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Full text of "The Sunday School anniversary"

SUNDAY SCHOOL 



ANNIVERSARY 




BY 

ERNEST 
H. HAYES 



METHODIST SUNDAY SCHOOL DEPARTMENT 
LUDGATE CIRCUS HOUSE, LONDON, E.G. 4. 

Price - Fourpence. 



"Anniversary Hymns that are 
different and better " says the 

Rev. J. ARNOLD QUAIL. M.A., B.D. 

' These eight selections from School Worship each consist 
of twelve or thirteen or in one case fifteen numbers, of 
which both words and music in both notations are clearly 
printed on good paper, making them pleasant to handle and 
easy to use. 

And the very cheap price of each set with music is 3d. net, 
words only being 2s. per hundred net. What strikes one in 
going through these hymns is that in respect of both words 
and music they are vastly different. One breathes a purer air 
and moves in another world. 

There is nothing in any of these hymns or tunes of which 
any teacher, superintendent, choirmaster or organist, however 
highly cultured and sensitive, need be in the least ashamed, 
or fearful lest it injure the tender souls or debase the unformed 
taste of the children to whom it is taught. 

The language is correct and chaste, the themes are dignified 
and the music is competent and worthy. They excel in the 
direction of variety, for within each selection the numbers 
are so pleasantly varied and contrasted in theme, metre and 
general effect, and as between the eight selections there is 
such variety too, that between them they appeal to a very wide 
range of tastes and requirements. Schools of every size 
and sort which are seeking something different and better for 
the anniversary, may hope to find it here." 



The set of Eight Selections will be sent on approval to any 
Sunday School Officer, post free, on request to METHODIST 
SUNDAY SCHOOL DEPARTMENT, LUDGATE CIRCUS HOUSE, 
LONDON, E.G. 4. 



THE 

SUNDAY SCHOOL 
ANNIVERSARY/ 

BY 

ERNEST H. HAYES 



Author of 

" THE CHILD IN THE MIDST," " THE CONCISE GUIDES.' 
" THE PIONEER SERIES," ETC. 



This booklet has been compiled in collaboration 
with a Committee of the Council of Christian 
Education,, and the author has thereby had the 
benefit of the suggestions of a group of Sunday- 
School Leaders of wide experience. 

i 



CONTENTS 

PAGE 

I THE AIM AND THE PLAN .... 3 

II THE ANNIVERSARY PREACHER ... 6 

III THE ANNIVERSARY SERVICES ... 7 

IV THE ANNIVERSARY AFTERNOON . . .11 

V IDEAS FOR WEEK-EVENINGS . . . . 13 

VI SHORT LIST OF PLAYS 18 

VII SPECIMEN PROGRAMMES, ETC. . . .19 



Made and Produced in Great Britain by 
Bertram Johnson, Ltd., Wellington, Surrey 




IT is surely a very wise step for every school to 
consider well in advance what is the real object 
in holding the Anniversary, as well as to dis- 
cuss the general plan that will best achieve that object. 
It needs no arguing that if we aim at everything in 
general we shall hit nothing in particular ; therefore 
a clear-cut aim is necessary. 

Too often one looks through anniversary programmes 
in vain for any indication that this annual celebration 
will be of any real permanent value. Too often the 
idea seems to be merely to have a good time, or to get 
a record collection, and nothing more. Yet, if the 
anniversary is worth holding at all, it should mark a 
turning-point in the work of the school and leave a 
permanent improvement behind it. 

We suggest that the aim and object of the anniversary 
is to provide a red-letter day for the children, a time 
of inspiration and re-dedication for the teachers 
an occasion for setting " the child in the midst " of the 
Church, and an opportunity for bringing parents into 
close relationship with the School. It may also pro- 
vide an occasion for thanksgiving on the part of the 
children for their Sunday School and their Church. 

The general plan of the anniversary should be care- 
fully drawn up, and it should definitely exclude certain 
elements ; namely, any attempt to exploit the children 
for a mere money-making purpose, or to provide a 
well-rehearsed religious performance (in which the 



4 THE SUNDAY SCHOOL ANNIVERSARY 

children have a prominent part) in place of the usual 
Sunday worship. 

Every effort should be made to prevent the special 
nature of the day spoiling the necessary atmosphere for 
worship. Whatever is done to make the services 
appropriate for the day, such services should be not 
less devout or worshipful than those of an ordinary 
Sunday. 

The reason for this is simple. This special day may 
be the only Sunday when a number of the scholars 
enter into the worship of the Church, and great care 
must be taken to show them worship at its best, so that 
they particularly the older ones will be attracted and 
encouraged to attend the ordinary services regularly. 
Thus the real aim of the anniversary should be to 
make the day's services spiritually impressive for all 
taking part. To the younger children it should be the 
day when they realise a deeper meaning in worship 
than ever before. For the older scholars it may well 
be the memorable day when they make the great de- 
cision to serve Jesus Christ. For the teachers it may 
be a time of re-dedication, and a means of better equip 
ment for their work. For the congregation in general, 
and for the parents in particular, it should result in a 
deepened and more intelligent interest in the work of 
the school, and an endeavour to co-operate with the 
officers and teachers more fully. 

