0126 Shoemaker Building. 
For more information: Call 301-314-7682. 



HOW BIG 



I S 



SUMMER? 



For information about services in McKeldin Library 
for persons with disabilities, contact the coordinator 
of library services for persons with disabilities at 
301-405-9074. 

Maps £ind campus parking permits are available from the 
Department of Campus Parking in the Regents Drive garage. 
For more informaHon, call 301-314-PARK (301-314-7275). 

A university ID card is required to ha\e access to 
services. Students who have a summer school non-photo 
ID may also be reqiiired to furnish a photo ID. 

Golf Course 

The Office of Student Affairs operates a golf course 
on North Campus. It is open from daybreak until dark 
seven days a week, including holidays. Registered 
students who present an ID card may use the course 
Monday - Thursday for a daily rate of $17 and Friday - 
Sunday for a daily rate of $22. Reserved tee times may 
be made by non-members by calling the Golf Shop. 
Students may also purchase a summer school 
membership for $250. (The summer school membership 
is only active when school is in session.) 

Suitable attire is required by all players. Tank tops, 
cut-offs and T-shirts are prohibited. Shirts must have a 
collar. Metal spikes are not permitted. The University of 
Maryland Golf Course is a soft spikes facility. 

Golf carts are mandatory on weekends and holidays. 
Fees are as follows: 

18 holes - $12 per person 
9 holes - $7 per person 

In addition to the course, you may 
enjoy a driving range, golf lessons, a 
grill /patio/bar, golf outings and 
tournaments, a golf shop and 
amenities. 

Tokens for the driving range are 
available in the Golf Shop for $2 (30 
balls). Golf lessons can be arranged by 
caUing the Golf Shop and speaking with 
one of the golf professionals. An 
individual lesson costs $40. A series of 
four lessons costs $130. The cost of 
group lessons varies. 

The dining areas ser\'e a varied menu 
throughout the day. An inviting and 
casual atmosphere offers light snacks, 
grill items and your favorite beverages. 



No outside food or be\'erages are to be consumed on the 
premises. By law, alcoholic beverages are not allowed to 
be purchased at outside sources and carried onto the 
premises. To purchase alcoholic beverages, you must 
furnish proper identification 
upon request. 

Outings of all sizes are welcome. Additional 
information and pricing can be obtained by contacting 
the Golf Shop. A regular schedule of club tournaments 
and social events are offered. All events are posted on the 
monthly calendar in the Golf Shop. All individuals with 
an established USGA handicap are welcome to 
participate. 

The Golf Shop is a full-service golf operation that offers 
golf equipment, apparel and accessories. Special orders 
and shipping arrangements can be accommodated. The 
Golf Shop can re-grip your clubs to your specifications. 

Amenities Include: bag storage - $100; locker rental - $50; 
bag storage and locker rental - $125; handicap svstem - 
$15 members, $30 non-members. 

For more information: Call the Golf Shop at 
301-403-4299. Rates are subject to change. 



Health Services 




The University Health Center (UHC) is a nationally 
accredited ambulatory health care facility. It provides a 
wide variety of medical serx-ices, including some mental 
health services, a pharmacy and referral ser\'ices. A 
detailed brochure is available at UHC. 

Every currently registered student is eligible to use 
UHC. Students are charged a $10 co-payment for most 
visits with UHC providers. There are fees for visits with 
specialists and for certain procedures, such as. X-rays, 
laboratory tests, dental appointments, allergy injections, 
physical therapy, massage, acupunture and medications 
dispensed through the pharmacy and medical units. 
Charges are listed on one's student account under 
general headings, such as, "laboratory fee," rather than 
naming the specific test or purchase. UHC assumes no 
financial responsibility for any care received off campus. 
Health insurance is strongly recommended. 

The center is located on Campus Drive across from the 
Stamp Student Union. Although an appointment is not 
required, it is recommended. To .schedule an 
appointment, call 301-314-8184. During summer sessions, 
the University Health Center's hours of operation are 
8 a.m. to 8 p.m. Monday - Friday and 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. 
on Saturday. The center is closed on Sunday. 




El 




Health Services Continued 

For more information: Visit the UHC Web site at: 
www.infonn.umd.edu/UniversityHealthCenter/ 
or call 301-314-8180. In the event of an emergency, 
dial 911. 

The Center for Health and Wellbeing, a service of 
UHC housed at the Campus Recreation Center, is open 
afternoons in the summer. Diet counseling and 
HIV information are among the health education 
programs available. 

For more information: Call 301-314-1280. 



Housing 



You can rent a room or an apartment on campus at the 
University of Maryland, College Park for any or all terms 
of Summer Sessions 2000. Most rooms are doubles, with 
some available single rooms assigned by lottery. 
Furnished apartments, for four to six students, are 
available with air conditioning, carpeting, full kitchens 
and utilities; no pets allowed. You will have a twin-sized 
bed, mattress, dresser, desk and chair, private telephone 
line and separate data line. You must provide your own 
telephone, desk lamp, cooking utensils, pillow, linens 
and all other personal and household items. 
Coin-operated laundry and vending services are 
available in a nearby 24-hour community center. Parking 
requires a $35 university permit. 

Rooms are available from June 4, 2000, the day before 
the start of Session I and III classes, until August 25, the 
day final examinations are completed for Session II. For 
an extra fee, spring semester campus residents who 
register for Session I and III may move directly from 
spring room assignments to Summer Session 
assignments. Students whose Summer 2000 Residence 
Halls Agreement forms are received before April 14 are 
eligible for the single room lottery. Students who sign up 
for Session III only will not be guaranteed an on-campus 
assignment. 

Housing Scliedule: 

Friday, April 14 

Deadline to submit Summer Residence Halls 

Agreement for single room lottery and other 

housing requests. 

Monday, May 8 

Deadline to cancel Session I and III Summer 

Residence Halls Agreement without financial 

obligation; written cancellation must be sent to 

Residence Life. 

Sunday, June 4 

Residence halls are open at 10 a.m. for Session I and 

III residents to claim rooms. 



Monday, June 5 

Rooms not claimed by noon are forfeited and "no 
show" cancellation charge of two weeks' housing 
cost ($216) is assessed. 

Monday, June 19 

Deadline to cancel Session II Summer Residence 
Halls Agreement without financial obligation; 
written cancellation must be sent to Residence Life. 

Friday, July 14 

Residents not staying for Summer Session EI must 

vacate rooms by 7 p.m. 

Sunday, July 16 

Residence halls are open at 10 a.m. for Session II 

residents to claim rooms. 

Monday, July 17 

Rooms not claimed by noon are forfeited and "no 

show" cancellation charge of two weeks' housing 

cost ($216) is assessed. 

Friday, August 25 

All residents must vacate rooms by noon. 



Libraries 



There are seven libraries on campus: Architecture 
Library, Art Library, White Memorial (Chemistry) 
Library, Engineering and Physical Sciences Library, 
Hombake Library (which includes the Performing Arts 
Library) and McKeldin Library. McKeldin Library is the 
main library on campus. It houses many special 
services and collections, such as study carrels, 
interhbrary loan, photocopy services, government 
documents and maps, and archives and manuscripts. 
Hombake Library, in addition to housing the Performing 
Arts Library, houses Nonprint Media Services, the 
Library of American Broadcasting and a WAM 
computer lab. 

All of the libraries are accessible for persons with 
disabilities and all have nearby handicapped parking 
spaces. For further information about services in 
McKeldin Library for persons with disabilities, contact 
the Coordinator of Library Services for Persons with 
Disabilities at 301-405-9074; TTY at information desk in 
McKeldin: 301-405-9076. 

A University of Maryland student ID card is required to 
borrow materials from campus libraries. New students 
must have their ID cards validated at the circulation 
desk. A map showing the locations of the libraries 
appears in this section of the guide. The libraries are 
open for Summer Sessions 2000 from Monday, June 5 - 
Friday, August 25. For additional information, visit 
the libraries' Web site at www.lib.umd.edu/UMCP. 



HOW 



I s 



SUMMER? 



Summer Library Schedule 
Monday, June 5 - Friday, August 25, 2000 





Holiday 
Closings 


Monday 


Tuesday 


Wednesday 


Thursday 


Friday 


Saturday 


Sunday 


Architecture 


July 4 


9 a.m. 

to 
5 p.m. 


9 a.m. 

to 
5 p.m. 


9 a.m. 

to 
5 p.m. 


9 a.m. 

to 
5 p.m. 


9 a.m. 

to 
5 p.m. 


Closed 


Closed 


Art 


July 4 


9 a.m. 

to 
5 p.m. 


9 a.m. 

to 
5 p.m. 


9 a.m. 

to 
5 p.m. 


9 a.m. 

to 
5 p.m. 


9 a.m. 

to 
5 p.m. 


10 a.m. 

to 
5 p.m. 


Closed 


Chemistry 


July 4 


8 a.m. 

to 
11 p.m. 


8 a.m. 

to 
11 p.m. 


8 a.m. 

to 
11 p.m. 


8 a.m. 

to 
11 p.m. 


8 a.m. 

to 
11 p.m. 


10 a.m. 

to 
8 p.m. 


noon 

to 

10 p.m. 


Engineering, 
Physical 
Sciences 


July 4 


8 a.m. 

to 
11 p.m. 


8 a.m. 

to 
11 p.m. 


8 a.m. 

to 
11 p.m. 


8 a.m. 

to 
11 p.m. 


8 a.m. 

to 
1 1 p.m. 


8 a.m. 

to 
11 p.m. 


8 a.m. 

to 
11 p.m. 


Hornbake, 

Performing 

Arts 


July 4 


8 a.m. 

to 
10 p.m. 


8 a.m. 

to 
10 p.m. 


8 a.m. 

to 
10 p.m. 


8 a.m. 

to 
10 p.m. 


8 a.m. 

to 
6 p.m. 


noon 

to 

5 p.m. 


noon 

to 

10 p.m. 


McKeldin 


July 4 


8 a.m. 
to 

10 p.m. 


8 a.m. 

to 
10 p.m. 


8 a.m. 

to 
10 p.m. 


8 a.m. 

to 
10 p.m. 


8 a.m. 

to 
8 p.m. 


10 a.m. 

to 
8 p.m. 


noon 

to 
11 p.m. 



Getting to and Around Campus Parking 



By car: Take the Capital Beltway to the College Park exit. 
Exit 25. Heading south on Rt. 1, go approximately 1-1/2 
miles, then turn right on Campus Dr. At the stop sign, 
turn right onto Regents Dr. There are free 15-mtnute 
meters there for you while you purchase a $4 all-day 
meter parking pass from Campus Parkmg in the Regents 
Dr. Garage, which allows you to park at any meter but 
the red cap meters. (If the free meters are not available, 
you must park at a paid meter in Regents Dr. Garage.) 
Park at meters for 25 cents/hour. There are free 5-minute 
meters at the Visitor Center (Turner Hall Lab Bldg. on 
Rt. 1, just south of Campus Dr.). 

By Metrobus: The following routes go through campus 
on Campus Drive: C2, C8, F6. The following routes pass 
campus on Route 1: 83, 86. 

By Metrorail: Take the Green Line to College Park. 
Get on Shuttle UM at Bus Bay B. 

By campus shuttle: One can ride Shuttle UM round trip 
from the College Park Metro Station to the Stamp 
Student Union for free. No campus ID is required. There 
are two stops in between — one of which is near the 
Mitchell Building. 

By MARC: MARC commuter trains stop at the College 
Park Metro Station. 

The closest international airport is Baltimore- 
Washington International Airport. Campus is accessible 
from Ronald Reagan National Airport via Metrorail. 



With a parking permit issued by the Department of 
Campus Parking, you may park in lots 1, 2, 4, 11, 16 and 
the Stadium Drive Garage (SDG) permit area; otherwise, 
you may park at paid meters or in cashier-attended lots. 
No permit is required after 4 p.m. for commuters who 
park in unrestricted parking areas. Bicycles and mopeds 
need not be registered, but they must be parked in 
bicycle racks. 

Students holding 1999 - 2000 academic year parking 
permits may use them for Summer Sessions 2000. You 
may use handicapped parking spaces only if you have a 
current campus parking permit and a state-issued 
disabled permit and/or license plate. No parking is 
allowed on campus roads, in fire lanes or at unpaid 
meters. 

To obtain a parking permit, go to the Department of 
Campus Parking at the Regents Dri\e Garage (REX3) on 
or after May 17, 2000, Monday - Friday between the 
hours of 8:15 a.m. and 4 p.m., complete a parking permit 
application, present a photo ID, and pay the parking fee 
(campus residents: $35; commuters: $19) or complete the 
permit application on the "Forms" section of this guide 
and you will be billed. 

Locating the office: From Route 1, enter campus 
through the main gate (Campus Drive). Go to the stop 
sign. Turn right onto Regents Drive. Go one block. 




i^\Ml 




Parking Continued 

The garage is on the left-hand side. The entrance to the 
office is halfway down the block. There are parking 
meters in front of the building with 15 minutes of free 
parking. 

You will need to make a U-turn to park at the meters. 
Just turn the knob. If the free meters are not available, 
you must park at a paid meter in Regents Drive Garage. 

For more information: Call the Department of 
Campus Parking at 301-314-PARK (301-314-7275). 

Police 

University Police work with the community in a 
cooperative commimity policing effort to prevent crime 
and to respond and provide assistance to victims once 
crime has occurred. The internationally accredited 
department consists of approximately 75 sworn officers 
empowered by state law to make arrests, investigate 
crimes and carry firearms. With the assistance of civilian 
personnel and an additional 100 Student Police Aides, 
police services are provided 24 hours a day, 7 days a 
week. 

The department offers a variety of crime prevention 
programs and services, e.g., rape aggression defense 
classes, walking escorts, etc. Police may be contacted 
using emergency phones located throughout campus or 
by dialing 911. Police Headquarters is located on 
Rossborough Lane near Baltimore Avenue (Route 1). 
For additional details on university services, policies, 
crime statistics, steps for safety, etc., please refer to the 
Safety and Security brochure available from the police 
(301-405-3555) or visit the police Web site at 
wv\rw.umpd.umd.edu. 



Postal Services 



Student mail is delivered to residence halls once daUy 
Monday through Saturday, except holidays. Items too 
large to be placed in mailboxes are delivered to the 
residence desk on the third floor of Annapolis Hall. That 
clerk notifies students of receipt of items and requests 
that they be picked up. In some instances, students will 
be required to pick up items from Campus Mail 
Services' mail facility, which is across Route 1 at Campus 
Drive /Paint Branch Parkway. This is not a full service 
postal facility, but there is a stamp vending machine in 
the lobby and, for a fee, you can rent a maUbox at 
the facility. Faxes received through the facility are 
delivered to residence halls at no cost. Domestic faxes 
can be sent from the facility. Its hours of operation are 
8 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. Monday - Friday and 8 a.m. to 1 p.m. 
on Saturday. 




For more information: Visit the campus mail services 
Web site: www.dbs.umd.edu/mail/ or call 301-405-4473. 

Mail Boxes, Etc., located on the lower level of the Stamp 
Student Union, provides stamps, postal services, fax 
service and shipping (UPS, FedEx) services from 10 a.m. 
to 4 p.m. Monday - Saturday. For more information, 
call 301-314-9982. 

There is a U.S. Post Office at 4815 Calvert Road, which 
can be accessed by taking Shuttle UM to the College Park 
Metro Station and walking through the station, exiting 
through the far exit. 

The phone number is ^^- — 

301-699-0258. The 
North College Park 
Post Office 
is located at 9591 
Baltimore Avenue (Rt. 1); 
phone: 301-345-1714. ' 

Recreation Services 

Campus Recreation Services (CRS) offers a wide 
variety of recreation programs, including aquatics, fitness 
programs, informal recreation, intramural sports, 
outdoor recreation and sport clubs. CRS has some of the 
most advanced recreation, sports and fitness facilities in 
the nation, including an outdoor pool, an indoor 
Olympic-size pool, weight rooms and fitness centers, 
racquet courts, gymnasiums, a turf field, an outdoor 
recreation center, an aerobics room, a martial arts room, a 
pro shop and locker rooms. CRS facilities include the 
new Campus Recreation Center, Reckord Armory, Ritchie 
Coliseum and the weight and fitness areas in the Health 
and Human Performance (HHP) building. Currently 
enrolled students do not need to purchase a membership; 
it is included in the student activities fee. Additional fees 
may apply for some services and activities. 

Located on North Campus between Cumberland and 




AB Aberdeen campus off campus HJP 

ACY Allei;.my Hall 024 B-4 HHP 

AN Annapolis campus off campus HOW 

Annapolis 1 iall C-4 HKF 

ANA Anne Arundel Hall 1160 F-3 HZF 

ANS Animal Sciences 142 G-6 ITV 

ARC Architecture Building 145 E-3 JMP 

ARM Reckord Armory 078 D-5 JMZ 

Aquatic Center J-5 JRN 

ASY Art-Sociology Building 146 F-3 JUL 

AVM A.V.Williams Building 115 F-7 KEY 

BA Univ. of Md. at Bait. (UMAB) .. off campus KN I 

BAL Baltimore Hall Olf. (:-4 

EC Univ. of Md. Bait. Co. (UMBC) . . off campus LEF 

BEL Bel Air HaU 099 1-6 LEO 

BP Biology-Psychology Building 144 G-5 LPA 

BRi:) Byrd Stadium 161 H-4 MCB 

GAL divert Hal] 015 C-4 MC:K 

CAM Cambridge Hall 096 H-5 MMH 

CAR Caroline Hall 070 E-3 

CBD Cumberland HaU 122 1-5 MNT 

CEC Cecil Hall 017 C-4 MOR 

CEN Centreville HaU 09S H-6 MTH 

CHE Chem Engineering Building 090 G-6 PGG 

CHL Charles Hall 025 B-4 PHY 

CHM Chemistry Building 091 F-6 PKT 

CHS Chestertown Hall 121 1-6 PLS 

CLB Classroom Building 106 F-7 QAN 

COL Cole Student Activities Building 162 G-4 

CRC Campus Recreation Center 068 J-5 I^IT 

C:RL Carroll Hall 065 E-3 

CSS Computer and Space Sciences Bldg. 224 . . H-5 SCP 

DEN Denton Hall 252 K-4 SHM 

Diner 1-5 SHR 

DNC Dance BuUding 053 C-4 SKN 

DOR Dorchester Hall 064 F-3 SOM 

EAS Easton Hall 253 K-4 SQH 

EDA Education Annex 066 D-3 SSU 

EDU Education (Benjamin) Building 143 ... G-3 STM 

EGL Engineering Classroom Building 088 . . . E-6 SYM 

EGR Engineering Lab Building 089 F-6 TAL 

ELK Elkton Hall 254 J-4 TLF 

ELL Ellicott Hall 256 1-4 TWS 

ERE Engineering Research Building 093 ... F-7 TYD 

FRID Frederick Hall 029 C-4 VMH 

Gl, G2, G3 Shady Grove campus off campus 

GEO Geology Building 237 F-5 WDS 

GLF Golf Course Clubhouse 166 K-2 WIG 

C;i^T Garrett Hall 031 D-4 WOR 

HAG Hagerstovvn Hall 258 1-4 WSH 

HAl^ Harrist)ii Lab 002 D-7 WTU 

HBK Hornbake Undergrad Library 147 .... F-5 

*Bold t^'pe indicates classrootn facility. 



H.J. Patterson Building 073 F-4 

Health and Human Performance 255 . . 1-6 

1 loward Hall 028 C-4 

Harford H.ill 014 C-4 

Holzapfel Hall 074 E-5 

Instructional Television Facility 045 . . . F-6 

J. M. Patterson HaU 083 G-6 

Jimenez Hall 034 F-4 

Journalism Building 059 E-4 

JuU Hall 227 H-5 

Francis Scott Key Hall 048 E-4 

Kent Hall 022 D-4 

Lee Building D-5 

LeFrak Hall 038 D-4 

Leonardtown Housing 238-249 B-7 

La Plata Hall 259 1-5 

Microbiology Building 231 F-5 

McKeldin Lihrarv o35 F-4 

Marie Mount Hall 046 D-5 

Mitchell Building E-5 

Montgomery Hall 032 B-5 

Morrill HaU 040 E-4 

Mathematics BuUding 084 F-6 

Prince George's Hall 021 C;-4 

Physics BuUding 082 F-6 

Preinkert Field House 054 E-3 

Plant Sciences Building 036 F-5 

Queen Anne's H.ill 061 F-3 

Regents Drive Garage G-5 

Ritchie Coliseum 004 C-6 

South Campus Dining Hall D-3 

South Campus Surge 233 C-3 

Shoetnaker BuUding 037 D-4 

Shriver Lab 075 E-5 

Skinner BuUding 044 D-4 

Somerset Hall ( 163 E-3 

Susquehanna HaU 233 C-3 

Adele H. Stamp Student Union 163 G-4 

St. Mary's Hall 062 F-4 

Symons Hall 076 E-5 

Talbot Hall 030 D-4 

TaUaferro HaU 043 E-4 

Tawes Fine Arts Building 141 F-3 

Tydings HaU 042 E-4 

Van Munching HaU 039 E-2 

Visitors C "enter D-6 

Woods HaU 047 E-4 

Wicomico Hall 069 E-3 

Worcester H.ill 051 E-3 

Washington Hall 023 C-4 

Wind Tunnel 081 F-7 



i^^Bi*8B&?. 





UNIVERSITY OF 

MARYLAND 



002 HAR Harrison Lab D-7 074 

004 RIT I^tchie CoHseum C-6 075 

008 Annapolis HaU C-4 076 

014 HRF Harford Hall C-4 078 

015 CAL Calvert H.ill C-4 081 

016 BAL Baltimore Hall C-4 082 

017 CEC Cecil Hall C-4 083 

021 PGG Prince Georges Hall C-4 084 

022 KNT Kent Hall D-4 088 

023 WSH Washington HaU C-4 089 

024 AGY Allegany Hall B-4 090 

025 CHL Charles Hall B-4 091 

028 HOW Howard Hall C-4 093 

029 FRD Frederick Hall C-4 096 

030 TAL Talbot Hall D-4 098 

031 CRT Garrett Hall D-4 099 

032 MNT Montgomery Hall B-5 106 

034 JMZ Jimenez HaU F-4 115 

035 MC:K McKeldm Libraw F-4 121 

036 PLS Plant Sciences Building F-5 1 22 

037 SHM Shoemaker BuUding D-4 141 

038 LEF LeFrak Hall D-4 142 

039 VMH Van Munching Hall E-2 143 

040 MOR Morrill Hall E-4 144 

042 TYD Tydings Hall E-4 145 

043 TLF Taliaferro Hall E-4 146 

044 SKN Skinner Building D-4 147 

045 ITV Instructional Television Facility F-6 161 

046 MMH Marie Mount HaU D-5 162 

047 WDS Woods HaU E-4 163 

048 KEY Francis Scott Key HaU E-4 166 

051 WOR Worcester HaU E-3 224 

053 DNC Dance BuUding C-4 224 

054 FKT Preinkert Field House E-3 227 

059 JRN Journalism BuUding E-4 231 

060 ANA Anne Arundel HaU F-3 233 

061 QAN Queen Anne's HaU F-3 233 

062 STM St. Marys HaU F-4 237 

063 SOM Somerset HaU E-3 238- 

064 DOR Dorchester HaU F-3 252 

065 CRL CarroU HaU E-3 253 

066 EDA Education Annex D-3 254 

068 CRC Campus Recreation Center J-5 255 

069 WICWicomico HaU E-3 256 

070 CAR Caroline HaU E-3 258 

073 Hp> H.J. Patterson BuUding F-4 259 



HZF Holzapfel Hall E-5 

SHR Shriver Lab E-5 

SYM Syinons Hall E-5 

ARM Reckord Armory D-5 

WTU Wind Tunnel F-7V 

PHY Physics BuUding F-6 

JMP J. M. Patterson HaU G-6 

MTH Mathematics BuUding F-6 

EGL Engineering Classroom Building . . . E-6 

EGR Engineering Lab BuUding F-6 

CHE Chem Engineering BuUding G-6 

CHM Chemistry BuUding F-6 

ERB Engineering Research Building F-7 

CAM Cambridge HaU H-5 

CEN CentreviUe Hall H-6 

BEL Bel Air HaU 1-6 

CLE Classroom Building F-7 

AVM A. V. WiUiams Building F-7 

CHS Chestertown Hall 1-6 

CBD Cumberland HaU 1-5 

TWS Tawes Fine Arts BuUding F-3 

ANS Animal Sciences G-6 

EDU Education (Benjamin) BuUding . . . G-3 

BP BiologN-Psvchologv Building G-5 

ARC Architecture Building E-3 

ASY Art-Sociology BuUding F-3 

HBK Hornbake Undergrad Library F-5 

BRD Byrd Stadium H-4 

COL Cole Student Activities Building G-4 

SSU Adele H. Stamp Student Union G-4 

GLF Golf Course Clubhouse K-2 

CSS Computer and Space Sciences Bldg. . . . H-5 

IPT hist, of Physiciil Sci. andTech H-5 

JUL JuU HaU H-5 

MCB Microbiology Building F-5 

SCP South Campus Surge C-3 

SQH Susquehanna HaU C-3 

GEO Geology BuUding F-5 

249 LEO Leonardtown Housing B-7 

DEN Denton HaU K-4 

EAS Easton HaU K-4 

ELK Elkton HaU J-4 

HHP Health and Human Perfortnance . . . 1-6 

ELL EUicott HaU 1-4 

HAG Hagerstown HaU 1-4 

LPA La Plata Hall 1-5 



H W 



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Ellicott communities, the Campus Recreation Center 
(CRC) is the newest CRS building. Meter parking is 
available in Lot 2H. Located on South Campus off of 
Route 1 is Ritchie Coliseum, a renovated facility includes 
a weight room, fitness center, martial arts room, 
gymnasium and locker rooms. Be sure to bring your 
student ID card and a photo ID so you can 
experience one of the best recreation centers in the 
nation. Whether it is running or racquetball, lifting or 
lounging, swimming or snacking. Campus Recreation 
Services is a sure fit! Locker rentals are available at the 
Campus Recreation Center and at Ritchie Coliseum. Free 
one-day lockers also are available. 

For more information: Call CRS Member Services 
Desk at 301-405-PLAY (301-405-7529) or visit the CRS 
Web site at vvvvw.crs.umd.edu. 

Recreation Summer Hours*: 

Campus Recreation Center: 

Monday - Friday 6 a.m. to 10 p.m. 

Saturday 8 a.m. to 9 p.m. 

Sunday 10 a.m. to 9 p.m. 

(indoor pool closes one hour prior to building 

closing) 

Outdoor Aquatic Center: 

Monday - Sunday 11 a.m to 7 p.m. 

Ritchie Coliseum: 

Monday - Friday 6 a.m. to 8 p.m. 

*Hours are subject to change 

Religious Services 

The university provides an array of chaplaincies, many 
of which are housed on campus in Memorial Chapel. 
Some refer students to off-campus houses of worship 
and other services during the summer. Information listed 
below is about summer services. To find out about 
summer services not listed below, please contact the 
chaplain's office. 

Baptist 

2120 Memorial Chapel 
301-405-8443 

Black Ministries Program 

1112 Memorial Chapel 

301-405-8445 

Services: office hours 9 a.m. to 5 p.m.; 

occasional fellowship events. 

Catholic (see "Roman Catholic") 



Christian Church/Disciples of Christ 

(see "United Campus Ministry") 

Christian Science 

2118 Memorial Chapel 
301-474-0403 

Church of Christ 

(see "United Campus Ministry") 

Church of Jesus Christ of Latter Day Saints 

7601 Mowatt Lane 
College Park, MD 
Office hours: 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. 
Worship: Sunday at 11 a.m. 

Disciples of Christ 

(see "United Campus Ministry") 

Eastern Orthodox 

Sts. Constantine and Helen 
2747 Riva Rd. 
Annapolis, MD 
1-301-261-8218 (toll call) 

Episcopal 

2116 Memorial Chapel 
301-405-8453 

Hindu 

2112 Memorial Chapel 
301-314-8008 

Jewish (Chabad) 

7403 Hopkins Ave. 

College Park, MD 

301-277-2994 

Office hours: Rabbi Backman lives at the center: 

Hours and services are flexible. 

Worship: Shabbat weekly 

Jewish (HiUel) 

Hillel House 
7612 Mowatt Lane 
College Park, MD 
301-422-6200 

Lutheran 

2103 Memorial Chapel 

301-405-8448 

Worship: referred to Sunday 10 a.m. service 

at: Hope Lutheran Church 

4201 Guilford Dr. (at the south side of campus: 

Guilford Dr. and Knox Rd.) College Park, MD 




l^k. 




Religious Services Continued 

Methodist 

(see "United Methodist") 

Muslim 

301-776-1776 

For details, visit the Muslim Student Association 

Web site at: 

www.inform.umd.edu/StudentOrg/msa or contact 

Dr. Ali Darwish (darwish@writeme.com). 

Services: Thursday after sunset — weekly study 

group in English; Friday — weekly study group in 

Arabic; other, occasional activities. 

Worship: Daily prayer in room 0128-B Holzapfel 

Hall; Friday prayers at 1:15 p.m. in Stamp Student 

Union (room varies) 

Presbyterian 

(see "United Campus Ministry") 

Roman Catholic 

Catholic Student Community Center 

4141 Guilford Dr. 

College Park, MD 

301-864-6223 

Services: Wednesday at 6 p.m. — weekly cook-out 

and volleyball for registered students; 

variable office hours — contact: Sr. Rita Ricker 

(rricker@wam.umd.edu) or 

Fr. Bill Byrne (frbill@wam.umd.edu). 

Worship: Sunday Mass — 10 a.m. and 7 p.m. 

at the center; Monday - Friday — noon Mass in 

room 1116 Memorial Chapel 

United Campus Ministry 

(Disciples of Christ; Presbyterian USA; 
United Church of Christ) 

2101 Memorial Chapel 
301-405-8450 

United Methodist 

2102 Memorial Chapel 
301-405-8451 

Wicca 

Contact the Office of Campus Programs in the 
summer to ask if the Wiccan Student Union 
will be acHve: 301-314-7174. 



Student Union 



The Adele H. Stamp Student Union, located on Campus 
Drive, houses a variety of services: 

Art Gallery: The Parents Association Gallery, located 

off the main lobby of the union and maintained by 
the Art and Learning Center, exhibits local, 
national and international art. Exhibitions with 
open house receptions occur monthly. The gallery 
welcomes exhibition suggestions from 
UM students. 

The Art and Learning Center is a multi-purpose studio 
and classroom facility located on the lower level. 
During the summer, an extensive series of 
children's summer day camp programs in the 
visual arts, performing arts and leadership 
development are featured. The center is located 
in Room 0232. For more information, call 
301-314-ARTS (301-314-2787). See also the Kids 
and Camps section of this guide. 

Bookstore: The University Book Center is located in the 
basement of the union. For more information, see 
Bookstores on page 1. 

Chevy Chase Bank is located on the lower level. The 
bank has free ATMs on campus at the following 
locations: Byrd Stadium, Cole Field House, 
Ellicott Hall, South Campus Dining Hall and 
Stamp Student Union. For more information, 
call 301-864-8722. 

Eatery Services in the union Include McDonald's, 

Boardwalk Fries, the Maryland Food Coop and 
Dining Services operations, including Adele's, 
The Coffee Bar, The Pizza Shop, Taco Bell Express, 
and the Union Shop. There are also vending 
machines. For more information, call 301-314-8086. 

Mail Boxes, Etc., located on the lower level, provides 

stamps, postal services, fax service, shipping (UPS, 
FedEx) services, notary service, self-serve 
photocopy machines, key duplicating, rubber 
stamps, business cards and more. For more 
information, call 301-314-9982. 

Movie Theater: Due to renovations, the Hoff Theater 
will be closed this summer. 

Recreation Center: Located in the basement of the 

student union, the recreation center features eight 
bov/ling lanes, 11 regulation billiard tables, one 
three-cushion pocket billiard table and 25 of the 



10 



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E R ? 



latest pinball and video games. For more 
information, call 301-314-BOWL (301-314-2695). 
Ticket Office: There is a ticket office on the lower level. 
The Ticket Office acts as the box office for most 
S.E.E. Productions events on campus, including 
Ritchie Coliseum concerts. As a Ticketmaster 
outlet, it sells tickets for concerts and plays at 
most Baltimore/D.C. area venues, such as the 
MCI Center, USAir Arena, the 9:30 Club, Rams 
Head, Warner Theater and Lincoln Theater. 
Tickets for professional sporting events, such as 
those of the Baltimore Orioles, and for entry to 
the Washington Monument and the National 
Aquarium also are available. 

Other services include: Locker rentals in the student 

union ($10 rent for the summer includes the lock), 
one-day meter passes, meter debit cards, student 
advantage cards, SPREE prepaid phonecards, 
Metrobus passes, Metrorail One-Day passes, 
Maryland Association of Rail Commuters (MARC) 
train tickets and discounted tickets for King's 
Dominion and Six Flags America. 

For more information: call 301-314-TKTS 
(301-314-8587). 

The Terrapin Express 
Prepaid Debit Card 

Terrapin Express, the latest advance in the university's 
quest to make campus life a little easier, is a prepaid 
debit account that can be used to pay for products and 
services all around campus. It is convenient, secure 
and simple: 

• Convenient: With Terrapin Express, you have 
purchasing power all over campus without cash, 
checks or credit cards. If you forget to buy a book 




for class or need school supplies, there is no worry 
when you have Terrapin Express. 

• Secure: Unlike cash — or even checks — if your card is 
lost or stolen, the account can be frozen immediately 
just by calling the Terrapin Express Contract Office's 
Lost Cards Division at 301-314-8064. 

• Simple: It is easy to open a Terrapin Express 
account. Stop by the Terrapin Express Contract 
Office in 1109 South Campus Dining Hall with a 
minimum of $20 to open your account. Money can 
be applied to the card using cash, check, or credit 
card (VISA, MasterCard, American Express or 
Discover Card). Your account is activated instantly; 
there is no waiting for clearance before the first use. 
Once you have opened your account, you can 
always add more money anytime with cash, check 
or credit card. 

Each semester the number of locations and services 
grows. Eventually, you will be able to go anywhere 
on campus to use your Terrapin Express. It is now 
accepted at: Adele's (restaurant), the A.V. Williams 
Building concession stand. Boardwalk Fries, The Coffee 
Bar, computer workstation labs (for printing). The Dairy, 
The Diner (EUicott Complex), Engineering Deli and 
Bakery, the Health Center, Leonard town Store, 
Mail Boxes, Etc., Marketplace Deli, McDonald's, North 
Campus Snack and Shop, The North Woods at Denton 
Dining Room, Office of Academic Computing Ser\'ices' 
(OACS') Open Lab, The Pro Shop, the recreation center 
in the Union, Rossborough Inn, Rudy's, Sneaker's Cafe, 
South Campus Dining Room, South Campus Gazebo 
Room, Splash Grill, Taco Bell Express, the Ticket Office 
in Stamp Student Union, Union Shop, the University 
Book Center, Tawes Theatre and washers and dryers in 
various residence halls. 

For more information: Visit the dining services Web 
site at www.dining.umd.edu or call: 
301-314-8068 (voice); 301-314-9234 (TTY). 



Transportation 



Free shuttle bus service (Shuttle UM) is available from 
the College Park Metro Station for visitors to campus 
and for all members of the university community. No ID 
is required. The shuttle runs every quarter hour, from 
the bus bay in Lot HH across from the Stamp Student 
Union, from 6:45 a.m. to 7:45 p.m. Exit the Metro station 
through the gate on the left and wait for the shuttle in 
Bus Bay B, the second to the last bus stop on the left. 




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Transportation Continued 

After leaving the Metro station, the shuttle stops: 

• On Paint Branch Parkway at Greenhouse Road 
(before Route 1 ); 

• On Campus Drive at the "M" in front of the Math 
Building (across Campus Drive from the Mitchell 
Building); 

• In Lot HH (across from the Stamp Student Union). 

Other, limited. Shuttle UM service is available during the 
svmimer for members of the University community. A 
campus ID card is required. Schedules and maps of the 
routes (Adelphi North, Circuit, Queens Chapel, Rhode 
Island Avenue, and Springhill Lake) are posted on the Web 
and on the shuttle bays near the Stamp Student Union. 
Schedules for all shuttle services provided are also available 
at the Commuter Affairs and Community Service Office 
located at 1195 Stamp Student Union and at the union's 
information desk. Service will not be provided when the 
university is closed for Independence Day, July 4. 

For more information: Please refer to the shuttle's 
Web page at www.umd.edu/shuttle or call 301-314-2255. 

Metrobus routes serving the campus are 83, 86, C2, 
C8 and F6. Bus schedules are available at the information 
desk in the Stamp Student Union, or call Metro at 
202-637-7000 for more information. 



12 








i 




^3ecial 
Institutes 



^ucanse< ^ 
the univer 
from h^^ 



Course ^^ 

Ofiferings , 



Schedule of Classes 
for Summer 2000 

Summer Session I 

Summer Session II 

New! Summer Session III 
Three-Week 
Accelerated Session 

Evening Classes 

Core Classes 



Graduatv 

Courses \ 



SUMMER SESSIONS 







iMr: 



HOW BIG IS SUMMER? 





College of 
Agriculture 
and Natural 
Resources 

The oldest college at the 
university, the College of 
Agriculture and Natural 
Resources has a long history 
of service to Maryland. Its three- 
part structure — academic 
programs, the Maryland 
Cooperative Extension Service 
and the Agricultural Experiment 
Station — allows it to touch 
the lives of individuals throughout 
the state and beyond. 

The college offers an array of 
programs designed to prepare 
students for careers in fields 
ranging from bioengineering and 
genetics to dietetics 
and natural resources 
management. 

Faculty and students collaborate 
with scientists at the important 
agricultural, environment and 
health organizations and agencies 
in the area, including the U.S. 
Department of Agriculture, 
Nation;il Institutes of Health, U.S. 
Food and Drug Administration 
and the U.S. Environmental 
Protection Agency. 



SESSION I JUNES- JULY 14 



College Park Summer Sessions course offerings are updated daily on the Web at 
http://w\vw.tcstudo.umd.cdu and http://ww\v.umd.edu/summer. For a complete 
list of evening courses, see page 102. 

The following course listing is accurate as this guide went to press. However, 
departments often add course sections in response to high demand, and others might 
have been rescheduled. You can get up-to-the-minute course offermgs at 
http://testudo.umd.edu and http://umd.edu/sunmier. 

• Seat counts and section information are updated hourly and waitlisted nightly 

• Print sections of the schedule to reference when calling MARS 

• Access from any WAM lab, *any on-canipus Windows PC, MAC or NeXT 
computer, or any dial-up computer by telnetting to INFORM 

* A WAM jccount is not needed to access the WEB. 

Questions? Call SPOC at 1-877-989-SPOC or 301-314-3572. 

GUIDELINES FOR COURSE SELECTION 

The session for which a specific course section is scheduled is designated by the first 
two digits of the section number: 01 for Summer Session I, 02 for Summer Session 
II, and 03 for Summer Session III. Many courses are offered in two or more of the 
summer sessions. If the course or section meeting dates deviate fixjm the regular 
Summer Session dates, the specific starting and ending dates are displayed below the 
course description. The section number indicates the session to which a nonstandard 
course or section belongs for registration purposes. Additional information on 



nonstandard date courses 
can be found on 
page 1 1 of the Academic 
Services section of this 
guide. In many 
instances registration, 
hilling and grading 
procedures will be 
different for those 



Sample Course Listing 



'"°'^"°"'" AASP202 Black Culture in the United States crxi. 

^^^ (3) REG/P-F/AUD. ^^'^'^ 

CORE: Sooil or foliocJ Hi«on (SH) DI\'ER.SI'n' The m'.'SlS.m, 

coune cxinuncs impomnl aspecv of American Negro hlc 

and thought which arc irflccted in A^Amencan bientuir. 

dfania, music and art Beginning mth die cultuial heritage — P«?cnp«ioB 

of slavery-, the counie airvrys the changing modes of black 

creatisr expression from the I'Wi-centun- to the present 

StMlon UIO l (00011) Silbennan,S. TuTh llflaain-3:4(lpm d.^, 

MARS Number inslnictor 



AASP Afro-American Studies 

(Behavioral and Social Sciences) 

AASP202 Black Culture in the United States 
(3) REG/P-F/AUD. 

COK£; Social or PobncJ HLsiot%- (SH) DIVERSlFl' The 
course examines important a.spccts of Amencan Negro Ute 
and thought which an; ivlleacd m Afro-Amcrican btenturc. 
drama, music and art. Beginmng with the cultural henuge 
ofdaMTy-. the course survw the changing modes of black 
ciejtne expression from the 19th-centur)' to the present. 
0101 (OOOU) Silbcrman.S. TuTh ll:0()am-2:40pm 

iirr \2:>' 

AASP498S Special Topics in Black Culture: The 
Construction of Love, Intimacy and 
Sexuality in Black America 
(3) REG/P-F/AUD. 

111111(00052) Saiiders.T TuTh ll;(Klam-2:4(lpm 

(LEF 1221) 



AGRO Agronomy 

(Agriculture and Natural Resources) 

AGR0499 Special Problems in Agronomy 
(1-3) REG/P-F/AUD. 

Individual Imtnicaon couiv:: contact department or 
instniaor to obtain section number. 

AGR0608 Research Methods 
(1-4) REG/AUD. 
IndiMdiul Instruction coui^; contaa dcpanmeni or 

in'.tnictor to obtain section number. 

AGR0799 Master's Thesis Research 
(l-«) REG. 

Individual Instruction course: contict department or 
instructor to obtain sccnon number. 




/^Oflik 




AGR0899 Doctoral Dissertation Research 
(1-8) REG. 

Individual Instruction course: contact department or 
instructor to obtain section number. 

AMST American Studies 

(Arts and Humanities) 

AMST201 Introduction to American Studies 

(3) REG/P-F/AUD. 
COR£: Humamnes (HO) IntroducQon to American 
cultural studies — past and present — by examining the 
concept of "self" m American autobiographical wntmg and 
the concept of "society" in accounts of various 
commimities. 

0101(00244) Hummel, M. MTh 9:00am-12:30pm 

(TLFUOl) 
For detailed course description, see Web site 
http://\vww.infonn.unid.edu/EdRes/Colleges,'ARHU/ 
Depts/AmericanStudies/Summei<IO.hmil 

AMST203 Popular Culture in America 
(3) REG/P-F/AUD. 

CORE: Humarunes (HO) An introducrion to Aniencan 
popular culmre. its historical development, and its role as a 
reflection of and influence on our culture and soaety. 
0101(00254) Snyder, D. MW l:00pm-4:20pm 

(TLFllOl) 
For detailed course descnpdon. see Web site 
http://www.intbrm.umd.edu/EdRes/Colleges/ARHU/ 
Depts/AmericanStudies/SummcrOO.html 

AMST204 Film and American Culture Studies 
(3) REG/P-F/AUD. 

CORE: HumaniDes (HO) E-xploraaon of the American 
lilm from a historical perspective, illustratmg the mouon 
picture s role as an insdtudonal phenomenon, as a form of 
communication, and as a source of cross-cultural study. 
0101(00264) Lounsbury.M. MW 6:15pm-9:45pm 

(TLF2101) 
For detailed course descripnon, see Web site 
http://www.inform.umd.edu/EdRes/Colleges/ARHU/ 
Depts/AmericanStudies/SummeiOO.html 

AMST205 Material Aspects of American Life 
(3) REG/P-F/AUD. 

CORE: History or Theory of Arts (HA) Historical survey 
of American material culture. Ways of describmg and 
interpreting accumulated material evidence (e.g., buildmgs, 
town plans) introduced by stressing relaaonship between 
artifact and culture. 

0101(00274) Nasstrom.H. TuTh l:00pm-4:20pm 

fTLF 1101) 
For detailed course descnption. see Web site 
http://www.inform.umd.edu/EdRes/Colleges/ARHU/ 
Depts/.AmencanStudies/SummeiOO.html 

AMST386 Experiential Learning 
(3-6) REG/P-F. 

Individual Instrucuon course; contaa department or 
instructor to obtain secQon number. Pmequisue: permissim of 
department. 56 semester hours. 

Please see mdividual instructors for course and contact 
Department for pernussion to register. 



AMST398 Independent Studies 
(1-3) REG. 

Individual Instruction course: contact department or 

instructor to obtain section number. 

See individual mstructor and Department for permission to 

regLster 

AMST418M Cultural Themes In America: The 
Politics of Compassion: Social 
Inequity In the Volunteer Experience 
(3) REG/P-F/AUD. 
0101(00358) AUahyan,R. TuTh 9:00am-12:2(>pm 

(TLF 2101) 
In the senunar. we will explore the raced, classed, and 
gendered history and politics of volimteerism in the United 
States. We will consider how organizations use volunteers to 
provide pubbc services and how diffenng volunteer culmres 
structure relations amount service providers and pubbc 
constituenaes. We will consider the boundaries and blurrmg 
among volunteerism, charity, service-learning, social 
acnvism, and social movements politics. Students will do 
pamcipant-obsenanon as volunteers m an organization and 
wnte an ethnographic analysis based on their field notes (a 
written record of their observations as volunteers) and 
insights gamed from course readings. The course will be 
organized as a senunar with weekly themes. Smdems will be 
expected to draw upon their pamapant-observaaon and the 
course readings to pamcipate in class discussion. The weekly 
topics will include: The "Tradition" ofVoluntecnsm in the 
United States, Cultures of "Institutional Kindness," Shapmg 
Carmg Selves, Moral Carters m Insututional Settings. "The 
Street-Level Bureaucrat," and the PoliQcs otAiblunteensm. 
Students will periodically turn in theu field notes for 
feedback fioni die instructor. The final ethnographic repon 
will be written in three parts (an organizational descnpQon, 
a placement of the organization \vitliin American culmre. 
and an analyocal account of particular cultural aspects ot the 
orgamzanon of interest to the smdent), mrned m over the 
course of the semester. 

AMST418Q Cultural Themes in America: Public 
Schools, Extracurricular Activities, 
and the Acculturation of American 
Adolescents 

(3) REG/P-F/AUD. 
0101(00358) Adams, P. TuTh 4:30pm-7:50pm 

(TLF 2137) 
This course exammes die role of high school extracurricular 
activities includmg mteischolasnc sports and soaal and 
scholastic clubs that are important components of the 
tradiaonal high school experience. It considers both the 
serious and formal significance of these activiDes and the 
imoffiaal soaal meaning resultiing fitjm die sanctioned and 
unsanctioned behavior of student events, such as 
homecoming, prom, and graduation, and the miages ot these 
events and acQvines as represented m the popular media. 
The class will be presented in a coUoqmum format with 
some intbrmal lectures and class discussion and pamapation. 



AMST428B American Cultural Eras: American 
Film Culture In the 1960s 
(3) REG/P-F/AUD. 

Prerequisite: a course in one of the follmnng: .iMST,film, 20th- 
century American history, ARTH, or SOCY. Investigating the 
interaction between the film medium and an era of 
significant culmral change, the course wil emphasize: 1) 
insntutional factors; 2) Hollywood genres; 3) documentaries 
and experimental observation and reform. 
01111(00378) Lounsbury.M. MW l:00pm-4:30pm 

(TLF 2101) 

AMST429E Perspectives on Popular Culture: 

Television 

(3) REG/P-F/AUD. 
0101(00398) Parks, S. MW 4:30pm-7:50pm 

(TLFllOl) 
Television is the most popular form of leisure nme activity 
and serious public discourse in the Umted States and 
American television is the most popular m the world. What 
are the relationships between the mdustry, the content and 
the audiences? UTio is watching what and why? What are 
the various societal results of the contmual conversation 
between the television mdustry and audiences? Smdents will 
learn and try various methods of examining television 
content and die roles of television in die culture. 

AMST898 Directed Readings in American 
Studies 
(3) REG/AUD. 

Individual Instruction course; contact deparmient or 
instructor to obtain section number. 

AMST799 Master's Thesis Research 
(1-6) REG. 

Individual Instruction course: contact department or 

mstnictor to obtain secnon number. 

AMST899 Doctoral Dissertation Research 
(1-8) REG. 

Individual Instruction course: contaa department or 
mstructor to obtam section number. 

ANSC Animal Science 

(Agriculture and Natural Resources) 

The following courses may involve the use of animals. 
Students who are concerned about the use of animals in 
teaching have the responsibibty to contact the instructor, 
prior to course enrollment, to determine whether animals 
are to be used m the course, whether class exercises 
involvmg ammals are optional or required and what 
alternatives, il any. are available. 

ANSC386 (PermReq) Experiential Learning 
(3-6) REG/P-E 

Prerequisite: permission of department. 56 semester hours. 

0101 (00473) STAFF Time and room to be arranged 



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Trr-^fr"^" '»Af!o 




-^r^ 



'^^i»lf- 



Maryland otTers a variety of travel study opportunities reaching nito various regions of 
the continental United States and extending the imagination, learning and life 
experiences of the participants. Listed below are the travel study options available to 
students in summer 2000. Some of these offerings have early decision dates, so please 
make note of any unusual deadhne dates for application or inquiry. 

Offerings this year include: Service Learning Opportunities offered by the College of 
Arts and Humanities - Department of Sociology: (see page 95) 

ANTH 496 Field Methods in Archaeology (6 credits) 

ANTH 696 Field Training in the Techniques of Archaeological Survey and 
Excavation. (6 credits) (June 5 - July 14) 

Urban Archaeology in Historic Annapolis 

LEARN VALUABLE FIELD TECHNIQUES IN ARCHAEOLOGY THIS 
SUMMER AS YOU EXI^LORE ARCHAEOLOGICAL EXCAVATION SITES IN 
HISTORIC DOWNTOWN ANNAPOLIS. 

For almost 20 years, the university's Department of Anthropology, in cooperation with 
the Historic Annapohs Foundation, has offered a revealing gliinpse of colonial life in 
Maryland's state capital through the excavation and inspection of buried historical 
artifacts. Join Mark Leone, professor in the Department of Anthropology, and Jessica 
Neuwirth, an archaeologist and curator with the Archaeology in Annapolis project, as 
they continue excavations at the Upton Scott house in Annapolis. Upton Scott, a 
native of Ireland, arrived in Maryland in 1759 as the appointed physician to then Gov. 
Horatio Sharpe. Dr. Scott's residence, completed in 1 765, was considered one of the 
finest in Annapolis at the time. The property included several formal gardens, a 
greenhouse and two small brick outbuildings. 

All forms of archaeology field techniques are discussed, including surveying with a 
transit, laying out excavation units, excavation with shovels and trowels, mapping, 
drawing, note taking and photography. At the project's field laboratory in Annapolis, 
students master their lab skills, including artifact identification and processing, 
identification of historic period ceramics and glass, as well as computerized database 
entries. In addition to their field work, students engage in hvely discussions 
concerning the role of archaeology in contemporary society. The project has made 
specific efforts during the last decade to address Afi'ican American presences in its 
work. We continue to add to this growing archaeological datab.vse by searching for 
material evidence of enslaved Afi'ican Americans who worked in the Scott property 
outbuildings during the late 18th and early 19th centuries. 



ANSC399 (I'trmKeq) Special Problems in Animal 
Science 

(1-2) REG/P-F/AUD. 

Individual Instnicaon course: conun department or 
inMructor to obcain section number. 

ANSC660 Poultry Literature 
(1-4) REG/AUD. 
l^cidiiius on individual topics are assigned. Written reports 
required. Methods ofanaly^ and prcsentanon of scientJBc 
material are discussed. 
I i 1 1 1 1 (00489) STAFF Time and room to be amngcd 

ANSC699 (PcrmReq) Speclal Problems In Animal 
Science 

(1-2) REG/AUD. 
Individual Instruction course: contact department or 

instructor to obtain section number 

ANSC799 (PrrmReq) Master's Thesis Research 
(1-6) REG. 

Indmdual Instnicaon course: contact department or 
instructor to obtain section number. 

ANSC899 fPcrmReq) Doctoral Dissertation 
Research 

(1-8) REG. 
Indisidual Instruction course: contaa department or 
instructor to obtain section number 

ANTH Anthropology 

(Behavioral and Social Sciences) 

ANTH220 Introduction to Biological 
Anthropology 

(4) REG/P-F/AUD. 

C \ IKE: Life Science Ub (LL) DIVIRSITY CrrJil udl be 
t;umicd for otil)' one oftlieJollouvigiASTH 101 mASTH 220. 
IvnncrlyANTH 101. Human biological e\'oluDon. including 
tlic biologv' of contemporary human groups, non-human 
primate social behavior, and the fossil, biochemical, and 
molecular esidence tor human e\x>luaon. Includes a 
l.ihontor> study of human popubnon genetics, biochemical 
\ .iri.mon, and anatomical disrrsity in modem and fossil 
human and non-human prmiate groups. 
1 1 1 1 1 1 (00S86) .Mack. M. MWF 9:.V)am- 1 1 :45ani 

(PL5 1176) 
TuTh 9:00am- ll:4aani 
(WDS 0124D) Ub 

ANTH260 Introduction to Sociocultural 
Anthropology and Linguistics 

(3) REG/P-F/AUD. 

< < >Rt Bch.ivior.ll and Socnal Snence (SB) DIVERSITY 
t Vi-.iil III// hcgranlcdfor ifi/y mk lyl ihcfoUoumgAS'TH 102 « 
l\77/ J6() ForninfyAMV 102. Culture and social 
n l.iiioiiships in a wide xinet^- ofscttinp 6oni small-scale to 
. oniplex socieocs. An osrrsicw of how anthropology* 
fn.ilwes human behasior Paraciilar attenbon to the 
uiitionship bct^^ren language and cultuir. 
111(11(00606) Stuan.W. MTuW 9:,10im- 1 1:45am 

gRN 1105) 






ANTH360 Method and Theory in Sociocultural 
Anthropology 
(3) REG/P-F/AUD. 

Prmquisile: ANTH 260. Theoretical approaches and research 
methods in sociocultuial anthropology'. Emphasis on current 
debates, new directions, and their historical antecedents. 
0101 (00616) Stuart, W. MTuW l:(M)pm-3:15pm 

(KEY 0125) 

ANTH386 (PcrmReq) Experiential Learning 
(1-6) REG/P-F. 

Individual InstrucDon course: contact department or 
instnictor to obtain secDon number. Prerequiiite: pmmsshn of 
department. Rewtmieiuied: completion ofadwrned courses in 
rehwit siibfield of mlhropolo^'. 56 semester hours. ForANTH 
majors only. 

Approval of mstructor requu«d; check with Department tor 
section (and index) number 

ANTH398A (PermReq) Independent Study 
(1-3) REG/P-F/AUD. 

Individual Instrucnon course: contact department or 
iastructor to obtam section number. 
Approval of Instructor required; check with Department for 
secDon (and mdex) number. 

ANTH476 (PermReq) Ssnior Research 
(3-4) REG/P-F/AUD. 

Individual Instrucnon course: contact depamnent or 
instructor to obtain section number For.iSTH majors only. 
Credit will he granted for only one of the follounng: ANTH 476 or 
ANTH 486. Capstone coune in which students pursue 
independent research into a current problem in 
anthropology; selected with assistance of a committee of 
faculty. Research leads to the writing of a senior thesis in 
anthropology. 

ANTH477 (PermReq) Senior Thesis 
(3-4) REG/P-F/AUD. 

Individual Instruction course: contact department or 
instructor to obtain section number Prerequisite: AXTH 476; 
permission of department. ForANTH majors only. Credit will be 
granted for only one ofthefolloMng:ANTH 477 or ANTH 487. 
Capstone course in which students write a senior thesis on 
independent research into a current problem in 
anthropology. The thesis is defined before a committee of 
faculty. 

ANTH486 Honors Research 

(3) REG/P-F/AUD. 

Individual Instruction course: contact deparmient or 
instructor to obtain section number. Prerequisites: permission of 
department; admission to University Honors Program or 
Anthropology Honors Program. ForANTH majors only. Credit 
mil he granted for only one ofthefollotmig:ANTH 486 or 
ANTH 476. Capstone course in which students pursue 
independent lesearch into a current problem in 
anthropolc^, selected with assistance of a committee of 
faculty. Research leads to the writing of an honors thesis in 
anthropology. 



ANTH487 Honors Thesis 

(3) REG/P-F/AUD. 

Individual Instruction coune: contact department or 
instructor to obtam section number Prerequmtes:ANTH 
486; permission ofdepanmetu; admission to Unifersity Honors 
Program or Anthropology Honors Program. ForANTH majors 
only. Credit mil he granted for only one of the following: ANTH 
487 or ANTH 477. Capstone course m which smdcnts 
write a thesis on the restilts of independent research into a 
current problem in anthropology. 

ANTH496 Field Methods in Archaeology 
(6) REG/P-F/AUD. 

Formerly ANTH 499. Field training m the techraques of 
archaeological survey and excavation. 
0101 (00885) Neuwinh.J. MTuWThF 8:00am-4:00pm 
(Arranged) 
Meets 06/05/00-07/14/00 
This course fiilfiUs requirements for ANTH 340. 

ANTH689A (PermReq) Special Problems in 
Anthropology 
(1-6) REG/S-E 

Individual Instruction coune: contact department or 
instructor to obtain section number. 
Approval of instructor required; check with Department for 
secDon (and index) number. 

ANTH696 Field Methods in Archaeology 
(6) REG/AUD. 

Formerly ANTH 699. Field training m the techniques of 
archaeological survey and excavation. 
0101 (00925) Neuwirth.J. MTuWThF 8:00am-4:rtjpm 
(Arranged) 
Meets 06/05/00-07/14/00 

ANTH712 (PermReq) Intemshlp Analysis 
(3) REG/AUD. 

Individual Instruction course; contact department or 
instructor to obtain section number. Prerequisite: ANTH 705. 
The preparation and presentation of internship reports; 
development of skills in import writing and presentation. The 
completion of a professional quality report based on the 
internship experience. Review of problems in ethics and 
professional development. 

Approval of instructor required; check with Department lor 
section (and index) nimiber. 

ANTH789 Internship 

(3-12) REG/AUD. 

Individual Instruction course: contact department or 
instructor to obtain secnon number. 




School of 
Architecture 

The School of Architecture is a 
small, selective program with an 
outstanding record of preparing 
professionals in both architecture 
and community/urban planning. 

In the past 10 years, more 
of our students have won honors 
in Association of Collegiate 
Schools of Architecture 
competitions than have those at 
any other architecture school in 
the world. 

Faculty expertise, demonstrated 
through research, publication, 
design and service to the 
community, is enhanced by a 
regional location that is rich in 
architectural styles and 
community contexts. 

The School of Architecture also 
houses a highly-reputed 
architectural library that includes 
the archives of the National Trust 
for Historic Preservation and the 
Elizabeth Alley Visual Resource 
Collection, one of the best 
teaching collections of slides and 
visual materials on architecture in 
the country. 



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ARCH Architecture 

(Architecture) 

ARCH 150 Design Career Discovery; 
(3) REG/P-F/AUD. 

Inm)duction lo ,i possible caa-cr m an cnvironjTicnlal design 
profession thmugh an intensive tha-e-week exposure to the 
characterisno, opponunitics, values and rewards offered by 
caivers in architecture, landscape architecture and urban 
planning. Activities will include: field trips to design offices 
and built projects; lectures; and a hands-on design project. 
0101 ^1284) Wittltim, D. M liiWriiF y-3)Qnv4J(lpin 
(ARC 1105) 
Meets 06/26/00-07/14/00 

ARCH17D Introduction to ttie Built Environment 
(3) REG/P-F/AUD. 

CORE: History or Theory of Arts (HA) liltroductjon to 
conceptual, perceptual, behavioral and technical aspects of 
environmental design; methods of .in-ilysis, problem solving 
and project implementadon. 

0101(00969) Wonham.B. MTuWTh 11:1 Klam- 12:40pm 
(ARC 1 103) 



ARCH220 History of Architecture I 
(3) REG/P-F/AUD. 

Survey ofWestern architectural history to the Renaissance, 
with coasidetation of parallel developments in the Eastern 
World. 

(1101(01018) Saunders, E. MTuWThF 9:30am-10:5()am 
(ARC 1101) 

ARCH242 Drawing I 

(2) REG/P-F/AUD. 

Introduces the student to basic techniques of sketching and 
use of varioas media. 

0101(01048) Escobal,L. MW 7:(X)pm-10:(X)pm 

(ARC 110.1) 

ARCH343 Drawing II: Line Drawing 

(3) REG/P-F/AUD. 

l^cre(]itt^fti':AR(^H 400 or pcrtmssum of department. For ARCH 
majors only. Basic ftee hand bne drawing for architectural 
perception and design. 

11101(01060) Escobal.L. TuTh 7:00pm-10:20pm 

(ARC 1101) 



Architecture at Maryland 

ARCH 150 Introduction to Architecture — Design Career Discovery Workshop in 
Architecture 

gune 26-July 14) 

So You Want to Be A Designer? 

A special three- week workshop this summer allows an insiders view of the 
environmental design professions. 

Faculty from the School of Architecture explain careers in architecture, 
landscape architecture, and urban design and planning. This hands-on course 
takes you on a tour of buildings, subway systems, historic neighborhoods, parks 
and gardens in the Washington, D.C.— Baltimore area. Visit with professionals in 
their offices and at construction sites. Learn the history, value and 
technology available in the design profession. The course culminates with a 
project made in class that is suitable for your portfolio and/or application for 
admission to a design school. 

The lead instructor for the summer workshop is Melissa Goodill, assistint professor 
of architecture. Goodill recendy received the 1999 Gabriel Prize, awarded ever\' 
year by die Western European Architectural Foundation tor the pursuit of critical 
research on aspects of French architecture between 1 630 and 1 930. 

The Design Career Discovery Workshop in Architecture is open to liigh school 
juniors or graduating seniors, college students, or anyone interested in 
considering a career choice or career change. No previous experience in 
architecture is recjuired, only your enthusiasm! 

For more information, call 301-405-6284. 



ARCH428 (I'ermRcii Selected Topics In 
Architectural History 

(1-3) REG/P-F/AUD. 

Individual InstrucDon course: contaa department or 
instructor to obtain section number. Majors only. Contaa L. 
Vann for mformaaon. 

ARCH428G Selected Topics in Architectural 
History: Great Cities 

(3) REG/P-F/AUD. 
01(11(01100) DupuyK. TuTh 7.00pm-10;20pm 

(ARC 1123) 
Hrc-rc-quistc:ARCH 403. 

ARCH429 (i\-rmR,;i) Independent Studies in 
Architectural History 

(1-4) REG/P-F/AUD. 

Individual Instrucaon course: contaa department or 
instructor to obtain section number. Majors only. Conact L. 
Vann for infoniiation. 

ARCH436 History of Islamic Architecture 

(3) REG/P-F/AUD. 
I^rrrequisite: ARCH 220 ffrpermiisum of department. Survey 
of Islamic architecture 6om the sevvnth through the 

18th century. 

(1101(01119) Attia,A. MW7:00pm-10;20pm 

(ARC 1105) 

ARCH445 Visual Analysis of Architecture 
(3) REG/P-F/AUD. 

Prenifuisite: ARCH 401 and.iRCH )4). orpemissicn of 
department. Visual prinaples of architectural dcsi^ through 
graphic analysis. 

0101(01131) STAFF MW 7:00pm-10:20pm 

(ARC 1 101) 

ARCH470 (I'trmRe,!) Computer Applications In 
Architecture 

(3) REG. 

Pren-tjuL^iteiARCH 400 or permission i'^' department. 
IntroducDon to computer ptogiamnung and uoUzaDon. 
widi emphasis on architectural applications. 
(11(11(01141) Bovill,C. MW 7*0pm-10:20pm 

(ARC 1123) 

ARCH479 Independent Studies in Architecture 
(l-») REG/P-F/AUD. 

lndividu.il Instrucaon course: contact department or 
instructor to obtain section number 

ARCH479P Independent Studies in Architecture 

(4) REG/P-F/AUD. 

n|M' (01162) STAFl- Time .ind n^,™ to K- amnged 

ARCH488C Selected Topics in Architectural 
Preservation 

(t-4) REG/P-F/AUD. 

Also offerc-d as HlSl'dr^C Credit will be granted for only 
one of the following: ARCH4JWC or HISP61'JC. 
01111(01183) STAFF Time and room to be arranged 
Meets 05/29/00-06/16/00 




^B& 




ARCH489 Independent Studies in Architectural 
Preservation 
(3) REG/P-F/AUD. 

Also offered as H1SP679. Credit will be granted for only 

one of the follov™g:ARCH489 or HISP679. 

0101 (01202) Capen.J. TuTh 7:<K)pni- 10:20pm 

(ARC 1 125) 
0102(01203) Arnold. C. TuTh 7:(X)pm- 10:20pm 

(ARC 1121) 
ARCH 489 section 0102 may be taken only widi ARCH 481C 
Meets 06/19/00-07/14/00 

ARCH628 (PermReq) Selected Topics in 

Architectural History: Architectural 

History 

(1-3) REG/AUD. 

Individual Instruction course: contact department or 
instructor to obtain section number. Majors only Contact L. 
Vajin for information. 

ARCH629 (PermReq) Independent Studies in 
Architectural History 
(1-3) REG/AUD. 

Individual Instrucnon course: contact department or 
lastnjctor to obtain section number. Majors only Contact L. 
V.inn for intormation, 

ARCH678B Selected Topics in Architecture 
(3) REG/AUD. 

Individual Instruction course: contact department or 
instructor to obtam section number. 

AREC Agricultural and 
Resource Economics 

(Agriculture and Natural Resources) 

AREC386 (PermRen) Experiential Learning 
(3-6) REG/P-E 

Individual Instrucnon course: contact department or 
instructor to obtain section number. Prereqiiisile: iHTinission of 
department. 56 semester hours. 

AREC399 Special Problems 

(1-2) REG/P-F/AUD. 

Individual Instruction course: contact department or 
instructor to obtain section number. 

AREC699 Special Problems in Agricultural and 
Resource Economics 
(1-2) REG/AUD. 

Individual Instrucnon course: contact department or 
instructor to obtain section number. 

AREC799 Master's Thesis Research 
(1-6) REG. 

Individual Instruction course: contact department or 
instructor to obtain section number. 

AREC899 Doctoral Dissertation Research 
(1-8) REG. 

Individual Instruction course: contact deparmient or 
instructor to obtain section number. 



'*■,!!• M *' 







ARCH 488C/HISP 619c Selected Topics in Architecture - Historic Preservation 
Field School 

(3 credits) (May 29 -June 16, 2000) 
Preserving the Past in Historic Cape May 

The Chalfonte Hotel is the oldest Victorian hotel in the beautiful seaside resort 
town of Cape May, N.J. Built by master carpenter Col. Henry Sawyer, a Civil 
War hero, the hotel has been in continuous use since 1 876 and is a registered 
historical landmark. 

A special summer program in historic preservation offers students a close up 
look at the academic, technical and professional rigors of the preser\'ation 
processes. Students stay at the Chalfonte fiom May 29-June 16, and work side 
by side with faculty and professional preservationists. Areas of study may include: 
architectural investigation; historic American buildings survey; a historical 
investigarion of the site; a feasibility/marketability study of the site preservation; 
and preservation techniques like wood and paint restorarion. Students will 
render a report that includes written, graphic and photo documentation ot 
existing conditions, analysis and solutions to problems in their specific area of 
study, and a tinal report to the hotel management. Restoration work done tliis 
summer wiU sei-ve as a basis for future visits by architectural preservationists 
from the university. 

ARCH 489/HISP 679 Measured Drawings for Historic Preservation 

(3 crediu) (June 19 -July 14, 2000) 

This course only may be taken with the above, not independently. It will 
conclude in College Park during the remaining four weeks of Summer Session 
I. Special requirement: Academic and/or practical experience in a preservation 
discipline. Contact Michael Arnold at 301-405-6324 for additional information. 
Please note the early application deadline of APRIL 1, 2000. 



HOW 



SUMMER? 



ARHU Arts and Humanities 

(Arts and Humaniries) 

ARHU386 (I'ermReqj Experiential Learning 
(3-6) REG/P-F. 

Prmqiiisilc: permission of department. 56 semester hours. 
01(11(01534) Host, D. Time and mom to be iirranged 

ARTH Art History & Archaeology 

(Arts and Humanities) 

ARTH100 Introduction to Art 

(3) REG/P-F/AUD. 
CORE: History or Theory of Ans (HA) No credit touvrd the 
major can be n^ceivedfor titis course. Major appioaches to 
understanditig the visual arts, and includes analysis of 
techniques, subject matter, and form. I'ainong, sculpture, 
architecture, and the graphic arts. 

0101(01634) Kuo.J. MTuWTh 12:30pm-l:5f)pni 

(ASY 3215) 

F 12:30pm-l :50pm 

(ASY 3215) Dis 

ARTH200 Art of the Western World to 1300 
(3) REG/P-F/AUD. 

CORE: History or Theor>' of Arts (HA) Painting, sculpmre. 

and arehitectuR' from prehistoric times to the Renaissance. 

0101(01645) Shieas,S. MTuWTh 11 :OOani-12:20pm 

(ASY 3215) 

Fll;00am-12:20pm 

(ASY 3215) Dis 

ARTH290 Art of Asia 

(3) REG/P-F/AUD. 

CORE: History orTheor>' of Arts (HA) DIVERSITY 
South and East Asian art from prehistory through the mid- 
I9th cenmry. 

0101(01666) Kuo,J. MTuWTh 9:30am-10:50am 

(ASY 3215) 

F 9:30am-10:50am 

(ASY 3215) Dis 

ARTH351 Twentieth Century Art from 1945 
(3) REG/P-F/AUD. 

formerly ARTH 4.%. Painting, sculpture and architecture in 
Europe and America from 1945 to the present. 
0101 (01676) Younger, J. MTuWThF 2:fK)pm-3:20pm 
(ASY321.S) 

ARTH386 (PermReq) Experiential Learning 

(3-6) REG/P-F 
Individual Instruction course: contact department or 

instructor to obtain section number Prerequisite: permission of 
departmetJt. 56 semester houry. 

ARTH498 (PertnReq) Directed studies in Art 
History I 
(2-3) REG/P-F/AUD. 

Individual Instruction coune: contact dcpamiient or 
instructor to obtain secdon number. 



ARTH499 (PermReq) Honors ThesIs 
(2-3) REG/P-F/AUD. 

Individual Instruction coune: contan department or 
instructor to obtain section number 

ARTH699 Special Topics in Art History 
(3) REG/AUD. 

Indmdual Instruction course: contact department or 

instructor [o obtain seclion minibcr. 

ARTH799 Master's Thesis Research 
(1-6) REG. 

Individual Instruction course: contact department or 
instructor to obtain section number 

ARTH899 Doctoral Dissertation Research 
(1-8) REG. 

Individual Instrucnon course: contact department or 
instructor to obtain section number 

ARH Art Studio 

(Arts and Humanities) 

ARTT1D0 Two Dimensional Art Fundamentals 
(3) REG/P-F/AUD. 

Credit will be granted for only one ofthefoUouHng:.-iRTT 100. 
.iRTS 100,DES\ lOl.or.APDS 101. Formerly .iRTS 100. 
Principles and elements of pictonal space examined through 
the manipulation and organization of various materials. 
0101(01747) Craig,!' MTuWTh 9:(Klam-l 1:30am 

(ASY 2314) Lab 

ARTT110 Elements of Drawing I 
(3) REG/P-F/AUD. 

FiOTifr/y .4RT.S I /(/ Mcdi.i .ind related techniques to depict 
still-life, 6gure and nature. 

0101(01758) Humpha-y,M. MTuWFh 9:30aml2:00pm 
(.ASY 2317) lab 

ARTT200 Three Dimensional Art Fundamentals 
(3) REG/P-F/AUD. 

Prerequisite: ARTT WO. Cmk uill k granted for oidy one oftlu 
follou'ing:.'{RTT 200,.iRTS 200, D/?SiV 102. or.iPDS 102. 
Formerly ARTS 200. Three-ciimcnsional form and space 
examined through the manipulation .and organization of 
various materLils. 

0101(01780) Sham,F MTuWTh 10:(Hlaiii-12:.?0pm 
(ASY 1311) 

ARTT208C Intermediate Special Topics in Art: 
Special Topics Studio/Color 
(3) REG/P-F/AUD. 

0101(01790) Craig, P MTuVlTh 9:0flam-ll:.V>am 

(ASY ill 4) Lib 

ARTT210 Elements of Drawing II 
(3) REG/P-F/AUD. 

Prerequkite.WrV 1 10. Fmncrly .iRTS 210. Continuation of 
ARTT 110 vvitli .iddinonal eiiiphaSLS on piaorial space. 
0101(01800) HuinphayM. MTuWTh 9:30aml2:00pm 

(ASY 2321) Ub 



ARTT320 Elements of Painting 
(3) REG/P-F/AUD. 

Prmquisite: ARTT 210 Formerly ARTS 320. Basic tools and 
language of painting. Oil and/or uster-based paints. SectK>n 
0101 focuses on acrylic painting, 
0101 (01811) Craig, R MTuWTh 12:00piii-2:30pm 

(ASY 3316) Ub 

ARTT333 Elements of Sculpture: Wood and 
Mixed Media 

(3) REG/P-F/AUD. 

l'rerequuiles:ARTT 200; and ARTT 210. Basic sculptural 
techniques and processes using uT>od and mixed media. 
0101(01832) Sham,F. MTuWTh l:00pm-3:30pm 

(ASY 131 1) Lab 

ARTT341 Elements of Printmaking: Woodcut and 
Relief 

(3) REG/P-F/AUD. 

/%Tr^utsi7f:.'lRTT2/tt/i'rmfr().-lR7'SJ-»I. Basic techniques 
and processes related to uxxxlcuts, linocuis and other idief 
media. 

0101(01842) Bla2ina,J. MTuWTh 9:00am- 11 :30am 
(ASY 1317) Lab 

ARTT343 Elements of Printmaking: Screen 
Printing 

(3) REG/P-F/AUD. 

Pn-reqmsitc: ARTT 210. Formerly ARTS 545. Basic techmques 
and processes related to serigraph and silkscrcen printing. 
0101 (01852) Blazina,J. MTuWTh 12:3Opm-3K)0pm 
(ASY 1317) 

ARTT353 Elements of Photography 
(3) REG/P-F/AUD. 

Prerequisites: lARTT 100 ondARIT 1 10} or pmussron of 
department. Introduction to black-and-white photographs'. 
Basic technical and aesthetic wcabulary, camera mechanics 
and datteiom techniques. Introduction to the photographic 
message and meaning in both 6ne art and design concept 
0101(01862) TTOiler.n .MTuW 9:00am-12:30am 

(MMH 0401) Lib 

ARTT354 Elements of Computer Graphics 
(3) REG/P-F/AUD. 

I'rvrequisites: lARTT 100 atul.iRFF 1 10) or permission iV 
department. Introduction to computer graphics, imaging, 
illustration and mixed media. 

0101(01873) Ramapala.N. MTuWTTi 12;30pm-3«)pm 
(ASY 331 IE) Lab 

ARTT418 Drawing 

(3) REG/P-F/AUD. 
0101(01884) Humphre-s.M MTuWTh 9-_50am-12flOpm 
(ASY 2317) Lab 

ARTT428 Painting: Acrylic 

(3) REG/P-F/AUIX 

Section 0101 will tbcus on aiTylic paint 
0101(01905) Cnug.R MTuWTh 1100pm-2:30pm 
(ASY 3322) Lab 





ARTT438D (Pe,mRe<i) Sculpture: Advanced 
Sculpture 

(3) REG/P-F/AUD. 

0101(01926) Sham,E MTuWTh 1 :(K)pni-3:3Upm 

(ASY 1311) Lab 
Prerequisites: ARTT 333 and permission of instnictor. 

ARTT449 Advanced Photography: 
(3) REG/P-F/AUD. 

Individual Instnicnon course; contact department or 
instructor to obtain section number 

ARTT489I (PmnRci) Advanced Special Topics in 
Art: Advaced Special Topics: 
Computer Imaging 

(3) REG/P-F/AUD. 

0101(01958) Ratnapala.N. MTuWTh 3:00pm-5:30pm 
(ASY 331 IE) Lab 
This course is an art course for students with experience in 
computer iinaguig. Students will be permitted to work 
according to their own level of expertise with the guidance 
of the instructor. Adobe Photoshop. Ofoto, Fractal Design 
Painter, Microsoft Word, and Quark Express are some of the 
software programs tliat will be explored. 

ARTT498 (PcrmReq) Directed Studies In 
Studio Art 

(2-3) REG/P-F/AUD. 

Individual Instruction course: contact department or 
insmictor to obtain section number. 

ASTR Astronomy 

(Computer, Mathematical and 
Physical Sciences) 

ASTR100 Introduction to Astronomy 
(3) REG/P-F/AUD. 

CORE: Physical Science (PS) Credil for ASTR tOO amml he 
obtained after, or simuitamously with, recwinj^ credit for any 
astronomy course numbered 250 or higher. Credit will be granted for 
only one of the following: ASTR 100 or ASTR 101 or ASTR 
120. An elementary course in descriptive astronomy, 
especially appropriate for non-science students. Sun. moon, 
planets, stars and nebulae, galaxies, evolunon. CORE 
Physical Science Laboratory (PL) Course only when Liken 
concurrendy with ASTR HI. CORE Physical Saence 
Non-Laboratory (PS) Course when taken alone. 
0101(02020) Hoban,S MTuWThF 9:30am-10:50am 
(CSS 2400) 

ASTR498 Special Problems in Astronomy 
(3) REG/P-F/AUD. 

0101(02041) Trasco, |, Time and room to be arranged 

ASTR699 Special Problems in Advanced 
Astronomy 

(1-6) REG/AUD. 

Individual Instruction course: contact department or 
instructor to obtain section number. 

ASTR799 Master's Thesis Research 
(1-6) REG. 

Individual Instruction course: contact deparmient or 
instructor to obtain section number. 



ASTR899 Doctoral Dissertation Research 
(1-8) REG. 

individual Instruction course: contact department or 
instructor to obtain section number. 

BCHM Biochemistry 

(Life Sciences) 

The College of Life Sciences enforces course prerequisites. 
Students who do not meet the course prerequisites will be 
administratively dropped Irom the course. 

BCHM281 Elements of Biochemistry 
(3) REG/P-F/AUD. 

Prerequisite: CHEM 104 or CHEM 233 or CHEM 235. Not 
open to students who have completed BCHM 461. For 
undergraduate students who desire a one-semester 
biochemistry course rather than a two-semester sequence. 
Basic chemistry and metabolism of most molecules of 
biological importance. 

0101 (02209) STAFF MTuWThF 4:00pm-5:20pm 

(CHM 1402) 

BCHM461 Biochemistry I 

(3) REG/P-F/AUD. 

Prerequisite: CHEM 243 or CHEM 247. A comprehensive 
introduction to general biochemistry. The chemistry and 
metabolism of carbohydrates, lipids, nucleic acids, and 
proteins. 

OIOI (02219) STAFF MTuWThF 9:30am-10:50am 
(CHM 1407) 

BCHM699 Special Problems in Biochemistry 
(1-6) REG/AUD. 

Individual Instrucdon course: contact department or 
instructor to obtain secdon number. 

BCHM799 Master's Thesis Research 
(1-6) REG. 

Individual Instruction course: contact deparmient or 
instructor to obtain section number. 

BCHM899 Doctoral Dissertation Research 

(1-8) REG. 
Individual Instruction course: contact deparmient or 
instructor to obtain section number. 

BIVIGT Business and IVIanagement 

(The Robert H. Smith 
School of Business) 

BMGT110 Introduction to Business and 
Management 
(3) REG/P-F/AUD. 

Not open to BMGT students who have completed 56 or more 
credit hours.. 411 others ma)i lake it airytime. A survey of the field 
of business, includmg its environment, organization, overall 
and functional management, and current issues and 
developments. 

0101 (02294) STAFF MW 6:40pm-10:00pm 

(VMH 1311) 



BMGT201 Introduction to Business Computing 
(3) REG/P-F/AUD. 

Sophomore standing. For BMGT majors only Not open to 
students who have completed BMGT 301 prior to Fall 1 997. 
Basic literacy course using common busuiess computer- 
based applications. Considers the role of information 
technology m the modern workplace, as well as the use of 
computing applications in problem solvmg. 
0101(02304) Chaires,M. TuTh 3:00pm-6:20pm 

(VMH 1311) 
0102(02305) Chaires,M. TuTh 6:40pm- 10:00pm 

(VMH 1311) 

BMGT220 Principles of Accounting I 
(3) REG. 

Soptiomore standing. Basic theory and techniques of 
contemporary finanaal accounting. Includes the accounting 
cycle and the preparation of financial statements for single 
owner and parmership forms of business oi^anizations 
operatuig as service companies or merchandisers. 

0101 (02316) STAFF MTuWTh 12:30pm-2:10pm 

(VMH 1303) 

0102 (02317) STAFF TuTh 6:40pm- 10:00pm 

(VMH 1303) 

BMGT221 Principles of Accounting II 
(3) REG. 

Prerequisite: BMGT 220. Basic theory and techmques of 
accounting for managerial decision making. Involves the 
introduction of the corporation and manufacmring 
operations. Includes cost-volume-profit analysis and capital 
budgeting. Introduces the topics of income taxation and 
international accounting. 

0101 (02329) STAFF MTuWThF 9:30am- 10:50am 

(VMH 1303) 

0102 (02330) STAFF MW 6:40pm- 10:00pm 

(VMH 1303) 

BMGT230 Business Statistics 
(3) REG. 

Prerequisite: MATH 113 or MATH 115 or placement in 
MATH 220 or higher. Not open to students wlio ham completed 
BMGT 231. EN'EE 324, or STAT 400. Credil uHll be granted 
for only one of tlie following: AREC 484, BIOM 301, BMGT 
230, CNEC 400, ECON 321, EDMS 451, GEOG 305, 
GVPT 422, PSYC 200, SOCY 201, URSP 350, or TEXT 
400. Introductory course m probabilistic and statistical 
concepts, including descriptive statistics, set-theoretic 
development of probability, the properties of discrete and 
contmuous random variables, sampling theory, estimation, 
hypothesis testing, regression, decision theory and the 
application of these concepts to problem solving in business 
and management. This coune does not meet requirements 
for management science and statistics majors. 
0101 (02342) Alt. F TuTh 2:00pm-5:20pm 

(TYD1118) 
0102(02343) Alt,F TuTh 6:40pm-10:00pm 

(TYD1118) 



HOW 



IS SUMMER? 




Robert H. 
Smith School 
of Business 

The Smith School of Business is 
moving quickly to the top ranks 
of business schools nationwide. 
Ranked 20th by "U.S. Neivs & 
H'orld Report" for its 
undergraduate programs, and 
22nd by "Business IVeek" for its 
graduate programs, the school 
was recently recognized by 
"Computerworld" magazine as 
having the nation's third best 
technology-oriented M.B.A. 
program. 

The Smith School's strong base 
in finance, accounting, 
management, marketing, 
transportation and public policy 
is coupled with new emphasis on 
business telecommunications, 
electronic coinmerce, financial 
engineering, global knowledge 
management and logistics, and 
supply chain management. Close 
partnerships with other colleges 
at the university offer unique 
educational opportunities in the 
fields of information technology, 
biotechnology and systems 
engineering. 

The school's Dingman Center for 
Entrepreneurship provides a wide 
range of services for the regional 
business community, fhjm 
professional services to 
investment cipital. 



BMGT231 Statistical Models For Business 
(3) REG. 

Pmvquisite: Mj-iTH 141 or pmnisswn of department. Required 
for marujgement scierue and itatistia and decision and information 
sciences majors. Credit will he granted for only one of the following: 
BMGT231 ENEE 324. or STAT 400. An introductory 
course in statistical concepts, including probability fiom a 
naive set theory approach, random variables and their 
properties, and the probability distributions of selected 
discrete and continuous random variables. The concepts of 
sampling, sampling distributions, .ind the application of these 
concepts to estimation and hypothesis testing are included, 
as are briet surveys ot the regression and anova models. 
OlUl (02355) Widhelm.W TuTh 2:W)pm-5:20pm 

(VMH 1207) 

BMGT302 Business Computer Application 
Programming 
(3) REG. 

ftereqinstte: iiMC.T 201 or CMSC 102 or CMSC 103 or 
permission of department. Not open to computer sderue students. 
For BMCT majors only. Corisiders characteristics of business 
data programming and common software development 
processes and practices. Covers the designing, wnting, 
documenting, and testing of an efficient, structured program 
in Visual Basic. 



0101(02365) Geter.R. 



TuTh 3:00pm-6:20pm 
fVMH l.VOl 



BMGT310 Intermediate Accounting I 
(3) REG. 

Prerequisite: BMCT 221. Comprehensive analysis of financial 
accounting topics related to financial statement preparation 
and e.xtemal re-porting. 
0101(02376) STAFF MTuWThF 11 :00am- 12:20pm 

(VMH 1207) 
0102 (02377) Park,T TuTh 6:40pm-10:00pm 

(VMH 1207) 

BMGT311 Intermediate Accounting II 
(3) REG. 

Prcrcqmsiic: B.MCT 310. Continuation of BMGT 310. 
111111(02388) Shaw.K. MW 6:40pm-10:00pm 

(■TYD2111) 

BMGT321 Cost Accounting 
(3) REG. 

Prerequisite: B.MCT 221. .\ study of the basic concepts of 
product costing and cost analysis for management planning 
and control. Emphasis is placed on the role of the 
accountant in organizational management, analysis of cost 
behavior, standaal cost, budgeting, responsibility accounting 
and relesant costs for decision making. 
1111)1(02399) Bedingfield.J. MW 3:00pm-6:20pm 

(VMH 12t)2) 



BMGT332 Operations Research For Management 
Decisions 
(3) REG. 

Prerequisite: BMCT 230. Surveys the philosophy techniques, 
and applications of operations rrscarch to managerial 
decision making. The course is designed phmaril)' for 
students not majoring m management science or statistics. 
Techniques covered include linear programming, 
transportation and assignment models. Maikos' processes, 
ins-entory and queuing models. Emphasis is placed on 
formulating and solving decision problems in the fiinctional 
areas of management. 

0101(02421) Ibrahim, H. MW 2«)pm-5;20pm 

(VMH 1314) 

BMGT340 Business Finance 
(3) REG. 

Prerequisites: BMCT 221: and {BMCT 230 or BMGT 23 1 ]. 
The principles and pracaces involved in the organization, 
financing, and rehabilitabon of business enterprises; the 
various types of secuntics and their asc in raising funds, 
apportioning income, risk, and control; intercorporate 
relations; and new developments. Emphasis on solubon of 
problems of financial policy faced by maiugement. 
0101(02431) Rawlmgs.L. MW 6:40pm-10:00pm 

(VMH 1212) 

8MGT343 Investments 
(3) REG. 

Prerequisite: BMGT 340. An introduction to financial 
investments. Topics include sccunnes and securities markets; 
invesmient risb. returns, and constraints; portfolio poliacs; 
and institutional im^esimeni policies. 
0101(02443) Zhang,X. MTuWTh 11 :00am- 12:.«)pm 
A'MH 1202) 

BMGT3S0 Marketing Principles and Organization 
(3) REG. 

Prerequisite: ECO\ 200 or ECOS 205. An introduction to 
the concepts and principles of marketing, uicludmg the 
marketing of senice and nonprofit organizations. Provides 
an cn'eniew of all the concepts in marketing, including 
relationship markenng. produa deNrlopment, pricing 
promotion, markcong rtseaa'h. consumer behavior, 
international marketing. distribuDon. and internal maiketing 
to employees. 

0101(02453) Snakumaran.B. MTuWThF 12;30pm- 
1:50pm 

(VMH 1311) 

0102(02454) Boas,D. TuTh 6:40pm-10:(K)pm 

CVm 2102) 

BMGT354 Promotion Management 
(3) REG. 

Prerequisite: BMGT 350. Marketmg commumcaDons theory 
with an in-dcpth treatment of all elements of the pronwoon 
mix, including adsrmsing. sales promoaon. dirva marketing, 
public relations, and personal selling. Concepts appUed 
through class exercises, team project, piesentaoon, and 
discussions. 

0101(02466) Yeagk-,M. TuTh 6:.V)pm-9:50pm 

(TYi:)ll01) 





BMGT360 Human Resource Management 
(3) REG. 

The basic course in human resource management mcludes 
manpower planning, recruitment, selection, development, 
compensation, and appraisal of employees. Explores the 
impact of scientific management and unionism on these 
functions. 

0101 (02487) STAFF MW 3:00pm-6:20pm 

(TYD 2102) 

BMGT362 Labor Relations 
(3) REG. 

A study of the development and methods of organized 
groups in uidustry with reference to the settlement of labor 
disputes. An economic and legal analysis of labor union and 
employer association activities, arbitration, mediation, and 
concUiation; collective bargaining, trade agreements, strikes, 
boycotts, lockouts, company unions, employee 
representation, and injunctions. 

01(11 (02498) Levine. M. MTuWThF 1 1 :00am- 12:20pm 
(VMH 1303) 

BMGT364 Management and Organization Tlieory 
(3) REG. 

The development of management and organization theory, 
nature of the management process and funcQon and its 
future development. The role of the manager as an organizer 
and director, the commumcation process, goals and 
responsibilites. 

0101(02508) Levine, M. MTuWThF 9:30am-10:50am 
(VMH 1307) 

0102 (02509) STAFF MW 3:00pm-6:20pm 

(VMH 1307) 

0103(02510) STAFF MW 6:40pm-10;00pm 

(VMH 1307) 

BMGT372 Introduction to Logistics Management 
(3) REG. 

The study of logistic functions of business involved in the 
movement and storage of supplies, work-in-prc^ress and 
linjshed goods. The trade-o£ between cost and service and 
the purchase and supply of raw materials; the warehousing 
and control of inventory; industrial packaguig; materials 
handling within warehouses; and the distribution ot timshed 
goods to customers required to mmimize costs, maximize 
pro6ls or increase customer service levels. 
0101(02532) Evei^,P. MTuWThF 9:30am-10:50am 
(VMH 1314) 

BMGT373 (PermReq) Logistlcs and 
Transportation Internship 
(3) REG. 

Prmquisilcs: BMGT 370 and BMGT 372 (one of these courses 

may be taken as a corequisite) and pennission of department. 

Involves supervised work experience in logistics and/ or 

transportation. Smdents will be expected to relate course 

material to work experience in an analysis of a firm's 

operations. 

0101 (02542) Dewitt.W Time and room to be arranged 



BMGT380 Business Law I 
(3) REG. 

Legal aspects of business relanonships. E.\ammation of torts 
and busmess crimes, contracts and agency. The law of 
personal property and bailment relationships. Survey of 
public policy issues. 
0101 (02552) Mcaenalun.W MTuWThF n:0Oam-12:4(.)pm 

(VMH 1203) 
0102(02553) STAFF MW 6:40pm-10:00pni 

(VMH 1203) 

BMGT381 Business Law II 
(3) REG. 

Prerequisite: BMGT 380 or pennission of department. The 
Umform Commercial Code, mcludmg sales, commercial 
paper, secured transacnons, bulk sales and documents ot tide. 
The law of partnerships and corporations. Reorganization 
and bquidation under die bankruptcy laws. The law of real 
property, landlord and tenant relationships and decedents' 
estates. 

0101 (02564) McCleiialian.W MTuWThF 9:30am-10:50am 
(VMH 1203) 

BMGT398 (PermReq) Individual Study in Business 
and Management 

(1-3) REG. 

Individual Instruction course: contact department or 
instructor to obtain section number 

BMGT411 Ethics and Professionalism in 
Accounting 

(3) REG. 

Prerequisite: BMGT 3! I. For aceounlinf; majors otdy. Senior 
standing. Analysis and discussion of issues relating to ethics 
and professionabsm in accounting. 

0101(02616) Loeb.S. MW 5:30pm-8:50pm 

(VMH 12071 

BMGT424 Advanced Accounting 
(3) REG. 

Prerequisite: BMGT 311. Advanced accounting theory 
appbed to specialized topics and current problems. Emphasis 
on consolidated statements and parmership accounting. 
0101(02647) Hardy. K. MW 6:40pm- 10:00pm 

(TYD 1118) 

BMGT434 Introduction to Optimization Theory 
(3) REG. 

Prerequisite: MATH 220: or pennission of department. Primarily 
for students majoring in management science and statistics. 
Linear programirang. postoptimality analysis, network 
algorithms, dynamic programming, nonlmear programming 
and smgle variable inimniizaDon. 

0101 (02657) McAree, R MW 2:00pm-5:20pm 

(VMH 1207) 



BMGT443 Security Analysis and Valuation 
(3) REG. 

Prerequisite: BMGT 343. Study and appbcadon of the 
concepts, methods, models, and empirical findings to the 
analysis, valuation, and selection of securities, especially 
common stock. 

0101(02687) Shah.B. MTuWTh 2:00pni-3:40pm 

(VMH 1203) 

BMGT446 International Finance 
(3) REG. 

Prerequisite: BMGT 340. Fmancial management fiom the 
perspective of the multinational corporanon. Topics covered 
include the organization and funcoons of foreign e.xchange 
and international capital markets, international capital 
budgetmg. financmg foreign trade and designing a global 
financmg strategy. Emphasis of the course is on how to 
manage exchange and political risks while ma,\miizing 
benefits from global opportunity sets faced by die firm. 
0101 (02707) STAFF TuTh 6:40pm- 10:00pm 

(VMH 1206) 

BMGT451 Consumer Analysis 
(3) REG. 

Prerequisite: BMGT 350. Recommended: PSYC 100; and 
PSYC 22 1. Not open to studaits who haw completed CNEC 
437. Credit will be granted for only one of the following: BMGT 
451 or CNEC 437. Idennfymg buyer behavior concepts 
relevant to a specific marketing problem so that appropriate 
marketing decisions can be made. Concepmal fi-ameworks 
are drawn fix)m psychology, sociology, economics, and other 
social sciences to aid in understanding the behavior of 
ultimate and mdustrial buyers. 

0101 (02727) STAFF MW 6:30pm-9:50pm 

(VMH 1206) 

BMGT452 Marketing Research Methods 
(3) REG. 

Prerequisites: BMGT 230: and BMGT 451. Fomierly BMGT 
450. Focuses on aiding marketing decision making dirough 
exploratory, descnpnve. and casual research. Develops 
student skills m evaluatmg and writmg market research 
proposals, interpreting and analyzing subsequent reports, and 
appraising dieu- asefiilness to managers; designmg studies, 
including selection of data collection method, development 
of data coUecnon instrument, sample design, collection and 
analysis of data, and reportmg the results. 
0101 (02737) STAFF MTuWThF 9:30am-10:50am 
(VMH 1202) 

BMGT454 International Marketing 
(3) REG. 

Prerequisites: BMGT 350 plus one other nurkclmg course. 
Marketing functions fiom the mternational executive's 
viewpoint, includmg coverage of mternational marketing 
pobcies relating to product adaptation, data collection and 
analysis, channels of distribution, pricing, communications, 
and cost analysis. Consideration is given to the cultural, 
legal, financial, and organizational aspects of international 
marketing. 

0101(02747) STAFF MTuWThF 11 :(X)am- 12:20pm 
(TYD 2109) 



10 



HOW B 



IS S U 



M E R ? 



BMGT457 Marketing Policies and Strategies 
(3) REG. 

CORE: Capstone (CS) PreKquisiU: BMGT 451. Corcquisile: 
BMGT 452. This capstone course ties together concepts 
from all the various marketing courses using the 
fundamentals of strategic market planning as the framework. 
Application of these principles is accomplished by anal>'Zing 
and discussing cases and by playing a marketing strategy 
computer simulation game. Analysis of current business 
articles to understand the link between theory and real- 
world problem solving. 

0101(02757) STAFF MTuWTh 9:20am-n:00am 

(VMH 1311) 

BI\AGT464 Organizational Behavior 
(3) REG. 

Prerequuile: BMGT 564. An examination of research and 
theory concerning the forces which contribute to the 
behavior of organizational members. Topics covered include 
work group behavior, supervisory behavior, mtergroup 
relations, employee goals and attitudes, commumcatioii 
problems, organizational change, and organizational goals 
and design. 

0101 (02768) STAFF MW 6:40pm-10:00pm 

(VMH 1202) 

BMGT472 Advanced Logistics Operations 
(3) REG/P-F/AUD. 

PimquisiU: BMGT 572. Analysis of the operarional aspects 
of logistics management, including purchasing pobcies, 
transportation planning, and mventory control. Attention is 
directed toward total logistics cost minimization and the 
establishment of a sastainable competitive advantage based 
on logi.stical acmines. 

0101(02778) Rabinovich,E. MTuWThF 11 :00am-l 2:20pm 
(VMH 1307) 

BMGT495 Business Policies 
(3) REG. 

CORF: Capstone (CS) Pmcquisila: BMGT 540; mid 
B.V/G7' 550: and BMGT 564. WO semaler hoim. For BMGT 
majors only. A case study course where smdents apply what 
they hxK learned of general management principles and 
their specialized functional appbcanons to the ov^•rall 
management function in the enterprise. BMGT majors only. 
All otliers must have authorization. 
0101(02788) STAFF MTuWThF 11 :00am- 12:20pm 

(VMH 1314) 
0102(02789) STAFF MTuWThF 12:30pm-l :50pm 

(VMH 1314) 
0103 (02790) STAFF TuTh 3:00pm-6:20pm 

(VMH 1314) 

BMGT496 Business Ethics and Society 
(3) REG. 

PrfTcqiinnf: otu- anmc in BMGT; or j>mnL<sum of dq}tirTmfnt. A 
study of die standards of busmess conduct, morals, values, 
and the role of business in society, with comideration of the 
sometimes conflicting interests of and claims on the firm 
and its objecdves. Emphasizes a strategic approach by 
business to the management of its external environment. 
0101(02803) Shaffer, B. TuTh 6:40pm-10:00pm 

(VMH 1314) 



BMGT498 Special Topics in Business and 

Management: Integrated Marketing 
Communications 

(3) REG/P-F/AUD. 

0101(02813) Sheinm.n. TuTh 6:30pm-9:50pm 

(VMH 1202) 

BMGT501 Business Functions 

(4) REG. 

Intensive review of markeang and finance functions in the 
business enterprise. Credit not applicable to graduate 
degrees. Majors only until first day of classes. The focus of 
this course will be divided into two areas: marketing from 
June 5- June 23, finance homjune 26- July 14. 
0101(02824) Schrenk.L. MW 5:30pm-10:00pm 

(VMH 1314) 

BMGT611 Managerial Accounting 
(1.5) REG/AUD. 

I'rereqiiisile: B.MGT 610. Use of accounting data in corporate 
plannmg and control. Cost-volume- profit analysis, 
budgeting, pncmg decisions and cost data, transfer pncing, 
acrivit^'-based management, performance measures, and 
standard costing. Majors only until first day of classes. 
OIBA (02844) Gordon, L. M 6:40pm- 10:00pm 

(Arranged) 

BMGT615 Business Communications 
(1.5) REG/AUD. 

For BMGT majors only. Instruction and pracncal expenence 

in written and oral business commumcatioas. Basics of 

structuring business documents and oral presenladons. 

Fosters practice-based (rather than lecture- or case- 

discussion-based) learning. Majors only imtil first day of 

classes. 

OlGl (02854) Parke\-Barao.T Tu 6:40pm- 10:00pm 

(SGII 3032) 
01G2 (02855) Parkey-Barao.T Th 6:40pm- 10:00pm 

(SGII 30.32i 

BMGT620 Strategic Information Systems 
(1.5) REG/AUD. 

For BMGT majors only Use tif information technology to 
achiew competime advanuge, efficient operations, and 
effective decision making. Analysis of fiincnoiis of 
information technology and its uiipact on competitive 
strategy and organizanonal operations. Majors only until first 
day of classes. 
OlGl (02866) Ibrahim. H. M 6:40pm-I0:00pm 

(SGI 220) 
t^ourse also meets Saturday, June 26th 9am-5pm. 
II1G2 (02867) Ibrahim, H. W 6:40pm-10:00pm 

(SGI 22t1) 



BMGT632 Decision Modeling and Analysis 

(1.5) REG/AUD. 
I^rmquistu: BMGT 650. For BMGT majors only. Sot open to 
students uAo hmr ampliud BMGT 65 1 . Pimndes an 
understanding of the role that quantitative methods have in 
the making of business decisions. Topics include problem 
formulaQon and modeUng. linear and integer piDgramnung 
and their applicaoon to busmess and industiv'. network 
models and related applications, and projecl and machine 
scheduling. PC-based software is used to sol\r and analyze 
prciblems. Majors only until first day of classes. 
OIBA (02878) Gass,S W 6:4(Jpm-10;00pm 

(Ananged) 
.Meets 06/07/00-07/12/00 

BMGT682 Business Law for Managers 
(3) REG/ALID. 

Prerequisile: permisswn ot depanmfnl. Sursry of United States 
legal insumtions and processes as «ell as substanrise areas of 
the law that affect busmess. Lxaminanon of ton and contract 
law. the legal fonns of busmess organizanon and legal 
liability and major regulatory laws that afica busiiKss. 
Majois only until first day of classes. 

OlGl (02901) Leete.B. TuTh 6:4Opm-10K)0pm 

(SGII 2022) 

BMGT690 Strategic Management 

(3) REG. 
For BMGT majors only or permission cf department. Integrative 
strategic management focusmg on strategy formulation and 
implementation in domestic and global setting;. Industry 
and competitor analysis, mdustn and firm value chain, 
leadership, goal setting, organizanonal structure and culture. 
Case studv approach to top management and organizaDonal 
problems. Majors onh' until first day of classes. 
OlGl (02911) STAFF MW 6.40pm- 1 0«)pm 

(SGII 3042) 
01G2 (02912) STAFF TuTh 6:40pm-10:00pm 

(SGII 1052) 

BMGT698 tl'.rmReqi MBA Field Project 

(3-6) REG/AUD. 
1 1 (02923) Phillips. G. Time and room to be arranged 

BMGT715 International Accounting: A 
Managerial Perspective 
(3) REG/AUD. 

Prertqiusiie: B.\IGT 6 fl Focuses on using accounting data 
for managerial plannmg and control on a global basis. The 
genenc topics cosertd m the course include foimdaaons of 
a global accounting sv-stcm; sursry of mtenuDoiul 
accounang standards and measures; and the unpaa o( 
globalization on the use of managerial accounting data. 
Guest speakers will participate m the course. Majors only 
until first day of classes. 

OlGl (02933) C«)idon, L. Sa 8:30ain-5K)0pni 

(800 2032) 
Meru 06/05/00-06/26/00 
This course will meet at the College Park Campus on 6^12 
and 6/19 in room 1303 VMH. 




/l^Qflik 




BMGT721 Data Management Systems 
(3) REG/AUD. 

For BMGT majon only or permission of department. In this 
coune we cover the fundamentals of database management 
(DBMS) technology and its application in the development 
of business information sy-stems. In addition to mastering the 
technology, an important goal of this course is to understand 
management and system development issues, when 
information is a valuable corporate resource. We also explore 
new advances that build upon the core DBMS technology. 
Finally, we develop an extensive database applicaoon usmg 
state-of-the-art DBMS softw^e. Majors only until first day 
of classes. 

0101(02963) Liu,S. TuTh 6:40pm- 10:(X)pm 

(SGI 220) 

BMGT725 Information Systems Analysis and 
Design 
(3) REG/AUD. 

Prerequisite: BMGT 620; or BMGT 721. Introduction to 
practical techniques for information systems and design. 
Design requirements for intbrmadon processmg systems. 
Models and tools for requirement analysis. Case studies for 
actual systems and applicarions. Majors only until first day ot 
classes. 

OlGl (02973) Fisher.A, MW 6:40pni-10:00pm 

(SGI! 1022) 

BMGT741 Advanced Financial Management 
(3) REG/AUD. 

Prerequisite: BMGT 640. Advanced theones and concepts 
underlying financial decision making m the lirni. Case 
smdies, model building and applications in financial theory 
and management. Majors only until first day ot classes. 
01 G 1(02993) Isberg.S. MW 6:40pm-10:00pm 

(SGII 2032) 

BMGT745 Financial Institutions Management 
(3) REG/AUD. 