The general plan of the anniversary arrangements 
should include four features : 

(a) A Teachers' Conference or devotional meeting ; 

(b) Special Sunday Services, graded so as to provide 
worship for the three main sections of the school ; 

(c) An Afternoon Departmental Service in which 
parents and visitors participate ; or a Rally of all depart- 
ments, each taking some part, to demonstrate school 
unity ; or a Promotion Service for teachers and scholars. 



THE AIM AND THE PLAN 5 

(J) A Week-night Demonstration of some aspect of 
modern Sunday-school work, or a tableau, Bible scene 
or play. 

Some such plan should be definitely set out before 
any preparations are made, since it will simplify the 
work of outlining the programme. It will automatically 
rule out certain undesirable elements that often creep 
into anniversary celebrations. With this aim in view 
there will be no place for some of the doggerel verses 
and poor music sometimes used at anniversaries. Nor 
will the day be a kind of glorified religious concert ; nor 
will the church or chapel be turned into a sort of enter- 
tainment hall where the chief feature is a huge platform 
upon which children perform. Moreover, if the aim 
of worship for children is to be realised, they will not 
be submitted to weeks of wearisome practice of special 
hymns, that must automatically make the anniversary 
services mechanical. It will certainly include a devo- 
tional or prayer season, with possibly a communion 
service and re-dedication service for teachers as part 
of the celebration. 

If this four-fold plan is worked out, it will be seen 
that it has met the aim and object of the anniversary as 
set out above. The inclusion of (a) ensures that the 
teachers shall be enheartened and inspired to do better 
work in the new school year just beginning. The 
careful arrangement of (b) will ensure that the day will 
be full of inspiration and blessing to the children, as 
well as to the ordinary adult congregation. Any of the 
suggestions under (c) will bring parents, teachers and 
children into a happy relationship that cannot fail to 
help the school forward. The suggestion under (d) 
should not merely demonstrate to parents and church 
members the varied nature of the work in a modern 
Sunday school but also assist the money-raising side 
of the anniversary. 



II 

THE ANNIVERSARY PREACHER 

THE choice of the anniversary preacher is closely 
related to this subject of aim and plan. If the 
purpose of the day is to draw a great crowd 
of adults in the hope of getting a bumper collection, 
then the " star " preacher may have a rightful place. 

If, on the other hand, we are anxious to make the 
day a blessing to the children, the first qualification for 
the anniversary preacher is the gift of speaking to 
children and of inspiring young people. Some other 
way should be found of raising money for the school, 
so that the collection will occupy a relatively insignifi- 
cant place the object will not be so much to get a 
crowded congregation as to get an interested one. 

Since the minister of a church is usually the president 
of the Sunday School and leader of its work, it is not 
well that he should always be absent on such an impor- 
tant day. If some change in the ordinary pulpit 
arrangement is necessary, he might exchange with a 
neighbouring minister for one of the services. If one 
of the objects of the day is to increase the interest of the 
scholars in their Church and its history, a former 
minister or officer might be invited to take the services. 

Where the morning service is of a special character 
(see Section VII of this booklet), it can be more 
suitably conducted by a Sunday School leader or 
leaders. 



Ill 

THE ANNIVERSARY SERVICES 

IT will be seen that one of the essential features of the 
school anniversary is the gathering of the scholars in 
the church so that they worship together as a school. 
To achieve this purpose the children should sit together, 
but as part of the congregation, not as performers. 
The front pews should be reserved for them in depart- 
ments, with the younger children on small chairs in 
front where space permits ; and every child should be 
able to see the minister. 

The hymns should be taken from the ordinary 
Sunday-school worship. This means that the leaders 
of the various departments should make a practice 
during the year of introducing new hymns to the chil- 
dren, so that the hymnody of the school is steadily 
growing in range. These new hymns need not be specia 1 
productions every year ; indeed, sometimes they can 
be taken from either the church or the school hymn 
book (only about one-fifth of the hymns in any book 
are known to the children in the ordinary way !). The 
scholars can sing these new hymns as their contri- 
bution to the anniversary services. In any case any 
new hymns included in the anniversary day should be 
introduced and taught at suitable occasions during the 
school year. 

On no account whatsoever ought the bad old custom 
of spending three to six or even more Sunday after- 
noons in " practising " the anniversary hymns be 
tolerated. We are convinced that these anniversary 



THE SUNDAY SCHOOL ANNIVERSARY 

hymn practices are not worth while, and are largely a 
waste of a most valuable opportunity. Under the best 
conditions they mean a very serious interruption in the 
Sunday School courses and the teaching work of the 
school. But more often than not they mean that both 
teachers and scholars get utterly bored, not only with 
the set of hymns being practised, but with the anni- 
versary itself. Their reaction to this is slackness of 
interest in the Sunday School generally, resulting in 
irregularity in attendance. Moreover, such interruption 
to the ordinary routine of Sunday School life makes 
the settling-down again after the anniversary very 
difficult ; and, where the holiday season follows almost 
at once, the disorganisation in the school life spread over 
two or three months, is so serious as to have grave 
effects on the whole work. 

The Christian education of the children is the first 
task of the Sunday School. It is for that purpose that 
the school is organised and accommodation is provided 
on Church premises. It is, or ought to be, for this 
purpose that the children are sent to Sunday School ; 
and it is the main objective of the Sunday School 
teacher. To waste one-tenth of the year's Sundays in 
practising hymns is, therefore, completely unjustifiable, 
however good the hymns may be, or however successful 
the anniversary Sunday may prove. 

The best plan of all is to make the anniversary hymns 
grow out of the year's work- By this is meant the intro- 
duction of a new hymn from time to time into the 
school sessions, to be taught as part of the ordinary 
work. These new hymns should be selected for the 
valuable contribution they make to the worship side 
of the school, or for their bearing upon the lessons being 
taught. Any hymn which does not definitely contribute 
to the spiritual value of the worship, or to the spiritual 
education of the scholars, is unworthy a place in the 
anniversary programme. 



THE ANNIVERSARY SERVICE V 

The practice still obtains of wasting a great deal of 
good school money on the special printing of words and 
music of anniversary hymns, in some cases in defiance 
of copyright law. This practice is defended on the 
ground that no available selection is suitable for a par- 
ticular school. Often, however, this is a purely arbit- 
rary decision ; common-sense and a practice of proper 
economy should have the last word in these matters. 
The National Sunday School Union and the Denomi- 
national Young People's Departments publish selections 
of anniversary hymns mostly taken from existing books, 
which provide a sufficiently wide selection for all 
ordinary tastes. It is obviously cheaper to print one 
selection for a large number of schools than for each 
school to print its own special set. 

Our advice and practice is to get the majority of the 
hymns for Anniversary Sunday from those that are 
known to the children and some that are known by the 
congregation, so that everyone can worship fully and 
intelligently. Two hymns of a special character at 
each service are quite enough to provide novelty, and 
to mark the day as different from ordinary Sundays. 

The publication of the Hundred and Twenty-Five 
Best Junior Hymns in large type at 6d. each (by the 
N.S.S.U. and the denominational Young People's 
Departments) makes it possible for schools to have 
good hymns sung by the children at the cost of a few 
pence. In most churches these large hymn-sheets 
could be displayed where the children can read the 
words, without obtruding the sheet too much upon 
the congregation. Among these, " 125 Best" hymns 
are many that are very suitable for anniversary occasions, 
such as : 

" All creatures of our God and King." 
" All things which live below the sky." 
" As all the thoughts of our hearts." 
" Come ye people, lift your voices." 



10 THE SUNDAY SCHOOL ANNIVERSARY 

' Far round the world." 

* For peace and for plenty." 

4 God has given us a book full of stories." 

4 Hail to all the heroes." 

' Jesus and Joseph, day after day." 

' Father above us, our father in might." 

4 Oh all ye works of the Lord." 

' Praise to the Lord, the Almighty." 

" Thou perfect Hero-Knight." 

Full reference of these and the other hymns available 
in large-type form, together with suggestions about 
selecting and using hymns, will be found in the 
pamphlet, " A Guide to Junior Hymns, price 
4iJ. post free from the publishers of this booklet. 

A valuable feature of worship which is coming more 
and more into use in Sunday Schools, and which pro- 
vides a welcome change from the ordinary service on 
anniversary days, are verses that call to praise or wor- 
ship (in some quarters called an introit or sanctus). 
The use of these is described in the pamphlet to which 
we have just referred. 

No better start could be made for an anniversary 
service than to have the children singing softly such a 
verse as " Here we tread with hallowed feet," or " We 
bow in prayer before Thy throne, God." In this 
way we can set the atmosphere for worship from the 
beginning ; and this is as much appreciated by adults 
as by the scholars themselves. Or a happy note can 
be sounded for the day's worship by the children 
singing a call to worship such as " Come ye people, lift 
your voices " (verse one) or, " Lord of life and power 
and grace." After the offering has been received (not 
44 the collection taken "), let the children sing a dedica- 
catory song-prayer such as " Master, bless the gifts we 
bring Thee." Immediately after the service is con- 
cluded, let them sing a little parting song, such as 
44 Hark, hark, hark to the music." These features are 
very simple, very appropriate to worship, and very 
acceptable to the congregation. 



IV 

THE ANNIVERSARY AFTERNOON 

TIME was when the anniversary afternoon service 
was a massed meeting of scholars of all ages, 
and the unfortunate speaker had to give an 
address that aimed to interest all the scholars, but 
which in the very nature of things often failed 
lamentably to interest more than a few. 