Prerequisite: BMGT 640. The role of financial management 
in financial insdWDons.The economic role and regulation of 
financial msnturions, analysis of risks and returns on financial 
assets and babilioes, and the structure of assets, liabibnes and 
capital. Majors only until first day of classes. 
OlGl (03014) Malmquist,D. TuTh 6:40pm-10;00pm 
(SGII 2032) 

BMGT753 International Marketing 
(3) REG/AUD. 

Prerequisite: BMGT 650. Environmental, orgamzanonal, and 
financial aspects of internadonal marketing as well as 
problems of marketing research, pricing, channels of 
distribution, product pobcy, and communications which face 
U.S. firms trading with foreign firms or which face foreign 
firms in their operauons. Majors only until first day of 



BMGT757 Marketing Strategy 
(3) REG/AUD. 

A capstone markenng course. Marketing strategies designed 
to manage products in selected market segments. Topics 
covered include competitor analysis, buyer analysis, market 
segments, and product strengths and weaknesses; product 
related issues are identified and marketing strategies 
developed, assessed and implemented. Majors only unnl first 
day of classes. 

OIGI (03064) STAFF MW 6:40pm- 10:00pm 

(SGII .1012) 

BMGT764 Executive Power and Negotiation 
(3) REG/AUD. 

Negotiations knowledge and skills through a series ot 
readings (the use of power during hargairang exchanges, 
principles of effective listenmg, and bargaimng strategies and 
tactics) and through the oppormiuty to pracuce negotiatmg. 
Majors only until fint day of classes. 
OlGl (03074) Gannon, M. TuTh 6:40pm- U):00pm 

(SGII 1052) 

BMGT798I Special Topics in Business and 
Management: Industry and 
Competitive Analysis 
(3) REG/AUD. 

Majors only until first day ot classes. 
OlGl (03124) STAFF MW 6:40pm-10;00pm 

(SGII 2042) 

BMGT799 Master's Thesis Research 
(1-6) REG. 

Individual Instruction course: contact department or 
mstnictor to obtain section number 

BMGT828 (PermReq) Independent Study in 
Business and Management 
(1-9) REG. 

Individual Insmiction course: contact department or 
instructor to obtain section number By permission only of 
the Graduate Director. 

BMGT899 Doctoral Dissertation Research 
(1-8) REG. 

Individual Instruction course: contact department or 
instructor to obtain section number. Contact Graduate 
Program Director to make arrangements. 



OlGl (03044) STAFF 



TuTh 6:40pm-10:00pm 
(SGII 2042) 



BSCI Biological Sciences Program 

(Life Sciences) 

The following courses may involve the use of animals. 
Saidents who are concerned about the use of animals in 
teaching have the r^ponsibility to contact the mstructor, 
prior to course enrollment, to determine whether animals 
are to be used in the course, whether class exercises 
invoking animals are optional or required and what 
alternatives, if any, are available. 

BSCI105 Principles of Biology I 
(4) REG/P-F/AUD. 

CORH: Life Science Lab (LL) Prerequisite: placement in 
MATH no or higher. For science majors. Credit will be granted for 
only one of the following: BSCI lO.i/B/OL 101 or BSCI 
105/BIOL 105. Formerly BIOL 105. Basic prmciples of 
biology with special emphasis on cellular and molecular 
biology. 

0101(03236) STAFF MTuWThF ll:00ani-12:20pni 

(BPS 1250) 

TuTh 8:00am-l 1 :00am 

(FiJP 1226) Ub 

0102(03237) STAFF MTuWThF ll:00am-12:2()pm 

(BPS 1250) 

TuTh8.00am-ll;OOam 

(HJP 1236) Lab 

0103(03238) STAFF MTuWThF ll:00am-12:20pm 

(BPS 1250) 

TuTh 8:00am- 11 :00am 

(HJP 1235) Lab 

0104(03239) STAFF MTuWThF 1 l:00am-12:20pm 

(BPS 1250) 

TuTh l:00pm-4:00pm 

(H[P 1236) Lab 

0105(03240) STAFF MTuWThF ll:00am-12:20pm 

(BPS 1250) 

TuTh l:00pm-4:00pm 

(FIJP 1235) Ub 

BSCIIOSm (PermReq) Principles of Biology I 
(4) REG/P-F/AUD. 

CORE: Life Science Lab (LL) Prerequisite: placement in 
MATH 110 or higher. For scieiue majors. Credit will he granted for 
only one ofthejolioumg: BSCI 103/BIOL 101 or BSCI 
105/BIOL 105. Formerly BIOL 105. 
0105(03252) STAFF MTuWThF ll:(X)am-12:20pm 
(BPS 1250) 

BSCI124 Plant Biology for Non-Science Students 
(3) REG/P-F/AUD. 

For non-scieme majors only. Not open to students who have 
completed BSCI 105/BIOL 105. Formerly PBIO 100. A basic 
course in plant biology specifically designed for the non- 
science smdent. Emphasis is placed on an evolutionary and 
ecological approach to studymg fimdamental concepts and 
processes of plants, their place in the biosphere, the 
importance of plants to man. and the manner in which 
humans mipact on plants and theu- environment. This course 
will not count toward graduation requirements for any 
student in the College of Lite Sciences or the College of 
Agriculture and Natural Resources. 

0101(03284) Koines, R MTuWTh ll:00ani-12:40pm 
(HJP 2242) 



12 



HOW 



IS SUMMER? 



BSCI125 Laboratory in Plant Biology 
(1) REG/P-F/AUD. 

Pre- or corcquisite: BSC1 124. For non-sderue majors only. 
Formerly PBIO 101. Laboratory invcsoganons for the non- 
science student into the processes and functions of plants, 
their evolution, adaptations and ecologic.il roles. This course 
will not count toward graduation requirements for any 
student in the College of Life Sciences or the College of 
Agriculture and Natural Resources. 
0101(03294) Caines,A. TuTh 8:00am-! ! :00am 

(HJP 1125) Lab 

BSCI201 Human Anatomy and Physiology I 

(4) REG/P-F/AUD. 
CORE: Life Science Ub (LL) Prerequisite: BSC1 105 or 
equivaletii. Formerly ZOOL 201. Anatomy and physiology of 
the skeletal, muscular, neural, endocrine, and sensory systems. 
Course not acceptable toward major requirements in the 
College of Life Sciences. 

0101(03304) Kapp,J. MTuWThF ll:30am-12:50pm 

(BPS 1243) 

TuWTh 8:30am- 11 :30am 

(HI'S 0205) Ub 

0102 (03305) Kapp.J. MTuWThF 1 1 :30am- 1 2:50pm 

(BPS 1243) 

TuWTh l:00pm-4:00pm 

(BPS 0205) Ub 

0103(03306) Kapp,J. MTuWThF ll:30am-!2:.S0pm 

(BPS 1243) 

TuWTh 4:(X)pm-7:00pm 

(BPS 0205) Ub 

Students must pay a $40.00 Uboratory Materials fee. 

(Sponsoring Department: BIOL.) 

BSCI205 Environmental Science 

(3) REG/P-F/AUD. 

CORE: Life Science (LS) Fomu-riy PBIO 2J5. Basic 
ecological pnnciples as the\' relate to the ecological 
dilemmas of overpopulanon, poUudon, increasing 
consumption of natural resources, and deteriorating land use 
etlucs facing nunkind today. Course not acceptable toward 
major requirements in the College of Life Sciences. 
0101(03328) Komes,P MTuWTh 9:00am-10:4()am 
(HJP 1229) 
(Sponsoring Department: BiOL.) 

BSCI223 General Microbiology 

(4) REG/P-F/AUD. 

CORE: Life Science Ub (LL) Prerequisite: BSCI 105. Credit 
ivill be granted for only one ofthefoUou'ing: BSCI 122 or BSCI 
22). Formerly MICB 200. Fundamental concepts in 
morpholt^, physiology, genetics, immunology, ecology, and 
pathogenic microbiology. Applications of microbiology to 
medicine, the food industry .ind biotechnology. 
0101(03349) Joseph, S. MTuWThF 8:00am-9:IK)am 
(MCB 1207) 
MTuWThF 9:00am- 1 1:00am 
(MCB 1201) Ub 
0102(03350) Joseph, S. MTuWThF 8:00am-9:00am 
(MCB 1207) 
tMTuWThP 9:00am- 1 1 :00am 
(MCB 1205) Ub 

0103 (03351) Joseph, S. MTuWThF 8:(X)am-9:(X)am 

(MCB 1207) 

MTuWThF 9:(X)am-l 1:00am 

(MCB 1206) Lab 



BSCI230 Cell Biology and Physiology 

(4) REG/P-F/AUD. 
Prereijuisites: BSCI 105; and CHEM 10}. Formerly ZOOL 
211. Biochemical and physiological mechanisms underlying 
cellular function. Properties of cells which make life possible 
and mechanisms by which cells provide energy, reproduce, 
and regulate and integrate with each other and their 
environment. 

0101(03361) Compton,R. MTuWTliF 11 :30am 12:50pm 

(PLS1130) 

TuWTh 8:30am- 1 1:30am 

(BPS 0207) Ub 

0103(03363) Coniptoii.R. MTuWThF 11 JOam- 1 2:5(Jpm 

(PLS 1 130) 

TuWTh l:00pm-4:00pm 

(BPS 0207) Ub 

Students must pay a $40.00 Uboratory Materials fee. 

Sponsoring Department: BIOL. 

BSCI279 (PermReq) Supplemental Study: 
Supplemental Study in Biology 
(1-3) REG/P-F/AUD. 

0101 (03374) STAFF Time and room to be arranged 
(Sponsoring Department: BIOL.) 

BSCI289 Off-Campus Internship 

(1-3) S-E 
0101(03385) STAFF Time and room to be arranged 

BSCI338Z (PermReq) Special Topics in Biology 
(1-4) REG/P-F/AUD. 

0101 (0339S) STAFF Time and room to be arranged 
(Sponsoring Department: BIOL.) 

BSCI342 Biology of Reproduction 
(3) REG/P-F/AUD. 

Prerequisite: BSCI 105 or permission oj department. Also ojiered as 
IVMST 326. Credit unll he granted for only piif of the following: 
BSCI 342 or mtST 326. Formeriy ZOOL 326. The 
biology of the reproductive system with emphasis on 
mammals and, in parncular, on himian reproduction. 
Hormone acoons, sperm production, ovulation, se.xual 
differenaation, sexual behavior, contraception, pregnancy, 
lactation, maternal behavior and menopause. 
0101 (03406) Roberts, R. MWF 8:00am- 10: 15am 

(BPS 1238) 
(Sponsoring Department: BIOL.) Acceptable towards 
Biological Speaalization Areas: PHNB, ZOOL, BGEN 
(non-lab) and GENB (category I). 

BSCI348 Special Topics in Cell Biology and 
Molecular Genetics 
(1-4) REG/P-F/AUD. 

Individual Instruction course: contact dep,irtment or 
instructor to obtain section number 

BSCI348R Special Topics in Cell Biology and 

Molecular Genetics 

(1-4) REG/P-F/AUD. 
0101(03418) Srradi.A. Time and room to be arranged 



BSCI370 Principles of Evolution 
(3) REG/P-F/AUD. 
I'rertqutsiU: BSCI 106/BIOL 106. Fomttly ZOOL 32SQ. 
Understanding evolutionary processes in a natural and 
human environment, uiduding adaption; DNA sequence, 
protein, and genome evolution: evwhition of developmental 
mechanisms: mechanisms of evoluoonary change (mutaaon, 
rutural selecDon, dritt); epidemjologv': coe\"olution and 
biological control: speciation; comparaDve methods; 
extinction and conscrvaDon; human evxslution. 
0101 (03429) Uy,J. MTuWTh 9«f)am- 10:40am 

(PLS 1117) 
(Sponsoring Department: BIOL.) Acccpcable lon^ards 
Biological Sciences Specialization areas: MARB, BEES, 
EEBB. ZOOL, BGEN, and GENB (category II). 

BSCI378H Cell Biology and Molecular Genetics 
Department Honors Seminar 
(1-3) REG. 

Repealahk to 6 credits. Formerly XOCB 38SH. Required 
seminar for all students participating in departmental honors 
research program. 
0101 (03448) STAFF Time and room to be arranged 

BSCI379 Cell Biology and Molecular Genetics 

Department Research 

(1-3) REG/P-F/AUD. 
Individual Instruction course: contact department or 
instructor to obtain section number. 

BSCI389 Entomology Department Research 

(1-2) REG/P-F/AUD. 
0101 (03461) STAFF Time and njom to be arranged 

BSCI399 (PermReq) Blology Department 

Research 

(1-3) REG/P-F/AUD. 
0101(03492) STAFF Tune and room to be arranged 

(Sponsonng Department: BIOL.^ 

BSCI399H (PermReq) Blology Department Honors 
Research 
(1-2) REG. 

Prerequisite: parrieipation in the Biohgy Deparxmeru Horrors 
Program. RepealaHe to 8 credits ^'centent defers. Formerly ZOOL 
3t8H. A laboratory research problem; required each 
semester dunng honors partiapation and culmiiuluig in an 
honors thesis 

0101 (03503) STAFF Time and room to be arranged 
(Sponsoring Dcparmient: BIOL.) 

BSCI422 Principles of Immunology 
(3) REG. 

Prerequisites: BSCI 222 arid BSCI 223. Recarmemlei: BSO 
230.}umot or Smior sum^»g..AcapiMe touad Biohgkii Sdencrs 
Spe(uli:ation Areas: .\tICB. C\(BG. PHSB and GEXB 
(CaiegoT)' 2). Formerly MICB 454. The unmune system m 
health and disease. Presentation and analysis of the cellular 
and molecular processes that comprise the immune system. 
0101 (03505) Armstrong. J. MW 1 :00pm-4:30pm 

(MCB 1207) 





BSCI488A Summer Biology Institutes: Topics in 
Biology for Secondary and Middle 
School Teachers 
(1-8) REG/P-F/AUD. 

0101 (03534) Kent, B. Time and room to be arranged 

BSOS Behavioral and 
Social Sciences 

(Behavioral and Social Sciences) 

BS0S386 (PermReq) Experiential Learning 
(3-6) REG/P-E 

Prerequisite: pemtissioti of department. 56 semester hours. 

0101 (03584) Beaidsley-, K. Time and room to be arranged 

01 02 (03585) STAFF Tune and room to be arranged 

BS0S396 (PermReq) Fellowship Program in 
Political Leadership 
(2-6) REG. 

Individual Instrucdon course: contact department or 
instructor to obtain section number. Prerequisite: permission of 
department and acceptance of full-time fellotahip program. 
Corequtsite: BSOS 346. BSOS 356 or BSOS 366 IndiMdual 
instruction course. 

BS0S399 (PermReq) Directed Study in Behavioral 
and Social Sciences 
(3-6) REG. 

0101(03598) STAFF Tmie and room to be arranged 
0102(03599) Lucas, N. Tmie and room to be arranged 

CCJS Criminology and 
Criminal Justice 

(Behavioral and Social Sciences) 

CCJS100 Introduction to Criminal Justice 
(3) REG/P-F/AUD. 

CORE: Behavioral and Social Science (SB) Formerly CJl'S 
WO. Introduction to die admimstranon of criinmal justice in 
a democratic soaety, with emphasis on the theoretical and 
historical development oflaw enforcement. The prmaples 
of organization and adnunistrarion for law enforcement; 
fimctions and specific activities; planmng and research; public 
relations; personnel and training; inspection and control; 
direcnon; policy tbrmulation. 

0101(03651) Gaston,A. MTuWTh 9:00am-10:40am 
(LEF 2208) 

CCJS105 introduction to Criminology 
(3) REG/P-F/AUD. 

CORE: Behavioral and Social Science (SB) Formerly CRIM 
220, Criminal behavior and the methods of its study; 
causation; typologies of criminal acts and offenders; 
punishment, correcuon and incapacitaaon; prevenaon of 

0101(03662) Simpson, S. MTuWTh 9:00am-10:40am 
(LEF 2166) 




College of 
Behavioral and 
Social Sciences 

The College of Behavioral and 
Social Sciences (BSOS) faculty and 
students are engaged in research and 
teaching about social, pohtical and 
economic issues that define 
contemporary Ufe. BSOS emphasizes 
the importance of diversity in 
shaping our understanding, the 
impact of economic globaHzation 
and technology on our communities 
and politicil institutions, and the 
training of leaders to cope with a 
changing world. Its criminologN' and 
criminal justice program is one of 
the best in the country'. Economics 
is one of the 10 best public 
university' departments, and 
Government and Politics, 
Psychology and Sociology are 
ranked in the top 25 percent 
nationwide. 

The James MacGregor Burns 
Academy of Leadership is a 
burgeoning center of research and 
education for students, 
underrepresented populations, and 
emerging leaders to hone their skills 
and understanding of principled 
leadership and civic engagement. 
The college also hosts a major 
center for the study of military 
sociology and a Center tor 
Population, Gender and Social 
Inequahty, which focuses on the 
economic and social changes that 
affect family life, workplace and 
national social policies in the United 
States and abroad. 



CCJS200 Statistics for Criminology and 
Criminal Justice 
(3) REG/P-F/AUD. 

Prerequisites: M4TH 1 1 1 and iCCfS 100 or CCfS 105) or 
permission of department. Introduction to descriptive and 
inferential stanstics, graphical techmques. and the computer 
analysis of criminology and criminal justice data, Basic 
procedures of hypothesis testing, correlation and regression 
analysis, and the analysis of continuous and binary 
dependent variables. Emphasis upon the exammation of 
research problems and issues in cninmologN' and cnminal 
justice. 

0101(03673) Allen. L. MTuWTh 9;(X)am-10:40am 
(TYD 1108) 

CCJS234 Law of Criminal Investigation 
(3) REG/P-F/AUD. 

Prerequisite: CCJS 2.W. Formerly CJUS 234. General 
principles and theories of cnmmal procedure. Due process. 
Arrest, search and seizure. Recent developments. Study and 
evaluaDon of evidence and proof 

(IIUI (03694) Zumbrun.A. MW l:15piii^:15pm 

PNC 1143) 

Tune and room to be arranged Dis 

CCJS300 Criminological and Criminal Justice 
Research Methods 
(3) REG/P-F/AUD. 

Prerequisites: CCJS 100 and CCJS 105: and one of the 
following: CCJS 200 or SOCY 201 or PSYC 200 or ECON 
321 or BMGT 230. Formerly CJUS 300. Introduction to the 
formulation of research questions covering crime and 
justice, research designs, data collection, and mterpretation 
and reporang in criminological and justice-system settings, 
111111(03705) Brooks.L. MTuWTh 9:00ani-10:40am 
(TYD 1118) 

CCJS320 Introduction to Criminalistics 
(3) REG/P-F/AUD. 

I'rercqiiisite: CCJS 234. Formerly CJl'S 320. An introduction 
to modern methods used m the detection, invesagation and 
solution of crimes. Practical analysis of e\idence in a 
criminal mvesQgation laboratory, including photography, 
fingerprmts and other impressions, ballistics, glass, hair, 
handwriting and document examination, drug analysis, and 
lie detection. 

0101 (03716) Mauriello,T MW 6:00pm-9;00pm 

(ALS3120) 

Time and room to be arranged Dis 

CCJS331 Contemporary Legal Policy Issues 
(3) REG/P-F/AUD. 

Prerequisites: CCJS 230: and CCJS 234 or eqiiimlent. Fomierly 
CJL'S 330. In-depth examination of seleaed topics. 
Cnniinal responsibility. Socio-legal policy alternatives with 
regard to de\'iance. Law enforcement procedures for civil 
law and sunilar legal problems. Admissibility of evidence. 
Representaoon. Indigents nght to counsel. 
nun (03727) Zumbrun.A. MW 10;00am-l:W>pm 

(DNC 1143) 
Time and room to be arranged Dis 



14 



HOW BIG 



SUMMER? 



CCJS340 Concepts of Law Enforcement 
Administration 
(3) REG/P-F/AUD. 

PraequisiU: CCJS 100 or cqimulmt. Formerly CJVS 340. An 
introduction to concepts of organization and management 
as these lebte to law enforcement. Pnndples of structure, 
process, policy and procedure, communication and authority, 
division of work and organizational controls. Human 
element in the organization. Infomial uiteracnon and 
bureaucracy. 

0101(03737) Brooks.L. MTuWTh 11 :00am- 12:40pm 
(LEF 1201) 

CCJS350 Juvenile Delinquency 
(3) REG/P-F/AUD. 

Prmquisile: CCJS 105. /vnTL-r/)' CRl\I -^50. Juvenile 
delinquency in leladon to the general problem of crime; 
analysis of factors underlying juvenile delinquency; 
tieatmeni and prevention; organization and social 
responsibilitv- of h\\ enforcement. 

0101 (03747) Simpson, S. MTuWTh 2:(X)pm-3:40pm 
(LEF 2166) 

CCJS352 Drugs and Crime 

(3) REG/P-F/AUD. 

Prerequisiie: CCJS WO Formerly CJUS 352. An analysis of 
the role of criminal jusrice in the control of drug use and 
abuse. 

0101 (03757) Gaston.A. MTuWTh l:(Xlpm-2:40pm 
(LEF 2208) 

CCJS359 Field Training in Criminology and 
Corrections 
(1-6) REG/P-F/AUD. 

Individual Instrucdon course: contact department or 
iastnictor to obtain section number. 

CCJS386 (PennReq) Experiential Learning 
(3-6) REG/P-E 

Individual Instrucdon course: contact department or 
instructor to obtain section number. Prerequisite: permission of 
department. 56 semester luntrs 

CCJS398 (PermReq) Law Enforcement Field 
Training 
(1-6) REG/P-F/AUD. 

lndi\idual Instruction course: contact department or 
instructor to obtain secnon number. 

CCJS399 Independent Study in Criminology and 
Criminal Justice 
(1-3) REG/P-F/AUD. 

Individual Instrucnon course: contact department or 
instructor to obtain section number. 

CCJS451 Crime and Delinquency Prevention 

(3) REG/P-F/AUD. 
Prertquaites: CCJS 105 or CCJS 350 or permission of 
department: mJ CCJS 300. Formerly CRIM 451. Methods 
and programs in prevention of crime and delinquency. 
0101(03785) BouB"arel.J. MTuWTh 11 :m)am-12:-tOpm 
(LEF 2208) 



CCJS699 Special Criminological Problems 

(1-3) REG/AUD. 
Individual Instruction course: contact department or 
instructor to obtain section number. 

CCJS799 Master's Thesis Research 
(1-6) REG. 

IndiNndual Instruction course: contact department or 

instnictor to obtain section miiiilx'r 

CCJS899 Doctoral Dissertation Research 
(1-8) REG. 

Indi\idual Instruction course: contact department or 
instructor to obtain section number 

CHEM Chemistry 

(Life Sciences) 

The College of Life Sciences enforces course prerequisites. 
Students who do not meet die course prerequisites will be 
administratively dropped from the couise. 

CHEM103 General Chemistry I 
(4) REG/P-F/ALTD. 

CORE: Physical Science Lab (I'L) Prerequisite: placement in 
MiTH ! 10 cr higher. Recommended: placement in AHTH / 15 
or higher. Credit will be granted for only one of the following: 
CHEM 102. CHEM 103, CHEM 105. CHEM 107. 
CHEM HI. CHEM 143. The first semester of a chcmistr>' 
sequence intended for students whose curricula require a 
year or more of chemistry. The namre and composition of 
matter, chemical calculations, elements and morganic 
compounds. Lecture, discussion and labonitorN- meeting 
times will be arranged between 8:()()am and 12:20pm 
Monday rfirougji Friday The fint class meeting wiD be 
lecture. 

0131(03860) STAFF MTuWThF ll:00am-12:20pm 

(PHY 1410) 

Time and room to be arranged Lab 

MTuWThF 8:00am-10:50am 

(CHM0115)Dis 

0132(03861) STAFF MTuWThF ll:00am-12:20pm 

(PHY 1410) 

Time and room to be arranged Lab 

MTuWThF 8:(IOani- 10:50am 

(CHM 01 19) Dis 

0138(03866) Chang, E. Tu 6:3Opm-I0:3Opm 

(BPS1I24) 

Th 6:30pm-10:30pm (Arranged) Ub 

Meets 06/05/00-08/25/00 

0139(03867) Chang, E. Tu6:30pm-10:30pm 

(BPS 1 124) 

Th 6:30pm-10:30pm (Arranged) Ub 

Meets 06/05/00-08/25/00 



CHEM103M (PermReq) General Chemistry I 

(4) REG/P-F/AUD. 
CORE: Physical Socnce Lab (I'L) Prerequistu: piicemenl in 
\L4TH 1 10 or higher. Rjxcmmmded: pLcemenl in .VHTH / 15 
or higher. Credit will be granted Jcr only one ofthejoUating: 
CHEM 102, CHEM 103, CHEM 105, CHEM 107, 
CHEM 111, CHEM 143. 

Discussion meeting times will be 9:30 a.m. Monday duDugh 
Friday. Prerequisite: CHEM 103 taken at UMCP widun 
twislw months of die semester in which CHEM 103M is 
taken. A student is eligible to take this couiv only if the lab 
scores received m CHEM 103, die last time it was taken, 
totaled at least 8<J.o percent of die maximum possible total. 
These scores will count for part of the grade m CHEM 
103M. 

0131 (03879) STAFF MTuWThF 11 :00am- 12:20pm 

(PHY 1410) 

MTuWThF 9:30jm-!0:50am 

(CHM 0115) Db 

0132(03880) STAFF MTuWThF 11 :00am- 12:20pm 

(PHY 1410) 

MTuWThF 9:30am-10:50am 

(CHM0II9)Dis 

0133(03881) STAFF MTuWThF 11 flOam- 12:20pm 

(PHY 1410) 

MTuWThF 9:30am-I0:50am 

(CHM 0124) Db 

CHEM113 General Chemistry II 
(4) REG/P-F/AUD. 

CORE: Physical Science Ub (PL) PrertquisiU: CHEM 103 
or CHEM 105. Credit will be granted for only one of the 
following: CHEM 1 13 or CHEM 1 15. Kineocs: 
homogeneous, heterogeneous, and lomc equib'bna; 
coddadon-rcduction: electrochemistry; chemistry' of die 
elements. Lecture, tliscussion and laboratory meeting times 
will be arranged betwrcn 8:0()am and 1 2:20pm Monda>' 
dirough Friday The fait class will be lecture. 
0141(03918) STAFF MTuWThF I l:O0am-12:20pm 
(CHM 1402) 
Time and room to be arranged Lab 
MTuWThF 8«Oam-10:50am 
gMP1109)Dis 
0142(03919) STAFF MTuWThF ll.<)0am-12:20pm 
(CHM 1402) 
Time and room to be arranged Ub 
MTuWThF 8<Xlam-10:50am 
{lMP3I04)Dis 
0148(03921) DusolAL. Tu 6:30pm-9.30pm 

(BPS 1238) 
Th 6:30pm-9.30pm (Amnged) Lab 
Meets 06/05/0O-08/25iO0 
0149(03922) DusoHL. Tu 6:30pm-9J0pm 

(BPS 1238) 
Th 6:30pm-9;30pm (Amnged) Lib 
.Mats 06/05/00-08/25/00 





CHEM113 M (PcrmReq) General Chemistry II 
(4) REG/P-F/AUD. 

CORE: Physical Science Lab (PL) Prereiimsite: CHEM 103 
or CHEM 105. Credit will begranledfor only one of the 
following: CHEM 1 13 or CHEM 1 15. 
Discussion meeting times will be 9:30 a.m. Monday through 
Friday Prerequisite: CHEM 1 13 taken at UMCP within 
twelve months of the semester which CHEM 1 13M is 
taken. A student is eligible to take this coune only if the kb 
scores received in CHEM 1 13, the last time it was taken, 
totaled at least 80.0 percent of the ma.\imum possible total. 
These scores will count for part of the grade in CHEM 
113M. 

0141(03936) STAFF MTuWThF 11:00am- 12:20pm 

(CHM 1402) 

MTuWThF 9:30am-10:50am 

gMP1109)Dis 

0142(03937) STAFF MTuWThF n:00am-12:20pm 

(CHM 1402) 

MTuWThF 9:30am-10:50am 

gMP 3104) Dis 

0143(03938) STAFF MTuWThF ll:00am-12:20pm 

(CHM 1402) 

MTuWThF 9:30am-10:50am 

(|MP 1202) Dis 

CHEM233 Organic Chemistry I 
(4) REG/P-F/AUD. 

Prerequisite: CHEM 1 13 or CHEM 153. Credit will k granted 
for only one of the following: CHEM 104, CHEM 233. CHEM 
255. The chemistry of carbon: aliphatic compounds, 
aromanc compounds, stereochemistry, arenes, halides, 
alcohols, esters, and spectroscopy. Lecture, discussion and 
laboratory meeting times will be arranged between 8:00am 
and 12:20pm Monday through Friday The first class will be 
lecture. 

0171(03953) STAFF MTuWThF ll:00am-12:20pm 

(CHM 1407) 

Time and room to be arranged Lab 

MTuWThF 8:00am-10:50am 

(CHE 2118) Dis 

0172(03954) STAFF MTuWThF 11 :00am-12:20pm 

(CHM 1407) 

Time and room to be arranged Lab 

MTuWThF 8:00am-I0:50am 

(CHE 2120) Dis 

0173(03955) STAFF MTuWThF ll:00am-12:20pm 

(CHM 1407) 

Time and room to be arranged Lab 

MTuWThF 8:00am-10:50am 

(CHM 0127) Dis 

0174(03956) STAFF MTuWThF 11 :00am-12:20pm 

(CHM 1407) 

Time and room to be arranged Lab 

MTuWThF 8:00am-10:50am 

(CHE 2145) Dis 

0175(03957) STAFF MTuWThF 11 :00am-12:20pm 

(CHM 1407) 

Time and room to be arranged Lab 

MTuWThF 8:00am-10:50am 

(PHY 1221) Dis 

0176(03958) STAFF MTuWThF 11 :00am- 12:20pm 

(CHM 1407) 

Time and room to be arranged Lab 

MTuWThF 8:00am-10:50am 

(EGR 3102) Dis 



CHEM233M (PermReq) Organic Chemistry I 
(4) REG/P-F/AUD. 

Prt-reijmtte: CHEM 113 or CHEM 153. Credit unll be granted 
for only one of the foilomng: CHEM 104, CHEM 233, CHEM 
255. Discussion meeting times will be 9:30 am Monday 
through Friday Prerequisite: CHEM 233 taken at UMCP 
within twelve months of die semester m which CFIEM 
233M is taken. A student is eligible to take this course only 
if the lab scores received m CFJEM 233, die last time it was 
taken, totalled at least 80.0 percent of the ma.\imum possible 
total. These scores will count for part of the grade in 
CHEM 233M. 

0171(03968) STAFF MTuWThF ll:00am-12:20pm 

(CHM 1407) 

MTuWThF 9:30am- 10:50am 

(CHE2118)Dls 

0172(03969) STAFF MTuWThF 11 :00am-12:20pm 

(CHM 1407) 

MTuWThF 9:30am-10:50am 

(CHE 2120) Dis 

0173(03970) STAFF MTuWThF 11 :00am-12:20pm 

(CHM 1407) 

MTuWThF 9:30am-10:50am 

(CHM 0127) Dis 

0174(03971) STAFF MTuWThF ll:00am-12:20pm 

(CHM 1407) 

MTuWThF 9;30am-10:50am 

(CHE 2145) Dis 

CHEM243 Organic Chemistry II 
(4) REG/P-F/AUD. 

Prerequisite: CHEM 233 with a grade of C or belter. Credit will 
be granted for only one of the tollomng: CHEM 243 or CHEM 
247. A continuation of CHEM 233 with emphasis on 
molecular strucmre; substitution reactions; carbonium ions; 
aromancit)'; synthetic processes: macro-molecules. Lecture 
and laboratory meeting times will be arranged between 
8:00am and 12:20pm Monday through FndayThe first class 
meeting will be lecture. 

0181(03983) STAFF MTuWThF 11 :(»am- 12:20pm 

gMZ 0220) 

Time and room to be arranged Lab 

MTuWThF 8:00am- 10:50am 

(CLB 0109) Dis 

0182(03984) STAFF MTuWThF ll:00am-12:20pm 

GMZ 0220) 

Time and room to be arranged L^b 

MTuWThF 8:00am-10:50am 

(PLS 1172) Dis 



CHEM243M (PermReq) Organic Chemistry II 
(4) REG/P-F/AUD. 

I'rerequisite: CHEM 233 with a grade of C or better. Credit will 
be granted for only one of the following: CHEM 243 or CHEM 
247. Prerequisite: CHEM 243 taken at UMCP within 
twelve months of the semester m which CHEM 243M is 
taken. A smdent is eligible to take this course only if the lab 
scores received in CHEM 243, the last time it was taken, 
totalled at least 80.0 percent of the maximum possible total. 
These scores will count for part of the grade m CHEM 
243M. 

0181(04002) STAFF MTuWThF 11 :00am- 12:20pm 

gMZ 0220) 

MTuWThF 9:30am-10:50am 

(CLB 0109) Dis 

0182(04003) STAFF MTuWThF 11 :00am-12:20pm 

QMZ 0220) 

MTuWThF 9:30am-10:50am 

(PLS 1172) Dis 

CHEM399A Introduction to Chemical Research 

(1) REG/P-F/AUD. 

01(11(04021) STAFF Time and room to be arranged Lab 

CHEM399B Introduction to Chemical Research 

(2) REG/P-F/AUD. 

01(11 (04032) STAFF Tmie and room to be arranged Lab 

CHEIVI399C Introduction to Chemical Research 

(3) REG/P-F/AUD. 

(0111(04043) STAFF Tune and room to be arranged Ub 

CHEM481 Physical Chemistry I 
(3) REG/P-F/AUD. 

Prerequisite: CHEM 1 13 or CHEM 153 or CHEM 133; and 
M4TH 141: and PH\'S 142. A course primarily for 
chemists and chemical engineers. 

01(11(04054) STAFF MTuThF 8:00am-9:20am 

(CHM 1402) 
Meets 06/05/00-07/28/00 

CHEM482 Physical Chemistry II 
(3) REG/P-F/AUD. 

Prerequisite: CHEM 481 A course primarily for chemists and 
chemical engineers. 

0101 (04064) STAFF MTuThF 12:30pni-l:50pm 

(CHM 1402) 
Mppts 06/05/00-07/28/00 

CHEM699 Special Problems in Chemistry 
(1-6) REG/AUD. 

Individual Instruction course: contact dcparmient or 
instnictor to obtain secDon number. 

CHEM799 Master's Thesis Research 
(1-6) REG. 

Individual Instruction course: contact department or 
instructor to obtain section number. 



H W 



I G IS 



SUMMER? 



Intensive Study 
in Elementary 
Modern Chinese 



An accelerated intensive course of 
study designed for highly 
motivated students who wish to 
complete a one-year language 
requirement in a summer session. 
It introduces fundamentals of 
standard Chinese (Mandarin), 
including pronunciation, grammar 
and Chinese characters, 
emphasizing the four basic 
language skills: speaking, listening, 
reading and writing. Requires no 
previous knowledge of Chinese; 
not open to students who have 
learned from whatever source, 
enough Chinese to qualify for 
more advanced courses. Students 
are required to attend all classes 
and complete all assignments to 
maintain the rapid pace of this 
intensive course. Early enrollment 
is advised in this popular intensive 
course. Admission closes as of the 
second class. 

Summer Session I: 
June 5-July 14 

CHIN 101 Intensive Elementary 
Chinese (6 credits) 

Introduction to speaking, reading 
and writing Chinese with 
emphasis on mastering the 
essentials of pronunciation, basic 
characters and structural patterns. 



CHEM899 Doctoral Dissertation Research 
(1-8) REG. 

Individual Instnicnon course: contact department or 
instructor to obtain secnon number. 

CHIN Chinese 

(Arts and Humanities) 

Chinese Placement: Non-majot^ are required to have an 
inter\iew with a program placement advisor, Ms. Jung-Jung 
I.ec or Mr. Hung-Yi Shen, before they will be permitted to 
enroll for any Chinese language course (except CHIN 213). 

CHIN101 (I'mnRt-q) Intensive Elementary 
Chinese I 
(6) REG/P-F/AUD. 

Non-majon admilled miy afier j piucmeni mlervieu'. 
Introduction to speaking, reading, and wTiang Chinese, with 
an emphasis on mastering the essentials of pronunciation, 
basic characters and structural patterns. 
1)101(04129) Lee, J. MTuWThF 9:30am- 12:20pm 

gMZ 1211) 

CHIN213 Chinese Poetry Into English: An 
Introduction 
(3) REG/P-F/AUD. 

CORE: Literature (HL) DIVERSITY Issues in the 
interculrural and interlingual interpretation of foreign 
literature through the study ofWestern translations of and 
scholarship on selected Chinese poets. No knowledge of 
Chinese required. 

111111(04159) STAFF TuTh 6:C10pm-9:20pm 

(TYD 1 102) 

CHIN499 (I'mnReq) Directed Study In Chinese 
(1-3) REG/P-F/AUD. 

Individual Instruction course: contact department or 
instructor to obtain sccDon niunber. 

CHPH Chemical Physics 

(Computer, Mathematical and 
Physical Sciences) 

CHPH799 Master's Thesis Research 
(1-6) REG. 

Individual Instruction course: contact department or 
mstnictor to obtain secnon number, 

CHPH899 Doctoral Dissertation Research 
(1-8) REG. 

Iiklividu.ll Instrucnon course: contact department or 
instructor to obtain section number. 



CLAS Classics 

(Arts and Humanities) 

CLAS170 Greek and Roman Mythology 

(3) REG/P-F/AUD. 
COIUi: Literature iHL) laughi in English, no prvivquisite: 
cannot be taken for lariguagc credit. This course is 
particularly recommended for students planning to major m 
foreign languages, English, history, the 6ne arts, or 
journalism. 

0101(04274) Stalcy.G. MTuWThF 11 fl<)am-12:20pin 
(MMH1400) 

CLAS470 Advanced Greek and Roman Mythology 

(3) REG/P-F/AUD. 
PrmjuiiiU: CLAS 170 ot pemission fffikpartmenl. Selected 
themes and characters of Gieck and Roman m^th. Historv- 
of the study of m%th and research methods in mythology. 
0101(04285) StaJey.G. MTuWThf 12:30pm- 1:50pm 
(MMH 2*J7A) 

CMLT Comparative Literature 

(Arts and Humanities) 

CMLT270 Global Literahjre and Social Change 

(3) REG. 
CORE: Literature (HL) DIVERSITY Compaianw stud)- 
of literature through selected literary works from scvnal 
non- Western cultures, viewed citxs-<ultuially in light of 
panicuLir social, poUtical. and economic perspeai\«s. 
0101(04345) Cieply.S. MW6«)pm-9:15pra 

(SQHIIOI) 

CMLT275 World Literature by Women 
(3) REG. 

CO\<E: Literature (HL) DIVERSITY Alx c§mi as WMST 
215. Crrdii uill begnmuijci ontf ont cf the jiiliMwg: C\(LT 
275 or \ntST 275. Comparatnr study of selected works \rf 
women wntets of seN'enl countries, e-^cplonng pomts of 
intetwction and di\Tigence in wtimen's literan' 
representations. 

0101 (043S6) Monel. L. TuTh 6«0pm-9:15piii 

(SQH 2120) 

CMLT386 (PermReq) Experiential Learning 
(3-6) REG/P-E 

Indisidual Instruction course: contact department or 
instructor to obiam section number. Pimpaatt: penmsskm tf 
depanmmt. 56 semesler houn. 

CMLT699 (PrrmReq) Independent Study 
(1-6) REG. 

Individual Instruction course: conQa department or 

instructor to obtain section number. 

CMLT788 (PermReq) Pfacticum in Comparative 

Studies 

(1-6) S-E 
Individual Instruction course: contact department or 
instructor to obtain section number. 




,0 



/^ogik 





College of 
Computer, 
Mathematical 
and Physical 
Sciences 

This college provides a solid base 
for the universiry "s excellence in 
science and technology with six 
departments: Astronomy, Computer 
Science, Geology, Mathematics, 
Meteorology and Physics. The 
computer science, physics and 
mathematics departments are in the 
top tier of various national rankings. 
A research group in the modern 
theory of chaos and nonlinear 
dynamics is ranked No. 1 in 
the nation. 

The coUege is propelling the 
university toward national leadership 
in the critical public policy and 
scientific area of earth system 
science. A close relationship with 
NASA Goddard, combined with 
strengths in geology, meteorology 
and in the computationally intense 
area of coupled global climate and 
land surface models is enabling 
important study of global data sets. 

Technology transfer fiom the 
coUege has enabled several 
successful start-up companies in 
Maryland, and the dissemination of 
world class research to industry and 
government is building the college's 
reputation nationwide. 



CMLT799 Master's Thesis Research 
(1-6) REG. 

Individual IiistrucnoTi course: contact department or 
instructor to obtain section number 

CMLT899 Doctoral Dissertation Research 
(1-8) REG. 

Individual Instrucaon course: contact department or 
instructor to obtain section number. 

CMSC Computer Science 

(Computer, Mathematical and 
Physical Sciences) 

CMSC106 Introduction to C Programming 
(4) REG/P-F/AUD. 

Prerequisite: MiTH 1 10. Crpiiil mil mi; he grained (or CMSC 
106 if students already have credit for either CMSC 1 13 or 
CMSC 1 14. For CMSC majors only. Not open to students who 
have completed CMSC 1 13 or CMSC 1 14. Design and 
analysis of programs in C.An introduction to computmg 
using structured programming concepts. CMPS and 
Computer Engineering majon; will be given priority for 
registration until the first day of classes, 
0101(04500) STAFF MTuWTh 9:30am- 10:50am 

gMP3201) 
Meets 06/05/00-07/28/00 

F 8:00am-9:20am 

gMP 3201) Lab 

1 02 (04501) STAFF MTuWTh 9:30am- 10:50am 

QMP 3201) 

Meets 06/05/00-07/28/00 

F 9:30am-10:50am 
gMP 3201) Lab 

CMSC114 Computer Science I 
(4) REG/P-F/AUD. 

Prerequisite: (CMSC 105 or CMSC 106) with a grade ofC or 
better or score of 4 or 5 on Pascal AP exam or permission of 
department based on satisfactory performance on the depamnent's 
placement exams. Corequisile: MATH 140. Credit will be granted 
for only one of the following: CMSC 114 or CMSC 1 13. With 
CMSC 214, this course forms a one-year sequence for 
computer science majors. Introduction to UNIX. 
Procedural and data abstraction using C++. CMPS and 
Computer Engineering students will be given pnority for 
registration until the fim day of classes. 
0101(04511) STAFF MTuWTh 9:30am- 10:50am 

(CLB 0102) 
Meets 06/05/00-07/28/00 

F 9:30am-10:50am 
(CLB 0102) Lab 



CMSC150 Introduction to Discrete Structures 
(4) REG/P-F/AUD. 

CORE: Mathematics or Formal Reasoning (MS) Pre- or 
coreqiiisite: MiTH 140. Formerly CMSC 250. Fundamental 
mathematical concepts rebted to computer science, 
including finite and infinite sets, relations, fiinctions, and 
propositional logic. Introduction to other techniques, 
modeling and solvmg problems m computer science. 
Introduction to permuutions, combinations, graphs, and 
trees with selected applicaoons. 

0101(04521) STAFF MTuWTh 11 :00am- 12:20pm 
(CLB 0102) 
Meets 06/05/00-07/28/00 

Fll:00am-12:20pm 

(CLB 0102) Dis 

0102(04522) STAFF MTuWTh I I:00am-12:20pm 

(CLB 0102) 

Meets 06/05/00-07/28/00 

F 12:30pm-l:50pm 
(CLB 0102) Dis 

CMSC251 Algorithms 

(3) REG/P-F/AUD. 

Prerequisites: CMSC 114 utih a grade ofC or better and CMSC 
1 50 with a grade of C or better. A systematic study of the 
complexity of some elementary algorithins related to 
sorting, graphs and trees, and combinatorics. Algorithms are 
analyzed using mathematical techniques to solve recurrences 
and summations. 

0101 (04532) STAFF MTuWThF 12:30pm- 1:50pm 
GMP 3201) 

CMSC311 (PermReq) Computer Organization 
(3) REG/P-F/AUD. 

Prerequisite: CMSC 214 with a grade ofC or better. 
Introducnon to assembly language. Design of digital logic 
circuits. Organization of central processors, mcluding 
instruction sets, register transfer operations, control 
microprogrammmg, data representation, and arithmetic 
algorithms. Memory and mput/output organization. 
0101 (04542) STAFF MTuWThF ll:00am-12:20pm 
(CLB 01 1 1) 

CMSC330 (I'ermReq) Organization of 
Programming Languages 
(3) REG/P-F/AUD. 

Prerequisite: CMSC 214 u-iih a grade ofC or better. The 
semantics of programming languages and their rrm-ome 
organization. Several different models of languages are 
discussed, including procedural (e.g.. C. Pascal), fiinctional 
(e.g., ML. LISP), rule-based (e.g.. Prolog), and object- 
oriented (e.g., C++, Smalltalk). Run-time structures, 
mcluding dynamic versus static scope rules, storage for 
strmgs, arrays, records, and object inheritance are explored. 
0101 (04552) STAFF MTuWTh 9:30am- 10:50am 

(CLB 0111) 
Meets 06/05/00-07/27/00 

CMSC386 (PermReq) Experiential Learning 
(3) REG/P-E 

Individual Instruction course: contact department or 
instructor to obtam section number. Prerequisite: permission of 
department. 56 semester hours. Written permission of instructor 
must be obtained in advance on department form. 



HOW 



IS s u 



M E R ? 



CMSC386C (PermReq) Experiential Learning 
(3-6) REG/P-F. 

Prerrquisilt': pfrmisikm of dfpartmetit. 56 setnfMer houn. 
(1101(04634) STAFF Time ami mom to be arranged 

CI\/ISC390 (I'ermReq) ilonors Paper 
(3) REG/P-F/AUD. 

Irulividual Instrucnon count-: contact department or 
instructor to obtain section number l^^rvrvquisiw: admissioti to 
CMSC HiVk'R Ihi^am Special study or research direaed 
towiinl pR'paraDon of lionors paper 

CMSC420 O'mnReq) Data Structurcs 
(3) REG/P-F/AUD. 

Prmquism: a grade of C or bciltr m CMSC 3)0 or CMSC 
400; and permission ofdepanmenl; or CMSC graduate student. 
DescTiption. propemes. and storage allocation of data 
structure including lists and trees. Algorithms for 
manipulating structures. Apphcations from areas such as data 
processing, informabon retrieval, symbol mampulation, and 
operating systems. 

0101 (04727) STAFF MTuWTh 12:.10pm-l:50pm 

(CLBOllI) 

CMSC460 (PermReq) Computational Methods 
(3) REG/P-F/AUD. 

Prerequisites: MATH 240 and .\L\W 24 1 and CMSC 105 or 
CMSC 106 or CMSC 114 or ENEE 1 14 or permission of 
inslnictoi Also offered as MAPL 460. Credit mil be granted for 
only one of the/olloumg: CV/SC/AMPL 460 or 
CMSC/MAPL 466. Basic computadonal methods for 
interpolation, least squares, approximarion, numerical 
quadrature, numerical solution of polynomial and 
transcendental equanons, systems ol linear equations and 
initial value problems for ordinary ditfeivntial equations. 
Emphasis on methods and their computational properties 
rather than their analytic aspects. Intended primarily for 
students m the physical and engmeermg sciences. 
01111(04747) STAFF MTuThF 8:IK)am-9:20am 

(MTH B0421) 
.Meets 06/05/00-07/2K/00 

CMSC498A (PermReq) Special Problems in 
Computer Science 

(1-3) REG/P-F. 

!ndi\idual instruction course: contact department or 
msmictor to obt.im secnon number. 

CMSC798A (PnmReq) Graduate Seminar in 
Computer Science 

(1-3) REG/AUD. 

Individual lastruction course: contact department or 
uistruaor to obtain section number. 

CMSC799 (PermReq) Master's Thesis Research 
(1-6) REG. 

Individual Instrjction course: contact dep,irnnent or 
iiLstnictor to obtain section number 

CMSC818A (PermReq) Advanced Topics in 
Computer Systems 

(1-3) REG/AUD. 

Individual Instruction course: contact department or 
instructor to obtain section number 



CMSC828A (PermReq) AdvaHced Toplcs In 
Information Processing 
(1-3) REG/AUD. 

Individual IitstrucDon coupie: contact department or 
lasiructor to obtain secDon number 

CMSC838A (I'lrmReq) Advanced Topics in 
Programming Languages 
(1-3) REG/AUD. 

Individual Instruction course: contact department or 
instructor to obtain section number. 

CMSC858A (PirmReq) Advanced Topics In Theory 
of Computing 
(1-3) REG/AUD. 

Individual Instruction course: contact department or 
instructor to obtain secnon number. 

CMSC878A (PermReq) Advanced Topics In 
Numerical Methods 
(1-3) REG/AUD. 

Individual Instruction course: contact department or 
instructor to obtain section number 

CMSC899 (PermReq) Doctoral Dissertation 

Research 

(1-8) REG. 
Individual Instruction course: contact deparmient or 
instructor to obtain section number 

COMM Communication 

(Arts and Humanities) 

C0MM107 Oral Communication: Principles and 
Practices 
(3) REG/P-E 

\'ot open to s!i4dmts who haiv completed COMAI 100 or SPCH 
100. Credit will be granted for only one of the follotiHng: COMM 
100 or COMM 101 or SPCH 100 or SPCH 107. fonnerfy 
SPCH 107. A study of and practice in oral communication, 
including principles of interviewing, group discussion, 
hslening, informative briefings, and persuasive speeches. 
0101(05416) STAFF TuTh 6:30pm-9:50pm 

(PLS1146) 
OlO: (05417) WoKm.A. MTuWThF 9:30am- 10:50am 

(PLS1146) 
(1103 (05418) WoK™,A. MTuWThF n:00am-12:20pm 

(PLS1I46) 
0104(05419) STAFF MW 6:30pm-9:50pm 

(PLS1146) 

C0MM200 Advanced Public Speaking 
(3) REG/P-F/AUD. 

l-omierly SI'Cl I 200. Rhetorical prllIClpk^ and models of 
speech composition in conjunction with the preparation 
.rnd presentation of specific fomis of public speaking. 
0101(05432) Mason.A MW 6:00pm-9:20pm 

(SKN 1112) 



C0MM230 Argumentation and Debate 

(3) REG/P-F/AUD. 
Formerly SPCH 230. A study of the fimdaniental prinaples 
of reasoning, analysis, and evidence pieparaDon of debate 
bric6 and pnesentation of standaid academic debate. 
0101 (05442) Mason,A. TuTh 6:00pm-9:20pm 

fl'LS 11841 

C0MM250 Introduction to Communication 

Inquiry 

(3) REG/P-F/AUD. 
Pormerly SPCH 250 An introduction to the field of 
commumcation. Definitions, modek, and contexts of 
communication; rtiecorical theory and riictorical criticism of 
discoune. 

0101(05452) Drake, L MTuWTh 11:00am-12;50pm 
(SKN 0104) 

C0MM324 Communication and Gender 

(3) REG/P-F/AUD. 
DIVERSITY Formaiy SPCH 324. The creation of images 
of male and temale, and masculine and feminine, through 
conmiunication, the differences in male and female 
communication behaviors and styles, and the impbcaoons of 
those images and styles for male-female transacoons. 

0101 (05462) Grmg-Pemble, L. TuTh 6:3<)pm-9:5f)pm 

(PLSllll) 

0102 (0S463) Gnng-Pemblc, L. MW 6:30pm-9:50pm 

(PLS nil) 

C0MM330 Argumentation and Public Policy 

(3) REG/P-F/AUD. 
Formerly SPCH 330. Conteinporarv' theones of 
argumentation with special emphasis on methods of 
formulating and cntiquing public pobcy argument 
0101(05474) Chambers, M. TuTh 6:30pm-9:50pm 
(PLS 1117) 

C0MM350 Public Relations Theory 
(3) REG/P-F/ ALTD, 

IM-requL'ite: Crade C or better m Jour 201 or COMM 250;oi 
permission ofdepanmau. Sot open to studmts uAo hjir ccmplfud 
JOUR 330. Credit uiW hegranudpr oidy ont of tlie Jottowing: 
COMM 350 or COMM 430 or'jOiR 330 or JOUR 530. 
FormertyJOUR 330. The histoncal development and 
contemporarv' sQtus of public rebtions in business, 
government, assoaauons and other organizations. 
Application of communication theory and social saence 
methods to the research, planning, communication and 
evaluation aspects of the public relaoons prtxress. 
0101(054*4) Hung.C. TuTh 6:.Vlpm-9:50pm 

(PLS 1119) 




/^Elk 




University of Maryland College Park Scholars 

Background 

The University of Marylands College Park Scholars (CPS) program is a unique, 
two-year living-learning program for freshmen and sophomores. Once invited to 
CPS, students choose to be in one of twelve thematicaUy-linked CPS programs: 



' Advocates for Children 

• American Cultures 

'Arts 

' Business, Society, and the Economy 

' Earth, Life, and Time 

' En\dronmental Studies 



International Studies 

Life Sciences 

Media, Self, and Society 

Public Leadership 

Science, Discovery, and the Universe 

Science, Technology, and Society 



Each CPS curriculum consists of seven to ten courses that relate to the CPS 
theme area. Each curriculum is interdiscipUnary, and most of the courses taken 
for CPS count for either major requirements or university CORE requirements. 
The fundamental CPS course, taken each semester, is the CPS colloquium. The 
colloquium is designed to be interactive, engaging students in discussions and 
debate with prominent experts in various fields. Students also participate in co- 
curricular activities, such as field trips and communirs' activities, which also 
enrich the understanding of the CPS theme area. In the second year of the 
program, students have the opportunitN' to participate in a variety of experiential 
learning projects, including internships, service learning activities, and research 
projects. 

Students who live on campus live in special residence halls in the Universiry of 
Marylands Cambridge Community. These residence halls house the CPS 
program offices, classrooms, faculty' offices, and computer labs. CPS also 
welcomes students who conunute to campus to jom the program. At the 
successful completion of the CPS curriculum, students receive a CPS citation on 
their transcript. Then, in their junior year. College Park Scholars have an 
opportunity- to apply to their departmental or college honors programs. 

Summer 2000 Course Offerings: 

CPSP259 College Park Scholars Practicum (1-3 credits) 

Prerequisite: Admission to College Park Scholars. See Page 21 for fiiO description 
of multiple sections being offered in Summer Session I and II. 

CPSP359 Discovery Projects in Research (2 credits) 

Restricted to stiidents in McNair Scholars, College Park Scholars, and 
Universiry Honors. See page 21 for full description of course times, location and 
instructor. 



C0MM351 Public Relations Techniques 
(3) REG/P-F/AUD. 

nmqtmite: COMM 350 and grade C or belter in JOUR 202. 
Sol open to students who tunv completed JOUR 331. Credit will 
he granted for only one of tite folloumg: COMM 351 or JOUR 
331. Formerly JOUR 331. The techniques of pubbc 
rdiDom, including news releases, publications and printed 
nutenaJs, audio-\Tsual techniques, speeches and special 
events, .^pplicaaon of these techniques in laboratory and 
tield projects, 

01111(05494) Simone.L. MW 6:30pm-9:50pm 

(PLS 1172) 

C0MM386 (PermReq) Experiential Learning 
(3-6) REG/P-F. 

Prerequisite: permission of department. 56 semester hours. For 

COMM majors ordy. Supervised internship expenence with 

communication professionals. Relation of academic training 

to professional e.xpenence. 

111111(05514) Morrison,A. Time and room to be 

arranged 

C0MM399 (PermReq) HonOfS TtlBSlS 

(3) REG/P-F/AUD. 
N 1 1 i 1 (05524) ST.\FF Tune and room to be arranged 

C0MM400 Research Methods in Communication 
(3) REG/P-F/AUD. 

herequisite: CO.MM 250 and an miroduitor)^ course in statistics. 
Formerly SPCH 400. Philosophy of saenrific method: role of 
cheor\'; research ethics; empirical research methods 

measurement, sampling, design, anal^'sis). 

1 1 1 1 1 (05535) Uwrcnce, P. MTuWTh 9;00am-l 0:50am 
(SKN 0104) 

C0MM401 Interpreting Strategic Discourse 
(3) REG/P-F/AUD. 

Formerly SPCH 401. Pnnaples and approaches for pracQcal 
.ir,al\-sis of discourse designed to shape audience opinion. 
I I'll (05545) Parry-Giles, S. TuTh 6:30pm-9:50pm 
(SKN 0104) 

C0MM402 Communication Theory and Process 
(3) REG/P-F/AUD. 

Recommended: COMM 250. Formerly SPCH 402. 
Philosophical and conceptual analysis of communication 
theones. 

11101(05555) Chambers, M. MW 6:30pm-9:50pm 

(SKN 0104) 

C0MM425 Negotiation and Conflict Management 
(3) REG/P-F/AUD. 

Formerly SPCH 425. Role of communication m shaping 

negoDaDon and conflict processes and outcomes. 

0101(05565) Cai,D. MW 6:00pm-9:20pm 

(PLS 1119) 

MW 6:00pm-9:20pm 

(PLS 1117) Dis 



4 



20 



H W 



IS SUMMER? 



C0MM426 Conflict Management 

(3) REG I'-f- AUl ) 

Rmmmmded: CO\L\l 425, COMM 250, and COMM 402. 
Fmnerly SPCH 426. Role of communication in nunaging 
conflict procc-sses. 

0101(05575) Cai.D. MW l:(*)pm-l:20prii 

(SKN 0104) 

C0MM475 Persuasion 

(3) REG/P-F/AUD. 

Formerly SPCH 475. Uas« of persuasion, with cinpliisis on 
recent experimental developments in persuasion. 
0101 (05585) Hiihbard, S. TuTh 6:30pm-9:50pni 

(PLS1113) 

C0MM482 Intercultural Communication 
(3) REG/P-F/AUD. 

DIVERSITY Rmntrly .SPCH 482. Ihe nujor variables of 
conmiunicaQon m an intca-ultural context: cultural, racial 
and national differences; stervotypes; values; cultural 
assumptions; and verbal and nonverbal channels. 
0101 (05595) Cordova, N. TuTh 6:30pm-9:50pm 

O'LS 1172. 

C0IVIM489 (I'ermRcq) Topical Research: Topical 
Research 
(1-3) REG. 

Individual Instruction course: contact department or 
instructor to obtain section number. 

C0MM798 Independent Study 
(1-3) REG/AUD. 

Individual Instruction course: contaa department or 
insmictor to obtain section number 

C0MM799 Master's Thesis Research 
(1-6) REG. 

Individual Instruction course: contact department or 
instructor to obtain section number 

C0MM899 Doctoral Dissertation Research 

(1-8) REG/S-E 
Individual Instruction course: contact deparmient or 
instructor to obtain section number 

CONS Sustainable Development 
& Conservation Biology 

(Life Sciences) 

C0NS609 Special Topics in Conservation Biology 

(1-3) REG/S-F 
01(11 (05663) Inouye, 1). Time and room to be arranged 

C0NS798 ii'mxRai) Research Papers in 
Sustainable Development and 
Conservation Biology 
(1-4) REG/S-E 

0101 (05674) Inouye. D. Time and room to be arranged 



CPSP College Park 
Scholars Program 

(Undergraduate Studies) 

CPSP259 College Park Scholars Practicum 
(1-3) REG. 

Prvrcquisite: admission to CoLcge Park Scholars. Section 
01(11 is internship; 0102, service-learning with Lakeland 
STARS; 0103, semce-learnmg; 0104, semce-leaming with 
PLUMS; 0201, service-learning with Lakou Workcanip 
Project; and 0301 , oral histones. Please sec your Faculty 
Director before you register You will need to complete an 
apphcation form for 0201. 
0101(05725) Vietri, L. Time and room to be arranged 

Meeli 06/05/00-08/25/00 
0102(05726) Brenden,E. TuTh 9;30am- 11 :00am 

(CBD 1140) 
Time and room to be arranged 

0103 (05727) Johnson, L.Time and room to be arranged 

Meat 06/05/00-08/25/00 

1 04 (05728) STAFF TuTh 2:(X)pm-4: 1 5pm 

(CBD114<J) 
Time and room to be arranged 

CPSP359 Discovery Projects in Research 

(2) REG. 

Restricted to smdents in McNair Scholars, College Park 
Scholars, and Uraversity Honors. 

0101(05740) Conies, J. M 9:30am-l 1:30am 

(SQH1119) 

Time and room to be arranged 

DANC Dance 

(Arts and Humanities) 

DANC2(K) Introduction to Dance 

(3) REG/P-F/AUD. 

CORE: History or Theory of Arts (HA) DIVERSITY A 
study of dance as a form of communication and as an art 
form; a survey of the theories and styles of dance, and their 
relationships to other art forms. 

0101(05741) Perez, S. MTuWThF I0:00ani-ll:20ani 
(DNC1147A) 

ECON Economics 

(Behavioral and Social Sciences) 

EC0N200 Principles of Micro-Economics 

(4) REG/P-F/AUD. 

CORE: Behavioral and Social Science (SB) Prnrijuiau: 
MiTH 110 or pUcemem m MATH 115 or ahmr. Ii is 
nxommetided ihal sludmts (omplele ECOS 200 heforr taking 
ECON 201. Crtdil will he gmnled for only one of the following: 
ECON 200 or ECON 203. FonneHy ECON 20.1 This 
coune emphasizes the behavior of iiidiMdu.il consumers and 
business tirms, problems of international trade and finance. 
the distribution of income, pobcies for ehminadng poverty 
and dLscnmmation, the problems of environmental 
poUuDon, and the impaa of ditfea-nt market structures upon 
economic acnvit^'. 
0101 (05790) STAFF TuWTh 6:30pm-9;25pm 

fTYD 1132) 
0102(05791) STAFF MTuWThF 9:00am-10:45am 

(TYD1128) 
0103(05792) STAFF MTuWThF II :00ani- 12:45pm 

(TYD 2102) 



EC0N201 Principles of Macro-Economics 

(4) REG/P-F/AUD. 
CORE: Behavioral and Social Sacnce (SB) Prertquisiu: 
MATH 110 or placement m MATH 115 or dme. Il u 
recommended thai students complete ECON 200 before taking 
ECON 201. Credit will he granted for only one ofthefoUouJn^: 
ECON 201 or ECON 205. An introducnon to die 
problems of unemployment, inflaaon. and economic 
growth. Emphasis on roles of monetary and fiscal policy in 
the condua of macroeconomic policy. The efficacy of wage 
and price controk is analyzed. 
0102(05805) STAFF MTuWThF 9KJ0am-I0:45am 

(TYD 2102) 
0103(05806) STAFF MTuWThF ll«»am-12:45pm 

(TYD 1 1 18) 
0104 (05807) STAFF MTuW 6:30pm-9:25pm 

(TYD 1128) 

EC0N305 Intermediate Macroeconomic Theory 
and Policy 

(3) REG/P-F/AUD. 
Pnmjuisita: ECON 200: md ECON 201; and .\H7H 220. 
Credit wiB he granted for only one of the foUouing: ECON 305 or 
ECON 405. Formerly ECON 401. Analysis of die 
detcrminaDon ot naaonal income, employment, and pnce 
levek. Discussion ot consumpnon, imrstment, inflaaon. and 
government fiscal and nionetarv' policy. 
0101(05819) STAFF MTuWThF 9:30am-10:50jm 
TYD 01 IT) 

EC0N306 Intermediate Microeconomic Theory 
(3) REG/P-F/AUD. 

Prerequisites: ECON 200. diiJ ECON Jl/l, aiul .\L-\TH 220. 
Fonnerly ECON 405. Analysis of the rfieones ot' consumer 
behavior and of the firm, market systems, dismbuoon theory 
and the role of externalities. 
0101(05830) STAFF MTuWThF II flOam-1 2:20pm 

(SQH 1120) 
0102 (05831) STAFF TuTh 6:30pm-9:50pm 

(TYD 2111) 

EC0N315 Economic Development of 
Underdeveloped Areas 

(3) REG/P-F/AUD. 
Prerequisites: \ECON 200: and ECON 201 1 or ECON 205. 
Credit will be granted for only one t.f the foOouing: ECON 51 5 or 
ECON 416. Rvmcrly ECON 415 Analysis of die cconotnic 
and social chanctensncs of underdevrloped areas. Recent 
theones ot econonuc development, obstacles to 
development, pobtics and planning lor dcviclopmenL 
0101 (05843) STAFF MTuWThF 9:3aam-10-30am 
(rYD21(») 

EC0N330 Money and Banking 
(3) REG/P-F/AUD. 

Pmrqumte: ECON 2(X) and ECON 201. Citdil uill be 
granted for only one of the foUiWng: ECON 5.10 if ECON 
450. Rmnerly ECON 450 The structure o(" financial 
institutions and their lole m the piOMsion of money and 
near money Analysis of the Federal Rescrvr System, die 
techniques of central hanks, and the control of supply of 
financial issets in stabdization pobi^- Relanonship of money 
and credit to economic activity and the price level 
0101 (05853) STAFF MW 6:30pm-9;50pm 

TYD 01 II) 




/I^ik 



©»: 




EC0N340 International Economics 
(3) REG/P-F/AUD. 

Prerequisite: ECON 200 and HCON 201 Credit mil he 
granted for only one ofthefollouHng: ECON 340 or ECON 
440. Formerly ECON 440. A desaiption of international 
trade and the analysis of international transactions, exchange 
rates, and balance of payments. Analysis of policies ot 
protection, devaluation, and exchange rate stabilization and 
their consequences. 

0101 (05863) STAFF MTuWThF 9:30am-10;50am 
(SQH 1120) 

EC0N386 Experiential Learning 
(3-6) S-F. 

Prerequisite: ECON 200, ECON 201, GPA 2. 75. 56 semester 

hours. For ECON majors only 

0101 (05874) Wallis.J. Time and room to be arranged 

EC0N399 (PeimReq) Individual Reading and 
Research For Undergraduates 

(1-3) REG/P-F/AUD. 

Individual Instruction course: contact department or 
instruaor to obtain section number. Prerequisite: sl\ hour? 
of upper division economics courses. 

EC0N460 Industrial Organization 
(3) REG/P-F/AUD. 

Prerequisite: ECON 306 or ECON 406. Changing structure 
of the American economy; price policies in different 
industrial classifications of monopoly and competition in 
relation to problems of public policy. 
0101 (05897) STAFF TuTh 6:30pm-9:50pm 

(TYDOlOl) 

EC0N799 Master's Thesis Research 
(1-6) REG. 

Individual Instruction course: contact department or 
instructor to obtain section number. 

EC0N899 Doctoral Dissertation Research 
(1-8) REG. 

Individual Instruction course: contact department or 
instructor to obtain section number. 

EDCI Curriculum and Instruction 

(Education) 

EDCI298 (PermReq) Special Problems in Teacher 
Education 

(1-6) REG/P-F/AUD. 
0101(05960) STAFF Time and room to be arranged 

EDCI390 Principles and Methods of Secondary 
Education 

(3) REG/P-F/AUD. 

Prerequisites: admission to leather education program: and 2.5 
GPA. Corequisites: EDHD 4 13 and EDHD 420. For education 
majors only Principles and methods of teaching in junior and 
senior high schools. Instructional problems common to all 
of the subject fields, considered in relation to the needs and 
interests of youth, social problems and the central values of 
society. 

0101 (05991) Hendricks, S. MW 3:40pm-7:00pm 

(EDU 2102) 

Time and room to be arranged Lab 



EDCI397 Principles and Methods of Teaching in 
Elementary Schools 
(3) REG/P-F/AUD. 

Prerequisites: admission to teacher education program; and 2.5 
GPA. For education majors only Teaching strategies, classroom 
interactive techniques, and procedures for planning and 
evaluating instruction in elementary schools. Emphasis on 
principles of effecnve instrucQon, classroom management, 
and adaptation of instruction for various student 
populations, 

0101(06003) STAFF MTuWThF 8:30am-l 1:30am 
(EDU 2212) 
.Meets 06'26/00-OT14/00 

EDCI415 Methods of Teaching ESOL in 
Elementary Schools 
(3) REG/P-F/AUD. 

Prirequisite: EDCI 434 or permission of department. Analysis of 
elementary school classroom culture, social contexts, and 
instructional strategies which foster language development 
in elementary school content areas (i.e., math, soaal studies, 
art and science), coasistent with current theones of child 
second language acquisition. For undergraduate and 
graduate prospective and cunent teachers of English to 
speaken of other languages. 

01(11(06012) STAFF TuTh 3:40pm-7:rK)pm 

(EDU 0206) 

EDCI436 Teaching for Cross-Cultural 
Communication 
(3) REG/P-F/AUD. 

The techraques and content for teachmg culture in foreign 
language classes and English as a Second Language (ESL) 
classes. Research and evaluation of selected aspects of a 
culture as basis for creating teaching materials. 
0101 (06042) STAFF MW 4:00pm-7:00pm 

(EDU 1315) 

EDCI488A Selected Topics in Teacher Education: 
Computer Mindtools for Schools 
(3) REG. 

0101 (06082) McKillop,A. MTuWThF 1 :00pm-4:00pm 
(EDU 1315) 
Meets 06/26/00-07/14/00 
Explores several different types of computer applications for 
use in schools and stresses their ability to support critical 
thinking. Technologies include spreadsheets, expert systems, 
databases, Internet, hypermedia, and semantic networking. 
Course assignments will include projects using each 
technology. 

EDCI488B Selected Topics in Teacher Education: 
Student-Constructed Hypermedia 
(3) REG/P-F/AUD. 
0101(06092) McKiUop,A. MTuWThF 8:30am-l 1:30am 
(EDU 2101) 
Meets 06/26/00-07/U/OO 

EDCI489 Field Experiences in Education 
(1-4) REG/P-F/AUD. 

0101(06122) STAFF Time and room to be arranged 



EDCI498 Special Problems in Teacher Education 

(1-6) REG/P-F/AUD. 
0101 (06133) STAFF Time and room to be arranged 

EDCI498W Special Problems in Teacher 

Education: Performance Assessment 
in Social Studies 
(3) REG/P-F/AUD. 

0101 (06144) Taylor-Thomas, M. TuTh 4: 15pm-7:15pm 

(EDU 0202) 

EDCI680 Trends in Secondary School Curriculum 
(3) REG/AUD. 

Recent developments in educational thinkmg and practice 
which have effected the curriculum. For Master's 
certilicaDon students only. 

0102 (06165) Pnce.J. MW 9:00am- 12: 20pm 

(EDU 1121) 

EDCI681 Trends in Elementary School 
Curriculum 
(3) REG/AUD. 

Recent developments in educational thmking and practice 
which have affected the curriculum m elementary 
education. For Master's certification smdents only 
0102(06175) Pnce.J. MW l:0(Jpm-4:20pm 

(EDU 1121) 

EDCI690 (PermReq) Teaching as a Profession 
(3) REG. 

Prerequisite: permission of department. The profession of 
teaching and the knowledge base that defines teaching. 
Current and social issues that affect teaching and learning; 
role of research and e.xpenence m learmng to teach. For 
Master's certification smdents only 
0101(06185) STAFF F 9:00am-12:30pm 

(EDU 2119) 
Meets 06/09/00-08/25/00 

EDCI691 (PermReq) Models Of Teaching: Theories 
and Applications 
(3) REG. 

Prerequisite: permission of department. Theory and research on 
teaching as applied to models of instruction. Practice in 
developing an iratial repertoire of teaching models and in 
providing thoughtfiil critique of teaching based on these 
models. For Master's certification smdents only 
0101 (06195) STAFF TuTh 9:00am-12:20pm 

(EDU 0220) 
(1102(06196) STAFF TuTh l:00pm-4:20pm 

(ASY 3217) 

EDCI798 Special Problems in Teacher Education 
(1-6) REG/AUD. 

Individual Instruction course: contact deparmient or 
instructor to obtain section number. 

EDCI799 Master's Thesis Research 
(1-6) REG. 

Individual Instruction course: contact department or 
instructor to obtain section nimiber. 



22 



HOW B 



SUMMER? 



EDCI888 Apprenticeship in Education 
(1-8) REG/AUD. 

Individual Instruction course: contact department or 
instnictor to obtain section number 

EDCI899 Doctoral Dissertation Research 
(1-8) REG. 

Individual Instruction course: contact department or 
instructor to obtain section number. 

EDCP Education Counseling 
and Personnel Services 

(Education) 

E0CP108B College and Career Advancement 

Concepts and Skills: Academic Skills 
(1) REG/P-F/AUD. 

0101(06315) STAFF MTuVlTh ll:00am-12:00pm 
(SHM 2102) 
Meels06/W/00-07/0U00 

EDCP108J (PermReq) College and Career 

Advancement: Concepts and Skills: 
Job Search Strategies 
(1) REG/P-F/AUD. 

Athletes only. 

0101 (06326) Ahn, S. TBA (COL 01 13) 

EDCP386 (PermRe,]) Experiential Learning 

(3-6) REG/P-F. 
Individual Instruction course; contact deparancnt or 
instructor to obtain section number. Prerequisite: permission of 
depmtmenl. 56 semester houn 

EDCP411 Principles of Mental Health 
(3) REG. 

Prerequisite: tutw semester iwurs m the Muiitoral sderues or 
permission of department. Mechanisms involved with personal 
adjustment, coping skills, and the behavion that lead to 
maladjustment. 

0101(06348) Gieenbenj.K. M W 1 1 :00am-2:20pm 
(EDU 3236) 

EDCP420 Education and Racism 
(3) REG/P-F/AUD. 

DIVERSITY Stntegv' dewlopmcnt for counselors and 
educators to deal with problems of racism. 
0101(06358) Brittan-FoweU,C. MW 9:00am-12:20pm 
(EDU 2102) 

EDCP462 Disability in American Society 
(3) REG. 

/'r<-n.fr(i.<»c ( iidei^iniujic Suius .W scmcsier houn. t;nncal 
e.'iaminanon of the history of legislaoon and analvMS of 
current policies toward sevrrcly physically and mentally 
disabled persons. 

0101(06368) Fabian, E. TuTh9:00am-l 2:20pm 

(EDU 3233) 



EDCP489 (PermReq) Field Experiences in 

Counseling and Personnel Services 
(1-4) REG/P-F/AUD. 

Indisidual Instruction course; contact department or 
instructor to obtain section number. 

EDCP498 Special Problems in Counseling and 
Personnel Services 
(1-3) REG. 

Individual Instruction course: contact department or 

instruaor to obtain H'Ction number, 

EDCP611 Career Development Theory and 
Programs 

(3) REG/AUD. 
Research and theory rebted to career and educational 
decisions; programs of related information and other 
activirics in career decision. 

0101 (06392) Pyle, M. MW 3:40pm-7;00pm 

^nU 3233i 

EDCP614 Personality Theories in Counseling and 
Personnel Services 
(3) REG/AUD. 

ExaminaDon of constructs and research relating to major 
personality theories with emphasis on their significance for 
working with the beha\iors of indi\iduals. 
0101(06402) Fallon. M. MW 9:00am- 12:20pm 

(EDU 0202) 

EDCP617 Group Counseling 
(3) REG/AUD. 

Prerequisite: EDCP 616. A sur\ey of theor\', iwearch and 
practice of group counseling and psychotherapy mth an 
introdut"tion to growth groups and die laboratory approach, 
therapeutic (actors in groups, composidon of cherapeuDc 
groups, problem clients, therapeutic techniques, research 
methods, theories, ethics and training of group counselors 
and therapists. 

0101(06412) Holcomb-McCoy,C TuTh 3:4Opm-7K)0pm 
(EDU 2102) 

EDCP625 Counseling the Chemically Dependent 
(3) REG. 

Chemical dependency and its effects on the indisidual's 
personal, social, and work ftincdoning. Counseling 
procedures for persons with dnig and alcohol problems. 
0101 (06422) STAFF MW 6;-«1pm-10:(X)pm 

(EDU 4233) 

EDCP633 Diagnostic Appraisal of Children I 

(3) REG. 
Prerequisite: EDCP 632. Assessment of darlopmcnt, 
emotional and learning problems of children. 
0101 (06432) Tc^-C>olubco\v.H.TuTh9:30ani-12:45pm 
(EDU 3136) 

EDCP798 Special Problems in Counseling and 
Personnel Services 
(1-6) REG/AUD. 

Individual Instrucnon course: contaa department or 
instrucior to obtam section number. 



EDCP799 Master's Thesis Research 
(1-6) REG. 

Indnidual Insmicaon course: contaa deparrment or 

in-imiaor to obrain secnon number 

EDCP888 Apprenticeship in Counseling and 
Personnel Services 

(1-8) REG/AUD. 
Indnidual Instruction course; contaa depanmcni or 
instructor to obtain section number. 

EDCP888S Apprenticeship in Counseling and 
Personnel Services: School 
Psychology 

(1-6) REG/AUD. 
0101(06448) Strein.W Imie and room to be arranged 
For School Psychologj- students only. 

EDCP888U tPnmReq) Apprenticeship in 

Counseling and Personnel Services: 
College Student Personnel 

(3) REG/AUTD. 
0101(06458) STAFF M 2;(Nipm-5;<«Jpm 

(ARC 1127) 
Time and room to be arranircd Dis 

EDCP889 Internship in Counseling and Personnel 
Services 

(1-8) REG/AUD. 
Individual Instruction couise; contaa depanmeni or 
instructor to obtain section number. 

EDCP899 Doctoral Dissertation Research 

(1-8) REG. 
Individual Instniction course; contaa department or 
instruaor to obtain section number. 

EDHD Education, 
Human Development 

(Education) 

EDHD3(X) (PermReq) Human Development and 
Learning 

(6) REG/AUD. 

Prerequisite: jjmuikw to te>^ha edikjaon prcgnm. Major 
concc-pts and theories of hunun dc%ck)pment and leanung 
and their impUcadons for the educational process. One half 
day a wrck ui school to obsersr student behasior, participate 
in classroom actiMDcs, and aaend semirurs on school topics. 
0101(06523) Alexander, P MTuWThF 9;3(lam-l2;X1pm 
(EDU 3315) 

EDHD320 Human Development through ttie 
Lifespan 

(3) REG/AUD. 

Central concepts irbted to parameters of human 
desriopmcni. indnidual and social, n'hich arise thtDUghout 
the s'arious stages of the lifespan. Conmnuty and change 
within the devclopmg indisidual. 

0101(06544) Marcus, R. MW li30pm-3:-)Opm 

(EDU 3315) 
Tune and room to be arranged Dis 




sMl 




EDHD400 Introduction to Gerontology 
(3) REG/AUD. 

Multidisciplinary survey of the processes of aging. 
Physiological changes, cultural forces, and self-processes that 
bear on quality of life in later years. Field study of programs, 
insdtutions for elderly, individual elders, their families and 
care providers. 

0101(06554) Smith, G. TuTh 7:0Opm-10;(X)pm 

(EDU1107) 

Time and room to be arranged Dis 

EDHD411 Child Growth and Development 
(3) REG/AUD. 

Theoretical approaches to and empirical studies of physical, 
psychological and social development from concepdon to 
puberty. ImpHcaoons for home, school and community. 
0101 (06564) Jones Harden, B. TuTh 4:00pm-7;00pni 
(EDU 3233) 
Time and room to be arranged Dis 

EDHD413 Adolescent Development 

(3) R£G/P-F/AUD. 

Adolescent development, including special problems 
encountered in contemporary culture. Observational 
component and individual case study 
0101(06575) Gardner, A. TuTh 7:00pm-10: 10pm 

(EDU 2102) 
Time and room to be arranged Dis 

EDHD420 Cognitive Development and Learning 
(3) REG/AUD. 

Prerequisite: EDHD 300 or EDHD 320 or EDHD 411 or 
PSYC 355 or PSYC 341 or permission of department. Current 
developmental theories of cogmtive processes such as 
language, memory, and intelligence and how differences in 
cognitive level (infancy through adolescence) mediate 
learning of educational subject matters. 
0101 (06586) Metsala,J. MW 4:00pm-7:00pm 

(EDU 3236) 

EDHD430 Adolescent Violence 
(3) REG/AUD. 

Prerequisite: PSYC 100 or EDHD 300 or permission of 
department. Examines the roots of violence among 
adolescents and the extent to which this constitutes a 
problem in various settings. Research studies on its origins, 
prevention and intervention and implications for social 
policy are examined. 

0101(06596) Marcus, R. MW 4;00pm-7:00pm 

(EDU 3315) 

Time and room to be arranged Dls 

EDHD489 (PermReq) Field Experiences in 
Education 
(1-4) REG. 

Individual Instruction course: contact department or 
instructor to obtain section number. 

EDHD498 Special Problems in Education 
(1-3) REG/P-F/AUD. 

Individual Instruction course: conuct department or 
instructor to obtain section number. 



EDHD721 Cognitive Development and Learning: 
An Introduction 

(3) REG/AUD. 

Introductory survey into contemporary theory and research 

in cognitive development; appbcadons to classroom leammg. 

0101(06630) Metsala.J. TuTh 4:00pm-7:(Xlpm 

(EDU 3236) 

Time and room to be arranged Dis 

EDHD789 Internship in Human Development 
(3-8) REG/AUD. 

lndividu.il Instruction course: contact department or 
instructor to obtain secnon number. 

EDHD798 Special Problems in Education 
(1-6) REG/AUD. 

Individual Instruction course: contact deparmient or 
lastructor to obtam secnon number 

EDHD799 Master's Thesis Research 
(1-6) REG. 

Individual Instruction course: contact department or 
instructor to obtain secnon number. 

EDHD888 Apprenticeship In Education 
(1-8) REG/AUD. 

lndi\ndual Instrucnon course: contact department or 
instructor to obtain secnon number 

EDHD889 Internship in Education 
(3-8) REG/AUD. 

Individual histruction course: contact department or 
instructor to obtain section number 

EDHD899 Doctoral Dissertation Research 
(1-8) REG. 

Individual lastrucnon course: contact department or 
instructor to obtam secnon number 



EDMS Measurement, Statistics, 
and Evaluation 

(Education) 

EDMS451 Introduction to Educational Statistics 
(3) REG/AUD. 

Junior stimdinit. Introduction to statistical reasoning; locanon 
and dispersion measures; computer applicanons; regression 
and correlation; formation of hypotheses tests; t-test; one- 
way analysis of variance; analysis of contiiigency tables. 
0101 (06701) STAFF MTuWTh 12:00pm- 1:40pm 

(EDU 1 107) 
0102(06702) MacreadyG. MTuWTh 2:00pm-3:40pm 

(EDU 1107) 

EDMS645 Quantitative Research Methods I 
(3) REG/AUD. 

Research design and stansncal appbcations in educational 
research: data representanon; descnpnve statistics; estimation 
and hypothesis testmg. Application of statistical computer 
packages is emphasized. 

0101 (06713) STAFF MTuWTh 5:00pm-6:40pm 

(EDU 1121) 

0102 (06714) STAFF MTuWTh 7:00pm-8:40pm 

(EDU 1121) 



EDMS646 Quantitative Research Methods II 
(3) REG/AUD. 

Prerequisite: EDMS 645. A second-level mferential statistics 
coufse with emphasis on analysis ot variance procedures and 
designs. Assignments include student analysis of survey data. 
Apphcanon of statisncal computer packages is emphasized. 
0101(06725) MacreadyG. MTuWTh 5:(K)pm-6:40pm 
(EDU 3315) 

EDMS798 Special Problems in Education 
(1-6) REG/AUD. 

Individual Instruction course: contact department or 
instructor to obtam section number. 

EDMS799 Master's Thesis Research 
(1-6) REG. 

Individual Instruction course: contact department or 
instructor to obtain section number. 

EDMS889 (PcrmReq) Intemshjp in Measurement 
and Statistics 
(3-12) REG. 

Individual Instruction course: contaa department or 

instnictor to obtain section number 

EDMS899 Doctoral Dissertation Research 
(1-8) REG. 

Individual Instruction course: contact department or 
uistructor to obtain section number. 

EDPA Education Policy, Planning 
and Administration 

(Education) 

EDPA301 (PcrmReq) Foundations of Education 
(3) REG/P-F/AUD. 

l^erequisite : junior standing and admission to teacher edmation; or 
Baehelor's degree with permission of department. Social context of 
educanon and conflicts over philosophies, values, and goals 
that are reflected in educational instimtions in our pluralisnc 
society. Helps teachers become reflective, critical thinkers 
about the social and philosophical issues they face and the 
choices they make. 
0101(06813) Splaiiie,J. MW 7:00pm-10:20pm 

(EDU 3233) 
0102(06814) Herschbach,D. MW 3:40pm-7:00pm 

(EDU 1107) 

EDPA489 Field Experiences in Education 
(1-4) REG/P-F/AUD. 

Individual Instrucnon course: contact department or 
instructor to obtain section number. 

EDPA498 (PirmReq) Special Problems in 
Education 
(1-3) REG/P-F/AUD. 

Individual Instrucnon course: contact department or 
instructor to obtam section number. 



24 



HOW 



SUMMER? 



EDPA640 Introduction to Educational Leadership 
(3) REG/AUD. 

The focus of this course is the analj'sis of the role of 
education adimnistiators/leadcrs in the social, political, and 
legal contexts of schools. Also examines the role of 
leadership in school improvement. 
0101 (06916) Mawhinney. H. TuTh 3:40pm-7:00pm 
(EDU1107) 

E0PA690 Research In Education Policy, Planning 
and Administration 
(3) REG/AUD. 

Introduction to research methods and designs used in studies 
of education policy, planning, and administration. 
0101 (06926) Hultgrcn. F TuTh 3:40pm-7:00pni 

(EDU 2101) 

E0PA788D Special Topics In Education Policy 
and Administration: Education, 
Society, and Work 
(3) REG/AUD. 

0101(06936) Hcrschbach. D. TuTh 7:(K)pm- 10:20pm 
(EDU 3233) 

EDPA788G Special Topics in Education Policy 
and Administration: Cultures of 
Teaching and Learning in Japan and 
ttie U.S. 

(3) REG/AUD. 
Some ewning meetings are expeaed. 
0101 (06937) Fuikelstem. B. MTuWThF 10:00am-l:00pm 
(EDU 0114) 
Meeis 06/21/00-07/01/00 

Time and room to be arranged Dls 

EDPA788I Special Topics in Education Policy and 
Administration: Interinstitutional 
Cooperation in Higher Education: 
Consortia and Regionalism 
(3) REG/AUD. 

0101(06946) BerdahLR. TuTh 3:40pm-7:00pm 

(EDU .131 5) 

EDPA788N Special Topics in Education Policy 
and Administration: K-16 Reform 
(3) REG/AUD. 

0101 (06947) STAFF MW 3:40pm-7:OOpm 

(EDU 0202) 

EDPA788P Special Topics in Education Policy 
and Administration: Economic 
Evaluation of Education 
(3) REG/AUD. 

0101(06956) Kites. S. MW 3:40pm-7:OOpm 

QMZ 1215) 

EDPA798 (I'amRci) Special Problems in 
Education 
(1-6) REG/AUD. 

Individual Instruction course; conuct department or 
instructor to obtain secnon number 



EDPA799 Master's Thesis Research 

(1-6) REG. 
Individual Instnicaon course: contact department or 

lastructor to obtain secnon number, 

EDPA889 Internship in Education 
(3-8) REG/AUD. 

Individual Instruction course: contact department or 

instructor to obtain section number 

EDPA899 Ooctoral Dissertation Research 

(1-8) REG/S-F 
Individual Instruction course: coniaa department or 
uisiruaor to obtam section number. 

EDSP Education, Special 

(Education) 

EDSP210 Introduction to Special Education 
(3) REG/AUD. 

Characteristics and needs of children with handicaps. 
Current issues m special education. 
0101 (07197) Danehey.A. MTuTh 5J0pm-8:50pm 
(EDU 2119) 
Meets 06/05/00-06/28/00 

EDSP376 Fundamentals of Sign Language 
(3) REG/P-F/AUD. 

Receptive and expressive sialls m American Sign Language. 
Examination of the causes of deafiiess. characteristics of deaf 
education, and aspects of the culture of the deaf conimumt\'. 
0101(07207) Glower, R. MW 7:00pm- 10:00pm 

(EDU 1107) 

EDSP402 (PermReq) Field Placement Severe 

Disabilities I 

(2-5) REG. 
ftr- or conquisiia: {EDSP 400i Mid EDSP 404 ) or permission 
1^ department. Praciicum experience in setting serving 
severely disabled indisiduals. Enrollment limited to those 
adnutted to sererely handicapped specialts- aita. Field 
placement for two to five haif-da)^ per \wek. Students 
\Mthout the reqiured co- or prerequisites can register for this 
cour^ with departmental approval. Open to special 
education graduate students only for this term. 
0101 (07218) STAFF Time and room to be arranged 

EDSP421 (P,rmRiq) Field Placement: Early 
Childhood Special Education I 
(2-3) REG. 

Pre- or corequisite: EDSP 420: md EDCI 4 10. Pracncuni 
experience in settings semng preschool handicapped 
children. Opportuniaes for studsing the patteras of 
development and learning among nonhandicappcd and 
handicapped inl'ants and older preschoolers. Enrollment 
limited to students admitted to earl)' childhood specialty'. 
Field placement for two or thire half-days per \sTek. 
Students without the required pre- or corequisites can 
register for this course with departmental approval. C^-n to 
special education graduate students only for this term. 
0101 (07229) STAFF Tmie and room to be arranged 



EDSP442 (I'trmRtqi Field Placement 
Educationally Handicapped I 
(2-3) REG. 

/V- or corequis\tc \EDSP 44 / jnd EDCI 456} or permission of 
depitrtmmi. Pracncum expenencc in setting serving 
educationaUy handicapped individuals. Demonstration of the 
content of EDSP 441. Enrollment limited to students 
admitted to educationally handicapped specialty. Field 
placement for two or three half-<lays per week. Students 
without the required co- or prerequisites can register for this 
course with departmental appros'al. Open to special 
education graduate students only for this term. 
0101 (07240) STAFF Time and room to be arranged 

EDSP443 Assessment and Instructional Design 
for the Handicapped: Reading and 
Written Communication Disorders 
(3) REG/P-F/AUD. 
Prerequisites: [EDSP 320: '^ui EDSP .121', or permissun of 
departmeni. Pre- or corequisiies: EDSP 331 :md EDSP 332: W 
EDSP 333. Characteristics and assessments of individuals 
with readmg and wxittcn commumcation disorders at 
elementary to secondary levels, and methods of teaching 
reading and wntien language skills to such indiMduak. 
Adaptation of regular mstrucuonal methods and cunicula. 
0101(07251) Robens.A. TuTh 4:00pm-7O0pm 

(EDU 01 14) 

EDSP461 (PirniRcq) Field Placement 
Secondary/Transition I 
(3) REG. 

Pre- or {orequisile: EDSP 460. For EDSP rmgors onfy. 
Practicum experience in secondary transiaon programs for 
individuals with disabilides. Field placement for twt) half- 
dav's per week. Students without the required pre- or 
corequisites can register for the course with departmental 
approval. Open to special education graduate students onh' 
for this term. 
0101 (07261) STAFF Time and room to be arranged 

EDSP470 Introduction to Special Education 

(3) REG/AUD. 
Designed to gtw an understanding of the needs of all types 
of exceptional children. Open to all students except 
undergraduate special educadon majors. 
0101 (07272) Voih. L. MTuTh 7KX)pfn-10«)pm 

(EDU 1315) 
Metis 06/05/00-06/29/00 

EDSP489 Field Experiences In Special Education 

(M) REG/P-F/ALTD. 
0101 (07283) STAFF Time and room to be arranged 

EDSP498 Special Problems in Special Education 

(1-6) REG. 
Individual Instruction course: contaa depaitmeiu or 
insiniaor to obtain secix>n number. 





EDSP499G Workshops, Clinics, and Institutes in 
Special Education: Inclusive Practices 
in the Schools 
(3) REG. 
0101(07306) Gmber.B. TuTh 4:00pm-7:00pm 

(EDU 1315) 
Time aiid room to be arranged Dis 

EDSP670 Single Subject Research in Special 
Education 
(3) REG/AUD. 

Prenquisite: EDSP 600 or pcniiisiuni of tieptirlmenl. Design, 
application, and analysis ot" single subject research in speaal 
education classrooms across all disabiliaes. 
0101 (07336) Egel,A. MW 7;00pm-10:00pm 

(EDU 3236) 

EDSP678I Seminar in Special Education: Medical 
and Developmental Interventions in 
the N.I.C.U. 
(3) REG/AUD. 

0101(07356) Hussey-Gardner. B. Time and room to be 
arranged 

EDSP678T Seminar in Special Education: 
Programming for Handicapped 
Infants: Medical and Genetic 
Implications 
(3) REG/AUD. 

0101 (07366) Wachtel, R. Time and room to be 

arranged 

EDSP788S Selected Topics in Special Education: 
The Reauthorization of IDEA 
(Individuals with Disabilities 
Education Act): Implications for 
Regular and Special Educators 
(2-3) REG. 
0101 (07406) Warren. S. M WTh 9:00am-5:20pm 

(EDU 4233) 
The 1997 Amendments to IDEA pose interesting challenges 
to regular and special educators and administrators and 
parents. This course will highlight the cnQcal components of 
this bw and the iniphcations for educating students with 
disabilities and other diverse learning styles. Strategies for 
implementation at the school and classroom levels will be 
explored. 

Meels 06/19/00-06/28/00 
Ckises kldjune 19,Jme 2ljune 22,June 26 and Jim 2S. 2000. 

EDSP798 Special Problems in Special Education 
(1-6) REG. 

Individual Instruction course: contact department or 
instructor to obtain section number 

EDSP799 Master's Thesis Research 
(1-6) REG. 

Individual Instruction course: contact department or 
instructor to obtain section number. 



EDSP888 Apprenticeship in Special Education 
(1-8) REG. 

Individual Instruction course: contact department or 
instructor to obtain section number 

EDSP889 Internship in Special Education 
(3-8) REG. 

Individual InstnicDon course: contact department or 
instructor to obtain section number 

EDSP899 Doctoral Dissertation Research 

(1-8) REG. 
Individual Instruction course: contact department or 
instructor to obtain section number. 

ENAE Engineering, Aerospace 

(The A. James Clark School 
of Engineering) 

ENAE261 Aerospace Analysis and Computation 
(3) REG/P-F/AUD. 

Prerequisites: CHEM 10}. ENAE 202. ENES 100. ENES 
102. and PHYS 161. Corequisile: MITH 241. ENAE majors 
only or permission ofdepartmenl. Introduction of Imear algebra, 
vector spaces, matrices. Imear mappmgs. determinants, 
eigenvalues and eigenvectors, finite differences, nimiencal 
differentiation and integration, differential and difference 
equations, boundary value problems, random vanables and 
probab Jity distributions, sampling theory, estimation theory, 
applications to aerospace engineering problems. 
OHM (07536) STAFF Time and room to be arranged 

ENAE283 Introduction to Aerospace Systems 
(3) REG. 

Preiequisues: PHYS 161 and ENES 100 and ENES 102. 
Corequisiles: ENAE 261 and PmS 262. For ENAE majors 
only. Introduction to airplanes and space vehicles as aerospace 
systems. Fundamentals that descTibe these systems. Elements 
of aerodynamics, airtbils and wings. Airplane pertbrmance, 
stability and control. Aircratt and rocket propulsion. 
Fundamentals of orbital motion. Aspects of vehicle 
conceptual design. 
0101(07546) Diaz,R. MF l:00pni-2:20pm 

(EGR 3102) 
TuWTh l:00pm-3:15pm 

(EGR 3102) 

ENAE311 Aerodynamics I 

(3) REG/P-F/AUD. 

Prerequisites: ENAE 281; and ENES 221; and .VMTH 246. 
Corequisile: ENME 22}. ENAE majors only or permission of 
department. Formerly ENAE 471. Fundamentals of 
aerodynamics. Elements of compressible flow. Normal and 
oblique shock waves. Flows through nozzles, difiiisers and 
wind tunnels. Elements of the method of characteristics and 
finite difference solutions for compressible flows. Aspects of 
hypersomc flow. 

0101 (07556) STAFF MTuWThF 3:00pm-4:20pm 

(EGR 21 12) 



ENAE423 Vibration and Aeroelasticity 
(3) REG/P-F/AUD. 

Prerequisite: ENAE }22. EN.AE majors otdy or permission of 
dcpanmenl. Continuarion of ENAE 322. Dynanuc response 
of smgle and multiple degrees of freedom systems, finite 
element modeling, wong divergence, aileron reversal, wing 
and panel flutter. 

0101(07566) Lee.S. MTuWThF 8:00am-9;20am 

(EGR 2112) 

ENAE499 Elective Research 

(1-3) REG/P-F/AUD. 

Individual instruction course: contact department or 
instructor to obtain section number. 

ENAE799 Master's Thesis Research 
(1-6) REG. 

Individual Instruction course: contact department or 
instructor to obtain section number. 

ENAE899 Doctoral Dissertation Research 
(1-8) REG. 

Individual Instruction course: contact deparmient or 
instructor to obtain section number. 

ENBE Biological 
Resources Engineering 

(Agriculture and Natural Resources) 

ENBE388 (PermReq) Honors Thesis Research 
(3-6) REG. 

Individual Instrucdon course: contact deparmient or 
instnicior to obtain section number 

ENBE489 Special Problems in Biological 
Engineering 

(1-3) REG/P-F/AUD. 

Individual Instruction course: contact department or 
instructor to obtain section number. 

ENBE499 Special Problems in Agricultural 
Engineering Technology 

(1-3) REG/P-F/AUD. 

Individual Instruction course: contact department or 
instructor to obtaui secnon number. 

ENBE699 Special Problems in Biological 
Engineering 

(1-6) REG/AUD. 

Individual Instruction coune: conuct department or 
instructor to obtain section number 

ENBE799 Master's Thesis Research 
(1-6) REG. 

Individual Instruction course: contact deparmient or 
instructor to obtain section number. 

ENBE899 Doctoral Dissertation Research 

(1-8) REG. 
Individual Instruction course: contact department or 
instructor to obtain secnon number. 



26 



HOW BIG 



SUMMER? 



ENCE Engineering, Civil 

(The A.James Clark School 
of Engineering) 

ENCE489 Special Problems In Civil Engineering 
(1-3) REG/P-F/AUD. 

Individual Instrucdon coune; contact dcparanent or 
instructor to obtain section number. 

ENCE664 Construction Contracts and 
Specifications 

(3) REG/AUD. 

For ENCE majors only. Basics of contract law; tv'pes and 
selection of construction contracts; essentials of plans and 
specifications; bidding, awarding and administration of 
contracts; liability, bonding, claims, and other legal aspects 
associated with construction projects. 
0101(07699) 0'ConneU,K. MW 5:30pm-8;10pm 

{EGR 2107) 
Meets 06/05/00-07/26/00 

ENCE688 Advanced Topics in Civil Engineering 
(1-3) REG/AUD. 

Individual Instruction course: contact department or 
instructor to obtain section number. 

ENCE689 Seminar 

(1-16) REG/AUD. 

Individual Instruction course: conuct department or 
instnictor to obtain section number. 

ENCE799 Master's Thesis Research 
(1-6) REG. 

Individual Instruction course: conuct department or 
instructor to obtain section number, 

ENCE899 Doctoral Dissertation Research 
(1-8) REG. 

Individual Instruction course: contact department or 
instruaor to obtain section number. 

ENCH Engineering, Chemical 

(The A. James Clark School 
of Engineering) 

ENCH215 Chemical Engineering Analysis 
(3) REG. 

PimqiiutU: CHEM 133 or CHEM 113. Pre- or cortijuisiie: 
MATH 141. Introduction to methods of chemical 
engmeenng calculations and anah'sis. Stoichiometric 
relations, material and energy' balances, and behavior of 
gases, vapors, Uquids and solids. Analytical and computer 
methods. 

0101 (07766) Smith,!. MTuWTliF 9:30am- 10:50am 
(CHE 2140) 



ENCH437 Chemical Engineering Laboratory 

(3) REG/P-F/AUD. 
Prmifmites: ENCH 424: and ENCH 440; and ENCH 442. 
Corequisite: ENCH 426. Application of chemical 
engmeenng process and unit operaoon pnnaples in small 
scale semi-commennal equipment. Data from experimental 
observations are used to evaluate pertbrmance and efficiency 
of operations. Emphasis on correct presentation of results in 
report form. 

0101(07786) Smith.!. Tu!h 11 :00am-l 1:50am 

(CHE 2145) 

!u!h 12:l»ani-5:OOpm 

(CHE 1145) Lab 

ENCH468 Research 

(1-3) REG. 
Individual Instrucaon course: contact department or 
instruaor to obtain section number. 

ENCH648 Special Problems in Chemical 
Engineering 

(1-6) REG. 

Individual Instruction course: contact department or 
instructor to obtain secoon number 

ENCH799 Master's Thesis Research 
(1-6) REG. 

Individual Instruction course: contact department or 
instructor to obtain section number. 

ENCH899 Doctoral Dissertation Research 
(1-8) REG. 

Individual Instruction course: contact department or 
instructor to obtain section number. 

ENCO Engineering, 
Cooperative Education 

(The A. Jaines Clark School 
of Engineering) 

ENC0098 (PmiiR,:,) Summer Co-op Work 
Experience 

(No credit) S-F. 
0101 (07853) Sauber. H. !inie and room to be arranged 
Special fee required for this course. (See fees in "Academic 
Services" section of this guide.) 

ENEE Engineering, Electrical 

(The A. James Clark School 
of Engineering) 

ENEE204 Basic Circuit Theory 
(3) REG. 

PrtrequisiK: PH\'S 262. Corequisiie: MiTH 246. Basic cimut 
elements; resistors, capacitors, inductors, sources, mutual 
inductance and transfonners; their I-V relationships. 
KircholTs Laws IX" and .\C steadv' state analv-sis. Phasors. 
node and mesh analv'sis. superposition, theorems of 
Thevemn and Norton. Transient analysis for first- and 
second-order cimms. Engineeruig College only (04). 
0101 (07904) Alexander. C. M!uW!h 8:00am-9;20jm 
(CSS 2330) 
Meets 06/05/00-07/25/00 



ENEE244 Digital Logic Design 

(3) REG. 
Prempasilt: ENEE 1 14 or CMSC 1 14. RamaeJ to stuJaus 
with 09090 or 09991 major coda. Gates, flip-flops, registen 
and counters. Karnaugh map simplificanon of gate 
networks. Switching algebra. Svnchronous sequential 
systems. PLA's. Elements of biiuiy anthmetic umts. 
Engineering College only (04). 

0101(07914) Silio.C. MTuWTl, 9J0am-10:50am 

(EGR. 3106) 
Xkets 06/05/00-07/25/00 
All lomier-division CHEM. MA!H. PHYS and Engmeenng 
courses that are required courses for the BS degree m 
Electrical Engineering must be completed before cnioDuig 
in any 300- or 400-level ENEE course (except E.-^EE 300 
and ENEE 301).!tansfer students will be allowed one tcnn 
to complete all such courses after starting to take upper-level 
ENEE courses. 

ENEE302 Digital Electronics 

(3) REG. 
Prerequisite: ENEE 204 and (ompkuon of ail lourr-divisiort 
courses in the EE curria4lum. Restricted to students uiih 09090 or 
09991 major codes. Large signal terminal characteristics of P- 
N junction diodes, bipolar and MOSFE! nansisiois. Digiol 
electroracs at transistor levrl: rnvrrter. NAND. NOR AND. 
OR gates. CMOS and I IL logic Combmatonal and 
sequential digital circuits, memory design. Circuit sunulaiion 
with SPICE. ENEE majors (09090) onl>-. 
0101(07924) Oiloff.J. M!uWThll«Oain-12:20pm 
(CSS 2428) 
Meets 06/05/00-07/25/00 

ENEE312 Semiconductor Devices and Analog 
Electronics 
(3) REG. 