A better method that is followed in some places is 
to make one or all of the department sessions special 
in character, and invite parents and members of the 
church and congregation to attend, to see the children at 
their worship, and possibly join in parts of it. 

This " birthday afternoon " is considered by many as 
the best possible time to demonstrate the unity of the 
whole school by a Rally of all departments in the church. 
In this " School Rally " each department has some part. 
The Beginners and Primaries sing their own hymn, the 
Juniors recite one of their Scripture memory passages, 
the Intermediate Department sing a special hymn or 
read a Psalm, while the Senior Department takes over 
the work of stewarding in the aisles, distributing Bibles 
and hymn books, taking the offertory, or conducting 
some part of the service. 

Another method of providing for all departments at 
a Rally is to have two speakers, or rather a story-teller 
and a speaker, in place of the usual address. Early in 
the afternoon, get someone to tell a story of a fairly 
simple character that will appeal to the Primary and 
younger Junior children. Later on possibly after the 



12 THE SUNDAY SCHOOL ANNIVERSARY 

Primary children have gone to their departments for a 
brief session of their own a speaker can address the 
remainder of the scholars. 

Experiments have been made from time to time to 
introduce novel features into the afternoon service, 
with more or less success such as dramatic Bible 
readings, Biblical tableaux, a short missionary scene or a 
simple pageant. Everything depends on the spirit in 
which such things are undertaken, but where proper safe- 
guards are made against providing a mere " show," 
they have a powerful religious contribution to make. 

Some simple Biblical tableaux can be presented, 
without undue preparation beforehand, by the younger 
children ; or Intermediate scholars could present in 
dramatic form such Biblical scenes as David and 
Jonathan, Paul and Timothy, etc. A short missionary 
scene, if presented as a part of the service and not 
as a mere entertainment, can be made very effective, 
and will give colour and life to the anniversary pro- 
gramme. A Missionary Celebration of a simple 
character will also provide a suitable anniversary after- 
noon. The idea of a Celebration is to present, chiefly 
by readings, the story of a great man's life-work, 
illustrated by musical items. Musical authorities in the 
school will also be aware of the possibilities of pre- 
senting a simple cantata, where there is a good choir to 
sustain it adequately. 



V 
IDEAS FOR WEEK-EVENINGS 

IN some schools a Saturday afternoon Departmental 
Demonstration, followed by a tea-table con- 
ference and an evening lecture, has been included 
with great success in the anniversary programme. Other 
schools arrange a Teachers' Conference on the Monday 
evening following " the Day." 

There are many aspects of Sunday-School work that 
can fruitfully form the subject of a special lecture by an 
expert, followed by questions and discussion, so that 
the ideal way presented by the visitor can be applied 
to the actual conditions faced by the school workers 
themselves. If we cannot realise our ideal in these 
matters, we can at least idealise the real. The Adoles- 
cent Problem, Week-night Activities, Worship in the 
Sunday School, the Training Class, Expression Work, 
and a host of other subjects spring to the mind as 
suitable for conferences of this sort. Such a feature of 
an anniversary has proved the turning-point in the 
development of many a Sunday school towards spiritual 
prosperity. 

A Reunion of Old Scholars is often included in the 
anniversary arrangements, and has the double advantage 
of renewing old associations with past scholars (who 
may now be parents of scholars in the school) and of 
encouraging the teachers by showing them what may 
be the ultimate result of the work beipg done week by 
week in the classes. Sometimes a former minister of 
the church presides at such a gathering, and past officers 
and teachers make a point of attending. 

13 



14 THE SUNDAY SCHOOL ANNIVERSARY 

Time was when what was called " The Annual 
Meeting " was the sole arrangement made for the 
anniversary apart from the " Sunday Sermons." The 
" meeting " often consisted of a long speech by a 
visiting chairman, the secretary's and treasurer's reports, 
the distribution of prizes for regular attendance during 
the preceding school year, and one or more addresses by 
special speakers. 

We have attended many such meetings in the past, 
and are sure that most of them were not worth while. 
The speakers were in a quandary, since the audience was 
a very mixed one, consisting of scholars from Primary 
age upwards, teachers and parents, and a sprinkling of 
the more interested members of the church and con- 
gregation. This type of meeting still survives in some 
places, but most schools desire something more effective 
to round off the anniversary day. 

The aim of an Anniversary Meeting should be to pro- 
vide information about the work of the school in an 
interesting way, and to demonstrate its value to the 
Church and the School. Some place ought to be found 
for a brief but interesting report, or series of reports, 
about the ordinary work of the year. Once in a while 
the meeting could be conducted and carried through by 
the scholars, one of the Seniors taking the chair and 
calling upon a member of each department to report 
on the work done. In the case of the younger scholars, 
some coaching would, of course, be necessary ; while 
in the case of the older scholars speaking for the Inter- 
mediate or Senior Departments, the report could be 
the actual work of the scholar, previously approved by 
the members of the department concerned. 

Where there are Brigades, Scouts, Guides, etc., 
connected with the School, this type of meeting could 
include a demonstration of the educational work done 
through these week-night activities. Parents and 



IDEAS FOR WEEK-EVENINGS 15 

church members should be made specially welcome at 
such a meeting, and time for social intercourse should 
be provided to enable teachers, scholars, parents and 
minister to get into personal touch. This form of 
demonstrating the activities of the school at an annual 
meeting can be varied and adapted in almost endless 
ways, according to the nature of the actual work being 
done, local conditions and talent, etc. 

Another valuable week-night feature for an anni- 
versary is a Departmental Demonstration of one of the 
Sunday afternoon sessions. Parents and adults can 
often attend such a demonstration better on a week- 
evening that on Sundays. Great care should be exercised 
that, if departmental worship is demonstrated in part 
or in whole, it becomes a real demonstration and not a 
show. The audience should be kept in the background 
as much as possible, and should not be allowed to 
applaud or make their presence felt in any way while 
the actual demonstration is in progress. Anything that 
brings the Sunday School before the attention of the 
rank and file of our churches, and thereby gives them a 
more intelligent interest in its work is of value. Un- 
fortunately, in too many cases the very people one 
wants to attend a demonstration of this character are 
conspicuous by their absence. 

A Joint Social Meeting of the Sunday School teachers 
and church members might be arranged one year, to 
include short addresses on " What the School owes to 
the Church," and " What the Church owes to the 
School." Short expositions on the work of each depart- 
ment are also very appropriate for such a meeting, since 
the extent of the ignorance of the average church 
member as to what is being done in the Sunday School 
of to-day is amazing. To listen to some of them talk 
and to hear occasional references made to our work 
even by prominent preachers makes one wonder where 



16 THE SUNDAY SCHOOL ANNIVERSARY 

such people have been during the last twenty years. 
In other words, the popular idea of Sunday School 
standards of work in some quarters seems often to be on 
a par with the bad old days of 20 or 30 years ago, when 
a Sunda'y School was often a bear-garden, and teaching 
was a byword for " goody-goody " talk that failed 
either to interest or inspire. 

To dispel prejudice and ignorance, and to show how 
the modern Sunday School works, we would recommend 
a Demonstration of Graded Methods, such as is pro- 
vided in The Golden Staircase (N.S.S.U., 4J.). This 
shows in a most convincing way how each department 
develops out of the others, and all lead to membership 
with the Church. 

Another form of demonstration evening could show 
the story-method of teaching. Adults as well as children 
love a story, and a story-hour at which the leader or a 
teacher from the Beginners', Primary and Junior Depart- 
ments each tell a story would be most useful to parents 
as well as interesting to others. Such an evening 
could be made even more valuable if a brief exposition 
of the story-method for each grade were given first. 

A concert by the scholars is a never-ending source of 
interest to parents, provided it is properly done, and 
does not exhaust the energies of the teachers too much 
in its preparation. There is also room for endless 
experiment and local enterprise in the arranging of 
tableaux, Bible plays, really good services of song, 
and worth-while recitations, etc. " The Life of Jesus 
in Story and Song," " Songs of the Seasons," " A 
Calendar of Nature" " In God's Garden," " Heroes of 
the Cross " are titles taken from anniversary pro- 
grammes, and explain themselves. There is abundant 
scope with a Bible and a hymn-book for working out a 
programme under one of these headings, consisting of 
hymns (or verses of hymns), action-songs, Bible 



IDEAS FOR WEEK-EVENINGS 17 

readings, or brief Bible stories that may make a very 
powerful spiritual impression if carefully and reverently 
presented. The addition of costumes and scenery of a 
simple character adds to the effectiveness of this kind 
of presentation. 

A Bible Play or Scene might also be considered as an 
item occasionally in the anniversary programme. There 
may be a difference of opinion among teachers as to the 
extent to which we are justified in dramatising Bible 
scenes, and presenting Bible characters in costume, 
with scenery and other effects. These are matters that 
must be left to personal conviction, but those with 
scruples about the dramatic method should not blind 
their eyes to the fact that many of the Bible stories, 
even if only read in dialogue form, without special 
costume or scenery, have very great educational and 
religious value. Anything that helps to make the Bible 
a living real book, and shows how true to modern life 
are its characters and scenes, is most useful. 

There is no need to go to the length of staging a 
Bible play in the style of the professional actor that can 
be attempted by an ambitious set of amateur players 
with very good effect if done in the right spirit ; the 
Bible scene can be simple in the extreme and, generally 
speaking, the simpler the more effective ! 



VI 

SHORT LIST OF PLAYS 

| HE following, among many others, can be 
recommended for Anniversary use : 

Moses in the Bulrushes, for 12 speaking characters 
(N.S.S.U., 4d.) 

Joseph and his Brethren, for 20 speaking characters 
(N.S.S.U., 3d.) 

David and Jonathan, for 18 speaking characters (Nat. 
Society, 2d.) 