Prerequisite: ENEE 302 and amptetion ofaB louvr-daision 
technical courses in the EE curricuium. Restricted to students u\lh a 
09090 mem code. !he basic phv-scal openDon of P-.\ 
junction diodes. MOSFE!°s and bipolar transistors. Basic 
transistor circuit configuraDons (CE. CC. CB. CS, CD. CG). 
DC bias: small signal analysis. Simple multi-tiansistor cncuils 
difi'-amp; cuircni minor. Frcquenc>' response. ENEE nujon 
(09090) only. 

0101 (07934) Alexander, C. MTuWTh 9J0jm-10-iOan 
(CSS 2330) 
.\!(ft<f>,Oiino.o-, 25/00 

ENEE350 Computer Organization 
(3) REG. 

Prerequisite: EN'EE 244 and completion of all lower-dnvkm 
technical courses in the EE curricubim. For 09090 and 09991 
m^ors only. Not open to students u4to hair ampteied ENEE 
250. Formerly EN'EE 250 Structure and otgmizaooa of 
digital computers Registers, memory. coatTol and I/Q Daa 
and instruction tbrmats, addresang modes, assembly 
language piogtamming. Elements of system software, 
subroutmes and their bnkages. EN'EE majors (09090) only 
0101(07944) SibaC. MTuVlTh 8«tan-9-20jm 

(EGR 3106) 
.\kets 06/05/00^/25/00 





ENEE380 Electromagnetic Theory 
(3) REG. 

Prmquisites: MATH 24 J and PHYS 263 and completion of all 
Imivr-division technial aun& in ihe EE cuniailum. Introduction 
to electromagnetic fielcis. Coulomb's law, Gauss's law, 
electrical potential, dielectric matenals capacitance, boundary 
value problems, Biot-Sav'art law. Ampere's law, Lorentz force 
equation, magnetic matenals, magnetic circuits, inductance, 
time varying fields and Maxwell's equadons. 
0101(07954) Taylor, L. MTu'WTh 12:30pm-I:50pm 
(CSS 2330) 
Meeu 06/05/00-07/25/00 

ENEE440 Microprocessors 
(3) REG. 

Premquisite: EXEE 350 and completion of all louvr-diinsion 
technical courses in the EE airriailum. For 09090 and 0999} 
majors only. Microprocessor architectures, instruction sets, and 
applications. Bus structures, memory, I/O interfacmg. 
Assembly language programming, LSI device configuration, 
and the embedding of" microprocessors in systems. ENEE 
majon (09090) only 

OlO: (07974) Hawkins. W. MTuWTh 8:00am-9:20am 
(EGR 0135) 
Meets Ofi/05/00-(l7/25/(K) 

ENEE499 (PermReq) Senior Projects in Electrical 

Engineering 

(1-3) REG. 
0101(07984) Papamarcou.A. Tmie and room to be 
arranged 

ENEE699 (PermReq) Independent Studies in 
Electrical Engineering 
(1-3) REG/S-E 

Individual InstrucDon course: contact department or 
instructor to obtain section number 

ENEE799 (PermReq) Master's Tliesis Research 
(1-6) S-E 

0101(07997) Tits.A. Tune and room to be arranged 

ENEE899 (PermReq) Doctoral Dissertation 
Research 

(1-8) S-E 
0101 (08008) Tits.A. Tmie and room to be arranged 

ENES Engineering Science 

(The A. James Clark School of 
Engineering) 

ENES102 Statics 

(2) REG/P-F/AUD. 

Prerequisite: AM7H 140. For engineering majors only. Formerly 
ENES / 10. The equilibrium of stationary bodies under the 
influence of various kinds offerees. Forces, moments, 
couples, equilibrium, trusses, fiames and machines, centroids, 
moment of inertia, beams, and friction. Vector and scalar 
methods are used to solve problems. 
0101(08069) STAFF MTuTh 10:00am-ll:40am 

(EGR 2154) 



ENES220 Mechanics of Materials 
(3) REG/P-F/AUD. 

Prerequisites: ESES 102: and. MATH 141:andPm'S 161. 
For engitieering majors only (not including ENEE majors). Stress 
and deformation of solids-rods, beams, shafts, columns, tanks, 
and other strucmral. machme and vehicle members. Topics 
mclude stress transformation usmg Mohr's circle; shear and 
moment diagrams: denvanon of elastic curves: and Euler's 
buckling formula. Design problems related to this material 
are given m lab. 

0101 (08079) STAFF MTuWTh 9:30am-10:50am 

(EGR 0135) 

TuTh 12:30pm-2:30pm 

(EGR 0135) Dls 

ENES230 Introduction to Materials and Their 
Applications 

(3) REG/P-F/AUD. 

Prerequisite: ENES 100 or permission ofdepartmetit. Structun; 
of materials, chemical composition, phase transformaoons, 
corrosion and mechanical properties of metals, ceramics, 
polymers and related matenals. Material selection in 
engineermg applications. 

0101(08100) Yeh.K. MTuWThF9:30am-10:50ani 
(CHE21.W 

ENFP Engineering, Fire Protection 

(The A.James Clark School 
of Engineering) 

ENFP429 (PermReq) Independent Studies 

(1-3) REG/P-F 
0101 (08150) Spivak. S. Time and room to be arranged 

ENFP489G Special Topics: Advanced Fire Data 
Analysis 

(3) REG/P-F/AUD. 

Prerequisite: a first course m statistics, or permission of the 
department. 

0101 (08171) KUpatrick,A. MW 5:30pm-8:30pm 

(EGR 0135) 

ENFP619 Graduate Seminar 
(1-3) REG/AUD. 

0101(08181) STAFF Time and room to be arranged 

ENFP629 Selected Topics 

(3-6) REG/AUD. 

0101(08192) Spivak. S. Tmie and room to be arranged 

ENFP629G Selected Topics: Advanced Fire Data 
Analysis 

(3) REG/AUD. 

Prerequisite: a fint course m statistics, or permission of the 
deparmient. 

0101(08203) Kilpatnck.A. MW 5:30pm-8:30pm 

(EGR 0135) 

ENFP649 Special Problems 

(1-3) REG/AUD. 
0101 (08213) STAFF Tmie and room to be arranged 

ENFP799 Master's Thesis Research 
(1-6) REG/S-E 

Individual Instrucnon course: contact department or 
instructor to obtam section number. 



English at Maryland 

Explore Women's Science Fiction, 
American Blues and Folk Music 
and Things That Go Boo on the 
Big Screen... 

How do -women science fiction 
writers differ from their male 
counterparts? Does the diverse 
folk and blues history found in 
America have an international 
cultural impact? And what 
about horror films... taking a 
shower has never been quite 
the same since the release of 
Alfred Hitchcock's classic 
thriller, "Psycho." Three EngUsh 
courses offered this summer 
wiU examine each of these 
diverse topics. 



ENGL English 

(Arts and Humanities) 

ENGL101 Introduction to Writing 
(3) REG. 

An introductory course in expository writing. 

0101 (08275) STAFF MTuWThF 9:30am- 10:50am 

(ARC 1125) 
011)2(08276) STAFF TuTh l:O0pm-4: 15pm 

(SQH2119) 
0103(08277) STAFF MTuWThF 11 :00am- 12:20pm 

(SQH nil) 
0104(08278) STAFF TuTh 6:(K)pm-9: 15pm 

(SQH 1101) 
An introductorv- course in academic wTiting. 

ENGL101X Introduction to Writing 
(3) REG. 

For students for whom English is a second language. 
0101 (08302) STAFF MTuWThF 9:30am-10:50am 
(SQH 2120) 

ENGL205 Introduction to Shakespeare 
(3) REG/P-F/AUD. 

CORE: Literature (HL) Recommended for non-majors. 
Readmg of representative works. Genre, action, character, 
theme, language, and staging. Shakespeare's relation to 
Renaissance culture. 

0101(08313) Driver. E. TuTh 9:OOam-12:15pm 

(SQH 1105) 



28 



HOW B 



S S U 



E R ? 



1^^ 



ENGL 462 Folksong and Ballad 

(3 credits) (June 5 -June 23) 

"Folksong and Ballad" provides a 
broader awareness and appreciation 
of America's diverse folksong 
heritage and its impact on world 
culture. Interdisciplinary, 
multicultural and multimedia, the 
course explores popular and diverse 
music styles including ballads, 
country, bluegrass, blues, rock, gospel, 
soul, rap and zydeco. Students 
consider the European and African 
roots of many of these musical 
traditions, but the focus returns to 
the distinctly American nature of 
these iTiusical genres and the 
international mipact they've had. 
Sound and video recordings 
supplement the lectures, discussion 
and reading material. The course is 
taught by Barry Lee Pearson, 
professor of English, who has written 
two books as well as articles, reviews, 
program and recording notes on 
African American traditional and 
popular music. In 1993, Pearson was 
nominated for a Grammy for Best 
Traditional Blues Album for his 
recording, "Roots of Rhythm and 
Blues: A Tribute to the Robert 
Johnson Era." In addition to teaching 
and writing, he is a performing 
musician who has toured worldwide. 
For more information, 
cill 301-405-3809. JH 



ENGL222 American Literature: 1865 to Present 

(3) REG/P-F/AUD. 
CX)RE: Literature (HL) Surwys American writing from the 
Ciul War tJirough tlic Cold War. Authors such as Clemens, 

Trust. Hu^^^on, Bellow. 

I M ( 1 1 (08324) Orlando, E. TuTh 6:00pm-9: 1 5pm 

(SQH 1117) 

ENGL234 Introduction to African-American 
Literature 
(3) REG/P-F/AUD. 

CORE: Literature (HL) DIVERSITY A survey of African- 
American literature from the late 18th century to the 
present. 

111111(08335) Mondie.L. M W 6:00pm-9: 1 5pm 

(SQH 1 1 17) 

ENGL243 Introduction to Poetry 
(3) REG/P-F/AUD. 

I ( mV:: Literature (I IL) How poetry works. Focus on style, 
MilijiM. rhythm, voice, technique .ind structure. Readings 
truiii J range of cultures and communities. 
UlUl (08356) VanEgmond.l' TuTh l:00pm^: 15pm 
(SQH 1117) 

ENGL244 Introduction to Drama 
(3) REG/P-F/AUD. 

CORE: Literature (HL) A sur\ey of the basic literature of 
drama troni the cbssical Greeks to modern times. 
011)1(08367) Taylor, D. MW l:00pm-4:15pm 

(SQH 2117) 

ENGL250 Introduction to Literature by Women 
(3) REG/P-F/AUD. 

CORE: Literature (HL) DIVERSITY Ako offered ^ HMST 
255. Credit mil be granted for only one of the following: ENGL 
250 or\mST 255. Images of women in literature by and 
about women. 

0101(08377) Ryan,L. MW9:00am-12:15pm 

(ARC 1 105) 

ENGL301 Critical Methods in the Study of 
Literature 

(3) REG/P-F/AUD. 

For Englt^h Mtd Ilnghh ednittlion mttjors only. An introduction 
to the techniques of literary analysis and a brief survey of 
the most common appaiaches to literature. 
(1101(08398) Handelm.in, S. TuTh 6:(X)pm-9: 15pm 
(SQH 2117) 

ENGL304 The Major Works of Shakespeare 
(3) REG/P-F/AUD. 

Prerequisite: tuv lower-level English courses, at least orte in 
literature; or permission of department. .\W open to students u4to 
hatv (ompleted ENGL 40) and ENGL 404. RepirsentatiMf 
early, middle, and later works, including comedies, tragedies, 
histories, and romances. Historical and culmnil conte.xts. 
0101(08408) Coogan.R. MW 6:(X)pm-9: 1 5pm 

(SQH 21 17) 



ENGL310 Medieval and Renaissance British 
Literature 

(3) REG/P-F/AUD. 

Prerequisite: luv lower-letvl English (ouryes, at kast otu- m 
literature; or permission of department. Detailed study of selected 
nujor medieval and Renaissance works written in England. 
Cultural attitudes and histoncal contexts May include 
Beowulf, Anglo-Saxon lyric, drama, soiuiets; works of 
wx)men writers. Chaucer, Spenser, Sidney. Some reading in 
Middle English. 

0101(08418) Howard,! TuTh 6:00pm-9: 15pm 

'SQH 1 103) 

ENGL312 Romantic to Modem British Literature 
(3) REG. 

Detailed study of seleaed major texts from the 19th and 
20th centuries. Transitions from RorrunDcism toViaonan 
age to Modernism. Historical, social, literary contexts. Issues 
such as rise of democracy: industrial ir\X)lunon; the "wwman 
question": revolutions in literary form. Authors might 
include Wordsworth, Austen. Dickens, Arnold, T.S. Elioc, 
Woolf. 

0101(08429) Auchard,J. MW6«)pm-9:15pm 

(SQH 1119) 

ENGL313 American Literature 
(3) REG. 

Prerequisite: tuv lower-level English courses, at least one in 
literature; or permission of department. A detailed study of 
selected major texts of American bteraturc from the 17th 
century to the 20th centurs'. Issues such as race, gender, and 
regionalism. Authors such as Franklin. Hawthorne, 
Dickinson, Hemingway, and Momson. 
0101(08440) Cross. R. TuTh l:00pm-4:l Spin 

(SQH 1 1 19) 

ENGL348A Literary Works by Women: Science 
Fiction by Women 

(3) REG/P-F/AUD. 

DIVERSITY 

0101 (08451) Donawcnh.J. TuTh 9:00am-12:15pm 
(SQH 1119) 

ENGL379P Special Topics in Literature: Science 
Fiction and Horror Film 

(3) REG/P-F/AUD. 
0101(08501) Kolker.R. TuTh lKMpm-4: 15pm 

(SQH 1120) 

ENGL379W Special Topics in Literature: An 
American Mythology: The Film 
Western 

(3) REG. 

0101(08511) Miller.J. TuTh 6JOpiD-lftO0pm 

(SQH 1120) 




rtHk 




ENGL 379P Special Topics in 
Literature: Science Fiction and 
Horror Film 

(3 credits) (June 5 -July 14) 

"Special Topics in Literature: Science 
Fiction and Horror Film" examines 
the form, structure and meaning of 
two of the most popular genres in 
contemporar>' American film. Discuss 
the history' of science fiction and 
horror films; their roots in old 
legends and myths; their 
psychological aspects that lock the 
viewer into the surreal; and the 
cultural and political impact that 
these films have on American society'. 
Films to be viewed may include 
; "Psycho," 1 961, Alfi-ed Hitchcock 
(Paramount); "The Shining," 1980, 
Stanley Kubrick, (Warner Bros.); 
S "The Fly," 1986, David Cronenberg 

(Fox); and "Alien," 1 979, Ridley 
u Scott (Fox). The course is uught by 
: Robert Kolker, professor of English, 

who is the author of five books on 
, film, including a recently published 
> textbook and CD. Film. Form .r,H 
Culture (McGraw-Hill). Kolker is 
president of the Society- for Cinema 
Studies and is a member of the 
National Gallery of Art film advisory 
board. For more information, call 
301-405-3809. 



ENGL391 Advanced Composition 
(3) REG. 

Prmqumte: 56 hours ofwlkgc nrdii which must imlude EKGL 
101 or cqim-dmt. An advanced composidon coune which 
emphasizes consmicting «Tinen arguments accommodated 
to real audiences. 

0K.5 (08531) SWFF MTuVlThF U:00am-12:20p„, 
(SQHlIOTi 

0107(08532) SWF M W 6:00pm-9: 1 5pm 

(SQH 1123i 

0108(08533) STAFF TuTh 6:00pm-9:15pm 

(SQH 1111-1 

ENGL392 Advanced Composition: Pre-Law 
(3) REG/P-F/AUD. 

Prerequisite: 56 hours of college credit which mist include EXGL 
101 or equiialent. Techniques of argumentaDon and 

persuasion. Intensive practice to help vvnteis achieve stylistic 

fle.>abilit\- and correcmess. 

0101(08547) ST.VF MTuWThF 9:30am-10:50-an, 
(SQH 1121) 

ENGL393 Technical Writing 
(3) REG. 

Prerequisite: 56 hours of college credit uMt must imlude ENGL 
101 or equimlerit. The writu^ of techracal papers and 
reports. 

0102(08557) STAFF MTuWThF 9:30am- 10:50am 

(SQH 21191 

0103(08558) STAFF MTuUThF 9:30am-l 0:50am 

(SQH nil) 

0105 (08559) ST.\FF MTuWThF 1 1 :00am-12:20pm 

(SQH 1123) 

nlM,s (08560) ST.W MW 5:00pm-9:15pm 

(SQH nil) 

0109(08561) STVF MW 6:00pm-9:15pm 

(SQH 2122) 

0112(08562) STAFF TuTT, 6:00pm-9:15pm 

(SQH 2121) 

0113(08563) STAFF TuTh 6:0Opm-9: 15pm 

(SQH 1123) 

ENGL393X Technical Writing 
(3) REG. 

Prerequisite: 56 hours of college credit which must include EXGL 
101 or equiivlent. For students for whom En^h is a second 

0101(08580) STAFF MTuWThF 9:3f)am-l 0:50am 
(SQH 2121) 

0102(08581) STAFF TuTT, 6:00pm-9:I5pm 

(SQH nil) 

0103(08582) STAFF MW 6:00pm-9:15pm 

(SQH 1107) 




ENGL348A Literary Works 
by Women— Science Fiction 
by Women 

(3 credits) (June 5 -July 14) 

"Literary Works by Women— Science 
Fiction by Women," features works 
by noted women writers JVIary 
Wollstonecraft SheUey (who wrote 
Frankenstein), Andre Norton, Joanna 
Russ, Ursula K. Le Guin,Tanith Lee 
and Connie WiUis. The course also 
examines diverse authors including ■ 
black writer Octavia Butler, Indian 
writer Manjula Padmanabran and 
South American writer Angelica 
Gorodischer. Do women have a 
special tradition within the genre? 
Using feminist theory, students look 
at aspects of the science, psychology 
and literary strategies of these works. :' 
They examine how the writers' 
difi'ering (and changing) standpoints 
on the political issues of feminism, 
sexualit)' and colonizing are 
represented in their fictions. The 
course is taught by Jane Donawerth, 
professor of English, who has 
published two books on science 
fiction by women. She has won 
numerous teaching awards and has 
enjoyed reading science fiction since 
she was a child. For more 
information, call 301-405-3809. 



HOW B 



S SUMMER? 



ENGL394 Business Writing 
(3) REG. 

PimqiiisiU: 56 hours ofwllege atdit, uiikh must include ENGL 
101 or equimlenl. Intensive practice in the forms of written 
communication common in the business worid-letters. 
memos, short reports, and proposals. Principles of rhetoric 
and cffcctivi- style. This course satisfies the junior English 
requirement. 

0101 (08595) STAFF MTuWThF 8:00am-9:2()am 

(SQH 1121) 

0102 (08596) STAFF MTuWThF 9:30am-10:50am 

(SQH 1123) 
0103(08597) STAFF MTuVlThF ll:00am-12:20pm 

(SQH 2119) 
01(14(08598) STAFF MW6:00pm-9;15pm 

(SQH 2121) 
0105 (08599) STAFF TuTh 6:00pm-9:15pm 

(SQH 1121) 
0106(08600) STAFF MTuWThF 9:30am-10:50am 

(SQH 1117) 

0107 (08601) STAFF TuTh 6:00pm-9:15pm 

(SQH 1 105) 

0108 (08602) STAFF TuTh 6:00pm-9:15pm 

(SQH 1119) 

0109(08603) STAFF MW 6:00pm-9:l5pm 

(SQH 1105) 

ENGL395 Writing for Health Professions 
(3) REG. 

Prerequisiu: 56 hours of allege atdit, which rmisl include ENGL 
101 or equiwienl. Focus on accommodating technical 
material and empirical studies to lay audiences, and helping 
writers to achie\'e sr\'listic flexibility and correctness. 
0101 (08618) Doyle.A. MTuWThF 9:30am-10:50am 
(SQH 1101) 

ENGL399 (I'mnReq) Senior Seminar: Arresting 
Images: Impolitic Art and Uncivil 
Actions 
(3) REG/P-F/AUD. 

0101(08628) Kauffii'jn.L. MW 6:(X)pm-9:15pm 

(SQH 2119) 

ENGL429 (PemReq) Independent Research in 
English 
(1-6) REG/P-F/AUD. 

Individual Instruction course: contact department or 
instructor to obtain section number 

ENGL472 African- American Literature: 1945 to 

Present 

(3) REG/P-F/AUD. 
Prertquisite: two English tourses m literature or permission of 
department. Transformation of African-American litenitxiivs 
into modern and posmiodern forms. Influenced bv World 
War II and the Ci\il lights and Bbck Powier mo\•emcn^. 
this literature is characterized by consaous attempts to 
reconnea literarj' and folk forms, the emergence of women 
writers, and highly e.xpenmental fiction. 
0101(08660) King,N. MW l:(K)pm-4;15pm 

(SQH 1 103) 



ENGL699 (PermReq) Independent Study 
(1-3) REG/AUD. 

Individual Instruction course: contaa department or 
iastnictor to obtain secnon number 

ENGL799 Master's Thesis Research 
(1-6) REG. 

Individual instruction course: contacT department or 
instructor to obtain section number, 

ENGL899 Doctoral Dissertation Research 
(1-8) REG. 

Individual Instrucaon course: conuct deparmieiu or 
instructor to obtain section number. 

ENMA Engineering, IVIaterials 

(The A. James Clark School of 
Engineering) 

ENMA499 (PermReq) Scnior Laboratory Project 

(3) REG/P-F/AUD. 
0101(08755) Chnstou.A. Time and room to be 

arranged 

ENMA698 Special Problems in Materials Science 
and Engineering 

(1-3) REG/AUD. 

Individual Instruction course: contact department or 
instructor to obtam section number. 

ENMA799 (PermReq) Master's Thesis Research 
(1-6) REG. 

Individual Instruction course: conuct departmenl or 
uistnictor to obtain section number. 

ENMA899 (PermReq) Doctoral Dissertation 
Research 

(1-8) REG. 

Individual Instruction course: contaa department or 
instructor to obtam section number. 

ENIVIE Engineering, Mechanical 

(The A.James Clark School of 
Engineering) 

ENME232 Thermodynamics 

(3) REG/P-F/AUD. 

Prerequisite: PH\'S 261. Introducaon to thermodynamics. 
Thermodvuamic properties of nutter. First and second laws 
ot thermodynamics, cycles, reactions, and mixtures. 
0101(08821) Molki.M. MTuWTh 9:atam- 10:40am 
(CHM2201t 

ENME271 Computational Methods 
(3) REG. 

PrertqtasM: ESES 221 Introduction to computational toob 
for the solution of engineering problems. Generation of 
computer algonthnis using software such as MATLAB 
numerical analvis and generation ot' graphical displav'S. 
Computer stmulaQons with u.ser intcracDons. 
0101(08831) Ainane.S. MTuWTh 9:OOam-10:40»m 
(EGL 1202) 



ENME320 Thermodynamics 

(3) REG/P-F/AUD. 

Prerequisttes. M'i'l'H 141. and PhTiS 262. The ptopenies. 
charaaerisQcs and fijndamental equations of gsses and 
vapon. Appbcanon of the first and second bws of 
thermodvTiaiTucs m the anaKvs of basic heat engines, air 
compression vapor cycles. Flow and non-6ow processes for 
gases and vapon. 

0101 (08841) STAFF MTuWOi 9:0Oam-10:4Oam 

(EGROllO) 

ENME331 Fluid Mechanics 

(3) REG/P-F/AUD. 

Prrrtqumtts: ESSIE 252 and EKES 221. Pnnaples of fluid 
mechanics. Mass, momentum and energv' conservation. 
Hydrostatia. Control volume analysis. Internal and extcnuJ 
flow Boundary lavien. Modem measurement techniques. 
Computer anah'sis. Laboratory experiments. 
0101 (08851) Bigic D. TuTh 12:3(Jpm-3;50pni 

(EGR 3106) 

ENME351 Electronics and Instrumentation II 
(3) REG/P-F/AUD. 

Prerequisites: E\ME 252 and PH\'S 263. Continualion of 
ENME 252. Modem instrumentaoon. Basic circuit design, 
standard microelectronic circuits. Digital data acquisition and 
control. Signal conditioning. Instrumentation inteiiaang. 
Designing and testing of analog circuits. Laboratory 
expennients. 

0101(08861) Rodiblum,R. MW 12:30pm-2JOpm 

(EGR 01 10) 

MW 2:40pin-4:40pm 

(EGR 0110) Lab 

0102(08862) Rothblum,R. MW 12:30pm-2J0pni 

(EGR 01 10) 

MW 4:45ptn-6:45pm 

(EGR 01 10) Lab 

ENME361 Vibration, Controls and Optimization I 
(3) REG/P-F/AUD. 

Prerequisites: ESES .'J; aiul ESES 220 a,d MiTH 246. 
Fundamentals of vibraoon. conirok and optmuzaoon. 
Analv'Sis and design m time, Laplace and frequency domains. 
Mathematical descnption of system response, system stability, 
control and optimization. Optimal design of mechanical 
systems. 

0101(08875) Coder, D. MTuW9HXbm-1 1:15am 

OTVini) 

ENME488 (PermReq) Special Problems 
(3) REG/P-F/AUD. 

i>10] (08885) .\injne. S Time and loom to be arranged 

ENME489T Special Topics in Mechanical 
Engineering: Turbomachinery 
(3) REG/P-F/ALT>. 

0101(08896) .\lari..N,C .\lTuVlTh 10:00am-1 1:40am 
(EGR 2112) 




(Smor: 




ENME799 Master's Thesis Research 
(1-6) REG. 

Individual Instruction course: contact department or 
imCTuctor to obtain secDon number 

ENME808 Advanced Topics in Mechanical 
Engineering 

(3) REG/AUD. 
0101(08928) diMarzo.M, Time and room to be 

arranged 

ENME899 Doctoral Dissertation Research 
(1-8) REG. 

Individual Instruction course: contact department or 
instructor to obtain section number. 

ENNU Engineering, Nuclear 

(The A. James Clark School 
of Engineering) 

ENNU468 Research 

(2-3) REG. 

Individual Instruction course: contact department or 
instniaor to obtain section number 

ENNU648 Special Problems in Nuclear 
Engineering 

(1-6) REG. 

Individual Instruction course: contact department or 
instructor to obtain section number. 

ENNU799 Master's Thesis Research 
(1-6) REG. 

Individual Instruction course: contact department or 
instructor to obtain section number 

ENNU899 Doctoral Dissertation Research 
(1-8) REG. 

Individual Instruction course: contact department or 
instructor to obtam section number. 

ENPIVI Engineering, 
Professional Masters 

(The A. James Clark School of 
Engineering) 

ENPM606 Linear Control Systems 
(3) REG/AUD. 

Incroducdon to control engineermg; including simulation 
and modeUng, bnear systems theory, specifications, structures 
and limitations, feedback system stability in terms of loop 
gam, classical design, and state feedback. 
0101 (09009) STAFF TuTh 5:30pm-8:10pm 

aTVllll) 
Meeu 06/06/00-07/27/00 



ENPM623 Control of Combustion Generated Air 
Pollution 

(3) REG/AUD. 

Prereqimiti-i: ENME 315 and EKME 321 or equimlml. 
Analysis of the sources and mechamsms of combustion 
generated air pollution. Air pollution due to internal 
combastion engines, power generation and mdustrial 
emissions. Techniques to minimize and control emission. 
Acid rain, ozone, plume analysis, scrubbing, filtering. 
0101(09010) FarreU,R. TuTh 5:30pm-8:10pm 

(EGR 2107) 
Mech 06/06/00-07/27/00 

ENPM808 (PermRcq) Advanced Topics in 
Engineering 

(1-3) REG/AUD. 

0101(09072) STAFF Time and room to be arranged 

ENPM808F Advanced Topics in Engineering: 
Applied Finite Element Methods 

(3) REG/AUD. 
0101(09088) EtheridgcJ. MW 5:30pm-8:10pni 

(ITVllU) 
Meets 06/07/00-07/26/00 

ENRE Reliability Engineering 

(The A. James Clark School 
of Engineering) 

ENRE467 System Safety Engineering 
(3) REG/P-F/AUD. 

Prerequisitts: MiTH 246 ,md PHYS 263 or permission of 
department. Role of system sat'ety, the language of system 
safety, and programs for achievmg safety, such as the problem 
solving process, safety cnteria, safety descriptors, checklist- 
timeliness elements, safety training, hazard analysis, and 
uncertainty in safety measurements. Time-phased mtiicators, 
hazard nomenclature, hazard mode and effect analysis, hazard 
classificadon, hazard probability, sur\ival rate, distributions 
applied to human performance. 

0101 (09155) Allocco, M. Th 5:30pm-8:30pm 

OTVUOO) 
Meets 06/03/00-08/19/00 

ENRE607 (PermReq) Reliability Engineering 
Seminar 

(1) REG/AUD. 

Topics of current interest, emphasizmg the latest techmques 
and developments. Invited speakers uill be selected to 
provide insights fiom the viewpoint of practitioners noted 
for their expertise in vanous facets of industry. Managers of 
reliability programs will be included along with those who 
are responsible for setting national pobdes and requirements. 
In-depth reviews will be provided, descnbing current 
research work undenvay across the nation. 
OIRE (09165) STAFF Time and room to be arranged 

ENRE648 (PermReq) Special Problems in 
Reliability Engineering 

(1-6) REG/AUD. 

Individual Instruction coune: contact department or 
instructor to obtain section number 

ENRE799 Master's Thesis Research 
(1-6) REG/S-E 

Individual Instruction course: contact department or 
instructor to obtain section number 



ENRE899 Doctoral Dissertation Research 
(1-8) REG/S-E 

Individual InstnicDon course: contact department or 
instructor to obtam section number 

ENSE Systems Engineering 

(The A. James Clark School 
of Engineering) 

ENSE799 (PermReq) Systems Engineering Thesis: 
Master's Thesis Research 
(1-6) REG. 

Individual Instruction course: contact department or 
instructor to obtain section number. 
Contact Systeins Er^eering Office, Rm. 2172 A.V. 
Williams Bldg. to make arrangements. 

ENSP Environmental Science 
and Policy 

(Agriculture and Natural Resources) 

ENSP386 Internship 
(3-6) REG. 

Individual Instruction course: contact department or 
instructor to obtain section number Prerequisite: internship 
proposal approved hy the spedalty admor, the director ofEI^'SP and 
the student's internship sponsor. 

ENTM Entomology 

(Life Sciences) 

ENTM699 Advanced Entomology 
(1-6) REG/AUD. 

Indi\idual Instruction course: conuct department or 
instructor to obtam section number 

ENTM789 Field Experience in Pest Management 
(1-6) REG/AUD. 

Individual Instruction course: contact department or 
instructor to obtain section number. 

ENTM799 Master's Thesis Research 
(1-6) REG. 

Individual Instruction course: contact department or 
instructor to obtain section number. 

ENTM899 Doctoral Dissertation Research 
(1-8) REG. 

Individual Instruction coiu^e: contaa department or 
instructor to obtam section number 

ENTS Telecommunications 

(The A. James Clark School 
of Engineering) 

ENTS609 Telecommunications Project 
(3) REG/AUD. 

Individual Instrucuon course: contact department or 
instructor to obtain section number 



32 



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FMST Family Studies 

(Health and Huinan Performance) 

FMST302 Research Methods in Family Studies 
(3) REG/P-F/AUD. 

Prerrquisite: introdtulory suitistus courst. For FMST majors oni)'. 
Formal)' FMCD 302. Introduction to the methods of die 
social and beliavioral sciences employed in family science. 
The role of theory, the development of hypotheses, 
measurement, design, and data analysis. 
0101(09513) Letiecq.B. MW 6:00pm-9:20pm 

(MMH 1304) 

FIVIST330 Family Theories and Patterns 

(3) REG/AUD. 
Junior slanding. Formerly FMCD 3 JO. Theory and research on 
the family, including a cross-cultural analysis of family 
patterns. 

0101(09523) Dargan.V MW 9:30am- 12:5()pm 

(MMH 0108) 

FMST332 Children in Families 
(3) REG/P-F/AUD. 

Prmquisile: FMST t05 or FSYC 100. Formal)' FMCD J32. 
A fanuly hfe education approach to the smdy of children 
and famihes. Emphasis on the interaction of children ^^^th 
parents, siblings, extended kin, and the community. 
0101 (09534) Dargan.V. MW 2:(X)pm-5:20pm 

(MMH 0108) 

FMST383 Delivery of Human Services to Families 
(3) REG/P-F/AUD. 

Prerequisite: FMST 330 Formerly FMCD 383. Processes of 
service delivery with speaal emph.isis upon relanonships 
among managen, ser\ice providers and clients. The impaa 
of human service systems on families. 
0101 (09565) Wallen.J. MW 9:30ani-12:50pm 

(MMH 3418) 

FMST386 (PermReq) Experiential Learning 
(3-6) REG/P-E 

Individual Instruction course: contaa department or 
instructor to obtam section number. Prerequisite: permission of 
department. 56 semester hours. 

FMST399 (PirmRcq) Independent Study 
(1-6) REG/P-F/AUD. 

Individual Instruction course: contact department or 
instructor to obtain section number. 
Individualized family and community studic-s projects of 
interest to student and faculty. 

FMST431 Family Crises and Intervention 
(3) REG/P-F/AUD. 

Prerequisite: PSYC 100. Family crises such as divorce, 
tiisability, substance abuse, financial problems, intrafamilial 
abuse, and death. Theones and techniques for intervention 
and enhancement of family coping strategies. 
0101(09579) Epstcm,N. TuTh 2:OOpm-5:2t>pm 

(MMH 0108) 



FMST460 Violence in Families 
(3) REG/P-F/AUD. 

Prerequisite: PSYC 100 or SOCY tOO or SOCY 105. 
Theories of child, spouse, and elder abuse in the family 
setting. Emphasis on hLstoncal, psychological, soaological 
and legal trends relating to physical, emotional, and sexual 
abuse. Introducrion to methods for pre\"ention and 
remediadon. 

0101(09600) LcDecq,B. MW 2:00pm-5:20pm 

(MMH 1400) 

FMST477 Internship and Analysis in Family 
Studies 
(3) REG/P-F/AUD. 

Prerequisites: FMST 383, plus an additional six FMST credits 
and permission ofdepanmeru. For FMST majors only. Credit will 
he granted for only one of the following: FMST 477 or FMST 
347. A supervised internship and a seminar requiring 
analysis. Opportunities to integrate dieorj' and practice 
including 120 hours of contracted field cvperience. Summer 
or fall internship contracts due May 1 ; Spring contracts due 
December 1 . See department for application procedures. 
0101(09610) Oravecz,L. Tu9:30am-1 2:50pm 

(MMH 1206) 
Meets 06/05/00-08/17/00 
Meets on alternate Tuesdays. A planned, supervised 
internship complemented by analysis. Opportunities to 
integrate theory and practice. Field experience requires 
niimmum of 120 hours per semester. 

FMST487 Legal Aspects of Family Problems 
(3) REG/P-F/AUD. 

Laws and legal procedures, with emphasis on adopDon, 
marriage, divorce, annulment, and property nghts, and how 
they affect family Utc. 

0101(09620) Myncks,N. TuTh 6:00pm-9:20pm 

(MMH 1304) 

FMST490 Family and Addiction 
(3) REG/AUD. 

Prerequisite: SOCY 100 or SOCY 105 or PSYC 100 or 
permission ofinstntaor Theory, research, and cbmcal practice 
in the area of addicaons and recovery as they rebte to 
family processes. Also offered as FMST()98D. Credit will be 
granted for only one of the following FMST490 or 
FMST698D. 

0101 (09630) Wallen,J. MW 6:00pm-9:20pm 

(MMH I4<K)) 

FMST497 The Child and the Law 
(3) REG/P-F/AUD. 

Legislation and case law regarding children's legal rights with 
emphasis on the rights of children in thejus-enilejusoce 
system, and rights to medical, educational, and other social 
services. 

0101 (09640) Myncks, N. TuTh 2:00pm-5;20pm 

(MMH 1304) 

FMST498 (PermReq) SpCClal TOpJCS 

(1-3) REG/P-F/AUD. 

Individual Instruction course: contact department or 
mstructor to obtain section number. 
Individual family studies instruction course on topics of 
interest to student and facultv. 



FMST498S Special Topics: Sexuality: Issues in 
Family Therapy and Service Delivery 
(3) REG/P-F/AUD. 

0101(09662) Epstein, N. TuTh 9J0am-12:5Opm 

(MMH 1108A! 

FMST645 Sexuality: Issues in Family Therapy 
and Service Delivery 
(3) REG/AUD. 

Prerequisites: a basie course in human sexuahty and permission of 
insiruaor. Typical, dysfiinctional, and pathological sexual 
fiinctioning: effects on individuals, couples, and family 
systems. Sensitizes students to sexual issues, explores how 
perceptions of such issues affea work with people, and 
emphasizes implications for marriage and family therapv'. 
0101(09672) Epstein, N. TuTh 9:30am- 12:5'Jpm 

(MMH1108A) 

FMST650 (PermReq) Ethlcal, Legal, and 

Professional Principles in Marriage 
and Family Therapy 
(3) REG/.^UD. 

Prerequisite: permissiort ot department Limited to students admitted 
to the family therapy program. An introduction to the basic 
principles and practices of t'amily therapy. Emphasis on basic 
therapy skills applied to a family context and on professional 
ethics of the family practiooner. Addresses iherapci's legal 
responsibilines and liabiliaes, certificanon, and bcensure 
issues. 

Time and itxim to be 
arranged 



0101(09682) BuidettcR. 



FMST654 Clinical Marriage and Family Therapy 
Practice 
(3) REG/AUD. 

Prerequisite: FMST 651. Limited to students admitted u> the 
family tlierapy program. Application of theorv' and technique 
to the clinical practice of mamage and family dierapy. 
Emphasis on case management and clinic administration. 
Includes compleoon of 12 succcssivr months and 5<I0 hours 
of supervised, diiea cbent contact with couples, families, and 
individuals horn an int^rativr ^mily systems perspectivr. 
0101(09692) WcrlinicKC M 8*aam-4:3iipm 

(Arranged) 

FMST658 Supervised Clinical Practice of 
Marriage and Family Therapy 

(1-3) S-F 
0101(09703) Gavlin.N W V:llllam-12.-00pm 

(MMH 1310) 
Time and room to be arranged Dis 

FMST689 (PermReq) Intemshlp 
(3-6) REG/AUD. 

Individual InstrucQon course: contaa department or 

instructor to obtain section number. 

Internship related to student's chosen specialization. 





FMST698 (PermReq) Advanced Topics in Family 
Studies 

(1-3) REG/AUD. 

Individual Instruction course: contact department or 
instructor to obtain section number 

FMST698D Advanced Topics in Family Studies: 
Family and Addiction 

(3) REG/AUD. 

Also offered as FMST490. Credit will be granted for only 

one of the foUowing FMST490 or FMST698D. 

0101 (17144) WallenJ. MW 6:00pm-9:20pm 

I'MMH 1400) 

FMST698G Advanced Topics in Family Studies: 
Group Process in Marriage and Family 
Therapy 

(3) REG/AUD. 
0101 (09728) Masselain,V. MFSa 8:00am-5:00pm 

(Room to be anangeed) 
Meeis 06/05/00- 07/16/00 

FMST698T Advanced Topics in Family Studies: 
Innovations in Brief Strategic Family 
Therapy 

(1-3) REG/AUD. 
0101 (09748) STAFF Time and loom to be arranged 

FMST698V Advanced Topics in Family Studies; 
Violence in Families 

(3) REG/AUD. 

01111(09758) Letiecq.B. 



MW 2:00pm-5:20pm 
(MMH1400) 



FMST699 Independent Study 
(1-6) REG/AUD. 

Individual Instrucdon course: contact department or 
instructor to obtain secDon number. 

FMST7S8 Supervision of Marriage and Family 
Therapy Supervision 

(1-3) REG/AUD. 
0101 (09770) STAFF TuTh 9:30am-12:50pm 

(MMH 1312) 

FMST789 (PermReq) Non-Thesis Research 
(1-3) REG/AUD. 

Individual InstrucDon course: contact department or 
instructor to obtain section number. 

FMST790 Marriage and Family Therapy 
Supervision 

(3) REG/AUD. 

Pmequisile: permission ofdepanmmi. Credit will he granted for 
only one of the following: FMST 790 or FMST 690 Theory 
and research in supervision of marriage and family therapy. 
Emphasis on major models, articulation of personal model, 
and demonstration of perceptual, conceptual, and execudve 
skills in marriage and family therapy supervision. Designed 
to meet the didactic course component of the designation 
of Approved Supervisor of the American AssoaaQon for 
Marriage and Family Therapy. 

0101 (09782) STAFF F 8:00am-4:30pm 

(MMH 1312) 



FMST799 Master's Thesis Research 
(1-6) REG. 

Individual Instruction course: contact department or 
instructor to obtam section number 

FREN French 

(Arts and Humanities) 

FREN101 Elementary French 

(4) REG/P-F/AUD. 

\'ot open to students with 2 or more years of high-school level 
French or to natiw /fluent speakers ofFremh. Introduction to 
basic structures and pronunaation with emphasis on the 
four skills: bstemng. speaking, reading and wntmg. 
(1101(09843) Kamal,L. MTuWTh 9:00am-l 1:15am 
(IMZ 0202) 

FREN103 Review of Elementary French 
(4) REG/P-F/AUD. 

Limited to students who have had at least two years of high school 
French or equivalent or who do not qualify for FRE!^ 203. Credit 
in// he granted for only one of the following: FREN 101, FREN 
102 or FREN 103. 

0101(09863) El Nasser, M. MWTh 9;00am-12:00pm 
OMZ 1224) 

FREN203 Intermediate French 
(4) REG/P-F/AUD. 

CORF: Humanines (HO) Completion of the study of basic 
grammancal structures, with readings, conversation, and 
composition. Fulfills the Arts and Humanities language 
requirement. 

0101(09873) RacuieJ. MTuWTh 9:00am-l 1:15am 
gMZ 3120) 

FREN204 Review Grammar and Composition 
(3) REG/P-F/AUD. 

CORE: Humanities (HO) Prerequisite: FREN 203 or 
permission of department. An intensive review of major aspects 
of contemporary grammatical usage; traimng m 
comprehension and guided composition. 
0101(09884) Dali,S. MTuWTh 9:00am- 10:45am 

GMZ 3205) 
Taught concurrendy with FRiN 301. 

FREN211 Intermediate Conversation 
(3) REG/P-F/AUD. 

Not open to native speakers. Prerequisite: FREN 203 or 
permission of department. Practice in spoken French with 
emphasis on contemporary French topics. 
0101 (09894) Mufti, M. MTuWTh 9:00am-10:45am 
OMZ 3203) 
Taught concurrendy with FREN 311. 

FREN250 Readings in French 

(3) REG/P-F/AUD. 

CORE: Literature (FU.) Prerequisite: FREN 203 or equivalent. 
Not open to native speakers. Selected readings fiom various 
genres in French literamrc. Discussion and brief wntten 
reports m French. 

0101 (09904) Bekrou,V MWTh l:00pm-3:15pm 

GMZ 1215) 



FREN301 Composition and Style 
(3) REG/P-F/AUD. 

Prerequisite: FREN 204 or permission of department. 
Grammaacal analysis, translation, &ee and guided 
composition. 

0101(09914) Dali,S. MTuWTh 9:00am-10:45am 

gMZ 3205) 
Taught concurrendy with FREN 204. 

FREN311 French Conversation 
(3) REG/P-F/AUD. 

Prerequisite: any 200-level course in French aboiv FREN 203 or 
permission of department. Not open to native speakers. 
Development of aural comprehension and oral expression 
through use of radio and television broadcasts. 
0101(09924) Mufti, M. MTuWTh 9:00am-10;45am 
gMZ 3203) 
Taught concurrendy with FREN 211. 

FREN386 (PermReq) Experiential Learning 
(3-6) REG/P-E 

Individual Instruction course: contaa department or 
instructor to obtam secnon number Prerequisite: permission of 
department. 56 semester hours. 

FREN399 (PermReq) Directed study in French 

(1-3) S-E 

Individual Instrucaon course: contaa deparmient or 
instructor to obtain section number 

FREN480 French Cinema: A Cultural Approach 
(in Translation) 

(3) REG/P-F/AUD. 

Formerly FREN 475. A smdy of French culture, civilization, 
and literature through the medium of film. Taught in 
English. 

0101(09938) Fnndethie,M. MWTh 6:0Opm-8: 15pm 
gMZ 3120) 
Taught concurrendy with FREN 499M. 

FREN499M Special Topics in French Studies: 
Dimensions and Perspectives of 
Francophone African and Caribbean 
Cinema 

(3) REG/P-F/AUD. 
0101(09948) Fnndediie, M. MWTh 6:00pm-8: 15pm 
gMZ 3120) 
Taught concurrendy with FREN 480. 

FREN499V Special Topics in French Studies: 

Workshop in Cross-cultural Analysis 

(3) REG/P-F/AUD. 
OlOl (09959) Verdaguer.P MTuWThF 10:00am-12:30pm 
gMZ 0118) 
MTuWThF l:30pm-3:15pm 
gMZ 0118) 
In this workshop, conducted entirely m French, a variety of 
courses will be used as a basis for cross-cultural analysis, 
mcludmg French and Amencan television matenals, films, 
cartoons, and press articles. Special emphasis will be on fihn 
remakes and the issue of culmral adaptaQon.Wrmngs by 
French and American thinkers and scholars will also be 
exanuned to better understand the representative fiinction of 
stereotypes. Interpersonal and presentational activities. 
Meets 06/19/00-06/30/00 



34 



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FREN798 Master's Independent Study 
(1-3) REG/AUD. 

IndiMdual Instruction course; contact department or 
iaslruaor to obtain section number 

FREN799 Master's Thesis Research 
(1-3) REG. 

Individual Instruction course; contaa department or 
instructor to obtain section tmnibcr, 

FREN898 Doctoral Independent Study 
(3) REG/AUD. 

Individual Instruction course; contact department or 
instructor to obtain section number. 

FREN899 Doctoral Dissertation Research 

(1-4) REG. 
Individual Instruction coune; contact department or 
instrunor to obtain section number 

GEOG Geography 

(Behavioral and Social Sciences) 

GE0G100 Introduction to Geography 
(3) REG/P-F. 

CORE; Behavioral and Social Science (SB) An introduction 
to the broad tield of geognphv' as it is applicable to the 
general educadon student. The couise presents the basic 
rationale of vanarions in human occupancy' of the earth and 
stresses geographic concepts relevant to understanding 
world, regional and local issues. 

0101(10025) BeUer-Simms. N. TuTh 5;00pm-8;30pm 
(LEF 2205) 

GEOG170 Maps and Map Use 

(3) REG/P-F/AUD. 
CORE; Mathematics or Formal Reasoning (MS) The use 
and interpretaoon of nups encountered in both "everyday" 
reading and in saentific literature. Development of skills in 
nup reading, envTTonmental analysis, interpretation and 
orienteering. 

0101(10045) Btodsky.H. TuTh 9;00ani-12;30pm 

(LEF 1222) 

GE0G350 The American City: Past and Present 
(3) REG/P-F/AUD. 

Development of the Amencan city horn the early 19th 
century to the present. The internal structure of 
contemporary metropolitan areas, the spatial arrangement of 
residential, commeraal. and other activities. Washington, 
D.C. and Baltimore examples. 

0101 (10075) Zbric. M. TuTh 2;00pm-5;30pm 

(LEF 1222) 

GE0G372 Remote Sensing 

(3) REG/P-F/ALTD. 

Principles of remote sensing in relation to photographic, 
thermal infrared and radar imaging. Methods of obtaining 
quantitative intbrmanon ftoni remotely-sensed images. 
Interpretation of remotely-sensed images emphasizing the 
study of spatial and environmental rcbnotiships. 
0101 (10085) Hasken,J. MW 6;00pni-9:30pm 

(LEF 1221) 



GE0G384 (PermReq) Intemship in Geography 

(3) S-E 
Individual Instruction course: contaa department or 
instructor to obtain section number Prnequisiie: CEOC 
305; and GEOG } 10; and permission (ifdepanmenl. Corequisite: 
CEOC 385. Supervised field training to pnwide career 
experience. Introduction to professional level acnvitics, 
demands, opportunities. Pbcement at a public agency, non- 
profit organization, or private firm. Participation requires 
application to the internship advisor in preceding semester 

GE0G385 (PmnReqi Intomship Research Paper 
(3) REG/P-F/AUD, 

Individual Instruction course; contact deparmient or 
instructor to obtain set"tion number. Prerequisite: GEOG 
305; and GEOG 310; and pennissioti of department. Coivquistte: 
GEOG 384. Seminar conducted on campus. Research 
paper rebted to the students intemship. 

GE0G422 Population Geography 
(3) REG/P-F/AUD. 

The spatial characteristics of popuknon distribution and 
growth, migration, fertility and mortality from a global 
perspective. Basic popubtion-envuonmcntal rebtionships; 
carrying capacitv', density, rebtionships to national 
development. 

0101(10119) ZbncM. TuTh 6;00pm-9:30pm 

aEF 1222) 

GE0G498 (PermReq) Topical Investigations 
(1-3) REG/P-F/AUD. 

Individual Instruction course; conua department or 
instructor to obtain secnon number. 

GE0G498I Topical Investigations: Remote 
Sensing 
(3) REG/P-F/AUD. 

0101 (10131) Haskctt.J. MW 6:00pm-9:30pm 

(LEF 1221) 

GE0G788 (PermReq) Selected Topics in 

Geography 

(1-3) REG/AUD. 
Individual Instruction course; contaa department or 
instructor to obtain section number 

GE0G789 (PermReq) Independent Readings 

(1-3) REG/AUD. 
Individual Instruction course; contact department or 
instructor to obtain section number Contact department to 
make arrangements. 

GE0G790 (PermReq) Intemshlp in Geography 
(3) REG/AUD. 

Individual Inslrucoon coune; contact deparuncm or 
instructor to obtain section number Field e.vpenence m the 
students specialty" m a Federal, state, or local agencv' or 
pnvMe business. Research paper required. Contact 
department to make arrangements. 



GE0G799 (PermReq) Mastor's Thesis Research 

(1-6) REG. 
Individual Instruction course; contaa department or 
instruaor to obtam section niunber. 

GE0G899 (PermReq) Doctoral Dissertation 

Research 

(I-S) REG. 
Individual instrucDon course; contaa dqnrtment or 
instruaor to obtain section number. 

GEOL Geology 

(Computer, Mathematical and 
Physical Sciences) 

GE0L100 Physical Geology 

(3) REG/P-F/AUT). 
Cndit wili be granted jor only one oftheJoUpuvig: GEOL 100 or 
GEOL 103 or GEOL 105 or GEOL 101 A general survey 
of the rocks and minerals composing the earth, its surface 
feamrrs and the agents that form them, and the dyiuimc 
forces of pbte tectonics. CORE Physical Science Laboraiorv' 
(PL) Course only when taken concumentK' with GEOL 

no. 

0101(10210) STAFF MTuWThF 9jnam-Ui;5flam 
(PLS1113) 

GE0L110 Physical Geology Laboratory 
(1) REG/P-F/AUD. 

ftr- or mequisite: GEOL 100 or GEOL 120. TTie basic 
materials and took of physical geok)gy stressing 
familiarization with rocks and minerals and the use of nups 
in geologic interpretations, CORE Phv^cal Saencc 
Laboratory (PL) Coune only when taken with GEOL 100. 
0101 (10220) STAFF MW 12K»pm-3«Jpm 

iGE0 21iihiUb 

GE0L120 Environmental Geology 
(3) REG/P-F/AUD. 

CORE; Physical Science (PS) A rrview of geologic laaors 
undertynng many environmental problems and the 
interactions betwren popubtion and physical emironmenc 
geologic hazards, land-use planning, conserv:iBon. mineial 
resources, waste disposal, land rrxbmation and the geologic 
aspects of health and disease. The course is aimed at knvr 
di\ision students in educaoon and kbeial arts, and should be 
usctiil to any student concerned with gcok)gic perspectives 
of environmental problems. 

0101 (10230) STAFF MTuWThF 9J0iain-IiJ;5<iam 
(PLS 11. VI) 

GE0L499 (PermReq) Special Problems In Geology 
(1-3) REG/P-F/AUD. 

Individual lastrucnon course; contaa department or 
instruaor to obtain sevTion number. 

GE0L799 Master's Tliesis Research 
(1-4) REG. 

Individual Instruction course; contacT department or 
instructor to obtain scclioa number. 





GE0L899 Doctoral Dissertation Research 
(1-8) REG/S-E 

Individual Instruction course: contact department or 
instructor to obtain section number. 

GERM Germanic Studies 

(Arts and Humanities) 

GERM101 Elementary German I 
(4) REG/P-F/AUD. 

Formerly GERM lU. IntroducDon to basic structures and 
pronunciation by emphasis on the four sldJls: listening, 
speaking, reading and unting. Reading? concern the current 
litestyle and ci\-ibzjtion of the Gemun-speaking world. 
0101(10355) STAFF MTuWThF 11 :00am- 1:00pm 
OMZ 3205) 

GERM201 Intermediate German I 
(4) REG/P-F/AUD. 

CORF: Humanmes (HO) Prfrr<;iiL<ite: GERM W2. 
Grammar re\iew and greater mastery of vocabulary, idioms, 
conversational fluency, and compositional skills. Readings 
stress the current lifestyle and civilization of the German- 
speaking world. 

0101(10375) STAFF MTu^^ThF 11 :00am- 1:00pm 
gMZ 3203) 

GERM499 Directed Study: Directed Study in 
German 

(1-3) REG/AUD. 

Individual Instruction course: contact department or 
instructor to obtain section number. 
Contact instructor before registering. 

GERM798 Master's Independent Study 
(1-3) REG/AUD. 

Individual Instruction course: contact department or 
instructor to obtain section number 
Contact instructor before registenng. 

GERM799 Master's Thesis Research 
(1-6) REG. 

Indlv^dual InstiucDon course: contact deparmient or 
instructor to obtain section number. 

GERM898 Doctoral Independent Study 
(1-3) REG/AUD. 

Individual Instruction course: contact department or 
instructor to obtain section number 

GERM899 Doctoral Dissertation Research 

(1-6) REG. 

Individual Instruction coune: contact deparmient or 
instruaor to obtain section number. 



GVPT Government and Politics 

(Behavioral and Social Sciences) 

GVPT100 Principles of Government and Politics 

(3) REG/P-F/AUD. 
CORE: Behavioral and Soaal Science (SB) A study of the 
basic principles and concepts of pobocal saence. 
0101 (10454) Grant- Wisdom, D. TuW 9;00am-12:20pm 
(TYDOlll) 



GVPT170 American Government 
(3) REG/P-F/AUD. 

CORE: Behavioral and Social Science (SB) A 
comprehensive smdy of national government in the United 
Sutes. 

0101(10465) Gimpel.J. MTuWThF 10:00am- II :30am 
(ASY 321 1) 

GVPT200 International Political Relations 
(3) REG/P-F/AUD. 

CORE: Behavioral and Social Snence (SB) Prereqiusile: 
G\TT WO. Fmnerly GVPT 300. A study of the major 
faaon underlying international relations, the methods of 
conducting foreign relations, the tbrcign policies ot the 
major powers, and the means ol avoidmg or alleviating 
mtemational conflicts. 

0101(10476) Young, K. TuTh l:0(Jpm-4:20pm 

(TYD 1102) 

GVPT241 The Study of Political Philosophy: 
Ancient and Modern 

(3) REG/P-F/AUD. 

Prmiiiuisile: GIVT 100. Examines some of the salient 
continuities and breaks between the anaent and modem 
traditions m Western pobocal philosophy. 
0101 (10486) Alford. C. MW 6:30pm-9:50pm 

(TYD 01 17) 

GVPT282 The Government and Politics of the 
Third World 

(3) REG/P-F/AUD. 

Prmquisile: GITT 100. A study of the governmental 
institutions, processes and problems, and the socio-economic 
environment which are common to the great majority ot 
the Third World states of Africa, the Middle East, Asia, and 
Latin America: and in which internal politics develop. 
0101(10496) Unmng.E. MW 12:30pm-3:50piii 

(TYDOlll) 

GVPT386 (PermReq) Experiential Learning 
(3-6) REG/P-E 

Prerrquisite: permission of departtnetit. 56 semesler hours. 
0101(10526) STAFF Time and room to be arranged 

GVPT388 (PermReq) Toplcal Investigations 
(1-3) REG/P-F/AUD. 

0101(10537) STAFF Time and room to be arranged 

GVPT396 Introduction to Honors Research 
(3) REG/P-F/AUD. 

Prerequisite: admissiou to attd permission of GiVT Honors 
Program. A reqiured course for all honors students designed 
to emphasize library research, methodology, and writing 
skills in political science and political philosophy. A written 
proposal, bibliography and research design for an honors 
paper required of all smdents as a final project. 
0101 (10558) STAFF Time and room to be arranged 

GVPT397 Honors Research 

(3) REG/P-F/AUD. 

Prerequisite: GI PT 396 imti admissiott to GWT liortors 
program. Individual reading and research. Preparation of an 
original paper. 
0101 (10568) STAFF Time and room to be arranged 



GVPT432 Civil Rights and the Constitution 
(3) REG/P-F/AUD. 

Prerequisite: GI TT 231. A smdy of civil rights m the 
Aniencan constitutional context, emphasizing freedom of 
religion, freedom of expression, minority discrimination, and 
the nghts of defendants. 

0101(10598) Feinstein,H. MW 9:00am-I2:20pm 

(TYD 1102) 

GVPT473 Legislatures and Legislation 
(3) REG/P-F/AUD. 

Prerequisite: GI VT 1~0. A detailed survey of lawmaking and 
the legislative process, emphasizmg the U.S. Congress and its 
members. 

0101(10628) Uslaner.E. TuTh 12:30pm-3:50pm 

(TYD 1108) 

GVPT898 Readings in Government and Politics 
(3) REG/AUD. 

Indi\idual Instruction course: contact department or 
instructor to obtam section number. 

GVPT899 Doctoral Dissertation Research 

(1-8) REG. 
Individual Instruction course: contact department or 
instructor to obtain section number. 

HESP Hearing and Speech 
Sciences 

(Behavioral and Social Sciences) 

HESP202 Introduction to Hearing and Speech 
Sciences 
(3) REG/P-F/AUD. 

Introduction to phonetics, the physiological bases of speech 
production and reception, and the physics of sound 
0101(10691) Silvemian.S. MWF ll:00am-l:15pm 
(LEF 0135) 
Meets 06/05/00-07/14/00 

HESP300 Introduction to Psycholinguistics 
(3) REG/P-F/AUD. 

Prerequisite: HESP 202 or HESP 120 or L/NG 200 or 
permission of department. An introduction to current theories 
of language and an mvestiganon of their relationship to 
human communication behavior. Survey of the 
experimental literature relating to this question. 
0101(10701) Wolff. P MWF 8:30am-I0:45am 

(LEF 122!) 

HESP305 Anatomy and Physiology of the Speech 
Mechanism 
(3) REG/P-F/AUD. 

Prerequisite: HESP 202 or permission of department. Anatomy, 
physiology, and neuiolc^ of speech mechanism. 
0101(10711) McCall,G. MWF 2:00pm-t: 15pm 

(PLS1130) 



36 



HOW 



SUMMER? 



HESP311 Anatomy, Pathology and Physiology of 
the Auditory System 

(3) REG/P-F/AUD. 

PrmquisiU: HESP 202 m pmnissmi ofdeparlmenl. Gross 
anatomy of the ear and pathways for transmission of sound 
energy through the peripheral and central auditory system. 
Causes, development and effects of pathological conditions 
contributing to temporary' or chronic heanng impairments. 
0101(10721) UntzJ. MWF 2:IK)pm-4:15pm 

(LEF0135) 

HESP386 (PermReq) Experiential Learning 
(3-6) REG/P-F. 

Individual Instruction course: contact department or 
instructor to obtain section number Prervquisiie: pamissim of 
dppiirtmnu. 56 ^cttifsttr tumr^. 

HESP400 Speech and Language Development In 
Children 

(3) REG/P-F/AUD. 

Prmijuisilc: HESP .WO or HESP 120 or U\G 200 or 
pmniision ofdcpanmml. Anal\-5is of the nonnal processes of 
speech and language development in children. 
0101(10733) Roth.F MWF ll:00am-l:!5pm 

(LEF 1220) 

HESP402 Speech Pathology I 

(3) REG/P-F/AUD. 

Pmequisile: HESP 400. Etiology, assessment and tieatment of 
language and phonological disorders in children. 
0101 (10743) Roth, E MWF 2;00pm-4;25pm 

(LEF 1201) 

HESP403 Introduction to Phonetic Science 
(3) REG/P-F/AUD. 

Prerequisile: HESP .)0.5 I'rpennifswn cifdepartmenl. An 
introduction to physiological, acoustic and perceptual 
phonetics; broad and narrow phonetic transcription; current 
models of speech production and perception. 
0101(10753) Silverman. S. MWF 8:30am-10:45ani 
(LEF 1222) 
Meeis 06/05/00-07/14/00 

HESP404 Speech Pathology II 
(3) REG/P-F/AUD. 

Pracquisiic: HESP 505. Etiology; assessment and therapeutic 
management of phonation, resonance, and fluency disorders 
in children and adults. 

0101(10763) Cowan-Baker, 1> MWF 1:1 KIpin-.V 15pm 
(LEF 1222) 

HESP420 Deafness and Sign Language 
(3) REG. 

Orrfit will begmiuedfor only one oflhcfollmmg: HESP 498A 
or HESP 420. An introduction to American Sign Language 
and Deaf Culmre. 

0101(10793) Kinsella-Mcicr, M. MW 5:(K)pm-8:20pm 
(LEFOl.VS) 

HESP498C Seminar: Advanced Sign Language 

(3) REG/P-F/AUD. 
0101(10803) William.s,l. MTuUTh 1 l:(H)am-l:15pm 
(PLS 1 172) 



HESP499 (PnmRiq) Independent Study 
(1-3) REG/P-F/AUD. 

Individual Instruction course: contact department or 

iastnictor to obtain section number 

HESP635 Aural Rehabilation/Habilitation 
(3) REG/AUD. 

Principles, methods and procedures for aural 
rehabilitation/habilitation in children and adults. 
0101(10825) Uusacco,D. TuTh 3:00pm-6:20pm 

(LEF 2208) 

HESP638 Research Practicum: Minor Research 
Problems 
(1-3) REG/AUD. 

Individual Instruction course: contact department or 
iastructor to obtain section number. 

HESP648A (I'mnRcq) Clinical Practice in Speech: 
Diagnostic Practice in Speech 
(1-2) REG/AUD. 

Individual Instruction course: contact department or 
instructor to obtain secoon number. 

HESP648B Clinical Practice in Speech 

(1-2) REG/AUD. 
01111(10838) SIAFF 1 inie and room to be arranged 
0102(10839) STAFF Time and room to be arranged 
0103(10840) STAFF Time and room to be arranged 
0104(10841) STAFF Time and room to be arranged 
01(5(10842) STAFF Time .ind room to be .imnged 

HESP649 (PermReq) Cllnlcal Practice in 
Audiology 
(1-2) REG/AUD. 

Individual Instruction course: contact department or 
instructor to obtain section number. 

HESP708 Independent Study 
(1-6) REG/AUD. 
Indisndual Instrucoon course: contact department or 
instructor to obtain section number. 

HESP799 Master's Thesis Research 
(1-6) REG. 

Individual Instruction course: contact department or 

instnictor to obtain section number 

HESP899 Doctoral Dissertation Research 
(1-8) REG. 

[nLli\idu,Ll lastruction course: contact deparmient or 
instructor to obtain section number 

HISP Historic Preservation 

(Architecture) 

HISP619 (PermReq) Special Topics In Historic 

Preservation 

(3) REG/AUD. 
11101(10919) lUk,!. liiiie and room to be arranged 



HISP619C Special Topics In Historic Preservation 

(3) REG/AUD. 
Also offered as ARCH 488C. Credit will be granted for 
only one of the foUowing: HISP 619C or ARCH 48«C. 
0101 (17145) STAFF Time and room to be arranged 
Meet< 05/29/00-06/16/00 

HISP679 Measured Drawings for Historic 

Preservation 

(3) REG/AUD. 
0101(10951) SLAFF Tmie and Kx)m to be arranged 
Also offered as ARCH489. Credit will be granted for only 
one of the following: HISP 679 or ARCH 489. 
Thcs course may only be taken with HISP 6I9C not 
independently; will conclude in College Park June 19 - 
July 14. 

.\f«f! 06/19/00-07/14/00 

HISP700 Final Seminar in Historic Preservation 

(3) REG/AUD. 
Critical e\'aluation of project, portlbbo. or tieldwork on 
which the smdents have been working throughout the 
program; a synthesis of historic preservation process aixi 
achievvments with special focus on careers m the held. 
0101 (10962) Fbck.J Time and room to be arranged 

HIST History 

(Arts and Humanities) 

HIST111 The Medieval Worid 

(3) REG/P-F/AUD. 
CORE: Social or Pobtical History (SH) FormM)' HIST t3t. 
The development of Europe in the Middle Ages; the role of 
religious s-alues in shaping nc'w social, economic, and 
political institutions; medics^ literature, art and architecture. 
0101(11013) Rutenburg,J. MTuWThF II :0ftim- 1120pm 
(KEY 01 16) 

HIST112 The Rise of the West 1500-1789 

(3) REG/P-F/AUD. 
CORE: Humanities (HO) Formerly HIST 1)2. Historv' of 
early modem Europe. Desdopment of the tutional 
consciousness of European peoples. Evolution of state powrr 
and bureaucracT, economic instimaons. art. Uterature. science 
and religion. 

010! (11023) Bum.s.W MTuWThF 12:30pm- 1:50pm 
(KEY 0126) 

HIST156 History of the United States to 1865 
(3) REG/P-F/AUD. 

CORE: Social or K.lmcal Histon (SHI The Uratcd Sates 
ftom colonial nnics to the end of the CisilWar. 
Establishment and dewbpment of American instituDons. 
0101(11033) Hughi-s.M. MTuWThF 11 :lXliam-12:20pm 
(KEY 0103) 





HIST157 History of the United States Since 1865 
(3) REG/P-F/AUD. 

CORE: Social or Pobncal History (SH) The United States 
from the end of the Civil War to the present. Economic, 
social, intellecttial, and political developments. Rise of 
industry and emergence of the Urated States as a world 
power. 

0101(11044) Smead,E. MTuWThF9:30am-I0:50am 
(KEY 0103) 

HIST211 Women in America Since 1880 
(3) REG/P-F/AUD. 

CORE: Soaal or PoLncal Hi!,tor>- (SH) DIVERSITY Ako 
offered as H MST 2U. Credit will be granted jor only one of the 
follmnng: HIST 21 1 or IVMST 211. An examination of 
women's changing roles in working class and middle class 
famihes. the effects oi' mdustrialization on women's 
economic activities and status, and women's involvement m 
political and social struggles including those for women's 
rights, birth control, and avU rights. 
0101(11055) GuHicbon, G. MTuWThF 9:30am-10:50am 
(KEY 0126) 

HIST306 History of Religion in America 
(3) REG/P-F/AUD. 

A history of religion, religious movements, and churches in 
America from the early Colonial period to the present, with 
special attention to the relation berween church and society. 
0101(11075) Bradbury. M. MTuWThF 9:30am-l 0:50am 
(KEY 0116) 

HIST319L Special Topics In History: Latin 
American History and Film 

(3) REG/P-F/AUD. 

0101(11105) Williams,D. MW 6: 1 5pm-9:30pm 

(PLS1113) 

HIST357 Recent America: 1945-Present 
(3) REG/P-F/AUD. 

Recommended: HIST 157 or HIST 356. Credit mil txpMited 
for only one of the fotloumg: HIST 357 or HIST 367. 
American history from the inauguration of Harry S.Truman 
to the present with emphasis upon politics and foreign 
relations, but with consideration of special topics such as 
radicalism, conservatism, and labor. 
0101 (11135) Smead, H. MTuWThF 11 :00am-12:20pm 
(KEY 0125) 

HIST386 (PennReq) Experiential Learning 
(3-6) REG/P-E 

Prerequisite: permission of department. 56 semester hours. The 
History Department's Internship program. Pre-professional 
experience in historical research, analysis and writing in a 
variety of work settings. 
0101 (11146) Flack, J. Time and room to be arranged 

HIST419A (PermReq) Special Topics in History: 
Field Work Analysis 

(3) REG/P-F/AUD. 

0101 (11158) Holum, K. Time and room to be arranged 

HIST419B Special Topics in History: Archaeology 
of Roman Palestine 

(3) REG/P-F/AUD. 
OICC (11168) STAFF Time and room to be arranged 
0101 (11169) Holum, K. Time and room to be arranged 



HIST459A Society in America: Historical Topics: 
Native American Ethnohistory: 
Theories and Methods 
(3) REG/P-F/AUD. 

0101(11189) Brooks. J. TuTh 6:0Opm-9: 1 5pm 

(KEY 0125) 

HIST499 (PermReq) Independent Study: Field 

Work in Israel 

(1-3) REG/P-F/AUD. 
0101 (11210) Holum, K. Time and room to be arranged 

HIST499A (PermReq) Independent Study 
(1-3) REG/P-F/AUD. 

0101(11220) STAFF Time and room to be arranged 

HIST619A Special Topics in History: Field Work 
Analysis 
(1-3) REG/AUD. 

0101 (11232) Holum, K. Time and room to be arranged 

HIST619B (PermReq) Special Topics in History: 
Independent Study 
(1-3) REG/AUD. 

Individual Instruction course: contact department or 
instructor to obtain section number. 



HIST799 (PermReq) Master's Thesis Research 
(1-6) REG. 

Individual Instruction course: contact department or 
instructor to obtam section number. 

HIST899 (PermReq) Doctoral Dlssertatlon 
Research 
(1-8) REG. 

Individual Instruction course: contact department or 
instructor to obtain section ntimber. 

HLTH Health 

(Health and Human Performance) 

HLTH106 Drug Use and Abuse 
(3) REG/P-F/AUD. 

An inteniisciplmary analysis of contemporary drug issues 
and problems. The course will examme physiological, 
psychological, social, philosophical, histoncal, legal and 
health aspects of drug use and abuse. Special attention will 
be focused on those general motivations for drug use th.it 
attend life on the coUege campus. 

0101(11297) King.N. MTuWTh l:00pm-2:45pni 

(HHP 1302) 

HLTH140 Personal and Community Health 
(3) REG/P-F/AUD. 

Meaning and sigmficance of physical, mental and soaal 
health as related to the individual and to society; important 
phases of national health problems; constructive methods of 
promoting health of the individual and die community. 
0101(11308) Pomietto,B. MTuWTh 9:00am-10: 45am 
(HHP 0307) 



HLTH150 First Aid and Emergency Medical 
Services 

(2) REG/P-F/AUD. 

Lecture, demonstration and training in emergency care, 
including cardiopulmonary resusatation, hemorrhage 
control, shock, poisons and bone injury treatment and 
childbirth. American Red Cross and Heart Association of 
Maryland Certification awarded. 
11101(11318) STAFF TuWTh 9:00am- 10:40am 

(HHP 0302) 
0102(11319) STAFF TuTh 7:00pm-9:30pm 

(HHP 0302) 

HLTH230 Introduction to Health Behavior 

(3) REG/P-F/AUD. 

Psychological, soaal psychological, and sociological 
approaches to the following health areas: development of 
health attimdes and behavior, patient-provider interaction 
and the organization of health care. 

0101(11330) Feldman.R. MTuWTh 11 :00am- 12:45pm 
(HHP 1301) 

HLTH285 Controlling Stress and Tension 
(3) REG/P-F/AUD. 

Health problems related to stress and tension. Analysis of 
causative psychosoaal stressors and interverung physiological 
mechamsms. Emphasis on prevention and control of stress 
through techmques such as biofeedback, meditation and 
neuromuscular relaxation. 

0101 (11340) Greenberg,J. MTuWTh 9:00am-10:45am 
(HHP 1301) 
Section 0101 includes a service learning component. 
Learning will be enhanced by students' applying knowledge 
and skills learned in the class to people in need of the this 
e.\'pertise. In turn, people in need will benefit fiom this 



HLTH289 Topical Investigations 
(1-3) REG/P-F/AUD. 

Individual Instrucnon course: contact department or 
instructor to obtain section number Contact department to 
make arrangements. 

HLTH377 Human Sexuality 

(3) REG/P-F/AUD. 

Formerly HLTH 477. The biological and developmental 
aspects of human sexuality; the psychological and emotional 
aspects of se-xual behavior; sexual identity; the historical, 
cultural, social, Ungmstic, legal and moral forces affecting 
sexual issues; the importance of communication, disclosure 
and intimacy in interpersonal relationships; and research 
trends in the area of human sexuality. 
0101(11352) Sawyer,R. MTuWTh 11 :00am-12:45pm 

(HHP 1312) 
0102 (11353) Burt, J. TuTh 6:00pni-9:45pm 

(HHP 1301) 
Section 0102 includes a service learning component. 
Learrang vmU be enhanced by smdents applying knowledge 
and skills learned in the class to people in need ot the this 
expertise. In turn, people m need will benefit trom this 



38 



H W 



SUMMER? 



Summer Institute 
on Caregiving 

Caregiving in the 21st Century 

Each year the number of aging 
adults requiring part- to full-time 
care is increasing. Professional 
caregivers need to keep up-to-date 
on current trends in caregiving with 
respect to the social, ethical, legal 
and financial aspects. The non- 
professional caregiver — those caring 
for a relative or friend either 
directly or indirectly - also need to 
be acquainted with the numerous 
options and assistance available to 
them. These courses are designed 
to help both the professional and 
the non-professional cope with the 
various decisions caregivers are 
required to make. 



HLTH498F Special Topics in 
Health: Caregiving - Social and 
Ethical Aspects 

(1 cr) June 10, 17 and 24 and 

July 1 and 8 

Saturdays 9-12 Noon 

The role of the caregiver at all 

levels — from the professional 

caregiver in an institutional setting 

to the family member caring for 

someone in a home setting - will 

be discussed. Various resources 

available to the caregiver will be 

discussed. 



u 




HLTH386 (PermReq) Experiential Learning 
(3-6) REG/P-F. 

Individual Instruction course: contact dcparancnt or 
instructor to obtain section number. Prenquisite: permission of 
depamnml. 56 semester hours. Contact department to make 
arrangements. 

HLTH389 Topical Investigations 
(1-3) REG/P-F/AUD. 

Individual lastruction course: contact department or 
inscmctor to obtain section number. Contact department to 
make arrangements. 

HLTH420 (PermReq) Mcttiods and Materials in 
Health Education 

(3) REG/P-F/AUD. 

Prerequisites: HLTH 105 or }1LTH 140. The purpose of diis 
course is to present tlie interrelationships of cumculum 
planning, methodology and the selection and use of 
teaching aids and materials. Special problems associated with 
health teaching arc discussed. Smdents become familiar «nth 
a variety- of resources as well as with planning for and 
presenang demonstration lessons. 

01(11(11366) Sawyer. R. MTuWTh 9:00am-l0:45am 
(HHP 0305) 

HLTH430 Health Education In the Workplace 
(3) REG/P-F/AUD. 

A survey of the role of health education in work settings. 
Examinadon of occupanonal stress, the healdi effects of shift 
work, women's health in the workplace, health education 
approaches to informing workers and management, and 
health promotion programs m the workplace. 
0101(11376) Feldman.R. MTuVtTh l:0()pm-2:45pm 
(HHP 1.301) 

HLTH471 Women's Health 

(3) REG/P-F/AUD. 

DIVERSITY Also offered as WMST 471. Credit mil kgrailcd 
for only one of the following: HLTH 471 or IVMST 471. The 
historical, physiological, psychological, and sociological 
mechanisms which contribute to women's health. Topics 
will include gynecological concerns and reproducow health; 
nutrition, e.xercise; violence: substance ase/abuse: and the 
health of special populations. 
0101 (11396) Desmond, SMTuWTh ll:lX)am- 12:45pm 

(HHP 1302) 
0102(11397) Smison.S. MW 6:(Xlpni-9:45pm 

(HHP l.lol) 

HLTH489 (PermReq) Field Laboratory Projects 
and Workshop 

(1-6) REG/P-F/AUD. 

IntliMdual Instruction course: contact department or 
instructor to obtain section number. Contact department to 

ni.ikc .irnini:enienp 

HLTH498A Special Topics in Health: Massage 
Therapy 

(3) REG/P-F/AUD. 
0101(11411) Gilbert, G. MW 5:00pm-8:40pm 

(HHP 0302) 
0102(11412) Gilbert. G. TuTh I:(X)pm-4:40pm 

(HHP 0302) 



HLTH498F Special Topics in Health: Careglving- 
Social and Ethical Aspects 
(1) REG/P-F/AUD. 

Class meets June 10. 17. and 24 and July 1 and 8. 
0101(11445) Deren.J. Sa9KP0am-l 2:00pm 

(Amnged) 
The role of the cartgi\'CT at all le%rls-&om the professional 
caregiver in an institutional setting to the family member 
caring for someone in a home s«ting-wiD be discussed. 
Various resources available to the caregiver will be discussed 

HLTH498X Special Topics in Health: AIDS 

Education 

(3) REG/P-F/AUD. 
0101 (11413) Bernstein. J. MTuWTh 9:0Oam-I0:45am 
(HHP 1302) 

HLTH665 Health Behavior I 
(3) REG/AUD. 

The psychological, social psychological, and sociological 
theories of health behasior.The reladon of health 
knowledge, bebefe, attitudes, intenaons, and behavior to 
prewntive, illness, sick-role, and health utilizadon bchavion. 
0101 (11422) Desmond. S. TuTh 6:00pm-9:45pm 

HHP 1302) 

HLTH688 Special Problems in Health Education 
(1-6) REG/AUD. 

Indmdual Instruction course: contacT department or 
instruaor to obtam section number. Contact depanment to 
make arrangements. 

HLTH785 Internship in Health Education 
(3) REG/AUD. 

Prerequmta: (HL7H 665: and HLTH 775, md HLTH 7«0); 
or permission of depigment. The application of pmiously 
acquired skills and knowledge to the planning, conduct, and 
evaluation of health education. Emphasis on education 
designed to affect and use psychosocial influences of health 
behavior. The setting of the internship will depend upon the 
student's background and career goals. Contact department 
to make arrangements. 
0101(11433) Hyde. D Time and room to be arranged 

HLTH799 Master's Thesis Research 

(1-6) REG/S-F 
Individual Instruction course: contaa deparanent or 
instruaor to obtain section number. Contaa department to 
make amngemenls. 

HLTH899 Doctoral Dissertation Research 

(1-8) REG/S-E 
Individual InsmicDon course: contaa department or 
instruaor to obtain section number. Contaa depanment to 
make arrangements. 





Foreign Language 
Studies 

Global business and gro\ving 
immigration are making language 
skills more valuable than ever. 
Learning a second language has long 
been a priority in many Asian and 
European countries, and now 
Americans are catching up. With 
courses from beginner to advanced, 
in languages from Arabic to Urdu, 
we can help you get started or 
improve your skiUs. 

For more information: 
Tlie Language Center 

University of Maryland 
1105 Jimenez Hall 
College Park, MD 20742 
301-405-4926 

The Department of Asian and East 
European Languages and Cultures is 
pleased to present its Suinmer 2000 
intensive language programs. This 
summer take advantage of these 
special intensive language courses 
that enable you to acquire a full year 
of college-level study in the summer 
sessions. Two langviages will be 
featured: Chinese and Japanese. 

You will be able to earn 12 credits 
during the Summer Sessions and 
complete two semesters of language 
study in just 12 weeks. Upon 
successflil complerion, these 
accelerated courses will enable you 
to fulfill tlie University of Maryland 
foreign langtiage requirement. 



HONR Honors 

(Undergraduate Studies) 

H0NR238B Honors Seminar: Images of 

Masculinity in Twentieth Century 
American Literature and Film 
(3) REG. 

CORE: Literature (HL) 

0101(11494) O'Sullivan, S. MW 6:00pm-9: 1 5pni 

(PLS1158) 

H0NR248G Honors Seminar: Social and Group 
Violence in America 

(3) REG. 

CORE: Social or PobDcal History (SH) 

01(11(11504) Smcad.E. TuTh 2:aipm-5: 1 5pm 

(ANA 0120) 

H0NR379 Honors Independent Study: Discovery 
Projects in Research 
(2) REG. 

0101(11544) Cordcs,J. M 9:30am-l 1:30am 

(SQH 1119) 

Time and room to be arranged 

HORT Horticutture & 
Landscape Architecture 

(Agriculttuw and Natural Resources) 

H0RT399 Special Problems in Horticulture 
(1-2) REG/P-F/AUD. 

Individual Instruction course: contact deparmient or 
instructor to obtain section number. 

H0RT799 Master's Thesis Research 
(1-6) REG. 

Individual Instruction course: contact department or 
instructor to obtain section number. 

H0RT899 Doctoral Dissertation Research 
(1-8) REG. 

Individual Instruction coune: contact department or 
instructor to obtain section number. 

ITAL Italian 

(Arts and Humanities) 

ITAL101 Elementary Italian I 

(4) REG/P-F/AUD. 

Credit mil he granted for only one of the following: ITAL 101 or 
ITAL 121. Introduction to basic grammar and vocabulary; 
vvTitten and oral work. 

11101(11674) Fleri.M. MTuWTh 9:00am-l 1:15am 
gMZ 1226) 

ITAL386 Experiential Learning 
(3-6) REG/P-E 

Individual Instruction course; contact department or 
mstructor to obtain section number Prerequisite: Learning 
Proposal approved by the O^e of Experiential Learning Programs, 
faoilty sponsor, and student's internship sponsor. 56 semester hours. 




Intensive Course in 
Elementary and 
Intermediate Modern 
Japanese 

An accelerated intensive course of 
study designed for highly motivated 
students who vwsh to complete a 
one-year language requirement in a 
single summer. Introduces 
fundamental language skills in 
modern Japanese. Emphasizes 
conversational skills (listening, 
comprehension, and speaking), 
including grammar and 
pronunciation. Introduces reading 
and writing Hiragana, Katakana, and 
Kanji. Requires no previous 
knowledge of Japanese. Students are 
required to attend aU classes and 
complete aD assignments to maintain 
the rapid pace of this rigorous 
course. Early enrollment is advised 
in this popular intensive course. 
Admission closes as of the 
second class. 

Summer Session I: 
June 5- July 14 

JAPN 101 Elementary Japanese I 
(6 credits) 

Introduction to the basic spoken 
patterns of contemporary Japanese 
and the two phonetic syllabaries 
(katakana and hiragana). 

JAPN 201 Intermediate Japanese I 
(6 credits) 

Contemporary spoken and written 
Japanese. Prerequisite: Japanese 102 
or equivalent 



40 



HOW B 



SUMMER? 



ITAL399 Directed Study in Italian 

(1-3) S-F. 
Individual Instnicnon course: contact department or 
instructor to obtain secdon number. 

IVSP Individual Studies Program 

(Undergraduate Studies) 

IVSP317 Progress Report 

(1) S-F. 

Individu.il instruction course: contact department or 
instructor to obtain secdon number. Prm\/uiii7c; admission lo 
Il'SP major. A written anal™ of the program. Students 
register for IVSP 317 only once, die semester before die 
final term. 

IVSP318 (PermReq) Independent Learning 
Activities: Individual Studies 
(1-6) REG. 

Individual Insirucdon course: contact department or 
instructor to obtam secdon number IVSP majon only. 

IVSP420 (PermReq) Senior Paper 
(3) REG. 

Indi\'idual Instruction course: contact department or 
instruaor to obtain secdon number, hereqiiisile: admission to 
Il'SP major. For Il'SP majors only. Synthesizing final paper or 
a final special project. 

JAPN Japanese 

(Arts and Humanities) 

JAPN101 Elementary Japanese I 
(6) REG/P-E 

Inooducdon to basic patterns of contemporary spoken 
Japanese and to die two phonedc syllabaries (Katakuia and 
Hiragana). 

0101(11820) STAFF MTuWThF 9:30am- 1 2:20pm 
OMZ 0208) 

JAPN201 Intermediate Japanese I 
(6) REG/P-F/AUD. 

Prervquisile:JAI'\ 102 or equimkni. Formerly JAP!\ 205. 
Contemporary spoken and written Japanese. 
111(11(11840) STAFF MTuWThF 9:30am-I2:20pm 
OMZ 31 18) 

JOUR Journalism 

(Journalism) 

J0UR198 Survey Apprenticeship 
(1) S-E 

011)1 (11900) Paterson.J. Time and room to be arranged 
Students must meet with Assistant Dean Greig Stewart in 
JRN 1 1 17 no btcr than Fnday. June 2. 2000 to gain 
permission to enroll. 



J0UR200 Journalism History, Roles and 
Structures 

(2) REG/P-F/AUD. 

/V- or corequisileJOVR 100 ForJOiR majors onfy. 
Introducnon to die study of journalism fiom the standpoint 
of media histor\' and sooology. 

0101 (11911) Paterson.J. MW HXlpm-3:M)pm 

gRN 1 104) 

J0UR201 (PmnRaji News Writing 
and Reporting I 

(3) REG. 

ftr- or corequisiU.JOVR 101. Prmqiiisiu: }0 uvrds per mmute 
wordprtxessing ability: and grammar competency dememslrated by a 
score of 52 or higher on the TSUI" andJOLR 200. 
Intioducdon to news for the print and electioruc media, 
development of new concepts: laboratory in nesvs-gathering 
tools and writing skills. 

0101(11921) Flynn,A. MTuWThF 9:00am-10:40am 
QRN 3103) 
A 5-minute typing test is required prior to the first class. 
Students must type a minimum of 30 wpm to remain 
enrolled m the course. Must have at least 28 credits earned. 
Seek permission to enroll and take typing test in 1 1 17 JRN. 

JOUR201P News Writing and Reporting I 

(3) REG/P-F/AUD. 
Pre- or iOKquisile:JOi'R 101. Pnycqtusile: 30 uotJj per minute 
iiwdprocessing ability: and grammar compeieruy demonstraled b)' a 
score of 52 cr higher on the TSIVE and JOUR 200. 
0101(11931) Crane, S MTuWThF 9:00am- 10:40am 
([RN3111) 

J0UR202 News Editing 
(3) REG. 

Prerequisite: grade iif C or better inJOVR 201. For JOUR 
majors only. Copy editing, graphic principles and processes, 
new media technology. 

0101(11941) Flynn,A. MTuWThF 2:0Opm-3:4Opm 
gRN31in 

J0UR326 (P'TmReq) Supervised Internship - 
News Editorial 
(3) REG. 

Prerequisites: a grade of C or better m JOUR 201, JOUR 202 
and JOUR 320 and permission of department. For JOUR majors 
oiify. Supervised mternship experience with conimunic*aDon 
professionals ui ncwspapen. magazines, photojournalism. 
Reladon of academic training to professional e.\-perience. 
Not open to students first niatriculanng after May 1999. 
0101(11961) Callahan. C. Time and room to be- 

arranged Lab 
Students must gain permission to register for this course 
hem Assistant Dean drag Stewurt in JRN 1 1 17 no later 
than Friday, June 2. 2000, Students must spend a nuninium 
ol 135 hours spread owr at least a ten week period at their 
internship site. Conscquendy. grades will not be determined 
undl after die end of die first summer session. 



J0UR340 Advertising in America 
(3) REG/P-F/AUD. 

Prerequisite: grade of Cor better in JOUR 201. Scphcmore 
standing. For JOUR majors only. Survey ot' history, regulation, 
campaign strategies and advertisings role ui the public 
informanon system of the United States. 
0101(11971) ZanotE. TuTh9:0Uam-12KXlpm 

ORN 1 104) 

J0UR366 (I'rrniRuj) Supervised Internship - 
Broadcast News 
(3) REG/P-F/AUD. 

Prerequisites: a grade crfC or better inJOUR 201, JOUR 202, 
and JOUR 360 and permisston c^ depanmeni. Recommended: 
JOUH 361 for tekvisun internship For JOUR moiOTj only. 
Supcnised internship experience widi communicanon 
professionals in broadcast news. Relation of academic 
training to professional expenence. Not open to students 
first matricubting after tAxy 1999. 

0101(11981) Katcef.S. Time and room to be 

arranged Lab 
Students must gam permission to register for this course 
fiom Assistant Dean Greig Stcwan in JRN 1 1 17 no later 
than Friday. June 2. 2WI0. Students must spend a minimum 
ol 135 hours spread OTer ten wreks at their mternship site. 
Consequendy. grades will not be determmcd until after the 
end of the firsts 



J0UR376 Readings in Journalism Literature 

(3) REG/P-F/AUD. 
Prer{quisite:JOUR 320 orJOLR 360. Sol open u> studous 
who hmre completed JOUR 440. Credit uiB (if granted lor only 
one ^ the JoUouing: JOUR 376 or JOUR 440. Formerl)JOUR 
440. Analysis of books b\- journalists highly icf^ided for 
wTidng style and'or the content of their reponing, with an 
emphasis on understandmg the boob in the context of 
nadonal and international aftairs. 

0101(11991) Paterson,J. MW 4:1 5pm-7: 15pm 

ORN 1 104) 

J0UR398 Independent Study 

(1-3) REG. 
Indnidual Irttrucoon course: contact depanmcnt or 
instniaor to obtain section number. Contact department to 
make anangements. 

Consult m JRN 1 1 17 fijr section and uidex nimibcr 
corresponding to faculty member. 

J0UR451 Advertising and Society 
(3) REG/P-F/AUD. 

PrerequL<ilts:JOUR 201 and JOUR 202:orperrmssuniff 
department. Junior standing. Adsvrtismg as an institution lAith 
mamtest economic purposes and latent social effects. 
Influences of ad\rrtisiiig on people, and related issues of 
ethics and social responsibility. 

0101(12060) ZaiKK,E. TuTh 4:15pin-7:I5pm 

(JRN IIW 




(SMr: 




J0UR470 Journalism and Public Communication 
Research 

(3) REG/P-F/AUD. 

Prmquisile:A univasity slatislics course; students are encouraged to 
have compkled the theory and technique courses in their major 
sequence. Not open to students who have completed JOUR 477. 
Credit mil be granted for only one oflhefollouing:JOUR 470 or 
JOUR 477. Formerly JOUR -^yy. Journalism and public 
communication research methods used m measuring public 
opinion and media programs and materials. 
0101 (12070) Ncwhagen.J. MW 1 :00pm-4:()0pm 

(JRN 3102) 

JOUR501 (PermReq) Fundamentals of Writing 
and Editing 

(3) REG/AUD. 

Prerequisite: permission of department. Prmdples of news and 
feature writing. For graduate students with limited prior 
traimng or experience in journalism. 
0101(12080) Callahan, C. MTuWThF 9:00am-10:40am 
(JRN 3102) 

J0UR601 Theories of Journalism and Public 
Communication 

(3) REG/AUD. 

Prerequisite: pemjUsion of department. Survey and evaluation of 
current commuracanon theories. Attention is given to the 
nature and function of saentific theory, models of 
communication behavior, the namre of information, social 
functions of journalism and public communication, attitude 
change and persuasive communication and theories of 
language and meaning. 

0101 (12110) Newhagen.J. TuTh l:00pm-4:00pm 

(JRN 1102) 

JOUR620 Seminar in Public Affairs Reporting 
(3) REG/AUD. 

Prerequisile:JOUR 320. 

0101(12120) SteppC. MW9:00am-12:00pm 

gRNlI02) 

J0UR698 Special Problems in Communication 
(1-3) REG/AUD. 

Individual Instruction course; contact department or 
instructor to obtain section number 
Consult in JRN 1 1 17 for section and index number 
corresponding to faculty member 

J0UR798 Master's Professional Fieldwork 
(2-6) REG/AUD. 

Individual Instruction course: contact department or 
instructor to obtam section number 
Consult in JRN 1 1 17 for section and index number 
corresponding to faculty member 

J0UR799 Master's Thesis Research 
(1-6) REG. 

Individual Instruction course: contact department or 
instructor to obtain section number 
Consult in JRN 1 1 17 for section and mdex number 
corresponding to faculty member 



J0UR888 Doctoral Professional Field Work 
(3-9) REG/AUD. 

Individual Instruction course: conuct department or 
instructor to obtam section number 
Consult in JRN 1117 for section and index number 
corresponding to faculty member 

J0UR889 Doctoral Tutorial in Journalism and 
Public Communication 

(3-9) REG/AUD. 

Individual Instruction coune: contact department or 
instructor to obtain section number 
Consult m JRN 1 1 17 for section and mdex number 
corresponding to faculty member 

J0UR899 Doctoral Dissertation Research in 

Journalism and Mass Communication 

(1-8) REG/S-E 

Individual Instruction course: contact department or 
instructor to obtain section nimiber 
Consult m JRN 1 1 17 for section and index number 
corresponding to faculty member 

JWST Jewish Studies 

(Arts and Humanities) 

JWST499W (PmnRcq) Independent Study in 
Jewish Studies 

(1-3) REG/P-F/AUD. 

0101(12404) Holum, K. Time and room to be arranged 
This course is only available in Israel. 

KNES Kinesiology 

(Health and Human Performance) 

KNES132N Physical Education Activities: Coed: 
Badminton (Beginning) 

(1) REG/P-F/AUD. 
niOl (12464) Lee.Y. TuWTh 10:00am- 12:00pm 

(HHP 2101) Lab 

KNES1320 Physical Education Activities: Coed: 
Badminton (Intermediate) 

(1) REG/P-F/AUD. 
0101 (12474) Lee.Y. TuWTh 1 0:00am- 12:(30pm 

(HHP 2101) Lab 

KNES137N Physical Education Activities: Coed: 
Golf (Beginning) 

(1) REG/P-E 

Students must pay a $25 goll" facility fee direcdy to pro shop. 
Meets in golf" range classroom. 

0101 (12504) STAFF MTuWTh 9:30am-10:50am 

(GLF 1102) 

KNES147N Physical Education Activities: Coed: 
Scuba (Beginning) 

(2) REG/P-F/AUD. 

SmdenLs must qualify on the first day of class m order to 
stay in the class. Students must attend ALL classes. 
0101 (12515) Landers, R. MTuWTh 8:00am-10:00am 
(CRC B0120) 
TBA(CRCB0!20)Ub 



KNES154N Physical Education Activities: Coed: 
Swimming (Beginning) 
(1) REG/P-E 

0101 (12526) STAFF MTuWTh 1 :00pm-2:20pm 

(CRC B0120) 

KNES1540 Physical Education Activities: Coed: 
Swimming (Intermediate) 
(1) REG/P-F/AUD. 

0101(12537) STAFF MTuWTh 11 :30am-12:50pm 
(CRC B0120) 

KNES155N Physical Education Activities: Coed: 
Tennis (Beginning) 
(1) REG/P-E 

0101 (12548) VanderVelden.L. MTuWTh 9:30am-10:50am 
(COL 1 100) Lab 

0102(12549) VanderVelden,L. MTuWTh 11 :00am- 12:20pm 
(COL 1100) Ub 

KNES1550 Physical Education Activities: Coed: 
Tennis (Intermediate) 
(1) REG/P-E 
0101 (12560) VanderVelden,L. MTuWTh 9:30am-10:50am 
(COL 1100) 
0102(12561) VanderVelden,L. MTuWTh ll:00am-12:20pm 
(COL 1100) Lab 

KNES157N Physical Education Activities: Coed: 
Weight Training (Beginning) 
(1) REG/P-E 

0101 (12572) STAFF MTuWTh 8:00am-9;20am 

(HHP 0103) 

KNES1570 Physical Education Activities: Coed: 
Weight Training (Intermediate) 
(1) REG/P-E 

0101 (12583) STAFF MTuWTh 8:00am-9:20am 

(HHP 0103) 

KNES260 Science of Physical Activity and 
Cardiovascular Health 
(3) REG/P-F/AUD. 

CORE: Life Science (LS) Course details (1) die public 
health importance of and the processes underlymg 
cardiovascular disease, (2) the risk factors for cardiovascular 
drsease and the methods whereby they were identified, and 
(3) the prmciples of the scientific evidence supportmg the 
use of physical activity to prevent cardiovascular disease. 
0101(12594) Lindle,R. MTuWTh l:00pm-2:45pm 
(HHP 0306) 

KNES287 Sport and American Society 
(3) REG/P-F/AUD. 

Sport will be related to such social problems as deUnquency, 
segregation, coUective behavior, and leisure: to soaal 
processes such as socialization, stratification, mobility, and 
soaal control; and to those familiar social institutions the 
family, the school, the church, the military, the economy, the 
pohty. and the mass media. 

0101(12604) VanderVelden, L. TuTh 4:30pm-7:50pm 
(HHP 1303) 



42 



HOW B 



IS SUMMER? 



KNES289 (I'mnReq) Topjcal Investigations 
(1-3) REG. 

Imiividuai Instruction courtc: contact dcparniicnt or 
instnictor to obtain section number. 

KNES350 The Psychology of Sports 
(3) REG/P-F/AUD. 

An exploration ot pepionaliry factors, inclutling but not 
limited to nioti\:ition, aggression and enioDon. as the\' arieci 
sports participation and motor skill pertbrniance. 
111(11(12616) lso-Ahola,S. MW 4:3Upm-7:5l)pm 

(HHP 1303) 

KNES360 Physiology of Exercise 
(3) REG/P-F/AUD. 

ftm-ijuisito; {BSCI 201; and BSCl 202); or pcnnissim of 
dq)artmi'nt. A study of the physiology of* exercise, including 
concepts otwork, muscular contraction, energv' 
transtbrmation. metabolism, oxygen debt, and nutrition and 
athletic pertbrniance. Emphxsis on cardiovascular and 
R-spiratory hincdon in relation to physical activity' and 
training. 

01(11(12627) Hmw-n.M. MWTh 2:(K)pm-4:(K)pni 

(HHl' 2132) 

WTh ll:IK)am- 1:00pm 

(HHP 21.12) Lab 

KNES389 (i>,rmR<;iJ ToplcBl Investigations 
(1-3) REG. 

Individual Instruction course; contact dep.irtment or 
instructor to obtain section number. 

KNES389G Topical Investigations: Exercise 
Leader: Fitness Certification 
Preparation 
(3) REG/P-F/AUD. 

0101(12539) Lmdle.R, MlbWrh l(M)0am-12:IHIpm 
(HHP 0.1(16) 
Pa-requi.site: KNES 360. 

KNES389K Topical Investigations: Kinesiological 
Sciences Option - Internship 

(3) REG/P-F/AUD. 

Individual Instruction course: contact deparouent or 

instructor to obtain secDon number. 

Pa-requisite: KNES major .ind relevant KNES major cla.sses. 

KNES451 Children and Sport A Psychosocial 
Perspective 

(3) REG/P-E 

Prmqiiisila: KI^'ES 287 and KNES 350. E.\amination ot' 
youth sports from a psychosocial perspective, including the 
impact ot" highly strucmred sports on young athletes and the 
complex soci.al network of coaches, parents and peers. 
0101(12650) lirown.r. TuTh 4:30pni-7:.SOpni 

(HHP 0.106) 

KNES498 Special Topics in Kinesiology 
(3) REG/P-F/AUD. 

lndividu.il Instruction course: contact deparmiem or 
instruaor to obtain section number. 



KNES689 (I'nmiic,]) Special Problems in 
Kinesiology 

(1-3) REG. 

Individual Instniction course: contact department or 
instructor to obtain section number 

KNES799 (PermReq) IMastor's Thesis Research 
(1-6) REG. 

Individual Instruction course. LOiiUti dcp-iruncni or 
instructor to obtain section number. 

KNES899 (I'rrmReq) Doctoral Disscrtation 
Research 

(1-8) REG. 

Individual Instrucnon course: contact department or 
instructor to obtain secoon number 

LARC Landscape Architecture 

(Agriculture and Natural Resources) 

LARC451 (PermReq) Sustainable Communities 

(3) REG/P-F/AUD. 

E.\plores concepts, strategies and examples ot communit>' 
design which address the needs of a gmwing population 
while pa'sening the environment and its resounres. 
UlSF (12727) Hill, M. Time and room to be arranged 

Metis 06/OUOO-OS/W/OO 
This course meets in Monteverde. Costa Rica. Contaa M. 
Hill for information. 

LARG471 (PermReq) CapstonB studio 

(4) REG/P-F/AUD. 

CORE: Capstone (CS) l>rereqiusiies: L'iRC 420 and URC 
440 and LARC 470 For LARC majors only. A self-diitcted 
study in the area of specialization selected by the smdent. 
The goal is the completion of a landscape architectural 
project proposal written during the LARC 470 course. 
Retiuires the student to submit a final project report and 
nuke an oral presentation, open to the Monteverde 
community. 
OlSF (12738) Hill, M. Time and room to be arranged 

Meeu06/0U00-08/ 10/00 
This course meets m Montewrde, Costa Rica. Contact M. 
Hill for infbrniation. 

LARC489 (I'ermRi-q) Special Topics in Landscape 
Architecture: Sustainable Futures In 
Costa Rica 

(4) REG/P-F/AUD. 
OlSF (12749) Hill.M. Time and room to be arranged 

Meels 06/01/00-08/ 10/00 
This course meets m Montevenie, Costa Rica. Contact M. 
Hill for infbmution. 

LARC499 (PermReq) Independent Studies in 
Landscape Architecture 

(1-4) REG/P-F/AUD. 
OlSF (12761) Hill. .M. Time and mom to be .irrangcd 

.\ln-is 06/01 '00-08' 10/00 
This course meets in Montcvrrde. Costa Rica. Contact M. 
Hill for uiformation. Pivrequisitc: 12 credits in LARC or 
permission of dep.irtinent. 



LATN Latin 

(Arts and Humanities) 

LATN120 (PermReq) Intensive Latin 
(4) REG/P-F/AUD. 

Prerequisite: permission ofdq)anmetn. Sot open for cndit to 
students with credit jor LATS 102. Elc-mcnts of Latin grammar 
and Nt>cabiilar)': elementary reading. The first y«i's study of 
Latin compressed into a single semester. 
0101(12821) Staley,M. MTuWThF 9:00am- 10:40am 
fMMH 2407 A) 

LATN499 (PermReq) Independent Study in Latin 
Language and Literature 

(3) REG/P-F/AUD. 

0101(12841) Hallett.J. Time and room to be arranged 

LATN699 (PermReq) Independent Studies in Latin 
Literature 

(1-3) REG/ALT). 
0101(12852) Hallett,J. Time and room to be arnmged 

LBSC Library Science 

(Library and Information Services) 

LBSC625 (PermReq) Information Policy 
(3) REG/AUD. 

Nature, structure, de\-elopmeni and applicaaon of 
information policy. Interactions of social objecti\'es, 
stakeholders, technoltjgy and other forces that shape pobcy 
decisions. 

0101(12913) Weingarten.E MW 5;yjpm-8:45pm 

(HBK4113) 
.\ftfis 06/05/00-07/19/00 

LBSC641 a'<T>MR<.;; Selection and Evaluation of 
Instructional Media 

(3) REG/AUD. 

Prerequisite: permission (fdepartmeni. Davlopmeni of criteria 
and procedures for selecting and evaluating media tor 
instruction. S^'slenuDc planning for media use. Exploration 
of pt«ent and e\'olving issues. 

0101(12933) Neuman,M. MTuW l:00pm-4:15pm 
(HBK 0105) 
.\leeu 06/05/00-07/14/00 

LBSC650 (I'mnReqi Information Access 
(3) REG/AUD. 

Pmequisne: penmssitm i^' deparrman. InfomuQon needs, 
intbmiation interviews, question analysis, infbmution 
resources, search strategy, quen' formulation, source 
selection. 

0101(12943) White. M. TuTh 9:30am- 12:45pni 

(HBK 0103) 
Meets 05/.WOO-07/13/0O 
Requited of all MLS students. 





LBSC670 (PermReq) Information Structure 
(3) REG/AUD. 

Prerequisile: pemtission ofdq)artmetU. Knowledge analysis and 
representation; information presentation and assimilation; 
bibliographic and record control. 

0101 (12953) Green, R. MTh 9:30am-12:15pm 

(HBKOllS) 
Meets 06/01/00-07/06/00 

Sa 9:30am-12:15pm 
(HBKOllS) 
Satuiday meeting dates: 06/03/00, 06/17/00, 07/01/00. 