Scenes from the Prophets, for 23 speaking characters 
(Nat. Society, 4d.) 

Stories of the Master, for 20 speaking characters 
(N.S.S.U., 6d.) 

The Dawn of the Kingdom, for 25 speaking characters 
(Carey Press, 6 d.) 

The Gospel in Britain, for 8 speaking characters (N.S.S.U., 



The Pageant of Praise, for 5 speaking characters 
(Methodist Missionary Society, 2d.) 

The Pageant of the King's Children, for 50 speaking 
characters (N.S.S.U., 8J.) ~ 

The Pageant of the Sunday School, for 18 speaking 
characters (N.S.S.U., 6d.) 

The Seekers, for 27 speaking characters (London 
Missionary Society, 2d.) 

Where Love is, God is. for 7 speaking characters (Nat. 
Adult School Union, 6d.) 

Most of these plays can be inspected at Sunday-school 
and denominational book-rooms, or can be secured through 
the post " on sale or return," if kept clean and properly 
packed for the return journey. 

18 



VII 

SPECIMEN ANNIVERSARY PROGRAMMES* 
No. 1. PROMOTION AND DEDICATION SERVICES 

AS PART OF A SCHOOL ANNIVERSARY AND YOUNG PEOPLE'S 
FESTIVAL. 

9.0 a.m. Breakfast for Staff and Senior Scholars. 
10.0 a.m. Devotional Service for Staff and Senior 

Scholars. 
1 1 .0 a.m. Morning Worship with Promotion Service 

(see below). 

3.0 p.m. United Rally in the Church (see below). 
4.30 p.m. Tea and Conference for Teachers. 
6.30 p.m. Dedication Service (see below) followed by 

Holy Communion. 
7.45 p.m. Social Gathering for Parents and Teachers. 

PROMOTION SERVICE. This Service should be well 
thought out by the Leaders' Executive, and detailed plans 
made, so that points of organisation are clear to those taking 
part, and the service runs smoothly. A definite theme 
should run through the Order of Service, and the choice 
of hymns, readings and the address be in accord with it. 
Suitable themes are : Praise (as below) Worship, Power, 
Citizenship, Comradeship, Building, Service, Joy. 

The School should occupy the body of the church, and 
the congregation be asked to sit in the side seats or in the 
galleries. Vacant seats in front of each Department group 
must be left for the scholars to be promoted. 

It adds to the solemnity of the service if the minister who 

officiates gives a charge or message to the leader who receives 

a group of scholars a verse from the Bible will be sufficient. 

During the promotion of one group of children, the leader 

* Baaed on actual services held in well-known schools. 

19 



20 THE SUNDAY SCHOOL ANNIVERSARY 

from the department from which they go, and the leader 
into whose department they are to be received, will stand on 
either side of the minister. The former will read from a 
roll which he afterwards hands to the other leader the 
names of those to be promoted. Each scholar will come to 
the front as his name is called.* 

Call to Worship. Psalm 100, verses 1, 2, 4. 

Hymn. ' All creatures of our God and King ' (S.W. 141 ) 

Prayer. 

Bible Reading. Psalm 148. 

Story for the Little Ones. 

Hymn by Beginners and Primary. ' All things bright and 
Beautiful.' 

Offering and Dedication. 

Introduction to Promotions. 

Promotion of Beginners to Primary. 

Promotion of Primary to Junior. 

Hymn by Juniors. * Angels holy, high and lowly.* 

Promotion of Juniors to Intermediate. 

Hymn by Intermediates and Seniors. ' Lord of all being.' 

Promotion of Intermediates to Senior. 

Promotion of Seniors as teachers to Primary, and of other 
teachers to their new departments. 

Prayer. 

Voluntary, during which the Beginners and Primary go 
out. 

Address. 

Hymn. * We build our school on Thee. (S.W. 85.) 

Benediction. 

AFTERNOON RALLY all Departments uniting and taking 
part in the Service. 

Call to Worship. * Lord, again we meet before Thee.' 
(C.W., P . 8S.) 

* The sources of hymns, etc., in this and the following Orders of Service 

are not given if well-known and found in all hymn-books. Special 

hymns in newer collections are acknowledged as follows : 

S.W. School Worship 

C.S. Child Songs. 

CW. Children's WortMp and Haw to Conduct It. By E. R Hyc. 



SPECIMEN ANNIVERSARY PROGRAMMES 21 

Prayer. 

Hymn. ' Summer suns are glowing.' 

Cradle Roll Ceremony. 

Primary Story. 

Hymn by Primary Department, ' Dainty wee daisy.' 
(C.S., 47.) 

Voluntary, while Beginners and Primary march out to 
own departments. 

Hymn by Junior Department, ' All things which live 
below the sky.' 

Bible Reading by Intermediate Department. 

Offertory. 

Dedication. 

Hymn. ' Lord of all being.' 

Address. 

Hymn. ' Father of all, we come to Thee.' (S.W. 303.) 

Notices Prayer March out. 