LBSC682 (PermReq) Management of Electronic 
Records & Information 

(3) REG/AUD. 

Role of archivists and records managen in the management 
of electronic records. Records life cycle and the impact of 
technolog)f programs for managing electronic records. 
0101 (12963) Miller, M. TuTh 5;30pm-8;45pm 

fHBK 01051 

LBSC690 (PermReq) Information Technology 
(3) REG/AUD. 

Prerequisite: permission of department. Pnnaples of information 
processmg systems; algonthms; data structures and 
inlbrmation rctnev-al techraques; system specification and 
implementation tools; apphcarions; influences on problem 
solving; technolog\' as process. 

0101(12973) Allen, R. MTh 5:30pm-8;45pm 

(HBK 0103) 
Meets 07/10/00-08/24/00 

LBSC708U (PermReq) Special Topics in Library 
and Information Service: Managerial 
Accounting 

(3) REG/AUD. 

0101(13013) Gordon, L. 



TuTh 5:30pm-8:45pm 
(HBK 4113) 



LBSC708V (PermReq) Special Topics in Library 
and Information Service: Information 
Retrieval and Resource Discovery on 
the Internet 

(3) REG/AUD. 
0101(13023) Soergel.D. TuTh 9:30am-12:15pm 

(HBK 4113) 

LBSC709 (PermReq) Independent Study 
(1-3) REG/AUD. 

bidividual Instruction course: contact department or 
instructor to obtain section number. 

LBSC725 (PermReq) Library Services for Client 
Groups with Disabilities 
(3) REG/AUD. 

Prerequisite: permission of department. Charaaenstics, abilities, 
needs, and nghts of children and adults with sensory and 
other handicappmg conditions. Role of the inlbrmanon 
specialist in providing phsMcal and mtellectual access to 
services and resources for and about these client groups. 
0101(13045) Neuman.M. MW 5:30pm-8:45pm 

(HBK 41 15) 



LBSC741 (PermReq) Seminar In School Library 
Media Programs 
(3) REG/AUD. 

Prerequisites: permission of department; and LBSC 643 or 
permission ofinstrvaor. Derelopment, management, and 
ev-aluation of school librar\' media programs at all levels. 
0101 (13065) Liesener.J. TuTh 5:30pm-8:45pm 

(HBK 0115) 
Class meets Sat.,June 24, 9 am - 4 pm. in HBK 0115. 
Meets 06/05/00-07/14/00 

LBSC745 (PermReq) Storytelling Materials and 
Techniques 

(3) REG/AtJD. 

PrertquLsite: permission of department. Literary sources and 
instruction and practice in oral techniques. 
0101 (13076) Sheldon,A. MW 5;00pm-«:15pm 

(HBKOllS) 

LBSC753 (PermReq) Information Access in the 
Social Sciences 
(3) REG/AUD. 

Prerequisite: LBSC 650 orpemiission oj instrwtor Research 
methods, information needs, information structure, and 
information sources and services in the social sciences (for 
e.'omple, andiropology, economics, education, geography, 
history, political science, psychology, sociology). 
0101(13085) White, M. TuTh 5:30pm-8;45pm 

(HBK 41 15) 

LBSC899 (PermReq) Doctoral Dissertation 

Research 

(1-8) REG, 
Individual Instrucnon course: contact department or 
instructor to obtain section number. 

LING Linguistics 

(Arts and Humanities) 

LING2(X) Introductory Linguistics 
(3) REG/P-F/AUD. 

CORE: Bchanoral and Social Science (SB) Sot open to 
students uho hai-e completed ANTH 571 or HESP 120. Ways 
of studying human language; basic concepts of modem 
linguistic analysis (sound systems, word formation. synta-\, 
meaning). The nature of human language; the soaal aspects 
of language; langu^ change; dialects; writing systems; 
language imiversals, etc. Basis for tiiture work m hnguistics. 
0101 (13166) STAFF MTuWThF 9:30am-10:50am 
(MMH 1304) 

LING499 (PermReq) Directed studies in 
Linguistics 
(3) REG/P-F/AUD. 

Individual Instruction coune: contact department or 
instructor to obtain section number. 

LING689 Independent Study 
(1-3) REG/AUD. 
0101 (13188) STAFF Time and room to be arranged 



LING698 (PermReq) Directed Study 
(3) REG. 

Individual Instruction couRe: contaa department or 
instructor to obtain secnon number. 

LING798 Research Papers In Linguistics 
(1-6) REG/AUD. 

Individual Instnicaon course; contact department or 
instructor to obtain section number 

LING799 (PermReq) Master's Thesis Research 
(1-6) REG. 

Individual Instruction course: contact department or 
instructor to obtain section number 

LING889 (PermReq) Directed Research 
(1-8) REG. 

Individual Instruction course: contaa department or 
instructor to obtain section number 

LING895 (PermReq) Doctoral Research Paper 
(6) REG. 

0101(13207) STAFF Tmie and room to be arranged 

LING899 (PermReq) Doctoral Dissertation 
Research 
(1-8) REG. 

Individual Instrucuon course: contact department or 
instructor to obtam section number 

IVIAPL Applied Mathematics 

(Computer, Mathematical 
and Physical Sciences) 

MAPL460 Computational Methods 
(3) REG/P-F/AUD. 

Prerequisites: MiTH 240 and MiTH 241 ani CMSC 105 or 
CMSC 106 or CMSC 114 or EXEE 1 14 or permission of 
imtmaor. Abo offered as CMSC 460. Credit will be granted for 
only one oftliefollounng: MiPUCMSC 460 or 
MAPL/CMSC 466. Basic computational methods for 
mterpolation. least squares, appro>amation. numerical 
quadrature, numencal solution of polynomial and 
transcendental equanons, systems of bnear equations and 
iraQal value problems for ordinary differential equations. 
Emphasis on methods and their computational properties 
rather dian their analytic aspects. Intended primarily for 
students in the physical and engineering sciences. 
0101 (13269) STAFF MTuThF 8:00am-9:20am 

(MTH B0421) 
Meets 06/05/00-07/28/00 

MAPL698A Advanced Topics in Applied 
Mathematics 
(1-4) REG/AUD. 

Individual Instruction course: contaCT department or 
instructor to obtain section number 

MAPL799 Master's Thesis Research 
(1-6) REG. 

Individual Instruction course; contaa department or 
instructor to obtain section number 



44 



HOW 



S U 



M E R ? 



/MAPL899 Doctoral Dissertation Research 

(1-8) REG. 
Individual Immiction course: contaa department or 
instnictor to obtain sccuon number. 

MATH Mathematics 

(Computer, Mathematical 
and Physical Sciences) 

MATH001 Review of High School Algebra 
(3) REG/P-F/AUD. 

Raommcndcil fcr sliidom ii'/io plan :o lake AHTH / 10 or 
MiTH 002 but are ml airrenlfy <iinilified lo do so. Speiialfee 
required in addilion lo ihe rc/iiilar luilion charge. This couree does 
not carry credit towards any decree at the Vniversity. Provides 
students with the foundation in intermediate algebra that is 
nccessar)' for the study of the tint coOege hvA nuth course, 
MATH 1 10. Topics include a review of the operations on 
real numbers, linear equations in one and two variables, 
systems of linear equations, hnear inequalities, operations on 
polynomials, factoring, applications and solutions of 
quadratic equations. 

0102(13334) STAFF MTuWThF9:30ani-IO:5()am 
(MTH 1311) 
(See fees in "Academic Services" section of tliLs guide). 

MATH002 Advanced Review of High School 
Algebra 

(3) REG/P-F/AUD. 

Recommended (or sludans who plan lo lake but who are not 
currently qualified for MATH 1 1.\ I'rcrequisile: a satis/actor)' score 
on Ihe mathematics placemeiu exam or MiTH 001 or MATH 
OOIL Special fee required in addition to the regular tuition charge. 
This course does not cany credit totvards any degree at the 
Uniivrsity. Re\ic%v of high school algebra at a faster pace and 
at a more advanced level than MATH 001. Exponents; 
polynomials; linear equations in one and t\vo variables; 
quadraDc equations; and polynomial, rational, exponential 
and logarithmic functions. 

0101 (13358) STAFF MTuWThF 8;00am-9:20am 

(MTH 0307) 
(See fees m "Academic Services" section of this guide). 

MATH110 Elementary Mathematical Models 
(3) REG/P-F/AUD. 

Pmequisile: permLtsicm ofdepanmenl based on satisfactor)' score on 
the malhemalics placement exam, or M'{TH 001 with a grade of 
C or better, or MATH 002. Not open to students majoring in 
inutliematics, engiiteering, business, life scierues, and ttie physical 
scierua. Not open to students u4io have completed jVMTH 140, 
MATH 220, or any MATH or STAT course for which .MiTH 
140 or MiTH 220 is a prerequisite. Credit will be granted for 
onl)' OKC of ihe following: .M^TH 110 or .\LiTH 1 l.l Topics 
include simple and compound interest; recursion for 
computing balances; installment loans and amomzadon; 
appmxinianng ilata by hnear models; analvMS of applications 
to real-world coUecDons of data; probabilit)'; conditional 
probability; independence; e.\pected value; graphing .ind 
.inalysis of systems of inequalides: linear progTamming and 
applications. MATH 1 10 is not open to students in the 
Engineenng and Computer, MathenuDcal, and Physical 
Sciences Colleges. 

0102 (13381) STAFF MTuWThF 9:30ani- 10:50am 

(MTH 0306) 

0103(13382) STAFF MTuVTfhF II :lK)ani- 12:20pm 

(MTH 11306) 



MATH111 Introduction to Probability 

(3) REG/P-F/AUD. 
COR£: Mathenutics or Formal Reasoning (MS) 
Prerequisite: permission ofdeparlmenl based on salisfxlory score on 
the malhemalics placement exam, or MATH 1 10, or MATH 002 
mlh a grade of Cor belter. Not open lo students majoring in 
malltemalics, engineering or the physical sciences. Noi open to 
sttidents wlio liave completed STAT 100 or any MATH or ST.4T 
course with a prerequisite of MAIH 141. Credit will he granted for 
only one of the following: i\UTH 111 or STAT 100. Logic, 
Boolean algebra, counting, probability, random vanables, 
expectation applications of die normal probability 
distribution. 

0101 (13396) STAFF MTuWThF 8:fXJam-9:20am 

(MTH 0306) 

0102(13397) STAFF MTuWThF 9:30am-10:50am 

(MTH BM21) 

MATH113 College Algebra with Applications 
(3) REG/P-F/AUD. 

l^erequisite: permission oj department kised on ^alisfactor)' scok on 
the mathematics placement exam, or M4TH 002. Not open lo 
studaits who have completed MATH 140 or M€TH 220 or any 
course for which MATH 140 or MATH 220 is a prerequisite. 
Credit will be granted for only one of the following: [) MATH 1 13 
or lit (MATH 1 10 and M.ATH 115). Graphs and applications 
of elementary tunctions including poKTiomial. rational, 
exponential and logarithmic functions. Systems of linear 
equations and linear inequalities used to solve repnesentatiw 
problems in linear programming. Matrices and nutrix 
operations including inverse. Sequences. 
0101(13411) STAFF MTuWThF 8:00am-9:20am 

(MTH 1308) 
0103(13412) STAFF MTuWThF II :0(Jani- 12.20pm 

(MTH 1308) 

MATHIISPrecalculus 

(3) REG/P-F/AUD. 

Prerequisite: permission of department based on satisfaclor)' score on 
the mathematics placaiieni exam, or AHTH 002 with a grade of 
H or lieltir, or M-iTH 1 13. Not opm to students who luiw 
completed AW7H 1 40 or any M-iTH or ST.iT course for u^liih 
.M-iTH 140 is a prerequisite. Credit will be granted for only one of 
the follouing: MATH 113 or MATH 115. Preparation for 
MATH 220 or MATH 140. Elementary functions and 
graphs: polynomi;ils, raaonal fiincnons. exponential and 
logarithmic functions, trigonometric functions. Algebraic 
techniques preparatory for calculus. 
0101 (13426) STAFF MTuWThF 8:0Oam-9:2()am 

(MTH 0106) 
0103(13427) STAFF MTuWThF 11 :00am- 12:20pm 

(MTH 1313) 



MATH140 Calculus I 

(4) REG/P-F/AUD. 
CORE: Mathcmadcs or FormaJ Reasoning (MS) 
Prerequisite: permission cf department based on 3 1/2 yetm of 
coUtge pKparatory malhanatia (inchidmg trigonometry) and a 
satisjactcrry score on the mathematics placement exam, or MATH 
1 15 with a grade of Cor better. Credit will be granted for only one 
oflliefolhumg: M-iTH 140 or AHTH 220. Introduction to 
calculus, including functions, bmits, contuiuity. derivatives 
and applications of the denv^ovc, sketching of graphs of 
functions, definite and indefinite mtegrak, and calculation of 
area. The course is especially lecommcndcd for science and 
mathematics majors. 

0101(13452) STAFF MTuWThF 8fl0am-9:20am 

(MTH 0101) 

Meets 06/05/00-07/28/00 
0102(13453) STAFF MTuWThF 9:30am-10:50am 
(MTH 0106) 

Meets 06/05/00-07/28/00 
lilM, (13454) STAFF MTuWThF 1 1:00am- 12:20pm 
(MTH 0106) 

Meets 06/05/00-07/28/00 

MATH141 Calculus II 

(4) REG/P-F/AUD. 
CORE: Mathematics or Formal Reasoning (MS) 
Prerequisite: .\L4TH 140 or equiitilent. Credit will be granted for 
only one cfthefollouing: MiTH 141 or MiTH 221. 
Continuation of MATH 140, including techniques of 
integration, improper integrals, applications of integrarion 
(such as voliunes, work, arc length, moments), imieise 
ftmctions, exponential and logarithmic functions, sequences 
and series. 

0101 (13465) STAFF MTuWThF 8flOim-9:20jm 

(MTH 01(B) 
.Wats 06/05/00-07/28/00 

0102 (13466) STAFF MTuWThF 9:30jm-10:50jm 

(MTH 0103) 
Meets 06/05/00-07/28/00 
0103(13467) STAFF MTuWThF ll:00am-12-.20pm 

(MTH 0103) 
Meets 06/05/00-07/28/00 

MATH210 Elements of Mathematics 
(4) REG/P-F/AUD. 

Pn-reqimilc: oiu- jrjr cfioUcgc pnfarauv)' algebra. Required foe 
majors in elementary education, and opat onl)- to students m this 
field. Topics fiom algebra and number theory, designed to 
provide insight into anthnienc: inductivie proof", the natural 
number system based on the IVano a.\ioms; mathemaDcal 
systems, groups, fieUs; the system of mtegeis; the sv'stem of 
rational numbers; congruence, divisibility; systems of 
numeraDon. 



0101 (13478) STAFF 



MTuWThF 8.0ajm-9:20jm 
(MTH 0104) 
Mtas 06/05/00-4)7/28/00 





MATH211 Elements of Geometry 
(4) REG/P-F/AUD. 

PKKquisite: ^lATH 210. Structure of mathematics systems, 
algebra of sets, geometrical structures, logic, measurement, 
congruence, similarity, graphs in the plane, geometry on the 
sphere. 

0101 (13489) STAFF MTuWThF 8:00am-9:20am 

(MTH1311) 
MeeL< 06/05/00-07/28/00 

MATH220 Elementary Calculus I 
(3) REG/P-F/AUD. 

CORE: Mathemancs or Formal Reasoning (MS) 
Prerequisite: pennisshn of department hosed on 3 1/2 years of 
college preparatory mathematics (including trigonometry) and 
satisfactory performance on tlie mathematics placement exam, or 
MATH 1 13, or MATH 1 15. Not open to students majoring in 
mathematics, engineering or the physical sciences. Credit will he 
granted for only one of the following: \tiTH 140 or MATH 
220. Basic ideas of differential and integral calculus, with 
emphasis on elementary techniques of differendation and 
applications. 

0101 (13500) STAFF MTuWThF 8:00am-9:20am 

(MTH 1313) 

0102 (13501) STAFF MTuWThF 9;30am- 10:50am 

(MTH 0101) 

0103(13502) STAFF MTuUThF ll:00am-12:20pm 

(MTH B0423) 

MATH221 Elementary Calculus II 

(3) REG/P-F/AUD. 

CORE: Mathemancs or Formal Reasoning (MS) 
PrerequisiU: MATH 220, or MiTH 140, or equivalent. Not 
open to students majoring in mathematics, engineering or the 
physical sciences. Credit will he granted for only one of tlie following: 
MiTH 141 or MiTH 221. Differential and integral 
calculus, \vidi emphasis on elementary techniques of 
integration and applications. 
0102 (13516) STAFF MTu^^•ThF 9:30am-10:50am 

(MTH 0411) 
0103(13517) STAFF MTuWThF 11 :00am-12:20pm 

(MTH 0411) 

MATH240 Introduction to Linear Algebra 

(4) REG/P-F/AUD. 

Prerequisite: MATH 141 or equu-alem. Credit will be granted for 
only one of the follouwg: AL-ITH 240 or .VMTH 400 or 
M-iTH 461. Basic concepts of linear algebra: veaor spaces, 
applicaQons to line and plane geometry, linear equations and 
matrices, similar matnces, Imear transformations, eigenvalues, 
determinants and quadratic forms. 

0103(13529) STAFF MTuWThF ll:00am-12:20pm 
(MTH 0307) 
Meets 06/05/00-07/28/00 

MATH241 Calculus III 

(4) REG/P-F/AUD. 

Prerequisites: MATH 141 and arty one of the folloumg: MiTH 
240 or ENES 102 or PHYS 161 or PHYS 171. Introduction 
to multivariable calculus, including vectors and vector- 
valued functions, partial derivatives and applications of 
partial deris'atives (such as tangent planes and Lagrange 
mulnpliers), multiple integrals, volume, surface area, and the 
classical theorems of Green, Stokes and Gauss. 
0102 (13540) STAFF MTuWThF 9:30am-10:50am 
(MTH 0201) 
Meets 06/05/00-07/28/00 



MATH246 Differential Equations for Scientists 
and Engineers 
(3) REG/P-F/AUD. 

Prerequisite: .\HTH 141 and any one of the f^llouing: MiTH 
240 or ENES 102 or PH\'S 161 or PH\'S 171. An 
introduction to the basic methods of soKing ordmar^^ 
differential equations. Eqiutions of hrst and second order, 
linear differential equations, Laplace transforms, numcncal 
methods, and the qualitative theory of differential equations. 
0103(13551) STAFF MTuWThF 11 :00am- 12:20pm 
(MTH B0421) 

MATH401 Applications of Linear Algebra 
(3) REG/P-F/AUD. 

PrerequL'ite: AUTH 240 or MiTH 461. Vanous applications 
of linear algebra: theory of finite games, linear programming, 
matrix methods as applied to finite Markov chains, random 
walk, incidence matrices, graphs and direaed graphs, 
networks, transportaoon problems. 
0103(13564) STAFF MTuWThF 11 :00am-12:20pm 
(MTH 0101) 

MATH410 (PermReq) Advanced Calculus I 
(3) REG/P-F/AUD. 

Prerequisites: MiTH 240 and MiTH 24 1 with a grade of C or 
better. Not open to students u^w haiv completed MATH 350. 
First semester of a year course. Subjects covered durmg the 
year are: sequences and series of numben, continuiry and 
differentiability' of real valued hincnons of one variable, the 
Rieman mtegral, sequences of ftincnons, and power series. 
Functions of several variables including partial derivatives, 
multiple integrals, line and surface integrals. The implicit 
fimction theorem. Meets 8 weeks 4 days per week. 
0102 (13584) STAFF MTuThF 9:30am- 10:50am 

(MTH 1308) 
.Meets 06/05.WO-07/28/00 

MATH411 Advanced Calculus II 
(3) REG/P-F/AUD. 

Prerequisite: MiTH 410. Not open to sludmts who liaiv 
completed MiTH 350 and MiTH 351. Credit will be granted 
for only one of the following: MiTH 411 or MiTH 412. 
Continuation of MATH 410. 

0102 (13594) STAFF MTuThF 9:30am-10:50am 

(MTH 0102) 
Meets 06/05/00-07/28/00 

MATH461 Linear Algebra for Scientists and 
Engineers 
(3) REG/P-F/AUD. 

Prerequisites: MiTH 141 and one MATH/STAT course for 
which MiTH 141 is a prerequisite. This course cannot be used 
toward tlie upper leivl math requirements for MiTH/ST.iT 
majors. Credit uill he granted for only one of the folloumg: MiTH 
240, MiTH 400 or MiTH 461. Basic concepts of Imear 
algebra. This course is similar to MATH 240, but with more 
extensive coverage of the topics needed in applied linear 
algebra: change of basis, complex eigenvalues, 
diagonalization, the JonJan canonical form. 
0102 (13604) STAFF MTuWThF 9:30am-10:50am 
(MTH 0105) 



MATH462 Partial Differential Equations for 
Scientists and Engineers 

(3) REG/P-F/AUD. 

Prerequisita: .MiTH 241: and .MiTH 246. Credit will be 
granted for only one of tire following: MiTH 462 or MiTH 
415. Lmear spaces and operators, orthogonality, Sturm- 
Liouville problems and eigenfiincnon expansions for 
ordinar\- differential equations, introduction to partial 
differential equanons, includmg the heat equation, w^ve 
equation and Laplace's equanon, boiindarv' \"alue problems, 
initial valus problems, and minal-boundarv \-alue problems. 
0101 (13616) STAFF MTuWThF 8:00am-9:20am 

(MTH 0102) 

MATH478A (PermReq) Selected Topics For 
Teachers of Mathematics 

(1-3) REG/P-F/AUD. 
0101 (13636) STAFF Time and room to be arranged 

MATH498A Selected Topics in Mathematics 
(1-9) REG/P-F/AUD. 

Individual Instrucoon course: contact department or 
instructor to obtain secnon number 

MATH648A Selected Topics in Analysis 
(1-3) REG/AUD. 

0101(13648) STVF Time and room to be arranged 

MATH668A Selected Topics in Complex Analysis 

(1-3) REG/AUD. 
0101 (13659) STAFF Time and room to be arranged 

MATH718A Selected Topics in Mathematical 
Logic 

(1-3) REG/AUD. 
0101 (13670) STAFF Time and room to be arranged 

MATH748A Selected Topics in Geometry and 
Topology 

(1-3) REG/AUD. 

0101(13681) STAFF Tune and room to be arranged 

MATH799 Master's Thesis Research 
(1-6) REG. 

Individual Instruction course: contact department or 
instructor to obtain section number 

MATH899 Doctoral Dissertation Research 
(1-8) REG. 

Individual Instruction course: contacT department or 
instructor to obtain section number 

MEES Marine-Estuarine- 
Environmental Sciences 

(Life Sciences) 

MEES608E Seminar in Marine-Estuarine- 

Environmental Sciences: Theories of 
Science/Values In Science I 

(1) REG. 

0101 (13745) Tenore, K. Tu 9:00am-10:30am 

(Arranged) 
Corequisite: MEES 608F (see Summer Session II page 90) 



46 



HOW B 



IS SUMMER? 



MEES699 Special Problems in Marine-Estuarine- 
Environmental Sciences 
(1-3) REG/AUD. 

Individual Instnicrioii course; contact department or 
instructor to obtain section number. 

MEES799 Masters Thesis Research 
(1-6) REG. 

ninl (13757) STAFI I une and room to be arranged 

MEES899 Doctoral Dissertation Research 
(1-8) REG. 

0101(13769) STAFF Time and room to be arranged 

METO Meteorology 

(Computer, Mathematical 
and Physical Sciences) 

MET0499 Special Problems in Atmospheric 
Science 
(1-3) REG/P-F/AUD. 

individual Instruction course: contact department or 
instructor to obtain section number. 

MET0798 Directed Graduate Research 

(1-3) S-E 
Individual Instruction course: contaa department or 
insmictor to obtain section number. 

MET0899 Doctoral Dissertation Research 
(1-8) S-E 

Individual Instruction course: contact department or 
instructor to obtain section number. 



M0CB899 Doctoral Dissertation Research 

(1-8) S-E 
Individual Instruction course: contact department or 
instructor to obtam section number. 

MUET Ethnomusicoiogy 

(Arts and Humanities) 

MUET210 The Impact of Music on Life 

(3) REG. 
COI<^: History or Theory of Arts (HA) UIVEl^ITY 
Cndil will be granted for only one of tlie following: MVSC 210 or 
MUET 210. Formerly MUSC 210. Music as a part of 
cultuiv. Materials drawn from traditions throughout the 
globe to illustrate issues of historical and conteniporar\' 
significance, including the impact of race, class and gender 
on the study of music. 

0101(14048) STAFF MTuWTh 10:00am-l 1:40am 
(TWS 2138) 

Meeu 06/05/00-07/16/00 
0102 (14049) STAFF MTuWTh 12:30pm-2:10pm 

(TWS 2123) 

Meeli 06/05/00-07/16/00 

MUSC School of Music 

(Arts and Humanities) 

MUSC106 Beginning Classical Guitar Class 
(2) REG/P-F/AUD. 

Introduction to classical guitar notaoon, technique, literature 

and performance. No previous musical experience required. 

0101 (14101) Cavallaro,G. MTuWTh 12:00pm-l:40pm 

(TWS 2138) 



MUSC155 Fundamentals for the Classroom 
Teacher 
(3) REG/P-F/AUD. 

Open 10 students majoring in pre-early childhood eduatim. pre- 
ekmenutry education, eUmtnUry edualim, or childhood eduation: 
other students take Kfl'SC 150. Credit uiU be granted Jot only 
oneofthefollouing:MUSC 150 or MUSC 155. The 
fundamentals of music theory and practice, related to the 
needs of the classroom and jdndergaiten teacher, and 
oiginizcd in accoidance with the six-area concqx of 
musical learning. 

0101 (14135) STAFF MTuWTh 8;30am-10:10am 

(TWS 3238) 

MUSC248 Selected Topics in Music: History of 
Rock Music, 1950 to Present 
(3) REG/P-F/AUD. 

0101(14145) Jenkins, C. MTuWTh l:OOpm-2:40pm 
(TWS 31 16) 

MUSC388 (PcrmReq) Music iRtemshlp 
(3) REG. 

Individual Instruction course: contaa department or 
instructor to obtain section number. 

MUSC389 ti>crmReq) Music Intcmship Analysis 
(1) REG. 

Individual Instruction course: contaa department or 
instructor to obtam section number. 

MUSC448 (PcrmReq) Selected Topics in Music 
(1-3) REG/P-F/AUD. 

Individual Instruction course: contaa department or 
instruaor to obtam section number. 



MICB Microbiology 

(Life Sciences) 

MICB688 Special Topics 

(1-4) REG/AUD. 
Individual Instruction course: contaa department or 
instructor to obtain section number. 

MICB799 Master's Thesis Research 
(1-6) REG. 

IndiMtiua] Instrucdon course: contact departnietu or 
instructor to obtain secoon imnibcr. 

MICB899 Doctoral Dissertation Research 
(1-8) REG. 

In(iividudl lastruction course: contact department or 
instruaor to obtain section number. 

MOCB Molecular and Cell Biology 

(Life Sciences) 

M0CB699 Laboratory Rotation 

(2-3) S-E 
OIUl (13975) STAFF Time and room to be arranged 



MUSC130 Survey of Music Literature 
(3) REG/P-F/AUD. 

CORE: History or Theory of Arts (HA) Open to all students 
except music and music education majors. A study of the 
principles upon which music is based, and an introduction 
to the musical repertorv- perfonned in America today 
0101(14111) Beicken,S. MTuWTh 9:00am-10:40am 
(TWS 2123) 

MUSC140 Music Fundamentals I 
(3) REG/P-F/AUD. 

CORE: History orTheorv' of Arts (HA) Limited to non-music 
majors. Introductory theory course. Notation, scales, intervals, 
triads, rhvthm, form, and basic aural skills. 
0101(14122) ST.\FF MTuWTh 11 :«)am- 12:40pm 

(TWS 2102) 
0102(14123) STAFF MTuWTh l:00pm-2:40pm 

(TWS 2135) 



MUSC448A (PermReq) Selected Topics in Music: 
Jazz Improvisation 

(1) REG/P-E 

0101(14161) Vadala.C. MTuWThF 9:Oaam-12:(Xlpm 
(TWS 1102) 
.Meeu 06/05/00-06/09/00 

MUSC448C Selected Topics in Music: Rule 
Masterclass 2000 

(2) REG/AUD. 

0101 (14171) Montgomery, W. MTuWThFSaSu 

10K)aam-10:00 (TWS 1125) 
Metis 07/0S/0O-07/16/OO 

MUSC499 (PermReq) Independent Studies 
(2-3) REG/P-F/.UT). 

Individual Instruction course: contact department or 
instruaor to obtain section number. 

MUSC699 Selected Topics in Music 

(1-3) REG/AUD. 
Individual Instruction course: contaa department or 
instruaor to oboin seax>n number. 




/^ogik 




MUSC699C Selected Topics in Music: Flute 
Masterclass 2000 

(2) REG/AUD. 

mm (14185) Montgomery, W. MTuWThFSaSu 

10:00am-10:00 (TWS 1125) 
Meets 07/08/00-07/16/00 

MUSC799 Master's Thesis Research 
(1-6) REG. 

Individual Instruction course: contact department or 
instructor to obtain section number 

MUSC899 Doctoral Dissertation Research 
(1-8) REG. 

Individual Instruction course: contact department or 
instructor to obtain secdon number 

NFSC Nutrition and Food Science 

(Agriculture and Natural Resources) 

The following courses may involve the use of ammak. 
Students who are concerned about the use of animals in 
teaching have the responsibility to contact the instructor, 
prior to course enrollment, to determine whether animals 
are to be used in the course, whether class exercises 
involving animals are optional or required and what 
alternaaves, if any, are available. 

NFSC100 Elements of Nutrition 

(3) REG/P-F/AUD. 

CORE: Life Science (LS) Fonm-rly NIITR 100. 
Fundamentals of human nutrition. Nutrient requirements 
related to changing individual and family needs. 
0101(14248) Jackson, R. MWF 9:30am-10:50am 

(PLSIUI) 
TuTh 9:30am-10:50am 
(PLSnil)Dis 
0102 (14249) Jachon, R. MWF 9:30am-10:50am 

(PLS 1 1 1 1) 
MW Il:00am-12:20pm 
(PLS 1115) Dis 

NFSC399 (PermReq) Special Problems in Food 
Science 

(1-3) REG/P-F/AUD. 

Individual Instrucdon course: contact department or 
instructor to obtam secDon number 

NFSC490 (PerinRe<i) Special Problems in 
Nutrition 

(2-3) REG/P-F/AUD. 

PmequisiSes: NFSC 440 and permission of depanmenl. Formerly 
NUTR 490. Individually selected problems in the area of 
human nutrition. 
0101 (14273) STAFF Time and room to be arranged 

NFSC678A (PermReq) Selected Topics in Nutrition 

(1-6) REG/AUD. 
0101 (14284) STAFF Time and room to be arranged 



NFSC699 (PermReq) Problems in Nutrition and 
Food Science 

(1-4) REG/AUD. 

Individual Instruction course: contact department or 
instructor to obtain section number 

NFSC799 (PermReq) Mastor's Thesis Research 
(1-6) REG/S-E 

Individual Instruction course: contact department or 
instructor to obtain section number. 

NFSCSeg (PermReq) Doctoral DissertatloH 
Research 

(1-8) REG/S-E 

Individual Instruction coune: contact department or 
instructor to obtain section number 



NRIVIT Natural Resources 
Management 

(Agriculture and Natural Resources) 

NRMT389 (PermReq) IntOmship 

(3) S-E 

0101(14350) Kangas, P Time and room to be arranged 

NRMT489 (PermReq) Field Experience 

(1-4) REG/P-F/AUD. 
0101 (14360) Kangas, P Tmie and room to be arranged 

PBIO Plant Biology 

(Life Sciences) 

PBI0699 (PermReq) Special Problems in Plant 
Biology 

(1-3) REG/AUD. 

Individual Instruction course: contact department or 
instructor to obtain section number. 

PBI0799 (PermReq) Master's Thesis Research 
(1-6) REG/S-E 

Individual Instruction course: conuct deparmient or 
instructor to obtain section number. 

PBI0899 (PermReq) Doctoral Dissertation 
Research 
(1-8) REG/S-E 

Individual Instruction course: contact department or 
instructor to obtain section number 

PHIL Philosophy 

(Arts and Humanities) 

PHIL170 Introduction to Logic 
(3) REG/P-F/AUD. 

CORE: Mathematics or Formal Reasoning (MS) 
Development of analytical reasoning skills dirough study of 
formal logics, reasoning systems, and fallacious uiference 
patterns. 

0101(14487) Julien,A. MTuWThF 9:30am-10:50am 
(SKN 1112) 



Philosophy at Maryland 

Summer provides the perfect 
opportunity to explore new 
subject content and if you have 
an unusual degree of intellectual 
curiosity, philosophy may be the 
subject for you. Philosophers are 
the original intellectual 
omnivores: within Maryland's 
department, there are 
philosophers whose work deals 
with music, biology, painting, 
policy, physics, rehgion, 
linguistics, psychology, geology, 
computer science and many 
other fields, as well. Courses 
often cross disciphnary 
boundaries and deal with 
material firom a variety of 
subjects. For the Summer 2000 
the Philosophy Department has 
put together a series of courses 
that are unique and provide a 
once-in-a-hfetime opportunity 
to tackle in depth a subject of 
timely interest. A sampUng of 
this summer's offerings include 
the following. A full hsting of 
offerings for the summer and 
specific times and locations can 
be found under the Philosophy 
rubric on pages 48 - 49 
(Summer Session I); pages 91 -92 
(Summer Session II) and 
pages 101 (Summer Session III). 



H W 



IS SUMMER? 



PHIL308I Studies in Contemporary Ptiilosophy: 
Abduction and "The X-Files" 

(3) REG/P-F/AUD. 

01111(14517) Nelson, U. TuWTh 2:30pm-4:45pm 

(SKN 1115) 
An." you a Mulder-penon or i Scully-pcRon? Are you open 
to the "rcalni of extreme possibility" or do you put your 
faith in todays science? This sununer, m "Abduction and 
'The X-Files'," wc'U attempt to aawer: which of these 
perspective, -the Midder-perspective or the ScuUy- 
perspective -is mote rational? To succeed in this task we will 
consider basic issues about the natua' of knowledge; 
infervnce to the best explanation (a.k.a. abducuve inference 
or abducDon); and. the dilierence, if any, between science 
and pseudoscience.To facilitate our exploration of these 
issues we will spend some time viewing episodes of "The 
X-Files." which provide numerous, non-technical examples 

PHIL308J Studies in Contemporary Philosophy: 
Human Rights: Fact or Fiction? 

(3) REG/P-F/AUD. 
0101 (14527) Letkowitz. D. MTuWTli 12:3llpin-2:ll)pm 
(SKN 1115) 
Throughout die world, people use the language of rights in 
pobocal and moral arguments. But when is the use of rights 
talk legimnate, and when is it a lot of "hot .iir"? Do 
indl\^duals, groups, or both have rights? Do tix;es have 
rights? What about ammals or unborn generations? Is there 
a right to a nunimal level of wt'll-being? Is tlierc a right to 
adequate leisure tmie (as contamed in the U.N. Declaration 
of Human Rights)? In this class we will examine the 
answers philosophers h.ive offered to questions like these, 
and apply them to contemporary issues such as the 
environment, abortion, and health care. 

PHIL342 Moral Problems in Medicine 
(3) REG/P-F/AUD. 

Pitreijuisile: PHIL 100. PHIL 140, or pentmsim nf Jifartmnil. 
A critical examination of the moral dimensions of decision- 
making in health related contexts. Readings are drawn from 
philosophical, medical, and other sources. 
01111(14567) Dougherty, J. TuWTh 7;(X)pm-9:I5pm 
(SKN 1115) 

PHIL408E Topics in Contemporary Philosophy: 
Existentialism 

(3) REG/P-F/AUD. 

0101(14587) Slote,M. TuWTh 10:(X)am- 12; 15pm 

(SKN 1116) 
E.xisiennalisni h.is had a major impact on die tliought of the 
20tli century, mtluencing literature, psychology, philosophy, 
and theology. This course tocuses on some of the most 
important e.xistenriaUsis — notably. Kierkegaard, Nietzsche, 
Heidegger. Pascal, and Sartre — and e.\amines their seminal 
contribunons hbioricaliy, cTirically. and with an eye to 
currtnt intellectual developments. This course is intended 
for students fiom a wide variety of backgrounds and docs 
not presuppose e.xtensive knowledge of philosophy 

PHIL498W Topical Investigations 
(1-3) REG/P-F/AUD. 

Hlnl (14597) STAFF 1 iiiie and mom to be arranged 

PHIL688W Selected Problems in Philosophy 
(1-3) REG/AUD. 

(11(11(14617) SIAFF 1 line .ind n.om to be arninged 



PHIL788W Research in Philosophy 
(1-6) REG/AUD. 

0101(14637) STAFF Time and room to be arranged 

PHIL799 Master's Thesis Research 

(1-6) REG. 
Individual Instnicoon coune; contact department or 
Instructor to obtain section number Contact department to 
make arrangements. 

PHIL899 Doctoral Dissertation Research 
(1-8) REG. 

Individual Instruction course; contact deparmient or 
mstructor to obtain section number. Contact department to 
make arrangementj. 

PHYS Physics 

(Computer, Mathematical 
and Physical Sciences) 

PHYS121 Fundamentals of Physics I 
(4) REG/P-F/AUD. 

CORE; Phv-sical Science Lib (PL) Prmquisilc: prmom loum 
uvrk in trigmometry or M-iTH 1 IS. The first part of a two- 
semester course in general physics treating the fields of 
mechanics, heat, sound, electricity, magnetism, optics, and 
modem physics. Together with PHYS 122. this generally 
satisfies the minimum requirement of medical and dental 
schools. 

0101(14710) Restorff.K. MTuWThF 9:30am- 10;50am 

(PHY HIO) 

TuTh 12;CH:)pm-2;OOpm 

a'HY 3306) Lab 

MW ll;(K)am-ll;50am 

(PHY 4208) Dis 

0102(14711) Restorff.K. MTuWThF 9;30am-10;50am 

(PHY 1410) 

TuTh 2;(X»pm-4;(Klpm 

(PHY 3306) Ub 

TuTh l;00pm-l;50pm 

(CHE 2145) Dis 

PHYS122 Fundamentals of Physics II 
(4) REG/P-F/AUD. 

CORE: Physical Science Lab (PL) Prmqumle: PfA'S 121 or 
equiivlenl. A continuation of PHYS 121, which together 
with It, generally satisfies the minimum requirement of 
medical and dental schools. 

0101(14723) Rapport. M. MTuWThF 9;30am-10:50am 

(PHY 0405) 

TuTh 12;a)pm-2:(X)pm 

(PHY 3316) Ub 

MWll:0(lam- 11 :50am 

(PHY 0405) Dis 

0102(14724) Rapport, M. MTuWThF 9:3(kim-10;50im 

(PHY 0405) 

TuTh 2;00pm-4*0pm 

(PHY .1316) Lab 

TuTI) l;IK)pm-l;.50pm 

(CHE 2136) Dis 



PHIL 308! Abduction and 

"The X Files" 
June 5 - July 14 

Are you a Mulder-person or a 
Scully-person? Are you open to 
the "realm of extreme 
possibility" or do you put your 
faith in today's science? This 
summer, in "Abduction and 'The 
X-Files'," we'll attempt to 
answer: which of these 
perspectives, the Mulder- 
perspective or the Scully- 
perspective, is more rational? To 
succeed in this task we will 
consider basic issues about the 
nature of knowledge; inference 
to the best explanation (a.k.a. 
abductive inference or 
abduction); and, the difference, if 
any, between science and 
pseudoscience. To facilitate our 
exploration of these issues we 
will spend some time viewing 
episodes of "The X-Files," which 
provide numerous, non-technical 
examples. 



J 



PHYS161 General Physics: Mechanics and 
Particle Dynamics 

(3) REG/P-F/AUD. 
CORE; Physical Science (I'S) ftr- or nwijuisiir: MATH 141. 
Crttlit ui/; ru)( he grmled (or PhTi'S 171 md PH^-S 161 w 
PHYS 141 orfmmr PhTlS 191. First semester of a thire- 
semester calculus-based general physics coune. Ljws of 
motion, force, and energy; prmaplcs of mechanics, 
collisions, hnear momentum, rotation, and grasicaDon. 
0101(14737) Richards, H. MTuWTliF 9:30am-10:50jm 
(PHY 1402) 
MWIIflOara-nKXlpm 
(PHY 1402) D» 





PHYS263 General Physics: Electrodynamics, 

Light, Relativity and Modern Physics 

(4) REG/P-F/AUD. 

CORE: Physical Science Lab (PL) I'rmqiiiMe: PHYS 262^ 
Credit mil tuti hefflititedfor PhPi'S 273 and PH\'S 2bi or 
former PfA'S 293. Third semester of a three -semester 
calculus-based general physics course. Electrodynamics, 
Maxwell s equations, and electromagnetic waves; geometncal 
optics; interference and diSbcrions; special theory of 
relativity; and modern physics. 

0101 (14759) Nasser, L. MTuWThF 9:30am-10:50am 

(PHY 4220) 

MW l:00pm-4:00pm 

(PHY 3220) Lab 

MW 11 :00am- 12:00pm 

(PHY 4220) Dis 

PHYS299 (PermReq) Special Problems in Physics 
(1-6) REG/P-F/AUD. 

Individual InstrucDon course: contact department or 
instructor to obtain secnon number. 

PHYS399 (PermReq) Special Problems in Physics 
(1-3) REG/P-F/AUD. 

Individual Instruction course: contact department or 
instructor to obtain section nimiber. 



PHYS429 Atomic and Nuclear Physics 
Laboratory 

(3) REG/P-F/AUD. 

Tliis coune meets entire Suiruner Session 1 plus the first 
rwo weeb of Summer Session 11. 

0101(14773) Gammon, R. MTu l:00pm-6:00pm 

(PHY 3112) Lab 
Meels 06/05/00-07/28/00 

PHYS499 (PermReq) Special Problems in Physics 
(1-16) REG/P-F/AUD. 

Individual Instruction course: contact department or 
instructor to obtain section number 

PHYS621 Graduate Laboratory 
(3) REG/AUD. 

Prerequisite: PHYS 405 or equiivknt. Design and performance 
of advanced experunents in modern and classical physics. 
The course meets entire Summer Session 1 plus the first 
four weeb of Summer Session 11. 

0101(14785) Gammon, R. MTu l:00pm-6:00pm 

(PHY 31 12) 
Meets 06/05/00-08/10/00 

PHYS798 (PermReq) Special Problems in 
Advanced Physics 
(1-3) REG/AUD. 

Individual InstrucDon course: contact department or 
instructor to obtain section number. Contact department to 
make arrangements. 

PHYS799 (PermReq) Master's Thesis Research 
(1-6) REG. 

Individual Instruction course: contact deparmrent or 
instructor to obtain section number. 



PHYS899 (PermReq) Doctoral Dissertation 
Research 
(1-8) REG. 

Individual Instruction course: contact department or 
instructor to obtain section number. 

PSYC Psychology 

(Behavioral and Social Sciences) 

The following courses may mvolve die use of animals. 
Students who are concerned about die use of animals in 
teaching have the responsibility to contact the instructor, 
prior to course enrollment, to determme whether animals 
are to be used m the course, whether class e.xercises 
involving ammals are optional or required and what 
alternatives, if any, are available. 
The Department of Psychology enforces prerequisites. 
Students who do not meet course prerequisites will be 
administratively dropped fiom the course. 

PSYC100 Introduction to Psychology 
(3) REG/P-F/AUD. 

CORE; Behavioral and Social Science (SB) A basic 
introductory course, intended to bring the student mto 
contact with the major problems confionting psychology 
and the more miportant attempts at their solution. 
0101(14850) Smith. B. MTuWThF 9:30am-10:50am 
(BPS 1243) 

PSYC200 (PermReq) Statistical Methods in 
Psychology 
(3) REG/P-F/AUD. 

Prereqmite: PSYC 100: ami MATH HI or MATH 140 or 
M'iTI-l 220. A basic introduction to quanntadvc methods 
used in psychological research. 

0101(14860) Brittan-Powell, C. MW 9:00am-12:20pm 
(BPS 2283) 

PSYC221 Social Psychology 

(3) REG/P-F/AUD. 

Prerequisite: PSYC WO. The influence of social factors on 
the mdividual and on mterpersonal behavior. Includes topics 
such .15 conformity, attitude change, person perception, 
interpersonal attracoon, and group behavior. 
0101(14871) Sechrist,G. TuTh l:00pm-4:20pm 

(BPS 1243) 

PSYC235 Psychology of Adjustment 
(3) REG/P-F/AUD. 

Prerequisite: PSYC 100. Theory and research on the 
psychology of penonal adjustment m everyday life, with an 
emphasis on self-concept, emotions, self-control, 
interpersonal relations, and stress. 

0101(14882) Smith,B. MTuWThF 11 :00am- 12:20pm 
(BPS 1236) 



PSYC301 Biological Basis of Behavior 
(3) REG/P-F/AUD. 

Prerequisites: BSCl 105 mtd PSYC 100. An inttoducnon to 
the anatomical strucwres and physiological processes that 
determine behavior. After a smdy of the basic fimctioning of 
the nervous system, the coune will examine the acquisition 
and processing of sensory information, the neural control of 
movement, and the biological bases of complex behaviors 
such as sleep, learning, memory, sex, language, and addiction. 
01(11 (14892) HaU. F TuTh 4:00pm-7:20pm 

(BPS 2283) 

PSYC336 Psychology of Women 
(3) REG/P-F/AUD. 

Prertquisile: PSYC 100. .Also offered ,ts 11- MST 336 Credit will 
be granted for only one ojihejolloums: PSYC 336 or K'MST 
336. A survey of the biology, life span development, 
socialization, personality, mental health, and special issues of 
women. 

0101 (14922) Goldberg,]. TuTh 9:0nam-12:20pm 

(BPS 2283) 

PSYC341 Introduction to Memory and Cognition 
(3) REG/P-F/AUD. 

Prerequisite: PSYC 100. An mtroducnon to the basic models, 
methods of research, and findings m memory, problem 
solving, and language and their applications. 
0101(14933) Wolff, R MW 12:30pm-3:50pm 

(BPS 2283) 

PSYC434 Severe Mental Disorders: Etiology and 
Treatment 

(3) REG/P-F/AUD. 

Prerequisites: PSYC 200. and PSYC 301, and PSYC 353, or 
permission of department. Examines multiple perspectives on 
severe mental illnesses such as schizophrema and the major 
affective disorders. Integrates the biological findings with the 
human experience of these illnesses, theu" cultural and socio- 
pobtical aspects, and their psychological, pharmacological, 
and social service treatments. Opporrumty is provided for 
interacting with persons suffenng fiom these illnesses. 
0101(14974) Coursey,R. MW l:0(.)pm-4:20pm 

(BPS 1124) 

PSYC436 Introduction to Clinical Psychology 
(3) REG/P-F/AUD. 

Prerequisite: PSYC 200 or equivalent. Cntical analysis of 
cbmcal psychology, with particular emphasis on current 
developments and trends. 

0101 (14984) Couisey, R. TuTh 5:00pm-8:20pm 

(BPS 1236) 

PSYC469H Honors Thesis Proposal Preparation 
(1-3) REG/P-F/AUD. 

0101(14994) STAFF Time and reiom to be arranged 

PSYC478 (PermReq) Independent Study in 
Psychology 

(1-3) REG/P-F/AUD. 

Individual Instruction course: contact department or 
instructor to obtain section nimiber. 

PSYC479 (PermReq) Special Research Problems 
in Psychology 

(1-3) REG/P-F/AUD. 

Individual Instruction course: contact department or 
instructor to obtain section number. 



50 



H W 



IS SUMMER? 



PSYC499H Honors Thesis Research 
(3) REG/P-F/AUD. 

(1101 (15009) STAFF Time and room to be arranged 

PSYC619 (PermReq) Research Team in 

Clinical/Community Psychology 
(1-3) REG/AUD. 

0101 (15020) STAFF Time and room to be arranged 

PSYC788 Special Research Problems 

(1-4) REG/AUD. 
Individiul Instruction coune: contact department or 
instructor to obtain section number 

PSYC789 Special Research Problems 
(1-4) REG/AUD. 

Individual Instruction course; contact department or 
instructor to obtain section number 

PSYC799 Master's Thesis Research 
(1-6) REG. 

Individual Instruction course: contact department or 
instructor to obtain section number 

PSYC899 Doctoral Dissertation Research 

(1-8) REG. 
Individual Instrucaon course: contact deporunent or 
instructor to obtain section number 



PUAF Public Affairs 

(Public Affairs) 

PUAF610 Quantitative Methods in Policy Analysis 
(3) REG/AUD. 

For PL'Al- majors only or pmnL<siorj of dt-piirtnifni. An 
incioducoon to the use of statistical and mathematical 
analysis of public policy problems utilizing skills in statistics, 
probability theory, computer programming, and regression 
analysis. RecogniDon of uiaccurate analyses and the use of 
available tools in die construction of models 
0101(15088) Rame\-,0. M 6:40pm- 10:00pm 

(VMH 1 107) 
Meets 06/05/00-08/14/00 

PUAF620 Political Analysis 

(3) REG/AUD. 

Ivr PI 'Ai- majors only or permission of department. Examination 
of politics as a process for allocating scarce itsources among 
claimants for pubbc beneBts. Comparison of the allocaove 
model of politics widi odier distnbutivc processes, such as 
markets. Cximpanson of the model with behavior of 
different pobtical instituDons, such as C'ongress and the 
presidenc)'. Study of poliucs as a process ssith distinctive 
concepts of rationaLty The traaslanon of voter and interest 
group prc-feienccs into public choices. The impaa of 
political dccisioas on competing consatuenacs. 
0101(15098) Mallino,D. TuTh 6:40pm-I0:(K)pm 

(VMH 1107) 
Meets 06/05/00-08/17/00 



PUAF650 Normative Analysis 
(3) REG/AUD. 

For PUAF majors only orpermissim of department The 
normative or philosophical issues invoK'ed in public policy 
issues: the Imuts and uselulness of decision making took like 
cost/benefit analysis; problems of choosing, justifying and 
using cntena to judge a program's success and/or 
appnapnateness; and questioas of personal condua. 
ConsideraDon of such pobcy problems as tan&, income 
distribution, and reverse drscrimination. 
0101(15108) FulLnmder,R. M 3:00pm-6:20pm 

(VMH 1107) 
Meets 06/05/00-08/14/00 

PUAF670 Finance 

(3) REG/AUD. 

For PUAF majors only or pcmmsion of department. Introduction 
to principles of resource allocation over time, role of debt in 
context ot changing sources of governmental revenues, 
long- and short-term debt instruments, analysis of mixed 
public-private economic development projects, leasing, and 
the impact of borrowing devices. 

0101(15118) Slater, S. TuTh 3:00pm-6:20pm 

(VMH 1 1 07) 
Meets 06/07/00-08/25/00 

PUAF798B Readings in Public Policy 
(1-3) REG/AUD. 

Individual Instruction course: contact department or 
instructor to obtain section number. For PU^F majors only 

PUAF899 Doctoral Dissertation Research 
(1-8) REG. 

Individual Instruction couise: contact department or 
instructor to obtain section number 

RUSS Russian 

(Arts and Humanities) 

RUSS386 (PermReq) Experiential Learning 
(3-6) REG/P-E 

Prerequmie: permission of department. 56 senKSter lioiirs. 

nmi (15224) Martin. C. Time and room to be arranged 

RUSS499 Independent Study in Russian 

(1-3) REG. 
0101 (15235) Martin, C. Time and room to be arranged 

RUSS798 Independent Study 

(1-3) REG/AUD. 
Individual Instruction course: contact department or 
instructor to obtain section number 

SOCY Sociology 

(Behavioral and Social Sciences) 

SOCYKX) Introduction to Sociology 
(3) REG/P-F/AUD. 

CORE: Uehauoral and Social Science (SB) The 
fundamental concepts .uid principles of sociology. Includes 
consideration of culture, patterns of social uiteracQon, 
norms, values, social insti(uDons. stntificanon. and social 
change. 

0101(15297) STAFF MTuWTh 11 :(X)am- 12:40pm 
(ASY 2309) 



S0CY105 Introduction to Contemporary Social 
Problems 

(3) REG/P-F/AUD. 

CORE: Behavioral and Social Saence (SB) An examination 
of contemporary social ptodeins through soookigical 
perspectives; vrays in which social problems arc pan of the 
organization of society; a detailed study of selected social 
problems including social conllia and social inequabty. 
0101(15308) Zamara-Moghadam. L. MTu\HTh 

9KI0jni-10:40am 
(ASY 3203) 

S0CY203 Sociological Theory 
(3) REG/P-F/AUD. 

Prerequisite: SOCY 100. Development of the saence of 
sociology; historical backgrounds; recent theories of sodety 
Required of aU sociology majon. 

0101(15328) Korwraewncz, R. TuTh 9:00am- 12:20pm 
(.ASY 3207) 

S0CY325 The Sociology of Gender 

(3) REG/P-F/AUD. 
I )rVERSITY I'rerequisite: i credits c^ saaolcgy. Also offatd as 
IW/ST 325. Credit uifl he granted for only one cfthefblloumg: 
SOCY 325 or HMST 325 Insntunonal bases of gender 
roles and gender inequaUt); cultural perspectivrs on gender, 
gender socialization, feminism, and gender-role change. 
Emphasis on contemporary American society. 
0101 (15348) Hunt,J. MTuWTh 1 :00pm-2:40pm 

(.^SY 3207) 

S0CY380 Honors Independent Reading in 
Sociology 

(3) REG/P-E 

Prerequisiu: permission W Ajxinmou Fotmeriy SOCY 378. This 
course permits soaology honor students to undertake i 
program or reading on a particular problem in soaolog\' or 
a subfield therem.The reading will be done under the 
supervision of a member of the sociology faculty. Required 
of soaology honor students. 
0101 (15359) STAFF Tune and rtwm to be arranged 

S0CY381 Honors Independent Research in 
Sociology 

(3) REG/P-E 

Prerequisite: SOCY 380. Rmnerl)' SOC\' 388 This course 
pernuts sociology students to de6ne a particular problem in 
sooology or a subfield therein and to develop a research 
plan for use as a thesis topic. The vwork will be done under 
the supervision of a member of the soaology tacults'. 
111111(15370) STAFF Time and room to be ananged 

S0CY383 Honors Thesis Research 
(3) REG/P-F 

Prerrquisile: SOCY 381 KmnCTfy SOCY 389. Student 
research under the direction of a member of the soaokigy 
facultv. culnuTUtmg ui die presentation and defense of a 
thesis reporting the research. 
0101 (15381) STAFF Time and room to be arranged 





S0CY386 (PermReq) Experiential Learning 
(3-6) REG/P-F. 

Individual Instruction course: contact department or 
instructor to obtain section number. PrerequisiU: pmnission of 
department. 56 semester hours. 

S0CY399 (PnmRcq) Independent Study in 
Sociology 
(1-6) REG/P-F/ AUD. 

Individual Instruction course: conuct department or 
instructor to obtain section number 

S0CY430 Social Structure and Identity 
(3) REG/P-F/AUD. 

Prerequisite: 6 aedits ofsoaolo^' or perniissum of departtnent. 
Theoretical issues in social ps\'chology', focusing on social 
construction of identity. Identity formation and 
transformation in social process. Structural and cultural 
dimensions of social identitv: 

0101(15406) Hunt.L. MW 9:00am-12:20pm 

(ASY 1213) 

S0CY441 Social Stratification and Inequality 
(3) REG/P-F/AUD. 

Prerequisite: 6 credits oj sociology or permission of department. 
Junior standing. The sociological study of social class, status, 
and power. Topics include theories of stracificarion, correlates 
of soaal position, tuncnons and d\^luncnoiis of social 
inequality, status mconsistency, and soaal mobility. 
0101(15416) Pease, J. TuWTh l:00pm-3:15pm 

(ASY 3203) 

S0CY498C Selected Topics in Sociology: 
Sociology of Sexuality 
(3) REG/P-F/AUD. 

0101(15446) Moore. L. TuTh 6:00pm-9:20pm 

(ASY 1213) 
Examines the theoretical and macro-level insotutions that 
shape our percepaons of se.V gender and sexuality as we 
enter the 21st century. Explores the social construction of 
sexuabty in Amenca as it intersects with gender, 
race/ethradty, class, violence, media, family, economy, and 
globalization 

S0CY699 Special Social Problems 
(1-16) REG/AUD. 

Individual Instruction course: contact department or 
instructor to obtam section number. 

S0CY799 Master's Thesis Research 
(1-6) REG. 

Individual Instrucnon course: contact department or 
instruaor to obtain section number. 



S0CY899 Doctoral Dissertation Research 
(1-8) REG. 

Individual Instruction course: contact department or 
instructor to obtain section number. 



SPAN Spanish 

(Arts and Humanities) 

The language of instruction in all courses is Spanish unless 
otherwise noted. 

SPAN101 Elementary Spanish I 
(4) REG/P-F/AUD. 

Prerequisite: So previous Spanish: high school level 1 Spanish with 
grade of A or B; high school level 2 Spanish uHth a grade ofCor 
below. Not open to natiiv/Jluent speakers of Spanish. Introduction 
to die fiinctions and structures of the Spanish language, with 
emphasis on the four skills of listening, speaking, reading and 
wxiting. 

0101(15511) Lacone.J. MTuWTh 9:30am-ll:45ani 
gMZ 2207) 

SPAN102 Elementary Spanish II 
(4) REG/P-F/AUD. 

Prerequmie: SP.-l-V 101 ai i'MCP or cqmwlent. Not open to 
native/fluent speakers of Spanish. Further study of the fimctions 
and structures of the Spanish language, with emphasis on the 
four skills of listening, speaking, readmg and wntmg. 
0101(15522) Mende2,C. MTuWTh 9:30am-l 1:45am 
gMZ 0103) 

SPAN201 Intermediate Spanish 
(4) REG/P-F/AUD. 

CORE: Humaranes (HO) Prerequisite: SPAN 102 or SPAN 
103 at UMCP or high school leivl i Spanish with a grade c>fA or 
B or high school la'el 4 Spanish with a C or heloiv. Not open to 
native/fluent speakers of Spanish. Formerly SPAN 203. 
Continued development of the functions and structures of 
the Spanish language with emphasis on the tour skills of 
listening, speakmg. reading, and writmg. 
0101(15533) Wemgarten,L. MTuWTh 9:30am- 11 :45ani 
gMZ 2206) 

SPAN202 Intermediate Grammar and 
Composition 
(3) REG/P-F/AUD. 

CORE: Humaiunes (HO) Pivrcquisile: SPAN 201 or high 
school leivl 4 or 5 uith a grade of A or B or permission of 
department. Not open to native /fluent speakers of Spanish. 
Formerly SPAN 204. An in-depdi study and analysis of 
selected grammatical topics with emphasis on composinon, 
writing and reading. 

0101(15545) Roman. C. TuTh 6:00pm-9:15pni 

QMZ 1215) 

SPAN224 Violence and Resistance in the 
Americas 
(3) REG/P-F/AUD. 

CORE: Literature (HL) DIVERSITY Indigenous vision of 
violence and resistance m the Amencas. Texts and maps hora 
the European exploren and conquerors arc also studied. 
Readings include primary texts from the 16di as well as 
fram the 20th cenmn: AD readings are in English. No 
Spamsh is required. 

0101(15555) Merediz.E. TuTh l:00pm-4: 15pm 

QMZ 2207) 



SPAN311 Advanced Conversation I 
(3) REG/P-F/AUD. 

Prerequisite: SPAN 202 or SPAN 21 1 or permission of 
department. Not open to native. /fluent speakers of Spanish. 
Further development of listening and speaking skills m 
Spanish. Opportumt)' to develop oral fluency, improve 
pronunaation and mcrease vocabulary. Indi\idual and/or 
group oral presentations. 

0101(15586) Roman. C. MW 6:00pm-9:15pm 

gMZ 2207) 

SPAN386 (PermReii) Experiential Learning 
(3-6) REG/P-E 

Prerequisite: permission oj department. 56 semester hours. 
111(11(15617) STAFF Tmie and room to be arranged 

SPAN699 Independent Study in Spanish 
(1-3) REG/AUD. 

IndiMdual Instruction course: contact department or 
instructor to obtain section number 

SPAN798 Open Seminar: Exploring Latin America 
in the New Century: National 
Identities in the Era of Globalization 
(3) REG/AUD. 

0101(15711) Sosnowski.S. MTuWThF 8:30ani-l :30pm 
QMZ 0122) 
This course is specially designed for educators. 
MeeU 06/26/00-07/07/00 

SPAN799 Master's Thesis Research 
(1-6) REG. 

Indisadual Instruction course: contact department or 
instructor to obtain section number. 

SPAN899 Doctoral Dissertation Research 

(1-8) REG. 
Indi\idual Instrucnon course: contact department or 
instructor to obtain section number. 

STAT Statistics and Probability 

(Computer, Mathematical 
and Physical Sciences) 

STAT100 Elementary Statistics and Probability 
(3) REG/P-F/AUD. 

CORE: Mathematics or Formal Reasorung (MS) 
Prerequisite: permission oj Math Department based on satisfaaory 
score on Math plaeemeru exam or MiTH 110 or .V1-17H / 15. 
Not open to students who have completed MiTH 111 or any 
M-\TH or STAT course with a prerequisite ofM-{TH 141. 
Credit iiill be granted for only c^ne of the folbuing: M-ITH 111 or 
STAT 100. Smiplest tests of statistical hv-potheses; 
applications to before-and-after and matched pair studies. 
Events, probability combinations, independence. Binomial 
probabilities, confidence limits. Random \'anables, expected 
values, median, variance. Tests based on ranks. Ljw of large 
numbers, normal approximation. Estimates of mean and 
variance. 

0101 (15774) STAFF MTuWThF 8:00am-9:20am 

(MTH 0105) 



52 



H W 



SUMMER? 



STAT400 Applied Probability and Statistics I 
(3) REG/P-F/AUD. 

Prm'quisite: MATH 14i. Not aaeptdble ujward graduate degrees 
in STAT, XIAPL, or MATH. Credit will he granted for only one 
of the follmmg: STAT 400 or ENEE 324. Random variables, 
standard distributions, moments, law of large numbers and 
central limit theorem. Sampling methods, estimation of 
parameters, testing of hypotheses. 
0102(15786) STAFF MTuWThF9:30am-10:50am 

(MTH 0307) 
011)3(15787) STAFF MTuWThF 11 :lX)am- 12:20pm 

(MTH 0105) 

STAT798A Selected Topics in Statistics 
(1-4) REG/AUD. 

01(11(15799) SIAll Time jnd room to be arranged 

STAT799 Master's Thesis Research 
(1-6) REG. 

Individual Instruction course: contact department or 
instructor to obtain secDon number 

STAT899 Doctoral Dissertation Research 

(1-8) REG. 
Individual Instnicnon course: contact departnieni or 
instructor to obtain secdon number 

SURV Survey Methodology 

(Behavioral and Social Sciences) 

SURV623 Data Collection Methods in Survey 
Research 
(3) REG/AUD. 

Review of aJtemadve data collection methods u.sed in 
survey's, concentrating on the impact these techmques have 
on the quality of sun-e\' data, mcludmg measurement error 
properties, levels of nonresponse and coverage error 
Reviews of the literature on major mode comparisons 
(face-to-face interMewing, telephone survey and sell- 
administered questionnaires), and alternative collection 
methods (diaries, administrative records, direct observation, 
etc.). The statistical and social saence bteratures on 
intcrvle^^er effects and nonresponse, and current advances in 
computer-assisted telephone interviewing (CATI), 
computer-assisted personal interviewing (CAPI), and other 
methods such as touchtone data entry (TDE) and voice 
recognition (VRE). 

0101(15943) STAFF TuTh 5; 1 5pm-8;00pm 

(LEF 2166) 
Meets 06/08'00-07/29/00 

SURV625 Applied Sampling 
(3) REG/AUD. 

Prerequisite: statistics ivunc appnnvd by the department. Practical 
aspects of sample design. Topics include: probability samphng 
(including simple random, systcnianc, stntilied, dastcred, 
multisuge .uid t\vo-phasc sampbng methods), sampling with 
probabilities proportional to size, area sampling, telephone 
sampling, ratio estimation, samphng error estimation, frame 
problems, nona-sponse, and cost factors. Coune is team 
taught by James Lepkowski and Roger Tourangeau. 
0101(15953) Lcpkowski,J. MW 6: 1 5pm-9:tX)pm 

(LEF 1208) 
Meets 06/05/00-07/26/00 



SURV699 ii'trmReqi Special Topics in Survey 

Methodology 

(1-4) REG/AUD. 
0101 (15963) Groves. R Time and room to be arranged 

SURV699A Special Topics in Survey 

Methodology: Advanced Issues in 
Questionnaire Design 
(1) REG/AUD. 

0101(15973) Krosnick.;. MTuWThF 3:00pm-6:00pm 
(LEF 1208) 
Meets 06/19/00-06/23/00 

SURV699B Special Topics in Survey 

Methodology: Introduction to Small 
Area Estimation 
(1) REG/AUD. 

0101(15983) Lahiri. 1' MTuWThF 3:00pm-6:lX)pm 
(LEF 1208) 
MeeU 06/26/00-06/30/00 

SURV699K Special Topics in Survey 

Methodology: Multi-level Analysis of 
Survey Data 

(3) REG/AUD. 

0101(15995) Croninger.R. MTuWThF 10:30am-12:30pm 
(LEF 1208) 
Meat O/i Oh LHt-llh W IHI 

SURV722 Randomized/Nonrandomized Design 
(3) REG/AUD. 

Prerequisite: SURl ' 625. Research designs from which causal 
inferences are sought. Classical experimental design will be 
contrasted with quasi-expenments. evaluation studies, and 
other observational study designs. Emphasis placed on how- 
design feamres impact the nature of statistical estimation and 
inference trom the designs. Issues of blocking, balancing, 
repeated measures, control strategies, etc. 
0101(16003) Davion.C. TuTh 5:30pm-8: 15pm 

(LEF 1201) 
Meeu 06/03/00-07/11/00 

THET Theatre 

(Arts and Humanities) 

THET110 Introduction to the Theatre 
(3) REG/P-F/AUD. 

CORE: Histor.' orTheon' of Arts (HA) Introduction to the 
people of the theatre: actors, direaors, designers and 
backstage personnel. The core and charaaerisocs of a pla\' 
scnpt: theatrical forms and styles; and theatre histor\'. 
0101 (16053) Schuler.C. MTuWThF Il:00am-I2:20pm 
{TWS2228) 

THET386 (PermReq) Experiential Learning 
(3-6) REG/P-E 

Individual Instruction course: contaa department or 
instructor to obtain section number Prerequisite: permssiem o)' 
department. 56 semester hours. 

THET499 (PirmReq) Independent Study 
(3) REG. 

Indindual Instnicnon course: contact department or 
instructor to obtam section number. 



THET499P Independent Study: Puppetry 
Workshop 

(3) REG/P-F/AUD. 
0101 (16078) Cotter, M. TuTh 9K)Oam-12.-O0pm 

(TWS223fi) 
Work with the direaor of the number one children s theatre 
in this area: the Blue Sky Puppet Theatre. Michael Coaer 
will take students through production and pcrfonrunce of 
their own original material in this exating. student 
oriented, class that is perfect for teachers, musicians, wntcis. 
and theatre majors. 

THET669F Independent Study 
(1-3) REG/AUD. 
0101(16088) Hebert,M. Time and room to be arranged 

THET789 (PemReq) Master's Practicum 

(1-6) REG/AUD. 
Individual Instruction course: contaa department or 
instructor to obtain section number. 

THET799 (PermReq) Master's Thesis Research 

(1-6) REG. 
Individual Instruction coui%: contaa department or 
instruaor to obtain section number. 

THET899 Doctoral Dissertation Research 
(1-8) REG/AUD. 

Individual Instruction course: contaa department or 
instruaor to obtain section number. 

UMEI Maryland English Institute 

(Arts and Humanities) 

For additional noncredit Maryland English Institute coimes, 
turn to the "Noncredit Courses and Special Evrnts" section 
of this giude. 

UMEI001 (PcrmRtq) English as a Foreign 
Language: Beginning 
(12) S-E 
Intensive course for the non-rutivr speaker of English who 
has litde or no previous knowledge of English. Focus on the 
rapid acquisinon of the basic features of English giamnur 
and pronunaadon and on speaking and understanding 
American English; reading and wnting appropriate to the 
level will be mcluded. Special fee re<)uired for this course. 
This course does not cany credit towards am' degree at the 
Umveisit)' and does not count in the letcndon plan. 
0101(16153) Gia>;H. MTuWThF 9;OOam-12K)0pin 
(ARCII2I) 
MTuWThF IO0pm-3fl0pcn 
(ARC1121) 
Meets 06i 19/00-08/11/00 
0102(16154) STAFF Time and room to be amngcd 

Meets06il9IOO-08/]VOO 
(See fees in "Academic Services" section of this guide.) 





The Maryland English Institute 

Background 

Gaining comfort with the language supports academic and social adjustnient. 
Through a range of programs, from full-time intensive language courses in 
English to courses in improving pronunciation, the Maryland English Institute 
enables students from non-English speaking countries to improve their language 
skills. At the same time, through such programs as Speaking Partners and 
Welcome Home to Maryland, American students and host families gain 
knowledge of other cultures and customs while they share conversations and a 
taste of American home life. 

At the University of Maryland, the Maryland English Institute (MEI) has 
become a leader and innovator in teaching non-native speakers of EngUsh. 
MEI has developed over the last 15 years into a ftiU-service language training 
center with an outstanding faculr\' and sophisticated techjiological tools for 
language training in the Washington, D.C. - Baltimore, Maryland area. 

Each of our instructors has a master's degree in linguistics, teaching EngUsh as a 
second language (TESL), or a related field. Most are fluent in one or more 
other languages, and all have extensive classroom teaching experience. Within 
MEI, there are experts in the assessment of Enghsh language proficiency and in 
the custom design of programs or workshops to meet specific language needs. 

MEI offers, in addition to regularly scheduled intensive and semi-intensive 
courses, specially tailored English language and orientation programs for groups 
of non-native speakers of English. These are offered either on campus or at oS- 
campus locations and range from one-day language evaluations to short and 
long-term instructional courses that focus on the particular needs of a given 
group. 

Accommodation for visiting groups during the summer are in apartment suites 
on campus, with dining services provided in a fashionable contemporary "mini- 
mall" of food choices. All fees for room and board are included in the course 
registration. 



UMEI002 (PermReq) English as a Foreign 
Language: Intermediate I 

(12) S-F. 

Intensive course for the non-naove speaker of EngUsh who 
has had some previous instruction in English. Emphasis on 
improving listening and speaking skills, on mastering 
intermediate granimaDcal structures, and on expanding 
vocabulary. Includes practice in reading and \\Titing 
appropriate to the level. Special fee required for this course. 
This course does not carry credit towards any degree at the 
University and does not count in the retention plan. 

0101 (16164) Kilday, K. MTuWThF 9:00am-12:00pm 

(ARC 1123) 

MTuWThF l:00pm-3:00pm 

(ARC 1123) 

0102 (16165) STAFF Time and room to be arranged 

Meeu 06/19/00-08/11/00 
(See fees in "Academic Senices" section of this guide.) 



UMEI003 {PermReq) English as a Foreign 
Language: Intermediate II 

(12) S-F. 
Intensive cour5e tor the non-native speaker of English who 
has mastered the essential structures of English grammar. 
Emphasis on impro\Tng communicative skills for a wide 
range of Unguisdc simadons. on rapid expansion of 
vocabulary, and on impro\ing reading comprehension and 
basic writing skills. Speaal fee required for this course. This 
course does not carry credit towards any degree at the 
University' and does not count in the retention plan. 
0101 (16175) Baker. M. MTuWThF 10:00am- 12:00pm 
(TWS 2212) 
MTuWThF l:00pm-3:00pm 
(TWS 2212) 
Meels 06/19/00-08/11/00 
0102(16176) STAFF Time and room to be arranged 

Meeis 06/19/00-08/11/00 
(See fees in "Academic Services" section of this guide.) 



UMEI004 (PermReq) English as a Foreign 
Language: Intermediate III 

(12) S-R 

Intensive course for the non-native speaker ot English who 
has a good command of the basic features of spoken and 
ssTitten English. Emphasis on refinmg speaking and listemng 
skills, on impro\Tng reading speed and comprehension of 
academic texts, and on developing wnting skills for 
academic courses. Speaal fee required for this course. This 
course does not cany credit towards any degree at the 
Uraversity and does not count m the retention plan. 
111111(16186) Taylor, K. MTuWThF 9:00am- 11 :00am 
(TWS 2228) 
MTuWThF l:00pni-3:00pm 
(TWS 2228) 
Meels 06/19/00-08/11/00 
01(12(16187) Wiltshire, C. MTuWThF 9:00am- 12 :00pm 
(PLS 1158) 
MTuWThF l:00pm-3:00pm 
(PLS 1158) 
Meels 06/19/00-08/11/00 
(111)3(16188) AndeRon,J. MTuWThF 9:00am- 12:00pm 
(COL 3114) 
MTuWThF l:00pm-3:00pni 
(COL 31 14) 
Meets 06/19/00-08/11/00 
(See tees in "Academic Services" section of this guide.) 



UNIV World Courses 

(Undergraduate Studies) 

UNIV099 (PermReq) Internship Seminar 

(No credit) S-E 
nidi (16249) Kenyon,V 
arranged 

Permisiion of Co-op Coordinalor required. Obtain signature and 
more information at the Career Center, 3 1 00 Hombake 
Library'. Speaal fee required for this course. (See fees in 
"Academic Senices" section of this guide.) 



Time and room to be 



URSP Urban Studies and Planning 

(Architecture) 

URSP399I (PermReq) Independent Study 
(1-3) REG/P-F/AUD. 

Indisidual instruction course: contact department or 
instructor to obtain section number. 

URSP681 Urban Planning Law 
(3) REG/AUD. 

Credit mil he granted loi only one of tlieJoHouing: CRSP 681, 
I'RBS 450, or CRBS 681. FomeHy URBS 681. Survey of 
the urban legal environment. Issues of planning, zoning, 
eminent domain, land use controls, housing codes, historic 
preservation and related ta.\ provisions. 
011)1(16302) Kanna,S. MW 7:00pm-9:30pm 

(ARC 1121) 



54 



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IS S U 



M E R ? 



The Curriculum: 

The Intensive English Program 

(June 19 - August 11) 

The MEI intensive program offers: 

• Six levels of tuU-riine English language instruction 

• Twent\'-t\vo hours of instruction weekly 

• A student-teacher ratio averaging 16 - fallowing each student maximum 
opportunity for active participation 

• Classes in grammar amd writing, reading, listening comprehension and oral 
assignments 

• Summer program in June, July and August for eight weeks 

MEI s program is student centered. Faculty' and admmistrators are flexible in 
designing and adapting courses and curricula to meet students' needs. For 
example, at the highest level, students may take a course entided "Strategies for 
College Success." This class gives students an in-depth look at the college 
application process in the United States and exposes students to American 
campus life through hands-on activities, seminars featuring guest speakers from 
the Maryland campus, and interactive assignments. 

Curricula vary by level to match students' proficiency levels, stages of language 
acquisition and sociolinguistic needs. Teachers within a level work together to 
track individual student progress and make instructional changes as needed. 

For additional information regarding times, locations, costs, see Department UMEI in 
the "Courses Offerings" tab of this guide. 

New Course Summer Sessions 2000 

English for Professional Communication 

(June 20 - August 1) 

English for Professional Communication is a si.x-week course tailored to meet 
the needs of individuals interested in advancing their ability to communicate in 
writing for the workplace. Participants learn how to write clear, concise letters, 
memoranda, and reports in English., Topics include how to identify the essential 
message, select a correct word, decide what style and tone to use, and write 
grammatically correct sentences. The course is practice based and highly 
interactive. Participants receive frequent written and oral feedback so they can 
apply what they learn right away. The course meets in the evenings for 2 1/2 
hours twice per week for six weeks at the College Park campus. For additional 
information about the MEI and/or for application and registration materials, call 
The Maryland English Institute at 301-403-0346. 



URSP703 (PirmRuD Community Planning Field 

Instruction and Practicum 

(3-6) REG. 
Pmtjuisita. VRSP 600, L'RSP 601, LRSP 604, URSP 605 
or perniissim fiem the Pmgam. For .MCP iru^ors only. Fomrrly 
VRBS 703. Concepts and ideas thai Yaw shaped the 
profession, current planning issues. Professional expenence as 
intern in planning office. Weckl>- seminars focus on practical. 
theoT^acal, professional and ethical issues arising during 
inieniship.This couiw is part one of a 6-CTtdit course, final 
3 credits to be completed in Summer Session II. Students 
must sign up for both Summer Sessions I and II. 
1)101(16322) Baum.H. Tu 7KX)pm-9;30pm 

(CAR 0100) 
Time and room to be arranged Dis 

URSP705 Summer Community Planning Studio I 
(4) REG/AUD. 

iMul (16324) Bross-er, S. Time and room lo be amnp.*d 

URSP788 (PermReq) Independent Study in Urtan 
Studies and Planning: Independent 
Study in Urban Studies and Planning 
(1-3) REG. 

[ndindual Instruction course: contact department or 
instruaor to obtain section number. 

URSP798 (PtTmRcq) Readings in Urban Studies 

and Planning 

(1-3) REG. 
Indixidual Instruction course: contaa department or 

instructor to obtain section number. 

URSP799 (PermReq) Master's Thesis Research 
(1-6) REG/S-F. 

Indisidual Instruction course: contaa department or 
instructor to obtain section number. 

VMSC Veterinary Medical 
Sciences 

(AgricultuFe and Natural Resources) 

VMSC799 Thesis Research 

(1-6) REG. 
Indi\idual Instruction course: contaa department or 
instructor to obtain section number. 

VMSC899 Dissertation Research 

(1-8) REG. 
Indi\-idual Instruction course: contaa department or 
mstructor to obtam secaon number. 





mm 




WMST Women's Studies 

(Arts and Humanities) 

WMST211 Women in America Since 1880 
(3) REG/P-F/AUD. 

CORE: Social or Polincal History (SH) DIVERSITY Ako 
offered as HIST 211. Credil will he granted Jor oidy om of the 
folloumg: II7V/ST 211 or HIST 211. An exanimarion of 
women's changing roles in working class and middle class 
families, the effects of indListriali2ation on women's 
economic activines and status, and women's involvement in 
political and social struggles, including those for women's 
rights, birth control, and civil rights. 

11101(16438) Gullicbon.G. MTuWThF 9:30am-IO:50am 
(KEY 0126) 

WI\/IST250 Introduction to Women's Studies: 
Women, Art and Culture 

(3) REG/P-F/AUD. 

CORE: History or Theory of Arts (HA) DIVERSITY An 
examination of women's creaave powers as expressed m 
selected examples of music, film, art, drama, poetry, fiction, 
and other literature. E.xplores women's creadvity in reladon 
to families, religion, education, ethmcity, class, sexuality, and 
within a cultural tradition shaped by women. 
0101(16448) STAFF MW 6:00pm-9:15pm 

(WDS 2101R) 

WMST255 Introduction to Literature by Women 
(3) REG/P-F/AUD. 

CORE: Literature (HL) DIVERSITY Also offered as ENGL 
250. Credit will be granted for only one of the following: W^'tST 
255 or ENGL 250. Images of women in literature by and 
about women. 

0101(16458) Ryan.L. MW 9:00am- 12: 15pm 

(ARC 1 105) 

WMST275 World Literature by Women 
(3) REG. 

CORE: Literature (HL) DIVERSITY Also offered as CMLT 
275. Credit wiit be granted for only one of the following: VIMST 
215 or CMLT 275. Comparative study of selected worb by 
women writers of several countries, explormg points of 
intersection and divergence in women's literary 
representanons. 

0101(16469) MoneU. TuTh 6:00pm-9:15pm 

(SQH 2120) 



WMST325 The Sociology of Gender 
(3) REG/P-F/AUD. 

DIVERSITY Prerequisite: 5 credits of sociology. Abo offered as 
SOCY 325. Credit will be granted for only one of the jollowing: 
WMST 325 or SOCY 325. Institunonal bases of gender 
roles and gender inequality, cultural perspectives on gender, 
gender socialization, leminism, and gender-role change. 
Emphasis on contemporary American society. 
0101 (16480) Hunt, J. MTuWTh 1 :00pm-2:40pm 

(ASY 3207) 

WMST336 Psychology of Women 
(3) REG/P-F/AUD. 

Pn-reqiHsitt: PSYC 100. Also offered as PSYC 336. Credit will 
he granted for only one of the following: HMST 336 or PSYC 
336. A study of the biology, life span development, 
socialization, personality, mental health, and special issues of 
women, 

0101 (16491) Goldberg,]. TuTh 9:00am-l2:20pm 

(EPS 228.^) 

WMST348A Literary Works by Women: Science 
Fiction by Women 

(3) REG/P-F/AUD. 

DIVERSITY Also listed as ENGL 348A. See description on 
page 30. 

0101(17129) Donawerth,]. TuTh9:00am-l2:15pm 
(SQH 1119) 

WMST400 Theories of Feminism 
(3) REG/P-F/AUD. 

Prerequisite: one cottrse in W^IST or a course cross-listed with a 
IVMST course. A smdy of the mulapliciry of feminist 
theories which have been developed to explain women's 
position in the family, the workplace, and society. Major 
feminist writings are considered in the conte.xt of their 
historical moment and in the context of the intellectual 
traditions to which they relate. 

(1101(16502) STAFF TuTh 6:00pm-9: 1 5pm 

(WDS2I01R) 

WMST471 Women's Health 

(3) REG/P-F/AUD. 

DIVERSITY Also offered as HLTH 471. Credit uilt he granted 
for otdy one of the following: WMST 471 or HLTH 471. The 
women's health movement fixim the perspective of 
consumerism and fenunism.The physician-patient 
relationship in the gynecological and other medical settings. 
The gynecological exam, gynecological problems, 
contraception, abortion, pregnancy, breast and cervical 
cancer and surgical procedures. Psychological aspects of 
gynecological concerns. 
0101 (16512) Desmond, S. MTuWTh ll:00am-12:45pm 

(HHP 1302) 
0102(16513) Simson.S. MW 6:00pm-9:45pm 

(HHP 1301) 



WMST499 (PermReq) Independent Study: 

Individual Study in Women's Studies 
(1-3) REG/P-F/AUD. 

Individual Instruction course: contact department or 
instructor to obtain section number. Prerequisite: 3 hours of 
WMST and lumor standing. 

WMST699 (PermReq) Independent Study 
(1-3) REG/AUD. 

Individual (nstnicDon course: contact department or 
instructor to obtain section number. By permission of 
instructor only. 

ZOOL Zoology 

(Life Sciences) 

Z00L609 (PermReq) Special Problems in Zoology 
(1-6) REG/AUD. 

Individual InstrucDon course: contact department or 
instructor to obtain section number. Contact deparmient to 
m.-ike arrangements. 

Z00L708 Advanced Topics in Zoology 
(1-4) REG/AUD. 

Individual Instruction course: contact department or 
instructor to obtain section number. 

Z00L799 (PermReq) Master's Thesis Research 
(1-6) REG. 

Individual Instruction course: contact department or 
instructor to obtain section number. 

Z00L899 (PermReq) Doctoral Dissertation 
Research 

(1-8) REG. 

Individual Instruction course: contact department or 
iastructor to obtain section number. 





HOW 



IS SUMMER? 




College of 
Arts and 
Humanities 

The 25 departments and centers 
in the College of Arts and 
Humanities otTer education, 
research and scholarship in the 
arts, histor\', literatures, languages 
and cultures of people 
throughout the world. Here, the 
performing and visual arts 
thrive, making it a true center of 
human thought, human 
creativity, human history and 
human potential. 

The college has taken leadership 
in the uses of technology, 
especially electronic media, for 
instruction and research, and has 
developed important 
multidisciplinary programs in 
Latin American Studies, the 
Committee on Africa and the 
Americas, and Jewish Studies. 
There also are ambitious 
interdisciplinary projects Unking 
hnguists with computer 
scientists, psychologists and 
neurobiologists in the study of 
cognitive and neurosciences. 



SESSION II JULY 17 - AUGUST 25 



Sample Course Listing 

tour,.. I-.ll,. 

AASP100 Introduction to Afro-American Studies 
(3) REG/P-F/AUD. 



College Park Summer 
Sessions course offerings 
are updated daily on the 
Web at http/Avww.testudo. 
umd.edu and 
http://www.umd.edu/ 
summer. For a complete 
list of evening courses, 
see page 102. 



CORE: Social or Pobncal Historv' (SH) DIVERSITV m'.'SSS.m, 
Sigmficani aspects of ihc history of Atro-Americuis with 
paracular emphasis on the evolution and de%vlopincnt of 
black coniniuniocs fiom slavery to the present. — Daaipo m 

InterdisciplmarN' introducaon to social, political, legal and 
economic roots of contemporar\' problems faced by- 
blacks in the United Sutes with apphcaaons to the Uves 
of other racial and ethnic minoriDcs m the Americas and 
in other societies. 
S«s»ion 02U I (00001) Quinn, K. TuWTh 10:00ara-12:15pm Dayi 

MARS Number liuilnirtM (LhH-AI) LoaHtm, 



AASP Afro-American Studies 

(Behavioral and Social Sciences) 

AASP100 Introduction to Afro-American Studies 
(3) REG/P-F/AUD. 

CORE: Social or Political History (SH) DIVERSITY 
Signiticjnt .ispects of the history of Afro- Americans with 
parncular emphasis on the evolution and development of 
black communities fhim slavery to the present. 
Interdisciplinary introduction to social, political, legal and 
economic roots of contemporan' problems faced by 
blacks in the Umtcd States with appUcauons to the Uves 
of other racial and ethnic minorities in the Americas and 
in other societies. 

0201 (00001) Qmnn, K. TuWTh 10:l«am-12:15pm 
(LEF 1220) 

AASP202 Black Culture in ttie United States 

(3) REG/P-F/AUD. 
CORE: Social or Pohtical Histor>' (SH) DIVERSITY 
The coune examines important aspects of American 
Negro life and thought which arc reflected in AIid- 
American literature, drama, music and art. Beginning 
with the cultural heritage of slavery, the course surveys 
the changing modes of black curative expression from the 
1 9th-centur\* to the present. 

0201(00012) Wmograd.T TuTh 1 1 :00am-2:40pm 
(LEF 1221) 

AASP478I Humanities Topics in Afro-American 
Studies: Black Popular Culture in 
American Society 
(3) REG/P-F/AUD. 
0201(00032) George, E. TuTh ll:00ani-2:30pm 

(PLS 1117) 
This course will examine contemporary Black popular 
culture in the U.S. from the 1970s to the 1990s. Film, 
television. literature, advertisements and music will be 
e.xamincd as cultural products that reflect particular values 
and ethos of Black Americans in the Utter part of the 
20th century. We will explore how pohtical and historical 
factors such as the "war on poverty." the Reagan years, 
and the Rodnc)' King incident influenced the production 
of Black popular culture. 



AASP498E Special Topics In Black Culture: 

Race, Gender and Identity 

(3) REG/P-F/AUD. 
112111(00042) Quinn.K. TuTh 4 JOpm-7:50pm 

(TLF 2137) 
This course focuses on the \'arious ways in which race, 
gender, and class - along with other aspects of identity - 
shape the h\T.-s and e.\penences of people lising m the 
United States. We will grapple with the ways in which 
the nutehal world - the built enMronment and our 
urban areas in particular - influence our mulople 
identities and the ways in which we influence our 
material world. 

AGRO Agronomy 

(Agriculture and Natural Resources) 

AGR0499 Special Problems in Agronomy 

(1-3) REG/P-F/ALT). 
Indisidual instruction course: contact department or 

instructor to obuiii secuon number 

AGR0608 Research Mettiods 
(1-4) REG/AUD. 

Indisidual Instrucnon course: contact deparrment or 
instructor to obtain secDon number. 

AGR0799 Master's Thesis Research 
(1-6) REG. 

lndi\idual Instrucnon course: contact department or 
instructor to obtain secoon number. 

AGR0899 Doctoral Dissertation Research 

(1-8) REG. 
Individual Instruction course: contact department or 
instructor to obtain section number. 




/I^OJtk 



57 




AMST American Studies 

(Arts and Humanities) 

AMST212 Diversity in American Culture 
(3) REG/P-F/AUD. 

DIVERSITY Exploranon ot the role of ethnic diversity- 
in the shaping of American culnjre. Special emphasis will 
be placed on the multicultural origins of American 
popular and material culture, such as foodways and 
entertainment, and on the experience of 
" Americanizarion . " 

0201 (00284) Woodfork.J. MTuWTh 3:00pm-4:40pm 
(TLF 2101) 
For detailed course description, see Web Site 
http://www.inform.umd.edu/EdRes/Colleges/ARHU/ 
Depts/AmencanStudies/SummerOO.html 

AIVIST298 Selected Topics in American Studies: 
Film and American Culture 
(3) REG/P-F/AUD. 

0201 (00294) Metcalf, G. MW 5:00pm-8:30pm 

(TLF 210n 
For detailed course description, see Web Site 
http://www.inf0rm.umd.edu/EdRes/C0llege5/ARHU/ 
Depts/AmericanStudies/Summer<Xl.html 

AMST298A Selected Topics in American Studies: 
Popular Music In American Society 
(3) REG/P-F/AUD. 
0201(00304) Stephens. V. TuTh 8:30am- 1! :50am 

(TLF 2101) 
This course will examine American culture through an 
analysis of popular music history, music production, and 
musical and visual aesthetics. Issues of identity and 
authenticity' will also be addressed along with other 
contemporan' issues. 

AMST298G Selected Topics in American Studies: 
Understanding African Americans and 
Their Material Culture 
(3) REG/P-F/AUD. 
0201(00314) Williams Forson. P. MW8:I.Xlam-ll;30am 
(TLF 2101) 
"Everyday Use": Undentanding African Americans and 
Their Material Culture. This course examines the ways m 
which African Americans shape their material world by 
the choices they make m their everyday selection of 
objects. In the selection of clothes, food, cars, and other 
objects, humans draw attention to the complex ways that 
we shape the material world as it simultaneously shapes 
us. This course will examine Timberlands (clothes), music. 
food, museum exhibitions, and critical readings, to 
undersund the intersection of African American and 
material culture. We will examine in detail human 
agency, and the intended and unintended consequences 
of the choices we make. 

AMST298I Selected Topics In American Studies: 
The Vietnam War 
and American Culture 

(3) REG/P-F/AUD. 
0201(00324) Marnm,E. TuTh 5:00pm-8:30pm 

(TLF 2101) 
Did "American Culture" lead the United States into war 
in Vietnam? Did it inform the way the U.S. fought and 



ultimately lost the war? Now that the war is becoming 
an mcreasingly distant memory, how can we begin to 
understand the ways in which the war is represented in 
culture? This course seeks to examine these and other 
questions through a host of representations from many 
different authors and artists in many different forms. We 
will read the poetry of Chicano/a antiwar activists, the 
hterature of Tim O'Brien, and the histories of Loren 
Baritz and Ngo Vinh Long. We will sec films from 
Viemamcse and American irnsts.We will examine 
photographs and posters and explore the music of Bruce 
Springsteen and others. By the end of the term, we will 
have begun to explore howViemam is represented in 
cyberspace. Students will not only develop their 
knowledge of the events of the war and its historical 
conte.xt, but will practice the art of cultural analysis as 
well. Participants in the course will be encouraged to 
pursue a project related to their areas of interest, such as 
music, literature, or film. In examining these different 
cultural products, wc will explore different ways of 
studying culture(s) and e.xanune what the texts we read 
tell us about the American war inViemam. 

AMST298P Selected Topics in American Studies: 

Electronic Publications 

and Virtual Exhibitions 

(3) REG/P-F/AUD. 
0201(00334) Rector. C. Time and room to be arranged 
In this interdisciphnary, online course we will examine 
the mass phenomenon ofWeb pubhcation and online 
exhibition fixim a cultural studies perspective, through 
two main hues of questioning; 1) How does Web 
pubhcation affect the production and consumption of 
information? How does Web pubhcation affect practices 
surrounding our ideas of academic and institutional 
information? How does it affect different kinds of non- 
academic information production? How has the Web 
made possible new forms of information production? 
2) How do we create methods or practices for thinking 
about information and the Web? What new critical 
thinking skills need to be developed to esaluate both the 
content of information found on the Web and the ways 
we use the Web? Web technologies are both the medium 
and the message in this course; however, this is a class 
which emphasizes critical analysis o%'er technical skills and 
students can expect to spend most of their time reading, 
WTiring, and chscussing the material with their classmates. 
The first day of class we will meet and learn how to 
make a Web page. After that, aB of our interactions will 
be onhne through e-mail, Web pubhshing, and chat room 
discussion. Prerequisites: Basic computer Uteracy (i.e., 
abihty to use a word processing program, e-mail, and a 
Web browser, such as Netscape or Internet Explorer) is 
required. Monvated students without any computer 
experience may still take the course but should contact 
the instructor in advance. The class will meet on Monday, 
July 17 from 9-12 in the AT&T Teaching Theatre (3140 
Engineering). 

AMST386 Experiential Learning 
(3-6) REG/P-E 

Individual Instruction course: contact department or 
instructor to obtain section number. Prerequisite: pennisshn 
ofdejiartment. 56 setnester hours. 

Please see individual instructors for course and contact 
Department for permission to register. 



AMST398 Independent Studies 
(1-3) REG. 

Individual Instruction course: contact department or 

instructor to obtain section number. 

See individual instructor and Department for permission 

to register, 

AMST418E Cultural Themes in America: Race, 
Gender and Identity 
(3) REG/P-F/AUD. 

0201 (00348) Quinn, K. TuTh 4:30pm-7:50pm 

(TLF 2137) 
This coune focuses on the various ways in which race 
and gender, along with other aspects of identity, shape the 
Uves and e.xperiences of people h\ing in the United 
States. Additionally, we will grapple with the ways in 
which the material world-the built environment and our 
urban areas in particular-influences our mulnple identities 
and the ways in which we influence our material world. 
We will study and document local historic and cultural 
resources that illustrate how race and gender are socially 
and physically constructed. In consulution with the 
instructor, interested students may be able to conduct 
fieldwork for a commuraty-based study in heu ot the 
sundard research paper. This course is cross-hstcd with 
AASP498E Special Topics in the African Diaspora: Race, 
Gender, and Identity. 

AMST428M American Cultural Eras: Culture 

and Media of the 1970s 

(3) REG/P-F/AUD. 
0201(00388) Wemstem.D. TuTh 6:n0pm-9:30pm 
(KEY 0102) 
The study of 1970s media can help us to understand 
current problems and developments in mass media and 
society. Aspects of the decade's culture that we will snidy 
include punk rock, rap. Star Wars, RoUing Stone 
magazine. Hunter S.Thompson, Saturday Night Live. 

AMST429I Perspectives on Popular Culture: 

Black Popular Culture in 

American Society 

(3) REG/P-F/AUD. 
0201(00408) George, E. TuTh ll:00am-2:30pm 

(PLS 1117) 
This course will examine contemporary Black popular 
culture m the US. from the 1970s to the 1990s. Fihn, 
television, hteramre, advertisements, and music will be 
examined as cultural products that reflects the particular 
values and ethos of Black Americans in particular at this 
moment in historv.We will explore how pohtical and 
historical factors such as the "war on poverty," the 
Reagan years, and the Rodney King incident influenced 
the production of Black popular culture. This course is 
cross-hsted with AASP 4781: Humanities Topics in Afro- 
American Studies: Black Popular Culmre in American 
Society. 

AMST698 Directed Readings 
in American Studies 
(3) REG/AUD. 

Individual Instruction coune: contact department or 
instructor to obtain section number. 



58 



HOW BIG IS SUMMER? 



AMST799 Master's Thesis Research 

(1-6) REG. 
Individual Instrucuon course: conuci department or 
instructor to obtain section number. 

AMST899 Doctoral Dissertation Research 

(1-8) REG. 
IndiN^dual Instruction course: contact department or 
instructor to obuin section nuniber. 

ANSC Animal Science 

(Agriculture and Natural Resources) 

The following courses may invoKe the use ot animals. 
Students who are concerned about the use of animals in 
teaching have the rcsponsibihty to contact the instructor, 
prior to course enrollment, to determine whether 
animals are to be used in the course, whether class 
exercises involving animals are optional or required and 
what alternatives, if any, are available. 

ANSC386 (PermRtq) Experiential Learning 
(3-6) REG/P-F. 

Prmquisiu: pfrmission oj depanment. 56 semater hours. 

0201 (00474) STAFF Time and room to be arranged 

0202 (00475) Erdman, R. Time and lOom to be arranged 

ANSC399 (PermReq) Special Problems 
in Animal Science 
(1-2) REG/P-F/ AUD. 

Individual Instruction course: contact department or 
instructor to obtain section number. 

ANSC660 Poultry Literature 
(1-4) REG/AUD. 

Readings on indisidual topics are assigned. Written 
reports required. Methods of analysis and presentation of 
scientific material are discussed. 
02111 (00490) ST.'VFF Time ,ind mom to be arranged 

ANSC688 (PermRtq) Special Topics: Mammary 

Gland Biology 

(1-4) REG/AUD. 
0201 (00500) STAFF Time and room to be arranged 

ANSC699 (PermReq) Special Problems in Animal 

Science 

(1-2) REG/AUD. 
Individual Instruction course: contact department or 
instructor to obuin section number. 

ANSC799 (PermReq) Master's Thesis Research 
(1-6) REG. 

Individual Instruction course: contact deparmient or 
instructor to obtain section number 

ANSC899 (PermReq) Ooctoral Dissertation 

Research 

(1-8) REG. 
Individual Instrucuon course: contact department or 
instructor to obtain section number. 



ANTH Anthropology 

(Behavioral and Social Sciences) 

ANTH386 (PermReq) Experiential Learning 

(1-6) REG/P-F 
Individual Instruction course: conuct department or 
instructor to obtain section number. Prrre4jmsite: pennission 
ofdqyartment. Rtcommmded: completion of advanced counts in 
relevant subjield of anthropology. 56 semester hours. ForASTH 
majors only. 

Approval of instructor required; check with Department 
for section (and index) number 

ANTH398A (PermReq) Independent Study 
(1-3) REG/P-F/AUD. 

Individual Instruction course: contact department or 

instructor to obtain section number. 

Approval of Instructor required; check with Department 



for section (and index) i 



nber. 



ANTH476 (PermReq) Senior Research 
(3-4) REG/P-F/AUD. 

Indisidual Instruction course: contact department or 
instructor to obtain section number. FcrASTH majors only. 
Credit will he granted for only one of the follouing: ASTH 476 or 
ANTH 486. Capstone course in which students pursue 
independent lesearch into a current problem in 
anthropology, selected with assistance of a committee of 
faculty. Research leads to the WTiting of a senior thesis in 
anthropology. 

ANTH477 (PermReq) Senior Thesis 
(3-4) REG/P-F/AUD. 

Individual Instruction course: contact department or 
instructor to obtain section number. Prere{fuisite:A\'TH 
476: permission of department. ForASTH majors only. Credit 
ui'H be granted for only one of the following: AKTH 477 or 
ANTH 487. Capstone course in which students write a 
semor thesis on independent research into a current 
problem in anthropology. The thesis is defined befon: a 
committee of faculty. 

ANTH486 Honors Research 

(3) REG/P-F/AUD. 

Individual liiMruction course: contact deparmient or 
instructor to obtain section number Prerequisites: 
permission of department: admission '" t'niifrsir)' Honors 
Program or Anthropology Honors Program. For ANTH majors 
only. Credit will be granted for only one of the following: 
ANTH 486 or ANTH 476. Capstone course in which 
students pursue independent research into a current 
problem in anthropology, selected with assisunce of a 
committee of faculty. Research leads to the WTiting of an 
honors thesis in anthropolog:s-. 

ANTH487 Honors Thesis 

(3) REG/P-F/AUD. 
Indisidual Instruction course: contact department or 
instructor to obtain section number Prerequisites: ANTH 
486; permission of department: admission to Vnitrrsity Honors 
Program or Anthropology Honors Program. For ANTH maiors 
only. Credit will he granted for only one of the following: 
ANTH 48' or ANTH 4". Capstone course in which 
students wTite a thesis on the results of independent 
research into a current problem in anthropology. 



ANTH689A iPermReq) Special Problems in 

Anthropology 

(1-6) REG/S-F 
Individual Instruction course: contaa depanmcnt or 
instructor to obuin section number. 
Approval of instructor required; check with Department 
for secnon (and index) number 

ANTH712 (PermReq) Intcmship Analysis 
(3) REG/AUD. 

Indisndiul Instruction course: conuct department or 
instructor to obuin section number. Prerequisite:. A NTH 
705. The preparation and prcscnution of internship 
reports; development of skills in report wriong and 
presenution. The compleoon of a professional quality- 
report based on the internship experience. Review ot 
problems in ethics and professional devrlopment. 
Approval of instructor required; check with Department 
tor section (and index I number 



ANTH 789 (PermReq) Internship 

(3-12) REG/AUD. 
Individual Instruction course; conuct department or 
instructor to obtain section number. 



ARCH Architecture 

(Architecture) 

ARCH221 (PermReq) History ot Architecture II 
(3) REG. 

PrerequL<itc:.-iRCH 220 or permission of department. Sur>Ty 
ofWestern architectural history fiom the Renaissance to 
the 20th-century, with consideraoon of parallel 
developments in the Eastern World. 
0201(01028) Vann,R. MTuWThF 9;00am-10:50am 
ARC 1101) 

ARCH223 (P.rmReqi History of Non-Westem 

Architecture 

(3) REG. 
CORE: History or Theory of Arts (HA) DIVERSITY 
Survry of architectural historv'. including prehistonc and 
vernacubr; anaeni civilizations of Egypt. Mesopotamia 
and the Indus valley; the Islamic wxirld; Hmdu and 
Buddhist traditions of Asia; and pre- European Afiica and 
the Americas 

0201(01038) Vann, R TuTh 7:nOpm-IO:20pm 

ARC 1 105) 

ARCH428 (PnmReq) Selected Topics in 

Architectural History 

(1-3) REG/P-F/AUD. 
Individual Instruction course: conun department or 
instructor to obtain sccoon number. Majors only. Cooaa 
L.Vann tor infornution. 





ARCH429 (PermReq) Independent studies in 
Architectural History 
(1-4) REG/P-F/AUD. 

Individual Instruction course; contact department or 
instructor to obtain section number. Majors only. Contact 
L.Vann for information. 

ARCH479 Independent Studies in Architecture 
(1-4) REG/P-F/AUD. 

Individual Instruction course: contact department or 
instructor to obtain secnon number. 

ARCH628 (PermReq) Selected Topics in 

Architectural History: Architectural 

History 

(1-3) REG/AUD. 

Indmdual Instruction course: contact department or 
instructor to obtain section number Majors only. Contact 
L.Varm for information. 

ARCH629 (PermReq) Independent Studies in 
Architectural History 
(1-3) REG/AUD. 

Individual Instruction coune: conact department or 
instructor to obtain section number. Majors only. Contact 
L.Vann for information. 

ARCH678B Selected Topics In Architecture 
(3) REG/AUD. 

Individual Instruction course: contact department or 
instructor to obtain section number. 

ARCH678F Selected Topics in Architecture: 

Facades 

(3) REG/AUD. 
0201 (01272) Schumacher.!. MW 7:00pm-10:20pm 
(ARC 1127) 



AREC Agricultural and Resource 
Economics 

(Agriculture and Natural Resources) 

AREC386 (PermReq) Experiential Learning 
(3-6) REG/P-E 

Individual Instrucnon course: contact department or 
instructor to obtain section number. Prerequisite: permission 
ofdepartmem. 56 semester hours. 

AREC399 Special Problems 

(1-2) REG/P-F/AUD. 

Individual Instruction course: contact department or 
instructor to obtain section number. 

AREC699 Special Problems in Agricultural and 
Resource Economics 
(1-2) REG/AUD. 

Individual Instrucnon course: contact deparmient or 
instructor to obtain section number. 



AREC799 Master's Thesis Research 
(1-6) REG. 

Individual Instrucnon course: contact deparmient or 
instructor to obtain section number. 

AREC899 Doctoral Dissertation Research 
(1-8) REG. 

Individual Instruction course: contact department or 
instructor to obtain section number. 

ARTH Art History & Archaeology 

(Arts and Humanities) 

ARTH200 Art of the Western World to 1300 
(3) REG/P-F/AUD. 

CORE: History or Theory of Arts (HA). USP Distributive 
Studies Area C: Literature and the Arts Course. Pamting. 
sculpture, and architecture from prehistoric times to the 
Renaissance. 

112111(01646) Denny D. MTuWTh 2:00pm-3:20pm 

(ASY3215) 

F 2:00pm-3:20pm 

(ASY 3215) Dis 

ARTH201 Art of the Western World after 1300 

(3) REG/AUD. 
CORE: History or Theory of Arts (HA). USP 
Distributive Studies Area C: Literature and the Arts 
Course. Painung, sculpture, and architecture from the 
Renaissance to the present. 

0201(01656) Denny, D. MTuWTh 2:00pm-3:20pm 

(ASY 3215) 

F 2:00pm-3:20pm 

(ASY 3215) Dis 

ARTH250 Art and Archaeology of Ancient 
America 
(3) REG/P-F/AUD. 

CORE: History or Theory of.\rts (HA) DIVERSITY 
Art and archaeology of ancient Mesoamerica from 500 
B.C. to 1500 A.D. 

0201 (01657) Younger,]. MTuWTh 9:30am-10:50am 

(ASY 3215) 

F 9:30am-10:50am 

(ASY 3215) Dis 

ARTH386 (PermReq) Experiential Learning 
(3-6) REG/P-E 

Individual Instrucnon course: conuct department or 
instructor to obtain section number. Prerequisite: permissiou 
ot department. 56 semester hours. 

ARTH498 (PermReq) Directed Studies 
in Art History I 
(2-3) REG/P-F/AUD. 

Individual Instruction course: contact department or 
instructor to obtain section number. 

ARTH499 (PermReq) Honors ThesIs 
(2-3) REG/P-F/AUD. 

Individual Instrucnon course: contact department or 
instructor to obtain section number. 



ARTH699 Special Topics in Art History 
(3) REG/AUD. 

individual Instruction course: contact department or 

instructor to ohciin secnon number, 

ARTH799 Master's Thesis Research 
(1-6) REG. 

Individual Instruction course: contact department or 
instructor to obtain section number. 

ARTH899 Doctoral Dissertation Research 
(1-8) REG. 

Individual Instrucnon course; contact department or 
instructor to obtain section number. 

ARn Art Studio 

(Arts and Humanities) 

ARTT100 Two Dimensional Art Fundamentals 
(3) REG/P-F/AUD. 

Credit will be granted for only one of the follounng: ARTT 
WO.ARTS 100. DESS Wl, orAPDS Wl. Formerly 
.-{RTS 100. Principles and elements of pictorial space 
examined through the manipulation and organization of 
v-arious materials. 

0201(01748) Thorpe, J. .MTuWTh 9:00am-l 1:30am 
(MMH 1417) Lab 

ARTT110 Elements of Drawing I 
(3) REG/P-F/AUD. 

Formerly ARTS 110. Media and related techmques to 
depict srill-hfe, figure and nature. 
0201 (01759) Thorpe,]. MTuWTh 12:00pm-2:30pm 
(MMH 1413) Ub 

ARTT150 Introduction to Art Theory 
(3) REG/P-F/AUD. 

CORE; History or Theory of Arts (HA) Exammation of 
contemporary art; review of global, philosophic and 
critical positions by the examination of works of art. 
0201 (01769) ST.^FF MW 12:00pm-3:20pm 

(ARC 1125) 

ARTT210 Elements of Drawing II 
(3) REG/P-F/AUD. 

Prerequisite: ARTT 110. Formerly ARTS 210. Continuation 
of ARTT 1 10 with additional emphasis on pictorial 
space. 

0201 (01801) Thorpe,]. MTuWTh 12:00pm-2:30pm 
(MMH 1413) Lab 

ARTT320 Elements of Painting 
(3) REG/P-F/AUD. 

Prerequisite: ARTT 210. Formerly ARTS 320. Basic tools 
and language of painnng. Oil and- or water-based pamts. 
Secnon 0101 focuses on acryhc painting. 
0201(01812) STAFF MTuWTh 9:30am-12:00pm 
(.'^SY 3322) Lab 

ARTT353 Elements of Photography 
(3) REG/P-F/AUD. 

Prerequisites: I ARTT 100 and ARTT UOl or permission of 
department. Introduction to black-and-white photography. 
Basic technical and aesthetic vocabulary, camera 



60 



HOW B 



IS SUMMER? 



mechanics and darkroom techniques. Incroducdon to the 
photographic message and meaning in both fine art and 
design concept. 

0201 (01863) Tyroler. B. MTuWThF 8:30am- 11 :30am 

(MMH 0401) Ub 

Meets 07/ 17/00-08/ 11/00 

ARTT354 Elements of Computer Graphics 

(3) REG/P-F/AUD. 
Prmquisius: lARTT WOandARTT UO) of permission of 
depanment. Introduction to computer graphics, inuging, 
iUustiation and mixed media. 

0201 (01874) Ratnapala. N. MTuWTh 12:30pm-3:00pm 

(ASY3311E)Ub 

0202 (01875) H..itn.,pila, N. MTuWTh 3:00pm-5:3()pm 

(ASY3311E) 

ARTT41 8 Drawing 

(3) REG/P-F/AUD. 
0201 (01885) Thorpe. J. MTuWTh 1 2;00pm-2:30pm 
(MMH (MOl) Lah 

ARTT428 Painting: Acrylic 

(3) REG/P-F/AUD. 

Section Ulill will tocus on acrylic paint. 
0201 (01906) STAFF MTuWTh 9:30am-12:00pm 
(ASY 3322) Lab 

ARTT449 Advanced Photography 
(3) REG/P-F/AUD. 

Individual Instrucnon course: conuct department or 
instructor to obtain section number. 

ARTT489I (PamRcq) Advanced Special Topics in 
Art: Advaced Special Topics: 
Computer Imaging 
(3) REG/P-F/AUD. 
0201 (01959) Ratnapala, N. MTuWTh 3:00pm-5:30pm 
(ASY 331 IE) Ub 
This course is an art course for students with experience 
in computer imaging. Students vaW be permitted to work 
according to their own level of expertise wnth the 
guidance of the instructor. Adobe Photoshop, Ofoto, 
Fractal Design Painter, MicroSoft Word, and Quark 
Express are some of the software programs that will be 
explored. 

ARTT498 (PermRcq) Directed Studies 

in Studio Art 

(2-3) REG/P-F/AUD. 
Individual Instruction course: contact department or 
instructor to obtain section number. 

ASTR Astronomy 

(Computer, Mathematical and 
Physical Sciences) 

ASTR100 Introduction to Astronomy 

(3) REG/P-F/AUD. 
CORE: Ph>'sical Science (PS) CreJii for ASTR lOOtannol 
be obtained after, or simultaneously with, receiving credit for any 
astronomy course numhrred 250 or higher. Credit will bt 
granted for onfy one of the foH,>i/ir,|.-.4,STR 100 or ISTR 



101 or ASTR 120. An elementary course in descriptive 
astronomy, cspeaally approprute for non-sciencc students. 
Sun, moon, planets, stars and nebulae, galaxies, evoluDon. 
CORE Physical Science Laboratory' (PL) Course only 
when uken concunrnUy with ASTR 111. CORE 
Physical Science Non-Laboratory (PS) CouiM when taken 
alone. 

0201 (02021) Hunt.J MTuWThF 9:30am-10:50am 
(CSS 2400) 

ASTR101 General Astronomy 

(4) REG/P-F/AUD. 
CORE: Phy'sical Science Ub (PL). USP DistnbuQve 
Studies Area B: Natural Sciences and Mathematics Course. 
Credit for ASTR tOt cannot be obtained after, or simultaneously 
with, receiving credit for any astronomy course numbered 250 or 
higher. Credit will be granted for only one of the following: ASTR 
100 or ASTR 101 or ASTR 120. Descriptiw astronomy', 
appropriate for non-science majors. Sun, moon, planets, 
stars, nebulae, galaxies and evolution. Uboratory exercises 
include use of photographic material, computer 
simulations and observing sessions if weather permits. 
0201 (02031) Hunt,J. MTuWThF 9:30am- 1 0:50am 
(CSS 2400) 
TuTh ll:00am-l:00pm 
(CSS 1 109) Ub 

ASTR498 Special Problems in Astronomy 

(3) REG/P-F/AUD. 
0201 (02042) Trasco.J. Time and room to be arranged 

ASTR899 Special Problems in Advanced 
Astronomy 

(1-6) REG/AUD. 

Individual Instruction courie: contact department or 
nntnKt(ir to obtain section number, 

ASTR799 Master's Thesis Research 
(1-6) REG. 

Individual Instrucaon course: contact department or 

in^tnictnr to obtain ^ecnnn number. 

ASTR899 Doctoral Dissertation Research 
(1-8) REG. 

Individual Imtrucrion course: contact department or 
instructor to obtain section number. 



BCHM Biochemistry 

(Life Sciences) 

BCHM462 Biochemistry II 

(3) REG/P-F/AUD. 

Prerequisite: bCHM 461 A conanuation of BCHM 461. 
0201 (02229) STAFF MTuWThF 9:.1(lam-10:50am 
iCSS 2324) 

BCHM699 Special Problems in Biochemistry 
(1-6) REG/AUD. 

Individual Instruction course; contaa department or 
instructor [o t>btain secniMi luinihcT 

BCHM799 Master's Thesis Research 
(1-6) REG. 

Indmdual Instrucnon course: contact department or 
instructor lo ohuiri section number 

BCHM899 Doctoral Dissertation Research 
(1-8) REG. 

Individual Imtrucnon course: contact department or 
instructor to obtain section number. 



BMGT Business and Management 

(The Robert H. Smith School of 
Business) 

BMGT201 Introduction to Business Computing 
(3) REG/P-F/AUD. 

Sophomore standing hor HSliji maiors oniy. Sot open to 
students uiio have completed BMGT 301 prior w Fall 1991 
Basic Uteracy course using common business computer- 
based appUcations. Considers the role of information 
technology in the modem workplace, as well is the use 
of computing appUcadom in problem solving. 

0201 (02306) Chaires,J. TuTh 6:40pm-10:IXjpm 

(\MH l.ViT) 

BMGT220 Principles of Accounting I 
(3) REG. 

Sophomore standing. Basic theory and techniques of 
contemporary finanaal accounong. Includes the 
accoundng cycle and the preparanon of financial 
statements for single owner and partner^p forms of 
business organizations opetatmg as service companies or 
merchandisen. 

11201 (02318) STAFF MTuWThF 9:30am- 10:50am 
(VMM 1303) 

0202 (02319) STAFF TuTh 6:40pm- 10:00pm 

(VMH 1303) 

BMGT221 Principles of Accounting II 
(3) REG. 

Prerequisite: BMCT 220. Basic theory and techniques of 
accoundng for maiugerial decision making. Imxilves the 
introducdon of the corporadon and manufacturing 
operaDons. Includes cost-volume-profit analysis and 
capital budgedng. Introduces the topics of mcome 
ta-xation and internaDonal accounting. 

0201 (02331) STAFF MTuWTh 2:00pm-3:40pm 

(VMH 1303) 

0202 (02332) STAFF MW 6:40pm-IOK)Opni 

(VMH 1303) 

BMGT230 Business Statistics 
(3) REG. 

I'rerequisiie: MiTH 1 1.' .'r SL-iTH 1 15 or plxemeru in 
.MiTH 220 or higher. \ot open w studenb u4w have 
completed BMGT 251. ESEE 524. or ST.n 400 Credit 
will be granted for only one of the following: AREC 484, 
BIO.\l 501, B.\IGT 250. CSEC 400. ECOS 521, 
EDMS 451. GEOG 505. CI 7»T 422. PSYC 200. SOCY 
201, VRSP 550. or TEXT 400. Introductory course in 
probabilisQc and statisdcal concepts, including descnpovc 
staastics, set-theoreoc destlopment of probabUity, the 
properties of discrete and connnuous random variables, 
samphng theory, estimation, hypothesis testmg. regression, 
decision theory and the apphcanon of these concepts to 
problem soK-ing in busmess and management. This course 
does not meet irquirements for nuiugemem saencc and 
statisdcs majors. 
0201(02344) Fu,Z. MW 9fl0im- 1 2:20pm 

(TYD 1118) 
0202 (02345) Pan. X. MW 2:00pm-5:20pm 

(TYD 1118) 





BMGT302 Business Computer Application 
Programming 
(3) REG. 

Prerequisite: BMGT 201 or CMSC t02 or CMSC 103 or 
permission ofdepartimnl. Not open to computer srience 
students. For BMCT majors only. Considers characteristics 
of business data programming and common software 
development processes and practices. Covers the 
designing, writing, documenting, and testing of an 
efScient, structured program in Visual Basic. 
0201 (02366) Chaires,J. TuTh 3:00pm-6:20pm 

(TYD 1118) 

BMGT310 Intermediate Accounting I 
(3) REG. 

Prerequisite: BMCT 221. Comprehensive analysis of 
financial accounting topics related to financial statement 
preparation and external reporting, 
0201(02378) Kim.O. MW 6:40pm-10:00pm 

(VMH 1202) 

BMGT311 Intermediate Accounting II 
(3) REG. 

Prerequisite: BMGT 310. Continuation of BMGT 310. 
0201 (02389) STAFF MTuWThF 9:30am-10:50am 
(VMH 1207) 

BMGT321 Cost Accounting 
(3) REG. 

Prerequisite: BMGT 221. A study of the basic concepts of 
product costing and cost analysis for management 
planning and control. Emphasis is placed on the role of 
the accountant in organizational management, analysis of 
cost behavior, standard cost, budgeting, responsibility 
accounting and relevant costs for decision making. 
0201 (02400) STAFF MW 3:00pm-6:20pm 

(VMH 1207) 

BMGT323 Income Tax Accounting 
(3) REG. 

Prerequisite: BMGT 221. Introduction to Federal income 
taxation of individuals. Examination of tax laws by use of 
illustrative examples and problems. 

0201 (02411) Pantalone.V MW 6:40pm-10;00pm 

(VMH 1207) 

BMGT340 Business Finance 
(3) REG. 

Prerequisites: BMGT 221: and {BMGT 230 or BMGT 
231}. The principles and pracnces involved in the 
organization, financing, and rehabihtation of business 
enterprises; the various types of securities and their use in 
raising funds, apportiomng income, risk, and control; 
intercorporate relations; and new developments. Emphasis 
on solution of problems of financial pohcy faced by 
management. 

0201(02432) GunbeyL. TuTh 6;40pm-10:00pm 

(TYD 2102) 

0202 (02433) STAFF MW 6:40pm-10:00pm 

(VMH 1314) 



BMGT350 Marketing Principles and Organization 
(3) REG. 

Prerequisite: ECON 200 or ECON 205. An introduction 
to the concepts and principles of marketing, including 
the marketing of service and nonprofit organizations. 
Provides an overview of all the concepts in marketing, 
including relationship marketing, product development, 
pricing, promotion, marketing research, consumer 
behavior, international marketing, distribution, and 
internal marketing to employees. 
0201 (02455) Nandan.S. MTuWThF ll:00am-12:20pm 

(VMH 1207) 
0202(02456) Yang.Q. TuTh 6:40pm- 10:00pm 

(TYD 2109) 

BMGT357 (PermReq) Retailing and Marketing 
Internship 
(3-6) REG. 

Prerequisites: BMGT 350 and permission of department. For 
BMGT majors only. Supervised work experience with a 
firm engaged in marketing goods or services. Students 
apply concepts learned in marketing classes and analyze 
the firm's organizational structure, environment, and 
marketing strategy. 

0201 (02476) Wagner, J. Time and room to be arranged 

0202 (02477) Wagner, J. Time and room to be arranged 

BMGT360 Human Resource Management 
(3) REG. 

The basic course m human resource management 
includes manpower planning, recruitment, selection, 
development, compensation, and appraisal of employees. 
Explores the impact of scientific management and 
umonism on these fiinctions. 

0201 (02488) STAFF MW 3:00pm-6:20pni 

(TYD 2102) 

BMGT364 Management and Organization Theory 
(3) REG. 

The development of management and organization 
theory, nature of the management process and tiinction 
and iLs tiiture development. The role of the manager as an 
orgamzer and director, the communication process, goals 
and responsibilites. 
0201(02511) STAFF MTuWThF 9:30am-10:50ani 

(VMH 1203) 
0202(02512) STAFF MW 6:40pm-10:00pm 

(TYD 1118) 

BMGT370 Introduction to Transportation 
Management 
(3) REG. 

Prerequisite: ECON 200; or ECON 205. An overview of 
the transportation sector, including providers, users and 
government agencies. Examines contemporary public 
pohcy issues, such as deregulation, along with managerial 
strategies in transportation. 

0201(02522) Dewitt.W MTuWThF 11 :00ani- 12:20pm 
(VMH 1202) 



BMGT380 Business Law I 
(3) REG. 

Legal aspects of business relationships. Examination of 
torts and business crimes, contracts and agency. The law 
of personal property and bailment relationships. Survey of 
public pohcy issues. 

0201(02554) STAFF TuTh 6:40pm-10:00pm 

(TYD 1118) 

BMGT398 (PermReq) Individual Study In 
Business and Management 
(1-3) REG. 

Individual Instrucnon course: contact department or 
instructor to obtain section number 

BMGT402 Database Systems 
(3) REG. 

Prerequisite: BMGT 305 or equivalent. Introduction to basic 
concepts of database management systems. Relational 
databases, query languages and design will be covered. 
File-processing techniques arc examined. 
0201(02596) Spear, R. MW 6:40pm- 10:00pm 

(VMH 1307) 

BMGT403 Systems Analysis and Design 
(3) REG. 

Prerequisite: BMGT 305 or equinileiit. Techniques and tools 
applicable to the analysis and design of computer-based 
information systems. System hfe cycle, requirements 
analysis, logical design of databases, performance 
evaluation. Emphasis on case studies. Project required that 
involves the design, analysis and implementation of an 
information system. 

0201(02606) Spear, R. MW 3:00pm-6:20pm 

(VMH 1307) 

BMGT417 Advanced Tax Accounting 
(3) REG. 

Prerequisites: BMGT 311: and BMGT 323. Federal 
taxation of corporations, partnerships, fiduciaries, and 
gramitous transfers. Tools and techniques of tax research 
for comphance and planning. 

0201(02626) Pantalone.V MW 3:00pm-6:20pm 

(VMH 1202) 

BMGT422 Auditing Theory and Practice 
(3) REG. 

Prerequisite: BMCT 311. A study of the independent 
accountant's attest fiinction, generally accepted auditing 
standards, comphance and substantive tests, and report 
forms and opinions. 

0201(02637) Pfeifier,G. TuTh 6:40pni- 10:00pm 

(VMH 1207) 

BMGT435 Introduction to Applied Probability 
Models 
(3) REG. 

Prerequisite: BMCT 231 or permission of department. 
Statistical models in management. Review of probabUity 
theory, Monte Carlo methods, discrete event simulation, 
Markov chains, queuing analysis, other topics depending 



62 



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S S U 



M E R ? 



upon time. Guass, 3 highcr-lcvcl computer language, will 
be introduced in the class and the students will carry out 
various exercises using this language. 
0201 (02667) Trichur.V. MW 2:00pm-5:20pm 

(VMH 1203) 

BMGT440 Financial Management 
(3) REG. 

I'mequiiiie: BMGT .140. Analysis and discussion of ca.ses 
and readings relating to financial decisions of the firm. 
The application of finance concepts to the solution of 
financial problems is emphasized. 
0201(02677) Schrenk.L, MW 6:40pm-10:00pm 

(VMH 1203) 

BMGT445 Commercial Bank Management 
(3) REG/P-F/AUD. 

Prerequisitei: BMGT .UO; and HCOS 4)0. Analpis and 
discussion of cases and readings in commercial bank 
management. The loan function is emphasized; also the 
management of liquidity reserves, investments for 
income, and source of funds. Bank objectives, ftinctions, 
pohcies, organization, structure, services, and regulation 
arc considered. 

0201 (02697) Stanton. S. TuTh 6;-»l)pni-l(l:0llpm 

iTYl) lliiXj 

BMGT447 (PermRt-.j) Internship and Research in 
Finance 
(3) REG. 

Prerequisilei: BMGT 340 and BMGT 343 (or 400 level 
finance electii/e); and core requirements in business and 
management; and permission of department. Recommended: 
finance major courses. For finance majors only. Supervised, 
sponsored internship in a corporation or financial 
institution. Analysis of approved research topic in 
corporate finance, investments or financial 
institutions/markets. 
0201(02717) Kolodny. R. Time and room to be arranged 

BMGT457 Marketing Policies and Strategies 

(3) REG. 
CORE: Capstone (CS) Prerequisite: BMGT 451. 
Corequisite: BMGT 452. This capstone course ties 
together concepts from all the various marketing courses 
using the fiindamentals of strategic market planning as 
the framework. Application of these principles is 
accomplished by analyzmg and discussing cases and by 
playing a marketing strategy computer simulation game. 
Analysis of current business articles to understand the 
hnk between theory and real-world problem solving. 
0201 (02758) Lclkoff-Hagius. R. MTuWThWOara-lliOOam 
(VMH 1314) 

BMGT495 Business Policies 

(3) REG. 
COR^: Capstone (CS) Prerequisites: BMGT 340: and 
BMGT 350; and BMGT 364. 100 semester hours. For 
BMGT majors only. A case study course where students 
apply what they have learned of general management 
principles and their specialized fimctionat applications to 



the overall management function in the enterprise. 
BMGT majors only All others must have authorization. 
02(11(02791) STAFF TuTh 3:(Xlpm-6:20pm 

(VMH 1314) 
0202 (02792) STAFF MW 3:00pm-6:20pm 

(VMH 1314) 
112(13(02793) STAFF TuTh 6:40pm- 10:(Xtpm 

(VMH 1314) 

BMGT498 Special Topics In Business and 

Management: Integrated Marketing 
Communications 

(3) REG/P-F/AUD. 

0201(02814) STAFF TuTh «:30am- 11 :50am 

(TYI) ni«) 

BMGT505 Organizational Behavior and Strategic 
Management 

(3) REG. 

Intensive review of organizational behavior theory*, and 
administrative processes and poUcy in the business 
enterprise. Credit not appUcabie to graduate degrees. 
Majors only until first day of classes. 
0201 (02834) STAFF TuTh 6:40pm-10:00pm 

(VMH 3327) 

BMGT615 Business Communications 
(1.5) REG/AUD. 

For BMG'i majors only. Instruction and pracncal 
experience in written and oral business communications. 
Basics of structuring business documents and oral 
presentations. Fosters practice-based (rather than lecture- 
or case- discussion-based) learning. Majors only until first 
day of classes. 

02GI (02856) Welsh. S. M 6:40pm- 10:00pm 

(SGII 3032) 

BMGT620 Strategic Information Systems 

(1.5) REG/AUD. 
For BMGT majors only. Use of information technology to 
achieve competitive advantage, eflicient operations, and 
effective decision making. Analysis of functions of 
information technology and its impact on competitive 
strategy and organizational operations. Majors only until 
fint day of classes. 

02G1 (02868) Wasko.M. W 6:40pm-10:00pm 

(SGII 22(^) 

BMGT681 Managerial Economics and Public 
Policy 

(3) REG/AUD. 

For BMGT majors only. Sot open to students u4io hatv 
completed BMGT 671 and BMGT 680. Basic 
microeconomic principles used by firms, including supply 
and demand, elasticities, costs, productivity, pricing, 
market structure and competitive impUcations of 
alternative nurket structures. Market failures and 
government intervention. Public policy processes 
affecting business operations. Majors only until first day 
of classes. 

02BA (02888) Shaffer, B MW 6:40pm-10:00pm 

(Arranged) 

02GI (02889) Windle. R. MW 6:4(lpm-10:(X)pm 

(SGII 3042) 

02G2 (02890) STAFF MW 6:40pm- 1 0:(X)pm 

(SGI 220) 
02G3 (02891) STAFF TuTh 6:40pm-I0:00pni 

(SGI 220) 



BMGT690 Strategic Management 
(3) REG 

For BMGT majors only or pcrnussion of department. 
Integrative strategic marugemeni focusing on strategic 
formulanon and implementation in domestic and global 
settings. Industry and compeQtion analysis, mdustry and 
Arm value chain, leadership, goal setting, organizaaonal 
structure and culture. Case study approach to top 
management and organizaoonil problems. Majors only 
until fint dav of classes. 



(1201 (02913) STAFF 



TuTh 6:40pin-10:00pm 
SGII 1052) 



BMGT720 Information Technology and Corporate 
Transformation 
(3) REG/AUD. 

Prerequisite: BMGT 620. The impact and the cnabkng 
role of information technologies (IT) in tnnsforrmng 
business and work group and indisndiul processes. Topics 
include gaining compentive advantage through IT 
appbcations; identifying high pay-off IT applicaaons. and 
leading the process of IT-induccd change process. Majon 
only until first day of classes. 

0201 (02953) Alavi, M. TuTh 6:40pm-10:00pm 

(VMH 1203) 

BMGT726 Distributed Data Processing 
(3) REG/AUD. 

Prerequisite: BMGT 620; or BMGT 721. Introduction to 
distributed data processing concepts. The buildmg blocks 
of distributed systems: computers. lerrmnals. and 
communications: the interface and protocols that allow 
them to fiincoon as an integrated system. Major 
categories of distributed systems; resource-sharing 
networks, multiple-processor networks, and tightly 
coupled multiprocesson. Majors only until fir^t day of 
classes. 



02G2 (02983) Aufftet.J. 



MW 6:4Opm-I0:0Opm 
(SGII 3052) 



BMGT741 Advanced Financial Management 
(3) REG/AUD. 

Prerequisite: BMGT 640. Ads'anced theories and concepts 
underlying finannal decision making in the firm. Case 
studies, model building and appUcanons in financial 
theory and management. Majors only until first [lay of 
classes. 

0201 (02994) Bryant. S TuTh 6:40pm-10:00pm 

(VMH 1202) 

BMGT743 Investment Management 
(3) REG/AUD. 

Prerequisite: BMGT 640 Methods of security selection 
and portfoho management in the debt and equitv' 
markets Insistnient alteriutisTs. securines markets, bond 
and common stock v'aluanon. options, portfolio theory, 
and behanor of stock prices. Majors only until first day 
of classes. 

02G2 (03004) CampbeU.A. TuTh 6:40pm-10K)0pin 
(SGII 2032) 





BMGT746 International Financial Management 
(3) REG/AUD. 

Prerequisite: BMGT 640. The role of financial 
management in the multmadonaJ firm. The financing and 
managing of foreign mvestments, assets, currencies, 
miports and exports. National and international financial 
institutions and markets. Open to BMBA, BMSB. BMJT. 
BMPM and LMBA students with 30 credits completed. 
Majors only until first day of classes. 
02G2 (03024) Dubois, A. MW 6:40pm-10:00pm 

(SGII 2n32) 

BMGT752 Marketing Research Mettiods 
(3) REG/AUD. 

Prerequisites: BMGT 6.iO. and BMGT 650. The process of 
acqmnng, classifying and mterpretmg primar\' and 
secondary marketing data needed tor mteUigent, 
profitable markenng decisions. Evaluaoon of the 
appropriateness of alternative methodologies, such as the 
inductive, deductive, survey, observational, and 
experimental. Recent developments in the systematic 
recording and use of internal and external data needed 
for markenng decisions. Majon only tintil first day of 
classes. 

02G2 (03034) STAFF MW 6:40pm- 10:00pm 

(SGII 3022) 

BMGT754 Buyer Behavior Analysis 
(3) REG/AUD. 

Pr(Tf,jiiisi/f; BMGT 650. A systematic examination and 
evaluation of the literature, research tradinon and theory 
of buyer behavior in the marketplace from a hindamental 
and applied perspective. The cognitive and beha\noral 
bases underlying the buying process of individuals and 
institutions. Open to BMbX. BMSB, BMJT BMPM and 
LMBA students with 30 credits completed. Majors only 
until first day of classes. 

02G2 (03054) STAFF TuTh 6:40pm-10:00pm 

(SGII 3012) 

BMGT795 Management of the Multinational Firm 
(3) REG/AUD. 

The problems and policies of mternational business 
enterprise at the management level. Management of a 
multinational enterprise as well as management within 
foreign umts.The mulDnational firm as a socio- 
econometric instituaon. Cases in comparative 
management. Majors only unti] fint day of classes. 

0201 (03084) STAFF MW 6:40pm-10:00pm 

(VMH 1206) 

BMGT798A Special Topics In Business and 
Management: Work Teams: Actual 
and Virtual 
(3) REG/AUD. 

Majors only until first day of classes. 
02G2 (03104) Falaone.R. TuTh 6:40pm-10:00pm 
I SGII 3032) 

BMGT798B Special Topics in Business and 
Management 
(3) REG/AUD. 

Majors only until first day of classes. 

0202 (03105) STAFF MW 6:40pm-10:00pm 

(Arranged) 



BMGT799 Master's Thesis Research 
(1-6) REG. 

Individual Instruction course: contact department or 
instructor to obtain section number 

BMGT828 (PermReq) Independent Study in 
Business and Management 

(1-9) REG. 

Individual Instrucnon course; contact department or 
instructor to obtain section number. By permission only 
of the Graduate Director. 

BMGT899 Doctoral Dissertation Research 
(1-8) REG. 

Individual instrucaon course: contact department or 
instructor to obtain section number. Contact Graduate 
Program Director to make arrangements. 

BSCI Biological Sciences Program 

(Life Sciences) 

BSCI106 Principles of Biology II 
(4) REG/P-F/AUD. 

CORE: Life Science Lab (LL). USP Distributive Studies 
Area B: Natural Sciences and Mathematics Course. 
Prerequisite: .lf.4TH / 10 pliii:ement. For science majors. 
Formerly BIOL 106. Basic prmciples of biology with 
special emphasis on organismic, ecological and 
evolutionarv' biolog\'. 

0201(03262) STAFF MTuWThF !l:00am-12:20pm 

(PLS 1130) 

TuTh 8:00am-l 1:00am 

(HJP 2104) Lab 

0202(03263) STAFF MTuWThF ll:00am-12:20pm 

(PLS 1130) 

TuTh l:00pm-4:00pm 

(HJP 2104) Lab 

BSCI120 Insects 

(3) REG/P-F/AUD. 

CORE: Life Science (LS) Formerly ESTM WO. A survey 
of the major groups of insects, their natural history, and 
their relationships with humans and their emironment. 
Coune not acceptable tow^ major requirements in the 
College of Life Sciences. 

0201(03274) Messersmith, D. .MTuWITiF 9:30am-10:50am 
(PLS 1161) 

BSCI202 Human Anatomy and Physiology II 

(4) REG/P-F/AUD. 

Prerequisite: BSCI 20 1 or pennission of department. Formerly 
ZOOL 202. Anatomy and physiology of the 
cardiovascular, respiratory, immune, digestive, urinan- and 
reproductive systems. Course not acceptable toward 
major requirements m the College of Life Sciences. 
(1201 (03316) Perrino,L. MTuWThF ll:30am-12:50pm 
(BPS 1250) 
TuWTh8:30am-l 1:30am 
(BPS 0205) Lab 
0202(03317) Pemno,L. MTuWThF ll:30am-12:50pm 
(BPS 1250) 
TuAVTh l:00pm-4:00pm 
(BPS 0205) Lab 
0203(03318) Perrino.L. MTuWThF ll:30am-12:5npm 
(BPS 1250) 
TuWTh 4:00pm-7:00pm 
(BPS 0205) Lab 
Snidents must pay a J40.00 Laboratory Materials fee. 
Sponsoring Department: BIOL. 




College of 
Life Sciences 

The College of Life Sciences 
offers undergraduate and 
graduate study in chemistry, 
biochemistry', entomology, cell 
biology and molecular genetics 
and a range of programs in the 
biological sciences, including 
marine biology, microbiology, 
physiology and neurobiology. 
Many undergraduates prepare 
for professional education in 
medicine, dentistry, optometry, 
osteopathic or pediatric 
medicine in the rigorous 
programs of this college. 

Pre-med students are invited to 
apply for the Joint Biomedical 
Research Program, a 
collaboration with the 
University of Maryland School 
of Medicine in Baltimore. 
Undergraduate research 
tellowships are also granted 
through the Howard Hughes 
Medical Instimte. These 
fellowships, reserved for the top 
science schools in the nation, 
allow students to pursue 
independent research under 
faculty direction. 



64 



HOW 



SUMMER? 



BSCI222 Principles of Genetics 
(4) REG/P-F/AUD. 

Praeqmsiles: BSCI 105, one year college chemislry. Credit will 
he granted for only one of the following: BSCI 222/BIOL 
222 or HORT 274. Formerly BIOL 222. Principles and 
mechanisms of licrediU' and gene expression. Considers 
plant, animal, and nucrobia! organisms. 
0201(03338) Imbcrski, R. MTuWThF 9:30am-10:50am 
(BPS 1250) 
TuThF 11.00ani-l:(X)pm 
(BPS 1238) Ub 
0202(03339) Imberski. R. MTuWThF 9:30am- 10:50am 
(BPS 1250) 
TuThF 11 :00am- 1:00pm 
(BPS 2283) Ub 

BSCI279 (PmiiRcq) Supplemental Study: 
Supplemental Study in Biology 
(1-3) REG/P-F/AUD. 

0201 (03375) STAFF Time and room to be arranged 

(Sponsoring Department: BIOL.) 

BSCI338Z (PermReq) Special Topics in Biology 
(1-4) REG/P-F/AUD. 

0201 (03396) STAFF Time and room to be arranged 
(Sponsoring Department: BIOL.) 

BSCI34e Special Topics in Cell Biology and 
Molecular Genetics 
(1-4) REG/P-F/AUD. 

Individual Instruction course: conuct department or 
instructor to obtain section number 

BSCI360 Principles of Animal Behavior 
(3) REG/P-F/AUD. 

Prcrequmles: BSCI 105 md BSCI lltb and BSCI 222. 
Formerly ZOOL 360. Study of ammal behavnor \vidi 
emphasis on its evolution and function. Topics include 
genetic basis of behavior, communication, aggression, 
foraging, cooperation, mate selection and relevance for 
conservation. 

0201(03428) Raboy.B. MTuW 9:30am-10:50am 

(PLS 1115) 
Th 9:30am- 12: 10pm 
(PLS 1115) Dis 
(Sponsoring Department: BIOL.) Acceptable towards 
Biological Sciences Specialization areas: PHNB, ZOOL, 
EEBB, MAIU3. DGEN, DEES, and GENU (category II). 

BSCI373 Natural History of the Chesapeake Bay 
(3) REG/P-F/AUD. 

Prerequisite: J (oune m Hohguol sncnecs or permission of 
department. Formerly ZOOL 581. Consideration of the 
major groups of organisms associated with the 
Chesapeake Bay and current issues that determine 
humans' present and (uture uses for the Chesapeake and 
its biou. 

0201(03438) SnuU.E MTuWTh ll:00am-12:40pm 
(BPS 0283) 
(Sponsoring Department: BIOL.) Acceptable towards 
Biological Sciences Specialization areas: ZOOL, EEBB, 
AMRB, BGEN (non-lab), BEES, and GENB (category II). 



BSCI379H Cell Biology and Molecular Genetics 
Department Honors Seminar 
(1-3) REG. 

Prerequisite: Admission to departmental honors program. 

Repeatahle to 8 aedits if content differs. Formerly 

MICB 379. Student should consult program guideUncs. 

Research project carried out under guidance of faculty 

advisor. 

0201 (03536) STAFF Time and room to be arranged 

BSCI379 Cell Biology and Molecular Genetics 
Department Research 
(1-3) REG/P-F/AUD. 

Individual Instruction course: conuct department or 
instructor to obtain section number. 

BSCI389 Entomology Department Research 
(1-2) REG/P-F/AUD, 

U2U1 (03462) STAFF Time and room to be arranged 

BSCI390 Vertebrate Zoology 

(3) REG/P-F/AUD. 

Prerequisites: BSCI lOb and BSCI 224 or permission of 
department. Formerly ZOOL 590. An introduction to the 
natural history of vertebrates, their evolutionary history. 
patterns ot geographic distribution and systematics. 
020 1 (03472) GiU. D. Meets 07/ 1 7/00-08/04/00 

MWF 8:00am- 1:00pm 
(PLS 1117) 
(Sponsoring Department: BIOL.) Acceptable towards 
Biological Sciences Specialization areas: ZOOL, MAIUJ, 
EEBB, BEES, BGEN, and GENB. 

BSCI391 Vertebrate Zoology Laboratory 
(1) REG/P-F/AUD. 

Prerequisites: BSCI 106 and BSCI 224 or permission of 
department. Corequisile: BSCI 590. Formerly ZOOL 591. 
Field trips to observe vertebrates and to institutions 
where scientilic research on vertebrates is being 
conducted. 

0201 (03482) GUI, D. TuTh 8:00am-5:00pm 

(BPS 0275) 
(Sponsoring Department: BIOL.) Acceptable towards 
Biological Sciences Specialization aa>as: ZOOL, MARB, 
EEBB, BEES, BGEN, and GENB. 

Meeu0'/1~'00-n>l/04 DO 

BSCI399 (PermReq) Biology Department 
Research 
(1-3) REG/P-F/AUD. 

0201 (03493) STAFF Time and room to be arranged 
(Sponsoring Department: BIOL.) 

BSCI399H (PermReq) Blology Department 
Honors Research 
(1-2) REG. 

Prerequisite: participation in the Biology Department Honors 
Program. Repeatahle to 8 credits if content differs. Formerly 
ZOOL 518H. A laboratory' research problem; required 
each semester during honors participaaon and 
cubninaDng in an honors thesis. 

0201 (03504) STAFF Time and lOom to be arranged 
(Sponsoring Department: BIOL.) 



BSCI430 Developmental Biology 
(3) REG/P-F/AUD. 
Iherequisites: BSCI 250/ ZOOL 211 and BSCI 222/BIOL 
222. Formerly ZOOL 450. Stnictural. ftincaonal and 
legubtory cscnts and mechanisms that operate during 
development to produce an integrated. mulDceUular 
organism composed of a multitude of differentiated cell 
types. 

0201(03514) GoodcM. TuWTh 11. OOam-1 :10pm 
(PLS 1111) 
(Sponsoring Department: BIOL.) Acceptable towards 
Biological Sciences Spccializanon areas: PHNB, ZOOL. 
CBMG, BGEN, and GENB. 

BSCI433 Biology of Cancer 

(3) REG/P-F/AUD. 

I ■': requisites: tBSCI 250 and BSCI 222) or permission of 
.ii/'Mment. Formerly ZOOL 416. Causes and 
consequences of neoplasDc transformations at the 
biochemical and cellular levels. 

0201 (03524) STAFF MTuWTh 9:0()am- 10:40am 
(MCB 1207) 



BSOS Behavioral and Social 
Sciences 

(Behavioral and Social Sciences) 

BS0S386 (PermReq) Experiential Learning 
(3-6) REG/P-R 

Prerequisite: permission of department. 56 semester /lours: 
<I2I'I (03586) ST.«lFF Time and room to be arranged 

BS0S396 (PermReq) Fellowship Program In 

Political Leadership 

(2-6) REG. 
Indi\idua] InstrucQon course: contact department or 
iastructor to obtain section number. Pirrrquisile: ptmmsion 
of department and acceptance of full-time felhwskip ptognm. 
Corequisite: BSOS 546. BSOS 556 or BSOS 566. 
Individual instruction course. 

BS0S399 (PermReq) Directed Study in 

Behavioral and Social Sciences 
(3-6) REG. 

0201 (03600) STAFF Time and loom to be arranged 

0202 (03601) Lucas. N. Time and itiom to be arranged 

CCJS Criminology and Criminal 
Justice 

(Behavioral and Social Sciences) 

CCJS100 Introduction to Criminal Justice 

(3) REG/P-F/AUD, 
CORE: Behauoral and Social Science (SB). USP 
Distributisr Studies Area D: Social and Behavioral 
Sciences Couree. Formerly CfVS 100 Introduction to 
the administration of criminal justice in a democratic 
society, wnth emphasis on the theoreocal and histoncal 
development of bw enforcement. The principles of 
organization and administranon for bw enforcement; 
(iinctions and specific 





65 




activities; planning and research; public relations; 
personnel and training; inspection and control; direction; 
policy formulation. 

0201 (03652) STAFF MTuWTh 9:00ani-10:40ani 

(LEF 2208) 

CCJS105 Introduction to Criminology 
(3) REG/P-F/AUD. 

CORE: Behavioral and Social Science (SB). USP 
Distributive Studies Area D: Social and Behavioral 
Sciences Cource. Formerly CRJM 220. Criminal 
behavior and the methods of its study; causation; 
typologies of criminal acts and offenders; punishment, 
correction and incapacitation; prevention of crime. 
0201 (03663) STAFF MTuWTh 9:00am-10;40am 

(SKN 0104) 

CCJS200 Statistics for Criminology 
and Criminal Justice 
(3) REG/P-F/AUD. 

Prerequisites: MATH Uland {CCJS 100 or CCJS 105) or 
permission of department. Introduction to descriptive and 
inferential statistics, graphical techniques, and the 
computer analysis of criminology and criminal justice 
data. Basic procedures of hypothesis testing, correlation 
and regression analysis, and the analysis of continuous and 
binary dependent variables. Emphasis upon the 
examination of research problems and issues in 
criminology and criminal justice. 

0201(03674) STAFF MTuWTh 11 :00am-12;40pm 
(ARC 1101) 

CCJS230 Criminal Law in Action 
(3) REG/P-F/AUD. 

Formerly CJVS 230. Law as one of the methods of social 
control. Criminal law: its nature, sources and types; 
theories and historical developments. Behavioral and legal 
aspects of criminal acts. Classification and analysis of 
selected criminal offenses. 

0201 (03684) STAFF MTuWTh 9:00am-10:40am 

(MMH 1400) 

CCJS234 Law of Criminal Investigation 
(3) REG/P-F/AUD. 

Prere,]msiie: CCJS 230. Formerly CJUS 234. General 
principles and theories of criminal procedure. Due 
process. Arrest, search and seizure. Recent developments. 
Study and evaluation of evidence and proof 
0201 (03695) Bur\-, R. TuTh 6:00pm-9:00pm 

(TYD2111) 
Time and room to be arranged Dis 

CCJS300 Criminological and Criminal Justice 
Research Methods 
(3) REG/P-F/AUD. 

Prerequisites: CCJS 100 and CCJS 105; and one of the 
following: CCJS 200 or SOCY 201 or PSYC 200 o, 
ECON 321 or BMGT 230 Formerly CJUS 300. 
Introduction to the formulation of research questions 
covering crime and justice, research designs, data 
collection, and interpretation and reporting in 
cnnunological and justice-system settings. 
0201(03706) Bouffard.J. MTuWTh 9:30am-ll:10am 
(COL 31 10) 




Criminology and Criminal Justice 

CCJS 370 Race, Crime, and 
Criminal Justice 

(3 credits) July 17-August 25 

News Stories Are More Than Black and White 

The media's portrayal of racial stereors'pes 
connected with criminal activirs* — whedier 
real or imagined — can have lasting social 
consequences. 

One need only recall news stories of the 
last decade like the Susan Smith case and 
Fawana Brawley episode. In the Smith 
case, the South Carolina mother of two 
initially claimed a black caijacker abducted 
her children — who later were found drowned in a 
lake;Tawana Bra'wley insisted she was viciously attacked and raped 
by a group of white men. Both of these highly publicized cases later proved 
quite different from what was originally reported in the media. 

Katheryn Russell, associate professor of criminology and criminal justice, 
examines the serious damage possible from the media's manipulation of racial 
stereotypes. "Race, Crime, and Criminal Justice" asks students to question the 
media's role in the often-joined issues of race and crime. Russell earned her 
doctorate in criminology' from the University of Maryland and a law degree 
from Hastings College of the Law, University of California. She is the author 
of The Color of Crime (NYU, 1998), a well-received book on the 
phenomenon of the "racial hoax" in the media. 

The course requires a considerable amount of reading, including a daily 
review of the Washington Post. Headlines, mug shots, and the way race is 
portrayed are analyzed and discussed in class. Students then create newspaper 
policy reports — the reports — the reportsconsider how race should be 
addressed and referenced in the media, and coincide with the course's 
extensive readings on America's historical legacy of race and crime. The 
capstone of the class involves meeting with an editor from the Washington 
Post. Students present their policy ideas and interact face-to-face with a 
professional whose job it is to deal with these issues on a daily basis. 

For more infortnation, call 301-405-4699. 



66 



HOW BIG IS SUMMER? 



CCJS320 Introduction to Criminalistics 
(3) REG/P-F/AUD. 

Prerequisite: CCJS 234. Formerly CJUS 320. An 
introduction to modern methods used in the detection, 
mvestigation and solution of crimes. Practical analysis of 
evidence in a criminal investigation laboratory', including 
photography, fingerprints and other impressions, ballisucs, 
glass, hair, handwriting and document examination, drug 
analysis, and lie detection. 

0201 (03717) Mauriello.T. MW 6:00pm-9:0()pm 

(ALS3120) 

Tune and room to be arranged Dis 

CCJS359 Field Training in Criminology 
and Corrections 
(1-6) REG/P-F/AUD. 

Individual Instruction course: contact department or 
instructor to obtain section number. 

CCJS370 Race, Crime and Criminal Justice 

(3) REG/P-F/AUD. 
DIVERSITY Praequisite: CCJS WO or equimlent. Role 
and treatment of racial/ethnic minorities in the criminal 
justice system. Course will provide students with 
historical and theoretical fi^uncwork for understanding 
this dynamic. 

0201(03769) Russell. K. MTuWTh 2:00pm-3:40pm 
(LEF 1201) 

CCJS386 (I'ermReq) Experiential Learning 
(3-6) REG/P-R 

Individual Instruction course: contaa department or 
instructor to obtain section number. Prerequisite: permission 
of department. 56 semester hours. 

CCJS398 (I'ermReq) Law Enforcement 
Field Training 
(1-6) REG/P-F/AUD. 

Individual Instruction course: contact department or 
instructor to obuin section number. 

CCJS399 Independent Study in Criminology and 
Criminal Justice 
(1-3) REG/P-F/AUD. 

Individual Instruction course: contact department or 
instructor to obtain secnon number. 

CCJS452 Treatment of Criminals and 
Delinquents 
(3) REG/P-F/AUD. 

Prerequisites: CCJS 105 or CCJS 550 or permission of 
department: and CCJS 300. Formerly CRJM 452. Processes 
and methods used to modify criminal and deUnqucnt 
behavior 

0201 (03795) STAFF MTuWTh 2:00pm-3:40pm 

(SQH 1103) 

CCJS699 Special Criminological Problems 

(1-3) REG/AUD. 
Individual Instruction coune: contact department or 
instructor to obuin section number. 



CCJS799 Master's Thesis Research 

(1-6) REG. 
Individual Instruction course: contact department or 
instructor to obtain section number. 

CCJS899 Doctoral Dissertation Research 
(1-8) REG. 

Individual Instruction course: contact department or 
instructor to obtain section number. 



CHEM Chemistry 

(Life Sciences) 

The College of Life Sciences enforces course 
prerequisites. Students who do not meet the course 
prerequisites will be administratively dropped from the 



CHEM103 General Chemistry I 
(4) REG/P-F/AUD. 

CORE: Physical Science Lab (PL). USP Distributive 
Studies Area B: Natural Sciences and Mathematics 
Course. Prerequisite: plaamenl in M'iTH 1 10 or higher. 
Recommended: placement in MATH U5 or higher. Credit will 
he granted for only one of the following: CHEM 102, CHE.\I 
103, CHEM 105, CHEM 107, CHEM 111, CHE.M 143 
The first semester of a chemistry sequence intended for 
students whose curricula require a year or more of 
chemistry. The nature and composition of matter, 
chemical calculations, elements and inorganic 
compounds. Lecture, discussion and laboratory meeting 
nmes will be arranged between 8:00ain and 12:20pm 
Monday through Friday. The first class meeting will be 
lecture. 

0231(03868) STAFF MTuWThF ll:00am-12:20pm 

(CHM 1402) 

Time and room to be arranged Lab 

MTuWThF 8:00am- 10:50ani 

(CHM 2201) Dis 

0232(03869) STAFF MTuWThF ll:00am-I2:20pm 

(CHM 1402) 

Time and room to be arranged Lab 

MTuWThF 8:(K)am-IO:50am 

(CHM 0122) Dis 

CHEM103M (PermReq) General Chemistry I 
(4) REG/P-F/AUD. 

CORE: Physical Science Lab (PL). USP Distributive 
Studies Area B: Natural Sciences and Mathematics 
Course. Prerequisite: placement in MATH 1 10 or higher. 
Recommended: placement in MATH 115 or higher. Credit will 
be granted J'or only one of the following: CHEM 102, CHEM 
103, CHEW 105, CHEM 107, CHEM 111, CHEM 143. 
( 123 1 (0388S) STAFF MTuWThF 1 1 :00am- 1 2:20pm 
(CHM 1402) 
MTuWThF 9:30ani-10:50am 
(CHM 2201) Dis 
0232(03886) STAFF MTuWThF 11:OOam-I2:20pm 
(CHM 1402) 
MTuWThF 9:30am- 10:5()am 
(CHM 0122) Dis 
Discussion mceong times will be 9 30 a.m. Monday 
through Friday Prerequisite: CHEM 103 taken at UMCP 
within twelve months of the semester which CHEM 



103M is taken. A student is eligible to lake this course 
only if the bb scores received in CHEM 103. the last 
time It was taken, totaled at least 80.0 percent of the 
mxximum possible total. These scores will count for part 

ofthc grade in CHE.M 103M. 

CHEM104 Fundamentals of Organic and 
Biochemistry 

(4) REG/P-F/AUD. 

CORE: Life Science Ub (LL). USP Distnbutn-e Snidies 
Area B: Natural Sciences and Mathematics Course. 
Prerequisite: CHEM 103 or CHEM 105. Credit uHll be 
granted for only one of the following: CHE.VI 104 or CHE.\I 
233 (or CHEM 235). Intended for students whose 
curricula require one year of chemistry. Students 
requiring two or more years of chemistry should register 
for CHEM 233 or CHEM 235. The chemistry of carbon: 
aliphatic compounds, aromatic compounds, 
stereochemistry, halides, amines, and amides, aads, esters, 
carbohydrates, and natural products. Lecture, discussion 
and laboratory meeting times will be arranged between 
8:OOam and 12:20pm Monda)' through Fnday. The first 
class meeting will be lecture. 

0261(03896) STAFF MTuWThF 11:00am-12:20pm 

(CHM 0115) 

Time and room to be arranged Lab 

MTuWThF 8:0Oam-10:5Oam 

(CHE 2140) Dis 

CHEM113 General Chemistry II 
(4) REG/P-F/AUD. 

CORE: Phoical Science Ub (PL). USP DistnbuDVT 
Studies Area B: Natural Sciences and Mathematics 
Course. Prerequisite: CHEM 103 or CHEM 105 Credit 
will be granted for only one of the fotbuing: CHEM 113 or 
CHEM 1 15. Kinetics: homogeneous, heterogeneous, and 
ionic equilibria; oxidation-reduction; electrochcmistn'; 
chemistry of the elements. Lecture, discussion and 
laboratory meeting times will be arranged bctw\*en 
8:00am and 12:20pm Monday through Friday. The first 
class will be lecture. 

0241(03923) STAFF MTuWThF 11 :0Oam-I2:2Opm 

(CHM 1407) 

Time and room to be arranged Lab 

MTuWThF 8:00am- 10:50»m 

OMP 1109) Dis 

0242 (03924) STAFF MTuWThF 1 1 :00am- 1 2:20pm 

(CHM 1407) 

Tune and room to be arranged Lab 

MTuWThF 8:00am-10:5Oam 

(CHM 0128) Dis 

CHEM113M (PermReq) General Chemistry II 

(4) REG/P-F/ALT). 
CORE: Ph\-sical Science Ub (PL; LSP DistributisT 
Studies Area B: Natural Sciences and Mathemancs 
Course. Prerequisite: CHEM 103 or CHEM 105. Credit 
will be framed for only one cf the follouing: CHEM 113 or 
CHEM 1 15. 

0241(03939) STAFF MTuWThF 11:00am-12:20pm 

(CHM 1407) 

MTuWThF 9:30am-10:50am 

OMP 1109) Dis 

0242(03940) ST.^FF MTuWThF 11 :00am- 1 2:20pni 

(CHM 1407) 

MTuWThF 9:30am- 10:50am 

(CHM 0128) Dis 

0243(03941) STAFF MTuWThF 11 :00am- 12:20pm 

(CHM 1*17) 





MTuWThF 9:30am- 10:50am 
(EGROllO)Dis 
0244(03942) STAFF MTuWThF 11 :00am-12:20pm 
(CHM 1407) 
MTuWThF 9:30am-10:50am 
(CHM 0124) Dis 
Dificussion meeting times will be 9:30 a.m. Monday 
through Friday. Prerequisite: CHEM 1 13 taken at UMCP 
within twelve months of the semester which CFIEM 
1 13M IS taken. A student is ehgible to take this course 
only if the lab scores received in CHEM 113, the last 
time It was taken, totaled at least 80.0 percent ot the 
maximum possible total. These scores will course for part 
of the grade in CHEM 1I3M. 

CHEM243 Organic Chemistry II 
(4) REG/P-F/AUD. 

Prereqmsiie: CHEM 233 mlh a grade ofCor belter. Credit 
will be granted for only one of the following: CHEM 243 or 
CHEM 247. A continuation of CHEM 233 with 
emphasis on molecular structure; substitution reactions; 
carbonium ions; aromaticity; synthetic processes; macro- 
molecules. Lecture and laboratory meeting times will be 
arranged between 8:00am and 12:20pm Monday through 
Friday The first class meeting will be lecture. 
0281(03987) STAFF MTuWThF ll:00am-12:20pm 
(CSS 2324) 
Time and room to be arranged Lab 
MTuWThF 8:00am-10:50am 
(CSS 0201) Dis 
0282(03988) STAFF MTuWThF II :00am- 12:20pm 
(CSS 2324) 
Time and room to be arranged Lab 
MTuWThF 8:00am-10:50am 
(CHM 0119) Dis 
0283(03989) STAFF MTuWThF 11 :00am- 12:20pm 
(CSS 2324) 
Time and room to be arranged Lab 
MTuWThF 8:00am-10:50am 
(CHM 0115) Dis 
0284(03990) STAFF MTuWThF 11 :00am-12:20pm 
(CSS 2324) 
Time and room to be arranged Lab 
MTuWThF 8:00am-10:50am 
(CSS 2352) Dis 
0285(03991) ST.^FF MTuWThF ll:00am-12:20pm 
(CSS 2324) 
Time and room to be arranged Lab 
MTuWThF 8:00am- 10:50am 
(CSS 2416) Dis 

CHEM243M (PermReq) Organic Chemistry II 
(4) REG/P-F/AUD. 

Prerequisite: CHEM 233 with a grade of C or better. Credit 
will he granted for only one of the following: CHEM 243 or 
CHEM 247. Prerequisite: CHEM 243 taken at UMCP 
within twelve months of the semester in which CHEM 



243M is taken. A student is eligible to take this course 
only if the lab scores received in CHEM 243, the last 
time it was taken, totalled at least 80.0 percent of the 
ma.ximum possible total. These scores will count for part 
of the grade in CHEM 243M. 

0281(04006) STAFF MTuWThF ll:00am-12:20pm 

(CSS 2324) 

MTuWThF 9:30am-10:50am 

(CSS 0201) Dis 

0282(04007) STAFF MTuWThF 11 :00am- 12:20pm 

(CSS 2324) 

MTuWThF 9:30am-10:50am 

(CHM 0119) Dis 

0283(04008) STAFF MTuWThF n:00am-12:20pm 

(CSS 2324) 

MTuWThF 9:30am-10:50am 

(CHM 0115) Dis 

0284(04009) STAFF MTuWThF 1 l:00ani-12:20pm 

(CSS 2324) 

MTuWThF 9:30am- 10:50am 

(CSS 2352) Dis 

CHEM399A Introduction to Chemical Research 

(1) REG/P-F/AUD. 

0201 (04022) STAFF Time and room to be arranged Ub 

CHEM399B Introduction to Chemical Research 

(2) REG/P-F/AUD. 

0201 (04033) STAFF Tune and room to be arranged Lab 

CHEM399C Introduction to Chemical Research 

(3) REG/P-F/AUD. 

021 1 1 (04044) STAFF Time ,ind axini to be arranged Lab 

CHEM699 Special Problems in Chemistry 
(1-6) REG/AUD. 

Individual Instrucrion course: contact department or 
instructor to obtain section number. 

CHEM799 Master's Thesis Research 
(1-6) REG, 

Individual Instruction course: contact department or 
instructor to obtain section number. 

CHEM899 Doctoral Dissertation Research 
(1-8) REG. 

Individual instruction course: contact department or 
instructor to obtain section number. 

CHIN Chinese 

(Arts and Humanities) 

CHIN102 (PmnReii) Elementary Spoken Chinese 
(3) REG/P-F/AUD. 

Prerequisite: CHIN Wl or equwalent. USP Distributive 
Studies Area A: Cultural and Historical Course. Son- 
majors admitted only after a placement inten>ieit>. Continued 
study of grammatical patterns and vocabulary buildup 
with particular emphasis on conversation. May be uken 
in conjuncnon with CHIN 103. 

0201(04139) Brown. W. MTuWThF 11 :00am-12:20pm 
gMZ 1226) 



Intensive Study in 
Elementary Modern 
Chinese 

An accelerated intensive course of 
study designed for highly motivated 
students who wish to complete a 
one-year language requirement in a 
summer session. It introduces 
fundamentals of standard Chinese 
(Mandarin), including 
pronunciation, grammar and 
C'hmese characters, emphasizing the 
tour basic language skills: speaking, 
hstening, reading and writing. 
Requires no previous knowledge of 
Chinese; not open to students who 
have learned fiom whatever source, 
enough Chinese to qualify for 
more advanced courses. Students 
are required to attend all classes and 
complete all assignments to 
maintain the rapid pace of this 
intensive course. Early enrollment 
is advised in this popular intensive 
course. Admission closes as of the 
second class. 

CHIN 102 Elementary Spoken Chinese 
(3 credits) 

Continued study of grammatical 
patterns and vocabulary buildup 
with particular emphasis on 
conversation. May he taken in 
conjunction wnth CHIN 103. 
Prerequisite: CHIN 101 or 
equivalent 

CHIN 103 Elementary Written Chinese 
(3 credits) 

Continued study of grammatical 
patterns and buildup of vocabulary 
with particular emphasis on reading 
and wTiting. May be taken in 
conjunction with CHIN 102. 
Prerequisite: CHIN 101 or 
equivalent 



HOW 



s s u 



E R ? 



CHIN103 (PermReq) Elementary Written Chinese 
(3) REG/P-F/AUD. 

I^t'requisite: CHtN 101 or equivaletu. USP Distributive 
Studies Area A: Cultural and Historical Course. Ntin- 
majim ddmittfd only after a placemmt inten>inv. Continued 
study of graniniaDcal patterns and buildup of vocabulary 
with particular emphasis on reading and writing. May be 
taken in conjunction with CHIN 102. 
0201 (04149) Brown, W. MTuWThF 9:30am-10:50ani 
OMZ 1226) 

CHIN213 Chinese Poetry into English: An 
Introduction 
(3) REG/P-F/AUD. 

CORE: Literature (HL) DIVERSITY. USP Distributive 
Studies Area C; Literature and the Arts Course. Issues in 
the intercultural and interlingual interpretation of foreign 
literature through the study ofWestern translatioas of and 
scholarship on selected Chinese poets. No knowledge of 
Chinese required. 

0201 (04160) STAFF TuTh 6:00pni-9:20pni 

(JMZ 0220) 

CHIN499 (PermReq) Directed study in Chinese 
(1-3) REG/P-F/AUD. 

Individual Instruction coune; contact department or 
instructor to obtain section number. 

CHPH Chemical Physics 

(Computer, Mathematical and 
Physical Sciences) 

CHPH799 Master's Thesis Research 
(1-6) REG. 

Individual Instruction course: contact department or 
instructor to obtain section number. 

CHPH899 Doctoral Dissertation Research 
(1-8) REG. 

Individual Instruction coune: contact department or 
instructor to obtain section number. 



CLAS Classics 

(Arts and Humanities) 

CLAS170 Greek and Roman Mythology 
(3) REG/P-F/AUD. 

CORE; Literature (HL). USP Distributive Studies Area 
A: Cultural and Historical Course. Taught in English, no 
prerequisite: cannot be taken for language credit. This 
course is particularly recommended for students planning 
to major in foreign languages, English, history, the fine 
arts, or journahsm. 

0201(04275) Vandiver.E. MTuWThF 11 :OOani-12:20pni 
(MMH 1400) 

CLAS799 (PerniReij) Master's Thesis Research 

(1-6) REG/S-R 
0201 (04295) Hallett.J. Time and room to be arranged 



CMLT Comparative Literature 

(Arts and Humanities) 

CMLT270 Global Literature and Social Change 
(3) REG. 

CORE: Literature (HL) DIVERSITY Comparative study 
of literature through selected literary works from several 
non-Western cultures, viewed cross-culturally in light of 
parncular social, pohrical, and economic perspectives. 
0201(04346) Mm.H. TuTh 6:00pin-9:I5pm 

(SQH 1101) 

CMLT275 World Literature by Women 
(3) REG. 

CORE: Literature (HL) DIVERSITY Also offered as 
WMST 275. Credit mil he granted for only one of the 
following: CMLT 275 or liMST 275. Comparative study 
of selected works by women writers of several countries, 
exploring points of intersection and divergence in 
women's literary representations. 

0201(04357) Voloshen.L. MW 6:00pm-9:15pm 

(KEY 0116) 

CMLT386 (PermReq) Experiential Learning 
(3-6) REG/P-B 

Individual Instruction course: contact department or 
instructor to obtain section number. Prerequisite: permission 
of department. 56 semester hours. 

CMLT699 (PermReq) Independent Study 
(1-6) REG. 

Individual Instruction course: contact department or 
instructor to obtain section number. 

CMLT788 (PermReq) Practicum in Comparative 
Studies 
(1-6) S-F. 

Individual Instruction course: contact department or 
instructor to obtain section number 

CMLT799 Master's Thesis Research 
(1-6) REG. 

Individual Instruction course: contact department or 
instructor to obtain section number. 

CMLT899 Doctoral Dissertation Research 

(1-8) REG. 
Individual Instruction course: contact department or 
instructor to obtain section number. 



CMSC Computer Science 

(Computer, Mathematical and 
Physical Sciences) 

CMSC386 (PermReq) Experiential Learning 
(3) REG/P-E 

lndi\idual Instruction course: contact department or 
instructor to obuin section number Prerequisite: permission 
oj department. 56 semester hours. Written permission of 
instructor must be obtained in advance on department 
form. 



CMSC386C (PermReq) Experiential Learning 
(3-6) REG/P-E 

herequistte: permission of department. 56 semester hours. 
0201 (04635) Rudd, H. Time and room to be arranged 

CMSC390 (PermReq) Honors Paper 
(3) REG/P-F/AUD. 

Individual Instruction course: contact department or 
instructor to obtain section number Prerequisite: admission 
to CMSC Honors Program. Special study or research 
directed toward preparation of honors paper. 

CMSC411 a^ermRf.;; Computer Systems 
Architecture 
(3) REG/P-F/AUD. 

Prerequisites: a grade of C or better in CMSC 5 1 1 and 
CMSC 330; or CMSC 400; and permission of department; or 
CMSC graduate student. Input/output processors and 
techniques. Intra-system communication, buses, caches. 
Addressing and memory hierarchies. Microprogramming, 
parallelism, and pipelming. 

0201(04717) STAFF MTuWThF U:00am-12:20pm 
(CLBOlll) 

CMSC451 (PermReq) Design and Analysis of 
Computer Algorithms 
(3) REG/P-F/AUD. 

Prerequisites: a grade of Cor better in CMSC 2 1 4 and a grade 
ofCor better in CMSC 25 1 ; and permission of department. 
Fundamental techniques for designing efficient computer 
algorithms, proving their correctness, and analyzing their 
complexity. General topics include sorting, selecQon, 
graph algorithms, and basic algorithm design paradigms 
(such as divide-and-conquer, dynamic programming and 
greedy algorithms), lower bounds and NP-completeness. 
11201(04737) STAFF MTuWThF 9:30am- 1 0:50am 
(CSS 1113) 

CMSC498A (PermReq) Special Problems In 

Computer Science 

(1-3) REG/P-E 
Individual Instruction course: contact department or 
instructor to obtain section number. 

CMSC798A (PermReq) Graduate Seminar in 
Computer Science 
(1-3) REG/AUD. 

Individual Instruction course: contact department or 
instructor to obtain section number. 

CMSC799 (PermReq) Master's Thesis Research 
(1-6) REG. 

Individual Instrucnon course: contact department or 
instructor to obtain section number. 

CMSC818A (PermReq) Advanced Topics In 
Computer Systems 
(1-3) REG/AUD. 

Individual Instrucnon course: contact department or 
instructor to obtain section number. 





CMSC828A (PermReq) Advanced Topics in 
Information Processing 
(1-3) REG/AUD. 

Individual Instruction course: contact department or 
instructor to obtain section number. 

CIVISC838A (PmnRcqj Advanced Topics in 
Programming Languages 
(1-3) REG/AUD. 

Individual Instruction course: contact department or 
instructor to obtain section number. 

CIVISC858A (PermReq) Advanced Topics in 
Theory of Computing 
(1-3) REG/AUD. 

Individual Instruction course: contact department or 
instructor to obtain section number. 

CMSC878A (PermReq) Advanced Topics in 
Numerical Methods 
(1-3) REG/AUD. 

Individual Instruction course: contact department or 
instructor to obtain section number. 

CMSC899 (PermReq) Doctoral Dissertation 
Research 
(1-8) REG. 

Individual Instruction course: contact deparmient or 
instructor to obtain section number. 



COMM Communication 

(Arts and Humanities) 

C0MM107 Oral Communication: Principles and 
Practices 
(3) REG/P-E 

Not cipeii to sludenls who have compleled COMM 100 or 
SPCH 100. Credit will he ^^rmled for only one of the 
fottowing: COMM 100 or COMM 107 or SPCH 100 or 
SPCH 107. Formerly SPCH 107. A study of and practice 
in oral commumcarion. including principles of 
interviewing, group discussion, bstening, informative 
briefings, and persuasive speeches. 

0201 (05420) STAFF MW 6:30pm-9:50pm 

(PLS 1146) 

0202 (05421) STAFF TuTh 6:30pm-9:50pm 

(PLS 1146) 

0203(05422) STAFF MTuWTh ll:00am-12;50pm 

(PLS 1146) 

C0MM324 Communication and Gender 
(3) REG/P-F/AUD. 

DIVERSITY Formerly SPCH 324. The creation of 
images of male and female, and masculine and fenumne, 
through communication, the differences in male and 
female communication behaviors and styles, and the 
imphcarions of those images and styles for male-female 
transactions. 

0201 (05464) Parry-GUes,T TuTh 6:30pm-9;50pm 
(PLS nil) 



C0MM352 Specialized Writing in Public 
Relations 
(3) REG/P-F/AUD. 

Prerequisite: COMM 351. Not open to students who have 
completed JOUR 332. Credit will be granted for only one of 
the following: COMM 352 or JOUR 332. Formerly f OUR 
332. Pubhc Relations writing for science, technology, 
health, medicine, corporate finance, educational policy, 
law and government in broadcast and techmcal media, as 
well as newspapers, magazines, proposals, speeches and 
correspondence. 

0201 (05504) Altschul. b. MW 6:30pm-9:50pm 

(SKN 1115) 

C0IVIM399 (PermReq) Honofs ThesIs 

(3) REG/P-F/AUD. 
(1201 (05525) STAFF Time and room to he arranged 

C0MM482 Intercultural Communication 
(3) REG/P-F/AUD. 

DIVERSITY Formerly SPCH 482. The major variables 
of commumcation in an intercultural context: culmral, 
racial and national differences; stereotypes; values; cultural 
assumptions; and verba] and nonverbal channels. 
1)2(11(05596) Cordova. N. MW 6:30pm-9:50pin 

(PLS 1172) 

C0MM489 (PermReq) Topical Research: Topical 
Research 
(1-3) REG. 

Individual Instruction course: contact department or 
instructor to obtain section number. 

C0MM798 Independent Study 
(1-3) REG/AUD. 
Indi\ndual Instrucnon course: contact department or 
instructor to obtain section number. 

C0MM799 Master's Thesis Research 
(1-6) REG. 

Individual Instruction course: contact department or 
instructor to obtain section number. 

C0MM899 Doctoral Dissertation Research 
(1-8) REG/S-E 

Individual Instruction course: contact department or 
instructor to obtain section number. 



CONS Sustainable Development & 
Conservation Biology 

(Life Sciences) 

C0NS609 Special Topics in Conservation Biology 

(1-3) REG/S-E 
(t2(M (05664) L)ietz, j. Time and room to be arranged 

C0NS798 (PermReq) Research Papers in 
Sustainable Development and 
Conservation Biology 
(1-4) REG/S-E 

0201 (05675) Dietz.J. Time and room to be arranged 



CPSP College Park Scholars 
Program 

(Undergraduate Studies) 

CPSP259 College Park Scholars Practicum 
(1-3) REG. 

Prerequisite: admission to College Park Scholars. Section 
0101 is internship; 0102, service-learning with Lakeland 
STARS; 0103, ser\nce-learning; 0104, service-learning 
with PLUMS; 0201, service-learning with Lakota 
Workcamp Project; and 0301, oral histories. Please see 
your Faculty Director before you register. You will need 
to complete an apphcarion form for 0201. 

0201 (05729) STAFF Time and room to be arranged 

ECON Economics 

(Behavioral and Social Sciences) 

ECON200 Principles of Micro-Economics 
(4) REG/P-F/AUD. 

CORE: Behavioral and Social Science (SB). USP 
Distributive Studies Area D: Social and Behavorial 
Sciences Course. Prerequisite: MATH 110 or plaeemeni in 
.\1ATH 115 or above. It is recommended that students complete 
ECON 200 before taking ECON 201. Credit unit be granted 
for only one of the folloumg: ECON 200 or ECON 203. 
Formerly ECON 203. This course emphasizes the 
behavior of inchvidual consumers and business firms, 
problems of international trade and finance, the 
distribunon of income, policies for ehminating poverty 
and discrimmation, the problems of envirormiental 
pollution, and the impact of different market structures 
upon economic activity. 

0201(05793) STAFF MTuWThF 11 :00am- 12:45pm 
(TLF 1101) 

0202 (05794) STAFF MTuWThF 9:00am-10:45am 

(TYD 2102) 

0203 (05795) STAFF TuWTh 6:30pm-9:25pm 

(TYD 1132) 

ECON201 Principles of Macro-Economics 
(4) REG/P-F/AUD. 

COl^: Behavioral and Social Science (SB). USP 
Distributive Studies Area D: Social and Behavorial 
Sciences Course. Prerequisite: MATH 1 10 or placement in 
MATH 1 15 or above. It is recommended that students complete 
ECON 200 before taking ECON 201. Credit will be granted 
for only one of the following: ECON 201 or ECON 205. An 
introduction to the problems of unemployment, inflation, 
and economrc growth. Emphasis on roles of monetary 
and fiscal pohcy in the conduct of macroeconomic 
policy. The efficacy of wage and price controls is 
analyzed. 

0202(05808) STAFF MTuWThF I0:(.10am-ll:45ani 

(TYD 2109) 

(1203(05809) STAFF MTuW 6:30pm-9:25pm 

(TLF 1103) 

EC0N305 Intermediate Macroeconomic Theory 
and Policy 
(3) REG/P-F/AUD. 

Praequisiles: ECON 200; and ECON 201; and MATH 
220. Credit will be granted for only one of the following: 
ECON 305 or ECON 405. Formerly ECON 401. 



70 



HOW B 



SUMMER? 



Analysis of the determination of national income, 
employment, and price levels. Discussion of consumption, 
invesnnent. inflation, and government fiscal and monetary 
policy. 

0201 (05820) STAFF TuTh 6:.^()pm-9:50pm 

(TYI) 01112) 

EC0N306 Intermediate Microeconomic Theory 
(3) REG/P-F/AUD. 

I'rereqwsilfs: ba.)\ 200: Mid tCUN' 201: mil MAIH 
220. Formerly ECON 403. Analysis of the theories of 
consumer behavior and of the firm, market systems, 
distribution theory and the role of externalities. 
0201 (05832) STAFF MW 6:30pm-9:50pm 

(TYDOlOl) 
0202(05833) STAFF MTuWThF ll:00am-12:20pm 

(SQH1117) 

EC0N340 International Economics 
(3) REG/P-F/AUD. 

PTae(iuisilc: ECON 200 mJ ECON 201. Credit u/ill he 
granted for only one oj ilie followinii: ECON 340 or ECON 
440. Formerly ECON 440. A description of international 
trade and the analysis of international transactions, 
exchange rates, and balance of payments. Analysis of 
policies of protection, devaluation, and exchange rate 
stabilization and their consequences. 
0201 (05864) STAFF MW 6:30pm-9;50pm 

(TYD 1101) 

EC0N386 Experiential Learning 

(3-6) S-F 
Prerequisite: ECON 200, ECON 201, CPA 2.75. 56 
semester hours. For ECON majors only 
020! (05875) U'.illis. J. Tunc and room to be arr,inj;cd 

EC0N399 (PnmReq) Individual Reading and 
Research For Undergraduates 

(1-3) REG/P-F/AUD. 

Individual Instruction course: contact department or 
instructor to obtain section number. Prerequisite: six 
hour^ of upper division eronoiiucs courses. 



EC0N422 Quantitative Methods In Economics I 
(3) REG/P-F/AUD. 

Prerequisites: ECON 200 and ECON 201 and ECON321 
or BMGT 230: or permission of department. Emphasizes the 
interconnection between economics problems and the 
assumptions employed in theor)', formulation, statistical 
estimation and testing of economic models, including 
single s-ariable. 

0201(05911) Kelejian MTuWThF 10:00am-l 1:20am 
(ASY .3221) 

EC0N425 Mathematical Economics 
(3) REG/P-F/AUD. 

Prrm;i(i.-i(rj: ECON .fO.> or ECON 40.\ and ECON 306 
or ECON 406, and MATH 220 or equiivlent. 
Mathematical developments of theory of household and 
firm, general equilibrium and welfare economics, market 
impcrl'ections, and role of inlorniation. 
02111(05887) STAFF MTuWThF 1 l:00ani-12:20pm 
(SQH 1121) 

EC0N799 Master's Thesis Research 
(1-6) REG. 

Individual Instruction course: conuct department or 
instructor to obtain section number. 



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College Of 
Education 

The College of Education 
prepares teachers, counselors, 
administrators and educational 
specialists to work in school and 
non-school settings, with students 
from infacy through adulthood. 
Solidly placed among the top 25 
education schools in the country, 
the college is widly recognized as 
having one of the top three 
programs in counsehng and 
personnel ser\'ices. 

A highly selective program is 
offered for teachers, 
administrators, curriculum 
developers and policy experts in 
early childhood through higher 
education, as well as special 
education. The college also 
grants degrees in human 
development and educational 
statistics, and offers graduate 
outreach programs in education 
technology and other areas. Its 
nationally renowned Center for 
Young Children otFers a creative 
learning experience for 
preschoolers an well as a living 
laboratory for the study of early 
childhood. 



EC0N899 Doctoral Dissertation Research 
(1-8) REG. 

Indisidual Instruction coutw: contaa department or 
instructor to obuin section number. 

EDCI Curriculum and Instruction 

(Education) 

EDCI298 fi'ermReq) Special Problems in Teacher 
Education 

(1-6) REG/P-F/AUD. 

■Oil (05961) STAFF Time and room to be arranged 

EDCI390 Principles and Methods of Secondary 
Education 

(3) REG/P-F/AUD. 
Prerequisites: admission to leather edisation program: and 2.5 
CPA. Corequisites: EDHD 413 and EDHD 420. For 
edueation majors only Principles and methods of teaching 
in junior and senior high schools. Instiucnonal problems 
common to all of the subject fields, considered m relaoon 
to the nccils and interests of youth, social problems and 
the ceiiiral values of society. 

112111(05992) Munyer.J. Meets 07/17/00-08/04/011 

.MTuWThF 9:00am-12:20pm 

(EDU 1315) 

EDCI424 Social Studies in the Elementary School 
(3) REG/P-F/AUD. 

Curriculum, organization and methods of teaching, 
evaluation of materials and utilization of environmcmal 
resources. Emphasis on mulaculmral education. Primarily 
for in-service teachers, grades 1-6. 
0201(06022) Kennen-Ariev, R TuTh 9;0Oun-I2J0pni 
(EDU 1121) 

EDCI434 Methods of Teaching English to 
Speakers of Other Languages 

(3) REG/P-F/AUD. 

A survey of the historical and current approaches, 
methods, and techniques of teaching English to spcaken 
of other languages ftom grammar translation to audio- 
Ungual to communicaave approaches. Aiu1«ls ot 
successfiil cla,ssroom practices which address the needs ol 
cultural and language minoritN' students. 
0201(06032) .^nand.S MW 3:40pm-7K)0piii 

tni' 2119) 

EDCI488D Selected Topics In Teacher Education: 
Materials for Creating Skilled and 
Motivated Readers (K-6) 

(3) REG/P-F/AUD. 
o:m1 (06102) Dreher. M MTuWTh l:00pm-4:45pm 
(EDU 1121) 
THIS COURSE MEETS NEW STATE OF 
MARYLAND READING REQUIREMENTS. 
Selecting, evaluating, and using a variety of 
materials to ctrate skilled and motivated readers in 
the elementary grades. Topics include nonficoon. 
fiction, basal readers, effective cbssroom libraries, 
software, and Internet resouaes lor teaching 
reading, and strategies for motivating children to 
read. 

Meets 07 /t7/00-0Sm/00 





E0CI488X Selected Topics in Teacher Education: 
Teaching AP English in the New 
Century 

(3) REG/P-F/AUD. 
0201 (06112) SLitcr.W MTuWThF l:00pm-4:15pm 
(EDU2102) 
Meels 07/17/00-08/04/00 

EDCI489 Field Experiences in Education 

(1-4) REG/P-F/AUD. 
0201 (06123) STAFF Time and room to he arranged 

EDCI498 Special Problems in Teacher Education 
(1-6) REG/P-F/AUD. 

02(11(06134) STAFF Time and room to he arranged 

EDCI761 Advanced Clinical Practices in Reading 
Assessment 
(3) REG/AUD. 

Prerequisite: EDCl 665. Coreqtiisile: EDCI 762. Clinical 
practicum in assessment focusing on strengths and needs 
in reading. Case report writing and conferences. 
0201 (06217) Codling, R. Time and room to be arranged 

EDCI762 Advanced Clinical Practices in Reading 
Instruction 
(3) REG/AUD. 

Prerequisite: EDCI 665. Corequisite: EDCI 761. Clinical 
practicum in instruction focusing on instructional 
techniques and diagnostic teaching. 
0201(06227) Codling. R, Time and mom to be arranged 

EDCI788G Selected Topics in Teacher Education: 

Proseminar 

(3) REG/AUD. 
0201(06237) STAFF Time and room to be arranged 

EDCI788U (PermReq) Selected Topics in Teacher 
Education: Instructional Implications 
of Cognitive Sciences 
(3) REG/AUD. 

For Master's certification students only. 

0201(06247) Dreher.M. MW 9:00am-12:20pm 

(EDU2102) 
0202(06248) Slater, W. MW 9:00am-12:20pm 

(EDU 1121) 

EDCI798 Special Problems In Teacher Education 
(1-6) REG/AUD. 

Individual Instruction course: contact department or 
instructor to obtain section number, 

EDCI799 IVIaster's Thesis Research 
(1-6) REG. 

Individual Instruction course: contact department or 
instructor to obtain section number. 

EDCI888 Apprenticeship in Education 
(1-8) REG/AUD. 

Individual Instruction course: contact department or 
instructor to obtain section number. 



EDCI899 Doctoral Dissertation Research 
(1-8) REG. 

Individual Instruction course: contact department or 
instructor to obtain section number. 



EDCP Education Counseling and 
Personnel Services 

(Education) 

EDCP108E College and Career Advancement: 

Concepts and Skills 

(1) REG/P-F/AUD. 
0201 (06325) STAFF Time and room to be arranged 

EDCP386 (PermReq) Experiential Learning 
(3-6) REG/P-E 

Individual Instruction course: contact department or 
instructor to obtain section number. Prerequisite: permission 
of department. 56 semester hours. 

EDCP489 (PermReq) Field Experiences in 

Counseling and Personnel Services 
(1-4) REG/P-F/AUD. 

Individual Instruction course: contact department or 
instructor to obtain section number. USP Distributive 
Studies Area D: Social and Behavioral Sciences Course. 

EDCP498 Special Problems in Counseling and 
Personnel Services 
(1-3) REG. 

Individual Instruction course: contact department or 
instructor to obtain section number. 

EDCP798 Special Problems in Counseling and 
Personnel Services 
(1-6) REG/AUD. 

Individual Instruction course: contact department or 
instructor to obtain section number. 

EDCP799 Master's Thesis Research 

(1-6) REG. 
Individual Instruction course: contact department or 
instructor to obtain section number. 

EDCP888 Apprenticeship In Counseling and 
Personnel Services 
(1-8) REG/AUD. 

Individual Instruction course: contact department or 
instructor to obtain section number. 

EDCP888U (PermReq) Apprenticeship in 

Counseling and Personnel Services: 
College Student Personnel 
(3) REG/AUD. 
0201 (06459) STAFF Tu l:30pm-4:30pni 

(ARC 1127) 
Time and room to be arranged Dis 

EDCP889 Internship in Counseling and Personnel 
Services 
(1-8) REG/AUD. 

Individual Instruction course: contact department or 
instructor to obtain section number. 



EDCP899 Doctoral Dissertation Research 
(1-8) REG. 

Individual Instruction course: contact department or 
instructor to obtain section number. 



EDHD Education, Human 
Development 

(Education) 

EDHD300 (PermReq) Human Development and 
Learning 

(6) REG/AUD. 

Prerequisite: admission to teacher education program. Major 
concepts and theories of human development and 
learmng and their implications for the educational 
process. One half day a week in school to observe student 
beh.avior. participate m classroom activities, and attend 
senunars on school topics. 

0201 (06524) Robereon-TchabcE. MTuWThF 9 JOam-l 2:30pm 
(EDU 3315) 

EDHD306 Study of Human Behavior 
(3) REG/AUD. 

USP DistributitJe Studies Area D: Social and Behavioral 
Science Course. The scientific principles of human 
behavior, development, and adjustment. Field work: 
observation, recording, and analysis of the behavior of an 
individual. Does not satisfy requirements of professional 
teacher education program. 

0201 (06534) Reio,T MW 12:30pm-3:00pm 

(EDU 3315) 

Time and room to be arranged Dis 

EDHD411 Child Growth and Development 
(3) REG/AUD. 

Theoretical approaches to and empirical studies of 
physical, psychological and social development from 
conception to puberry. Imphcations for home, school and 
community. 

0201(06565) Killen,M. TuTh 12:30pm-3:40pm 

(EDU 3233) 

EDHD41 3 Adolescent Development 
(3) REG/P-F/AUD. 

Adolescent development, including special problems 
encountered in contemporary culture. Observational 
component and individual case study. 
0201 (06576) Batde,A. MW 4:00pm-7:00pm 

(EDU 3233) 
Time and room to be arranged Dis 

EDHD460 Educational Psychology 
(3) REG/P-F/AUD. 

Prerequisite: PSYC 100 or EDHD 306 or permission of 
department. Application of psychology to learning 
processes and theories. Individual differences, 
measurement, motivation, emotions, intelligence, 
attitudes, problem solving, thinking and conununicating 
in educational settings. (May not be substituted for 
EDHD 300 by students in professional teacher education 
programs.) 

0201 (06606) Reio, T TuTh 7:00pm- 1 0: 1 0pm 

(EDU 3233) 



72 



HOW 



IS SUMMER'? 



EDHD489 (I'lrmRe,)) Field Experiences In 
Education 

(1-4) REG. 

Individual Instruction course: contact department or 
instructor to obtain section number 

EDHD498 Special Problems in Education 
(1-3) REG/P-F/AUD. 

Individual Instruction course; conucl department or 
instructor to obtain section number. 

EDHD600 Introduction to Human Development 
and Child Study 

(3) REG/AUD. 

An over\'icw of the niultidistiplmary, scientific principles 
which describe human development and behavior and an 
application of these principles in an analysis of a 
behavioral record. Techniques of observation, recording, 
and analysis of human behavior. Emphasis on critiquing 
and applying research findings. 

0201(06620) Batde.A. TuTh 4:00pm-7;00pm 

(EDU 3315) 

Time and room to be arranged Dis 

EDHD789 Internship in Human Development 

(3-8) REG/AUD. 
Individual Instruction course: contact department or 
instructor to obtain section number. 

EDHD798 Special Problems in Education 
(1-6) REG/AUD. 

Individual Instruction course: contact department or 
in.structor to obtain section iiuiiiher, 

EDHD799 Master's Thesis Research 
(1-6) REG. 

Individual Instruction course: contact department or 
instructor to obtain section number 

EDHD888 Apprenticeship in Education 
(1-8) REG/AUD. 

Individual Instruction course: contact department or 

instructor lo obtain section number 

EDHD889 Internship in Education 
(3-8) REG/AUD. 

Individual Instruction course: cont.ici deparmient or 
instructor to obtain section luiiiibcr 

E0HD899 Doctoral Dissertation Research 
(1-8) REG. 

Individual Instruction course: contact department or 
instructor to obtain section number. 

EDMS Measurement, Statistics, 
and Evaluation 

(Education) 

EDMS451 Introduction to Educational Statistics 
(3) REG/AUD. 

Junior slunJitiji. Introduction to sutistical reasoning: 
location and dispenion meisurcs: computer applications; 
regression and corrclanon; formation of hypotheses teso; 
l-test; one-way analysis of variance; analysis of 
contingency tables. 

0201 (06703) STAFF MTuWTh 1 2:()0pm- 1 :40pm 
(EDU 2119) 



EDMS645 Quantitative Research Methods I 

(3) REG/AUD. 
Research design and statistical applications in educational 
research: data rcpresentaoon; descriptive sutistics; 
estimation and hj-pothesis testing. Applicaaon of statistical 
computer packages is emphasized. 
0201 (06715) STAFF MTuWTh 5:00pm-6:40pm 

(EDU 0212) 

EDM$646 Quantitative Research Methods II 
(3) REG/AUD. 

Prerequisite: EDMS 645. A second-level inferential 
statistics course with emphasis on analysis of variance 
procedures and designs. Assignments include student 
analysis of survey data. Application of statistical computer 
packages is emphasized. 

0201 (06726) Roberts,]. MTuWTh 5:00pm-6:40pm 
(EDU 1107) 

EDMS651 Intermediate Statistics in Education 
(3) REG/AUD. 

Prerequisite: EDMS 646 or equiiKilent. Multi-way anal)'sis of 
variance; analysis of covariance; multiple regression and 
correlation analysis: computer packages for statistical 
analysis. 

0201 (06736) Roberts. J. MTuWTh 7:00pm-8:40pm 
(EDU 1121) 

EDMS779 (PermReq) Seminar in Applied 

Statistics 

(1) REG. 
0201 (06746) STAFF Time and room to be arranged 
Enrollment restricted to students with a major or minor 
in measurement, statistics, and evaluation. Concurrent 
registration for one credit is require-d when taking EDMS 
651. 

EDMS798 Special Problems in Education 
(1-6) REG/AUD. 

Individual Instruction course: contact department or 
instructor to obtain section number. 

EDMS799 Master's Thesis Research 
(1-6) REG. 

Individual Instruction course: contact department or 
instructor to obtain section number 

EDMS889 (PermReq) Intomship in Measurement 

and Statistics 

(3-12) REG. 
Individual Instruction course: contact department or 
instructor to obtain section number. 

EDMS899 Doctoral Dissertation Research 

(1-8) REG. 
Indisidual Instrucuon course: contact department or 
instructor to obtain section number. 



EDPA Education Policy, Planning 
and Administration 

(Education) 

EDPA489 Field Experiences in Education 

(1-4) REG/P-F/AUD. 
Individual Instruction course: contact department or 
instructor to obtain section number. 

EDPA498 (PermReq) Special Problems in 
Education 
(1-3) REG/P-F/AUD. 

Individual Instrucnon course: conuct department or 
instructor to obtain section number. 

EDPA634 The School Curriculum 
(3) REG/AUD. 

A foundatiom course embracing the curriculum as a 
whole from early childhood through adolescence, 
including a resicw of historical developments, an analysis 
of condibons affecting curriculum change, an 
examinadon of issues in curriculum making, and a 
consideration of current trends in curriculum design. 
0201 (06906) Selden, S. TuTh 3:40pm-7:00pm 

EDU 2101) 

EDPA788A Special Topics in Education Policy 
and Administration: Education 
in East Asia 
(3) REG/AUD. 

02(11 (06927) STAFF MW 3:40pm-7:OOpm 

(EDU 0206) 

EDPA798 (PmiiReqi Special Problems 
in Education 
(1-6) REG/AUD. 

Individual Instruction course: conuct department or 

instructor to obtain section number. 

EDPA799 Master's Thesis Research 
(1-6) REG. 

Individual Instruction course: contact department or 

instructor to obtain section number 

E0PA837 Curriculum Theory and Research 
(3) REG/AUD. 

Prerequisite: EDPA 6}y CriDcal and analytic review of 
major themes, concepts and language forms reles'ant to 
current curriculum theory and research. 
02(11(07050) Selden, S. TuTh 7:00pm- I0:20pm 

(EDU 2101) 
This course will focus on r.uc. class, and social justice. 

EDPA889 Internship in Education 

(3-8) REG/AUD. 
Individual Instruction course: contan department or 
instructor to obuin sesOon number 

EDPA899 Doctoral Dissertation Research 

(1-8) REG/S-F. 
Individual lastruction course: conua department or 
instructor to obuin section number 





EDSP Education, Special 

(Education) 

EDSP376 Fundamentals of Sign Language 
(3) REG/P-F/AUD. 

Receptive and expressive skiUs in American Sign 
Language. Examinanon of the causes of deafness, 
characteristics of deaf education, and aspects of the 
culture of the deaf community. 

0201(07208) Lyles.D. MW 7:00pm-10:00pm 

(EDU 1315) 

EDSP402 (PermReq) Field Placement: Severe 
Disabilities I 
(2-5) REG. 

Pre- or corequisites: {EDSP 400; Mid EDSP 404\ or 
permission ofdepurtmeni. PracQcum experience in settings 
serving severely disabled individuals. Enrollment bmited 
to those admitted to severely handicapped specialty area. 
Field placement for two to five half-days per week. 
Students without the required co- or prerequisites can 
register for this course with departmental approval. Open 
to special education graduate students only for this term. 
0201 (07219) STAFF Time and room to be arranged 

EDSP421 (PermReq) Field Placement: Early 
Childhood Special Education I 
(2-3) REG. 

Pre- or iorequisile: EDSP 420: and EDCl 410. Practicum 
ex-perience in settings serving preschool handicapped 
children. Opportunities for studying the patterns of 
development and learning among nonhandicapped and 
handicapped infants and older preschoolers. Enrollment 
bmited to students admitted to early childhood specialty. 
Field placement for two or three half-days per week. 
Students without the required pre- or corequisites can 
register for this course with deparmiental approval. Open 
to special education graduate students only for this term. 
0201 (07230) STAFF Time and room to be arranged 

EDSP442 (PermReq) Field Placement: 
Educationally Handicapped I 
(2-3) REG. 
Pre- or corequisite: {EDSP 441 <md EDCl 456} or 
permission of department. Practicum experience in settings 
serving educationally handicapped individuals. 
Demonstration of the content of EDSP 441. Enrollment 
limited to students admitted to educationally handicapped 
specialty. Field placement for t\s'o or three half-days per 
week. Students without the required co- or prerequisites 
can register for this course with departmental approval. 
Open to special education graduate students onlv for this 
term. 
0201 (07241) STAFF Time and room to be arranged 

EDSP461 (PermReq) Field Placement: 
Secondary/Transition I 
(3) REG. 

Pre- or coreqiiisite: EDSP 460. For EDSP majors only. 
Practicum experience in secondary/transition programs 
for individuals with disabilities. Field placement for two 
half-days per week. Students without the required pre- or 
corequisites can register for the course with departmental 
approval. Open to special education graduate students 
only for this term. 
0201 (07262) STAFF Time and room to be arranged 



EDSP470 Introduction to Special Education 
(3) REG/AUD. 

Designed to give an understanding of the needs of all 
types of exceptional children. Open to all students except 
undergraduate special education majors. 
0201 (07273) STAFF MTuTh 7:00pni-10:00pni 

(EDU 2119) 
Mills 07/n'00-08'W/00 

EDSP489 Field Experiences in Special Education 

(1-4) REG/P-F/AUD. 
0201 (07284) STAFF Tunc and room to be arranged 

EDSP491 Characteristics of Learning 
Disabled Students 
(3) REG/AUD. 

Prerequisite: EDSP 470 oj permission ol department. 
Diagnosis, etiology, physical, social, and emotional 
characteristics of learning disabled students. 
0201 (07294) STAFF TuTh 7:00pm-10:00pm 

(EDU 2102) 

EDSP498 Special Problems in Special Education 
(1-6) REG. 

Indmdual Instruction course: contact department or 
instructor to obt.un section number 

EDSP499R Workshops, Clinics, and Institutes 
In Special Education: Seminar on 
Deaf Culture 

(2) REG/P-F 

0201(07316) Glower. R. TuTh 7:00pm-10:00pm 

(EDU 1107) 
This 2 credit seminar will provide a four week overview 
of deaf culture. The class will address such issues as how- 
technology helps and hinders deaf people, how deaf 
children are raised, and political and social issues within 
deaf culture. Discussions will be lively and the issues 
thought provoking. 

Meets 07 n-'OO-OS'lO'OO 

EDSP600 (PermReq) Exceptional Children and 
Youth 

(3) REG/AUD. 

Prerequisite: 9 hours in special education and permission of 
department. Examines research relevant to the education of 
exceptional children and youth. 

0201 (07326) Voth. L. Sa 9:00am-5:20pm 

(EDU 2101) 

EDSP678A Seminar in Special Education: Trauma 
and Resilience in Early Childhood 
(3) REG/AUD. 

0201(07346) Newcomb. S. TuTh 4:00pm-7:ll0pm 
(EDU 2119) 

EDSP788E Selected Topics in Special Education: 
Process of Assessments & Curriculum 
Development, to Build Exemplary 
Programs for Students with 
Deaf/Blind & Other Low Incidence 
Disabilities, 
(2) REG/AUD. 

0201 (07386) STAFF Time and room to be arranged 



EDSP788K Selected Topics in Special Education: 
Foundations and Educational 
Implications of Deaf Blindness & 
Other Low Incidence Disabilities 
(2) REG/AUD. 

0201(07395) STAFF Trine .uiJ room to he arranged 

EDSP798 Special Problems in Special Education 
(1-6) REG. 

Individual Instruction course: contact department or 
instructor to obtam section number. 

EDSP799 Master's Thesis Research 
(1-6) REG. 

Individual Instruction course: contact department or 
instructor to obtain section number. 

EDSP888 Apprenticeship in Special Education 
(1-8) REG. 

Individual Instruction course: contact department or 
instructor to obtain section number. 

EDSP889 Internship in Special Education 
(3-8) REG. 

Individual Instruction course: contact department or 
instructor to obtain sectton number. 

EDSP899 Doctoral Dissertation Research 
(1-8) REG. 

Individual Instruction course: contact department or 
instructor to obtain section number. 



ENAE Engineering, Aerospace 

(The A. James Clark School of 
Engineering) 

ENAE499 Elective Research 

(1-3) REG/P-F/AUD. 

Individual Instruction course: contact deparmient or 
instructor to obtain section number. 

ENAE799 Master's Thesis Research 
(1-6) REG. 

Individual Instruction course: contact department or 
instructor to obtain section number. 

ENAE899 Doctoral Dissertation Research 
(1-8) REG. 

Individual Instruction course: contact department or 
instructor to obtain section number. 



ENBE Biological Resources 
Engineering 

(Agriculture and Natural Resources) 

ENBE388 (PermReq) Honors Thesis Redearch 
(3-6) REG 

Individual Instruction course: contact department or 
instructor to obtain section number. 



74 



H W 



SUMMER? 



ENBE489 Special Problems In Biological 
Engineering 

(1-3) REG/P-F/AUD. 

Individual instruction course: contact department or 
instructor to obtain section number 

ENBE499 Special Problems in Agricultural 
Engineering Technology 

(1-3) REG/P-F/AUD. 

Individual Instruction course: contact department or 
instructor to obtain section number, 

ENBE699 Special Problems in Biological 
Engineering 

(1-6) REG/AUD. 
Individual Instruction course: contact department or 
instructor to obtain section number 

ENBE799 Master's Thesis Research 
(1-6) REG. 

Individual Instruction course: contact department or 
instructor to obtain section number 

ENBE899 Doctoral Dissertation Research 
(1-8) REG. 

Individual Instruction course: contact deparnnent or 
instructor to obtain section number 



ENCE Engineering, Civil 

(The A. James Clark School of 
Engineering) 

ENCE489 Special Problems in Civil Engineering 
(1-3) REG/P-F/AUD. 

Indindual Instruction course: contact department or 
instructor to obtain section number. 

ENCE688 Advanced Topics in Civil Engineering 
(1-3) REG/AUD. 

Individual Instruction course: contact department or 
instructor to obtain section number 

ENCE689 Seminar 

(1-16) REG/AUD. 

Ii!di\'idual Instruction course: contact department or 
instructor to obtain section number, 

ENCE799 Master's Thesis Research 

(1-6) REG. 
Individual Instruction coui^e: contact department or 
instructor to obtain section number. 

ENCE899 Doctoral Dissertation Research 
(1-8) REG. 

Indindual Instruction course: contact department or 
instructor to obtain section number. 



ENCH Engineering, Chemical 

(The A. James Clark School of 
Engineering) 

ENCH250 Computer Methods in Chemical 
Engineering 

(3) REG/P-F/AUD. 

Prmquisim: ESES 100; and ESCH 213. Coreqiiisilc: 
M-iTH 246. Algorithm development and application ot' 
software to the analysis of chemical engineering 
problems. File management and editing, graphics and 
numerical methods. Use of spreadsheets, statistics/math 
software and process simulators for the design of chemical 
process equipment. 

02(11 (07776) Wang. N. MTuWThF 8:00am-9:20am 
(CHE 2136) 

ENCH488 Research 

(1-3) REG. 

Indiwdual Instruction course: contact department or 
instructor to obtain section number 

ENCH648 Special Problems in Chemical 
Engineering 

(1-6) REG. 

Individual Instruction course: contact department or 
m-itructor to obtain section number 

ENCH799 Master's Thesis Research 
(1-6) REG. 

Individual Instruction course: contact department or 
instructor to obtain section number. 

ENCH899 Doctoral Dissertation Research 

(1-8) REG. 
individual Instruction course: contact dep.innK-nl or 
instructor to obtain section number 



ENCO Engineering, Cooperative 
Education 

(The A. James Clark School of 
Engineering) 

ENC0098 (PcrmRiij) Summer Co-op Work 
Experience 

(No credit) S-F 
0201(07854) Sauber. H. Time and loom to be arranged 
Special fee required for this course. (Sec fees in 
"Academic Services" section of this guide.) 

ENEE Engineering, Electrical 

(The A. James Clark School of 
Engineering) 

ENEE499 (PnmR,:i) Senior Projects in Electrical 
Engineering 

(1-3) REG. 
0201 (07985) Pap.miarcou.A. Time and room to be 
arranged 




A. James 
Clark School 
of Engineering 

Glenn L. Martin 
Institute ofTechnology 

For more than lOd years, the 
engineering program has 
contributed to the academic and 
research reputation of the 
university. The Clark School, now- 
recognized as one of the 20 best 
engineering schools in the 
nadon, has departments in 
aerospace, biological resource, 

i chemical, civil and 

^ environmental, electrical and 
computer, fire protection, 
materials and nuclear, and 
mechanical engineering, with 
emphasis on the interdisciplinary 
nature of research and education 
in these areas. Student teams 
collaborate on projects like 
alternative fuel vehicles, robots, 
space technology, smart structures 
and manufacturing systems. 

Engineering research at Maryland 
is closely tied to the regions 
strengths in information 
technology, biotechnology and 
■ communications. The university 
" serves as a resource to start-up 
technology-based companies and 
to established industries that need 
technical assistance. 





75 




ENEE699 (PermReq) Independent Studies in 
Electrical Engineering 

(1-3) REG/S-F. 

Individual Instrucrion course; contact department or 
instructor to obtain section number. 

ENEE799 (PermReq) Master's Thesis Research 
(1-6) S-F. 

U201 (07998) Tits, A. Time and room to be arranged 

ENEE899 (PermReq) Doctoral Dissertation 
Research 

(1-8) S-F 
0201(08009) Tits. A. Tmie and room to be arranged 



ENES Engineering Science 

(The A. James Clark School of 
Engineering) 

ENES220 Mechanics of Materials 
(3) REG/P-F/AUD. 

Prereqmsites: ENES l02:amtM4TH !4I:muIPHYS 161. 
For engineering majors only (not indiiditig ENEE majors). 
Stress and deformation of solids-rods, beams, shafts, 
columns, tanks, and other structural, machine and vehicle 
members. Topics include stress transformation using 
Mohr's circle; shear and moment diagrams; derivation of 
elastic curves; and Euler's buckling formula. Design 
problems related to this material are given in lab. 
(1201(08080) STAFF MTuWTh 9;30am-10;50am 
(EGR 0135) 
TuTh 12;30pm-2;30pm 
(EGR 0135) Dis 



ENFP Engineering, Fire Protection 

(The A. James Clark School of 
Engineering) 

ENFP429 (PermReq) Independent Studies 

(1-3) REG/P-F 
0201 (08151) Spivak. S Time .uid room to be arranged 

ENFP431 Building Safety and the Law 
(3) REG/P-F/AUD. 

junior standing. Responding to natural and manufactured 
building hazards requires a complex legal environment, 
including regulation and liabihtv'. Key topics include the 
use of model codes, admimscrative regulation, 
retrospective codes, federal preemption, arson, 
performance based codes, risk based regulation, 
engineering malpractice, product liability and disaster 
investigation. 

0201 (08161) Branmgan,V. TuTh 6:00pm-9;00pm 
(EGR 0135) 

ENFP619 Graduate Seminar 
(1-3) REG/AUD. 
(.)201 (08182) STAFF Time and room to be arranged 

ENFP629 Selected Topics 

(3-6) REG/AUD. 
0201 (08193) Spivak. S, Tunc and room to be arranged 

ENFP649 Special Problems 

(1-3) REG/AUD. 
0201 (08214) STAFF Time and room to be arranged 

ENFP799 Master's Thesis Research 
(1-6) REG/S-F 

Individual instruction course; contact department or 
instructor to obtain section number. 



Engmeer?!?^ at Maryland 




Legal View of 
Builciing Safety 
Makes Good Sense. 
New technologies 
,ind ch;inging 
LDniiminiry- patterns 
vNill require 
constantly updated 
building codes and 
regulations. 