EVENING WORSHIP AND DEDICATION SERVICE. At the 
Evening Service, teachers and officers enter with the Choir 
and occupy the front pews. 

Hymn. 'For the might of Thine arm.' (S.W. 317.) 

Scripture Sentences. 

Prayer-verse (sung kneeling). ' Dear Lord, here in Thy 
house of prayer.' (S.W. 3.) 

Prayer and Lord's Prayer (sung). 

Hymn. ' True-hearted, whole-hearted.' 

Scripture Lesson. 

Hymn. ' Lift up your heads, ye gates of brass.' 

Offertory on behalf of Sunday School. 

Offertory Prayer. 

Sermon. 

Consecration Hymn. ' Take my life, and let it be.' 

Teachers' Re- dedication. After the last hymn, the 
teachers and workers should come out from their pews and 
collect in a group around the minister by the communion 
table. They should have in their hands typed copies of the 
Order, and join in the responses. 

Minister : ' Now ye are the body of Christ and members 
in particular. . . . Now there are diversities of gifts, but 



22 THE SUNDAY SCHOOL ANNIVERSARY 

the same spirit . . . and God hath set some in the church, 
first apostles, secondly prophets, thirdly teachers.' (From 
1 Cor. xii.) 

' You, who are set as teachers have a great work to do ; 
therefore covet earnestly the best gifts. Have joy in the 
performing of big and small tasks, might and steadfast- 
ness in your striving.' 

Response : I will go forth in the strength of the Lord. 

Minister : ' Use the gifts that God hath given you : 
the gifts of the spirit of love and of power and of a sound 
mind.' 

Response : I will go forth in the strength of the Lord. 

Minister : ' Have patience and tolerance in your fellow- 
ship with others and let the joy and radiance of Christ 
shine in your hearts.' 

Response : I will go forth in the strength of the Lord. 

Prayer (repeated by all) : 

' Teach us, good Lord, to serve Thee as Thou deservest 
and not to count the cost ; to fight and not to heed the 
wounds ; to toil and not to seek for rest ; to labour and not 
to ask for any reward, save that of knowing that we do 
Thy will ; through Jesus Christ our Lord.' Amen. 

Benediction. 

Vesper. ' God be in my head.' (S.W. 59) 

No. 2. ANNIVERSARY SERVICES 

DESIGNED TO PROVIDE HYMNS THAT THE CONGREGATION 

KNOW, INTERSPERSED WITH SPECIAL HYMNS SUNG BY THE 

CHILDREN ONLY. 

The ordinary church hymn books are used, supplemented by 
large-type hymn sheets for the scholars' own hymns. 

MORNING. 

Call to Praise (School only). ' Lord of Life, and power, 
and grace.* (C.W., p. 85.) 

Scripture Sentences (the congregation to rise with the 
Minister). 

Hymn. ' Angel voices, ever singing.' 

Prayer and Lord's Prayer (sung). 



SPECIMEN ANNIVERSARY PROGRAMMES 23 

Primary Hymn. ' Buttercups and daisies/ (C.S. 233) 

Scripture Reading. 

Hymn. ' We thank Thee, Lord, for this fair earth.' 

Children's Story. 

School Hymn. ' God has given us a book full of stories.' 
(S.W. 43.) 

Prayer and Notices. 

Offertory and Dedicatory Song-Prayer. ' Master, bless 
the gifts we bring Thee.' (C.W. p. 71.) 

Hymn. ' Brightly gleams our banner.' 

Sermon. 

Hymn. ' Land of our birth.' 

Benediction. 

School Hymn. ' Green the hills.' 

EVENING. 

Call to Worship (School only). ' Here we tread with 
hallowed feet.' (S.S.H. 402B.) 

Scripture Sentences (the congregation to rise with the 
Minister). 

Hymn. ' Day is dying in the west.* 
Prayer. 

Hymn. ' The Lord is rich and merciful.' 
Scripture Lesson. 

Hymn. ' Onward, Christian soldiers ' (verses 1, 2 and 3 
only). 
Prayer. 

School Hymn. ' God speaks to us in bird and song.' 
Notices. 

Offertory and Dedication. 
Hymn. ' Lord of the brave.' 
Sermon. 

Hymn. ' For the might of Thine arm.' (S.W. 317.) 
Benediction. 
Vesper 
' Smile on our work, our laughter, and our play ; 

Lift us at eve to slumber on Thy breast ; 
Shine on the praise and worship of Thy day ; 
Breathe on our sleep the sweetness of Thy rest.' 

Amen. 



24 THE SUNDAY SCHOOL ANNIVERSARY 

No. 3. ANNIVERSARY MORNING SERVICE 

PLANNED BY THE PRIMARY AND JUNIOR DEPARTMENTS. 

Thought for Primaries " Praise." For Juniors " Stories 
of Jesus." both arising out of previous lessons. 

Voluntary, during which children and teachers enter 
Church and occupy chairs in front, and front pews for 
Juniors. 