ENFP 431 Building Safety and the Law 

(3 credits) July 17 - August 25 

Vincent Brannigan, professor of fire protection engineering, gives an 
overview of the full range of safety problems in the modern built 
environment. This information is especially valuable for upper-level students 
in engineering, criminal justice, urban studies, architecture or any other 
professional field that requires a working knowledge of builciing safety laws. 
Discuss the appropriate response to both natural and manufactured building 
hazards, including regulation and liability issues. Key topics include the use of 
model codes, administrative regulation, retrospective codes, federal 
preemption, arson, performance based codes, risk based regulation, 
engmeering malpractice, product liability and disaster investigation. 

Professor Brannigan has a law degree from Georgetown University and is a 
member of the Maryland and Washington, D.C., bar associations. Prior to 
joining the faculty at the University of Maryland, he worked at the 
Consumer Product Safety Commission, the National Fire Prevention and 
Control Administration and the Center for Fire Research at the National 
Bureau of Standards. He has been a consultant on technology and the law to 
the Office of Technology Assessment and other federal agencies and has 
assisted numerous local regulatory otfici;ils. 

For more information, call 301-405-3922. 



76 



HOW 



IS SUMMER? 



ENGL English 

(Arts and Humaniries) 

ENGL101 Introduction to Writing 
(3) REG. 

An introductory counc in expository wriang. 

0201 (08279) STAFF MTuWThF 9:30am-10:50am 

(SQH 1107) 
0202(08280) STAFF TuTh 6;00pm-9:15pm 

(SQH 1103) 
0203(08281) STAFF MTuWThF ll:00am-12:20pm 

(SQH 1 105) 
0204(08282) STAFF MW 6:00pm-9:15pm 

(SQH 2117) 
An introductory course in academic writing. 



ENGL101B (PermReq) Introduction to Writing 
(3) REG. 

For Bridge students only. 

0201 (08292) STAFF MTuWThF 1 :00pm-2:20pm 
(Arranged) 

ENGL101X Introduction to Writing 
(3) REG. 

For students for whom English is a second language. 
0201 (08304) STAFF MTuWThF 9:30am-10:50am 
(PNC 1147 A) 

ENGL205 Introduction to Shakespeare 

(3) REG/P-F/AUD. 
CORE: Literature (HL) Recommended Jot non-majon. 
Reading of representative worb. Genre, action, character, 
theme, language, and staging. Shakespeare's relation to 
Renaissance culture. 

0201(08314) Eicke.L. MW 9:00am- 12: 15pm 

(SYM 2109) 

ENGL222 American Literature: 1865 to Present 

(3) REG/P-F/AUD. 
CORE: Literature (HL) Sur\evs American wTiting fiom 
the Cm\ War through the Cold War. Authors such as 
Clemens. Frost, Hunton. Bellow. 
0201(08325) Singer, M. MW 1:OOpm-4:15pm 

(SQH 1101) 

ENGL241 Inti^oduction to the Novel 

(3) REG/P-F/AUD. 
CORE: Literature ^HL) Historical, formal, social 
questions about the genre. Readings drawn from a range 
of cultures and communities. 

0201(08346) Salamanca,]. TuTh 9:00am- 12: 15pm 
(SQH 2122) 

ENGL243 Introduction to Poeti^ 
(3) REG/P-F/AUD. 
CORE: Literature (HL) How poetry works. Focus on 
style, subject, rhythm, \-oice. technique and structure. 
Readings from a range of cultures and communities. 
0201(08357) Jessar.K. MW 6:00pm-9: 1 5pm 

(SQH 1107) 



ENGL250 Introduction to Literature by Women 

(3) REG/P-F/AUD. 
CORE: Literature (HL) DIVERSITY Abo offered as 
\VMST 255. Credit mil be granted for only one of the 
following: ES'GL 250 or li'MST 255. Images of women in 
Uterature by and about wt)men. 

0201(08378) Gordon, M. TuTh l:00pm-4: 15pm 

(SQH 1105) 

ENGL310 Medieval and Renaissance British 
Literature 
(3) REG/P-F/AUD. 

Prerequisite: two lower-lefel English lourses. at least one in 
literature; or permission of department. Detailed study of 
selected major niedie\-al and Renaissance works written 
in England. Cultural amtudes and historical contexts. 
May include Beowulf, Anglo-Sa.xon lyric, drama, sonnets; 
works of women writers, Chaucer, Spenser, Sidney. Some 
readings in .Middle English. 

1121)1(08419) Marcuse.M. TuTh 6:00pm-9:l Spin 

(SQH 1105) 



ENGL312 Romantic to Modem British Literature 

(3) REG. 
Detailed study of selected major te.xts ftom the 19th and 
20th centuries. Transitions from Romanticism to 
Victorian age to Modernism. Historical, social. Uterary 
contexts. Issues such as nse of democracy: industrial 
revolution; the "woman question"; revxiludons in Uterary 
form. Authors might include Wordsworth, Austen, 
Dickens, Arnold, TS. Eliot, Woolf. 
0201(08430) Kleine.D. MW l;00pm-4:15pm 

(SQH 1107) 

ENGL313 American Literature 
(3) REG. 

Pmtijuisite: two lower-letrl English courses, at least one in 
literature; or permission of depanment. A detailed study of 
selected major te.\t3 of American literature from the 17th 
cenmry to the 20th century-. Issues such as race, gender, 
and regionalism. Authors such as Franklin, Hawthorne, 
Dickinson, Hemingway, and Morrison. 
0201(08441) Forrester, M. TuTh l:00pm-4:15pm 
(SQH 1107) 

ENGL348R Literary Works by Women: 

Representing Race and Gender in the 
Twenty-first Century 
(3) REG/P-F/AUD. 

DIVERSITY 

(1201(08461) RayS TuTh 6:00pm-9: 1 5pm 

(SQH 111171 

ENGL379G Special Topics in Literature: The 
Cinema of Alfred Hitchcock 
(3) REG. 

0201(08491) .VliUer.J TuTh t.:.V»pm-IO:OOpm 

(SQH 1120) 



ENGL380 (I'ermReq) Internship 

(3-6) REG/P-F/AUD. 
Prcrrquisile: permission of department. The English 
Deparrmenr's mtemship program. Prrprofesuonal 
experience in wntmg and editing m a variety of fields. 

0201 (08521) Trnrhek. M Trnie and mom to be arranged 

ENGL391 Advanced Composition 
(3) REG. 

Prerequisite: 56 hours of college credit u4tuh must irtclude 
ESGL tot or equiiMlent. An advanced composiDon 
course which emphasizes constructing written arguments 
accommodated to real audiences. 

0202 (08534) STAFF MTuWThF 9;30am-10:50am 

(SQH nil) 
0203(08535) STAFF MTuWThF 11 :00am- 12:20pm 

(SQH 1123) 
0204(08536) STAFF MW 6:il0pm-9:15pm 

(SQH 21 19) 
0205(08537) STAFF TuTh 6.00pm-9: 15pm 

(SQH 2122) 

ENGL393 Technical Writing 
(3) REG. 

Prerequisiic: 56 hours oj colkgc credit u-huh must inctuJe 
EiVGL to I or equivalent. The wnting of technical papen 
and reports. 

0201 (08564) STAFF MTuWThF 8:Oaam-9:20am 

(SQH 2119) 

0202 (08565) STAFF MTuWThF 9:30am- 10:50aiii 

(SQH 2120) 
0204(08566) STAFF MTuWThF 11 :00am- 12:20pm 

(SQH 2119) 
0206(08567) STAFF MW 6:l«ipm-9:15pm 

(SQH 1123) 
0207(08568) STAFF MW 6:00pm-9:15pm 

(SQH 1111) 
0209(08569) ST.\FF TuTh 6:0(ipm-9: 1 5pm 

(SQH 1121) 
0210(08570) STAFF TuTh 6:00pm-9:1 Spin 

(SQH 1123) 

ENGL393X Technical Writing 
(3) REG. 

Prerequisite: 56 hours of college credit uhu'h must include 
E\CL 101 or eqiHwlent. For students for whom English 
is a second language. 

0201 (08583) STAFF MTuWThF 9:30jin-10:50>iii 

(SQH 21 19) 

0202 (08584) STAFF TuTh 6.-00pm-9.I5pin 

(SQH 1111) 

II2II3 (0«585) STAFF M W 6:tlOpm-9: 1 5pm 

(SQH 1121) 





ENGL394 Business Writing 
(3) REG. 

Prereqiiisiie: 56 hours of college aedil. tMch musi include 
ENGL 101 or equivaleiil. Intensive practice in the forms 
of written communication common in the business 
world-letters, memos, short reports, and proposals. 
Principles of rhetoric and etfecnve style. This course 
satisfies the junior English requirement. 

0201 (08604) STAFF MTuWThF 9:30am-10:50am 

(SQH 1105) 

0202 (08605) STAFF MTuWThF 9:30am-10:50am 

(SQH 1101) 

0203(08606) STAFF MTuWThF ll:00am-12:20pm 

(SQH 1 107) 

0204 (08607) STAFF MW 6:00pm-9:15pm 

(SQH 1105) 

0205 (08608) STAFF TuTh 6:00pm-9:15pm 

(SQH 2121) 

ENGL404 Shakespeare: The Later Works 
(3) REG/P-F/AUD. 

Prerc^uijj/f . Iwo English courses in literalim or permission oj 
department. Close study of selected plays from the second 
half of Shakespearx:'s career. Generic issues of later 
tragedies, later comedies, romances. Language, theme, 
dramatic technique, sources, and early modern English 
social-historical context. 

0201(08638) Grossman. M. MW 6:00pm-9:15pm 
(SQH 1101) 

ENGL429 (PermRcq) Independent Research 
in English 

(1-6) REG/P-F/AUD. 

Individual Instruction coune: contact department or 
instructor to obtain section number, 

ENGL489A Special Topics in English Language: 
The Language of Advertising 

(3) REG/P-F/AUD. 
0201(08670) Hendrickson.A. MW 6:00pm-9:15pm 
(SQH 1117) 

ENGL699 (PermReq) Independent Study 
(1-3) REG/AUD. 

Individual Instruction course: contact department or 
instructor to obtain section number. 

ENGL799 Master's Thesis Research 
(1-6) REG. 

Indisidual Instnicnon course: contact department or 
instructor to obtain section number. 

ENGL899 Doctoral Dissertation Research 
(1-8) REG. 

Individual Instruction course; contact department or 
instructor to obtain section number. 



ENMA Engineering, IVIaterials 

(The A. James Clark School of 
Engineering) 

ENMA499 (PermReq) Senior Laboratory Project 

(3) REG/P-F/AUD. 
0201(08756) Chnstou.A. Time and room to be arranged 



ENMA698 Special Problems in Materials Science 
and Engineering 

(1-3) REG/AUD. 

Individual Instruction course: contact department or 
instructor to obtain section number. 

ENMA799 (PermReq) Master's Thesis Research 
(1-6) REG. 

Individual Instruction course: contact department or 
instructor to obtain secDon number. 

ENMA899 (PermReq) Doctoral Dissertation 
Research 

(1-8) REG. 

Individual Instruction course: contact department or 
instructor to obtain section number. 



ENIVIE Engineering, Mechanical 

(The A. James Clark School of 
Engineering) 

ENME488 (PermReq) Special Problems 
(3) REG/P-F/AUD. 

0201(08886) Auune. S, Time and room to be arranged 

ENME799 Master's Thesis Research 
(1-6) REG. 

lndi\idual Instruction course: contact department or 



uctor tn obt.r 



I numbe 



ENME808 Advanced Topics in Mechanical 
Engineering 

(3) REG/AUD. 
02(11(08929) diMarzo, M. Time and room to be arra 

ENME899 Doctoral Dissertation Research 
(1-8) REG. 

lndi\idual Instruction course: contact department or 
instructor to obtain secnon number. 



ENNU Engineering, Nuclear 

(The A.James Clark School of 
Engineering) 

ENNU468 Research 

(2-3) REG. 

Individual Instruction coune: contact department or 
instructor to obtain section number. 

ENNU648 Special Problems in Nuclear 
Engineering 

(1-6) REG. 

Individual Instruction course: contact department or 
instructor to obtain secnon number. 

ENNU799 Master's Thesis Research 

(1-6) REG. 

Individual Instrucuon course: contact deparmient or 
instructor to obtain section number. 

ENNU899 Doctoral Dissertation Research 

(1-8) REG. 
Individual Instruction course: contact department or 
instructor to obtain section number. 



ENPM Engineering, Professional 
Masters 

(The A. James Clark School of 
Engineering) 

ENPM808 (PermReq) Advanced Topics 

in Engineering 

(1-3) REG/AUD. 
1121 1 1 (09073) STAFF Time and room to be arranged 

ENRE Reliability Engineering 

(The A. James Clark School of 
Engineering) 

ENRE648 (PermReq) Special Problems in 
Reliability Engineering 
(1-6) REG/AUD. 

Individual Instruction course: contact department or 
instructor to obtain section number. 

ENRE799 Master's Thesis Research 

(1-6) REG/S-F. 
Individual Instruction course: contact department or 
instructor to obtain section number. 

ENRE899 Doctoral Dissertation Research 

(1-8) REG/S-R 
Individual Instruction coune: contact department or 
instructor to obtain section number. 



ENSE Systems Engineering 

(The A. James Clark School of 
Engineering) 

ENSE799 (PermReq) Systoms Engineering 
Thesis: Masters Thesis Research 
(1-6) REG. 

Individual Instruction coune: contact department or 
instructor to obtain section number. 
Contact Systems Engineering Office, Rm. 2172 A.V. 
WilHams Bldg. to make arrangements. 



ENSP Environmental Science 
and Policy 

(Agriculture and Natural Resources) 

ENSP386 Internship 
(3-6) REG. 

Individual Instruction coune: contact department or 
instructor to obtain secnon number. Prerequisite: internship 
proposal approved by the specialty advisor, the director of ENSP 
and the student's internship sponsor 



ENTM Entomology 

(Life Sciences) 

ENTM699 Advanced Entomology 

(1-6) REG/AUD. 
Individual Instruction coune: contact department or 
instructor to obtain section number. 



78 



HOW BIG IS SUMMER? 



ENTM789 Field Experience in Pest Management 

(1-6) REG/AUD. 
Individual Instruction course: contact department or 
instructor to obtain section number 

ENTM799 Master's Thesis Research 
(1-6) REG. 

Individual Instruction course: contact department or 
instructor to obtain section number 

ENTM899 Doctoral Dissertation Research 
(1-8) REG. 

Individual Instruction course: contact department or 
instructor to obtain section number. 

ENTS Telecommunications 

(The A. James Clark School 
of Engineering) 

ENTS609 Telecommunications Project 
(3) REG/AUD. 

Individual Instruction course: contact department or 
instructor to obtain section number. 



FMST Family Studies 

(Health and Human Performance) 

FMST260 Couple Relationships 
(3) REG/P-F/AUD. 

honneriy i-MCl) 260. Couple relationships and their 
alternatives in contemporary dating, courtship and 
marriage. 

02(11(09503) Rubin. R. MW 9:30ani- 12:50pm 

(MMH 0108) 

FMST330 Family Theories and Patterns 

(3) REG/AUD. 
Junior standitig. Formaiy FMCD 330. Theory and research 
on the family, includmg a cross-cultural analysis of family 
patterns. 

0201 (09524) Zeiger. R. MW 2:00pm-5:20pm 

(MMH 0108) 

FMST332 Children in Families 
(3) REG/P-F/AUD. 

Prmquisile: FMST 105 or PSYC 100. Formerly FMCD 
332. A family life education approach to the study of 
children and families. Emphasis on the interaction of 
children with parents, siblings, extended kin, and the 
community. 

0201 (09535) \^deigriff-Avr:ry,A, TuTh9:3«ani-12:50pm 
(MMH 1304) 

FMST341 Personal and Family Finance 
(3) REG/P-F/AUD. 

Crrdil mil ht granud (or only one of the t'oHouma: FMCD 
441. FMST 341. FMCD 341 orCSEC 410 Fi<rmeHy 
FMCD 341. Individual and family financial strategies 
with emphasis on financial planning, savings, investments, 
insurance, income ta.xcs. housing, and ase of credit. 
Planning, analyzing, and controlling financial resources to 
resolve personal/family financial problems and to attain 
financial security. 

0201 (09545) Stephenson, M. MW 2:00pm-5:20pm 
(MMH 1400) 



FMST381 Poverty, Affluence, and Families 

(3) REG/P-F/AUD. 
DIVERSITY Prerequisite: SOCY 100 or SOCY 105. 
Formerly FMCD 381. Social, political, cultural and 
economic factors influencing income and wealth in 
American families. 

0201 (09555) Rubin, R. TuTh 2:00pm-5:20pm 

(MMH 0108) 

FMST388 (PcrmRe.j) Experiential Learning 

(3-6) REG/P-F. 
Individual Instruction course: contact department or 
instructor to obtain section number Prerequisite: permission 
of department. 56 semester hours. 

FMST399 (PermReq) Independent Study 
(1-6) REG/P-F/AUD. 

Individual Instruction course: contact department or 
instructor to obtain section number. 
Individualized family and community studies projects of 
interest to student and t'aculty. 

FMST431 Family Crises and Intervention 
(3) REG/P-F/AUD. 

Prerequtstte: PSYC 100. family crises such as divorce, 
disabihty, substance abuse, financial problems, intrafamilial 
abuse, and death. Theories and techniques for 
intervention and enhancement of family coping 
strategies. 

0201(09580) Zeiger. R. TuTh 9:30am- 12:50pm 

(MMH 0108) 

FMST432 Intergenerational Aspects of Family 
Living 
(3) REG/P-F/AUD. 

Prerequisites: PSYC 100: and SOCY 100 or SOCY 105: 
and FMST 332 {or other human developmertt course]. The 
historical, cultural, developmental, and psychosocial 
experiences of contemporary American generations. 
Interacbons across generations ssithin the family and the 
consequences for individual des-elopment. Cross-national 
comparisons. 

0201 (09591) Burdette. R TuTh 6:00pm-9:20pm 

(MMH 1304) 

FMST498 (PtriiiRtq) Special Topics 
(1-3) REG/P-F/AUD. 

Individual Instruction course: contact department or 
instructor to obtain section number. 
Individual family studies instruction course on topics of 
interest to smdent and faculty. 

FMST498R Special Topics: Sexuality and Family 
Relations 
(3) REG/P-F/AUD. 

0201 (09652) Vandergritf-Avery.A. MW 6:<«lpni-9;2(^ 
(MMH 1I08A) 
E.xamination of se.\uality-related issues across the family 
life span, including childhood sexual abuse, adolescent 
sexuality, se.xual orienution, rape, intimacy, infidelity, 
fertiUty, and sexuality and aging. 



FMST854 Clinical Marriage and Family Therapy 
Practice 
(3) REG/AUD. 

Prerequisite: FMST 651 Lmited to students admiiud to the 
family therapy program. ApplicaDon of theory and 
technique to the clinical practice of marriage and family 
therapy. Emphasis on case management and clinic 
administration. Includes completion of 1 2 successive 
months and 50<j hours of supervised, direCT client contaa 
with couples, families, and individuals fiom an integrative 
family systems perspective. 

MjMt (09693) Wcrlinich.C M 8:00am-4:30pm 

(.Arranged) 

FMST658 Supervised Clinical Practice of 
Marriage and Family Therapy 
(1-3) S-F. 
11201(09704) Wcrlinich,C. W 9:(jOam- 12:00pm 

(MMH 1310) 
Time and room to be arranged Dis 

FMST689 (PermReq) intemship 
(3-6) REG/AUD, 

Indisndual Instruction course; contact department or 

instructor to obtain secnon number. 

Internship rcbted to student's chosen specializanon. 

FMST698 (PermReq) Advanced Topics in Family 

Studies 

(1-3) REG/AUD. 
Individual Instruction course: contact department or 
instructor to obtain section number. 

FMST698R Advanced Topics in Family Studies: 
Sexuality and Family Relations 
(3) REG/AUD. 
0201 (09738) \andergritT-Asrry.A. MW 6.«l|)m-9J()pn) 
(MMH II08A) 
Examination of sexuality-related issues across the family 
life span, including childhood sexual abuse, adolescent 
sexuahty, scvua] orienunon, rape, tnamacs', infidelity', 
tVrohts'. and scxualirv and aging. 

FMST699 Independent Study 
(1-6) REG/AUD. 

Individual Instrucnon course: contaa department or 
instructor to obtain section number. 

FMST789 (PermReq) Non-Ttiesis Research 
(1-3) REG/AUD. 

Individual Instruction course: contact department or 
instructor to obtain secDon number. 

FMST799 Master's Thesis Research 

(1-6) REG. 
Individual Instruction course; conUcT department or 
instructor to obtain section number. 





FREN French 

(Arts and Humanities) 

FREN102 Elementary French 

(4) REG/P-F/AUD. 

Prerequisite: FREN 101 at UUCP or permission of 
department. Further work on basic structures and 
pronunciation with emphasis on the four skills: listening, 
speaking, reading and WTiting. 

0201(09853) Varney,T. MTuWTh 9:00ani-l 1 : 1 Sam 
QMZ 0122) 

FREN203 Intermediate French 
(4) REG/P-F/AUD. 

CORE: Humanities (HO) Completion of the study of 
basic grammatical structures, with readings, conversation, 
and composition. Fulfills the Arts and Humanities 
language requirement. 

0201(09874) Cassidy.V. MTuWTh 9:00am-l 1:15am 
gMZ 3120) 

FREN386 (PtrmReq) Experiential Learning 
(3-6) REG/P-E 

Individual Instruction course: contact department or 
instructor to obtain section number. Prerequisite: permission 
of department. 56 semester hours. 

FREN399 (PermReq) Directed Study in French 
(1-3) S-E 

Individual Instruction course: contact department or 
instructor to obtain section number. 

FREN798 Master's Independent Study 
(1-3) REG/AUD. 

Individual Instruction course: contact department or 
instructor to obtain section number. 

FREN799 Master's Thesis Research 
(1-3) REG. 

Individual Instruction course: contact department or 
instructor to obtain section number. 

FREN898 Doctoral Independent Study 
(3) REG/AUD. 

Individual Instruction course: contact department or 



instructor 



to obtain section number. 



FREN899 Doctoral Dissertation Research 
(1-4) REG. 

Individual Instruction course: contact department or 
instructor to obtain section number. 



GEOG Geography 

(Behavioral and Social Sciences) 

GE0G140 Coastal Environments 
(3) REG/P-F/AUD. 
CORE: Physical Science (PS) Introduction to coastal 
environments, with emphasis on U.S. East Coast. Physical 
and ecological systems, beach processes, waves, currents, 
human impacts, coastal zone management and shorehne 
engineering. Case studies of coastal areas, including 
Ocean City, Maryland. 

0201(10035) Kearney M. TuTh 9:30am-l :00pm 

(LEF 2205) 



GE06320 The United States and Canada 
(3) REG/P-F/AUD. 

The two countries as tiinctioning geographic systems 
with important differences and key hnkages. An 
examination of the cultural, environmental, and 
economic components and their spatial variation. 
Attention to the role of regions m national economies. 
0201(10055) EneyA. MW 9:00am-12:30pm 

(LEF 2166) 

6E0G321 Maryland and Adjacent Areas 
(3) REG/P-F/AUD. 

The physical environment, natural resources, and 
population in relation to agriculture, industry, transport, 
and trade in the State of Maryland and adjacent areas. 
0201(10065) Eney.A. MW l:00pm-4:3{)pm 

(LEF 2166) 

GE0G373 Geographic Information Systems 
(3) REG/P-F/AUD. 

Characteristics and orgamzation ot geographic data; 
creation and use of digital geospatial databases; meudau; 
spatial data models for thematic mapping and map 
analysis; use of geographic information system in society, 
government, and business. Practical training with use of 
advanced software and geographic databases. 
0201(10095) Shuey.C. MW 6:00pm-9:30pm 

(LEF 2166) 

GE0G384 (PermReq) Internship in Geography 

(3) S-E 

Individual Instruction course: contact department or 
instructor to obtain section number. Prerequisite: GEOG 
305; and GEOG 310; and permission of department. 
Corequisite: GEOG 385. Supervised field training to 
provide career experience. Introducnon to professional 
level activities, demands, opportumties. Placement at a 
pubhc agency, non-profit organization, or private firm. 
Participation requires apphcation to the internship 
advisor in preceding semester. 

GE0G385 (PermReq) Internship Research Paper 
(3) REG/P-F/AUD. 

Individual Instruction course; conuct department or 
instructor to obtain section number. Prerequisite: GEOG 
305: and GEOG 310: and permission of department. 
Corequisite: GEOG 384. Seminar conducted on campus. 
Research paper related to the student's internship. 

GE0G421 Cultural Ecology 

(3) REG/P-F/AUD. 

Basic issues concerning the natural history of humans 
fiom the perspective of the geographer. Basic 
components of selected behavioral and natural systems, 
their evolution and adaptation, and survival strategies. 
0201 (10109) BeUer-Simms, N. TuTh 5:00pm-8:30pm 
(LEF 1222) 

GE0G498 (PermReq) Toplcal Investigations 
(1-3) REG/P-F/AUD. 

Individual Instruction course; contact deparmient or 
instructor to obtain section number. 



GE0G498J Topical Investigations: Geographic 
Information Systems 
(3) REG/P-F/AUD. 

0201(10141) ShueyC. MW 6:00pm-9;30pm 

(LEF 2166) 

GE0G788 (PermReq) Selected Topics in 
Geography 
(1-3) REG/AUD. 

Individual Instruction course: contact department or 
instructor to obtain secnon number 

GE0G789 (PermReq) Independent Readings 
(1-3) REG/AUD. 

Individual Instruction course: contact department or 
instructor to obtain secnon number. Contact department 
to make arrangements. 

GE0G790 (PermReq) Intomship in Geography 
(3) REG/AUD. 

Individual Instruction coune: contact department or 
instructor to obtain section number. Field experience in 
the student's specialty in a Federal, state, or local agency 
or private business. Research paper required. Contact 
deparmient to make arrangements. 

GE0G799 (PermReq) Master's Thesis Research 
(1-6) REG. 

Individual Instruction course: contact department or 
instructor to obtain section number. 

GE0G899 (PermReq) Doctoral Dissertation 
Research 
(1-8) REG. 

Individual Instruction course: contact department or 
instructor to obtain section number. 



GEOL Geology 

(Computer, Mathematical and 
Physical Sciences) 

GE0L499 (PermReq) Special Problems in 
Geology 
(1-3) REG/P-F/AUD. 

Individual Instruction course; contact department or 
instructor to obtain section number. 

GE0L799 Master's Thesis Research 
(1-4) REG. 

Individual Instruction course; contact department or 
instructor to obtain section number. 

GE0L899 Doctoral Dissertation Research 
(1-8) REG/S-E 

Individual Instruction course: conuct department or 
instructor to obtain section number. 



HOW BIG IS SUMMER? 



GERM Germanic Studies 

(Arts and Humanities) 

GERM102 Elementary German II 
(4) REG/P-F/AUD. 

Prmquisile: GERM 101 or (quimlmi. Formerly GERM 
112. A condnuadon of GEKM 101, completing the 
introduction of basic structures and continuing the 
involvement with the civilization of the Cierman- 
speaking world. 

0201(10365) STAFF MTuWThF IhOOatn-lrOOpm 
(jMZ 3203) 

GERM202 Intermediate German II 

(4) REG/P-F/AUD. 
CORE; Humanities iHO) haequimc: CliR.M .HII. 
Formerly GERM 211. Connnuation of GERM 201. 
Grammar review and greater mastery of vocabulary. 
idioms, convenational fluency and compositional skills. 
Readings stress the current hfestyle and ciN'ilization of the 
German-speaking world. 

0201(10385) STAFF MTuWThF ll:00am-l:00pni 
(IMZ3118) 

GERM499 Directed Study: Directed Study In 
German 
(1-3) REG/AUD. 

Individual Instruction course: contact department or 
instructor to obtain section number 
Contact instructor before R'gisterini: 

GERM798 Master's Independent Study 
(1-3) REG/AUD. 

Individual Instruction course: contact department or 
instructor to obtain section number 
Contact instructor before registering. 

GERM799 Master's Thesis Research 

(1-6) REG. 
Individual Instruction course: contact department or 
instructor to obtain section number. 

GERM898 Doctoral Independent Study 
(1-3) REG/AUD. 

Individual Instruction course: contact deparmient or 
instructor to obtain secnon number 

GERM899 Doctoral Dissertation Research 
(1-6) REG. 

Individual Instruction course: contact department or 
instructor to obtain section number 



GVPT Government and Politics 

(Beha\'ioral and Social Sciences) 

GVPT100 Principles of Government and Politics 
(3) REG/P-F/AUD. 

CORE: Behavioral and Social Science (SB) A study of 
the basic principles and concepts of political science. 
0201(10455) Frain.C. TuTh '):(H)am- 12:20pm 

(ARC 1 105) 



I 




Government and Politics 

GVPT 309X Topics in international 
Relations: Conflict Resolution — The 
Israeli/Palestinian Experiment 

(3 credits) July 17- August 25 

Give Peace a Chance 

Until recendy, most of the dialogue 
between Palestinians and Jews in the 
Middle East was spoken with bullets and 
bombs. 



A groundbrcakmg course this summer 
allows an iti-dcpth understanding of this volatile issue. "Conflict 
Resolution: The Israeli/Palestinian Experiment" uses interactive discussion, 
historical perspectives and problem-solving workshops to search for 
common ground concerning the continuing disagreements in the Middle 
East. Topics discussed and analyzed include the fate of Jerusalem, the 
problems associated with refugees, both authorized and unauthorized 
settlements, water rights, border disagreements and security concerns. While 
focusing mainly on the Israeli-Palestinian situation, the course helps place 
this conflict in the bro.ider perspective of other global ethno-political 
conflicts. 

The class features two uniquely qualified instructors: Manuel Hassassian and 
Edy Kaufrnan. Hassassian and Kaufrnan have worked together for the last 
six years and are also research associates of the University of Maryland's 
Center for International Development and Conflict Management. 

Hassassian is a Palestinian and resident of the West Bank. He is dean of the 
College of Arts and Humanities at Bethlehem University. Hassa.ssian was 
educated in the United States and received his do. roritc in polituil s.-icncf 
from the University of Cincinnati. 

Kaufhian is an Israeh citizen currently on leave from Hebrew University 
where he teaches international relations. He was former director of the 
Harry S. Truman Institute for the Advancement of Peace. Kaufrnan received 
his doctorate in international relations from the Sorbonne, University of 
Paris. 

These two distinguished scholars also instruct other courses this summer. 

Professor Hassassian will teach "Islamic Political Theory" GVPT 447 

(also offered as PHIL 408); and 

Professor Kaufman will teach "Topics in 

International Relations: Human Rights 

and Democratization in Latin America" 

GVPT 309P (also offered as SPAN 

448B). 

For more information, 
caU 301-405-4156. 




1 



i 




/^B& 



81 




GVPT170 American Government 
(3) REG/P-F/AUD. 
CORE: Behavioral and Social Science (SB) A 
comprehensive study of nanonal government in the 
United States. 

0201 (10466) Fishel, K. MW 9:00am-12:20pm 

(SQH1119) 

GVPT309P Topics in International Relations: 

Human Rights and Democratization in 

Latin America 

(3) REG/P-F/AUD. 

0201(10506) Kauthian.E. TuTh 2:00pm-5:20pm 

(TYD0117) 

Also offered as SPAN 448B. 

GVPT309X Topics In International Relations: 
Conflict Resolution - The Israeli 
Palestinian Experiment 
(3) REG/P-F/AUD. 

0201 (10516) Hassassian, M. TuTh 6:00pm-9:20pm 
(TYDOlOl) 
To be team taught by Palestinian and Israeh Professors: to 
cover historic background to the conflict, the peace 
process and an appbed exercise in confhct resolution on 
the issue of Jerusalem. Course taught by Manuel 
Hassasian and Edward Kaufinan. 

GVPT386 iPermReq) Experiential Learning 
(3-6) REG/P-E 

Prerequisite: pennission of department. 56 semester hours. 
0201 (10527) STAFF Time and room to be arranged 

GVPT388 (PermReq) Topical Investigations 

(1-3) REG/P-F/AUD. 
0201 (10538) STAFF Time and room to be arranged 

GVPT399B Seminar in Government and Politics: 
Vietnam Legacies and Film 
(3) REG/P-F/AUD. 

0201 (10588) Vietn, L. MW 6:00pm-9:50pm 

(PLS 1140) 

GVPT444 American Political Theory 
(3) REG/P-F/AUD. 

Prfrf^uiiitc- Gl'TT 100 or GITT 170. A study of the 
development and growth of American poUtical concepts 
6om the Colonial period to the present. 
0201(10608) Terchek,R. TuTh l:00pm-4:20pm 

(TYD 2102) 

GVPT447 Islamic Political Philosophy 
(3) REG/P-F/AUD. 

DIVERSITY The wTinngs of one or several authon 
fk)m the rise of Islamic philosophy until today are 
exaimned in order to see how they understand the 
confbctmg clamis of revelations and unaided human 
reason about the best regime, justice, and human vnrtue. 
0201(10618) Hassassian, M. TuTh 2:00pm-5:20pm 
{TYD 0111) 
Also offered as PHIL 408. 



GVPT898 Readings in Government and Politics 
(3) REG/AUD. 

Individual Instruction course: contact department or 
instructor to obtain section number. 

GVPT899 Doctoral Dissertation Research 

(1-8) REG. 
Indmdual instrucnon course: contact department or 
instructor to obtain section number. 

HESP Hearing and 
Speech Sciences 

(Behavioral and Social Sciences) 

HESP386 (PermReq) Experiential Learning 

(3-6) REG/P-E 
Individual Instruction course: contact department or 
instructor to obtain section number. Prerequisite: permission 
of department. 56 semester hours. 

HESP407 Bases of Hearing Science 
(3) REG/P-F/AUD. 

Prerequis\te: HESP .f / / or permission of department. 
Fimdamentals of hearing, including the physics of sound, 
anatomy and physiology of peripheral and central 
auditory nervous system, psychophysical procedures used 
in measurement of auditory sensation and perception, 
and topics in psychological acoustics. 
0201 (10773) Lantz.J. MWF 8:30am-10:45am 

(LEF 0135) 

HESP417 Principles and Methods in Speech- 
Language Pathology and Audiology 
(3) REG/P-F/AUD. 

Prfrc<;rii5i(f : iHESP .i 1 1 and HESP 402 and HESP 41llor 
permission of department . The principles underlying the 
treatment of speech, language and hearing disorders in 
children and adults. 

0201(10783) Palmer, S. MTuWTh 9:30am-l 1:45am 
(LEF 1201) 

HESP499 (PermReq) Independent Study 
(1-3) REG/P-F/AUD. 

Individual instruction course: contact department or 
instructor to obtain section number. 

HESP625 Dysphagia 
(3) REG. 

Prerequisite: permission of department. Credit will he granted Jor 
oitly one of the fotlomng: HESP 639B or HESP 625. 
Nature and clinical management of dysphagia as it 
pertains to different chmcal settings for adult and 
pediatric populaDons. 
0201(10815) McCaU,G. 
Meets 07/17/00-08/04/00 

MTuW 3:00pm-6:00pm 

(LEF 0135) 
ThF l:00pm-4:00pm 

(LEF 0135) 
Gerald N. McCall, Course Chairman. 



HESP638 Research Practicum: Minor Research 
Problems 
(1-3) REG/AUD. 

Individual Instruction course: contact department or 
instructor to obtain section number. 

HESP649 (PermReq) Clinical Practice in 
Audiology 
(1-2) REG/AUD. 

Individual Instrucnon course: contact department or 
instructor to obtain section number. 

HESP708 Independent Study 
(1-6) REG/AUD. 

Iiidi\iLiu.il Instruction course: contact deparmieilt or 
instructor to obtain section number. 

HESP728 Advanced Clinical Practice in Speech 
(2) REG/AUD. 

0201 (10856) STAFF Time and room to be arranged 
Ub 

HESP799 Master's Thesis Research 

(1-6) REG. 
Indmdual Instrucnon course: contact department or 
instructor to obtain section number. 

HESP899 Doctoral Dissertation Research 

(1-8) REG. 
Individual Instruction course: contact department or 
instructor to obtain section number. 



HiSP Historic Preservation 

(Architecture) 

HISP619 (PermReq) Special Topics in Historic 
Preservation 
(3) REG/AUD. 

0201 (10921) Flack, |. Time and room to be arranged 

HISP700 Final Seminar in Historic Preservation 
(3) REG/AUD. 

Critical evaluation of project, portfobo, or fieldwork on 
which the students have been working throughout the 
program; a syntbesis of historic preservation process and 
achievements with special focus on careers in the 6eld. 
0201 (10963) Flack, J. Time and room to be arranged 



HIST History 

(Arts and Humanities) 

HIST156 History of the United States to 1865 

(3) REG/P-F/AUD. 
CORE: Social or PoUncal History (SH) The United 
States from colomal times to the end of the Cisil War. 
Esublishment and development of American institutions. 
0201(11034) Hughes, M. MTuWThF 9:30am- 10:50am 
(KEY 0103) 



82 



HOW B 



I S 



S U M 



E R ? 



HIST157 History of the United States Since 1865 

(3) REG/P-F/AUD. 
CORE: Social or Polmcal History (SH) The United 
States from the end of the Civil War to the present. 
Economic, social, intellectual, and political developments. 
R-ise of industry and emergence of the United States as a 
world power. 

0201(11045) STAFF MTuWThF ll:OOam-12:20pm 
(KEY 0103) 

HIST285 East Asian Civilization II 
(3) REG/P-F/AUD. 

CORE: Social or Politicil Hisior)' (SH) A survey of the 
historical development of modern Asia since 1 700. 
Primarily concerned with tlie efforB of East Asians to 
preserve their tradidonai cultures in the face ofWestern 
expansion in the 18th and t9th centuries, and their 
attempts to survive as nations in the 20th century. 
0201(11065) LUley.C. MW 12:30pm-3:45pm 

(KEY 0103) 

HIST314A Crisis and Change in the Middle East 
and Africa: Nationalism and Nation- 
Building in the Middle East 
(3) REG/P-F/AUD. 

DIVERSITY 

0201(11085) Zilfi.M. MTuWThF '):30am-10:.SOam 
(KEY 0116) 

HIST319B Special Topics In History: Black 

Atlantic World 

(3) REG/P-F/AUD. 
0201(11095) I'llnue.S. TuTh 6:00pm-9:15pm 

(KEY 0116) 

HIST332 Europe During the Renaissance and 
Reformation I 
(3) REG/P-F/AUD. 

Continental Europe trom 1 450 to 1 650: development 
and spread of Renai-ssance culture; growth in the powen 
of central government; economic expansion and 
beginnings of overseas colonization; division ofWestern 
Christendom into t^vo rival religious camps. Particular 
emphasis on the Protestant and Catholic reformations 
and their consequences for Europe's pohtical, social, and 
cultural development. Renaissance and reformation, 
1450-1555. The age of religious wars, 1555-1650. 
0201 (11115) Burns, W MTuWThF ll:00am-12:20pm 
(KEY 0116) 

HIST353 America in the Revolutionary Era, 1763- 
1815 
(3) REG/P-F/AUD. 

Crrdit will be ^^ranted for only one of the following: HIST 353 
or HIST 361. The background and course of the 
American Revolution and early nationhood through the 
War of 1812. Emphasis on how the Revolution shaped 
American pohtical and social development, the creation 
of a new government under the Consdcudon, and the 
challenges facing the new nation. 
0201(11125) RidgwayW TuTh 6:00pni-9: 1 5pm 

(KEY 0126) 



HIST386 (PermReq) Experiential Learning 
(3-6) REG/P-E 

Prerequisite: penrtissiort of department. 56 semester hours. The 
History Department's Internship program. Pre- 
professional experience in historical research, analysis and 
wTidng in a I'ariety of work settings. 
020! (11147) Flack. I. Time and room to be arranged 

HIST453 Diplomatic History of the United States 

from 1914 

(3) REG/P-F/AUD. 
American foreign relations in the 20th-century. World 
War l.the Great Depression, World War 11, the Cold War. 
the Korean War, and Vietnam. A continuation of HIST 
452. 

0201 (11179) Papadopoulos, S. MW 6:00pm-9:!5pm 
(KEY 0125) 

HIST463 History of the Old South 
(3) REG/P-F/AUD. 

The golden age of the Chesapeake, the institurion of 
slaverv-. the fronrier South, the antebellum planUQon 
society, the development of regional identity and the 
experiment m independence. 

0201 (1 1 199) 0'Dono\-an, S. MW 6:00pm-9: 1 5pm 
(KEY 0120) 

HIST499A (PermReq) Independent Study 

(1-3) REG/P-F/AUD. 
0201 (11221) STAFF Time and room to be arranged 

HIST619B (PermReq) Special Topics in History: 

Independent Study 

(1-3) REG/AUD. 
Individual Instruction course: contact department or 
instructor to obtain section number. 

HIST799 (PermReq) Master's Thesis Research 
(1-6) REG. 

Individual Instruction course: contact department or 
instructor to obtain section number. 

HIST899 (PermReq) Doctoral Dissertation 

Research 

(1-8) REG. 
Individual Instruction course: contact department or 
instructor to obtain section number. 



HLTH Health 

(Health and Human Performance) 

HLTH106 Drug Use and Abuse 
(3) REG/P-F/AUD. 

All intcrdisciphnars .inalvsis ot contemporar>' drug issues 
and problems. The course will exanune ph\*siological. 
psychological, social, philosophical, histoncal. legal and 
health aspects of drug use and abuse. Special attention 
will be focused on those general motivations for drug use 
that attend life on the college campus. 
0201(11298) Guran,L. MTuWTh l:O0pm-2:45pm 
(HHP 0305) 



HLTH150 First Aid and Emergency Medical 
Services 

(2) REG/P-F/AUD. 

Lecture, demonstration and training in emcrgcncv care, 
including cardiopulmonary resusciUDon, hemorrnage 
control, shock, poisons and bone injury treatment and 
childbirth. American Red Cross and Heart Assocution of 
Maryland Certification awarded. 

0201(11320) STAFF MW 7:iNipm-9:30pm 

HHP 0302) 

HLTH285 Controlling Stress and Tension 

(3) REG/P-F/AUD. 

Health problems re-btcd to stress and tension. Analysis of 
causative psychosocial sta-ssors and intervening 
physiological mechanisms. Emphasis on prevention and 
control of stress through techniques such as biofeedback, 
meditation and neuromuscular reUxaDon. 
0201(11341) Brown, S. MTuWTh ll:00am-12:45pm 
(HHP 1301) 
Section 0101 (Summer Session I) includes a service 
learning component. Learning will be enhanced bv' 
students' applying knowledge and skills learned in the 
class to people in need of the this expertise. In turn, 
people in need will benefit from this service. 

HLTH377 Human Sexuality 

(3) REG/P-F/AUD. 

Formerly HLTH 477. The biological and developmental 
aspects of hunun sexuality ; the psychological and" 
emotional aspects of sexual behavior: sexual idenoty; the 
historical, cultural, social, hnguistic, legal and moral forces 
afiectmg se.xual issues; the importance of commumcation, 
disclosure and inamacy m interpersonal relationships; and 
research trends m the area of human sexuahty. 
0201(11354) Burt. J. TuTh 6:0i;ipm-9:45pm 

(HHP 1301) 
Section 0102 includes a service learning component. 
Learning will be enhanced by students appKing 
knowledge and skills learned in the class to people in 
need of the this expertise. In mm. people in need v^ill 
benefit from this service. 

HLTH386 (PermReq) Experiential Learning 

(3-6) REG/P-F 
Individual Instruction course: contact department or 
instruaor to obtam section number. Prrrtquisiu: permissun cf 
depmmera. 56 semcsir hours. Contact depanmeni to make 
irnngiiiicnts 

HLTH389 Topical Investigations 
(1-3) REG/P-F/AUD. 

Individual Instruction course: contaa department or 
instruaor to obtain section number. Conaa department to 
nuke arr.uigenicnt 

HLTH437 Consumer Behavior 
(3) REG/P-F/AUD. 

Prerequisites: PSYC 100; and SOCY 100. Credit uiH he 
granted for onby one of the following: CS'EC 43~ or HLTH 
437. An apphcation of the behavioral sciences to a study 
of consumer behavior. Current theories, models and 
empirical research findings are explored. 
0201(11386) BmvvTi.S. MTuWTh 9:00am- 10:45am 
(HHP 0301) 

HLTH471 Women's Health 

(3) REG/P-F/AUD. 

ni\ERSlTY .U-o ,fmJ i. HMST •»■;. Credit uill he 
granted for only one oj the folloutng: HLTH 4't or H'SIST 
4~l. The historical, physiological, psychological, and 
sociological mechanisms which contribute to v^omen's 
health. Topics will include gynecological concerns and 
rcproducnvT health; nutrmon. exercise; violence; 
substance use abuse; and the health of special 
popubnons. 
0201(11398) King.N. MTuWTh ll:0Oam-I2:45pm 

(HHP 1302) 
0202(11399) Kass,B. MW 6:<l0pm-9:43pm 

(HHP 1301 




/i^Gfe. 



83 




Summer Institute 
on Caregiving 

Caregiving in the 21st century 

Each year the number of aging 
adults requiring part- to full-time 
care is increasing. Professional 
caregivers need to keep up-to- 
date on current trends in 
caregiving with respect to the 
social, ethical, legal and financial 
aspects. The non-professional 
caregiver - those caring for a 
relative or friend either directly 
or indirectly — also need to be 
acquainted with the numerous 
options and assistance available to 
them. These courses are designed 
to help both the professional and 
the non-professional cope with 
the various decisions caregivers 
are required to make. 

HLTH 498G Special Topics in 
Health: Caregiving - Legal and 
Financial Aspects 

(1 cr) July 29 and August 5, 12 and 19 
Saturdays 9-12 Noon 

Topics discussed will include 
current Medicare and Social 
Security regulations affecting 
caregivers and those receiving the 
care. Current legislation affecting 
professional caregivers and family 
members providing care also will 
be covered. 



HLTH489 (PermReq) Field Laboratory Projects 
and Workshop 

(1-6) REG/P-F/AUD. 

Individual Instruction course: contact department or 
instructor to obtain section nuinber. Contact department 
to make arrangements. 

HLTH498G Special Topics in Health: Caregiving- 
Legal and Financial Aspects 

(1) REG/P-F/AUD. 

July 22 and 29 and August 5, 12 and 19. 
0201(11446) Considine.G. Sa 9:00am- 12:00pm 

(Arranged) 
Topics discussed will include curent Medicare and Social 
Security' regulations affecting caregivers and those 
recei\ing the care. Current legislation affecting 
professional caregivers and family members pro\nding 
care will also be covered. 

HLTH688 Special Problems In Health Education 
(1-6) REG/AUD. 

Individual Instrucnon course: contact department or 
instructor to obtain section number. Contaa department to 
make arrangements. 

HLTH799 Master's Thesis Research 
(1-6) REG/S-E 

Individual Instruction course: contact department or 
uBcructor to obtain section number. Contaa department to 
make arrangements. 

HLTH899 Doctoral Dissertation Research 
(1-8) REG/S-E 

Individual Instruction course: contact department or 
mscruaor to obtain section number. Contaa department to 
make arrangements. 



HONR Honors 

(Undergraduate Studies) 

H0NR259Q Honors Seminar: Conformity, 

Rebellion, and Identity: A Literary 
Perspective 

(3) REG. 

CORE: Literature (HL) 

0201 (11514) Airozo,J. MTuWThF 9:30am-I0:50am 

(ANA 0100) 



HORT Horticulture & Landscape 
Architecture 

(Agriculture and Natural Resources) 

H0RT399 Special Problems in Horticulture 
(1-2) REG/P-F/AUD. 

Individual Instruction course: contact department or 
instructor to obtain section number. 

H0RT799 Master's Thesis Research 
(1-6) REG. 

Individual Instrucnon course: contact deparmient or 
instructor to obtain section number. 

H0RT899 Doctoral Dissertation Research 

(1-8) REG. 
Individual instruction course: contact department or 
instructor to obtain section number. 



ITAL Italian 

(Arts and Humanities) 

ITAL102 Elementary Italian II 

(4) REG/P-F/AUD. 

Prerequisite: ITAL Wl ot pcrmmicn cf departmetit . 
Continuation of study of basic grammar; wTitten and oral 
work, with increased emphasis on spoken Itaban. 
0201(11684) Falvo.J. MTuWTh 9:00am-ll:15am 
gMZ 1224) 

ITAL386 Experiential Learning 
(3-6) REG/P-E 

Individual Instruction course: contact deparmient or 
instructor to obtain section number. Prerequisite: Learning 
Proposal approved by the Office of Experiential Learning 
Programs, fanilly sponsor, and student's intnnship sponsor. S6 
semester hours. 

ITAL399 Directed Study in Italian 
(1-3) S-E 

Individual Instruction course: contact department or 
instructor to obtain section number. 

ITAL471 Italian Cinema: A Cultural Approach (in 
Translation) 

(3) REG/P-F/AUD. 

Credit will be granted tor only one of the following: ITAL 471 
or ITAL 472. Formerly ITAL 475. The culture of Italy 
through the medium of film fix)m the silent days up to 
the present. In Enghsh. 

0201 (11705) Falvo.J. MW 6:00pm-9:20pm 

OMZ 2206) 
Taught concurrendy with ITAL 472. 

ITAL472 Italian Cinema: A Cultural Approach (in 
Italian) 

(3) REG/P-F/AUD. 

Credit ivill be granted for only one of the Jollowing: ITAL 471 
or ITAL 472. The culture of Italy through the medium of 
film from the silent days up to the present. In Itahan. 
0201 (11715) FalvaJ. MW 6:00pm-9:20pm 

OMZ 2206) 
Taught concurrendy with ITAL 471. 



iVSP Individual Studies Program 

(Undergraduate Studies) 

IVSP317 Progress Report 

(1) S-E 

Individual Instruction course; contact department or 
instructor to obtain section number. Prerequisite: admission 
(0 IVSP major. A wTitten analysis of the program. Students 
register for IVSP 317 only once, the semester before the 
final term. 

IVSP318 (PermReq) Independent Learning 
Activities: individual Studies 

(1-6) REG. 

Indi\idual Instrucnon course: contact department or 
instructor to obtain section number. IVSP majors only. 

IVSP420 (PermReq) Senior Paper 
(3) REG. 

Individual Instruction course: contact department or 
instructor to obtain section number. Prerequisite: admission 
to Il'SP major. For IVSP majors only. Synthesizing final 
paper or a final special project. 



84 



HOW B 



I S 



SUMMER? 



Intensive Course in 
Elementary and 
Intermediate Modern 
Japanese 

An accelerated intensive course 
of study designed for highly 
motivated students who wish to 
complete a one-year language 
requirement in a single summer. 
Introduces fiindamental 
language skills in modern 
Japanese. Emphasizes 
conversational skills (listening, 
comprehension, and speaking), 
including grammar and 
pronunciation. Introduces 
reading and writing Hiragana, 
Katakana, and Kanji. Requires 
no previous knowledge of 
Japanese. Students are required 
to attend all classes and 
complete all assignments to 
maintain the rapid pace of this 
rigorous course. Early 
enrollment is advised in this 
popular intensive course. 
Admission closes as of the 
second cLiss. 

JAPN 102 Elementary Japanese II 

(6 credits) 

Continued introduction to the 
basic spoken patterns of 
contemporary Japanese. 
Reading and writing of about 

100 kanji. Prerequisite: Japanese 

101 or equivalent 

JAPN 202 Intermediate Japanese II 
(6 credits) 

Contemporary spoken and 
written Japanese Prerequisite: 
Japanese 201 or equivalent 



JAPN Japanese 

(Arts and Humanities) 

JAPN102 Elementary Japanese II 
(6) REG/P-F/AUD. 

Pmeijuitiie.JAPS /O/ or fi)uiHi/rn(, Continued 
introduction to the basic spoken patterns of 
contemporary Japanese. 

02(11(11830) STAFF MTuWThF 9:30am-12:2f)pm 
OMZ 2206) 

JAPN202 Intermediate Japanese II 
(6) REG/P-F/AUD. 

hm-jmnlrJAPS 2UI »r quiiu;™/ Formerly JAPS 206. 
Contemporan' spoken and written Japanese. 
02111 (11850) STAFF MTuWThF 9;30»m- 1 2:20pm 
QMZ 0202) 



JOUR Journalism 

(Journalism) 

JOUR202P News Editing 

(3) REG/P-F/AUD. 

Prmquisile: grade ofCor heller in JOUR 201. For JOUR 
majors only. 

0201 (11951) STAFF MTuWThF 9;00am-10:40ani 
(JRN 3103) 

J0UR398 Independent Study 
(1-3) REG. 

liidmdual Instruction course: contact department or 
instructor to obtain section number, Conuct department 
to make arrangements. 

Consult in JRN 1 1 17 for section and MARS code 
corresponding to faciJty member. 

J0UR4(X) Law of public communication 

(3) REG. 
Prerequtsile: junior sunding. Junior slunJing. Legal rights and 
constraints of mass media: hbel. pri\-ac>-. copNTight. 
monopoly, contempt, and other aspects of the law applied 
to mass communication. Previous study of the law not 
requited. 
112111(12049) Rmh.T MW 4:00pm-7:00pm 

(JRN 1116) 
11202(12050) Rush.T MW 4:00pm-7:00pm 

(JRN 1116) 
Graduate and ad\'anced special students must register for 
\ection 0202. 

J0UR502 Reporting for Graduate Students 
(3) REG/AUD. 

/"rirfijuisiri-: /OLK .hH or permusion iV depjrtmeni 
Intensive training in basic public affairs journalism for 
graduate students with limited training or experience. 
Not apphcable for degree credit. 

"2111(12090) Crane, S. MTuWThF 9:00am-10:40am 
gRN 3102) 

J0UR503 Reporting for Broadcast News 
(3) REG/AUD. 

I'reTr^uisileJOi'R SOI. Training in gathering and 
producing news tor radio and television newcists. 
■201(12100) KaicefS MTuWThF 9:00am- 10:4«am 

•R\ •-■■■ 




College of 
Journalism 

The College of Journalism has 
emerged as one of the best 
journalism schools in the nation 
by focusing on traditional core 
journalism values while 
embracing new technologies for 
news gathering and delivery. 
Recent graduates are now 
reporters, editors and producers 
at the New York Times, CNN, ^m 
the Washington Post, U.S. News (H 
&: World Report, the Associated 
Press, washingtonpost.com and 
other top news organizations 
around the country. 

Journalism students learn &om 
faculrv' such as former New- 
York Times managing editor 
Gene Roberts, former CNN ^| 
executive producer Lee ^M 

Thornton. Pulitzer Prize- 
winning journalist and author 
Haynes Johnson and world- 
renown scholar Michael 
Gurevitch. Many students spend 
a semester as Washington and 
Maryland Statehouse 
correspondents for Capital 
News Service, the college's 
premier public affair; reporting 
program in Washington and 
Annapohs. ^H 




/j^Dflik 



85 




College of 
Health and 
Human 
Performance 

The College of Health and 
Human Performance is a leader in 
training health and weOness 
professionals able to contribute to 
individual, famUy and community 
physical and mental well being. 
The college has strong research 
programs in gerontology, strength 
training for older adults, health 
insurance and long-term care, and 
minority health concerns. Its 
traditional role in educating 
physical education and health 
teachers for k-12 programs is 
based in the Department of 
Kinesiology, where sports 
medicine, physical therapy and the 
effects of exercise on all age 
groups are also part of the 
curriculum. 

In the Department of Family 
Studies, research into the social 
disfianctions that lead to abuse, 
both physical and substance- 
oriented, is paired with the study 
of community organizations that 
support and nurture healthy 
environments for children, teens, 
the disabled and the elderly. The 
Family Service Center provides 
therapists-in-training with 
valuable experience while 
providing low cost counseling. 



J0UR698 Special Problems in Communication 
(1-3) REG/AUD. 

Individual Instruction course: contiicc department or 
instructor to obtain section number. 
Consult inJRN II 17 for section and MARS code 
corresponding to faculty member. 

J0UR798 Master's Professional Fieldwork 
(2-6) REG/AUD. 

Individual Instruction course; contact department or 
instructor to obtain section number. 
Consult in JRN 1 1 17 for section and AMRS code 
corresponding to faculty member. 

J0UR799 Master's Thesis Research 
(1-6) REG. 

Individual Instruction course: contact department or 
instructor to obtain section number. 
Consult in JRN 1 1 17 for section corresponding to 
faculty member. 

J0UR888 Doctoral Professional Field Work 
(3-9) REG/AUD. 

Individual Instruction course: contact department or 
instructor to obtain section number. 
Consult in JRN 1 1 17 for section and MARS code 
corresponding to faculty member. 

J0UR889 Doctoral Tutorial in Journalism and 
Public Communication 
(3-9) REG/AUD. 

Individual Instruction course: contact department or 
instructor to obtain section number. 
Consult in JRN 1 1 17 for section and MARS code 
corresponding to faculty member. 

J0UR899 Doctoral Dissertation Research in 

Journalism and Mass Communication 
(1-8) REG/S-E 

Individual Instruction course: contact department or 
instructor to obtain section number. 
Consult in JRN 1 1 1 7 for section and MARS code 
corresponding to faculty member. 



KNES Kinesiology 

(Health and Human Performance) 

KNES121J Physical Education Activities: Women: 
Martial Arts: Rape Agression Defense 
(1) REG/P-E 

0201(12454) STAFF TuTh 6:00pm-9:00pni 

(CRC 2113) Lab 
Students must pay a $25 materials fee directly to the 
instructor. 

KNES134N Physical Education Activities: Coed: 
Bowling (Beginning) 
(1) REG/P-F/AUD. 

Students must pay a $35 facility fee. Required bowling 
shoes may be rented on a day-to-day basis. 
0201 (12484) STAFF TuWTh 2:00pni-4:00pm 

(SSU BO 1 00) Lab 



NES1340 Physical Education Activities: Coed: 
Bowling (Intermediate) 

(1) REG/P-F/AUD. 

Students must pay a t35 facility fee. Required bowling 
shoes may be ten ted on a day-to-day or session basis. 
0201 (12494) STAFF TuWTh 2;U0pm-4:00pm 

(SSU BO 1 00) 

Students must pay a $35.00 facility fee. Required 
bowling shoes 

KNES137N Physical Education Activities: Coed: 
Golf (Beginning) 

(1) REG/P-E 

Students must pay a $25 golf facility fee direcdy to pro 
shop. Meets in golf range classroom. 
0201 (12505) STAFF MTuWTh 9:30am-10:50am 
(GLF 1102) 

KNES147N Physical Education Activities: Coed: 
Scuba (Beginning) 

(2) REG/P-F/AUD. 

Students must quality on the first day of class in order to 

stay in the class. Students must attend ALL classes. 

0201(12516) Landers, R. MTuWTh 8:00am-10:00ain 

(CRC B0120) 

TBA (CRC B0I20) Ub 

KNES154N Physical Education Activities: Coed: 
Swimming (Beginning) 

(1) REG/P-E 

0201 (12527) STAFF MTuWTh l:00pm-2:20pm 

(CRC B0120) 

KNES1540 Physical Education Activities: Coed: 
Swimming (Intermediate) 

(1) REG/P-F/AUD. 

0201(12538) STAFF MTuWTh I l:30ani- 12:50pm 
(CRC BO 120) 

KNES155N Physical Education Activities: Coed: 
Tennis (Beginning) 

(1) REG/P-E 

0201(12550) STAFF MTuWTh 1 1:00am- 1 2:20pm 
(COL 1100) 

KNES1550 Physical Education Activities: Coed: 
Tennis (Intermediate) 

(1) REG/P-E 

1)201(12562) STAFF MTuWTh 1 1 :00am-12:20pm 
(COL 1 1 00) 

KNES157N Physical Education Activities: Coed: 
Weight Training (Beginning) 

(1) REG/P-E 

0201 (12573) STAFF MTuWTh 8:00am-9:20am 

(HHP 0103) 

KNES1570 Physical Education Activities: Coed: 
Weight Training (Intermediate) 

(1) REG/P-E 

0201 (12584) STAFF MTuWTh 8:00am-9:20am 

(HHP 0103) 



HOW B 



IS S U M M E R "> 



KNES289 (PcrmRiq) Topical Investigations 

(1-3) REG. 
Individual Instruction course: contact department or 
instructor to obtain section number. 

KNES350 The Psychology of Sports 
(3) REG/P-F/AUD. 

An exploration ot' personalm- tactors. including but not 
limited to motivation, aggression and emotion, as the)' 
affect sports parncipation and motor skill performance. 
0201(12617) Catina,P. TuTh 4:30pm-7:50pm 

(HHF 1.1(1.^) 

KNES389 (PermReq) Topical Investigations 
(1-3) REG. 

Individual Instruction course: contact department or 
instructor to obtain section number. 

KNES455 Scientific Bases of Athletic 
Conditioning 
(3) REG/P-F/AUD. 

Prerequisite: KSES .'60. An examination of physical 
fitness/athledc conditioning programs stressing the 
practical application of exercise pliysiolog\' theory for 
enhancing athletic performance. Cardiovascubr 
considerations, strength and power development, 
nutrition, speed, muscular endurance, environmental 
considerations and ergogenic aids. 
0201(12660) Hatfield, B. MW 4:30pm-7:50pm 

(I IMP 1.V0) 

KNES498 Special Topics in Kinesiology 
(3) REG/P-F/AUD. 

Individual Instruction course: contact department ot 
instructor to obtain section number. 

KNES689 (PmnReq) Special Problems in 
Kinesiology 
(1-3) REG. 

Individual Instruction course: contact deparmient or 
instructor to obtain section number. 

KNES799 (PermReq) Master's Thesis Research 
(1-6) REG. 

Individual Instruction course: contact deparmient or 
instructor to obtain section number 

KNES899 (PniiiRcj) Doctoral Dissertation 

Research 

(1-8) REG. 
Individual Instruction course: contact deparmient or 
instructor to obtain section number 



LARC Landscape Architecture 

(Agriculture and Natural Resources) 

LARC489K (PermReri) Special Topics in 

Landscape Architecture: English 
Landscape and Country House 
(3) REG/P-F/AUD. 

02AK (12760) SuUivan.J. Time and room to be arranged 

Wetii 07/i:/(io-iis'ti.nn 



LATN Latin 

(Arts and Hunianiries) 

LATN220 (PermReq) Intermediate Intensive Latin 
(4) REG/P-F/AUD. 

Prereqiiisile: LiTN 102, or LATN 120, or (quimlenl. Not 
open 10 sludenls with credit for LATN 204. Review of Latin 
grammar: reading in prose and poetry fitom selected 
authors. 

0201(12831) Mejer.J. MTuWThF 9:30am-ll:10am 
(MMH 2407A) 
Students are advised to pick up course information 
before registering for the course. 

LATN499 (PirmRcq) Independent Study in Latin 

Language and Literature 

(3) REG/P-F/AUD. 
0201 (12842) Hallett.J. Time and room to be arranged 

LATN699 (PermReq) Independent Studies in 

Latin Literature 

(1-3) REG/AUD. 
0201 (12853) Hallcti, J. Time and room to be arranged 



LBSC Library Science 

(Library and Information Services) 

LBSC601 (PmiiReq) Information Use 
(3) REG/ALtD. 

hereijimiie: permission oj depiirlmeni. Nature and use of 
int'ormation and knowledge; model of infornution/ 
knowledge c'ycle; information transter s^-stems in society; 
strucmiv and tlinctions of information s\-5tems. 
Information usen and their needs. Methods of inquiry' 
and problem solving. 

0201(12903) Barlow. D. MW 9:30am- 1 2:45pm 

(HBK0115) 




College of 
Library and 
information 
Services 

CLIS is a graduate school for the 
education of professionals in 
information storage and recricN-al, 
archives and records management, 
school librar\' media services and 
human-computer interaction. In a 
first-time ranking of schools of ■ 
information studies by U.S. NeN^-s ' 
& World Report in 1999. the 
college was ranked 14th in the 
nation. In special areas it ranked 
2nd in archives, 6th in health 
information studies and 10th in 
information SN'stems. 

Links to the area's many libraries 
and archives, including the 
Library of Congress, the National 
Archives, the National Librars- of 
Agriculture and the Nation.il 
Library of Medicine provide a 
rich resource for faculty and 
students in their pursuit of 
knowledge in this complex and 
evolving field. 




/i^Kfe. 



87 




LBSC632 (PermReq) Library Personnel 

Management and Communication 

(3) REG/AUD. 

Prerequisile: permission ofdepanment. Penonnel 
management and communication theor)' and 
methodologN' as applied to library' and information 
science oi^anizations.The role of the manager, leadership 
skills, planning and organizing resources, problem soKing 
and decision making, selecaon and e\'aluation of 
personnel, and effective communication. 
0201 (12923) Walston, C. TuTh 9:30am-12:45pm 
(HBK4115) 

LBSC707 (PermReq) Field Study in Library 
Service 
(3) REG/AUD. 

Prerequisites: all core courses and permission ofhoih depurtmenl 
and instructor Unpaid, supervised experience within 
library operations and/ or the opportimit)' to perform a 
study to solve a specific problem in a suitable Ubrary or 
other information agency-. 

0201 (12983) Wilson, W. W 3:30pm-5:00pm 

(HBK4115) 

LBSC708C (PermReq) Special Topics in Library 
and Information Service: Instructional 
Materials Development 
(3) REG/AUD. 

0201(12993) Clabaugh.S. MW 4:15pm-7:00pm 

(PLS 1130)) 

LBSC708W (PermReq) Special Topics in Library 
and Information Service: Managing 
Cultural Institutions 
(3) REG/AUD. 

0201 (13033) Kurtz. M. MW 5:30pm-8:45pm 

(HBK o\m 

LBSC709 (PermReq) independent Study 

(1-3) REG/AUD. 
Individual Instruction course: contact department or 
instructor to obtain section number. 



NEED HELP? 

For more information 
call SPOC 

1-877-989 SPOC 
or 301-314-3572 



LBSC737 (PnmReq) Seminar in the Special 
Library and Information Center 
(3) REG/AUD. 

Prerequisites: permission of department; and LBSC 630 or 
permission of instructor Role of special libraries and 
information centers in the information transfer process 
Analysis of the information transfer system: information 
needs and uses; management of special Ubraries and 
mformanon centers; and types, such as goverrmiental or 
industnal libraries, archives, and information anal\-sis 
centers. 

0201(13055) Abek,E. TuTh 6:00pm-8:45pm 

(HBK 4113) 

LBSC772 (PermReq) Seminar in tfie Organization 
of Knowledge 
(3) REG/AUD. 

Prerequisite: LBSC 670 or permission oj instnictor. Topics and 
issues in the organization ot knowledge. 
0201(13086) Green, R. TuTh l:00pm-4:00pm 

(HBK 4113) 
Class also meets Saturday, 8/12/00 from 9;30 am to 
12:30 pm. 

LBSG786 (PermReq) Library and Archives 
Preservation 
(3) REG/AUD. 

Prerequisite: permission of department. Literature and ke\' 
issues in the preservabon of archival and hbrar\* materials. 
The development of preservation programs and the 
estabhshment and maintenance of effective management 
techmques.The nature of the materials fiom which 
archives and books are made, causes of damage and 
deterioration, binding structures and emironmental 
concerns will be discussed within the context of general 
archives and libraries administration. 
0201 (13105) Cybulski.W. TuTh 5:30pm-8;45pm 
(HBK 0105) 

LBSC899 (PermReq) Doctoral Dissertation 
Research 
(1-8) REG. 

Individual Instrucrion course: contact department or 
instructor to obtain section number. 



LING Linguistics 

(Arts and Humanities) 

LING240 Language and Mind 

(3) REG/P-F/AUD. 

CORE: Humamties (HO) The study of language as a 
cogniti\"e phenomenon. Wa\^ of representing people's 
knowledge of their native language, vva^'s in which that 
knowledge is attained naturallv by children, and how it is 
used in speaking and listening. Relevant philosophical 
hterature. Rehtionship to study of other cognitive 
abihries: reasoning, perception, sensory-motor 
development. 

0201 (13176) Thornton, R. MTuWThf l:00pm-2:20pm 
(MMH 1304) 



LING499 (PermReq) Directed studies in 
Linguistics 
(3) REG/P-F/AUD. 

Individual Instrucrion course: contact department or 
instnictor to obtain section number. 

LING689 Independent Study 
(1-3) REG/AUD. 

0201(13189) STAFF Time and room to be arranged 

LING698 (PermReq) Directed Study 
(3) REG. 

Individual Instruction course: contact department or 
instructor to obtain section number. 

LING798 Research Papers in Linguistics 

(1-6) REG/AUD. 
Individual Instrucrion course: contact department or 
instructor to obtain section number. 

LING799 (PermReq) Master's Thesis Research 
(1-6) REG. 

Individual Instrucrion course: conuct department or 
instructor to obtain secrion number. 

IJNG889 (PermReq) Directed Research 
(1-8) REG. 

Individual Instruction course: contact department or 
instructor to obtain secrion number. 

LING895 (PermReq) Doctoral Research Paper 

(6) REG. 
0201 (13208) STAFF Tmie and room to be arranged 

LING899 (PermReq) Doctofal Dissertation 

Research 

(1-8) REG. 
Individual Instrucrion course: contact department or 
instructor to obtain secrion number. 



IVIAPL Applied Mathematics 

(Computer, Mathematical and 
Physical Sciences) 

MAPL698A Advanced Topics in Applied 
Mathematics 
(1-4) REG/AUD. 

Individual Instrucrion course: contact department or 
instructor to obtain secrion number. 

MAPL799 Master's Thesis Research 
(1-6) REG. 

Individual Instrucrion course: contact department or 
instructor to obtain section number. 



HOW BIG IS SUMMER? 



MAPL899 Doctoral Dissertation Research 

(1-8) REG. 
Individual Instruction course: contact department or 
instructor to obtain section number. 



MATH Mathematics 

(Computer, Mathematical and 
Physical Sciences) 

MATH001 Review of High School Algebra 
(3) REG/P-F/AUD. 

Recommended for nudenu wlw phn w lake MATH t tO or 
MATH 002 hui are not mnently qualified lo do so. Spedalfee 
required in addition lo the fp^i/jr tuition charge. This course 
does not carry credit touwds any degree at the Vniivrsity. 
Provides students with the foundation in intermediate 
algebra that is necessary for the study of the first college 
level math course. MATH 1 10. Topics include a review of 
the operations on real numben. linear equations in one 
and two sariables. systems of linear equations, linear 
inequalities, operations on polynomials, factoring, 
appUcadons and solutions of quadratic equations. 
0202(13336) STAFF MTuWThF 9:30am- I0:50ani 
(MTH04I1) 
fSce lecN in ".\c.uiemR Senices" section of this guide.) 

MATH001S Review of High School Algebra 
(3) REG/P-F/AUD. 

Recommended for niidenis who plan to lake MATH 1 10 or 
MiTH 002 but are not currently qualified to do so. Spedalfee 
required in addition to the regular tuition. This course does not 
carry credit towards any degree at the Unii>eTsity 
0201 (13347) STAFF MTuWThF 8:00am-3:30pm 
(EGR 1102) 
(See fees in "Academic Services" section of this guide.) 
Meets 08/14/00-08/23/00 

MATH002 Advanced Review of High School 
Algebra 
(3) REG/P-F/AUD. 

Recommended for students who plan to take but who are not 
currently qualified for MATH 1 15. Prerequisite: a satisfactory 
score on the mathematia placement exam or MATH 001 or 
MATH OOIL. Spedalfee required in addition to the regular 
tuition charge. This course does not carry credit toumds any 
degree at the University. Review of high school algebra at a 
faster pace and at a more advanced level than MATH 
001. Exponents; polynomials: linear equanons in one and 
two \'ariables: quadratic equations; and polynomial, 
rational, exponential and logarithmic functions. 
0203(13360) STAFF MTuWThF II :0<>am- 12:20pm 
(MTH 1313) 
(See fees in "Academic Services" section of this guide.) 



MATH110 Elementary Mathematical Models 
(3) REG/P-F/AUD. 

Prenquisite: permission of department based on salisfaetory score 
on the mathematics placement exam, or AHTH 001 with a 
grade of C or better, or XtiTH 002 Sot open to students 
majoring in malherrwlics. engineering, business, life sdences. and 
the physical sderues. Mot open to students who hair completed 
MATH 140. .\UTH 220. or my .\1-1TH or ST.-iT course 
for whuh MATH 140 or MATH 220 is a prerequisite Credit 
will be granted for only one of the following: ,KtATH 110 or 
.MATH 1 13. Topics include simple and compound 
interest; recursion for computing balances; installment 
loans and amortizaaon; approximanng data by hnear 
models; analysis of applications to real-world collecnons 
of data; probability; conditional probabihty; 
independence: expected v-alue: graphing and analysis of 
systems of inequalities; hnear programming and 
applications. MATH 1 10 is not open to students in the 
Engineering and Computer, Mathematical, and Physical 
Sciences Colleges. 

0201 (13384) STAFF MTuWThF 8:00am-9:20im 

(MTH 0411) 

020.1(13385) STAFF MTuWThF 1 1:00am-I2:20pm 

f.MTH B0427) 

MATH111 Introduction to Probability 
(3) REG/P-F/AUD. 

CORE; Mathematics or Formal Reasoning (MS) 
Prerequisite: permission of department based on satisfactory score 
on the mathematia placement exam, or MiTH 1 10. or 
AHTH 002 with a grade ofCor heller. Not open to students 
majoring in mathematics, engineering or the physical sderues. 
Sot open to students who have completed ST.iT 100 or any 
MiTH or STAT course with a prerequisite of .M-iTH 141. 
Credit will be granted for only one of the following: MATH 
II! or ST.-iT 100. Logic, Boolean algebra, counting. 
probabihty. random s'ariables, expectation applicadons of 
the normal probabihty distribution. 
112112(13400) STAFF MTu\^ThF 9;30am-10:50am 
(MTH B042I) 

MATH113 College Algebra with Applications 
(3) REG/P-F/AUD. 

Prerequisite: permission of department based on satislaaory score 
on the malliematics placement exam, or .MATH 002. Sot open 
to students who hair completed \t-\TH 140 or .\LiTH 220 
or any course for ivhich MATH 140 or MATH 220 is a 
prerequisite. Credit will be granted for only one of the follouing: 
I) M.ATH 113 or III (MATH 1 W and .\LATH 1 Isi. 
Graphs and applicadons of elemcntarv' fiinctions 
including polynomial, radonal, exponential and 
logarithnuc fiwcaons. Systems of Unear equaoons and 
linear inequahdes used to soKr representanvc problems in 
linear programming. Matrices and mathx operadons 
including inverse. Sequences. 
0201 (13414) STAFF MTuWThF 8:0(>ani-9:20am 

(MTH 13l.'>) 
0203(13415) STAFF MTuWThF ll:00am-12;20pm 

(MTH 1308) 



MATH115 Precalculus 

(3) REG/P-F/AUD. 
Prerequisile: permission of department based on saiisiiaory siort 
on the mathematics placement exam, or .\tATH 002 uirt a 
grade cf B or better, or MATH 113 Sot open to students iWuj 
have completed .MATH 140 or any .MATH or STAT came 
for uiiich .\LATH 140 is a prerequisiU. Credit will be granted 
for only one of the follouing: .MATH 113 or .MATH 1 15 
Preparation for MATH 221 1 or MATH 14)1. Elementars 
fiincdons and graphs; polynomials, raaonal iiinctioa'' 
exponential and loganthimc (imcdons, trigonometrii 
fiincdons. Algebraic techmqurs preparatory for calculus 

0201 (13430) STAFF MTuWThF 8:00am-9;2ajni 

(MTH 0307) 

0202 (13431) STAFF MTuWThF 9;30am-I0;50am 

(MTH 0307) 

MATH220 Elementary Calculus I 
(3) REG/P-F/AUD. 
CORE; Mathemancs or Formal Reasoning (MS) 
Prerequisite: permission of department based on 3 1/2 years of 
college preparatory rruithematia /including tngonomeiryl and 
Sdtisfadory performance on the mathematics placement exam, or 
MATH 1 13. or M.ATH 1 15. Sot open to sludenis ma/oring 
in mathemalus, engineering or the phpial scunces. Credit wdi 
he granted for only one of the follouing: .MATH 140 or 
MATH 220. Basic ideas of diSeirntial and integral 
calculus, with emphasis on elementary techniques of 
diffeiendadon and apphcadons. 

0201 (13504) STAFF MTuWThF 8:00am-9:2ftuii 

(MTH 0306) 

0202 (13505) STAFF MTuWThF 9:30am- 10:50ain 

(MTH 0306) 

0203 (13506) STAFF MTuWThF 1 1 ;00am- 1 2:20pm 

MTH 0306) 

MATH221 Elementary Calculus II 
(3) REG/P-F/AUD. 
CORE; MathemaDcs or Formal Reasoning (MS) 
Prerequisite: MATH 220. or .MATH 140. or r^uiioinu. .Vw 
open to students majoring in nuthenuiaa. ertgineemig or the 
physical sciences. Credit will he granted for only otie of the 
follouing: .MATH 141 or .MATH 221 Differential and 
integral calculus, with emphasis on elementary- techniques 
of integraDon and apphcaDons. 

0201 (13518) STAFF MTuWThF 8«0jm-9;20jm 
.MTH 0105) 

MATH246 Differential Equations for Scientists 

and Engineers 

(3) REG/P-F/AUD. 
Prerequisite: .MAIH 141 and any one of the lolkmv^: 
MATH 240 or F.N'ES 102 or PHYS 161 or PHYS 171 
An introduction to the basic methods of soKing ordinan* 
differential equaoons. EquaDons of first and second coder, 
hnear differential equations. Lapbce Cranstbrms. numerical 
methods, and the quahtatnr theory of didcrcntul 
equaoons. 

0202(13553) STAFF MTuWTTiF 9:3Oain-I0:5<lam 

(MTH 0105) 

0203(>3S54) STAFF MTuWTTiF 11 KJOam- 12.20pm 

(MTH 0105) 





MATH406 Introduction to Number Theory 
(3) REG/P-F/AUD. 

Prfrei{msiie: \MTH 141 or pcrmiuion of itqiartmcni. 
Integers, divisibility, prinie numbers, umque factorization, 
congruences, quadratic reciprocity, Diophantine equations 
and arithmetic functions. 

0203(13574) STAFF MTuWThF 1 l:ll()am-12:20pm 
(MTH0411) 

MATH461 Linear Algebra for Scientists and 
Engineers 
(3) REG/P-F/AUD. 

Prerequisites: M4TH 141 and one MiTH/ STAT mime for 
which MATH 141 is a prerequisite. This course cannot be used 
toward the upper h'el math requirements for M4TH/STAT 
mafors. Credit will he granted for only one of the following: 
MATH 240. M-iTH 400 or M-iTH 461. Basic concepts 
of linear algebra. This course is similar to MATH 240, 
but with more extensive coverage of the topics needed in 
apphed hnear algebra: change of basis, complex 
eigenvalues, diagonahzation, the Jordan canonical form. 
0201 (13606) STAFF MTuWThF 8:00am-9:20am 
(MTH 1308) 

MATH463 Complex Variables for Scientists and 
Engineers 
(3) REG/P-F/AUD. 

Prerequisite: MATH 241 or equivalent. The algebra of 
complex numbers, analytic functions, mapping properties 
of the elementary fiincrions. Cauchy integral formula. 
Theory of residues and application to evaluation of 
integrals. Conformal mapping. 

0203(13626) STAFF MTuWThF 11 :00ani-12:20pm 
(MTH 1311) 

MATH498A Selected Topics in Mathematics 
(1-9) REG/P-F/AUD. 

Individual Instruction course: contact department or 
instructor to obtain section number. 

MATH648A Selected Topics in Analysis 
(1-3) REG/AUD. 

n2l>l (13649) STAFF Time and room to be arranged 

MATH668A Selected Topics in Complex Analysis 

(1-3) REG/AUD. 
0201 (13660) STAFF Time .ind room to be arranged 

MATH718A Selected Topics in Mathematical 

Logic 

(1-3) REG/AUD. 
0201 (13671) STAFF Time and room to be arranged 

MATH748A Selected Topics in Geometry and 

Topology 

(1-3) REG/AUD. 
0201 (13682) STAFF Time and room to be arranged 

MATH799 Master's Thesis Research 
(1-6) REG. 

Individual Instruction course; contact department or 
instructor to obtain section number. 



MATH899 Doctoral Dissertation Research 
(1-8) REG. 

Individual Instruction course: contact department or 
instructor to obtain section number 



MEES Marine-Estuarine- 
Environmental Sciences 

(Life Sciences) 

MEES608F Seminar in Marine-Estuarine- 

Environmental Sciences: Theories of 
Science/Values in Science II 
(1) REG. 

0201(13755) Tenore.K. Tu 9:00am-10:3Uam 

(Arranged) 
Corequisite: MEES 608E, (See Summer Session I) 

MEES699 Special Problems in Marine-Estuarine- 
Environmental Sciences 
(1-3) REG/AUD. 

Individual Instruction course: contact department or 
instructor to obtain section number. 

MEES799 Masters Thesis Research 
(1-6) REG. 

0201(13768) STAFF Time and room to be arranged 

MEES899 Doctoral Dissertation Research 

(1-8) REG. 
0201 (13770) STAFF Time and room to be arranged 



METO Meteorology 

(Computer, Mathematical and 
Physical Sciences) 

MET0499 Special Problems in Atmospheric 
Science 
(1-3) REG/P-F/AUD. 

Individual Instruction course: contact department or 
instructor to obtain section number. 

MET0798 Directed Graduate Research 

(1-3) S-F 

Individual Instruction course: contact department or 
instructor to obtain secnon number. 

MET0899 Doctoral Dissertation Research 

(1-8) S-H 

Individual Instruction course: contact department or 
instructor to obtain section number. 



MICB Microbiology 

(Life Sciences) 

MICB688 Special Topics 

(1-4) REG/AUD. 

Individual Instruction course: contact deparmient or 
instructor to obtain section number. 



MICB799 Master's Thesis Research 
(1-6) REG. 

Individual Instruction course: contact department or 
instructor to obtain secnon number 

MICB899 Doctoral Dissertation Research 
(1-8) REG. 

Individual Instruction course: contact department or 
instructor to obtain section number 



MOCB Molecular and Cell Biology 

(Life Sciences) 

M0CB699 Laboratory Rotation 
(2-3) S-E 

0201(13976) STAFF Time and room to be arranged 

M0CB899 Doctoral Dissertation Research 
(1-8) S-E 

Individual Instruction course: contact deparmient or 
instructor to obtain section number 



MUET Ethnomusicology 

(Arts and Humanities) 

MUET210 The Impact of Music on Life 
(3) REG. 

CORE: History or Theory of Arts (HA) DIVERSITY 
Credit mil he granted for only one of the following: MVSC 
210 or MUET 210. Formerly MUSC 210. Music as a part 
of culture. Materials drawn from traditions throughout 
the globe to illustrate issues of historical and 
contemporary significance, including the impact of race, 
class and gender on the smdy of music. 
0201(14050) STAFF MTuWTh 1 0:00am- 11 :40am 
(TWS 2123) 

Meets 07/17/00-08/27/00 
0202(14051) STAFF MTuWTh 12:30pm-2: 10pm 
(TWS 2123) 

Meets 07/17/00-08/27/00 

MUSC School of Music 

(Arts and Humanities) 

MUSC130 Survey of Music Literature 
(3) REG/P-F/AUD. 

CORE: History orTheorv- of Arts (FLA) Open to ail 
students except music and music education mafors A study of 
the principles upon which music is based, and an 
introduction to the musical repertory performed in 
America today. 

0201 (14112) Jenkins, C. MTuWTh 10:00am-l 1:40am 
(TWS 3116) 

MUSC140 Music Fundamentals I 
(3) REG/P-F/AUD. 

CORE: History or Theory- of Arts (HA) Limited to non- 
music majors. Introductory theory course. Notation, scales, 
intervals, triads, rhythm, form, and basic aural skills. 
0201(14124) STAFF MTuWTh I l:l>0am-12:40pm 

(TWS 2102) 
0202(14125) STAFF MTuWTh l:00pm-2:40pm 

(TWS 2135) 



90 



HOW B 



SUMMER? 



MUSC388 (I'nmReq) Music Ititemship 
(3) REG. 

Individual Instruction course: contact department or 
instructor to obtain section number. 

MUSC389 (PermRen) Musjc Intemshjp Analysis 
(1) REG. 

Individual Instruction course: contact department or 

msmictor to obtain section number. 

MUSC448 (PermReq) Selected Topics in Music 
(1-3) REG/P-F/AUD. 

Individual Instruction course: contact department or 
instructor to obtain secnon number. 

MUSC499 (PermReq) Independent Studies 
(2-3) REG/P-F/AUD. 

Individual Instruction course: contact dcparmieni or 
instructor to obtain section number. 

IVIUSC699 Selected Topics in Music 

(1-3) REG/AUD. 
Individual Instruction course: conuct department or 
instructor to obtain section number 

MUSC799 Master's Thesis Research 
(1-6) REG. 

Individual Instruction course: contact department or 
instructor to obtain section number. 

MUSC899 Doctoral Dissertation Research 
(1-8) REG. 

Individual Instrucuon course: contact department or 
instructor to obtain section number 



NFSC Nutrition and Food Science 

(Agriculture and Natural Resources) 

The following courses may involve the use of animals. 
Students who are concerned about the use of animals in 
teaching have the responsibility to conuct the instructor, 
prior to course enrollment, to determine whether 
animals are to be used in the course, whether class 
exercises involving animals are optional or required and 
what alternatives, if any. arc available. 

NFSCKX) Elements of Nutrition 

(3) REG/P-F/AUD. 

CORE: Life Science (LS) l-omerty MTR 100. 

Fundamentals of human nutrition. Nutrient requirements 

related to changing individual and family needs. 

02(11(14250) STAFF MWF 9:3nam-IO:50am 

(PLS 1111 

TuTh9:30am-l():50ani 

(PLS 1 1 1 1) Dis 

0202 (14251) STAFF MWF 9:30am-10:50am 

(PLS nil) 

MW 11 :00am- 12:20pm 

(PLS 1115) Dis 



NFSC315 Nutrition During the Life Cycle 
(3) REG/P-F/AUD. 

hnequisile: Nl^SC 100 or MFSC 200. Formerly WTR 
315. A smdy of how development throughout life, 
including prenatal development, pregnancy, lactation, 
adolescence and aging, alter nutrient requirements. 
Students will apply this knowledge to the dieury needs 
and food choices of these different groups. 
0201(14261) STAFF MWF 9:30am-ll:40im 

(SQH2117) 

NFSC399 (PermReq) Special Problems in Food 
Science 
(1-3) REG/P-F/AUD. 

Individual Instruction course: contact department or 
instructor to obtain secnon number. 



NFS(;490 (PermReq) Special Problems in 
Nutrition 
(2-3) REG/P-F/AUD. 

Prerequisite: \'FSC 440 tmd permission of depanmtnt. 
Fonnerty WTR 490. Individually selected problems in 
the area of human nutrition. 
0201 (14274) STAFF Time and room to be arranged 

NFSC678A (PermReq) Selected Topics in 
Nutrition 
(1-6) REG/AUD. 

0201 (14285) STAFF Time and room to be arranged 

NFSC699 (PermReq) Probloms io Nutrition and 
Food Science 
(1-4) REG/AUD. 

Individual Instruction course: contact department or 
instructor to obtain section number. 

NFSC799 (PermReq) Mastof's Thesis Research 

(1-6) REG/S-E 
Indivndual Instrucaon course: contact department or 
instructor to obtain section number. 

NFSC899 (PtrmReq) Doctoral Dissertation 
Research 
(1-8) REG/S-E 

Individual Instruction course: contact department or 
instructor to obtain section number. 



NRMT Natural Resources 
Management 

(Agriculture and Natural Resources) 

NRMT489 (PermReq) Field Experience 

(1-4) REG/P-F/AUD. 
0201(14361) Kangas. P Time and room to be arranged 



PBiO Plant Biology 

(Life Sciences) 

PBIOegg (PermReq) Special Problems in Plant 

Biology 

(1-3) REG/AUD. 
Individual Instrucnon course: contaa department or 
instructor to obtain secnon number. 

PBI0799 (PermReq) Master's Thesis Research 

(1-6) REG/S-F 
Individual Instrucaon course: conua department or 
instructor to obtain section number. 

PBI0899 (PermReq) Doctoral Dissertation 

Research 

(1-8) REG/S-F. 
Individual Instruction course: contact department or 
instructor to obtain section number. 



PHIL Philosophy 

(Arts and Humanities) 

PHILKX) Introduction to Philosophy 
(3) REG/P-F/AUD. 

CORE: HumaniDes (HO) An introduction to the 
literature, problems, and methods of philosophy either 
through a study of some of the main figures m 
philosophic thought or through an examination of some 
of the central and recurring problems of philosophy. 
0201 (14466) Lesher.J. MTuWThF 9:0<jam-10:20am 
(SKN 1112) 

PHIL140 Contemporary Moral Issues 

(3) REG/P-F/.AUD. 
( t'RE: Humanities (HOi The uses of philosophical 
analysis in thinking clearly about such widely debated 
moral issues as abortion, euthanasu. homosexuality, 
pornography, revierse discnmmadon. the death peniltv 
business ethics, sexual equahty, and economic jusnce 
n2ol (14476) Deise.E MTuWThF 12:00pm- 1:2Upm 
5KN 1115) 

PHIL308G Studies in Contemporary Philosophy: 

Sexual Consent 

(3) REG/P-F/AUa 
0201(14507) .Mouenbecker. P TuWTh7«)pin-9:15pm 
(SKN 1112) 
TradiQonal approaches to ethia condemn a wide range 
ot sexual behavior, even betwren consenang adults: e.g.. 
sex outside of mamage, sex protected by contracepoon. 
homosexuality, etc. But according to more modem 
approaches, consent is enough to make most sexual 
practices acceptable. Is consent enough, for example, to 
counter objecaons to homosexual relationships? If not. 
what more is needed to make sex betwren adults morally 
accepuble? These are the kinds of quesDons thai will be 
our focus m this course. 









Philosophy 



PHIL 308G Sexual Consent 

Traditional approaches to ethics 
condemn a wide range ot sexual 
behavior, even between 
consenting adults; e.g., sex outside 
of marriage, sex protected by 
contraception, homosexuality, etc. 
But according to more modern 
approaches, consent is enough to 
make most sexual practices 
acceptable. Is consent enough, for 
example, to counter objections to 
homosexual relationships? If not, 
what more is needed to make sex 
between adults morally 
acceptable. These are the kinds of 
questions that will be our tocus in 
this course. 

PHIL 308R God, Evil, and Evidence 

Writing of the hanging of two 
adults and a chOd that he 
witnessed while in a Nazi death 
camp, holocaust survivor Elie 
Wiesel relates that the two adults 
died quickly. The child, on the 
other hand, took longer: 
"For more than a half an hour he 
stayed there, struggling between 
life and death, dying slowly in 
agony under our eyes. And we 
had to look him Rill in the face. 
He was still alive when I passed in 
front of him. His tongue was still 
red, his eyes were not yet glazed. 
Behind me, I heard the same man 
asking; "Where is God now?" 
Is the existence of such hideous 
evil evidence that God does not 
exist? Is there any proof that God 
does exist? Does one even need 
proof in order to rationally 
believe that there is a god? These 
are the types of questions that 
will be explored in this course. 



PHIL308R Studies in Contemporary Philosophy: 
God, Evil, and Evidence 
(3) REG/P-F/AUD. 

(12(11(14537) Bernard, C. TuWTh 3:3(Jpm-5:35pm 
(SKN 1112) 
Writing ot the lianging of two adults and a child that he 
witnessed while in a Nazi death camp, holocaust survnvor 
Eire Wiesel relates that the two adults died quickly. The 
child, on the other hand, took longer: "For more than a 
half an hour he stayed there, struggling between bfe and 
death, dying slowly in agony under our eyes. And we had 
to look him fiill in the face. He was still alive when 1 
passed in front of him. His tongue was still red, his eyes 
were not yet glazed. Behind me, I heard the same man 
asking: 'Where is God now?'" Is the existence of such 
hideous evil evidence that God does not exist? Is there 
any proof that God does exist? Does one even need 
proof in order to rationally believe that there is a God? 
These .are the types of questions that we will explore in 
this course. 

PHIL308X Studies in Contemporary Philosophy; 

Metaphysics for the Millennium 

(3) REG/P-F/AUD. 
"21)1 (14547) Stairs.A. MTuWTh l:3(Jpm-3:l(lpm 
(SKN 1115) 
The word "metaphysics" is used in popular talk to refer 
to such things as reincarnanon. divination and various 
sorts of psychic phenomena. Philosophen use the word 
to refer to the study of things like the nature of causality 
or the constitution of the self What do these two sorts of 
questions have to do with one other? A great deal, it 
turns out. Questions such as "What would count as 
reincarnation?" or "Could Taiot card reading really 
work?" lead us very quickly into territory mined by 
philosophers such as Aristotle and David Hume. And a 
look at parapsychological research will help us construct 
a class ex^periment to e.xpIore some puzzling questions 
about what holds the world together. 

PHIL310 Ancient Philosophy 

(3) REG/P-F/AUD. 

Prerequisite: six credits in philosophy or classics. A study of the 
origins and development of philosophy and science in 
ancient Greece, focusing on the pre-Socratics. Socrates. 
Plato, and Aristode. 

(1201(14557) Lesher.J. MTuWThF 10:30am- 1 l:5()am 
(SKN 1112) 

PHIL408 Topics in Contemporary Philosophy: 
Islamic Political Philosophy 
(3) REG/P-F/AUD. 

(12111(14577) Hassassian. M. TuTh 2:00pm-5:20pm 
(TYDOlll) 

PHIL498X Topical Investigations 
(1-3) REG/P-F/AUD. 

(12(11(14607) STAFF Time and room to be arranged 

PHIL688X Selected Problems in Philosophy 
(1-3) REG/AUD. 

(I2(.)l (14627) STAFF Time and room to be arranged 



PHIL788X Research In Philosophy 
(1-6) REG/AUD. 

((2(11(14647) STAFF Time and room to be arranged 

PHIL799 Master's Thesis Research 
(1-6) REG. 

Individual instruction course: contact department or 
instructor to obtain secnon number. Contact department 
to make arrangements. 

PHIL899 Doctoral Dissertation Research 

(1-8) REG. 
Individual Instruction course: contact department or 
instructor to obtain section number. Contact department 
to make arrangements. 



PHYS Physics 

(Computer, Mathematical and 
Physical Sciences) 

PHYS122 Fundamentals of Physics II 
(4) REG/P-F/AUD. 

CORE: Physical Science Lab (PL) Prerequisite: Pffl'S 121 

or equivalent. A continuation of PHYS 121, which 

together with it, generally satisfies the mimmum 

requirement of medical and dental schools. 

0201(14725) Rapport, M. MTuWThf 9:30am-10:50am 

(PLS 1412) 

TuTh 12:00pm-2:00pm 

(PHY 3316) Lab 

MW I l:00am-l 1:50am 

(PHY 0405) Dis 

0202(14726) Rapport, M. MTuWThF W0am-10:50am 

(PLS 1412) 

TuTh 2;00pm-4:00pm 

(PHY 3316) Lab 

TuTh l:00pm-l:50pm 

(CHE 2140) Dis 

PHYS262 General Physics: Vibrations, Waves, 
Heat, Electricity and Magnetism 
(4) REG/P-F/AUD. 

CORE: Physical Science Lab (PL) Prerequisite: PHYS 
161. Credit unll not he granted for PHYS 272 and PHYS 
142 or former PHYS 192 or PHYS 262. Second semester 
of a three-semester calculus-based general physics course. 
Vibrations, waves, fluids; heat, kinetic theory, and 
thermodynamics; electrostatics, circuits, and magnetism. 
0201 (14748) STAFF MTuWThF 9:30am-10:50am 
(PHY 0405) 
MW l:00pm-4:00pm 
(PHY 3219) Lab 
MW ll:00am-1 2:00pm 
(PHY 4220) Dis 

PHYS299 (PermReq) Special Problems in Physics 
(1-6) REG/P-F/AUD. 

Individual Instrucnon course: contact department or 
instructor to obtain section number. 



92 



HOW B 



I S 



SUMMER? 



PHYS399 (PermReq) Special Problems in Physics 
(1-3) REG/P-F/AUD. 

Individual Instruction course: contact department or 
instructor to obtain section number 

PHYS499 (PermReq) Special Problems In Physics 
(1-16) REG/P-F/AUD. 

Individual Instruction course: contact department or 
instructor to obtain section nunihcr 

PHYS798 (PermReq) Special Problems In 

Advanced Physics 

(1-3) REG/AUD. 
Individual Instruction course: contact department or 
instructor to obtain section number Conuct department 
to make arrangements. 

PHYS799 (PermReq) Master's Thesis Research 
(1-6) REG. 

Individual Instruction course: contact department or 
instructor to obtain section number 

PHYS899 (PermReq) Doctoral Dissertation 
Research 
(1-8) REG. 

Individual Instruction course: contact deparmient or 
instructor to obtain section number. 



PSYC Psychology 

(Behavioral and Social Sciences) 

PSYC2(X) (PermReq) Statistical Methods In 
Psychology 
(3) REG/P-F/AUD. 

Prmqmsite: PSYC 100; md .\UTH 111 or MATH 140 or 
MATH 220. A basic introduction to quantitative methods 
used in psychological research. 

0201(14861) Crowley. M. TuTh 6:00pm-9:20pm 
(BPS 1236) 

PSYC221 Social Psychology 

(3) REG/P-F/AUD. 

PrerequnUe: PSYC 100. The influence of social factors on 
the individual and on interpersonal behavior Includes 
topics such as conformity, attitude change, person 
perception, interpersonal attraction, and group behavior 
0201(14872) Hill.D. MTuWThF ll:00am-12:2()pm 
(BPS 1236) 

PSYC332 Psychology of Human Sexuality 
(3) REG/P-F/AUD. 

Prerequisilc: PSYC 100. A survey of historical and 
contemporary psychological views on a wide variety of 
sexual behaviors; theory and research bearing on the 
relationship between life span psychological development, 
psychological (unctioning, interpersonal processes and 
sexual behavion: political and social issues invoK'ed in 
current sexual norms and practices. 
0201(14902) Brown, R. MTuWThF I l:00am-12:20pm 
(BPS 1243) 



PSYC334 Psychology of Interpersonal 
Relationships 
(3) REG/P-F/AUD. 

I'rereqiiisile: PSYC 100 Research, theory and their 
pracncal applications peruining to the development, 
maintenance and dissolution of human relationships. 
Processes critical to successful relating (e.g., 
communication, bargaining, conflict resolution), and 
issues associated with troubled dyadic relations with equal 
partners (e.g., jealousy, spouse abuse, divorce). 
0201(14912) Brown. R. MTuWThF 9:30am- 10:50am 
(BPS 2283) 

PSYC336 Psychology of Women 
(3) REG/P-F/AUD. 

Pmeqimile: PSYC WO. Also offered as WMST }}6. Credit 
will be granted for only one of the following: PSYC }}6 or 
ll'iWST i36. A survey of the biology, Ufe span 
development, socialization, penonality, mental health, and 
special issues of women, 

0201(14923) Wonnell,T MTuWThF 9:30am-I0:50am 
(BPS 1236) 

PSYC353 Adult Psychopathology 
(3) REG/P-F/AUD. 

Prerequisite: PSYC 100. Credit will begrmledfor only one of 
the following: PSYC 353 md PSYC 33 1 or PSYC 431. 
The nature, diagnosis, etiology, and treatment of mental 
disorders among adults. 

0201(14943) Harris, A. MW 5:00pm-8:20pm 

(BPS 2283) 

PSYC355 Child Psychology 

(3) REG/P-F/AUD. 

Prerequisite: PSYC 100. Sot open to students who have 
completed PSYC 333. Sur\'e\' of research and thcor>' of 
psychological development fixim conception through 
childhood, stressing physiological, conceptual and 
behavioral changes, and the social and biological context 
in which individuals develop. 

0201 (14953) Jacobson,J. MTuWThF 12:30pm- 

1:50pm 

(BPS 1236) 

PSYC420 Experimental Psychology: Social 
Processes I 

(4) REG/P-F/AUD. 

Prerequisite: PSYC 200; and PSYC 221; md completion of 
the departmentally required English, math, and sncnce 
supporting course sequence. Restricted to PSYC majors who 
haw completed 45 credits. A laboratory course to provide a 
basic undersunding of experimental method in social 
psychology and experience m conducQng research on 
social processes. 

0201(14963) Johnson, M. TuTh l:OOpm-4:20pm 

(BPS 2283) 

W 1:00pm-4:20pm 

(BPS 0147) Lab 

0202(14964) Johnson. M. TuTh l:00pm-4:20pm 

(BPS 2283) 

M l:00pm-4:20pm 

(BPS 01 47) Ub 



PSYC469H Honors Thesis Proposal Preparation 

(1-3) REG/P-F/AUD. 
0201 (14995) STAFF Time and room to be arranged 

PSY(M78 (P,rmR,q) Independent Study in 
Psychology 
(1-3) REG/P-F/AUD. 

Individual Instruction course: conuci department or 
instructor to obtain secnon number 

PSYC479 (PermReq) Special Research Problems 

In Psychology 

(1-3) REG/P-F/AUD. 
Individual Instruction course: conuct department or 
instructor to obtain section number 

PSYC499H Honors Thesis Research 
(3) REG/P-F/AUD. 

0201 (15010) STAFF Tune and room to be arranged 

PSYC619 (PnmReq) Research Team in 

Clinical/Community Psychology 
(1-3) REG/AUD. 

0201 (15021) STAFF Time and room to be arranged 

PSYC788 Special Research Problems 
(1-4) REG/AUD. 

Individual Instruction course: contact depanment or 
instructor to obtain section number 

PSYC789 Special Research Problems 

(1-4) REG/AUD. 
Indindual Instruction course: contaa department or 
instructor to obtain section number 

PSYC799 Master's Thesis Research 
(1-6) REG. 

Individual Instruction course: contact department or 
instructor to obtain section number. 

PSYC899 Doctoral Dissertation Research 

(1-8) REG. 
Individual Instruction course: conuct department or 
instructor to obtain secDon number 






School of 
Public Affairs 

The newest professional school at 
the university offers graduate 
education to men and women 
interested in public policy and 
management, specializing in 
international security and 
economic policy; public 
managenient; finance and 
leadership; environmental policy 
and social policy. Ranked 20th in 
the 1998 U.S. News EWorld 
Report evaluation of public affairs 
graduate programs, the school 
offers outstanding faculty, 
multidisciphnary programs and 
access to the pubhc policy 
community' ofWashington, D.C., 
and Annapolis, Md. 

Seeking to improve the capacity 
of mid-career professionals to 
serve the public effectively, the 
school forms partnerships with 
government agencies through its 
Office of Executive Programs. 
OEP provides executive education 
in housing and community 
development, environmental 
policy, management and leadership 
skills, international finance and 
health and human services. 
A similar program, the Maryland 
Government Executive Institute, 
sponsored jointly with the Robert 
H. Smith School of Business, 
offers two-week intensive training 
for state executives in public 
pohcy and organizational 
management. 



PUAF Public Affairs 

(Public Affairs) 

PUAF798B Readings in Public Policy 
(1-3) REG/AUD. 

Individual Instruction course: contact department or 
instructor to obtain section number. For PUAF majors 
onlv. 

PUAF89g Doctoral Dissertation Research 
(1-8) REG. 

Individual Instruction course: contact department or 
instructor to obtain section number. 

RUSS Russian 

(Arts and Humanities) 

RUSS386 (PermReq) Experiential Learning 
(3-6) REG/P-F. 

PrcrftjuisiU': pcrmisshn of department. 56 semester hours. 
0201 (15225) Martin, C. Time and room to be 

arranged 

RUSS499 Independent Study in Russian 
(1-3) REG. 

(1201(15236) Martin. C. Time and room to be 



RUSS798 Independent Study 
(1-3) REG/AUD. 

Individual Instruction course: contact department or 
instructor to obuin section number 



SOCY Sociology 

(Behavioral and Social Sciences) 
S0CY100 Introduction to Sociology 

(3) REG/P-F/ AUD. 

CORE: Behavioral and Social Science (SB) The 
Hindamental concepts and principles of sociology'. 
Includes consideration of culture, patterns of social 
interaction, norms, values, social institutions, stratification, 
and social change. 

0201 (15298) Hamilton,V. MTuWTh 9:00am- 1 0:40am 
(ASY ,^207) 

S0CY201 Introductory Statistics for Sociology 

(4) REG/P-F/ AUD. 

Prerequisite: SOCY 100 and AUTH 111 or equivalent. Not 
open to students who have eompleced BMGT 231. EXEE 
324, or STAT 400. Credit will be granted for only one ot the 
follouwg:AREC 484. BIOM 301. BMGT 230. CNEC 
400, ECON 321, EDMS 451, GEOG 305, GITT 422. 
PSYC 200, SOCY 201, URSP 350, orTEXT 400. 
Elementary descriptive and inferential statistics. 
Construction and percentaging of bivariate contingency 
ubles; frequency distributions and graphic presentations; 
measures of central tendency and dispersion; parametric 
and nonparametric measures of association and 
correlation; regression; probability; hypothesis testing; the 
normal, binomial and chi-square distributions; point and 
interval estimates. 

0201 (15318) STAFF MTuWTh l:00pm-2:40pm 

(ASY 3203) 

TuTh 9:30am- 1 1:00am 

(ASY 3203) Lab 



S0CY305 Scarcity and Modern Society 
(3) REG/P-F/AUD. 

Prerequisite: 3 credits of sociology. Resource deplenon and 
the deterioration of the environment. Relationship to 
hfesryles, individual consumer choices, cultural values, and 
institutional failures. Projection of the future course of 
American society on the basis of the analysis of scarcity, 
theories of social change, current trends, social 
movements, government actions, and the futurist 
literature. 

0201(15338) Finsterbusch, K. TuTh 9:00am- 12:20pm 
(ASY 1213) 

S0CY325 The Sociology of Gender 
(3) REG/P-F/AUD. 

DIVERSITY Prerequisite: 3 aedits of sociology. Also offered as 
ll'MST 325. Credit will he granted for only one of the 
following: SOCY 325 or HMST 325. Institutional bases of 
gender roles and gender inequality, cultural perspectives 
on gender, gender sociahzation, feminism, and gender- 
role change. Emphasis on contemporary American 
society. 

0201 (15349) STAFF MW l:00pm-4:20pm 

(ASY 3207) 

S0CY380 Honors Independent Reading In 
Sociology 
(3) REG/P-E 

Prerequisite: permission ot department. Formerly SOCY 378. 
This course permits sociology honor students to 
undertake a program or reading on a particular problem 
in sociology or a subfield therein. The reading will be 
done under the supervision of a member of the sociology 
faculty. Required of sociology honor students. 
0201(15360) STAFF Time and room to be arranged 

S0CY381 Honors Independent Research in 
Sociology 
(3) REG/P-E 

Prerequisite: SOCY 380. Formerly SOCY 388. This course 

pernuts sociology students to define a particular problem 

in sociology or a subfield therein and to develop a 

research plan for use as a thesis topic. The work will be 

done under the supervision of a member of the sociology 

faculty. 

0201(15371) STAFF Time and room to be arranged 

S0CY383 Honors Thesis Research 
(3) REG/P-E 

Prerequisite: SOCY 381. Formerly SOCY 389. Student 
research under the direction of a member of the 
sociology faculty, culminating in the presentation and 
defense of a thesis reporting the research. 
0201 (15382) STAFF Time and room to be arranged 

S0CY386 (PermReq) Experiential Learning 
(3-6) REG/P-E 

Individual Instruction course: contact department or 
instructor to obtain section number Prerequisite: permission 
of department. 56 semester hours. 



94 



HOW BIG 



SUMMER? 



Traveleam 2000 

Maryland offers a variety of travel study opportunities reaching into various 
regions of the continental United States and extending the imagination. 

learning and life experiences of 
the participants. Listed below 
are the travel study options 
available to students in summer 
2000. Some of these offerings 
have early decision dates, so 
please make note of any 
unusual deadline dates for 
application or inquiry. 

( )fferings this year include: 
Service Learning 
< Ipportuniries offered by the 
1. Oilege of Behavioral and 
Siicial Sciences - Department 
t Sociology. 




SOCY 398A The Contemporary Experience of Native Americans 

(3 credits) (July 15-29) 

Instructor; Linda Moghadani 
Participants will live and work 
on a Lakota Indian Reservation 
in South Dakota as part of this 
service learning course. In 
addition to service work, the 
on-site experience will include 
field trips to organizations 
serving the Lakota and 
opportunities to visit cultural 
points of interest. The course 
requires assigned readings and 
orientation prior to students' 
departure, along with a day of 
discussion and reflection upon 
your return. Enrollment is 
limited for this exciting new 
program — please contact 
Program Manager Kristin 
Owens at (301) 405-2652 
for additional information 
regarding course content 
and cost. 




S0CY398A Special Topics in Sociology: TTk 

Contemporary Experience of Native 

Americans 

(3) REG/P-F/AUD. 

ii2iil (15397) Zamani-Moghadam. L. 

Time and room to he arranged 
Participants w ill live and work on a Lalcou Indian 
Reservation in South Dakou as part of this scvice 
learning course. In addition to service work, the 
on-site experience will include field trips to 
organizations serving the Lakou and opportunities 
lo visit cultural points of interest. TTie course 
assigned readings and orienution prior to student's 
departure, along with a day- of discussion and 
reflection upon your return. Enrollment is limited 
tor this exciting new program. Please contact 
Kristin Owens at (301) 405-2652 for additional 
information regarding course content and cost. 
Meeis0~.'15fmur.29 no 

S0CY399 (PermReq) Independent Study In 
Sociology 
(1-6) REG/P-F/AUD. 

Individual Instrucnon course: contact department or 
instructor to obtain section number. 

S0CY427 Deviant Behavior 

(3) REG/P-F/AUD. 

I^erequisitc: 6 (redits oj soaohg)' lyr permission of department. 
Current theories of the genesis and distnbution of 
Jcviant behas-ior, and their implications for a general 
theory of desnanl behavior. DeBniDons of deviance. 
labeling theory, secondary deviance. 
0201 (15396) STAFF MW 9:00am-12;20pm 

(ASY 3203) 

S0CY443 The Family and Society 
(3) REG/P-F/AUD. 

Prerequisite: 6 credits ofuxiology or permissioti of department. 
Study of the family as a social insntuoon: its biological 
and cultural t'oundaaons. historical deselopmcnt. 
changing structures, and iiincaons. the mienction of 

iiirriage and parenthood, disorganizing and reorganizing 

.Ltors in preseni-day trends. 

:iil (15426) Undry.L. TuTh l:00pm-«:20pm 

(ASY 1213) 

S0CY498B Selected Topics in Sociology: 
Sociology of Popular Culture 
(3) REG/P-F/AUD. 
'Ciil (15436) Wiedcnholt.Vt; TuWTh 6:00pm-«:15pm 
(.ASY I2I3) 
Mosies. talk shows, grunge, jokes, billboards, video guaa, 
RMiiance nosrls. sports, malls and uttoos are all social 
phenomena, and, therefore, subject to sociological 
HuK-sLs. The class will use a mux of theoncs fiom 
'. I indsm to postmodern approaches to im'esagate 
: ^pular culture- 

S0CY699 Special Social Problems 
(1-16) REG/AUD. 

Individual Instrucnon course: conuct department or 
mstruaor to obtain section number 





S0CY799 Master's Thesis Research 
(1-6) REG. 

Individual Instruction course: contact department or 
instructor to obtain section number. 

S0CY899 Doctoral Dissertation Research 

(1-8) REG. 
Individual Instruction course: contact department or 
instructor to obtain section number. 

SPAN Spanish 

(Arts and Humanities) 



The language of instruction in all 
unless otherwise noted. 



IS Spanish 



SPAN101 Elementary Spanish I 
(4) REG/P-F/AUD. 

Prereqmsiie: No prmoiis Spamih: high school level 1 Spanish 
with grade of A or B; high school level 2 Spanish with a grade 
ofCor below. Not open to nalive/jluent speakers of Spanish. 
Introduction to the fianctions and structures of the 
Spanish language, with emphasis on the four skills of 
Ustening, speaking, reading and vwiting. 
0201(15512) Di Stravolo, L. MTuWTh 9:30am-n:45ani 
(]MZ0125) 

SPAN102 Elementary Spanish II 
(4) REG/P-F/AUD. 

Prerequisite: SPAN 101 at L'MCP or equivalent. Not open to 
native/jlueni speakers oj Spanish. Further study ot the 
fiinctions and structures of the Spanish language, with 
emphasis on the four skills of listening, speaking, reading 
and writing. 

0201(15523) Ziarko, H. MTuWTh 9:30am-l 1:45am 
gMZ 2207) 

SPAN201 Intermediate Spanish 
(4) REG/P-F/AUD. 
CORE: Humamties (HO) Prerequisite: SPAN 102 or 
SPAN 103 at UMCP or high school level J Spanish ivith a 
grade of A or B or high school level 4 Spanish unth a C or 
below. Not open to native/fluent speakers of Spanish. Formerly 
SPAN 203. Continued development of the functions and 
structures of the Spamsh language with emphasis on the 
four skills of Ustening, speaking, reading, and WTiting. 

0201 (15534) Hancock, Z. MTuWTh 9:30am- 11 :45am 

gMZ 0120) 

0202 (15535) Farhan,A. TuWTh 6:00pm-9:00pm 

GMZ 0103) 

SPAN228B Selected Topics in Latin American 

Literature and Society: Contemporary 
Film & Literature in Latin American 
Societies 
(3) REG/P-F 

0201(15565) Peres, P. MW l:00pm-4:15pm 

gMZ 0202) 



SPAN301 Advanced Grammar and Composition I 
(3) REG/P-F/AUD. 

Prerequisite: SP.W 202. Recommended: SP.4N 207. Practice 
of complex grammatical structures through reading and 
WTiting of compositions and essays. Specific lexical, 
syntactic, rhetorical, and stylistic devices will be 
highlighted. 

0201(15575) Pere2,A. TuTh 6:00pm-9;15pm 

QMZ 3205) 

SPAN312 Advanced Conversation II 
(3) REG/P-F/AUD. 

Prerequisites: SPAN 202 and SPAN 211 or SPAN 311 or 
permission of department. Not open to native/fluent speakers ol 
Spanish. Continued mastery of listening and speaking 
skills in Spamsh. Opportunity to develop oral fluency 
improve pronunciation, and increase vocabulary. Emphasis 
on colloquial and technical language as well as 
development of hnguistic accuracy. Individual and/or 
group oral presentation. 

0201(15597) Altuna, M. TuTh 6:00pm-9:15pm 

gMZ 2206) 

SPAN399 Independent Study in Spanish 
(1-3) REG/P-F/AUD. 

Individual Instruction course: contact department or 
instructor to obtain section number. 

SPAN409 Great Themes of the Hispanic 
Literatures: Idea of a Continent 
(3) REG/P-F/AUD. 

0201 (15659) Aguibr-Mora.J. MW 6:00pm-9:15pm 
gMZ 1224) 

SPAN448 Special Topics in Latin American 
Civilization: Story of Two Cities 
(3) REG/P-F/AUD. 

0201(15679) Aguilar-Mora.J. TuTh 6:00pm-9: 15pm 
gMZ 1226) 

SPAN448B Special Topics in Latin American 
Civilization: Human Rights and 
Democratization in Latin America 
(3) REG/P-F/AUD. 

0201(15689) Kauhnan.E. TuTh 2:00pm-5:20pm 

(TYD 01 17) 

SPAN699 Independent Study in Spanish 
(1-3) REG/AUD. 

Individual Instruction course: contact department or 
instructor to obtain section number. 

SPAN799 Master's Thesis Research 
(1-6) REG. 

Individual Instruction course: contact department or 
instructor to obtain section number. 

SPAN899 Doctoral Dissertation Research 
(1-8) REG. 

Individual Instruction course: contact department or 
instructor to obtain section number. 



STAT Statistics and Probability 

(Computer, Mathematical and 
Physical Sciences) 

STAT100 Elementary Statistics and Probability 
(3) REG/P-F/AUD. 

CORE: Mathematics or Formal Reasomng (MS) 
Prerequisite: permission of Math Department based on 
satisfactory score on Math placement exam or M-iTH 110 or 
MATH 1 15. Not open to students who have completed 
MiTH HI or any M4TH or STAT course with a 
prerequisite of MiTH 141. Credit will be granted for only one 
ofthefollounng: M.'iTH 111 or STAT 100. Simplest tests of 
statistical hypotheses: apphcations to before-ind-after and 
matched pair studies. Events, probability, combinations, 
independence. Binomial probabihties, confidence limits. 
Random variables, expected values, median, variance. 
Tests based on ranks. Law of large numbers, normal 
approximation. Estimates of mean and variance. 
0202 (15776) STAFF MTuWThF 9:30am-10:50am 
(MTH 0101) 

STAT4(X) Applied Probability and Statistics I 
(3) REG/P-F/AUD. 

Prerequisite: MiTH 141. Not acceptable toward graduate 
degrees m STAT MiPL. or MATH. Credit will he granted for 
only one ofthefollounng: ST.iT 400 or H.VEE 324. 
Random variables, standard distributions, moments, law 
of large numbers and central Umit theorem. Samphng 
methods, estimation of parameters, testing of hypotheses. 
0203(15788) STAFF MTuWThF ll:00am-12:20pm 
(MTH B0421) 

STAT798A Selected Topics in Statistics 

(1-4) REG/AUD. 
0201(15800) STAFF Time and room to be arranged 

STAT799 Master's Thesis Research 
(1-6) REG. 

Individual Instruction course: contact department or 
instructor to obtain section number. 

STAT899 Doctoral Dissertation Research 
(1-8) REG. 

Individual Instruction course: contact department or 
instructor to obtain section number. 

SURV Survey IVIethodology 

(Behavioral and Social Sciences) 

SURV699C Special Topics in Survey 

Methodology: Hierarchical Models for 
Survey Data 
(1) REG/AUD. 
0201 (16004) STAFF MTuWThF 12:00pm-3:00pm 
(arranged) 
Meets 07/; 7/00-07/2 )/00 

SURV699D Special Topics in Survey 
Methodology: Designing 
Questionnaires for Elderly Populations 

(1) REG/AUD. 
0201 (15994) Knauper.B. MTuWThF 3:00pm-*:CX)pm 
(Arranged) 
Meets 07/24/00-07/28/00 



96 



HOW BIG 



S SUMMER? 



New Program 
Summer Sessions 
2000 

English for International Business 
(August 6 - August 25) 

I'hc English tor International Business 
Program is designed for non-native 
speakers of English interested in 
targeting their advanced English 
language skills for business purposes. 
Participants meet for five hours per 
day for three weeks. The daily 
schedule consists of approximately 
three hours of formal language-based 
instruction plus approximately two 
hours of structured activities. Special 
activities include a Mar^'land crabcake 
luncheon, a visit to the golf course, 
case study assignments, guest speakers 
and corporate on-site visits. 
Participants have access to campus 
recreational facilities, such as the 
swimming pools (indoors and 
outdoors), the golf course, and tennis 
courts, and may visit popular sights in 
Washington, D.C., Annapolis, and 
Baltimore in their free time. The 
program is open to mature 
participants who give evidence of 
serious interest in advancing their 
command of English for business 
purposes. Most will have graduated 
fix)m a university or will have 
experience in the workplace. To 
participate, applicants must have a 
high level of proficiency in English. 

For addinonal information about the 
MEl and/or for application and 
registration materials, contact: 

Maryland English Institute 

Linda M. Sahin. Director of Programs 

2 140 Taliaferro Hall 

Maryland English Institute (MEI) 

University of Maryland 

2 122 Taliaferro Hall 

College Park, Maryland 20742 

University of Maryland 

niei@umail.unid.edu 

CoUege Park, MI) 20742 

www.inrorm.umd.cdu/ARHU/depts/MEI 

301-405-0346 • 301-314-9462 (fax) 

Linda_M-Sahiii@umail.unid.edu or 

lsahin@deans.umd.edu 



THET Theatre 

(Arts and Humaniries) 

THET110 Introduction to the Theatre 
(3) REG/P-F/AUD. 

(X)RE; History or Theory ofArts (HA) Introduction to 
the people of the theatre: actors, directors, designers and 
backstage personnel. The core and characteristics of a play 
script: theatrical forms and styles; and theatre history. 
I '211 1 (16054) Hebert, M. MTuWThF Il:(X)am-12:3)pni 
(TWS0I47) 

THET120 Acting I 

(3) REG/P-F/AUD. 

hereqimiieiTHET 1 1 or pnimsiion of depannu-nt. Basic 
principles ot acting techniques. Exercises structured to 
develop the student's concentration, imagination, sense 
and emotional memory. Textual analysis, character analysis 
and scene study; and the application of these techniques 
to character portrayal through performance of short 
scenes. 

0201(16064) Hebert. M. MTuWThF 9:30ani-ll):.S0am 
(TWS 1228) 

THET386 (PermReq) Experiential Learning 
(3-6) REG/P-F. 

Individual Instruction course: contact department or 
instructor to obtain section number. Pmeijuisile: permissioti 
of depdrlmenl. 56 semester hours. 

THET499 (l>ermReq) Independent Study 
(3) REG. 

Individual Instruction course: contact department or 
instructor to obtain section number. 

THET789 (PermReq) Master's Practicum 
(1-6) REG/AUD. 

Indisidual Instruction course: contact department or 
instructor to obtain section number 

THET799 (PermReq) Master's Thesis Research 
(1-6) REG. 

Individual Instruction course: contact department or 
instructor to obtain section number. 

THET899 Doctoral Dissertation Research 

(1-8) REG/AUD. 
Individual Instruction course: contact department or 
instnictor to obtain section number. 



UNIV World Courses 

(Undergraduate Studies) 

UNIV099 (PermReq) Internship Seminar 

(No credit) S-F. 
0201(16250) Kcnyon. M. Time and room to be amngEd 
Permission of Co-op Coordinator required. Obtain 
signature and more information at the Career Center, 
3K)() Hornbakc Library. Special fee required for this 
course. (See fees in "Academic Services" section of this 
guide.) 

URSP Urban Studies and Planning 

(Architecture) 

URSP399I (PermReq) Independent Study 
(1-3) REG/P-F/ALT). 

Individual Instrucaon course: contact dcpirtment or 
instructor to obtain section number. 

URSP688C Recent Developments in Urban 

Studies: Smart Growth: Case Study of 

Local Growth Management Practice in 

Maryland 

(3) REG/AUD. 

0201(16312) Cohen.J, ThF 4;00pm-6;30pm 

(ARC 1121) 
Time and room to be amnged Dis 
Prerequisite: URSP 688B. Students will learn prmciples 
and techniques of growth management and then analyze 
development trends and planning 'regulaton' practices in 
a sector of cither Charles or Frederick County. The 
student analysis will be informed by a learned 
understanding of die 1992 Maryland Planmng Act; the 
several programs implemented by the State m 1997 that 
are collectively known as "Sman Growth"; and best 
management practices from around the U.S. Based on 
their study, sradents vsill prepare i lepon for the study 
counn' summarizing their anals-sis and recommendations 

URSP703 (PermReq) Community Planning ReW 
Instruction and Practicum 
(3-6) REG. 

Prerrquisites: iRSP 600. IRSP 601. LRSP 604. VRSP 
605 or permiision from the Program. For MCP majors only. 
Formerly i'RBS W.i. Concepts and ideas that have shaped 
the profession, current planmng issues. Professional 
cxpenence as intern in planning office. Weekly seminars 
focus on practical, theoretical, professional and ethical 
issues arising during internship. 

0201 (16323) Baum, H. Tu 7:00pm-9;30pm 

(CAR 0100) 
Time and n>om to be amnged Dis 
This course is part one of a 6-creclit course, final 3 credits 
to be completed in Summer Session II. Smdents must 
sign up tor both Summer Sessions I and II 

URSP706 Summer Community Planning Studio II 
(2) REG/AUD. 

0201(16325) Urosscr. S. Tune and room to be arranged 






URSP788 (Pn-mRcq) Independent Study in Urban 
Studies and Planning: Independent 
Study in Urban Studies and Planning 
(1-3) REG. 

Individual Instrucnon course: contact department or 
instructor to obtain section number. 

URSP798 (PermReq) Readings in Urban Studies 
and Planning 
(1-3) REG. 

Individual Instruction course: contact department or 
instructor to obtain section number. 

URSP799 (PermReq) Master's Thesis Research 
(1-6) REG/S-E 

Individual Instruction course: conuct department or 
instructor to obtain section number. 

VMSC Veterinary Medical 
Sciences 

(Agriculture and Natural Resources) 

VMSC799 Thesis Research 
(1-6) REG. 

Individual Instruction course: contact department or 
instructor to obtain section number. 

VMSC899 Dissertation Research 
(1-8) REG. 

Individual Instruction course: contact deparmient or 
mstructor to obtain section number. 



WMST Women's Studies 

(Arts and Humanities) 

WMST255 Introduction to Literature by Women 
(3) REG/P-F/AUD. 

CORE: Literature (HL) DIVERSITY Also offered as 
ENCL 250. Credit will be granted for only one of the 
following: WMST 255 or ENGL 250. Images of women in 
literature by and about women. 

0201(16459) Gordon, M. TuTh l:00pni-4:15pm 

(SQH 1105) 

WMST275 World Literature by Women 
(3) REG. 

CORE: Literature (HL) DIVERSITY Also offered as 
CMLT 275. Credit i(i7/ be granted for only one of the 
following: IVMST 215 or CMLT 275. Comparative study 
of selected works by women writers of several countries, 
exploring points of intersection and divergence in 
women's bterary representations. 

0201(16470) Voloshen.L. MW 6:00pm-9:15pm 

(KEY 0116) 



WMST325 The Sociology of Gender 
(3) REG/P-F/AUD. 

DIVERSITY Prere<imsite: 3 credits of sociology .ilso offered as 
SOCY 325. Credit will be granted for only one of the 
follomng: WMST 325 or SOCY 325. Institutional bases of 
gender roles and gender inequality, cultural perspectives 
on gender, gender socialization, t'enuiusm, and gender- 
role change. Emphasis on contemporary American 
society. 

0201 (16481) STAFF MW 1 :00pm-4:20pm 

(ASY 32(17) 

WMST336 Psychology of Women 
(3) REG/P-F/AUD. 

Prere^umtc: I'SYC WO. Also offered as PSYC 336. Credit 
will be granted for only one of the follomng: n'MST 336 or 
PSYC 336. A study of the biology, life span development, 
socialization, personality, mental health, and special issues 
of women. 

0201 (15492) Wonnell.T MTuWThF 9:30am-10:50am 

(BPS 1236) 

WMST348R Literary Works by Women: 

Representing Race and Gender in the 
Twenty-first Century 
(3) REG/P-F/AUD. 

DIVERSITY 

0201(17127) R.)y.S. TuTh 6:00pm-9: 15pm 

(SQH 1107) 

WMST471 Women's Health 

(3) REG/P-F/AUD. 

DIVERSITY Also offered as HLTH 471. Credit will he 
granted for only one of the following: WMST 471 or HLTH 
471. The women's health movement from the 
perspective of consumerism and feminism. The physician- 
patient relationship in the gynecological and other 
medical settings. The gynecological exam, gy-necological 
problems, contraception, abortion, pregnancy, breast and 
cer\ical cancer and surgical procedures. Psychological 
aspects of gynecological concerns. 

0201(16514) King, N. MTuWTh ll:00am-12:45pm 
(HHP 1302) 

0202 (16515) Kass, B. MW 6:00pm-9:45pm 

(HHP 1301) 



WMST499 (PermReq) Independent Study: 

Individual Study in Women's Studies 
(1-3) REG/P-F/AUD. 

Individual Instruction course: contact department or 
instructor to obtain section number. Prerequisite: 3 hours 
of WMST and junior standing. 

WMST699 (PermReq) Independent Study 
(1-3) REG/AUD. 

Individual Instruction course: contact department or 
instructor to obtain section number. By permission of 
instructor only. 

ZOOL Zoology 

(Life Sciences) 

Z00L609 (PermReq) Special Problems in Zoology 
(1-6) REG/AUD. 

Individual Instruction course: contact department or 
instructor to obtain section number. Contact department 
to make arrangements. 

Z00L708 Advanced Topics in Zoology 
(1-4) REG/AUD. 

Individual Instruction course: contact department or 
instructor to obtain secDon number. 

Z00L799 (PermReq) Master's Thesis Research 
(1-6) REG. 

Individual Instruction course: contact deparmient or 
instructor to obtain section number 

Z00L899 (PermReq) Doctoral Dissertation 
Research 
(1-8) REG. 

Individual Instruction course: contact deparrment or 
instructor to obtain section number 





HOW B 



IS SUMMER? 



SESSION III JUNE 5 - JULY 23 

College Park Summer Sessions course 
offerings are updated daily on the Web at 
http://www.testudo.umd.edu and 
http://www.umd.edu/summer For a 
complete list of evening courses, see 
page 102. 

AGRO Agronomy 

(Agriculture and Natural Resources) 



AGR0308 Field Soil Morphology 

(1-2) REG/P-F/AUD. 
0301(00168) Rixnhoia,M MTuWThF 7:00am-7:00pm 
(HJP 1104) 
Prerequisite: One college course (3 credits) in 
introductory soil science (or permission of 
instructor). An intensive field study of soils at 
locations across the state of Maryland, with 
particular emphasis on soil morphology, soil 
classification, and evaluating the suitabilit>' of soils 
for a variety of uses. Special fee to be charged to 
cover field preparation and the costs of 
transportation in addition to the regular tuinon 
charge (See fees in "Academic Services" section of 
this guide.) 

Meels 05/J0/00-06/ 16/00 



Diy< 
(HJP 1104) ESSo™ 



Sample Course Listing 

« Cour»t rillf ^ 

AGR0308 Field Soil Morphology « 

(1-2) R£G/P-F/AUD. *" 

„ tlV 11(00168) IU«ilK«.M MluW'ITif 7.-OQini-7.<Mpni 
Instructor 
MARSNumbfr ,v/ffU 05/JO/00-06/16/00 
Prerequisite: One college course (3 credits) in 
introductory soil science (or permission of 
instructor). An intensive field study of soils at 
locations across the state of Manland, with — '^""'P'" 
particular emphasis on soil morphology, soil 
classification, and evaluating the suiubility of soils 
for a variety of uses. Special Fee to be charged to 
cover field preparation and the costs of 
transportation m addiaon to the regular tuition 
charge (Sec fees in "Academic Services" section of 
this guide). 



J 



AGR0608B Research Methods: Field Studies In 

Pedology 

(4) REG/AUD. 
0301(17128) lUx-iilHintM. MTuVlTliF 7:IXiun-7AXIpni 
(HJP 1104) 
Prerequisite: One college course (3 credits) in 
introductor\' soil science (or permission of 
instructor). An intensive field study of soils at 
locations across the state of Maryland, wfith 
particular emphasis on soil morphology, soil 
classification, and evaluating the suitability' of soils 
for a variety of uses. Special fee to be charged to 
cover field preparation and the costs of 
transportation in addition to the regular tuition 
charge. (See fees in "Academic Services" section of 
this guide.) 

Meets 05/30/00-06/16/00 

ANTH Anthropology 

(Behavioral and Social Sciences) 

ANTH240 Introduction to Archaeology 
(3) REG/P-F/AUD. 

CORE: Behavioral and Social Science (SB) 
DIVERSITY Cndil iiiW he granied for only one of the 
foUomnx: ANTH 240 or ANTH 241. Formerly 
A NTH 24 /. Exploration of the variety of past 
human societies and cultures through archaeology, 
ftom the emergence of anatomically modern 
humans to the more trcent historical past. 
0301(00596) EmsteiaJ. MTuWThF 9:0flBni-lia)pm 
(KEY 0102) 



ANTH386 (PermReq) Experiential Learning 

(1-6) REG/P-R 
Individual Instruction course: contact department 
or instructor to obtain section number Prerequisite: 
permission of department. Recommended: completion of 
advanced courses in relevant subfteld of anthropology. 56 
semester hours. For ANTH majors only. 
Approval of instructor required; check with 
department for section (and index) number 

ANTH476 (PermReq) Senior Research 
(3-4) REG/P-F/AUD. 

Individual Instruction course: contact departnieiu 
or instructor to obtain section number For ANTH 
majors only. Credit will be granted for only one of the 
following: ANTH 476 or ANTH 486. Capstone 
course in which students pursue independent 
research into a current problem in anthropology, 
selected with assistance of a committee of faculty. 
Research leads to the writing of a senior thesis in 
anthropology. 

ANTH477 (PermReq) Senior Thesis 
(3-4) REG/P-F/AUD. 

Individual Instruction course: contact depanment 
or instructor to obtain section number Prerequisite: 
ANTH 47 6; permission of department. For ANTH 
majors only Credit will be granted for only one of the 
following: ANTH 477 or ANTH 487. Capstone 
coune in which students wTite a senior thesis on 
independent research into a current problem in 
anthropology. The thesis is defined before a 
committee of faculty. 

ANTH487 Honors Thesis 

(3) REG/P-F/AUD. 
Individual Instruction course: contact department 
or instructor to obtain section number Prerequisites: 
ANTH 486; permission of department: admission to 
Vnii'ersity Honors Program or .-inthropolog)' Honors 
Program. ForAS'TH majors only Credit will bt granted 
for only one ofthefollounng:AN'TH 487 or ANTH 
477. Capstone course in which students write a 
thesis on the results of independent research into a 
current problem in anthropology. 



ARCH Architecture 

(Architecture) 

ARCH428C Selected Topics in Architectural 
History: Seminar in Roman Villas 
(1-3) REG/P-F/AUD. 
03<J1 (01090) Saunders. E. TmaidiDcmiDtraia^ 
This course meets in Ca-stellammare di Stabia. Italv 

ARCH481 (PnmR.qi The Architect in 
Archaeology 
(3) REG/P-F/AUD. 

IM-requisitc: pernmsion of department. The role of the 
architect in field archaeolog\- and the analysis of 
exca^ting, recording, and publishing selected 
archaeological expeditions. 

0301 (01172) Sachs, S. Tme ani room to be na^ 
This course meets m Castellimmare di Stabu, Italy. 
Contact S. Sachs for information. 

ARTT Art Studio 

(Arts and Humanities) 

ARTT150 Introduction to Art Theory 

(3) REG/P-F/AUD. 
CORE: Histor\- orTheors- of Arts (HA) 
Examinaoon of contemporary an; review of ^olul. 
philosophic and critical positions by the 
examinauon of works of art. 

0301 (01770) Klank,R. MTuWTh 7.0Upn-10JC(»n 
(ASY2309) 

ARTT320B Elements of Painting 
(3) REG/P-F/ALT). 

l^ereqmnie: AKIT 211) Formeriy ARTS 320. Focus 
on watercolor. 

0301 (01822) Klank. R. MTuWTh HX)pm-6fl0pm 
(ASY 2317) 




©» 




ARTT418B Drawing: Focus on Watercolor Wash 

(3) REG/P-F/AUD. 
(13111 (01886) Kbnk, R. MTuWTli 1 ■.f)0pm-6:00pm 
(ASY 2317) 

ARTT428A Painting: Water Color 
(3) REG/P-F/AUD. 

0301 (01917) KbTik, R. MTuWTh 1 :00pm-6;00pm 
(ASY 2317) Lab 

ARTT468B Seminar on the Interrelationship 

between Art and Art Theory: Issues in 
Contemporary Art 
(3) REG/P-F/AUD. 

0301 (01948) Klank, R. MTuWTh 7;00pm-10:20pm 
(ASY 1309) Lab 

CPSP College Park Scholars 
Program 

(Undergraduate Studies) 

CPSP259 College Park Scholars Practicum 
(1-3) REG. 

Prerequisite: admissioii lo College Park Scholars, Section 
0101 is internship; 0102, service-learning with 
Lakeland STARS: 0103, service-learning; 0104, 
service-learning with PLUMS; 0201, service- 
learning with Lakota Workcamp Project; and 0301, 
oral histories. Please see your Faculty Director 
before you register. You wiU need to complete an 
application form for 0201 . 
0301(05730) Hiller, C. Time and lOom to be anangpd 

EDCI Curriculum and Instruction 

(Education) 

EDCI301 Teaching Art in the Elementary School 
(3) REG. 

For elementary and pre-elemenlary education majors only. 
Not open lo art education majors. Art methods and 
materials for elementary schools. Includes 
laboratory e-xpenences with materials appropriate 
for elementary schools. Emphasis on emerging areas 
of art education for the elementary classroom 
teacher. 

0301(05971) Hendnck5.S MTuWThF8:30am-ll;30am 
(EDU 1315) 

EDCI385 Computers for Teachers 
(3) REG/P-F/AUD. 

Prerequisites: admission to teacher education program: and 
2.5 GPA. For education majors only. Credit will be 
granted for only one ofthefollounng: EDCI 385: or 
EDCI 487: or EDIT 406: or EDIT 477: or EDSP 
480. A first-level survey of instructional uses of 
computers, software, and related technology for 
preservice teachers. 

0301(05982) Baccus,A. MTuWThF8:3()am-ll:30ani 
(EDU 1107) 



EDCI443 Literature for Children and Youth 
(3) REG/P-F/AUD. 

For elementary education and pre-elementary education 
majors only. Analysis of literary materials for children 
and youth. Timeless and ageless books, and 
outstanding examples of contemporary publishing. 
Evaluation of the contributions of indi\'idual 
authors, illustrators and children's book awards. Also 
for in-service teachers. 

0301(06052) Saiacho,0. MTuWThF 12:30pm-4:15pm 
(EDU 2119) 

EDCI443A Literature for Children and Youth 
(3) REG/P-F/AUD. 

For elementary education and pre-elementary education 
majors only. 

0301 (06062) Comas, J. MTuWThF 1 ;00pm-4:00pm 
(EDU 0220) 

EDCI463 Reading in the Secondary School 
(3) REG/P-F/AUD. 

Prereqttisites: admission to teacher education program: and 
2.5 CPA; or permission of department required for post- 
baccalaureate students. For education majors only. The 
flindamentals of content area reading instruction. 
Emphasis on middle school through high school. 
0301(06072) Saiacho,0. MTuWThF 5:0Opni-8:(;K.lpni 
(EDU 0212) 

ENGL English 

(Arts and Humanities) 

ENGL277 Mythologies: An Introduction 

(3) REG/P-F/AUD. 
CORE: Literature (HL) Introduction to the myths 
of Europe, Asia, Oceania, the Middle East, Africa 
and North and South America. 
(1301 (08389) Dickson, N. MTuWThF 9;00am-12:00pm 
(DNC 1139B) 

ENGL360 African, Indian and Caribbean Writers 
(3) REG/P-F/AUD. 

DIVERSITY Prerequisite: two lower-la'el English 
courses, at least one in literature: or permission of 
department. Selected writers from countries formerly 
colonies of Britain, France, Denmark, etc. Attention 
to ways regions have developed distinctive political 
and aesthetic values resulting from indigenous 
traditions and foreign influences. 
0301 (08471) Morrison, A. MTuWThF 9:00am-12;00pm 
(SQH 1103) 

ENGL462 Folksong and Ballad 
(3) REG/P-F/AUD. 

A cross-section of American folk and popular songs 
in their cultural contexts; artists from Bill Monroe 
to Robert Johnson. 

0301 (08650) ftaisoaB. MTuWThF 9:00am-12:00pm 
(SQH 2117) 



GVPT Government and Politics 

(Behavioral and Social Sciences) 

GVPT388A Topical Investigations: Analysis of 
Concepts and Filmic Images 
(3) REG/P-F/AUD. 

030 1 (10548) Glass, J. Time and room to be arranged 
Requires concurrent registration in GVPT 399A 
for a combined total of 6 credits. See course 
description under GVPT 399A. 

GVPT399A Seminar in Government and Politics: 
Films and the Politics of the Family 
(3) REG/P-F/AUD. 

May be taken concurrendy with GVPT 388A for a 
total of 6 credits. Survey of films to understand the 
politics of the family. Emphasis on families, their 
struggles over power, the effects of lonehness, 
despair and disintegration, and the politics implicit 
in these emotional realities. 

0301 (10578) Glass, J. MTuWThF l:30pm^:30pm 
(JMZ 0220) 



Creation and Evolution 

PHIL 3080 

In 1 86(1 Thomas Huxley and Bishop 
Samuel Wilbeiforce participated in 
the first public debate over 
evolution vs. creation. Huxley, the 
evolutionist, won. 140 years later, 
the debates continue. But now, in 
the eyes of educators, 
governments, and the public at 
large, the evolutionists are losing. 
Should they be? This course 
explores the long and sullied 
creation vs. evolution controversy. 
Topics include creation vs. 
evolution in relation to science, 
education, and the meaning 
of life. 

For a complete listing of Summer 
Offerings in Philosophy, see fiiU 
course descriptions on the 
foDowing pages: 
Ses.sion I, pages 48 - 49; 
Session II, pages 91 -92; 
Session III. page 101. 



100 



HOW BIG IS SUMMER? 



PHIL Philosophy 

(Arts and Humanities) 

PHIL140 Contemporary Moral Issues 

(3) REG/P-F/AUD. 
CORE: Humanities (HO) The uses of 
philosophical analysis in thinking clearly about such 
widely debated moral issues as abortion, euthanasia, 
homosexuality, pornography, reverse discrimination, 
the death penalty, business ethics, sexual equality, 
and economic justice. 

0301 (14477) Ammann.M. MTuWThF^JItaii-lllSpm 
(SKN 1115) 

PHIL308C Studies in Contemporary Philosophy: 

Creation and Evolution 

(3) REG/P-F/AUD. 
0301(14497) SkinxT.R. MTuNMTiF 12L^^^Ilv.^:15p!n 
(SKN 1112) 
In 1860, Thomas Huxley and Bishop Samuel 
Wilberforce participated in the first public debate 
over evolution vs. creation. Huxley, the evolutionist, 
won. 140 years later, the debates continue. But now, 
in the eyes of educators, governments, and the 
public at large, the evolutionisLs are losing. Should 
they be? This course ex-plores the long and sullied 
creation vs. evolution controversy. Topics include 
creation vs. evolution in relation to science, 
education, and the meanmg of life. 



SOCY Sociology 

(Behavioral and Social Sciences) 

S0CY398B Special Topics in Sociology: The 
Peoples and Landscape of the 
American Southwest 
(3) REG/P-F/AUD. 

0301 (15462) Lengermann.J. Time and room 

to be arranged 
This course is a study tour of the Southwest High 
Country in western New Mexico, eastern Arizona, 
and southern Colorado. A hmited number of 
students will be selected to join UMD faculty on 
this summer 2000 adventure. Participants will learn 
about the histories and culture of ancient and 
modern peoples that have inhabited this 
environment, including Pueblo. Navajo and 
Hopi Native Americans .vs well as the 
Spanish- and Anglo-Americans. Students will learn 
how to appreciate the different ways these peoples 
ha%e related to the physical environment and to 
each other. This course includes many trips to view 
historic points of interest and natural phenomena: 
including (but not limited to ) Sante Fe.Taos, Mesa 
Verde, Canyon de Chelly, and the Grand Canyon. 
Please contact program manager Kristin Owens at 
(301) 405-2652 for more information regarding 
specific travel itinerary and costs. 

Meets 06/12/00-06/21/00 




Travelearn 2000 

Maryland offers a varitjty of travel study opportunities reaching into 
various regions of the continental United States and e.xtending the 
imagination, learning and life experiences of the participants. Listed 

below are the travel study 
options available to students in 
summer 2000. Some of these 
offerings have early decision 
dates, so please make note of any 
unusual deadline dates for 
.ipplication or inquiry. 

'"- - * Offerings this year include: 
Service Learning Opportunities offered by the College of Behavioral 
and Social Sciences - Department of Sociology: 

SOCY 398B (3 credits) The Peoples and Landscapes 
of the American Southwest 

Oune 12 - 26) 

Instructor: Joseph Lengermann 

This course is a study tour of the Southwest High country in Western 
New Mexico, Eastern Arizona and southern Colorado. A limited 
-..^.^'.^ ?53i*i^»v» number of students will be 

selected to join University' of 
Maryland faculty on this 
summer 2000 adventure. 
Participants will learn about the 
histories and culture of ancient 
and modern peoples that have 
4^ ^k' ' "-'^ ^^^B inhabited this environment for 

i^B-^ «,Am. . , ^ ._. f^KL^^^H centuries, including Pueblo, 

Navajo, and Hopi Native 
American tribes as well as the Spanish - and Anglo-Americans. 
Students will learn how to appreciate the different ways these peoples 
have related to the physical environment and to each other. This course 
includes many trips to view historic points of interest and natural 
phenomena including, but not limited to, Mesa Verde, Taos, Canyon De 
Chelly, the Hopi Mesas, Santa Fe and the Grand Canyon. Please 
contact Program Manager Kristin Owens at 301-405-2652 for more 
information regarding specific travel itinerary and costs. 






EVENING COURSES (After 5 p.m.) 



Session I 

June 5 - July 14, 2000 

AMERICAN STUDIES 

AMST204 FILM & AM CULTURE 

ARCHITECTURE 

ARCH242 DRAWING I 

ARCH343 DRAWING II; LINE 

ARCH428G GREAT CITIES 

ARCH436 HIST ISLAMIC ARCH 

ARCH445 VISUAL ANALYS ARCH 

ARCH470 COMPUTER APPLICTNS 

ARCH489 IND STARCH PRESER 

BUSINESS AND MANAGEMENT 

BMGTl 10 INTRO TO BMGT 

BMGT20 1 INTRO TO BUSN COMPUTING 

BMGT220 PRIN ACCOUNTING I 

BMGT22 1 PRIN ACCOUNTING II 

BMGT23U BUSINESS STATISTCS 

BMGT3 1 INTERMED ACCTG I 

BMGT3 1 1 INTERMED ACCTG II 

BMGT340 BUSINESS FINANCE 

BMGT350 MKT PRINC+ORGANIZ 

BMGT354 PROMOTION MANAGMNT 

BMGT364 MGT+ORGANIZ THRY 

BMGT380 BUSINESS LAW I 

BMGT41I ETHICS+PROFLSM ACCT 

BMGT422 AUDITING THRY+PRAC 

BMGT424 ADVANCED ACCOUNTNG 

BMGT446 INTERNATIONAL FIN 

BMGT45I CONSUMER ANALYSIS 

BMGT464 ORGANIZATNL BEHAVT^ 

BMGT4% BUSINESS ETHICS&SOCLETY 

BMGT498 INTEGRATED MKTG COMM 

BMGT501 BUSINESS FUNCTIONS 

BMGT6 1 1 MANAGERIAL ACTNG 

BMGT615 BUSINESS COMMUNICATIONS 

BMGT620 STRAT INFO SYSTEMS 

BMGT632 DEC MODELING & ANALYSIS 

BMGT682 BUSN LAW FOR MNGRS 

BMGT690 STRATEGIC MNGMT 

BMGT72I DATA MANAGEMENT SYSTEMS 

BMGT725 INFR SYS ANAL+DESN 

BMGT741 ADV FINANCL MNGT 

BMGT745 FINANCL INSTUT MNG 

BMGT753 INTERNATL MARKETNG 

BMGT757 MARKETING STRATEGY 

BMGT764 EXEC POWER & NEGOTIATION 

BMGT798I INDUSTRY/COMPETITV ANLY 



CHEMISTRY 

CHEMIU3 GENEFIAL CHEM 1 

CHEMl 13 GENERAL CHEM II 

CHINESE 

CHIN213 CHIN POETRY-TRANS 

COMMUNICATION 

COMMl(J7 ORAL COMM PRIN 

COMM200 ADV PUBLIC SPEAKING 

COMM230 ARGUMENTATN+DEBATE 

COMM324 COMMUN & GENDER 

COMM330 ARGUMENT & PUBLIC POLICY 

COMM350 PR THEORY 

COMM351 PR TECHNIQUES 

COMM40I INTERPRET STRAT DISCOURS 

COMM402 COMM THEORY 

COMM425 NEGOTLATION&CONRICT MNT 

COMM475 PERSUASION 

COMM482 INTERCULTLFRAL COMM 

COMPARATIVE LITERATURE 

CMLT27U GLOBL LIT+SOC CHNG 

CMLT275 WRLD LIT BY WOMEN 

CRIMINOLOGY AND CRIMINAL JUSTICE 

CCJS32II INTRO CRIMINALISTC 



ECONOMICS 

ECON200 
ECON20I 
ECON306 
ECON330 
ECON460 



PRIN MICRO-ECONOMICS 
PRIN MACROECONOMICS 
INTERMED MICROECTHRY 
MONEY AND BANKING 
INDUSTRIE ORGANIZ 



EDUCATION COUNSELING 
AND PERSONNEL SERVICES 

EDCP625 COUNSEL CHEM DEPENDENT 

EDUCATION POLICY, PLANNING 
AND ADMINISTRATION 

EDPA301 FOUNDATIONS EDUC 

EDPA788D SPTOP ED POL&ADMN 

EDUCATION, SPECIAL 

EDSP2 1 I NTR TO SPEC EDUC 

EDSP376 FNDM SIGN LANGUAGE 

EDSP470 INTRO SPECIAL EDUC 

EDSP670 SNGL SBJ RES SP ED 

ENGINEERING, CIVIL 

ENCE6M CONST CONTR+SPECS 

ENGINEERING, FIRE PROTECTION 

ENFP489G ADV FIRE DATA ANLYS 



ENGINEERING, PROFESSIONAL MASTERS 

ENPM606 LINEAR CONTROL SYSTEMS 
ENPM623 CONT COMB GENER AIR POLL 
ENPM808F APPLIED FINITE ELEM METH 

ENGINEERING, RELIABILITY 

ENRE4h7 SYSTEM SAFETY ENGR 

ENGLISH 

ENGL 1 01 

ENGL222 

ENGL234 

ENGL30I 

ENGL304 

ENGL3I0 

ENGL312 

ENGL379W 

ENGL391 

ENGL393 

ENGU93X 

ENGL394 

ENGL399 



INTRO TO WRITING 
AM LIT 1865-PRESNT 
AFRICAN-AMER LIT 
CRIT METH STUD LIT 
SHAKESPEARE-MAJ WKS 
MED+REN BRIT LIT 
ROM TO MOD BRIT LIT 
THE FILM WESTERN 
ADVANCED COMP 
TECHNICAL WRITING 
TECHNICAL WRITING 
BUSINESS WRITING 
IMPOLITIC ART UNVIC ACT 



FAMILY STUDIES 

FMST3U2 RESRCH IN FAM STUDIES 

FMST487 LEGAL ASP FAM PROB 

FMST490 FAMILY & ADDICTION 

FRENCH 

FREN480 FRENCH CINEMA 

FREN499M FRANCOPH AFRCAN&CARB CIN 

GEOGRAPHY 

GEOG 1 00 INTRO TO GEOGRAPHY 

GEOG372 REMOTE SENSING 

GEOG422 POPULATION GEOG 

GOVERNMENT AND POLITICS 

C;VPT241 i'OL PHlL;ANCIENT&MODERN 



HEALTH 

HLTH150 

HLTH377 

HLTH471 

HLTH498A 

HLTH665 



FIRST AID+EMER MED 
HUMAN SEXUALITY 
WOMENS HEALTH 
MASSAGE THERAPY 
HEALTH BEHAVIOR I 



HEARING AND SPEECH SCIENCES 

HESP42U DEAF & SIGN LANGUAGE 

HISTORY 

HIST319L LATIN AM HIST AND FILM 
HIST459A NATIVE AMER ETHNOHIST 



102 



HOW BIG 



S S U 



E R ? 



HONORS 

HONR238B MASC 20C AM LIT&FILM 

HUMAN DEVELOPMENT 

EUHD400 INTR TO GERONTOLGY 
EDHD413 ADOLESCENT DEVEL 

LIBRARY SCIENCE 

LBSC625 INFORMATION POLICY 

LBSC682 MGMT ELEC RCRDS & INFO 

LBSC690 INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY 

LBSC7()8U MANAGERIAL ACCT 

LBSC725 LIB SRV CLNT DSABL 

LBSC741 SEM SCH LIB MED PG 

LBSC753 INFO ACCESS SOCIAL SCI 

MEASUREMENT, STATISTICS AND EVALUATION 

EDMS(i45 QUANT RSRCH METH 1 

EDMS646 QUANT RSRCH MTH II 

PHILOSOPHY 

PHIL342 MORAL PROB MEDICNE 

PSYCHOLOGY 

PSYC43(. INTR CLINICAL PSYC 

PUBLIC AFFAIRS 

PUAF6 1 QUAN MTHDS POL ANL 

PUAF620 POLITICAL ANALYSIS 

SOCIOLOGY 

SOCY498C SOCY OF SEXUALITY 

SPANISH 

SPAN2I12 INTRMED GRAM+COMP 

SPAN3 1 1 ADV CONVERS ATN I 

SURVEY METHODOLOGY 

SURV623 DMA COLLECTION MTHDS 

SURV625 APPLIED SAMPLING 

SURV722 RANDOM/NONRANDOM DESIGN 

URBAN STUDIES AND PLANNING 

URSP681 URBAN PLANNINC; LAW 

URSP703 FIELD INSTRUCTION 

WOMEN'S STUDIES 

WMST250 WOMEN, ART&CULTURE 
WMST400 THEORIES FEMINISM 



Session II 

July 17 - August 25, 2000 

AMERICAN STUDIES 

AMST298 FILM & AMERICAN CULTURE 

AMST298I VIETNAM WAR&AMER CULTURE 

AMST428M CULTURE & MEDIA 197yS 

ARCHITECTURE 

ARCH223 HIST NON-WESTERN ARCH 

ARCH678F FACADES 

BUSINESS AND MANAGEMENT 

BMGT201 INTRO TO BUSN COMPUTING 

BMGT22n PRIN ACCOUNTING I 

BMGT22I PRIN ACCOUNTING II 

BMGT3 1 INTERMED ACCTG I 

BMGT323 INCOME TAX ACCOUNT 

BMGT340 BUSINESS FINANCE 

BMGT350 MKT PRINC+ORGANIZ 

BMGT364 MGT+ORGANIZTHRY 

BMGT380 BUSINESS LAW I 

BMGT402 DATABASE SYS 

BMGT422 AUDITING THRY+PRAC 

BMGT440 FINANCLU MANAGEMT 

BMGT445 COMERCL BANK MGNMT 

BMGT495 BUSINESS POLICIES 

BMGT505 ORG BEHAV+STR MNGT 

BMGT615 BUSINESS COMMUNICATIONS 

BMGT620 STRAT INFO SYSTEMS 

BMGT681 MANGRL ECON & PUBLIC POL 

BMGT690 STRATEGIC MNGMT 

BMGT720 INFO TECH & CORP TRANSF 

BMGT726 DISTRIB DATA PRCSS 

BMGT741 ADV FINANCE MNGT 

BMGT743 INVESTMENT MANGMNT 

BMGT746 INTERNE FINCL MNGT 

BMGT752 MARKETG RSRCH METH 

BMGT754 BUYER BEHAV ANALYS 

BMGT795 MGT MULTINATL FIFIM 

BMGT798A WORK TEAMS 

CHINESE 

C:HIN2I3 chin POETRY-TRANS 

COMMUNICATION 

COMM1U7 ORAL COMM PRIN 

COMM324 COMMUN & GENDER 

COMM352 WRITINGS IN PR 

COMM482 INTERCULTURAL COMM 

COMPARATIVE LITERATURE 

CMLT27II GLOBL LIT+SOC CHNG 

CMLT275 WRLD LIT BY WOMEN 



CRIMINOLOGY AND CRIMINAL JUSTICE 

CCJS234 LAW (RIM INVESTIGATION 

CCJS320 INTRO CRJMINALISTC 



ECONOMICS 

ECON2ito 
ECON2UI 
ECON305 

ECON3(l6 
ECON34() 



PRIN MICRO-ECONOMICS 
PRIN MACROECONOMICS 
MACROECTHRY & POL 
INTERMED MICROECTHRY 
INTERNATL ECONMICS 



EDUCATION POLICY, PLANNING AND 
ADMINISTRATION 

EDPAS3- ( URRICTHRY+RSC 

EDUCATION, SPECIAL 

EDSP376 FNDM SIGN LANGUAGE 

EDSP470 INTRO SPECIAL EDUC 

EDSP491 CHARAC LEARN DISABLED 

EDSP499R WRK. CLN, IN SP ED 



ENGINEERING, 

ENFP43I 

ENGUSH 

ENGL 101 

ENGL243 

ENGL310 

ENGL348R 

ENGL379G 

ENGL391 

ENGL393 

ENGL393X 

ENGL394 

ENGL4(14 

ENGL489A 

ENGL602 

ENGL61I 



FIRE PROTECTION 

BUILDING SAFETY' & LAW 



INTRO TO WRITING 
INTRO TO POETRY 
MED+REN BRIT LIT 
RACE & GENDER IN 21ST C. 
CINEMA OF HITCHCOCK 
ADVANCED COMP 
TECHNICAL WRITING 
TECHNICAL WRITING 
BUSINESS WRITING 
SHAKESPEARE: LATER WORKS 
LANGUAGE OF ADVERTISING 
CRITTHRY & LIT CRITICSM 
APPRCH COLLG COMPT 



GEOGRAPHY 

GEOG373 GEOG INFO SYSTEMS 

GEOG421 CULTURAL ECOLOGY 

GOVERNMENT AND POLITICS 

GVPT3IWX (.XINFLKT RESOLUTION 

GVPT399B VIETNAM LEGACIES & FILM 

HISTORY 

HIST31>)B BLACK ATLANTIC WORLD 

HIST353 AMER REVOLUTN 1763-1815 

HIST453 US DIPL HS FR 1914 

HIST463 HIST OF OLD SOUTH 




i 



103 




HEALTH 

HLTH150 FIRST AID+EMER MED 

HLTH377 HUMAN SEXUALITY 

HLTH471 WOMENS HEALTH 

HUMAN DEVELOPMENT 

EDHD460 EDUCATIONAL PSYCH 



CORE REQUIRED COURSES 



These CORE courses are offered during Summer Session I, II and III, 2000. Consult the 
most recent edition of the Schedule of Classes or Undergraduate Catalog for COFIE 
program requirements. Refer to the "Course Otfermgs" section m this guide for session, 
class and time information. 



ITAUAN 

ITAL471 ITALIAN CINEMA 

ITAL472 ITAL CINAMA IN ITL 

LIBRARY SCIENCE 

LBSC7U8W MANAGING CULT INST 
LBSC737 SEM-SPEC LIB+INFO 

LBSC78fi IIB&ARCHIV PRESERV 

MEASUREMENT, STATISTICS AND EVALUATION 

EDMS645 QUANT RSRCH METH I 
EDMS646 QUANT RSRCH MTH II 
EDMS65I INTERMED STAT EDUC 

PHILOSOPHY 

PHIL.idSG SEXUAL CONSENT 

PSYCHOLOGY 

PSYC200 STAT METH IN PSYCH 

PSYC353 ADULT PSYCHOPATHOLOGY 

SOCIOLOGY 

SOCY498B SOCY POPULAR CULTURE 



SPANISH 

SPAN201 
SPAN301 
SPAN312 
SPAN409 
SPAN448 



INTRMEDAT SPAN 
ADV GRAM+COMP I 
ADV CONVERSATN 2 
IDEA OF A CONTINENT 
STORY OF TWO CITIES 



URBAN STUDIES AND PLANNING 

URSP703 FIELD INSTRUCTION 



Session III 

June 5 -June 23, 2000 

ART STUDIO 

ARTT150 INTRO TO ART THEORY 
ARTT468B SEMINAR ON THE 

INTERRELATIONSHIP 
BETWEEN ART AND 
ART THEORY 



EDUCATION, CURRICULUM AND INSTRUCTION 

EDCI463 READING IN THE 

SECONDARY SCHOOL 



CORE FUNDAMENTAL 
STUDIES COURSES 

CORE AND USP INTRODUCTION TO WRITING 
COURSES 

ENGLlOl INTRO TO WRITING 

ENGLIOIX INTRO TO WRITING (ENGLISH AS 
A SECOND LANGUAGE) 

CORE AND USP PROFESSIONAL 
WRITING COURSES 

ENGL391 ADVANCED COMPOSITION 
ADVANCED COMPOSITION: 
PRELAW 

TECHNICAL WRITING 
TECHNICAL WRITING (ENGLISH AS 
A SECOND LANGUAGE) 
BUSINESS WRITING 
X^TIITING FOR HEALTH 
PROFESSIONALS 



ENGL392 



ENGL393 
ENGL393X 



ENGL394 
ENGL395 



CORE AND USP MATHEMATICS COURSES 



MATH 111! 


ELEMENTARY MATHE.VL'mC.'U. 




MODELS 


MATHlll 


INTRO TO PROBABILITY 


MATH 113 


COLLEGE ALGEBRA WITH 




APPLICATIONS 


MATHU5 


PRECALCULUS 



USP students should contact the CORE Office in the 
Office of the Dean for Undergraduate Studies, 2130 
Mitchell Building, Zip 5251. phone (301) 405-9359 for lists 
of approved USP courses. 

CORE DISTRIBUTIVE STUDIES 

Sote: Courses noted "(D)' jIso meet the CORE 
Diversily Requirement 



HUMANITIES AND THE ARTS 


CORE LITERATURE COURSES (HL) 


CHIN213 


CHIN POETRYTRANS P) 


ClASm 


GREEK+ROMAN MYTH 


CMLT270 


GLOBL LIT+SOC CHNG (D) 


CMLT275 


UTU.D LIT BY WOMEN 




(Also as WMST275) P) 


ENGL2n5 


INTRO SHAKESPEARE 


ENGL222 


AM LIT 1865-PRESNT 


ENGL234 


AFRICAN-AMER LIT (D) 


ENGL241 


INTRO TO THE NOVEL 


ENGL243 


INTRO TO POETRY 



ENGL244 


INTRO TO DRAMA 


ENGL250 


LIT BY WOMEN 




(Also as WMST255) (D) 


ENGL277 


MYTHOLOGIES 


FREN250 


READNGS IN FRENCH 


HONR238B 


MASC 20C AM LIT&FILM 


HONR259Q 


CONFORM & REBEL IN LIT 


SPAN224 


VIOL&RESTN IN AMER (D) 


WMST255 


INTRO LIT BY WOMEN 




(Also as ENGL250) (D) 


WMST275 


WORLD LIT BY WOMEN 




(Also as CMLT275) (D) 



CORE HISTORY OR THEORY OF THE 
ARTS COURSES (HA) 

-\MST205 M/^TRL ASPC AM LIFE 

ARCH170 INTRO BUILT ENVIRN 

ARCH223 HIST NON- WESTERN ARCH (D) 

ARTHIOO INTRO TO ART 

ARTH200 ARTWSTWRLDTO 1300 

ARTH201 ART WSTWRLD AFTER 1300 

ARTH250 ART&ARCHLGY ANCIENT AMER (D) 

ARTH29n ART OF ASIA (D) 

./VRTT 1 50 INTRO TO ART THEORY 

DANC20(I INTRO TO DANCE P) 

MUET200 WORLD POP MUSC&GENDER 

(Formerly MUSC248A) (D) 

MUET2 1 IMPACT OF MUSIC ON LIFE 

(Formerly MUSC210) (D) 

MUSC 1 30 SURVEY MUSIC LIT 

MUSC140 MUSC FUNDAMENTLS I 

THETllO INTRO TO THEATRE 

WMST250 WOMEN, ART&CULTURE (D) 

CORE HUMANITIES COURSES (HO) 

AMST20 1 INTRO AMER STDY 

.^MST203 POP CULTUR IN AMER 

AMST204 FILM & AM CULTURE 

FREN203 INTERMEDIATE FRENCH 

FREN204 REVIEW GRAMM.'Ul&COMP 

GERM201 INTRMEDATE GERM 1 

GERM202 INTERMED GERMAN II 

HIST112 VtTST 1500— 1789 

LING240 LANGUAGE AND MIND 

PHIL 100 INTRO PHILOSOPHY 

PHIL140 CONTEMP MORAL ISSU 

SPAN201 INTRMEDAT SPAN 

SPAN2n2 INTRMED GRAM+COMP 



104 



HOW 



I G IS SUMMER? 



CORE MATHEMATICS AND THE SCIENCES 



CORE PHYSICAL SCIENCES NON-LAB 
COURSES (PS) 



ASTRIUIJ 

GEOG140 
GEOL120 
PHYS161 



INTRO TO ASTRONOMY 
(If taken Fall 1993 or after) 
COASTL ENVIRNMENT 
ENVIRONMENTAL GEOL 
MECHN+HARTCL DYNAM 



CORE LIFE SCIENCES NON-LAB COURSES (LS) 

BSCI120 INSECTS 

BSC1205 ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCE 

(Formerly PB10235) 



KNES260 


SCI PHY ACT&CARDIO HLTH 


NFSCIOO 


ELEM OF NUTRITION 


CORE MATH OR FORMAL REASONING 


NON-LAB COURSES (MS) 


CMSClSIl 


INTRO DISCR STRUCTURE 


GEOG170 


MAPS AND MAP USE 


MATHIIl 


INTRO TO PROBABILITY 


MATH 140 


CALCULUS 1 


MATHUl 


CALCULUS II 


MATH220 


ELEMNTRY CALCULS 1 


MATH221 


ELEM CALCULUS 11 


PHIL 170 


INTRO TO LOGIC 


STATIOU 


ELEM STAT + PROB 


CORE PHYSICAL SCIENCES LAB COURSES 


ASTRIOI 


GENERAL ASTRO 


CHEM103 


GENERAL CHEM 1 


CHEM103M 


GENERAL CHEM 1 


CHEM113 


GENERAL CHEM 11 


CHEM113M 


GENERAL CHEM 11 



GEOLlOO/110 PHYS GEOLOGY/LAB 

(Both courses must be taken m the same 
summer se«ion or semester) 
PHYS121 FUND OF PHYSICS 1 

PHYS122 FUND OF PHYSICS II 
PHYS262 VIBWAVEHEAT+ELEC 
PHYS263 ELECDYN LIGHT RELA 



CORE LIFE 

ANTH22II 

BSC11U5 

BSCI105M 

BSCII05 

BSCI124/125 



BSC1201 
BSC1223 
CHEM 104 



SCIENCES LAB COURSES (LL) 

INTRO BIOLOGICAL ANTH (D) 
PRIN BIOL I (Formerly BIOL) 
PRIN BIOL 1 (Formerly BIOL) 
PRIN BIOL II (Formerly BIOL) 
PLANT BIOLOGY/LAB 
(Formerly PBIOlOO/101) 
(Both courses must be taken in the same 
summer session or semester) 
HUMN ANAT+PHYSLG 1 
(Formerly ZOOL) 
GENERAL MICROBIOL 
(Formerly MICB20n) 
FUND ORG+BIO CHEM 



SOCIAL SCIENCES AND HISTORY 

CORE SOCIAL OR POLITICAL HISTORY 
COURSES (SH) 

AASPKXi INTRO AFROAM STUDY (D) 

AASP202 BLK CULTURE IN US <P) 

HISTUl MEDIEVAL WORLD 

HIST156 HIST U.S. TO 1865 

H1ST157 HIST U S SINC 1865 

HIST211 WM IN AM SINC 1880 

(AlsoasWMST211)P 
HIST285 EASTASIANCIVLII 

HONR248G SOCIAL & GROUPVIOLENCE 
WMST21 1 WM IN AMER SINCE 1880 

(AI.S0 3S HIST211)(D) 

CORE BEHAVIORAL AND SOCLU. SCIENCE 
COURSES (SB) 

ANTH240 INTRO ARCHAEOLOGY (D) 

ANTH260 INTRO SOCIO ANTH & LING (D) 

CCJSIOO INTRO CCJS 

CCJSI05 INTRTOCRIM 

ECON200 PRIN MICRO-ECONOMICS 

(Formerly ECON203) 

ECON20! PRIN MACROECONOMICS 

GEOGIOO INTRO TO GEOGRAPHY 

GVPTIOO PRINC GOVT+POLITIC 

GVPT170 AMERICAN GOVT 

GVPT2(l(l INTERN POLl RELATIONS 

LING200 INTRODUCTORY LINGUISTICS 

PSYCIOO INTRO PSYCHOLOGY 

SOCYIOO INTRO TO SOCIOLOGY 

SOCY105 INTR CNTMP SOC PRB 

CORE ADVANCED 
STUDY REQUIREMENT 

See the seiorul edition ot ilic Spring 21100 or first edition of 

Fall 21 Hill Silx-Jule lit" ( Uhs lor details. 

CORE CAPSTONE COURSE (CS) 

(MAJORS ONLY AFTER COMPLETING 86 CREDITS) 
BMGT457 MRKTNG POLCY+STRAT 
BMGT495 BUSINESS POLICIES 
LARC471 CAPSTONE STUDIO 

CORE HUMAN 
CULTURAL DIVERSITY 



("*" indicates i 



■ IS also CORE Pistribunw Swdies) 



CORE DIVERSITY COURSES RECOMMENDED 
FOR FRESHMEN AND SOPHOMORES 
(UNDER 56 CREDITS) (D) 

,\ASPIi"i INTRO AFRO.\M STUDY* 

AASP202 BLK CULTURE IN US* 

.^MST2I2 DIVERSITY AMER CULTURE 

ANTH22(I INTRO BIOLOGICAL ANTH* 

ANTH240 INTRO .\RC;HAE0LCX;Y* 

ANTH26n INTRO SOCIO ANTH & LING* 



ARCH223 


HIST NON-WESTERN ARCH* 


ARTH250 


ART&ARCHLGY ANCIENT AMER* 


ARTH29(i 


ART OF ASIA* 


CHIN213 


CHIN POETRY-TRANS* 


CMLT270 


GLOBL LIT+SOC CHNG* 


CMLT275 


WRLD LIT BY WOMEN* 




(Also as WMST275) 


DANC2flfl 


INTRO TO DANCE* 


ENGL234 


AFRICAN-AMER LIT* 


ENGL250 


LIT BY WOMEN* (Also as WMST255) 


HIST211 


WMINAMSINC188fJ* 




(Also as WMST211) 


MUET200 


WORLD POP MUSC&GENDER* 




(Formeriy MUSC248A) 


MUET210 


IMPACT OF MUSIC ON LIFE* 




(Formeriy MUSC210) 


SPAN224 


VIOL&RESTNINAMER* 


WMST211 


WM IN AMER SINCE 1880* 




(Also IS HIST211) 


WMST250 


WOMEN, ART&CULTURE* 


WMST255 


INTRO LIT BY WOMEN* 




(Also as ENGL250) 


WMST275 


WORLD LIT BY WOMEN* 




(Also as CMLT275) 


CORE DIVERSITY COURSES RECOMMENDED 


FOR JUNIORS AND SENIORS 


(AnER 56 CREDITS) (D) 


CCJS370 


R.^CE CRIME & ejus 


COMM324 


COMMUN & GENDER 




(Formeriy SPCH) 


COMM482 


INTERCULTURAL COMM 




(Formeriy SPCH) 


EDCP420 


EDUCATION+RACISM 


ENGL348A 


SCI Fl BY WOMEN 




(AJsoasWMST348A) 


ENGL348R 


RACE & GENDER IN 21ST C. 




(AlsoasWMST348R) 


ENGL360 


AFRINDC\RIBWRTS 


MST38I 


PVRTY+AFFLUNCE 


GVPT447 


ISLAMIC K)L PHIL 


HIST314A 


NATM&NAT-BLDG MIDEAST 


HLTH47I 


WOMENS HEALTH 




(AlsoasWMST47l) 


SOCY325 


SOCY OF GENDER (Also as WMST325) 


WMST325 


SOCIOLOGY OF GENDER 




(Abo as SOCY325) 


WMST348A 


SCI Fl BY WOMEN (Also as ENGU48A) 


WMST348R 


RACE & GENDER IN 21ST C. 




(Also as ENGLVWR) 


WMST471 


WOMENS HEALTH (Abo as HLTH471) 





05 



Maryland Summer 
Sessions and International 
Applicants 

Study Abroad 

Foreign Language Studies 

The Maryland 
English Institute 



■^'*:..Al. 



:J,\ /Nl 



»i 



i-l 



j*i4i»>Ili':^ 



n:^^ 



m 



ffering a wbi 
I of possibfTTfTes 






)NS 







tefiiMlfiii 



HOW 



B I G 



S U 



E R ? 



Table of Contents 



Maryland Summer Sessions and 

International Applicants 1 

Study Abroad 2 

Foreign Language Studies 6 

The Maryland English Institute 7 



Maryland Summer Sessions 
and International Applicants 

Introduction 

It may come as a surprise that a major research 
university so close to Washington, D.C. is measured in 
acres - 1,580 to be exact - and not by city blocks. The 
University of Maryland's classic tree-lined campus offers 
an ideal academic community in which students from 
more than 120 countries around the globe share classes 
and exchange viewpoints with Americans drawn 
together from all 50 states. Maryland's gentle rolling 
terrain provides a pleasant reminder of the region's 
agricultural past. Yet, the historical and cultural 
offerings of our nation's capital are only nine miles away. 

Close to the College Park campus are such important 
national resources as the Library of Congress, the 
Smithsonian Institutions, the National Institutes of 
Health, the National Aeronautics and Space 
Administration (NASA) and the National Science 
Foundation. On-campus facilities provide everything 
from specialized student housing to one- 
of-a-kind research 
facilities, an 18-hole golf 
course to a new track 
complex. A university- 
run shuttle bus system 
links them all together 
with ease. 

A global perspective is 
evident in the University 
of Maryland's 
curriculum, research and 
outreach innovations. 



Adding to the rich mix of social, intellectual and cultural 
perspectives are the nearly 2,700 international students 
among the 32,000-plus undergraduate and graduate 
students who attend in the regular school year. In fact, 
19 percent of College Park's graduate students come 
from beyond the borders of the United States. 
The Office of International Education Services (lES) has 
a long history of supporting educational exchange. It 
begins long before you ever arrive on the campus. The 
following information provides a first step in ser\'ices 
lES offers - from handling visa problems to helping 
international students make American friends - aimed at 
assuring that your stay at the University of Maryland is 
truly an enriching experience. 

International Applicants 

The Uni\ersity of Maryland Summer Sessions 
welcomes international students currently enrolled in 
other U.S. colleges and universities, as well as students 
from abroad. Students who are studying at another 
institution in the U.S. on F-1 or J-1 visas and who 
intend to return to their institutions in the fall do not 
need an 1-20 or IAP-66 issued by the University of 
Maryland. The application is the same as that for any 
other visiting student. See Forms section. Form A. 
TTie F-1 student visa is the appropriate visa category for 
international students outside the United States who 
intend to enroll full-time in the Uni\ersit\' of Maryland 
Summer Sessions and whose primary reason for coming 
to the U.S. is to study. Summer Session students who 
wish to obtain an F-1 visa should complete a Certificate 
of Finance form indicating sufficient funds to pay tuition 
and living expenses for their summer study. We 
estimate the cost for tuition, living expenses, books and 
^^^^^ fees for each summer 

f^^^* ^^^^g^^ session to be S3,400. 

^- - — ^- Z^KifllA Students must 

register for a full- 
MS'.1 '^^■^■^^^^^■H time (minimum of 6 

credits) program of 
study per session. 
Students who apply 
must be proficient in 
English. A TOEFL 
score of 575 is 
required. 




nitoiftoML 



Students are required to submit a complete application 
by May 11 in order to allow sufficient time to receive an 
F-1 visa for the start of the Summer Sessions. 

Students whose reason for coming to the U.S. includes 
tourism, as well as study and who do not intend to 
enroU full-time, may use the B-l/B-2 tourist visa. There 
are approximately 20 countries that are part of a visa- 
waiver program. Citizens of these countries may travel 
to the United States as tourists without obtaining visa 
stamps in their passports. 

Intemational students are encouraged to take 
advantage of the many facilities available on the CoUege 
Park campus as well as in Washington, D.C., Baltimore 
and the surrounding areas. 
To reach us on the internet: www.umd.edu/summer 

Key phone numbers: 

SPOC 

1-877-989-SPOC; 301-314-3572 

Undergraduate Admissions 
1-800-422-5867; 301-314-8385 

Graduate Admissions 
301-405-4198 

For more information contact: 

Office of Intemational Education Services 

Room 3116, Mitchell Building 

Uruversity of Maryland 

College Park, Maryland 20742 

USA 

1-301-314-7740 




Study Abroad 



Welcome to study abroad! Study abroad increases 
awareness of other cultures and languages while 
providing a comparative intemational perspective. 
Many students find study abroad essential for their 
major or career plans. Others view it as part of their 
liberal arts education. This is to introduce you to the 
exciting opportunities available through study abroad. 
For more detailed information on a specific 
course /program, please do not hesitate to contact the 
Study Abroad office: 

Dr. Richard Weaver, director 

3125 Mitchell Building 

College Park, MD 20742 

301-314-7746 301-314-9437 fax 

studyabr@deans.umd.edu 

www.inform.umd.edu/INTL/studyabroad 

Office Hours: Monday - Friday, 

8:30 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. 




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The Study Abroad office assists students interested in 
studying in a foreign country. We offer the following 
services: 

Advising 

Our advisors help undergraduate and graduate 
students select study abroad programs appropriate for 
their academic needs, personal interests and professional 
goals. Students who plan to study abroad must meet 
with one of our advisors, in addition to an advisor from 
their college or academic department, before they go 
abroad. Study abroad advisors also determine the 
transferability of credit for work completed overseas. 

Resource Library 

We have catalogs of study abroad programs 
administered by other United States colleges and 
universities, as well as course catalogs for a limited 
number of foreign universities. The library also includes 
information on internships and work abroad, travel and 
financial aid for study abroad. Students are welcome to 
use the library during regular office hours. 

When to Study Abroad 

Students can study abroad for a semester, year, summer 
or winter term. The summer is a particularly desirable 
time for many students to study overseas. Seniors 
should note that the University of Maryland requires 
students to spend their last 30 credits on campus. 
However, with the approval of their department and 
college, seniors can attend UM-sponsored programs on 
the condition that they return to UM for their final 12 
credits. 

Where to Study Abroad 

The University of Maryland offers programs in a 
variety of locations. Students are not limited to 
Maryland-sponsored programs. Students may 
participate in a large number of programs offered by 
other accredited United States universities or apply 
directly to many foreign universities. For additional 
information, please visit or call the Study Abroad office. 

Eleven exciting study abroad programs are being 
offered this summer. By combining course work with 
cultural experiences, these courses provide a unique, 
cross-cultural perspective on a variety of topics and an 
experiential, hands-on introduction to a new culture. 
Study abroad enriches any college experience, and it's a 
great way to spend your summer break engaged in a 
one-of-a-kind educational activity. 



The University of Maryland offers the following 
programs for Summer Sessions 2000: 

Israel: Combined Caesarea Expeditions 

(various dates offered) 

The Combined Caesarea Expeditions (CCE) excavates 
the terrestrial and harbor remains of ancient Caesarea, 
built by King Herod from 22-10 B.C. Most CCE 
archaeologists will continue with exploration of King 
Herod's temple. Others will work on dwellings from one 
of the earliest Jewish and Christian communities. 
Systematic training is provided in all aspects of field 
work, and either 3 or 6 credits can be earned. Students 
with or without prior archaeological experience 
accepted. 
(HIST 499; HIST 419; HIST 619) 

Cape Town, South Africa: 

The Western Cape: 300 Years of Housing 

(May 21 - June 16) 

Graduate and advanced undergraduate students of 
architecture, landscape architecture, historical 
preservation and American studies are eligible to 
participate in a program focusing on indigenous 
housing and urban patterns. The Western Cape allows 
for a detailed study of a historic area in Cape Town. 
Students document the condition and significance of 
buildings and land uses of a selected area, as well as the 
needs and resources of the community. Fieldwork and 
lectures are supplemented by trips to homes and 
housing developments in the area. 
(URSP 705; ARCH 489S; HIST678A) 

Costa Rica: Sustainable Futures 

(June 5 - August 13) 

This 10-week course offers students an opportunity to 
live and work in Monteverde, a rural but rapidly 
developing region in Costa Rica. Students work on 
projects concerned with creating sustainable 
communities that are ecologically and socially just. This 
multidisciplinary program is designed for various 
disciplines, including architecture, planning, landscape 
architecture, resource management, international 
development and women and development. An 
intensive studio component is required that allows 
students to apply what they've learned to a specific 
project identified by instructors and the Monteverde 
community. 
(LARC 451; LARC 471; LARC 489; LARC 499) 




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England: Honors at Kiplin 

(July 31 - August 21) 

Honors students at all Maryland colleges and 
universities can participate in a survey course 
focusing on British history, culture and 

literature. In northern England, students 
^ reside in Kiplin Hall, the country estate 

of the first Lord Baltimore. They 
participate in seminars and 
excursions to nearby sites of 
archaeological and architectural 
interest. In London, groups visit 
and study major sites and make 
day trips to Bath, Oxford and 
Greenwich. There is ample 
opportunity to explore London's 
' ' ' " cultural life, including the many 

theatres and museums there. 
(HONR 318) 

Germany: German Language and Culture 

(July 17 - August 21) 

Provides an opportunity to sh,idy German language 
intensively. Courses are offered at three levels of 
language instruction based on student ability. The 
academic program emphasizes intensive language study, 
examination of German culture, contemporary political 
and social issues as well as German literature. Each 
week, classes make excursions in the region, focusing on 
a particular theme of the course. Students can choose 
from either home stay or resident hall living options. 
(GERM 499 and GERM 201/202/203 depending 
upon placement) 

Rome: Architecture: The Building 
and the City 

(May 28 - July 8) 

For graduate and upper-level undergraduate 
architecture students, the course emphasizes the analysis 
and understanding of architecture and urbanism 
through built works in Italy. It focuses on the 
relationship between buildings, and the context and 
form of a city. Urban examples from Rome and other 
areas provide the background for discussion about the 
urban plan of the city and its development. Students 
currently enrolled in an accredited architecture program 
with at least two semesters of completed architectural 
design are eligible to apply. 
(ARCH 343/678D; 
ARCH 445/678V; ARCH 478/678A) 




Madrid and San Roque, Spain: Spanish 
Language and Culture 

(May 25 -July 9) 

Develop Spanish language proficiency and explore the 
culture and life of present day Spain. Students actively 
participate in academic courses and are placed with 
Spanish families or in university residence halls with 
Spanish students. They also take excursions throughout 
Madrid and San Roque and the surrounding 
countryside. Participation requires intermediate level 
Spanish proficiency. 

(SPAN 326 and choice from SPAN 311/312; SPAN 422; SPAN 
408M; or SPAN 399) 

South Africa: Contemporary issues in 
South African Public Policy, Leadership 
and Democratization 

(June 1 - June 24) 

Offers a unique opportunity to study leadership and 
public policy in a newly formed democracy. Focuses on 
three phases of the South African post-independence 
period: Democratization of South Africa; Public Policy 
Analysis; and the Future of South African Leadership. 
Discussion and field trips to meet with current political 
leaders and non-governmental agencies supplement 
course lectures. Students should expect to live with a 
South African home-stay family. 
(BSOS 399) 




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Taxco, Mexico: Spanish Language 
and Mexican Culture 

(June 18 - August 5) 

Students at all levels of Spanish can improve their 
Spanish and explore first hand the culture of Mexico 
in the colonial town of Taxco. Visit museums and 
archaeological sites of significant historical and artistic 
interest. Hacienda El Chorrillo, a refurbished colonial 
estate, serves as the academic center with classrooms, a 
library, theater, gardens, pool and a cafe. Classes are 
taught in Spanish by faculty from the Uni\'ersidad 
Autonoma de Mexico for either students or teachers 
of Spanish. 
(ALL LEVELS of Spanish) 




UK: Landscape Architecture 

(July 16 - August 11) 

Focuses on the study of English architecture, gardens 
and urban design. This year, a four-week course (two 
weeks at Kiplin, one week in London and Bath, and one 
week in-studio at College Park) includes a survey of 
country estates, parks and gardens in the context of their 
natural and cultural setting. Tours throughout the 
English countryside and London give students a first- 
hand experience of noteworthy historic places. 
(LARC 489) 



New Zealand: Nutrition and Public Health in 
a Bicultural Society 

(June 12 -July 7) 

TTiis course will introduce students to the nutrition and 
public health systems in a bicutural society. The format 
will include lectures, readings, discussions, 1-3 field 
visits per week, journals and a final report. Students 
will be required to critically compare and contrast one 
aspect of the New Zealand public health system with 
that of the U.S. The University of Otago, Wellington 
Medical School will be the participating institution in 
New Zealand and the class will conduct field visits to 
local organizations. Students will also be paired with a 
local public health professional for a day in order to gain 
a more "hands-on" appreciation of the health care svstem. 
(NFSC 498) 

Admission 

Summer Sessions study abroad courses are designed for 
sttidents who are highly motivated, both academically 
and personally, and who are seeking to actively engage 
in the challenge of a new learning experience. 
Applicants should normally have a 3.0 (B) academic 
average and the approval of an academic advisor. 

The application deadlines for Summer Sessions 2000 
programs vary betvv'een Februar\' 1 and April 1. 

Early planning for summer study abroad is strongly 
encouraged. Please contact the Study Abroad office for 
more information about the programs that interest you. 
Space is limited so apply early. 

The Study Abroad office contact information appears 
on page 2 of this section. 




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Foreign Language Studies 

Global business and growing immigration are making 
language skills more valuable than ever. Learning a 
second language has long been a priority in many Asian 
and European countries, and now Americans are 
catching up. With courses from beginner to advanced, in 
languages from Arabic to Urdu, we can help you get 
started or improve your skills. 

For more information: 

The Language Center 
University of Maryland 
1105 Jimenez Hall 
College Park, MD 20742 
301-405-4926 

The Department of Asian and East European 
Languages and Cultures is pleased to present its 
Summer 2000 intensive language programs. This 
summer take advantage of these special intensive 
language courses that enable you to acquire a full year 
of college-level study in the summer sessions. Two 
languages will be featured: Chinese and Japanese. 

You will be able to earn 12 credits during the Summer 
Sessions and complete two semesters of language study 
in just 12 weeks. Upon successful completion, these 
accelerated courses will enable you to fulfill the 
University of Maryland foreign language requirement. 

Intensive Study in Elementary 
Modern Chinese 

An accelerated intensive course of study designed 
for highly motivated students who wish to complete 
a one-year language requirement in a summer session. 
It introduces fundamentals of standard Chinese 



(Mandarin), including pronunciation, grammar and 
Chinese characters, emphasizing the four basic language 
skills: speaking, listening, reading and writing. Requires 
no previous knowledge of Chinese; not open to students 
who have learned from whatever source, enough Chinese 
to qualify for more advanced courses. Students are 
required to attend aU classes cind complete all 
assignments to maintain the rapid pace of this intensive 
course. Early enrollment is advised in this popular 
intensive course. Admission closes as of the second class. 

Summer Session I: June 5 - July 14 
CHIN 101 Intensive Elementary Chinese 
(6 credits) 

Introduction to speaking, reading and writing Chinese 
with emphasis on mastering the essentials of 
pronunciation, basic characters and structural patterns. 

Summer Session II: July 17 - August 25 
CHIN 102 Elementary Spoken Chinese 

(3 credits) 

Continued study of grammatical patterns and 
vocabulary buildup with particular emphasis on 
conversation. May be taken in conjunction with CHIN 
103. Prerequisite: CHIN 101 or equivalent 

CHIN 103 Elementary Written Chinese 

(3 credits) 

Continued study of grammatical patterns and buildup 
of vocabulary with particular emphasis on reading and 
writing. May be taken in conjunction with CHIN 102. 
Prerequisite: CHIN 101 or equivalent 

Intensive Course in Elementary 
and Intermediate Modern Japanese 

An accelerated intensive course of study designed for 
highly motivated students who wish to complete a one- 
year language requirement in a single summer. 
Introduces fundamental language skills in modem 
Japanese. Emphasizes conversational skills (listening. 




HOW 



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SUMMER? 



comprehension, and speaking), including grammar and 
pronunciation. Introduces reading and writing 
Hiragana, Katakana, and Kanji. Requires no previous 
knowledge of Japanese. Students are required to attend 
all classes and complete all assignments to maintain the 
rapid pace of this rigorous course. Early enrollment is 
advised in this popular intensive course. Admission 
closes as of the second class. 

Summer Session I: June 5 - July 14 
JAPN 101 Elementary Japanese I 
(6 credits) 

Introduction to the basic spoken patterns of 
contemporary Japanese and the two phonetic 
syllabaries (katakana and hiragana). 

JAPN 201 Intermediate Japanese I 
(6 credits) 

Contemporary spoken and written Japanese. 
Prerequisite: Japanese 102 or equivalent 

Summer Session II: July 17 - August 25 
JAPN 102 Elementary Japanese II 
(6 credits) 

Continued introduction to the basic spoken patterns of 
contemporary Japanese. Reading and writing of about 
100 kanji. Prerequisite: Japanese 101 or equivalent 

JAPN 202 Intermediate Japanese II 
(6 credits) 

Contemporary spoken and written Japanese 
Prerequisite: Japanese 201 or equivalent 



The Maryland 
English Institute 



Background 

Gaining comfort with the language supports academic 
and social adjustment. Through a range of programs, 
from full-time intensive language courses in English to 
courses in improving pronunciation, the Maryland 
English Institute enables students from non-English 
speaking countries to improve their language skills. 
At the same time, through such programs as Speaking 
Partners and Welcome Home to Maryland, American 
students and host families gain knowledge of other 
cultures and customs while they share conversations 
and a taste of American home life. 

At the University of Maryland, the Maryland English 
Institute (MEI) has become a leader and innovator in 
teaching non-native speakers of English. MEI has 
developed over the last 15 years into a full-service 




language training center with an outstanding 
faculty and sophisticated technological tools 
for language training in the 
Washington, D.C. - Baltimore, 
Maryland area. 

Each of our instructors 
has a master's degree 
in linguistics, teaching 
English as a second 
language (TESL), or a 
related field. Most are 
fluent In one or more 
other languages, and all 
have extensive classroom 
teaching experience. Within MEI, 
there are experts in the assessment of 
English language proficiency and in the 
custom design of programs or workshops to 
meet specific language needs. 

MEI offers, in addition to regularly scheduled intensive 
and semi-intensive courses, specially tailored English 
language and orientation programs for groups of non- 
native speakers of English. These are offered either on 
campus or at off-campus locations and range from one- 
day language evaluations to short and long-term 
instructional courses that focus on the particular needs 
of a given group. 

Accommodation for visiting groups during the summer 
are in apartment suites on campus, with dining services 
provided in a fashionable contemporar\' "mini-mall" of 
food choices. All fees for room and board are included 
in the course registration. 

The Curriculum 

The Intensive English Program 

(June 19 -August 11) 

The MEI intensive program offers: 

• Six levels of full-time English language 
instruction 

• Twenty-two hours of instruction weekly 

• A student-teacher ratio a\eraging 16-1, 
allowing each student maximum opportunity' 
for active participation 

• Classes in grammar and writing, reading, 
listening comprehension and oral assignments 

• Summer program in June, July and August for 
eight weeks 




pteffiSloM 



MEI's program is student centered. Faculty and 
administrators are flexible in designing and adapting 
courses and curricula to meet students' needs. For 
example, at the highest level, students may take a course 
entitled "Strategies for College Success." This class 
gives students an in-depth look at the college 
application process in the United States and exposes 
students to American campus life through hands-on 
activities, seminars featuring guest speakers from the 
Maryland campus, and interactive assignments. 

Curricula vary by level to match students' proficiency 
levels, stages of language acquisition and sociolinguistic 
needs. Teachers within a level work together to track 
individual student progress and make instructional 
changes as needed. 

For additional information regarding times, locations, 
costs, see Department UMEI in the "Course Offerings" 
section of this guide. 

New Course 
Summer Sessions 2000 

• English for Professional Communication 
(June 20- August 1) 
English for Professional Communication is a six-week 
course tailored to meet the needs of individuals 
interested in advancing their ability to comrmmicate in 
writing for the workplace. Participants learn how to 
write clear, concise letters, memoranda, and reports in 
English. Topics include how to identify the essential 
message, select a correct word, decide what style and 
tone to use, and write grammatically correct sentences. 
The course is practice based and highly interactive. 
Participants receive frequent written and oral feedback 
so they can apply what they learn right away. The 
course meets in the evenings for 2 1/2 hours twice 
per week for six weeks at the College Park campus. 




New Program 
Summer Sessions 2000 

• English for International Business 
(August 6 - August 25) 
The English for International Business Program is 
designed for non-native speakers of English interested 
in targeting their advanced English language skills for 
business purposes. Participants meet for five hours per 
day for three weeks. The daily schedule consists of 
approximately three hours of formal language-based 
instruction plus approximately two hours of structured 
activities. Special activities include a Maryland crabcake 
luncheon, a visit to the golf course, case study 
assignments, guest speakers and corporate on-site visits. 
Participants have access to campus recreational facilities, 
such as the swimming pools (indoors and outdoors), the 
golf course, and tennis courts, and may visit popular 
sights in Washington, D.C., Annapolis, and Baltimore in 
their free time. The program is open to mature 
participants who give evidence of serious interest in 
advancing their command of English for business 
purposes. Most will have graduated from a university 
or will have experience in the workplace. To participate, 
applicants must have a high level of proficiency in 
English. 

For additional information about the MEI and/or for 
application and registration materials, contact: 
Maryland English Institute 
2140 Taliaferro Hall 
University of Maryland 
College Park, MD 20742 
mei@uinail.umd.edu 
www.inform.umd.edu/ARHU/depts/MEI 

Linda M. Sahin, director of programs 

Maryland English Institute (MEI) 

2122 Taliaferro Hall 

University of Maryland 

College Park, MD 20742 

301-405-0346 

301-314-9462 fax 







ses 
ents 



Noncredit Courses 
Special Events 
Community Events 
Community Services 





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Table of Contents 



Noncredit Courses 2 

The Information Technology Certification/Training 

Institute 2 

Cisco Systems Networking Academy 

CCNA with Network+ 3 

A+ Certified Technician Programs 3 

GIS Powerful Skills For Multidiscipline 

Problem Solving 5 

Microsoft Certified Systems Engineer Program 6 

TEK.XAM The Technology Certificate Exam 7 

TEK.XAM The Review Course 8 

Windows 2000 One-Day Classes 9 

Elderhostel 9 

Other Noncredit Courses 10 

Flute Master Class 10 

French and Italian for Travelers 10 

Introduction to Desktop Publishing 11 

Special Events 11 

Annual Fourth of July Celebration 11 

Maryland Special Olympics 11 

National History Day 11 

National Orchestral Institute 12 

NCAA Men's National Lacrosse Championship 12 

Community Programs 13 

Children's Developmental Clinic 13 

LEAP — Language-Learning Early 

Advantage Program 13 

Senior University 14 

Summer Reading Program 14 

UMTV 14 

Community Services 14 

Family Service Center 14 

Hearing and Speech Clinic 14 

Noncredit Courses At The 
University Of Maryland 

Noncredit, continuing education at the University of 
Maryland this summer includes a range of courses 
offered in various formats and designed for a variety of 
audiences — busy professionals looking to gain new 
skills or update existing ones as well as older adults 
seeking enrichment activities. 



Summer noncredit courses are open to the general 
public and no admission application is required. 
Programs vary in length and format. 

The University of Maryland is dedicated to lifelong 
learning in the broadest sense of the term with programs 
this summer ranging from computer certificaHon 
courses offered through our new Information 
Technology Certification/Training Institute to 
Elderhostel programs for people age 55 and older. 

If you are searching for career accreditation, skill 
building or just want to take a course for your own 
personal enrichment, the University of Maryland is the 
place to be this summer. Here are some of the great 
programs being offered: 

• Information Technology CertificationyTraining 
Institute 

• Elderhostel 

The Power of Laughter 

• Other Noncredit Courses 

Flute Master Class 

French and Italian for Travelers 

Introduction to Desktop Publishing 

For more information on these and other summer noncredit 
programs, contact: 

Office of Continuing and 

Extended Education 
2103 Reckord Armory 
College Park, MD 20742 
301-405-6545 or 1-800-711-8627 
or summer@umail.umd.edu 





Noncredit Courses 

The Information Technology 
Certification/Training Institute (ITCTI) 

Information has become the true power in the 
Washington area, as the region takes national leadership 
in technology jobs and Internet connections. Recent 
studies have shown that more technology workers — an 
incredible 470,000 — are employed by more technology 
companies (more than 9,000) in the formerly 
government-dominated Washington area than in 
California's Silicon Valley, Boston's Route 128 corridor 
or in any other region, according to the New York Times. 
And 60 percent of area adults are online, a greater 
proportion than in any other of the 64 major markets 
surveyed. People are living and working technology in 
Washington! 

One sure road to success in this hot IT field is computer 
certification, where the Tek.Xam Certificate, Microsoft 
Certified Systems Engineer, Cisco Certified Network 
Associate, and A+ Certified Technician credentials 
clearly identify professionals with the right computer 
skills for the 21st century. More than a million of these 
prestigious training credentials were awarded in 1999, as 
technology companies struggle to find professionals 
with up-to-date technical skills to fill the many jobs still 
open in the IT field. 

This summer the University of Maryland, ranked 
among the nation's best in equipping managers to 
handle technology, through the Office of 
Continuining Education, opens its new ITCT 
Institute, where the latest, most highly- 
valued professional computer 
certification programs are offered 
by this major research university, 
the flagship institution of 
Maryland's system of higher 
educahon. 

Tek.Xam (Technology 
Certificate Exam) allows 
students, from a wide variety 
of disciplines, to demonstrate 
for professional employers their 
technological proficiency and 
problem-solving skills. Many 
liberal arts students already have the 
technological skills required for jobs 
involving a high use of technology. 
Tek.Xam will allow them to show their 



competence. The ITCT Institute offers both the Tek.Xam 
and a comprehensive, 35-hour hands-on exam review 
course this summer. The University of Maryland is one 
of a select group of approximately 10 colleges and 
universities offering the exam this summer. 

Microsoft Certified Professional credentials are the most 
widely-held in the industry, certifying expertise in 
network and operating systems software used by an 
overwhelming number of employers. Six courses 
required for Microsoft Certified Systems Engineer 
(MCSE) status will be offered this summer to certify IT 
professionals as competent to plan, implement and 
support Microsoft Windows NT and BackOffice. 

Network design and support certification is offered 
through Cisco CCNA with Network +, a 168-hour 
training program that helps students master networking 
concepts and product-neutral networking technologies. 

A+ certification training, including computer 
maintenance, repair and customer service, wiU be 
offered for those seeking to qualify as entry-level, 
intermediate, or advanced computer technicians. This 
program is sponsored by widely-recognized industry 
group, CompTlA. 

Introductory GIS (Geographic Information Systems) 
training will be offered for those interested in the this 
field where common database operations are combined 
with geographic analysis for explaining, predicting, 
analyzing and planning. 




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CCNA with Network+ 

The CCNA core curriculum prepares the student for a 
complete range of networking concepts, from basic 
networking terminology through complex subnet 
masking rules and strategies. Course work will include 
substantial hands-on lab time to further reinforce the 
learned material, and to better prepare the student for 
certification. To achieve the CCNA designation, students 
must pass one required exam. 

In addition, the CCNA training program provides the 
necessary information for students to successfully pass 
the Network+ exam. The Network+ material covers a 
wide range of vendor and product-neutral networking 
technologies. Certification examinations are 
administered independently by Sylvan Prometric. 

CCNA - Cisco Certified Network Associate Program 

(168 hours) 

Designed for those responsible for configuring and 
supporting multiprotocol networks that use Cisco 
routers. 

Learn to install, configure and operate simple-routed 
LAN, routed WAN and switched LAN networks, 
including: 

• Cisco configuration for IP, IPX and AppleTalk routing 

• Cisco router software configuration and management 

• Network addressing basic including IP address classes, 
subnet masks, and DNS Cisco 

• IP routing-RIP and IGRP 

• Network Testing Commands-Telnet, PING, trace and 
debug 

• Cisco wide area networking-HDLC, PPP, frame relay, 
X.25 

• IP subnetting 

• Cisco access lists 



CCNA0101 Cisco CCNA Part I 



(42 hours) 
Cost: $925 



This course covers the foundation of networking 
principles including: basic terminology, the seven layers 
of the Open Systems Interconnect model (OSl), 
Contrasting Transmission Control Protocol /Internet 
Protocol (TCP/IP) and OSI, network topologies, 
networking components (hardware) and basic network 
design. 

Location: University of Maryland 

Section: Date: Registration Deadline: 

CEOl June 9, 16, 23, 30; May 25 

July 7, 14, 21, 28; 
August 4, 11, 18 and 25 
Fri 6:30 p.m.-lO p.m. 



Coming in Fall 2000 
and Spring 2001 

CCNA0102 Cisco CCNA Part II 



(42 hours) 



This course examines the router elements and 
identifies the ICMP functions. Learn how to load 
the Cisco Internetworking Operating System (lOS) 
software, configure and verify Internet Protocol (IP) 
addresses, control router passwords, identification 
and banner, and study the basic router 
configuration and setup. Course also includes an 
introduction to Wide Area Networks (WANs) and 
its major components. 
Location: University of Maryland 
Section: Date: 

CEOl Fall 2000 



CCNA0103 Cisco CCNA Part III 



(84 hours) 



This course covers advanced router configurations, 
configuring IPX access lists and SAP filters, 
advanced Local Area Networks (LANs) and WAN 
theory and design, ISDN protocols, function 
groups, reference points and chaiuiels will be 
discussed. 

Location: University of Maryland 
Section: Date: 

CEOl Fall 2000/Spring 2001 



^ 





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A+ Certified Technician Programs 

Computer technicians are among some of the most 
sought-after professionals in the IT industry today. As 
more and more companies are requiring their employees 
to be certified, the demand for quality training grows. 
Individuals earning A+ certification possess the 
knowledge and customer relations skills essential to be a 
successful computer service technician, as defined by 
experts from companies throughout the industry. 
Computer technicians with A+ certifications can apply 
for technical positions confident that their credentials are 
proven and represent the highest industry standard. 

Wliat you do as a CompTIA Certified A + Technician 

As a CompTIA Certified A+ Technician, you will be 
able to: 

• Analyze on-the-job computer problems to determine 
whether they are hardware or software related 

• Completely disassemble any computer for rebuild, 
part replacement or upgrade 

• Design, monitor and control your company's 
computer maintenance system 

• Provide recommendations for compatible 
replacement hardware and software additions 

• Save your company money by providing immediate 
action in house instead of downtime while awaiting 
expensive contract repair service 

How you become a CompTIA Certified A + Technician 

To become certified by the Computer Technology 
Industry Association, you must pass two tests that 
assess your ability to diagnose and solve hardware 
problems, and your ability to understand and install 
operating systems. Tests cover a broad range of 
hardware and software technologies, but are not related 
to any vendor-specific products. 

The A+ certification process is sponsored by the 
Computing Technology Industry Association 
(CompTIA) that certifies the competency of entry-level 
service technicians in the computer industry. Major 
computer hardware and software vendors, distributors, 
resellers and publications, and the Association of 
Services Management International (AFSMI) support 
the program. 



Course Offerings include: 

CTIA0100 A+ Certified Technician Program (84 hours) 

Cost: (cohort) $1,848 
(single session) $2,100 
Designed for the novice to intermediate level computer 
technician. Develop hands-on skills necessary to 
support personal computers and peripherals. 
Location: University of Maryland 

Section: Date: Registration Deadline: 

CEOl July 17 - August 1 July 3 

MTuWThF 8 a.m.- 4 p.m. 
CE02 June 6 - August 29 May 23 

TuTh 6:30 p.m. - 10 p.m. 

CTIA0101 introduction to PC Hardware (14 hours) 

Cost: $350 

A basic overview of personal computers, including 
hardware, software and their related functions. 
Section: Date: Registration Deadline: 

CEOl July 17, 18 July 3 

MTu 8 a.m-4 p.m. 
CE02 June 6-15 May 23 

TuTh 6:30 p.m. - 10 p.m. 

CTIA0102 PC Repair and Troublestiooting (35 hours) 

Cost: $875 
Learn how to diagnose, repair and upgrade personal 
computers at the board level. Design a PC system with 
peripherals, upgrade using CD-ROMs, sound cards, 
modems and memory. 

Section: Date: Registration Deadline: 

CEOl July 19 - 25 July 5 

MTuWThF 8 a.m. - 4 p.m. 
CE02 June 20 - 29, July 6-25 June 6 

TuTh 6:30 p.m. - 10 p.m. 

CTIA0103 PC Operating Systems (35 hours) 

Cost: $875 
A focus on DOS, Microsoft Windows95 ,3.1, and NT 
4.0. Review major operating systems, including 
installation, configuration and individual systems 
support. 

Section: Date: Registration Deadline: 

CEOl July 26 - August 1 July 12 

MTuWThF 8 a.m.- 4 p.m. 
CE02 July 27 - August 29 July 13 

TuTh 6:30 p.m. - 10 p.m 



HOW 



I G IS 



SUMMER? 



CTIA0104 A-t- Certified Technician Program Boot Camp 
Alternate Patti (35 hours) 

Cost: $875 
Designed for the experienced technicians seeking 
certification. An accelerated review course with an 
emphasis on test preparation. Topics include 
troubleshooting, DOS, memory management, hardware 
disassembly, installation and reassembly, Windows 3.1, 
Windows95, printer management, LANs and diagnostic 
procedures. 

Location: University of Maryland 

Section: Date: Registration Deadline: 

CEOl July 10-14 June 26 

MTuWThF 8 a.m.- 4 p.m. 

GIS Powerful Skills For Multldlsclpllne 
Problem Solving 

Major challenges facing the world today 
— overpopulation, pollution, deforestation, natural 
disasters — all have a critical geographic dimension. 
A geographic information system (GIS) is a 
computer-based tool used by individuals, organizations, 
schools, governments and businesses seeking innovative 
ways to solve these problems. Mapmaking and 
geographic analysis are not new, but the GIS mapping 
technology performs these tasks better and faster than do 
the traditional manual methods. 

GIS technology integrates common database operations 
such as query and statistical analysis with the unique 
visualization and geographic analysis benefits offered by 
maps. These abilities distinguish GIS from other 
information systems and make it valuable to a wide 
range of public and private enterprises for explaining 
events, predicting outcomes and planning strategies. 

What You can Do as a GIS Professional 

As a GIS-trained professional, you will have the skills to : 

• Create maps, critical paths and problem 
solution tracks 

• Integrate information 

• Visualize scenarios 

• Solve complicated problems 

• Present powerful ideas 

• Develop effective solutions like never before. 

Today, GIS is a multibillion-dollar industry employing 
hundreds of thousands of people worldwide. 
Professionals in every field are increasingly aware of the 
advantages of thinking and working geographically. The 
GIS professional has a highly versatile, adaptive and 
desirable set of skills ever more important to employers 
in today's world. 




Geographic Information System Training 

For specific information regarding course offerings, 
times and location, please check our Web site at 
www.umd.edu/conted, or call the Office of Continuing 
and Extended Education at: 1-800-711-UMCP, 
301-405-6545. 




/l^te. 




Microsoft Certified Systems 
Engineer Program 

Today's computing environment requires network 
professionals who are trained in the latest developments 
and real world situations related to a variety of 
employers. This means having proficiency and expertise 
in Microsoft products. Training in Microsoft network 
and operating systems offers opportunities to work not 
just with the latest software found in most industries, 
but also with software on the cutting edge of technology. 

What you can do as an MCSE 

The competition for NT experience is expected to 
intensify as Microsoft's network operating system 
captures an even greater share of the market in the 21st 
century. As a Certified Microsoft Professional you are 
qualified to plan, implement and support back office 
and front office computing systems. According to a 
survey by the New York Times magazine, more than 
150,000 MCSEs will be needed by the ham of the 
century. Now is the time to join the growing team of 
network, operating system and applications experts 
commanding high salaries and significant job 
opportunities. 