Call to Worship, sung by Juniors (unannounced), accom- 
panied by the organ to tune of Big Ben striking the hour : 

4 Father, this hour, be Thou our Guide, 
Then by Thy pow'r, no foot shall slide.' 

Hymn (all). * Angels holy.' 

Cradle Roll read, new name enrolled, and Cradle Roll 
hymn sung by Department. 

Hymn (all). 4 For the beauty of the earth.' 
Announcements by General Secretary. 

Offertory. A Primary child taking from own Depart- 
ment, Juniors taking from own Department, and from 
congregation. 

Offertory Verse, sung by Primary Department. 
Address by Superintendent. 
Hymn (all). 4 Yes, God is good.' 

Junior children sing ' Tell me the stories of Jesus,' and 
chosen children tell briefly the following stories (un- 
announced) (a) The visit of the shepherds ; (b) Visit of 
Wise Men ; (c) Visit to Temple at 1 2 years old ; ( d) Choosing 
helpers (call of the four fishermen) ; (c) A busy Sabbath 
day. ; (/) Blessing the children ; (g) Last instructions ; 
(h) How a missionary (Paul) carried on later. 

Hymn (all). ' We've a story to tell to the nations.* 

Benediction. 

Congregation remain standing while children march out. 



SPECIMEN ANNIVERSARY PROGRAMMES 

No. 4 ANNIVERSARY MORNING SERVICE 

PLANNED AS A FLOWER SERVICE, WITH SCHOOL LEADERS 
TAKING PART. 

Call to Worship. 

Hymn. ' All creatures of our God and King.' (S.W. 141 .) 

Prayer with sung response : 

For the glory of Thy sunshine and the clear air of Thine 
out-of-doors and for health to enjoy them : 
We give Thee thanks, Lord. 

For the shape of the hills and the trees, and for the colours 
of the flowers and the sea ; and for sight to enjoy them : 
We give Thee thanks, Lord. 

For the songs of the birds and the streams ; for the music 
of laughing human voices ; and for hearing to enjoy them : 
We give Thee thanks, Lord. 

For the stories and books of all ages, the poems and songs 
of the heroes ; and for a mind to enjoy them : 
We give Thee thanks, O Lord. 

For those who have vanquished evil, for their faith and 
hope and courage ; and for power to follow them : 
We give Thee thanks, Lord. 

For those who have loved us and cared for us, and asked 
only our love in return ; and for a heart to love them : 
We give Thee thanks, O Lord. 

For Jesus, Thy Son and our Leader, for a heart to love 
Him and a life to give Him : 

We give Thee thanks, Lord. Amen. (From S.W.) 

Scripture Reading. 

Story for the Little Ones by the Leader of the Beginners' 
Department. 

Hymn. ' Thy word is like a garden, Lord.' 

Short Talks on the work of their Departments by the 
Leaders of the Beginners, Primary and Junior Departments. 

Quartette. ' God be in my head.' (S.W. 59.) 

Notices. 

Offertory and Dedicatory Prayer. 

Hymn. ' Son of Man, our Hero strong and tender.' 
(S.W. 77.) 

Address. 

Hymn. ' These things shall be, a loftier race.' 

Benediction. 



re you keen about your 



Sunday School ? 

j 

No need to ask ; of course you are. So are we, and 
because of it, we want you to know of this splendid School 
Hymn-book. Here are the details of contents of " School 
Worship." 

Part I contains 105 Hymns classified under the general 
headings of THE ETERNAL FATHER ; OUR LORD JESUS CHRIST ; 
THE CHRIST-LIKE LIFE ; LOYALTY AND FRIENDSHIP. 

Part II consists of 292 Hymns, of which the most important 
classifications are : THANKSGIVINGS FOR ALL MERCIES ; FOR 
THE BLESSINGS OF THIS LIFE ; LOVE AND REDEMPTION ; FOR 
GRACE, GLORY AND MERCIES ; PRAISE AND SERVICE. 

Then follow Orders of Worship for CHRISTMAS, EASTER, 
NEW YEAR, FLOWER SERVICE, MISSIONARY SERVICE, MAY 
MORNING, HARVEST, DEDICATION OF TEACHERS, INDUCTION 
OF SCHOLARS, ETC. 

A series of THIRTEEN LITANIES and RESPONSIVE DEVOTIONS. 
Si XTY-Six PRAYERS and COLLECTS for every possible occasion. 
FiFTY-Six PSALMS for Daily Use. 
PRAYERS FOR PRIVATE DEVOTION. 

" SCHOOL WORSHIP " has 640 pages, size 5|in. by 3|in., 
fin. thick, printed in specially good type, single column to a 
page. 

PRICES from 10J., words only. Tune book from 5s. 



Please send a P.O. Is. for a copy post free, and we 
are sure you will thank us for having introduced 
" School Worship " to you. 

METHODIST SUNDAY SCHOOL DEPARTMENT, 
Ludgate Circus House, Ludgate Circus, London, E.C.4