How you become a MCSE 

Microsoft Certified Systems Engineers are required to 
pass four operating system exams and two elective 
exams that provide a valid and reliable measure of 
technical proficiency and expertise. Exams are 
developed with the consultation of professionals in the 
industry and reflect how Microsoft products are used in 
organizations throughout the world. 

The operating system exams require candidates to 
prove their expertise with desktop, server and 
networking components. The elective exams require 
proof of expertise with Microsoft BackOffice products. 
Certification examinations are administered 
independently by Sylvan Prometric. 

MCSE0100 Microsoft Certified Systems 

Engineer Program (161 hours) 

Cost: (cohort) $5,635 
(single session) $6,440 

This certification recognizes a high level of expertise 
with Microsoft Windows NT and BackOffice. A MCSE 
can plan, implement and support these products. The 
student must pass six required MCSE exams. 
Location: University of Maryland 

Section: Date: Registration Deadline: 

CEOl Junes- September 27 May 22 

MW 6:30 p.m. - 10 p.m. 
Sat 8:30 a.m. - 4:30 p.m. 




MCSE0578 Networking Essentials (14 hours) 

Cost: $560 

Overview of networking technologies, including LANS, 
MANS, WANS and the Internet. 
Section: Date: Registration Deadline: 

CEOl June 5, 7, 12, and 14 May 22 

MW 6:30 p.m. - 10 p.m. 

MCSE0803 Administrating Windows NT 4.0 (21 hours) 

Cost: $840 
Learn to perform daily administrative and maintenance 
duties using Windows NT-based network. 
Section: Date: Registration Deadline: 

CEOl June 19, 21, 24, 26 and 28 June 5 

MW 6:30 p.m. - 10 p.m. 
Sat 8:30 a.m. - 4:30 p.m. 

IVICSE0922 Supporting IVIicrosoft Windows NT 

4.0 Core Technologies (35 hours) 

Cost: $1,400 

Configure, customize, opHmize, integrate and 
troubleshoot the Microsoft Windows NT operating 
system in a single domain environment 
Section: Date: Registration Deadline: 

CEOl July 5, 8, 10, 12, 17, 19, 22 and 24 June 21 

MW6:30pjn.- 10 p.m. 
Sat 8:30 a jn.- 4:30 p.m. 



H W 



I S 



SUMMER? 



MCSE0688 Internetworking Microsoft TCP/IP on Microsoft 
Windows NT 4.0 (35 hours) 

Cost: $1,400 
Covers implementation and support for Transmission 
Control Protocol /Internet Protocol. 
Section: Date: Registration Deadline: 

CEOl July 26, 31; July 12 

August 2, 5, 7, 9, 14, 16 and 21 
MW 6:30 p.m. - 10 p.m. 
Sat 8:30 a.m. - 4:30 p.m. 

MCSE0689 Supporting Microsoft Windows NT Server 4.0 
Enterprise Tectinologies (35 hours) 

Cost: $1,400 

Learn to implement the Microsoft Windows NT Server 
4.0 in an enterprise environment. Includes directory 
services, server network analysis and troubleshooting. 
Section: Date: Registration Deadline: 

CEOl August 23, 26, 28, 30; August 9 

September 6, 9, 11 and 13 
MW 6:30 p.m. - 10 p.m. 
Sat 8:30 a.m. -4:30 p.m. 

MCSE0936 Creating and Managing a Web Server Using 
Microsoft Internet Information Server (21 hours) 

Cost: $840 
Set up a Web site. Install, configure and implement IIS 
components. 

Section: Date: Registration Deadline: 

CEOl September 18, 20, 23, 25 and 27 Septembers 
MW 6:30 p.m. - 10 p.m. 
Sat 8:30 a.m. - 4:30 p.m. 

TEK.XAM The Technology Certificate Exam 

Background 

The Information Technology Association of America 
estimates that more than 346,000 information technology 
jobs in this country are unfilled, only 37 percent of them 
in technology companies. Representatives of technology 
based companies have said they need employees who 
combine the traditional analytic and communication 
strengths of a liberal arts education with basic 
technological skills. 

Recognizing this, the Virginia Foundation for 
Independent Colleges (VFIC), in conjunction with 
Virginia's business community, has developed 
Tek.Xam — The Technology Certificate Exam. Tek.Xam 
will enable students to indicate to potential employers 
that they possess a level of technological proficiency that 
has become essential in today's workplace. The 
examination is intended to serve as a widely accepted 
credential that can help meet the needs of corporations 



across the country seeking to fill technology intensive jobs. 
Tek.Xam will build bridges between liberal arts 
students and the business community, both high-tech 
and more traditional companies. Liberal arts majors 
have good critical thinking and communications skills, 
but often are not recognized as possessing the 
technological competency necessary to compete for jobs 
that involve a high use of technology. The truth is that 
many colleges are including computer literacy courses in 
their general education requirements as well as 
incorporating technology across their curriculum. 
Moreover, some students already are acquiring the 
necessary experience through specialized courses. These 
individuals — an estimated group of more than 4.5 
million — have the skills; the challenge is to provide 
prospective employers with credible, acceptable 
evidence of their ability to use information technologies 
productively. 

The Exam 

Tek.Xam is a five-hour examination with seven major 
components: 

1. Internet research and e\olution 

2. General computing concepts 

3. Web design 

4. Presentation 

5. Spreadsheets 

6. Word processing 

7. Legal and ethical issues in technology 

At the urging of corporate representatives, the exam 
tests students' technical proficiency as well as measures 
their ability to use technical tools to solve problems that 
require critical thinking and analytic skill. 

Tek.Xam is computer-based and delivered via the 
Internet. It includes a combination of multiple choice 
questions and application tasks, so that students use 
software packages to ascertain or create correct answers. 
With an open architectural format, students are not 
forced to use the software of a single \ endor. 




^ffaik 




Exam Review Course 

TEKX0100 Tek.Xam: The Technology Examination 
Review Course (35 hours) 

Cost: $770 
A comprehensive, hands-on review of the seven major 
components of the Tek.Xam. 

Internet Research and Evolution 
General Computer Concepts 
Web Design 
Presentation 
Spreadsheets 
Word Processing 

Legal and Ethical Issues of Technology 
Location: University of Maryland 
Section: Date: Registration Deadline: 

CEOl June 5-16 May 12 

MTuWThF 8 a.m.- 11:30 a.m. 
CE02 June 5-16 May 12 

MTuWThF 1:30 p.m.- 4:30 p.m. 
CE03 June 19 - 30 May 12 

MTuWThF 8 a.m - 11:30 a.m. 
CE04 June 19 - 30 May 12 

MTuWThF 1:30 p.m.- 4:30 p.m. 

Tek.Xam The Technology Examination 

TEKX0101 Tek.Xam: The Technology Examination (5 hours) 

Cost: $150 

Tek.Xam is computer-based and delivered via the 
Internet. Students use software packages to ascertain or 
create correct answers. The exam is designed to test 
students' technical proficiency and to measure their 
ability to use technical tools to solve problems that 
require critical thinking and analytic skill. 

Tek.Xam is currently endorsed by a growing number of 
major employers and is rapidly becoming an important 
credential for recognizing technological competency. 

Location: University of Maryland 
Section: Date: Registration Deadline: 

CEOl July 1 Sat, time: TBA June 16 

CE02 October 7 Sat, time: TBA September 22 



Endorsers of the Tek.Xam 



Bell Atlantic - Virginl\ 

The Bowman Companies 

Columbia Capital Corporation 

CSX Corporation 

Dominion Resoltrces, Inc. 

East Coast Oil Corporation 

First Union - VA/MD/DC 

GE Financial Assistance 

Hunton & Williams 

McGuire, Woods, Battle & Boothe 

National Fruit Product Co., Inc. 

Phillip Morris USA 

Reynolds Metals Company 

Thompson, Siegel & Walmsley, Inc. 

J. M. Turner & Company, Inc. 

Wheat First Union 

Carilion Health Systems 

Crestar Financial Corporation 

Dollar Tree Stores, Inc. 

EDS Communications 
Ferguson Enterprises, Inc. 
First Virginia Banks, Inc. 

Heidrick & Struggles 

Landmark Communications 

Media General, Inc. 

Norfolk Southern Corporation 

The Pittston Company 

Resource Bankshares Corporation 

Tredegar Industries 

The Wachovia Corporation 

American Electronics Association 

Professional Services Council 

Virginia State Council of Higher Education 

The Virginia Chamber of Commerce 

Virginia's Center for Innovative Technology 

AT&T Foundation 

The Andrew W. Mellon Foundation 

The Collis-Warner Foundation 



H W 



BIG IS SUMMER? 



Coming this year starting 
in July and September 

Windows 2000 One-Day Classes 

Check the Office of Continuing and Extended 
Education website at www.umd.edu/conted 
or call 301-405-6545, 1-800-711-UMCP for details. 

ITCE0100 Microsoft Windows 2000: First Look (7 hours) 

This course introduces the structure and features 
of the Microsoft Windows 2000 operating systems. 
Gain the knowledge necessary to evaluate the 
advantages and benefits of incorporating Windows 
2000 for your business environment. Prerequisites: 
Working knowledge of an OS, proficiency using the 
Windows interface and knowledge of basic 
computer hardware. 

Location: University of Maryland 
Section: Date: Day and Time: 

CEOl July 29 Sat 8:30 a.m.- 4:30 p.m. 

ITCE0101 Preinstalling and Deploying MS Windows 2000 
Professional (7 hours) 

This course provides the IT support professional 
with the knowledge and skills necessary to 
preinstall and deploy Microsoft Windows 2000 
Professional on new or existing computers. 
Students receive MOC kit and Windows 2000 
Professional Beta 3. Prerequisites: General 
knowledge of installing applications, general 
knowledge of networking concepts. 

Location: University of Maryland 
Section: Date: Day and Time: 

CEOl September 16 Sat 8:30 a.m. - 4:30 p.m. 

ITCE0102 Installing and Configuring MS Windows 2000 
File, Print and Web Server (7 hours) 

This course is designed to teach value-added 
providers, system builders, and IT administrators 
how to install and configure the Microsoft 
Windows 2000 as a file, print and Web server. 
Students receive MOC kit and evaluation copies of 
beta 3 releases of Windows 2000 Professional and 
Windows 2000 Advanced Server. Prerequisites: 
Experience using Windows NT 4.0 in a network 
environment, knowledge of basic computer 
hardware, knowledge of basic networking concepts. 

Location: University of Maryland 
Section: Date: Day and Time: 

CEOl September 30 Sat 8:30 a.m. - 4:30 p.m. 




About Elderhostel, Inc. 

Elderhostel, Inc. is a not-for-profit organization with 25 
years of experience providing high-quality, affordable, 
educational adventures for adults who are 55 and older. 
These short-term educational programs are a fun and 
exciting way for participants to share new ideas, 
explore new places and make new friends. 

Founded in 1975 as a nonprofit organization, 
Elderhostel programs originally were based on a few 
college and university campuses in New England. 
Today, Elderhostel, Inc. annually serves hundreds of 
thousands of older adult students who tra\el to its 
residential educational programs throughout the U.S. 
and the world. Programs provide opportunities to learn 
while volunteering in the public interest. Elderhostel 
supports a network of independent community based 
Institutes for Learning in Retirement. 

"Hostelers" come together as a group of individuals 
who share a common passion for learning. This love of 
learning for its own sake forms the basis for lasting 
friendships and provides a rich environment for 
intellectual and personal growth. Learning is 
encouraged, people respect and listen to one another 
and indi\idual contributions are valued. 

Elderhostel offers you the world's most diverse and 
affordable selection of programs — activities that excite 
your imaginahon, sharpen your intelligence, open you 
up to new experiences and put you in touch with 
interesting new people in exciting places. 

Last year alone, almost 175,000 people took advantage 
of the unique experience that Elderhostel adventures 
have to offer. Whether vou attend by yourself, with a 
spouse, a friend or in a group, you'll enjov the company 
of fellow "hostelers" as you share common interests, 
discoveries and adventures. 




/I^te. 




The foUotvitig program is offered this summer at the 
University of Maryland through Elderhostel, hw: 

The Power of Laughter-Fun Begins at 50+ 

Discover the healing power of humor. Laugh and learn 
while you discover that good humor and good health go 
hand-in-hand. This program combines lectures, interactive 
exercises and a variety of audio and visual techniques to 
explore recent health findings, practical ways to put more 
fun into your Ufe, how to improve your sense of humor and 
even create your own humor. In addition, we will examine 
humor as a profoundly important social and cultural 
phenomenon. We will review basic explanations of what 
humor is and how it functions both in individuals and in 
society, trace its important manifestations, particularly in 
American art, literature and entertainment, and focus on its 
various uses in contemporeuy communication. 

Date: July 9-14 

Place: University of Maryland 

Cost: $516 (residential program) 

Registration for this course is not processed through the 
University of Maryland. For more information and to 
register, please contact: 

Elderhostel, Inc. 

75 Federal St. 

Boston, MA 02110-1941 

Toll free 1-877-426-8056 (registration ) 

1-617-426-7788 (administrative office) 

Monday - Friday, 9 a.m. - 9 p.m. 

Toll free: 1-877-426-2167 (TTY line) 

This program wUl be held on campus with hotel 
accommodations within walking distance. 
Accommodations include comfortable rooms, AC, double 
occupancy, unlimited singles, extra charge and private 
baths. Washington, D.C. is nearby with easy access by 
public transportation or car. 

Other Noncredit Courses 

Flute Master Class 

An intense flute master class session for 
flutists — primarily for advanced flutists of the young 
professional, college graduate and college 
undergraduate levels — is presented by William 
Montgomery, professor in the University of Maryland 
School of Music, from July 8 - 16. Additional studies are 
included for flutists of all ages and abilities. 
Montgomery will open the session by performing 19th 



and 20th century flute sonatas at a free concert open to 
the public on Saturday, July 8 at 8 p.m. in Ulrich Recital 
Hall, Tawes Fine Arts Building at the university. On July 
16 at the same venue, outstanding performers from the 
Flute Master Class will present a 4 p.m. concert. Call 
301-405-5539 or e-mail wm26@umail.umd.edu for 
audition information. 

French and Italian for Travelers 

Planning a trip abroad this summer? Want to learn 
basic language skills needed to get a hotel room, find 
your way around, order a meal, take the train or just go 
shopping? French for Travelers and Italian for Travelers 
are two courses designed for individuals traveling in 
French and Italian-speaking countries. Each course will 
concentrate on elementary vocabulary and grammatical 
structures necessary to fundamental situations faced by 
all travelers. 

French for Travelers 



Course: 


ARHU.OOOl.CEOl 




Dates: 


May 31 - June 12 




Time: 


6:30 - 8:30 p.m., Monday - 


- Friday 


Location: 


University of Maryland 




Cost: 


$200 




Italian for Travelers 





Course: ARHU.0002.CEO1 

Dates: May 31 - June 12 

Time: 6:30 - 8:30 p.m., Monday - Friday 

Location: University of Maryland 

Cost: $200 

For more information or to register, contact: 

The Office of Continuing and Extended Education, 
1-800-711-UMCP. 




HOW BIG 



SUMMER? 



Introduction to Desktop Publishing 

Learn desktop publishing at a three-day training 
session presented at the University of Maryland's Shady 
Grove campus this summer Gain hands-on experience 
in the basic concepts of publication production using 
desktop publishing software. Core skills for page layout 
are taught in a Windows environment, incorporating 
both designer and corporate approaches. Students 
produce a variety of projects, including brochures and 
newsletters. 

Course: ARHU.0003.CEO1 

Dates: June 5, 7 and 9 

Time: 8:30 a.m. - 12:30 p.m. 

Cost: $198 (includes computer fee) 

For more information or to register, contact: 

The Office of Continuing and Extended Education, 

1-800-711-8627. 

Special Events 

Annual Fourth of July Celebration 

Come jt>in in the fun, v\ith firevvcnks, music and food at 
the Annual Fourth of July Celebration, co-sponsored by 
the University of Maryland and the city of College Park. 
Food and music start at 7 p.m., with fireworks around 
9:15 p.m. Festivities are free and open to the public, on 
Parking Lot 1, off Campus Drive near the University 
Boulevard/ Adelphi Road entrance. Come early to beat 
the crowd! 

Maryland Special Olympics 

The state's largest multi-sport event returns to the 
University of Maryland, June 2 - 4, to celebrate the 30th 
anniversary of its first-ever competition. Maryland's 
premier athletic facilities will play host to 1,200 athletes 
with developmental disabilities who will compete in 
aquatics, track and field, bowling, equestrian, golf and 
Softball events. An expected 1,000 \olunteers, 2,000 
family members and 400 coaches converge on the 
campus as well. All e\'ents are free and open to the 
public. Special Olympics of Maryland provides year- 
round sports training and athletic competition in a 
variety of Olympic-type sports for persons with mental 
retardation. To volunteer or learn more about the Special 
Olympics of Maryland Summer Games, call 
410-290-7611 or visit the Web site at www.somd.org 
Help us build heroes! 



National History Day 

This summer, June 11-15, more than 2,000 young 
scholars from across the nation will gather at the 
University of Maryland for the 25th National History 
Day, a five-day annual event engaging both students 
and teachers in historical inquiry and creative 
presentation. A half-million sixth through 12th grade 
students participate in local district and state 
competition to win the honor of representing their 
school. This year's theme, "Turning Points in History: 
People, Ideas, Events" led many students to exciting 
discoveries in their own local communities on how 
people have struggled to create and react to turning 
points in history. Students chose their own study topic 
and will present their findings in museum-type exhibits, 
multimedia documentaries, original performances or 
traditional research papers. While the competition is an 
exciting way for many students to learn about historical 
issues, ideas, people and events, one outstanding young 
scholar will also receive a scholarship to attend the 
University of Maryland. For more information, call: 
Mark Robinson at 301-314-9542 or e-mail 
mmhd@aol.com 





Art to 

make 

the 

spirit 

soar 




The Clarice Smith Performing Arts Center will soon 
take flight — becoming a vibrant center of the 
performing arts for regional audiences and national 
and international professionals. The state-of-the-art 
performing arts "village," comprised of ten 
interconnected structures on the northwest end of 
the university's campus, is scheduled to open 
officially in fall 2001. 

The performing arts center serves the music, theatre 
and dance departments of the university. Facilities 
include the Joseph and Alma Gildenhom Recital 
Hall (300 seats); the Ina and Jack Kay Theater (650 
seats); a Concert HaU (1100 seats); Studio Theater 
(200 seats); Dance Theater (200 seats); Experimental 
Theater (100 seats); the Performing Arts Library; and 
the Prince George's County Room for educational 
and outreach activities. 

Events are already scheduled. Join us as we 
celebrate life through the performing arts! 

2000 

National Orchestral Institute 

• June, 10, 17, 24 

Flute Concert 

• July 8, 8 p.m. and July 16, 4 p.m. 

2001 

General Assembly of the World Federation of 
International Music Competitions 
Coming • May 4-6, 2001 

Leonard Rose CeUo Competition 
and Sixth American Cello Congress 
Coming • May 24 - June 2, 2001 

Gala Dedication-Clarice Smith Center 
Coming • September 29, 2001 

2002 

William KapeO International 
Piano Competition and Festival 
Coming • May 23 - June 1, 2002 



C/3 

O 
I— 

o 

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o 



National Orchestral Institute 

Three Saturday evening public concerts Qune 10, 17, 24) 
are performed by the National Orchestral Institute (NOI) 
Philharmonic, under the direction of internationally 
acclaimed conductors-in-residence during the summer 
2000 NOI program. The National Orchestral Institute 
brings together 90 premier young musicians, each on 
full scholarship, for an intensive training experience in 
orchestra music. These talented young musicians are 
selected from hundreds of individual auditions heard in 
16 cities across the United States. Concertmasters and 
principal musicians from major American orchestras 
lead sectional rehearsals and present master classes on 
repertoire required for professional auditions. Chamber 
music coaching and other professional development 
seminars also are presented. Previous NOI participants 
have won positions with prestigious symphony 
orchestras around the world, in addition to pursuing 
careers as teachers and musicians in chamber music 
ensembles and military bands and orchestras. Concerts 
are performed at the Universitv of Maryland's Tawes 
Theater. For more information, call 301-405-2317, or 
e-mail noi@accmail.umd.edu. 

NCAA Men's National 
Lacrosse Championship 

Returning for the tenth time to the Uni\'ersity of 
Maryland's Byrd Stadium, the NCAA Division 1 Men's 
Lacrosse Championship continues to be one of the most 
exciting events in college athletics. A semifinal 
doubleheader will be played on Saturday, May 27, with 
action getting underway at noon, and the national 
championship will be played on Memorial Day, May 29, 
at 10:55 a.m. 

Hosting the event will be The Maryland Terrapins, who 
ranked as high as fifth nationally last year The Terrapins 
have won the men's lacrosse national championship 
twice and have appeared in the finals nine times, most 
recently in 1998 when they won the Atlantic Coast 
Conference championship. For Championship Weekend 
ticket information, call 301-314-7070. 



12 



>;=.^..vTint.-»>- art, ■.v-vv, : ..^^-^.t^.fl.g 




HOW BIG IS SUMMER"? 



Crossing Borders 

Breaking Boundaries 

AFRICA AND ITS INFLUENCE, JAZZ 
AND AMERICA, AND CONSIDERING 
THE POSTMODERN 

July 10 - 22 

Crossing Borders/ Breaking Boundaries is a 
multidisciplinary summer institute for arts 
educations. It is an integrated program supporting 
performance, sdiolarship and education in the fine 
arts. Developed especially for Maryland secondary 
school educators in dance, music, theater and the 
visual arts, the Institute: 

• EXPOSES YOU to new scholarship in the arts 
and arts education 

• ENGAGES YOU in an exploration of new 
performance possibilities witliin and across the 
arts disciplines 

• SUPPORTS YOU in creating new teaching 
units and lesson plans that incorporate 
Maryland's EssenHal Learner Outcome 
guidelines for the fine arts 

• PREPARES YOU to work collaboratively with 
teachers in your own and other arts disciplines 

• STRENGTHENS the position of the arts in 
your high school 

The two-week residential institute includes 
workshops, lectures, performance explorations 
classes and collaborative teaching endeavors. 
Sponsored by The Clarice Smith Performing Arts 
Center, The Center for Renaissance and Baroque 
Studies and the Maryland State Department of 
Education. ^/^ ■. ,^^ 

DEADLINE FOR APPLICATIONS 

For full consideration, all application forms and 

supporting materials must be postmarked no 

later than April 1. 

Call 301-405-6830 or visit our Web site at 

www.inform.umd.edu/CRBS/lextsite/programs/a 

i2000/ai2000.html 



Community Programs 

Children's Developmental Clinic 

The Children's De\'elopmental Clinic, conducted by the 
university's College of Health and Human Performance 
in conjunction with the department of Physical 
Education at Prince George's Community' College, 
allows individualized one-to-one services for children 
experiencing developmental difficulties. Children with 
learning problems, developmental delays, physical 
fitness and coordination problems, brain damage, 
mental retardation, emotional disturbances or 
orthopedic handicaps can benefit from the clinic. While 
motor development is the major area of concern, 
language and reading development also are addressed. 
A parent education program runs in conjunction with 
children's sessions. Participants, ages birth through 21, 
must be referred by professionals such as teachers, 
pediatricians, psychologists or therapists. 

The clinic will run a four-week session, June 19 - 
July 13, with children scheduled for half hour and 
one-hour sessions two days per week. Children 
participate in a one-to-one motor development program 
and also will be included in language or reading 
development phases if needed. Tentative cost for Prince 
George's County residents is $85; residents from other 
Maryland counties pay S90; and out-of-state residents 
pay $100. The fee for any additional children is $75. For 
information, contact Paul Hahn, director; or Kathy 
Hinkal, at 301-322-0519. 

LEAP — Language-Learning Early 
Advantage Program 

LEAP, a program ser\'ing children ages 3-5 with 
language or speech delays, but without major 
disabilities, fosters speech /language development 
through classroom acti\ities, field trips and daily 
individual therapy. LEAP is conducted by the 
university's licensed and certified Hearing and Speech 
Sciences faculty, along with undergraduate majors. The 
program meets three times weekly, morning or 
afternoon, from June through mid-July. (Other sessions 
run from September through May each year.) 

Each child has a specific therapeutic/educational plan 
targeting his/her individual communication needs, with 
a student /teacher ratio of two-to-one. Learning includes 
perceptual-motor and sensory activities, dramatic play, 
art, storvtelling and computer activities. Cost for the 
summer session is $400. Contact director Kathy Dow, at 
301-405-4228 for more information. 




^^ 



13 




Senior University 

Lifelong learning for adults 50 and older is the focus of 
Senior University, a member-run community of active 
adult learners dually-sponsored by the university's 
Center on Aging and the Office of Continuing and 
Extended Education. At Senior University, which is 
affiliated with the Elderhostel Institute Network, 
members pursue stimulating learning experiences 
through study groups and special events in a 
non-competitive and supportive atmosphere. There are 
no grades, credits or exams, and previous college 
background is not required. Activities are conducted in 
partnership with university departments, programs, 
facult)' and staff, along with the community. All 
members are encouraged to pro\'ide leadership, 
participate on committees, lead study groups and plan 
special events. Study groups, which include seminars, 
lectures and presentations, are led by knowledgeable 
members, university faculty and staff and coimnunity 
experts. Most study groups meet once a week for two 
hours, for a five- to 10-week period. Topics include 
computers and technology; foreign languages; literature 
and writing; science and mathematics; health; family; 
finance and business; art, music and dance; social 
sciences; history, current events and politics; religion and 
philosophy. Call 301-403-4467 for more information. 

Summer Reading Program 

The university's Sununer Reading Program is a 
five-week diagnostic instruction program for qualified 
students in grades one through 12, as well as an 
information seminar for parents. The program is 
conducted by Rose Marie Codling of the Department of 
Curriculum and Instruction's Reading Center. Students 
learn in small groups led by a team of advanced 
master's candidates. Program goals include increased 
student reading abiUty, motivation and strategy use. For 
information, call 301-405-3153. 

UIVITV 

Award-winning television programming from 
Maryland's flagship university is available on UMTV. 
UMTV is keeping pace by offering in-depth programs 
that reflect the intellectual curiosity and wide-ranging 
interest of the local community. UMTV — operated by 
Maryland's highly-ranked College of Journalism — can 
be seen on channels 59/12 in Montgomery County and 
32A/30B in Prince George's County, or on university's 
in-house cable channel 38. 

For more information, call 301 405-3610, or visit our 
Web site at WTvw.umd.edu/flagship 



Community Services 

Family Service Center 

The Marriage and Family Therapy Program at the 
university's Family Ser\ice Center provides therapy for 
families, couples and individuals throughout the 
metropolitan community. Counseling for family conflict, 
single parenting, poor communication, defiant teens, 
child behavior and discipline struggles, as well as 
troubles experienced by stepfamilies or those in the 
process of divorce or separation is available. Given 
sufficient interest and participation, individual therapy 
groups can be formed. Hours are Monday - Thursday, 9 
a.m. to 9 p.m., with some Friday and Saturday 
appointments available. Fees are based on a sliding 
scale. Contact Director Carol A. Werlinich 
at 301-405-2273. 

Hearing and Speech Clinic 

The university's Hearing and Speech Clinic offers 
education, treatment and preschool ser\'ices for 
communication disorders including language, 
articulation, stuttering, voice and hearing. Hearing aid 
fitting and aural rehabilitation classes also are available. 
For information, call Beth Coon at 301-405-4218. 




14 




HOW B 



SUMMERS 



Everything You Need 

A Fun-Filled Summer 

Is Right Here... 

The University of Maryland again offers 
fun and learning for children of all ages 
this summer. Whether it's shooting a 
three-pointer, finding out that physics can 
be fun or writing a headline for a student 
newspaper, a full range of activities to 
engage the interest of any child is available 
this year. 

All of our instructors are fully qualified 
and many of the summer classes use 
the university's state of the art sports, 
education and physical activity facilities. 

Best of all, the university is right here at 
home! Check out this summer's schedule 
of classes and camps. Let your child 
experience our Terrapin hospitality while 
expanding his or her mind and body. 

Each class may have its own registration 
deadline and contact telephone number. 
So be sure to check out the information 
at the end of each course description to 
make sure your child doesn't miss out on 
any of these special opportunities. 



^ 




KICK 


Shannon 


m\ ^#Vl 


Higgins-Cirovski's 


Sasho Cirovski's 


Maryland Soccer 


Maryland Soccer 


Camp for Girls 


Camp for Boys 


For Ages 7-17 


For Ages 6-17 


Make new friends and enjoy 


the game of soccer. Work with 


Learn the Terp's formula for 


women who have been 


success this suninier at this great 


successful players and coaches 


soccer camp tor boys. Maryland 


at all levels throughout their 


men s soccer head coach Sasho 


careers. Maryland women's 


Cirovski and assistant coach JefF 


head coach Shannon Higgins- 


Rohrman know that kids learn 


Cirovski and her staff will help 


and develop skills more quickly 


you reach your full potential as 


when they are having fun. Run, 


a soccer player, hnprove your 


play and think as a total soccer 


skills and techniques, including 


player during this creative and 


goal-tending, strategies and 


motivating training sessions and 


tactics through individual 


learnmg exercises. Stay in campus 


training and challenging game 


dorms or participate as an 


competition. Stay in campus 


extended day camper {a'^es 10-17) 


dorms during our residential 


July 5-9 and July 12-16. Half-day 


camp {ages 7-/7) June 25-29. 


camp {ages 6-9) ]u\y 19-23. We 


Campus day camp {ages 7-10) 


also otTer a day camp in 


July 24-28. Day camp in 


Columbia, Md. from June 26-30. 


Columbia, Md. {ages 7-15) 


Call 410-740-1147 


July 17-21. 


or 301-314-7005 


Call 301-314-0330 




The Gary Williams^ 

Boys Basketball Cihi|!^^ 

For Ages 9-17 ^^^^^ ^M 

Learn how to play basketball fi-om 
the Terp's coaching staff in the Cole 
Field House. Play three games a day 
against other campers of similar 
age and ability, as Terrapin coach 
Gary Williams and his staff teach 
both individual and team basketball 
skills. Earn trophies for team and 
individual achievement. 

All you can eat training table meals. 
Stay in campus dorms or go home at 
night if you like. Special Activities — 
Group swim lessons, evening movies, 
professional players guest lectures. 

Choose from three sessions! 
June 18-22 June 25-29 July 5-9 

Call 301-314-7029 




Gymkana 

For Ages 5-16 • Attend weekly or up to four weeks. 

It's Gymkana time again! Time for flips, swimming, ice cream, games, 
gymnastics, trampoHning and all-around exciting fun. Gymkana is a 
gymnastic summer camp where healthy hving and natural fun are a must. 
Young children learn and participate in gymnastics without the pressure 
of competition. 

June 19 -July 14 Call 301-405-2566 



Gymka-tots 

Co-ed » Ages 5-1 

Movement 

TumbUng 

Trampoline 

Selected apparatus 

Swimming 

Games 

Arts and crafts 



Gymkana 

Separate programs for 
boys and girls 8-16 

Apparatus 

Tumbhng 

Trampoline 

Vaulting 

Double mini-trampolining 

Areosports (balancing and pyramids) 

Weight training and swimming 




HOW BIG 



SUMMER? 



Table of Contents 

Academic/Arts/Pre-College Programs 

The College Bound Program 1 

Center for Young Children Summer Camp 1 

Educational Talent Search Program 2 

Summer SAT Workshop 2 

Summer Technology Program - 

Navigating the World Wide Web 2 

El Ingeniero 2 

Family Arts Summer Camp Program 2 

Maryland 4-H Camping 3 

Maryland Scholastic Press Association 

2000 Summer Journalism Program 3 

Physics is Phun 3 

Physics Summer Outreach Program 3 

Pre-CoUege Programs 4 

Upward Bound 4 

Math and Science Regional Center 4 

Summer Bridge Program 4 

Women in Engineering 4 

Sport Camps 

Tom Bradley Baseball Camp 4 

Gary Williams Boys Basketball Camp 5 

Chris WeUer Basketball Ccm:ip 5 

Coed Summer Sports Program 

And Computer Science Program 6 

Summer Field Hockey Camp 6 

Terrapin Football Technique School 6 

Junior Golf Camps and Clinics 6 

Gymkana 6 

Dick Edell's Summer Lacrosse Camp 7 

All-America Lacrosse Camp for Girls 7 

Sasho Cirovski's Maryland Soccer Camp for Boys 7 

Shannon Higgins-Cirovski's Maryland 

Soccer Camp 2000 for Girls 8 

Gina LeMandre's Maryland Softball Camp 8 

Bill Goodman's Track and Field Camp 8 

Janice Kruger's Volleyball Camps 8 




Academic/Arts/ 
Pre-College Programs 

The College-Bound Program 

For high school sophomores, juniors and seniors 

The Collegc-Bciund program, offered by the Learning 
Assistance Service, is a transition program for high 
school students interested in attending college. It 
includes study skills, workshops and information about 
resources and student life at the university. Students in 
the program do independent work, meet academic skills 
counselors, visit classes, explore the library and hear 
about life at the university from current students. They 
also can take a career inventory and hear about career 
and college transition issues from Counseling Center 
psychologists. Workshop topics include time 
management, textbook reading and listening and note 
taking. Exam, writing and math learning skills also are 
covered. College-Bound meets Mondays - Thursdays 
from July 5 - August 3. Cost is $223 and does not include 
parking permit fees. For information contact Shirley 
Browner at 301-314-7702. 

Center for Young Children 
Summer Camp 

Children ages 3 (pre-Kindergarten) 
through second grade 

The Center for \bung Children, the university's 
nationally accredited preschool and kindergarten 
program, offers a full-day summer camp program for 
children ages 3 through second grade. The camp 
provides arts and crafts activities, cooking, group games, 
drama, movement, sports, swimming at the Campus 
Recreation Center, as well as introduction to Spanish 
classes. All camp instructors are licensed and have 
degrees in earlv childhcx)d education. Each classroom 
features computers the children can use; morning and 
afternoon snacks are provided, as well as milk for lunch 






brought from home. Summer camp begins Monday, June 
26 and ends Friday, August 11. Hours are 7:45 a.m. to 
5:30 p.m. daily for children ages 3-6; and 8 a.m. to 4 p.m. 
for children in first and second grades (aftercare can be 
arranged until 5:30 p.m.). Registration begins in 
February with priority to the University of Maryland 
community. Tuition is yet to be determined. Call Nancy 
Hey at 301-405-3168 for information. 



Educational Talent 
Search Program 

Educational Talent Search conducts 
year-round programs that encourage 
low-income and potential first- 
generation college students to 
complete, or reenter, high school in 
order to prepare for college. Summer 
programs include: 

Summer SAT Workshop 

Scholastic Aptitude Test orientation, including test 
preparation skills and actual questions, is presented in a 
simulated test environment. Two-week sessions are 
offered from 6:30 to 9 p.m. during July and August for 
high school juniors and seniors. There is no cost to 
eligible students in Prince George's and Charles counties. 

Summer Technology Program- 
Navigating the World Wide Web 

Provides students with hands-on experience 
conducting research via the World Wide Web, thus 
increasing their computer efficiency and skill level. 
Presented from 6:30 to 9 p.m. in three one-week sessions 
during June, July and August. All students are eligible, 
at no cost. 

For both programs, contact director Shirley Morman 
at 301-314-7763, or visit the Web site at 
www.inform.umd.edu/ETSP 

El Ingeniero 

For primarily Hispanic seventh- and eighth-graders, 
this six-week program enhances math and science skills 
and instills an interest in careers in engineering. This is 
a non-remedial program where children are admitted 
on a rolling basis. Contingent upon funding, there is a 
fee of $300. For information, call Lucy Negron-Evelyn 
at 410-715 9828. 



Family Arts Summer 
Camp Program 

Children ages 7 through high school can participate in 
one- to two-week residential Family Arts Summer 
Camps throughout summer 2000. Full- and half-day 
camps at the university focus on a wide variety of 
artisHc experiences, including drawing, printmaking, art 
history, painting, photography, 

crafts, world music, theater 
and multimedia arts. 
Participants can access a 
wealth of academic and 
cultural resources within 
walking distance of the 
university, including 
photography and pottery 
studios, university galleries, 
libraries and the university 
swimming pool. Instructors are 
from the University of Maryland, Washington 
Studio School, Corcoran Gallery of Art, Capitol Hill Arts 
Workshop, Maryland Center for the Arts, Takoma Park 
Elementary School and College Park Friends 
Community School. The counselor-in-traLning 
leadership programs provide young adults the 
opportunity to work with professionals while earning 
community service credits and learning about art and 
the art of teaching. 

Through the photographic arts outreach program, 
students and community volunteers provide 
photography services to community organizations. 
Activities often include public exhibition and discussion, 
field trips, peer review and print and online publications. 
Recent projects include collaborations with the Baltimore 
County Homelessness Awareness Project, Quest Arts for 





HOW 



I S 



SUMMER? 



Everyone: Theatrical Experiences for Deaf and Hearing 
Actors, Hoyer/Challenger Center of Prince George's 
County Chilci Resource Center and a therapeutic 
recreation program. For information, contact arts 
outreach coordinator Barbara Tyroler at 301-314-ARTS. 



Maryland 4-H Camping 

A few days of Maryland 4-H camping can provide 
wonderful memories for young people that last a 
lifetime. Campers in the 4-H program meet new friends, 
learn new skills and enjoy being close to nature. 
Maryland 4-H camps — all accredited by the American 
Camping Association- 
are located across 
the state: Patuxent 
River 4-H Center in 
Prince George's 
County; Frederick 
County Camp and 
Activity Center; Camp 
Hashawha in Carroll 
County; The Rocks 4-H 
Camp in Harford County; and 
Western Maryland 4-H Center. Most 
camps run for one week, Sunday 
Saturday, with occasional Friday - Sunday 
weekend sessions. For information, call 
301-791-1404 or visit the 4-H Camping Web site 
at www.agnr.umd.edu/CES/4H 



Maryland Scholastic Press 
Association 2000 Summer 
Journalism Program 

Middle and high school journalism students 
and newspaper faculty advisers 

The Maryland Scholastic Press Association and the 
university's College of Journalism offer a journalism 
program for middle and high school students who are 
involved with their student newspapers. The program 
improves journalism skills, presents academic and career 
opportunities in the journalism field and gives a glimpse 
of living and learning at a large university. Student 
publication advisers who attend can gain important 
insight and improve their journalism education skills. 
Half the students in the program stay at the university; 
the other half commute from liome. 




The program has three main components: 

• Student workshops in journalism include Web and 
desktop publishing design, photography, newspaper, 
sports and literary writing, and a field trip to the 
Newseum in Arlington, Va. 

• The editor-in-chief program is for students who will 
be editors of their school newspapers in the fall. It 
includes intensive training, a trip to the Newseum and 
a visit to a professional newspaper's newsroom. 

• The publication adviser program is an intensive 
noncredit workshop for teachers who ad\'ise school 
newspapers. 

All programs are scheduled June 26 - 30. Students must 
be at least 12 years old and must have completed the 
seventh grade to attend. Fees are $155- 
$200 and scholarships mav be 

available, with an April 1 deadline 
to apply. For information, 
contact Julie Gammill Gibson at 
301-405-8321 or e-mail 
jgibson@jmail.umd.edu 



Physics is Phun 

Students learn about physics 
through free demonstrations on 
mechanics, sound, light, electricity, 
gnetism, etc., conducted bv the 
university's Physics Department. One- to 
two-hour programs designed to educate, inform and 
entertain are presented to upper elementarv, middle- 
and high school-aged groups, as requested bv other 
student programs. For more information, contact 
Richard Berg at 301-405-5994. 

Physics Summer 
Outreach Program 

For girls who ha\'e completed eighth grade, the Physics 
Department presents a pair of two-week morning science 
programs including "hands-on" science experience, 
designed to encourage an interest in science. For 
information, call Bemadine Kozlowski at 301-405-5949. 




^te. 





Pre-College Programs 

Pre-College Programs, including Upward Bound and 
the Math and Science Regional Center, bridge the gap 
that can separate the university from community 
members who might not have the resources to learn 
about post-secondary educational opportunities. These 
programs provide local high school students with 
academic counseling and support, career guidance, 
college information 
vNorkshops and personal 
development seminars. 

Upward Bound 

Upward Bound serves 
students from 10 target 
high schools in Prince 
George's and 
Montgomery counties, 
including Bladensburg, 
Springbrook, High 
Point, John F. Kennedy, Montgomery 
Blair, Northwestern, Forestville, Potomac, Fairmont 
Heights and Wheaton. 

Math and Science Regional Center 

The Math and Science Regional Center is regionally- 
based, serving students from Maryland, Washington, 
D.C., Virginia, West Virginia and Pennsylvania. Upward 
Bound eligibility criteria, as set by the U. S. Department 
of Education, state that participants must be U. S. 
citizens, permanent residents of the U.S., potential first 
generation college students or low-income, 13-19 years 
old, in ninth through 12th grades, have a proven need 
for academic support and are looking to pursue an 
education beyond high school. For more information 
about Upward Bound, call 301-405-6776; for the 
Math and Science Regional Center, call David Wall 
Rice at 301-405-1773. 

Summer BRIDGE Program 

For minority engineering and science students 
entering the university this fall as freshmen 

A six-week pre-freshman summer program 
sponsored by the university's A. James Clark School 
of Engineering, BRIDGE puts minority science and 
engineering students on an academic fast track. 
The program continues throughout the students 
academic career and helps minority students 
graduate in less time, earn higher grades, and 
also encourages them to pursue graduate 
education in science and engineering. The 
National Science Foundation's Alliance 



for Minority Participation funds the summer BRIDGE 
program, which allows fees and housing for the summer 
session to be offered free of charge. Registration 
deadline is in early May, and all minority high school 
graduates accepted to the University of Maryland as 
science and engineering majors will receive an 
application in the mail in March. For information, call 
Wanda Bird at 301-405-3878 or visit the Web site 
at wwTV.engr.umd.edu/organizations/cmse/ 

Women in Engineering 

Women who are thinking about becoming engineers 
can explore the world of engineering in this fun and 
exciting week-long residential summer program. The 
program introduces them to engineering through hands- 
on activities, laboratory experiments, speakers and other 
information sessions. This positive learning experience 
in a collegiate environment increases participants' 
knowledge of engineering, exposes them to female role 
models in engineering, introduces them to other high 
school women with similar interests and supports them 
in a decision to pursue an engineering course of study in 
college. Two, one-week residential programs are offered, 
July 16-21 and August 6-11, with rising 11th and 12th 
grade female high school students chosen through a 
competitive application process. Application deadline is 
April 15, 2000. There is a $25 commitment fee due upon 
acceptance, and $350 scholarships are awarded to each 
student to help cover housing, food, materials, 
supplies, etc. For information, contact Women 
in Engineering, 1106 Glenn L. Martin Hall, 
University of Maryland, College Park, MD 
20742; telephone 301-405-3283; or visit the 
Web at wwTv.engr.umd/wie/lweek.htm 

Sports Camps 

Tom Bradley 
Baseball Camp 

Former major league pitcher Tom 
Bradley, Maryland head baseball 
coach, and his staff present five, 
week-long instructional camps for 
youth ages 7-15, and another camp for 
those age 13-18. Activities include daily 
baseball games, live pitching, hitting 
contests, home run derby pitching machines, 
/ batting machines and camp achievement 

awards. 

For pitchers, instruction includes balanced 
pitching, mechanics, pickoff moves, grips 




HOW BIG IS SUMMER'? 



and leg and arm exercises. Hitting instruction features 
the balanced stance, power position, launch, moment of 
truth, extension and follow-through mechanics. 
Participants also learn the proper way to throw and field 
from the middle, comers, outfield and behind the plate, 
as well as how to take leads on the bases, steal bases, 
slide, take the extra base and score runs. Catchers learn 
how to develop proven squatting and throwing 
mechanics, soft receiving hands, signal 
calling, pitch selection and 
handling pitchers. 

Camps for ages 7-15 are scheduled 
June 12 - 16; June 
26 - 30; July 3 - 7; July 17 - 21 and 
July 24 - 28. Ages 13-18 camp is 
July 10 - 14. Call 301-314-7122 for 
information. 



Gary Williams Boys 
Basketball Camp 

Learn the game of basketball from the 
Maryland coaching staff in Cole Field House! 
Boys ages 9-17 who have not yet graduated from high 
school can play three games a day against other campers 
of similar age and ability, as Terrapin coach Gary 
Williams and his staff, including Maryland assistant 
coaches Billy Hahn, Dave Dickerson and Jimmy Patsos, 
teach basketball skills. Special activities including group 
swim sessions, evening movies and lectures by guest 
speakers round out the week of meeting new friends 
and becoming better basketball players. Instructors teach 
both indi\idual and team skills, gi\'e individual "report 
card" evaluations of each player and present awards 
and trophies for team and indi\'idual achievement. 
Campers stay in campus dorms (day camp option also 
available) and enjoy all-you-can-eat training table meals 
during each of three five-day sessions: June 18-22; June 
25 - 29, or July 5-9. Previous camp speakers include 
Steve Francis (Houston Rockets), Joe Smith (Minnesota 
Tlmberwohes), Walt Williams (Houston Rockets), Tony 
Massenburg (Houston Rockets), Keith Booth (Chicago 
Bulls), Johnny Rhodes (University of Maryland), 
Michael Adams (Charlotte Hornets) and shooting 
specialist Da\e Hopla. For more information, 
call 301-314-7029. 




Chris Weller Basketball Camp 

Girls ages 8-18 

Maryland women's basketball head coach Chris Weller 
and her coaching staff lead a summer basketball camp for 
girls ages 8-18. The camp features past and present 
women Terrapin basketball players, as well as coaches and 
athletes from other area colleges and high schools. 
Camp participants are assigned to teams 
based on age and leam a variety of skills 
to improve their game, gain experience 
and grow into well rounded players. 
The program teaches self- 
confidence and respect for both 
teammates and oppjonents in a 
comp)etitive, yet friendly, 
atmosphere. 

Campers are housed overnight 
in a university residence hall with 
all meals provided. There is a 
day-only option that includes lunch 
and dinner. Two, four-dav individual 
camp sessions are scheduled in late Julv 
and early August. Teams can register for a 
reduced fee for the overnight camp only. You need at 
least eight players to register as a team. A two-day 
shooting camp immediately follows the second 
individual session in August — again with a single fee 
for both dav and overnight campers. 

Awards for the most \'aluable plaver, foul shot champion, 
one-on-one championship and most impro\ed player 
are presented in an awards ceremonv at the camp's 
conclusion. Top 
players in the camp 
can also compete in 
an all-star game. 
Registration is first- 
come, first-ser\ed, 
beginning in 
Februarv. For 
information, or to 
get on the mailing 
list and receive a 
brochure, call 
Jeanne Welch 
at 301-314-1747. 







Coed Summer Sports Program 
and Computer Science Program 

A three-week coed summer sports program conducted 
by the College of Health and Human Performance 
features on-campus sports activities for children ages 
5-14. Organized into three groups (ages 5-7, 8-10 and 

11-14) children participate 
in soccer, softball, tennis, 
racquetball, basketball, 
lacrosse and aquatics. 
Children ages 7-14 
enrolled in the morning 
program also can 
participate in an 
afternoon (1 to 4:30 
p.m.) computer science 
program. The program 
runs Monday - Friday 
from 9 a.m. to noon, 
June 19 - July 7, 
and cost is $70 
per week, per 
child, per 
program. For 
information, 
301-405-2503. 



Summer Field Hocicey Camp 

High school girls can develop field hockey skills at 
Summer Field Hockey Camp, presented by Maryland 
coach Missy Meharg, whose Terrapins finished sixth in 
the nation last year. Two sessions are scheduled — one in 
late July and another in early August. Call 301-314-3895 
for more information. 



Terrapin Football 
Technique School 

Get a head start on your 
football career at the Terrapin 
Football Technique School, a 
football camp for high school 
student-athletes ages 14 and older. 
Conducted by University of Maryland 
football coaches, the camp, open to overnight 





or day campers, emphasizes individual football 
techniques. It includes football techniques for all 
positions; weight training; flexibility, form running and 
sprint technique; inspirational talks about motivation, 
responsibility and mental preparation; and nutrition and 
drug education. There are evening activities for 
overnight campers. Campers have full use of the 
Maryland football stadium, practice fields, weight rooms 
and other campus facilities. The Maryland football staff 
will personally work with each participant, with a 
player/coach ratio of about 10 to one. Two sessions are 
scheduled: Camp 1, from Sunday, June 25 to Wednesday, 
June 28; and Camp 1, from Wednesday, June 28 through 
Saturday, July 1. For more information, call 301-314-7096. 



Junior Golf Camps and Clinics 

Golfers ages 8-17 learn full swing, short game shots, 
golf course management and golf etiquette at junior golf 
camps at the University of Maryland golf course. Camps 
include both range instruction and golf course play. 
There also will be one-day and multi-day clinics 
presented throughout the golf season, with each clinic 
emphasizing either full swing or short game shots. 
Individual clinics run for two hours and multi-day clinic 
schedules vary. Specific dates and fees will be available 
March 15. Call 301-403-4299 for information. 



Gymkana 

It's Gymkana time again — time for all the fun, flips, 
swunming, ice cream, games, gymnastics, trampolining 
and excitement we can dish out! Gymkana is a 
gymnastic summer camp where healthy living and 
natural fun are a must. It provides a wholesome 
opportunity for boys and girls of all abilities to learn 
gymnastics, while at the same time stressing a healthy, 
drug-free lifestyle. Young children learn and 

participate in gyinnastics without the pressure 
of competition. Separate programs for 
-.-^*^--, boys and girls ages 8-16 feature 

apparatus, tumbling, trampolining, 
vaulting, double mini- 
trampolining, acrosport 
(balancing and pyramids), 
weight training and 
swimming. Gymka-tots, 



HOW BIG 



SUMMER'^ 



a co-ed program for ages 5-7, stresses fundamental 
movements, body control and awareness, tumbling, 
selected apparatus, trampoline, swimming, games and 
arts and crafts. Attend weekly for up to four weeks. 
Early-morning day care is available. For information, 
contact Joseph Murray, College of Health and Human 
Performance at 301-405-2566. 

Dick Edell's Summer 
Lacrosse Camp 

Join a lacrosse camp that teaches young men to be the 
very best lacrosse players they can be. Led by twice 
former National Coach of the Year Dick Edell, 
the camp features morning, afternoon and 
evening lacrosse sessions during a one-week 
program. Campers are organized by age and 
ability so they can learn to play with, and 
against, young people with similar talents. Ede 
has led Maryland to three Atlantic Coast 
Conference championships and six 
NCAA Final Four appearances. He is 
joined by Terrapin assistant coaches 
Dave Slafkosky, Scott Marr and 
John Stainbrook, along with 
Lafayette head coach Bill Lawson 
and current Maryland players 
This creates a five-to-one 
camper- to-staff instructional 
ratio. Two, one-week camps 
are scheduled: June 17 - 21 
or July 8 - 12, with both 
overnight ($425) and 
day-camper ($325) options. 
Free transportation is pro\'ided 
from Baltimore-Washington Internationa 
Airport. Call 301-314-7117 or 
410-442-5585 for information. 



All-America Lacrosse 
Camps for Girls 

All-America Lacrosse Camp, led by 
Maryland women's lacrosse coach Cindy 
Timchal, opens up new lacrosse 
opportunities for girls from beginner to 
advanced levels. Timchal is the single most 
successful coach in the women's gamt> — 
Maryland has won more national titles. 





including the 1998-99 championship, than any other 
NCAA team. 

TTie camp emphasizes innovative techniques, with 
goalies receiving specialized individual instruction. 
Morning sessions focus on individual skill development 
including advanced stick skills, dodging, scoring, 
feeding, cutting and defensive skills. In the afternoon, 
emphasis is placed on game strategies, organized 
offenses, transition, defensive communication and 
specialty sessions. Evening sessions feature teamwork, 
game theories, full-field games and include special 
programs on sports psychology and conditioning. 

In addition, a specialty camp for advanced players ages 
4 through college, features intense sessions focused on 
shooting, goal-tending and defensive play. Call 
410-455-9520 or 301-314-4273 for information. 

Sasho Cirovski's Maryland 
Soccer Camp for Boys 

Maryland head coach Sasho Cirovski 
and assistant Jeff Rohrman offer their 
formula for success at a soccer camp 
for boys, ages 10-17, this summer. 
Designed to meet the individual 
needs of each player based on age 
and ability, the camp is based on a 
simple coaching principle: young 
people learn and develop skills most 
quickly and effectively when they are 
ha\ing fun. 

Learning exercises and functional 
training games are designed to teach 
indi\idual techniques, skills and tactics 
through creative and motiN'ating sessions 
in an environment of positive 
reinforcement and communication. Each 
player develops a better appreciation of 
how to run, play and think as a total 
soccer plaver. Sessions are open to 
residential and extended day camp>ers. 
For information, call 
410-740-1147 or 301-314-7005. 







Shannon Higgins-Cirovski's 
Maryland Soccer 
Camp 2000 for Girls 

Learning soccer one step at a time — while emphasizing 
the fundamentals — helps each camper at Maryland 
Soccer Camp 2000 reach her full potential. The camp 
gives female soccer players the opportunity to work 
with women who have been successful players and 
coaches at all levels throughout their careers. The goal is 
to have each player improve her soccer skills, 
techniques, strategies and tactics through individual 
training and challenging game competition. Emphasis 
also is placed on developing a winning attitude, 
enjoying the sport and making new friends. In addition, 
successful collegiate goalkeepers will teach campers 
their goal-tending methods and strategies. For 
information, contact the soccer office at 301-314-0330. 



Gina LaMandre's Maryland 
Softball Camp 

Maryland softball coach Gina LaMandre presents a 
one-week softball camp for young women ages 10-18. 
Learn effective offensive, defensive and pitching skills 
by using drills and competitive games that are helpful 
and motivating. Instruction meets the 
individual needs of campers based on 
their age and abilities. Scheduled for 
July 16-20, the camp has both 
overnight and commuter options. 
Fees and registration deadline have 
not yet been determined. For 
information, contact Rachel 
Lawson at 301-405-0521, email: 
rlawson@wam.iimd.edu or visit the 
Web site at wTvw.umterms.com 

Bill Goodman's Track 
and Field Camp 

Warm-ups, drUls, lead-ups and 
instruction on various track and 
field skills and events highlight 
Maryland track coach Bill 
Goodman's Track and Field Camp 



scheduled June 18 - 22. Goodman, whose Terrapin 
squads have won both Atlantic Coast Conference 
and IC4A championships, is assisted by his Maryland 
staff, including Dan Rincon, Roland Desonier and 
Donald Thomas. Desonier is a Track and Field Hall of 
Fame member and Thomas has worked with junior 
college programs that have produced five All-Americans 
and four JUCO championships. Goodman and his staff 
not only teach individual techniques and strategies, but 
also will provide the positive training environment 
necessary to being a competitive track and field athlete. 
Camp runs from 9 to 11:45 a.m. and 1 to 5 p.m. daily. For 
information, call 301-314-7457. 



Janice Kruger's Volleyball Camps 

Maryland volleyball coach Janice Kruger offers three 
summer camps providing individual specialization and 
team instruction. A one-week individual player and 
specialization camp (setter and hitter training) is 
scheduled for July 9 - 22, while a full team camp, 
available for groups of nine or more, begins August 6. 
Camps have both overnight and commuter options. 
Call 301-314-7114 for information. 




10 



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HOW B 



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SUMMER? 



Table of Contents 

Visiting Undergraduate 

Summer Student Application 2000 (2 pages) A 

Permission to Transfer Credits Form B 

Visiting Graduate 

Summer Student Application 2000 (2 pages) C 

Summer Course Registration Form D 

Registering through MARS Worksheet E 

Estimated Billing Form F 

Residence Halls Agreement Form (2 pages) G 

Summer Student Parking Registration Form H 







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Visiting Undergraduate Summer Student Application 2000 



UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND. COLLEGE PARK 

Please read the admissions intDrmalion on page A of the "Academic .Ser\ices" 
section of this guide to determine if you must complete this application. 

NOTE: Current University of Maryland, College Park students do not need 
to apply Tor summer admission. Current high school students should use a 
regular application for admission. 

There is a $45 non-refundable application processing fee (S65 for international 
students). Please attach a check or money order made payable to the 
University of Maryland. Write your Social Security number on your check or 
money order. Or. you may pay by credit card. 



U .S. Social Security Number 



Questions? Call 301-314-3572 or 1 -877-989-SPOC 



If you wish to use your credit card check one and fill in 
VISA f^l^Mt [J 



Customer Account Number 
Effective Dale 



Name on Card 
Your Signature 



Expiration Date_ 



Last Name 



First Name 



Middle Name 



Former La.st Name 



4) Permanent Address (Billing Address) 



5) Current (Local) Address 



Number and Street Address Apartment City State Zip Code 



Number and Street Address Apartment City State Zip Code 



County 



D"'" a 



Country 



Female 



Area Code and Telephone Number 



County Country 
6) E-mail Address 

8) r 



Area Code and Telephone Number 



m m 



MM D D 

Date of Birth 



Y Y 



9) Please check the appropriate box below: The information on this item is requested solely for the purpose of determining compliance with federal civil rights 
laws. Your response is completely voluntary and will not affect consideration of your application. By providing this information, you will assist us in assuring 
that this program is administered in a nondiscriminatory manner. 

D American Indian or Alaskan Native IJ Black ~ Asian or Pacific Islander Hispanic White D Other 



10) Are you a United States citizen? 
Country of birth 



Alien registration number . 



!Z Yes n No If no. please complete the follow ing: 

Country of Citizenship Type of visa_ 

Date issued Date of expiration. 



1 1 ) Please check one : 

D high school graduate 

D currently enrolled at another college/university 

D college/university graduate 

D Golden ID student 

12) Have you previously applied tor admission to the University of Maryland. College Park.' Zl Yes G No 
If yes. 

Type of Program: [i Undergraduate . Graduate 

TermA'ear Applied for: Dates of attendance, if applicable: 



13) List the high school from which you graduated. Also list the college or university you currently attend or last attended. 



Name of High School or GED 


City, Sute 


Attendance Dale 
Month and Year 


Graduation Dale 


Cumulauve GPA 








From 


Through 








1 1 1 


1 1 1 




College/University 




1 


1 


1 


1 


Ciedils Earned 


Graduation Dale 


Degree Oblained 



14) If you think you should be billed at in-state tuition rates, please complete page 2 of this form. 
(Complete signature line on page 2.) 

Page 1 of 2 

VISII out WEB SITE AI w w w u m d . « d u / s u m m • i A 



IN-STATE TUITION STATUS 

In-state tuition status is granted to applicants who demonstrate permanent Maryland state residency, or dependence on another person with permanent 
Maryland state residency. To be considered for in-state tuition status, every item on this page must be answered completely. Use N/A for any item that 
does not apply to your situation. The Office of Undergraduate Admissions may contact the applicant for a clarification or tor additional information if necessary. 

1, Name of applicant (student): 2. Social Security Number: - - 



3, Please check one: 

U a I am seeking to demonstrate financial dependence on a parent, court-appointed legal guardian, or spouse who is a permanent Maryland resident and who has either 

provided more than one half of my financial support tor the past twelve months or has claimed me as a dependent on his or her most recent income tax returns The person 

providing financial support is listed in item 4 and he or she (not the applicant) will answer Items 5 through IS. 
D b I am seeking to demonstrate financial independence and permanent residence in the state o( Maryland I have earned laxatjle income which covered one halt or more of 

my expenses for the past twelve months and I have not been claimed as a dependent on another persons most recent income lax returns. I (the applicant) will answer items 

4 through IS. 

4, Name Relationship to applicant 

If spouse, date of marriage If legal guardian, date of court appointment 



Permanent address City State 

Length of time at permanent address: Years Months (If less than 12 months, then provide previous address information,) 

Previous address City State 

Length of time at previous address: Years Months 

For items 5 through 14, the person named In Item 4 should checl< YES or NO tor each question and complete all blanks. Use N/A for any item that does not apply, 

YES NO N/A 

_^ ^ _ S. Are you a full-time active member of the U,S, Armed Forces? 

a. If yes, attach copy of most recent assignment orders and indicate dale of expected separation from the military 



b. If yes, are you stationed in Maryland or have you established Maryland as your home of residency? Yes __ No If yes, effective date . 

n n n 6. Are you a part-time (S0%) or full-time ■permanent" employee of a University System of Maryland institution? 
a. If yes, attach verification of permanent/regular employment. 

n D D 7. Are you a citizen of the United states? 

a. If non-citizen, type of visa b. Date visa issued c. Expiration dale of visa 



n 


D 


D 


D 


D 


D 


n 


D 



d. If permanent resident, alien registration number e. Date of issue f. Expires . 

D 8. Are all, or substantially all, of your possessions in Maryland? 

n 9. Are you registered to vote? 

a. If yes, in what state? b. Date of registration 



D 10. Do you possess a valid driver's license? 

a. If yes. in what state? b. Initial dale of issue c. Most recent date of issue . 



11. Do you own any vehicles? 

a. II yes, first vehicle's initial date of registration b. Most recent date of registration c. State of registration . 

d. If yes, second vehicle's initial date of registration e. Most recent date of registration f. State of registration . 



D n n 12, Have you paid Maryland state Income tax for the most recent year on all earned Income Including taxable Income earned outside of Maryland? 

a. Check the actual years you have tiled a Maryland state income tax return; 1999 1998 1997 

b. Check the actual years you have filed another state's income lax return: L_ 1999 . - 1998 . 1997 

c. If you did not file a tax return in Maryland for the most recent year, state reason(s): 



D D n 13, Is Maryland state Income tax currently being withheld from your pay? 

a. II no. state reason(s); 



Q D D 14. Do you receive any public assistance from a state or local agency other than one in the State of Maryland? 

a. If yes, please explain 



I certify that the information provided in items 3 through 14 is complete and correct. I understand that the University reserves the right to request additional information it 
necessary. In the event the University discovers that false or misleading information has been provided, the applicant may be billed by ttie University retroactively to recover 
the difference between in-state and out-of-state tuition for the current and subsequent semesters. 



Signature of person completing Items 4 through 14 
Questions? Call the Office of Residency Classification: (301) 40S-2030. 



Page 2 of 2 

VISIT OUR WEB SITE AT w w w . u m iJ . • d u / s u m m 1 1 A 



University of Maryland Permission t o Transfer C redits Form 

Student Name: 



Social Security No.: 
Street Address: 



City . State Zip 

Home Institution: 



Credit earned at the University of Maryland, College Park during Summer Sessiotis 2000 will be iransferrable to the student's 
home institution for the following course(s): 

Course 



Description 



Credit earned 



Grading Method: □ Regular □ Pass-Fail QAudit 

Advisor's Signature: Date: 

Institution: 



Department: 
Street Address: 



Cit>' State Zip 

Advisor's phone: E-mail: 



*This Jorm is for your personal use o)ily and should not be submitted to the University ofMaryland, College Park. 



Visiting Graduate Summer Student Application 2000 



UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND. COLLEGE PARK 



Questions? Call 1 -877-989-SPOC or 301-314-3572 



Are you claiming Maryland residency? yes no (If yes. complete the back of this application) 

Have you ever applied to our Graduate School before either as an Advanced Special or Degree Seeking Student? 

Do you qualify for the Golden ID fee waiver? yes no 

U.S. SOCIAL SECURITY NUMBER 



. no yes Year_ 



nnnsnnQnnnn 



EBB® 



SUMMER 2000 



Last Name 

Present Address: 



City 



stale or Country 



Worti Phone 
E-mail Address 



Please check one (see page X of the "Academic Services" section of the guide): 

Visiting Graduate Student 
J Institute Student 

_ ) Advanced Special Student: (check one) 
J a. Bachelor's Degree with 3.0 GPA 

b. Master's or Doctoral Degree 

c. Bachelor's Degree (4 yrs out) 

d. Test Scores, indicated below 

Golden ID Student 



Citizenship n U.S. J Non-U.S. 

Non-U. S. Citizens or Permanent Immigrants: 
Country of Citizenship 



City and Country of Birth . 
Type of Visa 



Permanent Alien Registration #_ 
Date of Issue 



This information is solely for the purpose of determining compliance with Federal civil rights law. Your response will not affect consideration of your application. 
Birthdate: / / D American Indian/Alaska Native _^ Hispanic . Asian/Pacific Islander 



Sex: HH Male iZi Female 



IZJ Black, not of Hispanic origin 



White 



List in chronological order all colleges, universities or other institutions of higher learning which you have attended, including the University of Maryland. 
An official transcript is required for Advanced Special Student status: an unofficial copy may be attached to expedite the summer registration process. Visiting gradu- 
ate student applicants must submit a letter of permission from their dean indicating they are in good standing and that UM credits will be accepted for transfer. 


Name of Institution 


Location 


From 


To 


Major 


Degree 


Date Awarded/ 
Expected 


Overall 
Average 



















































Has disciplinary action been initiated or taken against you at any of the institutions attended, including the University of Maryland? 
CH no L_j yes If yes, please attach a statement describing the incident and its resolution. 

Have you ever been indicted for, pleaded guilty to, or been found guilty of any criminal offense excluding minor traffic violations? 

!^ no l7 yes If yes. please attach a statement describing the incident and its resolution. 

If appropriate, please complete the following and have the testing agency send OFFICIAL test results to the Graduate School. If you have 
not taken the required examination, indicate when you plan to do so. Our institutional code is 5814 



(ORE) 


Date. 


(MAT) 


Date 


(GMAT) 


Date 


(TOEFL) 


Date 



VerbaL 
Score_ 
Score_ 
Score_ 



Quantitative. 



AnalyticaL 



Graduate Record General (Aptitude) 

Miller Analogies Test 

Graduate Management Admissions Test 

Test of English as a Foreign Language 

(A TOEFL score report must be submitted t>y all applicants whose native language is not English unless they have a degree from an accredited 
U.S. institution ol higher education) 

List any work and military experience (major categories and time periods only) for the past two years. 



F 

FS 

R 

lES 

GRAD 

SA 



Title 


Employer 


State 


From 


To 























Page 1 of 2 - 

VISIT out! WE8 SITE AT « w w u m d e d u / s u m m e i C 



MARYLAND RESIDENTS ONLY 

The following Information is used to determine your eligibility for in-stale status for admission and tuition purposes. The University reserves the right 
to request additional information if necessary. 

Yes No 

on 1. For the most recent 12 months, has another person(s) provided half or more than half of your support? 

2. Have you been or \n\\\ you be claimed as a dependent by another person(s) on Federal and/or state income tax returns 
for any of the following years? 1998 Dves D No 1999 G Yes D No 

3. If the answer to 1 and/or 2 is yes, indicate name of person who has provided financial support or is claiming you as a dependent. 
Name Relationship to applicant 



If you, the applicant, answered "NO" to questions 1 and 2, please complete the following. 

~ IN ALL OTHER CASES — 

The person listed In question 3 should complete the following. 

Yes No 

[_] LJ 4. Are you or your spouse a full-time resident of the U.S. Armed Forces? 

If yes, you may omit questions 5-16. Please attach a photocopy of most recent orders. 

CH CD 5. Current Residence 



Street Address 



Apt.# 



City 



County State Zip 



D C 6. Previous Residence 

Street Address Apt.# City 

[H CD 7. Do you own any property outside of Maryland? Date of acquisition 

If yes, for what purpose do you hold such property? 

n D 8. Are you a citizen of the United States? 

a. If non-citizen, type of visa 

d. If permanent resident, alien registration number . 

CD CD 9. Are you registered to vote? 

a. If yes, in what state/country? 



MflDA- P*D/Y 

(Dates Occupted) 



County State Zip 



b. Date visa issued , 



c. Expiration date of visa_ 

e. Date of issue f. Expires 



CD CD 10. Do you possess a valid driver's license? 
a. If yes, in what state was it issued? 

CD CD 1 1 . Do you own any motor vehicles? 

a. If yes, registered in what state? 



b. Date of original registration, 
b. Date of original issue 



b. Date of original registration. 



CD CD 12. Do you have the use of a motor vehicle in another person's name? 
If yes, indicate the name and relationship of person 



n n 13. Have you paid Maryland income tax for the most recent year on all earned income including all taxable income earned outside the stale? 

If no, please state reason . 

14. List actual years and states in which you have filed a tax return in the last 3 years 



, — , , — , (State/Country Tax Ysar) (Slate/Countiy Tax Year) (Stale/Counvy Tax Yta/) 

U LJ 15. If employed, is Maryland income tax being withheld? 

CD CD 16. Did you give a Maryland home address on most recent Federal and state tJix forms? 

CD CD 17. Do you receive any type of financial aid (loans, scholarships, grants) from a state other than Maryland? If yes, from which state? 

CD D 18. Do you receive any public assistance from a state or local agency other than one in the State of Maryland? 

a. If yes, please explain 



/ certify that the information submitted in this application is complete and accurate to the best of my knowledge. I agree to abide by the rules, 
policies and regulations of the University of Maryland if I am admitted as a student. 



Signature 



Date 



Application Processing Fee: 

A non-refun(Jable $50 processing fee must accompany this 
application. Make check or money order payable to the 
University of Maryland and write your Social Security number 
on your check or money order. Or, you may pay by credit card. 



If you wish to use your credit card, check one and fill in 



JI2 D ^^ 



Customer Account Number. 

Name on Card 

Effective Date 

Signature 



Expiration Date . 



- Page 2 of 2 • 



VISII OUK WEB SITE AI www u m d e d u / s u m 1 1 C 



Summer Course Registration Form 



Register on the Web 
http://www.umd.edu/su(nmer 



Register by phone 
MARS (301)403-0500 

See MARS /mrksheel on page ^ 



Currently enrolled students and newly-admitted students can register without completing a summer application. 

Maii-in registrations must be postmarked by May 26. 2000 for Sessions I and III, and by July 7, 2000 for Session II. 
Complete the entire form. Do not write in shaded areas. 



2000 Summer Sessions 

Checic all that apply: 

J Session I -i Session II -i Session III 

STAMP AND SIGNATURE 



^ 



MANDATOfTY FOfi STUDENTS 
ON ACADEMIC WARNING 
ORDtSMISSAl- '^m 



LAST NAME 


























FIRST NAME 














Ml 


















































1 1 1 1 





SOCIAL SECURITY NUMBER 



Were you registered at the University of Maryland. College Park during Spring Semester 2000? 

YES NO 
If NO: Please read admission information in this guide. 



( 



) 



STUDENT SIGNATURE 



DAYTIME PHONE NUMBER 



E-MAIL ADDRESS 



COURSE REQUEST: Complete this part with Information found in 
the Course Listing section of this guide. If MAILING this form, 
please provide alternate sections. 



vis COURSE REQUESTS: 

IN THIS 


^''l^ prefixInumbef 


Suffix- 


SECTION 


Grading 
Method 


Credit Waitlist 
Level Position 


mw\ 1 


. •*W\1P 


.b^S.^ 


\\P\W s.\ 


^1*^ 


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i 












f 














f 














. 


M 







ALTERNATE 

SECTIONS OR 

INDEX NUMBERS: 







































RESTRICTED COURSE 
AUTHORIZATION 



STAMP SIGNATURE 

m. 



^rSr^vsvTTt <>«i' 



MH 



*The suffix IS a letter and nol all courses have them 




ALL STUDENTS COMPLETE THIS SECTION: In the space below, list the course(s) you have requested. The lower part of this form 
must be validated by the Office of the Registrar and returned to you. It is your proof of registration. 









WAITLISTED SECTIONS 
AND POSITION: 


°0 auV^IML 

wW SECURITY* 1 


- — 1 


IN THIS 






SPACE 

4^ 


PREFIX NUMBER 


Suffix 


SECTION 


Grading 
Method 


Credit Waitlist 
Level ! Position 
















I 


/ 


/ 


/ 


















/ 


/ 


/ 
















/ 


/ 


/ 


















/ 


/ 


/ 
















' 


/ 


/ 


/ 
















i 


/ 


/ 


/ 




Students who register and later decide not to attend classes must CANCEL their registration PRIOR TO THE FIRST DAY OF 
CLASSES. Failure to do so will result in financial obligation even though the student does not attend classes. 



NAME 

ADDRESS 



CITY, STATE, ZIP 



jistration Verification and Signature: 



VISIT out WEB SHE AT w w w . u m d . e d u/s u m m « r D 



REGISTERING THROUGH MARS (Maryland Automated Registration System-Phone-ln) 



Use MARS for all schedule adjustments, such as 

adds, drops, grading method changes and credit level 

changes. 

MARS: (301) 403-0500 

MARS HELPLINE: (301) 314-1600 

When to Call Mars 

Summer Session I; Call MARS March 1-June 2 

Summer I Classes begin: June 5 

Summer Session II: Call MARS March 1-July 14 

Summer II Classes begin: July 17 

Summer Session III: Call MARS March 1-June 2 

Summer III Classes begin: June 5 

Hours of Operation 

Seven days a week: 7:30 a.m. - 10:45 p.m. 

HOWTO USE MARS 

1 . Select courses from this guide. Note section num- 
ber and INDEX NUMBER. The section number 
indicates during which summer session the course 
meets. Sections beginning with 01 meet during 
Summer Session I; those beginning with 02 during 
Summer Session II; those beginning with 03 during 



Summer Session III. The five digit INDEX NUM- 
BER is located to the right of the section num- 
ber in parentheses. The INDEX NUMBER is 
used to identify your course selection to MARS. 
Read course listings carefully Some courses 
are "BY PERMISSION ONLY." These courses 
require departmental approval. Contact the 
department offering the course prior to 
registration. 

2. Fill out the MARS Course Worksheet below with 
ACTION CODE and INDEX NUMBER informa- 
tion. ACTION CODES tell the computer what 
you want to do — for example, add, drop or list 
courses. ACTION CODES are listed under the 
course worksheet form. 

3. Pay tuition and fees. Registration is not final until 
tuition and fees have been paid. See important 
payment information on pages 15 and 16 of the 
"Academic Services" section of this guide. 
Failure to pay by the date specified on your bill 
may jeopardize your continued enrollment. 



WORDS FROM MARS 

There may be penods of silence during your call to 
MARS. This IS normal and occurs when informa- 
tion is being verified or processed DO NOT HANG 
UP Wait for the next set of instnjctions. 
Accidental termination of call. If you are acciden- 
tally cut off from MARS before you complete your 
request, recall the system. You will be registered for 
transactions processed pnor to termination. 
Cancellation of Registration. See page 12 of the 
"Academic Services" section of this guide for can- 
cellation deadlines and information. 
PIN - Personal Identification Numt)er. PINs 
have been assigned to all eligible students. If you 
misplace, forget or feel the confidentiality of your 
PIN has been jeopardized, you can request a new 
number at the Registration Information Counter, 
first floor, Mitchell Building. You will need to provide 
photo identification. 
Quesfions? Call (301) 314-8240. 
WAITLISTING WITH MARS 
See pages 12 and 13 of the "Academic Services" 
section of this guide. 




TO REGISTER FOR COURSES, FOLLOW STEPS 1 - 8 

1. Before processing your registration, fill in the boxes below, one course per line. Each course selection is identified in the Course Listing by a unique 
5-digit INDEX NUMBER (to the right of the section number). Be prepared with alternate selections. Note that MARS will not allow you to register for 
any time conflicts. 

2. Call MARS 301-403-0500 (from campus call 9-301-403-0500). 

3. Select Registration Activities from the MARS main menu (Option 1). '^^^t^^Pfl A ^^ ^T 

4. Select Registration/Schedule Adjustment from the Registration Activities menu (Option 1). tm "f y 1/ \| 1.^ 

5. Enter your student ID number (usually your Social Security number) - - 

6. Enter your PIN (Personal Identification Number) 

7. Add courses to your schedule by pressing 2, the INDEX NUMBER of the course and #. 

ACTION INDEX NUMBER COURSE SECTION DAYS TIMES 

COURSE 

U 1} 

U 1} 

U 1] 

U ll 

U 1] 

U 1] 

8. Press # after entering your transactions. This # signals the computer to process your requests. 

ACTION CODES FOR REGISTRATION/SCHEDULE ADJUSTMENT 

Action Codes are accessed by pressing the corresponding button on the telephone keypad. 

ADD A COURSE: 1=Regular 2=Pass/Fail 3=Audit 4=Satisfactory/Fail 

2 INDEX NUMBER ## OR 4## to list courses with grading method 
DROP A COURSE: CHANGE CREDIT LEVEL: 

3 INDEX NUMBER ## (Limited to variable credit level courses) 
OR 3## , MARS will list your courses and prompt you to press 8 INDEX NUMBER * NUMBER OF CREDITS ## 
1 to drop or to continue (Example: 2 credits=02) 
CHANGE GRADING METHOD: OR 8## to list courses with credit levels 
(Limited to variable grading method courses) '-'^''" ^O^'' SCHEDULE: 

4 INDEX NUMBER * GRADING METHOD ## 5**** 

WAITLIST FEATURE: 

7## 



VISII OUR WEB SITE AT * w w . u m d . e d u/ s u m m e r E 



Summer 2000 Estimated Billing Form 



APPLICATION PROCESSING FEE FOR NEW STUDENTS 

(See definition in the "Academic Services" section of this guide. 
Undergraduate U.S. Citizen $45 

Undergraduate International Student $65 
Graduate U.S. Citizen $50 

Graduate International Student $50 



Amount due: 



Undergraduate Tuition — 

Resident $174 per credit 
Non-resident $280 per credit 



Graduate Tuition — 

Resident $278 per credit 

Non-resident $380 per credit 



SESSION I, SESSION III OR SESSION I AND III COMBINED 

Mandatory fees to be included: Student services - $105, Building recreation - $21. 
Credit hour charges below include all required mandatory fees. 



Credit hours 


1 


2 


3 


4 


5 


6 


7 


8 


9 


10 


AMOUNTS 


Undergraduate Resident 


300 


474 


648 


822 


996 


1170 


1344 


1518 


1692 


1866 




Undergraduate Non-resident 


406 


686 


966 


1246 


1526 


1806 


2086 


2366 


2646 


2926 




Graduate Resident 


404 


682 


960 


1238 


1516 


1794 


2072 


2350 


2628 


2906 




Graduate Non-resident 


506 


886 


1266 


1646 


2026 


2406 


2786 


3166 


3546 


3926 





Subtotal: 



SESSION II 

Mandatory fees to be included: Student services - $105, Building recreation - $21. 
Credit hour charges below include all required mandatory fees. 



Credit hours 


1 


2 


3 


4 


5 


6 


7 


8 


9 


10 


AMOUNTS 


Undergraduate Resident 


300 


474 


648 


822 


996 


1170 


1344 


1518 


1692 


1866 




Undergraduate Non-resident 


406 


686 


966 


1246 


1526 


1806 


2086 


2366 


2646 


2926 




Graduate Resident 


404 


682 


960 


1238 


1516 


1794 


2072 


2350 


2628 


2906 




Graduate Non-resident 


506 


886 


1266 


1646 


2026 


2406 


2786 


3166 


3546 


3926 





Maryland English Institute - see page X of the "Academic Services" 
section of this guide for fees. 

LATE REGISTRATION FEE (if applicable): $20 per session 



SPECIAL FEES/OTHER CHARGES (specify) 
See page X of the "Academic Services" 
section of this guide for fees. 



ON-CAMPUS HOUSING FEE 

One six-week session or Sessions I and III jointly 
Sessions I and II jointly 
Three-week Session III only 
Eight-week course 

CAMPUS PARKING FEE 

Commuter $19 

Resident $35 

Social Security Number - - 



692.28 

1,384.56 

346.14 

923.04 



Subtotal: 
Amount due: 

Amount due: 



Amount due: 
Subtotal: 



Subtotal: 



Amount due: 
TOTAL AMOUNT DUE: $ 



Make check/money order payable 
to the University of Maryland. 

Write the student's Social Security 
number on the check/money order. 



1/11/00 



If you wish to pay by credit card, please fill in: 



Expiration date 



Customer account number 
Name on card 



.Signature . 



SUMMER 2000 RESIDENCE HALLS AGREEMENT 



[.AST NAME, FIRST NAME, MI 



J htMALt 

□ male 



STUDENT ID No. 



HOME ADDRESS 



Are you a Graduate student? 

Do you want consideration for a single room? 

Do you smoiic? 

Do you object to a roommate who smokes? 

Roommate Preference: 



□ yes 


□ 


□ yes 


u 


Uyes 


u 


Uyes 


u 



STUDENT ID# 



CITY 



STATE 



ZIP CODE 



DO YOU LIVE IN UM RESIDENCE HALLS NOW? 

LJ no LJ yes 

Room and Hall 

Additional $108 enclosed solely by current on-campus resident in order 
to request campus housing from end ol finals in May to start of 
Summer Session 1. Subject to Resident Life approval and according to 
"interim occupancy" procedures. The deadline to add interim is May 
1'), 2000. 

Q ves G no 



DATES OF OCCUPANCY/PAYMENT 

Li Session I only: June 4 - JiJy 14 

$692.28 ($666 housing + $26.28 telecom) 

L] Session II only: July 16 - August 25 

$692.28 ($666 housing + $26.28 telecom) 

LJ Session III: June 4 - June 23 

$346.14 ($333 housing + $13.14 telecom) 

G Sessions I & II: June 4 - August 25 

$1,384.56 ($1,332 housing + $52.56 telecom) 

LJ 8-week course: June 4 - July 28 

$923.04 ($888 housing + $35.04 telecom) 

LI Maryland English Institute: June 1 1 - August 4 
$923.04 ($888 housing + $35.04 telecom) 



HOME PHONE 



I understand that 1 am obligated to accept summer 
residence halls housing and resident telecommuni- 
cation services upon Resident Life's receipt of this 
Agreement. I have read, understand and will abide 
by all Terms and Conditions of On-Campus 
Summer Housing. 



STUDENT SIGNATURE 



BIRTH DATE 



PARENT SIGNATURE 

(if student is under 18 years of age) 



FOR OFFICE USE 



occu- 
registrants: 



TERMS AND CONDITIONS OF ON-CAMPUS SUMMER HOUSING 

When the Agreement is signed by the student and confirmed by the University, this Agreement 
provides the student with the opportunity to live in a University summer residence hall, sub- 
ject to all terms stated below. I'he student is also subject to responsibilities and processes set 
forth in the Code of Student Conduct, Undergraduate and/or Graduate Catalog, Summer 
Sessions Catalogue, and other relevant University documents. 

I. PARAMETERS OF THE AGREEMENT 

ELIGIBILITY. Individuals must be single students without dependents at the College Park 
Campus. No provisions are made for spouses or family members. 

OCCUPANCY PERIODS. Housing may be requested for Session 1 only. Session 11 only, 
Session 111 only, both Sessions 1 and II. and 8-week classes and MEl classes. S 
pancy is available from June 4. 2000 to "^pm August 25, 2000 lor Session I and 
from June 4, 2000 to 7pm July 14. 2000 for Session 1 only registrants; from June 4, 2000 to 
7pm June 23, 2000 for Session HI only; from July 16, 2000 to 7pm August 25, 2000 for ses- 
sion II registrants; from June 4, 2000 to 7pm July 28. 2000 for 8-week registrants; from June 

I I, 2000 to 7pm August 4, 2000 for MEl registrants. Housing priority will be given in the 
following order (I) Session 1 and II registrants, (2) 8-week registrants, (3) Session I only or 
Session 11 only registrants, and (4) Session III only registrants 

LIABILITY. The University cannot and does not assume responsibility for personal accident, 
injury, or illness sustained by residents, guests or visitors, nor for the damage, theft, or loss of 
personal property. The student releases the University, its officers, agents and employees from 
any liability on account of any accident, injury, illness, property, damage, theft, or loss. The 
University recommends that students obtain private insurance against such harm or loss. 

II. UNIVERSITY SERVICES 

The University will provide the following services on a continual basis, although interruptions 
may be necessitated by an act of God, an order of a University/civil authority, limited or restrict- 
ed control or availability of resources as determined by the University, maintenance activities, 
or other condition that is reasonably beyond administrative control. Services are provided in 
accordance with standards and levels of service determined by the University. It is the expeaa- 
tion of the University that services will be available and uninterrupted and that any disruption 
of .services vital to the health and safety of residents will be restored within a reasonable amount 
of time. 

The residential and telecommunication facilities are provided as services to students and are 
unique to the University environment, rherelore, the relationship between the student and the 
University is not a landlord/tenant relationship; rather this Agreement is a license to use certain 
facilities for a particirlar period of time. 

ASSIGNMENT OF BUILDING AND ROOM. Resident Life docs not discriminate in 
room or hall a.ssignments on the basis of race, color, religion, or national origin. Except for 
cases that involve disciplinary action, summer housing does not affca an individual's request 
for housing in any subsequent academic term. 

Available accommodations normally are in apartments (include kitchen and dining area) and, 
if necessary, suites (no kitchens, no ctraking permitted). Individuals assigned to suites must 
maintain an approved meal program, as determined by the Department of Dining Services, for 
the ftil! period of assignment to a suite. 

Available spaces, especially singles, in each building type arc limited. lo .assure that these spaces 



are assigned as equitably as possible, all completed Agrrrmrna received with payment in (iill to 
the Office of the Bursar by the published priority deadline will be submitted in a lottery draw- 
ing for building and room types. Agreements received after the priority deadline will be con- 
sidered on a first-come, first-served basis for existing vacancies. 

UTILITIES AND HOUSEKEEPING. The University will provide heat, water, dectridQr, 
and waste disposal ser\'ice5. The University will remove trash from dcsigrutcd areas and will 
clean common hallways and public areas on a scheduled basis. 

FURNISHINGS. The University will provide each resident: bed, mattress, dresser, desk and 
chair set, telephone line and data line. The University will provide each student rcx>m with win- 
dow blinds, closet(s), window screen, and smoke detector. 

REPAIRS. The University will make all repairs and perform maintenance in the residence hall 
and the resident's room with authorized personnel. Repairs to the room or University furnish- 
ings will occur upon request or in accordance with routine schedules. Repairs and maintenance 
activities shall be conduaed under a system of priority scheduling. 

TELECOMMUNICATIONS. The University provides (at a standard, 6-week charge) tele- 
phone service for each resident. On-campus phone calls may be made by residents with no 
additional charge. Local and long distance service may be arranged by the student on a private 
basis, and additional charges for these services shall be paid for by the resident. 

III. RESPONSIBILITIES OF RESIDENTS 

CARE OF FACILITIES. ( 1 ) The resident accepts responsibility and agrees to be held account- 
able for his/her actions, for the actions of his/her gucst(s). and the proper use and care of the 
residential facilities, assigned space, common areas, and University property. The resident also 
agrees to repon prompdy any interruptions of service or needed repairs. (2) The resident agrees 
to take reasonable action to protea residential facilities and property from wanton, reckless or 
negligent damage; retrain from encouraging or participating in aaivities which cause danuge: 
report damages; and assist the Univcrsirv in idcntifting individuals responsible lor damage, theft 
or loss. (3) The resident, at the time of check-out from the residence hall, will letum the 
assigned space and its University' furnishings in the same condition as they were received, with 
the exception of reasonable wear and tear. (4) The resident assumes responsibility for the appro- 
priate use of safet)' and security hardware (e.g., locks, smoke deteaor) within his/her assigned 
residence hall space and building, and will immediately report loss ol assigned key<s) or mal- 
functioning hardware. 

CONDUCT. ( 1 ) The resident shall condua himself/herself in a manner which promotes a 
courteous, safe, and secure residence hall and dining ensironmcnt. The resident understands 
that his/her fwhavior should be conducive to the punuit of academic goals, as well as individ- 
ual and community development and welfare. (2) The resident shall ensure that his/her room- 
mate(s) will have access to and equitable use ol the assigned space. (3) Rules and regulatioTU 
are intended to promote the safety and well-being of residents. Thc>' include but are not lim- 
ited to prohibitions against: cooking elements; flammable materials; wrapons and fire-crackers; 
unauthorized modifications of assigned space; pets; duplication and transfer of L niversity keys; 
disruptive/destructive behavior behavior such is indmidaiion or harassment which thrcaiciu 
the property, safety, security, health, or well-being of others; improper use of fire/ safety or build- 
ing security equipment; and threats to or interference «ith University staff in the pafuiiiiatKC 
of their duties. Violation of rules and regulatioiu can consritute grounds for termifuaon of this 
Agreement. (4) When it is determined by Resident Life that a student has violated State or 
Federal laws and/or University nJes and regulations, and when such condua 
indicates that the student constitutes a threat to the safny. health, or wril-bcing 
of community members or of himself/herself disciplinary and/or administrative 
action, including terminauon of this Agrremmi. may be taken. 



HOW TO RESERVE RESIDENT LIFE ON-CAMPUS SUMMER HOUSING 



CAREFULLY REVIEW the terms .iiul Kiiuliiions uirIli which housing is offered. I hese arc in ilic Summer Residence Halls 
Agreement below and on the reverse. 

COMPLETE the Agreement form on the reverse and sign your name, print your age and the current date where 
requested. Do not complete the Agreement form if you will be working this summer for the University's Resident Life 
or Residential Facilities departments; separate procedures apply for these employees. 

DETACH the Agreement form at the dashed line. 

KEEP the text below for your records and information. 

SUBMIT the Agreement, with payment in full, to the Office of the Bursar. Agreements received by April 14 will have priority 
consideration for single rooms, roommate preferences, other assignment preferences. Agreements received after April 14 will be 
assigned in their date-received order. 

NOTICE of your assignment will be mailed 7-10 days before the start of your Summer Session classes. 

HOW TO RESERVE RESIDENT LIFE ON-CAMPUS SUMMER HOUSING Students who sign up for Session III only 
will not be guaranteed an assignment to an on-campus apartment. 



USE OF/CHANGE OF ASSIGNED SPACE. (1 ) The resident agrees that a change of assign- 
ment may be made only with the written approval of Resident Life in accordance with estab- 
lished room change procedures. Requests which are based upon consideration of race, color, 
religion, or national origin cannot be honored. (2) The resident agrees: (a) to live only in the 
space to which he/she has been officially assigned; (b) not to sublet or otherwise use or grant 
use of the assigned space, residence hall common areas, or grounds for any unauthorized pur- 
pose; and (c) not to sell, solicit, or conduct a business enterprise therein without the written 
permission of Resident Life's Assignment Office. (3) If a vacancy occurs in the assigned room, 
the remaining residentCs) agrees to follow established procedures for the reassignment of anoth- 
er student to that space. (4) When vacating an assigned space, the resident must complete 
established check-out procedures. (5) Resident Life reserves the right to move a resident from 
one space to another in order to: (a) meet its responsibilities to student health, safety, and well- 
being; (b) maintain, operate, or renovate facilities; (c) reassign rooms to students of the oppo- 
site sex; or (d) consolidate groups of residents for reasons of security or closing a portion of a 
residence hall. 

GUESTS. A guest may stay in the assigned space only witli the concurrence of the room- 
mates(s) and for no more than three consecutive nights. Resident Life may invoke limitations 
of the guest privileges. Guest(s) must abide by established University/Resident Life regulations. 

SAFETY AND SECURITY. The resident agrees to take primary responsibility for his/her own 
saiety and .security and tor the safety and security of his/her residence hall community. The 
University and Resident Life will work cooperatively with residents to promote a safe and secure 
environment. The resident agrees to read and abide by security policies and precautions stated 
in University publications. 

rv. ADMINKSTRATIVE PROCEDURES 

ROOM ENTRY, INSPECTION, AND PROPERTY REMOVAL. (1) The University 
reserves the right to enter rooms for purposes of (a) improvements; (b) inspection and mainte- 
nance; (c) recovery of University/Statc-owned property which is not authorized for use in the 
assigned space; (d) fire and safety inspeaion; and (e) actions necessary to insure the safety, 
health and general welfare of the resident or others and/or the protection ot University or stti- 
dent property. (2) A resident's request for maintenance and repair constitutes his/her consent 
for room entry. While entry without notice may be necessary, attempts will be made to pro- 
vide prior notification whenever feasible. (3) The University respects the resident's right to pri- 
vacy within his/her room. When entry or inspection is required, reasonable consideration will 
be given. (4) The University reserves the right to remove and dispose ol any personal proper- 
ty remaining in a room following (a) termination or expiration of this Agreement, (b) the resi- 
dent's separation by/from the University, and/or (c) the date the resident officially checks out 
of the room. A charge for costs incurred by such removal may be assessed to the resident. 

LIABILITY FOR DAMAGES. (I) The student will be assessed charges for damage, loss or 
special service (e.g., cleaning) due to misuse or abuse of his/her assigned space and the State 
property contained therein. When the assigned residence hall space is shared, and where the 
responsible siudent(s) fails to assume responsibility, an equal portion of the charges will be 
assessed to each occupant. (2) lndividual{s) identified as being responsible for damage, theft, 
loss, or special service (whether intention;tl or negligent) in common areas of the residential 
facilities will be assessed the cost of repair, replacement or restoration. 

(3) When individual responsibility cannot he determined, and where deemed necessary by 
Resident Life, residents may be held collectively responsible for damage, theft, loss, or special 
service to the common areas or to University property within the residential facility. 

RELEASE FROM AGREEMENT PRIOR TO CLAIMING SERV1CF.S. The University 
will release an individual from this AgrremrnI prior to the date services may be claimed, with- 
out the itidi\idual uKiirring any financial obligation, when written notice signed by the indi- 



vidual is received by Resident Life Assignments Office on or before May 10, 1959 for Session 
lorJune2l, 1999 for Session II. If notice is received after these dates, and before services are 
claimed at check-in (i.e., keys issued), the individual, regardless of his/her Univcrsiiy status ai 
the date of release from this Agreement, will be charged as follows: 



RELEASE FEES 



NOTICE FOR SESSION I* 



NOTICE FOR SESSION H 



BY 
May 8 

May 9-15 
May 16-22 
May 28-May 29 
No-show/No notice 
to Resident Life 



AMOUNT 

$0.00 

$54 

$108 

$162 

$216 



BY 

June 19 
June 20-26 
June 27-July 3 
July 4-10 

No-show/No notice 
to Resident Life 



AMOUNT 

SO.OO 

$54 

$108 

$162 

$216 



'8-wcek classes that begin on May 29 arc subjea to the same cancellation dates and fees as 
Session I. Cancellations from MEl registrants must be received by .May 24 to avoid the 

charec structure shown above. 



Requests for release from this Agreement must be made in writing and direaed specifically to 
Resident Life Assignments Oflfice, 2100 AnnapolU Hall. NOTICE TO AM' OTHER UNI- 
V'ERSITY OFFICE WILL NOT ENSURE RELEASE. 

FAILURE TO CLAIM SERVICES. WTien an individual (1) fails to properiy daim the 
assigned space and has not secured release from this Agreement prior to the deadline for claim- 
ing services, or (2) fails to notify' the Resident Life Assignments Office of delas-ed arrival hv 1 2 
noon on the first University-scheduled class day of the summer session lor within "2 hours of 
the receipt of assignment if assignment is made after the first class day). Resident Life will ter- 
minate this Agreement, and the individual, regardless of his/her University status, will be 
charged an amount equal to two weeks' housing fee. 

RELEASE AFTER CLAIMING SERVICES. Resident Ufi wUl release an individual from 
this Agreement after services are claimed without the individual incurring any fifundal oblig- 
ation beyond charges asstxriated with occupancy when Resident Lifi: has received proof from 
the student of withdrawal from all summer sessions course work. 

TERMINATION OF AGREEMENT. Resident Life may terminate this Amement at any 
time and require the individual to forfeit the assigned space when (1) it is detemiined that 
information ftirnished by the individual or parent/guardian for the purpose of obtaining resi- 
dence hall services is substantially incomplete, misleading, or false in whole or in nan. (2) it is 
determined that an individual, for whaiocr reason, is not eligible to reside in the building; (3) 
it is determined that the student has violated housing rules, and may also be deiiicd contin- 
ued access to any University residential facility, or (4) University fiidlitics are found to be inad- 
equate in number or ph\-sical condition. 

CREDITS /WD REFUNDS. Release from this Agiremeni must be secured by Resident Lifi: 
Assignments office before any approved credit of housing or telecommunication liees may be 
initiated. Appropriate housing and telecommunication charges are assessed for services from 
the week during which services must be claimed through the wrek during which check-out is 
completed. Failure to check out by the approved date will decrease the amount of credit. No 
credit is approved if check-out occurs during the last three weeks of each session or if the occu- 
pana' period is three weeks or less. Refund, if due, must be requested in writing from the 
Office of the Bursar 



STUDENT PARKING REGISTRATION INFORMATION 
SUMMER SESSION ONLY 

Prior to purchasing a summer session parking permit, returning students who already have purchased a permit during 
the 1999-2000 academic year should first check the expiration date of their pennit. Annual permits purchased during 
the Fall Semester 1999 and permits purchased in the Spring Semester 2000 have an expiration date of 
August 30, 2000. 

Note — all student parking permits, regardless of the lot designation shown on the front of the permit, are valid in 
parking area(s) 1,2,4,11,16 and Stadium Drive Garage (SDG) from June 5, 2000 through August 30, 2000. 
Students who do not have a permit should read the following instructions before completing the application form. 

1 . Please use pen/ink only. 

2. Parking registration fees are not refundable. 

3. You may not register for a parking permit in your name for another person. 

4. You will be issued one permit which may be transferred to other vehicles. Applicants who have a vehicle with a 
canvas top or who have a motorcycle may choose to register one of these vehicles by indicating this on the 
application. You will receive a decal for this vehicle. If you need to register a third vehicle you will have to pay the 
full summer school parking registration fee. 

5. You must select to have either your permit mailed to your home address or to pick up your permit at the 
Department of Campus Parking (DCP) office. Regardless of your selection, permits will not be mailed or made 
available for pickup until May 17, 2000. If you do not make a selection then the permit will be mailed to you. 
You must allow three working days to process your application. The last day the DCP can mail your permit is 
May 22, 2000 for Summer Session I and III and July 3, 2000 for Summer Session II. 

6. All persons associated with the university including those displaying a State disabled permit or tag must still purchase 
and display a DCP hanging permit for the current year. 

7. The parking fee is $19 for commuter students and $35 for resident students. Note your request on the 
Estimated Billing Form. 

8. Please complete all sections of the application. Sign, date, cut out and submit the application with your other 
forms to: SPOC, 1101 MitcheU Building, CoUege Park, MD 20742 

The DCP office is located on the lower level of Regents Drive Garage. From Route 1 , enter the campus via the main 
gate on Campus Drive. Follow to the traffic circle, where the "M" is located, and turn right onto Regents Drive. The 
garage is one block down on the left side and there are fi-ee 15-minute meters in front of the office. If the meters are 
unavailable you must park at and pay a meter in the Regents Drive Garage. 

If you have any parking-related questions, please contact DCP at (301) 314-7275. 



APPLICATION FOR 
STUDENT PARKING REGISTRATION 

Summer Sessions Parking Permit 

UM Student ID Number 



□ MAIL 



PICK UP 



Will you live on campus? 

□ Yes No 

Initials Student's Last Name 

DD 



OFFICIAL USE ONLY 



YEAR 
99 



Qass 
Code 



PERMIT NUMBER 













Amount 




Gate Card # 





























Expires 8/30/00 or 



STUDENTS— DO NOT WRITE IN THIS AREA 



Local or Campus Housing Address 



Important — F>lease iNDiwt if vouwiu k 

USING ONE OF THESE T»PES Of VtHKlIS. 

Motofcydf ~ "leep" type of veliide 
(canvas lop) or conveitiUe 
Your are required und«r penalty to indicate your 
correct class standing. You must have successhdy 
completed the numtjer of credits listed 

QRCLE ONE: CODE 

Freshman (0-27 credits) F 

Sophomore (28-55 credits) H 

As a condition of receiving a University of Maryland, College F^rk. parking permit, I hereby agree to abide lunior (56-85 credits) J 

by the existing parking regulations. All vehicles park at owner's risk. The University of Maryland Senior (86 credits) S 



City 



State ZIP 



is in no way responsible for damage to vehicle or contents. 



Signature 



Local phone number 



Graduate Student C 

Univ. College U 

Golden 10 P 

Oass UnknoMi P 




SUMMER GUIDE 
USER SURVEY 

W/n a FREE summer coursel 

Your completed questionnaire will be entered 
into a drawing for a FREE summer 2000 course 
or program of your choice worth up to $1 ,000 
or more. The drawing will be at the Maryland 
Day celebration on campus, April 29. 

Submit your completed questionnaire now\ 

We're trying to make the Summer Guide more 
helpful, easy-to-use and enjoyable, and we 
need your input to tell us how we're doing. 
Please take a few minutes to complete this 
questionnaire so we can continue to improve 
the Guide. Drop your completed question- 
naire in the mail — no postage necessary. 

CONTEST RULES: Contest winner, to be 
selected from all completed questionnaires, 
may select one undergraduate course, gradu- 
ate course, or noncredit program offered in 
Summer 2000. Tuition only will be paid, 
excluding all other charges. If winner selects a 
credit course, he/she must satisfy all individ- 
ual requirements for course enrollment, and 
be academically eligible to enroll in the 
course. University of Maryland employees are 
not eligible. Winner must be at least 16 years 
old. One entry per person No cash will be 
paid In lieu of tuition. 



Thank You! 



lust tear out and drop in the mail! 



1 what type of courses or programs are you interested in? 

credit courses children's programs or camps any or all programs 

international enrichment other 

2 Which sections of the Guide did you use. and how helpful did you find each section? 



Very 


Somewhat 


Nor TOO 


NC3T HELPFUL DiO NOT USE 


HELPfUL 


HELPFUL 


Helpful 


AT ALL 


Academic Services 


a 


Q 


□ 


Q Q 


Campus Services 


3 


□ 


3 


3 3 


Course Listings 


J 


J 


J 


J J 


International 


J 


J 


J 


J J 


Kids and Camps 


3 


3 


3 


J J 


Noncredit/spec events 


3 


Q 


3 


3 3 


Forms 


3 


□ 


3 


3 3 


3 How convenient was 


It for you to find the informat 


on you needed in (he Cu 


Very convenient 




Somewhat convenient 


Not too convenient 




Not at 


all convenient 



4 Were you able to hnd everything you looked for in the Guide'' yes no 

( 1/ MO. please explain ) 

5 How visually attractive did you find the Guide? 

Very attractive _Somewhat attractive _Not too attraaive _Not at all attractive 

Please explain^^ 

6 Please describe your current educational status _U Md College Park student 

Student at another college or university High school student 

_Former U Md College Park student _Not currently m school 

7 Please provide the following information This is voluntary and will not be shared, 
but we will need to contact you if you win the free course 

Name . 

Address 



Phone 

E-mail 

Summer 2000 3/2000 









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m^ 







Air-Conditioning 

Alignment 

Batteries 

Brakes & ABS 

CV Boots & Joints 

Custom Wlieels 

Exhaust & Emissions 

Electrical 

Fuel System 

Heating & Cooling 

Lighting 

Oil & Filter Change 

Scheduled Maint. 

Shocks/Struts 

Starting & Charging 

State Inspection 

Steering 

Suspension 

Tire Repair 

Transmission Maint 

Wheel Balancing 

Wiper Blades 



^MKCHELIIU 



BFC€iodrich 



KumtmtM 



amaceswne 



MERCHAlSrS 



TIRE & AUTO CENTERS 



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Thrust Angle reg. price S49.95. 
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Not valid with other offers. With coupon through 5J3V00. 



Drain & fill radiator with 
up to 1 gallon antifreeze. 
Oil & filter up to 5 qrts. 
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$2g9S 

Compare at *79** 



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IRELLI. 



COLLEGE PARK 

8152 Baltimore Avenue, 301-345-5236 

-haOO-MERCHANTS (637-2426) 



Access your worl< history online! 

www.merchantst' 



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p^lVYLAltfo o^Y 2OOO 




free! 



im^ct 



APRIL 29, 2000 



10-5 



The University of Maryland opens 

its doors to the community. Bring 

your family to College Park for a i.ivt «•'"'*' 

day of fun and learning " e m n str «ti ons 

for all ages. 



www.maryland.edu 



HANDS-ON WORKSHOPS 

SPORTS cLimcs 



/<Br U NM \' E R S I T Y OF 

W MARYLAND